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Full text of "Epitome: Yearbook 1976"

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EPITOME 1976 



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ORJgWORP 

<jJ^X » To t Ke 
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LEMIGrl life. 

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LEHIGH UNIVERSITY, 1925 



THE SETTING 
Bethlehem . . . Christmas City . . . Steel town . . . 
College town. It was first home to Moravians seeking 
religious freedom. Now, the center of Bethlehem Steel 
Corporation, Moravian College and Lehigh University, 
it is a city steeped in religious, educational and indus- 
trial tradition. 





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Introduction. 3 



CITY VIEWS 



NORTH & SOUTH 




4, Introduction 




Introduction. 5 



BETHLEHEM 
This biend of colonial and contemporary 
provides a bridge to the past of our 
Bicentennial nation. Pre-Revoiutionary 
relics juxtapose construction sites and 
scaffolds in this city of historic tradition, 
and modern transition. 






Introduction. 7 




THE STRUCTURES 

This Wend of old and 
new also is found across 
the bridge, at our 111 
year-old University. Ivy- 
coated buildings and 
Railroad Gothic 
architecture foreshadow 
the Bethlehem Steel plant 
and the modern 
chemistry complex. 
These structures remind 
us of just how brief our 
four-year stay is, and 
that the University wiiJ 
continue to grow long 
after our Lehigh ex- 
perience becomes a 
muted memory. 



8, Introduction 




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Introduction, 9 



THE STUDY 

But what will we remem- 
ber about our Lehigh 
experience? The tedium of 
weekly lab reports or the 
relentless struggles with a 
40-page research paper? 
Perhaps we will remember 
when hours of study led to 
fleeting moments of 
revelation . . . these 
moments of insight that 
made the studying 
worthwhile. 








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10, Introduction 




Introduction. 11 



THE SOCIAL INTERACTION 

We will surely remember much more 
than our academic struggles, such as 
extended snack bar visits with friends, a 
casual game of cards between classes, and 
practical joking in the cafeteria. We iearned 
as much from each other as from our 
classes and textbooks. This social 
interaction also was part of the Lehigh 
experience in '76. 




12. Introduction 




Introduction, 13 



THE SPIRIT 
Four years of Lehigh undergraduate life 
has given us good friends, professors, good 
books and a warehouse of memories. Our 
memories of the spirit of '76 (Lehigh-style,) 
will linger on in coming years. 





14, Introduction 




Introduction, 15 




aht Epitome. 



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PORTRAITS OF THE FOUNDERS 



AN EDITOR'S GUIDE 




The passage of decades often can be chronicled in the architecture of this 200 year-old nation, as 
evidenced in the opening photographs of the University Center, first as it stood in the late 1800's (once 
known as Packer Hall), then as it appears today. This campus and the Bethlehem community have changed 
radically throughout the eleven decades of Lehigh's existence. However, as the introductory section reveals, 
both the community and the University have preserved their founding spirit and historical identity. Lehigh 
founder Asa Packer, once of the nation's earliest industrialists and philanthropists, founded in 1865 a 
University which soon became a leader in blending technological and scientific training with study or the 
liberal arts. In 1976, an age which places increasing importance on technology, Lehigh continues to embrace 
this founding philosophy. It is therefore appropriate to focus this 100th yearbook of Lehigh on our founder, 
and subsequent pioneers of his ideals. 

The 1976 Epitome undertakes to provide Portraits of the Founders during Lehigh's embryonic stages. This 
book is a capsulized history of Lehigh and American educational ideals of the late 1800's. The Epitome also 
provides a personalized collection of the issues and events of Lehigh from 1972 through 1976. The 
traditional ingredients - senior portraits, directory, and sports, also have been maintained. We hope this 
Epitome, divided as outlined below, will provide a comprehensive portrait of Lehigh, one which will 
sustain interest through coming years. 



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SPEAKERS AND ACTIVITIES 

The theme of Portraits of Founders is supported in this collection of the pioneers and leaders who 
lectured or performed on campus this year. Also included in this section, (pages 24 through 65), is a fairly 
extensive collection of student organizations which reflect the direction of this University in 1976. 



» r I E r 






THE LEHIGH EXPERIENCE 

This section provides a light-hearted, pictorial essay of The Lehigh Experience for 1976 graduates. The 
essay, compiled by Jo Fineman (pages 68 through 81) begins with the brief memoirs of one of Lehigh's older 
alumni, in order to provide a historical backdrop for the subsequent contemporary portrait. 



18, Editor's Guide 



TO THE 1976 EPITOME 



THE FOUNDERS 



Pages 180 through 189 offer a literary and illustrative it of the Founders. This essay, written and 
researched by Marty Baron, (Rob Feldman assisting), includes a portrait of the founding and developing 
stages of Lehigh, and personal features on the early, outstanding human products of the University's 
educational techniques. 




PORTRAITS OF THE PRESENT 



The balance of the 1976 Epitome spans the more traditional yearbook elements outlined below. 

SPORTS, pages 284 through 321, provides the names, faces and scoreboxes for athletics in 1976. Edited by 
Helen Richardson, Dan Solis-Cohen, Jay Pennick and Fred Haynes, this section also includes a four-year 
wrap-up, outstanding athlete features, and an intramurals listing on page 321. 

SENIORS & FACULTY, pages 84 through 177, also comprises more than a catalog of seniors and their 
professors, by department. Edited by Helen Richardson and Andrea Kaplan, this section features a 14-page 
essay of early Lehigh life reprinted from founding issues of the Epitome. Photo reproductions were 
prepared by Warren Bradway. 

ADMINISTRATION, pages 324 through 333, reflects the theme by including the educational philosophies 
of selected administrators, including President Deming Lewis, Dean John Karakash and Dr. Lora Liss. 

LIVING GROUPS, pages 192 through 281, presents portraits of today's Lehigh students living in 
dormitories and fraternities. 

SENIOR DIRECTORY spans pages 336 through 359. 

COMMUNITY, pages 362 through 375, includes glimpses of Lehigh business interests. 

ANIMATED HISTORY, in the effort to provide a proper balance of coverage for the reader, offers a 
humorous history of four years of undergraduate life, from the perspective of Lehigh men and women. Jeff 
Bloom and this editor collaborated to produce copy for the animated history, (pages 376 through 389), while 
Gene Mater provided his art work and sense of humor for graphic effect. 

Even though the 1976 Epitome exceeds in length many preceeding volumes, the staff concedes many 
omissions and oversights. Every Lehigh graduate will remember different aspects of four years as a student. 
A yearbook staff only can strive to produce a literary and photographic framework for these years. We 
hope that our portraits have come close to achieving this ambitious goal. 



LAUREN EISENBERG & 
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, 1976 EPITOME 





Editor's Guide, 19 



DEDICATION 

Many founders of America, as well as 
Lehigh's founder, Asa Packer, are dis- 
tinguished for their commitments to 
technological and cultural exchange. 
Shortly after our University was founded 
in 1865, its leaders expressed hopes of 
merging engineering skills with progress 
in the humanities, in the effort to pro- 
duce an adaptable, versatile graduate. 

Eleven decades later, the University 
continues to pursue the same direction. 
Dr. John J. Karakash, dean of the College 
of Engineering and Applied Sciences, 
provides an excellent example of this 
pursuit, thus making appropriate this 
dedication to him of the 100th Epitome. 

Dean Karakash has conducted pioneer- 
ing research on the prototype electronic 
digital computer, on radar systems and 
bioengineering projects. He also joined 
other researchers to study mechanical 
hearts. 

Before he came to Lehigh three dec- 
ades ago, Dean Karakash earned respect 
and recognition in other fields. He was 
an international and Balkan Olympic 
javelin champion, a translator in several 
languages, a columnist and a music crit- 




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20, Dedication 





Even more important to Lehigh students, Dean 
Karakash possesses the same commitment to 
others that distinguishes leaders. As a resource- 
ful, perceptive educator, he has adapted his 
teaching techniques to environments outside the 
classroom, such as the cafeteria, snack bar and 
student lounges. This commitment has often 
kept him working overtime on campus until 2 
a.m. 

This Renaissance Man is distinguished by two 
of his pursuits. First, for bridging the gap separa- 
ting many students from faculty members. Sec- 
ond, for his own technological, cultural and ath- 
letic strides which have proven the various 
fields can be blended successfully. In 1976, Le- 
high University should continue to pursue this 
direction for its students as vivified by Dean 
Karakash. 



Dedication, 21 





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To tke 
board of tru-sfee-s, 
tke faculty, tke 
•student- body, ot\A 
©J] olker^s i isle I > i^l 
ed , we offer' 1kk5 
brief' record of" 
LEMIOM life. 



SPEAKERS AND 
ACTIVITIES 




McCLINTK -MARSHA] L 

STEEL BUILDINGS, 
BRIDGES, Etc 




i:onlrd< ling llitii rs: 




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THE SPEAKERS AND ACTIVITIES 



1975-76 was a year of activity, especially on the political campaign trail. Several speakers who came to 
Lehigh this year reflected this political climate of our 200 year-old nation. 

The Blaustein Lecture Series marked its tenth anniversary by sponsoring, not one, but three speakers — 
George W. Ball, Hans }. Morgenthau and James R. SchJesinger. Other politically-oriented speakers included 
debaters WiJiiam Rusher and Ailard Lowenstein, Sen. Richard Schweiker, Flo Kennedy and jimmy BresJin. 

But politics was not the only center of attraction for Lehigh audiences this year. Dramatic presentations 
of Grease and 1776 played Grace Hall, while the Mustard 6- Cheese revealed a wealth of student talent with 
productions including Richard III, Daisy, and MacBeth. 

This year, the hills of South Mountain also came alive to the sounds of The Kinks (Lafayette Weekend), 
Don McLean and Livingston Taylor, and Peter Frampton. Cheech & Chong also were slated to perform but 
the off-beat comics got lost 'en route,' and never appeared. 

From stage to screen, the Epiphany Movie Series observed its sixth year with films including Love and 
Death, Mash, and RoIJerbaJJ. 

The Royal Lichtenstein Circus also marked its sixth year of performance to Lehigh audiences. 

Even the busiest Lehigh students took time to enjoy some of these events on campus this year. 




Blaustein Lecturers this year included George W. Ball (third from left), Hans J. Morgenthau (second from left) and 
James R. Schlesinger, (top of next page). Also pictured above are Series coordinator, Dr. Carey B. Joynt, (left), and 
Lehigh President Dr. Deming Lewis, (right). 



24, Speakers & Activities 




As Jong as the United States maintains nuclear equality with the Soviet Union, keeps NATO defenses in 
repair, and as long as the Western European governments remain committed to the same objectives of 
freedom, a direct challenge to major Western nations is improbable. 

— George Ball. 

The United States necessarily is the only counterweight to the expansion of Soviet power, and it has 
given us, in the past four years, an unenviable destiny which we must face. 

— James Schlesinger. 

Once a considerable number of nations have nuclear weapons, and if the nuclear arms race continues 
between the United States and Russia, it is inevitable that there will be a general nuclear war, meaning the 
end of civilization as we know it, if not the end of mankind. 

— Hans Morgenthau. 



Speakers & Activities, 25 



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ISSUES: 1976 AND BEYOND 
LOWENSTEIN VS. RUSHER 



. . . the electoral system itself seems somehow unable to 
register even seismographic sense of American will. 
— Lowenstein. 



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Allard Lowenstein, (standing), debates 
William Rusher, (seated left). Dean Brian 
Brockway officiates. 

26, Speakers & Activities 




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JIMMY BRESLIN 



Disorder gives this country energy. I don't think a 
democracy can survive with perfect order. 



I am essentiaiiy a working man, not a great, 
profound thinker. 



FLO 
KENNEDY 



In a reaily oppressive society, as completely corrupt as ours, we're all niggerized in one 
way or another ... the less (democratic) society is, the more we're all niggerized. 



Speakers & Activities, 27 



SENATOR 

RICHARD 

SCHWEIKER 



We have to balance the imperfections of Con- 
gressional oversight against the risks of 
abuses of presidential power. 




RUSTY RHODES 



Kennedy was killed as he was 
seeking peace in the world. We 
must seek the truth or forever pay 
the price of living in tyranny. 




28, Speakers & Activities 



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Speakers & Activities, 29 



LIVINGSTON 
TAYLOR 



30, Speakers & Activities 





PETER 
FRAMPTON 



Speakers & Activities, 31 




GREASE 




32, Speakers & Activities 




1776 




Speakers & Activities, 33 



THE ROYAL LICHTENSTEIN CIRCUS 




it's a kind of a ritual, people sitting closely together and 
enjoying the signs and symbols of life and man. 



34. Speakers & Activities 




AN EXCEPTIONAL 

STUDENT ACTIVITY 
IN 76 

SELF-RELIANCE . . . MORE 
THAN JUST A COURSE 



Seven women and eight University men this year 
enrolled in English 198, SeJf-ReJiance in a Tech- 
nological Society. They labored to turn a decaying 
century-old house into a comfortable, contemporary 
dwelling. Peter Beidler, associate professor of English, 
supervised this project, which was filmed by Good 
Morning, America TV show. In May, the students 
sold the house for a profit, part of which they shared. 




Speakers & Activities. 35 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 




Row 1: M. Sudano, C. Tapper, N. Kirsch, S. Smith, (president). M. Walker. M. Surdovel, S. Langenberg. P. Hein. A. Kunes; Row 2: D. 
Stavisky, C. Ursic, N. Reynolds, C. Manns, L. Black, R. Hinz, D. Miller, L. Kraushaar, N. Shilay; Row 3: C. Davis, M. Ferrante, F. 
Sievalla, R. Gross, D. James. 



ALPHA GAMMA DELTA SORORITY 



36, Speakers & Activities 




Seated: J. Luker. M Groover; Standing: R. Colgrove. G. Freestone, J. McGlade. 



AMERICAN 

INSTITUTE 

OF 

INDUSTRIAL 

ENGINEERS 




ARNOLD AIR 
SOCIETY 



A. Gagnon, M. Malone, G. Green, A. Polaneczky, C. Kneiss, Capt. Fratto, Capt. Fergus, C. Kowalchuk, T. 
Addison, M. Proft, J. Leknes, M. Hoffman, P. Carey. G. Fritchman, B. Dietz, D. Atherholt, D. Kaminski, J. 
Chaippini, L. Pellett, C. Lambert, B. Weffer, W. Zalewski, J. SanLorenzo. 



Speakers & Activities, i7 




J/ 



B. Bellew, K. Thompson, J. Rieger, T. Nederostek, G. Gerhat, V. Maslanka, G. Kazmer. R. Fiebrantz. J. Klusaritz, G. Kralik, S. Gower, S. 
Stellate D. Clymer, A. Ring. B. Muth. B. Snow. C. Lambert, W. Musselman, A. Murphy. G Rpese, F. Rodriques, S. Begany, R. McLennan. 



ALPHA LAMBDA OMEGA . . . ALO. 



38, Speakers & Activities 



ALPHA PHI SORORITY 




Row 1: C. Lee, P. Whelchel, B. Murphy, P. Ruffin, G. Holt; Row 2: S. Swisher, S. Thompson, G. Martins, E. Boorujy, R. Eeckhout; Row 3: 
K. Talhelm, M. Marson, K. Capobianco, M. Skibo, L. Washington. 



Speakers & Activities, 39 



THE BAND 



Despite construction of the Taylor Sta- 
dium parking lot, which moved band 
practice to the Saucon Valley Fields, the 
Marching 97 continued the tradition of 
excellence which makes it known as the 
Finest in the East. Small flame bands 
were sent to Delaware and Davidson, but 
the entire 97 represented Lehigh at every 
other football game, and at the Lafayette 
bonfire. 

In the spring, the Concert Band played 
the premiere of NOVA, written espe- 
cially for the Lehigh Band by David 
Stock. NOVA was performed at the win- 
ter concert, which featured music from 
Revolutionary times up to the present. 
The Concert Band also played while on 
tour to Washington and Baltimore during 
spring break. 

Ronald Demkee was the guest con- 
ductor at the annual Pops Concert, April 
24 in Grace Hall. 

The Varsity Band performed at local 
concerts in the newly-finished Bethle- 
hem Plaza Mall and Muhlenberg College. 
- The Band. 



40. Speakers & Activities 




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P. Every, K. Gerb, J. Gorcsan, B. Gruver. A. Peters, M. Tarduno, R. Werkman, D. York, A. Ring, E. Graber. R. 
Quier, D. Blanchard, D. Paulus, M. Pavia, H. Tritt, B. Brake. W. Chieco, A. DeLuca, R. Doll, J. Dreyfuss, K. 
Jerwann, J. Jolly, W. Kimball, M. Melino, N. Miele, D. Moll, R. Moroz, R. Reed, D. Rush, P. Scarff, S. Sharko, 
R. Stofanak, J. Thatcher, U. Weist, W. Williamson, P. Dinsmore, W. Gallagher, A. Levin, J. Torongo, M. Wager, 
A. Bangser, G. Bast, G. Davis, M. Hahn, R. Heller, T. Kamens. K. Molinaro, D. Ritter, R. Yeaton, S. Filemyr, P. 
Grady, K. Sailer, R. Snyder, M. Thompson, D. Walters, C. Berta, K. Frantz, A. George, M. Surdovel, M. 
Velnich, R, Cressman, T. McMahon, T. Marrs, J. Ney, D. Weaver, C. Ackerman, S. Bartoskik, f. Cox, D. 
Haessig, R. Hegedus, N. Sharko, D. Tiller, J. Brown. 



CONCERT 
BAND 



Speakers & Activities, 41 






* 




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Jeff Bloom. Editor-in-Chief 



Eileen Canzian, Editorial Page Editor 




Ed Bogucz. (right) Jeff Bodenstab; News Editors 



Fred Haynes, Sports Editor 



Helen Richardson, Desk Editor 




42, Speakers & Activities 



BROWN & WHITE 





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PARTIAL STAFF PHOTO: Seated: J. Bodenstab, G. Schuster, A. Grey, D. Sprick, R. Jaffe, A. Zimmerman, K. Grigsby, E. Bogucz, C. 
Gordon, D. Tilles, E. Canzian; Standing: P, Fenaroli, J. Bloom (editor-in-chief), J. Swiatek, G. Itzenson, S. Danoff, P. Menard. 




Prof. Robert Sullivan. Jeff Bloom. 



Speakers & Activities, 43 



STAGE BAND 



D. Paulus, R. Reed, T. Thatcher, P. 
Scarff, H. Tritt, P. Grady, M. 
Thompson, K. Sailer, D. Walters, R. 
Heller, K. Molinaro, G. Bast, R. 
Yeaton, G. Davis, S. Bartosik, C. 
Ackerman, D. Ruch, T. Batory. 



CHI 
EPSILON 



Row 1: M. Connolly, Prof. J. O 
Liebig, (adviser) G. Yakowenko, V 
Maslanka, B. Butler, J. Handler, B 
Raiser, M. Goldberg, D. Ward, B 
Buck; Row 2: D. Charters, M 
Garrabrant, B. Bachelor, C 
Schwinger; Row 3: P. Nonemacher 
L. DiSabatino, S. Helfrich, D 
Yetter, D. Simmons. 



44, Speakers & Activities 





WOMEN'S CHOIR 



A. Fisher, R. Gent, R. Grapin, R. Hinz, B. Hjorth, L. Hutchison, C. Hvizdos, J, Janecek, M. Kaufmann, A. Kunes, A. Lustig, L. Sudock, R. 
Vogel, K. Donlon, D. Fennick, J. Goldman, M, Griest, D. Hari, M. Inslee, J. Krause, S. Okoniewski, M. Rogers, S. Rzasa, M. Buchinsky, S. 
Gimson, S. Goldberg. A. Harwick, P. Hein, M. Jack, A. Karoly, R. Kauffman, L. Kraushaar, S. Langenberg, E. Lemke, D. Miller, P. Roth, 
K. Talhelm, K. Woerner, D. Harle, C. Hazlehurst, A. Helffrich, P. Lewis, N. Reynolds, R. Sutherland, J. Torongo. 



Speakers & Activities, 45 



CIRCLE K CLUB 



The Lehigh University Circle K Club is a 
campus action organization sponsored by the 
Bethlehem Suburban Kiwanis Club. It is one 
of the largest collegiate service organizations, 
one which includes more than 1,000 chapters 
throughout the U.S. and Canada. 

This year, the club engaged in many activi- 
ties aiding the Lehigh and Bethlehem commu- 
nity. These activities included sponsorship of 
the Powderpuff football game, the sale of 
Kiwanis popcorn, UNICEF collection during 
Halloween, distribution of literature on Mul- 
tiple Sclerosis, and attendance of the Pennsyl- 
vania District Convention, at which Lehigh 
earned a second place trophy for the Multiple 
Sclerosis Award. 

The Circle K Club of Lehigh University is a 
growing group of enthusiastic and dedicated 
students interested in friendship and in- 
volvement. The club is the middle link from 
Key Club, the high school level, to the Ki- 
wanis Club, the business level. The Tri-K 
activities serve the community on all levels. 

The Circle K International Theme this year 
has been Impact on Life. 




Seated D. Koriner, T. Meiss, T. Vasko, K. Schaffer; Standing: N. Flaster, K. 
Motschwiller; Not pictured: C. Kozak, P. Eichen, C. Alva, K. Czarnecki, J. Fabre. K. 
Bandler. J. Coyle, D. Munnelly, J. Goldberg. 



OFFICERS: D. Konner, President; K. Bandler, Vice-President; T. Vasko, Secretary; P. Eichen, Treasurer. 



46, Speakers & Activities 





■■ I 




100th 
YEAR . . . 
EPITOME 



FOUNDING 

EPITOME 

EDITORS 



Speakers & Activities, 47 



Helen Richardson 

Women Sports, Section 

Editor. 




June Fasesky, Managing Editor. 



Prof. Sharon Friedman, Faculty 
Adviser. 



48, Speakers & Activities 



THE 1976 EPITOME STAFF 




Row 1: A. Dember, B. Judson, L. Eisenberg (editor-in-chief), H. Richardson, J. Church, A. Kaplan, R. Feldman. Row 2: L. 
Chatzinoff, M. Baron, D. Solis-Cohen, E. Connery. A. Cowin, B. Hedderman. 



Greg Gleason, Assistant Photo Editor. 



Eric Connery, Photo Editor. 

I*' WW ! « 



V 




Speakers & Activities, 49 



FORUM VI STEERING COMMITTEE 




Standing: M. Maskaleris, W. Jones, B. Patterson, Prof. R. Sarubbi, Prof. L. Leder, Prof. F. Beer, S. Lochner. C. Roysdon, Prof. D. Amidon, 
1. Mead; Seated: D. Gomez, Prof. R. Bell. G. Iacocca. 



FRATERNITY 

MANAGEMENT 

ASSOCIATION 

. . . FMA. 



J. Ney, R. Hawk, Standing: T. Boone, D. Jones, H. 
Smollinger, A. George. Not pictured: J. Crabtree. 



50, Speakers & Activities 




GAMMA PHI BETA SORORITY 




Row 1: S. McGovern, A. Levy, C. Cardello, A. Werley. D. Tice, D. Dabrowski, J. Raibaldi; Row 2: R. Welliver, P. Russell, J. Sugarman, M. 
Carpenter, D. Lerf, G. Tarantini, B. Dippel, L. Zwirn, S. Stemple, E. King, S. Gimson; Row 3: L. Buck, J. Cawley, A. Wenhold, F. 
Braunstein, B. Davis, L. Melillo, K. Mitchell. S. Chodakewitz, L. Zarembo, L. Southworth, L. Montovano, M. Kaufman, V. Pardo; Not 
pictured: T. Eck, S. Kossar, M. Leonardi, P. Petko, S. Trost, C. Kuerner, L. Phillips. 



Speakers & Activities. 51 



GLEE CLUB 




T. Anderson, P. Avakian, M. Barron, D. Brown, S. Buchanan, D. Charles, S. Chen. Y. Cheng, S. Cohen, P. 
Crabill, P. Davidoff, G. Davis, W. Deprefontaine, S. Dill, B. Dunbar, M. Dybeck, S. Eberhardt, R. Furanna, 
B. Hamlette, P. Hamlin, J. Horner, S. Hutton, J. Johnson, A. Kaminsky, M. Kearns, J. Kloeber, G. Kraft, P. 
Landin, P. Menard, A. Merwin, T. Miller, R. Nahigian, R. Nesbitt, R. Orlemann, A. Redden, T. Reiber, R. 
Rentier, M. Roberts, A. Ruggles, D. Seicol, L. Shoemaker, S. Silver, J. Steeley, J. Stone, K. Tower, D. Trost, 
L. Weiss, P. Wurdack. 



52, Speakers & Activities 



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Speakers & Activities, 53 



GRYPHONS 



G. Liddick, President; B. 
Williamson, Vice-President; 
C. Tack, Treasurer; C. 
Meyer, Secretary; Dean S. 
Drager, Adviser. 




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MEN 



1 



A Grypon's duties include aiding and advising freshmen in 
social and academic adjustments to University life. Gryphons 
are known best as listeners who hear the needs and problems 
of their freshmen neighbors. 

They are also responsible for keeping academic progress 
reports on their freshmen, and for encouraging such progress. 
This last charge sparked the issue of imposing a minimum 
grade requirement on prospective Gryphons. 

The Gryphons already meet standards used in an extensive 
screening process including interviews with other Gryphons 
and residence halls personnel. 



54. Speakers & Activities 



HILLEL SOCIETY 




Seated: S. Welner, S. Ades, F. Braunstein; Standing: D. Klein, D. Konner. 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL . . . IFC 




S. Seidel 

D. Baskin 

P. Leitner (president) 

Dean R. Reeves 

R. Hawk 



kers & Activities, 55 



LEHIGH UNIVERSITY VOLUNTEERS . . . LUV. 




G. Bernstein, J. Bradley, M. Cahn, J. Costaldi, A. DeCillis, E. Fruin, D. Glueck, M. Howell, T. Kielty, S. Kovak, L. Leaky, M. Leonardi, B. 
Nassult, K, Saxe, N. Sharko, N. Stein, C. Lack, E. Lober, R. Vaccino, D. Van Doren, P. Wise. F. Woodruff, A. Zimmerman, S. 
Glazebrook. 



MUSTARD & CHEESE 




M. Skibo, C. Bayer, in The Bald Soprano. 



56. Speakers & Activities 



ORGANIZATION FOR THE ENHANCEMENT 
OF AFROMANITY . . . OEA. 




Row 1: C. Penks, Jr., J. Garrison, D. Hampton, L. Scott, C. Brown; Row 2: C. Waxner, P. Jones, R. Thomas, W. Morris, L. Jackson. 



Speakers & Activities, 57 



PHI ETA SIGMA 




58. Speakers & Activities 



Mary Howell, President 
Sue Bieling, Vice-President 
Wendy Frank, Secretary 
Martin Gardner, Treasurer. 


M. Aho 
P. Appino 
R. Baker 
W. Bast 
R. Bates 


C. Reese 
A. Reitz 

R. Rothstein 

D. Santanasto 
M. Schemel 




J. Bechard 


J. Schreiber 




S. Beck 

G. Bernstein 


J. Siegel 
A. Sisson 




P. Blazewicz 


R. Stofanak 




K. Boczar 


R. Tallon 




R. Boldosser 


M. Tarduno 




R. Braen 


D. Valerio 




B. Brake 


J. Velimesis 




D. Buchanan 
M. Buchinsky 


R. Vogel 
G. Wai 




D. Bulas 


L. Weiss 




R. Busch 


G. Wilhite 




G. Calabrese 


W. Wilkes 




J. Cassidy 
A. Cerra 


A. Ying 

C. Zambotti 




K. Chany 


W. Bartholomew 




S. Chen 


J. Janinek 




D. Clymer 
J. Copoulos 


P. Joyce 
D. Kaiser 




D. Corbett 


T. Kamens 




M. Craig 


R. Kauffman 




f. Davidson 


P. Klauder 




J. Davis 


J. Klusaritz 




J. Depsky 
P. Dinsmore 


K. Kochaba 
L. Kraushaar 




R. Donovan 


R. Kruger 




J. Doyle 
f. Dunn 
J. Fetcho 


A. Leitgeb 
R. Loughridge 
M. MacDonald 




R. Forrest 


A. Madden 




M. Frey 
D. Gardner 


R. Malchione 
T. Mastri 




R. Gogle 
R. Graves 


R. McCormick 
S. McGouldrick 




J. Gretter 


C. Musto 




D. Hari 


P. Newman 




C. Hazlehurst 


K. Owen 




P. Hein 


D. Paulus 




B. Hjorth 
H. Hoyt 
D. Illowsky 


E. Perry 
S. Petrizzo 
E. Pfenninger 



PRE-LAW SOCIETY 




Prof. H. Whitcomb, (adviser), S. Lochner. Not pictured: K. Gardner, 
J. Kline, J. Martin. 



RUGBY CLUB 




K. Cahill, T. Loose, J. SanLorenzo, J. Eschelman, D. Zuck, K. Deutch, T. Judge, A. Braen, G. Streich, D. Hurley, M. 
Arendas, M. Vallee, C. Bailey, D. Hooker, A. Loser, S. Strait, L. Hogg, C. Emerling, T. Smith, C. Gordooni, R. 
Abele, D. Sabor, Brutus, N. Greek. 



Speakers & Activities, 59 



RADIO STATION 




Row 1: A. Thum (third from left), S. Freilich, R. Jaffee, J. Kievet, S. Strickland; Row 2: J. Sion, P. Klein, M. Hutton, M. Berlant, P. Lamb, 
E. Liebman, D. Martin. B, Fisher; Row 3: M Alterman, A. Schecter. D. Tilles, (fifth from left), J. Lewis, J. Mancuse, C. Haclitt, M. 
Pettigrew. R. Rosenthal, T. Dexter. 



60, Speakers & Activities 



RESIDENCE HALLS COUNCIL . . . RHC. 






Speakers & Activities, 61 




62, Speakers & Activities 



I 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES COUNCIL . . . SAC. 




Gary Hirschberg, 
Publicity Chairman 



Chuck Marino 



Bob Miller 




Melanie McCoy 



Nancy Kirsch 



I/5SAC76 F0UL 
ItHltH 

'2 CONRAD 

;;i men 

.'2 5TAVISM 
23BYK 
M his uwrfk 
IS KHLEHAn 

miEi 

1 KnoCH 






ADVANTAGE TIME 



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Speakers & Activities. 63 



STUDENT METALLURGY SOCIETY 




Row 1: J. Kershner, A. Fox, G. Miller, G. Yencho, M. Sippel; Row 2: B. Fritz, G. Molitor, L. Nusselt, C. Packard, J. Dandridge, J. Paules, A. 
Morin, A. Romig, T. Castle. 



TAU 

LAMBDA 

CHI 

SORORITY 




i > ■'■■'"%.-. w» S*K& v u^&Jteif St- 5 * 



R. Kincaid, E. Knipe, C. Schmidt, C. Kiss, M. Schantz, J. Schlener, M. Klopack, J. Wagner, S. Oravec, C. Cenci, 
L. Trinkle, C. Hvizdos. 



64, Speakers & Activities 




Speakers & Activities, 65 



mmm 



E 



ORgWORJP 




^ To 1k 



board of trustee-' 5, 
ike faculty , tl\e 

^btuderd- body', OJ\d 
oJ 1 olker^s 1 i vie r 11 -o1 

ed , we offer 1 hk5 
brieP record c 

LEMIGM life. 




re 

■ ■■■■■I in* 




THE LEHIGH 
EXPERIENCE 




McCLINTlC-MARSHAI I. 

STEEL BUILDINGS, 
BRIDGES, Etc 






."*> 




* 






s < <* 








' 













PORTRAIT OF AN ALUMNUS AS A YOUNG MAN 

LEHIGH LIFE IN THE 1920's 



When Jack Killmer entered Lehigh University as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1922, he ate his meals in what is now 
Lamberton Hall, visited his classmates in what were then 
the only two dormitories on campus — Taylor and Price 
Hall — and went to the second floor of Drown Hall on 
Friday night of the big spring weekend for a dance. 

In his college day, women were not to be found at 
fraternities more than twice a year; Williams Hall was the 
newest building on campus with only five cars parked 
nearby; the University Center was called Packer Hall; 
chapel was compulsory at 7:45 every morning and a flu 
epidemic, prevalent throughout the country, claimed the 
lives of several of Killmer's classmates. 

There's no denying that things were different half a 
century ago. As Killmer reminisces about his college days, 
a smile brushes across his face and his blue eyes light up 
with enthusiasm. 

Jack Killmer can afford to be a man of reflection and 
leisure. He did well by the University and today, the 



University benefits through the charisma of this 74 year- 
old alumnus. 

In 1966, Killmer, originally from Reading, Pennsylvania, 
retired to Florida after serving Bethlehem Steel as chief 
metallurgical engineer. 

"Now I'm very much interested in Lehigh," he says. 
Killmer, Alumni Bulletin correspondent for the class of '22, 
vice president of the alumni association, is trying to get 
alumni to leave the University money in their wills in 
amounts around the figure of $10,000. 

Killmer recounts that life at the University in 1918 was 
strongly influenced by pre-World War I and actual war- 
time conditions. "The army took over all dorms and frats, 
including mine (Delta Upsilon). The navy had one or two 
frats. There were 100 men in a fraternity. And the student 
Army Training Core (SATC), which we called Saturday 
Afternoon Tail Chasers, were drilled and taught in the 
regular army branch, Camp Coppee. They were the 
poorguys wearing uniforms," Killmer said. 



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68, Experience 



Time has far from dulled Killmer's memory. If anything, 
it has sharpened it. He recalls all the details of Lehigh life 
in 1919. Killmer even remembers things he heard when he 
first arrived at the University — things like Lehigh's 78-0 
rout of Lafayette in 1917. 

Killmer participated in swimming and track and wres- 
tled in the 125 lb. class while at Lehigh. "We got 'mat-itch' 
in those days — canvas mats. It was treated with yellow 
salve — called it the 'yellow menace'." 

He refers to the wrestling coach at that time, Billy 
Sheridan, as "One of the best anybody ever had — a legend 
at Lehigh." And Killmer rattles off the names and traits of 
all the University's athletic coaches as if he worked with 
them yesterday. 

"Everybody had to attend pep rallies before games. Bosie 
Reiter, physical education, would get wild — throw himself 
all over — urge the fellows to fight, fight, fight." 

Intramurals in Killmer's day were in their infancy — 
"Just about coming into its own," he says. 

"ATOs and BETAs were most of the big athletes then. I 
think ATO's class of 1923 had no graduates. At one time 
the whole house flunked out and the house was closed for 
a semester. The BETAs were better. They insisted on some 
study, but, well, they weren't too much better. Delta Tau 
Delta was pretty good as far as running the campus." 

He recalls Chi Psi, Delta Upsilon, Sigma Nu, Phi Delta 
Theta, Fiji, Theta Delta Chi, and Delta Tau Delta being on 
campus and Psi Upsilon off campus when he was here at 
the University. 

"When Theta Delt was built, there was no road for them 
to use to get up there. I don't know how they managed to 
get up there." 

Faculty? "Older men who were characters." And Killmer 
remembers them. "Charles Thornburg, 'Thorny' — math 
department head and head of all disciplinary measures. He 
knew everyone in this school by his first name and he 
made it a point to know just whom he was dealing with. 
Did he run a tight ship!" 



"There were a bunch of characters in the math depart- 
ment — Lambert, grey hair, beautiful goatee and mous- 
tache. Metallurgy head was Plug Richards who may be the 
world's authority on aluminum, iron, steel, copper. Busi- 
ness — little short fellow, bald — Stewart. Arts — quiet man 
named Black." 

Socially, Killmer agrees Lehigh was a far cry from what 
it is today. "Bishopthorpe Manor was a prep school for 
girls. They were a different type of girl. Cedar Crest girls 
studied. Bishopthorpe girls didn't," he says with a sly grin. 

For spring houseparty weekend in his freshman year, 
(and this was the last year that this was in vogue, he says), 
the men would leave the fraternity to room with a friend 
in town for a week, while women came and lived in their 
places. 

"Friday was the big night for the dance on the second 
floor of Drown which was then the U.C. Top name bands 
would come — Fred Waring, Sherbo from New York. No 
'jive' you understand, this was the old style." 

Killmer has maintained an interest in the University 
since the day he graduated. After his graduation in 1924 he 
chaperoned parties at Delta Upsilon up until the house 
closed during World War II and when, he says, he grew 
too old. 

"Some fellows got drunk and two tried to make my wife 
on the second floor. I'd had it. At least they weren't DU's." 

On a recent visit to the University Killmer, who says he 
is just old enough to dislike long hair and beards, attended 
a Happy Hour at DU. "Short hair cuts look good," he says 
rubbing his bald head, before admitting the boys he met 
were clean, nice boys. "I was surprised, fellows came 
around and put themselves out to say "hello." I think 
they're all right. I really do." 

Killmer seems content and fulfilled. He's involved — just 
as he's always made it his business to be. 

"There's nothing like retirement. It's wonderful." And 
for this Lehigh alumnus who drank the beer, and partied 
Lehigh-style before we were born, "Life's been wonderful." 



Experience. 69 



FIFTY YEARS LATER . . . 
THE LEHIGH EXPERIENCE 






The Office of Admissions — where the life cycle of a 
Lehigh student officially begins. Oddly enough, this is 
probably also the first place where most students are 
introduced to the Epitome, for while they sit nervously 
awaiting interviews, they invariably leaf through past year- 
books to catch a capsulized glimpse of the University. 



The typical events and places that make up one's years 
at Lehigh are what this section is all about. From standing 
in line for room keys and bursar's receipts as freshmen to 
waiting for interviews at the Placement Office as seniors, 
we've tried to capture those things unmistakably "Lehigh" 
that have touched the lives of this University's students. 



70, Experience 




My first week at school was great. There were so 
many things for us to do that I didn't have a minute 
to breathe. First registration, then a Freshmen lunch- 
eon, then meeting my roommate and gryphons. 
Everything happened so fast. 



What I remember most is meeting so many new 
people. Everybody was extra-friendly in the begin- 
ning. It was as if we (Frosh) were all in the same 
boat. 



The wildest thing during orientation was the fresh- 
man rally. It was like camp — the cheering for '76 
and the alumni speeches. 'Steck' really fired us up 
with spirit. 




Experience. 71 




72, Experience 





UC food doesn't taste the same as at Rathbone, but it's the 
same grungy stuff. 1 guess the atmosphere makes the 
difference. With a good view outside, you can almost 
overlook the gray meat and green gravy. 



You couldn't pay me to get my books the first few days of 
the semester. No way wouJd 1 stand in those h'nes. 



If I don't go up and shut myself away in the stacks I can't 
get any work done. Sitting downstairs in Linderman is like 
. . . going to a party. 



Experience, 73 



LEHIGH - LAFAYETTE 
HAPPENINGS 



It's the biggest weekend here, (Lehigh-Lafayette). The 
game is big, but the parties afterward are what every- 
body gets really psyched about. Cocktails after the 
game followed by dinner parties, and then the "hill 
comes alive" to the beat of band parties. 

I think about who I'm gonna ask out for Lehigh-La- 
fayette way in advance. I have to be sure it's someone I 
can relax and have a good time with all weekend. 





One of Lehigh's first meetings with Lafayette at Taylor Stadium 



74, Experience 



1976 Talent Show 



Donkey Basketball game 




Experience, 75 






J«I« 










This campus looks beautiful when it's covered with snow. 
It sounds corny, but everything is so clean and pure 
looking when the snow first fails. 

The way I look at snow on campus, it's another excuse to 
stash your books. You can go fraying, have a snow ball 
fight and if you've got a car and money it's only an hour's 
ride to go skiing in the Poconos. 

I just want to curl up in my blankets and forget about my 
7:55 class when 1 look outside my window and see snow. 
It's so cold outside and so nice and warm and cozy inside 
that I hate to have to go out. 




76, Experience 



SNOW SCENES & SPILLS 




Experience, 77 



f-. 



SOCIAL SCENE 



I wouldn't go to pub nights and happy hours every 
single week. They get to be boring after a while. 
They get to be as routine as everything else around 
here. 



The only thing that gets me through a week of 
work is knowing I can forget about schoolwork all 
weekend. 




78, Experience 




At the point where I have absolutely had it with studying I usually walk over to the UC and 
play some pinball or pool. J can really let out some frustration on those pinball flippers. 



If I have a minute or two before classes sometimes 111 go play some pinbaJi. 




Experience, 79 




80, Experience 





When you're a senior all the decisions you've ever made 
while at Lehigh seem trivial. It is time to decide what 
direction you wish your life to take, and only you can be 
the one to choose. 



While the difficulties and pressures of the Lehigh ex- 
perience may often seem to overwhelm, there is a part of 
the experience which is unforgettable in looking back, the 
good times — and there were many. 



Experience. 81 





SENIORS 

AND FACULTY 




F- 



ORgWORP . 

To tKe 
board of tri_usfee«s, 
tKe Scully , tke 
sstudend'- body, &i\A 
oJi olkens irtfertNsI 
ed , we offer' iKics 
brief" record of" 
LEMiGM life. 



Miff 

i 4 I V * 



T «U + 



McCLINTIC- MARSH Al I 

STEEL BUILDINGS 
BRIDGES, Etc 





ACCOUNTING 




Timothy W. Addison Mark D. Alpert 




Michele Barnes Christopher J. Beckman Marc A. Beerman 



(ames R. Berger 




Richard E. Berse 



G. Paul Bishop 



[ames T. Blaine, III Bruce P. Blueweiss 




Ned D. Bogert 



Richard A. Boig 



|ohn J. Bolebruch 



Albert (. Bova. Jr. 



84, Seniors & Faculty 




Seated (1 to r): F. Luh, K. Siriclair, R. Mills (chairman). Standing: D. Bainbridge, ], Paul, C. Moore, B. Fries, D. Martin. 




Joseph E. Bower Allen G. Braithwaite, III Geoffrey D. Brown 



Stokes F. Burtis, III 




Craig M. Caltagirone Kenneth J. Carlson, Jr. Richard D. Carpenter 



Seniors & Faculty, 85 



100 YEARS OF EPITOME 

This year marks the 100th year of publication for the Epitome at 
Lehigh. For 100 years, this annual collection of names, academic, 
athletic records, and pictures has tried to capture the spirit and 
meaning of a Lehigh education. 

To celebrate this 100th anniversary, we have reprinted selected 
chapters from the first few volumes of the Epitome, beginning in 1876. 
In many respects, the Lehigh we have known from 1972-1976 reflects 
the same direction, the same spirit epitomized 100 yearbooks ago. 




-JlEBITQRIALt- 



3N presenting to Lehigh University students and Lehigh's 
friends the first issue of the epitome • a few words of 
introduction may serve to show the causes that have led to its 
publication, and prevent any misunderstanding as to its 
character and mission. 

In the past few years no feature in the history of our 
American colleges has been more striking than the astonishing 
interest that has been developed in athletic sports. Having its 
origin among the students, at the outset in many colleges 
frowned upon by the authorities, the enthusiasm has gradually 
spread, until now student and professor alike anxiously await 
the news from Saratoga or hear with joy or sorrow of the 
victory or defeat of their college nine. Instead of having 
obstacles thrown in the way of their sports, the fortunate 
students of to-day have the cooperation of the college 
authorities. Gymnasiums have been multiplied, until now there 
is scarcely a well-equipped college in the country which has 
not one, and a striking illustration of the importance that is 
now attached to this portion of a college paraphernalia is 
found in the fact, that if a college cannot advertise that it has 
gymnasium de facto, it is sure to have one in prospectu. 

The above is a prominent though single illustration of the 
fact that the public is daily growing more and more in 



sympathy with student life and student sports, daily 
recognizing more and more clearly the fact that there is much 
in a college course beyond the mere curriculum of studies. A 
young man in deciding where to spend the four best years of 
his life, may properly consider well all pros, and cons. Other 
things being equal, shall he not wisely choose in selecting that 
college for his Alma Mater, where, the day's work done, 
facilities for healthful sport surround him, where a glowing 
college spirit prevails, evidenced by live societies, reading 
room, athletic organizations and other similar signs of a good 
college tone? 

It is the recognition of the important bearing of such 
influences upon the growth of an institution, that has led to the 
publication of annuals at many of our colleges. Public spirited 
students have sought by this means to lay before the public, 
that important branch of the course of education, that 
catalogues never can show, the real college life itself. 

And now among this list of honorable publications our 
modest little epitome- for the first time asks a place. It does not 
claim to be a literary publication; that is not its genius. The 
causes that have led to its birth demand of it that it shall be 
simply an honest exponent of all our college organizations, and 
this, kind reader, is all we have sought to make it. 

Ere dropping our editorial quill, a few words of 
explanation to those who will compare our athletic 
organizations with those of other colleges. In fairness please 
remember, that Lehigh University is essentially a scientific 
school That large class from whose ranks are mostly drawn our 
boating and our ball men, those who having both time and 
money go to college as much for the culture derived from 
college life as from the course of study, is wholly wanting at 
Lehigh. This class rarely finds its way into scientific schools. As 



86. Epitome Feature 



is well said in the -new education.- "The student in a polytechnic 
school has a practical end constantly in view; he is training his 
faculties with the express object of making himself a better 
manufacturer, engineer," &c. Instead of boating and baseball, 
our exercise consists largely in surveying, laying out railroad 
curves and the like; athletic sports serving only as a reserve 
with which to occupy the few idle moments that an unusually 
severe course permits us to call our own. 

With these few words of explanation we think we have 
cause to be proud of the condition of our different 
organizations. 

The Class Histories show what has been done in athletic 
sports. The Engineering Society has lately shown unmistakable 
signs of renewed activity. The Chemical and Natural History 
Society proposes to treat us again this year with one of their 
exceptionably good courses of lectures. And the Junto is likely 
to rise from its ashes, not like the Phoenix, still as a Phoenix, 
but with another plumage in the form of a Reading Room. She 
will be hailed with joy in her new form by many students who 
have long seriously felt the want of a first-class reading room. 

Our brief editorial life has about expired. Yet ere our 
demise, we commend to succeeding classes the tender sprout 
planted by the hand of '78. Cherished by your fostering care, 
may she grow to be a noble tree, under whose wide spreading 
branches may many come to slake their thirst from Lehigh's 
fount of knowledge. 






Epitome Feature. 87 




Joanne G. Church 



Rocco J. Colabella, Jr. 



Janice A. Cook 



Thomas M Connor 





Ann M. Cowin 



A 




Jeffrey W. Crabtree 




Kenneth M. Cramer 



Seniors & Faculty 




+.k 



Thomas (. Critchley 




7 



David H. Crosson 




Barrett C. Cummins 



Charles M. DeAngelo 




Peter ]. DeBonis 




James M. Deitoh 




Robert C. Doll, Jr. 




Seniors & Faculty, 89 



THE LEHIGH UNIVERSITY. 



2 
O 

h— i 

H 

I— I 

O 

CD 

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W 

o 
o 



EXPENSES. 

Tuition is/ree in all branches and classes. The following is an estimate for the 
actual expenses for one collegiate year, clothing, traveling, board, room rent, 
washing, and incidentals not included. 

Books, Stationery, etc $50 00 

Chemicals, deposit, 75 00 

Chemicals, deficit, 14 53 

Materials (Platinum, $15. Blow pipe outfit, $10. Deposit $2.) 27 00 

Mineralogy, deposit 5 00 

Drawing Instruments 12 00 

Board, T square, triangles, curves, tacks, paper, etc 9 00 

Trips of Inspection (Hotels at $2 per day) 34 00 

Bridge Toll 3 00 

Gymnasium key (money refunded if returned intact) 50 

Class Dues 15 00 

Sodding Athletic grounds 75 

Ticket of Membership to Athletic Association 1 00 

Subscription to "Lehigh Weekly Advocate," 1 50 

Nine re-examinations, at $5 45 00 

Lehigh Burr, EPITOME, Engineering Journal, 3 00 

Doctor's bills (25 calls at $1.50) 37 50 

$333 78 



• Through an error this page 
without charge to the University. 



in the binding of the last "Register." We have inserted it 



\ 


Y 


\ 











— iir'TtS V - 



Costs and 
Accommodations 



Undergraduate expenses 

Tuition in Lehigh's undergraduate colleges is $3,300 a 
year for 1975-76. An increase for 1976-77 is projec- 
ted but the amount is not known at this writing. A 
student regularly enrolled in any of the undergrad- 
uate divisions of the University who registers for few- 
er than the normal hours of work will pay either 
$138 for each semester-hour carried, or the regular 
tuition, whichever amount is lower. Lehigh University 
reserves the right to change at any time the rules gov- 
erning tuition and fees. 

Items of personal expense are dependent upon 
each student's personal habits and circumstances. 
There are certain basic expenses in addition to tuition 
which must be met. For example, books, stationery, 
and drawing instruments may be purchased at the 
bookstore in Maginnes Hall at an average annual ex- 
pense of about $175. This allowance does not include 
personal expenditures. 

Since Lehigh is primarily a residential university, 
provision is made for student living quarters and din- 
ing facilities, and social fraternities. Not all upper- 
classmen live in residence halls or fraternity houses. A 
few elect to live in off-campus apartments or rooming 
houses. Students living in residence halls are required 
to eat in the University dining facilities. Four basic 
meal plans are available, and are described later in this 
section. There are no fees for athletics, health service, 
library, student activities, or student concerts and 
lectures. In addition, there are no matriculation, grad- 
uation, or laboratory fees. 

Undergraduate fees are payable prior to registra- 
tion. A bill will be rendered by the Bursar's Office 
which will indicate the payment date. If desired, pay- 
ment may be made in installments of 60 percent, plus 
a service charge of $3 per semester, due prior to regis- 
tration, 20 percent due one month after registration, 
and 20 percent due two months after registration. 
The $3 service charge is not refundable. 



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Epitome Feature, 91 




Susan R. Fradkin 



Allan R. Frank 



Gary M. Gentzle 



92. Seniors & Faculty 




Andrew S. George 





mttk 

Thomas V. Gilboy, III Steven C. Goldberg 




Craig C. Gordon Jeffrey B. Gotlinger 





Charles G. Greco 



Brian E. Gross 



Richard B. Hallett Sean J. Handerhan 



Seniors & Faculty. 93 





(5la# ; t6 



ijj EADER! Doff your hat! whilst in imagination you are 
•*)» presented to one of the finest classes it ever becomes to 
province of the Historian to chronicle. We bring to your mind's 
eye a dignified body, and shall endeavor to the best of our 
ability to treat it in a dignified manner. The Class as a body 
might be designated as a "heavy corporation," and as regards 
appearances - but hold: Our modesty will not permit us to go 
further. However, think! think of facial beauty in its grandest 
forms, then try to imagine something still more beautiful, and 
you have the effect that would be produced on you by the 
combined physiognomy of the Class. As regards energy it is 
safe to affirm that the " '76;" is the most enterprising class that 
ever entered the portals of Lehigh, and that in the pursuance 
of study, of athletic sports, and all the exercises incident to 
college life, her men have excelled, that is as a class body. But 
to retrograde, the class entered in 1872 with an aggregate of 
40. At the time of entering there was probably nothing to 
distinguish them from ordinary Freshmen, unless it was their 
good looks, and the absence of all hazing on account of their 
being rather a "bad crowd" to tackle. The first year passed 
swiftly by with nothing of importance to mark its flow until the 
last day, when the Class marked their Freshmen epoch by a 
burial of Rhetoric, thus inaugurating the custom at Lehigh, it 



being its first observance here. Surely the grim old trees must 
have lifted their green arms in wonder at the mysterious rites 
going on under their protecting shelter, and the moaning night 
winds must have carried a strange tale that night as it swept on 
its hurrying course. '72 and '73! To-day a poor unnoticed 
worm. A metamorphosis, and to-morrow behold the emerging 
butterfly. The despised Freshmen have changed into wise 
Sophomores, and the Class nose reaches an elevation about 
two degrees higher than before. In this year the Class gave 
further token of their enterprise by starting a College paper 
known as the "Lehigh Journal." It also held a burial of Logic 
which proved an immense success, for notwithstanding the 
dark and stormy night, the terraces were lined with people. 

This was the last burial held by the Class of " '76;" but 
the burial system thus inaugurated has been taken up by the 
other classes, and is now a recognized custom. The Class also 
tried to start an Athletic Association, comprising the 
Gymnasium, Boat Club and all athletic sports. The enterprise 
was started on a large scale, and the subscriptions amounted to 
some thousands; but very unfortunately, and owing to no 
mismanagement on the part of the students, the project failed. 
Another year of college life gone and " '76" are Juniors. In this 
capacity they started the idea of having a Semi-Annual Class 
Reunion, holding the first Class Supper at the Eagle Hotel on 
the 21st of December. Perhaps it would not be amiss to 
mention here an incident which occurred in this year as an 
example of the many interesting and often humorous 
adventures which occur at College. One cold, chilly afternoon 
in Fall, the Civil Engineers in the Class were engaged in 
making a hydrographical survey of the Lehigh River. They 
were at work from two till five o'clock, and the disagreeable 
feelings brought on by the raw and uncomfortable weather, 
were not at all allayed by handling a chain coated with ice, or 
an accidental immersion of their lower extremities in the cold 
waters of the river. There was a great deal of shivering, some 



94, Epitome Feature 



very blue faces, and alas! that we have to record it, some very 
strong language used on the river bank that afternoon, which 
did not, however, better matters any; but to cut a long story 
short, the whole thing terminated in a determination to "cut" 
at four. The hour having at last arrived, found the instructor, 

Mr. A , together with the chainmen, concealed from the rest 

of the corps by an intervening bend of the river. The chainmen 
very shrewdly started back to re-measure a line, and when out 

of Mr. A 's sight, folded their chain, and silently departed 

with the rest of the party, who having gained the top of the 
bank took to practical engineering, and made tracks. 

Mr. A having by this time also gained the top of the 

bank sighted the fleeing party, and did his level best to stop 
them, but at that moment the party seemed strangely hard of 
hearing, and paid no attention to the calls and shouts which 
followed them. The party having reached the depot, drew all 
the heat out of two or three stoves, and were making 
themselves comfortable, when they were startled by the 
apparition of an exasperated instructor, half frozen, breathless 
with rapid walking, and breathing terrible threats against the 
Junior Engineers. It is probably not necessary to state that as 
he came in one door the class "waltzed" out of the other, Grif. 
and Pete leading the van, while Evans' big boots were 



clattering along in close proximity to their heels. Walt, had 
business with some one in the telegraph office, and Ed. had to 
hurry over the river to see his father. 

Kind reader, let us draw the curtain here; but if you have 
ever been to college you can appreciate the situation of the 
corps, and the diplomacy, tact and squirming necessary to 
extract themselves from the scrape. In this year, intelligence 
reached the class of the death of Harry Eastman, one of the 
old members, and at one time president of the class. He was at 
this period attending the Naval Academy, but left on sick leave 
and expired at his home in Washington, D.C., in the month of 
February. Harry was a good scholar and well beloved by his 
class. This is the only member that the class has lost by death. 

To close. The class is now in its Senior year, and stands on 
the world's threshold, and though as a class she will soon cease 
to exist, yet the memories which cluster around her will always 
be sacred to her members, and the few happy days of the 
future will serve to recall the associations and pleasures of the 
four years at Lehigh. Though the Class History here ends, yet 
the history of its members is still to be traced, not with the pen, 
but by the results achieved by them in the great future of their 
lives. 

HISTORIAN. 




Epitome Feature, 95 




Todd C. Hansen 



Robert K. Howard 



Robert K. Hynes 



John Irvin 





Richard L. Koenigsberg Rein A. Krevald 



Gilbert M. Levine 



W. Gary Liddick 



Seniors & Faculty, 97 



TYPICAL FRESHMEN. 



Jtk No. 1. Being green, his main object in life is to 

^p conceal it. Of course he smokes, drinks, wears his hat 
^A on the back of his head, stands on the top step and 
^^B spits beyond the bottom one without taking his hands 
I out of his pockets, and uses bad language on all 
V occasions, especially when in the hearing of upper 
H classmen. He spends his spare hours in the janitor's 
fl room, gleaning points on all subjects relating to the 
fl College, which he immediately, with the air of having 
been born knowing them, communicates to his ben- 
ighted classmates at the top of his voice. When ordered to stop 
his "infernal racket," he retires mortified but not suppressed, 
and with still enough pluck to refrain from touching his hat to 
any professor he may chance to meet. Among other bright and 
manly things, he tries to chew tobacco in recitation but finds it 
rather inconvenient not to spit, and, after filling the chalk- 
trough with tobacco juice, and flunking horribly, retires, van- 
quished, to the nearest place of seclusion to unburden the 
anguish of his soul. Of this type, which is rather the least 
inoffensive and most easily moulded, are the largest number of 
Freshmen. 



rNo. 2. The studious boy. This individual has 
come to College to study. He has seen the folly of 
his ways and discovered that life is a stern reality 
and the world a Golgotha and place of skulls, so 
he puts away childish things and burns with a 
desire to be a man. He attends Chapel regularly, 
Sundays and week-days; not because he like 
Chapel (Heaven forbid!) but "because it is a rule 
of the institution and as such," &c, &c. He is 
politic and spends much time and labor in getting 
on the right side of his professors and instructors. Walking, 
sitting or standing, he always has his nose in a book or is 
taking notes. He is oftenest found in the Library, seated at one 
of the smaller tables, surrounded by massive dictionaries and 
reading the Life of George Washington, Martin Luther, or A. 
T. Stewart. Such is his desire to study, that he occasionally 
substitutes his text-book for his prayer-book during the Chapel 
service; but this always surreptitiously because he is most 
politic when most devout, and because he has an instinctive 
idea of the "eternal fitness of things." He confides to his 
roommate, (and his room-mate, faithless wretch, passes it on to 
the next,) that by following this course he hopes to become — 
"well, even President of the United States, who knows?" Too 
often, however, he is led far, alas! very far astray, and develops 
into a Sophomore of the bold, bad stamp; thus verifying the 
old saying, "A good beginning makes a bad ending." 



98. Epitome Feature 





:V. 



No. 3. The blase youth from the city. This is 
•j£gr r the "dizzy lad" who has seen all, been all, done 
all. He rarely seen to smile, never at 
things which amuse other people. He never won- 
ders, is never surprised, you can never tell him 
anything. He knows everybody and everything in 
the theatrical and sporting line; to ask him if he 
has seen "Pinafore" is to insult him. His conver- 
sation has at all times an intense and absorbing 
interest, owing to the number of lies he is ca- 
pable of telling per minute; and in this he dis- 
plays an ingenuity and a wily forethought which, while com- 
manding respect, causes the listener to hold his breath and 
pray, and the hair of his fellow-Freshmen to rise. He is 
constantly dodging some murderous policeman, irate father or 
large German brother, and is always in financial embarrass- 
ment. It is only from these things that he drives the excitement 
necessary to his existence, as he will explain to you 
confidentially, when he borrows your last quarter, having 
probably an hour before offered you a bet of ten dollars. 
College is tame and wearies him inexpressibly, and, being 
essentially a fast man, he graduates at his first examination. 



Commencement Week. 



MONDAY, JUNE IS, 1883. 




gOPjtojWDRE CREJvI^IOjNL 
& 

CREIATIO CALCULI 

— A — 

CLASSE SOPHMORICS.' 

Universitatis Letiiensis. 

CIP.EMONIA APUD PYKAM. 
DLDLIIUTng.-I MLCATIGSE S.-EIDLTATlOSES. 

I.audalio Funebris, . . Archimedes. 

Cantus Lugubiis. 

Oratio I^'ine. D'scipulus, Doolitli. 



Camus LugubrK 

P.ecatio Saceidos. 

Ignis subjectio pyrae. 

Omnes Calculuin exseciantur — 

ei pestem exop'ant — 

ei male precanrur — 

et eum in perperua oblivione 

obniunt. 

Vale, Calcule detestabilis! 

Semper 

a daemonibus diabolicis 

Vexeris ! 



W 




Gerald C. Livingston 



John H. Long 



Jack L. Malick 



Arnold F. Manche 




Susan A. Missal 



Lisa M. Mueser 



Walter R. Musselman 




Bruce S. Perry 



Raymond S. Plevyak 




Andrew J. Preston, Jr. 



100, Seniors & Faculty 




Gregory V. Riccardi 




lames M. Richmond 



Marc L. Rinaldi 




J \ 




Anthony f. Rocco 



Mary L. Rogers 



Jeffrey T. Rohrer 





Michelle L. Roman 



Ronald M. Roth 



R. Michael Rowsey Glenn R. Schacter 



Seniors & Faculty, 101 




The Physics Building blaze of 1900. 
Only the walls of the structure were left standing. 



OUR LITTLE GROANS AND 
CHUCKLES. 



If the University Library were open on Sunday, the 
students might go there and read instead of doing many other 
things less profitable and less becoming the day. 



Now that the balance-room is not opened until after 
Chapel, something in the way of a coat-room should be 
provided. At present, unless a student chooses to come up to 
the University in a freezing condition, he must drag from one 
room to another overcoat, overshoes, umbrella, and an armful 
of books. 



The thanks of the students are due and hereby tendered to 
Prof. Chandler, to whose enterprise and energy the University 
owes the possession of its new Athletic Grounds. We also 
thank the professors and officers of the University for their 
willing and substantial aid in the construction of these grounds. 
All that is now needed is the promised leveling and filling 
necessary to make a fine place for base ball. 



102, Epitome Feature 



The custom of having regular recitations while the exam- 
inations are going on, is, in our opinion, useless, and unjust. It 
is useless because it is a settled fact that no student who has a 
recitation and an examination on the same day will look at the 
subject of the recitation unless he is well up on the subject of 
the examination. It is unjust because if the student fails to 
attend the recitation he gets an absense; and if he attends and 
is not prepared, he gets a zero. It is also unjust because the 
student should be allowed to give his undivided attention to 
the examinations, in which he naturally wishes to do as well as 
possible. It is a very serious thing for a student with his full 
allowance of absences to have a recitation on the same day as, 
and just previous to an examination for which he is not well 
prepared, and no student should be required to do it. 

We are to have no more hops in the Drawing Room. The 
reason is supposed to be the fear of some injury to those "new 
desks." How very absurd. The "new desks" are strong and firm 
and could be moved up in one corner without the slightest 
injury. The students have always done this moving as well as 
the other work for the arrangement of the room for dancing 
purposes, themselves, and now to be denied the use of not only 
the least expensive, but also the only appropriate and good- 
sized hop-room in the town, because of some "new desks," is 
exasperating. Our hops should be encouraged and identified 
with the University as much as our Athletic Sports have been, 
and the good they would do the University would more than 
counterbalance the harm done to those "new desks." It is to be 
hoped that after one or two generations of Freshmen have 
hacked, defaced and put their marks upon them, that those 
"new desks" may not only be looked at, but actually moved 
and touched. In the meantime we suggest glass cases and red 
velvet cushions for those "sweet, tunnin' 'ittle new desks." 



Why is it that while with employes the graduates of 
Lehigh are always above par, the number of students attending 
the University is always so small? Is it because the University 
is not so much or widely known? Is it because the standard is 
above the average? Is it because the tuition in all branches is 
free? At the death of Judge Packer almost every newspaper in 
the country contained an eulogy upon his life, and the Univer- 
sity was at the same time noticed and spoken of as one of his 
many noble works. Notwithstanding this the next Freshman 
class was only a little larger than the average, and much 
smaller than might have been expected. The standard may be 
above the average standard, but it is not higher than that of 
many other colleges, and is certainly not above the average 
capacity. The only reason for a slim attendance which we have 
ever heard put forth, is, that students do not like the "tuition in 
all departments free," saying that it sounds so much like a 
charity school. Absurd as this is, it may be the true cause, and 
if so, would it not be well to have some fees, though they be 
small and merely nominal, in order that this obnoxious clause 
be removed? Lehigh University with all its present wealth and 
advantages should be full to overflowing. 




Epitome Feature. 103 




Brian M. Sharlach Charles E. Shoemaker, Jr. Robert D. Sievers 



Susan M. Skacel 




Charles 1. Skender 



Melanie J. Skibo 



Pamela M. Smith 



Stuart M. Smith 



104, Seniors & Faculty 




Robert E. Sneddon, Jr. 



Kevin B. Soder 



Louis J. Sosa 




Arlene Steinberg 



Michael P. Sterba 



Philip J. Subits 



Ralph A. Thomas 




Seniors & Faculty, 105 



LEHIGH IN THE 1890s... 



A member of the first class, Clarence Wolle, of Bethlehem, gives the following 
sketch in the Quarterly for 1891: "Christmas Hall, as you know, was the first 
building. The chapel was on the first floor, recitations were held on the second 
floor, and the dormitories were on the third. The Chemical Laboratory was in the 
two rooms on the west end of the building. During that period the erection of 
Packer Hall was begun. It was finished in '68, and we moved up into the new 
laboratory, which occupied the place of the drawing rooms on the first floor. The 
laboratory was designed by Professor Wetherill, and was considered one of the 
finest in the country." 

"Mineralogy, Geology, and Blow-Piping were studied on the second story of 
the Lehigh Valley telegraph office. I remember very well the first examination 
which was held in these subjects. It took place before quite an audience of 
interested people from Bethlehem. The examination was almost cruelly rigid, but 
so thoroughly were the subjects studied that not a single error was made by the 
whole class. I think that the students who attend Lehigh now would scarcely 
recognize the campus as it was twenty-five years ago. Just before an important 
examination, for instance, I remember a crowd of us sitting in the woods just back 
of Packer Hall and discussing the situation. A few hundred yards west of the 
present situation of Packer Hall was a rocky locality known as 'The Old Man's 
Place.' A hermit made it his abode up to about 1885. Quite a stream of water ran 
through it and it was a favorite resort, when I was a student, for Bethlehem's 
picnic parties." 

The paternal care with which Dr. Coppee, ably assisted by George Washing- 
ton Smith, watched over his boys, is amply illustrated in a set of "Rules for the 
Students," which every student was cautioned to have in his possession. The 
precision shown in the phrasing of these rules, the niceness of the wording, leaving 
no loop-hole for members of the firm of Duck & Dodge, is admirable and awe- 
inspiring. We quote in part: 

"RULES FOR STUDENTS." 

"GOOD ORDER. — Punctuality in all his duties, careful preparation of all 
lessons and subjects of study, entire silence and respectful attention in the Chapel 
and recitation room, obedience to the directions of the President, Professors, 
Instructors, and all officers of the University, will be required of every student." 

"The rooms of the students, wherever they are, will be subject to visits from 
the President and Instructor, to whom the students must always open their doors 
when required." 

"No student shall have or use fire-arms or gunpowder on the University 
precincts, or carry any weapon about his person. No intoxicating drinks shall be 
taken into the University, nor used there. Smoking in the halls and in the grounds 
is strictly prohibited." 

"Students may lodge or board only in such houses as meet the approval of 
the President, and they shall not change their boarding or lodging places without 
his permission. The hours of meals in all such houses must conform to the 
University arrangement of recitation and study hours." 

"THE JANITOR. - The Janitor is an officer of the University, specially 
placed by the President in charge of the buildings and grounds. He is delegated 
with authority to direct disorders to cease and to report damages and breaches of 
order to the President." 

"No student shall play at cards, or in any way gamble. No student shall 
become intoxicated; no student shall use profane or indecent language." 

"No student shall hold a meeting or transact business without permission of 
the President. When proper, such permission will always be granted." 

"No student or body of students shall invite any person to address or lecture 
to them, without the sanction of the President, to be obtained before the invitation 




Dr. Henry S. Drinker, (center), poses 
with area military commanders in 
World War I. 



106. Epitome Feature 




is given. Nor shall any student put himself under the tuition of any person not 
recognized as a University Professor or Instructor, without the President's per- 
mission." 

"No student shall leave the town of Bethlehem, without special permission in 
writing from the President, or, in his absence, from one of the Professors." 

"In such studies as do not require the opening of text-books in the recitation 
rooms, no student shall open his book without the direction of the Professor or 
Instructor." 

"After the ringing of the bell for study hours, no student shall leave his room 
without permission from one of the Instructors. This applies equally to students 
who occupy rooms in Christmas Hall, and those who live elsewhere in the town. 
Study hours form an essential part of the University exercise and discipline, and 
must not be infringed." 

"After the ringing of the bell for study hours, there shall be no noise or 
disorder whatever in the rooms or halls, at any time during the night. Loud 
talking, whistling, loud cries of all kinds, the use of all musical instruments, are 
particular examples of the noises to be avoided." 

"PUNISHMENTS. - The punishments inflicted by the Faculty shall be the 
following: 1st, Warning; 2nd, Reprimand; 3rd, Suspension from College exercises 
and privileges for a definite term; 4th, Conditional attachment to the class and to 
the University, dependent upon good behavior and strict attendance to study; 5th, 
Dismission; 6th, Expulsion with dishonor. These modes and grades of punishment 
may be used successively, or otherwise, at the discretion of the Faculty." 

As the years passed, and living conditions in the University changed, these 
rules were gradually abolished. That the outer shell of one of them, at least, 
remained, Dr. Drinker has offered a story to prove. Upon the first night which he 
spent on the campus as President in 1905, he was awakened at nine-thirty by a 
prolonged clanging of the bell in Packer Hall tower. Much alarmed, he hurried 
over to Packer Hall, and finding the watchman, asked him the meaning of all this 
clamor. 

"Why, yes, Doctor," said the watchman, "I rang the bell." 

"Well, what's the matter, what's the matter?" pursued the agitated President. 

"Matter, sir? I don't see anything the matter," — looking slowly round, his 
eyes lighting finally upon the disturbed features of the man before him. "Can I do 
anything for you, sir?" finished the watchman. 

"Why did you ring that bell?" 

"Bell, sir? Why did I ring — " A look of dawning intelligence crept into the 
watchman's face, followed by a gleam as of suppressed mirth. "It's half-past nine, 
Dr. Drinker," he said. 

Followed a motion, which, to those who know Dr. Drinker, is as inseparable 
from him as is the time-piece in question. Mechanically he took out his watch. 
"Half-past nine?" he repeated. "Yes, yes, so it is." Suddenly there flashed into his 
mind a memory of the old days, when he was a student at Lehigh, Packer Hall 
had been a dormitory, and he had occupied a room there. 

"Why, it's the curfew, of course," said Dr. Drinker, and might have added, 
"The joke's on me," but the watchman cut him short with assurances that he 
always rang the bell at that hour — every night. 

These early years of the University's history, its test years, represent a time of 
hard work and no glory for the small group of men who with so much loyalty and 
enthusiasm threw in their influence with Lehigh. As Bishop Whitehead puts it: 
"With utmost diligence on the part of all concerned, little progress was made at 
first. The faithful President and a few Professors toiled early and late for several 
years, doing the best that could be done, but knowing that theirs was the pioneer 
work. 



Epitome Feature, 107 




David K. Tiller 



Thomas Van Wort 



Joseph P. Weis 



Bruce F. Whyte 




Barry S. Winter 



Gordon T Wyatt 



David L. Zabor 



James G. Zahka 




108, Seniors & Faculty 



WHAI LL 




\ 



V* 





You can put off plastics for a year 



Seniors & Faculty, 109 



CHAPTER VII 
HIGH DAYS 

Of those whose names have stood on the rolls at Lehigh, be he a professor of 
thirty years' experience or a youth who has boasted the black cap no longer than a 
month, no one expects, when he takes up his books in September, to have many 
extra holidays or free afternoons showered upon him. Lehigh's schedule is a 
crowded one. In these days of specialization it becomes increasingly difficult to 
master in four years' time the cultural studies of the undergraduate course and the 
technical requirements of the specialist. The Burr of '87 pictures the skepticism of 
a student who has been told to rejoice because Ash Wednesday is a holiday. He 
says he bets his boots that it comes on a Saturday, - "all our holidays do." 

Nevertheless, Lehigh understands the meaning of ceremonial, and realizes its 
value enough to pause for the observance of those rites and ceremonies which 
grow in significance as the University advances in years. 

Early in October of every year a day is set apart to honor the memory of Asa 
Packer. At the memorial service held in the Chapel in the morning, an address is 
made by some man prominent in public affairs. 

The afternoon sports, consisting of a "Track Meet," are very much milder 
than of yore; but the name of "Cane Spree" clung to the exercises long after the 
cane "rush" between Sophomores and Freshmen was abandoned. The off-hand 
way in which the students regarded the casualties incident to this species of sport 
is shown in the following remarks which the Burr of 1889 makes on a recent rush: 
"The struggle on the whole was a fine one, practically free from slugging, with the 
usual amount of confusion incident to all rushes and unfortunately more than the 
usual number of accidents." The grand rush held on the night before opening, on 
the terrace in front of Packer Hall, has also passed into oblivion, though there are 
many who carry the scars of battle gained on that steep slope in the dark, with the 
ambulance waiting in the President's back yard, - a monument, if a somewhat 
mobile one, to Dr. Drinker's paternal foresightedness. There were fireworks, too, 
in the early eighties, but the abolition of rushes and fireworks is not to be 
deplored so much as is the abandonment of the Founder's Day Ball, or Athletic 
Hop, as it was called. An affair brilliant in its day, patronized by many of 
Lehigh's friends from Bethlehem and Philadelphia, it afforded one of the few 
opportunities the University has to welcome her friends in a social way, and its 
abandonment after nearly thirty years of success is to be regretted. Founder's Day 
is often made the occasion for unusual ceremonies, such as the formal laying of 
the corner-stone of the Lucy Packer Memorial Church in 1885. 

THE LAFAYETTE GAME. 

Of course the important event of the Fall term is the Lafayette football game. 
The evening before the fatal conflict everyone congregates in the gymnasium for a 
"smoker." Speeches are made by faculty, student and coach, enjoining the 
bleachers to help the team beat Lafayette; cheers are given and much tobacco 
consumed; boxing and wrestling matches are staged. The "smoker" at Lehigh was 
designed originally as a winter gymnasium meet, to "further the interest in such 
sports as fencing, boxing and wrestling, and to afford all the opportunity of have a 
good time," to note from a report in the Brown and White of the first "smoker," 
held in February of 1895. Later on, smokers held by the different collegiate 
departments were very popular; more lately, one has been held before every 
important athletic contest. 




110, Epitome Feature 




THE GRIDDERS OF THE 1880s 



The athletic field on the afternoon of the Lafayette game is a magnificent 
sight. A throng of fifteen thousand people pours in through the upper and lower 
archways of the field and transforms the high, bleak walls of the stadium into a 
gorgeous semi-circle of color, life and movement. The brass bands, the cheers and 
songs, the meeting of old friends between the halves — and the meeting of old 
enemies on the field, the pride in Lehigh's valiant players - nothing in college life 
can exceed it, unless it be the aftermath of the battle, when the foe is vanquished 
and the celebrations begin. After the famous victories, both baseball and football, 
of eighteen ninety-nine and ninety, when Dashiell and Warriner starred in both 
sports, one of the college papers records how "almost the entire population of 
Bethlehem was out to see the parade. The firemen rang their engine bells and the 
spectators applauded the procession." The town always takes part in Lehigh's 
"Pee-rades" and bonfires, many of the merchants in Bethlehem donating boxes 
and crates for the conflagration and lending conveyances wherewith to haul the 
fuel up South Mountain to Look-out Point; where, in the evening, the crowd 
assembles to see Lafayette's effigy thrown to the flames. Previous to 1902, Lehigh 
played two football games with Lafayette every season; the custom, inaugurated 
in that year, of playing only one, makes a more exciting climax to the season, and 
leaves the teams of the two colleges with a greater number of bones intact for the 
next year. Speaking of broken bones, it is a pleasure to contrast the well-nursed 
turf of the modern football field with the condition of things described by Richard 
Harding Davis, Lehigh '86, in the following extracts from his article in the Lehigh 
Quarterly for 1891: 

From the Lehigh Quarterly, Vol. I, No. 2, April, 1891. 
THE EARLY DAYS OF FOOTBALL AT LEHIGH. 

I was so much more of a spectator than a player in the first games of football 
at Lehigh that I felt I could not fairly be accused of writing in self-laudation if I 
accepted the invitation of the editor of The Quarterly and told something about 
them. 

My position as spectator was not back of the ropes, but behind the rush line 
to the right of the quarter, where I had an uninterrupted view of the field and 
absolute leisure, as the captain, though he did not know much, had at least 
sufficient judgment to always pass the ball to the other half, and I never got it by 
any chance unless he fumbled it and some one else did not fall on it first. And as 
our side never got the ball except on those chances regulated by the beneficent 
fourth down rule, I had plenty of time to study the game and to count the stripes 
on my jersey and try to keep up with the other side's score. It was not difficult to 
keep tally of our own. 

J. S. Robeson, '86, or "Jake" Robeson, is the father of football at Lehigh. He 
had played the game at the Germantown Academy, and it was due to him that it 
was taken up in South Bethlehem. It was he who induced the Sophomores of the 
University of Pennsylvania to send their eleven up to play an eleven from '86 on 
December 8, 1883, and it was he who captained the 'Varsity team the following 
year. This game with the '86 eleven of U. of P. was the first game played at 
Lehigh, and though it was raining at the time, and the grounds were covered with 
eight inches of mud, over 300 spectators came out to see it played and stood 
through it until the end, which was a victory for the visitors by a score of 16-10. 
There was no grass on the athletic field then, nothing but rocks, tin cans and a soft 
quicksand of mud. As the Lehigh Sophomore team had never played before, their 
jackets were as white as when they came from Geisendarfer's shop, where they 
had been patterned after the only one in the college, one owned by Robeson, and 
of which we were all very envious. Geisenderfer only charged us seventy-five cents 
apiece for these jackets, and I hope, if he still lives, that the editor of The 
Quarterly will allow this reading notice to stand, as he was a good tailor and gave 
me long credit. 

Epitome Feature. Ill 



APPLIED SCIENCE 




Daniel F. Hurley 



AMERICAN STUDIES 




George N. Ferguson 



Kevin R. Gardner 




Anne L. McGregor 



Jeanne M. O'Brien 



Robert L. Roth 




Ira M. Schulman 



Susan Sharko 



Christine C. Volz 



Rodney Waters 



112, Seniors & Faculty 



BIOLOGY 



Seated (1 to r): S. Herman, S. Barber, E. Hoagland, S. Krawiec; Standing: 
D. Bell, S. Kundell, H. Prit chard. 




David D. Auperin 



Helen J. Barr 



Leonard Bielory 



Kenneth A. Brader 




lames E. Buirkle 



Donna M. Coco 



Meryl H. Cohen 



Roberta A. Cowell 



Seniors & Faculty. 113 




Hester L. Dorer 



Abbie L. Esterman 



Gregory K. Fox 



Judith L. Freedman 




Alan J. Greenberg 



Michael D. Hopman 



Scott F. Karaen 




Selig N. Kratenstein 



Kenneth F. Kruger 




Robert C. Laderer 



114, Seniors & Faculty 




rv" 

James S. Litrides 




Craie F. McBeth 



Frances C. Mearns 





Michael R. Melino 



]. Daniel Merlino 



Richard A. Miller 




John M. Mizel 



Robin L. Nemery 



Christopher J. Nowik David A. Nusblatt 



Seniors & Faculty. 115 




Louis B. Polish 



Joseph A. Rao, Jr. 



Peter J. Rocco 



Kurt C. Rolf 





David G. Sawutz 




Nancy E. Spence 




George E. Wieland, III 



116, Seniors & Faculty 




Michael P. Antonovich 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 




Demosthenes Bays Linda A. Beginnes 



Seniors & Faculty. 117 




Seated (1 to r): G. Poehlein, L. Sperling, L. Wenzel (chairman), C. Clump, W. Luyben; Standing: W. Schiesser, R. Coughlin, F. Stein, M. 
Charles, A. Foust. 




Robert C. Best. Ill 



Timothy E. Boland 



Edward P. Bzik 



Richard S. Conner 




?nn R. Dissinger 



David A. Engler 



Alan R. English 



Stephen K. Evans 



118, Seniors & Faculty 




David L. Fair 



Kenneth B. Ferguson 



Charles G. Fick Robert S. Frederick 




Theresa M. Gilly 



Carlos M. Gomez Frederick N. Hartman Carl M. Husser, II 




Stephen E. Johnson 



Duane E. Judd 



Patricia A. Kadar 



Thomas C. Lemm Francisco E. Linares 




Paul J. Pringle 



George A. Reifsnyder William S. Rosanio Michael J. Sauers 



Seniors & Faculty, 119 




James T. Sommerwerck William R. Strzepek 



Dante P. Volpe 



David E. Webb 




Robert C. Weber 



Gary D. Wiegner 



Michael R. Yoder 



Robert ). Zwickl 



120, Seniors & Faculty 




William C. Allison 



Dennis R. Brown 



Kenneth W. Cale 




James M. Chiadis 



Peter K. Coughlin 




Seated (1 to r): S. Schaffer, K. Schray, R. Sprague, C. Kraihanzel, J. Manson; Standing: J. Merkel, G. 
Simmons, D. Smyth, H. Leidheiser, T. Young, N. Heindel, J. Sturm. 



Seniors & Faculty, 121 




John C. Kutzer 



Paul L. Lumnitzer. II 



Jonathan M. Mack 



122, Seniors & Faculty 





& Aife 



Harold E. Minor 



Dixon R. Rich. Jr. 



Jeffrey C. Searer 




Robert H. Seevers, Jr. 




Bruce P. Stiles 





Robert F. Werkman 



Seniors & Faculty, 123 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 




Christopher D. Alva Walter Andrew 



Bradley E. Atwood Peter R. Avakian 




Robert P. Batcheler 



David C. Beechwood 



Stephen W. Bilan Eugene H. Borgosz 




Charles D. Brown 



Mark D. Brune 



William F. Buck 



Brian S. Butler 




Douglas D. Carvel David A. Charters 



Yan Kee Cheng 



Neil J. Clemence 



124, Seniors & Faculty 




Row 1 (1 to r): A. Ostapenko, L. W. Lu, R. Johnson, G. Driscoll, D. Van Horn, L. Beedle, J. Fisher. A. Richards, J. 
Liebig (chairman); Row 2: C. Haffner, D. Mertz. G. Dinsmore, A. Brune, C. Kostem, T. Hirst, L. Tall. H. Daniels; 
Row 3: C. Siegrist. B. Allan, J. McGraw, J. Wheeler, T. Owens, J. Smith, S. Tumminelle. F. Chen. 




John W. Conover. Ill 



David A Cronomiz 



Thomas K. Daniels 



Michael Derewianka 




James M. Ducey 



Thomas E. Farrell, III 



David L. Freeman 



John P. Haney 



Seniors & Faculty. 125 




Charles Hathaway, III Steven C. Helfrich 



Thomas F. Horn 




Mehrdad Houriani 



Richard B. Hunter 



Jeffrey D. Jolly 



126, Seniors & Faculty 




Gary D. Kraft 



Roger H. Lambert 



Kenneth C. Loush 



Peter E. Loyka 




John C. Lutz 



Gregory f. Martin 



Kristy E. McGee 



Amelia A. Mesko 



^^•-^ 




Seniors & Faculty. 127 




James H. Newbold 



Philip B. Nonemaker 



David A. Oram 



Louis J. Pagnotti, III 




James K. Payne 



Joseph A. Polaneczky 



Arthur L. Poole, III 




Thomas J. Porsch 



Robert A. Putt 







m 



.-■-*■* 




'& 



99 



M 







Stephen A. Rosner 




Ernest H. Ruckert, III 



Paul D. Ruffle 



Otto A. Schatz 



Clifford W. Sch winger 




Kevin P. Schields 



Richard W. Spieth 



Stanley D. Sterner 




Stephen S. Szoke 



Bruce H. Uhl 



Steven W. Thatcher 





< mi 




John D. Vernarr 



Jen S. Wang 



David S. Ward 




John J. Warwick 



Mark E. Whitmore 



Douglas S. Wood 



James B. Youst 




130, Seniors & Faculty 




Susan Ann M. Freeh 



Seated: E. De Angeli; Standing: D. Feaver, J. Hare, C. R. Phillips, J. Maurer (chairman 



ECONOMICS 





17fcri 




John E. Benz 



John E. Callies 



Gustavo A. Danjoi 




Raymond W. Hepper Christopher R. Ingram 



Philip I. Kent 



|ames E. Mead 



Seniors & Faculty. 131 




Elliot N. Michael 



Robert T. Milton 



Neil J. Miritello 



Thomas P. Murphy 





ifc Jkh *ih 




Richard C. Paul, Jr. 



Bart F. Pinello 



Ralph ]. Silvestri 



Robert B. Smyth 




Seated to r): J. Innes, }. Keefe, N. Balabkins, G. Garb, A. Bearse, C. Shen; Standing: J. Luizer, L. R. Tripp, J. 
McNamara, F. Jensen, W. Pillsbury, A. Cohen, J. R. Aronson. 



Gregory P. Whitford 



132, Seniors & Faculty 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 




Gary J. Bast 



Wayne R. Bittle 



Allen D. Bowers 



Nicholas Browse 




Clayton W. Burns 



David R. Coffin 



James J. Daday 



James H. Egen 



Seniors & Faculty. 133 




Row 1 (1 to r): W. Dahlke, P. Ota, F. Hielscher, N. Eberhardt, D. Talheim; Row 2: B. Fritchman, H. Gnerlich, D. Leenov, A. Susskind 
(chairman), J. Mixsell, J. Ondria. 





*J* 




Terry L. Eward 



Carl D. Garthwaite 



Frederick M. Gross 



George D. Helm 




Mark A. Hoffman 



James H. Holbrook William C. Hookway 



Kirk D. Houser 



134, Seniors & Faculty 




Lawrence C. Howe 



Steven M. Kamin 



Robert K. Kast, Jr. 



Scott M. Lewis 




Charles M. Loeffler 



Morris L. London 



Erhardt A. Pankratz 



Jeffry L. Parker 








Anthony D. Scarselletti Randal] C. Schiefer 




Garrett L. Schultz 



John C. Simunek 



Steven B. Smith 



Steven V. Sperry 




John F. Stangl 



Tihamer T. Toth-Fejel Thomas L. Vogelsong Stephen V. Waldenburg 



136, Seniors & Faculty 




David E. Walton 



y^A 



Mark E. Warner 




John E. Waylett, Jr. 



Richard J. Wilson 



Paul J. Wolownik 



ENGLISH 




Seated (1 to r): T. Dawson, M. Tracy, D. Lepley, R. Suiter, M. Cuda, J. Swick, R. Arbur, D. Greene, R. Harson, A. 
Hartung; Standing: P. Beidler, P. Bodey, G. Gorsky, G. Hauk, [. Hammond, R. Mundhenk, [. Frakes, J. Vickkey, F. Hook, 
J. DeBellis, M. Kaufman. 





Angela C. DiAdamo 



Kevan S. Green 



Alisha B. Kline 



Beth T. Knobler 



Sandra M. Welty 



Seniors & Faculty. 137 



ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 







Karen L. Bachman 



Antone V. Carvalho 



Michael C. Eby 



David S. Franke 




Dennis A. Grube 



li\J 

Christian Jubok 



Robert H. Rimby 




Paul A. Schwarzbach, Jr. Craig F. Seyfried 




Robert W. Shannon 



138, Seniors & Faculty 



FINANCE 




Donald R. Baskin, Jr. Peter A. Bechte 




George M. Belfield Christopher N. Brennan 









Sheldon L. Church Sharon L. Cohen 



Randall F. Corelli 




Eric R. Demaree 



Andrew S. Dember Raymond W. DeQuintal Robert Ezrapour 



Seniors & Faculty, 139 




Seated (1 to r): J. Tucker, J. Hansz, E. Schwartz, B. Smackey; Standing: C. Beidleman, ). Greenleaf, K. Bell, R. Horton, L. Krause. 




Stanley R. Fendryk 



Geoffrey E. Fisher 



Jack W. Frey 



Robert P. Frey 




Stuart C. George 



Mark E. Goehring 



Daniel P. Grgurich 



Thomas F. Grogan 



140, Seniors & Faculty 




Peter R. Gysel 



[ames G. Halkins 



Douglas J. Halliday ]ohn J. Harrington, fr. 




Douglas G. Hawxhurst 



Lyle W. Hogg 



David M. Katz 



Donald R. Kingsbury 



Bw HB9KgiHBi3Kifla«&i JtsS 
Bj| J^^^ "r^Bl = ^B. V Ty:"Bl^^ 






H\.* : 


Bw flH 

B^BflL E. 


r J! - 

Si 


■ |Bhii ' 

^■f ;" BV9 

Bfl 9H Bf 1 Bi^^r 

l ■ - : - II Bm 




■E~* "^ 











Seniors & Faculty, 141 




Jeffrey T. Kline 



Paul R. Knauer 



John A. Kozel 



Jay A. Kuritzky 




Paul N. Leitner 



Paul R. Levy 



Charles A. Lockard 




Paul S. Loschiavo 



Paul R. Marino 



Stanley F. Martin 




Philip M. McCutcheon 



142, Seniors & Faculty 




William D. Mohvlskv 







James ). O'Donnell, Jr. 



Richard K. Perrine 



Robert J. Plunkett 




Seth Reiser 



Mark P. Rickert 



Romaine M. Ross Walter J. Senkowsk 




Seniors & Faculty, 143 




Joseph D. Sterrett 



James D. Stewart 





John G. Swanson 




Michael G. Thomas 




Weston C. Vogel, Jr. 




James C. Williams 



FINE ARTS 

H 




John A. D'Antonio 



Left to right: C. Alvare, R. Viera, R. Strasburger, R. Redd (chairman) 




Barbara K. Ehrsam Jane W. Gumble 



James E. Healy 



David J. Kacar 



Seniors & Faculty, 145 




Diane R. Lichtenberg 



Peter G. Longley 



Susan L. Shapiro 



Andrew M. Tuller 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 




Sarah L. Goodson 



Audrey J. Groedel 



Margaret A. Miller 



Seated: L. Lefkowitz, A. Van 
Der Naald, S. Juka; Standing: 
J. Maurer (pro tern 
chairman), J. Van Eerde, D. 
Gardiner, A. Hye. 




146. Seniors & Faculty 




Mary Anne E. Shafer 



Janet L. Torongo 



FUNDAMENTAL SCIENCE 






Krista J. Anderson 



Frank N. DeFrank 



Elizabeth A. Ezaki 



Robert J. Gluckman 



Emily E. LaCosta 




Jennifer K. Long 



Linda J. Yurkovic 



GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE 




Jeffrey M Citrone 



Vaughn Girol 



Joel B. Levy 



Peter B. McGee 



Robert A. Stewart 



Seniors & Faculty, 147 



GOVERNMENT 




*Jfcb 



Valerie [. Assetto 



Seated (1 to r) T. Pasquini, S. Kaplan, J. Ryan. F. Neher, J. Kelley, J. Bass; Standing: R. Sassen, D. Simpson, 
Parks. B. Carson, C. Sclar, E. Evenson, A. Walker. 







Gordon G. Blewis 




Lawrence DelVecchio 



Gregory W. Enders 



Neal H. Flaster 



148, Seniors & Faculty 




Amidee T. Haviland Left to right: R. Yates, C. McCoy (chairman), H. Whitcomb. 




Roberta A. Karpinecz Stanley B. Palmer Edward M. Peters, Jr. 




Richard B. Petigrow David M. Roderick, Jr. A - Hilary Tatem 



Mark S. Wilson 



Seniors & Faculty. 149 



HISTORY 




Steven W. Bates 



John P. Dellitalia 



Stephen P. Desjardins 



Jeffrey W. Duke 




Barbara A. Ewing 



Bruce R. Leach 



William R. Leahy 




Lawrence S. Warshaw S. Robert Williams 



150, Seniors & Faculty 




Seated (1 to r): L. Leder, J. 
Dowling, J. Saeger. C. L. Tipton; 
Standing: J. Haight, H. Finke, L. 
O'Malley. R. Simon, W. G. 
Shade, J. Ellis, G. M. Ellis, C. 
Pursell, I. Duffy. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 




Francis [. Arsi 



Paul F. Barnes 



Robert M. Bossert 



Timothy A. Brader 




Kendall O. Buckstaff 



Timothy E. Byerley Christopher J. Christian William M. Connors 



Seniors & Faculty. 151 




Preston M. Crabill Anthony S. Crivello Robert A. Deutsch 




Roberto E. Fischman George A. Freestone 



Daniel Gomez 




William D. Graeff 



Robert J. Grande Thomas F. Graziano 




Dennis A. Houser 



Craig W. Johnson Peter C. Kershaw 



Steven S. Lichtman 



152, Seniors & Faculty 




Sealed (1 to r): J. Adams, G. Kane (chairman), E. Zimmers; Standing: L. Plebani, W. Richardson, M. Groover, G. 
Whitehouse, B. Wechsler. 




Jeffrey P. Luker 



John E. McGlade 



Mark M. Nagel 



John N. Pritchard 




Patricia S. Roth 



William L. Schroer 



Kevin D. Skinner 



David L. Strickland 



Seniors & Faculty, 153 




Steven D. Sturgis William E. Tomassini 




Gregory A. Torski Raymond D. Trakimas 



Richard A. Valk 




154, Seniors & Faculty 




Terry M. Weiner William J. Williamson, III 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 




Sanjoy Bannerjee 



Jessica L. Fischer 



William H. Hewit 



lames H. Mathews 





Norma D. Weiss 



Left to right: M. Hodges, H. Braddick, Z. Slouka, C. 
Joynt, R. Wylie. 



Seniors & Faculty, 155 



JOURNALISM 




Martin D. Baron 



Priscilla L. Chatman Steven H. Dunkleberger Lauren H. Eisenberg 





Robert K. Feldman 



Andrea R. Kaplan 



[ohn E. Mahoney 




Left to right: R. J. Sullivan, S. Friedman, J. B. McFadden (chairman) 



156, Seniors & Faculty 



MANAGEMENT 




Timothy T. Altaffer William E. Apelian 




Edwin C. Brader Michele A. Calabrese Carlo D. Cella, III 




Mohamed A. Dandashy Dorothy C. D'Elia 



Stanley J. Ehrlich 




Reijo A. Finnia 



Robert W. Fitting 



James T. Gallagher 



Kevin C. Gross 



Seniors & Faculty, 157 







Todd W. Heck 



Douglas W. Hellieson Joel A. Manfredo 



Joseph J. Sabol 





Stephen A. Seidel 



Amy B. Shikora 



Dennis M. Slutsky 






Richard L. Warner 




158, Seniors & Faculty 




MARKETING 




HJ^, 


*W 


HI 


Vlfc 


Robert C. Andler, Jr. 


^^B 


ife «.■ 




JPj 


■ mm \ * 


k >\¥V> 




Randall S. Frey 



Michael J. Green 



Peggy D. Green 




Linda Grobstein 



Peter T. Henderson 



Gary J. Iacocca 



Lisa J. Koch 



Seniors & Faculty, 159 




Thomas M. Kreidler 




Michael J. Moss 



Robert M. Sweeney David W. Worrall 



MATHEMATICS 





Karen J. Kozlow 



Leann L. Kulp 



Bruce C. Long, II 



John P. Lynch 



160, Seniors & Faculty 




Seated (1 to r): D. Maher, R. Silverman. C. Queen, A. K. Snyder. A. Wilansky, E. Pitcher, S. Gulden; Standing: D. Trutt, C. C. Hsing, 
Rayna, G. McCluskey, N. Schecter, D. Davis, R. Basener, P. Cohen, f. King, V. R. G. Rao. 




Donald J. McGillen 



Lois A. McGowan 



William M. Moyer, III 



Kathy J. Murphy 




t 




Richard N. Parkes Karen V. Snyder Charles A. Sonon Debbie D. Yuan 



Seniors & Faculty. 161 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 




Mark S. Barandy 



Robert J. Bardsley 



Jeffrey P. Beitzel 



Gregory J. Borsinger 



162. Seniors & Faculty 




MSI 

Richard L. Brazill 



Charles J. Breuer, III 



Thomas L. Butler 




Row 1 (1 to r): J. Osborn, T. Chen, F. Erdogan, T. Jackson, G. Sih, F. Brown; Row 2: A. MacPherson, P. Kosky, R. Sarubbi 
S. Johnson, J. Owczarek, F. Beer, D. Rockwell, R. Benner, P. Hilton, A. Kalnins. 




Edward H. Butz 



Stephen J. Clark 



John C. Crafts 



Scott D. Curtiss 



Seniors & Faculty. 163 







Peter A. Eichen 



Richard A. Gaffin Joseph E. Giansante 






4\-kk 



George A. Hanna 



Eric L. Hanssen David C. Harwood 




Geoffrey K. Hintz William J. Hommes Marnix A. Hoogewerff Richard C. Kinney 



164, Seniors & Faculty 




Robert E. Klawitter Clifford J. Kozak 



James M. Kron 



Myron Lemecha 




Jeffrey P. Lentz 



Robert E. Linney 



Michael S. Magee 




Salem D. Mikdadi Robert S. Moroz 



John J. O'Grady 





Douglas H. Olsen John J. Ondrejack 




Neil N. Overturf 



Seniors & Faculty, 165 




Thomas A. Peters 




Mark P. Pettigrew 



Michael T. Radio 




rM 




Donald C. Sangtinette 



Mark D. Schober 



James F. Schultes, Jr. 



Jeffrey L. Scott 



166, Seniors & Faculty 




Robert H. Shuman, IV 



Ronald S. Smith 



Bruce D. Stackhouse 





William E. Stecker 



Jeffrey L. Stoneback 



Douglas R. Taylor 



Brian C. Thompson 




Leon J. Vlahakes 



Leonard C. Wagner 



Douglas R. Wright 




METALLURGY 




Gene P. Miller 



Craig W. Packard 




John R. Paules 



Cheryl A. Ross 



Martin J. Sippel Gregory J. Yencho 




Seated (1 to r): P. Bretz. A. Romig. G. Conard, S. Butler, C. Vantyne; Standing: S. Tarby. T. Dinsmore, D. Smyth, A. Pense, W. Kraft. D. 
Thomas, J. Goldstein. 



168, Seniors & Faculty 



PSYCHOLOGY 




Seated (1 to r): J. Brozek, A. Brody (chairman), G. Shortess, M. Richter, K. Richter; Standing: R. Loeb, L. Horst, E. Kay, L. Paul. H. Foster. 




Mario J. Acerra 



Michael D. Barnett William F. Bekkenhuis Michael F. Bruno 




Alphonso B. Dance 



Anne C. Fisher 



Cynthia D. Glueck 



Martha L. Griest 



Seniors & Faculty. 169 




Keith A. Klingensmith 



Valerie J. Levy 



Melville D. Lide 



Ann N. Mermelstein 



170, Seniors & Faculty 




Peter K. Scott 



Denese D. Walters 



Frank E. Weinperl, ]r. 



Seniors & Faculty. 171 



RELIGION 




David J. Eisenmenger 



Left to right: V. Elkins. P. McGinty, Chap. H. Flesher. 




SOCIAL RELATIONS 





k. A 




Jeri L. Fisher 



Gail M. Francis 



Nancy A. Langton 



Alison ). Lusti 



172, Seniors & Faculty 




Dawn E. Starr 



Stuart M. Wilsker 




Left to right: R. Rosenwein, L. Freeman, J. Mcintosh, R. Williamson 



URBAN STUDIES 




Seniors & Faculty, 173 



ATHLETICS 




T. Turner, |. Whitehead, T. Thompson, S. Schultz, B. Gardner, J. Covert. G. Winchester, H. Bond. W. Leckonby, 
C. Anderson. B. Everhart, H. Price. S. Sanders, J. Biedron, G. Leeman, ). Steckbeck. 



AEROSPACE STUDIES 




Row 1 (1 to r): V. Ziccardi, M. Janowiak. L. Hasbrouck; Row 2: J. Fratto, D. Achey, D. Adkins, T. Harmon. 
Fergus. 



174, Seniors & Faculty 



INFORMATION SCIENCE 




Sealed: D. Hillman; Standing (1 to r): P. Marshall, A. Kasarda, J. O'Connor, R. Barnes. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 




Seated (1 to r): J. Locascio, Col. C. Hamner, Maj. R. John; Standing: A. Miller, SGM ]. Kress, Capt. R. Walsh, Capt. 
H. Manns, Capt. J. Fry. 



Seniors & Faculty 175 



MUSIC 




(l.-r.): J. Brown, f. Bidlack, R. B. Cutler. 



PHILOSOPHY 




(l.-r.): R. Barnes, J. Hare, R. Lindgren (chairman), T. Haynes. 



17H. Seniors & Faculty 



PHYSICS 




The Department: B. Benson, E. E. Bergmann, G. Borse, R. Emrich, F. Feigl, R. T. Folk, W. B. Fowler, A. S. Kanofsky, Y. W. 
Kim, J. A. McLennan (chairman), S. H. Radin, J. A. Sands, R. A. Shaffer, W. R. Smith, W. J. VanSciver, G. D. Watkins, D. D. 
Wheeler. 




Seniors & Faculty, 177 



- 







*»" 








ORgWORP . 



,■*•"* 



F 

r^J/^ To tke 
board of tru-Stee-s, 
tKe faculty, tKe 
•^hjderd- body, oj\A 
©J] otKer^s inie rent- 
ed , we offer tKks 
brieF record of 
LErtiGM life. 



THE FOUNDERS 



|R.7V " ««.;! 




» 






k. ■' jt*L'^ 


1 v * 


* 


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5 
V 


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■B'LO'J.L'j.'JB 







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McCLINTIC- MARSHALL 

STEEL BUILDINGS, 
BRIDGES, Etc 




C««lr*tii«« tun- <■-; 




THE FOUNDERS . . . 

LEHIGH AND AMERICAN . . . 

ATTITUDES AND 

ACHIEVEMENTS 



This 1976 Bicentennial Year, despite the distractions of 
commercial exploitations, is a time for thoughtful 
reflection among many Americans. It is a year for tracing 
our beginnings as a nation struggling to overcome hard- 
ships, and defending the democratic values which com- 
prise our heritage today. 

Such reflection adds a vital perspective to the Lehigh 
experience. Where graduating students fit in with respect 
to our University and its larger physical and ideological 
beginnings can be better understood by studying the 
founders of Lehigh and America. 

The following essay, written by Martin Baron, with Rob 
Feldman as assistant, undertakes this ambitious study of 
founders. The first segment concerns Industrial Age Amer- 
ica and the birth of a technical school with a liberal arts 
perspective in 1865 — Lehigh. 




B ¥ E t 



LEHIGH UNlV£R$lTVn^^ 



Coilrgt 


Colors 






Coltfg< 


«?fits- 





The second segment focuses on the human products of 
Lehigh, particularly the prominent leaders of business, in- 
dustry and other professions. It is hoped that readers will 
find traces of their own dreams and goals in these found- 
ers—the essence of the American spirit of achievement, 
and Lehigh's spirit of intellectual growth. In this way, 
Lehigh graduates in 1976 may come closer to under- 
standing their role as students of liberal arts, business or 
engineering in a 200-year-old nation. 

Finally, this article should be read with the following 
caveat. The number of outstanding Lehigh alumni is formi- 
dable, perhaps justifying charges of omission or oversight 
when a writer cites the top five or ten such leaders. 
Therefore, we preface this essay with expressed regrets 
that more Lehigh alumni could not have been cited for 
their contributions to art, business, technology and other 
fields that have shaped life in America today. 




180. Founders 



Knowledge is of Jittie use, when confined to mere 
speculation. But when speculative truths are reduced to 
practice, when theories, grounded upon experience, are 
applied to the common purposes of life; and when, by these, 
agriculture is improved, trade enlarged, the arts of h'ving 
made more easy and comfortable, and, of course, the 
increase and happiness of mankind promoted; knowledge 
then becomes really useful. 



That statement could have been read at the founding of 
Lehigh University in 1865, and most probably would have 
been particularly appropriate for the occasion. It could 
have accurately set forth the principle upon which Lehigh 
was established. And a poll of Lehigh students today 
would likely show a clear majority in agreement with the 
comment. 

The statement, in fact, is included in a volume of the 
American Philosophical Society for Promoting Useful 
Knowledge, headed by Thomas Jefferson. That the remark 
has retained its credibility is an indication of the intrinsic 
force of an idea. That it so clearly epitomized the educa- 
tional philosophy of Lehigh is testimony to the University's 
distinctly American character. 




The nation celebrated its Centennial a decade after 
Lehigh University began teaching its first class of students. 
During the 90 years since the Declaration of Independence 
officially set America apart from Europe, the complexion 
of the United States changed radically. 

An index of physical production in mining, based upon 
ten metals, coal and petroleum, for the years since 1879 
showed production multiplied very close to five times 
between 1879 and 1900. In the longer period between 1860 
and 1897, coal production multiplied approximately four- 
teen times and pig iron eleven times. Between 1869 and 
1899, lumber production in board feet multiplied nearly 
three times; and between 1876 and 1896 barrels of petro- 
leum nearly seven. This was also a time for inventions. 
Between 1837 and 1882, inventions included the electro- 
magnetic telegraph, the telephone, electric light and an 
alternating current system. 

But even in the throes of the industrial age in which 
Lehigh was born, the average American and particularly 
the entrepreneurs who founded universities those days 
remained committed to the Jeffersonian's utilitarian philos- 
ophy. The untapped resources of North America presented 
inhabitants with their task. In Jefferson's day, it took the 
form of agricultural development. During the days of Le- 
high's founding, it came to mean the expansion of industri- 
al might. 

Although Asa Packer gave the first $500,000 to the estab- 
lishment of Lehigh, he did not plan its curriculum. For 
that, he turned to William Bacon Stevens, Episcopal Bish- 
op of Pennsylvania, who became the first president of the 
Board of Trustees. It was Stevens who said: 



What our land now needs . . . (is^Men who make their studies 
tell in their practical benefits in developing the resources of 
the land, in opening up new highways of communications, in 
broadening the range of human comfort, in increasing the 
productive power of machinery, in utilizing the agencies of 
the material world, and in doing those things which make 
the world a better place to live in, draw out of it new 
treasures, add to man's domestic and social comfort, and 
elevate him in the scale of moral beings . . . Men who make 
past discoveries stepping stones to new ones, past triumphs 
herald to new conquests, and the feeling that we are 
stretching forth to higher results, have reaped new fields or 
opened long-buried treasures, or unlocked the still guarded 
secrets of nature's laboratory. 



Founders, 181 



Lehigh was structured to produce just that kind of man. 
Now Lehigh's products include women, and the institution 
is probably much truer to its label as a university than it 
was originally. It is no accident that Lehigh has the reputa- 
tion of an engineering school — a fact which particularly 
irks majors in the arts and sciences. Even though the 
founders stressed a broad education, there always has been 
a conscious tilt toward the technical. 

Asa Packer's vision in 1865 consisted of a university 
based on a poJytechnicai college instead of on the tradi- 
tional liberal arts college. That was a fairly bold concept at 
that stage in educational history. Until then, universities 
had grown out of expanded liberal arts colleges, although 
medicine became an important feature. With the advice of 
Bishop Stevens, Packer sought to make science the nucleus 
of a curriculum that would stress the exploration of indi- 
vidual potential. 

Debate at that time focused on the need for technical 
education. Like other industrial entrepreneurs, Packer had 
to go to Europe for possessors of scientific knowledge and 
technical skills. The coal, iron ore and zinc industries of 
the Lehigh Valley created a demand for young talent with 
technical background. 

Bishop Stevens cited John Amos Comenius, a Moravian 
clergyman (1592-1669), as the original advocate of realistic 
instruction. Comenius proposed Realschules which would 
make school students bear more directly upon the wants 
of practical life. The shift from classical tradition to the 
practical education in the United States occurred primarily 
in the second quarter of the nineteenth century, when the 
Rensselaer School (1829) for practical applications of sci- 
ence became the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1849. 
In 1847, the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard College 
was established. The University of Michigan established 



\hi$h jgnivfrsitg, 

SOUTH BSTHLBHGM, FA, 

(Fopsdki. by thi Hom. ASA PACKKK or Mai < h Chink* 



engineering courses about 1850. A West Point graduate 
founded in 1829 the Literary, Scientific and Military Acad- 
emy which became Norwich University in 1834. It offered 
practical courses in sciences including engineering and 
was the prototype of land grant colleges. The Morrill Act, 
finally passed in 1862, set aside funds from the sale of 
public lands to establish such branches of learning as are 
related to agriculture and the mechanic arts. 

The tilt toward the technical, however, did not negate 
the value of the liberal arts education. And Packer includ- 
ed the liberal arts in the curriculum, for Lehigh was to be 
more than a vocational school. The Lehigh graduate, 
trained in the practical sciences, was supposed to under- 
stand the significance of his task. As Bishop Stevens said: 
This education to be really valuable must be moral as 



The shift from classical tradition to the prac- 
tical applications of science occurred primarily in 
the second quarter of the nineteenth century . . . 



well as scientific and practical. The GOD of nature, and 
the GOD of the BIBLE are one. All the researches of 
human philosophy, all the discoveries of science, all the 
applications that busy themselves with what GOD has 
opened before the mind in the world of nature. Indeed, the 
University Seal included the words, HOMO MINISTER ET 
INTERPRES NATURAE - Man, the servant and inter- 
preter of nature. — the words of Sir Francis Bacon, whose 
thoughts inspired Comenius. 

Whether Lehigh was fully committed at first to the 
liberal aspect of a university education is debatable. 
During the first ten years of its existence, out of eighty-one 
degrees conferred by Lehigh, only six were of Bachelor of 
Arts. 



T1IK object <>f tai* Institution i» to give a thorough education in Civil. 
Mechanical and Mining Engineering, and alao in Chemistry and Metal- 
'unt_\ Situated ia a region fauuau for iu rich and varied mineral reaoarcea, 
and aWo for it* va»t manufacturing interval*, the Lkuigh Ckivkraity ha» 
peculiar advantage* fur iu epecial work. To it* technical »tu<lie» be* been 
added a CUvuical Courae, and there are now al«> Lectureship* of INycbology 
andCbrktian Kvtdaacee, and of Constitutional ami International |j»». 
While the technical education i» thorough and eoinprchcifiic. there are 
thus advantage* of large and liberal culture. 

Through the liberality of iu Founder. the tuition iu all branchea and 
> at rats. 



RKO.I 1HKMKXTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicant* (or adnuasion into the Fir*t t'bvw mu*t be at lcm»t aiawjca 
year* of age, and tuuat present teatimoiiial* of good moral character. They 
will be examined in the following wibject* : 

ihtkrmatiem. — Arithmetic complete; tfctvie* BJBW BsatdwnVa Algebra. 



182, Founders 



During the first decade of the University, modifications 
were made back and forth between technical and liberal 
curricula. Initially, the liberal education was reduced from 
two semesters to one and a half. Then Lehigh's founder, 
Asa Packer, sanctioned a professorship of religion and 
established a department of classics which prompted an 
entire reorganization of the University. Perhaps the most 
convincing sign of a commitment to the liberal arts came 
in 1876 with the hiring of Rev. John N. Leavitt as president 
— the only president who did not have a technical or 
business background. 

Henry Coppee, Lehigh's first president, also appreciated 
the liberal arts. In fact, his title in the register read Presi- 
dent and Professor of History and English Literature. Cop- 
pee did his best to impress the classical and aesthetic 
values upon a town more occupied with steel and railroads 
than with the humanities. 

Whether Coppee's spirit filtered down to Lehigh students 
is questionable. In 1878, a committee of alumni called on 
Asa Packer to deliver an address urging that Lehigh Uni- 
versity be made a purely engineering school. This would 
have eliminated the recently added school of General 
Literature. One member of that committee, Lehigh presi- 
dent-to-be Henry S. Drinker, as president emeritus, said, 
... as added years gave increase of judgment, every one 
of us came to agree with the wise decision of the founder 
to abide by the broader scope in which the institution had 
been organized. 

Today, almost a century after that committee of alumni 
presented its proposal, it is still doubtful whether Lehigh 
students in one curriculum really understand — or even 
contemplate — their role in society or the role of fellow 
students in a different curriculum. And it is ironic that in 
an age which requires interdisciplinary problem-solving, 
Lehigh, like most other schools, is producing specialists — 
of course, because it must, because they are needed. But 
they are specialists for the most part devoid of the broad 






HENRY COPPEE, FIRST PRESIDENT OF LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 



intellectual scope which Lehigh supposedly is expected to 
foster. Liberal arts students, so quick to mourn the material 
poverty of much of the world, regard with disdain engi- 
neers and businessmen who possess the skills to raise the 
standard of living. And engineers and businessmen, so 
consumed with Jeffersonian faith in physical empire-build- 
ing, often find themselves without the developed set of 
values that liberal arts is designed to cultivate. 

Historian Daniel Boorstin writes of the attitude of Amer- 
ican founders: Such preoccupation with material and 
commonplace human needs surely turned jeffersonian 
energies to use. But so sparse a philosophy . . . would not 
much help men of a later age whose choice was among 
numerous competing ends. That sparse philosophy still 
lingers among Lehigh students and graduates. 

Jacob Bronowski, a leader in the modern movement of 
Scientific Humanism, said: We have to cure ourselves of 
the itch for absolute knowledge and power. 



Andrew Carnegie at dedication of Taylor Hall. 1908. 



Founders. 183 



We have to close the distance between the push-button 
order and the human act. We have to touch people, 
Bronowski says. But he does not stop there. We are na- 
ture's unique experiment to make the rational intelligence 
prove itself sounder than the reflex. Knowledge is our 
destiny. Self-knowledge, at Jast bringing together the ex- 
perience of the arts and the explanations of science, waits 
ahead of us . . . 

That we must continue to make material progress, and 
understand ourselves in the process, is true. These are 
lessons of history, lessons which Lehigh's founders said 
they hoped to teach. And yet, lessons which many students 
still have to learn. 

Much of the Jeffersonian attitude persisted in the 1860's, 
but the hundred years since those action-oriented views 




HENRY S. DRINKER 



were put forth had produced some significant change. And 
Lehigh reflected them. It is important to remember that 
papers by Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace on 
the origin of the species and the survival of the fittest 
concept were presented in 1858 to the Linnean Society in 
London. The application of the theory to man came within 
the nineteenth century. It signified fundamental alteration 
in the Jeffersonian view of man. The Jeffersonian saw man 
struggling among other creatures in his mastery of nature. 
The Social Darwinist saw man struggling against those of 
his own species. Man's value was determined by his suc- 
cess in the social process, by his accomplishment in mate- 
rial terms. It was in that philosophical context that Lehigh 
University developed. 

From 1865 to 1901, the ideas of Social Darwinist Herbert 
Spencer were of transcendent importance in American 
thought. Spencer said the preservation of the human spe- 
cies required the distribution of benefits in proportion to 
merit, merit being measured by the power to sustain one- 
self. Spencer's notions probably found their way into Le- 
high. 

Lehigh was and is a place where students train to 
become materially successful. One hardly needs a survey 
to tell him that most Lehigh students want an education in 
order to get a job. Education for its own sake is not a 
prominent attitude. 

It is significant that there are no traces in Lehigh's 
founding of collectivist movements of that time. The Uni- 
versity is devoid of the repudiation of materialism that 
characterized transcendentalists of the period. And the 
school hardly was touched by the same collectivism and 
anti-materialism of radical movements a century later. 




184, Founders 




The hard-driving individualism and the passion for up- 
ward mobility probably stem largely from the founder 
himself. In 1822, when he was hardly 17, Asa Packer left 
his Connecticut home with a knapsack and a few coins. He 
walked to the township of Brooklyn in Susquehanna Coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania. There he apprenticed himself to his uncle 
Edward Packer, a carpenter. He worked in that area for 
eleven years felling trees, clearing land, and building log 
cabins. There he married Sarah Blakslee, an industrious 
woman who made every garment both wore during the 
first ten years of their married life. 

In 1833, Packer moved 100 miles away to the Lehigh 
Valley. He walked the distance by foot paths, through 
rough mountain passes between the upper waters of the 
Susquehanna and the Lehigh. Packer met up with coal 



PORTRAIT 

OF OUR FOUNDER 



people and spent his first two summers in the area piloting 
coal from Mauch Chunck (now Jim Thorpe) to Phila- 
delphia, acting as master of the boat. 

The Philadelphia Press in an 1879 edition recalled Pack- 
er's personal progress: Not contented with the profits from 
his mere manual labor, he contracted for the mastership 
of a second boat (he took charge of one of the first), which 
he placed in charge of his brother-in-law (who grew up in 
Packer's home) Jones I. Blakslee. From that time his 
prosperity was marked. Among his other investments was 
the purchase in the autumn of 1834 of a small store, the 
property of E. W. Kimball, which stood upon the banks of 
the Lehigh. Giving up active operations as a boatman, he 
retained a money interest in several boats and buying a 
boat yard he built boats and contracted for the building of 
docks on the upper Lehigh which he completed in 1837. 

With his boat yard he began constructing decked canal 
boats which could haul coal and freight directly to New 
York through the bays and rivers. He also saw a future in 
railroads in the valley. In October 1851, he purchased the 
stock of the Delaware, Lehigh, Schuylkill and Susque- 
hanna Railroad Company and changed the name to the 
Lehigh Valley Railroad. He then set out to lay tracks the 
46 miles from Mauch Chunck to Easton. The route became 
operational on September 4, 1855 and in two years coal 
tonnage increased by one half million. 

But there was more to Packer than business. He was 
elected to the state legislature in 1842 and 1943. He served 
as associate judge on the first county court in newly- 
formed Carbon County from 1843 to 1848. In 1853, he went 
to Washington as a representative. He ran unsuccessfully 
for the Democratic nominee for President of the United 
States in 1868, and a year later, as the Democratic candi- 
date, lost his race for the governor of Pennsylvania. 



Founders, 185 



Unsolicited, Packer at the age of 60 gave $500,000 and 60 
acres of land in South Bethlehem toward the founding of 
Lehigh University. His total monetary contribution to the 
school eventually amounted to $3,000,000. 

Upon the founder's death in 1879, Lehigh President Hen- 
ry Coppee said, J know of no human life, which may be 
more properly presented to young men, as a model. In 
1931, Lehigh's seventh president Clement C. Williams, said 
in an address: That the life of such a man can stand out 
on the landscape of human achievement as conspicuously 
as a Cheops on the plains of Egypt or a Shasta in the 
Coast Range shows that in the final count, individual 
personality — ability, will, faith and character — tran- 



Entrepreneurship, the type Asa Packer ex- 
emplified and the type his University was de- 
signed to cultivate, produced a nation with a 
record of spectacular material successes. 



Lehigh's founding and two hundred years after the nation 
achieved independence, it is important to remember that it 
was individual effort, genius and motivation — not a 
governmental master plan — which made the United States 
the envy of the world. 

That assessment is somewhat chauvinistic — but it is 
realistic. Entrepreneurship, the type Asa Packer ex- 
emplified and the type his University was designed to 
cultivate, produced a nation with a record of spectacular 
material successes. To be sure, the nation had its problems. 
They were the inevitable consequences of a Jeffersonian 
philosophy at the time of Lehigh's founding that half- 
heartedly recognized the human effects of physical action. 

That past negligence, however, does not negate the mer- 
its of individualism and material progress. Together, the 
two produced a nation with unmatched technical capacity, 
fueling increases in the standard of living here and abroad. 
Lehigh University continues to be very much a part of this 
engine of growth. The combination of technical studies 
and liberal arts has the potential to turn out graduates 
equipped to keep the American production process intact 
— but graduates also equipped to cope with the profound 
human questions that will arise. For this task, the Lehigh 
student must take time out to consider the principles of his 
University and the significance of his own role in shaping 
American society. 



scends the collectivist abstractions among the forces of 
civilization. As the influence of men lives after them, so 
the rugged spirit of Asa Packer pervades to this day his 
chief philanthropy, Lehigh University, in that its educa- 
tional philosophy is based on individual capacities, in 
scientific realities and natural economic relations of so- 
ciety engaged in free enterprise. 

University President Deming Lewis could make the same 
statement today. That educational philosophy still holds. 

Today's educators and students, for the most part, prob- 
ably don't accept the spirit of ruthless competition that 
was adopted by industrial heavyweights in Packer's day. 
But individual accomplishment, symbolized by the found- 
er's own life, continues to be a standard for Lehigh stu- 
dents. That is important. More than a hundred years after 




Packer Mansion. Mauch Chunck 



186, Founders 



LEHIGH'S GREAT ACHIEVERS 



JAMES WARD PACKARD '84 



In the years that came after the hectic turn of the 
century, Packards became gradually a familiar symboJ, a 
symbol in the strictest sense of progress, TIME magazine 
wrote in 1928 about the automobiles manufactured by a 
former Lehigh mechanical engineering student. At age 30, 
Packard drew the first plans for his automobile; in 1809, 



the first, high sloping model rolled out upon the roads. 

Packard's commercial models were capable of traveling 
30 miles per hour, and sold for $1,200. As president of 
Packard Motor Co. of Detroit, this Lehigh graduate rose to 
become an important influence in transportation, providing 
the means for a more mobile society. 



RICHARD HARDING DAVIS '86 



Richard Harding Davis became one of the first war 
correspondents to see actual combat. Davis wrote about 30 
volumes of fiction, edited a magazine, but could not handle 
an academic career at Lehigh. 

He entered Lehigh in 1882 as a special student in the 
Latin-Science curriculum, and became the founder of Ar- 
cadia, (the student government), The Burr, (the then stu- 
dent weekly magazine), and the Mustard & Cheese drama 



society. The husky athlete also organized Lehigh's first 
football team, and played halfback. Davis was known as a 
prankster who used to walk his pet snakes down the 
streets of Bethlehem. 

Davis the correspondent covered military conflicts for 
the New York Times, the New York Herald, the New York 
Tribune and the Times of London. 



M. A. DeWOLFE HOWE '86 



Of all the men of letters Lehigh has produced, Howe 
probably ranks among the best. The author of 28 books, he 
won the Pulitzer Prize for his 1924 biography, Barret 
Wendell and His Letters. TIME magazine called him a 
genial wit who looks like a diffident Boston banker. The 
New York Herald-Tribune viewed him as a man Bostonian 
in essence if not by birth. 



Howe wrote the monumental five-volume Memoirs of 
the Harvard Dead in the War against Germany. He also 
penned his autobiography, A Venture in Remembrance, in 
which he recalls experiences with classmate Richard Har- 
ding Davis, Robert Frost and Henry James. Howe also 
served as editor of Atlantic Monthly. 






JAMES WARD PACKARD '84 



RICHARD HARDING DAVIS '86 



M. A. DeWOLFE HOWE '86 



Founders, 187 



FRANCIS R. DRAVO '87 and RALPH M. DRAVO '89 



After being thrown out of work during a business reces- 
sion, Francis Dravo decided in 1890 to go into business for 
himself. The former Lehigh mechanical engineering stu- 
dent became the Pittsburgh representative for a manufac- 
turer of steam engines. Ralph had graduated a year earlier 
and joined his brother to direct firm finances in 1893. 



The Dravo Construction Co. is now the Dravo Corpo- 
ration, and in every section of the nation, there are bridges, 
piers and other engineering monuments by Dravo. It has 
built locks, dams and ships. It manufactured ore process- 
ing equipment, heavy materials handling equipment, steel 
grating, etc. 



TOM M. GIRDLER '01 



Tom Girdler was one of the country's best known busi- 
nessmen while he headed Republic Steel Corporation. He 
was known for a caustic tongue and his criticism of 
President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and for his opposition to 
labor unions. 

In 1937, John L. Lewis, the determined union organizer, 
took on Tough Tom. The inevitable strikes came to Repub- 



lic plants. During the strike, a Senate investigation later 
found Republic had maintained an arsenal of 522 revolv- 
ers, 64 rifles, 2,707 hand grenades, 143 gas guns and 245 
shotguns. 

In steel, when not fighting unions, he was recognized as 
a production genius. He also streamlined mass production 
techniques in aircraft manufacture. 



MONROE J. RATHBONE, '21 



Fortune Magazine's first published Hall of Fame for 
Business Leadership was an exclusive list. Among those 
inducted posthumously were Thomas Edison, David Sar- 
noff of RCA, Henry Ford, John D. Rockefeller, and Andrew 
Carnegie. Among the four original inductees who are still 
living was chemical engineer graduate Monroe Rathbone. 



As chairman and chief executive of Standard Oil of New 
Jersey, now Exxon, Rathbone pioneered a costly search for 
oil outside the Middle East. It was the most important 
decision in the company's history, and it set an entirely 
new standard for the oil industry. 




FRANCIS R. DRAVO, '87 



RALPH M. DRAVO, '89 



TOM M. GIRDLER 01 



MONROE J. RATHBONE, '21 



188, Founders 






EDWARD H. GOTT, '29 



JACK DREYFUS, JR., '34 



LEE A. IACOCCA, '45 



EDWARD H. GOTT, '29 



Ed Gott is a man who knows this steel town well, having 
grown up in Pittsburgh, and been educated in Bethlehem. 
He was graduated from Lehigh with a B.S. in Industrial 
Engineering. 

Gott worked his way up the ranks of the nation's largest 
steel producer, U. S. Steel, to become its president in 1960. 
He served in that post until 1973, when he retired as 



Chairman of the Board and chief executive officer. He 
prides himself on working at almost every job in the steel 
mill during his lifetime. 

Also active in the community, Gott was a lifetime scout- 
ing devotee who served as national vice president of the 
Boy Scouts of America. 



JACK DREYFUS, JR., '34 



It is a little known fact that the man responsible for one 
of the nation's largest mutual funds, Jack Dreyfus, barely 
got passing grades as a Lehigh student. His only other real 
interests in life were golf and bridge. 

Upon graduation, Dreyfus worked on Wall Street in a 
"routine" job until 1946, when he bought himself a seat on 
the New York Stock Exchange. It was not until the early 
1950's that Dreyfus founded the billion-dollar mutual fund 
of the same name. 



Dreyfus, former chairman of the New York Racing Asso- 
ciation, is one of the leading thoroughbred race horse 
owners in the country. 

Dreyfus has put much of his energy recently into some 
pioneering medical research. Through research, he has 
found that Dilantin, the drug used for epilepsy, also helps 
those suffering emotional instability and depression, and a 
malfunctioning nervous system. He is now financing fur- 
ther research. 



LEE A. IACOCCA, '45 



He's the 45-year-old marketing marvel whose innovative 
cultivation of the growing youth cult in this country redi- 
rected the sluggish course of American industry, TIME 
magazine once said of Iacocca. He is the man who in- 
troduced the Mustang, the Maverick and the Lincoln Conti- 
nental to America. And as the youngest president of Ford 
Motor Company, the nation's third largest auto manufac- 



turing company behind G. M. and Jersey Standard, Lee 
Iacocca stands among Lehigh's most famous and successful 
holders of a Lehigh B.S. in Industrial Engineering. In 1970, 
the 46-year-old Iacocca was elected President of Ford. He 
was one of the youngest major corporation presidents ever, 
and was featured on the covers of both TIME and NEWS- 
WEEK magazines. 



Founders, 189 




LIVING GROUPS 



fc> r»*> w 



Tr ORgWORP . 

K°/^ To tke 
board of tru-stee^s, 
ike t acuity , tk< • 
sstueieni- body, cvv J 
©J I olker^s ir^ereol 
ed , we offer" lkk.s 
brieF rec or v I of 
LEMIGM life. 



l A 1 I 




McCLINTIC- MARSH Al I. 

STEEL BUILDINGS, 
BRIDGES, Etc 






Works: 






Contracting OHIee* 







i^ 




DRAVO A-l 




Row 1: J. Zangara; Row 2: M. Craig. R. Lundberg. D. Garfield, R. Landless; Row 3: G. 
Golly. Y. West, J. Demas, T. Winters. R. Herman; Row 4: C. Kraft. T. Harraka, D. 
Semple, J. Buzby. 



DRAVO A-2 




Row 1: W. Siedlarz, K. Douglas. P. Cruily, F. Reilly; Row 2: P. Terrenzia, G. Simpson. M. Herbets, S. Gordon. M. Anderson; 
Row 3: ]. Reed, B. Gans, D. Visokey. 



192, Living Groups 



DRAVO A-3 




Row 1: C. Reed; Row 2: ). Dunegan, S. Frock, L. Martin; Row 3: S. Maddox, D. Hargrave, W. Rhoads, G. Watson, 
D. Morris; Row 4: G. Caro, M. Brodfuehrer; Row 5: C. Wolle, R. Tedrow. J. Schwanda. 



DRAVO A-4 




Row 1: P. Joyce, J. McDermott, S. Alfano; Row 2: H. Bierstein, B. Morris, P. Wilson; Row 3: D. 
Gobysos, D. Mengel, D. Mathesius, L. Langweber. 



Living Groups, 193 



DRAVO B-2 



Row 1: J. Sullivan, B. Lamm. B. McMichael; Row 2: T. Tate. S. Guemple. J. Bugbee, C. Keener; Row 3: S. 
Forstater, F. Lusby, T. Zaremba. J. Dean, J. Demato, J. Sommer, J. Noonan. 




DRAVO B-3 



Row 1: S. Runyon, T. Maguire, M. Long. S. Schwartz, R. Parkman; Row 2: S. Jones, T. Hudson, J. Devlin. T. 
Woodward. J. Odorisio, K. Ashton, S. Scheibe, K. Krenz, B. Church. 



194, Living Groups 




DRAVO B-4 



Row 1: J. Shields, R. Davis, R. Schlack. C. Sheppard. C. Hyun Kim; Row 2: J. Spirdon, B. Himes, J. Buck. R. 
Bitting. M. Aho. M. Reiber. J. Andrelczyk. B. Curry. T. D'Amelio, C. Berta. 




DRAVO B-5 



Row 1: K. Graybeal, T. Stevens. J. Dunn. C. Perry: Row 2: ]. 
Fitzgerald. G. Tuttle. B. Vinton, J. Luttmann. B. Addison. R. 
Curtiss, T. Barns, L. Elewett. P. Gorbinsky, B. Logan. D. 
Martin, f. Michael. L. Mitchell. K. Molinaro, T. Poff. F. 
Hosenfeld. 



Living Groups. 195 




DRAVO C-G 



G. Liddick, J. Gentles, M. Federbusch, C. Carella, C. Haas, J. Edmunds, G. Bechtel, N. Godschall. 



DRAVO C-l 



Row 1: B. Bartholomew, R. Loughridge, C. Hopkins, G. 
Wai; Row 2: B. Rentier, C. Easton, T. Shannahan, M. 
Seasholtz, P. Grady; Row 3: J. Magee, M. Pando, J. 
Greenbaum. R. Kuber, R. Jakielski. [. Schwenk. 




196. Living Groups 




Row 1: D. Callivas, M. Barth: Row 2: T. Hoover, J. Sion, ]. Whitcraft, J. Cahir; Row 3: R. Hotaling, J. Wallach, E. 

Laughlin, G. Thomas, (. Murray, S. Cook. H. Hoyt, B. Field. Not pictured: J. Grant. T^"E? A "\ J (~^\ (~^ O 




Row 1: T. Chappel, M. Neporent. B. Kimball, H. Henning, M. Pyles, S. Esinli; Row 2: S. Walters, K. Huber, F. 
Vultaggio, G. Reel, W. Tanchak. 



DRAVO C-3 



Living Groups, 197 



DRAVO C-4 




Row 1: G. Schuster, T. Palmisano. J. Nolan, E. Scheller; Row 2: C. Hankins, J. Kweder, M. Moulds, P. Guthorn, M. Siegrist, K. Klages. 
C. Vircchio. 



DRAVO D-l 




Center: L. Hauserman; Left to Right: D. Hume, R. Kruger. T. Kokkinos, P. Sudano, J. Johnson, L. Weiss, T. Braun. 



198. Living Groups 



DRAVO D-2 




m 


JH 


8 'Hl . .j-.' 


A * 


•\ av 


" 


^H 1 V'- 





Row 1: J. Mancuso, J. Ripoll, M. Scherer, J. Dille; Row 2: R. Wengert, 
A. Caetta. D. Tangel. J. Koch, D. Wolf, D. Jablon, B. Fryburg; Row 3: 
D. Vogler, D. Jurreller, f. Depsky 




Row 1: J. Davis, R. Speir, P. Malik; Row 2: S. Carpenter, G. Archer, R. Whalen, E. 
Michael, E. Nortavage, B. Schollenberger; Row 3: B. Kistler, B. Larkin, R. Adams; 
Row 4: M. Anderson, B. Schneck, L. Engel, F. Hencken. 



DRAVO D-3 



Living Groups, 199 



DRAVO D-4 




Row 1: B. Siegel, C. Cowdery, J. Schrader, D. Byelick, L. Johnson, M. Kovacevik; Row 2: B. Dietrich, G. Lammert, ). Karper, 
R. Karibian; Row 3: [. Habig. J. Stevens. P. Appino, J. Reid, P. Keating. 



DRINKER 1 




Row 1: R. Rosenfeld, B. Hill, S. Kreiger. D. Bartner. J. Cowperthwait, F. Bibas, T. Yarkin, G. Pin, C. Buhrendorf; Row 2: M. Kozel, T. 
Piaia. M. Del Port, K. Vincent, G. Werth, D. Miller, L. Bell, R. Rosenthal, J. Van Artsdalen, D. Salonia. 



200, Living Groups 



DRINKER A-2 




Row 1: J. Phillips; Row 2: f. Wyble, D. Hewit, O. Koder, P. Klauder, N. Campbell, T. Blair, M. Stoute, R. Woefel; Row 3: T. McMahon, T. 
Splescia, K. Noonan, B. Van Nostrand, C. Johnson, T. Komens, J. Ripley, N. Snyder, B. Wolf, D. Engle, T. Lugonski, K. Sailer. 



DRINKER B-2 




Row 1: M. Holland, T. Ying, G. Zagursky, B. Waldeck, T. Howland, L. Pellet, W. Zalweski, D. Morgan, D. Mander; Row 2: D. Merlino, M. 
Jaffe, S. Lesher, L. Weitzner, D. Barnes, K. Marsh, J. Weeks, T. Hoffman, G. Weiss, P. Sandvick, G. Valdes. D. Dudrill, B. Judge. 



Living Groups, 201 



DRINKER A-3 




Row 1: P. Mancino, B. Charwat, J. Altomare. J. Kenny. L. Williamson, R. Inserra. F. Snyder, J. Buffy. T. Cox, K. Walden; 
Row 2: D. Vigliano, S. VanKeuren, ]. Anderson, J. Sachs. 



DRINKER B-3 




Row 1: T. Mastri, B. Ferguson, B. Hamlette, J. Johansen, F. Johnson, G. Troxel, P. Drosswimmer; Row 2: T. Adcook, 
Copoulos, K. Czarnecki, T. Deutsch, C. Gorski, B. Parino; Row 3: C. Mercy. C. Tack. 



202, Living Groups 




DRINKER 4 



UP the I: B. Cortright, P. Auerbach, 
K. Colangelo, G. Davis, E. Tarof, B. 
Dietz, A. Bartlette, T. Cerra, G. 
Ramsey, C. Lutz, M. Rust, D. Smith; 
DOWN the V: H. Pecker, S. 
Reemer, M. Malone, J. Velemesis, P. 
Dickey, D. Shavel. D. Kane, S. 
Ditamasso. F. Cavanaugh, A. Rietz, 
R. Brennan, T. Cheng, M. Schultz, 
B. West, D. Sell. 




Row 1: S. Ludlum, A. Magill. E. Miller, T. Hindenland, B. Stout; Row 2: G. Zotian, B. Donohue. 



RICHARDS A-l 



Living Groups. 203 




RICHARDS B-l 



Row 1: M. Flanagan; Row 2: K. Roman. C. Szechenyi, G. Wippick; Row 3: 
T. Masters, M. Stammherr, J. Lewis, M. Kalma, E. Tober, J. Goldner, M. 
Luczynski. 



RICHARDS A-2 



K. Meritz, S. Filemyr, J. Stewart, R. Vicino, E. Pettinato, B. 
Walker, G. Mino. J. Dittrich, G. Gross, R. Luni, Tonto, J. 
Johnson, M. Shriber, P. LaPorta. M. Sisson, G Goelz, H. 
Schweitzer, E. Blew, B. Ascetta, P. Dinsmore, S. Buchanan. 




204, Living Groups 



RICHARDS B-2 



Row 1: L. Lyng, J. Cillo, D. Simon, S. Scaramuzzino, P. Goldstein, D. Worral, B. Friemuth; Row 2: D. Levinson, B. Wolfe, R. Gogle, G. 
Barlow, J. Glaze; Row 3: G. Kanary, R. Ellsworth, T. Keeler, C. Kahle, W. Cummius; Row 4: E. Costello, M. Silverman; Row 5: |. 
Breslow, H. Gravenhorst, S. Mazzeo. 




Row 1: J. Ochs, J. Schaffer, K. Slike, K. Kahn, J. Smith, M. Pankos, K. Anderson; Row 2: B. Piskin, P. Friedman, K. Leonetti, M. 
Shapiro, D. Wolchok, M. Reges; Row 3: C. Hamburger, S. Gimson, R. Schwimmer, J. Engelhardt, J. Dean, S. Draber, M. Fitzgerald. 



RICHARDS A-3 



Living Groups, 205 



RICHARDS B-3 



Row l: M. Velmch. Arnold Palmer, D. [ames. M. Cochran; Row 2: I. Pavels L. Turner, K. Yarna 1, C. 
Staviski, S. Kratovil, K, Berry; Row 3: M. Zito, J. Magee, M. Voionmaa, D. Came, M. MacDonald, L. 
Kaufman, S. Hirsch; Row 4: K. McDonough, J. Branco, S. Dahl; Row 5: M. Garrabrant. P. MacFarland. P. 
Petko. 




RICHARDS 4 



Row 1: J. Love, B. Gruver, L. Lasser. M. Beck. S. Stacom; Row 2: T. DeCilveo, L. Moore, K Benusa. R. 
Vogel A Madden. E. Feldman, S. Woytkewicz; Row 3: C. Hart, N. Barrett, L. Totten, C. Coll J. Welty. J. 
Qu.nn, L. Cant, D. Gruver, M. Klein, C. Charwat, A. Altman, M. Gellman; Row 4: M^ Fiore, M. Mart.nez D. 
Clark. P. Bruns, M. McCoy. D. Daych, L. Collmann, N, Grace, B. Sobel; Row 5: J. Freedman, S. Skacel, S. 
Eisenberg, C. Hertzog, S. Slaff, K. Zeitel. 



206, Living Groups 



TAYLOR 1-E 




Row 1: D. Blanchard, G. Iztenson, F. Diciccio; Row 2: D. Evans, A. Shukaitis, C. Smith, B- Nesbitt, B. Doddman, B. Klimack, P. 
Cramer, P. Wise, B. Glickman, R. Ross, C. Herman, D. Wilens, B. Sampson, K. Kummer. 



TAYLOR 1-W 




Row 1: R. Megasko, R. Carnevale. T. Cunningham, J. Borillo, R. Eastman. D. Missley, G. Wilhite. D. Young; Not Pictured: 
D. Seicol, C. Cryer, S. Shymon, R. Husband, T. Monetti, B. Peters, R. Johns. J. Ratkevic, M. Frey, B. Pottenger, T. 
Rhodin, B. Frankievich, V. Scullin. 



Living Groups, 207 



TAYLOR 2 & 3W 




Row l: M. Johnson, E. Gillman, T. Donohue, A. Schechter; Row 2: B. Pinciotti, D. Sobers, M. Baker, T. Jacobsen, E. Hanssen, 
L. Chasalow, J. Byrne, J. Barnes; Row 3: D. Weiss, B. Heinz, D. Zukswert. 




M&MB-l 



Row 1- C Gruver, C. Reese. R. Stilwell, J. Debottis, M. Pacelle; Row 2: G. Werner, J. Edell, J. Feldman, 
G Bernstein, P. Kalajian, B. Shannon, J. Beitler, A. Ingus; Row 3: D. Wagner; Row 4: K Chany, B. 
Blumfeld. E. Markecin, C. Dipps. R. Bates, J. Cassimatis, D. DeRoche, K. Chynoweth, R. Warbchke, G. 
Blythe, R. Cohen, P. Blazewicz, D. Summins. 



208. Living Groups 




M&M B-2 



Row 1: Toronto, J. Lampert, B. Schaefer; Row 2: 
P. Brooks, P. Scharf, P. Kinkel, J. Horner. R. 
Sohaney; Row 3: R. Peek. C. Erickson, P. 
Blejwas. S. Traendly, T. Cowles; Row 4: T. 
Antanasiotis, F. Fogg, K. Diehl, R. Hegedus, P. 
Gushue; Row 5: B. Ewing, K. Owen, T. Toth- 
Fejel; Row 6: D. Taggart. 




M&M B-3 



S. Dill, E. Karpovich, C. Alva, B. Swartwout, P. Klein, D. Freeman, B. Morrison, B. Kelly, K. Lankenau, 
J. Mellow. P. Wurdack, D. Poole, J. Goresan, D. Nardone, T. Pilch, M. Tully, J. Cawley, S. Teitelbaum! 
M. Cowell, A. Kratz, D. Wright, B. Raiser, B. Brown, D. Gibbons, f. Walters, A. Straw. B. VanWinkle, M. 
Roberts, R. Swartz, A. Ruggles. J. Kersher, F. Taylor, D. Lenyo, K. Kleiner, J. Snyder, J. Jenkins, 



Living Groups, 209 



M&M A-l 




Row 1: P. Mitchell, B. Mapp, P. Wright; Row 2: E. Stober. M. Fener. N. Taylor, J. Cook, H. Elosge; Row 3: H. Palmer, C. 
Winters, M. Lieb, B. Hughs, L. Werner, K. Kochaba, R. Sieber; Row 4: L. Leonard, L. Wolfe, P. Handwerk, T. Schifter, D. 
Serignese, L. Ewin, W. Smith, N. Alpert; Row 5: P. Latz, G. Price, M. B. Morrison, L. (acobson; Row 6: B. Levitt, C. 
Meyer, D. Kaiser, S. Rzasa, E. Nova, N. Rosenstein. 




Row 1: L. Branch, K. Saxe, K. Perlman, G. Ehrlich, K. Mitchell, M. Carpenter, P. Lewis; Row 2: A. Simmons, J. Doyle, 
Hjorth, A. Sotzing, B. Sutherland, D. Passafaro, J. Fasesky, S. Beck; Row 3: K. Boczar, A. Pinto, T. Toth-Fejel, J. Ryan, R. 
Hourigan, C. Kuerner, M. Buchinsky, P. Lynch, B. Raynoha, L. Sperry, S. Gladstone, S. Krause, B. Gent, A. Romana. 



M&M A-2 



210, Living Groups 




M&M A-3 



Row 1: H. Barr, H. Dorer, G. Holt 
T. Cloud; Row 2: M. Hutton, K 
Schmidt, J. Meglio, T. Bloom, N 
Dimmig; Row 3: D. Bulas, A. 
Fleming, S. Grysewicz; Row 4: C 
Cable, K. Rau, J. Cassidy, S 
McGouldrick; Row 5: D 
Dabrowski, A. Werley, J. Raibaldi 
A. Levy; Row 6: M. Hart, J 
Sugarman, T. Smith, J. Kearney 
Row 7: I. Schiff. T. White, J 
Gallub, M. Skibo; Row 8: M. 
Search. 




G. Roush, R. Ingber, K. Weisman, D. Lombardo, T. Obenauer, R. Lund, D. Strickland, F. Houriani, J. Goldman, J. 
Plewa, J. Cuilty, J. Schiff, B. Wepfer, J. Staufenberg, D. DiSanto, N. Parry, G. Diehl, J. Thatcher, P. Davidoff, D. 
Illowsky, C. Munson, C. Gunheim, D. Black, J. Wroblewski, W. Stottmeister, M. Eitingson, F. Gross, P. Bieszard, 
C. DePrefontaine, M. Purcell, J. Cox, L. Deren. Not Pictured: L. Radkowski, S. Chaplin, D. Gardner, J. Sergi, T. 
Miller, P. Marcus, M. Hovia, A. Chencinski, J. Soltan, J. Hendrzak, T. Stephenson, Y. Cheng, D. Breen, B. Bauman. 



CONGDON 



Living Groups, 211 



EMERY 




Row 1: Y. West, B. Sorrel, B. Hann, T. Winters; Row 2: C. Vandlik. M. Cochran, C. Lewis, L. Cutter, D. Smith, A. Kunes, 
A. Hazen, D. Pitonak; Row 3: J. Gardill, M. Busch, L. Marcucci, L. LeBorit, |. Dukiet, M. Dickerman, M. Gleason, A. 
Levin, L. Goodwin, K. Knitter; Row 4: L. Reynen, L. Mihatov, S. Velthaus, K. McGeary, G. Reinhart, C. Richardi, P. 
Elliot, B. Holland. 



LEAVITT 




K. Costello, J. Morino, C. Swinger, ]. Alessie, G. Bast, J. Fabre, D. VanDoren, M. Purvis, W. Schuck. r, A. Thompson, Panuse, ). 
Brown. J. Haslett, D. Hayes, J. Kangass, D. Lydel, D. Pierce, D. Herbinak, D. Domicina, M. Wager, W. Grath, J. MacGahan, A. 
Lupotin, R. Yeaton, M. Pfefferle, U. Weist, D. Heckman, M. Pettigrew, J. Kotex, J. Lysak, K. Snyder, P. Caragiorgas. 



212, Living Groups 



McCONN 




Top: T. Marrs, C. Rynier, D. (ankowski, J. 
Edwards, P. Morton, G. Johnson, P. Barry, 
G. Haffner, P. Lande, L. Vogel, T. Castle, 
M. Jumbo, D. Moll, J. Greer; Middle: S. 
Hanzlik, J. Mead, B. Pyle, B. Powell, D. 
Adams, P, Lilienfield; Bottom: J. McMinn, 
J. Ryan, B. Gallagher, T. Heisey, M. 
Edelstein, M. Melino, F. Daly, J. Waylett, 
M. London, D. Simmons, J. Vogelsong, T. 
Fediw, D. Yetter, T. Boland, M. Markoff, 
P. Greenfield. 



The House Survives Moe 

Jumbo turns werewolf 

Project Week 

Negatory and Nyuk-Nyuk-Nyuk 

Volkswagon Jacks — "Pit Crews" 

"Go deep down the middle" 

Marmo shoots the Pres. 

Craig decorates the bathroom 

Blue-Block? 

747's still waiting 

Snake 

3-Ball fetish 

Get blown letters pile up 

Rotation Ping Pong 

Bumper Crops of Wizards 

House Cum Soars . . . What a bore!!! 

Pizza Runs 

Beer Copter 

Ion Counter 



Cold Feet, Warm Heart 

BSE, Inc. 

"Gentlemen, Here's the Deal" 

"Where are my tearways!" 

Tom? Which One? 

Hooples — Too Many 

Sitting on the piano 

Chris Calls the question, and again . 

Hunter trucks on 

The T.V.'s get a break 

Where's the heat? 

Ya want to live 'til 7? 

Bear loses his head 

Lynch — Scratch my back 

Ripped and rammed 

"I could do the same to you if 

you knew a girl" 

Embarassment at dinner 

Cat's Family— Tree questioned. 



Living Groups, 213 



SMILEY 




Row 1: M. Rice, M. Wilson, T. Eward, D. Volpe, G. Wiegner, D. Wagenseil, R. Schild; Row 2: M. Fortney, B. Finn, 
B. Bare, B. Pittman. D. Olsen, B. Hommes, R. Nehigian, A. Plushanski, B. Rosenthal, G. Geshner, T. Williams; 
Row 3: L. Rudewicz, B. Woodbury, T. Lemm, J. Dreyfuss, D. Halliday. M Shiner. N. VandenBeemt, G. Dissinger, 
M. Antonovich; Row 4: T. Schroeder, J. Carnali, J. Leknes, J. Erlichson, P. Lovka, D. Ryder, M. Derewianka. 



THORNBURG 




Row 1: M. Barend, M. Marson, R. Zenn, M. Cuozzi, R. Bernstein, D. Bealafeld, E. Breslow, L. Orysh, M. Madden; Row 2: 
"Baco" J. Sable, P. Knauer, J. Jacobson, C. Kozel, M. Howel, K. Talhelm, M. Garrutto, B. Howard, P. Knox, B. Dahl. B. 
Bridgeman, D. Tompkins, C. Noswick, M. Pebner, K. Thurow, S. Weinstein, I. Rosenberg, P. Boorujy, M. Lasser, P. 
Longely, T. Cantalupo, J. Graham, D. Corbett, E. Perillo. 



214, Living Groups 



CAROTHERS 




Row 1: B. Murphy, P. Whelchel. D. Harris, S. Schwartz, L. Snady, D. Wist, E. Golden; Row 2: S. Petrizzio, T. Jackson, S. Eckert, J. 
Chiu, E. Quirk, K. Koplow, J. Bradley, D. Goldman, K. Bryant, L. Kurz, L. Washington, B. Lemke. L. Hutchinson; Row 3: D. York, 
J. Davidson, L. Yurkovic, J. White, L. Kulp, S. Swisher, P. Torrey. 



BEARDSLEE 




Row 1: R. Villanueva, ]. McCoy, C. Au-Young, M. Baron, K. Fischer, R. Teske; Row 2: R. Harbold. K. Reiser, B. Blueweiss, J. 
Goldberg, R. Constantin, R. Porkes, D. Miller, J. Butterly; Row 3: K. Jackson, R. Cole, M. Schemel, B. Lang, P. Coughlin, A. 
Delenick, M. Branibar, M. Hirsch, B. Potter, R. Cooper, P. Schultz, K. Pearce, P. Gilmore, D. Berger, K. Frantz, G. Waltzer, 
S. Ehrlich. 



Living Groups. 215 



PALMER 



Row 1- K Donlon M. Scharf, J. LeClair. S. Okoniewski. f. Zelenko. A. Schoff, M. Lorini, D. Strauss; Row 2: J. 
Woolsev A Steele J Benoit, M. Lebowitz, K. Woerner, S. Langenberg. M. Baba, J. Cawley, M. McLennan; Row 3: 
L. Goodman, P. Holt, E. Burkart. K. Kapner, E. Burkart, C. Hazlehurst. S. Kovak, S. Eshleman, S. Stemple, D. 
Strohmayer, B. Mutzberg. 




STEVENS 



Row 1: M. Doeberl, J. Miller, G. Plotch, G, Reifsnyder, J. Saddel, S. Eberhart, C. Jubok, B. Herder, P. 
Gordenstein, K. S. Danoff, K. Motschwiller; Row 2: M. Goldberg, E. Cafduner, B. Marks, A. Ben-Ami, B. 
Toback, G. Blewis, D. Klein, P. Hubert, D. Konner, S. Shimmel, D. Robinson, B. Moore, E. Wise, P. Gilbert, 
G. Rettew, P. Candon, C. Robinson, R. Freed, M. Kirby. 



216, Living Groups 



fe <fr£S £ m % 



fc^ 



- I P 



I 



STOUGHTON 



Row 1: P. Seidenberger, P. Russell, N. Kirsch, C. Musto, L. Zwirn, L. Passes, L. Southworth, K. Comely. 
S. Welner, J. Durham, J. Obetz, L. Reubell, V. Shevitz; Row 2: S. Chodakewitz, A. Reese, S. Sonin, C. 
Tapper, A. Arbucho, B. Davis. L. Melillo, L. Lusardi, D. Kavett, L. Loewer, D. Miller. L. Seibel; Row 3: 
L. Montovano, R. Welliver, B. DeFrances, R. Heinz, L. Kraushaar, M. Jack, N. Shalay, L. Kaye, E. 
Goldstein, E. King, (. Fraivillig, T. Leitgeb, L. Levitt, K. Grigsby, C. Marconis, P. Hein, M. Leonardi. 




WILLIAMS 



Row 1: T. Bear, C. Manns, E. Brady, S. Thompson, W. Wilkes, C. Nusbaum, D. Carroll, S. Robinson, J. 
Goldman, S. Smith, M. Surdovel, S. Kossar, L. Zarembo; Row 2: K. Fleck, M. Peitrasz, L. Sonnenschein, G. 
Martens, D. Fennick, E. Schilden, L. Eckert, D. Harley, M. Walker, S. Smith, D. Geyer; Row 3: W. Gulick, P. 
Fix, G. Delp. S. Senzer, R. Thompson, J. Hanna, D. Dzieman, D. Stauffer, J. Ogorzalek, B. Kardos, B. Lilly, G. 
Fritchman, C. Ivanovsky, D. Stradal, B. Doremus. 






Living Groups, 217 



BISHOPTHORPE 




Row 1: S. Einstein, M. Roman, S. Darlak, R. Boig; Row 2: D. Zahn, J. Liu, M. Reuben, L. Wels, A. Kline, ). Gana; Row 3: B. 
Sutherland, B. Walters, B. Houk, P. Wascher, S. Lichtman, T. Dexter; Row 4: E. Bowman, D. Welford, H. Luttmann, M. Griest, 
J. Long; Row 5; J. Vinarski, S. Byrne, F. Zarnowski, M. Eby, J. Hummel, D. Novotny; Row 6: D. Goldner, M. Johnston, D. 
Finkelstein, S. Mills, A. Zweister, ]. Kohler, L. Koppenhaver. M. Liswith, J. Ernst, R. Hegeman, P. Goeller. 




218, Living Groups 




ALTERNATIVE LIFESTYLES 



Many Lehigh students grow frustrated with cramped dormitory quarters, noisy hallways and less-than- 
delectable dishes served up in the cafeteria, (remember mystery meat?). For those, there are alternative 
lifestyles. 

With the RH-11 apartment complexes, now more than one year old, students trade cubby-hole quarters 
and crowded dorm hallways for leaky ceilings, paper-thin walls and even less closet space. Still, students 
generally enjoy the greater privacy and independence with apartment life on campus. 

With SMAGS, (Saucon Married and Graduate Students), students sacrifice walking distance from campus 
for the more spacious units, and proximity to open fields for picnics and shopping at nearby Hellertown. 

But for the true 'pioneer', the choice is clear — off-campus apartments or houses. Here, the responsibilities 
are many: housecleaning, cooking, paying gas and electric bills, ad infinitum — an instant, sometimes 
shocking, introduction to 'real world' realities. Despite the chores and responsibilities, off-campus living 
offers more privacy, room to study, entertain, and closer community contact. 



mil i 





Living Groups, 219 




1. C. Wkitsch 


18. W. Conrad 


2. P. Houghton 


19. B. Kris 


3. R. Trakimas 


20. Z. Lilienfeld 


4. J. Schatz 


21. J. Pariseau 


5. R. Brazill 


22. M. Oeting 


6. G. Abboud 


23. T. Woznicki 


7. ). Martin 


24. P. Wolownik 


8. B. White 


25. T. Faughnen 


9. J. Groses 


26. J. McCartney 


10. R. Krevald 


27. J. Gotlinger 


11. ). Mallaney 


28. O. Schatz 


12. S. Fay 


29. F. Anderson 


13. P. Thomas 


30. M. Radio 


14. C. Kershner 


31. R. Perrine 


15. V. Cotogno 


32. N. Bard 


16. T. Boschen 


33. B. Wolstromer 


17. K. Hutter 


34. M. Hoogewerff 




35. J. Crabtree 



220. Living Groups 





ALPHA CHI RHO 

WHALE MEAT . . . SPACE CADETS ... I'M SCREWED . . . 
THE MAD CRAPPER ... VIBE-METER ... EAGLES ... 
QUICKS . . . APPLE RUN . . . REIN . . . CRABBY ... BO ... 
JIM ... ALEX . . . CIA . . . SKIP . . . OTTO . . . HOOG 
CONRACK . . . TANJ . . . RADIO . . . GOTT . . . CRITTER 
TEX ... BRYAN R ... RAY ... WAHOO ... MORE 
OPTIONED SEMESTERS! 




Living Groups. 221 



ALPHA SIGMA PHI 



Rico ... eat my shorts . . . Detective Geeba ... the Beard and the Boss . . . Glenn 
. . . Cass is Hoggin . . . Hey boys! . . . Brucie . . . Scranton or Bust! . . . Beakin it . . . 
They call me John . . . Tube Crew . . . Happy Days . . . Punt! . . . Isn't that Wild ... a 
pisser . . . Call of the Wild . . . Gregg . . . Mech Man . . . anticipation and tales . . . 
Tex . . . Alpha Sig, How the hell are ya? . . . Herman's Rules (Herman Hartman) . . . 
Rhode's own carpet shampoo . . . Art's gone mountain climbing . . . The great 
pumpkin ... JQ ... Quidnunk . . . Geeba. No Party Arty. Schwartz. Geeba. 
Profigliano . . . Beak. Beak. You can't Beak the Beaker!! Sig Tool Team . . . Kilgore 
. . . Citizen . . . Pete, Peggy and Pecker . . . Schultes . . . Pin Check . . . 
Appropriations Committee . . . Pecker is Otiose . . . "Ken Stober" . . . Winta . . . 
Rudy . . . Merganser! . . . Gosport Man! Doink . . . DEW IT . . . Gluck . . . Jack Lacks 
Libido . . . One unfriendly to go . . . Would I ever lie to you? . . . Where's Doug on 
the composite? Cass, one man eating squad ... A hard man is good to find . . . Kurt 
. . . Wog's 5 AM reveille . . . JK . . . Millersville Maulers . . . Max Baby ... I'd like 
em big . . . D Rodent Woman . . . Hawk, uh, Hunts . . . Florida or Bust . . . Leach's 
Pinmate (?) ... Foulie Howie . . . unmentionable . . . JEB . . . Pumpkin . . . 
Powerblow . . . Clink to Drink ... Big Rose and Little Rose . . . Waiter, take this 
swill away! . . . Javelin Jimmy . . . Flush . . . Arty, Awards . . . Dingleberries . . . 
Beeeeeeaaaaak! 




1. R. Hunter 


20. H. Smith 


2. "Beak" Solis-Cohen 


21. R. Cassaveccia 


3. J. Quinn 


22. f. Lutz 


4. G Wallach 


23. C. [ohnson 


5. W. Regi 


24. S. Goldberg 


6. B. Allison 


25. K. "Rico" Ricciardelli 


7. J. Schultes 


26. E. Ruckert 


8. J. Payne 


27. B. "Boo Boo" Baker 


9. T. Caine 


28. A. Alexander Ricci. II 


10. D. Rhodes 


29. H. Andrews 


11. R. Koubek 


30. J. Smith 


12. P. Geraghty 


31. B. Hamm 


13. E. Laughhn 


32. K. Rolf 


14. M. Anderson 


33. P. Dzera 


15. B. [ohnston 


34. R. Sneddon 


16. J. Benz 


35. D. Auperin 


17. D. Webb 


Not pictured: 


18. J. Kenny 


G. Haase 


19. S. Stine 


H. Winter 



222, Living Groups 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA 






.>■ ~** 



i 






i p 


~ 


V 




HT^ f 




1. R. Ellsworth 


19. E. Boltz 


2. f. Lobach 


20. B. Heitzman 


3. T. Giordani 


21. S. Shymon 


4. |. Ritter 


22. T. Tate 


5. ]. Legath 


23. M. Durback 


6. C. Williams 


24. N. Garris 


7. J. Fitzgerald 


25. D. Robinson 


8. C. Heller 


26. O. Koder 


9. C. Wintjen 


27. J. Rinn 


10. D. DePaolis 


28. A. Vandergrift 


11. B. Shannon 


29. J. Buzby 


12. M. Rowsey 


30. D. Hessinger 


13. D. Snyder 


31. E. Markazin 


14. M. Hoffman 


32. D. Wagner 


15. T. Deutsch 


33. D. Sparago 


16. S. Hefele 


34. C. J. Skender 


17. G. Gordon 


35. Hans 


18. B. Fritz 





During this past year, the seniors have perpetuated the idea of fraternalism to 
its utmost. Through their time and efforts as officers of the house they have given 
the members of ALPHA TAU OMEGA a sense of brotherhood which hopefully 
will continue forever, as they become alumni. 

The house wishes to give special thanks to President Cord Wintjen, Treasurer C. 
J. Skender, and Secretary Mike Rowsey for their time and devotion above and 
beyond what was required of them. 

Good luck in the future to all seniors: Cord; C. J.; Mike; Chuck; Sean; Jim; Chris; 
Lyle; Pete; Jim and Craig. 




Living Groups. 225 






BETA THETA PI 



Beta Pits at midnight . . . Fredness the cat . . . I. E. 3 classes . . . time to rack up some more games 
... Do Yams . . . spuds, excellent for Nu-Bombs . . . fire up some ales . . . Happy Days crew . . . 
Parking lot hoops ... I don't make pies . . . Who took O. J. ... Barney settles down . . . lookout, 
visiting Orwigsburgers . . . Penny Baiter moves in . . . the Garage . . . Beta Chi annex . . . you can't cut 
a pie in six pieces . . . Whose turn is it to mangle Wac? . . . Congratulations to brothers Sloand, Frick, 
Duke, Deacon, and McCorkel . . . Scottie's escapade in red . . . push button Brads . . . Lennie's fifteen 
foot wide tree stump . . . the Turk knows all the lore . . . our favorite, Debbie . . . crank up the V on 
those streets . . . Ieeeeee! . . . suck down some brews, Brother Moon . . . J. B. the impressionist . . . 
"You don't just take a man's bed apart!" . . . Congratulations to brother Daniels, Drusboskey, Corbet, 
Stine, Simcik, April, and Bradley . . . the Beta Beach . . . pump iron . . . howl at the moon in the bank 
(First National, that is) . . . Redness steps down, Wilson steps up ... Is Fred racking again? . . . Pretty 
Boy might just as well be married . . . T. Haynes is coming back . . . Bro tapped a kidney in films . . . 
Brad call Mary Ford . . . 

Yours in — kai — 

T. Judge 



226, Living Groups 



1. F. Vavda 


13. G. Douglas 


2. B. Davis 


14. P. Kelley 


3. B. Baiter 


15. R. Piger 


4. T. Grogan 


16. D. Kennedy 


5. D. Aprill 


17. J. Grady 


6. D. Wilson 


18. J. MacDonald 


7. M. Klohonatz 


19. B. Bradley 


8. L. Norella 


20. T. Stine 


9. T. Judge 


21. T. Justice 


10. B. Kennedy 


22. D. Winters 


11. L. Warshaw 


23. M. Barr 


12. B. Mitchell 









228, Living Groups 




CHI PHI 



The Alpha's mother almost loses her son, two weeks in a row . . . Kent pulls a 3- 
day binge (he stays sober) . . . cake party in the bar . . . Chiras bolts when he eats 
the chairs (again) . . . Joe, get the phone . . . Dixon, always discrete, sets an example 
. . . Sonny and Will take Disco for a ride . . . Wonder Boy in the shower again 
saying "I gotta win!" ... too much grease destroys the mind and General John 
takes over . . . B. and the TV becomes Joe and the TV . . . Chicken Little Huss says 
"The sky is falling" . . . Cousin Brucie slips under the wire ... the pinball machine 
lasts 3 days . . . Griffin judges dog show, and gets first prize . . . F. Lar loses the 
Buckeye state for a grunt ... I wonder what's coming down the back stairwell 
next . . . Craig bangs Butchie, and Charlie blows his top . . . John's fork sculpture 
... the Abominable Snowman comes when Citrone wimps out . . . the battle of the 
balloons . . . Psi strips Rho . . . Hey deke! ... Not me man! . . . mellow out . . . the 
fish make it, but the fry bolt . . . Hef and Frenchie share a box . . . Bob tones up the 
muscle in his head ... Is Brian alive? . . . S.D.'s head is proclaimed a disaster area 
... B., Salty and Gus leave, but we get an L. A. and a pledge in return . . . Gus 
slaloms in the front yard . . . Happy does it to us in the library (and lady's head) 
. . . Who's the goon? . . . Huf subleases Linderman to Lowan . . . rush thru lunch for 
"the story" . . . Cilia geta pregnant, (she thought) . . . Tacos ... the pud . . . 
Intramurals? Kulik challenges Lauda but campus cops stops him ... the phone 
becomes dangerous . . . heh, heh ... We're walking on the wild side, but 
everyone's "Looking Good!" GOOD NIGHT. - Chi Phi 



1. B. Huss 


19. S. Stebbins 


2. J. Zebleckes 


20. A. Kalish 


3. B. Fields 


21. P. Schwarzbach 


4. D. Penney 


22. S. Sutker 


5. (. Dussinger 


23. D. Black 


6. A. Kulik 


24. C. Cowdery 


7. L. Jacobs 


25. S. Dickson 


8. C. Bosch 


26. J. Harris 


9. D. Fischer 


27. C. Tosi 


10. B. McDowell 


28. M. Archibald 


11. B. Bacheson 


29. P. Oxenbol 


12. J. Weeks 


30. R. Backert 


13. M. Polachek 


31. G. Schuster 


14. C. Yung 


32. Z. Davis 


15. E. Lindenfelser 


33. C. Perry 


16. I. Brandt 


34. |. Harris 


17. D. Rich 


B. Gorsey 


18. S. Strickland 


J. Citrone 



Living Groups, 229 



CHI PSI 



Two tickets to the Delaware Police Ball . . . Peggy likes Chuckle's "cheeks" . . . 
Where's Antlers? . . . Sammy's room! . . . Where's Sammy? ... At the Coke 
machine . . . False, Why? Because! . . . Living at Lehigh, loving at Oneonta . . . 
Where's our bald #4? . . . Hey, Volpy, heard from Bobo? Just one more 
semester for the red head? ... But Mel, I just got up! . . . Digger, what happened 
to Buckeyes? . . . Steward last seen at RH 11 . . . Won't anybody go to Datona 
with me? . . . Can Kovacs really out party Esh? Chi Psi loses one to Lafayette . . . 
Rock-why can't you flex that one? The Lodge's cantaloupe picker . . . The great 
pumpkin the f. t . . . Pratt got a what at the X-Mas party? Nice feet, Froggie . . . 
Egor . . . Thuro doesn't need a shower, Chasbo . . . He's really got Hatter's 
disease. Who's the dumb blond from Hood? . . . The 13's are bamming again . . . 
I'll knock you . . . Chod's in the cold dorm? . . . The Reading boy returns . . . The 
"O" back in . . . Shut up sophs! ... A varsity jacket for me? . . . Who left the hat 
in the f. dorm? The lodge sends a fond farewell to Antlers, Jack, Ric, Mel, 
Danny, Chuck, Crazy Lukes, Volpy, Sammy, Jerry, Irv, and Dundee, (again). 





1. R. Heimsteadt 


IS. S. McKay 


2. B. Andler 


16. B. Reichert 


3. C. Sonon 


17. R. Rooney 


4. D. Danahy 


18. C. Mobus 


5. f. Tracy 


19. K. Fazioli 


6. W. Cummings 


20. N. Simpler 


7. L. Disabatino 


21. J. Commisa 


8. A. Bott 


22. J. Eschlemen 


9. B. Kovacs 


23. [. Irvin 


10. S. Strait 


24. C. Harris 


11. D. Ashton 


25. B. Thuring 


12. E. Camuti 


26. J. Healy 


13. M. Melillo 


27. P. Stackpole 


14. G. Skola 





230, Living Groups 




Living Groups, 231 



DELTA CHI 







^ 






Tube room heater committee . . . Coat and Tie . . . Pelican . . . Nice Socks . . . PPC . . . Noons . . . Were 
we? . . . Wanna go see my Piranha . . . J(A + B + P) . . . Straw Hat . . . Tennis makes you dumb . . . Yo 
Chuck . . . Hemostats . . . Phantom Muncher . . . Pony . . . Poindexter . . . Tut . . . Toast . . . It's all in the 
2X . . . Weak Act . . . Lincoln Tunnel . . . Parkway . . . Shutzbear Ratings . . . Elephant trunk . . . Burglar 
Check . . . Symps . . . I'm a vegetable . . . Spaghetti Strangler . . . Knives . . . My brain hurts . . . TY . . . 
Dueling Bongs . . . Mary — "Hello" . . . Seriously, I'm Roebuck . . . Who's minding the store? . . . Pass the 
brownies . . . Let's go overboard . . . Beer pong . . . Mc Sorley's . . . Double dip chocolate chip . . . 
Dempsey's run . . . Channel Check . . . Hook 'em Horns . . . Scabs . . . Turkey . . . TL's . . . Squat . . . 
ramramram . . . Clique . . . Good night Gene! 




l^FfT^ 






1. B. Andersen 


15. C. Bossi 


2. J. Piehl 


16. R. Miller 


3. M. Gass 


17. C. Markley 


4. S. Speer 


18. G. Mikes 


5. P. Zink 


19. J. Baccaro 


6. P. Schickaneder 


20. P. Holton 


7. R. Schloesser 


21. D. Schutzman 


8. O. Sinnot 


22. J. Glass 


9. L. Esposito 


23. H. Biggin 


10. G. Pritchard 


24. L. Drennen 


11. T. Tutwiler 


25. M. Rondy 


12. C. Garthwaite 


26. J. Zahka 


13. W. Knisely 


27. J. Weis 


14. G. Freestone 


28. R. Hynes 



Living Groups. 233 




Roomarama . . . Social's gone in two weeks . . . These speakers are virtually indestructible . . . 
Some day we will find Ruth slumped over in the mashed potatoes ... Bo robs the cradle . . . 
"oooh, Brad!" . . . The PRIME DIRECTIVE . . . Chickenman . . . Pledge Darrow . . . Cans vs. 
Bottles . . . Soccer team is #1 . . . White Tigere . . . Cat saves the day ... Bio & T. V. G. take the 
plunge . . . The Wildness Committee . . . The boiler room ghost almost gets caught . . . Becky 
Best . . . G. T. O. . . . "I can't get next to you, babe!" ... My study guide is available upon 
request . . . What ever happened to Blimp's wallet? ... 60 shots in an hour . . . HAAA TAAH! . . . 
BRRR . . . Roy Smeltz called ... Joe D. an accountant??? . . . BIG . . . L. O.'s bouncing Swedish 
meatballs . . . The pits are dead, long live the pits . . . Tebo hits the drums . . . The Function 
function . . . The five dollar date . . . Teddy wants the top down . . . Micro-unit ... Dr. Ruh, not 
Dr. Roo . . . Dump & Pump . . . Schmnutz, wake the $%c&# up!!!! . . . What are we gonna do 
with that many pledges????? . . . GORP . . . CIGAR, ANYONE? . . . "It's not easy being a sex 
god" ... B & A club . . . Scoping . . . "Sure I love you, got any other questions?" . . . MPP is high 
this time of year . . . Mr. Disco juggles the books . . . "My jaw always hurts the next morning" 
. . . Dempsey's at 4 . . . Phase 5 . . . Marathon Hearts . . . Intramural Drinking Team off to another 
away game . . . "Where should we take the picture this year?" 



234. Living Groups 



1. S. Crowell 


16. L. O'Mahoney 


2. P. Gysel 


17. M. Bennet 


3. T. Tripp 


18. D. Burk 


4. J. Kline 


19. J. Fitzpatrick 


5. A. Redden 


20. J. Hunter 


6. R. Simms 


21. D. Deshler 


7. R. Miller 


22. J. Tarulli 


8. L. Oliphant 


23. J. Nickolaus 


9. (. Stoneback 


24. T. Gilboy 


10. C. Moodie 


25. J. Harper 


11. B. McCarthy 


26. S. Faber 


12. R. Foltz 


27. L. Smith 


13. J. Nemetz 


28. J. Fox 


14. B. Darrow 


29. M. Wishbow 


15. D. Borck 





DELTA PHI 



M 



V> 



J:.v 





Groups, 235 




236, Living Groups 



DELTA SIGMA PHI 



1. E. Leonard 


15. D. Roberts 


2. A. Thum 

3. J. Barczynski 

4. K. Schumacher 


16. R. Gallagher 

17. B. Miller 

18. 1. Schulman 


5. T. Kinsella 

6. B. Peiper 

7. R. Fountain 


19. M. Karpowich 

20. R. Connors 

21. R. Nelson 


8. J. Woynarowski 


22. G Ehrich 


9. B. Pulford 
10. N. Flaster 


23. J. Lunny 

24. B. Buck 


11. G. Schachter 

12. T. Yetsko 


25. A. Batory 

26. D. Brunner 


13. D. Katz 


27. D. Leitman 


14. B. Stevens 






DELTA SIGMA PHI 1976 AWARDS 

Art Thum "The Golden Mop" Award 

Brad Miller "BigFoot" Award 

Dave Roberts "Roast Beef Gravy with Ham" 

John Barzcynski "Schroeder" 

John Woynarowski "Medical Perversion" 

Glenn Schachter "Judith Crist" 

Rich Gallagher "The Talking Highway" 

Bat "Make a Man out of a Pledge" 

Terry Yetsko "Gretchen did it again" 

Doug Brunner "Land Shark & Freddy" 

Brian Neff "Columbia Record Club's 'Men of the Year' 

Mark Karpowich "Jed Clampett" 

Doug Palaskey "Thomas Edison" 



Bob Pulford 
Brad Peiper 
Ryan Fountain 
Bill Buck 
Brian Butler 
Rick Nelson 
Wazzy Ughes 
Jim Lunny 
Dale Leitman 



'• F - 



"Every day is Thanksgiving" 

"Gobble" 

"Pizza throw for distance" 

"Mr. Whipple" 

"Stoned Again" 

"Skippy Jars Break Too" 

"Lisa Loves You" 

"Abbott's" 
Gerry Yakowenko "He talks too much" 
Gary Ehrich "Smile" 

Micheal Berle "Class of 72-3-4-5-6" 

Tim Kinsella "Too Young to Go" 

Rich Connors "Get Down" 

Kin Schumacher "Ring thru Nose" 
David Katz "Woody Must Go" 

Ira Schulman "God of Silence" 

Neal Flaster "Our man in D.C." 

Bob Stevens "Genghis Kahn Tact" 

DELTA SIGMA PHI "YOU'VE GOTTA LIVE HERE TO BELIEVE IT' 



DELTA TAU DELTA 



"Good taste is better than bad taste, but bad taste is better than no taste at all." 

In every man's heart are a tiger, a pig, an ass, and a nightengale; diversity of character 
is due to their unequal activity." — Ambrose Bierce 

Do not put off til tomorrow, what can be enjoyed today." — Josh Billings 

"I have made mistakes, but I have never made the mistake of claiming that I never 
made one." — James Gordon Bennett 

"If you want to get a sure crop, and a big yield, sow wild oats." 

"The way to fight a woman is with your hat. Grab it and run." — John Barrymore 

"Make love to every woman you meet, if you get 5% of your outlay, it's a good 
investment." — Arnold Bennett 

"Here's to woman! Would that we could fall into her arms, without falling into her 
hands." — Ambrose Bierce 

"Fun is like life insurance; the older you get, the more it costs." — "Kin" Hubbard 







238, Living Groups 




1. M. Weaver 


14. J. Diorio 


2. M. Thomas 


15. G. Clark 


3. M. Rieker 


16. G. Jarrell 


4. E. Pierce 


17. B. Hefele 


5. D. Kingsbury 


18. G. Gross 


6. S. Kelley 


19. C. Lukach 


7. D. Shurts 


20. J. Ducey 


8. J. Thomas 


21. I. Esch 


9. E. Brader 


22. B. Graver 


10. D. Kozel 


23. C. Squiteri 


11. R. Ross 


24. G. Talerico 


12. T. Farrel 


25. J. Orr 


13. B. Giclio 


26. T. Palmisiano 



Living Groups. 239 




1. M. Vallee 


20. D. Nickel 


2. J. Schulze 


21. M. Tisiker 


3. D. Corderman 


22. P. Gordon 


4. ]. Rodden 


23. J. Pierna 


5. M Yaszemski 


24. K. Schaeffer 


6. L. Henshaw 


25. P. McGinnis 


7. J. Silverberg 


26. G. Swenson 


8. J. Berger 


27. K. Karny 


9. D. Craven 


28. D. Breithaupt 


10. f. Dille 


29. J. Hetherington 


11. R. Kelley 


30. J. Neely 


12. R. Adams 


31. J. Lore 


13. D. Glueck 


32. G. Martin 


14. ). Grier 


33. K. Cahill 


15. R. Winters 


34. J. Vargo 


16. B. Cambell 


35. J. Edell 


17. M. Nakonechny 


36. L. Martin 


18. H. Sklar 


37. Unidentified 


19. C. Meier 


38. Unidentified 



DELTA UPSILON 



Bird . . . Sluvdog . . . Hogger . . . What's you gig? . . . Monty Python . . . Gitgo . . . Brew me, bro . . . Tic . . . 
Conservative Caucus . . . Bogart . . . Louise . . . Sheri . . . Mrs. Iacocca . . . Batman . . . Flare . . . Bip and Bop . . . 
Knucklers . . . The Army ... Pro Wrestling, All Star Wrestling . . . Ted and Kas Who? . . . Tinski Dropped 
Trough . . . Class of 2001, Tic . . . Beach . . . Pump Steel . . . Hockey in the DU Garden . . . Wall Beers ... The 
Club . . . The Claim to Fame Bar . . . Pepsi Czar, Beer Czar, Energy Czar . . . Boxing in the Chapter Room . . . 
Greasi Grubb . . . One Dollar Bulk . . . Thanks, Helen . . . Thanks, Brad . . . Philly Flares . . . Dogalls . . . Pimply 
Puss . . . Cagey Vets . . . Stan Who? . . . Bore Us No Longer, Knave . . . Uncouth . . . Clintahn . . . 
Nikanakanookie . . . Scran-ahhn . . . Q squared . . . Ron-n-n-n-n-n-nee . . . Hess St. Gang . . . Rose and the 
Chainfoot . . . Pulverizer . . . Quay-lude . . . Cowboy . . . Strange Gig . . . Devilbug . . . Guido . . . Gweed . . . 
Devilbug . . . Aldrich Who? . . . Nickelham . . . Hose . . . Cahill's Broom Gitgo . . . Vegetarians and Meditation 
. . . Hombie . . . Glickster Gigster . . . Silverbagel . . . Goober . . . Howard . . . Non-entity . . . Adelgig . . . The 
Bottmon . . . Ziggy Edwards . . . Youg Doung . . . Tiny . . . Head's friend . . . Junior's friend . . . Yaz's friend . . . 
Schulz-i . . . Ozone, Home of Larry D . . . Bright Eyes' Driving School . . . Sheeba . . . Poo-poo on the rug . . . 
Alchi Joe . . . Communism . . . Shampoo in the water . . . Horsedix . . . Crooked Hoot . . . Clap Shots . . . Big 
Red . . . Berjahr . . . Ah-ah-ah-aaaht, ah-ah-ah-aahht . . . Nationalized property . . . Scibby . . . Ron Wintez . . . 
No friends . . . Miller Pretzel Hombie ... Hi Jeff . . . Nasal Flare . . . Vargo's One Punch . . . Take 50 and throw 
one . . . Fiscal Conservatives . . . Guidogitgo . . . 



Living Groups, 241 



KAPPA ALPHA 



Beep-Beep . . . hrurrr ... Is it SEARS' ice cream? . . . Wee Wee King . . . Jolly Wally 
. . . Black market milk . . . Midnight Monopoly . . . City View Double Occupancy . . . 
Where's K.T.? OTR . . . Chicken wing crashes . . . closeout sale . . . Molly Molitorrr . . . 
House Als are due Yeowwww TV Tuck . . . Pubnight on Wednesday starting Monday 
. . . Bernard . . . Zero . . . Little peter in 20 minutes . . . Lower hall of fame . . . Anybody 
need Physics and Chem notes? ... Is this the head table? . . . I'm having Coke 
withdrawals . . . Master, Master . . . what is it, Igor? ... I have a heads ache . . . 
Bernard's the smoke detector ... He did what? . . . rubber go boom!!! . . . Bamby flicks 
in the cold dorm . . . Kap dinner theatre . . . "Brother in heat" . . . isn't he something? 
. . . too much enthusiasm!! . . . Omega Gamma Delta . . . how many points did he 
get??? . . . Now wasn't that a refreshing commercial? . . . there's someone on the 
couch . . . let's use the floor . . . Don't talk to me, I can't cope! . . . Dickster is watching 
American Graffiti for the 26th time . . . get away you southern Carpet-Bagger!! . . . N. 
B. P. A. . . . he who says pays . . . The Blade . . . Kenzo's Pub ... If you have a girl, 
watch out for the snake . . . Igor lost his master . . . Wally Winchester and his wildcat 
and his ... I can't believe the guy has the luxury to . . . iron lungs . . . how did Ritter 
ever manage to 8626 the very first time? . . . much? . . . Bama's tango and Red 25 . . . 
Price child . . . bearded lady . . . tough guy . . . Mu Sigma . . . the delicious guarantee 
. . . Flash's answering service . . . Rudy T ... all star calibre . . . who has the quarters? 
. . . Hey, Dickster . . . how's Dorothy? 



242, Living Groups 



1. R. Plevyak 


15. S. Sturgis 


2. R. Johns 


16. [. Searer 


3. R. Price 


17. W. Andrew 


4. G. Molitor 


18. B. Tuck 


5. D. Ritter 


19. D. Furrance 


6. V. Sytzko 


20. J. Egan 


7. D. Y. Shin 


21. [. Pauls 


8. B. Putt 


22. A. Frank 


9. K. Tower 


23. T. Frank 


10. M. Lockard 


24. G. Kraft 


11. P. Lathrop 


25. D. Bennett 


12. M. Beerman 


26. G. Moyer 


13. D. Tiller 


27. D. Bright 


14. C. Botway 


28. G. B. Beerman 




■■■PPI 





1. J. Bishop 


17. T. Smith 


33. R. Uptegraff 


2. R. Corelli 


18. J. Cawley 


34. D. London 


3. P. Loschiavo 


19. D. Williams 


35. J. Sanlorenzo 


4. L. Perrelli 


20. R. Bloom 


36. D. Hetrick 


5. K. Gardner 


21. V. Scullin 


37. E. Vees 


6. R. Price 


22. B. Peck 


38. S. Brown 


7. J. Mountsier 


23. B. Van Lopik 


39. F. Lusby 


8. T. Billera 


24. B. Westcott 


40. R. Henmnghausen 


9. K. McCarthy 


25. R. Herman 


41. D. Hawxhurst 


10. B. Murphy 


26. C. Bachman 


Not pictured: 


11. T. Cohn 


27. T. Winters 


C. Shepperd. 


12. K. Kravitz 


28. R. Frey 


D. Grgurich. 


13. K. Noonan 


29. D. Hargrave 




14. J. Borillo 


30. C. Donahue 




15. Brandy 


31. B. Hedderman 




16. D. Schoneman 


32. M. Rayhill 





244, Living Groups 



KAPPA SIGMA 




U 



WAY AND LOCAL RENTALS 




Zandi's Zammies 

The Honeymoon Suite 

Crabnuts vs. the Cristie Complex 

I need 11 dummies for bridge 

"You're such a Teddy Bear" 

"But I can score any weekend" 

Psyched on the Haus 

"I want to clean up all rumors . . . Allison and I are through. 

Where's Howard THIS semester? Who cares? 

Sload, Gload, Scroad, Load, Toad, Stouche 

Somf 

Tune in tomorrow when Lenny gets a date 

"But I did it all summer" 

Oh, Mark ... Oh, Patty . . . 

Shonads, Runt, Polio, Stuffy 

SYD gets a new slant on life 

Steve, can I pick up some rolls in your car? 

Blow it out! 




Living Groups, 245 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 

"My eyes are beholden to the proud delights 
Life has offered; my awareness never crowded with thoughts of clothed 
horses or images of nude trees . . . until last night. 
And a merchant asked, what of Wheels? 
The Master replied: 
A Wheel is round, much like an apple. 
Both have simplicity in their nature. 
A Wheel can rotate causing it to move in a circle. 
This I observed while quite young. 
Some have yet to learn the wisdom of the circle. 
An apple can fall from a tree and becomes 
Unnoticed as it rots and goes back to earth. 
A Wheel can fall from a tree and will be 
Noticed immediately, for it is not natural 
For Wheels to grow on trees. 
A cart with four strong Wheels does not deserve 
More than a passing glance, but a cart riding atop 
Four apples would cause men to wonder. 
What is normal to an apple is not 
Normal to a Wheel. 
But both are like circles. 

And both are very much alike. 

« 

Except for the Apple." 

- The Profit 




1. E. Butz 


18. 


J, Johnson 


2. R. Monetti 


19. 


K, Reichenbach 


3. G. Hillenbrand 


20. 


C. Seyfreid 


4. R. Kinker 


21. 


B. Arnstein 


5. M. Malone 


22. 


M. Nunzio 


6. J. Sommer 


23. 


D. Kuzo 


7. A. Scheifer 


24. 


F. Bader 


8. Z. Nusselt 


25 


M. Hulsman 


9. G. Ramsey 


26 


R. Bardsley 


10. C. Lutz 


27 


). Watson 


11. L. Sommers 


28 


W. Brichta 


12. G. Torski 


29 


R. Canavan 


13. T. Weiner 


30 


G. Shelby 


14. J. O'Grady 


31 


B. Dunbar 


15. K. Green 


32 


J. Giansante 


16. M. Handman 


33 


J. Jacopin 


17. D. Morris 







246, Living Groups 





START 




Living Groups, 247 







<X>£© 



PHI DELTA THETA 



1. A. Wynn 


11. D. McCarthy 


2. J. Mathews 


12. A. Morin 


3. PHI 


13. C. McBeth 


4. P. Avakian 


14. G. DiPaulo 


5. B. Schadt 


15. T. Brader 


6. J. Papazian 


16. W. Baer 


7. R. Braen 


17. T. Rieber 


8. T. Anderson 


18. F. Ditmars 


9. D. Tashjian 


19. R. Gibbons 


10. P. Althenpohl 


20. M. Havener 



Lehigh's chapter of Phi Delta Theta celebrated this year its 100th 
anniversary of existence on this campus. In commemoration, the fraternity 
sponsored a public talk April 21, by David Amidon, lecturer in urban 
studies. Amidon spoke on "Wrong Turns in American History." 

"We are the gods of hell fire" . . . P.W. gets whipped again . . . Tom, Kaye, Craig and Sylvia . . . Brades gets 
top offer . . . Bob accepts five year Post . . . Bazillion . . . Exorcist Club . . . donkey dorks again . . . that is what 
she said . . . Radar gets drafted by the army . . . Scott gets drafted by Mary Ann . . . Garfield, do you want 
anymore grain? . . . Altenpohl, do your clean ups! . . . Greg and Jill went up the hill . . . Again? . . . Coughman 
. . . Man from central . . . Welcome Back Gnatek ... 7 no trump . . . Has anyone seen Lumpy ...?... Magoof 
. . . Another disco Rich? . . . Phoneman gets disconnected . . . 2nd isn't bad in the trot . . . Get your FACE out 
of the Juke Box . . . That's talking . . . The Big Four . . . Crazy Peter strikes again . . . Bunny . . . Phis a mute . . . 
Who's Barry . . . Black Android . . . P. B. Supperdud . . . Babyface Papazian . . . Prez goes out on the town . . . 
O. K. not . . . Mac's . . . S. S. B. . . . George Magainer . . . Dancer, the Midnight Marauder . . . Cheen is broke . . . 



e- 



lUM 



Living Groups, 249 




og5 



^1. 



\ & 






250, Living Groups 



FIJI . . . APEX OF THE UNIVERSITY 
(this year's achievements of the shining stars) 

1. Captured seventh consecutive President's Cup. 

2. Placed 37 out of 39 brothers on Dean's List. 

3. Ended Theta Delta Chi's 15-year basketball reign. 

4. Received numerous awards for the beautiful interior decor of our 
house. 

5. Constantly had Lehigh's beautiful women (both of them) at our house 
for social affairs. 

6. Won intramural boxing and wrestling tournaments. 

7. Received good neighbor award from Deming Lewis for our 
outstanding relationships with neighboring living groups ... (i. e. 
donated 50 lb. ham to Sigma Alpha Mu). 

8. Won Turkey Trot but donated the turkey to the needy. 

9. Sold autographed composites and donated proceeds to Sister's of the 
Poor. 

10. Received ASPCA award for humane treatment to animals. 

11. Initiated meetings of temperance union at our house on Sundays. 

NEED WE SAY MORE? 



1. S. Martin 


14. D. Bryant 


2. J. Schunck 


15. J. Brown 


3. J. Flanigan 


16. M. Borden 


4. B. Kopenhaver 


17. M. Cranley 


5. S. Mock 


18. J. Long 


6. P. Gebert 


19. T. Connor 


7. J. Folkes 


20. G. Scherer 


8. M. Seward 


21. T. Porsch 


9. A. Cariddi 


22. F. Diana 


10. E. Demaree 


23. R. Glasbrenner 


11. J. D'Antonio 


24. C. Serrao 


12. A. Tomlinson 


25. S. Thatcher 


13. M. Schimpf 


26. M. Koenig 



PHI GAMMA DELTA 










ifci 



-■A 




1. N. Kelly 


17. J. Stamateris 


2. T. Varro 


18. M Devine 


3. J. Jablonki 


19. G. Fisher 


4. M. Connolly 


20. C. Miller 


5. J. Callaghan 


21. J. Grievo 


6. F. Reck 


22. G. Riccardi 


7. M. Losch 


23. A. George 


8. M. Rinaldi 


24. A. Bova 


9. S. Udasin 


25. S. Kamen 


10. K. Shields 


26. M. Brune 


11. P. Boccagno 


27. J. Bower 


12. B. Stewart 


28. S. Miller 


13. R. McCard 


29. D. Baskin 


14. J. (aninek 


30. R. Adey 


15. L. Fisk 


31. B. Pinello 


16. R. Wright 


32. C. Qualoid 




252, Living Groups 



■f PHI KAPPA THETA 



• /-,-—.- 



Aft*;. 




Raisins. Bit and chunk of the news. Eat beans, Lou. Are you done? Bend over, I'll drive. D. B., 
Brunz, Bandy, Enzo. There are so many perfect people here. Horse moons McDonald's. Grandma in 
the tube room. QV at Healy's. Campus Cops: 0-2, goodbye television. PKT tractors win tug of war. 
The Brazilians improve. My first uninterrupted bulk session, Barfly returns. Smyth, these cakes are 
foul. Thelma. 10 lbs. of burger, some sliced up cheese and milk. Rigatoni soup. Our new cook, Bob. 
Rat, Max, Desi and Marc. McGarvey Board this Friday. Convention in New Orleans. Queen of 
Spades, Jack of Diamonds, Marian is here; the weekend has started. The fantastic four. Clint Kelley 
and Petrosmythi. Rack monster. What's the story on that? Feet off the new furniture. This will never 
do. Little Al, Vito, Smyth, Bingo, Roo. 29-11, it's unaminous. Hogar contest. Tower of tubage. Two 
with everything, Mike. Stooges. Window. Gaping. The box. The rocket. The module. Sunday 
cleanups, with or without the buffer. Definite breakage material. Quincy and Clyde all the way. 
Woman within. Red Brick. An imprint in a lemon merangue pie. Less public A. I. Abstentions-for- 
against, he's bagged. You don't know me, you never come up to the third floor. Cags, Jabbo, Robbo, 
Fou Lisk, Chow Lee. Is Lucky Schmoe in the hospital again? Take the money out of social. Islanders 
and Flyers. Pumpkins, a gun and a rock. Yore. Some fun, eh? We're looking for a few good men.The 
mystery pitcher at CMU. Beat did what in a revolving door? Get the blanket and pillow. The King, 
Queen, Prince, Duke and Jester. I can do push-ups all night. What king of fruit do you like. Candy, 
cigarettes and change for a quarter. Your best friend. Civil War. The Colonel. When you walk 
through a storm. The sad part about it is. Just remember. The new ending. Goodbye. Mickey Mouse. 



Living Groups. 253 







PHI 
SIGMA 
KAPPA 



1. B. Long 


15. L. Gore 


2. J. Bolebruch 


16. D. Hagen 


3. P. Henderson 


17. S. Wheeler 


4. B. Gault 


18. B. Muir 


5. J. Burns 


19. T. Woodward 


6. P. Pringle 


20. A. Preston 


7. R. Finn 


21. C. Hertz 


8. (A) Nicole (Dog) 


22. G. Lortie 


8. (B) A. Magid 


23. K. Ellefsen 


9. B. Plunkett 


24. B. Morris 


10. W. Senkowski 


25. D. Mendenhall 


11. R. Farenwald 


26. M. Pure 


12. S. Roda 


27. D. Dudenhoeffer 


13. M. Craig 


28. C. Bailey 


14. J. Hudson 


29. A. Crivello 



254. Living Groups 





Living Groups, 255 



1. K. Roman 

2. T. Zaremba 

3. C. Keener 

4. C. Buhrendorf 

5. D. Preusch 

6. ). Fitzgerald 

7. F. Cincotta 

8. S. Kratenstein 

9. J. Golle 

10. W. Tarallo 

11. W. Taylor 

12. G. Watson 

13. S. Guemple 

14. C. Hathaway 

15. R. Benoit 

16. J. Quinn 

17. N. Snyder 

18. L. Hay 

19. M. Barth- 
Wehrenalp 

20. G. Zawislak 

21. R. Brennan 

22. T. Simon 

23. R. Enterline 

24. C. Wolle 

25. B. Donaghy 

26. B. Gindrich 

27. W. Rhoads 

28. M. Dale 




256, Living Groups 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 



A transitional 4 years at Pi Kappa Alpha ... the fall 72 Open House and the first impression of Pike . . . 
the building at 514 Delaware Avenue, not spectacular, but a feeling was in the air . . . the first rush dinner 
. . . meeting college men, upperclassmen, Brothers . . . freshman anxiety, making an impression, being judged 
. . . but friendliness, openness, being made to feel at home . . . the first pubnight — "Zoom", pretzels, . . . pool, 
there are MORE than 2 girls at Lehigh! . . . First hangover, . . . praying in the John, classes? Oh well, more 
dinners, more pubnights, band parties, learning Brothers' names slowly, becoming known to them ... the 
pre-bid . . . meeting other Pike freshmen . . . decision . . . pledging, wake-ups, clean-ups? . . . line-ups? . . . and 
Diamond . . . GWF . . . "help" week . . . hard work, what for? G. P. . . . Brotherhood!?! 

Responsibility . . . the sophomore slump . . . helping each other . . . intramurals, partying, rushing new 
members, even studying, unity the BIG move to 515 Delaware ... the future, lot's to be done . . . memories 
linger . . . working together . . . accomplishment . . . feeling good . . . Kings of Fountain Hill! . . . that feeling in 
the air ... Look out for the valley . . . psych? . . . leadership? . . . Brotherhood? . . . APATHY! . . . very 
contagious . . . descending further and further, tangible problems-scholastic, financial, rush, ... the feeling 
was gone, the air polluted . . . 

Came summertime . . . wounds healing . . . faults forgotten . . . criticism . . . thought . . . and then. THE 
WEDDING . . . happiness, warmth, love, beginning of a new life . . . "Friendship on a firmer and more lasting 
basis" . . . hard work . . . organization . . . retreat . . . goals . . . direction . . . togetherness . . . unity . . . striving 
. . . fruition . . . 

On our way up ... don't look back . . . "Pike's Peak" is not far in the future . . . the feeling of 
BROTHERHOOD is in the air. 



Living Groups. 257 



1. S. Thornton 


22. G. Glassgall 


2. |. Lyon 


23. M. Prott 


3. D. Birdakin 


24. T Dunn 


4. A. Stern 


25. F. Defrank 


5. ]. Rosener 


26. E. Hansen 


6. S. Hazlett 


27. J. Bodenstab 


7. C. Easton 


28. L. Meyers 


8. M. Zimmerman 


29. E. Bzik 


9. B. Andrews 


30. S. DiAntonio 


10. I. Sanders 


31. D. Bzik 


11 W. Fitzgibbons 


32. T. Valk 


12. J. Larson 


33. S. Evans 


13. M. Yoder 


34. D. Fair 


14. J. Kusko 


35. ]. Buck 


15. S. Goldstein 


36. K. Stoffel 


16. M. Pyles 


37. N. Deluca 


17. C. Husband 


38. T. Travers 


18. R. Jacobs 


39. J. Ballove 


19. R. Sievers 


40. ]. Garrison 


20. K. Tate 


41. E. Helgans 


21. G. Lapres 





PI 

LAMBDA 
PHI 




258. Living Groups 




Living Groups, 259 




1. J. Swanson 


14. 


G. Ott 


2. B. Flax 


15. 


J. Hemmemdinger 


3. G. Kratzer 


16. 


R. Kramer 


4. D. Jenkins 


17. 


W. Mathew 


5. B. Thompson 


18. 


R. Allison 


6. P. Blazewicz 


19. 


). Pryor 


7. R. Emmet 


20 


D. Summins 


8. B. Goldstein 


21 


B. Leibermann 


9. D. Stackhouse 


22 


T. Cunningham 


10. B. Sampson 


23 


S. Frank 


11. E. Pettinato 


24 


B. Havialand 


12. B. Fisher 


25 


J. Schneider 


13. G. Blythe 







260, Living Groups 



PSI UPSILON 



UPS\U)tt W)j 



I want to be just like George Ott . . . Riight, that's nice . . . Good morning Lucien 
. . . Wouldn't it be nice to put Pryor's tongue in Rouse's mouth . . . Hey Geek . . . 
No agonies of the flesh . . . Doctor Dimento . . . Every house has a Bo, right 
Winston . . . wooden leg . . . Return of the firetruck . . . Pinball . . . Hey Flax, oil the 
springs . . . Midnight move . . . Clint Alexis and magnum force . . . Mario Hump 
and his Valiantee . . . Porkchop . . . Bo, please graduate . . . Biggins . . . Hop on a 
spoon . . . The Doctor . . . Whose got the ZACKLEY'S? . . . Giggle Juice . . . 
Steward's affair . . . Sue Schumacker . . . Flaming Bush . . . Geasette Roulette . . . 
Butche's . . . Jake the Snake . . . Brother Egor . . . 

Oh the memories of Psi U. Remember the Prowler, Rahway, all the women? 
Who could ask for better times? I know the seniors will hate to leave, especially 
the great meals . . . shitheads, pink death. But all in all we will continue with the 
great Psi U. traditions . . . Bring in the Grog. 




Living Groups, 261 



SIGMA ALPHA MU 



The year of the neb, Kline stories, to nuzz, Jud-you are nuzz, Speed-mutt, our house pet turning vegetable, 
the dumbest white man alive, our nebs: ABCD, Mutt-face, Debbie Wontons and the all-night virgil, where is 
she? . . . Jud-you should KNOW that! Roy, seriously, you're ugly, Fred, I WANT YOUR DOOR!!!!, to be 
nuzzing, the Muttable one, Harry-O-Mr. fix-it, the Gay Mahler, the doctoral thesis, Brad Vans trips to New 
York, the Dr. and his wife take residence, WHEEZIE, Speed-dogs election to the bush-man Hall of Fame, the 
up and coming rookie of the year, the secret life of A. Levy, Willy "Knees" indoctrinated into the bongers 
hall of fame, to have nuzzed, Greekers-without brushing your teeth, Studly — can you come up to dinner 
Tuesday night? ... to be Mossaus, Gorgeous George watching the fashion shows, the Saturday shoppers vs. 
the jocks, Kenny's fudgestripes, Rosen's 20 shots of Tequilla, nuzzly, Mark Spitz takes to running, the D.J. 
and his XMAS tree, freshmen up to dinner tonight, who really cares? . . . our sophoMoore steward, Fuller- 
you beast, Seth's functional room, nuzzeramos, the 7.55 club, Andy who?, Sarge's famous quote — "I'm 
going to KILL you", the rise of the Italian power structure, the Lurie answering service, superpledge, BIG 
GUY, the mayor of Long Island, Stalins stock of redheads, Roy's phantom girlfriend, to be mosseated. Lloyd 
M. and Mindy Exstein, Sammy's answer to the radical, the 437 club, the Shooky boycott, Big Guy-not on the 
B & W desk!!! Jack Benny, Assistant local ad manager — yeah, right! . . . Chat — mails here, Jake's 
unprecedented move downstairs, Fuller rent-a-car, to be nuzzed, Jan Lewis, O'Henry and Precht, pissed . . . 
just a little? . . . WHEEZIE . . . Springstein is better than Clapton, Beezador, our famous Wing-T formations 
in Packard, nuzzily Jud in the corn fields of Kansas, Seth, get me a cold one, Chat for Spinner and Kreitman 
and a player to be named later, Speedy vs. Rosen, you nuzzer you, do we play to play, play to win, win to 
play, or win to win? . . . Muhammed Kesselman, intense, Rich, I'm totally into it., our lawyers, Long Island 
vs. Westchester, N. Levvvvvy, B. Pissssskin, Brett and Melinda — we're just friends, Mary Baba and the 40 
thieves, Weinstein's triple, Roy — miss the morning ones? . . . nuzzing it, BIA, NLA and SLA?, mosseated, 
Good's wedding bells, Bro's happening, Mel's dominance over Seth, Jud's horrendous paddle tennis, the 
. Bloom era, to nuzz to not to nuzz, the good doctor — activity ratio specialist for the mob, into the plight, 
brainstorming, at least Burt likes one Kirsch, Rich — can I have the room tonight? . . . Rivlins leaps from 
smags to prior, Coltrain and Miles . . . and Springsteen, the Krafty one, steamers, when we pledges . . . Fred 
— Snaaaap his neck, the Evil Nuzzer, the sound screen, hot stereos for sale, Fullers 3 a.m. phone calls, 
nuzzera; Sarakins famous quote — When do meals start? . . . Seth in hibernation, the lazies man in Sammy 
history, and you?, the cone of silence, Speedy's walls, big guy slippers, PC'S at Benetz Inn, Columbia vs. 
Dartmouth, the Sammy Soul Brothers, those infamous chipless chocolate chip cookies, the ice blanket, the 
night of revelations, Doctor, I . . . backgammon . . . cleanups . . . mossea . . . nuzzed out . . . thank you . . . and 
maintain till next year. 
262, Living Groups 





1. J. Kirsch 


8. W. Spinner 


15. A. Tuller 


22. K. Matlick 


2. B. Kesselman 


9. P. Fenaroli 


16. D. Nusblatt 


Not pictured: (. Bloom, 


3. S. Reiser 


10. B. Roth 


17. H. Talmud 


E. Liebman, M. Exstein, M. Ehrenpreis. 


4. A. Dember 


11. J. Jacobsen 


18. P. Lichtenbert 


M. Rosen, R. Rivlin, A. Levy, 


5. H. Reiss 


12. L. Chatzinoff 


19. M. Stahller 


R. Gross, D. Fuller, G. Levkoff. 


6. M. Moore 


13. B. Judson 


20. L. Sarakin 


B. Kreitman. S. Lurie, G. Hirschberg, 


7. S. Martin 


14. L. Weinstein 


21. L. Mahler 


S. Frelich. 



Living Groups, 263 



1. B. Chieco 


15 


S. Crape 


2. J. Stork 


16 


J. Shaffer 


3. M. Pin 


17 


G. Pin 


4. Trevor 


18 


I- Johnson 


5. B. Quinn 


19 


S. Tober 


6. f. Hummel 


20 


B. Goldman 


7. M. Langley 


21 


S. Kreider 


8. J. O'Donnell 


22 


K. Fredrick 


9. M. Rickert 


23 


J. Maynard 


10. T. Rocco 


24 


M. Loizeaux 


11. B. Connors 


25 


T. Dondero 


12. S. Cahill 


26 


D. Persico 


13. G. Ferguson 


27 


G. Crape 


14. J. Economy 


28 


Ziggy 




264, Living Groups 



SIGMA CHI 



The brothers of Sigma Chi are a unique group of men. They are forty-odd 
individuals, some odder than others, who manage to coexist peacefully and 
happily under one roof for four years, give or take a semester. Yessir, the 
Sigs enjoy a pleasant lifestyle, so pleasant that several brothers each year 
commit academic suicide just to have the privilege of sticking around Sigma 
Chi and dear old Lehigh for another semester. Such loyalty is rare in men 
these days, and should be commended whenever the opportunity arises. To 
say the least, the Sigs psyche me! 
At this point, you may be asking yourself, what is the method of the Sigs 

madness? What secret of life have they discovered which accords them such 
earthly bliss? Well, it's all very simple; the men of Sigma Chi respect each 
other's individuality and consider their bond of brotherhood to be stronger 
than any petty quarrel they may have among themselves at present. Now I 
ask you, who's that profound? me? you? 
— Glen Ferguson 





4 




Living Groups, 265 




Hey Mikey - Pinned to Jake - Sled ride - Wanna die? . . . When the pain starts, the fighting 
stops . . . Hey, squirrel-bait-Johnson's Believe it or not - Who's getting pinned today? . . . Min-max 
social budget ... I almost ate that thing . . . Frenchy's wakeups - McCutcheon sleeps in . . . 
Carter? . . . Axel's one hour weekend . . . Jr.: chum - Huges & Pesto are parked in again . . . Josten 
has a beer . . . Sperry is upstairs wretching . . . How are your eggs cooking? . . . Lemon Pledge . . . 
YES!! - $20 meat scale - McCutcheon takes the bait . . . Dick-0 gets thrown into his room . . . Yaa 
Hoo! . . . Must drink . . . The Sun: Must see it . . . Dean QuayLudes - Phone call for Geason - D. 
Bag - 4-Way Street . . . We're there . . . Loeffler goes to a party . . . K.M. ain't walking too straight 
. . . Grimsby - A good 11 . . . Pheasants ... Pet him first . . . Taillights: clean-ups: ethnics . . . 
Thanks Sam - Commander Keano . . . Did anyone get seconds: firsts? . . . McCauley cleans Kaj's 
drawers . . . Kaj, you're such a 



266, Living Groups 



1. B. Shannon 


15. 


B. Carter 


2. J. Pearson 


16. 


B. Kiefer 


3. C. Loeffler 


17. 


R. Pesto 


4. R. Orlemann 


18. 


B. Josten 


5. D. Brown 


19. 


D. Freeman 


6. R. Cunliffe 


20 


K. Karch 


7. T. Schell 


21. 


R. Robb 


8. G. Gleason 


22. 


M. Highes 


9. Jake 


23. 


M. Sheehan 


10. D. Roe 


24. 


B. Lally 


11. C. McCauley 


25. 


P. Johnson 


12. C. Ingram 


26. 


B. Nezgod 


13. K. Werner 


27. 


B. Rimby 


14. J. Thomas 


28. 


P. McCutcheon 



SIGMA NU 




Living Groups. 267 




268, Living Groups 




SIGMA PHI 




1. B. Reeves 


13. J. Warnken 


2. P. Hartranft 


14. J. Rodgers 


3. M. Sterba 


15. K. Sullivan 


4. f. Baker 


16. R. Venanzi 


5. C. Lockard 


17. P. Grady 


6. M. Gardener 


18. J. Manfredo 


7. C. Raymond 


19. ). Lubarsky 


8. G. Wyatt 


20. B. Boswell 


9. D. Slutsky 


21. C. Brennan 


10. M. Kimak 


22. B. Frey 


11. G. Krutal 


23. B. Greenspan 


12. D. Gabel 





V «* * \^Xr ■*] I 




Living Groups, 269 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON 



Beer's Bayes Bonanza . . . Gabe blade, The Greek, Ash browns ... 86 cans in Miers' 
room ... a keg a day . . . E.O., J.J., F.T.M., i, IQ . . . do a little dance, make a little love . . . 
hey Dago. Reedhead Weedhead, Mac and Meza, Richie's birthday, XL and G. Snell . . . 
D for the D Team Taiwan . . . FDU crew, Lou who? . . . H.D. . . . Flipper, Goon . . . Stroke 
my arm once more, and it will get hard . . . Stick an m-h up the a curtains for Murph . . . 
L. is R. Mrs. Beitzel, Bartooni, Deutscheronni . . . the Bunt Bump . . . Arsi, the Mansion, 
and the Allman Bros, in the van . . . The Blimp, Bayer-head, smags crew . . . "you know 
damn well what I said'' ... 19 in the studio . . . Roger Finch, D-Zone, $80 hook . . . Take 
it away Enders, 75 is still alive . . . (well s it, we'll f it) 2 Spencerooni, Chatas, Professor 
. . . have another drink, Dick . . . we want a MOON! . . . Benjamin, Darby, Bunter . . . you 
better put your brown pants on . . . H-toad, the Bouncer, DiGregorro . . . M.M., A and R, 
Nancy Kuhls ... its only a bush fire . . . Speed Beitzel, Dillwad, DiPrimawitz, 
Madierawitz . . . NFW, ixnay on the alktay, the System, the Yodelers, Fabian, Ars ... 1 
if by land, 2 if by sea, 3 if by air . . . Crow is below Sammy, the Ghetto, . . . L.T. crew . . . 
Mrs. Charters . . . Gregski, Chunny, Mrs. Endess? THAT will cost you, 10-5 suck'em . . . 
Timsky, Sky-high, H-off, Miers, Trudy . . . Sorry, Senior . . . E.E. Ill Bombay Door 
Parties, Oh the Monkey! . . . Barton's customized leather goods, party in H-Off's room 
. . . we're talkin' . . . 10-4 good buddy, the cooler . . . hall party . . . and another one, 
Dick? 



M 35 




270. Living Groups 




1. K. Houser 


20. R. Reed 


2. D. Madiera 


21. P. Dolan 


3. C. Ugol 


22. E. Quirk 


4. A. D'Onofrio 


23. H. Kestembaum 


5. E. O'Mara 


24. J. Murphy 


6. B. Dietrich 


25. J. Blaine 


7. M. Barton 


26. D. McKendrick 


8. D. Charters 


27. ]. Beitzel 


9. R. Lambert 


28. C. Brown 


10. S. Seidel 


29. B. W. Haltenhoff 


11. T. Kisner 


30. W. Grieshaber 


12. C. Shietrum 


31. W. Mencer 


13. J. Miers 


32. P. Rocco 


14. G. Enders 


33. F. Arsi 


15. L. Vlhakes 


34. R. Asbeck 


16. T. Cressman 


35. H. Davis 


17. S. Giglio 


36. B. Dillman 


18. J. King 


37. R. D. Prima 


19. K. O'Grady 





Living Groups. 271 



TAU EPSILON PHI 



LU much ado about nothing . . . Hey babe! . . . Ya Wanna BOLO much? 
. . . Supahaxtion . . . Horizontal business . . . Are you up for it? ... Grease 
fire at 5 a.m. . . . Fire alarm at 3 a.m. . . . BG anyone? . . . Kaleda's Gang . . . 
Juvenile hot babes . . . Giggle sisters . . . Mmmatt from Seattle . . . Hey 
Moose Relax it's Mint . . . Born to run and rerun . . . Do you want to hear 
that song at your funeral? . . . Thunder what? . . . Cavewoman . . . Claim 
your phone calls! . . . Give it to Mikey, he'll try anything ... a little bing of 
this a little bong of that . . . DB's Sunday Special % price vasectomy & 
lobotomy . . . Soccer team wins, Shaw scores . . . Tertiary . . . RCOOH . . . 
KKK & K. Mcthis . . . Most hurting egg ... BurCzar . . . RBC . . . Relocated 
. . . Cadaver brings down the JAPS! . . . Stone & a barrel of laughs . . . DC 
wins the 5th AB Dumont AWARD . . . Belcher Bob . . . Those Pranking 
Pledges . . . Seeds gets Rookie of the Year . . . Klaw gets MVD for 2nd 
STRAIGHT year . . . Shot poker . . . ROR . . . DG had another great night on 
the hill . . . Glue your rug today . . . Supervan . . . E.Boy, what are you 
doing hiding under my bed? ... TOH NEMITUNI KOONETOH BAA 
CHATREH SAHELI BEPUSHUNI. 




272. Living Groups 







1. A. Banyser 


18. D. Caplan 


2. M. Kearns 


19. J. Kenny 


3. E. Geist 


20. D. Shaw 


4. C. Reed 


21. B. Glickman 


5. S. McDougall 


22. J. Underhill 


6. D. Ward 


23. J. Boyea 


7. W. Marx 


24. S. Tancin 


8. A. Greenburg 


25. G. Livingston 


9. B. Klimowitz 


26. E. Carduner 


10. C. Kaleda 


27. R Sarlati 


11. N. Levin 


28. M. Imbriani 


12. J. Hoffman 


29. F. Hencken 


13. B. Klawitter 


30. R. Sederholm 


14. K. Klages 


31. S. Frock 


IS. P. Levy 


32. J, Handler 


16. R. Estapour 


33. D. Gross 


17. A. Marche 


34. S. McLellan 




Living Groups, 273 



it n 







1. G. Kramon 


14. M. Bartholomew 


2. D. Walters 


15. M. Redmond 


3. J. Reed 


16. L. Howe 


4. A. Smolowe 


17. B. Charles 


5. ]. Hollerman 


18. G. Calabrese 


6. W. Romig 


19. B. Lutz 


7. D. Palmeri 


20. S. [ones 


8. R. Wormser 


21. f. Fisher 


9. C. Oberg 


22. R. Hotaling 


Dog: Chivas Regal 


23. B. Sheppard 


10. J. Ostberg 


24. P. McBeth 


11. C. Cucullu 


25. C. Hawk 


12. D. Collins 


26. E. Shultz 


13. G. Guelz 


27. P. Smith 



274, Living Groups 



THETA CHI 



Pixie 

Dutchboy (Balding) 

In the mood . . . Ba-Dah 

In the pit . . . Da-Dah 

I'll be there 

Absolutely no class whatsoever 

Uncle Ricky 

The Limey (fondles soft table legs) 

Rings thru the nose 

Boody 

Light in your loafers 

Best hill on the house 

Dryer fixed yet? 

Wimp 

Puddin' Palmeri 

I'll kick your ass 

Wingless vs. Mean Machine 

Palmerius Exhonoroos 

Pud 

The Dud 

Ferd! 

Smegma . . . Are you all right in there? 

Why? Chuck, Why?! 

The nags 

Hey! 

The Denaults 



Granny 
Ragu 
Smooth 

Larry, How do you get out of here 
Don't get crumbs in my car! 
The E.E. symposium is in session 
Brucellosis 

3Pump, 2Stone, lWhite, 2Rye, 3Raisin 
Cookieman 

Just a pup in the world 
Cocktails in the suite 
Hey Steve, how about problem 4? 
Dereliction 
Chem. E Blues 
Sunshine 
Mom 
Ya, sure 

Good idea, Right . . . 
Wedgie Lutz 

I'd give my left arm to be ambi- 
dextrous 

Yes Dear, Yes Dear 
Arachibutyrophobia 
PW'D 

REDWINGS 
Mettrhorhagic Profusion 




s «L> 



!,),!„ J»WIII»WW»MW;>i i. i ii i i»«« iyWWq»»w«WIW»W«l»>gfWW"^^ JWWjW 



mwm 



MMMMMiMVWMalMMM 



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1 1/ J— 




Living Groups, 275 




Fall Semester Officers: 
David A. Oram, President 
Richard B. Hallet, Treasurer 
Louis J. Sosa, Recording Sec. 
Richard L. Koenigsberg, Corres. Sec. 
Neil f. Miritello, Karukon 
Spring Semester Officers: 
J. Peter Ellis 
Gary Kauffman 
Keith Haley 
James D. Hohman 
Rudolf DiMassa 



1. K. Clifford 


16. S. Concklin 


2. G. Gentzle 


17. R. Gaffin 


3. B. Senior 


18. G. Kaufman 


4. P. Tauck 


19. K. Haley 


5. Huge 


20. S. DiMassa 


6. P. Ellis 


21. J. Hohman 


7. T. Baroody 


22. R. D. Czekanski 


8. H. Prati 


23. K. Soder 


9. R. Hallett 


24. R. Koenigsberg 


10. B. Arnot 


25. T. Kreidler 


11. C. Fick 


26. D. Helliesen 


12. D. Lasky 


27. B. Felker 


13. N. Miritello 


28. M. Versuk 


14. T. Norton 


29. L. Keller 


15. P. Clausen 


30. G. Allen 



276. Living Groups 



THETA DELTA CHI 




Intramurals . . . lineups . . . band parties . . . sororities . . . Huge . . . pledging . . . 
Happy Days . . . Leonard finally on his way . . . Torps a career man . . . City League 
Basketball . . . Disco . . . Oldies . . . Kevin and Lo join Neil in the engagement ranks . . . 
crew . . . house cleanups . . . fines ... the C.R. . . . Cutting trees . . . Christmas party . . . 
Mrs. Trainer . . . and the pledges turned convicts . . . Best time I ever had . . . Can't be 
. . . It's not true . . . Interviews and the Placement Office . . . job Offers? . . . The Fonz 
. . . Laverne and Shirley . . . Hap . . . Skies . . . Boot . . . DAO . . . Torps . . . Claus . . . 
Tauck ... Jim Beam . . . Earth to Bart . . . Keith . . . Dave . . . Cliff . . . Step up! ... 
Finman . . . Side and a half . . . Out . . . Carp . . . Gaf . . . Gee, the state police are 
looking for you . . . Pots Grin . . . Pritch . . . Chuck . . . Hug . . . Czkans . . . Skip . . . 
Conck . . . Rebel . . . Felks . . . T.K. . . . Craby . . . Kell . . . Prats . . . Bo . . . Kaufroy . . . 
Grease . . . Cheech and Chong No Show . . . Suds . . . Rip . . . Lou . . . The Bionic 
Woman . . . The Box . . . B.D.'s . . . Housebills . . . Housemeetings . . . Severe beating . . . 
Theta Delta Chi 1976. 




Living Groups, 277 



THETA XI 



Phone call up at Lambda Chi . . . bus leaving at 7 ... be under it ... I don't need this 
aggravation . . . call a doctor . . . What was that gronk's name? . . . 

Hey, I know . . . sincerely yours in the back . . . Oh, you have a drink, Motor . . . take a 
hike . . . You are a DAWG . . . This is the upstairs . . . Are you sure you have the right 
room? . . . Cold Dorm East publicity photos by Bunny . . . (Uncle Marty's hair is out of 
control) . . . 

Sister MJ . . . Coney Island Baby . . . Phone call for Mr. Kirsch in the foyer . . . Can I, can 
I? . . . Well, there's always the third staff . . . Goodnight, Irene . . . Buddha for president . . . 
Which Juan, Weaks? . . . Wake Bruce at 7 . . . Vital . . . Crawdad and Wopper Taters . . . 

If we have crockets, you're gonna find them in your bed . . . Oh, save us . . . Hey, 
George, what's for lunch? . . . Who asked you? . . . Blow it out . . . Louie's: "For you, eighty 
cents." . . . The Doobs; who else? . . . Yes, we are having a party tonight . . . He's got that 
10-beer look . . . (massive brain damage) . . . Whoosh 'im . . . Flame on, Motor . . . Hey, easy 
on me . . . our resident Airhead . . . and the Mud Dubbers . . . Wuff-Wuff. Five to cancer 
. . . pound some sand . . . eat that now, and you'll never make weight . . . what the hell . . . 
the Leaping Lep invited Horizontal Holly . . . Everyone knows who Bambi is . . . Been to 
Maryland lately, Rich? . . . Arnabag; our favorite cynic . . . schlong . . . He's a real stub . . . 
This is a cookie meal, isn't it? . . . Impeach the steward! Is this UFG? . . . 






278, Living Groups 



/\i^?N^\r 



■ i ■ 



^^* cl 



'A 



*s *• 




*H 1%&QJ& 1 ' 




1. J. Ondrejack 

2. R. Wilson 

3. P. Crabilo 

4. T. Boone 

5. C. Cole 

6. J. Edleman 

7. R. Waters 

8. K. Skinner 

9. R. Shuman 

10. D. Trost 

11. K. Swartz 

12. B. Anderson 

13. R. Bedell 

14. P. Crawford 

15. K. Sweigard 

16. G. Herman 

17. D. Charles 



18. B. Proven 

19. E. Englehardt 

20. J. Wolf 

21. B. Numbers 

22. R. Van Hoesen 

23. J. Fernandez 

24. P. Blasberg 

25. B. Kirsch 

26. M. Van Hoesen 

27. K. White 

28. J. Parker 

29. K. Grau 

30. B. Patterson 

31. J. Stewart 

32. S. Donaldson 

33. K. Buckstaff 



Living Groups, 279 



ZETA PSI 



1. G. Woodend 


15. D McGillen 


29. D. Mayer 


2. J. Heid 


16. B. Holdgraffer 


30. G. Csernica 


3. B. Winter 


17. S. Detwiler 


31. B. Zucker 


4. DOYLE 


18. R. Valk 


32. M. Farrara 


5. G. Zenuk 


19. P. Bechtel 


33. J. Kearney 


6. M. Goehring 


20. T. Smith 


34. C. Burns 


7. R. Thevenet 


21. S. Johnson 


35. G. Greene 


8. K. Wilson 


22. D. Hartzell 


36. C. C. Kim 


9. L. Trozzo 


23. S. Bartosik 


37. D. Frankenbach 


10. T. Byerley 


24. D. Dietrich 


38. D. Crosson 


11. E. Noymer 


25. J. Zmuda 


39. B. Perry 


12. J. Ruddy 


26. B. Loving 


40. f. Sills 


13. P. Kelly 


27. D. Winecoff 




14. T. Cassone 


28. B. Moroz 






:: **^:&iy 



■ 



280, Living Groups 



18 




¥4 





Four years! For the class of 1976, it has brought many good times along with its share of bad 
WF experiences. Zeta Psi has grown and matured during this time, as have its seniors. The senior 

U •■'** 

S class has done much for our house, above all, giving it character. Being the first official pledge 

f\ class to the new house on the hill, these 16 were given the foundations upon which to build the 
future. Looking back over those four years, smiles, frowns, laughter and a sense of 
accomplishment come to surface. We have achieved much at Lehigh in a very short time; we plan 
to continue in that direction. As we review our failures and successes, we realize how 
instrumental the seniors were in providing undying enthusiasm throughout all phases of 
fraternity life. However, all things must pass, and so too the class of '76. We wish them the best 
luck in their futures, remembering it's great to be a ZETE. 




Living Groups, 281 




SPORTS 







McCLINTIC- MARSH \! 

STEEL BUILDINGS, 
BRIDGES, Etc 



[ ORgWORP . 

fo me 
bocxrd of tru-stee-s, 
ike faculty , tke 
vbiudttni- kocly, cm v. J 
©J J otker^s indertol 
ed , we offer ikks 
brieP recotxl oP 
LEHIGM life. 




284, Sports 




Row 1 (I to r): J. Dutt, A. Bott, L. Hogg, M. Rieker, f. Sterrett (co-capt), J. Mullane (co-capt), M. Kelly, R, Glasbrenner, P. 
Fenton, R. Liptak; Row 2: W. Lynch, J. Ringer, D. Kozel, G. Clark, C. Reese, N. O'Connor, W. Connois, R. Gardner, M. 
Weaver, J. Tracy, L. Daniels; Row 3: W. Bradley, D. Aprill, G. Pierog, J. Bigach, J. Healy, G. Borgucz, J. Gift, S. Maddox, K. 
Frederick, S. Fendryk; Row 4: C. Sonon, T. Stine, J. Schulze, S. Martin, D. McKinney, J. Pieczynski, T. Giordani, M. Orcutt, 
C. Matics; Row 5: f. Whipell. J. Luckhardt, J. Whitehead, C. McNaron, M. Yaszemski, R. Ross, N. Camuti, L. Henshaw, G. 
Skola, ]. Gallagher, C. Palmer, S. Sanders, F. Dunlap. 



Highlighted by victories over Penn, 
Rutgers, and Delaware, the Engineer 
football team rolled to an impressive 
9-2 regular season, winning the Lam- 
bert Cup for the fourth time. How- 
ever, the season came to a dis- 
appointing conclusion when the grid- 
ders fell to New Hampshire in a Divi- 
sion II quarterfinal playoff contest in 
Taylor Stadium. Three fourth quarter 
touchdowns by the Wildcats buried 
the Engineers, 35-21. 

Included in the middle of the 9-2 
season was a seven-game winning 
streak in which the gridders played 
their best ball of the year. It started 
when the gridders came from ten 
points behind to defeat Pennsylvania 
for the first time since 1889. After 
crushing Gettysburg the following 
week the team returned home for the 



first of two major tests. Scoring in the 
first 25 seconds of play the Engineers 
crushed Rutgers 34-20, a team Coach 
Dunlap later called, "the best team on 
our schedule." 

The gridders did not get any rest; 
perennial Division II power Delaware 
was next. The Engineers used three 
second quarter touchdowns and Mark 
Weaver's brilliant second half kick-off 
return to turn back the Hens, 35-23. 

The following two weekends were 
parents' weekends and the gridders re- 
sponded with two impressive vic- 
tories. Freshman parents saw a well- 
balanced Engineer attack shellac 
Maine 51-14. Colgate brought a 5-1 
record into Taylor Stadium, but left 
with two losses, falling 38-6 to the 
Engineers before upperclass parents. 

The streak came to an end at Buck- 



nell when the gridders suffered their 
second loss of the season. The Engi- 
neers outgained Bucknell by 200 yards 
but the Bisons won where it counts, 
on the scoreboard, 32-25. 

The regular season closed on a posi- 
tive note as the Engineers won the 
11th meeting between Lehigh and La- 
fayette 40-14 in Taylor Stadium. 

Several fine individual achieve- 
ments highlighted the exceptional sea- 
son. Rod Gardner, who was named 
Associated Press college All-American 
second team fullback, gained 1112 
yards and scored 104 points to lead 
the ground game along with Weaver, 
who gained more than 700 yards and 
scored 88 points. Quarterback Joe 
Sterrett was chosen to the Kodak All- 
American college team after throwing 
22 touchdown passes. 



Sports, 285 




WE 




THEY 


27 


Millersville 


18 


32 


Army 


54 


34 


Pennsylvania 


23 


56 


Gettysburg 


22 


34 


Rutgers 


20 


35 


Delaware 


23 


51 


Maine 


14 


38 


Colgate 


6 


37 


Davidson 


19 


25 


Bucknell 


32 


40 


Lafayette 
NCAA Division II Playoff 


14 


21 


New Hampshire 
Final Record 9-3 


35 




286, Sports 



FOOTBALL 




V 



# ■ .. m* 




# # 



Most Outstanding Player 

When Joe Sterrett finally got his chance to start, after 
waiting three years, he had to learn a whole new offense. 
The Engineers switched to the Wing-T this year, and under 
Sterrett's leadership the gridders became one of the top 
offensive teams in Division II football. 

Sterrett set a Lehigh record, passing for 22 touchdowns 
and he directed the offense to seasonal records for net 
yards rushing, 2692, total net yards, 5037 and points, 409. 
He was named first team quarterback on Kodak's College 
Ail-American team. 




Sports, 287 




After a promising start in which the Lehigh soccer team won three and tied one of its 
first six games. Coach Tom Fleck's newly instituted Dutch style offense disintegrated, 
and the hooters fell to a 4-8-2 record. The team only scored once and was shut out four 
times in its final five games. 

The team's new style was designed to help improve the offense and defense. The 
result was a steady defense which allowed less than two goals a game, but a lackluster 
offense which scored less goals than in the previous season. 

Senior co-captain Jim O'Donnell led the hooters in scoring for the second year in a 
row. Halfbacks Skip DiMassa and Hank Prati lent valuable offensive support. Defen- 
sive standouts included surehanded goalie. Larry Keller, and fullbacks Bob Weick and 
co-captain Jose Perna. 

The Engineers played extremely well in games with soccer powers like Pennsylvania. 
Navy, and Hartwick. The team battled to scoreless ties with last season's division 
champs. Delaware and Bucknell. 

In many of their games, the Engineer booters showed potential, but their lack of 
scoring caused their demise. With the loss of only three seniors and only one starter, 
Coach Fleck should be optimistic about next year's squad. 



WE 




THEY 


1 


Navy 


2 


2 


Swarthmore (OT) 








LaSalle 


4 





Delaware (OT) 





5 


Rutgers (OT) 


2 


3 


Drexel 


2 


1 


Pennsylvania 


3 


4 


Gettysburg 


3 


1 


Rider 


5 





West Chester 


1 





Lafayette (OT) 


1 


1 


Hartwick 


2 





Muhlenberg 


1 




1 


Bucknell (OT) 
Final Record 4-8-2 






283. Sports 



Most Outstanding Player 




The Epitome chose Hank Prati as the soccer team's 
most outstanding player. Prati started the season at 
fullback but was switched to halfback to utilize his 
offensive skills. The junior's consistent play at midfield, 
both on offense and defense, stood out all year for the 
Engineers. He was especially adept in breaking up the 
opponent's attack and starting Lehigh's offense on the 
move. Prati, a walk-on player from Cranbury, N.J., tied 
for the lead in goals scored. He should be congratulated 
on his fine season. 



SOCCER 




1975 SOCCER ROSTER: L. Keller, J. Bulter, S. Concklin, T. Wilson, R. Weick, M. Skiff, G. Parris, J. O'Donnell, R. DiMassa, H. Prati, 
J. Pema, C. Sheppard, L. Oliphant, R. Speir, P. Malik, P. Shook, B. Schneck, P. Dietrich, J. Schadt, G. Crape, f. Shiremann, K. McGee. 



Sports, 289 




Top — Bottom row: W. Rogers, J. Heil, S. Thatcher, M. Cowell, |. Cassimatis, M. Yardis, J. Davis, 
M Hoffman. Row 2: Coach Covert, K. Sprick, D. Cope (co-capt), S. Thoren, C. Sumrell, T. 
Borges, H. Hoyt, S. Collins. Row 3: D. Friedfeld, B. Herder, M. Ranney, E. Michael, D. Norris, T. 
Critchley, J. Grady, C. Nunan. 



WE 




THEY 


20 


Delaware 


37 


16 


Rider 


45 


39 


Pennsylvania 


20 


15 


LaSalle 


50 


30 


Bucknell 


27 


19 


St. Joseph's 


40 


19 


Temple 


40 


21 


West Chester 


36 


22 


East Stroudsburg 


37 


25 


Millersville 


32 


26 


Army 


31 


27 


Rutgers 
NYU Win by Forfeit 

Lehigh Invitational Second 


29 


15 


Lafayette 

ECC Championships Second 
IC4A Championships Second 

Final Record 12-2 


50 




290, Sports 



CROSS COUNTRY 




After a successful regular season winning twelve dual 
and tri— meets while losing only to Penn and Bucknell, the 
harriers played the role of the bridesmaid in the East Coast 
Conference and IC4A championships to the Bisons of 
Bucknell. 

Coach John Covert's runners had to do it without the 
services of captain Elliot Michael who missed the entire 
season with an injury. Stellan Thoren, another top runner, 
missed several weeks early in the campaign, rendering the 



ranks even thinner. But teammate Mickey Yardis picked up 
the slack and led the team on to many victories by finish- 
ing first or second in every meet. 

Along with Yardis, two freshmen sprang forward to 
strengthen the Engineers. Dave Norris and Jim Davis sur- 
prised their coach with their quick maturing in the 1975 
season. Davis finished third in the ECC championship 
meet. 



Most Outstanding Player 




Junior Mickey Yardis has been chosen by 
the Epitome as the cross country team's most 
outstanding runner. Yardis led the harriers to 
a 12-2 regular season mark and second place 
finishes in the Lehigh Invitational meet and 
the East Coast Conference and IC4A cham- 
pionships. He placed in the top two spots in 
every Lehigh dual meet this season while 
running second in the Lehigh Invitational and 
ECC meets, and sixth in the IC4A's. Yardis is 
to be congratulated for his excellent season. 



Sports. 291 



FIELD HOCKEY 



Winning seasons are becoming more common for women's teams at Lehigh, but this 
year's 10-0 record from the Engineer field hockey team exceeded everyone's expectations. 

The squad mowed down all opponents with speed, accuracy and tough defense. The 
Engineers scored 42 goals, giving up only five. No team scored more than once against 
Lehigh, five teams couldn't score at all. 

Much of the Engineers' firepower came from sophomore Lori Collmann, who broke her 
own scoring record by blasting 16 goals. She and freshman Janet LeClair scored five goals 
apiece against Centenary and Cedar Crest, respectively. Freshmen front runners Amy 
Wenhold and Julie Crouse also terrorized opposing goalies. 

The 4-2-4 system Lehigh used emphasized midfield control. Sophomores Jeanne Bonney 
and Carol Hart gave strong performances in their link positions. Bonney played aggressive 
defense, and Hart pounded in four goals. 

The Engineer defense stopped most scoring threats before they started. The ball seldom 
came inside the 25-yard line, but when it did, backs Cheryl Kolp, Andie Altman, Nancy 
Barrett and Stacy Stacom quickly sent play in the other direction. 

Lehigh's goalie was usually the loneliest player on the field. Lehigh Valley all-star Trudi 
Schifter and junior Helen Richardson made the saves, producing meager goals-against 
averages of .57 and .33, respectively. 

Victories over Rutgers, Kutztown and Lafayette were especially sweet, since the 
Engineers had never conquered any of the three before. 

Playing in the Mid-Atlantic Regional tournament was the season's highlight. Unfortu- 
nately, the Engineers' winning streak came to an end at the hands of Maryland. With the 
entire starting lineup returning next year, the future seasons bring promise of continued 
excellence. 



10-0-0 



292. Women's Sports 



WE 




THEY 


4 


Delaware Valley 





3 


Bloomsburg State 





7 


Centenary 





9 


Cedar Crest 


1 


4 


Moravian 


1 


3 


Rutgers 





3 


Muhlenberg 


1 


4 


Lancaster Bible 





2 


Kutztown State 


1 


3 


Lafayette 
Final Record 10-0-0 


1 




Row 1 (1 to r): J. LeClair, A. Wenhold, T. Schifter, S. Robinson, B. Lemke, A. McGregor (co-capt.), M. Fener; Row 2: M. Westhead, B. 
Geiger, J. Love, B. Ewing, L. Young, F. Herrick, D. Daych, S. Stacom; Row 3: H. Bond (coach), J. Crouse, L. Collmann, C. Hart, H. 
Richardson, C. Kolp (co-capt.), N. Barrett, S. Sachs. A. Altman, E. King, f. Bonney, A. Steele, B. McCreary, B. Everhart (coach). 



Women's Sports, 293 



VOLLEYBALL 





WE 
2 
1 


Results 

Centenary 
Villanova 


THEY 

2 


2 
2 
1 


Albright 

Lafayette 

Kutztown 





2 


2 


Lafayette 





2 


Moravian 
Final record 5-2 







After last season's dismal 0-5 record, 
the Engineer volleyball team had no- 
where to go but up. The squad's fortunes 
certainly improved this year, and the 
women compiled a successful 5-2 record. 

Consistent serving and strong spiking 
were two advantages the Engineers 
turned into wins. Juniors Pat Gedney 
and Andi Gorbach scored points with 
their serves and strong play. Co-captains 
Marcie Reuben and Sue Perrotta kept 
things moving for Lehigh, with help from 
Gina Tarantini, Laura Moore, Irene Pa- 
vels and Kathy Benusa. 

Among the season's highlights were 
two triumphs over Lafayette, as well as 
wins over many teams who throttled the 
Engineers last year. The squad swept 
both games in all victories, while staying 
close to more experienced Kutztown and 
Villanova contingents. 

Lehigh held a 12-4 won-lost advantage 
in individual games in seven matches. 

With only one senior leaving, victories 
in volleyball promise to continue for 
some time. 



Row 3(1 to r): C. Izuno, S. Perrotta (co-capt.), M. Reuben (co-capt.), L. Moore, K. Benusa; 
Row 2: L. Kaufman, S. Bschorr. M. Klopack. F. Wald, A. Gorbach. P. Gedney; Row 3: M. 
Klein, C. Cardello, G. Tarantini. L. Goodman, H. Hall, I. Pavels. B. Everhart (coach). 



294. Women's Sports 



FOOTBALL 




Bad breaks frustrated the powderpuff football team as they lost a 16-6 heartbreaker to Lafayette. 
Incomplete passes and a strong Leopard defense stalled the offense, while the Engineer defense missed 
chances for the big play. There were some bright spots for Lehigh, though. Tight end Sue Sachs outfought 
the three defenders who shadowed her all day to haul in a Pam Watson pass for the Engineers' only 
score. Halfback Helen Richardson's punishing blocking and sure hands also helped the offense. Defensive 
ends Pat Henry, Andie Altman and Lou Ann Eckert and tackle Cheryl Staviski cut off the Lafayette 
ground game. Defensive backs Diane Gable, Mindy Fener, Rose Welliver and Doris Campbell had their 
hands full with pass coverage, but held on well. Graduating co-captains Watson and Gable will be sorely 
missed, but the Engineers showed the potential to put it all together in the future. 



Women's Sports. 295 




WINTER SPORTS 



SWIMMING 



WE 




THEY 


55 


Temple 


58 


62 


Penn State 


50 


29 


Fordham 


83 


32 


East Stroudsburg 


80 


62 


Delaware 


57 


63 


Rutgers 


48 


68 


Gettysburg 


42 


48 


LaSalle 


65 


71 


Lafayette 


40 


46 


Penn 


67 


41 


Bucknell 

ECC - 4th 

EISL 

NCAA 

Final Record 5-6 


72 




The Engineer mermen once again placed fourth in the ECC swim- 
ming championships. They were led by freshman Harold Schweitzer, 
who placed first and second in the 200 - and 100-yard butterfly 
respectively, setting a Lehigh record in the 200. Other top performers 
were freshmen Phil Klauder and Nick Campbell, sophomore Kevin 
Silva, junior Jim Ritter, and senior Bob Roth. Four-year swimmer 
Roth will be sorely missed next year. 




Row 1: K. Myers, J. Fitzgerald, B. Quier, P. Battaglia, T. Shannahan, P. Klauder, N. Campbell. 
Row 2: B. Mohylsky, S. Handerhan, C. Breuer (co-capt), B. Roth (co-capt). J. Manfredo. Row 3: B. 
Gardiner (coach), K. Silva, J. Ritter, B. Knisely. J. Koester, D. Stephens (asst. coach). 




Sports, 297 



WRESTLING 





1976 WRESTLING TEAM 



When Mike Frick outpointed two time national cham- 
pion Pat Milkovich of Michigan State 7-4, to win his 
second consecutive NCAA crown, he vaulted the Engi- 
neers into fifth place in the national tournament. All told, 
the Engineers set a team record for total points in nation- 
als, accumulating 55.25. Three other matmen captured 
places: Mike Lieberman, third at 177; Bob Sloand, fourth at 
126; and Tihamer Toth-Fejel, fifth at 142. 



Lieberman lost to Mark Johnson of Michigan in the semi- 
finals, but wrestled back without losing to garner the third 
position. Sloand was unseeded but defeated number two 
seed Bob Antonacci of Iowa State in finishing fourth. Toth- 
Fejel lost in the quarter-finals to past champion Don Rohn 
of Clarion, but wrestled back to defeat Rohn in the con- 
solation finals for fifth spot. 



298, Sports 



The grapplers qualified for eight places in the tourna- 
ment in Tucson, Arizona through Easterns competitions, 
which were held two weeks earlier at Franklin & Marshall. 
Frick, Lieberman, Sloand, Toth-Fejel, and heavyweight 
Don McCorkel all won Eastern titles as the Engineers 
romped to their second straight EIWA crown. Nils Deacon, 
was second at 167 and Lance Leonhardt and Guy Talarico, 
who placed third at 118 and 190 pounds respectively, also 
qualified for the trip west. 

The dual meet season started slowly for the grapplers as 
the lost five of their first ten matches, including four on a 
western swing that included national champion Iowa and 
runner-up Iowa State. The season turned around com- 
pletely during the second semester when Frick, who had 



missed the first semester due to academic problems, re- 
turned. Only one loss, at Navy, marred the remainder of 
the slate as the grapplers won nine of ten matches and 
finished with a dual meet record of 14-6. Included in the 
victories was a 24-17 win over Penn State that featured the 
return of Lieberman to the line-up after missing six weeks 
with a cracked bone in his neck suffered in an auto 
accident. 

Toth-Fejel and McCorkel both set Engineer records with 
19 dual meet victories over the season. Adding to that 
Toth-Fejel went undefeated in dual meet competition 
while McCorkel recorded a remarkable 12 pins over the 
dual meet season. 



WE 




THEY 


29 


Wilkes 


12 


24 


Northwestern 


10 


22 


Florida 


14 


20 


Indiana State 


12 


26 


E. Carolina 


13 


16 


Oregon State 


18 


17 


Iowa 


32 


11 


Iowa State 


31 


15 


Northern Iowa 


21 


18 


Southern Iowa 


27 


31 


Bucknell 


10 


26 


N. Carolina State 


9 


31 


Yale 


10 


16 


Navy 


22 


34 


Rutgers 


7 


44 


Army 


6 


24 


Penn State 


17 


37 


Cornell 


6 


27 


Syracuse 


14 


31 


John Carroll 

EIWA 1st Place 
NCAA 5th Place 
Final Record 15-5 


12 





Sports, 299 



GRAPPLERS HOLD EASTERN CROWN . . . 



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300, Sports 




AND FIFTH SPOT IN NATION 



Sports, 301 



Most Outstanding Player 
With a record breaking 54 career victories, surpassing Terry DeStito's 
mark of 52, the Epitome recognizes co-captain Mike Frick as this year's most 
outstanding wrestler. The senior 134-pounder ended his collegiate career by 
successfully defending his national crown, while leading the Engineers to a 
fifth place finish. The name Mike Frick has been synonymous with Lehigh 
wrestling over the past four years. His absence will be sorely felt next year. 






302, Sports 



NO-NEED CONTROVERSY 



As has been the case for the past several years, the 
controversial subject of no-need scholarships for wrestlers 
was a prominant issue during the 1975-76 season. Sparked 
by a first semester administrative decision to award Mike 
Frick a cancellable loan while the senior co-captain and 
returning national champion was on academic probation, 
arguments for and against the no-need grants filled the 
University throughout the fall semester. 

Advocates of the grants argued that the rising cost of 
higher education was increasing the difference between a 
Lehigh education and that obtainable with a no-need 
grant from an already cheaper state institution. Their 
opposition came from people who argued that the Univer- 



sity is for education, and that allowing even one no-need 
grant would set a dangerous precedent that could jeopard- 
ize the high academic reputation Lehigh has earned. 

Much of the sting of the no-need advocates arguments 
faded when the grapplers went to Tucson and crowned 
one national champion while finishing in the top five in 
the country for the second straight year. This, along with a 
very close decision by the NCAA which could have elimi- 
nated the no-need grants, silenced many advocates. In a 
December meeting, the NCAA defeated a resolution to 
eliminate no-need grants by eight votes. However, despite 
the Engineers' great showing and the growing NCAA opin- 
ion, the argument will probably linger in coming years. 




Sports. 303 




HOCKEY 



Most Outstanding Player 

He did not score any goals, had only one assist and rarely ever 
skated beyond the Lehigh blue line but Pete Bechtel gloved, waffled, 
and stick checked his way to contention for All-ECAC Division III 
goaltender's honors. 

The 6-foot, 210 pound senior business student from Lancaster, Pa. 
is far and away the best goalie Lehigh has ever had. Bechtel has even 
been heralded by rival coaches. He posted an 8-6-2 won-loss-tie 
record and a 3.68 goals-against-average for his final season. 

The Epitome recognizes Peter Bechtel for his outstanding goal 
tending play. 




304. Sports 



Lehigh's hockey team saw two of its ECAC Division III 
rivals go to the Division playoffs. The Engineers bowed to 
reigning champions, Amherst 7-5, and fell twice to Roches- 
ter Institute of Technology by a one-goal margin. Both 
teams were in the four-team playoffs in March. 

Coach Joe Biedron and first year Assistant Coach Steve 
Penman's squad won its third consecutive Middle Atlantic 
Conference crown on route to an overall 10-7-1 season. 
More important, the Engineers proved they can compete 
with the best teams in it's ECAC division. 

Alternate captains Bob Oliwa and Mike Dale, plus fiery 
freshman Pete Goldstein head the returnees. Dale claimed 
the scoring title this year with 38 points. A defenseman 
who is known to make end-to-end rushes with puck, Dale 



slapped in 18 goals and 20 assists. Oliwa, a slick play- 
making center scored 16 goals and 15 assists for his 31 
point, second place finish. 

Only two players will graduate from the hockey team 
this year, but they are an important loss. Pete Bechtel, who 
never played goalie until he came to Lehigh, developed 
into one of the top Division III netminders. His strong 
catching glove and acrobatic kick saves led the Engineers 
to many triumphs, especially two key ECAC wins over 
Fairfield University. 

Marc Rinaldi, who captained the pucksters for two years 
also leaves this year. His senior year was a disappointing 
one for him, as he again injured his left shoulder in mid- 
season and was forced to stop playing. 



WE 




THEY 


14 


Queens 


1 


5 


Rutgers 


2 


4 


Fairfield 


2 


4 


Cortland State 


5 


3 


Cortland State 


6 


4 


Rutgers 


1 


8 


Lafayette 


2 


5 


Amherst 


7 


5 


Fairfield 


4 


10 


Villanova 


3 


2 


Villanova 


1 


6 


West Chester 


3 


3 


Rutgers 


3 


1 


Philadelphia 
Junior Flyers 


6 


5 


West Chester 


6 


6 


R.I.T. (OT) 


7 


4 


R.I.T. 


5 


16 


Lafayette 
Final Record 10-7-1 


3 




Row 1: P. Bechtel, C. Hopkins, R. Frey. M. Dale. M. Rinaldi, B. Oliwa, J. Cillo, B. Krogslund. Row 2: 
Coach J. Biedron, S. Scharkss, H. Marsh, E. O'Mara, W. Cummings, J. Pennick, D. Radford, Coach S. 
Penman. Row 3: R. Benoit, C. Cucculu, P. Grady, D. Marfone. P. Goldstein, G. Mallanik, A. 
Tomlinson, Mgr. J. Marino. Not pictured: M. Langley, B. Rockhill. 



Sports. 305 




BASKETBALL 



The Engineer basketball team, directed by first year 
coach Brian Hill, scrapped and scrambled its way to a 9- 
15 record, the cagers' best record in four years. 

Highlights of the season were winning the Roanoke 
Tournament during the winter vacation and losing a 
close contest to fourth nationally-ranked Rutgers. 

Sophomore forward Ray Green led the Engineers in 
scoring with 303 points. He also paced the team in 
rebounding with 218 caroms. Junior forward Charley 
Brown was second leading scorer and rebounder. 




306, Sports 



WE 




THEY 


29 


Army 


56 


82 


Wagner 


77* 


45 


Penn State 


93 


71 


Pitt-Johnstown 


64 


78 


Kings Point 


53 


67 


Colgate 


70* 


66 


Elizabethtown 


57 


71 


Rider 


69 


57 


Roanoke 


56* 


60 


Holy Cross 


84 


87 


Rutgers 


102 


53 


Drexel 


69 


60 


Scranton 


84 


59 


Delaware 


66 


67 


Bucknell 


71 


64 


Rider 


62 


63 


West Chester 


82 


97 


Muhlenberg 


61 


79 


Lafayette 


99 


64 


Delaware 


70 


69 


Bucknell 


71 


77 


Rider 


99 


88 


West Chester 


83* 


75 


Lafayette 


77 


*ot 


Final Record 9-15 






Most Outstanding 

Brian Hill coached the basketball team to its best season in four 
years. He inspired confidence in a team that won only one game last 
season. 

His game strategy involved a tight man-to-man defense and a well- 
patterned offense. More important, Hill's style of coaching helped the 
players believe in themselves and their abilities. 

The Epitome congratulates Coach Hill for the fine job this year. 




Row 1: T. Kobylenski, B. Milligan, D. Packer, G. Belfield, J. Cassidy, B. Griffin. Row 2: Coach B. Hill, R. Zajac, R. Green, D. 
Kistler, C. Brown, P. Brandenburg, P. Weaver, K. Clifford, B. Zambo, B. Roth, Asst. Coach P. Kennedy. 



Sports, 307 



INDOOR 
TRACK 





- i 



Most Outstanding Player 

The Epitome applauds Jim 
Kappel for his consistent per- 
formance during the indoor track 
season. Jim always placed first or 
second in the 60-yard dash and 
the 60-yard high hurdles. The 
sophomore from Bethpage, N.Y., 
holds the University record in 
the 60-yard high hurdles with a 
7.3 timing. 



Coach John Covert's indoor track- 
men ended a victorious season with 
a 4-3 dual meet record. The Engi- 
neer team finally found a home in 
the Saucon Valley fieldhouse. The 
squad broke in the new complex 
with its first intercollegiate event on 
January 30 with East Stroudsburg 
and Bloomsburg. 

The team's strengths ley with jun- 
iors Stellan Thoren and Mickey 
Yardis in the long distance events, 
junior Mike Green in the long 
jump, and sophomore Jim Kappel in 
the hurdles. Kappel took first place 
in the 60-yard hurdles at the 
unofficial ECC championships. 



WE 


Middle Atlantic 

Assn. AAU 

Phila. Classic 

Development Meet 


THEY 


52 


East Stroudsburg 


62 


52 


Bloomsburg 


45 


80 


LaSalle 


46 


80 


Drexel 
Princeton Relays 


31 


43% 


Temple 


66% 


43% 


Villanova 


48 


71 


Lafayette 

Delaware Invitat'l 

Lehigh Invitat'l 

IC4A 

E. Stroudsburg Invit 

Final Record 4-3 


64 




308, Sports 




RIFLE 



Row 1: B. Ronemus, R. Smith, J. Lore, J. Duffy, W. Andrew. Row 2: B. Liebermann, W. Smith, Sgt. R. 
Dunn (coach), L. Loewer, B. Lally. Row 3: D. Cole, L. Brannaka, B. Gross, B. Bronner, G. Haffner, J. 
Esch. 



Lehigh's rifle team continued to be the University's win- This year's high team score was 1341, the highest score 

ningest team by adding a 13-1 season to it's already impres- in the last eight years. Walt Andrew, the team's captain, 

sive record. The heartbreak of the year was the loss to copped the individual season high with 279 out of 300 

Rider Business College, which outscored the Engineers points. 
1294 to 1290, out of a possible 1500. 




SQUASH 



In it's first varsity season, the Engineer squash team 
struggled to a 3-11 record. Coach Art Smith left 
before Christmas break, elevating captain Bill Coch- 
ran to acting coach. Number four bracketted player, 
Kevin McCarthy, assumed the leadership as the new 
captain. 

McCarthy, who picked up a squash racket for the 
first time only two years ago, headed the equally 
inexperienced team. Four freshmen filled the nine- 
man line-up. The team's trio of wins came over Penn 
State and two victories over Hill School. 



Row 1: K. McCarthy, E. Weidman, J. D'Antonico, P. Sleeman, W. Smith. 
Row 2: Coach A. Smith, B. Cochran, K. Noonan, B. Hurlman, R. Van 
Hosen, C. Cryer, C. Covert. Not pictured: B. Kirker, G. Young. 



Sports, 309 




BASKETB 




WE 




THEY 


80 


Centenary 


29 


70 


Allentown 


34 


42 


NCACC 


48 


59 


Cedar Crest 


26 


59 


Lafayette 


68 


54 


Albright 


38 


68 


Kutztown 


53 


60 


Mt. St. Mary 


63 


63 


Muhlenberg 


34 


58 


Lafayette 


79 




Final Record 6-4 





The Engineer cagers combined the talents of four 
returning starters and several freshmen to produce a 
successful 6-4 season. 

Co-captains Sue Sachs and Sue WDytkewicz pro- 
vided much of Lehigh's spark. Sachs muscled her way 
to the basket and dominated both boards. Woytkew- 
icz's fine shooting, sharp passes and defense were 
major assets. 

The freshman quartet of Patty Garnish, Andie Al- 
tman, Celia Webster and Nancy Barrett was always in 
the thick of things, either pouring in points or 
denying them to opponents. Diane "Doc" Gable dis- 
played a deadly outside shot, while Cheryl Kolp's 
rebounding skill brought her many points from close 
range. 

The Engineers turned the tables on several teams 
who beat them last year by thrashing Kutztown, Muh- 
lenberg and Albright. They blew Centenary, Cedar 
Crest and Allentown right off the floor, but dropped 
two decisions to Lafayette. A remarkable comeback 
against Mount St. Mary's also fell just short. 

With the skill and potential the Engineers displayed 
this year, they can be counted on to keep growing 
stronger. 



Row 1: S. Sachs. S. Woytkewicz (co-capts.); Row 2: A. Altman, M. Krafty, 
K. Benusa, L. Moore. L. Kaufman, D. Gable; Row 3: C. Kolp, P. Garnish, C. 
Hart. L. Collmann. C. Webster, K. Kochaba, N. Barrett, B. Everhart 
(coach). 



H10, Women's Sports 




WE 




THEY 


58 


Centenary 


28 


44 


Temple 


69 


37 


Widener 


84 


43 


Gettysburg 


52 


34 


Lafayette 


60 


64 


Pennsylvania 


58 


76 


Elizabethtown 


46 


63 


La Salle 


59 


52 


Bloomsburg 
Final Record 4-5 


77 



A winning season again eluded the women's swim team, despite several fine 
individual performances. 

Sophomore co-captain Maureen Madden excelled in freestyle and butterfly, 
lowering team records in both events. Freshman Carol Zetterstrom contributed 
record-setting times in freestyle. Irene Pavels, another freshman, gave a strong 
showing in butterfly and relays. 

Mary Jane Haesche's seven wins in nine diving contests earned the graceful 
sophomore a trip to Easterns. Patti Bruns lowered team marks in backstroke, as 
did Jennifer Engelhardt in breaststroke. 

Among the season's highlights were lopsided wins over Centenary and 
Elizabethtown, and a come-from-behind victory over La Salle. 

Another year's experience and a deeper squad should send the Engineers' 
record to the sunny side of .500. 




>i 




Row 1: C. Zetterstrom, C. Davidson, D. Dabrowski, S. Erickson, I. Pavels, T. Lindley (co-capt.), D. 
Sarchiapone, M. Madden (co-capt.), P. Bruns, J. Engelhardt, J. Peto (asst. coach). H. Bond (coach). 





SWIMMING 







Women's Sports, 311 




SPRING SPORTS 




BASEBALL 



« k i-l t|« ll 




Row 1: Batboy P. Schlar, K. Tilton, S. Clark. J. Dutt, A. Otlinger, E. Scheidler. C. Rynier. Row 2: J. Parisi (scores), M. Smith, S. 
Dunkleberger, W. Bilenki, D. Wilson, J. McDonald, M. Iorio, S. Rubenstein. Row 3: C. Anderson (pitching coach), R. Piger. S. Sterner. ). 
McDonald, J. Carroll, D. Winters, G. Troxel, S. Schultz (coach). 



WE 




THEY 


7 


Armstrong State 


2 


1 


Armstrong State 





2 


Georgia Southern 


5 


3 


St. Joseph's 


6 


5 


Muhlenberg 


3 


9 


Drexel 


1 





Penn State 


10 


2 


Delaware 


3 


4 


Delaware 


7 


1 


Temple 


8 


4 


Trenton State 


3 


9 


Bucknell 


5 


6 


Bucknell 


5 


5 


Penn 


10 


5 


Upsala 


10 


8 


Rider 





5 


Rider 





5 


Rutgers 


6 


5 


Kutztown (10 inn.) 


4 


2 


West Chester 


7 


11 


West Chester 


8 


4 


Fordham 


3 


8 


Lafayette 


5 


14 


Gettysburg 


1 


6 


Scranton 


2 


1 


Lafayette 
Final Record 15-11 


7 



Stan Schultz's baseball troops compiled their second 
best win total this season. Their 15-11 record, (6-4 in 
conference play), was not impressive on its face, but when 
one realizes that the Engineers this year are losing only 
three stars, senior second baseman Joe McDonald, hurler 
Stan Sterner, and outfielder Steve Dunkleburger, one still 
sees a promising next year. 

All other lettermen will be returning, including three 
freshmen. Pitchers Mark Iorio and Mitch Smith will give 
the Engineers a solid one-two punch for next year. Fresh- 
man RBI king, Glenn Troxel will be back and can only 
improve with age. 

Also, the Engineers will see return Al Ottinger, Rich 
Piger and co-captain Joe Carroll, the team's top three 
hitting stars. Carroll heads the team with a .539 slugging 
percentage. Highlights this season were a grand slam 
homerun hit by Walt Bilenki and Jim Dutt's team leading 
12 stolen bases. 



Sports, 313 



TRACK AND FIELD 



The Engineer track team ran, jumped, and heaved its 
way to a terrific spring season. The trackmen opened the 
season with a victory over four other teams in the Lehigh 
Invitational Meet. The squad also defeated West Chester 
and Lafayette in dual meets, and performed well in the 
Rutgers and Penn Relays. Lehigh finished third in the East 
Coast Conference Championships held at Saucon Valley, 
missing the number two spot by one point. 

The team had outstanding performances in all facets. 
Sam Scott, Al Dance and Jim Kappel were consistent 
winners in the sprints, with Kappel also achieving in the 
120-yard high hurdles. Those three, along with track star 



Mike Green, comprised Lehigh's undefeated 440 relay 
team. Green and Cary Tenenbaum were solid competition 
in the long jump, placing second in the Rutgers Relay. In 
throwing, Lehigh was led by Jim Schunck in the shotput 
and discus, and John Vargo in the javelin. Vargo set a 
Lehigh record this year in the javelin with a heave of 217 
feet. The distance events were perhaps the Engineer's 
strongest. Stellan Thoren, Wayne Rogers, Jim Davis, Kave 
Norris and Mickey Yardis were all top finishers in events 
ranging from the 880 to the six-mile. Rogers won the 3000- 
meter steeplechase in a record time of 9:04.5 at the ECC 
meet. 




314, Sports 




GOLF 



Coach G. Leeman, P. Malik, C. Foster, L. Sniscak, J. Coles, K. Houser, T. Porsch. B. Waldvogel, J. Warnken, M. Versuk. 



Led by co-captains Tom Porsch and John Coles, the golf 
team finished a highly successful 15-8 season. After a slow 
start, the Engineers rallied to win 13 of their final 18 
matches, including a 38-stroke victory over Lafayette to 
clinch the All-Sports Trophy. Tom Porsch led the golfers 
with a 78 average and had two 73's, the low individual 
score of the season. 



In tournament play, the Engineers finished fourth in the 
East Coast Conference championships. Sophomore Mike 
Versulz took third place individually in the ECC's. In the 
EIGA's, Coles copped the number one spot and along with 
Porsch, Versulz, Kirk Houser brought back a second place 
finish. Coles was the first individual champion from Lehigh 
to win this event. 



TENNIS 



The tennis team managed a 9-12 record under rookie 
coach Bruce Smith. It was an up and down season, the 
high point a thrilling 5-4 win over Bucknell, the low, a 
stunning 5-4 loss to Drexel. 

The season featured the emergence of Jack Ridge, one 
of the top singles players in the conference. Under the 
tutelage of Smith, Ridge posted an excellent 15-6 record. 

The other bright spot for the netmen was the rapid 
development of freshmen Ted Yerdon and Bill Siegle. 
Each of them amassed impressive 4-1 records through 
the rugged conference schedule. 




Row 1: N. Hano, \. Ridge, K. Kennedy, B. Long, G. Joyce. Row 2: Coach 
B. Smith. B. Kelly, B. Siegele. T. Yerdon, G. Kent, E. Dianastasis. 



Sports, 315 



LACROSSE 



"„ ! ? V V 








V' 



Vftj^ 



Row 1: A. Grande, C. Solomon. J. Kirsch, P. Barnes. J. Rich. K. Gardner. B. Toicura. P. Gebert, D. Carvel. Row 2: D. Varrelman. C. 
McBeth. D. Coffin, T. Tripp, J. Hohman, C. Von Heill, D. Mathesius. ]. Debottis. Row 3: B. Cochran, A. Finley, B. Crystal, D. Byelick. 
B. Philips, T. Walter. B. Smyth, M. Kane, F. Reilly. R. East, S. Drabeck, Coach J. Luckhardt. 

With a coach who never played the game; a starting defensemen Roland East, and midfielders Mike Kane, Tim 

goalie who first picked up a stick two years ago and a Tripp and Bruce Crystal. 

scarcity of players causing the cancellation of the J.V. Although the team started in the hole with a 0-3 record, 

schedule, the 1976 lacrosse came within a game of becom- it pulled itself up to close with a commendable 5-6 record, 

ing the second winning team in the last four years at The last game of the season would determine if the la- 

Lehigh. crosse team would have a winning or losing season. Dela- 

John Luckhardt took over the coaching chores after Tom ware, ranked 13th in the nation, handed the team its sixth 

Gilburg left to coach football at Franklin & Marshall, defeat, and another year under .500. 

Luckhardt had never played lacrosse, but he had coached Early in the season the Engineers beat Kutztown State 

the J.V. team for the previous two years. The new coach 10-9 on two late goals by freshman Greg Solomon, who 

had to gather as much of a team as he could before the broke his collar bone after scoring the winning goal. Kut- 

first game. ztown was ranked 11 in Division II, and beating the 

He began with a small but experienced nucleus of Golden Bears had to be a highlight of the lacrosse season, 
captains Paul Barnes and Jay Rich; attack Jessie Kirsch; 



316, Sports 




LOOKING BACK 







In four year of athletic competition at Lehigh, the teams 
and spectators have collected memories of success, strain 
and struggle. The Epitome acknowledges particular effort 
and excellence on the football fields and wrestling mats. 

In four years at the sports arenas at Lehigh, many 
memorable athletic achievements were presented. One 
might forget the names and mix up the scores, but the 
important thing is to reminisce. 

The teams to garner the most publicity and attention 
from the majority of the class of '76 were the Lambert Cup 
football teams and the two wrestling teams that finished 
fifth in the Nationals. 

Ail-American quarterback Kim McQuilken passed the 
Engineers into a share of the Lambert Cup after the grid- 
ders posted a 7-4-1 record in 1973. The football team also 
participated in the NCAA Division II play-offs that year. 
The Engineers ended the season losing to Western Ken- 
tucky, 25-16, in the Blue-Grass Bowl. Two years and another 
All-American quarterback later, Lehigh won its second 
Lambert Cup in four years. This time it was Joe Sterrett 



along with Rod Gardner, Mark Orcutt and Jerry Mullane 
grabbing the Ail-American recognition as the 1975 squad 
posted the winningest record, 9-2, since the undefeated 
1950 team. Having beaten Delaware, Rutgers, Colgate and 
for the first time since 1889, Penn, the Engineers tackled 
the University of New Hampshire in the NCAA play-offs. 
But on that Saturday afternoon after Thanksgiving in Tay- 
lor Stadium, the Engineers again were eliminated in the 
first round. 

As football's success grew over the four year span, so 
did the wrestling team's. Back to back fifth place finishes 
in 1975 and '76 in the NCAA tournament marked a high- 
point for Lehigh wrestling. Tom Sculley started the Engi- 
neers off the national path as he won the national crown at 
134 pounds in 1974. Mike Frick and Mike Lieberman won 
the National championships at 134 and 177, to give the 
Engineers a record 54 points for a fifth place. The 54 points 
record was broken the very next year as Frick repeated as 
134 champ, and Lieberman earned a second, and the 
Engineers chalked up a 55.25 points and a fifth, again. 



Sports, 317 



LACROSSE 



WE 


THEY 


11 


Bucknell 1 




(OT) 


10 


Villanova 8 


12 


Cedar Crest 4 


9 


Lafayette 13 


7 


Kutztown 6 


11 


Franklin & Marshall 7 


14 


Centenary 5 


8 


Lafayette 4 




Final Record 7-1 




Row 1: M. Fener. L. Moore, L. Snady, T. Smith; Row 2: K. Benusa, C. Kolp 
(co-capt.), N. Barrett, E. King, B. McCreary. J. Fischer, S. Stacom; Row 3: B. 
Everhart (coach), L. Collmann (co-capt.), M. Westhead, D. Gable, K. Berry, C. 
Manns. J. Cloud, D. Sultzer, D. Daych, G. Winchester (trainer). 



An explosive attack combined with menacing defense to lead the Engi- 
neers to a 7-1 lacrosse mark. 

Sophomore co-captain Lori Collmann set two new scoring records (38 
goals in eight games, and seven goals in one game) at wing. "Wiz" King, 
playing the sport for the first time, didn't show it; she netted 17 goals. Second 
home Nancy Barrett also was a prolific scorer, especially under pressure. 
First home Marianne Westhead and third home Mindy Fener added greatly 
to the attack. 

Defensively, center Tracy Smith's fierce checking hampered opponents, as 
did the speed and stickwork of wings Diane Daych and Kathy Benusa. Third 
man "Doc" Gable and coverpoint Stacy Stacom constantly picked off passes 
and set up the attack. Sophomore co-captain Cheryl Kolp, playing point, 
hustled all over the field, knocking down shots and taking the pressure off 
goalies Laura Moore and Dee Sultzer. 

The Engineers were a come-from-behind team, picking up wins over 
Bucknell, and Kutztown, and an electrifying defeat of Lafayette in this 
fashion. 




318. Women's Sports 



TENNIS 



The Engineer tennis team rolled to its second perfect (8-0) 
season in a row. Both individually and as a team, the 
women's performances were awesome. 

Freshman Andie Altman overpowered all her opponents at 
first and second singles, dropping only 14 games in eight 
matches. Sophomore Patty Handwerk's methodical style of 
play earned her a 6-2 singles record. Freshman Mimi 
McLennan (7-1) provided strength and consistency at third 
singles. 

The first doubles pair of senior team captain Kathy Murphy 
and sophomore Lynn Lasser racked up a 7-1 slate. Junior Pat 
Henry and freshman Allison Steele swept to an unblemished 
record at second doubles. 

Most of the Engineers' wins were runaways. They blitzed 
Bloomsburg 9-0 and shut out Muhlenberg, Centenary and 
Albright. They also handed Lafayette a 4-1 setback. With only 
Murphy graduating, the win streak, now at 17 over three 
seasons, promises to grow longer. 








Row 1: T. Schifter, A. Steele, P. Henry, A. Esterman; Row 2: P. 

Handwerk, L. Lasser. A. Altman, M. McLennan. K. Murphy 

(capt.); Row 3: H. Bond (coach). J. Davidson, T. Bloom, N. Fisher, 

Welty, L. [acobsen, L. Kaufman, M. Michaels. 



WE 


THEY 


4 


Villanova II 


4 


Cedar Crest 1 


4 


Lafayette II 


5 


Muhlenberg 


4 


Kutztown 1 


5 


Albright 


9 


Bloomsburg 


5 


Centenary 




Final Record 8-0 



Women's Sports, 319 



FIELD HOCKEY - It takes 11 people 
to make up a hockey team, but it takes 
the efforts of a whole squad to go 10 
games without a loss. To spare the 
Epitome the burden of singling out 
one of 28 strong players, the Most 
Outstanding Player award goes to the 
1975 field hockey team as a whole, 
along with congratulations on the 
team's first undefeated record. 




■ 




- 



IRENE PAVELS & ANDI GORBACH 




MARY )ANE HAESCHE & MAUREEN MADDEN 

SWIMMING — Two members of the swim team 
deserve special recognition. Co-captain Maureen 
Madden held the team together, and took first or 
second place points every time she hit the water. 
Mary Jane Haesche's diving performances were one 
of the team's strongest points. The Epitome recog- 
nizes their efforts, naming Madden and Haesche 
Most Outstanding Players. 



VOLLEYBALL — Hard work and steady play are keys to athletic 
success. The Engineer volleyball team had two players exhib- 
iting both qualities. Andi Gorbach worked her way from the 
third team to the starting lineup; once there, her performance 
was excellent. Irene Pavels' consistent efforts were also in- 
strumental. The Epitome recognizes Gorbach and Pavels as 
Most Outstanding Players. 



WOMEN'S SPORTS: MOST 
OUTSTANDING PLAYERS 




SUE WOYTKEWICZ & SUE SACHS 

BASKETBALL — Co-captains Sue Sachs and Sue Woytkewicz 
suffered through last season with injuries and the frustration of 
a losing record. They were the driving force for this year's 
success. Sachs' inside play (118 points, 100 rebounds) and Woyt- 
kewicz's hustle and composure kept the Engineers in many 
games. The Epitome names them Most Outstanding Players. 



320, Women's Sports 




CHERYL KOLP & LORI COLLMANN 



ANDIE ALTMAN 



LACROSSE - Co-captains Cheryl Kolp and Lori Collmann led 
the Engineers in many respects this year. Collmann's 38-goal 
total and her speed, moves and determination were exciting. 
Kolp was the team's steadiest performer on defense. She gave 
opponents nothing around the goal. The Epitome commends 
Kolp and Collman for their contributions, and chooses them as 
Most Outstanding Players. 



TENNIS - Andie Altman com- 
pletely dominated all eight of her 
opponents this year. She lost only 
14 games in 16 sets, and embarrass- 
ed several adversaries by denying 
them even one game. For her su- 
perb performance, the Epitome 
chooses Altman as its Most Out- 
standing Player, and congratulates 
the team for two straight unbeaten 
seasons. 



INTRAMURALS 





Upperclass 




1. 


Pi Lambda Phi 


2486 


2. 


Kappa Sigma 


2466 


3. 


Zeta Psi 


2118 


4. 


Beardslee 


2113 


5. 


Theta Xi 


2020 


6. 


Chi Psi 


1899 


7. 


Delta Chi 


1860 


8. 


Alpha Lambda Omega 


1839 


9. 


Sigma Nu 


1791 


10. 


McConn 


1716 


11. 


Congdon 


1630 


12. 


Delta Phi 


1620 


13. 


Alpha Tau Omega 


1527 


14. 


Beta Theta Pi 


1459 


15. 


Phi Delta Theta 


1434 


16. 


Bishop Thorpe 


1377 


17. 


Alpha Sigma Phi 


1347 


18. 


Alpha Chi Rho 


1346 


19. 


Stevens 


1342 


20. 


Phi Kappa Theta 


1250 





Freshman 




1. 


Drinker 4 


1764 


2. 


Dravo Al-2 


1751 


3. 


Richards 2A 


1604 


4. 


Dravo B2-3 


1568 


5. 


Drinker 3B 


1428 


6. 


Dravo D3-4 


1196 


7. 


Drinker 2A 


1053 


8. 


Taylor 2 


953 


9. 


M & M B-l 


949 


10. 


Drinker 1 


929 







W 


omen 


1. 


M & M A-l 


1319 


6. Thornburg 789 


2. 


Palmer 


1185 


7. Gamma Phi Beta 645 


3. 


Stoughton 


922 


8. Richards 3B 596 


4. 


Richards 4 


899 


9. M & M A-2 562 


5. 


Emery 


804 


10. Williams 560 



Women's Sports. 321 



Trustees 



Honorary Members 

W. Frederic Colclough 
S. Murray Rust, Jr. 
Ralph L. Wilson 



Members Emeriti 

Frank William Sterrett (the Rt. Rev.) 

Andrew E. Buchanan, Jr. 

Frank L. Magee 

Allen C. DuBois 

Kenneth L. Isaacs 

H. Randolph Maddox 

Leonard M. Horton 

Hugh P. McFadden, Esq. 

Ivor D. Sims 

Edwin H. Snyder 



Corporate Members 

Monroe J. Rathbone 
Harold S. Mohler 
Edward A. Curtis 
William B. Eagleson, Jr. 
Dr. C. Lester Hogan 
Donald B. Stabler 



Edwin H. Gott 

Kirk P. Pendleton 

Frank C. Rabold 

Dean T. Stevenson (the Rt. Rev.) 



Members Elected by Alumni 



Alfred G. Blake 
Dr. Stephen F. Goldman 
Walter S. Holmes, Jr. 
William C. Hittinger 
Morgan J. Cramer 
Milton H. Grannatt, Jr. 
Donald J. Wikstrom 
Charles E. Swenson 



Appointed Trustees 

James H. Walker 
Dr. Frederick Seitz 
Edmund F. Martin 
Dr. Frank J. Kear 
Dexter F. Baker 
Malcolm Carrington, Jr. 
Lee A. Iacocca 
Richard M. Smith 






Tt'oRJgWORJ? . 

fJXT To Ike 

board of tru-st 
tke faculty , tl v.- 
^hjderd:- body, and 
oJl olker^s inferecfl 
ed , we offer iris 
brief record of 
LEMIGM life. 



ADMINISTRATION 




$skQ 




McCLINTK -MAR; HALL 

STEEL BUILDINGS, 
BRIDGES, Etc 




Contra, tina tilth r-: 



fTl 




PRESIDENT 




W. Deming Lewis 



Let me try to epitomize the sig- 
nificance and present value of a Le- 
high degree. That is not an easy task 
since both qualities depend on who is 
judging them. They can be evaluated 
from the point of view of our society 
as a whole, they can also be judged 
from the viewpoint of any one of 
thousands of holders of Lehigh de- 
grees. 

Our highly specialized and rapidly 
changing society needs designers, 
builders, operators, entrepreneurs, la- 
wyers, ministers, managers, profes- 
sors, and a host of other specialists 
who will do their jobs well, who are 
able to change as their fields develop 



and to grow as their responsibilities 
increase and to exercise intelligently 
their responsibilities as citizens of a 
democracy. The four years at Lehigh, 
through the broad-gauged academic 
curricula and through extracurricular 
activities are designed to help the stu- 
dents develop as far as they can in 
these directions in four years. They 
are not designed to cram students 
with facts, but rather to encourage 
them to make effective use of knowl- 
edge, broad understanding, commu- 
nication and cooperation in our com- 
plex society. 

From the individual graduate's 
point of view the material significance 



of this development of his powers is 
reflected in his paycheck and in his 
opportunities for advancement. Equal- 
ly important, if not more so, are the 
doorways which a broad Lehigh edu- 
cation opens up; doorways to liter- 
ature, art, music, doorways to better 
appreciation of other human beings, 
to history, to social service of one 
kind or another. The benefit to health 
and enjoyment that come from learn- 
ing a lifetime sport can also be sub- 
stantial. 

These are some of the values that 
can come from a Lehigh education 
and are symbolized by a Lehigh de- 
gree. — W. Deming Lewis. 



324, Administration 




Albert C. Zettlemoyer, Provost and Vice President 




Eric Van Tine Ottervik, Vice President of P/anning 



Administration. 325 



VICE PRESIDENTS 




Elmer W. Glick, Vice President and Treasurer 




326, Administration 



Preston Parr, Vice President for Student Affairs 







Paul J. Franz, Vice Presidenf for Development 




Joseph F. Libsch, Vice President for Research 



Richard M. Spriggs, Vice President for Administration 



Administration. 327 



ACADEMIC 
DEANS 



The basic assumption in promoting 
education as we know it, is that every 
individual has, or ought to have, both 
the opportunity and responsibility to 
prepare for service to society from a 
station of his or her choice. Hence, 
education as we wish to practice it, 
calls for developing the individual, 
both in terms of identifiable com- 
petences essential for such service, or 
for a job if you like. This duality in 
purpose is a casualty of the simplistic 
either/or philosophy of college edu- 
cation, which we must reject. We 
wish to help develop good people who 
are good for something. 

To put this into operational terms, 
our college programs must be so or- 
ganized and implemented that, for stu- 
dents who have the will to commit 
their energy, four essential con- 
sequences will materialize. First, they 
will develop the power to think, and 
think clearly, to the point where 
thinking becomes a habit; second, they 
will develop a sense of values which 
will serve as a reference for the many 
personal and professional decisions 
they will be called upon to make as 
individuals, citizens, and in their 
work; thirdly, they will develop the 
capacity for intelligent application of 
facts, principles, methods and tech- 
niques — in other words, intelligent 
application of knowledge toward the 
solution of problems — and last, but 
not least, they will develop the self- 
discipline and will to work — and 
through work to serve. 

The fact that the College carries the 




John J. Karakash, Dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences 



name of Engineering and Physical Sci- 
ences tends to automatically identify 
our education programs with industri- 
al and research centers, and with con- 
ception, development, design and 
manufacture of components and sys- 
tems ranging from transportation to 
construction, from communication to 
food processing, from fuels to in- 
struments. There is nothing wrong 
with such identification, but not all is 
right with it, because our educational 
goals are aimed at developing individ- 
uals and enabling them to make ca- 
reer choices of their own. Most of 
these choices will indeed be made 
within the industrial— scientific world. 
However, if we are successful in 
enabling our students to attain the 
four consequences I indicated above, 
it should not be unreasonable to find 
quite a number among them choosing 
to apply knowledge intelligentJy in 
sectors outside industry. As an illus- 
tration, the management of modern 



cities requires approaches and tech- 
niques developed in engineering. The 
same is true in the world of services- 
social, medical or military. Rather 
than pretend surprise, we expect to 
find some of our graduates going to 
law schools, medical schools, schools 
of management, while most will con- 
tinue to follow paths leading to in- 
dustry. In a sense, therefore, we view 
employment as a highest priority con- 
sequences but not the objective of ed- 
ucation. 

If we do our part, and if students do 
theirs, recognizing that what may first 
appear classroom captivity can truly 
become an opportunity for 
growth— then there is no reason why 
the Lehigh degree may not continue to 
mean in the years ahead what it has 
meant in the past— an admission ticket 
to the world of service to society with 
a high degree of adaptive strength in 
pursuit of challenge. — John J. Kara- 
kash. 



328, Administration 




Brian G. Brockway, Dean of the College of Business and Economics 




John W. Hunt, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 



Robert D. Stout, Dean of the Graduate School 



Administration. 329 



DEANS OF STUDENTS 




William L. Quay. Dean of Students Robert F. Reeves, Assistant Dean of Students 




Sharon G. Drager, Assistant Dean of Students 



Nathan W. Harris. Assistant Dean of Students 



330. Administration 




Joseph A. Petronio. Bursar 



Administration, 331 




George L. Beezer, Publications 



lames W. Harper, Director of Community Relations 



HP^l 






^Jl 




James H. Wagner, Registrar 



Alumni Association: Dennis R. Diehl, Assistant Director; James W. Niemeyer, 
Executive Director; Harry Ramsey, Associate Director 



332, Administration 




Lora Liss, Affirmative Action Officer 



It has long been my personal goal to 
obtain a more just and equitable dis- 
tribution of society's resources for 
those who start out without the privi- 
leges conferred by birth of wealth or 
social status. In the past, I served in 
various capacities to advance civil 
rights and civil liberties interests. As a 
university sociology instructor I spe- 
cialized in courses in urban society, 
social policy, research and education 
and social change, for example, in 
which we explored the impact of vari- 
ous societal institutions on minorities. 
It has been my experience that en- 
couraging the emerging aspirations of 
women and minorities can spell the 
difference between success and fail- 
ure for them. 

At Lehigh I will continue to assert 
the values of participatory democracy 
in order to effectively gain improved 
status for women and minorities. The 
efforts made in this direction have 
largely been outlined in the 
Affirmative Action Plan which is cur- 
rently the subject of University-wide 
hearings and hopefully will have been 



approved by the government and be- 
gun by the time this message is print- 
ed. 

The Affirmative Action Plan details 
broadened recruitment, establishment 
of objective criteria for selection, pro- 
motion salary, tenure and other per- 
sonnel decisions for employment at all 
levels. The result of reducing dis- 
criminatory practices will be reflected 
in our hiring and promotion of the 
proportions of women and minorities 
available in the job market for each 
particular job family. 

Lehigh University is a microcosm of 
American society and all the problems 
of backlash, perceptions of reverse 
discrimination, preferential treatment 
and "quotas" need to be thoughtfully 
addressed. The efforts of all members 
of the University commu- 
nity— students, staff, faculty, alumni 
and members of the Board of 
Trustees— are needed to produce ra- 
tional, deliberate discussion and reso- 
lution of the many controversial is- 
sues which Affirmative Action has 
epitomized. — Lora Liss. 




Reverend Hubert L. Flesher, University Chaplain 



Administration. 333 



GHASSAN N. ABBOUD 
Mech. Engr. Tripoli, Lebanon 

Alpha Chi Rho, ritual officer, pledge master; Honors; 
ASME; Intramurals; SAC security director; International 
Club 

TIMOTHY W. ADD/SON 
Accounting Lebanon, Pa. 

Town 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



WILL/AM LOUIS ARMA 
Acct/Finance North Caldwell, N.J. 

Town; Dean's List; Beta Alpha Psi, Treasurer; Senior 
Class Gift Committee, vice-chairman; Senior Class In- 
vestment Committee, chairman 



MARK DAVID ALPERT 
Accounting Needham, Mass. 

Town; Freshman, Sophomore honors, Intramurals, Beta 
Theta Pi, Weightlifting; Basketball 

TIMOTHY ALTAFFER 
Mgt/Mkt Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Town; Intramurals; Marketing Club; WLVR; WLTN 

MICHAEL A. ALTERMAN 
Elec. Engr. Huntingdon Valley Pa. 

Town; SSDO; WLVR; WLTN 

CHRISTOPHER DAVID ALVA 
Civil Engr. San Fernando, Ca. 

Town; President, Stevens House; Freshman honors; Gry- 
phon Society; American Society of Civil Engineers; 
Wrestling; Circle K Club; LUV. 

MICHAEL JOSEPH AMENDOLA 
Accounting Branford, Conn. 

McConn, Concessions Chairman; Freshman honors; In- 
tramurals; Bridge Club 

FRANK EDGAR ANDERSON JR. 
Mech. Engr. Springfield, Pa. 

Alpha Chi Rho; Honors; American Society of Mechani- 
cal Engineers; Ice Hockey Club 

KRISTA JOYCE ANDERSON 
Fundamental Sci. Quakertown, Pa. 

Richards; Mustard & Cheese 

ROBERT CHRISTIAN ANDLER JR. 
Marketing Williamsville, N.Y. 

Chi Psi, IM Manager, Secretary, President; Marketing 
Club 

WALTER ANDREW 
Civil Engr. Wrightstown, N.J. 

Kappa Alpha; Rifle Team. 

MICHAEL P. ANTONOVICH 
Chemical Engr. Reading, Pa. 

Smiley House; Phi Eta Sigma; Tau Beta Pi; University 
Forum 

WILLIAM ERIC APELIAN 
Management Chalfont, Pa. 

SMAGS; U.S. Marine Corps 



FRANCIS JOHN ARSI 
Indust. Engr. Millburn, N.J. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, house recorder, U.S. Grant Dubach 
Award; Intramural Manager; Ski Club 

BRADLEY EARL ATWOOD 
Civil Engr. Bordentown, N.J. 

Taylor House 

DAVID DONALD AUPERIN 
Biology Amityville, N.Y. 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

PETER RICHARD AVAKIAN 
Civil Engr. Wall, N.J. 

Phi Delta Theta, social director, American Society of 
Civil Engineers; Glee Club, manager. 

KAREN LESLIE BACHMAN 
Environmental Sciences & 

Resource Management Westfield, N.J. 

Town 

SANJOY BANERJEE 
I.R. & Math Kensington, Md. 

M-MB2; Dean's List; Karate 

MARK STEPHEN BARANDY 
Mech. Engr. West Caldwell, N.J. 

Thornburg; Dean's List; Pi Tau Sigma; Fencing Club 

ROBERT JOHN BARDSLEY 
Mech. Engr. Harrington Park, N.J. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, social chairman; ASME 

MICHELE BARNES 
Accounting Muttontown, L.I., N.Y. 

RH-11; Honors; Apprentice Teaching Council 

MICHAEL DAVID BARNETT 
Psychology Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Bethlehem Bach Choir 

MARTIN DROR BARON 
Journalism-MBA Tampa, Fla. 

Beardslee; Dean's List; Freshman, sophomore honors; 
Williams Prizes; Phi Beta Kappa; Omicron Delta Kappa; 
Phi Eta Sigma; Intramurals; Brown & White, Editor-in- 
Chief; Epitome, feature editor; Senior Class Gift Com- 
mittee, publicity chairman 



334, Directory 



HELEN JEANNE BARR 
Biology-German Oreland, Pa. 

M & M A-3; Dean's List; Sophomore honors; Varsity 
Field Hockey, co-captain; Lehigh Valley College Field 
Hockey Assn.; first team All Stars; Gryphon Society; 
Powder Puff Football 

DONALD RICHARD BASK1N JR. 
Finance Greenville, Pa. 

Phi Kappa Theta, social chairman, IFC representative; 
Intramurals; IFC, secretary, vice-president; IFC Judiciary 
Committee; Freshman section president 

GARY JAMES BAST 
Elect. Engr. Chatham, N.J. 

Leavitt House, secretary, concessions manager; Phi Eta 
Sigma; L.U. Band, staff asst; Marching & Concert Bands 

ROBERT PRUETT BATCHELER 
Civil Engr. Virginia Beach, Va. 

Theta Xi, Secretary; National Merit Scholarship; Chi 
Epsilon; ASCE; Epitome; Brown & White 

STEVEN WILLIAM BATES 
History Rutledge, Pa. 

Delta Tau Delta, corresponding secretary, vice-president; 
Freshman, varsity football; IM; Senior Class Project; Pre- 
Law Society 



ANTHONY T BATORY 
Mathematics Philadelphia, Pa. 

Delta Sigma Phi; Dean's List; Jazz Ensemble 

PETER ANDREW BECHTEL 
Finance Lancaster, Pa. 

Zeta Psi, President; Varsity Ice Hockey 

CHRISTOPHER J. BECKMAN 
Accounting Spotswood, N.J. 

SMAGS; Alpha Tau Omega, house manager; Rugby 

DAVID CHRISTIAN BEECHWOOD 
Civil Engr. Huntingdon Valley Pa. 

RH-11; Dean's List; Freshman, sophomore honors; Tau 
Beta Phi; Intramurals; Varsity Track 

MARC ALAN BEERMAN 
Acct/Finance New York, N.Y. 

Kappa Alpha, social chairman, president; Intramurals; 
Investment Club; Y.B.A.; N.B.P. Assn., vice-president 



GEORGE MICHAEL BELFIELD 
Finance Southampton, Pa. 

Town; Dean's List; Sophomore honors; Varsity Basket- 
ball, captain 

DENNIS EDWARD BENNER 
Government Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Pre— Law Society; Partner — Treasure Hunting 
Firm; U.S. Naval Reserve 

JOHN EDWARD BENZ 
Economics Upper St. Clair, Pa. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, asst. treasurer; Dean's List; Ski Club, 
president; Ski Team; Sky Diving Club; Karate Club 

JAMES R. BERGER 
Accounting Pine Grove, Pa. 

RH-11; Intramurals; WLVR, disc jockey; LUV; Senior 
Class Gift Committee 

RICHARD E. BERSE 
Accounting Westfield, N.J. 

Town; JV Basketball; Dravo representative, Sigma Alpha 
Mu, social chairman; pledge master 



ROBERT C. BEST 
Chemical Engr. 
Town; Pi Kappa Alpha 



Bethlehem, Pa. 



LEONARD BIELORY 
Molecular Biology Bradley Beach, N.J. 

Stevens; Classics honors; Phi Eta Sigma; Tau Beta Pi; 
Omicron Delta Kappa; American Chemical Society; 
B'nai Brith Hillel, president; Alpha Epsilon Pi, master 

STEPHEN WAYNE BILAN 
Civil Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

SMAGS; Murth Quinn Scholarship; Edwin Goff Schol- 
arship; J. W. Davis Scholarship; Department honor stu- 
dent; American Society of Civil Engineers; Intramural 
basketball; American Society of Highway Engineers; 
Towne Council, Delta Chi 

G. PAUL BISHOP 
Accounting Greenville, SC. 

Beta Theta Pi, secretary; Freshman honors 

WAYNE RORY BITTLE 
Elect. Engr. Warminster, Pa. 

RH-11; L.U. Computer Society; IEEE; Intramurals 



LINDA ANN BEGINNES 
Chemical Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; AIChE 

WILLIAM F. BEKKENHIUIS 
Psychology Seaford, N.Y. 

RH-11; L.U. Band 



JAMES TOWNLEY BLAINE III 
Acct/Finance Pittsford, N.Y. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, treasurer; Band; Marching 97 

GORDON GEOFFREY BLEWIS 
Government New York, N.Y. 

Stevens; Brown & White; WLRN; Chess Club 



Directory. 335 



JEFFREY BRIAN BLOOM 
Economics Hewlett, N.Y. 

Sigma Alpha Mu. secretary, president; Williams Prize in 
Journalism; Undergraduate Achievement Award; Sigma 
Alpha Mu; Cyanide; Brown & White, Editor-in-Chief; 
College Young Democrats, president; Visiting Lecturers 
Committee; IFC representative; Leviathan; 
WLRN/WLVR; Summer Congressional Intern, 1975; Le- 
high Horizons, freelance writer 

BRUCE PETER BLUEWEISS 
Accounting Stamford, Conn. 

Beardslee, athletic manager; Intramurals; Tennis 

NED DAVID BOGERT 
Accounting Glen Rock, N.J. 

Taylor II, vice-president, president; Intramurals; Drama 
Club; Epitome Photographer; Brown & White Photog- 
rapher; Senior Class Gift Committee 

RICHARD ALLEN BOIG 
Acct/Finance East Brunswick, N.J. 

Bishopthorpe House; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; 
Class of 06 Scholarship; ODK, president; Cyanide; Bay- 
member; President, class of 76; Forum Representative to 
the Board of Trustees; Senior Class Gift Committee, 
chairman; University Discipline Committee, sr. member 

TIMOTHY E. BOLAND 
Chemical Engr. Conyngham, Pa. 

McConn, treasurer, president; freshman honors; AIChE; 
Intramurals 

PETER RAYMOND BOORUTY 
Urban Management Florham Park, N.J. 

Thornburg House, vice-president; honors; Navigators; 
Leviathan 

EUGENE H. BORGOSZ JR. 
Civil Engr. Cheektowaga, N.Y. 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Varsity Football 

GREGORY GUIDO BORSINGER 
Mech. Engr. Upper Nyack, N.Y. 

Phi Gamma Delta 

ROBERT MICHAEL BOSSERT 
Indust. Engr. Nutley, N.J. 

RH-11; Dean's List; Alpha Pi Mu 

ALBERT J. BOVA JR. 
Accounting Allentown, Pa. 

Phi Kappa Theta; Wrestling; Intramurals; Marching 
Band 

JOSEPH EDWARD BOWER 
Accounting Berwyn, Pa. 

Phi Kappa Theta; Intramurals; Freshman Social Chair- 
man 



AL BOWERS 



Elect. Engr. 
Town; Bowling 



Annapolis, Md. 



EDWIN C. BRADER 
Management Laurys Station, Pa. 

Delta Tau Delta, sergeant at arms 

KENNETH ALAN BRADER 
Biology Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town 

TIMOTHY ALAN BRADER 
Indust. Engr. Johnston, Pa. 

Phi Delta Theta, warden; alumni secretary, president, 
IFC representative; Hockey Club; Intramurals; Inter- 
fraternity Council, rush chairman 

E. WARREN BRADWAY 
Fine Arts North Wildwood, N.J. 

Town 

ALLEN GEORGE BRAITHWAITE III 
Accounting Watkins Glen, N.Y. 

Zeta Psi, pledge president, asst. treasurer; Freshman, 
sophomore honors; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; Beta 
Alpha Psi; Marching Band; Concert Band; Varsity Band; 
Hoopla; Skydiving Club 

RICHARD L. BRAZILL 
Mech. Engr. Spencerport, N.Y. 

Alpha Chi Rho, house manager, pledge educator; Dean's 
List; Freshman, sophomore honors, L.U. Scholarship; Pi 
Tau Sigma; ASME; Intramurals; Skydiving Club; Fresh- 
man Engineering Tours 

CHRISTOPHER N. BRENNAN 
Finance Old Westbury, N.Y. 

Sigma Phi, steward, athletic manager; Dean's List; In- 
vestment Club; Brown & White, asst. circulation man- 
ager; Lehigh Horizons, asst. circulation manager 

CHARLES JAMES BREUER III 
Mech. Engr. Lansdale, Pa. 

Alpha Tau Omega; ASME; Swimming Team, co-captain 

WILLIAM ANTHONY BRICHTA 
Mathematics Center Valley, Pa. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, intramural manager, co-captain for 
football & soccer 

DENNIS RICHARD BROWN 
Chemical Engr. Port Jervis, N.Y. 

Psi Upsilon, social chairman; IFC representative 

GEOFFREY D. BROWN 
Accounting Huntington, N.Y. 

Phi Gamma Delta; Varsity Ice Hockey 



336, Directory 



NICHOLAS BROWSE 
Elect. Engr. Holicong, Pa. 

Taylor; Freshman honors; WLRN; WLTN-TV, Chief En- 
gineer; Mustard & Cheese 

CHARLES DREW BROWN 
Civil Engr. Westfield, N.J. 

Sigma Nu, rush chairman; Dean's List; Freshman honors; 
Phi Eta Sigma, president; Chi Epsilon; American Society 
of Civil Engineers; Glee Club, tour manager, section 
leader; Senior Class Gift Committee 

MARK DAVID BRUNE 
Civil Engr. Easton, Pa. 

Phi Kappa Theta, social chairman; ASCE; Intramurals; 

Wrestling 

MICHAEL F. BRUNO 
Psychology Philadelphia, Pa. 

Psi Upsilon, vice-president; Intramurals 

WILLIAM F. BUCK 
Civil Engr. Coopersburg, Pa. 

Delta Sigma Phi, social chairman; Freshman, sophomore, 
junior honors; Chi Epsilon; Beta Theta Intramurals 

KENDALL OWEN BUCKSTAFF 
Indust. Engr. Northridge, Ca. 

Theta Xi, rush chairman; AIIE; Intramural Boxing 

/AMES EDWARD BUIRKLE 
Biol °gy Leonia, N.J. 

Taylor; Dean*s List; Freshman, sophomore honors; In- 
tramurals 

CLAYTON WAYNE BURNS 
Elect. Engr. Schenectady, N.Y. 

Zeta Psi; Varsity Track 

STOKES FENIMORE BURTIS III 
Accounting Swarthmore, Pa. 

Town; Delta Tau Delta, treasurer; Varsity Lacrosse 

BRIAN S. BUTLER 
Civil Engr. West Orange, N.J. 

Delta Sigma Phi, rush chairman, president; Dean's List; 
Chi Epsilon; American Society of Civil Engineers 

EDWARD HAROLD BUTZ 
Mech. Engr. Catasauqua, Pa. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, president; Dean's List; Pi Tau Sigma- 
ASME 

TIMOTHY E. BYERLEY 
Indust. Engr. Haddon Heights, N.J. 

Zeta Psi; Rugby; Intramurals 

EDWARD PAUL BZIK 
Chemical Engr. East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Pi Lambda Phi, KOE; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; LUV 



MICHELE A. CALABRESE 
Management Berkeley Heights, N.J. 

RH-11; LUV Council 

JOHN CALLIES 
Eco/Finance Fairfield, Conn. 

Town; Delta Upsilon, vice-president; Dean's List; Junior 
honors; Intramurals; Senior Class Gift Committee; In- 
vestment Committee, vice chairman 

KENNETH WILLIAM GALE 
Chemical Engr. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Delta Chi; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's List; 

Intramurals 

CRAIG M. CALTAGIRONE 
Accounting Reading, Pa. 

Beta Theta Pi, treasurer, president; WLRN; WLTN 

KENNETH J. CARLSON JR. 
Accounting Pepper Pike, Ohio 

Kappa Sigma, vice-president; Freshman Scholastic 
Award; Intramurals; Lehigh Hockey Club; Gryphon So- 
ciety, tutor; IFC representative; Senior Class Gift Com- 
mittee 

RICHARD DAVID CARPENTER 
Accounting Wyndmoor, Pa. 

Theta Delta Chi, rush chairman, social chairman; Fresh- 
man, sophomore honors; Dean's List; Beta Alpha Psi; 
Baseball 

ANTONE V. CARVALHO III 
Environmental Sciences & 

Resource Mgt. Stamford, Conn. 

Beardslee, social chairman, treasurer; Intramural Fresh- 
man Wrestling Champ, 2nd place upperclass division; 
Tennis; Guitar; Piano; Senior Class Gift Committee 

DOUGLAS DONALD CARVEL 
Civil Engr. Reading, Pa. 

Beta Theta Pi, house manager, social chairman; IFC 
representative; ASCE; Swimming; Lacrosse; Football 

CARLO D. CELLA III 
Management/SR Glen Rock, N.H. 

Xi Delta Chi 

DAVID A. CHARTERS JR. 
Civil Engr. Garden City Pk, N.Y. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, committee chairman; Sophomore 
honors; Dean's List; Chi Epsilon; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta 
Sigma; ASCE; Intramurals 

PRISCILLA L. CHATMAN 
Journalism Trenton, N.J. 

Town; Sophomore, junior honors; Williams Prize in 
Drama; Varsity Basketball Cheerleader; Brown & White, 
feature editor; Mustard & Cheese; Organization for the 
Enhancement of Afromanitv 



Directory, 337 



YAN-KEE CHENG 
Civil Engr. Hong Kong 

Congdon House; Dean's List; ASCE; Glee Club 

KATHLEEN CHESTER 
Accounting Ellicott City, Md. 

Town; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; Beta Gamma Sigma; 
Cheerleader 



ROCCO COLABELLA JR. 
Acct./Finance East Chester, N.Y. 

Sigma Chi; Sophomore honors; List; Freshman Football; 
Intramurals; LUV 

JOHN W. COLES /// 
Management Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

Beta Xi Pi; Varsity Golf, captain 



JAMES MICHAEL CHIADIS 
Chemistry Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Town House 

CHRISTOPHER J. L. CHRISTIAN 
Indust. Engr. Riverdale, N.Y. 

McConn; AIIE; WLTN, business manager; WLRN 

JOANNE GOODELL CHURCH 
Accounting Meriden, Conn. 

RH-11; Senior Class Gift Committee, division leader; 
Epitome 

JEFFREY CITRONE 
Geology Easton, Pa. 

Chi Phi, rush chairman, secretary; Intramurals 

STEPHEN J. CLARK 
Mech. Engr. West Chester, Pa. 

Kappa Sigma, treasurer; Baseball 

NEIL JAY CLEMENCE 
Civil Engr. Somerville, N.J. 

Sigma Nu 

DONNA MARIE COCO 
Biology Glenshaw, Pa. 

RH-11; McClintic-Marshall, social chairman; Sophomore 
honors; Dean's List; Medical Professional Club; Pow- 
derpuff Football; LUV; Mustard & Cheese; Big Sister 
Program; Senior Class Gift Committee 

DAVID R. COFFIN 
Elect. Engr. Williamsport, Pa. 

Phi Delta Theta, social chairman, pledge master; Eta 
Kappa Nu; Phi Eta Sigma; Tau Beta Pi; Varsity Lacrosse 

MERYL HOPE COHEN 
Biology Elberon, N.J. 

Town; Swim Team; Intramural Softball; LUV; Concert 
Committee; Outdoors Club; Mustard & Cheese 

SHARON LYNN COHEN 
Finance Pittsburgh, Pa. 

RH-11; Dean's List; Freshman honors; Intramurals; Men's 
Glee Club, accompanist; Living Group, social chairman; 
Student Representative, Lehigh Financial Aid Policy 
Committee 



RICHARD S. CONNER 
Chemical Engr. Lebanon, Pa. 

RH-11; Freshman, sophomore honors; Phi Eta Sigma; 
American Institute of Chemical Engineers; IM football & 
basketball 

THOMAS MICHAEL CONNOR 
Accounting Conshohocken, Pa. 

Phi Gamma Delta; Football 

WILLIAM M. CONNORS 
Indust. Engr. Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Sigma Chi, IM; AIIE; Football; Track; Boxing; LUV 

JANICE ALLYN COOK 
Accounting Bethlehem, Pa. 

M & M Al; Junior honors; Dean's List; Beta Gamma 
Sigma; Beta Alpha Psi; LUV Council; Senior Class Gift 
Committee; Investment Fund; Hillel 

RANDALL FRANCIS CORELLI 
Finance Chappaqua, N.Y. 

Kappa Sigma; Varsity Hockey 

VICTOR LOUIS COTUGNO 
Biology Irvington, N.J. 

Town; Alpha Chi Rho, house manager; Rugby Club; 
Skydiving Club 

ROBERTA ANNE COWELL 
Biology Wenonah, N.J. 

Richards; Skydiving Club 

ann McCarthy cowin 

Acctg/Mgt. Scarsdale, N.Y. 

RH-11; Intramurals; Investment Club; Epitome, co-sec- 
tion editor of senior section; Senior Class Gift Com- 
mittee 

NEIL A. COWLEY 
Chemistry Phillipsburg, N.J. 

Pi Lambda Phi 



PRESTON McCLOUD CRABILL 
Indust. Engr. Urbana, Ohio 

Theta Xi, social chairman, vice-president; T. Edgar 
Shield Music Cup; Glee Club; Intramurals; AIIE 



338. Directory 



JEFFREY WAYNE CRABTREE 
Acctg/Economics Cranford, N.J. 

Alpha Chi Rho, treasurer; Freshman, sophomore, junior 
honors; Pre— Law Society; FMA Board of Directors 

JOHN CLIFFORD CRAFTS 
Mech. Engr. Smithtown, N.Y. 

Town; ASME 

CHARLES A. CRAPE III 
Chemistry Garden City, N.Y. 

Sigma Chi 

THOMAS JOSEPH CRITCHLEY JR. 
Accounting West Orange, N.J. 

Delta Phi, steward; Freshman, sophomore honors; Cross 
Country; LUV 

DAVID ANTHONY CRONOMIZ 
Civil Engr. Danville, Pa. 

Town; ASCE 

DAVID HILEMAN CROSSON 
Accounting Abington, Pa. 

Zeta Psi, secretary; Big Brothers; Hoopla, president 

BARRETT CHARLES CUMMINS 
Accounting Newton, N.J. 

Chi Phi; Swim Team; Intramurals 

SCOTT DONALD CURTISS 
Mech. Engr. Newtown, Conn. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, steward, house manager; Dean's List; 
Sophomore, junior honors; ASME 

JAMES J. DADAY 
Elect. Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

RH-11; AFROTC; Intramurals; Civil Air Patrol, oper- 
ations officer 

ALPHONSO DANCE 
Psychology/SR Brooklyn, N.Y. 

M & M B-2; Track; OEA, president; Mustard & Cheese, 
director; Dance Company, producer & director 

MOHAMED DANDASHY 
Management Beirut, Lebanon 

SMAGS 

GUSTAVO ADOLFO DANJOI 
Eco/Finance Honduras, C. A. 

Chi Phi, secretary, pledge master; Freshman, sophomore 
honors; Dean's List 

JOHN PAUL DANTONIO 
Art History Princeton, N.J. 

Phi Gamma Delta, IFC representative; Interdepartmental 
honors; Varsity Squash Team; Intramurals; Parnassus 
Art Society; WLRN; Cheerleading; Pre-Law Society 



BRIAN MICHAEL DeANGELIS 
Government Fountain Hill, Pa. 

Town; Harrisburg Urban Semester 

CHARLES M. DeANGELO 
Accounting Trenton, N.J. 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Marching Band 



PETER DE BONIS 
Accounting 
Chi Phi; Dean's List; Beta Alpha Psi 



Easton, Pa. 



FRANK NICHOLAS DeFRANK 
Fundamental Science Roseto, Pa. 

Pi Lambda Phi, president; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Tau Beta Pi; Pre-Med Society; Intramurals; IFC repre- 
sentative; RHC representative; Dravo D-3, president; 
Freshman, sophomore, junior honors 

JAMES MICHAEL DEITCH 
Accounting York, Pa. 

Theta Chi, treasurer; Williams Extempore Speaking 
Prize; Dean's List; FMA Board of Directors; Intramurals; 
WLRV; Photography Club; Computer Club 

DOROTHY CELESTE D'ELIA 
Management Phillipsburg, N.J. 

RH-11; Senior Class Secretary 

JOHN P. DELL ITALIA 
History West Orange, N.J. 

Town; Pre— Law Society 

ERIC ROBERT ALLAN DEMAREE 
Finance West Longbranch, N.J. 

Phi Gamma Delta, rush chairman, social chairman; 
Dean's List; Intramurals; BC FIJI fraternity newsletter, 
editor; Mustard & Cheese 

ANDREW SETH DEMBER 
Finance Great Neck, N.Y. 

Sigma Alpha Mu, treasurer, vice-president; Dean's List; 
Epitome, business manager; Pre-Law Society 

RAYMOND WALTER deQUINTAL 
Finance Cresskill, N.J. 

Town; Alfred Glancy Scholarship 

MICHAEL DEREWIANKA 
Civil Engr. Manchester, Conn. 

Smiley House; Holy Infancy Tutor 

STEPHEN PAUL DESJARDINS 
History Reading, Pa. 

Phi Kappa Theta, IFC representative 

ROBERT ALAN DEUTSCH 
Indust. Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; AIIE 



Directory, 339 



ANGELA CHRISTINA DiADAMO 
English Marlton, N.f. 

Bishopthorpe House, selection committee; Dean's List; 
Senior Class Executive Committee 

GLENN RICHARD DISSINGER 
Chemical Engr. Myerstown, Pa. 

Smiley House, Intramural Athletic Manager; Dean's List; 
Freshman, sophomore honors; Tau Beta Pi; American 
Institute of Chemical Engineers; Intramurals; Chess Club 

ROBERT C. DOLL JR. 
Accounting Churchville, Pa. 

Thornburg House, treasurer; Beta Alpha Psi; Omicron 
Delta Epsilon; Concert Band; Marching Band; Varsity 
Band: Wind Ensemble; Chamber Groups; Investment 
Club: Navigators 

HESTER LOUISE DORER 
Biology Los Angeles, Ca. 

M & M A-3, social chairman; Field Hockey; Senior Class 
Executive Committee; Senior Class Fund Raising Com- 
mittee; Class Gift Committee, division leader 

JAMES M. DUCEY 
Civil Engr. Bath. Pa. 

Delta Tau Delta, scholarship chairman, IM manager; 
ASCE, vice-president; Baseball 

JEFFREY W. DUKE 
History Lancaster. Pa. 

Beta Theta Pi. rush chairman; Varsity Wrestling 

STEVEN H. DUNKLEBERGER 
Journalism Silver Spring, Md. 

Town; Delta Tau Delta, recording secretary; Freshman 
Football; Varsity Baseball 



MICHAEL C. EBY 
Environmental Sciences & 
Resource Management 
Bishopthorpe House; Class Gift Solicitor 



Mohnton, Pa. 



ROBIN JEFFERY EECKHOUT 
Acctg/Finance North Haledon, N.J. 

Carothers; Powder Puff Football; Alpha Phi, president; 
Epitome; Ski Club; Marketing Club; SAC Pulbicity Com- 
mittee; Freshman Camp; Freshman Orientation; Tutor; 
Intramurals 

JAMES HENRY EGEN 
Elect. Engr. West Caldwell, N.J. 

Kappa Alpha; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma, Eta Kappa Nu, 
recording secretary; Intramurals; IEEE 

STANLEY JOSEPH EHRLICH 
Management Trenton, N.J. 

Beardslee House, vice-president; Publicity Committee 
for Class Gift 



BARBARA EHRSAM 
Fine Arts Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore, junior honors; McClain 
Progress Award; Parnassus Art Society, secretary, treas- 
urer 

PETER ALAN EICHEN 
Mech. Engr. Shamokin, Pa. 

Smiley House; Dean's List; ASME Union Carbide 
Award; Tau Beta Pi; Pi Tau Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma; 
ASME, secretary, officer at large; Intramurals; Circle K 
Club, secretary, treasurer, vice-president; Paper Pub- 
lished in ASME, Heat Transfer Journal; Class Gift Com- 
mittee 

STEVEN HENRY EINSTEIN 
Accounting Woodcliff Lake, N.J. 

Bishopthorpe, house moderator; Dean's List; Phi Eta 
Sigma; Pre— Law Society; Investment Club; Forum 

LAUREN HOPE EISENBERG 
Journalism Oreland, Pa. 

Town; Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma; Epitome, Editor- 
in-Chief; Visiting Lecturers Committee; Student Leaders 
Committee; Hillel; Pre— Law Society; Linderman Library 
Student Assistant; Rodale Press free lance writer; Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa 

DAVID JOHN EISENMENGER 
Religion/Music Clifton, N.J. 

RH-11; Marching Band; Moravian Orchestra; Wind En- 
semble; Karate Club 

GREGORY WILLIAM ENDERS 
Government Barrington, 111. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Marching '97; WLRN, asst. music 
director 

ALAN ROBERT ENGLISH 
Chemical Engr. Oradell, N.J. 

McConn, social chairman; AIChE; Intramurals; LUV 

JOHN TRAVER ERNST 
Accounting East Meadow, N.Y. 

Bishopthorpe, house leader; Forum; Class Gift Com- 
mittee 

ABBIE LEE ESTERMAN 
Biology Fort Lee, N.J. 

SMAGS; Women's Varsity Tennis; L.U. Women's Choir; 
RHC representative; M & M A-3, secretary, president; 
Mustard & Cheese 

STEPHEN K. EVANS 
Chemical Engr. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pi Lambda Phi; Archon, vice-president; Paul Reinhold 
Award; Phi Eta Sigma; JV Wrestling; Intramurals; Fo- 
rum; IFC representative; LUV 



340, Directory 



TERRY LEE EVVARD 
Elect. Engr. 
Smiley House; IEEE 



York, Pa. 



BARBARA ANNE EWING 
History Baltimore, Md. 

RH-11; Varsity Field Hockey; Lacrosse; LUV 

ELIZABETH ANNE EZAKI 
Fundamental Science Allentown, Pa. 

RH-11 

ROBERT EZRAPOUR 
Finance Tehran, Iran 

Tau Epsilon Phi, bursar, president; Sophomore, junior 
honors; Dean's List; Intramurals; IFC representative; 
Treasurer's Council; Miller Blood Drive 



DAVID LEE FAIR 
Chemical Engr. Maryville, Tenn. 

Pi Lambda Phi, rush chairman; AIChE 

ROBERT KEITH FELDMAN 
Journalism Jenkintown, Pa. 

Sigma Alpha Mu; Freshman, sophomore honors; Sigma 
Delta Chi Newswriting Award; Intramurals; LUV; Brown 
& White; IFC & RHC representatives; College Young 
Democrats; Epitome 



JESSICA LEE FISCHER 
International Relations Reading, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore honors; International Rela- 
tions Club; Varsity Tennis, Swimming & Cheerleading; 
Class Gift Committee; Brown & White 

ANNE CATHERINE FISHER 
Psychology/ English Oakhurst, N.J. 

RH-11; Mustard & Cheese; L.U. Women's Choir 

GEOFFREY EDWARD FISHER 
Finance Rydal, Pa. 

Phi Kappa Theta, scholastic chairman, asst. treasurer, 
treasurer 



JERI LEE FISHER 



Social Relations 
SMAGS 



Bethlehem, Pa. 



ROBERT W. FITT1NY 
Management North Caldwell, N.J. 

Phi Delta Theta, house manager; Rugby Club; Squash 
Team 



W. MALCOLM FLANAGAN 



Acctg/Finance 

Richards; Gryphon Society 



Westport, Conn 



Finance 
Town 



STANLEY R. FENDRYK 



Greene, N.Y. 



GEORGE NEIL FERGUSON 
American Studies Darien, Conn. 

SMAGS; Law Club 



NEAL H. FLASTER 
Government North Caldwell, N.J. 

Delta Sigma Phi, asst. treasurer; Sophomore honors; 
Forum; Government Department Student-Faculty Com- 
mittee; Circle K, secretary, vice-president; Washington 
Semester Program; WLRN News, Brown & White 



KENNETH BRIAN FERGUSON 
Chemical Engr. West Caldwell, N.J. 

Kappa Alpha, scholarship chairman; Freshman honors; 
Dean's List; Mu Sigma; AIChE; ACS; Freshman section, 
president; Karate; Head Start; Class Gift Committee; 
NBPA section 

CHARLES GEORGE FICK III 
Chemical Engr. Reading, Pa. 

Theta Delta Chi, steward 



REIJO ANTERO FINNILA 
Management Staten Island, N.Y. 

Sigma Chi, steward, house manager; Intramurals; LUV 



JAMES PAUL FOLKES 
Accounting Lansdale, Pa. 

Phi Gamma Delta, president, historian, pledge trainer 

SHERRY FONTAINE 
Urban Studies Bethlehem, Pa. 

Richards; Junior honors; Business Tomorrow II National 
Conference; LUV; Parkridge Day Care Center; Fritz Day 
Care Center; Registration Asst.; Bethlehem co-op worker 

GREGORY KENYON FOX 
Biology Basking Ridge, N.J. 

Theta Xi, steward; Freshman, sophomore honors; Phi 
Eta Sigma; Intramurals; Photography Club; Concert 
Committee; Amaranth Contributor 



ROBERTO EUGENIO FISCHMANN 
Indust. Engr. Guatemala, C.A. 

SMAGS; Alpha Epsilon Pi Exchequer; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Tau Beta Pi 



JOSEPH ROBERT FOX 
Chemical Engr. Clarks Summit, Pa. 

Delta Phi, recording secretary, president; IFC representa- 
tive; Dean's List 



Directory, 341 



SUSAN RITA FRADKIN 
Accounting Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 

RH-11; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's List, Beta 
Gamma Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma. Varsity Tennis; In- 
tramurals; Investment Club; LUV Council 

ALLAN R. FRANK 
Accounting Allentown, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha, treasurer; Dean's List; Sophomore honors; 
Phi Eta Sigma; Beta Alpha Psi; WLVR/WLRN, engineer; 
Dravo A-l, president 

DAVID SCOTT FRANKE 
Environmental Science Reading, Pa. 

Drinker; Dean's List; Gryphon Society; Sigma Alpha Mu, 
social member 

ROBERT STEPHEN FREDERICK 
Chemical Engr. Phillipsburg, N.J. 

Town; Freshman honors; AIChE 

JUDITH LYNN FREEDMAN 
Biology Pottsville, Pa. 

Richards; Freshman, sophomore honors; Williams Act- 
ing Prize; Mustard & Cheese, secretary, treasurer; Con- 
cert Band; Marching Band 

SUSAN ANN M. FREEH 
Classics Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Classics Club; Civil Air Patrol; Information 
Officer; Pep Club; Drill Team; LUV 

DAVID LUND FREEMAN 
Civil Engr. King of Prussia, Pa. 

SMAGS; ASCE; Freshman Ice Hockey; Intramurals 

GEORGE ANDREW FREESTONE 
Indust. Engr. Camp Hill, Pa. 

Delta Chi, steward, recording secretary; Alpha Pi Mu; 
AIIE 

JACK WILLIAM FREY 
Finance Kutztown, Pa. 

Town; Freshman Soccer; Investment Club; Town House; 
Model Railroad Club 

RANDALL S. FREY 
Marketing Chatham, N.J. 

Kappa Sigma; Ice Hockey; Marketing Club; Photo Club; 
Brown & White, photographer 

ROBERT PAUL FREY 
Finance/Eco Rockville Centre, N.Y. 

Sigma Phi, steward; JV Basketball; Rugby Club; Ski 
Club; Investment Club 



RICHARD ALAN GAFFIN 
Mech. Engr. Somerset, N.J. 

Theta Delta Chi, steward; Dean's List; Freshman, soph- 
omore honors 

JAMES THOMAS GALLAGHER 
Management Reading, Pa. 

Alpha Tau Omega; Marketing Club, secretary; Varsity 
Football; Brown & White 



KEVIN RICHARD GARDNER 
American Studies East Brunswick, N.J. 

Kappa Sigma, vice-president, rush chairman, scholarship 
chairman; Dean's List; Sophomore honors; Kappa Sigma 
National Scholarship/Leadership Award; Phi Alpha 
Theta; Varsity Lacrosse; Law Society, president; Class 
Constitution Committee, chairman; Epitome, assistant 
editor 

CARL D. GARTHWA1TE 
Elect. Engr. Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

Delta Chi; Eta Kappa Nu; Drill Team 

GARY MICHAEL GENTZLE 
Acctg/Finance Easton, Pa. 

Theta Delta Chi; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's 
List; Golf Team; Brown & White 

ANDREW STEVEN GEORGE 
Accounting Madison, N.J. 

Phi Kappa Theta, president; L.U. Band, manager; Frater- 
nity Management Assn., Board of Directors 

STUART CRAIG GEORGE 
Business Chagrin Falls, Ohio 

Kappa Sigma, steward, rush chairman; Intramurals; 
Class Gift Committee 

JOSEPH E. GIANSANTE 
Mech. Engr. Pottsdam, Pa. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, scholarship chairman; Dean's List; 
Freshman, sophomore honors; Pi Tau Sigma; In- 
tramurals 

THOMAS V. GILBOY III 
Accounting Scranton, Pa. 

Delta Phi, steward; Dean's List; Investment Club, presi- 
dent 

VAUGHN P. GIROL 
Geology Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Town; Lehigh Valley Grotto, president; Outing Club 



GUY JAY FRITCHMAN 
Government Allentown, Pa. 

Williams House, treasurer; Intramurals; Arnold Air So- 
ciety, commmander 



JAMES BRADLEY GLASS 
Mech. Engr. Johnstown, Pa. 

Delta Chi, rush chairman, president; Sophomore honors; 

Pi Tau Sigma; ASME; Intramurals 



342, Directory 



ROBERT/. GLUCKMAN 
Natural Science North Brunswick, N.J. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, social chairman, associate editor; Wil- 
bur Scholarship Prize; Freshman honors 

CYNTHIA D. GLUECK 
Psychology/SR Abington, Pa. 

RH-11; Richards House, secretary; Sophomore honors; 
Dean's List; Psi Chi; Intramurals; Chamber Singers; Class 
Gift Committee; SAC Publicity; Wiley House Volunteer, 
tutor: Twining's Day Nursery, volunteer; Student Affairs 
Equal Opportunities Steering Committee 

MARK EDWARD GOEHR1NG 
Finance Medford, N.J. 

Zeta Psi, athletic manager; Phi Alpha, vice-president, 
IFC representative; Intramurals; Freshman Wrestling; In- 
vestment Club; Class Gift Campaign, publicity; Frater- 
nity Solicitor Coordinator; IFC, social chairman; Class 
Graduation Festivity Committee 

STEVEN C. GOLDBERG 
Accounting Westfield, N.J. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, treasurer; Pre-Law Society; LUV 

CARLOS MANUEL GOMEZ 
Chemical Engr. Granada, Nicaragua 

Chi Phi, soccer team; Phi Eta Sigma; AIChE; Spanish 
Society 

DANIEL GOMEZ 
Indust. Engr. Bogota, Colombia, S.A. 

Sigma Nu, rush chairman; AIIE; IE Council; Forum, 
secretary, treasurer; Intramurals 

SARAH LEE GOODSON 
Spanish/SR Little Silver, N.J. 

RH-11; Dean's List 

CRAIG CAMERON GORDON 
Accounting Williamsport, Pa. 

Town; Beta Gamma Sigma; Beta Alpha Psi; Rugby; Mar- 
keting Club; Brown & White, business manager; Class 
Treasurer 

JEFFREY BRIAN GOTLINGER 
Accounting Delray Beach, Fla. 

Alpha Chi Rho, executive committee; Rugby Club 

WILLIAM DANIEL GRAEFF 
Indust. Engr. Meadowbrook, Pa. 

Taylor; Dean's List; AIIE 

WALTER OWEN GRAHAM III 
Mech. Engr. Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Alpha Sigma Phi; ASME 

ROBERT JOSEPH GRANDE 
Indust. Engr. Clifton Heights, Pa. 

Town; Intramural Wrestling 



THOMAS FRANCIS GRAZIANO 
Indust. Engr./Finance Cardondale, Pa. 

Town; Phi Kappa Theta, scholastic chairman, football 
coach; Freshman honors; Rust Engineering Scholarship; 
Dean's List; Alpha Pi Mu; AIIE; Intramurals, Skydiving 
Club; Karate Club; Judo Club; Investment Club; In- 
tramural Manager; Basketball Weekend, chairman; Pow- 
der Puff, coach; Minor— Ancient History; Trustee Schol- 
arship 



CHARLES GLEN GRECO 



Accounting 
Town 



Oakland, N. J. 



KEVAN SCOTT GREEN 
English Wyncote, Pa. 

SMAGS; Sophomore honors; Sailing Team; WLVR; L.l. 
Festival of the Arts; SMAGS Council Representative; 
WLTN 

PEGGY DIANE GREEN 
Mkt/Mgt Union, N.J. 

Town; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Marketing Club; 
Brown & White, business staff/comptroller 

MICHAEL JAMES GREEN 
Marketing Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Theodore H. Meyer Field Cup Award, Out- 
standing athlete in track; East Coast Conference Long 
Jump Champion 

ALAN JEFFREY GREENBERG 
Biology Lakewood, N.J. 

Tau Epsilon Phi, chaplain; Dean's List; Pre-Med So- 
ciety; Hillel 

DANIEL PAUL GRGURICH 
Finance McKees Rocks, Pa. 

Kappa Sigma, secretary, president; IFC representative; 
Judiciary Committee, chairman; Forum; West Hills Com- 
munity Theatre 



Management 
RH-11 



LINDA GROBSTEIN 

Massapequa Park, N.Y. 



AUDREY GROEDEL 
Foreign Careers Louisville, Ky. 

RH-11; French Club; Brown & White; Class Fund Raising 
Committee 

THOMAS F. GROGAN 
Finance Dunmore, Pa. 

Beta Theta Pi, social chairman, vice-president; In- 
tramurals; Investment Club, vice-president; Marketing 
Club; Intramural Athletic Manager Fund 

BRIAN EVAN GROSS 
Accounting Lansdale, Pa. 

Town; Varsity Rifle Team 



Directory, 343 



FREDRICK M. GROSS 
Elect. Engr. Thompsontown, Pa. 

Congdon, social chairman; SSDO; LUV 

KEVIN CHARLES GROSS 
Management Wyckoff, N.J. 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Skydiving Club 

DENNIS ALAN GRUBE 
Environmental Sciences & 

Resource Management Easton, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's List; Glee 
Club 

JANE GUMBLE 
Fine Arts Paupack, Pa. 

RH-11, social chairman; Sophomore honors; Swim 
Team; Parnassus Art Society; Class Fund Raising Com- 
mittee; Class Gift Committee; London Semester 

PETER R. GYSEL 
Finance/Economics Holcomb, N.Y. 

Delta Phi 

ELIAS A. HADDAD 
Mech. Engr. Beirut, Lebanon 

Town; ASME; Soccer; Tennis; Swimming; Arabic Club 

/AMES GARY HALKINS 
Finance Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town 

RICHARD BRIAN HALLETT 
Accounting Emmaus, Pa. 

Theta Delta Chi, treasurer; Varsity Soccer 

DOUGLAS /AMES HALLIDAY 
Finance/Economics Allentown, Pa. 

Smiley, treasurer; Dean's List; Investment Club; Sailing 
Team 

SEAN /AMES HANDERHAN 
Acctg/Mgt North Wales, Pa. 

Alpha Tau Omega, Social Chairman; Varsity Swim 
Team; James C. Gravany Award, outstanding freshman 
swimmer; Marketing Club, program chairman, vice-pres- 
ident; Class Steering Committee, concert chairman; 
Brown & White 



TODD CHRISTIAN HANSEN 
Accounting Toms River, N.J. 

Town; Scholarship, Financial Aid; Track; Judo Club; 
Investment Club; Phi Gamma Delta, social member 

ERIC LEE HANSSEN 
Mech. Engr. Sligo, Ireland 

Taylor, treasurer, president; Freshman, sophomore hon- 
ors; Dean's List; Pi Tau Sigma; ASME; Varsity Golf 
Team; IM Basketball; Chess Club; Investment Club; 
Computer Society; Karate Club 



Finance 
Chi Phi 



Psychology 
Town 



JOHN J. HARRINGTON /R. 

Allison Park, Pa. 



ANDREA E. HARWICK 



Bethlehem, Pa. 



DAVID CARLSON HARWOOD 
Mech. Engr. Farmingdale, N.J. 

SMAGS; Varsity Rifle Squad; Baha'i Club 

CHARLES HATHAWAY III 
Civil Engr. Coshocton, Ohio 

Pi Kappa Alpha, secretary; ASCE 

DOUGLAS GEORGE HAWXHURST 
Finance Metuchen, N.J. 

Kappa Sigma, guard; Basketball; Boxing Club; Forum 

AMIDEE TEBU HAVILAND III 
Government Ridgefield, Conn. 

Psi Upsilon, steward, athletic manager; Intramurals; 
Rugby; Soccer; ROTC; Freshman Soccer Manager 



/AMES E. HEALY 
Pre Architecture 
Delta Phi; ASCE; Intramurals; LUV 



Bayport, N.Y. 



TODD WILLIAM HECK 
Management Fort Washington, Pa. 

Town; Dean's List; Freshman, sophomore honors; Phi 
Eta Sigma; SAC, publicity chairman, concert chairman; 
WLVR-FM 



Elect. Engr. 
Zeta Psi 



JOSEPH PATRICK HEID 

Wynnewood, Pa. 



JOHN P. HANEY III 
Civil Engr. Annandale, N.J. 

Town; Freshman honors; ASCE; SAC 

GEORGE A. HANNA 
Mech. Engr. Zwitine, Syria 

Town; ASME; Soccer; Horseback riding; Flying; Sky- 
diving; Arabic Club, president 



STEVEN C. HELFRICH 
Civil Engr. New Port Richey, Fla. 

Town; Intramural Manager; Dean's List; Wilbur Prize for 
Math, 2nd place; Chi Epsilon, secretary; ASCE; Fresh- 
man honors; Intramurals; Orienteering Club; Karate 
Club; Gryphon's Freshman Tutoring Program; Sailing 
Club; Mustard & Cheese; WLRN, CE Undergraduate 
Advisory Board 



344, Directory 



DOUGLAS WILLIAM HELLIESEN 
Management Haworth, N.J. 

Theta Delta Chi; Sailing Club; Intramural Football; 
Freshman Intramural Wrestling 

PETER TODD HENDERSON 
Marketing Wyckoff, N.J. 

Phi Sigma Kappa, vice-sentinel, inductor, L.S. chairman; 
Baseball; Intramurals; Forum 

RAYMOND WILLIAM HEPPER 
Economics Denville, N.J. 

RH-11; Freshman honors; Dean's List; Pre— Law Society 

WILLIAM HARDY HEWIT 
International Relations Plainfield, N.J. 

Town; JV, Varsity Wrestling; LUV; Taylor, president 

MARK HENRY HOFFMAN 
Elect. Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; ROA Bronze Medal; Phi Eta Sigma; AFROTC, 
cadet dep. co.; Computer Society; IEEE 



MEHRDAD HOURIANI 



Civil Engr. 
Town 



Tehran, Iran 



LYLE HOGG 



Finance 
Town; Football 



Middlebury, Conn. 

JAMES HARVEY HOLBROOK 
Elect. Engr. Lancaster, Pa. 

Town; Intramurals; JV Tennis; Freshman, Varsity Soc- 
cer; Renegade Beach Club, president; Tau Epsilon Phi; 
Mid 40's Plymouth Club, asst. bursar 

WILLIAM ]OHN HOMMES 
Mech. Engr. Wyckoff, N.J. 

Smiley, social chairman; Tau Beta Pi; Pi Tau Sigma; 
ASME 

MARNIX A. J. HOOGEWERFF 
Mech. Engr. Portland, Oregon 

Alpha Chi Rho, IM manager, IFC representative; Fresh- 
man honors; ASME; Freshman Soccer 

WILLIAM C. HOOKWAY III 
Elect. Engr. Sparta, N.J. 

Town; Sigma Phi Epsilon 



NANCY J. HOPKINS 
Psychology Roselle, N.J. 

Town; Psi Chi 

MICHAEL DAVID HOPMAN 
Biology Englewood Cliffs, N.J. 

RH-11, social chairman; Freshman, sophomore honors; 
Hillel 

THOMAS F. HORN 
Civil Engr. Morristown, N.J. 

Smiley; ASCE; Intramurals 



DENNIS A. HOUSER 
Indust. Engr. Wescosville, Pa. 

Town; AIIE 

KIRK DOUGLAS HOUSER 
Elect. Engr Chambersburg, Pa. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Scott Paper Co. Leadership Award; 
Eta Kappa Nu; Tau Beta Pi, treasurer; Golf 

ROBERT K. HOWARD 
Acctg/Finance Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Thornburg; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's List; 
Beta Alpha Psi; Phi Eta Sigma; Investment Club; Market- 
ing Club 

LAWRENCE CLINTON HOWE 
Elect. Engr. Charleston, W. Va. 

Theta Chi, steward, president; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sig- 
ma; Eta Kappa Nu; Freshman Baseball 

RICHARD B. HUNTER 
Civil Engr. Lansdale, Pa. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, rush chairman, pledgemaster, mar- 
shall; ASCE, treasurer, president; LUV, treasurer, central 
board 

DANIEL FRANK HURLEY 
Applied Science Paramus, N.J. 

Delta Upsilon; Sophomore honors; Rugby Club 

CARL MARK HUSSER 
Chemical Engr. Hellertown, Pa. 

Town; AIChE 

ROBERT K. HYNES 
Accounting Baldwin, N.Y. 

Delta Chi, secretary 

GARY J. IACOCCA 
Mkt/Mgt Allentown, Pa. 

Delta Upsilon, rush chairman, social chairman, presi- 
dent; Forum, vice chairman, secretary, treasurer; Mar- 
keting Club; Freshman Camp Council; Ski Club; In- 
tramurals; Class Gift Committee 

CHRISTOPHER ROBERT INGRAM 
Economics/Finance Wilton, Conn. 

Sigma Nu, social chairman; Intramurals; Skiing; Tennis; 
Soccer 

JOHN IRVIN 
Accounting Greensburg, Pa. 

Chi Psi, treasurer, rush chairman; Sophomore honors; 
Swimming; LUV 



Directory. 345 



CRAIG WINSTON JOHNSON 
Indust. Engr/Mgt Port Chester, N.Y. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, social chairman, athletics manager; 
AIIE; Rugby 

DAVID SHAFFER JOHNSON 
Urban studies Princeton, N.J. 

Town; Rugby; Hockey 

STEPHEN EDWARD JOHNSON 
Chemical Engr. Montoursville, Pa. 

Zeta Psi; Dean's List; AIChE Award; Tau Beta Pi, secre- 
tary; AIChE, president 

JEFFREY DAVID JOLLY 
Civil Engr. Lansing, N.Y. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, executive committee; ASCE; March- 
ing Band 

CHRISTIAN JUBOK 
Environmental Sciences & 

Resource Management White Plains, N.Y. 

Stevens; L.U. President's Award in ROTC; Intramurals; 
Rifle Team; ROTC; ROTC Drill Team; ROTC News- 
paper, editor; LUV; Gryphon Tutoring Program; Skiing; 
Swimming; Tennis 

DUANE EARL JUDD 
Chemical Engr. Hellertown, Pa. 

Town; AIChE 

PATRICIA ANN KADAR 
Chemical Engr. Hellertown, Pa. 

Town; Merit Scholarship; AIChE 

KENNETH KARL KALAPAY 
Accounting Easton, Pa. 

Dravo; Phi Eta Sigma; Beta Gamma Sigma; Beta Alpha 
Psi, president; Concessions, business manager 

SCOTT KAMEN 
Biology Mountainside, N.J. 

Phi Kappa Theta 

STEVEN MICHAEL KAMIN 
Elect. Engr. Woodmere, N.Y. 

Delta Chi; IEEE 

ANDREA KAPLAN 
Journalism/SR Laurence, N.Y. 

Town; Brown & White, reporter; Epitome 

SUSAN ANN KARCHER 
Psychology/SR Kinnelon, N.J. 

M & M A-3, social chairman, vice-president; Sophomore 
honors; Dean's List; Psi Chi, vice-president; Intramurals; 
Soccer Team, ballgirl; Little Sisters Program; Mustard & 
Cheese 



DAVID MICHAEL KATZ 
Finance Canton, Ohio 

Delta Sigma Phi, steward, treasurer; Intramurals; In- 
vestment Club; Class Gift Committee 



PHILIP I. KENT 



Economics 
Town 



White Plains, N.Y. 



PETER CHARLES KERSHAW 
Indust. Engr. Jenkintown, Pa. 

Alpha Tau Omega; AIIE 

SUSAN RAE KETCHAM 
Psychology Swarthmore, Pa. 

RH-11; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's List; Psi 
Chi; Intramurals; SAC Publicity; volunteer work 

JOSEPH MICHAEL KIEVIT 
Accounting Nutley, N.J. 

RH-11; Beta Alpha Psi; Intramurals; WLRN, sports direc- 
tor; Class Executive Committee; Class Gift Committee, 
chairperson; Freshman House, vice-president; Brown & 
White, sports writer 

ROBERTA JEAN KINCAID 
Accounting Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town Council, secretary, co-social director, board of 
directors; Beta Alpha Psi; Intramurals; Tau Lambda Chi, 
president 

RICHARD CURTIS KINNEY 
Mech. Engr. Somerville, N.J. 

RH-11; American Society of Testing Materials Award; Pi 
Tau Sigma: Tau Beta Pi; Intramural Track; ASME, presi- 
dent; Pi Tau Sigma, president 

JESSE STUART KIRSCH 
Accounting East Hills, N.Y. 

Sigma Alpha Mu, pledgemaster; Varsity Lacrosse, tri- 
captain; Marketing Club; Brown & White, make-up edi- 
tor, national ad manager 

WILLIAM EDWARD KIRSCH 
Accounting Adelphi, Md. 

Theta Xi, rush chairman; Dean's List; Varsity Swimming 

TIMOTHY WILLIAM KISNER 
Psychology White Plains, N.Y. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, president; Band; Intramurals 

ROBERT E. KLA WITTER 
Mech. Engr. Quakertown, Pa. 

Tau Epsilon Phi. scribe; ASME; Intramurals 

JEFFREY TODD KLINE 
Finance/Economics Allentown, Pa. 

Delta Phi, corresponding secretary; Sophomore honors; 
Intramurals; Pre— Law Society; Investment Club; Sky- 
diving Club 



346. Directory 



KEITH A. KUNGENSMITH 
Psychology Cromwell, Conn. 

Kappa Alpha, recording secretary 

ELIZABETH ANN KNIPE 
Mathematics Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's List; Lam- 
bda Alpha Lambda; Phi Eta Sigma; Intramurals; Town 
Council; Tau Lambda Chi 



BETH TERI KNOBLER 
English 
SMAGS; Brown & White 



Union, N. 



LISA J. KOCH 
Mkt/Mgt Fair Lawn, N.J. 

RH-11; Marketing Club; Class Fund Raising Committee; 
Brown & White, business staff 

MARK HARRY KOELMEL 
Finance East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Drinker; Gryphon Society 

RICHARD LEE KOENIGSBERG 
Accounting Lido Beach, N.Y. 

Theta Delta Chi, alumni secretary, corresponding secre- 
tary; Dean's List; Freshman Tennis; Intramurals; 
Pre-Law Society; WLRN; WLTN; Basketball; Class Gift 
Committee 

CLIFFORD /. KOZAK 
Mech. Engr. Linden, N.J. 

Thornburg; Pi Tau Sigma; ASME; LUV; Intramurals; 
Circle K Club 

JOHN ANTON KOZEL 
Finance/Mgt Basking Ridge, N.J. 

Town; Intramurals; Karate; Chess Club; Skiing Club; 
Beta Theta Pi 

KAREN JEANNE KOZLOW 
Mathematics Milford, N.J. 

Carothers; Intramurals; Computer Society; LUV 

GARY DEAN KRAFT 
Civil Engr. Mohnton, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha, attendant; ASCE; Intramurals; Glee Club, 
asst. manager 



GARY JOHN KRAL1K 
Chemistry Easton, Pa. 

Town; Town Council, social chairman, vice-president; 
Alpha Lambda Omega, recording secretary, president; 
Volleyball Club; Intramurals; Freshman Soccer; Skiing 

SELIG NATHAN KRATENSTEIN 
Biology/Psychology Valley Stream, N.Y. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, president; Squash Club; Pi Kappa Al- 
pha, secretary, IM manager 



THOMAS MARK KREIDLER 
Marketing Bethlehem, Pa. 

Theta Delta Chi; Marketing Club 

REIN ARNO KREVALD 
Accounting Tarrytown, N.Y. 

Alpha Chi Rho, steward, president 

JAMES M. KRON 
Mech. Engr. Wyndmoor, Pa. 

Town; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; ASME; Sky- 
diving Club; WLRN & WLTN, engineer, remote director 

KENNETH FRANCIS KRUGER 
Biology Flushing, N.Y. 

RH-11; M & M B-l, president; Karate Club, president 

LEANN LOUISE KULP 
Mathematics Nazareth, Pa. 

Carothers; Freshman, sophomore honors; Lambda Alpha 
Lambda; Powder Puff Football 

JAY ANDREW KURITZKY 
Finance Mamaroneck, N.Y. 

Beta Theta Pi 

JOHN CHRISTOPHER KUTZER 
Chemistry Mountain Lakes, N.J. 

Delta Chi, corresponding secretary; Sophomore honors; 
Intramurals; Karate Club 

EMILY EUGENIE LA COSTA 
Natural Science/Spanish Westfield, N.J. 

RH-11; Dean's List; L.U. Honor Student; President's 
Award; Frosh Camp Counselor; Record Library Com- 
mittee 

SARA BELLA LACS 
Marketing Curacao, Netherlands 

RH-11; Marketing Club; Hillel, Investment Club 

ROBERT C. LADERER 
Biology Upper St. Clair, Pa. 

Phi Gamma Delta; Intramurals; LUV 

ROGER HAROLD LAMBERT 
Civil Engr. Sterling, Mass. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, secretary; Freshman Lacrosse; ASCE 

JEFFREY P. LANTZ 
Mech. Engr. Allentown, Pa. 

Alpha Chi Rho; ASME; Intramurals 

WILLIAM R. LEAHY 
History Berwyn, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore honors; Phi Alpha Theta; 
Forum; Student Life Committee, chairman; College 
Young Democrats, secretary, treasurer; Mustard & 
Cheese; Catacomas 



Directory. 347 



PAUL N. LEITNER 
Finance Short Hills, N.J. 

Delta Phi, corresponding secretary; Sophomore, junior 
honors; Dean's List; Omicron Delta Kappa; Frosh Foot- 
ball; IFC, president, treasurer; FMA, chairman of board 
of directors 



MYRON LEMECHA 



Mech. Engr. 
Town; ASME 



THOMAS C. LEMM 
Chemical Engr. 
Smiley; Freshman, sophomore honors 



Bethlehem, Pa. 



Dumont, N.J. 



GJLBERT MARK LEVJNE 
Accounting Hillside, N.J. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, assistant pledge chairman; Intramurals 



JOEL BENTON LEVY 



Geology 
Town 



Largo, Fla. 



PAUL REED LEVY 
Finance Malverne, N.Y. 

Town; Tau Epsilon Phi, scholastic chairman, athletic 
manager; Intramurals; JV Tennis; WLRN 

DIANE ROBIN LICHTENBERG 
Psychology/Fine Arts Great Neck, N.Y. 

Town; McClain Progress Award; Dean's List; Parnassus, 
vice-president; UJA, president; Brown & White 



STEVEN S. LICHTMAN 
Indust. Engr. Berlin, N.J. 

McConn, social chairman; Freshman, sophomore honors; 
Dean's List; Alpha Pi Mu; IE Council; Intramurals; AIIE, 
treasurer; Computer Society; Varsity Basketball, statisti- 
cian, manager; Manufacturing Systems Research Pro- 
gram 



WILMER GARY LIDDICK 
Accounting Duncannon, Pa. 

Town; Gryphon Society, president; Intramurals 

MELVILLE D. LIDE 
Psychology Trenton, N.J. 

Sigma Phi, social chairman, secretary, president 



ROBERT EDWIN LINNEY 
Mech. Engr. Fairfield, Conn. 

Town; ASME; LUV, project chairperson 

CHARLES ALAN LOCKARD 
Finance Potomac, Md. 

Sigma Phi, president, vice-president, social chairman; 
Sophomore honors 

CHARLES MONROE LOEFFLER 
Elec. Engineer Kirtland, Ohio 

Sigma Nu, Dean's List; IEEE chairman, Eta Kappa Nu 

MORRIS LOUIS LONDON 
Elect. Engr. Elkins Park, Pa. 

McConn, vice-president; IEEE; WLRN; LUV 

KENNETH CHARLES LOUSH 
Civil Engr. Forest City, Pa. 

Town; ASCE; Intramurals 

BRUCE C. LONG II 
Mathematics Carlisle, Pa. 

M & M B-3; Intramural Bowling; Marching Band; Con- 
cert Band; Varsity Band; Wind Ensemble; Asst. Band 
Librarian; Head Band Librarian 

JENNIFER KAY LONG 
Fund. Science Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

Bishopthorpe, steering committee; Dean's List 

JOHN H. LONG 
Acctg/Finance Cherry Hill, N.J. 

FIJI, president, recording secretary; IFC Judicial Com- 
mittee 

PETER GIFFORD LONGLEY 
Architecture Florham Park, N.J. 

Thornburg; Dean's List 






JEFFREY P. LONTZ 



Mech. Engr. 

Alpha Chi Rho; ASME 



Allentown, Pa. 



PAUL LOSCHIAVO 
Finance Massapequa, N.Y. 

Kappa Sigma, IM manager, steward; Pre— Law Society; 
Private Pilot; Forum; Class Gift Committee; Fraternity 
Solicitation Committee, chairman; Williams Prize for 
Debate, Extemporaneous Speech; Army Skydiving Club; 
Mustard & Cheese; WLRN: USAF ROTC 



FRANCISCO E. LINARES PETER EDWARD LOYKA 

Chem. Engr. Panama, Republic of Panama Civil Engineering 

Thornburg House Town; ASCE; Intramurals 



348. Directory 



JEFFREY P. LUKER 
Indust. Engr. Baton Rouge, La. 

Chi Psi, executive council; Freshman, sophomore hon- 
ors; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; Alpha Pi Mu, vice- 
president; AIIE, president; IE Council representative; 
Skiing Club 

PAUL L. LUMNITZER 11 
Chemistry Johnstown, Pa. 

Phi Delta Theta, steward, social chairman 

ALISON ]A1GH LUST1G 
Sociology New Hyde Park, N.Y. 

RH-11; Chamber Singers, historian; Big Sister Com- 
mittee; Chamber Music; Women's Choir; Mixed Choir 

JOHN CHARLES LUTZ 
Civil Engr. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, HC; ASCE; Intramurals 

JOHN PATRICK LYNCH 
Math/French Livingston, N.J. 

McConn; WLTN, program director; WLRN; LUV 

MICHAEL STEPHEN MAGEE 
Mech. Engr. Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, steward; Freshman, sophomore hon- 
ors; Dean's List; Pi Tau Sigma, treasurer 

JOHN EDWIN MAHONEY 
Journalism Margate, N.J. 

Town; Alpha Sigma Phi; Brown & White 

JACK LESLIE MALICK 
Accounting Englewood, N.J. 

SMAGS; Smiley, concession chairman; Investment Club; 
LUV; Brown & White, photographer 



JAMES WILLIAM MARTIN 
History Maywood, N.J. 

Alpha Chi Rho, secretary; Freshman, sophomore honors; 
Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Alpha Theta; In- 
tramurals; Pre— Law Society, treasurer; Concert Produc- 
tion Manager; Class Gift Committee 

STANLEY MARTIN 
Finance Little Neck, N.Y. 

Sigma Alpha Mu, social chairman; Freshman, soph- 
omore, junior honors; Dean's List; Frosh Cross-Country; 
Brown & White, photographer; WLRN; Fencing; Karate 
Club 

JAMES HOWARD MATHEWS 
International Relations Newton, N.J. 

Phi Delta Theta, steward, chaplain; Dean's List; IR Club 

CRAIG McBETH 
Biology Pottstown, Pa. 

Phi Delta Theta, secretary; Varsity Lacrosse 

PHILIP M. McCUTCHEON 
Finance/Mgt Maitland, Fla. 

Sigma Nu, Lt. commander; Varsity Squash 

JOSEPH FRANCIS McDONALD 
Finance Inkerman, Pa. 

Beta Theta Pi, secretary, IM manager; Dean's List; Var- 
sity Baseball, captain 

KRISTY EUGENE McGEE 
Civil Engr. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Theta Delta Chi, secretary; ASCE; Varsity Soccer; Brown 
& White, sports editor 



PETER B. McGEE 



Geology 
SMAGS 



Greenwich, Conn. 



ARNOLD F. MANCHE 
Accounting New York, N.Y. 

Tau Epsilon Phi, steward, rush chairman; Sophomore 
honors; Dean's List; Beta Alpha Psi; Hillel; LUV; WLRN 

JOEL ALBERT MANFREDO 
Management Bethlehem, Pa. 

Sigma Phi, president, vice-president, house manager, IM 
chairman; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Swimming 
Team; Brown & White, circulation; Horizons, circula- 
tions 

PAUL RICHARD MARINO 
Finance Greenwich, Conn. 

Beta Theta Pi, treasurer 

GREGORY JOHN MARTIN 
Civil Engr. Luzerne, Pa. 

Delta Upsilon; Freshman, sophomore honors; ASCE 



DONALD JAMES McGILLEN 
Math/Physics Woodlyn, Pa. 

Zeta Psi; Intramurals; Boxing Club 

JOHN McGLADE 
Indust. Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Delta Chi, corresponding secretary; Alpha Pi Mu, Tau 
Beta Pi; AIIE 

ANNE LOUISE McGREGOR 
American Studies Clarks Summit, Pa. 

Richards; Lacrosse; Field Hockey; Football; Pre— Law 
Society; LUV 

JAMES ENOCH MEAD 
Economics Paoli, Pa. 

McConn; Dean's List; WLRN/WLVR Engineer; Comput- 
er Society; Hillel, vice-president; Forum; PP&D Com- 
mittee of Forum, vice-chairman; EdPol Committee of the 
Faculty 



Directory. 349 



FRANCES CAROL MEARNS 
Biology Pottstown, Pa. 

Town; M & M A-3, president; Varsity Field Hockey 
Team; Powder Puff Football; LUV; LUST; Soccer Ball 
Girl; Gryphon Society 

MICHAEL R. MELINO 
Biology Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 

McConn, treasurer; Circle K Club, secretary; Marching 
Band; Concert Band; LUV 

J. DANIEL MERLINO 
Biology Pompton Plains, N.J. 

Gryphon; Beta Theta Pi 

ANN NAOMI MERMELSTEIN 
Psychology/Theater Arts Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

M & M A-2; Powder Puff Football; Mustard & Cheese, 
props chairman; LUV; Mental Health/Mental Retarda- 
tion Intern; Soccer Team, assistant 

AMELIA AGNES MESKO 
Civil Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; ASCE; Cheerleading 

ELLIOT NIEL MICHAEL 
Economics/Psych Millwood, N.Y. 

Gryphon, area coordinator; Cross-Country, captain; 
Track 

SALEM D. MIKDADI 
Mech. Engr. Kuwait, State of Kuwait 

Town; Col. William A. Eddy Award; Swimming; Soccer; 
Arabic Club 

GENE PAUL MILLER JR. 
Metallurgy & Materials Science Bethlehem, Pa. 

Delta Upsilon; Metallurgical Society, president 

RICHARD ALAN MILLER 
Bio/Chemistry Allentown, Pa. 

Delta Phi, social chairman; Freshman, sophomore hon- 
ors; Dean's List 

ROBERT T. MILTON 
Economics Spring, Texas 

Town 

HAROLD E. MINOR 
Chemistry Allentown, Pa. 

Town; Sophomore honors; Phi Eta Sigma; SAACS; 
Marching Band; Concert Band 

NEIL JOHN MIRITELLO 
Economics Glen Head, N.Y. 

Theta Delta Chi, Intramurals 

DAVID MISENHIMER 
Environmental Sciences & 
Resource Management Northampton, Pa. 



SUSAN ANN MISSAL 
Accounting Bristol, Conn. 

RH-11; Freshman honors; Dean's List; Tennis; LUV 

JOHN MAYNARD MIZEL 
Biology Hurley, N.Y. 

RH-11; IM Wrestling; LUV 

WILLIAM DAVID MOHYLSKY 
Finance Bethlehem, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha; Swimming 

ROBERT STEPHEN MOROZ 
Mech. Engr. Allentown, Pa. 

Zeta Psi; Freshman honors; Merit Scholarship; ASME; 
Marching Band; Concert Band; Varsity Band 

MICHAEL J. MOSS 
Arts Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Town; Varsity Baseball; Varsity Golf 

WILLIAM HENRY MOYER III 
Mathematics Coopersburg, Pa. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, social chairman, asst. rush chair- 
man; Frisbee Team 

LISA M. MUESER 
Acctg/Mgt Harrisburg, Pa. 

RH-11; National Merit Scholarship; Lehigh Presidential 
Scholarship; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's List; 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Lambda Alpha Lambda; Beta Alpha 
Psi; Intramurals 

KATHYJ. MURPHY 
Math/Psychology Fair Haven, N.J. 

RH-11; Women's Varsity Tennis, co-captain 

THOMAS PATRICK MURPHY 

Eco/Finance North Caldwell, N.J. 

Delta Phi, rush chairman; Dean's List; Baseball; Swim 
Team; Skydiving Club 

WALTER RICHARD MUSSELMAN 
Accounting Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Town Council, vice-president; Alpha Lambda 
Omega 

MARK MAYNARD NAGEL 
Indust. Engr. Williamsport, Pa. 

RH-11; Beardslee, social chairman; Forum; Dining Com- 
mittee; WLVR 

SCOTT CHRISTIAN NEILSON 
Finance/Economics Oyster Bay, N.Y. 

Delta Chi; Freshman, sophomore honors; Ski Team; Gry- 
phon Society; Scuba Diving Club 

ROBIN LYNNE NEMERY 
Biology Roslyn, N.Y. 

RH-11; Lambda Alpha Lambda; Phi Eta Sigma; In- 
vestment Club; Film Club; Riding Club; Brown & White; 
Intramurals 






350. Directory 



/AMES HUGH WEBSTER NEWBOLD 
Civil Engr. Langhorne, Pa. 

Town; ASCE 



LOUIS J. PAGNOTTI 111 
Civil Engr. Old Forge, Pa. 

Sigma Phi, rush chairman; ASCE; Intramurals 



PHILIP BARRY NONEMAKER 
Civil Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Chi Epsilon; Tau 
Beta Pi; CE Advisory Board; Skydiving Club; Ori- 
enteering Club; ASCE; SAME 

CHRISTOPHER /. NOW1K 
Biology Northampton, Pa. 

Thornburg, vice-president, Sophomore honors 

DAVID ALAN NUSBLATT 
Biology Yardley, Pa. 

Sigma Alpha Mu; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's 
List; Intramural Tennis; Health Professions Society 

/AMES /. O'DONNELL JR. 
Finance Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sigma Chi; Freshman honors; Varsity Soccer, MVP, cap- 
tain; LUV 

DOUGLAS HERBERT OLSEN 
Mech. Engr. Wilbraham, Mass 

Smiley; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; ASME; SAME; AF- 
ROTC; Karate Club 



JOHN J. ONDRE/ACK 
Mech. Engr. Carteret, N.J. 

Theta Xi; Dean's List; Pi Tau Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma; 
ASME; Intramurals; Ski Club; IFC representative 

DAVID ALAN ORAM 
Civil Engr. Lebanon, N.J. 

Theta Delta Chi, president; ASCE 

ROBERT D. ORLEMANN JR. 
Fine Arts Glenside, Pa. 

Sigma Nu, alumni contact, recorder; Parnassus Art So- 
ciety; Brown & White; Glee Club 



NEIL N. OVERTURF 
Mech. Engr. Elkins Park, Pa. 

Gryphon Society-Drinker, senior class representative; 
James C. Haydon Scholarship; Frosh Football; In- 
tramurals; Gryphon Society, area coordinator 

A. GIBSON PACKARD III 
Mech. Engr. Easton, Md. 

Kappa Sigma; ASME; Intramurals; Varsity Hockey; Ice 
Hockey Club, president 

CRAIG WILLIAM PACKARD 
Metallurgy Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Stewarts Cort Scholarship; William W. Coleman 
Scholarship; Metallurgical Society 



ERHARDT PANKRATZ 
Elect. Engr. Allentown, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's List; 
Grande Band; Varsity Band; Marching Band 

JEFFRY PARKER 
Elect. Engr. Scottsdale, Ariz. 

SMAGS; Eta Kappa Nu; IEEE; Model Railroad Club; 
Computer Society, secretary 

RICHARD NED PARKES 
Mathematics Kutztown, Pa. 

Beardslee 

RICHARD CHADWICK PAUL JR. 
Economics York, Pa. 

Town; Delta Upsilon, IFC representative; Reader's Digest 
National Speakers Corps.; Mustard & Cheese; WLRN, 
general manager 

JOHN ROBERT PAULES 
Metallurgy & Materials Science Slatington, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha, vice-president; Dean's List; Tau Beta Pi, 
vice-president; Metallurgy Society; Intramurals; ASM- 
AIME 

JAMES K. PAYNE 
Civil Engr. Camp Hill, Pa. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, HC; ASCE; Skydiving Club 

SUSAN T. PERROTTA 
Psych/Spanish North Woodmere, N.Y. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore honors; Dean's List; Psi 
Chi; Varsity Volleyball Team, captain; Intramurals 

BRUCE SCOTT PERRY 
Accounting Fair Lawn, N.J. 

Zeta Psi; Freshman honors; Class Gift Committee; In- 
tramurals 

EDWARD MICHAEL PETERS JR. 
Government Allentown, Pa. 

Town; Williams Prize; Government Department Stu- 
dent/Faculty Committee, chairman; Mustard & Cheese; 
Dramatics Society; Rugby Club 

THOMAS ALAN PETERS 
Mech. Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Theta Xi, treasurer; Freshman, sophomore, junior hon- 
ors; Dean's List 

MARK P. PETTIGREW 
Mech. Engr. Oradell, N.J. 

Leavitt, vice-president; ASME; WLRN, engineer; WLTN 



Directory, 351 



RICHARD B. PETIGROW 
Government Maplewood, N.J. 

Town; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Government De- 
partment Student/Faculty Advisory Committee 

RAYMOND STEPHEN PLEVYAK 
Accounting Olyphant, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Pre— Law 
Society; Cheerleading; Intramurals; YBA; NBPA, presi- 
dent 

ROBERT JOSEPH PLUNKETT 
Finance/Economics Blairstown, N.J. 

Phi Sigma Kappa, president, vice-president, steward; 
Intramurals; BDA 

ALOYSIUS JOSEPH POLANECZKY 
Civil Engr. Oreland, Pa. 

Town; Dean's List; ASCE; Arnold Air Society; Lehigh 
Valley Skydiving Club 

LOUIS BERNARD POLISH 
Biology Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 

Town; Sophomore honors; Intramurals; Band 

FRED DANIEL POLOHOVICH 
Urban Studies Hellertown, Pa. 

Town 

ARTHUR LEE POOLE III 
Civil Engr. Allentown, Pa. 

Town; ASCE 

THOMAS JAY PORSCH 
Civil Engr. Grove City, Pa. 

Phi Gamma Delta, treasurer; Freshman honors; ASCE; 
Varsity Golf Team, co-captain 

ANNE T. POWER 
Psychology/Mgt-SR Trenton, N.J. 

RH-11; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Psi Chi, secre- 
tary, treasurer; Intramural Leader; Intramural Instructor, 
swimming; Soccer Ball Girl; Volunteer work; Mustard & 
Cheese; Marketing Club; Teaching Assistant 

ANDREW J. PRESTOM JR. 
Accounting Kinnelom, N.J. 

Phi Sigma Kappa, manager; Beta Alpha Psi; Intramurals; 
IFC 

PAUL JAMES PRINGLE 
Chemical Engr. Towanda, Pa. 

Phi Sigma Kappa, secretary, rush chairman; AIChE; 
Football; Intramurals; BDA 

ROBERT ALLEN PUTT 
Civil Engr. Robesonia, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; Tau Beta Pi; 
ASCE 



MICHAEL TERRY RADIO 
Mech. Engr. Allentown, Pa. 

Alpha Chi Rho; Freshman, junior honors; ASME; In- 
tramurals 



JOSEPH A. RAO JR. 



Bangor, Pa. 



Town; Intramurals 



JAN GREGORY REBER 
Mech. Engr. Mohrsville, Pa. 

Sigma Nu; Pi Tau Sigma Award; Phi Eta Sigma; Tau 
Beta Pi; Pi Tau Sigma; ASME; Frosh Football 

GEORGE AUGUSTUS REIFSNYDER 
Chemical Engr. Reading, Pa. 

Stevens; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; ChE Society; 
NSF Project; Chess Club 

SETH REISER 
Finance Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. 

Sigma Alpha Mu; Brown & White 

GREGORY V. RICCARDI 
Accounting Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Phi Kappa Theta, vice-president; Sophomore honors; 
Intramurals; Government Club 

DIXON ROBERT RICH JR. 
Chemistry Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Chi Phi, president; Ski Club; Parachute Club; Lehigh 
Student Blotter 



JAMES MICHAEL RICHMOND 
Accounting Nutley, N.J. 

Delta Sigma Phi, social chairman; Sophomore honors; 
Dean's List 

KATHRYN I. RICK 
Psychology/English Pittsburgh, Pa. 

M & M A-2; Williams Essay Contest; Dean's List; Rifle 
Team; Gryphon Society; LUV 

MARK PETER RICKERT 
Finance Sayville, N.Y. 

Sigma Chi, Pledgemaster, rush chairman; Frosh Football; 
Class Gift Committee 

ROBERT HENRY RIMBY 
Environmental Sciences & 

Resource Management Birdsboro, Pa. 

Sigma Nu; Volleyball Club 

MARC RINALDI 
Town; Varsity Hockey Team, captain; Phi Kappa Theta; 
Intramurals 



352. Directory 



ANTHONY J. ROCCO JR. 
Acctg/Finance Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Sigma Chi, president, vice-president, secretary; LUV; 
Forum; IFC; Class Gift Committee 

PETER JOHN ROCCO 
Biology Westbury, N.Y. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, secretary; Upward Bound Program 

JEFFREY THOMAS ROHRER 
Accounting New Shrewsbury, N.J. 

Chi Phi, treasurer; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Beta 
Alpha Psi 

KURT C. ROLF 
Biology Massapequa, N.Y. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, president 

MICHELLE LEE ROMAN 
Accounting Honolulu, Hawaii 

Bishopthorpe, house manager; Forum 

RICHARD JAMES ROONEY 
Psychology New City, N.Y. 

Chi Psi, steward; Boxing; Football; MVP '74 Boxing 
Tournament 

WILLIAM SALVATORE ROSANIO 
Chemical Engr. Westfield, N.J. 

Delta Upsilon, steward, IM manager; AIChE; Rugby 
Club, match secretary; Mustard & Cheese 

STEPHEN ANTHONY ROSNER 
Civil Engr. Worthington, Ohio 

SMAGS; McConn, secretary; ASCE 

CHERYL ANN ROSS 
Metallurgy & Materials Science Wallingford, Conn. 

Town; Women's Swim Team 

ROMAINE MARLYN ROSS 
Finance Treichlers, Pa. 

Delta Tau Delta, corresponding secretary; Dean's List; 
McConlogue Memorial Award; Varsity Football; In- 
tramural basketball 

PATRICIA S. ROTH 
Indust. Engr. Wilmington, Del. 

Richards; Alpha Pi Mu; Mustard & Cheese; Women's 
Choir 

ROBERT LLOYD ROTH 
Social Studies New Rochelle, N.Y. 

Itaska Club, exchequer; Oragami Team, captain 

RONALD M. ROTH 
Accounting Allentown, Pa. 

Tau Epsilon, rush chairman, public relations chairman, 
parlimentarian; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; Beta Alpha 
Psi; Beta Gamma Sigma; Pre— Law Society; Investment 
Club 



MICHAEL ROTOLO 
Elect. Engr. Paramus, N.J. 

Delta Upsilon, social chairman; Rugby Club; EE Forum 
representative; Mustard & Cheese 

R. MICHAEL ROWSEY 
Accounting Bridgewater, N.J. 

Alpha Tau Omega, scribe; Sophomore honors; Market- 
ing Club 

ERNEST HERMAN RUCKERT III 
Civil Engr. Park Ridge, N.J. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, brotherhood chairman; ASCE; Outing 
Club 

PAUL D. RUFFLE 
Civil Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Freshman honors; Herbert W. McCord Scholar- 
ship 

JOSEPH JOHN SABOL 
Management Forty Fort, Pa. 

Thornburg; Dean's List; Amaranth Literary Magazine, 
layout editor 

STEVEN EDWARD SAMLER 
Elect. Engr. Huntington, N.Y. 

Delta Chi, rush chairman 

DONALD CURTIS SANGTINETTE 
Mech. Engr. Cherry Hill, N.J. 

Town; ASME 

MICHAEL JULIUS SAUERS 
Chemical Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore honors; AIChE 

DAVID GEORGE SAWUTZ 
Biology Saugertus, N.Y. 

Sigma Nu, chaplain; Intramurals; Outing Club; Chess 
Club 

GLENN ROBERT SCHACHTER 
Accounting Massapequa, N.Y. 

Delta Sigma Phi, steward, IM manager, asst. rush chair- 
man; Intramurals; IFC, social chairman; LUV 

THOMAS E. SCHELL 
Chemical Engr. Whitehall, Pa. 

Sigma Nu; AIChE; Ski Club 

RANDALL C. SCHIEFER 
Elect. Engr. Reading, Pa. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, rush chairman; Dean's List; Harold 
Horn Prize; Tau Beta Pi Prize; Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa 
Nu; IEEE; Computer Society; Intramurals; IFC represent- 
ative 

MARK D. SCHOBER 
Mech. Engr. Union, N.J. 

Taylor; Gryphon Society; Navigators; LUV 



Directory, 353 



WILLIAM LOUIS SCHROER 
Indust. Engr. Brantford, Ontario, Can. 

Town: AIIE; Intramurals 

IRA MARTIN SCHULMAN 
American Studies Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Delta Sigma Phi, president, vice-president; Freshman, 
sophomore honors; Dean's List; Williams prize in De- 
bate, first place; Williams Prize for Extemporoneous 
Speech, Phi Alpha Theta, president; Omicron Delta Kap- 
pa: Cyanide; History Visiting Committee representative; 
Forum; Representative to Board of Trustees; AEC, chair- 
man; WLRN, general manager, business manager, sports 
director; Young Democrats, vice-president; Leviathan, 
president; Karate Club; Brown & White 

JAMES FRANCIS SCHULTES JR. 
Mech. Engr. Woodbury, N.Y. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, vice-president; Intramurals 

GARRETT LOYD SCHULTZ 
Elect. Engr. Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

SMAGS; WLRN/WLVR, chief engineer 

PAUL A. SCHWARZBACH JR. 
Environmental Sciences & 

Resource Management Easton, Pa. 

Chi Phi, historian, rush chairman, social chairman; John 
Howell Powell Scholarship; Sparks Memorial Award; 
Intramurals 

CLIFFORD WILLIAM SCHWINGER 
Civil Engr. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Leavitt; Freshman honors; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Chi Epsilon; ASCE 

JEFFREY LEE SCOTT 
Mech. Engr. Oakdale, Pa. 

Kappa Sigma, house manager; ASME, treasurer; In- 
tramurals; Swimming; Epitome, staff assistant 

JEFFREY CHARLES SEARER 
Chemistry West Chester, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha, vice-president; Freshman, sophomore hon- 
ors; Dean's List; Tau Beta Pi; Frosh Soccer; Intramurals; 
Investment Club 

ROBERT HARMON SEEVERS 
Chemistry Yorktown Heights, N.Y. 

M & M B-2; Freshman, sophomore honors; Williams 
Extempore Prize, second place; SAACS, president; Mus- 
tard & Cheese 

STEPHEN SEIDEL 
Management Blairstown, N.J. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; US Dubach Award; German Club; 
Inter-collegiate Skydiving; Intramurals; Civil Air Patrol; 
Skydiving Club, treasurer, president, IFC representative; 
IFC Board, secretary; Mart Library, student assistant 



WALTER JACOB SENKOWSKI 
Finance Lancaster, Pa. 

Phi Sigma Kappa, pledgemaster, rush chairman; Dean's 
List; Intramurals; LUV; IFC representative 

CRAIG FRANCIS SEYFRIED 
Environmental Sciences & 

Resource Management Catasauqua, Pa. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, executive committee, director of 
fraternity ed.; Senior honors; Wrestling Team; Hockey 
Club; Intramurals 

MARY ANNE E. SHAFER 
German Bethlehem, Pa. 

Richards; Sophomore honors; String Orchestra; En- 
semble Groups; Mustard & Cheese, pianist, musical di- 
rector; "Music at Lehigh," Concert Committee 

ROBERT WILLIAM SHANNON 
Environmental Sciences & 

Resource Management Wilton, Conn. 

Sigma Nu; WLVR 

SUSAN LORI SHAPIRO 
Art History Glen Cove, N.Y. 

SMAGS; Departmental honors; Hillel; Parnassus Art So- 
ciety, president; Mustard & Cheese 

SUSAN MARGARET SHARKO 
American Studies Bernardsville, N.J. 

M & M A-2; Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Alpha Theta; Phi Beta 
Kappa; Alpha Phi Omega; Marching Band; Concert 
Band; Wind Ensemble; Chamber Music; LUV; Brown & 
White; Epitome 

BRIAN MARC SHARLACH 
Accounting Stamford, Conn. 

Town; Freshman honors; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Beta Alpha Psi; Outing Club; Hillel 

KEVIN PHILIPP SHIELDS 
Civil Engr. Trenton, N.J. 

Phi Kappa Theta, recording secretary, vice-president; 
ASCE; Intramurals; CE Concrete Canoe Race 

AMY BETH SHIKORA 
Mgt/Mkt Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; class honors; Volleyball; Bridge Club 

LINDA TAZU SHINTAKU 
Chemical Engr. Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

RH-11; Freshman honors; Intramural Table Tennis; In- 
tervarsity Christian Fellowship; LUV 

CHARLES E. SHOEMAKER JR. 
Acctg/Economics Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; York Award; Fred Mercur Scholarship; Alumni 
Prize; Williams Essay Prize; Beta Gamma Sigma, presi- 
dent; Omicron Delta Epsilon, president; Beta Alpha Psi; 
Phi Eta Sigma: Pre— Law Society 



354, Directory 



ROBERT HOCH SHUMAN IV 
Mech. Engr. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Theta Xi, house manager; Sophomore honors; Dean's 
List; Pi Tau Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma; ASME; Ski Club; 
Scuba Diving Club 

ROBERT DOUGLAS SIEVERS 
Accounting Smyrna, Del. 

Pi Lambda Phi, rush chairman; social chairman; Market- 
ing Club 

RALPH JOSEPH S1LVESTRI 
Eco/Finance West Orange, N.J. 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

MANUEL /. SIMOES 
Finance Bethlehem, Pa. 

Sigma Nu; Intramurals; Arnold Air Society 



STEVEN BRYCE SMITH 
Elect. Engr. York, Pa. 

Williams, president; Lehigh Christian Fellowship; Para- 
chuting Club; IEEE 

STUART M. SMITH 
Accounting Howard Beach, N.Y. 

RH-11; Cyanide, secretary; Ski Club; SAC, treasurer, RH 
representative 

ROBERT EDMUND SNEDDON JR. 
Accounting Plymouth Meeting, Pa. 

Alpha Sigma Phi; Intramurals 

KAREN VIRGINIA SNYDER 
Mathematics Slatington, Pa. 

RH-11; Lambda Alpha Lambda; Powder Puff Football; 
Women's Caucus; LUV 



JOHN CHRISTOPHER SIMUNEK 
Elect. Engr. Peekskill, N.Y. 

Taylor; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma 



KEVIN BRUCE SODER 
Accounting New Britain, Pa. 

Theta Delta Chi, Varsity Soccer 



MARTIN J. SIPPEL 
Metallurgy Allentown, Pa. 

Town; Metallurgy Society 

SUSAN M. SKACEL 
Accounting Towson, Md. 

Richards; Beta Alpha Psi; Brown & White; LUV 

CHARLES JUDE SKENDER 
Accounting Harrisburg, Pa. 

Alpha Tau Omega, treasurer, sentinel; Sophomore hon- 
ors; Dean's List; Beta Alpha Psi, secretary; JV Basketball; 
WLRN, music director 

MELANIE /. SKIBO 
Acctg/Mgt Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Intramural Softball; IR Club; Orchestra 

KEVIN DAVID SKINNER 
Indust. Engr. Woodbury, N.J. 

Theta Xi; Alpha Pi Mu; Marching Band; Varsity Band 

DENNIS MARTIN SLUTSKY 
Management Fall River, Mass. 

Sigma Phi; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Boxing Club; 
Chess Club; Brown & White; Mustard & Cheese 



JAMES TRACY SOMMERWINCLE 
Chemical Engr. Bel Air, Md. 

Delta Upsilon; AIChE; Frosh Soccer; Rugby Club; Mus- 
tard & Cheese 

LOUIS JOHN SOSA 
Accounting Queens, N.Y. 

Theta Delta Chi, recording secretary; Intramurals 

MICHAEL SOVA 
Accounting Connellsville, Pa. 

Delta Phi, IFC representative, social chairman; In- 
tramurals; LUV Council; Harrisburg Urban Semester; 
Drinker, president; RHC; Forum; Class Gift Committee 

NANCY ELLEN SPENCE 
Biology Roselle, N.J. 

RH-11; Dean's List; Class Gift Committee, publicity 

STEVEN VINCENT SPERRY 
Elect. Engr. Rumson, N.J. 

Sigma Nu, president, pledge marshall; Dean's List; Phi 
Eta Sigma; Tau Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nu, vice-president; 
Intramurals; LUV; Frosh Tutor; Fairchild Summer 
Scholarship; Class Vice-President 



PAMELA SMITH 
Accounting Trenton, N.J. 

Town; OEA; Black Theater; Dance Group; Cheerleader; 
LUV 



RICHARD WARREN SPIETH 
Civil Engr. Boiling Springs, Pa. 

Delta Upsilon, social chairman; Intramural Football & 
Wrestling 



RONALD SCOTT SMITH 
Mech. Engr. Short Hills, N.J. 

Pi Lambda Phi; ASME 



BRUCE DANIEL STACKHOUSE 
Mech. Engr. Hightstown, N.J. 

Psi Upsilon, president, pledgemaster, rush chairman 



Directory, 355 



JOHN F. STANGL JR. 
Elect. Engr. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; IEEE; Lehigh Valley Engineer Club; Computer 
Society; Town House; Lehigh Wheelman Assn.; WLRN 

DAWN ELOISE STARR 
Social Relations Zionhill, Pa. 

Town 



JOHN GORDON SWANSON 
Finance Rahway, N.J. 

Psi Upsilon, treasurer 

ROBERT NAT SWEENEY 
Marketing New Canaan, Conn. 

Sigma Nu; LUV; ROTC 



WILLIAM EVERETT STECKER 
Mech. Engr. Phillipsburg, N.J. 

Town; ASME 

ARLENE STEINBERG 
Accounting Glen Cove, N.Y. 

RH-11; Carothers, social chairman; Intramural Skiing; 
LUV; Class Gift Committee 

MICHAEL STERBA 
Acctg/Finance Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Sigma Phi 

STANELY DAVID STERNER 
Civil Engr. Hanover, Pa. 

Town; ASCE; Varsity Baseball; Delta Tau Delta, social 
member 

JOSEPH DAVID STERRETT 
Finance Wallingford, Pa. 

Delta Tau Delta, president; Football 

JAMES D. STEWART 
Finance Haddonfield, N.J. 

Theta Xi; Football 

ROBERT A. STEWART 
Geological Sciences Hopkinton, N.H. 

Phi Kappa Theta, alumni secretary, steward, vice-presi- 
dent, house manager; Dean's List; Varsity Hockey; Ice 
Hockey B— Team; Intramurals 

DAVID LEE STRICKLAND 
Indust. Engr. Glen Rock, N.J. 

Congdon, IM manager; University Scholarship; Bethle- 
hem Fabricators Award; Alpha Pi Mu; AIIE 



SHAUNA TARSHIS 
Urban Studies Great Neck, N.Y. 

Town; Dean's List; Forum; Parnassus Art Society; Mus- 
tard & Cheese; Women's Caucus 



JOSEPH D. TARULLI 



Biology 
Delta Phi 



Glen Head, N.Y. 



ANN HILARY TATEM 
Government Delhi, N.Y. 

Town; Dean's List Administrative Asst.— Borough of 
Fountain Hill 



STEVEN WILLIAM THATCHER 
Civil Engr. St. Paul, Minn. 

Phi Gamma Delta, house manager; Cross-Country; Track 



RALPH ALBERT THOMAS 
Accounting Washington, D.C. 

Beta Theta Pi, assistant steward, steward; Sophomore 
honors; Dean's List; Class '06 Scholarship Award; Var- 
sity Football, Wrestling, Basketball, manager; OEA, vice- 
president: Wrestling Team, head manager 

BRIAN CARSON THOMPSON 

Mech. Engr. Mansfield, Ohio 

Theta Xi, social chairman; Dean's List; Pi Tau Sigma; 
Phi Eta Sigma; ASME 

DAVID K. TILLER 
Acctg/Elect. Engr. Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Kappa Alpha, steward; IEEE; Volleyball; Swimming 



WILLIAM RICHARD STRZEPEK 
Chemical Engr. Easton, Pa. 

Town; Theta Xi 

STEVEN DAVID STURGIS 
Indust. Engr. Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha, pledgemaster; Phi Eta Sigma, treasurer; 
Tau Beta Pi; Alpha Pi Mu, president; AIIE; Epitome, 
sales manager; Gryphon Society: Mustard & Cheese; 
Varsity Cheerleader 



Accounting 
Town 



PHILIP J. SUBITS 



Bethlehem, Pa. 



WILLIAM E. TOMASSINI 
Indust. Engr. Endwell, N.Y. 

Delta Upsilon, pledge class president, alumni relations 
representative; AIIE; IEEE; Sophomore Class representa- 
tive to EE Student/Faculty Forum; Class representative 
to IEC; Intramurals; Hockey Club; Investment Club 

JANET LOUISE TORONGO 
French/Russian Yardley, Pa. 

RH-11; Freshman honors; Dean's List; Lambda Alpha 
Lambda, Marching Band; Concert Band; Varsity Band; 
Wind Ensemble; Brass Quintet; Women's Choir; Mixed 
Choir; Palmer, treasurer; Music at Lehigh Committee 



356. Directory 



GREGORY ALLEN TORSKl 
Indust. Engr. Mansfield, Ohio 

Lambda Chi Alpha, high phi; Richard K. Mellon Schol- 
arship; AIIE 

JOHN J. TRACY 
Economics/Govt Seaside Park, N.J. 

Chi Psi, social chairman; Sophomore honors; Varsity 
Football 

RAYMOND D. TRAK/MAS 
Indust. Engr. Elma, N.Y. 

Alpha Chi Rho, secreatary; Freshman, sophomore, junior 
honors; Tau Beta Pi; Alpha Pi Mu; AIIE; Intramurals 

ANDREW MARC TULLER 
Fine Arts New York, N.Y. 

Sigma Alpha Mu; Rifle Team; Epiphany Film Series, film 
coordinator; Parnassus Art Society; Brown & White, 
photographer 

BRUCE HENRY UHL 
Civil Engr. Allentown, Pa. 

Town; ASCE; Allentown City Basketball League 

RICHARD ALAN VALK 
Indust. Engr. Carlisle, Pa. 

Zeta Psi; Varsity Track; Marching Band 

JOHN DAVID VERNARR 
Civil Engr. Allentown, Pa. 

Town; Dean's List; ASCE; Sophomore honors; Arnold 
Air Society 

JOANNA VILLANI 
Spanish/ SR Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore, junior honors; Dean's List; 
LUV 

WESTON C. VOGEL JR. 
Finance Allentown, Pa. 

Town; Dean's List; Zeta Psi, treasurer, vice-president; 
Swim Team; Athletic Manager; LUV 

THOMAS LEE VOGELSONG 
Elect. Engr. Allentown, Pa. 

McConn, membership chairman; Wilbur Scholarship 
Award; Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu; Tau Beta Pi; 
IEEE; Frosh Tennis; Intramurals; Gryphon Society, tutor; 
LUV 



ROBERT ARTHUR WAGENS/EL JR. 
History Huntington, N.Y. 

Smiley; Intramurals; Cathedral Choir; Cathedral of the 
Nativity, counselor, asst. acolyte instructor; Cathedral 
Youth Group, gym teacher; Sts. Cyril & Methodius 
School, Sunday school teacher; LUV 

LEONARD C. WAGNER 
Mech. Engr. Reading, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore honors; ASME 

STEPHEN VALENTINE WALDENBURG JR. 
Elect. Engr. Northport, N.Y. 

Chi Phi, vice-president; Marching Band; Varsity Band 

DENESE D. WALTERS 
Psychology/SR Willingboro, N.J. 

Town; Dean's List; Intramurals; LUV; Mustard & Cheese; 
Varsity Basketball Cheerleader 

DAVID ERIC WALTON 
Elect. Engr. Potomac, Md. 

Taylor; IEEE; JV Soccer 

JEN SHIH WANG 
Civil Engr. Nutley, N.J. 

Town; ASCE; Table Tennis Club 

DAVID S. WARD 
Civil Engr. Woodcliff Lake, N.J. 

Tau Epsilon Phi, pledge warden; Phi Eta Sigma; Chi 
Epsilon 

MARK EDWARD WARNER 
Elect. Engr. Pottstown, Pa. 

M & M B-2; IEEE; Computer Society 

RICHARD LAWRENCE WARNER 
Management East Chester, N.Y. 

Town; Dean's List; Beta Gamma Sigma 

LAURENCE STUART WARSHAW 
History/Govt Lawrence, N.Y. 

Beta Theta Pi; honors; Brown & White; IFC, pledge 
committee, representative; Pre— Law Society; 
WLRN/WLTN; SAC Concert Committee 

JOHN J. WARWICK 
Civil Engr. Monmouth Beach, N.J. 

SMAGS; ASCE 



DANTE P. VOLPE 
Chemical Engr. Chalfont, Pa. 

Smiley; Dean's List; Phi Eta Sigma; AIChE 

CHRISTINE C. VOLZ 
American Studies Yardley, Pa. 

SMAGS 



RODNEY TOPPING WATERS II 
American Studies West Chester, Pa. 

Theta Xi; Lacrosse 

PAMELA JOYCE WATSON 
Accounting Honey Brook, Pa. 

Richards; Powder Puff Football; Varsity Tennis 



Directory, 357 



JOHN EDWARD WAYLETT JR. 
Elect. Engr. Dunellen, N.J. 

McConn; IEEE 

DAVID EDWARD WEBB 
Chemical Engr. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, steward; AIChE 

TERRY MARC WEINER 
Indust. Engr. Allentown, Pa. 

Lambda Chi Alpha, secretary; Freshman honors; In- 
tramural Weightlifting; IFC representative 

FRANK EDWARD WEINPERL JR. 
Psych/Sociology Hellertown, Pa. 

Town; Dean's List; Karate; Brown & White, reporter; 
Volunteer work 

NORMA DIANE WEISS 
Interdisciplinary Brodheadsville, Pa. 

RH-11; Dean's List; Powder Puff Football; Intramurals; 
Pre-Law Society; IR Club; LUV 

SANDRA M. WELTY 
English/Journalism Wyndmoor, Pa. 

Town; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Williams Prize in 
Creative Writing, first & second places 

ROBERT FRANK WERKMAN 
Chemistry Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Freshman, sophomore honors; Marching Band; 
Concert Band; volunteer 

GREGORY PAUL WHITFORD 
Economics Vero Beach, Fla. 

Phi Sigma Kappa; Skydiving Club; AFROTC 

MARK EDGAR WHITMORE 
Civil Engr. Akron, Ohio 

Kappa Sigma, asst. grand scribe, IFC representative; 
ASCE; Intramurals; Rugby Club; Class Gift Committee 

BRUCE F. WHYTE 
Accounting Hartsdale, N.Y. 

RH-11; Dean's List 

GARY DREW WIEGNER 
Chemical Engr. Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Smiley, social chairman; AIChE; Intramural Football 

GEORGE E. WIELAND III 
Biology Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Computer Society 

S. ROBERT WILLIAMS 
Government Manlius, N.Y. 

Chi Psi, house manager, IFC representative; Chi Psi 
Scholastic Award; Varsity Indoor & Outdoor Track 
Pre— Law Society, vice-president 



WILLIAM JOSEPH WILLIAMSON III 
Indust. Engr. Exton, Pa. 

Taylor; Alpha Pi Mu; Tau Beta Pi; AIIE; Gryphon So- 
ciety, vice-president; Marching Band; Concert Band 

STUART MICHAEL WILSKER 
Social Psychology Cedarhurst, N.Y. 

Sigma Chi, rush chairman, steward; Frosh Football; Var- 
sity Football 

MARK SAMUEL WILSON 
Government Philadelphia, Pa. 

Smiley, president; Freshman sophomore honors; RHC 
Facilities Committee; Pre— Law Society 

RICHARD JOHNSTON WILSON 
Elect. Engr. Greensburg, Pa. 

Theta Xi, president; Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu; 
Intramurals; Concert Band; Jazz Band; Forum 

MARK ALEXANDER WISHBOW 
Biology Morristown, N.J. 

Delta Phi, steward; Intramurals 

PAUL JOHN WOLOWNIK 
Elect. Engr. Chester, Pa. 

Alpha Chi Rho, vice-president; Sophomore honors; 
Dean's List; IEEE; Intramurals; Skydiving Club 

DAVID W. WORRALL 
Mkt/Mgt North Haledon, N.J. 

Gryphons, Dean's List; Intramurals; Gryphon Society; 
Phi Delta Theta; Epitome; WLTN; Marketing Club; 
Hoopla; LUV 

THOMAS VAN WORT 
Accounting Garnerville, N.Y. 

Town: Band, senior representative 

PAUL JOSEPH WURDACK JR. 
Elect. Engr. Bethel Park, Pa. 

M & M B-3; Glee Club; AFROTC 

JOHN J. WOYNARONSKI 
Biology/Latin Reading, Pa. 

Delta Sigma Phi. Phi Beta Kappa, Cross Country; Track 

GORDON T. WYATT 
Acctg/Finance Clarks Summit, Pa. 

Sigma Phi, athletic chairman; Dean's List; Sophomore 
honors; Pre— Law Society; Brown & White, circulation 
manager; Horizons, circulation manager 

GREGORY J. YENCHO 
Metallurgy & Materials Science Bethlehem, Pa. 

Town; Freshman honors; Stewart Cort Scholarship; 
ASM-AIME; Metallurgy Society; Computer Society; Le- 
high Wheelman Assn. 



358. Directory 



MICHAEL RAYMOND YODER 
Chemical Engr. Reading, Pa. 

Pi Lambda Phi, vice-president, IFC representative; 
Freshman, sophomore honors; AIChE; Intramurals 



/AMES BRADLEY YOUST 



DAVID LYNN ZABOR 
Accounting Greenwich, Conn. 

Phi Delta Theta, treasurer, vice-president; Sophomore 
honors; Dean's List; Beta Alpha Psi; Rugby Club, cap- 
tain, president; Class Executive Committee; Brown & 
White, credit manager 



Civil Engr. 
Town; ASCE 



Bethlehem, Pa. 



DEBBIE DEE YUAN 
Mathematics Princeton, N.J. 

SMAGS; Sophomore honors; Dean's List; Hoopla; Mus- 
tard & Cheese; Apprentice Teachers Program 



Accounting 
Delta Chi 



/AMES GEORGE ZAHKA 

West Newton, Mass. 



LINDA JANE YURKOVIC 
Fundamental Science Morristown, N.J. 

Carothers; Computer Society 



ROBERT JOSEPH ZWICKL 
Chemical Engr. Whitehall, Pa. 

Taylor; Sophomore honors; Phi Eta Sigma; Marching 
Band 






Directory, 359 



IcCLINTIC- MARSHALI 



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STEEL BUILDINGS, 
BRIDGES, Etc 













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COMMUNITY 



ORJgWORP . 

10 tke 
board of tru-stee-s. 
tke faculty, tKe 
^tuderd- body, OJTslI 
oJJ olkero infenedt 
ed , we offer ikies 
brief record of 
LEMIGM life. 



LEHIGH ALUMNI CLUBS 



For further information on whom to contact in your area please feel free to call or write the Alumni Office, Alumni Memorial Bldg. on 
campus. 



ALLENTOWN 

Larry E. Moyer '61, Connecticut Mutual Life, 1405 N. Cedar 

Crest Blvd., Allentown, Pa. 18014 
ATLANTA 

Malachy C. Murray '56, Lake Shore Drive, Norris Lake Shores, 

Lithonia, Ga. 30058 
CENTRAL NEW YORK 

Robert W. Hyla '62, Henneberry Road, RD #2, Manius, N.Y. 13104 
CENTRAL OHIO 

George P. Enke '33, 1009 S. Fair Oaks Drive, North Canton, 

Ohio, 44720 
CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA 

James C. Byerly '71, Byerly Ins. Agents & Brokers, P.O. Box 251, 

Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 
CHICAGO 

Alan Greenley '58, 116 Tanglewood Lane, Naperville, Illinois 

60540 
CONNECTICUT 

Joseph M. King. Jr. '61, 102 Adelaide Road, Manchester. Conn. 

06040 
DELAWARE 

John W. Yamarick '51, 2711 Landon Drive, Wilmington, Delaware 

19810 
DELAWARE VALLEY 

Ralph Palazzo '43, 1832 North Olden Avenue, Trenton, N.J. 08638 
DETROIT 

Charles G. Myers III '65, 30310 Southfield Road, Apt. 62B, 

Southfield. Mich. 48076 
FAIRFIELD COUNTY 

Jon M. Von Bergen '62, 28 Deep Gorge Road, Greenwich, Conn. 06830 
FLORIDA WEST COAST 

Francis J. Rowan, Jr. '57, 10353 Hettrick Circle W., Largo, 

Florida 33540 
HOME CLUB 

Michael G. Bolton '65, 2026 Montgomery Street. Bethlehem, Pa. 

18017 
JERSEY SHORE 

Douglas P. Stives '68, 41 Center Street, Rumson, N.J. 07760 
LANCASTER COUNTY 

Irvin L. Huber '48, 1938 Park Plaza, Lancaster, Pa. 17601 
MARYLAND 

Robert H. Hicks, Jr. '44, 7002 Wellington Court, Baltimore. 

Md. 21212 
MID-HUDSON VALLEY 

Austin E. Short '57, Rt. 216, Stormville, N.Y. 12582 
MID-JERSEY 

Donald H. Stires '50, Pave-Rite Inc., 43 West High Street. 

Somerville. N.J. 08876 
NEW ENGLAND 

Ronald D. Johnson '62, 52 Summer Street, Norwell, Mass. 02061 
NEW YORK 

Richard H. Leeds '44, Thomson Leeds Co., Inc., 711 Third Avenue. 

New York, N.Y. 10017 
NITTANY VALLEY 

Claries A. Nicholson '50, 931 Robin Road. State College, Pa. 16801 
NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA 

H. Merritt Hughes, Jr. '63, 451 N. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, 

Pa. 18705 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

Robert A. Kaufman '68, Shady Grove, Inc., 1681 8th Street, 

Oakland. California 94607 
NORTHERN NEW JERSEY 

Ralph T. Bartlett '47, 164 Green Avenue, Madison, N.J. 07940 



NORTHERN NEW YORK 

Thomas J. Healy '58, Rt. 6, Loughberry Road, Saratoga Springs, 

N.Y. 12866 
NORTHERN OHIO 

Lawrence G. Mackowiak '70, Park Centre 12-L East, 1700 F East 

13 Street, Cleveland, Ohio 44114 
NORTHWEST INDIANA 

John J. Hursh '40, 1030 N. Karwick Road. Michigan City, 

Indiana 46306 
NORTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Alan E. Greener '55, 436 Connecticut Drive, Erie, Pa. 16505 
OHIO VALLEY 

E. William Kuhl, Jr. '66, 902 Oregon Trail, Cincinnati, Ohio 45215 
PACIFIC NORTHWEST 

Harold E. Meyer '53, 4145 W. Mercer Way, Mercer Island, 

Washington 98040 
PHILADELPHIA 

Robert T. Hoyt, Jr. '52. 559 Woodlea Lane, Berwyn, Pa. 19312 
PITTSBURGH 

Malcolm Hay, Jr. '60, 131 Grove Street Ext., Sewickley, Pa. 15143 
ROCHESTER 

William Grason, Jr. '60. 58 Christyn Marie Drive, Rochester, 

N.Y. 14626 
ROCKY MOUNTAIN 

Richard M. Ruthhart '45, 935 Logan Street, Apt. 203, Denver, 

Colorado 80203 
ST. LOUIS 

T. Frank James '61, 16 Midpark Lane, St. Louis, Missouri 63124 
SAN DIEGO 

Mark H. Hannah '62, 427 Sea Ridge Drive, La Jolla, California 

92037 
SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

John Weidenhammer '71, 1504 Old Mill Road. Wyomissing, Pa. 19610 
SOUTHERN ANTHRACITE 

John T. Morrison '53, 211 E. Market Street, Orwigsburg, Pa. 17961 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

James B. Price '43, 12849 Milbank Street, Studio City, 

California 91604 
SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY 

William I. Evoy '61, Taunton Lakes, Marlton, N.J. 08053 
SOUTHERN NEW YORK 

David R. Angell '62, RD #2, Box 229, Endicott. N.Y. 13760 
SOUTH FLORIDA 

Robert D. Happ '62, 2840 N.E. 52nd Street, Fort Lauderdale, 

Florida 33308 
TEXAS 

Charles H. Messerve '48. 12131 Pebble Brook Drive. Houston, 

Texas 77024 
UPPER JERSEY 

Donald F. Kane '62. 33 Orange Place, Packanack Lake, Wayne, 

N.J. 07470 
VIRGINIA 

W. Robb Sultzer, Jr. '73. 6628 Janke Road, Richmond, Va. 23225 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

T. Peter Gratto '62, 3403 Surrey Lane, Falls Church. Va. 22042 
WESTCHESTER / ROCKLAND 

Jay C. Lacke '64, RR 1, Stewart Road, South Salem, N.Y. 10590 
WESTERN NEW YORK 

Carl Henzelman '48. 430 Lincoln Parkway. Buffalo, N.Y. 14216 
YORK 

Richard Paul '42. Paul Laboratories, 476 W. Market St., 

Box 1802, York, Pa. 17405 



362, Community 



Compliments of 



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Community. 363 





364, Community 





Community, 365 




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530 W. Broad St. 
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LOORS by BASTIAN 

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Phone Allentown 395-2061 



366, Community 



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306 Brodhead Avenue 

Bethlehem, Pa. 

Electrical Contractors 

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Pennsylvania 



Community, 367 




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Community, 369 




LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 
BOOKSTORE 

MAGINNES HALL #9 




370, Community 




BLAUSTEIN LECTURE SERIES 



OBSERVES TENTH ANNIVERSARY 



This year, 1976, was the Tenth Anniversary of the prestigious Blaustein Lectures in International 
Relations at Lehigh University. The occasion was marked by three distinguished speakers coming to Lehigh. 
The previous nine programs in this series were presented by a single lecturer each year. 

The speakers this year were George W. Ball, Hans Morgenthau and James R. Schlesinger (below). Pictured 
above with Mr. Ball (third from left) and Mr. Morgenthau (second from left) are Dr. Carey B. Joynt (left), M. 
J. Rathbone Distingued Professor who coordinates the series, and Dr. Deming Lewis, University President. 

The previous speakers in this series were Harold Wilson, and the late Sir Denis Brogan, of England; Abba 
Eban, of Israel; the late Henri Paul Spaak, of Belgium; Lee Kuan -Yew, of Singapore; and Dean Rusk, 
Maxwell Taylor, Averell Harriman and James Reston, of the U.S. 

This prominent series is made possible by gifts from the Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Foundation of 
Baltimore, Md. The late Dr. Blaustein was a member of the Class of 1913 at Lehigh. Mrs. Blaustein is 
chairman of the Foundation and her son, Dr. Morton K. Blaustein is president. 




Community, 371 




372. Community 





V ^t 








Community, 373 



BEST WISHES FOR A SUCCESSFUL CAREER 



Compliments of 



ICARUS 



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Allentown's Leading Food 
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serving all the leading food 

services, including FMA 

at Lehigh 

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PHONE 434-961 I 



374, Community 



CLARENCE B. HANEY, INC. 

MASON CONTRACTOR 

1745 Easton Avenue 

Bethlehem, 

Pennsylvania 




Community, 375 




376, Animated History 



AN ANIMATED HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF '76 

Four years ago, Frankie Frosh and Cathy Coed joined approximately 900 other members of Lehigh's 
freshmen Class of '76. In four years, Frankie, Cathy and Lehigh have made substantial strides, undergoing 
some transitions in the process. 

In the classroom, Frankie and Cathy saw the deletion of Lehigh's foreign language requirement, the 
establishment of plus-minus grading, and the cutback in the course-drop period provided. They also saw the 
size of their classes inflate with the economy. The student body increased from 3,500 in 1972 to 
approximately 3,900 in 1976. Meanwhile, the inflated economy caused tuition to climb at spiraling rates. 

Not all increases at Lehigh were negative, however. The social life for Frankie and other men improved as 
the number of women admitted to Lehigh increased. This also made life more comfortable for women 
students already on campus, as they became a more accepted minority. 

Frankie and Cathy also saw great athletic gains in their four years at Lehigh. They watched Lehigh 
wrestlers sweep the Easterns and take two firsts at Nationals in 1975, football victories over Penn and 
Delaware in 1975, the gradual recovery of the basketball team, and the growth and addition of several 
women's varsity sports. 

These are just some of the achievements the Class of '76 will remember after graduation. In the next 
animated section, we will review the past four years — first, from Frankie Frosh's inimitable perspective, 
second, from Cathy Coed's viewpoint. With this approach, we hope to provide a needed balance of opinions 
and impressions which has been overlooked too long at Lehigh. 



Animated History, 377 



1972 



fsge v^oU A6AIN 7 .A UMa£ SweDLtVs aRiWAY!] 




Steck: What class is this? 
Response: 76! 
Steck: What do we do? 
Response: We really mix/ 

Frankie Frosh, 76, took the official oath of allegiance to 
Lehigh University on Aug., 28, 1972. He came to South 
Mountain very unsure of what to expect during the next 
four years of his life. 

Upon arrival at the University on Sunday, Aug. 27, 
Frankie was beseiged with paraphernalia ranging from a 
desk blotter covered with ads from the school fraternities 
to a red balloon given him by a member of the University 
Counseling Service. Also, Frankie was given a piece of 
paper on which were listed Emergency Phone Numbers to 
Know, such as the police, fire department, ambulance 
service, and Butz Hall at Cedar Crest College. 

After returning to the Alumni Memorial Building three 
times, Frankie was finally giver the correct key to his room 
in Drinker. Mr. and Mrs. Frosh then proceeded with Frank- 
ie to the dining room in the U.C. for their last meal with 
their son before turning him loose in the jungle. 

The luncheon menu offered a choice of three specialties 
of the dining service chef; mystery meat with gravy, mys- 
tery meat without gravy, or just gravy. 

After his final farewells to mom and dad, Frankie re- 
turned to Drinker to await the arrival of his two room- 
mates. He got back to his room just in time to partake in 
chanting across the quad of Richards Sucks.' Also, he was 
introduced to what would be his best friend during his 
four-year stay at the University, Bud (in a can). 

By now it was almost six o'clock and Frankie was 
anxiously awaiting the arrival of his roommates. Finally, 
one showed up. His name was John and he was an engi- 
neer from Wilkes Barre, Pa. More important, he seemed 
like a nice guy. 

We'll have to sit down and have a long talk in the 
morning, John said. He then went off to the Mart. 

The following morning was freshman convocation day. 
The ceremony was held in Grace Hall with Dean Brian 
Brockway as keynote speaker. It was a most memorable 
occasion. Joining Brockway on the podium were the other 
academic deans, Sam Missimer (the man who, during his 
admission interview, asked probing questions like, What 
do you want to be when you grow up?), and a tall man 
who approached the microphone and carefully read, Hello 
boys and girls, my name is Dr. W. Deming Lewis. I'm 
University chancellor, I mean president. 

Now Brockway drew center stage attention. The Busi- 
ness College dean knew just how to handle this timid 
group of initiates. After telling them how he almost flun- 
ked out of college, Brockway warned the Class of '76 that 
the University would not be its nursemaid and that one 



1973 



out of four of them would not make it to graduation in 
four years. 

After the ceremony, Frankie returned to the dorm for an 
important section meeting. It was here that he first met his 
gryphon, Vik. 

Vik told the group that his purpose was whatever you 
want it to be, and that he was available any Tuesday night 
after 2 a.m. or Friday after 9 p.m. for counseling. In case of 
emergency, Vik said that he could be reached at the 
computer center. 

The next day, Frankie registered and received his class 
schedule; 8:00 classes everyday, a 1-4 p.m. on Friday and 
no lunch on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. There was 
also a minor conflict on the schedule. He had three classes 
scheduled to meet at noon on Wednesday. To remedy this, 
Frankie got in line at Broadhead Avenue, a line which 
headed into the registrar's annex in the Alumni Memorial 
Building. 

From 7 to 10 that evening, Frankie waited in line at the 
Bookstore, only to learn that they were fresh out of every 
textbook he needed. 

And so began the first of four undergraduate years at 
Lehigh for Frankie Frosh. During his freshman year, Nixon 
was re-elected president, and the war in Vietnam ended. 
At Lehigh, the year was highlighted by campus appear- 
ances by Jane Fonda, Isaac Asimov, John Kenneth Gal- 
braith, Singapore Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew, a debate 
between Charles Goodell and J. Daniel Mahoney, and a 
visit by 400-plus-pound wrestler Chris Taylor. SAC con- 
certs lost money, but featured the New York Rock En- 
semble and Livingston Taylor. 

In sports, the Engineer grapplers came in third in East- 
erns and lost a dual meet to Navy, but a more memorable, 
a quick 118-pound freshman wrestler donned Lehigh togs 
and that year captured the Eastern crown. He was named 
tournament Outstanding Wrestler; his name, Mike Frick. 

In football, the big name was quarterback Kim 
McQuilken. The gridders defeated Lafayette 14-6 that sea- 
son. 

The Lehigh University Forum met several times during 
the year. 

The chairmanship of the University Board of Trustees 
changed hands from the head of Standard Oil of New 
Jersey, Monroe Rathbone to Hershey Foods chief, Hal 
Mohler. 

While the intellectual elite debated such issues as the 
language requirement in the Arts college, Frankie and 
mar;y of his classmates discussed a more pressing question; 
When was the last time you saw a girl on campus? 

The interests of those few women on campus were often 
represented by assistant dean of student life, Ruth Hurley. 
She also offered a new course to freshmen as a seminar — 
Human Sexuality. Frankie, who had anxiously registered 
for the course, soon learned that, like his social life at 
Lehigh, Sex was far from easy. 



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1973 




It was March 7, 1974. Spring break at the University was 
about to begin, and 4:00 hourlies had just ended. The 
newspapers were filled with news of the Rodino Com- 
mittee's progress toward the impeachment of the president. 
All of these factors led to an outbreak at the University, 
perhaps the most memorable event at Lehigh ever. About 
4,500 students and Bethlehem residents jammed into lower 
campus to witness 400 students who were stricken with 
cases of epidermis epidemic, or as it was more commonly 
known, streaking. 

And for Frankie, and his sophomore classmates, the 
warm Thursday evening festivities added a new dimension 
to their favorite pasttime, girl-hunting. However, for most 
of the streakers, the evening's excitement was the result of 
the large crowds since LUST (Lehigh University Streaking 
Team) was like the Marching 97, a predominantly male 
organization. 

The streakers paraded through the freshman quad and 
Centennials always with that one topic of discussion circu- 
lating throughout ... I hear there's a girl doing it in front 
of M & M. 

And when the paraders built up a thirst, the cry became, 
To the snackbar.' Some streakers even thought the evening 
was a proper occasion to pay a call on Dr. and Mrs. Lewis 
at the President's home. 

Frankie, who had been practicing trying to find females 
at Lehigh for over a year and a half now, was one of the 
lucky LUST members. Spotting a female exhibitionist and 
trying to act debonaire he approached one of Lehigh's 
horse-less Lady Godiva's and began to make light conver- 
sation. This is the biggest thing ever at Lehigh, he said. The 
coed glanced at Frankie's physique and jogged on saying, 
Sorry, fellow, not even close. 

Lehigh, 1973-74 featured a cast of comics, mostly slapst- 
ick. The year began with the campus' best known trouble- 
maker, law professor Charles Vihon, resigning to attend 
Harvard Law School. But Vihon was never taken off the 
University payroll, and received his full $15,000 a year 
salary in exchange for his resignation. 

But the Vihon role did not end here. He also went on to 
marry Associate Dean of Student Life, Ruth Hurley, who 
played the lonely role of campus token feminist. The script 
left it up to the audience to answer the question. Is taking 
Hurley away from Lehigh part of the $15,000 deal Vihon 
made with the administration? 

And then there was the saga of the attempt by women to 
infiltrate the Marching 97. In this scene, the band's man- 
ager, Andrew Shmereler starred as the campus leading 
male chauvinist pig, challenging everything from 
women's right to enter the marching band to their right to 
vote in this country. The scene ends with a climactic half- 
time show at the Delaware football game in which several 



1974 



bandies doffed their bandcaps showing the crowd that 
either a group of hippies had joined the band, or the 
Marching 97 had finally gone coed. While this was taking 
place, the band was playing There's nothing like a dame 
from a formation on the field spelling DAME. 
SAC opened the year with a $1500 loss on a concert 
featuring Canned Heat. And then, under the leadership of 
the concert chairman, Mark Linder, Bethlehem teenagers 
were treated to a SAC concert featuring Jo Jo Gunne and 
Brownsville Station. When the latter played its hit Smok- 
ing in the Boys Room, Grace Hall rocked. 

Then there was Prof. Robert Folk who led the campaign 
in favor of plus-minus grading by claiming that he couldn't 
sleep at night during grading time because it was too 
difficult to determine what letter grade a student had 
earned for the course. 

But the problem with Lehigh, 1973-73 as a play is that 
throughout the comedy, there were two scenes that just did 
not fit. Some were just too serious in nature, two were 
tragic. 

Mitch Fishkin, '76, a pledge at Delta Phi fraternity, fell 
from a moving car during a fraternity prank and died. 
Another student was found hanging in his room. 

On the sports scene, it was still McQuilken to Schlegel, 
but the gridders seemed to be headed to another mediocre 
season after losing to Delaware and Penn. But then, sud- 
denly, a freshman tailback named Rod Gardner broke into 
the Engineer starting line-up and the team went on to 
share the Lambert Cup with Delaware, and to be invited to 
play in the NCAA DIVISION playoffs. The gridders lost a 
close, 25-16 contest to Western Kentucky down in the 
Bluegrass Bowl. 

The grapplers improved over the previous season but 
once again settled for third at Easterns. Tom Sculley went 
on to capture the 134-pound crown at Nationals. 

A wide variety of speakers lectured at the University 
during the year. On the political front, Democratic sena- 
torial candidates Herbert Dennenberg and Peter Flaherty 
debated in Grace Hall. Gov. Milton Shapp brought his re- 
election campaign to campus and Sen. William Proxmire 
was the Forum Convocation speaker. Senate Watergate 
Committee Chief Counsel Sam Dash and former congress- 
man Allard K. Lowenstein. 

On the lighter side were authors Norman Mailor and 
Jean Sheppard. 

But while the 1973-74 year at Lehigh was packed with 
memorable campus events, what was happening in the real 
world clearly over-shadowed all. A vice-president had 
been caught as a crook and forced to resign. The resigna- 
tion of the president was becoming more of a possibility 
everyday. The year may have been the most trying period 
for the American government. 




1974 



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Professor Mills . . . 

Yes, sir. 

My name is Frankie Frosh and you're my curriculum 

adviser. J was wondering if you wouJd pJease sign this 

add-drop slip for me. 

Forget it.' None of the students I advise are aJiowed to 

drop a course after the first week of the semester. Didn't 

you read that the faculty voted to lower the course-drop 

period? 

Yes, but I thought it was cut hack from 12 to 7 weeks. 

That's only because those artsy profs aren't concerned 

about Lehigh's reputation. It should have been cut back to 

one week. 

But Professor Mills, there is a conflict in my schedule. I 

have two different Accounting courses scheduled to meet 

at the same time. 

If you can't handle the workload, you shouldn't have 

come to Lehigh. 



Professor Folk . . . 
Yes sir. 

/ was wondering why I received a C in Physics from you 
last spring. 

Well, let me see, your average on the seven hourlies was 
87.325. They make up 35 per cent of the course grade. You 
got a 76 on the final, which counts 60 per cent. And, for 
class work, you did very well and received two out of five 
points. Your overall average came to 79.497. I lost at least 
three nights sleep trying to decide between a B and a C for 
you. Fortunately, I won't have to face this problem any- 
more, since the faculty passed my motion on plus-minus 
grading. If this had been the case, I could have been 
generous and given you a C-plus. But not last semester, 
sorry. 

1974-75 at Lehigh was a year in which the course drop 
period was lowered, plus-minus grading established, and 
the registrar called for the re-establishment of Saturday 
classes. This even got student members of the Forum 
aroused. 

But somehow the University's academic pressures seem 
to subside somewhat for many undergraduates thanks to 
the reliable Lehigh tradition, watching a top-notch wres- 
tling team. The 1975 varsity wrestling squad was perhaps 
one of the finest group of grapplers ever to don Lehigh 
wrestling togs. For the first time in 7 years, the Engineers 
defeated Navy in a dual meet. They also wrestled to tie 
with the Nittany Lions of Penn State. But the best was yet 
to come. 

At the Easterns in Annapolis, Md., almost all previous 
EIWA records were smashed as nine Lehigh grapplers 
placed in the tournament, seven of whom were crowned 
EIWA champs. 



1975 



As the team prepared for Nationals, which were held at 
Jadwin Gym, Princeton, what seemed to be out of the 
question suddenly was the quiet talk of the campus. 

The Engineers did not go on to do the ultimate and win 
at Nationals. However, they did finish fifth as a team and 
Mike Frick and Mike Lieberman were crowned National 
champs. Frick was named the NCAA's Outstanding Wres- 
tler. 

But while cheering packed houses characterized the 
wrestling season, sparse crowds were in attendance to 
watch the basketball team play to a season's mark of 1-23. 
The season opened with the hoopsters taking on the 
Czechoslovakian National Team. Needless to say, Lehigh 
lost. And as the season came to a close, the hoopsters lost 
their coach, Tom Pugliese, who resigned a self-proclaimed 
bitter man. This proved that there is always a bright side 
to losing. 

In football, Joe Alleva ran the offense with help from a 
sensational tailback named Rod Gardner. No Lambert Cup 
or bowl bids this year, but the team ended a 7-3 season 
with a 57-7 demolition of Lafayette at Fisher Field in 
Easton. 

Besides sports, the year provided many other academic 
activities. Grace Hall was turned into a haven for greasers 
when SAC presented Sha Na Na. A crowd showed up to 
see another SAC concert featuring Herbie Hancock. 

On the lecture circuit, the campus heard from former 
Secretary of State Dean Rusk, author Elie Wiesel, colum- 
nist Carl Rowan, reported Seymour Hersh, anthropologist 
Margaret Mead and economist Marina V.N. Whitman. 

And for those who still need some other outlet for their 
excess energy, there was always the fire alarm box near 
FIJI. 

Besides Pugliese, another well known Lehigh figure en- 
ded his association with the University, Dean Clarence 
Campbell. Joining the staff that year was Dr. Lora Liss, 
Affirmative Action Director. 

Among the first projects Liss became interested in was 
the Women's Caucus on campus. When the group tried to 
get official University recognition and support, it was 
refused. Men were not allowed to be voting members of 
the organization, and that's discrimination. 

But as the campus laughed at this problem, some real 
discrimination was taking place at a Lehigh fraternity. The 
alumni association of Theta Chi fraternity asked some 
brothers to leave the house because they were gay. 

And while all this was occuring at Lehigh, the real world 
was reading about a new American president and how he 
pardoned his predecessor. Also, the Mid-East went to war 
on the evening of the holiest day of the Jewish calendar. 
Arab terrorism filled the front pages of newspapers sharing 
the headlines with rioting in South Boston over forced 
busing. 




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Did you see that poJJ that claims that 47 per cent of the 

students has cheated? 

Boy, that's really going to hurt Lehigh's reputation. 

Heck, who cares about that. What really scares me is that 

now the profs are going to get wise and start to take 

precautions during finals. 

So? 

How am I going to pass my Management 270 final? 

And now Frankie was entering his final year at Lehigh. 

Three years of hard work and study, and he was ready to 

tackle any question put to him, except; What are you 

going to do after you graduate? 

And so, Frankie began a year of job interviews, plant 
trips, and rejections. Senior year is supposed to be the 
easiest at college, but Frankie was tenser than ever. Maybe 
I'll join the Peace Corps or worse yet, get an MBA at 
Lehigh next year. 

But throughout the year, Lehigh activities seemed to help 
Frankie take his mind off his tensions. One night, he went 
to Grace Hall to see the Donkey Basketball Game. Hey, 
there's Deming Lewis! a friend said. 
Where? 
He's on top. 

Frankie later remarked, This is the first time I've ever 
been to a basketball game at Lehigh. And indeed, what 
was going on during that evening's festivities was much 
more entertaining than the basketball played at Lehigh 
during his freshman, sophomore and junior years. But this 
year was different. A new young coach named Brian Hill, 
a freshman guard named Bill Griffin, and a winning atti- 
tude meant suddenly the Lehigh basketball team was 
worth watching. 

Basketball was just one of the year's sports successes. 
The gridders rolled up one of their best seasons. An 86- 
year old jinx against Penn was ended, and the Engineers 
went on to beat Rutgers and Delaware. More important, 
the team won the Lambert Cup and was given a bid to 
play in the NCAA Division II playoffs. Lehigh lost to New 
Hampshire in the opening round of the playoffs in Taylor 
Stadium. 

The grapplers dominated Easterns again this season and 
finished fifth in Nationals with Mike Frick ending his 
Lehigh career as a two-time national champ. 



1976 



Frick almost ended his Lehigh career a year early when, 
at the start of the fall semester, he considered transferring 
to Slippery Rock. The University's financial aid committee 
had cut off his aid for scholastic reasons. But the com- 
mittee reconsidered and gave the 134-pound star a cancel- 
lable loan. 

During the year, an issue of Lehigh Horizons was 
burned, not by a reader, but by the Administration. Some 
40,000 copies of a spring issue of the publication were 
brought to the Bethlehem Steel incinerator because they 
contained a story about a campus sex poll. The adminis- 
tration apparently felt that sex was not a proper subject 
for discussion in Horizons. Many students agreed. They 
felt that Horizons should deal with issues which affect 
Lehigh students. 

And speaking of polls, the same poll that showed 47 per 
cent of students here has cheated, also revealed that more 
than three quarters of the student body has smoked mari- 
juana. The other 25 per cent did not know what marijuana 
was. 

But the big story of the year had to be the Midnight 
Marauder who entered rooms in the A-3 section of 
McClintic-Marshall House. The story led to a campus-wide 
discussion on campus security, and M & M A-3 residents 
leaving their doors unlocked at night. Fraternities were 
burglarized, a woman was attacked on campus, but no one 
was really concerned. After all, Lehigh's finest, (campus 
cops), were busy staking out the Snack Bar under the 
leadership of Capt. Eugene Dax. 

The year saw speakers including Jimmy Breslin, Sen. 
Richard Schweiker, Flo Kennedy, William Rusher and 
Allard Lowenstein. 

In concerts, Peter Frampton proved to be one of the 
most successful SAC shows ever. The Kinks played La- 
fayette Weekend. Another show featured Don McLean and 
Livingston Taylor. 

The Forum met during the year. 

And so, Frankie finally made it to graduation. He was 
leaving Lehigh with a diploma and four years of memories. 
He leaves behind beer and pinball, cribnotes, and with the 
very question he asked as freshmen still unanswered: 
Didn't Lehigh go co-ed a few years ago? 



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In the summer of '72, Cathy Coed was eagerly awaiting 
the start of her four year career at Lehigh. Her friends at 
home were envious, especially about Cathy's social pros- 
pects. 

You're in luck.' With that ratio of 10:1 guys to girls, you'll 
probably have 10 dates every weekend, they mused. 

And so it was that August that Cathy came to South 
Mountain with high hopes for her academic and social 
growth during her four years at Lehigh. She would soon 
learn to accept one out of two. (Besides, Lehigh had an 
excellent chemical engineering department.) 

Several days after Cathy had adjusted to Lehigh sur- 
roundings, (including the shortage of ladies rooms, the off- 
limits-to-women steam and weights rooms in the gym, etc.), 
she and her hall-mates started talking about their first 
weekend at Lehigh. The brothers of Beta Upsilon Mu had 
invited her section to a dinner Friday night. Cathy and her 
friends didn't realize it then, but this would be one of few 
times that they would see so many brothers in an unnatur- 
al state — sober. The meal went fast, as meals go when no 
one talks to anyone else. One brother later apologized for 
his friends' silence. You'll have to excuse them. They're 
not used to seeing girls on weekdays. They thought you 
were waitresses at first. 

After dinner, most of the brothers left the room to return 
to their calculators, or to watch a rerun of Star Trek. 

Cathy realized then that her image of Lehigh fraternity 
men needed some revision. 

The next day Cathy and her friends were sitting in the 
snack bar discussing their social situation, when one of 
them said: What is that big blob on the wall, next to the 
counter? 

Beats me, Cathy said. It must be somebody's idea of art. 

That's not what I heard some guy call it yesterday, 
another said. 

But the 'blob on the wall,' was not the only obstacle to a 
healthy social life at Lehigh. Apparently other students 
agreed, and many complained to Ruth Hurley, designated 
spokesperson for Lehigh women and the token female 
administrator. Hurley helped organize a student caucus 
meeting to discuss social options for students. Few males 
attended; most mistakenly thought the session would be 
held at Cedar Crest. 

In 1972-73, Cathy learned much more than introductory 
engineering. She learned and a new way to say 'Cedar 
Crest' and 'Sacred Heart' 

Even more important, Cathy realized that she would 



cz^Z 



1973 - 1974 



have to transfer to one of those schools if she ever wanted 
to date a Lehigh guy. 

1973-1974 was a year of great strides for Cathy Coed and 
all women at Lehigh. It was the year the men to women 
ratio dropped to a slightly more healthy 6:1 mark. Women 
on campus made their presence known to the boys in the 
band as well as on the baseball field. It was the end of this 
year when women were elected president of the SAC and 
vice chairman of Forum. But despite these achievements, 
Lehigh women still fought uphill battles for acceptance. 

The year began with the resignation of Dean Hurley, 
who had faithfully represented the interests of women at 
Lehigh. She set aside the cause to become the wife of 
Charles Vihon, a law professor Lehigh saw fit to banish. 

As role model Hurley left the Lehigh scene, another role 
model, freshman Mori Irvine wound-up to take her place. 
This confident woman set her sites on the baseball dia- 
mond, specifically for what she called "first base-person." 
Irvine proved that Cedar Crest students were not the only 
ones to make first base at Lehigh. 

From the baseball diamond to the football field, women 
continued making tracks. Seven bold women joined the 
previously all-male Marching 97. One of them was Cathy's 
roommate, Susan. 

Sue, for a while there I didn't think the Marching 97 
would take you. A marching harp-player could really hurt 
their image, you know, Cathy once said. 

I know. But we convinced the guys that we could play, 
march and act perverted ;ust as well as they could. And 
we did, Sue answered proudly. 

Cathy soon realized how true this was. Sue had become 
unbearable, and was the first person at Lehigh deemed too 
gross for the gross bus. Another first for Lehigh women. 

Cathy and her other friends saw participation by women 
in other facets of Lehigh life that year. When 400 men 
streakers ran naked through campus streets and class- 
rooms, a few women joined the band wagon. Their names, 
dimensions, and phone numbers were long remembered in 
the hearts of many Lehigh men. 

The 1974 Senior Class Gift poster deemed sexist by some 
women would have sparked more controversy on campus 
if more students had actually seen the poster. However, the 
class gift committee chairman took most of the posters to 
hang in his dormitory room. 

Cathy Coed's second year at Lehigh ended with a 
Women's Conference and plans to revitalize a Women's 
Caucus on campus next fall. 



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1974 



1973 







Cathy's junior year was her most difficult, academically. 
It seemed that the first week hadn't even passed when she 
was faced with a stack of lab reports and projects. The 
members of her lab group were considering how to break 
down their assignment. 

Mitch, you can do the stats, and all the calculations, 
jack, you do the background research, and I'll write up 
the results, one member said. 

What can I do? Cathy asked eagerly. 

Well . . . er . . . we all though you'd be willing to type 
everything up. You know, Cathy, we're lucky to have a 
girl in our group. None of us can type. 

I've got news for you guys, Cathy fumed. I can't either.' 

And so began a rocky year for Cathy and all women at 
Lehigh. It was a year marked by great steps forward, and 
some backward, for women on campus. 

One giant leap backward came when the newly formed 
Women's Caucus was denied University support — for 
what seemed a valid reason. The Caucus refused to in- 
clude males as voting members. Eventually, the Caucus 
compromised here, and offered membership to men. Not 
that men on campus eagerly joined the ranks. Only two 
men attended caucus meetings, and one was a Brown & 
White reporter. 

Cathy was relieved when the Caucus cleared this ob- 
stacle and received official recognition. Now the group 
could move on to the truly important areas of debate, such 
as whether hosting a pancake breakfast for Lehigh men 
would hurt the image of campus women. Cathy didn't 
think it would. Lehigh women didn't have any image to 
hurt. 

Other steps backward included the ousting of a Brown & 
White reporter from a subcommittee meeting on 
Affirmative Action at Lehigh. One subcommittee member 
defended the move. Well, at least we didn't show dis- 
crimination. We closed the meeting to all men and 
women. That's progress, isn't it? 

Despite this regression, Lehigh women did make some 
forward strides. Alpha Lambda Omega accepted women 
members in its social, commuter group; lacrosse and bas- 
ketball were added to women's varsity sports, and the 
Caucus turned from pancake breakfast talk to hosting what 
was a successful Women's Emphasis Week. The year en- 
ded with discussions about establishing a women's re- 
source center in the University Center telephone room, and 
with one of the men in Cathy's lab group finally learning 
to type. 



1976 



Three years had passed now, and Cathy Coed could 
hardly believe she was a senior applying for jobs in 
chemical engineering. It was a time of trepidation for 
many jobhunters in the class of '76, but Cathy had fared 
well in the market. She had four job offers with enticing 
salary offers. 

Hey, Cathy, I heard you just got an offer from Exxon, 
one of her classmates said. 

That's right, Steve. And I got an offer for a plant trip 
from Mobil yesterday, Cathy answered proudly. 

You're lucky to be a girl. You're getting all the offers this 
year! he said. 

What do you mean lucky? What about my Phi Beta 
Kappa? And my engineering experience last summer? And 
my scholarships? Cathy asked angrily. 

Now don't get me wrong, her friend stammered. 
Those things certainly don't hurt. 

As a senior at Lehigh, Cathy knew well what it meant to 
be a female student on South Mountain. She had learned 
this lesson well from her personal experiences, a course in 
Consciousness-Raising I taught by Professor Laura Libber, 
and even from comments from select administrators at 
Lehigh. One dean made campus news with his comments 
about the 20 per cent quota for admission of women to the 
University. These women think they can take over every- 
thing at Lehigh. Why, just yesterday one of them was 
boxing in my boxing ring. I say we've got to re-evaluate 
coeducation at Lehigh now, before they try to take over 
the steam room too. 

Another administrator showed his letters (MCP), in com- 
menting on reported attacks by men on women students 
walking on campus at night. 1 don't see what the girls are 
complaining about. These charges are grossly exaggerated 
Boys will be boys you know, he explained. 

But the boys in the administration did bow to the 
presence of females at Lehigh in 1975-76, when the Univer- 
sity officially recognized three sororities on campus. Al- 
though they were not exactly feminist in perspective, the 
sororities did offer women a social alternative to life 
centered on beer-logged, 'fraternity hill.' Sorority sisters 
drank TAB and their functions were on lower campus — 
except during initiations, when they played slaves to the 
fraternity men, and some competed in a wet T-shirt con- 
test. 

Cathy didn't join a sorority, but she did share many 
experiences with members of the female minority at Le- 
high. She noted the mysterious absence of the Women's 
Caucus this year. 

Even though some women were joking that the Women's 
Caucus had transferred to Washington for a semester, 
Cathy had great optimism for the group's revival next fall. 
Cathy was hopeful, and much wiser than she was as a 
freshman four years ago. She felt that Lehigh had led her 
to a new lifestyle, and possible even a different calling 
than her B.S. in chemical engineering indicated. She 
planned to move into the convent the day after graduation. 



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390, Commencement 




Sunday, May 30, 1976 Grace Hall, Lehigh University 

Commencement Speaker: Hedley W. Donovan (top, right), 
(editor-in-chief of Time Inc.) 



Commencement, 391 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



One year ago, a green staff of Epitome writers, photographers and layout workers first organized to begin 
work on the 1976 Epitome. One academic year, hundreds of cigarettes, layout forms, rolls of film and 
typewriter ribbons later, this book is delivered. 

Perhaps more this year than in others, this yearbook is not the product of one editor's efforts. Instead, it 
has been a collective struggle to accurately depict many facets of Lehigh life. The 1976 Epitome staff 
deserves collective praise for its efforts. 

Individual thanks should be extended to several others who made valuable contributions to this year's 
book. They include Epitome adviser, Professor Sharon Friedman, for her expert advice and concern, and 
journalism professors J. B. McFadden and Robert Sullivan for their pertinent advice during the year. 

Journalism Division secretary Gerri Scudner deserves special thanks for keeping the telephone lines 
untangled and messages straight during even the most hectic deadline days. 

Mr. Marv Merin and his cast of photographers also deserve recognition for the many times they supplied 
us with quality work. 

Finally Mr. Mike Gilroy of Bradbury-Keller earned extra special acknowledgement as a patient and 
cooperative publishing representative, as well as for being the voice on the phone with needed encour- 
agement. 

Finally, the 1976 staff deserves my thanks for giving more than was asked. I hope it was as positive 
an experience for all of you as it was for me. 

Lauren H. Eisenberg, Editor-in-Chief, 1976. 

1976 EPITOME STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief 
Lauren H. Eisenberg 

Business Manager 
Andrew Dember 

Photography Editor 
Eric Connery 

Photographers 

Greg Gleason, (Asst. Photo Ed.; 

Glenn Geshner 

Bart Senior 

Margo Henston 

Warren Bradway 

Features Editor 
Martin Baron 

Managing Editor 
June Fasesky 

Artist 
Gene Mater 

Business Staff 
Larry Chatzinoff 
Bob Judson 

Others 



Sports Editors 

Jay Pennick, Dan Solis-Cohen 

Helen Richardson 

Sports Staff 

Fred Haynes, Doug Borck 

Gary Brennan, Larry Vogel 

Scheduling Editor 
John Mountsier 

Identification Editor 
Bob Hedderman 

Senior Section Editors 

Andrea Kaplan, Helen Richardson 

Layout Staff 
Joanne Church 
Ann Cowin 
Cindy Musto 
Others 

Writers 

Jo Fineman 

Rob Feldman 

Sue Sharko 

Jeff Bloom 

Assistance From 

Alumni Office and Library Director Mack. 



SPECIFICATIONS 



The 1976 Epitome of Lehigh University was printed by the offset lithographic process of Bradbury Keller Publishing Co.. Gettysburg, 
Pa. The stock used was 80# Warren's Cameo Dull. The basic type style is Melior and Melior italics. 

The photography herein is the work of student photographers, in addition to athletic team photos by Ryan Studios, Bethlehem and 
senior portraits by Merin Studios, Phila., Pa. Merin also provided color and selected candid photos. The cover was prepared by S K 
Smith Co. of New York. 



392, The Finish 



9 






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