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Full text of "Entre Nous 1945"



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/entrenous1945howa 



VL ENTRE NOUS 

DF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIVE 
PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS DF 
HOWARD EDLLEGE - BIBMINGHAM, ALA. 



DEDICATION 



^¥n tribute to 

DR. HUL-CEE M. ACTON 

For in him we have found the embodiment of the 
ideals which make up the Christian Gentleman. 

"For always having a smile of encouragement for 
the weary, and bringing laughter to the lips of the 
downcast; for having boundless patience with the 
slow of mind, and tolerance for the listless; for these 
and many other pleasant memories, which are indel- 
ible imprints in our minds, CHER PROFESSEUR, 
we shall ever be grateful". 

Because, through him we have glimpsed a vision 
of the Spirit that shall make men free, we lovingly 
dedicate this ENTRE NOUS to Dr. Acton. 




HOWARD in 



TO EDUCATE FUTURE OFFICERS 
OF THE UNITED STATES 
NAVY! 

After 103 years of none too placid 
endeavors of learning, Howard finally 
receives her MESSAGE TO GARCIA. 
This program, a challenge in itself, is 
also a privilege, an opportunity we 
believe, for our small Southern college 
to join with greater forces in the 
struggle for the victory of man — 
free and unafraid. 

We've known no physical danger, 
or torture or even discomfort com- 
pared with the men before Aachen or 
Okinawa, but we have felt a small 
part of the mental anguish that is an 
inevitable byproduct of war. Insig- 




WORLD WAR II 



nificant as it is, this 
has been the strong- 
est bond between us 
and those who fight 
in our stead. We've 
known and felt at 
odd moments and in 
the dark stillness of 
the night, the doubt 
and fear and uncer- 
tainty that haunt 
men who fight and 
die. We've known 
insecurity and con- 
fusion and bewilder- 
ment in the same 
small measure. 

But out of our 
doubts and fears 
have grown a strong- 
er faith in God our 
Father and our 
brother, man, and 
an unshakable de- 
termination to build 
out of this chaos a 
clean new world, 
washed of the petti- 
ness and jealously 
and hypocrisy that 
curse men and drag 
them in the mud. 




■ 




LT. ARTHUR S. POSTLE, Commanding Officer 



LT. JOHN B. CROSSLEY, Executive Officer 



NAVY ADMINISTRA 



LT. ARTHUR S. POSTLE 

The Navy V-12 Unit at Howard is fortunate in having 
as its Commanding Officer, Lt. Arthur S. Postle, a native 
of Ohio and a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University, where 
he also received his M.A. Degree. Besides his love for 
fishing and hunting, and a decided interest in that greater 
of all indoor sports, bowling, Mr. Postle is a member of 
that select group of Americans who enjoy dabbling in the 
art of writing. 

Before entering the Navy in April, 1943, our C. O. was 
Dean of Men at the University of Cincinnati. His first 
assignment was that of Commanding Officer of the Car- 
son-Newman V-12 Unit where he remained until the latter 
part of June, 1944, when he was transferred to Howard. 
Evidence of his feeling toward his "adopted" college was 
shown in his statement, "This cruise on the good ship 
HOWARD has proved to be a memorable one. The college 
officials, faculty, mess squad, ship's company and crew all 
have contributed toward making this a delightful tour of 
duty. Long may Howard College continue to assist her 
sons and daughters to serve effectively their country and 
their fellow men". 



LT. JOHN B. CROSSLEY 

Lt. John B. Crossley is another Yankee who has come 
to Dixie to cement relations here. Born in Wilmington, 
Delaware, the Unit's Executive Officer is a graduate of 
Pomona College, in Claremont, California. Before entering 
the Navy in April, 1943, he was Superintendent of Schools 
at Placentia, Cal. Lt. Crossley received his indoctrination 
training at Columbia University, after which he was as- 
signed to Milligan College, in Tennessee, as Executive Of- 
ficer. He remained there until he received orders to report 
to Howard in September, 1944. Mr. Crossley is an ardent 
sports fan, but admits that golf and tennis are his favorites. 

Our Executive Officer expressed well the sentiments of 
the entire unit when he said, "It is hoped that before an- 
other issue of the ENTRE NOUS the war will be over and 
that the Navy on Howard Campus will be but a memory. 
For those of us in the Navy program, memories of our stay 
here will be happy ones. Our thanks to you of the college 
who have made our tour of duty a pleasure." 



NAVY 

V-12 UNIT 

HEADQUARTERS 




TIDN 



SHIP'S COMPANY 

Pictured below are Chief Athletic Specialist Knudsen, whose home is in Ogden, Iowa; 
Yeoman l/c Sanders, a Birmingham boy; PhM. l/c "Whitey" Whitehead, who would claim 
no other than Texas as his stamping grounds; PhM. 3/c Broshot, the "Yankee Clipper" 
from Wisconsin; Chief Yeoman Wooten, a native of Birmingham; Chief Storekeeper Ends- 
ley, who is also a resident of Birmingham; Chief Athletic Specialist Walter Jurkicwicz, 
who claims Detroit, Michigan as his home. Not included in the picture are Lt. Commander 
I. A. Robbins, Medical Officer; Yeoman l/c Dczutti, from Pittsburgh, Pa.; and PhM. 2/c 
James Crim, also from Birmingham. 




Knudsen, Russell Peter 

Sanders, Jr., William Leonard 
Whitehead, Alfred Edell 
Broshot, Elmer William 

Wooten, Jr., Ralph Hi nry 
Endsley, 
Jurkiewicz, 




VL NAVY 



Manager — Brook side, 
-Sophomore. 



WILLIAM THOMAS ALDERSON, JR.— Math— Football 

Jersey — Sophomore. 
MILTON McCOOL ARMSTRONG— Band— Springfield, Missour 
CHARLIE WILLIAM BABERS— Knoxville, Tennessee— Soph 
WILLIAM FORREST BACKSTROM— Columbus, Mississippi, Sophomore. 
WILLIAM THOMAS BAILEY— Pi Kappa Alpha— Lucedale, Mississippi— Sophomore 
JOHN EDWARD FRANK BAKER— Roseland, Florida— Freshman. 
HOWARD EUGENE BAKER— Clanton, Alabama— Freshman. 



Ne 



Kappa Phi — Cheerleader — Swimming Team — 
Kappa Alpha — Softball — Swimming — Orlando, 
Florida — Freshman. 



\1, 



issippi— 



sey — 
Minnesota 



DOWDELL ADAMS BARNES, JR.— Pi 
Opelika, Alabama — Sophomore. 

ELMER MICHAEL BARNES, JR.— Pi 
Florida — Sophomore. 

JAMES WILLIAM BAROS, JR.— Miami, 

EDWARD PARR BARRETT— Pi Kappa Alpha— Birmingham, Alabama— Fr 

WILLIAM TRAVIS BASSETT— Grand Prairie, Texas— Freshman. 

ROY LANE BATES— Football— Scuttlebutt— Softball— "H" Club— Purvi 
Sophomore. 

THOMAS LAWSON BECKWITH, JR.— Basketball— Morristown, New Je 
Sophomore. 

HAROLD HENRY BEEBE, JR.— Orchestra Leader— South Minneapoli 
Freshman. 

LEON LOUIS BERATAN— Philadelphia, Pennsylvania— Freshman. 

DOMMINICK BIANCAVILLA— New York City, New York— Sophomore. 

WILLIAM CARROLL BLACKERBY— Basketball— Bessemer, Alabama— Freshman. 

GEORGE WILLIAM BLACKFORD— Spartanburg, South Carolina— Freshman. 

CARLTON ALBERT BONNER, JR.— New Augusta, Mississippi— Sophomore. 

THOMAS MONROE BOTSFORD, JR.— Pi Kappa Phi— Band— Drill Platoon— Opelika. 
Alabama — Junior. 

JAMES OGLETHORPE BOWLING, JR.— Pi Kappa Alpha— Birmingham, Alabama- 
Sophomore. 

FOSTER KEY BRADLEY, JR.— Bessemer, Alabama— Junior. 

RONALD ALVA CAIN— Miami, Florida— Freshman. 

WILLIAM WAGNER CARDEN— Sigma Nu— Treasurer— Florence, Alabama- 
Sophomore. 

ULYSSES GRANT CARTER— Football— Birmingham, Alabama— Sophomore. 

WW MAM LEITCH CARTER— Football— Irvington, New York— Sophomore. 

GUY DANIEL CASEY— Alpha Pi Omega— Min. Assoc— Mission Band— Ushers Club- 
Gadsden, Alabama — Sophomore. 

WILLIAM FREDRICK CECIL— Binghampton, New York— Freshman. 

EWIN STARLING CHILDERS— Band— Laurel, Mississippi— Junior. 

LEWIS ROBERT COBBS— B.S.U. Council— Min. Assoc.— Pre-Chaplain— Dallas, Texas- 
Junior. 

CHARLES EDWARD COLE— Riderwood, Alabama— Sophomore. 

PAUL CONNAIR— Football— Dayton, Ohio— Sophomore. 

JOHN BULLOCK CONNER— Tuskegee, Alabama— Freshman. 

JACK STERLING COOK— Basketball— Petal, Mississippi— Sophomore. 

HARRY INABINET CORLEY — Columbia, South Carolina— Freshman. 

LESLIE LEONARD COSTON— Bessemer, Alabama— Freshman. 

SLENNON MILLS COVAN— Mobile, Alabama— Sophomore. 

JOHN REVEL CROOK— Elba, Alabama— Freshman. 

JACK EDWIN CROUCH — Columbus, Mississippi— Freshman. 

WILLIAM H. CUTCHEN — Ozark, Alabama— Freshman. 

JUSTUS WILBURN DANEHOWER— Gadsden, Alabama— Freshman. 

ALBERT IRVING DANENBERG — Band— Swimming— Birmingham, Alabama- 
Freshman. 

GEORGE WINFIELD RAYMOND DAVIDSON, JR.— Florala, Alabama— Freshman. 
JAMES BRITT DAVIS — Pi Kappa Alpha — Vice-Pres. — Boxing — Track Team — Birming- 
ham, Alabama — Sophomore. 




V-12 UNIT 




1 N A V Y 




V-12 UNIT 





JAMES ARTHUR DeSANA— Sigma Nu— Recorder— Navy Orchestra— Drill Platoon- 
Detroit, Michigan — Sophomore. 

JAMES BLANDING DICK, JR.— Kappa Sigma, Auburn— Alpha Phi Omega— Auburn, 
Alabama — Sophomore. 

RAY WILLIAM DONALSON— Haleyville, Alabama— Freshman. 

MURPHREE YATES DONNAN— Tigcrville, South Carolina— Sophomore. 

FREDERICK CLAUDE DONOVAN— Knoxville, Maryland— Freshman. 

WILLIAM RUDOLPH DREYER— Phi Kappa Tau— Navy Orchestra— Navy Band- 
Swimming Team — St. Petersburg, Florida — Sophomore. 

CHAUNCEY WOLD ERICKSON— Omaha, Nebraska— Sophomore. 

RICHARD PAUL ERICKSON— Boxing Team— Macon, Missouri— Junior. 

JAMES BERNARD FLOYD— New Orleans, Louisiana— Sophomore. 

JAMES WILLIAM FOWLER— Huntsvillc, Alabama— Freshman. 

STANTON GRAVES FRENCH, JR.— Whitehaven, Tennessee— Freshman. 

MARION THOMAS GAMBLE— Village Springs, Alabama— Sophomore. 

FAMES GANN, JR. — Softball — Inglenook, Alabama — Sophomore. 

WILLIAM HENRY GOEKE— Detroit. Michigan— Freshman. 

JOHN HARRY GOODLOE— Pi Kappa Alpha— Fairfield, Alabama— Freshman. 

HUGH CARROLL GRAY— Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity— Engineering— Band— Tupelo, 
Mississippi — Junior. 

LORENZ NATHA N1EL GREGG— Math— Sigma Nu— Scuttlebutt Staff— Union 
Springs, Alabama — Junior. 

ERWIN GREMLI, II— Sarasota, Florida— Freshman. 

RICHARD CORBETT GUESS— Hattiesburg, Mississippi— Senior. 

SUMNER GURNEY— Charleston, South Carolina— Freshman. 

JOSEPH LEONARD HARGROVE— Pre-Med— Scuttlebutt Staff— Crack Drill Platoon 
Leader — Basketball — Shreveport, Louisiana — Freshman. 

FEUBEN FRANKLIN HARRISON— Alpha Phi Omega— Birmingham, Alabama- 
Freshman. 

FRANK MATTHEW HART— Boxing— Kelton, South Carolina— Freshman. 

TEE HANSFORD HEITT, JR.— Band— Drill Team— Dora, Alabama— Sophomore. 

WALTER ROGER HERNDON, JR.— Pi Kappa Alpha— Band— Birmingham, Alabama- 
Sophomore. 

GEORGE WARREN HERRING— Pi Kappa Alpha— Band— Birmingham, Alabama- 
Sophomore. 

GEORGE LUDLOW HODGES, Jr.— Anderson, South Carolina— Junior. 

ROY BROWN HOLLINGSWORTH— Birmingham, Alabama— Sophomore. 

HUGH GRANT HOLMES— Pi Kappa Phi— Drill Platoon— Anna Maria, Florida- 
Freshman. 

JACKSON HOOD— Blytheville, Arkansas— Sophomore. 

ALBERT EARL HORROCKS — Birmingham, Alabama— Sophomore. 

JOHN EDWARD HOUSE, JR.— Birmingham Alabama— Freshman. 

JEFFERSON TRENT HOWELL, JR.— Pi Kappa Phi— Drill Platoon— Clearwater, 
Florida — Freshman. 

CLYDE JAMES JACKSON— Boxing— Knoxville, Tennessee— Freshman. 

SAMUEL LEWIS JAYNES — Pi Kappa Alpha — Columbus, Mississippi — Freshman. 

JOSEPH TAYLOR JETT— Pi Kappa Alpha— Vice President— Maryville, Tennessee- 
Junior. 

WILLIAM EARNEST JOHNS— Pi Kappa Alpha— Boxing— Birmingham, Alabama- 
Freshman. 

REX ROBERT KAL1NS — Basketball— Boxing— Decatur, Illinois— Freshman. 

RICHARD FRANCIS KEARNS— Miami, Florida— Freshman. 

OLLIE RUSSELL KENNEDY— Math— Nashville, Tennessee— Junior. 

CHARLES CHRISTIAN KETTE— Vicksburg, Mississippi— Sophomore. 

BENJAMIN EDGAR KIDD— Pi Kappa Alpha— Auburn, Alabama— Freshman. 

1RVIN KLUKOS— Bedford, Massachusetts— Freshman. 

CLARENCE EUGENE KRATZ— Pi Kappa Alpha— Secretary— Choir— A Capella— "H" 
Day — Birmingham, Alabama — Junior. 




VL NAVY 



RAYMOND EVERETT KYKER— Football— Vienna, Virginia— Sophomore. 
JOHN BUFORD LARD— Waterloo, Alabama— Sophomore. 

ROBERT OTTIS LAUDERDALE, JR.— Pi Kappa Phi— Birmingham, Alabama— Senior. 
ROBERT SMITH LAWRENCE— Pi Kappa Alpha— Mountain Grove, Missouri- 
Sophomore. 
MILTON HATCHER LEA — Sigma Chi — Vanderbilt — Thompson Station, Tennessee — 

Junior. 
RUEDY LILLFORD LOCKERBY— English— Pre-Chaplain— B.S.U. Council— Y.M.C. A.— 

Min. Assoc. — Training Union — Sunday School — Carbondale, Illinois — Junior. 
OLIVER MAURICE LOWERY— Pi Kappa Alpha— Crack Drill Platoon— Atmore, 

Alabama — Sophomore. 
GEORGE EDWARD LYNE, JR.— Greenville, South Carolina— Freshman. 
STEWARD MacFARLAND, JR.— Sagua laGrande, Cuba— Freshman. 
CHARLES EDWARD MALOY— Opp, Alabama— Freshman. 

GEORGE FRANKLIN MANDY— Alpha Phi Omega— Birmingham, Alabama— Freshman. 
PAUL JOSEPH MATON— Pana, Illinois— Freshman. 
HERR1S MARET MAXWELL— Pi Kappa Alpha— President— "H" Club— Chairman I. 

F. & S. Council- -Boxing Manager — Navy Social Committee — Sports Editor — 

Scuttlebutt— Entre Nous Staff— Entre Nous Who's Who— Football— Starkville, 

Mississippi — Sophomore. 
WESLEY WILLARD MEEKS— Entre Nous Staff— Manchaster, Alabama— Freshman. 
WILLIAM COOPER MICKLE— Sigma Nu— Crack Drill Team— Swimming— Recorder 

and Treasurer of Sigma Nu — Anniston, Alabama — Sophomore. 
OLIVER FANANE MIDGETTE— Pi Kappa Alpha— Mobile, Alabama— Sophomore. 
GENE MIKBELL— 

ISRAEL BERNARD MILLER— Huntsv, lie, Alabama— Freshman. 
DADE WILLIAM MOELLER— Malabar, Florida— Freshman. 
WILLIAM GLENN MOORE— Lus erne, Alabama— Freshman. 
RALPH RIED MURRELL— Bessemer, Alabama— Freshman. 

EUGENE RAYMOND MYERS— Texatus Tarmacus— Bridgeport, Connecticut- 
Sophomore. 
HUGH BOYD McCURDY, JR.— Math— New Orleans, Louisiana— Sophomore. 
HOWARD LEE McWILLI AMS— Pi Kappa Phi— Meridian, Mississippi— Sophomore. 
GALE WILLIAM NUERNBERGER — Math — First Company Commander — Creighton, 

Nebraska — Junior. 
JOHN EDGAR NUTTY— Phi Delta Theta— Math — Ames, Iowa — Junior. 
EARL HALTA OAK, JR.— Sigma Nu— Recorder— Treasurer— Platoon Leader— 

Witchita, Kansas — Sophomore. 
THOMAS NOLAN OBER — Phi Gamma Delta — University of Kansas — Laurence, 

Kansas — Senior. 
PAUL HERBERT OEHLER — Sigma Nu— Treasurer — Witchita, Kansas — Sophomore. 
PHILIP CORDON OLINGER — Mexico City, Mexico — Freshman. 
ROBERT DEAN OSBORN— Pana, Illinois— Freshman. 
HAROLD LEON PARRISH— Bessemer, Alabama — Freshman. 
ROBERT HOOVER PATTON — Miami, Florida — Freshman. 

JED THEODORE PEPPER — Kappa Sigma — Football — Pickens, Mississippi — Sophomotc. 
BRUNO MASSIMO PERFETTI— Jeannette, Pennsylvania— Freshman. 
WALTER EMETT PERRY— Birmingham. Alabama— Junior. 
CAREY WILLIAM PHILLIPS, JR.— Pi Kappa Alpha— Kappa Phi Kappa— Alpha 

Epsilon Delta — Birmingham, Alabama — Junior. 
KIRBY GENE PICKLE — Kappa Phi Kappa— Birmingham, Alabama — Junior. 
JAMES NOEL PITTMAN— Math— Alpha Phi Omega— President— Vice-President of 

Student Body — Birmingham. Alabama — Junior. 
CECIL DUDLEY POWERS, JR. — Drill Platoon — Birmingham, Alabama — Sophomore. 
JOHN PRATT — Braintrec, Massachusetts — Sophomore. 
JIM JUNIOR RAY— Engineering— Intermural Sports— Basketball — Calhoun City, 

Mississippi — Sophomore. 
AMOS MARTIN RAYFIELD, JR.— Miami, Florida— Freshman. 

CLYDE AUSTIN REAVES, JR. — Drill Platoon — Boxing — Glencoe, Alabama — Junior. 
HOWARD ELWYN REED— Sigma Nu — Lieutenant Commander — Birmingham, Alabama 

Sophomore. 




V-12 UNIT 










|5 C) £*| C*. 



^Jke 



NAVY 




V-12 UNIT 







■ 



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JOSEPH KEITH REED— Fairfield, Alabama— Sophomore. 

CHARLES BULLEN REID— Red Bay, Alabama— Sophomore. 

JEWETTE EDWARD RICHARDSON— Sigma Nu— Montgomery, Alabama— Sophomore. 

H. G. ROBERTS — Blue Springs, Mississippi — Sophomore. 

SAMUEL JOSEPH ROSS— Band— Girard, Ohio— Freshman. 

ALBERT PAUL SAENGER— Long Island, New York— Sophomore. 

MIMO LOUIS SCAPPINI— Waterbury, Connecticut— Sophomore. 

RICHARD WOODWARD SEAVER— Editor of Scuttlebutt— Pi Kappa Theta— Entre 
Nous Staff — Thompson, Connecticut — Freshman. 

JOSEPH SENKOW— Brooklyn, New York— Sophomore. 

JOSEPH HARRY SHAFFIELD— Crack Drill Platoon, Birmingham, Alabama- 
Freshman. 

ROGER WILLIAM SOMPKINS— Princess Anne, Maryland— Sophomore. 

JAMES BRUCE SMITH— Phi Gamma Delta— University of Ala. Transfer— Birming- 
ham, Alabama — Freshman. 

JOHN JAMES SMITH— Anderson, South Carolina— Freshman. 

LUCIEN LAMAAR SMITH— Sigma Nu— Chaplain and Marshall— LaPine, Alabama- 
Sophomore. 

RAYMOND AGEE SMITH— Delta Kappa Epsilon— University of Alabama— Alpha 
Epsilon Delta — Monroeville, Alabama — Sophomore. 

THOMAS EDWIN SMITH— Pi Kappa Alpha— Birmingham, Alabama— Senior. 
JOSEPH MEYER STAMMER— Sigma Nu— Football— Birmingham, Alabama— Sophomore. 
MARVIN EUGENE STEINER— St. Louis Missouri, Sophomore. 
JAMES CLYDE STRAUS, III— Cheer Leader— Dallas, Texas— Freshman. 
JAMES ARLAND STRICKLAND— Tyler, Texas— Freshman. 
ALEXIS EVERETTE TEMPLETON— Hollandale. Mississippi— Freshman. 
HERMAN DOUGLAS THOMAS— Pi Kappa Phi— Luverne, Alabama— Freshman. 
OLIVER UNA THOMAS— Sigma Nu— Tuscaloosa, Alabama— Sophomore. 
CECIL O. THRASH — Sigma Nu — Recorder — Tallassee, Alabama — Sophomore. 
WYCLIFF DAVID TOOLE, JR.— Miami, Florida— Freshman. 
CECIL LEWIS TRAYWICK— Pi Kappa Phi— Adamsville, Alabama— Senior. 
ROBERT WARREN TRIPPLETT— Louisville, Mississippi— Sophomore. 
EDWARD JOHN TUZEL— Football— Blackswood, N. J.— Sophomore. 
IRA EDWARD VICKERY— Pi Kappa Alpha— Mobile, Alabama— Freshman. 
NORMAN EDGAR WAGNER— Beena Vista, Va — Sophomore. 
WARD WILLIAM FARRIOR, JR.— New Bern, M. C— Junior. 
STANLEY WARTH, JR.— Jacksonville, Florida— Freshman. 

BOMAN COLLINS WEBBER, JR.— Drill Platoon— Birmingham, Alabama— Freshman. 
CLARENCE EDMON WHITE— Piedmont, Alabama— Sophomore. 
ROBERT LOUIS WHITE— Daphine, Va.— Freshman. 

ALIAN BARTON WILLIAMS, III— Editor of Scuttlebutt— Gross Point, Michigan- 
Junior. 
RALPH SMITH WINN— Birmingham, Alabama— Freshman. 
JOHN LEONARD ZENT— Keymar, Maryland— Sophomore. 



HOARD of TRUSTEES 



OFFICERS 

FRANK SAMFORD, President 

MEMORY L. ROBINSON, Chairman of the Executive Committee 

PEYTON A. EUBANK, Secretary 

MEMBERS 

JOSEPH LINYER BEDSOLE Mobile 

Divisional Vice-President, McKesson & Robins, Inc. 
CHARLES RENFROE BELL Anniston 

President, Commercial National Bank 
WILLIAM ANDREW BERRY Birmingham 

State Manager, The Life Insurance Co. of Virginia 
VIRGIL BOULDIN Montgomery 

Justice, Supreme Court of Alabama 
JOHN HALL BUCHANAN Birmingham 

Pastor, Southside Baptist Church 
LUCIEN POWELL BURNS Selma 

Mayor, the City of Selma 
PEYTON ALFRED EUBANK Ensley 

President, Peyton A. Eubank Real Estate & Insurance Company, Inc. 
MRS. J. E. FRANKS Fort Payne 

VIRGIL M. GARDNER Oxford 

Pastor, First Baptist Church 
JOHN WILL GAY Scottsboro 

Banker 
EDWIN WHITE HAGOOD Albertvilie 

Pastor, First Baptist Church 
JOSEPH DAVIS HEACOCK Birmingham 

Physician 
JAMES CLARENCE INZER Gadsden 

Attorney 
J. THEODORE JACKSON Dothan 

Attorney 
HENRY J. KITTRELL Mobile 

President, Kittrell-Milling Motor Company 
ROBERT EUGENE LAMBERT, JR. Darlington 

Planter and Merchant, R. E. Lambert & Sons 
MRS. C. FULLER MANLY Birmingham 

JOHN J. MILFORD Huntsville 

Pastor, First Baptist Church 
JOHN RENFROE MULLINS Clanton 

J. R. Mullins & Sons, Merchants 
J. D. PITTMAN Birmingham 

J. D Pittman Company 
MEMORY I.. ROBINSON Birmingham 

Attorney 
TOM D. RUSSELL Alexander City 

President, The Russell Manufacturing Company and Allied Interests 
FRANK PARK SAMFORD Birmingham 

President, Liberty National Life Insurance Company 
LEWE H. SESSIONS Enterprise 

President, Sessions Company, In.'., Manufacturers 
JAMES T. UPCHURCH Montgomery 

Secretary-Treasurer, Interstate Oil Company 
ROBERT WARD Hartford 





- * 



ADMINISTRATIDN 




MAJOR DAVIS 



VL PRESIDENT 

Major Harwell G. Davis' years of administration at Howard have not been easy 
ones. When he took over the task of leading the college, it was heavily in debt. 
Major Davis saw her through this crisis safely only to be confronted with the prob- 
lem of running a college during a war. The Navy has added greatly to the prestige 
of the school, but many problems have arisen in correlating civilian and Naval stu- 
dents activities. The varied positions that he has held have well fitted him for the 
task. Major Davis has endeared himself to the campus, not only through his business 
ability but also because of his friendly attitude toward the students. Moreover many 
of us even now realize that the character of Major Davis is the kind that Howard 
may build upon through the years. And to his character we give our deepest respect 
and loyalty. 



DEAN BURNS 



Dean Burns is a man of deep cultural background, of warm, friendly coopera- 
tion to faculty and students alike, and a man of action. 

His love of Howard and his desire for her improvement are felt in his every 
decision. Through his tireless efforts Howard has steadily advanced in the world of 
learning. 

His scholastic ideals have led him to take an active interest in Hypatia and 
Trident and to foster the annual Scholarship Day. 

On the administrative side, Dean Burns is efficient, thoughtful and just; once 
having decided upon a policy he does not hesitate, but puts it into immediate effect. 

Scholar, teacher, gentleman, and above all, friend to the students, Dean Burns 
has earned his place among the immortals of Howard College. 





y&f 



DEAN DALE DEAN DBENCHAIN 



Dean Dale is the friendly embodiment of the 
Howard spirit. His office is the meeting place 
of large groups of students who gather to absorb 
his wit and understanding, and his classes are 
famous, or should we say notorious, for the free- 
dom of discussion he allows. His very real inter- 
est in students led to his appointment as Dean of 
Men and there is no man on the campus better 
fitted for this post. 



Howard students are proud of our open-minded 
and open-hearted Mrs. Obenchain, prominent in 
civic and educational circles. Especially lucky 
are women students who claim her attention as 
advisor for small, yet terrifying problems of the 
moment. And versed as she is in more important 
problems of the world, she proves her stature by 
her willingness to lend a sympathetic ear or to 
render personal assistance. Mrs. Obenchain is 
a charming person to know. In short, she is the 
type of woman college girls dream of becoming. 



DR. R E I D 

Vice -f-^ resident 



Dr. A. Hamilton Reid, vice-president, 
has led Howard College through difficult 
days of financial reverses. His tireless 
efforts in regard to the Centennial For- 
ward Program have supplied the college 
with a sizeable fund for building and 
improvements after the war. 

Last year Dr. Reid left Howard to 
accept the position of President of the 
Executive Committee of the Alabama 
Baptists. It was a loss which we felt 
deeply, but we wish him every success 
in his new office. 



MRS. KIRKLAND 



eaistrar 



Helen Sharbutt Kirkland's office is 
seldom empty of the puzzled hordes of 
freshmen, the bewildered maze of sopho- 
mores, or superior confusion of seniors. 
To each she gives her time, thought and 
proved ability. Every student who comes 
in goes away with an appreciation for 
her helpful attitude. 




ALLEN 
ACTON 
BAKER 

BREWSTER 
COLLIER 
CORRIE 
COUNTS 
DOSTER 
ECHOLS 



FAUST 
FLEMING 
FORMAN 
FREEMAN 
FRIEL 

HADLEY 

HALBROOKS 
HAMERICK 
HESS 




Jig; jj 



FACULTY DINES 



Jke 




HUL-CEE M. ACTON, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Romance 
Languages 

MRS. B. C. ALLEN, Secretary to the President 

JOHN NEWTON BAKER, A.M., Associate Professor of 

Sociology and Chairman of Public Relations 
MRS. RUTH BERRY, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Biology 
MARIE BOST, Librarian 

LENT S. BREWSTER, A.B., Assistant to the President 
P. P. BURNS, A.M., Litt.D., Professor of English 
OSCAR S. CAUSEY, A.M., Professor of Education 
JAMES H. CHAPMAN, A.M., Th.M., Professor of Bible and 

Religion 
NASH COLLIER, A.B., Assistant Professor of Physics 
GEORGE B. CORRIE, A.B., M.A., Professor of Economics 
MARGARET L. COUNTS, Manager of College Bookstore 
W. P. DALE, II., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

History 
JAMES F. DOSTER, A.M., Instructor in History 
MRS. ROBERT ECHOLS, A.M., Instructor in Math 
JESSE IVEY EDWARDS, A.B., Th.M., Assistant Professor 

of Bible and Religion 




FACULTY • • • 



GEORGE P. FAUST, A.B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

English 
SARAH FLEMING, A.B., M.A., Instructor in Mathematics 
ELIZABETH FORMAN, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics 
HENRY L. FREEMAN, M.S., Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics 
NELLIE FRIEL, A.B., Instructor in Chemistry 
DORIS GODWIN, A.B., Instructor in Biology 
WILLARD D. HADLEY, M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor 

of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
VIRGINIA HALBROOKS, A.B., Assistant Librarian 
MRS. J. D. HAMRICK, Hostess, Girls' Dormitories 
GEORGE W. HESS, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 
KATHERINE HORTON, B.S., Instructor in Physical 

Training for Women 
WYNELLE D. JACKS, B.S., Instructor in Economics 
ELIZABETH JACOBS, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of 

Home Economics 
JOHN JAMES, A.B., Instructor in Physics 
MRS. KATHLEEN MARTINSON, B.S., Director of Glee 

Club and Choir, Instructor in Voice 
LOLA B. McCOLLOUGH, Ph.B., A.M., Instructor in 

English 



HAROLD NELSON, A.B., A.M., Assistant Professor of 

Economics 
MRS. I. R. OBENCHAIN, A.M., Associate Professor of 

Sociology 
A. H. OLIVE, M.S., Phm.D., Assistant Professor of 

Pharmacy 
ROBERT OWENS, A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Romance Languages 
JOHN R. PATTY, M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 
LEON W. RICHARDS, M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy 
JOHN F. ROTHERMEL, A.M., Instructor in Journalism 
HARRY J. SARKISS, A.M., Th.M., B.D., Ph.D., Associate 

Professor of History 
ANTIONETTE SPARKS, A.M., Assistant Professor of 

Speech 
ALIDA TOWNES, Instructor in Art 
MRS. WILLIAM R. VAN GELDER, A.M., Instructor in 

English 
W. M. VINES, A.B., DD., Assistant Professor of Bible 
MRS. W. C. VAIL, B.M., Instructor in Piano 
HAROLD E. WILCOX, M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Chemistry 
F.RSKINE R. WALKER, Director of Physical Training 

for Men 
JOHN XAN, M.S., Ph.D., F.A.I.C, Professor of Chemism 




^Jke 



F A C U 



PROFESSOR DEAR 

by 
A. Student 

Say! Have you heard the latest of verses. 
Which called for a chorus of curses 
From faculty members of Howard? 

No? Then let me relate you this ditty, 
It is, of a truth, very witty 
And tells of the profs at old Howard: 

There once was a fellow named Guesser, 

Whose knowledge grew lesser and lesser. 

It at last grew so small 

He knew nothing at all, 

So they made him a Howard professor! 



Now please don't suspect we're deriding 

The "Book-larnin' " Howard's providing, 

For tis not really so, 

I believe the profs know, 

We appreciate all of their guiding. 

Take Chemistry, Physics, or Writing, 

Our profs make them just as inviting 

As a flower in June, 

Or a full, golden moon, 

In a word, they are truly "delighting." 

Take Home Economics or Speakin', 

And if it's sound knowledge you're seekin', 

Then you needn't look more, 

It's right here at your door, 

Open up, Go ahead, take a peek in! 



L 




JACOBS 
JAMES 

KIRKLAND 
MARTINSON 
McCOLLOUGH 
NELSON 
OWENS 
PATTY 



RICHARDS 
ROTHERMEL 
SARKISS 
SPARKS 

VAN GELDER 
VINES 
WILCOX 
XAN 



L T Y 



The meaning of all of these verses, 
(Tis for this you've been saving those 

curses) 
Will be found just below, 
So read on, onward go, 
Let me deal this last, shattering blow. 

Professors, who teach, guide and explain, 

Our helpers along knowledge lane, 

Never mind what we say, 

It's the true student way, 

To deride you and chide you, 

And try to outstride you, 

But never forget that our heart's are of 

gold, 
Tis from them pour our thanks to you, 

ten-thousand fold. 



As Dogpatch has its L'il Abner, so Howard has its Nash Collier. 





FACULTY 
SNAPS 

Biologically speaking . . . 
Save me one to flunk! 
Those boys, we love 'em 
all . . . Just a two-point 
smile . . . It's all Greek 
to me ... I have a lady, 
doctor . . . "Farm-or- 
cognosy" . . . It's your 
attitude that counts . . . 
Have you heard the one 
about — . . . "How will 
I torture them today?" 
. . . Popular twosome . . . 
Sophisticated Lady . . . 
"And this is known as 
James' Law" . . . Char- 
acter study . . . Beauty 
plus brains . . . The per- 
fect gentleman . . . Ar- 
chimedes, Inc. . . . It's 
in the bag . . . An un- 
known. . . 




ACTIVITIES 




'44 STUDENT SENATE 



VL STUDENT 




'44 SENATE 

The Student Senate is the highest student governing group on the 
campus. Being a student body officer or a Senator is no light job. 
With the president of the student body presiding over the meetings 
these officers and senators supervise the activities of the student body 
and determine how the student activity fees will be spent. It is one 
organization in which there is all work and no play and these rep- 
resentatives, elected by the student body and the respective classes, 
have the responsibility of making budgets, appropriations to the var- 
ious organizations whose functions benefit the entire student bod)', 
and of sponsoring War Bond and Red Cross Drives. This year the 
Senate has figured, adjusted, and "stretched" the student fund in order 
to eke out enough money to keep the Crimson in Publication, and to 
assure the students that there would be an Entre Nous for 1944-45. 
With this task accomplished the Senate deserves a "pat on the back" 
for the splendid management and service done this year. 



LEWIS MARLER, President 



'45 SENATE 

War Loan drives — Red Cross Drives — Blood 
Donor Drives — Parties — Pep Meetings — Student 
Programs — all these and many other familiar and 
long remembers occasions are a product of the 
Student Senate this year. The Student Senate, 
composed of the president, vice-president, secre- 
tary, and treasurer, elected by popular vote by 
the student body, and ten senators, four from the 
senior class, three from the junior class, two from 
the sophomore class and one from the freshman 
class, elected by members of the respective classes, 
conduct the business of the student body and 
make the yearly budget, appropriating the money 
to the various organizations and to the two pub- 
lications, the Crimson and the Entre Nous. This 
is not always easy to do with the limited amount 
of money, but after many hours of figuring and a 
few headaches the Student Senate comes out vic- 
torious once again. 




'45 STUDENT BODY OFFICERS 



GOVERNMENT 



'45 STUDENT SENATE 





VL CRIMSON 



It may be the latest news on the new curric- 
ulum or it may be merely a bit of gossip about 
the latest boy-girl affair. But if it happens on 
Howard's campus, sooner or later it will find its 
way into the columns of The Crimson. 

Published bi-monthly, The Crimson strives to 
keep Howardites informed about activities of 



campus organizations, student and faculty per- 
sonalities and events affecting the college as a 
whole. The editors during the past year have 
maintained strict editorial policies, advocating 
needed improvements, but always giving credit 
where credit is due. Bias and prejudice have been 
religiously excluded from The Crimson's make-up. 



EDITORS 

LOUISE HARDIN AND MIRIAM GANN 




STAFF 

EDITORS Miriam Gann, Louise Hardin 

SOCIETY.. Jimmy Dolvin, Jo Graves 

SPORTS.. ...Ronald Weathers, Nell Brown 

BUSINESS MANAGER Ann Allison 

REPORTERS AND FEATURE WRITERS 

Betty Lee Woodcock, Mary Ann Boswell, Vivien 

Barnes, Page Kelley, Tommie Johnson, Mary Jo Cock- 

rell, Neil Lovett. 
CIRCULATION... Frances Young 

FACULTY ADVISORS . ...Mr. J. F. Rothermel, 

Mr. John N. Baker and Dean P. P. Burns. 



SCUTTLEBUTT'S BEGINNINGS 

The Naval Unit at Howard, established in July, 1943, 
took time out for six weeks to get settled into its new 
routine and accustomed to its new surroundings. Hav- 
ing successfully accomplished these two great tasks, 
it appeared that the trainees were all set to live a 
healthy, happy, Howard life. But something was lack- 
ing, something missing in the unit's make-up. 

"Could it be, sir, by chance, incidentally, excuse nie 
for bothering you, that what we need is a unit news- 
paper?" one timid trainee suggested. And so it was 
that August, 1943 saw the unit's initial journalistic at- 
tempt, appropriately dubbed the Scuttlebutt, brought 
forth for all to behold. 




EDITORS 

ALLAN WILLIAMS AND DICK SEAVER 



SCUTTLEBUTT 



Established to provide an outlet for informa- 
tion from headquarters, to create a closer tie be- 
tween the unit and college, to furnish a bit of 
entertainment for all, and to give interested 
trainees an opportunity for journalistic expe- 
rience they would otherwise not have had, the 
Scuttlebutt has served its purpose well. Nor can 
we ever forget the spirit of friendliness and co- 



operation of the editors and staff of the Howard 
Crimson; without which their aid this publication 
would have been impossible. 

To us who have worked on the Scuttlebutt, 
the memories of this little two-page sheet will 
always be pleasant ones — it is our hope that you 
who remain at Howard after the Navy has de- 
parted will likewise remember it in somewhat a 
similar manner. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS— J. B. Smith (10), Al Horrocks (4); SPORTS EDITORS— Maxwell (7), Therell (12), Whittington 
(13); FEATURES— Gregg (2), Johns (6), Hargrove (3); NEWS— Cecil (1), Stammer (11), Reid (9), Patton (8); 
STAFF STENOGRAPHER— Howell (5). 





POLLY COCHRAN, Editor; MARY NELL PASS, Assistant 



EDITORS 

By now you have doubtless dis- 
covered WHAT the Entre Nans is; 
the "sixty-four dollar question" 
WHEN has been answered; and we 
hope the PURPOSE of this so- 
called "activity" will be revealed 
twenty-thirty-forty years from now 
when you remove its musty form 
from the bookshelf and for the 
first time read some things that 
are written in it. 

You have your kicks now, you 
will have them then — and on these 
two pages are the people upon 
whom you will heap words, words, 
words. 

We're not offering apologies of 
any kind; for we too have cur 
kicks — there was a war on, paper 
was scarce, photographic materials 
were almost non-existent, and a lot 
of you didn't cooperate. 



VL ENTRE NOUS 



On the other hand, we are the debtors. Just 
as generals appraise true merit by the standard of 
"over and above the call of duty", so are editors 
in a position to note that extra mile which some- 
times means the entire journey. For this, the 
editors of Entre Nous would like to give special 
thanks. . . 

To Mary Ann McGee who stepped in calmly 
at crucial moments and contributed many inches 
of copy with which to fill these pages. 

To Wendell Givens, who executed the beauty 
parade with all the skill and abandon of a Zieg- 
field. 



To Ronald Weathers, whose coverage of the 
world of sports at Howard was strictly "on the 
ball". 

To Seaman Dick Seaver, whose poignant touch 
of humor brought life to the V-12 as well as 
other pages of Entre Nous. 

And to our faculty advisor — that busy, lova- 
ble, jack-of-all-trades, Mr. Baker. 

In the history of yearbooks, never has an edi- 
tor had a more able and willing assistant than 
I have had this year. Working with Mary Nell 
Pass has been a privilege and experience long to be 
remembered. — The Editor. 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief L_ ...POLLY COCHRAN 

Assistant Editor ... MARY NELL PASS 

Assistants- MARY ANNE McGEE, 

BETTY LEE WOODCOCK, LOUISE HAR- 
DIN 

Navy Editor DICK SEAVER 

Assistants RHETT MAXWELL, 

ALLAN WILLIAMS 

Sports Editor RONALD WEATHERS 

Feature Writers... ..WENDELL GIVENS, 

GAY DANIEL, EYRA DELL PETREA 

Art Editor... HUGH MORRIS 

Photographers. SPENCER HICKS, 

MARJORIE APPERSON 

Snapshots ... ...TOMMIE JOHNSON, 

JO GRAVES, MARY LOU FORD 







WENDELL GIVENS— Features 

General Assistants GERRY ARLEDGE, 

MILDRED ARLEDGE, RAI CARPENTER, 
MARIE LIPSCOMBE, JO COCHRAN, BET- 
TYSU BOZEMAN, PEGGY RUCKER 

Business Manager... ...EDWARD ASHLEY 




DRAMA SERVICE DEPARTMENT 




In the field of public relations at How- 
ard College, the Drama Service Depart- 
ment has made its bow on the campus. 
Contributing to the cultural, artistic and 
religious life of the state, it is designed to 
give technical, personal assistance to all 
schools, churches and special groups who 
knock on our door. 



LYDIA KEYES WOODCOCK— Director 



Its director, Lydia Keyes Woodcock, is 
a member of Zeta Phi Eta, professional 
drama fraternity. She has spent the great- 
er part of her life in the study of the 
drama and knows it from both the edu- 
cational and the producing end. In her 



work she has friendly entre to the leading 
publishers, and our mails attest the serv- 
ice rendered the play producing public. 
Her slogan is, "Bring us your problems — 
we do not know all the answers, but our 
advisory group is a 'who's who' of those 
who do." 





^Jke 



GREEKS 



KAPPA CHAPTER * 




OFFICERS 

President _ Mary Louise Wrenn 

Vice-President Nonnie Simmons 

Corresponding Secretary .... Shirley Anderson 

Recording Secretary.— .. Margaret Morton 

Treasurer Janyce Ward 



SORORITY OFFICERS 
Lead out in Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Dance 



MEMBERS 



In spite of outstanding loyalty to ea;h other, the 
girls of Kappa Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi, oldest 
sorority at Howard, have diverse interests and en- 
gage in many activities. Among Kappa girls are the 
presidents of Womens' Student Government, Pan- 
Hellenic, Beta Pi Theta and Alpha Epsilon Delta. 
A D Pi had three finalists in the Entre Nous Beauty 
Parade and more members in H-Day than any other 
sorority. Sigma Nu and Pi Kappa Alpha fraternities 
chose Marie Lipscombe and Jeanne Mangum as their 
respective sweethearts. 

Outstanding events on the A D Pi social calen- 
dar were initiations, rush parties, banquets, Foun- 
ders Day and parties at the Sorority lodge with the 
Navy trainees. The war has added two new ac- 
tivities, knitting for the Red Cross and serving as 
junior hostess at the U.S.O. A D Pi still holds the 
Pan-Hellenic scholarship cup for the campus and 
one for Beta Province of Alpha Delta Pi. 

Nearly every organization on the campus is repre- 
sented in A D Pi: Masquers, Tile and Mortar, 
A.E.D. Beta Pi Theta, Womens Student Government, 
Pi Gamma Mu, Glee Club, A Capella Choir, Dietet- 
ics Club and Pi Kappa Theta. 



Shirley Anderson 
Bettysu Bozeman 
Marie Breeze 
Elizabeth Buck 
Rai Carpenter 
Marie Lipscomb 
Norma Harrison 
Dorothy Fuller 
Margaret Ann Miller 
Martha Ann Miller 
Margaret Morton 



Mary Ann McGee 
Virginia Robinson 
Bobbie Collie 
Betty Ann Jonsey 
Peggy Rucker 
Nonnie Simmons 
Martha Nell Stuart 
Joyce Turrentine 
Janyce Ward 
Mary Louise Wrenn 
Betty Miller 



ALPHA DELTA PL. 



Amu rson 

BoZEMAN 

Bri i /i 
Buck 



Carpenter 

cockrell 

KlNARD 
LOVEL] 



Mancum, J. 

Mangum, M. G. 

Ma sis 

Mn i i r, M. G. T. 



Miller, Martha 
Morton 
McGi i 

Robinson 
Rucker 



Simmons 
Stuart 

Turrentine 
Ward 
Wr i \ \ 




BETA BETA CHAPTER « 




rnMt 

SORORITY OFFICERS 



Evidence that Beta Sigma Omicron deserves its 
name, "The Friendly Sorority", is seen daily as 
groups of the campus' more interesting persons gath- 
er in front of the lodge, swapping yarns and en- 
joying life with those little girls with the great 
big smiles. 

Qualities other than friendliness, however, hive 
helped the Beta Sigs within the past year to win 
such honors as president of Pan-Hellenic, president 
of Y.W.C.A., "Miss U.S.S. Howard", a member of 
Who's Who, beauty parade finalists, officers in the 
Red Cross unit, the Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Council, 
and various class positions. Such merit speaks for 
itself. 

Sparkling originality has created a campus legend 
concerning their success at entertaining. There was 
never a dull moment at the Night Club Party, the 
atmospheric Jungle Party, the chili supper, the skat- 
ing party, and other memorable fun fests of the year. 

Beta Sigma Omicron originality has also been ap- 
plied in a larger way to USO work, knitting for 
refugees, making scrapbooks for soldiers, war bond 
and stamp sales, and promoting Howard publicity. 



OFFICERS 

President Virginia Ingram 

Vice-Presidents.-. .Dorothy Turnlr 

Anne Ruth Thornton 

Treasurer ...Gene Smiti i 

Secretary ...Nina Farr 



MEMBERS 



Gerry Arledge 
Mildred Arledge 
Olive Bailey 
Fay Blackerby 
Betty Byars 
Gaye Byars 
Marjorie Cash 
Mary Copeland 
Polly Covington 
Margie Brown 
Lois Crow 
Eva Elkins 
Nina Fay Farr 
Margaret Hand 
Annie Earle Hermann 
Virginia Ingram 



Elois Lemon 
Virginia Martin 
Bette Payne 
Tinker Brown 
Jane Russell 
Nell Rae Sample 
Dorothy Saylor 
Florence Sherrod 
Gene Smith 
Virginia Thompson 
Annie Ruth Thornton 
Gloria Tucker 
Dorothy Turner 
Shirley Stamps 
Mildred Thomas 



BETA SIGMA DMICRDN 



ARLEDGE, G 
ARI.EDGE, M. 
BAILEY 

BLACKERBY 
BYARS, B. 



BYARS, G. 
CASH 

COPELAND 
COVINGTON 
CROW 



ELKINS 
FARR 
HAND 

HERRMANN 
INGRAM 



LEMON 
MARTIN 
PAYNE 
RUSSELL 



SAMPLE 
SAYLOR 
SHERROD 
SMITH 



THOMPSON 
THORNTON 
TUCKER 
TURNER 




ALPHA PI CHAPTER * 




SORORITY OFFICERS 



"Dream Girl of Delta Zeta" is more than a song 
at Howard College. Two of the four fraternity 
sweethearts are members of the sorority, and three 
of the five Entre Nous beauties, including Miss 
H-Day wear the miniature lamp. 

The D Z's seem to have a knack for getting into 
activities. Besides holding a large share of class of- 
fices, the group includes Tile and Mortar, Chi Delta 
Phi and A. A. U. W. presidents; Vice-presidents of 
Pan Hellenic and Inter-Fraternity Sorority Council; 
members of Alpha Epsilon Delta, Beta Pi Theta, Pi 
Kappa Theta, Kappa Pi, and Masquers; editors of 
Entre Nous and Crimson and Crimson business man- 
ager. 

Delta Zeta has the highest number of Hypatia 
honor members and students listed in Who's Who 
of any campus sorority. 

But Delta Zeta cannot be represented by a list of 
honors; nor can it be pictured purely as a social 
organization. Its purpose goes much deeper than 
that. Working as a group, the girls strive to offer 
individual opportunity for development of leadership 
and character. They do not try to be the most 
popular, glamorous or brilliant. Instead they work 
together to become a true combination of all three — 
the ideal college coeds. 



OFFICERS 

President Martha Purser 

Vice-President Louise Massey 

Recording Secretary Margie Orr 

Treasurer Marie Nunnely 

Corresponding Secretary -Louise Hardin 



MEMBERS 



Virginia C. Bailey 
Ruth Becton 
Mary Ann Boswell 
Jo Cochran 
Polly Cochran 
Margaruite Frost 
Betty Griffin 
Jean Gullege 
Louise Hardin 
Sara Hawthorn 
Juanita Hayes 
Mary Belle Hilliard 
Sara Hollinshead 
Tommy Johnson 
Louise Massey 
Martha Nolen 
Marie Nunnely 
Margie Orr 
Sue Patrick 
Martha Purser 



Ruth Rivers 
Eugenia Shelton 
Betty Simenton 
Dorothy Stone 
Doris Jean Sturgis 
Jewel Schweinbraten 
Evelyn Taylor 
Ruth Thomas 
Frances Walker 
Mary Jo Whitten 
I'Bell Whitman 
Betty Lee Woodcock 
Frances Young 
Marion McClendon 
Margie Thompson 
Marcia O'Neal 
Helen J. Schultz 
Mary Ann Allison 
bobbylene harris 



DELTA ZETA 



BAILEY 
BECTON 
BOSWELL 

COCHRAN, J. 
COCHRAN, P. 

FROST 
GRIFFIN 
GULLEGE 
HARDIN 

HAWTHORN 

HAYES 

HILLIARD 

HOLLINSHEAD 
JOHNSON 
MASSEY 

NOLEN 

NUNNELY 
ORR 
PATRICK 
PURSER 
RIVERS 

SHELTON 
SIMENTON 
STONE 
STURGIS 

SCHWEINBRATEN 
TAYLOR 

THOMAS 
WALKER 
WHITTEN 
WHITMAN 
WOODCOCK 
YOUNG 




ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER J 




SORORITY OFFICERS 
Lead Out in Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Dance 



If one characteristic of Phi Mu at Howard out- 
shines another, it is versatility. The girls who can 
play hostess so graciously at their traditional teas, 
reign supreme on the athletic field, support a score 
of campus activities, and at the same time, hold 
their own scholastically, defy classification. They 
are Phi Mu's. 

Individuality, the keynote of the Phi Mu person- 
ality, is tempered by its bond of love and loyalty to 
the "Faithful Sisters." 

And just as the interests are as numerous as the 
members, so are the chapter honors varied ones. Phi 
Mu enthusiasm reached a peak during the football 
season when it was led by three Phi Mu cheer- 
leaders. Various elections brought the honors of 
secretary of the student body, president of masquers, 
president of the dormitory council, and president of 
the Wesleyan Foundation to their door. Distinction 
was again won when another Phi Mu "Miss Howard" 
was elected, the sixth over a period of seven years. 

Social highlights of the year were dinner parties, 
"informals" at the house, and the annual Valentine 
Tea. 



OFFICERS 

Presidents ,.__Mary Nell Pass 

Jeanette Counts 

Vice-Presidents ... .._ Jimmie Dolvin 

Jo Ann Templeton 

Secretaries Jo Ann Templeton 

Beryl Jeffery 

Treasurer.... _„Sarah King 

Sarah King 



MEMBERS 



Marguerite Chitwood 
Jeanette Counts 
Jimmie Dolvin 
Sarah Garrett 
Jo Graves 
Beryl Jeffery 
Sarah King 
Gene Morris 
Mary Nell Pass 
Georgia Stephens 
Jackie Webb 
Twink Wells 
Mary Ruth Riddick 
Emmaline Ryan 
Jo Ann Templeton 
Jeanne Vann 
Nanette Wood 
Billie Jean Young 
Vivien Boyle 



Jerry Cole 

Billie Cooper 

Pat Howren 

Marjorie Apperson 

Jane Scofield 

Helen Counts 

Louise Crowson 

Mary Kathryn Deason 

Mary Frances Higginbotham 

Christine Kincaid 

Mary Alice Matthews 

Carolyn McGibbon 

Marie NeSmith 

Ruth Newman 

Judy Pastuer 

tommie reinhardt 

Betty Ward Clem 

Annie Lois Holmes 



PHI MU.. 



BOYLE 
COLE 
COOPER 

COUNTS, H. 
COUNTS, J. 

CRAWSON 
DEASON 
DENLEY 
DOLVIN 
FORD 

GARRETT 
GRAVES 

HIGGINBOTHAM 
JEFFRIES 
KINCAID 

KING 

KIRKLAND 
MATHEWS 
McKIBBON 
MORRIS 
NEWMAN 

PASS 

PASTEUR 

REINHARDT 
RIDDICK 
RHYAN 
STEPHENS 

TEMPLETON 
VANN 
WEBB 
WELLS 
WOOD 
YOUNG 




THETA ALPHA ZETA CHAPTER » 




FRATERNITY OFFICERS 
Lead out in Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Dance 



The members of Theta Alpha Chapter of Lambda 
Chi have adapted themselves admirably to the fra- 
ternity scheme of things in war time. Dedication 
services before each of the ten departures into serv- 
ices have strengthened the bond between those who 
go and those who stay. Still another bond has 
been the admittance of several returned veterans into 
the chapter here. 

Service to the student body has been recognized 
and awarded by the election of a Lambda Chi to 
president of the student body, and other members 
hold class and campus positions of honor, as well as 
lending support to the Red Cross Drive, the Inter- 
Fraternity-Sorority Council and other campus ac- 
tivities. 

Socially the Lambda Chi's have caused quite a 
stir by honoring each of the sororities with a special 
party. Eighteen other parties have contributed no 
end to brightening up of the campus life. 

Fortunate is the chapter in having as faculty ad- 
visors, Mr. Baker and Dr. Sarkiss, two of Howard's 
most popular professors. Other support is received 
from the very active alumni group in Birmingham 
of one hundred fifty members. 



OFFICERS 

President Hubert Edgar 

Vice-President Julius Byars 

Secretary ... : Harold Knight 

Treasurer Bill Brown 



MEMBERS 



Billy Adams 
Julius Byars 
Bill Brown 
David Barksdale 
Julian Davidson 
Jack Dorrough 
Hubert Edgar 
Boyd Franklin 
James Galbreath 
Bob Gilliland 
Charles Lavender 
Harold Knight 
Clarence Mayo 
John Nichleson 
Harry New 



Bill Prescott 
Robert Sanders 
Jimmy Wood 
Archie White 
Gordon Moon 
Bill Holmes 
Bill Carlson 
Sam Sibert 
Harry Kirkley 
W. D. Peoples 
Luther Smith 
Clyde Dowdle 
Jack Bains 
dwight castleberry 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 



ADAMS 
BYARS 
BROWN 
BARKSDALE 

DAVIDSON 
DORROUGH 
EDGAR 

FRANKLIN 

GALBREATH 
GILLILAND 
LAVENDER 
KNIGHT 



MAYO 
NICHLESON 
NEW 

PRESCOTT 



SANDERS 
WOOD 
WHITE 
BAKER 

HAWTHORN 




fll A\ 




ALPHA PI CHAPTER Jf 




FRATERNITY OFFICERS AND SWEETHEART 
Lead Out in Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Dance 

Alpha Pi Chapter of the Pi Kappa Alpha in the 
last year faced the difficulties confronting college 
fraternities all over the United States — the conver- 
sion from a war time schedule back to peace time 
life. The first step in the reconversion will be the 
securing, in November, of the fraternity house which 
has been headquarters of the Howard V-12 Unit. 
The "Pikes" look forward in anticipation to the day 
when they will once more live together in unity and 
true fraternalism which is Pi Kappa Alpha. 

In the fraternity there are a number of returned 
veterans, attracted by the fellowship offered them 
at Howard by the extended hand of Pi K. A. 

Pi K. A. at Howard is representative of a cross sec- 
tion of the young men of America. Among its 
members are students of Engineering, the Ministry, 
Medicine, Pharmacy, Art, Journalism, and future 
officers of the United States Navy. Whatever the 
Pikes may study, there are three qualities that are 
continually stressed — Character, Duty, and Versatil- 
ity. The Pikes are represented in almost every phase 
of school activity. They have members in the Stu- 
dent Senate, the Baptist Student Union, and the 
president of Pi K. A. is the president of the Inter- 
Fraternity-Sorority Council. 

Nor have the Pikes been inactive in the social field 
for they have had a wide variety of parties both at- 
tractive and entertaining. 



OFFICERS 

President .Rhett Maxwell 

Vice-Presidents Joe Jett, J. B. Davis 

Treasurer Oliver Midgette 

Secretary... .__ Carroll Blackerby 



MEMBERS 



Jimmy Anderton 
Edward Barrett 
Bill Bailey 
Carroll Blackerby 
Carl Bonner 
Jim Bowling 
John Buchanan 
Feagin Burns 
Bobby Burns 
Howard Clark 
Charles Doyle 
John Goodloe 
Don Herndon 
Walter Herndon 
John McTyeire 
Joe Jett 
William Johns 
Eugene Kratz 
Rorert Knight 
Benjamin Kidd 
Maurice Lowery 
Neil Lovett 
Rhett Maxwell 



Oliver Midgette 
Hugh Morris 
Jack Panell 
Carey Phillips 
Tommy Smith 
Edward Vickery 
Eugene Hodges 
Othinel Whitman 
Bill Thornworth 
Charles Kette 
Sam Jaynes 
Thomas Bullock 
J. B. Davis 
Lester Watson 
Dick Wambach 
Paul Putman 
Tabor Green 
Palmer Turner 
Robert Smith 
George Giddens 
Lewis Alford 
John Palmer 



PI KAPPA ALPHA.. 



ANDERTON 

BARRETT 

BAILEY 

BLACKERBY 

BONNER 

BOWLING 
BUCHANAN 
BURNS, F. 
BURNS, R. 
CLARK 



DOYLE 

GOODLOE 

HERNDON, D. 
HERNDON, W. 
HERRING, W. G. 

JETT 
JOHNS 
KRATZ 
KNIGHT 
KIDD 

LOWERY 
LOVETT 
MAXWELL 
MIDGETT 
MORRIS 



PANEL 
PHILLIPS 
SMITH 
VICKERY 
WHITMAN 





fr» .f-.' h+\, (^} 

. _- 





ALPHA ETA CHAPTER J 




FRATERNITY OFFICERS & SWEETHEART 
Lead Out in Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Dance 



OFFICERS 

President _ ..Robert Lauderdale 

Treasurer. Cecil Traywick 

Secretary Howard McWilliams 

Pledge President Thomas Botsford 



MEMBERS 



The Star and the Lamb of Pi Kappa Phi have not 
failed to shine this year at Howard. Though few 
in number at times, especially at the close of each 
semester, the members have been outstanding con- 
tributors to campus life. 

Carrying on under handicap in the top Pi Kappa 
Phi manner, the fraternity has occupied their house 
across from the college, always dreaming of the 
future and their return to their real home (behind 
Berry Field) when the war is over and the girls have 
moved. 

Talk of parties at Howard never fails to bring 
out the fact that this group, composed chiefly of 
seamen with a sprinkling of ministerial students and 
chemists, know how to give the top-notchers of the 
campus. Their spirit, interest, and wholehearted 
desire to please makes them a must on everybody's 
acquaintance list. 

Know them? If you don't, you're missing half of 
campus life. 



Robert Lauderdale 
Cecil Traywick 
Howard McWilliams 
Ralph Winn 
Harold Parrish 
Douglas Thomas 
Thomas Botsford 



D. A. Barnes 
Hugh Holmes 
J. T. Howell 
B. R. Becker 
Earl Morrer 
Wilbur Dannehower 
Donald Carpenter 



PI KAPPA PHI.. 



BECKER 
BARNES 
BOTSFORD 



DANNENHOWER 
HOWELL 
HOLMES 



LAUDERDALE 
MOORER 

McWILLIAMS 



PARRISH 
THOMAS 
TRAYWICK 
WINN 





£3tfX£ 



IDTA CHAPTER J 




OFFICERS 

Commander ■__.. Elwyn Reed 

Lt. Commander Jim DeSana 

Treasurer Bill Mickle 

Secretary William Carden 

Reporter __„ Earl Oak 

Marshall Fox Fowler 



OFFICERS AND SWEETHEART 



Sigma Nu, the oldest fraternity on the campus, possesses a heri- 
tage so closely woven with Howard tradition that the histories of the 
two on the East Lake campus are inseparable. Fraternal problems of 
the present are softened by its long-held dignity of the not too somber 
(sober) variety. 

And even war has not changed the quality nor the spirit of Sigma 
Nu except to broaden it. Its membership which was formerly chosen 
from the finer old families in Birmingham and Alabama now is com- 
prised chiefly of blue-coated trainees from Philadelphia, Chicago, 
Kansas City, and Detroit who have brought the stimulus of new ideas, 
yet true to the universal Sigma Nu instincts. 

Despite unavoidable changes, the white rose of Sigma Nu, the 
snake, the star, and the Sweetheart, Miss Marie Lipscombe, remain 
the same. 




Lead out in Inter-Fra- 
ternity-Sorority- 
Conn cil 



MEMBERS 

Bill Mickle 
Jim DeSana 
Bill Carden 
Fox Fowler 
Paul Oehler 
Smilley Gregg 
Vance McMullen 
Dale Wallace 
Bill Landers 

Bowman Webber 
Chuck Maloy 
Paul Maton 
Jewett Richardson 
Joe Stammer 
Elwyn Reed 
Cecil Thrash 
O. U. Thomas 

Albert Stephens 
Earl H. Oak 
Bob Bell 
Les McLeod 
Lucien Smith 
Rex Kalins 



OLDEST FRATERNITY DN THE 



SIGMA NU 



CARDEN 
DeSANA 
EDWARDS 
FOWLER 



GREGG 
OAK 

OEHLER 
MICKLE 



REED 

RICHARDSON 
SMITH 
STAMMER 



STEPHENS 
THOMAS 
THRASH 



CAMPUS 





PAN-HELLENIC 



MEMBERS 



Virginia Ingram 

Annie Ruth Thornton 
Dot Saylor 



Mary Ann McGee 
Jeanne Mangum 

JlMMIE DOLVIN 



Mary Nell Pass 
I'Belle Whitman 
Frances Young 



The Women's Pan-Hellenic Council is composed of two representatives from each sorority on the 
campus. The presidency rotates among the four sororities every four years. The primary functions of 
the Council are to co-ordinate the activites of the sororities, regulate rush rules and set up standards of 
conduct for sorority girls and regulations regarding the houses. The Dean of Women, Mrs. I. R. Oben- 
chain, is faculty advisor and works in close co-operation with the Council. 




COUNCILS 



MEMBERS 



Mary Ann McGee 
Janyce Ward 

Mary Louise Wren 



Mary Nell Pass 
Jeanette Counts 
I'Belle Whitman 



Martha Purser 
Virginia Ingram 

Annie Ruth Thornton 



The Pan Hellenic Workshop program presents discussions, skits and speakers of interest to both 
sorority and non sorority girls. One of the most popular aspects of the Workshop Program is acting 
as junior hostess at the U.S.O. Pan Hellenic freshmen orientation program includes discussions of the 
clubs and organizations on the campus, explanation and interpretation of rush rules and entertaining 
with open house to give new students an opportunity to meet and be with Howard people. 




INTER - FRATERNITY - SORORITY COUNCIL 



The Inter - Fraternity - Sorority Council was 
formed last fall by representatives from the eight 
sororities and fraternities to act as a stabilizer and 
arbitrator in campus affairs involving the 
"Greeks". 

1 he Council has fastened the development of 
good feeling between the separate organizations 



and co-ooeration between the Greeks and the fac- 
ulty and student body. A constitution has been 
adopted and meetings are held regularly. 

Another aim of the Council is to bring better 
forms of recreation and entertainment to the 
campus. Some of the social affairs sponsored by 
the Council were the formal Christmas dance, 
followed by a series of informal dances. 



Robert Lauderdale 
James Galbreath 
Rhett Maxwell 



MEMBERS 

I'Belle Whitman 
Mildred Arledge 
Jimmy DeSana 



Jeanne Mangum 
Jtmmie Dolvin 




NAVY S DCIAL COMMITTEE 



The Navy Social Committee was organized by 
the officers of the V-12 Unit in the belief that 
it could provide better entertainment for the 
trainees. The Committee operates on the social 
fund which is collected from the Coca-Cola ma- 
chine, Athletics and tax on laundry. 



Some of the social events sponsored by the 
committee are semi-annual smokers and boxing 
matches and the Midshipmen's Ball presented ev- 
ery semester. 



OFFICERS 

Chairman Rhett Maxwell 

Co-Chairman James Pittman 

Treasurer Joe Stammer 

Secretary Robert Lauderdale 

Arrangements Spencer Hicks 



ANCHDHS AWEIGH 

■Jke J^ona of Jhe V fai/u 

Stand Navy out to sea, 

Fight our battle cry, 

We'll never change our course, 

So vicious foe steer shy-y-y-y 

Roll out the T.N.T. 

Anchors Aweigh 

Sail on to victory and sink their bones to Davy Jones hooray — 

Yo-ho there ship-mate, take the fighting to the far off seas; 

Yo-ho there mess-mate, hear the wailing of the wild ban-shees. 

All hands fire brands Let's blast them as we go. So 

Stand Navy out to sea, 

Fight our battle cry; 

We'll never change our course, so vicious foe steer Shy-y-y-y-y 

Roll out the T.N.T. 

Anchors Aweigh Sail on to victory 

And sink their bones to Davy Jones hoo-ray! 

Anchors Aweigh my boys, Anchors Aweigh 

Fare-well to college joys, 

We sail at break of day, day, day, day! 

Through our last night on shore, 

Drink to the foam, 

Un-til we meet once more, 

Here's wishing you a happy voyage home. 

Heave a-ho there, sailor, everybody drink up while you may; 

Heave a-ho there, sailor, for you're gonna sail at break of day 

Drink away, drink away, for you sail at break of day, Hey! 

Stand Navy down the field, 

Sail set to the sky! 

We'll never change our course so, 

Army you steer shy-y-y-y 

Roll up the score Navy 

Anchors Aweigh — 

Sail Navy down the field, 

And sink the army, sink the army gray. 




jL beauties 



'd 




SELECTDR 




A. B. WINDHAM 



*C °«. °«. *m *<l <!• + 
















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1 



JfSCC 



8& 





rv/ontez ^Mart5ili 



. 



AUTY 




re I idi ~Dara ^Jvawlh 

ltd red ^rriedi 

(i55 rfimmie ^LJolui 



~s4bcnA,t the l/Uotr l/Wko flicked L^m 



Lt. Comdr. Amasa B. Windham, distinguished 
Howard alumnus, the man who met Madeline 
Carroll, and who admits a knowledge of many 
talents including journalism, acting, playwriting, 
sketching and photography, and who has attained 
a measure of success in this man's Navy, remains 
untouched by fame and success — he still wants to 
go down in history merely as the man who met 
Madeline Carroll. . . 

That's the way it was. He immediately be- 
came a BMOC (Big Man On the Campus). His 
ability and drive, in addition to his girth, was 
responsible for this. He soon had more irons 
in the fire than the Village Smithy, and during 
his time at Howard, Amasa Windham became the 
most talked about, (both good and bad) man 
on the campus. A member of Sigma Nu fraterni- 
ty (and still very active in its affairs) Windham 
was parade manager every years he attended How- 
ard. This was in those glorious never-never years 
when "Beat Southern!" was the only thing 
thought of from Fall opening until Thanksgiv- 
ing Day. Thanks to Amasa Windham, Howard 
won the parade cup from Southern each year he 
was in charge. He founded the Beauty Parade, 
now an annual affair; he was co-founder of 
Trident. He was a feature columnist for The 
Crimson, writing a column under the name oi 
"Prof. Whoozis." 

Abe (as he was known to friend and foe) was 
perhaps best known as a campus politician, tie 
never ran for office, he was content to run 
someone else's campaign, then run the office after 
election. Through his ability, Gail Patrick, who 
Jater attained movie fame, lost by a split-hair 
vote for student body president. Abe admits his 
candidate wasn't half as good as Miss Fitzpatrick, 
but he "couldn't let a woman win." Despite the 
political tilt, he and Gail remained good friends, 
and are so today. 

His travels took him to a local newspaper, 
where he was employed as artist. From here, he 
dashed out five plays, all of which were published, 
one of which won the Montevallo Playwriting 
Award. Next, he turned to acting, traveling with 
a Federal Theater circuit, and Summer Stock in 
New England. Back to Birmingham, he settled 



w=3^a 




down to writing for the Birmingham Age-Herald. 
Writing headlines on war news proved too much 
for him finally, and he enlisted in the Navy, be- 
ing commissioned a lieutenant (jg). 

It was while traveling with the Navy that he 
met the girl of his dreams — Miss Carroll. 

"She's wonderful, she's beautiful, I'll now die 
happy," said Windham. . . 

In addition to England's contribution to movie 
fame, Windham is on speaking terms with Allen 
Jones, Johnny Mack Brown, Brock Pemberton, 
Olie Olson and Chic Johnson of "Hellzapoppin;" 
Al Capp, of L'il Abner renown; Vera Zorina, 
Loraine Day, Robert Ripley, Dinah Shore, and 
even the one and only "Prince Mike" Romanoff. 

At present Windham is busy sharing in the 
making of the headlines he used to write. He is 
a member of a Navy military government unit 
on the island of Okinawa. It was here that he 
made the selection of the beauties for the beauty 
section of this publication. One can almost pic- 
ture the mighty Windham gazing fondly at the 
pictures of the beauties, ducking shell bursts, and 
thinking tenderly of the Madeline he left in the 
States. . . 

All this may sound unusual to the reader, but 
we are writing of an unusual man. . . After all, 
didn't he meet Madeline Carroll? 

— Portrait by Pfc. Tommy Hill, Howard 
alumnus and friend of the subject. 




REMEMBER 








REGISTRATION 
R.S.LI. PRESIDENT WELCOMES 




DOWN PAYMENT 




HDAV '44 QUEEN OF H DAY 



/ 




B.S.LI. 

SWEETHEART 

BANQUET 





RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK 



SPEAK WEEK 

imei uou 'ue 



t 



had h 



ere 



a 



emem 



bey* .... 




tadc/ T*nD.nv A All J REMODEL 
EAPS^wTARBABV WATERMELON CU INO 



INTER-FRATERNITY SORORITY DANCE 




when uou re awau 



& 



Inflation, the house with 
the interesting rooms is the 
home of interesting people. 
Friendly and fun-loving, yet 
coming to school with a 
purpose, many InfIationit.es 
arc leaders on the campus 
in a variety of 
tulils including music, phar- 
macy, religious education, 
and journal! 



ememoer 



k 





HMBHHnnHMHH 



INFLATION 




RATION 



Lucky are the Ration girls who are 
nearest that huh of dormitory life — the 
dining hall, who can sit on their shady 
lawn and watch softball games and drills, 
and who have at their command the 
genial and sympathetic guidance of their 
"housemother", Louise McGinty. Variet) 
oi achievements make them indispensable. 



DURATION 




— n 



Sensation, the newest resi- 
dent hall on the campus, 
has created quite .1 stir with 
its willingness to participate 
in many campus activities, 
its adeptness at all girls' 
■•ports, and its abundance of 
really good - looking fresh- 
men. Most of all. Sensation 
has presented a true chal- 
lenge to sleepy uppercla.s- 
man life at Howard. 



The home of Woo Hill sunbath 
devotees, of sun parlor dal 
perts, >>( music t'.ms who mother 
l ( grand piano, and of 
Hostess, Mrs. | D. Hamrick, Du- 
ration is declared, by all its occu- 
pants, ,.vc". 





SENSATION 



HOSTESS' OF RESIDENCE 
HALLS 




MA KILLIAN1 



MRS STEPHENS 





'I ins yen tin: ( iments 

fraternit) dream girl, fiss Howard", two beauty parade t in .iti^i ^. 

and selected phj :otine, and V-12 fiends, 

minational, and mail 
bound together by their common intipath; for "eagei beavers 11 idmirat 

tor \jill ( oilier 



e mends 



an 



d don 




ome 



f 



t 



Arnold and Scoffield . . . And the police came . . . After rehearsal . . . 
Double decker . . . Our editor . . . Sensation plus . . . Duration plus . . . 
Pretty background . . . Roommates . . . Before dinner . . . Three is a 
crowd . . . Homeward Bound. . . 




Sweet and lovely . . . Do you prefer blondes or brunnettes . . . Ummm! 
Steak Fry . . . Winter time . . . Up a tree . . . Rat week . . . We built a 
snowman . . . Good deed for the day . . . Tabby . . . Wading in Febru- 
ary . . . Saturday hotdogs . . . Moon beam. . . 





Ptomaine Tavern, Ruhama . . . Bowdens . . . Lib . . . He's such a fickle 
snowman . . . Sensation, plus plus ... I think he lives here too . . . Love 
those girls . . . Big deal up? Dormitory council . . . After breakfast, but 
they're not awake. . . 



to 



come 



back 



some da 



dc 



i 



TWITTER 











SNAP 



Sweet slumber . . . Lab 



Whizzards? 



Ma 



Ginty . . . Boys, car- 
rying the car? Anone? 



. . Roberto 



Which way is he go- 



ing, George? ... 
Don't rush her, girls 



. . . Oak's roommates 



. . . Navy escort 



Happy? . . . She's got 



more than her share 



Like cats? . . . Be- 



tween classes . . . Dad- 



dy! 



Take your 



pick, Ensign . . . Dar- 
ling Sisters . . . Those 
passionate Phi Mu's! 



SHOTS 



Pride of Iowa 



Have a drink? 



Frat Brothers . . . It's 



hard life . . . The 



day after . . . Main 



view . . . He's a Sigma 



Nu . . . He's an Ex- 



Marine . . . It's theirs 



for keeps . . . Back- 



ward glance . . . How- 



ard Garmany Clark, 



III . . . What, again? 



Two yanks at 



Howard . . . Don't let 



Mr. Willis catch ya. . . 





■V 



SNAP 

Quintessence of smiles 
. . . Watch that hand! 
. . . Miss Heifner pos- 
es .. . Self explana- 
tory . . . Friendliest 
Gent to the gals . . . 
Eight Sailors and a 
girl . . . Professor Al 
. . . Don't forget to 
write ... A Darling 
girl ... Pi Kappa 
Phi's . . . Last resort 
. . . Dream girl . . . 
The great lover . . . 
Two loafers . . . 
Where'd ya get that 
fag? . . . Why, Mr. 
Knight! . . . Keen 
power of observation 
. . . Some fun, No? 
. . . Camel Walk. . . 



SHOTS 



He thinks his name is 



Collier . . . Our Pho- 



tographer . . . Lambda 



Chi Manpower 



The big three 



Most anytime 



Yardbirds . . . "Mi 



zie" . . . Mail Call 



All the comforts of 



home . . . Not bridge, 



in a sorority house 



Male from overseas. 





SNAPS 

Miami E.H.S Go- 
ing up? . . . Must be 
Thursday . . . Could 
be . . . Pikes . . . And 
they add their charms 
. . . Pharmacy stu- 
dents . . . Chicken . . . 
Waiting on another 
male . . . Marion and 
Betty . . . Frosh . . . 
Is she running? . . . 
One and a half min- 
utes before lab. . . . 



She might be presi- 
dent someday . . 
"Whitey" . . . 




WHO'S WHO 



As elected by students' popular vote 

Most intellectual boy . . . most promising boy . . . most popular boy . . . 
wittiest girl . . . most promising girl . . . best all around boy . . . Miss 
Howard . . . most intellectual girl . . . most beautiful girl . . . wittiest 
boy . . . best dressed boy . . . best all around girl . . . most popular girls . . . 
most handsome boys . . . best dressed girl. 



C D UPLE S 



Evelyn and Bill . . . Mary Nell and Bob . . . Louise and Jack ... Jo and Jimmy . . . 
I'belle and Billy . . . Jimmie and Carroll . . . Ray and Ray . . . Margie and Billy . . . Gene 
and Chuck . . . Jean and John . . . Vivian and Ed . . . Eustacia and Whitehead . . . 
Bobbie and Jack . . . Mary Lou and Luke . . . Jimmy and Martha . . . Mr. and Mrs. 
Jerry and Gene . . . Dot and Harry . . . Marie and Oak . . . Louise and Paul . . . Patton 
and Patton. . . 




rs. <UJi 



UUlS 




ZJkanL to MRS. DAVIS 



No greater inspiration toward graciousness and 
charm is needed by Howard Co-eds other than 
our lovely first lady, Mrs. Davis. Her presence 
is always felt and appreciated at the academic 
teas, lectures, and banquets that she somehow 
takes time to attend. 

But in far greater ways has she proved her 
interest in the welfare of all students. Sensitive 
to all unsightliness, and adept in the art of decora- 
tion, she has left the indelible mark of her good 
taste on the most beautiful spots of the campus. 
The auditorium, Pine Lodge, and the offices in 
Main are now pointed to with pride. 



Programs, too, such as the impressive Christ- 
mas Pageant were directed by the versatile hand 
of Mrs. Davis. Her eagerness to share the finer 
things has brought us many speakers who have 
enlightened an otherwise dull and pointless chapel 
period. 

The embodiment of the Howard spirit in per- 
sonal recognition and rememberance of the indi- 
vidual student. Doing the unexpected, the warm 
and the heartfelt things, has been her real way 
of saying, "Take time to create beauty in your 
lives." For all this, we are grateful, Mrs. Davis. 



STAR GAZING 



It is evening. The hot stillness of the after- 
noon sun has lifted leaving a gentle caressing 
breeze to comfort and cool "Tomorrow", I 
thought, "I will be an alumna," and the strangest 
of all feelings constricts my heart. It is just as if 
someone had shown me through a long, beauti- 
ful hall full of an interesting variety of collec- 
tions — some beautiful, some plain, and some un- 
pleasant to gaze upon — then stood me at the end 
of the hall before a closed door and said — "Now, 
open it." 

Slowly, I saunter down the walk from Main 
and sit upon a bench under spreading Sherman. 
In the dusk, a certain enchantment falls over 
everything and the evening songs of hidden 
warblers make the picture complete. Lovingly I 
look around while echoes of passing footsteps 
bring a strange parade before my mind's eye. 

Over there is the well-worn path from Smith — 
it was merely a small trail when my scared feet 
brought me tremblingly to Main my first day. 
Freshmen tests and initiation really sufficed to 
crumble my ego about the knowledge I had when 
I graduated from high school. They were fun 
even if they did scare us half to death, and, my, 
the seniors were so dignified and wonderful. Their 
complete friendliness and willingness to help 
startled me and made me determine to come out 
of my own little world and acquire that radiant 
spirit I found on the campus. Next came the 
vision of rushing and trying to find some class 
in a strange place called Ethiopia, talking to 
professors and finding that they are human, too. 
Sororities, rush parties, organizational activities, 
and "get acquainted" parties whirl past. Grad- 
ually even the rushed whirl settles into a def- 
inite pattern — gay excitement in seeing old friends 
and making new ones, determined plunge into 
classes and books, a complicated entanglement 
into extra-curricular activities with committee 
meetings and parties on every hand, then finals 
with the rush for the library and all the cram- 



ming that goes with it, finally the tearful good- 
byes to friends. So, the vicious, yet entertaining 
cycle goes on and on. 

The evening star is out and dusk is gathering. 
Hark! Faintly I can hear gay music and indis- 
tinctly I can see a crowd dressed in gay scarfs 
and sombreros. Yes, we did have fun at the 
Mexican Fiesta as well as all the other socials. 
Many settled couples can date their first meeting 
or their courtship back to those "get-togethers". 
Now — am I dreaming? No, I see, now. The 
girls, visions of loveliness, are walking around in 
their evening gowns after a formal dinner. 

The parade hastens on at a mad pace. Scene 
after scene of little and big events push one an- 
other on hurriedly — H-Day, Class events, Chapel 
programs, B.S.U. work, "Join-the-Church" Day, 
Prayer groups, Religious experiences, Friends and 
acquaintances, Dormitory life with never a dull 
moment, bring their pleasant or bitter memories 
and fade away into the dusk. 

A day at college is a full and exciting day. 
Yet my most treasured memory is that at the 
close of a busy day when perplexities and cares 
have hurled their force upon me, I can pause 
quietly, and with all the girls at the Vesper Call 
"Be still and know" that God is right here waiting 
and wanting to bless and guide. Vespers at twi- 
light time is a call to prayer and meditation and 
a blessing of added peace and strength. 

Why, it's dark! I must go. The time has come 
for me to open the door to the future. Goodbye, 
dear Howard. The stars are so beautiful and the 
moon is casting a mellow glow over the substan- 
tial walls of Main. Thank You, God, for How- 
ard. It has helped me to find more defenitely my 
taste in life and has not only taught me "book 
knowledge" but how to live and live abundantly. 
I pray that you, Howard, may ever stand as a 
beacon to guide eager feet in finding their place 
in the Road of Life. 




MBMMHMM^H 



ATHLETICS 




BUB WALKER— COACH 




HllACH WALKER 



About Bub Walker, who's given name 
is Erskine Ramsay: Coach Walker came 
to Howard in July, replacing Snitz Sni- 
der, who found it favorable to return to 
his old coaching job at Bessemer High 
School. Walker, an Alabama boy to the 
core, prepped at Ensley High School, in 
Birmingham, and Marion Military Insti- 
tute. He went to College at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, starring with tiie 
Crimson Tide as a stellar right half back. 
For half a dozen or so seasons before 
coming to Howard, Coach helped his 
brother, Peahead, an ex-Howard great, as 
backfield coach of the Wake Forest Dea- 
cons. Bub's outstanding backfield com- 
bination at Wake Forrest was turned out 
in 1941. Arriving at Howard in early 
July, Coach Walker quickly showed the 
faculty and students that he wasn't one 
to sit around all day on his big — front 
porch. Within three weeks, Coach knew 
just about who was interested in the 
team and ere another week had gone 
by he had men out for their summer 
practice. 



KNUDSEN and JURKDWICZ 

Chiefs Jurkowicz and Knudsen were the salt 
of the earth in the opinion of most of the lads 
who had to work under them in the Physical 
Ed. department. Both are ex-college stars, 
Knudsen excelling in track and football at 
Morningside College, in Iowa, and Jurkowicz 
holding down center on the football squad in 
his days at the University of Minnesota. Knud- 
sen has been with the Navy unit since its 
coming here in 1943, while Jurkowick is some- 
what a recent addition, coming in late 1944. 



KEEP 'EM TRYING 



The frost was on the pumpkin, 

The grapes were on the vine 
When Howard had the ball 

On the Majors' 10-yard line. 
Two seconds, showed the great 
big clock, 

To do or not to do — 
To put the pesky ball across 

Or just lay down and lose. 
Big Pritchard snapped the ball 

And all the linemen hit 
As Spencer faded, way, way back, 

To do his mighty bit. 



At first he failed to find his man 

As he danced about out there, 
But then at once he saw him, 

And the ball was in the air. 
'Twas then the final whistle blew, 

The crowd's one heart did jump 
As Davis raced to catch the ball 

And pull it in — ker-plunk! 
Across the double stripe he streaked 

And all the crowd did yell, 
But Millsaps won it, anyhow, 

So tell me, what the hell? 



MISSISSIPPI BOYS 




: ^. 






■it.- 



V:/ 



sss 



r-- 



- '''I-*': 



I 







WHERE THEY DRESS 



n , 




• • HOWARD'S 



WHERE THEY PRACTICE 
WHERE THEY PLAY 







Such was the spirit that Howard's 1944 football team ex- 
emplified — always fighting, always trying right on down to the 
last seconds of the last minute of the last period. Except in the 
matter of losing games, the 1944 Bulldogs were typical of How- 
ard teams, who display what skill they possess to the best of 
their ability along with a fine fighting spirit. 

"Brand new" might well describe this particular team. Only 
four members of the 1943 squad were on hand when a new 
coaching staff, headed by one Bub Walker, issued the call for 
the opening of Summer football practice in July. Besides the 
return of end Lewis Marler, tackle James Pittman, center Bill 
Pritchard and blocking back Jack Hay, 39 men turned out for 
the first practice. In that group, half a dozen had had some 
college experience, 24 had had some high school training and 
the rest had had no experience at all. 



^Ml^t^^ 




HERE'S THE TEAM. STRONGLY RE-INFORCFD BY NAVY PERSONNEL: 

FROM THE LEFT (first row), Lorenz Gregg, Ray Kiker, Guy Bassett, Ross Veal, Ed Tuszl, Andy Papaminas, John Pastus, Jack Hay, Fox Fowler, 
Guy Elmore, Bill Aderson, manager; (second row) Earl Moorer, Dudley Powers, C. B. Clark, George Williams, Russell Kennedy, Paul Connair, 
Joe Stammer, Butch Edwards, Grant Carter, Milton Wray, James Dick, manager; (third row) Eugene Kratz Roy Bates, Charles Davis, Clarence 
White, Dom Biancavilla, Billy Gamble, Ray Smith, Frank Joffrion, Rhett Maxwell; (fourth row) Clarence Mayo, H. G. Roberts, Bill Pritchard, 
Lewis Marler, Elwyn Reed, Buddy Stigler, ,James Pittman, Bill Carter, Bill Starling, Edwin Spencer and Coach Bub Walker. 



BULLDOGS 



• • 



Millsaps' Majors (of Mississippi) an old Dixie 
conference opponent for Howard, provided the 
Bulldogs with their first taste of competition. 
Playing on the Majors' home field, the 'Dogs lost, 
19-14, but it was all the Millsaps team could do 
to hold on to its lead in the second half of that 
game as Howard's line charged in repeatedly, of- 
fensively and defensively, bringing the Majors to 
their knees. The second-half lacing Howard gave 
the Majors meant only one thing to the Bulldogs: 
"We'll square our account with these boys when 
we play them again this season". 

The Bulldogs continued their wanderings be- 
fore their first home game, next going to Mont- 
gomery to renew their rivalry with the Auburn 
Plainsmen. The Seadogs (oft called that) were 
going to take their 'first in '44', but the Tigers 
had different ideas as the team, Kuykendall and 
all, romped all over the Howard lads, 32-0. 

Alabama 63, Howard 7 (those 7 points looked 
mighty good) . 

Carson-Newman was next in line to brush the 
Bulldogs, the Eagles turning the trick in a Tri- 
Cities, Ala., benefit game, 12-6. An acute case 
of fumblitis coupled with a few bad breaks gave 
the Eagles the game. The Bulldogs consistently 
outplayed them, but 'twas to no avail. 



It was 'now or never' by this time as Howard 
came up to its last game of the season, and it 
was 'never' as the Millsaps Majors were on their 
toes from start to finish to triumph, 19-7. The 
Howard line proved its worth all night long, but 
it was a weak pass defense that let the Majors in 
with victory no. 2 over the Bulldogs. 




^Jke 



PLAYERS 



A couple of Preachers — Marler ind Billy Gamble, both 
ends — were the only civilians who heeded the first call for 
practice. Later they were joined by two more Preachers, 
Arthur Koehler and Guy Bassett, and Clarence Mayo. Bas- 
sett, because of a dislocated shoulder suffered in practice 
soon was dropped from the squad, leaving four civilians 
on the team. All of that quartet, however, proved to be 
key men, Marler and Gamble starting on the flanks in all 
five games, Koehler starting at fullback in four games, 
while Mayo got in plenty of time as a reserve tackle. Soon 
after the close of the football season, Mayo went into the 
Navy, leaving behind a football scholarship at Georgia Tech 
which he hopes to use upon his return to civilian life. 

'Big Pitt' Pittman, who dabbled in politics at Howard long 
enough to be elected student body vice-president, was 
hampered all season by an old shoulder injury, but, never- 
the less, he carried on at tackle, starting in five games and 
handling the kickoff duties. 

Alternating as Pittman's running mate on the other 
side of the line at right tackle were Roy Bates and Buddy 
Stigler, two Mississippi boys from Purvis and Drew, re- 
spectively. Neither had had previous college experience, 
but both caught on fast and developed greatly before the 
season's conclusion. 

Two of the best-manned positions on the team were 
the guard spots. Coach Walker had four fine boys to 
choose from, but before the season was up he invariably 
settled for Rhett Maxwell and Bill Carter as his starters, 
although he knew he could count on Fox Fowler and Ed 
Tuszl, two low-slung hefties who could shove the defense 
around. 

Bill Pritchard became known as the team's 'Ironman' ere 
the season had gotten through September, because of the 
lad's stellar line-backing and excellent passing. Having no 



c.i|iable understudy. Bill was forced to go the route the 
entire season, and seldom did he weaken in his assignment. 
Small for his position, Bill wasn't one to let size interfere 
with his play as he backed up a tough line that held op- 
ponents at bay and forced them to the air. 

Talk about blocking backs, Howard had two of 'em 
who just wouldn't quit when it came to blocking. Hay, 
letterman from the 1943 squad, found very able assistance 
in Milton (Red) Wray, a Mississippi lad with an engaging 
smile. Both came in for a lot of play and signal-barking 
all season long. The pair seemed indestructible and were 
in top shape for every game. 

The tailback position, sore spot of the team, was handled 
most of the time by Ed Spencer, a fair passer, kicker and 
runner. Vainly trying to help him was Ray (my brother's 
a pilot) Kyker, Vienna, Virginia's gift to Howard Col- 
lege. 

Jed Pepper, speed merchant deluxe, who was by far the 
fastest man on the squad, ran his plays from the wingback 
spot. A dangerous man once in the open, Jed sometimes 
returned punts and could always pick up the yardage on 
those reverses. His understudy was Charles Davis. 

It was Milo Fields, hefty hard-charging fullback, who 
gave Howard a spark of life in the first game of the sea- 
son, but he was soon transferred leaving the spot perma- 
nently weakened as Arthur Koehler tried to fill in, but 
couldn't get the same results of the plunging Fields. 

There's the team, take it for what it's worth — it played 
five games and lost as many. The Bulldog line play was 
terrific both offensively and defensively. When teams 
failed to go through it, they went over it, and quite suc- 
cessfully as Howard never could set up a decent pass de- 
fense all season long. 




The Bulldogs had a mascot and it wasn't a 
bulldog. Called "Tar Baby" because of her black 
shiny coat, the little pup was the center of at- 
traction anywhere the team was playing. "Tat 
Baby" got her biggest hand of the year, marching 
at Legion Field with Mickle's Mighty Men. Only 
a few weeks later, though, death called Tar Baby 
after she had given birth to three still-born pup- 
pies. She was quietly laid to rest with ap- 
propriate honors from the Navy, the boys bury- 
ing the little lady next to Renfroe Hall where 
her grave is marked with a beautiful headstone. 



Only four came back (sound's like a book title). Hut every one of 'em 
bad sometbing on tbe ball, and except for Marler played a lot of it. From 
tbe 194) team tbey are, from the left, Lewis Marler, James Pittman, Bii! 
Pritchard and John Hay. 






Bill Pritchard 
Bill Cartlr 

Riii tt Maxwell 



Red Wray 

Bill Starling 
James Pittman 



Grant Car u r 
Elwyn Reed 

Lewis Mareer 



Roy Bates 
Ed Tuszl 
Jack Hay 





^Jke 



i i 



H 



J 9 



CLUB 



The 'H' Club, admission to which is the highest honor that can be accorded an 
athlete at Howard College, was in 1944 made up to a large extent of Navy men train- 
ing here. In 1944 there were thirty-five members. 



OFFICERS 



James Pittman, President 
Lewis Marler, Vice-President 



Wendell Givens, Secretary 
Ronald Weathers, Treasurer 



"H" CLUBBERS 



Lewis Marler 
Billy Gamble 
Elwyn Reed 
Frank Joffrion 
Roy Bates 
James Pittman 
Clarence Mayo 
Buddy Stigler 
Andy Papminas 
W. L. Carter 
Wendell Givens 
David Staff 



Ed Tuszl 
Rhett Maxwell 
O. R. Kennedy 
Fox Fowler 
George Taylor 
R. A. Smith, Jr. 
Bill Pritchard 
Milton Wray 
Jack Hay 
Charles Davis 
Jed Pepper 
Bub Walker 



Arthur Oehler 
Billy Adams 
Milo Fields 
Ed Spencer 
U. G. Carter 
Bill Alderson 
James Dick 
Jack Moran 
Ronald Weathers 
Dean William Dale 
Ray Kyker 



TUB-BEATER 

Howard, in 1944 was blessed with "the best 
football team that ever had the good fortune of 
wearing Bulldog moleskins." Anyone who read the 
local papers, The Birmingham Agc-Hcrald-Ncius 
in particular, was inclined so to believe, what 
with the great job of so-called "tub-beating" 
Wendell Givens, ex of this great institution, did 
for the boys. It got so bad (really it was good), 
that one was forced to look in the lineups and 
summary an account of a Howard football game 
to find who actually won the game. No matter 
what the score "the Bulldogs had the situation 
well under control." Nice going Wendell. 




DEAN DALE 




INTRA 



No intramural football was played, 
but the girls covered the break, be- 
tween football and basketball season 
nicely with a hotl\ r -contested volley- 
ball tournament. No team in the 
seven-team league went through the 
campaign unbeaten, but the end of 
season's play found the athletic Phi 
Mus out in front. The title was taken 
with a grain of salt by the Phi Mus, 
and well might it have been as it was 
just another trophy to put on an al- 
ready crowded mantel-piece. 

Came basketball season, every quintet in 
the six-team all-Navy intramural basketball 
league took a sound beating except the Sec- 
ond Platoon, Company Two, which swept to 
five straight triumphs and the first-half 
championship. The Second Platooners, Smith 
Hall inhabitants, incidentally, had a record 
reading as follows: Wins over — Second Pla- 
toon, Co. 1 (20-16), Third Platoon, Co. 1 
(10-6), First Platoon, Co. 1 (8-7), Third 
Platoon, Co. 2 (17-16) and First Platoon, Co. 
2 (19-17). 

In the second-half intramural cage playoff, 
Roy Bates' Third Platoon, Co. 1 copped the 
championship, going through a double-elimi- 
nation tournament undefeated, knocking off 
First Platoon, Co. 2 in the finals, 28-2 5, for 
the title. Third platooners breezed through, 
winners over: the Preachers, 27-14, Third 
Platoon, Co. 2, 2 5-18, Second Platoon, 
Co. 1, 33-20 and First Platoon, Co. 2. An- 
other civilian team known as the Campus 
Cutups failed to last long in the tourney, 
being defeated in its first and only two 
tournament frays. Charles Litsey, Bill Jenkins, 
Julian Davidson, Bill Adams and Wendell 
Givens were the only civilians other than 
the Preachers who lifted a finger in intramural 
cage play. 

Howard's intramural sports program for 
1944 and early 194 5 was carried out with 
more enthusiasm and by more active partici- 
pants than by any such activity in many a 
moon — more than a month of Sundays, to 



MURALS 



say the ieast. For the boys, softball and bas- 
ketball held the spotlight, while the girls dab- 
bled — but definitely — in two hot sessions of 
volleyball and basketball. 

The boys Softball league, made up of six 
Navy teams — the civilians "faked out" — was 
marked in particular by the friendly, but 
nevertheless, hard-fought rivalry between pla- 
toons quartered in Renfroe and Smith Hails. 
What with the league boasting no team which 
held the upper hand, the teams went about the 
merry task of popping one another with reg- 
ularity. As a result, there was a three-way 
photo-finish at the end of regular league 
play, thus necessitating a playoff. 

It was Ed Riley's outfit which finally 
emerged the winner, sweeping a 7-3 decision 
from Elmer Barnes' bozos after the latter had 
bumped off Roy Bates' crew in the playoff. 

The Purples of Sewanee were invited to play 
Howard's Intramural All-Stars. Twice be- 
fore Sewanee had triumphed and this time 
was no exception as the Sewanee crew knocked 
out a 5-3 triumph. 

Sensation, latest addition to the Duration, 
Inflation, Ration & Co. clan proved the sen- 
sation of the girls basketball race, whisking 
through the season undefeated and at no time 
in danger of being defeated. The only defeat 
registered against the team was when it ven- 
tured into the "outside world" and fell to a 
Birmingham Business College combine. Phi 
Mu again proved the class along Sorority 
row, and the Town Girls proved one of the 
stronger contenders in the race for loop hon- 
ors. 

One of the most interesting pugilistic ex- 
hibitions yet seen at Howard was put on by 
the members of the V-12 Unit. The boys 
went through several weeks of tough training 
before the preliminaries that were held in 
Causey Gym. The winners of the first bouts 
slugged it out in the finals at Roebuck Coun- 
try Club a week later. The winners were 
Les McLeod, Rudy York, Jack Baker, Rex 
Kalins, Bill Bailey, Clyde Jackson and J. B. 
Davis. Others in the Boxing team are Rid 
McCoy, Chauncey Erickson, Bob Kyle, M. L. 
Scappini, John Pickering, Bob Osborn, Bill 
Reaves, Hart, and Shaffield. 




f I *A 3 





From the left, (first row) Jack Moran, Carroll Blackerby, Ray Kiker, Jack Cooke, 
A. M. Romeo, Don Swagart; (second row) Emery Lowry, Ed Riley, John Pastis, Jim 
(Junior) Ray, Paul Godwin, Howard Baker and Bill Alderson, Manager. 

BASKETBALL TEAM 

Howard fielded two basketball teams in 1945 for the first time since 1941, the 
Varsity romping a ten-game schedule in the Boys Club undefeated to win that 
league's championship, and the Bees tieing Palmerdale for the championship in the 
Birmingham Park and Recreation Board's Willow Wood circuit. 




SEASON RESULTS 






Howard 


55, 


Goslin 13. 


Howard 


52, 


Sumiton 18. 


Howard 


42, 


Goslin 27 (practice). 


Howard 


60, 


Mt. Olive 3 0. 


Howard 


23, 


Louisville Seminary 2 5 (practice) 


Howard 


29, 


Boys Club 20. 


Howard 


3 6, 


IWcluel-McCone 30. 


Howard 


52, 


Goslin 14. 


Howard 


54, 


Acipco 2 5. 


Howard 


36, 


Sumiton 20. 


Howard 


'2, 


Long-Lewis 45. 


Howard 


49, 


Gadsden 47. 


Howard 


42, 


Bcehtel-McCone 3 5. 


Howard 


44, 


Boys Club 3 0. 


Howard 


36, 


Stockham 42. 


Howard 


65, 


Military Police 14. 


Howard 


2 


Army Air Base ( forfeit 1. 



PLAYERS 



Big Jim Ray was the offensive spark of the 
varsity, the towering center pouring through 
nearly 200 points during the season. On two oc- 
casions he set scoring marks at the Boys Club, 
tallying 27 points for one record and following 
up with 33 a few weeks later to erase that mark. 

Paul Godwin, Emery Lowry and Jack Moran 
alternated as starting forwards for the Bulldog 
varsity, Godwin's scoring performance being sec- 
ond to big Junior Ray's. Lowry, before hurting 
his knee, furnished plenty of points for Howard 
quint, and Moran, a keen little eager in his own 
right, augmented the scoring when Lowry fell 
down. 

E. J. Riley and Ray Kiker were usually the 
starting guards, both being exceptionally welj 
versed in the art of ball-hawking. Riley, in par- 



ticular, was a hard man to get around, and Kyker 
was the gamest man on the court in every How- 
ard game. 

The Bulldogs were beaten only once prior to 
two post-season tournaments falling to Stockham 
Pipers, 42-36, one February eve when the Pipers 
sank 20 gift shots. Participating in the South- 
eastern A. A. U. meet, Howard bowed in the 
first round to Smyrna Air Base, 63-48. 

Players who gave the starting five plenty of 
support were Carroll Blackerby, the Bessemer 
flash, Jack (Sleepy) Cooke, A. M. Romeo, the 
people's cherce, Don Swagart, straight from the 
fleet, John Pastis, best liked man on the team, 
and Howard Baker, a cr3cker-jack center on any- 
body's team. Bill Alderson took up where he 
left off in football in assuming managerial duties 
of the basketball team. 



SOFTBALL TEAM 



These lads proved to be 
tops when it came to play- 
ing softball — even if they 
did lose to Sewanee. From 
the left, {first row) U. G. 
Carter, D. H. Irwin, Frank 
Joffrion, Doug Feagan, {sec- 
ond row) Roy Bates, Guy 
Elmore, E. S. Childers, Paul 
Connair, R. G. Roberts, El- 
mer Barnes, R. C. McCain, 
C. R. Edwards, N. B. New- 
man and D. B. Eblen. 




VL NAVY HYMN 



Eternal Father, strong to save, 

Whose arm doth bind the restless wave, 

Who bidd'st the mighty ocean deep, 

Its own appointed limits keep, 

Oh hear us when we cry to thee 

For those in peril on the sea. 

Lord, guard and guide the men who fly 
Through all great spaces of the sky, 
Be with them traversing the air, 
In darkning storms and sunlight fair, 
Oh hear us when we lift our prayer 
For those in peril in the air. 

Oh Trinity of love and power, 
Our brethren shield in dangers hour, 
From rock and tempest, fire and foe, 
Protect them whereso-ere they go, 
Thus ever let there rise to thee 
Glad hymns of praise from air and sea. 




%e ORGANIZATIONS 







SPATULA 



OFFICERS 

President _ I'Belle Whitman 

Vice-President Magdalene Wade 

Secretary ... _ — Ruth Newman 

Treasurer .... Lillie Mazzare 

Reporter _ ...Carolyn McLendon 



MEMBERS 



Marie Nesmith 
Imogene Friel 

TOMMIE RriNHARDT 
MoNTEZ HARTSILL 

Ruth Newman 
Jane Scofield 



Sara Norred 

Carolyn McLendon 
I'Belle Whitman 
Magdalene Wade 
Jean Wright 

Johnnie Crotwell 



Juanita Hayes 
Lillie Mazzare 
Mary Lancaster 

Jeanette Cornelius 

Martha Stuart 

Lura Drye 



Jean Gulledge 
Frances Bell 
Joyce DeLay 
Bernice Greer 
Laura Doan 



Spatula is one of the newest clubs on the campus. It 
was organized last fall to form a membership in the Na- 
tional Pharmacy Sorority, Kappa Epsilon. 

The goal of Spatula is to promote professional fellowship 
and to unify its members in their broadest interpretation. 



Scholarship, Character and sincere interest in Pharmacy are 
the basis of its membership. Outstanding speakers and 
frequent informal get-togethers make its meetings popular. 
Mrs. Richards, wife of the Dean of Pharmacy and a fem- 
inine "pill-roller" at heart, is faculty advisor for Spatula. 



TILE AND MORTAR 



OFFICERS 

Presidents Feagin Burns, Elbery Herring 

Vice-Presidents Magdalene Wade, Harrison Williams 

Secretaries . Jean Wright, Bobby Burns 

Treasurers ....Jean Wright, Bobby Burns 



MEMBERS 



Fi agin Burns 
David Barksdale 
Frances Bell 
Bobby Burns 
Laura Doan 
Johnnie Crotwell 
Bernice Greer 
James Galbreath 
Montez Hartsill 
Elbrey Herrinc 



Carolyn McLendon 
Jake Matson 
LrLLre Mazzara 
Harry New 
Ruth Newman 
Jack Pannell 
Paul Putman 
Jane Scofield 
Magdaline Wade 
I'Beli.e Whitman 



Harrison Williams 
Jean Wright 
Juanita Hayes 

Martha Nell Stuart 
Marie Nesmith 
Janet Cornelius 
Imogene Freil 
Jean Gulledge 
Sara Norred 



Joyce DeLay 

tommie reinhardt 
Jack Dorrough 
Mary Lancaster 
Hugh Haden 
Dr. Hadley 
Dr. Richards 
Dr. Oltve 



These junior "pill-rollers" boast of the largest organiza- 
tion in the science department. Entering other campus ac- 
tivities and trying to get off their required work make 
them about the busiest people around, still they find time 



to keep up with the modern pharmacy world through 
meetings and activities under the skillful guidance of Dr. 
Hadley, Olive and Richards of the Pharmacy Department. 





CHI ALPHA SIGMA 



OFFICERS 

President Robert Smith 

Vice-President Bobby Burns 

Secretary Howard Clark 

Treasurer. _ ...Howard Clark 

MEMBERS 



Ruth Newman 
Jimmy Wood 
Howard Clark 
Silvia Pincus 
Robert Smith 



Bobby Burns 
Nellie Friel 
Nash Collier 
Dr. Wilcox 
Dr. John Xan 



If there is any one organization which claims for its 
membership the geniuses on the campus, it is Chi Alpha 
Sigma, honorary fraternity for Chemistry majors. 



For obvious reasons, the members of this organization arc 
few in number — but "the people's choice" for among them 
may be your Madame Curie or your John Xan of tomor- 
row. 



ALPHA EPSILON DELTA 



OFFICERS 

President... _ Mary Louise Wrenn 

Vice-president. Robert Lauderdale 

Secretary Marian Harris 

Treasurer Doris Jean Sturgis 

MEMBERS 



Doris Sturcis 
Marian Harris 

Sylvia Grasberger 



Bessie Carson 
Georgia Smith 

Mary Louise Wrenn 



Robert Lauderdale 

Ira Lee Myers 

R. A. Smith 



Alpha Epsilon Delta is the honorary pre-medical fra- 
ternity on the campus. It has as its purposes to encourage 
excellence in pre-medical work by furnishing a goal toward 
which the student may strive during the early semesters 
of his or her pre-medical career, to bind together similarly 
interested students, to act as a force in crystalizing any 
movement for the good of the pre-medical student, and to 



bridge the gap between the spirit of the pre-medical school 
and that of the school of medicine. 

The first chapter of Alpha Epsilon Delta was formed at 
the University of Alabama in 1926, and the second chapter, 
the Alabama Beta, was organized at Howard in 1928. 

During the year Alpha Epsilon Delta held several open 
meetings with prominent Birmingham doctors as speakers. 
The annual banquet was held June 1, at the Tutwiler Hotel. 






OFFICERS 


' 


President 


- -.— 


James Pittman 


. 


First Vice-President 


Robert Smith 


( 


Second Vice-President 




Harry New 




Secretary 




Hugh Morris 




Sgt.-at-Arms 




George Mandy 



The purpose of Alpha Phi Omega, National Service fra- 
ternity, is to "assemble college men in the fellowship of the 
Scout Oath and Law, to develop friendship and to promote 
service to humanity". The four fields of activity in which 
the services are delivered are: Student body and faculty, 
youth and community, members of the fraternity, and the 
nation as participating citizens. Alpha Phi Omega has a 
unique place to fill and if true to its colors and if it redupli- 
cates its past, it shall fill it well. 



MEMBERS 



Billy Adams 
Bill Brown 
Walter Byars 
Hovx ard Clark 
Raymond Cosby 
Robert Duncan 
Poyd Franklin 
Bob Gilliland 
Wendell Givens 
Frank Harrison 
Walter Herndon 
George Mandy 



Terry Monroe 
Hugh Morris 
Harry New 
Lionel Patton 
James Pittman 
Paul Sanderson 
Robert Thompson 
Dr. Wilcox 

(Faculty Advisor) 
Dr. Owens 

(Faculty Advisor) 



ALPHA PHI 
OMEGA 




£tfc.ta 




J~m, f'~ *J 





KAPPA PHI KAPPA 



OFFICERS 

President Hugh vanEaton 

Vice-President Edward Ashley 

Secretary John Oakes 

Treasurer Robert Lauderdale 

Faculty Advisor Prof. O. S. Causey 








MEMBERS 




Edward Ashley 


Forrest Hicks 


John Oakes 


Garfield Bassett 


Hugh Haden 


Kirby Pickle 


William Brown 


Frank Hixon 


George Threadgill 


Hugh vanEaton 


Robert Lauderdale 





Believing that true education is the key to that better world we all want, Kappa Phi Kappa 
members arc chosen on the basis of character, qualities of leadership and qualities of scholarship. 
This national professional education fraternity iias also as a requirement for membership, a min- 
imum number of courses in the field of education and psychology. 




CHI DELTA PHI 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President.. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Betty Lee Woodcock 

Ann Hatcher 

Nell Brown 



Gladys Palmer 



MEMBERS 



Jo Ann Templeton 
Gladys Palmer 
Ann Hatcher 
Gladys Weese 



Jeannette Counts 
Betty Lee Woodcock 
Gay Daniel 
Jane Jordan 



Miriam Gann 
Nell Brown 

Mildred Blankenship 
Joy Boyd Patton 



Chi Delta Phi, national honorary literary sorority is 
dedicated to the promotion of interest in writing on the 
campus. 

During the past year the members, who are required to 
submit an original manuscript to a board of judges before 
being elected to membership, held many informal meetings 



for the purpose of reading and discussing the merits of 
their various writing attempts. 

It is the opinion of the members of Chi Delta Phi that 
the fullest advancement in writing is achieved through 
suggestions and criticism. 



PI KAPPA THETA 



OFFICERS 

President _ Forrest Hicks 

Vice-President .. _ Jimmie Dolvin 

Secretary _ _ Jo Ann Templeton 

Treasurer.. Ronald Weathers 

Reporter Miriam Gann 

Vacuity .\di 'nor..- - J. F. Rothermel 



MEMBERS 



Mary Jo Cockki i i 
Mary Neix Pass 
Edward Ashley 
Tommie Johnson 
Mary Ann Boswi i i 



l'oi i v Cochran 
Jo Gr wis 

Louise Hardin 

Mary Ann Allison 



Forrest Hicks 

Ronald Weathers 
Jo Ann Templeton 
Ji anne Vann 
Miriam Gann 



Betty Lee Woodcock 
Rllett Maxwell 
Dick Seaver 
Jimmie Dolvin 



Trips to Shangri-la, riding the old mill wheel, visiting 
interesting Birmingham night scenes, a new constitution 
and initiation service, the largest group of Naval and civilian 
students — these arc a few of the headliners in this year's 
history of the "pavement pounders," better known as the 
Pi Kappa Theta members. 



A journalistic group, they are the students who find the 
news — or better still, the ones who make the news. A 
potpourri if there ever was one, there's never a dull moment 
with the Pi Kappa Thetas. 





Y. W. C. A. 

OFFICERS 

Presidents Annte Lee Golden, Virginia Ingram 

Vice-Presidents Virginia Ingram, Vernice McIntosh 

Secretaries Gladys Weese, Mary Jo Cockrell 

Chairman of Freshmen Commission ...Louise McGinty 

Reporter Miriam Gann 

Program Chairman Margaret Montgomery 



Young Women Christian Association is a non denomina- 
tional organization which seeks to bring about a closer 
understanding among the women students on the campus. 
This year the "Y" has served its purpose well under the 
leadership of the two successive presidents, Annie Lee Golden 
and Virginia Ingram. 



Y. M. C. A. 



OFFICERS 

Presidents, _ Loyd Moon, Earl Potts 

Vice-Presidents Bill Culbreath, Ruedy Lockerby 

Secretaries - _.Ruedy Lockerby, Loyd Moon 

Treasurers ....Hubert Ray, Frank Hixon 

Reporters ._._ BrLL Brown, Page Kelley 

Social Chairman — — ; .Raymond Cosby 



The Y.M.C.A. holds to the philosophy that the most 
useful persons are those who seek a maximum spiritual, 
mental, and social development. With this in mind, the 
Howard College "Y" seeks to unite male students of all 
denominations in social and religious activities. 





PI GAMMA Ml! 



OFFICERS 

President Gay Daniel 

Secretary.^ Ann Hatcher 

Treasurer . Cecil Little 

Vacuity Advisor Mrs. I. R. Obenchain 



MEMBERS 



Gay Daniel 

\l vrtha Miller 
Lucy Lade 

( il \dys Weese 
Frances Duke 



Efro Gatsis 
Ann Hatch] r 
Cecil Little 

Jane Crosm i y 

Mary Anni McGee 



Virginia MiHaiiiy 
Joyce Turki ntini 
Mary Brooks 



Pi Gamma Mu is the National Honor Society of Social 
Science. Students having a minimum of twenty hours in 
this field and who have a 2. average are eligible upon the 
recommendation and approval of faculty members and 



members of Pi Gamma Mu for membership. The purpose 
of this organization is to attain a scientific approach to the 
study and solution of human problems through study of 
economics, history, political science, and sociology. 



WOMEN CHRISTIAN VOLUNTEERS 



OFFICERS 



President _ 

Vice-President 

Set retary-Treasurer 

Reporter 



Margaret Montgomery 

Beth Kelli ■■ 

Madolyn Vernon 

Dorothy Moon 



MEMBERS 



Nonie Simons 
Martha Thomas 
Ruby Cato 
Juanita Arnold 
Dorothy Hargitt 
Theresa Franks 



Mary Burson 

Mary Elizabeth Darling 
Dorothy Cambron 
Eyra Dell Petrea 
Iva Nell Hurt 
Evelyn Winter 



Velorese Harper 
Doris Teagui 

Virginia Heifner 
Margurite Johnson- 
Beth Kelley 

Katherine Davidson 



Mamie Lee Carroll 

WaRI NE WlNGARD 



Helen Judy 

Madolyn Vernon 
Dorothy Mullican 
Twink Wilis 

Annie Lee Golden 
Dorothy Warren 



These girls are not banded together for airing narrow 
minded views on piety and social conditions, but meet to- 
gether to try in an organized way to put their Christianity 
in practice. This year they have been very active under the 



leadership of Margaret Montgomery, starting work at the 
Juvenile court, and keeping up a mission. The group is 
made up of girls who have volunteered their services to tne 
Lord in various fields of work. 








MISSION BAND 

OFFICERS 

President Harvey Matthews 

Vice-President Martha Thomas 

Secretary Archie White 

Treasurer Gay Daniel 

Reporter — -..- , -Beth Kelley 



The Mission Band was organized on Howard campus by 
those students interested in mission work. It is made up 
not only of those students who are preparing to be mission- 
aries, but those who are interested in knowing about the 
work and supporting it. 

Part of the work of the Mission Band is supporting and 



working in various missions about Birmingham. Each year 
missionaries from different fields are invited to speak to 
this group. 

This organization does not have the conventional "roll" 
but is made up of volunteers. The above picture includes 
those who are active in mission work. 



MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 



Mack Harpir, Edward Ashley 



OFFICERS 

Presidents _ 

Vice-Presidenti 

First Ralph Longshore, John Oakes 

Second _ John Bob Riddle, Harvey Matthews 

Secretaries _ _ ._ ___Cecel Little, Ramond Cosby 

Treasurers Bob Jeffers, Lloyd Moon 

Pianist.. Leland Tindal 

Choristers Frank. Rains, Ralph Longshore 



MEMBERS 



Rex Dickey 
Archie White 
Q. P. Davis 

Mason Bondurant 
Bob Jeffers 
Nelson Duke 
Earl Potts 
John Bob Riddle 
Cosby Hall 
Forrest Hicks 
Leland Tindal 
William Simerall 
Marvin Hare 



Don Edwards 
George Brown 
Billy Gamble 
Robert Brown 
Edward Ashley 
Earnest Mickler 
Robert Thompson 
Raymond Cosby 
J. B. Jackson 
Mack Harper 
Lamar Davis 
Louis Cobbs 

ruedy lockerby 

Bill 



Ted Seals 
John Oakes 

George Sparkman 
Frank Morrison 
Frederick Kelley 
Tom Coleman 
William Glaze 
Hugh Morris 

Hugh VanEaton 
Glenn Dismukes 
Bill Carlson 

Jimmy Anderton 
Cecil Little 
Culbreath 



Lloyd Moon 
Sigurd Bryan 

William Allen Poe 
Ralph Longshore 
Harvey Matthews 
Frank Rains 

Verrell Wofford 
Page Kelley 

Clifton Corley 

Robert Hornbuckle 
Calvin Forrester 
Hugh Chambliss 
Billy Adams 





BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 

1944 OFFICERS 

President Sue Pa i rii k 

First Vice-President Doris Shelby 

Second Vice-President... .._ Louise McGinty 

Third Vice-President ..._ . Nelson Duke 

Secretary _. _ Mildred Blankenship 

Treasurer Kathryn Davidson 

Pastor John Bob Riddle 

Prayer Meetings..... Margaret Montgomery 

Prayer Room and Prayer Mates Bessie Lee Edmondson, Annie Lee Golden 

Music Chairman Eyra Dell Petrea 

Navy Representatives Ruedy Lockerby and Lewis Cobbs 

B.S.U. Magazine Representative. — Don Edwards 

Sunday School Representative Ruth Faucett 

Training Union Director Madolyn Vernon 

Friendship Circle Chairman _ Ruth Thomas 

W.C.V. President - Joyce Brown 

Y.W.A.. — - - - Mamie Lee Carroll 

Mission Band - .....Cecil Little 

Ministerial Assot iation President ...Lewis Marler 

Reporter.... - ..Miriam Gann 

Vacuity Advisor Dr. John Xan 

Ridgecrest Chairman Fannie Ruth Thomason 

College Pastors Dr. J. C. Stivender, Rev. Phil Maxwell 



Believing education not to be preparation for 
life, but in itself a way of living, the Baptist Stu- 
dent Union seeks to make that way of living an 
abundant one. By including in its council repre- 



sentatives from all organizations connected with 
the Baptist church, B.S.U. coordinates its activi- 
ties into one great effort. 



BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 



1945 OFFICERS 

P resilient . Nelson Duke 

First Vice-President Louise McGinty 

Second Vice-President Fannie Ruth Thomason 

Third Vice-President Page Kelley 

Secretary Dorothy Warren 

Treasurer ..._ Helen Judy 

Pastor Chairman Hazel Adams 

Prayermates Juanita Arnold 

Music Chairman . Sigurd Bry \n 

Navy Representative _. Louis Cobbs 

B.S.U. Magazine Representative . Don Edwards 

Typist Martha Jones 

Prayer Room Chairman Flora Lou Thomas 

Sunday School Representative Margaret Ann Sargent 

Traming Union Director.-.. Madolyn Vernon 

Frii ndship Circle ...Twink Wells, Gerry Mitchell, Margie Godwin 

W.C.V. President ... .... Margaret Montgomery 

Y.W.A. Wilma Awbrey 

M/^ion Band Harvey Matthews 

Ministerial Association Presidents ...Mack Harper, Ed Ashley 

Reporter — Billie Jean Young, Earl Potts 

Facility Ad i isor Dr. John Xan 



B.S.U. has proved itself unsurpassable in the 
social realm by giving on the largest scale the 
most entertaining parties and beautiful banquets 
of any organization on the campus. 

And in our minds will ever bv those unforgct- 



able memories of beginning a day with meditation 
and prayer in Morning Watch. What is this thing 
which links the college student with the church, 
and strengthens the bond between Baptist stu- 
dents? It's nothing new, it's the SPIRIT of B.S.U'. 





A CAPPELLA CHDIR 



MEMBERS 



Mildred Arledge 
Yivhx Barnes 

Mary Jo Cockrell 
Polly Covington 
Rex Dickey 
Donald Edwards 
Nina Fay Farr 
Sara Garrett 
Cosby Hall 

Annie L. Harrison 



Forrest Hicks 
Frank Hixon 
Bill Jenkins 

Margurite Johnson 
Jo Ann Jordan 
Christine Kincaid 
Neil Lovett 
Louise Massey 
Jerry Monroe 



Gene Morris 
Margie Orr 
Lionel Patton 
Joy Patton 

Dorothy Perkinson 
Martha Purser 

loretta rosebrough 
Emaline Ryan 
Paul Sanderson 



Dot Saylor 
Ted Seals 

Robert Smith 

George Sparkman 
Margie Thompson 
Robi rt Thompson 
Janyce Ward 

Ronald Weathers 
Nanette Wood 



Howard's A Cappella Choir, one much in demand by the 
city churches, has had to give up its frequent Sunday night 



tours for the duration. Still Howard chapel programs 
arc enriched by their colorful voices and robes of the choir. 



GLEE 



CLUB 



MEMBERS 

MRS. KATHLEEN S. MARTINSON, Director of Glee Club and Choir 



Shirlly Anderson 
Mason Bondurant 
Johnnie Crotwell 
Elaine Denley 
Frances Dorn 
Don Edwards 
Martha Purser 
Emaline Ryan 
Margaret Morton 
Louise McGinty 
loretta rosebrough 



Norma Lou Kirk 
Nellie Dykes 
Madalene Hazel 
Flora Lou Thomas 
Jo Ann Templeton 
Cosby Hall 
Marian Harris 
Mary Ann Allison 
Theresa Franks 
Sara Garrett 
Sarah King 



George Sparkman 

Bettysu Bozeman 

Mildred Arledge 

Janyce Ward 

Chris Kincaid 

Gene Morris 

Frances Bell 

Annie Laurie Harrison 

Nannette Wood 

Forrest Hicks 

Jo Ann Jordan 



Mary George Mangum 
Louise Massey 
Marie Nunneley 
Marjorie Orr 
Mary Belle Hilliard 
Margie Thompson 
Tommie Johnson 
Mary Ann Boswell 
Mary Jo Cockrell 
Dot Saylor 
Iva Nell Hurt 



War has brought a change here, too, in that the girls 
glee club now finds itself in demand for many more pro- 
grams. 



The members present attractive pictures of Howard's 
Betty co-ed in their colorful evening outfits. And don't let 
anybody fool you, they sound just as good as they look. 





WHO'S WHO X J, 



mencan 
lAniuerdities 



a y^oiU 



eaes 



9 



Howard has eleven highly honored students this year — 
those whose biographies are to appear in the annual publi- 
cation, "Who's Who In American Universities and Col- 
leges". 

Being named in "Who's Who" is more than an honor, 
some of the students have discovered recently. The organi- 
zation which sponsors the book, will make an active effort 
to help students find occupation in the position which they 
most desire. 



Latest work of the group is the planning list which 
purports to aid returning war veterans in occupational re- 
adjustment and situation. Students elected to "Who's 
Who" chosen by a special faculty committee were as fol- 
lows: Page Kelley, Nelson Duke, Louise Hardin, Miriam 
Gann, Frances Young, Virginia Ingram, Eyra Dell Peirea, 
Paul Sanderson, Billy Adams, Mildred Blankenship, and 
Nell Brown 



DIETETICS CLUB 



OFFICERS 

f resident - - - Marie Nunneli.ly 

Vice-President — — Dorothy Saylor 

Secretary Betty Griffin 

Tieasurei Jo Cochran 

MEMBERS 



WlLDA GOSS 

Joyce Turrentine 
Betty Griffin 
Jo Cochran 

Marie Nunnelley 



Louise Massey 
Jimmie Doivin 
Frances Young 
Dorothy Saylor 
Jerry Cole 



Margaret Ann Miller 
Betty Miller 

Fannie Grammas 
Linda Lee 

Janyce Ward 



Mrs. Ann Green 
Miss Elizabeth Jacobs, 
Faculty Advisor. 



To the innumerable charms of the "southern belle", 
these girls are adding that of the "tasty" art of cooking. 
If you haven't dined with the girls at one of their famous 
luncheons, then you should choose your friends more care- 
fully. Other than courses in meal planning and table serv- 



ice, this organization give dietetics majors a chance to pur- 
sue further their research in nutrition. 

Other activities include sending representatives Marie 
Nunnelly, president and Dot Saylor, vice-president, to the 
Student Workshop program at Auburn; and knitting for 
refugees. 





KAPPA PI 

OFFICERS 

President „ Eyra Dell Petrea 

Vice-President Jane Crossley 

Secretary Betty Lee Woodcock 

Treasurer Shirley Anderson 

Reporter and Historian __ Lionel Patton 

MEMBERS 

Eyra Dell Petrea Betty Lee Woodcock Bessie Lee Edmonson Mary George Mangum 

Jane Crossley Lionel Patton Twinette Wells Shirley Anderson 

Alpha Alpha chapter of Kappa Pi, national honorary art fraternity, established on our campus in 
1940, is dedicated to the advancement of artistic talent. 



MASQUERS 



OFFICERS 

President Jeannette Counts 

Vice-President Nell Brown 

Secretary Sara King 

Treasurer .. _ Mary Ann McGee 



MEMBERS 



Jeanette Counts 
Sara King 
Marjorie Apperson 
Elaine Denley 
Mary Ruth Riddick 
Nell Brown 



Vivian Barnes 
Mary Ann McGee 
Gay Daniel 
Mary Ann Allison 
Jane Jordan 
Charlie Doyle 



Jerry Monroe 
Mildred Blankenship 
Loyd Moon 
Hazel Adams 
Jo Cochran 
Hugh Morris 



Bonnie Weaver 
Betty Lee Woodcock 
Joyce Turrentine 
Margaret Ann Miller 
Polly Cochran 
Shirley Anderson 



Bob Knight 





HYPATIA 



Yellow roses on a May morning are a tradi- 
tional sight at Howard College. Hypatia, highest 
honor society for women on the East Lake Cam- 
pus holds the annual tapping services in front of 
Main Building the first Wednesday in May. 

As a girl who exemplifies the highest qualities 
of Hypatia is tapped, a corsage of yellow roses 
is placed on her shoulder, signifying that she 
meets the requirements of the group — scholarship, 



leadership, character and promise of future use- 
fulness. 

A girl who has been elected a member of this 
organization has received the highest honor which 
her classmates can bestow upon her. She is looked 
up to as an example of an ideal Howard College 
co-ed and is expected to do her life's work to the 
best of her ability, whether it be that of a doc- 
tor, a newspaper woman, a teacher or a housewife. 



Louise Hardin 
Gladys Weese 
Mildred Blankenship 



MEMBERS 

Nell Brown Lucie Lade 

Eyra Dell Petrea Miriam Gann 

Gay Daniel Ann Hatcher 

Mary fo Cockrell 



Mary Ann McGee 
Betty Lee Woodcock 
Martha Purser 



TRIDENT 



Trident, the highest honor society for men on 
the campus, taps men from the junior class who 
meet its standards in the three fields of scholar- 
ship, leadership, and esteem of students and fac- 
ulty. 

One of the unforgettable thrills enjoyed by the 



entire student body is experienced during the im- 
pressive tapping ceremony when Trident taps an 
unsuspecting man in the audience. This year, 
under the accelerated program, Trident tapped 
twice. In the fall tapping, seven men, including 
two seamen, were added to Trident. 



Paul Sanderson 
Page Kelley 

Hugh vanEaton 
Nelson Duke 



MEMBERS 

Sigurd Bryan 

A S O. R. Kennedy 
A/S J. E. Nutty 
John Oakes 



Loyd Moon 

William H. Badgley 

Hugh Haden 

Nash Collier 

(Faculty Advisor) 







tiki* 





0*, ALMA MATER 



Oh, Howard, Alma Mater true, 

I love thy glorious name, deserving every honor due 

To an unsullied fame. 

I'll love thee through each fleeting breath 

For all that thou has done, 

And in the agonies of death 

Be still thy loving son. 

Oh, Alma Mater, dear, thy life 

A treasure is to me: 

Thou, Phoenix fair, through flames and strife, 

Hast shown thy right to be. 

Since poverty has made thee rich 

And struggle made thee strong, 

I view thee in thy self-made niche, 

And burst to filial song. 

Oh, parent true, the future fair 

Must hold but good for thee, 

For hope's fruition waits thee there 

In blest reality. 

And sons like thine will make thee shine 

With glory all thine own, 

And bring to thy maternal shrine 

Not gifts of gold alone. 

Words by Dr. G. W. Macon, '84 
Music by Prof. Paul DeLaunay 




MCI 



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we 



do 




k 



aue 



CLASSES 





GLADYS WEESE, PAUL SANDERSON, BILLIE JEAN YOUNG, BILL JENKINS 

3L SENIOR CLASS 



CLASS OFFICERS 

Presidents Gladys Weese, Hugh vanEaton 

Vice-Presidents __ __ Paul Sanderson, Frances Young 

Secretaries Billie Jean Young, Jimmie Dolvin 

Treasurers Bill Jenkins, Ralph Longshore 

Senators Frances Young, Gay Daniel, 

Mary Louise Wrenn, Nelson Duke, 
Eyra Dell Petrea, John Oakes 



JU Ylou, We JC 



now 



"there can no great smoke arise but 
there must be some fire, no great report 
without great suspicion. Frame, there- 
fore, your lives to such integrity, your 
studies to the attaining of such perfec- 
tion, that neither the malice of the strong, 
neither the malice of the weak, neither 
the swift reports of the ignorant be able 
to spot you with dishonesty or note you 



of ungodliness. The greatest harm that 
you can do unto the envious, is to do 
well; the greatest corasive that you can 
give unto the ignorant is to prosper in 
knowledge; the greatest comfort that you 
can bestow on your parents is to live well, 
and learn well; the greatest commodity 
that you can yield unto your country is 
with wisdom to bestow that talent that 
by grace was given you. . ." 




SENIOR SNAPS 



As we remember them ... In Hypatia . . . Graduation . . . Just Norma, being quiet 
and sweet . . . B.M.O.C. (Big Men On the Campus) . . . Everybody likes 'em . . . Viv- 
ian Barnes — Journalist . . . We'll miss you . . . You tell 'er, Page . . . R.T. . . . Presi- 
dents, Inc. . . . 



Chi Delta 
i, 4. Bir- 



1>: 



3, 



BILLY VDAMS— Lambda Chi Alpha I, 4; Min. Vssoc, I. :. !, 4; Pres.dcm „l 

-i.uKnt Bod) 4. 1. \l (. \, i. 2, • , 4. Birmingham, Ala. 
SHIRI1Y ANDERSON-Alpha Delta I', 1. 2, >. 4 : Kappa Pi 3, 4; Masquers 4; 

Berkeley Square Cast; Sec'j Alph., Delta Pi 4; Crimson Stall I Glee Club- 

V. \V. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 
CHARLES EDWARD \siiliy Religion; Min. Vssoc. Birmingham, Ala. 
WILLIAM \RI\lls BAKER— Lambda (I,, Alpha; Pre-Med; Chi V P ha S,g„,a, 

Sec") I a mini a (hi Alpha '- ; Pres. Lambda (hi Alpha 4; Senator 4. Birming- 

liani, Ala. 

VIRGINIA (I \IRI BAILEY- Economi Delta Zetaj Y W A- Y W C A 

I. :. I, 4; II. S. U. Council 2. 4. Hartsclle, Ala. 
GUY GARFIELD BASSETT— H/j/ory— Kappa Phi Kappa; Min. Assoc.; Square and 
' i"' i" ( lub. Roanoke, Via. 

MILDRED VIRGINIA BLANKENSHIP- English— Treas. Y. W C A 

1111 ''■ s U. ( .uncil i; llvpat, a 4; W. (. V.; \V . A. A. I, J. 

mingham, Ala. 
MASON ETHRIDG1 BONDURANT— Religion— A Cappella; Glee (lub; Crimson 

Staff. I airfield, Ala. 

\I\RY CORDELIA BROOKS— Economics— Transferred from B'ham.-Sou 

Beta Phi. Birmingham, Ala. 
MABE1 rOVCl BROWN Religion— W. S. A.; Mission Band; W C V 1 

4; Y. W. A.j Y. W. C. A. 1. 2, 3, 4. Montgomery, Ala. 
LEILA NEL1 BROWN— Speech— Masquers; Chi Delta Phi; Beta Pi Theta 4; 

Hypatia 4; Who's Who in A. C. U. Birmingham, Ala. 
Il\(,l\ BURNS— Pharmacy— Pi Ka PP a Alpha. Tarrant Ala 
Hiss < VRSON— English— A. E. D. Birmingham, Ala. 
POLLY COCHRAN— Pre-Med— Delta Zeta; Masquers; P, Kappa Theta; Nite Owl 

Suite; Editor "f Entre Nous MS; Scc'y Dormitory Council; Entrc Nous Staff 

' V W. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Cabinet 1; W. A. A.; B. S. U. Counsil 2. 

( enter, Ala. 

[ANI I ( ROSSLEY— Education— Phi Gama Mu. Placentia. California. 
JOHNNIE M. CROTWELL— Pharmacy— Tile & Mortar Club; Glee Club A 

Cappella Choir; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A. I, 2, 3, 4; Spatula 4; Student 

A. Ph. A. 4. Jasper, Ala. 

BILL CUI.BRETH-Rr/, X ,,,,,-Prcs. Class t; Pres. International Relations Club; 
Pres. Y. M. C. A. 3; Vice-Pres. 4; Vice-Pres. Class 2; Football; Min. 
Assoc. I, 2, 3, 4. Columbia, Ala. 

ELAINE DENLEY— History— Phi Mu; Masquers 3; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Y. W. 
C. A. I, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation 1, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 

FRANCES J. DORN— £wc//y/>— B. S. U. Council 1, 2; Glee Club 1- W C V 
I. 2; Y. W. C. A. I, 2; W. S. G. 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

GAi DANIEL— English— Sec 'y Hypatia; Entre Nous Staff 3, 4; "Most Intellec- 
tual Gtrl" 3; Y. W. C. A. I, 2, 3, 4; Mission Band; V. Pres. 2; Treas. 1, 4; 
Student Senate 3, 4; Masquers; B. S. U. L. Council 1; Chi Delta Phi; Pi 
Gamma Mu; Pres. Who's Who Among Students in Amer. Univ. & Colleges; 
W. ( . V.; Dormitory Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3. Birmingham, 
Ala. 

[IMMI1 DOLVIN— Dietetics— W. A. A. 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 2, 3, 4; Dietetics 
( lun : - *i < nmson Staff; Intramural Sports; Beauty Parade 2, 3, 4. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

NELSON DUKE— English— Min. Assoc. I, 2. 3, 4; Mission Band I. 2. S, 4; 
B. S. U. Council 1, 2, 3; Pres. 4; Student Senate 3, 4; Who's Who in 

A. C. U.; Who's Who in Entre Nous. Gadsden, Ala. 
HUGH VAN EATON— History— Kappa Phi Kappa Pres.; Trident I 

istciial Assoc; Y. M. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 
DONALD K. EDWARDS— Religion— Ministerial Assoc. 1, 2, 3, 4; Pres. 

Class 1; A Cappella I; Glee Club 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 1, 4; B S 

1, 2, 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 
MIRIAM GANN— I „, i ru a I nm— Editor of Crimson 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 1, 4; 

Y. W. A. I, 2, 1, 4; Crimson Staff I, 2; Hypatia 4; Who's Who in A. < ,'u.; 

B. S. U. L. Council; Pi Kappa Theta; Chi Delta Phi; Pi Gamma Mu; Crow's 
Nest; Entre Nous Staff. Jasper, Ala. 

ANNIE LEE GOLDEN— F„ x lh/^R. S. U. Council I, 2, 1, 4; Pres. W C V ■ 
Y ; W. (. A. I, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Mission Band, I, 2, 3, 4: 
W. S. G. Council; Dormitory Council. Shawmut, Ala. 

JOSEPHINE GRAVE;— S/, ,,>/(/. and English— -Phi Mu; Entre Nous Staff- Crim-n 
Staff; Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. I, 2, i, 4; Pi Kappa Theta 3, 4; B. S. U. 
Council; Wesleyan Guild I, 2, 3, 4. Blountsville, Ala. 

HUGH H. HADEN, JR.— Chemistry— A. E. D. 3, 4; Tile and Mortar 4; Can- 
didate for Degree with Honors; Trident 4. Summit, Ala. 



R. 



R. 



M.n- 



of 

U. 





SENIOR CLASS 




Jke 



SENIOR 




LOUISE HARDIN— English {journalism ) — Delta Zeta; Pi Kappa Theta 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Hypatia 4; Editor of Crimson 4; Who's Who in A. U. C.J B. S. U. Council; 



O. 



Entr 



No 



Staff 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 



3, 



da 



2, 



1, 



:hoi 



l, 



Vice-Pres. W. S 

Birmingham, Ala, 
MACK HARPER— H/sron — Pres. Ministerial Ass'n. 4; Choi 

3; B. S. U. Council 1, 2, 3, 4. Maplesville, Ala. 
FORREST HICKS— Englisli— Pres. Pi Kappa Theta, Ministerial Assn. 1, 2, 3, 4; 

A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Senator 4; Pres. of Class 3. 

Montgomery, Ala. 
VIRGINIA INGRAM— Economics— Beta Sigma Omicron; Pan Hellenic Pres. 4; 

Pres. Y. W. C. A. 4; Pres. B. S. U. 4; Who's Who A. U. C.j Treas. Stu- 
dent Gov't.; Howard's Who's Who 3, 4; Beauty Parade 3, 4; Intramural 

Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 
S. BERRYL JEFFREY— Biology— Phi Mu; Y. W. C. A. I. 2, 3, 4; W. A. A 1 

3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 
BILL JENKINS — Kappa Alpha; Masquers; Treas. Class 4. Birmingham, Ala. 
JO ANN JORDAN— Biology— Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 

2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 3, 4; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cappella 

and Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pres. Choir 3. Birmingham, Ala. 
JAMES F. KELLEY— iW<£/0M— Ministerial Assn. 1, 2, 3, 4. Dothan, Ala. 
PAGE H. KELLEY— Englisli— B. S. U. Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Ministerial As! 

2, 3, 4; Trident 4. Hartford, Ala. 
MYRA NONA KIRKLAND— Phi Mu; Economics Sec; Phi Mu 4; Y. W. C. A. 

1, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports Council 2, 3; Y. W. A. 

1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Pi 4; Student Senate 4; B. S. U. 1; Dormitory Council 3. 

Enterprise, Ala. 
LUCY D. LADE— Dietetics— Pi Gamma Mu; Kappa Tau; Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A.; 

W. S. G.; Hypatia Pres. 4. Norman, Okla. 
CHARLES T. LIGHTSEY— C/'fwo/ry— Chemistry Lab Instructor; Intrammil 

Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 
EDWARD CECIL LITTLE— History— Pi Gamma Mu; Mission Band 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Pres. Mission Band 3; Ministerial Assn. 1, 2, 3, 4; Moran Society I, 2, 3, 4. 

Clanton, Ala. 
RALPH LONGSHORE— History— Vice-Pres. Min. Assn. 3; Eta Beta Pi; Gadsden, 

Ala. 
ELEANOR L. LOVELL — Economics— Alpha Delta Pi. Birmingham, Ala. 
MARY GEORGE MANGUM— H/srory— Alpha Delta Pi; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Pi Pres. 3; Beauty Parade 3, 4; Glee Club 

I, 2; Dorm Council 1, 2, 3. Wingfield, Ala. 
FRANK MORRISON— English— Min. Ass'n. 1, 2, 3, 4. Clayton, Miss. 
T. LOUISE MASSEY— Die/e/irs— Delta Zeta; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cappella 

Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club; Home Ec. Club 2, 3, 4; Beauty 

Parade I, 2, 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 
MARTHA E. MILLER.— Economics— Alpha Delta Pi; Pres. Alpha Delta Pi 4; Treas 

Alpha Delta Pi 3; Vice-Pres. Pan-Hellenic 4; Wesleyan Foundation; Masquer. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
M. HUGH MORRIS— Speech— Pi Kappa Alpha; Student Senate; Alpha Phi Omega; 
Masquers; Min. Ass'n. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. Shawmut, Ala 
DOROTHY F. MYERS— English. Birmingham, Ala. 
IRA LEE MYERS — Biology— Biol. Lab. Instructor. Birmingham, Ala. 
MARY ANNE McGEE— English, History, french— Alpha Delta Pi; W. A. A. 

1, 2, 3, 4; Pres. Beta Theta 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Pres. Pan-Hellenic 
4; Masquers 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu 4. Birmingham, Ala. 

RUTH MARIE NUNNELLY— D/e/f/;cs— Delta Zeta; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Y. W. 

C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Ec. Club 2, 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 
MARGIE ORR— English — Delta Zeta; Beauty Parade 2, 3, 4; A Cappella Choir 

2, 3, 4; Glee Club I, 2, 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 

MARY NELL PASS— English— Phi Mu; Pres. Phi Mu 4; Sect'y. Phi Mu 3; Die- 
tetics Club I; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Pres. Dormi- 
tory Council 4; Ass't. Editor Entre Nous 4; Nite Owl; Crimson Staff 3, 4; 
B. S. U. 1, 2, 3, 4; Beauty Parade 3, 4; H-Day 3; Miss Howard 4; B. S. U. 
L. Council. Blountsville, Ala. 

SUE PATRICK— English— Delta Zeta: Sect'y. Delta Zeta 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 

3, 4; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Dormitory Council 2, 3; B. S. U. Council 2, 3; 
Pres. 4; Masquers 3; Pres. 4; Student Senate 3; W. S. G. 3; Pan-Hellenic 3. 
Scottsboro, Ala. 

JOY BOYD PATTON— Englislj— Chi Delta Phi; Crimson Staff 3, 4; Entre Nous 
Staff 3, 4; W. C. V. 3, 4; Transfer from Baylor University in Texas. 
Madisonville, Kentucky. 



CLASS * * ** 



~T1 



E. LIONEL PATTON — Religion — Alpha Phi Omega; Square and Compass Club; 
Y. M. C. A. I, 2, 3, 4; Boy's Glee Club 1, 2; Kappa Kappa. Henagar, Ala. 

EYRA DELI PETREA— Economics— IS. S. U. Music Chm. 1, 2. 4; Poster Chm. 3; 
Y. W. C. A. I, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. A. 1. 2. '. 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 4; A Cappelh 
Choir I, 2; Kappa Pi 3, 4; Hypatia; Historian 4; Student Senate 4. Greens- 
boro, N. C. 

JACOB HUBERT RAY— Englislj— Ministerial Assoc. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 

1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Phi Omega; Mission Band 1, 2, 3, 4. Gordo, Ala. 
MARY RUTH RIDDICK— Englislj— Phi Mu; Masquers; B. S. U. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. 

W. C. A. 1. 2, 3, 4; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Lab. Instructor. 

Milton, W. Va. 

PAUL E. SAXDFRSON-£»xlnJ- Trident Pres. 4; Alpha Pi Omega 4; Howard 

Red Cross Chapter; Ministerial Assoc. Birmingham, Ala. 
MARY H. SARTAIN— English— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; W. C. V.; B. S. U. 

Sect'y 3; Glee Club 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 
IIWrL F. SCHVPEINEBRATEN— £»g/;i/j— Delta Zeta; Pres. W. S. C; Wesleyan 

Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Pi. Birmingham, Ala. 
HORTEZ A. SEALS— Religion and History. Birmingham, Ala. 
FRANCES D. SHARMAN— English— A Cappella I, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, :-, 

4; Crimson Staff 1; Secretary of Senior Class. Birmingham, Ala. 
BETTY A. SIMONTON— English— Dela Zeta; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Kappa 

Theta; Wesleyan Foundation. Birmingham, Ala. 
NONIE SIMMONS— Englis/j— Alpha Delta Pi; Vice-Pres. Alpha Delta Pi; Pres. 

Beta P. Theta; Pres. W. S. G.; Y. W. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 
DORIS ELAINE SHELBY— Englis/y—R. S. U. Council 3, 4; Mission Band 1, 2. 

3, 4; Y. W. A.; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. Fairfield, Ala. 
GENE ELTON SMITH— Beta Sigma Omicron; Sec'y 1, Treas. 2; Asst. Rush 

Captain 3; Treas. Student Govt. 3; Y. W. C. A.; Finance Com. 3; Dietetics 

Club I, 2, 3, 4. Pinson, Ala. 
MARTHA L. THOMAS— Religion— Mission Band; Y. W. A.; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 

3, 4; B. S. U. Council 2. Mobile, Ala. 
ZELMA RUTH THOMAS— Biology— Delta Zeta; W. A. A.; Vice-Pres. Dorm. 

Council; B. S. U. Council 2, 3; Y. W. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Student Senate -". 

Scottsboro, Ala. 
ANNIE RUTH THORNTON— Economics— Beta Sigma Omicron; Pan-Hellenic i, 

4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-Pres. Beta Sigma Omicron. Birmingham, 

Ala. 
C 1 )RGE G. THREADGILL— English— Min. Assoc; Phi Kappa Phi 3, 4; Y. M. 

C. A. I, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2. Irondale, Ala. 
\V. M. TUCKER— Englis/j— Glee Club 4; A Cappella 4. Cullman, Ala. 
JOYCE MAY TURRENTINE— D:ere/<rs— Alpha Delta Pi; Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 

3, 4; Glee Club 2; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Alexandria, Va. 
MAGDALENE WADE— Pharmacy — Transferred from Vanderbilt; Vice-Pres. Spa- 
tula Club; Vice-Pres. Tile and Mortar Club; Y. W. A.; Y. W. C. A. 

Jr. A. A. V. W. Nashville, Tenn. 
JANYCE WARD— Home Economics— Alpha Delta Pi; Treas. Alpha Delta Pi 4 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; A Cappella 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Ec. Club 2, 3, 4; Trea. 

Home Ec. Club 3; Y. W. A. and Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala 
LAURA MAE WHITING— English— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; W. C. V. 1, 2, 3, 4 

B. S. U. Birmingham, Ala. 
I'BELLE WHITMAN— Pharmacy— Delta Zeta; Sweetheart of Pi Kappa Phi 3, 4 

Dorm. Council 3; Tile and Mortar Club I, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. 3, 4; Y. W. A 

and Y. W. C. A. I, 2, 3, 4; Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Council 3, 4; Cheer 

Leader 3, 4; Spatula 3, 4; Beauty Parade 3, 4; Vice-Pres. Pan-Hellen 

Sweetheart of Navy V-12 3; Entre Nous Who's Who 4. Elba, Ala. 
MARY JO WHITTEN— Ens/isA— Delta Zeta; Wesleyan Foundation. Birmingh 

Ala. 
GLADYS WEESE—Englis/j— Delta Zeta; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, : 

Club; Chi Delta Phi; Board of Publication; Hypatia 4. B: 
RUTH WOFFORD— Englislj— Glee Club; Y. W. C. A. Boaz, Ala. 
MARY LOUISE WRENN— B<o/o«y— Alpha Delta Pi Pres.; Vice-Pres. Alpha Delta 

Pi 3; Sec'y of A. E. D. 3; Pres. of A. E. D. 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Chemistry 

Lab. Asst. Birmingham, Ala. 
BILLIE JEAN YOUNG— Spanislj— Phi Mu; Transfer from Ala. College; Crimson 

Staff 3; Beauty Parade 3; B. S. U. Council 4; Y. W. A. 2, 4; Masquers 4; 

International Relations Club 3; Sec'y Senior Class. Columbiana, Ala. 
FRANCES YOUNG — Biology— Delta Zeta; Pres. Delta Zeta; Dream Girl of Lambda 

Chi Alpha 3; Dietetics Club; Intramural Sports; Pan-Hellenic 3; W. A. A.; 

Pres. of Sophomore Class. Birmingham, Ala. 



gham. 



Book Lover's 
ham, Aia. 




^Jke 




SENIOR CLASS 




FORREST HICKS, LOYD MOON, WILMA AWBREY, TW1NK WELLS 



VL JUNIORS 



OFFICERS 

President- Forest Hicks 

Vice-President ..... ...Loyd Moon 

Secretary Wilma Awbrey 

Treasurer... Twink Wells 

Senators ... Kathryn Davidson, John Bob Riddle, Dorothy Warren 



\Um 



We are the juniors. We are that undistinguished group of individ- 
uals who enjoy neither the expectation with which freshmen are watch- 
ed, nor the dignity which is accorded to the seniors. What we are going 
to be and do in College is already pretty well established. We hold sur- 
prises for the faculty or the student body. 

But as for ourselves, we feel little of this sureness, for we have 
reached the doubtful stage. We watch with wonder the positiveness with 
which the seniors pursue their chosen occupations; and some of us won- 
der, fleetingly, if we have been following the correct course for our fu- 
ture. We view the congested business world with misgiving and timidly 
wonder if there is not another profession in which there would not be 
so much competition. Cowardly? Not at all, we merely realize our de- 
ficiencies and determine that we shall try harder to remove them in the 
future. 

We have no delusions of grandeur, we are sure that few, if any, of 
us will attain excellence. But for that small percentage, we have high 
hopes. We are proud of the part that our class is playing in the student 
body. We gravely realize that the time is not long before we shall be 
launched into the business world. Our adolescent happy-go-lucky atti- 
tude is outgrown but we are near enough to it to realize and get the 
fullest measure from our college days. 

So, keep your eye on us, the class of '46! 



Jke 



MARY ANN ALLISON— History— Delta Zeta; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3,; A Cap- 
pella Choir 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2; B. S. U. Council 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

MARJORIE ELIZABETH APPERSON— Pre-MeJ— Phi Mu; Masquers 1, 2, 3; Y. 
W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; B. S. U.; Entre Nous Staff 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

JIMMY ANDERTON— History— Pi Kappa Alpha; Ministerial Assoc. 1, 2, 3; 
Crimson Staff 2, 3; House of Killian 3. Leighton, Ala. 

WILMA M. AWBREY— History— Y. W. A. Pres. 3; B. S. U. Council 2, 3; Mis- 
sion Band 1, 2, 3; Sect'y. of Class 1, 2; International Relations Club. 
Gadsden, Ala. 



ROBERT L. BROWN— Religion— Alpha 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Phi Omega; Ministerial Association. 



Birmingham, Ala. 

3; Y. W. C. A. 



WILLIAM J. BROWN— History— Lambda Chi Alpha; Vice-Pres. Ala. Collegiate 
Press Assoc; Treas. Lambda Chi Alpha; Reporter A. P. O.; Kappa Phi 
Kappa; Choir; Football 1; Y. M. C. A.; Board of Publications; Howard 
Crimson Business Mgr. Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

SIGURD BRYAN— English — Ministerial Assoc. Dothan, Ala. 

HUGH CHAMBLISS— Rf//$;o»— Ministerial Assoc. Boeling, Ala. 

MARY COPELAND— Sociology — Beta Sigma Omicron; Y. W. A. 1,2, 3. Oneonta, 
Ala. 

MARY JEANETTE COUNTS— English— Phi Mu; Masquers; Pres. 3; Phi Mu 
Pres. 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

LOIS CROW— Beta Sigma Omicron; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

CONSTANCE FIDELAS CULOTT A— History. 

KATHRYN B. DAVIDSON— Englis)}—W. C. V. 1, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

NELLIE M. DYKES— English— Y. W. A.; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3. Oneonta, Ala. 

THERESA FRANKS— Religion— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; W. C. V. 1, 2, 3; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Library Staff. Birmingham, Ala. 

SARA GARRETT— English— Phi Mu; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; A Cappella Choir I, 2, 
3; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

WILDA GOSS— Dietetics— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 3. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

NORMA HARRISON— Mathematics— Y . W. A. 1, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 
Frisco City, Ala. 

ANNE CALDWELL HATCHER— History— Pi Gamma Mu. Birminggham, Ala. 

FRANK HIXON— H/srory— Ministerial Assoc. 1, 2, 3; Student Senate; Y. M. C. A. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

EMMA L. HOWARD— Religion— Y . W. A. 1, 2, 3. Bessemer, Ala. 

ROBERT }EFFERS— Religion— Ministerial Assoc. Glencoe, Ala. 

SARA KING — English — Phi Mu; Masquers 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 3. Birmingham, 
Ala. 

NORMA LOU KIRK— English— Library Staff 1, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; 
Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3; B. S. U. Council 1, 2, 3. Berkley Square Crew. 

MARIE E. UPSCOMhE— Economics— Alpha Delta Pi 1; Sweetheart of Sigma Nu 
1, 2, 3; Beauty Parade 1, 2, 3; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; 
Pharmacy Club 1, 2; Dietetics Club 1, 2; Nite Owl Suite 2, 3; H-Day 
Representative 1, 2. Scottsboro, Ala. 

JEANNE MANGUM-£»gliiA- Alpha Delta Pi; Sect'y A. D. Pi; Pan-Hellenic 
Representative; Interfraternity-Sorority Council; Y. W. A. I, 2, 3; Y. W. 
C. A. I, 2, 3; Beauty Parade 1, 2, 3; Dream Girl of Pi K A 1, 2, 3. Win- 
field, Ala. 




JUNIOR CLASS 




^ke 



HARVEY J. MATTHEWS— History— Pres. of Mission Bd.; Ministerial Assoc; 
Pastor of Round Island Baptist Church. Decatur, Ala. 

MARGARET H. MONTGOMERY— Religion— Pres. W. C. V. 3 ; Member 1, 2. 3; 
Program Chairman Y. W. C. A. 2. 3; B. S. U. Council 2, 3; Mission Band 
1, 2, 3; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3. Hartselle, Ala. 



J. LOYD MOON— Religion— Ministerial Assoc. 1, 2, 3; 
B. S. U. 1; Council 1, 2, 3. Gurley, Ala. 

VERNICE MacINTOSH— Transfer from Judson College, 
ham, Ala. 

JOHN P. OAKES— Religion — Ministerial Assoc. 1, 2, 
Trident 3. Birmingham, Ala. 



Y. M. C. A. 3; 



Marion, Ala. Birming- 



Kappa Phi Kappa; 



Birmingham, 
I, 2, 3; Y. 



Ala. 

W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; 



3; B. S. U. 1, 2, 3; Ministerial 



GLADYS G. PALMER— English and History. 

L. MOZELLE PARKER— Economics— Y. W. A. 
B. S. U. 1; Council 3. LaFayette, Ala. 

A. EARL POTTS— Religion— Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 
Assoc. 1, 2, 3. Shawmut, Ala. 

MARTHA A. PURSER— Englisll—DtXli Zeta; Pres. Delta Zeta 3; Glee Club; Y. 
W. C. A.; International Relations Club; Marshal] 1, 2. Anniston, Ala. 

CORALEE REVELL— Sociology. Leeds, Ala. 

JOHN R. RIDDLE— History— Ministerial Assoc. 1, 2, J.. Gadsden, Ala. 

Mu; Choir; Glee Club; Y. W. C. A. 



W. A. A. 1, 2, 3; 



EMALINE RYAN— Social Science— Ph 
Leeds, Ala. 

MARGARET A. SARGENT— English— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; 
Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3; B. S. U. 1, 2, 3. Collinsville, Ala. 

DOROTHY SAYLOR— English— Beta Sigma Omicron; Y. W. C. A.; Glee Club; 
Dietetics Club 1, 2, 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

JO ANN TEMPLETON— loumalism and Sociology— Phi Mu; Sec. of Pi Kappa 
Theta; Glee Club 2, 3; Writer for Crimson 1; Asst. Editor of Crimson 2; 
Vice-Pres. Class 2; Entre Nous 1; Chi Delta Phi. Birmingham, Ala. 

FANNIE R. THOMASON— English— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

DOROTHY TURNER— Enghsl>— Beta Sigma Omicron; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

B. JEANNE VANN— Journalism— Phi Mu; Pi Kappa Theta; Asst. Editor of Crim- 
son I; B. S. U. Council 2; Entre Nous Staff 1; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Con- 
tact Committee 2. Tarrant, Ala. 

DOROTHY J. WARREN— Religion— Sect-y. B. S. U. 3; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3; 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; W. C. V. 1, 2, 3; Mission Band I, 2, 3; B. S. U. I, 2, 
3. Gadsden, Ala. 

RONALD WEATHERS— Economics— Bullpup 1; Entre Nous 1, 2, 3; Crimson 
sports editors 1, 2, 3; 'H' Club; Pi Kappa Theta; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; 
House of K.llian; Y. M. C. A. 3; Choir. Birmingham. 

BONNIE RUTH WEAVER— Sociology— Crimson Staff; Masquers; Y. W. C. A. 
1, 2, 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

TWYNETTE WELLS— Economics— Phi Mu; Y. W. A. I, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 
I, 2, 3; B. S. U. Council 3. Atmore, Ala. 

MICHAEL WHITE— Economics. Irondale, Ala. 

HARRISON M. WILLIAMS— Pharmacy. Birmingham, Ala. 

LIDA WILSON— Englis/j—Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. A. 1, 2, 3. Eldridge, 
Ala. 

RUTH WOFFORD— £hx//s/j— Transferred from Snead; Y. W. C. A. 2, 3. Boaz. 
Ala. 

BETTY L. WOODCOCK— English— Delta Zeta; Scholarship Day I, 2; W. S. C. 
Recognition day 2; Marshall 2; Kappa Pi Sec'y 2, 3; Delta Zeta Historian 
2; Pi Kappa Theta 2, 3; Reporter 3; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Masquers 2, 3: 
Chi Delta Phi 1, 2, 3; Vice-Pres. 2, 3; Crimson 2, 3; Entre Nous 3. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

JEAN WRIGFIT— Pharmacy— Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Tile and Mortar; Pharmacy 
Club. Birmingham, Ala. 




JUNIOR CLASS 





LDW 



OFFICERS 

President Bessie Lle Edmondsun 

Vice-President _ __. Hubert Edgar 

Secretary. '. Mildred Arledge 

Treasurer /Thomasine Johnson 

Senators Mary Lou Ford, Eddie Griffith 



~yV$ LyourS, ~25ophom,ore6, ^J/or trie Jakivia . . . 



"To be at home in all lands and ages; to 
count nature a familiar acquaintance and 
art an intimate friend; to gain a standard 
for the appreciation of other men's work 
and the criticism of your own; to carry 
the keys of the world's library in your 
pocket, and feel its resources behind you 



in whatever you undertake; to make 
hosts of friends among the people of your 
own age who are to be leaders in all walks 
of life; to lose yourself in generous en- 
thusiasms and cooperate with others for 
common ends — this is the offer of the 
college for the best four years of your 
life." 



ER DIVISION.. 



cJListen, ^J"ro$h, ^Jo l/i/ordd of l/i/iddt 



Then said a weary man to him, Speak 
to us of repose. . . The prophet's lips 
formed a half smile as he said, There is no 
repose except that which is an incident 
of work. 

Work shall be the fervent kiss of life 
upon you. And the echoing whisper of a 
sigh within you is respose. 

Repose is not the end of work. It is 
only an interval, as the deer pauses in its 
flight, then forward bursts with sure 
and sudden speed. 

Repose is not the goal of work but a 
proof of work. Before the stream may 



om 



become calm and peaceful, it must hew 
its way through the mountain, cutting 
through the rocks and rushing with wild 
energy across the barriers. 

Repose is a reward of comfort but let 
not your work be for comfort's sake. 
Rather let the sweetness of repose fall 
about you unexpectedly — as a caterpillar 
spins and spins, knowing not why it 
spins, and becomes the butterfly of beau- 
ty- 

If you would have true repose, then at 
sunrise leave all thoughts of it behind you 
in your zest for work. And when night 
falls you will find it waiting. 



CLASS OFFICERS 

President .. David Barksdale 

Vice-President Bill Holmes 

Secretary—. ...Gerry Arledge 

Treasurer Billy Cooper 

Senator ...J. B. Jackson 




r^v 



. . LOWER DIVISION 




GERALDINE ANNE ARLEDGE— Beta Sigma Omi- 
cron — Economics — Y. W. A.; Night Owl Suite; Y. 
W. C. A.; Sec. Freshman Class; Beauty Parade; En- 
tre Nous Staff. Athens, Tenn. — Freshman. 

MILDRED ARLEDGE — Beta Sigma Omicron— Eco- 
nomics— Y. W. A.; Entre Nous Staff; Y. W. C. A.; 
W.A.A.; Night Owl Suite; Inter-Sorority Fraternity 
Council; Sec'y- Sophomore Class; Beauty Parade; 
Choir; Glee Club. Athens, Tenn. — Sophomore. 

JU ANITA ARNOLD— English— B. S. U. Council; Y. 
W. A.; W. C. V.; Mission Band. Attalla, Ala.— 
Sophomore. 

GLADYS ATKINS— Religion— Montgomery, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

OLIVE BAILEY — Beta Sigma Omicron — Economics — 
Tarrant City, Ala. — Freshman. 

JACK BAINS — Economics — Lambda Chi Alpha. Oneon- 
ta, Ala. — Freshman. 

DAVID H. BARKSDALE— Lambda Chi Alpha; Cheer- 
leader. Tuscaloosa, Ala. — Sophomore. 

RUTH BECTON— Delta Zeta; Y. W. A.; Y. W. C. 
A. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

FRANCES BELL— Pharmacy— Tile and Mortar. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

CAROLYN BELLENGER— S/K-cr/j— Cleveland, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

FAYE BLACKERBY— Beta Sigma Omicron. Birming- 
ham, Ala. — Freshman. 

J. WAURINE BLOUNT— Economics— Y. W. A.; Y. W. 
C. A. Citronelle, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARY ANNE BOSWELL— Delta Zeta— English— Y. 
W. C. A.; Crimson Staff; B. S. U. Birmingham, Ala. 
— Sophomore. 

BETTYSU BOZEMAN— English— Alpha Delta Pi; Y. 
W. A.; Program Chmn.; Y. W. C. A.; B. S. U. L. 
Council; Beauty Parade; Entre Nous Staff; Nite Owl 
Suite; Glee Club; Transfer from Huntingdon Col- 
lege. Evergreen, Ala. — Sophomore. 

VIVIAN L. BOYLE— Phi Mu— Dietetics— Home Ec. 
Club. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 



MARIE BREEZE— Alpha Delta Pi; Y. W. C. A. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

CECIL JIMMIE BRIGANCE— Religion. Mobile, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

DOROTHY BROWN— Birmingham, Ala.— Freshman. 

GEORGE F. BROWN— History— Min. Assoc. Vine 
Mount, Ala. — Sophomore. 

HAZEL BROWN— Religion— Y. W. A. Blanche, Tenn. 
— Freshman. 

ALMA JEAN BRYANT— Home Ec.—Y. W. A. Crop- 
well, Ala. — Freshman. 

JOHN HALL BUCHANAN— Pre-Mcd— Pi Kappa Al- 
pha. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

ELIZABETH BUCK— Alpha Delta Pi— English— Y. W. 
A. Jackson, Miss. — Freshman. 

ROBERT BURNS— Pi Kappa Alpha— Pharmacy— Tile 
and Mortar; Chi Alpha Sigma. Birmingham, Ala. — 
Freshman. 

MARY E. BURSON. Birmingham, Ala.— Freshman. 

GAYE BYARS— Beta Sigma Omicron— English. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

JULIUS H. BYARS— Lambda Chi Alpha— Economics— 
Alpha Phi Omega. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

MARY ELIZABETH BYARS— Beta Sigma Omicron— 
History. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

BILLY FORD CAMBRON— Religion— Min. Assoc. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

DOROTHY LOUISE CAMBRON— English— Y. W. A. 
Birmingham, Ala.- — Freshman. 

GLORIA CAMPBELL— Home Ec. Arley, Ala.— Fresh- 
man. 

MAMIE LEE CARROLL— Religion— Y. W. A.; Y. W. 
C. A.; W. C. V. Hunts ville, Ala.— Sophomore. 

WILLIAM T. CARLSON— Religion— Lambda Chi Al- 
pha; Min. Assoc. Mobile, Ala. — Sophomore. 

OUIDA RAI CARPENTER— Alpha Delta Pi— Eng- 
lish — Y. W. A.; Entre Nous Staff; Nite Owl Suite. 
Evergreen, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARJORIE CASH — Beta Sigma Omicron — Economic s 
— B. S. U.; Y. W. C. A. Birmingham, Ala.— Fresh- 
man. 

RUBY CATO— Bus. Education— B. S. U.; Y. W. A.; 
Y. W. C. A. LaFayette, Ala. — Freshman. 

FAYE L. CHAMBLISS— Religion. Greenville, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

MARGUERITE CHITWOOD— Phi Mu. Birmingham, 
Ala. — Sophomore. 

DOROTHY L. CLARK— Englis/.i—Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. 
A. LaFayette, Ala. — Freshman. 

HOWARD G. CLARK— Pi Kappa Alpha— Chemistry— 
Chemistry Lab Instructor; Chi Alpha Sigma. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

JO COCHRAN— Delta Zeta— Dietetics— W. A. A.; 
Dietetics Club; Masquers; Dorm. Council; Y. W. A.; 
Y. W. C. A. Gadsden, Ala. — Sophomore. 

MARY JO COCKRELL— Alpha Delta Pi— English ami 
Spanislj—Y. W. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Senator; Interna- 
tional Relations Club; Dormitory Council. Talladega, 
Ala. — Sophomore. 

GERALDINE COLE— Phi Mu — Dietetics— Home Ec. 
Club. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

TOM A. COLEMAN — Religion— Min. Assoc. Truss- 
ville, Ala. — Sophomore. 

BILLIE COOPER— Phi Mu — Chemistry — Home Ec. 
Club. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 



Arledge, G. 
Arledge, M. 
Arnold 
Atkins 
Bailey 



Bains 

Barksdale 
Becton 
Bell 

Bellenger 



Blackerby 
Blount 
Boswell 
Boyle 
Bozeman 



Breeze 
Brigance 
Brown, D. 
Brown, G. 
Brown H. 



Bryant 
Buchanan 
Buck 
Burns 
Burson 



Byars, G. 
Byars, J. 
Byars, M. 
Cambron, B. 
Cambron, D. 



Campbell 
Carroll 
Carlson 
Carpenter 
Cash 



Cato 

Chambliss 
Chitwood 
Clark, D. 
Clark, H. 



Cochran 
Cockrell 
Cole 

Coleman 
Cooper 




.LDWEfl DIVISION 




ROBERT CLIFTON CORLEY— Religion. Birming- 
Ala. — Freshman. 

JANET ELIZABETH CORNELIUS— Pharmacy. Wal- 
nut Grove, Ala. — Freshman. 

HELENE ANNETTE COUNTS— Phi Mu— English. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

POLLY COVINGTON — Beta Sigma Omicron — Pharm- 
acy — B. S. U.; Transfer from Memphis State College, 
Memphis, Tenn. Chattanooga, Tenn. — Sophomore. 

DOROTHY LOUISE CROWSON— Phi Mu— History. 
Leeds, Ala. — Freshman. 

ELLA FLORENE CULBREATH— Religion— B. S. U. 
Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. Birmingham, Ala.— Sopho- 
more. 

MARY ELIZABETH DARLING— English— Y. W. A. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

JULIAN DAVIDSON — Math. — Oakman, Ala.— Fresh- 
man. 

Q. P. DAVIS — Religion — Min. Assoc, B. S. U. Samson, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

WILLIAM EDWARD DAVIS— Pre-Med— Crimson Staff. 
Irondale, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARL ELIZABETH DEASON— Phi Mu— Economics. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

JOYCE JEANETTE DeLAY — Delta Zeta — Pharmacy. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

REX HERNDON DICKEY— Religion— Min. Assoc. 
Boylston, Ala. — Freshman. 

GLENN DISMUKES — Religion — Min. Assoc. Mobile, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

CHARLES E. DOYAL — Pi Kappa Alpha— Math. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

LAURA KATHERINE DRYER— Pharmacy — Birming- 
ham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

WILLIAM HUBERT EDGAR— President Lambda Chi 
Alpha — Math. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 



BESSIE LEE EDMUNDSON— English— Y. W. A.; Y. 

W. C. A.; W. C. V. Albertville, Ala.— Sophomore. 
EVA MAE ELKINS — Beta Sigma Omicron — English — 

B. S. U.; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A. Birmingham, 

Ala. — Sophomore. 
NINA FAY FARR— Beta Sigma Omicron— English. 

Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

MARY LOU FORD— Phi Mu— Dietetics— Y. W. A.; 

Y. W. C. A.; Senator; Cheerleader. Anniston, Ala. — - 
Sophomore. 
AUGUST CALVIN FORRESTER— Religion— Min. As- 
soc. McKenzie, Ala. — Freshman. 
CHRISTINE D. FORRESTER— Journal, sm. McKen- 
zie, Ala. — Freshman. 
BOYD McDONALD FRANKLIN— Engineering— Alpha 
Phi Omega. Linville Falls, N. C. — Sophomore. 

LEE FRANKLIN — Religion. Center Point, Ala. — Fresh- 
man. 

IMOGENE FREIL— Pharmac y— Y. W. A. Fairfield, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

MARGUERITE FROST— Delta Zeta— Dietetics. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

JAMES MARVIN GALBREATH— President Lambda 
Chi Alpha — Pharmacy. Birmingham, Ala. — Fresh- 
man. 

BILLY HERBERT GAMBLE— Religion— Min. Assoc. 
Bessemer, Ala. — Sophomore. 

ELIZABETH ANNE GATTIS— English. Birmingham, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

ROBERT HANBY GILLILAND— Lambda Chi Alpha— 
— Math — Alpha Phi Omega. Gadsden, Ala. — Sopho- 
more. 

WILLIAM JOHNSON GLAZE— Religion— Min. Assoc. 
Bessemer, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARGIE GODWIN— Pharmacy — B. S. U.; Y. W. A.; 
Y. W. C. A. Tallassee, Ala. — Freshman. 

EVELYN GRAYSON— Biology. Birmingham, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

BERNICE E. GEER— Pharmacy — Tile and Mortar. 
Quinton, Ala. — Sophomore. 

EMILY JANE GRIER. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

BETTIE MAE GRIFFIN— Delta Zeta— Chemistry — 
Dietetics Club; Y. W. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. — 
Sophomore. 

ARRAH JEAN GULLEDGE— Delta Zeta— Pharmacy 
Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

CHARLES HALL— Lambda Chi Alpha— Pharmacy. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

WILBUR COSBY HALL— Religion— Min. Assoc.; A 
Cappella. Montgomery, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARGARET SAFFLES HAND— Beta Sigma Omicron— 
History. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

VELOREESE ANDREW HARPER— Religion— Y. W. 
A.; Y. W. C. A.; W. C. V. Decatur, Ala.— Sopho- 
more. 

MARIAN BLANCHE HARRIS— Biology — Glee Club. 
A Cappella. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

ANNIE LAURA HARRISON— Home Ec.—Y. W. A. 
Thomasvillc, Ala. — Freshman. 



CORLEY 

Cornelius 
Counts 
Covington 

Crowson 



culbreth 
Darling 
Davidson 
Davis, Q. P. 
Davis, W. E. 



Deason 
DeLay 
Dickey 
Dismukes 
Dorough 



DOYAL 

Dyer 
Edgar 

Edmondson 

Elkins 



Farr 
Ford 

Forrester, A. C. 
Forrester, C. D. 
Franklin, B. M. 



Franklin, Lee 
Freil 
Frost 

Galbreath 
Gamble 



Gattis 

GlLLILAND 

Glaze 
Godwin 
Grayson 



Geer, B. 
Greir 
Griffin 
Gulledge 
Hall, C. 



Hall, W. C. 
Hand 
Harper 
Harris 
Harrison 




i^iAJI&Jk 




I 41/ J I ii At*N 




..LOWER DIVISION 




MARY MONTEZ HARTSILL— Pharmacy — Tile and 

Mortar Club. Monroeville, Ala. — Freshman. 
SARA HAWTHORNE— Delta Zeta— English. Birming- 
ham, Ala. — Sophomore. 
EUNICE HAYES. Florala, Ala.— Freshman. 
JUANITA HAYES— Delta Zeta— Pharmacy— Tile and 

Mortar Club; Secretary of Spatula Club; Y. W. A.; 

Night Owl Suite; Dormitory Council. Selma, Ala. — 

Sophomore. 
MADELINE LAMARR HAZEL— -Spanish— Y. W. A. 

Mobile, Ala. — Freshman. 
AUGUSTA VIRGINIA HEIFNER— Englis/j— B. S. U.; 

Y. W. A. Oxford, Ala. — Freshman. 
ANNIE EARLE HERMANN— Beta Sigma Omicron— 

Math. Bessemer, Ala.- — Freshman. 
DORRENCE HERNDON— Pi Kappa Alpha— Pre-Med. 

Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 
MARY FRANCES HIGGINBOTHAM— Phi Mu. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 
DONN E. HILL — Religion — Min. Assoc. Birmingham, 

Ala. — Sophomore. 
SARAH HILL — English. Vernon, Ala. — Sophomore. 
MARY BELLE HILLIARD— Delta Zeta— English— Y. 

W. C. A.; B. S. U.; Glee Club. Birmingham, Ala. — 

Sophomore. 
BETTYE HODGE — Phys. Ed.—Y. W. A. Newton, 

Ala. — Freshman. 
SARAH HOLLINGSHEAD— Delta Zeta. Birmingham, 

Ala. — Freshman. 
WILLIAM M. HOLMES— Lambda Chi Alpha— Math— 

Vice-Pres. of Freshman Class; Chem. Lab. Asst. 

Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 



DOROTHY HANNAH HORGITT— Religion— Y. W. 
A. Decatur, Ala. — Freshman. 

ROBERT C. HORNBUCKLE— Religion— Min. Assoc. 
Huntsville, Ala. — Freshman. 

JULES HOWARD. Freshman. 

BETTY JANE HUNT. Tarrant, Ala.— Freshman. 

IVA NELLE HURT— English— Y. W. A.; Mission Band. 
Bridgeport, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARY EVELYN ISRAEL— English. Birmingham, Ala. 
— Freshman. 

JAMES B. JACKSON, JR.— Religion. Pine Apple, Ala. 
Sophomore. 

IBBIE NELLE JOHNSON— Religion. Sophomore. 

MARGUERITE JOHNSON— Religion— Y. W. A.; Mis- 
sion Band. Verbena, Ala. — Sophomore. 

THOMASINE JOHNSON — Delta Zeiz—Englislo— 
Crimson Staff; Entre Nous Staff; Pi Kappa Theta; 
Beauty Parade. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophmore. 

MARTHA LOUISE JONES. Birmingham, Ala,— 
Freshman. 

SAM JONES. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

HELEN JUDY— Religion— Treas. B. S. U. Council, 
W. C. V. Birminghanj, Ala. — Freshman. 

BETH KELLEY— Englisly— Y. W. A.; Mission Band. 
Hartford, Ala. — Freshman. 

EVELYN KINARD— Alpha Delta Pi— EnglisI?— Trans- 
fer from Chevy Chase; Pres. of Pledges of A. D. Pi. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

BETTY KING. Birmingham, Ala.— Freshman. 

CHRISTINE KINCAID— Phi Mu. Birmingham, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

ROBERT A. KNIGHT— Pi Kappa Alpha— Pred-Med. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

HAROLD KNIGHT— Lambda Chi Alpha. Birming- 
ham, Ala. — Freshman. 

IMOGENE LACKEY— Economics. Birmingham, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

MARY LANCASTER— Pharmacy. Steppville, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

REID LAVENDER— Pre-Med. Birmingham, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

LINDA WELLONS LEE— Dietetics— Y. W. A. Ameri- 
cus, Georgia — Freshman. 

MARGARET NELLE LEE— Sociology. Birmingham, 
Ala. — Sophomore. 

ELOIS LEMON— Beta Sigma Omicron— English. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

NEIL LOVETT— Englislj— Pi Kappa Alpha. Double 
Springs, Ala. — Freshman. 

EMERY MOORE LOWRY, JR.— Lambda Chi Al- 
pha — Economics. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

VIRGINIA MARTIN — Beta Sigma Omicron — Dietet- 
ics. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

RUBYE EVELYN MARLOWE— English. Birmingham, 
Ala. — Sophomore. 

VIRGINIA MASIS— Alpha Delta Pi— Business Finance— 
Costa, Rica. — Sophomore. 



Hartsill 

Hawthorne 
Hayes, E. 
Hayes, J. 
Hazel 



Hefiner 
Herrmann 
Herndon 

HlGGINBOTHAM 

Hill, D. 



Hill, S. 
Hilliard 
Hodge 

Hollinsheau 
Holmes 



Horgitt 

Hornbuckle 
Howard 
Hunt 
Hurt 



Israel 
Jackson 

Johnson, I. B. 
Johnson, M. 
Johnson, T. 



Jones, M. 
Jones, S. 
Judy 
Kelllv 
Kinard 



King 
Kincaid 

Knight, R. 
Knight, H. 
Lackey 



Lancaster 
Lavender 
Lee, L. 

Lee, M. N. 
Lemon 



LOVETT 
LOWRY 

Martin 
Marlow 

Masis 




. . LOWER DIVISION 




MARY ALICE MATTHEWS— Phi Mu— English. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

WILLIAM JACOB MATSON— Pharmacy. Birming- 
ham, Ala. — Freshman. 

WILLIAM CHARLES MAYNORD— Religion— Min. As- 
soc. Ensley, Ala. — Sophomore. 

LIZZIE MAZZARA— Pharmacy. Birmingham, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

JACOB ERNEST MICKLER — Religion — Min. Assoc. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

MARGARET ANN MILLER— Alpha Delta Pi— Math— 
Y. W. A. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

DOROTHY GERALDINE MITCHELL— Religion— Y. 
W. A.; B. S. U.; Freshman Marshall; Mission Band. 
Mobile, Ala. — Freshman. 

JERRY ALBERT MONROE— Religion— Alpha Phi 
Omega. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

DOROTHY JEAN MOON— Pharmac _y— Y. W. A.; 
Transfer from Snead College. Guntersville, Ala. — 
Sophomore. 

MARGARET MORTON— Alpha Delta Pi; Sec.;— 
Economics — Y. W. A.; Glee Club. Newton, Ala. — 
Sophomore. 

MARY LOUISE MOSELEY— English. Tarrant, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

DOROTHY JO MULLIGAN — English. Birmingham, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

CAROLYN ANN McKIBBON — Phi Mu — Economics. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

LOUISE McGINTY— English— B. S. U.; Y. W. A.; Y. 
W. C. A.; Senator; Mission Band; Dormitory Coun- 
cil; Auditor; Glee Club; State B. S. U. Fairfax, Ala. 
— Sophomore. 

CAROLYN McLINDON — Pharmacy — Tile and Mortar; 
Y. W. A.; Y. W. C. A. Mobile, Ala. — Freshman. 

RICHARD EVERETT McMATH— Pharmacy. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 



FANNIE MARIF NeSMITH— Phi Mu— Pharmacy— Y. 

W. A. Blountsville, Ala. — Freshman. 
HARRY B. NEW— Lambda Chi Alpha— Pharmacy- 
Alpha Phi Omega; Tile and Mortar. Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Freshman. 

BILLIF RUTH NEWMAN— Phi Mu— Pharmacy— Tile 

and Mortar; Chi Alpha Sigma; Freshman Marshall; 
Y. W. C. A.; Pharmaceutical Assoc. Anniston, Al.i 
— Freshman. 

JOHN DONALD NICHOLSON— Lambda Chi Alpha— 
History. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARTHA ALLISON NOLEN— Delta Zeta— English— 
Y. W. A. Springville, Ala. — Freshman. 

SARAH RUTH NORRED— Pharmacy. Birmingham, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

JACK PANNELL— Pi Kappa Alpha— Pharmacy— Tile 
and Mortar. Tarrant, Ala. — Freshman. 

JUDITH PASTEUR — Phi Mu — Interior Decoration— 
Y. W. A. Miami, Fla. — Freshman. 

BETTIE GENE PAYNE— Beta Sigma Omicron— Die- 
tetics. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARGIE ANITA PERKINSON— English. Birming- 
ham, Ala. — Freshman. 

WILLIAM ALLEN POE— History— Min. Assoc— B. S. 
U. Tuscaloosa, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARY VIOLET POSEY— English. Birmingham, Ala.— 
Sophomore. 

WILLIAM ERNEST PRESCOTT— Lambda Chi Alpha— 
Pre-Med. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

MARGARET MOZELLE " PRICE— English. Birming- 
ham, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARY CALHOUN REESE— Biology— English— Y. W. 
C. A.; Y. W. A.; B. S. U. Birmingham, Ala.- 
Sophomore. 

BETTY GLENN REEVES— History— Y. W. A. Do 
than, Ala. — Freshman. 

RUBY NELL REEVES — Economics— -Y. W. A. Dolh- 
an, Ala. — Freshman. 

TOMMIE ROSE REINHARDT— Phi Mu— Pharmacy— 
Tile and Mortar. Wilsonville, Ala. — Freshman. 

RUTH RIVERS — Delta Zeta — Religion. Birmingham, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

NANCY AGNES ROBERTS— Pre-McJ. Birmingnam, 
Ala. — Sophomore. 

LOIS MARIE ROBINSON— English— Y. W. A. Hart- 
ford, Ala. — Freshman. 

VIRGINIA CAROLYN ROBINSON— Alpha Delta Pi— 
Chemistry. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

LORETTA ROSEBROUGH — English— A Cappella; 
Glee Club. Birmingham, Ala. — Transfer from Monte- 
vallo, Ala. — Sophomore. 

PEGGY ANN RUCKER— Alpha Delta Pi— English— 
Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A.; Nite Owl Suite. Home- 
wood, Ala. — Freshman. 

NELDA CLAUDIA RUFFIN— English— Y. W. C. A. 
Tallassee, Ala. — Freshman. 

JANE RUSSELL — Beta Sigma Omicron — Biology. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

D. C. RUSLEY — Religion. Birmingham, Ala. — Sopho- 
more. 

NELL RAE SAMPLE — Beta Sigma Omicron — English. 
Birmingham. Ala. — Freshman. 

JANE CORNELIA SCOFIELD— Phi Mu— Pre-Med— 
Pharmacy Club; Y. W. A. Opp, Ala. — Freshman. 



Matthews 
Matson 
Maynord 
Mazzara 

MlCKLER 



Miller 
Mitchell 
Monroe 
Moon 

Morton 



MOSELEY 

MULLICAN 
McKlBBON 
McGlNTY 

McLlNDON 



McMath 

NeSmith 
New 

Newman 
Nicholson 



Nolan 
Norred 
Pannell 
Pasteur 
Payne 



Perkinson 
Poe 
Posey 

Prescott 
Price 



Reese 

Reeves, B. G. 
Reeves, R. N. 
Rlinhardt 
Rivers 



Roberts 

Robinson, L. M. 
Robinson, V. C. 
Rosebrough 
Rucker 



RUFFIN 

Russell 
Rusley 
Sample 
Scofifld 




..LOWER DIVISION 








EVELYN TAYLOR— Delta Zeti— English 

Ala. — Freshman. 



Birmingham, 
ROBERT TAYLOR— Religion. Birmingham, Ala.— Fresh- 



EARL SARTAIN — Math. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

ROBERT V. SANDERS— Lambda Chi Alpha— Economics. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

EUGENIA SHELTON— Delta Zeta— History— Y. W. A.; 
Altoona, Ala. — Sophomore. 

FLORENCE HAMILTON SHERROD— Beta Sigma Omi- 
cron — Economics — Treas. 2; W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

IRMA LOUISE SIMMS— Chemis/r) — Y. W. A. Mobile, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

WILLIAM DOUGLAS SIMRELL— Religion— Min. Assoc 
Decatur, Ala. — Freshman. 

VIRGINIA SKIPPER— English. Birmingham, Ala.— Fresh- 
man. 

GEORGIA SMITH— Pre-Med. Fairfield, Ala.— Freshman. 

ROBERT NORMAN SMITH— Chemistry— A Cappella; 
Chemistry Lab. Assistant; President Alpha Pi Omega. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

GEORGE BASCOM SPARKMAN— History— Min. Assoc; 
A Cappella. Dania, Fla. — Freshman. 

SHIRLEY MASON STAMPS— Beta Sigma Omicron— Eng- 
lish — Y. W. A. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

RUTH STAMPS. Birmingham, Ala.— Freshman. 

JACQUELINE STAPP— Religion— Y. W. A.; B. S. U. L. 
Council. Talladega, Ala. — Freshman. 

GEORGIA STEPHENS— Phi Mu— Interior Decoration— Y. 
W. A. Miami, Fla. — Freshman. 

DOROTHY STONE— Delta Zeta— Education. Birming- 
ham, Ala. — Freshman. 

MARTHA NELL STUART— Alpha Delta V\— Pharmacy. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

BOBBY CATHERINE STUBBS— English. Birmingham, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

DORIS JEAN STURGIS— Delta Zeta— Pre-Med.— Alpha 
Epsilon Delta. Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 



DORIS TEAGUE — English. Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

FLORA LEE THOMAS— Religion. Birmingham, Ala.— 
Sophomore. 

MILDRED THOMAS — Beta Sigma Omicron — English. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

ROBERT EARL THOMPSON— Religion— Alpha Phi Ome- 
ga — Min. Assoc. Pritchard, Ala. — Sophomore. 

VIRGINIA THOMPSON— English— Beta Sigma Omicron; 
Y. W. C. A. — Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

LELAND TINDAL— English— Min. Assoc. Greenville, 
Ala. — Sophomore. 

KARA TINDAL — English. Greenville, Ala. — Freshman. 

PEGGY JOYCE TOMMIE— English— Y. W. A. Gadsden, 
Ala. — Freshman. 

DOROTHY MARIE TUCKER— Religion— Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 

GLORIA TUCKER — French — Beta Sigma Omicron. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

MADALINE VERNON— English— Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. 
Alexander City, Ala. — Sophomore. 

ROBERT EARL VICKERY— Math. Southport, Fla.— 
Freshman. 

FRANCES WALKER— Delta Zeti— English. Birmingham, 
Ala.- — Sophomore. 

EVELYN GLADYS WALKER— Religion— Y . W. A. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

JOHN WARD. Birmingham, Ala.— Freshman. 

JACKIE WEBB — Phi Mu — English. Birmingham, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

ARCHIE T. WHITE— English — Min. Assoc. Cantonment, 
Fla. — Freshman. 

OTHNIEL C. WHITMAN— Pi Kappa Alpha— Math. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

INEZ yf/HYTT— Economics— Mission Band; Y. W. A.; Y. 
W. C. A. Athens, Ala. — Sophomore. 

ROBERT EDWARD WILKINS— Religion. Clanton, Ala.— 
Freshman. 

VERNIE E. WILLIAMS— Chemistry. Birmingham, Ala.- - 
Freshman. 

MARTHA LOU WINFIELD— Englis/)— B. S. U.; Y. W 
C. A.; Mission Band. Bessemer, Ala. — Sophomore. Zeta 
Tau Alpha; Transfer from Birmingham-Southern. 

EULA WARRENE WINGARD— Matl>— Y. W. A.; Y. W. 
C. A.; B. S. U. Clanton, Ala. — Freshman. 

EVELYN ELAINE WINTERS— English— Y. W. A. Fort 
Payne, Ala. — Freshman. 

JAMES MANLY WOOD— Lambda Chi Alpha— Chemistry. 
Birmingham, Ala. — Freshman. 

NANETTE ODESSA WOOD— Phi Mu— Economics— W. A. 
A.; Glee Club; A Cappella; Y. W. C. A.; B. S. U. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. — Sophomore. 



Sartain 
Sanders 
Shelton 
Sherrod 
Simms 



SlMRELL 

Skipper 

Smith, R. N. 
Smith, G. 
Sparkman 



Stamps, S. M. 

Stamps, R. 

Stapp 

Stephens 
Stone 



Stuart 
Stubbs 
Sturgis 

Taylor, E. 
Taylor, R. 



Teague 

Thomas, F. L. 
Thomas, M. 

Thompson, R. E. 
Thompson, V. 



Tindal, L. 
Tindal, K. 

ToMMIE 

Tucker, D. 
Tucker, G. 



Vernon 
Vickery 
Walker, F. 
Walker, E. 
Ward 



WrBB 
White 
Whitman 
Whitt 

WlLKINS 



Williams 
Winfield 
Wingard 
Winters 

Wood, J. M. 
Wood, M. 



& 


if****- 


JL y 




a 


£l 





SWAN SONG 



Renfroe Hall has seen a constant stream of blue in win- 
ter, and white in summer since the Navy came to Howard 
in July, 1943. Quite a contrast from the gay variety of 
colors it had seen pass through the hallways in days when 
civilians called Renfroe their home. 

In later years, in distant places, those V-12er's who lived 
here will have many fond memories to look back upon. . . 
There was the common room, where, gathered around the 
battered piano, they would sing their favorite songs or listen 
in silent rapture to the boogie of some solid sender. . . 
There were the screams of terror which echoed throughout 
the building as some brave soul tried to take an ice-cold 
shower (was there another kind?). . . The cries of "Chief: 
aboard, hit the deck," or, "Chief's ashore, back to the 
sack," will long be with us, as will the rememberance of 
those frosty mornings in winter, when, after having prayed 
earnestly for rain the night before, we awoke to the hor- 
rible, grating noise of reveille to find a clear blue sky above 
and calisthenics waiting just ouside. . . There were field 



days, with the swabbing, sweeping, dusting, washing, and 
waxing which made the building fairly shine with cleanli- 
ness. . . And then the games of bridge in the "study" 
room, where some of the weirdest combinations of bidding 
and playing, stuff that would have made even Culberson 
admit that all was lost, were brought to the fore by the 
ingenious, inventive trainee. . . Nor must we forget that 
the guarded realms of chow hall and kitchen are contained 
in Renfroe. For three brief periods each day, this section 
of the building would ring with sounds of clattering silver- 
ware and pleasant laughter; then silence through another 
night. . . The telephones were never still, but rang in- 
cessantly from morn till night as harried J. O. D.'s at- 
tempted to remember just who was to call whom and when, 
and where. . . But happiest of all memories was that most 
peaceful, most comforting feeling of lying, stretched Out, 
upon the bunk, perhaps a bit of moonlight shining through 
the darkened rooms, as slowly, sweetly, came the notes of 
taps, which twined around one's thoughts of home and 
friends and far-off lands. . . . 



cJLa ^J~ivi 



Yes, victory in Japan has brought us that goal for 
which we have strived so long — the end of this era of de- 
struction. There is great tumult, confusion, and excite- 
ment in our minds and heart as we anxiously stand on the 
threshold of a new world. Also in our hearts there is a 
quiet serenity because we know that even as Howard has 
held her own in a war torn world, she is at her best in the 
business of EDUCATION FOR LIFE. 



o 



UR DEEPEST THANKS and appreciation to you 
who have been so indispensable to the publication of this 
book — Mr. Faerber of the Alabama Engraving Co.; Mr. 
Fleming, president of the Birmingham Printing Co.; Mr. 
Missildine of Birmingham Printing Co.; Lt. Postle and 
Lt. Crossley for the very best of cooperation from the 
Naval Unit and for serving as judges of the Beauty Pa- 
rade; Mr. Falkenberg of the Alabama Theatre, Miss Lily 
Mae Caldwell and Mr. Townsend, both of the News for 
their assistance with the Beauty Parade; Mr. Lent Brew- 
ster, our very indispensable financial advisor; and Mr. 
John Baker, Faculty Advisor. 

Among our student supporters whom we could not 
leave out of our "Thank You" list are AS Hank Beebe 
and Jimmy DeSana for their assistance with the Beauty 
Parade; Louise Hardin and Miriam Gann for assistance 
with publicity. 

And perhaps we can best show our appreciation to 
those others whom we have not yet mentioned by patron- 
izing. . . 



ADVERTISERS 



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A Size for Every Domestic Use 



Complete Drug Store Service 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

V. C. WOODS 

DRUGS 

7607 1st AVE.. N. — 9-2121 5001 1st AVE.. N.— 9-1125 

1201 llth AVE.. S.— 7-1173 7301 1st AVE.. N.— 9-6161 



We Telegraph Flowers Everywhere 

Bonded Member F.T.D. 

Langston-Pate Florist 

231 80th Street, South 
Phone 9-4463 Birmingham, Ala. 



Compliments of 

Floral Park Bakers 

7621 First Avenue, North 
EAST LAKE 



Best Wishes 

to the 

GRADUATES 

and 

FACULTY 

of 
HOWARD 
COLLEGE 



We are glad to have the opportunity to extend 
best wishes for the success of The Entre Nous, 
and for the continued success and influence of 
Howard College. 



olan mills studios 

402 N. 20th St. Phone 4-2973 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



THE 
ALABAMA BAPTIST 

L. L. GWALTNEY, Litt.D., S.T.D., Editor 

$2.00 Per Year To Ministers $1.50 

Speeial Rates to Churches on 

the Budget Plan 

Write for Information 

Information Cultivates Inspiration 

Cooperation 

614-16 Chamber of Commerce Building 
BIRMINGHAM 3, ALABAMA 



Lovell's Watch Shop 

Jewelry 

25 No. 77th St. East Lake 



ZAC SMITH 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

Printing — Engraving 

Drawing Instruments 

Office Furniture 

Visible Records 

Everything Used in an Office 

2014 First Ave., 
Birmingham, Ala. 



MORGAN BROTHERS 

DEPARTMENT STORES 

7627 First Avenue, North 
5525 First Avenue, North 



W. W. ELLARD 

HARDWARE AND DRY GOODS 

Mrs. W. W. Ellard, Owner 
8305 1st Avenue, N. Phone 9-6902 



ROSE CLEANERS 

and 

SHOE REPAIR 

Serving Howard Students 32 Years 
17-19 North 77th St. Phone 9-9152 



O. E. RANDLE SERVICE 
STATION 

7701 2nd Avenue, South 
Birmingham Alahama 



JEFF D. JORDAN 
AND COMPANY 

Store of general 
Merchandise 



CENTRE 



ALABAMA 



King's Service Station 

Recappers Tire Repairing 



Pan-Am Products 



Centre 



Alabama 



Compliments of 

FARMERS' & MERCHANTS' 
BANK 



CENTRE 



ALABAMA 



Capital Stock $50,000 
Surplus Fund $100,000 

Members of 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Cherokee's Largest Banking Institution 



Compliments of 

M. L. WESTER 



CENTRE 



ALABAMA 



WEST POINT 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

Cotton Textile Manufacturers 
WEST POINT, GEORGIA 



Plants Located 

LANETT, ALABAMA ; SHAWMUT, ALABAMA 

LANGDALE, ALABAMA 

FAIRFAX, ALABAMA 

RIVERVIEW, ALABAMA 



JITNEY JUNGLE 

Groceries — Meats — Fruits 
Vegetables 

Quality Tells, Service Sells 



Centre 



Alabama 



EAST LAKE 

FURNITURE CO. I 

USED FURNITURE 

8318 1st Ave., No. Phone 9-9146 

Birmingham, Alabama 



Compliments of 

Cherokee County Bank 

Centre, Alabama 



Cherokee County's Oldest Banking 
Institution 





COMPLIMENTS 




OF 




Ch 


erokee H 


ardware 


CENTRE 


ALABAMA 



Phone 9-7721 



Notary Public 



ARLIE A. De ARMAN 

Printing - Mimeographing - Addressing 

Typewriting Letter Service 

8237 2nd Avenue, South 

Birmingham Alabama 



LIBERTY NATIONAL LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 



AND 



BROWN-SERVICE INS. CO, 

(DIVISION) 

Organized 1900 

FRANK P. SAMFORD, President 



Home Office 



BIRMINGHAM 



ALABAMA 




Extends to you congratula- 
tions on completion of your 
school work and offers best 
wishes for your future. 



WOOD FRUITTICHER 
GROCERY CO. 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



2321 FIRST AVENUE, NORTH 

PHONE 3-3111 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Compliments of 

FRIEDMAN JEWELRY CO. 

72 J North 19th Street 

Phone 4-5618 
Birmingham, Alabama 



EAST LAKE FEED STORE 

Distributors 

Happy Feeds in Red Ball Bags 



8505 1st Ave., N. 
Birmingham 



Phone 9-3795 
Alabama 



PICCLY 


WIGCLY 


GROCERIES 


H. C. 


FRASER 


22 77th St., N. 


East Lake 



MEET your friends at 

Bow den's 

"We Serve the Best of Everything" 

7702 2nd Ave. So. 

Lunches - Cold Drinks - Candy - Smokes 



Johnson Grocery & Market 

7700 2nd Avenue, So. 
Phone 9-9227 



Hodges Grocery 

7708 2nd Ave., So. 
Phone 9-6306 



Southern Headquarters For 

LABORATORY 
EQUIPMENT 

AND 

SUPPLIES 



McKesson & Robbins, Inc. 



1708 1st Avenue, North 



Birmingham 



Alabama 



Go 
THE DIXIE SYSTEM 

Short Trips are Allowed Non-Car 
Owners under O.D.T. Restrictions 




191S Fifth Ave., N. 



Ph. 3-7181 



Rent a Roeola for that Party 

BIRMINGHAM VENDING CO. 

2117 3rd Avenue, North Phone 3-5183 

ALL THE LATEST POPULAR RECORDS 



EXPERIENCE IS THE 
BEST TEACHER 

LflN€ Has Filled More Than 

15 MILLION 
PRESCRIPTIONS 



LflN€ 



DRUG 
STORES 



"JIL 



'aui the d->eit 



* tv * a 



■a 



To you 



who are now 
on the threshold 
— we extend 
our hearty 
congratulations 
and best wishes 




niAiii* 



Compliments of 



Hill Grocery Co. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



BAKE WITH 



ROLLER 
CHRITlPIOn 



"The Flour the Best 
Cooks t/se" 



Distributed By 

COSBY-HODCES MILLING CO. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 




HOBSON DRUG STORE 



SUNDRIES 

PHARMACEUTICALS 

REGISTERED 



R 



CANDIES 

BIOLOGICALS 

PHARMACIST 



ON DUTY AT ALL TIMES 



CENTRE 



ALABAMA 



Compliments of 

YEILDINC'S 

A Birmingham Institution Since 1876 

Corner 2nd Avenue at 22nd St., No. 
Birmingham Alabama 



* n 




DRUG STORES 

More than 30 years of reliable service 
in Birmingham 



S. H. HANOVER 

Jeweler 
206 North 20th Street 



Compliments of 

Sokol Bros. Furniture Co. 

A Friend of Howard College 

Come By and See Us 

1818 First Ave., N. 



Compliments of 

Birmingham Apothecary, Inc. 

Two Convenient Locations 

Medical Arts Building — Empire Building 
Phone 3-92 5 3 Phone 3-82 54 

Birmingham Alabama 



Greenwood Cafe 

Prop.: Arthur Greenwood 

407 North 20th Street 
Birmingham Alabama 



McLendon Grocery 

GROCERIES AND MEATS 
8303 1st Avenue, N. Phone 9-1871 



Howard's Service Station 

18 Years' Service 

East Lake 

7631 2nd Ave., So. Phone 9-9285 




Compliments of 

Cherokee Theatre 

""The Home of Good Pictures" 



In Business for Your Pleasure 



Centre 



Alabama 



Jordan 5< 


c & 10c Store 


The Store with 


a Thousand Different 




Items 


Centre 


Alabama 



Sokol Bros. Furniture Co. 



1818 1st Ave., North 
Phone 3-4246 



Phone 9-7100 



27 No. 77th Street 



Mabry's Hardware 

& Cycle Shop 

Morgan Mabry, Prop. 



Use 
Alabama's Best 

COKE 

A. B. C. 

COKE 



SMOKELESS FUEL CO. 

Distributors Domestic Grades 
Phone 4-6533 



John's Service 

LLEWELLYN W. JOHNS 

Johns -Service Funeral Parlors, Inc. 

We Accept Brown-Service Policies 

1806 7th Avenue, No. 



Alabama Optical Supply 
Company 

201 Woodward Bldg. 



Simmon's Radio 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
7606 1st Ave., No. Phone 9-7186 



GOLDEN FLAKE 

PRODUCTS 

Always Good — All Ways 

POTATO CHIPS SALTED PEANUTS 

PEANUT BUTTER SANDWICHES 

MIXED NUTS, CANDY, ETC. 

MAGIC CITY FOOD 
PRODUCTS CO. 



THE 
ALABAMA BAPTIST 

L. L. GWALTNEY, Litt.D., S.T.D., Editor 

2.00 per Year To Ministers $1.50 

Special Rates to Churches on the 
Budget Plan 

Write for Information 

Information cultivates inspiration and 
cooperation 

614-16 Chamber of Commerce Building 
Birmingham 3, Ala. 



Compliments of 

SMITH APOTHECARY 

WOODLAWN 
5415 1st Ave., No. Phone 9-2138 




■•Ml 



For 60 Years 
the South's 
Leading Home 
Furnishers 



Haverty Furniture 
Company 



111 No. 19th St. 



Birmingham 



Tucker's 
Barber Shop 

Where the Navy Goes 

East Lake 

7635 1st Ave., N. East Lake 



C. B. Buckhalter & Sons 



l The Fairway Trade Store" 



Centre 



Alabama 



Hotel McDonald 



WINFIELD, ALABAMA 



Air Conditioned Coffee Shop 



Earl Johnson Agency 

Insurance Real Estate 

Cherokee County Farms 



Centre 



Alabama 



Compliment* of 

Baptist Book Store 

517 No. 22nd St. 

Mrs. T. M. Floyd, Mgr. 

Phone 3-1535 



Loll 



ars 



Specialists in High 
Quality Photo Finishing 



LOCATIONS: 

302 North 20th Street 
1808 Third Avenue, No. 



INGRAM'S VARIETY STORE 
5c to $5.00 

CENTRE'S VALUE SPOT 

CHEROKEE PROVISION CO. 

Hickory Smoked Hams 

Mail Orders Filled as Stock Warrants 

Centre Alabama 




THE EMBLEM OF 
FINE PRINTING 



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Birmingham Printing Company 

Birmingham, Alabama 



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