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Full text of "The epicurean. A complete treatise of analytical and practical studies on the culinary art, including table and wine service, how to prepare and cook dishes, etc., and a selection of interesting bills of fare of Delmonico's from 1862 to 1894"



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THE EPICUREAN 



THE EPICUREAN 



A COMPLETE TREATISE OF 



ANALYTICAL AND PRACTICAL STUDIES 



ON THE 

CULINARY ART 

INCLUDING 

Table and Wine Service, How to Prepare and Cook Dishes, an Index for Marketing, 
a Great Variety of Bills of Fare for Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners- 
Suppers, Ambigus, Buffets, etc,, and a Selection of 
Interesting Bills of Fare of Delmonico's, 
from 1862 to 1894, 

MAKING A 

FRANCO-AMERICAN CULINARY ENCYCLOPEDIA 



BY CHARLES RANHOFER, 

FORMER CHEF OF DELMONICO'S, 
tfonorary President of the "Societe Culinaire Philanthropique," of New Yorh. 



ILLUSTRATED WITH 800 PLATES. 



Published by 

THE HOTEL MONTHLY PRESS 
950 Merchandise Mart < 
Chicago, 111. 



Copyright 1920 
By Rose Ranhofer 



PREFACE. 




PUBLISHING this work I have endeavored to fill a much needed want 
viz: the best and most effectual manner of preparing healthy and 
nutritious food. 



This edition contains innumerable recipes which I have simplified and explained 
in a comprehensive manner so as to meet the wants of all. It suggests, also, many 
useful and important hints to those about entering the profession. 

The book is illustrated and contains instructions how to prepare, garnish and 
serve according to the traditional rules of our most able predecessors, and now 
followed by the principal chefs of France and the United States. 

In some instances, where it was deemed necessary to differ from the standard 
rules and methods in order to cater to the various tastes, changes have been made. 

The book is divided into twenty-four chapters : Table Service, Bills of Fare, 
Supplies, Elementary Methods, Soups, Stocks, Hot and Cold Sauces, Garnishings, 
Hot and Cold Side Dishes, Shell Fish, Crustaceans, Fish, Beef, Veal, Mutton, Lamb, 
Pork, Poultry, Game, Miscellaneous Entrees, Cold Dishes, Vegetables, Cereals, Hot 
and Cold Desserts, Pastry, Bakery, Confectionery, Ices, Fruit, Wines and Preserves, 

]S r ot relying solely on my experience and knowledge, I have quoted from the 
most illustrious modern author, my much beloved friend and colleague, Urbain 
Dubois, ex-chef at the Court of Germany, and it gives me sincere pleasure to thank 
him for his generous assistance. 

The profession will acknowledge its indebtedness to the Messrs. Delmonico for 
the interest shown by them in developing the gastronomic art in this country. 

Many will recall the business receptions given to distinguished guests under the 
supervision and direction of Delmonico. 

Mention may be made of the following dinners : to President U. S. Grant, to 
President A. Johnson, to the Grand Duke Alexis of Eussia, to Gen. Prim, to Charles 
Dickens, to Sir Morton Peto, to Aug. Belmont, to Giraud Foster, to Gen. Cutting, 
to Luckmeyer, the so-called "Black Swan Dinner," to Admiral Eenaud, to Prof. 
Morse, to Bartholdi, to De Lesseps, to the Comte de Paris, also the ball given to 
the Eussian Admiral and Fleet, and the Greek dinner. 



viii PREFACE. 

I have entitled this work THE EPICUREAN, and have justly dedicated it to the 
memory of Messrs. Delmonico, as a token of my gratitude and sincere esteem. 

Their world-wide reputation continues to be maintained by Mr. C. C. Delmonico. 
In conclusion I feel that my experience will be useful to those seeking infor- 
mation in the gastronomic art. 

Hoping the public will appreciate my efforts, 

I remain respectfully, 

CHAELES RANHOFER. 



CIJ 18*27. 



BEA.VKR & SOUTH WJSrS 
22BROAU STitBKT 
MADISON SQUARE- 




Office Beaver & South WWSts 








COlsTTElSTTS. 



NUMBERS. 

TABLE SERVICE AND BILLS OF FARE, 

ELEMENTARY METHODS AND UTENSILS, 1- 182 

SOUPS, ... 183- 384 

SAUCES, 385- 635 

GARNISHINGS, ..... 636 ~ 77 

COLD SIDE DISHES, 77 1~ 835 

HOT SIDE DISHES, 836- 993 

MOLLUSKS AND CRUSTACEANS, 994-1093 

F ISH , 1094-1312 

BEEF, ............. 1313-1478 

VEAL, .......... 1479-1584 

MUTTON, 1585-1660 

LAMB, ........... 1661-1770 

PORK, : 1771-1820 

POULTRY, 1821-2045 

GAME, 2046-2209 

MISCELLANEOUS ENTREES, 2210-2408 

COLD SERVICE, 2409-2676 

VEGETABLES, 2677-2849 

EGGS, 2850-2951 

FARINACEOUS, 2952-2989 

HOT SWEET ENTREMETS, 2990-3124 

COLD SWEET ENTREMETS, 3125-3224 

PASTRY 3225-3404 

BAKERY, - 3405-3424 

ICES, .... 3424-3613 

CONFECTIONERY, .......... 3614-3704 

WINES, 3705-3715 

LAST CENTURY TABLES, ......... 

DELMONICO'S MENUS FROM 1861 TO 1894, 

INDEX, ..... > 



PAGE. 

1 

169 
239 
288 
331 
355 
368 
401 
427 
471 
507 
531 
547 
569 
583 
637 
675 
723 
815 
847 
865 
873 
907 
931 
969 
977 
1029 
1061 
1068 
1073 
1139 



SERVICE. 



PAGE. 

BREAKFASTS, 13 

Bills of Fare, 13 

DINNERS, American Service (Plate), 1 

American Service, Bills of Fare, 1 

American Service, Reception, 6 

American Service, Table Service, 5 

American Service, Wines and Cordials (Plate), 

French Service (Plate), 

French Service, Necessary Material, 9 

French Service, To Set the Table, 9 

Russian Service (Plate), . . 10 

LUNCHEONS, I 3 

MODEL MARKET LIST, 21 

SUPPERS, Ambigu, 

Buffet, 11 

SUPPLIES, 

BILLS OF FARE, 25 

Ambigu, 147 

Ambigu Picnic, 145 

Breakfasts (Plate), 25 

Buffet Large I 55 

Buffet Suppers, 14 fi 

Dancing Party, I 39 

Delmonico's, from 1862 to 1804, 1 78 

Dinners, ... 58 

Garden party, 

Invalids, 

Lunches, ..... 

Restaurant Breakfast, I 64 

Restaurant Dinner, 

Restaurant Lunch, 165 

Restaurant Supper, 167 

Suppers, 

Suppers, Sideboard, 142 

Suppers, Sideboard, English, 

Suppers, Sideboard, Large, 161 

Suppers, Small, 

DESIGNS FOR TABLES IN THE LAST CEINTUHY, . 1 7C 



THE EPICUREAN. 



SERVICE, 

AMEEICAN, FEENCH, ETJSSIAN-FOE BEEAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNEE, 
SUPPEE, COLLATION OE AMBIGU, 




DINNER SERVICE-AMERICAN STYLE- AND BILL OF TARE (Dinner Service & I'Amfricaine 

et le Menu). 

The success of a dinner depends upon good cooking, the manner in which it is served, and 
especially on entertaining congenial guests. The American service is copied more or less from the 
French and Russian, and remodeled to the tastes and customs of this country ; as it varies some- 
what from all others, a few instructions may be found useful to those desirous of learning the 
difference existing between them. 

THE BILL OF FARE (MENU). 

Menus are made for breakfasts, luncheons and suppers, but the most important one is for the 
dinner ; these menus are generally composed a few days in advance to enable the necessary pro- 
visions to be purchased, so that on the day of the dinner, there has been ample time to prepare 
everything necessary, consequently much confusion is avoided and the work better done. 

In carrying out the order the menu should be strictly followed, in fact, it must be an obliga- 
tory rule to do so. 

Making out the bills of fare Is the duty of the head cook, who composes and writes them 
according to the latitude he enjoys and the resources he has at hand. 

BILLS OF FARE FOR DINNER. 

Should the menu be intended for a dinner including ladies, it must be composed of light, 
fancy dishes with a pretty dessert; if, on the contrary, it is intended for gentlemen alone, then it 
must be shorter and more substantial. If the dinner be given in honor of any distinguished 
foreign guest, then a place must be allowed on the menu to include a dish or several dishes of his 
own nationality; avoid repeating the same names in the same menu. Let the sauces be of 
different colors, one following the other. 

Also vary the color of the meats as far as possible, from one course to the other. Offer on the 
menus all foods in their respective seasons, and let the early products be of the finest quality 
(consult a general market list to find the seasonable produce), and only use preserved articles 
when no others can be obtained. 

If the menus are hand written they must be very legible. 

Menus are indispensable for service a rAmericaine; there should be one for each guest, for as 



2 THE EPICUREAN. 

no dish served from the kitchen appears on the table, every one must be informed beforehand of 
what the dinner is composed, and those dishes that are to follow each other. 

Menus must be both simple and elegant, and of a size to allow them to be easily placed in the 
pocket without folding, as it is the general desire to keep the bill of fare of a dinner at which one 
has assisted. 

A few important observations necessary to bills of fare and their classification are here given: 

OYSTERS ON THE HALF SHELL. 

Oysters appear on the menu the same as in the Russian service; on French bills of fare they 
do not mention them. Suppress oysters in every month not containing the letter R, such as ; 
May, June, July and August, and serve Little Neck clams instead. 

SOUPS. 

Soups are served after the oysters. One clear and one thick soup should be selected but if 
only one is needed, give the preference to the clear soup. 

HORS-D\EUVRE, SIDE OR LIGHT DISHES. 

Hot hors-d'oauvre are, generally, timbales, croustades, cromesquis, palmettes, mousselines, 
bouchees, cannelons, cassolettes, rissoles, etc. With the same course serve cold side dishes, such 
as olives, radishes, canapes, caviare, pickled tunny, anchovies, etc. 

In the French service, the fish and the solid joints come under the head of releve"s or removes. 
In the American and English service, first comes the fish, then the removes. 

FISH. 

If the fish be boiled or braized, add potatoes to the menu; if broiled or sauted, some cucumber 
salad; and, if fried, serve plain or with a light sauce. 

REMOVES OR RELEVES. 

The releves or solid joints are composed of saddles, eiiher of veal, mutton, lamb, venison and 
antelope, or else beef tenderloins or middle short loins. Turkey, goose, capon, pullets, ducks, etc., 
may be served, accompanied by one or two vegetables. 

ENTREES. 

Place on the bill of fare first the heaviest entree, and conclude with the lightest; they must 
be previously cut up so as to avoid carving. No fish figures in the American service as an entree, 
but terrapin or crabs may be allowed; also lobsters, shrimps, frogs, croquettes, etc. 

Each entree should be accompanied by a vegetable, served separately, except when it is one of 
those described above, such as terrapin, etc. 

PUNCH OR SHERBETS. 

A punch or sherbet is always served after the entrees and before the roast; do not make an 
extra heading on the menu for these, only placing them on a line by themselves, for instance: 
Roman punch or American sherbet. 

ROASTS. 

Roasts are served after the sherbet; a game roast is usually preferred, but poultry, either 
truffled or not, may be substituted: such as turkey, capon, pullet, duck, guinea-fowl, squabs, etc.; 
also roasted butcher's meat; but game is usually considered to be more choice. 

COLD DISHES. 

Cold dishes come after the roast, and before the hot dessert; they are served with green salads; 
terrines of foies-gras and boned turkey are also served as a second roast. (In the French service 
these cold dishes are classified as the last entree.) 

HOT SWEET DISHES OR ENTREMETS. 

These appear after the roast; they are composed of puddings, crusts, fried creams, fritters, 
pancakes, borders, omelets, and souffles, and form a separate course by themselves. 

COLD SWEET DISHES OR ENTREMETS. 

The cold sweet entremets come after the hot and are composed of jellies, bavarois, creams, 
blanc-manges, rnace'doines, charlottes and large cakes, and form another course. 

DESSERT. 

After the cold entremets come the dessert, composed of cheese, fresh fruits, preserved fruits, 
cakes, jams, dried fruits, candied fruits, bonbons, mottoes, papillotes, victorias, pyramids, frozen 
puddings, plombieres, ices, ice cream and small fancy cakes, then the coffee and cordials. 



TABLE SERVICE. 




SERVICE OP WINES AND CORDIALS (Service des Vins et Liqueurs). 

The steward must inform and specify to the butler the wine to be served at each separate 
course. However important the dinner may be, still decanters of ordinary red and white wine 
must be placed on the table. The selection of the finer wines is the host's duty, he making bis 
choice when ordering the bill of fare. 

The steward's duty is to see that the wines are served at a proper temperature. 

All white wines must be served cold. 

Sherry and Xeres cool. 

Bordeaux between 55 and 60 degrees, Fahrenheit, according to its growth. 

Burgundy between 50 and 55 degrees. 

Champagnes, cold or iced, or in sherbets. 

Dessert wines cool. 

For choosing wines consult the table on wines of Delmonico's cellar. (No. 3709.) 

Russian Sideboards. Absinthe, Vermuth Bitters, Kumrnel, Mineral Waters, including Apol- 
linaris, Clysmic, St. Galmier and Vichy. 

FIRST SERVICE. 

With Oysters. Sauterne, Barsac, Graves, Mont Kachet, Chablis. 

After the Soup. Madeira, Sherry or Xeres. 

With Fish. (Rhine wines) Johannisberger, Marcobrunner, Hochheimer, Laubenheimer, Lieb- 
fraumilch, Steinberger. (Moselle) Brauneberger, Zeltinger, Berncasteler. 

With Removes. Cote St. Jacques, Moulin-a-vent, Macon, Clos de Vougeot, Beaune. 

With Entrees. St. Emilion, Medoc du Bordelais, St. Julien. Dry champagnes for certain 
countries. 

Iced Punches and Sherbets, Rum, Madeira. 

SECOND SERVICE. 

With Roasts. (Burgundies) Pommard, Nuits, Gorton, Chambertin, Romance Conti. 

Cold Roasts. Vin de Faille, Steinberger. 

With Hot Desserts. (Bordeaux) Chateau Margaux, Leoville, Laffitte, Chateau Larose, Pontet- 
Canet, St. Pierre, Cotes de Rhone, Hermitage and C6te-R6tie. (Red Champagne) Bouzy, Verzenay, 
Porto Premiere. 

THIRD SERVICE. 

With Dessert. (Burgundy) Volnay, Mousseux. (Champagnes) Delmonico, Roederer, Ros6 
Mousseux, Pommery, Cliquot, Perrier-Jouet, Moe't, Mumm. 

Wine Liquors. Muscatel, Malaga, Alicante, Malvoisie of Madeira, Lacryma Chris ti, red and 
white Cape, Tokay, Constance, Schiraz. 

Cordials. Curacoa, Kirsch, Cognac, Chartreuse, Maraschino, Prunelle, Anisette, Benedic- 
tine. 

Beers. Bass' Ales, Porter, Tivoli, Milwaukee. 



THE EPICUREAN. 



WINES AND LIQUOES USUALLY GALLED TOR (Vins et Liqueurs Gfoeralement Servis). 

A DINNER OF AMERICANS. 

EECEPTION-ROOM. 

Sherry, Bitters, 

DINNER WINES. 

Haut Sauterne, Amontillado, Sherry, 

Perrier-Jouet Brut, 

A DINNER OF FRENCHMEN. 

RECEPTION-ROOM. 

Sherry and Bitters, Vermuth, 

DINNER WINES. 

Graves, Xeres, Lafaurie, St. Pierre, 

Beaujolais, Liquors. 

A DINNER OF GERMANS. 
No wines or mineral- waters in the reception-room. 

DINNER WINES. 

Niersteiner, Sherry, Hochheimer, St. Estephe, 

Pommery Sec. Beaune, Liquors. 

American service, like the Russian, must be served quickly and hot. As easily understood by 
the following card, a dinner of ten minute intervals can be served with fourteen courses in two 
hours and twenty minutes and if at eight minute intervals, in one hour and fifty-two minutes, the 
same as an eight course dinner of ten minute intervals will take one hour and twenty minutes, so 
at eight minute intervals it will take one hour and four minutes. 



Cocktails. 

Barsac, Pontet Canet, 

Liquors. 



Absinthe. 



Yellow Cliquot, 



1 

2 
8 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 

14 


Figure 1 36 covers. 
10 minutes. 2 hours 20 
8 minutes. 1 hour 51. 


Figure 224 covers. 
10 minutes. 2 hours 10. 
8 minutes. 1 hour 44. 


Figure 316 covers. 
10 minutes. 2 hours. 
8 minutes. 1 hour 36. 


Figure 4 12 covers. 
10 minutes. 1 hour 50. 
8 minutes. 1 hour 28. 


Oysters. 
2 Soups. 
S. D. hot and cold. 
2 Fish, potatoes. 
1 Remove, vegetables. 
1 Entree, vegetables. 
1 Entree, vegetables. 
1 Entree, vegetables. 
1 Punch. 
1 or 2 Roasts. 
1 or 2 Colds, salad. 
1 Hot sweet dessert. 
1 or 2 Cold sweet des'rts 
( 1 or 2 Ices. 
{ Dessert. 


Oysters. 
2 Soups. 
S D. hot and cold. 
1 Fish, potatoes. 
1 Remove, vegetables. 
1 Entree, vegetables. 
1 Entree, vegetables. 


Oysters. 
2 Soups. 
S. D. hot and cold. 
1 Fish, potatoes. 
1 Remove, vegetables. 
1 Entree, vegetables. 
1 Entree, vegetables. 


Oysters. 
2 Soups. 
S. D. hot and cold. 
1 Fish, potatoes. 
1 Remove, vegetables. 
1 Entree, vegetables. 
1 Entree, vegetables. 


1 Punch. 
1 Roast. 
1 Cold salad. 
1 Hot sweet dessert. 
2 Cold sweet desserts. 
( 2 Ices. 
| Dessert. 


1 Punch. 
1 Roast, salad. 


1 Punch. 
1 Roast, salad. 


1 Hot sweet dessert. 
2 Cold sweet desserts. 
( 2 Ices. 
j Dessert. 


1 Hot dessert. 


( 1 Ice. 
( Dessert. 


1 
2 
8 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
18 

14 


Figure 510 covers. 
10 minutes. 1 hour 42. 
8 minutes. 1 hour 20. 


Figure 6 8 covers. 
16 minutes. 1 hour SO. 
8 minutes. 1 hour 12. 


Figure ~ 6 covers. 
16 minutes. 1 hour 20. 
8 minutes. 1 hour 10. 


Figure 8 4 covers. 
10 minutes. 1 hour 10. 
8 minutes. 56. 


Figure 9 4 covers. 
10 minutes. 1 hour. 
8 minutes. 48. 


Oysters. 
2 Soups. 
S. D. hot and cold. 
1 Fish, potatoes. 
1 Remove, veg'bles. 
1 Entree, veg'bles. 


Oysters. 
2 Soups. 


Oysters. 
1 Soup. 


Oysters. 
1 Soup. 


Oysters. 
1 Soup. 


1 Fish, potatoes. 


1 Fish, potatoes. 


1 Fish, potatoes. 


1 Fish, potatoes. 


1 Entree, veg'bles. 
1 Entree, veg'bles. 


1 Entree, veg'bles. 


1 Entree, veg'bles. 


2 Entree, veg'bles. 










1 Punch. 
1 Roast, salad. 


1 Punch. 
1 Roast, salad. 


1 Punch. 
1 Roast, salad. 


1 Punch. 
1 Roast, salad. 




1 Roast, salad. 


1 Hot sweet dess'rt. 


1 Hot sweet dess'rt. 


1 Hot sweet dess'rt. 










( 1 Ice. 
| Dessert. 


( 1 Ice. 
( Dessert. 


( 1 Ice. 
\ Dessert. 


j 1 Ice. 
i Dessert. 




Dessert. 



TABLE SERVICE. 5 

THE DINNER TABLE, RECEPTION TABLE SERVICE AND WINES. (Le Convert, Reception, 

Service de Table et les Vins.) 

TABLE SERVICE FOR TWENTY-FOUR PERSONS. 

An oblong shaped table is preferable for a large dinner party, the feet being less incommo- 
dious; it must at least be six or seven feet wide and twenty-two feet long, with rounded ends. This 
shaped table is most generally used, although some prefer round, or horse-shoe ones, or an oblong 
with square ends, and many other fanciful shapes, depending entirely on the size of the room and 
the taste of the host. 

Tables can be lengthened according to the number of seats desired ; the space allowed for 
each guest is, for a square table with square ends, two feet apart between each plate; when the 
ends are curved, the space for the corners must be twenty-two inches apart, and if entirely round, 
twenty inches. 

Cover a table twenty-two by seven with a felt cover made for the purpose, then over this lay a 
tablecloth twenty-four feet long and eight or nine feet wide, being careful that it is exceedingly 
white and smooth, having no creases whatever. 

Fold a well starched, large napkin, pinch it triangularly, and place it in the center of the 
table; have twenty-four smaller napkins also well starched, folded and pinched, and place these at 
the edge of the table and on each one set a plate with another napkin on top, folded either shaped 
as a boat, a tulip, or any other pretty design, or else the napkin may be simply folded square. 

The bread is placed either under the folds or in the center of the napkin, according to the 
manner in which it is displayed, or on a small plate to the left of the cover. Another way is to 
place the bread in front of the napkin. 

On the left of each plate, lay a table fork and also a fish fork. 

On the right set a table knife, a silver fish knife, a soup spoon, also a small fork for oysters or 
Little Neck clams 

In front, but slightly toward the right of each plate, set a small individual salt-cellar. The 
double silver pepper castors containing black and red pepper are distributed two on each side, and 
two at each end of the table, with eight single ones between the double ones. 

Glasses are placed in a semi-circle either in front of the plate or else on the right; arrange 
these according to the courses to be served. First, water glass; second, white wine; third, sherry; 
fourth, Rhine wine; fifth, champagne; and sixth, Bordeaux. 

Before serving the entrees remove the white wine, Sherry and Rhine wine glasses and 
replace them by fine Bordeaux and Burgundy glasses. Glasses intended for dessert wines and 
liquors, are only put on the table with the dessert. 

THE CENTER LINE OF THE TABLE. 

In the center of the table have a large piece of silverware decorated with plants, ferns and 
natural flowers, or else a high vase or simply a basket of flowers. These baskets or other decora- 
tions may be filled with one, or several kinds of variegated flowers, mingling red and white, scarlet 
and lilac, or Parma violets, or tulips and orchids, these produce a brilliant effect. (The entire 
house, staircases, halls, etc., may also be decorated with plants, palms, lemon and orange trees, 
or rubber plants. Mantels and mirrors to be also wreathed with flowers, or else scattered about in 
clusters, and have hanging baskets tastefully arranged in prominent corners, so as to add to the 
general beautiful effect.) 

On each side of the center piece and on the center line have two prettily arranged baskets con- 
taining seasonable or hot-house fruits; on each side of these, set an ornamental piece, either made 
of nougat, gum-paste or sugar candy, or should these high pieces not be desirable, others may be 
substituted either of bronze, or else stands covered with flowers, etc. 

On each end of these pieces set either candelabras or lamps, and beyond these high stands of 
graduated tiers filled with bonbons, cornucopias, Victorias, bonbon boxes, etc., all of them form- 
ing the center line of the table. Around this line, and at about twenty to twenty-four inches from 
the edge, draw a line the same shape as the table, and on this place decanter stands for decan- 
tered wine; two for sherry, four for white wine, and four for red Bordeaux, making ten in all, and 
the same quantity of decanter stands for decanters containing water, or instead of ten, twenty- 
four smaller ones may be substituted, one for each person. 

Place at intervening spaces, two compote dishes with stewed fruits, four stands for small 
fancy cakes, two compote dishes for candied or dried fruits, nuts, etc., or else fresh strawberries, 
raspberries or mulberries, if in season, a saucerful for each person, and finish by interlacing 
through these dishes as well as the decanters, strings of smilax or any other pretty creeping vine, 



6 THE EPICUREAN. 

following around about twenty-four inches from the edge of the table; set into this verdure at 
various parts, clusters of natural flowers. A table arranged according to this description will be 
found to have a most charming and pleasing effect. 

The diagram of the table should be obtained, and have the names of each guest tastefully 
written on fancy cards ; lay one of these on the right hand glass of each person, in a promi- 
nent manner so that it can be read from a distance which will greatly facilitate the seating of the 
guests. Procure bouquets of flowers for the ladies, set in fancy vases, tying them with ribbons, 
and having a pin attached to enable them to fasten them on to their dresses; gentlemen's button- 
hole bouquets should also be placed in vases. All these flowers must be in front, but slightly 
toward the left of each person. 

The bills of fare or menus should be placed on the left side, either in silver stands (Fig. 197), 
or set beside the plate. 

Tne host should always be seated so as to face the door leading into the dining-room. The 
hostess on the other end of the table directly opposite, their respective seats being at the top and 
bottom of the table. The seat of honor for a lady is on the right hand of the host, and naturally 
on the right hand of the hostess for a gentleman. The left hand may also be utilized as seats of 
honor but of minor importance. A dining room should be kept at a comfortable temperature. 
The sideboard should be placed at one side of the table, and on this or in the drawers and com- 
partments everything must be arranged in thorough order so as to have them handy, thus avoiding 
all confusion during dinner. 

The entire dessert service including wines to be arranged tastefully on the sideboard, giv- 
ing a very pretty effect to the room. A service table must either be in the dining-room behind 
a screen or in a pantry close by; it must contain one or several carving boards, sundry knives and 
forks, ladles, chafing dishes, etc. The service must be rapid and the dishes served hot; avoid 
having anything cooked in advance except the large pieces. Entries and all smaller dishes should 
be prepared according to their successive order, as the dinner progresses, at an interval of two 
or three courses, which means about ten or twenty minutes apart. A good steward can always 
manage to protract the dinner in case the cook is behind time, but it is his duty to inform those in 
the kitchen at least ten minutes beforehand so as to prevent any possible delay; he must also have 
a duplicate bill of fare from the kitchen identical with the one on the table, and classified accord- 
ing to the service, so as to be able to consult it in order to know exactly which dish follows the other. 

When the dinner is ready, the steward must place his help in their respective posi- 
tions, and give them final instructions regarding their duties; they should be attired in dress 
suits, white ties and gloves, and wear no jewelry whatever. In order to serve a ceremonial dinner 
for twenty-four persons, it will require: a steward, a butler, a carver and six waiters; carefully 
intrusting the care of the wines to the most intelligent, and the carving to the most expert; the 
remaining six being for the special table service, they must remain in their respective places to be 
at the call of the guests should their services be required. 

RECEPTION. 

The gentlemen are to be received by a waiter, who before introducing them into the reception 
room, takes their overeoats, canes, hats, umbrellas, etc., leaving these articles in a place set 
aside for this purpose, near the reception room, then hands each gentleman an envelope addressed 
to himself in which there will be found a card bearing the name of the lady he is to escort to the 
dining-room, and who is to be seated on his right hand during dinner. 

Two other waiters attired in full dress, introduce the gentlemen into the reception room ad- 
joining the dining-room, the doors to the latter being closed; in the reception room there should 
be a small Russian buffet, or simply serve some sherry, Xeres, bitters, vermuth and absinthe, to 
be handed round on trays to each guest as he arrives. 

It is absolutely necessary to have a lady's maid to receive the ladies, lay aside their outer gar- 
ments, or any article they may desire to confide to her care; these must be arranged in such a 
manner as to be easily returned to their respective owners. 

The maid must remain and wait, in order to be continually at the disposal of the lady guests. 

"When all the invited guests have arrived and been duly introduced, the dinner hour having 
struck, the steward opens the dining-room doors bows to the host, this being the signal to an- 
nounce that dinner is served. 

The hostess enters the dining-room first, on the arm of the gentleman in whose honor the din- 
ner is given, followed by the other guests, the host being last. Each one sits down at the seats 
indicated on the cards, and when all are comfortably seated the dinner begins. 



TABLE SERVICE. 7 

The service must be performed silently, a look alone from the steward sufficing for each man 
to do his duty. Every article handed round must be on a silver salver. 

THE SERVICE. 

Oysters. Little Neck clams are passed around, beginning on one side by the lady on the right 
and the other side by the gentleman on the right, these being the most distinguished guests ; 
change this method at each course, those being served last before, being the first now. 

The butler will pour out the Chablis, stating the name of each wine he serves. 

Soup. There are usually two soups to select from. While serving green turtle offer at the 
same time lemon cut in quarters. 

Sherry should be served with this course. 

Side Dishes. Pass hot hors-d'oeuvre ; these are served on warm plates. Serve the cold 
hors d'oeuvre at the same time, and should the guest prefer the latter, remove the hot plate at 
once and substitute a cold one for it. 

Sherry or Xeres should accompany this course. 

Fish. If there be two kinds of fish, offer the selection, and pass round the one preferred; should 
it be boiled or braized fish, have potatoes served at the same time; if broiled or sauted thinly sliced 
seasoned fresh cucumbers must accompany it, and if fried fish such as whitebait, serve with thin 
slices of buttered brown bread and quarters of lemon. 

Serve Rhine wine or white Bordeaux. 

Removes or Solid Joints. The removes may be placed on the table before being taken off for 
carving; if it be a saddle of venison, it should be cooked rare, passing currant jelly at the same 
time. A saddle of mutton must also be rare and very hot; it can be cut lengthwise at an angle in 
thin slices or across, although the first way is preferable; serve both these on very hot plates, and 
have one or two vegetables accompanying them. 

Serve champagne. 

Entrees. The entrees must be served one after the other without placing them on the table 
beforehand; they must be served on hot plates with one vegetable for each entree, to be either 
passed round separately or else carefully laid on the same plate, unless it is desired that they be 
dressed; in this case dress and present to each guest. Serve Bordeaux at the first entree, and an 
extra quality of wine at the last ; continue serving champagne to those who prefer to drink it until 
the roast. 

INTERVAL. SECOND SERVICE. 

Iced Punch or Sherbet. Should there be no ladies present, cigarettes can be handed round at 
the same time. Remove the two white wine and sherry glasses, and replace them by those used for 
Burgundy, also remove the cold side dishes. Ten to fifteen minutes must now be allowed between 
the courses. 

Roasts. The roast may be displayed on the table before carving, this being frequently 
requested by epicures; should there be several roasts, carve them all at the same time and pass 
them round according to desire, adding a little watercress for poultry, and should there be can- 
vas-back duck, let currant jelly and fried hominy be served with also a mayonnaise of celery. 

Serve the Burgundy from bottles laid flat in baskets (Fig. 767) holding the basket in the right 
hand and a white napkin in the left. 

Cold. Serve the cold dishes after the roast, these to be either goose livers (foies-gras) with 
truffles or boned turkey. The foies-gras must have a spoon to remove it with, and the boned 
turkey be cut into thin slices, and offer both to the guest at the same time, accompanied by green 
salads. 

Serve Johannisberg or Vin de Faille. 

Now remove everything from the table with the exception of the dessert, and to avoid using a 
brush lift up the extra napkins in front of each person, folding them in two so that the table is 
neat and clean without being obliged to use a brush or scraper. Lay the dessert plates on the 
table, and continue the service for the hot dessert. 

Hot Sweet Entremets. Make a distinct service for the hot entremets, then serve the cheese. 

Serve a fine Laffitte Bordeaux. 

Cold Sweet Entremets. Make another service for the cold entremets and ices. 

Dessert. Instead of serving the cheese after the hot entremets it may be done now, which is 
in fact its proper place; pass around the fresh fruits, stewed, candied and dried fruits, bonbon 
cases, bonbons, mottoes, ices, strawberries and raspberries with cream when in season, passing 
cakes around at the same time. 



THE EPICUREAN. 



Serve Madeira wine, Muscatel and Frontignan, also plates of salted almonds. 

CONCLUSION OF THE DINNER. 

It is now time for the hostess to bow, push back her chair and prepare to rise, this being a 
signal for the ladies to retire: after they have returned to the drawing-room, coffee is passed 
round on a salver containing spoons, hot water, sugar and cream. A few moments later another 
waiter comes forward with an empty tray to remove the cups the ladies hand him. 

The gentlemen partake of their coffee in the dining-room; at the same time servp them Kirsch, 
brandy, chartreuse, cigars and cigarettes. The doors are closed and the ladies and waiters have re- 
tired so as to allow the gentlemen more freedom to talk among themselves, still it will be necessary 
to enter the drawing room and dining-room occasionally in order to see whether anything be 
needed so as to avoid being called as much as possible. 

After half an hour or so, the gentlemen will rejoin the ladies in the drawing-room and then 
tea is served. The tea service is accomplished by passing around on trays, tea, sugar, hot water, 
cream, cups, spoons and slices of lemon. A few moments later another waiter removes the empty 
cups on a tray. 

After the tea the service is considered to be ended. 




FRENCH SERVICE (Service a la Tranpaise). 

There are two different services in use: The French and the Russian. 

Although recognizing the priority of both of these services, it will be well to mention the dif- 
ference existing between them and the English and the American service; first, they differ in the 
classification of the bills of fare and certain changes in the table service, these alone are sufficient 
to be interesting. 

The old style of French service threatens to disappear entirely and is rarely used, except on 
very rare occasions. 

The three services placed on the table, one after the other, had certainly the advantage of 
displaying the culinary labor as well as the most variegated and rare products by exhibiting them 
in all their profuseness. But the great inconvenience is the preparation of dishes beforehand in 
the kitchen in order to have each service ready at once and to keep them hot in heaters before 
beginning to serve the dinner. 

The dishes for the first course are placed on tne table in chafing dishes provided with covers, 
to be lifted off when the guests are seated, and left on the table till ready to be carved. 

Of course this inconvenience is somewhat remedied by keeping the heaters and chafing dishes 
at a given heat, and there must be placed near the table, either behind a screen in the dining- 
room or else in an adjoining pantry, a bain-marie with all the necessary sauces required for the 



TABLE SERVICE. 9 

dinner, and as soon as the meats are carved, each one is to be covered with its respective sauce 
before being handed around. 

But notwithstanding all possible care and attention the entrees are apt to lose much of their 
finer qualities by the very act of being cooked and dressed beforehand, then kept hot in these 
heaters or chafing dishes. 

Still this could scarcely have been the sole cause for abandoning the old system, for it con- 
tinued in usage for several centuries. "We are, however, obliged to recognize that first-class 
families have ceased to make a display of the great luxuriousness indulged in, in the past; to-day 
they are more restrained, the help less numerous and the chief cook frequently alone with one 
kitchen assistant, having no longer an extra man for pastry, confectionery and ices. The chef 
himself must see to the preparation of the pastry, ices and desserts. There is now scarcely to be 
found any house where for twelve persons they employ a chef, an assistant and a pastry cook and 
the remainder of the help corresponding to this great amount of luxury. 

The bills of fare are simpler; instead of dressing and arranging the service on the table itself, 
many houses have a mixed service; this is made by presenting the dishes on the table, then 
removing them to be carved. 

The general desire of the day is to dine quicker; taste changes with the fashion. The old 
French service is fast disappearing, and as it becomes more simple it gradually evolves into a 
mixed Russian and French service. 

FRENCH SERVICE FOR 24 PERSONS (Service a la Frangaise pour 24 Converts). 

The first service is composed of hors-d'oeuvre (side dishes), two soups, two removes, four hot 
entries, or two cold and two hot entrees. 

Remove the cold hors-d'oeuvre; serve the punch or sherbet. 

The second service is composed of two roasts to take the place of the removes; four entremets, 
two being of vegetables, one hot sweet entremets and one cold; these to replace the entrees; two 
entremets cakes to take the place of the cold entrees. 

Prepare the table for the dessert. 

The third service, or dessert, is composed of two shelved stands filled with bonbons, victorias, 
bonbon boxes, cossacks, two low stands or drums containing small fancy cakes, two basketfuls of 
fresh fruits, two assorted compotes, one orange jelly, one Bar-le-Duc jelly and two cheeses; two 
fancy pieces of nougat or candied sugar to replace the entremets cakes. 

The wines should be selected and served as indicated in another chapter, according to the taste 
and desire of the host. 

FRENCH SERVICE, DINNER FOR 24 PERSONS-TO SET THE TABLE (Service a la Fra^aise, 

Diner de 24 Converts Le Convert), 

The table must be sixteen to eighteen feet long and six to seven feet wide, with rounded cor- 
ners, covered with a table-cloth and having exactly in the center a high stand or epergne, or piece 
of silverware or bronze, filled with flowers. Continue the middle line with candelabras or 
lamps; leave a place for the chafing dishes and between these arrange the cold hors-d'oeuvre. 
Set the plates, the glasses to form a semicircle in front; the spoons and knives on the right and the 
forks on the left. 

Commence serving the most honored guest on each right side, and begin each separate service 
at the person served the last. 

All the dishes intended for the table should be dressed tastefully and the edges decorated with 
open- worked noodle borders; the meats laid symmetrically, the borders to be neither too high nor 
too much spread so that the dish covers can fit on easily; light bread borders can also be used. 

Decorate the meats with trimmed hatelets just before olacing them on the table. 

NECESSARY MATERIAL FOR 24 PERSONS (Materiel Nfcessaire ponr 24 Converts). 

Let the china, glassware, silver, cutlery and linen be as much alike as possible, have the 
glasses all plain or cut of the same pattern and shape; the china either all white, colored or gilt; 
the linen plain or damasked with large or small designs. 

The plates must be changed at each service as well as the knives and forks, they must be 



10 



THE EPICUREAN. 



washed immediately and used again for the following services, otherwise there will be as many 
knives and forks needed as plates, consequently far more material. 

24 soup plates. 24 dessert knives and forks. 

24 side-dish plates. 72 large forks. 

72 dinner plates. 72 steel knives. 

48 dessert plates. 24 silver or gilt knives. 

24 soupspoons. 24 side-dish knives and forks. 

24 coffee after-dinner cups. 24 coffeespoons 

Small salt cellars and pepper casters, one for each person. 



12 radish dishes for 24 persons. 

A glass or silver knife rester for each person. 

8 silver toothpick holders. 

24 wine decanters and water bottles. 

2 soup tureens. 

2 chafing dishes and covers for removes. 

4 chafing dishes and covers for entrees. 

2 chafing dishes and covers for roasts. 

24 water glasses. 

24 Chablis glasses. 

24 Bordeaux glasses. 

24 Frontignan glasses. 

24 fine Bordeaux glasses. 



2 shelved stands. 

2 silver baskets for fruits. 

2 drums for fancy cakes. 

2 dishes for jellies. 

2 dishes for cheese. 

4 compote stands. 

4 dishes and covers for vegetables. 

2 dishes for cold entrees. 

24 sherry glasses. 

24 Burgundy glasses. 

24 liquor glasses. 

24 Champagne flutes or goblets. 

24 punch or sherbet glasses. 



Fine Baccarat glass is the handsomest; keep in reserve glasses of all kinds in case of an 
accident. 

The oil and vinegar caster, as well as the mustard pot, are to be passed around according to 
necessity. 




KUSSIAN SERVICE (Service & la Eusse). 

The habit we have of eating everything very hot and very fast comes to us from the " Russian 
service:" it differs from the French service in the very fact that nothing hot appears on the table, 
everything is cut up as needed, either in the kitchen or pantry. The carving should be performed 



TABLE SERVICE. 11 

very neatly, having all the pieces of even size and placed at once symmetrically either in a circle or 
straight row on dishes for ten or less persons, then passed round to the guests, who help them- 
selves or are helped, according to their wish. 

As for the solid joints, removes or roasts, they can be served precisely the same, or else laid on 
very hot plates and handed directly to each guest. There must be a sufficiency of every kind of 
entree to serve for every person present. Should there be several and a variety of roasts and only 
one service required, then carve a third part of each one, or more of one than the other if certain 
dishes seem to be preferred. If there be several removes the same course can be pursued. As 
soon as one course is being passed around, the following one should be brought from the kitchen 
so that the dinner can be served uninterruptedly and eaten while hot and palatable. 

The cold meat pieces may be dressed and arranged on the table the same as the candelabras, 
silverware, bronze vases and flower baskets, all of these to be in the center line of the table, leav- 
ing eighteen inches of space uncovered between the end of the line and the edge of the table; 
between this center line and the edge draw a round or oval or any other desirable shape at eigh- 
teen inches above the edge. If there be two cold meat pieces lay them on the sides of the table 
and in the center of the line, and if four, then two at the sides and two at the ends in the center, 
if eight then have four at the corners between the sides and ends on the eighteen-inch line above 
the edge; finish to decorate this line with cold sweet dishes, baskets of fresh fruits, shelved stands 
filled with bonbons, cossacks, Victorias, drums containing small fancy cakes, competed dried 
fruits, etc., all these ornaments give the table a charming effect and should be arranged 
before the guests enter the dining-room. 

The straight line alone and the cold meat pieces can be also arranged, finishing at eighteen 
inches from the edge with garlands of leaves and flowers instead of the dessert, and when ready to 
serve the cold pieces, take them off and replace them by the taller desserts, shelved stands and 
drums, ranging the others here and there, half on either side of the table between the middle line 
and the flowers. 

Hot sweet entremets are always served as extras or " flying dishes," after the vegetables. 

The service is far less sumptuous and elegant than the French one, yet it pleases many and 
is very fashionable at the present time. The remainder of the service is exactly like the French. 

The old-fashioned bills of fare for the Russian service were classed differently to those of 
to-day; further on they will be found in great variety, appertaining to different epochs and a 
selection can be made of those most suitable; the service remains invariably the same, the only 
change being in the bill of fare. 

It is the custom in Russia to serve the iced punches or sherbets after the fish, but it is cer- 
tainly preferable to wait until the entrees are removed. 

SUPPER. (Le Souper.) 
" To sleep easily one must sup lightly." 
SUPPER BUFFET. 

Supper buffets are dressed on tables twelve to twenty feet long by four to five feet wide ; larger 
or smaller according to the number of guests and the richness of the bill of fare. Be careful that 
every article on the table shows to the best advantage, arranging each dish in a tasteful manner, 
yet observing certain indispensable rules so to facilitate the service that the buffet can be replen- 
ished and the dishes removed without the slightest confusion. The warm dishes should be served 
continuously without any delay and only a few at the time. Place a large piece of silverware in the 
center of the table to contain fruits, following the middle line on the length, then two large bas- 
kets of flowers and two pieces either of nougat or sugar, both ornamented with candied fruits, 
then two large cold-meat pieces and two stands filled with bonbon boxes, mottoes, victorias and 
bonbons, afterward two candelabras, and two entremets cakes to finish. In the front place a 
decorated salmon, behind on the other side of the center line stand the tenderloin of beef, and on 
each side of the fish and tenderloin, two medium-sized meat pieces, then the drums or high stands 
filled with small cakes. After this the small cold entrees, such as sandwiches and small rolls filled 
with rillettes; at each end of the table arrange the chicken and lobster salads. On one end of the 
table have plenty of material handy (according to the importance of the bill of fare), for hot 
service; have plates, soup tureens and chafing-dishes; behind, near the tenderloin of beef, put the 
ices, jellies and charlottes. 

These suppers are usually served after the first part of the dancing order is finished between 



12 THE EPICUREAN. 

< 

eleven o'clock and one in the morning. Frequently small tables are used when there is sufficient 
room; these are generally reserved for the ladies. 

HOT DISHES. 

First part. The soup is either consomme in cups, or barley cream, or rice and almond milk. 
These must be perfectly clear in order to serve them in cups the same as the consomme. 

Oysters prepared in different styles: Fricasseed, Hollandaise, Bechamel, poulette, Viennese, 
crawfish sauce, etc.; oysters fried or stuffed, small bouchees filled with salpicon, chicken or 
game croquettes, sweetbreads, lobster, etc., Timbales and mousselines; terrapin, Maryland or 
Newburg for white, Baltimore and Maryland Club for brown; red-head ducks and canvas-back, also 
quails and squabs and sometimes deviled crabs, stuffed lobsters, scallops a la Brestoise or frog 
croquettes. 

COLD DISHES. 

Second part. Decorate the table with hors-d'oeuvre composed of radishes, olives, celery, 
anchovy toasts etc. 

Large pieces such as a richly decorated salmon, a tenderloin of beef garnished with vege- 
tables, boned turkey and capon, ham stuffed with pistachio nuts and truffles, a suckling pig, a 
boar's head, large dishes of turkey and capon, truffled or otherwise. Volieres of peacock, young 
swans, pheasants and guinea fowls ornamented with their natural feathers, large terrines of Stras- 
burg foies-gras, woodcock, snipe, reedbirds, quails, leverets, veal kernels and game " pains," en 
damier; bastions of roast game on croutons and garnished with fresh water-cress, pyramids of 
lobsters and crawfish and truffles. 

There are a great variety of elegant entrees, and among others the following ones may bo 
selected: 

Aspics of all kinds, red beef tongue, foies-gras, fillets of chickens, oysters, etc. ; white and 
brown chaufroids of partridge and chicken, also ravigote ducks, galantines of chicken, cream of 
pigeons, squabs and quails covered with chaufroid and decorated with black truffles and very green 
pistachio nuts; smoked and unsmoked tongue well glazed and dressed pyramid form; lamb chops 
au vert pre, ballotines of quails and squabs, ducklings pear shaped and thrushes a la Perigord; 
terrines of Nerac and ducks' livers a la Toulouse and young rabbit a la mode de Rouen; pains of 
chicken or game. Entrees of larks and reedbirds, chicken mayonnaise; lobster, shrimp, crab and 
salmon salads, also salad a la Russe, and at equal distances have plates of small breads garnished 
with rillettes and fine sandwiches. 

Select from all this gastronomical wealth those dishes liable to satisfy the appetite and at the 
same time make a beautiful display on the table. 

SWEET ENTREMETS AND DESSERTS. 

Third part. Intersperse among the cold dishes, liquor and fruit jellies, bavarois, " pains" of 
rice puddings, blanc-manges and charlotte russes, assorted creams and crowns, waffles filled with 
whipped cream, macedoines, assorted large dessert cakes, and timbales of waffles, brisselets and 
wheelbarrows of small meringues with flowers or fruits, horn of plenty and Sultan vases, cherry 
baskets, high mounted pieces of gum paste, royal icing, nougat, sugar candy, marchpane and 
almond paste. Fancy variegated ices, such as virgin cream and biscuit glace, tutti-frutti, Monte- 
limar, Neapolitan, harlequin, bombs and delicious creams with nuts; parfait with coffee and 
burnt almond cream, chestnut mousse and souffles sabayon; sponge and plombiere with fruits, 
Nesselrode puddings and fiori di latte; pineapple water ices and Favart souffles; fresh, seasonable 
and hot-house fruits; compotes of fruits, small fancy cakes, Genoese cakes and others iced; bon- 
bons, Victorias, cornucopias, Cossacks, mottoes and bonbon boxes. 

This third part of the menu is certainly the prettiest and most coquettish, and with these lux- 
uries ends the selection of dishes from which an elegant table may be set. 

Drinks. Champagne, Bordeaux, Burgundy, wine punches, lemonades, grenadine and syrups 
of raspberry, currant or orgeat, coffee or tea. 

AMBIGU. 

A meal usually offered cold without any soup, and set on a table where removes are served at 
the same time, also entrees, side dishes and sweet desserts, and in which the service is blended 
into one, for no dishes are to be removed. Certain breakfasts, hunting luncheons, and supper? 
served in the midst of a ball, are also all called ambigu. 



TABLE SERVICE. 13 

SERVICE FOR LUNCHEONS. 

Lunch is a small repast indulged in between breakfast and dinner. This meal is called lunch 
in English, in French gouter or taste, because it is less heavy than the others, and, as generally very 
little is eaten, it is only tasted. In France this old custom only exists in country towns where 
breakfast is very matinal; the English and Americans also lunch, for they breakfast early and 
only dine toward six or seven o'clock, therefore lunch is an indispensable meal with them. Larger 
and more ceremonious luncheons are frequently served; these are called " dinner luncheons," and 
many bills of fare for their preparation will be found later on. For family luncheons there are 
generally served cold meats, light entries, sandwiches, pastries, ices, preserves, etc., 

LUNCHEON FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, OR FOR LADIES ONLY, OR 

GENTLEMEN ONLY. 

FOR LADIES ONLY. 

Although set with more simplicity than the dinner table, nothing elegant must be lacking; 
in the center of the table place a flower decoration, either a double cornicopia, or a boat, or two 
dossers set back to back, or a vase, or a temple, etc. , according to the reason the lunch was offered 
to the guests. On each side place a piece made of nougat, one of spun sugar, and at each end a 
high stand on tiers filled with bonbons, Victorias, mottoes, etc. 

At eighteen or twenty-four inches from the edge, according to the width of the table, draw a 
line the same shape as the table and lay on this decanters of white and sherry wines, also water 
decanters, one for every two persons; two fruit dishes, four containing small fancy cakes, and 
TWO of dried fruits. Set semicircular around each plate as many glasses as there are wines; on the 
right hand lay a card bearing the name of the guest, and on the left a dress or buttonhole bou- 
quet and the menu standing against the flower vase. Decorate the sideboard with the dessert 
service; carve the meats near the dining-room, and see that everything is served very hot. Let 
the wines be of a proper temperature, and specify each one while serving it; as soon as every- 
thing is in complete order, open the doors and bow, which means that the lunch is ready, and the 
guests may assemble in the dining-room to take their places at the seats designated on their cards, 
f he service begins the same as the dinner and continues likewise until the coffee is served, when 
the ladies retire to the drawing-room to partake of theirs, to listen to music, or to withdraw 
unceremoniously. 

If the lunch should be intended for gentlemen only, suppress all ornamentation except the 
flowers and fruits; the menu should be more substantial, and if for ladies and gentlemen together, 
serve the same as for a dinner, observing the same etiquette. 

MEAT BREAKFAST (Dejeuner k la Fourchette). 

A meat breakfast is composed of broiled meats, cold meat, fish, eggs, croustades, fried dishes, 
sweets and dessert. 

BILL OF FARE. 

COLD SIDE DISHES. MELON. 

Radishes, celery, olives, anchovies, caviare, sardines, fresh butter, artichokes poivrade, smoked 
breasts of goose, canape's of ham, gherkins, shrimps, mortadella, cucumbers, Lyons sausage, 
mackerel in oil, tomatoes and pickles. 

Oysters or Little Neck clams. 

FISH. 

Broiled mackerel, shad, smelts, perch, trout, herrings. 
Fried codfish, fillets of flounders, whitebait, frost fish. 
Baked sheepshead, baas, English soles, redsnapper, kingfish. 
Boiled salmon, grouper, halibut, skate, cod's tongues. 
Sauted weakfish, lobsters, mussels, bluefish, whitefish. 

EGGS. 
Omelets, scrambled, fried, poached, boiled soft and hard, soft, moulded or on a dish. 

ENTREES. 

Broiled pig's feet, sausages, blood sausages, sliced venison. 
Fried chicken, tendons of lamb, crawfish cutlets. 
Sauted tripe, chicken, kidneys, tournedos, calf's liver. 



14 



THE EPICUREAN. 



'v 

Baked sweetbreads, lamb chops in papers, quails, pigeons in cases. 

Braized calf's head, sheep's trotters, grenadins of veal. 

Broiled porterhouse steak, sirloin steak, tenderloin of beef, veal, mutton and lamb chops. 

COLD. 

Game pie, terrine of goose-livers (foies-gras.) 
Boned duck, chicken mayonnaise. 

ROAST. 

Game or broiled or roast poultry, with green salad. 

SWEET ENTREMETS AND DESSERT. 

If so far no eggs have been mentioned in the bill of fare, then fruit or spirituous omelets of all 
kinds may be served, or else Celestine omelet, snow souffle, etc., but in case eggs have already 
been used, then diversify the bill of fare by giving fritters, crusts, pancakes, pears, apples, peaches, 
etc. Have also pies, tarts and cakes as well as cheese and fresh fruit. 

Coffee and Liquors. 

THE BREAKFAST TABLE. 

The breakfast table must be laid simpler, although with as much care and taste as for all 
other meals; naturally there is less ceremony to be observed for a breakfast, the simplicity of the 
bill of fare and wines rendering it far easier to serve. The hors-d'ceuvre and fruit may be placed 
on the table, and when a dressy appearance is desired, flowers or high cold pieces, such as meat 
pies, chaufroids, aspics, trout or salmon, may also be added. 

The service for the wines and cooking is exactly the same as for a dinner. 

SUPPLIES (Approvisionnements). 

Good cooking is only obtained by having all the ingredients healthy, appetizing and nutri- 
tious; the stomach must not be fatigued, and yet the eye and the palate have to be somewhat flat- 
tered. A dish may be more or less simple, more or less difficult, but it must satisfy the taste and 
to obtain this result a cook should only use the best materials and those of the very freshest. 

All the supplies should be of the very first choice; the best cook in the world can fail to work 
properly unless the provisions are of the best. A cook anxious to perform his duty must pay the 
strictest attention to the selection of the food; this alone constitutes a science based on a deep 
knowledge and long practice. 

Beef must have light red, marbled meat, the fat being firm to the touch. 

Veal meat to be white and firm, also its fat. 

Mutton has red meat firm and marbled, the fat to be white. 

Pork must be carefully selected from pigs raised on acorns or corn, having firm, white meat, 
and firm, white, brittle fat. 

Chickens to be plump, the breast bone flexible, the ribs easily cracked. Pinch the pinion 
bones to see whether they are tender; the same of turkeys, other poultry and game. Old fowls 
can never replace young chickens, therefore use them as little as possible. A fish is to have a 
clear, fresh eye and must be firm to the touch; mistrust it as soon as the belly flesh becomes soft; 
the smell will indicate whether it be fresh or stale; the same of crustaceans. 

Vegetables to be selected of the very freshest. 

bruits by their appearance and taste. 

TABLE OF SUPPLIES. 
FISH AND SHELL FISH. 

Index for American Fish and when they are in Season. S indicates when in season. 









> 














fc. 

a> 

-2 


h 


a> 

^2 


S 


FISH. 


POISSONS. 


* 


S 


| 


_ 




0> 




in 

3 


S 


a> 

^5 


Q 
9 


a 

V 








.Q 






^*> 


c 


^* 


bfi 




2 




6 








V 






?2 




3 







u 


O 


B 






-5 


fc 


& 


< 


^ 




-5 


< 


02 


O 


k; 


Q 


Angel or moon 
















g 


g 










Bass, lake or black. . . . 


Bass de Lac 












s 


g 


s 


s 


s 


g 


s 


" sea 


" de Mer 










15 


g 


g 


g 


g 


g 






" striped 


" Bar 


g 


ij 


g 


o 


g 


g 




g 


g 


g 


g 


g 


Black fish or tautoe;. . . 


Tautog 








g 


g 


g 


g 


g 


g 


g 






Bluefish 












S 


S 


S 


s 


g 


s 







TABLE OF SUPPLIES. 



15 



FISH AND SHELL FISH. CONTINUED. 
Index for American fish, and when they are in season. S indicates when in season. 



FISH. 


POISSONS 


IN 

at 

a 

5 


February 


.a 

o 
ft 
oj 


Pi 


fr 


CD 

a 

3 

'-s 


~3 


to 

3 


September 


October I 


November 


December 


Bonito . . 


Bonite 












s 


S 


s 


S 


S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 

s 

15 






Butterfish. 




S 


S 


S 


s 




S 

"s" 

s 
s 
s 
s 

15 

S 

s 
s 


020202020202020202. 02 


Carp, common & Buffalo 
" German 


Carpe ordinaire 






15 


s 


S 


" miroir 


S 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 


S 

s 
s 
s 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 
s 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 
s 






Codfish 


Morue 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 

s 


S 
S 

s 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 


Eels 


An^uiHes 


Flounders or tiukes. . . 
Frost fish 


Plie, Limande 


Tacaud 


Grouper . . . 
















Haddock . 


Aiglefin 


s 

s 
s 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 
s 


S 

s 
s 
s 
s 


Halibut 


Fletan 


Herring 


Hareng. 


Kinfish. . 


Umbrine 


s 


s 


s 


s 

15 


s 

s 


Lafayette 












15 





Lamprev 


Lamproie ... ... 








s 
s 

15 


s 
s 
s 






Mackerel . . . . 


Maquereau 








s 
s 
s 
s 

. 


s 
s 
s 
s 


S 

s 

s 
s 


s 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 

' s 








" Spanish. . . . 
Mullet 


" Espagnol. 
Mulet 








15 

S 

s 
s 

s 
s 

15 

S 

s 
s 
















Muscalonge 


Masque allonge . . . 












S 

s 
s 
s 

15 

' s" 

s 
s 


S 

S 

s 
s 
s 

"s 

s 

s 


Perch 


Perche 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 


Pike perch. 
" or Pickerel 


Sand re 


1 - - - 




Brochet ou brocheton. 




s 
s 

15 


s 
s 
s 


s 


Pompano 










s 


Poi'rry. 


Sar^us 










Red Snapper 




s 

s 
s 
s 


s 

s 
s 
s 


s 

s 
s 
s 


s 
s 




Salmon, Kennebec ^ 
and Oregon J 
" trout 


( SaumonduKennebec 
(et de 1'Oregon 


s 


Ken 


Ken 


Ken 


Ken 


Truite saumonee 


Shad and roe 


Alose et oaufs 


s 


s 


15 
15 

S 








Sheepshead. 




S 


S 


S 

s 
s 


s 
s 
s 


15 

S 

s 
s 
s 


"s" 

s 
s 
s 


Skate 


Kaie 


s 
s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 
s 


s 
s 


s 

15 


s 


Smelts 
Sole, English 


Eperlans 
Sole Anglaise 




15 








Spot fish ... 




s 


s 


s 






S 
S 

s 


s 
s 


s 

15 


Sturgeon . .... 


Esturo'eon . 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 

15 


Trout, brook 


Truite de ruisseau . 








s 
s 


s 
s 






Turbot, American 
" English . . 


Turbot Americain .... 
" Anglais 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 
s 




















Weak fish 






15 

s 


s 
s 


S 

s 


s 
s 


s 
s 


15 

S 






Whitebait 


Blanchaille 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 




s 
s 


s 
s 


Whitefish 


Lavaret. . .... 























MISCELLANEOUS 



SHELL FISH : CRUSTACES ET COQUILLAGES-. 


Clams, hard 


Lucines orangees 
papillons. . 
Crabes durs . . 


02 02 02 


02 O2 O2 


s 
s 
s 


020202 


s 
s 

s 
s 


02020202 


s 


s 


s 


s 
s 
s 

15 

s 
s 


S 

s 

s 


02 02 02 


soft 


Crabs, hard 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 

15 
15 


" soft 


" inoux. 


Crawfish 


Ecrevisses 


S 
S 


S 

s 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 
s 


s 

s 


Lobsters 


Honiards 


s 

s 


s 
s 


s 

s 


s 
s 


Mussels 


Moules 


Oysters 


Huttres 


S 

s 


s 
s 


s 
s 

15 


s 


s 
s 

15 


s 
s 


s 
s 


Scallops. . 


Petoncles . 










Shrimps small 


Crevettes petites 


s 


s 



























Codfish tongues. . . 


Langues de inorue... . 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 










s 


s 


s 


Crabs, oyster 


Crabes d'huitres 


S 


s 


s 


S 


s 










s 


s 


s 


Frosrs . 


Grenouilles 


s 


s 


y 


s 


s 


Best 


Best 


Best 


Best 


Best 


s 


s 


Milts 


Laitances 


s 


y 


s 


s 


s 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


Terrapin 


Terrapene 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 












s 


s 




Tortue verte 


S 


s 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 




Chevrettes 












s 


s 


s 


s 


s 



































16 



THE EPICUREAN. 



FISH AND SHELL FISH. CONTINUED. 
Index for American Fish, and when they are in season. S indicates when in season. 







fc. 


1* 














t- 

a> 


h 


au 


1 


SALT FISH. 


POISSONS SALES 


a 


3 


,3 










03 




0) 
^ 


s 








3 




CM 





>^ 


5 


>, 


bfi 


" 


o 


> 








a 


<1> 




a 







3 


3 


Oi 


u 


o 


a> 






'-5 


f* 


"5 


"* 


^ 


^ 


*-i 


*! 


CO 


O 


^ 


Q 


Anchovies 


Anchois 


R 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


s 


S 


R 


R 


R 


Codfish dried ... 


Morue seche 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 


Herring 


Harengs 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 


" pickled 


" marines .... 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 


Mackerel . . 


Maquereau 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 


Prawns 


Crevettes 


s 


s 


s 












s 


R 


s 


R 


Salmon 


Saumon 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 































SMOKED FISH 


POISSONS FUMES: 


























Haddock, smoked or 
Finnan haddie 


Aiglefin 


S 


s 


s 














s 


s 


s 


Halibut 


Fletan 


s 


s 


s 














s 


s 


s 


Herring 


Haren" 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


" bloaters 




s 


s 


s 


s 












s 


s 


s 


" kippered. . . . 




s 


s 


s 


s 












s 


s 


s 


Mackerel 


Maquereau 


s 


s 


s 


s 












s 


s 


s 


Salmon 


Saumon 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


Shad 


A I ose 


s 


s 


s 


s 












s 


s 


s 


Sturgeon 


Esturgeon 


s 


s 


s 


s 












s 


s 


s 


Whitefish 


Lavaret 


s 


s 


s 


s 












s 


s 


s 































POULTRY. 

Index for Poultry and when it is in season. S indicates when in season. 
B indicates when the poultry is at its best. 



POULTRY. 


VOLAILLE. 


January 


February 


u 

fm 

as 

" 


"S 
p* 
< 


s 

s 


OS 

a 

a 
."-s 


_>> 

"3 

-S 


SB 

bC 

3 

< 


September 


October 


November 


December 


Capon 


Chapon 


s 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 










s 


Chicken, to broil 1J Ib? 
Sauter2lbs 
Roast 3 Ibs 
Braize 4 Ibs 
Duck, Mongrel 


PouletaGriller,li liv's 
Sauter, 2 " 
Rotir, 3 " 
" Braiser, 4 " 
Canards Metis . ... 


S 
S 

s 
s 
s 


S 

s 
s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 
s 
s 


s 
s 

s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 
s 


s 

s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 

s 


s 
s 
s 
s 


S 
S 

S 

s 
s 


S 

s 
s 
s 
s 


S 
S 

s 
s 
s 


S 
S 

s 
s 

s 


" tame 


" Domestiques 


i; 


B 


B 


B 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


B 


Duckling 


Caneton 










s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 




Fowl 


Poule. . . 


s 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


Geese 


Oie 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


" Mongrel 


" Metisse 


s 


s 


s 


s 










s 


s 


s 


s 


Gosling 


Oison 












15 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 




Guinea fowl 


Pmtade 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


Peacock 


Paon 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


Pigeon 
stall-fed 
Pullet 


Pigeon 
" engraisse . . . . 
Poularde 


s 
s 

s 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 

s 


s 
s 
s 


s 

s 
s 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 


s 
s 

s 


Squab 


Pigeonneau 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


is 


Turkey 


Dindon 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


E. R I 


" ex Ru'dels'nd 


It 


B 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


It 


B 


B 


B 


Young 


Dindonneau 


s 


s 


$ 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


B 


B 


B 


s 


Suckling pig. . 


Cochon de lait 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 































In case no fresh ones are procurable, frozen poultry can be found every day of the year. 



TABLE OF SUPPLIES. 



FRUITS. 



Index for Fruits and when they are in Season. S indicates when in season. 



FRUITS. 


FRUITS. 




at 

3 

a 

at 
>-s 


February 


A 

o 

u 

03 

^ 


' 


<! 


s> 

03 

& 


05 

3 


>> 

"3 
"^ 


en 
3 
bC 

3 

<5 


September 


October 


November 


December 


Alligator pears 


Avocats 














s 


S 


R 








Apples 


Pommes 


S 


S 


s 


s 


R 


s 


s 


S 


R 


R 


R 


s 


Apricots 


Abricots 














15 


15 










Bananas 


Bananes 


S 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 


s 


Barberries 


Epines Vinettes 




















R 


15 




Blackberries .... 


Mures 














s 


15 










Cherries 


Cerises 










s 


s 


15 












Chestnuts 


Marrons 


S 


s 


















R 


s 


Cocoanuts 


Xoix de Coco 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


S 


R 


R 


R 


s 


Currants, black & red. . 


Groseilles, cassis 














s 


15 










Fies 


Fiffues . . 




















15 






Ginger 


Gingembre 














15 


R 


R 


R 


R 


s 


Gooseberries 


Groseilles vertes ) 














s 












Grapes, Brighton 


dites a maquereau j" 
Raisins, Brighton.... 














s 


R 


R 


R 


R 




Concord 


Concord .... 














15 


R 


R 


R 


15 




Delaware 


Delaware . . . 














s 


R 


R 


15 






Hautfonds .... 


Hautfonds... 














s 


s 


R 


s 


R 




Hot house 


de serre 




s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 


15 


Ives 


Ives 














s 


R 


s 


s 


R 




Jona 


Jona 














s 


R 


R 


R 


R 




Malaga 


Malaga 


S 


s 


s 












R 


R 


R 


s 


Muscatel 


Muscatelle. . 














s 


R 


R 


s 


R 




Niagara . . . 


Niagara. . . . 














s 


R 


R 


R 


R 




Pokington 


Pokington . . 














s 


R 


R 


R 


R 




Rebecca 


Rebecca .... 














15 


R 


R 


R 


15 




Tokay 


Tokav 














s 


R 


R 


s 


R 




Grape fruit or shaddock 




S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 








R 


R 


s 


Green gages 


Reine Claude 
















R 


15 








Huckleberries 


Airelles 












15 


s 


s 










Lemons 


Citrons 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 


R 


Limes 


Poncires 


























Mangoes 


Mangoes 














s 


R 


R 








Melon, Cantaloup 


Melon, Cantaloup .... 














15 


R 


R 


15 






" Musk 


" Maraicher 














15 


R 


R 


15 






" Spanish 


" Espagnol ..... 






















R 




" Water 


" d'eau pasteque. 














s 


R 


R 


15 






Nectarines 


Brugnons 














s 


R 










Oranges, Florida 


Orange? de Floride. . . 


S 


s 


s 
















R 


R 


" Mandarins 


" Mandarines . . 


S 


s 




















R 


" Spanish 


" d'Espagne. . . 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 


R 


R 


Peaches 


Peches 














s 


R 


R 


15 






" hot house 


" de serre 










s 


R 














Pears 


Poires 


S 


s 


R 








15 


R 


R 


R 


R 


R 


Pineapples 


Ananas 


S 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


s 


R 


R 


R 


R 


R 


Plums 


Prunes 














s 


R 


R 








Persimmons 






















R 


15 




Pomegranates 


Grenades 


s 






















S 


Quiiifes 


Coin^s 


















R 


R 


R 




Raspberries 


Framboises 












s 


s 


R 










Strawberries 


Fraises .... 






s 


s 


s 


s 














' ' hot house 


" de serre 


s 


s 






















Tamarinds 


Tainarins 














s 


R 


R 








Tangerines 




s 




















R 


R 


Wintergreen 
















s 


R 


R 


R 


R 


R 




















i 











18 



THE EPICUREAN. 

GAME. 
Index for Game and when it is in Season. S indicates when in season. 



GAME. 


GIBIEB. 


fr 

a 

a 

& 


February 


a 


'C 

p. 


1 


05 

a 
>-> 


13 

1-3 


18 

a 
fee 


September 


October 


November 


December 


Antelope and Venison. 


















15 


S 


S 


15 

S 


"s" 




q 
















Courlis . 










S 


S 


S 


S 






' Lark 














S 


S 


S 


' Rail-chopper, or 




















S 


' Reed 


Mesange Moustache . 


















727272 


727272 


727272727272727272 72 72 72 72 GO GO GO GO GO 72 72 72 72727272 


727272; 727272G072 72 72 72 GO GO 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72727272 


Rice 


Oiseaux de Riziere. .. . 
Petits Oiseaux 


S 

s 
a 


S 
S 


S 

s 












Small 












Buffalo. 


Buffle 












Ducks, all kinds 


Canards de toutes- 
sortes . 


-f2 02 O2 72O2 02 : "; O: 72 O2 O2 72 


72 72 72 72 72 72 727272 72 72 


72727272727272GOG07272 


72727272GOGOGC72727272 










72 72 72727272727272 C.2&2 7272 


72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 GO 72 


Blackhead 


" a Tete noire. . . . 










Canvas-back ... 










Mallard . . . . 


" Malart 










Red head 


" Tete rouge 
Sarcelle ailes bleues. . 
" ailes vertes. . . 
Canards siffleurs . 










Teal, bluewing. . 
Teal, green 


















\Vidgeon 










Wood . . . 


" des bois 










Geese Brant 


Oies Barnacles. . 










" Wild 


" sauvages . 










Grouse or prairie hen.. 
" Spruce 


Tetras ou poule ) 
de prairie f 








15 














Hare, American 




















" English 


" Anglais 


S 

s 


8 














S 


72 72 GO GO 72 72 72 
















15 


Pheasants 




s 














Pigeons 


Pigeons 






8 


8 


S 


S 






s 
s 
s 
s 


Plovers, Grass 












" Corn, golden.. 
" Yellow legs. . 
Ptarmigans 




















" a pattes jaunes 
Poules de Neige 




















S 


S 


8 










Quails 


Cailles ,... 


s 














S 

s 


S 

s 


Rabbits 


Lapins 






















Robins 


Rouge gorge 


Law 


agai 


nst 


sell 5 


ng 












Snipe, Curlew 


Becassines, Courlis. . . 








020202020202 


72 72 72 72 72 72 


s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 


s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 


" English 


Anglaises. 
du Jersey. 
" de Sable 




































" Sand 


















Squabs, wild 


Pigeonneaux sauvages 
Ecureuil 


















Squirrel 


s 














S 




Dindon sauvage 


S 

s 


S 


S 


S 








Woodcock 










15 


s 


S 



















Almost everything, not fresh killed, may be found in good condition frozen, nearly every day in'the year. 



TABLE OF SUPPLIES. 



19 



MEATS. 

Index for Meats and when they are in season. S indicates when in season. 
B indicates when the meat is at its best. 



MEATS. 


VIANDES. 


a 

3 

a 
a 


February 


5 


P. 


| 


a 

3 


's 
i- 


In 

3 
be 

S 


Septembel 


October 


November 


December 


Beef 


Bceuf 


B 


B 


S 
S 
S 

s 
s 

B 
B 


S 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 

B 


72 72 72 GO GO GO CQ 


72 72 72 72 72 GO 03 


S 
S 


S 
S 


S 


S 


B 


B 


Kid 






Agneau de lait 


S 
S 
B 
B 
B 


S 
S 
B 
B 
B 










Lamb Yearling 


Agneau Tardif 
Mouton 


s 
s 
s 
s 


B 

S 
S 
S 


B 

S 
S 

s 


B 

S 
B 

S 


S 
B 
B 
B 


S 
B 
B 
B 




Pie- 


Cochon 


Veal 


Veau 







VEGETABLES. 

Index of Vegetables and when they are in season. M Indicates the month when in season. 
E Indicates when the vegetable comes from Europe; H when cultivated in hot-house or hot-beds. 



VEGETABLES. 


LEGUMES. 


fc 

cS 

9 

a 
>- 


February 


rd 

O 
(- 
CS 

S 


T, 
P. 
<i 


t*> 

OS 



v 
a 

3 
-5 


>> 
'3 

>-5 


to 

3 

be 

3 

< 


September 


October 


November 


December 


Artichokes 


Articliauts 


F, 


F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


F 


" Jerusalem 


ropinambours 


M 


M 


M 


M 












M 


M 


IVf 


Asparagus liot-liouse 


Asperges de serre 


M 


15 






















" Out-door 


" en Pleine terre 




15 


M 


M 


M 


M 














" Green " 


' ' Vertes 




15 


M 


M 


M 


M 














Tips " 


" Pointes 




15 


M 


M 


M 


M 














" "White " 


" Blanches 




15 


M 


M 


M 


M 
































M 


M 


15 






" Lima 


Haricots, Lima 
















M 


M 


M 






" Striner 


" Verts 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


" Wax and butter. 


Vlange tout. . , 




M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


15 




Beets 


Betteraves 


M 


M 


M 


new 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


Brussels sprouts 


Chouxde Bruxelles 


M 


M 


15 
















M 


M 


Cabbage Green Kale 


" Verts Kale . 


M 


M 


M 


M 


















Red 


' ' Rouges . 


M 


M 


M 


M 








15 


M 


M 


M 


M 


" Savoy. 


" de Savoie. 


M 


M 


M 


M 








15 


M 


M 


M 


M 


White 


" Blancs 


M 


new 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


Cardoons 


Cardons 


M 


M 






















Carrots . . 


Garottes. . 


M 


M 


M 


new 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


Cauliflower 


Choux rleurs 


F, 


F 


F 


H 


H 


H 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


Celery knobs Celeriac 


'eleri rave 


M 


M 


M 


M 






15 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


" Soup 


" Vert 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


Corn, green. . . . 
















M 


M 


M 


15 






Cranberries 


Caneberges 


M 


M 


M 


M 












M 


M 


M 


Cucumbers 


Concombres 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


M 


M 


M 


H 


H 


H 


" Small pickles 


















15 


M 


15 






Eefff-plant. . 


Aubergines 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


Garlic, dry 


Ail, sec 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


new 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


Herbs, Basil 


Herbes Basilic. . . . . 
















M 


M 


M 






Bay leaves, dry. 
Burnet ... . 


" Laurier, sec. . . 
" Pimprenelle. . . . 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 

M 


M 

M 


M 
M 


M 
M 


M 


M 


M 


Cbervil 


" Cerfeuil 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


M 


M 


M 


H 


H 


H 


Chives 


" Ciboulettes 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


M 


M 


M 


H 


H 


H 


Fennel 


' Fenouil 
















M 


M 


M 






Marjoram 


' Marjolaine 
















M 


M 


M 






Mint 


' Mentbe 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


M 


M 


M 


M 


H 


H 


H 


Parsley 


' Persil 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


M 


Rosemary 


















M 


M 


M 






Savorv 


' Sarriette 
















M 


M 


M 






Tarragon 




H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


M 


M 


M 


M 


H 


H 


H 


Thyme 


' TbTm 
















M 


M 


M 






Hops 


Houblons 










15 


15 














Kohl rabi 
















M 


M 


M 


M 


M 

































20 



THE EPICUREAN. 



VEGETABLES. CONTINUED. 
Index of Vegetables and when they are in season. M Indicates the Month they are in season. 

E Indicates when the vegetable comes from Europe; H Indicates when the vegetable is culti- 
vated in hot-houses or hot-beds; S Indicates when the vegetable comes from the South; L Indicates 
when the vegetable comes from Long Island. 



VEGETABLES. 


LEGUMES. 


b 

3 

a 

OJ 

>- 


February 


1 

el 

& 


S. 
< 


>> 



% 


o 

c 

3 
1-5 


j>> 

"5 

1-5 


In 
3 
be 

<5 


September 


October 


November 


>-, 

9 

^ 

S 
tl 
o 

6 

Q 

M 

M 

"s" 

M 


Leeks 


Poireaux 


M 
M 


M 
M 


M 
M 


M 
M 
M 


M 

M 
M 


M 
M 
M 


M 

M 


M 
M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 


M 

M 
M 
M 

M 
M 
M 


M 
M 
M 
15 
15 
M 
M 


Mushrooms, cultivated 
Field .... 
" Girolles .. 
" Morils. . . 
Okra or Gumbo 


Champignons cultives 
" de Prairie 

" Girolles. . 












" Morilles.. 
Gombaut 


















S 
M 
15 
M 
M 
M 


S 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
S 

s 

M 
M 

15 
M 
15 


S 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
S 
S 
M 
M 
M 
M 


S 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
8 
S 
S 
M 
M 
M 


S 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
S 
S 
M 
M 


8 
M 
M 


M 
M 


M 
M 


Onions 


Oignons. 


" Bermuda 


" de Bermude. . 
" Petits 


" Small 


M 


M 
M 
M 
L 

M 

15 


M 
M 
M 
L 

M 

M 


M 
M 
M 
L 
M 
M 


M 
M 

M 


M 
M 
M 


Oyster- plant 


Salsifis 


Parsnips 
Peas (South) 


Panais 
Pois 






S 
M 
M 
M 


L 

M 
L 


Peppers 


Poivrons 


S 
M 
15 


M 

M 


8 
M 


Potatoes 


Pommes de terre 


" Bermuda. . . . 
" Havana 


" Bermude 


" Havane 














" Sweet 


Patates 


M 
M 








M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 


M 
M 
M 
M 

M 
M 


M 
M 
M 
M 

M 
15 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 


Pumpkins 


Potirons 








Radishes, black 






M 
M 
M 
15 
M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 


M 
M 
M 
M 


M 
M 
M 
M 


" Horse 


Raifort 


M 

M 


M 

M 


M 
M 


Red 


Radis rou^'e 


" White or gray 
Rhubarb 


" Blanc ou giis. . . 


Rhubarbe 




M 
M 
M 
M 
M 

M 

M 

M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 

M 

M 
M 


Salad, Monk's beard. . 
Celery 


Salade barbedeCapucin 
" de Oeleri 


M 

M 
M 
M 

M 

M 
M 












M 
M 
M 
M 

M 

M 
M 

M' 
M 
H 
M 










M 

M 


M 
M 


M 
M 
M 


M 
M 
M 


Chicory 


" de Chicoree. . . . 
" de Maches 








M 


Corn 








Dandelion 


" de Pissenlit.. ) 
" Dent-de-liou.. ) 
" Escarolle 


M 


M 










Escarolle 






M 
M 

M 
M 
M 
M 
M 

M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 

M 

M 
M 
M 
M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 

15 

M 

M 
M 
M 
M 

M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
H 
M 


Lettuce 


" de Laitue. . . 


M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
H 
M 


M 
M 
M 
M 
M 
M 


M 
M 
M 
new 
M 
M 

M 


Romaine 


" de Romaine. . . . 


Watercress 


" Cresson 


M 
M 
H 

M 


M 
M 
H 

M 


M 
M 
H 
M 


M 
M 
H 

M 


Shallots 


Echalotes 




Oseille 


Spinach 

Squash, summer, white 
" " yellow 
" Winter,Hubbard 
" Marrow. 
Tomatoes 


Epinard 
Courge blanche \ *,, , 
" Jaune \ * jte> 
" HubbardHiver 
" Moelle " 
Tomates 


M 
M 
H 

M 


M 
M 
H 
M 


M 
M 

S 
M 


15 
15 
S 
M 






M 
M 
H 

M 
M 
M 


M 

M 
H 

M 
M 

M 










8 


8 
M 


S 
M 


M 
M 


Turnips, Rutabaga . . . 
Teltow 


Navets Rutabaga 
Teltow 


White... 


" Blancs. . 


M 


M 


M 


M 


IVf 


new 


new 


new 


new 



TABLE OF SUPPLIES. 



MODEL MARKET LIST. 





Reed 


On 
hand 


Neec 




Reed 


On 
hand 


Need 


BEEF. 

Chuck pcs. 








PORK AND PROVISIONS. 

Bacon pcs 








Corned Navel Ibs. 








Bologna Ibs 








Plate " 








Feet, Pigs pcs 
















Ham, Corned " 








Fillets pcs. 








" Fresh " 
















'' Smoked " 
















" Westphalia " 
















Lamb Tongues " 
















Lard Ibs 








Loin, Flat Bone " 








Larding Pork " 








" Hip " 
















' ' Short " 








Pork Tongues " 
















Salt Pork, Breast Ibs 
















Sausages " 








Ribs " 








" Frankfort " 








Round Ibs. 








' ' Meat " 








Rump " 
















Tails pcs. 








Smoked Beef Ibs 








Tongues, Fresh " 








Smoked Beef Tongue? pcs 








Butt 








Tenderloin Ibs 








LAMB (SPUING). 








Tripe " 








VEGETABLES. 

Artichokes pcs 








Racks Short Cut " 








" Twelve Ribs " 








Saddles Fore " 








" Jerusalem peck. 
Asparagus. . bunch 







.... 


Hind " 
















Tips " 
























LAMB (YEARLING). 








" String " 








Beets " 








Brussels Sprouts " 








Feet " i 






Carrots bbl 








Fries " 








Carrots, New " 
















Cabbage doz 
















Cauliflowers " 








Twelve Ribs ' 








Celery Knobs or Celeriac. . . . bunch. 
" Soup " 






















Hind ' 








Corn, Green pcs 
















Cranberries bushel. 
















Cucumbers doz. 
















Egg Plant " 
















Garlic " 








MUTTON. 
Brains ... . pcs 








Herbs, Dry bunch 








Chervil 








Chives 








Broast ... " 








Mint 








Feet " 








Parsley 








Kidneys . ... ' 








Tarragon 








Leers . ' 








Kohl-rabi 








Racks Short Cut ' 








Leeks 








Twelve Ribs ' 








Melon, Musk pcs. 








Saddles Fore ' 








Mushrooms, Cultivated Ibs. 








Hind " 








Field " 
















Okra pcs. 
















Onions bbl. 








VEAL. 
Brains . . . . pcs 








" Small '. peck. 








Oyster Plants doz 








Parsnips peck. 








Breast Ibs 








Peas bushel 








Feet . . . pcs 








Peppers pcs. 
















Potatoes bbl. 
















" New " 








Hind Quarter ' 








<k Sweet bushel. 






... 


Kidneys ' 








Pumpkin pcs. 


Livers . ' 
















Racks. . . . . . ' 








Radish, Horse " 








Shoulders ' 
















Spinal Marrow Ibs. 








Salad, Barbe. . . " 
















" Celery " 








Tails . . . " 








" Chicory " 








Tongues. .. . " 








" Corn peck. 









THE EPICUREAN. 



MODEL MARKET LIST. CONTINUED. 





Reed 


On 
hand 


Need 




Reed 


On 
hand 


Need 


VEGETABLES continued. 
Siilud Dandelion peck 








Shad Roes pcs. 








" Escarolle doz. 








Sheepshead Ibs. 








" Lettuce " 








Shrimp quarts, 








" Romaine " 








Skate Ibs. 








" Water Cress basket. 








Smelts 








Shallots bushel 








Sole, English 








Sorrel " 








Spot Fish 
























Squash Summer (white). . . . pcs. 








Trout, Brook 








" " (yellow) ..." 








Turbot, American 








" Winter Hubbard " 








' ' European 








" " Marrow " 








Turtle, Green 








Tomatoes box. 








Weakfish 








Turnips bbl. 








Whitebait 
















Whitefish 








EGGS. 
















Fresh pcs. 
















Ordinary " 








GAME. 
Antelope. S. or L Ibs. 
















Bear " 
Birds, Doe pcs. 








FISH. 








' ' Lark " 








Bass, Black or Lake Ibs. 








" Rail, Sora " 








" Rock 








" Reed, Rice " 








" Sea ' 








Buffalo Ibs. 
















Ducks, Black-head pcs. 
















' Brant " 
















' Canvas- back " 








Carp, Buffalo ' 








' Mallard " 








Clams, Hard pcs. 








' Red-head " 








Soft " 








Ruddy " 








Codfish Ibs. 








' Teal B. Wing " 








" Dry.. . " 








Grouse " 








Tongues ' 








Hare, American " 








Crabs, Hard pcs. 








Hare. European " 








' ' Meat Ibs. 








Partridges " 
















Pheasants, English " 
















Plovers, Bay. . . . " 








Eels Ibs. 








" Grass. . . . . . . " 








Flounders " 








" Yellow legs large . . " 








Frogs " 








" " small. ... " 








Frost Fish " 








Ptarmigans " 








Grouper " 








Quails " 








Haddock ' 








Rabbits ' 








" Finnan " 








Snipe " 








Halibut, 6 to 12 Ibs " 








" English " 








Herring pcs. 








" Sand . " 








" Bloaters " 








Squabs Wild " 








Salt " 








Squirrel " 








" Smoked " 








Turkey, Wild Ibs. 








Kingfish Ibs 








Venison L Saddle ** 








Lamprey " 








" S and Legs " 








Lobsters " 








" Whole " 








Mackerel pcs 








Woodcock . . pcs 








" Salt bbl. 
















" Spanish Ibs. 
















Mussels k . bushel. 








POULTRY 








Oyster crabs quarts. 








Capon pcs 








Pompano Ibs. 








Chickens B 1J Ibs " 








Perch " 








S 24- Ibs . . " 








Pike or Pickerel " 








" R 3 Ibs 








" Wall Eyed " 








" \Vinter " 








Porgies " 








Ducks Mongrel " 








Prawns " 








" Tame 








Red Snapper " 








Ducklings " 








Salmon " 








Fowl . . Ibs. 








" Frozen " 








Geese . . . pcs 








" Kennebec " 








" Mongrel " 








" Smoked " 
















" Trout " 








Guinea Fowl *' 








Scallops quarts. 








Peacock " 
















Pullets " 

























TABLE OF SUPPLIES. 



23 



MODEL MARKET LIST. -CONTINUED. 





Reed 


On 
hand 


Need 




Reed 


On 
hand 


Need 


POULTRY continued. 
Pigeons Stall Fed pcs. 








Grapes, Concord Ibs. 








' ' Delaware " 
















" Hot House " 








Turkeys Ibs. 
















" Ex R I " 
















" Snrinff . " 








































Lemons pcs. 








FRUITS. 
Apricots .. ............ pcs. 








Melon, Water 








































































Blackberries . . . quarts 
















































Currants Black or Red ....... " 
















Ginger . ... .quarts 

















































MISCELLANEOUS. 



Reed hand Need 



On v 



Need 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 



BILLS OF 



The bills of fare are classed as follows: Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners, Buffet or standing 
suppers, Collations, Hunting parties, Garden parties served Ambigu, sit down suppers and dancing 
parties including the refreshments and supper. 

These bills of fare are numbered according to articles and not to pages and every recipe in 
the book will be found in the Bills of Fare, thus forming a double index, as the table of contents 
at the end of the book is more conveniently classed by pages. 

The breakfast bills of fare include more than one hundred different ways of preparing eggs, 
fish, minces, chopped meats, broils and sweet dishes. 

The luncheons are composed of crustaceans, small entrees, poultry, game, hot entremets 
and desserts. 

The dinners are composed of American, English, Russian and French service: Buffets of the 
greatest variety and manifold ways of serving them. 

At the end of the book is placed a collection of choice bills of fare served by the house of 
Delmonico, between the years 1862 to 1893. 




LIGHT BREAKFAST OF COFFEE, CHOCOLATE, TEA. 

Muffins (3421) 

Rolls (3420) 

Echaudes (3282) 

Small flutes, finger-rolls (3419) 

Flutes or French rolls (3420) 

Small rolls, with butter (3420) 

Toast dry, buttered (3283) 

Toast dipped in milk or cream (3283) 



Crescents (3414) 

Biscuit, plain or with cinnamon j /go7\ 

Brioches (3269) 

Couques (3277) 

Corn bread (3422) 

Buns, English and Hot Cross (3270) 

Flutes of brioches (3268) 

Grissini with sugar and with butter \ /Q07a! 

GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Buckwheat cakes (with compressed yeast) (3272) 
Indian cakes (3274) 
Wheat cakes (3276) 

COOKED CEREALS. 

Hominy (3280) Oatmeal (3280) 

BREADS. 

Jocko (3416) 



Flannel cakes (3273) 
Rice cakes (3275) 
Polish Blinis (3281) 

Polenta wheaten grits (3280) 



Crown (3415) Graham (3423) Rye (3423) 

American bread (3417) 

Pulled bread, bread crumbs pulled out and browned in the oven. 

Assorted fruits (3699) Oranges (3699) Grape fruit (3699) 

Boiled eggs (2856) Fresh butter (775) 



26 



THE EPICUREAN. 



1 JANVIER. 


2 FEVRIER. 


DEJEUNER, 12 COUVERTS. 


DEJEUNER, 10 COUVERTS. 1 


MENU. 


MENU. 


Chablis Huitres (803) 
Madere Sec Poitrine d'oie fumee (822) 
Radis (808) Olives (800) 
Redsnapper marine (832) 


Graves Huitres (803) 
Sherry Fruits en ravier (793) 
Saucisson a Tail (818). 
Homard a la Boulognaise (794) 


Perches a la Polonaise (1208) 




Vin de Moselle Croquettes de pommes de 


(Eufs des gourmets (2950) 


terre en surprise (2782) 




Noisettes de filet de mouton 
glacees (1610) 


Hoclilieimer Alose a la Evers garnie de 
coquilles d'oeufs d'alose 


Fedelini Cardinal (2953) 


Goujons frits au beurre (1163) 


Poulet saute Montesquieu 
(1895) 


Mignons de filet de boeuf 


Beaune Tomates grillees sauce mayon- 


Cheron (1401) 


naise chaude (2838) 


Musigny Poulet saute Chasseur (1903) 


(Eufs moules en caisses au foie 
gras (2877) 


Salade Italienne (2635) 


bntet Canet Perdreaux rotis piques au jus 


St. Emilion Canvasback grilles (Canards 


garnis de cresson (2102) 


sauvages) (2054) 


Salade de mache (2669) 


Salade de celeri (2660) 


Fruits (3699) Fromage (3697) 


Gateau d'amandes (3225) 


Alicante Compotes (3686) 


Malaga Fromage (3697) 


Salade d'oranges (3690) 


Fruits (3699) 


Cafe (3701) 


Liqueurs Cafe (3701) 


. r 




3 MARS. 


4r AVRIL. 


x DEJEUNER, 24 COUVERTS. 


DEJEUNER, 18 COUVERTS. 


MENU. 


MENU. 


Crabes d'huitres marines (805) 


Huitres (803) 


Canapes de langues (777) 


ChaUis Harengs marines (787) 


SoMterne Saucisson de Lyon (818) 


(Eufs de vanneau (784) 


Maquereaux fumes (798) 


Caviar (778). 


Pompano Macedoine (1223) 


Omelette aux foies de volaille 


Pommes Dauphine (2783) 


(2884) 
Niersteiner Truites a 1'Hoteliere (1292) 


C6te-R6tie Tournedos de filet de boeuf La- 


Concombres (2661) 


guipierre (1434) 




Petits pois a 1'Anglaise (2742) 


Tournedos de filet de boeuf 
Flavignan (1432) 


Poulet saut6 Diva (1886) 


Lazagnettes a la Philadelphie 


Pointes d'asperges a la Main- 


(2957) 


tenon (2695). 






Pontet-Canet Cotelettes de pigeonneau Sig- 


CEufs poches a la Bourguig- 


nora (2269) 


nonue (2926) 


Pointes d'asperges au fromage 


LebviUe Faisan truffe roti (2110) 


(2697) 


Salade de laitue (2672) 


Clianibertin Sarcelles grillees (2067). 


St. Honore* k la Sultane (3261) 


Salade Russe (2645) 


Porto Compotes (3686) 


Gateaux aux fraises (3262) 


Fromage (3697) Fruits (S699) 


Dessert 


Liqueurs Caf6 (3701) , 


Liqueurs Cafe (3701) 



BILLS OF FAHE. 



5 MAI. 

DEJEUNER, 16 COU VERTS. 
MENU. 

Sherry Olives Croissants (800) 

Mortadelle (818) 
Sardines (817) 
Canapes de harengs a la Russe 

(777) 

Consomme tapioca (316) 

Haut Maquereau Espagnol f arci garni 

Sauterne de groseilles vertes (1199) 

Cotelettes d'agneau Gavardi 

(1675) 

Pommes Gastronome (2789) 
Champagne Filets de poulet a la Mexicaine 

(1859) 
Petits pois a 1'Anglaise (2742) 

Asperges chaudes a la vinai- 
grette (2692) 

(Eufs brouilles en bordure de 
risot aux foies de canards 

(2938) 

Nuits Canetons grilles mayonnaise 

vertes aux fines herbes (1938) 
Salade de laitue (2672) 

Tartelettes aux fruits varies 
(3337) 

Liqueurs Fromage (3697) Fruits (3699) 

Cafe (3701) 



.{* 6 



DEJEUNER, 10 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 



Lucines (803) 
Niersteiner Radis (808) 
Beurre (775) 
Olives (800) 

Tranches de saumon grillees 
sauce Bearnaise (1244) 

Champagne Grenadins de filet de bosuf 

Beaumarchais (1385) 
Pommes de terre Long Branch 
(2793) 

Cotelettes de pigeonneaux Lau- 

riston (2265) 
Champignons a la Rivera 

(2758) 

(Eufs frits a la Eugene Andre 

(2866) 

Chateau Poulet grille au jus (1831) 

Lagrange Salade de romaine (2675) 

Beignets de cerises fraiches 
(3042) 



Liqueurs 



Fruits (3699) 
Fromage (3697) 
Cafe (3701) 



7 JUILLET. 

DEJEUNER, 12 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Lucines (803) 

Graves Concombres en filets (783) 

Harengs saurs (788) 
Haricots verts marines (824) 

Oranges a la Russe (3613) 

Marcobrunner Kingfish a la Sultane (1185) 
Pommes Viennoise (2812) 

Ris d'agneau Joinville (1761) 
Mais saute au beurre (2731) 

Homard a la Bordelaise (1025) 
CEufs durs a la Bennett (2858) 

Chateau Alouettes grillees (2082) 

Larose Salade de romaine (2675) 

Bordure de riz aux bananes 

(3005) 

Fruits (3699) 
Fromage (3697) 
Liqueurs Cafe glace (3609) 



8 



Xeres 



AOUT. 

DEJEUNER, 18 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Piments verts (806) 
Avocats (771) 
Olives Espagnoles (800) 
Acharts aux fines herbes (792) 

Omelette aux truffes (2908) 

Liebfraumilch Weakfish a la Pontigny (1309) 
Concombres a 1'Anglaise (2661) 

Filets de poulet a la Valengay 

a855) 
Macaroni a la mode de Naples 

(2960) 

Champagne Grenadins de filet de veau aux 
tomates a 1' Argentine (1507) 
Pommes de terre aux truffes 
<mincees (2813) 

Chateau Canetons grilles (1938) 

Leovitte Salade de cresson aux pommes 
d'arbres (2676) 

Flan d'abricots (3170) 
Poncire a la Madison (3612) 

Fromage (3697) 
Fruits (3699) 
4* Liqueurs Cafe a la Turque (3702) 



28 



THK EPICUREAN. 



Q SEPTEMBBE. 

DEJEUNER, 22 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Absinthe, Vermouth, Kummel. 

Concombres marines (785) 
Canapes d'esturgeon (777) 
Choux fleurs marines (776) 
Paupiettes de harengs a la 
Polonaise (789) 

Lafaurie Kingflsh Montgolfler (1183) 

Salade de concombres (2661) 

Mignons de filet de boeuf a la 

Stanley (1406) 
Pure"e de pois verts (2742) 
St. Pierre Cotelettes de pigeonneaux Pro- 

venale (2268) 

(Eufs au miroir a la Tivolier 
(2855) 

HautBrion Perdreaux rotis au jus garnis 

de cresson (2102) 
Salade d'escarole (2671) 

Petites meringues Italiennesau 
cafe (3394) 

Liqueurs Fruits (3699) 

Fromage (3697) 

Cafe (3701) 



} 1O OCTOBRE. 

DEJEUNER, 14 COUVERTS. 

MENU. 
Graves Huitres (803) 

Cerneaux frais (834) 
Choux rouges (776) 
Maquereaux a 1'huile (797) 

Omelette physiologique (2904) 

Pompano a la Toulouse (1227) 
Moselle Pommes de terre Gastronome 

(2789) 

Beaune Cotelettes de chevreuil Buri- 

dan (2170) 

Petits pois a laFrancaise (2743) 
Poulets sautes a la Dodds 

(1887) 

Escargots au beurre de Pro- 
vence (1016) 

Champagne Rales a la Mareille (2150) 
Salade de laitue (2672) 

Glace parfait au nougat (3478) 

Liqueurs Confitures de groseilles de Bar 

(3678) 
Fromage (3697) 

Cafe" (3701) 



NOVEMBRE. 

DEJEUNER, 8 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 



Hermitage 
(plane) 



Reltinger 



St. Estephe 



Huitres et citrons (803) 

Cerneaux confits (833) 
Saumon fume (822) 

Petit Esturgeon aux quenelles 

et olives (1289) 
Pommes de terre grillees a la 

chapelure (2776) 

Filets mignons d'agneau sauce 

creme (1724) 
Nouilles saute"es au beurre 

(2972) 



Pain d'e"crevisses 
(2305) 



Chartreuse 



Champagne 



(Eufs sur le plat Conde" (2912) 

Outarde en daube (1944) 
Salade de celeri (2660) 

Pouding souffle" Saxonne (3107) 

Fruits (3699) 
Fromage (3697) 



Liqueurs Cafe (3701) 



12 DECEMBRE. 

DEJEUNER, 8 COUVERTS. 

MENU. 
Montrachet Huitres (803) 

Saumon fume (822) 
Alose marinee (787) 

Piesporter Tranches de saumon grillees 

sauce Bearnaise (1244) 
Pommes Marquise (2797) 

Tournedos de filet de boeuf aux 

raisins (1439) 

Petits pois Menagere (2744) 
Lapereau a la Thieblin (2138) 

Chaudfroid de jeunes pintades 
(2453) 

CEufs brouilles aux truffes du 
P<rigord (2947) 

Rauzan Ruddy ducks grilles (2066) 

Salade de laitue (2672) 

Amandes salees (3696) 
Fruits sees (3699) 
Compotes (3686) 

Liqueurs Cafe (3701) 



OF FARE 



13 

Oysters with lemon (803) 

Eggs on a dish with eepes (2922) 

Broiled fresh codfish with bacon (1138) 

Calf's head vinaigrette (1519) 

Hashed pheasant (2299) 

Porterhouse steak a la Sanford (1363) 

Saratoga potatoes (2803) 

Pelerine tartlets (3335) 

Dessert 



JANUARY BREAKFAST. 

14, 

Marinated tunny fish (831) 
Omelet, German style (2891) 
Grouper a la Franklyn (1162) 
Corned beef hash, American style (2291) 
Chicken leg cutlets with olives (1875) 
Mutton chops plain (1590) 
Dauphine potatoes (2783) 
Fruits (3699) 



15 

Eggs on a dish a la Bercy (2910) 
Chicken halibut with carrots (1173) 
Spinal marrow of veal, Villeroi (1549) 
Stewed mutton kidneys a la Burtel (1616) 
Chateaubriand Colbert sauce (1381) 
Anna potatoes (2770) 
Mars cake (3318) 
Fruits (3699) 



16 



Anchovy salad (772) 
Eggs Russian style (2865) 
Fresh herring paupiettes with milts (1176) 
Duck giblets, housekeeper's style (1927) 
Edible snails, Bourguignonne (1015) 
Veal cutlets a la Seymour (1497) 
Demi-glace potatoes (2784) 
Triumvirat fritters (3050) 



17 

Bouillabaisse a la Marengo (1123) 

Scrambled eggs with mushrooms (2942) 

Oxtail chipolata (1321) 

Fried artichoke bottoms (2683) 

Broiled chicken a la Delisle (1828) 

Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Light pancakes with preserves (3079) 

Dessert 



19 

Palmettes Perrier (922) 

Poached eggs with spinach (2933) 

Lobster, Duglere (1031) 

Shoulder of mutton marinated with cream 

sauce (1651) 

Fried asparagus tips a la Miranda (2696) 
Aspic of foies gras (small) (2412) 
Broiled partridge, English style (2085) 
Cheese (3697) 



18 



Soft eggs chipolata (2949) 
Fried frostfish (1160) 
Slices of mutton puree of beans (1635) 
Pork cutlets with fine herbs (1780) 
Potato and beetroot salad (2652) 
Broiled squab, Colbert sauce (2013) 
Compote (3686) 
Coffee (3701) 



Marinated smelts (821) 

Poached eggs Villeroi (2928) 

Lamb's trotters a la Bordelaise (1766) 

Turtle stew a la Foster (1093) 

Lentils with bacon (2750) 

Roasted tenderloin of pork with gravy 

(1817) 

Apples, Portuguese style (2998) 
Stewed fruits (3686) 



30 



THE EPICUREAN. 



JANUARY BEEAKF AST. 

21 

Anchovy salad (772) 
Ham omelet with green peas (2893) 
Small green turtle baked (1092) 
Sheep's trotters a la poulette (1659) 
Green peas with braised lettuce (2746) 
Squabs in earthenware saucepan (2018) 
Water-cress salad with apples (2676) 
Dessert 



Radishes (808) 
Olives (800) 

Crabs, Carolina style (1003j 
Gosling stewed with turnips (1954) 
Neck of lamb with cabbage (1729) 
Oyster plant poulette (2817) 
Pork tenderloins, Printaniere (1813) 
Celestine omelet with whipped cream 
(3057) 



* 

23 

Boiled eggs (2856) 

Perch stuffed and baked (1210) 

Corned beef with cabbage (1315) 

Hashed young rabbit (2303) 

Celery stalks with veloute" sauce (2721) 

Truffled pigs' feet, Perigord sauce (1786) 

Bavarois with meringues (3133) 

Dessert 



24: 



Canapes of anchovies (777) 
Salt mackerel with cream horseradish 
sauce (1195) 

Tenderloin of beef pudding with oysters 

(2322) 

Smothered red beans (2700) 
Tripe, Lyonnese style (1475) 
Broiled quail (2131) 
Rum omelet (3059) 
Rouen mirlitons (3323) 



25 

Marinated tunny fish (831) 
Soft clams on skewers (999) 
Cucumber salad (2661) 
Stewed lamb, Parisian style (1756) 
Trevise tomatoes (2836) 
Pork cutlets, Aurora (1776) 
Omelet with russet apples (3071) 
Dessert 



26 



Oysters (803) 

Omelet a la Andrews (2898) 

Minced tenderloin of pork a, la minute 

(1812) 

Lambs' tails, Conti (1763) 
String beans a la Pettit (2827) 
Edible snails a la Saintonge (1014) 
Parisian cakes (3321) 
Dessert 



27 

Shad, Irish style, garnished with croquettes 

(1254) 

Rissoles of mushrooms with marrow (953) 
Neck of veal au blanc (1538) 
Potatoes a la Bignon (2773) 
Lambs' tongues with olives (1765) 
Baked stuffed eggplants (2738) 
Rum omelet (3059) 
Dessert 



28 



Olives (800) 

Westphalian ham (786) 

Spotted fish with court bouillon, Calcutta 

(1287) 

Fried oxtails (1323) 
Stuffed mushrooms in cases (2762) 
Green turtle, Havana style (1091) 
Eggs with cream, meringued (3032) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 



31 



FEBRUARY- 

29 

Caviare canapes (777) 

Bonvalet omelet (2882) 

Codfish tongues with chopped sauce (1141) 

Truffled pigs' feet (1785) 

Kernel of veal with thickened gravy (1521) 

German salad with croutons (2664) 

Broiled ptarmigan (2071) 

Dessert 



BREAKFAST. 

SO 

Bouillabaisse Parisian (1124) 
Eggs on a dish, Bienvenue (2911) 
Pork cutlets with mashed potatoes (1782) 
Poulpetonniere pigeons (2321) 
Broiled bear steak (2046) 
Pont-Neuf potatoes (2800) 
Stewed or compoted fruits (3686) 
Coffee (3701) 

4. 'It 



31 

Oysters and lemons (803) 

Eggs miroir a la Provencal (2854) 

Chicken halibut baked with Parmesan (1172) 

Blanquette of breast of veal a la Jacquart (1490) 

Sauerkraut garnished (2819) 

Beefsteak with fine herbs (1374) 

Celery salad (2661) 

Preserved large white currants (3678) 



32 



Westphalian ham (786) 

Bertini omelet (2881) 

Salt herring with mashed potatoes (1177) 

Lamb carbonade a la Rambuteau (1667) 

Broiled pullet, tartar sauce (1991) 

Cream of biscuits with kirsch (3011) 

Cheese (3697) 

Dessert 



33 

Matelote a la mariniere, St. Mande (1201) 
Scrambled eggs with fine herbs (2939) 
Lambs' trotters, Chantilly (1767) 
Hashed chicken. Ancient style (2293) 
Sarah potatoes (2802) 
Broiled teal duck (2067) 
Corn salad (2669) 
Scuffled fritters with lemon peel (3048) 



Chiffonade potatoes (807) 
Hard-boiled eggs, New York style (2864) 
Frostfish or whiting baked (1161) 
Lamb hash with bananas (2296) 
Potatoes a la Parmentier (2811) 
Rump steak a la Villageoise (1367) 
Apple tartlets (3327) 
Coffee (3701) 



35 

Quenelles of fish, Montglas (2330) 
Turkey giblets, salamander (2033) 
Beef hash, Sam Ward (2288) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 
Veal kidneys a 1' Anderson (1524) 
Broiled ptarmigan (2071) 
Rum omelet (3059) 
Fruits (3699) 



36 



Scrambled eggs with tomatoes (2946) 
Minced leg of mutton a la Lyonnaise (163?-) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 
Veal kidneys a la Roederer (1525) 
Pigs' feet a la St. Menehould (1783) 
Mushrooms a la Raynal (2756) 
Apples with butter (2999) 
Dessert 



THE EPICUREAN. 



37 

Oysters on the half shell (803) 
Eggs in cases a la Colbert (2874) 
Cisco fish, Castillane sauce (1134) 
Kernel of ham, Biarritz (1794) 
Veal cutlets maitre-d'hotel (1501) 
Dandelion salad (2670) 
Compote (3686) 
Coffee (3701) 



MAKCH BREAKFAST. 

38 

Eggs on a dish (2909) 

Salt codfish, Spanish style (1142) 

Calf's brains, Aurora (1479) 

Frogs' legs deviled (1020) 

Tournedos of beef, Victorin (1438) 

Marshall potatoes (2796) 

Apple fritters, "Montagnard (3037) 

Dessert 



39 

Fried anchovies (1249) 
Eggs a la Gibson (2861) 
Kingfish, Princelay (1184) 
Minced tenderloin of beef with potato cro- 
quettes (1398) 

Broiled chicken with tarragon gravy (1831) 
Endive salad (2671) 
Apple pie (3199) 
Dessert 



4:0 



Smoked beef (822) 
Plain omelet with cream (2886) 
Weakfish a la Brighton (1308) 
Jugged neck of mutton (1639) 
Potato croquettes in surprise (2782) 
Lobster mayonnaise (2534) 
Pullet legs with new carrots (2005) 
Quartered apple fritters (3041) 



4,1 

Spanish olives with anchovies (800) 

Eggs on a dish a la Monaco (2916) 

Smoked herring with cream (1178) 

Stewed lamb, Duglere (1754) 

Mussels mariniere (1046) 

Beefsteak Bordelaise with marrow (1371) 

Duchess dariole cakes (3299y 

Dessert 



4,2 



Shad marinated (787) 

Poached eggs a la Mirabeau (2927) 

Matelote a la Talabasse (1202) 

Sliced kernel of pork a la Cavour (1795) 

Potato fritters (2788) 

Rib steak a la Bercy (1364) 

Omelet stuffed with strawberries (3068) 

Dessert 



43 

Eggs miroir, Jockey Club (2851) 

Lambs' kidneys glazed (1702) 

Baked beef palate, Chevreuse (1327) 

Potatoes persillade (2774) 

Chicken legb as cutlets with olives (1875) 

TreMse tomatoes (2836) 

Lambs' brains with mayonnaise (2446) 

Dessert 



4=4: 



Anchovy salad (772) 
Hard-boiled egg croquettes (2863) 
Breast of veal stew with roux (1491) 
Brussels sprouts sauted (2704) 
Sheep's tongue, Neapolitan style (1658) 
Potato shavings (2807) 
Baked chicken in shells (2345) 
Fruits (3699) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



33 



45 

Broiled sardines (1249) 
Omelet Desjardins (2887) 
Fried gudgeons (1163) 
Rump of beef miroton (1344) 
Guinea fowl with sauerkraut (1958) 
Mutton chops. Tavern style (1592) 
Sou filed potatoes (2808) 
Strawberries and cream (3699) 



APRIL BREAKFAST. 

46 

Anchovy salad (772) 

Eggs on a dish, English style (2914) 

Lamprey a la Rabelais (1189) 

Baked mashed potatoes (2798) 

Calf's brains tomatoed, Bearnaise (1485) 

Sirloin steak. Ancient style (1373) 

Broiled squabs, Colbert sauce (2013) 

Rum omelet (3059) 



* 

47 

Aries sausage (818) 

Canapes of shrimps (777) 

Scrambled eggs with tomato puree (2945) 

Smelts fried on skewers, tartar sauce (1269) 

Kernel of leg of mutton in papers (1631) 

Calf's brains a la poulette (1481) 

Broiled chicken with bacon, maitre-d'hotel 

(1830) 
Apples with butter (2999) 



48 



Oysters and lemons (803) 
Mackerel in oil (797) 
Hard-boiled eggs a la Benoist (2859) 
Matelote of canotiers (1 203) 
Broiled pig's feet (1784) 
Cabbage, peasant style (2706) 
Roasted wild squabs (2018) 
Provengal potatoes (2801) 



49 

Marinated sardines (817) 

Eggs on a dish with tomatoes (2924) 

Salmon (salt) a la Bedlow (1247) 

Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Flat sausages with tomato Soubise (1805) 

Broiled tenderloin, anchovy butter (1424) 

Endive salad (2671) 

Nougat of apricots, cake (3319) 



5O 



Oysters on the half shell (803) 
Omelet, Duxelle with fine herbs (2888) 
Carp broiled and breaded maitre-d'hotel 

(1130) 

Baked potatoes with cream (2780) 
Mutton kidneys on skewers (1618) 
Broiled chicken with tarragon sauce (1831) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 
Apple charlotte (3008) 



51 

Eggs molded in cocottes a la Bedford (2873) 

Lobsters a la Delmonico (1037) 

Veal cutlets a la Zingara (1498) 

String beans a la Pettit (2827) 

Terrine of duck's liver a 1'Aquitaine (2596) 

Roast squabs (2018) 

Cheese (3697) 

Strawberry short cake (3262) 



Small trout fried and marinated with 

wine (829) 
Ham and green pea omelet (2893) 

Stuffed lambs' trotters with tarragon 
gravy (1769) 

Squabs a la Crapaudine (2007) 
Sausages with truffles (1806) 
Cream with lemon peel in pots (3155) 
Croustades a la Castillane (895) 
Dessert 



34 



EPICUREAN. 



53 

Clams (803) 

Spanish omelet (2907) 

Salt codfish a la Villageoise (1144) 

Turnips with Bechamel (2848) 

Calf's brains with black butter (1484) 

Chicken pie a la Rigolo (2371) 

Terrine of larks (2601) 

Lettuce salad (2672) 



MAY BREAKFAST: 
54, 

Eggs a 1' Aurora (2857) 
Pompano a la Carondelet (1221) 
Lamb stew, Irish style (1758) 
Macaroni, Parisian style (2961) 
Mussels baked with fine herbs (1050) 
Minions of tenderloin of beef (1399) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 
Herisson tartlets (3333) 



55 

Stuffed clams (997) 

Fried carp with parsley (1131) 

Scrambled eggs with tomatoes and chives (2946) 

Baked breast of lamb (1662) 

Chicken pie (2554) 

Veal kidneys with marrow (1526) 

Potato and herring salad (2653) 

Frangipane omelet (3058) 



56 



Canapes Brownson (853) 
Porgies a la Manhattan (1229) 
Boiled eggs (2856) 
Smoked beef with cream (1358) 
Lamb kidneys on skewers (1703) 
Mashed potatoes in snow (2798) 
Roast squabs with water-cress (2018) 
Bermuda onion salad (2665) 



57 

Fried soft shell crabs (1006) 

Scrambled eggs with Piedmont truffles (2948) 

Matelote of carp, Miroir (1204) 

Hashed mutton a la Omer Pacha (2297) 

Potatoes in surprise (2809) 

Broiled partridge, English style (2085) 

Cos lettuce salad (2675) 

Francillon cake (3305) 



Hot potato salad (2654) 

Havanese omelet (2894) 

Stuffed carp a la Champenoise (1133) 

Paupiettes of tripe (1477) 

Lamb's head, vinaigrette sauce (1698) 

Small sirloin steak a la Bordelaise (1370) 

Potato cakes with ham (2779) 

Pelerine tartlets (3335) 



59 

Cassolettes a la Montholon (861) 
Poached eggs a la Boeldieu (2925) 
Shoulder of lamb with puree of celery (1753) 
Baked cauliflower a la Bechamel (2715) 
Calf's brains, peasant style (1483) 
Cold asparagus, vinaigrette sauce (2692) 
Small Celestine omelet (3056) 
Dessert 



60 



Anchovy salad (772) 

Ham omelet with green peas (2893) 

Small green turtle baked (1092) 

Sheep's trotters a la poulette (1659) 

Green peas with braised lettuce (2746) 

Roasted squabs (2018) 

Water-cress salad with apples (2676) 

Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 



35 



61 



Omelet a la Andrews (2898) 
Bluefish, Havanese style (1118) 
Calf's brains in matelote (1482) 
Baked potatoes (2771) 
Clams, Philadelphia style (994) 
Chicken roasted in the saucepan (1881) 
Watercress and apple salad (2676) 
Baskets filled with oranges (3570) 

* 

63 

Shrimps in side dishes (819) 

Hard-boiled eggs with noodles a la Carolli 

(2860) 
Bluefish with mayonnaise and tarragon (1121) 

Paupiettes of fillet of mutton a la Delussan 
(1613) 

Slices of round of veal with gravy (1547) 
Green peas a la Fleurette (2741) 
Broiled duckling with green mayonnaise (1938) 
Crescents of noodles with cherries (3015) 



JUNE BREAKFAST. 

62 

Shrimps with mushrooms and tomatoes, 



Bearuaise (1081) 

Fried eggs with chopped parsley (2871) 
Angel fish a la Bahama (1094) 
Calf's lights a la Mariniere (1529) 
Minced lamb a la Rivera (1719) 
Cauliflower with fried breadcrumbs (2718) 
Hamburg steak a la tartare (1361) 
Bordelaise potatoes, new (2775) 



64, 



Sweetbread canapes (857) 
Scrambled eggs with gravy (2940) 
Codfish cakes (1145) 
Oxtail, Alsatian style (1322) 
Lamb cutlets. Maintenon (1678) 
Mussels stuffed, Toulousian (1049) 
Roast pullet with water cress (1996) 
Dampfnoodles with cream (3030) 



65 

Cucumber fillets salted, Russian style (783) 
Eggs on a dish, Creole style (2913) 
Blackfish a la Orly (1114) 
Tendon of veal a la Bayeux (1581) 

Kidneys of lamb, stewed with Madeira and 
mushrooms (1704) 

Broiled squabs a la Crapaudine (2007) 

Potatoes sauted with artichoke bottoms and 
truffles (2805) 

Border cf rice with bananas (3005) 



66 



Crusts a la Morton (904) 
Omelet with caviare a la Stoeckel (2902) 
Sea bass with almond butter (1100) 
Crepine of lamb's trotters, Perigueux 

sauce (2242) 

Kohl-rabies, housekeeper's style (2708) 
Broiled chicken with bacon maitre-d'hotel 

(1830) 
Slices of fillet of veal, Pelerine potatoes 

(1514) 
Cream pie (3201) 



67 

Anchovy salad (772) 
Perch. Polish style (1208) 
Mashed potatoes in snow (2798) 
Squab cutlets in papers (2270) 
Stuffed tomatoes, Provencal (2835) 
Asparagus tips a la Miranda (2696) 
Fresh cherry fritters (3042) 
Dessert 



68 



Tunny marinated (831) 

Onion and ham omelet (2900) 

Turkey wings with turnips (2043) 

Green peas, French style (2743) 

Baked tripe with parmesan cheese (1474) 

Artichoke bottoms a la Mornay (2680) 

Crusts with Madeira (3026) 

Dessert 



36 



THE EPICUREAN. 



69 

Marinated sardines (817) 

Cheese omelet (2883) 

Pompano a la Duclair (1222) 

Anna potatoes (2770) 

Sausages with white wine (1807) 

Mussels a la poulette (1047) 

Duckling, green mayonnaise with fine herbs 

(1938) 
Columbia tartlets (3330) 



JULY -BREAKFAST. 
7O 

Hard-boiled eggs a la Washburn (2862) 
Porgy paupiettes, Hindostan (1230) 
Lamb hash, Creole style (2295) 
Chicken legs a la Saulniere (1873) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 
Sirloin steak, ancient style (1373) 
Genoese cake merigued (3308) 
Dessert 



71 

Radishes (808) 

Molded fresh butter (775) 

Fried eggs with brown butter (2870) 

Blackfish a la Sanford (1115) 

Rump of beef, mirotons a la menagere (1344) 

Puree of Jerusalem artichokes (704) 

Lamb salad a la Somer (2637) 

Chicken legs in papers (1876) 

Casino cakes (3293) 



Scrambled eggs with lobster garnished 
with Villeroi mussels (2941) 

Baked kingfish (1186) 

Noisettes of mutton with cooked fine herbs 
(1612) 

Veal kidneys with white wine (1527) 

Beef, Chateaubriand maitre d'hotel (1382) 

Sarah potatoes (2802) 

Mirabeau rice (3213) 

Dessert 



73 

Fried shrimps (1080) 
Eggs on a dish, Fermiere (2915) 
Brandade of salt codfish (1146) 
Lambs' crows, ravigote sauce (1668) 
Ribs of beef, old style (1332) 
Tomatoes a la Boquillon (2833) 
Fruits a la Creole (3051) 
Dessert 



74= 



Caviare canapes (777) 

Green omelet with fine herbs (2892) 

Deviled bluefish (1119) 

Clam pancakes or fritters (996) 

Calf s brains a la Chassaigne (1480) 

Mutton tendons with mushrooms (1656) 

Roasted squab with watercress (2018) 

Small babas with rum (3288) 



75 

Varenskis polonaise (993) 
Shad with sorrel puree (1256) 
Eggs au miroir a la Lully (2852) 
Lamb stew, Navarin (1755) 
Beef and tomato salad (2623) 
Baked hash of chicken (2293) 
Barigoule artichokes (2689) 
Printanier boats (cakes) (3291) 



76 



Poached eggs with spinach (2933) 
Pike perch a la Financiere (1214) 
Breast of lamb with veloute tomato sauce 
(1665) 

White bean salad (2658) 
Sausages Gastronome (1802) 
Spare ribs, Parisian style (1808) 
Risot a la Ristori (2980) 
Fruits (3699) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



37 



77 

Parsley omelet (2903) 

Butterfish marinated and fried (1127) 

Sausages with tomato Soubise sauce (1805) 

Potted pigeons (1965) 

Sliced leg of lamb a la Dordogne (1710) 

Cream potatoes baked (2781) 

Dessert 



AUGUST BREAKFAST. 

78 

Canapes of herring, Russian style (777) 
Eggs au miroir a la Meyerbeer (2853) 
Kingfish on the dish a 187) 
Calf's liver a la Claremont (1530) 
Plain boiled potatoes (2774) 
Broiled squabs (2013) 
Madeira crusts (3026) 
Dessert 



79 

Fried eggs a la sole (2869) 

Fresh mackerel in papers, Mephisto (1192) 

Stewed lamb with turnips (1759) 

Calf's liver and bacon (1531) 

Provengal potatoes (2801) 

Venison fillets a la Lorenzo (2177) 

D'Artois cake with apricot marmalade (3302) 

Dessert 



80 



Celery vinaigrette (779) 

Eggs on a dish, Venetian style (2920) 

Bonito a la Godivier (1122) 

Tournedos of beef, Talabasse (1437) 

Potatoes, omelet shape (2806) 

Broiled reedbirds (2151) 

Conde cakes (3297) 

Dessert 



81 

Lobster canapes (777) 

Scrambled eggs a la Duxelle with anchovy 

croustade (2935) 

Salt codfish, Faraday crowns (1147) 
Minions of veal puree of artichokes (1509) 
Lamb hash a la Celestine, baked (2294) 
Broiled chicken with tarragon gravy (1831) 
Eggplant salad, Provengal (2663) 
Gooseberry tart (3309) 



82 



Omelet with clams (2885) 
Porgy with Chablis wine (1231) 
Tripe with cooked fine herbs (1478) 
Lamb fries, tomato sauce (1696) 

Baked cream potatoes (2780) 
Roast duck (1921) 
Valentine cake with rum (3265) 
Dessert 



83 

Salmon quenelles stuffed (2335) 

Tenderloin of beef with Madeira half glaze 

(1425) 

Green peas with braised lettuce (2746) 
Frog's legs a la d'Antin (1017) 
Chicken roasted in the saucepan (1881) 
Omelet stuffed with preserves (glazed) (8067) 
Cheese (3697) 
Fruits (3699) 



84, 



Anchovy butter canapes (777) 

Shrimp omelet (2906) 

Pike perch a la Geraldin (1215) 

Noisettes of tenderloin a la Berthier (1411) 

Chicken quenelles a la Drew (2326) 

Broiled duckling (1938) 

Gooseberry tart (3309) 

Dessert 



38 



THE EPICUREAN. 



85 

Broiled eels, tartar sauce (1150) 

Omelet with mushrooms (2899) 

Hashed tenderloin of beef, Sheppler (2289) 

Chipolata sausages (1801) 

Partridge a la Baudrimont (2093) 

Italian salad (2635) 

Hollandaise potatoes with melted butter (2790) 

Gooseberry flawn (3173) 



* 

87 

Sardine canapes (777) 

Fried eggs with ham or bacon (2872) 

Buffalo fish, cream sauce (1126) 

Marshal potatoes (2796) 

Partridge with olives (2103) 

Slices of fillet of mutton maitre-d'hotel (1614) 

Peeled tomato salad (2666) 

Pumpkin pie (3203) 



SEPTEMBER BREAKFAST. 

86 

Blackfish a la Villaret (1116) 
Scrambled eggs a la Columbus (2934) 
Yearling lamb cutlets in crepinette (1691) 
Veal, minced Sicilian style (1544) 
Parsnip cakes fried in butter (2767) 
Beefsteak a la Perigueux (1376) 
Baked Biarritz potatoes (2772) 
Pancakes with orange-flower water (3078) 



* 



88 



Shrimps in side dishes (819) 
Omelet with sausages (2905) 
Picked-up codfish with cream (1148) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 
Venison cutlets deviled (2173) 
Cepes, Provengal style (2723) 
Broiled plovers (2118) 
Vanilla Chantilly eclairs (3304) 



89 

Oysters on half shell (803) 

Small trout marinated in wine (829) 

Eggs on a dish, Omer Pacha (2917) 

Lafayette fish breaded, English style (1188) 

Turkey giblets, peasant style (2034) 

Calf's brains crepinettes (2244) 

Julienne potatoes (2792) 

Peach with rice tartlets (3334) 



9O 



Shrimp canapes (777) 

Argentine omelet (2878) 

Bluefish in papers (1120) 

Stewed lamb, Peruvian style (1757) 

Partridge with sauerkraut (2104) 

Spare ribs, Parisian style (1808) 

Potato salad (2654) 

Semolina croquettes, pistachio sauce (3019) 



91 

Eggs cocottes (2873) 

Shoulder of mutton with turnips (1654) 

Black blood pudding (1772) 

Gosling saut6d with tomatoes, Robert sauce 

(1953) 

Baked noodles (2971) 
Minced venison (2184) 
Broiled grouse (2071) 
Dessert 



Poached eggs, matelote (2930) 

Mackerel, with white piquante sauce (1194) 

Tripe, Parisian style (1476) 

Venison hash, American style (2301) 

White beans, maitre-d'hotel (2701) 

Broiled reedbirds (2151) 

Fresh fruits (3699) 

Dessert 



BIJ^LS OF 



39 



93 

Spinal marrow a la Barnave (1548) 
Omelet with fine herbs (2889) 
Redsnapper a la Cherot (1232) 
Gastronome potatoes (2789) 
Pork cutlets half glaze and with apples (1777) 
Scallops a la Mariniere (1076) 
Bound steak with water-cress (1366) 
Cream cakes with whipped cream (3296) 



OCTOBER BEE AK FAST. 
94= 

Alligator pears (771) 

Scrambled eggs a la Jerome (2936) 

Pork chops. Castillane sauce (1778) 

Lyonnese potatoes (2794) 

Calf's liver with fine herbs (1533) 

Red cabbage salad (2659) 

Cheese (3697) 

Coffee (3701) 



95 

Fried shrimps (1080) 
Omelet with ham and green peas (2893) 
Kingfish a la Bordelaise (1181) 
Veal hash cakes, Brittany style (2300) 
Beetroot fritters with cream (2702) 
Yearling lamb cutlets (1669) 
Potatoes fried and channeled (2787) 
Coffee (3701) 



96 



Windsor canapes (777) 
Omelet with kidneys (2897) 
Buffalo fish, cream sauce (1126) 
Breast of pork with cabbage (1773) 
Calf's liver, Italian style (1532) 
Roasted plovers (2119) 
Potatoes, housekeeper's style (2791) 
Cannelons a la Celestine (3292) 



97 

Tongue canapes (777) 

Eggs on a dish with chopped ham (2923) 

Fisherman's Matelote (1205) 

Mutton kidneys a la Soubise (1617) 

Broiled tripe, tartar sauce (1473) 

Ruddy duck roasted (2066) 

Creamed potatoes (2781) 

Apricot cakes with cream of almonds (3287) 



98 



99 

Poached eggs with gravy (2931) 

Cupola of salt codfish, Biscaienne (2254) 

Lamb stewed with turnips (1 759) 

Broiled plovers (2118) 

Corned beef hash (2290) 

Omelet souffle with preserves (3065) 

Coffee (3701) 

Dessert 



Canapes with sliced salmon (777) 
Fried eggs, Neapolitan style (2868) 
Mullet, D'Antin sauce (1206) 
Calf's brains with Venetian sauce (1486) 
Pullet legs a la Bayonnaise (2003) 
Mutton chops Soyer (1591) 
Provengal potatoes (2801) 
Biscuits in cases with cream (3289) 



1OO 

Soft eggs for epicures (2950) 

Oyster patties (939) 

Lamb minion fillet pudding a la Gladstone 

(2323) 

String beans with butter (2829) 
Salisbury steak (1359) 
Mundane fritters (3044) 
Fruits (3699) 
Dessert 



40 



THE EPICUREAN. 



NOVEMBER- 

101 

Crawfish canapes (777) 

Omelet with frogs (2890) 

Fresh herring a la Calaisienne (1174) 

Pork cutlets, gherkin sauce (1781) 

Chicken legs, pure"e of Jerusalem artichokes 

(1877) 

Porterhouse steak (1362) 

Potato cakes (2778) 

Crescents with preserves (8298) 



BREAKFAST. 

1O2 

Oysters tartare (804) 
Eggs on a dish, Plumerey (2918) 
Red snapper a la Princess (1236) 
Hashed partridge Clemenceau style (2298) 
Kulash a la Finnoise (1318) 
Broiled chicken with bacon maitre-d'hotel 
(1830) 

Baked Biarritz potatoes (2772) 

D'Artois cake with apricot marmalade 
(3302) 



103 

Beets marinated (774) 
Soft eggs with pure"e of sorrel (2951) 
Maskinonge a la Providence (1207) 
Potato croquettes maisienne (2782) 
Beef palate a la Bechamel (1326) 
Minced partridge with rice (2091) 
Redhead duck roasted (2063) 
Goronflot (3310) 



1O4, 

Anchovy canapes (777) 

Omelet of beef palate (2880) 

Fresh mackerel, Bonnefoy (1191) 

Jugged venison (2180) 

Flat sausage broiled with tomato Soubise 

sauce (1805) 

Delmonico sirloin steak, plain (1375) 
Potato tartlets (2810) 
Marrow f rangipane pie (3088) 



105 

Fried eels, tartar sauce (1150) 

Scrambled eggs with Swiss cheese (2944) 

Calf's tails with cabbage (1580) 

Zampino, Modena style with string beans (1820) 

Mutton cutlets a la Bouchere (1593) 

Potatoes half glaze (2784) 

Broiled teal duck (2067) 

German pancake (3074) 



106 

Boiled perch, Valois sauce (1209) 
Omelet with smoked herring (2895) 
Calf's head a la poulette (1516) 
Troyes Chitterlings (1775) 
Rib steak of beef a la Royer (1365) 
Potatoes, housekeeper's style (2791) 
Woodcock roasted (2206) 
Wells of love (3338) 



1O7 

Molded eggs in cases a 1'Echiquier (2875) 

Pike perch a la Royale (1216) 

Breast of mutton (haricot) with turnips (1588) 

Jugged rabbit with blood (2141) 

Marinated pork tenderloin (1815) 

Celery salad (2660) 

Puff paste galette (3306) 

Stewed fruits (3686) 



1O8 

Whitefish a la Gherardi (1311) 
Eggs molded a la Parisian (2876) 

Mutton kidneys on skewers, Bordelaise 
sauce (1619) 

Tripe a la mode de Caen (1471) 

Stuffed tomatoes with fresh mushrooms 

(2842) 

Roast squabs with water-cress (2018) 
Cheese (3697) 



OF FARE. 



109 

Bartholomew canapes (852) 
Fried eggs a la Montebello (2867) 
Wall eyed pike a la Durance (1213) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 
Young rabbit, Valencia style (2139) 
Roast Guinea fowl (1958) 
Corn salad (2669) 
Darioles with vanilla (3301) 



DECEMBER BEEAKF AST. 

110 

Sardine canapes (777) 

Omelet with onions and ham (2900) 

Fresh herrings mustard sauce (1175) 

Woodcock pudding (2325) 

Bag sausage fried (1803) 

Chicken roasted in the saucepan (1881) 

Galettes, half puffed (3306) 



111 

Oysters on the half shell (803) 

Eels fried with butter and fine herbs (1151) 

Scrambled eggs a la Martinez (2937) 

Oxtail a la Castsllane (1320) 

Bussy potatoes (2777) 

Broiled canvasback duck (2054) 

Oyster plant salad (2656) 

Lafayette cakes with rum (3313) 



112 



Onion soup with Parmesan cheese (331) 
German carp with sauerkraut (1132) 
Omelet with bacon (2879) 
Blanquette of tenderloin of pork with 

mushrooms (1814) 
Minion fillets of lamb, shallot sauce vriih 

marrow (1727) 

Potatoes, housekeeper's style (2791) 
Blackhead duck roasted (2052) 
Celery salad (2660) 
Demonet tartlets (3331) 



* 

114, 

Frostfish, Cherbourg style (1159) 
Eggs on a dish with bacon (2921) 
Tripe a la poulette with mushrooms (1472) 
Paupiettes of fillets of veal a la Whittier 

(1511) 

Dauphine potatoes (2783) 
Roast squabs (2118) 
Monk's beard salad (2674) 
Madelenes with rum (3316) 



113 

Canapes of herring (777) 

Oyster omelet (2901) 

Whitefish, pimentade sauce (1312) 

Round buttock top of beef baked (1335) 

Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Roasted pullet with water cress (1996) 

Apple fritters, Montagnard (3037) 

Mince pie (3089) 



115 

Rissoles of crawfish a la Beatrice (949) 

Hunter's omelet (2896) 

Chicken sauted a la Sherman (2468) 

Minced tenderloin of beef, Creole style (1397) 

Roast duck (1921) 

Lettuce salad (2672) 

Cheese (3697) 



116 

Scrambled eggs with sweetbreads (2943) 

Lamb fries, cream horseradish sauce (1696) 

Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Braised duck with olives (1924) 

Cepes baked with cream (2724) 

Cheese (3697) 

Dessert 



42 THE EPICUREAN. 



BILL OF FARE FOR INVALIDS 

Arrow root, Indian (361) 
Bavaroise (362) 

Chicken broth, plain (363) 

Chicken and mutton broth with barley (364) 
Chicken and veal broth (365) 

Clam broth and puree (366) 

Custard cream of chicken or game (367) 
Extract of beef, clarified (369) 
Extract of beef, plain (368) 

Fish broth with clams (370) 

Frog broth and puree (371) 
Herb broth (372) 

Jelly of chicken and calf s feet (373) 
Jelly of meat and calf's feet (374) 

Jelly of calf's feet with Madeira wine (374) 

Mulled egg and almond milk thickened with rice flour (376) 
Mutton broth (375) 

Pressed beef juice (377) 

Pure"e of barley with chicken broth (378) 

Puree of chicken, partridge, grouse or roebuck (379) 
Puree of oatmeal or wheaten grits (380) 
Sabayon of chicken or game (381) 

Tea of beef, mutton, chicken or veal (382) 
Veal broth, refreshing (383) 

Wheat, oat or barley broth (384) 



BILLS OF FARK. 



117 JANVIER. 

LUNCH, 12 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Ecrevisses vinaigrette (782) 
Caviar garni de citrons (778) 
Sarsac Huitres sur coquilles creuses 

(803) 

Bouillon en tasses (187) 
Homard a la creme (1044) 

Champagne Tournedos filet de boeuf a la 
Perrier Jouet Roqueplan (1436) 

Petit s pois a 1'Anglaise (2742) 
Kis de veau a la Parisienne 

(1576) 

Macedoine a la Montigny (2755) 
Terrapene a la Maryland (1085) 

Chateau Cailles grillees garnies de 

Lagrange cresson (2128) 

Mousseline de foies gras a la 

Dana (2535) 
Salade de laitue (2672) 

CJiampagne Glace soufflee Favart (3534) 
Macarons d'angelique (3380) 
Fruits (3699) 
Bonbons (3642) 
Cafe (3701) 



1 118 



FEVRIER. 

LUNCH, 16 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Canapes de saumon (777) 
Mortadella (818) 



Consomme de volatile (190) 

Chateau Cotelettes de filet de boeuf a la 

Yquem Babanine (2255) 

Tomates a la Trevise (2836) 

CJiampagne Poulet saute a la Marcel (1892) 
Dry Monopole Petits Pois a la Parisienne 

(2745) 

Champignons sous cloche (2761) 
Punch, Favorite (3508) 

Chateau Becassines roties (2159) 

Larose Salade de cresson (2676) 



Omelette soufflee aux pommes 
(3063) 

Gelee a la Rose (3181) 
Charlotte Russe (3145) 

Glace pommes de terre farcies 
sauce marasquin (3575) 

Petits fours (3364) 
Cafe (3701) 



119 MARS. 

LUNCH, 10 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Thon marine (831) 
Celeri rave (779) 

Haut Consomme (189) 

Sauterne Canapes Lorenzo (855) 

Queues de petites langoustes 
a la Monte Carlo (1036) 

Champagne Cotelettes d'agneau Robinson 
Perrier (1685) 

Jouet Brut Petits pois aux laitues (2746) 

Terrapene Baltimore (1083) 

Pontet Canet Pigeonneaux grilles, sauce Col- 
bert (2013) 

Galantine de faisan decoupee 
(2495) 

Salade de laitue (2672) 

Omelette soufflee a la Vanille 
(3066) 

Glace ponding, Diplomate 
(3491) 

Fruits (3699) 

Petits fours (3364) 

Cafe (3701) 



120 AVRIL. 

LUNCH, 14 COUVERTS. 

MENU. 

Punch orange a la Russe (3613) 
Canapes d'anchois (777) 
Graves Consomme en tasses (189) 

Crabes d'huitre Salamandre 

(1005) 

St. Estephe Cotelettes d'agneau a la Clem- 
entine (1673) 

Pommes de terre fondantes 
(2799) 

Asperges a la sauce Hollandaise 
(2692) 

Champagne Poulet roti a la casserole 
Mumm Extra (1881) 

Dry Pate de jambon (2558) 

Salade de romaine (2675) 

Mazarine a Fananas et au kirsch 
(3053) 

Gateau St. Honore Sultane 
(3261) 

Plombiere Richemont (3481) 

Fruits (3699) 
Petits fours (3364) 
Liqueurs Cafe (3701) 



44 



THE: EPICUREAN. 



121 MAI. 

LUNCH. 16 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Lafaurie Consomme en tasses (189) 

Canapes de caviar (777) 

Coquilles de homard (2348) 

Champagne Ailes de poulet a la Genin 
Louis (1843) 

Ecederer Petits pois a la Parisienne (3745) 

Bis de veau a la St. Cloud 
(1566) 

Tomates farcies aux champig- 
nons (2842) 

Batailly Poulet grille au petit sale (1830) 

Galantine de caneton en forme 

de poire (2487) 
Salade de laitue (2672) 
Omelette fourree aux fraises 

(3068) 

Gelee macedoine au champagne 
(3179) 

Glace mousse S6miramis (3471) 

Liqueurs Fruits (3699) 

Petits fours (3364) 
Cafe (3701) 



122 

LUNCH, 16 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Fonds d'artichauts printaniers 

(773) 

CliaUis Bouillon (187) 

Vieux Moules a la Villeroi (1048) 

St. Pierre Noisettes de filet de boeuf a la 

Maire (1415) 
Aubergines a la Duperret (2735) 

Champagne Ailes de poulet a la Harrison 
Pommery Sec (1844) 

Concombres farcis (2734) 

Asperges sauce Hollandaise 
(2692) 

Sorbet Tosca (3519) 

Nuits Pigeonneaux rotis a la casserole 

(2018) 
Salade de laitue (2672) 

Omelette soufflee aux amandes 
(3062) 

Liqueurs Fruits (3699) 

Gateaux japonais (3347) 
Cafe (3701) 



123 JUILLET. 

LUNCH, 16 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Zeres et Accola (831) 

Bitter Betteraves (774) 

Lucines orange'es (803) 

Chdblis Homards rotis a la broche (1 040) 

Concombres a 1'Anglaise (2661) 

Champagne Escalopes de ris de veau 
Cliquot Sec Careme (2284) 

Mais bouilli en tige (2730) 

Chaudfroid de poularde (2458) 
Salade de laitue (2672) 

Omelette soufflee legere (3061) 

Gateau Fleury (3237) 
Framboises a la creme (3699) 

Glace pouding Diplomate (3491) 

Petits fours (3364) 
Fromage (3697) 

Cafe Granit au cognac glace 1 
(3609) 



124: AOUT. 

LUNCH, 12 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Xeres et Salade d'anchois (772) 

Bitter Cornichons (785) 

Timbales Chevaliere (963) 

Niesteiner Crabes tnoux grilles au beurre 

ravigote (1006) 
Concombres marines (2661) 

Pontet Canet Mignons de filet de boeuf 

Baillard (1400) 

Creme de pommes de terre au 
gratin (2781) 

Champagne Ailes de poulet Valerri (1856) 
Irroy Brut Petits pois a la franeaise (2743) 

Beaune Canetons rotis (1938) 

Pate de foies gras decoupe 
(2563) 

Salade de laitue (2672) 
Beignets de cerises (3042) 

Glace Spongade Parepa (3537) 
Liqueurs Cafe (3701) 

Claret cup Villars (3712) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



45 



125 SEPTEMBRE. 

LUNCH, 16 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Eperlans marines (821) 
Haut Olives (800) 

Sauterne 

Consomme de volaille (190) 

Homard a la Camille (1028) 

Chateau Noisettes de filet de breuf 

Couffran Triumvir (1419) 

Riz a 1'Orientale (2978) 

Filets de poulet a la Gallier 

(2466) 
Haricots verts sautes (2829) 

Champagne Pate de cailles a la ge!6e (2565) 

Salade de romaine ( 2675 ) 



Omelette soufflee aux macarons 

(3064) 
Gele"e tunisienne rubanee 

(3184) 

Fruits (3699) 
Compote (3686) 
Cafe (3701) 



126 OCTOBRE. 

LUNCH, 14 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

R6ties Waddington (826) 
Truffes a 1'huile (830) 
Consomme (189) 

Liebfraumilch Coquilles de queues d'ecrevis- 

ses (2341) 

Cotelettes de chevreuil Buridan 

(2170) 

Petits pois a lamenagere (2744) 

Champagne Pigeonneaux frits sauce Figaro 
Riunart (2017) 

Brut Cepes a la Provengale (2723) 

Pluviers grilles, sauce Colbert 
(2118) 

Madere Chaudfroid de dinde a la Peri- 

gord (2462) 
Salade d'Escarole (2671) 

Imperial Gateau Vacherin a la creme 

(3264) 

Glace delicieux aux noisettes 
(3592) 

Liqueurs Petits fours (3364) 

Cafe (3701) 



* 

128 DECEMBRE. 

LUNCH, 12 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 

Saumon fume (822) 
Tartelettes de gibier (825) 

Sauterne Huitres crues (803) 

Premiere Consomme en tasses (189) 
Homards Provencale (1039) 

St. Julien Noisettes de filet de bceuf Ber- 
Superieur thier (1411) 

Petits pois a 1'Anglaise (2742) 

Terrapene au madere (1090) 

Clicquot Sec Perdreaux grilles a 1'Anglaise 
(2085) 

Terrine de mauviettes (2599) 
Salade d'escarole (2671) 

Omelette soufflee a 1'Ancienne 
(3060) 

Flan de pommes Manhattan 

(3034) 
Riz Mirabeau (3213) 

Glace plombiere d'Alenoon 
(3483) 



127 



NOVEMBRE. 

LUNCH, 18 COUVERTS. 
MENU. 



et 
Bitter 



Piments doux d'Espagne (806) 
Jambon de Westphalie (786) 
Consomme en tasses (189) 
Canapes Martha (856) 

Huitres a la Bearnaise tomatee 
(1052) 

Chateau Mignons de filet de boeuf Dumas 

Lagrange (1402) 

Pommes de terre fondantes 
(2799) 

Becassines farcies Bordelaise 

(2160) 
Tomates Boquillon (2833) 

Champagne Coquilles de ris de veau a la 
Delmonico Harper (2357) 

Sorbet Jeune Ameriqne (3530) 
Nuits Cailles grillees (2128) 

Terrine entiere de foies gras en 

aspic (2413) 
Salade de laitue (2672) 

Glace soufflee a 1'Alcazar (3533) 

Liqueurs Fruits (3699) 

Petits fours (3364) 
Cafe (3701) 



Liqueurs 



Fruits (3699) 
Petits fours (3364) 
Cafe f3701> 



46 



THE 



JANUARY LUNCH. 



129 

Oysters a la Bearnaise tomatoed (1052) 
Escalops of fat livers with risot, Perigueux 

sauce (2281) 
Eggs cocottes (2873) 
Broiled quails (2128) 
Eudive salad (2671) 
Meringue flawn (3174) 
Dessert 



* 

131 

Baked scallops on toast (1078) 

Loin pork pie, English style (2378) 

Broiled ruddy duck (2067) 

Celery salad (2660) 

Glazed apple marmalade (3125) 

Roasted chestnuts 

Dessert 



ISO 

Scallops Brestoise (1074) 

Surtout of chicken livers with mushrooms 

(2367) 

Green peas, French style (2743) 
Broiled woodcock (2204) 
Water-cress and apple salad (2676) 
Mocha cake (3249) 
Apples 
Dessert 



132 

Baked oysters a la Crane (1057) 

Small patties with gravy (2318) 

Minced partridge (2090) 

Potato croquettes in surprise (2782) 

Broiled grouse (2071) 

Babas with rum (3288) 

Malaga grapes 



133 

Oysters a la Boucicault (1053) 

Veal palates, Epicurean style (1540) 

Roasted stuffed squabs (2018) 

Lettuce salad (2672) 

Banana crusts a la Panama (3023) 

Grape fruit 

Dessert 



135 

Scallops Havraise (1075) 

Skewers of chicken livers, Colbert sauce (2222) 

Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Broiled partridges, English style (2085) 

Lettuce salad (2672) 

Chateau framboise" (3141) 

Pears 



134r 

Scallops Mariniere (1076) 
Crepinettes of chicken, Turenne 
Broiled canvasback (2054) 
Cos lettuce salad (2675) 
Fruit flawn (3172) 
Florida oranges 
Dessert 



136 

Curried oysters, Indian style 
Shells of chicken (2345) 
Julienne potatoes (2792) 
Broiled teal duck (2067) 
Endive salad (2671) 
Pineapple 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 



47 



FEBRUARY 

137 

Oyster rissolettes, Pompadour (956) 
Beefsteak. Bordelaise with marrow and 

truffles (1372) 

Roast reedbirds with cresses (2152) 
Cauliflower salad mayonnaise (2649) 
Venetian lemon custard pie (3202) 
Chestnut Plombiere (3486) 
Grape fruit 
Dessert 



-LUNCH. 

138 

Border of risot of lobsters (2213) 

Minion fillets of spring lamb a la Benoist 
(1720) 

Brussels sprouts sauted (2704) 

Broiled ptarmigans (2071) 

Cucumber salad (2661) 

Rice souffle with maraschino (3121) 

Roasted chestnuts 

Dessert 



139 

Lobster a la Bonnefoy (1026) 
Minced beef a la Beekman (1396) 
Baked cauliflower with cheese (2717) 
Roast squabs (2018) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 
Printanier boats (cakes) (3291) 
Apples 
Dessert 



14O 

Fried soft clams (998) 

Lamb cutlets with string beans (1693) 

Marrow squash with Parmesan (2824) 

Chicken roasted in the saucepan (1881) 

Endive salad (2671) 

Small savarin cakes (3324) 

Roman bomb (3442) 

Bananas 



141 

Anchovy canapes (777) 

Lobster, Paul Bert (1038) 

Pork chops with apple croquettes (1779) 

Potato and beetroot salad (2652) 

Broiled teal ducks (2067) 

Jealousy cakes (3311) 

Malaga grapes 

Dessert 



14:2 

Crusts of fat livers (905) 

Cromesquis of beef tongue (872) 

Baked noodles (2971) 

Broiled ptarmigan (2071) 

Chicory salad (2668) 

Meringued omelet with fruits (3069) 

Florida oranges 

Dessert 



* 

143 

Oysters (803) 

Cromesquis of striped bass (870) 

Broiled breaded lamb cutlets with gravy (1690) 

Green peas, French style (2743) 

Broiled redhead ducks (2063) 

Tomato salad (2666) 

Custard in a dish (3159) 

Pineapple 

Dessert 



144 

Oysters (803) 

Scallops breaded with milk and fried (1077 

Veal cutlets with fine herbs (1504) 

Roast tame duck (1921) 

Water -cress salad (2676) 

Floating Islands (eggs) (3163) 

Syruped baba (3227) 

Pomegranates 

Dessert 



48 



THE EPICUREAN. 



MAECH LUNCH. 



145 

Scallops breaded with eggs and fried (1077) 

Veal pie a la Dickens (2380) 

Artichoke bottoms, Villars (2682) 

Broiled duckling (1938) 

Chicory salad (2668) 

Rice souffle" with maraschino (3121) 

Pineapple 

* 



146 

Small lobster, Bordelaise (1025) 

Fricassee of turkey wings baked (2038) 

Tomatoes a la Boquillon (2833) 

Broiled reedbirds (2151) 

Endive salad (2668) 

Meringued apples, Nubian (2996) 

Malaga grapes 



147 

Stuffed oysters, Mornay (1069) 

Terrapin, ancient style (1087) 

Artichokes, Rachel (2690) 

Broiled chicken with tarragon sauce (1831) 

Small orange souffles in cases (3120) 

Milk punch iced (3511) 

Bananas 



148 

Lobster with cream (1044) 

Squabs roasted in the saucepan (2018) 
Eggplant a la Robertson (2737) 
Small aspics of foies gras (2412) 
Apple flawn, latticed (3169) 
Strawberries 
Dessert 



149 

Consomme in cups (189) 

Stuffed small lobster tails (1043) 

Terrapin, Newberg (1086) 

Small " pains" of chicken a 1'Ecarlate (2543) 

Meringued omelet with fruits (3069) 

Grape fruit 

Dessert 



15O 

Oysters with Parmesan (1073) 
Pork cutlets with apples (1777) 
Mushrooms sauted with butter (2760) 

Roast English pheasants adorned with 
their own plumage (2107) 

Eggs with coffee cream meringued (3033) 

Florida oranges 

Dessert 



151 

Oysters a la Rubino (1055) 
Chicken croquettes, Exquisite (877) 
Asparagus, vinaigrette (2692) 
Roast thrushes (2166) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 
Custard in a dish (3159) 



152 

Lobster a la Hervey (1034) 

Terrapin a la Crisfleld (1084) 

Italian salad (2635) 

Crepinettes of pigeons, poivrade sauce 

with truffle essence (No. 2246) 
Madeira crusts (3026) 
Bavarois with meringues (3133) 
Pears 



BILLS OF 



49 



153 

Caviare (778) 

boallops a la Brestoise (1074) 

Grenadins of beef with sweet peppers (1394) 

Noodles with fried bread-crumbs (2973) 

Broiled squabs, Colbert sauce (2013) 

Stuffed eggs (sweet) (3031) 

Grape fruit 

Dessert 



APRIL LUNCH. 

154r 

Oysters on the deep shell (803) 
Lobster a la Rougemont (1041) 
Vienna Schnitzel, German style (1512) 
Green peas with braised lettuces (2746) 
Timbales of chicken, Parisian style (2382) 
Souffle's in cases with vanilla (3120) 
Oranges 
Dessert 



155 

Crusts a la Genoise (904) 

Deviled lobster (1043) 
Lamb steak, maitre-d'hotel (1713) 
Baked tomatoes (2837) 
Chaudfroid of larks (2454) 
Floating island (3163) 
Hot-house grapes 



156 

Radishes (808) 

Fresh butter (775) 

Croustades of lamb's sweetbreads (2251) 

Broiled teal duck (2067) 

Potatoes in surprise (2809) 

Cake stuffed with apricots (3325) 

Cream cakes iced with vanilla (3294) 

Bananas 



157 

Oysters on crusts (1062) 

Escalops of beef palates, chestnut pure"e (2277) 

Croustades of chicken livers with Madeira 

(2250) 

Tomatoes a la Tr6vise (2836) 
Squabs Crapaudine (2007) 
Cream pie (3201) 
Apples 



* 

159 

Pickled oysters (802) 

Lobster tails a la Stanley (1042) 

King's pilau of lamb (1709) 

Fried frog's legs, cream sauce (1022) 

Hot pie, Bontoux style (2314) 

Genoese cake (3307) 

Strawberries 



158 

Julienne soup, Faubonne (318) 

Quenelles of turkey, Providence (2336) 
Minion fillets of lamb, Landgrave (1721) 
Artichoke bottoms, Florence (2677) 
Larks a la Mardchale (2081) 
Meringued pancakes, Rossini (3073) 
Pineapple 

_ * 



160 

Oysters and lemons (803) 

Cream of peas a la St. Germain (260) 

Breast of lamb, chopped sauce (1663) 

Cromesquis of beef tongue (872) 

Boudinsof chicken. Soubise (2215) 

Baked apples (2992) 

Graoe fruit 



50 



THE EPICUREAN. 



161 

Clam pancakes or fritters (996) 

Small patties, Mazarin (944) 

Epigrammes of lamb a la Toulouse (1694) 

Broiled squabs (2013) 

Lettuce salad (2672) 

Surprise of fruits, frothy sauce (3219) 

Apples 



MAY LUNCH. 

162 

Colombines of chicken liver with ham (865) 
Deviled frog's legs (1020) 
Patties a 1'Andalouse (934) 
Slices of lamb, Previllot (1711) 
Broiled ptarmigans (2071) 
Chicory salad (2668) 
Almondine tartlets (3326) 
Hot-house grapes 



163 

Quenelles of fish, Montglas (2330) 

Sweetbread croquettes (893) 
Roast tame duck (1921) 
Cos lettuce salad (2675) 
Cream macaroons in cases (3383) 
Spanish oranges 



Boudins of pickerel a la "Walton (844) 

Benoiton shells (2339) 

Sweetbreads in papers (1573) 

Broiled chicken with tarragon sauce (1831) 

Water-cress and apple salad (2676) 

Apricots with cream of almonds (3287) 

Bananas 



165 

Lobster, Monte Carlo (1036) 

Palmettes of ham a 1'Aquitaine (927) 
Chaudfroid of chicken, Clara Morris (2451) 
Ptarmigans (2071) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 
Crescents with preserves (3298) 
Hot-house peaches 



166 



Brissotins of chicken, supreme sauce (849) 

Sweetbreads on skewers (2226) 

Parisian green peas (2745) 

Roast duck (1921) 

Endive salad (2671) 

Apple croquettes, Trimalcion (3016) 

Pineapple 



167 

Crusts a la d'Henin (904) 
Celestines with foies-gras and pure*e of chest- 
nuts (862) 

Squab cutlets, Perigueux (2267) 
Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 
Minions of tenderloin of beef, Stanley (1406) 
Mellow potatoes (2799") 
Lady bouchees with strawberries (3376) 



168 

Lobster a la Fresne (1032) 

Junot palmettes (921) 

Minion fillets of lamb in surprise (1725) 

String beans a la Pettit (2827) 

Strawberry short cake (3262) 

Biscuits in cases with cream (3289) 

Pears 



BILLS OF FARE:. 



51 



169 

Lobster a la Delmonico (1037) 

Timbales Mentana (974) 

Mutton cutlets with chicory (1602) 

Artichoke bottoms, Montglas (2679) 

Croquettes of capon a la Royal (876) 

Coffee cream eclairs (3303) 

Cherries 



JUNE LUNCH. 

17O 

Lobster, Paul Bert (1038) 

Varsovian palmettes (924) 
Breast of beef a la Florence (1314) 
Stuffed tomatoes baked (2837) 
Asparagus, Hollandaise sauce (2692) 
Bordelalse tartlets (3328) 
Hot-house grapes 



171 

Clam chowder (300) 

Shells of calf's brains (2355) 

Noisettes of tenderloin of beef, Berthier (1411) 

Broiled duckling (1938) 

Macedoine salad (2650) 

Strawberries and cream 

Peaches 



172 

Soft shell crabs, sauted in butter (1006) 

Lamb cutlets a la Durand (1674) 
Tomatoes a la Boquillon (2833) 
Italian salad (2635) 

Chicken roasted in the saucepan (1881) 
Rice border with bananas (3005) 
Grape fruit 



173 

Frog's legs fried with cream sauce (1022) 

Small puff paste salmon patties (945) 
Minion fillets of lamb, Lefort (1722) 
Roast squabs (2018) 
Cos lettuce salad (2675) 
Goronflot cakes (3310) 
Bananas 



174, 

Cromesquis of mussels (873) 

Soft crabs, sauted (1006) 

Tournedos of beef a la Hutching (1433) 

Chicken roasted in the saucepan (1881) 

Lettuce salad (2672) 

Strawberry ice cream (3451) 

Pineapple 



175 

Bressoles of fat livers (848) 

Shells of squabs, baked (2356) 

Broiled partridges, English style (2085) 

Tomatoes stuffed with fresh mushrooms (2842) 

Aspics of foies gras (2411) 

Strawberry short cake (3262) 

Raspberries 



176 

Clams, Philadelphia style (994) 

Cassolettes, Lusigny (860) 

Small" pains" of chicken arEcarlate(2543) 

Ducklings, Rouennaise (1937) 

Cos lettuce salad (2675) 

Meringued croustacles of Venice (3020) 

Strawberries 



THE EPICUREAN. 



Squab cutlets, Perigueux (2267) 

Potato cakes (2778) 

Lamb minion fillet pie a la Manning (2373) 

Small vanilla souffles in cases (3130) 

Cream cheese (3698) 



JULY LUNCH. 

178 
j. 

Pickled alligator pears (771) 

Soft clams on skewers (999) 

Noisettes of plain tenderloin of beef (1410] 

String beans, a la Pettit (2827) 

Roasted reedbirds (2152) 

Cream cakes iced with chocolate (3294) 

Apricots 



179 

Little Neck clams a la poulette (995) 

Sweetbread patties, French style (940) 
Grenadins of beef as venison (1388) 
Frog's lefts fried a la Horly (1021) 
Savarin with apricots (3117) 
Marly cake (3246) 
Blackberries 



180 

Frog's legs a la Osborn (1018) 
Soft shell crabs sauted in butter (1006) 
Chicken cutlets a la Clarence (2258) 
Corn cut up (2731) 

Potted tenderloin of beef a la Nelson 

(2320) 

Turkish coffee (3702) 
Cherries 



181 

Lobster tart a la Herault (2374) 
Cases of squabs, Umberto (2234) 
Boiled corn on the cob (2730) 

Small roasted spring chickens as an entree 

(1908) 

Lettuce salad (2672) 
Surprise of fruits (3219) 
Gooseberries 



182 

Croustades of gnocquis, Rivoli (899) 

Border of risot of lobster (2213) 

Pigeon tart a la Britannia (2377) 

Broiled duckling (1938) 

Celery salad (2660) 

Iced banana pudding (3487) 

Currants 



183 

Stuffed clams (997) 

Frog's legs a la d'Antin (1017) 

Sweetbreads larded and glazed with gravy 
(1575) 

Surtout of wild pigeons (2368) 
Timbale a la Nantaise (2381) 
Molded snow eggs (3164) 
Bananas 



184r 

Olives stuffed with anchovies (801) 
Lobster brochettes (2224) 
Cases of sweetbreads, Grammont (2235) 
Broiled chickens with tarragon sauce 

(1831) 

Small Quillet cakes (3397) 
Musk melon 
Cheese 



BILLS OF FARE:. 



53 



185 

Lobster, American style (1024) 



Pigeons braised with green peas (1969) 
Timbales of sweetbreads, modern (2388) 
Cream cakes iced with coffee (3294) 
Raspberry water-ice (3607) 
Peaches. 



AUGUST LUNCH. 

186 

Kulibiac, Russian style (908) 

Lobster a la Lawrence (1035) 
Beef pie a la Perez (2369) 
Shells of mussels (2349) 
Raspberry souffle (3122) 
Cheese 



* 

188 

Lobster a la Canaille (1028) 

Escalops of veal a la Arnold (2285) 
Smothered string beans (2828) 
Timbale for epicures (2383) 

Peach marmalade pancakes macedoine 

(3075) 
Pears 



187 

Frog's legs a la poulette with mushrooms 

(1019) 

Pilau of chicken (1878) 

Lobster a la Gambetta (1033) 

Tournedos of fillet of beef, Bretigny (1431) 

Savarin a la Valence (3259) 

Cheese 



189 

" Pain " of pike (2307) 

Lobster, mayonnaise (2534) 

Squabs, Stanislas (2011; 

Green peas, English style (2742) 

Noisettes of shoulder of lamb, Epicurean (1730) 

Parfait with nougat and with almonds (3478) 

Plums 



19O 

Cromesquis of beef palate (867) 

Fried sweatbreads, Neapolitan style (1562) 
Shells of frog's legs (2347) 
Japanese salad (2636) 
Cannelons a la Celestine (3292) 
Cheese 



191 

Oysters with fine herbs (1072) 

Lobster a la Britannia (1027) 
Fried chicken, Medicis (1870) 
Small vol-au-vent, Delmontes (2403) 
Cream cakes with St. Honore cream (3296) 
Apricots 



192 

Shells filled with crawfish tails (2341) 

Beef palate tourte, Parisian style (2390) 

Squabs sauted a I'lmpromptu (2010) 

Sarah potatoes (2802) 

Sweetbread fritters, cream sauce (1572) 

Water melon on ice 

Raspberries. 



54 



THE EPICUREAN. 



193 

Alligator pears (771) 



SEPTEMBER LUNCH. 

194r 



Boudins of game, Berchoux (2218) 

Oysters a la Rubino (1055) 

Epigrammes of mutton a la Jardiniere (1607) 

Timbale of pullet (2386) 

Iced souffles, Favart (3534) 



Oysters in cases a la Hilton (2231) 
Patties with Regence salpicon (943) 
Sirloin steak for gourmets (1378) 

Squabs roasted in earthenware saucepan 
(2018) 

Fiori di latte a la Bellini (3467) 
Apples 



195 

Shrimp patties (935) 

Tournedos of tenderloin of beef a la Roque- 
plan (1436) 

Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 
Broiled partridges, Colbert sauce (2099) 
Francillon cakes (3305) 
Oheese 



196 

Oysters with fine herbs (1072) 

Cromesquis of sweetbreads, Babanine 

(872) 

Broiled eggplant, Duperret (2735) 
Breasts of grouse a la Czarina (207?) 
Marillan cakes (3317) 
Bananas 



197 

Cromesquis of game, Stanislas (871) 

Shells of shrimps with oyster crabs (2342) 
Chateaubriand, with souffled potatoes (1883) 
Iced pudding, Constance (3490) 
Cocoanut 



198 

Fried soft clams with parsley (998) 

Blanquette of pullet with mushrooms 
(1997) 

Slices of kernel of venison a la Hussard 
(2181) 

Small aspics of foies-gras (2412) 
De"monet tartlets (3331) 
Cheese 



199 

Consomme" (189) 

Lobster a la Dugle"re" (1031) 

Timbale of squabs a la Berchoux (2387) 

Lamb cutlets, Murillo (1681) 

Cream with apples (3014) 

Cheese. 



20O 

Strained okra soup (299) 

Baked oysters a la Crane (1057) 
Cromesquis of beef tongue (872) 
Chickens Ecarlateala Derenne (2463} 
Apples, Baron de Brisse style (2993) 
Concord grapes 



BILLS OF FARE. 



55 



201 

Crawfish tails in shells (2341) 



OCTOBER LUNCH. 
2O2 

Stuffed oysters, Mornay (1069) 



Chicken fricassee (1861) 

Venison cutlets, tomato Parisian sauce (2174) 

Tomatoes stuffed with fresh mushrooms (2842) 

Conde peaches (3081) 

Watermelon 



* 

203 

Shells of oysters in their natural shells (2351) 

Mutton cutlets with marinade (1604) 

String bean salad (2657) 

Chicken pie, Australian style (2372) 

Alliance fritters (3036) 

Barberries 



Crusts of woodcock (906) 

Artichoke bottoms a la Florence (2677) 

Cream of lobster (2470) 

Jelly cake meringued (3243) 

Cheese 



204, 

Oysters in cases a la Lorenzo (2232) 

Venison cutlets with chestnut puree (2175) 
Souffle of chicken a la Delsart (2360) 
Broiled teal duck (2067) 
Frascati biscuits (3004) 
Muskmelon 

* 



205 

Brissotins of game, Lyonnese (850) 

Lobster a la Ravigote (2531) 

Green peas, English style (2742) 

Noisettes of tenderloin of beef with pure'e of 

mushrooms (1420) 

Peach ice cream a la Herbster (3453) 
Huckleberries 



206 

Shells of oysters with fried bread (2353) 

Salmis of partridge cold (2574) 
Croustade a la Perigueux (897) 
Italian salad (2635) 
Roasted woodcocks (2206) 
Scuffled omelet with vanilla (3066) 
Cheese 



207 

Fried soft clams (998) 

Patties with puree of game (936) 
Shells of terrapin with hazel-nuts (2358) 
Broiled snipe (2157) 
Frothy puree of apples (3127) 
Spanish oranges 



208 

Shells of oysters baked in their shells 
(2350) 

Epigrammes of lamb, ancient style (1695) 

Timbales of pullet (2386) 

Plain Delmonico sii'loin steak (1375) 

Lamb's lettuce salad (2669) 

Preserved quinces (3685) 



56 



THE EPICUREAN. 



209 

Steamed oysters (1064) 

Lobster & la Creole (1029) 

Rib steak a la Bercy (1364) 

Galantine of pheasant, sliced (2495) 

Roast chicken garnished with water-cresses 

(1881). 

Rice border with bananas (3005) 
Dessert 



NOVEMBER LUNCH. 

21O 

Venison cutlets a la Cauchoise (2171) 
Croustades of reedbirds (2252) 
Terrapin, Maryland Club (1088) 
Redhead duck roasted (2063) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Nesselrode pudding with candied chest- 
nuts (3495) 
Dessert 



211 

Oysters in shells roasted (2352) 

Croustades a la Perigueux (897) 
Rabbit pie with fine herbs (2379) 
Roasted teal ducks (2068) 
Peaches a la Stevens (3084) 
Dessert 



213 

Scallops, Horly (1077) 

Croustades a la Morgan (902) 
Veal cutlets, half glaze (1499) 
Celery knob salad (2660) 
Roasted ruddy ducks (2066) 
Genoese Madeleines (3314) 
Roast chestnuts 



212 

Oyster brochettes (2225) 

Cromesquis of capon (868) 

Breast of veal a la Mondoux (1488) 

Young rabbit fillets, currant sauce (2145) 

Terrapin a la Philadelphia (1085) 

Cream of almond rissoles (3116) 

Bananas 



Shells of scallops, Parisian style (2354) 
Crepine of young rabbit (2249) 
Sweetbreads larded and glazed with gravy 

(1575) 

Quenelles of turkey a la Providenee (2336) 
Roasted wookcock (2206) 
Cream cakes with burnt almonds (3295) 
Pomegranates 



215 

White cabbage, English style (776) 
Cromesquis a la Rumford (869) 
Shells of terrapin with hazel-nuts (2358) 
Small vol-au-vent of reedbirds, Diplomate 

(2407) 

Broiled young wild rabbit backs (2149) 
Tutti-frutti ice cream (3586) 
Stewed quinces 



216 

Marinated Gurnet (831) 

Patties a la Reine (938) 

Small sirloin a la Bearnaise (1369) 

Frog's legs a la Royer (1023) 

Broiled teal duck (2067) 

Guanabana water-ice (3603) 

Cheese 



BILLS OF FARE. 



217 

Curried oysters, Indian style (1071) 

Lobster cutlets a la Shelley (2261) 
Baked macaroni (2959) 
Cold quail pie (2565) 
Asparagus salad (2621) 
Croquettes a la Trimalcion (3016) 
Cocoanut 



DECEMBER LUNCH. 

218 

" Pain " of crawfish, Chartreuse (2305) 

Terrapin a la Crisfield (1084) 
Timbale of young hare (2389) 
Tenderloin of beef with olives (1428) 
Chestnut and vanilla souffle (3118) 
Cheese 



* 

22O 

Stuffed hard shell crabs (1004) 

Terrapin cutlets with cream sauce (1089) 

Turkey legs with Milanese noodles (2036) 

Broiled quails (2128) 

Cakes filled with apricot marmalade (3325) 

Bananas 



219 

Oyster crab patties (935) 

Minion fillets of lamb as venison (1723) 
Lobster with mayonnaise (2534) 
Loin of pork pie, English style (2378) 
Jelly rolled biscuit (3312) 
Cheese 



221 

Small vol-au-vent a la Lucini (2404) 

Veal cutlets a la Georgina (1496) 
Terrapin stew with Madeira wine (1090) 
Apple Charlotte (3008) 
Crumbled paste cakes (3345) 
Apples 



Turban of lobsters garnished with shells 

of lobster (2394) 

Marinated pork tenderloin (1815) 
Vol-au-vent, Parisian style (2406) 
Terrapin, Maryland Club (1088) 
Lady's bouchees with strawberries (3376) 
Cheese 



Fresh mushroom patties (937) 
Cases of lobster, Ravigote (2447) 
Baked stuffed egg-plant (2738) 
Gibelotte of rabbits (2147) 
Cannelons a la Celestine (3292) 
Grape fruit 



Kulibiac Smolenska (909) 
Lobster cutlets a la Lowery (2476) 
Chicken pie a la Manhattan (2370) 
Sweetbreads a la Montebello (1560) 
Africans fancy cakes (3364) 
Pomegranates 



THE EPICUREAN. 



225 JANUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Meissonier (324) 

Remove 

Sheepshead a la Bechamel (1257) 

Dauphiue potatoes (2783) 

Entrees 

Rack of pork, crown shape, with small onions 

(1798) 
Stuffed mushrooms in cases with Madeira (2762) 

Pullet a la Dame Blanche (1972) 
Green peas with braised lettuces (2746) 

Roast. 

Woodcock (2206) 
Chicory salad (2668) 

Hot Entremets 
Brioche and cream fritters with sabayon (3040) 

Bananas in surprise (3541) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Nuts and raisins (3699) 

Dessert 



226 JANUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS: 
MENU. 

Soup 
Mutton a la Cowley (329ji 

Remove 

Fresh codfish a la Duxelle baked (1136) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Entrees 

Corned breast of beef, English style (1315) 
Sweet potato croquettes (2831) 

Chicken fricassee a la Waleski (1866) 
Tomatoes, Queen style (2840) 

Roast 

Mallard duck (2059) 
Cos-lettuce salad (2675) 

Hot Entremets 
Flawn au lion d'or (3035) 

Plombiere a la Rochambeau ice cream (3482) 
Small fancy cakes (3364) 



227 JANUARY. 

DINNER 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme Channel (224) 

Side Dish 
Rissoles of partridges a la Waddington (955) 

Fish 

Chicken halibut baked with parmesan (1172) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Remove 

Braised middle short loin a la Messinoise (1347) 
Cardoons with half-glaze (2710) 

Entrees 
Fillets of chicken a la Bodisco (1835) 

Green peas Parisian (2745) 

Salmis of canvasback ducks (2056) 

Fried eggplant (2739) 

Beatrice Punch (3502) 

Roast 

Quail (2131) 
Celery salad (2660) 

Hot Entremets 
Countess pudding (3097) 

Palmyra souffle ice cream (3535) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Mottoes (3653) 

Black coffee (3701) 

Raw oysters or clams (803) may 



JANUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme Celestine (223) 

Side Dish 
Palmettes of pheasant a la Torrens (929) 

Fish 

Red snapper a la Mobile (1235) 
Broiled potatoes with fried bread (2776) 

Remove 
Aitch bone boiled, cream horseradish sauce 

(1317) 
Villeroi celeriac (2722) 

Entrees 

Chicken a F Hoteliere (1880) 

Fried stuffed lettuce (2752) 

Breasts of woodcock a la Diane (2200) 

Tomatoes a la Boquillon (2833) 

American sherbet (3521) 

Roast 

Pheasant (2107) 
Endive salad (2671) 

Hot Entremets 
Stuffed pears a la Lombarde (3086) 

Plombiere a la Richmond ice cream (3481) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 
* Dessert 

be added to these bills of tare. 



BIJL.LS OF FARE. 



59 



229 JANUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bennett (287) 

Remove 

Smelts, Diplomatic (1268) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Entrees 
Braised chicken with rice (1914) 

Noisettes of beef a la Berthier (1411) 
Brussels sprouts a la Baroness (2703) 

Roast 

Woodcock (2206) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 

Pineapple crusts, apricot sauce (3022) 
Iced biscuits a la d'Orleans (3437) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Stewed fruits (3686) 

Dessert 



* 

231 JANUARY 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme a la Remusat (240) 

Side Dish 
Chicken croquettes, Hungarian (878) 

Fish 

Soles a la Lutece (1272) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Remove 
Ham braised with stuffed tomatoes (1790) 

Entrees 

Slices of mutton fillet a la Alexandra (1608) 

Cauliflower a la Villeroi (2716) 

Quails with mushrooms (2134) 

Green peas, Parisian style (2745) 

Californian sherbet (3523) 



230 JANUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Chicken okra (299) 

Remove 

Fresh codfish slices with Hollandaise sauce 

(1140) 
Boiled potatoes. English style (2774) 

Entrees 
Sheep's tongue ecarlate with spinach (1657) 

Sauted chicken a la Tunisienne (1901) 
Fried oyster plant (2817) 

Roast 

Ruddy duck (2066) 
Celery salad (2660) 

Hot Entremets 
Apples, Baron de Brisse style (2993) 

Orange water-ice (3605) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Coffee (3701) Cognac 

Dessert 



Roast 
Capon (1826) 



Salad 



Hot Entremets 
Alliance fritters (3036) 

Favart souffle ice cream (3534) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Nuts and raisins (3699) 

Stewed bananas (3687) 

Dessert 
Raw oysters or clams (803) may 



232 JANUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of crabs a la Stevens (199) 

Side Dish 
Timbales Chevaliere (963) 

Fish 

English turbot with caper sauce (1307) 
Potato croquettes in surprise (2782) 

Remove 
Saddle of mutton roasted on the spit (1648) 

Entrees 

Chicken, Vienna style sauted (1905) 

String beans with butter (2829) 

Partridges a la Chartreuse (2094) 

Gnocquis (2955) 

Kirsch punch (3510) 

Roast 

Mallard duck (2059) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Creamy souffle with cheese (2982) 

Spongade a la Medicis (3536) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Coffee (3701) Liquors 

be added to these bills of fare. 



60 



TT1E EPICUREAN. 



233 JANUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Fermiere style (307) 

Remove 

Hot eel pie (2315) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Entries 

Breasts of chicken a la Lucullus (1846) 
Artichoke (bottoms) with marrow (2687) 

Pilau of mutton, French style (1641) 
Chicory with cream (2729) 

Roast 

Grouse with apple sauce (2072) 
, Escarole salad (2671) 

Hot Entremets 
Singapoi-e pineapple fritters (3046) 

Ice ci'eam with walnuts (3464) 

Fancy cakes (3364) 

Salted almonds (3696) 

Dessert 



* 

235 JANUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Sotip 
Consomme a la Dubarry (229) 

Side Dish 
Pheasant croquettes (891) 

Fish 

Sheepshead a la Buena Vista (1259) 
Potato cakes (2778) 

Remove 

Goose stuffed with sausages and chestnuts 
(1950) 

Entrees 

Veal cutlets, Milanese (1502) 
Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 

Woodcocks a la Cavour (2198) 
Artichoke (bottoms) Jusienne (2678) 

Pargny punch (3514) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Creole fruits (3051) 

Coffee mousse ice ci-eam (3473) 

Stewed fruits (3686) 

Dessert 

Raw oysters or clams may 



JANUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Jerome with sweet potato quenelles (317) 

Remove 

Baked stuffed perch (1210) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Entrees 

Sweetbreads a 1'Eugenie (1556) 
String beans a TAlbani (2825) 

Woodcock pudding (2325) 
Ballotines of stuffed cabbage (2705) 

Roast 

Chicken (1881) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Apples in surprise (2995) 

Maraschino ice cream (3462) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Fruits (3699) 

Dessert 



236 JANUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of carrots a la Crecy (268) 

Side Dish 
Neapolitan timbales (977) 

Fish 

Fresh codfish a la Norwegian (1137) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Remove 
Tenderloin of beef a la d'Aurelles (1449) 

Entrees 

Breasts of chicken a la Mirabeau (1849) 
Stuffed cauliflower a la Bechamel (2715) 

Sweetbreads a la Conti (1554) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Californian sherbet (3523) 

Roast 

Canvasback ducks with samp (2055) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Franklyn pudding (3098) 

Ice cream mousse with maraschino (3476) 

Nuts and raisins (3699) 
4* Dessert 

be added to these bills of fare. 



BIJLLS OF FARE,. 



61 



237 JANUARY. 

DINNER 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Garbure with lettuce (310) 

Remove 

Spotted fish, Queen sauce (1285) 
Potato fritters (2788) 

Entrees 

Tenderloin steak with Madeira (1425) 
Stuffed tomatoes, Provengal (2835) 

California quails a la Monterey (2136) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Roast 
Wild turkey, American style (2028) 

Hot Entremets 
Apples with butter (2999) 

Chocolate ice cream (3449) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Stewed fruits (3686) 

Dessert 



JANUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme a la Grammont (234) 

Remove 

Whitefish, Gherardi (1811) 
Potato tartlets (2810) 

Entrees 

Minions of beef tenderloin a la Salvini (1405) 
Spinach a la Rougemont (2822) 

Sweetbread cutlets, modern style (2271) 
Macedoine a la Montigny (2755) 

Roast 
Pullet with water-cress (1996) 

Hot Entremets 
Pineapple Carolina (3090) 

Lemon water-ice (3604) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Fruits (3699) 

Coffee (3701) 



239 JANUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS 
MENU. 

/Soup 
Chamberlain (295) 

Side Dish 
Godiveau and chives, puff paste patties (944) 

FisJi 

Sole, Venetian style (1278) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Remove 
Sirloin of beef a la Dauphiness (1350) 

Entrees 

Breasts of partridges a la Jules Verne (2087) 
Artichoke (bottoms) with cream bechamel 

(2686) 
Sweetbreads larded and glazed with gravv 

(1575) 
French green peas (2743) 

Brandy punch (3510) 

Roast 
Capon (1826) 

Hot Entremets 
Pudding a la de Freese (3099) 

Excelsior biscuit ice cream (3436) 
Fruits (3699) 
Dessert 
flaw oysters or clams may 



24rO JANUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme a la Daumont (228) 

Side Dish 
Cannelons of puree of game (859) 

Fish 

Haddock, Holland style (1165) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Remove 
Mongrel goose a la Royer (1946) 

Entrees 

Mutton cutlets with cucumbers (1603) 
Stuffed tomatoes with mushrooms (2842) 

"Woodcock salmis a la Sandford (2208) 
String beans a 1'Albani (2825) 

Punch Dolgorouski (3506) 

Roast 
Teal ducks (2068) 

Hot Entremets 
Peach fritters with maraschino (3039) 

Spongade ice cream a la Parepa (3537) 
Stewed fruits (3686) 

Dessert 
be added to these bills of fare. 



62 THE EPICUREAN. 

JANVIER. 24:1 

DINER, 14 COUVERTS A L'AMERICAINE. 

MENU. 
ffaut Sauterne Huitres (803) 

Sherry POTAGES. 

Consomme" a la Laguipierre (236) Creme do Celeri a la Livingstone (252) 

HORS-D'(EUVRE CHAUDS. 

Bouchees de salpicon de foies-gras (943) 

Marcobrunner POISSONS. 

Sheepshead a la sauce Cardinal (1261) Blanchaille frite a la diable (1310) 

Pommery Sec RELEVE. 

Filet de bceuf a la Bernardi (1444) 

Pontet-Canet ENTREES. 

Ailes de poulet a la Marceau (1847) Petits pates de cailles (2311) 

Petits pois a 1'Anglaise (2742) Fonds d'artichauts a la Mornay (2680) 

Souffle de becasses aux truffes (2366) 
Sorbet Andalouse (3322) 

Corton ROTS. 

Canard a tete rouge (2063) Salade d'escarole (2671) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Munich aux peches (chaud) (3055) 

Gelee aux ananas Californienne (3178) Creme bain-marie au cafe (3162) 

Glace Parfait nougat (3478) 
Old Port Dessert 



JANVIER. 24=2 

DINER, 60 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'ANGLAISE. 

MENU. 

Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme a Tlmperatrice (231) Tortue verte au clair (353) 
HORS-D'CEUVRE FROIDS. 

Salade d'anchois (772) Olives Espagnoles farcies (801) Sardines a l'huile(831) 

Thon marine (831) 

POISSONS. 

Darne de saumon a la Duperre (1240) Pompano a la Soya (1226) 

RELEVES. 
Chapon a la Re"gence (1825) Selle d'agneau braisee a la puree de navets (1745^ 

ENTREES. 

Cotelettes de veau Pogarski (2273) Paupiettes de dindonneau au souvenir (2045) 

Canards Mallart au Madere (2061) Vol-au-vent de poulet aux champignons (2399) 

ROTS. 

Faisans rotis aux truffes (21 10) Buisson d'ecrevisses (2572) 

RELEVES. 

Rissolettes a la Solferino (958) 

ENTREMETS. 

Asperges sauce mousseline (2692) Petits pois a la Francaise (2743) 

Gelee aux fruits (3187) Creme tutti frutti (3153) 

Petites caisses de homards a la ravigote (2447) Grosses truffes en serviettes (2843) 

RELEVES. 

Hure de sanglier en surprise garnie d'Africains (3255) Fondue aux truffes du Piemont (2954) 

Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 63 

JANVIER. 24r3 

DINER, 60 COUVEETS SERVICE A LA RUSSE. 

MENU. 
Servi par six, dix sur chaque plat. 

BUFFET SEPARE. 

Vermuth, Absinthe, Canapes de crevettes (777) Salade d'auchois (772) 

Kilmmel, Sherry Gelee de canneberges (598) Rhubarbe a la creme (3204) 

Thon marine (831) Radis (808) 

Olives (800) Caviar (778) 

Chablis 60 plats d'huitres sur coquilles (803) 

POT AGES (3 SOUPIERES). 

Amontillado Consomme Colbert aux oeufs poches(225) Bisque de homard (205) 

HORS-D'CEUVRE (3 PLATS DE CHAQUE). 
Timbales a la Talleyrand (988) Palmettes a la Perrier (922) 

POISSONS (3 PLATS DE CHAQUE). 

Fletan a la Coligny (1168) Filets de soles, Rochelaise (1276) 

RELEVES (3 PLATS DE CHAQUE). 

Dinde a la Franchise (2029) Selle d'agneau a la Chanceliere (1739) 

ENTREES (3 PLATS DE CHAQUE). 

Filets de volaille a la Certosa (1836) Cotelettes de tetras a la Segard (2259) 
Homard a la Rougemont (1041) Chaudfroid de cailles a la Baudy (2459) 

ROTS (3 PLATS DE CHAQUE). 

Perdreaux truffes (2100) Poularde au cresson (1996) 

LEGUMES (3 PLATS DE CHAQUE). 

Celeri a la moelle (2721) Petits pois fins a la Parisienne (2745) 

ENTREMETS SUCRES (CHAUDS) (3 PLATS DE CHAQUE). 

Brioches St. Marc (3006) Pouding a la Benvenuto (3092) 

ENTREMETS SUCRES (FROIDS) (3 PLATS DE CHAQUE). 

Vinde Paitte Gelee aux fruits (3 plats) (3187) 

Gaufres brisselets a la creme framboisee (3223) 
60 Glaces variees (3538) 

FLANCS. 

2 Chariots garnis de pommes d'api (3632) 
Une brouette garnie de fleurs sur socle (3638) 

CONTRE FLANCS. 

Deux etageres garnies de bonbons, marrons glaces et Victorias (3379) 
8 Tambours garnis de petits fours (3364) Macarons (3379) 

Africains (3364) Bouchees de dames (3376) 

SEIZE BOUTS DE TABLE. 

4 Corbeilles de fruits frais (3699) 4 Compotiers de fruits sees (3699) 
4 Fromages (3697) 4 Compotes de pommes (3686) 

Cafe (3701) 



Haut Sauterne 



Batailty 



Champagne 

Pommery Sec 



Chateau 
La Rose 



84 THE EPICUHEAlSr. 

JANVIER. 

DINER, 20 COUVERTS SERVICE A LA FRANQAISE. 

MENU. 

Premier Service. 

On place les hors-cPceuvre sur la table. 

Olives (800) Salade d'anchois (772) Celeri rave (779) Beurre (775) 

Radis (808) Melon cantaloup (799) Mortadelle (818) Caviar (778) 

Huitres sur coquilles avec citron (803) 
Les hors-d'oeuvre d'offlce se servent apres le potage 

POTAGES. 

Consomme 1 souveraine (243) Puree de volaille a la Dufferin (269) 

Marsala 
Timbales a la Lagardere (970) 

RELEVE. 
Bass raye a la Massena (1106) 

Marcobrunner 

Selle de mouton a la Duchesse (1644) 
Medoc Pomard 

ENTREES. 

Ailes de poulet a la Toulouse (1854) Cotelettes de filet de boeuf a la Babanine (2255) 
Ris de veau a la St. Cloud (1566) Salmis de becasses a la Beaumont (2207) 

Pichon Longueville 

PIECES FROIDES SUR SOCLE. 

Galantine de dinde. a la Berger (2499) Pate de foies-gras de Strasbourg (2564) 

Chateau Yquem 

Deuxieme Service. 

Retirer les hors-d'oeuvre et les pieces froides et placer le second service, nombre egal de plats du 
premier service. Salade en meme temps que le roti. 

INTERMEDE. 

Punch a Vlmptrial (3509) 

ROTS. 

Poulardes au cresson (1996) Canvasbacks rotis (canards sauvages) (2055) 
Chambertin Chateau Laffitte 

ENTREMETS. 

Quartiers d'artichauts (2688) Petits pois a la Frangaise (2743) Poires a la Ferriere (3085 1 ; 

Gelee macedoine au champagne (3179; 
Xeres 

GROS GATEAUX (sur socle) 

Napolitaine (3250) Mille-feuilles Pompadour (3247) 

Constance 

Troisieme Service. 
Enlever le tout excepte le milieu de table (dormant) qui est garni de fleurs ou de groupes, &c. 

DESSERT. 
Fromages varies (3697) Fruits frais en corbeilles (3699) 

2'okai 

Gueridons garnis de biscuits aux amandes glacees (3369) de fondants au chocolat (3650) 

et de fondants a la vanille (3651) 
Alicante 
Muscat 

Glaces Alaska Florida (3538) Sabayon a la .Denari (3532) Gelee d'oranges en tasses (3180) 

Compote de poires (3692) La hotte a la Denivelle (3636) 

Casque en nougat garni de sucre file" (3598) 

Pale ale 
Le cafe 1 et les liqueurs sont servis au salon. 



BULLS OF FAHE. 



65 



FEBRUARY. 

DINNER 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 

Manestrone Milanese (322) 

Remove 

Fried soles a la Colbert (1271) 
Cucumbers, English style (2661) 

Entries 

Boiled leg of mutton with mashed turnips (1629) 
Chicken sauted a la Stanley (1900) 

Chicory with cream (2729) 
Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 

Roast 

Pullet (1996) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Fruit crusts a la Mirabeau (3025) 

Ice cream with white coffee (3460) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Coffee (3701) 



FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Oyster soup with ravioles (337) 

Remove 

Smelts a 1' Alexandria (1265) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 
Roast stuffed chicken with tomato Conde" sauce 

(1883) 

Mutton cutlets, Russian style (1600) 

Celery stalks half-glaze (2721) 

Red cabbage, Montargis (2707) 

Roast 

Redhead duck (2064) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Cream fritters, Pamela (3013) 

Almond ice cream (3461) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of Brussels sprouts (250) 

Side Dish 
Rissoles of brains, Princeton (947) 

Fish 

Shad, Irish style (1254) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Remove 
Goose a la Chipolata (1945) 

Entrees 

Carbonnade of mutton a la Juvigny (1589) 

Salmis of teal duck a la Harrison (2070) 

Spinach with cream (2820) 

Lima beans (2699) 

Tosca punch (3519) 

Roast 

Truffled turkey garnished with black olives 
(2031) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Rice border with bananas (3005) 

Caramel ice cream (3447) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



24r8 FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme 1 Adelina (215) 

Side Dish 
Mousseline Waleski (916) 

Fish 

Redsnapper a la Mobile (1235) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Remove 

Quarter of boar, garnished with cutlets and 
breasts marinade sauce (2049) 

Entries 

Stuffed sweetbreads, Spanish style (1577) 

Chicken fricassee. Bouchard' (1862) 

Cauliflower, white sauce (2719) 

Smothered string beans (2828) 

Rum punch (3510) 

Roast 

Blackhead ducks (2052) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Compiegne with sabayon (3009) 

Jardiniere cutlets ice cream (3555) 
Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Fruits (3699) 
Coffee (3701) 



66 



THE EPICUREAN. 



Q-49 FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of potatoes, Benton (278) 

Remove 
Redsnapper, Demidoff (1234) 

Entrees 

Leg of mutton, Bourdaloue (1623) 
Baked potatoes (2771) 

Braised pullet, modern style (1989) 
Boiled cauliflower with white sauce (2719) 

Roast 

Larded English partridges (2102) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Flawn Golden Lion (3035) 

Cold Entremets 

Strawberry charlotte (3146) 

Fruits (3699) 

Dessert 



25O FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSON'S. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Marshall (323) 

Remove 

Soles a la Normande (1274) 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 

Entrees 

Pullet, English style (1985) 
Glazed endive (2740) 

Mutton cutlets, macedoine (1594) 
Noodles milanese timbales (2988) 




Cold Entremets 

Rice a la Mirabeau (3213) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Fruits (3699) 

Dessert 



251 FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Julienne fau bonne (318) 

Side Dishes 

Atte"reaux of sweetbreads a la moderne (841) 
Fried oyster crabs (1005) 

Fish 

Soles, Venetian style (1278) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Remove 

Rack of lamb larded and roasted with puree 
of split peas (1735) 

Entrees 

Escalops of pheasant with olives (2283) 
Stuffed tomatoes, Provencal (2835) 

Sweetbreads, Piedmontese style (1563) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Roman punch (3515) 

Roast 

Canvasback duck (2055) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Spanish pudding (3110) 

Pineapple water-ice (3606) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



252 FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 16 to 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup. 
Champetre (296) 

Side Dish 
Beef palate croquettes (875) 

Fish 

"Whltefish, pimentade sauce (1312) 
Potato cakes (2778) 

Remove 
Loin of veal a 1'Ambassade (1534) 

Entrees 

Chicken fillets Sadi Carnot (1853) 
Green peas with shredded lettuce (2747) 

Terrapin a la Newberg (1086) 
American sherbet (8521) 

Roast 

Ptarmigans (2072) 
Escarole salad (2671) 

Hot Entremets 
Chestnut croquettes (3017) 

Andalusian ice cream (3446) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



BILLS OF 



253 FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Pure*e of beans a la Conde (280) 

Remove 
Fried soles (1280) 

Entries 

Leg of mutton, Parisian style (1634) 
Celery with bechamel and croutons (2720) 

Reedbirds vol-au-vent, Diplomate (2407) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Golden crusts (3021) 

Cold Entremets 
Ministerial pudding (3209) 

Fresh fruits (3699) 
Cheese (3697) 
Coffee (3701) 



254: FRBRUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 



Remove 

Porgies with Chablis wine (1231) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Entrees 
Oxtails with glazed vegetables (1325) 

Chickens sauted a la Nantaise (1896) 
String beans a 1'Albani (2825) 

Roast 

Leg of mutton (1633) 
"Water-cress salad (2676) 

Hot Entremets 

Glazed apple fritters (3037) 

Rye bread ice cream (3450) 

Fancy cakes (3364) 

Coffee (3701) 



355 FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme 1 Bariatenski (219) 

Side Dish 
Attereaux of turkey (842) 

Fish 

Pompano a 1'Anthelme (1220) 
Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Remove 
Chine of pork a la Parmentier (1774) 

Entries 

Chicken epigrammes a la Volnay (1833) 
Tomatoes Trevise (2836) 

Tournedos of beef a la Marietta (1435) 
Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 

Venetian sherbet 

Roast 

Brant ducks with cauliflower Villeroi (2053) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Crescents of noodles with cherries (3015) 

Coffee mousse ice cream (3473) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



256 FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Hunter's style (315) 

Side Dish 
Cassolettes Lusigny (860) 

Fish 
Sheepshead a la Meissonier (1260) 

Remove 
Rump of beef, Flemish style (1341) 

Entrees 

Breast of pullet, Macedoine (2002) 
Ravioles a la Bellini (2976) 

Mutton cutlets, breaded with pur^e of truffles 

(1599) 
Artichoke (bottoms) a la Soubise (2681) 

P)'unelle punch (3510) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Celery salad (2660) 

Hot Entremets 
Madeira crusts (3026) 

Cold Entremets 

Harrison pudding (3207) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



68 



THE EPICUREAN. 



257 FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PEESONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Noodles with Parmesan (830) 

Remove 

Perch with parsley water (1211) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Suckling pig with sauerkraut (1811) 
Spinach a la Rougemont (2822) 

Lamb cutlets with mushrooms (1680) 
Small bunches of asparagus (2694) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Water-cress salad (2676) 

Hot Entremets 
Mundane fritters (3044) 

Stewed fruits (3686) 
Cheese (3697) 
Coffee (3701) 

* 



FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS 
MENU. 

Soup 
Small individual soup pots (346) 

Remove 

Baked frostfish (1161) 
Potato croquettes, surprise (2782) 

Entrees 

Leg of mutton a la Bordelaise (1622) 
Spaghetti, Queen style (2968) 

Breasts of pullets a la Montmorency (1998) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Roast 

Ptarmigans (2072) 
Celery knob salad (2660) 

Hot Entremets 

Conde peaches (3081) 

Bavarois with Meringues (3133) 

Fruits (3699) 

Dessert 



259 FEBRUARY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Shrimps, mignon (345) 

Side Dish 
Colombines of chicken livers with ham (865) 

Fish 
Fried oyster crabs (1005) 

Remove 
Tenderloin of beef, Neapolitan style (1455) 

Entrees 

Grenades of turkey a la Jules Verne (2035) 
String beans a la Pettit (2827) 

Salmis of pheasants a la Lorenzo (2106) 
Tomatoes a la Boquillon (2833) 

Pdquerette sherbet (3527) 

Roast 

Capon (1826; 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Pear crusts (3027) 

Ice cream, Ribambelle (3576) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



260 FEBRUARY 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of Jerusalem artichokes (257; 

Side Dish 
Attereaux of game (842) 

Fish 

Fillets of soles a la Marguery (1273) 
Sarah Potatoes (2802) 

Remove 
Quarter of veal, Scotch style (1541) 

Entrees 
Grenadins of beef with round potatoes, Valoii 

sauce (1393) 
Chicken quenelles, Bretonne (2328) 

Brussels sprouts, Baroness style (2703) 

Artichokes a la Rachel (2690) 

Mephisto sherbet (3524) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Chicory salad (2668) 

Hot Entremets 
Mellow pudding, apricot sauce (3094) 

Frozen Entremets 

Plombiere Montesquieu (3480) 

Small cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



BIJL.LS OF FARE. 69 

FEVRIER G\ 

DINER 14 COUVERTS 1 L'ANGLAISK 

MENU. 

POTAGES. 

Consomme* Comus (226) Chartreuse (297) 

POISSONS. 

Black bass a la Narragansett (1095) Petoncles a la Brestoise (1074) 

GBOSSE PIECE. 

Jambon roti a la broche sauce madere (1789) 

ENTREES. 

Ailes de poulet a 1'Epicurienne (1842) Cotelettes de mouton & la Nelson (1596) 

Filets de faisan aux truffes (2105) Souffle de volatile (2359) 

ROTS. 
Canvasback duck (canard sauvage) (2055) Pate" de foies gras de"coup6 (8563) 

RELEVES. 
Charlotte de pommes a la Destrey (3007) Pouding Lafayette (3208) 

ENTREMETS. 

Croutes aux champignons (2759) Artichauts a la Rachel (2690) 

Tartelettes d'abricots (3402) Gelee au marasquin (3186) 

Glace Comtesse Leda (3548) 

BUFFET. 

Cotes debceuf roties a 1'Americaine (1331) Selle de mouton rotie (1605) Potage somoule (316) 
Os a la moelle sur croutes de pain grillees (1319) Tarte de noix de coco (3200) 



FEVRIER 

DINER 20 COUVERTS A LA RUSSE. 

MENU. 
20 plats d'huttres et citrons (803) 

2 POTAGES. 
1 Brunoise aux quenelles (291) 1 Bisque de homard a la Cambridge (207) 

2 HORS-D'<EUVRE CHAUDS. 
2 Palmettes de dinde a la Be"arnaise (933) 

2 ENTREES FROIDES. 

1 Aspic de cretes et de rognons de coq a la Mazarin (2410) 1 Salade de poisson (2631) 

2 GROSSES PIECES. 

2 Filets de bceuf a la Godard (1451) 

6 ENTREES (PAR DEUX). 

2 Filets de poularde a la Montmorency (1998) 1 Saumon a la Victoria (1243) 
2 Ris de veau a la Montpensier (1561) 1 Faisan a la Montebello (2108) 

Sorbet a laprunelle (8510) 

2 PLATS DE ROTI. 

\ de canards a tete rouge (2063) 1 de dinde a 1'Americaine (2028) Salade laitue (2672) 

4 ENTREMETS DE LEGUMES. 

2 Tomates frites a la Gibbons (2841) 2 Haricots verts etuves (2828) 

6 ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

2 Beignets d'abricots au Marasquin (3039) 

1 Gelee a la Russe (3182) 1 Blanc manger Smolenska (3138) 

2 Glaces Plombiere d'Alengon (3483) 



70 THE EPICUREAN. 

FEVRIER 263 

CAREME DINER 16 COU VERTS A L'AMERICAINE. 

Sur le milieu de la table une corbeille de fleurs. 
MENU (en maigre). 

BUFFET RUSSE. 

Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Tortue verte au clair (353) Creme d'asperges St. Vallier (247) 

HORS-D CEUVRE CHAUDS. 

Cromesquis de filet de Bass (870) 

RELEVES. 

Sheepshead au court-bouillon (1262) Anguille a la marechale (1149) 
Pommes de terre, boules de neige (2798) 

4 ENTREES. 

ferrapene & la Maryland Club (1088) Redsnapper a la Che'rot (1232) 

Choux fleurs gratines (2717) Bass raye a la Maintenon (1105) 

Vol-au-vent de morue (2400) 
Punch a la Tremiere (3520) 

2 ROTS. 

Sarcelles a la gelee de groseilles (2068) Grenouilles a la Orly (1021) Salade de laitue (2672) 

Souffle au fromage de gruyere (2984) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Ci-outes aux ananas, sauce abricots (3022) Ponding Boissy (3205) Gelee d'orange en tasses (3180) 

Glaces, Bombe a la Trobriand (3440) 

Dessert 
Caf6 (3701) 



F^vRIER 264 

DINER 14 COUVERTS A L'AMERICAINE. 
MENU. 

Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme" Franklyn (233) Tortue verte aux quenelles a la moelle (353) 

HORS-D'(EUVRE 

Timbales a la Palermitaine (978) 

POISSONS. 
Bass raye a la Moruay (1107) Crabes d'huitres frits (1005) 

RELEVE. 
Selle d'agneau a la pure*e de navets (1745) Choux de Bruxelles sautes (2704) 

ENTREES. 

Poularde a 1'ivoire aux quenelles de'core'es (1988) Champignons a la Reynal (2756) 

Ris de veau & la Piemontaise (1563) Tomates a la Reine (2840) 

Punch Elisabeth (3507) 

ROT. 

Ruddy ducks (2066) Salade de chicoree (2668) 

Souffle au parmesan (2983) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Compiegne au sabayon (3009) 

Gel6e mace"doine au champagne (3179) Pouding Valois (3211) 

Glaces, Fiori a la vanille (3469) 

Fruits (3699) Fromages (3697) Compotes (3686) 

Cafe (3701) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



265 MARCH. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of larks with chestnuts (281) 

Remove 

Pompano a la Duclair (1222) 
Potatoes boiled with fried bread raspings (2776) 

Entrees 

Breast of veal stuffed and garnished with 
tomatoes (1492) 

Grenadins of tenderloin of beef (1384) 
Timbale of noodles a la Pearsall (2989) 

Asparagus in small bunches (2694) 

Roast 

Blackhead ducks (2052) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Light pancakes with jams (3079) 

Alaska Florida ice cream (3538) 
Dessert 



266 MARCH. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Paillettes (339) 

Remove 

Turbot, caper sauce (1307) 
Mashed potatoes (2798) 

Entrees 

Leg of mutton a la Reglain (1626) 
Braised onions (2765) 

Chicken cromesquis (868) 
Green peas, French style (2743) 

Roast 

Ptarmigans (2072) 
Dandelion salad (2670) 

Hot Entremets 
Apples a la Giudici (2990) 

Parisian ice cream (3573) 
Dessert 



267 MARCH. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of string beans a la Vefour (264) 

Side Dish 
Colombines of fat liver (866) 

Fish 

Halibut with fine herbs a la Reynal (1171) 
Snow potatoes (2798) 

Remove 

Rumps of beef a la Chatellier (1339) 
Macaroni a la Brignoli (2958) 

Entrees 

Chicken Championne (1879) 
Carrot's with cream (2714) 

Lamb cutlets, Giralda (1676) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Fine Champagne sJierbet (3510) 

Roast 

, Reedbirds (2152) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Italian pudding (3101) 

Cold Entremets. 

(Ice) Nesselrode pudding with candied chest- 
nuts (3495) 
Dessert 



268 MARCH. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Green turtle with marrow quenelles (353) 

Side Dish 
Palmettes a la Junot (921) 

Fish 

Salmon, Argentine style (1237) 
Potato tartlets (2810) 

Remove 

Loin of beef a la Norwood (1348) 
Fedelini Cardinal (2953) 

Entries 

Lamb minions, cream sauce (1724) 
Green peas, Parisian style (2745) 

Escalops of liver a la Rulli (2280) 
Tomatoes, Queen style (2840) 

Imperial punch (3509) 

Roast 

Capon (1826) 
Corn salad (2669) 

Hot Entremets. 
Rice with apples (3115) 

Parfait coffee ice cream (3479) 
Dessert 



THE EPICUREAN. 



269 MARCH. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Tapioca (316) 

Remove 

Fisherman's Matelote (1205) 
Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Entrees 

Cases of squabs a la Umberto (2234) 

Sweetbreads a la Montpensier (1561) 

Stuffed cauliflower bechamel (2715) 

Francatelli risot (2979) 

Roast 

Loin of mutton on the spit (1637) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Chocolate souffle (3119) 

Pineapple water ice (3606) 
Dessert 



27O MARCH 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 

Cream of carrots with Compiegne crouton 
(263) 

Remove 

Paupiettes of herring with milts (1176) 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 

Entrees 

Leg of mutton, Roederer style (1627) 

Mushrooms a la Dumas (2757) 
Brant ducks with cauliflower Villeroi (205(5; 

Roast 

Capon with water-cress (1826) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Zephyr of rice with pineapple (3124) 

Lemon water ice (3604) 
Dessert 



271 MARCH 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Calf's feet, English style (293) 

Side Dish 
Chicken rissoles (948) 

Fish 

Broiled salmon, Bearnaise sauce (1244) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 

Remove 

Tenderloin of beef a la Melinet (1452) 
Cepes with cream (2724) 

Entrees 

Chicken fillets a 1'Impe'ratrice (1841) 
String beans a la Bourguignonne (2826) 

Sweetbread cutlets, modern style (2271) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Prunelle piinch (3510) 

Roast 

Blackhead ducks (2052) 
Escarole salad (2671) 

Hot Entremets 
Apple charlotte (3008) 

Parfait with nougat (3478) 
Dessert 



272 MARCH. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Hungarian Consomme (235) 

Side Dish 
Castillane croustades, pure"e of chestnuts (895) 

Fish 

Flounders a la Dieppoise (1153) 
Potato cakes (2778) 

Remove 
Hind quarter of lamb with mint sauce (1732) 

Entries 

Sweetbreads, Monarch style (1570) 
Trevise tomatoes (2836) 

Pigeons, printaniere style (1966) 
Gnocquis timbale a la Choiseul (2987) 

Rebecca sherbet (3528) 

Roast 

Canvasback ducks (2055) 
Celery salad (2660) 

Hot Entremets 
Rice pudding, fruit sauce (3106) 

Italian mousse (3475) 
Dessert 



273 MARCH. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of oysters a la "Wilson (210) 

Remove 

Perch with Valois sauce (1209) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Entree* 

Shoulder of lamb with pure of celery (1753) 

Chicken fricassee a la Bouchard (1862) 

Oarrots, Colbert style (2711) 

Roast 

Mongrel ducks (1921) 
Monk's beard salad (2674) 

Entremets 
Strawberry fritters with macaroons (3049) 

Fromage glace ice cream (3553) 
Dessert 



274; MARCH. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of rice a la Cre"mieux (249) 

Remove 

Salmon, French style (1241) 
Cucumber salad (2661) 

Entries 

Capon a la Bressoise (1822) 
Rack of veal a 1'Albarii (1542) 

String beans a la Pettit (2827) 
Mushrooms a la Raynal (2756) 

Roast 

Teal ducks (2068) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Brioches, St. Mark (3006) 

Strawberry ice cream (3607) 
Dessert 



275 MARCH. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Velvet (356) 

Side Dish 
Attereaux of beef palates (836) 

Fish 

Canadian turbot a la Houston (1305) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Remove 

Ham a la Benedict (1787) 
Stuffed green peppers (2768) 

Entrees 

Breast of pullet a la Visconti (2001) 
Jerusalem artichokes, Salamander (2749) 

Small vol-au-vent, Parisian style (2406) 
Asparagus, vinaigrette sauce (2692) 

Champagne punch (3504) 

Roaxt 

Roast saddle of mutton on the spit (1648) 
Chicory salad (2668) 

Hot Entremets 
Meringued apples, Nubian (2996) 

Mignon ice cream (3564) 
Dessert 



276 MARCH. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Rice a la Rudini (343) 

Side Dish 
Robertson ham mousseline (915) 

Fish 

Sheepshead, Cardinal sauce (1261) 
Potato fritters (2788) 

Remove 

Oxtails hochepot (1324) 
Stuffed tomatoes, Provengal (2835) 

Entries 

Squabs, Carolina (2021)) 

Fried stuffed lettuce (2752) 

Veal cutlets. Pogarski (2273) 

Green peas, English style (2742) 

Scotch Haggis (1640) 
Pdquerette sherbet (3527) 

Roast 

Canvasback ducks (2055) 
Celery salad (2660) 

Hot Entremets 
Schiller pudding (3109) 

Mousse Siraudin icecream (3472) 
Dessert 



74 



THE EPICUREAN. 



277 MARCH. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of leeks with quenelles (253) 

Remove 

Flounders a la Jules Janin (1156) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Entrees 

Loin of lamb with sauted tomatoes (1718) 
Baked stuffed eggplant (2738) 

Boar saddle with gravy (2050) 
irtichoke (bottoms) with cauliflower (2685) 

Roast 

Chicken (1881) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Rice croquettes with orange raspberry sauce 
(3018) 

Fiori di latte, Bellini ice cream (3467) 
Dessert 



278 MARCH. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of chicken a la Reine (270) 

Remove 

Pike perch a la Geraldin (1215) 
Potato cakes with ham (2779) 

Entrees 

Capon a la Pondichery (1824) 
Kernel of mutton, Milanese (1630) 

Green peas with shredded lettuce (2747) 
Mushrooms a la Rivera (2758) 

Roast 

Brant ducks with cauliflower Villeroi (2053) 
Celery, Mayonnaise (2660) 

Hot Entremets 
Mirlitons of pears, bienvenue (3054) 

Sicilian pudding ice cream (3499) 
Dessert 



279 MARCH. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 



Cream of green peas a la St. Germain (260) 

Side Dish 
Palmettes of fat liver, Delmontes (925) 

Fish 

Canadian turbot a la Mercier (1306) 
Boiled potatoes, English style (2774) 

Remove 

Tenderloin of beef with vegetables (1466) 
Timbales of chicory with cream (2728) 

Entrees 

Lamb cutlets a la Victor Hugo (1689) 
String beans a I 1 Albani (2825) 

Pate a la Richelieu (2310) 
Maraschino punch (3510) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Coupole Madison (3029) 

(Iced) Fleury pudding (3493) 
Dessert 



28O MARCH. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
D'Osmont (306) 

Side Dish 
Turbigo patties (941) 

Fish 

Pompano a la Carondelet (1221) 
Potato croquettes in surprise (2782) 

Remove 

Saddle of veal with lettuce (1545) 
Ravioles a la Bellini (2976) 

Entrees 

Chicken poeled a la Stuyvesant (1911) 
Sweet potatoes with lobster coral (2830) 

Thrush pudding (2324) 
American sherbet (3521) 

Roast 

English pheasants (2107) 
Lettuce salad with anchovies (2673) 

Hot Entremets 
Franklyn pudding (3098) 

(Iced) Plombiere, Havanese style (3484) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 75 

MAES. 381 

DINER, 12 COUVERTS A L'AMERICAINE. 
MENU. 

Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

ConsommS Florentine (232) Creme d'asperges & la St. VaUier (347) 

HORS-D'CEUVRE. 
Timbales a 1'Arlequin (967) 

POISSON. 
Filets de bass a la Conti (1102) Pommes de terre Dauphine (2783) 

RELEVE. 
Selle d'agneau Chanceliere (1739) Fouds d'artichauts a la Villars (2682) 

ENTREES. 

Faisan pique aux truffes (2111) Ris de veau a la Theodora (1568) 

Macecloine de legumes a la Montigny (2755) Tomates farcies aux champignons (2842) 

Vol-au-vent aux huitres (2402) 
Punch a la Boiiquetikre (3503) 

ROT. 

Poularde truffee (1992) 

FROID. 

Terrine de foies de canards a 1'Aquitaine (2596) Salade de laitue (2672) 

ENTREMETS SUCRES. 

Gelee aux Reines-Claude (3187) Bavarois a la vanille (3135) 

Gateau Compiegne (3236) Cornets a la Creme a 1'orange (3148) 

Glaces Plombiere a la Havanaise (3484) 
Fruits (3699) Petits fours (3364) Caf6 (3701) 



MARS. 

DINER, 12 COUVERTS A L'AMERICAINE. 
MENU. 

Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme" Andalouse (216) Bisque d'eerevisses a la Persigny (204) 

HORS-D'CEUVRE. 
Bouchees aux crabes d'huitres (935) 

POISSONS. 

Pompano a la Mazarin (1224) Blanchaille frite a la Diable (1310) 

RELEVE. 
Selle d'agneau a la Franchise (1744) Choux fleurs au fromage gratings (2717) 

ENTREES. 

Mignons de filet de bcsuf Baillard (1400) Petits pois aux laitues braisees (2746) 

Timbale de volaille Parisienne (2382) 

Asperges a la vinaigrette (2692) 

Sorbet, jeune Amerique (3530) 

ROTS. 

Poules de neige (2072) Mesanges moustache (2152) 

FROID. 
Bordure de foies-gras (2483) Salade de laitue (2672) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Beignets alliance (3036) 

Gelee d'orange en tasses (3180) Brisselets a la creme framboisee (8223) 

Glaces, plum pouding (3496) 

Dessert Cafe (3701) 



76 THE EPICUREAN. 

MARS. 283 

D!NER DE 40 COUVERTS SERVICE A LA RUSSE. 
MENU. 

Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme" a la Noailles (237) Chiffonade aux croutes (253) 

HORS-D'(EUVRE. 

Timbales a la Lombarde (972) Bressoles de gibier (847) 

POISSONS. 
Redsnapper a la Crequy (1233) Aiguillettes de maquereaux a la Bonnefoy (1191) 

RELEVE. 
Selle d'agneau a la Brighton (1738) 

ENTREES. 

Ris de veau a la St. Laurent (1567) Filets de poulet. a la Marechale (1848) 
Terrapene a la Maryland Club (1088) Souffle de faisans a la Andrews (2365) 

ROTS. 
Poulets rotis a la casserole (1881) Mesanges moustache (2152) 

LEGUMES. 

Macedoine a la Montigny (2755) Celeri frit a la Villeroi (2722) 

ENTREMETS. 

Biscuits Frascati (3004) Charlotte de pommes Calville (3143) 
Gelee aux ananas Californienne (3178) Couronne a la Choiseuil(3154) 

Glaces et Dessert 



MARE 284 

DINER DE 20 COUVERTS (A LA FRANCAISE). 

MENU. 

POTAGES. 

Consomme Adelina (215) Puree de lucines a la Hendrick (197) 

GROSSES PIECES. 

Bass rave a la Rouennaise (1108) Filet de bceuf a la Bareda (1442) 

ENTREES. 

Cotelettes d'agneau a la Leverrier (1677) 

Ailes de poulet a la Villeroi (1857) Ris de veau a la Binda (1551) 
Terrapene a la Crisfield (1084) 

Petits vol-au-vent d'huitres, Maintenon (2405) 
Aspic de homards (2414) 

ROTS. 
Pigeonneaux rotis a la casserole (2018) Canards sauvages (tetes rouges) (2063) 

ENTREMETS. 

Tomates farcies aux champignons frais (2842) Epinards a la Rougemont (2822) 

Beignets souffles Medicis (3047) 

Gel6e a Torange en tasses (3180) Bavarois au chocolat (3131) Flan aux poires (3175) 

Dessert 



BIJL.LS OF FARE. 



77 



285 APRIL. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Fish chowder a la Stebeus (301) 

Remove 

Cutlets of kingfish, Mayonnaise mousseline 
(2260) 

Entrees 

Shoulder of lamb a la Benton (1748) 
Spaghetti macaroni a la Salvini (2969) 

Thrushes in the saucepan (2165) 

Okra garnished with barley bechamel crous- 

tades (2763) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Fried cream a la Maintenon (3010) 

Vanilla ice cream, Italian meringue (3458) 

Stewed fruits (3686) 

Nuts and raisins (3699) 

Dessert 



287 APRIL. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Noques (358) 

Side Dish 
Palmettes, Varsovian style (924) 

Fish 

Pompano, tomato sauce (1228) 
Potato fritters (2788) 

Remove 

Boiled ham a la Leonard (1788) 
Spinach a la Noailles (2821) 

Entrees 
Noisettes of tenderloin of beef a la Bonuefoy 

(1412) 
Artichoke bottoms, Soubise (2681) 

English pheasants a la Perigueux (2109) 
Smothered string beans (2828) 

Siberian punch (3516) 

Roast 

Ruddy ducks (2066) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Cabinet pudding with sabayon (3096) 

(Iced) Mousse with cordials (3476) 
Dessert 



286 APRIL. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Pilaff, Turkish style (341) 

Removes 

Smelts in dauphins a la Hamlin (1270) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Top round of beef, Parisian style (1336) 
Cabbage, Peasant style (2706) 

Entree 

Pigeons poeled, Lombardy style (1960) 
Quartered artichokes with marrow (2688) 

Roast 

Ducks (1921) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Pancakes of peach marmalade mace'doine (3075) 

Small cream biscuits (3187) 

Cheese (3697) 

Fruits (3699) 

Dessert 



APRIL. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Remusat consomme (240) 

Side Dish 
Renaissance timbales (981) 

Fish 

Striped bass, Hollandaise sauce (1110) 
Boiled potatoes persillade (2774) 

Remove 

Capons a T Amphitryon (1821) 
Mushrooms with thickened butter (2760) 

Entrees 

Minions of tenderloin of beef a la Meyerbeer 
(1404) 

Green peas, English style (2742) 
Shells of chicken a la Shaw (2344) 

Californian sherbet (3523) 

Roast 

Pullets (1996) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Humboldt pudding (3100) 

(Iced) Alengon plombiere (3483) 
Dessert 



78 



THE EPICUREAN. 



289 APRIL, 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Pot au feu (342) 

Remove 

Spotted fish with green ravigote sauce (1286) 
Mashed potatoes (2798) 

Entrees 

Braised leg of mutton with rice (1636) 
Artichoke bottoms a la Villars (2682) 

Baked thrushes (2164) 
String beans a la Bourguignonne (2826) 

Roast 

Chickens (1881) 
Tomato salad (2666) 

Hot Entremets 
Roman Triumvirate fritters (3050) 

Strawberry water ice (3607) 

Fruits (3699) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Coffee (3701) 



29O APRIL. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 






Soup 
Champetre (296) 

Remove 

Fillets of soles a la Richelieu (1275) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Entrees 

Chicken fricassee with crustacean sauce (1867) 
String beans a 1'Albani (2825) 

Larded veal cutlets with chicory (1500) 
Fried oyster-plant (2817) 

Roast 

Teal ducks (2068) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Apple fritters with kirsch (3038) 

Ice cream with orange-flower water (3459 
Fruits (3699) 
Cheese (3697) 
Coffee (3701) 

* 



291 APRIL. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Clear mock turtle (354) 

Side Dish 
Fontage a la Flavignan (907) 

Fish 

Trout, Joan of Arc (1294) 
Snow potatoes (2798) 

Remove 

Turkey grenades a la Jules Verne (2035) 
Turnips with Allemande sauce (2848) 

Entrees 
Round bottom fricandeau of veal with gravy 

(1543) 
Spinach with cream (2820) 

Artichoke bottoms with cauliflower (2685) 
Beatrice Punch (3502) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Zephyr of rice with pineapple (3124) 

(Iced) Cavour pudding (3489) 
Dessert 



292 APRIL. 

DINNER 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Oysters (803) 

Soup 
Ponsardin fish (308) 

Side Dish 
La Valliere tim bales (971) 

Fisli 

Shad with sorrel puree (1256) 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 

Remove 

Saddle of mutton, German style (1645) 
Beets with cream (2702) 

Entries 

Duck a la Matignon (1918) 
Green peas with shredded lettuce (2747) 

Sweetbreads a la St. Cloud (1566) 
String beans with butter (2829) 

Prunelle punch (3510) 

Roast 

Pullets with water-cress (1996) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Bananas fried with cherries (3003) 

(Iced) Rice a la Ristori (3577) 
Dessert 



OF FARE. 



293 APRIL 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of oatmeal, Toulousaine (275) 

Remove 

Fillet of salmon trout a 1'Antoinette (1302) 
Potatoes, Vienna style (2812) 

Entrees 

Calf's head in tortue (1517) 

Chicken sauted a la Madeleine (1891) 

Jerusalem artichokes a la Salamander (2749) 

Asparagus a la Main tenon (2695) 

Roast 

Pheasants (2107) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Mirabeau crusts with fruits (3025) 

Custard cream with caramel (3161) 

Dessert 



294r APRIL. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Giblet a la Reglain (311) 
Remove 

Chicken halibut, carrot sauce (1173) 
Potato tartlets (2810) 

Entrees 

Leg of mutton, Granville (1628) 
Ducklings with oronges (1943) 

Tomatoes, Queen style (2840) 
String beans, with butter (2829) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Flawn a la Manhattan (3034) 

Stewed fruits (3686) 

Cheese (3697) 

Dessert 



295 APRIL. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS 

MENU. 

Oysters (803) 

Soup 
Vermicelli (339) 

Side Dish 
Palmettes of Guinea fowl a la Paladio (926) 

Fish 

Soles a la Trouville (1277) 
Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Remove 

Breast of veal a la Mondoux (1488) 
Sorrel with gravy (2818) 

Entrees 

Salmis of teal duck a la Harrison (2070) 
Oyster-plant, fine herbs (2817) 
Coquilles a la Benoiton (2339) 

Rum ptmch (3510) 

Roast 

Spring turkey with water-cress (2044) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Savarin with apricots (3117) 

Valence cups with peaches, ice cream (3587) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



296 APRIL 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Lobster, Duke Alexis (321) 

Side Dish 
Lombardy Timbales (972) 

Fish 

Shad a la Evers with shad roe croquettes (1252) 
Broiled potatoes with fried bread (2776) 

Remove 

Virginia ham with stringed eggs (1792) 
Artichoke bottoms a la Villars (2682) 

Entrees 
Noisettes of tenderloin of beef a la Magiiy 

(1414) 

Sauted sweet peppers (2769) 

Chicken boudins a 1'Ecarlate (2214) 

Paradise sherbet (3525) 

Roast 

Capon (1826) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Pineapple Carolina (3090) 

Alaska Florida ice cream (3538) 
Dessert 



80 



THE EPICUREAN. 



297 APRIL. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 

Sago (316) 

Remove 

Weakfish a la Brighton (1308) 
Potatoes with melted butter (2790) 

Entrees 

Rack of lamb with sauted artichokes (1734) 
Cutlets of chicken a la Clarence (2258) 

Baked stuffed eggplant (2738) 
Boquillon tomatoes (2833) 

Roast 

Turkey (2028) 
Chicory salad (2668) 

Hot Entremets 
Fried bananas, cherry sauce (3003) 

Parisian ice cream (3573) 

Fruits (3699) 
Small fancy cakes (3364) 
Coffee (3701) 



298 APRIL. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. , 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of crabs, Stevens (199) 

Remove 

Sturgeon with quenelles and olives (1289) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 

Entrees 
Grenadins of tenderloin of beef a la Beau- 

marchais (1385) 
Red cabbage a la Montargis (2707) 

Border of risot of lobster (2213) 
Artichokes a la Rachel (2690) 

Roast 

Mallard ducks (2059) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Orange fritters a la Talleyrand (3045) 

(Iced) Pudding Duchess (3492) 
Fruits (3699) 
Cheese (3697) 
Coffee (3701) 



299 APRIL. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme" a la Grammont (234) 

Side Dish 
Cromesquis of scallops (873) 

Fish 

Small trout au bleu (1297) 
Potato cakes (2778) 

Remove 

Ham with spinach (1791) 
Onions, Hollandaise sauce (2764) 

Entrees 
Breast of chicken, Mexican style, in papers 

(1859) 
Carrots, Colbert style (2711) 

Tourte of chicken (2391) 
Sorbet Young America (3530) 

Roast 

Ruddy ducks (2066) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Pancake sticks Royeaux (3076) 

(Iced) Constantine bomb (3439) 
Dessert 



30O APRIL. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of cauliflower, Brisson (251) 

Side Dish 
Rissoles a la Demidoff (950) 

Fish 

Stuffed trout (1301) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Remove 

Turkey with white oyster sauce (2032) 
Artichoke bottoms a la Florence (2677) 

Entrees 

Fillet of lamb, Printaniere (1726) 
Spaghetti a la Laurence (2966) 

Pigeons with crawfish (1968) 
Stuffed lettuce with half-glaze sauce (2753) 

Punch Elizabeth (3507) 

Roast 

Canvasback ducks (2055) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Madison Cupola (3029) 

(Iced) Vermeil globules a la Damseaux (3588) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 81 

AVRIL. 3O1 

DINER, 14 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'ANGLAISE. 

MENU. 

POTAGES. 

Consomme Royale (241) Creme de laitues a la Evers (258) 

POIS8ON. 

Bass raye" sauce crevettes aux petoncles frits (1111) Croquettes de pommes de terre (2782) 

GROSSE PIECE. 

Selle d'agneau a la Frangaise (1744) Garottes aux fines herbes (2712) 

ENTREES. 

Ailes de poulet a la Harrison (1844) Ris de veau a la Conti (1554) 

Vol-au-vent Delmontes (2403) Terrapene a la Maryland Club (1088) 

ROTS. 

Dinde a 1'Americaine (2028) Salade de cresson et pommes (2676) 

RELEVES. 
Dampfnouilles a la creme (3030) Souffl6 au chocolat (chaud) (3119) 

ENTREMETS. 

Tomates farcies a la Provencale (2835) Macaroni au gratin (2959) 

Bordure Caroline au champagne (froid) (3140) Gelee de kirsch aux fruits (3187) 

Gaufres roulees, creme au curagoa (3224) Tartelettes de Valence (3336) 

(BUFFET). 

Aloyau a la Norwood (1348) Selle de mouton rotie (1648) Yorkshire pudding (770) 
Pommes tartelettes (2810) Tarte Conde (3220) Potage d'orge au celeri (285) 



AVRIL 302 

DINER 14 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'AMERICAINE. 
MENU. 

Petit Buffet Russe. 
ffaut Sauterne Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Sherry Consomme printanier aux qnenelles (239) 

Creme d'oseille aux ceufs farcis (262) 

HORS-D'(EUVRE CHAUD. 

Timbales des Gourmets (966) 

Niersteiner POISSON. 

Truites a 1'Hoteliere (1292) 

Champagne Pommery RELEVE. 

Poularde farcie a la Parisienne (1990) C61eri a la Villeroi (2722) 

8t. J alien Supfrieur ENTREES. 

Grenadins de filet de veau, sauce tomate Argentine (1507) 
Haricots verts au beurre (2829) 

Vol-au-vent a la Financiere (2396) 
Petits pois a la Frangaise (2743) 

Sorbet a la prunelle (3510) 

Romance ROTS. 

Canards a tete rouge (2063) 
Petits aspics de foies gras (2412) 
Salade de laitue (2672) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Pouding de Cabinet a la Royale (chaud) (3095) 
Suedoise de pommes (3218) Titnbale de gaufres (3222) 
Charlotte Russe (3145) Gelee Macedoine au champagne (3179) 

Champagne PIECES MONTEES. 

Cliquot doux Bateau Bon Voyage (3631) 

Panier de Perrette (3629) 
Apollinaris Glaces Cygne aux roseaux (3597) 

Fruits (3699) Cafe (3701) Petits fours (3364) 



82 
AVRIL 



Haut Sauterne 

Amontillado 

Johannisberger 

Gold seal 

Cliquot sec 
Chateau Laffitte 



Apollinaris 



AVRIL 



THE EPICUREAN. 

303 

DfNER 200 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'AMERICAINE. 

v '-, 

Societe St. George. 

MENU. 
Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme Souveraine (243) Creme d'asperges aux pointes d'asperges (248) 

HORS-D'CEUVRE. 
Timbales a la Sartiges (984) 
POISSONS. 

Bass raye a la Laguipierre (1103) 

Blanchaille frite a la mode de Greenwich (1310) 

RELEVE. 
Baron de boauf a la St. George (1313) Pommes roties (2771) 

ENTREES. 

Chapon a la Regence (1825) Petits pois aux laitues braisees (2746) 

Sorbet Rebecca (3528) 

ROT. 

Pigeonneaux rotis a la casserole (2018) Salade d'escarole (2671) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Plum pudding au rhum (chaud) (3103) 

Charlotte Russe (3145) 

Glaces (3538) Fruits (3699) Petits fours (3364) Cafe (3701) 



DINER 10 COUVERTS SERVICE A LA FRANCAISE. 
MENU. 

DEUX POTAGES. 



Le Consomme Balzac (218) 



La creme de haricots flageolets (259) 



DEUX RELEVES DE POISSON. 

Les filets de saumon a la d'Artois (1238) La Matelote des Canotiers (1203) 

DEUX GROSSES PIECES. 

La noix de veau a la Duchesse (1520) Les filets de poularde a la Varsovienne (2000) 



Les ris de veau a la Bussy (1552) 
Les petits pates au jus (2318) 



QUATRE ENTREES. 

La fricassee de poulet au kari (1868) 

Les boudins de kingfish a la Poniatowski (2220) 



DEUX PLATS DE ROTS. 

Les faisans Anglais (2107) Les sarcelles (2068) 

DEUX RELEVES DU ROTS. 

La Charlotte de pommes a la Destroy (chaud) (3007) Les (Eufs a la creme au cafe meringues (3033) 

QUATRE ENTREMETS. 

Les epinards a 1'Anglaise (2823) Les concombres panes et frits (2732) 

Les Buissons de meringues (3212) Les peches a la Louvoisienne (3198) 

Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 83 

MAL 305 

DINER, 100 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'AMERICAINE. 

MENU. 

Lucines orangees (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme 1 Se'vigne' (242) 

Bisque de crabes orientale (200) 

HORS-D'CEUVRE. 
Timbales a la V6nitienne (989) 

POISSONS. 

Saumon, sauce Marinade (1245) 

Soles a la Normande (1274) 

Pommes de terre Dauphine (2783) 

RELEVES. 

Filet de boeuf a la M61inet (1452) 

Risot a la Ristori (2980) 



ENTREES. 

Poulet saut6 a la Nantaise (1896) 

Petits pois a la Francaise (2743) 

Ris de veau a la Piemontaise (1563) 

Tomates en caisses gratinees (2839) 

Asperges bouillies, sauce creme (2692) 
Punch a la Tosca (3519) 



ROTS. 

Be'cassines (2159) 

Pat< de foies-gras decoup^ (256?) 

Salade de laitue (2672) 



ENTREMETS STORES. 

Ponding leger aux amandes (3112) 

Gelee aux framboises (3183) 

"Pieces Montees (3628) 
Glace Plombiere aux cerises (3485) 

Fruits (3699) Fromages (3697) Compote (3686) 

Petits fours (3364) Cafe (3701) 



84 THE EPICUREAN. 

306 
HAL 

DlNEE, DE 16 COUVERTS SERVICE A LA FRANQAISE. 

MENU. 

Premier Service. 

Potage Westmoreland (357) 

Consomme a la Daumont (228) 
Redsnapper a la Princesse (1236) 

Selle d'agneau de printemps a la Chanceliere (1739) 
Faisan anglais a la Montebello (2108) 

Vol-au-vent de grenouilles (2401) 

Pigeon neau a la Crispi (2008) 

Cotelettes de filet de boeuf Bienville (2256) 

Timbales des Gourmets (996) 
Pate chand de ris de veau a la McAllister (2313) 



Deuxieme Service. 

Mauviettes roties (2152) 

Chapon roti (1826) 
Gardens a la demi-glace (2710) 

Petits pois a 1'Anglaise (2742) 

Pouding a la Frankly n (3098) 

Gateau Mandarin (3245) 

Charlotte a la Russe (3145) 

Gelee Macedoine au Champagne (3179? 



Troisieme Service. 

Corbeilles de fruits frais (3699) 

Compotes de pommes a la gele"e (3686) Bonbons (3640) Petits fours (3364) 

Glace creme pralin'e a 1'angelique (3455) 
Glace orange a 1'eau (3605) 



BILLS OF FARE. 85 

MAL 3O7 

D!NER, DE 20 COUVERTS-SERVICE 1 LA RUSSE. 
MENU. 

HORS-D'OEUVRE. 

Badis(808) Olives (800) Caviar (778) Beurre frais moule* (775 

Huitres marinees (802) 

Lucines (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme" Berry (220) Creme de concorabres, Sheppard (254) 

HORS-D'CEUVRE. 

Palmettes de jambon a 1'Aquitaine (927) 
Tirabales a la Dumas (965) 

POISSONS. 

Alose Bruxelloise (1253) Saumon a la Daumont (1239) 

RELEVES. 

Selle d'agneau a la Chanceliere (1739) 

Canetons a 1'Andalouse (1930) 

ENTREES. 

Ris de veau a FlScarlate (1555) Filets de poulet a la Primatice (1851) 

Foie gras de Strasbourg (2562) Turban de homard (2394) 

Punch a la Favorite (3508) 

B&rs. 
Pigeonneaux (2018) Poulardes truffe'es (1992) 

LEGUMES. 

Asperges Comtesse (2693) Petits pois aux laitues braisees (2746) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Charlotte de porames (3008) Beignets d'ananas, Singapour (3046) 

Gelee aux mirabelles (3187) Bavarois a la Vanille (3135) 

FLANCS. 

Gateau a la Reine (3256) Vaeherin Sultane (3264) 

DESSERT. 

Petits fours (3364) Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) Fruit conflts (3679) 

Fruits frais (3699) Compotes de pommes a la gele"e (3686) 



86 THE EPICUREAN. 

MAL 308 

DI&ER, DE so COUVERTS SERVICE 1 UANGLAISE. 
MENU. 

POTAGES. 

fortue verte au clair (353) 

Creme de mals a la Hermann (255) 

POISSONS. 

Tranches de saumon k la Moderne (1242) 

Fricandeau d'esturgeon aux petits pois (1288) 

RELEVES. 

Selle d'agneau k la Paganini (1741) 

Pointe de culotte de boeuf a la mode bourgeoise (1340) 

ENTREES. 

^pigrammes d'agneau & la Toulouse (1694) Quenelles de volatile a la Richelieu (2327) 

Rissolettes a la Pompadour (956) Cotelettes de mouton a la Taverne (1592) 

Noix de veau au jus lie" (1521) Noix de veau au jus lie (1521) 

Cotelettes de mouton a la Taverne (1592) Rissolettes a la Pompadour (956) 

Quenelles de volaille a la Richelieu (2327) Epigrammes d'agneau & la Toulouse (1694) 

ROTS. 
Pigeonneaux rotis a la casserole (2018) Salmis de canetons (1940) 

ENTREMETS. 

Asperges sauce Hollandaise (2692) Creme de homard (2470) 

Mazarines & 1'ananas et au kirsch (3053) Gelee macedoine au champagne (3179) 

Cremes frites Pamela (3013) Cremes frites Pamela (3013) 

Gele"e macedoine au champagne (3179) Mazarines a 1'ananas (3653) 

Creme de homard (2470) Asperges sauce Hollandaise (2692) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Le moulin a vent (3639) Vases en sucre file" (3637) 

RELEVES. 

Gateau Chamounix (3235) Jambon au supreme (3255) 



OF FARE. 



8? 



309 MAY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme Celestine (223) 

Remove 

Porgy a la Manhattan (1229) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Cackling a la Grainville, larded (1933) 
Grenadins of beef, Previllot (1391) 

Sweet peppers sauted (2769) 
Oyster plant a la poulette (2817 

Roast 

Chicken (1881) 
"Water-cress and apple salad (2676) 

Hot Entremets 
Countess pudding (3097) 

Stewed fruits (3686) 
Nuts and raisins 
Dessert 



31O MAY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Lazagnette (339) 

Remove 

Fried brook trout (1299) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Entrees 

Shoulder of lamb a la Dessaix (1749) 
Salpicon of chicken, baked (2338) 

Artichoke bottoms with marrow (2687) 
Turnips with bechamel (2848) 

Roast 

Duckling (1938) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Rice with apples (3115) 

Burnt almond ice cream with Angelica (3455) 

Dessert 



311 MAY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of crawfish (201) 

Side Dish 
Turbigo patties (941) 

Fish 

Brook trout, Miller style (1295) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Remove 

Pullet, ancient style (1984) 
Carrots, Colbert (2711) 

Entrees 
Blanquette of breast of veal a la Jacquart 

(1490) 
Stuffed cos-lettuce a la Rudini (2816) 

Escalops of tenderloin of beef with truffles 

(2276) 
Tomatoes a la Boquillon (2833) 

Pargny punch (3514) 

Roast 
Turkey (2028) 

Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Figaro timbale (3123) 

Cold Entremets 

Strawberry, Charlotte (3146) 

(Iced) Parfait with coffee (3479) 

Dessert 



312 MAY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Montorgueil (326) 

Side Dish 
Isabella mousseline (912) 

Fish 

Flounders a la Joinville (1155) 
Potato cakes (2778) 

Remove 

Tenderloin of beef a la Travers (1460) 
Stuffed cabbage ballotine (2705) 

Entrees 

Lamb cutlets a la Giralda (1676) 
Mushrooms a la Reynal (2756) 

Vol-au-vent of frogs and soubise eggs (2401' 
Andalouse sherbet (3522) 

Roast 

Squabs f2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Apple pain with vanilla (2997) 

Cold Entremets 

(IcfcJ) Mousse with chestnuts (3477) 
Dessert 



88 



THE EPICUREAN. 



313 MAY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PEESONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Barch, Polish style (286) 
Remove 

Mackerel, arrowroot mayonnaise sauce (1803) 
Cucumbers (2661) 

Entries 

Duckling a la Lyonnaise (1934) 

Minions of fillets of veal with mushrooms 

(1510) 

Green peas with lettuce (2746) 
Artichoke bottoms a la Montglas (2679) 

Roast 

Ptarmigan (2072) 
Mace"doine salad (2650) 

Hot Entremets 
Pudding souffl6 with hazelnuts (3114) 

(Iced) Eice with citron garnished with truffles 

(3457) 
Dessert 



31-4 MAY. 

DINNEE, 8 TO 10 PEESONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of asparagus, croutons souffle's (248) 

Remove 

Angel fish a la Bahama (1094) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 

Entrees 

Broiled rack of lamb, Castillane sauce (1733) 
Chicken fricassee a la favorite (1864) 

Carrots stewed with cream (2714) 
Head of asparagus, Countess style (2693) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Brioches St. Mark (3006) 

Vanilla ice cream (3458) 
Dessert 



315 MAY. 

DINNEE, 16 TO 20 PEESONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Monteille (325) 

Side Dish 
Timbales a la Duchesse (964) 

Fish 

Brook trout a la Hussarde (1293) 
Potato tartlets (2810) 

Remove 

Tenderloin of beef a la Bien venue (1445) 
Glazed turnips (2847) 

Entrees 
Breast of chicken with cucumbers (1860) 

Lamb sweetbreads a la financiere (1760) 
Carrots, Viennese (2713) 

Punch Elizabeth (3507) 

Roast 

Pheasant (2107) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Plutnerey pudding (3104) 

Cold Entremets. 

Bain-marie cream molded (3149.) 

(Iced) Spongade a la Me"dicis (3536) 

Dessert 



316 MAY. 

DINNEE, 16 TO 20 PEESONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme, Dubarry (229) 

Side Dish 
Bressoles of fat liver (848) 

Fish 

Pompano a la Toulouse (1227) 
Mashed potatoes (2798) 

Remove 

Squabs a la Crispi (2008) 
Fried hops (2748) 

Entries 

Timbale of sweetbreads, modern style (2388) 
Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 

Breast of chicken a la Cussy (1838) 
Mushrooms in cases with Madeira (2762) 

Venetian sherbet (3529) 

Roast 

Turkey (2028) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Eice pudding a la Bagration (3105) 

Cold Entremets 

Cream Flamri (3167) 

(Iced) Souffle a 1' Alcazar (3533) 

Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 



89 



317 MAY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of crabs (198) 

Remove 

Porgy a la Manhattan (1229) 
Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Entrees 

Tenderloin steak with mushrooms (1427) 
Asparagus tips a la Maintenon (2695) 

Lobster a la Duglere" (1031) 
Risot Francatelli (2979) 

Roast 

Ptarmigan (2072) 
Cabbage salad (2659) 

Hot Entremets 
Grenades with cherries (3052) 

(Iced) Biscuit pudding (3488) 

Fresh fruits (3699) 

Cheese (3697) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Bonbons (3640) 

Dessert 



318 MAY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bragance (290) 

Remove 

. Halibut a la Kadgiori (1170) 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 



Leg of lamb a la Bercy (1705) 
Lettuce braised with gravy (2754) 

Breast of pigeons, Hunter's style (1963) 
String beans a 1'Albani (2825) 

Roast 
Pullet with water-cress (1996) 

Hot Entremets 

Apple " pain " with vanilla (2997) 

Chocolate ice cream (3449) 

Dessert 



319 MAY. 

DINNER, 16 to 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Radishes (808) Fresh butter (775) 

Soup. 
Consomme Duchess (230) 

Side Dish 
Chicken quenelles a la Richelieu (2327) 

Fish 

Striped bass a la Bercy (1101) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 

Remove 

Rump of beef a la Careme (1338) 
Beets with butter (2702) 

Entrees 

Cutlets of chicken a la Adolph Hardy (2257) 
Green peas, French style (2743) 

Vol-au-vent a la Financiere (2396) 
Mephisto sherbet (3524) 

Roast 

Chicken in the saucepan (1881) 
Italian salad (2635) 

Hot Entremets 
Rice pudding with strawberry sauce (3106) 

Ice cream corn on cob (3547; 
dessert 



3 2O MAY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 

MENU. 
Olives (800) Gherkins (785) 

Soup 
Gumbo with soft shell crabs (314) 

Side Dish 
Croustades, Perretti (900) 

Fish 

Blueflsh a la Barnave (1117) 
Potatoes with melted butter (2790) 

Remove 

Tenderloin steak with truffles (1429) 
Eggplant a la Duperret (2735) 

Entrees 

Chicken fricassee a la Chevaliere (1863) 
Cauliflower fried with bread-crumbs (2718) 

Lamb cutlets a la Giralda (1676) 
Green peas. Parisian style (2745) 

Tremiere punch (3520) 

Roast 

Duckling (1938) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Ferriere pears (3085) 

Pistachio ice cream (3454) 

Dessert 



90 



TT1E EPICUREAN. 



321 MAY. 

DINNER 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Gluten (316) 

Remove 

Brook trout, Court-bouillon (1298) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Breast of veal, housekeeper's style (1493) 
String beans a la Pettit (2827) 

Young pigeons, English style (2014) 
Onions with soubise sauce (2764) 

Roast 

Ptarmigan (2072) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Mirabeau crusts with fruits (3025) 

(Iced) Plombiere, Bavanese (3484) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Bonbons (3642) 



4, 

323 MAT. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Crawfish a la Renoinmee (304) 

Side Dish 
Timbales a la Montgomery (975) 

Fish 

Fillets of weakfish a la Pontigny (1309) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Remove 

Sirloin of beef with chicory and souffled sweet 
potatoes (1356) 
Stuffed peppers (2768) 

Entrees 

Breasts of chicken a la Lorenzo (1845) 
Oyster plant with fine herbs (2817) 

Vol-au-vent, ancient style (2398) 
Punch Bouquetiere (3503) 

Roast 

English pheasant (2107) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Baba marsala (3002) 

(Ices) Fiori di latte Bellini (3467) 
Dessert 



322 MAY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme Balzac (218) 

Remove 

Trout a la Beaufort (1290) 
Potato croquettes (2782) 

Entrees 

Duckling fillets a la macedoine (1935) 
Parsnip cakes fried in butter (2767) 

Lamb cutlets a la Victor Hugo (1689) 
Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Manhattan flawn (3034) 

Bain-marie cream with virgin coffee (3162) 

Dessert 
Assorted salted almonds (3696) 

* 



324 MAY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Quenefes (358) 

Side Dish 
Patties with mushrooms (937) 

Fish 

Baked paupiettes of soles a 1'Italienne (1279) 
Broiled potatoes with fried bread (2776) 

Remove 

Pullet a la Arco Valley (1971) 

Cucumbers breaded and fried, English style 

(2732) 

Entrees 
Minions of tenderloin of beef with cepes 

Bordelaise (1408) 
Stuffed green peppers (2768) 

Squabs a la Vestale (2022) 
Fried asparagus tips, Miranda (2696) 

Montmorency punch (3512) 

Roast 

Turkey (2028) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Frascati biscuit (3004) 

(Iced) Diplomate pudding (3491) 
Dessert 



jura 



BILLS OF FA:RE. 



DINER DE 20 COUVERTS SERVICE A LA RU88IL 



MENU. 



Lucines orangees (803) 



91 



325 



POTAGES. 



Consomme Careme (222) 
Bisque de homard Portland (208) 



Amontillack 



HORS-D ? (EUVRE. 

Attereaux de foies gras (838) 



Clicquot 



POISSON. 
Bluefish Barnave (1117) 



Pontet-Caner. 



RELEVE. 

Tranches de selle d'agneau puree de haricots (1747* 

ENTREES. 

Timbales de pigeonneaux, Berchoux (2387) 
Homard Rougemont (1041) 

Punch glace a laprunelle (3510) 



St. Piem 



ROTS. 



Canards farcis a 1'Americaine (1920) 
Souffles de fromage de gruyere (2985) 



LEGUMES. 

Asperges sauce hollandaise (2692) 
Petits pois a 1'Anglaise (2742) 



ENTREMETS. 

Bananes frites sauce cerises (3003) 

Riz aux fraises (3216) 

Dessert 



92 THE EPICUREAN. 

JUIN 326 

DINER DE 16 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'AMERICAINE. 

MENU. 
Lucines orangees (803) 

POTAGES. 

Haut Sauterne Consomme Antonelli (217) 

Amontillado Bisque de moules a la Cutting (209) 

Piesporter Auslese HORS-D'CEUVRE. 

Brissotins de homard a Flndienne (851) 

POISSONS. 

Kingfish a la Sultane (1185) 

Maquereaux espagnols aux petits pois (1200) 
Salade de concombres (2661) 

RELEVE. 

Pontet-Canet Selle d'agneau a la Chanceliere (1789) 

Aubergines frites (2739) 

ENTREES. 

Clicquot doux Poulets aux legumes nouveaux (1916) 

Petits pois a PAnglaise (2742) 

Pommery Casseroles de ris d'agneau a la de Luynes (2238) 

Tomates farcies (2842) 

Tetes d'asperges en petites bottes (2694) 

Sorbet parfait amour (3526) 

ROTS. 

Nuits Becassines (2159) 

Pigeonneaux au cresson (2018) 

FROID. 

Petits aspics de foies-gras (2412) 
Salade de laitue (2672) 

ENTREMETS SUCRES. 

Beignets de cerises (3042) 

Gele"e aux fruits (3187) 

Pouding Lafayette (3208) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Oporto Glace Esmeralda (3551) 

Liqueurs Fruits (3699) 

Petits fours (3364) 
Cafe" (3701) 



.BI.LLS OF FARE. 93 

JUIN. 327 

DINER DE 14 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'ANGLAISE. 

MENU. 

POTAGES. 

Consomme Careme (222) 

Creme de patates a la Girard (265) 

POISSONS. 

Kingfish a la Montgolfier (1183) 

Saumon a 1'Argentine (1237) 

HORS-D'OEUVRE. 
Cassolettes Montholon (861) 

RELEVES. 

Filet de boeuf a la d'Orleans (1450) 

Chapon a la Pondichery (1824) 

ENTREES. 

Bcassines saute"es a 1'Africaine (2153) Ailes de poulet a la Bodisco (1835) 

Ris de veau a la Napolitaine (1562) Vol-au-vent a la Financiere (2396) 

Filets de volaille a la Lucullus (1846) Cotelettes d'agneau a la Clemence (1673) 

Timbales de macaroni (2988) Pain de volaille a la Villars (2304) 

Pigeonneaux a la Crispi (2008) Homard a la Creole (1029) 

BUFFET. 

C6tes de boeuf roties au jus (1331) Selle de mouton rotie (1648) 

Haricots maitre-d'hotel (2829) Choux a la Paysanne (2706) 

ROTS. 
Canetons au cresson (1938) Mesanges moustache (2152) 

RELEVES. 

Pouding a 1'Italienne (3101) Cremes frites Pamela (3013) 

FLANCS. 

Le char des Cygnes (3634)) 

La Corbeille garnie de fruits en sucre tire (3628) 

CONTRE FLANCS. 

Gateau ananas (3252) Nougatine (3251) 

ENTREMETS. 

Petits pois a la Menagere (2744) Artichauts a la Rachel (2690) 

Gel<5e a la rose (3181) Charlotte a la Metternich (3144) 

Pain de fraises a la creme (3197) Tarte a la Rhubarbe (3204) 
Fruits (3699) Petits fours (3364) 

Fromage (3697) Cafe (3701) 



94 THE EPICUREAN. 

JUIN.. 328 

4 
'4 



MENU. 

POTAGES. 

Consomme" Comus (226) 

Benoiton (288) 

HOUS-D'CEUVRE. 
Bouche'es a la Heine (938) 

RELEVES. 

tfaumon de Kennebec a la d'Artois (1238) 

Filet de boeuf au Chasseur (1462) 

ENTREES. 

Oaneton aux cepes (1922) 

Pate" chaud de foies gras a l-'Alsacienne (2316) 

Chaudfroid de poulet a la Clara Morris (2451) 
Aspic de homard (2414) 

Sorbet Tremttre (3520) 

ROTS. 

Becassines (2159) 

Selle d'agneau de lait (1743) 

ENTREMETS. 

Asperges sauce creme (2692) 

Petits pois a la Francaise (2743) 

Croutes de bananes a la Panama (3023) 

Blanc manger a la Smolenska (8138) 

DESSERT. 

Pieces montees (3628) 

Glaces, Cartes surprise (3549) 
Fruits frais (3699) 

Petits fours biscuits aux noisettes (3368) 
Fromages varies (3697) 
Cafe (3701) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



95 



329 JUNE. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of carrots a la Crecy (268) 

Remove 

..rout a la Beaufort (1290) 
Potato fritters (2788) 

Entrees 

Calves' tongues, Perigueux (1584) 
Stuffed artichoke bottoms (2684) 

Timbales of fillets of soles a la Gauloise (2384) 

Roast 

Chicken (1881) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Portuguese apples (2998) 

Cold Entremets 

Spanish custard cream (3152) 

Dessert 



* 

331 JUNK. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme a la Plumerey (238) 

Side Dish 
Celestines with foies-gras (862) 

Fish 

Striped bass a la^Conti (1102) 
Potato cakes (2778) 

Remove 

Pullet, Egyptian style, broiled (1986) 
Turnips, Spanish sauce (2848) 

Entrees 

Lamb cutlets a la Signora (1686) 
String beans with butter (2829) 

Larks with rice (2084) 
Asparagus, Hollandaise sauce (2692) 

Bouquetiere punch (3503) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Meringued pancakes, Rossini (3073) 

Plombiere a la Richmond (3481) 
Dessert 



33O JUNE. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of lobster a la Cambridge (207) 

Remove 

Fresh mackerel fillets, Bonnefoy (1191) 
Broiled potatoes (2776) 

Entries 

Beef tongue, macedoine (1470) 
Rice, Manhattan style (2977) 

Squab cutlets a la Perigueux (2267) 
Tomatoes Trevise (2836) 

Roast 
Pheasants adorned with their own plumage 

(2107) 
Cabbage salad (2659) 

Hot Entremets 
Apples with burnt almonds (3000) 

Mossaganem (3192) 
Dessert 



332 JUNE. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of lobsters (205) 

Side Dish 
Timbales with red beef tongue (990) 

Fish 

Salmon a la Bearnaise (1244) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Remove 
Tenderloin of beef braised with roots (1461) 

Entrees 

Breasts of chicken a la Patti (1850) 
Sweet peppers sauted (2769) 

Mutton cutlets a la Savary (1597) 

Beet fritters a la Dickens (2702) 

Californian sherbet (3523) 

Roast 

Ducklings a I 1 Andalouse (1930) 
"Water cress and apple salad (2676) 

Hot Entremets 

Tyrolian pudding (3111) 

Strawberry ice cream (3438) 

Dessert 



96 



THE EPICUREAN. 



333 JUNE. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 

Tagliarelli (339) 
Remove 

Pompano a la Anthelme (1220) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Entrees 

Chicken sauted, Portuguese style (1898) 
Fried eggplants (2739) 

Artichoke bottoms and cauliflower baked 

(2685) 

Roast 

Turkey (2028) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Rice croquettes with oranges, raspberry sauce 
(3018) 

Surprise bananas (3541) 
Dessert 



334 JUNE. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Mullagatawny, Indian style (327) 

Remove 

Kingfish a la Princelay (1184) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Shoulder of lamb with cucumbers (1751) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Border of risot, Valenciennes (2212) 

Roast 

Duckling (1938) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Alliance fritters (3036) 

Ice cream, Malakoff (3150) 
Dessert 



335 JUNE. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme a la Sevigne (242) 

Side Dish 
Croustades Perretti (900) 

Fish 

Trout cooked in court bouillon (1298) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Remove 

Tenderloin of beef a la Montebello (1454) 
Mushrooms a la Rivera (2758) 

Entrees 
Sweetbreads, Piedmontese style (1563) 

Potato and truffle salad in border (2655) 
Kirsch punch (3510) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Crescents of noodles with cherries (3015) 

(Ices) Caramel bouchees (3543) 
Dessert 



336 JUNE. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of crawfish a la bateliere (202) 

Side Dish 
Timbales, Mentana (974) 

Fish 

Bluefish. Havanese style (1118) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Remove 

Lamb minion fillets, cream sauce (1724) 
Eggplant in cases a la Morton (2736) 

Entrees 
Tournedos of tenderloin of beef a la Marietta 

(1435) 
Carrots glazed with fine herbs (2712) 

Vol-au-vent a la Nesle (2397) 
Maraschino punch (3510) 

Roast 

Chicken (1881) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Fried cream Pamela (3013) 

(Ices) Tortoni cups (3584) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF IFAHIC. 



97 



337 JUNE. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Manioca (316) 

Remove 

Brook trout a la Cambace'res (1291) 
Baked potatoes (2798) 

Entries 

Loin of veal a la Saintonge (1536) 
Okra with barley croustades (2763) 

Chicken sauted a la Marengo (1893) 
Rice croquettes with salpicon (2952) 

Roast 



Hot Entremets 
Apple fritters, Montagnard (3037) 

Ice cream a la Cialdini (3445) 
Dessert 



4, 

339 JUNE. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup. 
Bisque of mussels a la Cutting (209) 

Side Dish 
Rissolettes a la Renan (957) 

Fish 

Flounders, Genlis style (1154) 
Cucumbers, English style (2661) 

Remove 

Rump of beef, Greek style (1342) 
Potatoes with artichokes and truffles (2805) 

Entries 

Breasts of chicken a la Chevreuse (1827) 
Boquillon tomatoes (2833) 

Sweetbreads a la Princess (1565) 
Asparagus tips a la Maintenon (2695) 

Siberian punch (3516) 

Roast 

Duckling (1938) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Savarin with apricots (3117) 

Rice ice cream, paradise (3456) 
Dessert 



338 JUNE 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup. 
Chartreuse (297) 

Remove 

Kingfish a la Bordelaise (1181) 
Cucumbers (2661) 

Entries 

Shoulder of mutton with potatoes (1652) 
Macaroni a la Cavalotti (2964) 

Squabs a la Vestal (2022) 
Braised onions (2765) 

Roast 

Chicken (1881) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Frangipane pie with marrow (3088) 

(Iced) Fiori di latte almond milk (3469) 
Dessert 



34O JUNE 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Benoiton (288) 

Side Dish 
Canelons of palate of beef (858) 

Fish 

Sheepshead bechamel (1257) 
Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Remove 

Loin of veal with gravy (1537) 
Eggplant in cases a la Morton (2736) 

Entrees 

Grenades of chicken a la Ritti (1871) 
Fried cucumbers (2732) 

Lobster a la Paul Bert (1038) 
Californian sherbet (3523) 

Roast 

Pheasant (2107) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Crust with cherries (3024) 

Ceylon with coffee ice cream (3545) 
Dessert 



98 



THE EPICUREAN. 



34:1 JUNE. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Pmree of potatoes a la Ben ton (278) 

Remove 
Sea bass a la Villeroi (1099) 

Entrees 

Qrenadins of beef with round potatoes, Valois 

sauce (1393) 
Artichoke bottoms a la Jussienne (2678) 

Vol-au-vent of salmon trout a la Regence 

(2408) 

Roast 

Duckling (1938) 
Macedoine salad (2650) 

Hot Entremets 
Rice border with bananas (3005) 

Cream with cherries (3154) 
Dessert 

'I' 



34=2 JUNE 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bennett (287) 

Remove 

Spanish mackerel a la Viennet (1197) 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 

Entrees 

Leg of lamb, onion puree (1716) 
Tomatoes a la Gibbons (2841) 

Breasts of squab a la Duxelle, stuffed (2019) 
Spinach a la Noailles (2821) 

Roast 

Turkey (2028) 
Tomato salad (2666) 

Hot Entremets 
Strawberry fritters (3049) 

Rhubarb pie (3204) 
Dessert 



34:3 JUNE. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme a la Laguipierre (236) 

Side Dish 
Timbales a la Beaumarchais (960) 

Fish 
Brook trout, Montagnarde (1296) 

Remove 

Chateaubriand, Colbert sauce (1381) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Entrees 

Sweetbreads a la Montebello (1560) 
Smothered string beans (2828) 

Chicken sauted a la Sandford (1899) 
Fried asparagus a la Miranda (2696) 

Elizabeth punch (3507) 

Roast 

Pheasant (2107) 
Italian salad (2635) 

Hot Entremets 
Strawberry souffle (3122) 

(Ice) Lemons in surprise (3557) 
Dessert 



34r4r JUNE 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 



Cream of artichokes, Morlaisienne (246) 

Side Dish 
Capon croquettes a la Royale (876) 

Fish 

Bass a la Conti (1102) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 

Remove 

Tenderloin of beef, Indian style (1463) 
Beets with cream (2702) 

Entries 

Pigeons, monarch style (1964) 
Asparagus tips with cheese (2697) 

Small croustades of sweetbreads (2251) 
Cauliflower a la Villeroi (2716) 

Mephisto sherbet (3524) 

Roast 

Chicken (1881) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Munich with peaches (3055) 

(Ice) Italian mousse (3475) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FA:RE. 99 

JTIILLET. 

DINER DE 24 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'ANGLAISE. 34:5 

MENU. 

POTAGES. 

Consomme Britannia (221) 

Bisque de crevettes a la Veragua (211) 

POISSON. 
Saumon sauce marinade (1245) 

GROSSES PIECES. 

Selle d'agneau rotie au jus (1746) 

Jambon roti a la broche sauce madere (1789) 

ENTREES. 

Cotelettes de poulet a la Clarence (2258) 

Noisettes de filet de boeuf a la Rossini (1417) 

Ris de veau a la Princesse (1565) 

Caisses de pigeonneaux Umberto (2234) 

ROTS. 

Canetons au cresson (1938) 

Perdreaux anglais grilles (2085) 

RELEVES. 

Compiegue au sabayon (3009) 

Creme frite Pamela (3013) 

ENTREMETS. 

Mais bouilli en tiges (2730) 

Fonds d'artichauts bechamel a la creme gratings (2686) 
Moscovite aux fraises (3191) 

Pouding glace a la Fleury (3493) 

Punch a la Siberienne (3516) 

BUFFET. 

Consomme" semoule (316) Longe de veau au jus (1537) 

Noix de bcauf salee Ecarlate a 1'Anglaise (1316) 
Chouxfleurs au fromage gratines (2717) Haricots verts etuve's (2828) 

Cantaloup (799) 



100 THE EPICUREAN. 

JUILLET. 346 

D!NER DE ie COUVERTS SERVICE A UAMERICAINE. 



MENU. 



POTAGES. 

Consomm6 Andalouse (216) 

Creme de mais Mendocino (256) 



HORS-D'CEUVRE. 
Timbales a la Rislori (982) 

POISSON. 

Kingfish a la Bella (1180) 

Pommes de terre fondantes (2799) 

Salade de concombres (2661) 

RELEVE. 

Double d'agneau garni de croquettes de pommes (1736) 

Tomates a la Boquillon (2833) 

ENTREES. 

Ailes de poulet a la Valerri (1856) 

Petits pois a la Francaise (2743) 

Ris de veau a la St. Cloud (1566) 

Haricots verts a la Pettit (2827) 

Punch a la Beatrice (3502) 

ROT. 

Pigeonneaux (2018) 

Salade de romaine (2675) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Gelle macedoine au champagne (3179) 

Bavarois aux framboises (3134) 

Gaufres brisselets a la creme framboise*e (3223) 

Glaces Manchons Dejazet (3567) 

Fruits (3699) Bonbons (3640) Petits fours (3364) Devises (3653) 

Cafe (3701) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



101 



34:7 JULY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Macaroni (339). 

Remove 

Pompano a la Potentini (1225) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 

Entries 

Roast duck with cherries (1923) 
Tomatoes, Queen style (2840) 

Sweetbreads a la Columbus (1553) 
Glazed turnips (2847) 

Roast 

Leg of lamb with gravy (1715) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Savarin with apricots (3117) 

Renaissance pudding (3210) 
Dessert 



349 JULY. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme printanier with quenelles (239) 

Side Dish 
Mousseline a la Waleski (916) 

Fish 

Pike perch, Continental style (1218) 
Persillade potatoes (2790) 

Remove 

Beef tongue a la Soligny (1468) 
Stuffed onions (2766) 

Entries 

Duckling a la Bordelaise (1931) 
Cauliflower with fine herbs (2716) 

Mayonnaise of chicken (2625) 
Champagne punch (3504) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Souffles with raspberries (3122) 

(Iced) Romanoff pudding (3497) 
Dessert 



34r8 JULY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Mussels a la Vigo (328) 

Remove 

Baked kingfish (1186) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Entries 

Calf ears, tomato sauce (1505) 
Stuffed green peppers (2768) 

Stewed pigeons (1967) 
Sauted mushrooms a la Dumas (2757) 

Roast 

Ptarmigan (2072) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Pancakes with orange-flower water (3078) 

White coffee ice cream (3460) 
Dessert 



35 O JULY. 

DINNER 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of peas, St. Germain (260) 

Side Dish 
Cromesquis of bass 870) 

Fish 

Small lobster, Bordelaise (1026) 

Remove 

Glazed pullet a la printauiere (1980) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Entries 

Sweetbreads, English style (1571) 
Sauted sweet peppers (2769) 

Beef palate tourte, Parisian style (2390) 
Parfait amour sherbet (3526) 

Roast 

Ducklings (1938) 
"Water-cress salad (2676) 

Hot Entremets 
Cream with apples (3014) 

(Iced) Plombiere, Havanese style (3484) 
Dessert 



102 



THE EPICUREAN. 



351 JULY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Clear mock turtle (354) 

Remove 

Spanish mackerel with crawfish (1198) 
Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Entries 

Loin of lamb with sauted tomatoes (1718) 
Artichoke bottoms a la Mornay (2680) 

Timbale of sweetbreads, modern (2388) 

Roast 

Tame ducks a la Siebrecht (1919) 
Cos-lettuce salad (2675) 

Hot Entremets 
Brioche fritters with sabayon (3040) 

(Iced) Bomb, Fifth avenue (3440) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



JULY. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cold, Russian style (302) 

Remove 
Bluefish in papers (1120) 

Entrees 

Leg of lamb, green sauce (1706) 
Breaded fried cucumbers (2732) 

Chickens sauted a la Madeleine (1891) 

Beet fritters a la Dickens (2702) 

Italian salad (2635) 

Roast 

Stuffed squabs, American style (2012) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
De"jazet pancakes (3172) 

Melon water-ice (3603) 
Dessert 



353 JULY. 

DINNER, 12 TO 16 PERSONS 
MENU. 

Soup 
Lamb sweetbreads, German style (320) 

Side Dish 
Mousselines Isabella (912) 

Fish 

Codfish, Norwegian style (1137) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Remove 

Sirloin of beef a la de Lesseps (1352) 
Eggplant a la Robertson (2737) 

Entries 

Squabs with Colbert sauce (2013) 
Sauted string beans (2829) 

Timbale of Gnocquis a la Choiseul (2987) 
Paradise sherbet (3525) 

Roast 

Pheasant (2107) 
Tomato salad (2666) 

Hot Entremets 
Crusts with bananas a la Panama (3023) 

Rice with apricots (3214) 
Dessert 



354- JULY. 

DINNER, 12 TO 16 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Pure"e of peas with croutons (282) 

Side Dish 
Timbales. Perigordine (979) 

Fish 

Porgies a la Manhattan (1229^ 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 

Remove 

Sirloin of beef a la Degrange (1351) 
Cauliflower with fried bread crumbs (2718) 

Entrees 

Duck with cepes (1922) 
Succotash (2731) 

Lamb cutlets a la Perigueux (1683) 
Glazed cucumbers (2733) 

Imperial punch (3509) 

Roast 

Chicken (1881) 
White cabbage salad (2659) 

Hot Entremets 
Croustade of Venice meringued (3020) 

(Ice) Cherry Plombiere (3485) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 103 

AOtT 355 

DlNER DE 30 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'AMERICAINE, 



MENU. 

Lucines orange"es (803) 

POTAGE. 
Consomme 1 Antonelli (217) 

HORS-D'<EUVRE. 

Palmettes Primatice (923) 

POISSON. 

Bass raye" a la Long Branch (1104) 

Pommes de terre duchesse (2785) 

RELEVE. 

Filet de boeuf a la Godard (1451) 

Concombres a la Villeroi (2732) 

ENTREES. 

Ponlet saute" a la Finnoise (1889) 

Petits pois Fleurette (2741) 

Ris de veau Zurich (1579) 

Haricots de Lima maitre-d'h6tel (2699> 

Punch it la Romaine (3515) 



Selle de Chevreuil (2194) 

Salade de celeri mayonnaise (2660) 



ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

trending souffle aux amandes pralinees (3113) 

Gateau Chamounix (3235) 
Gelee aux fruits (3187) 
Glaces Variees 
Dessert 



104 THE EPICUREAN. 

356 

. , % 

DINER DE 10 COUVERTS SERVICE A LA RUSSK 

MENU. 
Lucines (803) 

POTAGE. 

Consomme 1 Bariatenski (219) 

HOBS-D'(EUVBE. 

Coulibiac u la Russe (908) 

POISSON. 
Grouper a la Franklyn (1162) 

RELEVE. 

SeUe d'agneau a la Chanceliere (1739) 

ENTREES. 

Ailes de ponlet a la Beranger (1834) 

Ris de veau a la La Valliere (1557) 

Punch & la Romaine (3515) 

ROT. 
Pigeonneaux (2018) 

ENTREMETS. 

Petits pois a la Franchise (2743) 

Beignets de Cerises (3042) 

Cornets a la creme a 1'orange (3148) 
DESSERT. 

Pieces montees ou corbeilles de fleurs (3G28) 
Compotes (8686) Fruits frais (3699) Petits fours (3364) 

PETIT BUFFET. 

Jtfr&s, Absinthe, Vermuth, Kiimmel 

Caviar (778) Olives farcies (801) 

Tartelettes nonpareil (825) 
Canape's de homard (777) Crevettes en raviers ou en bateaux (819) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



105 



357 AUGUST 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Chamberlain (295) 

Remove 

Pike perch a la Financiere (1214) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Lamb cutlets a la Catalane (1671) 
Green peas, French style (2743) 

Chicken sauted with fine herbs (1907) 
Lima beans maitre-d'hotel (2699) 

Roast 

Woodcock (2206) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Semolina croquettes, pistachio sauce (3019) 
(Iced) Semiramis mousse (3471) 

* 



AUGUST 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Sorrel, Flemish style (347) 

Remove 

Black bass with sweet peppers (1097) 
Potato croquettes (2782) 

Entries 

Stuffed shoulder of lamb with glazed vegeta- 
bles (1752) 

Squab fritters, Oporto sauce (2020) 
TrSvise tomatoes (2836) 

Roast 

Pheasant (2107) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Venetian meringued croustade (3020) 

Cialdini ice cream (3445) 



359 AUGUST. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of Guinea fowl a la Washburn (279) 

Side Dish 
Att&eaux of chicken a la d'Antin (837) 

Fish 

Pompano Mazarin (1224) 
Potato croquettes (2782) 

Remove 

Pullet minion fillets a la Montpensier (1999) 
Stuffed tomatoes, Trevise (2836) 

Entries 

Lamb cutlets, Giralda (1676) 
Artichoke bottoms, soubise (2681) 

Woodcock hash in a croustade with soft eggs 
(2302) 

Rebecca sherbet (3528) 

Roast 

Saddle of venison (2194) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Spanish pudding (3110) 

Mushrooms, ice cream (3568) 
Dessert 



360 AUGUST. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bragance (290) 

Side Dish 
Bondons of pickerel, Walton (844) 

Fish 

Striped bass a la Rouennaise (1108) 

Broiled potatoes with fried bread raspings 

(2776) 

Remove 

Sirloin of beef with calf's brain patties (1355) 
Stuffed green peppers (2768) 

Entries 

Fillet of Guinea fowl a la Gaillardet (1957) 
Carrots with cream (2714) 

Frog legs a la Royer (1023) 
, Nenuphar punch (3513) 



Hot Entremets 
Pudding, Scotch style (3108) 

(Iced) Parfait with nougat (3478) 
Dessert 



106 



THE EPICUREAN. 



361 AUGUST. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cabbage (292) 

Remove 

Salmon, Daumont (1239) 
Gastronome potatoes (2789) 

Entrees 

Noisettes of mutton a la Provengal (1611) 
Carrots, Colbert (2711) 

Chicken vol-au-vent with mushrooms (2399) 

Roast 

Partridges (2102) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Golden crusts (3021) 

Cherries with cream (3154) 
Dessert 



4, 

363 AUGUST. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of crawfish a la Humboldt (203) 

Side Dish 
Scotch Timbales (985) 

Fish 

Sheepshead, Buena Vista, (1259) 
Potato fritters (2788) 

Remove 

Tenderloin of beef with truffles (1429) 
Eggplant, Duperret (2735) 

Entries 

Duckling, peasant style (1939) 

Glazed and larded sweetbreads with cepes, 

Bordelaise (1574) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 



SQ2 AUGUST. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Spaghetti (339) 

Remove 

Pike perch a la Royale (1216) 
Potato cakes with ham (2779) 

Entrees 

Grenadins of beef, Marc Aurele (1389) 
Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 

Broiled pullet, tartar sauce (1991) 
Breaded and fried cucumbers (2732) 

Russian salad (2645) 

Roast 
Reedbirds (2152) 

Hot Entremets 
Mirlitons of pears a la Bienvenue (3054) 

Ice cream with black coffee (3463) 
Dessert 



Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Crusts with pineapple and apricot sauce (3022) 

Sicilian ice cream (3579) 
Dessert 



364: AUGUST. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme a la Florentine (232) 

Side Dish 
Patties, Queen style (938) 

Fish 

Salmon a la Victoria (1243) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Remove 

Young turkey with turnips (2043) 
Baked artichoke bottoms bechamel (2686) 

Entrees 

Sweetbreads studded, Spanish style (1577) 
Stuffed peppers (2768) 

Fillet of sole tourte a la Financiere (2392) 

Pdquerette sherbet (3527) 

Roast 

Woodcock (2206) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Fried cream, Maintenon (3010) 

(Iced) Souffle Alcazar (3533) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FA:RE. 107 

SEPTEMBER 365 

DlNER DE 18 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'AMERIOAINE. 

MENU. 
Lucines orangees (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme" a la creme de faisan (227) 

Tortue verte liee (858) 

HORS-D'(EUVRE. 

Bressoles de foies gras (848) 



RELEVES. 

Bass raye" gratin6 an vin blanc (1113) 

Pommes marquise (2797) 

Cuissot de chevretul a la Francatelli (2183) 

Laitues braisues an jus (2754) 



ENTREES. 

Ailes de ponlet an supreme (1858) 

Petits pois a la Parisienne (2745) 

Timbale de homard a la d'Aumale (2385) 

Haricots verts Bourguignonne (2826) 

Punch a la Favorite (3508) 

ROT. 

Perdreaux sauce au pain (2102) 



FROID. 

Aspics de foies gras (2411) 

Salade de laitues (2672) 

ENTREMETS SUCRES. 

Pommes a la Nelson (2991) 

Gaufres brisselets a la creme framboisee (3223) 
Gelee aux fruits et au kirscb (3187) Pieces months (3628) 

Glace Bacchus (3590) Le puits (3591) 

Dessert (3701) 



108 THE EPICUREAN. 

SEPTEMBRK 366 

D!NER DE 200 OOUVERTS A LA RUSSE. 

MENU. 

HORS-D'(EUVRE FBOIDS. 

JSstomacs d'oie fume's (833) Hareng diable (777) Jambon de Westphalie (786) 

Melon cantaloup (799) 
Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme Franklyn (233) Bisque d'ecrevisses Persigny (204) 

HORS-D'(EUVRE CHAUDS. 

Timbales a la Benton (961) Croquettes de brochet a la Romaine (890) 

POISSONS. 
Halibut a 1'Amiral (1167) Eperlans Gondoliere (1266) 

RELEVES. 

Baron d'agneau tardif a la de Rivas (1661) Dinde a la Francaise (2029) 

ENTREES. 

Quenelles de t&ras a la Londonderry (2332) 

Casseroles de ris d'agneau a la de Luynes (2238) 

Chaudfroid de becassines en buisson (2461) 

Salade de homard a 1'Ame'ricaine (2638) 

ROTS. 
Pintades piquees garnies de leur plumages (1956) Selle de Chevreuil (2194) 

LEGUMES. 

Chicoree a la creme (2729) Choux de Bruxelles sautes (2704) 

ENTREMETS SUCRES. 

Ananas Caroline (3090) 

Gelee d'oranges en tasses (3180) 

Bavarois en surprise (3133) 

FLANCS. 
Gateau Chamounix (3235) Baba au Marsala (3002) 

DESSERT. 

Pieces montees (8628) Compotes (3686) 

Petits fours (3364) Fromages (3697) 

Devises (3653) Glaces variees (3538) 

Fruits frais (3699) Bonbons (3642) 

Amandes salees (3696) 
Cafe et liqueurs (3701) 



BILLS OF FARE. 10S 

SEPTEMBRE. 367 

DtNER DE 20 COUVERTS SERVICE 1 L'ANGLAISE. 



MENU. 



2 POTAGES. 

Consomme" Britannia (221) 

Bisque de homard (205) 



2 POISSONS. 

Maquereau Espagnol a la Perigord (1196) 

Sheepshead au court bouillon (1262) 

2 RELEVES. 

Filet de boauf Kothschild (1457) 

Selle de mouton a 1'Allemande (1645) 

4 ENTREES. 

Ailes de poulet a la Genin (1843) 

Cepes farcis (2726) 
Palais de veau & la Sevigne" (1539) 

Haricots verts sautes (2829) 

Noisettes de chevreuil a la Thierry (2196) 

Croutes aux champignons (2759) 

Souffle's de homard (2363) 



2 ROTS. 

Oie a la Royer (1946) 

Vanneaux a la Dumanoir (2122) 

2 RELEVES. 

Omelette fourre'e aux fraises (3068) 

St. Honore" Sultane (8261) 

4 ENTREMETS. 

Petits pofe & la Frangaise (2743) Timbale Nantaise (2381) 

Oroutes dories (8021) Rhubarbe a la creme (3204) 

BUFFET. 

Paillettes au fromage (823) 

Marcassin sauce marinade garni de cotelettes et poitrine (2049) 
Jambon roti sauce Madere (1789) 

Langnes de boeuf a la Romaine (1467) 

Epinards bouillis (2823) 



THE EPICUREAN. 

SEPTEMBRE. 368 

DtNEE DE 18 COUVERTS SERVICE A LA FRANQA1SE. S 

MENU. 
Huitres (803) 

HORS-D'OEUVRE FROIDS. 

Articbauts poivrade (773) Olives farcies aux anchois (801) Boeuf fume (822) 

Canape's d'e"crevisses (777) Corniclions (785) Tlion marine (831; 

POTAGES. 
Consomme" Colbert aux oeufs poches (225) Creme de riz Cremieux (249) 

HORS-D'CEUVRE CHAUD. 
Timbales Lagardere (970) 

RELEVES. 
Bass raye"e Maintenon (1105) Filet de boeuf a la Richelieu Moderne (1456) 

ENTREES. 

Ailes de poulet a la Lorenzo (1845) 

Cotelettes d'agneau a la Talma (1687) 

Ris de veau a la Marsilly (1559) 

Filet de tetras a la Tzarine (2073) 

ENTREES FR01DES SUh SOCLES. 

Aspic de poularde a la Cussy (2418) 

Pate de foies gras de Strasbourg (2564) 

INTERMEDE. 

Sorbet Californienne (3523) 

ROTS. 

Dinde truffle garnie d'olives noires (2031) 

Becassines anglaises au cresson (2159) 

ENTREMETS. 

Petits pois Parisienne (2745) Choux de Bruxelles sautes (2704) 

Gel^e a la rose (3181) Charlotte de pommes a la Destrey (3007) 

GROS GATEAUX. 

Vacherin (3264) Nougatine (3251) 

DESSERT. 

Fruits (3699) Compotes (3686) Petits fours (3364) 

Cafe" (3701) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



Ill 



369 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Monteille (325) 
Remove 

Blackfish a la Orly (1114) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Squabs, English style (2014) 
Tomatoes, Provengal (2835) 

Veal tongue, Flemish style (1583) 
Fried oyster plant (2817) 

Roast 

Snipe (2159) 
Water-cress and apple salad (2676) 

Hot Entremets 

Golden Lion flawn (3035) 
Iced biscuit, Diplomate (3435) 

Stewed fruits (3686) 
Coffee (3701) 



37O SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of chicory, Evers (258) 

Remove 

Kingfish, Bateliere a 179) 
Mashed potatoes ^2798) 

Entries 

Pullet a la Arco Valley (1971) 
Red cabbage, Montargis (2707) 

Paupiettes of beef with fine herbs (1421) 
Lima beans, maitre-d'hotel (2699) 



Larded partridges with gravy and water-cress 

(2102) 

Hot Entremets 
Light pancakes with jams (3079) 

(Iced) Bomb Fifth avenue (3440) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Mottoes (3653) 

Dessert 



* 

371 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of squash (263) 

Side Dish 
Small patties, Victoria (942) 

Fish 

Halibut a la Coligny (1168) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Remove 

Beef tenderloin a la printaniere (1464) 
Tomatoes, Queen style (2840) 

Entrees 

Partridge fillets a la Veron (2089) 
Artichoke bottoms with cauliflower (2685) 

Reedbird patty (2312) 
Elizabeth punch (3507) 

Roast 

Saddle of venison (2194) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Apricots with rice a la Jefferson (3001) 

Pineapple water ice (3606) 
Dessert 



372 SEPTEMBER 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Paterson (340) 

Side Dish 
Eissoles of crawfish, Beatrice (949) 

Fish 

Striped bass, Bercy (1101) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Remove 

Haunch of roebuck a la Bouchard (2178) 
Fried artichokes (2683) 

Entrees 

Guinea fowl w r ith sauerkraut (1958) 
Broiled potatoes (2776) 

Braised and stuffed woodcock (2209) 
Green peas, Parisian style (2745) 

Paradise sherltet (3525) 

Roast 

Blackhead ducks (2052) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Apples a la Nelson (2991) 

Bavarian cream with chocolate (3131) 

(Iced) Cavour pudding (3489) 

Dessert 



112 



THE EPICUREAN. 



373 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSON& 
MENU. 

Soup 
Croute au pot (305) 

Remove 

Fresh mackerel maitre-d'hotel (1193) 
Tomato salad (2666) 

Entries 

Grenadins of beef with potatoes, Valois sauce 

(1393) 
Saute"d string beans (2829) 

Timbale of noodles, Milanese (2988) 

Roast 

Teal ducks (2068) 
Macedoine (2650) 

Hot Entremets 
Souffle fritters, M<dicis (3047) 

Biscuit glace, Diploraate (3435) 
Dessert 



375 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 10 TO 14 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Macaronicelli (339) 

Side Dish 
Kulibiac Smolenska (909) 

Fish 

Flounders, Dieppoise (1153) 
Cucumber salad (2661) ' 

Remove 

Sirloin of beef a la Thieblin (1354) 
Straw potatoes (2792) 

Entries 

Fillets of partridges a la Ve"ron (2089) 
Marrow squash with parmesan (2824) 

Breasts of woodcock a la Houston (2201) 
Smothered string beans (2828) 

GolgorousM punch (3506) 

Roast 

Canvasback ducks (2055) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Peach fritters, Maraschino (3039) 

(Iced) Timbales, Algerian style (3580) 
Dessert 



374r SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Purge of wild duck, Van Buren (283) 

Remove 

Fresh codfish, egg sauce (1139) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Leg of lamb with carrots (1714) 
Stuffed artichoke bottoms (2684) 

Woodcock stewed a la Dumas (2199) 
Beets sauted in butter (2702) 

Roast 

Chicken in the pan (1881) 
Tomato salad (2666) 

Hot Entremets 
Custard cream with apples (3014) 

Caramel ice cream (3447) 
Dessert 



376 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 10 TO 14 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of lobster a la Benoist (206) 

Side Dish 
Andalusian patties (934) 

Fish 

Salmon trout, Antoinette (1302) 
Potato croquettes (2782) 

Remove 

Hind saddle of lamb, Chanceliere (1739) 
Lima bean succotash (2731) 

Entrees 

Fillets of canvasback with orange juice (2058) 
Green peas with braised lettuce (2746) 

Breasts of chicken, Princiere (1852) 
Sauted sweet peppers (2769) 

American sherbet (3521) 

Roast 

Woodcock (2206) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Peaches a la Conde (3081) 

(Iced) Plombiere Rochambeau (3482) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 



113 



377 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Pure"e of plovers & la The"o (271) 

Remove 

Blackfish a la Villaret (1116) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Entrees 

Gosling stewed with turnips (1954) 
String beans Bourguignonne (2826) 

Beef palates a la Bechamel (1326) 
Fried eggplants (2739) 

Roast ' 

Reedbirds (2152) 
Water-cress and apple salad (2676) 

Hot Entremets 

Chestnut croquettes (3017) 

Cold Entremets 

Waffle buckets with cream (3128) 
Fresh fruits (3699) 



378 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSON& 
MENU. 

Soup 
Mock turtle (355) 

Remove 

Pike perch, Russian style (1217) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Quarter of lamb with stuffed tomatoes (1781) 
Carrots, cream sauce (2714) 

Venison grenadins a la royale (2195) 
Spinach, Rougemont (2822) 

Roast 

Young pigeons stuffed (2018) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Madeira crusts (3026) 

Peach ice cream a la Herbster (3453) 
Dessert 



379 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Florence snow (339) 

Side Dish 
Richmond mousseline (914) 

Fish 

Aiguillettes of bass with oyster crabs (1096) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Remove 

Haunch of venison a la Lytton (2179) 
Stuffed tomatoes, Trevise (2836) 

Entrees 

Lamb cutlets, Giralda (1676) 
Lima beans, maitre-d'hotel (2699) 

Baked snipe (2156) 
Rebecca sherbet (3528) 

Roast 

Grouse, bread sauce (2072) 
Chicory salad (2668) 

Hot Entremets 
Rice with apples (3115) 

(Iced) Serano pudding (3498) 
Dessert 



38O SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 to 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup. 
Pure"e of chicken a la Reine (270) 

Side Dish 
Bateaux of fat liver, Russian style (843) 

Fish 

Salmon, Genevoise (1246) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 

Remove 

Ribs of beef, Hindostan (1330) 
Cabbage, peasant style (2706) 

Entries 

Chicken saute"d, Maryland C1894) 
Peas with minced lettuce (2747) 

Border of risot, Valenciennes (2212) 
Champagne punch (3504) 

Roast 

Woodcock (2206) 
Romaine salad (2675) 

Hot Entremets 
Mazarine with pineapples (3053) 

Plombiere d'Alengon (3483) 
Dessert 



114 



THE EPICUREAN. 



381 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Partridge a la Royale (338) 
Muskmelon (799) 

Remove 

Sea bass a la Villeroi (1099) 
Cucumber salad (2662) 

Entrees 

Veal cutlets a la Zingara (1498) 
Celeriac knobs, Mirabeau (2722) 

Lobster a la Gambetta (1033) 

Roast 

Chicken in the saucepan (1881) 
Escarole salad (2671) 

Hot Entremets 
Benvenuto pudding (3092) 

Brazil nuts ice cream (3464) 
Dessert 



SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Oysters with powdered okra (336) 

Remove 

Salmon a 1'Argentine (1237) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Entrees 

Chicken sauted, Parisian style (1904) 
Carrots with cream (2714) 

Mushrooms mousserons a la Reynal (2756) 
Roast 

Mallard ducks (2059) 
Dandelion salad (2670) 

Hot Entremets 
Mellow pudding, apricot sauce (3094) 

St. Jacques cups (3560) 



383 SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Piire"e of grouse a la Manhattan (272) 

Side Dish 
Cocks' kidneys, Villeroi (864) 

Fish 

Kingfish fillets, Valenfiay (2528) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Remove 

Beef tenderloin, Solohub (1459) 
Eggplant, Duperret (2735) 

Entrees 

Pullet with oysters (1994) 
Cauliflower, white sauce (2719) 

Vol-au-vent Financiere (2396) 
Pargny punch (3514) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Celery salad (2660) 

Hot Entremets 
Peaches a la Colbert (3080) 

Bomb with printanier fruits (3441) 
Dessert 



3Q4- SEPTEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Cream of cauliflower a la Brisson (251) 

Side Dish 
Small patties with shrimps (935) 

Fish 

Turbot remoulade sauce (2613) 
Potato cakes (2778) 

Remove 

Braised breast of veal a la Bourdaloue (1487) 
Glazed turnips (2847) 

Entrees 

Venison cutlets, Parisian tomato sauce (2174) 
Stuffed cucumbers (2734) 

Fillets of partridge a la Veron (2089) 
Artichoke bottoms, fried (2683) 

Venetian sherbet (3529) 

Roast 

English snipe (2159) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Cream of rice fritters (3043) 

(Iced) Italian mousse (3475) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 115 

OCTOBRE. 385 

DINER DE 24 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'ANGLAISE. 



MENU. 

POTAGES. 

Consomm6 Franklyn (233) 

Tortue verte (353) 

POISSONS. 

Carpe a la Charabord (1129) 

Filets de soles a la Marguery (1273) 

RELEVES. 

Selle de venaison pane"e aux cerises noires (2192) 

Dindonneau pique" roti puree d'artichauts (2042) 

ENTREES. 

Boudins de volaille a la Soubise (2215) 

Mauviettes a la marechale (2081) 

Att6reaux de palais de boauf (836) 

Petits vol-au-vent a la Lucini (2404) 

FROID. 

Mousselines de foies gras a la Dana (2535) 

Chaudfroid de perdreaux a la Beatrice (2455) 



ROTS. 
Canetons a la Rouennaise (1937) 

RELEVES. 
Petites omelettes a la Ce"lestine (3056) 

ENTREMETS. 



Courlis (2051) 



Pommes en surprise (29y&) 



Laitues farcies demi-glace (2753) Haricots verts au beurre (2829) 

Fonds d'artichauts, Montglas (2679) Salade Italienne (2635) 

Gelee Tunisienne rubane"e (3184) Pouding Saxonne (3107) 

Flan a la Manhattan (3034) Gaufres Brisselets creme a la framboise (3223) 



BUFFET. 



Aloyau boeuf roti (1346) Quartier de mouton aux pommes Gastronome (1642) 

Moelle sur croutes grilles (1319) Salade a la Parisienne (2644) 
Compotes (3686) Tarte a la creme (3201) 

Consomme semoule (316) 



116 THE EPICUREAN. 

OCTOBRE. 

DfNER DE 26 COUVERTS SERVICE 1 LA FRANQAISE. 

MENU. 

HORS-D'OSUVRE. 

Caviar (778) Radis (808) Anchois (772) Olives (800) 

Huitres et citrons (803) 

2 POTAGES. 
Consomme" a la Royale (241) Puree de levraut St. James (274) 

2 HORS-D'tEUVRE CHAUDS. 

Timbales a la Talleyrand (988) 

Rissoles de palais de bceuf (952) 

2 RELEVES. 

Bass raye" aux fines herbes (1112) 

Filet de boeuf a la Bayonnaise (1443) 

4 ENTREES CHAUDES. 

Ailes de poulet a I'lmpe'ratrice (1841) 

Ris de veau a la parisienne (1576) 

Pate chaud de becasses (2319) 

Cotelettes de faisan Reginald (2262) 

2 FLANCS. 
Pate" de foies gras de'coupg (2563) Ballotines de cailles a la Tivollier (2426) 

Punch a la Montmorency (3512) 

2 ROTS. 

Selle d'antilope sauce aigrelette (2190) 

Poularde au cresson (1996) 

2 PLATS VOLANTS. 

Souffle" au parmesan (2983) Tartelettes de creme au fromage (765) 

4 ENTREMETS. 

Petits pois a TAnglaise (2742) Tomates en caisses gratine'es (2839) 

Croutes aux poires a la Douglas (3028) Pouding Castellane (3206) 

2 FLANCS. 
Gateau Breton (3232) Marechal Key (3189) 

Glace bombe aux fruits printaniere (3441) Ananas en surprise (3595) 

Assiettes monte"es de bonbons (3642) Compotes (3686) Fruits (3699) 

4 Tambours garnis de petits fours et macarons (3364). 
Dessert. 



BIJL.LS OF FARE. 117 

OCTOBRE. 387 

DlNER DE 20 COU VERTS SERVICE A LA RUSSE 

(Service par 10) 

MENU. 
20 Plats d'huitres et citrons (803) 

2 POTAGES. 

1 Soupiere de Brunoise aux quenelles (291) 

1 Soupiere de puree de canards sauvages, Van Bnren (383) 

2 HORS-D'OEUVRE CHAUDS. 

2 Timbales Montgomery (975) 

2 POISSONS. 

1 Pompano a la Mazarin (1224) 

1 Cabillaud a la Duxelle au gratin (1136) 

2 RELEVES. 
2 Dindes cloutees a la Sartiges (2027) 

4 ENTREES. 

1 Epigrammes de chevreuil sauce marinade aux truffes (2176) 
1 Ris de veau a la Maltaise (1558) 

1 Aspic de foies gras (2411) 

1 Cotelettes de homard Lowery (2476) 

Punch Tremtere (3520) 

2 ROTS. 

1 Brasses sur canapes a la Perigord (2205) 

1 Cochon de lait farci et roti a la broche (1810) 

2 LEGUMES. 

1 Celeri sauce Mirabeau (2722) 

1 Petits pois aux laitues braise"es (2746) 

4 ENTREMETS. 

1 Pommes a la Portugaise (2998) 

1 Munich aux peches (3055) 

1 Buisson de meringues (3212) 

1 Gele*e aux violettes (3186) 

2 FLANCS. 

1 Gateau Mille feuilles Pompadour (3247) 

1 Gateau Napolitain (3250) 
Dessert. 



118 THE E FIGURE AN. 

OCTOBRE. 388 

DINER DE 50 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'AMERICAINE. 



MENU. 



Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Oonsomm6 Duchesse (230) 

Bisque d'e"crevisses (201) 

HORS-D'(EUVEE. 

Timbales a la Rothschild (983) 

POISSONS. 

Sheepshead Bourguignonne (1258) 

Plie a la Jules Janin (1156) 

RELEVES. 

Selle de chevreuil a la sauce au vin d'Oporto et ge!6e de groseille (2193) 

Fonds d'artichauts a la Jussienne (2678) 

ENTREES. 

Tournedos de filet de boeuf aux haricots verts (1440) 
Ailes de poulet a la Marceau (1847) 

Petits pois Parisienne (2745) 

Caisses de ris de veau a la Grammont (2235) 
Tomates Trevise (2836) 

Coquilles de truffes bechamel au gratin (2844) 

Sorbet Californienne (3523) 

ROT. 

Perdreaux (2102) 

FROID. 

Terrine de pluviers et mauviettes (2601) 

Salade de laitues (2672) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Mazarine a 1'ananas au kirsch (3053) 

Gel6e a 1'orange en tasses (3180) 

Nid garni d'reufs (3594) 

Charlotte Russe (3145) 

Pouding a la Waddington (3500) 

Fruits (3699) Petits fours (3364) 

Cafe" (3701) 



BIJL.LS OF FAHE. 



119 



g@9 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Pickled oysters (802) 

Soup 
Gumbo with hard crabs, Creole style (313) 

Remove 

Sheepshead a la Bourguignonne (1258) 
Potato cakes (2779) 

Entrees 

Beef tongue a la Romaine (1467) 
Boiled onions, Hollandaise sauce (2764) 

Paupiettes of hare with stuffed olives (2080) 
Carrots, cream sauce (2714) 

Roast 

Keedbirds (2152) 
Celery salad (2660) 

Hot Entremets 
Compiegne cake with sabayon (3009) 

(Iced) Caramel bouchees (3543) 
Dessert 



39 O OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Calf's tail, Rundell (294) 

Remove 

Smelts a la Norfolk (1267) 
Broiled potatoes (2776) 

Entrees 

Eoebuck fillets a la Lorenzo (2177) 
Noodles a la Lauer (2970) 

Chicken sauted a la d'Antin (1885) 
String beans a 1'Albani (2825) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Custard cream of chestnut caramel (3012) 

Peach ice cream a la Herbster (3453) 



391 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Barley with celery (285) 

Side Dish 
Fat liver croquettes, Dauphine (885) 

Fish 

Sole a la Normande (1274) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Remove 

Turkey a la Chipolata, stuffed (2024) 
Sauted Brussels sprouts (2704) 

Entrees 

Palate of beef in tortue (1328) 
Fried eggplant (2739) 

Plover a la Stoughton (2115) 
Oriental rice (2978) 

. Andalusian sherbet (3522) 

Roast 

Saddle of venison (2194) 
Escarole salad (2671) 

Hot Entremets 
Peaches a la Stevens (3084) 

(Iced) Rabbit in surprise (3596) 
Dessert 



39 2 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Montorgueil (326) 

Side Dish 
Timbales a la Marly (973) 

Fish 

Redsnapper a la Demidoff (1234) 
Mellow potatoes (2799) 

Remove 

Saddle of venison a la Morton (2188) 
Baked tomatoes (2837) 

Entries 

Pullet a la Mornay (1977) 
Smothered string beans (2828) 

Salmis of woodcock a la Sanford (2208) 
Fried celery (2064) 

Nenuphar punch (3513) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Cos lettuce salad (2675) 

Hot Entremets 
Peaches, Richelieu (3083) 

(Iced) Sicilian pudding (3499) 
Dessert 



120 



THE EPICUREAN. 



393 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Oysters, French style (335) 

Remove 

Frostfish, Cherbourg style (1159) 
Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Entrees 

Rump of beef, modern style (1345) 
Green peas, Parisian style (2745) 

Chicken sauted a la Dumas (1888) 
Baked stuffed tomatoes (2837) 

Roast 

Leg of mutton on the spit (1633) 
Romaine salad (2675) 

Hot Entremets 
Baba Marsala (3002) 

La Grandina ice cream (3556) 
Dessert 



* 

395 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup. 
Cream of rice a la Cremieux (249) 

Side Dish 
Rissoles of partridge a la Waddington (955) 

Fish 

Striped bass, Rouen style (1108) 
Potato tartlets (2810) 

Remove 
Saddle of venison larded aigrelette sauce 

(2190) 
Artichoke bottoms a la Florence (2677) 

Entrees 

Chicken sauted, point du jour (1902) 
Fedelini Cardinal (2953) 

Vol-au-vent a la Nesle (2397; 
Young America sherbet (3530) 

Roast 

Partridges (2102) 
Chicory salad (2668) 

Hot Entremets 
Pudding a la de Freese (3099) 

(Ices) Hen and chicks (3594) 
Dessert. 



394r OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup. 
Puree of woodcock a la Theo (271) 

Remote 

Flounders a la Madeleine (115*7) 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 

Entrees 

Leg of mutton a la Chipolata (1625) 
Parsnip cakes fried in butter (2767) 

Pigeons garnished with Montglas cases (1962) 
Green peas with shedded lettuce (2747) 

Roast 

Mallard ducks (2059) 
Water-cress salad (2676> 

Hot Entremets 
Orange fritters a la Talleyrand (3045) 

(Cold) Printaniere crown (3158) 
Dessert 



396 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Pur6e of partridge a la d'Henin (276) 

Side Dish 
Imperial timbales (968) 

Fish 

Fresh codfish, Norwegian style (1137) 
Snow potatoes (2798) 

Remove 

Sirloin of beef a la Perrin (1353) 
Oyster plant with fine herbs (2817) 



Pullet a la Villars (1982) 
Mushrooms with cream (2761) 

Lamb cutlets, Giralda (1676) 
Baked tomatoes (2837) 

Tosca punch (3519) 

Roast 

English snipe (2159) 
Cos lettuce salad (2675) 

Hot Entremets 
Apples a la Giudici (2990) 

Charlotte Corday ice cream (3546) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 



121 



397 OCTOBEE. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of wild squabs, Waleski (277) 



Carp a la Chambord (1129) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Entrees 

Snipe a 1'Africaine (2153) 
Cauliflower with fine herbs (2716) 

Chicken sauted a la Bourguignonne (1884) 
Green peas, English style (2742) 

Roast 

Teal ducks (2068) 
Cos lettuce salad (2675) 

Hot Entremets 
Knob celeriac fritters (3041) 

(Iced) Diplomate biscuits (3435) 
Dessert 



398 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Chicken and leeks (298) 

Remove 

Buffalo fish a la Bavaroise (1125) 
Potato fritters (2788) 

Entrees 

Roast goose a la Thieblin (1947) 
Macaroni with cream and truffles (2962) 

Mutton cutlets with cucumbers (1603) 
Fried eggplant (2739) 

Roast 

Plovers (2119) 
Cucumber salad (2661) 

Hot Entremets 
Crusts of pears, Douglas (3028) 

Mousse of fruits with pineapple (3474) 
Dessert 



399 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Pure"e of wild turkey, Sartiges (284) 

Side Dish 
Mousseline of woodcock (918) 

Fish 

Blackfish a la San ford (1115) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Remove 

Suckling pig a la Piedmontese (1809) 
Noodles a la Lauer (2970) 

Entries 

Pullet a la Seymour (1981) 
Glazed endives (2740) 

English snipe in papers (2158) 
Andalouse sherbet (3522) 

Roast 

Canvasback ducks (2055) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 
Apples with praslin (3000) 

Leona ice cream (3558) 
Dessert 



4rOO OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 



Side Dish 
Palmettes of pullet a la Clinton (930) 

Fish 

Spotted fish, green ravigote sauce (1286) 
Potato croquettes (2782) 

Remove 

Roast goose, German style (1 948) 
Braised onions (2765) 

Entries 

Grenadins of beef with celery bechamel (1392) 
Smothered string beans (2828) 

Cases of thrushes a la Diana (2237) 
Tomatoes Tr<vise (2836) 

Montmorency punch (3512) 

Roast 

Partridges (2102) 
Water-cress and apple salad (2676) 

Hot Entremets 
Peach pudding, Cleveland (3102) 

Burnt almond Angelica ice cream (3455) 
Dessert 



122 



THE EPICUREAN. 



4-01 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Oxtail a la Soyer (332) 

Remove 

Baked finnan baddies (1166) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

.Entrees 

Turkey wings with celery and chestnuts (2039) 
Fried oyster plant (281 7) 

Slices of kernel of venison in papers (2182) 
Tomatoes, Queen style (2840) 

Roast 

Partridges with gravy (2102) 
Lettuce salad (2672) 

Hot Entremets 

Pancakes a la Dejazet (3072) 
(Ice) Fiori di latte with violettes (3470) 
Dessert 



fr 4:02 OCTOBER. 

DINNER 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Spanish Oilla (349) 

Remove 

Salmon a la moderne (1242) 
Potato croquettes (2782) 

Entrees 

Boiled chicken, English style (1912) 
Lima beans, maitre-d'hotel (2699) 

Grenadins of mutton, poivrade sauce (1609) 
Red cabbage, Montargis (2707) 

Remove 

English snipe (2159) 
Romaine salad (2675) 

Hot Entremets 
Timbale Figaro (3123) 

Andalusian ice cream (3446) 
Dessert 

4* 



4rO3 OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of artichokes, Morlaisienne (246) 

Side Dish 
Rissoles of fat liver a la Ude (951) 

Fish 

Spanish mackerel a la Viennet (1197) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 

Remove 

Saddle of venison a la MacMahon (2187) 
Macaroni, Parisian style (2961) 

Entrees 

Plovers a la Montauban (2114) 
Tomatoes, Provencal style (2835) 

Boudins of chicken au Cardinal (2216) 
Mushrooms, under bells (2761) 

Californian sherbet (3523) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Celery salad (2660) 

Hot Entremets 
Tyrolian pudding (3111) 

(Iced) Montesquieu plombiere (3480) 
Dessert 



4r04r OCTOBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of lobster a la Portland (208) 

Side Dish 
Timbales a la Marly (973) 

Fish 

Soles a la Lutece (1272) 
Potatoes with melted butter (2790) 

Remove 

Pullet a la Mornay (1977) 
Fried artichoke bottoms (2683) 

Entrees 

Lamb cutlets a la Clementine (1673) 
String beans a la Bourguignonne (2826) 

Breasts of woodcock a la Vatel (2203) 
Green peas, Parisian style (2745) 

Tre'miere punch (3520; 

Roast 

Blackhead ducks (2052) 
Dandelion salad (2670) 

Hot Entremets 

Apples a la Nelson (2991) 

Poupelins (3091) 

(Iced) Romanoff pudding (3497) 
Dessert 



BIJL.LS OF FARE. 123 

NOVEMBRE. 4-O5 

DfNER DE 24 COUVERTS SERVICE A LA FRANQAISE. 

MENU. 

2 POTAGES. 

Consomme" aux nids d'hirondelles (244) 

Tortue verte li<e (353) 

2 RELEVES DE POISSON. 

Bass ray 6* a la Rouennaise (1108) 

Crabes d'huitres frits (1005) 

2 GROSSES PIECES. 

Baron de mouton au four a la puree de pommes (1650) 
Filet de boeuf a la Montebello (1454) 

8 ENTREES. 

iiles de poulet a la Chiselhurst (1837) 
Terrapene a la Baltimore (1083) 

Ris de veau au chancelier (1569) 

Pate chaud de foies gras a 1'Alsacienne (2316) 
Poularde braise"e Demidoff (1973) 

Pain de lapereau a la Maintenon (2308) 

Filets de becasses a la Diane (2200) 

Salade de homard a rAme*ricaine (2638) 

2 PLATS DE ROTS. 

Canards ruddy (2066) 

Chapon au cresson (1826) 

8 ENTREMETS. 

Petits pois Parisienne (2745) Celeri a la moelle (2721) 

Fonds d'artichauts Florence (2677) Choux de Bruxelles Baronne (2703) 

Pouding souffle Saxonne (3107) Glace asperges sauce au marasquin (3540) 

Gelee au kirsch (3187) Bavarois au cnocolat (3131) 

2 GROSSES PIECES D'ENTREMETS. 

La hotte & la Denivelle (3636) 

Le Char des Cygnes (3634) 

Dessert. 



124 THE EPICUREAN. 

NOVEMBRE. 4,06 

DINER DE 25 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'ANGLAISE. 



MENU. 



Premier Service. 

2 POTAGES. 

Consomme Charmel (224) Creme d'orge Viennoise (249) 

2 POISSONS. 
Sheepshead sauce Cardinal (1261) Sandre a la Durance (1213) 

2 RELEVES. 
Selle de mouton rotie (1648) Filet de boeuf a la Cauchoise (1446) 

6 ENTREES. 

Ailes de poulet a la Cussy (1838) 7ilets de pluvier a la Victor Hugo (2117) 

Ris de veau a la Maltaise (1558) Timbales de levraut (2389) 

Mignons de chevreuil a la Lorenzo (2177) Cotelettes de tetras a la Segard (2259) 

2 FLANCS. 
Brissotins de volaille au supreme (849) Mousseline au Cardinal (910) 

Deuxieme Service. 

2 ROTS. 

Canards a tete rouge (2063) Poulet a la casserole (1881) 

6 ENTREMETS. 

C&eri a la moelle (2721) Haricots verts a la Pettit (2827) 

Beignets d'ananas Singapour (3046) Creme de marrons au caramel (3012) 

Bordure Caroline au champagne (3140) Gele"e aux fruits (3187) 

2 RELEVES. 

Glaces Cantaloup en surprise (3591) Biscuit a THernani (3228) 

Dessert. 

BUFFET. 

Rosbif d'Aloyau a PAnglaise (1846) Pommes de terre grillees (2776) 

Salade de laitues (2672) Noix de boeuf salee a 1'ecarlate (1316) 

Potage au riz a la Rudini (343) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



125 



NOVEMBRE. 



4O7 



DINER DE 40 COUVERTS SERVICE A LA RUSSE. 
MENU. 



BUFFET SEPARE. 



Sherry, Bitters, Canapes d'anchois (777) Radis (808) Olives (800) 

Kummel, Vermouth, Celeri en branches (779) 



Absinthe 
Haiti Sauterne 

Zeres 



Johannisberg 



Nuits 



Leoville 



Champagne 
Ruinart 



Chdteau Margaux 



Lunel 
Liqueurs 



Saumon fume (822) Caviar (778) Concombres (2661) 
Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme Britannia (221) 

Bisque de crabes (198) 

HORS-D'(EUVRE. 

Attereaux a la Piemontaise (840) 

Timbale mosaique (976) 

POISSONS. 

Fletan a la Richmond (1169) 

Redsnapper a la Crequy (1233) 

RELEVES. 

Chapon a la Financiere (1823) 

Selle de mouton a la Duchesse (1644) 

ENTREES. 

Cailles farcies aux champignons (2134) 

Cotelettes de chevreuil a la Buridan (2170) 

Quenelles de volaille a la Drew (2326) 

Filets de t<tras a la Tzarine (2073) 

ROTS. 

Dinde truffee (2031) 

Becasses sur canapes (2206) 

LEGUMES 

Fonds d'artichauts a la Montglas (2679) 

Choux de Bruxelles a la Baronne (2708) 

ENTREMETS. 

Beignets de brioche a la creme Sabayon (3040) 

Mirlitons de poires Bienvenue (3054) 
Gele"e a la Russe (3182) 

Bombe Romaine (3442) 
Dessert 



126 



THE EPICUREAN. 



NOVEMBRE 408 

DlNER DE 16 COUVEKTS SERVICE A L'AMERIOAINE. 



MENU. 



Sherry, Bitters, 

Vermouth 



Huitres (803) 



Amontillado 



POTAGES. 



Consomme" a la Noailles (237) 

Puree de chapon Jussienne (267) 



HORS-D'CEUVRE. 
Timbales a la Irving (969) 



Zeltinger 



POISSON. 



Soles a la Rochelaise (1276) 

Pommes de terre, persillade (2774) 



RELEVE. 



Filet de bceuf a la Montebello (1454) 

Quartiers d'artichauts a la Villeroi (2688) 



St. Julien 



ENTREES. 

Cotelettes de mouton aux laitues braisees (1601) 
Macaroni Brignoli (2958) 

Becassines a la Waleski (2155) 

Petits pois a la Parisienne (2745) 
Quenelles de foies gras fourrees a la financiere (2331) 



Punch a la Stanley (3518) 



BataiUy 



ROTS. 



Sarcelles (2068) 

Cailles (2131) 

Salade d'escarole (2671) 



Royal Charter 
Liqueurs 



ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 



Croutes de poires a la Douglas (3028) 

Pouding de riz k 1'Imperial (3494) 

Petits fours (3364) Fromages (3697) Fruits (3699) 

Cafe (3701) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



127 



4-09 NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Oxtail a la Soyer (332) 

Remove 

Pompano a la Potentini (1225) 
Cucumbers (2661) 

Entries 

Round buttock top of beef, smothered (1834) 
Potatoes a la Parmentier (2811) 

Pullet a la Zingara (1983) 
Brussels sprouts, baroness (2703) 

Roast 

Hare backs with cream (2076) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Celeriac fritters (3041) 

farfait with almonds (3478) 
Dessert 



4rlO NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Oysters, American style (338) 

Remove 

Striped bass with fine herbs (1112) 
Potato fritters (2788) 

Entries 

Rump of beef a la Jardiniere (1343) 
Noodles a la Lauer (2970) 

Duck paupiettes with risot (1928) 
Tomatoes a la Boquillon (2833) 

Roast 

Plovers (2119) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Eice croquettes with orange raspberry sauce 

(3018) 

(Ice) Mousse of fruits with pineapple (3474) 
Dessert 



4:11 NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme with Lasagnettes (339) 

Side Dish 
Mousseline of woodcock (918) 

Fish 

Halibut a la Richmond (1169) 
Potato tartlets (2810) 

Remove 

Saddle of venison a la gastronome (2191) 
Cauliflower with fine herbs (2716) 

Entrees 

Duckling a la Bourguignonne, fried (1982) 
Glazed endives (2740) 

Sweetbreads a la Marsilly (1559) 
String beans a la Pettit (2827) 

Stanley punch (3518) 

Roast 

Plovers (2119) 
Fondu with Piedmontese truffles (2954) 

Hot Entremets 
Apples with burnt almonds (3000) 

(Icel Mokabelle (3565) 
Dessert 



4: 1 2 NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Cream of lettuce a la Evers (258) 

Side Dish 
Palmettos a la Pe"rier (922) 

Fish 

Striped bass a la Whitney (1109) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Remove 

Kernel of veal with half glaze (1522) 
Stuffed cucumbers (2734) 

Entrees 

Fillets of partridge a la Lucullus (2088) 
Smothered string beans (2828) 

Chicken sauted a la Maryland (1894) 
Eggplants in cases a la Morton (2736) 

Venetian sherbet (3529) 

Roast 

Saddle of venison (2194) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Peach pudding a la Cleveland (3102) 

(Ice) Montesquieu plombiere (3480) 
Dessert 



128 



THE EPICUREAN. 



4rl3 NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of young rabbit, St. James (274) 

Remove 
Baked sole, Italian style (1279) 

Entrees 

Chicken fricassee (1861) 
Creamed macaroni with truffles (2962) 

Rack of venison roasted, Colbert sauce (2169) 
String beans a la Pettit (2827) 

Roast 

Teal ducks (2068) 
Hot potato salad (2654) 

Hot Entremets 
Souffle fritters. Medicis (3047) 

(Iced) Biscuit Diplomate (3435) 
Dessert 



4rl4r NOVEMBER. 

DINNEE, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Giblets a la Reglain (311) 

Remove 

Flounders a la Genlis (1154) 
Mashed potatoes (2798) 

Entrees 

Pullet a la Le"ondise (1974) 
Pumpkin fried in small sticks (2814) 

Noisettes of fillet of beef a la fleurette (1413) 
Lima beans, maitre-d'hotel (2699) 

Roast 

Plovers (2119) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Cream with apples (3014) 

Macaroon mousse (3477) 
Dessert 



NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme, Plumerey (238) 

Side Dish 
Mousseline, Waleski (916) 

Fish 

Canadian turbot a la d'Orle"ans (1304) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Remove 

Loin of deer, cherry sauce (2168) 
Brussels sprouts sauted (2704) 

Entrees 

Pullet a la Mornay (1977) 
Marrow squash with parmesan (2824) 

Cases of English snipe a la Careme (2228) 
Green peas with shredded lettuce (2747) 

Pdquerette sJierbet (3527) 

Roast 

Mallard ducks (2059) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Conde peaches (3081) 

(Iced) Timbale, Algerian style (3580) 
Dessert 



NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 



Soup 
Bisque of crawfish a la Humboldt (203) 

Side Dish 
Palmettos of quails, African style (931) 

Fish 

Soles a la Trouville (1277) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Remove 

Sirloin of beef a la Bradford (1349) 
Eggplant, Duperret (2735) 

Entrees 

Paupiettes of young turkey, souvenir (2045) 
Green peas with braised lettuce (2746) 

Tournedos of venison, St. Hubert (2197) 
Smothered string beans (2828) 

Pargny punch (3514) 

Roast 

Woodcock (2206) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Timbale Figaro (3123) 

(Iced) Plombiere a la Rochambeau (3482) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 



129 



NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Mock turtle thickened (355) 

Remove 

Haddock, Ancient style (1164) 
Persillade potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Quarter of pork, Valenciennes(1797) 
Chopped lettuce (2751) 

Chicken fricassee a la Lucius (1865) 
Macaroni spaghetti, Laurence (2966) 

Roast 

Plovers (2119) 
Salad 



Hot Entremets 
Souffle of chestnuts with vanilla (3118) 

Caramel ice cream (3447) 
Dessert 



4, 

4-19 NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Oysters (803) 

Soup 
Clear terrapin (350) 

Side Dish 
Timbales a la Marly (973) 

Fish 

Turban of smelts (2393) 
Potato croquettes (2782) 

Remove 

Baron of yearling lamb a la de Rivas (1661) 
Okra with barley croustades (2763) 

Entrees 

Slices of kernel of venison a la Hnssarde (2181) 
Green peas, Parisian style (2745) 

Squab breasts a la Duxelle, stuffed (2019) 
String beans a 1'Albani (2825) 

Montmorency punch (3512) 

Roast 

Partridge a la Soyer (2097) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Crust of pears, Douglas (3028) 

Madrilian ice cream (3562" 
Dessert 



4rl8 NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Spaghetti with cream (348) 

Remove 

Striped bass, Hollandaise sauce (1110) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Braised chicken with noodles (1913) 
Carrots, Viennese style (2713) 

" Pains " of young rabbit (2549) 
Chestnuts with gravy (2727) 

Roast 

Brant ducks (2053) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Light pudding with almonds (3112) 

Plombiere d'Alencon (3483) 
Dessert 



4; 2 NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of shrimps, Bretonne (213) 

Side Dish 
Brissotines of game, Lyonnese (850) 

Fish 

Sole fillets. Venetian style (1278) 
Broiled potatoes (2776) 

Remove 

Turkey with cepes (2030) 
Tagliarelli in croustade (2986) 

Entries 

Young rabbit a la Celtoise (2137) 
Sauted string beans (2829) 

Sweetbreads, St. Cloud (1566) 
Macedoine a la Montigny (2755) 

Mephisto sherbet (3524) 

Roast 

Ptarmigan (2072) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Biscuits Frascati (3004) 

(Ice) Pudding Fleury (3493) 
Dessert 



130 



THE EPICUREAN. 



4:21 NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of English snipes a la Theo (271) 

Remove 

Spotted fish, Queen sauce (1285) 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 

Entrees 

Leg of lamb a la Guyane (1708) 
Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 

Duck with sauerkraut (1925) 
Beetroot fritters (2702) 

Roast 

Young rabbits larded and roasted (2142) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Noodle crescents with cherries (3015) 

(Ices) Mushrooms (3568) 
Dessert 



4:22 NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of peas with mint (261) 

Remove 

Stuffed fillets of sole (1281) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Entrees 

Cutlets of lamb a la Clemence (1673) 
Artichoke bottoms, Soubise (2681) 

Jugged hare (2075) 
Macaroni puree of game (2963) 

Roast 

Mongrel ducks, stuffed (1929) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Rice pudding, fruit sauce (3106) 

(Ices) Tortoni cups (3584) 
Dessert 



* 

4,23 



NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 12 TO 16 PERSONS 
MENU. 



Soup 
Bisque of shrimps a la Veragua (211) 

Side Dish 
Cromesquis of beef palate (867) 

Fish 

Canadian turbot a la Houston (1305) 
Broiled potatoes (2776) 

Remove 

Saddle of venison, Tyrolese style (2189) 
Stuffed green peppers (2768) 

Entrees 

Duck with cepes (1922) 
Tomatoes Trevise (2836) 

Sweetbreads au Chancelier (1569) 

String beans sauted (2829) 
Souffle of partridges a la Huggins (2364) 
Roman punch (3515) 

Roast 

Capon (1826) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Chestnut croquettes (3017) 

(Ices) The marvelous (3563) 
Dessert 



4:24: NOVEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Cream of cardoons, Livingston (252) 

Side Dish 
Cassolettes a la Lusigny '^60) 

Fish 

Redsnapper, Mobile (1235) 
Viennese potatoes (8812) 

Remove 

Tenderloin of beef a la Chanzy (1447) 
Squash with parmesan (2824) 

Entrees 

Fricasseed turkey (2038) 
Sauted Brussels sprouts (2704; 

Quails a la Mirepoix (2125) 
Celery bechamel with croutons (2720) 

Paradise sherbet (3525) 

Roast 

Canvasback ducks garnished with hominy 
(2055) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Apples, Baron de Brisse (2993) 

(Ices) Nest with eggs (3594) 
Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 131 

DECEMBRE. 4r25 

D!NER DE is COUVERTS SERVICE A LA FRANCAISE. 

MENU. 
Premier Service. 

POTAGES. 

Consomme aux nids d'hirondelles (244) 

Jarrets de veau a la Briand (319) 

HORS-D'CEUVRE. 

Croquettes de crabes Parmentier (879) 

Timbales Princesse (980) 

RELEVES. 

FletanalaReynal(1171) 

Filet de bceuf a la Melinet (1452) 

ENTREES. 

Epigrammes de levrauts a la Polignac (2078) 

Ailes de poulet a la Beranger (1834) 

Pate chaud de ris de veau a la McAllister (2313) 
Filets de pigeons aux olives (1970) 

Quenelles de volaille a la Drew (2326) 

Souffle de gibier a la Lucie (2362) 



Deuxieme Service. 
Punch Elisabeth (3507) 

ROTS. 
Canvasback (Canards sauvages) (2055) Perdreaux (2103) 

ENTREMETS. 

Fonds d'artichauts a la Villars (2682) 

Pointes d'asperges Miranda (2696) 

Pouding Tyrolienne (3111) 

Gelee aux ananas Californienne (3178) 

Brouette garnie de fleurs sur socles (3638) Panier de cerises (3630) 

Gateau Reine (3256) Baba sirope" (3227) 

Dessert 



132 Till] EPICUREAN. 

DECEMBER 426 

D!NER DE 20 OOUVERTS-SERVICE A LA RUSSE. 



MENU. 



Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme" Impe'ratrice (231) 

Bisque de lucines a la Hendrick (197) 

HORS-D'CEUVRE 

Orfites de coq farcies Duxelle (863) 

Bouchees a la puree de gibier (936) 

RELEVES. 

Aiguillettes de bass noir aux crabes d'huitres (1096) 

Selle d'antilope a la chasseresse (2185) 

ENTREES. 

Borcture de poulet a la Toulouse (2210) 

Vol-au-vent a PAncienne (2398) 

Bis deveau au chancelier (1569) 

Timbale de truffes a la Pe*rigord (2846) 

ROTS. 

Ruddy duck (2066) 

Oailles au cresson (2131) 

LEGUMES. 

Tomates farcies aux champignons frais (2842) 

Petits pois Parisienne (2745) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR. 

Peches Richelieu (3083) 

Paniers d'oranges a la gelee (3130) 

Flamri de semoule (3168) 

Bavarois aux marrons (3136} 

GLACES. 

Poules avec Poussins (3594) 
Compotes (3686) Bonbons (3642) 

Fruits frais (3699) Devises (3653) 

Petits fours (3364) Amandes Salees (3696) 

Dessert 



BIJ1.LS OF FARE. 133 

DECEMBRfc. 4:27 

DINER DE 24 COUVERTS SERVICE A L'ANGLAISE, 

MENU. 

POTAGES. 

Potage de becasses (360) 

Creme de legumes a la Banville (266) 

POISSON. 

Turbot Anglais sauce aux capres (1307) 

Pommes de torre Viennoise (2812) 

GROSSE PIECE. 

Filet de bceuf a la d'Orleans (1450) 

Haricots verts e^uves (2828) 

ENTREES. 

Ailes de poulet a la Primatice (1851) 

Ris de veau Maltaise (1558) 

Quenelles de poulet a la Bretonne (2328) 

Casserole de ris garnie de poulet Palestine (2239) 

ROT. 
Dindon farci aux marrons (2041) 

FROID. 

Terrine de foies de canards a FAquitaine (2596) 

Salade d'escarole (2671) 

RELEVES. 

Beignets souffles Medicis (3047) 

Compiegne au Sabayon (3009) 

ENTREMETS. 

Petite pois a FAnglaise (2742) 

Asperges a la Hollandaise (2692) 

Pain de bananes Havanaise (3195) 

Couronne a la Camper (3156) 
Gelee aux violettes (3185) Eclairs au chocolat (3303) 

BUFFET. 

Aloyau a la Norwood (1348) Selle de mouton rotie a la broche (1648) 

Pouding Yorkshire (770) Pommes roties (2771) 

Tarte aux pommes (3199) Consomme aux ravioles et aux perles (359* 



134 THE EPICUREAN. 

DECEMBER 4:28 

D!NEB DE is COUVERTS SERVICE A I/AMERICAINE. '- * 



MENU. 

Huitres (803) 

POTAGES. 

Consomme" a la Berry (220) 

Bisque d'e"crevisses a la Bateliere (202) 

HORS-D'OEUVRE. 
Bouchees Andalouse (934) 

POISSONS. 

Bass raye" a la Whitney (1109) 

Blanchaille a la Greenwich (1310) 

RELEVE. 

Filets de boeuf a la Conde (1448) 

Celeri a 1'Espagnole (2721) 

ENTREES. 

Filets de ponlet Ik la Sadi-Carnot (1853) 
P*tit* pois a 1'Anglaise (2742) 

Cotelettes de chevreuil Cauchoise (2171) 
Epinards Bechamel (2820) 

Souffles de foies gras aux truffes (2361) 

Punch Tournesol (3517) 

ROT. 

Becasses (2206) 

Salade de laitues (2672) 

ENTREMETS SUCRES 

Baquet de gaufres a la creme (3128) 

Gateau moka (3249) Macaronade (3188) 

Palais de dames a la Vanille (3353) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Fruits frais (3699) Compotes (3686) 

Cafe" (3701) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



135 



DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Westmoreland (357) 

Remove 

Flounders, Joinville (1155) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Entries 

Shoulder of lamb a la Gamier (1750) 
Cucumbers breaded, English style (2732) 

Fillets of Guinea fowl with sauerkraut (1958) 

Roast 

English snipe (2159) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Meringued pancakes, Rossini (3073) 

(Ice) Montelimar with hazel-nut cream (3566) 
Dessert 



4r30 DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Lentils, Chantilly (273) 

Remove 

Soles a la Colbert (1271) 
Cucumbers (2661) 

Entrees 

Rack of pork on the spit (1799) 
Stuffed turuip cabbage (2709) 

Chicken fricassee a la Waleski (1866) 
Tomatoes, Queen style (2840) 

Roast 

Woodcock (2206) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Fritters souffled, Me"dicis (3047) 

Caramel ice cream (3447) 
Dessert 



4:31 DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Puree of young rabbit, St. James (274) 

Side Dish 
Rissoles of sweetbreads (954) 

Fish 

Spotted fish, Calcutta (1287) 
Viennese potatoes (281 2) 

Remove 

Rack of mutton with small roots (1643) 
Fried stuffed lettuce (2752) 

Entrees 

Chicken with oyster sauce (1882) 
Green peas, French style (2743) 

Salmis of woodcock a la Beaumont (2207) 
Miuced cepes in croustades (2725) 

Venetian sherbet (3529) 

Roast 
Turkey stuffed, American style (2028) 

Hot Entremets 
Apples with burnt almonds (3000) 

(Ices) Leona (3558) 
Dessert. 



DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Chicken gumbo (299) 

Side Dish 
Attereaux of oysters (839) 

Fish 

Streaked turban of flukes (2393) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Remove 

Braised turkey a la financiere (2026) 
Stuffed tomatoes with fresh mushrooms (2842) 

Entries 

Sweetbreads a la Marsilly (1559) 
Celeriac, Mirabeau (2722) 

Salmis of quails a la Morisini (2132) 
Mushrooms stuffed in cases (2762) 

Siberian punch (3516) 

Roast 

Canvasback ducks garnished with hominy 
(2055) 

Hot Entremets 
Peach pu.dding a la Cleveland (3102) 

Burnt almond angelica ice cream (3455) 



136 



THE EPICUREAN. 



4:33 DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Bouillabaisse (289) 

Remove 

Boudins of salmon with shrimps (2221) 
Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Entrees 

Stuffed hare a la chatelaine (2074) 
Tomatoes, Frossart (2834) 

Chicken sauted a la Diva (1886) 
Green peas, Parisian style (2745) 

Roast 

Squabs (2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Crusts with fruit, Mirabeau (3025) 

(Ice) Pudding Constance (3490) 
Dessert 



I* 4:34: DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Gnocquis a la Pagioli (312) 

Remove 

Flounders a la Dieppoise (1153) 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 

Entries 

Stuffed chicken with tomato Conde sauce (1883) 
Ravioles, Bellini (2976) 

Mutton cutlets a la Marechale (1595) 
String beans sauted with butter (2829) 

Roast 

Pheasants (2107) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Fritters, Montagnard (3037) 

(Ice) Mousse a la Siraudin (3472) 
Dessert 



4:35 DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 

MENU. 

Soup 
Bisque of shrimps, Melville (212) 

Side Dish 
Croquettes of grouse, Soubise (886) 

Fish 

Weakfish a la Brighton (1308) 
Hollandaise potatoes (2790) 

Remove 

Ribs of beef a la Bristed (1329) 
Fried eggplant (2739) 

Entrees 

Chicken breasts a la Bodisco (1835) 
Carrots, Viennese style (2713) 

Young rabbit, hunter's style (2140) 
Tomatoes, Trevise (2836) 

Sunflower punch (3517) 

Roast 

Reedbirds (2152) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Meringued peaches (3082) 

(Ice) Parfait with coffee (3479) 
Dessert 



4:36 DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme, Bariatenski (219) 

Side Dish 
Bondons of woodcock a la Diane (845) 

Fish 

Striped bass with white wine (1113) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Remove 

Pullet with ravioles (1995) 
String beans sauted (2829) 

Entrees 

Noisettes of tenderloin of beef a laMaire (1415) 
Glazed cucumbers (2733) 

Vol-au-vent of frogs' legs, Soubise (2401) 
Parfait amour sherbet (3526) 

Roast 

Ruddy ducks (2066) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 

Pudding a la Bradley (3093) 

(Ice) Italian mousse (3475) 

Dessert 



OF FARE. 



137 



4_ 37" DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Oysters a la Cruyst (334) 
Remove 

Turbot a la Mercier (1306) 
Boiled potatoes (2774) 

Entrees 

Pullet with croustades a la Financiere (1993) 
Artichoke bottoms with marrow (2687) 

Noisettes of tenderloin of beef a la Fleurette 

(1413) 
Green peas, French style (2743) 

Roast 

Teal ducks (2068) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Rice border with bananas (3005) 

(Ices) Fiori di latte a la Orlandini (3468) 
Dessert 



^ 4r38 DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Frogs, garnished with timbales (309) 

Remove 

Flounders, Madeleine (1157) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Entrees 

Leg of mutton a la Bourgeoise (1634) 
Mushrooms a la Reynal (2756) 

Chicken broiled a la Delisle (1828) 
String beans a la Pettit (2827) 

Roast 

Woodcock (2206) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Brioche fritters with cream sabayon (3040) 

(Ice) Serano pudding (3498) 
Dessert 



439 DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 to 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup. 
Calf's tail a la Rundell (294) 

Side Dish 
Palmettes a la Perier (922) 

Fish 

Sole a la Lutece (1272) 
Duchess potatoes (2785) 

Remove 

Saddle of mutton with glazed roots (1649) 
Macaroni Brignoli (2958) 

Entrees 

Breaded tenderloin of pork, celery pure"e (181 8) 
Green peas, English style '(2742) 

Quails stuffed with mushrooms (2134) 
Parisian salad (2644) 

Rebecca sherbet (3528) 

Roast 

Plovers (2119) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Humboldt pudding (3100) 

(Ices) Potatoes (3575) 
Dessert 



DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 16 TO 20 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Hungarian consomme (235) 

Side Dish 
Ham mousselines, Robertson (915) 

Fish 

Striped bass, shrimp sauce (1111) 
Marchioness potatoes (2797) 

Remove 

Saddle of venison, hunter's style (2185) 
Jerusalem artichokes a la Salamander (2749) 

Entrees 

Stuffed tame duck a la Britannia (1917) 
Tr6vise tomatoes (2836) 

Noisettes of beef, mushroom pur6e (1420) 
Russian salad (2645) 

Champagne punch (3504) 

Roast 

Capon (1826) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Rice pudding, fruit sauce (3106) 

(Ice) Cherry plombiere (3485) 
Dessert 



138 



THE EPICUREAN. 



4r4rl DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Ravioles with Nizam pearls (359) 

Remove 

Haddock, Holland style (1165) 
Entrees 

Loin of pork a la Reglain (1796) 
Cucumbers breaded, English style (2732) 

Fillets of young rabbit a la Bienvenue, gar- 
nished with croquettes (2143) 
String beans a la Pettit (2827) 

Roast 

Squabs in earthenware saucepan (2018) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Peaches a la Conde (3081) 

(Ice) Biscuit glace, Diplomate (3435) 
Dessert 



DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 

Crabs a la Loubat (303) 
Remove 

Black bass with sweet peppers (1097) 
Viennese potatoes (2812) 

Entrees 

Mutton cutlets a la Macedoine (1594) 
Baked eggplant (2738) 

Mallard duck with celery, half-glaze (2060) 
Braised pullet with jelly (2570) 

Roast 

Partridges with water-cresses (2102) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Custard cream with apples (3014) 

(Ice) Plombiere d'Alencon (3483) 
Dessert 



4-4:3 DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme a la Dubarry (229) 

Side Dish 
Attereaux of turkey (842) 

Fish 

Canadian turbot a la d'Orleans (1304) 
Potatoes persillade (2774) 

Remove 

Mutton with Gastronome potatoes (1642) 
Asparagus, Countess (2693) 

Entrees 

Turkey with cepes (2030) 
Risot with Piedmontese truffles (2981) 

Young hare, Castiglione (2077) 
Teltow turnips with chestnuts (2849) 

Champagne punch (3504) 

Roast 

Redhead ducks (2063) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Peaches a la Colbert (3080) 

(Ice) Bomb with prunelle (3443) 
Dessert 



4-4-4- DECEMBER. 

DINNER, 8 TO 10 PERSONS. 
MENU. 

Soup 
Consomme, Andalouse (216) 

Side Dish 
Timbales, Soubise (986) 

Fish 

Striped bass with fine herbs (1112) 
Potato tartlets (2810) 

Remove 

Redhead duck, Bareda (2062) 
Artichoke bottoms, Mornay (2686) 

Entries 

Veal cutlets, Pogarski (2273) 
Green peas, housekeeper's style (2744) 

Fillets of young rabbit a la Lavoisier (2144) 
Brussels sprouts a la Baroness (2703) 

Paradise sherbet (3525) 

Roast 

Pullets (1996) 
Salad 

Hot Entremets 
Chestnut croquettes (3017) 

(Ice) Fiori di latte, Orlandini (3468) 



BILLS OF FARE. 139 

JANUARY. 4r45 

DANCING PARTY OF 100 PERSONS SERVED FRENCH STYLE. 

REFRESHMENTS AND SUPPER. 

BILL OF FARE. 

First Service, n o'clock. 

Genoeses with cream meringued (3308) Conde cakes (3297) Varied fruit tartlets (3337) 

Africans (3364) Macaroons (3379) 

Refreshments 
Lemonade, Orgeat and Grenadine syrup. 



Second Service, 12 o'clock. 

Assorted ice creams (3538) Rolled wafers with Curacoa cream (3224) 
Iced biscuits with vanilla (3438) Fancy cakes (3364) 

Tutti frutti biscuit (3586) Small cream biscuits (3137) 

Hot wine (3715) Champagne punch (3714) 



Third Service, i o'clock. 

SUPPER (HOT). 

Consomme" (189) Chicken croquettes exquisite (877) 

Victoria patties (942) Coffee and milk (3701) 

Venetian timbales (989) Escalops of fat livers a la Villeneuve (2279) 

; COLD. 

Roast capon and water cress (1826) 
Galantine of pigeons (2496) 

Terrine of snipe (2603) 

Tenderloin of beef with macedoine croustades (2440) 
Small " pain " of capon with tarragon (2542) 
Shrimp salad (2647) 

Sandwiches of different meats (815) 

Small rolls with lobster (809) 

SWEET ENTREMETS AND DESSERT. 

Thin chocolate wafers (3362) Fruit jellies (3187) 

Fresh fruits (3699) Varied ice cream (3538) 

Assorted fancy cakes (3364) 

Champagne. 



140 THE EPICUREAN. 



FEVRIEL. 

SOUPER DE 30 OOUVERTS SERVICE A L'AMERIOAINE. 



MENU. 

Huitres (803) 

Consomme" en tasses (189) 

Eadis (808) Olives (800) Celeri en branches (779/ 




Filet de boeuf a la Milanaise (1453) 

Petits pois a 1'Anglaise (3743) 

Ailes de poulet a la Lucullus (1846) 

Fonds d'artichauts a la Soubise (2681) 

Terrapene a la Orisfield (1084) 

Mousseline de foies gras a la Dana (2535) 

Celestine de poularde a la Talleyrand (2450) 

Salade d'ecrevisses a la Maintenon (2629) 

Pigeonneaux rotis a la casserole (2018) 

Truffes en serviette (2843) 

Flamrl a la crfime (8167) 

Gel^e Tunisienne rubanee (3184) 

Gelee au marasquin (3186) 

Pouding glace a la Duchesse (3492) 
Ceylan au cafe (3545) 

Fruits (3699) Petits fours (3364) Bonbons (364*) Devises (3653) 

Cafe (3701) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



MARS, 



SOUPER DE 30 OOUVEETS SERVICE A L'AM^RIOAINE. 



MENU. 



Graves 
Lafaurfe 



Nierstewer 



Chamberttn 



Pommery 
Malaga 



Huitres (803) 

Canapes d'e"crevisses (777) Salade d'anchois (772) 

Beurre (775) Kadis (808) Olives (800) 

Consomme" en tasses (189) 

Puree de volaille a la Reine (270) 

Croquettes de poulet a la Hongroise (878) 

Canape's a la Lorenzo (855) 

Cfltelettes d'agneau a la Maison d'Or (1679) 

Pigeonneaux a la Flourens (2009) 



Galantine de faisan de"coup6e (2495) 



Pat6 de foies gras dgcoupe* (2563) 



Poularde rotie truffee (1992) 

Salade Imp^riale (2634) 

Gele"e au marasquin (3186) 

Charlotte Bengalienne (3142) 

Glace mousse aux marrons (3477) 

Petites glaces moule*es vari&s (3431) 

Caf6 glace (3609) 

Fruits (3699) Petits fours (3364) 

Bonbons (3642) Devises (3653) 

Violettes praline"es (3659) 
Dessert 

Champagne glace* (3710) 



i42 THE EPICUREAN. 

APRIL. 4r4r8 

SIDEBOARD SUPPER FOR 300 PERSONS RUSSIAN SERVICE. 

BILL OF FARE. 
Consomme 1 (189) Cream of rice Cre'mieux (249) 

Truffled ham a la Florian (2523) Chaudfroid of fillets of redhead duck (2460) 

Decorated galantines of eels (2488) Foies gras in border (2483) 

Cold chicken fricassee (2467) Shrimp salad (2647) 

Javiare (778) Lemons and oranges (793) Small fancy rolls with lobster (809j 

Assorted canapes (777) Assorted sandwiches (811) 

ENTREMETS AND DESSERT. 

2 Vases of drawn sugar with flowers (3637) 

Savoy biscuit (3231) Baba syruped (3227) 

Cream with cherries (3154) Macedoine champagne jelly (3179) 

Bavarois with meringues (3133) High stands of assorted fancy cakes (3364) 

Plates filled with bonbons (3642) Basket of fresh fruits (3699) 

Preserves (3684) 



SUPPER, HOT AND COLD FOR 200 PERSONS. 
On twenty tables, ten persons to each. 

Consomme" (189) Puree of chicken Dufferin (269) 

Darne of salmon a la Duperre (1240) Crab salad (2628) 

Chicken fillets au supreme (1858) Squabs a la Flourens (2009) 

Artichoke bottoms a la Vi liars (2682) Green peas, French style (2743) 

Roast pheasant (2107) Roast turkey with water-cress (2028) 

Fruit jelly with kirsch (3187) Bengalian Charlotte (3142) 

Peaches a la Louvoisienne (3198) 

SIDEBOARD FOR TEA, REFRESHMENTS AND ICES. 

Tea (3704) Coffee (3701) Punch (3501) Chocolate (3700) 

Strawberry mousse (3474) Small ices (3431) 

American sherbet (3521) Lemonade (3713) Tea cakes (3339) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



MAL 

SOUPER ASSIS DE 35 COUVERTS SERVICE 1 L'AMERICAINE. 



MENU. 



Canapes de sardines (777) Anchois (772) Celeri en branches (779) Radis (808) 

Lucines orangees (803) 

Consomme de volaille en tasses (190) 
Homard a la Hervey (1034) 

Croquettes de palais de bosuf (875) 
Petits pois a TAnglaise (2742) 

Cotelettes d'agneau a la Talma (1687) 

Haricots verts a la Pettit (2827) 

Ailes de poulet a la Lorenzo (1845) 

Tomates farcies Provengale (2835) 

Chapon roti (1826) 

Salade de pommes de terre en bordure aux truffes (2655) 

Gelee au marasquin (3186) 

Charlotte Russe (3145) 

Glace bombe a la Trobriand (3440) 

Glaces moulees variees (3431) 

Fruits (3699) Petits fours (3364) 

Caf6 (8701) 



14* 



THE EPICUREAN. 



JUIN. 



45O 



SOUPEE ASSIS 40 COUVERTS. 



MENU. 



Haut Sauteme Lucines orangees (803) 

Caviar (778) Salade d'anchois (772) Olives (800) Sardines (831) 

Consomme (189) 

Truites de ruisseau a la Careme (2611) 

Salade de concombres (2661) 



Champagne 

Perrier-Jou'tt 



Atte*reaux de ris de veau a la moderne (841) 
Filets de volaille a la Cussy (1838) 

Petits pois a 1'Anglaise (2742) 

Quenelles de volaille Richelieu (2327) 



Petits pains de volaille a I'Scarlate (2543) 

Dome de homard garni de petites caisses (2481) 



Chambertin 



Canetons rdtis (1921) 

Salade de truffes a la Gambetta (2667) 



Gel6e mace"doine au champagne (3179) 

Gaufres brisselets a la creme frambois6e (3223) 

Glaces Delicieux aux noisettes (3592) 

Le casque orne" de sucre file" (3598) 



Fruits eristallise*s (3659) Petits fours (3364) 
Bonbons (3642) Devises (3653) 

Fruits frais (3699) 
Cafe" (3701) 



BILLS OF FARJ. U6 



JULY. 



AMBIGU PICNIC 60 PERSONS. 



BILL OF FARE. 



HORS-D'(EUVBE. 

Herring salad with potatoes (2633) 

Beef sandwiches a la Barlow (812) 

Chicken sandwiches (813) 

Okra and sweet pepper salad (2651) 

Small sturgeon Livonienne style (2594) 

Tenderloin of beef with vegetables, mayonnaise (2441) 
Smoked red beef tongue (2608) 

Pigeon galantines (2496) 

Veal and ham pie (2568) 

Duckling with Spanish olives (2482) 

Leg of mutton a la Garrison (2530) 

Broiled chicken (1831) 
Frog salad (2632) 

Lobster salad, American style (2638) Bagration salad (2622) 

Apricot flawn (3170) 

Punch cake with rum (3255) 

Charlotte Russe (3145) 

Bavarois with meringues (3133) 

Raspberries and cream (3699) 

Ice Cream. 
Vanilla (3458) Strawberry water ice (3607) Chocolate (3449) 

White coffee (3460) Iced biscuit with vanilla (3438) 

Fruits (3699) Fancy cakes (3364) 

Coffee (3701) 
Dessert 



146 



THE EPICUREAN. 



AUGUST GARDEN PARTY 100 PERSONS. 



uajioiqo put? saaddad uaaaS 



iA^ paaaAoo p'eo.iq 



Caviar, olives, butter, radishes 
Lobster remoulade^ m \Sheepshead with jelly 
Toasted bread covered ^f >with chicken and bacon 

i Si. A N LJ 

Merinsrue bavaroise cream\ ^ / Macedoine jelly 




Pain of calf liver, Salpicon 
Ribs of beef en bellevue Turkey in daube, Verneuil 



Coifee 



Tea 



BILLS OF FAilE. 147 



SEPTEMBER. 4r52 

AMBIGU 200 PERSONS. 



Radishes (808) Celery (779) 

Butter (775) Gherkins (785) 

Olives (800) Red cabbage, marinated, English style (776) 

Caviar (778) Chow-chow (791) 

Salted almonds (3696) Hard-boiled eggs on canape's (777) 

Marinated cauliflower (776) Anchovy salad (772) 
Potato salad with herring (2653) 



Slices of salmon with jelly (2578) 

Roasted peacock adorned with its plumage (2552) Galantine of suckling pig (2498) 
Kernel of veal with mayonnaise tomatoed sauce (2527) Beef a la mode (2433) 
Capon legs with truffles (1826) Cold snipe pie (2567) 

Lobster with mayonnaise (2534) 

Small " pain" of chicken a la Freycinet (2544) Galantine of gosling, melon shaped (2489) 
Pork liver terrine (2551) Japanese salad (2636) 

Barlow sandwiches (812) Rillettes (809) 

Slices of bread and butter (820) Sandwiches with anchovies (816) 

French roll sandwiches, American style (816) 

Assorted ice cream (3538) 
Fancy cakes (3364) Fruits (3699) 

Claret punch (3714) Lemonade (3713) 

Iced coffee (3609) Iced chocolate (3608) 



148 THE EPICUREAN. 

OCTOBER 4:53 

SUPPER FOR 300 PERSONS-ENGLISH SERVICE. 

BILL OF FARE. 

LARGE PIECES. 

Chicken pie (2554) Ribs of beef a la bourgeoise (2431) 

Ham glazed with sugar (2522) Turkey in daube (2616) 

ENTREES. 

Ballotines of quails a la Tivolier (2426) Decorated darne of salmon (2576) 
Cutlets of pheasant in chaudfroid (2477) Smoked red beef tongues (2608) 

Lamb cutlets, Imperial (2471) Galantine of pullet a la Mozart (2497) 

Lobster salad, American style (2638) Chicken mayonnaise (2625) 

RESERVE. 

Chickens (2469) and tongues (2608) 

Terrine of pork liver (2602) 

PASTRY PIECES. 

Fleury cake (3237) Nougatine cake (3251) 

Savoy biscuit (3231) Iced baba (3227) 

SWEET DISHES OF SMALL PASTRIES AND ICES. 

Pear tartlets (3337) Lozenges (3349) 

Espagnolettes (3346) Apricot nougat (3319) 

Nantes cakes (3352) Small fancy ices (3538) 

Japanese cakes (3347) 

Biscuits glaces (3438) " Pain" of bananas, Havanese (3195) 

Malakoff cream (3150) Surprise Bavarois (3132) 

Jelly with fruit and kirsch (3187) 

HOT SERVICE ON SIDEBOARD. 

Bisque of clams a la Hendrick (197) Cream of barley, Vienna style (249) Nizam pearls (316) 

Roast pullets (1996) 



BILLS OF FARE. 149 

NOVEMBER 454: 

SOUPER BUFFET ET ASSIS DE 400 PEKSONNES. 

MENU BUFFET. 



CHAUD. 

Consomme" de gibier (192) 

Mousseline Isabelle (912) 

Huitres a la Hollandaise (1066) 

Huitres frites a la Orly (1060) 

Bouchees a la Victoria (942) 

Quenelles de terras a la Londonderry (2332) 
P6toncles a la Brestoise (1074) 

Queues de homard a la Stanley (1042) 
Terrapene a la Baltimore (1083) 
Cafe (3701) The (3704) 



FROID. 

Saumon de TOrSgon a la Venitienne (2587) 
Filet de boeuf aux croustades macedoine (2440) 
Galantine de dinde a la Berger (2499) 

Langue de boauf ecarlate en arcade (2607) 
Becasses a la Valere (2619) Aspic de foies gras (2411) 

Mousseline de kingfish a la Briere (2536) Poulet roti garni de gele"e (2469) 

Mayonnaise de poulet (2625) Salade de homard a PAme'ricaine (2638) 

Sandwichs de gibier (814) Rillettes (809) Canape's (777) 

ENTREMETS SUCRES ET DESSERT. 

Pouding Valois (3211) Gelee aux framboises (3183) 

Gateau Vacherin a la creme (3264) Savarin a la Valence (3259) 

GLACES V ARISES. 

Fruits (3699) Petits fours (3364) Bonbons (3642) Devises (3653) 

Champagne glace (3710) 



Le souper est dresse 1 en buffet, ensuite servi sur des petites tables de cinq a dix converts, on 
decoupe le froid que 1'on dresse sur des petits plats que Ton place sur chacune des tables ainsi 
que le hors d'ceuvre froid. Avant de servir Fentremet Sucre et le dessert on remplace le froid et le 
hors d'oauvre par les gele'es poudings, gateaux, fruits, etc. Le chaud est au choix des convives- 



150 THE EPICUREAN. 

DECEMBRE. 55 

SOUPER BUFFET ET ASSIS POUR 100 COUVERT8. 

MENU BUFFET. 

CHAUD. 

Consomme" de volaille (190) Creme d'orge a la Viennoise (249) 
Huitres fricassees a la poulette (1067) Timbales a la Soubise (986) 

Coquilles de saumon (2346) Bouchers Turbigo (941) 

Terrapene a la Maryland (1085) Canvasbacks (canards sauvages) (2055) 

Cafe" (3701) The (3704) 

FROID. 

Chaudfroid de Courlis (2452) Terrine de lievre (2598) 

Langue de boauf e"carlate a la gele"e (2609) Aspics de filets mignons de perdreaux (2416) 

Cdtelettes de noix d'agneau mayonnaise (2474) Filets de poulet a la Gallier (2466) 
Salade de c61eri mayonnaise (2660) Salade de homard a 1'Ame'ricaine (2638) 

Sandwichs variees (815) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR FROIDS ET DESSERT. 

GeI6e au rhum (3186) Gaufres brisselets a la creme framboisee (3223) 

Gateau noisettes (3241) Charlotte Bengalienne (3142) 

Bombe panache'e au cafe" blanc et noir (3444) Souffle glace a la Favart (3534) 

Tutti frutti (3586) Biscuit glace" (3438) Toronchino Procope (3583) 

Fruits (3699) Petits fours (3364) Bonbons (3642) Devises (3653) 



Lefroid est decoupe" et servi sur table (want de servir le Souper. 
Le Souper assis est servi sur des tables de 5 a 10 Converts dans 1'ordre suivant. 

Consomme" de volaille Creme d'orge a la Viennoise 

Timbales a la Soubise Bouchees Turbigo 

Huitres fricassees a la poulette Coquilles de saumon 

Cotelettes de uoix d'agneau mayonnaise Filets de poulet a la Gallier 

Terrapene a la Maryland 

Chaudfroid de Courlis Terrine de lievre 

Langue de boeuf ecarlate a la gel^e Aspics de filets mignons de perdreaux 

Salade de homard a 1'Americaine Sandwichs variees 

Oanvasbacks (canards sauvages) Salade de celeri mayonnaise 

Gel6e au rhum Gaufres brisselets a la creme framboisee 

Gateau noisettes Charlotte Bengalienne 

Bombe panachee au caf6 blanc et noir Souffle" glace a la Favart 

Tutti frutti Biscuit glace Toronchino Procope 

Fruits Petits fours Bonbons Devises 



BILLS OF FARE. 



151 



SUPPER. 
JANUARY. 4:56 * JANUARY. 

Oysters on the half shell (803) 

Crawfish mariniere (1009) 
Breasts of woodcock a la Houston (2201) 

Deviled ribs of beef (1331) 

Aspic of breast of quail (2419) 

(Ice) Croquettes macedoine (3559) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



4=57 

Oysters on the half shell (803) 

Lobster on skewers, Colbert (2222) 

Game croquettes a la Dauphine (885) 

Green peas, English style (2742) 

Roast redhead ducks (2063) 

Celery mayonnaise salad (2660) 

Ice cream (3458) 

Dessert 



JANUARY. 458 

Oysters on the half shell (803) 

Woodcock croquettes with truffles (892) 

Mutton kidneys on skewers, deviled (1620) 

Lobster tails in their shells (2533) 

(Ice) Souffles Palmyra (3535) 

Dessert 



JANUARY. 459 

Oysters (803) 
Crusts with Chester cheese (946) 

Crawfish with butter (1011) 
Lamb sweetbreads, Sevigne (1762) 

Roast squabs (2018) 

(Ice) Nesselrode pudding with candied chest- 
nuts (3495) 
Dessert 



FEBRUARY. 46O 

Oysters (803) 

Consomme" (189) 

Marechalo mousseline (913) 

Escalops of fat livers a la Villeneuve (2279) 

Green peas, English style (2742) 

Doe birds (2051) 

(Ice) Stuffed tomatoes (3582) 

Dessert 



FEBRUARY. 461 

Oysters in cases a la Lorenzo (2232) 

Fresh mushroom patties (937) 

Striped bass a la Manhattan (2428) 

Chicken souffle a la Delsart (2360) 

Roast plover (2119) 

Salad 
Charlotte Russe (3145) 



FEBRUARY. 

Oysters in their natural shells with fried 

bread (2353) 
Lobster, American style (1024) 

Chicken salad (2626) 

Roasted English snipe (2159) 

(Ice) Plombiere a la Havanaise (3484) 

Dessert 



FEBRUARY. 463 

Oysters on crusts (1062) 

Turkey croquettes (894) 

Noisettes of tenderloin of beef, plain (1410) 

Sarah potatoes (2802) 
Aspic of foies-gras (2411) 

Asparagus salad (2621) 
Montelimar with hazel-nut ice cream (3566) 



152 



THE EPICUREAN. 



MAKCH. 

Cream of barley, Vienna style (249) 

Fried stuffed oysters (1070) 

Cr6pine of reedbirds (2247) 

Lobster mayonnaise, Printaniere (796) 

Roast ptarmigan with gravy (2072) 

(Ice) Bomb with kirsch (3443) 

Dessert 



SUPPER. 

MARCH. 



4,65 



Welsh rarebit (946) 

Lamb kidneys on skewers (1703) 

Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Roast squabs (2018) 

Strawberry water ice (3607) 

Sponge cake (3260) 

Dessert 



MARCH. 4:66 

Clear bouillon (187) 

Squab cutlets a la de Luynes (2266) 

Green peas, English style (2742) 

Broiled chicken (1831) 

Norwegian salad (2641) 

(Ice) Andalusian cream (3446) 

Dessert 



MARCH. 4,67 

Consomme 1 (189) 

Chicken croquettes, Exquisite (877) 
Small green peas, Parisian style (2745) 

Lobster a la Newberg (1037) 

Pheasant adorned with its own plumage (2107) 

(Ice) Fiori di latte a la Bellini (3467) 

Dessert 



APRIL. 4,68 

Oysters and lemons (803) 

Trout marinated in wine (829) 

Minions of tenderloin of beef a la Baillard 

(1400) 
English partridges (2102) 

Celery salad (2660) 

(Ice) Diploma te biscuit (3435) 

Dessert 



APRIL. 4,69 

Toast with oil and cheese (992) 

Croquettes of frogs (884) 

Pullet crepine (2243) 

Oyster salad (2642) 

Roast squabs (2018) 

(Ice) Plombiere a la Rochambeau (3482) 
Dessert 



APRIL. 



4=70 



APRIL. 



4:71 



Oysters (803) 

Crawfish, Maison d'Or (1010) 
Sweetbread in cases la Grammont (2235) 

Quartered artichokes (2688) 
Roast chicken with jelly and beef tongue 

(2469) 

Strawberry mousse ice cream (3474) 
Dessert 



Bouillon (187) 

Toast a la Waddington (862) 

Shells of oysters a la Villa (2340) 

Breasts of chicken a la Beranger (1834) 

Potato shavings (2807) 

English snipe (2159) 

Mignon salad (2620) 

(Ice) Turban with strawberries (3100) 



BILLS OF FAHE. 



153 



SUPPER. 



MAY. 



4:72 ' 



Clams (803) 

Yorkshire rarebit (946) 

Lobster a la Bounefoy (1026) 

Dauphine potatoes (2783) 

Broiled chicken (1831) 

(Ice) Komanoff pudding (3497) 

Dessert 



MAY. 4.73 

Consomme" (189) 

Crusts of clams a la Schenk (903) 

Ham mousseline a la Belmont (911) 

Ptarmigans, currant jelly (2072) 

Romaine salad (2675) 

(Ice) Tutti frutti (3586) 

Dessert 



MAY. 



4:74= 



Clams (803) 

Toast with sardines (992) 

Venetian timbales (989) 

Lamb cutlets with mayonnaise (2474) 

Broiled squabs, Colbert sauce (2013) 

(Ice) Bomb with maraschino (3443) 

Dessert 



MAY. 4,75 

Consomme (189) 

Soft clams a la poulette (995) 

Lamb cutlets, Signora (1686) 

Chicken salad with vegetables (2627) 

Broiled duckling (1938) 

Salad 

(Ice) Parfait with coffee (3479) 
Dessert 



JUNE. 4,76 

Clams (803) 
Brissotins of chicken supreme (849) 

Lobsters a la Newberg(1037) 
Border of forcemeat a la Duchess (2211) 

Roast squabs (2018) 

Ice cream parfait nougat (3478) 

Salad 

Dessert 



JUNE. 



Clams (803) 

Rissoles of lamb (952) 

Small green peas, Parisian style (2745) 

Duckling a la Rouennaise (1937) 

Broiled chicken (1831) 

Lettuce salad (2672) 

(Ice) Stuffed tomatoes (3582) 

Dessert 



JULY. 



478 



Clams (803) 

Lobster mayonnaise Printaniere (795) 

Brissotins of chicken au supreme (849) 

Green peas, French style (2743) 

Roast squabs (2018) 

Salad 

(Ice) Bomb streaked with white and black 
coffee (3444) 

Dessert 



JULY. 



479 

Clams (803) 

Timbales Calaisienne (962) 
Sweetbread cutlets a la Talleyrand (2272) 

Green peas, English style (2742) 

Roast sand-snipe with water-cress (2161) 

(Ice) Vanilla mousse (3458) 

Dessert 



154 



THE EPICUREAN. 



SUPPER. 



AUGUST. 



480 



Clams (803) 

Croustades Parrnentier (896) 
Chicken quenelles with consomme (2329) 

Sauted mushrooms (2760) 

Chaudfroid of lamb cutlets (2475) 

Broiled reedbirds (2151) 

Salad 

Virgin ice cream with orange-flower water 
(3459) 
Dessert 



AUGUST. 



481 



Clams (803) 

Quenelles of spring turkey (2336) 

Green peas, English style (2742) 

Cases of thrush with jelly (2449) 

Broiled wild squabs (2112) 

Tomato salad (2666) 

(Ice) Roman bomb (3442) 

Dessert 



SEPTEMBER. 

Oysters (803) 

Fish quenelles, Montglas (2330) 

Tenderloin of beef with olives (1428) 

Artichoke bottoms a la Soubise (2681) 

Roast woodcock (2206) 

Celery salad (2660) 

(Ice) Mousse with peaches (3474) 

Dessert 



SEPTEMBER. 483 

Oysters (803) 

Anchovy fritters (835) 

Partridge fillets, Giralda (2086) 

Roast duckling with green mayonnaise and 
fine herbs (1938) 

Aspics of foies gras (2412) 

Salad 

(Ice) Fiori di latte a la Bellini (3467) 
Dessert 



OCTOBER. 484 

Consomme (189) 

Scallops on toast, baked (1078) 

Chicken fillets a la Genin (1843) 

Green peas, English style (2742) 

Broiled plover (2118) 

Salad 
(Ice) Biscuit glacis (3438) 



OCTOBER. 485 

Oysters (803) 

Bressoles of fat liver (848) 

Minions of tenderloin of beef a la Dumas (1402) 

Salad of crawfish with jelly (2630) 

Roasted woodcock (2206) 

(Ice) Duchess pudding (3492) 

Small fancy cakes (3364) 

Dessert 



OCTOBER. 



486 



OCTOBER. 



487 



Oysters (803) 
Deviled stuffed lobster a la Carlu (1043) 

Toasted bread with bacon (827) 
Chicken breasts, Empress style (1841) 

Broiled snipe (2157) 

Cucumber salad (2661) 

(Ice) Marvelous (3563) 

Dessert 



Consomme (189) 

Ham mousseline Virginienne (911) 

Small aspics of foies gras (2412) 

Roasted ruddy duck (2066) 

Lettuce salad (2672) 

(Ice) Mokabelle (3565) 

Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 



155 



SUPPER. 



NOVEMBER. 488 

Oysters (803) 

Partridge quenelles a la Stuart (2333) 

Artichoke bottoms a la Mornay (2680) 

Terrapin a la Trenton (1090a) 

Roast grouse (2072) 

Cos lettuce salad (2675) 

(Ice) Mousse with macaroons (3477) 

Dessert 



NOVEMBER. 489 

Oysters (803) 

Small cases with fat livers (2229) 

Lamb cutlets a la Turenne (1688) 

Shells of capon with jelly (2590) 

Broiled woodcock (2204) 

Salad 

Parfait with coffee (3479) 
Dessert 



NOVEMBER. 



49O 



Oysters (803) 

Toast, Florentine (991) 

Cromesquis of crabs, Rumpford (869) 

Terrapin, Epicurean style (1090b) 

Small aspics of foies gras (2412) 

Roast plover (2119) 

Celery salad (2660) 

(Ice) Toronchino Procope (3583) 



NOVEMBER. 491 

Oysters (803) 
Consomme" (189; 

Palmettes of snipe a la Osborn (932) 

St. Jacques shells, Parisian style (1079) 

Toasted bread with chicken (827) 

Roast quails (2131) 

Escarole salad (2671) 

(Ice) Basket of oranges (3570) 



DECEMBER. 

Oysters (803) 

Consomme (189) 

Capon croquettes a la Royale (876) 

Peas English style (2742) 

Terrapin a la Maryland (1085) 

Roast reedbirds with water-cress (2252) 

Ice cream with chestnuts (3465) 

Dessert 



DECEMBER. 493 

Consomme (189) 

Brochettes of oysters with truffles (1058) 

Sweetbreads a la Mirabeau (2595) 

Fat livers, Toulousaine (2287) 

Fried egg-plant (2739) 

Roasted grouse (2072) 

Salad 

(Ice) Biscuit with vanilla, melon shape (3438) 
Dessert 



DECEMBER. 



494 



DECEMBER. 



Welsh rarebit a la Cutting (946) 

Lobster a la Bordelaise (1026) 

Noisettes of tenderloin of beef Berthier (1411) 

Terrapin a la Newberg (1086) 

Roast squabs (2018) 

Water-cress salad (2676) 

(Ice) Harlequin (3554) 

Dessert 



Consomme (189) 

Oysters on toast (1062) 

Ham mousseline a la Costa (911) 

Terrapin a la Crisfield (1084) 

Roast woodcock (2206) 

Okra and sweet pepper salad (2651) 

(Ice) Potatoes (3575) 

Dessert 



156 



TME EPICUREAN. 



JANVIER. 496 

BUFFET POUR 300 PERSONNES. 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Consomme de gibier (192) 

Huitres a la Villeroi (1056) 

Rissolettes a la Renan (957) 

Bouchees ' de ris de veau a la Frangaise (940) 

Terrapene, Maryland Club (1088) 

Perdreaux piques rotisau jus et cresson (2102) 

Crabes durs farcis a la diable (1004) 

FROID. 

Saumon a la Moderne (2582) 

Filet de bceuf a la Lucullus (2436) 

Voliere de faisan a la Waddington (2424) 

Jambon decore a la Gatti (2521) 

Ballotines de pigeonneaux a la Madison (2427) 

Galantine de faisan a la Lorenzo (2494) 

Langues de bceuf, Rochefort (2606) 

Salmis froid de perdreaux (2574) 

Salade de hoinard a TAmericaine (2638) 

Mayonnaise de volatile (2625) 

Tetras rods au jus (2072) 

Sandwichs (811) 
Tartines de pain blanc beurrees (820) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Paniers d'oranges a la gelee (3130) 

Bavarois aux marrons (3136) 

Gateau aux amandes (3225) 

Gaufres brisselets a la creme f ramboisee (3223) 

GLACES. 

Bacchus (3590) 

Le Puits (3599) 

Toronchino Procope (3583) 

Tutti frutti (3586) 

Napolitaine (3569) 

Mokabelle (3565) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Corne d'Abondance (3635) 
Chariot garni de pommes d'api (3632) 
Fruits (3699) 
Bonbons (3642) 
Devises (3653) 
Dessert 



FEVRIER. 4,97 

BUFFET POUR 200 PERSONNES. 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Consomme (189) 
Huitres frites au beurre (1061) 
Rissoles de palais de veau (952) 

Bouchees a la Victoria (942) 

Terrapene a la Baltimore (1083) 

Crabes durs farcis a la Caroline (1003) 

Ruddy duck roti (2066) 

Cafe (3701) 

FROID. 

Galantine d'anguilles (2488) 

Canetons aux olives Espagnole (2482) 

Faisan farci a la Prince Orloff (2553) 

Chaudfroid de filets de canards a tote rouge 

(2460) 

Filets de poulet Mirebel (2464) 
Mousseline de homard (2537) 

Aspic de foies gras (2411) 

Coquilles de chapon a la gelee (2590) 

Tartines de pain de seigle beurrees (820) 

Petits pains garnis de rillettes de Tours (809) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Gateau Mille feuilles Pompadour (3247) 

Gateau Favart (3263) 
Gelee au Madere (3186) 
Charlotte Russe (3145) 

GLACES. 

Ananas en surprise (3595) 
Turban a la vanille et aux fraises (3600) 

Madnlian (3562) 
Pommes de terre (3575) 

Pasteque (3589) 
Biscuit glace a la Diplomate (3435) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Vase en sucre file (3637) 

Moulin a vent (3639) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

Dessert 



BILLS OF 



157 



MARS. 4r98 

BUFFET POUR 250 PERSONNEL 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Bouillon clair (187) 
Brochettes d'huitres aux truffes (1058) 

Rissoles de volatile (948) 

Terrapene a la Maryland (1085) 

Homard a 1'Americaine (1024) 

Timbales a la La Valliere (2357) 

Cafe (3701) 

FROID. 

Sautnon a la Farragut (2581) 

Filet de boeuf aux legumes mayonnaise (2441) 

Buisson de crustaces a la Rochelaise (2572) 

Timbale de faisan aux truffes (2605) 

Galantine a la Berger (2499) 
Langue de boeuf Ecarlate en Arcade (2607) 

Chaudfroid de mauviettes (2454) 

Pate de longe d'agneau a la gelee (2561) 

Cuisses de poulet en forme de caneton ravi- 

gote (2529) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Gateau Favart (3263) 
Biscuit aux amandes (3229) 

Gelee prunelle (3186) 
Bavarois aux meringues (3133) 

GLACES. 

Comtesse Leda (3548) 
Timbale Chateaubriand (3581) 

Panier de Perrette (3629) 
(Eufs a la Tremontaine (3550) 

Mignonne (3564) 
Biscuit tutti frutti (3585) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Corbeille garnie de fruits (3628) 

Panier garni d'oranges (3570) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

1 )ossert 



AVRIL. 4:99 

BUFFET POUR 150 PERSON NES. 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Consomme (189) 

Huitres a la poulette (1067) 

Palmettes a la Varsovienne (924) 

Rissoles de palais de boeuf (952) 

Bouchees Turbigo (941) 

Terrapene a la Crisfleld (1084) 

Cafe (3701) 

FROID. 

Saumon a la Russe (2586) 
Filet de boeuf a la Noailles (2437) 

Galantine de pigeon (2496) 

Jambon truffe a la Florian (2523) 

Dinde en daube a la Verneuil (2615) 

Cotelettes d'agneau a 1'aspic (2473) 

Petites caisses de grives a la gelee (2449) 

Aspic de faisan (2417) 
Salade de homard a 1'Americaine (2638) 

Mayonnaise de poulet (2625) 
Sandwichs de viandes variees (615) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Gateau Genoise (3239) 
Gel<e a la Russe (3182) 

Gauf res brisselets a la creme f ramboisee (3223) 
Gateau Jamaique (3242) 

GLACES. 

Bacchus (3590) 

Le Puits (3599) 

Bombe a la Romaine (3442) 

Fiori di latte fleurs de violettes (3470) 

Plombiere Montesquieu aux pralines et aux 

pistaches (3480) 
Parfait au cafe (8479) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Le Char des Cygnes (3634) 
Bateau bon voyage (3631) 

Fruits (3699) 
Bonbons (3643) 
Devises (3653) 
Dessert. 



158 



THE EPICUREAN. 



MAT. 50O 4. 

BUFFET POUE 400 PERSONNES. 

MENU. 

CIIAUD. 

Bouillon clair (187) 

bucines orangees a la Philadelphie (994) 
Moules aux fines herbes gratinees (1050) 
Croquettes de canetons a la Muser (881) 

Bouchees aux crevettes (935) 

Crabes durs farcis aux champignons (1004) 

Cafe (3701) 

FROID. 

Saurnon a la Seymour (2584) 

Grenadins filet de boauf, Rochambeau (2439) 

Paon roti et pare de son plumage (2552) 

Pate" de filets d'oie Adolphe Hardy (2557) 

Cotelettes d'agneau a 1'Imperiale (2471) 

Terrine de noix de Jambon (2597) 

Poulet Ecarlate a la Derenne (2463) 

Aspic de veau aux artichauts macedoine (2421) 

Sandwichs (811) 
Rillettes de Tours (809) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Gateau a la gelee meringue (3243) 

Gelee aux f raises (3183) 

Baquets de gaufres a la cretne (3128) 

Biscuit a 1'Hernani (3228) 

GLACES. 

Melon Cantaloup en surprise (3591) 

Nid garni d'ceufs (3594) 
Ponding a la Constance (3490) 

Mousse a 1'ananas (3474) 
Biscuit glace a la d'Orleans (3437) 

Alexandria (3539) 
Petites glaces fantaisie (3431) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Le chariot des Colombes (3633) 
Le panier de Perrette (3629) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

Cafe (3701) 



JUIK 501 

BUFFET POUR 60 PERSONNEL 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Bouillon (187) 

Lucines orangees a la poulette (995) 

Palmettes a la Perier (922) 

Rissoles de poisson (952) 

Petits pates feuilletes de saumon (945) 

Homard roti a la diable (1030) 

FROID. 

Truites de ruisseau a la Careme (2611) 
Filet de bceuf aux croustades macedoine (2440) 
Cotelettes d'agneau au chaudfroid tomate 

(2475) 

Ris de veau a la Mirabeau (2595) 

Celestine de poularde, Talleyrand (2450) 

Fricassee de poulet chaudfroid (2467) 

" Pain" de foies au salpicon (2547) 

Galantine de caneton en forme de poire (2487) 

Sandwichs assorties (811) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Gateau Moka (3249) 

Gelee a la Violette (3185) 

Corbeille en Nougat a la Creme (3129) 

Pouding Renaissance (3210) 

GLACES. 

Poule avec pOussins (3594) 
Lapin en Surprise (3596) 

Arlequin (3554) 

Mousse aux fraises (3474) 

Souffle glace a 1'Alcazar (3533) 

Asperges (3540) 
Petites glaces fantaisie (3431) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Vase en sucre file garni de fleurs (3637) 
Moulin a vent (3639) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

Dessert 



BILLS OF FARE. 



159 



JUILLET. 5O2 

BUFFET POUR 80 PERSONNEL 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Bouillon clair (187) 
Moules a la Mariniere (1046) 
Lucines orangees farcies (997) 
Brissotins de volaille au supreme (849) 

Bouchees a 1'Audalouse (934) 
Crabes moux grilles beurre ravigote (1006) 

FROID. 

Truites a la gelee sauce Tartare (2612) 

Filet de boeuf aux croustades macedoine (2440) 

Ballotine d'agneau en forme de coupole (2425) 

Cotelettes de veau a 1'Anacreon (2478) 

Pate de foies gras de Strasbourg (2564) 

Poularde piquee a la gelee (2571) 

Galantine d'oison en forme de melon (2489) 

Jambon glace au sucre (2522) 

Sandwichs (811) 
Petits pains garnis de rillettes de Tours (809) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Biscuits a la creme (3137) 

Bavarois aux framboises (3134) 

Gateau Napolitairi (3250) 

Gateau Reine (3256) 

GLACES. 

Ananas en Surprise (3595) 

Delicieux aux noisettes (3592) 

Souffle" glace Palmyre (3535) 

Champignons (3568) 

Mousse aux peches (3474) 

f ouding a la Romanoff (3497) 

Petites glaces fantaisie (3431) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

2 Vases en sucre file garnis de fleurs (3637) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

Dessert 



AOUT. 503 

BUFFET POUR 150 PERSONNEL. 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Consomme (189) 

Moules a la poulette (1047) 

Lucines papillons frites (998) 

Croquettes de dinde (894) 

Bouchees a la Reine (938) 

Crabes moux sautes au beurre (1006) 

Cafe (3701) The (3704) 

FROID. 

Darne de saumon historiee (2576) 

Buisson d'ecrevisses (2572) 

Petits aspics aux crevettes (2422) 

Galantine de pintade a la Lytton (2490) 

Pate de caneton a la Rouennaise (2555) 

Poulet saute a la Sherman (2468) 

Sandwichs de viandes (811) 

Canapes d'anchois (777) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Gelee aux fruits et au kirseh (3187) 
Chateau framboise (3141) 

Pound cake (3254) 
Pouding Harrison (3207) 

GLACES. 

Cantaloup moule (3591) 

Nid garni d'oeufs (3594) 
Pouding a la Serano (3498) 
Mousse a 1'Italienne (3475) 

Spongade Medicis (3536) 
Petites glaces fantaisie (3431) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Le char des Cygnes (3634) 
Bateau bon voyage (3631) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

Dessert 



160 



THE EPICUREAN. 



SEPTEMBER 5O4r 

BUFFET POUE 300 PERSONNEL 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Consomme" de volaille (190) 

Bouchees a la Victoria (942) 

Croquettes de ris de veau (893) 

Homard a la Newberg (1037) 

Crabes moux frits (1006) 

Cafe (3701) 

The (3704) 

FROID. 

Turbot a la Eemoulade (2613) 

Chaudfroid de tetras (2457) 

Galantine de cochon de lait (2498) 

Pain de perdreau a la, Montgomery (2548) 

Petites caisses de be"cassines a la ge!6e (2448) 

Creme de homard (2470) 

Pate" froid de cailles (2565) 

Perdreaux piques rotis (2550) 

Salade de chapon (2624) 

Sandwichs (811) Rillettes de Tours (809) 

Canapes de caviar (777) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Gelee au mavsala (3186) 

Puree de porames mousseuse (3127) 

Gelee aux fruits et au kirsch (3187) 

Eiz Mirabeau (3213) 

GLACES. 

Corbeille jardiniere aux Colombes (3593) 

Cygne aux roseaux (3597) 
Creme spongade a la Pare"pa (8537) 

Mousse aux liqueurs (3476) 

Bombe aux fruits printaniere (3441) 

Oranges Posilipo (3571) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Arbre prodigieux (3639a) 
Moulin a vent (3639) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

Dessert 



OCTOBER 505 

BUFFET POUE 250 PEESONNES. 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Bouillon (187) 

Huitres a la Philadelphie (1063) 
Croquettes de crabes a la Parmentier (879) 

Selle de chevreuil rotie (2194) 

Bouchees de ris de veau a la Franaise (940) 

Cafe (3701) 

The (3704) 

FROID. 

Tranches de sheepshead a la gelee (2589) 

Filet de mouton a la Heury Clay (2541) 

Jambon de poulet garni de zampino (2525) 

Chaudfroid de perdreau Beatrice (2455) 

Hure de pore (2570) 

Aspic de homard (2414) 

C6telettes de faisan Chaudfroid (2477) 

Pate" froid de brasses (2569) 

Terrine de mauviettes (2599) 

Sandwichs (811) 
Pains de rillettes de Tours (809) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Biscuits de Savoie (3231) 
Gele"e au champagne (3186) 
Creme bain-marie (3160) 
Gateau mandarin (3245) 

GLACES. 

Ananas en surprise (3595) 
De"licieux aux noisettes (3592) 
Pouding aux biscuits (3488) 

Mousse Se"miramis (3471) 

Souffle glace" a 1'Alcazar (3533) 

Asperges sauce marasquin (3540) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

2 Vases en sucre file (3637) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

Dessert 



BILLS OF 



161 



NOVEMBER 5O6 

BUFFET POUR 200 PERSONNES. 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Consomme" (189) 

Huitres a la Hollandaise (1066) 

Rissoles de ris de veau (954) 

Becassiues roties (2159) 
Croquettes de brochet a la Romaine (890) 
Cafe (3701) 
The (3704) 

FROID. 

Saumon Venitienne (2587) 

Filet de boauf a la Evers (2435) 

Galantine de perdreau, Elisabeth (2493) 

Pate de lievre daiis un plat (2559) 
Cotelettes de homard a la Lowery (2476) 

Aspic de filets de caille (2419) 

Filets de poulet Renaissance (2465) 

Chaudfroid de courlis au fumet (2452) 

Estomacs de dinde a la Gustave Dore" (2617) 

Sandwichs (811) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Gel^e au sherry (3186) 

Pouding Castillane (3206) 

Bordure Caroline an champagne (3140) 

Gateau de noisettes (3241) 

Creme de riz a Tangelique (3151) 

Marrons a la creme (3147) 

GLACES. 

Corbeille jardiniere aux colombes (3593) 

Le cygne aux roseaux (3597) 
Pouding de ris a 1'Imperial (3494) 

La Grandina (3556) 

Fiori di latte a la fleur d'orange (3469) 

Sabayon a la Cannetti (3531) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Brouette de fleurs (3638) 
Chariot de pommes (3632) 
2 Corbeilles de fruits (3699) 

Glaces (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

Dessert 



DECEMBRE. 5O7 

BUFFET FOUR 150 PERSONNES. 

MENU. 

CHAUD. 

Bouillon (187) 

Huitres frites au beurre (1061) 

Timbales a la Dumas (965) 

Bouchees a la Reine (938) 

Terrapene Epicurienne (1090) 

Poules de neige roties (2072) 

Cafe (3701) 

FROID. 

Saumon a la Avelane (2579) 

Filet de boeuf a la Violetta (2438) 

Galantine de perdreau Clementine (2491) 

Petites caisses de foies gras (2229) 

Chaudfroid de cailles Baudy (2459) 

Cotelettes de becasses Sarah Bernhardt (2480) 

Terrine de lievre (2598) 
Aspic de cretes et rognons de coq a la Mazarin 

(2410) 
Sandwichs assorties (811) 

ENTREMETS DE DOUCEUR ET DESSERT. 

Gateau Roederer (3257) 

Gelee aux peches (3187) 

Timbales Massillon (3221) 

Pouding a la Boissy (3205) 

GLACES. 

Ananas en surprise (3595) 

Delicieux aux noisettes (3592) 

Manchon Dejazet a la creme Venus (3567) 

Biscuits glaces (3438) 

Glaces assorties (3538) 

Punch granit au cafe (3505) 

PIECES MONTEES. 

Bateau "Bon Voyage" (3631) 

Panier de Cerises (3630) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Devises (3653) 

Dessert 



162 



THE EPICUREAN. 



SEPTEMBER. 508 

SIDEBOARD FOR 150 PERSONS. 

BILL OF FARE. 

HOT. 

Consomme (189) 

Oysters a la poulette (1067) 

Sweetbread cutlets a la Talleyrand (2272) 

Roast woodcock (2206) 

Pullet croquettes a la Wright Sanford (882) 

Tenderloin of beef, royale (1458) 

COLD. 

Salmon with Montpellier butter (2588) 

English ham with jelly (2524) 

Galantine of partridge, sliced (2492) 

Decorated wild boar's head (2618) 

Dressed game pie a la Lesage (2556) 

Chaudfroid of young Guinea fowl (2453) 

Terrine of plover and larks (2601) 

Small "pain" of chicken a la Freycinet (2544) 

Mousseline of woodcock (2540) 

Sandwiches (811) 
Small "pains" of Rillettes de Tours (809) 

SWEET DISHES AND DESSERT. 

Mousseline biscuit (3230) 

Greengage jelly 3187) 

Chestnuts with cream (3147) 

Gugelhopfen cake (3240) 

ICES. 

Hen and chicks (3594) 

Rabbit in surprise (3596) 

Excelsior Biscuit (3436) 

Printaniere fruit Bomb (3441) 

Waddington pudding (3500) 

Chartreuse mousse (3476) 

CENTER PIECES. 

Chariot filled with lady apples (3632) 

Horn of plenty (3635) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Mottoes (3653) 

Dessert 



Lady cake (3244) 



OCTOBER. 509 

SIDEBOARD FOR 350 PERSONS. 

BILL OF FARE. 

HOT. 

Cream of peas, St. Germain (260) 

Bechamel oysters with truffles (1065) 

Rissoles a la Demidoff (950) 

Roast plover (2119) 

Patties with mushrooms (937) 

Frog croquettes (884) 

COLD. 

Salmon a la Regence (2583) 
Tenderloin of beef on a socle Bouquetiere 

(2434) 
Voliere galantine of pheasants, Casimir Perier 

(2423) 
Galantine of chicken a la d'Orleans (2486) 

Woodcock a la Valere (2619) 

Terrine of duck's liver a FAquitaine (2596) 

Aspic of minion fillets of partridge (2416) 

Fillets of sole a la Mazagran (2593) 

Assorted sandwiches (815) 

SWEET DISHES AND DESSERT. 

Plum cake (3253) 

Peach jelly (3187) 

Cream cornets with orange (3148) 

Camper crowns (3156) 

ICES. 

Bacchus (3590) 

The Well (3599) 

Banana pudding (3487) 

Bomb with maraschino (3443) 

Mousse with macaroons (3477) 

Apples in surprise (3574) 
Waffles with vanilla (3285) 

CENTER PIECES. 

Basket filled with candied fruits (3628) 
Perrette's basket (3629) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Mottoes (3653) 

Dessert 



Fruit cake (3238) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



163 



NOVEMBER. 51O 

SIDEBOARD FOR 200 PERSONS. 

BILL OF FARE. 

HOT. 

Cream of rice, Cremieux (249) 

Oysters Viennaise (1068) 
Palmettes of turkey a la Bearnaise (933) 

Turbigo patties (941) 

Terrapin a la Trenton (1090) 

Eoast partridges with gravy and water cress 

(2102) 
Coffee (3701) 

COLD. 

Decorated slices of salmon (2577) 
Saddle of venison a la Harder (2573) 

Aspic of oysters (2415) 
Chaudfroid of woodcock with f umet (2452) 

Red beef tongue with jelly (2609) 

Ballotines of quail a la Tivolier (2426) 

Terrine of wild rabbit (2604) 

Snipe pie (2567) 

Sandwiches (811) 

SWEET DISHES AND DESSERT. 

Breton cake (3232) 

Noyau jelly (3186) 
Apple Flamri (3166) 
Large brioche (3234) 

ICES. 

Hen with chicks (3594) 

Rabbit in surprise (3596) 

Plum pudding (3496) 

Grandina (3556) 

Parisian (3573) 

Gramolates with oranges (3610) 

CENTER PIECES. 

Basket of cherries (3630) 

Wheelbarrow filled with flowers (3638) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Mottoes (3653) 

Dessert. 



DECEMBER. 511 

SIDEBOARD FOR 400 PERSONS. 

BILL OF FARE. 

HOT. 

Chicken consomme (190) 

Oyster rissolettes a la Pompadour (1054) 

Lamb croquettes a la De Rivas (888) 

Roast quails (2131) 

Crab patties (935) 

Timbale a la Renaissance (981) 

Coffee (3701) 

COLD. 

Slices of salmon with jelly (2578) 

Ribs of beef in Belle vue (2432) 

Galantine of partridge (2492) 

" Pain " of partridge a la Montgomery (2548) 

Chaudfroid of snipe in pyramid (2461) 

Woodcock cutlets, Poniatowski (2479) 

Mousseline of pheasant, Princess (2538) 

Pate de foies gras in border (2483) 

Chicken legs in the shape of ducklings (2529) 

Sandwiches (811) 

SWEET DISHES AND DESSERT. 

Compiegne cake (3236) 

Prunelle jelly (3186) 

Apricot rice (3214) 

" Pain " of chestnut a la Beotie (3196) 

ICES. 

Algerian timbale (3580) 
Cauliflower with marchioness rice (3544) 

LSona (3558) 
St. Jacques Cup (3560) 

Corn (3547) 
Pears in surprise (3574) 

CENTER PIECES. 

Chariot filled with lady apples (3632) 
Horn of plenty (3635) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Mottoes (3653) 

Dessert 



Pound cake (3254) 



164 



THE EPICUREAN. 



JANUARY. 512 

SIDEBOARD FOR 300 PERSONS. 

BILL OF FARE. 
HOT. 

Clear bouillon (187) 
Fried oysters a la Horly (1060) 

Oyster patties (939) 

Scallops a la Mariniere (1076) 

Turkey croquettes (894) 

Roast canvasback (2055) 

Stuffed lobster tails (1043) 

COLD. 

Salmon a la Courbet (2585) 

Tenderloin of beef alaNoailles (2437) 

" Pain" of game Diana (2546) 

Bastion, American style (2429) 

Chaudfroid of chicken a la Clara Morris (2451) 

Cold salmis of quails a la Balzac (2575) 

Terrine of partridge de Nerac (2600) 

Galantine of pheasant (2495) 

Rolls filled with rillettes (809) 

Buttered slices of rye bread (820) 

SWEET DISHES AND DESSERT. 

Macedoine champagne jelly (3179) 
11 Pain " of apricots (3194) 

Pineapple cake (3252) 
Ministerial pudding (3209) 

ICES. 

The helmet (3598) 

Delicious with hazelnuts (3592) 

Montelimar with hazelnuts (3566) 

Ribambelle (3576) 

Madeleine (3561) 

Bice with maraschino (3578) 

CENTER PIECES. 

Basket filled with candied fruit (3628) 
Basket filled with tortillons (3628) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Mottoes (3653) 

Dessert 



"Wedding cake (3238) 



FEBRUARY. 513 

SIDEBOARD FOR 200 PERSONS. 

BILL OF FARE. 

HOT. 

Chicken consomme (190) 

Broiled oysters, maitre-d'hotel (1059) 

Scallops a la Havraise (1075) 

Palmettes a la P<5rier (922) 

Roast redhead ducks (2063) 

Coffee (3701) 

COLD. 

Salmon a la d'Estaing (2580) 

Tenderloin of beef a la Violetta (2438) 

Pain " of game a la Bartholdi (2545) 

Aspic of tongue a la Picquart (2420) 

Chaudfroid of fillets of pheasant (2456) 

Cutlets of kernel of lamb in Bellevue (2472) 

Galantine of pullet a la Mozart (2497) 

Boar's head (2570) 
Chicken mayonnaise (2625) 

Sandwiches (811) 

Small fancy rolls filled with rillettes de Tours 
(809) 

SWEET DISHES AND DESSERT. 

Syruped baba (3227) 

Sponge cake (3260) 

Californian pineapple jelly (3178) 

Blanc mange a la Smolenska (3138) 

ICES. 

Cantaloup in surprise (3591) 
Nest with eggs (3594) 
Stuffed tomatoes (3582) 

Sicilian (3579) 

Ristori rice (3577) 

Marvelous (3563) 

Granite with currants (3611) 

CENTER PIECES. 

Cornucopia garnished with fruit (3635) 
Wheelbarrow filled with flowers (3638) 

Fruits (3699) 

Bonbons (3642) 

Mottoes (3653) 
Dessert 



Angel cake (3226) 



BILLS OF FARE. 



165 



RESTAURANT BILL OF FAKE. 



JUNE. 

Coffee (3701) Chocolate (3700) 

English breakfast tea (3704) 



Arabian racahout (3703) 



SIDE DISHES. 

Clams (803) Gherkins (785) Sandwiches (811) Radishes (808) Olives (800) Caviare (778) 

Anchovies (772) Sardines (817) Lyons sausage (818) Stuffed olives (801) Marinated tunny fish (831) 

Mackerel in oil (797) Mortadella (818) Arlps sansa^ (fuz\ 



EGGS. 

Boiled (2856) Fried a la Eugene Andre (2866) 

On a dish (2909) Fried turned over a la sole (2869) 

OMELETS: Argentine (2878) With clams (2885) 

Cocottes (2873) Soft eggs with puree of sorrel (2951) 

FISH. 

Red bass water fish (1098) Pike perch a la Durance (1213) 



Aries sausage (818) 

Scrambled a la Columbus (2934) 
Hard boiled, Russian style (2865) 

With bacon (2879) 
Poached eggs with gravy (2931) 

Whitebait (1310) 



Black bass a la Narragansett (1095) Mussels a la poulette (1047) 

Kingfish a la bateliere (1179) Porgy with Chablis wine (1231) Bluefish a la Barnave (1117) 

HOT. 

Pig's feet a la St. Men<hould (1783) Veal cutlets (1501) Mutton cutlets (1590) Beefsteak (1368) 

Pork chops (1778) Spring lamb cutlets (1669) Roast squabs (2018) 

Beef palate a la Bechamel (1326) Chateaubriand (1380) 

Escalops of veal a la Habirshaw (2282) 

Mutton breast broiled (1585) Stuffed breast of lamb, Veloute tomato sauce (1665) 

Frogs' legs a la poulette with mushrooms (1019) Chicken sauted, half glaze (1906) 

Squabs a la Carolina (2021) Delmonico sirloin steak, Spanish style (1377) 

Porterhouse steak (1362) 



COLD. 



Corned beef, pressed (2430) 
Red beef tongue with jelly (2609) 
Boned turkey (2499) 

Lamb pie (2561) 
Aspic de foies gras (2411) 



English ham with jelly (2524) 
Ribs of beef Bellevue (2432) 
Calf tongue a la Macedoine (2610) 

Beef a la mode (2433) 
Roast chicken with jelly and beef tongue (2469) 



SALADS. 

Tomato (2666) Water-cress (2676) 

Chicken mayonnaise (2625) 



Celery (2660) 

Russian (2645) 



Mac<5doine (2650) 



VEGETABLES. 

POTATOES: Fried (2787) Mashed in snow (2798) Broiled sweet potatoes (2832) Saratoga (2803) 
Beets with butter and fine herbs (2702) Boiled asparagus with Hollandaise sauce (2692) 

Succotash (2731) 

BREAKFAST CAKES. 

Brioches (3269) Wheaten grits (3280) Hominy (3280) Oat meal (3280) Muffins (3414) 
Corn bread (3422) Indian cake (3274) Flannel cake (3273) Waffles (3284) 

DESSERT. 

Darioles with orange-flower water (3300) 
FRESH FRUITS: (3699) Apples Oranges Bananas Pears 



Watermelon 



CHEESE: (2697) American 



Brie Stilton 

Glass of cream or milk. 



Peaches 

Roquefort 



Chester 



166 THK EPICUREAN. 

RESTAURANT BILL OF FARE. 



JULY. 

Clams (803) 

SOUPS. 

Consomme" in cup (189) Pea puree with croutons (282) Julienne faubonne (318) 

Fish broth with clams (370) Clam chowder (300) Chicken okra (299) 

Mock turtle thickened (355) Cream of corn a la Hermann (255) 

FISH. 

Fresh mackerel maitre-d'hotel (1193) Fried soft shell crabs (1006) 

Striped bass a la Bercy (1101) Baked codfish Duxelle (1136) 

Kingfish a la Bateliere (1179) Fillets of spotted fish English style (1233) 

Porgies a la Manhattan (1229) Eels a la Marechale (1149) 

READY. 

Leg of mutton a la Bordelaise (1622) Sirloin of beef a la Dauphiness (1350) 

Sausages with cream potatoes (1804) Loin of veal with gravy (1537) 

Bacon with spinach (1771) Chicken fricassee a la Bouchard (1862) 

Poached eggs with puree of chicken supreme (2932) 

TO ORDER. 

Veal cutlet maitre-d'hotel (1501) Small steak plain (1368) 

Mutton cutlets with puree of chestnut (1599; Chicken croquettes exquisite (877) 

Lamb cutlets (1669) Minions of fillet of veal with mushrooms (1510) 

Squabs a la Briand (2006) Chicken cocotte (1832) 

Noisettes fillet of beef a la Berthier (1411) Frog's legs a la d'Antin (1017) 

Mutton breast with tomato Andalouse sauce (1586) Squabs sauted a I'lmpromptu (2010) 

COLD. 

Pickles (785) Radishes (808) Olives (800) Caviare (778) Celery (779) 

English ham with jelly (2524) Anchovies (772) Sardines in oil (772) Lyons sausage (818) 

Mortadella (818) Sandwiches (811) Mackerel in oil (797) 

Stuffed olives with anchovy butter (801) Marinated tunny (831) Spring lamb (2561) 

Red beef tongue (2609) Lobster with mayonnaise (2638) Boned turkey (2499) 

Goose liver pie (2562) 

SALADS. 

Russian (2645) Tomato (2666) Chicken mayonnaise (2625) Potato (2654) Macedoine (2650) 

Water-cress (2676) 

VEGETABLES. 

POTATOES: Fried (2787) Saratoga (2803) Hashed, with cream (2780) Lyonnese (2794) 

String beans a 1'Albani (2825) Boiled asparagus with Hollandaise sauce (2692) 

Lima beans maitre-d'hotel (2699) Green peas, French style (2743) 

Green corn on the cob (2730) Stuffed truffles (2845) 

Tomatoes broiled with mayonnaise sauce (2838) 

DESSERT. 

ICE CREAM: Toronchino, Procope (3583) Pistachio (3454) Asparagus (3540) 

Nesselrode pudding with chestnuts (3495) Vanilla (3458) Chocolate (3449) 

Tutti frutti (3586) Tortoni cups (3584) Neapolitan (3569) 

Banana cream (3451) White coffee (3460) 

WATER ICE: Raspberry (3607) Orange (3605) Lemon (3604) 

PUNCH: Roman (3515) Kirsch (3510) Lalla Rookh (3516) Maraschino (3510) 

Bucket made of Chantilly waffles (3128) Charlotte russe (3145) 

FRUITS: (3699) Watermelon Muskmelon Peaches Bananas Apples Grapes 

CHEESE: (3697) American Roquefort Edam Camembert Pont 1'Eveque 

French coffee (3701) Turkish coffee (3702) 



BILLS OF FARE. 167 

RESTAURANT BILL OF FARE. 



MAY. 
Clams (803) 

SOUPS. 

Consomme Careme (222) Rice a la Rudini (343) Sherman (344) 

Bisque of crawfish a la Bateliere (202) Cream of sorrel with stuffed eggs (262) 

Julienne Mogul (318) Pea puree with croutons (282) Croute au pot (305) 

Chicken okra (299) Chicken okra strained (299) Small individual soup pots (346) 

SIDE DISHES COLD. 

Radishes (808) Olives (800) Caviare (778) Sardines in oil (772) Lyons sausages (8} 8) 

Marinated tunny (831) Gherkins (785) Mortadella (818) 

Stuffed olives with anchovy butter (801) Mackerel in oil (797) 

SIDE DISH HOT. 

Cromesquis of sweetbread, Babanine (872) 

FISH. 

Mussels with shallot (1051) Eels broiled tartar sauce (1150) Planked shad ravigote butter (1255) 
Spotted fish Livournaise (1282) Weakfish a la Brighton (1308) Fried soft shell crabs (1006) 
Blackfish a la Sandford (1115) Lobster a la Camille (1028) Sheepshead, Buena Vista (1259) 

REMOVES. 

Roast sirloin of beef with brain patties (1355) 
Rump of beef Boucicault (1337) Pullet in surprise (1987) 

ENTREES. 

Mutton pie Canadian style (2375) Sauted chicken florentine style (1890) 

Mushrooms crust with truffles (2759) Minions of tenderloin of beef a la Stanley (1406) 

Hot plover pie (2317) Breasts of turkey Donovan (2037) Squabs a la Crispi (2008) 

Frog shells (2347) Sweetbread a la St. Cloud (1566) 

SORBETS: Lalla Rookh (3516) Kirsch (3510) Maraschino (3510) Rum (3510) 

ROAST. 

Leg of mutton a la Roederer (1627) Leg of yearling lamb with gravy (1715) 

Beef ribs, American style (1331) Squabs (2018) 

Duckling (1921) Partridge broiled, English style (2085) Chicken in the saucepan (1881) 

COLD. 

Galantine of chicken (2485a) Trout, tartar sauce (2612) Terrine of duck livers a PAquitaine (2596) 
SALADS: Lettuce (2672) Water-cress (2676) Mace"doine (2650) Chicory (2668) 

VEGETABLES. 

Purslain a la Brabancon (2815) Lima beans thickened maitre-d'hotel (2699) 

Potatoes Parisienne (2786) Potatoes, Anna (2770) Potatoes half glaze (2784) 

Green peas, English style (2742) String beans with butter (2829) 

Boiled asparagus with Hollandaise sauce (2692) 

Succotash (2731) Cepes baked with cream (2724) Stuffed cauliflower a la bechamel, baked (2715) 
Risot a la Francatelli (2979) Tomatoes a la Boquillon (2833) Cardoons with half glaze (2710) 

Fried eggplant (2739) Spaghetti macaroni a la Lawrence (2966) 

Asparagus tops a la Mai ri tenon (2695) Corn on the cob (2730) Spinach with cream (2820) 

Macaroni a la Brignoli (2958) Whole artichoke boiled with white sauce (2691) 

Macedoine a la Montigny (2755) Sweet potatoes roasted (2832) 

SWEET ENTREMETS. 
HOT: Pancakes with brown sugar (3077) Glazed apple marmalade (3126) 

COLD: Blanc mange with strawberries (3139) Bain marie cream molded (3149) 

Charlotte Russe (3145) Cream Malakoff (3150) 

DESSERT. 

FANCY CREAMS: Biscuit, Excelsior (3436) Basket filled with oranges (3570) 

Nesselrode pudding with candied chestnuts (3495) Biscuit glace* (3435) 

Neapolitan (3569) Plombiere with chestnuts (3486) 

CREAMS: Vanilla (3458) White coffee (3460) Pistachio (3454) 

WATER ICE: Lemon (3604) , Raspberry (3607) Pineapple (3606) 

Assorted cakes (3364) 
Preserved fruits (3679) greengages, peaches, pineapple, quinces (3679) 

Marmalade (3674) jelly, Dundee, peaches, ginger, Guava, Bar-le-duc (3678) 
Stewed fruits (3686) pineapple, peaches, pears, prunes, apples, with jelly, bananas, 

cherries, chestnuts, oranges, orange salad, strawberries, raspberries. 
Brandy fruits (3660) greengages, pears, oranges, strawberries with cream. 

CHEESE (3697) Stilton, Brie, Strachino, Gorgonzola, Gruyere, Chester, Gervais, Port Salut, Holland 
French coffee (3701) Turkish coffee (3702) 



168 THE EPICUREAN. 

RESTAUEANT BILL OF FARE. 

SUPPER. 

AUGUST. 
Clams (803) 

HOT. 

Welsh rarebit (946) Consomme 1 in cups (189) Golden buck (946) 

Stuffed lobster tails, deviled (1043) Ramequins (2975) 

Deviled mutton kidneys on skewers (1620) Stuffed hard shell crabs Carolina style (1003) 

Sweetbread croquettes (893) 

Chicken legs in papers (1876) Croustades a la Castillane (895) 

Bondons of woodcock a la Diane (845) Chicken breast a la Chevreuse (1827) 

Squab a la Briand (2006) Minions of tenderloin of beef a la Baillard (1400) 

COLD. 

Sandwiches (811) Caviare (778) Radishes (808) Mortadella (818) Anchovies (772) 

Marinated sardines (831) Celery (779) Tunny (831) Lyons sausage (818) 

Boned turkey (2499) Caviare canapes (777) Goose liver pie (2562) 

SALADS. 

Lettuce (2672) Cucumber (2661) Water-cress (2676) Celery (2660) 

Macedoine (2650) Cos lettuce (2675) Lobster American style (2638) 

Chicken mayonnaise (2625) 
Russian (2645) Tomato (2666) 

DESSERT. 

Ice Cream 

SHERBET: Kirsch (3510) Lalla Rookh (3516) Prunelle (3510) Maraschino (3510) 

WATER ICE: Raspberry (3607) Pine apple (3606) Lemon (3604) Orange (3605) 

FANCY: Pudding Cavour (3489) Banana in surprise (3541) Plombiere a la Rochambeau (3482) 
Vanilla (3458) Chocolate (3449) Coffee (3460) Pistachio (3454) 

Biscuit glace (3435) Neapolitan (3569) 

Charlotte russe (3145) Madeira jelly (3186) Apricot flawn (3170) 

FRESH FRUITS (3699): Bananas, pineapples, apples, oranges, Niagara grapes, huckleberries, 

currants, muskmelon, watermelon 

CHEESE (3697): Stilton, Gruyere, Cream, Strachino 
French coffee (3701) Turkish coffee (3702) 



All the Epicurean recipes are included in the menus. The heading of each recipe being in 
English and in French permits any person not thoroughly versed in both these languages to com- 
pose his bill of fare in either the one or the other. He has simply to make his selection of the 
necessary recipe and by referring to the number of the article, write his bill of fare in English or 
in French as he so chooses. In wording a dinner bill of fare be very careful to denote the fish or 
shell fish, the butcher's meat, the poultry and game in season, alternating white or brown for 
each course, also the white or brown sauces. I have as far as practicable replaced the term fillet 
by breasts for poultry or game and aiguillettes for fish, so that the word fillet need not 
be too frequently repeated in the same bill of fare. Oysters can be omitted from the bills of fare, 
also cold side dishes, salads and coffee, besides the details of the dessert following the entremets 
need only be mentioned by the single word of dessert. 



METHODS. 



(1). BURNT ALMONDS AND FILBERTS (Amandes et Avelines Pralines), 

Split some shelled almonds or filberts in two; if almonds are used mince well and roast lightly 
in the oven, on a baking sheet without letting them color, then mix in with them half their weight 
of sugar and enough egg-white, so they be entirely covered by the sugar. When the burnt 
almonds are spread on cakes, they must be covered over with sugar and glazed in a brisk oven. 

(2). CONDE ALMOND OR FILBERT PREPARATION (Appareil a OondS aux Amandes ou Aux 

Avelines). 

Put into a vessel three ounces of powdered sugar, one ounce of vanilla sugar, four ounces of 
icing sugar. Dilute this compound gradually with egg-whites, in such a manner that a smooth 
running paste is obtained, and beat it well for several minutes, so that it becomes a consistent 
body. To this add six ounces of dry almonds or filberts, shelled, ground or chopped up very fine. 

(3). TO CHOP AND SHRED ALMONDS (Pour Hacher et Effiler les Amandes). 

Chopped. When the almonds are partly dry, chop them up and sift them through a sieve 
(Fig. 94), chop again all that remains on the sieve and continue until there be no more to 
pass through. 

Shredded Almonds. Are freshly peeled almonds dried well in a cloth, then cut into thin 
fillets on their length, or else put them into a special machine that shreds them also, but they 
never look so well, as the machine cuts them into all sorts of shapes, while with the knife, they 
are cut into uniform lengths. 

(4). ALMOND MILK (Lait d' Amandes). 

Pound half a pound of almonds with a few spoonfuls of cold water and two spoonfuls of 
orange-flower water; prepare a very fine paste with this and dilute with a pint of water; strain the 
liquid forcibly through a napkin. 

(5). TO PEEL ALMONDS/ PISTACHIOS OR FILBERTS (Pour Monder les Amandes, Pistaches on 

Avelines). 

In order to remove the peels from almonds, filberts or pistachio nuts, they must first be 
plunged into boiling water and left on the fire until the skin detaches easily under the pressure of 
the finger, then drain and refresh in cold water; now drain and peel them by removing the skins 
wash in cold water, drain, wipe and dry in the heater or in a well aired place. 

For Filberts or Nuts. To be peeled dry, crack the shells with a nut-cracking machine, being 
careful not to break the kernel, then peel them dry by putting the nuts on a baking sheet and 
pushing it into a medium oven, removing them immediately the outer skin detaches when the nut 
is rubbed between the thumb and first finger; keep them either whole or in halves and use for 
ice cream and desserts. Those peeled in water are for chopping, or splitting in two for nougats, 
also for cooked sugar pastes. 

(6). TO POUND, CRUSH, AND COLOR ALMONDS (Pour Piler Broyer et Oolorer les Amandes). 

To Pound. Almonds are pounded in a mortar or crushed in a machine; in the mortar by 
wetting a few at the time with either eggs or liquids, then stirring in some sugar. In a machine, 
by mixing the almonds and sugar together and pouring it into the funnel of the machine; the first 
time they should be barely crushed, pass through four times, tightening the cylinders slightly for 
each turn, and the last time the almonds should be reduced to a paste. 

To Color Almonds. Use chopped or shredded almonds for coloring. For pink, dilute a little 
carmine in some thirty degree syrup with a little kirsch; rub the almonds in this and dry them. 
For violet, use red, blue and maraschino; for orange, yellow, red and curaao; for lemon color, 
yellow and noyau; and for green, spinach and orange flower water. 

(169) 



170 



THE EPICUREAN. 



(7). TO BLANCH EIOE (Pour BlancMr le Biz). 

Before blanching rice it should be picked, washed, then put into a saucepan and moistened 
with cold water; bring the liquid to boiling point, stirring it frequently with a spoon so it does not 
adhere to the bottom of the saucepan, and let it boil for seven or eight minutes, pour the rice into 
a sieve to drain, refresh in cold water and strain. 

(8). TO BLANCH VEGETABLES (Pour Blanchir les LSgumes). 

Vegetables are blanched in more or less time according to their nature, and not only to correct 
their bitterness, but to soften them as well; the blanching is the prologue of the cooking and is 
accomplished in boiling, salted water, either in a saucepan, a tinned copper pan, a copper untinned 
pan, or an untinned saucepan. In the copper and untinned pans, only the green vegetables 
should be cooked, such as spinach, green peas, string beans, fresh asparagus, in fact all vegetables 
that must retain a pretty, pale green color. Artichokes should be cooked in a very clean well- 
tinned saucepan. To blanch parsley, chervil, tarragon, onions, shallots, etc., plunge them in 
boiling water several times. 

(9). TO BONE POULTRY OE GAME (Pour D6sosser la Volaille et le Gibier). 
Poultry or game are generally boned in order to stuff them properly; they must first be singed 
lightly, the legs cut off as well as the pinions and neck, keeping the skin of the latter as long as 
possible ; split the skin right along the back so as to free the carcass on both sides, using a small 
knife for this purpose, afterward separate the stump from each wing, so as to reach the fillets. 
When the fore-part of the belly is detached, separate also the thighs by dislocating them at the first 
joint adhering to the carcass, then bone the fleshy part of the thighs and the drum-sticks. Cut 
the carcass down as far as the rump, so as to detach it entirely, and if these instructions are 
strictly followed, the piece of poultry or game will be found to be entirely boned, and the only 
parts now to be removed are the stumps of the wings and the large nerve found in the flesh of the 
thighs, and detach from the carcass the two minion fillets from which you remove the nerves. 

(10). DISH BORDERS OP NOODLE PASTE, COOKED PASTE, METAL, ENGLISH PASTE OR 
GUM PASTE, DISH BOTTOMS, FOUNDATIONS, SUPPORTS, TRIANGLE FOR DRESS- 
ING TONGUES, HATELETS FOR HOT REMOVES AND ENTREES, FANCY FRILLS, 
AND FAVOR FRILLS (Bordures de Plat en Nouilles Pate Cuite, et en Metal, Pate 
Anglaise et Pastillage, Fonds de Plats et Supports, Crouton Triangle pour Dresser les 
Langues, Hatelets pour Releve"s et Entrees Chauds, Boufi'ettes et Manchettes). 

Several kinds of borders are used in the kitchen for the purpose of decorating dishes; those 
most employed are cut out with a pastry cutter from a band of noodle paste (No. 142.) To make 

noodle paste borders requires ingenuity, although it is not difficult. First it needs a 

good noodle paste of a fine color and very smooth; divide it in several parts and roll 

these into sausage shapes, then flatten down with a rolling pin drawing them out to a 

sufficient length so the band 

can reach all around the basin 

of the dish ; then cut these 

bands into the desired width 

keeping them exceedingly 

straight ; roll them over on 

themselves without pressing, 

then unroll slowly on to a paper 

band to design them with a 

cutter (Fig. 1), rolling up the cut out end as soon as finished to prevent the paste from 
drying; they may also be molded in molds shown in Fig. 2. 

To fasten the border onto the dish, push a string of repere (No. 142) through a cornet around 
the basin of the dish exactly where the border is to stand upright; place the dish on top of a cool 
part of the range and unroll the cut-out band speedily onto the repere to fasten it on in an upright 
position, attach the two ends together, then bend the band outward with the fingers to give it 
sufficient splay, turning it around all the time until it is dry enough to stand by itself, then cover 
over to prevent the border from drying. 

Another style of border (Fig. 3) greatly admired is made of cooked white paste (No. 131) also 
carved out with the pastry cutter, but under more simple conditions and is more resisting. These 
are very appropriate for entrees having an abundance of garnishing or a plentiful supply of gravy, 
thereby requiring a more resisting substance than noodle paste. This kind can be seen in the 





FIG. 2. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



171 



different entrees illustrated in this work, but more specially in the figure representing a chicken 
a la Montesquieu (Fig. 372). But a style even more used and certainly far more practical is a 
border made of metal (Figs. 4-5-6) ; they are fit to be served at a family dinner as well as at 
the most luxurious banquet in which the dishes are invariably handed round to the guests, for 




instance those viands dressed in the kitchen. These borders are movable and should be made 
the same size as the basin of the dish for which it is intended. These borders are of sterling 
silver, but they can be imitated in plated ware ; let it be well understood that these borders- 
can only be placed on metal, silver or plated dishes. 



For Borders of English Paste or Gum Paste. Roll out the paste to the 
desired thickness and with a fancy cutter (Fig. 6A) cut out some pieces and dry 
them on an even surface covered with paper ; when finished place them in closed 
boxes in a dry place and when ready to use push a string of royal icing on 
the edge of the basin of the dish or platform and dress the border very evenly 
around. 




FIG. 6 A. 



Dish Bottoms, Foundations and Supports. These foundations or dish bottoms serve for 
dressing pieces, removes or entrees, so to raise them and 
give them a more elegant appearance. They are to be 
made either of bread, rice, hominy, wood or tin. Round 





FIQ. 7. 



FIG. 6. 



ones for entrees and ovals for removes or large roasts. The height for entrees is about one and a 
half inches, while for removes they are to be two inches ; those of wood or tin are to be covered 
with noodle paste, those of rice or hominy are sculptured or carved with a knife. 



172 



THE EPICUREAN. 



Molded supports are to be prepared for boned turkeys, capon, pullet, etc. ; these are of an 
oblong shape, rounded at the ends (See Fig. 9 A.); the longest ones intended for turkey's are nine 
and a quarter inches long by four and three quarters wide and two and a quarter high; for capons 






FIG. 10. 



FIG. 9. 

they are to be nine inches long, four and a half wide and two inches high; for tenderloins of 
beef, ten inches long by four wide and two and a half high; for hams, they are oval shaped, twelve 
by nine and three high. 

Triangle for Dressing Tongues, etc. For the largest ones have the three sides of the 

triangle each twelve inches long ; the thickness at the 
base is three inches and two inches at the top ; they can 
be made either of rice or hominy in molds having the 
required dimensions (Fig. 10), or else lower ones with 
the following proportions : length at the base, twelve 
inches by eight high; cut off an inch and a half from 
the top of the smallest and three inches from the 
largest ; this will form a platform for placing the 
subjects on. They can also be made of bread spread 
over with green butter and then 
heavily strewn with very finely 
chopped green parsley. Let it 

be well understood that the socles called dish bottoms are not intended to 
be eaten. The socle has nothing whatever to do with the dish itself ; it 
represents an accessory made for the purpose of raising the meats, etc., 
dressed over it, showing off advantageously the surrounding garnishing. 

Hdtelets (Skewers) for Hot Removes and Entrees, Hatelets are em- 
ployed either as an ornament or else a garnishing; they are applied to 
removes and entree dishes. Hatelets should only be used on ceremonious 
occasions, for a too prodigal use of them is apt to decrease their value. 
They are ornamented with unpeeled truffles, mushrooms, or cock's combs, 
either plain or double hatelets are also composed of Villeroi quenelles, 
sweetbread croquettes, or glazed crawfish ; they are also made of vegetables, 
carrots, turnips and artichoke bottoms slightly blanched. Hatelets in 
tended for garnishing cold pieces are to be found in the chapter on cold 
dishes (No. 2526). 

Fancy Frills for Large Pieces, such as Leg of Mutton, Ham, etc. Cut a band 
of paper twelve inches long by three and a half wide; fold it in two on its length 
and again in two, this making a seven-eighths of an inch wide band, cut it finely 
on the folded edge, or else pass it through a cutting machine; unfold the band, 
turn it over so that the cutting detaches better, then twist this band in a spiral 
around a tin tube ; fasten the end with a little mucilage, take it off 
the tube and place inside either a straight or turned up sconce. To 
make these sconces, fold a thin sheet of paper six inches square in two, 
then in four, then again fold in a triangle, beginning at the pointed 
ends, fold it once more. Cut the paper pointed shaped beginning from 
the center and rounding toward the bottom; unfold, and with the blade 
FIG. 12. of a small knife, press down each fold so as to have them all come on 
one side and thus form a kind of pointed funnel. Unite the points one on to the other, closing 
and pressing them together; they should now be the same shape as when cut; place one in th 





FIG. 13, 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



173 



corner of a fine towel, fold it over, press down heavily with the palm of the left hand, then pull 
the napkin quickly away with the right hand; by this operation, and the pressure, the paper is 
both folded and goffered at once; the sconce is now 
made and it only requires to have the bottom cut off 
to fit it into the frill. (See Fig. 13 and 14.) 

Fancy Frills for Cutlets, Chicken Leys or Wings. 
Cut some sheets of paper five inches long by three 
inches wide, fold in two across the length; fold once 
more in two; cut them by clipping in slits one thirty- 
second of an inch apart, or else use the machine. 
Fold this band, twining it in such a manner that the 
slits are rounded, then fasten with a little mucilage; 
roll the frill spiralwise on a column-tube or a piece of 
round wood three-eighths of an inch in diameter. 
Attach the end of the paper with a little mucilage 
and when the frill is properly fastened, cut the ends 
off straight so that they are all of one length (Fig. 12). 

Favor Frills. Have a small piece of rounded 
wood an eighth of an inch in diameter and an inch 
and three-quarters long, tapered on one end; roll on this spiralwise, some prepared paper a 
third smaller than for the other frills; fasten the two ends together on the stick and trim the 
paper adhering to the stick with a small ribbon fastened on in the shape of a little rosette. These 
favors are for chicken-breasts, lobster cutlets, etc. 




FIG. 15. 



(11). TO PEEPAEE BOUCHEES (Pour Preparer les Bouche'es). 

. Roll out on a floured table some six turned puff paste (No. 146), keeping it one quarter of an inch 
in thickness; let this paste rest, and then cut from it a dozen round pieces, using a channeled pastry 
cutter, from two, to two and a quarter inches in diameter (Fig. 16). Turn these over on to a wet 
baking sheet, leaving them a short distance apart, and egg over the surfaces with 
a brush. Trace on them quickly a ring using a smooth, well heated pastry 






FIG. 16. 



FIG. 17. 



FIG. 18. 



cutter (Fig. 17), so that the incision is clear, and with a small knife trace three lines in the 
inside of this ring (Fig. 18) ; put the baking sheet into an oven, not excessively hot, and cook the 
bouchees for eighteen to twenty minutes; detach them from the baking-sheet, slipping a knife 
underneath each one, open at once to empty them, save the covers, and keep warm until needed. 

(12). TO BEAIZE OE POELEE, SMOTHEE OE SAUTEE (Pour Braiser, Poeler, Etuver on Sauter). 

Braizing meat is to cook a piece of meat in a saucepan, lining the bottom with bardes or slices 
of fat pork, slices of veal, carrots and onions cut in slices, a bunch of parsley garnished with 
bay leaves, a little thyme, chives and one onion with cloves in it. Arrange the meat, fowl or 
game on top of these and moisten with some broth, then re-cover the meat with more bardes of 
fat pork ; these meats must be cooked slowly in a slack oven, or by placing hot coals on the cover. 

Poeler. Cut up one pound of breast of pork and half a pound of raw ham, into half inch 
squares; six ounces of carrot, four ounces of onion in half inch squares, two bay leaves, the same 
quantity of thyme, a bit of mace, two cloves and some basil, the whole of these aromatics tied 
inside a bunch of parsley. Melt the pork with the vegetables and bouquet, not letting it color, 
then place on top a fat pullet prepared and trussed as for an entree, covering the breasts with slices 
of peeled lemon, and bardes of fat pork tied on with a string; pour over some fat broth from the 
stock-pot and also some white broth to moisten to half the height, being careful to renew the 
moistening at times so that the same quantity always remains. 

Smothering meat is to cook it slowly in a good stock without evaporation taking place, so that 
it cooks entirely and retains its natural flavor. Smothered meats must always be thoroughly cooked. 



174 THE EPICUREAN. 

Banter. Either in a sauteuse or in a pan; let the article cook rapidly on a quick fire 
tossing backward, forward, and frequently. We saute* potatoes, etc. Chickens or tenderloin are 
sauted either in fat or oil on a moderate, but well regulated fire, turning the meats over when 
they are a fine color. 

(13), TO BREAD WITH BREAD CRUMBS, ENGLISH, PLOUR, MILANESE CRACKERS AND 

DEVILED (Pour Paner a la Pamire, k 1'Anglaise, k la Farine, & la Milanaise, & la Poudre de Cracker 

et a la Diable\ 

Bread Crumbs. We generally bread crumb all substances that are to be broiled or fried; if 
for broiling, they must first be coated with oil or melted butter, then laid in bread crumbs, or 
white breading, or else in bread raspings, or brown crumbs as explained below. 

For substances to be fried, such as croquettes, roll them first in white bread crumbs, then dip 
them in beaten eggs strained through a Chinese strainer, or else put four eggs in a bowl with salt, 
pepper, a tablespoonful of oil, the same quantity of water, and strain all through a strainer. 

Drain quickly and roll them again in white bread crumbs, and smooth the surfaces either by 
rolling them on a table or else use the blade of a knife. 

To Bread Crumb, English Style. Use only the yolk of the eggs instead of whole ones, mix- 
ing for each ten yolks, ten ounces of melted butter. 

White Bread Crumb. Is used for breading meats, fish and all substances to be fried; this 
breading is prepared with slightly stale bread, cutting off the crusts, and grating or rubbing the 
crumbs in a cloth, then passing it through a sieve (Fig. 95.), it must be kept in a cool, dry place, 
spreading it out and stirring at times. 

Brown Bread Crumbs. Is prepared with white bread dried in a heater and slightly browned 
in a very slack oven and afterward pounded and sifted through a sieve (Fig. 95). 

To Bread with Flour. Dip the articles such as fish, etc., in seasoned milk, then roll them 
in flour. For egg-plant, roll them merely in flour, omitting the milk. 

To Bread Crumb a la Milanaise. Mix bread crumbs and grated parmesan cheese, half 
and half; dip the substances to be breaded, in melted butter, then lay them in the cheese and 
bread-crumb mixture, equalizing well the crumbs with the blade of a knife. 

To Bread with Powdered Crackers. Dip the substance in beaten egg and its equal quantity 
of milk and then roll them in powdered crackers. 

To Bread a la Diable (deviled). Season first the substances, then coat them over with mus- 
tard and dip them in beaten eggs and roll them lastly in bread-crumbs. 

(14). BREASTS OF PORK SALTED AND SMOKED, ENGLISH BACON (Lard de Poitrine Sal6 et 

Fume". Petit sa!6 k I'Anglaise). 

If needed for summer use, begin toward the end of March to dry-salt some breasts of pork for 
four days, then pack them tight in a salting tub and cover over with a thin layer of salt. Pour 
over them a freshly made, and highly salted brine, place on top a perforated cover, and lay over 
some heavy stones, so that the breasts are entirely submerged, and leave them in this state until 
needed, setting the tub in a cool well-aired place. 

This salt pork will keep well until the fall, although it will be much saltier than if prepared in 
the usual way. The usual way is to wash the breasts and put them in brine in a special salting 
tub without any other meat; use a fork to remove them from the brine, as the hands cause fermen- 
tation, and when the salt pork is needed for use, it can be unsalted in cold water for several hours 
or till sufficiently done. Bacon or smoked salt pork is prepared the same, putting it in a brine 
half as strong and keeping it in a 50 degree Fahrenheit temperature, but no more. Drain and dry 
in an aired place, then smoke for three days in the cold. 

(15). BRINE (Sanmure). 

Brine is used for the preservation of meats and at the same time to give them the taste of any 
preferred aroma; for this reason we select among the many ways that are employed in different 
countries, one that we are sure will answer for our present needs. 

Boil in a large kettle twenty-five quarts of water, twenty-four pounds of salt, two pounds of 
saltpetre, three pounds of brown sugar and two ounces of carbonate of soda. Into a bag put a 
mixture weighing ten ounces, including thyme, bayleaf, sage, rosemary, juniper berries, savory, 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 175 

having more of each as desired, or less, if a certain taste displeases. After the salt is dissolved, 
leave the liquid to cool and then weigh it with a salt weight; with this it should be twelve degrees. 

To salt the meats, be careful to accomplish this when dry, by rubbing the meat with salt and 
a little saltpetre, and then let rest for twenty-four hours before putting it in brine. Strain the 
brine and cover all the salted parts and leave it in a cool place during the operation. The time 
needed for salting is according to the size of the pieces. 

A ham weighing seventeen pounds requires twenty-five days; a breast weighing twelve pounds 
requires fifteen days ; a shoulder weighing fifteen pounds requires twenty days. 

These indications are for meats to be eaten unsmoked. In case they should be smoked leave 
them ten days longer. Soak for twelve hours in cold water and then hang them in a smoking 
room or else in a big chimney, having them smoke slowly with oak shavings mixed with thyme, 
bayleaf, sage, etc. 

To Salt Hams. Put into a large kettle one pound of salt, four ounces of saltpetre, six ounces 
of brown sugar, thyme, bayleaf. basil, two ounces of juniper berries, a quarter of an ounce of 
botanic calament, all tied up in a bag, and when the salt has dissolved by boiling, remove from 
the fire, let cool to settle the brine and then pour off the clear part. Burn some aromatic herbs 
in a barrel, put in the hams, pour the brine, already strained through a sieve, over, close the 
barrel and leave it for eighteen days; drain out the hams, hang them up for twelve days in a 
well-aired cool place, then hang them in the chimney for twenty days. Wrap them in sheets of 
paper and hang in a dry place. 

For Winter Hams. These hams can only be kept during the winter. Have two hundred 
pounds of small corn-fed hams; rub over well with salt, then put them into a barrel and leave them 
for three clays in a very cool place. Three days later put them into another barrel, cover over with 
salt brine, having sufficient salt to allow a potato to float on the surface; the hams must be en- 
tirely immersed in the brine, cover with a board and a weight atop. Twelve days after change 
them into another barrel and pour the brine again over, this is so that they change positions and 
salt easier. 

After another lapse of twelve days, drain and put them to soak in cold water for twelve 
hours; drain once more, leave to dry in the open air for eight days, then smoke them in a smoke 
house for two days with hickory wood. 

(16). OLAKIFIED AND PUBIFIED BUTTER (Beurre Olarifie" et Epure"). 

Clarified. To clarify butter it should first be melted so as to extract all the buttermilk, 
letting it cook slowly; skim and when well despumated from all its impurities and it begins to 
smoke then it is ready; strain it through a fine piece of linen and keep to use when needed. 

Purified. Melt some butter in a deep saucepan, boil it for two or three minutes, remove, let 
stand to settle, then skim and pass it through a fine sieve pouring off the top only so to leave the 
sediment on the bottom. 

(17). BUTTER FOR BUTTERING MOLDS (Beurre Pour Beurrer les Moules). 
Melt one pound of veal kidney suet by chopping it up finely, then putting it into a saucepan 
with half a pint of water on a slow fire, stir occasionally to prevent its fastening on to the bottom 
of the saucepan and when the fat is limpid, add the same weight of fresh, saltless butter; stir 
until the butter and fat are perfectly clear. 

Cold Butter for Buttering Molds. It suffices only to knead some unsalted butter on the table 
to extract all its moisture and give it body, then put it into a cloth, sponge it off, put it in a pan 
in a warm temperature and work it until it becomes soft as cream. 

(18). TO PREPARE LIQUID CARAMEL (Caramel Liquide). 

Liquid caramel is most necessary ; it is used for coloring broths, gravies and even 
sauces, when their tints are found to be too light, still caramel should be used with discre- 
tion, for it is apt to give a bitter taste to the colored liquids into which it is added. Put a few 
spoonfuls of powdered sugar into a copper pan, stir it over a slow fire, then remove it on to a 
slower one to let cook until it becomes quite brown, and the smoke arising from it is whitish, this 
is a sign that it is thoroughly done. Take the pan from off the fire, moisten the sugar proportion- 



176 



THE EPICUREAN. 



ately with hot water, and allow the liquid to boil while stirring, and cook till the consistence of a 
light syrup is obtained. Caramel should be kept in a small, we'1-closed bottle, having a cork per- 
forated lengthwise, so that when the bottle is turned over, the liquid can drop out slowly without 
it being necessary to uncork it. 

(19). TO OARVE Off THE TABLE (Pour Dfoouper & Table), 

Carving should be done with ease and dexterity. It is a simple operation, yet to be 
a perfect carver one must have a few ideas of the natural construction of the various pieces to be 
cut up. The meat to be carved must be laid on a dish without any. sauce or garnishing, so as to 
be able to turn it around to the most convenient position. The tools indispensable for carving 
consist of a solid two or three-pronged fork, a good, keen, sharp-bladed knife and a pair of carving 




FIQ. 21. 



Fia. 22. 



scissors. It is essential to begin on the most practical side, and also to be able to distinguish all 
of the best parts so as to carve without deteriorating from their appearance or without injuring 
their gastronomical qualities. 

It is an easy study, but one that ought not to be neglected, for what embarrasses and confuses 
a carver is when he is unable to find the different joints, or else when he begins cutting a piece of 
meat against the grain. It is to facilitate this operation that we deem it necessary to give a few 
hints and suggestions, and as almost each piece is accompanied by a design, it will be easy to learn 
how to carve those meats usually served whole on the table. 



(20). PISH; HOW TO CARVE (Pour De"couper le Poisson). 

A general rule almost always observed for cutting up fish at table, is to use only silver imple- 
ments; this to be specially followed for boiled and braised fish. Fried fish is the only kind where 
knives are allowable. To carve boiled fish, use either a silver fish slice, spoon or fork. The lines 




FIG. 23. 

traced on the back of the fish (Fig. 23) denote in what direction it must be cut, observing, as the figure 
indicates, that it should be on the opposite side to the belly, for on this part the fleshiest meat 
is found. To cut up a bass, salmon, etc., or any fish of a long shape, first trace a line following 
the course of the bone, beginning at the head and finishing at the tail, then divide this back 
piece into slices and lay each one on a separate plate. All meats taken from the back and 
sides of a fish are fleshier and preferable to those found on the belly. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



177 



Fish slice. A name given to a certain utensil with which fish is cut at the table to serve 
it on plates. These slices are made of silver or silver-plate; the blade is broad and sharpened 




FIG. 24. 



on one side, fastened to a handle. Smaller slicers are also placed on the table to facilitate 
serving flat cakes, flawns and tarts that are difficult to lift with a spoon or a knife. 

(21). PAETEIDGES ; HOW TO OAEVE (Pour Decouper les Perdreaux). 

There are various ways of carving partridges; when young, simply divide them in two length- 
wise; when large, either detach the hind part from the breast or divide each one in three on their 
length, that is, cut a part of the breast with the leg on, so to leave the upper breast adhere to 
a part of the carcass; then detach with a pair of carving scissors; this is demonstrated in the 






FIG. 25. FIG. 26. FIG. 27. FIG. 28. 

drawing. If the hind part is detached with the breast, then this should be divided into three 
parts and returned to their original position; in this manner it is difficult to perceive that the 
partridge has been cut, for it is given its natural form. Large partridges need simply cutting 
in four. 



(22). PHEASANT AND GEOITSE OE PEAIEIE CHICKEN ; HOW TO OAEVE (Pour Dfcouper un 

Faisan une Grouse ou un Tetras). 

A pheasant can be carved the same way as a large chicken (Fig. 35), which means to cut it 
in five pieces, but should it be extra large two fillets can be taken from each side of the breast, 
leaving an upper or central part of the breast. The legs are generally dry and tough, yet should 
they have to be served, cut each one in two. 

Grouse or prairie chicken can be carved exactly the same. 



(23). EOAST BEEF; HOW TO OAEVE EIBS (Pour Decouper une Piece de Cotes de Boeuf Eoti), 




FIG. 29. 

American roast beef is taken from the ribs; sometimes seven ribs are served, but the piece 
containing only six is far more advantageous, while the four rib piece, cut from the short loin is 



178 



THE EPICUREAN. 



better still. Roast beef must be carved on the table, or else on the dining-room sideboard, for 
when cut beforehand it becomes dry and loses the best part of its juices. Roast beef is to be cut in 
thin slices, leaving a small piece of fat adhering to each one; at once place them on hot plates and 
be careful to baste with a little of the gravy flowing from the meat on to the dish. 

(24). TENDERLOIN OF BEEF; HOW TO CARVE (Pour De"couper un Filet de Bceuf). 
Whether the tenderloin be roasted or braized, when cutting off slices for the guests, do not let 
them be too thick or too thin; remove half an inch of the sole from the tenderloin (Fig. 30) and 




FIG. 30. 

cut the meat into even thin slices, crosswise if the tenderloin be large; if thin, have the slices cut 
on the bias, but do not penetrate through the sole piece; pare the bottom free of fat. Serve these 
slices on very hot plates with a little of its gravy, independent of the accompanying sauce or gar- 
nishing, which must be served separately. 

(25). HOT HAM; HOW TO CARVE (Pour Decouper un Jambon Chaud). 

Ham served hot is better when carved at the table, for it retains its essential juices. The 
most delicate part of a ham is the kernel, it being the fleshiest: this is to be cut in not 
too thick slices, leaving the fat adhering to the meat, then placed on hot plates; serve a good 




FIG. 31. 

sauce separately in a sauceboat. When the ham is accompanied by a garnishing, it must also be 
served separately and offered to the guests. In order to have a ham prepared for handing round, 
it should first be cut up, then reconstructed the same as should a leg of mutton. 

(26). LEG OF MUTTON; HOW TO CARVE (Pour Decouper un Gigot de Mouton). 
If the leg be roasted, carve it at the table or in the dining-room. It must be served on a dish 
without gravy, sauce or garnishing. Seize the end bone of the leg, having the kernel uppermost, 
for this is to be cut first, it being the fleshiest and the best part of the leg. The slices must be 




FIG. 33. 



broad and thin, to be served on very hot plates, each one accompanied by a little of the good gravy 
flowing from the meat. Should the leg have a garnishing this must be served apart. 

Lamb is carved the same way. The bone end of the leg to be trimmed with a specially made 
handle, or else a fancy favor frill. When the leg is to be presented at the table, it should be pre- 
viously carved and reconstructed to its original shape. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



179 




Fia. 33. 



(27). SADDLE OF MUTTON, SADDLE OF LAMB, AND SADDLE OF VENISON, EOASTED; HOW 

TO OAEVE (Pour D6couper une Selle de Mouton, d'Agneau, et de Ohevreuil Eoti). 
The dish containing these roasts must be placed on the table before the person who is to carve; 
the loin end to be turned to the left, for from this end is the saddle begun. There are two 
ways of carving the roasted saddle; the first way is to cut the slices on the length of the 
meat, slightly bias; see braized saddle, Fig. 33. They to be neither too long nor too thin. 
For the second way, the slices are cut the entire length of the meat, but in every case serve on 
very hot plates, adding a little of the good gravy from the meat and serving another gravy sepa- 
rately in a sauceboat. 

(28). BRAIZED SADDLE OF MUTTON; HOW TO OAEVE (Pour Decouper une Selle de Mouton 

Braisee). 

To have a braized saddle of mutton carved on the table, it should be placed on a hot dish with- 
out any gravy or garnishing; first make two incisions, 
one on each side, just between the fat of the flank or the 
kernel, then cut the large fillets across in rather thick 
slices; avoid having too much fat on any of them. A 
saddle of mutton can be carved in the kitchen without 
deteriorating from its good qualities; in this case, remove 
the fillets entirely, pare free of all fat and cut them 
across in half inch thick slices; return them to their original position, and when serving, hand 
around at the same time, both garnishing and a sauceboatful of gravy or sauce. 

(29). LOIN AND KEENEL OF VEAL; HOW TO OAEVE (Pour Decouper une Longe ou une Noix 

de Veau). 

Before carving a loin of veal, first detach the tenderloin and kidney; cut the loin into cross- 
wise slices, not too thin, and place each one on a hot plate, adding a slice of the kidney or minion 
fillet, also a little good gravy or any sauce accompanying this remove, only serving it separately. 

On Fig. 327 will be found a larded kernel of veal, served as an entree on a round dish. In 
order to cut the kernel, it requires to be held firmly by the fork on the udder side, enabling the 
larded meat to be cut in not too thick slices. Serve on hot plates with a little gravy, independent 
of the sauce or garnishing that accompanies it. 

(30). GOOSE OE DUCK; HOW TO CAEVE (Pour De"couper une Oie ou un Canard). 
Geese and ducks are carved the same as other poultry; when young, 
their legs can be served, but if large and older it were better to leave them 
undetached on the carcass. To carve a goose with ease, the breast must 
be turned toward the carver, as shown in Fig. 34. The meats of each side 
of the breast are to be cut in not too thin fillets and immediately placed 
on hot plates, then basted over with a little good gravy. When the geese 
are stuffed, add to each plateful a small piece of the dressing. If serving 
the legs of a young goose or duck it is obligatory, first to detach them from 
the carcass and divide in medium-sized pieces with the carving scissors. 
Large tame ducks are carved the same as geese, and young ducklings can 
be separated in four parts. The breast alone of wild ducks is used, 
lifting one fillet from off each side or both fillets may be divided length- 
wise in two ; serve these on a little good gravy taken from the carcasses, 
after breaking them up and pressing out all the juice ; heat this gravy 
slightly with lemon juice, salt, mignonette and finely chopped blanched 




FIG. 34. 
shallot. 



(31). PIGEONS ; HOW TO OAEVE (Pour Decouper des Pigeons). 

Young pigeons are served whole or simply cut lengthwise in two ; when very large, separate 
the hind part from the breast part and make two pieces of each of these. 

(32). PULLET OE OAPON ; HOW TO OAEVE (Pour Decouper une Poularde ou un Ohapon). 

A large piece of poultry that requires to be carved at table, calls for the greatest care in order 
to have all the pieces neat, even and of a proper size, neither too large nor too small. A pair of 
carving scissors will be found indispensable. To proceed with ease have the pieces laid on a dish 



180 



THE EPICUREAN. 



in front of the carver; should the pinions be left on the wings, cut them off with the scissors, then 
cut from the breast one small slice, taking the minion fillet along; from the remainder of the breast 
cut another pretty slice through the entire length. If the breast of the chicken be very large cut 
from it another slice without encroaching on the top part of the breast; after one side is finished 
cut the other without changing its position and as soon as the fillets are all removed, detach the 
thighs from the carcass by disjointing them, but first cut away the skin from the carcass just 
where the thigh begins; in this way it can be lifted off with a fork assisting with the blade of a 
knife. As soon as one thigh is detached, separate the leg at the knee bone with the scissors and 
divide the thigh in two, either across or on the length. 






FIG. 35. 



FIG. 36. 



FIG. 37 

The carcass can also be divided transversely in two or three pieces. The whole operation must 
be dexterous and speedy as all eyes are apt to be watching the carver, therefore he must not hesi- 
tate, but proceed bravely to the end. When a medium-sized fowl is to be carved, it can first be 
divided into four parts, detaching the legs from the carcass, then the breasts without making any 
upper breast. With these four parts eight pieces can be secured, two from each leg and two from 
each breast, cutting these on their length according to the lines marked in the figures. 

(33). EOAST TUEKEY ; HOW TO OAKVE (Pour DScouper une Dinde Eotie). 
To be able to carve a turkey at table it requires a certain amount of self-possession, for they are 
frequently very fat, and, therefore, more difficult to manipulate than a pullet. Unless it cannot be 
avoided, the legs of a roast turkey should not be detached, serving only the breast part: this is done 
in two distinct ways: the first consists of cutting the breast pieces in crosswise slices slightly on 
the bias as shown in the figure; the second by cutting the fillets lengthwise from the breasts with- 




FIG. 38. 

out having any upper breast part; in either case it is proper before beginning to detach the wings 
from both sides with a part of the breast adhering. When the thighs are wanted, detach them one 
after the other; clip off the drum sticks at the knee joint and then divide the second joint meats 
in pieces, leaving the drum stick whole. The gravy that is to be served with a roast turkey 
should always be in a separate sauceboat, 

(34). CHOPPED PAESLEY, TEUFPLES, ONIONS, SHALLOTS, MTJSHKOOMS, TONGUE AND 

OOEAL (Pour Hacher le Persil, les Truffes, les Oignons, les Echalotes, les Champignons, la Langue 

et le Corail). 

For Chopped Parsley see No. 123. 

For Truffles. Slice them and wipe off all the adhering moisture, then chop them up fine, 
spread them on a tin sheet covered with a sheet of paper, dry in the air and keep them in a cool 
place till needed. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 181 

For Onions. Cut them in two, suppress the end stalk, and slice them perpendicularly, then 
cut them horizontally into squares more or less large; they may afterward be chopped up so as to 
loosen them, and have them finer; wash them in cold water, drain on a cloth to extract all the 
liquid; proceed the same for shallots, without cutting them in two and put them on a plate in a 
cool place. 

For Mushrooms. If they are already cooked, drain them well, slice, then chop them up; if 
raw, peel off the skin, wash them nicely, cut in squares, then chop; use them immediately. 

For Red Beef Tongue. Use only the thin end of the tongue, slice, chop and lay it on a tin 
sheet covered with a sheet of paper, expose them to a draught to dry, chop once more until very 
fine, then pass them through a sieve, and keep in a cool place till needed. 

For Lobster Coral. Take out the red part found inside of a boiled lobster, wash it nicely, 
changing the water frequently, dry it in the air, then chop it up very fine to pass through a sieve 
(Fig. 96); spread it on a tin sheet over a sheet of paper, dry it in the air. and keep it for use in a 
cool place. 

(35), TO COAT JELLY MOLDS AND MOLD JELLIES (Pour Ohemiser les Monies a Gelfo et Mouler 

les Gele"es), 

If the mold need be only lightly coated, it is sufficient just to cool it on ice, then pour into it 
the cold liquid jelly and move it around so that it reaches all the sides; put the mold back on to 
the ice, and begin the operation again a quarter of an hour later, but should the coating of jelly 
be required thick, then glue over the top of the mold a 
heavy paper, and when the gum is dry, cut a ring in the 
surface of the paper with the tip of a small knife, 
leaving all around a margin a quarter of an inch, then 
pour some jelly into the mold, and turn it round on the 
ice inclining it in such a way that the coat acquires the 
necessary thickness on all its sides. 

To Mold Jellies. Put some ice into a small vessel, 

add its equal quantity of water, and set it in a cylin- Fm 

drical fancy mold; fill this up with some cold liquid 

jelly, lay on top and half an inch higher than the mold a tin sheet or plate, cover this with broken 
ice without any salt and after the jelly is thoroughly cold and firm, unmold it. In order to 
accomplish this, dip the mold quickly into hot water at one hundred and fifteen to one hundred 
and twenty degrees Fahrenheit; wipe it briskly and overturn it on to a cold dish as soon as the 
jelly detaches, and then remove the mold. 

(36). TO PEEPAEE 0000 ANUT (Preparation de la Uoix de Coco). 

Break a cocoanut across in two, exactly in the center; slip the blade of a thin round-tipped 
knife between the nut and the shell, push it in with the right hand and turn the cocoa with the 
left; detach and take out the entire half nut; remove the outer skin covering the nut with a vege- 
table knife (Fig. 156), and when it is all peeled, throw the nut into cold water; drain and scrape it 
on a coarse grater. Use a part of it for roasting by putting the grated nut on a sheet of paper 
into a moderate oven and keep the remainder into a stone jar in the ice-box mixing it with an equal 
weight of sugar. 

(37). VEGETABLE OOLOES (Oouleurs Veg<tales), 

Spinach green is frequently used for coloring purees, soups, butters, sauces and sugar. It is 
the healthiest coloring matter, and if possible use no other. Spinach green is prepared with very 
green, fresh spinach, well washed, pounded in a mortar and when well reduced to a paste, extract 
all the juice through a coarse cloth, and place this in an untinned copper sugar pan, and heat it 
till it decomposes, then pour it over a fine sieve so the pulp or coloring matter remains on top; the 
strained liquid is colorless and useless. For yellow, use a decoction of saffron or dandelion 
flowers; for red, employed for coloring bisques, orchanet dissolved in butter is used. The roucou 
annotto also gives a yellowish red and is much used. Vegetable colors, and clarified carmine, 
Breton Landrin, are those mostly employed. Breton Landrin green is beautiful for coloring 
sugar cooked to crack, as it is not detrimental to its transparency. 




182 THE EPICUREAN. 

Colorings : Carmine and Cochineal Red. Take two ounces of No. 42 carmine, broken in 
pieces; wet with a little cold water; crush in a small mortar and dilute with a little twenty-five 
degree syrup. Besides this, boil two quarts of syrup also to twenty-five degrees, mix in the 
carmine, boil up once, strain through a napkin and leave to cool, then add a few coffeespoonf uls of 
liquid ammonia and pour into bottles. 

For Red Cochineal. Finely pound five ounces of fine cochineal; place it in a copper pan and 
moisten with a quart of water, adding three ounces of cream of tartar, three ounces of alum and 
six ounces of sugar; set the pan on the fire and let the liquid reduce to half; now put in two gills 
of spirit of wine; boil up once, strain through a napkin and pour into bottles. 

(38). COURT-BOUILLON, PLAIN. (Court-Bouillon Simple). 

Plain court-bouillon is used for cooking large fishes, such as salmon, halibut, bass and lobsters. 

This court-bouillon is prepared with vinegar, roots and sliced onions, a large bunch of parsley, 
salt and water. If the fish has to be plunged into boiling water, cook the court-bouillon for seven 
or eight minutes previous to putting it in, and if on the contrary, then pour the liquid over the 
fish, and bring it to a boil. 

(39). COUET BOUILLON WITH WINE (Court Bouillon au Vin). 

The court bouillon is a most necessary auxiliary in all kitchens, where it plays an important 
part; it is prepared fresh every day, and special care is taken to have it good, for in it the principal 
fishes are cooked, and with it the sauce Normande is made, so useful for hurried work. 

First prepare a broth with the heads of large, fresh fish, some roots, onions, a bunch of parsley 
and a little salt; let it boil very slowly for half an hour, then strain and skim off the fat, and 
leave it to settle until clear. From the bones and heads of bass, sheepshead, blackfish, etc., the 
best fish stock is obtained. 

Cook a mirepoix composed of sliced roots, shallots and onions, add to it the fragments of fish 
as explained above and cook these together for a few moments on a good fire; moisten with two or 
three gills of white wine and let it fall to a glaze over a brisk fire; moisten it again at once with 
two gills of fish broth and also let this fall to a glaze, then remoisten to their height with good fish 
broth and a little white wine, add a bunch of aromatic herbs, a bunch of parsley, and some fresh 
mushroom peelings, boil the liquid while skimming and set it on one side of the range to despumate 
for a quarter of an hour, skimming it carefully. Strain the stock through a sieve, let it settle, and 
pour off the top into a glazed vessel, and if it be not succulent enough, then reduce it again; keep 
it in a cool place. 

This stock may be easily kept from one day to another, if care be taken to keep the 
vessel and its contents incrusted on ice. This court bouillon may also be moistened with red wine; 
in either case, it must be prepared with the greatest care possible. 

(40). ALMOND CEEAM (Creme d'Amandes). 

Pound one pound of almonds with one pound of loaf sugar, slowly adding four small eggs and 
some orange flower water. When the almonds have become a fine paste, take them from the 
mortar and transfer to a vessel, incorporating in six eggs, one at the time and one pound of fresh 
butter softened and divided in small pats. 

(41). ENGLISH CKEAM WITH OOIFEE (Oreme Anglaise au Caf6). 

Boil a quart of milk, add to it four ounces of freshly roasted coffee beans, cover the 
saucepan and leave to infuse for half an hour. Beat eight egg-yolks with half a pound of 
sugar, dilute with the boiling coffee milk strained through a fine colander; stand the saucepan on a 
slow fire, stir the cream until it becomes quite thick, without allowing it to boil, then take it off, 
strain through a sieve and pour it into a vessel, stir frequently till cold. 

42). ENGLISH CREAM WITH VANILLA, LEMON OR ORANGE ZEST (Creme Anglaise k la 

Vanille ou aux Zestes de Citron ou d'Orange). 

Beat in a saucepan half a pound of sugar with ten raw egg-yolks; mingle both 
well together and dilute with a quart of boiling milk, having had half a vanilla stick 
broken in pieces infused therein. Cook the cream on a moderate fire, stirring with a spoon 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 183 

or whisk and thicken without boiling; strain this through a fine sieve into a vessel and let cool, 
stirring it occasionally until this occurs. This cream can be flavored with lemon or orange peel 
instead of vanilla. 

(43). FRANGIPANE OEEAM WITH CHOCOLATE, OR WITH MAEEOW (Creme Frangipane auCho- 

colat ou a la Moelle). 

Chocolate. Add to some vanilla frangipane cream as described below, four ounces of chocolate 
melted in a slack oven and diluted a little at the time with cream. 

Marrow. Soak in fresh water four ounces of marrow cut in quarter inch pieces, then melt in 
a bain-marie. Into a saucepan put three ounces of sugar, six ounces of flour, four whole eggs and 
six yolks; stir well with a spoon and dilute with a quart of boiling milk. Pass this through a 
sieve into another saucepan, add an ounce of butter and cook, being careful that the cream con- 
tains no lumps; when well thickened remove from the fire; mix in a few spoonfuls of chopped 
almonds and the melted marrow. 

(44). FRANGIPANE CREAM WITH VANILLA OR ALMONDS (Oreme Frangipaue a la Vanille ou 

aux Amandes). 

Place in a vessel six ounces of flour, six egg-yolks, two whole eggs, three ounces of sugar and a 
little salt; dilute with six gills of milk. Whip well the preparation, pass it through a fine strainer 
into a saucepan and add to it three ounces of butter and half a vanilla bean; stir, -placing the 
saucepan on the fire until the cream becomes consistent, then remove and beat it firmly off the 
range; put it back on the fire to cook for a few moments, suppress the vanilla if for almond 
frangipane, and mix in four ounces of pounded almonds and four ounces of nut butter. 

(45). MOCHA CREAM (Creme Moka). 

Put into a tinned basin sixteen egg-yolks and one pound of sugar; beat and dilute with a pint 
of very strong coffee and a pint of boiling milk. Set the basin on the fire, stir with a small whip, 
pressing it against the bottom, bring the liquid to a boil, without allowing it actually to boil, then 
remove from off the fire, let stand till cold. Put sixteen ounces of butter in a vessel, heat it 
lightly and work it well to a cream, then pour it into the preparation and stir the whole vigorously 
with a whip. 

(46). PASTRY CREAM WITH VANILLA (Creme Patissiere a la Vanille). 
Place ten egg-yolks in a tinned basin, adding half a pound of sugar and an ounce of fecula or 
corn starch; mix the ingredients well together and dilute with a quart of boiling milk, having had 
half a vanilla stick infused therein. Stand it on the fire arid stir continually until it thickens and 
is ready to boil, then pour into a vessel to use when needed. 

(47), PISTACHIO OR HAZEL-NUT CREAM (Crime aux Pistaches ou aux Noisettes). 
Place eight egg-yolks in a bowl with one pound of sugar, beat well together and dilute with a 
pint of boiling milk; thicken this cream on the fire without allowing it to boil and as soon as it is 
cooked, take it off and add half a pound of pistachios pounded with orange flower water, vegetal 
green and kirsch, or else half a pound of roasted hazel-nuts pounded with a little water and mara- 
schino. Incorporate some cream into, either of these when nearly cold; also a pound of very good, 
fresh, unsalted butter; allow to cool. 

(48). QUILLET CREAM (Oreme a la Quillet). 

Pour one pint of thirty-two degrees hot syrup into a small tin basin, adding sixteen egg-yolks, 
one vanilla bean and two gills of orgeat syrup; set the basin on the fire and stir continuously until 
the preparation almost comes to a boil, then take it off and when it has lost its greatest heat, 
incorporate in with a whip one pound of unsalted butter of the very finest quality procurable, 
dividing it into small pats. 

(49). ST. HONORE CREAM (Oreme St. Honors'). 

Into a saucepan put ten egg-yolks and half a pound of sugar, one ounce of common flour and 
one ounce of rice flour; dilute with a pint of boiling milk into which half a vanilla stick has been 
infused. Put the saucepan on the fire and stir incessantly till the ingredients become consistent 
and are about to boil, then suppress the vanilla. Have twelve egg-whites already beaten to a stiff 
froth, incorporate them into the cream, beating it briskly with a spoon. 



184: 



THE EPICUREAN. 



(50). WHIPPED OKEAM OK CHANTILLY OEEAM (Creme Fouettee on Creme a la Chantilly), 

To obtain the very best result the cream must be the finest procurable and exceedingly thick. 
Pour it into a tinned basin, beat it with a tinned wire whip and if the cream be good it will rise in 
a few moments to a thick froth; should it be needed for meringue, after whipping it thoroughly 
add half a pound of powdered sugar for each quart of the unwhipped cream. For mousselines, 
after the cream is firmly whipped and not sweetened lay it on a hair sieve and leave it drain for 
one hour before using. After the cream is whipped it can be flavored by adding a tablespoonful 
of essence of coffee or one ounce of grated and sifted chocolate for every quart of cream. To 
flavor with vanilla add to the sugar one tablespoonful of vanilla sugar. 

(51), TO PEEPAEE OEOUTONS FOE SOUPS, EOASTS, VEGETABLES, EGGS, ETO. (Pour Preparer 

les Croutons Pour les Soupes, Eotis, Legumes, (Eufs, etc.). 

Cut the croutons from the crumb of a stale loaf of bread; for entrees cut them half heart- 
shaped, three inches long by two and a half wide, and a quarter of an inch thick (see Fig. 40.); 
fry them in butter, and as soon as one side is browned, turn them over, 
and repeat until they have attained a fine color on both sides. 

For Vegetables, Scrambled Eggs, Spinach, Chiccory, etc. Cut them 
triangle shaped, one and a quarter inches on the sides, by one quarter of 
an inch thick; fry them in butter, browning them nicely on both sides. 

For Soups. Serve croutons three-sixteenths to four- 
sixteenths square or round shaped, three quarters of an inch 
in diameter, by one-eighth in thickness ; either of these 
must be fried a fine color in butter, but do not allow them 
to get too dry. In order to obtain fine croutons, they must 
be fried in clarified butter, lard or oil, and in a sautoir, 
but not in the frying fat. 

For Roast Game, Pheasants, Partridges, Grouse and 
Quail, have oblong shaped croutons ; trim the edges and then cut off a 
quarter of an inch of the four corners; pass the knife all around the croutons 
a quarter of an inch from the edge, fry and cut away the centers, scoop 
out the crumb from this space, and lay them under the game ; reed-birds 
or larks must be laid on oblong croutons sufficiently long to hold two or 
more birds, but do not scoop these out. 

For Snipe, Woodcock or Plovers, have wider, oblong crusts (Fig. 41); dig out the crumb in 
the center to hold the bird and scoop out smaller hollows on each side, which should be garnished 
with a forcemeat, made of chopped up chicken livers and shallots, fried in scraped lard; mix some 
fine herbs with the livers. Epicures sometimes have the chopped intestines added to the force- 
meat. 

(52). TO PEEPAEE HOLLOW CEUSTS (Pour Preparer les Croutes Creuses). 

Hollowed out crusts are used for serving small garnishings composed of purges, game fillets, 
and also boned small birds, such as larks and reed-birds; they are also employed to serve with 
poached eggs, after filling the hollow space with some garnishing. Hollow crusts are made of 
bread crumb, timbale paste or puff paste. 



FIG. 42. 





FIG. 41. 



FIG. 40. 






FIG. 43. 



FIG. 44. 



FIG. 44a. 



Bread Crumb Crusts are cut oval and half heart shaped (Figs. 42 and 43); they are two inches 
long and three quarters of an inch thick; make incisions on one side near the edge, using for this 
a small knife; brown both sides in a sautoir with clarified butter, then drain them to open and 
scoop out the crumb. 

Crusts made of Timbale Paste are formed from an oval layer of paste, three -sixteenths of an 
inch thick; they are shaped in unbuttered tin rings, hal f an inch high, either oval or round, plain 
or channelled (Figs. 44 and 44a); the paste is cut flush with the top of the ring, the ring is now 
removed and the outside edge of the paste is pinched prettily, the top also to form the crest; let 




ELEMENTARY METHODS. 185 

dry for a few minutes; they are now to be placed in larger buttered rings, or surrounded with 
bands of buttered paper to support the paste while cooking; line the inside with buttered paper 
and till with raw rice; cook in a moderate oven; when done remove from the 
rings, empty out the rice, brush the crusts with an egg-wash and put in the 
oven to color nicely. 

To Make Puff Paste Crusts Plain or with Fluted Cutter. Cut the paste 
round or oval shaped in any desired size, arrange them on a moist baking FIG. 45. 

sheet, a short distance apart, and prick them; moisten the edges with a brush 
and apply around this a band of the same paste three-sixteenths of an inch in thickness by five- 
sixteenths of an inch in width; fasten the ends of the band together, egg the surface and bake 
these crusts in a moderate oven the same as small bouchees. 

(53). EGGING AND MOISTENING (Dorer et Mouiller). 

Egging With Whole Eggs. Beat the eggs with half as much water and run them through 
a sieve. 

Egg-yolks Alone. Stir the yolks with the same volume of water and strain. 
With Milk. Mix as much milk as yolks, beat well together and strain. 

Moistening. Moisten lightly with water, baking sheets or else flats of paste on which another 
is to be laid in order to fasten the two together. 

For both egging and moistening use a feather or a very soft hair brush (Fig. 184). 

(54). TO BEAT UP THE WHITE OF EGGS (Pour Fouetter les Blancs d'CEufs). 

Although the eggs intended for beating up the white 
should be perfectly fresh, still they must not be newly 
laid, for when these are used they are liable to become a 
greenish color, while baking. Procure an egg-beater or 
a whip made for this purpose, and a small untinned basin, 
separate most carefully the yolks from the whites, and 
put these into the basin with a very little salt, then begin 
to whip, slowly at the beginning but proceed gradually to 
increase the velocity of the motion as the volume increases 
so as to allow them to absorb all the air possible, which 
gives them their consistency. Should the whites threaten 

to turn, they must be whipped again until smooth, adding to them a handful of powdered sugar 

or a few drops of citric acid. 

(55). FAT PEEPAEED FOE FETING (Graisse Prepare Pour la Friture). 
The preference is generally given to beef kidney suet; cut it in half inch pieces and place 
these in an untinned iron pan with one gill of water for every pound of fat; cook on a slow fire 
stirring carefully from time to time so that it cannot adhere to the bottom. When very clear and 
it ceases to froth it is a sign that it is done, then strain through a sieve or cloth. 

(56). FAT FOE SOOLES AND FLOWEES (Graisse Pour Socles et pour Fleurs). 
Fat for Rodes. Remove the skin and all the membranes from twenty pounds of mutton 
kidney suet, cut it up in half inch squares, and put this grease into twenty-five quarts of cold 
water with one pound of carbonate of soda, wash well the fat, change the water frequently, 
drain, then melt it on a slow fire, being careful to stir it so that it does not adhere to the bottom 
of the pan, nor brown in the slightest, add to it eight ounces of Siam benzoin and as soon as it is 
thoroughly rendered out, mix in the same quantity of lard, strain through a fine towel, and put it 
aside to cool slightly; then add a little ultra-marine blue. Stir with a whisk until cool, and 
having body enough to be worked; fasten a mandrel on a round or oval board, begin workirg at 
the bottom of the foundation with a profile, previously soaked in cold water and kept wet, and 
when the base is very firm, continue coating the mandrel with the fat, and profiling it until the 
whole socle is finished. Decorate with natural or grease flowers as below forming a wreath 
around the top of the mandrel, or if preferred festoon it, leaving a few inches of the decoration 
fall in scallops gracefully around. 




186 THE EPICUREAN. 

To Make Grease Flowers. Have half as much fat prepared for socles as virgin wax, melting 
both together; color them in various colors while the fat is still hot and place in vessels keeping 
each color separate; have for instance: white, pink, red, green, brown, etc., let cool. Twelve 
hours later unmold the fat on to a wet napkin and scrape into fine shavings with a strong 
knife, then gather all of these in a damp cloth so as to soften and have it get smooth by 
kneading it till it becomes ductile as clay; roll into small balls and place these between two wet 
cloths; rub the top of each ball with a piece of smooth ice until it is very thin so that it resembles 
the petal of a real flower for example, to make a rose arrange some pink fat around a small stick 
to imitate the center of the flower, fasten on the petals all around as quickly as they are 
prepared and when there are sufficient, pull out the stick and begin another until enough flowers 
are obtained. Fasten them on to the upper border of a socle. This same grease can be used 
for modeling. 

(57). TO SCALE AND CLEAN FISH; TO SKIN EELS (Pour Ecailler le Poisson, le Nettoyer et 

De"pouiller les Anguilles). 

For English Soles. Remove the black skin, starting at the tail with a knife, then pulling it 
off. If trout be required for boiling, they must be cooked with the scales on. German carp 
should not be scaled. 

For Salmon, Turbot, Bass or Mullets. Scrape the outside with a strong knife in order to 
remove the scales. All fish must be emptied either by the gills or by an opening made in the 
belly; cut away the fins with a pair of strong scissors. 

To Skin Eels. They must be hung up by the head on a hook, remove a little piece of the 
skin all around below the fins so as to be able to catch hold of it, then grasp it with a cloth, and 
pull it down the whole length of the body, turning it inside out. Shave the spinal bone with a 
sharp knife, and in a contrary direction from the bone, or else the entire bone may be removed by 
detaching it from the flesh, beginning at the extreme thin end of the tail, and pulling it out 
entirely, the same for the ventral. 

(58). PONDANT (Fondant). 

Put into a small untinned copper basin two pounds of loaf sugar, moisten it with sufficient 
water to melt it, about one pint, and put the basin on a good fire to bring the sugar to a boil; skim 
it carefully and so long as the impurities rise to the surface and continue boiling till the sugar is 
cooked to the degree of ball ; then pour it on to a marble table or slab and keep it in position by 
four bars of iron, an inch square, and the length needed; when it is thoroughly cold work it with a 
spatula until it becomes a white and creamy paste; set it in an earthen vessel, and keep it in a 
cool place to use when needed. This fondant can be flavored and colored according to taste. 

(59). FOECEMEATS; EEMAEKS ON (Observations sur les Farces). 

Forcemeats are indispensable for performing fine work and are liked by good livers; 
they are principally used for hors-d'oeuvre, garnishings, removes and entrees; for stuffing breasts 
or shoulders of veal, poultry, game and fish. They are also necessary to form borders, for holding 
the garnishing and for large timbales; they must always be prepared in advance with the very 
freshest meats, otherwise they are likely to be of little good and liable to spoil, this being of the 
greatest importance to observe, and be sure to keep them on ice until needed. Always be careful 
when composing a menu, not to have too many dishes containing forcemeats, for they will detract 
from the simplicity and natural plainness of a dinner. 

(60). TO PEEPABE AND MAKE FOEOEMEATS AND TO EEOTIFY THEM (Pour Preparer et Faire 

les Farces et les Rectifier). 





FIG. 47. FIG. 48. 

Chicken. Use only the lean and well pared meats of poultry or game, some panada, fresh 
butter, or cooked and cold veal udder, raw egg-yolks or else the whites, or sometimes whole eggs, 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



187 




FIG. 49. 



salt and spices, also cold sauces or else raw cream. Pass the meat once or twice through a 
machine to remove the nerves (Fig. 47); afterward pound it to a pulp so it can readily pass through 
a metal sieve fitting on to the mortar (Fig. 48); pound the meat once more, then add the panada, 
the butter or udder, continuing to pound all the time, and then add the eggs singly without ceasing 

to pound and the seasonings; pass through a 
strong hair sieve. Put this into a thin tin 
vessel, set it on ice and stir for a few moments 
with a spoon in order to have it perfectly 
smooth, keep in a cool place until needed. 

Game. To make game quenelle forcemeat, 
proceed the same as for the chicken; to have it 
delicate, use brown sauce or melted meat glaze, 
and pass the meat once more after all the 
ingredients are mixed in. For this it requires 
a strong hair sieve, or one of fine tinned 
wire; stand this sieve on a round dish, slightly 
larger than itself, so it can receive the force- 
meat as it falls through ; put only a small 
quantity on the sieve at the time; press it 
forcibly with a large wooden spoon to have 
it pass through rapidly, and when all is finished, 
place it in a tin vessel and stir it for a few 
moments with a spoon to render it smooth and 
keep it in a cool place until needed. 

To Rectify Forcemeats. Try a little piece, 
formed into a half inch ball, in boiling water or 
in the oven, and if too consistent add some 
cream or veloute, for white forcemeats, and 
espagnole or melted glaze for brown game. If 

too weak, a little pounded panada is to be added, mixing it in gradually with some egg-yolks, 

whites or whole eggs. 

(61). TO PREPABE BEEAD STUFFING, AMEBICAN AND ENGLISH STYLE (Pour Preparer la 

Farce au Pain a 1'Ame'ricaine et a 1'Anglaise). 

Bread stuffing is used to stuff poultry and game and sometimes fish. Soak in water or milk a 
quarter of a pound of bread-crumbs, squeeze out all the liquid and put the bread into a saucepan; 
beat it up with a spoon and add to it a little boiled milk or broth, so as to form a paste the same 
as for a panada, remove it from the fire and set it aside to cool, season and mix in five or six table- 
spoonfuls of chopped-iip onions, either raw or cooked in butter, some chopped parsley and three or 
four raw egg-yolks. Bread stuffing may also be prepared without cooking, only mixing white 
bread-crumbs with butter or chopped suet, raw egg-yolks, parsley and chopped onions. 

American Style. Steep half a pound of bread-crumbs in milk and when well soaked extract 
all the liquid; put it over a slow fire in a saucepan and stir up with a spoon, to have it dry; add 
two ounces of onions, cut in dice, and fried colorless in butter, and when the stuffing is cold, add 
four ounces either of butter or beef marrow chopped fine, salt, pepper, sage, thyme, parsley, 
minced green celery leaves and four raw egg-yolks. 

English. Have half a pound of bread-crumbs steeped in white broth and all the liquid ex- 
tracted; put it on the fire to dry, then add four ounces of beef suet well skinned and chopped up 
fine; season with salt, pepper, nutmeg and add three ounces of chopped onions fried and lightly 
colored, one whole egg and four raw egg-yolks. 

(62), OHIOKEN OK GAME FOBOEMEAT WITHOUT PANADA (Farce de Volaille on de Gibier 

Sans Panade). 

Ingredients. One pound of breast of chicken or game, raw and free of sinews; eight egg-yolks, 
half a pound of butter, salt, red pepper, nutmeg and two gills of well reduced veloute (No. 415). Pass 
twice through the machine (Fig. 47). One pound of raw and nerveless chicken or game fillets, or 
else chop the pieces very fine and pound them to reduce to a fine paste; rub this through a round 



188 THE EPICUREAN. 

quenelle sieve (Fig. 142). Incorporate into it eight egg-yolks one by one, also half a 
pound of butter divided into small pieces; season with salt, red pepper and nutmeg, and add two 
gills of well reduced veloute (No. 415). Work the forcemeat well in a mortar, so that it acquires a 
good consistence; test it and if necessary to rectify (see No. 60). This forcemeat is used to make 
either red, white or green quenelles. 

(63), FORCEMEAT OF CHICKEN, FISH OR GAME WITH WHIPPED CREAM AND BUTTER 
(Farce de Volaille, Poisson on Gibier avec Creme Fouette"e et Beurre). 

Pound half a pound of chicken fillets after passing them twice through the machine (Fig. 47), 
then press this pulp through a sieve and return it to the mortar to pound once more, mixing in 
with it little by little, five ounces of butter, one whole egg and four yolks, or instead of the egg 
and yolks substitute four egg-whites. Season with salt, nutmeg and red pepper, then take out 
the forcemeat and set it into a thin metal vessel; lay this on the ice, beat up the forcemeat well 
for a few minutes, incorporating slowly into it the volume of one pint of very firm, well drained 
whipped cream, one pint of cream before being whipped will produce about three pints after being 
whipped; use the same preparation for forcemeats of game and fish, increasing or decreasing the 
panada and eggs according to the consistency of the viands employed. 

(64). CHICKEN LIVER, FINE BAKING FORCEMEAT (Farce Fine de Foies de Volaille a Gratin). 

Heat four ounces of grated lard, add to it one pound of saut6d cold chicken livers; pound well 
half a pound of bread-crumb panada (No. 121), add the livers a little at the time, pounding con- 
tinually, fry in butter one tablespoonful of shallots, adding to them two tablespoonfuls of mush- 
rooms, half a tablespoonful of truffles, both chopped, and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley; when 
all these ingredients have fried lightly add to them two gills of espagnole sauce (No. 414); let get 
slightly cold, then stir in one whole egg and three yolks; season with salt, pepper and nutmeg, add 
the chicken livers, rub all forcibly through a sieve and mix this preparation with one pou.ld of 
quenelle forcemeat. 

(65). CHOPPED FORCEMEAT FOR CHICKEN GALANTINES (Farce Hachis pour Galantines de 

Volaille). 

To prepare chopped farces or sausage-meat only lean meats without any skin or nerves are to 
be used, and fresh fat pork. Chop up both meat and pork and in some special cases they require 
to be pounded after being chopped. 

Farce or chopped meats for galantines of poultry is prepared with one pound of chicken or 
other poultry meat, and one pound of fat pork. The chicken may be replaced by lean veal, or 
half pork and half veal; chop all up very fine, and season with three quarters to one ounce of 
spiced salt (No. 168); pound well for a few minutes, then add two whole eggs, and one gill of water 
or cream; chopped truffles or cooked fine herbs may also be added if desired. 

(66) CHOPPED FORCEMEAT FOR GAME GALANTINES (Farce Hachis pour Galantines de 

Gibier). 

This is prepared with half game meat, either from the shoulder or thighs of hare or young 
rabbits, or the thighs of partridges or pheasants, and half fat pork, having a pound of each. Sea- 
son with an ounce of spiced salt (No. 168). "When it is well chopped mix in with it half a pound of 
foies gras. Strain galantine farces, but when the galantine farces of game or poultry are well 
chopped this is rarely required. 

(67). CHOPPED FORCEMEAT FOR GAME PIE (Farce Hachis pour Pate" de Gibier). 

Prepare a pound of lean veal or pork forcemeat without nerves or skin, a pound of fat pork, 
and season with salt, white pepper and red pepper; mince finely one ounce of onions and two 
ounces of carrots; fry them both in butter with thyme and bayleaf, adding the parings and 
carcasses of some game; moisten with a pint of white wine, and reduce till dry, then moisten once 
more with a pint of broth and reduce again till dry; now take out the bones, thyme and bayleaf, 
and pound up all the meat as well as the vegetables; rub this through a sieve and mix it in 
with the farce. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 189 

(68). CHOPPED rOKCEMEAT FOE OKDINAEY SAUSAGES (Farce Eachis pour Saucisses 

Ordinaires). 

Prepare a pound of lean, nerveless pork-meat and a pound of fat from the pig's throat; chop 
them up very fine, and season with three-quarters of an ounce of salt, black pepper and red pepper; 
when thoroughly chopped and a compact paste is formed, then mix in half a gill of water. 

Another Way. Remove the sinews from four pounds of lean fresh pork, taken from the 
shoulder or neck; add the same weight of not too mellow fat, from under the chine; chop together, 
season with a third of an ounce of salt for each pound, black pepper and red pepper to taste. 

(69). CHOPPED FORCEMEAT FOR COUNTRY SAUSAGES WITH SAGE (Farce Hachis pour 

Saucisses de Oampagne a la Sauge). 

Have three pounds of corn-fed lean pork, free of all its sinews, and one pound of fat pork; cut 
them both into inch squares, then chop them up finely together, and season with an ounce of salt 
and a teaspoonful of ground black pepper, a quarter of an ounce of powdered sage, the sixth part 
of a teaspoonful of cayenne pepper, a bit of powdered saltpetre and a gill of water. Work well 
together so as to mix thoroughly. 

(70). COOKED CHOPPED FORCEMEAT WITH CHESTNUTS AND WITH CHESTNUTS AND 
TRUFFLES (Farce Hachis Ouite aux Marrons et aux Marrons et Truffes). 

For each pound of forcemeat, chop up one medium shallot; fry it colorless in butter, then add 
to it one pound of chopped ordinary sausage-meat (No. 68); let it cook for a few minutes, and add 
four ounces of chopped chicken liver for every pound of the sausage-meat; season with pepper, salt 
and nutmeg, and let cook for a few minutes longer, then add some chopped parsley and two pounds 
of cooked whole chestnuts. 

With Chestnuts and Truffles. Mix one-half truffles and one-half chestnuts with this forcemeat. 

(71). CHOPPED FORCEMEAT WITH TRUFFLES (Farce Hachis aux Truffes). 

Add to the chopped forcemeat for ordinary sausage-meat (No. 68), one-half pound of raw or 
preserved black truffles cut in slices, and mix in also half a gill of Madeira wine for every pound 
of sausage-meat. In winter the truffles may be added two or three days in advance, not in summer, 
as they are liable to mold. 

(72). CODFISH FORCEMEAT FOR STUFFING FISH (Farce de Morue Fraiche Pour Farcir les 

Poissous). 

Chop up finely one pound of codfish free of bone and skin. Break three eggs in a saucepan, 
season with salt and pepper and add one gill of cream and a teaspoonful of butter, cook on the 
fire stirring the same as for scrambled eggs, let this cool, have also two ounces of bread crumbs 
soaked in milk and well squeezed. Put four ounces of butter in a sautoire with two finely chopped 
shallots, fry without coloring, then add the fish, four ounces of mushrooms and an ounce of truffles 
both to be finely chopped; season with half an ounce of spiced salt (No. 168), and into it stir the 
scrambled eggs and the bread crumbs. Cover the saucepan and cook in the oven for an hour, 
after removing beat in a spoonful of chopped parsley and four raw egg-yolks. This preparation can 
also be used for rissoles and coulibiacs. 

(73). COOKED AND RAW GAME OR CHICKEN FORCEMEAT FOR LINING CASES FOR 
SWEETBREADS, CHICKEN, ETC. (Farce Ouite et Orue de Gibier ou de Volatile pour 
Garnir les Caisses de Ris de Veau, de Volatile, etc.). 

Have one pound of raw chicken or game fillets cut in dice, fry them in four ounces of butter, 
seasoning with salt, pepper and nutmeg, and let cook for a few minutes, then set away to cool. 
Begin by pounding the meat, then add gradually to it eight ounces of butter, or calf's udder in 
small bits, and remove the whole from the mortar. Pound ten ounces of flour and milk panada, 
(No. 121), add to it eight egg-yolks one by one, and then the cooked meat, and continue pounding 
for ten minutes longer; rub all through a fine sieve, and mix to this forcemeat one pound of raw 
quenelle forcemeat (No. 89); either of chicken or game. Poach one of the quenelles and rectify if 
necessary as explained (No. 60); four spoonfuls of cooked fine herbs may be added to this force- 
meat. 



190 THE EPICUREAN. 

(74). OEEAM CHICKEN POECEMEAT WITH BECHAMEL AND MUSHROOM PUEEE (Farce de 
Volatile a la Oreme a la Bechamel et Puree de Champignons). 

For this forcemeat obtain one pound of chicken or game meat without any nerves or skin, pass 
this twice through the machine (Fig. 47), or else chop it up and pound to pulp; season with salt, 
red pepper and nutmeg, and mix in with one egg-white and two gills of cream bechamel (No. 411), 
and two gills of mushroom purde. For the puree of mushrooms, chop up one pound of peeled 
fresh mushrooms, cook them in butter till they have rendered all their moisture, then season and 
pound them with a third of their quantity of good bechamel reduced and thickened. When cold 
mix the mushrooms in gradually with the forcemeat in the mortar, rub all through a fine sieve, 
and try it to see whether it be too solid, if so, add some sweet cream by working it in with a whip, 
so as to have it consistent and smooth. 

(75). CHICKEN OE GAME CEEAM FOEOEMEAT (Farce & la Crerae de Volaille on de Gibier), 

Have one pound of chicken or game meat (the breast), free of nerves or skin, pass them twice 
through the machine (Fig. 47) ; or else chop and pound to a pulp, then press through a sieve, 
return to the mortar and mix in one egg-white, half an ounce of salt, red pepper and nutmeg, the 
equal quantity of six or eight gills of cream, before whipping; mixing it in gradually with a whip 
and working it well. Should the forcemeat be too thick add cream, and if it lacks consistency, 
more egg-white. 

(76). CEEAM FOEOEMEAT OF FISH (Farce de Poisson a la Creme). 

Take one pound of boned and skinned bass or any other firm fish; pound and rub it through a 
fine sieve; return it to the mortar, season with an ounce of salt, some nutmeg and red pepper and 
mix in while still stirring with a whip, two egg-whites and from six to eight gills of cream, meas- 
ured before whipping; pass the whole through a very fine sieve. Try a small piece in order to 
rectify if not correct, and if found to be too firm add more cream, and if too soft some more egg- 
whites. 

(77). BAKED FISH FOECEMEAT (Farce a Gratin pour Poisson). 

Put six ounces of butter into a sautoire and when hot add half a pound of finely chopped 
mushrooms and two ounces of chopped truffle parings. After the mushrooms have rendered their 
moisture, add one pound of cooked firm fish broken into fragments; as the whole becomes hot, re- 
move it from the fire, cool partly, then add five egg-yolks and five whole eggs, seasoning with salt, 
pepper and nutmeg; pass it through a medium sized sieve (Fig. 98), return to the vessel and beat 
it well with a spoon, incorporating in two spoonfuls of tomato pure"e, strained through a fine sieve 
(Fig. 100) and half a pound of raw fish quenelle forcemeat. 

(78), FOIES GEAS FOECEMEAT (Farce de Foies Gras). 

Pound half a pound of frangipane panada (No. 120) with six ounces of butter and half a pound 
of raw and very white fat livers; season with salt, pepper and nutmeg and when the whole is well 
pounded, strain through a sieve, then add six raw egg-yolks and two well beaten whites while con- 
tinuing to work the forcemeat. 

(79). CHICKEN OE GAME FOEOEMEAT WITH EICE FOE BOEDEES, BOTTOMS OF DISHES 
AND SUETOUTS (Farce de Volaille ou de Gibier au Riz pour Bordures, Fonds de Plats et 
Surtouts). 

Prepare and unnerve one pound either of chicken or game; pass it twice through the machine 
(Fig, 47) to suppress all the nerves and pound it to a pulp, take it from the mortar. Put eight 
ounces of pate a choux, cream panada (No. 121) into the mortar, pound it thoroughly with the same 
weight of cooked veal udder, add the game or chicken meat, season with salt, pepper and nutmeg, 
two gills of well reduced cold veloute (No. 415), six egg-whites and a little cream, then add half a 
pound of well picked, washed and blanched rice, cooked in white broth and cooled. Mix to- 
gether and keep it in a cool place. This forcemeat is used for borders, surtouts and dish bottoms. 

(80). FOIES-GEAS AND CHICKEN FOEOEMEAT FOB BOEDEES, BOTTOMS OF DISHES AND 

SURTOUTS (Farce de Foies-Gras et de Volaille pour Bordures, Fonds de Plat et Surtouts). 

Pound well one pound of raw fat livers; season with salt, pepper and nutmeg, then add eight 

egg-yolks, one at a time, continuing to pound the forcemeat; put in three pounds of chicken 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 191 

quenelle forcemeat (No. 89) and when all is well blended stand it on ice to use as needed. Forcemeat 
borders are made in special molds of a crown form, lightly hollowed on top, an inch and a half to 
two inches high. The bottoms of dishes and the surtouts are not as high, being only one inch gen- 
erally and two inches in diameter narrower than the basin of the dish. 

(81). BAKING FORCEMEAT FOR ORDINARY USE (Parce a Gratin Ordinaire). 
Fry in four ounces of melted lard, one bayleaf , two ounces of carrots and two ounces of celery, 
both cut in dice, one shallot and two ounces of onions, both finely chopped, also one ounce of 
truffles, the same of mushrooms and one tablespoonful of chopped parsley; add its equal quantity 
of calf's liver and two gills of espagnole sauce (No. 414). When the meats are cooked, let the prep- 
aration first get cold, then pound and rub it through a sieve; lay this forcemeat into a bowl, cover 
it with buttered paper and keep it in a cool place; mix with this three tablespoonfuls of raw 
quenelle forcemeat, either of veal, chicken or game, in order to thicken it, but only just when 
ready to use. The liver may be replaced by the same quantity of cooked or raw meat, either 
lamb, veal, chicken or game chopped up very fine and seasoned with salt, pepper and nutmeg. 

(82). CHICKEN GODIVEAU (Godiveau de Volaille). 

One pound or the wnite meat from a tender young chicken; three quarters of a pound of dry, 
brittle beef kidney suet, without skin or fibres; three quarters of an ounce of spiced salt (No. 168) 
two whole eggs; three quarters of a pound of cream panada, (No. 120); moisten and finish exactly 
the same as the veal godiveau (No. 85). 

(83). GODIVEAU OP PIKE (Godiveau de Brocket). 

A pound of skinless and boneless pike meat, chopped and pounded fine; two pounds of dry and 
brittle beef kidney suet free of fat and nerves, also chopped up fine; mix the two together, 
chop once more and season with an ounce of spiced salt; pound to a pulp to obtain a fine paste, 
and incorporate into it gradually, one pound and a half of cream panada (No. 120), and after- 
ward twelve beaten up egg-whites. Try the forcemeat to see whether it be too hard, if so add 
some cream, and if too soft, more egg-whites. 

(84). GODIVEAU OP RABBIT OR OTHER GAME (Godiveau de Lapereau ou Autres Gibiers). 
Take one pound of rabbit meat or any other game, one pound of dry, brittle beef kidney suet 
without skin or fibres, one ounce of spiced salt (general spices, No. 168), six eggs and four ounces 
of pate a choux panada (No. 121). Moisten and finish the same as the veal godiveau (No. 85). 

(85)- VEAL GODIVEAU (Godiveau de Veau). 

Veal godiveau frequently takes the place of forcemeat and is excellent if well prepared. 

Have a pound of fresh veal meat cut off from the kernel without any fat or nerves what- 
ever; cut it up into inch pieces, and pass them twice through the machine (Fig. 47), or in 
case there be no machine, chop them up very finely. Have also a pound and a quarter of beef 
kidney suet, perfectly dry and brittle, remove all its skin and fibres, and chop it up very finely, 
seasoning with one ounce of general spices (No. 168). Pound well the veal, add to it the suet, 
and pound all together to a pulp, so as to form a smooth paste, then stir in four whole eggs singly, 
as well as four ounces of frangipane panada (No. 120), in small quantities at the time. After the 
godiveau is well pounded, put it away for two hours in a cool place, then pound it over again, 
moistening it gradually with ice-water or else small pieces of very clear and clean ice. When 
the godiveau becomes sufficiently soft, try its consistency, by poaching a quenelle of it in boiling 
water, and if found to be too firm, add a little more ice-water, but if not sufficiently consistent, 
pound one ounce more panada with one egg, and incorporate the farce slowly to the panada, 
or even the egg alone will answer. 

(86). CHICKEN FORCEMEAT FOR MOUSSELINE (Parce de Volaille pour Mousselines). 

Ingredients. One pound of chicken breast-meat, one egg-white, two gills of bechamel, four 
tablespoonfuls of cream forcemeat, and the value of one quart of whipped cream. 

Have one pound of chicken breast-meat free of nerves; pass it twice through the machine 
(Fig. 47), pound it to a pulp and rub through a sieve, season with half an ounce of salt, red pepper 
and nutmeg, and incorporate gradually into it one egg-white and two gills of bechamel (No. 409). 



192 THE EPICUREAN. 

Strain all this through a sieve, and put it in a metal vessel on the ice for fifteen minutes, then work 
it well with a whip, incorporating gradually into it four tablespoonfuls of cream forcemeat (No. 74) 
and the value of a quart of whipped cream thoroughly drained. Try a little of it in a mold and 
if too consistent add a little more of the whipped cream. 

(87). GAME POKOEMEAT FOE MOUSSELINE (Farce de Gibier pour Mousselines), 
Take one pound of the breast- meat of some raw game suppressing the skin and nerves, pound 
and pass it through a sieve. Place this puree in a tin vessel and mix in one egg-white 
slowly working it gradually so that it attains body, then incorporate, always slowly, two or three 
gills of raw cream without once ceasing to mix the preparation. When mellow add four or five 
tablespoonfuls of puree of cooked foies gras, pounded and pressed through a sieve, season, and 
when very smooth poach a small piece in a small timbale in a bain-marie so to judge of its con- 
sistency; it must be firm, although mellow; if found necessary add a few egg yolks. 

(88). SALMON rOBOEMEAT POK MOUSSELINE (Parce de Saumon pour Mousselines). 
One pound of pared fish pounded and seasoned with half an ounce of salt, cayenne pepper 
and nutmeg, then rub through the sieve the same as the cream chicken forcemeat. Return it to 
the mortar and work into it one raw egg-white, half a pint of b6chamel (No. 409) and two table- 
spoonfuls of cream forcemeat (No. 76). Put it on to the ice, work vigorously and when very cold 
incorporate gradually into it equal quantity of well drained whipped cream. Serve this in tim- 
bales as hors-d'ceuvre or garnishing. 

(89). CHICKEN QUENELLE FOEOEMEAT, WITH SOUBISE OE TOMATO (Parce a Quenelle de 

Volaille, Soubise"e ou Tornate'e). 

Ingredients for these Quenelles. One pound of chicken, half a pound of pate a chou panada 
(No. 121); a quarter of a pound of butter, half an ounce of salt and nutmeg, six egg-yolks, one 
whole egg, one pint of chicken cream forcemeat. In order to make chicken or game forcemeats 
only the breasts are used, having them well pared, cut in pieces and pass through the machine 
(Fig. 47). Put this into a mortar, and pound it to a pulp, rub it through a sieve, pound it once 
more, and add to it the panada, putting it in gradually, then the butter or udder, without 
stopping the pounding process, and afterward the egg-yolks one by one, season with salt and 
nutmeg, rub the forcemeat again through the sieve, and then lay it in a thin metal vessel on the 
ice, and beat it up again for a few minutes so as to render it smooth. Poach a small piece of it, 
and if found to be too consistent, then thin it with a little cold sauce or raw cream, and keep 
it in a cool place until needed. Instead of using veloute or cream, one pint of chicken cream 
forcemeat (No. 75), may be added, made of chicken, egg-whites and cream. Quenelle forcemeats 
made of chicken can be used with soubise or tomatoes by mixing in either some soubise (No. 543), 
or fine consistent tomato puree (No. 730), instead of the cream or veloute. 

(90) FISH QUENELLE POECEMEAT (Farce a Quenelle de Poisson), 

Fish forcemeats are prepared with the raw meats of either pike, bass or sheepshead, increasing 
the weight with panada for those fishes requiring more consistence, such as cod, etc. Any fish 
lacking body, such as whiting, etc., can be mixed with sheepshead, bass or others. Pike meat is 
renowned as having plenty of consistence and is easy to procure. Prepare one pound of pike 
meat free of bones and skin, pound it well and when reduced to a paste take it out of the mortar. 
Pound one pound of cream panada (No. 120), with eight ounces of lobster butter, add the pike 
meat, pound again all together, then mix in slowly six raw egg-yolks, salt, nutmeg, sweet peppers 
and Hungarian paprika pepper; press the forcemeat through a sieve and put it 'in a thin metal 
vessel on ice. beat it well to have it smooth. Poach a small piece to try its consistence and rectify 
if needed, either by adding cream or panada, mixing the farce to the latter, a little at the time. 
To this forcemeat is frequently added some tomatoed soubise or mushroom puree and if required to 
be very light beat in two well whipped egg-whites. 

(91). GAME QUENELLE FOEOEMEAT (Farce a Quenelle de Gibier). 

Ingredients. One pound of game, half a pound of calf's udder, half a pound of bread-crumbs 
soaked in hot milk, salt, red pepper, nutmeg, four egg-yolks and one whole egg. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 193 

Pass one pound of the breast of game twice through the machine (Fig. 47), pound it to a 
pulp and rub it through a sieve, then set it in a cool place or on the ice. Soak some bread-crumbs 
in milk, extract from them all the liquid, let them dry and get cool; pound the bread-crumbs with 
calf's udder in four different parts and continue the process until all is done, then season with salt, 
red pepper and nutmeg, half an ounce in all; add to this the game pulp, and continue pounding 
for ten minutes, then mix in four egg-yolks, singly, and one whole egg. Poach one of the que- 
nelles in boiling water to discover its consistency, and if found necessary to rectify refer to No. 60. 

(92). LAMB OR VEAL QUENELLE FORCEMEAT (Parce a Quenelle d'Agneau ou de Veau), 
Procure one pound of either lean fillet, or kernel of lamb or veal; ten ounces of cooked calf's 
udder; four egg-yolks, two whole eggs, ten ounces of panada with flour (No. 121), three quarters 
of an ounce of salt, nutmeg and red pepper: suppress the fat and skin from the meat, cut it into 
half inch squares, put this twice through the machine (Fig. 47), then pound the meat, and when 
converted into a paste rub it forcibly through a round sieve (Fig. 142), or any other one not too 
fine; take it out of the mortar, lay in the panada, pound it fine, add to it the calf's udder, a little 
at the time, then the seasonings and strained meat, also the egg-yolks singly, and the whole eggs; 
pound again and after the preparation is thoroughly blended, rub it through a fine sieve. Set 
this forcemeat into a bowl, and stir it up a few moments with a spoon; poach one quenelle in boil- 
ing water to judge of its consistency, and if too hard, mix into it a few spoonfuls of cold veloute 
(No. 415), or raw cream; if, on the contrary, it is too thin, pound a little panada to smooth it 
down, and mix it in gradually with the forcemeat, by so doing it assumes a greater consistency. 

(93), DIFFERENT FORCEMEATS FOR RAVIOLES OF BEEF, CHICKEN AND VEAL (Differeutes 
Farces pour Ravioles de Bceuf, Volatile et Veau). 

For Beef. Half a pound of cooked chopped tenderloin of beef, quarter of a pound of brains 
in small one-eighth squares, two ounces of cooked and chopped ham, two ounces of chopped 
spinach. Two ounces of grated parmesan; salt, pepper, nutmeg, three egg-yolks and two table- 
spoonfuls of cream. All these ingredients well mixed and to be used for square ravioles. 

Chicken. Half a pound of chopped white or black poultry meat, and half a pound of chopped 
veal udder; pound well together with four egg-yolks and a gill of veloute; season with salt, 
pepper and nutmeg; mix into this preparation four ounces of parmesan cheese; this is for round 
ravioles. 

Veal. Fry two ounces of onions in four ounces of butter without allowing it to take color ; 
moisten with broth, reduce to a glaze and put in the veal, seasoning with salt, pepper and nutmeg; 
add four egg-yolks and chopped parsley. Make triangular shaped ravioles with this. 

(94). TO PREPARE GELATINE FROM CALF'S FEET (Pour Preparer la Colle de Pieds de Veau). 

Calf's feet gelatine is more especially used for preparing jelly and gelatineous sweet dishes. 
Soak seven or eight very fresh calve's feet, split in two, having the bones all extracted, put them 
into a small soup-pot with water and let the liquid boil for ten minutes; then drain it off, also the 
feet; cool these off and return them to the clean soup-pot with two spoonfuls of sugar, the juice of 
four lemons, and half a bottleful of white wine. Cover with water, then heat the liquid while skim- 
ming, and at the first boil set it on the stove to obtain a regular and continuous ebullition for four to 
five hours, strain the liquid into a bowl and let it get very cold. When the gelatine is firm, remove 
all the fat from the top, then wash the surface with warm water so that not a vestige of grease re- 
mains. Lift out the jelly without disturbing the sediment at the bottom of the bowl, arid put it 
back, either all or part into a saucepan to melt. 

For one quart of gelatine, mix in three quarters of a pound of broken sugar and the juice of 
four lemons; when the sugar is dissolved, test the consistency so as to rectify it if necessary, by 
adding either more water or more gelatine, according to its strength or weakness. Beat four egg- 
whites without getting them frothy, put these into one gill of cold water and pour it over the dis- 
solved gelatine, place the saucepan on a moderate fire, beat the liquid slowly till it is about reaching 
boiling point, then remove the saucepan to a slower fire, so that the liquid quivers, but does not 
boil; now add the juice of four lemons, cover the saucepan and keep it near the boiling point for 
thirty minutes, the gelatine should now be limpid. Filter it through a bag or strain it through a 
napkin fastened to the four feet of a filtering stool (Fig. 51) and pour it back into the filter 
until it becomes perfectly clear; this operation must be performed in a very warm place. 



194 THE EPICUREAN. 

(95). TO PEEPAEE PIG'S SKIN GELATINE (Pour Preparer la Colle de Gjuenne). 
Soak in cold water for five or six hours, six pounds of fresh pork skin; put it into a saucepan 
with cold water to double its height, and blanch it in this water until it boils, then drain and re- 
fresh it; scrape off the pieces one by one, wash them well, and return them to the saucepan with 
more clean, cold water and boil the liquid while skimming it; set it on one side of the range or on 
the gas stove, and add half a bottleful of white wine, then continue boiling for seven hours, skim- 
ming it frequently. Pass the liquid through a sieve into a basin, let it get cold and firm on ice, 
then remove all the fat from the top and wash the surface off with very hot water; melt it once 
more to mix it in with the necessary broth and clarify it with meat and eggs or white of eggs, pro- 
ceeding the same as for aspic-jelly (No. 103). 

(96). GHEEKINS (Cornichons). 

Cut off the stalks and ends from small gherkin cucumbers; put a few handfuls in a coarse 
towel or bag, with a heavy handful of kitchen salt, shake them in this bag to cleanse well and re- 
move all the outer roughness and then toss them on a large sieve to free them of the salt; 
range in a barrel, pour over a brine made with sufficient salt to float an egg or a potato on its sur- 
face, cover, and on top lay a heavy weight to keep them under water; leave them so for 
six days. Now drain off the brine and return to the barrel more fresh brine, it containing a 
much salt as the first one; put back both cover and weight to keep them submerged under the 
liquid and leave stand in a cool place. After a short time a scum will form on the surface; this 
must in no ways be disturbed until the gherkins are needed, for it acts as a protector, preventing 
any air from penetrating into the liquid. When the gherkins are wanted for use, take them from 
the brine; unsalt by putting them in fresh water for twelve hours. Pour half water and half vine- 
gar in an untinned copper basin, throw into it a small bagful of spices, such as cloves, peppers, 
mustard seeds and mace. Place on the fire and at the first boil, plunge in the well drained gher- 
kins and leave to bubble for a few moments, then remove the basin from the fire and put both 
gherkins and vinegar into a large jar or barrel to cool off; put in with them a handful of tarragon, 
some small blanched onions and shallots and a few red peppers; stand this in a well aired place for 
a few days and the gherkins will be then ready for use. 

(97). GEATED PAEMESAN AND SWISS CHEESE (Fromage Parmesan et Fromage de Gruyere rap6). 
Cut off all the rind from the cheese, leaving no black part on whatever; grate by rubbing the 
cheese against a sufficiently coarse grater (Fig. 177) until it is all consumed; keep in a cool but not 
too damp place. 

(98). GEATED HOESEEADISH AND HOESEEADISH EIBBONS (Eaifort EapS et en Eubans). 

Grated horseradish should be made of clean, fresh horseradish root, peeled or scraped, washed 
and dried, then rubbed against a large grater; it can either be served fresh or put into a stone jar 
with salt and vinegar, corking it well to preserve till needed. For horseradish ribbons, peel 
the root the same as for grating, and scrape it with the sharp blade of a knife, held at an angle 
from the top to the bottom; by this method fine ribbons of the root are obtained; let them be as 
long as it is possible to have them. Long horseradish should be used for this purpose. 

(99). COOKED CHOCOLATE ICING (Glace Cuite au Chocolat). 

Put into a sugar-pan a quarter of a pound of unsweetened chocolate; let it soften at the oven 
door, and dilute it with two gills of warm syrup at sixteen degrees, or simply with water, then add 
to the liquid some icing sugar, so as to obtain a smooth preparation neither too soft nor too thin. 

(100), COOKED COCOA ICING (Glace Ouite au Cacao). 

Dissolve a quarter of a pound of cocoa or unsweetened chocolate in a sugar-pan; cook three 
quarters of a pound of sugar in another pan with one pint of water till it reaches the degree of 
small thread, mash the cocoa with a spoon, dilute it gradually with the cooked sugar, then cook 
all together until it reaches small thread again; remove it from the fire, rub it against the sides of 
the pan with a spoon in order to mass it well; this icing is used to ice Genoese, eclairs and a variety 
of small cakes. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



195 



(101). KOYAL ICING, AND EOYAL ICING FLAVORED WITH ZESTS (Glace Koyale et Glace Eoyale 

Parfume'e aux Zestes.) 

Royal Icing. Put into a vessel the whites of one or several eggs (those not too fresh are pref- 
erable), and add to them some icing sugar, sifted through a very fine sieve, sufficient to have 
the eggs and sugar combined; form into a running paste, add several drops, either of 
lemon juice or acetic acid, according to the quantity of icing. With a wooden spatula 
beat up slowly to begin, then continue the action more briskly, always turning it in such a way that 
the air may enter, which helps to make the icing lighter and firmer. Beat it until the spoon, being 
lifted from the icing, it stands on it upright, without falling off. This royal icing is excellent for 
decorating pieces, cakes, etc., but for flowers or decorations to be made entirely of royal icing, then 
after beating, add more icing sugar, but do not get it too hard. Koyal icing can be made any color 
by using vegetable colors. 

Royal Icing flavored until Zests. Put into a basin, half a pound of sugar, add a few spoonfuls 
of sugar flavored either with orange or lemon zest, adding gradually sufficient white of egg to 
allow it to flow; this icing is used for covering cakes. 

a02). ICING WITH SYEUP POE CAKES FLAVOEED WITH VANILLA, OEANGE, LEMON OE 
PETJIT JUICES (Glace au Sirop pour Gateaux Parfum6e soit a la Vanille, a 1'Orange, au 
Citron on au Jus de Fruits), 

Put one pint of water and a pound of sugar in a saucepan, adding half a vanilla bean or else 
some orange or lemon peel; stand it on the fire, let boil up a few times to obtain a syrup, then 
remove the saucepan from the range immediately, suppress the vanilla or peels and incorporate 
sufficient sugar to form a very smooth flowing paste. 

For Uncooked Fruit Juice Icing. Prepare it with strawberry, raspberry, currant or pine- 
apple juice. Simply crush the ripe, fresh fruits, pour them on a sieve to collect all the liquid. 
Put some icing sugar in a vessel, dissolve it with a little thirty-degree syrup, and the fruit juice, 
incorporating the liquid slowly; just before using this icing warm it in an untinned copper vessel, 
stirring it during the operation. The icing sugars are colored according to taste and are used for 
icing Genoeses, pouring it over or else dipping in all kinds of small cakes, such as eclairs, etc. 

(103). TO PEEPAEE, CLAEIFY AND FILTEE ASPIC JELLY (Pour Preparer la GelSe d'Aspic, la 

Clarifier et la Filtrer). 



Aspic or meat jelly is prepared with chicken or game broth, obtaining it as clear as possible, 
and mixing it with a certain quantity of gelatine made either with calf's feet or pig skin, or even 

with isinglass. Aspics are also prepared with special stocks made under the 

following conditions: brown in a saucepan half a pound of breast of veal, one 

knuckle, and two fowls, suppressing the breasts; when the meats are lightly 

colored moisten them amply with some light broth, free of all fat, and add 

to it four or five boned and blanched calf's feet, also 

some roots and onions, a garnished bouquet, but no 

salt, boil the liquid while skimming, remove it to 

the side of the range, and finish cooking the meats, 

lifting them out as soon as they are done. Strain 

the liquid through a sieve, skim off all the fat, try 

a little of it on ice to judge of its consistency, and 

should it not be sufficiently firm, then heat it up 

once more, and stir into it a few gelatine leaves 

softened in cold water and dissolved in a small 

separate saucepan. The aspic should never be 

reduced with the idea of rendering it firmer, 
FIG. so. because the boiling only wastes it without thick- 

ening it; chop one pound of lean beef, one pound for two quarts of liquid, add to it four 
egg-whites or two whole eggs and one pint of white wine, dilute it gradually with the aspic 
jelly, put it into a saucepan on the fire, stir the liquid with a whisk until the instant boiling 
point is reached, then remove it to one side, and let it simmer very slowly, till it becomes perfectly 
clear, then strain it through a flannel bag (Fig. 50) ; or moisten a clean napkin and arrange it 
on a kitchen filtering stool as shown in Fig. 51; should the jelly not be sufficiently limpid, pour it 
through again until perfectly clear. 





FIG. 51. 



196 THE EPICUREAN. 

(104). CALFS FOOT JELLY WITH MADEIEA WINE (Gelfe de Pieds de Veau an vin de Madere). 
Take the value of one quart of calf's foot gelatine and mix into it three quarters of a pound of 
sugar and the juice of four lemons. After the sugar is dissolved try its consistency to rectify it if 
necessary, adding more water or more gelatine according to whether it be too soft or too hard. 
Beat up four egg-whites without letting them come to a froth, mix in a gill of cold water and pour 
this over the dissolved gelatine; set the untinned basin on a moderate fire, whip the liquid slowly 
until on the verge of boiling, then withdraw it to a slower heat and keep the liquid simmering with- 
out boiling; now add the juice of four lemons; cover and leave stand for thirty minutes. The jelly 
should now be limpid; filter it through a flannel bag or a napkin fastened to the four feet of a 
filtering stool (Fig. 51), return the jelly to the bag and continue the operation until it passes 
through clearly; this should be done in a warm place, As soon as the jelly is properly filtered let 
it stand until cold and then add one gill of good Madeira, pour it into a mold previously 
imbedded in ice and leave it for one hour and a half to set. 

(105). MEAT JELLY WITH GELATINE (Gel6e de Viande a la Gelatine). 
Put four quarts of good broth with one pound of gelatine into a saucepan, adding a quarter of 
an ounce of pepper-corns, two cloves, a few branches of celery and a little mace, put it on to the 
fire and stir continuously with a whip until the liquid boils; season to taste. Break six eggs, 
put them with their shells into a bowl and beat them up a little mixing in with them, half a bottle 
of white wine or a quarter of a bottle of Madeira, one gill of tarragon vinegar, and a quart of 
small pieces of clean ice, dilute this with a quart of the liquid jelly, and pour the clarification into 
the remainder of the jelly, stirring it constantly, then return the saucepan to the fire and continue 
the beating. When the jelly has reached the boiling degree, remove it from the fire, and keep 
it very warm for half an hour, but it must not boil again; filter as indicated (No. 103). 

(106). SWEET JELLY WITH GELATINE, OR FISH ISINGLASS (Gel^e Douce a la G61atine ou k 

la Oolle de Poisson). 

Put into a basin four quarts of water, three pounds of sugar, half a pound of gelatine or ten 
ounces of fish isinglass and the peel of eight lemons, stir the whole well together until the sugar is 
melted, then set the basin on a slow fire and beat well with a whip; as soon as it begins to boil put 
in twelve partly beaten egg-whites into which has been added the juice of twelve lemons; mix the 
whole well together stirring unceasingly and allowing it to boil slowly from fifteen to twenty min- 
utes, then withdraw the basin from the fire and let the jelly rest for a few moments; now pour it 
through a flannel bag upheld by a ring (Fig. 50); return it several times until it acquires a perfect 
limpidity. The lemon-peel can be suppressed, flavoring it with any kind of liquor or clarified 
fruit juice. 

(107). LAED (Saindoux). 

Lard is the produce of leaf lard melted with fat pork; this operation showld be performed 
rapidly, especially in summer time. Remove the membranes and sanguineous parts from all that is 
required for making the lard say about twenty pounds; cut the leaf lard and fat pork into half 
inch squares and steep them separately for two hours in an abundance of cold water using twelve 
quarts for each and two ounces of crystal soda also for each; wash both in several waters, keeping 
them separated; drain and lay first the fat pork in a saucepan with four quarts of water, melt it on 
a slow fire being careful to stir the bottom frequently; as it melts it becomes white and milky, then 
transparent, when in this state, strain it through a colander and return it to a clean saucepan add- 
ing the leaf lard; set it on a good fire and stir incessantly until the squares become dry and brown, 
then strain the fat, press well the squares, leave to cool slightly, afterward adding a gill of water 
for every two pounds of the fat. Beat the whole vigorously, let cool and draw off the clear part 
before the fat has had time to congeal, just when it begins to set, beat thoroughly to have it 
smooth. 

(108). AXUNGE (Axonge). 

Axunge is exclusively obtained by melting leaf lard without using any other material; axunge 
is finer than lard and is also employed for kitchen and pastry purposes. The leaf lard is melted 
in a bain-marie or by steam, this latter method being preferable. Remove the skin and fibers 
from ten pounds of leaf lard, cut it up in squares about half an inch each and bathe them in 
eighteen quarts of water with half a pound of crystal soda; wash in several waters, drain and 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 19? 

pound in a mortar, then put it into a well tinned copper basin in a bain-marie and steam by keep- 
ing the water boiling all the time until the lard is all melted, now strain it through a fine colander 
and leave to cool slightly, adding one pint of cold water, stir well, let it rest, then pour off the clear 
1 art when it begins to set, beat well to have it smooth. 

(109). VEAL UDDER (Te"tine de Veau). 

Veal Udder is the fatty part covering a kernel of veal; remove it entirely, tie it up and cook 
in plenty of white broth; when done take it out, pull off the string and press it lightly under a 
weight. Pare and cut it either into strips, squares or bands, etc. It is used in forcemeats instead 
of butter, pass it twice through the machine, pound well and then pass through a sieve. The way 
to keep it is to leave it covered in a cool place or else cover over entirely with salt. 

(110). TO PREPARE LARDING PORK (Pour Pre~parer le Lard a Piquer). 

Lift the bands of pork leaving as little meat on as possible, from the first rib to the end of the 
loin; lay them in brine for three months, then drain off, and put them on a table to rub one by one 
and cover with salt. Set them one on top of the other in a cool, dry place and range a board over 
with a weight on top; turn them over, and throw on some salt, and at the end of a month change 
those from the bottom to the top, and three months after, fasten a strong twine to each piece, and 
hang them up separately in a cold, dark room to dry. 

Another Way. The piece of pork taken from the back is the only one to use for larding pur- 
poses, as it is firm and not liable to crack. Remove all the meat from it, and cut it into an oblong 
piece, this being called a band; salt it dry with fine salt for three or four weeks, and if it be neces- 
sary to use it shortly after its salting, then rub it with very fine salt, and hang it up in a dry and 
cool place. This pork must be salted toward the end of the winter; fat pork never receives more 
salt than it needs, whichever way it may be employed, or however long the operation may last. 

(111). TO CUT PAT PORK FOR LARDING (Manure de Tailler le Lard Pour Piquer), 
The larding pork must be white and firm, perfectly dry and cooled on ice, specially in summer 
so to make it harder and to be enabled to cut it more evenly. Divide the pork into the required 
length leaving on the rind; remove a slice from the top of the necessary thickness to have the pork 
of the same thickness throughout, paring the two ends square, then divide it into lardons at equal 
distances cutting them perpendicularly as far down as the rind, for this use a thin knife, called a 
lard slicer, and cut the lard the size designated by Fig. 52, then cut them horizontally to 
obtain very square lardons of the desired size. 




FIG. 52. FIG. 53. Larding Needle for Beef & la Mode. 

FIG. 54. Trussing Needle. 
FIG. 55. Large Larding Needle. 

No. 1, lardons as represented in the figure are from three to four-eighths of an inch square, 
by three and one-quarter to four inches long. This size is for larding beef a la mode, braised 
tongue, kernel of veal, leg of mutton, etc. 

No. 2, are three-sixteenths of an inch square by two and one quarter inches long; this size is 
convenient for saddles of venison, fricandeaux, tenderloins of beef, etc. 

No. 3, these are five-thirty-seconds of an inch square, by two inches in length; this size is for 
poultry, large game, fish, sweetbreads, veal cutlets, etc. 

No. 4, lardons of one-eighth of an inch square, by one and three-quarter inches long; this 
size is for small game, pigeons, chickens, etc. 

The lardons as shown in the figures are represented one quarter their actual size. 

(112). TO LARD MEAT, POULTRY AND GAME (Pour Piquer les Viandes la Volaille et le Gibier). 

If it be butcher's meat, pare it properly by removing in strips the skin covering the meat, then 
all the superfluous iai. 



198 



THE EPICUREAN. 



The way to lard a tenderloin is to pare a fine tenderloin of beef, weighing six pounds after it 
is trimmed; remove the fat, slide the blade of a thin knife between the skin and the meat and 
press it on the skin so as to avoid injuring the flesh; remove also the superfluous fat on the side, 
then cut the two ends round shaped. Choose a larding needle of suitable size to hold the larding 
pork that should be cut into pieces of three-sixteenths by two and a quarter inches long; lay the 
tenderloin lengthwise on a heavy towel, place this over the left arm, then proceed to lard the meat 
with the larding needle threaded with a piece of the pork, boring the meat from right to left. 
The needle containing the pork must be stuck in the flesh to a depth depending upon its length, 
but the needle must be withdrawn with one stroke, so that the pork remains in the meat visible of 




FIG. 57. 



FIG. 59. 



an equal length on both sides. After the first row is larded, the next one should be slipped exactly 
between those of the first row; then instead of larding between the two lards of the last row, begin 
the operation from the start, which means lard two more rows the same as the first, observing that 
the second ones are arranged contrarywise to the first two, then continue until the whole tender- 
loin is filled. Proceed exactly the same for fricandeau, racks of veal, grenadins or sweetbreads. 

When a piece of poultry or game is required to be larded, it must first be drawn, singed and 
trussed, then singe the breast once more, or else dip this part into boiling water to harden the 
meat; after this is cold, lard with lardons adapted to their size. This in fact is the whole theory 
of larding, and by examining various larded pieces, one can easily become an adept in the art. 

(113), LEMONS; TO OUT THEM IS VAEIOUS MANNERS (Citrons Tallies de Diff6rentes Manieres). 

First wash and wipe the lemons, then cut them length- 
wise in four, to serve either with oysters or fried fish. 

Channeled slices of lemon are made by cutting small 
notches on the lemon lengthways of the peel, then cutting 
the lemon in crosswise slices an eighth of an inch thick. 
These are used for garnishing broiled fish. Slices of lemon 
cut the same way without being channeled, are frequently 
served with tea. 

Halved lemons are prepared by paring off the two 
ends and then make sixteen notches in the center, the 
third of the length of the lemon with the tip of a small 

these gashes should be very regular; run the knife through as far as the center, 
eight cuts to the right and eight to the left, this makes eight long triangles; 





Fro. 



FIG. 61. 



knife; 
having 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 199 

detach the lemon in two parts (Fig. 60). These are used also for cold fish and hatelets or 
skewers (Fig. 61). 

Shells of lemon can also be made, making two shells from one lemon. Cut from the center of 
the lemon, beginning at the stalk, as far as the middle of one side and from the other end of the 
lemon as far as the middle of the other side, about one half inch of the peel, without detaching it; 
cut across the lemon, keeping the ribbon of the peel intact, thus producing two identical pieces; 
these halved shells are used for garnishing fried fishes such as sole a la Colbert, etc. 

(114). COOKED MARINADE (Marinade Quite). 

Mince one pound of carrots, as much onions and half a pound of celery root; fry all these 
vegetables in a quarter of a pound of lard without letting them attain color, and moisten with 
two quarts of vinegar and one quart of water or more according to the strength of the vinegar. 
Add an ounce of parsley leaves, three bayleaves and as much thyme, half an ounce of basil, 
garlic, cloves, a bit of mace, a tablespoonful of crushed whole peppers and the same quantity of 
allspice, and some salt. Boil the whole for half an hour, put it aside to get cold and use this 
marinade for marinating venison, mutton, hare, etc. 

(115). RAW MARINADE (Marinade Orue). 

There are two kinds of raw marinade; the first one is made of oil, minced onions, branches of 
parsley, thyme, bayleaf, slices of lemon, salt, mignonette, garlic and basil. The second one is 
made of two quarts of vinegar, four quarts of water, minced carrots and onions, bayleaf, a clove of 
garlic, thyme, basil, mace, whole peppers and sprigs of parsley. 

(116). HOW TO DRESS MERINGUES (Pour Dresser les Meringues). 

Prepare a meringue paste as in No. 140. Pour the preparation 
into a pocket furnished with a socket and push it into rounds on to 
white paper bands; dust them over with fine sugar and press down 
the middle lightly, so as to efface the tip, formed by the socket, then 
range these paper bands on top of some wet boards. Cook the 
meringues on these boards in a very slack oven, leaving them 
in for fifty minutes; they must be of a fine golden color and 
well-dried; after taking them from the oven, detach them carefully 

from the paper, and remove all the soft parts from the insides, using a teaspoon for this purpose, 
then lay them immediately on a raised edged tin sheet, one beside the other, the hollow part up- 
permost, and keep them in a warm heater for twelve hours. 

(117). MINCE MEAT (Mince Meat). 

Suppress all fibers and skin from half a pound of beef kidney suet, chop it up very finely; 
have also chopped half a pound of cooked ox heart; seed and pick half a pound of Malaga raisins, 
half a pound of Smyrna raisins, half a pound of currants, chop up three ounces of citron, cut three 
ounces of candied orange peel into three-sixteenth of an inch squares, peel and chop finely two 
pounds of apples. Have two ounces of brown sugar, half an ounce of ground cinnamon, a quarter 
of an ounce of grated nutmeg, a quarter of an ounce of allspice and ground ginger, and a quarter of 
an ounce of powdered coriander seeds, one pint of cider, one gill of rum, quarter of a gill of brandy 
and the peels and juice of two lemons. Mix all the ingredients together and put them into a 
stone crock leaving it in a cool place for at least fifteen days before using. 

(118). TO TURN, CHANNEL AND FLUTE MUSHROOMS (Pour Tourner et Canneler les 

Champignons). 

Choose the freshest mushrooms and those of equal size, cut off the stems, wipe well the heads, 
and take them one by one in the left hand, the hollow side underneath, then with the tip of a 
small pointed knife cut away the peel in regular rings without destroying the mushroom, and turn 
from right to left pressing all the time against the tip of the small knife; this must be done quickly 
and let us observe that it is not on the first trial that a mushroom can be properly turned, it takes 
practice to accomplish this properly. As quickly as each one is done, throw it into a saucepan 
containing cold, acidulated water, just sufficient to cover, then drain off the water, and cook the 
mushrooms for seven or eight minutes with the lid on, adding salt, butter and lemon juice, to 
keep them as white as possible. As for fluting mushrooms, this art is only learned after long 





200 THE EPICUREAN. 

experience. Mushroom fluting has become almost a profession, and the difficulties to be overcome 
can be better understood on examining those pretty mushroom heads so delicately carved, we 
see displayed by all preserve manufacturers. 

(119), TO STONE OLIVES (Pour Enucle~er les Olives), 
If the olives are plump, large and contain small stones, these can be 
removed with a machine made for the purpose (Fig. 63) or with a tube 
from a column box, but generally the meat is cut off in spirals around 
the stone by means of a small knife. After the stone is removed, the olives 
resume their former shape, then plunge them into boiling water, and 
take them out again at once; they must be blanched without boiling. 

(120). PANADA CREAM FRANGIPANE (Panade Oreme Frangipane). 

Boil four gills of cream; put into another saucepan, four eggs, an 
ounce and a half of flour and some salt; mix and dilute with the cream, 
set it on the fire, and stir it with a spoon, bearing on the bottom of the 
saucepan, and when thickened and well worked remove it from the fire 
at the first boil and then set it away to cool with a buttered paper over it. 

(121), PANADA OF FLOUR AND MILK, BREAD-CRUMBS, AND PATE A FlG 63 

OHOUX (Panade de Farine et de Lait, Mie de Pain et Pate a Choux). 

Flour and Milk. Put in a saucepan half pound of flour, also four eggs and work well 
together adding some salt, and dilute with six to eight gills of milk; stir it over the fire and remove 
at the first boil, pour it into a bowl, cover with a buttered paper and let get cold. 

Bread-crumbs. Soak four ounces of bread-crumbs in a pint of water, squeeze out all the 
liquid and put it into a saucepan with a little salt and three gills of milk; thicken it on the fire 
without ceasing to beat, and stir it up with a spoon until it detaches itself from the pan, then set 
it in a bowl, cover with buttered paper and put away to cool. 

Pate a Choux. Put one pint of water or broth in a saucepan with two ounces of butter, set it 
on the fire, remove it aside at the first boil, and incorporate into it three quarters of a pound of 
sifted flour, mix well and dry on a slow fire till the paste detaches itself from the saucepan and let 
cool slightly, then stir into it gradually two whole eggs and four yolks, set it away in a cool place 
with a buttered paper over, for further use. 

(122). WHEAT AND RICE FLOUR PANADA (Panade de Farine de Gruau et de Biz). 

Wheat Flour. Boil half a pint of broth with half an ounce of butter, remove it to the side of 
the fire, and add to it four or five ounces of flour, or as much as it can absorb, stir the paste 
quickly, return it to a slow fire to dry, do not cease stirring until it detaches from the saucepan. 
Pour it into a bowl, cover with a round piece of buttered paper, and set it away to cool. 

Rice Flour. Have one pint of white broth or milk and half an ounce of butter; boil together 
and add sufficient rice flour to form a paste, let it dry, then set it away with a buttered paper 
cover to get cool. 

(123), PARSLEY BOUQUET, IN BRANCHES, FRIED OR CHOPPED (Persil en Bouquet, en Branches, 

Frit ou Hache'). 

Plain Bouquet or Bunch of Parsley. Take about one ounce of parsley branches, including 
the leaves, wash them nicely and fold them in such a manner that they form a small bundle or 
fagot, to be tied with a piece of string. 

The Garnished Bouquet of Parsley. Make it exactly the same as the plain bouquet the only 
difference being that it envelopes various aromatics, such as thyme, bayleaf, clove of garlic, basil, 
marjoram, chives, green celery, etc. When we speak of a garnished bunch of parsley without any 
specification, we mean garnished with a bayleaf and a small twig of thyme. 

Parsley in Branches for garnishing should be taken from well washed, very green parsley, 
from which the coarser stalks have been removed; keep it in fresh water and use when needed, 
draining it first: for garnishing fish, boiled beef, etc. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 201 

Fried Parsley is used as an accessory to fried dishes; it is not a garnishing, but simply a dec- 
oration; detach some leaves from some very green parsley, wash them in cold water, drain, 
press them in the hand or in a cloth to extract all the water, and when dry, lay them in a wire 
basket to plunge into boiling fat; drain as soon as they stiffen. 

Chopped Parsley. Choose very green parsley, wash, drain and press it so as to extract all 
the water, then cut it up as finely as possible, afterward chopping it well; wash it again, drain and 
squeeze it thoroughly to remove all the water; lay It on a cloth sieve and leave it in a cool place 
till needed. 

(124). ALMOND PASTE IOE FANCY OAKES (Pate d'Amandes a Petits Pours), 

Take one pound of peeled and well dried almonds; one pound of powdered sugar, and five whites 
of eggs. Pound the almonds and the sugar, either in a machine or mortar, and when well reduced 
to a powder, pass it forcibly through a twelve mesh sieve (Fig. 96); return it to the mortar, and 
mix in with the almonds the five egg-whites little by little, so as to make a paste, which can be now 
beaten and worked until a good body is obtained, having it as fine as possible. 

(125). ALMOND PASTE WITH COOKED SUGAE AND PILBEET PASTE (Pate d'Amandes et Pate 

d'Avelines au Sucre Ouit), 

Almond Paste. Shell and skin one pound of almonds; pound them with half a pound of 
powdered sugar and a little water to make into a very fine paste, the same consistency as a maca- 
roon paste. Cook three pounds of sugar to small crack, and as soon as ready pour it in small 
strings on to the paste, stirring constantly with a spatula and leave stand till cold. When this 
paste is thoroughly cooled off, return it to the mortar and pound it once more with liquors or 
vanilla syrup, to have it obtain a body and make it into a fine paste, then put it in a stone jar and 
leave it in a cool place. 

Filbert Paste with Cooked Sugar. Have one pound of shelled filberts pounded to a pulp 
with a pound of powdered sugar and a gill of water; lay this paste in a basin. Cook in a copper 
pan two pounds and a half of sugar to small crack, pour it slowly over the paste mixing it so that 
it mingles in well, ^i^n leave to cool and pound again, stirring in half a gill of liquor, either 
kirsch, maraschino or any other. Color the paste green or pink according to taste. 

(126). ALMOND PASTE WITH EGG-YOLKS (Pate d'amandes aux jaunes d'ceufs), 
Have one pound of almonds, one pound of sugar, and eight egg- yolks; pound or mash the 
almonds in a machine with the sugar so as to reduce them to a fine powder, then strain through a 
twelve mesh sieve (Fig. 96), put them into the mortar, and mix in well the yolks adding them little 
by little; pound all up together so as to obtain a very fine paste, having it quite thick. 

(127). ALMOND PASTE WITH GUM TEAGACANTH (Pate d'Amandes a la Gomme Adragante). 
Put three ounces of gum tragacanth to steep in two gills of water for twenty-four hours, then 
strain forcibly through a piece of linen. Pour this gum on a marble slab and work with the hand 
to have it acquire a body, incorporating in slowly two pounds of icing sugar, then add one pound 
of pounded almonds and the juice of a lemon strained through a sieve; beat the paste well and 
pour it into a vessel or stone pot; closing hermetically; keep in a very cool place to use when 
needed. This paste may be colored red, green, orange or any other color. 

(128). ALMOND PASTE WITH PISTACHIOS (Pate d'Amandes aux Pistaches). 
Have three quarters of a pound of almonds, half a pound of pistachio nuts, a pound and a 
half of sugar, two tablespoon fuls of orange flower-water and five egg-whites. Peel the almonds 
and pistachio nuts; dry and pound them with the sugar, egg-whites and orange flower-water till 
they become a fine paste, then add to it a little vegetable green, so as to give it a soft, green 
color. 

(129). BABA PASTE (Pate a Eaba). 

Sift a pound of flour on the table, divide it in four even parts and use one of these to make the 
leaven by forming it in a circle and placing three quarters of an ounce of yeast in the center, dilut- 
ing with a little warm milk to obtain a soft paste; roll this into a ball, cut it crosswise on the top 



203 THE EPICUREAN. 

with two cuts of the knife and lay it in a floured vessel; cover with a cloth and leave to rise in a 
mild temperature to double its size. Pile the remainder of the flour into a hillock, make a hole in 
the center to form a hollow and in it lay an ounce of sugar, a spare half ounce of salt (according 
to the saltness of the butter), six ounces of butter and six eggs. Mix all the ingredients well 
together and work the flour in slowly, then begin to knead the paste so that it becomes smooth and 
acquires a body slowly adding three more eggs and four ounces of butter; continue to knead until 
again quite smooth with plenty of body, then mix in the leaven, wrapping it lightly in the paste 
and cutting the whole in every direction until thoroughly mingled and the paste is finished, then 
add to it two ounces of seeded Malaga raisins, two ounces of Sultana or Smyrna currants softened 
in water, two ounces of cherries cut in four and two ounces of finely cut up citron. Lay the paste 
in a vessel, cover with a cloth and let rise to a third more than its size, then break it up with a 
spoon; the paste is now ready to be used. 

(130). BKIOOHE PASTE (Pate a Brioche), 

Take one pound of flour, three quarters of a pound of butter, seven to eight eggs, half an 
ounce of yeast, two pinches of salt, four pinches of sugar, two spoonfuls of brandy and some 
water. Dissolve the yeast in half a pint of tepid water, and with this liquid and a quarter of 
a pound of the flour, make a rather thick paste, put it into a small saucepan with a little luke- 
warm water at the bottom, and let it rise in a slack heater. Sift the remainder of the flour on the 
table, form a hollow and put in the center, the salt, sugar, brandy, two spoonfuls of water, three 
of the eggs and the butter; mix together thoroughly with the hand, and incorporate gradually the 
flour so as to obtain a smooth paste, then beat sharply with the hands for a quarter of an hour, 
adding the rest of the eggs one at the time. Beat it well against the table to let it acquire a body; 
then lay out the paste and spread the yeast over, fold it up to enclose the yeast and break it into 
small pieces with the hands; pile up the broken pieces, cut the paste once more, and put the 
pieces as quickly as they are cut into a floured vessel, cover it and set it to rise in a moderate 
temperature, until it will be raised to twice its original size; this will take at least six hours. Set 
the paste again on the floured table, break it up and refold it several times with the hands, return 
it to the vessel, cover and put it back once more in the same place to rise. Break the paste up 
again three hours later, put it back into the vessel, and this time set it either in a cool place or on 
the ice to become firm. It should now be left at least three hours before using. 

(131). OOOKED PASTE FOE FANCIFUL BORDERS (Pate Ouite pour Bordures de Fantaisie), 

Boil one pint of water with a quarter of a pound of butter and a grain of salt; as soon as the 
liquid boils remove it from the fire, and incorporate in one pound of flour so as to obtain a good 
paste, then replace it on to a moderate fire and stir vigorously until it detaches from the bottom of 
the saucepan, then remove it entirely and pour it on to a floured table; as soon as it cools off 
slightly, knead it with the hands, adding to it slowly one pound more flour; by this time the 
paste should be perfectly smooth; after it has obtained a consistency, turn it the same as puff 
paste (No. 146), giving it seven or eight turns, having the paste remarkably smooth; it must be used 
at once. 

(132). CREAM GAZE PASTE (Pate a Ohou). 

Put into a saucepan half a pint of water, a grain of salt, one ounce of sugar and two ounces of 
butter; set the saucepan on the fire and when the butter floats, remove the pan from off the range, 
and incorporate into it a quarter of a pound of fine flour, stir vigorously not to have it the least 
lumpy, and put it back on to a slow fire to dry until it detaches easily from the bottom, then take 
it off once more, and mix in a tablespoonful of orange flower-water; four or five minutes later stir 
in four or five eggs, adding them one at the time; it must now be more consistent than otherwise, 
and if a little of it should be dropped from the spoon, it must retain its shape and not spread. 

(133). DRESSING- PASTE (Pate a Dresser). 

Sift a pound of flour on the table, arrange it in a circle and in the center lay half an ounce of 
salt, four ounces of butter and a gill of water; mix thoroughly, working the flour in as fast as pos- 
sible. When the oaste bearins to attain a body, knead it thoroughly twice, mold it round, form, 
and leave in a cooi mc*_ 



ELEMENTARY METHO1JS. 203 

(134). ENGLISH PASTE POK BORDERS (Pate Anglaise Pour Bordures), 
One pound of fecula, one pound of sugar, six egg-whites. Lay the fecula on the table, forming 
a hollow in the center, into this put the sugar, a little tepid water and six egg-whites, lightly 
whisked; make a very hard paste, set it in a cool place hermetically closed in a bag for about two 
hours. 

(135). FINE FOUNDATION, ORDINARY FOUNDATION OR SHORT AND FLAWN PASTES 

(Pate a Poncer, Fine, Ordinaire on Brisee et a Flans), 

Fine Foundation Paste. Have one pound of flour, three quarters of a pound of butter, half 
a pint of cold water and half an ounce of salt. Sift the flour on a table, bring it all together and 
make a hollow in the center, spreading it with the hand, and in this space lay the butter, divided 
into small bits, half of the water and the salt; make a dough by mixing first the butter with the 
water, then drawing the flour into this wet part, a very little at the time, so as to obtain a paste 
neither lumpy nor too firm; if necessary, add the rest of the water, a very little at the time, mass 
it together, and knead it briskly two or three times. To knead dough is to put it in front of one, 
and push it little by little with the palms of both hands and pressing it hard against the table so 
as to get it smooth; after this is finished, bring it together again, detach carefully all the bits 
adhering to the table, and roll it into a ball with the hands, turning it in the left hand. Let 
the paste rest in the ice-box a quarter of an hour before using it. 

Ordinary Foundation or Short Paste is made with one pound of flour, half a pound of butter, 
half a pint of water and a third of an ounce of salt. Make a hollow in the center of the flour, 
put into this the butter, salt and half of the water; work well the paste, adding more water, knead 
it properly, then roll it into a ball on a floured table; cover and let rest for one hour. 

Flawn Paste. One and one-quarter pounds of flour, three-quai'ters pound of butter, a little 
salt, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, three or four egg-yolks; make the paste on the table, adding 
enough water so the paste will not be too firm; knead, bring together and leave to rest, being 
careful to cover it. 

(136). FROLLE PASTE OR SWEET (Pate a Frolle ou pate Sucrle). 

Arrange one pound of sifted flour in a circle on the table; in the center lay half a pound of 
butter, half a pound of sugar, the peel of a lemon, chopped very fine, a pinch of salt, one whole egg 
and four to five yolks. Work the whole well together to obtain a smooth paste, kneading it twice; 
form into a ball and put aside in the icebox to rest. 

(137). FRYING BATTERS (Pates a Frire), 

No. 1. Put into a vessel, half a pound of flour, a little salt, four tablespoonfuls of oil and 
three egg- yolks; dilute these with sufficient water at once, so as not to have to add any more, and 
the size of half an inch ball of compressed yeast dissolved in a little tepid water; mix till it becomes 
smooth and flows without being stringy; it should well cover the spoon. Lay a cloth over the vessel, 
and keep it in a moderate temperature. At the last moment add to it three beaten egg-whites. 

No. 2. Place in a vessel half a pound of flour, a little salt, two tablespoonfuls of oil, diluted 
in tepid water, and then add a piece of compressed yeast the size of a half an inch ball, dissolved in 
a little water. Set the batter in a moderate temperature, and when it begins to ferment, add a 
handful of flour, salt, oil and water. The batter should be renewed every day without adding 
yeast; the fermentation produced by the batter will be sufficient to keep it light, and avoid the use 
of any more yeast. 

No. 3. This is a finer preparation, intended for sweet dishes, etc. Take half a pound of flour, 
dilute it with tepid water, into which an ounce of butter has been melted, also salt; make a soft, 
very smooth batter and when it has cooled off, add to it half a gill of brandy, two egg-yolks and 
two whites, beaten to a stiff froth. 

No. 4. This is frying batter with baking powder. Put five ounces of flour into a vessel, dilut- 
ing it with two gills of tepid water, one tablespoonful of brandy, two of oil, a pinch of salt and one 
egg-yolk. When ready to use, add a small coffeespoonful of baking-powder and one egg-white, 
beaten to a stiff froth. 



204 THE EPICUREAN. 

(138), MACAROON PASTE (Pate a Macarons), 

Made with one pound of peeled and well dried almonds, three quarters of a pound of powdered 
sugar, a quarter of a pound of vanilla sugar and eight egg-whites. Pound the almonds with the 
sugar and part of the whites, so as to obtain a not too fine paste, then gradually add the remainder 
of the whites; work the paste well to have it obtain plenty of consistence. 

(139). MARCHPANE PASTE WITH ORANGE-FLOWER WATER (Pate Massepain a 1'eau de Fleur 

d'Or anger). 

One pound of almonds, one pound of sugar, one gill of orange flower-water and the juice of 
one lemon. Peel the almonds, wash them in cold water, drain on a cloth and pound them with 
the orange flower-water, adding the sugar and the lemon-juice; obtain a very fine paste and put 
it into a small saucepan to dry on a slow fire, turning it steadily until all the moisture evaporates 
and it detaches from the sides and bottom of the pan. A round bottomed saucepan or basin is far 
preferable to the flat ones, which are in general use. 

(140). PLAIN MERINGUE PREPARATION AND ITALIAN MERINGUE WITH COOKED SUGAR 
(Pate &. Meringue Ordinaire et Pate a Meringue Italienne Avec Sucre Quit). 

The preparation for meringues is composed of twelve or fifteen egg-whites for each pound of 
powdered sugar; set these whites in a basin with a grain of salt and beat up with a whip, very 
slowly at first, but increasing the velocity of the movement as the quantity becomes greater. The 
beaten whites should be stiff and remarkably smooth; then mix in the sugar a little at a time, 
using a wooden spoon for the purpose. 

Italian Meringue with Cooked Sugar. Cook one pound of sugar to "ball" (No. 171); 
incorporate a very little of it at a time into six beaten whites, without ceasing to stir; when 
all the sugar is absorbed work it for two minutes longer on a slow fire to have it very smooth. 

(141). MILAN PASTE (Pate a Milan). 

Form a hollow in the center of a pound of flour on the table, lay in it half a pound of butter, 
half a pound of sugar, a little salt and three eggs; mix well and knead the dough twice, then put 
it aside to rest in a cool place. 

(142). NOODLE PASTE, NOODLE PASTE POR BORDERS AND REPERE PASTE TOR FASTENING 
(Pate a Nouilles, Pate a Nouilles pour Bordures et k Repere pour Coller). 

Noodle Paste. Make a ring on the table with a pound of sifted flour, in the center lay a pinch 
of salt, a tablespoonful of tepid water and five beaten eggs; mix the eggs in slowly with the flour 
and then wrap the paste in a cloth, leave it to rest for fifteen minutes and afterward knead it well 
to have it smooth; this requires some time to do. 

Noodle Paste for Borders. The same preparation as for the above, the only difference being 
that the five whole eggs are replaced by ten yolks. This paste can also be used for covering dish 
bottoms. 

Paste for Fastening on Borders (Repere). This is simply sifted flour diluted with beaten 
egg and passed through a fine wire sieve to obtain a sufficiently liquid paste that can be pushed 
through a cornet. It should be consistent enough not to run. 

(143). OFFICE PASTE (Pate d'office). 

Sift one pound of flour on the table, make a hollow in the center, and in this lay half a pound 
of sugar, two whole eggs and four yolks. Mix all together to form a smooth paste, knead it twice, 
and let it rest in a cool place before using it. 

(144;, PIE PASTE (COLD) (Pate a PateO (froid). 

This is prepared with melted butter as follows: Sift a pound of flour, form a hollow in the 
center and in it lay four egg-yolks and the third of an ounce of salt dissolved in a little water. 
Melt eight ounces of butter, pour the clear part slowly into the hollow, then work the flour gradu- 
ally into it, adding the necessary water and knead the paste at once, roll it into a ball and leave 
to cool. This paste is far mellower than when made with cold butter. 

Another proportion for cold pie paste is to have one pound of flour, four ounces of butter, 
four eggs, tepid water and salt; prepare and finish as above. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



205 



(145). PASTES TOE HOT PIES (Pates a Pate's Ohauds). 

Lay in a circle on the table one pound of sifted flour; make a hollow in the center and into 
this put a third of an ounce of salt dissolved in a little water, eight ounces of butter, two egg- yolks 
and two gills of water. Mix first the butter with the eggs and water, add the flour working it in a 
little at the time, also pour in a little water as it becomes necessary, being careful not to get the 
paste too thin, and still avoid being too dry, otherwise it will not hold together well; knead the 
dough twice, detach it from the table and form it into a ball on the floured table, and when smooth, 
cover and let it rest. 

Another recipe is: one pound of flour, eight ounces of butter, half a pint of water, four egg- 
yolks, and a third of an ounce of salt dissolved in water; to be prepared the same as the above. 



(146). PUFF PASTE AND HALF PUFF PASTE (Pate Feuillet^e et demi Feuillet6e). 

This paste is actually not so very difficult to make, only it requires particular attention. 
Weigh one pound of the very best quality, not too fresh, but well dried flour; one pound 

of butter, well drained and cooled on 
the ice, then kneaded in a cloth to make 
it become flexible. Sift the flour on to 
the table, arrange it in a circle, and 
put into this one teaspoonful of salt and a 
glassful of water. With the right hand 
mix gradually the liquid with the flour, 







FIG 66. 



FiQ. 65. 

adding more water when necessary, so as to obtain 
a smooth, even paste, soft in preference to hard, 
and of a consistency neither stringy nor ropy; as 
soon as the dough is made, knead it well for two 
minutes, detaching all the small particles from the 
table, but if the paste be well made it should adhere 
neither to the table nor to the hand; cover it with a 
cloth and let it rest for twelve minutes. Dredge 
the table lightly with flour, lay the paste on top, and roll it out square shaped, roll out the butter 
likewise, lay it in the center of the paste, on top, then bring the four outer edges back on to the 
butter so as to inclose it well (Fig. 64); take a pastry rolling pin, apply it on the paste, and using 
the two hands push the paste and butter forward, rolling it out to the thickness of three-sixteenths 
of an inch or thereabout, keeping it straight on both sides as represented in the following design 
(Fig. 65). Fold this band into three, press it down with the rolling pin to compress it, the accom- 
panying design will show how to fold it (Fig 66). The paste has now only received one turn; to 
fold it once more, give it a half turn so as to lengthen it to the same thickuess, but in a contrary 
direction, as thin as before; then fold the paste in ihree, cover it and let it rest for ten or twelve 
minutes; the paste will now have received two turns; then give it two turns more, exactly the 



206 THE EPICUREAN. 

same as the others, and let it rest each time for ten minutes. Before giving the last two necessary 
turns to fine puff paste, it must have already had six, if more are given it will be found detrimental 
to its delicacy. 

One special obstacle to be absolutely avoided during the operation is not to let any butter what- 
ever escape from the folds of the paste, which might easily occur if the paste happens to be too 
soft, if rolled out too thin, if not rolled out regularly in smooth layers, and if it is thicker on one 
side than the other. In summer it is very difficult to obtain good puff paste without the use of 
ice or at least without a cold cellar; in any way this inconvenience can be obviated by sub- 
stituting good beef kidney suet for butter. This fat must first be skinned, then soaked in cold 
water, well drained, and pounded in a mortar, so as to convert it to a smooth paste, and then 
made supple by working it with the hands for a few minutes while wrapped in a cloth. If the 
paste should be made in moist, summer weather it must be laid on a cold baking sheet dredged 
with flour, and put aside in the ice box. 

For Half Puff Paste. The parings from puff paste make an excellent half paste. If this 
paste should have to be made, prepare a dough of three-quarters of a pound of butter for one 
pound of flour, operating exactly the same as for the puff paste, but giving it seven or eight turns 
instead of six. 

(147). KAVIOLE PASTE (Pate a Kaviole). 

Lay a pound of sifted flour on the table, form a hollow in the center and in it place one ounce 
of salt, four eggs, two ounces of butter and a little tepid water. 

Another proportion is one pound of flour, one ounce of salt, two eggs, one ounce of butter, 
two heaping tablespoonfuls of grated parmesan and a little tepid water. The paste should be soft, 
yet not too firm, knead it well to have it smooth, lay it on a board, cover with a cloth and let it 
rest in a cool place for one hour, then roll out and finish making the ravioles. 

(148). SAVAKIN PASTE (Pate a Savarin). 

One pound of flour, half a pound of melted butter, four ounces of sugar, eight eggs, six 
yolks, half an ounce of yeast, half a gill of raw cream, and a pinch of salt. 

Sift some of the flour into a warm vessel, and make a soft leaven with a quarter of the flour 
and the yeast, dilute it with tepid water, and cover it with some more of the flour, then leave it to 
rise in a warm temperature. When the leaven has risen to half its original size, break up the 
dough with the hands, and work into it gradually, and one by one the eggs and the remainder of 
the flour, then knead the dough vigorously for ten minutes to give it a body, add to it slowly the 
melted butter, afterward the sugar and salt, and lastly the raw cream; the zest of lemon chopped 
or grated may be added if desired. 

(149). TAET PASTE (Pate a Tarte). 

Make a paste on the table with three-quarters of a pound of flour, a quarter of a pound of 
arrowroot or fecula, half a pound of butter, three egg-yolks, two gills of cold water and a table- 
spoonful of sugar, adding a little salt. When the paste is smooth, wrap it up in a cloth, and 
leave it to rest for twenty-five minutes. 

(150). TIMBALE PASTE (Pate k Timbale). 

Mix one pound of flour, three-quarters of a pound of butter, four or five egg-yolks, one grain 
of salt, and one gill of water. Form a paste, reserving a little of the water. Knead it well, then add 
slowly the rest of the water, roll it out, and set it aside to rest under a cover. 

(151). SMALL PUFF PATTIES (Petits Pate's Feuillet^s). 

Make a puff paste the same as for puff paste (No. 146), giving it six turns, roll out the paste to 
three-sixteenths of an inch in thickness, let it rest awhile, then from it cut about fifteen round 






FIG. 67. 



pieces, using a smooth pastry cutter one and three-quarters to two inches in diameter; collect 
iho parings together at once, roll them out with the rolling pin to one-eighth of an inch thick, 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



207 



and cut the same quantity of round pieces with the same cutter, turn them over on to a wet bak- 
ing sheet in straight rows, a small distance apart, and lay on each one, a one to one and a quarter 
inch ball of veal Godiveau forcemeat, or one of fish, chicken, game, with or without chives. 
Moisten the paste around the garnishing, cover each one with the pieces that were cut first, pressing 
them down to make the two layers of paste adhere together all around the garnishing; flatten the 
paste with the back of a small one and a half inch pastry cutter, egg the tops using a soft brush, 
and cook these small patties in a well heated oven. 

(152). TO POACH QUENELLES, SMALL TIMBALES AND MOUSSELINES (Pour Pocher les 
Quenelles les Petites Timbales et les Mousselines). 

Quenelles. Quenelles are poached by pouring hot (nearly boiling) water into a sautoire by 
the side of the quenelles, set the sautoire on the fire to bring the liquid to a boiling point, and at 
the first boil, cover the sautoire, remove it to the side of the range so that the water only quivers, 
and take out the quenelles with a skimmer as soon as they are firm. The length of time to poach 
quenelles depends upon their size; either ten or fifteen minutes. Dry them on a cloth before 
dressing. 

Small Timbales. Kange the timbales in a sautoire; fifteen minutes before serving, fill it to 
half the height of the molds with boiling water, and set the sautoire on the fire; when the water 
is ready to boil, remove and place it in a slack oven for ten or fifteen minutes; after a lapse of ten 
minutes touch the forcemeat in the center, and if firm, take them out, let stand for a little 
and invert the molds into a cloth to drain off all the liquid. Unmold. 

Mousselines. Put these into a flat sautoire furnished with a perforated grater having the holes 
at regular spaces apart so that each one can receive a mold. The molds being rounded at the 
bottom, these holes are to keep them standing upright. Pour boiling water into the saucepan 
nearly sufficient to cover the height of the molds and stand it on the fire; when the water 
boils, remove and push it gently into a slack oven for ten or fifteen minutes, sufficient time 
to poach them slowly; they will be found done when touched in the center, they resist to the 
pressure of the finger, then take them from the water, stand them on one side to drain and un- 
mold. If the oven be too hot the timbales rise, which must be avoided otherwise they lose 
their quality. 

(153). TO PEESS MEATS, GALANTINES, BKEASTS, SWEETBKEADS, ETC. (Pour Presser les 

Viandes, Galantines, Poitrines, Eis de veau, etc.). 

For Meat Juices. Have a press as shown in Fig. 70. The meats intended for pressing 
should be clone rare, but cooked through, so that all the juice can be extracted. There 
is also a press for pressing galantines, sweetbreads, etc. This one 
is made as represented in Fig. 71; besides, there should be a double 
series of strips of wood, five inches across; the thinnest being a quarter 
of an inch thick, and the thickest are five inches; these are for the 
purpose of receiving the movable shelf belonging to the press so that 
all the pressed articles will be even throughout. For galantines it is also 

necessai'y to have a dozen tinned, sheet-iron 

sheets, a sixteenth of an inch thick, twelve 

inches long and six inches wide. These sheets 

are to be used when there are several galantines 

to equalize their thickness so that they are all 

pressed uniformly. The size of the press is 

thirty-eight inches high, twenty-eight inches 

wide and sixteen inches deep; the screw to be 

twenty-six inches long, and the wheel one foot 

in diameter. Press to the required thickness by 

arranging the strips either higher or lower; 
for galantines they are put an inch lower than the galantine itself; turn the screw slowly until the 
movable shelf rests on the two strips which are the thickness required. 

Sweetbreads are pressed either in round or oval molds, proportionate to the size of the 
sweetbreads; place these molds, one beside the other, on a shelf of the same dimension as the 
movable one and fill each one with a piece of unlarded, braised sweetbread just sufficiently large 
nough to fill up the mold when pressed. 





FIG. 71. 



208 



THE EPICUREAN. 



For Breast of Mutton or Lamb, Braised and Cooked. Range them on a board and press with 
a half inch thick strip on both sides to receive the movable shelf the same as the sweetbreads. 

Beef Tongues are placed in a mold the shape of the tongue, it being two inches thick, eight 
and a half inches long and three and a half inches on its widest part. Molds containing two, 
four, or six tongues can be had. 

Boned Hams are pressed in oval timbale molds. 

Corned Beef in square molds, two and a half inches deep. 

(154). TO PREPARE DECORATED QUENELLES, MOLDED QUENELLES AND POCKET 

QUENELLES (Pour PrSparer les Quenelles Decor6es, Mouses et a la Poche), 

Large decorated quenelles are used as a garnishing or to complete releve garnishings; they 

can be prepared with chicken, game or fish forcemeat. These quenelles are made on pieces of 

buttered white paper, shaping them to any desired form with a small knife while smoothing the 

surfaces neatly. Large quenelles are usually decorated with truffles or red beef tongue, the 






FIG. 72. FIG. 73. FIG. 74. 

former being preferable. The truffle decoration can be applied on to the quenelles either before or 
after poaching; in the first case the decorations are slightly incrusted into the forcemeat after 
wetting them with egg-white; the quenelles are then plunged into boiling water with the paper 
they have been molded on. If the quenelles are to be decorated after poaching then the pieces 
must be simply applied on, but first cover, or, better still, dampen one side with soft forcemeat so 
that they can adhere. Quenelles are poached in salted water without allowing it to boil. 

Molded. Butter some plain, oval-shaped, quenelle molds, using slightly melted butter; 
decorate the bottom of the mold the same as shown in the design. If required to be stuffed, then 






FIG. 75. FIG. 76. FIG. 76 A. 

place a layer of forcemeat on the decoration and over this any salpicon whatever (see salpicons, 
No. 165), and finish to fill the mold; smooth the tops, stand the molds on a baking pan, pour 
enough boiling water in to fill the pan to half the height of the molds and then poach in a slack 
oven. These molds are simply buttered, filled with forcemeat, smoothed on top and poached. 

Pocket Quenelles. Mix together half as much quenelle forcemeat (No. 89), as cream force- 
meat (No. 75), incorporating the latter gradually into the former, pass it all once more through a 
fine sieve, and fill a strong paper cornet with a third part of this forcemeat, push small quarter 
inch quenelles the shape of beads on to a buttered sheet, and then poach them in boiling, salted 





FIG. 



FIG. 78. 



FIG. 79. 



water. Color half of the remaining forcemeat with a little vegetal carmine, of a fine, light 
red color, and put this also into a paper cornet, and force them through on to another but- 
tered sheet, letting these quenelles be channeled shaped, poach in salted, boiling water. Color the 
remainder of the forcemeat with spinach green or vegetal green to obtain a light pistachio color, 
and set them into a paper cornet also, and with it form oval shaped quenelles on to a buttered 
sheet, pour over some boiling, salted water, and let thern poach for a few minutes. These quenelles 
are used as garnishings for soups, and for a variety of entrees. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



209 



(155). TO MOLD QUENELLES WITH A SPOON, EITHER PLAIN, PILLED OE ROLLED IN 
FLOUR (Pour Mouler les Quenelles a la Cuillere, Simples, Fourre'es ou Routes a la Farine). 
Select two common, large and very thin iron soup spoons, put one of these into a small panful 
of hot water, and taking the other in the left hand fill the hollow center with the forcemeat, 
smooth the top with the blade of a small knife dipped in tepid water, arranging it in such a man- 
ner that there is as much forcemeat above as below the level of the spoon, then remove the quenelles 
with the hot spoon sliding it beneath the forcemeat, then slip it at once on to the bottom of a 
buttered sauteing pan, without turning it over, so that the same side is on top. If the quenelles 
are wanted filled, prepare a montglas composed of mushrooms, tongue, truffles or foies-gras; thicken 
it with some very compact reduced, good brown sauce, so that when cold the preparation can be 
divided into small parts, and rolled into olive shaped pieces in the hand; in this case, when the 




spoon is filled with forcemeat, make a small hole with the finger on the surface so as to insert the 
montglas, salpicon or puree, cover over with more forcemeat, being careful that it is the same 
thickness all over the filling, smooth it down nicely, and remove the quenelle with the hot spoon 
to slip it on to the bottom of a buttered sauteing pan without turning it over. Generally 
for one pound it will take eight large soup-spoonfuls, or sixteen dessert-spoons, or thirty-two 
tea-spoons, or sixty-four coffee-spoons. Poach these quenelles by pouring hot water into the 
sauteing pan beside the quenelles, and set the pan on the fire to bring it to boiling point; at the 
first boil, move it on one side, so that the water only simmers for six to fourteen minutes, accord- 
ing to their size. Lift the quenelles with a skimmer, and drain them on a cloth before using 
them. 







FIG. 81. 



FIG. 82. 



FIG. 83. 



FIG. 84. 



To Prepare Quenelles Rolled in Flour. Divide some game, chicken or fish forcemeat into 
pieces; roll each one on a flour dredged table into strings three-quarters of an inch in diameter; cut 
these into pieces three-quarters of an inch long; roll them on the table to give each one the shape 
of an olive or small egg half an inch in thickness and one inch in length. Larger ones can be 
made of Godiveau an inch and three-quarters long by five-eighths in thickness. Poach the quenelles 
in boiling water with salt added to it. The Godiveau quenelles are poached by ranging them at 
equal distances on a baking tin covered with a sheet of paper, then placing it in a very slack 
oven. 

(156). TO RAISE, PARE AND POACH BREASTS OF POULTRY AND GAME (Pour Lever, Parer 

et Pocher les Filets de Volaille et de Gibier). 

Cut off the pinions from a clean, singed chicken, split the breast skin from one end to the 
other in the center, open it so as to disclose the flesh, then detach the breasts with a small knife 
following the breast-bone, and leaving the minion fillets adhering to them, removing them later if 
not needed. Take these breasts one by one, lay them the smoothest side uppermost on a table, 
press them down with the left hand and slip the blade of a knife between the flesh and the skin, 
so as to remove the latter at one pull without breaking it. Beat the breasts lightly with a damp 
knife handle, trim them in round half hearts on one end, and pointed on the other ; remove the 
inside nerve, and the fine skin from the minion fillet, beat these lightly and lay them on the 



210 



THE EPICUREAN. 



inside surface of the breasts, if found necessary to enlarge them, but unless the breasts are very 
small, they are not added. They can be interlarded either with slices of truffle or tongue, 
by cutting five or six incisions across the minion-fillet and garnishing them with either of these. 
Proceed exactly in the same manner for breasts of game. 

To Poach. Place the breasts of poultry or game in a buttered sauteing pan; turn all the points 
toward the center and on them, place a sheet of buttered paper, put on the cover and set the pan 
in a slack oven leaving it in long enough to poach according to their size and quality. 

(157). TO CLEAN CURRANTS, MALAGA AND SMYRNA EAISINS (Pour Nettoyer les Kaisins 

de Oorinthe, les Kaisins da Malaga et de Smyrne). 

Lay the currants on a table mixing in with them some flour, rub well together, then shake 
them through a coarse sieve, (No. 95) having eight meshes so that the small currant stalks 
pass through; wash well and dry them, then pick them over to free them of all the gravel stones 
which are generally to be found in these fruits, as well as the large stalks adhering to them. 

Smyrna (Sultana) raisins are cleaned the same as currants; abstain from washing them. Seed 
Malaga raisins and pick off the stalks. 

(158). RAVIOLES (Eavioles). 

Koll out some raviole paste (No. 147), very thin and in a perfect square; lay on top half an 
inch from the edge and one inch apart some chicken raviole forcemeat balls (No. 93), three-quarters 
of an inch in diameter, after the entire flat is covered, moisten it lightly by passing a brush around 
the forcemeat balls and then place another flat of pa'ste on top, it to be the same thickness as the 





FIG. 85. 



FIG. 86. 



FIG. 87. 



under one and about four inches wider. Press on to this upper paste between the balls of forcemeat 
with a ruler and the whole length of the flat and then across so that every one of the balls is en- 
closed in a small square; cut each of these out with a channeled wheel or jagger (Fig. 87). The 
jaggers are used for cutting lattice work bands for pies, or else replace it by a round channeled 
pastry cutter. Lay the cut pieces on a flour dredged saucepan lid and then drop them into boiling 
water to poach for about twelve minutes. 

(159). TO SEDUCE AND STRAIN SAUCES THROUGH A TAMMY (Pour Require les Sauces et les 

Passer k 1'Etamine). 




The reason sauces are reduced is to give them the delicacy and succulence necessary to their 
finish, by incorporating into them fumets, stocks and the required condiments. The stocks that 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 211 

are to be added to the sauces in order to reduce them should be as concentrated as possible 
so as to avoid any superfluous labor. In order to reduce a strained, despumated sauce, 
pour it into a flat saucepan having a thick bottom, set it on a brisk fire and let the sauce boil 
while stirring it well with a spatula, and pressing it down in a way that the sauce will fail to 
adhere to the bottom, and therefore burn. Mix in gradually the stock needed for its improvement, 
and continue to boil until it has acquired the necessary consistency and succulence, then take it 
off, and strain it through a tammy. 

(160). BICE TOE OBOUSTADES AND BICE WITH OEEAM (Biz Pour Croustades et riz a la Creme). 

Pick well four pounds of Carolina rice, put it into a newly tinned saucepan without washing 
it, adding a half pound piece of fresh pork, moisten it to three times its height with some water: 
heat the liquid on a moderate fire, and at the first boil, remove it to a slower one; twenty minutes 
after when the liquid is nearly all absorbed, cover the rice with a heavy buttered paper, close the 
saucepan, and set it at the opening of a slack oven, finish cooking the rice, drying it thoroughly, 
then remove the saucepan from the oven, take out the piece of pork, and work the rice while still 
in the saucepan, using a spatula for the purpose, then pound it again in a mortar so as to reduce it 
to a smooth paste. Lay this rice on a dampened marble slab, or a thick baking sheet, knead it 
with the hands so that it becomes smooth, mold it round shaped, and set it in a saucepan, buttered 
over with a brush, or else a mold proportionate to the size needed for the croustade. Press the 
rice down well, cover the top with a round sheet of buttered paper, and set it in the ice box for 
seven or eight hours, but not allowing the saucepan or mold to touch the ice. Unmold the rice 
after dipping the saucepan in hot water, cutting it out with a knife. 

Rice with Cream. Blanch for a few moments half a pound of fine, picked and washed rice; 
drain and refresh, then put it back into the saucepan and moisten it with one quart of boiled 
milk in which a stick of vanilla has been infused. Let the liquid come again to a boil, cover the 
saucepan, and finish cooking the whole very slowly for forty minutes. When the rice is tender and 
has absorbed all the liquid, add to it a pinch of salt, three ounces of sugar, two ounces of fresh 
butter and a few spoonfuls of whipped cream. Sometimes a few egg-yolks are added to this rice, 
if so, they must be put in before any other of the ingredients, while the rice has all its heat, so 
that the eggs can cook while in the act of stirring them. 

(161). TO PEEP ABE EISSOLES (Pour Preparer les Bissoles). 

Kissoles are prepared in two different ways, the first, by rolling out some fine paste or 
clippings of puff paste, into a long, thin piece from ten to fourteen inches wide; wet the bottom 
edges of this paste, then lay on it four balls of an inch and a quarter in diameter for the two 
and three-quarter inch rissoles made of rissole preparation, and from two and three-eighths inches 
distance apart from each other, and two inches from the edges; refold the paste forward, so as to 
cover up the prepared balls, and fasten the paste down to six-eighths of an inch around the balls; 
press on the two layers of paste to adhere them together, then 
cut out the rissoles half circular with a channeled pastry-cutter 
either two and one-quarter, two and one-half or two and three- 
quarters inches in diameter. As soon as the rissoles of the first 
FIG. 89. row are cut? i av them aside; pare the edges of the paste and 

begin the operation again; reduce the height of the cut out rissoles by pressing them down with 
the finger without misshaping them. These rissoles may now be breaded and dipped in egg, or left 
white; in the first case, lay them simply on a tin sheet covered with a white paper till ready to 
fry. In the second, place them at some distance apart on a floured cloth so that the paste cannot 
adhere to it. To prepare rissoles differently, roll out a thin flat, cut it into small round pieces with 
a channeled pastry-cutter either two and one-quarter, two and one-half or two and three-quarters 
inches in diameter, and on each one of these, lay a prepared rissole ball; wet the paste all round, 
and fold the piece of paste over the ball fastening the two edges together. Press the tops lightly 
with the fingers, keeping them a good shape, and lay the unbreaded ones on a floured cloth, and 
the breaded ones on white paper. 

il82). TO OUT BOOTS WITH A SPOON AND A VEGETABLE OUTTEE (Maniere de Oouper les 

Eacines a la Cuillere et k la Machine). 

Peel or scrape carrots, peel turnips, celery roots, turnip-cabbage or kohl-rabi, sweet potatoes 
or common potatoes; wash and keep them in cold water until needed; all of these vegetables 





212 



THE EPICUREAN. 



including peeled truffles can be cut olive shaped or in rounds large or small according to require- 
ments (Fig. 91). The rounds should be from a quarter of an inch to one inch in diameter; the 
long ovals from half an inch to one and a quarter inches. The oval spoons for this purpose 
may be either plain or channeled. When cutting vegetables with a spoon into either balls 
or olives dip the sharp end of the spoon into the thickest part of the root all through the depth 
and endeavor to remove the pieces as whole and perfect as possible. 




FIG. 91. 



Vegetable Cutter. (Tig. 92). This utensil is simple, practical and useful. It is used for cutting 
vegetables and roots into various shapes for soups or garnishing; having them pass by pressure 
through the deep cutters made of steel and movable so they can be easily changed when so 
desired. To proceed, first cut the roots into thin slices, all of equal thickness; place one of these 
on any one of the selected cutters; put this under the press and bear heavily on it. The pieces 
will fall through; pick out the imperfect ones; the others are ready for use. 

(163). BLONDE AND BROWN ROUX (Eons blond et bran), 

Roux is flour fried in butter and allowed to attain more or less color; it is used for thickening 
gravies, soup stocks and sauces; there are two kinds of roux, the blonde and the brown; the blonde 
is made as follows: Put into a saucepan to melt, one pound and two ounces of butter, add to it 
one pound of sifted flour and place the saucepan on a moderate fire to let it cook slowly while stir- 
ring until it becomes of a light blonde; this is used for veloute. For the brown, leave it on the fire 
or in a slack oven until it assumes a darker color; should it not be necessary to use it at once, 
pour it into a vessel, and employ it as needed, but when required for immediate use, take it from 
the fire, leave it in the pan and let it lose a few degrees of its heat before moistening it. For 
a veloute 1 , dilute it with a white veloute stock, and a brown espagnole stock if needed for brown; 
the proportions for both veloute and espagnole being: one pound and two ounces of butter, one 
pound of flour and four quarts of either white or brown stock. 



(164), BUM FLAVORED WITH VANILLA; SPIRIT OF STRAWBERRIES, RASPBERRIES AND 
APRIOOTS (Rhum VanillS ; Esprit de Praises, Framboises et Abricots). 

Rum flavored with Vanilla. Put twelve vanilla beans cut in pieces in a quart bottle with a 
quarter of a pint of boiling water, twelve hours later fill up the bottle with good rum and leave it 
for ten days; it will then be ready for use. 

Spirit of Strawberries, etc. Crush thirty pounds of strawberries or raspberries; to this pulp 
add three quarts of spirits of wine, put into an earthen crock, cover and leave to infuse for fif- 
teen days. Distill the fruits in an alembic in a bain-marie and continue the distillation until the 
liquor reaches twenty degrees. Spirit of apricots is made the same way only taking twenty pounds 
of fruit instead of thirty for each thr.ee quarts of spirit. The fruits are pressed through a sieve 
and the kernels broken and crushed in a mortar, then mixed in with the apricots. 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



213 



(165). SALPIOON; HOW TO PEEPAEE (Salpicon; Maniere de le Preparer), 
Salpicons are prepared with cooked and cold meats and fish, red beef tongue, sweetbreads oi 

beef palates; they are also made of chicken or game fillets, foies-gras, also with truffles, mushrooms. 

cepes, and besides these, oysters, lobsters, crawfish, etc. 

The characteristic of salpicon is that it is cut into small squares; they may be prepared with 

one kind of substance alone, but are generally mixed, for example: chickens, with red beef tongue, 

truffles or mushrooms; game, with foies-gras or truffles, and fish, with mushrooms and truffles. 

Salpicons are always thickened with a sauce corresponding to the nature of the meat, and in all 

cases it must be succulent and condensed. 

(166). TO SCALD (Echauder). 

In an analogous sense, scalding means to dip, to plunge in boiling water. A pig, a suckling 
pig, calf's head and feet of either the calf or sheep, chicken's legs and even whole poultry is scalded. 

To scald a pig is to detach the bristles adhering to its back by means of hot water, done by dip- 
ping it once or twice in hot water to facilitate pulling them out more readily, then scrape the 
surface with a knife; this operation must be performed as quickly as possible. The same to be 
done for calf's feet and head, also for sheep and lamb's trotters. Poultry is sometimes scalded, 
but this system of treatment should be completely abandoned and the feathers picked off dry, 
this being far superior to the scalding process; for by scalding poultry, especially young chickens 
they become partially cooked and the skin is apt to tear when being trussed; they also contract a 
bad taste and decompose quicker than those that are dry picked. 

(167), SIEVE-CLOTH OF DIFFERENT SIZE MESHES (Toile a Tamis de Difltates Grosseurs). 

Fig. S3 (four mesh) is used for broken and coarsely chopped almonds; Fig. 94 (six mesh) is used 
for Mocha sugar, finely chopped almonds and raisins; Fig. 95 (eight mesh) is used for bread 




FIG, 93. 




FIG. 95. 




*M *!* d* *- 



FIG. 96. 



FIG. 97. 



crumbs; Fig. 96 (twelve mesh) is used for powdered macaroons, purges and marmalades; Fig. 97 
(sixteen mesh) is used for sugar, flour and purees; Fig. 98 (twenty-eight mesh) is used for icing 
sugar. A mesh indicates the number of holes to each linear inch. 



(168). SPICES, AROMATIOS, AND SEASONINGS FOR COOKING PURPOSES (Epices, 

Aromates et Assaisonnements pour la Cuisine). 

The different articles employed as seasonings in kitchen work are comprised of salt, spices, 
aromatics, butter, fat, vinegar, oil and mustard. Salt is without exception the most indispensable 
seasoning; it removes the insipid taste from meats, vegetables and all other eatables. It excites 
the appetite and helps digestion, but of course must be used with judgment, for too much is apt 
to make it unhealthy. Coarse salt is the one to be used for cooking boiled meats and vegetables. 
Finely pulverized white salt is for table use and the one used in kitchens for seasoning is merely 
crushed and sifted purified salt. Spices are of different kinds; they are void of nutritious 



214 THE 

properties and are ouly for the purpose of improving the taste of various foods. They are composed 
of common black and white pepper, cayenne pepper; then come the weaker spices such as nutmeg, 
cinnamon, cloves and coriander. For seasoning, common raw pepper, ground only when ready to 
use is both agreeable and a tonic, but as much cannot be said for pepper cooked in stews, sauces or 
soups, for it loses its aroma while cooking and therefore only the acridity remains. Peppers that do 
not deteroriate while cooking are paprika (a Hungarian product), and red pepper; these both give a 
most agreeable flavor to stews and sauces, increasing as the cooking proceeds, and either of them 
are agreeable to the taste and a tonic without producing any irritating results. 

Aromatics. Among the most aromatic plants used in the kitchen must be mentioned bay 
leaf, marjoram, chives, sage, thyme, wild thyme, savory, tarragon, pimpernel, chervil, pepper-cress, 
parsley, onion, shallot, garlic and horseradish root. Some of these are used in a dry state, others 
in a fresh, and both are employed in numerous preparations. They can be used in sautes, braizes, 
in sauces and even in soups. The action of these aromatics on the general health is only injurious 
when indulged in injudiciously or in too large quantities, but when employed with a certain 
reserve, they are both healthy, stimulating and agreeable. 

Curry, the Best, comes from India. An imitation curry is made of one ounce of coriander 
seeds, two ounces of cayenne, a quarter of an ounce of cardamon seeds, one ounce salt, two 
ounces of tumeric, one ounce ginger, half an ounce of mace and a third of an ounce of saffron. 

Prepared Red Pepper is made with paprika (Hungarian red pepper), and Spanish sweet 
pimentos mixed in equal quantities. In case paprika cannot be had use quarter cayenne pepper 
and three-quarters Spanish pimentos. 

Spices. Before grinding spices be careful that they are the freshest; grind each kind separately 
and sift them through a silk sieve, then mix thoroughly and put them into hermetically closed 
bottles, and set these in a cool place (they are only to be mixed when ready to use). 

Spices for Bread Stuffing. Two ounces of sage, one ounce of marjoram, half an ounce of 
cayenne pepper, half an ounce of allspice, one ounce of thyme, two ounces of white pepper, a 
quarter of an ounce of nutmeg, and half an ounce of finely minced green celery leaf. 

Spices for Game Pies and Galantines. One pound of cinnamon, one pound of nutmeg, one 
pound of cloves, one pound of whole peppers, three ounces of cayenne pepper, three ounces of 
sweet Spanish pepper, three ounces of thyme and three ounces of bay leaf. These spices should be 
mixed in the proportion of one ounce to a pound of salt. 

Spices for General Use. Two ounces of cinnamon, two ounces of nutmeg, two ounces of 
cloves, two ounces of white pepper, twelve ounces of prepared red pepper, four ounces of mace, 
two ounces of thyme, two ounces of sage, two ounces of marjoram, two ounces of rosemary. One 
ounce of spices to two pounds of salt. 

Spices for Turtle Soup. Two ounces of curry, half an ounce of thyme, two ounces dry 
mushrooms, half an ounce of sage, a quarter of an ounce of mace, half an ounce garden citron, 
half an ounce of basil, half an ounce marjoram, half of the peel of a chopped lemon, two ounces of 
white pepper. These aromatics and spices are used when there is no time to prepare a stock, or 
when preserved turtle has to be used. Two ounces of spices to one pound of salt. 

Spices for Goose Liver Patties (Pate defoiesgras). Four ounces of nutmeg, four ounces of 
cloves, four ounces of basil, four of marjoram, four of thyme, two and a half ounces of black pepper, 
three ounces of white pepper, two and one-third ounces of bay leaf, two and a half ounces of mace, 
two and a half ounces of ginger, two and a third of coriander seeds, one and two-thirds ounce of 
sweet pepper. One ounce of these mixed spices to every two pounds of salt. 

(169). STEAKINE; HOW TO OAST AND OOLOE IT (Ste~arine; Manierede la Oouleretde la Colored 
Casting stearine in plaster molds is most simple and only requires a little attention. Tinned 
copper molds should be smooth in the inside and even polished. Put all the plaster molds in a vessel 
after separating each piece and leave them in tepid water for half an hour or longer according to 
their size. For tinned copper molds coat them first with a thin layer of stearine, then place another 
layer on this first one and continue until the stearine be sufficiently thick. The stearine must be melted 
in a bain-marie or on a slow fire, being careful to keep it stirred and also not to heat it too violently 
so that it remains white, for if too greatly heated it turns yellow and thereby looses its beautiful white 
appearance; if this should happen it should only be used to coat the inside of large pieces or else 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



215 



for pads for filling the inside of borders. To cast stearine in plaster molds, take the molds from 
the water, drain them out for u moment and then fit each piece into its respective place ; tie 
around firmly, fill up with the melted stearine and when a light crust has formed on the surface, 
break it and empty out the mold ; let rest for one minute, put it back into the water, remove and 
unmold with the greatest care. Should the unmolded pieces fail to be smooth or else be creased, 
this is caused by the stearine not being sufficiently warm and the molds too cold, and that the 
stearine was cast too slowly. This is of great importance to observe and is most essential when 
perfection is required. When the objects intended for casting are frail, such as rings, arms, 
figures or other thin pieces, it will be advisable to insert thin wires into these parts before casting 
the stearine in the mold. After unmolding the subjects, wash the mold well, being careful that no 
particles of stearine remain in the joints, so that it can be thoroughly closed and the stearine 
cannot escape through these joints Scrape the seams or moldings carefully. Stearine subjects 
can be colored with one or more colors; for this purpose use water paints (tubes in preference). 
This kind is mostly employed for this work and to it add a little beef gall to enable the paint to 
adhere on to the greasy surface. Use a soft badger brush and proceed with care; always 
wait until the first coat be dry before applying another. With a little taste and skill subjects 
can be painted so that a great effect is produced, especially for the larger ones. When required to 
be bronzed, mix a few drops of gum arab with a little of the gall, add bronze powder and a little 
water ; stir well, keeping it the consistency of honey. Paint over the subject with a camel's hair 
brush and if one coat be not sufficient then give another, adding a little more water. 



(170). TO STRAIN PUKEES (Pour passer les purees). 





Fio. 9!'a. 



FIG. 99. 

Vegetable, chicken, 
crustacean, and game 
purees are strained 
through a tammy (Fig. 
99) in order to obtain 
them as fine as possible. 
To accomplish this it 
will require the service 
of two persons : take 
hold of the tammy on 
both sides, pour the 
puree into its hollow 
center, then have two 
wooden spoons one lay- 
ing in the other, and 
press them vigorously 
against the tammy, 
allowing the puree 




216 THE EPICUREAN. 

to fall into a deep dish set underneath; this is easily accomplished and depends entirely upon the 
regular motion of the two spoons, as they must advance backward and forward without getting 
separated, or use either one of the machines shown in Figs. 99a and 99b. 

(171). TO COOK SUGAE (Pour cuire le sucre), 

In former days sugars were less refined than in our time, therefore it was most important that 
they should undergo the operation of clarification, or, as the very word implies rid them of their 
impurities and make them perfectly clear. To-day this operation is almost useless, however, in 
case of necessity we will give the exact manner of proceeding, for it may sometimes be found 
useful. Put twenty pounds of sugar into a copper basin, melt it with two-thirds of its quantity of 
water, or one-half pint of water to each pound of sugar, set it on the fire, and when the scum 
begins to rise, throw in some egg-whites beaten up with water, the proportions being one white for 
each quart of water; do not stir it again, but let it rise to the surface twice, then pour in half a 
pint of clear water without eggs; let it rise a third time, and as it does so, remove from off the fire 
and skim it. Return it to one side of the fire to let it boil and drive the scum on one side of the 
basin, skim this off as quickly as it gathers. Soon the sugar will become very fine, clear and trans- 
parent, but if otherwise, then let it boil till it clarifies thoroughly and pass it through the flannel 
bag. Sugar clarified by this process is ready to be submitted to all kinds of cooking which we 
explain further on. The cooking of sugar is easily measured by a thermometer, but a clever work- 
man will quickly find it out by the mere touch. These various cookings take different names which 
we will now endeavor to explain. 

First Liss6 ou Petit Filet or Small Thread. Cook the sugar, and in order to be sure that 
it has reached the first cooking, take out a little of the sugar with a spoon, dip the index finger 
in it and apply the finger to the thumb; separate the two fingers immediately, the sugar should 
then form a small thread, the thermometer marking two hundred and fifteen degrees Fahrenheit, 
(one hundred and one degrees Centigrade). 

Second Grand Lisse or Large Thread. At two hundred and seventeen degrees, the 
sugar stretches a little more between the fingers, it is now cooked to large thread (one hundred 
and two degrees Centigrade). 

Third Petit PerU or Little Pearl. The sugar reaches this cooking when between the 
two fingers it stretches and forms a thread that breaks. The thermometer is then two hundred 
and twenty degrees (one hundred and five degrees Centigrade). 

Fourth Grand PerU or Large Pearl. As soon as the sugar extends from one finger 
to the other without breaking it has reached large pearl, two hundred and twenty-two degrees 
Fahrenheit (one hundred and six Centigrade). 

Fifth Au souffle ou Glue, or the Blow. Dip a skimmer into the sugar, knock it at 
once against the edges of the basin, blow through the skimmer so as to make the small bubbles fly 
out, and when they do so properly, the sugar has reached its degree of cooking. The thermometer 
now marks two hundred and thirty degrees Fahrenheit (one hundred and ten degrees Centigrade). 

Sixth Petit Bouleor Small Ball. Dip the finger first into cold water, then in the sugar, and 
immediately into water; if the sugar has reached to proper cooking or small ball, it can be rolled 
into a soft ball between the fingers, two hundred and thirty-six to two hundred and thirty-eight 
degrees Fahrenheit (one hundred and fourteen to one hundred and fifteen degrees Centigrade). 

Seventh Grand BouU or Large Ball. When the thermometer reaches two hundred and 
forty-six to two hundred and forty-eight degrees Fahrenheit or one hundred and nineteen to 
one hundred and twenty degrees Centigrade, then the ball instead of remaining soft when rolled 
between the fingers, becomes solid and hard, the sugar has now reached large ball. 

Eighth Petit Casst or Small Crack. Dip the tip of the finger into cold water, then 
into the sugar and rapidly into cold water again, so as to detach it from the finger; if it has 
reached its proper cooking it should break. The thermometer is now two hundred and ninety 
degrees Fahrenheit (one hundred and forty-three degrees Centigrade). 

Ninth Casst or Crack. Letting the sugar boil a few minutes longer, it will reach the 
crack; now dip the finger into cold water, then into the sugar, and again into the water, the 
sugar must break between the teeth without adhering to them. It reaches this degree when the 
thermometer is at three hundred and ten degrees Fahrenheit (or one hundred and fifty-four degree? 
Centigrade). 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 217 

Tenth. Grand Casse" or Large Crack or Caramel. This last cooking is exceedingly delicate 
and requires the most particular care, so as to avoid having the sugar turn black which it is apt to 
do very easily. When reaching this last cooking, the sugar slightly loses its whiteness and 
assumes a shade scarcely perceptible to the eye; this is when the thermometer reaches three hundred 
degrees Farenheit, and it is now time to add to each twenty pounds of sugar, a teaspoonful of 
lemon juice. Continue the cooking and when the thermometer reaches three hundred and forty- 
five to three hundred and fifty degrees Fahrenheit, then remove the basin quickly from the fire, 
and instantly pour its contents on a marble to get cold. 

These are the various degrees the cooking of sugar undergoes, practice alone makes perfect in 
this particular work, which can only be acquired after much study and attention. 

(172). SUGARS OF DIFFERENT COLORS, AND ICING SUGAR (Snores de Diffe"rentes Couleurs et 

Sucre a glace Impalpable). 

For Pink, have powdered sugar from which icing sugar has been sifted, spread it on a baking- 
sheet covered with white paper, lay the tin on top of a very moderate fire, and pour into it sufficient 
carmine to give it the necessary color; mix and rub it slowly between the hands until the moisture 
contained in the carmine be entirely evaporated, then sift it through a sixteen mesh sieve 
(Fig. 97). 

For Yellow. Prepare the sugar the same as for the pink, using Breton vegetal yellow. 

For Orange. The same as the pink, coloring with Breton vegetal orange, or yellow and red 
mixed to imitate orange. 

Lilac and Violet. The same as the pink, coloring it with red and ultramarine blue, or else 
with Breton vegetal lilac or violet. 

Blue Breton vegetal blue and ultramarine blue. 

Green. Breton vegetal green, or else spinach green or watercress green. 

Icing Sugar. There are very few cities where powdered sugar is unobtainable, also icing 
sugar (confectionery sugar), but in case it has to be prepared at home the following remarks will 
be found useful. Pound some lump sugar to the finest powder, pass it through an ordinary sieve, 
then through an icing sieve called a drum; this latter includes two sieves, one for passing ordinary 
sugar and another much finer for passing the icing sugar, meaning exceedingly fine powdered 
sugar almost impalpable. 

(173). BAND TART (Tourte a bande). 

Roll out on a floured table, a layer of foundation paste (No. 135), cut in this a round, eight 
inches in diameter, lay this round on a small baking-sheet, moisten the border with a brush, and 
apply on this wet part, a puff -paste border having received six turns, five-eighths of an inch in 
thickness, one and one-half inches wide and twenty-six inches long; cut the two ends bias, fasten 




Fio. 100. 



them together after slightly dampening them and set the tart aside in a cool place for fifteen 
minutes. Prepare an egg wash of well beaten whole eggs, or the yolks alone diluted in a little 
cold water, apply it to the border, prick the inside or else put in a small mold, to prevent it 
inflating, then set the tart in a hot oven the ,-ame as for a vol-au-vent for thirty or forty minutes. 
After removing it from the fire, detach it from the sheet, and lay it on a dish to keep warm. 

(174). EMPTY TARTS, ANCIENT STYLE (Tonrtes k 1'Ancienne). 

Spread on a baking-sheet a layer of foundation paste eight inches in diameter; wet the 
edges of this crust using a brush, and lay on the center a spherical shaped pad, four and three- 
quarters in diameter and two and one-half high, made of paper and wrapped in slices of fat pork. 
Cover this pad with an upper layer of paste made with puff-paste clippings, fasten the upper and 



218 THE EPICUREAN. 

lower crusts together by pressing them down with the thumb, and cut away the surplus paste with 
the tip of a small knife, following the outlines of the lower crust. Moisten the edges of the crust and 
piace it on a band of six-turn puff paste (No. 147), an inch and a half wide by twenty-six inches 
long, and three-eighths of an inch thick; cut off the ends on the bias, wet them slightly and fasten 




FIG. 101. 

them together with the finger; channel the band lightly, decorate the dome with leaves cut from the 
paste, egg the surface, also the band, and bake the tart for thirty to forty minutes in a well heated, 
but not too hot oven. After removing the tart from the fire, cut the dome at the base so as to 
remove the pad; it is now ready to fill. 

(175). THICKENINGS POK SOUPS, SAUCES AND STEWS (Liaisons pour Potages, Sauces et 

Kagouts). 

Thickening for Soups. Put some egg-yolks into a bowl, beat them up with a wooden spoon 
and dilute with a few spoonfuls of good raw cream; some broth, or cold sauce; pass this through a 
sieve or tammy, add a dash of grated nutmeg and a few bits of fine butter. Boil well the soup, 
remove it to one side of the range and mix in the strained thickening; return it to the hot fire, to 
let cook without ceasing to stir and especially without letting it boil. 

For Sauces. This thickening is composed of egg-yolks beaten and diluted with some cold 
broth or raw cream. In order to thicken the sauce, it should necessarily be boiling, then remove 
it from the hot fire and stir a spoonful or more of it into the thickening, then pour the rest of the 
thickening into the sauce and cook it while stirring over a slow fire, without permitting it to boil. 
All sauces thickened with eggs must afterward be strained through a tammy. 

Thickening or Liaison Prepared Ready to Use. Twenty-five egg- yolks for one quart of 
cream; mix well together, pass it through a fine strainer and keep it in a pot (Fig. 171) in order 
to thicken sauces and stews as they are needed. 

Butter and Cream Thickening. Incorporate some butter and cream, and just when ready 
to serve, stir it vigorously (do not heat it again), and serve it at once. 

Blood Thickening. Reserve the blood of poultry or game, adding to it a little vinegar to 
prevent it from coagulating, then strain it through a sieve and stir it in gradually when needed to 
thicken a sauce. 

Arrowroot, Fecula and Cornstarch Thickening. Dilute one or the other of these with some 
water, broth or cold milk; strain through a sieve, and pour it into the liquid, stirring it 
continuously. 

Thickening of Kneaded Butter. Incorporate as much flour into butter as it will absorb to form 
a soft paste; mix it in small parts in the sauce, stirring constantly until all the butter is melted. 

(176). TO LINE AND BAKE TIMBALE CRUSTS (Pour Foncer et Cuire les Croutes a Timbales). 
Butter a plain timbale mold, five inches in diameter at the bottom, five and a quarter across 
the top and five and a half inches deep. If the timbale is to be decorated, apply some bits of 
sweetened noodle paste against the sides and bottom of the mold, dampen them with a brush 
dipped in water and then line the timbale with a paste not rolled out too thin. With a pastry 
cutter, two inches in dkimeter narrower than the mold, cut the paste from the bottom, but do not 
remove it; cover the whole surface of the paste with buttered white paper and fill in the empty 
space with common flour; dampen the edges, and cover the top first with a round piece of buttered 
paper, and then with a layer of the same paste, fastening it down to the dampened sides. Egg 
over the surface, and let it rest for fifteen minutes in a cool place, then set the timbale on a round 
baking sheet and cook it for fifty minutes in a hot oven. After removing it, unmold, open the 
top (the end which before was the bottom), and lift up the round piece previously cut with the 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



219 



pastry cutter, and which can easily be removed, then take out all the flour through this opening, 
also the paper, and brush the inside twice over with egg-yolks, then lay the timbale for a very few 
moments in a very hot oven so that it browns nicely, and range it on a dish to be garnished. 




FIG. 103. 



(177). TO BRUSH AND PEEL TRUFFLES (Pour Brosser et Peler les Truffes). 
Put some raw, fresh truffles into cold water; wash them well, changing the water, then 
take them out one by one, and rub the surfaces over strongly with a hard brush, and throw them 
as fast as they are done into clean water, drain; take them out again one by one, and remove with a 
small knife all those parts the brush failed to touch, then refresh them leaving them as little 
as possible in the water. Wipe the truffles on a cloth, and with the tip of a knife detach all the 
skin covering them, cutting it away as thinly as possible, put the truffles as fast as they are done 
into a saucepan with a well-fitting lid; put also the peelings into a saucepan, and keep them in a 
cool place while waiting to be used. 

(178), TO DRESS, SINGE AND TRUSS POULTRY AND GAME FOR ENTREES (Pour Habiller, 

Plamber et Brider la Volatile et le Gibier k Plumes pour Entries). 
After having dressed (drawn) and singed the pieces of poultry or game, remove the fork and 

breastbone, lifting it out through the neck without injuring the breasts; cut the legs below the 
joint, suppress the drumstick bones, and slip the leg into its place, 
having previously burned the top of the leg with alcohol so as to remove 
the outer skin. To truss either capon, young turkey, pullet, chicken 
or guinea-fowl: first, have a trussing needle threaded with some strong 
string, pass it through one thigh to the other and in the joint of the 
thick part of the leg, then cross through the wing directing the needle 
toward the neck, and take up the skin of the neck while passing through 
it, fastening it down to the back; pass through the other wing, tighten 
the string so that the wings and thigh are well attached to the body of 
the fowl, and the breasts are quite prominent. Secondly, with the 
needle cross through the back 
near the rump, direct the 

needle so that it passes the thickest part of the two legs, 

fasten the string strongly so that the thigh is well 

attached to the side, thrust the posterior inside, and tie 

it down with a few turns of a string. To prepare geese 

and tame ducks for entrees, suppress the wings and 

neck, singe and pick them, cut off the claws, truss 

the legs inside, and fasten them down by crossing 

through with the needle at the joints of the thighs and FlG 104 

the stumps of the wings; give them a rounded appear- 
ance, and push the posterior into the inside, and tie it firmly in place. For squabs, partridges and 

quails: pluck the feathers, singe and lightly pick them and draw them through the pouch; then 

truss them by making an incision in the rump, and tie them the same as the chickens. 

(179). TO DRESS, SINGE AND TRUSS POULTRY AND GAME FOR ROASTING. (Pour Habiller, 

Flamber et Brider la Volaille et le Gibier k Plumes pour Rotir). 

Dressing poultry and feathered game consists of first bleeding, then plucking out the feathers, 
drawing, singing and trussing them. To dress a chicken it must first be singed lightly all over with 
spirits of wine set afire, or over a gas-jet, in order to remove every vestige of feathers. When the 
poultry or game is singed, then pick out all the feather-stumps remaining in the skin. Burn off 
the skin from the legs to enable it to be taken off with a cloth. To singe small birds stick them 
simply on small skewers four or six at a time and pass them over a flame. For drawing a 
chicken cut on the back of the neck making a long aperture through which the pouch and wind 
pipe can be removed; put the index finger into the interior following the neck to detach the lungs 
adhering to the inside; make a small opening next to the rump to empty the chicken entirely and 
then wipe out the insules, cut the skin below the head, chop the neck off on a level with the breast 
chop off the feet and the end of the pinions and cross the wings over the back of the chicken. 
Thread a long piece of string into a large trussing needle, lay the chicken on the table, pressing it 




220 



THE EPICUREAN. 



down on its back, then with the open left hand take hold of the two thighs, so as to keep them 
held up at an equal height, pass through the flesh with the needle just below the drum-sticks, turn 
the chicken over on its side to thread it through the wings, running the needle through the breast 
skin; pull the string tight tie it on the side with a knot, and lay the chicken once more on its 
back, press the thighs down again with the left hand and run the needle through above the drum- 





FIG. 105. 



FIG. 106. 



sticks, then turn the chicken over on its side, and introduce the needle across the carcass, and at 
a quarter of the length of the bird near the rump to the other side, to meet the other end of the 
string and then tie it into a knot (Fig. 106). In this manner the chicken is properly trussed, 
and both knots being on the same side, they are easily cut and the string pulled out when the 
chicken is cooked. Pheasants, partridges and pigeons are to be trussed the same way when in- 
tended for roasting. After the poultry or game is trussed, lard it with thin slices of fresh pork, 




FIG. 107. 



FIG. 108. 



FIG. 109. 



sufficiently large to cover the whole breast, pare them square shaped, score them lightly on one 
side, and lay them over the breast, fastening them on with a string as shown in Fig. 109. 

Wild Ducks (Canvas Backs, Red Heads, Slack Heads, Mallard, Ruddy, Teal, etc.). Select 
two fine red head ducks, pick them as far up as one inch from the head, being very careful 
not to tear the skin; singe and draw. In order to accomplish this, the skin must be cut the whole 
length of the neck from its beginning until the back of the head is reached, remove the pouch and 
windpipe, stick the finger in the neck far down in the inside to detach the lights from the bones 





FIG. no. 



FIG. 111. 



and all adhering to the breast, make an incision above the rump and take out the gizzard drawing 
up the whole of the insides; cut the neck where it begins at the carcass, cutting the skin 
as far up as it is picked. Wipe the duck carefully, thrust the feet inside and season it 
interiorly with salt and mignonette. Should the duck be gamy it must have the inside 
washed out. Pick the feathers from the head and separate it where the neck finishes ; 
pick out the eyes and place the head in the opening that was used for drawing the bird; truss the 
duck bringing the feet toward the front and passing the trussing needle threaded with string near 



ELEMENTARY METHODS. 



221 



the first joint of the thigh next to the feet. Run the needle through the duck under the breast 
and then across the other thigh, pressing the duck down well so as to round well the breast, bring 
the neck skin down on the back and run the needle on the bias through the pinion-bone at the 
same time through the neck skin to pass it through the other pinion and return from whence it 
started, pull the string tight and push the rump inward, running the needle through to keep it in 
place, and bringing it back to one inch from its starting point, passing it through the skin and 
through the head by the eyes, fasten the two ends of string together tying them firmly. 

(180). VOL-AU-VENT CRUST (Croute de vol-au-vent). 

Prepare a puff paste with one pound of fine, dry flour and one pound of good butter, proceed- 
ing as for No. 146; give it six and a half turns, and when the paste is made, lay it on a floured 
baking tin, and set on top of it a model of tin or heavy cardboard having the exact dimensions 
desired for the vol-au-vent, cut the paste all around this with a small, heated knife, following the 
outlines of the model, but keeping the knife slightly inclined outward. As soon as the vol-au-vent 
is cut, turn it with one stroke upside down on to another dampened round baking sheet, being 




FIG. 112. 

careful not to injure its shape; groove the edges lightly with the back of a knife as represented in 
in the plate (Fig. 112); egg the surfaces over, and trace a ring, using the tip of a small knife an 
inch and a half from the edge, then in the center of this ring trace four or five light incisions to 
form lozenges. Bake the vol-au-vent in a hot oven for thirty minutes or more according to its 
size, opening the oven as little as possible. When the paste is dry and a fine color, take it out, open 
it by lifting up the center cover, and empty it of all the uncooked paste within, lay the vol-au-vent 
on to a dish, and keep it warm in the heater, not allowing the crust to get cold before using it. 
Small vol-au-vent crusts may be prepared the same way, using a three and a half inch pastry 
cutter to cut them with. 

(181). SMALL VOL-AU-VENT CRUST IS TWO PIECES (Petites croutes de vol-au-vent en deux pieces). 
Roll out with the rolling pin on a floured table, one pound of six-turn puff paste (No. 146), 
one quarter of an inch to three-eighths in thickness, let it rest for fifteen minutes, then 
cut from its surface six channeled or plain round pieces three and a half inches in diameter; as 
soon as this is done, remove the centers with a smooth pastry cutter two and a half inches in 
diameter; dipping it each time into hot water so as to make a clean cut, but it must be wiped dry 
before using. Cut up the clippings of paste, roll them to an 
eighth of an inch thick, and from this piece cut six round 
channeled or plain round under crusts three and a half inches 
in diameter, range these at regular distances on a wet baking 
sheet, moisten the edges of the paste with a brush, and lay on 
top of each one, one of the prepared rings, taking them up 
delicately so as not to break them, and press lightly on them to fasten the edges together; egg the 
surfaces of the rings, and let them rest for ten minutes, then push the baking sheet into a well 
heated, but moderate oven to bake from twenty to twenty-five minutes; after removing, detach 
them from the tin, press the center of the paste down with the finger, and keep them warm for 
garnishing. Small vol-au-vents may be prepared the same way making them of one piece only. 

(182). WHITE STOCK FOR MEATS AND VEGETABLES (Blanc pour cuisson de Viandes et Legumes). 
Have half a pound of chopped beef suet or marrow, and as much fresh fat pork, melt the 
whole in a saucepan, adding to it two minced carrots, two onions and one onion with six cloves in 
it, a bunch of parsley garnished with a bayleaf and as much thyme and a bit of mace. Add to it 
a teaspoonful of whole peppers, and put this on the fire to fry without coloring. Mix in well one 
ounce of flour, and dilute with three quarts of water, and four quarts of broth, salt, and the pulp 
of two lemons. This stock is used for cooking calf's heads, lamb trotters and also for artichoke 
bottoms, cardoons and oyster plants. 





Fid. 113. 



FIG. 114. 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 



KITCHEN UTENSILS. 



EOASTEE AND SPITS (Kotissoire et broches). 

In large kitchens the only roaster possible is the one shown in Fig. 115 with its broad hearth, long 
spits, long hanging chains and wheels; an endless chain with a weight sufficiently heavy to rotate it, 





FIG. 116. 



FIG. 115. 

steam, electricity or hydraulic pressure can to be used advantageously to attain the same end. Fig. 117, 
represents a roasting spit for small game, quails, woodcocks, thrush, etc. It is provided with six 
skewers; run the game on to one of 
these through the two leg bones; use 
as much as possible the different 
sides for different games, for instance 
one side for quails, partridges or 
thrush and the other three skewers 
for snipe, woodcock, plovers, bus- 
tards, etc. These spits are very 
useful for large dinners, for eight 

quails can be put on each skewer or ^^ ; ,. ,,,,,,^, _...^^^..,r^-rr-Jy 

forty-eight quails can be roasted FIG ]lg H 

at once without having them too 

crowded. The length of the spit is sixty-eight inches and the length of each one of the six skewers 
is twenty inches. For cradle spit No. 116, the cut of meat to be roasted such as loin, the saddle 



FIG. 117. 



224 



TTIE EPICUREAN. 



is placed exactly in the center to regulate the weight evenly. The simple spit for poultry, game, 
turkey, etc. is shown in Fig. 118. A spit being at times an impossibility, one is frequently 
obliged to have resource to the more simple roasters. The greatest objection to the old 
fashioned shell roaster is that the spit did not turn alone, it had to be everlastingly 





FIG. 119. 



FIG. 120. 



turned for if left the meat would certainly spoil; a great improvement on this is the turning 

spring spit to be wound up like a clock and strikes an alarm when slackening by the movable 

balls of the fan striking on a gong (Fig. 119). There are other roasters having two spoons turning 

at the same time as the spit feeding a small reservoir found on the top of the spit and through 

a shallow furrow perforated by small holes, the meat is 

continuously basted. The three pieces composing this 

oven are movable and can therefore be transported 

to any desirable place; the shell can easily be fastened 

on to the wall. There are also English spits adapted 

for all hearths (Fig. 120); it is easy to fasten it to a 

movable hearth fitting with the spit. These are run 

by clock work placed on top; the roasts are suspended 

perpendicularly and always turn in the same direction. 

Fig. 121 represents a wrought or sheet iron pan; 
the interior has a basket which is used for frying small 
fish, potatoes, croquettes, etc. Place inside the objects 
intended for frying and plunge the basket into the 
frying fat after it has attained the required heat; the 
articles being cooked and of a fine color, withdraw tne 
basket to drain them properly. 

Fig. 122 represents a copper case containing four high saucepans called bain-maries. 
A bain-marie consists of a vessel filled with boiling water into which is placed another vessel con- 
taining the substances that are required to be heated. The materials placed in the second vessel 




FIG. 121. 





FIG. 122. 



FIG. 123. 



can only acquire the temperature of the boiling water and heat gradually and progressively and 
therefore can be stopped at any time. Each saucepan should be ticketed with the name of the 
sauce it contains so that any sauce or soup can be selected without wasting time in searching for it. 



KITCHEN UTENSILS. 



225 



Fig. 123. The salamander and oven hithertofore used in kitchens to glaze or brown 
dishes presented difficulties on account of the attention and watchful care it necessarily 
required. By means of the new gas salamander, fish can be almost instantaneously glazed when 
covered with a well thickened or buttered sauce without any danger whatever of having the 
sauce curdle. This salamander is lighted by gas and can be fastened to the wall at the back 
of the range. It consists of two platforms, the upper one fixed and the lower one movable 
and sufficiently big to place the largest dishes on it. Naturally the gas comes from the top 




Fio. 124. 

and it is easy to regulate its intensity by a stop cock. Two minutes suffice to obtain a perfect glaz- 
ing without having the bottom of the dish attain the slightest heat, thus the sauce cannot deteri- 
orate whatever. It is an indispensable utensil and assists the cook greatly both as regards its use- 
fulness and speed. 

Fig. 124 is the reproduction of a very useful broiler, offering numerous 
facilities for various purposes. The broiling takes place in a metal case, it 
being provided with five gas tubes, having the sides bored with small holes, 
the gas projects into small bells to have it purified and then can be used for 
broiling without the annoyance of smell nor smoke. It is principally used for 
broiling toasts, canapes, or toasts for sandwiches; meats can also be broiled 
thereon such as cutlets, chops and beefsteaks. When the bottom is closed 
with a movable door, it can be used for roasting chickens, legs of mutton, 
beef, etc. The top part is useful for keeping things hot. All gas stoves can 
be regulated and moderated, according to the work, by modifying or in- 
creasing the volume of gas. 

Fig. 125 shows a singeing apparatus shaped like a horn; the largest part, from whence issues 
the flame is covered with a very fine metallic cloth which causes the flame to become enlarged. 
There is an opening on the other or thin end about an inch in diameter for the purpose of 
combining the air with the gas, forming a Bunsen burner. Poultry and game can be singed 
without blackening the skin whatever. 




FIG. 125. 




FIG. 126. 



Fig. 126 is a steam table with covered dishes, cases and bain-maries. The square boxes 
are used for soups, stews, etc.; the covered dishes for large pieces of meat to be carved and 
for entrees; the small steamers are for keeping the sauces and gravies. Instead of a dish on the 
right, place a carving-board with a knife and fork. The inside is used for keeping the dishes hot 
before and after they are dressed. These steam tables are heated by steam or gas, and are 
advantageously used either as a hot closet or as a substitute for a chafing dish. 



226 



TtLE EPICUREAN. 



BROILER AND RANGE (Grillade et Pourneau). 

The broiler shown below is most useful, for on it can be cooked all meats, either using charcoal, 
embers, or gas. In olden times meats were broiled on the embers of a chimney hearth, fanning 




FIG. 127. 

continuously to keep the fire alive. For many years sliding broilers have been used and charcoal. 

With gas the broiling is done in a metal case, by a gas tube having the sides pierced with small 
holes. Although gas is 
very little used in kitchens 
still it deserves to be en- 
couraged ; for not only 
does this style of broiling 
interest amateurs by its in- 
genuity, but it also has 
its particular advantages 
which are manifold, as the 
operation takes place with- 
out the slightest trouble 
and without having the 
meats give forth any 
smoke or disagreable 
smell, for the heat attains 

the meat from the top and all the escaping fat falls 

into a receptacle Fig. 127 shows an improved range 

an explanation of which is unnecessary. 

POETABLE HEATER (Etuve Portative). 
This heater is used for transporting meats out- 
outside or keeping hot dishes to be served. It is 
heated with small cakes of prepared coal, made red- 
hot in the hearth of the range, then put into a small 
sheet-iron box placed at the bottom of the heater. It can also be heated with an alcohol lamp. 
The heaters are made of tin and provided wich two gratings inside; they can be of any size (Fig. 128). 




FIG 128. 




FIG 139 



KITCHEN UTENSILS. 



227 



STEAM KETTLE WITH DOUBLE JACKET (Marmite a Vapeur avec Double Pond. 
Fig. 129. A steam double bottom kettle either having a ball in the center or else a winding 
pipe. In this same shaped pot all systems can be employed. The one shown on the figure has a 
double jacket; on top place a ring and in this a tinned basin; fill it half full of boiling water and 
use it for cooking ices; stocks, broths and consommes are cooked in those having a ball in the 
center, or else a winding pipe, but the ball is preferable. For cooking potatoes, lobsters, terrapin, 
etc., iron pots with rounded corners are used; on the bottom is an iron winding pipe furnished 
with holes: at the bottom is a hole for letting the water from the condensed stream run out, on 
top a hinged cover sufficiently heavy to close it hermetically, specially required for these kinds of 
pots. 

SAUTOIK, SAUCEPAN, SOUP POT, BRAZIEKE (Sautoir, Casserole, Marmite, Braisiere). 

Fig. 130 represents a flat, thick copper saucepan, generally called a sautoir; they are also 
made of a thinner copper and are intended for sauteing fillets of chickens, escalops, cutlets, etc. 
It is necessary to have these of all sizes, large as well as small. 

Fig. 131 represents a copper saucepan 
tinned in the interior and furnished with a 
cover fitting inwardly. These also must be of 
all sizes according to the importance of the 
work to be executed. 





FIG. 130. 



FIG. 131. 



Fig. 132 represents a glazing saucepan; the edges of this one are only half as high as the 
ordinary saucepan; it is covered with a hollow cover fitting outside the pan; this is for the purpose 
of holding red hot coals or ember so to glaze and color the meats. 




FIG. 132. 



FIG. 134. 



Fig. 133 represents a soup pot for broths with side handles, with or without a faucet, serving 
to draw off the liquid. Copper pots are preferable to iron or earthen ones, the first give the 
broth or soup a dark color and the latter in time acquire a bad taste. 

Fig. 134 represents a braiziere or long stew pan having rounded ends and handles. Its deep 
cover is made to hold hot embers, but this is not necessary if the braizing is done in the oven, then 
a well fitting cover will be found sufficient. 

FISH KETTLE (Poissonniere). 

Fig. 135 represents a fish kettle, these are either of copper or tin. The fish is placed on a 
metal sheet perforated with half inch holes, this has handles on both sides, it is put down into the 
bottom of the fish kettle and lifted again when the fish is cooked, thus avoiding the breaking of it. 

Fig. 136 represents oblong shaped, deep baking pans having handles on each end. These 
pans are furnished with a perforated metal grate. Their raised edge cover (Fig. 136), can when 
turned upside down, also serve for a deep pan suitable for cooking flat fishes, fricandeaux, sweet- 
breads, etc. 



228 



THE EPICUREAN. 



6. 



Fig. 137 represents a series of six small timbales with flat bottoms ranging from No. 1 to No. 

These timbales as shown in the figures are just half their actual size. 

Fig. 138 shows a series of convex molds for mousselines, No. 1 to No. 6. These molds like 
the flat bottomed ones are drawn half their proper size. They are to be placed on metal sheets 
perforated according to the size of the molds, supported by half inch high feet. 




FIG. 139. 

Fig. 139 are various border molds, the first has a concave bottom and is specially used for 
dressing entrees of chicken and game fillets, quenelles, etc. The second is an oval mold with a 
flat bottom useful for large releve borders. The third is a round bomb shaped mold with flaring 
sides, used for molding rice or forcemeat borders. The fourth is a plain bottom mold and the 
fifth is of an octagon shape with a flat bottom. 



KITCHEN UTENSILS. 



BASIN (Bassine). 

Basins are made of copper; as a general rule they are not tinned. In large kitchens there are 
some that are tinned and others that are not. If untinned they can also be used not only for 




FIG 140. 



beating up egg whites, cooking fruits, and jellies, but also for blanching and cooking green vege- 
tables, such as spinach, green peas, string beans, etc. , thereby retaining their natural color, giving 
them a more appetizing appearance. 

KITCHEN SIEVES (Tamis de Cuisine). 






FIG. 141. 



FIG. 148. 



FIG. 143. 



It is impossible to perform any kitchen work without the use of large and small sieves. Sieves 
and colanders are indispensable either for straining purees, forcemeats, gravies and broths, for 
draining purposes or when required to be laid aside for further use. 

MOLDS (Les Moules). 

The Figs. 144 and 145 represent two fancy jelly molds; they are cylindrical shaped, having 
a cover of the same size, hollow on top so that it can hold chopped ice. Many dessert molds are 
to be found in the market unprovided with covers, thereby making 
them useless and inconvenient. The Fig. 146 shows the cover of 
the mold seen upside down having a small piece adjusted to the 
center which fits into the cylinder of the mold. 





FIG 144 FIG. 145. FIG. 146. 

Fig. 147 is a copper macedoine mold with a tinned double copper bottom. This double bottom 
is movable and is kept at an even distance from the sides and bottom of the mold by three catches 
attached to it. If the double bottom be removed it then can be used for aspics of foies gras, 
unmolding it on to a jelly border having a support placed in the center. 



230 



THE EPICUREAN. 



JUICE PRESS (Presse Sues). 

These presses are for extracting all the liquid parts of fruits needed for preparing syrups and 
fruit jellies, such as currants, raspberries, blackberries, strawberries and barberries, in fact all 
fruits. This utensil should be made of wood for all red fruits lose their natural color when 
brought in contact with any metal. 

CREAM MOLDS (Moules a Oreme). 

Made of tin or copper; they are fancy and cylindrical. Used for molding cold creams, pains 
of fruits, blanc manges, etc. (Fig. 148). 





FIG. 148. 



FIG. 149. 



JELLY AND BABA MOLDS (Moules k Gele~e et Moules k Baba). 

Jelly molds are made both of copper, tinned in the inside, fancy and cylindrical, and are 
used for thick creams, blanc manges, flamris, etc. Three or four are not too many to have 
in a kitchen. Baba molds are of copper, tin and earthen- ware ; they are cylindrical shaped and 
generally have deep furrows in them, but can be of any shape (Fig. 149). 

"PAIN" AND PUDDING CYLINDRICAL MOLDS (Moules Oylindriques a Pain et a Ponding). 

These are cylindrical shaped, tinned on the inside. Generally puddings ate cooked in these 
molds, but they can also be used for rice or fruit pains, besides they are very useful in a kitchen 
either for hot entrees or else molding hot or cold sweet dishes. Dome shaped molds can also be 
used to poach pains and puddings (Fig. 150). 






FIG. 151. 



FIG. 153. 



Fig. 151 is a copper mold, tinned inside and outside, the double bottom is removable and is 
kept at an even distance from the edges and bottom by three catches fastened to it. It can be 
used for cold dessert creams; the same mold without the double bottom, but having a cover fitted 
on the outside can be utilized for hot or cold puddings. 

Fig. 152 rep resents a tin mold for making paste croustades and can also be used for molding 
rice or hominy. 




FIG. 153. 



PIE MOLDS (Moules k Pat6). 

Hot pie molds are shallow and round; for cold pies they are round, oval or oblong; made of 
tin or copper, but the tin ones answer the purpose. The round or oval ones are hinged (Fig. 153;. 



KITCHEN UTENSILS. 



231 



WHIPS OR WHISKS USED FOR KITCHEN AND PASTRY (Fouets de Cuisine et de 

patisserie). 

Whips or whisks are made of wicker or tinned wire, several of them should be kept on hand 
as they are frequently used. The wicker ones are the best, 
especially for beating creams, but for whipping hot liquids, 
such as consomme, sweet or meat jellies, the wire ones 
are preferable. When beating the white of eggs be careful 
to observe that the tin on the whisks is partly worn off, 

for the contact of egg-white with new tin causes it to curdle (Fig. 154). Some use whisks 
made of untinned brass wire, the wire not being as heavy as the other. 




KITCHEN KNIVES, CLEAVER, CAN-OPENER (Couteaux de Cuisine, Oouperet, Ouvre-boite). 

Have one large, strong knife for chops, one large carving knife for cooked meats, one 
smaller one for the same purpose and one kitchen knife. It is always advisable to keep a few 





FIG. 155. 



FIG. 156. 



FIG. 157. 



FIG. 158. FIG. 159. FIG. 160. FIG. 161. 



FIG. 162. 



well sharpened ones in reserve, either for carving or any other unforeseen occasion. Besides 
these there must be a channeled knife for turning vegetables and fruits. A knife for peeling 
and also a can-opener; it is most necessary to have a large and strong cleaver for 
splitting bones, also to be used instead of a mallet for beating meats to flatten 
them according to one's wants (Figs. 155 to 162). 

SUGAR DREDGER (Poudriere). 

Fig. 163 represents a sugar dredger containing about a pint. It is to be 
filled three-quarters full with powdered sugar and is used for sweetening pastry, 
fritters, omelets, etc. 

FIG. 163. 

LEG OF MUTTON HANDLE (Manche a Gigot). 

These handles are made of metal fitting on to the bone 
of a leg of mutton, lamb or ham; they assist the carver to turn 
around and cut the meat according to necessity. The old style 
ones are silver plated and screwed on to the bone, but the new 

style are made of steel and are fitted on by means of a rubber ring placed inside which grasps the 

bone tightly without breaking it (Fig. 164). 





232 



TTIE EPICUREAN. 



THERMOMETEK (Thermometre). 

Fig. 165, a thermometer used for cooking sugar. These can be used for all kitchen purpose^ 
cold chambers, refrigerators, etc. 



FAHRENHEIT. 



CENTIGRADES. 



FAHRENHEIT. 

Ice 32 degrees 

Burgundy Wine 45 " 

Ice Refrigerator 50 " 

Bordeaux Wine 55 " 

Water for unmolding 
ice cream 40 

Dining Room 62 " 

BenegalHeat 182 " 

Boiling Water 212 " 

Bugar Small Thread. . . .215 " 

" Long Thread.... 217 " 

" Pearl 220 " 

" Large Pearl 222 " 

" The Blow 230 " 

" The Ball 236 " 

" Large Ball 246 " 

" Small Crack 290 " 

" The Crack 310 

" Caramel 345 " 



Caramel 

The crack 
Small crack 



The ball 
Large pearl 

Small thread 



Large ball 
The blow 

Pearl 
Long thread 



Grand casso 

Casse 
Petit casse 



Grand boule 

Petit boule Souffl e ou glue 
Grand Perle Perle 

Lisse Grand Ltos6 



100 



ml 

m 



Fm. 165. 

OOPPER BASIN FOR COOKING SUGAR WITH THERMOMETER (Bassine pour Ouire 

le Sucre au Thermometre). 

Fig. 166 is a small copper basin with a tin cover having a hole in its top suffi- 
ciently large to allow the thermometer to be inserted. 
The steam that condenses on the side of the cover is 
continually cleansing the sides of the basin, so that 
when the sugar is well stirred there is no necessity to 
watch it, only see that it continues to cook to the desired 
heat. 




FIG. 166. 



SYRUP GAUGE (Pese Sirop). 

After a person has the habit of cooking sugar he 
rarely requires a syrup gauge; the degree of cooking can 
be judged by simply touching it with the fingers, but 
those who have not yet attained this proficiency need 

always use the syrup gauge. Place in a bottle and then plunge into the syrup this Fm - 16r - 
glass instrument which rises or falls according to the thickness or thinness of the liquid thereby 
giving the exact degree of its cooking by the numbers marked on it (Fig. 167). 



KITCHEN UTEXSILS. 



233 



COLUMN BOX (Boite a Oolonnes). 

Fig. 168 represents a column box. These tubes are for removing fanciful cuts of truffles, 
tongues, egg white, etc. The medium sized ones can be utilized for stoning Spanish 
olives; they are also used for coring apples and for rolling 
paper frills, for cutting vegetables, jardiniere, macedoine 
or Chartreuse, for bread croutons, etc. 

LEMON SQUEEZER (Presse Citron). 

Fig. 169 represents a lemon-squeezer. This kind is 
in common use and is used for squeezing lemons for ices, 
FIG, 168, jellies, etc. 





FIG. 169. 



STRAINER (CHINESE), AND MIXING POT FOR THICKENING (Passoire Chinois et Melangenr 

pour Liaisons). 

Fig. 170 represents a sauce strainer commonly called Chinese; they are made of tin or 
metallic tammy. It is necessary to have several sizes more or less fine ; 
they are either pointed or flat as shown in the design and are in constant 
use for sauces and gravies. 

Fig. 171 is a kind of pot containing a mixer. 
This is to stir egg-yolks and cream together for 
pouring it into sauces and ragouts for thickening; 
this is found especially handy for Hollandaise 

i ^^ . ma^'M^i u SclUCc. 

FIG. 170. FIG. in. GRIDIRON (Gril). 

Fig. 172 represents a thin wire double gridiron; it is useful for toasting 
bread, crackers, broiling oysters, tomatoes, and sliced potatoes. Stronger 
and thicker gridirons are used for meats and fish, having just sufficient room 
to hold the articles. 

MEAT CHOPPER (Pour Hacher les Viandes). 
Fig. 173 is a perpendicular machine used for chopping meats; these are excellent, and are 






FIG. 173. 

well adapted for making Salisbury steaks or Hamburg steaks. They have this advantage that they 
cut the meats without cutting the nerves, so that the meat comes to the top lightly chopped and 
nerveless. 

PONTAGE CROUSTADE MOLD (Moule a Oroustade Pontage), 




FIG. 174. 

Fig. 174 represents an iron in imitation of a small channeled timbale mold; it has a handle 
fourteen inches long, bent at the end and is furnished with a wooden handle. This mold is for 
the purpose of making fontage croustades (see Fontage, No. 907). 



234 



THE EPICUREAN. 



KITCHEN PORK (Pourchette de Cuisine). 
Fig. 175 represents a kitchen fork, used for 
turning over any broiled articles, sautes or else for 
tossing rice, etc. 



FIG. 175. 



o 



SKEWERS AND HATELETS (Brochettes et Hatelets). 

^__ ^^_^_ n ^___ Kitchen skewers are of iron, used for supporting 

large pieces of meat when laid on the spit. Small game 




FIG. 176a. 




are run on to skewers; the blade 

is flat, rounded on one end and 

pointed on the other. Table 

skewers are of white metal, 

silver or plated ware; they are 

used when broiling kidneys or other meats which are thrust on them (Fig. 176). Fig. 176a 

represents a hatelet and should not be confounded with a skewer. 

KITCHEN GRATER (Rape de Cuisine). 

An utensil made of tin having a semi-circular surface bored with 
projecting holes on which is to be grated either bread, cheese or various 
kinds of roots. There should always be two small graters in every 
spice box, one for grating nutmeg, the other for orange, lemon or Seville 
orange peel. The two latter ought to be enclosed in small separate 
boxes (Fig. 177). 

PASTE PINCHER (Pince a Pate). 

"With this small pincher the crest of pies are pinched; it will be better to 

have two; one large and one small (Fig. 178). 

FIG. 178. 

PASTRY BAG OR POCKET AND SOCKETS (Poche et Poche avec Douilles). 

These pockets are made of unbleached duck; they are used for laying out meringues, choux, or 
else quenelle forcemeat; they are of the greatest utility in kitchen and pastry work and it is 
advisable to have them of graduated sizes. The sockets are movable and are fitted in the 
bottom of the pocket before filling them. 



FIG. 177. 







FIG. 179. 



FIG. 180. 



FIG. 181. 



Fig. 180 shows us the graduated different sizes reduced to the tenth of their proper dimensions; 
these are the ones most generally used for kitchen wrk and pastry. 

Fig. 181 is half the natural size and represents a section of a series of sockets the most 
used for all work. 



KITCHEN UTENSILS. 



235 



SOUFFLE PAN, AND PIE DISH (Casserole a Souffle", et Plat a Tarte). 

These vessels are of plated ware or sterling silver, made in different shapes and different 
sizes; they are indispensable in a kitchen and are used principally for cooking souffles, but they 
can also be used for baking purposes, for poaching creams by bain marie and in fact for serving 
vegetables or garnishings on the table (Fig. 182). 





FIG. 182. 



FIG. 183. 



Pie Dish. Made of English china that can be placed in the oven without any danger of 
cracking; they are most useful. In these dishes one can cook meat, chicken, game or fish pies, 
fruit pies, or puddings, or creams, they can also be used for souffles. There is no end to their utility 
in a kitchen and there should always be plenty of different sizes. What makes them more 
useful and convenient is that they can very well be placed on the table with their contents as they 
were taken from the oven; for instance, anything baked, creams, puddings, etc. (Fig. 183). 



KITCHEN BRUSHES (Pinceaux de Cuisine). 

Brushes will be found very useful in a kitchen; it is better to have several; they can be 
made by any one; merely tying turkeys' tail feathers firmly together. Take the feathers, one by 
one, remove the feathers on each side, leaving only the end, then put about fifteen of these 




FIG. 184. 



FIG. 184a. 



together, tie with rows of strings, beginning on the feathered end and girding tightly; fasten at 
the other or upper end, tying the string firmly; now cut the lower end to equalize the quills; 
they do not last very long. Brushes can be purchased made of hair with a tin handle, much 
neater, stronger and easier to keep clean; these are shown in the Figs. 184 and 184a. 



OMELET, AND OYSTEE STEW PAN (Poele a Omelette, et Casserole pour les Huitres). 

Omelet Pan. A black, iron pan, polished on the inside. These pans are used principally for 
omelets; they should never be washed; when coated or burned on the inside, scrape with a flexible 
knife all that sticks to the bottom, heat well and then rub 
with a cloth and some salt until perfectly clean. The 
French omelet pans are the best, both for shape and 
strength (Fig. 185). 





FIG. 185. 



FIG. 186. 



Oyster Stew Pan. This saucepan is made of various sizes in tin with a copper bottom. It is 
furnished with a rounded cover perforated in the center with several small holes. The handle is 
very long. This saucepan is used for oysters and their liquor placed on the hot fire and when the 
steam escapes through the holes then remove it at once (Fig. 186). 



236 



THE EPICUREAN. 



SPOONS (Cuilleres). 

Fig. 187, represents four spoons, soup or table, dessert, tea and coffee. 

The approximative liquid capacity is: six soup or tablespoonfuls of liquid make a gill 01 
forty-eight a quart. 

Twelve dessertspoonfuls of liquid for a gill; eighteen teaspoonfuls and thirty-six coffeespoon- 
fuls. For sugar it requires eight tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar for a pound, sixteen dessert- 
spoonfuls, twenty- four teaspoonfuls and forty-eight coffee- 
spoonfuls. For flour it takes ten tablepoonfuls for a pound, 
twenty dessertspoonfuls, thirty teaspoonfuls and sixty coffee- 
spoonfuls. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASUEES (Poids et Mesures). 

Various ways of obtaining weights and measures. 

Weight by Quarts. One quart of water weighs two 
pounds and four ounces; one quart of milk two pounds and 
an ounce and a half ; cream two pounds and one ounce; oil 
one pound and fourteen ounces ; melted butter the same 
weight as oil ; powdered sugar one pound nine ounces ; rice 
one pound three ounces; flour one pound two ounces; bread- 
crumbs eleven ounces; horseradish or cocoanut twelve ounces; 
wheaten grits or Indian meal fifteen ounces; oatmeal thirteen 
ounces; semolina one pound seven ounces. 

Weight by Handfals. A handful of sugar weighs six 
ounces; flour four ounces; bread-crumbs two ounces; rice three 
ounces; herbs, parsley, etc., one ounce. 

Weight by Coffeecups. Six cupfuls of sugar weigh one 
pound; nine of flour one pound ; eight of Indian meal, one 
pound; six of rice one pound. Ten black coffeecupfuls of water make one quart, 
water make one quart. Four breakfast cupfuls of water make one quart. 




FIG. 187. 



Six teacupfuls of 



EEFEIGEEATOE, ICE-BOX AND COLD EOOM (Ee~frige~rateur, Glaciere Timbre et Ohambre froide), 
These refrigerators are to be kept full of ice so to reduce the temperature inwardly and to 
avoid inconvenience arising from the excessive heat of the atmosphere. A refrigerator as shown 




FIG. 188. 



in the accompanying design is all that is necessary for a restaurant, etc. At a third of its 
height are placed wooden gratings to uphold the ice, underneath is to be found a sheet of 
zinc or galvanized sheet iron with a small gutter, at the end, between this and the sheet of iron is 
a space of six inches. The bottom parts of these ice-boxes are used for keeping either beef palates, 



KITCHEN UTENSILS. 



237 



calf's heads, sheep's trotters, croquette preparations of all kinds, etc. ; each compartment should 
be entirely separate from one another, having a special one for fish, one for poultry, one for game, 
one for cold meats, one for garnishings, etc. 

The Ice box is simply a box of an oblong shape sufficiently thick to be filled with a non- 
conducting material such as charcoal, sawdust, tow, or simply an hermetically empty space not 
to allow the air to pass through the box; they are lined inside with galvanized sheet iron or zinc. 

The cold room is of a more modern invention, the meats being hung up in the inside. Cooked 
meats, also different provisions requiring a cold temperature of forty-five to fifty degrees Fahren- 
heit, such as butter, milk or cream, rest on shelves or in drawers, without being in direct contact 
with the ice, for it is evident that the cold air surrounding these provisions does not contain the 
slightest moisture that might destroy their properties. Another advantage the cold room has is 
that a quantity of cold entrees or sweet dishes already decorated with the jellies that are to be 
served will keep in perfect condition for a few days, while those placed directly on the ice do not 
afford the same security; however, each one has its own peculiar advantages and one must not 
be sacrificed for the other, on the contrary in all large kitchens each one has its own place and 
both have become indispensable. 

MEAT-SAFE (Garde -Manger), 

This is a kind of round or square cage composed of metallic cloth on a framework of 
iron or wood, provided inside with several shelves; also hanging hooks to which can be hung 
meats, poultry and game. On the shelves are placed all the provisions that should be 
exposed to the air without incurring any danger of contact with flies. These meat-safes are 
either suspended from the ceiling of the pantry by a pulley or else fastened to the wall outside a 
window; in both cases in order to have them accomplish their purpose they must be exposed to a 
thorough draught of air in as cool a place as possible. If the meat safe is hung in a room it can be 
entirely open on top, if on the contrary it is fastened outside then the upper part must certainly 
have a slightly inclining roof so that no rain can penetrate the inside. These meat-safes are only 
useful where ice is scarce for ice-boxes, are far preferable under all circumstances. 

CENTIMETERS AND INCHES (Centimetres et Pouces), 

Centimetres. 





7 



FIG. 190. Inches. 




FIG. 192. Circles. 



Figs. 190 to 196 indicate the difference between the centimeter and the inch; the dimensions 
of circles, triangles, lozenges, ovals, rounds or squares all measured by the sixteenth of an inch 



238 



TTIE EPICUREAN. 



across the diameter, or on the length for ovals and lozenges. These figures will at once give an 
exact idea of the proportions as they are explained in the different recipes, either for garnishings 
or salpicons or else for the diameter of sockets, column tubes, etc. 




FIG. 195. Ovals. 



% 




% 




I 




!/ 

% 


s/ y. % i 

/it /) '^ L-J 










FIG. 196. -Squares. 






BILL OF FAEE HOLDEE (Porte-Menu). 



The bill of fare is the programme of the dinner on 
which is found inscribed the dishes composing the meal. 
For ceremonious dinners the bills of fare are printed or 
else written on rich paper. They are laid on the table or 
fastened in a holder such as shown in Fig. 197; they are 
to be made either of silver or silver plate; if the bills of 
fare are printed, they are then usually laid between two 
guests. 

COVERS POR ROUND AND LONG DISHES (Cloches pour 

Plats Rends et Longs). 

Those for the kitchen are made of tin and are used to 
cover the dishes after they are dressed, either to keep them 
in the hot closet or to carry to the dining-room; have always 
round and long ones for both large and small dishes. These 
require to be kept very clean and bright. 




F;. 197- 



SOUPS CPotasres). 




Soup is the prelude of the dinner; it is a healtny, light and stimulating food, agreeing with 
every one, especially children and old people. The basis of soup is broth, and therefore it is on this 
article that one's whole attention must be borne. There are two kinds of soup, fat and lean; they 
are divided into clear and thick; the garnishings for these soups are either composed of crusts, 
vegetables, creams of game or poultry, eggs, fish, quenelles, tinibales, chiffonades, finely minced 
herbs, crustacean, farinaceous, etc. These two kinds of soups are divided into six chapters: First, 
Bisques; second, Consommes and Garnishings; third, Creams; fourth, Cosmopolitan or Mixed; fifth, 
Fish; sixth, Purees. Purees may be made into creams by using less butter and adding instead 
cream and egg-yolks, while creams can be turned into purees by suppressing the cream and 
egg-yolks, and stirring in, when ready to serve, a piece of fresh, fine butter. 

(184). FAT (La Graisse). 

Fat is insoluble in water, but melts by heat and floats on the surface of a liquid. As it is 
enveloped in the cells of a very fine indissoluble membrane, one part of the fat adheres always to 
the fibers, unless the cooking be too long and the cells are broken by the force of the boiling. Fat 
exists either separately in certain parts of animals, and in other parts it is interposed between the 
fibers; these last parts are always the most digestible and the most nourishing. 

Albumen (ISAlbumine). Is of the same nature as the white of egg which contains scarcely 
anything else than albumen; it is soluble in cold or tepid water and coagulates between one hundred 
and fifty to two hundred and ten degrees Fahrenheit. Albumen abounds in the blood and it is found 
in every part of the flesh; it coagulates after being dissolved, and in broth forms what is called 
scum, rising to the surface of liquids in which meats are cooked. The less blood the animal has 
lost, the more albumen there is, and as the blood contains much osmazome, the result will be that 
meat having the most blood will produce a more savory soup than that which has lost a larger 
quantity. 

When a piece of either beef or mutton is needed rare, it must be plunged into boiling liquid, 
and being at once seized by the action of the heat, the albumen coagulates and encloses the osma- 
zome inside. Allow fifteen minutes for each pound of meat for a leg of mutton weighing six to 
eight pounds; if boiled according to this time the meat will be found rare, unless the boiling has been 



240 THE EPICUREAN. 

too long. If on the contrary, this same piece of meat be put into cold water and is allowed to 
cook slowly, the albumen not coagulating at once, will let the osmazome escape into the liquid and 
the meats will be white and less juicy, but as nothing is lost, the broth will have gained by it in 
quality. 

Bones (Les os). Are inorganic parts having much solidity besides being of a gelatineous 
nature; they contain considerable fat substance analogous to marrow, but this is but a part of 
their matter. Bones contain eight times more gelatin than meat. They are generally split into 
smaller pieces. 

(185). FIBRINE (La Tibrine). 

Fibrine is insoluble; it forms the base of the muscles or flesh. After meat has been very much 
cooked, after it has boiled a long time, the remainder of it is almost pure fibrine. Fibrine is not 
very nutritious, and when it has thoroughly exhausted its soluble qualities, it becomes difficult to 
digest. Pure fibrine has no savor, it is insipid or flavorless and becomes yellow and brittle after 
drying. 

Gelatin (La Gelatine). Gelatin is soluble in very hot or boiling water, in tepid water it swells 
and dissolves only partially, and in cold water it softens without dissolving. It is colorless, insipid, 
inodorous and is susceptible to pass rapidly into a state of acetic fermentation. There is very 
little nutrition in gelatin; when in sufficient quantity it gives the broth the peculiar quality of 
forming into a jelly when cold. Gelatin exists in all parts of the meat, but more profusely in 
gristle and bone. In a pure state it is insipid. 

Osmazome (IS Osmazome). Soluble even when cold, this is a part of the flesh of the beef, of the 
brain and of certain mushrooms. It is osmazome which gives to the broth its savor, its aroma and 
its sapidity. It is supplied with an exceedingly stimulating property, exciting the appetite and help- 
ing considerably to facilitate digestion; it seems to exist only in the flesh and blood, and more abun- 
dantly in old cattle and in dark meats, than in young animals and white meat The properties of 
osmazome are more perceptible when the meats are broiled or roasted; then the sapidity is stronger 
and the aroma more exhilarating. Poultry gives very little sapidity to broths unless they be old and 
very fat, for their grease has a more pronounced flavor than that found in quadrupeds. Gristle, fat 
and bones are entirely free of osmazome; in broths there is one part osmazome to seven parts 
gelatin. 

(186). OARE TO BE TAKEN WHILE PREPARING BROTH (Des Soins a Prendre pour Preparer le 

Bouillon). 

First. Select the freshest meats procurable; do not wash, but remove all that is not of the 
very freshest; bone and tie up each piece separately leaving them as large as possible; split the 
bones and put them into a soup-pot with cold water and the meat. 

Second. Heat and boil it up slowly to give the albumen time to dissolve in the liquid; 
it coagulates as soon as the liquid reaches one hundred and fifty degrees Fahrenheit, and rising 
to the surface brings with it all the impurities contained therein, which is called scum. 

Third. Carefully remove this scum as quickly as it rises to the surface, and before 
the liquid boils, for after that the scum partly dissolves and the rest of it precipitates and destroys 
the transparency of the broth. "When the broth is well skimmed, add salt, allspice, and vegetables; 
then keep it boiling as continuously and slowly as possible to prevent too much evaporation. 

(187). CLEAR BOUILLON (Bouillon Olair). 

There is nothing that resembles consomme" more than clarified bouillon, and if it does not 
entirely take its place as regards quality, still it is often used instead. Clarified bouillon 
is in reality only an imitation of consomme, it is equally true that with care it can easily be 
prepared in excellent conditions, the principal one being to operate with good bouillon, either of 
chicken, beef or game, etc. To obtain clear bouillon, only lean meats must be used for clarification: 
in order to obtain four quarts of bouillon, have one pound of lean beef free of all fat and nerves, 
chop it finely, and mix in with it, two raw eggs and one pint of cold bouillon; place the strained 
bouillon on the fire, skimmed free of all its fat, and when it reaches boiling point, pour into it the 
clarification, beating it well with a whip. As soon as the bouillon boils, keep it to the same degree 
of heat without allowing it to boil, for one hour; skim the fat off, season with salt and a little 



SOUPS. 241 

sugar, and color it with caramel (No. 18), then remove and strain through a wet napkin stretched 
and fastened to the four legs of a kitchen stool (Fig. 99), or else a silk sieve. These bouillons are 
to be served with garnishings of Italian pastes and farinas, also garnishings of vegetables, etc., for 
various soups. 

(188), WHITE CHICKEN BOUILLON OR BROTH (Bouillon Blanc de Volaille), 
Have ten quarts of water in a soup pot; add to it three pounds of knuckle of veal, and 
trimmings, seven pounds of very fresh poultry. Boil, skim, and put in three quarters of a pound 
of carrots, half a pound of turnips, twelve ounces of leeks, two onions, one stuck with two cloves, 
two ounces of celery, one ounce of parsley roots, two bay leaves, salt/sixty grains of whole peppers; 
boil slowly and continuously for four nours, then strain through a silk sieve. If needed in a 
great hurry, boil six quarts of ordinary stock, have two fowls of three pounds each, after 
removing the breasts, chop the remainder of the fowls coarsely, put them in the stock, add four 
ounces of minced carrots and six ounces of leeks also minced, boil slowly for one hour; skim off 
the fat, season with salt, strain through a fine sieve or moistened napkin, and serve. The breasts 
are used for forcemeat or to clarify broth. 

(189). CLARIFIED CONSOMME (Consomm6 Clarifi6). 

Proportions. When the stock (No. 194a) is ready put five quarts of it into a soup pot, 
adding two pounds of lean meat and three pounds of cleansed and washed fowls. Boil it up 
slowly, and just when ready to come to a boil, carefully remove the scum arising on the 
surface and then add half a pound of roasted veal. Simmer slowly until the fowl is cooked, which 
will take from two and a half to three hours, lifting it out as soon as it is done so as to save the 
breasts which will be found useful for garnishings, purees, salads, sandwiches, etc. ; return what 
remains of the fowls to the broth once again and continue boiling for half an hour longer, skim the 
fat off very carefully and mix in the clarification. 

Clarification. Trim off the fat, remove the nerves from a piece of beef sufficient to obtain 
two pounds after it is chopped up, and mix in with this chopped meat half a quart of cold stock 
(or water) ; pour this clarification into the broth, add two ounces of minced carrots, and two 
ounces of minced leeks; season with salt and color the soup with caramel (No. 18); keep the liquid 
in a boiling state for one hour. The consomme should be perfectly clear, sapid and tasty; strain it 
through a silk sieve or a fine napkin and use when needed, serve in cups, or in a soup tureen 
with any garnishing desired. 

Remoistening . After the stock or consomme has been taken out of the pot, pour in sufficient 
water to have the meats entirely re-covered and boil again for three hours; remove all the fat 
and strain it through a napkin; do not salt this. This remoistening is used for diluting certain 
soups, and to moisten veal or chicken stock with which meat extract is made (see meat 
extract, No. 368). 

(190). CLARIFIED CHICKEN CONSOMME, (OonsommS de Volaille Glaring 
Put into a soup pot eight quarts of white chicken broth (No. 188), add two pounds of knuckle 
of veal, one pound of chicken legs and pinions, then boil, skim, and put in four pounds of roasted, 
unbrowned chicken, two minced leeks, one medium sized minced carrot, one onion stuck with one 
clove, a little parsley and celery roots. Boil continually for four hours. Chop up very fine two 
pounds of veal, mix in with it two whole eggs, dilute with one quart of cold broth and stir this 
into the consomme, using a whip, adding two broken up chicken carcasses. Boil on a slow fire for 
one hour, salt it according to taste, and strain it through a silk sieve. 

(191), CLARIFIED FISH CONSOMME (Oonsomm6 de Poisson Clarifia 

Butter the bottom of a saucepan, garnishing it with sliced onions, and place on top six pounds 
of fish bones, such as bass, perch or any other gelatinous fish, a bunch of celery, parsley, bay leaf, 
thyme, one pound of minced carrots, a pound and a half of leeks, and dilute with one quart of 
water. Cover the saucepan, set it over a slow fire, and let fall to a colorless glaze, then moisten 
with four quarts of hot water, boil, skim and let simmer for one hour, then strain through a sieve, 
and clarify the broth with the whites of four eggs and half a bottleful of white wine. 



242 THE EPICUREAN. 

(192). OLABIFIED GAME CONSOMME' (OonsommS de Gibier Clarine"), 

Butter the inside of a very thick saucepan, cover the bottom with sliced onions, and lay on top 
three pounds of broken knuckle of veal and eight pounds of game, such as partridges, quails, 
pheasants and young rabbit, also half a pound of legs and pinions or bits of poultry, moisten with 
a pint of stock, place it on a moderate fire, and cover the saucepan; let steam and fall to 
a glaze, then dilute with half bottle of white wine, and ten quarts of stock or water. Boil, then 
skim and season with salt and two pepper corns for each quart of liquid, two cloves, also half a 
pound of carrots, one ounce of parsley roots, half a pound of leeks, two ounces of celery, the whole 
minced. Kemove all the bones from two very fresh young rabbits; put these in with the stock and 
boil all for four hours; strain through a sieve and put it back into the saucepan; chop up fine the 
flesh from the rabbits with as much lean beef meat, mix in with it two whole eggs and dilute with 
half a bottleful of white wine. Skim off all the fat from the broth and stir in the chopped rabbits, 
continuing stirring for one minute, then let come to a boil, move it from the hot fire, and boil 
slowly and unceasingly for one half hour more; after the consomme is very clear, strain it through 
a silk sieve or through a napkin. 

(193), CLARIFIED LENT VEGETABLE CONSOMME' (ConsommS maigre de Legumes Olarifi& 

Mince about three pounds of carrots and three pounds of turnips, one pound of the white of 
celery, one pound of onions, half a pound of parsley roots, a quarter of a pound of parsnips and a 
pound and a half of leeks. Put half a pound of butter into a saucepan, warm it and fry the vege- 
tables, then moisten with two quarts of water and reduce slowly until they fall into a glaze. Dilute 
it with ten quarts of water, season with salt, pepper, half an ounce of sugar and cloves, adding one 
pound of mushroom stalks, then boil slowly until the vegetables are well done without mashing, 
and strain through a sieve. Return it to the fire and clarify the broth with the whites of four eggs 
and half a bottle of white wine. After it is very clear, strain it through a silk sieve or a 
napkin. 

(194a). BEEF STOCK OR BROTH (Bouillon de Bceuf). 

Proportion of Ingredients. Ten quarts of water, a quarter of a pound of chicken legs, one 
and one quarter ounces of salt, six ounces of leeks, half ounce of soup celery, eight pounds 
of meat with bone, twenty grains or cloves of black pepper, six ounces of carrots, one half ounce 
of parsnip, one half clove of garlic (if desired), two whole cloves, three ounces turnips, four ounces 
of onions, one of which stuck with two cloves. 

Put ten quarts of water into a stockpot, add eight pounds of beef meat (trimmings and bone), 
let there be at least two-thirds meat, being careful to have both meat and trimmings well freed 
of fat; and a quarter of a pound of scalded chicken legs, after removing the outer skin. Heat 
this up slowly so that it comes gradually to a boil, then skim carefully and add twenty grains of 
whole black peppers and one and one quarter ounces of salt. Put into a net six ounces of 
carrots, three ounces of turnips, six ounces of leeks, half an ounce of parsnips, one half an 
ounce of soup celery, and two ounces of onions in which two cloves should be stuck. Close the 
net and set it in the pot; after the vegetables have cooked for two hours, remove the net containing 
the vegetables and continue boiling the soup for two hours longer, making four hours in all. 
Take off all the fat from the surface and strain the soup either through a silk tammy or a napkin; 
pour it into another pot to make consomme; and in case it should be needed the following day 
only, pour it into vessels and set it to cool; the following is an economical way of doing so: set 
the vessels in a water reservoir supplied continually with cold water from melting ice in the 
refrigerators and brought through a pipe in the bottom of the tank, have a larger overflow pipe 
placed near the top so as to allow the water as it heats to flow off. 

(194b). PARTS OF BEEF USED FOR PREPARING BOUILLONS AND STOCKS, SEE FIG. 302 
(Parties du Bceuf Servant a Faire les Bouillons et les Fonds, Voir Fig. 302). 

These various pieces are No. 2, the cheek jowl; No. 3, the neck: No. 4, the brisket; No. 5, the 
cross-ribs; No. 6, the shin; No. 8, the plate; No. 9, the navel; No. 10, the inside flank; No. 11, 
the thick flank; No. 17, the round bottom; No. 18, the leg. The shin is the bottom part of the 
hind quarter the nearest to the ankle bone. The gelatinous flesh of the shin renders it suitable 
for the preparation of stock, broths and jellies. 



SOUPS. 243 

(195). GAME, VEGETABLE, PISH AND CHICKEN STOCK, FOR THICK SOUPS (Ponds de Gibier, 

Legumes, Poisson et Volatile pour Potages Lie's). 

In order to make thick stock use consomme of game, vegetables, fish or chicken before they 
are clarified. Place half a pound of butter in a saucepan with half a pound of sifted flour of the 
best quality, let cook well on a slow fire without coloring when needed for vegetables, fish or 
chicken, but for game make a brown roux; for either one or the other dilute this roux with boiling 
broth (if the soup should be a chicken soup, chicken broth should be used to dilute the roux, if 
game soup then game broth should be used, fish with fish broth, for vegetable, vegetable broth). 
Use a whisk turning it rapidly, so as to avoid having lumps; stocks for soups should be kept rather 
thin, that is to say but little thickened and should be well despumated, the fat removed before 
passing through the tammy; return the saucepan to the fire, and stir continuously with a spatula 
from the bottom until the broth boils. Remove the saucepan and place it so that only one side of 
the contents cook slowly for one hour; skim and take off all the matter that swims on the sur- 
face until the stock be entirely free from fat, and other impurities floating on top arising from 
the clarification, then strain through a tammy or fine sieve, and use this stock for thick soups 
either of game, vegetables, fish or poultry. 

(196). BISQUES (Bisques). 

An exquisite and delicious bisque. The ancient bisques made between the years 1700 and 1750, 
differed greatly from our modern bisques. They were more like stews than soups or potages and 
were prepared with squabs, quails, pullets and fish, the crawfish only serving as a garnish, and 
were basted over with a crawfish gravy. Bisques as they are made to-day, are simply a puree, 
thickened with rice, or thick stock, or wet crusts and accompanied by various garnishings. Bisques 
are divided into five classes: First, those made of clams, oysters or mussels; Second, crabs; 
Third, shrimps, Fourth, crawfish; Fifth, lobsters. They must be highly seasoned, although not 
containing much red pepper, rather clear than thick, slightly colored, and accompanied by small, 
simple garnishings. 

(197). BISQUE OR PUREE OP CLAMS A LA HENDRIOK (Bisque ou Pure"e de Lucines a la 

Hendrick). 

Put sixty medium-sized opened clams into a pan, with their own juice; set it on the fire, 
and when they are very firm to the touch drain and pound the clams with their equal weight of 
cooked hominy; after all is well pounded and reduced to a paste, wet it with the clam juice 
poured off gently from the top, and some water in case the bisque be too thick, then pass it 
through a sieve or tammy and season with red pepper and very little salt if necessary, warm the 
bisque without boiling it, and just when ready to serve incorporate therein some fine butter and a 
little cream, garnish with sippets of bread fried in butter and some small pike quenelles (No. 90). 

(198). BISQUE OF CRABS (Bisque de Crabes). 

Put twenty-four live crabs in cold water with a little salt, and leave them to soak for one hour, 
mince four ounces of carrot and the same quantity of onion, fry them in butter in a saucepan 
sufficiently large to contain all the crabs, add some parsley sprigs, thyme and bay leaf, season with 
salt, half a bottle of white wine and some white stock, then cover and cook for fifteen minutes: 
lift out the crabs, strain the broth, and set it aside to rest, pouring off the top twenty-five minutes 
later. Remove the shells from the crabs; pick out the lungs from both sides, wash each one 
separately in tepid water and suppress the small legs, then drain well and pound them to a paste 
with half their quantity of cooked rice, dilute this puree with some of the juice they were cooked in, 
drain through a sieve and then a tammy and mix in one pint of bechamel (No. 409). Season with 
salt and red pepper, heat up without boiling and just when ready to serve, incorporate therein a 
quarter of a pound of fine butter, stirring it well with a spoon until it be completely melted. 
Pour the very hot bisque into a soup tureen and serve separately a garnishing of pieces of bread 
cut into one quarter of an inch squares and fried in butter; divide them by putting six or eight 
in each separate soup-plate when serving. 

(199). BISQUE OF CRABS A LA STEVENS (Bisque de Crabes a la Stevens). 
Wash twenty-four live crabs in several waters; then drain them, fry half a pound minced 
onions in butter, adding a quarter of a pound of rice flour and then the crabs; moisten with half a 



244 THE EPICUREAN. 

bottleful of white wine and two quarts of broth; cook slowly in a covered saucepan for fifteen 
minutes, then lift out the crabs only, and strain the broth into another vessel, and leave it to 
deposit its sediment. Remove the large shells from the crabs, also the small legs and lungs, then 
wash the crabs well in warm water, moving them around in the pan so as to free them of all 
adhering sand; after draining them well, pound them in a mortar with the addition of a little butter; 
moisten them with the decanted stock and some other broth, should it be too thick; strain through 
a sieve or tammy, and return them to the saucepan. Heat to a boiling degree without actually 
letting it boil, warm it, then add some egg-yolks, cream and fine butter; strain again through a 
tammy and serve the soup very hot with crusts of bread cut dice shaped, a quarter of an inch 
in size. 

(200). BISQUE OF CEABS, ORIENTAL (Bisque de Orabes & 1'Orientale), 

Prepare and cook the crabs the same as for bisque of crabs (No. 198), have one pound of 
onions, cut them in halves through the center of the root and stalk, remove from each side of the 
halved onion, and on the bias, one quarter of an inch of the root and stalk; mince this up very 
fine, blanch, then drain and fry the pieces in butter, moistening them with one part of cream. 
Pound well the crabs to reduce them to a paste and add six quarts of oatmeal previously cooked 
for thirty minutes in one quart of water. Add the onions, and when all is well mingled together, 
increase the quantity of bisque with thedecanted crab juice and more broth, if the puree be too thick; 
strain through a sieve or tammy, return it to the fire, and heat it without boiling, and just when 
ready to serve, stir in a quarter of a pound of fresh butter. Pour the soup into a very hot soup 
tureen and add a garnishing of crescent shaped quenelles, made of sweet potatoes (No. 317). 

(201). BISQUE OP OBAWPISH (Bisque d'Ecrevisses). 

Wash in several waters four dozen crawfish after removing the fins, the same as for bisque 
Persigny (No. 204); put the crawfish into a saucepan, pouring over half a bottleful of white wine, 
four ounces of minced onions, the same quantity of finely minced carrots, a few sprigs of parsley, one 
bay leaf, as much thyme, salt, mignonette, a little red pepper and half a pint of broth; cook all 
together for ten minutes with the cover on, tossing them several times in the meanwhile, then take 
them from off the fire and leave them standing for ten minutes longer in their broth; pour them 
into a colander to drain, and afterward select half of the finest, medium and equal sized ones; remove 
the tail ends from these, and the shells, and keep the meats aside for the garnishing, also half of the 
finest, but smallest shells from the head; stuff these with a red pike forcemeat finished with crawfish 
butter (for this see crawfish butter, No. 573), and with the remainder of the crawfish and the frag- 
ments make a bisque, pounding them with their equal quantity of rice; when all is well pounded, 
moisten with the broth they were cooked in and more plain broth, then strain through a sieve and a 
tammy. Warm it well without boiling, and incorporate into it when ready to serve, a piece of 
crawfish butter; pour the soup into the tureen and garnish with the tails and bodies both cut 
lengthwise in two. Crawfish bisque should be colored slightly more than the shrimp bisque. Use for 
coloring bisques some orchanet warmed in clarified butter or any other greasy substance, or clear 
vegetal carmine. Breton makes an excellent coloring for bisques. 

(202). BISQUE OF CRAWFISH A LA BATELIEEE (Bisque dEcrevisses k la BateliereX 

After removing the fins from the middle of the tails as for a la Persigny (No. 204), wash 
forty-eight crawfish in several waters, drain them, mince some carrots, leeks, onions and celery 
root, fry them in butter and just on the eve of browning, mix in a quarter of a pound of flour; 
cook the flour for a few minutes, and then add the crawfish, some sprigs of parsley, two bay leaves, 
salt and mignonette, cover the saucepan and cook for fifteen minutes, tossing them several times, 
then drain. Pick out the meat from the tails, cut them in two and reserve them for the garnish- 
ing: pound the shells as well as the claws with twelve hard boiled egg-yolks, and when a good paste 
is obtained, moisten it with the thick stock, strained first through a sieve not too fine, and after- 
ward through a tammy; moisten again with fat or lean broth. Should the bisque be required for 
a lean dinner; warm it up without boiling and incorporate in half a pound of crawfish butter with 
cayenne and half a gill of Madeira wine. Set the crawfish tails into a soup tureen and pour the 
bisque over, and when serving the soup put into each plate six pieces of bread a quarter of an 
inch square, fried in butter. 



SOUPS. 245 

(203). BISQUE OF OEAWFISH 1 LA HUMBOLDT (Bisque d'Ecrevisses a la Humboldt). 
Wash thoroughly in several waters, four dozen crawfish, after removing the fins from the 
middle of the tail (see bisque Persigny, No. 204), drain them, then fry in butter, some carrots, 
onions, leeks, celery and parsley roots all cut into small squares; moisten with half a bottleful of 
Rhine wine, the same quantity of broth, and season with salt, mignonette and cayenne, and a gill 
of tomato puree (No. 730), put this with the crawfish on the fire in a well covered saucepan and 
cook for fifteen minutes, tossing them frequently while cooking; then drain them, and pick out the 
meat from the tails. Pound the shells with double their quantity of rice and when all forms a 
paste, moisten with the broth strained through a fine sieve; season and warm up without boiling, 
and when ready to serve, mix in a quarter of a pound of crawfish butter. Place the crawfish tails 
with small pancakes, cut round, five-eighths of an inch in diameter, in the soup tureen and pour 
the bisque over. 

(204). BISQUE OP CRAWFISH A LA PERSIGffY (Bisque d'Ecrevisses a la Persigny). 
Remove the small black vein found in the center of the tail from forty-eight crawfish, using 
for this purpose either the tip of a knife, or else by twisting it round to the right, and pulling the 
fin away from the middle of the tail, and the vein attached to this will come off at the same time; 
it is most necessary to abstract this as it is always filled with sand. Wash the crawfish well; put 
them into a saucepan with a pint of broth, and the same quantity of white wine, salt, black pepper, 
two ounces of butter, two minced shallots, parsley and bay-leaf; boil for fifteen minutes, then drain 
and empty the bodies of twelve of the finest among them; pound the others to a fine paste, adding 
one quart of veloute" sauce (No. 415), and one quart of broth; let boil again for fifteen minutes, 
then add to the bisque, half a pound of sliced bread, buttered and browned in the oven; simnver 
for fifteen minutes longer; then strain first through a sieve, and then through a tammy. Heat it 
up once more, and just when ready to serve, incorporate into it a quarter of a pound of fine buttev, 
with a little red pepper added; fill the empty bodies with chicken force:neat (No. 62) and lobster OK 
crawfish butter mixed; poach them in boiling water, and when done cut them lengthwise in twor 
have also a garnishing of crusts made with savarin, a quarter of an inch square, dried in the oven, 
and served separate. 

(205). BISQUE OP LOBSTEE (Bisque de Homard). 

Plunge into boiling, salted water, twelve pounds of small, live, well washed lobsters; cook 
them for twenty-five minutes, then drain; break their shells, and extract all the meat. Pound the 
lobster meat with its equal quantity of boiled rice; season with salt and red pepper, then dilute it 
with fat broth or lean, should the bisque be desired lean, strain through a sieve, and again through 
a tammy. Heat it up without allowing it to boil, add a pint of bechamel (No. 409), and half a 
pound of lobster butter (No. 580); stir well the bisque until the butter is thoroughly melted. Color 
a lobster bisque a deeper red than the crawfish. Crusts of brioche, a quarter of an inch square, 
and dried in the oven may be served at the same time. 

(206). BISQUE OP LOBSTER A LA BENOIST (Bisque de Homard a la Benoist), 
Mince very fine one medium carrots, one leek and two onions, fry them in butter and moisten 
with fat broth, or lean, some parsley sprigs, thyme, bay leaf, garlic, salt and black pepper. At 
the first boil, put in with this, twelve pounds of raw, live, and washed lobsters, continue to boil 
for thirty minutes, then drain them, break the shells, remove all the meat, reserve that from the 
claws, and pound the remainder with its equal quantity of wheaten grits. Make a light roux 
with four ounces of butter and five ounces of flour, moisten it with some of the broth the lobsters 
were cooked in, boil, skim, add this to the lobster preparation. Heat it up all together, then strain 
through a sieve and afterward through a tammy, warm it up again and just when ready to serve 
and very hot, stir into the bisque a piece of lobster butter (No. 580), and a quart of double cream. 
Put a garnishing into the soup tureen and pour the soup over; serve as a garnishing the lobster 
meat from the claws cut into small Julienne (No. 318), and small cream forcemeat quenelles, 
laid through a cornet on a buttered tin, "and poached in a little boiling water. 

(207). BISQUE OF LOBSTER A LA CAMBRIDGE (Bisque de Homard a la Cambridge). 
Select twelve pounds of small, live lobsters, eight of them in all; remove the claws and cook 
them apart in boiling, salted water for twenty-five minutes. Cut in slices crosswise the remainder 
of the lobsters, fry these pieces in butter on a hot fire, adding four tablespoonfuls of flour; when 



-246 THE EPICUREAN. 

slightly colored, moisten with half a bottleful of white wine and two and a half quarts of broth, 
half a gill of brandy, salt and pepper. Cook all for fifteen minutes, then remove the meat from 
the shells, pound it to a paste, and dilute it with its own broth; strain through a sieve, and after- 
ward through a tammy; mix in one quart of bechamel (No. 409) ; warm up without boiling, and 
just when ready to serve, thicken the soup with twelve raw egg-yolks diluted in a quart of cream, 
and when the soup thickens, incorporate into it a quarter of a pound of lobster butter (No. 580). 
Put the following garnishing into a soup tureen, and pour the soup over. Remove the meat from 
the boiled lobster claws, cut the red part of it in slices an eighth of an inch thick, and from these 
punch out rounds three-quarters of an inch in diameter, using a column tube for the purpose; also 
have small, round quenelles, half an inch in diameter, made from the fillets of a pike or whiting 
in the shape of round beads. 

(208). BISQUE OP LOBSTER A LA PORTLAND (Bisque de Bernard a la Portland), 
Cut twelve pounds of lobster lengthwise in two, break the claws, sprinkle over some butter, 
and cook them on a baking-sheet in a hot oven for twenty-five minutes. Remove them, and sup- 
press the largest shells, pound the meat with its equal quantity of plain boiled rice, seasoned with 
salt, pepper, and curry, and when all is well reduced to a paste, dilute it with broth; strain 
through a sieve and then a tammy, and warm up the soup without boiling; thicken it with twelve 
hard boiled egg-yolks pounded with four ounces of butter, and mix in also a pint of double cream, 
and serve as garnishing some mushrooms cut into fine Julienne and lobster quenelles. Put the 
soup into a tureen. 

Lobster Quenelles. Cut one pound of cooked lobster meat in thin slices, add the coral and 
two ounces of butter; pound well and when reduced to a paste, take it from the mortar. Pound 
three quarters of a pound of panada, add gradually to it half a pound of butter, then the lobster 
paste, three eggs, one after the other, salt, pepper, nutmeg, and two tablespoons of Allemande 
sauce, test and rectify if necessary (No. 60). Roll this forcemeat to use for lobster quenelles, or 
else fill some sheeps' casings with it to make lobster boudins. 

(209). BISQUE OR PUREE OP MUSSELS 1 LA GUTTING (Bisque ou PurSe de Moules a la 

Cutting. 

Clean well three gallons of raw mussels, scraping them with a knife; wash them several 
times in clean waters, and take them out with the hand so as not to disturb the sand settling at the 
bottom. Put them into a saucepan with minced onions, sprigs of parsley, pepper (no salt), and 
one pint of water; set the saucepan on the fire, and when they begin to get warm, toss them and 
return them to the fire; cover the pot, and toss them again frequently, until the mussels open and 
are well cooked, then take them off, and pick them from the shells, reserving about thirty of the 
smallest for the garnishing. Strain the juice, and let it rest so as to be able to pour off the top 
and avoid the sediment at the bottom, pound the mussels with as much pearl barley (half a pound) 
cooked in water, salt and butter, for three hours; moisten with the mussel gravy and water in case 
the soup be too thick; season with salt and red pepper, then strain all through a fine sieve or 
tammy; warm it without letting it boil, and just when ready to serve put in a piece of fresh butter, 
stirring it well into the soup with a spoon until it be melted. Garnish the soup with the thirty 
small mussels laid aside, and savarin croutons, a quarter of an inch square and dried in 
the oven. All lean bisques are made exactly the same as the fat ones, only substituting fish broth 
for meat, and garnishing with milts, scallops of sauted eel fillets, pike, quenelles with crawfish 
butter, crawfish tails, and the hearts of oysters. The sieve used for the bisque or puree is a round 
strainer made so as to fit in the mortar having a flange on the edge to fit the outside of it, the 
pestle is used to force the substance to be passed through it. 

(210). BISQUE OR PUREE OF OYSTERS A LA WILSON (Bisque ou Pure"e d'Huitres a la Wilson). 
Put sixty medium sized oysters in a saucepan with their own juice, set it on a hot fire to poach 
them; then drain. Fry colorless in some butter, two medium shallots and the same quantity of 
onions; dredge some curry over, and moisten with some of the oyster juice, season with salt and 
red pepper. Pound the oysters, and when they are a firm paste, wet them with some of their 
juice, and strain them through a fine sieve or tammy, warm them without boiling, adding a thick- 
ening of potato flour diluted in cold water, one tablespoonful for each quart, and when ready to 
serve, mix in some cream and fine butter; make a garnishing of chopped oysters and mushrooms. 



SOUPS. 247 

mixing some bread-crumbs and fine herbs with these, and seasoning with salt, pepper and nutmeg; 
add some raw egg-yolks and roll this mixture into balls; lay them on a buttered baking sheet, and 
poach them in a slack oven. 

(211). BISQUE 01 SHRIMPS A LA VERAGUA (Bisque de Orevettes a la Veragua). 

Cut into small three-sixteenth of an inch squares, two ounces of carrots, four ounces of onions and 
two ounces of celery root; put into a saucepan six ounces of butter, fry therein the vegetables without 
browning and add three pounds of fresh, well washed shrimps, one bay leaf and several sprigs of 
parsley, also a bottleful of white wine and half a pound of chopped mushrooms. Boil for ten minutes, 
drain, remove the parsley and bay leaf, then shell a quarter of the shrimps, suppressing the tails, 
which must be laid aside for the garnishing, pound the rest of the shrimps with the shells of those 
the tails were taken from, add one-fourth of the same quantity of rice and moisten with the stock 
and broth; strain this puree through a sieve or tammy, add one pint of bechamel, season with salt 
and cayenne pepper; warm without boiling, and just when ready to serve, add to it a piece of fine 
butter and some cream. Serve the soup very hot, with Savarin crusts, five-eighths by one-eighth 
of an inch thick, and dried in the oven, also the shrimp tails cut into small squares. 

(212). BISQUE OF SHRIMPS A LA MELVILLE (Bisque de Orevettes a la Melville). 

Throw one pound of shrimps into boiling, unsalted water and cook them for five minutes, 
drain, then dredge them over with salt and toss in a colander to mix the salt in well; when cold, 
shell the tails and keep them for garnishing. Mince one carrot, one onion, a celery stalk and two 
leeks, fry these in butter with one bay leaf and moisten with three quarts of either fish or vege- 
table stock and half a bottleful of wine; boil for twenty-five minutes, then put into this broth two 
pounds of raw shrimps and the shells of the tails reserved for the garnishing; boil for five minutes 
longer, then drain. Put into a stewpan two pounds of sliced bread, cover it with broth and let 
simmer for twenty minutes, then drain it on a sieve, pound the shrimps, add the moistened bread, 
and continue pounding until all is reduced to a paste, then dilute with the shrimp broth, and 
press all through a fine sieve, season and strain through a tammy. Heat it up till near the boiling 
point, but do not allow it to boil, then thicken with eight egg-yolks diluted with two gills of cream 
and a quarter of a pound of good butter, incorporating it vigorously into the bisque with a spoon, 
then pour it into a very hot tureen, with the shrimp tails cut into three or four pieces as a garn- 
ishing. 

(213). BISQUE OF SHRIMPS, BRETONNE (Bisque de Orevettes, Bretonne). 
Have three pounds of very fresh shrimps, throw them into boiling salted water and boil them 
for a few minutes, then drain and remove the shells from the largest ones, allowing three for each 
person; stuff these with pike forcemeat (No. 90), mixed with fine herbs; then poach them in boiling 
salted water, drain and keep them aside for garnishing the soup. Pound the remainder of the shrimps 
with a quarter of their quantity of crushed wheaten grits, previously cooked in water for thirty 
minutes, also twelve ounces of minced onion blanched and fried colorless in butter, adding to it 
six spoonfuls of flour diluted with milk, and cook all very slowly. Moisten the puree with broth, 
pass it through a sieve or tammy, put the puree into a saucepan, heat it to near the boiling point, 
then season with salt and cayenne pepper; when ready to serve add a piece of butter. Place the 
stuffed shrimp shells in the soup tureen, pour the soup over the puree and serve. 

(214). CONSOMME, GARNISHIFGS OF (Consomme, garnitures pour). 

Garnishings of Consommes. Consomme garnishings are served separately, by placing them 
in a tureen and pouring over sufficient of the soup to cover them; having only a little consomme in 
the tureen it is easier to serve the garnishing without breaking; divide equally into each plate and 
pour over some clear consomme; in case the garnishing is to be served in the same tureen as the 
soup (to be avoided as much as possible) first put the consomme into the tureen, and then the 
garnishing that all may be very hot. The garnishings we are about to describe may be served with 
either beef, chicken, game or fish consomme, for the fish using the lean garnishings. Consommes 
can also be thickened with potato fecula or arrowroot, by diluting these substances in a little cold 
water or broth, pour it into the consomme, stirring it all the time with a whip, boil, skim and then 
add a little Madeira or Xeres wine. These soups are called clear thick soups when they are 
thickened either with fecula or arrowroot. 



248 THE EPICUREAN. 

(215). CONSOMME A L'ADELINA (OonsommS &, 1'Adflina), 

The admitted rule for all soups is one quart of soup for four persons. The garnishing con- 
sists of round chicken quenelles, three-sixteenths of an inch, poached in boiling water; green peas 
cooked in boiling, salted water, and carrots cut into balls the same size and shape, and cooked in 
white broth with a little sugar. Also timbales, twelve pieces in all. Dilute one-quarter of a pint of 
pure"e of chestnuts with a quarter of a pint of cream and four egg-yolks, salt, and nutmeg; butter 
some dome shaped tartlet molds, put a round piece of truffle at the bottom, and then fill the molds 
with the above preparation; set one beside the other in a stewpan with boiling water reaching to half 
their height, and poach them in a slack oven; when firm to the touch, unmold and place them in a 
vegetable dish with the quenelles, carrots and green peas; pour over a little consomme, just sufficient 
to cover, and serve separately a tureen of consomme, having all very hot. Into each plate put some 
of the contents of the vegetable dish and tureen; this rule stands for all consomme garnishings, 
that is, one timbale, and a dozen and a half carrots, peas, and quenelles, inclusive. 

(216). CONSOMME A L'ANDALOUSE (Consomm6 a 1'Andalouse). 

For this consomme prepare a garnishing composed of timbales, cucumber crescents, and small 
quenelles. The timbales are made with a pint of tomato puree strained through a very fine sieve; 
mix into this ten raw egg-yolks and a gill of cream; season with salt and nutmeg. With this prep- 
aration fill some No. 2 timbale molds (Fig. 137), stand them in asautoire containing boiling water to 
reach to half their height and push into a slack oven; remove as soon as they are firm to the 
touch and let them rest for fifteen minutes, then divide each timbale into three parts. Place 
them in a vegetable dish with a little consomme. Pare some cucumbers to resemble crescent 
olives, blanch, drain, and cook in consomme. Have small quenelles made with chicken quenelle 
forcemeat (No. 89), and cream forcemeat (No. 75), half of each; push them through a pocket into 
rounds in a buttered sautoire and poach in a little boiling salted water; add the cucumbers and 
quenelles to the timbales, and serve at the same time with a tureen full of consomme. 

(217). CONSOMME ANTONELLI, LEAN OE PAT (OonsommS Antonelli, en Maigre ou en Gras) 

Use consomme of either chicken or fish, the following quantity being for twelve persons. 
Keep on the side of the range, three quarts of chicken consomme for fat, or fish broth for lean; 
thicken one or the other with three spoonfuls of tapioca, and cook for twenty-five minutes, skim- 
ming it nicely. Choose sixteen raw truffles, having all of them, if possible, one inch in diameter; 
peel them and mark with a column tube of five-eighths of an inch, a place for a cover; cut off the 
round cover using the tip of a small knife, and keep the piece aside; scoop out the insides with a 
vegetable spoon, leaving the surface as thin as possible, then salt them, and fill the empty space 
with a puree of goose livers (foies-gras) mixed with cream and egg-yolks, or if intended for lean, 
with a puree of salmon, bechamel, cream and egg-yolks. Close the opening with the piece laid 
aside, and arrange one beside the other in the bottom of a stewpan, just large enough to contain 
them; moisten them to half their height with consomme and Madeira, cover with buttered paper, 
and let the water boil, then place it in a slack oven for fifteen minutes, so as to poach the pre- 
paration inside the truffles. Serve these truffles in a vegetable dish with sixteen fine cocks' kid- 
neys if for fat, or if for lean, sixteen pike quenelles the same shape as the kidneys; serve also a 
garnishing of small stars cut from noodle paste, blanched and cooked in consomme. 

(218). CONSOMME BALZAC (ConsommS Balzac). 

The garnishing for this consomme is composed of three kinds of timbales, chicken, shrimps, 
and green peas, and turnip balls. 

For the Chicken Timbales have half a pint of chicken puree, two spoonfuls of bechamel, six 
egg-yolks, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. 

For the Shrimp Timbales, half a pint of shrimp puree, two spoonfuls of bechamel, six egg- 
yolks, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. 

For the Green Pea Timbales, half a pint of puree of green peas (No. 261), two spoonfuls of 
bechamel, six yolks, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Butter twenty-four timbale molds (Fig. 137, No. 2) 
fill each eight with a different one of the compositions; stand them on a baking tin with boiling 
water, reaching to half their height and poach in a slack oven. When partly cooled off, unmold, 
pare and divide in three parts, cutting them across. i*ut them into a vegetable dish with a gar- 
nishing of turnip balls, blanched, and cooked in consomme till they have fallen to a glaze; send 
this garnishing to the table with a soup tureen full of consomme". 



SOUPS. 249 

(219). CONSOMME A LA BAEIATENSKI (ConsommS a la Bariatenski). 

Make a pancake preparation (No. 3072), without sugar, and with it cook some very thin pan- 
cakes; when done cut from them pieces one and five-eighth inches long, by one and a half wide; 
spread over each piece a layer of chicken forcemeat, mixed with chopped mushrooms and parsley 
and a little anchovy paste; roll them up and lay them on a buttered baking pan; then poach them 
in a slack oven; prepare some marrow quenelles (No. 252), roll them into balls, five-eighths of an 
inch in diameter, and poach them in boiling water; have also a pluche of chervil (No. 448). Serve 
the same as for a 1'Adelina (No. 215), using chicken consomme. 

(220). CONSOMME' A LA BEEEY (Consomme" a la Berry), 

Prepare for this consomme a garnishing composed of small soft eggs (No. 2949), and lozenges 
prepared as follows: Take a pint of puree of asparagus, beat in twelve egg-yolks, a little raw cream 
and seasoning; pour the preparation into buttered baking tins, the bottoms to be covered with a 
sheet of paper; poach in a slack oven and when cold turn them over on a napkin; remove the 
paper and cut up into small lozenges, one inch long, by half an inch wide; have also the same sized 
lozenges cut from both carrots and turnips, keeping them an eighth of an inch thick; blanch and 
cook separately in consomme and when done the liquid should be reduced to a glaze. Serve the 
garnishings in a separate tureen, accompanied by a tureen full of consomme. 

(221). CONSOMME A LA BEITANNIA (Consomme" a la Britannia). 

Put on to boil three quarts of fish consomme, or chicken if needed for fat; thicken it with 
three spoonfuls of arrowroot diluted with cold broth, and remove it to one side. Pound the meat 
from a cooked lobster by breaking the shells and removing about three-quarters of a pound of its 
meat, and add to it half a pint of veloute (No. 415). Season and strain through a fine sieve, mix 
this with some chicken and cream forcemeat (No. 75), divide it into two parts, and color one of them 
delicate red; butter some long eight inch molds, by one and one-eighth square; fill half of each 
so as to form a triangle with the white forcemeat and the other half with the red, place the molds 
in a sautoire with water to half their height and poach them in a slack oven, then cut them in 
slices, a quarter of an inch wide. Have some asparagus tops, and serve the garnishing in a vege- 
table dish with a little consomme added, and a soup tureen of consomme separate. 

(222). CONSOMME CAEEME, LEAN OE PAT (ConsommS Careme en Maigre ou en Gras). 

For Fat. Have chicken consomme, thickened with arrowroot, allowing one spoonful for 
each quart, and diluted in half a gill of Madeira wine. Spread over a sheet of buttered 
paper, a layer of cream forcemeat (No. 75), one-eighth of an inch thick, poach it in a slack 
oven, then let get cold, and cut it in lozenge-shaped pieces: prepare crusts half an inch square, or 
else round shaped six by one-eighth high, and fried in butter. A printanier composed of small 
vegetables, trimmed either with a column, or else a vegetable spoon, using carrots, turnips, and 
string-beans, blanch and cook them in white broth. 

For Lean. Serve a fish consomme thickened with arrowroot and a garnishing composed 
of frog quenelles; a small printanier trimmed into squares, and each vegetable blanched 
separately and then cooked in fish consomme; crusts of bread cut round shaped, three-quarters 
of an inch in diameter, by an eighth of an inch in thickness, laid over with butter and browned 
in the oven. 

Frog Quenelles. Pound one pound of frog's meat and rub it through a sieve; lay it aside; 
pound also five ounces of rice flour panada (No. 122) with five ounces butter, adding it in three 
different parts. "While still continuing to pound, season with salt, red pepper and nutmeg; add 
the frog meat, pound again, then rub it all forcibly through a sieve. Mix in with it one whole egg, 
and two yolks, working them in well, then try the forcemeat and rectify it if necessary ("see 
No. 60). With this forcemeat make some olive shaped quenelles, poach and add them to the rest 
of the garnishing. 

(223). CONSOMME CELESTINE (Consomme" a la Celestine), 

A garnishing of thin pancakes without sugar; spread over each pancake a layer of chicken force- 
meat and fine herbs; set on top and press down another pancake, add another layer of forcemeat and 
one more pancake, and press the whole lightly, then with a column tube cut out round pieces one 
and three-q'uarters inches in diameter; lay these on a buttered baking tin, one beside the other, and 



250 THE EPICUREAN. 

leave them in a slack oven for about ten minutes, just allowing them time enough to poach. 
Place the garnishing in a tureen with some lettuce cut in very fine thread-like fillets, blanched and 
cooked in consomme and a pluche of parsley (a few leaves of young, blanched parsley); serve at 
the same time a soup tureen of consomme. 

(224). CONSOMME OHAEMEL (ConsommS Channel). 

A garnishing of small timbales the shape of half an egg, and one inch in diameter, have some 
molds of this shape and size; butter the insides and set them on a tin sheet having inch high feet 
attached to it, place this on to a larger pan, the smaller one having holes bored in seven-eighths of 
an inch in diameter, and a space of a quarter of an inch between each. Prepare one pint of pigeon 
puree, adding to it half a pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414), reduced with Madeira, season with 
salt, pepper and nutmeg, and mingle all well together. Fill the molds with this preparation, pour 
water into the lower pan, a sufficient quantity to half the height of the molds, when set in the 
holes, and then poach them in a slow oven, unmold, and serve at the same time some braised 
sweetbreads pressed under a weight, cooled off and cut into three-eighth squares, then rewarmed in 
a little consomme; have also a few Julienne cut mushrooms. Serve this garnishing in a vegetable 
dish with a little consomme. Serve a soup tureen of consomme separate. 



(225). CONSOMME COLBERT, WITH POACHED EGGS (Consomms Colbert, aux oeufs 

A garnishing of carrots and turnips cut into quarter of an inch balls, then blanched and 
cooked separately in white consomme. Green peas, lozenge-shaped string beans, and small sprigs 
of cauliflower, and some very small eggs poached in water, salted and acidulated with vinegar, 
crusts of bread-crumbs, six-eighths of an inch in diameter by one-eighth in thickness, masked with 
butter and browned in the oven. 

(226). CONSOMME COMUS (Oonsomm6 Comus.). 

A garnishing of small round rolls one and a quarter inches in diameter, made of ordinary 
bread dough; in these make an incision around the flat side and empty out the insides completely. 
Blanch some white cabbage leaves, suppressing the cores, drain them and cut them up very fine, 
then fry them in butter with quarter of its quantity of cooked ham cut in one eighth inch 
squares; moisten with a little white wine, add half its quantity of cooked, skinned and chopped up 
sausages; set this into the rolls, cover the tops with a layer of chicken quenelle forcemeat (No. 89), 
and poach them in a slack oven. Lay them on a vegetable dish round side up; and moisten 
with a little good consomme, then let simmer fora few minutes in the oven; add some cooked foies- 
gras (goose livers) cut in three-sixteenth of an inch squares, and some round five-eighth inch slices 
of lettuce, blanched and cooked in consomme. Serve this with a soup tureen of consomme at the 
same time. 

(227), CONSOMME OEEAM OP PHEASANTS OE GAME (Consomm6 Creme de Faisans ou Gibier). 

Choose small, fresh pullet eggs; boil them for four minutes in boiling water, then lay them in 
water to cool off and remove the shells; open them on one end with a tube half an inch in diameter 
from a column-box (Fig. 168), take out the yolks with a root-spoon, and empty them very carefully, 
slightly decreasing the thickness of the white; then fill each egg separately; using a cornet for the 
purpose, with cream pheasant forcemeat (No. 75), or other game forcemeat, as soon as each one 
is done, close the opening with the piece taken off, and set each one in an egg cup. Arrange these 
on the bottom of a deep stewpan containing a little boiling water, close the vessel, and poach the 
forcemeat, by putting the pan for fifteen minutes in a slack oven; dress the egg in a vegetable 
dish with a little consomme added, and serve at the same time a soup tureen of game 
consomme. 

(228). CONSOMME A LA DAUMONT (Consommg a la Daumont). 

A garnishing of dome-shaped timbales decorated with trufflas and filled with a marechale 
mousseline (No. 912); then poach in a slow oven and serve separately, some blanched turnips and 
cut into balls three-eighths of an inch in diameter, and cooked in white consomme; small pate a chou 
(No. 132) balls, with parmesan cheese, the size of greer peas, and fried a fine color; some blanched 
chervil (pluche), and rice cooked in white broth. Serve all the garnishing in a vegetable dish, 
and a tureen of chicken consomme at the same time. 



SOUPS. 251 

(229). CONSOMME A LA DUB AERY (Consomme a la Dubarry). 

A garnishing of timbales of mushrooms prepared as follows: half a pint of mushroom puree, 
half a pint of bechamel sauce (No. 409), eight egg-yolks and one whole egg; season with salt and 
nutmeg and fill with this some low and plain, buttered tartlet molds, poach them in a slow oven, 
unmold, and set them in a vegetable dish with some semolina quenelles, serve the garnishing 
separately with a soup tureen full of game consomme and crusts of bread, five-eighths by one-eighth 
of an inch, sprinkled over with butter and browned in the oven. 

Semolina Quenelles. Take a quarter of a pound of butter, beaten to a cream with eight raw 
egg-yolks, mixing them in gradually, add to it seven ounces of semolina, salt, pepper and nutmeg, 
and with this preparation make some small quenelles with coffeespoons; poach them slowly for 
thirty minutes. They should swell up to twice their original size. 

(230). CONSOMME A LA DUCHESS (Consomme" a la Duchesse). 

The garnishing for this consomme is composed as follows: prepare some bread-crumb croutons 
half an inch thick by five-eighths in length, slit them with the tip of a small knife at one-eighth of 
an inch from the edge all around; stand them on a baking sheet, pour over some melted butter 
and brown in a hot oven, remove, lift off the covers, scoop out the inside crumbs. Fry a little finely 
chopped onion in butter, dilute with some bechamel and season with salt, pepper and nutmeg; 
add the same amount of finely chopped lobster meat, thicken with egg-yolks, cream, and a little 
nutmeg; with this preparation fill the crusts, cover the tops with quenelle forcemeat finished with 
lobster butter and poach in a slack oven, then dress. Serve some consomme in a separate soup 
tureen containing rice, blanched and cooked in consomme, and small green peas, cooked English 
style (No. 2742). The croustades to be served separately at the same time as the consomme. 

(231). CONSOMME A L'IMPERATRICE (Consomme" a I'lmperatrice). 

For garnishing, have quenelles half-spherical shape, decorated with truffles and filled with a 
<:ream forcemeat, then poached in a slow oven; as soon as they are firm to the touch, unmold and 
set them in a vegetable dish with a little consomme and some rice cooked in white broth, some very 
small fresh green peas and rounds of red carrots, blanched and cooked in broth; serve separately 
a soup tureen of chicken consomme. 

(232). CONSOMME. A LA FLORENTINE (Consomme" a la Florentine). 

Make a garnishing of small stars cut from carrots each one an inch and a quarter in diameter 
by one-sixteenth of an inch in thickness; blanch them in boiling, salted water, then finish to cook 
in consomme; have also inch diameter rings made of chicken forcemeat (No. 62), colored with 
spinach green laid through a pocket on buttered tins, then poached in boiling, salted water; some 
rounds cut from turnips three-sixteenths of an inch in thickness by three-quarters of an inch in 
diameter, blanched, cooked in consomme and reduced to a glaze; when the liquid has all evap- 
orated the turnips should be done. Serve these garnishings with a little consomme and at the 
same time a soup tureen of hot consomme. 

(233). CONSOMME A LA FRANKLYN (Consomme a la Franklyn). 

The Garnishing. Cut out some rounds with a three-sixteenth inch tube from some slices of 
carrots a quarter of an inch thick, and from the reddest part. Trim some slices of turnip the same, 
and punch out the same quantity of pieces as of carrot, using the same tube, and cook them in 
consomme with a little sugar; also cook some string beans cut lozenge-shape in salted water and 
afterward drain all well. Butter some timbale molds (No. 5, Fig. 137); garnish them to three- 
quarters of their height with the vegetables, blending well the colors, and fill up the molds with a 
preparation made from a pint of cream, eight egg-yolks, two whole eggs, salt and nutmeg, strained 
through a sieve. Set these molds in a stewpan, with boiling water to cover half their height, and 
push them into a slack oven; when the preparation is poached remove them from the oven and set 
them away to cool. Unmold them and trim off the tops; then cut them through the center crosswise, 
and place them in a vegetable dish with a little consomme; also have pearl barley blanched and 
cooked in consomme; make some stars with bits of rolled-out puffed paste, a sixteenth of an 
inch in thickness, and baked in an almost cold oven, so that they remain white, these to be served 
on a plate apart. Serve a soup tureen of consomme at the same time as the garnishing, and allow 
three stars to each plate of soup. 



252 THE EPICUREAN. 

(234) CONSOMME A LA GKAMMONT (OonsommS a la Grammont), 

For the Garnishing. A quarter of a pound of filbert nuts, pounded with half a pint of cream, 
when reduced to a paste, place this puree into a bowl with half a pint of supreme sauce (No. 547), 
and ten whites of eggs; season, press through a sieve and then set the preparation into buttered 
timbale molds (No. 5, Fig. 137), lay them in a stewpan, one beside the other, with sufficient 
boiling water to cover half the height of the mold, then poach them in a slack oven, unmold, and 
cut them in two across the center; arrange them in a deep dish or vegetable dish; besprinkle 
them with a little consomme and have also game quenelles molded in molds, the size and shape 
of half a bird's egg cut lengthwise; in order to make these quenelles, mix an equal quantity of 
quenelle forcemeat (No. 89), with game and cream forcemeat (No. 75), and turnips cut into three- 
eighths of an inch balls, using either a vegetable or root spoon, then blanch and cook them ir 
white consomme. 

(235). CONSOMME A LA HONGEOISE (Consonant k la Hongroise). 

lor this consomme make some of the following biscuits: beat twelve egg- yolks in a vessel, 
whip the whites to a stiff froth and mix them lightly with the yolks; also four ounces of sifted 
flour and two ounces of grated parmesan; season with pepper, nutmeg and powdered parmesan^ 
spread this evenly on a sheet of paper, keeping it three-sixteenths of an inch in thickness and cook 
in a slack oven. Detach the paper, and cut the biscuit up into lozenges an inch and a half long 
by three-quarters of an inch in width. Besides this, prepare another garnishing with half a pint 
of onion puree and the same quantity of cream, six egg-whites, salt, paprika and nutmeg; with 
this fill some timbale molds (No. 4, Fig. 137), stand them in a sautoire, with boiling water, to half 
their height and poach in a slack oven; unmold, and divide in two, longitudinally. Make some 
small potato quenelles in the shape of a three-eighth of an inch ball; poach them in boiling 
salted water. Place the timbales and the quenelles in a vegetable dish, cover with consomme and 
serve the biscuits separately the same time as the soup. 

Potato Quenelles. Put ten ounces of puree of potatoes in a saucepan and dry thoroughly, 
working continuously to avoid burning. When it detaches from the pan, add to it two ounces of 
butter; season with salt and nutmeg, add four raw egg -yolks and mix in gradually two ounces of 
pate a chou (No. 132). 

(236). CONSOMME A LA LAGUIPIERRE (Consomme" a la Laguipierre). 

For Garnishing. Butter some small molds, shaped like small half pigeon's eggs; fill these 
with a game mousse, made of any seasonable game; set them on tin sheets; poach in a slack oven, 
unmold, and serve them in a separate vegetable dish, adding some oval shaped chicken quenelles, 
laid on a buttered tin through a bag, and poached in a little boiling water in a slow oven. Serve 
separately small one-quarter inch square crusts made of twelve turns of puff paste or trimmings 
and baked white in a very slow oven. 



(237). CONSOMME A LA NOAILLES (Oonsommg a la Noailles). 

A garnishing made of artichoke bottoms, two inches in diameter; remove the centers, using 
a half inch tube for the purpose, then divide the rest into sixteen equal sized pieces, and pare 
them nicely; put them into a vegetable dish with a little consomme, also some consistent Eoyal 
garnishing (No. 241), cut into quarter of an inch squares. Have also round timbales made of 
game, hare, or leveret, or any other seasonable game; half a pint of game puree, half a pint of 
espagnole sauce with tomatoes (No. 414); salt, pepper, nutmeg, and five whole or twelve yolks; 
butter the insides of the molds, fill them with the preparation, and poach them in a slow oven; 
when firm to the touch, unmold and set them in a vegetable dish with the royal cream cut in 
squares, and the artichoke bottoms. Serve very hot, and at the same time send a soup tureen of 
game consomme slightly thickened with arrowroot; adding just when ready to serve a little good 
Xeres or Madeira wine. 

(238). CONSOMME A LA PLUMEREY (Consomm^klaPlumerey), 

For the Garnishing. Have some lettuce soaked in cold water, then washed in several waters 
to remove all the adhering sand, blanch in plenty of water, cool off, and press out all the 
liquid, bend the leaves over, one third of their length at the top, trim the stalks nicely, braize 
them for one hour and serve them in a vegetable dish after dividing them in two, lengthwise. 
Have half a pint of puree of duck; the same quantity of supreme sauce (No. 547), half a pint of 



SOUPS. 253 

bouillon, twelve raw egg-yolks, and two whole eggs, season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg, then 
press it through a tammy, and fill some buttered timbale molds (No. 5, Fig. 137,), with this 
preparation; poach them in a slack oven, unmold, cut in two crosswise, and add them to the 
lettuce. Crusts of bread five-eighths of an inch square by one-eighth of an inch thick, sprinkled over 
with butter, and browned in the oven; serve these separately; send to the table at the same time a 
tureen of chicken consomme; serve in each plate, half a lettuce, and one slice or half a timbale, 
pour over some consomme and add three croutons for each person. 

(239). CONSOMME PRINTANIER WITH QUENELLES (Consomme Printanier aux Quenelles). 

Put two quarts of clarified consomme on to boil. Prepare a garnishing composed of tender 
carrots, turnips, celery roots, cucumbers, asparagus tops, string beans cut lozenge-shape, also 
small flowerets of cauliflower; cut the roots either olive or ball-shape, using a vegetable-spoon, 
blanch them in salted water, then let fall to a glaze several times in a little broth until they 
are cooked, then put them as soon as done into the soup tureen, adding the cauliflower, asparagus 
and some green peas previously boiled in salted water. Besprinkle this garnishing with a pinch of 
sugar, pour the broth over, and finish with small quenelles, three-eighths of an inch in diameter, 
having a quarter of the quantity of the other garnishing. Serve the soup with slices of toasted 
bread instead of the quenelles; when needed for a plain printanier, and for a consomme printanier 
royale, employ the same garnishings, adding slices of timbales royale (No. 241). 

(240). CONSOMME A LA REMUSAT (ConsommS a la Remusat). 

Mince up fine one small white onion, one carrot and one turnip, half a celery-knob, and the 
white part of a leek; fry these very slowly with some butter, season, and moisten with a little 
broth, then cook them covered, letting the liquid fall several times to a glaze, and until the 
vegetables are well done; press them through a tammy, and put this puree into a bowl. For one 
pint, add ten raw egg-yolks and one whole one, half a pint of cream, a pinch of sugar, salt and 
nutmeg; pour this preparation into buttered timbale molds (No. 4, Fig. 137) and poach by 
putting them into a stewpan with boiling water to half their height. When done cut each timbale 
in two through the center crossways and place them in a vegetable dish with some small chicken 
forcemeat quenelles, colored white, red and green, and pushed through a cornet on a baking 
sheet into the shape of beads, a quarter of an inch in diameter, having the same quantity of each 
color, and poach them in boiling salted water; drain them, and add them to the slices of timbale; 
serve separately and at the same time a soup tureen of chicken consomme. 

(241). CONSOMME A LA ROYAL (Oonsomm6 a la Royale). 

Butter some timbale molds (No. 5, Fig. 137), then fill them with the following preparation, 
mix well one pint of cream, eight egg-yolks, two whole eggs, salt and nutmeg; strain it through a 
sieve, and fill up the timbales, put them into a stewpan with boiling water reaching to half their 
height, and poach them in a slack oven, until firm to the touch. Remove them from the oven, 
let get partially cold, then unmold, and cut them crosswise through the center; put them into a 
separate vegetable dish with some white of chicken, mushrooms and truffles cut into small pieces 
an eighth of an inch square by five-eighths long. Serve at the same time a soup tureen of 
chicken consomme. 

(242). CONSOMME A LA SEVIGNE (Consomm< a la Sevign6). 

For the garnishing, butter some timbale molds (No. 3, Fig. 137), and fill them with the following 
preparation : one pint of the puree of the white of chicken made with equal parts of chicken and rice, 
cooked in consomme, the whole passed through a sieve, and moistened with one gill of supreme 
sauce (No. 547), eight egg-yolks, and one gill of cream, seasoning with salt and nutmeg. Set the 
timbales in a sautoire with boiling water reaching to half their height, and poach them in a slack 
oven; then let get partially cold, and unmold; and cut them crosswise through the center. Lay 
them in a vegetable dish with a little good consomme and some boiled green peas, serve separately, 
but at the same time, a soup tureen of chicken consomme. 

(243). CONSOMME A LA SOUVERAINE (Consomm6 I la Souveraine). 

A garnishing of timbales. Make a preparation with one pint of mushroom pure"e, two gills of 
espagnole sauce with essence of game (No. 414), ten egg-yolks, salt, red pepper, and nutmeg; fill 
some dome-shaped molds with this, and poach them in a slack oven, placing the molds in a stew- 



254 THE EPICUREAN. 



pan with boiling water reaching to half their height; when done, which means firm to the touch, 
unmold them, and put them into a vegetable dish with some consomme, also some turnips cut 
into triangles, half an inch by an eighth of an inch thick, blanched and cooked in consomme, 
squares of the red part of carrot cut the same thickness, blanched and cooked with consomme; some 
artichoke bottoms cut into quarter of an inch squares, and half inch round pieces of blanched 
lettuce leaves. 

(244), CONSOMME WITH SWALLOWS' NESTS AND CHINESE BIRDS' NEST SOUP (Consomme 
aux nids d'Hirondelles de Chine, et Potage aux nids d'Hirondelles). 

A Garnishing. Salanga from the Philippine Islands; these swallows build their nests in the 
rocks on the seashore. The nests greatly resemble shells and are formed of a transparent, yellow- 
ish material: certain naturalists affirm that they are the spawn of fish picked up from the ocean. 
For twelve persons, put six swallows 1 nests to soak in cold water for twelve hours; drain them and 
clean them carefully, removing with a coarse needle all the bits of feathers, and small, almost 
imperceptible black spots found adhering to the nest. Wash them well in several waters, then lay 
them in a saucepan and cover them with white broth; let it come to a boil, then set it on one side, 
and leave it in the same degree of heat, only it should not boil; drain the nests, put them in a 
soup tureen, and pour over an excellent chicken consomme. Swallows' nests can be obtained all 
the year round, the price varying according to their rarity. 

Chinese Bird's Nest Soup. The Chinese in New York prepare this soup in the following 
way: For each person soak about half an ounce of swallows' nests for four hours in cold water, then 
drain. Place a young fowl in a soup pot, cover with water and let boil, add a few sprigs of parsley 
and salt, boil slowly and when the fowl is done, take it out and strain the broth, skimming off all 
the fat. Cook the birds 1 nests in some of this broth, take it from the fire at the first boil, cover 
well and keep it in a bain-marie, to it add some lean ham cut in thin strips. Remove all the fat 
from the broth, strain it over the nests and put it back on the fire until it almost attains boiling 
point, now add the cooked chicken meat, free of fat, nerves or skin and cut up into quarter inch 
dice; season to taste and serve. 

(245). CREAM SOUPS (Potages Creme.). 

I believe it to be more advisable to select fresh vegetables for making cream soups, and to thicken 
them with raw egg yolks, butter and cream. The flavor of the fresh vegetables combined with 
the velvety liaison, helps to make these thick soups highly estimated, even were the cream and eggs 
to be suppressed. Purees can be made of these creams, by finishing them as indicated in the puree 
soups. For Lenten cream soups, moisten them with a vegetable stock instead of broth, and use 
lean bechamel, in the place of veloute. Cream soups will be improved by passing them through a 
tammy. 

(246), CREAM OF ARTICHOKES, MORLAISIAN (Oreme d' Artichauts Morlaisienne.) 
Trim well some artichoke bottoms so that all the green part of the leaves be removed; mince 
up two pounds of this, blanch and drain them. Put two ounces of butter in a saucepan, and 
when very hot, set in the artichokes and fry them without browning; moisten with two quarts ot 
broth; cover the saucepan, and let boil slowly until the artichokes are done, then drain and mash 
them in a mortar; and pass the puree through a fine sieve; put it back into a saucepan, and dilute 
it with its own broth, adding one pint of veloute sauce (No. 415). Set it on the fire and stir con- 
constantly, bearing on the bottom of the saucepan with a spatula; let boil up once, then remove 
all the fat; season with salt, sugar, and nutmeg, and thicken the soup with raw egg-yolks, cream 
and butter. The quantity of liaison for each quart of this soup, is two egg-yolks, one gill of 
cream, and two ounces of butter. Serve separately some Savarin croutons, a quarter of an inch 
square, and dried in the oven. 

(247). CREAM OF ASPARAGUS A LA ST. VALLIER (Creme d'Asperges a la St. Vallier). 

Mince up fine, five medium-sized onions, throw them into boiling salted water, and let them 
boil for five minutes, then drain, and fry them in a quarter of a pound of butter without 
coloring; add four heaping tablespoonfuls of flour, and let fry slowly for several minutes, 
then put in with them two pounds of green and tender asparagus, cut in one-inch length pieces, 
washed several times, and blanched for ten minutes in boiling, salted water. Moisten with two 



SOUPS. 255 

quarts of broth, and when the asparagus is done, drain it off, and mash it in a mortar 
diluting it with its own broth; pass all through a fine sieve, and put the puree into a saucepan, 
to heat; season with salt, sugar and nutmeg, and after it begins to boil, remove all the fat 
arising to the surface; just when ready to serve, thicken the soup with raw egg-yolks, diluted in 
cream, and incorporate therein some fine butter. Serve in a soup tureen with a garnishing of 
green peas and small quenelles, three-sixteenths of an inch in diameter, laid through a cornet on a 
buttered pan, and poached in some boiling salted water, poured into the pan; when done, drain 
them, and add them to the soup. 

(248). OEEAM OF ASPARAGUS WITH CROUTONS SOUFFLES OR ASPARAGUS TOPS (Creme 

d'Asperges aux Croutons Souffle's ou aux pointes d'Asperges). 

Bend some small green asparagus, beginning at the root end, so as to break it off, keeping 
only the tender parts (two pounds); cut into one inch length pieces, wash well, changing 
the water several times, then drain and throw into boiling, salted water, continue the boiling 
for ten minutes, then drain. Put four ounces of butter into a saucepan; when very hot 
add the asparagus, and fry colorless on a quick fire; moisten with two quarts of broth, and 
when done, drain and mash; then pass through a fine sieve. Add one pint of veloute (No. 415) 
to the broth, color it with some spinach green or Breton vegetable coloring, season with salt, 
sugar and nutmeg, and just when serving thicken the soup with raw egg-yolks diluted in 
cream, and work in two ounces of butter (No. 175). Serve separately some croutons souffles 
made with pate a chou (No. 132) rolled in strings and cut in three-sixteenth of an inch lengths; 
these pieces to be rolled in flour, then rolled around in a sieve to make them round. Fry in hot 
fat ; or asparagus tops may be served as a garnishing instead of the croutons. 

(249). CREAM OP BARLEY, VIENNA STYLE, OR OF RICE A LA CREMIEUX (Oreme d'Orge a 

la Viennoise, ou de Riz a la Ore"mieux). 

Put into a saucepan two ounces of butter, and when very hot, add four ounces of well cleaned 
pearl barley; heat it, then moisten with four quarts of broth; cover the saucepan, and cook the 
barley slowly for three hours, or more, until it yields easily to the pressure of the finger, then 
drain and pound in a mortar, diluting it with its own stock, afterward straining through a sieve 
or tammy. Return it to the fire, and in case it should be too thick add more of the broth; stir con- 
tinually with a spatula, bearing on to the bottom of the saucepan, until the soup is ready to boil; 
season with salt, sugar and nutmeg, and add the ^thickening to the soup, stirring it in well until 
all the butter is melted (No. 175). 

For Cream of Rice a la Cremieux. Pound or mash well in a mortar, half a pound of fresh 
bread-crumbs, mixing in gradually two whole eggs, and the third of its quantity of fine butter; 
form this into small, round cakes, seven-eighths of an inch in diameter and one-eighth of an 
inch thick; bake them in a hot oven, and serve the same time as the soup. The cream of rice 
is prepared exactly the same way as the barley, the only difference being that this requires less 
cooking than the barley. 

(250). CREAM OF BRUSSELS SPROUTS (Oreme de Choux de Bruxelles). 
Blanch in boiling, salted water for ten minutes, two pounds of well cleaned Brussels sprouts, 
drain and fry them in butter, then moisten with two quarts of white broth, and when cooked, 
drain them into a mortar, and mash them to a paste; dilute this puree with its own broth, and 
should it be too thick, add some more white broth, then strain through a sieve or tammy, and add 
one pint of veloute (No. 415); heat all up without boiling, and thicken with two egg-yolks, one gill of 
cream and two ounces of butter, this being the quantity to use for every quart of soup. Serve separ- 
ately a garnishing of brioche croutons (No. 51), one quarter of an inch square, and dried in the oven. 

(251). CREAM OF CAULIFLOWER, BRISSON (Oreme de Choux fleurs a la Brisson). 
Divide the cauliflower into several parts, clean them well, pare nicely, and remove the hearts; 
it will require two pounds for the soup. Cook them until half done in boiling, salted water, then 
drain and fry in four ounces of butter, moistening with two quarts of white broth; season 
with salt, sugar and nutmeg, and when the cauliflowers are done, drain off the broth, and 
mash in a mortar to reduce to a paste; dilute this with its own broth, add one pint of veloute 
(No. 415), and if the puree be too thick, then add more white broth. Set it on the fire to heat 
without boiling, and just when ready to serve, thicken it with cream, raw egg-yolks and butter 
(No. 175). Serve a garnishing of croutons souffles, with parmesan cheese made as explained (No. 
248), having added grated parmesan cheese to the pasta 



256 THE EPICUREAN. 

(252). OREAM OF CELERY OR OARDOONS A LA LIVINGSTONE (Creme de Oeleri ou Oardons I 

la Livingstone), 

For the Celery, remove the threads covering the stalks; have two pounds of very white, cut-up 
celery, blanch it in plenty of water, and cook in two quarts of white broth; when done, drain and 
mash it well to reduce it to a paste, diluting it with its own broth; press it through a fine sieve or 
tammy, add one pint of veloute (No. 415), and some more broth should the puree be too thick; 
then heat the soup without letting it boil, seasoning with salt, sugar and nutmeg. Thicken it with 
egg-yolks, cream and butter (No. 175). Serve in a separate tureen a marrow quenelle garnishing. 

Marrow Quenelles. Melt half a pound of well cleansed marrow; strain into a cool bowl 
through a fine muslin; beat it till it becomes a cream, then add eight egg-yolks one by one, 
and beat again until thoroughly incorporated, season with salt, pepper, nutmeg, add half a pound 
of white and very fresh bread-crumbs; divide this into four parts and form these into strings half 
an inch thick, then cut them across to have each one-half an inch long; roll in flour and poach in 
boiling water; serve with the soup. The cream of cardoons is made in exactly the same way as 
the cream of celery. 

(253), OREAM OHIFFONNADE WITH CRUSTS OR OF LEEKS WITH QUENELLES (Creme 
Chiffonnade aux Oroutes ou de Poireaux aux Quenelles). 

Prepare one pound and a quarter of lettuce leaves, eight ounces of sorrel leaves, three ounces of 
water-cress, and one ounce of chervil leaves, all well washed in several waters, and cut up very 
fine. Put half a pound of butter into a saucepan, and when very hot, add the herbs, and allow 
them to fry without attaining a color, then moisten with two quarts of veal stock or white broth, 
and boil for one-half hour, adding a quart of veloute (No. 415), and a thickening of four egg- 
yolks, one gill of cream and two ounces of butter for each quart of soup; strain through a 
sieve, and season with salt, red pepper and nutmeg. Serve a garnishing of round shaped bread 
crusts seven-eighths by one-eighth of an inch, sprinkled over with butter and browned in the oven. 

For the Cream of Leeks, have two pounds of the white part of leeks, prepared and finished 
as for the chiffonnade, but instead of round bread croutons, replace these by a garnishing of 
chicken quenelles (No. 89). 

(254). OREAM OF CUCUMBERS A LA SHEPPARD (Creme de Ooncombres a la Sheppard). 

Peel or remove the green skin from the cucumbers, mince up two pounds of them, blanch 
them in boiling, salted water for ten minutes, then drain. Heat four ounces of butter in a saucepan; 
when very hot, add the cucumbers, and fry them colorless, moistening with two quarts of white 
broth; boil all slowly until the cucumbers are thoroughly done, and then drain and mash them in a 
mortar; thin out this puree with its own broth, and if still too thick, add some more white broth, 
and strain the whole through a tammy. Add one quart of veloute (No. 415), season with salt, 
sugar and nutmeg, and heat it up without boiling; remove all the white particles arising to the 
surface, and thicken the soup with egg-yolks, cream and fine butter (No. 175). Pour the soup very 
hot into a tureen with a good white of chicken garnishing allowing one ounce for each 
quart, and cut up into three-sixteenths of an inch squares. 

(255). CREAM OF GREEN CORN A LA HERMANN (Creme de Mais Vertes k la Hermann). 

Boil some corn on the cob in water having salt and butter added to it; drain, then cut off the 
tender part of the corn; about two pounds in all. Pound this in a mortar with thick bechamel 
sauce and dilute this puree with white broth. Place a pound of chicken forcemeat (No. 60) in a 
deep buttered dish; stand it in a sautoire with water reaching to half the height of the dish, let 
boil and then put it in a slack oven to poach the forcemeat; leave it to cool, then pound in a mor- 
tar adding the corn puree, and enough broth to obtain a not too thick puree; strain through a 
tammy, heat up without boiling, and just when ready to serve add, to thicken the soup, egg- 
yolk and cream; work in a piece of fresh butter. Serve separately some Compiegne croutons 
browned in the oven. 

(256). OREAM OF GREEN CORN 1 LA MENDOOINO (Creme de Mais Vertes k la Mendocino). 

Cook the corn on the cob in salted water, adding a piece of butter; when done, remove the 
grains, mash them in a mortar, and dilute the puree with a quart and a half of broth; strain 
through a sieve or tammy, and set it into a saucepan; heat it up without allowing it to boil, and 



SOUPS. 257 

season with salt, sugar and nutmeg. Just when ready to serve, thicken the soup with egg-yolks, 
cream and fine crawfish butter (No. 573), with lemon juice added. Serve with a garnishing 
composed of shrimp tails, cut in small pieces. 

(257), OEEAM OP JEEUSALEM AETIOHOZES (Oreme de Topinambours). 
Peel the artichokes, and afterward weigh two pounds of them, and mince them well. (Jeru- 
salem artichokes can be imitated by using half artichoke bottoms, and half sweet potatoes.) Mince 
up one-quarter of a pound or two medium onions; fry them in butter, and then add the artichokes; 
fry also. Add two tablespoonfuls of flour, season with salt, sugar, and nutmeg, and moisten with 
two quarts of white broth. Boil and cook slowly until the artichokes are easily crushed; then 
drain and mash them; increase the volume of the pure"e with the broth the artichokes have been 
cooked in, strain through a sieve or tammy, and heat up without boiling; just when ready to serve 
thicken the soup with egg-yolks, cream and fresh butter (No. 175). A garnishing is made of 
artichoke bottoms, cut into one-quarter of inch squares. 

(258), OEEAM OP LETTUCE, EOMAINE OE OHIOOOET A LA EVEES (Oreme de Laitue, Eomaine 

ou Ghicoree a la Evers). 

Procure two pounds of lettuce, romaine or chiccory, and proceed exactly the same for either. 
Wash them in several waters after removing the greenish leaves, then cook them in boiling, salted 
water, until the hardest parts yield under the pressure of the finger, then drain and cool them off; 
squeeze out all the water, and chop them up coarsely. Put into a saucepan four ounces of butter, 
and when very hot, add the lettuce and let fry for a few minutes; moisten with two quarts of 
broth, then boil and simmer for fifteen minutes, adding one quart of veloute (No. 415), strain 
through a sieve or tammy, heat it up again, and when the soup is near boiling point, thicken with 
egg-yolks, cream and butter (No. 175). seasoning with salt, sugar, and nutmeg. 

Garnishing. Pound in a mortar, one-half pound of bread-crumbs with two whole eggs, add- 
ing them in gradually, and half of the same quantity of pate-a-choux (No. 132), roll it out to three- 
sixteenths of an inch in thickness, and cut in squares, then fry in clarified butter. 

(259), OEEAM 01 LIMA, KIDNEY OE HOESE BEANS (Oreme de Haricots de Lima, flageolets ou 

Feves de Marais). 

The manner for preparing either of these creams is exactly the same; cook till half done in 
salted water, two pounds of lima beans. Drain them and fry them colorless in two ounces of butter; 
moisten with two quarts of white broth, season with salt, sugar, and nutmeg, then cook slowly 
until thoroughly done; drain them and mash them in a mortar, moistening with two and a half 
quarts of white broth, then strain this puree either through a fine sieve or tammy, adding to it one 
pint of veloute (No. 415), return it to the fire, let heat to near boiling, then despumate well all the 
scum and grease arising to the surface, and thicken it with egg-yelks, cream, and fresh butter 
(No. 175). A garnishing of bread croutons of five-eighths of an inch square by one-eighth of an 
inch in thickness, sprinkled over with butter and browned in the oven. 

(260). OEEAM OF PEAS A LA ST. GEEMAIN (Oreme de pois a la St. Germain), 
Throw into boiling, salted water, two pounds of medium-sized peas, and boil them for ten 
minutes with a little piece of mint; drain them, then put four ounces of butter into a saucepan, 
and when warm, throw in the peas, and let them fry for a few minutes; moisten with white broth, 
adding a few lettuce leaves, about four ounces, and two ounces of onions; the lettuce to be cut up 
fine, and the onions minced; season with salt, sugar, and nutmeg, and boil until the peas are 
thoroughly cooked, then drain, suppress the mint, and mash them in a mortar, moistening them 
with two and a half quarts of white broth. Press through a sieve or tammy, and return them to 
the saucepan with a pint of veloute (No. 415); should the puree be too thick, then add more broth; 
warm it well without boiling, and thicken the soup with egg-yolks, cream and butter, (No. 175). 
Pour the soup into a soup tureen with some chopped up chervil, and a garnishing of extra fine 
peas. 

(261). OEEAM OF PEAS WITH MINT (Or&me de pois a la Menthe). 

Parboil two pounds of shelled green peas until partly cooked; then drain and put them on to 
fry with half a pound of fresh butter; moisten with white broth and add half a pound of minced 
white onions. When the peas are entirely cooked drain and pound them, diluting with veloute 



258 THE EPICUREAN. 

and the same broth they were cooked in; rub the whole through a tammy and return to the sauce- 
pan; put it on the fire and heat without boiling. Just when prepared to serve, thicken with egg- 
yolks, butter, and cream, adding a few mint leaves finely chopped and as garnishing some small 
chicken quenelles made with half chicken quenelle forcemeat, and half cream forcemeat laid 
through a pocket on a buttered baking tin. 

(262). OEEAM OP SOEKEL WITH STUFFED EGGS (Oreme d'oseille aux (Eufs Farcis). 

Pick the hard stalks from the sorrel, wash it in several waters to free it from all the adhering 
sand, then drain and press it. Weigh two pounds of this, and chop it up fine; put four ounces of 
cutter into a saucepan, and when hot, add the chopped sorrel and fry it colorless; moisten with a 
quart and a half of white broth, and one quart of veloute (No. 415); season with salt, sugar, and 
nutmeg; then put it on the fire to boil slowly, removing the butter floating on the t'op. Strain it 
through a sieve or tammy, and put it back to come to a boiling point without letting it boil, and 
thicken with raw egg-yolks, cream and fine butter (No. 175), adding to it at the last moment some 
lettuce chopped up and cooked in consomme. Pour the soup into a tureen, and serve separately a 
garnishing of hard boiled, stuffed half eggs. 

A Garnishing of Stuffed Half Eggs. Cut lengthwise in two, some small hard boiled eggs; 
remove the yolks, and fill the whites with chicken forcemeat and cream, mixing in with it chopped 
mushrooms, hard boiled egg-yolks and fine herbs; let the stuffing be dome-shaped, then dust over 
with grated parmesan; lay these eggs on a dish, and brown them nicely in the oven. Place them 
in a vegetable dish, and pass it around the same time as the soup. 

(263). OEEAM OF SQUASH, TUENIPS OE OAEEOTS WITH COMPIEGNE CEOUTONS (Oreme 
de Oourges, de Navets ou de Garottes aux Croutons de Compiegne). 

Peel the squash and mince two pounds of the inside, with four ounces of onions, or else select 
young, tender turnips, peel and mince two pounds of these, or, cut some carrots so as to have two 
pounds of the reddest part; the turnips and carrots should be parboiled. Put six ounces of butter 
into a saucepan, and when hot, add one of the above vegetables chopped very fine, and after it 
is lightly fried without coloring, then moisten with two quarts of white broth, skim and continue 
to boil until thoroughly cooked, then drain, mash the vegetable to reduce it to a paste, and dilute 
with the stock it was boiled in; season' with salt, sugar and nutmeg, and if too thick use more 
broth; thicken with egg-yolks, cream and fine butter. Compiegne croutons (No. 51), cut in 
quarter of inch squares, and dried in the oven, should be served as a garnishing. 

Garnishing for Turnips. Three ounces of butter worked with a small whip until perfectly 
white, then incorporate slowly into it two egg-yolks, two spoonfuls of sifted flour, salt, sugar and 
nutmeg; mix in with this three whites of eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, and poach in a slow oven, 
in some buttered dome-shaped molds; unmold and serve separately the same time as the soup. 

Garnishing for Carrots. Small chicken forcemeat and cream quenelles, laid through a cornet 
on a buttered pan and poached in boiling water, then drained and served with the soup. 

(264). OEEAM OF STEING BEANS A LA VEFOUE (Oreme de Haricots Verts a la VeTour). 

Clean and blanch some beans in boiling, salted water, then drain them; put four ounces of 
butter into a saucepan on the fire, and after the butter is warm, throw in the beans, and fry them 
for a few moments. Moisten with two quarts of broth, and let the beans cook, then drain, and 
pound them in a mortar, dilute them with some of their own broth, and should the puree be too 
thick, then add more broth, put the puree back into a saucepan adding one quart of veloute (No. 
415); season with salt, sugar and nutmeg, and stir well while bearing the spoon on to the bottom 
till it reaches boiling point, but be careful that it does not boil. Thicken with egg-yolks, butter 
and cream. Serve separately a royal cream prepared as follows: 

A royal cream (No. 241), garnishing poached in a buttered baking pan, let stand till cold, 
then cut it into small three-eighths of an inch squares and serve with the soup. 

(265). OEEAM OP SWEET POTATOES A LA GEEAED (Oreme de Patates a la Gerard). 

Have two pounds of sweet potatoes previously steamed; peel, mince and fry them in four 
ounces of butter, moistening with two and a half quarts of white broth; cook until done, then 
strain and pound them in a mortar, diluting the puree with its own broth, and in case it be too 



SOUPS. 259 

thick, add some more white broth and a pint of veloute (No. 415); strain the soup through a sieve 
or tammy, then return it to the saucepan, and heat it to boiling point without allowing it to boil. 
Thicken with egg-yolks, cream and butter, using two egg-yolks, two gills of cream and two ounces 
of butter for each quart. 

The Garnishing to be of one-quarter of a pound of bread-crumbs pounded in a mortar, and 
mingling with it gradually two eggs and a third of its volume of pate-a-choux (No. 132); roll it into 
small balls, three-sixteenths of a inch in size, and fry them in clarified butter, serving them the 
same time as the soup. 

(266). OKEAM OF VEGETABLES A LA BANVILLE (Oreme de Legumes a la Banville). 

Mince four ounces of leeks, six ounces of carrots, four ounces of turnip-cabbage, two ounces 
of celery, four ounces of turnips, and four ounces of onions. Place four ounces of butter into a 
saucepan on the fire, and when hot, add to it the finely minced vegetables and moisten with 
two quarts of white broth: boil, skim and cook slowly. As soon as the vegetables are well done, 
drain them, and pound them in a mortar, diluting the puree with some of its broth; strain through 
a sieve or tammy, heat it to a boiling point without letting it boil, then thicken with egg-yolks, 
cream and fine butter (No. 175.) 

Garnishing, Small Buttered Timbales (No. 6, Fig. 137) filled with one layer of finely cooked 
chestnuts and one layer of cooked rice, filling them up with royal cream (No. 241), and poach in 
a slack oven; unmold and serve these in a separate tureen with a little consomme poured over. 

(267). PUEEE OF CAPON A LA JUSSIENNE (Purge de chapona la Jussienne), 

Prepare a delicate quenelle forcemeat as for No. 89; put a pound of this into a buttered mold 
furnished with a socket, and let poach by placing the mold in a saucepan containing boiling water, 
to half its height, and placing it on the fire; at the first boil take it off, and set it in a very slack 
oven until poached; then unmold, and let get cold. Pound this preparation in a mortar, diluting 
it with two quarts of broth and one quart of veloute (No. 415); strain through a sieve or tammy, 
and heat up without boiling; just when ready to serve, stir the broth well, and season it with salt 
and nutmeg, adding three ounces of butter, working it in until it is all melted. Pour the soup 
into a soup tureen. For garnishing have some rice blanched and cooked in white consomme, 
also some croutons made of fragments of puff paste (No. 146), cut a quarter of an inch square; 
they should be cooked in a very slack oven, and when done, served separately. 

(268). PUKEE OF CAEEOTS A LA CRECY (Purge de Garottes a la Crgcy). 
Only use the red part of the carrot for this soup; mince up two pounds of red carrots, cutting 
them with a knife into thin lengthwise slices. Put two ounces of butter into a saucepan on the fire, 
and when it begins to heat, add to it two ounces of onions, and fry for one instant; then add the 
red carrots, and continue to fry slowly without letting it attain a color; moisten with three quarts 
of broth, salt; add a bunch of parsley, celery, and bay leaf, and boil until the carrots are entirely 
done; then put in half a pound of rice previously blanched, and cooked in consomme; drain, and 
mash the carrots and rice. Moisten this puree with the broth, and if it be too thick add some 
white broth to it; strain through a sieve or tammy, and return it to a clean saucepan; heat it to a 
boiling point, stirring continually, and bearing on the bottom of the saucepan with the spoon, 
to prevent the puree from adhering; let to boil slowly on one side of the saucepan only, 
for twenty minutes, removing all the scum and fat from the surface as quickly as it appears; 
season with salt, and sugar and when ready to serve incorporate gradually into it two ounces of fine 
butter, stirring the soup with a spoon until all the butter melts, and serve at the same time small 
quarter inch squares of bread-crumbs fried in butter. Rice, noodles, and Japanese pearls can 
also be served as garnishings for Crecy soup. 

(269). PUKEE OF CHICKEN A LA DUFFEEIN (Purge de poulet a la Dufferin), 
Take a good three pound chicken; raise the fillets, break up the bones and put them into a 
saucepan, with three quarts of broth; leave to boil for an hour, then strain the liquid through a 
fine sieve. Saute the removed fillets, then pound them with four hard boiled egg-yolks, and mix 
in slowly a pint of veloute; also two quarts of stock. Strain the puree through a tammy, heat up 
without letting it boil, and just when ready to serve incorporate in two ounces of fresh butter, 
working it well into the soup. Serve separately a garnishing of pearl barley, and puff paste 
croutons cooked -white, meaning cooked in a very slack oven. 



260 THE EPICUREAN. 

(270). PUEEE OF CHICKEN A LA EEINE (Purge de Poulet a la Reine), 

For Twelve Persons. Garnish the bottom of a braziere with slices of fat pork, minced carrots 
and onions, and a bunch of parsley garnished with a little thyme and bay leaf; place on top one 
chicken, moisten with a pint of broth, and let it reduce slowly but entirely; moisten again 
with two quarts of broth, let the liquid come to a boil, then skim it off and continue boiling until 
the chicken is thoroughly cooked. Remove all the meat from the chicken without any skin or fat, 
and pound this with half a pound of very fresh bread-crumbs, season it with salt and nutmeg, 
then moisten with the stock, rub this through a tammy, and heat it up without boiling, adding to 
it an almond-milk prepared as follows: Pound one ounce of freshly peeled almonds, add gradually 
to it one pint of milk and press this forcibly through a napkin. Just when ready to serve, put 
into the soup three ounces of fine butter, stirring it continually until thoroughly melted. Serve 
the soup with a garnishing of small quenelles, bead-shaped, of three-sixteenths of an inch in size, 
made of quenelle and cream forcemeats (Nos. 75, 89), half and half of each, and laid through a 
cornet on a buttered baking sheet, then poached in boiling water. 

(271), PUEEE OP ENGLISH SNIPE, PLOVEE OE WOODCOCK A LA THEO (Purge de Bgcassines, 

Pluviers ou brasses a la Thgo). 

Remove the fillets from eight English snipe; with half of them make a quenelle forcemeat 
the same as explained for game forcemeat (No. 62), let the quenelles be made either with a tea- 
spoon or else pushed through a pocket on a buttered sheet, in shapes of oval olives, and then 
poach them in boiling salted water; these quenelles are to be used for the garnishing. Put two 
ounces of butter into a saucepan with two ounces of chopped onions; fry them colorless, add the 
remaining fillets and carcasses, and when all is well browned, moisten with three quarts of broth 
and a quart of espagnole sauce (No. 414), let cook for thirty minutes, and despumate, which 
means to boil only on one side of the saucepan, and remove with a spoon all the fat and 
scum arising to the surface; then drain and remove most of the bones. Pound the carcasses and 
meats, dilute them with the broth, season and strain through a colander and afterward through a 
tammy; thicken when ready to serve with four ounces of butter divided into small pats, incor- 
porating them in with a whip, until they are entirely melted; lay the quenelles in a soup tureen, 
and pour the very hot puree over. 

(272), PUEEE OF GEOUSE A LA MANHATTAN (Purge de Terras a la Manhattan), . 

Roast three grouse for twenty minutes; cut o the fillets and break up the bones, putting them 
into a saucepan with four quarts of broth, adding a bunch of parsley garnished with bay leaf, half 
a pound of carrots, quarter of a pound of onions, and let simmer for one hour. Pound the fillets, 
add to it the same quantity of puree of sweet potatoes, and dilute all with the broth strained 
through a fine tammy, then return it to the fire in a saucepan to heat without boiling; season and 
stir into it just when ready to serve four ounces of fine butter. Make a garnishing with one pint 
of the soup; mix into a half a pint of cream, eight yolks and two whole eggs, and poach this in 
small buttered timbale molds (No. 5, Fig. 137), and cut crosswise before being put into the puree. 

(273), PUEEE OF LENTILS, OHANTILLT (Purge de Lentilles Ohantilly), 

TJnsalt a pig's head for twelve hours, partially cook it ; put into a saucepan one and a half 
quarts of picked and washed lentils, add the half pig's head, and moisten with four quarts of cold 
water to cover all well, then add two carrots cut in four lengthwise, four onions, one with two cloves 
in it, half a pound of well pared raw ham, and boil slowly until all be thoroughly cooked, then take 
out the half head, bone it, remove all the fat, and put it under a weight to reduce it to three-eighths 
of an inch thick; drain the lentils, suppress the vegetables and ham, and pound the lentils, 
diluting them with their own broth. Strain all through a sieve, add two quarts of bechamel (No. 
409), and heat it up without boiling; skim and when ready to serve, incorporate into it a good 
piece of fine butter. Cut the gelatinous parts of the head into dice, and serve them with the soup 
as a garnishing, also some croutons of bread fried in butter. 

(274). PUEEE OF LEVEEET OE YOUNG EABBIT, ST, JAMES (Purge de Levraut ou Lapereau 

St. James). 

Remove all the bones from the leverets or young rabbits, break up the carcasses, and fry them 
in butter with minced onions, carrots and a bunch of parsley garnished with thyme, bay leaf and 



SOUPS. 261 

celery, moisten with four quarts of broth, let the liquid boil up, then skim, and season with salt, 
pepper and cloves, continue to boil for one hour, then strain through a sieve. Cut up the meat in 
three quarter inch squares; fry these in butter with two ounces of lean ham, adding four table- 
spoonfuls of flour, and mix all well together, then moisten with the above stock, let boil and finish 
cooking. When the meats are well done, drain them off, and pound them in a mortar, diluting 
this puree with the stock, then press it through a sieve or tammy, the latter being preferable, for all 
purees are improved by being pressed through a tammy, as it removes any grains that may be in them. 
Heat the soup without boiling, season to taste, and incorporate into it a piece of good butter weighing 
a quarter of a pound, stirring it sharply with a spoon till thoroughly melted. Add a garnishing 
composed of small game and cream forcemeat (No. 75) timbales, the size and shape of half a 
pigeon's egg, poached in a slack oven and served in the soup. 

(275). PUEEE OF OATMEAL TOULOUSAINE (Purge d'Avenas Toulousaine), 
Put three pints of water into a saucepan; when it boils, drop into it like rain, six ounces of 
catmeal coarsely ground, salt and one ounce of butter, let cook for three hours, dilute it with three 
pints of white broth, and pass it through a tammy, return it to the fire stirring it continually, and 
at the first boil remove it to the side of the fire, and let boil and despumate for twenty-five 
minutes; skim all the fat, season with salt, nutmeg and sugar, and just when ready to serve, incor- 
porate into it a piece of fine butter; pour the soup into a soup tureen with a garnishing of bread 
croutons an inch in diameter sprinkled over with butter and browned in the oven, also croutons 
made of firm Royal cream (No. 241), using whites of eggs instead of yolks, poached in a slack oven, 
c.nd cut into squares. 

(276). PUKEE OF PAETEIDGES OE QUAILS A LA FHENIN (Pur& de Perdreanx on de Cailles 

a la d'He"nin). 

Boast some partridges; suppress the skin and bones, and pound the meat with one ounce of 
butter and two gills of veloute (No. 415) for each partridge; press this through a sieve and put it 
into a bowl with one raw egg-yolk and a litttle nutmeg. Put on the fire to boil, two quarts of 
thickened game stock; add to it the fragments of birds and a garnished bouquet, some minced 
Oarrots and onions, salt and nutmeg; boil on one side of the saucepan only in order to despumate 
for one hour, then remove all the fat, strain, and return it to the saucepan ; at the first boil add 
toe prepared puree, season to taste, then pour the soup into a soup tureen, after straining it through 
a fine colander, adding a garnishing of hulled barley and some small game quenelles. 

<277X PUREE OF PIGEONS OE WILD SQUABS A LA WALESKI (Purge de Pigeons on de Pigeons 

Eamiers a la Waleski), 

Infuse in half a pint of boiling Madeira wine, some thyme, marjoram, basil, cloves, mace, and 
pepper corns. Roast four pigeons, remove all their meat, and break up the carcasses, putting 
them into a saucepan with two quarts of broth, adding a quarter of a pound of onions, quarter ot 
a pound of carrots, and two ounces of celery, all finely minced; salt properly, and let boil for one 
hour, then strain through a napkin, and return it to a clean saucepan to boil and thicken with two 
tablespoonfuls of fecula diluted in a little cold water. Pound the meat from the birds with eight 
hard boiled egg-yolks and one ounce of butter, add some of the broth to this puree to dissolve it, 
then strain it through a tammy, heat it up without boiling, and add to it the Madeira wine infusion 
after straining it through a napkin; stir in when ready to serve, two ounces of good butter, then 
pour it into the soup tureen and serve as garnishing, small cream forcemeat (No. 75) timbales 
iTc. 5, cut in two crosswise. 

(278). PUEEE OF POTATOES A LA BENTON (Pnre"e de Pommes de Terre a la Benton). 
Mince up three pounds of peeled potatoes; put half a pound of butter into a saucepan, and 
\7iien warm, add one pound of the white part of leeks minced, and fry them colorless; then add 
the potatoes, and moisten with six quarts of white broth, and continue to boil until the potatoes 
are done, and break easily under the pressure of the finger; drain and rub through a sieve 
\vith the broth, and some white broth added; season with salt and nutmeg, and put in one pint of 
vslcnte" (No. 415); return this to the fire, and stir continually till boiling point is reached, then 
EUim and just when ready to serve work into it four ounces of fine butter, stirring well the soup 
until all the butter is melted. Serve separately round croutons three quarters of an inch, and an 
eighth of an inch thick, buttered and browned in the oven. 



262 THE EPICTJIlEAlSr. 

(279), PUREE OF PULLET OK GUINEA POWL A LA WASHBURN (PurSe de Poularde ou 

Pintade a la Washburn). 

Roast some small pullets or guinea fowls, remove all the meat, and suppress from this the fat 
and skin; break up the carcasses and put them into a saucepan with some minced carrots, leeks, a 
bunch of parsley and bayleaf. Cut half a pound of breast of pork; put two ounces of butter 
into a saucepan with the pork and fry together for a few minutes, then add the leeks, carrots 
and bunch of parsley, also the carcasses; moisten with six quarts of beef stock, season with salt, 
pepper-corns and two cloves, and boil up the liquid, skim off the fat and continue boiling for one 
hour, then strain through a sieve. Pound the meat taken from the pullets or guinea fowl with 
twelve hard boiled egg-yolks and two ounces of butter, diluting it with the stock, heat it up and 
have it boil for a few minutes, season, and stir in four ounces of butter, working it in the soup 
with a spoon until it is entirely melted, then pour it into the soup tureen and serve the following 
garnishing separate: 

Garnishing. Saute four ounces of chicken livers; pound and press them forcibly through a 
sieve, adding four egg-yolks and some cooked fine herbs. With this preparation make small half 
inch diameter balls, roll them in egg and bread-crumbs, and fry them in clarified butter. 

(280). PUREE OF RED BEANS A LA CONDE (Puree de Haricots rouges a la Conde"). 

Soak for twelve hours in tepid water, one quart of red beans; drain them, then put them into a 
saucepan with six quarts of water, one carrot cut in pieces, one onion and a bunch of ungarnished 
parsley, and let cook slowly for three hours, seasoning with salt, pepper and cloves. When the 
beans are sufficiently done, drain them and mash them in a mortar; dilute this puree with its own 
broth, giving it a proper consistency, then incorporate into it, when ready to serve, a quarter of a 
pound of good butter. Serve separately small croutons of bread a quarter of an inch square, fried 
in butter. 

(281). PUREE OF REEDBIRDS OR LARKS WITH CHESTNUTS (Puree d'Ortolans ou d'Alouettes 

aux Marrons). 

Procure three dozen larks, pick them, remove the pouches and gizzards, and take off the 
fillets, laying them aside. Fry the carcasses in a quarter of a pound of fine butter, with half a 
pound of smoked, lean, raw ham, cut in quarter inch squai'es, and moisten with three quarts of game 
consomme (No. 192), and one quart of espagnole sauce (No. 414). Boil slowly and despumate for 
one hour, then drain and pound the carcasses and ham with one quarter of a pound of blanched 
rice cooked in consomme, and one pound of chestnuts; moisten this with the broth and strain all 
through a sieve, and afterward through a tammy, add some Madeira wine, a pinch of cayenne 
pepper, and when ready to serve, work into it a Ihree ounce piece of fine butter, stirring it in 
vigorously till thoroughly melted. Saute the fillets when ready, and serve them with the 
soup. 

(282). PUREE OF PEAS WITH CROUTONS OR RICE (Pure"e de Pois aux Croutons ou au Riz). 

Have one pound of dry peas (green split peas), wash them well changing the water until it is 
perfectly clear, then put them into a saucepan with three quarts of beef stock or water, one carrot 
cut lengthwise in four, two large onions with four cloves, salt and pepper. Boil and let cook slowly 
on the range or in a slack oven, then remove the carrots and cloves, and pass the peas through a 
fine sieve with the onions. Season properly and moisten as required, then let the soup boil up 
again, skim it and work in about four ounces of butter. Serve a garnishing of bread croutons cut 
in quarter inch dice and fried in butter, or else some rice boiled in consomme. 

(283). PUREE OF WILD DUCKS, [CANVASBAOK, REDHEAD OR MALLARD] A LA VAN BUREN 

(Pur6e de Canards Sauvages [Oanvasback Tete Rouge ou Mallard] a la Van Buren). 
Roast two ducks for eighteen or twenty minutes, remove the fillets, and break up the bones, 
putting them into a saucepan with a split knuckle of veal and a quarter of a pound of ham, 
also two cut up tomatoes, and one onion with four cloves in it. Moisten with four quarts of broth, 
cook for two hours and strain the broth; pound tho fillets after removing all the skin, with the 
same quantity of cooked hominy, and two ounces of butter, dilute this with the broth, season with 
salt and nutmeg, and heat it up without boiling. Just when ready to serve incorporate into it, 



SOUPS. 3ZG3 

four ounces of good butter, and beat the broth up well with a spoon, until all the butter is melted; 
then pour it into a soup tureen with a garnishing of celery cut in dice, and blanched and cooked 
in some consomme, also quarter inch squares of brioche dried in the oven. 

(284). PUREE OF WILD TURKEY A LA SARTIGES (PurSe de Dinde Sauvage a la Sartiges). 

Tiventy-four Persons. Braise a wild turkey in a braising pan, garnishing the bottom of it with 
slices of fat pork, and slices of onions and carrots, and on top lay the turkey; moisten with a quart 
of broth, let fall to a glaze, then moisten again to its height with more broth, adding a bunch of 
parsley, garnished with thyme, bay leaf, one clove of garlic and a split knuckle of veal, also two celery 
stalks, and let cook slowly; when the turkey is done, remove it, and strain the broth through a 
tine sieve. As soon as the turkey is nearly cold, cut away all its skin, and detach the meat adher- 
ing to the bones, about four pounds in all; pound this with four ounces of freshly peeled almonds, 
and dilute with four quarts of broth and two quarts of veloute (No. 415), strain it through a sieve, 
and then incorporate into it half a pound of fresh butter. A garnishing of green peas cooked in 
salted water and some pearl barley boiled three hours in white broth to be added to the soup 
tureen. 

(285) BARLEY SOUP WITH CELERY (Potage d'Orge an Oeleri). 

Put half a pound of butter in a saucepan on the fire, and when it begins to heat, dredge in 
ten ounces of small pearl barley, well freed of all dust and impurities; let cook for a few minutes, 
then moisten with three quarts of white broth, and stir continually until it comes to a boil; salt, 
and cook for two hours and a half, till the barley be thoroughly done; adding three-quarters of 
a pound of celery roots cut in quarter inch squares, and blanched in boiling salted water for ten 
minutes. After the celery is well cooked; and just when serving the soup, taste it to see whether 
the seasoning be correct, then add a thickening of egg-yolks, cream and fine butter (No. 175). 

(286). BARSCH POLISH STYLE (Barsch a la Polonaise). 

Wash and peel ten red and sweet beet roots, cut them in slices of one eighth of an inch in 
thickness; put them into an earthen pot, or a wooden bucket; wet them plentifully with lukewarm 
water, mix a handful of bread-crumbs (the addition of bread-crumbs is to hasten fermentation), 
cover with a linen and leave it thus stand for a few days. When the barsch is well acidulated, 
take off the crust of fermentation which lies at the surface; strain the liquid, put it into an 
earthen pan or into an enameled iron saucepan; garnish it with a piece of fresh pork, knuckles 
of veal, breast of beef, a chicken or a duck; put it on the fire, and as soon as it commences to boil, 
skim it, and garnish with a few celery roots, parsley, onions, leeks, salt and whole pepper, dry 
mushrooms (Gribouis). Cover and boil slowly as for a pot-au-feu; take out the meat when cooked. 
Cut the beet roots which have been used to make the sour juice, in the shape of Julienne, and 
an equal quantity of onions, leeks and carrots; fry them in butter and wet with the broth of the barsch. 
Then add finely shredded cabbage and the mushrooms, and let all cook slowly. When all is 
cooked cut the breast of beef in squares of three-quarters of an inch, put some Frankfort sausages in 
boiling water for ten minutes, take off the skin, cut them in squares of three-eighths of an inch 
add them to the soup, as well as some small round raviolles. These raviolles are made with 
chopped cooked meat, well seasone ., and to which has been added a little brown sauce. When 
ready to serve this soup, put a littl broth into a saucepan, add to it some well colored and grated 
beet roots, and let boil, remove it then from the fire as soon as it boils, pass it through a linen into 
the soup: add to this soup some rennel or chopped parsley, salt and black pepper. This soup must 
be a little acid; should it not be acid enough, add a little vinegar. If this soup is to be served at 
fine dinners, you may add garnishing of marrow quenelles (No. 252), of the size of an olive, some 
hard boiled eggs, cut lengthwise in two, and stuffed with the yolks which have been removed, 
crushed fine and seasoned with salt, pepper, grated horseradish and chopped parsley, and after 
being stuffed sprinkle them with melted butter, bestrew on them some bread-crumbs and put into 
an oven to color. This soup can be thickened with sour cream (the Russian smitane), to suit the 
taste. The barsch can also be served in cups at receptions and evening parties, in preparing it in 
the following manner: Take off the grease of the barsch and strain it, and then clarify it by add- 
ing to each gallon one pound of lean meat of beef chopped and mix with a bottle of good Bordeaux 
wine, and leave it at the corner of the stove, without letting it boil; strain it through a napkin and 
serve very hot in cups. 



THE EPICUREAN". 

(287). BENNETT SOUP (Soupe a la Bennett). 

This soup as made renowned by an article that appeared in the New York Herald, March, 1874 

Put into a soup pot six gallons of water, take a piece of the shoulder of beef (the chuck), 
weighing ten pounds; cut off all the fat and remove the bones; divide the meat into inch squares; 
set the bones and trimmings into a net, and place all into a pot with the water. Set the pot on the 
fire, and let boil; at the first boil remove all the scum arising to the surface, then add salt, a spoonful 
of whole peppers tied in a small bag with three cloves, one pound of carrots, and three-quaarters of 
a pound of turnips, cut in half inch squares; half a pound of celery cut in quarter of an inch 
pieces, four ounces of onion, three-sixteenth inch squares, four pounds of cabbage, suppressing all 
the hard parts, and one pint of well washed barley. Cook for three hours, taste to see whether 
the seasoning be correct, stir in a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, and serve hot. 

If this soup should be made with dry beans, they need to be soaked in cold water twelve hours 
previous, and added to the soup, after it has boiled one hour. 

With dried whole peas. Soak them the previous evening, and add them to the soup, after it 
has boiled one hour. 

With lentils. Add them after one hour. 

With rice. Add it after two hours and a half. 

With split peas. Add them after one hour. 

With potatoes. Add them after two hours. 

Three hours cooking will be sufficiently long to boil this soup, no matter which garnishing is 
used. Put in the vegetables according to the time designated for their cooking, so that the soup 
be always ready after three hours boiling, and see that the vegetables are not too well done. 
Remove the net containing the bones and trimmings, take out the meat and the gelatinous parts 
adhering to the bones, cut them up into small pieces, and serve them with the soup. 

(288). BENOITON SOUP (Potage \ la Benoiton). 

Have half a pound of carrots, a quarter of a pound of turnips, a quarter of a pound of celery, 
half a pound of leeks, half an ounce of parsnips, and a quarter of a pound of onions; blanch 
separately the carrots, turnips, celery, and parsnips cut into three-sixteenth inch squares, and mince 
the leeks and onions. Put six ounces of butter into a saucepan on the fire, and when the butter is 
warm, throw in the onions, afterward the leeks, letting them fry for two minutes, and then the 
remainder of the vegetables; fry all together without attaining a color, and moisten with four 
quarts of broth, adding bouquet of parsley garnished with thyme, garlic, and bay leaf, and boil, 
all slowly for one hour; remove the bouquet, and add to the soup half a pound of peeled tomatoes 
cut in two, squeezed out, and divided into small half inch squares. Season and continue cooking 
for another half hour, then add a quart of puree of fresh peas, one ounce of rice, blanched and 
cooked in consomme, string beans cut lozenge-shaped, some asparagus tops and a pluche of 
chervil. 

(289). BOUILLABAISSE (Bouillabaisse). 

Prepare one-half pound of red snapper, one-half pound of lobster, one-half pound of perch, 
one-half pound of sea bass, one-half pound of blackfish, one-half pound of sheepshead, one-half 
pound of cod, one-half pound of mackerel. Cut all of these fish into two and a quarter inch 
squares. Mince a fine Julienne of a quarter of a pound of carrots, two ounces of chopped onions, 
and two ounces of leeks; have also two cloves of garlic. Heat in a saucepan, one gill of sweet oil, 
add to it the vegetables and garlic, fry them without allowing to color, then add one tablespoonful 
of flour, mix all together, and put in the fish; moisten to its height with half white wine and half 
water, adding two medium sized peeled tomatoes, cut in two, pressed out, and chopped up coarsely; 
let boil for fifteen minutes on a quick fire to reduce the moistening, then add one clove of crushed 
and chopped garlic, some saffron, salt, pepper, the pulp of a lemon pared to the quick, and 
chopped parsley; remove the two whole cloves of garlic. Serve the broth or stock in a soup tureen, 
the fish separately as well as thin slices of toasted bread; should the moistening not be sufficient 
for the soup, then add some fish broth to it. 

Another Way. Have one pound of codfish, one of sea bass, and one of chicken halibut; cut 
these in two and a quarter inch diameter pieces. Put into a saucepan three pounds of fish bones 
and parings with some carrots and onions finely minced, white wine, parsley, garlic, thyme, bay 
leaf, salt, and pepper. Moisten with half a bottlef ul of white wine and sufficient water to cover the 
fish entirely, then boil for twenty minutes and strain. Mince up a quarter of a pound of leeks, a 



SOUPS, 265 

quarter of a pound of onions, add three whole cloves of garlic, and fry these in a gill of oil without 
letting the mattain a color; then put in the fish, aad two pounds of live lobster cut in half incll 
slices from the tail. Moisten with a fish stock and white wine, a pinch of saffron, and lemon juice. 
Boil on a brisk fire for fifteen minutes, then remova the garlic; put some pieces of toasted bread 
into the soup tureen, pour the broth over, and serve the fish in a separate tureen. 

(290). BEAGANOE SOUP (Potage a la Bragance). 

Blanch half a pound of rice, drain, and put it into two quarts and half of boiling white brot3, 
then set the saucepan on the side of the range. Roast a chicken, cut it up, break the carcass, and 
put the pieces into the soup, with the severed thighs, a few slices of raw celery root and some 
mushroom parings; cook the soup for one hour; skim off the fat, strain it without pressing, then 
return it to the saucepan to let boil on the side of the fire, and season with salt. Pound the 
white chicken meat with the addition of a piece of butter, press it through a tammy, and add to 
this preparation: one whole egg, eight yolks, two tablespoonfuls of veloute (No. 415), and as much 
raw cream, season and poach these in timbaie molds (No. 5, Fig. 137), buttered; at the last minute, 
pour the soup into the tureen, adding to it a few spoonfuls of green peas, and serving the timbales 
cut crosswise in a separate vegetable dish. 

(291). BKUNOISE SOUP WITH QUENELLES (Potage & la Bmnoise aux QnenellesX 
Brunoise is made with half a pound of the red part of carrots, a quarter of a pound of turnips, 
quarter of a pound of celery, quarter of a pound of leeks, quarter of a pound of onions, and a quarter 
of a pound of cabbage. Trim or cut the vegetables into quarter inch squares, the leeks to be pre- 
pared Julienne shape; mince the onions and blanch each of the vegetables in separate waters, 
except the onions and leeks. Put four ounces of butter into a saucepan on the fire, and when it 
is very hot, throw in the onions, and the leeks a few moments later; cook a little longer, then add 
all the vegetables, and fry colorless. Dilute with one pint of broth, adding a good pinch of sugar, 
and reduce slowly till the moistening is entirely evaporated, and the vegetables adhere to the bottom 
of the saucepan; moisten again with four quarts of broth, then boil, skim and continue the cooking 
for one hour and a half more. Season with salt and pepper, pour the very hot soup into a tureea 
over a garnishing of small chicken quenelles three-sixteenths of an inch in diameter laid with a 
cornet on to a buttered sheet and poached in boiling salted water, and then well drained. 

(292\ CABBAGE SOUP (Potage aux Choux). 

Remove the outer leaves from a medium three pound cabbage, and divide it into four 
parts ; wash well in plenty of water, then blanch in boiling water for ten minutes, with the 
addition of half a pound of salt pork, cut lengthwise in two; drain the cabbage and pork, refresh 
them thoroughly in cold water for half an hour, then, drain and squeeze out all the water from the 
cabbage. Put the cabbage into a saucepan, season with a little salt and pepper and lay on top one 
pound of brisket of beef, a bunch of parsley garnishad with bay leaf, two medium carrots cut in 
four, two large onions with two cloves in them, and the lard that was blanched with the cabbage. 
Moisten with three quarts of boiling water, skim, close the lid hermetically and boil slowly for 
three hours. Drain and cut the cabbage into small pieces, set them into a soup tureen, with some 
sliced bread dried in the oven, pour the soup over and serve. 

(293). CALF'S PEET SOUP, ENGLISH STYLE (Potage Pieds de veau a 1'Anglaise). 
Cut in two lengthwise, and remove the bones from four calf's feet; blanch them, then braise 
them so that they are entirely cooked, taking about four or five hours. Strain the feet, and set 
them under a weight to reduce them to a quarter of an inch in thickness, and, when thoroughly cold, 
cut them up into inch squares. Prepare a pound of carrots, half a pound of turnips, half a pound 
of celery cut quarter inch squares, quarter of a pound of onions in three-sixteenth inch squares. 
Pat four ounces of butter in a saucepan on the fire, and when hot, add the onions and let fry fora 
few minutes, then the carrots, turnips and celery; fry all colorless, and moisten with the brotJtl 
from the calf's feet, increasing its quantity with broth so as to obtain four quarts. Boil, remove 
the fat, season with salt and pepper and thicken the soup with two heaping tablespoonfuls of fecula 
diluted in a quarter of a bottle of white wine, one gill of Madeira and a pint of tomato pure"e; 
then boil again, and despumate the broth. Blanch and cook for three hours in white broth, two 
ounces of pearl barley, add it to the soup, also the prepared calf's feet. Lay on a buttered pan 



266 THE EPICUREAN. 

through a cornet some chicken quenelles three-eighths of an inch in diameter, colored with spinach 
green, pour boiling salted water over, and when poached, drain and add to the soup ; when 
the whole is very hot, pour it into a soup tureen and serve. 

(294). CALF'S TAIL A LA EUNDELL (Queue de Veau a la Eundell), 

Parboil twelve calves' tails, cut them into pieces about one inch long, and fry them in butter 
with a quarter of a pound of onions, and adding one pound of carrots cut in quarter inch squares, 
a bunch of parsley garnished with thyme, bay leaf and a clove of garlic. Moisten with four 
quarts of broth, and allow the liquid to boil and to continue boiling slowly till the tails and vege- 
tables are thoroughly cooked, then remove the bunch of parsley. Cut two medium cabbages in 
four, plunge them into boiling, salted water, let boil for ten minutes, then drain and cut out the 
cores and other hard parts; divide each quarter into eight pieces, put them in a saucepan, pour 
the broth the tails were cooked in over it, let the cabbages boil up once, then finish the cooking in a 
slack oven for two hours. When ready to serve, lay the cabbages in a soup tureen, add the tails 
and vegetables, and pour some consomme over; season Jo taste and serve the soup with thin slices 
of buttered bread, browned in the oven. 

(295). OHAMBEELAIN SOUP (Potage & la Chamberlain.), 

Keep boiling on the side of the range, two quarts of thickened soup (No. 195); boil and skim 
it well. Have four ounces of minced onions, Bermuda ones in preference, blanch them in plenty 
of water, then drain and fry them in butter; moisten them with one quart of broth, adding a 
pinch of sugar. When done, press them forcibly through a fine sieve, and mix this puree to the 
thick stock; boil, then skim, and when ready to serve, thicken the soup with a thickening of four 
egg-yolks, one gill of cream, and two ounces of fine butter. Serve separately a garnishing of small 
cream chicken forcemeat timbales molded in timbale molds (No. 5, Fig. 137), poached and cut 
in two crosswise, putting them into a vegetable dish with a little consomme added, and serve. 

(296). OHAMPETEE SOUP (Potage Champetre). 

Despumate for twenty-five minutes on the side of the range, two quarts of thick white soup stock 
(No. 195), with a handful of mushroom parings added. Take some long French rolls called "flutes," 
each one being one inch and a half in diameter; scrape off the superficial upper crust, and cut them 
transversely into a quarter of an inch thick slices; brown these on one side with clarified butter, 
then drain them off, leaving the butter in the pan. Cover the toasted sides of these slices with a 
paste made of fresh Swiss, Chestershire, and Parmesan cheeses, pounded and moistened with a 
little beer and Marsala wine, finishing with a pinch of cayenne pepper; dust this paste over with 
grated parmesan, return the bread to the pan, and put it into a hot oven to glaze the cheese, then 
range them on plates. Skim all the fat from the soup, strain and put it back into the saucepan, 
add half a gill of soubise puree (No. 723), mingled with four egg-yolks, butter and grated nutmeg; 
pour it into a soup tureen and serve at the same time as the cheese crusts. 

(297). OEAETEEUSE SOUP (Potage a la Chartreuse). 

Boil up two quarts of clarified veal broth; put into it four or five spoonfuls of French 
tapioca, and let cook together for twenty-five or thirty minutes; strain, and return it to the sauce- 
pan on the side of the range. Prepare with some thinly rolled out raviole paste (No. 147), four or 
five dozen small ravioles, filling them with three different preparations; one-third of them with a 
good puree of spinach, one-third with a puree or cooked foies-gras combined with a little melted 
beef extract, and the other third with finely chopped up fresh oronge-agaric, thickened with a 
little reduced sauce, or should there be no oronge-agaric then use cepes or peeled mushrooms. 
Plunge into boiling water four or five not over ripe tomatoes; drain them as soon as the skin peels 
off, and press them through a tammy, and if -the puree be too thin, then let it drain on a fine sieve, 
reserving the liquid, and putting it into a saucepan with some good veal stock and reduce it to a 
half glaze. Cook the ravioles slowly in salted water for twelve to fifteen minutes with the cover 
on, then drain, and lay them in the soup tureen. Remove the soup from off the fire, mix it in 
with the puree of raw tomatoes, season, and pour it over the ravioles. 

(298). CHICKEN AND LEEK SOUP (Potage & la Volaille et aux Poireaux). 
Put into a saucepan one chicken, weighing three pounds. Let it be very fresh, drawn and 
singed; add a small split knuckle of veal, moisten with four quarts of good broth, and boil up the 



SOUPS. 267 

Ikjuid: skim and let simmer uninterruptedly for three hours. After the chicken is three-quarters 
done, remove it and lift off the skin; mince up the flesh, and put this into a saucepan, with the 
white part of twelve leeks, cut in two inch lengths, then lengthwise in four, and blanched in boil- 
ing salted water, drain them and put them on to cook with the minced chicken. After all is well 
done, pour it into the soup tureen; season the broth properly, and strain it through a fine, damp 
napkin; add this to the tureen and serve. Have a separate garnishing of small timbales, made 
with eight egg-yolks, one pint of cream, salt, sugar, and nutmeg, strained through a sieve; fill 
some buttered timbale molds (No. 4, Fig. 137), with this preparation, poach them (No. 152), then 
unmold. cut them in two crosswise, and lay them in a vegetable dish with a little broth added. 
Serve the garnishing separately at the same time as the soup. 

(299). CHICKEN OKKA SOUP (Gombo de Volaille). 

Prepare two pounds of the breast of chicken cut into half inch squares, half a pound of salted 
raw ham cut in quarter inch squares, half a pound of onions cut in eighth inch squares and two 
pounds or eight fine tomatoes plunged into boiling water to remove their skins; then cut in four, 
and slightly pressed to extract the seeds; four ounces of rice, picked, washed and cooked in salted 
water with half an ounce of butter, one pound of okras cut crosswise in pieces a quarter or three- 
eighths of an inch, according to their size, four ounces of finely cut up green peppers, four quarts 
of broth and four ounces of butter. Put the butter into the saucepan on the fire, and when it is 
very hot, throw in the onions to fry colorless, add the ham and let all fry together ; then add the 
chicken meat; fry again slowly while stirring, till the butter is entirely clarified; then moisten with 
chicken broth made from the bones of the chicken, and four pounds of leg of veal, adding 
some beef stock. Remove ail the fat from the soup, and boil for twenty minutes; put in the okras 
and green peppers, then continue cooking until the gumbo or okras are entirely done; add the 
tomatoes, boil a few minutes longer and season with salt, Worcestershire sauce and mushroom 
catsup. Place the rice in a soup tureen, and pour the soup over. This soup is frequently 
strained and served in consomme cups. 

(300). CLAM OHOWDEE (Chowder de Lucines). 

Prepare a quarter of a pound of well chopped fat pork, a small bunch of parsley chopped 
not too fine, four ounces of chopped onions, one and a half quarts of potatoes cut in seven-sixteenth 
of an inch squares; two quarts of clams retaining all the juice possible; one quart of tomatoes 
peeled, pressed and cut in half inch squares. Put the fat pork into a saucepan, and when fried, 
add the onions to fry for one minute, then the potatoes, the clams and the tomatoes; should there not 
be sufficient moistening, pour in a little water and boil the whole until the potatoes are well done. 
Add five pilot crackers broken up into very small bits; one soup spoonful of thyme leaves, two 
ounces of butter, a very little pepper and salt to taste. This quantity will make four gallons, 
sufficient for sixty persons. 

Another way. Chop up a quarter of a pound of fat pork, melt it down, adding four ounces of 
onions cut in quarter inch dice, and fry them with the pork, without coloring, then add one and a 
half pounds of potatoes cut in half inch squares, a pound of peeled and halved tomatoes, pressed 
out and cut in five-eighth inch squares, one ounce of coarsely chopped parsley, seventy-five medium 
sized clams, removing the hard parts and chopping them up very fine, the clam juice, a little 
salt if found necessary, pepper and thyme leaves. Boil the whole till the potatoes are cooked (the 
green part of celery chopped fine) and should the clam juice not be sufficient, then add a little 
water. 

(301), CHOWDEE OF FEESH AND SALT WATEE FISH A LA STEBENS (Chowder de Poissoa 

d'Eau Douce et d'Eau de Mer a la Stebens). 

Fresh Water Fish. Prepare a pound and a half of fresh water fish, such as eels, pike perch 
or wall-eyed perch (sandre), and cut in one and a half inch squares; also one pound of potatoes 
cut in half inch dice, three-quarters of a pound of minced onions, half a pound of chopped fat pork, 
and three green peppers chopped fine. Melt the pork, add to it the onions fry without coloring, 
then the add squares of potatoes and the fish, moisten to the height of the fish with water, season 
with salt and black pepper and let boil until the potatoes are cooked. This chowder must be 
thick and appear more like a stew, still, some broth can be added to it, to thin it out according 
to taste. 

Salt Water Fish. Prepare two pounds of sea bass, sheepshead, blackfish and kingfish, cut 
them in one and a half, to two inch squares, have also three-quarters of a pound of minced potatoes, 



268 THE EPICUREAN. 

three ounces of salt pork, and three ounces of onions. Put the salt pork into a saucepan with one 
ounce of butter, fry lightly with the onions, then add the potatoes and the fish, also a hunch of 
parsley garnished with thyme and summer savory; season with salt, black and red pepper, and 
moisten to the height of the fish with some water. Cook on a quick fire for twenty minutes, or 
until the potatoes are done, then remove the parsley, add two broken and soaked pilot crackers 
and serve. 

(302). GOLD SOUP, RUSSIAN STYLE (Potage Proid a la Russe). 

Cut into quarter inch squares, one salted cucumber and two fresh ones, free of their 
peel and seeds, (one pound in all), put these into a soup tureen on the ice; add the meat from 
sixty crawfish, or one pound of the meat from a lobster's claws, cut in quarter inch squares of the 
same dimension as the cucumbers; and half a pound of braized sturgeon or salmon cut in quarter 
inch squares; put all these on ice until ready to serve. Have one quart of sour cream, strain it 
through a tammy, also two quarts of kwass, and stir into it a few pieces of very clean ice, also the 
cucumbers and lobster laid aside; season with salt and a pinch of powdered sugar, and serve 
separately on a plate some hard boiled eggs, cut in four and sprinkled over with chervil and fennel. 

Kwass. In order to make twelve bottles of kwass, procure two pounds of rye, two pounds of 
wheat, and one pound of hulled barley; pour tepid water over all, and when these grains are 
swollen, add four pounds of rye flour, and mix well together with tepid water, so as to form a 
paste neither too thin nor too thick. Put this into a large earthen pot, into a hot oven, and let it 
brown. After this has cooked five hours, pour it into a pail or barrel and mix in with it twelve 
bottlefuls of cold water; let rest for twenty-four hours, then decant the liquid and clarify it with a 
quarter of a pound of yeast mixed with a third of a bottleful of Madeira wine; rest again for five 
hours, and remove the clear part, and with this liquid fill up the bottles, setting one dry Malaga 
raisin into each one, then cork, tie, and keep the bottles in a cool place. 

(303), OEAB AND SHKIMP SOUP A LA LOUBAT (Potage aux Orabes et aux Crevettes a 

la Loubat). 

Wash well twenty-four hard crabs; boil them, and remove all the shells as well as the lungs; 
cleanse them in water changing it frequently, then remove all the meat contained therein, and 
pound it while diluting with three pints of thickened fish so'JO stock (No. 195). Allow to 
despumate for half an hour, then skim off the fat and strain it through a sieve, returning it to a 
clean saucepan; place this on the fire, and stir continually, and at the Srst boil, skim it carefully; 
adding some red pepper; thicken the soup with six egg-yolks, half a pint of cream and three 
ounces of butter; make a garnishing of quenelles as follows: Have a pike quenelle forcemeat 
(No. 90), pushed through a cornet to form three-sixteenths of an inch beads, on a buttered tin sheet, 
and poach them in boiling, salted water; have also three-eighths inch ball of potatoes cooked in a 
very little white broth, and some shrimp tails cut into two or three pieces. 

(304). CRAWFISH SOUP A LA RENOMMEE (Potage d'Ecrevisses a la Renomme~e), 
Boil a few dozen crawfish in a court bouillon with white wine; dram them, and detach the 
tails from the bodies, suppressing the tail shells. Keep boiling on the side of the fire, one and a 
half quarts of thickened white soup stock; put into it the crawfish shells after pounding them, and 
let the soup despumate for thirty-five minutes, remove all the fat, strain and return it to the 
saucepan; boil it up again, and stir in cayenne pepper to taste. Take all the meat from the tails 
and claws of the crawfish, chop up the claws with the parings of the tails and claws, mixing in a 
little bread panada, red butter, a few raw egg-yolks and red pepper; prepare a small forcemeat with 
this, and shape it into tiny quenelles, rolling them on a floured table; poach them, then drain and 
put them in the soup tureen with the crawfish tails cut in two lengthwise. Skim the fat from the 
soup, thicken it with four egg-yolks and two spoonfuls of puree of white asparagus tops, and also a 
little raw cream; let the thickening cook without boiling, and finish the soup with a piece of good 
butter working it vigorously with a whip. 

(305). OROUTE AU POT (Oroute an Pot), 

Put into an earthen pot (a pipkin) twelve quarts of stock, adding a piece of the rump of beef, 
Which must weigh eight pounds when trimmed and free from part of its fat, and a fowl weighing 
four pounds, drawn, singed and well washed; then add one pound of carrots, half a pound of 
onions with four cloves in them, two ounces of celery, and twenty-four whole peppers. Let boil 
up, salt it, and continue boiling very slowly for three hours and a half to four hours. Kemove the 



SOUPS. 269 

vegetables as soon as each one is done, pare the carrots cork shaped one inch in diameter, and cut 
them into three-sixteenth inch thick pieces; the turnips shaped like a clove of garlic. Cut length- 
wise in two some small French rolls, make them into pieces two inches long, scoop out the 
crumbs, and on this side besprinkle them with some good chicken fat, brown them in a hot oven. 
Lay them on a dish, the rounded side uppermost, and one beside the other; sprinkle them over 
again with chicken fat, and brown them in the oven. Cut a cabbage into four parts, wash these 
in plenty of water, and blanch in salted water for ten minutes, then drain, and refresh for half 
an hour; press well, and put it in a saucepan with a carrot cut in four, and one onion with 
cloves in it; season with salt and pepper, and moisten with stock and half a pint of chicken fat; 
the cabbage must be covered two inches above its height, then cook for two hours. When the 
cabbage is done, drain, and serve it in a vegetable dish with the rolls around, and lay the carrots 
and turnips on top ; send the soup to the table in a separate soup tureen. 

(306). D'OSMONT SOUP (Potage a la D'Osmont). 

Mince up four ounces of carrot, two ounces of onions, and one ounce of celery, fry these in 
four ounces of butter, adding four pounds of fresh tomatoes cut in two and pressed. Moisten 
with two quarts of broth, and let cook for half an hour, then press the whole through a fine sieve; 
put this into a saucepan, adding one quart of thick soup stock (No. 195), boil, skim, and when ready 
to serve, taste the soup to see whether it be seasoned properly, if it should be too thick add some 
bouillon to it, and then pour it into a soup tureen with a garnishing of rice blanched and cooked in 
white consomme, also some small chicken forcemeat quenelles (No. 89) colored with spinach green. 

(307). FERMIERE STYLE SOUP (Potage a la Fermiere). 

Have four medium sized onions, four ounces of leeks, half a cabbage, suppressing the core, three- 
quarters of a pound of potatoes, four ounces of turnips, half a pound of carrots and four ounces of 
celery, all minced up very fine, also some minced lettuce. Put one pound of scraped fat pork into a 
saucepan on the fire, and when hot, add the minced onions and leeks; fry for two minutes, and throw 
in the other vegetables and cook them without letting them g3t brown. Sprinkle over four spoon- 
fuls of flour, let cook and a few minutes after, dilute with four quarts of stock; stir the whole until 
it boils, then add a bunch of parsley garnished with bay leaf, four ounces of string beans cut lozenge 
shape, and two ounces of raw ham cut in one-eighth inch squares; boil again for three-quarters of 
an hour, and then add a handful of chopped up sorrel, and a little minced chervil; season with salt 
and pepper, remove the parsley, season to taste, and pour the soup into a soup tureen over slices of 
toasted bread or else slices of buttered bread browned in the oven. 

(308). PISH SOUP A LA PONSARDIN (Potage de Poisson k la Ponsardin). 

Cut one pound of fillet of bass into slices a quarter of an inch thick, and one inch and a 
quarter in diameter; fry these in some butter, and set them under a weight; when cold pare them. 
Take the tails from one pound of shrimps, peel them, and keep the meat aside. Put into a sauce- 
pan, one very fresh bass head, also the parings cut from the fillets and the shrimps, add half a 
pound of stalks or parings of mushrooms, a quarter of a bottlef ul of white wine, and three quarts of 
water, also a bunch of parsley, thyme, bay leaf, carrots and minced onions; boil for thirty minutes, 
then strain. Make a blond roux with quarter of a pound of butter, and quarter of a pound of flour; 
moisten it with the fish broth, boil, despumate, and thicken it with egg-yolks, cream and lobster 
butter, with Kari; serve as a garnishing the shrimp tails and the small prepared fillets of bass. 

(309). FROG SOUP AND FROG SOUP WITH TIMBALES (Potage aux Grenouilles et aux Timbales de 

Grenouilles). 

Mince well a quarter of a pound of the white part of leeks, wet them with two quarts of fish 
broth, let boil slowly for half an hour, then press them forcibly through a sieve, returning this 
to the saucepan. Have one pound and a half of frogs, suppress half a pound from the thighs (the 
thick part of the thigh); put the balance in with the broth, and four ounces of fresh bread-crumbs; 
boil for ten minutes, then drain and pound all well. Dilute with the broth, strain it through a 
sieve, heat it up without boiling, and thicken with egg-yolks, cream and fine butter, the pro- 
portions being four yolks, one gill of cream, and two ounces of butter. Cook separate in some 
broth, the half pound of frogs kept aside; remove all the bones, and put them into the soup with a 
pluche of chervil (No. 448). 

Frog I'imbales.Use the same soup, but instead of the garnishing of boned frog thighs, sub- 



270 THE EPICUREAN. 

stitute small timbales the shape of half a pigeon egg; butter and fill them with frog forcemeat 
(No. 222), and cream; then poach them (No. 152) in a slack oven. Unmold, and serve separately 
in a vegetable dish with a little consomme; put a timbale into each plate when serving the soup. 

(310). GAEBUEE WITH LETTUCE (Gartoire aux Laitues). 

First wash sixteen small lettuce heads several times, changing the water each time; blanch them 
for ten minutes, then refresh and press out all the liquid from them; lay them on a cloth, season 
them with a little salt and pepper, and place on each a chicken forcemeat ball of an inch 
and a quarter in diameter, mixing in with it a little chopped chervil. Wrap up the forcemeat in 
the lettuce, fold them over, giving them a long appearance; then tie three times round with a fine 
string (lettuce for soup must not be wrapped in lard), and put them in a stewpan lined with 
carrots, onions, and a garnished bouquet. Cover with some veal stock, protect with a sheet of 
buttered paper, boil, and let the lettuce simmer for two hours, then drain, untie, and trim them 
slightly; put them into a vegetable dish, moistening them with consomme, and keep them in a 
warm place until needed. Trim off some small rye rolls, the same as for croute-au-pot (No. 305); 
range them in a deep dish, baste them over with chicken fat, and brown them in the oven; drain 
off the fat, and when colored, moisten them with good broth, season with a little mignonette, 
and send to the table at the same time a soup tureen of consomme. Serve grated parmesan 
cheese separately. Put into each plate one of the crusts, also one lettuce and cover with 
consomme. 

(311). GIBLET SOUP A LA EEGLAIN (Abatis a la Eeglain). 

Prepare the giblets taken from three ducks or two geese, the necks, pinions and gizzards; 
remove the skin from the necks, cutting them off near the head, pluck the pinions and 
singe them; make a cut on the side of the gizzards to remove the inside without breaking the 
pouch, suppress the interior white skin, also the outside tough part, retaining only the soft meat, 
cut this into quarter inch squares, then divide the neck and pinions into small pieces; as well as the 
unblanched hearts. Fry slowly in four ounces of butter, the white part of six leeks cut into inch 
long pieces, then blanch, add the giblets and fry all together for fifteen minutes, then dilute 
with half a gill of Madeira wine, and one gill of broth, and let fall slowly to a glaze. Moisten 
again with three quarts of broth and boil, then simmer slowly until thoroughly cooked; strain the 
liquid through a sieve, and thicken it by working into it two heaping spoonfuls of arrowroot or 
potato fecula, diluted in a little cold water. Add to the soup, the livers braized and cooled 
off, cut into quarter of inch squares, and some blanched chervil leaves; season with salt and cayenne 
pepper and serve with a garnishing of carrots, turnips and celery cut in squares of a quarter of an 
inch, blanched and cooked separately in white broth. 

(312). GNOOQUIS SOUP A LA PAGIOLI (Potage aux Gnocquis a la PagioliX 

To Make the Gnocquis. Put a pint of milk into a saucepan on the fire with two ounces of 
butter, salt, nutmeg and a pinch of cayenne pepper. At the first boil remove the saucepan and 
add to its contents sufficient flour to make a thin paste; dry this paste on a slow fire, stirring con- 
stantly until it no longer adheres to the pan, then remove it from the fire to allow the paste to 
cool off a little, and then incorporate into it seven or eight eggs. Pour this paste into a linen bag 
furnished with a socket having an opening of an eighth of an inch, boil some water in a saucepan, 
add to it a little salt, and force the paste through the socket in the form of strings into it in 
order to poach it, and when firm, drain them and range them in a vegetable dish, alternating layers 
of gnocquis with grated parmesan cheese, then brown the whole in the oven. Serve with a separate 
tureen full of consomme. 

(313). GUMBO OE OKEA WITH HAED OEABS, CEEOLE STYLE (Gombo aux Orabes durs k la 

Creole). 

Chop up a quarter of a pound of fat pork, put it into a saucepan on the fire, adding half a 
pound of onions cut in dice, and a pound of lean beef in squares; fry all together, then add six 
peeled tomatoes cut in two, two pounds of minced young okras, twelve small cooked crabs, sup- 
pressing the shells and lungs, wash them thoroughly and split them in four, one clove of garlic, 
three green peppers minced up fine, six quarts of broth, salt, pepper and a little curry; boil all up 
till well cooked, then thicken with six tablespoonf uls of arrowroot dissolved in cold water. Serve 
separately some rice cooked in twice its quantity of water, with salt, fill some buttered molds (No. 
6 Fig- 137), with this, set it in a slow oven, unmold and serve at the same time as the soup. 



SOUPS. 271 

(314). GUMBO OE OKRA WITH SOFT SHELL CRABS (Gombo aux Orabes Moux), 
Set into a saucepan four ounces of butter to heat, add to it two ounces of shallots, four ounces 
of lean raw ham, and fry without letting attain a color; pour in four quarts of thickened fish stock, 
a quarter of a pound of finely cut up green peppers and let the whole simmer for twenty minutes, 
then add sixteen soft shell crabs cut in two or four, according to their size, and well cleansed; boil 
again for fifteen minutes and drain off the crabs; pare them nicely and return them to the sauce- 
pan with the liquid, and thicken this with eight spoonfuls of ground gumbo or okra, and some 
good butter. Prepare a separate garnishing of rice cooked with twice its quantity of water, salt 
and lard, boiling all together for ten minutes ; fill a buttered one quart charlotte mold with this, 
and set it in a slack oven for fifteen minutes; unmold, and serve the same time as the soup. 

(315). HUNTERS' STYLE SOUP (Potage a la Chasseur). 

Roast three partridges and one young wild rabbit, all barded with slices of fat pork; when 
done, remove the fillets from the partridges as well as from the rabbit, doing this very carefully. 
Put the rest, meat and bones, into a saucepan or stock pot, with a fowl split into pieces, and two 
pounds of small, half inch squares of beef. Moisten with four quarts of beef stock (No. 194a),let it 
boil, then skim and add some carrots, turnips, onions and two cloves; cook slowly for two hours, 
salt properly, then cut into squares the fillets taken from the partridges and rabbit. Have some 
small, round rolls, an inch and a quarter in diameter ; after completely emptying them with a 
knife, fill the insides with a delicate young rabbit godiveau (No. 84), mixing in with it some 
chopped up mushrooms and truffles. Lay the rolls on a buttered pan, one beside the other, 
besprinkle them over with butter or broth, and dredge some grated parmesan cheese on top; set 
them in a slack oven for fifteen minutes, then lay them in a vegetable dish; strain the rest of 
the broth through a napkin, clarify it and boil it up again, thickening with a spoonful of tapioca 
for each quart and adding half a gill of Madeira wine. 

(316). JAPANESE OR NIZAM PEARLS. TAPIOCA, MANIOC, SAGO OR SALEP, SEMOLINO, 
CASSAVA. GLUTEN (Perles de Japon ou de Nizam, Tapioca Manioc, Sagou Salep, Semoule, 
Cassave et Gluten). 

It takes from twenty to forty minutes to cook these farinaceous foods. Let drop like rain into 
the boiling consomme, the proportion of one spoonful for each pint of liquid; boil slowly, and 
skim the surface carefully. The length of time to cook Japanese or nizam pearls, is to boil them 
for ten minutes, and finish cooking in a bain-marie, for thirty minutes longer. 

For sago and salep, boil for ten minutes, and finish cooking in a bain-marie for twenty minutes 
longer. 

French tapioca needs boiling five to ten minutes. 

Manioc tapioca which is generally used in this country requires longer cooking; it will take 
twenty minutes; it may be kept in a bain-marie for ten minutes longer. 

Gluten takes twenty minutes to cook. 

Semolino and farina, ten minutes. 

Cassava, twenty-five minutes. 

(317). JEROME SOUP WITH SWEET POTATO QUENELLES (Potage a la Jerome aux Quenelles de 

Patates). 

Pour some game broth (No. 195), into a soup tureen; serve separately sweet potato quenelles 
as a garnishing, also some blanched tarragon leaves. Have croutons of bread one and a quarter 
inches in diameter, covered with butter and browned in the oven; serve them at the same time as 
the soup and garnishings. 

Sweet Potato Quenelles. Bake some sweet potatoes in the oven, remove their insides when 
they are done so as to obtain a half pound of potato; and add while mashing them one ounce of 
butter, one ounce of grated parmesan, one whole egg, one yolk, salt, pepper, and nutmeg, also 
one tablespoonful of potato fecula. Make some flattened oval shaped quenelles, poach and serve 
when done with the soup. 

(318). JULIENNE SOUP PAUBONNE AND MOGUL (Potage a la Julienne Paubonne et Mogol). 

To Cut the Vegetables. Cutting vegetables Julienne, is the act of dividing them into slices 
either long or short, thick or thin. There is fine, medium and large Julienne. 



272 THE EPICUREAN. 

In order to accomplish this, cut first the roots or meats into thin slices, then divide them 
into bands of an equal width, so as to cut them transversely into fillets as wide as they are 
thick, or in other words square; the fine Julienne is five-eighths of an inch long by little over one- 
sixteenth of an inch square; the medium is seven eighths of an inch long by one-eighth of an inch 
square, and the large Julienne is cut one and three-quarters to two inches long by three-sixteenth 
of an inch square. The vegetables cut in Julienne are usually intended for soups, while chicken, 
game, foies-gras, truffles, tongue and mushrooms are used for garnishings. 

For Julienne. Put into a saucepan containing six quarts, four ounces of butter, add a 
vegetable Julienne cut one and three-quarter inches by three-sixteenths of an inch square, six ounces 
of the red part of carrots, four ounces of turnips, two ounces of leeks, two ounces of celery root and 
two ounces of minced onion. Blanch the carrots, turnips and celery separately, should they be 
hard; place the saucepan on a slow fire to simmer the roots without browning them, then moisten 
with two gills of broth, let fall slowly to a glaze and begin again, until the vegetables are nearly 
cooked, being careful to stir them occasionally. Moisten with three quarts more of boiling broth, 
let boil, skim, remove the fat, and add four ounces of cabbage leaves, suppressing the hard part 
and cutting them up fine and blanching them, boil all together till the vegetables are cooked, then 
add a chiffonnade composed of a handful of sorrel, the leaves of a lettuce head and a little chervil, 
all well cleaned, washed, pressed and cut up fine. Boil again for fifteen minutes, then skim and 
season with salt and sugar. Serve the Julienne with green peas cooked in salted water; slices of 
bread croutons may also be served separately, with the Julienne or else poached eggs or quenelles. 

For Julienne Faubonne. Have two quarts of Julienne and one quart of puree of peas 
mixed. 

For Julienne Mogul. One quart of Julienne, one quart of pure"eof peas and one quart of 
puree of tomatoes. 

(319). KNUCKLE OF VEAL A LA BRIAND (Jarrets de Veau alaBriand), 
Put into a stockpot eight quarts of broth with eight pounds of knuckle of veal; boil the liquid, 
skim, and then add to it six leeks, two celery roots, a bunch of parsley, and a freshly roasted young 
pullet weighing three pounds, continue to boil till the meat is all cooked. After the knuckles 
are done, bone them and set the meat under a weight to flatten it down to one quarter of an 
inch in thickness, and when cold cut it up into quarter of an inch squares. Take the chicken out 
of the soup as soon as it is cooked, and set it away to cool, then cut off all the meat, omitting the 
skin and bones, and cut this meat into quarter of inch squares. Skim the fat from the stock, 
strain it through a sieve, and return it to the saucepan, having previously washed it, add the 
squares of chicken and veal to this, and let the whole simmer for half an hour, with the addition 
of four ounces of rice, blanched and cooked in consomme, half a pound of lean, cooked ham, cut 
into quarter of inch squares, and eight tomatoes, plunged into boiling water; peel off the skin 
then cut into four, and squeezed lightly so as to remove the seeds ; boil again for twenty 
minutes, skim and season the soup to taste and serve very hot. Braised lettuce as explained 
for Garbure soup (No. 310) to be served in a separate vegetable dish. 

(320). LAMB OR VEAL SWEETBEEAD SOUP, GERMAN STYLE (Potage de ris d'Agneau on de 

Veau a 1'Allemande). 

Blanch some lamb or veal sweetbreads, by placing them in a saucepan with sufficient water to 
cover them; let the liquid boil, then remove from the hot fire, until they are firm to the touch; set 
them under a weight to reduce them to one half of an inch thick, when cold cut them up in 
squares, two pounds in all. Put four ounces of butter into a saucepan, and when very, hot, lay in 
the sweetbreads and fry them slowly without coloring, moisten with three pints of broth, and three 
pints of veloute (No. 415), let come to a boil while stirring continually, and then cook slowly 
until the sweetbreads are thoroughly done ; thicken the soup just when about serving, with two 
egg-yolks, one gill of cream, and two ounces of fine butter; these proportions being for one 
quart of soup. For garnishing fry in butter all the fragments, drain off the butter, set them aside 
to cool, and chop them up very fine, with as much cooked mushrooms, and mix with this half its 
quantity of veal quenelle forcemeat (No. 92) and chopped parsley; season with salt, pepper, and 
nutmeg, then divide this preparation into equal parts, so as to make small balls five-eighths of an 
inch in diameter, lay them on a tin sheet, and poach them in a slow oven. Have some noodles 
(No. 142) cooked in salted water: pour the soup into a soup-tureen, and add to it the quenelles, 
the sweetbreads, the noodles and some finely chopped parsley. 



SOUPS. 273 

\321). LOBSTEB AND OEAWFISH SOUP, DUKE ALEXIS (Potage de Homard et d'Ecrevisses an 

Due Alexis). 

Mince finely some carrots, onions and celery; fry them in butter, and moisten with one 
quart of white wine and two quarts of broth, adding four peeled tomatoes cut in two and pressed. 
Put into this stock, eighteen crawfish, let them boil for five minutes, then lift them out, and put 
in four pounds of live lobsters, selecting the smallest ones procurable, and cook them for half an 
hour, then drain them, and pick out all their meats, keeping aside only the meat from the claws, 
and pounding the rest; dilute this with the above stock, adding one quart of thickened fish soup 
stock (No. 195); strain through a sieve and heat up to boiling point, but do not allow it to boil; 
thicken it with raw egg-yolks, cream and fine butter, the proportion being two raw egg-yolks, one 
gill of cream and two ounces of fine butter for each quart of soup. Detach the tails from the 
bodies of the crawfish; suppress the belly side so as to keep only the thin shells of the bodies, and 
stuff these with the crawfish meat, chopped up fine and mixed in with an equal quantity of fish 
forcemeat made with crawfish, butter (No. 573), season well, and poach them in boiling, salted 
water. Put these stuffed bodies into the soup as garnishing, and if too large cut them in two 
lengthwise. 

(322). MENESTRONE MILANESE SOUP (Potage Menestrone a la Milanaise). 
Chop up half a pound of fat fresh pork, put it into a saucepan with a clove of garlic, half a 
pound of raw ham cut in dice, three-sixteenths of an inch square, half a pound of string beans, cut 
lozenge shape, half a pound of small flageolet beans and half a pound of Kohl sprouts cut in quarter 
inch squares. Fry all these vegetables with the ham in the chopped up fat pork, moisten with six 
quarts of broth, boil, skim, then add one pint of green peas, one pound of asparagus tops, and 
half a pound of broad or lima beans, after removing their outer skins, and also eight medium 
peeled and quartered tomatoes. Boil the whole, and when these vegetables are nearly done, 
twenty minutes before serving, add a quarter of a pound of blanched rice. Cook some smoked 
sausages, by soaking them for ten minutes in boiling water, then lift them out and peel them; 
cut into slices, and put them into the soup; suppress the clove of garlic, and serve with grated 
parmesan separate. 

(323). MARSHALL SOUP (Potage a la Marshall). 

Make a garnishing of stuffed cucumbers, by peeling three small cucumbers, divide them cross- 
ways into parts each a quarter of an inch high, and blanch the pieces for fifteen minutes in salted 
water, then drain, cut out the center with a three-quarter inch column tube, so as to remove 
the seeds; fill the insides with a raw fine herb quenelle forcemeat (No. 89), and range them in a 
saucepan garnished with salt pork; moisten them with broth, add some salt, cover with buttered 
paper, and leave them to cook slowly. Despumate on the side of the fire two quarts of consomme, 
thickening it with two dessertspoonfuls of fecula diluted in two gills of Madeira wine; pour the 
soup into a soup tureen and serve the cucumbers at the same time, but in a separate vegetable dish. 

(324). MEISSONIER SOUP (Potage a la Meissonier). 

Despumate on the side of the range, about three quarts of thickened soup, prepared with 
mutton broth. Remove the fat and hard parts from a cold, braised saddle of mutton; then take 
one pound of lean meat and pound it, mixing with it when cold, three minced white onions fried 
in butter and cooked in consomme. Pound all well together, and rub it forcibly through a fine 
sieve, and put this puree into a bowl with a little cayenne pepper and from four to eight raw egg- 
yolks, diluting with two gills of cream. At the last moment skim the fat from the soup, strain, 
and return it to the saucepan to let boil up, then set it aside and thicken it at once with the above 
preparation; heat it once more without boiling, and finish the soup with a piece of butter; pour 
it into a soup tureen and serve with a plateful of hot, small, round pieces of toasted bread. 

(325). MONTEILLE SOUP (Potage a la Monteille). 

Serve a chicken consomme (No. 190), garnished with stuffed lettuces (No. 2752), and cucumbers 
prepared as follows: Cut off the ends of the cucumbers, peel them nicely, and divide them length- 
wise into inch pieces; remove the seeds, pare them to resemble, cloves of garlic, then fry them in 
butter in a saucepan, season, and finish cooking them in a little white broth, in such a way that 
they are thoroughly done when the liquid is entirely reduced. Serve separately the lettuce and 
cucumbers in a vegetable dish, and at the same time a tureen of chicken consomme. 



274 THE EPICUREAN. 

(326). MONTORGUEIL SOUP (Potage a la Montorgueil). 

Keep boiling on the side of the fire, one and a half quarts of thickened chicken soup stock 
(No. 195), despumating it for forty minutes. Prepare a garnishing of tender vegetables, composed 
of green peas, string beans, green or white asparagus tops, small Brussels sprouts, small new 
carrots whole or cut up, some of the tender leaves picked from a cabbage, and some well minced 
lettuce and sorrel leaves. These vegetables must be blanched separately according to their nature, 
only the sorrel leaves remaining raw. One hour before serving, skim off the fat from the soup, 
strain the broth, and return it to the saucepan ; boil the liquid on the side of the range, add the 
vegetables according to their tenderness, the hardest ones first, and finally the cut up leaves. 
Now put into an earthern bowl, five or six egg-yolks, dilute them with a little cream, add some 
grated nutmeg and a few small pats of butter; thicken the soup with this, and finish with a small 
piece more butter, mixed with some spinach green. Pour it into a soup tureen and serve. 

(327), MULLAGATAWNY SOUP, INDIAN STYLE (Potage Mullagatawny a 1'Indienne). 
Put eight quarts of broth into a saucepan with two knuckles of veal, sawed crosswise into 
four pieces, and some fragments of chicken; boil, skim and add a bunch of parsley garnished with 
bay leaf and a clove of garlic; season with salt, pepper, mace and cloves; boil slowly for three 
hours, then remove the veal knuckles and cut off all the meat adhering to the bones, and set it 
under a weight to press it to a quarter of an inch thick and let get cool and cut up into quarter of 
inch squares. Strain the broth through a sieve, and skim off the fat. Have half a pound of carrots, 
half a pound of turnips, half a pound of onions, two ounces of knob celery, six apples and four 
ounces of ham, all well minced, adding one pound of boneless chicken meat, after removing the 
skin and fat, and cutting it in five-eighths inch squares. Put six ounces of butter into a saucepan, 
heat it well, then begin first by frying the onions, afterward the carrots, turnips, ham, knob celery, 
apples and chicken. When all are fried and slightly colored, add to them six tablespoon fuls of 
flour, mixing it in well, then dilute with the broth, let boil and continue to boil until every article 
is well cooked; season and add three teaspoonfuls of curry, and a little sugar, drain, remove the 
pieces of chicken and press the vegetables through a sieve. Put this puree back into the saucepan, 
return it to the fire with the veal and chicken, and stir from the bottom of the saucepan until 
boiling point. Let simmer for twenty-five minutes, taste and see if the seasoning be correct, then 
serve. Send to the table at the same time, some rice boiled in salted water, mixing in some lard 
or butter. 

(328). MUSSEL SOUP A LA VIGO (Potage de Monies a la Vigo). 

For Ten Persons. Take two ounces or one medium sized onion, cut it in one-eighth of an 
inch squares, and fry brownless in some butter, add to this sixty medium mussels previously 
cooked in very little water and white wine (no salt), parsley, thyme and bay leaf; when the shells 
open they are clone, remove them from the shells ; from each one remove the black and nervous 
part, being careful not to break them while doing so. Strain the broth, let it settle so as to be 
able to pour off the clear top, put a little of the broth with the mussels and keep them warm. Put 
the rest of the broth in a saucepan with two quarts of thickened lean fish stock (No. 195). Boil 
and despumate for ten minutes, then thicken with six egg-yolks, diluted in half a pint of cream 
and four ounces of fine butter. Put into the soup tureen four ounces of mushrooms cut in small 
Julienne, also the mussels ; pour the boiling soup over and serve. 

> 

(329). MUTTON A LA OOWLEY AND MUTTON HOOHEPOT (Mouton a la Cowley et Mouton a 

la Hochepot). 

Bone and remove carefully the skin, nerves, and fat from three necks of mutton, cutting the 
meat into three-eighth inch squares. Put into a saucepan the fragments, bones and parings taken 
from the necks, also a split knuckle of veal; moisten with eight quarts of broth, and put it on the 
fire in order to boil the liquid; skim, and add some carrots, turnips, bunch of celery, leeks, and 
onions, all minced up fine, seasoning with pepper, salt, and cloves. Boil slowly and uninterrupt- 
edly for two hours; then skim off the fat, and strain the broth through a sieve. Put six ounces of 
butter into a saucepan, with four ounces of one-eighth inch squares of onions; add four ounces of 
leeks cut Julienne shape, half a pound of carrots, half a pound of turnips, two ounces of celery, 
all being cut in three-sixteenth inch squares, and the meat from the necks previously prepared; 



SOUPS. 275 

moistening the whole with the broth, and cook for two hours. Then free it from fat, season and 
add a garnishing of small chicken quenelles (No. 154), shaped as large peas and a pluche of chervil 
A supplementary garnishing may be added of rice, or of pearl barley. 

For Mutton Hochepot, use the mutton the same as explained for the above, adding for each 
quart of broth, one pint of the puree of dried peas, and half a pint of puree of spinach. For all 
mixed clear soups, the consistency should be approximately after the soup is drained, two-thirds of 
liquid to one-third of solid matter, while for thick soups, three-quarters liquid to one-quarter 
solid. 

(330). NOODLE SOTIP WITH PARMESAN CHEESE (Potage aux Nouilles au Parmesan). 

For the Paste. Sift through a fine sieve, half a pound of flour, moisten it with four egg- 
yolks and one whole egg, adding a little salt and water; work well together and knead it till tho 
paste is thoroughly well mixed, roll it down to one-sixteenth inch in thickness; let it dry in the open 
air; then fold it up, one inch and a half wide, and cut this into fine strips, dredging them over 
with flour, to prevent them sticking together; blanch them in boiling, salted water for one minute, 
then drain and put them into a saucepan with some consomme to simmer for five minutes; remove 
all the fat from the top, and serve in a soup tureen with some good consomme". Serve separately 
some grated parmesan cheese. 

(331). ONION SOUP WITH PARMESAN CHEESE BROWNED, AND THICKENED ONION SOUP 
(Soupe k 1'Oignon et au Parmesan Gratin6 et Soupe a 1'Oignon lie"e). 

Cut into small eighth of an inch squares, two medium or four ounces of onions, fry them 
in butter and moisten with two quarts of broth, adding a bunch of parsley garnished with chervil, 
bay leaf and a clove of garlic; season with a little salt, pepper and some meat extract; boil for 
twenty minutes, then remove the bouquet, and pour the soup over very thin slices of bread placed 
in a metal soup tureen, in intervening layers of bread and cheese, parmesan, finishing with the 
parmesan, and sprinkle a little over the top of the soup. Bake in a hot oven. 

Onion Soup Thickened. To prepare onion soup cut up two medium onions, mince them 
finely, and fry them colorless in butter, adding two dessertspoonfuls of flour, and cooking it a few 
moments with the onions, then dilute with two quarts of broth. Season with pepper and a little 
salt, boil for ten minutes, and just when ready to serve thicken the soup with raw egg-yolks 
diluted in cream, and a little fine butter. Pour the soup over round, thin slices of bread, about 
one inch and a quarter in diameter, dried in the oven. 

(332). OXTAIL SOUP A LA SOYER (Potage de Queue de Boeuf a la Soyer). 

Cut three oxtails into small pieces from the thin end, stopping at the third joint from the thick 
end, and keep this large piece aside for braising (No. 1324). Put four ounces of butter into 
a saucepan; cut four ounces of the red part of a carrot, and the same quantity of turnip 
into quarter inch squares, add these to the butter after it is hot, also a bunch of parsley, garnished 
with one bay leaf, and fry without letting attain a color, then add three tablespoon fuls of flour and 
the tails; cook all together to a light brown, afterward moistening with four quarts of broth, 
and adding a quarter of a pound of blanched onions, cut in squares. Season with salt and Worces- 
tershire sauce, boil slowly and continuously until the meat is done. Have cooked separately for 
three hours in some white broth, two ounces of pearl barley, add this to the soup, also one gill of 
sherry when serving. If clear oxtail be needed, suppress the flour and barley, and thicken with three 
spoonfuls of arrowroot diluted in a little cold water. 

(333). OYSTER SOUP, AMERICAN STYLE (Soupe aux Huitres U'Ame"ricaine). 

For Ten Persons. Put sixty medium oysters including their juice, and as much water, into 
a tin saucepan with a perforated cover (Fig. 186), specially made for this soup; season with salt 
and pepper, and set them on a quick fire; as soon as the steam escapes through the holes on the 
cover, remove the saucepan from the fire, and pour into it two and a half gills ot milk, and two and 
a half ounces of butter, then serve. In those establishments whose specialty is oysters, before 
serving oyster soup, they place before each person a plateful of finely minced raw cabbage (cold 
slaw); this cabbage is to be seasoned with salt, pepper, vinegar, and tomato catsup. 



276 THE EPICUREAN. 

(334), OYSTEE SOUP A LA OEUTST (Soupe aux Huitres a la Cruyst), 

For Ten Persons. Mince up the white part of a small leek, and cut one small onion into one- 
eighth inch squares; fry these colorless in two ounces of butter, add two ounces of bread-crumbs, 
frying it in with the onion, and also sixty oysters with their own juice and a quart and a half of 
fish broth. Set the saucepan over a quick fire, and stir vigorously to prevent the oysters from 
sticking to the bottom, then skim, and season with salt, pepper and nutmeg; when ready to serve 
thicken the soup with raw egg-yolks, cream and fine butter, the proportions for each quart being, 
two egg-yolks, one gill of cream and two ounces of butter. Stir in also, when serving, a little 
chopped parsley. 

(335). OYSTER SOUP, TRENCH STYLE (Soupe aux Huitres a la Trangaise), 

Cut two ounces of onions into eighth of an inch squares; fry them without coloring in some 
butter, and add sixty medium oysters with as much water as there is oyster juice; then season with 
salt, pepper and nutmeg. Place the saucepan on the fire, and remove again at the first boil, lay the 
oysters into a soup tureen and strain the broth through a fine sieve, returning it to the fire to add 
to it half a pint of bechamel (No. 409), and thicken it with egg-yolks, cream and butter, the pro- 
portions for each quart being, three raw egg-yolks, one gill of cream and two ounces of good 
butter. Make a garnishing of pike quenelles (No. 90), adding to it some cooked fine herbs; another 
garnishing may also be used, composed of round bread croutons, each one inch in diameter, 
sprinkled over with butter and browned in the oven; serve these separately, but at the same time as 
the soup. 

(336), OYSTEE SOUP WITH POWDEEED OKEA OE GUMBO (Soupe aux Huitres an Gombo en 

poudre). 

Mince a two ounce onion finely, fry it in two ounces of butter without letting it attain a color, 
then add sixty medium oysters with their juice, and the same quantity of water, season with salt 
and red pepper, then place the saucepan on a quick fire and remove at the first boil; skim and 
thicken with two spoonfuls of powdered gumbo for each quart of soup. Have some rice boiled in 
salted water; when done, mix in with it a little butter and set it in a buttered mold, place it in a 
hot oven for ten minutes and serve this separately, but at the same time as the soup, after 
unmolding it. 

(337), SOUP WITH OYSTEE RAVIOLES (Soupe aux Eavioles d'Huitres). 

Poach in white wine three or four dozen large oysters, drain them, and keep the broth; cut the 
oysters into small dice, and thicken this salpicon with three spoonfuls of pike forcemeat (No. 90), 
and as much reduced bechamel (No. 409). With this salpicon and some raviole paste (No. 147), rolled 
out very thin, prepare some small round ravioles, cutting them out with a pastry cutter one inch 
and a quarter in diameter. Put to boil on the side of the fire, three quarts of thickened fish stock 
(No. 195); add to this the oyster broth, and despumate the whole for twenty-five minutes; at the 
last moment remove all the fat, and thicken the soup with a thickening of four or five egg-yolks, 
cream, butter, season to taste with salt, and a pinch of cayenne. Pour the soup into a tureen, add 
to it the ravioles, previously cooked for twelve minutes in salted water. 

(338), PAETEIDGE SOUP A LA EOYALE (Potage de Perdreau a la Eoyale). 

Put to boil on the side of the fire, two quarts of thickened game stock (No. 195). Pound the 
meat taken from the breasts of two cooked and cold partridges; press them forcibly through a 
sieve, and put this pure"e into a bowl to dilute with seven or eight egg-yolks, and a few spoonful? 
of raw cream; season it to taste. Fill small buttered timbale molds (No. 2. Fig. 137) with this prep- 
aration, poach them (No. 152). Break up the partridge bones, add them to the soup, also a bunch 
of aromatic herbs, and some mushroom parings. Twenty minutes later skim off the fat, season 
and strain the soup through a tammy, and return it again to the saucepan; boil it up twice, and 
then stir in four spoonfuls of Madeira wine, meanwhile keeping it very hot. At the last moment 
unmotd the small poached timbales; put in the soup tureen, and gently pour the soup over them. 



SOUPS. 277 

(339). ITALIAN OR GENOA PASTES; LASAGNE, LASAGNETTE, TAGLIABELLI, MAOOARONI, 
VERMICELLI, SPAGHETTI, PAILLETTES, MAOOARONOELLI, FLORENCE SNOW 
(Pate d'ltalie ou de Genes ; Lasagne, Lasagnette, Tagliarelli, Maccaroni, Vermicelli, Spaghetti, 
Paillettes, Maccaroncelli et Neige de Florence), 

All these various pastes are to be previously blanched by throwing them into boiling water for 
five or ten minutes according to their respective thickness. When blanched, drain them, and 
finish cooking in broth or consomme, the proportion being half a pound of paste to three or four 
quarts of liquid. Put the paste into a soup tureen and pour the soup over, serving at the same 
time on a separate plate, some grated parmesan cheese. 

Lasagne, Lasagnette and Tagliarelli. Blanch of these one half pound for five minutes, 
cook them in a quart of broth, and serve in a tureen with consomme. 

Maccaroni, Spaghetti, Vermicelli, Paillettes, Maccaroncelli. For the large macaroni, blanch 
half a pound for twelve minutes or less in proportion to their thickness, when done, drain, and 
cook them in a quart of broth. Serve in a soup tureen with consomme. 

Italian or Genoa Pastes and Vermicelli. Blanch half a pound of these for five minutes, drain 
and cook them in a quart of broth, serve in a soup tureen with consomme. 

Florence Snow. Florence snow is made of fine gluten paste, extremely white and distributed 
into very fine shavings. This paste does not require any cooking; range it on plates and pass it 
round to the guests, after serving the soup, when each one takes some if so desired. This paste 
dissolves as soon as it conies in contact with a hot liquid. 

(340). PATERSON SOUP (Potage a la Paterson). 

Put into a saucepan on the fire three quarts of broth, and when boiling, dredge into it 
five spoonfuls of tapioca; let it cook for twenty-five minutes, being careful to remove all the scum 
arising on the surface, then strain and keep it warm. Have a garnishing of timbales of puree of 
green peas made as follows: One pint of puree of green peas, into which mix one whole egg and 
four yolks, salt, sugar and nutmeg; pour this into buttered timbale molds (No. 3, Fig. 137), place 
the molds in a pan with water to half their height, and poach them in a slack oven, unmold and cut 
them in two crosswise; have also small three-eighths of an inch pearl quenelles (No. 154), also 
some mushrooms cut in three-sixteenth inch squares. 

(341). PILATJ, TURKISH STYLE (Pilau a la Turque), 

Put two knuckles of veal into a saucepan with eight quarts of broth, a few slices of raw ham, 
one chicken, and a roasted shoulder of lamb; boil up the liquid, skim, and add to it three carrots, 
two turnips, one celery stalk, six leeks, two onions, and two cloves; continue to boil slowly, till 
each one of the meats is done, then take them out as fast as cooked; strain the broth, remove all 
the fat, and clarify it, then reduce it one-quarter. Cut the chicken into small pieces, and put 
them into the soup; mince the shoulder of lamb, cut the ham into small dice, and after placing the 
knuckle of veal under a weight to get cool, cut it up into squares, and add all these to the soup, 
with some salt, red pepper, a slight infusion of saffron, and half a pound of blanched Sultana 
raisins. Parboil a quarter of a pound of rice for ten minutes in boiling, salted water, drain, and 
put it into three pints of boiling white broth; at the first boil, remove it from the fire, cover, 
and finish cooking in a cool oven for twenty-five minutes; when done, put it into the soup and 
serve. 

(342). POT-AU-FEU (Pot-au-feu). 

For Sixteen Persons. Have a soup-pot of enameled or lined cast-iron containing sixteen quarts 
of liquid; put into it a piece of boned, rolled and tied up, rump of beef weighing eight pounds and 
eight quarts of water or beef stock. Put the pot on the fire; heat it so as to bring the liquid to a 
boil, then skim it off carefully at the first boil, and set the pot back from the hot fire. Roast the 
bones taken from the meat, also one pound of knuckle of veal and some chicken giblets, add them 
to the soup, and leave it on one side or on a gas stove, watching it well to see that it boils slowly 
and continuously, on one side only, so as to obtain a very clear broth; let the meats cook for four 
or five hours, more or less according to their thickness and tenderness, and when the beef is Kalf 
done, strain slowly the liquid through a sieve without disturbing it. Remove the piece of run^ix, 
empty the pot, clean it well, and return to it the meat and the broth, after having partially removed 



278 THE EPICUREAN. 

the fat, then put the saucepan back on the fire, and at the first boil mix to it a pound and a half of 
the white part of leeks tied together, a pound and a half of large carrots, three-quarters of a pound 
of turnips, half a pound of celery-knob or root, one medium onion with two cloves and one 
ounce of parsnips, then add one or two young chickens weighing three pounds each, trussed 
and browned in the oven. Continue to boil all very slowly, being careful to remove the 
chicken and meat as fast as they are done; also the vegetables, keeping them warm. Saw 
sixteen pieces from a marrow-bone each one inch long, wrap them up in separate pieces 
of linen, tie them, and poach them for eight minutes in the boiling broth. At the 
last moment salt and color the broth properly, and strain it through a silk sieve or a 
damp napkin, keeping it warm. Have two vegetable dishes of braised cabbage, the leeks, carrots, 
turnips, and celery arranged in clusters, and neatly trimmed so that every person may be able 
to help himself to one or the other as desired. Toast, or butter, and then color in the oven, 
thirty-two croutons of bread three-sixteenths of an inch thick, by one and a half inches in 
diameter, also have the sixteen pieces of prepared marrow. Pour the soup into the soup tureen, 
and send the vegetables to the table, separately, also the croutons and marrow. When serving 
the soup, put into each plate a piece of marrow bone, two croutons and some soup, and pass the 
dishes containing the vegetables around separate. The boiled beef can be served at the same time, 
dressing it on to a dish, and surrounding it with the chicken cut in pieces, and branches of 
parsley; serve at the same time a sauceboat of tomato sauce (No. 549). 

(343). EIOE SOUP A LA RUDINI (Potage an riz a la Kudini). 

Put a quarter of a pound of picked and washed rice into a saucepan, with two quarts of cold 
water, set it on the fire, and stir occasionally to prevent the rice from sticking to the bottom; let it 
boil up once, then refresh it, finish cooking it in consomme with a piece of fine butter, and a pinch of 
black pepper; mingle in with it when done, three ounces of grated parmesan cheese, four raw egg- 
yolks, and set it away to get cold. Divide this preparation into small five-eighth inch diameter 
balls ; a few moments before serving roll them on to a dish containing two beaten eggs, drain them 
and put them one by one into new frying fat not too hot, and let them assume a nice golden color; 
then drain them again, and dry them in a napkin. Have two quarts of thickened chicken broth 
(No. 195), bring it to a boil, and remove it from the fire. Place four egg-yolks in a bowl, dilute them 
with one gill of cold broth, add four ounces of fine butter divided in small pieces, pour slowly into 
this thickening a quarter of the stock while stirring continually; return it to the rest of the stock, 
working it in briskly with a whisk, season to taste; pass it through a fine sieve or tammy. Pour this 
into a soup tureen, and serve separate a garnishing of the rice balls, and a plateful of grated 
Parmesan cheese. 

(344). SHERMAN SOUP (Potage a la Sherman). 

Have a garnishing of stuffed cabbage leaves, prepared as follows: Blanch some cabbage 
leaves, drain and trim them nicely, then fill the insides with a quenelle and cooked fine herb force- 
meat (No. 89), roll them up and lay them one beside the other, cover them with bouillon and a sheet 
of buttered paper, cook in a slack oven for two hours, being careful to add some moistening when 
they become too reduced. Cut some carrots into three-eighth inch balls, blanch and cook them in 
broth ; prepare a pluche of chervil; chervil leaves free of stalks, thrown into boiling water for one 
minute, then drained. Cut the cooked cabbage in slices of a quarter of an inch leaves, lay them 
on a deep dish, and dust over some grated parmesan cheese, over this place some thin slices of 
buttered bread browned in the oven, then another layer of cabbage, cheese and bread; pour over 
some very fat broth, besprinkle grated parmesan on top, and bake in the oven. Pour some con- 
somme into a soup tureen, add the carrots and chervil, and serve the baked cabbage apart. 

(345), SHRIMP SOUP, MIGNON (Potage aux Orevettes Mignon). 

Keep boiling on the side of the fire one quart and a half of thickened fish stock (No. 195). 
Break off the tails from a hundred cooked red shrimps, pick the meat from the shells, trim them 
and pound the parings with one-third of the picked tails, selecting the smallest ones for this; also 
a piece of butter and four egg-yolks, then press all through a sieve; keep the puree in a cool place, 
also the remainder of the picked tails cut in small dice. Put into the boiling soup half of the 
pounded shells; with a smallest size root spoon, five-sixteenth of an inch, cut out some very small 
cooked truffle balls, and set these into another small saucepan; divide into two equal parts the 
value of four or five spoonfuls of raw fish quenelle forcemeat CM o. 90); into one mix some Breton 




SOUPS. 279 

carmine, leaving the other half white ; place these two forcemeats separately into a paper cornet, 
and push them through on to a buttered baking sheet to form beads; poach them separately in 
salted water, drain and lay them in the soup tureen. From one quart of shelled green peas select 
one to two gills of the smallest and tenderest, and boil them in water; when drained, add them to 
the quenelles in the soup tureen. After the soup is well despumated, remove all its grease and 
strain it through a tammy; return it to a clean saucepan, let it boil, adding to it three spoonfuls 
of Madeira wine; two minutes later, thicken it with the shrimp puree and cook this thickening 
without letting it boil. Remove, and finish with a dash of cayenne pepper and a piece of red 
butter. Pour the soup into the tureen, add to it the shrimp tails, butter and truffles, and serve at once. 

(346). SMALL INDIVIDUAL SOUP-POTS (Petites Marmites Individuelles). 
There are two different ways of serving these. The first by making the soup in small soup-pots 
each one containing one-half a quart or more, diminishing the proportions of meat, vegetables and 
liquid, either of water or broth, after the proportions indicated in the pot-au-feu (No. 342). The 

second is to serve the pot-au-feu when it is ready, with the 
contents, dividing it into small individual pots, making an 
equal division of the meats, vegetables and liquid, into as many 
parts as there are half quarts of soup; and divide as well the 
meats, vegetables, and liquid into small two quart pots, having 
the meats and vegetables the same size as for the pint ones; for 
the one or the other use only half the beef meat well pared; the 
carrots, turnips, and celery cut into cylindricals, and divided 
into small parts, and each chicken into sixteen pieces; (Before 
using the small stone pots, they should be lined with the frag- 
ments of the chickens and vegetables, aromatics and spices, and 
cooked in the oven for twelve hours, pouring at intervals boiling 
water into them, so that they remain always full, then washed 

well out before using.) After the pots are filled, pour over the very hot broth, adding a table- 
spoonful of braised cabbage and the leeks divided, then boil the contents for a few minutes, and 
just when ready to serve, add for each pint four marrow bones sawed into inch thick pieces. 
Dress them over napkins on a plate. Each guest should have his individual soup-pot containing a 
little over a pint, and serve at the same time slices of toasted bread or bread buttered and browned 
in the oven, the size being three-sixteenths by one and one-half inches in diameter. 

(347). SOKEEL, SORREL WITH HERBS, AND SORREL FLEMISH STYLE (Oseille, Oseille aux 

Herbes et Oseille a la Flamande). 

Remove the stalks from a good handful of sorrel, mince it up fine, then fry it in two ounces 
of good butter, and moisten with two quarts of broth or water; season with salt and a dash of sugar, 
and let boil for fifteen minutes. Cut thin slices from some French rolls, butter them, and put them 
in the hot oven to brown; set them in the soup tureen and pour the soup over. 

Sorrel with Herbs. Sorrel soup may also be made by mincing fine a small handful of sorrel, 
half as much lettuce, and quarter as much chervil as lettuce. Melt and heat two ounces of 
butter in a saucepan, put in the herbs, fry them, and then moisten with two quarts and a half of 
broth or water, boil slowly for half an hour, and just before serving pour in gradually a thickening 
of four egg-yolks, a gill of cream, and one ounce of fine butter. A garnishing may be served of 
croutons dried in the oven, o'r some vermicelli. 

Flemish Style. For sorrel, Flemish style, prepare the soup as in the first article above; 
the only difference to observe is, that before putting in the sorrel, fry some leeks, onions, potatoes 
and artichoke bottoms, all minced up very fine; add the sorrel, and finish as for the above. 
Serve with a garnishing of rice cooked in white broth, and some green peas. 

(348). SPAGHETTI WITH CREAM (Spaghetti a la Creme). 

Melt four ounces of butter in a saucepan, adding two dessert spoonfuls of flour; cook the flour 
slowly, so as to make a blond roux, then dilute with two quarts of consomme, stir the liquid until 
it boils, move it aside at once, and continue to boil slowly and uninterruptedly for twenty-five 
minutes, strain through a fine strainer, and put it back into a clean saucepan. Cook in salted 
water, some spaghetti macaroni, drain it and cut it up in one inch length pieces, having about one 



280 THE EPICUREAN. 

pound, and put this in with the consomme. Place in a bowl four raw egg-yolks, with two ounces 
of grated parmesan, dilute it with two gills of raw cream, and one ounce of butter; pour this 
thickening into the soup, and let heat without boiling; season, and serve it in a soup tureen. The 
spaghetti can be replaced by any of the Italian pastes. 

(349). SPANISH OILLA (Oilla a 1'Espagnole). 

Put to soak in tepid water for twelve hours, half a pound of chick peas (Garbanzos). Set in 
an earthen pot, or any other kind, six pounds of lean breast of beef, three pounds of leg of mut- 
ton cut near the knee bone, half a pound of unsmoked salt pork, cut in one piece and then blanched, 
and half a pound of smoked ham, well pared and blanched. Cover with water, add the garbonzos 
boil and skim, maintaining a slow ebullition. Two hours after, put in the broth, one fowl, two 
pai'tridges, a piece of squash weighing one pound, half a pound of carrots, half a pound of onions, 
a bunch of parsley with a bay leaf, and clove of garlic, and one pound of chorissos sausages (garlic 
sausage). Blanch twelve lettuce heads, also two cabbages cut in four. After removing the cores 
(the hard part), take out the meats as soon as they are severally done, cool them partially, and then 
cut them into half inch squares. Strain the broth through a napkin, pour it in a soup tureen with 
rice cooked in fat broth, and if the meats should not be added to the soup, serve them separately 
as a garnishing, by cutting them up in slices, and arranging them in a circle on a dish. The chicken 
in the center, a partridge on each side, the lettuces on one side, the chick peas on the other, the 
cabbages on the ends, and the sausages cut into slices and laid on top of the cabbage. A 
tomato sauce served separately, also a green sauce a Tespagnole (No. 473). 

(350). TERRAPIN, CLEAR, THICK OR WHITE (Terrapene au Olair, Lie~e ou a Blanc). 

Prepare and cook the terrapin as told in No. 1082, observing all the instructions given for 
the preparation of these turtles. 

For Clear Terrapin. When the terrapins are cooked, select the largest ones, bone them entirely, 
and cut up the pieces found to be too large, and being more than one inch; it will require one 
pound and a half. Prepare a stock the same as for clear turtle (No. 353), thicken with arrowroot 
or else fecula, when the stock is ready and nicely seasoned, add the terrapin to it, boil it up for a 
few minutes and finish the soup with some brandy and Madeira wine. Serve separately the pulp 
of two lemons, two hard boiled, chopped up eggs, and some chopped parsley, the whole on one or 
several plates, together or each article separate. 

For Thick Terrapin Sonp. Make it exactly the same as the clear terrapin, with the excep- 
tion of using the same stock as for thick green turtle soup (No. 353). 

For Terrapin Soup, White. Prepare it as for the above, only thickening it with veloute" (No. 
415); diluting it with chicken broth (for lean use lean veloute and fish broth). Boil, skim, season 
properly, then add when ready to serve, some raw egg-yolks, cream and fine butter, the propor 
tions being two raw egg-yolks, one gill of cream and two ounces of fine butter for each quart. 

(351). DRIED TURTLE, THICK A.ND CLEAR (Tortue Seche Lie"e et Claire). 

Dry. This green turtle comes from South America; it is raw and dried in pieces; the only 
parts being used for drying are the cutaneous ones. When the dried turtle is needed put it first to 
soak in cold water for two or three days, changing the water frequently. Half a pound of dry 
turtle suffices to make soup for eight persons; when the pieces have softened, put them into a small 
stock-pot with six quarts of water, adding to it a piece of shin of beef, weighing two pounds; a 
two pound piece of neck of veal, a three pound chicken, two or three chicken giblets, a bone of 
cooked ham, carrots, celery, a bunch of marjoram, savory, parsley, thyme, and bay leaf. Cook 
the meats the same as for a pot-a-feu (No. 342), either on the gas, or on the back of the range, and 
as soon as the pieces of turtle are done, remove them and plunge them into cold water; then cut 
them into one inch and a quarter squares, and lay them in a saucepan with a little consomme; skim 
off the fat from the soup, strain, and set about two quarts of it into a saucepan; thicken it with 
blond roux (No. 163), despumate the soup while allowing it to boil slowly, remove all the fat, 
and season with salt and cayenne pepper, also two gills of good Madeira wine. Put the pieces of 
turtle into a soup tureen, and pour the soup over. Should the turtle be needed clear, then sup- 
press the roux, clarify the broth, and thicken it with arrowroot or potato fecula. Serve slices of 
lemon at the same time. 



SOUPS. 281 

(352.) PREPARATION OF A GREEN TURTLE WEIGHING ONE HUNDRED POUNDS (Prepara- 

tion d'une Tortue pesant cent livres). 

Lay the turtle on its back, and when it stretches out his head, seize it with one hand, and 
holding a knife in the other, cut its neck, leave it to bleed, then lay it again on its back, pass the 
knife along the flat shell, about one inch from the edge. Detach the flat shell and remove all the 
meat from the inside, doing exactly the same for the back, then saw them into six or eight pieces, 
plunge them into boiling water to remove the scales, doing the same for the four fins. Put the 
turtle meat into a soup pot with two knuckles of veal, moisten it with broth, let boil, then skim 
and add sprigs of parsley, celery, sage, marjoram, basil, thyme, bay leaf, mace, cloves, whole 
peppers and salt, cook for one hour, add the pieces of shell and fins and let boil again until all are 
cooked, then take them out and put them into cold water. Remove the gelatinous parts of the 
turtle, cut them into one and a half inch squares, strain the broth through a fine sieve and reduce 
it to a half glaze, add the green parts and let boil very slowly until the turtle be thoroughly cooked 
and the stock well reduced. If wanted for further use pour it into tin boxes, surround them with 
ice, and when perfectly cold cover the tops with hot fat and lay them aside in the ice box. 

(353). GREEN TURTLE SOUP, CLEAR 1 LA ROYAL OR THICK WITH MARROW QUENELLES 
(Soupe Tortue Verte, Claire a la Royale on liee aux Quenelles a la Moelle). 

Clear. Put eight quarts of beef stock into a soup-pot with four pounds of leg of veal, and 
four pounds of fowl or chicken wings, thyme, bay leaf, parsley, basil, marjoram, mushroom trim- 
mings, and celery; boil all for three hours, then strain through a sieve, and afterward through a 
napkin. Clarify this stock the same as consomme with chopped beef. Cook separately the pre- 
pared turtle, and keep it warm in a steamer (bain-marie); add to the soup a dessertspoonful 
of arrowroot for each quart, diluted with a little water, and add it to the boiling broth, stirring 
it in with a whip; boil and despumate the soup for twenty minutes, then season. "When ready to 
serve, drain the turtle, lay it in a soup tureen, and pour over the stock, seasoning with cayenne 
pepper and half a gill of Xeres for each quart. 

For Clear Turtle a la Royal. Add some royale timbales (No. 241). 

Thick Turtle with Marrow Quenelles. Proceed exactly the same as for clear turtle, but in- 
stead of thickening it with arrowroot, thicken the soup with a little brown roux, moistened with 
the turtle stock, boil and despumate, and strain through a fine sieve Garnish with marrow quenelles 
(No. 252), or if preferred, use turtle fat instead of marrow. Quenelles may also be made with a 
quarter of a pound of hard boiled egg-yolks pounded with one ounce of butter and four raw egg- 
yolks, seasoning with salt, nutmeg, and chopped parsley; divide this into pieces, roll them into 
balls half an inch in diameter, and poach them in boiling water; drain, and serve with the soup. 

(354). MOCK TURTLE OR CALF'S HEAD, CLEAR SOUP (Soupe Fausse Tortue on Tete de Veau 

an Clair). 

Bone a calf's head the same as described for plain calfs head (No. 1519); put it into 
cold water in a saucepan on the fire, boil up the liquid and let it continue boiling for half 
an hour, then drain, refresh and singe it. Butter the bottom of a saucepan, cover it with 
slices of ham, a carrot and some onions, a bunch of parsley garnished with sage, chives, thyme 
and bay leaf. Split the bones taken from the head, lay them on this bed of vegetables and 
add two pounds of knuckle of veal, and a pound and a half of chicken, or else some chicken 
thighs, either of these being partially roasted ; moisten with a quart of water, and let boil 
on a moderate fire until the liquid is reduced and fallen to a glaze, and the vegetables slightly 
colored. Moisten again with six quarts or either broth or water, add the blanched calf's head, 
boil up the liquid again, then skim and throw in one onion with a clove in it, a little mace and a 
quarter of a pound of mushroom trimmings; continue to boil slowly and when the head is cooked, 
remove it from the stock, cover it over with broth, and leave it till cold. Now cut away the white 
skin near the snout, divide the meat into equal sized half inch square pieces, taking only the 
cutaneous parts. Remove the chicken when done, season the stock, skim off the iat and strain it 
through a sieve, clarify it with two pounds of chopped beef and one whole egg, proceeding the 
same as for a consomme. Strain the liquid through a napkin or a silk sieve, and thicken it with a 
spoonful of fecula for each quart, diluting the fecula with half a gill of sherry and a little water, 
and then pouring it into the soup, stirring it vigorously until all is well mixed, then return it to 
the fire and stir again until it boils. Pound the meat from the chickens free of all fat, bones and 
skin, add to them when well pounded, four hard boiled egg-yolks, salt, nutmeg and four raw egg- 



m THE EPICUREAN. 

yolks, rubbing all through a sieve, mix in some chopped parsley and with this preparation make 
some small half inch diameter quenelles; poach them in boiling and salted water, drain and 
put them into a saucepan with the pieces of calf's head, moisten with the stock, boil and skim, 
then add half a gill of Madeira or extra sherrry wine for each quart of soup, and the juice of 
half a lemon for each quart; pour it into a soup tureen and serve very hot. 

(355). MOCK TUETLE SOUP, THICKENED (Soupe Fausse tortue Liee). 

It needs one gallon of soup for twelve persons. Proceed exactly the same as for the clear 
mock turtle only leaving out the fecula thickening. Put four ounces of butter into a saucepan on 
a slow fire, and when melted, mix in with it a quarter of a pound of flour, cook it slowly to obtain 
a blond roux, which then moisten with clear turtle stock, until it becomes the consistency of a 
light sauce, cook it slowly and keep despumating it for half an hour, then strain it through a sieve 
or tammy, and return it to the fire in a very clean saucepan, and after bringing the liquid up to a 
boil, despumate it again. Add the quenelles, the calf's head cut in pieces, and the pulp of a 
lemon without any peel or pips, also half a gill of sherry wine for each quart of soup. 

(356). VELVET SOUP (Potage Velours). 

Mince up fine the red part of a few good carrots; stew them with butter, salt, sugar and a 
little broth, and when done strain through a sieve and afterward through a tammy (Fig. 88). 
Put two quarts of good clear broth on to boil, mix in with it four tablespoonfuls of tapioca, let 
it despumate for twenty-five minutes on the side of the fire, skimming it off well. At the last 
moment add the carrot puree, season boil up once or twice more, and serve in a soup tureen. 

(357). WESTMOEELAND SOUP (Potage a la Westmoreland). 

For sixteen persons. Prepare two quarts of reduced and well-seasoned chicken consomme 
(No. 190); boil it, then thicken it with arrowroot, colored with a little roucou (Annotto); dilute 
the arrowroot and roucou in cold water, and add it slowly with the soup, stirring it in continually 
with a whip or spoon; then boil and skim. 

Prepare three-quarters of a pound of cooked calf's head the gelatinous, cutaneous parts, free of all 
fat and meat, press to three-eighths of an inch, cut this into three-eighth inch squares, and keep them 
warm in a quart of consomme. Have half a pound of round chicken quenelles (No. 154), half an 
inch in diameter laid through a bag on to a buttered tin pan, and poached in boiling salted water, 
and add them to the calf s head. Braised sweetbreads set under a weight, having half a pound in 
all, and pressed down to three-eighths of an inch in thickness, then cut in squares when cold, and 
put them to keep hot with the quenelles and calf's head; have also some celery cut in quarter inch 
squares, blanched and cooked in consomme, a quarter of a pound in all, and when done, add 
them to the other garnishings. Just when about serving, taste the soup, season it accordingly, 
and pour it over the garnishings in a soup tureen. 

(358). NOQUES OE QUENEFES SOUP (Potage aux Noques et aux Quenefes). 

Melt in a saucepan three ounces of butter, dredge in the same weight of flour and stir this over 
a moderate fire so as to obtain a light roux (No. 163); moisten with two quarts of broth, and stir 
again until it boils slowly and on one side only; despumate the soup by removing all the scum and 
fat arising to the surface. 

Noques. Beat up with a spoon five ounces of partially melted butter placed in a bowl, and 
when it is creamed, then incorporate into it three egg-yolks and one whole egg; as the compound 
becomes frothy, add to it four ounces of flour and two beaten egg-whites, season with salt and 
nutmeg, and try the preparation by taking up a teaspoonful and letting it fall, detaching it with 
another teaspoon, into boiling, salted water, and if it be too light and requires more consistency, 
then add a little more flour mixed with a little hot water, but if it be too consistent, then more 
butter is needed. Keep the noques in boiling water without letting them boil until they are well 
poached and firm, then drain, and range them in a soup tureen; remove the fat once more from 
the soup and thicken it with four egg-yolks and two gills of cream and a little butter; pour it over 
the noques after straining it through a fine sieve. 

Quenefes. Put into a bowl four yolks and two whole eggs, salt, and nutmeg; mix well, then 
add six ounces of flour, and to test whether the paste is sufficiently thick, take up some of it in a 
teaspoon, detach it with another spoon moistened with hot water, and let it drop into boiling water 
to cook for half an hour without boiling. Drain and use these quenefes instead of noques for the 
above soup. 



SOTTPS. J>83 

(359). EAVIOLE AND PEAEL SOUP (Potage aux Eavioles et aux Perles). 
Place four quarts of good consomme" into a saucepan, and after it boils skim it well. Blanch 
in boiling water for five minutes, two ounces of Nizam pearls, drain, and add them to the boiling 
consomme; cook until they become transparent, which will take about twenty minutes, pour the 
soup into the soup tureen, adding some poached ravioles (No. 158), arid serve at the same time a 
plateful of grated parmesan cheese. 

(360). WOODCOCK SOUP (Potage de Becasses). 

Remove the four fillets from two cold roasted woodcocks; pound two of these fillets with the 
livers and a few slices of cooked foies-gras; press through a sieve, and put this puree into a mor- 
tar, mixing in with it a third of its quantity of raw game quenelle forcemeat (No. 91); two whole 
eggs, a pinch of nutmeg, and half a gill of cold espagnole sauce. Poach this preparation in small 
buttered timbale molds (No. 1, Fig. 137). Despumate on the side of the fire, two quarts of game 
stock (No. 195), add to it the carcasses, necks, and heads of the woodcocks, all chopped up and a 
few aromatic herbs and twenty minutes later, skim off the- fat, strain it through a tammy, and 
put it back into a clean saucepan, to heat, stirring it with a spatula continually to prevent the soup 
adhering to the bottom of the pan, finish by incorporating into it a small piece of butter, having 
previously removed the soup from the fire. Pour the soup into a tureen, adding the two breasts 
kept aside, mincing them up in Julienne, also the poached timbales. 



SOUPS AND DIFFERENT PEEPAEATIONS FOR INVALIDS, 



(36D. INDIAN AEEOWEOOT (Arrowroot de 1'Inde). 

Prepare a plain chicken broth as indicated in No. 188; for each quart of this dilute a table- 
spoonful of arrowroot with a little of the cold broth, so as to form a smooth and liquid paste, add 
to it gradually the boiling broth, then boil all, stirring unceasingly with a spatula. After the first 
boil, simmer it gently for half an hour, carefully stirring it at times to prevent it from sticking 
to the bottom of the pan; then serve. 

(362). BAVAEOISE (Bavaroise), 

An infusion of tea sweetened with gum syrup and orange flower-water with milk. Have 
half as much boiling milk as tea; sweeten it with gum syrup, and flavor with orange flower- water; 
the latter can be replaced by a small glassful of good brandy. Bavaroise is taken at night before 
retiring. 

(363). CHICKEN BEOTH PLAIN (Bouillon de Poulet Simple). 

Chop up three pounds of chicken carcasses; put them in a saucepan with two quarts and a 
half of water, and a little salt; boil, then skim, add a well washed lettuce head, and half an ounce 
of chervil. Let boil for an hour and a half, remove all the fat and pass through a fine sieve; serve 
in cups. This preparation should produce about a quart of liquid. 

(364). CHICKEN AND MUTTON BEOTH WITH BAELEY (Bouillon de Poulet et Mouton a 1'Orge). 
Break up three pounds of chicken carcasses and place them in a saucepan with a pound of lean 
mutton cut in squares and an ounce of pearl hulled barley washed in several waters, half a pound of 
minced and blanched turnips; moisten with three quarts of water, boil, skim, and reboil all gently 
for three hours; skim again, season and strain through a fine sieve; serve in cups. 

(365). CHICKEN AND VEAL BEOTH (Bouillon de Poulet et de Yean). 

Place in a saucepan a pound and a half of broken up chicken carcasses and as much lean veal 
cut up in half inch squares; add three quarts of water, two ounces of carrots and an ounce of cut 
up turnips, both blanched in plenty of water and besides these two ounces of celery. Boil the 
whole for an hour and a half, skim off the fat, season with a little salt and strain through a fine 
sieve; serve in cups. 



284 THE EPICUREAN. 

(366). OLAM BEOTH AND PUEEE (Bouillon de Lucines Oranges et Pure"e 
Put one pint of clams into a saucepan with their own juice and a little water; cover the sauce- 
pan and set it on the fire, removing it after the first boil, then drain, and strain the liquor through 
either a fine sieve or else a napkin; serve it in cups. The clam puree to be prepared as follows: 
Pound the clams; after they are reduced to a paste, then moisten them with their own liquor, and 
as much water, and strain through a sieve. For either plain broth or puree, a little milk and 
butter may be added. 

(367). OUSTAED OEEAM OF OHIOZEN OE GAME (Oreme Bain-Marie de Volaille ou de Gibier), 

Cut either a three pound chicken, or two grouse, or two partridges into four parts, remove the 
lights and kidneys, wash well and cook them in two quarts of water seasoned with salt, a few 
parsley stalks, half an ounce of chervil, six ounces of turnips, and four ounces of minced celery; 
boil, skim, and let simmer until the chicken or game be cooked, then strain the broth through a 
napkin. With twelve raw egg-yolks mix one quart of this broth, adding a very little at the time, 
and strain through a sieve; fill up some small cups to an eighth of an inch from the top; place these 
cups in a low saucepan with boiling water sufficient to reach to half their heighth, then set them on 
the fire and as soon as the water is ready to boil, push the saucepan into the oven; when firm to 
the touch, remove them, and serve them either hot or cold as required. 

(368). PLAIN EXTEAOT OF BEEF (Extrait de Bo3uf Simple). 

Chop up very fine one pound of lean beef, put it into a saucepan and dilute it gradually with 
three pints of cold bouillon (No. 187); set it on a slow fire, and stir until it comes to a boil, then 
place it on the back of the stove where it will not boil, leave it there for half an hour, and strain it 
through a fine sieve or napkin. 

(369). EXTEAOT OF BEEF, CLAEIFLED (Extrait de Boeuf Clarine"), 

Remove the fat and nerves from five pounds of lean beef, either from the leg or rump, chop it 
up very fine and divide it equally into three empty and well washed champagne bottles, adding to 
each bottle, one gill of broth or water, or not any should a more concentrated extract be desired; 
cork and tie them well. Place these bottles in a high bain-marie, wrapping each bottle up in a cloth, 
and fill to five-sixths of their heighth with water; boil continually for two hours, and leave the 
bottles in the water one half hour after removing the saucepan from the fire, then uncork carefully. 
Fold two sheets of filtering paper together, lay them in a glass funnel and set these over high gallon 
glass jars, pour the liquid slowly through the paper and when all is strained, fill a well washed 
and clean champagne bottle with it; cork it up, letting the liquid reach nearly as far up as the 
cork, and put it on ice to keep. 

(370). FISH BEOTH "WITH OLAMS (Bouillon de Poisson aux Lucines Oranges). 
Heat two ounces of butter in a saucepan, add to it two ounces of minced onions, an ounce of 
carrots, two ounces of turnips and two leeks. Fry colorless, then put in two pounds of the heads 
and bones of fish and moisten it to its height with water, adding an ounce of celery, one tomato, 
a little thyme, bay leaf, parsley and salt. Cover and cook for twenty-five minutes, then strain 
through a sieve, return it once more to the saucepan adding a quart of clams and their juice; 
boil, strain again through a fine sieve, taste and serve in cups. 

(371). FEOG BEOTH AND PUEEE (Bouillon de GrenouiUes et Pure~e de Grenouilles). 

Mince half a pound of celery, carrots, turnips, and leeks; fry them without letting them 
acquire a color in two ounces of butter, then moisten with two quarts of chicken broth or water, 
and add a pound of frog's legs and hind parts, half an ounce of chervil, and two ounces of lettuce, 
both cut very fine. Boil all slowly for three quarters of an hour, season with a little salt and sugar, 
then strain through a napkin and serve in cups. 

For the Puree, pound the frog meat and add to it four ounces of bread-crumbs soaked in 
milk and then squeezed out. When all is well pounded, dilute with the same quantity of broth 
as above, and strain through a tammy; a little butter and milk may be added to advantage; this 
pure'e should be served in a clear state in cups. 



SOUP'S. 285 

(372). HERB BROTH (Bouillon aux Herbes). 

Four ounces of lettuce, one ounce of chervil, one and a half ounces of sorrel, all well washed, 
and cut up fine. Put these into a saucepan on the fire, with a little butter, stirring occasionally; 
when lightly cooked moisten with two quarts of white chicken broth (No. 188), or its equal volume 
of water. Let cook for fifteen minutes, adding one and a half ounces of butter and a little salt. 
Serve this in cups, either plain or with sippets of toasted bread or else with rice, semolina, etc. 

(373), CHICKEN AND CALF'S FOOT JELLY (Gel&de Volaille et de Piedsde Vean). 

Bone six calves' feet, blanch, and refresh them in cold water; put them in a saucepan with six 
pounds of round bottom of veal, four large fowls, afu<i removing the breasts, two knuckles of 
veal and sixteen quarts of water. Boil, then skim, and season with salt and pepper, adding a 
bunch of parsley, garnished with thyme, bay leaf, and two cloves of garlic, a little celery, three 
onions, one having two cloves in it, four carrots, and eight leeks; boil constantly until perfectly 
cooked from six to eight hours, and test the jelly to see whether it be firm enough, by putting a 
little on a plate on ice; if too gelatinous, then add a little water. Strain through a fine 
sieve, and remove the fat. 

For Clarification. Chop fine the chicken breasts, mix in with eight egg-whites, diluted with 
a little white broth, or half a bottleful of white wine; mix in the jelly gradually with the eggs, 
and put it back on the fire, stirring it constantly with a whisk, and when on the point of boiling 
remove it from the range, and strain through a flannel bag, restraining until it flows clear. 

(374), MEAT AND CALF'S FOOT JELLY (Gele"e de Viandes et de Pieds de Veau). 
Bone eight calves' feet, blanch, cool, and put them into a saucepan with six pounds of rcund 
bottom or shoulder of veal, six pounds of legs of beef, two veal knuckles and sixteen quarts of 
water. Boil, skim and add salt, whole pepper, a bunch of parsley, garnished with thyme, garlic, 
bay leaf and celery, three onions, one with four cloves in it, some medium carrots and eight leeks. 
Boil unceasingly until the meats are well done, (from six to eight hours), then strain through a 
sieve and skim off the fat. Set a little of it on some ice to see whether it is sufficiently gelatinous, 
and if too consistent add a little veal broth, then proceed to clarify the jelly as follows: Chop up 
very fine two pounds of lean veal, mixing with it half a pint of egg-white, diluted with half a bottle 
of white wine or a little water, and mix the jelly stock gradually with this meat, put it back on the 
fire, stir continually with a whip and when ready to boil, remove and add half a bottleful of 
Madeira wine, pour the jelly into a flannel jelly bag, restraining it until it be perfectly clear. 

For calves' foot jelly and Madeira wine (gelee depieds de veau au tnadlre) see No. 104. 

(375). MUTTON BROTH (Bouillon de Mouton), 

Cut into pieces four pounds of very fresh neck of mutton free of fat; put these into a saucepan. 
Prepare two ounces of carrots, four ounces of turnips, two ounces of celery, four ounces of leeks, a 
few sprigs of parsley, and a little thyme; fry colorless, the turnips, celery, carrots, and leeks in a 
quarter of a pound of butter; moisten with four quarts of water or stock, season well and let boil 
slowly during one hour and a half; remove all the fat from the surface, strain it through a napkin 
and serve it in cups. Another way is to wash in cold water three pounds of very fresh neck of 
mutton, cut into pieces; put this into a saucepan with two and a half quarts of water, boil, 
skim, then add three quarters of a pound of minced turnips, a few parsley stalks, and a few thyme 
leaves, seasoning with salt. Boil slowly for two hours, remove all the fat. strain it through a 
fine sieve and serve. Some pearl barley cooked separately in water or broth may be added to 
either. If the broth needs to be clarified, then chop up half a pound of lean mutton and mix in with 
it one raw egg; dilute with a little broth or water, and put it into the mutton broth, stir it up 
quickly, and place the whole on the fire so that it barely simmers, and when clear, strain through 
a napkin. 

(376). MULLED EGG AND ALMOND MILK THICKENED WITH RICE FLOUR (Lait de Poule et 

Lait d'Amandes, Lie a la Farine de riz). 

Break two very fresh eggs into a bowl, dilute them gradually with two gills of boiling water, 
adding some powdered sugar and a little orange flower-water; mix thoroughly and drink very 
hot. 



286 THE EPICUREAN 

Tliickened Almond Milk. A quarter of a pound of peeled fresn almonds and four bitter ones; 
pound them in a mortar, adding gradually half a pint of water, sugar, and one pint of milk. Press 
this well through a napkin, warm it up without boiling and thicken it with half an ounce of rice- 
flour diluted with half a pint of cold water; return it to the fire and remove at the first boil. 

(377). BEEF JUICE (Jus de Bceuf). 

In order to obtain a pint of beef juice it will take about five pounds of meat free irom all fat 
and nerves; cut it into about five-eighth of an inch thick slices; broil them nicely, not too rare or 
too well done, and after taking them from the broiler, cut them up into five-eighth inch squares, 
and press them well in the press shown in Fig. 70, to extract all their juice; when it is all well 
pressed out, strain it through a fine sieve or napkin, remove all the fat from the surface and serve 
in small cups. 

(378). PUREE OE BARLEY WITH CHICKEN BEOTH (Puree d'Orge au Bouillon de Volatile). 

Soak two ounces of pearl or other barley in cold water for twelve hours; wash it, then lay it in 
a saucepan and cover it well with four quarts of chicken bouillon (No. 188); boil and add 
more as the broth diminishes, boil until the barley bursts; continue to cook until the broth is 
thickened by the soluble parts of the barley, it takes about three hours to cook the barley; then 
strain forcibly and serve. A little butter and milk may be added if desired; serve in cups. 

(379). PUREE OF OHIOKEU, PARTRIDGE, GROUSE OR ROEBUCK (Puree de Poulet, Perdreau, 

Terras ou Chevreuil). 

Raise the fillets from a roast chicken or from either two partridges or two grouse, or else one 
pound of the saddle of roasted venison, pound them, add four ounces of bread-crumbs, previously 
soaked in chicken or game broth and squeezed thoroughly, pound again and dilute this puree with 
simply lightly salted chicken or game broth, free of any spices, aromaties or vegetables. Strain 
through a sieve and warm it up without boiling, adding two ounces of butter, stirring it in well; 
moisten with either chicken or game broth, letting it remain sufficiently liquid so as to be easily 
drank from cups. 

(380). PUREE OF OATMEAL OR VHEATEN GRITS (PurSe d'Avenas ou deBia 
Put four quarts of water or broth into a saucepan, let boil, and dredge in a shower while 
stirring one pound either of oatmeal or wheaten grits; let cook for thirty minutes, pass it through 
a tammy, and add either more water or some broth, so as to obtain a clear puree fit to be drank 
easily from a cup, without using a spoon; a little salt and butter may be added. 

(381). SABAYON OF CHICKEN OR GAME (Sabayon deVolaitle ou de Gibier). 

Put eight egg-yolks into a high and narrow bain-marie; dilute them with one pint of chicken 
or game broth, and place the bain-marie saucepan on a slow fire or in boiling water, then stir well 
with a whip or wooden beater until the sabayon becomes thick and frothy; as soon as it is done 
serve it very hot in cups. A little sherry added to the broth is considered an improvement by 
some. 

(382). BEEF, MUTTON, CHICKEN, OR VEAL TEA (The de Bojuf, Mouton, Poulet ou Veaul 

Two pounds of lean meat free from nerves and skin, either beef, mutton, chicken, or veal, 
taken from the thighs or any other juicy parts. Cut the meat into small quarter of inch squares, 
set them in a saucepan and pour over three pints of cold water, with a little salt added. Boil, 
skim, and keep near boiling point for one hour, then strain through a sieve or napkin and serve in 
cups. Another way is to fill up champagne bottles with the meat, put half a gill of water in each, 
tie down the cork with a string or wire, boil for three hours, uncork and pass through a napkin. 

(383). VEAL BROTH, REFRESHING (Bouillon de Veau Raftaichissant). 

Mince up four ounces of carrots, four ounces of turnips, four leeks, and two celery roots; fry 
them in two ounces of butter, letting them attain a light color, then add ten pounds of split knuckle 
of veal, and moisten it all with water until well covered, then boil and skim; add salt and let boil 
continually for two hours. Chop very fine two pounds of bottom round of veal, free of fat, sinews 



SOUPS. 287 

and skin; to this add one whole egg diluted with a little water or cold broth, pour it gradually 
into the veal broth and clarify it by beating with a whip; return to the fire to boil slowly and con- 
tinuously for three-quarters of an hour, adding one ounce of chervil, two ounces of lettuce, and 
two ounces of wild chiccory, all well washed and cut up fine. Boil again for twenty or thirty 
minutes, then strain either through a fine sieve or napkin. 

(384). WHEAT, OATS, OE BAELEY BEOTE (Bouillon de B16, d'Avoine ou d'Orge), 
Wash half a pound of either of these in several waters, then leave to soak for twelve hours; 
parboil them in plenty of water, and afterward cook them slowly in white chicken bouillon 
Wo. 188). When done and the grain crushes easily between the fingers, strain and press it well to 
extract all the insides. Half a pound of wheat should produce two quarts of liquid. To be 
served in cups. 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 



SA.TJOES. 



STOCKS, ESSENCES, AND AUXILIAKIES, 



(385). DUXELLE, OK COOKED PINE HEKBS (Duxelle ou Pines Herbes Chutes). 
Put four ounces of scraped fat pork and butter into a saucepan, and when well melted 
add to it six ounces of either chopped or one-eighth of inch pieces of shallot, a clove of crushed and 
chopped garlic, let these ingredients fry without coloring, adding half a pound of raw, finely 
chopped mushrooms; set it on the fire, and reduce while stirring continuously until the moisture 
from the mushrooms be entirely evaporated, then add an ounce of chopped parsley washed and 
pressed out; an ounce of chopped truffles may be added, but this is optional. If it needs to be 
thickened add to it half a pint of demi-glaze sauce (No. 413), and reduce until it acquires a 
consistency. 

(386). ESSENCES AND FUMET (Essences et Fumet). 

A sauce is thick, essence is not. Essence is an extract from the most nutritious parts of 
meat. Fumet, or flavor, is a steam which rises from certain cooked or raw meats, imparting a 
most agreeable smell and taste, it is the same preparation as essences, but less watery and reduced 
with Madeira. 

(387). CHICKEN ESSENCE (Essence de Volaille). 

Fry one pound of sliced kernel of veal and a pound and a half of broken chicken bones in some 
butter without coloring them, adding two minced shallots, half a pound of minced carrots, and 
four ounces of onions. Moisten with one quart of white chicken bouillon (No. 188) and reduce to 
glaze; moisten again and reduce once more, then add a bunch of parsley garnished with two bay 
leaves and as much thyme, four cloves and half a bottleful of white wine; boil, skim, and cook 
slowly for half an hour, then strain through a napkin or silk sieve. 

(388). PISH ESSENCE (Essence de Poisson). 

Cut in slices two pounds of bass, porgies or any other bony, and very frest fish; put them 
into a saucepan and season with salt, whole peppers and half a pint of white wine. Fry lightly in 
butter without attaining a color, three ounces of minced onions, three ounces of carrots, a bunch of 
parsley garnished with two bay leaves and the same of thyme, two cloves and two shallots; add all 
these to the fish with one quart of water, and cook slowly for forty minutes, then strain through a 
fine sieve. 

(389). GAME ESSENCE (Essence de Gibier). 

Have two pounds of young rabbit and the same quantity of raw pheasant, and put them into 
a saucepan with two chopped shallots, two ounces of mushrooms and two ounces of carrots, the 
mushrooms and carrots being either cut in quarter inch squares or minced; a bunch of parsley 
garnished with thyme and bay leaf, a clove of garlic and six cloves. Moisten with one quart of 
veal blond (No. 423), and half a bottle of white wine, also a quart and a half of broth; boil all 
slowly, skim and let simmer for one hour, then strain the essence through a silk sieve. 

(390). HAM ESSENCE (Essence de Jambon). 

Fry in butter and color lightly, one pound of sliced, smoked or unsmoked ham, add to it two 
ounces of minced onions, and four ounces of carrots, a bunch of parsley garnished with the same 
quantity of bay leaf as thyme, and moisten with half a pint of white wine; reduce this in a cov- 
ered saucepan, moisten again with one quart of veal blond (No. 423), and let boil and simmer 
for forty minutes, then skim and strain through a napkin or fine silk sieve. 



290 THE EPICUREAN. 

(391). HOT ASPIO ESSENCE, CLEAR AND THICKENED (Essence d'Aspic Ohaude Claire et lifie) 
Put into a saucepan, half a gill of vinegar, a few bits of tarragon, a bunch of parsley, a quarter 
of a pound of minced ham and a coffeespoonful of mignonette, a little mace; let all simmer for 
fifteen minutes, then moisten with half a pint of veal blond (No. 423), and a pint and a half of 
consomme (No. 189); reduce it all to half, strain it through a sieve and clarify with one egg- 
white; press the aspic through a napkin and use it for roast poultry. 

Thickened Aspic. Before clarifying, add its equal quantity of espagnole, and reduce it to the 
consistency of a sauce, despumate the surface and strain through a tammy. 

(392). MUSHROOM ESSENCE (Essence de Champignons). 

Put one pound of mushrooms previously washed and cut in four into a saucepan with the 
juice of half a lemon, salt, and a pint of broth; let boil together for ten minutes; cover the sauce- 
pan hermetically and let stand till cold; strain through a fine sieve. 

(393). ROOT ESSENCE (Essence de Racines). 

Have half a pound each of vegetables such as carrots, onions, turnips, parsnips, parsley root and 
celery; wash them well, and mince them up very fine, then fry them lightly in three ounces of 
butter and moisten with a quart and a half of water and half a bottle of white wine; let cook 
slowly for one hour, remove all the fat and scum, then strain through a napkin or silk sieve. 

(394). ESSENCE OP TAME OR WILD DUCKS (Essence de Canards Domestiqnes ou Sauvages). 

This is made with the fragments of six roasted duck bones, broken up and put into a 
saucepan with one pint of mirepoix stock, one quart of veal blond (No. 423), a bunch of parsley 
garnished with bay leaf and thyme, mignonette and nutmeg. Let simmer for one hour, then 
add the juice of an orange and a lemon, also their peels; strain through a napkin or a silk sieve. 

(395). TRUPFLE ESSENCE (Essence de Truffes). 

Brush and peel two pounds of fresh truffles; put them into a saucepan with half a bottle of 
Madeira wine and a pint of broth (No. 187), add two ounces of celery, as much carrots and as 
much onions, all minced up very fine, a bunch of parsley, thyme, bay leaf, salt and ground pepper. 
Cover the saucepan and allow the truffles to boil slowly for twenty minutes. Then let them get 
cold in their broth, keeping the cover hermetically closed. Strain through a napkin or fine sieve. 

(396). RAW FINE HERBS (Fines Herbes Crues). 

Composed of parsley, chervil, tarragon, fennel, chives and pimpernel, picked, washed, thor- 
oughly drained and each one chopped up separately; onions and shallots cut in very small dice or 
else chopped are considered the same as fine herbs. (The parsley, onions and shallot may be 
blanched by tying them in a small muslin bag, and plunging into boiling water, then refreshing 
them several times, afterward extracting all the water they contain.) 

(397). FUMET OF PARTRIDGE OR OTHER GAME (Fumet de Perdreaux ou d'autres Gibiers), 

Cut four ounces of onions into slices, put them into a well buttered saucepan with four ounces 
of sliced carrots, and lay on top eight ounces of sliced ham, four ounces of mushroom parings, two 
pounds of young rabbit and two pounds of partridge, add a pint of white wine and reduce to a 
glaze; moisten with a quart of broth (No. 187), cover the saucepan, and let boil and reduce on a 
brisk fire, moderating the heat when the liquid is reduced to three-quarters, then continue reducing 
until it has fallen again to a glaze. Add four quarts of game broth (No. 195), a tablespoonful of 
allspice (whole), a bunch of parsley garnished with celery, bay leaf, and thyme, and let cook for an 
hour and a half. Strain this through a napkin, put it back on the fire to clarify with two 
partridge breasts and one pound of lean veal, both well chopped; dilute it with half a bottle of 
white wine, stir well, and take it off the fire at the first boil; as soon as the fumet is very clear, 
strain it through a napkin. 

(398). CHICKEN OR GAME GLAZE (Glace de Volaille ou de Gibier). 

To the chicken stock, set apart to prepare a glaze, some good veal stock (No. 423) maybe added, 
operating the same fora game stock, to which put in parts of both veal and chicken; the process 
is always the same; it is especially during the shooting season that excellent game glaze can be 



SAUCES. 291 

prepared with all the smaller parts and bones of large game. Prepare an ordinary broth, obtaining 
it as clear as possible, strain, skim off the fat and let it deposit its sediment. Collect all the good 
meat from the large game, such as thighs, shoulders or breasts of hare or deer, also from old 
partridges, and the pinions and giblets from the pheasants or partridges. Make a mirepoix of 
roots, and minced onions, put with it all the above meats, also a piece of the shoulder, breast of veal; 
their white fragments, or those of chickens, and fry them for a few minutes; moisten them moder- 
ately with some broth (No. 187), and let this fall to a glaze, then moisten again abundantly with 
the prepared game broth, adding a few boned and parboiled calves' feet; as soon as the meat 
is done, drain well; strain and skim the liquid; let it settle so as to be able to pour off the clear top 
and reduce this once more. 

(399). FISH GLAZE (Glace de Poisson). 

Put into a saucepan six pounds of bass, four of soles, and two of codfish; moisten with fourteen 
quarts of water and one quart of white wine; boil, skim, and season with salt, cloves, whole all- 
spice, two cloves of garlic, half a pound of onions, and a bunch of parsley garnished with two bay 
leaves and as much thyme. Let simmer for one hour, then strain through a napkin, and redue 
to a quarter of its quantity, then set it away in a bowl to get cold; turn it out, and cut off the top, 
leaving the sediment at the bottom, then put it back on the fire, and reduce to the consistency 
of a thick syrup. 

(400). OLEAE HALF GLAZE (Demi-Glace Claire). 

This demi-glaze must not be confused with demi-glaze sauce. The demi-glaze is not a sauce 
but simply good, clarified gelatinous gravy reduced to half the consistency of a glaze; which 
means only slightly thickened; it must be bright, clear, and succulent. Before taking it from the 
fire mix in with it a spoonful of Madeira wine for each two quarts of liquid. 

(401). MEAT GLAZE, CLEAE (Glace de Viande Claire), 

Have a stockpot sufficiently large to contain four pounds of knuckle of veal, eight pounds of 
shoulder of veal, six pounds of shin or leg of beef, and add to these sixteen quarts of water and 
a very little salt; boil, skim, and garnish with a pound and a half of onions, one of them contain- 
ing four cloves, two pounds of carrots cut in quarters, a bunch of eight medium sized leeks, with a 
few branches of celery, and a bouquet made of two ounces of parsley leaves, three bay leaves and 
as much thyme; bring to a boil, skim as fast as the fat and white particles rise to the surface, and 
boil in this manner for eight hours, then strain it through a sieve, and reduce down to two quarts. 
Put this into a tin can having a tube half an inch in diameter, a quarter of its height from the 
bottom, and plugged with a tight cork; cork well and tie it firmly down, then put it on to boil in 
water for one hour, remove it from the water, and keep it in a warm place for three days to settle, 
then take out the top, then the lower cork, and receive the glaze as it falls in an earthern vessel. 
This glaze should be very clear; suppress the bottom, and use it in sauces etc., or else add it to the 
Spanish sauce stocks. 

(402). MEAT GLAZE, PLAIN (Glace de Viande Simple). 

To Prepare Meat Glaze. In the every day work of a kitchen, the meat glaze is always prepared 
either with the superfluous stocks or remoistening broths; it is a very easy matter to accomplish 
this. Skim off the fat from all surplus stocks, and then strain them; should they be troubled, 
clarify with a little lean beef operating the sauce as for consomme. After the liquid is once 
strained, set it into one or several saucepans, pouring it off steadily from the sediment, and reduce 
the liquid quickly, while stirring it in the saucepan with a ladle, until it becomes slightly thick; 
now pour it into a smaller saucepan, and leave it to boil on one side of the fire, while skimming, 
until the glaze is quite thick, then pour it into cans and let it get cold in a cool place to use when 
needed. 

(403). EOOT GLAZE iGlace de Eacines). 

Put into a saucepan two pounds of carrots cut in big squares, as many onions, one pound of 
celery roots, and three pounds of turnips; season with a little salt, four cloves, one teaspoon ful of 
whole allspice, and moisten with twelve quarts of water, adding four pounds of split knuckle of 
veal, and two pounds of the kernel, also a bunch of parsley, garnished with thyme and bay leaf; 
let cook slowly for four hours, then strain the whole through a fine sieve; return it to the fire, des- 
pumate well all the white and fat particles from the surface; let it continue to boil till the consist- 
ency of a thick syrup is obtained, then put it away to use when needed. 



292 THE EPICUREAN. 

(404), OLEAE GEAVY (Jus Glair). 

Butter the interior of a saucepan, cover the bottom with slices of onions, and lay on top some 
slices of unsmoked ham, add six pounds of split knuckle of veal, four pounds of beef and its bones, 
two pounds of parings of a roasted leg of mutton, with its bones broken, and four pounds of 
roasted chicken carcasses. Moisten with one quart of broth (No. 421), set it on the range, cover, 
and reduce on a moderate fire until the gravy becomes perfectly clear and falls to a glaze, 
remoisten with eight quarts of remoistening (No. 189), so that all the ingredients are covered, then 
boil, skim and season with salt, whole peppers, a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf and as 
much thyme, a clove of garlic and four cloves, let the whole cook for four hours, then strain 
through a fine sieve, skim off the fat and reduce to half, and then clarify it with one pound each 
of veal and beef chopped up together. After the gravy is clear, strain it through a napkin and it 
is now ready for use. 

A gravy may be made by remoistening espagnole sauce stock (No. 421), and adding to it some 
roast beef bones, chicken carcasses, etc. 

(405). THICK GEAVY (Jus Lie"). 

Cut into square pieces, six pounds of a shoulder of veal, put them into a saucepan with half a 
pound of melted lard to fry on a moderate fire, turning over repeatedly with a spoon; a quarter of 
an hour later put in one pound of cut up carrots and four ounces of onions; continue to fry the 
meats from twelve to fifteen minutes longer. Now moisten them with the value of one pint of 
remoistening (No. 189), cover the saucepan and let the liquid reduce until it has fallen to a glaze 
without allowing it to burn; moisten the meats again with eight quarts of hot broth and half a 
bottleful of white wine; skim the liquid at the first boil, then remove it to the side of the range 
and throw in a ham bone, a partly roasted chicken weighing four pounds, also a few chicken 
giblets, add a few whole spices and a bunch of parsley garnished with aromatic herbs. When the 
meats are about three-quarters done, skim the fat from the gravy and thicken with flour dissolved 
in cold water, two tablespoonfuls for each quart of liquid; continue to boil while skimming off 
more fat, and half an hour after, pour it through a sieve into another saucepan, let it come to a 
boil, then set it on one side of the fire to despumate for twenty-five minutes, stirring in at 
intervals a few spoonfuls of broth. Skim, remove the fat once more, and strain the gravy into a 
vessel leaving it to get cold, while stirring it from time to time. 

(406). MATIGNON (Matignon). 

Cut half a pound of carrots, half a pound of onions, half a pound of celery root and two 
ounces of parsley root into either three-sixteenth inch squares or small Julienne; fry them lightly 
without coloring in half a pound of chopped up fat pork, and add to them half a pound of ham cut 
either in squares or Julienne shape, also a quarter of a pound of mushrooms, a few branches of 
parsley (about half an ounce), two bay leaves, as much thyme and a teaspoonful of mignonette; 
moisten with a pint of white wine and a pint of veal blond (No. 423); boil and reduce the moisture 
to a glaze. 

(407). ALLEMANDE SAUCE (Sauce Allemande). 

Allemande sauce is made by reducing some veloute (No. 415), incorporating a little good raw 
cream slowly into it. When the sauce is succulent and creamy thicken it with a thickening of 
several raw egg-yolks, then boil the sauce for one minute to cook the eggs, pressing against the 
bottom of the pan with a spatula, strain it through a tammy into a vessel. Stir it from time to 
time until cold. 

(408). ALLEMANDE SAUCE WITH MUSHEOOM ESSENCE (Sauce Allemande a 1'Essence de Cham- 
pignons). 

After the veloute" (No. 415) sauce is reduced in a flat saucepan with a fifth part of mushroom 
essence (No. 392), thicken with twelve egg-yolks, some nutmeg and two ounces of butter, incor- 
porate slowly a part of the sauce into the thickening, then pour the whole into the sauce, adding 
the juice of one lemon. Set the saucepan on the fire, stir at the bottom Avith a spatula, boil the 
sauce for one minute, then strain through a tammy; pour it in a high saucepan and set it in a 
bain-marie, and cover it with a little white stock (No. 422) to prevent the surface from drying or 
set it away in a vessel for further use. 



SAUCES. 293 

(409), BECHAMEL SAUCE (Sauce BfohameU 

This is made by preparing a roux of butter and flour, and letting it cook for a few minutes 
while stirring, not allowing it to color in the slightest; remove it to a slower fire and leave it to 
continue cooking for a quarter of an hour, then dilute it gradually with half boiled milk, and half 
veal blond (No. 423). Stir the liquid on the fire until it boils, then mingle in with it a mirepoix of 
roots and onions (No. 419), fried separately in butter, some mushroom peelings and a bunch of 
parsley; set it on a slower fire and let cook for twenty-five minutes without ceasing to stir so as 
to avoid its adhering to the bottom; it must be rather more consistent than light. Strain it through 
a fine sieve then through a tammy into a vessel, and allow it to cooi off while continuing to stir; 
set it aside for further use. 

(410) CHICKEN BECHAMEL (Bechamel de Volaille), 

Lift the breasts from two chickens, bone the rest of them and cut the meats into three-eighth 
inch squares; cut up also one pound of lean veal the same size. Put half a pound of butter into a 
saucepan with four ounces of onions cut into three-sixteenth inch squares; fry slowly without letting 
them attain a color, then add the chicken and veal, and when all are well fried, throw in half a 
pound of flour; stir well and let the flour cook for a few minutes, then moisten with four quarts 
of chicken bouillon (No. 188); season with salt, mignonette, a bunch of parsley garnished with two 
bay leaves and as much thyme, then let boil and simmer for one hour and a half, skim oft the fat 
and scum carefully. Strain the bechamel through a fine sieve and then a tammy, and, to reduce it, 
add one quart of cream, and when the sauce covers the spoon, pass again through the tammy 
into a vessel; stir from time to time until it gets cold. 

(411). LEAN BECHAMEL WITH CREAM (Bechamel Maigre a la Oreme). 
Put ten ounces of butter in a saucepan with half a pound of onions cut in three-sixteenth 
inch squares, half a pound of carrots cut in quarter inch squares and a quarter of a pound of celery 
root cut the same; fry the whole on a slow fire, adding a quarter of a pound of flour. Let cook for 
a few minutes, then moisten with two quarts of boiled milk; stir with a spatula until boiling point; 
add a bunch of parsley garnished with two bay leaves and as much thyme, season with salt and 
whole peppers, and let cook slowly for one hour, then skim off the fat and reduce the sauce by 
adding to it gradually one pint of cream ; strain the whole into a high saucepan through a tammy 
(No. 159) and keep warm in a bain-marie, setting a few pats of fresh butter on top. 

(412). BECHAMEL WITH MUSHROOM ESSENCE (Bechamel a 1'Essence de Champignons). 

Put a quarter of a pound of butter into a saucepan, add to it two ounces of onions cut in three, 
sixteenth inch squares, a quarter of a pound of lean veal cut in three-eighth inch squares, two 
ounces of carrots cut in one-quarter inch squares and two ounces of unsmoked ham cut in one- 
quarter inch squares, also a bunch of parsley garnished with two bay leaves and as much thyme, 
and let these fry on a moderate fire; drain off the butter, and add four quarts of veloute (No. 415), 
seasoning with salt, pepper and grated nutmeg, then cook the whole for one hour, afterward straining 
it through a tammy, and reduce it with one quart of essence of mushrooms (No. 392). Strain il 
again through the tammy and just when ready to use, incorporate into it half a pound of fine, 
fresh butter. 

(413). HALF-GLAZE SAUCE, CLEAR AND THICKENED (Sauce demi-glace Claire et lie"e). 

A half glaze sauce only differs from an espagnole by its lightness. This sauce is generally 
made in large quantities at the time, so as not to begin it so frequently, as it requires the utmost 
care in its preparation. Heat in a saucepan one pound of clarified butter, and when it is very hot 
fill it up with flour so as to obtain a paste rather too light than otherwise; thicken it well while 
stirring for a few minutes on the fire, and then set it aside in a warm part to cook and brown very 
slowly, without adhering to the bottom of the pan, and without letting it get black. Five or six 
hours after, pour it into a vessel, cover it with paper, and let this roux stand to get cool. 

To make the Sauce : dilute the roux very slowly, with some beef stock (No. 194a), having it only 
slightly warm, and prepared for this purpose, and finish it exactly like the espagnole; it must be as 
clear as possible and of a light color; strain and skim it well. Stir the liquid over the fire to thicken 
the sauce, managing not to have any lumps in it, and should it not be perfectly smooth, then strain 
it through a fine colander Put four ounces of butter in a saucepan, add to it four ounces each of 



294 THE EPICUREAN. 

sliced carrots, onions and celery root; the same quantity of lean ham cut in quarter inch squares, 
a bunch of parsley garnished with bay leaves, thyme and allspice, fry without coloring, pour the 
sauce over the whore, add four gills of good white, dry wine, and a quarter of a pound of mushroom 
parings, and let all boil while stirring, then remove it at once to the side of the range, and continue 
boiling on one side only, so as to be able to despumate it properly for several hours. Strain and 
put as much of this as is needed into a reducing saucepan with two gills of meat glaze (No. 401); 
boil, reduce it to the necessary degree, using a spatula to stir it from the bottom, without leaving 
it for one instant, incorporate slowly into it a little good veal blond (No. 423) and a small quantity 
of good white wine. When the sauce is succulent without being too thick, strain it through a 
tammy and pour it into a vessel, or else into a saucepan to keep warm in a bain-marie. 

Clear Half -Glaze Thickened. Have a quart of well-reduced clear gravy (No. 404); put it on 
the fire to boil, add six tablespoonfuls and skim it carefully, adding two tablespoonfuls of fecula, 
arrowroot, or cornstarch, diluted in a little cold water, pouring it slowly into the stock while stir- 
ring it with a whip; boil again, skim and strain through a fine sieve; set it in a bain-marie and 
cover the top with some Madeira wine. 

(414). BROWN, ESPAGNOLE OE SPANISH SAUCE (Sauce Brune Espagnole). 

Espagnole or Spanish sauce is a leading sauce from which many smaller ones are made. 
To obtain a good espagnole, it is necessary to have good stock (No. 421); in case there be no stock 
specially prepared for this purpose, use good clear broth. For four quarts of stock, melt in a 
saucepan one pound of butter, stir into it the same weight of very dry, good flour, so as to obtain 
a clear paste; then let it cook for four or five minutes on the fire, without ceasing to stir, and after- 
ward set it back on to a very slow fire, or in a slack oven, to let it get a good dark brown color, 
being careful to move it about often. When the roux is cooked, take it from the oven and dilute 
with the prepared stock, not having it too hot, and stir the liquid again over the fire to bring it to 
a boil. Should the sauce not be sufficiently smooth should any lumps appear in it, then strain it 
through a fine sieve, and put it back into the saucepan; and at the first boil, set it on one side so 
that it only boils partially, and let it despumate in this way for two or three hours. Skim off well 
the fat, and strain the broth into a vessel to let get cold, meanwhile stirring frequently. 

(415). VELOUTE SAUCE (Sauce Velout^e). 

The veloute like the espagnole is also a leading sauce used for making secondary sauces. Melt 
three-fourths of a pound of butter in a small saucepan; stir into it three-fourths of a pound of 
good flour, and let the roux cook for a few minutes, then set the saucepan on a slower fire with- 
out letting it color; in order to obtain a well thickened sauce, the flour must be well cooked. 
When the roux is sufficiently done dilute it gradually with four quarts of good stock (No. 423). 
In case there be no special stock prepared for this sauce then use some good clear chicken stock 
(No. 195). Stir the liquid over the fire until it comes to a boil, then move it aside to let it cook on 
one side only; despumate the sauce for one hour, skimming off all the white particles arising to the 
surface; remove all the fat, and strain the veloute through a sieve into a vessel and let it get cool 
while lifting off the scum that forms on the top. 

(416) VELOUTE AND BROWN, ESPAGNOLE OR SPANISH SAUCE FOR LEAN (Sauce Veloutee 

et Espagnole en Maigre). 

The lean veloute or the lean Spanish sauce are made the same way as the fat (Nos. 414and415j, 
or using fish stock (No. 417); for lean veloute the stock must be reduced to a glaze without coloring. 

(417). HSH STOCK TOR LEAN ESPAGNOLE AND VELOUTE SAUCE (Fond de Poisson pour 
Sauce Espagnole et Sauce Veloute"e en Maigre). 

Butter the bottom of a sixteen-quart thick bottomed saucepan, and cover it with a layer of 
sliced onions, and on top of these four pounds of bony fish or else fish bones cut into pieces; 
moisten with one pint of water and set it on a brisk fire, covering the saucepan, and let it reduce 
to a glaze. Moisten again with one pint of white wine and four quarts of boiling water; skim off 
the fat and add a bunch of parsley garnished with two bay leaves, as much thyme, and half a 
pound of minced carrots and four ounces of celery, two cloves of garlic, and then let cook slowly 
for two hours; strain the whole through a fine sieve and use this stock for diluting the roux. 



SAUCES. 295 

(418). BEAISE STOCK POE BEAISING MEATS (Pond de Braise), 

Cover the bottom of a saucepan with bardes of fat pork, one pound of minced onions, one 
pound of minced carrots, and on top place either a leg of mutton, a piece of poultry, a tenderloin 
of beef or a kernel of veal. Moisten to the height of the meat with some beef stock (No. 194), add a 
bunch of parsley containing a bay leaf and as much thyme, a clove of garlic and two cloves; season 
with salt and whole peppers, and after it has cooked, strain it through a fine sieve, and return the 
stock to the braised meats to simmer until it is reduced to half. This braise may be replaced by a 
mirepoix stock for braising meats. 

(419). MIEEPOIX STOCK AND DEY MIEEPOIX (Fond de Mirepoix et Mirepoix Seche). 

This is the essence of meats and vegetables. Put into a saucepan half a pound of chopped fat 
pork, fry it until melted, and then add half a pound of butter, one pound of lean veal cut in three-eighths 
of an inch squares, and one pound of unsmoked ham, also a pound of carrots and six ounces of onions 
cut in quarter inch squares, and a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf and as much 
thyme, some basil, a clove of garlic, two cloves, and mace. Add to this a few mushroom parings, 
season with a little salt and mignonette, and when all the ingredients are well fried and of a fine 
golden color, moisten them with three quarts of remoistening (No. 189), and one pint of white 
wine, and a pint of Madeira wine; boil the whole slowly for two hours, then strain it forcibly 
through a tammy (No. 159) without removing the fat. Mirepoix is used for moistening meats, 
fishes, etc. 

Dry Mirepoix is made of minced, raw vegetables, and roots which are fried in lard and 
moistened with some good stock and white wine, and allowed to reduce to dryness. It is employed 
to cover the breasts of fowl, game, and also meats that are to be roasted on the spit. 

(420). POELEE STOCK POE COOKING FOWL OE WHITE GAME MEAT (Fond de Poele pour 

Cuire la Volatile et le Gibier Blanc). 

Poeler. Consists in cooking fowls or white game meat, the breasts of which are covered with slices 
of peeled lemon, then barded and cooked in a rich stock having it reach to half their heighth. To 
make the stock cut up one pound of fat pork, and half a pound of unsmoked ham into quarter inch 
squares; one pound of carrots and as many onions, both minced, a garnished bouquet of bay leaf 
and as much thyme, fry the whole lightly in half a pound of butter, adding a bunch of basil 
garnished with two cloves, mace, and a clove of garlic; moisten all with two quarts of veal blond 
(No. 423), add salt, ground pepper. 

(421). BEOWN, ESPAGNOLE OE SPANISH SAUCE STOCK (Fond pour Sauce Brune Espagnole). 

Butter the bottom of a thick bottomed saucepan and garnish it with slices of onions, placing on 
top half a pound of ham, some slices or parings of fat pork, twelve pounds of knuckle of veal, 
shoulder, and trimmings, six pounds of beef or parings, and moisten with one quart of beef stock 
(No. 194a); leave the saucepan on the fire until the broth is half reduced, then cover the saucepan 
and moderate the fire, continue to boil till all the moisture is reduced and falls to a glaze, 
which is easily perceived as the grease then becomes clear; moisten it once more with eighteen 
quarts of beef stock; boil, skim off the fat, and add a bunch of parsley, garnished with two bay 
leaves and as much thyme, basil, celery, and two cloves of garlic, also one pound of carrots cut 
lengthwise in four, salt, ground pepper, and a little sugar. Cook all together for six hours, skim 
off the fat and strain through a sieve to keep for further use. This stock is used for moistening 
brown roux. 

(422). VELOUTE STOCK (Fond pour Veloute"). 

Butter the bottom of a sixteen quart saucepan, having a thick bottom, cover it with sliced 
onions and on top of these lay four pounds of knuckle of veal and shoulder, half of each, four 
pounds of fowl without the breast, and moisten with one pint of remoistening (No. 189), put it on 
a brisk fire and cover the saucepan, as soon as the liquid is reduced to half, moderate the fire 
and let the sauce fall slowly to a glaze without browning, then moisten with six quarts more of 
white broth, skim off the fat and scum and season with salt, crushed whole peppers and a little 
sugar, add a bunch of parsley and celery green, garnished with two bay leaves and as much 
thyme, also half an ounce of basil, besides four ounces of mushroom parings or stalks and half a 
pound of minced carrots, then let cook for six hours, remove all the fat, add from time to time 
a little remoir,tening (No. 189), salt it to taste and strain through a sieve or a napkin. Use 
when needed. 



296 THE EPICUREAN. 

(423). VEAL BLOND STOCK (fond de Blond de Veau). 

Butter the bottom of a saucepan capable of containing sixteen quarts; set in four sliced onions, 
and on top of these four pounds of split knuckle of veal and four pounds of shoulder of veal, two 
fowls, after removing the breasts, and moisten all with one quart of beef stock (No. 194a). Place 
the saucepan on a brisk ftre, keeping the lid on, and reduce the moisture by moderating the heat of 
the fire, and letting the liquid fall slowly to a glaze; now moisten again with six quarts more of 
beef stock, season with salt and whole peppers, and add four leeks, two carrots, cut in pieces, a 
bunch of parsley, some celery, one bay leaf and as much thyme. Cook all slowly for six hours, 
then skim off the fat and strain through a fine sieve. Chop up the breasts taken from the two 
fowls with the same quantity of lean beef, and mix this in a little cold water, and with this meat 
clarify the veal blond the same as consomme; then strain it through a napkin. 

Veal blond should be clear, succulent and of a nice color, the grease should be thoroughly 
removed from it; added to clear soups it greatly improves them; it is also used in reducing 
sauces. 



HOT SAUCES, 



(424), AFKICAN SAUCE (Sauce a I'Africaine). 

Put two ounces of butter into a sautoire and when hot add two ounces of chopped up onions 
and fry without coloring; moisten with a pint of broth and a pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414), 
add a small bunch of parsley garnished with half a bay leaf and as much thyme. Bring the 
whole to a boil, skim, remove the fat and let cook for half an hour; strain through a tammy and 
incorporate slowly into the sauce, two ounces of butter, a pinch of cayenne and the juice of a 
lemon, also a gill of Madeira wine and two ounces of exceedingly fine cut up truffles. 

(425). ALLEMANDE WITH EED WINE AND PKUITS (Allemande au Vin Kouge et aux Fruits). 
Cook six ounces of dry black cherries or prunes, cut in four, in two gills of red wine and as 
much water, add a bit of cinnamon stick, three cloves, and the peel from one lemon: let simmer for 
twenty minutes on a slow fire, then drain and add to the juice the same quantity of espagnole (No. 
414) as there is sauce; reduce, skim, and after the liquid is well reduced, take out the lemon 
peel, cinnamon, and cloves, then put the cherries back into the sauce and serve. Cherries and 
prunes may both be used together, half of each. 

(426). AMEEICAN SAUCE (Sauce Amencaine). 

Split open the bodies of two cooked lobsters, take out all the creamy parts, rub them through 
a sieve, and keep them aside for further use. "Wipe well the shells, break them into pieces and chop 
them up coarsely on the table with the thick end of a knife. Fry in some oil, carrots, celery, pars- 
ley, shallots, and minced onions, add to these the chopped shells and let cook all together until 
their moisture is reduced, then moisten slightly above their height with white wine and mirepoix 
(No. 419); let this liquid boil up for two minutes, then move it on a more moderate fire, and add 
some thyme, bay leaf, and basil. Let the whole cook from twenty to twenty-five minutes, then 
strain it forcibly through a sieve into a bowl, and leave it to settle for a quarter of an hour, 
afterward removing all the fat, pour off the top gently into a sautoire, pressing it through a fine 
sieve, and let it reduce to a half-glaze. Mix in with it about a third of its quantity of tomato 
sauce, reduce it once more without ceasing to stir until it becomes short and succulent, by mixing 
in three or four spoonfuls of sherry wine. Strain it now into another saucepan, work in the 
butter, and finish with a dash of cayenne pepper, and two spoonfuls of the creamy part from the 
bodies already strained. This sauce should be served as quickly as it is made; in any way it must 
be kept stirred until the very last moment. 

(427). ANCHOVY SAUCES (Sauce aux Anchois). 

Anchovy Fat Sauce. Set into a saucepan half a pint of brown poivrade sauce (No. 522); the 
same quantity of espagnole (No. 414), and half a pint of veal blond (No. 423). Allow the liquid 
to boil up while stirring continuously, then despumate; just when ready to serve incorporate in two 
ounces of anchovy butter (No. 569). 



SAUCES. 297 

For Lean Anchovy Sauce. Clean twelve anchovies, by removing their skin and tails; wash and 
pound in a mortar; to this pulp add double their quantity of butter, rub through a fine sieve, and 
incorporate two ounces of this butter into one quart of white sauce (No. 562); season, and add a 
little lemon juice and nutmeg, then strain the whole through a tammy. The anchovy butter can 
be replaced by essence of anchovies, already prepared in bottles; in this case incorporate in just 
when prepared to serve, two ounces of fresh butter. 

(428). APPLE SAUOES (Sauce aux Pommes). 

Hot with Butter and Gravy. Peel a pound of sour apples, cut them in quarter inch thick 
slices, and remove the cores. Put a quarter of a pound of butter into a sauteing pan and when 
hot, throw in the apples and let them fry on both sides until they are a fine color, then moisten 
with four gills of veal blond (No. 423), and two ounces of brown sugar (or cayenne pepper) if 
preferred, and a little grated nutmeg, press the apples through a sieve and serve hot. 

For Hot or Cold. Peel and core one pound of sour apples, put them into a saucepan with a 
pint of water and when done, drain and pass them through a sieve; now add sugar, nutmeg, and 
an ounce of butter and serve the sauce hot; for the cold suppress the butter. 

(429). ARGENTINE SAUCE (Sauce Argentine). 

Put into a sautoir, four tablespoonfuls of oil; set it on the fire and when hot, add two ounces 
of chopped onions, and a finely shreded green pepper, a crushed and chopped clove of garlic, a bunch 
of parsley garnished with a bay leaf, and as much thyme; fry the whole without attaining color; 
then drain off the oil and moisten with one gill of white wine, and two gills of tomato puree 
(No. 730); season, and add a pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414), and three tablespoonfuls of meat 
glaze; boil the whole, skim carefully, and reduce to a proper consistency; pass through a tammy 
and serve. 

(430). AUROEA SAUCE, PAT AND LEAN (Sauce a 1'Aurore, en Gras et en Maigre). 

For Fat. Put into a saucepan half a pint of veloute (No. 415), with essence of mushrooms 
(No. 392), and half a pint of veal blond (No. 423); reduce to half, strain through a tammy, heat 
it up once more and when ready to serve incorporate two ounces of crawfish butter (No. 573) into 
the sauce. 

For Lean. Have in a saucepan one quart of bechamel sauce (No. 409); pound four hard 
boiled egg-yolks with four ounces of lobster butter (No. 580); press through a fine sieve, mix the 
two together adding the juice of a lemon, strain through a tammy and serve hot. 

(431). BAENAVE SAUCE (Sauce & la Barnave). 

Put four ounces of butter into a saucepan and when hot add a quarter of a pound of red 
carrots blanched and the same quantity of onions, both cut into three-sixteenth inch pieces. First fry 
the onions, then add the carrots and fry together a little, add a garnished bunch, of parsley with 
thyme, a clove of garlic, a pound of game carcasses and when a good color add half a bottle of red 
wine and a pint of broth. Let all cook for three-quarters of an hour, skim it carefully, strain the 
sauce through a tammy or sieve, dilute it again with another pint of broth and throw in an ounce 
of very fresh bread raspings, an ounce of butter and the juice of one orange. 

(432). BAVAEOISE SAUCE (Sauce Bavaroise). 

Reduce to half its volume one gill of vinegar; take it from the fire and let get cold, then 
add one gill of bechamel (No. 409), four raw egg-yolks and four ounces of butter divided into 
small pats, a gill of water, salt and nutmeg. Stir the preparation over a moderate fire until it 
thickens, then incorporate into it three ounces of butter, a small bit at a time, working it in well 
with a whip so as to have it light, add to finish, three ounces of crawfish butter (No. 573) and 
a tablespoonful of grated horseradish. 

(433). BEAENAISE SAUCE, HOT MAYONNAISE, AND WITH TOMATOES (Sauces B^arnaise, 

Mayonnaise Ohaude et aux Tomates). 

Put into a saucepan one gill of vinegar with two ounces of chopped shallots, also a few tarragon 
leaves; cover the saucepan with its lid, and reduce the liquid almost completely, then take it from 
off the fire. Let the vinegar get slightly cold, and afterward mix in with it four raw egg-yolks, 



298 THE EPICUREAN. 

season with salt and mignonette, and return it to a slow fire, and then incorporate into it slowly 
three ounces of clarified butter, stirring it continually in the meanwhile with a small whip; now 
strain it through a tammy; whip it well, and mix in with it a coffeespoonful of chopped tarragon, 
and the same quantity of chopped parsley. This sauce should have the consistency of a mayon- 
naise, and can also be made the same as the above, with half butter and half oil. 

Hot Mayonnaise. Is made the same as a bearnaise, only using oil and suppressing the 
tarragon. 

Hot Mayonnaise with Tomatoes. Pour one quart of hot mayonnaise in a deep saucepan, set it 
either on a slow fire or in a bain-marie, and when it begins to curdle, take it off and beat it up 
quickly, adding a little cold water; continue the beating process until perfectly smooth, then heat it 
again stirring vigorously without allowing it to boil, and finish by adding eight tablespoonfuls of 
well reduced tomato puree (No. 730), four tablespoonfuls of melted meat glaze (No. 401), and some 
lemon juice. Strain through a fine sieve, then mix in a teaspoonf ul of chopped parsley and a little 
cold water. 

(434). BEKCHOUX SAUCE (Sauce a la Berchoux). 

Put into a sautoire one pint of milk and let boil, then add two ounces of fresh bread-crumbs; 
season with salt, nutmeg, and red pepper and moisten with the quarter of a bottleful of champagne. 
Now pound a pinch of tarragon with two pinches of chervil, and a quarter of a clove of garlic; when 
it becomes a pulp add four ounces of fresh butter and a little spinach green to color. Incor- 
porate this butter into the sauce, strain through a fine tammy; if the sauce should be too 
thick add a little cream. 

(435). BIGAEADE SAUCE (Sauce & la Bigarade). 

A bigarade orange is a sour orange before it changes to an orange color; peel it without touch- 
ing the white parts, usinga peeling knife (Fig. 156), cut the peel up into small fine Julienne, plunge 
it into boiling water, and cook it until it is tender; drain and enclose it in a covered saucepan with 
four gills of espagnole (No. 414) or veloute (No. 415) if needed for a white sauce. Just when 
ready to serve, finish the sauce with a dash of cayenne pepper, meat glaze, the orange juice and the 
juice of a lemon; strained through a tammy, adding two ounces of fine butter. The bigarade 
can be replaced by an orange and a lemon, using the peel and juice of both fruits. 

(436). BOEDELAISE SAUCE, WITH MAREOW AND MAITEE D'HOTEL WITH MAEEOW 
(Sauce Bordelaise, a la Moelle et Maitre d'Hotel a la Moelle). 

Bordelaise Sauce. Put into a saucepan half a bottleful of Bordeaux wine, adding a small 
garnished bouquet containing a little garlic, half a bay leaf, and two cloves; a quarter of a 
pound of the peelings and stalks of some chopped mushrooms, one tablespoonful of blanched 
shallots lightly fried in three spoonfuls of oil, one pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414), half a pint of 
veal blond (No. 423), and season with salt, mignonette and cayenne, boil, skim off the fat and then 
pour in half a bottleful of white wine, and when the sauce is reduced, strain it through a tammy 
and stir in a teaspoonf ul of chopped parsley; a pound of beef marrow cut in either squares or 
slices may be added to the bordelaise just when ready to serve. A simpler way is to brown some 
minced shallots in oil with a clove of crushed garlic, adding red wine and gravy, then reduce it to 
half, pour in the espagnole, boil, skim off the fat and serve. 

Bordelaise Sauce with Marrow. Fry minced shallots in oil with a clove of garlic (crushed); 
moisten with red wine and reduced gravy, add some espagnole; boil and despumate, then put in 
squares of beef marrow or else have them cut in slices and plunged into boiling water and drained; 
add only when ready to serve. 

Maitre d'Hotel with Marrow. Have some maitre d'hotel butter (No. 581), slightly melted, 
into which add four ounces of shallots for each pound of butter, the shallots being cut into one- 
eighth inch squares, eight tablespoonfuls of meat glaze or chicken glaze, and add just when ready 
to serve, slices of marrow previously thrown into boiling water and drained. 

(437). BOUEGUIGNOTTE SAUCE-LEAN (Sauce a la Bourguignotte-Maigre). 
Cut a pound of eels into slices being careful that they are very fresh; put these into a saucepan 
with two quarts of water, two ounces of minced onions and two ounces of mushroom parings, a 
bunch of parsley garnished with bay leaf and as much thyme, two minced shallots, pepper and all- 



SAUCES. 299 

spice. Set the saucepan on the fire, let it come to a boil, and continue the boiling for twenty 
minutes, then strain the liquid and reduce it, adding one pint of lean espagnole sauce (No. 416), 
and a little lean broth (No. 417); let boil once again, despumate it, pour in a quarter of a bottleful 
of good white wine; boil and despumate again for half an hour, then add another quarter of a bottle 
of white wine, making half a bottleful in all; Volnay wine is excellent for this sauce. After it is 
reduced to a proper consistency, and just when ready to serve, incorporate into it a quarter of a 
pound of crawfish butter (No. 573). 

(438). BREAD SAUCES, AMERICAN, ENGLISH, TRENCH, REGLAIN AND GERMAN PRIED 
(Sauces au Pain, Ameiicaine, Anglaise, Franpaise, Reglain et Frite a rAllemande). 

American. Put into a saucepan one ounce of butter with one ounce of finely chopped 
onions, fry them lightly without coloring and moisten with a pint of boiling milk, add two ounces 
of bread-crumbs, salt, cayenne pepper and cloves, and just when ready to serve, add a little cream 
to finish. This sauce should be consistent and hot without boiling. 

English is made exactly the same, only replacing the fried onions by a raw onion cut in 
four, and whole peppers instead of the cayenne. 

French. Chop up a shallot and a quarter of a clove of garlic, putting them in a 
saucepan with two gills of white wine; let simmer and reduce, adding two tablespoonfuls of very 
fine bread-crumbs, a little fresh butter, a dash of mignonette and grated nutmeg and two gills of 
broth, let reduce to half, then squeeze in some lemon juice and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley. 

A la Reglain. Set four gills of milk into a saucepan, adding two ounces of bread-crumbs 
and one shallot cut in small eighth inch squares, a whole clove of garlic, and let heat without boil- 
ing for a few minutes, seasoning with salt, a little cayenne and nutmeg, two ounces of butter, a 
teaspoonful of raw fine herbs, one gill of white wine and the juice of an orange. 

Fried German. Melt and heat gradually half a pound of butter so as to obtain a hazel-nut 
butter, incorporate into it three ounces of white bread-crumbs, cook it over a slow fire for a few 
minutes without ceasing to stir, salt it lightly and take off the fire to pour into a hot sauce boat. 

(439). BRETONNE SAUCE (Sauce a la Bretonne). 

Mince up four ounces of onions, fry them in two ounces of clarified butter, and when fried 
without attaining a coior, drain them and moisten with one gill of veal blond (No. 423); reduce 
and let fall to a glaze. Add one gill of veloute (No. 415) if for white, and espagnole (No. 414) if 
for brown; season with salt and pepper, and meat glaze; strain it forcibly through a sieve, and 
incorporate into the sauce just when ready to serve, half an ounce of fresh butter. For a lean, 
sauce, moisten with some fish stock (No. 417), and lean veloute or espagnole (No. 416) and fish 
glaze (No. 399). 

(440). BUTTER SAUCE (Sauce au Beurre). 

Put into a saucepan, two heaping tablespoonfuls of flour, dilute it with half a pint of cold water, 
add some salt and whole peppers, one clove, grated nutmeg, and half an ounce of butter. Set it 
on the fire, and stir well until it boils; then allow it to cook slowly for fifteen minutes; remove it 
from the fire, and incorporate into it by degrees, one pound of fresh butter, and the juice of two 
lemons. If the sauce should become too thick, add a little more water, then strain it through a 
tammy. With this sauce a quantity of other sauces may be made such as caper, egg, oyster, horse- 
radish, etc. 

(441). CAPER SAUCE (Sauce aux Capres). 

Set into a saucepan two ounces of butter, mix it with one and a half ounces of flour; beat the 
flour and butter well together with a spoon, so as to obtain a smooth paste; now moisten it with 
two gills of water, add a pinch of salt, stir the liquid on the fire until the sauce becomes thick. 
At the first boil, remove it to the side of the range. It should be somewhat more consistent than 
thin. Incorporate into it gradually, two ounces of butter divided into small pats, the sauce should 
now be creamy; remove it and finish by adding some small nonpareil capers, arid the juice of a 
lemon; then serve. 

(442). CARDINAL SAUCE, FAT AND LEAN (Sauce Cardinal en Gras et en Maigre). 
For Fat. Reduce one pint of veloute (No. 415). with two gills of mushroom essence (No. 392), 
or else veal blond (No. 423), season with salt, pepper, and nutmeg; add a tablespoonful of meat, 
ctrcken, or game glaze (No. 401), two ounces of fresh butter, and the juice of one lemon. Serve 
in a sauce-boat, and dredge over the top chopped-up lobster coral. 



300 THE EPICUREAN. 

For Lean. Soak six carp milts in cold water, cook them for ten minutes in white broth (No. 
195) with the juice of one lemon, salt, and half an ounce of fine butter, then drain; put into a 
saucepan six tablespoonfuls of thick bechamel (No. 409), add to it a gill of cream; boil, season 
with salt and cayenne pepper, and beat in one ounce of fresh butter, strain through a tammy, add 
the milts, and heat them up rolling them in the sauce. Serve in a sauce-boat, dredging the top 
with some very finely chopped lobster coral. 

(443). OASTILLANE SAUCE (Sauce a la Oastillane). 

Pour into a saucepan six gills of espagnole sauce (No. 414) and two gills of veal blond (No. 
423), reduce it to a third, then add a tablespoonful of powdered sweet Spanish peppers, a very 
finely shreded green pepper, and a quarter of a pound of raw lean ham cut into small three- 
sixteenth inch squares, boil all slowly, despumate the sauce, and just when ready to serve squeeze 
in the juice of a lemon. 

(444). CELERY SAUCE (Sauce au Oeleri). 

Have half a pound of white celery stalks cut in quarter inch pieces, put them in boiling and 
salted water for five minutes, drain and place them in a saucepan with a pint of white stock (No. 
422). then reduce it to half, adding a pint of well-reduced veloute (No. 415), and just when ready 
to serve, incorporate into it two ounces of fine butter and half a gill of fresh cream, seasoning 
with salt, nutmeg and red pepper. 

(445). CHAMPAGNE SAUCE, ALSO WITH OHABLIS, RHINE WINE, SAUTERNE OR GRAVE- 
WINE (Sauce au Champagne, Chablis, Vin du Rhin, Sauterne ou Grave). 

The sauces may be made white or brown for a base; for white, using veloute (No. 415), for 
the brown, having a brown espagnole (No. 414). Reduce one quart of espagnole with half a pint of 
mushroom essence (No. 392), or the liquor in which they have been cooked, also a pint of mirepoix 
stock (No. 419), add a pint of champagne or any other wine and reduce once more until the 
sauce be sufficiently consistent. If made with veloute" thicken it with egg-yolks, cream and small 
pats of butter. 

(446). CHATEAUBRIAND SAUCE (Sauce Chateaubriand). 

Put into a saucepan one pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414), with two tablespoonfuls of meat 
glaze (No. 401), one pint of veal blond (No. 423), and reduce it all to half, then strain through a 
tammy, and just when ready to serve, stir in half a pound of fine butter, the strained juice of a 
lemon and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley. To make it with tarragon put into a saucepan two 
gills of dry white wine with some chopped shallots and mushroom peelings, and reduce it all to 
half. Mix in with it six tablespoonfuls of meat glaze (No. 401), and finish with three gills of 
reduced veloute (No. 415), let it boil for two minutes, then strain; at the last moment mingle in 
with it three ounces of butter in small pats, working it in well with a small tinned wire whisk; add 
the strained juice of a lemon and a few finely shreded tarragon leaves. 

(447). CHERRY SAUCE (Sauce aux Cerises). 

Lay in a saucepan, half a pound of currant jelly with six cloves, a small stick of cinnamon, 
two orange peels, one ounce of meat glaze. (No. 401), half a pint of veal blond (No. 423), one pint 
of espagnole sauce (No. 414), one gill of Burgundy, and four ounces of dried and pounded cherries, 
let all boil together for a few minutes, then add the strained juice of two oranges, mix all together 
well, and serve. 

Another way is to have a quarter of a pound of dried black cherries with their pits; soften 
them in cold water, and pound them in a mortar with three gills of red wine; pour the prepara- 
tion into an untinned copper vessel, add a small stick of cinnamon, and two cloves, also a piece 
of lemon peel; let the liquid boil for two minutes, then thicken it with a teaspoonful of fecula 
diluted with a little cold water; remove it to the side of the fire, cover, and keep it warm without 
boiling for fifteen minutes, then strain through a sieve and serve. 

(448). CHERVIL OR PARSLEY PLUOHE SAUCE (Sauce a la Pluche de Cerfeuil ou de Persil), 

A pluche is the leaves of either parsley or chervil blanched and combined with a sauce or soup. 
Reduce one pint of veloute" (No. 415) with two gills of white wine; season with salt, pepper, 
nutmeg and the juice of a lemon, and just when serving incorporate into it four ounces of fresh 
butter. Should the sauce be too thick add a little broth (No. 187), and then put in a heavy 
pinch of blanched chervil or parsley leaves. 



SAUCES. 301 

(449). OHIVEY SAUCE (Sauce a la CbJvry). 

Blanch in a red copper untinned vessel a handful of herbs composed of parsley leaves a third; 
chervil a third; pimpernel a sixth, and tarragon a sixth; drain them and extract well all their 
moisture, then put them into a mortar with a pinch of chives, pound them finely, adding a piece 
of butter, and after removing the preparation from the mortar rub it through a sieve, and add to 
it three gills of reduced veloute (No. 415) and a pinch of cayenne pepper. Color the sauce with 
a little spinach green or green vegetal coloring. 

(450). CLEKMONT SAUCE (Sauce a la Clermont). 

Cut six medium onions in two; then remove the stalk and root from both ends giving a sharp 
slanting blow with the knife, so when they are removed the onions easily fall apart; then mince 
them up finely. Put four ounces of butter into a saucepan on the fire, and when it is hot, add the 
onions, and fry them slowly so that they become a nice golden color, then drain off the butter, 
and finish cooking with a quart of remoistening (No. 189); season with salt, pepper, and sugar, 
and when the onions are well done, and the stock reduced to half, add to it a pint of espagnole 
sauce (No. 414) with two tablespoonfuls of meat glaze (No. 401); season nicely and serve. 

(451). OOLBEET, ENGLISH AND TAEEAGON SAUCES (Sauce a la Colbert, a 1'Anglaise et a 

1'Estragon). 

Colbert. Boil up one gill of meat glaze (No. 401) in a saucepan, remove it from the fire, and 
then incorporate into it four ounces of fresh butter, working them well together with an egg-whisk, 
until the butter is thoroughly melted; then add the juice of two lemons, some grated nutmeg, 
and two tablespoonfuls of good sherry wine; strain through a tammy, add a teaspoonful of 
chopped parsley, and serve. 

English. Put a saucepan on the fire, containing two tablespoonfuls of Worcestershire 
sauce, and two of mushroom catsup, the same quantity of melted meat glaze (No. 401); take 
it off when it bubbles, then work slowly into it two ounces of anchovy butter, the juice of one 
lemon, and a little grated nutmeg; strain through a tammy and serve. 

With Tarragon or Chervil. Pour a gill of melted meat glaze (No. 401) into a saucepan; at the 
first boil take it off the fire, and whip in with it a quarter of a pound of butter divided into small 
pats; finish the sauce with the juice of two lemons, and half a spoonful of tarragon leaves, or else 
a spoonful of chervil leaves, one or the other finely cut up. 

(452). CEAB SAUCE (Sauce aux Orabes). 

Have a pint of white sauce (No. 562), in a saucepan, add to it a pinch of cayenne pepper and 
the same quantity of ground mace, also two ounces of crab meat cut in dice, or if possible some 
oyster crabs blanched in their own oyster juice, and drained. 

(453). OEAWPISH SAUCE (Sauce aux Ecrevisses). 

Fry in two ounces of butter, one ounce of carrots, one ounce of celery root, one ounce of onions, 
and one ounce of shallot, a few parsley leaves, thyme, one bay leaf, and one clove of garlic. 
Moisten with half a bottleful of white wine, and let the whole cook for ten minutes, adding to it 
twenty-four well washed crawfish, a little salt and mignonette. Cook all together for five minutes, 
while tossing them up frequently, then take out the crawfish and let the stock settle; pour off 
gently the top, straining it through a very fine sieve; then reduce it to half and add a pint of veloute 
sauce (No. 415) and half a pint of white wine, and reduce it once more. Shell the crawfish, take 
the meat from the tails and lay them on one side; pound the remainder with five ounces of butter, 
heat it, and then pass it through a sieve into a bowl filled with ice water; lift up the butter, wipe 
it, and incorporate this butter into the sauce; color it with orchanet or else vegetable carmine, and 
strain it through a sieve. Add the crawfish meat cut in small dice to the sauce, and serve at once. 

(454). CEEAM SAUCE (Sauce a la Crime), 

Put into a small saucepan, one pint of bechamel (No. 409), reduce it with two gills of cream; 
when ready, incorporate into it a quarter of a pound of fresh butter; season with salt and a dash 
of cayenne pepper. 



302 THE EPICUREAN. 

(455), CUEEANT SAUCE, WITH EED WINE, POET WINE, CALIFORNIA WINE, WHITE WINE 
AND WHITE CUEEANTS (Sauce Groseilles au vin de Bordeaux, au viu de Porto, au vin 
de Californie, au vin Blanc et aux Groseilles Blanches). 

Plain currant jelly without being heated may be served with canvasback duck and saddle of 
venison. But if some people prefer sauce, the following will be found good: 

Currant Sauce with Red Bordeaux Wine. Put half a bottle of Bordeaux wine into a saucepan 
on the fire, and when the wine begins to simmer take it off, and put into it, to infuse, ten cloves, the 
peel of a lemon and a bit of cinnamon; leave them in for twenty minutes, and then add to it half a 
pound of currant jelly and two ounces of sugar, more or less, according to taste; dissolve and mix 
well, and when thoroughly melted, strain the sauce through a sieve and serve it hot. 

Currant Sauce with Port Wine. Put half a pound of currant jelly in a saucepan on the fire, 
dilute it with half a bottleful of port wine and one pint of brown espagnole sauce (No. 414), and 
when well dissolved strain through a sieve and serve hot. 

Currant Sauce with California Wine. Melt half a pound of currant jelly with half a pint 
of red California wine, and when well dissolved strain it through a tammy and serve hot. 

Currant Sauce with White Wine. Made with half a pound of currant jelly, a pinch of 
cinnamon, the same of ground cloves, half a bottle of white wine, and a pint of veloute (No. 
415), besides the pulp of one lemon; strain through a sieve and serve hot. 

White Currant Sauce. Blanch and strain a pint of picked white currants, mix in with them 
half a pound of apple with orange jelly, the juice of two lemons and half a pint of veloute (No. 
415). Dissolve with half a pint of white wine; strain through a tammy and serve hot. 

(456). CUEEY SAUCES, INDIAN AND WITH APPLES (Sauces au Kari, k ITndienne et aux 

Pommes). 

Curry. Brown in some butter four ounces of minced onions, adding to it one teaspoonful of 
curry; two minutes later moisten with two gills of veloute (No. 415), two ounces of mushroom 
peelings, and a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf. Reduce the sauce, and pour into it 
slowly about two gills of chicken broth (No. 188), and at the very last moment two spoonfuls of 
good raw cream. Pass the sauce through a tammy, and incorporate into it a piece of fresh butter, 
then heat it up without boiling. 

Curry, Indian. Put into a saucepan four ounces of ham, two ounces of onions, two ounces 
of mushrooms, all minced up very fine, a bunch of parsley garnished with as much bayleaf as thyme, 
one onion with three cloves in it, one teaspoonful of ground sweet Spanish pepper, a dash of 
cayenne pepper, a dessertspoonful of curry, a pinch of mace and one quart of chicken broth 
(No. 188). Let simmer and reduce to half ; add one quart of allemande sauce (No. 407), and a 
pinch of saffron, pass it through a tammy and just when ready to serve incorporate into it two 
ounces of fresh butter. 

Curry with Apples. Put four ounces of butter into a saucepan, adding to it four ounces of 
apples, four ounces of onions, two ounces of ham, all finely shreded, a pinch of mace, a teaspoonful 
of pepper-corns, a bay leaf and as much thyme. Set the saucepan on a moderate fire, and let all 
fry till the onions begin to brown, being careful to stir it constantly, and add a tablespoonful of 
curry, the same of vinegar, a teaspoonful of sugar, one quart of veloute (No. 415), two gills of veal 
blond (No. 423) and one teaspoonful of meat glaze (No. 401). Pass all through a tammy and 
add two gills of cream. 

(457). DANISH SAUCE (Sauce a la Danoise). 

Put two ounces of butter in a saucepan, with four ounces of thinly sliced ham, and when 
lightly fried and a fine color, drain off the butter; detach the glaze with a gill of broth, add a 
clove of garlic, a bay leaf, as much thyme and a pint of espagnole (No. 414); cook slowly, despu- 
mate, season well, and pass the sauce through either a sieve or a tammy. Cut four ounces of 
chicken fillets, eight of mushrooms, and four of ham, into three-sixteenth inch squares; put them 
into the sauce with a small teaspoonful of chopped parsley. 

(458). D'ANTIN SAUCE (Sauce a la d'Antin), 

Put into a saucepan two ounces of butter, add two ounces of onions cut in one-eighth inch 
squares, and fry them without letting them attain color; moisten with one pint of espagnole (No. 
414), one gill of Madeira, and one gill of tomato puree (No. 730); add half an ounce of chopped 



SAUCES. 303 

truffles, two ounces of mushrooms cut in eighth of an inch squares, a teaspoonful of chopped 
parsley, and a small pinch of tarragon leaves; and also one coffeespoonful of chopped 
chives. 

(459). DEVILED SAUCE (Sauce k la Diable). 

Lay in a saucepan three tablespoonf uls of vinegar, two ounces of one-eighth inch squares of 
shallot, a few parsley leaves, one bay leaf, as much thyme, and a clove of garlic crushed and 
chopped; let the whole boil for a few minutes, then add a pint of espagnole (No. 414), a pinch of 
mignonette, a very little cayenne pepper, a gill of red wine, and two tablespoonfuls of diluted 
mustard, also two tablespoonfuls of tomato sauce. 

(460). DIANA SAUCE (Sauce & la Diane). 

Into a saucepan put a quarter of a pound of butter; when hot add to it one medium onion, two 
shallots, one ounce of celery, all cut up very finely, and a bay leaf, and when these ingredients are 
well fried, add to them one pound of raw game carcass, and let the whole color nicely, adding three 
tablespoonfuls of flour, to make a roux, brown it slightly and then moisten with one pint of veloute" 
stock (No. 422) and a pint of cream. Let the sauce cook and despumate for half an hour, seasoning 
it with salt, pepper, and nutmeg; then strain it through a sieve, and afterward through a tammy, 
return it to the saucepan, and reduce it properly, incorporating into it two ounces of butter. 

(461). DUXELLE SAUCE WITH COOKED PINE HERBS AND TRUFFLES (Sauce & la Duxelle 

aux Fines Herbes Guiles et aux TruffesX 

Set into a saucepan two ounces of grated salt pork, and two ounces of butter, six shallots cut 
in squares; one clove of crushed and chopped garlic; when all these are fried without coloring add 
one quarter of a pound of chopped mushrooms, a bay leaf, as much thyme and two cloves. Mois- 
ten the whole with half a pint of white wine, and the same quantity of broth, one pint of espag- 
nole (No. 414) or veloute (No. 415), if for white and let cook for fifteen minutes. Add one 
tablespoonful of chopped truffles and a half a teaspoonful of chopped parsley; take out the bayleaf , 
thyme and cloves. 

(462). EGG SAUCE, ENGLISH AND POLISH (Sauce aux ceufs, k 1'Anglaise et k la Polonaise). 

For English Egg Sauce. Put a pint of veloute (No. 415) in a saucepan with some pepper, 
nutmeg, the juice of a lemon, and four hard boiled eggs chopped up over a white cloth, and then 
added to the sauce with a tablespoonful of chopped parsley. Should the sauce be too thick dilute 
it with some mushroom broth and white broth. 

For Polish Egg Sauce. Have six small hard boiled eggs; chop up the whites and yolks separ- 
ately; put into a sufficiently large frying pan half a pound of clarified butter, let it heat until it 
becomes hazel-nut butter, then season with salt, a tablespoonful or chopped parsley, a tablespoon- 
ful of diluted mustard and the chopped eggs; mix all without boiling and pour into a sauce-boat 
to be served separately. 

(463). FENNEL SAUCE < Sauce au Fenouil). 

Put one pint of veloute (No. 415) and a spoonful of meat glaze (No. 401) into a saucepan, and 
let them come to a boil, then thicken with one egg-yolk and some fresh butter, adding the juice of 
one lemon, and a tablespoonful of very finely chopped fennel. 

(464). FINANCIERE SAUCE FOR FAT AND FOR LEAN AND WITH GAME AND CHICKEN 
(Sauce k la Financiere en gras et en Maigre et au Gibier et a la Volaille). 

Put four ounces of butter in a saucepan, add four ounces of cooked lean ham cut in three- 
sixteenth inch squares, fry without coloring and then throw in four ounces of mushrooms or their 
parings, two bay leaves, as much thyme, one ounce of truffle parings and two gills of dry Madeira 
or sherry, let simmer and reduce over a slow fire. Moisten with one pint of veal blond (No. 423), 
and one pint of espagnole (No. 414), then let boil and despumate, adding a gill more Madeira, 
and when the suce is done, strain it through a tammy. 

For Lean. Replace the ham by smoked salmon or sturgeon, the sherry by sauterne, the veal 
blond by fish stock (No. 417), and use lean espagnole, and then finish the same as for the fat. 



304 THE EPICUREAN. 

For Financiers Sauce with Game or Chicken. Infuse in a quarter of a bottleful of warm 
white wine or champagne, two ounces of mushrooms and one of truffles. Place two ounces of 
butter in a saucepan with two ounces of finely minced raw ham, and when it is fried, drain off the 
butter and moisten with one pint either of chicken or game stock (No. 195), one pint of espagnole 
(No. 414), and the infused mushrooms and truffles; season with a dash of cayenne pepper, and 
let boil, skim and reduce it to a proper degree. Strain the sauce and keep it warm in a bain marie. 

(465). HNNOISE SAUCE (Sauce & la KnnoiseX 

Put two gills of veloute (No. 415) into a saucepan with six tablespoonfuls of melted meat 
glaze (No. 401), a pinch of paprika and a pinch of sweet Spanish pepper and salt; mix all well 
together, let boil, and incorporate slowly into it six ounces of butter, working it in with a wire whisk, 
and then add a coffeespoonful of chopped up parsley just when prepared to serve. 

(466). rLAVIGNAN SAUCE (Sauce a la Plavignan), 

Pound half a pound of very fat chicken livers, two ounces of butter, one tablespoonful of 
chopped parsley and a pinch of finely cut tarragon; have three gills of port wine in a saucepan with 
one pint of espagnole (No. 414), add to it salt, pepper, coriander seeds, cinnamon and sugar, boil it 
for a few minutes, and then mix in the pounded livers, stirring them in well: boil again for a few 
n*inutes longer and strain through a tammy; finish with two ounces of butter before serving. 

(467). TEENCH SAUCE (Sauce k la Trangaise). 

Keduce one pint of bechamel (No. 409), with two gills of mushroom essence (No. 392) in a 
saucepan, season with mignonette and nutmeg and half a small clove of crushed and chopped 
garlic, as well as a tablespoonful of meat glaze. Just when ready to serve incorporate into the 
sauce four ounces of crawfish butter (No. 573), strain through a tammy, then add a teaspoonful 
of vinegar and chopped parsley. 

(468). GASCOGNE SAUCE AND WITH TOMATOES (Sauce Gascogne et aux Tomates). 

Heat one gill of oil in a saucepan with two cloves of crushed and chopped garlic; add to this 
one teaspoonful of chopped parsley, the same quantity of chives, two ounces of chopped mushrooms, 
one ounce of chopped truffles, nutmeg, and mignonette, when all these ingredients are fried without, 
coloring, add half a pint of white wine and one pint of veloute (No. 415). Boil, skim off the sur- 
face, reduce and pour in two gills of white wine; thicken with four egg-yolks diluted with half 
a gill of cream, and just when ready to serve incorporate into the sauce one ounce of anchovy 
butter (No. 569). 

Gascogne and Tomato Sauce. Add to the above sauce two gills of tomato puree (No. 730), 
previously strained through a very fine sieve. 

(469). GENEVOISE SAUCE (Sauce Genevoise). 

Place in a saucepan one pound of the head of salmon, moisten it with a bottleful of red wine, 
and a pint of fish broth or water; add four ounces of mushroom parings, a bunch of parsley gar- 
nished with bay leaf, as much thyme, and a clove of garlic, two shallots, and one minced onion, a 
teaspoonful of pepper corns, and half a teaspoonful of whole allspice; set it on the fire to boil and 
continue boiling slowly for half an hour. Strain the liquid through a fine sieve; reduce it with a 
pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414) and half a gill of Madeira wine; when the sauce is well reduced 
and despumated, work into it just when ready to serve, two ounces of anchovy butter (No. 569). 

(470). GflNOISE SAUCE (Sauce I la Genoise). 

This sauce must not be confused with genevoise. Put into a saucepan two gills of vinegar, 
and two chopped shallots, let reduce till dry, then add a pint of espagnole (No. 414) and two gills 
of chicken essence (No. 387) or else fish essence (No. 388), according if needed for fat or lean; 
one ounce of chopped gherkins, two tablespoonfuls of small nonpareil capers, half an ounce of 
Sultana raisins and half an ounce of currants, a coffeespoonful of sugar, a dash of cayenne, 
mignonette, and nutmeg; reduce the whole to a proper consistency and add one gill of tomato 
puree; boil, despumate and reduce to the consistency of a light sauce. Serve this sauce with 
roasted or broiled poultry. 



SAUCES. 305 

(471). GOOSEBERRY SAUCE (Sauce aux Groseilles Vertes a Maquereau). 

Cut off the stalks and remove the black spots from half a pound of gooseberries; blanch them 
in an untinned copper vessel for two minutes, drain and add them to a pint of Hollandaise sauce 
(No. 477) or instead of using them whole they may be rubbed through a sieve and the pulp mixed 
with the Hollandaise sauce. 

(472). GOURMETS SAUCE (Sauce des Gourmets). 

Cut four tomatoes in two across, press out the seed and put them in a saucepan with pars- 
ley, thyme, bay leaf, salt, mignonette, and one small minced onion; boil for twenty minutes, drain 
and strain through a sieve; keep the liquid; then put a pint of the pulp into a saucepan with two 
gills of meat glaze (No. 401), beat them well together with a wire whisk, and stir in a quarter of a 
pound of lobster butter, adding a tablespoonf ul of wine vinegar, one pinch of minced tarragon and 
a tablespoonful of finely chopped and blanched shallots slightly fried in butter. 

(473). GREEN SAUCE (Sauce Verte). 

Pour into a saucepan one pint of white wine; add a tablespoonful of vinegar, two well 
chopped shallots, also the quarter of one bay leaf, two stalks of chives, two sprigs of thyme, and 
four branches of chervil; reduce the whole thoroughly, and then add to it one pint of veloute" 
sauce (No. 415), a little cayenne pepper, and some spinach green; strain through a tammy, incor- 
porate a few pieces of good butter and serve. 

(474). GREEN HOLLANDAISE SAUCE (Sauce Hollandaise Verte), 

Set into a saucepan five tablespoonf uls of flour, one tablespoonful of pepper corns, some thyme 
and bay leaves. Dilute this with a pint of water and boil while stirring so as to make a thick but 
smooth paste; cook it on a very slow fire for fifteen minutes, then take it off, let it get slightly 
cold, and add ten egg-yolks, afterward the butter and water, a very little at the time; using in all 
about two pounds of fresh butter and half a pound of ravigote butter, the juice of three lemons 
or simply a spoonful of vinegar; color with spinach green, and if too thick, thin it out with water, 
then strain through a tammy and keep it in a bain-marie at a moderate heat. 

(475). GRIMOD SAUCE (Sauce a la Grimod). 

Set in a bain-marie two raw egg-yolks, the juice of one lemon, salt, pepper, nutmeg, and mi- 
gnonette, also a quarter of a pound of butter; beat the eggs and butter together over a slow fire 
using a small egg-beater; add a little cayenne pepper, a pinch of saffron leaves infused in half a 
gill of water; and when the sauce begins to get warm, strain it through a tammy, and keep it in a 
moderate temperature until needed to serve. 

(476). HAM SAUCE AND HARLEQUIN SAUCE (Sauce au Jambon et a 1'Arlequin). 

Ham Sauce. Place in a saucepan on the fire two ounces of butter, add to it two ounces of 
lean ham either scraped or finely chopped, and then fry it without letting it attain color, and 
moisten with a pint of cream ; reduce and add one pint of be'chamel (No. 409) ; boil it again and 
thicken the sauce with six raw egg-yolks and half a pint more cream; and just when ready to serve 
throw in a teaspoonful of chopped parsley. 

Harlequin Sauce. Heat three ounces of butter in a saucepan, add half a pound of raw ham 
cut in three-sixteenth inch squares; fry without coloring, drain off the butter, take out the ham 
and detach the glaze with a little broth, adding four gills of espagnole sauce (No. 414), two of 
champagne, and two of veal blond (No. 423); reduce and despumate; strain through a tammy, 
add the ham, four ounces of gherkins cut in three-sixteenth inch squares, and four ounces of egg- 
white cut the same; also four ounces of carrots cut in same size squares, blanched and cooked in 
consomme with a little sugar, four ounces of cooked truffles cut the same as the carrots, and a 
heavy pinch of blanched parsley leaves. 

(477). HOLLANDAISE SAUCE AND HOLLANDAISE MOUSSELINE SAUCE (Sauce Hollandaise et 

Sauce Hollandaise Mousseline). 

Reduce half a gill of vinegar into which a coffeespoonful of white pepper corns has been 
added; remove it from the fire, and pour in about half a gill of cold water, five egg-yolks, two 
ounces of butter, salt, and grated nutmeg; set this saucepan into a larger one containing boiling 
water, or simply on a very slow fire; stir the contents constantly with a wire-egg beater, and as 



306 THE EPICUREAN. 

soon as the sauce becomes consistent add fresh butter divided into small pats, until six ounces 
have been consumed; squeeze in the juice of one lemon, more or less, according to taste, and if the 
sauce be too thick add a little more water to it; then strain it through a tammy (No. 159), pour 
it in the vessel described in Fig. 171, put it in a bain-marie not too hot, then stir it again con- 
stantly for a few minutes and serve. 

Hollandaise Mousseline. Keduce one gill of vinegar, with a few grains of pepper; take it 
off the fire, and when the liquid is nearly cold mix in with it five egg-yolks, beating them 
well with a wire whip, then add five ounces of fresh butter, salt, and nutmeg; set the saucepan 
over a slow fire, stir the preparation rapidly until the butter is melted, then strain the sauce 
through a sieve or tammy into another saucepan; set this one into another containing boiling water 
and keep it on the side of the range, working the sauce incessantly until it is thick and frothy, 
adding little by little a quarter of a pound of butter, and one pint of well-drained whipped cream; 
it is now ready to be served. 

(478). HORSERADISH SAUCES WITH BREAD-CRUMBS, BECHAMEL OR CREAM (Sauces au 
Raifort k la mie de Pain, Bechamel ou Creme). 

The horseradish needed for making sauces should be first scraped, then grated on a coarse 
grater. For plain horseradish, white sauce (No. 562), butter (No. 440) or Hollandaise sauces (No. 
477) are used. The horseradish should never be cooked in the sauce, it must only be put in, in order 
to heat it. 

Horseradish Sauce with Bread-crumbs. Soak two ounces of bread-crumbs in hot water, then 
squeeze. Cook with broth in a saucepan for a few minutes, finishing with an ounce of butter, two 
spoonfuls of raw cream, salt, and a pinch of sugar. At the last moment add the grated horse- 
radish to the sauce. This sauce is also frequently prepared with plain veloute (No. 415), lightly 
reduced and finished with three spoonfuls of raw cream. This sauce must be passed through a 
tammy (No. 159) and then the grated horseradish added. 

Horseradish Sauce Bechamel, is made by pouring a pint of well seasoned bechamel into a 
saucepan; season with salt, cayenne, and sugar; take it off at the first boil, and add one gill of 
cream, and one ounce of fresh butter, also six ounces of grated horseradish; warm the sauce with- 
out boiling. 

Horseradish and Cream. Reduce a pint of cream to one-third, add to it salt, nutmeg, sugar 
and eight ounces of grated horseradish; warm it up and thicken with half a gill more of cream, 
two egg-yolks, and two ounces of butter. 

(479). HUNGARIAN SAUCE (Sauce a la Hongroise). 

Pour into a saucepan, the value of half a pint of tomato puree (No. 730) cooked plain, which 
means drained, but not thickened, also the same quantity of onion puree (No. 723), a gill of melted 
meat glaze (No. 401), and a pinch of paprika; let it all boil while stirring for two minutes, then 
remove it to the side of the range, and incorporate slowly into it, five ounces of butter, divided 
into small pats, without ceasing to stir. 

(480). HUNTER'S SAUCE (Sauce au Chasseur). 

Put two ounces of butter into a saucepan, with two shallots cut in one-eighth inch dice; fry 
them a light golden color, and then moisten with one pint of espagnole (No. 414), and one pint of 
game stock; season, and boil on one side only, to despumate, then add half a bottle of Bordeaux, 
one ounce of cooked lean ham cut into small three-sixteenth inch squares, and two ounces of 
mushrooms. This sauce may be thickened with two gills of liquid game blood mixed with a table- 
spoonful of good vinegar; thicken it without boiling, strain the sauce through a tammy and serve. 

(481). HUNTRESS SAUCE (Sauce k la Ohasseresse). 

Put into a saucepan on the fire, two ounces of butter with two spoonfuls of chopped onions; 
fry these for a few minutes, then add two ounces of chopped fresh mushrooms and two ounces of 
unsmoked, salted beef tongue cut into dice pieces three-sixteenths of an inch. After the humidity 
from the mushrooms has evaporated, let them fry together without coloring. Moisten with a 
quart of game stock (No. 195), and half a bottle of champagne, add a bunch of parsley garnished 
with a bay leaf and as much thyme, and then continue to boil slowly for half an hour; strain the 
sauce through a fine sieve, and thicken it with four tablespoonfuls of bread-crumbs, adding one 
ounce of butter, a teaspoonful of chopped parsley and the juice of a lemon. 



SAUCES. 307 

(482). HUSSARDE SAUCE (Sauce a la Hussarde). 

Fry in a saucepan two ounces of lean ham with two ounces of butter, adding two ounces of 
onions, two cut-up, blanched celery roots, all cut in squares, moisten with half a pint of broth (No. 
194a) and half a pint of white wine; add a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf and as 
much thyme, a clove of garlic and a pinch of tarragon; let the whole boil for half an hour, and 
then thicken it with two ounces of butter kneaded with one ounce of flour, squeeze in the juice of 
a lemon, strain the sauce through a tammy and mingle in with it two ounces of grated fresh 
horseradish. 

(483). INDIAN SAUCE (Sauce a 1'Indienne). 

Put two ounces of butter into a saucepan with two ounces of onions, two ounces of lean 
unsmoked ham, one ounce of celery and a bunch of parsley garnished with thyme and two cloves 
of garlic. Moisten with two gills of veal blond (No. 423), one quart of espagnole (No. 414) or 
veloute (No. 415) (if veloute is used thicken with four egg-yolks and half a gill of cream), add one 
tablespoonful of pepper corns, three cloves, one pinch of saffron, and one teaspoonful of curry. 
Reduce all this and then strain it through a tammy (Fig. 88), and just when ready to serve 
incorporate into it two ounces of fresh butter. 

(484). ITALIAN SAUCE (Sauce a ITtalienne). 

Place a tablespoonful of olive oil and two ounces of butter in a saucepan with two ounces of 
onions, and four shallots, all chopped up; a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf and the 
same quantity of thyme, two cloves and one clove of garlic, two ounces of ham cut in squares, fry 
all these without letting them attain color, add a quarter of a pound of chopped mushrooms; 
moisten with one gill of white wine and three gills of veal blond (No. 423), salt, red pepper and 
nutmeg to season, add a quart of espagnole (No. 414), or veloute (No. 415), skim off and reduce 
the sauce; suppress the parsley, just when ready to serve add the juice of a lemon and a teaspoonful 
of chopped parsley. For Italian sauce with truffles add two ounces of chopped truffles. 

(485). JUVI&NY SAUCE (Sauce Juvigny). 

This sauce is made by putting a teaspoonful of chives and the same quantity of parsley, both 
finely chopped, into a saucepan with two ounces of butter, set it on the fire and add to it one 
tablespoonful of shallots; fry all lightly without coloring, then put in one pint of veloute (No. 415), 
one gill of white wine, some salt, pepper, and nutmeg, let boil up for a few minutes; despumate 
well, and just when serving stir in a tablespoonful of small capers. 

(486). LAGUiPIERRE SAUCE (Sauce a la Laguipierre). 

Pour into a saucepan a quarter of a bottleful of white wine or champagne, add to it two ounces 
of chopped mushrooms, one tablespoonful of chopped and blanched shallots, half a clove of garlic, 
one bay leaf, six grains of allspice, eighteen grains of pepper, and let all these simmer together 
with two gills of veal blond (No. 423) for fifteen minutes, then add one pint of veloute (No. 415), 
and one gill of reduced mushroom essence (No. 392); thicken the sauce with four egg-yolks and 
one gill of cream, strain the whole through a tammy (No. 159), and then beat into it two ounces 
of fresh butter and the juice of one lemon. 

(487). LITHUANIAN SAUCE (Sauce a la Lithuaniemie). 

Knead together in a saucepan four ounces of butter with one and a half ounces of fresh bread- 
crumbs, add the juice of one lemon; two spoonfuls of meat glaze (No. 401), some nutmeg and 
mignonette. Set this on a moderate fire, and stir the preparation without letting it boil; just 
when ready to serve, add one tablespoonful of chopped parsley, dilute it with stock (No. 423); see 
that the sauce is not too thick. 

(488). LOBSTER SAUCE, LOBSTER SAUCE WITH MADEIRA WINE AND LOBSTER SAUCE 
WITH LOBSTER BUTTER (Sauce Homard, Sauce Homard au Vin de Madere et Sauce 
au Beurre de Homard). 
Lobster Sauce. Place a pint of veloute sauce (No. 415), in a saucepan with pepper corns, 

thyme, bay leaf and a tablespoonful of chopped and blanched onions, cook all together, then strain 

through a tammy (No. 159); just when ready to serve incorporate in a piece of lobster butter 

(No. 580), and a dash of vinegar. 



308 THE: EPICUREAN. 

Lobster Sauce with Madeira Wine. Put into a saucepan two gills of dry Madeira wine, one 
chopped shallot, a pinch of parsley leaves, mignonette and grated nutmeg, reduce with two gills of 
broth, and when well reduced add one pint of allemande sauce (No. 407) and two ounces of very 
red lobster butter (No. 580), strain through a tammy and drop in one ounce of lobster meat 
cut in three-sixteenth of an inch squares. 

Lobster Sauce with Lobster Butter. Ha\e in a saucepan half veloute sauce (No. 415) and 
half Hollandaise (No. 477), a little water, salt, mignonette and nutmeg. When the sauce is 
very hot incorporate in a piece of lobster butter and some chopped parsley. 

(489). LOMBARDS SAUCE (Sauce Lombards). 

Have in a saucepan half a bottleful of white wine, add to it two ounces of butter, one tea- 
spoonful of chopped parsley, two finely chopped and blanched shallots and a quarter of a pound of 
chopped mushrooms. Let all simmer till the liquid is reduced, then add a pint of bechamel (No. 
409), and a gill of cream, also the juice of a lemon and a pinch of mignonette. 

(490). SAUCE A LA LUCULLUS (Sauce a la Lucullus), 

Garnish the bottom of a thick bottomed buttered saucepan with four onions cut in slices, four 
ounces of sliced ham, one pound of sliced veal and half a pound of game fragments, moisten with 
one pint of veal blond (No. 423). Set this on a slow fire and let reduce to a glaze, then 
remoisten with two and a half quarts more broth, adding a bunch of parsley, as much celery, and 
two bay leaves, with an equal quantity of thyme, four cloves, two ounces of truffle parings and 
four ounces of mushrooms, let it boil until perfectly cooked, then strain through a tammy and 
reduce it to the consistency of a thick syrup, and add one quart of veloute" (No. 415) or espagnole 
(No. 414); for either one or the other have two spoonfuls of meat glaze (No. 401), then put in four 
ounces of truffles cut in balls and four ounces of channeled mushrooms; mix well with the sauce 
and serve. 

(491). LYOUNESE SAUCE WITH TARRAGON (Sauce Lyonnaise a 1'Estragon). 
Cut up eight ounces of onions into three-sixteenth inch squares; blanch, then drain and fry 
them in two gills of oil or else six ounces of butter; when nearly done, put them into a saucepan 
with one pint of veal blond (No. 423), one pint of espagnole (No. 414) or veloute" sauce (No. 415), 
and one tablespoont'ul of meat glaze (No. 401); reduce it, then add the juice of a lemon, some 
nutmeg, and mignonette. Strain the sauce through a tammy (No. 159), then incorporate into 
it four ounces of butter and a teaspoonf ul of tarragon leaves finely shredded and blanched. 

(492). MADEIRA SAUCE, OR SHERRY, MARSALA, ETC. (Sauce au vin de Madere, au Xeres, 

ou au Marsala, etc.). 

Keduce well one pint of espagnole (No. 414), adding slowly to it one gill of veal blond (No. 
423), or chicken stock (No. 195) and a few truffle parings; when the sauce is well reduced, incor- 
porate into it by degrees, two gills of Madeira wine or any other preferred. As soon as the sauce 
is finished, pass through a tammy and keep warm in a bain-marie. 

(493). MAITRE D'HOTEL SAUCE, THICKENED (Sauce k la Maitre d'Hotel, LieU 
Put into a high saucepan three gills of veloute' (No. 415) or bechamel (No. 409) with two gills 
of water; let it warm up and then add to it slowly half a pound of butter, working it in well, pass 
through a tammy; season with the juice of a lemon, some salt and pepper, and should the sauce 
be too thick then add a little more water; strain again through a tammy, add one teaspoonful 
of chopped parsley. 

(494). SAUCE A LA MANTAISE (Sauce k la MantaiseX 

Pound four ounces of chicken fat livers with two ounces of beef marrow; fry in two ounces of 
butter, two ounces of mushrooms, one teaspoonful of chopped parsley, two chopped shallots, and 
one crushed clove of garlic; let this get cold, and then pound it well adding to it the pounded 
livers and marrow; with this preparation fill a mold well lined with bardes of fat pork, and cook 
it in the oven for an hour, then unmold it over a sieve to drain. Dilute this mixture with a pint 
of espagnole (No. 414) or veloute (No. 415), and one or two gills of chicken essence (No. 387); 
strain it through a tammy, and beat up the sauce well before serving. 



SAUCES. 309 

(495). SAUCE A LA MAKOEAU (Sauce a la Marceau). 

Keep in a bain-marie, three pints of espagnole (No. 414) reduced with some game fumet 
(No. 397) and Madeira wine. Cook in plenty of salted water, in a covered vessel, one dozen peeled 
cloves of garlic, until very tender, then drain them; wipe them dry on a cloth, and fry them for a 
few minutes in a pan, with some melted butter till the moisture is thoroughly evaporated, then 
rub them through a sieve and afterward through a tammy (No. 159), and add this puree slowly 
into the sauce; stir well, and pour it into a sauceboat. 

(496). MARINADE SAUCE (Sauce Marinade). 

Cut into thin slices a quarter of a pound of carrots and as many onions; lay them in a sauce- 
pan with two ounces of butter, and a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf, as much thyme, 
basil, and a clove of garlic, two minced shallots, and four cloves. Fry the whole lightly without 
coloring in the butter, and then moisten with two quarts of water, and one pint of vinegar or more 
according to strength, and a tablespoonful of peppercorns; let cook for one hour, then strain 
through a sieve, return it to the fire, and reduce to half; add one quart of espagnole (No. 414) 
and reduce again to the consistency of a sauce. 

(497). MARINIERE SAUCE (Sauce Mariniere). 

Have two ounces of onions cut into small three-sixteenth inch squares; fry them colorless in 
two ounces of butter, then moisten them with a gill of white wine, adding one tablespoonful of 
brandy, two ounces of finely chopped mushrooms, one pint of veloute (No. 415), two gills of veal 
blond (No. 423) or fish stock (No. 195) (if for lean), salt, pepper, nutmeg, one clove of garlic, one 
bay leaf, and as much thyme. Let cook, despumate for half an hour, skim well the surface, and 
add another gill of white wine, then strain the sauce through a tammy (No. 159), and just when 
ready to serve, throw in a teaspoonf ul of chopped parsley. 

(498). MATELOTTE SAUCE (Sauce Matelotte). 

Cut in slices one pound of pike, half a pound of eels, and half a pound of carp; put these into 
a saucepan with minced carrots and onions, two ounces of each, half a handful of parsley and basil, 
two small cloves of garlic, bay leaf, thyme, salt and allspice: pour in half a bottleful of Bordeaux 
wine, and half a pint of fish broth or water; let boil for ten minutes, then drain and add to the 
liquid either half a pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414), or some kneaded butter; reduce, dilute with 
a gill of Bordeaux wine, and finally incorporate into it, two ounces of fresh butter. Just when 
ready to serve throw into the sauce, half a pound of mushrooms, and twenty-four small white 
onions lightly browned in a pan and cooked in broth. 

A More Simple Way, is to fry a little minced onions and shallot in butter, and when a nice 
color drain off the butter and moisten the onions with two gills of Burgundy wine; let the liquid 
reduce to half and then incorporate four gills of espagnole sauce (No. 414); let reduce 
once more, and after the sauce is properly done, strain it through a sieve, and keep it 
warm. 

(499). SAUCE A LA MILANESE (Sauce a la Milanaise). 

Have two ounces of butter in a saucepan with one ounce of minced, raw ham and two table 
spoonfuls of chopped shallot; fry them without coloring, and then add a small handful of parsley 
and basil, a bay leaf and as much thyme, one ounce of chopped mushrooms, a pinch of cayenne, a 
bit of mace, two cloves, one coffeespoonful of sugar, the juice of a lemon, half a gill of dry Ma- 
deira, and a pint of consomme (No 189). Boil all and reduce it to half, then add one pint of 
allemande sauce (No. 407), and strain the whole through a tammy (No. 159), afterward incor- 
porating into it two ounces of fine butter. A garnishing should be added to this sauce of pignolas, 
cooked spaghetti cut in half inch lengths, cooked ham and mushrooms cut in half inch sticks and 
an eighth of an inch square. 

(500). SAUCE A LA MIRABEAU 'Sauce a la Mirabeau). 

Pound three hard boiled egg-yolks with a handful of chervil and two tablespoonfuls of capers, 
adding a quarter of a pound of butter, a clove of garlic chopped and crushed; then rub the mix- 
ture through a sieve. Put into a saucepan a quart of veloute (No. 415) and two gills of chicken 
stock (No. 195); let it boil up; despumate the surface and reduce the whole, afterward adding 
very slowly the prepared butter, working it in the sauce with a whisk, season highly and strain 
through a tammy, heating it again before using. 



310 THE EPICUREAN 

(501). MODEEN HOLLANDAISE SAUCE (Sauce Hollandaise Moderne). 

Modern Hollandaise is made as follows: Melt two pounds of butter in a saucepan without heat- 
ing it too much, then let it settle, and pour off the top. Beat twelve egg-yolks in a saucepan 
with half a pint of water. Set the saucepan on a slow fire, and stir the contents continuously with 
a whisk; and as soon as the eggs become consistent incorporate into them the butter previously 
melted, little by little, some salt and mignonette; or else a dash of cayenne instead of the mi- 
gnonette, and besides this the juice of four lemons. If the sauce be too thick add a little water, 
and then pass it through a tammy (No. 159). Put the sauce in the mixing pot (Fig. 171); keep it 
in a bain-marie, not too hot, until needed. 

(502). SAUCE A LA MONTEBELLO (Sauce a la Montebello), 

Prepare one pint of thick bearnaise sauce (No. 433). and incorporate into it three gills of well 
reduced tomato sauce (No. 549), then strain the whole through a very fine sieve, and dilute it with 
two gills of champagne. 

(503). SAUCE A LA MONTIGNY AND TOMATO EXTEAOT (Sauce a la Montigny et a 1'Extrait 

de Tomates). 

Put into a saucepan two ounces of fresh butter and two teaspoonfuls of chopped shallots; let 
fry colorless with a bunch of parsley garnished with thyme and bay leaf; cook together for five 
minutes, then moisten with two gills of tomato extract, a gill of meat glaze (No. 401), three gills 
of espagnole sauce (No. 414), a pinch of powdered sugar, a pint of veloute (No. 415), chopped 
parsley and lemon juice. 

Tomato Extract. Cook some tomatoes for half an hour; strain them through a coarse sieve, 
put them on a piece of muslin over a vessel to retain all the falling liquid, and reduce this liquid 
to a thick syrup. 

(504). SAUCE A LA MOENAY (Sauce a la Mornay). 

After reducing a good bechamel sauce (No. 409), stir into it incessantly a few spoonfuls of 
mushroom sauce (No. 392) and some raw cream, also essence of fish (No. 388), should this sauce 
be needed for fish; but if otherwise then use a few spoonfuls of good chicken stock (No. 195) 
reduced to a half-glaze. When the sauce becomes succulent and creamy, pour it into a small 
saucepan, beat it smooth while heating it, and finish it off of the fire with some butter and grated 
parmesan cheese. This sauce is used for dishes that are bread-crumbed and for meats baked by 
a salamander. Its delicacy forbids it being boiled. 

(505). MUSHEOOM SAUCE (Sauce aux Champignons). 

Turn and wash half a pound of small mushroom heads (No. 118); put them into a saucepan 
with the juice of a lemon, and a piece of butter the size of a walnut, some salt and a gill of water. 
When they are cooked, after three minutes, drain, and put the liquid back into a saucepan with a 
pint of veloute (No. 415) or espagnole (No. 414), either fat or lean according to its requirements, 
then reduce and despumate the sauce. Just when ready to serve incorporate into it two ounces 
of butter and the cooked mushrooms. 

(506). MUSSEL SAUCE (Sauce aux Moules). 

Scrape eighteen mussels, wash them clean in several waters, and put them into a saucepan 
with half a gill of water, some vinegar and pepper, but no salt, sprigs of parsley and minced 
onions; cover the saucepan, set it on the fire, and toss it several times until they open, then take 
them from their shells, cut off their black parts, and strain the broth after it has well settled; 
pour off the clear part, leaving the sediment at the bottom, and strain this through a sieve. Put 
one pint of veloute (No. 415) into a saucepan, also two gills of the mussel broth; reduce, and 
thicken with four raw egg-yolks, a little nutmeg, half a gill of cream, two ounces of butter, and 
the juice of a lemon; strain the whole through a tammy (No. 159), and finish by adding a small 
coffeespoonful of chopped parsley and the eighteen cooked mussels; warm well and serve. 

(507). NEAPOLITAN SAUCE (Sauce Napolitaine). 

Put two ounces of cooked, lean, and well chopped ham into a saucepan with a bunch of parsley 
garnished with a bay leaf, and as much thyme, some mignonette, nutmeg and cayenne, two gills 
of Madeira wine, and two gills of broth; let reduce to half on a slow fire, then suppress the bunch 



SAUCES. 311 

of parsley, and add one pint of espagnole (No. 414); boil it up again, despumate, and strain it 
through a tammy (No. 159), put it back to reduce once more, adding to it two gills of Malaga 
wine, and a quarter o a pound of current jelly, dissolving the latter slowly by degrees, and two 
spoonfuls of grated horseradish. 

(508). NOUPAKEIL SAUCE (Sauce Nonpareille). 

Reduce one pint of veloute (No. 415), with two gills of cream, incorporating in two ounces of 
fresh butter; strain it through a tammy (No. 159), and set in one ounce of truffles, two ounces of 
mushrooms, two ounces of cooked egg-whites cut in squares, two tablespoonfuls of chopped coral, 
one teaspoonful of chopped parsley, one tablespoonful of small capers, and three ounces of red 
beef tongue or ham cut into three-sixteenths of an inch pieces. 

(509). SAUCE A LA NOKMANDE (Sauce k la Normande). 

Cut three pounds of bony fish into pieces, such as sheepshead, bass, blackfish, redsnapper, 
etc., let the pieces be of a quarter of a pound each; put them into a saucepan with two minced 
onions, two ounces of mushroom parings, some parsley, a bay leaf, the same quantity of thyme and 
two cloves of garlic, moisten with a quarter of a bottle of white wine, three pints of water, two 
gills of oyster liquor and let the whole cook slowly for thirty minutes, then strain the sauce through 
a fine sieve, and add to it one quart of veloute (No. 415), another quarter of a bottle of white 
wine, and reduce it all; just when ready to serve, thicken the sauce with four egg-yolks and 
incorporate into it two ounces of butter and the juice of a lemon; season well and finish by 
straining once more through a tammy (No. 159). 

(510). OLIVE SAUCE (Sauce aux Olives), 

Verdal or Spanish Olives, Stuffed or Not Stuffed. Remove the stones from two ounces of 
olives without injuring their shape, then throw them into boiling, salted water, drain them after 
they have boiled up once or twice, and put them into a pint of reduced and clear espagnole (No. 
414). The empty spaces in the olives may be filled with a chicken quenelle forcemeat (No. 89), 
mixed with anchovy butter (No. 569); poach and drain, and stir them into the sauce. 

(511). OKANGE SAUCE (Sauce k 1'Orange). 

Shred the peel of an orange as finely as possible, throw the pieces into boiling water, and let 
them cook for five minutes, then drain and put them into a saucepan with two gills of beef juice, 
three gills of espagnole (No. 414), the juice of two oranges and of one lemon, and a pinch of 
cayenne pepper. 

(512). SAUCE A LA D'OKLEANS (Sauce k la d'0rle"ans), 

Fry lightly in one ounce of butter three chopped shallots; add a tablespoonful of meat glaze 
(No. 401), and one pint of allemande sauce (No. 407), and incorporate into it half a pound of 
crawfish butter (No. 573) and a pinch of cayenne pepper; strain through a tammy and serve. 

(513). OYSTEK SAUCE (Sauce aux Huitres). 

Poach in white wine one dozen small oysters; strain the juice and leave it to settle. Put on 
the fire to reduce three gills of veloute sauce (No. 415), and stir into it slowly one gill of good 
fish stock (No. 195) and the oyster juice, thickening the whole with half a gill of cream, and two 
egg-yolks; season with salt, pepper, nutmeg, and the juice of a lemon; then strain the sauce, add a 
little butter to it, also the oysters and some chopped parsley. 

(514). SAUCE A LA PALERMITAINE (Sauce a la Palermitaine). 

Place all together in a saucepan one ounce of cooked, minced ham, one ounce of chopped pigno- 
las, one clove of garlic, one gill of oil, eight tomatoes washed, cut across in two and well pressed, 
a bunch of parsley garnished with as much bay leaf as thyme, mignonette, nutmeg and two cloves. 
Let all cook, then drain, and strain forcibly through a fine sieve, reduce together both the broth 
and puree, adding to it two gills of white wine, a teaspoonful of sugar, three gills of broth, one 
quart of allemande (No. 407), four ounces of butter, and the pulp of a lemon. 



312 THE EPICUREAN. 

(515), PARISIAN SAUCE (Sauce Parisienne), 

To make the essence, cook two ounces of truffle parings in three gills of boiling dry white wine 
with some parsley, bay leaf, and a small minced shallot, then leave it for half an hour in a high 
covered saucepan in a bain-marie before draining it over a sieve. Pour this essence into a pint of 
veloute (No. 415); reduce and add two spoonfuls of meat or chicken glaze (No. 398), a pinch of 
cayenne, and stir in just when ready to serve two ounces of butter and the juice of a lemon. 

(516). PERIGORD SAUCE (Sauce Perigord). 

Peel eight ounces of medium sized fresh Perigord truffles; cook them for five minutes with 
salt and Madeira wine, then remove from the fire and keep them in the covered saucepan. Make 
an infusion with two gills of Madeira wine, one ounce of raw ham, the truffle peelings, thyme and 
bay leaf, and a few sprigs of parsley. Put on the fire to reduce, four gills of good veloute (No. 
415), and incorporate into it slowly, one gill of cream, and the same quantity of the Madeira wine 
infusion already prepared. When the sauce is succulent and sufficiently consistent, strain and 
pour it into a saucepan, mixing in with it the cooked truffles cut into thin slices; keep the sauce 
warm in a bain-marie. 

(517). PERIGrUEUX SAUCE (Sauce Pe~rigueux). 

Peel three ounces of fresh truffles; cook them with some salt and Madeira wine; remove them 
from the fire and keep them in a covered vessel. Infuse in two gills of boiling Madeira wine, one 
ounce of raw ham cut into dices, the truffle peelings, some thyme, bay leaf, and sprigs of parsley. 
Put on the fire to reduce, one pint of espagnole (No. 414), stir slowly into it, one gill of veal blond 
(No. 423), and the same quantity of Madeira infusion. "When the sauce is succulent and sufficiently 
consistent, strain it, and set it into a saucepan with a few spoonfuls of the cooked truffles cut into 
eighth of an inch squares. 

Another way is to infuse in two gills of Madeira wine, one ounce of truffle peelings with a little 
thyme and bay leaf, leaving them in for thirty minutes. Pour into a saucepan a pint of espagnole 
sauce (No. 414) with essence of ham (No. 390), a little mignonette, and two gills of chicken or game 
stock (No. 195), then reduce and strain the sauce through a tammy (No. 159). Place in another 
saucepan two ounces of truffles cut in small one-eighth inch squares with two gills of Madeira 
wine, reduce it until dry, and incorporate into the sauce just when ready to serve one ounce of 
fresh butter. 

(518). PICKLE SAUCE (Sauce aux Cornichons). 

Slice two ounces of pickles into thin pieces, and lay them in a saucepan with one gill of vinegar 
and a pinch of mignonette; let it boil up quickly and reduce it to half its quantity, then add one 
pint of espagnole (No 414), two gills of veal blond (No. 423), a bay leaf, and as much thyme. 
Despumate the sauce for fifteen minutes, then suppress the bay leaf and thyme, and serve. 

(519). PIEDMONTESE SAUCE (Sauce Pi6montaise). 

Fry lightly without coloring in two ounces of clarified butter, four ounces of onions, when 
done, drain the butter, and finish cooking them in one pint of veal blond (No. 423). Skim off all 
the fat, and then pour in a pint of bechamel (No. 409) or espagnole (No. 414), reduce and add two 
ounces of white Piemont truffles cut in squares; just when ready to serve, stir in an ounce of garlic 
butter (No. 576) mixed with anchovy butter (No. 569); then add a dash of cayenne pepper and the 
juice of a lemon. 

(520). PIGNOLA SAUCE, ITALIAN STYLE (Sauce aux Pignons a lltalienne). 
Put two ounces of brown sugar in a saucepan with three gills of good vinegar, three gills of 
veal blond (No. 423), and a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf and thyme, some mignonette 
and nutmeg. Let the whole simmer over a slow fire, and reduce it to half. Then add a pint of 
espagnole (No. 414) and two gills of red wine; reduce again and put in four ounces of pignolas, 
let them boil in the sauce and serve. 

(521). PIMENTADE SAUCE (Sauce Pimentade). 

Cut up into quarter inch squares a quarter of a pound of lean veal and two ounces of onions, 
a quarter of a pound of raw, lean ham, then add a small clove of crushed garlic, put all these into 
a saucepan with some butter and let cook slowly. Fry some sweet Spanish peppers in oil after 



SAUCES. 313 

removing the skins; also some green peppers having both finely chopped, add these to the ham, veal 
and onions and then add a little good gravy and espagnole sauce (No. 414), also a little tomato 
puree (No. 730). Boil all together, season properly, skim off the fat and serve. 

(522). POIVRADE SAUCE (Sauce Poivrade), 

For Fat Poivrade a T Espagnole. Have a pint of poivrade (No. 523), half a pint of 
espagnole (No. 414), half a pint of veal blond (No. 423), and reduce all till properly done, season 
well. 

For Lean Poivrade. Suppress the ham from the poivrade (No. 523), and replace it by 
sturgeon, and the fat stock by some lean stock (No. 195). 

For White Poivrade with Veloute. Reduce two gills of white wine to half, adding some white 
peppers, aromatic herbs and mushroom parings. Put into this reduced stock three gills of veloute 
sauce (No. 415), with a little glaze (No. 401), and then stir in slowly a few spoonfuls of good stock 
(No. 423); when the sauce becomes succulent, set it into a deep saucepan, and if not used at once in 
a bain-marie. 

(523). POIVEADE FOE SAUCES (Poivrade pour Sauces). 

Not to be mistaken for poivrade sauce. Put into a saucepan four ounces of butter with half 
a pound of onions and six shallots, both cut into one-eighth inch squares, also a pound of carrots, 
half a pound of lean ham cut in three-sixteenth inch squares, a tablespoonful of pepper corns or 
else a teaspoonful of mignonette, a bunch of parsley garnished with two bay leaves, a clove of 
garlic and four cloves. Fry the whole slowly without coloring; then moisten with one pint of 
vinegar and a pint of veal blond (No. 423), reduce all until dry, and moisten once more with a 
pint of veal blond and two gills of white wine, also three pints of espagnole (No. 414). Boil 
slowly, despumate for an hour, and strain through a sieve. 

(524), POLISH SAUCE (Sauce a la Polonaise), 

Place in a deep saucepan, two tablespoonfuls of grated fresh horseradish, one coffeespoonful 
of powdered sugar, with one tablespoonful of meat glaze (No. 401), and a pint of veloute (No. 
415); squeeze in the juice of a lemon, add the chopped peel of a quarter of a lemon with a tea- 
spoonful of chopped parsley or fennel, season with salt, pepper and nutmeg, set the saucepan in a 
bain-marie and when ready to serve incorporate two ounces of fresh butter into the sauce. 

(525). POMPADOUR SAUCE (Sauce Pompadour). 

Fry lightly in two ounces of butter two finely chopped shallots, do not let them color; add to 
them four ounces of minced mushrooms; stir with a spoon until they have exhausted all their 
moisture; now pour in five gills of veloute (No. 415) and let the whole boil, with three gills of veal 
blond (No. 423), despumating it well. Thicken the sauce with six raw egg-yolks diluted in a gill 
of cream, add two ounces of butter, salt, pepper, and nutmeg, also a spoonful of chopped and 
blanched parsley. 

(526). PORTUGUESE SAUCE (Sauce a la Portugaise), 

Rub on a loaf of sugar, the peel of one lemon and one orange; scrape the sugar off with a 
spoon to obtain the part colored by the peels, then put this in a saucepan with a coffeespoon- 
ful of coriander seeds and two gills of port wine; set the pan on the fire and when a white 
foam rises to the top, remove it at once and cover. Half an hour later pour the wine through a 
fine sieve and add to it three gills of bechamel sauce (No. 409), and two of tomato puree (No. 730); 
let the sauce boil up once then strain it through a tammy; add to it the juices of both the lemon 
and orange, besides a spoonful of chopped parsley. 

(527). POULETTE SAUCE (Sauce a la Poulette), 

Pour a pint of veloute (No. 415) into a saucepan; let it boil, then thicken it with four raw 
egg-yolks diluted with a little cream; add at the last moment two ounces of butter, the juice of a 
lemon and some chopped parsley. 

(528;. PRINCESS SAUCE (Sauce a la Princesse). 

Put one pint of bechamel (No. 409) into a saucepan, adding to it two tablespoonfuls of chicken 
glaze (No. 398), one gill of cream, and some grated nutmeg; stir in just when ready to serve, four 
ounces of fresh butter, a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and the juice of one lemon. 



314 THE EPICUREAN. 

(529). PEOVENQAL SAUCE, PAT OE LEAN (Sauce a la Provengale en Gras cm en Maigre). 

Fry lightly in two gills of oil, half a pound of minced onions, two ounces of ham (or smoked 
salmon, if for lean), a pinch of parsley leaves, a crushed and chopped clove of garlic, thyme, bay 
leaf, mignonette, nutmeg, a pinch of ground cloves; dilute with a pint offish stock (No. 195), 
if for lean, or veal blond (No. 423) it for fat; let cook, despumate, and when the broth is reduced 
to a third, add a pint of espagnole (No. 414), if for brown or allemande (No. 407) if for white; 
one or the other, for fat or lean. Stir in two ounces of fresh butter and the juice of a lemon to 
finish. 

(530). QUEEN SAUCE (Sauce a la Eeine). 

Set into a saucepan, an ounce and a half of fresh bread-crumbs, and one pint of chicken 
essence (No. 387); pound two ounces of sweet almonds freshly peeled with two gills of cream, and 
press this forcibly through a napkin. Pound two hard boiled egg-yolks, with two ounces of fresh 
butter; season with salt, cayenne, and nutmeg, rub it through a sieve, then add this to the bread- 
crumbs, seasoning with salt, cayenne, and nutmeg, and also the cream almond milk, besides three 
gills of fresh cream. Chopped truffles may also be added to this sauce. 

(531). EAVIGOTE SAUCES, AEOMATIO, WHITE, WITH OIL AND GEEEN PEINTANIEEE (Sauces 
Eavigote, Aromatique, Blanche, a 1'Huile et Printaniere Verte). 

Aromatic Ravigote. Fry in one ounce of butter, two ounces of onions, moisten with two gills 
of Chablis wine, three gills of consomme, (No 189) and the juice of a lemon; add apiece of garlic the 
size of a pea, two chopped shallots, one ounce of chopped, pickled cucumbers, half an ounce of capers, 
some parsley roots cut in Julienne and blanched, branches of tarragon leaves, four cloves, two 
bay leaves, as much thyme, and some nutmeg; boil the whole slowly for half an hour, then strain 
it through a fine sieve; add this to one quart of espagnole (No. 414). Reduce and add two spoonfuls 
ot mustard; strain the whole through a tammy (No. 159) and incorporate into it two ounces of 
fresh butter, a teaspoonful of chopped chervil and half a teaspoonful of tarragon leaves, finely 
cut-up. 

White Ravigote. Infuse in one gill of vinegar, a quarter of an ounce of chervil, a quarter of 
an ounce ot tarragon, and a quarter of an ounce of pimpernel; add to the infusion one pint of 
veloute (No. 415) and one gill of white wine, then boil together for ten minutes; strain through a 
tammy (No. 159) and beat into the sauce two ounces of butter and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley. 

Hot Ravigote with Oil. Set into a saucepan three tablespoonfuls of chopped shallots with 
one gill of vinegar and three gills of white wine, reduce the liquid to half, then add to it a quart of 
veloute (No. 415), beat it up with a wire whisk and stir into it three gills of oil, putting in a very little 
at a time and continuing to beat, then add a teaspoonful of mustard, a pinch of tarragon and 
the same of chopped chervil. 

Green Ravigote Printaniere. After picking and washing half an ounce each of chervil, 
tarragon, chives and pimpernel, blanch them all in a copper vessel containing boiling, salted water, 
leave them to boil for a few minutes, then drain and refresh them; drain once more, and press out 
all the water. Pound these herbs well, and mingle with them four ounces of butter, color with 
spinach green (No. 37) then rub the whole through a sieve, stir well this butter into a pint of 
veloute, (No. 415) add to it a spoonful of good vinegar some pepper and nutmeg; pass this sauce 
through a tammy (No. 159). 

(532). EXIGENCE SAUCE (Sauce a la Ee"gence). 

For Fat. Set four ounces of butter in a saucepan, add four ounces of chopped onions; fry 
lightly and add two ounces of ham cut in three-sixteenth inch squares, eight ounces of minced 
mushrooms or their parings, branches of parsley, two bay leaves, as much thyme, two cloves and 
mignonette; fry all these ingredients together without coloring, moisten with two quarts of 
espagnole (No. 414) and a pint of chicken stock (No. 195), cook the whole for forty-five minutes, 
skim and pass through a tammy (No. 159). Put in a saucepan on the fire, three gills of white 
Bordeaux; when reduced to half, add a quarter of a pound of peeled truffles; heat well and put 
this in with the above sauce. 

For Lean. Use fish stock (No. 195) instead of fat chicken stock, suppress the ham and replace 
it by sturgeon or carp. 



SAUCES. 315 

(533). KOBEKT SAUCE (Sauce k la Eobert). 

Fry slowly in a saucepan two white onions weighing six ounces, and cut into small squares, 
with two ounces of butter, in such a way that they are half cooked without browning, then drain 
off the butter, and moisten the onions with two gills of consomme (No. 189), and one gill of white 
wine; reduce the sauce to a glaze, then moisten once more with three gills of espagnole sauce (No. 
414), reduced with one gill of veal blond (No. 423); add a coffeespoonf ul of sugar, a teaspoonf ul of 
vinegar, a tablespoonful of mustard, and a pinch of cayenne; let boil for a few minutes to enable 
the fat to be skimmed off, and keep the sauce warm in a bain-marie. 

(534). EOMAN SAUCE (Sauce Eomaine). 

Mince two ounces of celery root and put it into a saucepan with a coffeespoonful of coriander 
seeds, the same quantity of powdered sugar, a small clove of garlic crushed and chopped, a bunch 
of parsley and basil garnished with two bay leaves, and a quarter of a bottleful of champagne; let 
simmer for thirty minutes, then add one pint of espagnole (No. 414), and one gill of veal blond 
(No. 423); strain the whole through a tammy, and stir in two ounces of fresh butter and the juice of 
a lemon, also two ounces of Sultana raisins washed and boiled in half a gill of Madeira wine. 

(535). EUSSIAN SAUCE (Sauce a la Eusse). 

Have two tablespoonfuls of grated horseradish in a saucepan with one pint of veloute" (No. 415), 
a teaspoonful of chopped chives, a coffeespoonful of finely cut tarragon, a tablespoonful of mus- 
tard, and one gill of cream; season with salt and pepper, and add one teaspoonf ul of sugar, the juice 
of a lemon, and a heavy pinch of finely minced fennel, heat the sauce without boiling. 

(536). SALMIS SAUCE, WITH WHITE WINE, WITH CHAMP ACUTE, WITH EED WINE AND 
TEUFFLES (Sauce Salmis, au vin Blanc au Champagne, au vin Eouge et aux Truffes). 

With White Wine. Fry in butter without coloring the broken carcasses of six quails or 
three partridges; add to this half a bottleful of white wine and some broth, a garnished bunch of 
parsley and a few mushroom parings, then let boil slowly for one hour. Make an espagnole sauce 
(No. 414) with this fumet, and when properly reduced add to it the pounded meats and fragments 
previously cut off from the carcasses; pass all through a tammy, and then pour in some game 
glaze (No. 398) and butter, just when ready to serve. 

With Champagne Lay in a saucepan one pound of game carcasses, such as pheasants or 
grouse, after breaking them in pieces; to them add a quarter of a bottleful of champagne, two 
bay leaves, two minced shallots and one pint of broth; let all these simmer for half an hour 
before straining through a fine sieve, then reduce it to half with a pint of espagnole, adding an- 
other quarter bottleful of champagne and reduce it once more. Season with salt, black and red 
pepper, also grated nutmeg, and strain through a tammy, and just when ready to serve mix in two 
ounces of fresh butter. 

With Red Wine and Truffles. Break up the carcasses of six snipes, or plovers, or wood- 
cocks; fry them in some butter with their intestines, suppressing the gizzards and pouches, two bay 
leaves, as much thyme and as much basil, some truffle peelings, one pint of espagnole (No. 414), and 
two gills of red wine. Boil, skim, and when prepared to serve squeeze in the juice of a lemon; 
strain the sauce through a tammy, (No. 159), and add to it one or two ounces of peeled and minced 
truffles. 

(537). SHALLOT SAUCE AND SHALLOT GEAVY (Sauce a I'Echalote et Jus a I'Echalote). 

Blanch in boiling salted water three finely chopped shallots, placing them in the corner of a 
napkin; afterward cook them in a gill of consomme (No. 189); reduce this latter until dry, then 
add to it one gill of veloute (No. 415). Now pound four hard boiled egg-yolks with six ounces of 
butter; put the preparation into a saucepan, and stir it while heating till it becomes very hot, then 
season with salt, mignonette and lemon juice; if too thick add a little water and then strain it 
through a tammy (No. 159), and mix in a coffeespoonful of chopped parsley; stir it into the above 
prepared sauce. 

Shallot Gravy. Put eight minced shallots, a small bay leaf, some thyme and branches of 
parsley in a saucepan, moisten with two gills of clear gravy (No. 404) and let all cook for ten 
minutes on the corner of the range; strain through a napkin, and keep the saucs warm in a 
bain-marie until needed. 



316 THE EPICUREAN. 

(538). SHAEP SAUCE WITH OAPEES AND ONION PUEEE (Sauce Piquante aux Capres et 

a la Pure"e d'Oignons), 

Sharp Sauce. Reduce to one-half, five or six spoonfuls of tarragon vinegar, with some 
shallots, cut in one-eighth of an inch squares. Put on the fire to reduce, three or four gills of 
sauce espagnole (No. 414) free from all fat, one gill of veal blond, (No. 423) and then the above 
infusion, pouring it in slowly, and when the sauce is sufficiently succulent and thick, strain it into 
a saucepan and keep it warm in a bain-marie. 

Sharp with Capers, and Onion Puree Add a pint of espagnole (No. 414) to a tablespoonful 
of good vinegar, and set them in a saucepan with a bay leaf, a clove of garlic, a little thyme, two 
cloves, and two gills of broth, also a pinch of powdered sugar; let the whole boil for fifteen minutes, 
then skim off the fat; strain through a tammy, and finish by adding two spoonfuls of capers, 
and two of onion puree. 

(539). CHOPPED SAUCE (Sauce Hachfe). 

Add one tablespoonful of chopped shallots to one gill of vinegar; put them in a saucepan with 
one chopped and crushed clove of garlic; let boil slowly until thoroughly reduced then moisten 
with a gill of broth, and one pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414); add two ounces of chopped 
mushrooms, one tablespoonful of parsley, one of pickles, and one of small capers, all chopped 
separately, and just when serving, incorporate into the sauce two ounces of butter, salt, pepper, 
and nutmeg. 

(540), SHEIMP SAUCE, SHEIMP AND CEEAM SAUCE (Sauce aux Crevettes, Sauce aux Crevettes 

a la Creme). 

Shrimp Sauce. Skin half a pound of cooked shrimps; pound their shells with a quarter of a 
pound of butter, and the juice of one lemon; pass this through a sieve. Cut the shrimps into 
dice shaped pieces. Boil one pint of white poivrade sauce (No. 522), thicken it with two egg-yolks, 
and half a gill of fresh cream, and finish with a quarter of a pound of shrimp butter (No. 586), 
adding a pinch of cayenne pepper, a coffeespoonf ul of fine herbs, and the pieces of shrimp. 

Shrimp and Cream Sauce. Reduce one pint of bechamel (No. 409) with one gill of mush- 
room essence (No. 392), and incorporate into this, two ounces of shrimp butter (No. 586), a gill of 
cream, and two ounces of small dice pieces of shrimps; season with cayenne pepper and serve. 

(541). SHEIMP AND CEAB SAUCE (Sauce aux Crevettes et aux Crabes). 

Pour into a flat saucepan about one pint of bechamel sauce (No. 409), let it reduce, and incor- 
porate into it six tablespoonfuls of mushroom essence (No. 392) and the same quantity of raw 
cream. "When the sauce is very creamy, take it off the fire, and whisk into it gradually with 
a wire whip three ounces of fresh butter, and at the very last moment two ounces of shrimp 
butter (No. 586). Season and serve it in a separate sauce-boat with the shrimp tails, cut up into 
small pieces if they are large, but if small, leave them whole. Add the same quantity of crab meat 
cut the same size. 

(542). SICILIAN SAUCE (Sauce Sicilieune). 

Pour two gills of Marsala wine into a saucepan, adding to it one ounce of truffles and two 
ounces of mushrooms, both chopped ; also two shallots, chopped, blanched and lightly fried in an 
ounce of butter; and also one teaspoonful of chopped parsley, a clove of crushed and chopped 
garlic, a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf, and the same of thyme, pepper and some 
grated nutmeg. Let all these simmer and reduce on a slow fire, then remove the parsley, and add 
four gills of allemande (No. 407), and two of game (No. 389), or chicken essence (No. 387), the juice 
of half a lemon, the same quantity of orange, besides the peel of the latter finely cut up and blanched, 
and a coffeespoonful of powdered sugar. 

(543). SOUBISE SAUCE (Sauce Soubise), 

Cut off the stalks and roots from twelve onions after having divided them in two, throw them 
into boiling salted water for a few minutes, then drain, refresh, and drain them again. Heat a half 
a pound of butter in a saucepan, add to it the onions and fry them without coloring until well 
done, then pour in a pint of veloute (No. 415) and half a pint of stock (No. 422), some peppercorns 
and grated nutmeg. When the onions are sufficiently cooked, press them forcibly through a 
tammy (No. 170) and return the sauce to the saucepan on the fire, and add to it six gills of fresh 
cream; season properly, and incorporate in at the last moment a small piece of fresh butter. 



SAUCES. 317 

(544). SOUK SAUCE (Sauce Aigrelette). 

Put into a saucepan one pint of allemande sauce (No. 407) with one ounce of meat glaze (No. 
401), some white pepper and nutmeg; beat the sauce well and stir in one gill of lemon juice, the 
same quantity of gooseberries or verjuice, also two ounces of fresh butter; strain through a tammy 
and serve. 

(545). SOYA SAUCE (Sauce Soya), 

Reduce one pint of veloute (No. 415) or espagnole (No. 414) with two gills of essence of either 
chicken, game or fish, and when the sauce is of a sufficient consistency, add to it two tablespoon- 
fuls of soya sauce, and two ounces of fresh butter; beat in slowly with a whip. 

(546). PEINTANIERE SAUCE (Sauce a la Printaniere). 

Pick and wash half an ounce of chervil, half an ounce of chives, a quarter of an ounce of 
tarragon, and a quarter of an ounce of burnet. Throw these herbs into boiling salted water, 
to blanch for two minutes in an untinned copper vessel, drain, refresh, and drain once more to 
press out all the water; pound and add four ounces of butter, a tablespoonf ul of good vinegar and 
sufficient spinach green to color nicely; press this butter through a fine sieve and when prepared to 
use it, add it to a pint of hot allemande sauce (No. 407); season to taste and serve. 

I (547). SUPKEME SAUCE (Sauce Supreme). 

Remove the breasts from five chickens, break up the carcasses and second joints. Cut two 
pounds of kernel of veal into large squares, and cook them with the chicken bones, in half a pound 
of butter without allowing them to color, then moisten with seven quarts of veloute stock (No. 422) ; 
let boil, skim well, and season with salt, pepper, and a bunch of parsley garnished with basil and 
bay leaf, and continue to boil for two hours, being careful to skim off the top when necessary; then 
strain the whole through a fine sieve. Place a saucepan on a slow fire, containing one quarter of 
a pound of butter and as much flour; when cooked without coloring, moisten it with one and a 
half quarts of the above stock, and let it boil on one side of the stove only, so as to be able to skim 
it properly, now add a quarter of a bottleful of Sauterne wine, cook again, and despumate for two 
hours; strain the sauce through a tammy, and reduce with one pint of cream, and just when ready 
to serve, beat in a piece of fresh butter. 

(548). TARRAGON SAUCE (Sauce a 1'Estragon). 

Reduce one pint of veloute (No. 415), or espagnole (No. 414) with half a pint of chicken 
essence (No. 387). Infuse a pinch of tarragon leaves in a gill of chicken essence, and add this 
infusion to the veloute or espagnole; strain all through a tammy, and just when serving throw in 
a tablespoonf ul of tarragon leaves cut in lozenges, and blanched in boiling water in an untinned 
copper pan. 

(549). TOMATO SAUCE (Sauce aux Tomates). 

Put a quarter of a pound of butter in a saucepan, with half a pound of carrots, half a pound 
of onions, half a pound of bacon or unsmoked ham, all cut in quarter inch squares, a bunch of 
parsley garnished with thyme and bay leaf, and four cloves; when fried colorless, add eight pounds 
of tomatoes cut in two and well pressed; season with salt and mignonette, and moisten with a 
quart of moistening (No. 189), then cook it all slowly for forty minutes. Make a blond roux (No. 
163) with a quarter of a pound of butter, and a quarter of a pound of flour; dilute it with one 
quart of white stock (No. 422), and the tomatoes; then strain the whole through a fine sieve or 
tammy (No. 159), let it boil again, despumate the surface, and reduce it until it becomes the 
consistency of a sauce. 

(550). TOMATO SAUCE ANDALOUSE, A LA OONDE, A LA PARISIENNE (Sauce aux Tomates 

a 1'Andalouse, a la Conde", a la Parisienne). 

"Wash and cut in halves, four pounds of tomatoes, press them well to extract all their juice 
and seeds, then put the pulps into a saucepan with four ounces of minced onions, three bay leaves 
and as much thyme, four ounces of green peppers finely shredded, two ounces of mushroom par- 
ings, one clove of garlic, four ounces of ham, one pinch of saffron leaves, one small coffeespoon- 
ful of mignonette and one pint of espagnole (No. 414); let the whole cook for twenty minutes; 
then strain the sauce through a tammy (No. 159), and stir into it at the last moment two ounces of 
fresh butter. 



318 THE EPICUREAN. 

A la Conde. Fry eight ounces of minced onions in two ounces of butter, add four pounds of 
very ripe tomatoes cut in halves, and the juice and seeds extracted, three bay leaves and as much 
thyme; also some cayenne pepper. Let the whole cook on a slow fire, then drain and strain 
through a sieve, return the sauce to the saucepan, adding one pint of espagnole (No. 414), reduce 
it to a proper consistency, and stir into it two tablespoonfuls of meat glaze (No. 401) just before 
serving. 

Parisienne. Have in a saucepan two ounces of chopped mushrooms with a teaspoonful of 
chopped parsley, a small crushed clove of garlic and two shallots, both finely minced, two ounces 
of bacon cut in dice, three bay leaves, the same quantity of thyme, a teaspoonful of whole 
peppers, salt, and four pounds of tomatoes, cut in halves, and their juice and seeds well extracted; 
also one pint of moistening (No. 189). Let this all cook for twenty minutes, drain and strain 
through a sieve, add to the puree one pint of veloute (No. 415), one pint of onion puree 
(No. 723), four tablespoonfuls of meat glaze (No. 401) and two ounces of fine butter. Before 
serving be assured that the sauce is seasoned properly. 

(551). TKUFFLE SAUCE (Sauce aux Truffes). 

Moisten one pound of chicken parings with three pints of veloute stock (No. 422) and a quarter 
of a bottleful of white wine; add to it a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf, and as much 
thyme, a quarter of a pound of minced carrots, four ounces of onions, one branch of celery and one 
coffeespoonful of whole peppers ; let it all simmer for two hours, then strain through a sieve and 
reduce the sauce to half, skimming it well in the meanwhile ; now add one quart of allemande 
sauce (No. 407), and reduce again with a quarter of a bottleful of white wine. Strain the whole 
through a tammy, and just when serving incorporate into the sauce four ounces of fresh butter 
and three ounces of peeled and minced truffles. 

(552). TUETLE SAUCE, FAT AND LEAN (Sauce Tortue Grasse et Maigre). 

Fat. Pour into a saucepan three gills of dry Madeira wine, add two ounces of minced, lean 
ham, one pinch of mignonette, a bunch of parsley garnished with a bay leaf, the same quantity of 
thyme and basil, two small green peppers, one chopped shallot, one ounce of truffles and two of 
mushrooms chopped separately. Let all these ingredients simmer and reduce on a low fire adding 
to them four gills of espagnole (No. 414), two gills of concentrated veal blond (No. 423), two gills 
of tomatoes (No. 730), and add two more gills of Madeira wine; strain the sauce through a tammy 
and beat in when ready to serve two ounces of fresh butter. 

Lean. Cut into slices half a pound each of carp, eels and pike; put them into a saucepan with 
a quarter of a bottle of white wine, one quart of water, one clove of garlic, four ounces of onions cut 
in four, two ounces of mushroom parings, a bunch of parsley containing basil, marjoram, thyme 
and bay leaf, some mace, mignonette and a pinch of cayenne. Let simmer and reduce the stock to 
half on a very slow fire, then strain it forcibly through a tammy, return it to the fire and add one 
pint of espagnole (No. 414), and one gill of tomato puree (No. 730); reduce once more, pour in a 
quarter of a bottleful of champagne, squeeze in the juice of a lemon, and when ready to use incor- 
porate into the sauce two ounces of lobster butter (No. 580). 

(553), LA VALLIERE SAUCE (Sauce k la La Valliere). 

Reduce one quart of veloute (No. 415) with one quart of veal blond (No. 423), and the broth 
obtained from cooking eight ounces of mushrooms, add one tablespoonful of meat glaze (No. 401) 
and thicken the sauce with four egg-yolks diluted in half a gill of cream and two ounces of fresh 
butter. Strain through a tammy and add half a pound of channeled mushrooms (No. 118). 

(554). VALOIS SAUCE (Sauce a la ValoisX 

Boil two gills of white wine with one gill of vinegar and add two tablespoonfuls of chopped 
shallots, let the liquid reduce thoroughly, then remove it from the fire, let partly cool and stir in 
six egg-yolks, beat them up with an egg-beater and finish the sauce with four ounces of fine fresh 
butter slowly incorporated; strain and after returning it to the saucepan stir into it two ounces 
more of butter and mix in one spoonful of chopped parsley, or replace half the parsley by chopped 
tarragon leaves if preferred. 



SAUCES. 319 

(555). VENETIAN SAUCE (Sauce a la Vfoitienne). 

Have ready in a steamer or bain-marie saucepan one pint of veloute sauce (No. 415), and just 
when about serving add to it one gill of chicken (No. 398) or fish glaze (No. 399), some salt, pepper, 
and nutmeg, and a teaspoonful of good vinegar; thicken the sauce with egg-yolks and cream, 
then add two ounces of fresh butter, and a coffeespoonf ul of fresh parsley, also a pinch of finely 
shredded tarragon leaves. 

(556). VENISON SAUCE (Sauce Venaison), 

Dilute in a saucepan five gills of poivrade sauce (No. 522), and four ounces of currant jelly 
with half a bottleful of Burgundy wine, adding two tablespoonfuls of vinegar and the same 
quantity of sugar, also the pulp of a lemon; reduce for a few minutes, then strain through 
a tammy. 

(557). VIOTOKIA SAUCE (Sauce a la Victoria). 

Cover a saucepan containing one tablespoonful of finely chopped shallots and the juice of two 
lemons; let boil together, then add two ounces of well chopped mushrooms and boil again until 
these have evaporated all their moisture, then put in two gills of melted meat glaze. When 
ready to serve finish the sauce by mixing in a quarter of a pound of butter, a teaspoonful of 
vinegar, the same of soya sauce (No. 545), a pinch of tarragon leaves and one of parsley, besides 
two tablespoonsf uls of chopped up pickles. 

(558). VIENNESE SAUCE (Sauce a la Viennoise). 

This sauce is prepared with one pint of allemande sauce (No. 407), seasoned with nutmeg, red 
pepper, and the juice of a lemon; finish it with four ounces of crawfish butter (No. 573), and 
just before serving, throw in a teaspoonful of chopped parsley. 

(559). VILLAES SAUCE (Sauce a la Villars). 

Into a pint of chicken essence (No. 387) add two tablespoonfuls of rice flour diluted in a gill 
of cold milk, also some salt, pepper and lemon juice, two ounces of cooked chicken cut in small 
squares and four chopped hard-boiled egg-yolks; work the sauce steadily, reduce properly, and 
add one gill of double cream, and two ounces of fresh butter. 

(560). VILLEEOI SAUCE (Sauce a la Villeroi), 

Put into a sautoire with some butter two ounces of lean ham; fry for a few minutes, then drain 
off the butter and moisten the ham with one gill of white wine; reduce it until dry, then pour in a 
pint of veloute (No. 415) and season the sauce with mignonette and nutmeg; reduce again and 
then thicken with four egg-yolks diluted in a gill of cream; let the sauce boil up once or twice 
while stirring it at the bottom of the sautoire with a reducing spatula, then strain it through a 
tammy (No. 159), and mix in with it some chopped and drained mushrooms, also a teaspoonful of 
chopped parsley or fine herbs. This sauce should be more consistent than allemande sauce and 
it is used only when beginning to cool, to coat cold meats. It can also be soubised by adding 
to it a few tablespoonfuls of soubise sauce (No. 543). 

(561). WESTPHALIAN SAUCE (Sauce Westphalienne). 

Put three gills of white wine and half a pound of minced, lean Westphalia ham into a sauce- 
pan with a bunch of parsley garnished with one bay leaf and the same quantity of thyme, some 
mignonette, salt and nutmeg. Moisten the whole with two gills of veal blond stock (No. 423), 
then reduce and finish with four gills of espagnole (No. 414), reduce again to the proper con- 
sistency, then strain through a tammy, and just when ready to serve stir in two ounces of butter 
and the juice of a lemon; pass throngh a tammy and serve. 

(562). WHITE SAUCE ; WHITE ENGLISH SAUCE AND WHITE SAUCE WITHOUT BUTTEE 

(Sauce Blanche, Anglaise et Sauce Blanche sans Beurre). 

Melt some butter in a saucepan and beat it with the same weight of flour; season with salt, 
pepper, and nutmeg, and moisten with water. Set it on the fire and stir constantly until it begins 
to bubble, then thicken it just before serving with egg-yolks, cream and fresh butter, adding the 
juice of a lemon; strain the sauce through a tammy and serve. 



320 THE EPICUREAN. 

White Sauce, English Style. Infuse in a pint of boiling cream, the peel of one lemon, a cof- 
feespoonful of white pepper corns, some thyme and a bay leaf, leaving them in for half an hour. 
Melt three ounces of butter, and stir in it two ounces of flour, fried without coloring, add the pre- 
pared infusion, straining it first through a fine sieve, also the juice of a lemon. Set the saucepan 
on the fire, and stir well till it boils, then leave it for a few minutes and incorporate into it 
three ounces of fine butter. 

White Sauce, Without Butter. Break into a saucepan four raw egg-yolks, add to them one 
gill of olive oil, salt, pepper and nutmeg. Heat some water in a saucepan larger than the one con- 
taining the eggs and oil, set the smaller into the larger one, and as soon as the water is sufficiently 
hot that the hand cannot bear the heat then begin to stir it so as to mix the eggs with the oil; as 
quickly as the sauce is well thickened, take it from the saucepan and serve it at once, adding the 
juice of a lemon. This sauce should only be tepid, for if a degree warmer the egg-yolks coagu- 
late and the oil separates from them. This sauce is excellent for artichokes and plain boiled aspar- 
agus. 

(563). YOKE SAUCE (Sauce d'York). 

Made by reducing some vinegar with shallots, cut in eighth of an inch squares, and adding 
to it two or three spoonfuls of white bread-crumbs lightly fried in butter and some good gravy. 
Let the sauce cook for ten minutes on the side of the range, season to taste, and finish with some 
chopped parsley and lemon juice. 

(564). ZTTOHETTE SAUOE (Sauce a la Zuchette). 

Reduce some brown espagnole sauce with the liquid part of drained tomatoes, add some dry 
mushrooms that have been previously soaked, moisten from time to time with a little veal blond 
stock (No. 423). Pare some cucumbers in either clove of garlic or olive shape, blanch and cook 
these in white broth having just sufficient to moisten, so that when the cucumbers are done the 
stock will be thoroughly reduced. Strain the sauce through a tammy, put in the cucumbers 
and serve. 



HOT BUTTERS, 



(565), BLACK BUTTEK (Beurre NoirX 

This butter is used for eggs, brains or fish. Put four ounces of butter in an omelet pan over 
a slow fire, and when it falls after raising, skim it off, and set it gain on the fire; as soon as 
it is black, but not burned, season it with salt and mignonette. Strain it through a fine strainer 
over the eggs, etc. Throw a dash of vinegar in a hot pan, and pour it over the eggs through a 
fine strainer. 

(566). MELTED BUTTER (Beurre Pondu). 

Set four ounces of butter in a saucepan, season it with salt, pepper, mignonette, and the juice 
of a lemon; let it melt sufficiently to liquify it, or else melt it thoroughly, and let it settle, pouring 
off the top carefully, refraining from disturbing the sediment at the bottom. 

(567). HAZEL-NUT BUTTER (Beurre Noisette). 

Place four ounces of butter in a pan on the fire, and as soon as the froth falls, skim it care- 
fully, and leave it on the fire until it begins to brown slightly, then let it settle and pour off the 
clear part; season with salt, pepper, and lemon-juice, and throw this over fish or any other article, 
after straining it through a fine strainer. 



SAUCES. 321 

COLD BUTTEKS, 



(568). ALMOND BUTTER (Beurre d'Amandes). 

Pound in a mortar, one ounce of peeled sweet almonds mixed with a few bitter ones; add four 
ounces of sugar, and moisten with a little milk, then stir in eight ounces of fresh butter, and beat 
it all well together, then press the whole through a fine sieve. 

(569). ANCHOVY BUTTER (Beurre d'Anchois). 

Wash an ounce of anchovies, wipe them well to remove the silver scales covering them, then 
pound them thoroughly, adding a quarter of a pound of butter, and a little cayenne pepper. Rub 
through a sieve and use when needed. 

(570). CAMBRIDGE BUTTER (Beurre Cambridge.) 

Lay in a mortar and pound well, six hard boiled egg-yolks, with four well cleansed anchovies 
and a spoonful of chopped capers, also some tarragon and chives; when the whole is reduced to a 
paste, add to it one spoonful of English mustard, and the same quantity of French mustard, some 
salt, pepper, and vinegar, and one pound of fresh butter. Rub the compound through a sieve, and 
then mix in with it a tablespoonful of chopped parsley. 

(571). CAYENNE, CHILI, PAPRIKA AND SWEET SPANISH PEPPER BUTTER (Beurre de 

Cayenne, Chili, Paprika, Piments doux d'Espagne). 

Mix into half a pound of fresh butter, either a full teaspoonf ul of cayenne pepper or Chili 
pepper, and two teaspoonfuls Hungary paprika pepper; add to it some salt, lemon juica 
and sweet Spanish pimentos. 

(572). CRAB BUTTER (Beurre de Crabes). 

Wash well some crab coral, then pound it in a mortar, adding double its quantity of butter, a 
dash of cayenne pepper and the juice of two lemons; press it through a sieve. 

(573). CRAWFISH BUTTER (Beurre d'Ecrevisses). 

Have one pound of very red crawfish shells, pound them with two pounds of butter and when 
they are reduced to a paste, then put it into a saucepan and cook slowly until the butter be thor- 
oughly clarified; strain it through a piece of muslin into a bowl, and as soon as the greatest heat has 
passed off, beat it up with a spoon till it becomes cold. If needed to be colored a deeper red, add 
a little orchanet melted in a little butter, or else some vegetal carmine. 

(574). PINE HERB BUTTER, COOKED (Beurre aux Fines Herbes Ouites). 
Fry in some butter a few blanched and finely chopped shallots, add to them a few well chopped 
truffles and fresh mushrooms, and let the whole get quite cold, then add to it some fresh butter, 
salt, pepper, chopped parsley and lemon juice. 

(575). RAW FINE HERB BUTTER, (Beurre aux Fines Herbes Crues). 

Wash some parsley, chervil, tarragon, pimpernel, chives and water-cress leaves, and then cut 
them up finely. Wipe off a piece of fresh butter in a cloth, and beat it up in a warm basin until 
it becomes slightly creamy, then mix in with it gradually the raw fine herbs; season this butter 
with cayenne, salt and lemon juice. 

(576). GARLIC BUTTER (Beurre d'Ail). 

Blanch one ounce of garlic in plenty of water, drain and pound it well, adding half a pound 
of butter and seasoning with salt and red pepper. 

(577). BUTTER WITH GREEN GOOSEBERRIES (Beurre aux Groseilles & Maquereau). 
Have a pound of well picked green gooseberries; pound them well and then add to them one 
pound of fresh butter, pound again together and season with salt, pepper and fine herbs. 



322 THE EPICUREAN. 

(578). HOESEEADISH BUTTEE (Beurre de Eaifort). 

Pound four ounces of scraped horseradish with eight ounces of butter, some salt and red 
pepper; then rub it through a sieve. If this butter be needed to add to a sauce, only put it in at 
the last moment. Horseradish should not be allowed to boil; neither should it be prepared too 
long in advance. 

(579). KNEADED BUTTEE (Beurre Mania 

Kneaded butter is frequently used at the last moment to thicken sauces and cooked small 
vegetables. In order to prepare this auxiliary, it is necessary to lay a piece of butter on a plate or 
in a small vessel, and incorporate into it slowly with a wooden spoon, a sufficient quantity of flour 
to form a smooth paste, but not too consistent, so that it can easily be dissolved by the heat. 

(580). LOBSTEE AND SPINY LOBSTEE OOEAL BUTTEE (Beurre au Corail de Homard ou de 

Langouste), 

Lobster Butter. Pound one pound of very red spiny lobster shells with two pounds of butter 
until they are reduced to a paste; put this into a saucepan till the butter be cooked and clarified, 
then strain it through a piece of muslin into a bowl. As soon as the butter has thrown off its 
first heat, begin beating it with a spoon till it gets cold, and if needed to be dyed a deeper red 
shade, then add to it a little orchanet, melted in a small quantity of butter, or clear vegetal carmine. 

Coral Butter. Take some lobster eggs, also the red parts found in the interior of the 
body and crush them very finely in a mortar; mix in a piece of fresh butter four times the volume 
of the eggs; pass the whole through a Venice sieve and serve. 

(581). MAITEE D'HOTEL BUTTEE (Beurre Maitre d'Hotel). 
Mix in with some fresh butter, chopped parsley, salt, pepper, and lemon juice. 

(582). MONTPELLIEE BUTTEE (Beurre Montpellier). 

Pick, wash, and blanch one pound of chervil, chives, tarragon, pimpernel, and water-cress; 
drain and refresh them, then press them well to extract all the water, and pound them in a mortar 
with six hard boiled egg-yolks, six well washed anchovies, five ounces of pickled gherkins, five 
ounces of dry capers, and add salt, pepper, and a piece of garlic the size of a pea; pound all 
together and rub the whole through a fine sieve, and when it has all passed, put two pounds of 
butter into the mortar, add the strained ravigote, two tablespoonf uls of oil, and one of tarragon vine- 
gar; and mix it all thoroughly together. Montpellier butter should be a pretty, light green color. 

(583). EAVIGOTE OE GEEEN BUTTEE (Beurre a la Eavigote ou Beurre Vert), 
Made with one ounce of tarragon, two ounces of chervil, one ounce of chives, well washed, half 
an ounce of blanched parsley leaves, and one ounce of chopped and blanched shallot; pound all 
these herbs with half a pound of butter, and color it with some spinach green strained through a 
sieve. 

(584). SAFFEON BUTTEE (Beurre de Safran), 

Lay a pinch of saffron on a plate and work it in a nut of butter with a spatula; it is then ready 
to use. 

(585). SHALLOT BUTTEE (Beurre d'Echalotes). 

Peel and mince finely twelve shallots, then pound them, afterward adding half a pound of 
butter; rub the compound through a sieve. 

(586). SHEIMP BUTTEE (Beurre de Orevettes). 

Pound one pound of shrimps without removing their skins, also two ounces of lobster coral; 
add to this one pound of fresh butter, some salt, cayenne pepper and the juice of a lemon, then 
press the whole through a sieve. 



SAUCES. 323 

COLD SAUCES, 



(587). APPLE SAUCE (Sauce aux Pommes). 

Apple Sauce. Peal a pound of sound apples, suppress the cores and seeds and place them in 
a saucepan with a little water; when cooked drain and press through a sieve; reduce and add a lit- 
tle brown sugar and the juice of two oranges and their finely shredded peels that have been previ- 
ously cooked in salted water. 

(588). OHANTILLY APPLE SAUCE WITH HORSERADISH A LA SANFOKD (Sauce Chantilly 

aux Pommes et au Eaifort a la Sanford). 

Core a pound of sour apples, lay them in a saucepan with a little water; when done drain 
out and press through a very fine sieve. Add to the pulp one ounce of powdered sugar and two 
ounces of- grated horseradish; stir well and beat in lightly the value of one pint of well-drained 
whipped cream. Serve this sauce separately with young ducks or goslings. 

(589). APPLE SAUCE, ENGLISH STYLE, (Sauce aux Pommes a 1'Anglaise). 

Cut up one pound of peeled apples, small, cook them with a little water and a grain of salt; 
when dry mix in four spoonfuls of grated fresh horseradish; remove from the fire at once, and 
press through a sieve; mix into the pulp a spoonful of sugar and the juice of two oranges. Heat 
up without boiling, and remove as soon as the sugar is dissolved. This sauce can be served with 
all salted and smoked meats. 

(590). APPLE SAUCE POE GOURMETS, APPLE SAUCE WITH HORSERADISH AND ORANGE 
JUICE (Sauce aux Pommes des Gourmets, Sauce aux Pommes au Raifort et jus d'Orange). 

Gourmets. Take one pound of peeled apples, remove the seeds and put them in a saucepan 
with a little water, when cooked, drain and strain through a sieve, reduce and add a little brown 
sugar, the juice of two oranges and their peels finely cut up and boiled in salted water. 

With Horseradish and Orange Juice. The same preparation as for apple sauce (No. 587), 
adding the juice of two oranges and six tablespoonf uls of grated fresh horseradish. 



(591). SWEDISH APPLE SAUCE (Sauce aux Pommes Suedoise). 

Cut five or six apples into four quarters, peel and cook them in a little white wine, reduce all 
of their moisture, then press them through a sieve. Place this puree in a bowl and mix in with it 
about an equal quantity of finely chopped horseradish, thicken this preparation with a few spoon- 
fuls of mayonnaise (No. 606). This sauce is excellent for roast geese or roast pork, as well as for 
cold meats. 

(592). BOAR SAUCE (Sauce Sanglier). 

Grate half a pound of fresh horseradish, then lay it in a bowl with four ounces of cranberry 
jelly (No. 598), adding a spoonful of mustard, the well chopped peel of one lemon and one 
orange, two ounces of powdered sugar and one tablespoonf ul of sweet oil, mix all the ingredients 
well together and serve. 

(593). CHAUDPROID, BECHAMEL CREAM SAUCE, WITH TOMATO PUREE AND WITH 
PEOULA (Sauces Ohaudfroid, Bechamel a la Creme, Bechamel k la Pure"e de Tomates et k 
la Fe"cule). 

Bechamel Cream Chaudfroid. Is made with bechamel reduced with fowl or fish essence well 
despumated, and half its quantity of white chicken or fish jelly added. 

Bechamel Tomato Puree Chaudfroid. Is a chaudfroid prepared the same as for the cream, 
adding to it a quarter of its quantity of red tomato puree strained through a very fine sieve. 



324 THE EPICUREAN. 

With Fecula. Boil a quart and a half of chicken broth with six gelatine leaves and when well 
dissolved thicken with four ounces of fecula previously diluted in cold water. Mix with this chaud- 
froid half a pint of cream, strain it through a tammy (No. 159), stir up well and dip into this 
chaudfroid once or several times the whole pieces of meat required to be glazed. 

(594). OHAUDPROID BROWN AND GAME (Ohaudfroid Brun et Chaudfroid de Gibier). 

Put into a saucepan, one pint of very clear well-colored espagnole sauce (No. 414), reduce it 
with some veal blond (No. 423), and dilute with half its quantity of aspic jelly (No. 103). Boil 
up the sauce and remove it at once to the side of the fire, in order to despumate it for ten minutes, 
skimming it well in the meantime; then take it off entirely and pass through a tammy. Before 
using try a little to find out whether it coats properly; if not strong enough add some gelatine. 

Game Chaudfroid. Add one pint of game essence (No. 389) to half a pint of sauterne wine, 
moisten with game stock (No. 195), and add one quart of well-reduced espagnole sauce (No. 414), 
despumate and stir in one pint of jelly. The white wine may be replaced by Madeira. 

(595). GHAUDFROID GREEN OR RAVIGOTE (Ohaudfroid Vert ou Ohaudfroid Ravigote). 
Blanch in boiling and salted water, one handful of chervil, parsley, tarragon and pimpernel; 
drain and pound these with a few capers; press through a sieve and mix this puree with a veloute 
sauce (No. 415), then reduce and despumate, adding some chicken stock (No. 195); reduce once 
more, and now add the juice of one lemon and some spinach green, also half its quantity of 
either meat, chicken, or game jelly. 

(596). OHAUDPROID WHITE WITH VELOUTE AND BLOND OHAUDPROID (Ohaudfroid Blanc 

au VeloutS et Ohaudfroid Blond). 

Pour into a saucepan, one pint of veloute (No. 415) (for lean, use fish veloute"); reduce it with 
half a pint of chicken broth (No. 188), or veal stock (No. 423), then add one pint of aspic jelly 
(No. 103); boil up this sauce, remove it to the side of the fire to be able to despumate for fifteen 
minutes, skimming it carefully in the meanwhile, then take it off the fire, strain, and try a little 
before using, to see whether it is sufficiently thick to cover the meats. For blond chaudfroid, add 
chicken glaze (No. 398) to white veloute (No. 415). 

Thickened with Egg-yolks a V Allemande. Veloute (No. 415) reduced with essence of chicken 
(No. 387) well despumated, and thickened with egg-yolks, mixed with half as much melted white 
jelly. 

Blond Chaudfroid. Is made with half brown and half white chaudfroid. 

(597). OHIOKEN AND GAME SAUCE (Sauce pour Volaille et Gibier). 

This sauce is prepared with some sweet oil, the juice of a lemon, chicken or game gravy, 
chopped fine herbs, garlic, shallots, salt and pepper. 

(598). CRANBERRY SAUCE (Sauce aux Caneberges). 

Wash five pounds of cranberries, lay them in an untinned saucepan on the fire, with one quart 
of water, let cook slowly while stirring frequently, and when they are done add to them five pounds 
of sugar; pass them through a coarse colander, put in jars and set the jelly away in a cool closet. 

(599). CUMBERLAND SAUCE (Sauce k la Cumberland). 

Cook in salted water the finely shreded peels of two oranges and two lemons, and when they are 
tender put them into a vessel with one tablespoonful of mustard, a pinch of ground ginger, a pinch 
of cayenne pepper, a gill of Madeira wine, the juice of one orange and one lemon, some salt, and 
two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, and mix in with these ingredients half a pound of currant jelly. 

(600). CURRANT OR GOOSEBERRY SAUCE WITH SUGAR (Sauce aux Groseilles Blanches ou 

Vertes au Sucre). 

Pick one pound of white currants from their stalks, or pick off the stems from one pound of 
gooseberries; blanch either one or the other, and then drain them on a sieve. Have cooked half a 
pound of sugar to the small crack, lay in the currants, let it boil up once, and then pour it into 
glasses to serve cold with meats, game or poultry. 



SAUCES. 325 

(601). CURRANT SAUCE WITH ORANGE (Sauce aux Groseilles a 1'Orange). 

This is prepared with currant jelly diluted with port wine; add to it the rind of one orange 
grated on sugar and pressed through a sieve. Peel another orange and after shredding the peel 
very finely cook it in water, drain and then add it to the sauce, with the juice of the two oranges. 

(602), TINE HERBS SAUCE AND SHALLOTS WITH OIL (Sauce aux Pines Herbes, et aux 

Echalotes a 1'Huile). 

This sauce is prepared with chervil, parsley, chives, and small squares of blanched shallots, 
also some tarragon leaves. Dilute a little mustard in oil and vinegar, season well, and stir in the 
above chopped fine herbs. Shallots with fine herbs and oil is made by mixing in with fine herbs, 
and oil is made by mixing in with one gill of vinegar, some salt, pepper, and two gills of sweet oil, 
chopped and blanched shallots, chopped tarragon and English mustard. 

(603). GREEN SAUCE (Sauce Verte), 

"Wash some parsley leaves, chervil, tarragon, and burnet; plunge them into boiling water 
in a copper vessel, and blanch them for three minutes; drain, press out all the liquid, and then 
pound the herbs in a small mortar with a few chives added; press them through a sieve, and 
put into the same mortar a few hard boiled egg-yolks and some anchovy fillets; pound them also, 
and stir in gradually the green puree; dilute the preparation with some oil, vinegar and mustard, 
and finish the sauce with a spoonful of finely chopped pickled gherkins. 

(604). GREEN SPANISH SAUCE (Sauce Espagnole Verte). 

Pound to a paste one ounce of chervil and one ounce of parsley; add to it four ounces of 
bread-crumbs soaked in water and then squeezed out, six anchovy fillets, two ounces of chopped 
pickled gherkins, two ounces of capers, and one small chopped up onion; pound well the whole 
and then rub it through a sieve into a bowL, beat it well with some sweet oil, the same as for a 
mayonnaise, adding salt, pepper, and spinach green to color; soften the sauce with a little water. 

(605). HORSERADISH AND CREAM SAUCE, AND WITH OIL (Sauce Raifort a la Oreme, et a 

1'Huile). 

Put into a bowl a quarter of a pound of grated horseradish with an equal quantity of fresh 
bread-crumbs, a little sugar, some salt, the juice of two lemons, a tablespoonful of vinegar and a 
little white stock (No. 422), also adding a pint of cream. This sauce is used with cold meats. 

With Oil. Cut some slices of lemon after suppressing the yellow and white rind; put them 
into a vessel with oil, vinegar, salt and pepper, some chopped parsley, tarragon, grated horseradish 
and a little ground pepper; mix all well together. Broiled fish may be served with this sauce. 

(606). MAYONNAISE SAUCE (Sauce Mayonnaise). 

In order to obtain a quick and certain mayonnaise sauce, it must be worked simply with k 
small wire whisk. Put five egg-yolks into a bowl suppressing every particle of the white, 
add some salt, white or red pepper, and ground mustard; after these are thoroughly mixed pour 
in slowly a quart of sweet oil and one gill of vinegar, alternating them without once stopping to 
work vigorously. In a few minutes the sauce becomes voluminous, consistent, smooth and firm. 

(607). MAYONNAISE SAUCE A LA BAYONNAISE (Sauce Mayonnaise a la Bayonnaise). 

Lay five egg-yolks in a bowl with a quarter of a gill of water, half an ounce of salt, a little 
pepper and a little cayenne, then beat it up and incorporate slowly into it two and one-half pints 
of oil and one gill of vinegar, stirring it unceasingly, and when the sauce thickens add to it more 
vinegar, and continue pouring in the oil and vinegar till they are both consumed. It must be of 
a high consistency, of a white color, and of a good flavor; it is preferable to use a wire whisk 
in place of a wooden spoon for this purpose. Add to this mayonnaise half a pound of lean Bay- 
onne ham, cut in squares, some powdered Spanish peppers, and some chopped parsley. 



326 THE EPICUREAN. 

(608). MAYONNAISE OAKDINAL (Sauce Mayonnaise Cardinal). 

Pound one ounce of lobster coral with a little vegetal carmine, a teaspoonful of English 
mustard, some salt, cayenne pepper, and the juice of two lemons; pass all this through a fine 
sieve, and mix in with it slowly a pint of mayonnaise sauce (No. 606); this sauce should be a 
nice light red color. 

(609). MAYONNAISE FIGARO (Sauce Mayonnaise Figaro). 

Strain some cooked tomatoes through a very fine sieve, then let them drain well for several 
hours in a napkin, and mix this pulp in slowly with very firm mayonnaise sauce (No. 606); add 
to it some powdered cayenne, very finely chopped, and blanched shallots and anchovy essence. 

(610). MAYONNAISE SAUCE PROVENQAL WITH SWEET PEPPERS (Sauce Mayonnaise Pro- 

vengale aux Poivrons doux). 

Mash four medium sized cloves of garlic with two tablespoonfuls of English mustard, two 
cooked egg-yolks, two tablespoonfuls of bread-crumbs soaked in milk and all the liquid pressed out; 
beat the whole with two raw egg yolks, half a coffeespoonful of pepper, some salt and a teaspoon- 
ful of sweet Spanish peppers; incorporate in a pint of oil, dropping it in slowly, and a few spoon- 
fuls of tarragon vinegar, also a little water. Just when serving mix in the sweet Spanish peppers, 
previously broiled so their skin can be removed, then cut them up in squares. The sweet peppers 
can be replaced by those that come in cans, which are very well prepared. 

(611X MAYONNAISE SAUCE WITH ARROWROOT (Sauce Mayonnaise a 1'Arrowroot). 
In case any difficulty be found to raise a mayonnaise either on account of defective oil, or on 
account of the weather, the following manner will explain how always to obtain a good result: 
Dilute in cold water in a small saucepan, a heaping spoonful of arrowroot or simply fecula; be 
careful there are no lumps in it, then heat it over a slow fire, stirring well with a spoon, until it 
forms a smooth paste, having it hard, in preference to soft. As soon as this is done, pour 
it into a vessel, and beat it with a spoon until it loses its greatest heat, then mix in a pinch of salt, 
a little red pepper, and a pinch of ground mustard, and three or four raw egg-yolks. Work well 
the preparation while pouring in very slowly, two or three gills of good sweet oil, alternating it 
with a dash of vinegar. 

(612). MAYONNAISE SAUCE, GREEN WITH PINE HERBS, PRINTANIERE, AND RAVIGOTE 
(Sauce Mayonnaise Verte aux Fines Herbes Printaniere et Ravigote). 

Pick and wash a handful of chervil, tarragon, chives, burnet and garden water-cress. 
Blanch them in boiling, salted water for five minutes, then drain, refresh and press well to extract 
all the water. Pound this thoroughly, adding the juice of one lemon and some ground mustard. 
Mix this ravigote into a pint of mayonnaise sauce (No. 606), and color it a fine pistache green with 
some spinach green. 

(613). MAYONNAISE SAUCE WITH JELLY AND JELLIED (Sauce Mayonnaise a la Gel6e et 

Collee). 

In order to make this mayonnaise set a thin tin salad bowl on chopped ice containing one pint of 
white jelly (No. 103), add to it a pint of oil, a gill of tarragon vinegar, a little salt, and some white or 
red pepper. Stir the mixture well with an egg-beater being careful to remove all that adheres to 
the sides, then add little by little the juice of one lemon; also some chopped and blanched chervil 
may be advantageously added to the sauce. 

Mayonnaise Sauce Jellied. Use an ordinary mayonnaise (No. 606) with oil, pouring into it slowly 
some cold liquid jelly (No. 103). A jellied mayonnaise may also be prepared by whipping the jelly 
on ice and incorporating into it at the same time some oil and vinegar, exactly the same as for the 
egg mayonnaise. 

(614). MAYONNAISE SAUCE WITH FRUIT JELLY (Sauce Mayonnaise a la Gele"e de Fruits). 

Break four raw egg-yolks into a vessel; mix in with them two tablespoonfuls of water, salt and 
a little white and red pepper, stir well and incorporate slowly, especially at first, one quart of sweet 
oil and eight spoonfuls of vinegar at different intervals. To make the fruit jelly mayonnaise, add 
for one pint of mayonnaise sauce (No. 606i, one spoonful of English mustard, and a quarter 
of a pound either of currant, grape, apple, quince or cranberry jelly. 



SAUCES. 327 

(615). MAYONNAISE MOUSSELINE SAUCE (Sauce Mayonnaise Mousseline). 

Made with a jelly mayonnaise the same as explained in No. 613, leaving out the chervil, and 
stirring in the same quantity of unsweetened whipped cream, well drained and very firm. An 
ordinary mayonnaise without being jellied can also be used. 

(616). MINT SAUCE (Sauce a la Menthe). 

Put into a sauce-boat half a glassful of good vinegar, a strong pinch of powdered sugar, a 
little cayenne pepper, and two heavy pinches of finely chopped fresh mint leaves; let them infuse 
for half an hour. 

Another way. Mix in a saucepan one gill of good vinegar with the same quantity of water; 
add to it two spoonfuls of powdered or brown sugar; boil it up once, and then set it away to get 
cold; put in some finely shredded fresh mint leaves. 

(617). ORANGE SAUCE (Sauce a 1'Orange). 

Have half a pound of currant jelly (No. 3670), two gills of port wine, the juice of three oranges 
and of two lemons, and the peel of two oranges grated into sugar. Dissolve the currant jelly 
and the flavored orange sugar with the liquids, add a grain of salt, and a dash of cayenne, then 
strain the sauce; it should be more light than consistent. This sauce is excellent for either cold 
or hot game. 

(618). PEACH OR APPLE MARMALADE (Marmelade de Peches ou de Pommes). 

Peaches. Peel and remove the stones from one pound of peaches, cook in a little water, 
drain and press through a sieve, sweeten with an ounce of brown sugar. These marmalades are 
for roast meats and poultry. 

Apples. A pound of peeled apples cooked in a little water, pressed through a sieve and 
sweetened with an ounce of brown sugar. 

(619). PERSILLADE SAUCE (Sauce Persillade). 

Place in a small bowl one tablespoonf ul of mustard and four pounded hard boiled egg-yolks, 
dilute this gradually with two gills of oil and four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, or the juice of four 
lemons ; add to it salt, pepper and mignonette, some parsley leaves, chervil and tarragon, all 
finely chopped, and serve the sauce separately. Chopped hard boiled egg-whites are frequently 
added to this sauce. 

(620). POIVRADE SAUCE (Sauce Poivrade). 

Put into a bowl one gill of espagnole sauce (No. 414), add to it twice its quantity of oil, some 
Chili and tarragon vinegar, pepper and salt; beat the whole together with a whisk and throw in 
a teaapoonful of chopped parsley and some finely chopped blanched shallots. 

(621), POLISH SAUCE (Sauce a la Polonaise). 

Squeeze into a sauce boat the juice of four lemons and of two oranges; add to them a heavy 
pinch of mignonette, two teaspoonf uls of mustard, and six tablespoonfuls of pulverized sugar; mix 
well and dilute this preparation sufficiently to have it the consistency of a syrup. 

(622). RAISIN SAUCE (Sauce aux Raisins). 

Pour two gills of good vinegar into a saucepan, add a bunch of parsley, garnished with two 
bay leaves and as much thyme, peppercorns and cloves; reduce the liquid to half; then add four 
gills of good gravy (No. 404). Boil the whole, dissolve a tablespoonful of fecula in two gills of 
cold broth, mix in with the sauce, then boil, skim and add a quarter of a pound of Smyrna raisins 
and the same quantity of currants, also half a pound of currant jelly (No. 3670), dissolving it 
slowly; let the sauce get cold and serve it up with game. 

(623). RAVIGOTE SAUCE WITH OIL (Sauce Ravigote a 1'Huile). 

Pound a handful of chervil, burnet, tarragon and chives, also a little garlic and shallot; 
add to them a spoonful of bechamel sauce (No. 409), some salt, white and red pepper, ground mus- 
tard and grated horseradish root; pass all through a tammy (No. 159), and mix in with it sufficient 
oil and vinegar to obtain a sauce that will not be too thick. 



328 THE EPICUREAN. 

(624). REMOULADE SAUCE (Sauce Remoulade), 

Chop up well one blanched shallot, have a handful of parsley leaves, chervil, tarragon and 
burnet; pound the whole in a small marble mortar; add four nicely cleaned anchovy fillets, five 
or six hard boiled egg-yolks, rub all the ingredients through a sieve, then mix in three or four raw 
yolks, stir into this preparation one pint of oil, half a gill of vinegar and mustard, the same as for 
mayonnaise (No. 606) and finish the sauce with capers, finely chopped pickled gherkins and a dash 
of cayenne pepper. 

(625). REMOULADE SAUCE, INDIAN STYLE (Sauce Remoulade, a I'lndienne), 
Pound in a mortar four hard boiled egg-yolks, add to them two raw yolks, one spoonful of 
mustard, salt, pepper and the juice of two lemons, and a quarter of a gill of water in which a few 
saffron leaves have been infused and a quarter of a coffeespoonful of curry; strain all through a 
sieve and put the preparation into a bowl to stir and work in slowly one pint of sweet oil, and half 
a gill of vinegar, adding a teaspoonful of powdered sugar, some parsley, chervil, tarragon, chives 
and two shallots chopped and blanched, besides the hard boiled egg-whites cut into small squares. 

(626). EEMOULADE SAUCE VERT-PEE (Sauce Eemoulade Vert-Pre"). 

Place in a mortar four hard boiled egg -yolks with two raw yolks, two spoonfuls of mustard, 
salt, pepper and a smack of garlic; pound them well together and then press through a sieve and 
lay the compound in a bowl; work it well, incorpoi'ating into it one pint of oil and half a gill of 
vinegar, till it becomes the consistency of a mayonnaise. Cut three shallots in small 
squares and blanch them in boiling water, drain and add them to the mayonnaise; chop separately 
a handful of parsley, chervil and half as much tarragon, burnet, water-cress and chives; mix 
together all these herbs, and put in three heaping tablespoonf uls to the prepared mayonnaise, coloi 
it a pretty pistache color with spinach green, and throw in when finished two spoonfuls of chopped 
up capers. 

(627). EEMOULADE SAUCE WITH ANCHOVIES (Sauce Ee"moulade aux Anchois). 
Pound four hard boiled egg- yolks; add to them four raw egg-yolks, two spoonfuls of mustard 
and eight anchovies; rub all through a sieve, and put the mixture into a vessel to work and stir in 
gradually one pint of oil and a half gill of vinegar, season with very little salt and pepper, and 
then add three chopped and blanched shallots, some parsley and two ounces of chopped capers. 

(628), RE'MOULADE SAUCE WITH FINE HERBS (SauceEe'mouladeaux Fines Herbes). 
Put into a bowl one tablespoonful of mustard, salt, pepper and a raw egg-yolk ; beat this up 
vith a wooden spatula and pour very slowly into it from six to eight spoonfuls of oil, also two of 
tinegar and one tablespoonful of Chili vinegar ; add finely chopped parsley, chervil and tarragon. 

(629). ROSSEBERRY SAUCE (Sauce k la Rosseberry). 

This sauce is made with one tablespoonful of English mustard diluted in a gill of good 
Tinegar, adding a coffeespoonful of powdered sugar and two tablespooufuls of grated fresh 
horseradish, then adding some salt and chopped parsley. 

(630). ROUGEMONT SAUCE (Sauce a la Rougemont). 

Procure four ounces of lobster coral or eggs, the creamy parts of the bodies of two lobsters, and 
pound these together with six hard boiled egg-yolks, then press the whole through a sieve into a 
bowl; dilute and incorporate into it five gills of oil and half a gill of vinegar, two chopped and 
blanched shallots, a dash of cayenne, a tablespoonful of tarragon and chervil, and half as much 
chopped parsley, as well as one ounce of chopped pickled gherkins. 

(631). TARTAR SAUCE (Sauce Tartare). 

Deposit in a bowl one gill of veloute sauce (No. 415), two tablespoonfuls of mustard, four 
fresh egg-yolks, salt and pepper; stir well together and incorporate into it five gills of oil and half 
a gill of tarragon vinegar, two chopped and blanched shallots, a dash of cayenne pepper, and a 
tablespoonful of tarragon and chervil, also half the quantity of chopped parsley, and an ounce of 
chopped up pickled gherkins. 



SAUCES. 329 

(632). TARTAR SATTOE, ENGLISH STYLE (Sauce Tartare, a 1'Anglaise). 
Make a mayonnaise with three hard boiled egg-yolks, one gill of veloute, (No. 415) a pinch 
of ground mustard, salt, and sweet oil; stir into it gradually two spoonfuls of English anchovy 
essence; the same of Harvey sauce, and the same of Worcestershire sauce, so as to give the tar- 
tar a fine dark color. 

(633). TOMATO CATSUP (Catsup de Tomates). 

Boil one quart of vinegar in a saucepan, adding a quarter of an ounce of capsicum 
peppers, one ounce of garlic, half an ounce of shallot, all nicely peeled, and half an ounce 
of white ground pepper, also a coffeespoonful of red pepper, and let boil for ten minutes, then 
strain through a fine sieve. Mix in with this vinegar, one and a half pounds of tomatoes, reduce 
all together and then add the juice of three lemons, and salt to taste. Should this sauce be too 
thick, add more vinegar or some water; fill up the bottles, let stand till cold, then put them in 
a very cool place to use when needed. This sauce is excellent as a relish for cold meats fish, 
oysters, etc. 

(634). VINEGAR SAUCE WITH FINE HERBS (Vinaigrette anx Piues Herbes). 
Chop up finely the following herbs: chives, chervil, tarragon, and parsley; put them into a 
bowl with some salt, pepper, a little cayenne pepper, three spoonfuls of vinegar, and six of olive oil; 
stir all well together and serve. 

(635). VINEGAR SAUCE WITH SHALLOTS AND MUSTARD rv'kaigrette aux Echalotes et 

a la Moutarde). 

Cut a shallot in one-eight inch squares, blanch and drain it. Put one gill of vinegar in a 
bowl, add to it salt and two gills of sweet oil, some mustard, and the blanched shallots. 

(636). ZISKA SAUCE, PARISIAN SAUCE FOR ALL FOODS (Sauce Ziska, Sauce Parisienne pour 

tous Mets). 

Put into a bowl two teaspoonfuls of English mustard with a little salt and some sugar; beat 
it all well together, then pour in slowly the value of three gills of sweet oil, and half a gill of good 
vinegar, also a few finely chopped pickled gherkins. 

Parisian Sauce for all Foods. Put into an earthen vessel, either over hot cinders or in a 
heater for twenty-four hours, two gills of water, two gills of vinegar, one gill of verjuice, two gills 
of white wine, one ounce of ground mustard seeds, half an ounce of black pepper, half a teaspoon- 
ful of ground ginger, half a teaspoonful of mace, a quarter of a teaspoonful of cloves, four ounces 
of salt, a few branches of basil, four bay leaves, two ounces of pounded shallots, one dried bitter 
orange peel, and half a gill of lemon juice. After all these have infused for two days, strain the 
sauce through a fine sieve, put it into bottles, and keep it to use for cold meats. 



ADDITIONAL RECIPES. 



All the following garnishings may be served for removes by arranging them in clusters and 
making them either larger or smaller, according to the dishes required to be garnished. For large 
pieces of meat that are intended for removes they must be larger than for those intended for en- 
trees; in the latter case they should be mixed together instead of being dressed in separate groups. 

(637). ADMIEAL GAENISHING (Garniture I TAmiral). 

Take eight mussels a la Villeroi (No. 698), sixteen fluted mushrooms (No. 118), half a pound 
of skinned and sauted shrimps; eight trussed crawfish, the tail shell removed. Parsley leaves to 
be arranged in bunches at both ends. Serve with Normande sauce (No. 509). For an entree 
mix the mushrooms and shrimps with the sauce, add chopped parsley and oranges around the 
Villeroi mussels and crawfish. 

(638). A LA EEINE GAENISEING (Garniture a la Eeine). 

Is composed of the white meat cut from a cooked chicken, truffles and mushrooms, all being 
cut into three-sixteenths of an inch squares. This garnishing is used with bouchees of the same 
name, or else inside small patties a la Reine; in this case mingle the ingredients with a veloute 
sauce (No. 415) thickened with egg-yolks and leave it to get cool before filling the patties. 

(639). ANDALOUSE GAENISHING (Garniture a 1'Andalouse). 

Made with eight braised lettuce, eight small Chorisos (smoked sausages) cooked with the 
cabbage, two pounds of cabbage, half a pound of chick peas; one pound of braised ham; one pint 
of espagnole sauce (No. 414) reduced with two gills of tomatoes (No. 730). Dress the lettuce, 
the cabbage and the chick peas in clusters, range the sausages on one end and the ham on the 
other. 

(640). AQUITAINE GAENISHING (Garniture a 1'Aquitaine). 

Have a pound of escaloped duck livers sauted in butter; half a pound of small button mush- 
rooms cooked with butter, lemon juice, salt and water; a quarter of a pound of small whole truffles, 
cooked in Madeira wine; half a pound of pressed beef palate cut cock's-comb shape, warmed in 
meat glaze (No. 401) and butter. Infuse a stick of Ceylon cinnamon for ten minutes in a gill of 
Madeira wine; strain this through a napkin into a quart of reduced espagnole sauce (No. 414). 
Dress the garnishing in clusters, pour over half the sauce and serve the remainder in a separate 
sauce-boat. This garnishing can be used for entrees; if this be the case, mix the ingredients 
composing it together in a sautoire with the sauce, and dress them. 

(641). BAELET A LA EEINE GAENISHING (Garniture d'Orge a la Eeine) 
Wash in several waters four ounces of pearl barley; cook it in salted water for three hours 
until thoroughly done, and it crushes easily when pressed between the fingers; drain and let it 
simmer in a little good, fresh cream. Just when ready to serve, stir in an equal quantity of 
chicken puree (No. 713) with almond milk (No. 4), and with this garnish some croustades (hol- 
low tartlets made of fine paste (No. 135) rolled out very thin). 

(642). BEEF TONGUE GAENISHING, ANDALUSIAN TOMATO SAUCE (Garniture de Langue de 

Bceuf, Sauce Tomates Andalouse). 

Cut twelve slices, each one three-sixteenths of an inch thick from the thick end of a cooked 
beef tongue; pare them neatly either into rounds, ovals, or half hearts; heat them in a little half 
glaze (No. 413), and dress them around a remove covering with a Andalusian tomato sauce (No. 
550). 

(331) 



332 THE EPICUREAN. 

(643;. BOUOHEES OF PUREE OP PHEASANTS GARNISHING (Garniture de Bouche*es a la Purge 

de Paisans). 

Prepare a dozen puff paste bouchees (No. 11), cook them only a short time before they are 
needed so as not to be obliged to heat them over again. After they are emptied, keep them warm. 
Put into a saucepan a few spoonfuls of good pheasant puree (No. 716); press through a tammy (No. 
170), and heat it while stirring well on a slow fire and incorporate into it a few spoonfuls of good game 
fumet (No. 397), reduced to a half-glaze, but be careful it does not boil; season highly and finish 
by stirring in a small piece of butter. Fill the bouchees with this puree, baste over with a little 
sauce and cover either with their own covers, or else with a round piece of cooked truffle cut 
out with a column tube (Fig. 168). Dress pyramidically on a folded napkin. 

(644), BOURGEOISE GARNISHING (Garniture a la Bourgeoise), 

Have two pounds of cabbage, parboiled and cooked with half a pound of salt pork, blanched 
for fifteen minutes, moisten with a quart of strained broth (No. 194a), and its fat. Twenty pieces 
of small cork shaped turnips, blanched and cooked in broth, reduced to a glaze just when cooked. 
Twenty small pear-shaped carrots, blanched, cooked in broth, and reduced to a glaze just as they 
are finished. Twenty small, blanched, braised and glazed onions. Dress the cabbage on both ends 
of the meat, garnishing the former with the salt pork cut in slices, and group the carrots, turnips. 
nd onions around in alternate clusters. Serve separately a gravy (No. 404) thickened with cspag- 
iole sauce (No. 414), and well reduced. 

(645). BRETIGNY GARNISHING (Garniture a la Biftigny). 

Kemove the breasts from sixteen reedbirds, roll them in a sauce made with some gravy (No. 
404), to which has been added meat glaze (No. 401), the carcasses and a little Madeira wine, 
the whole allowed to reduce and then strained. Have sixteen pieces of channeled mushrooms 
(No. 118) cooked in butter, and seasoned with salt, pepper, and chopped truffles; sixteen slices 
of sweetbread of one ounce each, blanched and sauted in butter and seasoned with salt, pepper 
and chopped parsley. Sixteen pieces of potato cut into one inch diameter balls, then blanched 
and sauted in butter. Range the potato balls on the ends of the dish, and place the sweet- 
breads, mushrooms, and reedbird breasts around in alternate clusters. Serve with this 
garnishing a separate sauce-boat of Madeira sauce with truffle essence (No. 395). 

(646). PARMA BROCHETTES GARNISHING (Garniture Brochettes de Panne), 
Made with semolino cooked in light broth and a grain of salt. Prepare a well cooked and 
thick mush; remove it from the fire, and finish it with some grated parmesan and butter, seasoning 
it to taste. Spread this preparation in layers on baking sheets dampened with cold water, having 
each one an eighth of an inch thick; as soon as they are cold and stiff, cut them into one inch 
rounds; prepare half as many rounds of the very best fresh Swiss cheese. Take some small wooden 
skewers, and pass on each three rounds, one of cheese and two of semolino, placing the cheese one 
in the center; dip them in beaten eggs, and roll them in white bread-crumbs. A few minutes 
before serving plunge them into hot fat, a few at the time, to heat and get a nice color, then drain 
and serve them separately on a folded napkin, or else around the piece to be garnished. 

(647). BRUSSELS GARNISHING (Garniture Bruxelloise). 

One pound of Brussells sprouts, blanched and cooked in consomme (No. 189). Half a 
pound of salt pork cut in slices and broiled. Half a pound of carrot balls three quarters of an 
inch in diameter, blanched, cooked in consomme (No. 189) and reduced to a glaze. Half a pound 
of small blanched onions braised and glazed. One pound of Chipolata sausages cut in two length- 
wise. Dress all these garnishings in different groups around the remove, and serve separately a 
sauce-boat of half-glaze sauce (No. 413) with ham essence (No. 390) added. 

(648). FRIED OALVES' BRAIN GARNISHING (Garniture de Oervelles Frites). 
Calves and lambs' brains are those most generally used for garnishings. They are first soaked 
so as to be able to scrape and cleanse them properly, then cooked in water with some salt, vinegar, 
thyme, bay leaf, sliced onions, branches of parsley and pepper corns. Let the brains get cold in a 
vessel containing their own strained broth, and then divide the calves' brains into six pieces, and 
lambs' brains into two rounds or ovals. Dip them in beaten eggs, roll them in white bread-crumbs 
and fry them a fine golden color in hot fat. Serve separately a Chateaubriand sauce (No. 446). 



GAKNISHINGU3. 333 

(649). CARDINAL GARNISHING (Garniture Cardinal), 

The cardinal garnishing is composed of twelve ounces of lobster quenelles made with a tea- 
spoon (No. 155), twelve ounces of sauted shrimps, twelve ounces of small ouions blanched and then 
cooked in fish stock (No. 417) and let fall to a glaze, six ounces of small whole truffles rolled in 
a little fish glaze (No. 399) and fresh butter, then arranged pyramidically, the onions dressed the 
same. Dress the quenelles in clusters and cover them lightly with a Cardinal sauce (No. 442), 
and the shrimps sauted in butter with fine herbs and lemon juice. Some Cardinal sauce to be 
served separately. 

(650). OEPES OR MUSHROOMS STUFPED A LA DUXELLE, PROVENCAL OR MINCED WITH 
BECHAMEL GARNISHING (Garniture de Cepes ou de Champignons Farcis a la Duxelle, 
Provenpale Emince's a la Bechamel). 

Eemove the stalks from two pounds of young cepes or mushrooms, wash them well and cook 
them with lemon juice, some butter and salt. (In case no fresh cepes can be obtained then use 
preserved ones.) For garnishings, the heads alone are employed. Drain them, and fry them in 
some sweet oil with a finely chopped shallot and a crushed and chopped clove of garlic, one 
tablespoonful of chopped parsley and a gill of brown espagnole (No. 414), also a tablespoonful of 
meat glaze (No. 401) and some chopped-up truffles. Cepes or mushrooms are also used as a gar- 
nishing when stuffed with a Duxelle (No. 385), thickened with a little raw lamb quenelle forcemeat 
(No. 92) or else a baked liver forcemeat (No. 64). In both cases they are to be placed in a 
baking-sheet and sprinkled over with either oil or melted butter, putting them into the oven to 
bake. Sliced cepes or mushrooms are also to be used as a garnishing, cutting them up finely and 
sauteing them in butter or oil, then thickened with bechamel (No. 409), reduced with a little 
meat glaze (No. 401). These minced cepes are served either on hollow crusts or in a vegetable dish. 

(651). OHAMBORD GARNISHING (Garniture Chambord). 

The Chambord garnishing is composed of eighteen pieces of truffles cut the shape of a clove of 
garlic and cooked in Madeira wine and afterward rolled in a little fish glaze (No. 399) and fine 
butter. Eighteen crawfish tails from which the shells have been removed and the bodies glazed. 
Eighteen heads of fluted mushrooms (No. 118) cooked in a little water, butter and lemon juice. 
Ten pieces of fish quenelles decorated with truffles. Eighteen small pieces of milt a la Villeroi 
(No. 698), or fillets of striped bass; a lean Spanish sauce (No. 414) reduced with Madeira and white 
wine, or else a lean veloute* sauce (No. 415), reduced with fish broth, mushrooms and champagne 
wine, and buttered at the last moment. Dress the truffles, the mushroom heads and the crawfish 
in alternate clusters, and cover them either with the white or brown sauce; arrange around this 
garnishing the quenelles decorated with truffles, the Villeroi milts or fillets of striped bass, and 
send a third part of the sauce to the table in a separate sauce-boat. 

(652). EGGS WITH CHEESE GARNISHING (Garniture d'ceufs au Fromage). 

This garnishing is composed of two ounces of butter, six whole eggs, four ounces of Swiss and 
parmesan cheese, both grated, a pinch of sugar and nutmeg. Beat up the eggs for two minutes, 
add to them the cheese, sugar, nutmeg, and half of the butter; melt the remainder of the butter in 
a saucepan, pour into it the eggs, and stir the liquid over a slow fire using a spoon for this purpose^ 
until the compound thickens to the consistency of cream. Take it off the fire, keep stirring it again 
for two minutes, then mix in with it two spoonfuls of raw cream or veloute (No. 415). Pour the 
melted cheese in some boat shaped tartlet crusts, made with very thin foundation paste; bake them 
in a hot oven and serve. 

(653). CHEESE CRUST GARNISHING (Garniture de Croutes au Fromage). 

First cut some slices three-eighths of an inch thick from a kitchen loaf; divide them into long 
squares, two and a half inches by one and a quarter. Grate some Swiss and parmesan cheese, a 
quarter of a pound of each, and put it into a vessel with three soupspoonfuls of Stilton cheese, and 
mash them together with a spoon in order to obtain a smooth paste, then work into it slowly a few 
spoonfuls of sherry wine or ale, without letting it get too soft, season with red pepper, and 
cayenne. Moisten lightly with melted butter the prepared slices of bread, toast them on both sides 



334 THE EPICUREAN. 

cover one side with a layer of the cheese preparation; dredge over them some grated parmesan, 
and lay the slices on a dish to push it in the oven so as to color the tops, or else use a salamander 
(Fig. 123) for the purpose; arrange these toasts around a remove or else serve them separately on a 
folded napkin or simply on a plate. 

For Chester Cheese. Use the same slices of bread, only instead of toasting them, lay them in 
a sautoire with hot clarified butter; brown them on one side only, then drain, and leave the butter 
in the sautoire. Cover the fried sides with a layer of grated cheese (Chester), sprinkle over a dash 
of cayenne pepper, and return the crusts to the sautoire containing the butter, then push it into a 
moderately heated oven. When the cheese has become creamy, take out the sautoire, and dress 
the crusts either on folded napkins or around a remove. 

(654). CHESTNUT WITH GEAVY GAENISHING (Garniture de Marrons an jus). 
Peel two pounds of chestnuts; scald them so as to be able to remove their red skins, then lay 
them in a buttered flat saucepan. Moisten them to their height with broth (No. 194a) and let 
the liquid come to a boil, then remove the saucepan to a slower tire while cooking the 
chestnuts, being careful to keep them whole. After they are tender the moistening should be 
reduced to a glaze, and then glaze them over with a brush before serving them. Another way is 
to split the shells on the side of each chestnut, plunge them into very hot frying fat, drain, and 
peel off the shells and red skins; cook them in boiling water with two ounces of butter, one ounce 
of celery, a little sugar and salt; simmer the whole and reduce the moisture entirely, then add a 
little meat glaze (No. 402) and some good gravy (No. 404); reduce and roll the chestnuts around 
so as to glaze them thoroughly and dress them either around a remove or in the center of an entree. 

(655). OHEVEEUSE GAENISHING (Garniture Ohevreuse), 

Eight ounces of truffles cut in small slices, heated in Madeira wine and some meat glaze (No. 401). 
Sixteen ounces of foies-gras of either duck or goose, weighing in all about a pound. Thirty-two 
pieces of stuffed Spanish olives. Mingle these garnishings together in a sautoire, and add one 
quart of supreme sauce (No. 547), and at the very last moment add two ounces of very fine butter. 

(656). CHICKEN MINION HLLETS GAENISHING (Garniture de Filets Mignons de Poulet). 

Pare the minion fillets by removing the inside nerve, and the fine skin which covers them, have 
them all the same shape and size, then cut on each minion five or six small crosswise incisions 
dividing them in equal spaces, and in these incisions lay small, round slices of truffles, half an inch 
in diameter and cut very thin. Lay the minions on buttered sheets, giving them the shape either 
of a crescent or else laying them straight without bending them, but they can also be rolled around 
a column mold and laid one beside the other, streak half of them with truffles and the others with 
tongue, and fill the inside of them with quenelle forcemeat (No. 89), place on each of those 
streaked with truffles an olive, and on those streaked with tongue a ball of truffles, half an inch in 
diameter, put them in a buttered sautoire, moisten with a little mushroon essence (No. 392), cover 
them with buttered paper, and let them poach in a slow oven. Use these minions for improving 
garnishings. 

(657). OHIPOLATA GAENISHING (Garniture k la Chipolata). 

This garnishing is composed of eighteen small whole carrots or else cut into balls and glazed, 
eighteen small glazed onions, eighteen cooked mushrooms, fluted (No. 118) eighteen whole chestnuts 
moistened with broth and cooked until they fall to a glaze, and small broiled Chipolata sausages (No. 
754). Set these various garnishings into a sautoire, and pour over when ready to serve some 
espagnole sauce (No. 414) reduced with Madeira wine, add half a pound of half inch squares of salt 
pork, fried in butter and cooked in consomme; arrange the garnishing in clusters for removes, or 
mingled for entrees. 

(658). OHOUX WITH CHEESE GAENISHING (Garniture de Ohoux au Promage). 
Prepare a pate-a-chou with three gills of water, half a pound of fiour, a quarter of a pound of 
butter, a pinch of salt and a pinch of sugar, when dry mix into the paste five or six eggs one after 
the other and finish with a handful of grated cheese. Make round choux laying them on a baking tin 
a short distance apart, either with a pocket or a spoon, egg the surfaces and dredge over with parmesan ; 
bake in a good but slackened oven. When dry, remove and leave till partly cold, then open the 
Bides and fill each one with a spoonful of cheese fondue (No. 2954). Dress on a napkin or 
around a remove. 



OAUJSTISHINOS. 335 

(659). OOOKS'-COMBS GAENISHING A LA COLBEET (Garniture de Cretes de coq a la Colbert). 

Select one pound of cock's-combs of equal size; put them into a colander and plunge it 
by degrees into some water a little warmer than tepid, then heat it gradually, in the meanwhile 
watching them attentively until they are done, or when by rubbing them with a cloth, the skin 
detaches. Drain at once, and put them in a cloth with a little fine salt, and rub them thoroughly 
till they are clean; finish cleansing by rubbing them with salt between the fingers, and in case the 
skin should not peel off, plunge them once more into boiling water, and finish by skinning prop- 
erly. Now put them into warm water to soak for twenty-four hours, changing the water several 
times, and then cut off the tip of the points and the roots of the combs; lay them once more in 
plenty of salted, tepid water, and squeeze them well to make them disgorge their blood; change 
the water several times, and finish by cooking them very slowly in acidulated water, then drain 
dry, and roll them in meat glaze (No. 401), fine butter and chopped parsley. 

(660). OONNETABLE GAEMSBIlfG (Garniture Oonn^table), 

Prepare sixteen minion fillets of chicken well freed of all sinews and skin; streak eight of them 
with tongue and dress them in a circle, shaping them around a three-quarter inch column cutter, 
put them on small square pieces of buttered paper; fill the interiors of each with chicken quenelle 
forcemeat (No. 89) laid through a pocket, and on top of the forcemeat set small half inch balls of 
truffles. The other eight minion fillets are to be also laid in- a circle on squares of buttered paper, 
filling the interiors with the same forcemeat as the others, but on the top of each set a stoned 
olive stuffed with anchovies; place them all on a buttered baking-pan, cover over with a buttered 
paper, moisten with mushroom essence (No. 392) and poach in a slack oven. Have sixteen small 
game quenelles made with a teaspoon (No. 155) and laid in a buttered sautoire, after decorating 
them with pistachio nuts, and poached in boiling salted water. Sixteen escalops of ducks' liver, 
covered on both sides with a villeroy sauce (No. 560) containing mushrooms and raw fine herbs; 
let these get cold, then dip them in beaten eggs, and bread-crumbs, and fry them to fine golden 
color. Garnish the remove with the quenelles, minions and Villeroi ducks' livers. Serve a 
financiere sauce (No. 464) separately. 

(661). CEAWTISH GAENISHING (Garniture d'Ecrevisses). 

Whole crawfish are sometimes used combined with other garnishings, but they are considered 
more as decorations than otherwise; in any case they must first be cooked in a court-bouillon 
(No. 38), and the shells removed from the tails, without detaching the meat from the bodies, or leave 
the shells on. 

How to Cook Them. Wash the crawfish, changing the water several times during the opera- 
tion; suppress the small vein found in the middle underneath the fins, at the tail end, then lay the 
fish in a saucepan, and season with salt, mignonette, vinegar, or white wine, sliced onions, branches 
of parsley, thyme, and bay leaf. When they are cooked, break off the small side claws, and 
remove the shell or not as desired. They can now be trussed as shown in Fig. 506, for skewers. 
The crawfish tails after being picked out of their shells, are used as garnishings, sauteing them 
in butter and seasoning with salt, pepper, fine herbs and fish glaze (No. 399). The body shells 
stuffed with forcemeat (No. 90) are used for soups. 

(662). DEMIDOPP GAEftlSHING (Garniture a la Demidoff). 

Sixteen pieces of small, flat lobster croquettes (No. 880), sixteen pieces of risolletes of pan- 
cakes with forcemeat or hashed fish, sixteen pieces of large drained oysters, rolled in powdered 
crackers and fried in clarified butter, drained and dredged over with chopped parsley. Dress this 
garnishing around a remove and serve separately a lean veloute saucs (No. 415) reduced with 
some of the oyster liquor. 

(663). DOLPB3TTES OF CHICKEN GAENISHING (Garniture de Dolphettes de Poulet). 
Brown two shallots in two ounces of butter; add one pound of cooked white chicken meat cut 
in one-eight inch squares, and four ounces of ham cut the same; season with salt, pepper, and nut- 
meg, and cover the whole with a pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414), and a gill of tomato sauce (No. 
549). Let the whole boil up once, then remove it, and set it aside to get cold, and with this pre- 
paration make crescent shaped croquettes; dip them in beaten eggs, and bread-crumbs, and fry 
them nicely. 



336 THE EPIOURK AJSL 

(664). DOLPHETTES 01 TENDERLOINS OP BEEF GARNISHING (Garniture de Dolphettes de 

Tilet de Boeuf). 

Fry colorless, in two ounces of butter, one ounce and a half of chopped shallot; add to it a 
pound and a half of cooked and finely hashed tenderloin of beef, three ounces of fresh bread- 
crumbs, three ounces of grated parmesan, and eight egg-yolks or two to three whole eggs. Let this 
preparation cool off, then divide it into eight parts, forming each one into a ball; roll these in 
fresh bread-crumbs and grated parmesan, mixed well together and fry them to a fine color. 

(665). DUCHESS GARNISHING (Garniture Duchesse). 

Lay on the table a quarter of a pound of flour; two ounces of parmesan, and two ounces of 
Chester cheese, both finely grated; a grain of salt and a pinch of cayenne pepper; dilute with a 
little water and one egg so as to obtain a smooth and firm paste. Roll this out on the floured 
table to one-eighth of an inch in thickness; cut it into inch and a half diameter round pieces, and 
lay these on buttered sheets; cook in a hot oven, not having them brown. Beat up some fresh 
butter in a bowl; mix in with it double its quantity of grated Chester cheese, and a dash of 
cayenne pepper. Lay the round pieces of cooked paste two by two, one on top of the other, after 
spreading them all thickly with the cheese preparation; range them once more on the sheet, and 
heat for a few minutes in a moderate oven, then dress on a napkin or around the remove. 

(6661 FERMIERE GARNISHING (Garniture a la Fermiere). 

Sixteen persons. One pound and a half of braised cabbage (No. 2706), arranged in clusters. 
Eighteen small braised lettuce (No. 2754), eighteen potatoes, cut olive shaped, blanched, cooked 
afterward in broth, and let fall to a glaze. Eighteen pear shaped carrots, blanched, and cooked in 
white broth, then let fall to a glaze. Dress all these garnishings in clusters, being careful to 
alternate tastefully the different colors. Serve separately thickened gravy (No. 405). 

(667). FINANOIERE GARNISHING (Garniture a la Financiere). 

Sixteen Persons. For Removes. Should the garnishing be required for dressing around a 
large piece, then it can be composed of whole peeled truffles of quenelles, molded in a dessert- 
spoon (No. 155), escalops of foies-gras, mushroom heads, cock's-combs and kidneys, lamb sweet- 
breads or small veal sweetbreads larded and glazed. This garnishing is used for garnishing 
removes of poultry, game and meats, dressing it in groups around and serving a financiere sauce 
(No. 464), separately. 

For Entrees. Cooked, peeled and minced truffles; small mushroom button heads, slices of 
sweetbreads a quarter of an inch thick, pared with a cutter to an inch in diameter, quarter inch 
thick slices of foies-gras pared with an inch diameter, round cutter, and oblong quenelles. Put the 
garnishings into a sautoire and cover with financiere sauce (No. 464). Use this garnishing for 
covering or surrounding entrees. 

(668). FLEMISH GARNISHING (Garniture a la Flamande). 

Blanch and drain a pound and a half of cabbage, put it into a saucepan with half a 
pound of salt pork, pepper, one onion with two cloves in it, and sufficient unskimmed broth 
(No. 194a) to cover the cabbage, then let cook all together for two hours. Cut sixteen carrots into 
pear-shaped pieces, parboil them first, and then finish cooking them in some broth with sugar, 
until they fall to a glaze. Have sixteen cork-shaped pieces of turnips, parboil and cook them also 
in consomme with sugar, till they fall to a glaze. Drain the cabbage when it is done, and lay 
them on the ends of the remove to be garnished, being careful to suppress the onion containing the 
cloves. Cut the salt pork into slices, and lay these on top of the cabbage, then set the carrots 
and turnips in clusters on the sides. Serve separately a half-glaze sauce (No. 413) or else a white 
sauce (No. 562). 

(669). FRENCH GARNISHING (Garniture a la Franyaise). 

Twenty-four pieces of truffles, the size and shape of a crescent olive, in a good half-glaze 
sauce (No. 413) with Madeira. Six ounces of cooked cock's-combs and four ounces of cooked cock's- 
kidneys. Twenty-four small mushroom heads, turned (No. 118), sauted, drained and rolled in meat 



337 

glaze (No. 401) and fresh butter, twenty-four pieces of small chicken quenelles (No. 89) poached in 
a small pointed mold decorated with truffles, twenty-four crawfish tails, shelled and sauted in 
butter, seasoned with salt, lemon juice, chopped parsley, meat glaze (No. 401) and fresh butter. 
A French sauce (No. 467), to be served separately. 

(670). PEITADELLES OF VEAL GAENISHING (Garniture de Fritadelles de Veau), 
Dip a pound and a half of bread-crumbs in some milk, and when well soaked, extract all the 
liquid; have a pound of pared and well chopped roast veal, also two ounces of finely chopped beef 
marrow. Put two ounces of chopped up onions in a saucepan to fry in two ounces of butter, but 
do not let it attain a color, then add the veal, the pressed bread-crumbs and the beef marrow, salt, 
pepper and nutmeg, also a finely chopped lemon peel; reduce and beat in two eggs. After the 
preparation has cooled off, divide it into small parts so as to be able to make flat croquettes, dip 
them in egg, then in bread-crumbs and fry to a good color. 

(671). FEITADELLES OP EOAST BEEP GAENISHING (Garniture de Pritadelles de Eosbif). 

Cut into three sixteenth inch squares, one pound of lean roast beef, chop up two 
ounces of onions, fry in two ounces of butter, dredge over with two spoonfuls of flour, 
moisten with broth and reduce; then add the beef, salt, pepper, nutmeg, chopped parsley and two 
ounces of cooked lean ham cut as small as the beef, heat the whole without boiling; set it aside to 
get cold and then roll it into balls one inch and a quarter in diameter, flatten down, dip in beaten 
eggs, bread-crumbs, and fry them nicely in butter. 

(672). GODAED GARNISHING (Garniture a la Godard). 

Make twelve quenelles, in an entremet spoon (No. 155), decorate richly. Twelve small 
sweetbreads larded and glazed, the throat sweetbreads if possible. Twelve large cock's-combs, 
and twelve cock's-kidneys. Twelve pieces of escalops of foies-gras, cut half heart shaped; twelve 
fluted mushrooms (No. 118) and twelve medium whole truffles, all rolled in a little half-glaze sauce 
(No. 413). Six very small squabs may be added if desired, but it is apt to make the garnishing too 
large. Dress around the dish in clusters, serve a half-glaze sauce (No. 413), separately. 

(673). GEIBOULETTE GAENISHING (Garniture de Griboulettes). 

Have ten ounces of chopped raw beef free of nerves, half a pound of kidney suet, the skin and 
fibers suppressed; chop each of these separately, then mix in with them five ounces of fresh bread- 
crumbs, three tablespoonfuls of onions, chopped and fried in butter, one tablespoonful of chopped 
parsley, salt, and pepper. Divide this preparation into flat balls, flatten them down to an inch 
and a half in diameter, dip them in beaten egg, then in the bread-crumbs and fry in clarified 
butter until a fine color. 

(674). GEIMOD GAENISHING (Garniture a la Grimod). 

Ten ounces of cooked cock's-combs warmed in a little dry Madeira and half-glaze sauce (No. 
413). Twenty ounces of cock's-kidneys poached the same as quenelles, drained and thickened with 
meat glaze (No. 401) and butter. Twenty ounces of foies-gras quenelles, mixed in and thickened 
with a half-glaze sauce and Madeira. Arrange all of these in clusters around a remove, and serve 
separately a Grimod sauce (No. 475). 

(675). HENEION GAENISHING (Garniture a la Henrion). 

Raise the fillets from six snipes, remove all the nerves and skin, pare, season them with salt, 
and pepper, and saute them in butter a few minutes before serving. Trim twelve slices of un- 
smoked red beef tongue into half heart-shaped pieces the same size as the snipe fillets, and heat 
them in a little half -glaze sauce (No. 413) with Madeira wine. Have twelve croquettes made of 
blanched chicken livers, the finely chopped insides of the snipes, and the meat cut from the 
thighs, also some mushrooms; the livers, thighs, and mushrooms to be cut into three-sixteenths of 
an inch square; mix the whole with a brown sauce (No. 414), and use this preparation for making 
round croquettes one and a half inches wide by one quarter of an inch thick, dip them in beaten 
egg, then bread-crumbs, and fry them a nice color. Serve separately a financiere sauce (No. 464), 
finished with the snipe carcasses. 



338 THE EPICUREAN. 

(676). IMPEEIAL GARNISHING (Garniture a rimpenale), 

Have a half pound or eight whole truffles peeled and cooked in champagne; eight escalops of 
foies-gras, breaded a la Villeroi, and fried; sixteen pieces of fluted mushroom heads (No. 118) 
cooked in butter, lemon juice and water; eight cocks'-combs and eight cocks'-kidneys, sixteen 
chicken quenelles made with a teaspoon (No. 155). Arrange the foies-gras at the end of the dish 
and the remainder of the garnishing in clusters around, and cover with a little half-glaze sauce 
(No. 413) and Madeira. Serve in a separate sauce-boat a financiere sauce (No. 464). 

(677), JARDINIERE GARNISHING (Garniture a la Jardiniere). 

The jardiniere is composed of whole roots and vegetables, or else cut into distinct pieces, such 
as carrots, turnips, string beans, cauliflower, small glazed onions, Brussels sprouts, asparagus tops 
or cucumbers cut in the shape of cloves of garlic. The carrots and turnips are to be blanched, 
but not refreshed, then sauted in butter with a little sugar, and finished cooking in beef 
broth (No. 194a), just sufficient so that when the roots are done the moistening .is reduced to 
a glaze. The small onions to be sauted in butter with a little sugar and let fall to a glaze; the 
string beans cut in lozenges and cooked first in salted water, then refreshed and drained and 
sauted in butter. The cauliflowers to be cooked in water and cut into small flowerets, the Brussels 
sprouts, asparagus tops and cucumbers cooked in salted water, then sauted in butter. The green 
vegetables should be cooked in a copper vessel, the others in a tinned one. This garnishing 
is usually arranged in clusters and served with a separate brown Madeira sauce (No. 492). For 
entrees mix all the vegetables together and add to them a brown sauce (No. 414) and some fine 
butter. 

(678). LIVERS A LA VINOELAS GARNISHING (Garniture de Poies-Gras a la Vincelas). 

For this garnishing use fat duck or geese livers, weighing from a half pound to a pound. Peri- 
gueux foies-gras preserved plain may be substituted in case no fresh livers are on hand, but when 
the latter can be procured, then blanch and braise them in a mirepoix with Madeira stock (No. 419), 
let them get cold in it, then cut them up into quarter inch slices, and trim them either 
round shaped or into ovals or hearts. In the meanwhile prepare four ounces of peeled truffles, 
eight ounces of salt, unsmoked red beef tongue, and six ounces of cooked mushrooms, cut all these 
three into eighth of an inch squares, and lay them in a Madeira sauce reduced with some good 
white wine, and after the preparation is cooked, let it get cold, and with it cover one side of the 
livers, and over this lay chicken cream forcemeat (No. 75) ; dredge finely chopped pistachios over 
the top. Garnish the bottom of a dish with slices of fat pork, lay the livers on top, and cover the 
whole with buttered paper, set it into a moderate oven for ten minutes, and serve separately a 
champagne sauce (No. 445). 

(679). CHICKEN LIVER GARNISHING IN CASES OR OROUSTADES (Garniture de Poies de 

Volaille en Caisses ou en Oroustades.) 

Choose a pound of very white, fine, and fat chicken livers, mince them well and fry them 
briskly in butter, moisten with half a gill of Madeira wine and half a pint of espagnole sauce (No. 
414); season with salt, pepper and the juice of a lemon. With these prepared livers fill some 
croustades made with puff paste fragments, or else oiled cases previously dried in the oven, gar- 
nishing the bottoms with chicken and fine herb forcemeat (No. 75). Serve a half-glaze sauce 
(No. 413) with Madeira separate. 

(680). MACEDOINE GARNISHING (Garniture Mac6doine). 

Cut into small quarter of an inch squares, eight ounces of carrots, selecting only the very red part, 
or else use a round or oval vegetable spoon, two to three-eighths of an inch in diameter; have eight 
ounces of string beans cut into small lozenges, also six ounces of very tender turnips, prepared ex- 
actly the same as the carrots: blanch these separately in salted water, keeping them slightly hard, 
then lay them with a piece of butter in a sautoire. and season with salt and sugar; toss them for a 
few minutes on a brisk fire to dry well the moisture, then drain off the butter. Put on, to reduce, 
two or three gills of bechamel (No. 409), stir into it a few spoonfuls of raw cream, and finally a 



339 

few spoonfuls of root glaze (No. 403); remove it from the fire, and add to it the vegetables already 
cooked, as well as six ounces of green peas, and six ounces of asparagus tops, both previously 
boiled in salted water. Finish the macedoine by incorporating into it three ounces of fresh butter 
broken up into small bits. 

(681). MARROW AND OHIVE8 CANAPES GARNISHING (Garniture Canape's a la Moelle et 

a la Ciboulette), 

Have sixteen oval shaped bread croutons, slit them all around a quarter of an inch from the 
edge, and fry them in clarified butter. Empty out the centers, and garnish the insides with slices 
of marrow previously plunged into boiling water, drained, and seasoned with salt and cayenne 
pepper; dredge over the top some finely shred chives, and set them for one minute into a warm 
oven; before serving cover with a Madeira sauce (No. 492). 

(682). MARROW FRITTERS GARNISHING (Garniture de Beignets de Moelle). 
Cut some beef marrow in thick slices, and plunge them into boiling water, then drain and 
leave them to get cold. Dip each separate piece into bread-crumbs, then in beaten egg, and again 
in bread-crumbs, and fry them a fine golden color in very hot f rying-fat. A separate sauce-boat of 
half -glaze sauce (No. 413) should be served at the same time. 

(683). MARROW FRITTERS WITH TRUFFLES GARNISHING (Garniture de Beignets de Moelle 

aux Truffes). 

Cook in white veloute stock (No. 422) for ten minutes, six marrow bones cut in six inch lengths; 
let them get cold, then take out the inside marrow. Prepare a half-glaze, with an equal quantity 
of jelly, or simply put a gelatine leaf in the half-glaze, and to it add some chopped truffles; put a little 
of this half glaze into the bottom of timbale molds (No. 3, Fig 137) set on top a piece of the marrow 
sufficient to fill it half, and over the marrow a slice of truffle, and again a piece of marrow, so as to 
fill the mold to within an eighth of an inch from the top; finish with some of the sauce, then unmold, 
and dip each one in beaten egg, roll in bread-crumbs, and fry, or else simply cover the marrow with 
an espagnole sauce (No. 414), containing chopped truffles, having it almost cold, then dip them 
in frying paste (No. 2, No. 137), and fry them a fine color; serve a half -glaze sauce separate (No. 413). 

(68*). MATELOTE GARNISHINGS (Garnitures Matelote). 

These garnishings are composed of roe, milt, crawfish tails, small glazed onions, whole 
mushrooms, and even truffles; they are to be dressed either in clusters or mixed together; if the 
latter be desired, then cover them with a matelote sauce (No. 498), and if the former, arrange them 
in distinct groups, and serve the sauce separately. 

(685). MATELOTE BOURGUIGNOTTE GARNISHING (Garniture Matelote Bourguignotte). 

Eighteen crawfish cooked in a court bouillon (No. 38). Eighteen croutons of bread cut 
into half heart-shape and fried in butter. Eight ounces of small mushroom heads, eight ounces 
of small onions blanched, then cooked in consomme and glazed. Eight ounces of crawfish tails, 
a pint and a half of bourguignotte sauce (No. 437). Put into this sauce the mushrooms, small 
onions, and crawfish tails; dress this garnishing around the remove, and decorate the dish with 
crawfish and the bread croutons fried in butter. 

(686). MATELOTE MARINIERE GARNISHING (Garniture Matelote MariniereX 
This garnishing is to be made with thirty-six small quenelles of pike (No. 90) seasoned with 
cayenne pepper, thirty-six cooked mussels, after removing the small black appendage found attached 
to them, thirty-six crawfish tails, and six ounces of minced truffles. Mingle all these ingredients in a 
sautoire, and cover them with a mariniere sauce (No. 497), reduced with a part of the mussel 
broth. Add butter to the sauce just before serving. 

(687). MATELOTE NORMANDE GARNISHING (Garniture Matelote Normande). 
To be made with eighteen cooked mussels out of their shells, eighteen medium sized blanched 
oysters, eighteen pieces of milt a la villeroi (No. 698), to be the same size as the oysters; eighteen 
medium sized cooked mushroom heads, eighteen trussed crawfish cooked in a mirepoix (No. 419), 



340 THE EPICUREAN. 

eighteen round crusts one inch in diameter, cut from the crusty part of small rolls, buttered and 
colored in the oven. Mix in a sautoire with some Normande sauce (No. 509), the mussels, oysters, 
and mushroom heads, then dress them around a remove, and garnish the outside edge with the 
croutons, the crawfish, and the milt a laVilleroi (No. 698). 

(688). MILT GARNISHING (Garniture de Laitances), 

Select very fresh milts, and suppress all the sanguineous parts; soak them for one hour, 
then lay them in a saucepan with some water, salt, vinegar, and parsley. Boil up the liquid, 
and remove it to the side of the range, and keep it thus for twelve to fifteen minutes in order to 
have them poached. They are to be served either with a Colbert sauce (No. 451), or else milt 
a la Villeroi (No. 698), 

(689). MIRMIDONS WITH PARMESAN GARNISHING (Garniture de Mirmidons au Par- 
mesan). 

A mirmidon is a small canelon. They are made thin and short and are filled with a special 
preparation. Pound two raw chicken fillets with an equal quantity of cooked fat livers; two or 
three raw peeled truffles, and two raw egg-yolks; season this forcemeat and press it through a 
sieve. Prepare a noodle paste (No. 142), roll it out into a thin, long, three inch wide band, and 
cut this band transversely into three inch length pieces; plunge them inte boiling, salted water, and 
let them cook for eight minutes, then remove the saucepan to the side of the fire, to keep the 
water bubbling for two minutes longer; the paste should now be done. Drain the pieces with a 
skimmer, and set them in a vessel containing tepid, salted water, then lift them out one by one 
to wipe dry, and spread on the table; cover each separate piece with a layer of the prepared force- 
meat, rolled so that the edges of the paste meet, and arrange these mirmidons on the bottom of a 
buttered sautoire (Fig. 130), keeping them close together, the edges of paste underneath; moisten to 
their heighth with a tomato sauce (No. 549) and half-glaze sauce (No. 413), reduced with two or three 
spoonfuls of Madeira wine; boil the sauce, cover the saucepan and set it on a very slow fire to allow 
the mirmidons to simmer from fifteen to twenty minutes; drain, trim the ends nicely, then range 
them in layers in a vegetable dish, dusting over each layer with grated parmesan, and besprink- 
ling the top with a little Madeira sauce (No. 492). 

(690). MORIL AND GIEOLLE GARNISHING (Garniture de Morilles ou de Girdles). 

Wash in several waters one pound of morils; cut off half of their stalks, then throw 
them into boiling water, and leave them to soak awhile; change the water, then drain them by 
lifting them up with the hand and laying them on a sieve, afterward saute them in four ounces of 
butter, adding the juice of a lemon, and let them cook for ten minutes. Moisten them with one pint 
of consomme (No 189), adding a bunch of parsley garnished with thyme and a bay leaf; boil the 
whole for twenty minutes, then suppress the parsley and drain off the broth; now add some espagnole 
sauce (No. 414), and fine herbs, and reduce it to the consistency of a light sauce, to which add the 
morils and serve very hot. 

Girolle. Cut off the stalks from two pounds of girolles and then divide them into two or four 
pieces, according to their size. Wash well in several waters, then drain. Heat four ounces of 
butter in a sautoire, adding the girolles and some lemon juice; moisten with a pint of bouillon (No. 
187,) season with salt and let boil slowly for a few moments, then drain and put them back into 
the saucepan. Reduce a pint of espagnole sauce (No. 414) with the clear part of the stock, add it 
to the girolles just when serving and finish the sauce with a little chicken glaze (No. 398) and two 
ounces of fresh butter. 

(691). MOUSSERON GARNISHING, PRINCESS SAUCE (Garniture de Mousserons, Sauce 

Princesse). 

An eatable mushroom growing under moss, found in woods. Cook two pounds of mousserons 
under a cover, by placing them on a buttered dish, and seasoning with salt, pepper, and two gills 
of white wine; cover with a bell cover, begin to cook on the fire, then finish for twenty minutes in a 
moderate oven; drain and place the liquid in a pint of princess sauce (No. 528), reduce and when 
done to perfection, add a tablespoonful of chicken glaze (No. 398), and two ounces of butter. 
Roll the mousserons in the sautoire and serve. 



341 

(692). MUSEBOOMS A LA DELSAET GABNISHING (Garniture de Champignons a la Delsart). 

Select twelve fine, large mushrooms, cut off the stalks and empty them partly with a vegetable 
spoon, being careful not to break them, then throw them gently into fresh acidulated water. 
Chop up finely two ounces of the mushroom parings, one ounce of onions, one clove of crushed garlic, 
and one teaspoonf ul of chopped parsley, heat well two ounces of butter in a saucepan, add the onions 
to fry colorless, then the garlic, and parsley, and finally the mushroom parings after these have 
reduced their moisture, put in two ounces of bread-crumbs, a pint of bechamel (No. 409), salt, 
pepper, and nutmeg, stirring in four raw egg-yolks, drain the mushrooms