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Full text of "Entre Nous 1928"

THE 



Entre Nous 



1928 



COPYRIGHT 
1928 



THE 



ENTRE NOUS 

MARGUERITE PENCE, Editor-in-Chief 

H. CLAY KNIGHT, Business Manager 





t HTie ENTRE NOUS 



A YEARBOOK OF 



HOWARD COLLEGE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Published by tke Student Body Nineteen Hundred Twent>>-Eignt 



^ 





W® z & w ® v $ 

Keeping perpetually in our memories something of the spirit and ideals that have lent to 
the progress of this institution, enhanced as it is by* almost a century of noble traditions, 
We have endeavored to preserve the record of a transitory" era in the history" of Howard 
College, to chronicle as accurately as possible the events and achievements of the year, 
to offer a graphic reminder of the phases of student life, to arouse in the hearts of those 
vJhom Howard has as alumni reminiscences and recollections of the factors outside of the 
classroom which make the institution what it is. May this volume serv"e both as a con- 
necting link with an eOentful past and as an entering wedge to a still more eminent fu 










o^^^^^Sr^ B°°k Two Athletics 

tO&J Book ^hree Organize 

JO Book F° ur Features 

J 









Dr. John C. Dawson, LL.D., Ph.D. 



The great educator who is our president, proving repeatedly his 
remarkable executive ability, has upheld the standard of advance in 
Howard College, impressing his higli character and rectitude upon all 
who have approached him; has met criticisms with patience and the 
open attacks of ignorance without resentment; has followed sleepless 
nights with days of incessant toil; has charged the atmosphere with 
the dream of a golden age — not in the past but in the future; has 
succeeded in making more and more of that dream a reality ; has made 
daily life richer and fuller: has enriched personal character; has 
elevated all human relationships; and has left the impress of his life 
on an immortal institution. 




Dean Perct P. Bi rns, \.M 



We admire the charm and dignity of his personality ; we esteem 
his scholarly attainments; we appreciate the unflagging interest lie 
ha- always taken in any move for the realization of a Greater Howard. 
To the disciple of literature Dean Burns is an inspiration, to ever) 
student he is a wise counselor, a sympathetic friend and above all a 
man who measures up to high ideals in character and who deem- it 
a pleasure to put forth effort in building a record of splendid attain- 
ment for his Alma Mater and ours. 



Administration and Faculty 

Hul-Cee M. Acton, A.M., Ph.D. Annie B. Boyf.tt, A.M. 

Professor of Romance Languages Dean of Women and Instructor in English 

Richard L. Alexander, A.B., M.A. J. L. Brakefield, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Instructor in History Head of Department of Biology 

Clarence A. Balof, B.S., M.A. P. P. Burns, A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics Dean and Professor of English 

Paul Barnett, A.B. Oscar S. Causey, A.B. 

Instructor in Economics Associate Professor of Biology 

Ora D. Bohannon, A.B. James H. Chapman, A.M., Tn.M. 

Instructor in Modern Languages Professor of Religious Education 

William E. Bouannon, A.M. J. C. Dawson, A.M.. Ph.D., LL.D. 

Director of Summer School and Professor of President and Head of Department of Romai 

Education Languages 

Marie Bost L. O. Dawson, A.B., D.D. 

Librarian Professor of Bible and Church History 

Paul de Launay, A.B., Lic.Mus., Doc.Mus. 

Director of Music and Associate Professor of 

Romance Languages 

Olive de Launay (Concert Soprano) 
Instructor in Voice and Director of Glee Clubs 

J. E. Dillard, A.M., D.D. 
Lecturer in Religious Education 

James E. Dillard, Jr., A.B. 
Instructor in English 

Chester C. Dillon, A.B. 
Director of Athletics 

J. J. Duncan 

Instructor in Pharmacy 

Theopiiilus R. Eacles, A.M. 
Vice-President and Professor of Mathematics 

Bertha H. GlBBS, A.B. 

Secretary to Director of Summer School 

\V. M. Hartin, A.M., Th.M. 
Instructor in History 

\Y. B. HAYNIE, A.B., B.C. P. 
Instructor in English 



Administration and Faculty 

\\wr.i i Mi NDON FRANK1 in P. LA88I hk. A.M. 

S rttary fa President Instructoi in Chemistry 

fAMBS A Hbndricks, A.B., Im.I!.. D.D. W. I. Little, Ph.C. 

Professoi of Economics Professor of Pharmacy 

Georgi w . Hess, A.M.. Ph.D. Louis W. Lohr, A.B., M.B.A. 

Issociate Professor of Math, mains Assistant Professor of Economics 

Iomii Johnson John II. Loli ir, A.B. 

tssistant Treasurer Instructor in Athletics 

Ass\ Kenda Jones, A.B. II. M. Martin, A.m., Ph.D. 

Registrar Professor of Spanish 

Am. i mis II. Mason, A.B., Docteur d'Universiti 
Professor of English 

Bennie S. M ison, A.B. 
Instructor in Romance Languages 

O. W. Mosher, I'h. IX 
Professor of History 

Willi ims Ni w ton 
Instructor in Athletics 

Louis K. Oppitz, A.M., Ph.D. 
Dean of Science and Professor of Physics 

PlKklss J. Prewii I 

Instruilor in Journalism 

H. D. ROYCE, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Jons R. Sampey, Jr., S.M.. Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

Earl Stiver 
Student Director of Glee Chilis 

Rivmii. Franklin I'ikkhu A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Education 

W. X. Thomas, A.M., Ph.D. 
.Issociate Professor of .Indent Languages 

I vmes A. Ward, A.m., M.D. 
Instructor in Biology 

Robert I.. Wi \i r, A.B. 
Field Set retary 





ptttotlam 



3fl*trlj*r 8>tmamt Samson 



T 



O the memory* of 

her, who v?on the 

love, the admiration and 

the confidence of the 

Student Body through 

her unfaltering lo\>e, her 

unselfish sacrifice and her 

unswerving devotion to this institution, do 

we dedicate this page of The Entre NIous. 

"To make the world brighter for those we know"; 
To give our best selves for those tCe lov"e; 
To live in the hearts of those we lea\>e; 
Is not to die." 




OCUMMKB9 




fook One: ^fie (^Josses 




W ^ 9 '?! 



* ■'. 




Senior Class Officers 

Loyal Phillips President 

Edward E. Beason Vice-President 

Alyne Price, Sara Hunt . Secretaries 

Clifton Brown Treasurer 

\V. T. Maynor Prophet 

Mildred Hearn Historian 

Marguerite Pence Poet 

J. L. M. Smith Reporter 



CL 



A. J. Abercrombie, Jr., A.B. 

A A T 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



Con 



Club. 



Abercrombie is a rather easy going sort of fellow, 

and one that all like. He doesn't strut around and 

advertise just where he is going, but you can depend 

on it that he gets there. 



Dovey Fair Axdersox, A.B. 

THOMASVILLE, ALA. 



If pluck and determination to win out at all costs 

means anything in life, we know that Dovey will 

win by a large margin. Coach Dillon will miss this 

plucky back when the 1928 season starts. 



Zack Yeargix Appletox, A.B. 

FORT PAYNE, ALA. 

Ministerial Association. 

Who doesn't know Zack? He is one of Howard's 
popular ministerial students, and he is a true Bull- 
dog supporter. He has been right there with his 
colors on and his vocal chords tuned every time the 
Bulldogs met an opponent. He is also a prominent 
student and unbroken success is predicted for him. 




Fraxk R. Ayvbrey. R.S. 

II K A 

ROANOKE, ALA. 

Assistant Football Manager (2); Football Manager (3); 
Secretary ami Treasurer Mens ran-Hellenic (3); Glee 
Club il. 2, S, 1); "H" Club; Assistant Cheer Leader (4>. 

Awbrey's voice and genial personality have made 
him a mainstay of the glee clubs, and his presence 
next year will be sorely missed, lie is not only an 
outstanding student in things musical, but takes an 
active interest in all things collegiate. 



Senior CI 



ass 



\V. MoRG w 15 \ki r. .A. I). 

s a x, b n e 

BIRMINGH \\l, U \. 
Editor "Howard Crimson" (4); President Square and 
Compass (i>; Beta PI Theta (S, I); President Central 
Howard Club <n. Scientific Socletj (1): "<'riiu.si.ir' 
Btafl (l. '-'. ■•': \ in. .1 vn- (J, S); Tennis Club mi. 
Men's Pan-Hellenic (4); Le Cercle Francala (1, 3, ■■<. 
Howard Phillips Reporter (8, I). 

Baker is one oi those fellows \\ h< > takes lite serious- 
ly, :iikI it he is L;«iiiiii to do a thing you can depend 
mi it thai he U going at it whole-heartedly. A free 
thinker and a profound student, he has become an 
outstanding figure on the campus during the hist two 
years, after dropping out a year when lie was hall 
through ami taking up his abode in Florida. 

William Henry Bancroft, A.B. 

i; N 

BIRMINGHAM, AI.A. 
News Scholarship; President Freshman Class; Captain 
Freshman Football; Football (1, 2. :i. 4); Captain Var- 
sltj Football (it; Has, -i. ail n. 2, 3. 4); Captain Fresh- 
man Baseball; Freshman Basketball; Basketball (2). 
Our vocabulary is simply too limited to say what we 
would like to about Billy. Howard has probably 
ue\er had a greater athlete, nor will ever have one, 
who, with his athletic prowess, has a more pleasing 
personality, is more thoroughly a gentleman, a more 
conscientious student than is he. He was horn a 
leader, and he demonstrated his ability as a general 
when he led the Crimson Bulldogs through the past 
season, as captain of the freshman team, as president 
of the Freshman Class, and on many occasions when 
he was looked upon unofficially, but without question, 
as the boss. Bancroft is a News scholarship man, 
and the News should be and is proud of him. 

GUILLIARD B.ARGER, A.B. 
B II H 

BIRMINGHAM, Ai.A. 

Music Medal t2); Beta Pi Theta; Le Cercle Francals; 

Secretary Y. W. C. A. (3); Piano Orchestra (1. 2). 

Just to look at Guilliard creates the subconscious 
thought that there must be fairies after all, but to 
hear her play is to perpetuate belief in the tiny folk. 
Ah, and so petite! Maybe that's why she loves to 
"parlez-vous." Anyway, she has done her work 
thoroughly at Howard, and you may expect her to 
make good from now on. 

James Leonard Battles, A.B. 

GADSDEN, ALA. 
Rotary Club Scholarship (l): Y. M. C. A. (3, I); B. S. 

V. Council (3); Ministerial Association (3, 4); President 
Ministerial Association (4); Mission Band (4). 

Battles is one of our most popular ministerial stu- 
dents — one who has shown his interest in everj 
phase of college life, including politics. As president 
of the Ministerial Association this year he has done 
fine work. 





Senior Class 



En\\ 



d E. Beason, A.B. 

II K * 

DEMOPOLIS, ALA. 

"Entre Nous'' Staff (3); Vice-President Senior Class; 
Commerce Club. 

Ed went to Alabama for two years and then de- 
cided to get his diploma at the best school in the 
world. Although he hasn't spent very much time 
on the campus, due to his insurance "interest-,'' he 
has won himself a place in everyone's heart. 



Clifton G. Brown, A.B. 

II K * 

JASPER, ALA. 

Freshman Football; Varsity Football (2. 3. I); Alter- 
nate Captain Football (4); Baseball (1. 2. 3); "H" 

Club; Assistant Business Manager 'Entre Nous" (4 1; 
Treasurer Senior Class. 

"Cliff" is not only an outstanding man "football- 
ically" speaking, but in every line of endeavor. He 
buys his clothes at Blach's — therefore, dresses well 
and succeeds whether it be with coeds, professors, 
upper classmen, or just mere rats. He is one of 
Howard's most outstanding men in the athletic fir- 
mament, and withal is a most likable boy — really, he 
is just a grown-up boy. 



Jewel Burnham, A.B. 

GADSDEN, ALA. 

Etowah County W. M. U. Scholarship; Y. \V. A. (1, 2. 

:!); Religious Education Club (2); House President 

Ratliff Hall to); Assistant Librarian (2, 3). 

Jewel has the uncanny knack of making the Honor 
Roll consistently, and keep.; on friendly terms with 
teachers and students alike. But "uncanny" is the 
wrong word. "Perseverant" is better, for there is 
not a more conscientious student on the campus. She 
has also taken a prominent part in Women's Student 
Government. 



Murray S. Cawthorne, A.B. 

II K A 
ENSLEY, ALA. 
Glee club CS). 
have seen very little of Murray during his so- 
il at Howard (maybe that is because we don't 
i) the Science Hall often enough), but in reading 
life lines in his hands we find that success 
awaits him without 



Senior Class 

HORTON B. CH VMLEl . A.B. 

(> K N 
BIRMINGH \M. \l \. 



1. 1,1, nl . S. i, 111 'I., Soi 

University ol Alabai 



y; Med 

(2, $). 



Iiiiii 
iss of 
whole 



Chamblee strayed awa] from Howard t"i 
work at Alabama, but we are glad to hi 
come back and graduate with the good old 
'zS. He is a good student and is liked bj tl 
student body. It he makes as good a doct. 
is ,i friend, the world will be a better 
live in. 



M \iu; \KI T I) VVIDSON. A.B. 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Beta li Theta; Le Cerele Francals; v. W. C. A.; 
Honor Roll. 

Margaret is another language shark. She can 
"polly-voo Frawnsay" or "Ah, blah, Espanyol" with 

the best ot them, and we look tor her to wind up in 
the language department of some college before long. 
Books have not taken all her time, however, and 
she has found occasion to take part in many student 
activities. 



Roy E. Dias. 



A.B. 

LA. 



Deas has spent the greater part of his time in the 
Science Bui. ding, but he has found time to cultivate 
many friendships. He is an all-round good fellow 
and the professors can vouch tor the fact that he is 
a good student. Well hear more of Roy. 

Owen Dees, A.B. 

2 T, A i> 

RlSSKt.t. Villi:, ALA. 

Southwestern Presbyterian 1'niv, 
Club (l); Scrub Basketball (1); 
V. M. C. A. (1); Freshman Basketball (2); Varsity 
Has,- 1, all (3); "Entre Nous'' staff (41; ■'H" Club. 

Owen is a true artist. Although he does not wield 
a brush and palette, he can shoulder his trust) cam- 
era and tripod and find beaut] in the most common 
places. Most of the views in this year's annual are 
results of his eye for the beautiful. The camera is 
not his only weapon, however, because he has a mean 
ri^ht arm that sees service every spring with the 
baseball team. 





Senior Cb 



Arthur Dix, A.B. 
e K x, i t 

DECATUR, ALA. 

Band (1, 2. 3); Secretary Band (2. 3); Y. M. C. A.: 
(1, 2. 3); Secretary Y. M. C. A. (2); Vice-President 
Y. M. <'- A. (3); Pan-Hellenic <•oun.il (3); Treasurer 
B. S. U. (3); Vice-President Junior Class; State Ex- 
ecutive Council Y. M. C. A. (3); Allied Arts Club (3); 
•Crimson" Staff (2, 3). 

Dix is a sheik of no mean ability, but the remarkable 
part of it is that he can sti I meet hi. classes on time 
the next morning. His string of honors bespeaks his 
varied interests in all student activities. If you are 
looking for a real "go-getter," Arthur is your man. 



Milton E. Doughty, A.B. 

A A T 
SLOCOMB, ALA. 
Band (2, 3, 4). 

Being a product of Newton Institute no doubt has 
helped "Doc" to make good. Quiet and unassum- 
ing, we find Doughty a mo t accommodating stu- 
dent — and when it comes to tooting that trumpet he 
is right there! 



Ernest E. Epley, A.B. 

A A T, 1! II H, II K T 
ALABAMA CITY. ALA. 



Epley probably knows more about French and Span- 
ish than any other student in school. He is major- 
ing in French and taking the most advanced course-, 
in Spanish, so he ought to In- well versed, lie is one 
of the really deep thinkers at Howard and his well- 
founded views have won him many friend;. How- 
ard's loss will be gain for the world at large. 



William Leslie Ezi 

WARD. ALA. 



A.B. 



Mi 



rial As.- 



the outstanding ministerial students at 
ing liberal in his views and a pro- 
»f the Bible, lie will do a great sco- 
ld in the work he expects to follow. 



Senior Class 



Jam 



Adoi i'h Ferry, B.S. 

II K A 



Although his name i- apt to suggest a "slow method 
oi transportation over a narrow stream," there are 
no slow methods found in this "Ferry." He is quick, 
alert, ami well informed over a large field. Howard 

will miss him in '.:<;. 



Bessie Ledbetter Franks, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, A I A. 

Student Mission Band (4); v. \v. c. A. 
Howard won't be the same without Mr. Franks. 
She has won friends in all her classes, and is known 
as a foremost student. She has been a helpful friend 
to man] students, and although the school hates to 
see her leave, we as a cla s are proud to have her 
finish with us this spring. 

John Drue Gibson, B.S. 

II k * 



Freshman !•' 



(3). 



Who doesn't know "Hoot" — the clown of the campus 
and a student who has not an enemy in the whole 
college. Everybody likes "Hoot," and "Hoot'' likes 
everybody. He is another one of those Walker 
County atldetes, and we hope that said county has 
a lot more fellows like him to send our Alma Mater. 
Gibson started out on the road to fame as an end 
on the Bulldog eleven, but sustained a broken ankle. 
He got his letter this year, however, and well de- 
served it. 



Ralph I). Grant, A.B. 

2 A X 



Glee cluii (l. 2. 3. 4i; Varsity Quartette (l. -. :: > . 
Allied Arts Club; Delegate B. S. U. (1, 2); sun.- Win- 
ner of Atwater Kent Radio Contest; State Represent- 
ative in Southern District Radio Contest. 

Ralph is another of the song birds and one whose 
merit as a songster has been recognized on many 
occasions during his college life. As soloist with the 
Glee Club this year he made a great hit on the trip. 
Looking into the crystal we see a bright future for 
him in all things musical. Good luck! 





Senior Class 



Thelma Grogan, A.B. 

CENTER. ALA. 



"Studies" seems to have been Thelma's hobby while 
at Howard — a thing which many a student might 
wish to have set down permanently as a reminder 
of their efforts — also a thing which others might 
have said of them if they had been such a hard- 
working and conscientious student as Thelma. Her 
thoughtfulness of others makes her a friend indeed. 



Earl Raymond Ha.mmett. B.S. 

LEEDS, ALA. 
Commerce Club. 

Hammett is one of those boys you just can't keep 

down. Besides carrying a heavy course in college, 

he has worked more than the law- allows. A genial 

fellow is Earl. 



Helen- Harime. A.B. 

B A 2, B II 9, II K T 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Hypatia; Pan-Hellenic Representative <r>. )); French 

Star (3); Honor Roll (3); Y. \V. C. A. Cabinet (4); 

Y. \v. C. A. Undergraduate Representative. 

Howard has never known a more loyal student than 
Helen. She is willing to work day and night for the 
glory and betterment of her Alma Mater. No doubt 
that is the reason she has been added to the faculty. 
Success is sure to crown her efforts in any Held of 
endeavor. 



Sue Undine Harris. A.B. 
$ m, n K T 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

University of California (1); Y. W. C. A. (1, .. S, I); 
Tennis Club (2. ::. I>; Secretary Junior Class; Assistant 
Editor "Entre Nous" (3); Women's Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil (4); Student Council (4); Secretary Hypatia t^>. 

The dictionary does not carry the name "Undine," 
but in this case at least we are sure it means "hard 
working," tor Sue has certainly shown her worth in 
ever} line ol endeavor at Howard. Her place will 

be hard to rill. 



Senior Cla; 



Louise II vwkins, A.B. 

BIRMINGH \M. \l \. 

A modest, retiring young lad] of fine capabilities 
and an unceasing worker. Studying 1kin been her 
hobby — a might} fine one t<> have. H\ the way, 
she is majoring in French, and her thesis books have 
come all the way from France itself. In those of 
n< who have no linguistic ability, lu-r knowledge of 
French inspired profound awe. Louise has remained 
behind the screens, always read) to do lu-r hit for 
tlu- colleee wo love. 



Joe Heacock, Jr., A.B. 



Joe i- not onl) a saxophonist de luxe, but is the sort 
of student that we like to see at Howard. lie is in- 
terested in anything for the betterment ot Howard 



d is willing to work 



Mildred Hearx. A.B. 

B A 2 



AI.BFRTVII 



AI.A. 



Chemistry Scholarship (1. 2, 3>; Piano Orchestra i 2. :; i ; 
\. w. i'. a. Cabinet (2); Allied Arts ciui. (2); Vice- 
President Women's Student Government i 2 > : Music 
Medal (2); Summer "Crimson" Staff (2); .Most Repre- 
sentative Girl, Summer School (2); President Women's 
student Government (3); "Crimson" Staff i " « ; Fairest 
Co-ed (3); Senior Historian. 

How Mildred could graduate in three years and take 
such a prominent part in student activities at the 

same time is more than we can fathom, hut the fact 
remains that she did it. And we're mighty glad to 
have her graduate with us. She is one of the most 
attractive little hlondes on the campus, and is very 
popular. She was our historian. 



Kathrvx Hendricks, A.B. 

A A II 
BIRMINGHAM, AI.A. 
Glee Club (3); Y. W. C. A.; Economics Club. 
Maybe "Kat" is due an apology, since her name is 
not in the correct alphabetical order, hut you see she 
didn't let us in on the secret that she had a brand- 
new name. A though Kathryn (we haven't learned 
to say "Mrs. Saxon" yet) hasn't been with lis the 
whole four \ears, she has been here long enough to 
become a real Howardite. Much luck to you and 
Herman — may joy and happiness be yours. 



Senior CI; 



Rupert S. Hicks, A.B. 
a A T 

BOOTHTON, ALA. 

Honor Roll (1); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3); Pan-Hellenic 

Council (4); Associate Editor "The Bulldawg '■ (4): 

Treasurer Student Body (4). 

The treasurer of the student body this year has 
worked hard, and we know that he well deserves his 
salary (?). Aside from a few week-end trips to 
Judson ( !) Rupert has stayed right on the job. Big 
business is calling to him now. 



Lucile HlGGIXS, A.B. 
* M 

BROWNSVILLE, TENS'. 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2); Varsity Bask, thall (2>; Girls- 
Glee Club (2); Pan-Hellenic (2. 3): Student Council 
(2); Treasurer Pan-Hellenic (2); "Entre Nous" Spon- 
sor (2); U. R. of Y. W. C. A. (3); Tennis Club (2, 3); 
Basketball Manager (3); Tennis Club Coach (3i; Voted 
Best Liked Girl (3). 

"Shorty" is one of Howard's most popular co-eds. 
Petite is she, but when she wants to put something 
over you might as well fall in line. The "love bug" 
seems to have bitten her ferociously this year, but 
we're for you, "Shortv" ! 



Robert Holrrook. Jr.. A.B. 
e K N 

AKRON, ALA. 

Robert hails from the house of Holbrook, famous for 
its Big "Snipe" and Little "Snipe." He is whole- 
hearted and earnest in his every endeavor, and al- 
though quiet at times, he readily makes a good im- 
pression. 



J. Harold Hood, A.B. 

BESSEMER, ALA. 
Allied Alts Club. 

Harold possesses rare friendliness, and may always 
be found with a smile on his face. He is a Howard 
booster out-and-out, and wherever Harold goes the 
fame of Howard is sure to go. His amiability will 
win a wav in the world. 



Senior Class 



Arthur L. I [orton, A.B. 

CLEVEI \\l>. ALA. 

Glee Club (»); Ministerial Assoi latlon, 

"A. I.." is a real student ol the Bible and we pre 
diet for liim a big service in the pulpit. He is i 
true Howard supporter, and takes a pjreal interest ii 
all tilings, especially those "l a religious nature. lit 
ami his wife have made many friends at Howard 



Rim Morton. A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Kuhv is one of the biggest religious workers of our 
class. She has taken an active part in all B. S. I. 
and Student Mission activities, and we look for her 
to continue her good work after she gets her diploma 
this spring. 



Mam 



Howard Houston, A. 15. 

u K T 



AM, ALA. 



Mamie has a loyal cognomen and, true to her name, 
she is a most untiring booster for Howard. A hard 
worker and a conscientious student is most fitting!} 
said of Mamie Howard. To say that she was elected 
to Pi Kappa Tau gives the record of her scholarship. 



Sara Hint, A.B. 

1 I X, II K T, X A $ 

SCOTTSBORO, ALA. 

v. w. C. A ; v. w. A. (1, -J>; Secretary of V. W. < '. 
CD; Music Committee of V. W. <'. A. i 1 1 : Char 
Member Allied Arts Club; Vice-President Allied A 
H); Glee ciui. Accompanist d. 2. l); Piano Orches 
(1, 2, 3. t); Honor Roll (1. 2); Musi, Medal (2); s 



Just a wee hit of humanity, hut a pianist of no mear 
note. Sara plays differently from all others — lu 
plays without the begging. As accompanist for the 
(!lee Clubs, she has made good when others couldn't 
Her sunny dispo ition will be missed at Howard nexl 
vear. 




Senior CI 



ass 



James Theodore Jackson, A.B. 

II K 'I', 15 II H, 2 T, II K T 
ASH FORI), ALA. 
President of Student Body (4); Honor Roll (1. 2. 3. 4); 
Freshman Marshal; Sophomore Marshal; Chief Marshal 
(3); Student Council (3); Y. M. C. A.: Secretary I. M. 
C. A. (3); President College B. Y. P. U. ; Eeonomics 
Club; Allied Arts Club; Alternate Debater CZ); Mens 
Pan-Hellenic (3); Vice-President Pan-Hellenic (4 1; 
Secretary Deviating Council (3); Representative State 
Y. M. C. A. Council (4); Voted Most Unusual Student 
• and Hardest Working Boy at Howard (4). 

"Little Jack," though young in years, has shown his 
right to be the world's youngest student body presi- 
dent; Howard's highest ranking scholar; Howard's 
most representative student, etc. No one doubts 
Jack's ability in anything. His place will be hard 
to fill next year. Good luck to you, Jack! 

Helen Johnston, B.S. 
b a s. II K T 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Freshman Marshal: Math Medal; Scientific Society (2, 
3, 4); Secretary-Treasurer Scientific Society (3); Secre- 
tary Scientific Society (4); Junior Marshal; Candidate 
for Degree with Honors. 

Helen certainly knows her Chemistry, and every- 
thing else that she has taken. Her hard work and 
amiable nature have endeared her to all of the stu- 
dents and faculty. Dr. Sampey will have to look 
long for an abler assistant. She has the distinction 
of being the first co-ed to receive the Honors Degree 
from Howard. 

Henry Hexdox Joxes. B.S. 

II K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Birmingham-Southern College (1, 2); Student Council 
(4); "Entre Nous" Staff (4); Ghe Club (3, 4): Vice- 
President Commerce oub (3); Pan-Hellenic Council 
(3, 4). 

If you've ever seen Henry Jones standing still, you've 
got something on us. He's a dynamic sort of fellow, 
full of plots and schemes, which he has the ability 
to carry through. Since the first day he set foot on 
the Howard campus he has been working for the 
betterment of the college, and has helped greatly in 
student activities of even nature. 



A.B. 



Kell 

come 

been 

the 



Lewis E. Kei.i.ey 

ECLECTIC, \l A. 
President Min 
to Facultj and Cha 

4). 

y has spent mo t of his time around the Minis- 
Club, so all of us have not had a chance to 

in close contact with him. lie has, however, 
one of the most sincere religious workers on 
ampus since coming to Howard, and has a 
bright future before him. 



Cla« 



Whitney J. King, [r., A.B. 



"Whit" i- quite a ladies' man and has also pi 
in the band. He has played on the varsit) bask( 
team and keeps "guard" over a certain membi 
the co-ed basketball team. A likeable bo) that 
the present aside For the Inline is no other tha 



Henry C 



ay Knight, B.S. 

II K * 

IRAB, ALA. 

Business Manager "Entre Nous" (41; Advertising Man- 
ager (!ic.' riuli C'.i; Assistant I Mr. .t or Student Em- 
ployment Bureau (2, 3); Director Student Employment 
Bureau (4); Freshman Football; Dining Hall Council 
(2); Pan-Hellenic (3, 1). 

Clay is easily the busiest student at Howard, both 
on and off the campus. As director of the Sponsor 
Club he has done some fine work for Howard stu- 
dents. This Knight is rightly called the "Sheik of 
Arah-ia." He is the capable manager of this year's 
Annual 



William George Laatsch, B.S. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Scientific Society (1, 2); Commerce Club (3). 

George is a remarkably quiet boy and one that is 
only on the campus because he means business We 
are sorry that we haven't seen more of him during 
his stay at Howard. You may be sure it will be 
done if you "let George do it." 



William Henry Langley, A.B. 

II K A 
ROANOKE. ALA. 



William is a Howardite first, last and always. He 
is ever on the alert to do some good turn for the 
dear ole school that he loves so well. This year he 
has shown that a vice-president can work if he 
wishes to. 




Senior CL 



Nancy Lea, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Nancy has gone about her work quietly, but with 

this same quietness has won her way into the hearts 

of many students. Such a persevering worker is 

bound to succeed in life. 



S. A. Lecroy, B.S. 

HOLI.INS, ALA. 

Scientific Society (3, 4). 

Lecroy is another student whose influence is felt 

rather than heard, for he never makes a bluster over 

things he is doing — he just does them silently and 

competently. He is a credit to the institution. 



Bernard Lee, A.B. 

ARKADELPHIA, ALA. 

Where have you kept yourself these four years, Ber- 
nard? Why, we hardly know you, and yet we do 
know that you are going to be a great surgeon, for 
the hard work you are doing must eventually bring 
success vour wav. We wish you lots of luck. 



B.S. 



Marion I. 

11 K >1> 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Honor noil (l) ; Glee Club ct). 

"Banker" has a way of his own that is unique to say 
the least, and it sets results. This year "Banker" 
has gotten down to real work, and "there's a dif- 
ference." May he live up to his name and save lots 
ol money anil then give it to Howard. 



Senior Class 



III (111 M. C. I.IMMR. B.S. 
11 K T 

IRON TON, Al \. 

Honor Roll (2, S); Chemistry Assistant (3); Blologj 

Assistant (8, ii; Biology Award (S) ; Scientific Society, 

Member Executive Committee ol Scientific Society. 

We know that Hugh's ambition to be a greal sur 
geon will be realized, because he does not confine his 

activities to dreaming. He spends hours upon hours 
in the laboratory in preparation tor higher study, 

ami is one of the best pre-med student at Howard. 
1 1 is appointment to a place as laborator) instructor 
is one proof of his ability. Science Hall has claimed 
him most of the time, hut he has found time to take 
part in many activities. 



George J. Little, A.B. 
e k n 

ATTALLAj ALA. 

"Shorty" joined the "draft" department of a local 
bank soon after coming to Howard, and ever since 
then he has been up anil going. Even though out- 
side duties require much of his time, he has never- 
theless, taken a somewhat active part in the various 
college activities. 



Oler D. Mason, A.B. 

ISNEY, ALA. 
Honor Roll (3). 

Mason has made a good record as a student and in 

the meantime has found time to make many friends, 

along with his scholarship. \Ye prophesy for him 

a career of unbroken usefulness. 



William Thomas Maynor, A.B. 

2 A X, 2 T 

ONEONTA, ALA. 

"Crimson" Staff (1, 2. 3, 4); Sports Editor "Crimson" 

(2, 4); "Entre Nous" staff (3); Athletic Editor "Entre 

Nous" (4); Y. M. C. A.; Senior Class Prophet. 

"Tommy" is a newspaper man that can make the old 
typewriter sing out wonderful stories of Howard 
College and its many activities. As a member of 
the fourth estate, "Tommy" has done a great deal to 
make Howard known to all the world. He has been 
invaluable in getting up the En'tre Nous this year 
in more than his specific work of athletics. He will 
enter the newspaper field with a sure enough col- 
legiate background. 



Senior CL 



Hugh aIcClexdox, 

PINSON, ALA. 



A.B. 



Hugh is a quiet sort of fellow who spends most of 
his time off the campus, hut his stately bearing and 
sensible conversation are qualities that have made 
him stand out. "Mac" is one student who is the 
same, no matter what crowd he happens to be in at 
the moment. He's a credit to our class. 



James Broyvx McClendon, B.S. 

PINSON", ALA. 



Sci< 



i 11' So.'i 



Honor Re 



(3). 



Brown's happy-go-lucky, devil-may-care manner has 
made him known to everybody. "Do your own work 
if you can't find somebody to do it for you," is his 
philosophy, and we find him in the thick of things 
in every class. Although he has not stayed on the 
campus, he has made many friends among the stu- 
dents. 



Emory Speer McNider, A.B. 

MORVIN, ALA. 

Y. M. C. A. (1); Secretary Y. M. C. A. <2>; Treasurer 
Y. M. C. A. (3); President Y. M. C. A. (4); B. S. U. 
(3); Student Council (4); Commerce Club (3); Scien- 
tific Society (2). 

As an active worker in the religious work of the 
college, Emory has no peer. For four years now he 
has really worked hard and has made friends by the 
score. He is a studious, whole-hearted boy, who 
has left his mark on the campus without any noise. 



Axxie Lee Ormi:. A.B. 

A A 11 

SAMSON, ALA. 

on College (1. 2); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2>; Bas- 
;.li (l. 2); Altrurian Club (1, 2); Y. w. C a (8, 
i); Commerce Club (3); Scientific Society (3). 

on claimed Annie Lee for two years, but the 
to come to Howard was too great and to How- 
she came. She is a girl of tine ideals and a win- 
disposition that can't be beaten. Howard hates 
to see her leave. 



Senior Class 
II uw> Passmori . Jr.. 15. 



K N 



BIRMINGN \M. \l \. 
Scientific Society, President Scientific Si 
Science Hall won't look the same next \ 
Harry has become a permanent fixture 
in the "lab." He's a true scientist and 
work like an Edison or a Watt. Being 
(lie Howard Scientific Societj i- onl) 
man} honors achieved bj his hard \ 

I. mi i i G. PAYNE, A.B. 

HAM, M \. 



dow 

stick- 
presi 



i ii 
i there 

to hi- 

lenl i.i 
of the 



Hi 



B1RM1 

\lli. .1 



i -lull 



boi latlon. 



Payne has been :i pillar and post in a'l student ac- 
tivities at Howard. A staunch supporter ol all 
things ol interest to the student bod) and to the 
college as a whole, we cannot saj too much to praise 

him. He i^ one ot our Outstanding ministerial stu- 
dents and one ot the comparatively few real thinkers 
on the campus. A steady friend — and a man. 

Marguerite Lot ise Pence, A.B. 

2 I x, B n o, X A <!•, II K T 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Clvltan Scholarship (1, 2. t, it; Secretary-Treasurer 

Sophomore Class; Honor Hull (l. 2. ::, I); V. \v. C. A. 
Cabinet CJ. 3. I); \'i. .-rr.si.i.nt v. \v. C. a. i :; i , Is 
soctate Editor "Crimson" (2, 3. 4); Editor-in-Chief 
"Entre Nous" in: Secretary Chi Delta Phi National 
Honorary Fraternity (4); President Beta Pi Theta Na- 
tional Honorary Fraternity < :s. 4>; Historian Hypatian 
National Honorarj Socletj (4); Le Cercle Francals (1); 

French star (3); Poet of Senior class. 
Marguerite can do more things and do them better in 
the lea t amount of time than anyone in college, and 
if there were an) more h mors t i he attained, "Six" 
Fence would attain them. She is system personified, 
and this, no doubt, accounts for her remarkable effi- 
ciency in every line of endeavor. As editor-in-chief 
of this year's ENTRE NOUS site has demonstrated her 
journalistic ability in a tine way. It's a trite expres- 
sion, maybe, but we hate to imagine Howard with- 
out her. 

Loyal Phillips, A.B. 

H K x, ^ T 

CULLMAN, ALA. 
it Business Manager "Crimson" d. 2. 3. 4); 



Assist a 

Junior 
Manag 



il; v. M. <\ A. Cabinet (2, :; > . Glee Club 
Financial chairman Howard-Southern 
Parade. 

Loyal certainly live, up to his name when it comes 
to showing loyalty to Howard (and, incidentally, to 
Evelyn). He is a boy of remarkable vision, a schol- 
arly mind, and a sincere friend to all students. He 
is a boy that is always full of pep, and whenever 
he starts a thing he puts a "snap" into it that carries 
it over. As president of this year's Senior Class 
Loyal has made good. In all student activities he 
has ever made good. 



Senior Class 



William Richard Porter. A.B. 

MERIDIAN', MISS. 



"Bill" is another of those working collegians. He 
has worked soon and late since coming to Howard, 
and he rightly deserves his "dip." What will the 
co-eds do for specials when Porter is gone? May 
his work in the future bring as much joy to his fel- 
lowmen as he has brought in envelopes to his fellow- 
students. 



Alyne Price, A.B. 

A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



Last fall Alyne went to Cuba with the football team, 
but she came back the same friendly little girl that 
she has been ever since the day she entered Howard. 
A girl of high ideals like Alyne is sure to make her 
mark in the world. 



Everett Lane Rhodes. A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Chemistry Scholarship (2, 3, 4). 

"Dusty" Rhodes is a philosophical sort of fellow who 
looks upon the roses and thorns of life with the 
same cynical smile. While he has little to say ex- 
cept when spoken to, his quiet and reserved manner 
has made many friends for him. 



Pace W 



Roberts, Jr. 
<i> r r 



B.S. 



Square and Compass; Band (1, 2, S, f); Manager Band 
(i!. i) : Commerce flub t:o. 

"Red" is as fiery and energetic as his flaming curls 
indicate. He's always doing something, and he does 
nothing uselessly. He toots a mean trombone, and 
his hard work as manager of the band has been one 
of the most important tilings that kept the organiza- 
tion going. His experience as a salesman. has caused 
him to be appointed on almost everything that has 
collecting in it. We can't appreciate "Red" too much. 



Senior Class 
Stanley Brooks R\ ssi i i . A. 15. 

I A\ I III Ml II, \l \. 



S-h-h! S-h li! There comes Howard's quietesl ed. 
rhough rather sh) to some, Brooks has won his \\ .1 \ 
into the hearts ami minds >>t man) students. He i- 
quiet ami unassuming, bul when he speaks you can 
depend en what lie says, ami his infrequent smile is 
well worth waiting lor. His "lime ami Tide" in 
the Crimson has been pern ed with interest this 



Evelyn Sellers, A.B. 

A A II, I! II (» 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Student Council 1::. i>; Secretary PhlUlps-Howard Club 
(3); Treasurer \ W. 1'. a. (4); Secretarj Beta Pi 
Theta Honorary French Fraternltj (4); Feature Edi- 
tor "Bntre Nous" 1 11; "Crimson" StaH in. 

Evelyn is the other co-ed who made the trip to Cuba 
last tall. Her first year at Howard was enough to 
capture our hearts, and being the "wonderful girl 
of our dreams," she has managed to hold them all so 
far intact. She is a sure enough princess, not only 
in looks but in every way, and the underclasses hate 
to have her bid them adieu. 

James Clarence Sellers, A.B. 

MCCULLOUGH, ALA. 

Mission Hand; Ministerial Association. 

Sellers is one of Howard's most versatile preachers. 
He holds down a heavy course and does lots of ac- 
tive church work at the same time. He is outspoken 
in his convictions and a prominent member of the 
Ministerial Association. Incidentally, "Red" was a 
star in the preachers' line in the game with the 
••Infidels." 



Rlth F. Sherer, A.B. 
i; 1 x 



Pierian Club (1); Y. W. 1 '. A.; Secretarj oi Commerce 
Club (3); Vice-President Pan-Hellenic Council 1 :: 1 . 
Senior Editor of "Entre Nous" (I); President of Pan- 
Hellenic (4 1. 

Ruth has been in Howard and out of Howard, hav- 
ing tried another school one year, but of course she 
found Howard better and came back. She is the 
capable senior editor of the Entre Nous this year, 
but she says, "I do not choose to write myself up." 
Strictly speaking, Ruth has been associate editor, for 
she has had her finger in on nearly every page. 
We know she will make good in the future. 





Senior Class 

Allex Anderson Simpson - , A.B. 
e K x, s T 

LAFAYETTE, ALA. 



2. 3); 
How. 
Y. M. C. A. 
Allen is for all business, fun and pleasure. Since en- 
tering upon his collegiate career he has found time 
to work, study and become a factor in many college 
activities. Like his buddy, "O car" Phillips, he is a 
Howard booster of no mean repute. This year, as 
business manager of the Crimson, he has demon- 
strated what a real business man he is going to be. 

Apsey P. Smith, B.S. 

A A T 
EUTAW, ALA. 

Commerce Club (3). 
Apsey has probably been late at more classes than 
any one at Howard, but when he does arrive he 
misses nothing that takes place. He has not been 
seen on the campus so very much during his so- 
journ here, but those who have come to know him 
vouch for his being a most likeable chap. 

James Lemuel McKinley Smith. A.B. 
II K A 

GREENSBORO. S". C. 
Associate Editor "Crimson" (2. 3); Glee Club (1, 2. 3, 
4); Feature Editor "Crimson" (2); President Commerce 

Business Manager Glee Club (4); Reportei 

Senior Class (4). 
is anything in Birmingham that Jimmy 
not held an office in, it must be the Asso- 
ciation for the Blind. His dominating personality 
has made him a prominent figure in the city and on 
the campus, and lots of shrinking freshmen will con- 
tide to yen that for the first six weeks they thought 
he was a member of the faculty. He is one of the 
strongest links that connects Howard with the out- 
side world. 

Edmund Marvin Smith. A.B, 

2 N 

MOBILE, ALA. 
Freshman Football; Freshman Baseball; Varsity Foot- 
ball (2. 3); Varsity Baseball C2. 3, 4); Varsity Bas- 
ketball (2i; President Sophomore Class; President 
Junior Class; Pan-Hellenic (3. n : Associate Athletic 
Bditor "Entre Nous" (4); Biology Lab. instructor tti; 
Mask riub: Captain Baseball (3); Manager Basketball 

(8). 
"Bull" had hard luck this year in the realm of foot- 
ball b\ being hurt in the first game of the season, 
but where the team went his spirit went also. Al- 
though a football player ol the fir>t calibre. "Bull" 
has spent much lime in the laboratory among the 
frogs etc. lust the kind of a friend you like to 
have is "Bull" Smith. 



lub (3); 



If there 
Smi h ha 



Senior Ch 



Robert E. Smith, B.S. 

i.i SSI Ml K. M \. 



and consequent!} is not so well known as he might 
have been, but we find him a young man of sterling 
worth and one that is sure to make a waj For him- 
self in the world. 



Margaret Henrietta Staples, A.B. 

* M 
BIRMINGHAM. AI.A. 



(2). 

Margaret has only been with ib for two years now, 
and Howard hates to give her up so early. She i.. 

the first girl to be "tapped' for Hypatia during her 

tirst year on the campus, but there's a reason. A 

harder worker cannot he found and to one of her 

ability and intellect, success i- sure to come. 



David R. STEVENS, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, AI.A. 

David is fend of his mathematics and has taken 
practically all that the college offers. He has heen 
campus shy during his four years here, but those 
who know him have come to appreciate his real 
worth. 



Grace Stuckey, A. B. 

TARRANT, AI.A. 

v. \v. c. A. (2, 3. 4i; Student Mission Band (1, 2. 3. I); 
Secretary Student Mission Band < :' i ; Y. w. C. A. 
Cabinet (4); B. s. V. Council <i); President Student 
Mission Kami (4); Charter Menilnr Holigious Educa- 
tion Club (3). 

Grace loves religious work, and we know that if she 

follows her firt inclination it will be towards this 

line of work, in which she is bound to succeed. She 

is a quiet sensible girl, well worth knowing. 




Senior CI 



ass 



Eva Eunavee Taylor, A.B. 
b ii e 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Glee Club; Student Mission Band; Y. W. A.; Y. W. 
C. A. 

Eva is intensely earnest in everything she undertakes 

and sincerely works at anything she is called upon to 

do. In spite of her unusually quiet reserve, she has 

numerous friends who appreciate her real worth. 

Mabel C. Turxipseed, A.B. 
a z, n k t 



nore Marshal 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

ibinet (2, 3); Latin W 
President of Hypatia 
CI. 2, 3, 4). 



(1); Sopno- 
Honor Roll 



Mabel has the happy faculty of being able to learn 
foreign languages as easily as Helen Johnston has 
been able to learn chemistry. She is a girl with a 
smile that wins and a sincerity of purpose and de- 
votion to the right that cannot be questioned. How- 
ard could certainly u:e several more Mabels next 
year — and everv vear. 



Edgar Edwin Weaver. A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Square and Compass; Honor Roll (1, 3); Ministerial 

Club CI, 2, 3, 4); Student Volunteer Band CL 2. 3, 4'; 

Debating Team (1, 2, 4): B. S. U. C3. 4); Allied Arts 

C4). 

E. E. Weaver is a true Howardite. He has been an 
outspoken supporter in everything for the betterment 
of the school and of the class, and when in the future 
we shall look back and count over the real friends 
we had in the Class of '28, one of the first we'll 
think of will be Mr. Weaver. He is one of the 
mainstays of the Ministerial Association. We like 
him a whole lot. 



John Loyv.max Wilkii 

11 K <!• 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



g. B.S. 



tball 



nhnn> is another of our famously valiant Bulldogs, 
ho has For the last time donned his uniform for the 
Irimson and Blue. This young man is witty and no 
listake. When he is around the moments seem to 
ike wings and make their Might. It is rumored 
l.u "Pictorial Reviews" are already coming ad- 
dressed to Mrs. "Johnny." We wonder! 



Senior Class 



Arthir B. Win i 



A.B. 



Arthur is a t 

tor him to do 

college, lie i 

clai 



<■ student of (lie Bible, and «t look 
nuch beneficial work when he leave. 

little seen on the Campus, but in his 
6S he ranks with the best. 



Cecil S. Wood, A.M. 



Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3. II; S,vrriiiry Minis- 
terial Association (2); Vice-President Ministerial Asso- 
ciation (3, I); Chorister Mission Band (S). 

Big jovial Cecil is found in the midst of things. 
His booming laugh is known to every student, and 
Howard will lose one of her best liked minister, this 
spring. He takes an active part in student matters, 
and played a good game in the Preacher-Infidel con- 
test. He also does active church work. 



Walter O. Woolley, A.B. 

MARIOK, ALA. 

Basketball; Y. M. C. A.; President Non-Fiats (4). 

Otis comes from down Judson way, and we wonder 
just how he managed to leave the old home town, 
which holds so many attractions, but anyway we 
are glad that he came to Howard. He is one of the 
best-hearted students that we know, and is a good, 
steady scholar. Best wishes, Otis. 



Helex French Wright, A.B. 
A a n 

TALLADEGA, ALA. 



Stud, I) 



(2); Girls' Glee Club 



"Heck" left us for a year, but returned this year to 
receive her degree from Howard. Courted by some 
and loved by all — that's "Heck," who is all Wright. 
Our college days have been brighter because of her 
cheery disposition. If a smile goes a long way, then 
Helen is sure of success. 




Senior Class 



W. Russell Bicklev, Jr. 
2 x 



A.B. 



MOBILE, ALA. 

Bicklev is the boy with the provocative Southern 
drawl that you read about in novels. He is not hasty 
with words, nor does he act without sufficient delib- 
eration (for instance, he was the Iait senior to have 
his picture made), but he claims your attention when 
he does speak and act. We cherish his friendship. 



Henry Eugene Long, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Football; "H" Club. 

The Entre Nous would not have been complete 
without "Pop." He has been a factor in school these 
four years, finding time to go out for football every 
year, make his grades and even raise a family, too. 
It is safe to say that every student on the campus 
knows "Pop" and feels that he deserves his "H." 
Although he didn't see a great deal of service, still 
he gave his all every time he was sent on the grid- 
iron. 



Byron B. Nelson, 
s a x 



A.B. 



ndv 



TALI.ASSEE, ALA. 
of the most energetic fell 



vs on the 

campus, and never has an idle moment. He is a 
three-year graduate, therefore the Class of '2$ claims 
him, but the Class of '27 didn't want to give him up, 
so they have his picture, too. Besides keeping up a 
heavy course, he finds time to exhibit his superiority 
in tennis, and Hoyle himself can't juggle the cards 
any better in a bridge game. 



Margaret Thornton, 
a a u, b 11 e 



A.B. 



Margaret started her college career in Florida, but a 
better school soon claimed her. Again this year she 
strayed away to another school for awhile, but the 
call to Howard was overpowering, and now we are 
fortunate to have her step in again and get her 
sheepskin with the Class of '28. We like her so 
well that we are really jealous of any school that 
kept her away from us. 



Senior Class Prophecy 




AHEIS 1 burst into the office of Morgan Baker, publisher <>i the Posmocol 
'! itan, the South's ultra-modern ina.ua/iiic, he greeted me with a long 
:, although 1 had seen him only a few times since we graduated from 
Howard College ten years ago. 1 soon found out, however, that he 
had a very good reason. Leonard Battles, famous reformer, had just 
shot his biggest bolt at the publication in the form of an interview in another widelj 
read magazine, lambasting the Posmocolitan in no endearing terms. 

"1 think we II even things up in our next issue, off the press today," Morgan said. 
"Loyal Phillips, my managing editor, has had his staff working on the evolution 
question for quite a while and we have an article on Battles' past life, also, that ought 
to quiet him down." 

Just then Marguerite Pence, feature editor, brought in a feature story on "Howard 
— The Wonder College of the South," and asked the publisher when he could he inter- 
viewed by a representative of the International Syndicate, conducted by Whitney King. 
I found out later that the representative was Mildred Hearn. While Baker was 
going over the feature story, I glanced through the latest edition of his magazine 
and found the names of Edith Burton, Ernest Epley and Lucile Higgins on the staff. 
Allen Simpson was business manager and Bob Holbrook was with the advertising 
department. It seemed that quite a few of the old grads had gone into some phase 
of journalism. 

As the alumni banquet was to be held that night and the annual Howard-Southern 
football game the next day, we drove out to the college to look up some of the old 
gang. Coach Cliff Brown's boys were in fine shape for the battle, which was to be 
fought in Dawson Bowl, the gift of Marion Lee, prominent banker. I noted that 
Bickley and Cawthon, architects, had drawn the plans, and Robert Smith ami Bill 
Laatsch, contractors, had charge of the work. Dean Noble Beall gave us a cordial 
welcome, as did several other members of the faculty: Helen Hardie of the Language 
Department; Helen Johnston, professor of chemistry; Zack Appleton, professor of 
religious education, and Dovey Anderson, freshman coach. 

Many other alumni had come to Birmingham for the occasion and were looking 
over the ten new buildings, the last three of which were just being completed. James 
T. Jackson, president of the Chamber of Commerce, and Mrs. Jackson, nee Nancy 
Elgin, told me of many of my old classmates. Clay Knight is head of a real estate 
and insurance concern, with John Wilking ami William H. Langley as partners. 
Ralph Grant is on a nation-wide concert tour with the Grand Opera, in which Helen 
Wright and Alyne Price have prominent parts. Rupert Hicks is publicity director of 
the company. Sara Hunt, of Hunt Conservatory of Music, has made a big name for 



herself as organist. Margaret Staples is Birmingham Y. W. C. A. director, and 
Nancy Lea has charge of athletics at the central club house. 

We went to the Bluebird Cafe, one of the Hammett chain, for lunch. There 1 
bought a copy of The Journal, edited by Charles Thigpen, to get the latest details of 
the sensational divorce case, in which the former Mabel Turnipseed and Dr. J. D. 
Heacock, Jr., were the principals. The law firm of Jones, Awbrey and Smith (Apsey) 
was supporting the famous doctor, while Arthur Dix, noted divorce lawyer, had the 
other side. Many prominent characters were listed as witnesses, including Annie Lee 
Orme, widely known clubwoman; Mrs. Herman Saxon (Katherine Hendricks), Dr. 
Marvin Smith, Senator Cecil Wood, Rev. Eugene Long, and David Stephens, of the 
wholesale firm. The charge was desertion, Dr. Heacock evidently spending too much 
time with his sick cats. 

Otis Woolley, superintendent of Marion public schools, joined us at lunch and had 
many questions to ask regarding the whereabouts of the old grads. As I had been on a 
world tour for the past four years, writing a series of articles on international relations, 
I could tell him of only a few of them. "I understand that the Franks brothers and 
their wives, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Windsor (Mary Lee Blackman), 
left recently for China, where they will have charge of a large mission," I said. "I 
was talking with C. E. Robinson, captain of the S. S. Sherman, one of the Porter- 
Roberts line, on the way over, and he gave me interesting accounts of a number of our 
old friends. Hoot Gibson and Edward Beason worked unceasingly to get England 
to go dry, and now that they have attained success are amassing large fortunes boot- 
legging out of France. The last time Robinson heard of them they were negotiating 
with James A. Ferry, widely known engineer, to build a tunnel under the Channel 
to take care of the increased demand. Owen Dees is making undersea movies, he said, 
by a new process invented by A. J. Abercrombie. Milton Doughty was director of the 
ship's orchestra. The captain also told me that Guilliard Barger went back to the 
States recently for a vacation, having been connected with the Paris Conservatory of 
Music. Roy Deas is on some desert isle studying sea plant life and writing a book 
on the subject." 

Many of my old classmates have gone into religious work, I was told. E. E. 
Weaver is on an evangelistic tour, while L. G. Payne, Lewis Kelley, and A. L. Horton 
have big congregations in Birmingham, and J. C. Sellers, S. A. LeCroy, and W. A. 
Ezell are preaching in other parts of the state. Emory McNider is State V. M. C. A. 
Secretary and Harold Hood is head of the Bessemer "Y," while O. D. Mason is 
traveling for the organization. Mamie Houston and Grace Stuckey are doing home 
mission work, while Eva Taylor and Ruby Horton are with the National B. S. U. 
The teaching profession has claimed Thelma Grogan, who is head of the History 
Department at Lanier High; Louise Hawkins, assistant superintendent of Bessemer 
public schools; Harry Passmore, professor of physics at University of Alabama, and 
Lane Rhodes, instructor in language at Phillips. 



Aftei lunch we attended ceremonies on the campus, the Senior Class placing a 
bronze bulldog on the apex oi Panther Monument. Dr. William II. Bancroft, directoi 
of the famous hospital and president <>t the Alumni Association, made a short talk, as 
did George Little, the realtor. 'The McLendon brothers left off their surveying of 

the Red Mountain subdivision to attend the exercises. Brooks Russell, head ot the 

United States Department ot Health, and who came to Birmingham tor the game, told 

me something ot the national reputation of Bancroft Hospital. Dr. Hugh l.inder, 
noted surgeon, is on the staff, as is Horton Chamblee, famous medico. Murray 
Cawthome is X-ray technician. 

The banquet and pep meeting, held in the gym of the big student activities build- 
ing, was a brilliant affair, with tour thousand loyal Howardites hacking the Little 
Ten champs, who would attempt to hold the championship the next day. There I saw 
or got information about the rest of the good old Class of '2S. There was Sue Harris, 
whom J. I.. M. Smith, the prize fight promoter, told me was soon to be Alabama's 
first lady, her husband being expected to win the coming election by a big majority. 
Margaret Thornton is also married and one of the city's most charming matrons. 
Clarietta Kendrick is director of girls' athletics at Howard, while Ruth Sherer, I 
learned, has made a big name for herself as a business woman, and Margaret David- 
son has gone abroad to get another degree or two. I saw Bernard Lee and Jewel 
Parks, but did not get to talk to either of them. 

Thus within a period of a few days I had gleaned information regarding the 
progress of those who received the coveted diploma in the spring of 1928. How 
different the old school looks! Our beloved President Dawson, who handed us our 
diplomas that year in the old Administration Building, realized his dream of building 
Howard from the inside out, and recently retired from active administration, but is 
still working for the college with all his heart and soul. May the college be as great 
an asset to the world as he has been to the college! 

Tom Maynor, Prophet. 





Senior Class History 

W^^fflAR INTO the dim future, so far away that we can hardly imagine the 
!/fC2v/0\ great gulf that separates us from it, we see a goal. At that goal are 
seemingly triumphant winners of a struggle; their faces are alight, in 
their hands are clasped the precious trophies received as their reward. 
We survey the distance — it seems almost impassible. Some of us turn 
back, others look toward those that beckon us on. . . . 

We were Freshmen then, entering, some of us timidly, others with a determined 
purpose in view; all of us seeking the conquest of the diploma — what a magical word! 
But now, look back. The seemingly endless four years have been all too short; the 
path, instead of being strewn with stumblingblocks and disheartening barriers, has 
been smooth and peopled with precious friendships. The conquest is completed. We 
beckon to those who follow, then look ahead into the unknown future — but this is a 
history, not a prophecy. 

Four years ago we came to Howard, two hundred strong. Green? Yes! And 
dumb. We realize it now, but we didn't think so then — oh, no! Life can never give 
us another year like that first year in college — full of homesickness, dreams, hopes, wise- 
cracking sophs with the ever-present boards, and the gradual awakening of that far- 
famed Howard spirit. We elected Billy Bancroft for our first president, and he 
proved to be a valiant leader, being also captain of Howard's first freshman football 
team. It was a bunch of real bull pups, worthy of the name. They started off right, 
adding glory to the crown of their Alma Mater by defeating the Southern rat team. 
22-0. Our first year was saddened by two deaths — one, Coach Cope, whom the 
freshmen had learned to admire very much, even though they had known him onh 
a short time; and the other, a member of the Senior Class, Henry Thompson. That 
year we saw our first Howard-Southern game, which ended in a 0-0 tie. Finally, 
came our first commencement, and with it the glad realization that we were no longer 
freshmen — but, at last, upper classmen! 

After a long vacation we came back to school convinced that, this year, we were 
quite important. Most of our time was spent in trying to impart some of our con- 
viction to the freshmen. Marvin "Bull" Smith was our guide for this year. When 
our second commencement rolled around we looked back on what we considered to 
be a highly successful year, for we had gloriously defeated Southern in football, 20-16; 
and our endowment campaign had gone over the top. 

Our third year, with "Bull" Smith re-elected as president, saw main chanties. 
Disaster paid us an unwelcome visit in the form of a fire, which partially destroyed 
our Science Building. However, it was soon rebuilt, and with new additions. The 
Department of Pharmacy was instituted. The degree with honors was inaugurated. 
Paul Barnett and Clyde Warren, forming one of the ablest debating teams to ever 
represent Howard, were awarded the decision against their rivals from Southern. 
Our traditional rivals failed to conquer in either football or baseball, the big game 
ending in a 7-7 tie, while the Bull Pups romped over the Kittens to a 40-0 victory. A 



unique event that took plan- this year, which will ever hold a cherished place in oui 
memory, was the stealing ot the panther. 

Now we have come to our last year in tlu- school we have all learned to love so 
well. We have chosen Loyal Phillips as our leader, because <»t his manj excellent 
qualities and because he has proven himself to be a friend to all Howardites. We 
received a terrible blow the lirst part of the year, when death claimed one ot those 

dearest to us, Mrs. John C. Dawson, the wife ot our beloved president. Her loss is 
kcenlv telt and sincerely mourned — no one can ever take the place she has held in 
our hearts. Another verj dear friend we lost this year was Mis. A. I ). Smith. She 
was a life-long friend to Howard College and a real mother to the boys. Such friends 
as these will he hard to replace. 

This year we will graduate two more honor students: one, Theodore Jackson, 
president ot the student body, and the other, Helen Johnston, the first girl to ever 
receive a degree with honors from Howard College. This year marks a milestone m 
our athletic history. The first Home-Coming, marked by a pep banquet, was such a 
success that from now on it will be an annual affair. The freshman team was again 
victorious over their rivals. Best of all, however, we dedicated Birmingham's new- 
municipal stadium with a Howard victory, by "rolling it over" Southern, 9-0. There 
will be many Howard-Southern games played in that magnificent stadium, hut to the 
team of this year goes the honor of being able to say, "We won the first!" The 
Senior Class is proud to claim as one of its members, Billy Bancroft, the captain of 
this year's eleven, which is the best in Howard's history. Billy is the man who 
started our class on its way by being its first president and the captain of the first 
freshman football team. He has wound up his college career in a brilliant way. We 
do him honor, because, in addition to being the best football player that ever donned a 
Howard uniform, he is also a good student, a sincere friend, and, above all, a gentle- 
man. The present Senior Class has never seen a Southern football team defeat 
Howard — we are the second class to claim this distinction. As our gift to the campus, 
we are leaving the first stone which will be a foundation to a monument erected to 
the "Valiant Six" who stole the panther. Each Senior Class will leave one more 
stone, so that in the years to come the monument will be a huge pyramid. 

Now, our playtime is almost over, and soon this serious business of life must 
begin. We are thankful if the little we have done has in any way helped our Alma 
Mater. We know that we will never be able to fully realize all that she has meant 
to us. We will strive, in the future, to uphold the high ideals of the college we all 
love and of our president, who has been a constant source of inspiration to us through- 
out our college careers. 

Mildred Hearx. Historian. 



Senior Class Poem 

Four full years we've lived together, 
Strength'ning friendship's potent tie, 

So that years may not dissever 
Hearts, but memory unify. 

Eyes alight with ardor burning, 

To siege Learning's eitadel, 
Hearts afire for knoivledge yearning 

Those four years did not dispel. 

Strength of will to equal fervor 
We ask noiv, a battle iron. 

Give us faith in each endeavor- 
To promote the work begun. 

Thus endowed, life's steepest mountain 
Levels to our onward course. 

Thus inspired, life's sweetest fountain 
Flows for us. with Cod its source. 

Marguerite Pence. 




Junior Class 



Officers 



John Will Gay 



Til 



Bll,,K Ell « Vice-President 

Nan « Elgin Secretary 

CHESTER Quari.es Treasurer 




Junior Class 



Mary Ruth Adams Birmingham, Ala. 

* M 
Secretary Girls' Tennis Club; Vice-President Girls' Ten- 
nis Club; Allied Aits Club; Y. W. C. A.; Freshman 
Commission. 



Bertha Almgren 



Birmingham. Ala. 



Margaret Bass ........ Birmingham, Ala. 

A A II 

Secretary Freshman Class; Allied Arts; Maid Howard- 
Southern Freshman Game (1); Maid Howard-Loyola 
Game (3); University Tennessee (21; Sponsor Military 
Company; Maid Carnival Ball; Sponsor Military Ball. 



imogene bates ....... nirmingnam, 

Glee Club (1, 2, 3); B. S. U. ; Y. W. A. (1, 2, 3); 
retary Howard-Judson Fund. 


.*\ia. 
Sec- 


Albert Beasley Birmingham, 

e k n 

Debating Team (2). 


Ala. 


Bernard Beason - . . • Decatur, 


Ala. 


Codie D. Beli Andalusia. 


Ala. 



n K <1>, X T 

Birmingham News Scholarship; President Freshman 
Class; Associate Editor •■Crimson" (1. 2.>; Y. M. C. 
A. (1. 2. 3); State Student Council Y. M. C. A. (1); 
Economies club (2t; Business Manager "Alabama Stu- 
dent" (1. 2i; Fraternity Editor "Entre Nous" (2); 
Business Manager Girls' Glee Club (2); Sophomore 
Editor "Entre Nous" i2); Honor Roll (2); Mathematics 
Club (3); Assistant Editor-in-Chief "Entre Nous" (3). 



C. II. Blanton . 
Pharmacy Laborat< 



Lafayette, Ala. 

* r r 

Assistant (3); President Howard 
■uticat Association. 



Chrystine Cl.YBPR> 



Alabai 



City. Ah 



Bom/ 
A Z 

Judson College U>; Voted Neatest Girl ill: Pierian 
Club ill; Ann llasseltine Missionary Society (II; 
Y. W. C. A. (1); French club (1); Pan-Hellenic (2); 

Yoted Best Dressed Co-ed i 3 ) ; Glee Club (3L 



David Booki 
St. Clair II. 

J. D. Browi 



Tunnel Springs, Ala. 

. . Evergreen, Ala. 



Elb 



Ala. 



Junior Class 

Bi i i \n Hki nson Samson, Ala, 

Nil i Hi kss Birmingham, Ala, 

Vlabama College (l); class Marshal (1): Alabama 

Players (1); Procter (1); V W. C v. Vllled Vrta 

(2); Girls' Tennis Club (2, S): Glee Club I I), 

Off* Woodfin Caine Safford, Ala. 

V m. , • \ Cabinet: Treasurer v. M. C. v. (S); Fool 
ball (2, S); Economics Club (2, 3). 

Robert Bruci Caine Blalock, Ala, 

Honor Roll n. 2); French Prlie (2); v. U. C \. 

William I'm i Cates .... Birmingham, Ala, 

Honor Roll (1): Scientific Society (2, S): Vlce-Presl- 

i,t,i Scientific Socletj (3); Chemistry Instructor (2. 3); 

Glee Club (3). 

Louise Church ....... Birmingham, Ala. 

* M, B II o 

v. \v. C. A.; Vice-President Freshman Commission 

(l): President Girls' Tennis Club (2); Allied Arts 

Club; Phllllps-Hownrd Club; Honor It. .11 (11; net a 

PI Theta. 

Hugh Jack Clark Weaver, Ala. 

6 K N 

Freshman Basketball. 

Cecil Crawford Arab, Ala. 

A A T 

W. L, CRUMPLER Bessemer, Ala. 

1 T 
Debating Team (1, 2). 

Sara Cunningham Birmingham, Ala. 

A 2, X A <1> 
Allied Arts Club; Y. \Y. C. A. Cabinet (2. 3); Fresh- 
man Marshal; Pan-Hellenic Council (2, 3); Secretary 
Pan-Hellenic Council (3); S.i|.lumior.- Marshal; Or- 
ganization Editor "Crimson" (3); Junior Editor "Entre 
Nous" (3); Honor Roll (1, 2). 

Charles Gordon Dobbins .... Camden, Ala. 

2 N, 2 T 
President Allied Arts Club (2); Student Council (1, 2. 
3); Freshman Football; Varsity Squad (2. 3); B. S. 
G. Coun.il (2. 3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2); Most 
Likeable Boy (2); Assistant Editor "Crimson" (3); 
Organization Editor "Entre Nous" (2); President- 
elect Student Body. 

Nancy Elgin- Searles, Ala. 

A /., X A * 

Freshman Commission (1>; Maid Howard-Southern 
Game (1); Secretary Sophomore Class; Maid Howard- 
Southern Cam.- I 2); Y. W. C. A.; Allied Arts Club (2. 
3); Honor Roll (1, 2); Secretary Student Body (3); 
Pan-Hellenic Council (3); French Club tl); Secretary 
Junior Class (3); Feature Editor "Entre Nous" (2); 
Associate Editor "Crimson'' (3). 





Junior Class 



Billie Ellis Mobile, Ala. 

A Z 
Basketball (2, 3); Glee Club (2); Allied Arts Club (2. 
3); President Woman's Student Government (3); Vice- 
President Junior Class; Art Editor "Entre Nous" (3); 
Humor Editor "Crimson" (3); Swimming Club (3). 

Thomas Edwin Ellis Anniston, Ala. 

A A T 

Glee Club (1. 2. 3); Allied Arts Club (2. 3); Min- 
isterial Association; Mission Band; '■Crimson" 
Staff (3). 



Herbert M. Etheredge . 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Edres Nanette Farrell . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Basketball (3). 

Rayburn Fisher Cullman, Ala. 

e k n 

Freshman Football; Baseball; Band; Vice-President 
Sophomore Class; Manager Varsity Baseball (2); Pan- 
Hellenic Council (2); Secretary Pan-Hellenic Council 
(3); Student Council (3); Football (3); Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet (2, 3); Treasurer H-Club (3). 

Ralph S. Foster Luverne, Ala. 

2 X 

Glee Club; "Crimson" Staff; Scientific Society. 

Kenneth P. Fuller Demopolis, Ala. 

2 X 

Economics Club; Tennis Club. 



Cumbie Gordon Garrett .... Ashland, Ala. 
Baptist Bible Institute; Ministerial Association. 

John W. Gay, Jr Seottsboro, Ala. 

n K * 

Tennis Team (1. 2); Men's Pan-Hellenic (3); Treasurer 

Tennis Club; Treasurer Sophomore Class; President 

Junior Class. 

Evelyn Giles Birmingham, Ala. 

s i x, b n e 

Honor Roll (1. 2); Beta PI Theta National French 
Fraternity (in. 

Maurine Ethel Gipson .... Albertville, Ala. 
A A II 

Woman's College (1); Allied Arts Club (21: Treasurer 
Woman's Student C.overnment. Junior Kepresentattve 
Woman's Studenl Governmenl (S); v. W. C. a. Cab- 
inet (3); Piano Orchestra (2>. 

ToHN Mason Glenn Forest Home, Ala. 

r. a x 

Y. M. C. A. (1. 2. 31; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3). 



1 K I M t lolUUS 



Junior Class 
Birmingham, All 



Mildred Golson Birmingham, Al 

* M. X A 'l> 
President Chi Delta Phi (3); President Tennla Cli 

(8); Alii, ,1 Mis Club; Secretarj \ ,i Arts flu 

Pan-Hellenic Council (2, S). 



I.ivkki Gravlee Birmingham, Ala. 

SAX 

"Crimson" Staff (8); Summer "Crimson" Staff; M ir 

ager Summer i:i .-.i i.m : T.nnis Club i- '■'■ ) ; Business 

Manager Fraternity Play; Economics Club > i I . Scl 

entlflc Society (2, 3). 



Weh i Ikee \l > 



Margarei Hanlin 



Cl ii ins Harris Cedartown, Ga. 

II K A 
Football (l. 2. 3): Baseball ii. ■:. J); Alternate Cap- 
tain Football (3); Captain-Elect i4): Srrivtno <;,..it:ia 
(.Mul>; Vice- riesid. nt H-Club. 



Harold M. Harris . 
Bullpupi 

Samuel Hart . . 



Winfield, Ala 



Margaret Hassler Birmingham, Ah 



Judson College; Freshman Cabinet; Altruian Club 

Ann Hasseltinr Snc-i.-ty: V. \V. A.; Suidt-nt i ouncil (3) 

Vice-President V. W. C. A. 1 :; i ; Allied Arts Club 

H. S. V.; -Mission Hand; Tt-uuis Club; Swimming Club 

Football Maid. 


Mary Sue Hawkins 






Kay Minette, 


Ala 






H S 1 








Scientific Soc 


ety; 


'harms 


ceut 


ioal Associatio 




Ivky HUTTO . . 








. Headland, 


Ala 


Ausie Hyatt . 








. Albertville, 


Ala 





Junior Class 

Frank James Birmingham, Ala. 

A A T 

Earl Johnson Tallassee, Ala. 

Noah V. Johnston Anniston, Ala. 

* 2 r 

Nelson M. Kendrick McCalla, Ala. 

Raymond G. Knight .... Birmingham, Ala. 
n K A 

Freshman Football; Freshman Baseball; Varsity Base- 
ball (2); Glee Club (2, 3); Pan-Hellenic (2); Presi- 
dent Pan-Hellenic (3); Reporter Scientific Society t3). 

Elizabeth Carrel Lawson . . Birmingham, Ala. 
<I> M 

President Freshman Commission; Glee Club (2. 3); 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2); Girls' Council 11); "Crim- 
son" Staff (3). 

Lucy Lea Birmingham, Ala. 

Elizabeth Leslie Birmingham, Ala. 

<!> M 

Y. W. C. A.; Freshman Commission; Allied Arts Club. 

Ira R. Lowery Birmingham, Ala. 

* :; r 

Debating Societv; Glee Club; Orchestra; Scientific 
Society. 

Jewell Mars Birmingham, Ala. 

Blue Mountain College (1. 2); Euzelian Literary 
Society. 

JEWET Motley Birmingham, Ala. 

8 K X 

Clarence Leon Morgan Mobile, Ala. 

1 A X 

Captain Freshman Basketball: Freshman Baseball: 

Freshman Football; Varsity Football t2>; Varsity 

Basketball (2); Men's Pan-Hellenic Council. 



Junior Class 



J. C. Mm i ik. |k Birmingham, All 

A A T 



Marcarei McCuli \ Birmingham, Ah 

A A II 



I 01 \ Ilena McCi i mi gh Kinston, Ala. 

K A 1 

Newton Junior College; Basketball (1, 8); Glee C 

(3); French Club (1. a); Music Club ii, 2); Cla 
President i-i; 1. s\ \.. sm.l.-ni M'.-mmu iiinul. 



Elspeth MacDonald Birmingham, Ah 

A ^ 



Willie B. McDonald Winfield, Al 

() K N 



Byron Nelson East Tallassee, Ala. 

2 A X 

Annie Newman Birmingham, Ala. 

A Z 

Fresh man Commission; Tennis Club. 



Othelia Nichols . 



Fayette, Ala. 



Annie Marcarei Nunnelle^ . Birmingham, Ala. 

B A 2 

Glee Club (2, 3). 

Edward Thomas Xi nnelley . Birmingham, Ala. 

II K A 

Freshman Football; Commerce Club; Glee Club. 

Margaret O'Dell ...... Birmingham, Ala. 

A A II 

Newman Panell Birmingham, Ala. 

$ 2 r 





Junior Class 

D. E. Plummer Carbon Hill, Ala. 

A A T 

Georce H. Putnam Birmingham, Ala. 

Olix C. Reed ....... Birmingham, Ala. 

2: A X 
"Crimson" Staff (3); Pan-Hellenic Council (3>; Phi 
Mu Play (2); Sigma Delta Chi Play (3); Tennis Club. 

John' Robert Rushing Lockhart, Ala. 

Birmingham News Scholarship; Debating Team (2); 
Freshman Marshal: President r.iileg.- S. S. ('lass ill; 
President College B. Y. P. U. (2); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(1. 2); President Y. M. C. A. <:'); Vice-President B. 
S. U. (2); Delegate Y. M. C. A. Milwaukee Conference 
(2); Delegate B. S. U. Conferences; Editor "Bull Pup" 
(3); Sophomore Marshal; Religious Education Club; 
Vice-President Math Club < 2 > ; President Math 
Club (3). 

Mertice Scofield ...... Birmingham, Ala. 

2 I X 

Commerce Club; Pan-Hellenic Council (3). 

Naomi Shepherd Cordova, Ala. 

^ I X 

James Crumpton Shelburxe . . . Danville, Va. 

<I> K 2, 2 T 

Varsity Debating Team CD; President Sigma Upsilon 

(31; Chairman Parade Committee (3). 

Ivev John Shuff Bessemer, Ala. 

Debating Team (3) ; Secretary Student Mission Band 

(2); Reporter Student Mission Band (3 i ; Treasurer 

Ministerial Association ( 3 1 ; Reporter Alabama Baptist 

Ministerial Association (3). 

Mary Scott Smith Lineville, Ala. 

A A II 
Scientific Society (l); Pan-Hellenic council (3). 

Earl Stiver Montgomery, Ala. 

Glee Club (1, -)\ Honor Roll 1 1) ; Assistant Director 
Glee club (3). 

Solon B. Suddeth Birmingham, Ala. 

i; N 
Freshman Football; Freshman Basketball; Treasurer 

Brcshman Class; Yarsitv Boot bail (2, 3); Manager 

Baseball t3i ■ Economies club; Tennis Club; Phillips- 

Howard Club. 

James GLENN VANCE, Ik. . . . Birmingham. Ala. 

O K N 

Freshman Football; Varsity Football (2, S); Coach 

of Girls' Swimming ('tub (8). 



Junior Class 



George Wilks Warrick Birmingham, Al 

II K A 

Honor Roll (3); Summer Crimson Stafl (3); Vlc< Pre) 

dent Phillips-Howard Club (3); Glee Club (3); Crlmsi 

StaB CM. 



X \..\u V. Wi ns Gadsden, 

A 7. 


Ah 


Sophomore Representative Woman's Council; Vlee-1 
• i.-ii t Woman's stu. l.'iu .'..un.ii c.i; Treasurer Y. \ 
(S); Glee Club (3). 




Virginia Wittmeier Birmingham, 

B A 1 


Ah 


Freshman Marshal. 




Maki Woodali Springville, 

A A II 


Al; 


Kathleen Wright Blocton, 


Ah 


Raymond E. Yost Talladega, 


Ah 



Fred Burnham Jacksonville, Ah 

II K •!> 



Josephine Cac 


I.E . . 




. . . Mt. 


nop,. 


Ala. 


Council 


(2); v. 


Normal 1 

\V. ('. A 

Student 


l. 2); Gl 
. ; Bask. 
Mission 


lee Club (1, 
•ii. all (l. 2 
Band. 


|; V. '\\ 


u.i. nt 

. A.; 


(kv S, 


Campbell . . 




. . Tusc 


:a!oosa, 


Ala. 


DOROTH 


v Clin 


DRESS . 
Y. 


A 2 

w. C. 


. Birmii 

A. 


ngham, 


Ala. 


Haroi i 


i Peace 




e k n 


. . Birmi 


ngham, 


Ala 


Tennis 


Team 


:l>; Tennis Club; 
Basketball 


Freshman 
3). 


i Bask. 


tl.all; 



Millard C. Strickland Alexandria, Air 

II K $ 

Football; Basketball. 





Sophomore Class 
Officers 

Mardis Howle President 

Florence Bass Vice-President 

Frank Aycock Treasurer 

Sarah Hargrove Secretary 



Sophomore Class 
is Alabama City. Ala. 



Athoi ine Allen, a Z . . 

V. \v. 



Anderson, •!> M . . . . . . Trussville, Ala 

Club (2); V. \Y. C. A. (1. 2); Dalphine Club (2). 



Geraldine Armstrong Birmingham, Ala 



Frank Aycock, Jr., DEA Selma, Ala 

Freshman Football m. Men's Pan-Hellenic Council (2) 
Assistant Cheer Leader (2); Freshman Basketball Man 

iiK'T; Class Treasurer i2>. 



Mari Hock Hanks, A A II . . . . Birmingham, Ah 



Amos Barr, II K A Haleyville, Alt 

Freshman Football (l); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2). 



Florence Bass, A A II Birmingham, Ala. 

Y. W. C. A. (1, 2); Glee Club (2). 



Velda Bates Birmingham, Ala. 

Allied Arts Club: Glee Club. 



Leu. A Bvrd Beasley, A A IT, B II 6 . Birmingham, Ala. 



Louise Bellsnyder, A Z Birmingham, Ah 

Basketball (1); Glee Club; V. W. C. A. 



Eva Berry Pine Hill, Ala. 

Honor Roll (2). 



Rebecca Berry, A A II Birmingham, Ala. 

Basketball (2); Swimming Team (2). 



WyATT Blassingame, 2 X . . . . Montgomery, Ala. 



Mildred Bledsoe, 2 I X Birmingham, Ala. 

Allied Arts Club; Y. W. C. A.; Freshman Commission. 



Sheppard Bryan, - A X Greenville, Ala. 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Ministerial Assoeiation (1, 2). 





Sophomore Class 

Sam Joe Campbell, A 2 <J> . . . . Headland, Ala. 
Wm. Perry Claxton, 2 A X . . . . Anniston, Ala. 

Jesse Chandler, II K A Birmingham, Ala. 

Margaret Cobb Birmingham, Ala. 



James O. Colley, 2 X . . . . 
y. m. c. A. (1 



Ah 



Jack Compton Linden, Ala. 

Howard Scientific Society; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 



James Cunningham, II K <p . . 
Y". m. C. A. (1, 



Martha Darden, SIX 



Grove Hill, Ala. 



Goodwater, Ala. 



Claude Darwin Birmingham, Ala. 

John B. Davis, QEA Selma, Ala. 

Ralph Dismukes Birmingham, Ala. 



Henry Donahoo. G K X . . . . Birmingfa 



Jere A. Dumas, Jr., IE E A 



Ala. 



Alfred Floyd Dyar. sax 



Birmingham, Ala. 



'.i.i.iot P. ELLIS, A A T Enterprise, All 

Art Editor "Entre Nous"; Allied Arts Club; Glee run.. 



Jack Finkli a, II K A Hixon, Ala. 



Sophomore 


Class 




RALPH Flood 


. . . Louisville 


, K>. 


Ministerial Ass,,, 






Cecil Folm ak, ii k a, * * * 


.... Ensley, 


Ala. 


Birmingham-Southern t i i ; Glee l 
(1); Band (1, 


!lub (1, 2); v. M. 


C. A. 


Elizabeth Franks 


. . Birmingham, 


Ala. 


J. Harold Freeman, 11 K A . 


. Birmingham, 


Ala. 


Manager Freshman Football (2) 
Football (2 


Manager-elect V; 


irslty 


J. G. Galloway 

Y. M. C. A. (1 


. Alexander City, 


Ala. 


Hollis F. Garrard, 2 A X . . 


. Birmingham, 


Ala. 


Allied Arts; Hand; 


Glee (Tub. 




J. Leon Gilbert, A A T . . . 


. Alabama City, 


Ala. 


Ed F. Goldsmith, 2) X . . . 


. . . . Ens'.ey, 


Ala. 


James E. Gourley, 2 N . . 


. . Birmingham, 


Ala. 


William Grimmer, II K A . , 


. . Birmingham, 


Ala. 


Freshman F<>" 


tball. 




Irene Hacker 


. . . . Center, 


Ala. 


Y. ^y. C. A.; Birmingham News 
Allied Arts 


Scholarship; Y. V, 


'. A.; 


Sarah Hargrove, <I> M . . . 


. . Birmingham, 


Ala. 


Allied Arts. Y. \v. C. A.; Honor 
more class 


Roll; Secretary Sopho- 


Frances Harris, <I> M . . . . 


. Birmingham, 


Ala. 


Allied Arts; Feature Ed 


[tor ■'Crimson." 




Martha Harris, AS. . . . 


. . Birmingham, 


Ala. 


Girls' Basketball 


Team. 




Blair Hays, 9 K X 


. . . Cullman, 


Ala. 


Pharmacy, 






C. M. Head 


. . Birmingham, 


Ala. 





Sophomore Class 

Edwin T. Hicks, n K * Selma, Ala. 

y. M. c. A. 

A. Hudson- Hicks, A A T Trnv, Ala. 

W 

B. F. Hixon 

* - * Ministerial Assc 

^9^J0f^^ ^"^^^r Mardis Howle, SAX Wetumpka, Ala. 

^^ I \ President Sophomore Class; Honor Roll; Organization 

•'^ f*y I - fXL Editor - Entre - Nous " 

j i A Clarence Landham, IT K * . . . . Anniston, Ala. 

J^^^^i,^^ 1 Y - M - c - A -: Honor Roll. 

■-.»— £3^^B ' j» T * Jt James Lantrip Birmingham, Ala. 

S ^^L. f Pharmaceutical Association. 

^p, *^^ ^^^^^9 ' Alma Lonc Birmingham, Ala. 

'' ^ f# \f^ -S ^\ T - B> L0NTG Birmingham, Ala. 

-A. . ^ ^l ^J James Rowe Longshore, 2 X . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Afl^^^L Henry L. Lyon Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

JET TlL Ministerial Association; Y. M. C. A. 

— *_ Marie Mackey Birmingham, Ala. 

^ k ^V^ 1 '*. Vera Mackey Birmingham, Ala. 

m :^T '^» ' ~&W Margaret Mansell, B a 2 Dothan, Ala. 

^M^%^ V *2^^ Frances Mapi.es, HUB Birmingham, Ala. 

\^ t "^ * flP Rosalie Martin Jemison, Ah 

% J^J, fr French Club; Debating Soc 

V ^^ 4,j^S Mattie Matthews, B A 2 Dal] ' 

^(Vr Honor Roll; President Y. \V. A. 



Sophomore Class 
Gilbert Meadows, A at. . . . Lowndesboro, Ala 
Robert Miller, Jk Birmingham, Ah 

John Wm. Minor, Jr., IN Ensley, Ah 



Ann Moore Gadsden, Ala. 

Religious Education Club; Honor Roll; Vice-President 



Wm. Harry Morton, A A T . . . Alabama City, Ah 
Freshman Cheer Leader, 



Jewel Mosley, - I X ....... . Ensley, Ala. 

Y. W. c. A. 



Bonnie McVeigh Birmingham, Ala. 

Mrs. Lillian McWright .... Birmingham, Ala. 
Morris Nelson Walnut Grove, Ala. 



James O'Brien Tarrant, Ala. 

Pharmacy Society; Band. 



Goldsby K. Osburn Perrvville, Ala. 



Elizabeth Otvvei.l, <I> M Oneonta, Ala. 

Glee Club; T. W. C. A. 



Fay Owen Oxford, Ala. 



T. J. Payne, Jr., II K <I> . . . . 

Scientific Society. 



Thomas H. Peacock, 9 K X . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Wm. Alfred Pearson Milltown, Ala. 





Soph 



CI; 



ophomore L^iass 



Augusta Piatt, A Z Birmingham, Ala. 

Women's Pan-Hellenic Council. 



Caesar Burks Powell, A A T . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Glee Club; Orchestra. 



Sterling Powers, 2 A X 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Maurice Pride Montgomery, Ala. 

y. m. c. A. 



Fred R. Putman, A A T . . . . Alabama City, Ala. 
Glee Club (1, 2). 



Marv Glenn Reynolds, * M . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Secretary Freshman Class; Student Council (2); Honor 
Roll; "Entre Nous" Staff (2). 



Lee Roberts, n K 4> . . . , 

Freshman Football; Vi 



Oneonta, Ala. 



Houston Robinson Verbena, Ala. 

Elizabeth Sanders, A Z Ensley, Ala. 

Sara Sanders, A Z Anderson, S. C. 

Barney Saxon, 9 K X Lineville. Ala. 



Tom Shamburger Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 



John Sibley, 11 K * . 




Birmingham, Ala. 


Claude Smeraglia . . 




. Birmingham, Ala. 


Secretary-Treasurer 


Pharmaceutl 


C8J Association. 


Gordon S. Sorrei.l . 




. . Thorsby, Ala. 



VERA Mae Sim awn, A 1 Birmingham, Ala. 

Glee Club. 



Sophomore Class 

.... Birmingham, Ala 



Virginia Stovall . 



Ruth Strange, SIX Ensley, Ala. 

V. \Y. C. A. (1. -I. 

Eleanor Sudduth, $ M Birmingham, Ala. 

Student Council (1); Allied Arts Club; Glee Club; v. w. 
C. A. (l, 2); "Crimson" staff (2). 

Kims St. John, 9 K X Cullman, Ala. 



HUGH Taylor, II K A Miami, Fla. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 



Fred Tente, Jr., II K A . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Student Council (2); Glee club (2); Hand (1, 2). 



Roy L. Thomas Ashland, Ala. 

J. C. Tolsox, IT K A Birmingham, Ala. 



Donald E. Van- Buskirk, 2 X . . . . La Junta, Col. 

Freshman Football; Freshman Baseball; Varsity Football 



Luther Vines Clanton, Ala. 

Lewis Benton Waldrop, 2 X . . . . Bessemer, Ala. 
Raymond Walker, * 2 T . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 



Mary Estelle Waits 



. Gadsden, Ala. 



J. D. Wn.i.iNGHAM Birmingham, Ala. 

Ministerial Association; Y. M. C. A. 



H. B. Woodward, Jr., n K * . . . . Lineville, Ala. 

Freshman Tennis Club. 



Davis C. Wooley Montgomery, Ala. 

Ministerial Association; Y. M. C. A. 





Freshman Class 

Officers 

0mer Reed President 

Alfred Turmfseed Vice-President 

Louise Stapp Secretary 

W. C. McDonald Treasurer 




Freshman Class 
Mildred Abercrombie 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Leonard Lee Allen 
phoenix city, ala. 

Robert J. Allen 

ENSLEY, ALA. 
Band (1). 

Joe E. Anderson 

THOMASVILLE, ALA. 

Charles Loyd Arledge, 17 K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

A. Maxwell Bains, 77 K <P 

BLOUNTSVILLE, ALA. 

John R. Barton, K 7V 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Band (1). 

Florence Marie Balm, — IX 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Y. W. C. A. 

Buster Bazemore, 2l J X 

SYLACAUGA, ALA. 

Charter C. Bishop 

BILLINCSLEY, ALA. 

Virginia Bishop, -4 J 77 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Freshman ("lass Reporter; Y. \v. C. a. 

Aline Blackburn 

JON'ES MILL, ALA. 

T. M. Borland, Jr., 77 A' .4 

PINCKARD, ALA. 

James W, Boswell, 2" J X 

BRUN'MDGE, ALA. 

Shirley B. Brakefield, 2" TV 

GAMBLE MINKS, ALA. 

Myra L. Brincman 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

J. T. Browder 
port payne, ala. 

Christine Brown 
birmingham, ala. 



Fresh 



reshman 



CI 



ass 



Elbert Byron Bruce, // K </' 

[RONDALB, ALA. 

Eugenia Ruth Bush, B A 1' 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

y. \v. r. a.; Glee riui> (1). 

Agnew Byrne 

BAY MINBTTE, ALA. 

George T. Cotton, Jr., 2'.' A' 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALA. 
Band (1); Glee Club Orchestra (1). 

Alice Mildred Cranford, A 1' 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glje Club (1); Y. W. C. A. 

Allie M. Daugherty 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALA. 

Thelma Davis 

INCLENOOK, ALA. 

William C. Davis, Jr. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Orchestra (1). 

OVVAREAN L. DAWSEY 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1). 

Vertis L. Day 

DAVISTON, ALA. 

WlLFORD DoRFMAN 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

LUCILE DYAR 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Br ford Dyer 

MALONE, ALA. 

Manning B. Eagles, 2" N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Hubert B. Echols, 2 A X 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Music Scholarship; Glee Club (1). 

Thomas C. Edwards, II K A 

piedmont, ala. 

Frances Marie Elliott, .1 2' 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Ruth Elizabeth Ellis, B A 2 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); Y. W. C. A. 





Freshman Class 

Elizabeth Fenn 
birmingham, ala. 

Student Mission Band. 

Harold Harrison Floyd, 2" J A" 

BRUNDIDGE, ALA. 
Band (1). 

Myrtice Folmar 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club; Swimming Club. 

Philip F. Foshee 

CLANTO.N, ALA. 

Robert X. Frederick 

HALEVVILLE, ALA. 

Hexry Blrbage Galloway 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALA. 

James A. Garrett. Jr.. <I> — r 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Clarice Lambert George 
natchez, miss. 

Y. \Y. C. A.; Glee Club (1). 

Katherixe Gerald 
birmingham, ala. 

Frank M. Gibbs. 2T 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Thomas J. Gibbs 

ENSLEY, ALA. 

C. B. GlLLILAXD 
ANNISTON, ALA. 

Ralph Gilmore, Tl K A 
brundidge, ala. 

James Napoleox Goldex 
adcer, ala. 

H. B. Goodwin 

POWDERLY, ALA. 

Elwyn S. Gore 

Cl AN ION, AI A. 

Alma Gladys Graves, - / A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Y. \Y. C. A. 

Pauline Elizabeth Gravis, A I // 

BANGOR, AI A. 



I'n slim, in 1'iMlliinssh'li. 



Freshman Class 
Ruth Gravlee, 2' / X 

BIRMINGHAM, AI A. 
Secretarj Freshman Commission; v. W. C. 

Lena (Ikh n 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
QI< e Club Mi; V. W. ''. A. 

Frank Hagood, 2' A 

EVERGREEN, ALA. 

Gwendolyn Hall 

BERRY, ALA. 
V. w. C. A.; Glee Club (1); v. \v. A. Missloi 

Evelyn Harbin 

ATTALLA, ALA. 

Grace Hardy, A I // 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Madge Hardy, A J 77 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Jack Harvey Harris, .4 A T 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (l i ; Band (1). 

Olive Harris 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); v. W. C. A. 

H. H. Hays 

JEMISON, ALA. 

Bex B. Henderson 1 

ENTERPRISE, ALA. 

William J. Hester 

CI. ANTON, ALA. 

Sarah Frances High, A J 77 

ASHVILLE, ALA. 

Clifford A. Holcomb 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Edna Haley 
birmingham, ala. 

Mary Haley 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Irwin F. Holleman 

CENTER, ALA. 

F. D. HOLLIFIELD 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 





Freshman Class 

Margaret Holmes, A A II 
birmingham, ala. 

Ida Belle Holt.am, .1 2 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); Y. W. C. A. 

Sarah Hoover, J Z 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

C. A.; President Freshman Commission; 
Chairman Y. \V. C. A. 

Mary Alice Howard 

JACKSON, ALA. 

Edwin Huey, II K <I> 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Tom Huey, Jr., 2 N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Mary Elizabeth Huff 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club (1). 

Katherine H. Irwix 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1). 

Broughtox Isom 

PHIL CAMPBELL, ALA. 

Evelyn James, B A 2 

GADSDEN", ALA. 
Y. W. A.: Y. W. C. A. 

M. Presley Jeter, Jr., 2 X 
montevallo, ala. 

Ruth Jewell 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

William Bert Johxsox, 2" .1 X 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Edw. B. Johnston, 2' f 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

C. R. Joxes, Jr. 

ATHENS, ALA. 

John Graham Joxes, // K A 
ql'incv, vta. 

Maurice Joxes 
west blocton, ala. 

William Marion Joxes 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



Freshman CI 



ass 
Elizabeth Jordan, - / X 

BIRMINGHAM, \I \. 

LAWTON Kami-lain, .1 .1 T 

EVl RGRE1 N, ALA. 

Mariox Gay Keith 
ensley, ala. 

William Odes Kent, 2' I X 

SHAD\ GROVE, ALA. 
Football d). 

Marguerite Kimbrell 

FAYETTE, ALA. 
Y. W. c A.; Mission Band. 

Rose Dey King 

MOORF HAVEN, FLA. 
Y W. C A.; Y. W. A.; Glee Club (1). 

Virginia Lorraine Knapp, -4 J // 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Glee Club (1). 

Lincoln E. Knight 

CULLMAN, ALA. 

William Ernest Kreh, .4 .1 T 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Wade C. Lamberth, Z N 

ALEXANDER CITY, ALA. 

C. M. Lancaster, .4 .1 T 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Otis K. Lawson, 77 K <I> 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Tennis Club (1). 

Edith W. Leckie, J Z 

BESSEMER, ALA. 

Hazel Marguerite Leveille, 2' I X 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); Y. W. C. A. 

Othello Lloyd, J Z 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); Freshman Commission. 

C. E. Locke 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

W. Lewis Longshore, & K N 

LAFAYETTE, ALA. 

Walter L. Malone 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 





Freshman Class 
Nellie Manx, .1 2" 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

William Horace Manx, 77 K <I> 

TALLASSEE, ALA. 

Mary Pendleton Mason, B J I 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Glee Club (1); Freshman Cabinet; Freshman Cor 
sion. 

Ollie Ruth Matthews, .1 2" 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Opal Miller 
birmingham, ala. 

Richard Howard Milxer 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Roy D. Mims 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Lloyd C. Mooxeyham 

CLIO, ALA. 

Jackie Ola Moody 

CHEROKEE, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); Y. W. A.; T. W. C. A. 

Jeanette Morgax, J Z 

SLOCOMB, ALA. 

Joseph Willett Morris 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Maverine McClure 

HUNTSVII.I.E, ALA. 
V. W. A. 

Horace McDanal, 7/ K <1> 

SIPSEV, ALA. 

W. C. McDonald, Jr.. 77 7v A 

FAIRFIELD, ALA. 

Leonard McGarr, 77 A.' </> 

TALLASSEE, ALA. 

James C. McGehee, 2' ZV 

PRATT CITY, ALA. 

Earl S. McGilvray 

STROUD, ALA. 



Truman McGonigai 

MOBILE. ALA. 



J X 



Freshman Class 
Clarence W. McInnis 

REPTON, ALA. 

Annie Laurie McKinley, .1 I // 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

J. E. McLeod 

WAYCROSS, CA. 

J. W. McLendon, '/> 2' /' 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

William II. McMurray, 2' I X 

FAIRFIELD, ALA. 

D. C. McNair 

ATWOOD, ALA. 

Helen Carithers McNeil, <I> M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

John Charles McRee, 2 A X 

GREENVILLE, ALA. 

Tennis Club (1). 

Margaret Newell 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Matthew Nichols 

ADGER, ALA. 

Flora Etta Nix 

BELLE ELLEN, ALA. 

Ruth Genevieve O'Kelly, <I> M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Y. W. C. A.; Swimming Club. 

Ethelyne Oliver, J Z 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); Freshman Commission. 

Robert Padgett, 77 K <I> 

SOUTH PITTSBURG, TENN. 

B. D. Palmer, A A T 

EUTAW, ALA. 

James Robert Pittard, K N 

EASTABOGA, ALA. 

Olivia Prescott, '/' M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1). 

Andrew J. Prewitt 

FORT PAYNE, ALA. 
Freshman Representative. 





Freshman CI 



ass 



E. Ray 

HALEVVILLE, ALA. 

Daniel Regan 

IRON'DALE, ALA. 

Omer L. Reed, JT A X 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
President Freshman Class; Glee Club Orchestr 

Howard Riddle 
birmingham, ala. 

Minnie Riddle, A A IJ 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); Y. W. C A. 

Mary Fay Riser, <P M 

LAFAYETTE, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. 

W. B. Roberts 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Band (1); Glee Club Orchestra (1). 

Effie Mae Robinette, SIX 

ONEONTA, ALA. 
Y. W. C. A. 

Louise Sanders, J Z 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Y. W. C. A. 

James B. Scarbrough 

GADSDEN, ALA. 

Elizabeth Scheuing. .1 2' 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club (1); Y. Y\'. C. A. 

Olive Carroll Seroyer, — IX 

ENSLEY, ALA. 
Y. W. C. A. 

Wilda Josephine Sharp 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Rufus W. Shei.ton, 77 K <P 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Elsie Maurine Slaughter, <P M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Y. W. C. A. 

Elizabeth Carolyn Smith 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Y. \V. C. A.; Glee Club (1). 

Ralph B. Smith. A .1 T 

SLOCOMB, ALA. 

Jack M. Spain 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



Fresh 



reshman 



CI 



ass 



A 



O. B. Sparks, Jr., 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Louise Joyce Stapp, -1 / .\ 



KNSLEV, ALA. 



V. \V. C. A. 



Mary Elder Spark 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Julian E. Stephens 

KEENER, ALA. 

Julian E. Stephens, 2' I X 

CRAYFORD, ALA. 

Mary Lou Stephens 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Edith Stocks, <P M 

GADSDEN, ALA. 
T. W. C. A.; Swimming Club. 

Norman Douglas Strozier 
birmingham, ala. 

Lemuel Strength 

TALLASSEE, ala. 

Houston Studdard 

CORONA, ALA. 

James H. Talmadge 

ENSLEY, ALA. 

Clara Thomas 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Y. W. C. A. 

Marion B. Thomas, 2 ZV 

TALLADEGA, ALA. 
Glee Ciub (1). 

Ruth Thompson 

HARTSELLE, ALA. 
r. C. A.; Y. W. A.; Women's Student Govern! 

Buey N. Tomlinson 

HARTSELLE, ALA. 

John Alfred Turnipseed, 77 K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Vice-President Freshman Class 

John Wm. Urquhart, 2l J X 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Band (I) ; Tennis Club. 

Clara Louise Vail, A — 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 





Fresh 



reshman 



CI 



ass 



Joe W. Vaughn, 77 A' <P 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Glee Club Orchestra. 

G. T. Walden 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Mary Elizabeth Wallace, <Z> M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Flora Ward 

NEWVILLE, ALA. 

Mildred Warren 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Mary Katherixe Waters, A Z 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
Freshman Commission. 

James W. Watters 

SELMA, ALA. 

Robert D. Weayer 

BUFFALO, ALA. 

Alma Weeks 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Ollie A. West-Brook, I A X 

CADSDEN, ALA. 
n Pharmacy CI 
harmaceutical A 

Annie Lou Whiten 
heflin, ala. 

Student Mission Band; Y. W. C. A. 

Ruth Wilbanks, <I> M 

GADSDEN, ALA. 
Y. Y\\ C. A.; Y. W. A.; Swimming Club. 

Clyde Wilder, 77 A' A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Bert L. Williams. Jr.. 2' J X 

STUTTGART, ARK. 
Band; Glee Club: Orchestra. 

Charles Nolen Williams, A A T 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Ellen Jeannette Williams 
birmingham, ala. 

H. B. Williams 

WEST GREEN, ALA. 

Pearl Williams, 2" 7 A" 

CARBON HILL, ALA. 

\Y. C. A . ; V. W. A.; Freshman Editor "Entre Nous. 



Freshman Class 



MARGARI r WYATT . 



Birmingham, Ala 



Charles Yandlk, A AT. . . . Birmingham, Ala. 



Pauline York, A A II Sumiton, Ala. 

y. w. A.J v. w. c. A. 

Emmett Aldridge, II K <I> . . . . Brooksville, Ala. 

Robert Austin Birmingham, Ala. 

Clarence Richardson Birmingham, Ala. 



Conrad St. John 



GunterM-ille, Al 




Did Ja Ever 



did ja ever 


how cute 


did ja ever 


did ja ever 


fiat house 


say the cutest 


and what 


ask the 


walk up 


and you 


thing you've 


you say 


way to the 


to an upperclassman 


wonder 


said since 


is a rival 


gymnasium 


and in 


why 


you were 


to 


and get 


your sweetest 


the upperclassman 


iittle and 


childish sayings 


laughed 


voice 


laughed 


innocent 


but an 


at and 


ask the 


did ja ever? 


when you 


upperclassman 


then 


way to the 




always said 


grabs a 


someone tells 


Science Hall 




cute things 


board 


you 


and he points 




that the 


and beats 


Howard 


back of the Alain 




aunts 'n' uncles 


you for 


ain't got 


Building and 




would chuckle 


wise-cracking 


no 


you find 




over and 


did ja ever? 


gym 


yourself 




say 




did ja ever? 


in a 


"Suds." 




AN APPRECIATION 

to 

Dr. J. E. Dillard 



Dr. Dillard is claimed and acclaimed by Howard students to the extent 
that they always want him where they are, and that's why this page, 
which we dedicate to him in all love and gratitude, is next to the class 
section. His zeal in behalf of Howard during the recent endowment 
campaign is of inestimable value to this institution, and it is the greatest 
satisfaction to all those interested in the school to know that such a loyal 
Howard booster will serve as chairman of the Committee on New 
Buildings and Equipment. We honor you. Dr. Dillard. 





°jBoo/c ©wo: ^Athletics 





FOOTBALL 



ENTRE NOUS 



jlffif§jj£ 1928 y((V(^X% 



Howard Beats BIham-Southern 9-0 Before 17,000 

BuUtmpsWin From Ci,b h l 4 To li 

BMffiBSR FINISHES BfllLLIJlHTLT 




SP££TS 



™ Bulldogs Vs. Timers, Rickwood, Saturday at 2 P M 
Bulldogs Crush Spring Hill Badgm 37-0 - 



HSTKIOBMER 

SPRJNC HriL BY 37-B SCBRE II 




Bullpups Battle Baby Tigers To Vie O-O' 

"EBOK" P. mMK. KW ISSISTiUn >*m _ D„|U rt « .,„ n u. • ■ 1 . . 

jt vDUimog vs. Panther, Legion Field, Saturday 1 P.M. 

\\mwiswLvm 

beats B ham-S(iuthern 9-0 Before 17,000 

BATTLE O F MARNE Next We ek 

— 




)ups Still Victorious Over Par 



Bulldogs Hold Undefeated Loyola To 0-0 Draw 



Howard Breaks Grid Record to Tie Auburn 9-9 



ulllDWUS SiTOH EMIT. FORM i 
IM H0L01N6 iHCILHT POW RFULFOI 



vtitiau 



SOT-SMS MISSISSIPPI Oil , 
SATUHDJtT TO PL»T THE CHOCTRWSJ- 




UfiUfl IIBI'iNBLimsm 
IMlSIMIlltDnil 






Page eighty- jour 



ENTRE NOUS 



YM^ I928 ^(f(^V^ 




loaches 

Coach C. C. Dillon, as Athletic Director and head football coach, has had his hands full, 
but you'll agree with us that he did quite a neat job of it. A glance at last year's football 
results will convince anybody that he knows his pigskins — and his men. He guided the Bulldogs 
through one of the toughest grid campaigns in their history last Fall, and did it well. 

However, we would not have had such a good season had it not been for Coach "Doc" New- 
ton, who coached the line and did most of the scouting. He can watch a game and photograph 
in his mind every play the prospective opponents run, and some others that might be run from 
the same formations. Baseball, however, is his long suit. He has been doing good work 
with the pastimers and we wish him luck when he leaves us this spring. 

Coach "Eddie" McLane, who joined us last Fall, also comes in for a share of the honors. He 
had charge of the ends and it is admitted that Howard never had a better outlay of flankmen. 
His success with the basketball team was almost remarkable, considering Howard's cage results 
in the last few years. 

Coach "Slick" Lollar, staying at Howard to coach this year after completing a brilliant ath- 
letic career, marked himself as a coach of ability. His strong Bullpup team will furnish much 
good material for the varsity next year, and the 'Pups will know football. He also did fine work 
with the Rat cagemen and is coaching the baseball team. 



Page eighty-five 



ENTRE NOUS 



m^ '»' «% 




^^SU^mdl\\\\\\\M^m\\\\ 



<3^7 




The Season 



The piercing blast of a whistle. The thud of leather against leather. Muffled scurrying of 
feet on the grassy field. The clash of straining bodies. Again — again — and again. A roar from 
one side of the field. Maniacal antics of fans. Flying cushions and hats. An audible sob 
from across the rectangle. Legion Field belched forth a seething mass of humanity. Howard 
College had dedicated Birmingham's new municipal stadium with a 9 to o victory over Birming- 
ham-Southern! 

The 1927 football season had so many high spots that it seems better to emphasize them 




Page eighty-six 




instead of going into a dry history of the year's campaign. Hut the complete victory over 
Birmingham-Southern towers above them all, because there was never so much at stake. Legion 
Field was dedicated in tine style, and the Crimson Bulldog still retains the battered crown of 
Birmingham footballdom, wrested from the Hilltop Panthers six years ago. 

Captain Billy Bancroft closed his football career in brilliant style. The other seniors that 
played — Clif Brown and Johnny Wilking — played football that will long be remembered. But 
those fighting the Panther for the last time were supported one hundred per cent by those playing 
their first game, or second, or their third, against the ancient foe. Bud Harris and Sam Bradley 
were playing like a couple of demons. Sam Spicer, "Ox" Clark and "Shorty" Griffith knocked 
opposing linemen around like chessmen. Don Van Buskirk, "Red" Garret, Louie Rhudy, 
"Soupy" Suddeth, Mitch Burns, Roy Williams, Fred Burnham and "Ham" Smith had big 
shares in the honors. 

Howard was superior practically all the way through, but the Panthers held through the 
first half, which ended with the score o-o. In the third quarter, Bill calmly stepped back and 
tossed the pigskin to Sam Spicer, thirty yards away, and Sam scrambled over the line for a 




Page eighty-seven 



ENTRE NOUS 



1928 


















six-point lead. The Bulldog captain put the ball squarely between the uprights from the 
29-yard line in the closing period; score, Howard, 9; Southern, o. 

The Canines started their first Dillon season off by a 37 to o victory over Spring Hill. While 
the game was not so important, it marked them as a winning aggregation. Bull Smith, one of 
the strongest linemen, sustained a twisted knee that kept him out for the rest of the year. Then 
came the first big surprise of the season. 

The highly-touted Loyola Wolves swaggered into Birmingham with a perfect record to keep. 
They were knocked off their pedestal of glory when the Howard men held them to a 0-0 dead- 
lock, when they had not been beaten or tied in three years. The contest was one of the hardest 
fought of the season, but "Bucky" Moore's expected long runs were cut short by alert Howard 
linemen. 

The march of the Crimson horde was stopped short the next week when the Bulldogs jour- 
neyed over into Mississippi to meet Millsaps. The Majors were not as strong as the team met 
the week before, but the locals couldn't get started off on the right foot and went down in 
defeat, 13 to 6. The overthrow got their nettle up, however, and another page was added to 
Howard's football history a week or two later. 






r> 




Page eighty-eight 



/7^2tw^ ENTRE NOUS 





«&, 







Smarting under the di cip ine administered by the Majors, the Dillonites took their spite out 
on Jacksonville Normal, showing no mercy in their 43 to o victory. "Husky" left the opposing 
gridders standing agape with his deceptive runs, the hoy from Colorado springing over for 
five touchdowns. Practically all the reserves got to put in some time, several showing up so 
well as to get letters at the end of the season. Anderson, Fisher, and Gibson did excellent 
work in the backfield, and the reserve linemen, Colley, Vance, Herbert, Harold Harris, Long, 
Morgan, Caine, and Knight, performed admirably. 

Phoney Smith and his Mercer Bears were paid back with interest for their defeat of last 
year. A small band of Howardites followed the Bulldogs to Macon to see them administer the 
14 to o defeat, most of them going via the hobo route. The Crimsons were "right" that day, 
and the most formidable Mercer attack could not pierce the line when the ball was near the 
goal. The whole Bulldog eleven played football — and how! 

Auburn's Tigers swept into the Magic City with blood in their eyes. They crept out after 
being held to a 9-9 tie by a team they had always beaten. Bancroft threw a pretty pass to 
Spicer, who caught the ball on the goal line, and with the score tied, kicked a field goal for 
three more points. With the game all but won, the Bulldogs were backed up against their own 




Page eighty-nine 



Pilfer NOUS 



i92S 





goal line and a bad punt gave the Tigers possession of the ball. A field goal from placement tied 
the score, and a minute later the game ended. The line sufferd another serious loss when Lee 
Roberts was injured internally and forced to stay out for the rest of the season. But that boy 
played football while he was in there! Another disastrous invasion of the Magnolia State was 
made the next week, the Mississippi College Choctaws scalping the Bulldogs, 12 to o. Although 
Coach Dillon used all his bag of tricky offensive tactics, the Mississippians had developed a 
marvelous passing attack which the locals were unable to solve. 

The Marion Cadets fell before the onslaught of the local gridders by the score of 33 to 7. 
A fairly large band of students made the trip to Selma, while the Judson seniors came over to 
root for their home team. The Bulldog line was weak during several intervals of play, enabling 
the Soldiers to run a touchdown over, but the locals soon ran up a safe score. The reserves also 
made good in this contest. 

Then came the epochal battle with Birmingham-Southern, Howard winning the handsome 
Birmingham News Trophy, besides winning the first game ever played at Legion Field. 

As a reward for their season of hard work the gridders were taken on a trip to the South- 
land. After chalking up a 52 to o score against Miami University, they set sail across a small 




Page ninety 



~ s %r™ o z&@& 






corner of the pond to give Cuba an exhibition. While they heat National University by t li • ■ 

score of 20 to 6, that was expected, and there were other big features of the trip to he talked about. 
The Havana men put up an aggressive game, although football was new to them. 

Prospects for a good season next year are excellent. Seven men will he lost — Bancroft, Brown, 
Wilking, "Bull" Smith, Anderson, Gibson, and Long — but there is a wealth of good material 
on hand. Coach Chester C. Dillon, serving his first year as head coach, had good material this 
\ear, and put out a team accordingly, and with his system thoroughly instilled should put Howard 
in an even more prominent place on the football map next season. Coaches "Doc" Newton 
and Eddie McLane ably assi ted him during the past season, Coach Newton being especially 
valuable as a scout, while McLane trained the ends perfectly. 

Thus the graduating class can leave Howard saying that the Bulldogs were never licked by 
the Panthers during its four years here. The fighting Bulldogs were victorious over Badgers, 
Tigers, Bears, Panther:., conquered a regiment of Soldiers, made a whirlwind out of a Hurricane, 
and then spread out to cop an international contest. They battled Wolves and Tigers to a draw, 
and were scalped only by the Choctaws and courtmartialed by the Majors. 




Page ninety-one 



"^fe l E 92S OVS ^^ 







Just Look This Over 

Howard 37 

Howard o 

Howard 6 

Howard 43 

Howard 14 

Howard 9 

Howard o 

Howard 33 

Howard 9 



Spring Hill o 

Loyola University o 

Millsaps 13 

Jacksonville Normal o 

Mercer University o 

Auburn 9 

Mississippi College 12 

Marion 7 

Birmingham-Southern o 



Howard 52 ; Miami University o 



Howard 20: H; 



Nati 




Page ninety-two 



ENTR.E NOUS _^a^?.<N 
W 7Q9S "SflES % 





Managers 



A manager may be a perfect man and never get to fame. He works like thunder 
and if anything goes wrong he gets blamed for it, and if everything goes right no- 
body knows the difference. We were fortunate to get a good set of managers this 
year. 

Manager Willie B. McDonald handled the football equipment competently and 
if any man deserves to wear the block "H" it's "Mac." Palmer Webb, as assistant 
Athletic Director, has his hands full but was a big help to Coach Dillon. Harold 
Freeman kept track of all the baseball equipment last Spring and that's a job for 
any man. Again we congratulate ourselves on our choice of managers. 




Page ninety-three 





(^' ^ ^ « — — 


WKmJjLJ 

3* 




J r * A^Sk 


*/•■* ■■ ' -' 


^ ^ * - 




&^ i sKJb ri 




* V . ,! 1M 


■^jMr~jn j| 


Wk £K ^S 


wL ^ VF " 


* mm- ^^ 




J)Jg 





The Bullpup Season 



Whatever sort of season the Bullpups had before November 18 matters little, because on that 
day the results of all other games were forgotten and they received the praise of all Birmingham 
and Alabama football followers by winning over their biggest rivals, who were supposed to 
come out on top by a big margin. The Panther Kittens were knocked completely off their perch 
as favorites when the local freshmen battled their way to a 14 to 13 victory. 

Coach "Slick" Lollar's boys had a short but hard schedule, and came through with the 
credit side of the ledger in their favor. A. M. I. was beaten by the score of 9 to 6 in a hard- 
fought battle at Anniston ; then the Rats came home and took a severe flogging at the hands of 
the Alabama Baby Tide, 51 to o. 

The Auburn Tiger Cubs were tied, 0-0, in one of the toughest rights of the year. The young 
Plainsmen were also expected to win over the Pups, but were unable to get through the hefty 
Birmingham line. The Baby Moccasins of Chattanooga took a 1 3 to 6 score on Tennessee ground. 

Coach Lollar graduated much good material for the varsity next year, and a number of both 
linemen and backs showed up so well that they should be in the Bulldog tir>t line-up next season. 

Bullpup Results 

Bullpups 9; A. M. 1 6 

Bullpups o; Alabama 51 

Bullpups o; Auburn o 

Bullpups 6; Chattanooga 15 

Bullpups 14; Panther Cubs 13 



tty-four 




BASKET BALL 



ENTRE NOUS ^^teK 

1928 jSf|^ " 





Varsity Basketball 



Whitney King, Forward 

For the last two years Whit has been an outstanding 
man in Howard basketball. He is another Bulldog 
that will not be on hand next year and coming for- 
wards will have to step about to come up to his stand- 
ard. He is too short to hit the loop on every shot, but 
his speed and fight have made him a valuable man. 

Millard Strickland, Forward 

"Strick"' proved to be a most versatile basketball man 
during the past season. Besides serving as manager, he 
played in practically every game at center or forward, 
filling in well where he was needed. He has another 
year to go, and should be one of Coach McLane's best 
bets next year. He was one of the five letter men on 
hand at the first of the season. 

Grady Gilbert, Center 
Gilbert was one of the few Bulldogs who didn't suf- 
fer a slump this year. Although this was his first year 
on the varsity, he stood out as he did as a Bullpup, play- 
ing center and guard alternately. He is a good shot 
and plays an excellent defensive game, being largely 
responsible for the Canines' win over Jacksonville. 
During the next two years he will be a mainstay of 
local cage activities. 

Fred Burnham, Guard 
Although not a regular, Burnham was used on fre- 
quent occasions and put out to the limit whenever he 
was called upon. He is a good guard, valuable as a 
defensive player, and should see lots of action during 
his next two years at Howard. This is his first year 
on the Crimson squad, coming from Jacksonville Nor- 
mal. 

"Ox" Clark, Guard 
"Ox" was a strong pillar in the frosh team year be- 
fore last, but failed to come out for the varsity last 
year. During the past season, however, he played fine 
basketball, and will be one of the veterans back next 
year around which the Crimson mentor ought to build 
a strong team. His long suit is defensive work, but he 
is also a good shot from a distance. 

Mitchell Burns, Guard 

"Mitch" i-- an all-round basketball man, playing 
guard, center or forward. Most of his time during tin- 
past season was spent at guard, and the success of the 
year hinged, to a great extent, upon him. He is 
poison when it comes to long shots, anil his guarding 
during the past season kept the opposing score much 
lower than it might have been. 



Page ninety-six 



ENTRE NOUS 

1928 




llllllli&ii^ 



Varsity Basketball 

Capt. Johnny Wilkinc, Guard 
For lour years Johnn) has been in the thick of things 
athletic at I low .ml, and has stood out as one oi the best 
cagers on the Bulldog squad, holding his position .it 
guard with little competition. A large share <>! the 
credit tor everj game »im this season goes to the 
Bulldog captain, hi. breaking up ot the enemy's defense 
accounting tor many points tin- opponents didn't make. 
His aggressive game will he missed keenly next year, 
Wilking having played his hist game tor Howard. 

Forward 



Billy Bancrc 

When the team seemed to he slowing up 
passing anil running, the Bulldog mentor i 



n their 
ariablj 

sent in Bancroft to liven things up. His speed, added 
to this year's good shooting, made him one of the most 
valuable men on the squad, and he had the remarkahle 
knack of putting spirit into the team. This is also 
Bancroft's last year. 



Jim C.wvehox, Guard 

Jim played a consistently good game during the 
past season, and will he missed from the squad next 
year. Guards were more plentiful this year than last, 
and he didn't see quite as much action as he did when 
he was captain, hut he added much reserve strength 
to the Crimsons. He played an airtight game against 
Southern, and Howard fans are sorry that he will he 
absent next year. 

Fermox Vickery, Forward 

This was "Vick's" first year on the varsity, hut he 
proved himself to he a real basketball player. He was 
high scorer for the season and held that place in nearly 
every game. Birmingham-Southern, Jacksonville, and 
Maryville especially felt the sting of his brilliant of- 
fensive work, his shooting and running being of the hest 
variety. We need more like him. 



Harold Peace, Forward 

Harold was late getting started this year, hut he hit 
his stride in the second game with the Hebrews — 
and how! He didn't suffer another slump for the rest 
of the season, his deadly aim accounting for many 
points on the trip into Tennessee. He is small in 
stature, but one of the biggest men on the team when 
it comes to offensive basketball. He has another year 
left and should he one of the mainstays of the team 
next year. 




Page ninety-seven 



./«^C^ EMTRE NOUS ^#1B&\ 



Girls Basketball 



C.APT. Cl.ARIETTA KENDRICK, Guard 
Among other outstanding Howard athletes that are 
graduating this year is Capt. Kendrick of the Co- 
eds. Kendrick played better basketball during the 
past season than ever before, and that's saying 
something, for she has been a fighter all the way 
through. Her work at guard had a lot to do with 
the Crimsonettes' success. 

Lucile Dyar, Forward 

Although this was Lucile's first year on the team 
she stood out as one of the best forwards. Her eye 
for the basket and her all-round good playing 
throughout the season opened up a berth, in the first 
choice lineup at once. We are glad that her bas- 
ketball career has just begun. 

Salina Shivers, Guard 

Shivers is another Jones Mill product and Jones 
Mill is noted for its championship teams. Salina 
left one championship team and came to Howard 
to have a big part in the manufacture of another. 
She played fine ball all the season and will be one 
of the mainstavs next vear. 



Alyne Blackburn, Guard 

They just don't make 'em any better than Alyne. 
Another All-State player from the Mill, she kept 
up her good work during the past season and will 
feature in co-ed athletics for three more years. As 
a guard she stands out alone. Opposing forwards 
could do little damage while she was at her favorite 
position — another reason for the successful season. 




How 


nil . 


• • ■ -27; 


Athens . . . . 


• -5 


How 


1 111 . 


. . . .26; 


Auburn .... 


• -3 


How 


nil . 


. . . . 20; 
. . . .26; 


\uburn 


, , 


Hovs 


Alabama .... 


■ U 


How 


lid . 


• ■ • 25 ; 


Alabama .... 


• >9 


How 


i id . 


. . . .20; 


Jacksonville . . 


. 20 



Page ninety-eight 



rf&£m>» ENTRE NOUS ^t/^n 



Girls' Basketball 



Martha Dari 



ForWi 



Here's to the alternate captain, who is one 
fightin'est little Forwards that ever donned a uni 
form! And can she ^ho(>t ? As evidence, she looped 
130 points during the season and played a wonder- 
ful defensive game as well. She played the who 
season in brilliant Style, looping from five to ninetet 
points in a game. She has two years left and t 
what makes fans dance with glee. 

Bernadine Moose, Guard 

Moose is one of Howard's best all-round co-ed ath- 
letes, standing out in every phase of sports entered 
by the fair sex. She was one of the strongest re- 
serves Coach Firguson had and should be in the 
first lineup next year. She is a guard of exception- 
al ability and plays a good defensive game. We are 
glad she has three more years. 

Lucy Lea, Guard 

Lucy is another good guard who was sent in many 
times during the season when reinforcements were 
needed. She played a hard game all the way 
through and was on hand for all the trips mat 
She has another year and should be one of the main- 
stays next season. 

Grace Hays, Manager 

Grace worked as hard as any other girl on the team, 
but in the capacity of manager. She flitted about 
everywhere in search of opposition and it was 
through her that the Crimsonettes got such good 
teams to play. She was also one of the reserve 
guards at the first of the season and well deserves 
her letter. 

Coach "Firpo" Firguson 

"Firpo" knowshow to handle basketball teams, that's 
a fact. His work with the co-eds this season brought 
him the esteem of all Howard fans. The excellent 
season was due as much to good coaching as good 
playing and we hope Coach Firguson has the girls 
in charge again next year. 



Howard 25 ; Jacksonville .... 

Howard 30; Chattanooga n 

Howard 23; Southern 27 

Howard 32; Southern 23 

Howard 25; Southern 16 

Howard 38; Mortimer Jordan . . 28 




Page ninety-nine 



ENTRE NOUS ^m^gt^ 



^^^^^m\\\\\\wMm^ 




Bottom Row (left to right): 
Second Re 



McLendox, Cox, Watsox, Montgomery, Chappelle, Joxes. 
w: Foshee, Dew, Foster, Coach Lollar. 



Freshman Basketball 



The Bullpups of the past season stood out more prominently than a Freshman team has in 
several years. They won third place in the Hoys Club League, heating all comers at least once 
but losing out in the first rounds to lower their average. They had no regular schedule except 
that of the League, but did fine work there. The\ broke even with the Panther Cubs, and 
some of the outstanding teams of the city. 

Coach Lollar graduated some fine material for the varsity combine next year. The varsity 
needs reinforcements and this time it is going to get them. Foster was one of the outstanding 
forwards of the League, while Watson, Dew, Montgomery and Chappelle also stood out in every 
game. Foshee, McLendon and Bondurant also played well. 



Page one hundred 




BASEBALL 



0£te mT f 9 £ OVS ^^ 













^■i 







'^^p p 




Whitney King Third Base 

Bill Bancroft Shortstof 

\V. B. McDonald Oa//Wd 



"Bud" Harris Second Base 

Jim Cawthon First Base 

Ch vri is Hi i back Catcher 



Page one hundred ti-'O 



/fi^&C^ ENTRE NOUS ^rfS*s 



msMmmm^i^S^. 



%>j£. 



^^l^NgWIIIIIIlii^ 




Capt. "Bull" Smith Pitcher 

"Ox" Clark First Base 

Raymond Knight Shortstop 

Owen Dees . . . 



Rayburn Fisher . ...... Outfield 

Percy Brooks Catcher 

Bob Holbrook Third Base 

Pitcher 



Page one hundred three 



Varsity Baseball 



As the Entre Nous goes to press the Bulldog diamond men arc 
practicing daily for a lengthy schedule that will be well on its way by 
the time the annual is out. Coach "Doc" Newton seems to have good 
prospects this season, and present indications are that this spring's Bull- 
dogs will be better than those of last year. The team suffered greatly 
from loss of veteran men, but new material is fitting in well. 

The pitching staff ought to be stronger than last year with the addi- 
tion of Cliff Brown. "Bull" Smith, who was the mainstay of the pitch- 
ing staff last year, is also back, while Dees looks good. Bancroft or 
Spicer is expected to be on the receiving end of the battery most of the 
time, with Clark or Cawthon at first, Harris at second, Whit King at 
third, several good candidates being on hand for shortstop and the out- 
field, including Fisher, Bradley, Williams, Roberts, McDonald, Harold 
Harris and others. 

Last spring's season was fair, the Canines winning four out of ten 
major games. The season started off slowly, no definite schedule having 
been made, and, with a badly disorganized team to start with, it took 
Coach Newton several weeks to make up a good combination. 

The Howard nine started off by splitting a series with Marion, tak- 
ing the first by a score of 6 to 2, losing the next, 8 to i, due to lack of a 
strong pitching staff. After several contests with local shop and foundry 
teams, the Bulldogs went forth to battle the Birmingham-Southern 
Panthers, taking the first two games of the series, 4 to 2 and 2 to 1, 
both being hard-fought contests. Southern came back and took the next 
pair, 3 to 1 and 2 to 0, and the season ended before the play-off could 
be arranged. 

McWane Cast Iron and Pipe Works fell before the 'Dogs, 7 to 4, 
but the locals were downed by Fort Benning in three straight games. 
8 to 2, 7 to 4, and 7 to 1. 



Pane one hundred fnut 



ENTRE NOUS 




Freshman Baseball 

What appears to be the best Bullpup baseball team 
Howard has had in several years is now working out on 
Berry Field in preparation for a hard schedule. Coaches 
Lollar and McLane have some of th? outstanding high 
school stars in the state, and should raise the baseball 
reputation of Howard considerably this spring. 

The annual goes to press too early for a report of the 
present season, but the following are showing up well in 
various positions: Pitchers, Slcelton, Coleman, Foshee, 
Kent, McLendon; first base, Bullard, Folson, Embry, 
Bains; second base, Watson; shortstop, Akin, Finklea; 
third base, Mann; catchers, Davis, Morris; outfield, Britt, 
Dew, Anderson, Slcelton, McDonald, Chappelle. 

Getting off to a late start, with a chopped-up schedule, 
the Frosh of last year failed to make an impressive show- 
ing. We do not charge that this fact was the cause of the 
camera backfiring, but none of the pictures were good, thus 
the absence of one feature of the annual this year. 



Vane one hundred jive 



/^a>w^ ENTRE NOUS ^s^?^ 

(ffi®^. 1928 ^^ 



*£..;::« 



ftfifi? 



db^: 



Mm 



^^j^^m^M 1 ^^^ 




Page one hundred six 



/^3!J«^ ENTRE NOUS 




Clark, 



Peace, 



Caw ti ion 



Football 



Basketball 



Basketball 



Football 



Brown, 



Football ■ „ H „ CLUB OFFICERS Football 

Knight, Lou« Rhudy President M. Smith, 



Baseball 
McDonald, 


Clifton Harris . 
Solon Sudduth . 
Rayburn Fisher 






. . Vict 


-Pr, 

Set 
Tn 


tsideni 
retary 


King, 


Football 


Awbrey, 
Gay, 


Baseball 
Manager 

Tennis 


Fran 

this i 
this i 
club, 


k Awbrey . . . . . ■ 
Preamble 

he students of Howard Colli gr», 
ting in at hi. tics in some form, \ 
nstitution, recognizing the need 
:ollege for an organization of s 
do hereby give notice of tin- 
Monogram H Club 


. . . . R porter 

who have, by par- 
von our letters from 

on the campus of 
aid students into a 
organization of the 


Gibson;, 
Long, 


Basketball 
Football 
Football 


QUARLES, 
C//<? 


er Leader 
















Vickery, 


Basketball 


DOZIER, 

C/« 


er Leader 
















Gilbert, 


Basketball 


Spicer, 


Football 
















Miller, 


Tennis 


Williams, 


Football 
















Aycock, 
Che 


■er Leader 


Sudduth, 


Football 
















Strickland, 

Basketball 


H. Harris 


Football 
















Anderson 


Football 


C. Harris 


















Rhudy, 





Griffith, 



Football 
Herbert, 

Tennis 



Page one hundred seven 




Boys Tennis Club 
Officers 

J. C. Miller, Jr President 

John W. Gay Vice-President 

John Frye Secretary 

Chester Quarles Reporter 

Members 

J. C. Miller Bascomb Woodward 

John Gay Olin C. Reed 

John Frye Byron McFekriv 

Chester Quarles Herbert Etheridge 

Harold Peace J. C. Garrett 

Jack Meacham Cecil Wood 

Harry Morton J. C. McRee 

Fred Putman William Herbert 

Ellis Davis Herman Saxon 



Page one hundred eight 




Girls Tennis Club 

Officers 

Mildred Golson President 

Mary Ruth Adams Vice-President 

Annie Newman Secretary 

Elizabeth Leslie Treasurer 

Members 

Louise Church Elizabeth Teague 

Annie Newman Louise Bellsnyder 

Lucile Higgins Evelyn Caldwell 

Elizabeth Leslie Grace Hays 

Sue Harris Sara Harcrove 

Mildred Golson Allen Orton 

Mary Ruth Adams Ruby Orton 

Lazelle Roberts Mary Glen Reynolds 
Frances Harris 



Page one hundred nine 



^Sjfe^ 1$28 <^G^\ 




Swimming Club 








Presi 


tent 


OR SUDDUTH 

Rebecca Berry 


. . . Vice-Pjresideni 




Louise Bellsnyder 


. . Secretary 




Bernadine Moose 


Treasurer 




Mildred Golson 


. Reporter 




Glen Vance 


. . Coach 




Members 






Mari Ruth Adams Mildred Golson 


Clarieta Kendrick 




Louise Bei i snyder Frances Harris 


Bernadine Moose 




Rebecca Berry Graci Hays 


Edith Stocks 




Louise Church Sara Hoover 


Eleanor Sudduth 




Kui ii El i is 


Ruth Wn banks 






Page on 


■ hundred ten 



mmmKwmwsm*ma 












"■"1 




^Book ©hree: Orgardzati 




ENTRE NOUS 



/T^V/W^ 1928 ^ 

■llllllllklli^ 




Student Body Officers 

J. T. Jackson President 

William Langley Vice-President 

Rupert Hicks Treasurer 

Nancy Elgin Secretary 



Page one hundred thirteen 




Student Council 

James Theodore Jackson President of Student Body 

Sue Harris Senior Representative 

Henrv Jones Senior Representative 

Emory McNider Senior Representative 

Evelyn Sellers Senior Representative 

Charles Dobbins Junior Representative 

Rayburn Fisher Junior Representative 

Margaret Hassi.er Junior Representative 

Mary Glen Reynolds .... Sophomore Representative 

Fred TENTE Sophomore Representative 

Andrew PrewiTT Freshman Representative 



Page one hundred fourteen 



Wlllllllllllfalf/^i 1 ^^^^ 




Woman s Student Government 
Officers 

Mildred Hearn President 

Naomi Wells Vice-President 

Ann Moore Secretary 

Mattie Matthews Treasurer 

Council 

Thelma Grogan Senior Representative 

MAURINE Gipson Junior Representative 

Irene Hacker Sophomore Representative 

Jewel Burnham Ratliffe House President 

Ruth Thompson Crumpton House President 

Billie Ellis Bancroft House President 

Jeanette Morgan Watlington House President 

Billie Ellis General House Manager 

Ausie Hyatt Monitor 

Edith Leckie Monitor 



Vaqe 



hundred fifteen 



/^Zfcfrs^ ENTRE NOUS ^r/?K?j 




Marcuerite Pence 
Editor-in-Chief 



Henry Clay Knighi 
Business Manager 



The Entre Nous 

On the Entre Nous staff chosen for 1928, there have been some students who worked will- 
ingly and ably, some who worked grudgingly and sparingly, and some who did nothing at all 
towards the compilation of this volume, but who, no doubt, will be most severe in their criticisms 
of its shortcomings. Invaluable assistance has been given by persons who had no place on the 
staff, and to those and all who made this hook possible the editor's most grateful acknowledgment 



Page one hundred sixteen 



ENTRE NOUS 





The Entre Nous Staff, "As Chosen 



Clifton" Brown Isststant Manager 

\V. T. Maynor Athletic Editor 

E. Marvin Smith . . . Asst. Athletic Editor 
Mary Glen Reynolds . . . Sorority Editor 
Rayburn J. Fisher . . . Fraternity Editor 
Owen Dees ..... Photograph Editor 

Henry H. Jones Humor Editor 

Mardis Howie . . . Organizations Editor 



Codie D. Bell ..... Assistant Editor 

Evelyn Sellers Feature Editor 

Elliott P. Ellis hi Editor 

Bii.lie Ellis Issociate Art Editor 

Pearl Williams .... Freshman Editor 
Jack Finklea .... Sophomore Editor 
Sara Cunningham .... Junior Editor 
Ruth Sherer Senior Editor 



Page 



hundred seventet 



ENTRE NOUS 




The Crimson 

A vital factor in keeping up that indomitable Howard spirit is the Howard 
Crimson, the weekly newspaper published by the student body. However, it has 
more services to perform, such as giving students and alumni an accurate and 
complete account of what is happening on the campus. And it has performed 
these duties well this year. 

In choosing Morgan Baker as editor, Howard students made no mistake. A 
born newspaper man, with a sense of news values, and all other faculties neces- 
sary in the make-up of a good editor, he has set standards that should be the goal 
of those in charge of the paper in the future. Although he had been out of school 
the year before he was elected, his literary ability was recognized and confidence 
shown in his journalistic ability. 

No newspaper, however, can be published without competent financial man- 
aging. Allen Simpson, as business manager, has handled this side of the Crimson 
with success, keeping advertising space well filled without crowding the news 
section. His job is a hard one, but he has a businesslike turn of mind and he 
has filled his place well. 

Since Howard's large summer school felt the same m\\\ for a college journal 
as the regular winter session, Morgan Baker and Ralph Callahan, at the begin- 
ning of the k)27 summer school, instituted the Summer Crimson, an innovation 
unique among Southern colleges. The paper met witli great favor. 



Page one hundred eifffltt 



^HgyAuDCpjMscw 




Page one hundred nineteen 



ENTRE NOUS 
1928 




^fP^ 



Pi K 



appa 1 au 



Honorary Society, Founded 1922 

This is a society, the purposes of which are to emphasize the importance 
of the highest proficiency in student scholarship, and to stimulate in- 
dividual ambition by making membership in it the reward for notable 
excellence in studies and for notable service to the college. Members 
are elected from the faculty, the graduates and the undergraduates of 
the college. Undergraduates are elected from those members of the 
Senior Class who have maintained a grade of "A" in a majority of their 
courses for the whole period of their stay at college. Faculty members 
and alumni and alumnae are elected on the ground of notable scholar- 
ship, the achievement of honors for themselves in college, or the ren- 
dering of noteworthy service to the college. 



Charter Members 



John C. Dawson 
P. P. Burns 
Ruth Morris 
Bennie Spinks 
J. A. Hendricks 
James B. Trant 



Annie Bovett 
John E. Brewtos 
E. E. Cox 
Gladys Falkner 
J. P. Hall 
Eunice Sloan 



Undergraduates 1928 
Mary Lee Blackman Sue U. Harris 

Ernest L. Eplev Mamie Houston 

Helen D. Hardie Sara Hunt 

James Theodore Jackson 
Helen Johnston- 
Hugh Linder 
Marguerite Pence 
Mabel C. Turnipseed 



Patjc one liundred tian-'y 



ENTRE NOUS 




Hypatia 

Founded at University of Alabama, 1922 
Colors: White and Gold Flower: Yellow Rose 

Officers 

Mabel Turnipseed President 

Sue Harris Secretary 

Margaret Staples Treasurer 

Marguerite Pence Historian 

Helen Hardie Monitor 



Hypatia is a senior honorary society for women. The purpose of this organization 
shall be to recognize and honor the attainments in all phases of college life of girls 
ready to enter the Senior Class, and thus to encourage undergraduates to similar 
efforts. Hypatia hopes each year to further one specific movement for the benefit of 
the whole student body, or for the co-educational body. The members of the society 
are so chosen upon the basis of present usefulness to the inititution and the promise 
of future usefulness to society, as indicated by possession of the following qualifica- 
tions: (1) General Scholarship, (2) Character and Personality, (3) Interest in 
College Activities, (4) College Honors. 



Page one hundred twenty- 



; #a%=, 



ENTRE NOUS 



Mfiillllll 



^' 9 *°.<3i®m 



%t^^^^^^^m^\\\w\^m^um 



nmwammam 




Page one hundred tii-cnty-tv.o 






ENTRE NOUS ^r/^?.^ 



Chi Delta Phi 

Honorary Literary Sorority 
Founded University of Tennessee, 1919 

Mu Chapter 



Colors: Blue and Gold 



F I oii-i 



Pansv 



Mildred Golson President 

Nancy Elgin Vice-President 

Marguerite Pence Secretary and Treasurer 

Eleanor Sudduth Sara Cunningham 

Sara Hunt Sarah Epstein 

Sarah Sanders 



Chi Delta Phi, National Literary Sorority, has for its goal the raising 
of literary standards by encouraging undergraduates to foster their 
talent in original poems, essays, and short stories. The sorority is open 
to girls of the upper classes, try-outs being held semi-annually to select 
new members. 



Page one hundred tiu-enty-t/irec 



/^gr^v ENTRE NOUS ^jrf&t^ 



^^Ipiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 




Page one hundred twenty-four 



Beta Pi Theta 



Honor;ir\ Literary French Fraternirj 



Flower; Fleut 



theta Nu Chapter 

Established at Howard, 1926 

Colors: R< 



Purple 



Purpose: To organize representative men and women in universities and colleges 
who will, by travel, study, conversation, interest, influence, and ability, advance the 
progress of literary French and things cultural in America; who will maintain the 
highest scholarship anil literary standards; who will encourage consecration to social 
service and the highest ideals of a liberal education; and who will recognize and 
award merit in productive French literature. 



Honorary Members 



Dr. Jons ('. Dawson 
Prof. Pali, de Launay 
Dean P. P. Burns 



Dr. H. M. Avion 
Mrs. A. II. M vson 
Dr. II. M. Martin 



Active Members 
Class of 1928 
Morg.w Baker J. T. Jackson 



guilliard barcer 
Margaret Davidson 

Ernest Eplev 
Helen Hardie 



\1 vrguerite Pence 
Eva Taylor 

Margaret Thorn t to> 
Evelyn Sellers 



Class 0/ 1929 



I.OL'ISF ClIlRCH 

Evelyn Giles 



Edna Levenson 

Joseph Marino 



Class of 1 9 JO 

I. ELLA BVRD BEASLEY 



Page one hundred twenty -five 









f© 



£ 



<y/ <<> 



Sigma Upsilon 



Alpha Gamma Epsilox Chapter 

Established 1926 
Colors: Purple and White Flower: Cream Rose 

Officers 

James C. Shelburne President 

W. L. Crumpler Secretary 

Frater in Facultate 
Paul Barnett 

Fratres in Col leg 10 
Class of iojS 

W. L. Crumpler Bessemer, Alabama 

Arthur Dix Decatur, Alabama 

J. T. Jackson- Ashford, Alabama 

Loval Phillips Cullman, Alabama 

ClaSS of 1Q2Q 

ALBERT BEASLEY Birmingham, Alabama 

Codie Bell (Pledge) De Funiak Springs, Florida 

James C. Shelburne Danville, Virginia 



Page one hundred twenty-six 




//>*a^5^ ENTRE NOUS ^^JK?^ 
iiiiiiiiiiwiilkiw 1 ^ ^fi*== ^^jqpililii 

Square and Compass 

Incorporated, 1917, under the Laws of the State of Virginia 
Colors: Navy Blue and Silver Gray Motto: "Amor Omnia Vincit' 

Howard College Square of Square and Compass 

Incorporated 
Established March 15, IQ2I 

Founders 

H. L. Nipper James J. Bell A. M. Glover V. M. Gardner W. M. Kelly 

W. T. Edwards V. B. Ross Buford Lawrence 

Fratres in Facultate 
Dr. H. M. Acton Dr. R. F. Terrell 

Fratres in Collegio 
Class of 1928 

Morgan Baker (President) Birmingham, Alabama 

William Porter Piedmont, Alabama 

P. YV. ROBERTS (Secretary and Treasurer) Meridian, Mississippi 

Class of 193 1 
J. T. Browder Fort Payne, Alabama 

i 

MA 





Page one hundred twenty-seven 



*2Wfc* 



ENTRE NOUS 



iJmwww 



mzz^z^sm 



ySKs 



g^fK^wMiiiiiiiiiiiiiSk!^ 











Pfl^c one hundred twenty-eight 



ENTRE NOUS 




Student Mission Band 

The Student Mission Hand is an organization composed of active- 
Christian students who find it both expedient and interesting to engage 
themselves in sacrificial Christian ministry. 

It aims to find out where simple ministry is most needed and to supply 
this need. It does not confine its activities to the campus alone, but 
reaches its hand ot mercy over the entire city. The Mission Hand is 
the only Christian student organization on the campus proposing off- 
campus activities and executing them. 

Officers 

Ivev Shuff President 

Annie Lou Whiten rice-President 

Loi.a McCullough Secretary and Treasurer 

Irene Hacker Pianist 

Cecil Wood Chorister 

Marguerite Kimbrell Reporter 



Members 



St. Clair Bower 
Will Calvert 
Delmas Casey 
Perry Claxton 
Thomas Ellis 
Ara Ellison 
Elizabeth Fenn 
Mrs. J. E. Franks 
Thelma Grogan 
Gwendolyn Hall 



Irene Hacker 
Byron Hixon 
Elsie Johnson 
Marguerite Kimbrell 
Rosalie Martin 
Lola McCullough 
LeRoy Priest 
J. C. Sellers 
Ivey Shuff 
Mary Stark 



Grace Stuckey 
Eva Taylor 
Flora Ward 
Annie Lou Whiten 
Cecil Wood 



Page one hundred twenty-nine 



am$£^ ENTRE NOUS ^/Jg?.^ 

^©5^ i928 ^»% ~ 



iilllilllJIHlllllllllllllHl 




Page one hundred thirty 



ENTRE NOUS 




Baptist Student Union Executive Council 

Chester L. Quarles President 

Rayburn Fisher First Vice-President 

Elizabeth Lawson Second Vice-President 

Ann Moore Third Vice-President 

Annie Lou Whiten Secretary 

Davis Wooley Treasurer 

Irene Hacker Reporter 

Fred Putman Chorister 

Nell Burns Pianist 

Or. J. C. Stivender Pastor 

The B. S. U. Defined 

The B. S. U. is the general religious organization to formulate, propagate, and 
correlate the religious activity on the campus. 

Object of the B. S. U. 

The object of the I'nion shall be: the winning of others to Christ and His church; 
the enlistment of Christians in Bible and Mission study; the training of individuals 
in the practice of : tewardship as taught in the New Testament; the calling out of 
the called for special service; and the utilizing of Christian workers in denomina- 
tional activity. 

Membership 

Every student in Howard College, regardless of denomination, is a member of 
the B. S. U. 



Page one hundred thirty-one 



ENTRE NOUS 






&&. * 92 °<M®m 



^^v^p^iiiiiiiiiiiiP 




Paqe one hundred thirty-two 



ENTRE NOUS 
)W 1928 





%M.<BA 





The V. M. C. A. is the only organization on the campus which reaches every student (regard- 
less of denomination) from registration to graduation. The V. M. C. A. is ready and anxious 
at all times to render service to any student on the campus. 

Viewing the year's work, the first service rendered to the new students was to meet them at 
the train and show them the way to Howard — the be.;t college in the South. Second, a hike was 
given by the V. M. C. A. and V. W. C. A. at the beginning of the first semester for the purpose 
of getting the upper classmen and freshmen acquainted, as well as furnish them an evening of 
wholesome recreation. Third, the Y. M. C. A. has sponsored a prayer service each evening in the 
boys' dormitory for the purpose of increasing the spiritual life of the campus. Fourth, the V. M. 
C. A. ami the V. W. C. A. rendered a distinct service to the college and to the students by furnish- 
ing each student with a "Hand Book," which gave them helpful information concerning all phases 
of college activity. Fifth, the Y. M. C. A. has had some of the best speakers available to address 
them at the weekly meetings. Sixth, the Y. M. C. A. is giving physical training through tennis, 
etc., as well as mental and spiritual training, realizing man requires the four-fold development. 
Finally, the chief purpose of the Y. M. C. A. as a college organization is to cause each student 
to grow spiritually, as he will be more like the Master. 

Officers 

Emory McNider President 

R. B. Caine, Jr First Vice-President 

James Cunningham Second Vice-President 

Davis C. Woolley Secretary and Reporter 

O. W. Caine Treasurer 

Cabinet Members 
J. D. Willingham Sheppard Bryan 

Clyde Dotson Garon Galloway 

Mack Ward Alton Barr 

Rayburn Fisher Jack Finklea 

J. T. Jackson Charles Dobbins 

Frank Coleman 
Jack Compton 
H. L. Lyon 



''age one hundred thirty-three 




imiiw 




Page one hundred thirty-four 




Organized at Howard, October 19, 1922. 
Entered National Association, November 3, 1926. 

The Young Women's Christian Association at Howard is the one organization which is open 
to all girls alike. Through its influence a fellowship and understanding is maintained among 
girls and groups of girls on the campus. Its greatest contribution is the development of Chris- 
tian character and leadership. It has been the purpose of this organization to develop the 
"Fourfold" life, which means mental, physical, social, and spiritual development. During 
the several years existence of the Y. W. C. A. at Howard, it has accomplished much. Students 
have been sent to the Summer Conferences at Blue Ridge, to Student Conferences, and this 
year one goes to the conference at California. 

The executive work of the Y. W. C. A. is carried on by the Y. W. C. A. officers elected by 
the Y. W. C. A. at large and the Cabinet, each member of which is chairman of some committee. 
It is the aim of this association to bring all those into its membership who profess to be followers 
of Jesus Christ. 

Officers 

Margaret Staples President 

Margaret Hassler Vice-President 

Guilliard Barger Secretary 

Evelyn Sellers Treasurer 

Helen Hardie Undergraduate Representative 

Cabinet Members 
Nell Burns Elsie Johnson 

Sara Cunningham Mattie Matthews 

Irene Hacker Marguerite Pence 

Grace Hays Grace Stuckey 

Sara Hoover Mary K. Waters 



Page one hundred thirty-five 




Page one hundred thirty-six 




ENTRE NOUS 



&*_ I928 je2K9mt 



The Ministerial Association 

Officers 

Leonard Battles President 

Cecil Wood Vice-President 

Vanci John ton Secretary 

hi \ Sm 11 .... Treasurer 

A. L. Horton Pianist 

J. C. Sellers Chorister 

Lewis Kelley Representative 

Walter Field Reporter 



Members 
W. I.. Ezell 

W. D. WlLLINGHAM 

B. F. HlXON 

Clyde Dotson 
Albert Chambers 
Zack Appletox 

N. L. GlLLILAND 

O. D. Mason 
Shephard Bryan 

C. S. Heard 
Henry Lyon 
E. V. Calvert 
L. G. Payxe 
Vance Johnston 
ivey shuff 

h. i.. wooten 
Lewis Kelley 
J. C. Sellers 
W. P. Claxton 
Fred Log ax 
Leonard Battles 
Noble Y. Beall 
Wm. F. Calvert 

C. O. Hopper 



W. L. Crumpler 
G. E. Franks 
R. L. Garmon 
Stanley L. Guytoj 
W. H. Harris 
W. D. Holloday 
W. M. Holland 
A. L. Horton 
J. C. Jacksox 
L. W. Stamps 
A. C. Weaver 
Cecil Wood 
Davis C. Wooley 
L. L. Allen 
Henry G. Costox 
Walter Field 
A. G. Prewitt 
St. Clair Bovvers 
J. T. Brouder 
C. G. Garrett 
Clay Herring 
Gordon Sorrell 
E. E. Weaver 



Page one hundred thirty-seven 




Religious Education Club 

Founded Howard College in 1926 

A. Hudson Hicks President 

Joe D. Heacock First Vice-President 

Davis Wooley Second Vice-President 

Grace Stuckey Third Vice-President 

Jewel Burnham Secretary 

Ann Moore Treasurer 

Elsie Johnson Reporter 

Purpose: To foster the professional religious spirit 
in Howard College 



Page one hundred thirty-eight 



ENTRE NOUS 



\ - 




Historical Society 

Founded Howard College, 1927 

Officers 

Virginia Wittmeier President 

Ivey Shuff Vice-President 

Ann Moore Secretary-Treasurer 

Brooks Russei.i Reporter 

The Historical Society was organized by the "A" students of history 
for the purpose of fostering the study of history in Howard College. 
Students who are eligible for active membership are those who are either 
majoring or minoring in history, and who have a grade of "B," and 
persons who are eligible for associate membership are students who do 
not have history as a major or minor subject, but who have a grade of 
"A." The Society plans to have lectures by history leaders, exhibitions, 
and other features of interest. 



Page one hundred thirty-nine 




HOWARD PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION 

■Mj 





*^if 








frt<7C our hundred forty 




NOTS *$& 



Howard College Pharmaceutical Association 



L ^" v -'-' 1 1 E purpose of the Howard College Pharmaceutical Association is three- 
K5f§> told: (1) to promote interest in Pharmacy; (2) to make tin's depart 
ment better known on the campus, in (neater Birmingham, throughout 
Alabama and elsewhere; (3) to offer programs which will be of interest 
and value to the Pharmacy student. 



Officers 

C. II. Hi. anion- President 

O. II. West-Brook Vice-President 

CLAUDE SMERAGLIA Secretary-Treasurer 

Irene Godwin • • Corresponding Secretary 

Members 

E. L. Alldredce Brooksville, Alabama 

A. M. Bains Blountsville, Alabama 

C. H. Blanton Lafayette, Alabama 

T. M. Borland, ]r Pinckard, Alabama 

GEORGE T. COTTON, Jr Alexander City, Alabama 

Irene Godwin Birmingham, Alabama 

Mary Sue Hawkins Bay Minette, Alabama 

Blair Hays Cullman, Alabama 

E. J. Lantrip, Jr Birmingham, Alabama 

E. S. McGilvray Stroud, Alabama 

L. C. Mooneyham Clio, Alabama 

H. O. Moore Birmingham, Alabama 

1. A. O'Brien Birmingham, Alabama 

\V. J. SHAMBURGER Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

CLAUDE SMERAGLIA Birmingham, Alabama 

C. H. St. John Guntersville, Alabama 

H. M. Taylor Miami, Florida 

R. D. Weaver Milltown, Alabama 

O. H. West-Brook Gadsden, Alabama 



Page one hundred forty-one 



ENTRE NOUS 



tzfer'^'^m 



f»iiiiiiiifaii]i^^^K^ 



* ^($(gNgjj^ 




SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 



OF' 






^ P%'^ 





Page one hundred forty-tvio 



ENTRE NOUS 




^s% 



Howard Scientific Society 



( )fficers 

, Passmore, Jr • ■ ■ Preside 

Paul Cates Vice-President 

Helen Johnston Secretary 

Roy Deas Treasurer 

Raymond Knight Reporter 



Roll 



Montague Adams 
C. II. Blanton 
Dr. J. 1.. Brakefield 
David Booker 
Howard Carter 
Paul Cates 
Mr. 0. S. Causey 
Jack Compton 



Roy Deas 
Joe Duncan, Jk. 
Holms Garrard 
Irene Godwin 
Mary Sue Hawkins 
Helen Johnston 
C. B. Landham 
Mr. F. P. Lasseter 



Bernard Lee 
S. A. LeCroy 
Hugh Linder 

S. A. LlNDSEY 

Dr. W. R. Little 
I. R. Lovvrey 
Dr. L. K. Oppitz 
1'. J. Payne 



Harry Passmore, Jr. 
Augusta Piatt 
J. R. Rushing 
Dr. J. R. Sampey 

J. M. SlZEMORE 

David Stevens 
Margie Townes 
Clarence Young 



The Howard Scientific Society was founded in 1923 under the leadership of Dr. S. A. 
Ives, then Dean of Science. The faculty members were the officers the first year. At each of 
the three programs that were presented, a faculty member of some other institution spoke. 

During the years of 1924 and 1925, the Society grew in membership and in the number of 
programs presented. The students took a more active part. All of the officers of the Society 
were chosen from the student members. At the programs, papers were read by visiting speakers, 
faculty and student members. 

The Society revised its Constitution in 1926 and adopted a three-fold purpose: "(1) To 
promote the study of Science in all its aspects; (2) To promote a better relationship and under- 
standing of the different sciences; (3) To create a spirit for a bigger and better School of 
Science in Howard College." 

This year the promoting and furthering of its three-fold purpose is the aim of the Society. 
The programs are so arranged that the aim of the first two purposes will be fulfilled. The 
Seniors are asked to present their theses, and the faculty members are asked to present some 
of their problems that may occur in experimental research, in the classroom, or in collateral read- 
ing. The other members are asked to present some phase of Science that interests them. 

Faculty members, alumni and student members are all working for a "bigger and better 
School of Science in Howard College." Our faculty members are working toward this goal 
through many fields of endeavor. The offices of president and secretary-treasurer of the Ala- 
bama Academy of Science and the offices of senator and secretary-treasurer of the Alabama 
Section of the American Chemical Society are held by members of Howard's faculty. The 
scientific societies and honor fraternities that are represented on Howard's campus by the 
faculty members are: the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American 
Chemical Society, Alabama Academy of Science, American Pharmaceutical Association, Ala- 
bama Pharmaceutical Association, Electrochemical Association, Jefferson County Pharmaceutical 
Association, Sigma Xi, Gamma Alpha, Phi Lambda L'psilon, Alpha Chi Sigma, Phi Sigma and 
Phi Chi. Publications of the faculty members have appeared in the Journal of the American 
Chemical Society, Journal of Chemical Education, American Electrochemical Society, Proceed- 
ings of the Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine, Physical Review, and Journal of 
Biological Chemistry. 

Three of our alumni are holding teaching fellowships in Columbia, Nebraska and Florida. 
Others of our Alumni are helping us attain our aim by demonstrating the "goods thac Howard 
delivers" in the graduate schools of Chicago, Ohio State, Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins, Tulane, 
Vanderbilt, Emory, Alabama and the Southern Dental College. Many of our alumni are teach- 
ing in high schools; several alumni or student members are working in our own Birmingham 
district as bacteriologists at the Hillman Hospital, at the City Health Department, and as 
chemist at the American Cast Iron Pipe Co., and Doster-Northington Drug Co. 

And everywhere and at all times faculty, alumni, and student members are talking and 
boosting the School of Science. 



Page one hundred forty-three 



ENTRE NOUS 



mmmm iihh^^ 



C9 





Pat/r our hundred forty-four 



ENTRE NOUS ^ftfg**. 

JSi 1928 




Glee Club 



Florence Bass*** 
Katherine Irwin* m 
Annie Laurie McKinley' 

Naomi Wells*** 
Christine Bomar*** 
Ruth Ellis** 
Ida Belle Holtom** 
Elizabeth Schueing** 
Mary Asenath Wood** 



Pf.rsonnel 

Soprano 
Edith Burton* 
Velda Bates* 
Bonnie McVeigh* 
Edres Farrell 
Evelyn Caldwell 
Edna Cocowitch 
Ovvarrean Dawsey 
Myrtis Folmar 
Clarice George 



Lena Green 
Gwendolyn Hall 
Margaret Hanlin 
Olive Harris 
Julia Kennedy 
Rose King 
Cecilia Lacy 
Alma Long 
Frances Maples 



Opal Miller 
Jackie Moody 
Ethelyne Oliver 
Olivia Prescott 
Mary Fae Riser 
Sarah Smith 
Virginia Stovall 
Eleanor Sudduth 
Eva Taylor 



Virginia Bishop* 
Charlotte Burns 



Elliot Ellis*** 
R. G. Knight*** 
Fred Putman*** 
Fred Tente*** 
George Warrick* 

Ralph Grant*** 
Frank Awbrey*** 
Ralph Foster*** 
James Yarborouch' 



Alto 
Ruth Bush*** Mildred Cranford** 

Elizabeth Lawson*** Hazel Leveillf.** 

Tenor 

Rayburn Fisher** Murray Cawthorn 

N. G. Lowery* Charles Dobbins 

Finis St. John* Will Lacy 

Napoleon Golden* Edward Nunnei.ly 

Baritone and Bass 
Gordon Sorrell*** Tom Ellis* 
Louis Rhudy** Mitchell Burns 

Dyer Talley Dew* Carl Hulsey 
Herbert Ethridge* Hubert Echols 

Accompanists 
Mary Mason 



Vivian Anderson* 
Nell Burns* 
Evelyn Harbin* 

Omar L. Reed 
A. Palmer Webb 
Clarence Young 
Clifford Gordon 
Eugene Locke 

Cecil Folmar 
Horace McDanal 
Robert Miller 
Marion Thomas 
Floyd Wright 

Joseph Marino 



►•♦Denotes numbers who sang the week at the Pantages, and also made the 
■• Denotes members who sang the week at the Pantages. 
• Denotes members who made the trip. 



Page 



hundred forty-five 



ENTRE NOUS 




Allied Arts Club 



Officers 

Chester L. Quarles President 

Sara Hunt Vice-President 

Mildred Golsan Secretary 

Thomas Ellis Treasurer 

Purpose: To foster that which is upbuilding in a student's life in the four allied 
arts, namely: Literature, Music, Dramatics and Handicrafts. 



Roll 

Chester L. Quarles 

Sara Hunt 

Mildred Golson 

Thomas Ellis 

Louise Church 

Mary Glen Reynolds 

Sara Hargrove 

Harold Hood 

Herbert Etheredge 

Charles Dobbins 

Hoi. i. is Garrard 
Lella B. Beasle\ 
Nell Burns 
Lazelle Roberts 
Joseph Marino 
Irene Hacker 
Eleanor Sudduth 
Margaret Hassler 
Billie Ellis 



Theodore Jackson 
Elliot Ellis 
Mildred Bledsoe 
Nancy Elgin- 
Mildred Hearn 
Maurine Gipson 
L. G. Payne 
Grace Hays 
Elizabeth Leslie 
Velda Bates 



Page one hundred forty-six 



ENTRE NOUS 







/>a^<? onr hundred forty-seven 





§il 




3 


; 




ip. 


, . ^ 






Hw 






^ 


\3) : 






^^SK 


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33 :i 




~iff^K':- 


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Page one hundred fifty 



OSitm> ENTRE NOU3 ^jbi^®\ 

pwiiiiiiii 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



Founded at the University of Virginia in 1868 
Seventy-three Active Chapters 
Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Flower: Li 

Alpha Pi Chapter 

Established March 10, igii 



F. R. Aw BRl "i 
Murray Caw 1 
James Ferry • 



Fratres in Collegio 
( j lass of IQ28 
. . Roanoke, Ala. H. H. Jones . 

Birmingham, Ala. W. H. Langley 

Birmingham, Ala. J. L. M. Smith 



Birmingham, Ala. 
. • Roanoke, Ala. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Dwight Clark . 
J. D. Farrington 
Cecil Foi.mak . 
Chester Griffith 



Class of IQ2Q 



. Birmingham, Ala. 

. . . Athens, Ala. 
. . . . Ensley, Ala. 

. Cave Springs, Ga. 
George Warrick . 



C. T. Harris . . 
Raymond Kniciii 
Jack Meachem . 
Edward Nunnally 

. Birmingham, Ala 



Cave Springs, Ga 
Birmingham, Ala 
Birmingham, Ala 
Birmingham, Ala 



Class of 1930 

Frank Aycock Selma, Ala. Jere Dumas . . . 

Alton Barr Haleyville, Ala. Jack Finklea . . 

T. M. Borland Pinckard, Ala. Harold Freeman . 

Mitchell Burns .... Birmingham, Ala. William Grimmer 

Fred BuSEY Jones Mills, Ala. W. C. McDonald . 

J. E. Chandler .... Birmingham, Ala. Fred Tente, Jr. . 

J. B. Davis Mobile, Ala. J. C. Toi.son . . . 

Class of 1 93 1 

Lloyd Arledge .... Birmingham, Ala. Graham Jones . . 

T. C. Edwards Piedmont, Ala. Hugh Taylor . . 

Leon Gay Geneva, Ala. Alfred Turnifseed 

Ralph Gilmore Brundidge, Ala. Clyde Wilder . . 



. Birmingham, Ala. 

. Monroeville, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

. Birmingham, Ala. 

Fairfield, Alabama 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Quincy City, Fla. 

. . Miami, Fla. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Page one hundred fifty-one 



ENTRE NOUS ^rfB*S 
1928 ^^m 




Pi Kappa Alpha 



Roll of Chapters 



University of Virginia 

William and Mary College 

University of Tennessee 

Southwestern Presbyterian College 

Transylvania University 

University of Richmond 

Vanderbilt University 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

University of Kentucky 

Louisiana State University 

North Carolina State College of Engineering 

and Agriculture 
University of Florida 
Missouri School of Mines 
Howard College 
University of Cincinnati 
University of California 
New York University 
Syracuse University 
Kansas State Agricultural College 
University of Washington 
University of New Mexico 
Southern Methodist University 
Cornell University 
Emory University 
University of Texas 
Davidson College 
Birmingham-Southern College 
Tulane University 
Hampden-Sidney 

Presbyterian College of South Carolina 
Washington and Lee University 
University of North Carolina 
North Georgia Agricultural College 
Trinity College 
Georgia School of Technology 



University of Arkansas 
Millsaps College 
University of Missouri 
Southwestern University 
Ohio State University 
University of Utah 
Iowa State College 
Rutledge University 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Kansas 
Western Reserve University 
University of Illinois 
Beloit College 
Washington University 
Oregon Agricultural College 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Pennsylvania 
Carnegie Institute of Technology 
University of Colorado 
University of Minnesota 
Lombard College 
University of Nebraska 
University of Arizona 
University of Oklahoma 
Colorado College 
University of Michigan 
Purdue University 
Mercer University 
LTniversity of Alabama 
University of Denver 
Utah Agricultural College 
Wittenberg College 
University of Southern California 
University of Mississippi 
Mississippi A. and M. 



Page one hundred fifty-tiuo 



ENTRE NOUS 




Page one hundred fifty-four 



Sigma Nu 



Founded at Virginia Military institute in i!U><; 

Ninety-two Active Chapters 

Colors: Old Gold, Black and White Flower: White Rose 

Founders 
James 1. Hopkins Greenfield Quari.es 

John \Y. Hobson James M. Riley 

Iota Chapter 

Established in 1879 

Frater in Facultate 
O. S. Causey 



W. H. Bancrofi 

W. R. BlCKLEY . 

J. B. Caw [HON 



FRATRES IX COLLEGIO 

Class of ig28 

J. 1). Heacock Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 

. . Mobile, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



J. W. King Birmingham, Ala. 

E. M. Smith Mobile, Ala. 



Class of IQ2Q 

C. G. Dobbins Camden, Ala. J. R. Longshore .... Birmingham, Ala. 

R. S. Foster Luverne, Ala. E. N. McConnell . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

K. P. Fuller Demopolis, Ala. \V. G. Riddle Birmingham, Ala. 

S. B. Sudduth Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of IQJO 

W. R. Bi.assingame . . . Montgomery, Ala. J. W. Minor Ensley, Ala. 

J. O. C01.1.EY Troy, Ala. D. E. VanBuskirk Lajunta, Col. 

J. E. Gourlev Birmingham, Ala. L. B. Wai.drop Bessemer, Ala. 

W. M. Herbert .... Birmingham, Ala. J. F. Yarbrough Jasper, Ala. 



Class of 1QJI 
S. B. Brakefield . . . Gamble Mines, Ala. M. P. Jeter . 

G. T. Cotton .... Alexander City, Ala. 
M. B. Eagles Birmingham, Ala. 

E. D. Goldsmith Ensley, Ala. 

F. T. Hagood Evergreen, Ala. 

T. E. Huey Birmingham, Ala. 



. . . Montevallo, Ala. 
J. M. Jokes . . ... Birmingham, Ala. 

W. C. Lamberth ■ . . Alexander City, Ala. 

J. C. McGehee Ensley, Ala. 

O. B. Sparks Birmingham, Ala. 

M. B. Thomas Talladega, Ala. 



Page one hundred fifty-five 




ENTRE NOUS 

3SL_ ;9 ? s ^jM 




Sigma Nu 



Roll of Chapters 

West Virginia University 
University of Chicago 
Iowa State College 
University of Minnesota 
University of Arkansas 
North Georgia Agricultural College Univercity of Montana 
Washington and Lee University University of Washington 

Syracuse University 



University of Virginia 
Bethany College 
Mercer University 
University of Alabama 
Howard College 



University of Georgia 

University of Kansas 

Emory University 

Lehigh University 

University of Missouri 

Vanderbilt University 

University of Texas 

Louisiana State University 

University of North Carolina 

Mount Union College 

Kansas State Agricultural College 

University of Iowa 

Ohio State University 

William Jewel College 

University of the South 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of Vermont 

North Carolina State College 

Rose Polytechnic Institute 

Tulane University 

Leland Stanford University 

University of Nebraska 

Lombard College 

State College of Washington 

University of Delaware 

Brown University 

Stetson University 

University of Maine 

University of Nevada 

University of Idaho 

George Washington University 



Bowdoin College 
University of Arizona 
Drury College 
Wesleyan University 
University of Wyoming 
Oklahoma A. and M. College 
University of Florida 
University of Tennessee 



Case School of Applied Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



Dartmouth College 
Columbia University 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Oklahoma 
Western Reserve LTniversity 
University of Maryland 
Trinity College 



William and Mary College 

University of Utah 

Butler University 

DePauw University 

Purdue University 

Indiana University 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
Colorado Agricultural College 
Carnegie Institute of Technology 
Oregon Agricultural College 
Colgate University 
University of California 
Georgia School of Technology 
Northwestern University 
Albian College 

Stevens Institute of Technology 
Lafayette College 
University of Oregon 
Colorado School of Mines 
Cornell University 
University of Kentucky 
University of Colorado 
University of Wisconsin 
University of North Dakota 
University of Illinois 
University of Michigan 
Missouri School of Mines 
Washington University 
University of Miami 
University of Mississippi 



Page one hundred fifty-six 






HlllllllHli^i^^^ 



k ^^^^^^^S^iiiiii"» ,,,ll " ,,l,imi 




/\i<7<' owf hundred fifty-eight 



ENTRE NOUS ^fcjfrv 



h 



^ x u^i!iiiiii«kp 



Theta Kappa Nu 



Organized 1919 

Colors: Silver, Black and C'ri 



Nationalized 1924 

Flower: White Ruse 



Alabama Alpha Chapter 

Established in 1924 

Fratres in Facultate 
Fail Harnett FRANK Lasseter 



Arthur Dix . . 
Robert Holbrook 



Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1928 
. ■ . Decatur, Ala. George Little . . . 
. . . . Akron, Ala. Loyal Phillips . . 
Allen Simpson Lafayette, Ala. 



. Attalk 
Cullman 



Ala. 
Ala. 



Class of IQ2Q 



Albert Beasley .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Sam Bradley Annbton, Ala. 

Hugh Jack Clark .... Anniston, Ala. 

Rayburn Fisher Cullman, Ala. 

John Garrett Albertville, Ala. 

Harold Harris Winfield, Ala. 



William Holbrook . 
Jewett Motley . . . 
Willie B. McDonald 
Harold Peace . . . 
Glenn Vance . . . 
Raymond Yost . . . 



. . . Akron, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 
, . Winfield, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

. Talladega, Ala. 



Class of 1 9 JO 
Dyer Talley Dew .... Trussville, Ala. Russell Smith . 

Henry Donahoo .... Birmingham, Ala. Sam Spicer . . . 

Blair Hays Cullman, Ala. Finis St. John . 

Thomas Peacock .... Birmingham, Ala. Willie B. Wells 



Barney Saxon Lineville, Als 



Roy Williams 



. Cullman, Ala. 
Andalusia, Ala. 
. Cullman, Ala. 
. Gadsden, Ala. 
. Anniston, Ala. 



Class of 193 1 



Raymond Akins Akron, Ala. 

John R. Barton .... Birmingham, Ala. 
Russell Bullard . . . Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Frank Coleman Anniston, Ala. 

Raymond Davis Anniston, Ala. 

Horace Dew Anniston, Ala. 



Roy T. Flanagan . 
Arnold Fuqua . . . 
Wheeler Garrett . . 
Haywood Hargrove . 
Walter L. Longshore 
Milton C. Tyler . . 



. Anniston, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
. Albertville, Ala. 
. Memphis, Tenn. 

. Lafayette, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



John Watson Lincoln, Ala. 



Page one hundred fifty-nine 



dSatxt^ ENTRE NOUS ^r/J^N 



% 



Theta Kappa Nu 



Roll of Chapters 



Howard College 

Birmingham-Southern College 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

University of Arkansas 

Rollins College 

University of Florida 

Oglethorpe University 

Eureka College 

University of Illinois 

Hanover College 

Depauvv University 

Rose Polytechnic Institute 

Frankling College 

Brooklyn Polytechnic 

Alfred University 

North Carolina State College 

Wake Forest College 

University of North Carolina 

Marietta College 

Baldwin-Wallace College 

Oklahoma City University 

Gettysburg College 

Thiel College 

Washington and Jefferson College 

Wofford College 

Randolph-Macon College 

Hampden-Sidney College 



Iowa Wesley an College 
Simpson College 
Baker University 
Louisiana State University 
Centenary College 
Louisiana Polytechnic 
Clark University 
University of Michigan 
University of Minnesota 
Millsaps College 
Drury College 
Westminister College 
Culver-Stockton College 



Page one hundred sixty 



dEgto*^ ENTRE NOUS ^r», 
/^©Jfe, 1928 ' ^ ' 



iWiPWIIIIIIII^ 



§5|3t^^ 






mm 



Page one hundred sixty-two 



ENTRE NOUS 

1928 Ms 




Pi K 



appa 



Phi 



Founded at the College ol Charleston, D« 

Thirty Active Chapters 

White 

Founders 
L. Harry Mixon Andre 

SlMi)\ FOGARTY, Jk. 



Flower: Rid Rose 



Alpha Eta Chapter 

Established April 25, 1925 

Fratres in Facultate 
Williams Newton Perkins J. Prewitt 



Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1928 
Edward E. Beason .... Demopolis, Ala. J. Theodore Jackson .... Ashford, 

Ci 11 ton c;. Brown Jasper, Ala. Clay Knight Arab, 

John Drue Gibson . . . Mount Hope, Ala. David Marion Lee . . . Birmingham, 
John L. Wilking Birmingham, Ala. 



Ala. 
Ala. 

Ala. 



Class of IQ2Q 

Codie D. Bei.l Andalu ia, Ala. John Will Gay Scottsboro, Ala. 

Fred Blrmiam Jacksonville, Ala. Burt Poe Birmingham, Ala. 

Herbert Doweli Birmingham, Ala. Louis Rhudy ..... Birmingham, Ala. 

Millard Strickland .... Alexandria, Ala. 

Class of 1930 

Amos Bur ion Lock 17, Ala. Clarence Landham .... Anniston, Ala. 

James Cunningham . . . Grove Hill, Ala. T. J. Payne, Jr. ■ Dora, Ala. 

Ralph Fletcher .... Birmingham, Ala. Lee Roberts Oneonta, Ala. 

Edwin F. Hicks Selma, Ala. John Sibley Birmingham, Ala. 

Bascomb Woodward Lineville, Ala. 



Class of 1931 



Emmett Aldridge 
Maxwell Bains . 
Elbert Bruce . . 
Cecil Chappell . 



. Brooksville, Ala. 
Blountsville, Ala. 
. . Irondale, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Horace McDanai. . 
Leonard McGarr . 
Horace Mann . . 
Emmett Morris . 



. . Sipsey, Ala. 

. Tallassee, Ala. 

. Tallassee, Ala. 

Ganlendale, Ala. 



Edwin Huey Birmingham, Ala. 

Otis Lawson Birmingham, Ala. 



Robert Padgett . . South Pittsburgh, Tenn. 
Rufus Shelton .... Birmingham, Ala. 



Joe Vaughn Birminghc 



Tagt one hundred sixty-three 



ENTRE NOUS 

1928 ^W^ 




Pi Kappa Phi 



College of Charleston 

Presbyterian College of S. C. 

University of California 

Davidson College 

Wofford College 

Emory University 

Georgia School of Technology 

University of North Carolina 

University of Georgia 

Duke University 

Purdue University 
Mercer University 
Tulane University 
University of Oklahoma 
University of Washington 
University of Florida 
Oregon Agricultural College 
Howard College 
Michigan State College 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 



Roll of Chapters 

University of Nebraska 
Roanoke College 
University of Alabama 
Oglethorpe University 
Washington and Lee University 
North Carolina State College 
University of Illinois 
University of Tulsa 
Stetson University 
Cornell University 



Page one hundred sixty- four 



J&> 



ENTRE NOUS 



^niiiiliiii 



^^ 



if£L 1928 ^^a®WN&( 




/^i' owe hundred sixty-six 



ENTRE NOUS 






Alpha Lambda Tau 

Organized in 1917 Nationalized in 1917 

Eta Chapter 

Established in 1926 

Colors: Cold and Black Flower: American Beauty Rose 

Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1928 

A. J. Adercrombie, Jr. . . Birmingham, Ala. Ernest Epi.ky .... Alabama City, Ala. 

Milton Doughty Slocomb, Ala. Rupert S. Hicks Boothton, Ala. 

Aspey P. Smith Eutaw, Ala. 

Class of 1929 

Cecil B. Crawford Arab, Ala. Sam Hart Florala, Ala. 

Tom Ellis Anniston, Ala. Frank James Birmingham, Ala. 

Lawrence Fitzpatrick . . Birmingham, Ala. J. C. Miller Birmingham, Ala. 

Leon Gilbert .... Alabama City, Ala. Dabney Plummer . . . Carbon Hill, Ala. 

Hoke Green Wehadkee, Ala. Chester Quaiu.es Troy. Ala. 



Class of 1 9 jo 

Elliot Ellis Enterprise, Ala. Harry Morion, Jr. 

Hudson Hicks Troy, Ala. C. B. Powell . . . 

Gilbert Meadows . . . Lowndesboro, Ala. Fred Putman . . . 

Crook Stewart ..... Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1 93 1 

Jack Harris Birmingham, Ala. Beckham Palmer . . 

Lawton Khamplain . . . Evergreen, Ala. Ralph Smith . . . 

Ernest Kreh Chicago, 111. Buey Tomlinson . . 

Maxwell Lancaster . . Birmingham, Ala. Charley Williams . 
Charles Yandle Birmingham, Ala. 



A'abama City, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Alabama City, Ala. 



. . Eutaw, Ala. 

. . Slocomb, Ala. 

. Hartselle, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Page 



hundred sixty-seven 



ENTRE NOUS 




51 R HARRY MORTON 
EAR L OF ' 
HO RSEF LATHERS 



RAT5" PALMER ANDKAMPLAIN 





CROOK STEWABT 
SPEED BREAKER 




fc- *J *"' HOKE GREEN J/P 

~-^^- MAN OF AFFAIRS «^^"_ 



C B. POWELU 
TRUMPETER EXTRAORDINARY 




' THE tfOSV 
"tJUtU" JAMES 





BOOPVANOLE 



"SKEEr'ABERCWOMBiE 
MILTON DOUGHTY FINANCIER 

ONE OF THE -SENroi?^ 



Pan,- on,- hundred sixty -eig 111 



/«at5R>^ ENTRE NOUS 

Iffllllllll^^ 




Page one hundred seventy 



ENTRE NOUS 



<sfl^ 




Sigma Delta Chi 



iunded at Howard College, i<;-4 



Flower: Pink Carnation 



Morgan Bakef 
Rai.i'ii Grant . 



Fratres in Collegio 
Class of 1928 

Birmingham, Ala. W. Thomas Maynor . ■ • . Oneonta, Al 



Clanton, Ala. John O. Si ddi hi 



Morris, Ah 



Wn.i. E. Lacy 



Class of 1929 
Wetumpka, A'a. Clarence Morgan . 
J C. Reed Birmingham, Ala. 



Mobile, Ala. 



Class of 1930 

Shephard Bryan .... Greenville, Ala. Floyd Dyer . . 

William Perry Claxton . . Anniston, Ala. Hollis Garrard 

Ellis Davis ..... Birmingham, Ala. Lavert Gravlee 

Ralph Dismukes .... Birmingham, Ala. Mardis Howle . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
. . Eclectic, Ala. 



Class of 1 93 1 

Buster Bazemore .... Sylacauga, Ala. Charles McRee . 

James Boswell Brundidge, Ala. Sterling Powers . 

Harold Floyd ..... Brundidge, Ala. Omer Reed . . . 

Bert Johnson Birmingham, Ala. Julian Stephens . 

Otis Kent Oak Grove, Ala. John Urquhart . 

Truman McGonegal .... Mobile, Ala. Ollie Westbrook 

William McMurray . . . Fairfield, Ala. Bert Williams . 



. Greenville, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
. . Gadsden, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Page 



hundred seventy-one 



mm 



ffilllllllltHilt^iiKS 



ENTRE NOUS ^tfg*. 

1928 Jiimh 



S^^^S^,,;, 



ii - 





6 J-»E 
11 1 LI IT llM 



i 



« 



i 

if 



Prt<7,- o;/(- hundred seventy-iw 




/^a^r^ ENTRE NOUS ^^/?g?^ 

aj ^r -A "A > f 

Men s Pan-Hellenic Council 
Officers 

Raymond Knight President 

J. T. Jackson Vice-President 

Rayburn Fisher Secretary 

Representatives 

Frank Awbrey Raymond Knight Frank Aycock 

Sigma Nu 
William H. Bancroft Solon Sudduth Marvin Smith 

Theta Kappa Nu 
Arthur Dix Harold Peace Rayburn Fisher 

Pi Kappa Phi 
J. T. Jackson II. Clay Knight John YV. Gay 

Alpha Lambda Tan 
Rupert Hicks Chester Quari.es Frank James 

Sigma Delta Chi 
W. Morgan Baker Olin C. Reeo Clarence Morgan 



Page one hundred seventy-three 



t%£%^ 



ENTRE NOUS 



& i9 2 8 Jffi®d& 



V .''.i 




/We one hundred seventy-four 



ENTRE NOUS 



ll'^l^llllllllllllt^iillllllllll'/^nJiV^/^"--^/ /~^V_^A 



Phi Sigma Gamma 

Founded al Howard C< liege, i<;-s 



Colors: Blue, Silver, G 



Flower: Swecl Pea 



l-K\iRi:s IX COLLEGIO 

Ctoi of 1928 
P. W. Roberts Jr Piedmont, Ah 



II. Bi wrov . 
1 1 1 wi P. (' \ 1 1 • 



C. 

W 

Vanci Johnston . . 

Ira R. I.ckvf.rv . . . 

New man II. Pannei l 

James B. Varnell . 

Lawrence W. Weeks 



Cla 



ss of 1929 



Lafa 



Air 



Birmingham, Ala. 

. Anniston, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

. Scottsboro, Ala. 
. . Anniston, Ala. 



Class of 1 9 jo 

James A. Garrett Birmingham, Ala. 

Clifford R. Gordon" Cu'lman, Ala. 

Raymond F. Walker Birmingham, Ala. 

T. M. Wyers Eldridge, Ala. 

Clarence B. F. Young Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1931 

William Parker Cofield, Jr LaGrange, Ga. 

Chester Foster Hackleburg, Ala. 

Frank M. Gibbs Birmingham, Ala. 

Cordon- M. Hanking Birmingham, Ala. 

1 in; \r.n Johnston Birmingham, Ala. 

J. W. McLendon Birmingham, Ala. 

Atkins H. Simmons Memphis, Tenn. 

1. M. Sizemore Birmingham, Ala. 



Page one hundred 



enty-fivi 



ENTRE NOUS 



^PPSt 1928 JgS^ 




Page one hundred seventy-six 



Colors: Hlue and White 



ENTRE NOUS ^rftt*. 

<i|ilM!lillllllllliii«nilll 



Alpha Delta Pi 



Founded at W 



College, 1851 



Kappa Chapter 

Established in 1019 



Flower: Violet 



KATHRYN Hendricks 
Annie Lee Orme . 
Alvne Price . . . 



SORORES IX COLLE 

Class of 1928 



Birmingham, Ala. 
. . Samson, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Evelyn Sellers . . 
Margaret Thornton 
Helen Wright . . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
. . Samson, Ala. 
. Talladega, Ala. 



Margaret Bass . . 
Maurine Gipson . 
Margaret McCulla 



Class of IQ2Q 
Birmingham, Ala. Margaret O'Del 

. Albertville, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala 



Mary Scott Smith 
Cassie Wilder . 



Mary Woodall Springville, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 

. . Lineville, Ala. 

. Andalusia, Ala. 



Class of 1930 
Mary Dock Banks . . . Birmingham, Ala. Rebecca Berry . . 

Florence Bass Birmingham, Ala. Lella Byrd Beasley 

Josephine Hunnicutt . . . Birmingham, Ala. 



. Birmingham, Ah 
. Birmingham, Ah 



Class of 1931 

Virginia Bishop .... Birmingham, Ala. Margaret Holmes . . . Birmingham, Ala 

Pauline Graves Cullman, Ala. Virginia Knapp .... Birmingham, Ala 

Grace Hardy Birmingham, Ala. Annie Laurie McKinley . Birmingham, Ala 

Madge Hardy Birmingham, Ala. Minnie Riddle .... Birmingham, Ala 

Sarah Hich Ashville, Ala. Pauline York Summiton, Ala 



Page one hundred seventy-seven 



/«a5JC^ ENTRE NOUS ^^fiaK 

(Siiiiiiiiiiilwirai. 1 ^^ 



sfls^lpillllllll lOlii^SSII!^ 




/'(/r/ ( - »/;<• hundred seventy-eight 



ENTRE NOUS 




Phi Mu 



Colors: Ron- and White 



lunded ai Wesleyan College, 1X52 

Flower: Enchantress C 



Alpha Gamma Chapter 

Established in 1924 

Soror IX Facultate 
Annie Boyeti 



SORORES IX COLLEGIO 
Class of IQ28 
Birmingham, Ala. Lucile Higgins . . 

. Birmingham, Alt 



Margaret Staples 



Brown .ville, T< 



Class of 1929 
Mary Ruth Adams . . . Birmingham, Ala. Mildred Golson . . 
Louise Church .... Birmingham, Ala. Elizabeth Lawson . 
Elizabeth Leslie Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Vivian Anderson .... Trussville, Ala. 
Evelyn Caldwell . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Sarah Hargrove .... Birmingham, Ala. 
Frances Harris .... Birmingham, Ala. 
Eleanor Sudduth . 



Class of 1930 

Grace Hays Birmingham, Ala. 

Elizabeth Otwell .... Cullman, Ala. 
Mary Glen Reynolds . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Lazelle Roberts .... Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1931 
Helen McNeil .... Birmingham, Ala. Maurine Slaughter . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Genevieve O'Kelly . . . Birmingham, Ala. Edith Stocks Gadsden, Ala. 

Olivia Prescott .... Birmingham, Ala. Mary Wallace .... Birmingham, Ala. 
Ruth Wilbanks Gadsden, Ala. 



Page 



hundred seventy-nil 



rf£&t&^ BUT RE NOUS 

llllllllllllllWiira 1 ,^^ 



* -^gl^wipiiiiiii^^ 




Page one hundred eighty 



Delta Zeta 



Colors: Rose ;nul (Ji 



>unded ;it Miami University, 1902 



Founders 



Ai I'M \ Lloyd Hayes 
Ann \ S. Freidline 
Julia B. Coleman 



Anna Keen Davis 
Mary C. Galbraith 
Mabelle Hageman 



Alpha Pi Chapter 

Established in 1924 

SORORES IN FACULTATE 
Mrs. Ora Bohannon Mrs. A. H. Mason 



M \i;i I, TURNIPSEED . 



SORORES IN CoLLIiGIO 
Class of IQ28 

. Birmingham, Ala. 



Christine Bomar 
Bertha Almgren 
Nancy Elgin . . 



Class of IQ2Q 

. Alabama City, Ala. Billie Ellis Mobile, Ala. 

, . Birmingham, Ala. Margaret Hassler . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
. . . Searles, Ala. Annie Newman .... Birmingham, Ala. 
Naomi Wells Gadsden, Ala. 



Class of 19 JO 

Atholine Allen .... Birmingham, Ala. Sara Hoover Birmingham, Ala. 

Louise Bellsnvder . . . Birmingham, Ala. Aucusta Piatt .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Lovina Edwards Piedmont, Ala. Elizabeth Sanders Ensley, Ala. 

Margaret Ham. in . . . Birmingham, Ala. Lvde Thommason Ensley, Ala. 



Edith Leckie . 
Othello Lloyd . 
Jeanette Morca? 



Class of 193 1 
. . . Bessemer, Ala. Ethelyne Oliver . 

. . . Birmingham, Ala. Louise Sanders . 

. . . Slocomb, Ala. Sarah Sanders . . 

Mary Katherine Waters . Birmingham, AI; 



Birmingham, Ala. 
irmingham, Ala. 
Anderson, S. C. 



Page one hundred eighty-one 



Mm 



ENTRE NOUS 



IS 



1928 



«iiiiiiilWi^y^^^^^^^^ 



.^h 



^^j^mmiwww^mimM 








/'ci^/,- one hundred eighty-two 



rf%B&^ ENTRE NOUS 

iMiMSiiiiiiyiiiiiiiMiinira/'M^^ 



£*s=§^^ 



Sigma Iota Chi 

Founded at St. James-Xavier College, 1903 
Colors: Purple and Gold 

Publication: "Parchment" 

Chi Chapter 

Established in 1924 
SORCRES I\ COLLEGIO 

Class of 1928 

Sara Hunt Scottsboro, Ala. Marguerite Pence . 

Ruth Sherer Jasper, Ala. 

Class of IQ2Q 

Evelyn Giles ..... Birmingham, Ala. Mertice Scofield . 

Naomi Shepherd ...... Cordova, Ala. 

Class of 1930 

Mildred Bledsoe .... Birmingham, A'a. Myrtice Folmar . . 

Martha Darden .... Goodwater, Ala. Jewel Mosely . . . 

Ruth Strange Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1931 
Florence Baum .... Birmingham, Ala. Hazel Leveille . . 

Gladys Graves .... Birmingham, Ala. Effie Robinette . 

Ruth Gravlee Birmingham, Ala. Olive Serover . . . 

Elizabeth Jordan . . . Birmingham, Ala. Louise Stapp . . . 

Pearl Williams ..... Carbon Hill, Ala. 



Flower: Violel 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 

. . Oneonta, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Page one hundred eighty-tin 



^sacs^x ENTRE N0US s^ask\ 




Page one hundred eighty-four 



ENTRE NOUS ^rf&*^ 



Lambda Sigma 

Founded at Howard College, 1921 
Colors: Blue and Gold Flower: Ps 

Founders 
Edna Pate Jessie Freeman 

Bertha Howard Virginia Minter 

sorores in' facultate 
Bertha Howard Gibbs Anna Kenda Jones 

SORORES IN COLLEGIO 
Class of TQ2Q 

Sara Cunningham Birmingham, Ala. 

Dorothy Childress Birmingham, Ala. 

Elspeth MacDonald Birmingham, Ala. 

Margaret Pate Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1030 

Martha Harris Birmingham, Ala. 

Vera Sim. awn Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1 (j j; 1 

Mildred Cranford Birmingham, Ala. 

Frances Elliott Birmingham, Ala. 

Ida Belle Holtam Birmingham, Ala. 

Ollie Matthews* Birmingham, Ala. 

Elisabeth Scheuing* Birmingham, Ala. 

Clara Vaii Birmingham, Ala. 

• Pledges. 



Page one hundred eighty-five 




Page one hundred eighty-six 



Beta Delta Sigma 

Founded at Howard College, 1924 
e and White Flower: Sweet P 

SORORES IN COLLEGIO 
Class of KJ2H 

Helen Hardie Birmingham, Ala. 

Mildred Hearn Albertville, Ala. 

Helen Johnston Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of i()2ij 

Irene Godwin Birmingham, Ala. 

Sue Hawkins Bay Minette, Ala. 

Cecilia Lacy Plant City, Fla. 

Mattie Matthews Dallas, Ga. 

Anne Nunnelly Birmingham, Ala. 

Virginia Wittmeier Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of igjo 

Margaret Mansill Dothan, Ala. 

Sarah Overby Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of igji 

Ruth Bush Birmingham, Ala. 

Evelyn James Gadsden, Ala. 

Mary Mason Birmingham, Ala. 

Gwendolyn Hall Berry, Ala. 

Ruth Ellis Birmingham, Ala. 



Page one hundred eighty-seven 




/^at\^^ ENTRE NOUS _^?/?K?.Vn 

2>jfe 1928 £0Wk 

: iir#iii 

Women's Pan-Hellenic Council 

Officers 

Ruth Sherer President 

Mildred Golson Vice-President 

Sara Cunningham Secretary 

Helen Hardie Treasurer 

Representatives 
Alpha Delta Pi 
Alyne Price Mary Scott Smith 

Phi Mu 

Mildred Golson Sue Harris 

Delta Zeta 

Nancy Elgin Augusta Piatt 

Sigma Iota Chi 
Mertice Scofield Ruth Sherer 

Lambda Sigma 
Sara Cunningham Martha Harris 

Beta Delta Sigma 
Helen Hardie Annie Ninnai.ly 

The purpose of the Women's Pan-Hellenic Council of Howard College: 

i. To promote the welfare of Howard College as affected by sororities in said institution. 

2. To foster and demonstrate a spirit of mutual helpfulness among sororities. 

3. To discuss plans and make laws, which, in the opinion of the Council, shall effect the 
purpose named above. 



Page one hundred eighty-right 




^ook tyour : features 



ENTRE NOUS 




Miss Marguerite Pence, 
Editor-in-chief, The Entre-Nous, 
The Howard College Annual, 



Dear Miss Pence/ 



Under separate cover I an' returning the pic 



Judge beauty, for after 



delicate. thine to he 
auty is only in the eye of the 'beholder" and we all 
ch conflicting opinions on that score. So please 
e girls that are not selected that no reflection has 
at upon then in any way. They are all lovely. 



numbered on tbe back, fir 



them by number. 



has "personalit 

and second plac 

number fnur-Ah- 
dimplee and tho 
graphicaly at 1 



rst place because of her tznsophlcated 

"-and a bright smile disolosing lovely 
puzzled me. I gave her first place 



ved beauty, a face of lovely 



repoat my task was a hard < 
ervite 1 am glad. 



Hy best wishes 



~cn^> 



UJ<iJUfU__^ 



Miss Marguerite Pence, 
805 Martin Bldg. 
Birmingham, Ala.. 



Dear Kis» Penc 



Miss trilson return*-" from Arizona yesterday . Renatned only 
one hour and did not have an opportunity to write ynu a let 
but. chose three more photographs which T at once nailed to 
youfgpectal delivery). The remaining photographs T have ma 
to you under separate cover. T trust you will receive then 



not able 
e latter t 

r "Annual" 



MaStUiL 




DMEOID 



ENTRE NOUS 



KtlllPiMllllllllfflWI!!^ 1 ^^* 



ff^s^k^gRfB^ 



WHO'S VHO- 

AND HOW, 





BILLIE ELLIS 
PEPPIEST 

nosr ruiTTumNo coed 




DOC DOZIER 

PEPPIfTST 
MOST FhRTTERlK'O 
BEST HOWARD 

BOOSTER 



CHRISTINE BOflUR 
xJOHN GUY 
HOST DESPERATELY IN 

LOVE 




WILLIAM S. BOHatSNON 

MOST POPULAR PROFESSOR 



Page two hundred 



WHOS WHO- 

AND HO 1 




MARGUERITE PENCE 
most capable 
/109t versatile 
host dependable: 
most i mho i native coed 
best how. wd boosts/? jakes c shelburne^ 
most dependable 
most mneitfATivE 




CHARLES DOBBINS 

UGT.IEST MAN 
WST fP/ENDLY STUDENT 



.\\./,(,/l,V BOX Eh' 




J.T. JACK SOW 

MOST CAPABLE 
MOST DIGNIFIED SENIOR 



Page tv:o hundred one 



The Petty Entry Noose 



Patented 1928 



>n Hard College Slelvdents' Chronicler of the Neglected Truth EC 
Published By Squirrel Food Department of the 1928 Entre Nous Staff 



No Volume At All 



NoCKUM Ex PENSE, Editor and Thief 



Soakum H. Jones, Accomplicci 



CAMPUS PUB- 
LICATIONS 



The Very Red 

(Non-Socialist) 
This is a weakly pang which occasionally 
makes its appearance as we are leaving 
chapel siesta for the 11:10 snooze. It re- 
ports all campus news just late enough to 
be stale. It is tremendously popular with 
the ministers over the state, especially in 
Clanton. 

Bull Dawg Bull 

This is our humorous magazine, which ap- 
pears just as regularly as the check from 
home, and bids fair to become a dangerous 
rival to "Life" and "College Humor." It is 
overflowing with jokes and verses border- 
ing on the vulgar, but very funny neverthe- 
less. The cartoons are good and the rest 
perfectly killing. But the funny part about 
this funny paper is that we, as yet, have 
not seen a copy of it. Isn't our post office 
service terrible? 

The Entry Noose 

This is a publication forced on the student 
body each year, if the management can 
swindle enough people to lose only $500 
apiece. It carries the pictures of all stu- 
dents who are handsome enough to have 
their pictures made. It tells how seniors 
are super men and women and with all the 
pictures of the campus and lovely buildings, 
it makes a good dust catcher to put on 
some shelf back home. 

The Bulldog's Puppy 

The Rat Bible is put out by the X. T. 
Z. A., and is presented to all freshmen and 
fresh women entering Hard. It contains a 
calendar, a blank schedule, pictures of one 
or two politicians, a list of "Don'ts" which 
all frosh do and a list of "Do's" which they 
don't. It also gives invaluable information 
about cutting, making, and flunking classes. 



STATISTICS 



By a careful study and use of question- 
naires, we have induced, deduced and pro- 
duced the following statistics, which are 
more or less inaccurate: 

1. There are 500 yellow slickers on Hard's 
campus, 16 green ones, and 200 red ones; 
600 are painted with appropriate slogans 
and resemble very closely a walking bill- 
board or comic sheet of the Sunday "News"; 
one man carries an umbrella. 

2. If all students who eat in campus 
boarding houses were placed in line they 
would reach. 

3. If all the co-eds who wear short dresses 
were placed end on end, they would be In 
a very uncomfortable position. 

4. Of the 300 co-eds at Hard, 75 have 
dates, 200 would like to have dates, and 25 
arc married. 

5. Among the professors: They told 19,000 
jokes; 16 were funny, 13 were risque, 26 
were awful, and the rest were antediluvian. 
They made 15,000 lectures, gave 3,000,000 
quizzes, flunked -150,000 students, and said 
enough to All a set of volumes thrice as 
large as Wells' Outline of History. 

6. As to the freshmen: The 250 here dur- 
ing Russian season hoped to get bids; 100 
got rushed, 50 were pledged, 35 wore initi- 
ated. 15 went back to the farm to do the 
spring plowing, and the rest passed two 
courses and stayed to see that things were 
run right on the campus. 

7. Take your height, multiply by your 

term average, add the number of cuts you 
made last semester, subtract the number of 

times you were called before Miss Lottie, 
Mr. Causey, and Dean Burns. This gives 
you the score of the Faculty-Senior base- 
ball game. 



Acknowledgment 



The Entry. Noose staff feels that it should 
express its deep appreciation to the follow- 
ing parties, without whose co-operation this 
book could not have been published: To 
those countless thousands who have asked 
us when the book was to appear, thereby 
reminding us that we were editing an an- 
nual; to the 98% of students who did not 
have their pictures made; to that one stu- 
dent who bought an annual and paid Tur- 
ner's Studio before Easter (we had to ask 
him only 179 times); to the Religious Edu- 
cation Club, who decided they didn't want a 
page after their panel had been completed: 
to the editor of The Very Red, who actually 
found and returned some of the cuts he bor- 
rowed, and to the college administration for 
the palatial office in old Ruhama Church and 
the beautiful mahogany furniture furnished 
for the use of the staff. 



Consumme of 1928 

SEPTEMBER 

Hundreds (or did the catalog say thou- 
sands?) of fine youths forsook farms and 
drug stores and trekked toward Hard, where 
they embellished their caputs with red caps 
and learned all about college except how to 
study. 

OCTOBER 
Numerous football games came off and 
much money changed hands. 
NOVEMBER 
Southern's cat lost all nine lives (9-0), and 
the dormitories served dressing on Thanks- 
giving. 

DECEMBER 
Santa Claus came, and all the boys hoped 
they would get a roadster and coonskin coat, 
which they didn't, instead of the loud sox 
and awful ties, which they did. 
JANUARY 
After mid-term exams some several schol- 
ars wended their weary way homeward. 
FEBRUARY 
There was an extra day in which to cut 
classes this year. 

MARCH 
Came in like a lion and acted like a 
hyena. 

ArRIL 

Young man's fancy turned to what the 

co-eds had been thinking about all winter. 

MAY 

Spent in cramming for exams, final flings 
at campus courses, paying up outstanding 
debts, etc. 

SUMMER 

Wholly a matter of conjecture: Some will 
profanely coax old Beck down the corn row; 
some will adorn street corners and public 
squares of the home town to treat natives 
with a view of collegiate-CUt clothes; some 
will peddle Pictorial Reviews and alumi- 
numware; seniors will be wondering what 
they can do to make a living. 





> 


loving 
memory of 

those 

students 

larked 

energy 

to 

have 

their 

picture 

made, 

do 

we, the stuff. 

dedicate 

this 

space. 







HONORARY OR- 
GANIZATIONS 



There are many and various kinds of 
these so-called "honorary" groups — Allied 
Arts, Science. History, French, Math, Re- 
ligion, and Education — for those students 
who are trying to spoof the profs and make 
them think they are interested in the sub- 
ject. You can also by this means get your 
name and picture in the annual again. Fra- 
ternity infested as Hard's campus is, the 
honor of belonging to one of these groups is 
almost as much as the overwhelming dis- 
tinction of belonging to the human race. 

There are Sigma Upsilon and Chi Delta 
Phi. which are composed of intelligentia and 
literati who are interested (?) in what 
Shakespeare said to Dante when they heard 
John Erskine had written "Adam and Eve." 
They write, too, as disproven by this nit- 
wit of an editor. 

Then there is Alpha Beta, composed of 
embryonic Newtons who have faith enough 
to believe that there are such things as 
atoms and these are as complex as the grad- 
ing system used in the Physics Department. 

Beta Pi Theta gets big French headlines 
in the "Very Red," but the Chinese which 
they should "polly voo" is Greek to most of 
them. 

When the Religious Ed. Club meets, flasks, 
pistols and dice are checked at the door, and 
those whose breath smells of onions or 
whisky are promptly ruled out. 

The History Club has done research work 
this year to establish exact data concern- 
ing the social customs of the period in which 
Queen Victoria ordered Magellan to divide 
all Gaul into three parts. 

The Commerce and Math Clubs became so 
rough that they had to function sub rosa 
this year. That's why you never see on 
the bulletin board any notice of their meet- 



that there are not enough, for every man 
should belong to six such lodges (even Little 
Jack and Six Pence only belong to four 
each). There is room on each watch chain 
for at least four keys and the average vest 
contains 40 square inches which could bo 
utilized as parking space for pins. The 
Class Cutters. Crip Hoppers. Course Bust- 
ers. Chapel Goers, Dean Dodgers, and Book 
Borrowers should certainly get together and 
perfect a form of organization. It is a burn- 
ing shame we don't have enough clubs, and 
somebody ought to write a piece about it. 



To Whom It May Concern: 

There are many different lies and varieties 
of lies — white lies, black lies, college cata- 
logs, and statistics. This is true, hut we 
guarantee that the data given on this page 
is one per cent accurate and correct. We 
compiled it from the directory, the diction- 
ary, last year's edition of the phone book, 
a copv of the chapel song book, a gallon of 
corn meal, two quarts Of water, one pack- 
age of raisins, and one cake of yeast. If 
anyone is offended, he may address all com- 
munications to the Honeymoon Matrimonial 
15ui.au riumnelly. Alabama. On second 
thought he can save the stamp and smoke 
b Chesterfield— they satisfy. 



EDUCATION 

Aspiration, mystification, examination, four 
years' duration. 

Anticipation, hard occupation, short vaca- 
tion, no cessation, 

Expectation, conditionalizatlon, passiflcation. 
then salvation. 

Realization, gratification in sweet gradua- 
tion. 

We apologize to the whole world — but 
hope not more than half of it feels of- 
fended at the effort hereby made to fill 
up another page. 






SUDDST 







VAN BOSKIfctO 



WHEN WE BIG HEAD/ 
WER^LITTLE -" 



ft 




LANGL&Y 








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BANCR.OFT 



Pa^^ /oio hundred three 



ENTRE NOUS 

1928 ^(J%f% 



^nfiiiiini 



-rt r *d -ill-** 

-3- -3- _ fr _ -a.- 

•^ *>*• "»rf Kf* 

#1 U #3 f» ,4 * ^ 



The " Ayes'' Have IT 



In making up this cut, the "Ayes" carried the page, the "Noes," however, running them a very 
close race for the place of prominence. The twenty students who make a partial appearance on 
this page are afforded an opportunity to look themselves in the eye and figure out all their com- 
plexes by analysis and introspection. 

Now check up and see if you can fit the eyes with the following names. 



Brooks Russell 


Virginia Knapp 


HORTON CHAMBLEE 


Evelyn Sellers 


W. B. McDonald 


Ruth Gravlee 


Charlie Dobbins 


Maurine Gipson 


Lawrence Fitzpatrick 


Sara Hunt 


Conn- Bell 


El IZABE 111 SCHEl ING 


W. II. Langley 


Grace Hays 


11. 11. Jones 


Olivia Prescott 


E. E. Weaver 


Ei izabeth Otwei l 


Francis Hollifield 


Nancv Elgin 



Page too hundred four 



ENTRE NOUS 










yVO MA/VS LAND' 




HOWARD BOYS AT LUNCH HOUR 
' PAN-HELLENIC KIDS 



Page t<wo hundred fivi 



ENTRE NOUS 




\S 



Patir two hundred 



^^®ife I928 Jzft<§vr^ 




Page two hundred seven 



>fcw^ ENTRE NOUS 



#l«lllllllfcilllli/^^'^^^ 



^^piiiiiiiiiiiiliiip 



NOTABLES 




UL-OHGIHCLVB 



Page two hundred eight 



ENTRE NOUS 





Page tiuo hundred nine 



The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, 
Moves on; nor all your Piety nor Wit 
Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line, 
Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it. 
Rubaivat of Omar Khayyam. 



ENTRE NOUS 




BIRMINGHAM 
JACKSONVILLE 
NEW ORLEANS 




CORRECT CLOTHES 
for College MEN 



Where Style and Quality Predominate 




§> 



TWENTIETH STREET AND THIRD AVENUE 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



FRATERNITY, COLLEGE 

AND 

CLASS JEWELRY 



COMMENCEMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS 
AND INVITATIONS 



J eiveler to the Senior Class of 
Howard College 



L. G. Balfour Company 

MANUFACTURING 

JEWELERS AND STATIONERS 

Attleboro, Mass. 

ASK ANY COLLEGE GREEK 



*dSS$o-* ENTRE N0US s^rt5*\ 





Pay Cash and Pay Less 












2009 Second Avenue 
Where Styles are Created 

THE STORE FOR COLLEGE MEN AND 
LITTLE MEN, AGES 2 TO 16 




i THE STYLE STORE THAT VALUES BUILT 
I 


: 


Exclusive, But Not Expensive 



■:. nidi 



ENTRE NOUS 












HHil 


NORTON 
HALL 

ONE OF 

Five 
Modern 
Buildings 




THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST 

The Beeches- THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

" ! Our students enjoy a modernly equipped new suburban home, 

admirably located midst numerous student-served churches and a 

LOUISVILLE, world-famous faculty of sound Christian thinkers who offer a 

i^ comprehensive curriculum based on genuine Christian scholarship, 

making it possible for them to thoughtfully face truth under safe 

guides and affording them an atmosphere of evangelism and 



TURNER STUDIO COMPANY 

WISHES TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE COURTESY OF 

THE ENTRE NOUS STAFF 

IN SELECTING THEM AS 

OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 



TWENTIETH STREET AND FOURTH AVENUE 
Birmingham, Alabama 



«5Jfcx 



ENTRE NOUS 



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Visit the 

STRAND 

Theatre 



Birmingham's Most 
Popular Movie 

THEATRE 




COMPLIMENTS OF 

KAUL 

LUMBER 

CO. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



ALABAMA 
BY-PRODUCTS 
CORPORATION 

MINERS OF HIGH GRADE 
STEAM AND DOMESTIC 

COAL 

Phone 7-5171 

American Traders Building 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



NEWMAN'S 
CLEANERIES 

SHOES REBUILT 

Always a Representative on the 

Campus to Call for and 

Deliver Your Clothes 

Visit Our 
Modern Cleaning Plant 

Office and Plant 

5601 Second Avenue 

East Lake Branch 
121 S. 77th St. 

Phone Woodlawn 866-372 



ENTRE NOUS 




"WHAT YOU BUY WE 

STAND BY" 

Counts Brothers 

Furniture and Sewing 
Machine Company 

2209 Second Avenue 

o 

NEW HOME DEALERS 



BUY ON OUR CLUB PLAN AND 
SAVE MONEY 



ELECTRICITY— GAS 
RAILWAY 



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ELECTRIC 

CO. 



B 



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Birmingham — Ensley 
Bessemer 




Printers of the "Howard Crimson" for the Past Eight Years 

WE SPECIALIZE IN 

PRINTING NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES AND HOUSE ORGANS 

Special Attention Devoted to College and School Newspapers 

Write for Samples and Prices 

WESTERN NEWSPAPER UNION 

N. C. Cady, Resident Manager BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 



ENTRE NOUS 




HOTEL PATTEN 

Chattanooga' s Complete Hotel 
Headquarters For College Activities and Visitors 

JOHN LOVELL, Manager 



Birmingham Real Estate 

V. H. HUEY 

Realtor 

Phone 3-4104 
2016 FOURTH AVENUE 



Birmingham Distributors 

OF 

MERRY WIDOW 

AND 

BAKELIGHT 
FLOUR 

LEE BROTHERS 

Wholesale Grocers 

2321 Morris Ave. 
Birmingham, Alabama 



DEPENDABLE 

MERCHANDISE FOR 

EVERYBODY 

THE IDEAL 

Corner 1st Ave. and 19th St. 



Founded 1838 

JUDSON COLLEGE 

(For Women) 
MARION, ALABAMA 



Member of Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools of the Southern States, 
and thus recognized as an accredited A- 1 
college. 

Standard college courses leading to the 
A.B. degree, including teacher-training 
and superior advantages in Music, Art, 
Expression and Home Economics. 

Good equipment. Excellent board. Best 
moral and religious influences. 



For catalogue and 



book address 



PRESIDENT E. V BALDY 

A.M., D.D., LL.D. 



ENTRE NOUS 




i!iiiiii«Skiiii 



Schools 



AN OPEN LETTER TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 



Theology 
Religious Education 

Sacred Music 
Missionary Training 

o o o 



THE OLD BOOK 

Southwestern Seminary Is Christ- 
rilled and world-girdling In Its spirit. 
It is orthodox anil fundamental to the 
core. It accepts the Old Book page 
for page and without qualifications. 
- nlstory is rich and Its future 
promising. 



SOUTHWESTERN 

BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL 

SEMINARY 



NIC XT 
SESSION 
OPENS 
SEPT. 



AFTER COIXEOE, 

The Seminary welec 

lege trained men an 
who plan to crown t 
cation wllti speclaltl 
religious field. 



Spec! 



SPECIALTIES 

courses offered 



■hillK. 



teaching, 



and singing. Scholarship 

and evangelism have set 
apart the "Southwestern" 
men and women. The spirit 
on the campus Is 100% In 
cordiality and fellowship. 
Men and women are trained 
In ten distinct lines of re- 
ligious educational work, and 
gospel singers are prepared 
for every phase of activity 
in the music field. Women 
along with men are given 
their specialty. 



EXPENSES 
Expenses are kept at a mini- 
mum, with no tuition and 

low rents and board. Special 
homes are offered to married 
students, and hundreds make 
their way through school 
preaching, directing educa- 
tional activities, and singing. 
Two and three years are re- 
quired for the completion of 
the various courses, and the 
outlay is negligible as com- 
pared with the Increased ef- 
ficiency in service. 

CLIMATE 
Th great open spaces of the 
Southwest offer splendid 
health conditions. The maj- 
esty of the plains Is unpar- 
alleled, and the beauty and 
accessibility of the Seminary 
Is everything to be desired. 
COME JOIN WITH US! 



Write for Catalogue 

L R. SCARBOROUGH, DD., LL.D., President 

SEMINARY HILL, TEXAS 



GULF STATES STEEL COMPANY 

General Offices, Brown-Marx Building 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Manufacturers of 




BASIC OPEN HEARTH 

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Wire Nails and Staples, Bright An- 
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Barbed Wire, Bale Ties, Steel 
Bars and 

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Send for Catalogue 



ENTRE NOUS 



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P 



ERFECT 

ROTECTION 

OLICIES 

LUS 

ERSONAL SERVICE 



W. I. PlTTMAN 

General Agent 

E. E. Beason 

A. Hayden McDanal 

Frank T. Walsh 

Special Agents 



Volunteer State Life Insurance Co. 

121 1-12 American Traders Building 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



THE 
ALABAMA 

Finest in the Entire 
South 

Offering the Very Best in Motion 
Picture Entertainment 

"Plus" 
Publix Stage Shows 

Featuring "Vic," the Boy Whose 
Trumpet Has Captured Birmingham 

The Last Word in Entertainment 



Clothes Quarters 

Collegiate Clothes 

LESS EXPENSIVE 
MORE VALUE 

Taf(e the "El" 

Klothes Shoppe 

Incorporated 
Upstairs 207^2 N. 19th St 

FRED THELEN, Manager 



$K 



ENTRE NOUS 
1928 




HOWARD COLLEGE 

CLASS "A" STANDARD COLLEGE 
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS 

Owned and Controlled By 
THE BAPTISTS OF ALABAMA 



In choosing a college the graduate of the high school nat- 
urally prefers to go to an institution that is alive and progres- 
sive. Howard College is growing steadily every year in num- 
bers and influence. This is due to the character of the college 
life and to the splendid instruction offered in the class rooms. 



Howard College Prides Itself on Being One of the Best 

Institutions for Higher Education in 

This Section of the South 



For Catalogue and Other Information Address 

JOHN C. DAWSON, Ph.D., LL.D. 
President 

Birmingham, Alabama 



0£3fc* 



ENTRE NOUS 






In Your 

Home Town 



We are as near you as 
your telephone and post 
office. Use our services 
throughout your vaca- 
tion. 



iOUIS SAKS*. 

2nd Ave. at 19th St. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



From Old to New With Any Sho 




GOODYEAR SHOE 
HOSPITAL 

Scalici Brothers 

Sirmingham's Leading Shoe Repair Shop 
Phone 4-9330 

418 North Twentieth St. 

Opposite Tulwiler Hotel 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



EVERY COLLEGE BOY AND GIRL 



Is invited to put his or her savings, before 
or after graduating, in the sound, conservative 
and attractive 

PREFERRED STOCK 



ALABAMA POWER COMPANY 

DIVIDENDS QUARTERLY— TIME OR CASH PAYMENTS 
Consult Our Nearest Office 



-*m* 



ENTRE NOUS ^rf&*^ 
1928 ^p 





H. CLAY KNIGHT 

Wishes to thank his friends for their 

patronage while selling Conrad 

Shoes during his college years at 

Herman Saks &? Sons 



For Your Graduation 

For Your Football 
Games 

and Last But Not Least 
For Your Best Girl 

"FLOWERS" 

FROM 

Tutwiler Flower 
Shop 

TUTWILER HOTEL 

PHONE 3-9747 

Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere 
Any Time 



Atlanta-Southern 
Dental College 

ATLANTA. GEORGIA 

Four-Year Course, Leading to the 
D.D.S. Degree 



NEW COLLEGE BUILDINGS 

MODERN EQUIPMENT 

AMPLE CLINICAL FACILITIES 

LARGEST DENTAL COLLEGE IN 

THE SOUTHEAST 

DENTAL CLINIC OPEN THE 

ENTIRE YEAR 

Entrance Requirements One Year 
of College Work 

Session Opens October First 



For Catalogue and Information Write 
DR. R. R. BYRNES, Executive Dear 



COLLEGE ANNUALS 

CATALOGUES, BULLETINS 

PROGRAMS 

BIRMINGHAM 
PRINTING CO. 

Printers, Rulers 

Binders and Loose Leaf 

Manufacturers 

Office and Plant 

Fifth Floor Phoenix Building 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 




Have Your Diplomas Framed at HYNDS-UPSHAW'S 



DEALERS IN MICH CRADE 



Paints, Varnishes, Wall Paper and Brushes 



Hynds-Upshaw Paint & Glass Co, 

2118 Second Ave., N. Phones 3-1932, 3-601 





TRAVEL BY TRAIN 

Safe — Comfortable — Reliable 
Economical 

Trains run day and night — No exposure to sun, 
wind, rain or dust. 

Rest, relax and read while you ride and arrive at 
destination on schedule feeling fit. 

Courtesy and Efficient Service Always 

J. O. LINTON District Passenger Agent 
2010 First Avenue, Birmingham, Alabama 

CENTRAL OF GEORGIA RAILWAY 

The Right Way 



ENTRE NOUS 

^^♦^§^|p5§ fNlllllll 




CAHEEN'S 




NEAI/S PLACE 


1924-1926 Second Avenue 




Right Near the College 


Birmingham, Ala. 




I Always Want to Serve the 


APPAREL FOR 




COLLEGE TRADE 


COLLEGE GOING BOYS 




A Good Barber and a Nice Place 


AND GIRLS 




COME IN TO SEE ME 


For Convenience and Service 




When You Think of Drinks 


Rent Them From 




Think of 


Woodlawn Ford Rental 




BURCHFIEI/S 


Company 




We Have Everything in the Dru^ 


Fords, Chevrolets and Chryslers 




Line 


G. C. CuRLEE, Proprietor 




E. G. BURCHFIEL 


108 North Fifty-fifth St. 




Phone Woodlawn 1003 


Phone Woodlawn 1551 




7639 First Avenue 









MERITA 

BREAD, CAKES AND 
CRACKERS 



w 



AMERICAN 
BAKERIES CO. 



COMPLIMENTS 



American Traders 

National 

Bank 

Birmingham, Alabama 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE 
SYSTEM 



ENTRE NOUS _^r/^N 

>3&, _ " 2S _ M^ 




h 



» ~^^(^i\\mB\\\m^m^ 



Safe Investments 

A College Education 

AND A 

Savings Account With Us 



Jefferson County 

Building and Loan 

Association 

Birmingham, Ala. 



COMPLIMENTS 

INDEPENDENT 
PRODUCE CO. 

Dealers in 

All Kinds of Fruit 

Produce, Poultry 

and Eggs 

2101 Morris Avenue 
Birmingham, Ala. 



GRADUATION 
FLOWERS 

Corsage and Arm 
Bouquets 

THE BLOSSOM 
SHOP 

Phone 3-6291 
505 North Twentieth Street 

Moulton Hoiel 



The 

Southsiae Baptist 
Church 



Joins with the hosts of friends and 
well-wishers of Howard College in 
congratulating the Board, Faculty 
and Students upon the splendid rec- 
ord the College is making and 
wishes for this great institution ever- 
increasing prosperity and usefulness. 

All Howard College folk receive a 

special welcome at Southside 

Church. 

J. E. Dillard, Pastor 



2&C^ ENTRE NOUS ^^B?Jn 



m iii 



Fishing for Business 

Quality and Service 
Our Bait 

The 

COLLEGIAN LUNCH 

We Are Open Late 
329 So. 77th St. J. W. Stone. Prop. 



TYLER 
GROCERY CO. 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



Tyler's Best Brands 
Good Things to Eat 



PHONE 4-7989 


Williams Plumbing and 


Heating C 


ompany 


2625 Avenue 


G, South 


BIRMINGHAM, 


ALABAMA 



Caps, G 


owns, Hoods 


For Faculty 


and Graduates 






n 


PAUL 


A. 


WILLSIE 


Smith Bldg. 




Omaha, Nebraska 



Howard's Right 
— and How! 


"TUCK' 

Tucker's Ba 

on the grid 

you the 


AT 

rber Shop 
ron and c 
very best 


is back of you both 
ff. He also offers 
barber service. 


Tuckers Barber Shop 


120 So. 77th St. 


College Station 



COMPLIMENTS 



Doster-Northington 



INCORPORATED 



Wholesale Druggists 



LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

HOSPITAL SUPPLIES 



2108 First Ave. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



/^«. ENTRE NOUS 



aimiiiiiiiiwi 



INSURANCE 



Fire, Liability 

Automobile 

Surety Bonds, Accidents 

Health, Burglary 



A. D. Smitk, 

Hamilton fi? Glover 

Insurance Agency 

205J/2 N. 21st Street 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



BANKHEAD- 

LELAND 

HOTEL 



Birmingham ' s 

Newest and Finest 

Hotel 



Conveniently Located 
Popular Prices 



A. B. CANSLER, Manager 



INSURE WITH HOWARD MEN 

We Offer the Best of Life Insurance 

ALBERT LEE SMITH 

Class 1906 
General Agent for Alabama 

Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company 

Agents Wanted 

401-2-3-4 Comer Building BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



ENTRE NOUS ^rf53*\ 

i»MPM!l!lllllllllllfMil!^ 



FOREMOST IN FASHION 
FAR MOST IN VALUE 

Apparel for 

Ladies, Gentlemen and. the Boys 



GRAY SPORTING GOODS COMPANY 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



Golf Accessories — Sport Clothing 
Fishing Tackle — Guns and Ammunition 
Cutlery — Bicycles — Athletic Equipment 

PHONES 3-7490, 3-2872 103 NORTH TWENTIETH ST. 

Agents 

A. J. REACH WRIGHT & DITSON 

STALL & DEAN MFG. CO. 

Birmingham, Alabama 



ENTRE NOUS ^jt*&3t^ 





COMPLIMENTS 


D. H. 


BROWN COAL COMPANY, Inc. 




Coal and Coke 


Bell Phone 


Postal Phone 


3-5111 


Birmingham, Alabama 22 




HOWARD COLLEGE 

TEXT BOOKS AND 

COOK BOOKS 



PENNANTS. BANNER 
STATIONERY 
NOVELTIES 



DUCK INN 



THE STUDENTS' HANG-OUT 

Where College Taste Predominates 

GOOD CHECKS CASHED CHEERFULLY 

"When Hungry or Thirsty, Just Visit Us" 



EXAMINATION BLANKS 
ADVICE TO FRESHMEN 



EVERYTHING THAT 

SCHOOL CHILDREN NEED 



'BILL" BAINS AND MAURICE FAHEY 

PROPRIETORS 



&s^ 



ENTRE NOUS 



fj^p^T^ 1928 ^^^^^%t^ 



HDIIIIIIPI 



WILLIAM L. DLNI IAM 



GEORGE E. DENHAM 



DENHAM AND DENHAM 

Architects 

1220-21-22 COMER BUILDING 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



STEPHENSON'S FULL RANGE 


FURNISHED IN 


PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY HOME 


STEPHENSON BRICK COMPANY 


2025 Fourth Avenue BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
3-8161 




E. 


R. 


Maynord 6f Son Const 


ruction Co. 








General Contractors 




BUILDERS OF THE PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY HOME 


2318 Ensle\ 


Avenue 


Phone 6-1468 


ENSLEY, ALABAMA 



We Are Very Proud to Have 
"FURNISHED" 

THE 

PI KAPPA PHI 

Fraternity Home 



E. L. HUEY 
FURNITURE CO. 

1919 Third Avenue 
BESSEMER, ALABAMA 



Trie Subway Parlors Co. 



BILLIARDS AND POCKET 
BILLIARDS 

Brown- Marx Subway 

Brown-Marx Building 

20th Street at First Avenue 

W. L. Jackson, Proprietor 



COMPLIMENTS 



"FRIEND' 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF A 

HOWARD BOOSTER 



THE ELECTRICAL WORK IN THE 
"PI KAPPA Phi- 
Fraternity Home Was Done by 

BERT PINCH 

The Man Who Knows Hon- 
1726 Tuscaloosa Ave. Phone 6-3304 



A Plant of Personal 
Service 

ESTES LUMBER 
COMPANY 



PROPST LUMBER 
COMPANY 

PRATT CITY, ALABAMA 

Lumber and Building 
Materials 



Phone 6-2105 



MILL 
OHATCHEE, ALABAMA 



ENTRE NOUS ^d^SBN 

wiijp^iiiiiiiiiiiiiIwii^Vj^^^ 



iiiliiwiiii 



PIKE AVENUE 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

ivitos you to worship with them. A mo; 
ndial welcome awaits Howard students 

REV. THEO. HARRIS. Pastor 



The Covers for this book were created . nd 
Smithcrafted by the 

S. K. SMITH CO. 

Its North Wells Street 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



and Smith, rat t. is of Good 
>r Good Annuals Everywher 



E 


nsley B 


aptist Churc 


h 




2301 


Avenue E 






DAVID M. 


GARDNER, D.D. 

Pastor 






Miss Gladys Rickles 






Young 1 


cople's Director 






ie Worship w 


th t's. Welcome Awi 

You. 





S. H. HANOVER 

J eiveler 



Phone 3-1618 



206 N. 20th Street 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Dispensers of True Southern Hospitality 

Birm.ingh.arns Most Distinguished 
Hotel 

"The Tutwiler" 

Coleman J. Hudson, Manager 



Direction: DINKLER HOTELS COMPANY, Inc. 

CARLING L. DlNKLER, President 



fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiiira, 1 ^^ 



1928 



¥**£& 



iflllillllliiiiiiiris^iiiiiiiiiiii 



-o 



There's a Lot of Satisfaction in 
Trading with a Store That 

Guarantees Satisfaction 
or Your Money Back 

WE DO! 



The Home of "True Economy" 

HERMAN SAKS 
Of SONS 



Second Avenue at Eighteenth St. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

EDUCATIONAL 

EXCHANGE 

COMPANY 



Birmingham, Alabama 




NOW— AS ALWAYS 

THE SOUTH' S 

SMARTEST 
FOOTWEAR 

FRENCH BOOTERY 

Birmingham, Ala. 



BETSY ROSS 



There is a Difference 
in Bread 



McGOUGH 
BAKERIES 



ENTRE NOUS ^/?K?^ 
1928 jSff^ 




REDROCK SERVICE 
STATION 

8801 First Avenue, North 
Phone Wdl. 9150 

U'LL LIKE OUR SERVICE 



Acme Barber Shop 

PROMPT SERVICE 

SKILLED BARBERS 

SANITARY METHODS 



118 South 77th Strekt 
COLLEGE STATION 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

AMERICAN LAUNDRY 

Phone 3-4715 



Our 100 Per Cent 
Larger Home 

Tells the Story of 

Jemison Service 

Through 25 
Constructive Years 



5>JEMISON COMPANIES 



-521 HORTh 



IB.ST STREET 



We Sell 




YOU JUST KNOW SHE MADE IT 
WITH 

Roller Champion 



The Flour the Best Cool?s Use 



ENTRE NOUS 






EQUIPMENT FOR YOUR PARTICULAR SPORT 

AT 

YOUR SPORT SHOP 

WARREN BROS. HARDWARE CO. 




Organized 1847 

Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company 
of Philadelphia 

INSURANCE IN FORCE OVER $1,700,000.00 
ASSETS OVER $368,000,000.00 
SURPLUS OVER $28,500,000.00 

Unequaled Service to Policy Holders 
VERY LOW NET COST UNSURPASSED VALUE 

Liberal Contracts with Disability and Double Indemnity Benefits 

W. T. RATLIFF, General Agent 

910-913 Jackson Building 



ENTRE NOUS ^mtt*. 




COMPLIMENTS 

HERTZ DRIV-UR-SELF STATIONS 

2020 5tm Avenue. North 
BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 

2020 Fifth Avenue, Birmingham, Alabama 

us l.i<<' Street, Montgomery, Alabama 
IIS North Royal Street, Mobile, Alabama 
2104 Broad Street, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 



E. C. Adams 6? Co. 

CARLOT DISTRIBUTORS 

Scaldsweet O-anges and 

Grape Fruit 

2103 Morris Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Hirschs Millinery 

213 and 215 North 19th St. 
Birmingham, Alabama 

'Exclusive and Up-lo-the-Minut? Styles' 

ATTRACTIVE HATS FOR THE 

COLLEGE GIRLS 



Compliments of 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 



ENTRE NOUS ^rf&s. 

1928 ^ff^ ' 

5i4fNl!!!Ii!Ji 




"Come to Pizitz" 

Snappiest Up-to-the-Minute 
COLLEGE CLOTHES 



Most R 



ble Prices in Birmingham 



featuring 

University and College 2-Pants Suits 

at $24.50, $29.50, $35.00 

ALSO 

Campus Togs 2-Pants Suits 
$30, $35, $40, $45 

The famous Simon Ackerman Custom- 
Built Clothes, ready to put on at $55. 
Made on Fifth Avenue, New York 
See These Famous Models 
Harvard, Yale and Columbia Men Wear 
These Clothes 



PIZITZ 



TIRES AND 
TUBES 



CALL 



THE "81" TIRE 



7-1 ) 31 



Beautiful Selections of Gifts for 
Every Occasion 

A. & A. ASH 

JEWELERS AND 
OPTICIANS 

CHINA AND GIFT SHOP 

"The Best Place to Shop After 
All" 



1921 Second Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 



Our Banking Hours Are 

7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

and 8 :00 p. m. on 

Saturday 

FOR THE CONVENIENCE 
OF OUR CUSTOMERS 



WAHOUMA 
SAVINGS BANK 

(Wahouma) BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 

"Your Home Bank 



v«\^ ENTRE NOUS ^b^SSJK 



COMPLIMENTS 

SOUTHERN STORE FIXTURE CO. 



2023 Fifth Avenue, North 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



THE ALABAMA BAPTIST 

Published by the 

ALABAMA BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

L. L. Gualtney, Editor 

PRICE $2.00 PER YEAR; TO CHURCHES 
WHICH HAVE THE BUDGET PLAN, $1.50 



Compliments of 

BUFFALO ROCK BOTTLING CO. 

CHERO COLA BOTTLING CO. 

NU-GRAPE BOTTLING CO. 

ORANGE CRUSH BOTTLING CO. 

TRY-ME BOTTLING CO. 







JEWEL CAFE 

406 North Nineteenth Street 

'The Home of Good Cooking and 
Prompt Service" 



If you wish Coffee and Tea in yov.r 

home that is "Just a little 

better," buy 

DIXIE CLUB 
COFFEE AND TEA 

FROM YOUR GROCERS 



I System Coup*. 
For five, a Sedan or Tour- 
ing Car costs less 
rail fare. Go ■ 
as you please, anytime, 
anywhere. 

SAUNDERS SYSTEM 

1701 SECOND AVE.. N. 

1917 FIFTH AVE.Kl. 

BIRMINGHAM 





EARLE BROTHERS 

Wholesale Grocers 

Gold Bar Fruits and 

Vegetables 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



AFTER THE LAST DANCE 

As Well As Through the Vacation Season. 

She Will Remember 
"Only Here Can Such Shoes Be Found" 

CINDERELLA 

Shoe Company 

1927 Third Ave. 



RITZ THEATRE 

On Birmingham's Broadway 

Keith's Big-Time 

Vaudeville 

Fox Feature Photoplays 

Movie Tone 

Joe Bells Band 



GO TO THIS RITZ THIS 
WEEK 



ENTRE NOUS 



#>jfe. i928 ^.Mm 






lining 



Birmingham's Best SSoe Store for 
Over 20 Years 




BIRMINGHAM 
ENSLEY 



- 


'. BARBOUR 


.1. ii 






"Dcpendabl 


Service" 




Nu-Way Plumbing 


Co. 


Mot 


Water, Heating. 


Pipe Filling 


Con- 




tr;icting and 


Repairing. 






Phone 


3514 




7401 


First Avenue 


Blrminghai 


'• Al:l 



A FRIENDLY WELCOME 

IS WOVEN INTO EVERY •'SECURITY- SERVICE 

WE ARE CONFIDENT YOU WILL LIKE TO BANK HERE 

WHERE PERSONAL SERVICE MEANS SATISFACTION 

SECURITY TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK 

North Birmingham, Alabama 



SMOKE AND SOOT CAN BE BANISHED 

HEAT YOUR HOME WITH 

SEMET-SOLVAY COKE 

PHONE 

ADAMS ROWE AND NORMAN 

3-4151 
FOR NAMES OF AUTHORIZED DEALERS 



ENTRE NOUS 




SAVE AND HAVE 

7 Per Cent on Monthly 
Savings. 7 Per Cent 
on Full Paid Cer- 
tificates. 

Backed by First Mortgages on Im- 
proved Birmingham Real Estate 

Fidelity 

Building 6? Loan 

Association 

W. A. BERRY, President 

T. L. Bond, Secretary 

2122 First Avenue, North 

Phone 3-2168 



ii BRAEBURN ,, 

Would make Phi Beta Kappa if 

smartness and leadership could do 

for cloth what they do for a 

"University man." 

Braeburn Styles plus our fashion- 
dictated clothing accessories give you 
an "A" in appearance. 



ODUM BOWERS 
& WHITE 

Headquarters for the Latest 
in Clothes 



The 
Chas. H. Elliott Co. 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement 

Invitations 

Class Day Programs 

Class Pins and 

Rings 

Dance Programs and Invitations 

Menus 

Leather Dance Cases and Novelties 

Fraternity and Class Stationery 

School Catalogs and Illustrations 

Wedding Invitations 

Calling Cards 

Seventeenth Street and Lehigh 

Avenue 

Philadelphia 



Corn well-Martin 
Drug Co. 

8000 UNDERWOOD AVENUE 
Phone Wdln. 13 

"Headquarters for the Students" 



PERSONAL SERVICE 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



/362£lt^ ENTRE NOUS ^s^SS^ 



mill^B^U^Qs 



P^ 



'll'H^ 



IIIIHIffiSs 



Greenwood Cafe 


"77ie Bes/ P/ticc 10 £a/" 


"BRING YOUR BEST GIRL 


FOR DINNER" 



WHEN YOU BUILD YOUR HOME 

VISIT THE 

Standard Sanitary 
Manufacturing Co.'s 

SHOWROOM 

503 South 22nd Street 




TEMPLE 



Pictures and 5 Acts of 
"Loew" Vaudeville 

Continuous 
1 to II P.M. 



HOME OF 



^AfixQ^oldwyn \faftx picture 



'Aln>a\)s Loerv's for Cood Shot 



LOVEMAN, JOSEPH AND LOEB 

CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE 
MEN AND WOMEN 



Specialized in Fashion and Price 




ENTRE NOUS ^m^?*\ 



Galax 


Theatre 


Another 


Publix Show 


"Featuring the Best Pictures of 
the Day" 


at the Most 


-Reasonable Prices 



TRIANON 

LEADING PICTURES AT 
LOWEST PRICES 

Alioays 



OUR NEW MONTHLY LOAN PLAN 
$10.00 Per Month Per $1,00 Borrowed on New and Selected Home; 

ANCHOR BUILDING AND LOAN COMPANY 

Straight Loans 

3 or 5 Years, Made for 50 to 60 Per Cent of Our Appraised Value of Property 

Money Immediately Available for Any Size Loans 

WOFFORD BOND & MORTGAGE COMPANY 



2027 Third Ave. 



Tel. 3-3420 







ALABAMA 


BUS COMPANY 






Birmingham 
Very soor> 


OPERATING BETWEEN 

and Gadsden Birmingham 

Birmingham and Jasper 
we w!ll have connections from Bnmingham to all points 


and Tuscaloosa 
in the Soutli. 






Phone Us for Schedules and Rates for Sp: 


rial Trips 






Terminal, 2022 Fifth Avenue, North 






Phone 


3-3930 



ALABAMA PHOTO NEWS SERVICE 

"Photographers of the Football Pictures for Howard" 

PRESS AND COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHS 

is — we will go an) where to accommodate you and make your photographs. Group 

work a specialty. 

Prices Incomparable — W or\ Unsurpassed in Quality and Service 

Visit Our Studio at 412'j North Twenty-First Street 

Phone 3-7194 



^b^ ENTRE NOU5 ^&m&K 
~yM^ I928 C^^^s 



PANSY FOODS 

HAM 

BACON 

LARD 

SAUSAGE 

Quality 

Alabama Packmrf 
Company 

BIRMINGHAM 



The Piccadilly 

Birmingham's Most Dhliltguished 
Cufeteria 



108 North Twentieth Street 
BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 



For Yellow Cabs 

Call 3-0101 

We Haul Trunks and Baggage 
Call 7-1164 

WHITMAN-JENKINS CAB CO. 



RUHAMA BAPTIST CHURCH 

(The College Church) 

Ruhama is the Howard College Church. Most of the Faculty and boarc'.ing 
students attend Ruhama. For forty years she has Keen the church home for 
Howard College students and is loved by the Alumni everywhere. The 
church has a beautiful, new, and adequate building with up-to-date facilities 
for worship. Sunday School, B. Y. P. U. and social life. The pastor is an 
alumnr.s of the College and understands student problems. A most cordial 
welcome awaits you at the worship services, the Young People's Department 
of the Sunday School, the B. Y. P. U. Department, the mid-we;k services 
and the social functions. 

"Howard Students Feel Perfectly al Home at Ruhama" 

J. C. STIVENDER, A.M., D.D., Th.D. 

Pastor 




ENTRE NOUS 




"ffffo 




Choose the Profession of Business 



"The Road lo Culture is along the Economic route," says Paul Lomax, New Yo.k 
University. 

"Business has 'molhered' the other professions; it has commercialized the idea of the 
inventor and made him the world's benefactor; it has capitalized the musician, the author, 
the artist, and given them to humanity; it has brought the hospital to the afflicted; the 
library to those thirsting for knowledge; and necessities, comforts, and luxuries to home, 
offices, shops and factories. 

Business training contributes to success in any other profession. The rewards of 
business are certain. Its scope is without limit, and the field so diversified that it satisfies 
varied types of ambitions, abilities and attainments. 

Supplement your College work with a thorough business training and your education 
becomes an asset. Training offered by Wheeler Business College offers a direct route 
to remunerative employment. 

WHEELER BUSINESS COLLEGE 

1912-1922 First Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Wheeler Students Get the Best Positions 



/^aCSB^ ENTRE NOUS ^#358^ 



Mentone Springs Hotel Will 

Open for Summer Guests 

"July 15th" 

New Road Open to Travel from Valley- 
head lo Hotel 

"24 Rooms with Private Bath" 

MAKE RESERVATIONS 
EARLY 



MENTONE 
SPRINGS CO. 

OFFICES 

204 Lincoln Life Bldc. 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



PATRONIZE THE 
STATE 



BAPTIST BOOK 
STORE 

517 North 22nd Street 



BIBLES OR BOOKS 
OF ALL KINDS 



TEXT BOOKS 




Be Sure Beforehand and Not Sorry 
Afterward 



picking a wife and the chances of making 

a mistake in the store or the girl arc 
about even. The sales arguments we use 
are simple promises of satisfaction cov- 
ering quality and value We keep them. 

217 North Nineteenth Street 

JleWeCry 6om.pa.ny 



"3atterUfiu 

(CUR) 

corrtf 



23 Years 
Quality 

Batterton Coffee 



Compa 



ny 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



rfm$£^ ENTRE NOUS ^r/Jg3K 
^ffg^ 1928 ^^ { 



BOOKKEEPING, CIVIL SERVICE 
SHORTHAND 

Telephone 3-4641 
AN ACCREDITED BUSINESS COLLEGE 

ALVERSON 

BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

ROBERT E. ALVERSON, President 

2019-2021 First Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Write or Call for Catalog — Day and Night Classes 

TYPEWRITING — SECRETARIAL 
HIGHER ACCOUNTING 



ENTRE NOUS 




HUTTON'S 



B 



EAUTY PARLORS 
ARBER SHOP 

Sam L. Hutton, Prop. 

320 South 80th Street 
Corner Underwood and fiOth Street 



WEBB BOOK CO. 

7 he Dig Bool( Sloic 

Can Serve You Best in Ever)) Way 

College Text Books and Supplies 

Very Large Slocks in Eve 

?l Your Needs 



This Ph. 



Line 
nd Sa 



2014 Second Avenue, North 
Birmingham, Alabama 













COLLEGE THEATRE 


E. E. Forbes and Sons 




A ni.-e place to spend the afternoon and 
evening. 


Piano Company 




Always a CoocI Show 

106 South 77th Street 


Where Prices Are Lower 
PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORDS 














1922 Third Avenue 




LONDON HAT SHOP 


Birmingham, Alabama 




405 North 20th Street 

The best place in town to have your hat 

cleaned, shoes shined and suit 

pressed. 









BLEDSOE'S 

CLEANERS AND DYERS 

Office and Plants 

7611 FIRST AVENUE 

Phone Wdl. 9132 

Where the Highest Quality of W or\ Costs 
No More 



Cleaning — Pressing — Repairing 

Inman Pressing Parlor 

and Barber Shop 

Suits Pressed While You Wait, 25 Cents 

We Have the Nicest While- You-Wait 

Parlor in Town 

Shower Baths 

22\yi N. 19th St. Phone 4-9403 

D. Stewart, Prop. 



Hawkins Roofing 
and Heating Co. 

Roofing and Sheet 
Metal Contractors 

WARM AIR HEATING 



We Repair All Kinds of Hot 
Air Furnaces 

All Work Guaranteed. Give Us a Trial. 
Service Complete 



1 05 S. 22nd St. Phone 4-2043 




f/ Mffg'llW, 



N ANNUAL SHOULD BE MORE THAN 

A MERE RECORD OF EVENTS « 

IT SHOULD PRESERVE THE 

'ATMOSPHERE'.' TRADITIONS AND 

INSPIRATION OF THAT PART1C- 

- T ULAR SCHOOL YEAR 

10 THIS END WE H AVE EN DEAVORED 

TO COOPERATE WITH THE ST\FFA\D 

SCHOOL IN THE ILLUSTRATING OF 

this Annual *#* 



mu- 



.- 



~%J^ 



"In the Jteavt of the South " Iff 

THE ALABAMA WPG ® i 

BIRMINGHAM ^ /7/ ^ 

For a Quarter of a Centup* Illustrators of Dist- 
inctive College and High School Annuals 



THIS BOOK PRINTED BY BENSON 




S ^gSjP LARGEST COLLEGE ANNUAL 

sAtmC PUBLISHERS IN THE WORLD 



4 




HIGHEST QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 
SUPERIOR EXTENSIVE SERVICE 



nsonI 

iPRINTINGCO. 
NASHVILLE,, 
tjENN 



COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS 






CLEANING 



SHOE 
REPAIRING 




NEW 
SHOES 



Mill 
/a/fe Kose Says: 

Fcr Clothes Cleaning and Shoe Repairing, No Need to Look for Be"er — 

You Will Never Find It. 

College Boys and Girls — This Is a Special Appeal to You.' 

We Clean and Press Your Suit While You Wait for 45c, 

or Your Plain Silk and Wool Dresses for 75c 

Cash and Carry Only 

We also clean your bath robes, sweaters, ties, coats, lap robes, cotton or wool 
blankets, portieres, 'cotton or wool comfoits, infants' coats, capes and furs. 

our shoe repairing can't hi beat. We fix 'em while you wait. 

Wo claim to be the fastest cleaners in the United States, and we are among the 
oldest shoe repairers in Birmingham. 

Satisfaction In our work is absolutely guaranteed. One trial will convince anyone 

We carry a complete line of children's shoes — and we also have trucks to call for 
k — under different prices than the cash-and-carry prices. 
No special charges for one-hour service between the hours of 9 



and deliver your w 
Phone Wdln. 9136. 
a.m. and 4 p.m. 

We are located at 116 77th St.. 
sam » block for 16 yi a is. 

This is an all-year 'round offt 
reminder, as it will not appear dail 



last Lake lire hall 
s accepted. 



We have been 



Alterations </ Specialty 

JAKE ROSE CLEANERS AND DYERS 

16 S. 77th St. Phone Wdln. 9136