(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Entre Nous 1920"

I 



-•>=• 



'fPf *P> ■■ ■ ^-^ Ng"T 




The 

Entre-Nous 

Volume Seven 

1920 




lU'HLISIIKII MV 



Senior Class of Howard College 



III KM INCH AM. A I. AH A MA 



FOREWORD 



In after years, Comrades, 
you will not sit within 
class-room walls, nor go 
to Chapel, nor hear the 
wrath of a dear Profess, 
nor have to stand a sweet 
old Exam. But again, 
you'll be separated from 
your dear old Pal, per- 
haps, and from some of the 
rest of us. If this volume 
will aid in treasuring up 
Vengeance on the former 
things mentioned, and in 
cherishing the Memory of 
the latter, we consider 
ourselves amply repaid. 

THE EDITORS. 



] ) E D I G A T I X 



In recognition oftbkhani tears 

OF FAITHFUL ami SCBC ILABL V SERVICE 
\\ ill' II HAS BEES BENDEHKD BO CHEER- 
H I.I.V A Nil i;kxkiioisi.v TO THE 
DPBUTLDING "K HOWARD DURING 1IKH 
DABS DATS AND HEB BRIGHT ONES, «'K 
TAKE PLEASURE IN DEDICATING THIS 
1930 EDITION UK i HE K.Vi RE-NODS TO 

PROF. JOHN G. DAWSON. 




Prgf. J. C. Dawson, A. I'... V M., LL. I). 



i Order of Boohs i 



/. THE COLLEGE 

II. THE CLASSES 

III. ATHLETICS 

IV. ORGANIZATIONS 
V. MISCELLANEOUS 



The College 




BOOK 

ONE 








UK-'OUil - . FRfM 










# 



* 




isiiwlia 



u Ws\t (greater ^ohiarb" 



A college of at least twenty-five 
teachers, cultured. Christian, com- 
petent. A college with all the 
branches of the languages, the sci- 
ences, the arts, the philosophies, and 
of religious education. A college 
for the co-education of the sexes 
tinder the most salutary circum- 
stances. A college with at least one 
million dollars in modern, commo- 
dious and convenient buildings. A 
college with at least two million dol- 
lars in endowment. A college that 
gives the finest culture and renders 
the greatest service. 

Chas. B. Williams. 












V 



("has. B. Williams, B.A„ M.A., B. D., Ph.D., D. D. 
President of Howard College. 



B 




JOHN CHARLES DAWSON, AT... A.M.. LI.. 1). 
Dean and Professor of Romance Languages. 

A. I!., Georgetown College (Ky.) ; A.M. and LI.. 1)., Howard College; Studied in 
Germany and France, spring and summer, 1903; in Germany, 1907; University of Caen, 
France, 1909; Student, Cornell University, summer, 1904: Universitj of Chicago, summer, 
1905: Editor of Picard's "La Petite Ville" (Ginn & Co. i : Member of Southern Association 
of Colleges; Member of Modern Language Association of America-; Professor of Modern 
Languages, I Inward College, since 1903; American Dean, Uniyersity of Toulouse, France, 
spring, 1919; Acting President, September, 1917-March, 1919; Dean since May, 1917. 



.1 \.\ll S ALBERT HENDRICKS, \ I;. \. M., Th. B., D. D. 
Professor of the Social Sciences. 

A.B., Howard College, 1892; A.M., ibid., 1892; Th. B., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, 1895: Student Union Seminary, 1902-03; Graduate Student, Columbia University, 
1902 03; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, the summer quarters of the 1908 09 10-11; 
1)1). Louisiana College, 1910; Professor <>t" the Social Sciences in Howard College since 

1905. 





THEOPHILUS RANDOLPH EAGLES, A. B., A.M. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Atlantic Christian College, 1902-03; A. B., University of North Carolina. 1908; Professor 
of Mathematics, Catawba College, 1908-09; Professor of Mathematics, Bethany College, 
1909-10; A.M., University of North Carolina, 1912; [nstructor University of North Carolina, 
1910-13; Acting President, March lsl to September 1, 1919; Professor of Mathematics, How 
ard College, since 1913. 



STONEWALL JACKSON PULLIAM, VI',, A.M. 
Professor of Greek and Latin. 

A.B., Central College, Danville, Ky., V M . ibid., 1888; Instructor and Assistant Pro 
fessor of Greek and Latin, Georgetown College, Ky., 1890 1911; Acting Assistanl Professor 
of Latin in the University of Alabama, 1913 17; Professor of Greek and Latin in Howard 
( College, since June, 1917 



Hllll* 




WILLIAM EVERETTE BOHANNON, B. Sc, A. B., A.M. 
Director of the Summer School, and Professor of Education. 

B. So.. Southern Normal College, 1904; A. B. (Classic), Southern Normal College, 1906; 
Life Certificate Graduate, Western Kentucky State Normal; Institute Instructor; Author 
of County Educational Survey. Kentucky; A. B. (Psychology), Indiana State University, 
1915: A.M. (Education), Indiana State University, 1916; Graduate Student (Education and 
Psycholog) I, University of Chicago (six quarters*. 1916 17; Professor of Education, Howard 
College, since June 1. 1918 



SUMNER ALBERT IVES, A.B., S. B., S. M. 

Professor of Biology. 

V I'... Wake Forest College, 1903; Marine Biological Laboratory, summer, 1905; Uni- 
versity of Chicago, summers, 1907-08; S. I'... Universirj of Chicago, 1909; S. M. University 
of Chicago, 1918; Professor of Natural Sciences, Chowan College, 1905-09; Mead ol the 
Department of Natural Sciences and Prof essor of Biology, Ouachita College, 1909 12; Pro 
5oi of Biology, 1 1. .ward College, since June. 1918. 





ISAAC NEWTON KUGELMASS, B. Sc, M. A. 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

B. Sc, The College of the City of New York; .M.A., School of Chemistry, Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Candidate (Columbia); Instructor, Departments of Chemistry, The Col 
lege of the City of New York and Columbia University; Author, "Experimental Colloidal 
Chemistry," "Chemistry <>f Laundering;" Editor, Laundering Chemistry Series; Professor 
of Chemistry and Physics, 1 Inward College, since September, 1918. 



JAMES HORTON CHAPMAN, A. B., A. M., Th. .M. 
Professor of Religious Education. 

Universitj of Alabama, A. B., 1904, A.M., 1905; Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
Th. M., 1908; Student Columbia University, summer session, 1916; Graduate Student Boston 
University, session 1917-18. 







A. BESS CLARK. A. B. 
Ih'an oj Women and Professor of English Language. 

Student University of Iowa, summer 1906; University of Iowa. 1907-09; A. I!.. Iowa. 
1909; Student Columbia University, 1916; Principal High School, Bellevue, Iowa, 1909-10; 
Principal Maquoketa High School, Iowa, 1910-13; Principal High School, Chisholm, Minne 
sota, 1913 19; Dean of Women and Professor English Language, Howard College, 1919. 



PAUL de LAUNAY, A. B., Lie. Mus. I Paris, Frani i l. 
Director of Music. 



A. B., University Paris; Studied Painting under Joan Paul Laurens and Benjamin 
Constant, and Sculpture under Fremiet; studied Music privately, then at the Paris Conserva 
tory under Anthiome and Lavignac, Composition under Massenet, Organ under Guilmant; 
Choir Boy under Gounod, at St. Eustache, of Paris; Lie Mus., Paris, France, 1894; Organist, 
St. Thomas, .Montreal: and Director Music, Westmount College, 1902-03; Director of Cm 
servatory Music, Roanoke College, 1903-06; Director Conservatory Music. Sweet Briar Col 
lege, 1906-07; Concert Organist, Universitj of Virginia, summer school, PX>7 19; Organist 
and Choir Master. Trinity Church, Columbia, S C. 1907-18; Director of the Parisian School 
of Music and Art. 1907-1S; Director of School Music. Evansville, hid., and Organist and 
Choir Master of St. John's. 1918 PC Music Director Scottish Rites and York Rites Lodges 
since 1909; Member American Guild of Organists of New York Chapter since 1909; Director 
Music Howard College, 1919. 



!^*JJ 



*PERCY PRATT BURNS, A. B. 

Professor of English. 

A. B., Howard College, 1904; Professor in South Carolina Co-educational Institute, 
1904-10; Principal of Howard Academy and Acting Professor of English; Commandant, 
1911-13; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, summer quarter, 1913; Professor of 
English, Howard College, since 1912. 



CHESTER C. DILLOX. A. B. 

Director of Athletics. 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1913; Director of Athletics East High School. Waterloo, 
Iowa, 1918-19; Director Athletics Dakota Wesleyan University, 1915-16; Director Athletics 
Simpson College, 1916-18; Director Athletics Howard College, 1919. 



RUTH LEE LONG. 

Instructor, Home Economics. 

Graduate of Alabama Girls' Technical Institute, 1906; Student summer school, Univer- 
sity of Alabama, 1913; Life Grade Certificate, 1913 ; Student summer school. Howard College, 
1916-17; Head of Department of Home Economics, Howard College, since September 1, 1918. 




■< >n leave of absence, 1919 20 



1 

ill ii*- 



.» 



• 



* 







. 



RUTH MORRIS. 
Instructor, Chemistry. 



A. T. LOW I'LL. 
Instructor, Modem Languages. 







Ji 




JJ* 




J. J. BELL. 

Instructor, Chemistry. 



R. E. MINTER. 
Instructor, Biology. 



Etttre-Nnua, 1920 



:« 




A 



fctflcfy 




W D. yfWrt#*/ - S. IAS. ///7JL4- - 




S TUOEtIT 
BODY 

\ 1920 



Otfr 










The Classes 




BOOK 

TWO 





1 




Class ^mutfes 



£$a, fal}en mu tomto, faoulb speake 
Ijer praises hue, 

3i stopt is, faith tbots astonishment; 

i\nb, fallen mu pen faonlh fartte 
ljer titles true, 

,3lt rafrisl|t is faitt] fancies faonberment. 

l|ct in my Ijari 3 tljen both 
speake anb farite 

©lie faonber tljat mjj fait cannot enbite 

— SPENSER 



Senior Class Mildred Clapp 

Junior Class Ruth Casey 

Sophmore Class .... Merle beasley 
Freshman Class . . . Annie Paul Moon 




B 



4 



J 






mM?7?//cA-ec/Mm^ ffi 



MHWM 



These young ladies were 
elected by popular vote of 
each class. Needless to say, 
we have others who will take 
you off your balance, hut these 
are specially to he honored. 



lEntrf-NouH, 1920 



y^i 











/?//// Jo t/'/s7b'V r 











BEALLE, THOMAS B., A. B Northport, Ala. 

\'ice-Presiilent Pliilomatliic Literary Society, '16; Vice-Presi- 
dent Divinity Club. 17; Associate Editor Crimson, '17-'18: News 
Editor Crimson. '19; Editor-in-Chief Crimson, '20; President 
Divinity Club, '19; President Philomathic, 'JO; Member Executive 
Committee Entre Nous; Religious Editor Eutre Nous, '20. 

Thomas B. Bealle, better known as "Beally Goat." hailed four years ago from 
Newton. Being well-stocked with learning, he has contributed much to the 
standard of Howard. By the rumbling in his cranium one can tell he is a man of 
great thoughts, which, if interrupted, there is an expression produced not alto- 
gether sweet. This reveals a good quality, however, since he chooses to think for 
himself. We believe in you. Tom. We know you will succeed. 



IOOZER, MORGAN WATKINS, A. B Thomaston, Ala. 

Psi Delta. 

Alpha Phi Epsilon Literal v Society; Glee Club, '16 17; Ba 
ball. '14-'1S- 16; Biolog] ( 'lub. "19-'20. 



Mere's a Boozer who doesn't booze. Morgan came as a prep student in '14. 
Me lias stuck it out, you see. and now leaves carrying along A. and B. with him, 
We see him in Social Science studying about the railroads, and in Biology studying 

the anatomy of the cat. Any man who can do both of these things can win a wife, 
a fortune and prevent a famine. Vm will win. Morgan. 




CARLISLE, ROBERT F., A. B Birmingham, Ala. 

Sigma Nu. 

Alpha 1'lii Epsilon Literary Society; Dramatic Club, '17; 
Track ream, 17: Hungrj Club; Manager Second Baseball 
Team, '19. 

Fred is one of the local products whom we sec only in class. But wc would 
scarcely demand more than he displays there, lie is a man of chivalry and firm 
ability. I lis name will he seen in "Who's Who" some day. Dramatic ambitions 
have their apparitions, nevertheless Fred is destined to an excellent position. 



CARLISLE, ARTHUR D., A. B Birmingham, Ala. 

Sigma Nu. 

Alpha Phi Epsilon Literary Society; Assistant Track Man- 
ager, '1S-'16; Track Manager, 'id '17; Assistant Football Manager, 
'Hi -'17; Football Manager '1/-'18; Member Hungry Club; Varsity 
I ootball Squad, '18. 



Out again, in again — that's Arthur. We are glad his in-again is in our class. 
Quite a modest chap is he. I lis list of honors shows that he has a head all his own. 
Luck to the man who thinks. lie will he thinking the h-o-m-e some day and some 
fair maiden will help him put them up close. You have won your spurs with us, 
Arthur. 




CLAPP, FRANCIS MILDRED, A. B. . . 

Zcta Omega. 



Birmingham. Ala. 



Glee Club, '17; Captain Girls' liasket Ball Team. M8-T9; 
Member Crimson Staff, '18-'19; Marshal at the Inaugural; Sec- 
retary Girls' Glee Club, '19-'.20; Biology Club, '18-'19-'20; Maid 
for football (lame between Birmingham Southern and Howard; 
Editor of Senior Class; Vice-Presidfent of Senior Class. 

With this aggregation of accomplishments and that sweet smile, is it any 
wonder the "divines" fall for her? She has her fun — yes. studies some. That's 
what we are in school for. Besides she is going to teach, she says, hut we have our 
doubts. Safe to say. she will teaeh againsl somebody's will. 



EU*^3 




COOK, WALLACE II.. A. B Stanton, Ala. 

Philomathic Society; President Divinitj Club; Biology Club. 

A man from Stanton who has been working hard while in College. He is 
tall in stature and has a far vision. Wallace is a clean man, a good preacher, and 
we are confident that he will save many souls, win a good wife, and accomplish 
much in the world. The Presbyterians tried to get him to preach for them. 




: w i 



CONNELL, ARTHUR T., A. B Fort Gaines, Ga. 

Member Philumathic Literary Society. 

Here is a live man from Georgia, lie began at the beginning and lias won 
his way to A. and 15. lie has very little to say to the girls ; he is modest, von 
know. We suggest, Arthur, that yon say it in this way: "Mademoiselle, aimcz- 
vons me? Respondez en francais, s'il vous plait." She will reply, of course, 
"( )ni. Monsieur, j'aime vons." Then there will he another "j'aime vous" and the 
difficulty will he over-begun. 



CONNELL, ISEE L., A. B Fort Gaines, Ga. 

.Member Philomathic Literary Society. 

Isee will always he remembered by his hard and faithful work while in Col- 
lege. An independent man pins a strong independent voice is likely to make things 
move. I'dr certain reasons, the hoys have made a change in his name, and he i- 
now well known as "I see I Alia." 





Gilwfia 



DAY, BERTRAM GRIFFIN, A. B Nicholsville, Ala. 

Glee Club, 'i'J-'-'O; Member Philomathic Literary Society; 
President Philomathic. 

Bertram G. Day, or 'Fessor Day, is carrying away much valuable knowledge 
from the storehouse of the College, lie is known to all the professors as the "star" 
in his classes. His specialty has been in the Social Sciences. Luck to you. Pro- 
fessor. You have demonstrated to Professor Hendricks that you are not a 
mutton-head. May you advance in stature as vou have in wisdom. 



DILLON, ROSS ERNEST, A. B Birmingham, Ala. 

Member Divinity C!ul>; Member of Alpha Phi Epsilon Liter- 
ary Society; Volunteci Band. 

"Father" Dillon is a favorite among the boys. Since be is studying to be a 

missionary, be has married a lovely bride, become the father of a line baby girl, 
and is learning to ride bis own bouse well. A good start for a missionary. We 
all say so. 




isiiwlia 



DOBBS, CARY C, A. B Mathiston, Miss. 

K. S. Mississippi College, '18. 

Cary C. I)ol)l)s is the name of a man plus a little mustache from Mississippi 
College. To honor him further, they gave him a B. S. degree which he keeps in 
his vest pocket. He is a gentleman among ladies, a business man among men. 
and a dictionary in his classes. The world is yours, Cary, and all that's in it. 



DUMAS, VERA MADGE, A. B Birmingham, Ala. 



Delta (ia in ma Sigma. 



Girls' Baskel Ball, '18-'19; Glee Club, '17-'20; 
Student Council. '18; Marshal Commencement, '19; 
of Senior Class 



Member 
M usician 



Vera is one of those few persons who attend to their own business. But just 
look at her grades and consult any of the faculty if you want to know some good 
fact-. She has developed a new interest in literature this year, and we are all wish- 
ing her the best, whether she specializes in Latin or Journalism. 



V 



J 




snwrs 



DURRETT, HENRY PARK, A. B Gordo. Ala. 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Cartoonist, llie Entse-Nous, '20. 

Park is one who knows that the mummy hasn't had any fun for 2,000 years, 
and consequently believes in enjoying the present. He takes down all notes given, 
prepares every lesson carefully, makes splendid marks on examination, and walks 
around as if he hadn't done anything. Four years of it is enough, old boy; we 
think you deserve a degree. 



GILES, MARY ELIZABETH, A. B Birmingham, Ak. 

Member Biology Club, '\'>; Secretary Junior Class. '18; 
Sponsor llaskci Ball Team, '19. 

Mary slipped up on us and got ahead by finishing her work in the summer 
school. She is teaching in North Carolina, and we think her success is due partly 
to her previous experience from her timely moral lectures on the campus. She 
kit much affection behind her. and she will not he separated from it always, 
somebody said. 





Eilwlia 



GULLAGE. JAMES. A. B Clio, Ala. 

Psi Delta. 

Treasurer Student Body, '16; Member Student Congress; 
Member ('■'«• Club. 

( )ur friend, Gullage, comes from Clio. Having married a wife recently, he is 
devoting much time at the fireside. He comes to College long enough to tell his 
professors what he knows. I le is a ministerial student, praying for the conversion 
of the world, especially for a few important personages on the campus. A small 
head hut plenty of brain, a speech that's convincing. 



HARRIS, THEODORE, A. B Ensley, Ala. 



Member Divinity C'lnl). 



He possesses the prae-nomen of Theo. and the cognomen of Harris, and is 
one of the most popular divinity students. Me always has a friendly word and 
smile for everyone. "Although I am a pious man. 1 am no less the man." The 
pastor of a good church in Ensley. 




Not many summers ago Nell was a cunning little baby. But on account of 
too ardent athletic feats performed during this period of growth, there was such 
waste of conserved energy that she has scarcely attained the minimum stature yet. 
But since it isn't quantity hut quality that counts. Xeil's all right. 



HOSKINS, CHARLES EDWARD, A. I'.. 



Montevallo. Ala. 



/'; Kappa Alpha. 

Assistant Tennis Manager, ']'>-' 17; Tennis Singles Cham 

iiion. '1()-'17; Tennis Manager, 'I7-'18; Vice-Presideni Alpha Phi 
Spsilon Literary Society, '1/-'18; Tennis Manager, '18-'19; Tennis 
Singles Champion, '18-'19; Membei Tennis Doubles Champion 
Team. '18-'19; Biology Club, '18-'19 and '19-'20; Secretary Alpha 
Phi Epsilon Literary Society, '19-'20i Social Editor Entre- 
Nous, '19-'20. 

In the warp and weft of human fabric we oftimes observe diverse shades and 
hues. The line of Charley is accentuated with sociahleness shaded with scnsible- 
ness. A man of much business, affable manner, and steady endeavor. Surgery 
suits you, Charley. You'll gel plenty of practice. 







* 




isiiwda 



«, 




JACKSON, WILLIAM EWART GLADSTONE, A. B, 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Psi Delia. 



Director Glee Club. '19; Assistant Business Manager Entrb- 
Noi s, 20; Cheer Leader, part of '18. 

In spite of the handicap of a successful elder brother, Gladstone is making 
Ins College career an independent success. We wonder if his affinity for one of 

the co-eds is due to the fact that she is a good accompanist. To hear him sing in 
either French or English is worth admission; to see him how is worth— well, just 
ask the boys. 



JACKSON, GEORGE WASHINGTON, A. B. 

Psi Delta. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



One of those silent work-while-vou-sleep kind of fellows who gets there 
while you think he's packing up to start. Uncle Sam took him out for two years, 
but we are happy to have him in our class. We wish him much success in his 
automobile business. 



" 




JOHNSTON, ANNA GREGORY, A. B Birmingham, Ala. 

7. da Omega. 

Crimson Advisory Hoard, '16-'17; Girls' Baskel Ball, '1S-'19; 
( iirls' Glee Club, '18-'19-'20; Student Executive Committee, "18-'19; 
Entre-Nous Board, '19-'20; Vice-President Junior Class; Secre- 
tary Senior Class. '20, 

She has forbidden us to discuss her many trips to the "station," but there arc 
several other characteristics to he mentioned. I ler inevitable tardiness, her — yes— 
danciii"-, and Iter frank conversation, also the ease with which she dispenses with 
her classes, these are to he noted. There is another pertinent topic, hut she has 
barred that, too. Besides, he's gone now. 



LANGSTON, MANLY FROST, A. B. 



Birmingham. Ala 



Sigma Xit. 



Associate Editor of Crimson, '19; Editor-in-Chief Crimson, 
'20; Student Councilman; Alpha Phi Epsilon; Assistant Cheei 
Leader, '19; Member of the "Dirtj Four." 

"Snow" is interested in Frost and a few other minor topics, such as athletics. 
girls, and, oh yes, his classes a little. The linn of C'edric & Snow will soon be open 
lor business. You will do well to patroni/e them for they will give \ OU a good 
deal. "Snow" will be pleased to call and talk matters over with you. 



EJ|*Ha 




GilwP 




* 




isjiwlia 




LINDSAY, WILLIAM RUPERT, A. B Belleville, Ala. 

Sigma Nu. 

Varsitj Basket Ball, '16-'17; Poel Sophomore Class; Biology 
Club; Hungry Club; Upha Phi Epsilon Literal-] Society; Business 
Manager Crimson, '19-20. 

Wop. despite his tradesman tendency, aspires to the political arena. We hope 
that he will meet with as much success here as he evidently did in his campaign in 

Scotland. Just another example of long distance — and the heart grows fonder. 



LONG, RUTH LEE, A. B Gilbertown, Ala. 

Acting Dean <>f Women, '18-'1°; Instructor in Home Eco- 
nomics, '18-'19, '19-'20. 

She thinks without confusion clearly. 
Loves her fellow-man sincerely. 
Acts from honest motives purely, 
Trusts in heaven and God securely. 




LOPEZ. JOSE FUNDADOR, A. 1! 



Guanica, Porto Rico. 



President Divinity Club, '19; Member Missionary Band; 
Philomathic Literary society; Biology Club. 

Jose Fundador is ;i great name for a great man. "What?" Jle sailed several 
years ago from Porto Rico to prepare himself as a missionary. "Well. 1 do 
declare." lie has carried himself well, and has the good wishes of his numerous 
friends among the hoys — and girls. 



EilwlRl 



MARTIN, FLETA KATHLEEN, A. B Warrior. Ala. 

Sigma Delia Chi 

A contribution from Athens College. She came to us in her Senior year, 
and is specializing in Religions Education for her future use. Very suspicious. 
Fleta has made a good impression on the College circle. We wish she had come to 
us sooner. 




Wesl Point, ( la. 



McGINTY, HELIARY HERBERT, A. B 

Divinity Club; Crimson Staff, '16-17, '17-'18, i 

II. Herbert is one student who "got through" with his Greek. At the same 
time he never forgot the girls, was a chum with the hoys, and was pastor of a 
good church. We love you, Mae. You are a good old pal. May the Mrs. Mac-to-be 

soon be joined to thee, and the waves he calm when you put out to sea. 



MINTER, RUSSELL E., A. B Birmingham, Ala. 

President Biology Club, '20; Secretary Philomathic Literarj 
Society, '20; Laboratory Instructoi Biology, '19-'20. 

Collaborator with Professor Ives in persuading the queasy co-eds that the 
angle-worm is not fatal, and that there is nothing to be feared from imperfectly 
pickled pigeons in the bug lab. "hoe" M inter is certain of a good practice if he 
wants it. He's got the right turn. 




MOODY, CLAUDE EMMETT, A. B Russellville, Ala. 

Psi Delta. 

Football. '17-'18; Basket Ball, 'IS; Track. '18; Secretary 
Al|)ha Phi Epsilon Literary Society. 1/. 

He is one of those fellows who gives us a time writing him up. He is so 
busy looking after his own affairs that he doesn't have time to get in the notice 
of the "common rabble." 1 le is quiet, steady, and — yes — a lion among the ladies. 



MORGAN. WALLACE WILLIAM. A. 



Tyler, Ala. 



Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Philomatbic Literary Society; Football Squad, '17 T'. 

Wallace's chief asset is his cheerful friendliness, lie is a Strong believer in 
co-education, and specializes in campus courses. Having a great name, he aspires 
to great things. We are glad to say that he is willing to work for it. too. Watch 

him smile his way to success. 








MORRIS, RUTH, A. B Birmingham, Ala. 

Helta Gamma Sigma. 

Member Student Council " 1 7 - " 1 s : Instructor in Department 
<ii Chemistry, '18- '20; Marshal from Sophomore Class, "18; Head 
Marshal, '19; Assistant Editor Entre-Nous, '_'0; Statistician 
Senior Class. 



It can be said without fear of contradiction that Ruth is a "weighty" girl. 
Her opinions and her discoveries are of great import. As a student, she lias been 
perhaps the most thorough of any member of the class. Whether the subject in 
hand was Greek or Chemistry, she became its master. Her ambition is a worthy 
one. We know she will get there. 



MOYE, LUTHER, A. B Evergreen, Ala. 



President Divinity Club, '18-'19; President Student Volunteer 
Band, '18-'19; Glee, Club, '19-'20; Philomathic Literary Society, 
ivi'jo; Treasurer Senior Class. 

He is a product of Florence Normal School, and is now taking a special 
course in poetry as a pre-requisite to the school of matrimony. See him smile 
and you will think that he has begun already. Luther is a good student, an ex- 
cellent preacher, and a favorite with all the class — hoys and skirls. 




siiwra 



NEWMAN, WALTER D., A. B Birmingham, Ala. 

Psi Delta. 

Varsity Basket Ball, '17-'18-'19-'20; Captain Basket Ball, '19; 
Philomathic Literary Society; Varsity Baseball. '18-'19; Vice- 
President Student Body, '18-'19; Track Team, " 1 7" 1 s ; Member 
Athletic Council, '1'); Entre-Nous Staff, 20; President Student 
Body, - 19-'20. 

One who doesn't worry until the time comes, and thinks the professor may 
forget and not call on him after all. lie thinks wrong most of the time. He has 
added unto himself a wife since he entered College. She is his better half, lie 
has a hand in everything that's done. 



NIAGER, ROY, A. B Ubany, Ala. 

Member l>i\inity Club; Editor-in-Chiel Entri Nous, '20. 

Personally he is inclined to he quiet. It is his purple how lie thai makes all the 
racket. Me is a student who takes his work seriously, His specialties are Latin 
and Greek. With a lew exceptions during the year they seem to agree with him 
quite well. Me tried to correct the chapel attendance rule, hut the faculty saw it 
differently . 




w 



&L 




PARSONS, ROBERT AUSTIN, \. 



Ashland. Ala 



Sigma Nu. 

President of Senior Class: President Student Body, '18; 
President Alpha Phi Epsilon Literary Society; President of the 
Mystic Order of Bums; Representative "t" Alpha Phi Epsilon Lit- 
erary Society in Inter-Socierj Debate; Member Student Body 
( ouncil. 

The presidency of nearly everything on the campus rarely means much, but 
"Pa" is the sort who fills any office he holds. The above Hock of variegated 
responsibility ought to speak eloquently for his ability, but it is no measure of his 
popularity. 



PITTARD, CLARENCE ROBERT. A. B Lineville, Ala. 

/'si Helta. 

Varsity Football, '16-17; Basket Ball, "17-'18; Manager Bas 
ket Ball, '18-'19; Track, '16-'17; Vice President Alpha Phi Epsilon 
Society; Member Divinity Club; Vice-President Biology Chili. 
INI"; President Biology Club, '19 '20. 

Clarence is a business man this year as well as a student. So he pays us 
little attention. It keeps him rather busy to keep up with his affairs at both 
"offices." All joking aside, he is an "all around goodfellow." He is buying two 
copies of the Entre-Nous like some others are doing. 



% 




PRICE, CHARLES BENJAMIN, A. B 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Varsity Football, '14-'15-'16-'17-'19; Glee Club, '1S-'16-'17; 

Vice-President Athletic Association, 'ld'17: President Athletic 
Association, "17-*18; Track Team. '14 -'15. 

Pooley likes to warble, he also likes to sleep; 

Me likes to act the lover's part, and does it mighty neat. 
Now, what care he for lessons; why should he take a peep 

Into a musty "Bug" hook, his pleasures to defeat? 



Athens, Ala. 



PRICE, SIDNEY LANIER. A. B. 



Tine Hill. Ala. 



Sigma Nu. 

Vice-President of Junioi ( las~; Business Manager of (rim- 
son. '19; Assistant Cheet Leader, '19; Member Student Council; 
Membei "Dirt) Kour;" Alpha Phi Epsilon; Editor-in-Chief-Elect 
K s i k i Nous. 

Cedric is like the proverbial little bo) always teasing girls, and he always 

lived up to his reputation at Howard. This is not all that ( edric can do. however, 
for he was instructor in Chemistry, an enthusiastic worker for the Crimson, and 
almost a misogynist. Bui he has changed his mind. 



h. 




SENN, ANN l.< >UISE, \. B. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



II pita Delta Pi. 



Girls' Glee Club, '17-'19-'20; Secretary Biology Club, "19; 
Sponsor Birmingham-Southern - Howard Game, 19; Winner 
' in Muted Doubles ["ennis, '19; Poet Senior Class. 

Aiin brings down all the honors on the tennis court from championship to 
tripping "the light fantastic." She captures her share of A's. And there is great 
Speculation on the campus whether her future career will he on the tann or 
elsewhere. 



SHELBURNE, KINGMAN CODY, A. B Gadsden, Ala. 

/';' Kappa Alpha. 

Glee Club, '16-'17-'18-'19; Alpha Phi Epsilon Literary So 
Biology Club. 

Kingman's scholarship and work lost to l u 20 one of it > strongest members. 
He i> neither a grind nor a shark, hut he's what the faculty members mean when 
they say "a good student." Me will he remembered for having a great affinity for 

chapel not at chapel time. Why? Well, everybody knows. 






s, 



•w 



m 




TRANT, JAMES B., A. B Birmingham, Ala. 

Alpha Phi Epsilon Literary Society; Treasurer Student As- 
sociation, '19; Member Dormitory Council, '19- '20; V. M. C. A. 
Cabinet, T9-'J0; Biology Club, '19-'20. 

As he is president of the Y. M. C. A. and treasurer of most organizations to 

which he belongs, to comment on his morals would be superfluous. We are sure 
he would not like to have us dwell on either his sudden or brief love affairs, or 
his success in debating. J. B. is bound for an Eastern university to work for a 
higher degree. And then — 



&\*m 




VAUGHN'. JEWELL COMER, A. B. 



Ashland, Ala. 



Sigma Nu. 

dec Club. '17; Manager Football, '17; President Alpha Phi 
Epsilon; Representative of Alpha I'lu Epsilon Literary Society 
in Inter-Society Ik-bate; Giftorian of Senior Class. 

If you ever want a thing put across, just tell it to Jewell and. "mihi crede," 
it will get across in a jiffy, lie is a student who puts his heart, mind and soul to 
each duty he has to perform. It is worth your while to lake- notice of him. Things 
are going to move for him. 



m 



■ 




isiiwlia 



WILLIAMS, CHARLES WESTON, A. B Birmingham, Ala. 



Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Athletic Editor Crimson, '19-'20; Editor-in-Chief Aristonian, 
JO: Business Manager Ehtke-Nous, '20; C'la-s Prophet; 
Rhodes' Scholarship IlnMer. '20. 

A man who has stopped over with us from "Woco," Texas. He is bound for 
Oxford, England, with a Rhodes Scholarship in his valise. Woco is all business, 

and intends to make the world hear him. We are confident that he will succeed. 
We hope he will soon get back home and start the reformalution. 



JMtstory of ilje jlentnr (Elass 

Sing, heavenly muse, of the adventurous Class of 1920! Tell of their achieve- 
ments and failures, as the case may be (and generally is). Sing to me. that I may 
transmit to a kind and patiently waiting posterity the unparalleled significance of 
the event which has occurred. That the true weight and importance of this matter 
may be realized, leave it not to some unworthy scribe ; but speak, muse, that I may 
modestly and truthfully tell of the merits and attainments of the Seniors of 1920. 

Some eighty-four or more youths, eager for knowledge of the ways of the 
world, were scattered broadcast over the regions round-about, only awaiting the 
eventful day when each should claim Howard College as his Alma Mater. But 
many wanderings awaited this esteemed "companie of sundry folks." The tyran- 
nical Sophomores eyed them askance, and nightly became a terror. Patronizing 
Juniors took every occasion to humble them before the fair co-eds, and scarce 
a contemptuous glance of scorn came from the haughty Seniors. Even the Fresh- 
men girls were not spared. ''The quality of mercy truly was not strained," and 
the term "Rat !" was a summons as imperative as the notes of the Pied Piper. But, 
even then, we were not without honor in our own country. Far-reaching social 
discoveries were made. Ross Dillon learned the difference between a prune and 
a date, and, by appealing to Annie Laurie, Mr. Day settled his love affairs. Cedric 
Price became another Sir Lochinvar ; while, in Frost Langston, we found a gay 
and debonair Lothario. But even they were as the glow of a firefly to the noonday 
sun, compared to Anna Johnson, our modern, but blonde. Cleopatra. 

Yet, while in the very rudiments of knowledge, we were lured on ; our pro- 
fessors offered higher degrees to all making official passing marks in all their 
studies. By one supreme effort, we crammed so that most of us succeeded in 
entering our Sophomore year and career. 

In this higher plane of existence, we became the proverbial "know-it-all 
Sophs." Xo more doubts, no more questions! We were now giving directions 
to unfortunate Freshmen. The other classes, too, received our friendly help and 
encouragement. We helped them when they stumbled and supported them when 
they weakened. We advised the faculty and piloted them through many weighty 
discussions. Meek and courteous we were, and though our modestv restrains 
us, we feel it our duty to hint at our help in sustaining this noble institution. Our 
success truly has been great. At the close of this year came the call to arms. 
It was with great pride that we saw many of our men answer so nobly. We. too, 
may truly trill our "anna virumque cano." 

Thus the first of our Junior year found our ranks sadly depleted. 1 lowever. 
even wars must end, and we were glad this one ended in time for many of our 
men to come back to the old class. Of course, we were vastly proud of the 
various bars and insignia of rank that they brought home. 

Rumors, meanwhile, with tidings, ran swiftly through our ranks, and we 
awoke one line morning to find ourselves past Scylla and Charybdis — at the very 
threshold of the sacred citadel — we were Seniors! And now we number oiils 



_*_ 1 






ETwlRl 



forty-five. Some of our noble company were enthralled by the siren call of 
Fortune; some were lined away by their own inclinations, while others obeyed the 
summons of the little lord. Cupid. But even now, oh gentle reader, our immortal 

fame will not suffer, for great and glorious have been the characters who came to 
ns from other classes. Mildred Clapp, Ann Senn and Vera Dumas had the good 
taste to push forward and get their diplomas with this august body. Anion," those 
who have won fame as lowly followers of the elusive pigskin are : Carlisle, Moody, 
Morgan, Newman and Pittard. "Pooley" Trice nut only gained distinction in 
that line, hut sustains a rheumatic crook in his arm for the winning of his name. 
The gallant Mr. Move came into our midst and made such an urgent appeal to the 
fair co-eds, that they rushed to instant response under cover of Leap Year. This 
small chronicle goes to press with Mr. Move still undecided which it shall he. 

Even the innovation of "absence blanks" served as a stepping stone to ns. We 
have acquired prominence with our excuses, probably not so much by their fitness 
as by their startling originality. It was during our reign, too, that the worthy 
Green was supplanted by faithful George and his "magic wand," as guardian of 
the old bell, whose clapper has long since suffered at the hands of some enterpris- 
ing young student. 

Classes have come and gone in the past, and no doubt in the future greater 
classes will rise up to "call us blessed." as they seek the heights scaled by us. But 
unanimous, though modest, we realize that no class will ever reach the glittering 
prominence of the Class of 1920. 

Nell Hodges, Historian, 'jo. 



^I'^n&oi 



To every dream thai comes in all. 
An end N always there; 

Some clouds and rain must ever fall 
With just a little care. 

School lift- has been a glad sweet dream, 
And now the dawn is here; 

We see the sunlight's golden gleam. 
The day is bright and clear. 

Ma\ Fortune smile on each of you, 

As you answer the call to man; 
Tin- world is seeking workers true — 
"They can who think they can." 



— Ann Senn, 'jo. 



>fk 



s. 



jlemor (Ulass 



We, the Senior Class of Howard College, County of Bliss, State of Ignorance, 
and partly over and partly under the age of twenty-one years, being of feeble 
mind and fading memory, do hereby make and publish this our last will and testa- 
ment, revoking all former wills which may have been made at any time hereto- 
fore by us : 

First — We will that all our debts and graduating expenses shall be paid by 
the Junior Class as soon after Final Exams as practical. 

Second — We will and bequeath to the Sophomore Class all worn-out belts, 
paddles, razor strops, etc., for rat inspections ; also our places in English, Math, 
and Chemistry. 

Third — We will and bequeath to the beloved Freshman Class all our old 
powder puffs, run-down shoes, torn-up pants. We further will to these excellent 
students our numbered seats in chapel and insist that they be present at every as- 
sembly. 

Fourth — We will to the coming Freshman Class our room in Renfroe Hall, 
our places on the campus, our reserved seats at the Lyric and Bijou, provided they 
pay in advance for these privileges. 

Fifth — We will to the coming ministerial students our vacant places in that 
well-known building called "Hell's Half Acre." 

Sixth — We nominate and appoint our beloved Prof. I. X. Kouglemas as 
executor of this our last will and testament, and declare that he shall be required 
to give bond of five million dollars for the performance of his duties arising here- 
under ; ami that he shall be required to make an inventory of all the property 
coming into his hands as such executor, and that be shall make a report to the. 
Senior Class court of his proceedings hereunder. 



Witness my hand this 32nd day of Juvember, 1920. 



Signed in presence of 

J. I). Rockefeller, 
President W. Wilson. 



[erman Stringshore. 




Wfk 



1 



* 




EilwlRl 



Diary pob 1930 — by "Hortense." 

Jan. 1 — Tuesday— "Fessor" Day begins the year by divorcing his fourth wife and 
resolving, as before, to let the women alone. 

Jan. 4 — Friday Park Durrett made eighteenth vice-president of the United Pedes 
trians (tramps) of America at their biennial convention in Los 
Angeles. 

Jan. 13 — Sunday — Luther Moye accepts the call to the First Baptist Church of 
Pulltite and begins work in his new held. 

Jan. lf> — Wednesday — Wallace Morgan celebrates the tenth anniversary of John 
Barleycorn's demise and is arrested as an 1. W. W. 

Feb. 3 — Sunday — Tom Bealle is made High Muckety-Muck of the local branch of 
the Salvation Army. 

Feb. 14 — Thursday — Valentine Day — also Snow Langston's lucky day — he wins 
30 cents at draw-poker. 

Feb. 22— Friday — Legal holiday — Birthday of George Jackson and George Wash- 
ington. 

.March 4 — Monday — Arthur Carlisle celebrates his first anniversary in the White 
House — as chief butler. 

March 9 — Saturday — Mildred Clapp, the leading prima donna of the year, sings 
to a packed house at the Metropolitan, New York. 

March 20 — Wednesday — Clarence Pittard appointed United States Ambassador 
to Liberia. 

April 1 — Monday — All Fool's Day — Jockey Newman breaks out of the Jefferson 

County jail. 

April 30 — Tuesday — Gladstone Jackson pilots his new aeroplane to Havana and 
hack. His popularity increases immediately. 

May 2 — Thursday — "Pooley" Price, prominent mule dealer of Athens, comes to 
Birmingham on business. 

May 24 — Friday — The Class of '20 has its reunion at the College. Luncheon at 
the Tutwiler. Reminiscent speeches by Cook. Moody, and Trant. 
"Pa" I 'arsons was unable to attend because his wife would not grant 
the necessary "leave of absence." ( We understand why — she was 
formerly a co-ed at Birmingham-Southern.) Charlie Hoskin also 
sent his regrets. I li- engine broke down just this side of Roanoke. 

June 3 — Monday- Rupert Lindsey elected Director of Athletics at Howard for 
the following year. 



j une 11 — Tuesday — The Faculty at Howard receives an invitation to the wedding 
of Nell Hodges, who has become very wealthy and resides at Venice, 
Cal. The lucky man is William Wrigley, III. 

f u ] v 4_ Thursday— Independence Day— Lopez celebrates by divorcing his seventh 
wife. 

July 19 — Friday — Return engagement of "Follies of 1929" at the Jefferson, star- 
ring Anna Johnson and Al Jolson, Jr. 

Aug. 1 — Thursday — Minter opens up a new sanitarium in Pratt City. 

Aug. 6 — Tuesday — Seen in the New York Sun for Aug. 2nd : "Goldwin signs 
two more stars. Emotional actresses from Dixie complete galaxy 
of cinema stars. Miss Dumas and Miss Martin affix signatures to 
$100,000 contracts." 

Sept. 11 — Wednesday — Howard University opens with 3,600 registrations the 
first day. "Doc" Shelburne, now a great railroad magnate, pays the 
campus a visit. 

Oct. 4 — Friday — Howard football team, under Coach Lindsey, defeats Auburn in 
the opening game of the season, 36-0. 

Nov. 28 — Thursday — Thanksgiving Day — Howard wins the S. 1. A. A. Champion- 
ship by defeating Tech. 18-0. Professor Eagles loses his fourteenth 
watch. 

Dec. 25 — Wednesday — James Buchanan Trant and Miss Ruth Long are united 
in the Holy Bonds of Matrimony by the Very Reverend James 
Gullege, A. B., M. A., Th. D. 

CUR T A 1 N 



C 



gJ|*Il3 




EilwP 



ii 



' 20 




Ej*|ig 




w .■ 



Statistics 



Fellow Students: To me lias fallen the preponderous task of compiling the 
statistics of the most wonderful class thai ever gathered on the rostrum of 

I Inward College— the Class of 1920. I low tremendous the task you may see when 
you consider that these facts embrace a period beginning in 1842. when two of 
our members, Isee Lee Connell and J. F. Lopez, entered upon the threshold of 
this most sacred institution, and extending to the present time. 

Since the modern method of investigation of all weighty problems seems 
to he by questionnaires, I sent out many of these documents-first, to find out 
what a statistician should do; and, finally, to gain the life history of each member 
of the class. 1 am indebted t<> some of the greatest men of the country, among 
whom are 7(> lawyers, 12 politicians. 4 almanac editors. 16 janitors. 4 ( > wardens. 
and three members of this Senior Class. For I should never have been ahle to 
find out what they had become except by the aid of their valuable response thru 
my questionnaires. Thus I compiled the following definition: Statistics are con- 
glomerations, compilations, or amalgamations of facts, true or imaginary, elastic 
or otherwise, flexible or fixed, pertaining to the predicament of the people, their 
actual or imaginary qualities, properties or resources. 

At first glimpse I thought our resources would reach such a huge figure as 
to sound fictitious. But on taking inventory. I found a stray nickle in Tom Bealle's 
wallet, two Egyptian marbles and a cent in S. L. Price's vest pocket, two stuhs 
of matinee tickets in the possession of Charles lloskin, and a powder puff in Vera 
Dumas' hook. Thus 1 concluded our combined resources are so inlinitesimally 
small as to be entirely negligible. 

In our large family there are forty-live members. Of this number eleven 
are human ; the remainder are men. The total weight of this family is 19.872. ( > 
grams. Ruth Morris is the heaviest, her weight being 396.8 grams; while Bertram 
Day. being only 150.9 grams heavy, is the lightest. (That accounts for his being 
elected goat. ) Twenty-one men served with Uncle Sam. in this country and 
abroad. Five of these were lieutenants and one a Y. M. C. A. secretary. I esti- 
mate that they saluted their superior officers 199.870 times, hiked 12.^72 miles and 
consumed ()H7.S>7<) pounds of beans. This is a quantity sufficient to supply Pratt 
City with beans for the next H7 years. 

When we are playing, it is our custom to stand on each other's shoulders. 
\\ hen we do this, we are 3,499.7 inches tall. Thus arranged we need take only five 
steps to make a journey around the world. We are always particular, however, 
in making these journeys, for should the wheels in Bertram Day's head fail to 
register one step, the sixth would land us on Birmingham-Southern's Campus in- 
stead of on our own. Since our resources are so limited, by forming this pinnacle 
we were able to view the Harvard- Yale football game from Birmingham abso- 
lutely free of any charges. 



During our stay at Howard we have spent 93,237 hours in class. This does 
not include those that Park Durrett rode. We should have spent 186.574 hours in 
preparation for these classes, but the unusual brilliancy of Xell Hodges reduced 
that number to 186,321.5 hours. 

There seems to be quite a diversity of opinion as to what member of our 
family is the champion speller. Two are presenting their claims to this place 
of honor. The slight majority seem to favor Theodore Harris, but the friends of 
Isee Lee Connell claim a victory for him. I hear it rumored that if the high 
title of Math Shark fails to fall upon Mary Giles it will unquestionably descend 
on Kingman Shelburne. 

I have recently received a telegram from Secretary Garfield, thanking us 
for the conservation of coal during the recent coal shortage. It is estimated 
that we saved five hundred tons, which we were able to do only by virtue of 
the fact that we did not have to prepare those learned documents — I have special 
reference to these. He further stated that these five hundred tons of coal were 
shipped to Armenia, where they kept 15.839 orphans from freezing. The paper 
conserved by a similar regulation will supply the entire Hottentot race with 
Algebras and also with keys for working the problems. The ink we failed to 
consume will be sufficient to write all the treasurer's statements for the next 
hundred years and then draw the mental-ability curves of each member of this 
class. 

The statistics of this class could never have been compiled had it not been 
that seven of our members took census this year. They turned all their data 
over to me so that I would be able to reveal something that even the question- 
naires tailed to reveal — namely, the ages of our members. Instead of the tradi- 
tional 16, they read 21, 22, 23. 24. 28, 30 and upward. S-sh — there's no need for 
alarm — I'm not reading your grades, I'm only repeating the ages of some of our 
members. These seem to account for the fact that Rupert Lindsey and George 
Jackson have each received 121 proposals from our college girls this year. 

I am loath to close these statistics without mentioning the greatest problem 
ever undertaken by any member of our family — that of W. 11. Cook, in an effort 
to find the total amount of grev matter in our class. I regret to say that Mr. 
Cook, not even with the aid of our aforesaid Math Shark, lias yet figured out a 
formula to obtain this information. 

We have the most complete family in the history of the College. We are 
of noble birth, since we are descended from a Kingman. Our Pa is a Parson; 
we lack nothing, not even to a Cook. As one of our members was Pat (ting) and 
Clapp (ing), Jackson (Jack's son) Manlev said: "1 see you are a Newman, but 
Senn has crept in. Take my advice and do not Crowder Anna (any) Moore." 
During the Day Dobbs of Frost on the Flint look like Jewells). We are not 
troubled, for if we should not always have the Price, we would have a Mint(er). 
A senior went out to look for our Booldog, but when she found h in i be was onl) 
a Pooly. 

The sad fact that there are no red-headed members of our family lias 
caused one of our most loved members, because of bis humiliation about the 



EJi*lig 




Eilwfrl 



. 







aforesaid fact, to lose his hair, even unto the finest fuzz, from the anterior por- 
tion of his cranium. Witness, all ye halls of Howard, that the faculty has en- 
deavored to put all the polish possible on this — the Class of 1920. That this 
polish has been accepted there can he no doubt. Even the most unfriendly critics 
could not deny this, for in future years he will be able to discern the above- 
mentioned gloss, all of which has beset itself upon Mr. Trant's head. 

Ruth Morris. 
Statistician Senior Class lyjo. 



Jientor Claes JS'nno, 



I. 

In the city's eastern suburb, 

1 .ooming into the sky. 
Proudly stands old Howard College 
As the time Mies hv. 



Refrain. 

Old men. "rats," and Class of Twenty. 

Prove yourselves to he 
Equal to the tasks before you, 

When you all are free. 



II. 

Pushing upward to the top-rung. 

With a keen desire, 
Always striving to he cheerful. 

And without much ire. 



Refrain. 



III. 

So. farewell, fellow-students. 

Trials and cares a-plenty 
You will have, but don't forget the 

Class of Xineteen-Twcntv. 



Refrain. 



-C. E. 1 Ioskin. '20. 



Entrf-Noita, 192II 



fe 




1920 



f/.l./V/PPf/e. 



JUHIOk 

cms 

OFFICERS 









*& 



/>o£rr 



secy- r&sts . 






Page Sixty -four 



lEtttrp-Nmta, 1920 



CARR. C. W. 

Psi Delta 
( rADSDEN, Al.A. 



CASI A'. RUTH BRINPLEY 
Delta Gamma Sigma 

BlRM [NGHAM, Al.A. 



CROWDER, C. W. 

BlRM [NGHAM. Al.A. 




Page Sixty-five 



iEtttnsNDUH, 1920 



=^ 




GARDNER, V. M. 
Dadeville. Ala. 



1 1 ALL. S. W. 

Psi Delta 

Talladega, Ala. 



KING, M.O. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Ariton, A.LA. 



Page Sixty-six 



lEnire-NmtH, 1920 



LAMMERT, ORENE 

Delta Gamma Sigma 

Ensley, Ala. 



LAMPRINIDIS, X. 

Birmingham, Ala. 
(From Greece) 



LAWRENCE, B. 

Birm immiam , Ala. 




Page Sixty-seven 



l£ntn>-NmtB, 1920 




NEWFIELD, S. U. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



NIPPER, H. L 

GUNTERSVILLE. Al.A. 



O'REAR, B. I',. 

Phi Kaffa Xu 
Iasper. Ala. 



Page Sixty-eight 



lEttirr-NmtH. 1920 



OSBORN, E. C. 

Perryville, Ala. 



PLEDGER. W. G. 

Phi Kappa Nil 

Leeds, Ala. 



SPARKS, S. E. 
Birmingham, Ala. 




Page Sixty- ni lie 



Sntrp-Noua, 1920 




WALKER, D. C. 

Sigma Nu 
Ensley, Ala. 



WHEELER, II. (.. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
Arab, Ala. 



WHORTON, J. I.. 
Hanceville, Ala. 



Page Seventy 



Sntre-NmtH, 1920 



^tstor^ of tl}t 3|umor Class 



In the fall of 1917 a band of enthusiastic boys and girls entered the registrar's 
office at Howard College and matriculated as members of the Freshman Class. 

Our country being then engaged in preparing to fight "German autocracy," 
not one member of the class knew how soon the "call to service" would come. We 
labored under this suspense, conscious of the fact that the more thorough our 
preparation the better service we could render in defense of our beloved country. 
With our imagination stirred and our emotions warmed by the efficacious instruc- 
tion of our able teachers, we realized some measure of achievement. The passing 
of time with its pleasant and unpleasant events brought us to the culmination of 
our career as Freshmen. How glad to know that the age of Freshmanism had 
passed and the era of Sophomority had come ! 

In September, 1918, with an abundance of jest and jollity, and on fantastic 
toes, we topped the steps of the Main Building, full fledged Sophomores, having 
left behind the terrible anxiety of "Rat" and the many calamities that usually 
obstructed a Freshman's pathway. When the roll was called, several whom we 
knew as "Rats" failed to answer to their names, while several new faces ap- 
peared. We extended a hearty welcome to the new members of our class, trying 
as best we could, as loyal and congenial sons and daughters, to point out the dan- 
gers, snares and humiliations such as "going to town," "Greek" and "flunking." 
Tho our hearts were sad because of the absence of many of our former class- 
mates, we were made to rejoice when it was found that some of them had an- 
swered their "country's call" and offered their lives, if necessary, in the effort to 
establish world-wide democracy. Since our Government had established the 
S. A. T. C. at Howard, we had a double pursuit : Preparing for leadership in army 
activities, and pursuing our regular college course. Oh! We were made to re- 
joice: Instructions were received from "Uncle Sam" to abolish the military 
training, which permitted us to devote our whole time to our academic work. 
We accordingly applied ourselves diligently to our books and came out victorious 
on Commencement Day. 

Juniors! Glorious thought! At last we an- known by this name, which re- 
minds us that in a short time we shall be important, self-satisfied Seniors. ( >nr 
school life this year has been full of obnoxious perplexities, but with the encour- 
agement of our noble professors, we have succeeded thus far; so we will con- 
tinue to be steadfast and true, and if Dame Fortune does not forsake us. some 
day on the topmost step of the ladder of fame will he found some of the names of 
the Junior Class. The mental picture of the past three years, with its manv joys 
and sorrows, successes and failures; with the pre-war conditions, time of actual 
hostilities and post-war reconstruction and adjustment, presents to us unnumbered 
opportunities, greater responsibilities and observant obligations. As loyal, patri- 
otic and aspiring young men and women, we have labored with unrestrained 

Page Seventy-one 






iEntre-Nmia, lff2fl 



fervency, ardor and intentness, zealous to play our part in the role of world activi- 
ties and policies, as law yers, missionaries, doctors, ministers, senators or presidents. 
We are, alter these three years of impetuous toil, aware of the fact that we 
cannot ride to these stations in life on "flowery beds of ease." and that there 
is no "royal toad to learning." 

Mail in tin- Junior Class, Fellow students! 

Thy name we love so well; 
Thy loyal sons salute thee, 

\- ih\ fame through ages swill-,. 



Jin i\uaut 

When I consider how the years have passed. 

And now our college days are almost o'er; 

That soon we'll take our entrance thru the open door 

( >f life, into the work-worn world at last. 

To fail or triumph in our destined task. 

In close accordance with I lis plans and laws. 

I would our work he perfect, without flaws. 

I pray, tho such has not been true in past. 

That every life may yield work nobly done: 

Deeds that will live thru ages ever great, 

Thoughts that will last the wear and tear of time; 

That many a guerdon fair he won 

When, having reached the time designed by fate, 

Life's \aM unfinished tasks we leave behind. 



Page Seventy-two 



lEntrp-Nmta, 1920 







r 'C£t - /^-e £J/OC>Y7. 

SOP/JOMOJPE. 




C/JfSS QFF/C££S 



5£<T/e£7#*!Y 





/s/s roses'?*/ 















Page Seventy-four 



Etttrr-NnuH, 1020 




Page Seventy-five 



Sntrp-NnuH, 1020 





yro/r ty/rpoy 





jophotioreClass «, 










' S/S£^*/£i.O IT-*"- / c %>»*<*-£- 2 - 



.Pa^re Seventy-six 



Sntrf-Nnus, 1020 



j^opfyomore (Elass JHtstoru 



Chapter I. 

The fall of 1918 saw the birth of the Class of 1922. and an illustrious class 
it was. For lo ! even in the first year of our existence, great deeds were done by 
us, but withal you found us meek, courteous and quiet in demeanor and deport- 
ment. Even though we were handicapped by the S. A. T. C. and were not quite 
our normal selves we managed to show the upper class men who and what we 
were. 

The class roll would seem like a directory of school celebrities, for the Freshman 
Class furnished the majority of stars for the teams : football, basketball and base- 
ball. When the ardor of the Sophomores broke forth too violently in oratory. 
we defeated them gloriously. 

On the matter of the "Rat Reception" we may well dwell with pride. A band 
of faithful "Rats" met and planned the reception which was to mark the turning 
point in the lives of the Freshmen, for ever afterwards we have been looked up to 
as a class that does things. 

Chapter II. 

Ah, how good it feels to be a Sophomore or rather NOT to be a Rat. Never 
did pioneers struggle with greater difficulties or accomplish more surprising re- 
sults than the Class of 1922. Our work in the past year has been quite successful. 
In the realm of class work many have distinguished themselves, as the professors 
will vouch for. Some have soared to fame in oratory. We have in our midst 
great speakers, like Bell and Patterson; persuasive and silver-tongued masters of 
the art of argument, such as Wright and Powell. 

We are quite sure that our readers will excuse us for singing out our honors. 
but we cannot refrain from mentioning the fact that this year our class is so 
well represented in all phases of college life. Newman, ( ). P>.. Acton and McLane 
represented us in football; Acton, Newman, O. I'., Wright, Mobley and Knight, 
in basketball. The Sophomores, too, have furnished many members for the Glee 
Clubs, notable among whom are: Misses i [arris, Sloan. ( Hi/.ts. Brassfield, Beasley 
and Waddey, of the Girls' Glee Club; and Messrs. Sims. Hill. Carlisle. F. O. 
Matthews, McLane, Aubrey, |. M., Patterson and Newman, O. B. Although our 
class has not been active socially, we have been determined to keep out of "the 
clutches of the automatic." Among the Sophomores who have distinguished 
themselves in scholarship for at least a "!'>" average are: Misses Merle Beasley, 
Gladys Falkncr, Eunice Sloan, and Messrs. C. L. Brock and 1. X. Patterson. 

Act I Cram. 

Act II Exam. 

Act 111 Passed. 

Act IV Junior. Classed. 

J. Ford Robinson, 

Class Historian, JJ. 
{ Continued in our next. > 

Page Seventy-seven 



Entrp-Nnua, 1020 



!£{<£- 






(iortb, ®h;mi GUiitljer? 



The Thing that we have sought for, 
Or yet are seeking still — 

Is it just a flittering will o' the wisp 
That dances over the hill. 

Waiting to lure us onward 
And so our hopes fulfill ? 






No — work is there, and sorrow. 

Disappointments are not a few ; 
Yet at the rainhow's very end 

A pot of gold awaits you 
For service greatly rendered. 

O, noble '22. 



-Gladys Watlington, Class Poet, '22. 



Page Seventy-eight 



Stttre-Nnua, 132fl 



















^7£. 3/eEW7osS 






Page Highly 



EnJrp-Noua. 1320 







FRESHMAN CLASS 







< ' 0*/&s*~tJ*i 



<Z~. t-r.&'/eoss 



y.. <V*r*rv/. 



Page Eighty-one 



Etttrr-Nmta, 192fl 








W. I4< S/.S7/oy*S 



Page Eighty-two 



Entrr-Nnua, X3ZQ 



y^t 




Page Eighty-three 



«< 



iEntrp-NmtH, 1920 



2=7 



!}tstory of the Jfrcslitcs 



[>ong before we actually entered bodily into the sacred confines of Howard 
College, we had listened to the high-brow chatter of its faithful alumni. Beautiful 
word pictures had been painted in glowing colors of its architectural structures 
of Gothic, Ionic and Tuscan. In imagination we saw ourselves tiptoeing thru its 
Malls of Fame, equipping ourselves, mind, soul and body, with the wonderful 
stores of knowledge which were ensconced in every department — and ours, just 
for the asking. 

So, on September 10. 191 ( ). one hundred and twelve expectant youths and 
maidens "put out from the harbor of childhood into the sea of life." Xo longer 
were these young people to be called "school children." tho by no means were; 
their school days ended. College, with all its allurements, opened to receive hus- 
kies and semi-huskies in body, if not in mind. All sought admittance to its beau- 
tiful Halls and desired to drink from the fountains of knowledge and intellectual 
attainments that had been so glowingly portrayed to them. 

As ever) class has something characteristic to mark its place in Time, so, 
although a Freshman group of post-bellum days, we are not without name and 
fame. We chose for our president a valiant hero of our fighting forces, whom 
Howard College is honored in owning, and of whom we are justly proud: Mr. 
G. C. O'Kelley. Of course, all of us have worked and striven to be individual, 
but a few have achieved distinction beyond all expectation. Some have become 
the best students of their classes: .Mr. ( ). R. Grimes, Geo. A. Xeclcy. and John 
E. Brewton. With the assistance of Alford. Britton. Ingram. Herring, and 
Robinson, the intellectual level of the class will be kept high. 

By able-bodied Freshmen, a very creditable record has been made in the 
athletic fields, especially in the games with Birmingham-Southern. 

Another very singular fact of historical note is. that as we were heralded for 
the first time into the college history, so also was our new college president, Dr. 
Charles I',. Williams; our musical director. Prof. Paul de Launey : our athletic di- 
rector. C. C. Dillon, and our beloved English professor. Miss A. Bess Clark. 

In discussing the relative merits of the class, some, deliberately, and others 
automatically, have gone to seek new fields and pastures green. Those of us 
remaining, realizing that capacity for work is capacity for worth. let nothing 
be a bar to the attainment of efficiency. So in this reconstruction age, alertness, a 
desire to be live wires, and a push from Miss Clark, have put a group of Freshmen 
on the platform for public speaking. This has proven to be a very successful 
mental stimulus. 

Our History would not be complete until it shows how society has affected 
our class. Mr. Herring and Miss Bates have proven that tho love is blind, the 
onlookers are not. Miss Hodges and Miss biles must be mentioned for having so 
many telephone calls as to necessitate absence from classes. In the realm of 



Page Eighty-four 



fEntn>-Nmt0, 1920 



beauty, several have striven for the highest place, but first honors have been given 
to Miss Annie Paul Moon. 

Seriously, we may compare our class during the year 1919-20 to a ship just 
putting nut to sea. Thus far on the journey some have ridden triumphantly on 
the mast heads, some have been below deck, still others have, sad to saw fallen 
overboard. To the former we chant te deum ; to the latter, requiem. 

Jesse Loura Freeman, '23. 



Page Eighty-five 



Entrr-^mtH, 13211 



Jfrcslmtau (Class |Jncm 



These are famous Freshmen 

( )f credit and renown. 
Students of Howard College, 

Sung of by a clown. 

Annie Paul was said by all 
To be the Freshman beauty. 

( )f her charms 1 now should sing, 
Which is a poet's duty. 

lint Helen Lane drove insane 
The Freshmen one by one. 

'Til she could count by myriads 
The lovers she had won. 

"Jumbo" studied English long 

For to get an "A," 
Bui he found it all a dream 
Which vanished in a daw 

Freshman Bryan saw ( )rion 

Shining in the sky ; 
Then down his rope he nimbly slid. 
Wishing he could fly. 

The Ensley car takes Herring far 
On Friday nights and Sundays. 

But the pleasantest thing for him to say 
Is. "Bon jour." twice on .Mondays. 



Rohlin, "Fritz" or "Einar," 

Call him what you will, 
If. friend, you in a pinch should need. 
Fritz sure the bill can fill. 

Alford. Alford. sure and steady 

In his work or play, 
Never quits and never whimpers. 

Let come that which may. 

"Toby." "Toby," prime sport lover. 

Co-ed lover, too. 
The more you know the more vim like 

This care- free Sigma Nu. 

John. John, the English star 

Wrote "Ravings of a Rat," 
'Twas about "Ix>ve" and all such things, 

But he's not to blame for that. 

When Justice goes to the telephone, 

We know to listen tight, 
For from experience, all have learned 

That he will end it right 

Xow let us sing, "Long Live the King," 
And Freshmen, "Long live ye," 

And when these "Rats" come back Sophs. 
.May I be here to see. 

— L. F. Watson, Class Poet. 




Page Eighty-six 



Jlthletics 




BOOK 
THREE 





Sntrr-Nmts, X920 




Coach Dii.i.ox 



Page Eighty-nine 






?£ntrp-NnuH, 1920 




- 



=: < 



a 

t/3 



j- < * 



85 .,-. 

=. > • 

-. > Kl 

- - < 

• ; 

= * i 

u , .• > 

a - a 

- - 7 
= - - 



- . £ 



J^ 



u:- 



:X 



• -J 



X. 



Pa^f Ninety 



iEntrr-NnuH, 1920 



« 



liofaaro's Jfnotbali J8*asmt 



When the season opened last fall many of last year's stars were gone. The 
coach knew nothing of the ability of his men. However, he was not long in find- 
ing out the best man for each place. 

Our schedule was extremely heavy, and most of the games were played 
against great odds. Auburn was greatly surprised when the plucky toe-artist. 
O. B. Newman, gracefully received a forward pass and planted the oval behind 
the Plainsmen's goal. Sewanee, Alabama and Mississippi, each handed us the 
small end of the score, but admitted they worked for it. Birmingham-Southern 
fell helpless before the Crimson warriors. Desperate was the struggle, but glori- 
ous was the result. 

Capt. "Peahead" Walker never failed to distinguish himself and his team. 
He was ranked as one of the best quarterbacks in the South. Coach Dillon found 
in Claude Carr his most useful man. At end. guard, tackle, or backfield, he was 
there with the fight. "Big" Martin and Brindley were valuable men to the squad. 
"Puny" Adams was invincible even against teams our superior. The line plung- 
ing of Burney Acton was something to be feared by all opponents. 

Every supporter of Howard is well pleased with the 1919 season, and onlv 
hope that next year will show an equal gain. 



J^chebule of football 



Howard 6 Auburn 19 at Birmingham 

Howard Sewanee 18 at Sewanee, Tenn. 

Howard Alabama 48 at Tuscaloosa 

Howard Mississippi A. and M. 39 at Starkville. Miss. 

Howard 31 Morgan at Petersburg, Tenn. 

I loward 7 Hamilton 7 at 1 lamiltoii 

Howard 2 Birmingham-Southern at Birmingham 

I loward Marion 12 at Marion 

1 loward 82 Hamilton Campus 

Howard 6 Springhill 6 at Mobile 



Page Ninety-ont 



?£ntre-NmtH, 1920 




Page Ninety-two 



Sntr^-NflUH, 1920 



pieties at 2fofoarb, 1919-20 

Howard College is coming to its own in athletics. The Crimson and Bine 
has always been favored with good teams, especially the past two seasons. Dur- 
ing the war all phases of athletics fell below normal at Howard as well as at other 
colleges. Now that the war has ended there is a general revival of college sports. 
Howard is no exception, for her teams have been conspicuous for their splendid 
work. 

Our institution enjoys the distinct privilege of being one of the smaller col- 
leges which are honorably recognized by the largest colleges and universities of 
the South. The spirit of the student body is excellent, praising the teams in 
victory and standing loyally beside them in defeat. 

Athletics at Howard are now controlled more by the students than ever be- 
fore. The faculty and students are doing all in their power to place Howard where 
she should be in athletics — on top. 

For the past two years we have fought without a coach. After searching 
the South, those in charge wandered to the North, and away up in Iowa found in 
Coach Dillon the man they wanted to direct athletics at Howard. With the com- 
ing of Coach Dillon, one can see a winning smile on every face, and only the 
coming season can measure his ability. All hail to Coach Dillon, his warriors and 
loyal supporters. 



Page Ninety-thr* 



Sutrp-NnuH. 192U 




a: _: 



~ / - 

^i - < 

r - r 

"• fc"U 



- U 5 



t/5 ' 



- • 5 

— a< 

- X C 






_ 



X 

s-" 



Po<7^ Ninety-four 



iEntrf-Nnua, 1920 



2=7 



gasket JBail 



Basket ball had for several years been a minor sport at Howard, but for 
the past four seasons there has been a great revival, and the fives turned out have 
won recognition throughout the South. Games have been offered her by teams in 
South Carolina, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, Illi- 
nois, Ohio and Louisiana. Many of these have been accepted. Last year's basket 
ball season was the best since 1905, when Howard won the S. I. A. A. champion- 
ship. 

The start this season was rather destructive, but Coach Dillon is whipping his 
sharpshooters into form, and the remainder of the season should be one long 
line of victories. 

In O. B. Newman is found one of the best centers in the State. Claude 
Carr's departure left a big hole at guard, which is well tilled by Alford. who 
plays a safe, consistent game. Rurney Acton, a member of last year's squad, is 
back, with the old-time fight. The only four-year man playing this year is W. 1). 
Newman, who is doing good work at forward. Alabama will not soon forget the 
team he carried against them last season. 



Page Ninety-five 



£ntn>-Noit0, 1950 




5 - 



_ 

* _- 



r' <^ 

Q- * Z 

< J J 

— ' is J: 

v. — . 



X - x 

Sob 



'Z 



Pa^c Ninety-six 



Entrr-Hami, 1920 



^ 



^Baseball 



Howard is more than proud of the baseball team she had last year. The 
few games lost can scarcely be compared with the numerous victories. The 
Crimson tossers had little respect for Auburn, Oglethorpe or Birmingham-South- 
ern, thus proving to them the value of the Howard team. Had not Alabama 
been so fortunate as to have the "Magic" Boone grace the mound each time we 
played them, there is little doubt that another scalp or two would dangle from 
the victory belt. 

Such men as "Dick" Griffin, C. Carr, S. Jackson, Louis Walker and "Rowdy" 
Crews will long be remembered for their splendid work. 

The prospects for 1920 are exceedingly bright. Griffin's position at short can 
be efficiently filled by "Peahead" Walker. McLane, captain-elect, will hold fast 
to the keystone. John Ingram, a Freshman, conies well recommended as a third 
baseman. J. C. Roberts and Lee Head are catchers any college would be glad to 
have. O. B. Newman, the crack third baseman of last season, has an eagle eve on 
the initial sack. The outheld should be well cared for by Burnev Acton, \V. 1). 
Newman, and an abundance of new material. The pitching staff is somewhat 
weakened, but with Max King and Claude Matthews as a nucleus, the Crimson 
supporters have little to fear. 

A schedule is being arranged for the 1^20 season that will include teams in 
both the South and the North The famous University of Illinois team will play 
a series of games on the local diamond. All indications point to the best season 
I toward has ever had with the "national pastime." 



Page Ninety-seven 



iEntrp-NouH, 1920 




Page Ninety-eight 



iEntrr-Nou^ 1320 



® 



emus 



While football, basket ball and baseball are being duly emphasized, we must 
not overlook tennis. Not all our athletic talent can be claimed by the other teams. 
We have some men who, for lack of time or other reasons, do not take part in 
football, basket ball or baseball, but are shining stars in tennis. 

On the campus are three excellent courts, owned by three different fraterni- 
ties, but being accessible to all students of the College. 

While we were not able to schedule any series of games last season, we hope 
to arrange matches with some of the leading colleges of the State before the close 
of this year. We are also planning to have an Inter-Fraternity Tournament this 
year, as well as a tournament among the non-Frat. men, and one among the 
co-eds. 

Among the tennis "bright lights" are Fred Smith, Charles Herron, O. B. New- 
man, Claude .Matthews and Charles lloskin. Other players of ability are Ford 
Robinson, William Wright, A. Y. Smith, W. K. Newman and L. 1'. McLane. 

( reneral interest in the game is growing, and we hope to make it a favorite 
sport in the College and give it the place it really deserves in our athletics. 

C. E. Hoskix, Jr., '20. 



Page Ninety-nim 



lEntrp-Nmta, 1020 



H~Q=W=A=R~D 



is for Head and he is a "rat," 

And may be pretty "green," 
Bui what he did for Birmingham-Southern 

Can be very plainly seen. 

is for ( ). P> — the boy who is every co-ed's bean ; 
But the thing that makes everybody love him 
[s his wonderful educated toe. 



is for dear old Walker, 

The star of the South ; 
And, although he is a bit bowlegged, 

lie made Birmingham-Southern foam at the month. 

is for Acton, a "speed demon" by name. 

And the way he led Birmingham- Southern — 

( )h. wasn't it a shame ! 



D 



is for all the rest. 

They played hard and did their best. 
And in the years to come, you'll see 

Where the team of 1 *> 1 c > stood the "acid test." 



For on November 8th they won honor and fame. 
1 1-( )-W-A-R-l ) s])ell> 1 toward, the school we love so dear, 

And may her "Bulldog" he a terror to the "Panther" 
For many a year ! 



Page One Hundred 



iEtttrr-Nmtn, 1920 



m 




J 


CO 


< 


»~ 


o 


i<- 


1- 


c 





<«■» 


. o 


< 


lu 


CD 


•i 


H 


»- 


*— 


X 


£ 


' ^ 


-M. 


<x 


< 


Cv 


Cw 


1 


or 


pt)l 




U4 


u> 


»^ 


^ 


c 


a 


,0 


I? 



s>& 



?£ntrr-Nnit0, 1920 




Page One Hundred and Two 



Organizations 




BOOK 
FOUR 





1Entr?-NnuH, 1920 




£ntr?-NnuH, 1920 





6 C. o'hell y 



BlNHELLENIC '£^ 

Council iy 

14* 



Tl A.pAHSOfJ*? 




M. U. K/f/G 



yy. z>. /v'fiw/t/v' 



A;//r C^/c Hundred and Six 



iEtttrr-Nnus, 192II 




Page One Hundred and Seven 



i£ntrr-Nn«H, 1920 



£=3 




II. A. CASEY C. K. III 'SKIN II P. IIIKRETT 1 B. I'KKK 

B. F. Acton K. ('. Srelburni ('. W. Williams M. O. Kinc; 

K. II. \)l w (>. I!. Newman I.. M. Martin 

I.. I'. M. I. ssi I., (i. Walker 

W. W. Morgan R. E. W II. G Wheeler 

o. T. Alford W. II. Head 



Page One Hundred and Eight 



3Entn>-N0tt0, 1020 



|Jt ^appa ^Iplja 

Founded at University of Virginia, March 1st, 1858 
Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Flower: Lily of the Valley 

Standard : Tulip 

FOUNDERS 

Frederick S. Taylor James B. Schlater 

Robertson Howard Little \Y. Tazewell 

Julian E. Wood 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1920 

1 f. P. Durrett Gordo, Ala. 

C. E. Hoskin, Jr Montevallo, Ala. 

W. W. Morgan Tyler, Ala. 

C. B. Price Athens, Ala. 

EC. C. Shelburne Gadsden, Ala. 

C. \Y. Williams Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1921 

M. O. King \riton, Ala. 

II. G. Wheeler Arab, Ala. 

Class of 1922 

B. F. Acton Birmingham, Ala.. R. F. D. 4 

L. M.Martin Crossville, Ala., R. F. D. 1. 

L. P. McLane Pinckard, Ala. 

( ). B. Newman Birmingham, Ala. 

L. G. Walker Camp Hill, Ala. 

Class of 1923 

O. T. Alford Birmingham, Ala. 

E. I). Bates Birmingham, Ala. 

II. A. Casey Birmingham, Ala. 

R. II. Dean Ariton, Ala. 

R. E. Wood Red Level, Ala. 

Page One Hundred and Nine 



lEtttrr-NnitH, 1Q2Q 



CHAPTER R( )l.l. 



Alpha — University of Virginia 
Beta — I )avidson College 
Gamma — William and Man College 
Delta — Birmingham Southern College 
Zeta — Universitj of Tennessee 
Eta — Tulane University 

Theta — Southwestern Presbyterian University 
[i >ta — I lampden-Sidney College 
Kappa — Trans> K ania University 
( )micron — Richmond College 
Pi — Washington and Lee University 
Tau — University of North Carolina 
Upsilon — Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
Psi — North Georgia Agricultural College 
Omega — Kentucky State University 
Alpha Alpha — Trinity College 
Alpha-Gamma — Louisiana State University 
Alpha-Delta — Georgia School of Technology 
Alpha-Epsilon — North Carolina A. & M. College 
Alpha-Zeta — University of Arkansas 
Alpha-Eta— University of State of Florida 
Alpha Iota — Millsaps College 
Upha-Kappa — Missouri School of Mines 
Alpha-Lambda — Georgetown College 



Upha Nil — University ot* Missouri 
Alpha \i — Universitj of Cincinnati 
Alpha Omicron — Southwestern University 
Alpha-Pi — Howard Colt 

\lplia-Kho — Ohio State University 
Alpha-Sigma — University of California 

\lpha Tau — University of Utah 
Alpha-Upsilon — New York University 
Alpha-Phi— I. S. C— "Ames" 
Alpha-Chi — Syracuse University 
Alpha l'si — Rutgers College 
Alpha-Omega — K. S. A, C — "Manhattan" 
Beta-Alpha — Pennsylvania State College 
Beta Beta — University of Washington 
Beta-Gamma— University of Kansas 
Beta-Delta — University of New Mexico 
Beta-Epsilon — Western Reserve University 
Beta Zeta — Southern Methodist University 
Beta-Eta — University of Illinois 
Beta-Theta — Cornell University 
Beta- Iota — Beloit College 
Beta-Kappa — Emory University 
Beta Lambda — Washington University 



ALUM XI CII Al'THRS 



Alumnus Alpha — Richmond, Va. 
Alumnus Beta — Memphis, Tenn. 
Alumnus Gamma — White Sulphur Spgs 
Alumnus Delta — Charleston, S. C. 
Alumnus Epsilon — Norfolk, Va. 
Alumnus Zeta — Dillon. S. C. 
Alumnus Eta— New Orleans, La. 
Alumnus Theta — Dallas. Tex. 
Alumnus Iota — Knoxville, Tenn. 
Alumnus Kappa — Charlottesville, Va. 
Alumnus Lambda — Opelika, Ala. 
Alumnus Mu — Fort Smith. Ark. 
Alumnus Nu — Birmingham, Ala 
Alumnus Xi — Lynchburg, Va. 
Alumnus Omicron — Spartanburg, S. C. 
Alumnus J'j — Gainesville, Ga. 
\lumnus Rho — Lexington, Ky. 



Alumnus Sigma — Raleigh, X. C. 

Alumnus Tau — Salisbury, X. C. 

W. Va. Alumnus Upsilon — Charlotte, X. C. 

Alumnus Phi — Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Alumnus Chi— Muskogee, Okla. 

\kimmis ['si — Pensacola, l-'la. 

Alumnus Omega — Nashville, Tenn. 

Alumnus Alpha-Alpha — Jacksonville. Fla. 

Alumnus Alpha Beta — Oakland. Cal. 

Alumnus Alpha-Gamma — Atlanta, Ga. 

Alumnus Alpha-Delta — Kansas City, Mo. 

Alumnus Alpha Epsilon — Long Island. X. 

Alumnus Alpha-Zeta — Columbus, Ohio. 

Alumnus Alpha-Eta — Charleston. \\ Va 

Alumnus Alpha -Theta — Chicago. III. 

Alumnus Alpha-Iota — Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Alumnus Alpha-Kappa — Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Page One Hundred and Ten 



?£tttn>-Nmt0, 1320 




Page Our Hundn </ and Eleven 



iEtttrr-Nmta, 1920 






P Iota Chapter. 





R. B Sties I. C. Roberts F, 0. Carlisu C. Shbppiblo B. Runyan 

W. R. LlNDSEY B. (". CoWART S. LEA III K ANGEL 

R. F. Carlisle M. L. Robinson M. F. Langstom I'. K. Smith C. <i. IIkrrkn 

S. I.. I'kui C. 1). Cox R. A. Parsons A. T. Carlisle 

\Y. S. Perryman I. ('. Vaughn l». C. Walker 



Page One Hundred and Twelve 



Entr^-NnuH, 1920 



jStgnut Hit 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1869 
Colors: Old Gold, Black and White Flower: White Rose 

FOUNDERS 

James F. Hopkins James M. Riley 

John W. Hopson Greenfield Quarles 

Eighty Active Chapters 

IOTA CHAPTER OF SIGMA XL- 
Established in 1879 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1920 

Arthur D. Carlisle Birmingham, Ala. 

Robert F. Carlisle Birmingham, Ala. 

Manly F. Langston Birmingham, Ala. 

William R. Li nosey Belleville, Ala. 

Robert A. Parsons Ashland. Ala. 

Sidney L. Price Pine Hill. Ala. 

Jewell C. Vaughn Ashland. Ala. 

Class of 1921 
Douglass C. Walker Ensley.Ala. 

Class of 1**22 

Franklin O. Carlisle Birmingham, Ala. 

Clarence D. Cox Birmingham, Ala. 

R. Clyde Hili Sulligent, Ala. 

Charles G. Herren \.nniston, Ala. 

R. Belton Sims Vernon, Ala. 

Fred R. Smith Montgomery, Ala. 

W. Stover Perryman Oak Mill. Ala. 

Class of 1923 

Ross Angei Birmingham, Ala. 

Burnett C. Cowart Nauvoo, Ala. 

James B. Gibson Birmingham, Ala. 

J. CLARENCE Roberts Feeds. Ala. 

BRICKEN RUNYON \shland. \la. 

Memory I.. Robinson Birmingham, Ala. 

Clifford Sheffield Pine Hill. Ala. 



Page One Hundred and Thirteen 



Etttrp-NmtH, 192fl 



M ' 



Roi.l. OF CHAPTERS 



University of Virginia 

Bethany College 

Mercer University 

University of Alabama 

Howard College 

North Georgia Agricultural College 

Washington and Lee University 

University of Georgia 

University of Kansas 

Emory University 

I .eliigh University 

University of Missouri 

Vanderbilt University 

University of Texas 

Lousiana State University 

University of North Carolina 

De Pauw University 

Purdue University 

Indiana University 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Mount Union College 

Southwest Kansas College 

University of Iowa 

Ohio State University 

William Jewell College 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of Vermont 

Xorth Carolina College of Agricultural 

and Mechanical Arts 
Rose Polytechnic Institute 
Tulane University 
Leland Stanford University 
University of California 
Georgia School of Technology 
Northwestern University 
Albion College 

Stevens School of Technology 
Colgate University 
Maryland State College 
Trinity College 



Lafayette College 
University of Oregon 
Colorado School of Mines 
Cornell University 
University of Kentucky 
Cniversity of Colorado 
Cniversity of Wisconsin 
Cniversity of Illinois 
Cniversity of Michigan 
Missouri School of Mines 
Cniversity of Washington 
Cniversity of West Virginia 
I niversity of Chicago 
Iowa State College 
University of Minnesota 
University of Arkansas 
Cniversity of Montana 
Syracuse University 
Case School of Applied Science 
Dartmouth College 
Columbia University 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of < Oklahoma 
Western Reserve University 
Cniversity of Nebraska 
Lombard College 
State College of Washington 
Delaware College 
Brown Cniversity 
Stetson University 
University of Maine 
Cniversity of Nevada 
Cniversity of Idaho 
George Washington University 
Colorado Agricultural College 
Carnegie Institute of Technology 
Oregon Agricultural College 
Bowdoin College 
Cniversity of Arizona 
Drury College 



Fifty-four Alumni Chapters 



Page One Hundred and Fourteen 



iEntr*-Nnu0, 1920 




Page One Hundred and Fifteen 



£tttn>-Nmt0, 1920 




I. ('. I! aim o( k 
W. E. i ■. Ja< kmis 

I VMl S < ill I \'-l 

I \i. Hursi 

C. K. M M TIIKWS 



W. I>. Nbwman 

I. M. AWBREY 

('. ( \KK 
V. M. BU( KAI.KW 

A. V. Smith 



: \\ I \; h:. in 

W. W. Slatkn 
A. .1. MoBLEY 

\\ '. K. Newm \s 



C. I.. Kki.ley 

C. A. M v 

R, E. Lambert 

\V. A. M 

M. W, BoOZBR 



W. II. Wright 
E. C. Rohlin 
.1. M. Black 

( . K. I'lTTARI) 

S. W. Hall 



Page One Hundred and Sixteen 



Tinirr-Noaa, 102H 



Local Founded 1900 



Colors: Purple and Gold 



Flower : Violet 



FOUNDERS 



Mel Durant Smith 

\Y. L. Crawford 



Flavius Hatcher Hawkins 
Albert Lee Smith 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Class of 1920 



Claude Emmett Moody 

Morgan Watkins Boozer . . . . 
Clarence Robert Pittard . . . . 

Walter D. Newman 

James Gullage 

George Washington Jackson . . . 
William Ewart Gladstone Jackson 



Class of 1921 



Samuel Wilkes Hall 
Claud Carr . . . . 



Class of 1922 



William Harrison Wright 
James Moses Aubrey . . . 
Aaron Jackson Mobley . . 
James Clarence Babcock . 
Claude E. Matthews . . 
William Amos Moody . . 



Class of 1923 



Robert Eugene Lambert 
Almutii Yaw Smith 
Walter Keith Newman 
ElNAR Caul Rohlin 
William Winston Slaton 
Clarence Leigh Kelley 
( Clarence Mi Ki nley I [ursi 
Vardaman Moore Buckaleu 



Page (hie Hundred and Seventeen 



Russellville, Ala. 
Thomaston, Ala. 
Lineville, Ala. 
Opelika, Ala. 
Clio, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Talladega, Ala. 
Gadsden, Ala. 



Roanoke, Ala. 
Roanoke, Ala. 
Kitten, Ala. 
Glen Mary, Tenn. 
Scottsboro, Ala. 
Russellville, Ala. 



Darlington, Ala. 

( 'enter, Ala. 

Collinsville, Ala. 
Gadsden, Ala. 
Rogersville, Ala 
Talladega, Ala. 
Bessemer, Ala. 
Roanoke, Ala. 



i rjs ?intr?-N0«H, laan ^^^ 




Pa<7« One Hundred and Eighteen 



lEtttre-NouH, 1920 




Page One Hundred and Nineteen 



«: 



JEittre-Noua. 192LT 




(I. C. O'Kblley E. E. Jornsom J. W. Brewton 11. 1!. O'Rbar 

J. \V. Button \V. (i. Pledger I.. I". Watson 

I I. Bell \V. (I. Smith I. N. Patterson II. Thomas 

J. F. Robinson D. II. McMeans Robert Herring 



Page One Hundred and Twenty 



lEtttriNNmm, 1920 



<w 



|il]t Jtappa Jfu 



Local Founded at Howard College 1919 
Colors : Gold and Black Flower : Marcchal Nicl Rose 



B. B. O'Rear 



J. J- Bell 



FOUNDERS 



J. F. Robinson 



W. G. Pledger 
D. H. McMeans 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1921 
B. B. O'Rear 



Class of 1922 



J. J- Bell 

I. N. Patterson 

J. F. Robinson 



D. H. McMeans 
W. G. Pledger 
W. G. Smith 



Class of 1923 

J. E. Brewton J. W. Britton R. W. Herring 

E. E. Johnson G. C. O'Kelly 

T. E. O'Rear Herman Thomas 

L. F. Watson 



Page One Hundred and Twcntv-otH 



Entr*-NmtB, 1920 







Aim Stun 1-n 1 1 \ l.\Kki\ 

Gladys Watlimgtom ssib Mas Basspiklo 

M\R\ (.111^ Kl.IZABKTH Mll.LKR AXNIE PAWL MOON 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-two 



jEntrr-NnuH, 192fl 



Alplra Selta ft 

Founded at Wesleyan College. Macon, Georgia, 1861 
Colors: Light Blue and Green Flower: Single Violet 

FOUNDERS 
Mrs. Fitzgerald Mrs. Rush 

Mrs. Crew 

CHAPTER F( HJNDED 
In March. 1919, the Signa Chapter of Alpha Xu Sigma was made Kappa 
Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi at Virginia College, Roanoke, Va. 

SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1920 

Ann Senn Mary Giles 

Class of 1922 

Gladys Watlington Gussie Mae Brassfield 

Class of 1923 

Anne Paul Moon Lois Williams 

Elizabeth Miller Lilita Larkix 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha Wesleyan College. Macon, Georgia 

I )elta University of Texas. Austin. Texas 

Zeta Southwestern University. Georgetown, Texas 

Epsilon Sophie Newcomb, New Orleans. Louisiana 

Theta Laurence College. Appleton, Wisconsin 

Iota Florida Woman's College. Tallahassee. Florida 

Kappa Howard College. Birmingham, Alabama 

Lambda Brenau College, Gainesville, Georgia 

Xu Randolph-Macon. Lynchburg, Virginia 

Omicron Trinity College. Durham. North Carolina 

Pi Iowa State College. Ames. Iowa 

Rho Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 

Sigma University of Illinois. Urbana, Illinois 

Tan University of Kansas, Lawrence. Kansas 

Upsilon Washington State College. Pullman, Washington 

Phi Hanover College. Hanover. Indiana 

Chi Wittenberg College. Springfield, Ohio 

Psi University of California, Berkely, California 

Omega University of Louisiana. Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Xi University of Ohio, Athens, Ohio 

Alpha-Alpha Universit} of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 

Mpha-Beta University of Iowa. Iowa City, Iowa 

Alpha-Gamma University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 

Alpha-Delta Colin College, Waterville, Maine 

Upha-Zeta Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 

Alpha-Theta University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 

Alpha-Epsilon University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Nebraska 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-three 



Entrr-Nnua. 1920 






\l UMNAE CHAPTERS 



Delta — Austin. Texas 

Zeta — Georgetown, Texas 

Theta — Appleton, Wisconsin 

Pi — Ames, Iowa 

Klio — Grove Hall. Massachusetts 

Sigma — Chicago. Illinois 



Tau — Lawrence, Kansas 
Upsilon — Pullman. Washington 
Psi — Berkely, California 
Alpha-Beta — Iowa City, Iowa 
Alpha-Delta — Waterville, Maine 
Alpha- Epsilon — ( )maha. Nebraska 



CLUBS 



Atlanta, Georgia 
Birmingham. Alabama 
Chicago, Illinois 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston. Texas 



Macon, Georgia 
Montgomery. Alabama 
( bcford, Georgia 
San Antonio, Texas 
Trov, Alabama 



STATE ORGANIZATIONS 



Colorado 
( )klahoma 



. . Boulder 
Oklahoma City 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-four 



Entrp-NnuH, 1920 TH 




Page One Hundred and Twenty five 



Sntrp-NmtH, 1920 










M \ k 1 1 Clack 
M vBf i Ho 

NiiRIM l.i I I - 



. \ \ \ \ Joh n son 

\ i i i I loDGl S 



Mary II Wilson 
Mildred Clapp 
Hblyh I . \ \ I 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-six 



iEntrf-Nnua, 1020 



3£eta ©mega 



Local Founded 1916 



COLORS : Green and Gold 



Flower : Red Rose 



FOUNDERS 

Kathleen Clark 

Hazel Newman Strickland 

Annie Merle I [aggard 



Frances Martin 
Cecilia Cain 



SORORES IX COI. I. EGN > 



Class of 1 ( >20 



Frances Mildred Clapp 
Anna Gregory Johnston ^Catherine Nell Hodges 



Class of 1923 



Nancy Mable I [odges 

Marie Clark 



I [elyn Allison Lam-; 
Norinne Lyles 



SPECIAL 
Mary I [orde Wilson 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-seven 



ittttrr-Nmta. 1920 ^^M 



SOKOKKS IX IRRE 



Hazel Xkw.max Strickland 
Kathleen Barton Clark 
Frances Amanda Martin 

An mk Merle Haggard 
Cecilia Clementina Cain 



Frances Sheldon DeBardeleben 
Hattie Hope Nettles 
Lilla Earle Dowell 

Mary Brown Buckshaw 
Bennie Hope Spinks 



Marjorie Lloyd Gilmore 



Nannie Myrtle Price 



[Catherine Aileen Crosswell 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-eight 



lEntrr-NmiH, 1920 




Page One Hundred and Twenty-nine 



£ntn>-NmtB, 1020 




<^rJ.#C>YS /^6evtf« £~C//V/c;£ ^AO^yY /?sVA//£ 3oY£7~/7 



Page One Hundred and Thirty 



?intn>-WomU920 



*Belta (Sammn jlignta 



Local Founded 1919 
Colors: Green and White Flower: White Rose 



Ruth Morris 



Vera Madge Dim \s 



F< lUNDERS 
Ruth Brindley Casey 

SORORES IX COLLEGIO 

Class of 1920 

Annadelle Emerson Patterson 
Class of 1921 



Vera Madge Dumas 



Ruth Morris 



Ruth Brindley Casey 



Orene Marguerite Lammert 



Class of 1922 
Gladys Falkner Eunice Sloan- 

Class of 1923 
Annie Lou Cassia Boyett 

PATRONESS 
M us Andrew B. Clenea> 



I'di/i' One 1 1 a mired and Thirty-oni 



iEtttrr-NnuB, 1020 







w 

^ , QlOLQGY 



P. OUKR.CTT 




C £ MOODY \. \ 

IV o PIE 




WHHEAD f? Llfi/OJAY 

Secy - T/izas 







>/ /. W/co-e rov 



fl G ZJ^y /€ H Comroi/ 



Page One Hundred and Thirty-tWO 



Entre-Nous, 1020 



££&.■ 




iEntrr-NnuB, 192fl 




Page One Hundred and Thirty-four 



lEntrp-Naus, lff20 



JMplja pi|t ^pstion 



Founded at University of Alabama, April 29th, 1918 

Colors: Garnet and Green Flower: Red Rose 

FOUNDER 

Roy L. Smart 

Franklin Chapter 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1920 



M. W. Boozer, Hugo, Ala. 
A. 1). Carlisle, Birmingham, Ala. 
R. F. Caki.isli:, Birmingham, Ala. 
R. E. Dillon, Birmingham, Ala. 
C. E. Hoskin. Jr., Montevallo, Ala. 
George Jackson, Birmingham, Ala. 
Gladstone Jackson, Birmingham, Ala. 
M. F. Langston. Birmingham, Ala. 



W .R. LlNDSEYj Evergreen, Ala. 
C. E. Moody, Russellville, Ala. 

R. A. Parsons, Ashland, Ala. 

C. R. Pjttard, Lineville, Ala. 

S. L. Price, Pine Hill. Ala. 

K. C. Shelburne, Gadsden. Ala. 

I. B. Trant, Dothan, Ala. 

I. C. VAUGHAN. Ashland. Ala. 



B. B. O'Rear, Jasper. Ala. 



Class of 1921 

E. Osborne, Perrvville, Ala. 



Class of 1922 
J. J. P.kll, Easonville. Ala. G. T. McRae. .Mobile. Ala. 

D. O. Carlisle, Goodwater. Ala. W. S. Perry. man, Oak Hill. Ala. 

C. G. IIerren, Anniston, Ala. J. F. Robinson, Goodwater, Ala. 

D. H. Ah Means, Rogersville, Ala. C. P. Komixe. Rogersville, Ala. 

Class of 1923 

E. Angel, Birmingham, Ala. C. Hirst, Bessemer, Ala. 

- Gibson. Birmingham, Ala. C. W. Cook (Special). Maplesville, 

R. Herring, Sumterville, Ala. Ala. 

CHAPTER R( )1.1. 



Chi Delta — Stetson University — Fla. 
Franklin — 1 low aid College — Ala. 
Hamenean — University of Mississippi 

—Miss. 
Mu Sigma Rho — Richmond College — 

\'a. 
Phi Gamma Emory University — Ga. 
Philomathic — University of Alabama 

—Ala. 



Stewart — Southwestern I 'resbyterian 

I 'niversitY — Tex. 
Varsity Club Stetson University — 

Fla. 
Wirt — Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
—Ala. 

Mississippi A. and M. — Miss. 
— University of Kentucky— Ky. 



Page (hie Hundred and Thirty-five 



Entrr-Nowi, X3ZH 




Philomath ic Literary 

-.. Society 











A;</r 0»« Hundred and Thirty-six 



?£ntn>-Nnun, 1920 



•pi]tlmttatl|tc ^Cttcrary ^octetu 

Colors: Sky Blue and White Motto: Know Thyself. Knoic Thy Cod 

OFFICERS 

First Term 

H. L. Nipper President 

W, W. Morgan Vice-President 

S. L. Heath President 

W. H. Cox Vice-President 

G. C. O'Kelly President 

H. Thomas Vice-President 

T. I!. BEALLE President 

R. E. Lambert Vice-President 

G. A. Xeely Secretary 

Second Term 

J. I-. Mom: President 

I. \Y. MYERS Vice-President 

\Y. I). Newman President 

Y. M. Gardner Vice-President 

\Y. \Y. Morgan President 

I. X. Patterson Vice-President 

B. G. Day President 

H. G. WHEELER Vice-President 

R. E. MlNTER Secretary 

J. E. Krewton — (Full Year) Treasurer 

ROLL OF ACTIVE MEMBERSHIP 

Dukeminier, R. A. Morgan, \Y. VV. 

Durrett, II. I'. Moye, I. I.. 

Gardner. V. M. Myers, I. W. 

Clover. A. M. Neely, G. A. 

( iross, C. W. Newman, J. 

I [arris, Theo. Newman, \Y. I). 

Head. A. L. Nipper, II. I.. 

M<ad. \\. II. O'Kelly, G. C. 

Neath. S. I.. Patterson. I. X. 

Justice, B. R. Quinn, I.I. 

Kin-;, A. II. Sims. R. |', 

I .ainhert. R. E., Jr. Stone, ( E 

I .aurence. I'>. Thomas, I I. 

I. iles. |. T. Wats,,,,. I . I". 

Lopez, I V Wheeler. II. C. 

M inter. R. K. \\ horton. J. I.. 

Page (hie Hundred ami Thirty-seven 



Alford, o. 


T. 


Rates. C. ( 




Bealle, T. Y 


. 


Beggs, R. 


K. 


Bonfield, B 




Brewton, | 


E. 


Britton, |. 


W. 


Bryan, \\ . 


1. 


( lompton, ( 


:. e 


Connell, |. 


ii. 


Cook. \\ . 1 


i. 


Cowart, R. 


c. 


Cox. E. E. 




Causey, B. 


F. 


Day, 1'.. (.. 




Dean. R. II 





Sntrr-NnuH, 1920 



JHtstoro of ttjc jpiitlomatHc ^literary jiuctcty 

In the infancy of the College there was seen a necessity for literary training 
and development other than that given the students in the class-room. To meet 
this dehcienev. was founded the Philomathic Literary Society in 1844. This 
society enjoys the distinction of being the oldest organization of its kind in Ala- 
bama, and has sent one nearly fifteen hundred trained speaker- and ready-thinkers 
throughout the country. 

This society offers to its members invaluable training in all the lines of public 
speaking. — namely, in debating, declamation, oratory, and reading. There, young 
men have the privilege of familiarizing themselves with the actions of deliberative 
bodies, of acquiring ease and grace in the art of speaking, and of exerting their 
personality to the fullest. In such a society as this a student learns to convince 
others that his opinions are worth while. 

If he has any talent it is discovered and cultivated. The more he puts into hi- 
societv the more he will get out of it. His experience in the society will aid him 
in plaving a successful game when he gets out into the arena of life : for we strive 
to train men to be able to render the most service to their fellowmen and them- 
selves. 

It would be a pleasure here to name men of fame that have gone out from 
our hallowed old society hall- -but space and time would not permit. 

A thing of extraordinary interest is. that for half a century, this old society 
has held the championship in debate in the College between the two societies, ol 
which we are naturally proud. And certainly we will not do less than maintain 
the good record in the years to come. 



Page One Hundred and Thirty-eight 



UUillLJUJiM 




Entrr-Nnua, X32H 




•xjrerr 



G/gls Glee Club 



/7»"* S*~"* 




Page One Hundred and Forty 



iEntrr-NnuH, 102fl 



(girls' dike (Club 



"We came, we sang, we conquered," is generally conceded by everyone who 
have been so "fortunate" as to have had the opportunity of hearing us sing. 
Nothing that has been attempted musically in the history of the college has 
aroused such interest and enthusiasm as our Monday morning recitals. The 
success of these weekly rehearsals was such that we were really growing "swell- 
headed," and our president, fearing that such flattering offers might come from 
all parts of the State that we might not stop in our rise to fame until "Grand 
Opera" was reached, closed them, to the profound regret of everyone. Rut in 
truth the Glee Club is really going to "put Howard on the map" in the musical 
line. 

In turning through the pages of this year's history of the College, the organiza- 
tion and struggles of the Glee Club are fully recorded: thus it reads: 

"In the early fall of 1919 the Co-eds of this noble institution, having increased 
in number, wisdom, and talent, held a meeting under the auspices of Professor de 
Launey, director of music here, and decided that with the above requisites com- 
bined with perseverance and practice they could have a Glee Club worthy of the 
name of the Howard College Girls' (dee Club; that this Club could provide better 
music and be a delightful auxiliary to the Monday morning chapel programs; 
could also be a recreation for the girls, and when able to provide an entertaining 
program was to secure contracts and tour the State, and would become so 
widely known as to offer the greatest inducement for girls, musically inclined, to 
attend this institution. Then officers were elected: Professor de Launey, direc- 
tor; Miss Merle Beasley, president and pianist; and Miss Mildred Clapp, secre- 
tary. 

After the organization, the Club had its share of hardships. Co-eds were the 
greatest evils. Sometimes it seems as it" it had decided to have a general one. 
Then practice hours were irregular because of the laboratory work, and sometimes 
it seemed awful to have to stay cooped up indoors and sing to an uninteresting 
ceiling, when the beautiful sunshine and merry breezes were begging for your 
presence outside. 

And in conclusion : 

All Hail! It succeeded, and won its well deserved honors and returned 
to add another star of achievement to the crown of its Alma Mater. Long may it 
live in the "Greater Howard" to be! 



Page (hit- Hundred <jh</ Forty one 



iEtttrr-Nmta, 192fl 




pg 
x 

U 



§a 



2,3 

- 
z - 

. /. 

= - 

i = — ■ 

5/) . 



■; _- 

* L. - 

-; — -^ 

< W x at: 

7 = * 



i ; in o 

• - — /. — x 
~ Po-iS 

-, < _- — r- 

i£ . ^ —'X 

— .— = — 

sals 

PQ » C/3 

_ - 2 OS 
mU| « 

.„ — a: 

S ±'z~~ 

- 1/3 - 
— S S 

. — < 

£h3 U 

= S&; * 

- _ _ 



/'«*/«' Om* Hundred and Forty-two 



iEntn>~Nnui5, 1920 



^ofcrarh %kt Club 



.MEMBERS 



First Tenors: 

Charles Hurst 

B. R. Justice 

I. X. Patterson 
J. C. Roberts 
F. R. Smith 



First Bass: 

Clarence Algood 
A. M. Awbrev 
F. C). Carlisle 

II. P. DURRETT 

R. C. J I ILL 

C. G. Herren 

R. McDaxiel 



Second Tenors: 

J. M. Black 

O. B. Newman 
E. C. Ron li. \ 

W. \\ . Slaten 
R. E. Wood 
R. K. Beggs 



Second Bass: 

I. M. AwBREY 

B. C. COWART 

J. T. Piles 

C. E. .Matthew s 

K. C. Shelburne 

A. V. Smith 



< >FFICERS 

R- B. Sims Director, President and Business Manager 

F. P- SMITH Secretary and Treasurer 

Phili.ii> Powells iccompanist 

(Under the supervision of Prof. Paul de Launey.) 



Page One Hundred and Forty-three 



Sntrr-Nnus, 1920 





j*z$ 



Entrr-NmtB, 1920 





AoPfZ 



Officers 




/.WAfyt&s 




//.di-iV/z^^f^ 



/. A/- jt&TTEeJOs/ 



Page One Hundred and Forty-six 



?itttn>-N0U0, 1920 



<?=7 




7^/<»i ^ Sew. /.£ 



<9./? *St*,srs<?/? 



'cj.S'Vsa'V it:c"i"/c<>t*r>^f^ 



Page One Hundred and Forty-seven 



iEntre-Nnita, 19211 




M&. nweej.tr*!. tr****? £>tS/s*zo 



/a/. P'/rrT&eso"/ \ 



Page One Hundred and Forty-eight 



lEtttrr-Noua, 1920 



^Religions Jkih at Jlotarh 



Saved? Yes. All of you going to heaven ? Certainly. Good bovs and girls, 
then ? Exactly. What is the foundation of this belief, and the evidence that it is 
true? Well, that's another question. What is being done to foster the religious life 
at Howard? Answer is in the following: Chapel, Y. M. C. A.. Divinity Club, 
Student Volunteer Band ; President, Professors, Students. 

Every Monday, Wednesday and Eriday we go to chapel whether or no. We 
hear everything from soul-stirring and masterful addresses on down to zero. 
Sometimes we are asked to help. The Y. M. C. A. has been overshadowed bv 
other organizations and is now almost alive. The Divinity Club has life ever- 
lasting. It is the largest this year of any year we know about. Such divines — 
sincerely — as Luther Move, Tom Bealle, Virgil Gardner, G. W. Myers, John 
Whorton, and others, are choosing to think for themselves, are talking back to the 
professors, and are thereby making a fight for their originality and faith. A few 
others are very thirsty. Water, wine or Wampole's is all the same to them, just so 
it is labeled the truth. Who are they? We can't say. The Student Volunteer 
Band speaks for itself ; some are going to South America, some to the East, and 
some are going to stay at home. 

Our President came from Texas via Chicago and Xew York. He has, there- 
fore, bigness, liberality and scholarship. He has put many of us to thinking hard. 
His contribution to the religious life of the college cannot be estimated. He has 
constantly held before us that which is pure and noble and cultural. Our pro- 
fessors do not hesitate in their opinions about Christianity; they believe in them 
firmly. They even venture to give advice, with apologies, on certain occasions. 
Truly, they have helped many a student on to better work, better thinking, and a 
more useful life. This is a fact — we can only mention it — to their everlasting 
credit and to the glory of the institution. 

Students are sincere, frivolous, honest, dishonest, good. bad. All of us, 
however, are human beings with the capacity for the Christ-life. Sometimes we 
are reached, changed, saved. The student body this year has been congenial and 
orderly. The year's work has been enjoyed by all. and we recommend our dear old 
Howard as a Christian institution for youths and maidens who want Christian 
training. K,,v Niager, '-'O- 



Page One Hundred and Forty-nine 



£ntr*-Nmia, 1920 





/9/S> 




Page Our Hundred and Fifty 



Miscellaneous 




BOOK 
FIVE 





Etttrp-NoitH, 1920 



•jJJresttonts of tlje jiiuoeni ^Soby 

1915-'16 
Ben Walker 

1916-'17 

A. C. Ried 

1917-'18 
Lewis W. Dockery 

1918-'19 
Horace Greeley Williams 

1919- '20 
Walter D. Newman 



Marshals 

1917-'18 
JUNIOR 

Miss Nell I'ui.uam, Chief Mr. Walter William Adams 

SOPH< >MORE 

Miss Kith Morris Mr. Ralph Erickson 

FRESHMAN 

Miss Mary Brown Buckskaw Mr. Edwin C. Osburn 

1918-'19 

JUNIOR 

Miss Ruth Morris. Chief Mr. John Caylor 

Mr. James Buckhannon Trant 

SOPHOMORE 

Miss Ruth <. asia Mr. Edwin C. Osburn 

FRESHMAN 

Miss Gladys Falkner Mr. I. X. Pattersou 



Page One Hundred and Fifty-three 



Entrp-Nmtfl, 1020 



^Scholarships 

Smith Medal for Mathematics 
L915-'16 



Isee Lee Con neel 

William Wirt Sowell 

Jessie Elizabeth Macon 
John Ford Robinson 



1916-'17 
1917-'18 
1018-'19 



Carey W. Phillips 
M M'.l.l. Beasley 
Arthur Duke 



Fames Jefferson Reel 



Culpepper Ex cm Medal for Chemistry 
To be awarded beginning l ( '19-'20 

Culpepper Exum Medal for Physics 

To be awarded beginning 1919-'20 

Delta Gamma Sigma Loving Cup 

To be awarded beginning 1919-'20 

ATHLETICS 

Porter Loving Cup 

1917-'18 
Claude Carr 

1918-'19 
James Shelley Jackson 

( JRATORY 

Cox Medal 

1915-'16 
Ernest Dunlaf 

Peace Medal 

1916-'17 
Ira X. Harris 

Junior ( )ratorical 

1918-'19 
|oii\ Caylor 

Freshman Sophomore Debate 

1918-T9 
James Jefferson Bell 



Pinjc One Hundred and Fifty-four 



Stttrr-Nnua, 1920 







W£>. AfeisfrfffW 





CT^JL. kVs/o&ra*/ 



^B* 1 










/^.l/A/pser 



//. /? Dis^^Err 




J~. &. 7~&<V7~. 



Page One Hundred and Fifty-five 



lEntre-NmtH, 192II 







pp 1 o 

/r^>.r>.r» fuss-Ms^*; ^ -^ ^^v ^ a^» Mar 

STAFF 







£0/72>& /s* c-ss/e^ 











77 & .3 £#£*-£. 



Page One Hundred and Fifty-six 



Sntrr-Noua, 1020 





| £mtr£-AIouj 

AS50C\AT£ 



•S F /?oG/fjo*/ 




./ n tkhi/t 




C E.Moody 



J . E. ti K t. kv' rorf 



Page One Hundred and Fifty seven 



^ 



Entrf -Nnua, 1J20 




Chas.W Williams 
Editor. 



/4RIST9/Mlrt/N 

Staff 




P/Z/CE 




King 



sSh£L8UR.HE 



®l|c j\rtsimmm 

Published Monthly 

by 

ALPHA-PI CHAPTER 

of Tine 

■$lt l&appa r^P^a Sfratmtttu 

Howard College, Birmingham, Alabama 

STAFF 

Charles W. Williams Editor-in-Chief 

Lovick I'. McLane Business Manager 

( Iharles r> Price J 

K. C. Shelburne > Associate Editors 

Max O. King ) 

Published with the purpose of creating ;i closer friendship between active 
members, alumni, and sister chapters. 



Page Our Hundred and Fifty-eight 



iEtttrr-Nmta, 1920 



®I|e JVrtstontan 



Last November the members of the local chapter of the Pi Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity felt the need of some sort of organ which should serve to unite more 
firmly the members of the chapter, the alumni of the chapter, and the sister chap- 
ters. After discussing the matter for a few weeks a committee was appointed 
to look into the matter further and to see what the cost of printing a small monthly 
would be. The committee reported favorably, and at the next regular meeting 
of the fraternity a Staff was elected. Charles W. Williams was elected editor-in- 
chief and Lovick P. McLane, business manager. The other members of the staff 
were chosen on a merit basis. 

The first issue came out during the holidays, and was mailed to the members 
at their respective homes. Due to the splendid work of Manager McLane and the 
fine response of the alumni, the paper has been on a firm financial basis ever since 
the first. 

The Staff has felt amply repaid for its efforts because of the friendly recep- 
tion of the publication by the alumni, and particularly by the General Office of 
the fraternity in Atlanta. There it is recognized as the best chapter publication of 
the year. 

The March issue proved to be the best of the year. This was the anniversary 
number, and possessed several features that were not found in the regular issues. 
It was printed in the colors of the fraternity, garnet and gold, and contained 
pictures of the foremost athletes of the year. In addition, there were articles by 
Pi's of former years, and an article by Professor Chapman, himself a fraternity 
man. 

We, the Staff, feel that we have been rewarded for our efforts. The publi- 
cation has brought forth much comment from the outside, and to a great extent 
has attained its purpose. We hope that the chapter will see lit to continue its pub- 
lication in the coming years. CHARLES W. Williams. 



Page One Hundred and Fifty-nine 



lEtttrr-Nnita, 102U 





^fttfKP Crimson Staff 




/'</</<• One Hundred and Sixty 



jEntrf-NnuH.1920 



flection Returns ~ Results of j^tuocnt Ballot 

The Entre-Nous Staff conducted the annual student election on Monday. 
March 8th. The voting was heavy and many were the candidates for the various 
offices. Seven of the candidates received a majority, and on Wednesday, the 10th. 
the remaining three positions were voted on. Much interest was displayed by the 
student body in both elections, and the Staff feels that the results are representa- 
tive of the opinion of the whole College. 
The final results were as follows: 

Best Looking Girl Miss Theresa Cory 

Best Looking Man Max ( ). King 

Most Popular Girl Miss Mildred Claim- 

Most Popular Man (). B. Newman 

Best Student George A. Neely 

Best Athlete ( ). B. Newman 

Most Distinguished Divine Luther Mom: 

Biggest Cigarette Hum Charles I Iurst 

Biggest Liar II. Park Durrett 

College Vamp Miss Vida Waddy 



3Recoo,mtton aub 2Il]anh« 



I he Editors of the Entre-Nous wish to express their appreciation of the 
generous services of Prof. Paul de Launay as Artist. Ili> work i> first-class, as 
you have observed. 



Page One Hundred and Sixty-one 



lEntrr-NmtH, 1920 




V. 

■7 



H 



Pa//*? 0>ir Hundred and Sixty-two 



Itttrr-Niwa, 1920 



^faarheb Cecil ^Rhobes j§cijaiarsl]tjj 





Clayton E. ( 'rosland 
( lass '07 



Charles W. VVillj his 
Class '20 



Page One Hundred and Sixty three 



Sntrr-Nous, 1920 




Dr. L. O. Dawson 
Speaker on Founders' Pay 

January 2". 1<>20 

II. J. Willi ngh aw 

Speaker Inaugural Exercises 

1919 

C. X. Wiley 
Speaker History of Chemistry 
1920 



Page One Hundred and Sixty-four 



• 



II 



_ • 



1 








College Men 

Expect the Newest Styles 
and the Best Values from 



Porter's 



_ ., a m w/i I. 1 



Our service to college 
men is based on an inti- 
mate knowledge of cor- 
rect, refined styles which 
is noticeable for its ele- 
gance rather t h a n for 
" freakish ness." 



In Alabama, in Tennessee, in Florida — Porter's is the headquarters for 
college men, who look to us for their clothes in a matter of course way 
that spells their absolute confidence in our store. 

Make Porter's your headquarters — glad to have 
you drop in any time. 

EVERYTHING MEN AND BOYS WEAR 




'In Iht- 1 1 carl of Three Big Cities" 



NASHVILLE It l KM [NGHAM 

Cor, 5th and Church 1^22-24 First Avenue 



JACKSON VI I I I 

Cor. Bay and I .amu 



in Birmingham 



the best of everything 
worn by men & boys 
comes from 




CASH STORE U-> BIRMINGHAM 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF EVERYTHING FOR 

THE KITCHEN 

THE LAWN 

& THE GARDEN 

Oub ( icons Are the Best Ouk Pricks Are Right 

ROB'T PROWELL STOVE CO. 

1920 THIRD AVENUE 



BRING YOUR K( >DAK FILMS 

HERE 

FOR DEVELOPING 

AND PRINTING 

Also Enlarging and Picture 

Fram ing 

TERRESON'S 

302 North Twentieth Street 

BlRM I Mi HAM , Al.AI'.AM A 



ZAC SMITH 
STATIONERY CO. 

"The House oj Immediate Service" 

PRINTING ENGRAVING 

OFFICE FURNITURE 

15 North Twentieth Street 

Ml KM I M.IIAM . A I. A ISA. MA 



DISTINCTIVE PORTRAITS THAT PLEASE 

TURNER STUDIO 
COMPANY 

Under personal direction of 
UNAS. R. HATCHER 

Clark Building, Twentieth Street and Fourth Avenui 
BIRMINGHAM 



HELP YOURSELF 



TO 



(t 



Good Eats" 



AT THE 



Britling 
Cafeteria 

1913-17 First Avenue 



WARREN 
BROTHERS 

2012 Second Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM 

BASE BALL 

A N I ) 

TENNIS 
SUPPLIES 



H O WA RD 
COLLEGE 



In Birmingham 

CO-EDUCATIONAL 

Session Opens 
SEPTEMBER 13, 1920 



FREE TUITION 
BEST TEACHERS 
VARIETY OF COURSES 
FINE COLLEGE SPIRIT 

WINNING ATHLETIC TEAMS 



For Catalogue and other information, address 

CHARLES B. WILLIAMS, Ph. D. 
President 



P. C. RATLIFF & SON 

INSURANCE 

THE PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

ASSETS OF OVER $200,000,000 

P. C. RATLIFF & SON, General Agents 

1003 Jefferson County Hank Building, Birmingham, Alabama 

A /'''mi Mutual Premium, less a Penn Mutual Dividend, purchasing a 
Penn Mutual Policy containing Penn Mutual values, makes an 
Insurance Proposition which, in the sum of All Its Benefits, 
is unsurpassed for net low cost, and care of all interest 
of all members. It is best not just one way, but 
all ways, and always. Back of it is a 
seventy-two-year reputation for fair 
dealing with all its policy holders, 
whether continuing, withdraw- 
ing, maturing or dying. 



Oxford & Holman Bibles and 
Testaments 

Engraved Cards 

School Announcements 

and School Supplies 

Dewberry & Montgomery 

Stationery Company 



Suits 
Coats 

1 )kksses 



S K 1 RTS 

Waists 
Petticoats 



O/ierer dr %Jvess/er 

NEWEST STYLES AND 
PERFECT FITTED 

GAR. Ml-: NTS 

Phone Main 85 ( H 

209 Nineteenth Street 

Birmingham, Alabama 



Increase Your 
INCOME 

PA Y CASH 

at the 

CASH STORE 

and 

SA VE! 



QUICK SERVICE 



CLEAN TOWELS 
SHARP RAZORS 

POLITE BARBERS 



IF YOU ARE , 
HARD TO PLEASE 
TRY US 



COLLINS C& ROBBINS 

SANITARY 

BARBER SHOPS 

102 North Twenty-first Street and Molton Hotel 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



LOVEMAN 

JOSEPH 

& 

LOEB 

E V E R V Till X G 

THAT YOUNG MEN" 

WEAR 

Shoes Clothing Hats 

aixl all the in-betweens 



E.G.BURCHFIEL 

DRUGGIST 

We handle the most complete line of 
STATIONERY, SOAPS 

AND 

TOILET REQUISITES 

IN 

EAST LAKE 



We Appreciate the College TraiU 



COLLEGE, FRATERNITY AND SOCIETY PHOTOS 
Phone Main (#34 

DeLUXE STUDIO 

1918j/> Second Avenue, Birmingham, Ai.ap.ama 
HIGH GRADE PHOTOGRAPHS 

POPUL \K I'KK I S 

PHOTOS IN THIS ANNUAL MADE BY US 



J. T. RHODES 



f. ELMER RHODES 



First Avenue Coal & Lumber Co. 

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE LUMBER 
Laths, Shingles and Domestic Coal 

Ai.i. Kinds ok Building Material 
Office and Yards, o424 First Avenue, East Lake Car Line 
Phone 56 Woodlawn 



JUDSON COLLEGE 

MARION. ALABAMA 
Standard College Courses 

Music, Art, Expression, 
Home Economics 

Graduates receive First Grade 
Teacher's Certificate. 

Students of Nome Economics 
Housed in Model I lome. 

Large Athletic Field, Gymnasium, 

Swimming Pool, Motion 

Picture Show. 

Best Christian Influences. 

For Catalog, View-Book and 
information, address 

DR. PAUL Y. BOMAR, /'resident, 
Marion. ALABAMA 



Birmingham Paint 
& Glass Co. 

20H)-1S Third Avenue, Through 
to 2015-17 Fourth Avenue 

SMALL LOTS CAN LOTS 

CONTRACT LOTS 

PAINTS, GLASS, SASH. 

DOORS. ROOFING 



Appreciates the College 
Trade 



ELLARD'S 
PLACE 



LUNCHES, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, 

CANDIES 



FOUNTAIN DRINKS 
A SPECIALTY 



GOOD SERVICE 
C( >URTEOUS TREATMEN' 



At the "Station" 



"The Largest Talking Machine 
House in the Entire South." 

C. C. Holcombe 
Music Co. 



BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 



ESTABLISHED 1818 






MADISON AVENUE COR. FORTY-FOURTH STREET 
NEW YORK 



BOSTON 

tmmontcor BorurroN 



NEWPORT 

220 BCLLCVUI AVCNUC 




CAFES 



GREENWOOD BROTHERS 

No. I. M7 North Twentieth Street 
No. 2. 407 North Twentieth Street 

CAVE POOL ROOM— THIRTY TABLES 
I larber Attachments 

THE LARGEST IN THE SOUTH 



Ml KM INCH AM. ALABAMA 



Clothes quarters 
for young men 



L E S S EXP E X S E 

M () R E I' A L V E 



Kloftves Stoppe 



R. B. BROYLES 



2213-15 SECOND AVENUE 



FURNITURE FOR EVERY NEED 



For the- 



l-A'ATLh'XITY IlorSIi 
S(>RQKITY HALL 
CLUB AM) 
H O M E 



PATHE PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 

WITH NEW FEATURES 



You 



Have the Foundation 



Build on It 



By taking a business course in this oldest, largest and best 
Business College, which has a record for turning out success 
winners, as many of the leading men of Birmingham and 
other cities are numbered among its thousands of graduates. 

When you finish your course you will be able to get a 
good position, paying well, and can either adopt a business 
career or pursue your studies for a profession, easily and 
comfortably. 

Don't forget that your previous educational advantages 
will enable you to complete your business course in the 
shortest possible time. 

I )ay and night sessions the year round. 

Call, telephone or write for catalog and full information. 



Wheeler Business College 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
WILLARD J. WHEELER, President 1909 to 1929 First Ave. 



M. II. WILSON 



l.n.A n US 



STEPHENSON STUDIO 



"Makers of the Best 
Photographs" 

410 North Twentieth Strei i 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Phone Main 4<>.v 



MEET ME AT NORTON'S CORNER 

NORTON DRUG CO. 

David Letaw, Manager 
Fourth Avenue and Twentieth Street, Birmingham, Alabama 

PHONES: 



151 
' 8135 
9141 



B 



[GGEST 
USIEST 
RIGHTEST 
EST 



A. H. CATHER 
PRINTING 
COMPANY 



NEWSPAPERS 
MAGAZINES 
ANNUALS 
BOOKS and 
PERIODICALS 



Birmingham, 



\l VBAMA 



WRIGHT'S 


BARB UK 


SHOP 


First-Class Work 


1 1<> North Twentieth Street 



TABLES F( >R LADIES 

Phone 3962 Main 

Cleanliness, Quality, Service 

CHRIS' PLACE 

Chris Comas, Prop. 

Open Pax and Night 
192(> First Ave.. Birmingham, Ala. 





J HE graduate of today enters a world 
electrical. 

Gathered from the distant waterfalls or 
generated by the steam turbine, electric 
power is transmitted to the busiest city 
or the smallest country place. 

Through the co-ordination of inventive 
genius with engineering and manufac- 
turing resources, the General Electric 
Company has fostered and developed to 
a high state of perfection these and 
numerous other applications. 

And so electricity, scarcely older than the gradu- 
ate of today, appears in a practical, well developed 
service on every hand. 

Recognize its power, study its applications to your 
life's work, and utilize it to the utmost for the 
benefit of all mankind. 




©trie 



General Office 
Schenectady NY 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



) • .« i 



WHY DON'T YOU MARRY THE GIRL? 
WE'LL HELP YOU 



BEN. M. JACOBS & BROS. 

Established 1884 
"EVERYTHING IX FURNITURE" 

BlRM I XC1IAM. ALABAMA 

COMPLETE OFFICE FURNISHERS 



JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Strongest in the South for the World 
Strongest in the World for the South 



Insuring your life in a Southern Company with Strength, Safety and 
Absolute Security is the perfect consummation of patriotism and sound 
judgment. < )ld line policies that say what they mean and mean what they 
say. The general agents for this company are Howard men. 

BERRY & SMITH 

General Agents for Alabama 
401 -.* [EFFERSON COUNTY BANK BUILDING 



"Let OgTERs Feather 




LET OSTER'S 

FEATHER 

YOUR NEST 

2020-2022 THIRD AVENUE 



iqjo 



TI I E choice of a man's 
clothiers is almost as 
important to his suc- 
cess iu life as the selection 

of his associates — the two 
combine in giving the world 
a basis upon which to judge 
him. Ours is the favorite 
store of many of the most 
success) ul nun in this com- 
munity. 



ODUM, ROWERS & WHITE 



The Mouse oj Kuppenheime 
Clothes 



Birmingham. Alabama 





MORRIS 


HOTEL 


RI 


:furnished and rem* ide 


RED AT A COST OF $75,000 




Rates $1.50 l'i 


m Day Up 




T. L. HOBAR' 


\ Manager 


In the 


Heart of Birmingham 


We Cater t<> College Trade 



PHOTOS that will make your best 
girl happy 

Get Them Made at 

BOYETT'S STUDIO 

2008/. Second Avenue 
Next to First Xational Bank 



PATRONIZE 



ENTRE-NOUS 



ADVERTISERS 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC 




INSTITUTE 


THE OLDEST 


School OF TECHNOLOGY IX THE SOUTH 




C< >URSES ( >F [NSTRUCTK >N 


1. 


College of Engineering and Architecture. 


11. 


College of Agricultural Sciences. 


Ml. 


Academic College. 


IV. 


College of Veterinary Medicine. 


V. 


Department of Pharmacy. 


VI. 


Department of Agricultural Education. 


Reserve ( Hficers 


Training -Corps (Infantry. Field Artillery, Engineers). 


For General Catalogue and Detailed Information, Address 


CI I 


AS. C. THACH, M.A.. I.L.D.. President 




Auburn, Alabama 



We Are the Birmingham Home 

of 

Spalding's Athletic (it ions 

" The Best of Everything 

for Outdoor Sports" 



BIRMINGHAM ARMS & CYCLE CO. 



We have moved to 

2017 Third Avenue 

BlRM INGHAM . ALABAMA 



Pianos, ( )rgans. 


Player Pianos, 




Graphonolas and Records 




ON EASY 


TERMS 




We can save 


you money 




Write for 


( Catalog 


E. 


E. FORBES & SONS 




1922 Third 


A VENUE 




Birmingham 


. Alabama 



albert ash 



AARON ASH 



A. & A. ASH 



)L\M()\1)S. JEWELRY 
AND SILVERWARE 



he Best Place to Shop 
After All 



Phone 2842 



Repair Work a Specialty 



1921 Second Avenue 

1'ikm inc. ham. Alabama 




THIS ANNUAL ILLUSTRATED 
BY THE 

ALABAMA ENGRAVING COMPANY 

OF BIRMINGHAM 

SIXTEEN VICARS EXPERIENCE IN III USTRATING 
COLLEGE ANNUALS 



WRITE US FOR PRK ES AM) SPECIMENS 



WIMBERLY & THOMAS 
HARDWARE CO. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 
of all kinds 



COM I'l.l'.TI. STOCK OF 

Baseball, Basketball and 
I .awn Tennis Supplies 



Mail Orders Shipped Same Pay 
Received 



2011 First Avenue 



AVOID T II A 'I' COL 1) 

It'c me nd the rips 
And patch the hides , 

Build up the heels 
And save your soles. 

JAKE ROSE SHOE SHOP 
I 'monk Woodlawn 1403 




SMART STYLE 

A N 1 1 

SUPERIOR QUALITY 

"For the Man Who Cares" 

FLORSHEIM SHOE 
STORE 

203 North Nineteenth Street 
Near Second Avenue 



MUSIC 



Jazz and Highbrow 

VICTROLAS 

ST HI X WAY PI AX (>S 
PIANOLAS 

CLARK & JONES PIANO CO. 

1913 Third Avenue 

birm ingham 



HOWARD COLLEGE SUMMER 


SCHOOL 


COLLEGE COURSES 




TEACHERS COURSES 




For information, Address 




\VM. E. BOHANNON, Director. 





Quality and Style 

Are First Considerations with this House 



Hence discriminating people prefer our 
Engraved and Embossed Stationery. 
Invitations, Visiting Cards, etc. 

Also highest quality and lowest cost 
guaranteed in Printing, Lithographing, 
Binding and personal and business 
Stationery of every desirable kind. 

Write us when in the market for Office 
Supplies or ( )ffice Furniture, Files and 
Equipment of Any Kind. 



Established in 1872 



Roberts & Son 

Tin-. Big Alabama I Iouse 

Store and Plant 1810-12 Third Ave. 
^Birmingham