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Full text of "Epitome: Yearbook 1941"

The 1 94 1 Epitome 



VOLUME I 



YEARBOOK 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/epitomeyearbook165lehi 







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THE 

1941 

EPITOME 



Published by the Senior Class of 
LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 




BETHLEHEM - PENNSYLVANIA 
MCMXLI 



Copyright, 1941 

The 1 94 1 Epitome 

Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 

Donald R. Schoen, Editor-in-chief 



edition: 800 COPIES 



Printed at the Country Life Press, Garden City, New York 



I 



F THEN A PRACTICAL 
END MUST BE ASSIGNED 



to a University course, it is that of training good 
members of society. Its art is the art of social hfe, and its end 
is fitness for the world. ... It is the education which gives 
a man a clear conscious view of his own opinions and judg- 
ments, a truth in developing them, an eloquence in expressing 
them, and a force in urging them. ... It shows him how to 
accommodate himself to others, how to throw himself into 
their state of mind, how to bring before them his own, how 
how to influence them, how to come to an understanding with 
them, how to bear with them. He is at home in any society, 
he has common ground with every class; he knows when to 
speak and when to be silent; he is able to converse, he is able 
to Hsten; he can ask a question pertinently and gain a lesson 
seasonably, when he has nothing to impart himself; he is ever 
ready, yet never in the way; he is a pleasant companion, and 
a comrade vou can depend upon; he knows when to be serious 
and when to trifle, and he has a sure tact which enables him to 
trifle with gracefulness and to be serious with effect. 

John Henry Newman, 

Idea of a University 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Volume l-YEARBOOK 
Preface xi 

Book /—The University 

Chapter One: Administration 5 

President Williaiiis — AdJiiinistration — Dean Congdon — Library— 
Chapel— Depart7}ient of Athletics— Health Service— Military Depart- 
ment— Departinent of Buildings and Grounds 

Book //—The Colleges 

Chapter One: College of Arts and Science 33 

Dean Fahner— English— Languages— Education and Philosophy— Moral 
and Religious Philosophy— Mathe7iiatics— History— Geology— Music- 
Fine Arts— Biology— Psychology 

Chapter Two: College of Business Administration 45 

Dean Carothers—Depart?ne?its 

Chapter Three: College of Engineering 53 

Chemistry and Chemical Engineering— Civil Engineering— Electrical 
Efigineering— Industrial and Mechanical Engineering— Metallurgical 
Engineering— Mining Engineering— Engineering Phy sics 

Book III— SrvT)E,y:T Life 

Chapter One: Student Government 65 

Dr. Beardslee— Arcadia— Inter-fraternity Council— Inter-dortnitory 
Council— Toivn Council— Class Officers— Omicr on Delta Kappa— Cy- 
anide— Committees— Phi Beta Kappa— Tail Beta Pi— Review of Year 

ix 



Chapter Two: Living Groups 85 

Alpha Chi Rho— Alpha Kappa Pi— Alpha Tau Omega— Beta Kappa 
-Beta Theta Pi-Chi Phi-Chi Psi-Delta Phi-Delta Sigma Phi-Delta 
Tau Delta— Delta Upsilon— Kappa Alpha— Kappa Sigma— Lambda Chi 
Alpha-Phi Delta Theta— Phi Gatnma Delta— Phi Sigjna Kappa— Pi 
Kappa Alpha— Pi Lambda Phi—Psi Upsilon— Sigma Alpha Mu— Sigma 
Chi— Sigma Nu— Sigma Phi— Sigma Phi Epsilon—Tau Delta Phi— Theta 
Delta Chi— Theta Kappa Phi— Theta Xi— Drinker House— Price House 
—Richards House— Taylor House— Cosmopolitan Club 

Chapter Three: Publications 169 

Pi Delta Epsilon— Brown and White— Bachelor— Epitome 

Chapter Four: Music, Debating, Dramatics 177 

Tone— Glee Club— The Symphony Orchestra— The Collegians— Band 
—Student Concert Lecture Series— Debatiiig Council— Mustard and 
Cheese 

Chapter Five: Organizations 189 

Alpha Kappa Psi— Lambda Mu Sigma— Alpha Epsilon Delta— R. W. 
Hall Pre-medical Society— Chemical Society— C. E. Society— L E — 
M. E. Society— Pi Tau Sigma— E. E. Society— Eta Kappa Nu—R. W. 
Blake Society International Relations Club— Pi Mu Epsilon— Newtonian 
Society— Phi Eta Sigma— Scabbard and Blade— Mining and Geological 
Society— Physics Society— DeMolay— Alpha Phi Omega— Sportsman's 
Club— Review of Year 

Chapter Six: Athletics 217 

Football— Wrestling— Basketball— Soccer— Swimming— Baseball— Ten- 
nis— Track— Cross Country— Hockey— Lacrosse— Golf— Fencing— Rifle 



Volume U-CLASSBOOK 

Message from the Class President 251 

A History of the Class of 1941 252 

The Class of 1941 260 

Appendix 347 




PREFACE 



THE i^^i EPITOME is an experiment. Not only 
in physical format, in size and in organization is it 
diiferent from previous Lehigh yearbooks, but in pur- 
pose also; the staff has attempted to publish a book which 
is at once a record of the senior class and a summation 
of Lehigh University. In order to accomplish this pur- 
pose, it has been necessary to make drastic changes in 
much traditional material, to include certain things never 
before seen in Epitovies, and to omit entirely much that 
has in the past appeared in the book. Being an experi- 
ment, it is entirely likely that errors of commission and 
omission are numerous; but no one ever made an omelet 
without breaking eggs, nor a yearbook without mistakes. 
Considerable credit is due to the i^^^ Scarlet Letter 
of Rutgers University- for their trailbreaking in this new 
kind of yearbook, which tries to be a real book in the 
permanent, enduring sense of the word— a volume to be 
read and kept, not merely scanned and laid aside. 

The Editors 



XI 



BOOK I 

The University 




iilliiiJiiiiWi 










CHAPTER ONE 



ADMINISTRATION is a ticklish and difficult job from any viewpoint. 
J~\_ The problems confronting executives call not only for intelligence and 
knowledge, but for initiative, wisdom and common sense as well. To handle 
the manifold and complex situations which arise in the administration of our 
modern University, Lehigh's Board of Trustees elected Clement Clarence 
\^^illiams to the position of President when Charles Russ Richards retired 
from that office in 1935. 

President Williams, seventh president of Lehigh, began his engineering 
career when he graduated with a B.S. in C.E. from the University of 
Illinois in 1907. He was a member of the faculty of the University of Colo- 
rado until 1 9 14, and for the next 21 years was associated with similar insti- 
tutions. He received a LL. D. degree from Lafayette in 1935, and was given 
Eng. D. degrees by Northwestern and Bucknell in the two years following. 
Besides his educative activities. President AVilliams served as a supervising 
engineer for the War Department during W^orld War I, and has written 
books and articles on civil engineering and coUege education. Through his 
businesslike office in the Alumni Memorial building pass the manifold prob- 
lems of University direction and supervision. 

The final authority for all administrative decisions rests, of course, in 
Lehigh's Board of Trustees, of which Eugene GifFord Grace, E.E. '99, is 
the president. Mr. Grace's generous gift of S3 00,000 has made possible the 

President CLEMENT CLARENCE ^^^LLIAMS 



5 



construction of the campus's newest building, Grace hall, the construction 
of which began last year. He joined the Bethlehem Steel Company in 1899 
after graduating as valedictorian of his class, and rose very rapidly through 
various positions to the presidency of that company, in 1 9 1 3 . Mr Grace has 
been a Lehigh trustee since 191 2, and has served as a corporate member 
since 191 3. 

Secretary of the Board of Trustees, Treasurer of the University, and Vice- 
president of the University are three titles combined in one man— Walter 
Raleigh Okeson, another Lehigh "old grad" who has served his Alma Mater 
in one capacity or another ever since he graduated, in 1896. Okey, besides 
his University functions, has been a football official for many years; he has 
served as commissioner for the Eastern Intercollegiate Football Association, 
and is now chairman of the National Football Rules Committee. As Treasurer 
of Lehigh, Mr. Okeson has in a large measure control over the University's 
seven million dollars' endowment; he handles this vast sum with capacity 
and discretion. 

John Irvine Kirkpatrick is a Lehigh man also, having graduated in 1929. 
As Assistant to the President, Mr. Kirkpatrick works on the many broad 
problems of administration which no one man can adequately handle. When 
in college he led a rather full career, having been a member of several honor 
societies as well as a mainstay on the football and lacrosse teams for three 
years. He worked as a furniture salesman and as a bank examiner before 
taking on his present job with the Administration. 

Robert F. Herrick, still another graduate of Lehigh, has offices in the 
Alumni Memorial building as both Editor of the Alumni Bulletin and acting 
Secretary of the Alumni Association. In the first capacity Mr. Herrick over- 
sees the publication of the organ which binds together the University's 
graduates in a unified body; as Secretary he attends alumni meetings, handles 
correspondence, and raises funds for the Association. 

Completing the page is Alfred V. Bodine, President of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. As president of the organization Mr. Bodine spends much time in 
integrating and coordinating various alumni groups, and in traveling around 
to meetings and discussions. Especially interested in the far-famed and much- 
talked-about Alumni Students Grants Plan, the ethics, justification, purpose 
and necessity of which have been hotly debated ever since its announcement, 
and the conduct of which has been subject to much criticism, Mr. Bodine 
has concerned himself to a great extent with it. 

ABOVE -Eugene G. Grace, Walter R. Okeson. 

CENTER - Board of Trustees. 

BELOW - John I. Kirkpatrick, Robert F. Herrick, Alfred V. Bodine. 



Besides the duties performed by the officers of Lehigh University men- 
tioned so far, there is a multitude of tasks which must be taken care of 
smoothly and efficiently if order is to be wrought out of the complex chaos 
attending education. Students must be obtained, selected and considered; 
they must be formally admitted; monies must be wrung from them to pay 
partially for their learning; their place of habitation must be swept and 
garnished, must be advertised and made known— and in the end they must 
be assisted in the very vital pursuit of jobs. 

The job of selecting from the candidates falls on the shoulders of E. Ken- 
neth SiMiLEY, whose title is Director of Admissions. Mr. Smiley, who had 
been at Lehigh previously when he was Registrar from 1923 to 1926, re- 
turned in 1934 to take over the post of Assistant Director of Admissions. He 
later took charge of his department. The Director of Admissions acquaints 
prospective students with Lehigh, and helps select from those seeking ad- 
mission the ones to be taken in. After gaining access to the portals, and semi- 
annually thereafter, all Lehigh men pass through the familiar assembly line of 
the cohorts of George B. Curtis, the Registrar and University Editor. He 
it is who enforces University policy as to who shall, or shall not continue; 
he heads the Register committee of the Faculty. Mr. Curtis's passion for the 
Bacon-Shakespeare controversy is well known. 

Frederick R. Ashbaugh, the Bursar and Purchasing Agent, is one of the 
oldest Administration officials in point of service, having come here in 1896 
as secretary to President Drown— there were no female employees on the 
campus in those days. He assumed his present position in 1908. 

Responsible to both the students and the administration for the way Le- 
high's store conducts itself is John W. Maxwell, Manager of the Supply 
Bureau in the basement of the Alumni Memorial building. Mr. Maxwell, a 
Lehigh man of the class of '26, supplies many thousand textbooks each year 
to students as well as hundreds of other items of civilization and culture. 

Publicity at Lehigh is handled by Dale H. Gramley, journalism professor 
and University News Editor, and by Charles J. Moravec, Assistant Univer- 
sity News Editor. Air. Gramley and Mr. Moravec, familiar figures to all 
engaged in publications work, see to it that Lehigh's achievements and dis- 
tinctions receive their proper acknowledgment. 

This year more seniors than ever have received jobs before graduation; 
although this press for qualified men is partially due to Rearmament, the in- 
dustry of E. Robins Morgan, Director of Placement, has played a large part. 
Mr. Morgan, another Lehigh graduate (M.E. '03), is as efficient in getting 
jobs for seniors as he was in pole vaulting during his college days; his record 
in that sport still hangs in the gym. 

ABOVE - E. Kenneth Smiley, George B. Curtis. 
CENTER - Frederick R. Ashbaugh, John W. Maxwell. 
BELOW -Dale H. Gramley. 



The main contact between the Administration and the students, however, 
is made not through any of these men but through the office of the Dean of 
Undergraduates. Here the evanescent cut pohcies of the University are made 
clear to those who have wittingly or unwittingly transgressed them, and here 
Leliigh men go to receive advice and guidance, to wangle excuses for vari- 
ous things, and to talk their way out of multifarious jams. A Dean of Under- 
graduates must be almost superhuman: he must be firm, yet kind; authorita- 
tive, yet easily approached; a disciplinarian, yet an understanding man. Such 
a man Lehigh had in Dean McConn, who relinquished his post in 1938; such 
a man Lehigh now has in Wray Hollowell Congdon, who succeeded Mc- 
Conn in office. 

Dean Congdon graduated with an A.B. from Syracuse in 19 14, and re- 
ceived his M.A. the following year. He has had a long and varied career in 
education, having held positions in China, and having been principal of 
academies there. He has been a teaching fellow at the University of Michigan, 
and was at one time Professor of Education at that institution. Dean Congdon 
came to Lehigh in 1934 as associate Dean of Undergraduates; he still teaches 
graduate courses in his field, and his signature is written on the flyleaves of 
several books on Education in the University library. 

Dean Congdon's job is no enviable one, for he must not only restrain 
undergraduate enthusiasms from overstepping the bounds of reason, but must 
also maintain as frictionless as possible a state between the University and 
the people of Bethlehem. He engineers the details of University functions, 
and keeps vigilance over the many outside activities held by groups within 
the school. The Dean is assisted by his secretaries. Miss Beatrice Flickinger 
and Miss Virginia Kirkhuff. In his office can generally be found several 
students waiting to see him about their dire crimes or their courses, their 
scholarships or their grades. They sit across the desk from him in conference, 
unfold their woes, and receive his considered advice. 

An enormous amount of routine work passes through the Dean's office, for 
every time a student group wishes to function in some fashion it must be 
approved by the Administration. Dean Congdon also spends a considerable 
part of his time, as do most of the Administration officials and many of 
Lehigh's faculty, in interviewing prospective freshmen, and in speaking 
before high school and preparatory school audiences. All in all. Dean Wray 
Hollowell Congdon acts as a sort of bearing between the Board of Trustees 
and the Faculty on one hand, and the students of Lehigh on the other. 

Wray H. Congdon, Dean of Undergraduates. 



Although Lehigh is primarily an undergraduate school, it offers graduate 
courses and degrees in many fields, both engineering and arts. Dean of the 
Graduate school is Tomlinson Fort, who is also head of the mathematics 
department, and a professor in his subject. Dr. Fort, who received his first 
degree in 1906, from Georgia, has studied abroad, and has written several 
papers on mathematical subjects. His general task for the graduate school is 
supervision. Assisting Dean Fort in his many tasks is Robert P. More, who 
aids him as Executive Secretary of the Graduate Faculty. 

To provide for the students who from necessity or inclination decide to 
do part of their academic work during the summer months, Lehigh University 
maintains a Summer school, staffed for the most part by its regular professors 
and instructors, and offering courses for regular credit in over fifty different 
fields. Harold Prescott Thomas, head of the department of education, 
directs this Summer School. Dr. Thomas, who has a noteworthy war record, 
has here no job unique among his former experiences, for his career has 
included positions as an engineer for several companies, a superintendent of 
public schools, and a director of educational research. Women as well as 
men come to Summer school; Dr. Thomas must care for these timid entrants 
from another world, arrange programs of entertainment, and see that the 
leisurely life of his system does not become somnolent. 

Assistant Director of Admissions is Charles A. Seidle, who handles much 
of the work of that department, and helps to insure that Lehigh enrolls as 
good a crop of freshmen as possible. Performing a similar function for Mr. 
Curtis is James L. Shearer, assistant to the Registrar. Mr. Shearer, who 
graduated from Lehigh in 1939 and assumed his position here during the 
same year, is also adviser to the Cosmopolitan club. The job of Recorder is 
handled capably and efficiently by Miss Jeannette Cleaveland. The secre- 
taries, who are indispensable adjuncts to the general functioning of the Ad- 
ministration, work for the offices of the President, the Alumni, the Bursar, 
the Supply Bureau, the Registrar and the Director of Admissions. 

These are some of the people in Lehigh's Administration; but no outline 
here can give an adequate idea of the service they perform for the University. 
The academic machinery— the matters of discipline, of educational policy, 
of management— forms only a part of the vast system which must be made 
to run smoothly and well, in order that the University may hold together as 
a unit, and not disintegrate into groups striving for separate ends. 

ABOVE - Tomlinson Fort, Robert P. More, Harold P. Thomas. 

CENTER - The Misses Beatrice Flickinger, Virginia KirkhufF. 

BELOW - James L. Shearer, Miss Jeannette I. Cleaveland, Charles A. Seidle. 



13 



There are several hundred persons not connected with administration who 
serve Lehigh and the Lehigh hfe in a multitude of ways. From Dacey's 
hearty laughter in the Health Service bureau to the solemn quietness of the 
Library, people are constantly at work, ready to serve the Lehigh man in 
every conceivable fashion. The athletic department keeps the student strong 
and healthy by means of its intramurals, and provides intercollegiate sports 
for those endowed with more athletic prowess than their fellows. The mili- 
tary department gives us our much needed military training, a valuable asset in 
these years. Andrew W. Litzenberger's buildings and grounds department is 
everlastingly mowing the lawns, trimming the shrubbery, raking leaves, 
shoveling snow, planting grass, and then mowing the lawns again, all over 
and above the supervising of the construction of the new Grace hall and the 
upkeep of all the University buildings. The Health Service is open every 
day to repair the ills and injuries that inevitably occur in the normal course 
of student life. There are the Campus Cops who are on 24-hour duty to see 
that life and limb are respected by the 800 automobile drivers who roam the 
University's miles of highway. There is the Chapel wherein lies spiritual 
solace for all those who wish to partake thereof, and where events of a re- 
ligious nature are scheduled throughout the year. The Placement bureau is 
all-important in the matter of getting a job out of this foiu: years' work- 
without it many students would not know where to turn for the first appli- 
cation nor know the technique of interview, both tremendously important 
factors toward landing a position. These are but a few of the agencies that 
provide the atmosphere we have known for four years as "Lehigh." 

The Lucy Packer Linderman Memorial Library is located in the geo- 
metrical center of the lower campus. It is the second largest university library 
in the state of Pennsylvania and its shelves contain 244,000 volumes, about 
44,000 of which circulate each year. The job of classifying, cataloguing and 
otherwise keeping track of these thousands of books is no mean task, but 
it is handled efficiently and well by a staff under the direction of Librarian 
Howard S. Leach. 

Leach, who graduated from Wesleyan with an A.B. and later received 
his master's degree from Princeton, came to Lehigh from Princeton in 1924. 
At that time the Library was the original building that had been built in 
1877 and contained less than 160,000 volumes. Circulation was only one- 
tenth of its present value and hovered near 4,000 volumes per year. During 
Leach's tenure of office, however, the Library has expanded to its present 
size and prominence. In 1928 an addition was built on three sides of the old 
building in a collegiate Gothic style of architecture, the motif that has 

University Library. 



H 



characterized all new University buildings since the erection of the Alumni 
Memorial in 1924. This addition provided nearly five times the original floor 
space and made possible most of the facilities which the Library affords today. 

Most used of the Library's extraordinary facilities is the Browsing room. 
It reposes underneath the west wing of the main reading room, where stu- 
dents may wander at any time during the school day to while away an extra 
hour with the finest works of literature, both past and present, that man has 
produced. Other men, wearied by the endless toil of learning, find the easy, 
overstuffed armchairs there an excellent place for an inter-class nap. The 
Browsing room is supervised at all times by a student who is responsible for 
the contents of the room. The books there are not circulating, but are 
duplicated in most cases in the general stacks. 

In addition, the Library contains the very popular Art gallery, just above 
the main reading room's west wing. A monthly exhibition of collections by 
artists both nationally and locally known attracts many students. The ex- 
hibits are arranged by Garth A. Howland, head of the department of fine 
arts. 

The Treasure room contains old and rare volumes which have come to the 
Library and which form a valuable collection from an historical point of 
view. This room is open at various hours throughout the year and presents 
an opportunity for learning something of the lore and the ancient art of 
boobnaking. The Lehigh collection contains books, articles and papers by 
faculty, students and alumni. Complete files of all student pubUcations, in- 
cluding the Epitome, Brown and White, Burr, and Review, are on hand. 

Most familiar to the students and faculty are the circulation desk at- 
tendants, Mrs. Myrtle Helms Easton and Miss Jean Riegel. It is they who are 
responsible for circulated books and who sign books in and out. Theirs is an 
endless job of tracing lost books, sending notices of Library fines to delin- 
quent borrowers, collecting such fines (when possible), and tracing more 
lost books. 

Seldom noticed are the cataloguers who must file and keep track of all 
volumes, both new and otherwise, contained in the entire Library. Their 
task has not been Ughtened by the fact that in the first years of the Library's 
existence none of its contents had been catalogued. Ever since the year when 
the present system of cataloguing was introduced the staff has been working 
every spare moment in order to file these old volumes in the correct manner. 
Miss Mary Wheatley, head cataloguer, estimates that many months will be 
needed before the work will be finished. She is assisted by the Misses Muriel 
Kemp and Ruth Hall. 



17 



The Packer Memorial church is the scene of the reUgious and much of the 
musical life of the University. It was erected in 1887 when Mrs. Mary Packer 
Cummings, daughter of the founder, Asa Packer, made a gift to the Univer- 
sity in her father's memory to be used in building a chapel. It was one of the 
earliest buildings to be built by the University. 

Until 1937 there were chapel services of one sort or another in a certain 
percentage of which attendance was compulsory for all students. The meet- 
ings were held at various times, one year in the morning, another at noon, 
another at a different hour. However, in the year in which those who are 
now graduating were freshmen, the system of chapel services was abolished 
and in its stead a non-credit, compulsory lecture course in moral and re- 
ligious philosophy was instituted under the direction of the chaplain. Since 
then there have been no regular chapel exercises, although services of a re- 
ligious nature are conducted from time to time during the school year. 

Each May the annual Bethlehem Bach Festival is held in the chapel and 
attracts many thousands of music lovers from far and near. This year the 
thirty-fourth performance was rendered before an overflow crowd in a pro- 
gram that lasted two days. A new type of special amplification was intro- 
duced a year ago in order that accommodations could be provided for the 
overflow in Packard auditorium, but with this added convenience there were 
still many who were forced to remain outside. 

The largest special event in the chapel was Lehigh's first Christmas pro- 
gram in recent years. It was sponsored by the Combined Musical clubs and 
Tone and was presented by the glee clubs of Lehigh and the Moravian Semi- 
nary for Women. The auditorium was packed and an offering of over $100 
was received for buying vestments for the Lehigh Glee club. Dr. T. Edgar 
Shields, director of music, was in charge of the musical arrangements. 

Chaplain of the University and head of the department of moral and religious 
philosophy is Claude Gillette Beardslee, graduate of Yale, Southern Califor- 
nia, and Brown universities. He came to Lehigh in his present capacity in the 
school year 1930-31 after receiving his doctorate from Brown, and during 
the years that have followed he has made a niche for himself in student esteem, 
becotning secretary of Omicron Delta Kappa, and faculty adviser to Arcadia 
and the various living group councils. Until 1937 he conducted the regular 
daily chapel services, in addition to his classes in moral and religious philoso- 
phy. It was in that year that the chapel service was discontinued and the M. R. 
Phil, lecture courses substituted in its stead. Since then Dr. Beardslee has 
propounded the philosophies of both the ancients and the moderns to every 
freshman in order that he might find a method for organizing his religious 
belief. 




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The department of physical education and intramural sports and the divi- 
sion of intercollegiate athletics have a triple purpose: to promote the health 
of the students, to complete their education with training in athletic skUls and 
sportsmanship, and to represent Lehigh in the sports world. 

Handling the intramural side of the athletic picture is Fay C. Bartlett, 
better known as "Bart." Looking on athletics not only as a method of 
keeping well, but more as a source of pleasure both in college and in the 
years following, Bart holds intramural championships in many individual 
sports, such as golf putting, basket shooting, diving, and swimming. The 
department sponsors a program of team competition between the living 
aroups of Lehigh, with trophies awarded to the winning groups in each sport. 
The matches are held in football, basketball, bowling, badminton, wrestling, 

and baseball. 

Head of the division of intercollegiate athletics is Glen W. Harme- 
soN, popularly known as "Harmie." Through his office go all of the nego- 
tiations for the schedules of nine sports. He has also the duties of head foot- 
ball coach, and supervises the coaching of the other intercollegiate sports. 

A new system of letter awards to varsity athletes was put into effect this 
year. In former years there was no distinction between sports at Lehigh, no 
di\asion into major and minor classifications, but identical letters were given 
in all sports. There are now three classes of sports at Lehigh, with football, 
basketball, and wrestling in the first group. The sports are classified accord- 
ing to their importance to the student body. 

Among the other top-notch men on Lehigh's coaching staff is William 
Sheridan^ who came here in 191 1 as coach of wresthng. Finding the sport 
in its infancy, "Billy" has built it to the point where it is one of the most popu- 
lar sports among Lehigh men. 

New this year is the Alumni Student Grants Plan, a method of recognizing 
students who have definite athletic ability as well as high scholastic standing. 
The Alumni Association has provided a fund from which deserving men who 
fulfill the requirements of athletic and scholastic ability as well as high char- 
acter may receive financial aid. 

It was felt by the Alumni that through lack of support Lehigh's achieve- 
ments on the athletic field were not on the same level as in scientific and 
engineering work. Their interest has been rewarded by seeing several of the 
recipients of the grants distinguish themselves both in sports and in other 
campus activities. 

DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS - Rear Row: M. B. Westerman, J. J. Mahoney, P. E. Short, J. H. 

Carpenter, P. J. Boquel, F. Mercur, P. R. Calvert. Second Row: W. Sheridan, F. C. Bartlett, 

P. J. Morrissey, G. W. Harmeson, H. R. Reiter, M. E. Kanaly. Fro7it Row: W. D. McCaa, 

E. Heins. 

ABOVE - Intramurals. 

CENTER -F. C. Bartlett, G. W. Harmeson. 

21 



The Health Service bureau, located in the east wing of Christmas-Saucon 
hall, serves more than its original purposes of sanitation and student treat- 
ment. It is here that many go to pass away an extra hour during the morning 
or afternoon in discussing the events of the day and the local gossip with 
"Dace," and in pleasant harangue with Doc Keck. It is virtually impossible 
to enter the Health Service at any time of the day and not find a few, at 
least, present there engaging in this mild relaxation. This practice has been 
prevalent for many years and has served to make the Health Service perform 
as a social center, in a restricted sense, as much as a dispensary. 

The staff is composed of Doctor Raymond C. Bull, director of the Health 
Service, Doctor Carl O. Keck, and Mrs. Jennie V. Dacey, R.N. Dr. Bull is in 
charge of the general functions of the Bureau, the fall physical examinations, 
the typhoid injections each spring, and other similar duties. Keck acts as 
the medical consultant to ill and injured students and prescribes for their 
ailments. He is on duty, too, during the summer surveying course in Cana- 
densis where he serves as physical director as well as medico. Mrs. Dacey, 
known throughout Lehigh as just "Dace," is a registered nurse who is present 
during all Health Service hours. Her philosophies and witticisms are the 
stand-bys of the campus. 

The functions of the Health Service are four in number. The director has 
complete charge of the sanitation of University buildings, and endeavors, 
inasmuch as he is able, to see that sanitary conditions are maintained in off- 
campus buildings which contain Lehigh students. The second general func- 
tion is the administration of the annual physical examination each fall at 
registration. Those men who are found to be sub-normal or abnormal are put 
under observation and treated individually as the case requires. 

The third function is the joint administration with the department of 
biology of the non-credit course in hygiene for Freshmen. This is given in 
the form of a series of four lectures and a final examination during the 
Freshman Week orientation period prior to the opening of school. Freshmen 
who fail the examination are "penalized" by being required to take a second 
non-credit course during the second semester in which the material is run 
through a second time. After four lectures the examination is repeated. If 
anyone fails this one, he must wait until the subsequent Freshman Week, and 
continue taking the course until he has passed it, since it is required for grad- 
uation. 

The fourth function of the Health Service is its dispensary system. The 
dispensary is open seven hours a day during the week and at odd hours on 
Saturdays and Sundays. Here students are free to go at any open hour to 
receive treatment for their wounds and illnesses. 

ABOVE -R. C. BuU, C. O. Keck. 

CENTER - The Butterfly Club. 

BELOW - J. V. Dacey, W. Burkhardt. 

22 




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Nine men from the rank of colonel to staff sergeant comprise the Military 
department at Lehigh. They are officers of the regular United States Army 
taken out of active service and put into this college just as others are put 
into other colleges throught the nation so that college men may know the 
principles of military science and tactics. They take Freshmen and Sopho- 
mores, and in courses amounting to eight credit hours of study the funda- 
mentals of combat, of infantry weapons, of drill regulations, of military 
history, of map reading, of military organization, and of rifle marksmanship 
are instilled in the students' minds. A certain limited number of the most 
promising of these are permitted to carry on their study in 1 2 credit hours of 
advanced work as Juniors and Seniors. During this time the students become 
cadet officers in the University R.O.T.C. infantry regiment, acting as ser- 
geants in the Junior year and as higher officers in the commissioned 
brackets during the Senior year. At the end of this four years of training 
the graduates are commissioned as second lieutenants in the Infantry Officers 
Reserve corps or the Ordnance Officers Reserve corps, depending on the 
course of advanced study which the student has pursued. 

The Military department is located in what is now the Armory but what 
will soon be renamed Lamberton hall, in honor of the former president of 
the University. The Armory was originally known as the Commons, in the 
"old days" before the advent of the R.O.T.C. At that time, prior to 1920, 
the Commons served as a centralized eating place for most of the University. 
However this was necessarily abandoned to make way for the Military de- 
partment and the Commons has been the Armory ever since. 

With the advent of Grace hall next fall the Military department is sched- 
uled to move into its new quarters there. The entire second floor has been 
so designed that it will provide adequate indoor drill space for the winter 
season as well as classrooms for the prescribed courses. Offices for the mem- 
bers of the department will also be installed so that the new departmental 
home will be complete in every detail. Meanwhile, the Armory, having 
metamorphosed into Lamberton hall, will have reassumed its old capacity of 
a University Commons. 

Head of the department is Colonel Joseph S. Leonard, a graduate of the 
United States Military Academy in 19 10. It is his responsibility to coordinate 
the courses of R.O.T.C. training in such a way as to produce the best 
possible types of officer material in the men he graduates. His second in 
command is Lieutenant Colonel Adrian Brian, a Nebraska graduate, 19 17. 

ABOVE -The Armory 

MILITARY DEPARTMENT -Rear Row: Lieut. Pierce, Serg. Duby, Serg. Gasda, Serg. Beck. Front 

Row: Lieut. Campbell, Capt. Phillips, Capt. Barrows, Col. Leonard, Lt.-Col. Brian, Capt. 

Schwartz. 



25 



In area Lehigh's campus may not be so large as many another college can 
boast of, but inside its bounds are now twenty-two buildings each requiring 
the services of an efficient staff of janitors and repairmen for its adequate 
upkeep. The responsibility for keeping all the University spic and span and 
in the best condition falls to director of buildings and grounds Andrew W. 
Litzenberger, who supervises his work from an office in the Alumni Memorial 
building and from his home on the edge of the campus. To him fall such 
tasks as seeing that Grace hall is completed on schedule and that breaks in 
University steam lines, as have occurred this year, are promptly repaired. It 
is a never-ending job, for it is a human trait that there must inevitably be 
something to complain of in man's physical accommodations, for which some 
man must take the blame. At Lehigh it is Litzenberger who keeps these com- 
plaints to a minimum. 

At latest reports, Eugene Gifford Grace hall, the $300,000 gift of presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees Grace, '99, will be completed between July i 
and August i, which assures the student body of its availability for the fall 
term. The new recreation center and sports arena will be the new home of 
the R.O.T.C. faculty, classes and indoor drUl, which will move from the 
present quarters in the Armory during the summer. The drill floor on the 
second story will be so constructed that 15,000 square feet of floor space will 
be available for future dances and Proms. Downstairs will be an arena for 
accommodating 2,500 basketball fans or 3,300 wrestling enthusiasts. 

The Power house is the center of the campus steam supply. From it run 
underground conduits in a network to all parts of the University campus, 
supplying heat for the buildings and steam under higher pressure for labora- 
tory use. 

The Lookout is a part of Lehigh tradition. But more than that, it is a part 
of Houseparty tradition, probably even antedating Houseparty itself, which 
did not properly originate until 19 10. Located high on Old South Mountain 
directly behind Richards house, it commands a view of the University, Beth- 
lehem, and the whole of the broad Lehigh valley. Even though the view is 
principally to the north and west, here is the favorite spot of Houseparty- 
goers who come to watch the sun rise from behind the mountain. With all 
of Bethlehem and the panorama of Bethlehem Steel at its feet, small wonder 
that the Lookout is a "must" on the student's "list of places to visit with one's 
best girl," be it night or day. The night view is equally as impressive as the 
daytime view, with the many quivering lights of the city and the warm red 
glow of the steel resting like gems in the bed of valley lights. 



ABOVE -Andrew W. Litzenberger, Eugene GiflFord Grace Hall. 
CENTER - University Powerhouse. 
BELOW -The Lookout. 



26 



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BOOK II 

The Colleges 








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CHAPTER TWO 



LEHIGH'S College of Arts and Science is not, as some may think, an after- 
> thought tacked onto the technical part of the school as a concession 
to impractical visionaries who wanted book-learning rather than a sound, 
working education. On the contrary, the College of Arts and Science has a 
real and vital program of its own for the education of Arts students, and 
moreover, in cooperation with the other Colleges of Leliigh, it helps to pro- 
vide all students with a much fuller and more rounded education than any 
College could hope to achieve by itself. The courses and curricula offered by 
the College of Arts and Science are many and varied, but they all point 
towards a common aim, that of the education of the individual by himself and 
for himself, and for the betterment of society. 

The College itself began with the founding of the University, as a course 
in "General Literature"; and in 1877 the school was split into two parts, the 
school of General Literature and the school of Technology. In that same 
year Asa Packer established a classical professorship, thereby opening the 
classical department. At first the school of General Literature contained only 
two courses. Classical and Scientific; but it soon began to branch out, and 
today a student in the College of Arts and Science can take courses or major 
in any one of several dozen fields. 

Dean of the College is Philip Mason Palmer, the man largely responsible 
for the academic destinies of approximately 250 Arts students, and for the 

Philip Mason Palmer, Dean of the College of Arts and Science. 



33 



present flexible policy of allowing much selection of courses within the limits 
set by distribution requirements. Dean Palmer, besides being the official 
adviser for all Arts freshmen (a headache in itself) , has charge of the curricula 
within his College, and furthermore is head of the department of German. 

The department of English at Lehigh is important, as indeed it is at any 
college, for two reasons: all students, be they Arts, Engineering or Business, 
must take a year of English; and the study of our mother tongue, and its 
mastery, is fundamental to the study and mastery of any other subject. Be- 
cause of this importance, the English department is staffed with 13 men, 
second largest number in any Arts department. In addition to providing a 
background for every Lehigh man, this department provides specialization 
for a considerable number of Arts students. Sidehnes include dramatics and 
debating— perhaps more fundamental and desirable activities than is generally 
recognized. 

Robert Metcalf Smith, nationally-known Shakespearean scholar, is head 
of the department; he is assisted by associate professors Riley and Severs, who 
might be respectively termed specialists in Renaissance and Victorian litera- 
ture. The most publicized event of the school year, from the point of view 
of the English department, is probably the publication of "H. L. Piozzi (Mrs. 
Thrale)" by James L. Clifford, assistant professor in the department. This 
book, a biography of Johnsonian times, was printed under duress in England 
and, to date, only one copy had dodged the German blockade. 

English, however, is not the only language taught at Lehigh; the Arts 
college has on its staff men who instruct in Latin, Greek, German, French, 
Spanish and Italian. Since languages are such an important part of man's life 
in this heterogeneous world, and since a proper appreciation of the capacities 
and limitations of one's own native tongue is possible only after acquaintance 
with other tongues, it is necessary for the properly educated man to have at 
least a nodding acquaintance with some language other than the one with 
which he usually faces the world. That this acquaintance shall be made, is 
provided for by distribution requirements for Arts men; that it actually 
is made, is due to the efforts of such men as Professors More, Crum, Wright, 
and Barthold. 

The study of education may seem to some a derivative pursuit, but it has 
long been acknowledged that education is as much a science as an art, and 
that in order to have effective public schooling for our democracy we must 
train our teachers as we train our doctors or our engineers. Recognizing this, 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH - Rear Row: C. F. Sttauch, K. B. Horning, G. J. Christensen, L. A. 

Waters, E. L. Jones, K. K. Kost, W. B. Todd. Front Row: A. A. Rights, J. C. Callaghan, 

J. L. Clifford, J. B. Severs, R. M. Smith, E. H. Riley, E. H. Sloane, D. H. Gramley, C. J. 

Moravec. 

LANGUAGE DEPARTMENTS - Rear Row. J. G. Roberts, J. S. Tremper, D. G. Scott. Second Row: 

R. P. More, W. A. McDonald, G. D. Fame, R. A. Soto, R. F. McNerney. Front Row: A. J. 

Barthold, P. M. Pahner, H. W. Wright, E. L. Crum. 

34 



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Lehigh maintains a department of Education fully equipped to prepare men 
for the teaching profession. Furthermore, through arrangements made with 
local schools, Lehigh men working for their teachers' certificates can obtain 
actual practice in teaching, thus completing the cycle. 

After education comes philosophy, both in theory and in fact, for the 
next department is that of the handmaiden of thought and the overlord of 
knowledge. The interrelationship of the two fields is illustrated by Dr. Laf- 
ferty, who is a professor in both education and philosophy, and by the 
General Education course, a voluntary program of self-education punctuated 
by student-faculty dinners, under the benevolent directorship of Percy 
Hughes, Clara H. Stewardson, professor of philosophy. 

Moral and Religious Philosophy, a department almost unique with Lehigh, 
deals with the moral problems of students, and in its M. R. Phil, course 
for freshmen helps to set up a definite framework whereby the men can solve 
these problems for themselves. The professor of this department is Claude 
G. Beardslee, whose office in Drown hall is the repository of the documents 
of many societies, and who lends a hand as adviser for several prominent 
groups.' The offices of education and philosophy, however, are located in 
venerable Packer hall, the sandstone edifice which was the first structure 
built on University grounds. Its architecture has been described as mixed 
Gothic, Renaissance, late Italian and Builder's Choice, and it originally con- 
tained the offices of the president and the faculty. 

The department of Mathematics, largest department in the College of Arts 
and Science, is also situated in Packer hall. The size of this department— 1 7 
men— attests the importance of its work; like English, mathematics is a fun- 
damental tool indispensable to the educated man and his comprehension of 
the material world. Besides instructing freshmen in the rudiments of number, 
the mathematics department provides more advanced courses for all engineers 
—showing the interdependence of the three Colleges— and a specialized field 
for those adept at this particular form of symbology. 

History and Geology are not often regarded as the parallel subjects they 
really are— for the former deals with the epochs of man, while the latter 
concerns itself with the ages of the earth, broadly speaking. The two depart- 
ments are now on even terms, for whatever of human interest may be as- 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND PHILOSOPHY - Rear Roiv: R. H. White, T. T. Lafferty, R. E. 
Laramy. Front Row: H. P. Thomas, P. Hughes, F. C. Becker. 

DEPARTMENT OF MORAL AND RELIGIOUS PHILOSOPHY - C. G. Beardslee. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT - Rear Row. W. L. Godshall, E. B. Schulz. Front Row: 

G. D. Harmon, L. H. Gipson, S. M. Brown. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY - i?eflr Row: R. D. Butler, D. M. Fraser, L. Whitco, G. A. Rynearson. 

Front Row: A. H. Fretz, B. L. MiUer, B. WiUard. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS - Rear Row: W. R. Transue, M. F. Smiley, E. H. Cutler, T. Fort, 

J. L. Vandershce, V. V. Latshaw. Second Row: E. Park, L. P. Burton, D. T. Perkins, L. L. 

Smail. Front Row: J. P. Reynolds, R. N. Van Amam, F. S. Beale, G. E. Raynor, C. A. Shook. 

37 



cribed to history at the expense of geology is now offset by the unique events 
of the past decade; geology has no Hitler to explain away. 

Another example of Lehigh's diversified production is its annual class of 
pre-medical students, turned out (figuratively speaking) by the department 
of Biology. Significant of this class's quality is its acceptance by medical 
schools without reservation. Majors in zoology, botany, and bacteriology 
are offered by the department of Biology, as well as general courses designed 
for men majoring in other fields, and of course subjects for the general dis- 
tribution requirements. Noted for his interest in wild life in general and 
birds in particular is Francis Trembley, a member of the department, who 
has trained some of his prizes in the difficult art of falconry. 

The department of Psychology, with headquarters in one end of diversified 
Packer hall, serves a double purpose at Lehigh. It offers instruction in the 
field, a field becoming increasingly widely known as the importance of psy- 
chology in business, pleasure, health and every-day life is recognized more 
and more; and it functions as a testing bureau for the many tests given to 
Lehigh students during their sojourn at college. Freshman entrance and 
placement tests. Sophomore comprehensives, the Carnegie examinations— all 
are given in conjunction with the psychology department. 

Alusic is a department noted for the quality rather than the quantity of 
its instructors, there being but one professor of music, T. Edgar Shields. It 
might also be said that Dr. Shields' extracurricular activities are as essential 
as his formal courses, for he is affiliated with all of the Brown and White 
musical groups— the Band, the Chorus, the Glee club, the Symphony or- 
chestra, the honorary musical society Tone, and several others. Under his 
direction are the fine collection of records and the record player in Packer 
memorial chapel, where any student may go and play music of his own 
choice to his heart's content. 

Another department where one man reigns supreme with none to dispute 
his sway is the department of Fine Arts, in which Garth A. Rowland offers 
courses in such diverse subjects as the History of Architecture and Land- 
scape Painting. Professor Howland, a well-known local painter whose works 
have commanded attention in many exhibitions, has charge of the Art gallery 
in the University library, where paintings, drawings, etchings and similar 
works are usually on display for the public. His office is in Coppee hall, which 
was built in 1883 as a gymnasium, and formerly contained bowling alleys. 

One can see from this quick treatment of the subject that Lehigh's College 
of Arts and Science offers a diversified program, and a unified one in many 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY - Rear Row. F. J. Trembley, J. P. Sell, E. W. Parker. Front Row. 

R. W. Hall, S. J. Thomas. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY - J. L. Graham, W. L. Jenkins, A. Ford. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC - T. E. Shields. 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS - G. A. Howland. 
38 



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respects, to the student willing to undertake the time, effort and expense of 
a four-year college education. Judging from the results of the Carnegie tests 
(and from other educational ratings), Lehigh has an excellent Arts school- 
one of the best in the East. Although it may be said that too much emphasis 
is laid on the strictly technical in the University, this in itself is partiaUy 
healthy, for it means that any recognition of the values of scholarsliip and 
culture must be won in practically hand-to-hand battle with the spirited 
proponents of strict scientific training. 

But, it can be argued, why go to college at all? You can read the books 
at home, most lectures can be obtained in places other than the lecture room, 
and no quizzes or finals are necessary for the serious student. College life, 
from this %-ie\\T)oint, is a luxury easily dispensed with; it can be obtained 
without going to college. Activities are superfluous, sports are time-wastmg 
and sometimes positively dangerous or detrimental, and social events are 
unnecessary'. 

If college is the acquisition of facts and their assemblage in the mind mto 
a logical order, if that is all that college is in its essence, then reading the books 
at home will give a college education to any person fresh from high school. 
Experience ha^s proved that such a program yields no such results unless the 
participant be exceptional to an extreme degree. Why doesn't it? 

There are two reasons, intimately interconnected. In the first place, col- 
lege oflFers at once a change in life, meaning a change in the manner of 
li\Tng, and a change in the student's educational program. Usually college 
implies going away. This throws many heretofore unrealized responsibilities 
on the young man's back. He must readjust himself to an almost alien world, 
a place' where everyone is more important than he is. He must make new 
acquaintances and friends, new "contacts." His studies suddenly become 
more important than they were before. They take more time, theoretically. 
More depends on them. 

In the second place, there is generally a profound change in attitude cre- 
ated by the process of gaining a college education. Sometimes this change 
is for the worse, as when a student becomes exclusively preoccupied with 
either his books or his activities; mostly it is for the better. The college man 
evolves out of the college boy. He begins to see things in adult perspective; 
to evaluate. He may question and he may doubt his instructors, but eventu- 
ally, if the instruction is of any value, his outlook on life and his personality 
are strengthened, made significant. The four years that round off "preparation 
for life" are in reality a life as vital as any similar period will ever be. 



41 



These two reasons help to explain why the people able to afford it have 
always sent their sons to institutions of "higher education." Sometimes higher 
education is a flop. Sometimes it degenerates into expensive loafing, a staving 
off of the responsibilities of manhood for four more years. Sometimes higher 
education produces no discernible change in the student, who carries on 
unenthusiastically until graduation and then promptly erases college memories 
from his mind. But generally higher education has proved its worth in terms 
of hard cash and the values of the business world. It pays to be a college 
graduate. 

The formal education of college is, of course, only one side of the matter. 
Activities, sports, and social events are as necessary to the full development 
of the individual as courses of study and textbooks— another reason why 
independent study at home for the average person never can be as satisfac- 
tory as college life. The tendency for over-emphasis, in fact, is always placed 
on the activities, as an examination of this yearbook will show. A proper 
balance is necessary. 

The College of Arts and Science recognizes these factors and responsi- 
bilities, and tries by its program of distribution requirements and major con- 
centration to enable its students to wrest the most from their four years 
at Lehigh. The distribution principle, one found very widely in American 
colleges, is simply that of laying a broad foundation in all fields by requiring 
an elementary knowledge of most branches of knowledge. After this founda- 
tion is laid, students are permitted to specialize to a certain extent in a subject 
of their own choosing. Thus the proper selection of courses during the last 
two years enables a man to become well acquainted with any particular sub- 
ject, while the first two years are spent mainly in completing requirements 
such as history, English, science, and the like. 

One feature not found in the other colleges of the University is the com- 
prehensive examination required of all men in their major field before gradua- 
tion. Its purpose is to insure review and a mastery of the subject matter, so 
that the student will leave college with a unified grasp of his specialty. For 
the past two years. Arts seniors have taken, in addition to the comprehensive 
examination, the Carnegie tests (this year, all seniors took them) . These tests 
enable students to compare their education with that of similar men from 
other colleges, and to show their achievements for graduate record. 

No one denies that scientific knowledge is increasingly important in today's 
technical world, but it is the contention of the College of Arts and Science 
that science is not all; culture, the humanities, and a sense of values are as es- 
sential for education as any science. 



42 




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CHAPTER THREE 



THE COLLEGE of Business Administration of Lehigh University first 
appeared as a separate institution from the other two colleges in the 
year of 19 18-19 19, right at the conclusion of the first World War. Previous 
to the founding of the present college, courses in business principles, eco- 
nomics, and accounting had been offered as a part of the program of the 
Department of Arts and Science. This department also offered a major in 
business administration, intended to prepare the student to take his place 
in the business world, and to give him the double advantage of technical 
training and a broad general education. In the year 1918-1919 John L. 
Stewart was professor of economics and history, and offered courses which 
combined the two fields. He was assisted by Professor Bowen in this work. 

The 19 1 8-19 19 catalogue listed twenty-three undergraduate courses in the 
newly formed Business College. This statement was made concerning the 
aims and purposes of the business course: 

"As efficiency is the keynote of future prosperity in American industry, the 
course in Business Administration is designed to train men to cope ably with 
problems of business life, and to inculcate into the minds of the coming in- 
dustrial generation the idea that it is only by efficiency that we can hope to 
maintain national supremacy." 

Today's announcement reflects the present swing towards a more general 
education with perhaps less elaborate and more modest plans: 

Neil Carothers, Dean of the College of Business Administration. 



45 



"The College of Business Administration undertakes ... to provide a 
training in the fundamentals of business that will give the student an inteUi- 
gent understanding of business principles, an ability to analyze industrial 
facts, and a habit of thought that w^ill enable him to cope M'ith the problems 
that increasing executive responsibilities will bring him in later life. A college 
course cannot make business executives and industrial managers out of in- 
experienced college students, and no college course can provide a substitute 
for the training and experience which are to be gained only from actual con- 
tact with the complex problems of business. The College of Business Adminis- 
tration does not pretend to furnish such a substitute but to lay a foundation 
upon which a career in the field of business activity may be built." 

Thus, under the leadership of Dean Neil Carothers, Macfarlane professor 
of economics and Dean of the College of Business Administration, the funda- 
mentals of business and principles of sociology are stressed rather than highly 
specific applications to more or less temporary problems. Courses have been 
generalized in this search for the foundation first, not the superstructure. 
This procedure follows directly in line with the education provided by both 
other Colleges, the College of Engineering stressing the permanent relation- 
ships of nature and the theoretical background of practice, rather than prac- 
tice itself; and the College of Arts and Science firm in a belief in general 
subjects first, then specific majors later. The policy adopted in this fashion 
by the whole University is in a large part responsible for Lehigh's continued 
excellence in the educational world, and for the success of her graduates 
wherever they go. 

Dean Carothers was a Rhodes scholar, and since then has carved for himself 
a goodly niche in the business world, being nationally known for his radio 
talks and his articles on the state of the nation's pocketbook. He is one of 
Lehigh's busiest men, having more jobs than you can conveniently shake a 
diploma at. Continually engaged in projects and business surveys and inter- 
mittently dashing off to numerous conferences on this and that. Dean 
Carothers still has time to give his famed lecture course, Eco. 3 and 4, sopho- 
more economics, in which the method is all wrong, the quizzes are unfair 
and the marking system smells, but in which you still learn more economics, 
on the whole, than you would otherwise ever obtain. Neil Carothers' athletic 
figure (he was formerly coach of the tennis squad), trim gray suit and 
sparkling white head of hair are known all over the campus. He personally 
directs the curricula of most business men, helping them in their choice of 

coixEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - Keflj" Roiv: G. W. McKiiiley, C. H. Danhof, R. W. 
Mayer, T. F. Jones, L. R. Tripp, H. A. Kriebel. Front Row: C. E. Allen, W. L. Bishop, R. B. 
Cowin, N. Carothers, H. M. Diamond, F. A. Bradford, E. C. Bratt. 



46 



individual programs to fit their own special needs. That jobs are readily avail- 
able to Lehigh Business seniors, and that the College of Business Administra- 
tion has such a high rating, is in large measure directly due to Dean Carothers. 

At the present time the College of Business Administration is subdivided 
into the three departments of Accounting, Economics and Sociology, and 
Finance. All three departments are situated in stucco-covered, intricate 
Christmas-Saucon hall, which has undergone many alterations since the time 
when it was the first building in the Lehigh campus. Originally a Moravian 
church, Christmas hall has housed students as a dormitory (and professors 
too) as well as many departments and subjects in the University. The later 
addition of Saucon hall brought it to its present size. Besides providing class- 
rooms and laboratories for the Business college, Christmas-Saucon has in it 
the department of English, publicity offices, and the laboratory for the Brown 
and White's production. 

The department of Accounting is headed by Roy B. Cowin, who has been 
here since 1924, the year after Dean Carothers came to Lehigh, and who takes 
an active and abiding interest in the sport of archery. Other members of this 
department include Elmer Bratt, Carl Allen, Henry Kriebel, and Dean 
Carothers, who teaches an advanced course in Business law. The department 
of Accounting is fiu-ther subdivided into accounting, economic statistics, and 
law. Courses are offered to acquaint engineers with the principles of account- 
ing, and likewise for arts men wishing to gain some of the fundamentals of 
the subject. Accounting is to the business world what stoichiometry is to the 
engineer; it enables one to see how much he has, where it goes, and what 
comes out of any given process, industry or business. 

The department of Economics and Sociology offers courses to students 
interested in the social and economic aspects of business, and provides both 
broad backgrounds and more specialized work in these fields. Head of the 
department is Herbert M. Diamond, well known for his Sociology courses 
and for his interest in marriage counseling. Assistant Professor Jones, in- 
structors Danhof, Tripp, and McKinley, and Dean Carothers also do work 
in the Economics department. With the increasing realization today that 
man's economic civilization is intimately connected both with the past and 
with certain principles wherein economic laws operate, economics has become 
practically a fundamental for an understanding of history, philosophy, or any 
other subject in the humanities. Advertising, sales management, labor prob- 



49 



lems, social institutions, and social problems are offered by this department. 

The third department is that of Finance, which is headed by Frederick A. 
Bradford, professor of Economics, who is helped by Associate Professor 
Ward L. Bishop and Assistant Professor Robert W. Mayer. Such subjects as 
corporation finance, money and banking, investments, public finance and 
transportation are taught by this division of the College of Business Admin- 
istration. Certain parts of Finance are required of some engineers, for they 
must know the principles governing the institutions and companies for which 
they work. 

There is much more to Lehigh's Business college which cannot be covered 
here: the apparent easiness of the curriculum, compared to the long hours 
engineers spend in laboratories, and at the same time the concealed stiffness of 
that ciurriculum, which demands understanding rather than detailed knowl- 
edge, discrimination before memorization; and the broadness, the flexibility 
of the Business curriculum, which truly places education before training and 
growth of intellect before mere broad information. 



50 



'P^'V, ^ J^^J^H^i 








CHAPTER FOUR 



ENGINEERING is the big thing at Lehigh. No matter where the observer 
turns, he sees the symboUc shderule, dangUng from belts and protruding 
from pockets; he sees the classrooms and laboratories filled with young men 
learning the fundamentals of science, then later specializing in a particular field 
of appUed science; he feels, if he is at all sensitive, the pungent, pleasant odor 
of technics pervading the whole of Lehigh— decimal points, equations, lab 
reports and the like lending their essences to a mixture which is undefinable 
but peculiarly characteristic of engineering. 

The University was intended by its founder to educate engineers, and was 
thus wisely planned with a balance between the teachings of science, indis- 
pensable to the man as an engineer, and the teachings of the himianities, 
equally indispensable to the engineer as a man. It was recognized by Asa 
Packer, that a broad, firm foundation of principles is much better than any 
narrow, specialized training in processes, and hence at Lehigh the application 
of science to specific problems is kept secondary to the understanding of basic 
conceptions, and to "scientific" or deductive-inductive thinking. Because of 
these concepts of education and a firm foundation, the University has occu- 
pied a prominent position among engineering institutions for three-quarters 
of a century. 

Dean of the CoUege of Engineering is Alfred Copeland Callen, who is also 
head of the department of Mining Engineering; he succeeded Bradley Stough- 

A. Copeland Callen, Dean of the College of Engineering. 



53 



ton, who formerly was Dean, in 1939. Dean Callen, a Lehigh man who re- 
ceived his E.M. degree in 1909, has charge over general matters pertaining 
to engineering, but this is so huge a task that he is assisted by the heads of the 
various departments. An exponent of the liberal education and largely a non- 
believer in intense academic specialization. Dean Callen directs the affairs of 
the college which are concerned with personnel and management problems. 

All freshmen engineers at Lehigh take the same course, and in most depart- 
ments the sophomore year, which together with the first two semesters con- 
tams basic mathematics, physics, and chemistry, is essentially the same. The 
junior and senior years contain almost all of the specialization. Even here, 
however, there is much opportunity in most courses for the student to shape 
his education to his own ends, and to get a sampling of many subjects. 

Not typical of the engineering departments is that of Chemistry and 
Chemical Engineering-because of its size; there are currently over 300 men 
majoring in this subject. This is not only the largest department in the Uni- 
versity, but is also the field in which the greatest number of courses is 
offered— 86. Chemists and chemical engineers have their headquarters in the 
WilUam H. Chandler chemistry building, and they are presided over by 
Harvey A. Neville, professor of chemistry, director of the curricula, and 
widely-known colloids expert. Because of the enormous extent of chemistry, 
it is broken down into two great subdivisions, inorganic and organic chem- 
istry; Lehigh has what amounts to separate departments in both of these 
fields, as well as professors and instructors specializing in analytic, physical 
and biological chemistry. 

Quantitative Professor Alpha Albert Diefenderfer, who signs his com- 
munications with a Napoleonic "A.A.D." and has charge of sophomore 
chemists, and Harold V. Anderson, qualitative and X-ray expert, are two of 
the better-known teachers on the chemical faculty. The department is, of 
course, equipped to carry on many varieties of research. Professor Theis and 
his work with leather, skins and tanning are particularly worthy of mention. 

The department of Civil Engineering, headed by Hale Sutherland, has the 
run of two buildings: Packer hall, where classes and drawing instruction 
are held, and Fritz laboratory, where testing of steel, iron, concrete, cement 
and hydraulic materials is carried on. One of the less specialized majors, civil 
engineering prepares men as they prefer for either actual practice as drafts- 
men and computors, or for business positions. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY - Rear Row: J. H. Steele, R. D. Billinger, J. G. SmuU, H. A. Smith, 

E. D. Amstutz, W. A. McGrath, C. H. Reichard, H. S. Levenson, J. C. Mertz, E. J. Serfass, 

F. J. Fornoff. Second Row: H. V. Anderson, W. W. Ewing, A. A. Diefenderfer, H. A. Neville, 
H. A. Ullmann, G. C. Beck, C. W. Simmons. Front Row: E. Heins, P. T. W. Strub, R. F. 
Schultz, T. H. Hazlehurst. 

DEPARTMENT OF civii, ENGINEERING - Rear Row: A. T. Ippen, C. D. Jensen, B. G. Johnston, H. J. 
Godfrey, W. J. Eney. Front Row: H. G. Payrow, S. A. Becker, H. Sutherland, M. O. Fuller, 
E. H. Uhler. 

54 





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Perhaps when people speak vaguely of "engineers" they really mean the 
Electrical Engineers; certainly theirs is the most technical course, and prob- 
ably their coin of the realm— electrical power— is more baffling to the un- 
initiated than any other natural force. Fortified by plenty of mathematics and 
more than a smattering of physics, electrical engineers tackle problems of 
designing, installing, operating, and repairing complicated electrical ma- 
chinery, problems relating to communications, and electrical research of vari- 
ous kinds. Their headquarters is the James Ward Packard Laboratory of 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, to give it its full title, and the present 
head of their department is Loyal V. Bewley. He assumed the post last year 
after Stanley S. Seyfert, professor of and head of the department of Elec- 
trical Engineering, died in 1939. Shortly after Professor Bewley assumed of- 
fice he revised the curriculum, dropping the business option. 

Less technical but just as useful are the Industrial Engineers, whose cur- 
riculum is "designed primarily to meet the needs of that considerable body 
of students who intend to enter industries essentially technical, whether pub- 
lic utilities or manufacturing plants, but who intend to go into the adminis- 
trative departments." In keeping with this aim, industrials take courses in 
such widely different fields as psychology, law, mathematics and metallurgy, 
plus business and arts electives. Fred V. Larkin, who has the longest title on 
the campus, is professor of Mechanical Engineering, head of the department 
of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Engineering, and director of the 
curricula in iMechanical Engineering and Industrial Engineering. 

As can be seen from the fact that the same man commandeers both de- 
partments, there is rather a close tie-up between Industrial Engineering and 
Mechanical Engineering. The mechanicals deal not only with broad stuff 
such as design, construction, installation and operation of machinery, but 
also in specialized fields like aeronautics, air conditioning, and diesel engi- 
neering. Much of their work is done in Packard laboratory, and they, like 
most other branches of engineering, avoid excessive specialization— Mr. Mor- 
gan, director of placement, holds a degree in Mechanical Engineering. 

It is trite to call this age the Age of Iron, but Age of Iron it is— and will be 
until some more universally useful fabricant displaces iron from its present 
indispensable position. Plastics may do it, in the future; until that time, the 
world will need Metallurgical Engineers, and Lehigh will supply them. With 
offices and classrooms in Williams hall. Professor Gilbert E. Doan controls 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING - i?rar Row: D. E. Mode, N. S. Hibshman, H. C. I. 
Knutson, H. D. Gruber, C. Brunetti. Front Row: J. L. Beaver, L. V. Bewley, A. R. Miller. 

DEPARTMENTS OF MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING - Rear Row: T. T. Holme, J. A. 

Keller, J. F. BaUey, D. W. Williams. Second Row: C. H. Powers, T. E. Jackson, C. F. Warner, 
W. Forstall, J. V. Eppes. Front Row: T. E. Butterfield, A. W. Klein, F. V. LarHn, M. C. 
Stuart, J. R. Connelly. 



57 



(metaphorically speaking) that supply. Metallurgy leans toward chemistry, 
sheers sometimes into physics, says hello to mining, and nods its head, in effect, 
at most departments. It treats the production and refining of metals and 
alloys, and the intelligent use of these materials. Bradley Stoughton is now 
professor of Metallm-gy; he was dean of the College of Engineering until 
he retired from that position, and now is at times engaged on important de- 
fense work for the government. 

Metallurgy treats with the metals themselves, but Mining Engineering 
(graduates in which receive degrees of Engineer of Mines, E.M.) starts with 
the raw material still in the ground. Dean Alfred C. Callen is head of the 
mining department; he is assisted by professors Sinkinson and "Skipper" Eck- 
feldt. The Eckley B. Coxe Mining Laboratory is devoted exclusively to this 
subject, and there most of the operations involved in mining can actually be 
seen duplicated or represented. 

Last but not least in the roster of the College of Engineering comes the 
department of Physics, which handles all freshman and sophomore engineers 
as well as preparing for scientific research the men majoring in that field. The 
curriculum in Engineering Physics is reputed to be the toughest in the school, 
yet its students consistently make the highest group average of any engineer- 
ing curriculum. The physicists naturally drink deeply of mathematics, nor 
do they neglect the more theoretical aspects of chemistry. Fundamentally 
they study the phenomena of nature, such as electricity, magnetism, and gravi- 
tation. They find employment in industrial and academic research, and in 
the technical aspects of production. The department head is Charles C. Bid- 
well. Of note recently have been the researches of Maurice W. Ewing, who 
has investigated ocean bottoms while on leave from the University. 

This passing glance at Lehigh's comprehensive Engineering program can- 
not convey the picture nearly so well as a glance at the actual work in prog- 
ress can. Our civilization would soon rust away and grind to a halt without 
engineers, and every year the demands made on this profession become more 
stringent. That Lehigh has continually been in the forefront of engineering 
education speaks well for the system; and that Lehigh has not wholly subor- 
dinated the cultural values of college to technical training and narrow special- 
ization in one of the tiny segments of man's knowledge, speaks well for the 
University. Like the doctor, the engineer can afford neither to let his in- 
struments corrode nor his love of humanity die out. 

DEPARTMENT OF METALLURGY - Rear Roiv: B. Stoughton, J. H. Frye, Jr., R. D. Stoudt. Front 

Row: G. E. Doan, A. Butts. 

DEPARTMENT OF MINING ENGINEERING - Rear Row. W. A. Stauth, E. S. Sinkinson. Front Row: 

H. Eckfeldt, A. Copeland Callen. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS - i?eflr Row: R. G. Stiles, C. E. Berger, A. R. Frey, F. A. Scott. 

Second Row: B. Altshuler, R. A. Buerschaper, C. D. Baumann, K. P. Schiffert, B. L. Snavely. 

Front Row: C. R. Larkin, P. L. Bayley, C. C. Bidwell, M. Petersen, P. B. Carwile. 




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BOOK III 

Student Life 





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CHAPTER ONE 



THE PRIMARY function of STUDENT GOVERNMENT at Le- 
high is to give the students a voice in the policies and management of 
their college life. This is accomplished by the election of representatives to 
councils by the three living groups— the Fraternities, the Dormitories, and the 
ToM'n— and to Arcadia, the student governing body. Several other organiza- 
tions, while not originally governing bodies, have offered their services as 
advisory groups. 

Tau Beta Pi and Phi Beta Kappa form a joint criticism committee, which 
reviews student suggestions and criticisms and presents them to the admin- 
istration. Omicron Delta Kappa and Cyanide, which are composed of men 
who have shown outstanding leadership ability, investigate campus problems 
and make suggestions to the student governing body. In addition. Cyanide 
has the responsibility of enforcing freshman regulations. 

Certain functions of government are vested in Joint student-faculty com- 
mittees. The Board of Publications controls the Brown and White, Epitome, 
and Bachelor. Campus organizations are supervised by the Student Activities 
committee and the Student Club Finances committee. The Drown Hall 
House committee directs the use of the University social center. These com- 
mittees are appointed by Arcadia, the student governing body, which is 
composed of the leaders of the most important campus organizations, and 
represents Lehigh men in intercollegiate problems and conferences. 

Dr. Claude Gillette Beardslee, faculty adviser of student governing bodies. 



65 



Arcadia as it exists today is the student governing body of Lehigh. The 
purpose of Arcadia is, in general, to better conditions at Lehigh, and it tries 
to accomphsh this by getting the viewpoints of the students through their 
representatives and communicating these opinions and desires to the proper 
authorities. Its purpose is best exemplified by the various activities and duties 
that Arcadia undertakes. 

In the 8o's Richard Harding Davis organized the old Lehigh Arcadia, a 
student governing body. The original purpose of this society was to oppose 
the Greek letter fraternities. Arcadia grew in power and influence until in 
1922 it was recognized as the student governing body. However, from this 
date on the society began to lose its power, and it fell to an insignificant 
position on the campus. In 1938, to rebuild the influence of this student 
governing body, Arcadia combined with the Lehigh Union, another student 
power on the campus, and the purposes and duties of the two organizations 
were combined. The members of the new Arcadia are the leaders in various 
campus organizations and activities. Through this merger the spirits of the 
two organizations were combined and a stronger and more successful or- 
ganization, Arcadia, was the outcome. 

The duties of the new Arcadia, which include those of the former organi- 
zations and some added ones, include many services offered to the Lehigh 
students. At the Arcadia office in Drown Hall are maintained a Lost and 
Found department and a letter office. All students avail themselves of the 
opportunities offered by these services. During Freshmen Week Arcadia 
plans and sponsors the special assemblies and other freshmen activities. It 
also assumes the responsibility for the distribution of Freshman Handbooks 
and the sale of Freshman hats. Arcadia continues its work of planning school 
functions throughout the year. It arranges smokers and pep rallies, manages 
the Founder's Day sports, and assists in handling the Flag Pole Day activi- 
ties. It also assists various organizations around the school by giving them 
grants and giving them assistance in their work, as doing mimeographing 
for them. These are some of the routine duties that Arcadia performs. 
Aside from these duties, Arcadia also handles other school problems. This 
year it sponsored a council meeting which the officers of the Interdormi- 
tory council, the Town council, and the Interfratemity council attended. 
One of the major problems of Arcadia is to get student opinion on our pres- 
ent election system and to reorganize it, if it is thought advisable. 



ARCADIA -i?ea?- Row: G. J. Gabuzda; J. D. Wooters; C. R. Kiefer; R. S. Zachary. Front Row: 

R. P. Whipple; R. M. Ulmer; Dr. C. G. Beardslee; C. F. Kalmbach; A. E. Lee; F. R. Gilmore; 

W. Chase; G. A. Brenker. 

ABOVE - Arcadia in Session. 

BELOW - Mrs. Bowker, Arcadia Office Secretary; President Lee. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Arcadia will be found on page 347. 

66 



lpli%x 




The Interfraternity Council was formed in the spring of 19 19. When 
an investigation was made in that year, it was found that Lehigh was far 
behind other colleges and universities in organizing the fraternities. The 
presidents of the various houses then in existence met to create a council 
which would unite the fraternities. A committee was appointed to draft a 
constitution and at the second meeting of the council, the constitution was 
presented and adopted. It has remained unchanged since that time. As stated 
in the constitution, the purposes of the Interfraternity council are "to pro- 
mote a more intimate friendship between the various fraternities and the 
student body, to develop closer relationships among the fraternities at Le- 
high by means of interfraternity athletics and affairs, to lend a wider sup- 
port to all University functions, and to attempt to further promote the 
welfare of the University in general." 

In carrying out these purposes the Interfraternity council sponsors one 
of the leading social events of the year, the Interfraternity Ball, which this 
year featured the music of Bob Chester and his orchestra; and it approves 
the dates of houseparties. The Council encourages interfraternity athletics; 
cups and trophies are awarded as prizes in touch football, wrestling, swim- 
ming, table tennis, basketball, and bowling. One of the most important duties 
of the Council is to establish and enforce rules for rushing during rushing 
week. Two years ago the Interfraternity council put through a project to 
protect Lehigh li\ang groups, the "SoUcitors Authorization Plan." Under 
this plan all peddlers and salesmen must obtain a card of admission from the 
L^niversity before soliciting fraternity or dormitory trade. 

This year the program of the Interfraternity council has been varied. As 
usual the different fraternities were asked to purchase cookies from the Girl 
Scouts to help raise funds for the Scouts' summer camp. The Council also 
conducted a siu"vey on the possibility of having a reading period before 
examinations. The result of this survey has been a general appeal from the 
students throughout the University for some form of study period directly 
preceding examinations. This year, for the first time, the student members 
will be presented with Interfraternity council keys in recognition of serving 
on the Council. 

Roy S. Zachary is president and WiUiam L. Archer is vice president of 
the Interfraternity council. 

INTERFRATERNITY coiTSCTL - Rear Row: H. W. Jones; R. F. Moss; C. M. Rogers; W. R. Dix; 

H. T. Reuwer; R. L. Heyninger; T. H. Golden; R. W. Leaver. Third Row. G. E. Parsons; 

A. K. Hartley; J. Segal; H. M. Williams; E. R, Conover; A. Descheemaeker; H. W. Olinsky; 

K. C. Badger; H. V. Donohoe. Second Row. F. H. Rich; L. C. Schwab; J. A. Gordon; J. O. 

Phillips; J. P. Smpp; K. Gordon; W. P. Hitchcock; O. W. Cooke; R. N. Simonsen. Front 

Row. E. L. Pinto; J. P. Taylor; W. L. Archer; Dr. C. G. Beardslee; R. S. Zachary; N. IVI. 

Barber; R. L. Vockel; R. C. WeUs. 

ABOVE -The officers. 

BELO'w - Collecting tickets at the Interfraternity Ball; Chaperones at the ball. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Interfraternity council will be found on page 353. 

69 



The Interdormitory Council was formed in 1938. When Richards house 
went up in that year, it became apparent that a governing body for the dormi- 
tories was needed. George Albrecht, '39, representative of the dormitories 
in Arcadia, the student governing body, organized the first Interdormitory 
council. One member from each section of the different dormitories is elected 
to a position on the Council to be the official representative of his living group. 
The purposes of the Interdormitory council are: "to provide a higher 
tribunal in which dormitory matters may be discussed, to carry on and de- 
velop more fully dormitory social and intramural functions, to work for a 
more cohesive and cooperative relationship among dormitory men, and to 
serve as a coordinating body between the dormitories and the University." 

The Council encourages high scholastic records by presenting to the 
dormitory section with the highest scholastic average a scholarship cup. 
Intramural trophies are given to the sections which excel in the various ath- 
letic contests. Trophies are given in football, baseball, basketball, wrestling, 
and bowling, as well as in many others. The champions of the dormitories 
play the winners in the fraternities to determine the championship of the 
school. At the fall and spring houseparties the Interdormitory council spon- 
sors a dance which is open to all students of the University. Last year the 
Collegians, the University dance orchestra, were featured. 

Although the Interdormitory council is only three years old, it has made 
great progress in consolidating the previously disunited dormitories. This 
year it has carried out a program which has furthered the uniting of dorm 
men. A constitution has been drafted which the various sections have at this 
time and are preparing to ratify. A committee on discipline has been formed; 
this body will perform a function which has long been lacking in the dormi- 
tories. The Council has endorsed the proposed increase in the Student Concert 
Lecture fee and is working for the adoption of the increase. A proposal has 
been submitted to Arcadia which will put the distribution of football tickets 
for the Houseparty game on a new and fairer system. Perhaps the most signi- 
ficant thing that the Interdormitory council has done has been to meet in 
joint session with the Town council, the Interfraternity council, and Arcadia 
to discuss and formulate plans for a stronger student government. 

Wilbur Chase is president and Robert McMichael vice president of the 
Council. 



INTERDORMITORY COUNCIL - Rear Roiv: S. T. Lowry; C. E. Clain; W. R. Schnell; R. E. Slee; 

R. C. McMichael; R. R. Halligan. Front Row: E. M. Biggs; C. B. Seib; R. N. Gusdorff; W. T. 

Bostock; H. O. Schroeder; D. A. Bender; W. Chase; R. S. Willard; W. S. Dawless; F. W. 

Berger. 

ABOVE— The officers. 

BELOW— Dorm-men McConnor and Lee with dates; Senior Ball committee. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Interdormitory council will be found on page 353. 



70 



The Town Council, which is the governing body of the off-campus non- 
fraternity men, has three purposes. These are to foster cooperation among 
Town group men, to assist in obtaining better housing and Uving conditions, 
and to develop leadership among its members. To obtain these objectives the 
town council requires the cooperation of all its members to promote social 
activities, to provide a full program of intermural athletics, and to encourage 
high scholastic achievements and participation in extra-curricular activities. 

The Coimcil, which is still a young organization, was founded in March, 
1939. A group of town students who were non-fraternity men felt the need 
for the unification of the town, and they were encouraged in the movement 
by Dr. Claude G. Beardslee. The young Town council which was organized 
adopted a constitution, which provided that the town should be divided into 
geographical sections containing approximately equal numbers of students. 
Each town section then elected its own officers, and the president of each 
group formed the Town council. The president of the Council itself, who 
automatically becomes a member of Arcadia, was elected from the town at 
large. This same membership system as it was originally started exists today 
with sUght modifications. Two new representatives were recently admitted to 
the body, one from the Alpha To\vn house and the other from the Lehigh- 
Allentown club. These two groups were granted the privilege of representa- 
tion by a majority vote of the Council at one of the monthly meetings which 
the Council holds to conduct all of its business and organize its program. 

This year the Council sponsored an extensive program which included 
three dances, one in the winter and two in the spring. In addition, it presented 
trophy awards to the winning teams of the town intramural league, and it 
gave a scholarship cup to the section with the highest scholastic average. In 
order to reheve the individual students of personal solicitation by the various 
charities, the Council gave contributions to the Red Cross and similar organ- 
izations. The fulfillment of the program is insured by a one dollar member- 
ship fee from each town student. To assist it in its duties the Council has four 
appointed committees, the executive, membership, intermural athletics, and 
social committees. As an incentive to become a Council member, Cyanide 
and Omicron Delta Kappa have decided to give the members points toward 
membership. 



TOWN COUNCIL - Rear Row: G. L. Griffiths; G. J. Gabuzda; K. R. Templeton; B. W. Loge- 

chnik; J. Silverberg; D. W. Bedell; C. V. Clarke. Front Row: A. P. Dieffenbach; L. K. Oli- 

phant; A. Tallaksen; G. A. Brenker; C. R. Kiefer; A. Clark; R. H. Holland. 

ABOVE— The officers. 

BELOW— The Town Council Dance. 

A COMPLETE usT of the members of the Town council will be found on page 358. 



73 



The CLASS OF 1 94 1 has been guided in its final year at Lehigh by two out- 
standing men, Albert E. Lee, Jr., president, and Augustus A. Riemondy, 
secretary-treasurer. Lee, a dormitory man, has for four years shown accom- 
plishments in social leadership, athletics, and scholarship. Besides being presi- 
dent of his class, Lee was president of Tau Beta Pi and Arcadia, a varsity 
wrestler, and a member of several honoraries including Phi Beta Kappa. 
Riemondy distinguished himself mainly as an athlete, being captain of the 
soccer team and a letterman in two other sports, basketball and track. The 
class sponsored two social functions, a class banquet and the Senior Ball 
at fall houseparty. Largely responsible for the success of these activities 
were Robert I. Felch, chairman of the banquet committee, and Robert L. 
Stubbings, chairman of the Senior Ball committee. 

The CLASS OF 1942 chose as its leaders for its junior year two non-fraternity 
men, George A. Brenker, president, and Robert N. Gusdorif, secretary- 
treasurer. Brenker is also president of the Town council, a member of the 
Newtonian society, and an intramural debater. Gusdorff, of Richards house, 
from his freshman year on became known for his excellent acting in Mustard 
and Cheese productions. He also preceded Brenker as head of the class. Dur- 
ing the year the class held a class banquet and sponsored the Junior Prom 
at spring houseparty. The banquet was organized by a committee under the 
leadership of James J. Donahue, Jr. The speaker at the gathering was F. Alex- 
ander Magoun, professor of sociology at Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. The dance was successfully planned by a committee headed by 
Archie D. Tifft. 

The CLASS OF 1943 started its second year under the leadership of Robert 
P. Whipple, president, and W. Harry Olinsky, secretary-treasurer. Whipple, 
a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity, starred in his freshman year on both 
the basketball and baseball teams and in his sophomore year played on the 
varsity basketball team. Olinsky, a Sigma Alpha Mu, likewise an athlete, has 
already turned in creditable performances on the varsity football and basket- 
ball teams. This year the class held one gathering, a class banquet. Harry 
Olinsky, assuming a double duty, was appointed chairman of the committee 
which planned the affair. 

The CLASS OF 1944, still in its infancy, has already begun to make its mark 
at Lehigh. A class banquet, planned by a committee headed by E. Lyster 
Frost, broke the attendance record for any banquet ever held at the Uni- 
versity when a total of 293 freshmen attended the dinner. 



CLASS OFFICERS— Top; A. E. Lee; A. A. Riemondy. Middle: G. A. Brenker; R. N. Gusdorff. 
Bottom: R. P. Whipple; H. W. Olinsky. 



74 



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Although not officially recognized as student governing bodies, the hon- 
orary activities organizations include so many prominent students and influ- 
ential campus men that their decisions and actions on college affairs are in 
practice as important as those of the designated student councils. 

Omicron Delta Kappa, the national senior honorary activities fraternity 
for men, honors the students who have shown sound moral character and 
the most effective leadership in campus activities; works together with the 
administration toward the development of a better Lehigh; and encourages 
and inspires other students to try to achieve an ideal of moral and executive 
manhood. Election is based on a point system which recognizes leadership in 
athletics, scholarship, and social and cultural activities. The five ideals of the 
fraternity are: character, recognition, opportunity, inspiration, and loyalty. 

Omicron Delta Kappa was founded in 1914 at Washington and Lee uni- 
versity. It now has circles in many leading American colleges and universities. 
Lehigh's Xi circle was installed in 1925. 

The officers of the Xi circle are: Charles F. Kalmbach, president; Harry 
D. Chandler, vice president; J. Dukes Wooters, treasurer; and Dr. Claude 
G. Beardslee, secretary. 

Cyanide, junior honorary activities fraternity, has three piu^oses which 
are: to recognize the members of the junior class who are outstanding in 
scholarship and activities, to discuss the policies of the University, and to 
perform such services to the University as are deemed advisable. 

Cyanide was originally an organization of students in the chemistry cur- 
riculum. As time went on, the society changed to its present scope, open to 
students in any curriculum. The name. Cyanide, was chosen because in chemis- 
try the word is used for the separation of gold from the base metals. 

This year Cyanide again took the responsibility of enforcing the fresh- 
man regulations, and supervised freshman orientation. In addition. Cyanide 
launched an athletic policy investigation during which it quizzed several 
University officials in order to find out what is wrong with Lehigh athletics. 
The one social event on Cyanide's calendar was a party given for last year's 
Cyanide members. 

Officers of Cyanide are: Archie D. Tifft, president; Frank E. Smith, vice 
president; and Arthur H. Rich, secretary-treasurer. 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA - Rear Row: J. C. Atrwood; W. R. Okeson; R. L. Vockel; A. A. Rie- 

mondy; J. W. Maxwell. Third Row: J. I. Kirkpatrick; F. E. Smith; R. M. Ulmer; W. L. 

Archer; F. R. Gilmore. Second Row: W. H. Congdon; H. R. Reiter; R. E. Menus; R. N. 

Simonsen; J. H. Mathewson. Front Row: A. E. Lee; H. D. Chandler; C. F. Kalmbach; C. G. 

Beardslee; J. D. Wooters; W. H. Vogelsberg. 

CENTER PICTURE - Omicron Delta Kappa meets at dinner. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Omicron Delta Kappa will be found on page 355. 

CYANIDE - Rear Row: J. A. Gordon; R. S. Struble; C. G. Beardslee; J. N. Ambrogi; A. B. 

Brown; W. R. Okeson; F. E. Smith. Second Row: R. N. Simonsen; F. S. McKenna; A. D. 

Tifft; A. H. Rich; R. E. Metius. Front Row: J. H. Norwood; J. M. Roach; M. F. McConnell. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Cyanide will be found on page 351. 

77 



The Board of Publications, founded to insure solvency of publications, 
now has three major duties. It has complete control over the Epitome, the 
Brow?? and White, and the Bachelor; selects their major officers, and controls 
their finances. The board is composed of the dean of undergraduates, the 
head of the courses in journalism, one other faculty member, and three stu- 
dent members elected by Arcadia. The board, therefore, has the power to 
act for the administration, the faculty, and the student governing body of 
the University. 

The Student Activities Committee, composed of the dean of under- 
graduates, two professors, and three students, controls all activities. It gives 
and revokes permission for clubs to organize, approves or disapproves all 
petitions for dances, banquets, and other similar social activities sponsored 
by organizations of the University, and controls the distribution of the 
student activities fee. 

The Student Club Finances Committee was formed to supervise the 
finances of all organizations, other than publications. In accordance with this 
policy, all clubs must have their budgets approved by the committee, and 
submit a financial report each semester. 

Phi Beta Kappa, national honor scholastic fraternity, honors those 
students who have shown scholastic excellence in non-technical subjects. 
Men are elected at Lehigh late in the senior year by a faculty council of Phi 
Beta Kappa members. To become eligible for membership a student must 
have at least a 3.00 average for seven semesters. However, the number of 
men admitted in any one year is limited. The fraternity, organized on Decem- 
ber 5, 1776, at William and Mary college, has the distinction of being the 
nation's oldest Greek letter organization. The Lehigh chapter. Beta of 
Pennsylvania, was formally installed on April 15, 1887, at which time Alpha 
chapter of Pennsylvania was also given a charter at Dickinson college. It 
is the annual custom of Phi Beta Kappa at Lehigh to hold a banquet in con- 
junction with the chapter at Lafayette college. The speaker at this year's ban- 
quet was Professor Thomas R. Powell, professor of law at the Harvard Law 
school. 

BOARD OF PUBLICATIONS - J. C. Attwood, K. K. Kost, W. H. CoHgdon, G. A. Howland, D. H. 
Gramley, C. F. Kalmbach. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE - G. J. Gabuzda, W. H. Vogclsberg, G. D. Harmon, W. H. 
Congdon, D. R. Schoen, J. G. Roberts. 

STUDENT CLUB FINANCES COMMITTEE - Rear Row. M. Petersen, R. B. Cowin. Front Row: A. A. 
Riemondy, W. H. Congdon. 

PHI BETA KAPPA - Rear Row: J. A. Kaufmann; D. R. Schoen; J. R. Dorkin; G. J. Gabuzda; H. 
R. Davidson. Third Row: T. R. Hunt; R. A. Ware; A. E. Lee; J. H. Bricker; D. W. Burke; F. 
V. Hertzog. Second Row: F. N. Bahnson; W. A. Litzenberger; R. R. Myers; C. F. Kalm- 
bach; J. H. Quinn. Front Row: E. A. Brovv'n; J. C. Attwood; M. J. Fry; S. Kowalyshyn; F. R. 
Gihnore. 
A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Phi Beta Kappa wiHl be found on page 355. 



■-^ 








Tau Beta Pi, which is recognized as one of the vital factors in the life of 
the engineering schools of America, was founded in the spring of 1885 by- 
Professor Edward Higginson Williams, Jr., who was at that time head of 
the Mining department of Lehigh. Professor Williams' purpose was to create 
a society which would mark those men who conferred honor on their colleges 
by distinguished scholarship and exemplary character. Since that time the 
organization has grown to more than 70 chapters and 32,000 members. 

One of the highlights of the year for Tau Beta Pi is the election of new 
members, held in the fall and spring. In the fall the number of Juniors chosen 
is limited to three. The scholastic requirement for admission to the fraternity 
is for a Senior to be in the top quarter of his class, and for a Junior to be in 
the upper eighth. Having fulfilled the scholarship requirements, the student 
must also fulfill the more important requirements of integrity, breadth of 
interest, and unselfish activity which are the mark of an ideal engineer. In- 
tegrity is considered to be more important than any other qualification for 
a Tau Beta Pi and an engineer. 

This year the society made plans to erect a plaque to mark the room in 
Packer hall where the conversations took place between Professor Williams 
and the first initiate which resulted in the founding of Tau Beta Pi. 

The society contributes to the government of Lehigh by combining with 
Phi Beta Kappa to appoint a criticism committee to enable students to offer 
more conveniently criticisms of Lehigh's activities, management, or curricu- 
lum, to the administration. These criticisms are reviewed by the committee, 
and if they are considered to be of value, they are referred to the administra- 
tion. In recognition of the qualities of leadership which Tau Beta Pi expects 
of its members, a place in Arcadia has been made one of the privileges of the 
president of the chapter. 

The society's social events are the annual spring picnic and the two initia- 
tion banquets. This year the spring banquet was held jointly with the Epsilon 
chapter of Pennsylvania, which is at Lafayette. 

The officers of the Alpha chapter of Pennsylvania this year are: Albert E. 
Lee, Jr., president; Charles F. Kalmbach, vice president; Richard M. Shep- 
herd, treasurer; Harold H. Werft, corresponding secretary, and John D. 
Mettler, recording secretary. There are four faculty advisers, who are Cyril 
D. Jensen, Dr. J. Lynford Beaver, Dr. John C. Mertz, and E. Robins Morgan. 



TAU BETA VI -Rear Row: P. Lutters; A. B. Brown; J. F. Clark; C. C. Snyder; W. H. Morse; 
A. P. Dieffenbach; R. N. Brown; R. L. Stubbings; R. B. Spilman. Second Row: L. G. Gitzen- 
danner; S. S. Cross; F. H. Housel; A. C Foss; S. Kowalyshyn; B. V. Stuber; P. G. Foust; D. W. 
Bedell; R. L. Vockel; C. G. Reber. Fro?it Row: J. C. Mertz; C. D. Gilchrist; F. N. Bahnson; R. 
M. Shepherd; J. D. Mettler; A. E. Lee; H. H. Werft; E. D. Heins; R. B. Moyer; E. R. Morgan. 
ABOVE -The officers. 
BELOW - Initiation smoker. 



THE YEAR IN REVIEW 

University events for the year 1940-41, as narrated in the following para- 
graphs, show such a wide range of activities that they seem to indicate an ex- 
tension of the somewhat increased student interest in campus life and goings- 
on which has manifested itself in the last few years. A^ost Lehigh men are 
now much more wide awake to the problems of the campus and its happen- 
ings than they were four or five years ago. Whether this is due to better 
leadership, a different type of student, or just a sharper social consciousness 
pricked into action by the startling things taking place in the world to-day, 
it can only be conjectured; but it is nevertheless a fact that, all in all, there 
has been this year a kind of revival of interest in Lehigh doings among Lehigh 
men. The dormitories and the town group are now successfully organized, 
the sports letter set-up has had a housecleaning, and the elections system has 
been drastically changed. What happened this year? 

Classes formally began on September 19, and after all the tallies were in the 
enrollment, although it numbered 1749, had decreased, being 56 less than the 
previous year's total. The newly organized Alpha Town house was admitted 
to the Town council on the 24th, and on the 28th the Board of Publications 
approved a plan submitted by students to create a new magazine, the 
Bachelor, to replace the old Lehigh Review which had been banned (sup- 
posedly for indecency) by faculty action the previous June. A new cut 
system was announced by Dean Congdon during this month, a system some- 
what vague but quite efficient; and it was this month also that the first students 
attending with aid from the Alumni Student Grants plan were enrolled. 

Founder's Day was celebrated in honor of Asa Packer on October 2nd 
with the customary Chapel exercises and an address by President Williams 
on "The Stamina of American Youth"; but rain prevented laying the corner- 
stone for Grace hall, just as bad weather later put the contractors three months 
behind schedule on the building, making it necessary to hold the wrestling 
championships and the Houseparty dance elsewhere. Eight days after 
Founder's Day, O.D.K. and Cyanide met, followed by a Town council meet- 
ing, all organizations planning the year's activities. Small identification tags 
appeared on all Lehigh cars, student and faculty, as a faculty ruling went into 
effect on the 1 5th. Then sporadic political interest began to mushroom with 
(Continued on page 166) 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT IN REVIEW - Flagpole Day; Cyanide Officers Tifft and Rich; Military 
Ball Honorary Colonel; Movies of "Most Beautiful Freshman" Contest; At the Senior Banquet. 

















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CHAPTER TWO 



LEHIGH living groups had their humble beginning in the early dormitories 
J of Christmas and Saucon, and in the first fraternities of Chi Phi and 
Alpha Tau Omega. Since those first years of the University the living groups 
have expanded to the dormitory system of four houses, to twenty-nine fra- 
ternities, and to three living clubs. 

The dormitories did not grow out of a carefully laid plan at the opening 
of the University. The first dormitory was first built for a church, housed 
classes, and became a dormitory. The second dormitory was built as a dormi- 
tory, became a course building. A third dormitory had the genre origin of 
a brewery, was converted into a hotel, and became a dormitory when 
necessity compelled still a third change. Only Taylor house was built as a 
dormitory and remains such today. It was not until President Emeritus 
Richards conceived of a system of seven dormitories grouped on the side of 
South Mountain, and President C. C. Williams built the first two of this 
system that housing at Lehigh took on form and organization. 

Fraternities followed the casual growth of the dormitories with the first 
fraternity originating as a local society— the Calimiet club, Delta Sigma Phi 
as a senior engineering society, and Pi Kappa Alpha as the Lehigh Seal club. 
Then Delta UpsUon built a home on the campus. Lehigh fraternities were then 
each given a plot on the campus for a house. So the living groups integrated 
and organized their future. 

Henry Snirgis Drinker House. 



85 




ALPHA CHI RHO 



ALPHA CHI RHO was founded at Trinity college, Hartford, Conn., 
on June 4, 1895. Since that time there have grown up eighteen active 
chapters with more than five thousand members. The Phi Mu chapter, ad- 
mitted to the national fraternity in 19 18, grew out of a local fraternity, Theta 
Delta Psi. Alpha Chi Rho has occupied four houses since its installation in 
19 1 8. The present house, which has been recently added to and redecorated, 
is located at Market and Linden streets. The managers of the freshman foot- 
ball and basketball teams are Alpha Chi Rho's. There are also men in varsity 
soccer, swimming, and tennis. The captain of the hockey team, the 155-lb. 
interfraternity wrestling champion, and the national intercollegiate rifle 
champion are Alpha Chi Rho, as is the director of interfraternity sports. 
Alpha Chi Rho men are members of various honorary societies, including 
Omicron Delta Kappa, Alpha Kappa Psi, Scabbard and Blade, Pi Delta 
Epsilon, and Newtonian. Lehigh's new magazine, the Bachelor, has on its 
staff and among its competitors several of this chapter's men. Another mem- 
ber is on the business staff of the Broivn and White. Others are in Mustard 
and Cheese, the University Band, and on the debating team. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row. J. H. Burrus, II, '43; P. A. Thomas, '43; W. E. Hendrian, '44; 
R. C. Haas, '43; K. H. Norris, '43; D. R. Smith, '42; C. F. Leaman, Jr., '43; P. C. Smith, '43. 
Third Row: J. G. Hamilton, '42; E. I. Shuttleworth, '43; W. Wieland, '41; A. W. Foster, '42; 
D. M. Haire, '42; H. W. Boynton, '41; F. F. Kramer, III, '41; R. P. S. Smith, '42. Second Row: 
R. C. Huntoon, '41; H. R. Beucler, '41; K. C. Badger, '41; J. H. Mathewson, '41; C. C. Smith, 
'41; A. W. Hess, '41; J. D. Scott, '42. Front Row: K. I. Day, '44; C. C. Leaf, '44; N. S. More- 
ton, '44; H. R. Maack, '44; S. E. Mayo, '44; W. W. Wiley, '44. Others: R. L. Walker, '43; W. 
P. Glessner, '44; C. F. Moore, '44. 
FRATER IN FACULTATE - Stanley J. Thomas. 
IN THE CANDiDS - Fred Kramer and date at I.F., and President John Mathewson. 

86 





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ALPHA KAPPA PI 



ALPHA KAPPA PI was founded as a local fraternity, Phi Delta Zeta, at 
the Newark College of Engineering, in Newark, N. J., on January i, 
192 1. Foiur years later, in the Fall of 1925, Phi Delta Zeta met with another 
local fraternity, Alpha Kappa Pi, of Wagner college, of Staten Island, N.Y., 
for the purpose of forming a national organization from the two groups. 
Alpha Kappa Pi, as the new fraternity was called, has expanded until today 
it comprises twenty-eight chapters. Alpha Kappa Pi came to Lehigh in 1930 
when a group of Lehigh students, who in 1927 had previously organized as 
Howard hall, applied for and received a charter from the national organiza- 
tion. On February i, 1930, Howard hall became the Nu chapter of this 
national fraternity. Alpha Kappa Pi men at Lehigh are participants in ath- 
letics and all the other extra-curricular activities. Three members of the 
varsity football team and one of the varsity wrestling squad are Alpha Kappa 
Pi's. Members of this house are active in basketball, baseball, swimming, track, 
and tennis. In the field of music. Alpha Kappa Pi has members in the Glee 
club, and in the Symphony orchestra. One of the Lehigh Alpha Kappa Pi's 
is a member of Cyanide. Another belongs to the International Relations club. 
The Rifle club Usts an Alpha Kappa Pi as a member and there are men in 
Alpha Phi Omega and the Camera club. Another member is a varsity debater. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: H. L. Boyer, '42; R. C. Hopkins, '43; C. W. Holyoke, '42; J. F. 
Pfeffer, '42; C. L. Liebau, '43; L. H. Miller, '42; R. D. Moyer, '44; J. E. Devitt, '43; W. B. 
Hinman, '43; J. N. Ambrogi, '42; E. T. White, '42; R. A. Wilson, '41; J. M. Hood, '41; H. V. 
Donohoe, '41; R. M. Shepherd, '41; H. H. Werft, '41. Front Row: W. C. Stoeckle, '44; F. R. 
O'Neill, '44; R. W. Rrumscheid, '44; E. J. Gsell, '44; L. A. Mosier, '44; R. B. Henrick, '44. 
FRATER IN FACULTATE - Robert F. Herrick. 
IN THE CANDIDS - President Hood; two at chess; and Wilson and White at I.F. 



89 




ALPHA TAU OMEGA 



ALPHA TAU OlMEGA was founded at the Virginia Military institute, 
Lexington, Va., on September ii, 1865, allowing it the distinction of 
being the first American fraternity to be founded after the Civil War. The 
fraternity was incorporated under the laws of Maryland in 1870. The number 
of active chapters grew steadily until today there are ninety-four chapters 
in colleges from coast to coast. The first chapter to be established in the 
North was at the University of Pennsylvania in 1881. Just a year later the 
first initiate of the new chapter founded the Lehigh chapter, Alpha Rho. 
Until 19 16 the home of the Alpha Rho chapter was located in town, but an 
alumni drive at that time made possible a new house which was built just 
beyond the entrance to Sayre park. Alpha Tau Omega has occupied this 
house for 26 years. The captain of the golf team and the president of the Rifle 
club are Alpha Tau Omega members. This year members have won letters 
in soccer and hockey, an Alpha Tau Omega being a junior manager of hockey. 
They have been active in lacrosse, badminton, wrestling, Sportsman's club 
and the Brown and White. In scholarship Alpha Tau Omega boasts a member 
of Phi Beta Kappa, the vice-president of Alpha Kappa Psi, and a member of 
the Newtonian society. 

IN THE PICTURE -Rear Row: B. V. Lawshe, '44; P. B. Woodroofe, '43; R. F. Ryan, '42; R. K. 

Bleser, '44; R. Weller, '43; B. Craig, '44; R. M. Baker, '42; R. L. Bird, '43. Second Row: R. C. 

Paul, '42; R. Craig, '42; W. A. Siegele, '41; D. W. Burke, Jr., '41; J. R. Hendry, '41; M. J. F. 

Stacom, Jr., '41; J. H. Milbank, '42. Front Row: W. A. Ernest, '44; C. R. Conklin, Jr., '44; 

W. Trappe, Jr., '44; S. L. Hammond, '44; J. K. Cochran, '44; W. R. Dix, '44. Other: A. K. 

Wiggin, '42. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE - Howard Eckf cldt, Judson G. Smull. 

IN THE CANDiDS— President Burke; and some brothers harmonizing. 

90 









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-,jf sv * 




BETA KAPPA 



BETA KAPPA fraternity was founded at Hamline University, St. Paul, 
Minn., in October, 1901. When in a few years it became evident that 
the fraternity had an assured future at the university, it expanded, first to the 
University of Washington, then throughout the West. In 1925 it progressed 
eastward. Today there are over forty-eight chapters. In 1932 a group of 
Lehigh students banded together in a desire for closer contact in their uni- 
versity life, but not wishing fraternity activity to interfere with their studies. 
Soon they became known as the Omicron Sigma Phi fraternity and obtained 
a house on Montclair avenue. Two years later they petitioned for and re- 
ceived a charter from Beta Kappa. The Lehigh organization was installed as 
the Alpha Sigma chapter of Beta Kappa in May, 1934. The present chapter 
house is located at 805 Delaware avenue. Beta Kappa men at Lehigh are active 
in athletics, such as varsity track and varsity baseball, and participate in many 
other campus activities. The art editor of the new Lehigh Bachelor is a mem- 
ber of Beta Kappa. He has also been granted an award which places him 
among the ranks of the outstanding college cartoonists. The Mustard 
and Cheese society. Scabbard and Blade, and Pi Delta EpsUon list Beta 
Kappa's as members. One member has been elected to the Newtonian society. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Roiv: S. A. Bacskay, '44; J. M. Cordrey, '44; R. H. Wilson, '44; G. M. 
Clark, '42; W. F. Buhrig, '43; A. F. Von Block, '43; R. A. Tambella, '44. Third Row: L. D. 
Larson, '43; L. O. King, Jr., '43; O. W. Cooke, Jr., '42; J. B. Hill, Jr., '42; R. C. Stoehr, '43; 
T. P. Bradford, '43; G. W. Houston, '43; J. F. Musante, '43. Second Row: W. W. Dunham, Jr., 
'41; J. Beriont, '41; C. L. Bixby, Jr., '41; P. H. Buder, Jr., '41; VV. C. Kendall, '41; W. C. Bley, 
'41; J. H. Hageny, Jr., '41. Front Row: G. H. Brown, '44; L. F. Page, '44; T. F. Humphrey, 
'44; C. V. Davis, Jr., '44; E. R. Velie, '44. 
FRATER m FACULTATE - Max Peterson. 
IN THE CANDiDS - Jim Cordrey on the clarinet, the ever-recurring Bull Session, and President HiU. 

93 




BETA THETA PI 



IN 1827 John Reilly Knox and seven other undergraduates formed the 
first chapter of Beta Theta Pi fraternity at Miami university, Oxford, 
Ohio. In so doing they were the first fraternity to be estabhshed west of the 
Alleghenies and the first of the Miami Triad to be formed. At that time, 
since secret societies were banned at Miami, the society was forced to live 
a precarious existence for a number of years. The fraternity thrived, how- 
ever, and it is now one of the ten largest in the nation with over eighty active 
chapters. At Lehigh the Beta Chi chapter was founded in 1891 when three 
Beta transfers sought and obtained a charter. Their first house was on West 
Fourth street, but in 1902 it was moved to Wyandotte street. The house was 
later changed to Church street and finally the present chapter house was built 
in Sayre Park. It was completed in 1926. The current chapter has been scho- 
lasticaUy honored and active in many extra-curricular organizations. The 
captain and two other lettermen of the wrestling team are Beta's. There are 
Beta men in Omicron Delta Kappa, Cyanide, Pi Tau Sigma, and Alpha Kappa 
Psi. One man has been elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Other activities in which 
the house has participated are Mustard and Cheese and Broivn ajid White. 

IN THE PICTURE - i?eflr Row: D. Coles, '44; B. M. Peacock, '44; W. P. Snyder, '44; E. W. Palmer, 

'43; P. L. Reiber, '44; F. H. Bailey, '41; J. J. Deach, '44. Second Row: A. L. Williains, '44; 

D. R. Lowry, '44; J. C. Lampert, '42; R. F. Forshay, '42; W. H. Lindsay, Jr., '42; J. R. Simpson, 

III, '43; C. G. Thornburgh, Jr., '42; J. P. Larkin, III, '42; R. H. Brenneman, '42. Third Row: 

W. D. Gorman, '43; R. S. Struble, '42; W. F. Hartnett, '41; W. E. Scott, '41; W. B. McConnel, 

Jr., '41; N. R. Qark, '42; R. Brune, '42. Front Row: J. H. Blake, '44; S. C. Pruette, '44; E. Jones, 

'44; A. C. Mermann, '44. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE - John H. Ogbum, Paul E. Short, E. Kenneth Smiley, and Charles L. 

Thomburg. 

IN THE CANDiDS - Betas at dinner, around the piano, and President Scott. 

94 




CHI PHI 



THE present organization of Chi Phi fraternity was founded out of three 
previous orders by a merger in 1874. The oldest of these orders was the 
old Princeton order which itself was a survival of the old Chi Phi society, 
which was founded at the College of New Jersey in 1824. This Chi Phi soci- 
ety had expanded until the Civil War broke it up into a northern and a south- 
em fraternity. It was the re-combination of these two orders that produced 
the present Chi Phi. The Psi chapter of Chi Phi was the first fraternity to be 
installed at Lehigh. It was granted its charter in 1872 and for two years it 
was the only fraternity in the University. The Psi chapter was the twenty- 
second of the national chapter to be formed and has held continuous existence 
since its inception. The chapter has had many homes, the first of which was 
the present site of the Moravian Book shop. Other sites have been the Wash- 
ington Republican club, the Post ofiice, and the Union Trust company. The 
present house in Sayre park was erected in 1923. This year Psi chapter men 
have participated in both varsity and freshman football, varsity swimming, 
track, and the varsity rifle team. There are members in Mustard and Cheese, 
the Brown and White staff, Scabbard and Blade, and varsity debating. The 
advertising manager of the Lehigh Bachelor is a Chi Phi. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: D. E. Gregory, '43; J. G. de Grouchy, '43; F. A. Chidsey, Jr., '43; 
C. A. Steams, Jr., '43; C. L. Finch, Jr., '43; G. J. Walbom, '44; G. H. Froebel, Jr., '44. Third 
Row: A. W. Canizares, '43; V. E. Smith, '42; H. H. Corwin, '43; W. R. Frederick, '42; H. G. 
Werner, '41; R. R. Bright, '42. Second Row: D. Barnecott, '41; R. C. Seltzer, '41; W. A. 
Matheson, Jr., '42; J. L. Conneen, '42; R. L. Heyniger, '42; G. M. Ritchie, Jr., '41., L. K. Schwarz, 
Jr., '41. Front Row: R. E. Weltz, '44; J. H. Callahan, '44; C. E. Lehr, '44; D. T. Fischer, '44; 
H. K. Wrench, Jr., '44; E. L. Leet, '44. Others: C. Balough, Jr., '43; A. N. Bugbee, Jr., '44; 
H. W. Lynn, Jr., 44. 
IN THE CANDiDS— Presidents Conneen and Heyniger, Chi Phi's straddle the fence. 

97 




CHI PSI 



CHI PSI fraternity, founded by a group of students at Union college, 
celebrates its looth anniversary this year. It has progressed during this 
period through a conservative policy of expansion and now has twenty-five 
chapters located in schools from coast to coast. The national fraternity holds 
its chapters and alumni associations in very close contact through the aid 
of an official fraternity magazine distributed to every Uving member, and 
an official visitor who pays annual visits to each chapter and keeps a personal 
contact among the entire undergraduate membership. The local chapter was 
founded in 1894 by nine undergraduate students. It was named the Alpha 
Beta Delta chapter. The first house was on Seneca street, and the present 
home in Sayre Park was built in 19 15. Alpha Beta Delta has men active in 
many widely diversified activities. There are three men in Omicron Delta 
Kappa, one in Tau Beta Pi, one in Cyanide, two in Pi Delta Epsilon, and 
one in Alpha Kappa Psi. The business manager of the Brown and White, 
and the art and senior section editors of the Epitome are Chi Psi's. There 
are lettermen in soccer, cross-country, hockey, and swimming. Chi Psi men 
are on the varsity football and wrestling teams. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: R. A. Heironomus, '44; J. F. Donahue, '44; R. F. Riehl, '44; D. W. 
Armstrong, '44; J. W. Williams, III, '44. Third Row: R. E. Ashley, '42; A. G. Byrne, '43; H. B. 
Edwardsen, '44; W. F. Finney, Jr., '43; Q. J. Schwarz, '44; F. E. Felt, '44; W. C. Walker, '43. 
Second Row: C. A. Johnson, '43; J. M. Stockbridge, '43; A. F. Leckie, Jr., '43; W. S. Shuttle- 
worth, '42; F. B. Mayer, '42; A. L. Fischer, '42; G. C. Stone, '43; E. J. Reddert, Jr., '43; F. E. 
Smith, Jr., '42. Fro7it Row: J. R. Penn, III, '43; R. B. Anderson, Jr., '42; P. Carpenter, '42; 
H. D. Chandler, '41; R. L. Vockel, '41; C. E. Louden, Jr., '42; L. A. Schneider, '42. Other: 
W. H. Hebrank, '44. 

PRATER IN FACULTATE- E. Robins Morgan. 
IN THE CANDiDS- President Chandler, the house at dinner. 



98 




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DELTA PHI 



DELTA PHI fraternity was founded at Union college, Schenectady, 
N. Y., on November 17, 1827. It is the third American national col- 
legiate fraternity in order of founding and is a member of the Union Triad, 
composed of the original three college fraternities, established at Union. 
Delta Phi was estabUshed in the face of great opposition from the college 
authorities and it was several years before development was sanctioned and 
permitted to go unhampered by the Union faculty. Since then a program of 
very conservative growth has been followed. There are now fourteen active 
chapters located entirely in eastern colleges. Nu chapter was established at 
Lehigh in 1884 when six men petitioned for a charter. It was the fourth 
fraternity to found a chapter at Lehigh and it has had continuous existence 
since its inception. The membership has traditionally been Umited to a small 
group in keeping with the purposes of the founders who estabUshed the 
society "to consolidate mutual interests and at the same time mutually benefit 
each other." After two houses on Delaware avenue the fraternity has its home 
on Warren square. The men of Nu chapter have been active in both varsity 
and freshman sports, with lettermen in soccer and junior varsity wrestling. 
One of the sophomore competitors for cheerleader is a Delta Phi. There is a 
representative in the Electrical Engineering society, the Mining and Geo- 
logical society, the Sportsman's club, the R. W. Hall pre-medical society, 
and the Student Chemical society. 

IN THE PICTURE- Rear Row: W. O. Houston, '43; G. W. Phillips, '43; F. W. Wright, Jr., '42; 
S. B. Longley, '42; T. A. Birckhead, '43; C. R. Bergh, '43. Second Roto: A. M. Over, '43; J. O. 
Phillips, '42; J. C. Fisher, '41; R. B. Johnson, '41; C. L. Grouse, '41; J. H. Kidder, '42. Front Row: 
D. F. Longley, '44; M. G. Verbeet, '44; C. R. Bruns, '44; N. S. CuUiney, '43. 
IN THE CANDiDS - Petty gets the once-over, and President Johnston. 




DELTA SIGMA PHI 



DELTA SIGMA PHI fraternity was founded on December lo, 1899, at 
the City College of New York. The next two chapters were installed 
at Columbia University and New York University, forming a closely-linked 
basis for further expansion in the fraternity. The City College chapter, for- 
merly known as "Insula," now became the Alpha chapter. From the nucleus 
of three chapters there have grown forty-three chapters in the leading col- 
leges of the United States and Canada. The local chapter was originally a 
group of senior engineers who called themselves Sigma Iota. As the society 
expanded its name was changed to Phi Delta Pi. This group obtained a house 
on Delaware avenue and in 1929 it petitioned for admission to Delta Sigma 
Phi. 193 1 saw the charter granted, and in the fall of 1932 the Beta Theta 
chapter was installed. The continued expansion of the fraternity necessitated 
its moving into a larger house, which it now occupies. Members of the fra- 
ternity participate in a variety of activities. The chairman of the hockey 
club, members of the varsity football team, swimming team, and soccer team 
are Delta Sigs. Three members of the house are Tau Beta Pi men. The chair- 
man of the Senior Prom committee is a member of Delta Sigma Phi. Other 
men in the fraternity are on the Epitome staff and in the University Band. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: E. J. Gamble, '42; O. M. Colwell, '43; W. O. Gold, '44; J. E. Ray- 
iner, Jr., '44; C. W. Stahl, '43; J. D. Ryan, '43; G. A. Rothlisberger, '44. Second Row: W. R. 
Sultzer, '43; J. F. Bailey, Faculty; R. Mascuch, '42; E. W. Starke, Jr., '43; R. P. Hazard, '42; 
E. L. Pinto, '43; E. S. Davis, '43; J. Burgio, '42. Front Row: W. B. Holberton, '43; A. H. Zane, 
'41; G. G. Andrews, Jr., '41; J. M. Phelan, '41; G. W. Peterson, Jr., '41; R. L. Stubbings, '41; 
T. S. C. Holberton, Jr., '43. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE - Robert P. More, Edwin R. Theis, Joel F. Bailey, Henry A. Kriebel. 
IN THE CANDiDS-The house dog; Prezy No. 2 Zane on the books; the boys with dates; and 
Prexy No. i Phelan. 



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DELTA TAU DELTA 



DELTA TAU DELTA was founded at Bethany college, West Virginia, 
in the spring of 1858, but it was not until the following year that an 
efficient organization was effected. In 1886 the Rainbow society of the 
W. W. W. fraternity combined with Delta Tau Delta. The official organ 
of the fraternity is called The Raijibozo in honor of this society. At present 
there are seventy-four active undergraduate chapters, with a membership 
over 3,000 and an alumni membership of over 30,000. Beta Lambda chapter 
was founded at Lehigh University in 1874. In 19 14, after two residences in 
town, it moved into its present home, the second fraternity to have been 
built on the campus. The co-captain of basketball, the captain of track, and 
members of the cross-country, football, baseball, swimming, and tennis teams 
are Delta Tau Deltas. The business manager and the financial manager of the 
new Bachelor are members of the fraternity. The president, secretary, and 
ten members of Mustard and Cheese and the national advertising manager of 
the Brown and White are Delta Tau Deltas. Three members are in O. D. K., 
and two are in Cyanide. Pi Delta Epsilon, the band and numerous other 
campus organizations fist Delta Tau Delta men as members. 

IN THE PICTURE- Rear Row: J. L. S. Joralemon, '44; W. R. Taylor, '43; J. F. Lucker, '44; B. W. 
Thayer, '44; S. H. Shaw, '44; R. E. Joslin, '43; R. D. Mussina, '44; J. H. Oswald, '43; W. J. Peck, 
'43. Fourth Row: F. M. Taylor, '44; R. W. Jensen, '44; J. M. Morris, Jr., '43; P. H. Powers, Jr., 
'43; R. P. Whipple, '43. Third Row: W. McClave, '42; L. A. Croot, '42; R. H. MarshaU, '42; 
J. A. Gordon, '42; R. B. Strode, '41; C. H. Johnson, '41; A. D. Wolff, '42; J. L. Loughran, '42; 
E. A. Britton, '42. Second Row: A. S. Weigel, '41; J. D. Wooters, Jr., '41; S. G. MacNamee, '41; 
W. H. Vogelsberg, '41; R. H. Gunnison, '41; R. M. Ulmer, '41; B. A. Briody, Jr., '41. Front 
Row: D. C. Smith, '44; H. Boyd, '44; W. F. Metten, '44; W. E. Belser, '44; M. K. Barrett, Jr., 
'44; A. H. Kingman, Jr., '44. 
IN THE CANDIDS - President Vogelsberg, and the eternal bridge game. 

105 




DELTA UPSILON 



DELTA UPSILON is the only non-secret Greek letter fraternity in the 
United States. It was originally known as the Social fraternity at Wil- 
Uams coUege, Massachusetts, where it was founded in 1834. In 1885, the 
Lehigh chapter was installed by Charles Evans Hughes, Brown '81, now 
Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. The chapter house has 
the distinction of being the first fraternity house to have been built on the 
campus. There are sixty-one active chapters of Delta Upsilon in the United 
States and Canada, comprising thirty thousand members. The editor-in-chief 
and the sports editor of the Epitome, and the business manager of the Brown 
and White are D. U's. The captains of both the varsity and freshman basket- 
ball teams are Delta Upsilon men, as are members of the football, wrestling, 
swimming, tennis, and baseball teams. One of Lehigh's cheerleaders is a 
D. U. as is a member of the Student Concert Lecture Committee. The fra- 
ternity is represented in Omicron Delta Kappa, Cyanide, and Pi Mu Epsilon. 
Pi Tau Sigma and Alpha Kappa Psi are other honorary societies which have 
members among the D. U's. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: G. F. Kister, Jr., '44; A. J. Cornelius, '44; W. S. Frey, '44; R. L. 
Rahn, '44; G. Ramsden, '44. Fourth Row: P. J. Berg, '44; C. D. Curtiss, '43; R. T. Berg, '43; 
R. S. Rumsey, '43; K. Porter, Jr., '43; R. F. Goebel, '43; W. D. Hayes, '43; E. G. Boyer, '43; 
B. F. Hoffacker, Jr., '44. Third Row: J. H. Norwood, 42; R. M. lobst, '42; C. Heumann, '43; 
D. M. Middleton, '43; H. M. Williams, '42; H. G. Payrow, Jr., '43; M. F. McConnell, Jr., '42. 
Second Row: J. A. Quincy, '42; J. M. Altmaier, Grad.; B. Conchar, '41; D. R. Schoen, '41; 
N. T. FolweO, '41; R. J. Lyons, '43; F. S. McKenna, '42. Fro7it Row: E. A. Kister, '41; C. T. 
Edwards, '41; R. C. Reber, '41; J. H. Stives, '42; J. M. Beauchamp, Jr., '41; R. J. Caverly, '41; 
J. R. Findorff, '41. Others: W. J. Wise, '41; R. L. Green, '43. 
FRATRES IN FACtiLTATE - Wray H. CongdoH, Gilbert E. Doan, John I. Kirkpatrick. 
IN THE cANDms - President Stives, D. U.'s look informal, and dine. 

106 




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KAPPA ALPHA 



KAPPA ALPHA fraternity was founded over a century ago, in 1825, 
by a group of nine Union college students. The group, which was the 
first secret fraternal society to be formed in the United States, grew until 
it consisted of eight chapters; after this, it pursued a policy of restricted ex- 
pansion. The Lehigh chapter was formed mainly through the efforts of 
James E. Brooks, Henry E. Kipp, and Charles F. iMaurice in 1894 when the 
sLx charter members were initiated at a national convention in New York 
City. Meetings were at first held in a private room, but expansion necessi- 
tated the procurement of a house. After the occupation of numerous houses, 
the fraternity moved in 19 16 into its present home at Fourth and Seneca 
streets. Kappa Alpha men participate in wrestling, swimming, lacrosse, 
hockey, and junior varsity football. The assistant manager of the freshman 
football team is a Kappa Alpha. Presidents of the Aero club and the Radio 
club, and members of the Sportsman's club and the International Relations 
club are also members of Kappa Alpha. The business managers of the 
Epitome and of Mustard and Cheese belong to the fraternity. The musical 
groups to which Kappa Alpha men belong are the Glee Club, the Band, and 
Tone, honorary musical society. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row. R. C. Moore, '43; A. B. Parsons, Jr., '43; R. N. Davis, '43; W. O. 

Graham, '43; G. M. Holderer, '44. Second Row: J. L. Diamond, '42; P. C. Whiting, '43; W. S. 

Eisner, '43; T. G. Scott, Jr., '42; F. P. McKay, Jr., '43; W. G. Bourne, III, '44; J. I. Brower, Jr., 

'42. Front Row: K. Gordon, Jr., '42; R. N. Watts, '41; H. P. Chase, '42; J. A. Marvin, Jr., '41; 

H. H. Chamberlain, '41; W. L. Archer, '41; A. M. Craig, Jr., 41. Others: E. J. Stone, '42; R. 

M. Paddock, '44. 

FRATER IN FACULTATE - Charles W. Simmons. 

IN THE CANDiDS - President Marvin; the boys at poker; and Chamberlain and Brower hard at 

work. 

109 




KAPPA SIGMA 



THE Kappa Sigma fraternity was first established at the University 
of Virginia on December lo, 1869. Five men, who later became known 
as "the five friends and brothers," refused bids to other Greek letter societies 
in order to found their own organization. Since then, the national organization 
has grown to over one hundred chapters. In 1900 a group of eleven Lehigh 
undergraduates petitioned for entrance into Kappa Sigma. They were ac- 
cepted and a charter was granted on November 19, 1900, establishing the 
Beta Iota chapter. The original chapter house was located on Delaware ave- 
nue. After moving to several other residences, Beta Iota settled at 24 East 
Church street. The chapters are grouped into twenty-three divisions, with a 
district grandmaster at the head of each. The Lehigh chapter is in District V, 
which includes chapters at Bucknell University, Lehigh, Dickinson college, 
and Lafayette college. The house has men on the football and soccer teams, 
and members in the Sportsman's club. There are members of Pi Tau Sigma, 
Tau Beta Pi, Pi Mu Epsilon, and other honorary societies. 



IN THE PICTURE- Rear Row: K. W. Baumann, '44; W. R. Dabb, '44; J. M. Williams, '43; C. M. 
Thompson, '43; R. L. Dodson, Jr., '44; A. Mitchell, '44; J. F. Mengel, '44. Second Row: P. S. 
Falco, '44; T. M. Buck, '43; J. T. Riley, '42; C. B. Dutton, '42; J. P. Stupp, '43; J. K. Lehman, '43; 
R. Hardy, '44. Front Row: W. E. Deifer, '41; R. A. Buser, '41; A. E. Moog, '41; R. N. Brown, 
'41; A. H. Thomas, '41; J. D. Leighton, '42; W. H. Gaedcke, '42. Others: G. W. Burgers, '43; 
R. G. Schenk, '43; J. D. ScouUer, '44. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE - Harold V. Anderson, NeU Carothers, Albert A. Rights, Ernst B. Schulz. 
IN THE CANDiDS— Kappa Sigs dine, and President Brown. 

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LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA fraternity was founded at Boston university in 
J 1909 as a professional law fraternity. Soon, however, it developed into 
a social society and under a program of conservative expansion a second 
chapter was established at Massachusetts State in 19 12. By 1938 there were 
more than 80 active chapters located in every part of the country. In 1939 
a merger was effected with another national fraternity, Theta Kappa Nu, in 
which 29 new chapters were inducted. Lambda Chi Alpha is now the fourth 
largest college fraternity, having 108 active chapters. At Lehigh the present 
chapter sprung from a local fraternity. Delta Theta, which had been founded 
by three students in 1922. They applied for a charter and in 1926 were 
inducted as the Gamma Lambda Zeta of Lambda Chi Alpha. Gamma Lambda 
had occupied houses on Packer and Montclair avenues before it moved to 
its present Delaware avenue residence in 1927. The current chapter has had 
men in both varsity and freshman sports, and as managers of soccer and 
basketball. The first lieutenant of Scabbard and Blade and the treasurer of 
the Interfraternity council are Lambda Chi. There are men in intramural 
debating Brown and White staff. Mustard and Cheese, Alpha Kappa Psi, 
Lambda Mu Sigma, and Cut and Thrust. 

FN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: J. H. Bryan, '41; W. L. Clark, '41; N. M. Barber, '41; A. P. Luse, 
'41; W. H. Miller, '41; T. R. Bell, '41; A. F. Kendall, '41. Third Roiv: E. F. Bodine, '42; 
J. A. Hunt, '42; G. E. Archbold, '42; R. E. Rowand, '42; R. W. Leaver, '42; R. S. Newcomb, 
'42; J. S. Saylor, '42; E. H. Dofter, '43. Second Row: W. A. Nelson, '43; V. M. Anido, '43; 
G. F. Lueddecke, '43; E. K. Gross, '43; J. F. Kemmer, '43; D. E. Krebs, '43; P. V. Ward, '43; 
R. H. Bemasco, '43. Fro7it Row: G. G. Zipf, '42; C. T. Loveless, '42; C. R. Beddows, '44; 
K. T. Frauch, '44; C. N. Coddwig, '44; J. N. Hendershot, '44; R. F. Burroughs, '43; W. B. 
McClenachan, '43. 
IN THE CANDros - President Luse, and Barber. 



113 




PHI DELTA THETA 



THE PHI DELTA THETA fraternity was founded in 1848 at Miami 
university, Oxford, Ohio. Two other outstanding fraternities along with 
Phi Delta Theta were jointly known as the Miami Triad. There are 107 chap- 
ters of the fraternity in the United States and Canada. Lehigh's Eta chapter 
was founded on April 15, 1887, and it was initiated into the national fra- 
ternity by the Lafayette chapter. The present house, which is the third to 
be occupied by the fraternity, is located on the campus and was built by 
alumni in 1907. Athletics is a prominent activity of many Phi Delts, who 
represent their house as members of the varsity football and basketball teams, 
golf, baseball and soccer squads. Phi Delts are also out for freshman football, 
baseball, basketball, cross-country, and wrestling. Managers of cross-country 
and tennis are Phi Delts. Interfraternity clashes from which Phi Delts have 
emerged victorious have included football and softball championships for 
the past three years and last year's basketball title as well. Alpha Kappa Psi's 
treasurer is a Phi Delt, and other Phi Delts represent the house in the many 
course societies. 

IN THE mcivRE- Rear Row: J. L. iMacMinn, '44; R. N. Schantz, '43; R. F. Sotzing, '42; G. Z. 

Goetz, Jr., '42; J. A. Gould, '42; T. R. Hunt, '42; R. M. Palmer, '42; J. W. Niemeyer, '43. 

Third Roiv: W. L. Croft, '44; J. F. Kizer, Jr., '43; J. E. Lane, '43; F. L. Morgal, '43; E. P. 

BachteU, Jr., '41; B. A. Berlin, '43; R. I. Bashford, Jr., '43; J. T. Green, '42; C. A. Ginter, Jr., 

'43. Second Row: B. Ewing, '42; P. R. Hombrook, Jr., '42; R. H. Mueller, Jr., '41; J. W. 

Whiting, Jr., '41; C. H. Conover, '41; J. H. Bashford, '42; D. E. Eastlake, Jr., '42; J. F. Young, 

Jr., '41; K. E. Fiedler, '42; F. E. Weise, Jr., '41. Front Row: O. E. Fox, '44; R. C. Shafer, 

'44; G. A. Murray, '44; R. S. Brown, '44; W. B. Hursh, '44; S. Van \Tiet, Jr., '44; E. S. 

Stowers, Jr., '44; R. N. Figueroa, '44. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE - George Beck, Glen W. Harmeson. 

IN THE CANDiDS - Phi Delts pose for Dave, and Presidents for the year— Mueller and Conover. 

114 




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PHI GAMMA DELTA 



PHI GAMMA DELTA fraternity was founded in 1848 at Jefferson col- 
lege. Major Frank Keck of the Columbia University chapter conceived 
the idea of a chapter at Lehigh during a movement to establish chapters at 
the better universities in the country, and as a result, communicated with a 
group of students at Lehigh. On January 15, 1886, Major Keck and a number 
of other members of the fraternity installed the Beta Chi chapter. The first 
chapter house was on Market street, but the group expanded so rapidly that 
larger quarters were established on Cherokee street. The present campus 
house was built in 1922. Phi Gamma Delta men captain the varsity football 
and swimming teams, and participate in numerous varsity and freshman 
sports, among them wrestling, basketball, track, soccer, cross-country, tennis, 
lacrosse, and hockey. Managers and junior managers of wrestling, basketball, 
soccer, and football are also members. The business manager of the Freshman 
Handbook and the circulation manager of the Brown and White are repre- 
sentatives in the publications field. The presidents of Cyanide, Brown Key, 
and Cut and Thrust societies are Phi Gamma Delta. 

IN THE PICTURE - i?ear Row. D. F. Gearheart, '44; T. H. Golden, III, '43; C. H. McKaig, '43; 

R. D. Bailey, '43; D. H. Schaper, '43; R. C. Boston, '43; B. R. Heinz, '43; W. D. Gordon, '43; 

W. C. Hittinger, '44. Third Row: B. A. Elmes, '43; R. W. Beck, '42; P. W. Parvis, '42; 

R. F. Moss, '42; R. E. CuUen, '42; A. D. Tifft, '42; J. R. Muehlberg, '42; R. E. Metius, '42; 

B. W. Deehan, '43. Seco?id Row: S. D. Smoke, '41; D. S. Martin, '42; W. B. Simpson, '41; 

D. B. McAfee, '42; B. E. Smyth, '41; J. A. Tifft, '41; W. E. Hauserman, '41; G. Lelloy, '44; 

H. C. Griffith, '41. Front Row: G. A. Murray, '44; C. C. Hilton, '44; A. L. Baker, '44; F. J. Duni- 

gan, '44; D. L. Bennel, '44; D. T. Steele, '44; C. A. Elmes, '44; D. H. Brownlee, '44. 

FRATREs IN FACiiLTATE - Robert D. Butler, James L. Clifford, A. Henry Fretz, and Robert M. 

Smith. 

IN THE CANDiDS - Deehan at the vie, and President Smyth. 

117 




PHI SIGMA KAPPA 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA was founded at Massachusetts Agricultural college 
in the year 1873, where it was originally known as the "Three T's." The 
fraternity became national in 1888 with the establishment of a chapter at the 
Albany Medical college. From this beginning it has grown until there are now 
forty-nine chapters. The Nu chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa was founded in 
1 90 1 at Lehigh. The present house, which is the fourth to be occupied by 
the fraternity, was occupied in 1936 and is located at 406 Delaware avenue. 
At present Phi Sigma Kappa ranks fourth in scholarship among the fra- 
ternities. A Phi Sig is captain of the soccer team and a member of the basket- 
ball and track teams; other Phi Sigs are on the football and lacrosse teams. 
Lehigh's head cheerleader is a Phi Sig. The Bachelor, Lehigh's new magazine, 
has Phi Sigs for its editor and managing secretary; the circulation manager 
of the Brown and White is also a Phi Sig. Phi Sigma Kappa members have 
been elected to membership in Scabbard and Blade, Cyanide, and Omicron 
Delta Kappa. Pi Delta Epsilon, Pi Tau Sigma, and the Newtonian society are 
all represented in Phi Sigma Kappa. Other Phi Sigs are members of their 
respective course societies and the newly organized Sportsman's club. A 
number of members are taking Advanced Ordnance in the R.O.T.C. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: J. B. Forsyth, '44; P. S. Guckes, '43; H. A. Grubb, '42; H. L. 

Olmstead, '43; J. E. Smith, Jr., '43; W. L. Clark, '42; R. B. Parkinson, '43; G. J. Schneider, '43; 

F. V. Schumacher, '42; E. H. Klein, '42. Second Row: W. Danshaw, '41; R. G. Taylor, '42; 

R. A. Ritchings, '41; R. Caemmerer, '41; C. W. Baker, '41; A. A. Riemondy, '41; L. J. 

McKinley, '41; R. H. Forsyth, '42; P. A. Rodgers, '41. Front Row: W. E. Henry, Jr., 44; 

J. F. O'Brien, '44; J. D. Smith, '44; R. W. Enstine, '44; J. G. Clemmer, Jr., '44; E. W. Wallick, 

Jr., '44; W. M. Hall, '44; B. D. Ferrell, '44. 

FRATREs IN FACtn.TATE - Sylvanus A. Becker, Thomas E. Jackson. 

IN THE cANDiDS - Caemmerer and Rodgers make study look easy, and President Baker. 

118 




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PI KAPPA ALPHA 



PI KAPPA ALPHA fraternity was founded at the University of Virginia 
in 1868. The nucleus of the fraternity was six confederate soldiers who 
had lived through the Civil War together. Their early organization had an 
uncertain existence due to extremely unsettled conditions in the South, but 
a convention held at Hampden-Sydney in 1889 suppHed the necessary oppor- 
tunity for a reorganization among three of its four chapters. In 1909 the 
restriction limiting the fraternity's scope to the southern and southwestern 
states was removed and new chapters were established all over the country. 
At present there are eighty chapters. The Gamma Lambda chapter at Lehigh, 
which was founded in 1926, was originally a club known as the Lehigh Seal 
club and as Zeta Chi. At first the chapter occupied the house on the corner 
of Montclair avenue and Warren square which is now the Alpha Town 
House. The present house, located at 306 Wyandotte street, has been used 
by Pi Kappa Alpha since 193 1. Pi Kappa Alpha ranks sixth scholastically 
among Lehigh fraternities. The living group singing championship of the 
University is held by Pi Kappa Alpha. The manager of the freshman wrestling 
team and the business manager of the Epitotne are Pi K. A. as are the president 
of Pi Tau Sigma and vice president of Alpha Phi Omega. Other men are in 
the Advanced Ordnance course and in the various course societies. 

IN THE mctusE-Rear Row: G. E. Funk, '44; R. E. Roberson, '44; G. F. Hewitt, '44; R. J. 

Wiedenman, '44; J. W. Motter, '44; A. F. Jones, '44; S. Hart, '43. Second Row: J. B. Price, '43; 

R. H. Doney, '44; E. K. Mulhausen, '42; C. W. Freed, '42; D. E. Boughner, '42; A. H. Bren- 

nan, '43; J. J. Hucker, '43. Front Row: J. C. Reischer, '44; R. C. Gottschall, '44; J. F. Bonin, 

'44; S. C. Woodruff, '44; N. C. Applegate, '44; R. R. Lau, '44. 

FRATRES IN FAcuLTATE - George D. Haimon, and Bradley Stoughton. 

IN THE CANDiDS - Brothers Felch and Jones hit the books. Pi K.A. picnics, and President Felch. 

12 I 




PI LAMBDA PHI 



EARLY in the year 1 895 Pi Lambda Phi fraternity was founded at Yale 
University by students of different denominations interested in eliminat- 
ing all prejudice and sectarianism. The fraternity expanded quickly, and in 
1 9 1 5 the Pioneer club of Bethlehem petitioned for membership. The Pioneer 
club had been formed in 1909 by a group of Lehigh students. A charter was 
granted that same year, the ideals of the Lehigh club being very similar to 
those of Pi Lambda Phi, and the club became the Lambda chapter of the 
national fraternity. In January, 1940, Phi Beta Delta merged with Pi Lambda 
Phi making a total of thirty-three chapters under the latter's name. The 
incorporation of the two fraternities caused only minor changes in the 
national organization as both groups were established with similar purposes 
in mind. Lambda chapter first took residence on Market street, but moved to 
its present location at 827 Bishopthorpe street in 193 i. The chapter has been 
prominent in scholarship for many years, having taken the Phi Sigma Kappa 
scholarship cup more times than any other fraternity. The house is repre- 
sented on the staffs of the Bachelor and Brown and White as well as in Mus- 
tard and Cheese productions. There is representation in Phi Beta Kappa, Tone, 
Alpha Epsilon Delta, Lambda Mu Sigma, and numerous other societies. 

IN THE PICTURE - i?ear Row: T. D. Propper, '42; G. W. Wolfsten, '43; J. Weening, '43; W. M. 
Scrouse, '43; R. S. Margolies, '43; H. Nelken, '43; S. Zalkind, '43; N. J. Faber, '43; M. L. Mor- 
rison, '44. Second Row: F. H. Rich, '42; C. E. Kluger, '42; S. L. Hollander, '42; J. Dorkin, '42; 
S. O. Grossman, '41; S. Weinrib, '41; S. Margolis, '41; V. Lichtenstein, '41; R. A. Bobbe, '41; 
Front Row: C. Rosenthal, '44; W. Doniger, '44; A. Dubin, '44; A. Rosener, '44; D. P. Epstein, 
'44; R. Jaslow, '44; M. Blum, '44; T. A. Lawson, '44. 

IN THE CANDiDS - Grossman answers the door, two Pi Lambs study hard, and President Hol- 
lander. 




PSl UPSILON 



PSI UPSILON fraternity was founded in November, 1833, at Union 
college, Schenectady, N. Y., as a result of the contention of seven under- 
graduates that secret fraternities were tending toward narrowness and con- 
servatism. They organized a group in support of broadness and liberality, 
and the fraternity has since expanded until it now includes twenty-seven 
active chapters in the United States and Canada. In 1880, two members of 
the Lehigh faculty, E. H. Williams, Jr., and H. C. Johnson, interested a group 
of undergraduates in petitioning Psi Upsilon for a charter. The petition was 
granted in 1883, and the chapter was installed on February 22, 1884. A house 
on Market street was purchased shortly after the installation, and was occu- 
pied for almost twenty-five years. In 1908, T. E. Visscher, '99, drew up plans 
for the present house, which is just off the campus on Brodhead avenue. Upon 
its completion in 1909 the chapter moved into its new home. The house was 
enlarged in 193 i by an addition to its present size. A large number of Psi U's 
participate in athletics; football, varsity and junior varsity wrestling, basket- 
ball, swimming, soccer, baseball, golf and hockey being the sports in which 
they are active. They also bowl and play ping pong in the intramural tourna- 
ments. A number of members belong to the Glee club; others are taking parts 
in Mustard and Cheese productions. Still others belong to the Camera club 
and to the various course societies. 

IN THE mcrvRE-Rear Row: T. D. Wetrich, '44; W. A. Mackey, '44; P. M. Corsa, '44. Third 
Row: W. E. Howard, III, '42; G. W. Snyder, '44; H. S. Clarke, '43; G. C. Worrell, '43; 
J. J. Maloney, '43. Second Row: G. B. Smith, '44; H. McDonnell, '43; W. A. Detwiler, '42; 
J. S. Wetrich, '42; G. J. Bussman, '44; J. F. Mitchell, '43. Front Row: A. E. Jenkin, '42; 
E. R. Snovel, '41; E. W. Hine, '41; G. W. Woelfel, '41; E. S. Malloy, '41; W. P. Hitchcock, '42. 
FRATER IN FACULTATE - WUliam A. Comelius. 
IN THE CANDiDS - President Woelfel, and Psi U's at dinner. 




SIGMA ALPHA MU 



SIGMA ALPHA MU was founded at the City College of New York in 
1904. In the spring of 1923 a local fraternity called Eta Alpha Phi was 
installed as the Sigma Kappa chapter at Lehigh. As their basic principle, 
thirty-five chapters "foster and maintain among their sons a spirit of loyalty 
and devotion for Alma Mater and to form a close social and fraternal union 
of the Jewish students in the various universities, colleges, and professional 
schools in America." The present house, which was purchased in 1926 with 
the support of the alumni, is located at 506 West Third street and is the 
fourth to be occupied by the chapter. The first chapter house was located 
on Cherokee street. Next, the house of Sigma Alpha Mu was established at 
the corner of Broadway and Seminole street. Then a move was made to a 
new house on Wyandotte street in 1925. The Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity 
has not ranked below fourth scholastically for the past eight semesters, being 
at present in second position. Sigma Alpha Mu men represent Lehigh in 
fencing, basketball, football, soccer, hockey, baseball, and swimming. A 
Sigma Alpha Mu is the captain of the varsity tennis team. There are also men 
in Mustard and Cheese and the band, and on on the Brown and White staff. 
The secretary-treasm-er of the sophomore class is a Sigma Alpha Mu. In this 
fraternity are found members of the Newtonian society and Cut and Thrust, 
honorary fencing society. 

IN THE vicrvRE— Rear Row: M. Levy, '42; S. Breskman, '43; A. Price, '43; A. Haft, '43; 
M. Buchman, '43; W. Benesch, '43; I. Fisher, '43; H. Olinsl^y, '43; A. Landesman, '43; A. Wolf, 
'43. Second Row: R. Goodman, '42; M. Kantrowitz, '41; E. Miller, '41; R. Berg, '42; G. Gold, 
42; N. Hackman, '42; E. Klein, '42. Front Row: R. Linker, '44; R. Moss, '44; J. Levi, '44; R. 
Leeds, '44; A. Adler, '44; A. Lasser, '44. 
IN THE CANDiDS - President Hackman, the boys at pool, and Goodman takes a trick. 



126 




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SIGMA CHI 



SIGMA CHI, one of the original ttiree fraternities of Miami university, 
Oxford, Otiio, was founded on June 28, 1855, when six of the charter 
members withdrew from Delta Kappa Epsilon to form their own fraternity. 
The Alpha Rho chapter, established at Lehigh on June 6, 1887, was the 
fifty-eighth to be installed. There are now ninety-eight active chapters in 
existence. During the Civil War when the fraternity was about to die out 
in the South, seven members organized the Constantine chapter which kept 
Sigma Chi alive for the South. The local chapter was originally a club, the 
Crimson Halberd society, which petitioned Sigma Chi and was admitted as 
the Alpha Rho chapter. Alpha Rho was inactive from 1890 imtil 1893 when 
it was reinstated. Since 1904 the chapter house has been located at 204 East 
Broad street. Among the Sigs are found the sophomore managers of fenc- 
ing, wrestling, swimming, and basketball, and the junior manager of wrestling. 
Members of the fraternity participate in football, cross-country, track, 
varsity and freshman soccer and fencing, golf, hockey, and the rifle team. 
The Epitome, the Brown and White, and the Bachelor staffs contain Sigma 
Chi members. Honoraries to which Sigs belong include Newtonian, Tone, 
Phi Alpha Theta, and Delta Omicron Theta. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: R. L. Smith, '44; J. S. Marsh, '44; C. M. Norlin, '43; A. D. Hinrichs, 
'43; A. R. Tucker, Jr., '43; R. W. Mason, '43. Third Row: W. R. Robinson, Jr., '44; W. W. 
FuUer, '43; J. A. Read, '42; R. F. Wood, jr., '43; S. R. Bowen, Jr., '41; R. K. Gailey, '42; 
R. B. Cowin, Jr., '43. Second Row: M. C. Burgy, '41; R. S. Davis, Jr., '41; J. H. Jacoby, '41; 
T. R. Hunt, '41; J. E. Wigg, '42; J. P. Taylor, '41; H. T. Reuwer, '42; Front Row: D. F. 
Cox, '44; D. R. Helm, '44; J. L. Troy, '44; J. E. Doxsey '44; J. M. Skilling, Jr., '44. 
FRATRES IS FACiTLTATE - Raymond C. Bull, George B. Curtis, Howard S. Leach, and Martin 
B. Westerman. 

IN THE CANDiDS - In two views, the brother and dates of spring H. P. gambol on the lawn, and 
President Hunt. 



129 




SIGMA NU 



SIGMA NU began originally as a secret society, "The Legion of Honor," 
at the Virginia Military institute, Lexington, Virginia, when three cadets 
banded together to combat the campus control held by other houses there. 
In 1865 this group received its present name, Sigma Nu. Sigma Nu expanded 
entirely in the South until Pi chapter, the fifteenth, was founded at Lehigh 
in 1885. Today there are over 100 active chapters of Sigma Nu. The present 
house, situated at the entrance to Sayre Park, is the fourth that Pi chapter 
has owned. It was built in 19 15 and later was remodeled in 1938. Former 
houses were on High street. Church street, and Packer avenue. Alumni of 
Pi chapter have been directly responsible for much of the expansion of Sigma 
Nu in the East. The present house contains the president of the Interfraternity 
council, the editor-in-chief of the Brown and White, the president of Omicron 
Delta Kappa, the captains of the baseball squad and the lacrosse team, and the 
manager of varsity wrestling. Other prominent campus positions held by 
Sigma Nu's are the editorial manager of the Brown and White, the president 
of Pi Delta Epsilon, the second lieutenant of Scabbard and Blade, and the 
vice president of Tau Beta Pi. Two of its members have been elected to 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

IN TtiE PICTURE - Rear Row. T. G. Summers, '44; W. B. Farrell, '44; W. H. Carter, '44; J. L. 
Clammy, '44; J. R. Holrvedt, '43; W. C. Kirschner, '43; H. A. Gardner, '44. Third Row: 
R. W. Clark, '42; W. T. Mainwaring, '42; W. W. Gleadall, '42; F. R. Thaeder, '42; R. B. 
Steele, '42; G. E. Elliot, '42; J. L. Horn, '43; D. L. Hume, '42. Second Row: J. C. Atrwood, '41; 
S. B. Bowne, '42; E. W. Loomis, '41; R. S. Zachary, '41; C. F. Kalmbach, '41; R. W. Reese, '41; 
P. J. Whalen, '42. Front Row: C. A. Rugg, '44; P. J. Kervick, '44; A. J. Inderrieden, '44; 
R. L. Cooper, '44: 
IN THE CANDiDS-The game room, stocking up the record player, and President Zachary. 

130 



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SIGMA PHI 



THE SIGMA PHI society was founded in 1827 at Union college. It is 
the second oldest social fraternity, and claims the distinction of being 
the oldest national fraternity, since it expanded to Hamilton in 183 1. The 
original wish of the founders to curtail extensive expansion in the best in- 
terests of the fraternity has been well carried out. There are at present 10 
active chapters located throughout the country. The local chapter, the Alpha 
of Pennsylvania, was founded in 1887 after 26 members of Beta Beta, a local 
fraternity, applied for a charter from the Sigma Phi society. The present 
house on Delaware avenue was erected in 1888— the first to be built by a 
fraternity at Lehigh. Included among the members of Sigma Phi are the 
founder of the newly-formed Badminton club, the promotion manager and 
the assistant advertising manager of the Lehigh Bachelor, the program man- 
ager of Mustard and Cheese, a news editor of the Brown and White, the chair- 
man of the Freshman Banquet committee, and a member of both the Junior 
Prom and the Sophomore Banquet committees. There are members promi- 
nent in Freshman and Sophomore sports in addition to activities including 
Cyanide, Scabbard and Blade, International Relations club, Newtonian so- 
ciety and Alpha Kappa Psi, business administration honorary society. One 
member has been elected to Phi Beta Kappa. 

IN THE PICTURE- Rear Row: R. M. Lynch, '42; L. J. Caulk, '42; J. H. Bricker, '41; J. P. Beal, 

Jr., '41; F. Hanks, Jr., '41; L. D. Vander Veer, '42; A. H. Rich, '42. Second Row: F. B. Kern, 

'43; C. M. Rogers, '43; R. C. Hardenbergh, '43; S. J. Davy, '43; M. P. Pearsall, '43; E. F. 

\Vamer, '42. Front Row: H. W. Shawhan, '44; T. Peters, Jr., '44; D. M. Congelton, '44; E. 

L. Frost, '44; J. J. Probst, '44. 

FRATER IN FAcuLTATE - Frederick Alercur. 

IN THE CANDiDS - Two Sigma Phi's look nonchalant. President Caulk. 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON was founded in 1901 at the University of Rich- 
mond, in Richmond, Virginia. It has quickly grown until now it is one 
of the ten largest national college fraternities in the world. There are more 
than seventy active chapters scattered throughout the nation. Sixteen men, 
who had formed a local fraternity, Omicron Pi Alpha, applied for and re- 
ceived a charter from Sigma Phi Epsilon in 1907. Thus was formed the 
Pennsylvania EpsUon chapter, the seventeenth to receive its charter. The 
original home of the Pennsylvania Epsilon chapter was on West Fourth 
street, but it was later moved to the comer of Fourth and Wyandotte streets. 
In 1923 the present house was acquired on West Market street. Sig Eps are 
prominent this year both in sports and in other extra-curricular activities. 
There are men on the varsity wrestling, track, and soccer squads. Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Cyanide, Tau Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, and Eta Kappa Nu have 
Sig Eps among their members. The president of Phi Eta Sigma, two mem- 
bers of the Editorial council of the Brown and White, and two Junior 
Editors of the Epitome are members of the current chapter. Men are also 
active in debating, Cut and Thrust, and other campus activities. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: W. H. Fisher, '44; W. S. Woodside, Jr., '43; E. R. Conover, Jr., '43; 
E. A. Brawn, '44; J. V. Hogan, '44; A. J. White, '44; L. C. Bartlett, '43; F. H. Young, '43; R. E. 
Brawn, '44. Third Row: W. C. Mcjames, '42; R. N. Simonsen, '42; J. W. Witherspoon, IV, '42; 
C. M. Sanderson, Jr., '42; C. P. Davidson, III, '43; J. F. Beers, Jr., '42; S. I. Cory, Jr., '42; C. D. 
Bartlett, Jr., '42; W. Toohey, Jr., '41; C. L. Kingsbury, Jr., '44. Second Row: R. M. Bowman, '42; 
C. W. Hackney, Jr., '41; R. E. Finn, '41; F. C. Butler, '41; T. A. Wallace, Jr., '42; A. H. Ives, 
Jr., '41; W. H. Lehr, '41; H. P. Elliott, Jr., '41; R. Gray, '41. Front Row: R. T. Zackey, '44; 
P. V. Thevenet, '44; D. T. Poole, Jr., '44; R. F. Vosbury, '44; C. D. Bickley, Jr., '44; R. E. 
Brodt, '44; H. C. Ost, Jr., '44; J. L. Gretz, '44. Other: J. F. Clark, Jr., '42. 
FRATRES IN FACULTATE - Fay C. Bartlett, Eric S. Sinkinson. 

IN THE cANDms - President Wallace; Brothers Davidson and Hogan retire; and Vosbury and 
Ost relax with "Petey." 



134 




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TAU DELTA PHI 



TAU DELTA PHI fraternity was first established in 1910 at the College 
of the City of New York, where it was intended to be a local organiza- 
tion. In 1 9 14, however, a chapter was established at New York University. 
The group adopted a policy of conservative expansion until 1933. In that 
year, another national fraternity, Omicron Alpha Tan, sought to merge with 
Tau Delta Phi. Although the merger was completed, only five of the Omi- 
cron Alpha Tau chapters were granted admittance. Now after thirty-one 
years there are more than twenty-five active chapters throughout the United 
States and Canada. In 1926 a number of Lehigh men who were dissatisfied 
with existing fraternity conditions formed a local fraternity which they named 
Upsilon Kappa. The fraternity thrived, but in 1930 it was decided to secure 
a charter from a national fraternity. Tau Delta Phi was petitioned and a 
charter was granted in the name of Tau chapter on February 3, 1930. The 
first home of Tau chapter was located on Montclair avenue, but it was shortly 
moved to the Wilbur property on Delaware avenue. In 1938 the chapter 
moved to its present home on West Third street. Tau chapter has been par- 
ticularly active in Mustard and Cheese during the past year, with two of its 
members taking roles in the production "Boy Meets Girl." Other activities 
include hockey, freshman baseball. International Relations club, archery and 
intramural debating. Members of Tau Delta Phi are also in the Glee club, and 
are competing for Broivji and White business staff positions. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: F. S. Gruenwald, '44; L. R. Greene, '43; L. Friedman, '43; W. L. 
Kronthal, '44; L. C. Schwab, '44. Front Row: J. Segal, II, '42; S. Mark, '42; A. Samuels, '42; 
P. Miller, 45. 
IN THE CANDiDS— President Riemer; two of the boys talk things over. 



137 




THETA DELTA CHI 



THETA DELTA CHI had its inception on October 31, 1847 at Union 
college, Schenectady, New York. It was the twelfth national fraternity 
to be established. Its expansion has continued reservedly in all parts of the 
United States and Canada until there are now twenty-eight active charges. 
This is in keeping with the fraternity's poUcy of limited membership. Nu 
Deuteron charge was the fifth national fraternity to be organized at Lehigh. 
It was founded in 1884 and the first house was located in North Bethlehem. 
In 1920 alumni funds made possible the erection of a new modern home on 
the campus. Its prominent position on the face of South Mountain makes 
the house a Bethlehem landmark. Theta Delta Chi claims the distinction of 
being the first fraternity to use the pledge pin and fraternity flags. Prominent 
alumni of Nu Deuteron charge include the president of Bethlehem Steel, the 
vice president of General Aiotors, and the president of the Westinghouse 
Electric and Manufacturing company. Theta Delts this year have been active 
in both varsity and freshman sports, particularly in football, soccer, baseball 
and hockey. The current charge also has representatives in publications. Other 
activities in which Theta Delts are engaged are Mustard and Cheese, the Band, 
the Glee club, Scabbard and Blade and intramural debating. 

IN THE mcrvRE- Rear Row: R. B. Palmer, '43; J. D. Caproni, '43; R. C. Hird, '42; J. J. Donahue, 

Jr., '43; R. Bown, Jr., '42; J. S. Curtis, '43; K. D. Duggan, '42; R. L. Taylor, '43; J. B. Nutting, 

'43; R. W. Appleton, '43. Second Row: S. R. Brough, Jr., '42; C. B. Cole, '41; J. P. Curran, '42; 

J. T. Smith, '42; V. H. Adams, '42; G. E. Parsons, Jr., '42; R. W. Leavens, '41. Front Row: 

J. A. Hosford, '44; H. J. Bunke, Jr., '44; W. B. TUghman, III, '44; A. D. Hird, '44; J. S. 

Cooke, '44; A. K. Bartley, '43. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE - W. R. Okeson, P. M. Palmer, H. M. Oilman. 

IN THE CANDiDS - G. E. Parsons, Jr., President; J. T. Smith and R. Bown, Jr. 



131 










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THETA KAPPA PHI 



THETA KAPPA PHI fraternity was founded at Lehigh on October i, 
19 19, when a group of students banded together after their return from 
the World War, and organized a society in connection with the Newman 
clubs of the University. The war had interrupted their efforts to bring about 
such a group, but their determination was great enough to cause them to 
return to the University and to the task of establishiag the society. In 1922, 
the group amalgamated with another local fraternity at Perm State, and the 
expansion into a national fraternity, which has reached thirteen active chap- 
ters and ten active alumni clubs, had begim. The chapter house is located at 
618 Delaware avenue. Two Theta Kappa Phi men represent the house on the 
varsit)^ and freshman football teams. Other members participate on the cross- 
coimtry, swimming, wresthng, tennis, baseball, and freshman soccer teams. 
The freshman track manager is a Theta Kappa Phi man. The fraternity has a 
number of men who are members of the Newtonian society and Eta Kappa 
Nu, among other societies. Other men in the fraternity are members of 
Mustard and Cheese. One Theta Kappa Phi is a member of the CoUegians, 
Lehigh's dance band. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: T. J. Croake, '44; W. F. Heley, Jr., '43; J. G. Compton, '44; 
J. P. Mulhem, '43; R. D. Watt, '43; J. R. Gray, '43; H. E. Bunning, '43; E. J. Cavanaugh, '43. 
Third Row: W. P. McEkoy, '41; R. H. Coleman, '42; P. W. MarshaU, '42; J. M. Sexton, '42; 
H. E. iMahoney, '42; W. F. Foley, '41; J. L. F. Sipp, '41; C. E. McGrath, '43; J. S. Macdonald, 
'42. Second Roin: M. C. Gallo, Jr., '41; E. W. Kraus, '42; J. E. Tangel, '41; H. B. Zane, '41; 
J. J. Duane, Jr., '42; G. W. Rowland, Jr., '41; F. J. SchineUer, '41; T. P. Cunningham, Jr., '41; 
K. iM. Manion, '41; From Row: W. C. Galton, '44; A. E. B. Funk, Jr., '44; J. W. Galloway, 
Jr., '44; M. J. Redington, '44; D. K. Darcy, '44; F. T. Donate, '44; C. K. GQes, '44. 
PRATER IN FACULTATE— Morris E. Kanaly. 
DJ THE CANDms - H. Zane lends an air of study, the usual card game, and President Duane. 

141 




THETA XI 



THETA XI was founded nationally as an engineering social fraternity, 
but 1895 found it opening its doors to men of other curricula. The local 
chapter was at first known as the "Lehigh Herman" club; in 1903, three years 
after its origin a Theta Xi charter was granted. The present house, fifth to 
be occupied by the fraternity, is located at 507 Delaware avenue. A large 
variety of sports have participants among the Theta Xi's; included are 
junior varsity football, freshman cross-country, wrestling, swimming, track, 
baseball, varsity wrestling, swimming, tennis, and hockey. A Theta Xi is 
the swimming team manager while another is the drum-major of Lehigh's 
highly praised band. The president of the R. W. Hall society, the vice- 
president of the Civil Engineering society, and the manager of the combined 
musical clubs are all Theta Xi's. Honorary societies to which members of 
this living group belong are Alpha Epsilon Delta, Tone, and Scabbard and 
Blade. Other activities in which Theta Xi's participate include Mustard and 
Cheese and the Glee club. A Theta Xi is one of the members of the Bachelor 
staff, as is also a junior banquet committee member. 

IN THE PICTURE - Rear Row: C. Fisher, '44; N. T. Thayer, '44; R. B. Mathes, '44; C. O. Prinkey, 
'43; J. F. Thomlinson, '44; K. Knoll, '44; A. Lomar, '44; R. B. Rippey, '44. Third Row: W. E. 
Good, '41; J. T. Jones, '43; C. Kucher, '43; T. Bushey, '43; J. VanCeve, '43; J. Ransom, '42; W. 
B. Irvin, '43; J. W. GaUager, '43; H. Rapphun, '43. Second Row: L. Randell, '41; K. G. Wil- 
liams, '42; H. Luley, '41; J. P. Thomas, '43; J. O. Downs, '41; J. W. Sheibley, '41; A. W. Ped- 
rick, '43; V. M. Evans, '42; A. Descheemaeker, '41. Front Row: D. Talbot, '44; R. Deckard, 
'44; Robert R. Nylin, '44; A. Elliot, '44. 

FRATREs IN FAcuLTATE - Jacob L. Beaver, Donald M. Eraser, and John C. Mertz. 
IN THE CANDIDS - President Downes, and Luley gets no for an answer. 



142 




fh. 



Christmas hall was the first Lehigh dormitory, a fact receiving too little 
recognition, and was joined in 1872 by Saucon hall. But these two buildings 
have since ceased to be remembered as dormitories, having joined their facili- 
ties to house the English department and College of Business Administration. 
Their service as living quarters was probably brought to a close sometime in 
the fall of 1908 when Taylor house was first opened. 

The occasion of a new dormitory caused scarcely a ripple in the rather 
stolid Epito7!!e write-ups for 1909, only the senior class history mentioning 
that "upon returning to college last September, we found presented to us 
a new set of opportunities and of problems— those connected with Taylor 
hall and the Commons." But the new dormitory presented less of a problem 
to the seniors and Lehigh men of that day than the later expansion of the 
entire system has within the past two years. The new dorm elected section 
chairmen and accepted a modest position in the yearbook as well as the 
university. 

Taylor house was built with funds provided by Andrew Carnegie, and 
upon the instigation of Charles L. Taylor, '76, a former Lehigh trustee. 
Taylor had subsidized the erection of the field house and gymnasium. His 
persuasion of the great steel man brought about the new dormitory which 
was generously named by Carnegie after his friend Taylor. Only recognition 
for his donation to the university is a small metal plaque set in the end of the 
east wing of Taylor house. 

In the beginning of the school year 19 15-16, another dormitory was opened 
in what had been formerly Die Alte Brauerei, and continued under that rather 
genre name for another year. The history of this dormitory can hardly be 
eulogized in such high terms as Taylor house, but its origin and subsequent 
existence is none the less fascinating. The building had been built sometime 
in 1855 as a brewery, and having served in this capacity as production, it 



DRINKER HOUSE, SECTION 1 - Rear Roiv: R. E. Roberson, '44; J. A. Krawchuk, '43; M. E. Taylor, 
'41; . E. Nowicki, '42; A. L. Zanoni, '42; D. N. Hillegass, '44. Second Row: M. S. Johnson, '44; 
J. L. iVmier, '44; W. R. SchneU, '41; J. F. Pritchard, 44; F. H. Achard, Jr., '44; B. D. Chamber- 
lain, '43. Front Row. G. R. Potter, '44; J. A. Karas, '44; L. O. Southgate, Jr., '42; H. D. 
Sherwood, '44; R. L. Walker, '43. Other: E. J. Stone, '42. 

DRINKER HOUSE, SECTION II \-Rear Row: N. J. Mesirow, '42; S. C. Pruett, '44; C. J. Herzer, Jr., 
'44; M. L. Blanket, '43; C. H. Savage, '42; H. C. Farrand, '42; H. M. Rudio, Spec. Stud.; J. W. 
Woods, '43. Second Row: D. B. Anderson, '44; J. L. Riley, '42; C. B. Seib, Jr., '41; H. J. Olson, 
Jr., '42; H. A. Herold, Jr., '43; E. A. Hanudel, 42. Front Row: J. A. Thum, '43; G. E. Walsh, 
Jr., '44; H. C. DeValve, Jr., '44; P. R. Carl, Jr., '43. Other: H. B. Walton, '44. 

145 



turned to distribution when it was remodeled into a hotel complete with a 
bar on the first floor. A second transformation must have taken place in the 
early part of 19 15, for although the '15 Epitouie makes no mention of the 
latest dormitory, in the 19 16 Epitome appears a picture of the new dorm's 
inhabitants posed in a voluptuous setting of an oriental rug and a rubber plant. 
The calm heralding the building of Taylor house was only out-done by the 
reception of the Brewery, the new student home quietly making itself known 
in student life by taking its place in the yearbook in a humble nook by the 
side of Taylor house. 

In the yearbook for 19 17 Die Alte Brauerei received its first recognition 
when the Epitome remarked, "Incidentally, it may be noted that the name 
of 'Die Alte Brauerei,' famed for its glorious history, was changed to Price 
hall— a tribute to Henry R. Price, '70." The write-up went on to mention 
the quiet but earnest work that had been done for the University by Price. 
The unfortunate dormitory was not yet quite staid in its history for again 
its name was changed together with Taylor when last year the names of the 
old dorms were changed to conform with the streamlined titles of the new 
dormitories, and Price hall became Price house. 

In the early years when Price house and Taylor house were the only 
dormitories, there was no time or energy lost by their members in out-doing 
the fraternities in fagging the freshman. The cellar of Taylor was the scene 
of much of this good-natured bullying. Glancing through old Epitomes one is 
struck with the number of photographs showing tired freshmen smeared 
with paint and labeled with placards lined up in the dormitory basement. But 
the dormitory boys had their tender and feeling moments as when they would 
pose for yearbook pictmres. The early pictures of Price house men described 
above were nothing unique with Price house. Early Epitome pictures are 
almost luxurious with pillows and plushy carpets. These photographs seem to 
indicate that the dormitory man had a deeper side to him than the sadism 
of freshman antagonizing. He showed a genuine delight in decorating his 



DRINKER HOUSE, SECTION II B-Rear Row: W. R. Owen, '43; E. G. Evans, '42; D. B. Sands, '43; 
E. J. Hall, '44; I. H. Schram, '44; A. W. Hemphill, '43; J. E. Davis, '42; H. W. Haines, '42. 
Second Row: A. W. Clokey, '42; B. L. Heimer, '43; J. H. Dudley, '42; R. S. Willard, '42; R. F. 
Mincemoyer, '41; E. W. Edwards, '43. Front Row: S. Gerson, '44; E. L. Blossom, '44; B. W. 
Heerdt, '44; H. W. Lynn, '44; W. A. Senten, '44. 

DRINKER HOUSE, SECTION III A - Rear Row: G. A. Marusi, '43; P. G. Foust, '41; R. J. McGregor, 
'42; F. M. Selkregg, '44; W. P. Blamire, '41; W. M. Spears, '42; A. P. Johansen, '44; J. F. Belcher, 
'42. Second Row: J. W. Needles, '42; J. W. Prinkey, '41; R. B. Johnson, '41; W. S. McConnor, 
'41; A. E. Lee, '41; B. Ojserkis, '41. Front Row: J. L. Piazza, '44; R. D. Board, '41; A. R. 
Carcione, '41; F. V. Camarda, '44; R. G. Eitner, '42. Other: W. H. Morse, 41. 



146 




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room with school cushions, pennants and banners. And he enjoyed displaying 
them to the public eye via the yearbook. 

While Taylor house and Price house only became dormitories within the 
present century, there is no dearth of tradition in them, for the energetic 
inhabitants were quick to make the best of school traditions by turning them 
into dormitory traditions. So freshman regulations took on a color in the dorms 
that was peculiar to the dorms, and the Lehigh-Lafayette rivalry received 
new consideration by the dorm men. Each year over the Lehigh-Lafayette 
weekend, a banner of sorts is hung in the quadrangle of the dorm and guarded 
assiduously by dorm freshmen while Price house displays a similar banner 
on the front of their house. The banner has drawn attention from the Maroon 
men, for in '33 something akin to a riot occurred in the Taylor house quad 
when the barmer was carried off by Lafayette men. A contemporary observer 
said in one Epitoffie write-up of high color that bodies were being thrown 
about like balloons. 

If Taylor and Price houses slipped almost unnoticed into the records of 
the Epito?fie, Richards house suffered no such slight. With this dormitory's 
first appearance in the Epitome was a lengthy write-up on the donor of the 
building and a view of the starkly new building. 

Richards house is named after Charles Russ Richards, president of the uni- 
versity from 1922 until 1935, who died this past April in MinneapoHs. It 
was through his efforts that the two new dormitories were designed as a part 
of a large group of seven dormitories to spread up South Mountain to the 
Look-out. During his presidency, Richards had built a model of such a sys- 
tem which was placed in the Alumni building for a number of years. The 
dream of this dormitory system only began to be realized two years after 
the late president emeritus had left Lehigh. President Williams suggested 
the use of uninvested money of the endowments in building Richards house. 
The dormitory was opened in the fall of 1938. 

With the opening of the new dormitory, inhabitants of the older dorms 



DRINKER HOUSE, SECTION lu B-ReaT Roiv: T. R. Winco, '44; N. L. Wilson, '43; H. R. Nace, '43; 
F. J. McGrath, '44; G. S. Ferris, '43; E. D. Rassiga, '44; W. X. CkjUman, '43. Second Row: A. M. 
Belcher, '44; C. E. Bosserman, '44; S. T. Lowry, '41; R. D. Munnikhuysin, '42; I. R. CoUman, 
'44; R. J. Barr, '44; Front Row: R. E. Hamisch, '43; T. C. Laube, '44; W. C. Rieger, '44; E. T. 
Finnerty, '44. 

DRINKER HOUSE, SECTION IV A - Rear Row: H. M. Schwarz, '44; H. P. Ponisi, '44; C. F. Moore, '44; 
R. T. Hanger, '44; C. N. Charest, '44. Front Row: C. N. Greene, '44; J. J. Matzko, '42; G. j. 
Bleul, '44; E. R. Springer, '42; E. L. Diehl, '44; R. W. Link, '44. 

149 



were reluctant for the most part to leave their comfortable rooms and old 
friends in Taylor and Price for the new unfamiliar house, so the dormitory 
was filled with a large number of freshmen and a sprinkling of upper class- 
men and sophomores. Although most of these men came to Lehigh un- 
initiated with her tradition and history to a new dormitory that was as devoid 
of tradition as the freshmen were of respect for school tradition, the past two 
years have seen this young addition to the university body become a praise- 
worthy part of the campus and school life. The tradition of Lehigh-Lafayette 
football game has been entered into by the dormitory which has presented, 
with the two older houses, a banner each Lehigh-Lafayette game week-end. 

Following closely on the building of the Richards house came the Henry 
Sturges Drinker house. The name-sake of this house was president of Le- 
high from 1905 to 1920. In 1922 he was elected president emeritus. It was 
in his memory that on Founder's day in the fall of 1939 the corner stone was 
cemented to the foundation of the new dorm, dug into the hill rising just 
to the side of Richards house. This house, like Richards, was subsidized from 
endowment funds, and will pay off the costs of construction itself. 

So the new dormitories were added to the old, and Lehigh had a dormi- 
tory system that was growing rapidly. The new houses are the latest in 
dormitory design, are built in the pleasant college Gothic, and conform in 
this respect to the new library, Packard laboratory, and the Alumni build- 
ing-. Both houses contain lounges that are both beautiful and comfortable. 
In the two houses are game rooms, visiting rooms, and in Richards, a sound- 
proof room for musicians! 

While these new dormitories were being created with all modern con- 
veniences, the old dormitories were not quite standing still. Taylor was reno- 
vated a few years ago when the partitions between the sections were removed 
and fire doors installed. The result was the creation of many new single 
rooms with the destruction of several suites on each floor. 

In contrast between the new dormitories and the old, Taylor house and 



DRINKER HOUSE, SECTION IV B - Rear Roiv: N. T. Thayer, Jr., '44; J. C. Stephens, '41; W. W. 
Malley, Jr., '43; S. R. Mink, Jr., '44. Second Row: H. G. Dennis, '42; G. M. Clark, '42; S. H. 
Knott, '41; W. S. Dawless, '42. Froiit Row: T. G. Megas, '44; J. A. Ross, '44; B. J. Egan, '44; 
W. H. Bradford, '44. Other: R. .Metzner, '42. 

PRICE HovsE- Rear Row: L. H. Lempert, '44; C. R. Ingemason, '44; T. C. MacAllister, '43; C. 

D. Mills, '44; H. A. Johnson, '43; D. G. Sanders, '43; J. A. Wantuck, '43; R. H. Freeman, '43. 
Second Row: L. G. Gitzendanner, '41; R. L. Schaffer, '43; W. Gilmore, Jr., '43; H. C. Swartz, 
'43; R. J. Gill, '44; H. M. Atkins, '42; R. L. Ashbrook, '44; J. H. Henry, '44. Front Row: 

E. W. Roedder, '41; D. Eadie, '41; J. H. Mowen, '41; R. D. Spilman, '41; AV. Chase, Jr., '41; T. J. 
Lewis, Jr., '41; G. E. Tait, '41; G. F. Messinger, '41. 



150 




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Price house have suite rooms: two or more study rooms adjoining a large 
room used for lounging. These suite rooms are the social centers of each 
section. It is here that section meetings take place; some suite room in each 
section begins to serve the purpose of a gathering place after meals. Here 
plans are made for the evening, and the day's activities talked over. The 
function of the chapter room in a fraternity is function of the suite room 
in Taylor and Price house. Furnished sometimes with a sense of comfort 
and taste, and sometimes with negligence, the suite room is usually large 
with a spread of windows across the long wall. While fine art may creep 
into some of the pictures adorning the walls, more than Hkely it is Petty 
and Varga that are hung for admiration. Some of these rooms are laboriously 
decorated with school pennants, beer bottle labels, beer glass coasters or 
Saturday Evening Post color pictures. 

Where Taylor and Price have the suite room, Richards and Drinker have 
lounges on the first floors. Absence of suite rooms entirely in the new dormi- 
tories is not a disadvantage where the single rooms are more spacious than 
either Taylor's or Price's. Double rooms, a new phenomenon in Lehigh dormi- 
tories, replace to an extent the suite room, and become the gathering places 
with men sitting on the beds for want of enough chairs. The lounges are 
used for section meetings and house meetings as well as loafing and studying. 
These lounges are also used by the entire University when debates are 
held there. 

Fraternity men need never regard the dormitory men as lacking in any 
of the comforts and traditions of a fraternity house or of fraternity life. 
The dormitory freshmen are fags to upper classmen in a refined sort of way. 
They run mail duty, mail laundry cases, and answer the telephone. Frosh in 
the dorms furnish entertainment at section banquets, and play general jack 
of all trades about the dormitory. Seniors in the dormitory enjoy a hoary 
reverence, and have their weekly gatherings together in the local tavern. 
Week nights find the dorms modem cities of light with Taylor, Price, Rich- 



RiCHAKDS HOUSE, SECTION i-Rcar Row. R. C. Gordon, '42; W. B. Bowers, '42; J. Dunwoody, 
'43; W. P. Vamer, '42; J. H. Corson, '43; T. C. Mekeel, '42; R. E. Pollack, '43. Second Row: 
D. W. Layton, '42; L. E. Klein, '42. Front Row: D. C. Osbom, '42; S. S. Cross, '41; F. W. 
Berger, '41; T. J. Kochuba, '41; W. C. Cosford, '43. 

RICHARDS HOUSE, SECTION" IT A— Rear Row: H. N. Riefsvder, '44; T. M. Lambert, '44; H. W. 
Coumey, '44; J. W. Caum '44; R. R. Walling, '43; D. J. Flemming, '44; D. Spradlin, '44; F. R. 
Cloud, '42. Second Row: H. E. dejogh, '44; W. A. Eisele, '42. Front Row: R. L. Haney, '42; 
J. Ryle, '41; R. N. GusdorfF, '42; F. J. S. McGuiness, '43; T. Saulnier, '42. 



ards, and Drinker men studying and relaxing in their rooms. Week-ends 
find the windows still blazing for the most part, but with a great many dark 
windows also; members are out to the show. 

There is a scope to dormitory life that is not achieved in the more con- 
fined life of the fraternity. In the dormitory the members are bound by no 
wails to one group of thirty or less men. The members mingle with each 
other: Taylor house men go to the show with Drinker house men, and 
Richards house men go bowling with Price house men, and this not as the 
exception but as the general principle. During the L-L weekend, fresh- 
men of all the dormitories join in the execution of their duties. Frosh from 
all four houses unite in guarding the goal posts in the athletic field, in crouch- 
ing in the dark press booth high over the field to see that the invasions of 
years past are not repeated. Dormitory freshmen unite in parading in uni- 
formed demonstration about the campus and town on that special football 
weekend. The dormitory man enjoys the association of many friends, of 
acquaintances that fill four dormitories. 

It is not known whether the early dormitories of Saucon and Christmas 
were organized or not, but Taylor house fell to this task as soon as opened. 
The first organization of the dorm was the election of section chairmen. 
Around 191 5 a union was formed of Taylor sections and a president of the 
entire dormitory was elected. When Price house was created, it too was 
included in the union. A. V. Bodine, current president of the Alumni asso- 
ciation, seems to have been the last president of Taylor house, for the 19 17 
Epitome has no record of another house president. It is interesting to note 
that Bodine came from section D of Taylor, for in 1938, twenty-one years 
later, when the dormitories were re-organized again, the first president of 
this combine was from the same section. George Albrecht, Bus. '39, worked 
in his senior year for the formation of a dormitory union. The recent addi- 
tion of Richards house had enlarged the dormitory system to the point 
where an organization was necessary to give a strong voice to the many 



RICHARDS HOUSE, SECTION II B— Rear Row. R. R. Shively, '43; H. B. Frey, '43; L. F. Dellwig, '43; 
J. O. Betterton, '42; R. R. Macy, '42; J. L. Peterson, '42; J. C. Lampert, '42; A. E. Horka, '42. 
Second Row: J. A. Kaufmann, '41; A. M. Miller, '42. Third Row: P. B. Robeson; F. A. 
Zimmermann, '41; H. O. Schroeder, '42; R. W. Rosenquest, '41; E. D. Heins, '41. Front Row: 
W. R. Wirth, '42; A. J. Sabatino, '44; S. M. Ellsworth, '44; A. M. Bordagiy, '44. 

RICHARDS HOUSE, SECTION III A ~ Rear Row: K. Knoll, '44; R. K. Brown, '43; R. T. Meckback, 
'42; P. Parr, Jr., '43; H. C. Stieglitz, '43; C. L. Sturgis, '42; B. Baiko, '41; R. R. Young, '42; J. P. 
Townsend, '43; O. D. Summers, '44. Second Row: P. W. Saitta, '43; J. P. Troy, '43. Third Row: 
H. F. Jones, '41; W. T. Bostock, '42; W. Cashman, '44; J. H. Bruen, '42. Front Row: W. J. 
Skinner, '42; J. Schartz; R. L. Gerhart, '44. 

154 



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Lehigh students living in the dorms. The new organization required the sec- 
tions of the various dorms to sit in session and elect officers. Albrecht was 
made the first president. The first year of its existence, the dormitory council 
enabled the dormitories to present such a united front that two dorm men 
were elected to the presidencies of two classes out of three. The following 
year the new nomination system was inaugurated or more than likely the 
dormitories would have continued the success of the first year of their 
organization. 

The new organization was quick to endeavor to place the Interdormitory 
council on a basis with the Interfraternity council. The new council desired 
a place in the sun of student life, and presented in its second year an Inter- 
dormitory dance which this year has been joined with the Town council 
dance. This dance was held in the Masonic Temple, and was very well 
attended. 

Aside from this dance, the dormitories' social season opens with fall 
houseparty and closes with spring houseparty. Most of the sections partici- 
pate in houseparty by clearing members from a portion of the section where 
the dates will live over the week-end with the chaperons. Richards house 
and Drinker house use an entire section for their dates. Saturday night of 
the week-end, a dormitory dance is held in the University armory. 

While sponsoring these social activities, the Interdormitory council has 
had a more serious political life. It has conducted an investigation into the 
commons situation at Lehigh. The results of this investigation, when organ- 
ized and assimiliated, will be turned over to the alumni committee on the 
same question for the purpose of aiding in the establishment next year of 
a new commons. The Interdormitory council was appointed by the com- 
bined student councils last November to investigate the possibilities of fixing 
a University quiz schedule. The latest and perhaps the most important ac- 
tivity of the council has been the formation of a unified constitution for all 
of the dormitory sections. The constitution is to combine the best points 



RICHARDS HOUSE, SECTION III B—Rear Row. J. Gressitt, '43; J. Coriell, '44; G. Marusi, '43; J. D. 
McClay, '42; A. H. Morse, Jr., '44; H. R. Neureuter, '44; A. T. Robb, '43; G. F. Keller, '44; F. 
H. Rockette, '42. Second Row: G. K. Sebold, '42; G. W. Hanson, '42. Front Row: R. A. 
Wiley, '44; R. W. Samer, '42; C. E. Clain, '41; J. M. Bontya, '41; K. H. Rahn, '42. 

RICHARDS HOUSE, SECTION v/— Rear Row: F. C. Wiser, Jr., '43; C. M. Wetzel, II, '44; R. Witt- 
man, '43; W. B. Schramm, '43; S. C. Wright, '43-, J. R. Mercer, '43; C. L. Lytle, '44. Second 
Row: J. J. Hucker, '43; G. P. Haven, '43. Third Row: M. A. Weil, '41; A. B. Neill, Jr., '41; 
R. C. McMichael, '42; W. S. Titlow, Jr., '45; R. C. Gebert, Jr., '42. Front Row: H. H. Ockel- 
man, '44; R. C. Jordon, '44; S. W. Roberts, Jr., '44; D. W. Green, '44. 



of existing section constitutions in order to regulate attendance at section 
meetings, and other disciplines in regard to the dormitory system at large. 

From its present beginning, the council may work forward to a position 
of power and importance on the campus. The dance of the combined dormi- 
tories has every chance of becoming another big dance on the campus. From 
a modest beginning, this council promises pretentious growth. When Al- 
brecht was first aiding in the formation of this council, one of his principles 
of the organization was to engender among the various dormitories esprit 
de corps. The council is succeeding in this purpose. The success of the recent 
dance, the willingness of the councU members to form a common consti- 
tution, and the continued existence of the council point to the growing unity 
between the dormitories. The various sections are willing to sacrifice some 
of their importance to the central authority in order to improve the position 
of the dormitories as an entity. 

Among the dormitory men are Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi men. The 
president of Tau Beta Pi is a Drinker house man. Presidents of Arcadia, the 
senior class, and the Combined Musical clubs are dormitory men, the first 
two being from Drinker house and the last from Taylor house. Presidencies 
of the Camera club, the Sportsman's club, Robert W. Hall society, and the 
Civil Engineering society are held by dormitory men. Pi Mu Epsilon, Alpha 
Epsilon Delta, and Eta Kappa Nu are clubs having dormitory men as their 
presidents. The assistant manager of basketball and the manager of baseball 
live in the dorms as do also the make-up editor and the news manager of the 
BroiD7i and White and a junior editor of the Epitome. Brown and White 
reporters. Epitome competitors, and Bachelor contributors are dorm men, 
and dorm men participate in varsity wrestling. These offices are the major 
ones in the activities field, but other posts are held by dormitory men as well 
as simply membership in the course societies. Cyanide, Omicron Delta 
Kappa, and the other honoraries. Mustard and Cheese has dorm men in its 
membership as well as simply working in and for many of its productions. 



RICHARDS HOUSE, SECTION rv B-Rear Row: G. F. Minde, '42; J. G. Cella, '44; W. A. Brooks, '42; 
E. B. Backensto, '43; G. A. Logan, '42; R. H. Bartholomew, '42. Second Row: R. E. Byrne, Jr., 
'43; C. Creidenberg, '42. Front Row: H. E. Foster, '42; L. Dieringer, '41; E. M. Biggs, Jr., 
'42; F. R. Dirkes, Jr., '43; A. C. Foss, Jr., '41. 

158 




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Intramural athletics are conducted among the dormiton" sections. The 
football championship among the dormitories is held bv section A of Taylor 
house which section also is basketball champion. The bowhng champion is 
section C of Taylor while the intramural ^•^Testling for the dormitories is led 
by section D of Taylor. Dormitors- men are out for the rifle team, freshman 
soccer, lacrosse, archers' and freshman basketball. Taylor house has men on 
the junior yarsitj' wrestling team, the freshman \\"restling team, the track 
team and the fencing team. 

Other acti\"ities of the dormitories are the Band, the Symphony orchestra. 
Tone society, and the Glee club. In the way of philosophy, men haye joined 
the Robert ^^^ Blake sociers% the International Relations club and the Foreign 
PoUcy association. Course societies to which Taylor, Price. Drinker and 
Richards men belong are Chemical society, the American Chemical sociery, 
the American Socieu" of Mechanical Engineers. Pi AIu Epsilon and Pi Tau 
Sigma. De.Molay, Alpha Phi Omega and Phi Eta Sigma close the list of 
honoraries, while the Bro\^"n Astronomical sociers', the Shop club, the Camera 
club and the Archeiy* club continue the long list of actiyities. A dormitory' 
man is on the sophomore banquet committee, and the Student Concerts- 
Lecttues Series committee. Members of the Lehigh CoUegians, campus dance 
band, are in the dorms. Men of the four dormitories haye been awarded A^'il- 
Uam Chandler prizes in chemistry. Alumni Engineering prizes, and some 
of the Williams awards in English and speaking. 

More dorm sports participation is in yarsiry track, tennis, fencing, soccer, 
and hockey. A man of Taylor D belongs to the Spiked Shoe sociers'; fresh- 
men of the dormitories go out for football, baseball, and wrestling. ].Y. foot- 
ball is played by other dorm men. 

This lengthy enumeration of the actiyities of the dormitory" men rounds out 
the picture of dormitor\^ Hfe on the Lehigh campus, dormitory' life that has 
groTSTi out of the almost m-ythical dorms of Saucon and Christmas, out of 
hoar\' old Taylor house with its quadrangle of chestnut trees, out of Price 



TAYLOR HOUSE, SECTION A~Rejr Ro'^-: F. p. Horn. "43-, H. '\'\'. Tillev, '44; F. X. Leimer, "44; 

C. V. Davis, Jr., "44; J. J. Xitti, "42: H. F. Soule. '44. Second Ro-j:: R. A. Hofstetter, 41; 
P. A. Sweet, '44; A. H. Thomson. '44; D. Y. Freed, '44: J. S. Thomas, '4;: J. M. Roach, '42. 
Front Ron-: J. F. Loose, '41; R. J. Valleau, '41; L. A. .Mohr, '41: R. J. Loose, '41; H. Z. 
LIewell\Ti, '41. Others: L. A. Domlesk}-, '41; S. AL Enterhne, '41: G. H. Schaeffer, Jr-, '41; J. A. 
Tilley, '41; K. C. Wotring, '41; J. B. O'Hara, '42; R. Srickel. '42. 

TAYLOR HovsE, SECTION B-Rejr Rois: R. E. Gengenbach, '42; R. T. Rospond, '44; J. H. 
.Mneller, '43; '\^'. E. Bellinger, '43; G. '\'\'. Boyer, '43; G. T. .McKioley, '44; R. E. Davison, '44. 
Third Rov:: C. H. Schumacher, '42; C. Xeuendorffer, '43: \'. E. Smith, '42; K. C. Bander, "42; 

D. A. Marcks, '43; S. H. Vogt, '42; P. Lutters, '42. Second Ron-: J. P. Alien, '43; F. T. Brun- 
dage, Jr., "42-, H. J. Griesemer, '41: R. Ostheimer, '41: F. S. Klopp, '41; W. E. Gheen, '42; H. J. 
Strenkofsk}-. "41; G. R. Lutz, "41. Front Ro-: R. \^'. Loh. '44; D. AI. Lorimer, '44; .M. W. 
BeUis, '44: G. EI. Kocyan. "44: I. A^". GiLmore, '44: W. D. Schaeffer, '43. Others: A. L. Breen, 
'41; R. AL Luckring, '42; K. C. Swa\"ne, '44. 



161 



house with its slightly bizarre history, and out of the two new dormitories 
that rise above the campus up the steep slope of the mountain. This dormi- 
tory life has progressed from the dead traditions of frosh hazing and class 
fights, to the sudden expansion of this life through all the fields of student 
activity. With the breaking of fraternity monopoly in many societies, hon- 
oraries and teams, the dormitory man has had a chance to flex himself, turn 
from a modest and rather undistinguished past to an ambitious and fruitful 
future. The days are swiftly going when the dormitory man was barred 
from high offices, and kept tumbling in a little squirrel cage of inhibitions. 
His home is now as proud as the largest fraternity house and as comfortable 
as the wealthiest. His living group is organized with others in an alliance of 
dormitories; his position on the campus is not inferior to but equal with the 
once all-powerful fraternity man. 

But the growth does not stop here today. It will not cease with the erection 
of the two new dormitories, or with the formation of an interdormitory 
council, or with the letting down of barriers to higher activities and the 
destruction of monopolies. There are yet five more dormitories to be built 
to complete President Emeritus Richards' dream of Lehigh's greater dormi- 
tory system; and there are still more dormitories to be built far yet in the 
future when Price and Taylor are no longer satisfactory living quarters. The 
dormitories have a future of expansion, improvement and growth that comes 
from a close ingrafting with the University, wdth campus life and with one 
another. 

Apart from the official dormitory system of the University, there are two 
smaller informal living groups allied with the University— Leonard hall and 
the Cosmopolitan club. The Cosmopolitan club was organized in 1938 under 
the leadership of George Tabet, Ch.E. '39, of Cairo, Egypt. The club was 
organized in the February of that year with 1 3 foreign students and 5 Ameri- 
can students. In May of the same year, the university recognized the club. 
The purpose of the organization was to discuss the culture and ideas of the 

TAYLOR HOUSE, SECTION c-ReuT Row. V. J. Vitelli, '44; W. C. Knight, '44; A. J. Simpson, '44; 
A. N. Bugbee, Jr., '44; S. C. Woodruff, '44; C. A. Kendziora, Jr., '44; R. W. Neuber, '44; G. V. 
Carroll, '43; R. D. Gilmore, '44. Second Row: J. B. Loucks, '42; J. A. Kimberley, '42; A. L. 
Thalhamer, '42; J. F. Gover, '43; G. H. Leach, '43; V. J. F. Margiotti, '43; J. H. Boucher, '42; 
R. J. Fisher, '43. Front Row: W. J. Meikle, '41; W. P. Bear, '41; J. R. Dennis, '41; R. E. Slee, 
'41; R. R. Myers, '41; J. D. Van Blarcom, '42; W. R. Hoerner, '43. Others: B. C. Le Blanc, Jr., 
'43; J. A. Smyth, '43; J. L. Carroll, '44. 

TAYLOR HOUSE, SECTION D - Rear Row: W. H. Clark, '43; D. B. Parish, '43; N. J. Wilhelmy, '42; 
F. S. Nolte, '42; W. R. Woodruff, '42; J. H. Bleiler, '43; W. S. Tomkinson, '43. Third Row: 
H. T. Kalinoski, '42; H. W. Richards, '43; R. W. Pugh, '43; W. E. Hoffman, '43; E. D. Lati- 
mer, '42; A. E. Roslund, '43; J. Kellett, IH, '42. Secojjd Row: L. E. Sentz, '41; E. C. Slack, '41; 
W. J. Feigley, '41; C. Hartdegen, III, '41; R. R. Halligan, '41; H. E. Rasmussen, Grad.; T. M. 
Mantis, '41; E. F. Williams, '41; F. R. Gilmore, '41. Front Row: D. M. Feigley, '44; A. H. 
Todd, '44; J. A. Ross, '44; J. C. Fitch, '44; H. C. Hollenbach, '44; G. A. Rambert, '44. Others: 
W. C. Van Blarcom, '41; S. W. Reid, '42; L. E. Owens, '43; H. P. Sheevers, '44. 

162 




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various countries represented. A number of American students were asked to 
join so that they might contribute ideas of this nation. The faculty adviser was 
William H. Bohning, assistant to the registrar at that time. 

In the October of 1938 the group first considered owning a house for the 
members to live in. The idea of a home for foreign students exists on several 
prominent campuses in the country. The following June the University pur- 
chased the house at 217 West Packer avenue, altered and redecorated it so 
that the September of 1939 found the Cosmopolitan club settled in its first 
home. The house had been furnished with the aid of friends of the club 
among students and the faculty. The new living group comprised the 44th 
student living group and represents students from Austria, Switzerland, 
Palestine, Czechoslovakia, Egypt, Cuba, Canada, Mexico, Germany, Hono- 
lulu and the United States. The Cosmopolitan club is not affiliated with the 
campus dormitories. 

The officers of the dormitories for the past year were: Drinker house I— 
William R. Schnell, I.E., '41; Drinker house IIA— Charles B. Seib, Arts, '41; 
Drinker house IIB-John H. Dudley, M.E., '42; Drinker IIIA- William S. 
McConnor, I.E., '41; Drinker house IIIB— Stephen T. Lowry, C.E., '41; 
Drinker house IVA— Eugene R. Springer, M.E., '42; and Drinker house 
IVB— James C. Stephens, Bus., '41. The officers of Richards house are: sec- 
tion I— Roy L. Duncan, Jr., M.E., '42; section IIA— Robert N. Gustorf, Bus., 
'42; section IIB— Howard O. Schroeder, M.E., '42; section IIIA— William T. 
Bostock, Jr., Ch.E., '42; section IIIB— Charles E. Clain, M.E., '41; section 
IVA-Robert C. McMichael, Met.E., '42; and section IVB-Edward M. 
Biggs,Jr.,E.E., '42. 

The head of Price house is Wilbur Chase, Jr., Bus., '4 1 . The section chiefs 
of Taylor house are: section A— Luther A. Mohr, Met.E., '41; section B— 
Frederick S. KIopp, Ch.E., '41; section C— Richard E. Slee, Arts, '41; section 
D— Robert R. Halligan, E.E., '41; and section E— Donald A. Bender, Ch.E., 
'41. The head of the Cosmopolitan club is Otakar Ondra, assistant in Civil 
Engineering, and the president of Leonard hall is Harold King, Arts, '41. 

TAYLOR HOUSE, SECTION E-Rear Roiv: H. H. Otto, Jr., '43; E. S. Stowers, Jr., '44; R. E. Hohman, 
'44; D. J. Carrigan, '44; R. Wright, Jr., '44; C. H. Foster, Jr., '44; H. M. MuUer, '44; W. E. 
Miller, '44; H. C. Leifheit, '43. Second Row: J. Adrian, Jr., '42; C. S. Bennett, '43; J. S. Nolf, 
'43; A. H. Conklin, '42; R. O. Jensen, '43; F. H. Bower, '43; C. F. Fehnel, Jr., '43; M. G. Arsove, 
'43; H. D. Moll, '43. Front Row: C. C. Ruffle, '42; B. J. March, '41; J. D. Mettler, Jr., '41; D. 
A. Bender, '41; C. T. Jerauld, '41; G. V. Holby, '42; D. W. Kurtz, '42. 

COSMOPOLITAN ciAJB- Rear Row: F. Berinan, '43; C. Taylor, '41; L. Sargeant, Grad. S.; R. 
Spradling, '44; S. Sliwka, '41. Second Row: H. Huber, '44; F. Berman, '44; M. Eways, '43; A. 
Levoux, '44. Third Row: H. Nelben, '43; W. Meerbott, Grad. S.; J. Ristorcelli, 44; T. Fleischer, 
'42; G. Potter, '44; F. Strong, Grad. S. Fourth Row: P. Estrada, '43; P. Georgopoulo, '42; 
E. Dominiquez, '41; O. Ondra, Grad. S.; S. Tov, Grad. S. Front Row: A. Otamoto, '42; L. 
Sharpe, '42; K. Weber, '42; W. White, Grad. S.; T. Robertson, '42; T. Shintaku, '44. Other: 
J. Sidler, '43. 
FRATRES IN FAcuLTATE - A. J. Baithold, C. A. Seidle, J. Shearer. 

165 



THE YEAR IN REVIEW 

(Continued from page 82) 

the organizing of a Willkie-for-President club, and the later, not so success- 
ful attempted organization of a Roosevelt ditto. 

Early in October "Matmen," a Pathe news short featuring Lehigh grapplers, 
was filmed with the aid of a couple of Billy Sheridan's boys, and subsequently 
seen by a good many students when it appeared in the local theaters. On the 
1 6th came the Draft, registering 428 students and faculty men for Compul- 
sory Service, and two days later Captain Knight talked on the humorous side 
of World War II with the aid of his pet eagle iMr. Ramshaw— the first Con- 
cert-Lecture Series event. The next week, Benny Goodman played for 836 
week-end dates and their escorts at a Fall Houseparty which broke attendance 
records for that event. That week the Broivn and White began a series of 
news broadcasts over the Allentown station WSAN. 

Josef Hofmann played some of his world-famous— for the playing— pieces 
on November ist in Broughal high as the second Concerts-Lectiu-es Series 
presentation. On Election day several students took advantage of an offer to 
furnish an airplane ride home if they would vote for Willkie; they had a nice 
ride. . . . That Saturday was Lehigh's first Dad's Day, with over 600 fathers 
and guests enjoying the Muhlenberg game, a luncheon, and other activities 
planned by Arcadia. The night of the i8th Arcadia and the three Inter- 
Councils got together to form the grand Combined Councils, deciding for a 
project to work on a school calendar with systematized quizzes and meetings, 
and to investigate the possibilities of a pre-examination reading period such 
as other colleges have. Three days before, Tau Beta Pi started the ball rolling 
by pledging 19 engineers. 

The customary Lehigh-Lafayette game came around. On the 22nd, Okie's 
cup was presented to the senior class for the best pep rally of the season; the 
traditional pajama parade and serenade, as well as other traditional doings, 
heralded the event. Students from Cedar Crest and Moravian College for 
Women blithely turned the tables by picking Lehigh's most beautiful fresh- 
man, as a part of the festivities. The next day— Lafayette did the picking. 

December, cut short by the Christmas vacation, saw relatively few events 
take place on the campus. Lambda Mu Sigma, honorary marketing fraternity, 
saw the light of day when it was founded by a group of students on the 1 1 th, 
and on the 13th Margaret Webster presented a talk on "Shakespeare Without 
Tears" as the third Concerts-Lectures Series event. Things picked up when a 
capacity crowd of nearly a thousand turned out for the first Christmas Carol 
services in Packer Memorial chapel. "Boy Meets Girl," recent and very suc- 
cessful Broadway comedy, was presented on the 14th of December by Mus- 
( Continued on page 211) 

166 



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CHAPTER THREE 



PUBLICATIONS occupy an important and influential position in the 
many and diverse activities that constitute a full and well-rounded college 
career. 

They are not perhaps as often in the public eye as sports, but they are just 
as essential to the campus; they seldom have more than a superficial connec- 
tion with the formal education of coUege, but in their own way publications 
prepare men just as effectively for the descent from the ivor\^ tower as do 
scheduled courses and studies. The coUege paper provides a background of 
news, a field for the tournament of controversy, and a reflection of under- 
graduate sentiment. The coUege magazine is largely a vehicle for the students' 
wit, but gives space as well to more serious discussion. The college yearbook 
attempts to record the Seniors, and to summarize the university year. 

Pi Delta Epsilox, the national honorarv^ journalism fratemit)', recog- 
nizes coUege pubUcations, and tries to improve cooperation between them. 
Membership is limited to juniors and seniors who hold high positions on pub- 
Ucations, and is based on a point system of joumaUstic actixities. Pi Delt has 
reorganized many of Lehigh's pubUcations, including the Broivii and White, 
the Epitovie, and the late Re-vieiv; the chapter has also helped the Alora\'ian 
coUeges to obtain chapters. 

PI DELTA EPSILOX - i?ej7- Rou!: D. H. Gramlev; C. B. Seib; J. A. Gordon; K. K. Kost. Front 
Roxv: C. J. Moravec; R. J. Caverley; R. M. Ulmer; C. F. Kalmbach; E. H. Klein; J. AI. Roach. 
BELOW - Bro-Uz-Tz and White Editor C. F. Kalmbach; Epitome Editor D. R. Schoen; Bachelor 
Editor E. H. Klein; Freshman Handbook Editor A. R. Carcione. 
A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Pi Delta Epsilon vrSl be found on page 355. 

169 



The Brown and White is the Lehigh University semi-weekly newspaper. 
The expressed purpose of the organization is to give to its readers "all the 
Lehigh news first." 

The Brown and White was founded on January i6, 1894, and since that 
time it has grown from a single page four columns wide and eighteen inches 
high to its present size of four pages, and on special occasions sLx and eight 
pages. The paper is a member of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Association 
of the Atlantic States, and during its membership it has won more cups for 
supremacy in news, editorials, and advertising than any other member of 
the Association. The Brown and White is the only paper to have gained per- 
manent possession of any of these cups. 

Although the paper is associated with the journaUsm department of the 
university, it is managed and edited completely by the students. The editorial 
page has been contrived with the best interests of the students in mind. This 
has resulted in bringing about many improvements for the university and for 
the students. 

The Brown and White is open to any student who enrolls in the prescribed 
courses. These courses not only afford instruction in general newspaper work, 
but they give to the student the opportunity to do actual work on a paper. 
Nearly one-tenth of the students of the University take part in publishing the 
Brown and White. 

Once a week the Collegiate Digest, a national college rotogravure publica- 
tion, is included with the Brown and White. This added feature consists 
entirely of pictures of events on the campuses of colleges and universities all 
over the country. The circulation of the newspaper is increasing each year 
and at present is over 2200. 

This year the editorial staff of the Brown and White has made a determined 
effort to get the faculty and the trustees to approve a suggestion that there 
be alotted a short reading period before final examinations. Another con- 
sideration which has been put before the students by the editorials appearing 
in the Brown and White has been the petition to raise the Student Concert 
Lecture fee from one to two dollars per year. It is expected that at least one 
of these proposed changes will be put into effect in the near future. 

Charles F. Kalmbach is the editor-in-chief of the Brown and White, and 
Robert Caverly is business manager. 



BROWN AND WHITE EDITORIAL COUNCIL - Rear Roiv: L. C. Bartlett; J. F. Beers. Front Row: J. K. 

Binder; T. C. Mekeel; D. R. Schoen; W. J. Meikle. 

STAFF - Rear Row: C. J. Moravec; E. W. Edwards; L. E. Klein; R. B. Palmer; M. I. Buchman; 

D. H. Gramley. Front Row: S. J. Davy; J. M. Roach; C. F. Kalmbach; E. M. Biggs; A. L. 

Thalhamer. 

BUSINESS STAFF- Rear Row: L. A. Croot; H. M. Williams. Front Row: R. E. Cullen; K. K. 

Kost; H. D. Chandler; G. H. M. LeRoy. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Brown and White staff will be found on page 348. 



170 



The Lehigh Bachelor is the student-published magazine of the Univer- 
sity. Its purpose is to afford an outlet for those who wish to write, and to give 
to the students and faculty a publication which is a combination of the best 
features of all types of college magazines. 

The Bachelor was founded at the beginning of this school year after the 
suspension of the Lehigh Revie'zv, which was disbanded by the faculty at the 
end of last year. Under the leadership of Edwin H. Klein, a committee was 
formed to draw up a plan for the running of a successful college magazine. 
This committee petitioned the University to allow them to start a new pub- 
lication. 

The Bachelor this year has tried for as general appeal as possible among its 
readers. According to a survey made by the staff, it is approaching this goal. 
Attention is paid to Lehigh problems in a series of articles on the football 
situation on this campus, written by members of the team, members of the 
Broii-v and White sports staff, and the editor of the Epitome. It was found 
possible to have all points of view expressed in these articles, which laid the 
blame for the poor teams on poor material, poor coaching by the freshman 
and varsity coaches, and lack of financial support for the members of the 
team. 

The faculty contributed articles telling of their experiences in other lands. 
Lawrence H. Gipson wrote on "Enigmatic Ireland," and Dean A\^ray H. 
Congdon described "Chinese Education— 1940." 

Among the regular features is Platter Prattle, a re\new of the new record- 
ings. For the student interested in prints, an innovation was made this year. 
A series of prints of Lehigh buildings, done by Charles Thompson, was 
started in the Christmas issue. The first three were Packer hall, the Alumni 
Memorial building, and Packer chapel. 

In each issue an attempt is made to have at least one article which has news 
value. The Christmas issue gave shopping ad\'ice. The January number in- 
cluded "The Best Quiz," by Professor \\'illiam L. Jenkins, and an article 
called "Beating Quizzes," by William J. Meikle. The Alarch issue featured the 
National Intercollegiate Wrestling association tournament, with pictures of 
the leading wrestlers in the meet, and an explanation for the unitiated of the 
new point system. 

Edwin H. Klein is editor and Robert iM. Ulmer is business manager of the 
Bachelor. Charles J. Moravec is the faculty ad^-iser. 



BACHELOR EDiTORiAi, STAFF - Kear Roin: F. V. Schumacher; O. G. Leichliter. Front Row: 

C. J. iMoravec; W. J. Meikle; E. H. Klein; S. Weinrib; R. A. TambeUa. 

CENTER picTCRES - Editor-in-Chief E. H. Klein; Business Manager R. M. Ulmer. 

Bi:srN-Ess STAFT-Rear R010: D. E. Gregory; R. C. Hardenbergh; P. H. Powers; J. L. Reiley. 

Front Row: W. F. Boore; R. M. Ulmer. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Bachelor staff -wiU be found on page 347. 



173 



The 1 94 1 Epitome is the result of an attempt to combine with the best of 
the traditions bequeathed to this year's staff a new style in yearbook produc- 
tion, a style which is bookish in its entire approach and which is essentially 
modern in its design and layout. 

While at present primarily a senior publication, the Epitome is not merely 
that, perhaps because it originated with the sophomore class, and perhaps be- 
cause even a senior book must contain much of interest to the entire Uni- 
versity. 

Oldest of the undergraduate publications at Lehigh, the Epito7ne was 
founded in 1875 by members of the sophomore class and was first printed 
as an advertisement for Lehigh. Soon thereafter it became a University 
record book, and in 1885 its publication was taken over by the junior class. 
In 193 1 it became the senior book, which it has remained, up through the 
present year. 

In planning this year's book, the editors have attempted to keep in mind 
the purposes which an Epitome serves— those of permanently recording hap- 
penings of the year at Lehigh and of providing for members of the senior 
class a permanent memento of their university careers. Because the book is 
intended to be a permanent volume, this year's staff felt that a bookish style 
is better adapted to its purposes than the display technique of previous year- 
books. Because the book is intended primarily as a personal memento, inti- 
mate and handy rather than ponderous and bulky, a smaller size seemed de- 
sirable. 

Introduced as an innovation in this year's book were the senior biogra- 
phies. Feeling that activities lists do not provide an adequate summary of 
the college years of many members of the class, and yet aware of the pitfalls 
of the personal write-ups of Epitorties of a few years ago, this year's staff has 
experimented with the present objective summaries. 

Perhaps of most vital importance to the Epitome itself was the change 
made in its business organization this year, upon the recommendation of Pi 
Delta Epsilon. For the first time, advertising has been eliminated and sales- 
men of the book have worked upon a commission basis. 

More than was perhaps the case in the recent past, credit for the bulk of 
the work in preparing this volume goes to the sophomore competitors and the 
junior and assistant editors. This year for the first time, the staff held regular 
weekly meetings. Emphasis has been placed upon making the final product 
a staff's rather than an editor's book. 

EPITOME EDITORIAL STAFF - Rgflr Row: H. D. Chandler; F. S. McKenna; J. F. Beers. Front Row: 

A. B. Brown; D. R. Schoen; R. L. Vockel. 

SOPHOMORE COMPETITORS - Rear Row: A. D. Hinrichs; R. W. Pugh; J. F. Kemmer; D. E. Kj-ebs. 

Front Row: W. R. Sultzer; J. M. Stockbridge; E. H. Dafter; S. J. Davy; D. R. Schoen. 

BUSINESS STAFF - K. K. Kost; T. G. Scott; W. L. Archer; E. M. Biggs. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Epitome staff will be found on page 352. 



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CHAPTER FOUR 



No PHASE of student activities can boast more popular appeal than can 
the various musical, dramatic and forensic groups at Lehigh. Taken as 
a whole, the concerts of the combined musical clubs, of Tone, the produc- 
tions of Mustard and Cheese, the intramural and intercollegiate debates, and 
the programs of the Student Concert-Lecture Series feature very prominently 
in the calendar of a year's activities. 

Not only do these groups appeal to students as a means of filling in leisiure 
time and of providing stimulating contacts, but they serve as well to round 
out the actual educational program. Although run primarily by the students 
and imconnected in any way with courses of study, the extra-curricular activi- 
ties in this field serve as a vital stimulus to general campus interest in the arts. 

iMovong spirit behind all student organizations in the field of music is Dr. 
T. Edgar Shields, who is completing his thirty-sixth year of service to the 
Universit}^'. Director of the Glee club, the symphony orchestra, and the 
Band, and faculty adviser to Tone, the musical honorary. Dr. Shields spends 
many busy hours working with these groups. 

Largest of all the groups is the combined musical clubs, organiz- 
ationally a single unit, but in actual fact a combination of three separate 
groups. In recognition of the importance of this group to student extra-cur- 



177 



ricular life, Arcadia includes among its members the musical club's president 
—who this year is Fred Gilmore. 

Oldest and largest of the club's three groups is the Glee club, managed this 
year by Willard A. Litzenberger. Formed in 19 lo as an amalgamation of 
the old Glee club. Chapel choir, and Mandolin club, the Glee club has stead- 
Uy grown to be one of the outstanding men's college glee clubs in the east. 
Outstanding event of the year in Lehigh musical circles is the annual spring 
concert given by the Glee club in conjunction with the symphony orchestra. 
During the past three years this concert has been given together with per- 
formances by similar groups from Lafayette, Moravian College for Women 
and Cedar Crest. An annual fall concert is presented on the campus each 
November, followed by a dance with music furnished by the Lehigh Col- 
legians, third member of the combined musical clubs. Prior to the Christmas 
vacation this year, the Glee club combined with the Moravian girls' glee club 
to present an outstandingly successful Christmas Carol concert in Packer 
chapel. 

The Lehigh Collegians are strictly speaking part of the combined musical 
clubs, although their work is by no means limited to playing in connection 
with the clubs. In addition to providing music for the tM^o musical clubs' 
home concerts, they provide music for living groups at houseparties, for 
some of the Town and Dormitory council dances and for several non-Lehigh 
groups. 

The Symphony orchestra is not a young organization at Lehigh but it was 
reorganized five years ago and since that time has been particularly active. 
In addition to presenting several concerts on the campus this year, the orches- 
tra has appeared before the students at Blair academy and at Moravian Col- 
lege for Women. 

Tone, the honorary music society, was formed in 1937 from an existing 
student Concerts group. Its purpose is to stimulate interest in music at Lehigh 
through its regular monthly meeting, and through concerts. 

GLEE CLVB-Rear Row: H. D. Moll; C. F. Fehnel; F. F. Berman; G. W. Boyer; D. J. Carrigan; 
C. D. Mills; C. W. Holyoke; R. G. Eitner; H. F. Jones; F. A. Zimmermann; C. D. Bickley; 
B. W. Logechnik; J. L. Bretz; R. M. Paddock; W. K. Morgan. Fourth Row: R. O. Warwick; 
J. M. Phelan; K. H. Smith; A. H. Conklin; P. W. MarshaU; J. C. Gabuzda; W. R. Williams; 
J. K. Cochran; R. Hardy; H. King; S. A. Mark; K. G. WiUiams; H. C. Ost. Third Row: 
F. H. Bower; I. W. Gilmore; J. E. Gehr; E. B. Annett; F. W. Ivey; E. D. Latimer; Q. J. 
Schwarz; G. C. Stone; R. E. Woodling; R. O. Marsten; A. M. Karwacki; J. W. Martin; J. W. 
Woods; R. L. Courts. Seco?id Row: C. R. Kiefer; R. D. Gilmore; R. W. Saylor; A. C. Mer- 
mann; C. G. Kucher; R. M. Bowman; F. H. Young; E. R. Conover; P. A. Sweet; R. E. Weltz; 
K. H. Rahn; H. C. Farrand; G. B. Smith. Front Row: C. T. Jerauld; A. Samuels; P. Parr; R. K. 
Eberts; O. D. Summers; R. J. McGregor; F. R. Gilmore; T. E. Shields; W. A. Litzenberger; 
F. E. Smith; J. L. Diamond; G. H. Leach; L. H. Plante. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Combined Musical Clubs will be found on page 350. 
TONE -Rear Row: F. R. Gilmore; M. J. Fry; F. F. Berman; R. K. Beckwith; A. F. Mann; P. 
Parr. Front Row: D. E. Richards; F. V. Hertzog; A. Clark; K. G. Williams. 
ABOVE -The Lehigh Collegians, playing at the Engineers' Ball. 
A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Tone wUl be found on page 358. 

178 





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The Band is one of the largest organizations on the Lehigh campus. Its 
main function is to promote musical interests and school spirit. It plays not 
only at athletic events, but also performs for rallies, R.O.T.C. drill, and various 
concerts throughout the year. 

Although the Lehigh band was founded 33 years ago, it did not gain promi- 
nence until 1926. In that year Dr. T. Edgar Shields, the faculty director, 
obtained music, instruments and uniforms from the disbanded Bethlehem 
Steel company band. With this as a start the band began to grow in size and 
reputation. Today the band has a membership of about 150 men and ranks 
among the leading bands of the country. 

During the year the band participates in many school functions. In the fall 
the band does most of its work, for it is at this time that the marches and for- 
mations for the football games are worked out. The formations originate with 
and are directed by the band's student director, and for three or four nights a 
week during football season they are perfected by the band. The house party 
formation and selections played by the band are remembered by all who see 
and hear them. One of the distinctive features about the band that makes it 
popular is that it is managed and directed largely by students. The band mem- 
bers help to decide what popular selections the band will play and offer sug- 
gestions as to the formations the band wiU make. The outstanding formation 
used this year was a double heart with an arrow through the center, which 
was formed for the fall house party. The band plays at other athletic contests 
in addition to the football games. It plays at all home basketball games and 
travels with the hockey team to Hershey with the student excursion. In 
addition to athletic contests the band plays at many other school functions. It 
plays at all pep rallies, special school functions, for R.O.T.C. drills and at the 
exercises on Field Day. Several concerts are also presented by the band 
throughout the year. These are given at Commencement, on Founder's Day, 
and on Sub-freshmen Day. At the annual spring banquet the results of the 
election of officers is announced, and they are installed at this time. The band 
officers are then responsible for the success of the band during the following 
year, and must arrange for all trips and engagements that the band has. 

The officers of the band are Warren F. Boyer, student director; Richard A. 
Garling, manager; and Mervin J. Fry, assistant director. 



TOP - The Band. 

BELOW— Student Manager Richard A. Garling; Band Master T. E. Shields; Student Leader War- 
ren F. Boyer. 
A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Band will be found on page 347. 



The Student Concert-Lecture Series Committee is a group of six stu- 
dents and three faculty members whose aim is to bring the best in music, in 
letters, and in drama to the students. The series was started in the 1936-37 
school year at the request of Bernard Weiss, chairman of a committee ap- 
pointed by Tau Beta Pi to look into the possibility of bringing a definite 
cultural program to the students at a very low cost. 

Since the series was conceived by the students they have been the policy- 
determining body ever since its origin. During the spring months the com- 
mittee plans the program for the following year. This work consumes many 
hours of trying debate among the members of the committee in order to get 
a well rounded program wliich will appeal to the students as a whole and 
which will still stay within the budget of the Student Concert-Lecture Series. 

This year's program has been one of the best yet offered in the series. The 
students had opportunity to hear Josef Hofmann, concert pianist, who played 
before the largest crowd of the series; the Eva Jessye Choir, a Negro group, 
who sang spirituals and popular songs of the south; a debate between Bertrand 
Russell, famous philosopher and former professor at U.C.L.A., and George 
Sokolsky, current well-known syndicated columnist; Margaret Webster, 
Shakespearean actress and director of "Twelfth Night," a current success on 
Broadway; Captain Knight, who lectured on the present situation in England 
and who exhibited his trained eagle; and Dr. Will Durant, famous American 
journalist and authority on the eastern European situation. The committee 
also intended to have Jim Thorpe, one of the greatest athletes of all time, but 
because of an unavoidable accident he was unable to come to the campus this 
year. After their performance the guests are entertained by members of the 
committee; for instance, the Russell-Sokolsky debate was continued over the 
tables at Trainers. 

For all these entertainers the students are charged one dollar a year or 
approximately fifteen to thirty cents for each event. The public is admitted 
only after the students and faculty have been accommodated. 

The members of the committee are elected by the preceding committee, 
thus making the organization self perpetuating. Student membership is re- 
stricted to seniors. 

This year's chairman was Richard A. Ware. 



STxjDENT CONCERT-LECTURE SERIES COMMITTEE - Leff Row: W. H. Vogelsberg; G. B. Curtis; 

C. A. Shook; H. D. Chandler. Right Row: R. A. Ware; C. J. Moravec; F. R. Gilmore; J. L. 

Shearer; D. R. Schoen; C. F. Kalmbach. 

TOP -The Eva Jessye Choir. 

CENTER - Bertrand Russell and George E. Sokolsky debate the merits of conservatism. 

BOTTOM -The Student Concert-Lecture Series Committee. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Student Concert-Lecture Series committee vs^ill be found 

on page 357. 

182 



Delta Omicron Theta, honorary debating society, sponsors an extensive 
intercollegiate and intramural debating program, and honors the men who 
are outstanding in this field. The society was founded by a group of students 
of the class of 1928 who realized the need and desire for such an organization. 

An unusually large turnout marked the intramural league this year. A 
total of 44 students, making 22 teams, debated for Williams prizes totaling 
$200. First place was won by the team of Alfred L. Haft and David P. Scob- 
lionko. The second place team was Frank E. Felt and Hugh Boyd. The 
winners upheld in the finals the affirmative of the topic, "Resolved: That the 
United States should immediately form a permanent union with the British 
commonwealth of nations." The topic used in the earlier rounds was "Re- 
solved: That democracy in the United States can be preserved only through 
decreased government control of industry, labor, agriculture, and finance." 

The debates in the intramural league were held in the informal atmosphere 
of fraternity living rooms and dormitory browsing rooms. The Oregon 
system of debating, involving cross-examination, was used in the intramural 
debates. 

The intercollegiate group of debaters, who were selected for ability and 
experience, met several eastern colleges in a series of radio and luncheon club 
debates. In a radio debate against Scranton University, WHliam H. Barnard 
and William F. Boore, defended the affirmative of the topic, "Resolved: That 
conscription of man power should be made a permanent policy in the United 
States." Charles F. Meyer and Howard V. Donohoe argued against imion 
with the British commonwealth of nations in a debate with Bucknell college. 

Lehigh debates defended the negative of the topic, "Resolved: That the 
nations of the \\estern hemisphere should enter into a permanent union," in 
t\vo debates against teams from Western Maryland college and the Moravian 
College for Men. 

Four delegates from the squad discussed hemisphere union in a symposium 
with the Pennsylvania State college debating team, and seven men attended 
the Pennsylvania State Debaters' convention at State college. 

The officers of the society are: Frederic N. Bahnson, president; Henry G. 
Werner, vice president; and xMbert W. Foster, secretary. J. Calvin Callaghan 
is the faculty sponsor of the club. 

VARSITY DEBATERS - Rgijr Roiv. C. J. Dick; W. C. Roberts; R. W. Leavens; W. F. Boore; C. F. 
Meyer; C. R. Kiefer. Front Row: H. V. Donohoe; S. T. Lowry; H. G. Werner; F. N. Bahn- 
son; A. W. Foster; J. C. Callaghan; A. O. Putnam. 

iNTRAMtTRAL WTN-NERs - F. E. Felt; H. Boyd; A. L. Haft; D. P. Scoblionko. 
rNTRAMTni.AL DEBATERS - Rear Rovi: D. Y. Freed; G. K. Sebold; F. H. Rockett; R. M. Davis; 
D. B. Parish; P. J. Prang; A. C. Fortosis. Third Row: R. W. Neuber; L. C. Bardett; G. J. 
Bletd; H. C. DeValve; L. W. Hill; W. R. Robinson. Second Row: R. B. Palmer; W. T. 
DeLong; N. G. Bergstresser; G. R. Potter; J. E. Doxsey; A. C. Fulton. Front Row: F. E. 
Felt; H. Boyd; A. L. Haft; D. P. ScobHonko; L. C. Schwab; A. Clark; J. C. Callaghan. 
A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Debating council will be found on page 351. 

185 



Mustard and Cheese, the dramatic club of the University, serves both as 
an outlet for talent and as a means of experiment for students interested in 
all phases of dramatic production. 

The club was founded in 1885 by Richard Harding Davis, who became its 
first president. According to tradition, the birth of the society took place 
in the parlor of Charlie Rennig's saloon, where a group of students used to 
gather and eat cheese sandwiches spread with mustard. The club took its 
name from the bill of fare. In 1934 the acquisition of a faculty adviser, Albert 
A. Rights, led to a stronger club. iMr. Rights formed the Dramatic Workshop 
as an auxiliary organization for Mustard and Cheese, with the purpose of 
training aspiring students in acting, directing, and writing plays. 

Since its founding. Mustard and Cheese has given a wide variety of produc- 
tions, including several musical comedies written entirely by Lehigh under- 
graduates. This year's program lists four plays, all presented at Broughal 
high school. The first was the Broadway hit of a few seasons ago, "Boy Meets 
Girl." The leads were played by Richard T. Berg as "Benson," Conrad E. 
Kluger as "Law," and Miss Anna Marie Rohs of the Moravian College of 
Women as "Susie." The production featured special lighting and sound 
eifects; in two scenes the curtains remained closed while a "radio broadcast" 
and a "movie preview" kept the audience informed of the progress of the 
play. 

The second play given by Mustard and Cheese this year was Elmer Rice's 
Broadway success, "Two On An Island," which the club presented in iMarch. 
The cast was headed by Eleanor Lewis, who played "iMary Ward," Conrad 
Kluger as "John Thompson," Robert Gusdorif as "Clifton Ross," Joseph 
Larkin as "Lawrence Ormont," and Ann Ellis as "Dorothy Clark." The tech- 
nical staff of the club made an improvement over previous productions by 
using moving platforms for shifting the eleven scenes of the play. 

The two later productions were "I Killed the Count" and the laugh riot, 
"Three Men On ±\ Horse." The newcomers among the leading actors were 
Bill Wolfsten and Harry Gunnison. 

The president of Mustard and Cheese is R. Harry Gunnison; the vice 
president, J. Dukes AVooters; the secretary, Wilkes McClave; the business 
manager, Hazen P. Chase; and the technical director, Wilham H. Barnard. 
The faculty adviser is Albert A. Rights. 

MUSTARD AND CHEESE - Rear Roiv: L. Friedman; R. J. Berg; R. H. Gunnison; E. F. Warner; O. 

W. Cooke; K. Gordon; H. J. Friedman; L. J. Caulk; W. H. Barnard; R. W. Dech; D. W. 

Kurtz. Second Row: W. McCIave; J. L. Loughran; H. P. Chase; J. D. Wooters; A. A. Rights; 

T. J. Lewis; R. N. Gusdorff. Fro7it Roiv: W. J. Peck; R. C. Hardenbergh; J. H. HeUer; J. A. 

Gordon; C. E. Kluger; P. H. Powers. 

ABOVE - At a Rehearsal. 

BELOW - A Top O' the Mountain Theater Production. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Mustard and Cheese will be found on page 354. 

186 




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CHAPTER FIFE 



SOMEONE has remarked in fun that if two or more Americans were 
stranded on a desert isle, they would immediately form an organization 
and elect officers. Lehigh students are by no means as organized as this jester 
suggested Americans in general are; but there are over one hundred and 
thirty student organizations at Lehigh (inclusive of living groups), or ap- 
proximately one for every thirteen students. 

A few of them may be the result primarily of the extravagant American 
tendency to "join." It would be unfair, however, thus to condemn the gen- 
eral run of Lehigh student activities, for nearly all of them— in their aspira- 
tions at least, if not always in their accomplishments— are serving some worth- 
while purposes. 

We have surveyed thus far the Lehigh student government, its living 
group organizations, its publications, and its musical, dramatic and forensic 
activities. It remains now to consider those other groups which, outside of 
athletics, complete the picture of Lehigh's extra-curricular student life. 

Included in this miscellaneous category are such course societies as the civil 
engineering group; curriculum honoraries like the pre -medical fraternity. 
Alpha Epsilon Delta; groups such as DeMolay which are essentially social; 
and groups Like the International Relations club, which are primarily directed 
discussion groups. 

above: Drown Hall. Below: Chapel Doorway; University Library. 



189 



Alpha Kappa Psi is the honarary professional fraternity of commerce at 
Lehigh. Its purpose is to honor business men who have been high in scholar- 
ship and extra-curricular activities. Its membership is limited to the men in the 
upper two classes in the College of Business Administration. Through its 
efforts, Alpha Kappa Psi strives to arouse and continue interest in the business 
world and its functions. 

Alpha Kappa Psi was founded at Lehigh in 1924. Prior to this time it was 
a local society known as the Lehigh Business Administration club, but through 
the combined efforts of Registrar George B. Curtis and Dean Neil Carothers 
this society was granted a charter as the Alpha Sigma chapter. 

At its monthly meetings prominent businessmen and faculty members dis- 
cuss topics of practical interest. It also holds fall and spring banquets for the 
initiation of new members. A field trip through Bamberger's store in 
Newark, N. J., was sponsored by Alpha Kappa Psi, and senior vocational lec- 
tures were originated and are carried on by this fraternity. 

The officers are Robert M. Ulmer, president; James R. Hendry, vice 
president; Henry D. Chandler, secretary; and John W. Whiting, Jr., treasurer. 

Lambda Mu Sigma, local honorary marketing fraternity, was organized 
to give recognition to those students who have done creditable work in 
marketing subjects. A4embership in the fraternity is limited to junior business 
men with a minimum of a 2.0 average for five semesters and a B grade in 
marketing subjects. Extra curricular activities are also considered in making 
selections. The fraternity was founded in December, 1940, at Lehigh mainly 
through the efforts of Allen M. Paget, now president of the organization. 
Although it is now a local fraternity the expansion into a national organiza- 
tion may soon be realized since several other colleges have shown the desire 
to install other chapters of Lambda Mu Sigma. Since its founding the 
fraternity has held several meetings with faculty members and outside guests 
as speakers. The men who have addressed the fraternity this year are 
C. H. H. Weikel, research manager of Bethlehem Steel, Thomas F. Jones, 
assistant professor of economics, and Herbert M. Diamond, head of the 
department of economics and sociology. Officers are: Allen M. Paget, presi- 
dent; Thomas J. Lewis, secretary; and Ralph D. Stoneback, treasurer. 

ALPHA KAPPA vsi- Rear Row: E. C. Bratt; N. Carothers; R. W. Mayer; W. L. Bishop; J. H. 

Milbank. Second Row: R. Williams; W. V. Groeger; C. C. Smith; J. A. Tifft; D. W. Burke; R. 

M. Palmer. Front Row: W. E. Scott; J. R. Hendry; R. M. Ulmer; H. D. Chandler; W. H. 

Miller. 

CENTER PICTURES - Alpha Kappa Psi President Ulmer; Lambda Mu Sigma President Paget. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Alpha Kappa Psi will be found on page 347. 

LAMBDA MU SIGMA - Rear Row: Z. E. Nowicki; T. Saulnier; H. W. Riemer; D. T. Foster; T. 

F. Jones. Second Row: D. E. Boughner; R. S. Newcomb; T. D. Propper; J. J. Nitti; R. W. 

Rosenquest; R. M. Palmer. Front Row: N. J. Wilhelmy; J. H. Mowen; T. J. Lewis; A. M. 

Paget; R. A. Newhard; R. D. Stoneback; H. M. Diamond. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Lambda Mu Sigma will be found on page 353. 

190 




n 




Alpha Epsilon Delta is the national pre -medical fraternity. The purpose 
of the organization is to bring those interested in medicine in intimate con- 
tact with the natural sciences through means of student papers and talks by 
eminent authorities in that field. 

The Lehigh chapter of the national fraternity grew out of the Journal 
club which had been founded in 1930. This club increased its membership 
and in 1935, after failing to establish a pre-medical fraternity at Lafayette, 
Muhlenberg, and Ursinus, it became a member of Alpha Epsilon Delta. 

Men are elected to the fraternity on the basis of scholastic averages, outside 
activities, and interest in the purpose and program of the society. Alpha 
Epsilon Delta holds combined meetings with the Robert W. Hall society, a 
similar pre-medical group, whenever possible. 

One important project carried out this year was an alumni questionnaire 
which was sent to all pre-medical graduates of Lehigh. This survey was an 
attempt to determine the value of each course taken here. 

Frederick R. Gilmore is president and Willard A. Litzenberger is vice 
president of the chapter. 

The R. W. Hall Pre-Medical Society aims to stimulate interest in medi- 
cine and to join together in common interest the pre-medical students at 
Lehigh. 

The society was founded in 1920 by Dr. Robert W. Hall, a former head of 
the Biology department. Until 1927 the name of the club was "The Lehigh 
Pre-Medical society." 

The society holds monthly meetings, two banquets a year, out of town 
inspection trips, and visits weekly clinics at St. Luke's Hospital. This year, at 
the October meeting. Dr. E. J. Morrisey, surgeon at St. Luke's Hospital, spoke 
on "Orthopedic Surgery." In November, Dr. Otterbein Dressier, pathologist 
of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy, gave an address on "Mechanical 
Factors Underlying Disease Processes." The feature of the Christmas banquet 
was a discussion of "Modern Methods of Teaching," by Dr. Rothrock, 
pathologist at St. Luke's Hospital. The society holds a formal banquet annually 
in April at which new officers are elected. 

ALPHA EPSILON DELTA- Rear Row: F. J. Trembley; J. A. Shafer; A. F. Mann; J. J. Yankevitch; 

S. B. Longley; C. R. Kiefer; G. R. L. Gaughran; E. R. L. Gaughran; J. P. Sell. Profit Row: S. 

J. Thomas; W. A. Litzenberger; G. J. Gabuzda; F. R. Gilmore; J. R. Dorkin; R. W. Hall; F. 

V. Hertzog. 

CENTER PICTURE - Pre-Meds study a skeleton. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Alpha Epsilon Delta will be found on page 347. 

R. w. HALL SOCIETY - Rear Row: G. Melloy; J. P. Sell; A. F. Mann; F. V. Schumacher; S. F. 

Balshi; F. J. Gress; S. C. Wright; J. R. Dorkin; B. W. Parker; R. C. Paul; I. R. Collmann; 

G. R. L. Gaughran; E. R. L. Gaughran. Second Row: F. J. Trembley; J. A. Shafer; C. R. 

Kiefer; J. J. Yankevitch; W. L. Anders; I. W. Gilmore; R. I. Jaslow; M. I. Buchman; R. E. 

Rowand; W. X. Collmann; E. T. Finnerty. Front Row: S. J. Thomas; W. A. Litzenberger; S. 

B. Longley; F. R. Gilmore; G. J. Gabuzda; F. V. Hertzog; R. W. Hall. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the R. W. Hall society will be found on page 356. 

193 



The Civil Engineering Society functions for the purpose of creating an 
interest in civil engineering among the students. It accomphshes this through 
contacts with professional engineers who are actively engaged in the field of 
civil engineering. At its monthly meetings the society has guest speakers who 
discuss their special interest in engineering. Such topics as highways, railroads, 
hydraulics, structures, and sanitary engineering are presented at the meetings. 

Lehigh's chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers is an out- 
growth of the Civil Engineering Society which was organized in 1873. This 
society was reorganized in 1901 and again in 1922, and at this second reor- 
ganization it became a student branch of the national society. 

The society, aside from its monthly meetings, has two outstanding social 
events of the year. The annual Christmas banquet and the spring picnic 
constitute these two major activities. 

The officers of the Civil Engineering society are Stephen T. Lowry, presi- 
dent; Howard G. Luley, vice president; James H. Boucher, secretary; David 
S. Geissinger, treasurer; and Professor Harry G. Payrow, faculty adviser. 



The Chemical Society's purpose is to give to its members, the students 
of the department of chemistry, a close connection with the newest develop- 
ments in the field of chemistry. 

The society was originally formed in 1873 but membership dropped off un- 
til the present Chemistry building was erected. Interest again rose in the 
society and from this grew the present Chemical society which comprises 
about one sixth of the student body. At the regular monthly meetings of the 
organization prominent men from various fields are heard. These speakers 
represent a good cross section of the scientific world. They are professors 
from other universities, well-known industrialists, and, at times, graduate 
students at Lehigh. Instead of its regular meeting in December the society 
holds a Christmas banquet at the Masonic Temple. Entertainment is fur- 
nished by the students and a talk is usually given by some man from a non- 
scientific field. This event is the highlight of the year for the members of the 
society. 

John Beriont is president of the society; Charles H. Carter is the vice 
president; George E. Elliot is secretary; and John S. Say lor is treasurer. 



A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Civil Engineering society will be found on page 350. 
A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Chemical society will be found on page 349. 

194 




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The Industrial Engineering-Mechanical Engineering Society is a 
newly organized society wiiich was formed to combine more closely the two 
engineering curricula and to secure better speakers than the individual socie- 
ties could get. The purpose of the society is to create and promote interest in 
industrial and mechanical engineering at Lehigh. 

The Industrial Engineering Society was organized about twelve years ago, 
and the Lehigh Student branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, in 191 1. In the fall of 1940 these two societies combined to form a 
stronger organization. Any member of the industrial or the mechanical engi- 
neering curriculum may join this society, and a member of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers automatically becom.es a member. 

Monthly meetings are held by the society, and at these meetings outside 
speakers discuss subjects of universal appeal. Each year a representative is 
sent to the convention of the Eastern Student group of the A.S.M.E. Here 
prizes are awarded for the best papers that are presented, and Lehigh usually 
wins one of these awards. The society holds a Christmas banquet and a spring 
farewell picnic for the seniors. 

Pi Tau Sigma, honorary Mechanical Engineering fraternity, aims to foster 
the high ideals of the engineering profession, to encourage interest in depart- 
mental activities, and to promote the welfare of its members. The scholastic 
requirement of the society is a 2.5 average. Membership is limited to a cer- 
tain percentage of Juniors and Seniors in the Mechanical and Industrial Engi- 
neering curricula. Juniors are elected to the fraternity in the spring and 
Seniors in the fall. 

Pi Tau Sigma was founded in 1 9 1 5 at the University of Illinois by a group 
of students inspired and guided by Dr. Charles Russ Richards, who later be- 
came president of Lehigh. The Theta chapter of the fraternity was installed 
at Lehigh largely through the efforts of Professor Alexander W. Luce on 
Dec. 5, 1927. In 1935, Pi Tau Sigma was expanded at Lehigh to include both 
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering students since the two curricula are 
so similar. 

INDUSTRIAL-MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SOCIETY - Rear Row: T. T. Holmc; E. J. Coffey; R. A. 
Johler; R. A. Wilson; B. V. Smber; P. Lutters. Third Row: I. R. Burkey; C. H. Schumacher; 
R. A. Bobbe; E. S. Malloy; R. J. McNamara. Second Row: H. W. Jones; V. Lichtenstein; A. 
H. Ives; V. A. Frantz; D. R. Dehm. Front Row: F. J. Kotulak; W. E. Good; R. Caemmerer; 

E. R. Snovel; E. W. Kraus; C. F. Kalmbach. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the I.E.-M.E. society will be found on page 352. 
PI TAU SIGMA -Rear Row: P. Lutters; H. J. Griesemer; W. K. Hodson; F. J. Kotulak; C. H. 
Schumacher; E. S. A'lalloy; W. H. Lehr; A. S. Weigel; R. L. Vockel. Third Row: R. W. Clark; 
C. F. Kalmbach; M. C. Stuart; D. R. Williams; W. Forstall; T. T. Holme; T. E. Butterfield; 

F. V. Larkin; J. R. Connelly; J. F. Bailey; T. E. Jackson; C. H. Powers. Second Row: W. E. 
Deifer; R. Caemmerer; C. D. Gilchrist; R. I. Felch; E. D. Heins; C. G. Reber; B. Ojserkis. 
Fro?it Row: W. E. Good; R. B. Spilman; I R. Burkey; G. M. Ritchie; C. C. Snyder; R. C. 
Dimmich. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Pi Tau Sigma will be found on page 356. 

197 



The Electrical Engineering Society was organized to bring students of 
electrical engineering closer together. Its main purpose is to give first-hand 
information on the current problems of electrical engineering to those who are 
interested in them. 

On October 12, 1902, President Emeritus Charles F. Scott founded the first 
student branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers at Lehigh 
University. Thus the Lehigh branch became the first of a movement that has 
now grown to over 120 branches in all parts of the country. 

At the monthly meetings of the Electrical Engineering society student 
papers are presented or lectures are given by men prominent in the fields of 
electrical engineering. The annual Christmas banquet and spring picnic are 
the chief functions of the society. At present the society is promoting a plan 
to have a joint meeting of all the school societies at which prizes would be 
awarded to the students presenting the best papers. 

The officers of the society are Frederick H. Housel, president; Albert C. 
Foss, vice president; Stephen Kowalyshyn, Jr., secretary; and Walter H. 
Vogelsberg, treasurer. 



Eta Kappa Nu is the national honorary electrical engineering society. The 
aim of the organization is to provide for its members an intimate contact with 
the latest developments in their field. 

The national society was founded at the University of Illinois in 1904. At 
Lehigh the Chi chapter was formed in 1926. There are about thirty active 
chapters in colleges throughout the country. Eligibility of student members 
is limited to juniors and seniors and depends upon the character, accom- 
plishments, and records established during underclass years. 

The Lehigh chapter sponsors a number of interesting functions for its mem- 
bers and for others who are interested. Inspection trips are taken at frequent 
intervals during the school year, an annual award is made to the outstanding 
electrical engineering freshman, and the Engineer's Ball is held in conjunc- 
tion with Pi Tau Sigma. Proceeds from the dance go toward paying off the 
bond on the engineers' lounge which was furnished by these two societies. 

Louis Gitzendanner is president and Alton Dieffenbach is vice president of 
the chapter. 

ELECTRICAL ENcrNEERiNG SOCIETY - Rear Roiv: K. H. Smith; S. Caplan; H. J. Horn; W. A. Eisele. 

Second Row: R. R. Waer; G. K. Sebold; L. G. Gitzendanner; A. P. Dieffenbach; F. W. 

Berger; F. P. Librizzi. Front Row: D. Eadie; S. Kowalyshyn; F. H. Housel; A. C. Foss; R. H. 

Fredrickson. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Electrical Engineering society will be found on page 351. 

ETA KAPPA Nv-Rear Row: F. H. Housel; F. P. Librizzi; W. H. Vogelsberg; J. L. Beaver; S. 

Kowalyshyn; C. C. Stotz; W. A. Eisele. Front Row: A. C. Foss; A. P. Dieffenbach; L. G. 

Gitzendanner; R. H. Fredrickson; M. Temoshok. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Eta Kappa Nu will be found on page 352. 



198 




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The Robert W. Blake Society is Lehigh's honorary philosophical 
society. It was founded in 1923 by seven Lehigh students for the purpose of 
promoting closer acquaintance with the leading thought in the fields of 
philosophy, psychology, education, religion, and ethics; of fostering thought 
and discussion in these fields; and of providing formal self expression on the 
part of each member. The society was named in honor of Robert W. Blake, 
professor and head of the college of Arts and Science until his death in 192 i. 

Membership in the Robert W. Blake society is limited to 20 men who are 
chosen on the basis of high scholastic ability and of interest in the purpose 
of the organization. The society meets the first Friday of every month, at 
which time an outstanding speaker is heard. Following these meetings a gen- 
eral discussion is held. 

Once a year the society takes a trip to some nearby eastern university. This 
spring a trip was taken to the University of Pennsylvania. 

Frank V. Hertzog is president of the society; Hugh R. Davidson is the 
vice president; and David E. Richards is secretary-treasurer. 



The Lehigh International Relations Club was formed to stimulate in- 
terest in and to promote the study of international politics and problems 
among the students. 

Among the activities of the society this year was a combined meeting with 
the International Relations club of the Moravian College for Women. The 
club also sent delegates to an International Relations club conference at 
Georgetown university. At the conference, Lehigh had the distinction of 
having the vice president, one round table chairman, and one discussion leader 
chosen from its students. This year Lehigh was host to the Model League 
Assembly. Topics which have been discussed by the club at its monthly meet- 
ings include "Mexican Oil Expropriation," "Inter-American Relations," "Ger- 
man Trade Methods in the Americas," and "The Foreign Policy of Japan." 
At one meeting, Charles A. Seidle, assistant director of admissions, was a guest 
speaker. 

The officers of the society are: John F. Hamblin, president; Frank H. Rich, 
vice president; Welles R. Bliss, secretary; and Leon H. Plante, treasurer. 

R. w. BLAKE SOCIETY - Rear Row: Dean Holmes; C. R. Kiefer; J. J. Meehan; F. N. Bahnson; 

D. R. Schoen; A. Clark; R. A. Ware; H. King; A. Ford. Front Row: F. C. Becker, H. R. 

Davidson F. V. Hertzog; P. Hughes; D. E. Richards; C. L. Bixby. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the R. W. Blake society will be found on page 356. 

CENTER PICTURES - International Relations Club Officers; R. W. Blake Society Officers. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB - Rear Row: G. W. Wolfsten; R. W. Neuber; R. D. Stoneback; 

D. E. Boughner; A. Samuels; W. R. Wirths; C. C. RufHe; R. D. Czapko. Second Row: L. H. 

Plante; F. H. Rich; W. R. Bliss; J. F. Hamblin; W. L. GodshaU; K. Gordon; W. L. Archer. 

Front Row: R. A. Ware; N. J. Faber; S. S. Zalkind; W. E. Henry. 

A coiviPLETE LIST of the members of the International Relations club will be found on page 353. 

201 



Pi Mu Epsilon, honorary mathematics fraternity, honors the men who are 
proficient in mathematics and fosters the interest in mathematics among the 
undergraduates. Membership is open to men who have excelled in at least two 
years of mathematics and who have shown an inclination toward further 
study. 

Pi Mu Epsilon began at Lehigh when the Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter 
was inaugurated in 1929 upon the granting of a charter to the "Lehigh Uni- 
versity Mathematics Club." 

So that interest may be developed both students and faculty members speak 
at monthly meetings on various mathematical subjects. Among the topics this 
year were, "Mathematics and Electrical Engineering," "Calculation of Isolated 
Bernoulli Numbers," "Notation of Vector Analysis," "Probability," "Mathe- 
matical Aspects of Chemical Engineering," and "Four Color Maps." It is an 
annual custom for Pi Mu Epsilon to bring an eminent mathematician to 
Lehigh for a public lecture. 

John D. Mettler is president of Pi Mu Epsilon; Louis G. Gitzendanner is 
secretary of the society, and Philip G. Foust is treasmrer. 

The Newtonian Society is the Lehigh Freshman honorary mathematics 
society. Its purposes are to promote interest in mathematics among the mem- 
bers of the Freshman class, to promote friendship among students and faculty 
members, to honor Freshmen who have done outstanding work in mathe- 
matics, and to provide opportunity for intellectual activity outside the class- 
room. 

The Newtonian society was founded at Lehigh in 1927 and accepts as 
members all freshmen who receive an "A" grade in mathematics. 

At its monthly meetings guest speakers are present to discuss topics of 
practical and theoretical interest, and sometimes some of the members present 
talks or read papers. New members are inducted into the society in the fall 
and again in February. This year the Newtonian Society sponsored a fresh- 
man mathematics contest and offered awards to the Freshman who solved 
the problems of the contest. 

PI MU EPSILON - Rear Row: E. H. Cutler; J. B. Reynolds; K. W. Lamson; T. Fort; J. J. Som- 

ers; G. E. Raynor. Second Row: W. A. Eisele; F. P. Librizzi; A. B. Brown; S. S. Cross; A. P. 

Dieffenbach; H. A. Seebald; L. E. Sharpe. Front Row: J. F. Clark; F. H. Housel; L. G. 

Gitzendanner; J. D. Mettler; R. M. Maiden; L. R. White. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Pi Mu Epsilon will be found on page 356. 

NEWTONIAN SOCIETY - Rear Row: F. C. Wiser; J. P. Townsend; R. C. Roth; R. S. Miltenberger. 

Fifth Row: R. E. Siegfried; R. C. Shafer; J. M. Kennedy; C. D. Mills; E. A. Fehnel. Fourth 

Row: G. F. Keller; L. H. Lempert; H. W. Courtney; H. Boyd; I. M. Hunsberger; W. S. 

Titlow. Third Row: A. J. White; C. A. Kendziora; R. E. Roberson; S. C. Woodruff; H. W. 

Richards; D. I. Trexel. Second Row: M. W. Bellis; R. W. Loh; W. K. Zucker; D. F. Cox; R. 

W. Link; C. S. Bennett; C. R. Ingemanson. Front Row: M. G. Arsove; T. Peters; E. L. Frost; 

N. C. Applegate; D. T. Perkins; F. H. Bower 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Newtonian society will be found on page 354. 

202 



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Phi Eta Sigma was organized to promote high scholarship among fresh- 
men. Its purposes are to recognize freshmen's scholastic achievements, to 
promote a higher standard of learning, and to stimulate scholastic activity. 

Phi Eta Sigma, begun at the University of Illinois in 1923, is the national 
freshman scholastic honorary fraternity. The chapter at Lehigh was organ- 
ized and chartered in 1930. 

The society holds monthly meetings at which faculty members are the 
guest speakers. Two banquets are held by the society during the year, and 
at the fall banquet new members are inducted into the society. In order for 
freshmen to become eligible for membership, they must obtain a 3.5 average 
or higher. Each Fall the Phi Eta Sigma cup is awarded for one year to the 
living group whose freshmen, not less than five, have made the highest scho- 
lastic average for the year. One of the major social events of the year for 
the society members is the annual spring banquet. 

The officers of Phi Eta Sigma during the present year are Lynn C. Bart- 
lett, president; Walter E. Titlow, vice president; William C. Brower, secre- 
tary; and Maynard G. Arsove, treasurer. 

Scabbard and Blade was formed in order to unite in closer relationship 
the military departments of American universities and colleges; to preserve 
and develop the essential qualities of good and efficient officers; to prepare 
men to take an active part and to have an influence in the military affairs 
of the country; and to spread intelligent information concerning the military 
requirements of our government. 

Scabbard and Blade was founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1904. 
It has a membership of over 25,000 men who are elected for membership 
because of outstanding work in the military service. One must pass an exami- 
nation and prove himself superior on the rifle range to become a member. 

The major activity of the year is the MUitary ball, which is held in March. 
Scabbard and Blade holds monthly meetings at which outside speakers fre- 
quently address the members. Each spring the members of Scabbard and 
Blade take an active part in the Field Day exercises. Scabbard and Blade pre- 
sents two sabers to the two juniors that have been selected for outstanding 
work in Ordnance and Infantry departments. 

PHI ETA SIGMA -Rear Row: W. S. Tomkinson; R. W. Link; T. Peters; A. J. White; E. A. 

Fehnel. Second Row: R. S. Miltenberger; F. J. Rhodes; F. H. Young; R. H. Coleman; D. P. 

Scoblionko; H. W. Richards. Front Row: J. E. Gehr; M. G. Arsove; W. S. Titlow; L. C. 

Bartlett; W. C. Brower; R. W. Saylor. 

CENTER PICTURE - Monday Afternoon. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Phi Eta Sigma will be found on page 355. 

SCABBARD AND BLASE -Rear Row: E. F. Bodine; H. C. Farrand; J. A. Arnold; D. R. Smith; 

J. H. Dudley; R. R. Bright; H. W. Jones. Second Row: Col. J. S. Leonard; C. H. Carter; J. 

Beriont; J. R. Hendry; A. M. Karwacki; J. H. Bricker; W. A. Siegele; Lt. S. Pierce. Front 

Row: W. H. Vogelsberg; R. J. McNamara; W. K. Hodson; N. M. Barber; J. A. Tifft; W. L. 

Archer; R. Caemmerer; C. C. Smith. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Scabbard and Blade will be found on page 357. 

205 



The Mining and Geological Society's primary purpose is to bring to- 
gether the men of Lehigh who are studying either mining or geology so that 
they can become famiHar with their fellow students and can keep abreast 
of the current happenings in the fields of mining and geology. In order to 
accomplish this purpose the society holds monthly meetings at which a well 
known speaker is usually heard. 

The Mining and Geological society was founded in 1905. In 1909 A. Cope- 
land Callen, who is the present dean of the College of Engineering, was 
president of the society. The chapter at Lehigh is one of the many student 
branches of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. 

This year two outside speakers have given talks to the society: Dr. Arthur 
B. Cleves, who was geologist for the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, 
and Dr. G. H. Ashley of the Pennsylvania Topographic and Geologic 
Survey. 

George L. Griffith is president of the society and Harold H. Werft is the 
vice president. 



The Physics Society strives to bring together informally the students 
majoring in physics and to acquaint the students with one another. The 
society's program has consisted of talks by faculty members and by students 
and moving pictures on various technical subjects. In the first meeting. Pro- 
fessor Henry C. I. Knutson of the Electrical Engineering department, gave 
an explanation of "Frequency Modulation." In subsequent meetings the 
society viewed a film showing the making of radio tubes and heard talks by 
seniors on the research projects done in the advanced laboratory course. 
Topics spoken upon by the seniors are: "Measurement of Surface Tension," 
"A New Theory of Spark Discharge," "Physics and Defense," " Color Pho- 
tography," and "The Pyro-electric Effect of Crystals." The seniors who 
have addressed the society are Morton F. Kaplon, Henry G. Werner, Fred- 
eric N. Bahnson, Richard B. Moyer, and Hugh R. Davidson. Each year in 
May the society holds a picnic. 

The officers of the society are: Frederic N. Bahnson, president; Richard 
B. Moyer, vice president; Max Krissiep, secretary; and A. Bruce Brown, 
treasurer. 



A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Mining and Geological society wiU be found on page 354. 
A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Physics society will be found on page 355. 

206 



Established on A4arch 14, 192 1, at Arkansas University, Phi Alpha Theta 
has grown each year until its chapters now number twenty-seven. Dr. Andrew 
R. eleven, the founder, sought to honor those men who had achieved dis- 
tinction in the study of history. His purpose was to further an interest in his- 
torical problems through congenial association and stimulating cultural en- 
vironment. 

Alpha Alpha of Lehigh was accepted as an accredited chapter in May of 
1940. The program has been one designed to afford select students an oppor- 
tunity for discussion. Accordingly, this chapter has chosen as its principal 
subject the study of the United States Constitution. Meetings are held twice 
during each month, one session being devoted to contemporary problems of 
particular importance. "The Historian," official publication of the fraternity, 
holds a prominent position among historical magazines. This past year has 
seen the inclusion of an article by one of our faculty advisers, Dr. Harmon. 

Biennial meetings of the national organization are designed to conjoin, in 
point of time, with the meetings of the American Historical Association. 



The DeMolay Club of Lehigh University was founded in 1938 by a group 
of DeA4olays who, seeing that members away from their home chapters have 
little means of participating in DeMolay activities, desired to bring together 
in comradeship those students who are affiliated with the Order of DeMolay. 
The purpose of the organization, which is patterned after instructions issued 
by the Grand Council of the Order, is to enable Lehigh DeMolays to become 
acquainted with each other, and to provide a suitable body fitted to perform 
certain constructive activities. Any Lehigh student who is, or has been, a 
member of the Order of DeMolay is eligible for membership. The club does 
not seek to imitate fraternity or honorary activities, but rather to supplement 
them, and is not in any sense a secret body. 

Meetings of the DeMolay club are held once a month during the school 
year. These meetings, which are under the supervision of one of two faculty 
advisers chosen from faculty members of the Masonic Order, generally offer 
a talk as part of their program. The principal activity of the club is a duly 
accredited Installing Team composed of Lehigh DeMolays. This Team has 
installed the officers of several chapters of the Order of DeMolay in cities in 
New York and New Jersey as well as Pennsylvania. 



A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Phi Alpha Theta will be found on page 355. 
A COMPLETE LIST of the members of DeMolay will be found on page 351. 



207 



Alphi Phi Omega is a National Service fraternity. Its program and pur- 
pose embrace four main points: first, service to the students and the faculty; 
second, service to the youth of the community; third, service to the members 
of the fraternity; and fourth, service to the nation as active participating 
citizens. 

The national fraternity was founded on December i6, 1925, at Lafayette 
college. There are at present 95 active chapters in colleges and universities 
throughout the United States. The Alpha Psi chapter of Alpha Phi Omega 
was organized at Lehigh in 1936 from a local Eagle Scout patrol then in 
existence on the campus. 

This year the members of Alpha Phi Omega have carried out four major 
projects. They have fingerprinted some of the students for the F.B.L identi- 
fication files; they have erected signs directing visitors to the campus; they 
have instructed youths in swimming at the Community Center; and they have 
assisted with the Bethlehem scout troops. 

Richard M. Shepard is the president of the organization and Robert L 
Felch is the vice president. 

The Sportsaian's Club of Lehigh was formed in 1938 by several students 
who thought that Lehigh needed an organization to bring together students 
and faculty members who are interested in outdoor sports not sponsored by 
the University. The club has proved its popularity by its membership of over 
seventy students and faculty. The club has been built around a varied pro- 
gram of outdoor activities and instructive meetings. In previous years several 
trips to the Poconos for skiing and to the farm of Bob Stoudt, the first presi- 
dent of the club, for hunting and trapping have proved very successful. 

This year, besides the annual venison dinner which is held during the deer 
season, the club has gone deep-sea fishing in Delaware bay, they have hiked 
up Hawk mountain, and have gone deer hunting in Pike county. Also sev- 
eral speakers have been heard. 

The annual social activities of the club are a barn dance and a hay ride, 
both of which have proved highly entertaining. 

William P. Varner is president of the club and Frank A. Szabo is the vice 
president. 

ALPHA PHI OMECA- Rear Row: R. E. Woodling; J. Conforte; C. H. Schumacher; J. A. Arnold. 

Third Row: P. Lutters; W. S. Eisner; F. C. Bardett; W. E. Gheen; A. M. Paget. Second Row: 

T. J. Lewis; G. F. Messinger; R. I. Felch; H. W. Jones. Fro?2t Row: M. W. Harper; J. J. 

Hucker; R. C. Shafer; C. D. Gilchrist. 

CENTER PICTURE— Alpha Phi Omega Meeting. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of Alpha Phi Omega will be found on page 347. 

sportsman's ciajb- Rear Row: W. H. Congdon; M. E. Kanaly; F. C. Bartlett; J. Dunwoody. 

Third Row: R. F. Wood; R. E. Pollock; J. H. Corson; W. C. Cosford. Seco?id Row: W. R. 

Wirths; W. L. Archer; F. W. Berger; R. P. M. Stoudt. Front Row: R. J. Wiedenman; R. D. 

Stoneback; W. P. Varner; F. A. Szabo; J. E. CuUiney. 

A COMPLETE LIST of the members of the Sportsman's club will be found on page 357. 

208 







p 


If 1^1 


B^j 



THE YEAR IN REVIEW 

(Continued from page i66) 

tard and Cheese, and a vesper service was held the following day in the 
Chapel by the Combined Musical clubs and the Moravian Glee club. About 
a week later students left for Christmas vacation, some with books for study 
and others, wiser, without. 

The new year saw, on January loth, a debate on "Is Conservatism the Safest 
Policy" between Bertrand Russell and George Sokolsky, sponsored by the 
Concert-Lecture Series. Lehigh University, cooperating with federal au- 
thorities in national defense work, welcomed 24 Naval Reserve officers on 
the 13th when they arrived to study diesel engineering; and plans were com- 
pleted early in January for the instruction by Lehigh professors of men em- 
ployed in local industries, as a part of the same defense program. The Brown 
and White continued its campaign for better library lights, meeting with the 
usual success. The 75th anniversary program was formally opened on the 
7th of February by a one-hour program, wired to various Alumni groups in 
the East, of music by members of the Glee club and Symphony orchestra, 
and of dramatic work by members of Mustard and Cheese. Plans were laid 
for a complete celebration in the fall. A week later a mild furore was created 
among the student body by FM when it devoted considerable space to 
Lehigh's unconcern for Bethlehem Steel's workers and their problems. Bob 
Chester played for the Interfratemity ball on the 15 th. Cyanide, after hear- 
ing a financial report on Lehigh athletics by Walter R. Okeson, decided to 
investigate the whole athletic policy of the University. Two new societies 
were granted petitions to organize by the Student Activities committee on 
the 2oth, the societies being the Varsity "L" club, to be composed of all letter 
men, and the Canterbury club, whose aim was declared to be extension of 
Christian knowledge, fellowship and practice at Lehigh. The next day the 
Eva Jessye choir was presented by the Concert-Lecture Series, and students 
attending the event were polled on the question of an increased fee; 95 per 
cent declared in favor of an increase. "Swede" Larson, Navy football coach, 
spoke at the Senior banquet on the 27th, and the insurance plan became a tra- 
dition when the seniors voted for it as a class gift for the fourth straight year. 

On March 4 further organization of the dormitory group was completed 
when the Interdormitory council approved a constitution designed to provide 
uniform rules and regulations for all sections. Two days later the class of 
'44 held its banquet, breaking all Lehigh banquet attendance records for 
freshman affairs as it heard "Lone Star" Dietz, of Albright college, speak. 

IN THE PICTURES - Laying the Grace Hall Cornerstone; Conscription Committee Takes Oath; 
Grace HaU Framework; University License Plate Number One; Musicale at the President's 
Home; Founder's Day Observance. 

2 I I 



The same day the election of 2 1 men, engineers, arts and business, to national 
scholastic honorary Phi Beta Kappa was announced. A letter to the President 
from the Concerts-Lectures Series committee recommended, on the i oth, that 
the fee be raised (and it subsequently was, at a Board of Trustees meeting on 
April 19). The annual drive for next year's officers for the campus's many 
societies began: Arcadia conducted a poll on the 19th to help determine the 
election system to be used in the spring class elections, and the same night 
Tau Beta Pi pledged 19 engineers. The next night the Sophomore banquet 
saw 62 per cent of that class present (an F.B.I, man spoke) . On Friday and 
Saturday, March 21 and 22, the "Nationals" were held down in old Taylor 
gym, with precious few honors going to the host. 

April 2 was the date of the Junior class banquet, first such affair for that 
class, when Alexander Magoun spoke on marriage relations and afterwards 
held forth in a bull session in Drown hall until 2 a.m. After considering the 
poll, Arcadia on the 7th decided to hold elections by the same method as had 
been used the year before, namely by secret slate. The results of the Carnegie 
exams were announced, and it was proven that Lehigh's Arts college is not 
inferior. Will Durant, scheduled to speak on marriage for the Concerts- 
Lectures Series, caught the flu and was postponed. 

Houseparty came around on the i8th, with 850 dates and Larry Clinton's 
band; and the same week-end President Emeritus Charles Russ Richards died 
of a heart ailment at the age of 70. Petitions circulated to reinstate dismissed 
Morris Kanaly, track coach, received no action when the Board of Trustees 
met on the 19th. The month of May climaxed the year with annual elections 
and the University flag-pole day. 



IN THE PICTURES - Waiting to see the Dean; Flying home to "Win with Willkie"; Conscription 
Day; On the Mountain; Geology Field Trip; Sanctuary; "Yea, Eatsman!"; Naval Reserve Stu- 
dents; In the Brovi'n and White Lab. 






4r-^'i'*i: 










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mtt^miamk 




CHAPTER SIX 



IN ORDER to provide an opportunity to develop further the athletic 
skills which are essential to a true education, Lehigh University maintains 
an extensive intercollegiate sports program. Competition continues through 
all seasons, and is sufficiently varied to give an opportunity for those students 
who have only a few hours a week to devote to practice and games, as well as 
those who have more time. For the latter, there are football, basketball, 
wrestling, and baseball; the sports open to the others include soccer, rifle, 
fencing, and golf. 

Lehigh sports are classified into three divisions. Class One includes foot- 
ball, basketball, and wrestling. The second group is made up of those sports 
which are usually recognized in university athletics, but not considered as 
important as those in the first group; they are soccer, track, baseball, swim- 
ming, and tennis. Class Three includes all other intercollegiate sports, and 
continues the emphasis found in Class Two on "carry-over" sports. Class 
Three sports are cross-country, rifle, golf, fencing, lacrosse, hockey, and 
tennis. 

The program is supervised by Glen W. Harmeson, director of intercollegi- 
ate athletics. A member of the famous Purdue backfields of 1928 and 1929, he 
was brought to Lehigh as head coach of football in 1934. In 1939 he was 
given, in addition to his coaching duties, the position he now holds, replacing 
Col. Nelson A. Kellogg. 

Howard "Bosey" Reiter, Professor of Physical Education. 



217 



FOOTBALL 

This year as in other years the Lehigh band has had a major part in putting 
across the annual fail sport— football. With a total of 1 1 6 members on its rolls, 
this musical organization under the direction of Dr. T. Edgar Shields has 
added much to the fall Saturday afternoons in Taylor Stadium. The band has 
a marching group of from 96 to 108 men, depending on the importance of 
the occasion. During the past season, three outstanding marching formations 
were executed. On Oct. 19 when Lehigh was playing their rivals from Perm 
State, the band formed a tremendous LU in midfield during the half. The 
following week was fall houseparty. On this special occasion the band formed 
a huge double heart pierced by an arrow. To top off this unusual display, a 
swing arrangement of a currently popular tune was played in honor of the 
occasion. On Dads' Day when the Muhlenberg eleven invaded Taylor 
stadium, the band once more took the center of the field at half-time and 
formed a spectacular DAD topped by a smaller LU. All these displays were 
received with great applause by the attendant crowd. 

Another feature of the games is the eatsman. This concession is run by a 
group of students under the supervision of the placement bureau and has 
been very popular. To the roar of the crowd and the cheers of the cheerleaders 
is added the cry of the eatsman as he tries to convince you that you can buy 
"a pound of meat and a loaf of bread for a thin dime." At half-time the 
two wee booths where hotdogs and softdrinks are sold are all but impossible 
to see because of the pressing crowds of hungry lads. Many a dull moment 
is turned into a jolly one when the witty remarks of the coke vender sound 
above the din of the band. Although cokes cost a dime at the game and your 
sales resistance is under par, the eatsman is an integral part of the Saturday 
afternoon show in Taylor stadium. 

To wake up the lagging interest of the spectators and to spur the team on 
to greater efforts we have the untiring cheerleaders. These lads, dressed in 
their neat white pants and sweaters, make an impressive sight when they go 
through one of their formations. Bob Ritchings was head cheerleader during 
the 1940 season and under his guidance the megaphone boys did a swell job of 
leading the crowd in yells and songs. Under a new system, the cheerleaders 
went in for more or less difficult tumbling exhibitions. Hurtling through the 
air or turning somersaults in time to the cheers, the boys put an extra zip 
into the spirit of the spectators. 

The Brown and White football squad began its 1940 season on September 
28 when it traveled to Charlottesville, Virginia, to face a powerful eleven 
from the University of Virginia. Paced by the stellar performance of Bryant, 
a sophomore find, the Cavaliers overran the Engineers to the tune of 32-0. 

The following weekend found the Lehigh squad in Cleveland where they 

218 



encountered a polished Case outfit. Although the Cleveland boys won by 
three touchdowns, Emmett White, Lehigh's end, provided the most thrilling 
moment of the game when in the closing minutes he intercepted a Case pass 
and ran 50 yards for the first Lehigh tally of the season. The final score read 
25-6. 

On October 1 2 the Engineers played their first home game before a crowd 
of over 5000. Outpassed and outrushed by their rivals, the Scarlet of Rutgers, 
the Brown and White eleven dropped their third game in a row by a score 
of 34-0. Star of the game for the Engineers was Thomas Golden, sophomore 
guard, whose excellent tackling spelled defeat for many a Scarlet thrust. 

In the game with the Lions of Penn State on the following Saturday, the 
lack of good reserve material was very noticeable. Holding the visitors to a 
scoreless first half, the home team weakened badly in the second and lost the 
game by a score of 34 to o. Bill Simpson's kicking and Henry Reuwer's bril- 
liant defensive work were the highlights of the Engineers' play. 

Houseparty weekend brought victory to the battered ballcarriers as a 
hardfighting but inferior Hampden-Sydney eleven fell by a score of 12 to 7. 
Bernie Deehan and Jack Krawchuk made the two Brown and White tallies 
with the assistance of superb playing on the part of Bill Simpson and Joe 
Ambrogi. A'lost thrilling moment of the game came in the final minute when 
the entire team worked with perfect unity to hold their opponents on the 
three yard line. 

On November 2 the Mainliners from Haverford invaded Taylor stadium 
and carried off an 18-7 victory. Lehigh's lone touchdown was scored by 
Bernie Deehan. A most impressive performance was turned in by Bill Hayes 
who had to his credit 126 yards of the total 181 gained from the line of 
scrimmage. 

The next Saturday brought Dads' Day and the Mules from Allentown to 
the Lehigh campus. The lads from Allentown proved to be too much for the 
Engineers and carried oif the laurels and a 20-6 advantage. Krawchuk made 
the touchdown for the Brown and White on a pass from Conover. Steve 
Smoke gave several swell exhibitions of ball carrying during the course of the 
game. 

Saturday, November 1 6, marked the red letter day for the gridders as they 
triumphed over a shaky Lowell Textile aggregation by a score of 40-7. 
Touchdowns were made by Emery Loomis, Steve Smoke, Clarence Louden, 
Bernie Deehan, Jack Krawchuk, and Chuck Conover. Emery Loomis drop- 
kicked three of the extra points after touchdown and Joe Ambrogi accounted 
for the other one. Typical of the Engineers' superiority was the total yardage 
gained from the line of scrimmage by the opposing teams. Lehigh had 270 
yards to the Weavers' 18. The Brown and White actually had the run of the 
field in everything but forward passing. In that division the boys from 



Lowell Textile had a well-defined edge. The surprise scoring burst of the 
opponents which led to their lone tally came late in the final period. Passing 
from the 28 yard marker, the Weavers completed a beautiful toss which 
was augmented by the scoring run. The conversion point was good as the 
ball was passed over the goal. 

The game of the season— the Lafayette game— came on November 2 3 . The 
contest was held in East on before a crowd of 15,000. It marked the 74th 
of an unbroken series of encounters between the two schools. Unfortunately, 
the Engineers were no match for the highly polished, smoothly functioning 
outfit from Easton. Outclassed in everything but punting, the gridders lost 
the match 46-0. Led by their two stars— Nagle and Zirinsky— the Leopard- 
men lit into the Brown and White squad early in the game with a veritable 
"aerial blitzkrieg." The Maroon, with 17 forward passes attempted and only 
8 of them completed, gained 293 yards while the Lehigh lads attempted 
36 and completed 7 for a total of loi yards. Our opponents actually gained 
276 yards from the line of scrimmage merely by rushing the ball. Lehigh 
could do no better than 42 yards. Lehigh's only scoring threat, sparked 
by Steve Smoke and Bemie Deehan, came in the third period and fell a 
single foot short of paydirt. The game ended with an out and out victory 
for the Maroon (who, by the way, got a bid to the Orange Bowl) . We hope 
for better luck in the coming season! 



coach: 




RECORD 




Glen W. Hauserman 


LEHIGH 




OPPONENTS 


MANAGER: 





Virginia 


32 


William B. McConneU 


6 


Case 


25 


CAPTAIN: 





Rutgers 


34 


William F. Hauserman 





Penn State 


34 


CAPTAIN-ELECT: 


12 


Hampden-Sydney 


7 


Henry T. Reuwer 


7 


Haverford 


18 


JUNIOR MANAGERS: 


6 


Muhlenberg 


20 


Horace W. Boynton 


40 


Lowell Textile 


7 


WUliam H. Lindsay 





Lafayette 


46 



Joseph N. Ambrogi, '42 
Edward J. Cavanaugh, '43 
Bernard W. Deehan, '43 
Thomas H. Golden, '43 
Stanley Grossman, '41 



LETTERMEN: 

William F. Hauserman, '41 
William D. Hayes, '43 
Joseph Kaszycki, '41 
John C. Lampert, '42 



Walter V. Prelle, '42 
Henry T. Reuwer, '42 
Philip A. Rodgers, '41 
William B. Simpson, '41 
Stephen D. Smoke, '41 



FOOTBALL SQV AD - Rear Row: Westerman, Hunt, Kaszycki, Coach Harmeson, Bailey, Reurer, 
Smith, McCaa. Third Row: Krawchuk, Rogers, Clark, White, Ambrogi, Louden, Cavanaugh. 
Second Row: Grossman, Walker, Loomis, Hauserman, Rodgers, Eastlake, Conover, Kotulak, 
Smoke. Front Row: Golden, Elmes, Deehan, Caproni, Hayes, Olinsky, Simpson. 





-*^ , \ 



a 
-^^ 






B^'-^M^ 



W*#?.* '!>: 



/ 



/! 






\ 



WRESTLING 

The 1 94 1 wrestling season was looked upon with a rather skeptical and 
critical eye by most of the Lehigh fans due to the introduction of the 
new point system. The decision of the bout was taken out of the hands of the 
referee and in its place was installed a system by which each wrestler earned 
points for time advantage, takedowns, escapes, reversals, and near-falls. 

Billy Sheridan's wrestling team opened its season with a triumph over 
Kansas State at Taylor Gym. The meet was undecided up until the last bout, 
at which time Bill Lehr clinched it by a decision. Carcione gave Lehigh its 
only fall using a half nelson and crotch hold. Joe Quinn and Captain Duncan 
of Kansas State received laurels for the best performance; Duncan won by 
a two minute time advantage. 

Yale's well balanced and better conditioned team surprised Lehigh and 
succeeded in tying the score 12-12. Carcione, Bailey, Byrne, and Brenneman 
came through for Lehigh. Again Joe Quinn lost by virtue of time advantage. 

The next victory scored by Lehigh was over Syracuse. Byrne and Stock- 
bridge secured the only falls of the evening. The team representing Lehigh 
consisted of only two regular varsity wrestlers because Billy wanted to give 
members of the junior varsity squad some experience. 

Our first defeat was handed down by Penn State. Captain Bailey won on 
a decision over Ridenour who later won the 128-lb. class in the Easterns; 
Brenneman's 1 0-5 decision was a clear victory, but came when State led 1 5-3 
and there was no chance for a Lehigh win. In the 155-lb. class again Joe 
Quinn put on a fast moving match against Scalzo but was unable to earn a 
decision for Lehigh. An escape and a subsequent takedown by Jack Kerns of 
State in the closing seconds won the heavyweight bout and made the final 
score of the evening 18-6. 

Recovering from the defeat of the previous week Lehigh toppled Cornell 
by a score of 17-9. First victories of the season were registered by Harry 
Boyer, Joe Quinn, and Bob Bird as they chalked up wins in the 136, 145, and 
155 pound divisions. Captain Bailey defeated Littleton of Cornell by a 
referee's decision of 3-0. The best match of the evening was between Dick 
Brenneman and Forbes Brown in the 175-lb. class. Dick succeeded in throw- 
ing his previously undefeated rival with a bar-arm and dead scissors. 

Navy marked up Lehigh's second defeat by a score of 21-9 in about the 
same manner as they did last year. Tony Carcione, Frank Bailey, and Joe 
Quinn were the only Engineers to come through with wins. Navy was 
captained by Dick King, brother of Tommy King, one of Lehigh's outstand- 
ing wrestlers; Dick threw Bob Bird in the second period. George Weems, 
one of this year's Eastern Intercollegiate champions, and John Harrell, a 
national champion three years ago, earned falls in the 165-lb. and heavy- 

225 



weight classes. Dick Brenneman lost a very close decision due to one point 
time advantage. 

Lehigh next met Rutgers at New Brunswick and won a shut-out by a score 
of 34-0, avenging the past season's football score. Carcione, Edwards, Quinn, 
Brenneman, and Hitchcock threw their men and Lee, Boyer, and Byrne 
secured decisions. Rutgers as only able to obtain one point towards indi- 
vidual score in the whole evening. 

Lafayette was the next to fall under the strong Lehigh wrestling team. 
Again Billy Sheridan gave the junior varsity wrestlers a chance to gain some 
experience by using only one varsity regular in the meet. Falls were earned 
by Carcione, Lee, McKenna, Birckhead, and Stockbridge. The final score of 
the meet was 28-6 for Lehigh. 

The Lehigh matmen next defeated Princeton, winners of the Easter Inter- 
collegiate Wrestling Championship with Yale, by a score of 17-11. Carcione 
was the only man to obtain a fall. Joe Quinn and Neil Carothers, both mem- 
bers of Phi Beta Kappa, met again for the third time. Joe won after a very 
swift and thrilling match. Captain Bailey met Captain Bob Eberle, winner of 
the Eastern for three times, and was able to secure a referee's decision. This 
match was the most interesting and closely contested of the evening. Brenne- 
man and Hitchcock sewed up the match for Lehigh by gaining decisions. 

Lehigh was unable to retain the Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Associa- 
tion Championship and gave way to Yale and Princeton who tied for first 
place. Joe Quinn defeated Andrew Melgard of U. of Penn. in the finals by a 
score of 7-5 to win a title. Boyer and Hitchcock earned points towards 
Lehigh's teams score by falls. 

Lehigh completed its season by being host to 1 20 grapplers from 36 colleges 
and universities at the fourteenth annual National Collegiate Wrestling Tour- 
nament on March 2 1 and 2 2 . 



coach: 




RECORD 




Billy Sheridan 


LEHIGH 




opponents 


captain: 


17 


Kansas State 


9 


Roy S. Zachary 


12 


Yale 


12 


captain: 


24 


Syracuse 


8 


Frank H. Bailey 


6 


Penn State 


18 


captain-elect: 


17 


Cornell 


9 


Richard H. Brenneman 


9 


Navy 


21 


JUNIOR MANAGERS 


34 


Rutgers 





Archie D. Tifft 


28 


Lafayette 


6 


Robert S. Struble 


17 


Princeton 


ir 



Anthony R. Carcione, '41 
Frank H. Bailey, '41 
Harry L. Boyer, '42 



LETTERMEN: 
Richard H. Brenneman, '43 
Arthur G. Byrne, '43 
William P. Hitchcock, '42 



Albert E. Lee, '41 
William H. Lehr, '41 
Joseph H. Quinn, '41 



■WRESTLiyiG - Standing: Byrne, Lehr, Coach Sheridan, Hitchcock, Brenneman. Seated: Carcione, 
Quinn, Bailey, Boyer, Lee. 



226 








"^fSf 



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^1 iiJ .1^ 









LmI 



1 



i 



\\t'A' ■■ 




BASKETBALL 

This year's basketball team faced one of the hardest schedules ever con- 
fronted by a Lehigh team. Besides opposing our traditional rivals, Muhlen- 
berg, Rutgers, and Lafayette, the team played Temple, the strongest team 
in Philadelphia; North Carolina, the Southern Conference champion, and 
Duke, as well as many other stand-out teams. The high-light of the 1 7 game 
schedule was the southern trip taken during the Christmas vacation. On this 
trip the team played North Carolina, Duke, and Richmond, and although 
the team lost all three games, the trip was a success. In the North Carolina 
game Bill Binder, the high scorer of the Lehigh valley rang up 24 points, the 
most points that any man had been able to score against George Glammeck 
and his team all season. 

The first game of the year was played at Princeton, and for three quarters 
it was a tight ball game. At the end of the third period the score was tied, 
but in the last quarter, after co-captain Briody had gone out on fouls, the tall 
Princeton team pulled away to win handily 49-34. Temple was the first home 
game, and, led by Reber and Binder, Lehigh put up a fine game against the 
high powered Philadelphia club. The contest was not decided until the last 
minute of play when Temple fought off a desperate Lehigh rally to win 
53-47. After the southern trip the team took on Rutgers at New Brunswick 
and although leading at the half, the team fell apart in the last half, Rutgers 
winning 5 1-4 1. The team scored its first victory against Dickinson. Led again 
by Reber and Binder the team played the best brand of ball it had shown 
up to that time. Dickinson was undefeated until facing Lehigh. P.M.C. was 
an easy game, Lehigh winmng 51-22. The first Muhlenberg game, played 
at the Allentown Palestra, was a thriller from start to finish; Lehigh started 
off with a spurt and at one time led 19-2, but Muhlenberg came back and at 
the finish led by two points, the final being 47-45. Schneider paced the 
Muhlenberg team and Briody, Binder, and Reber were outstanding for 
Lehigh. Gettysburg came to Taylor Gym and once again the game was tight 
fought, the outcome was in doubt until the last couple of minutes when 
Gettysburg put on a rally to pull away to a seven point lead. The whistle 
blew with Lehigh on the short end of a 52-47 score. Muhlenberg came to 
Bethlehem for the second game of the series and amid a chorus of cheers and 
jeers the two teams ended the regular playing time tied at 53-53. Lehigh had 
led up to the last minute when the Mules deuced the game. In the overtime 
the rangy Muhlenberg team ran away to an eleven point lead and won the 
game finally 66-57. Swarthmore was the next opponent and Lehigh broke 
into the win column once again. The team outplayed Swarthmore and won 
the game easily 49-36. Binder and Reber were both injured in the game, but 
it didn't stop either of them; Binder scored 22 points and Reber, 13. Without 



the services of Binder, because of the injuries received in the Swarthmore 
game, the team went to Haverford and beat the Mainhners 56-39. Lafayette 
came to Lehigh with only a mediocre record against weak opposition but, 
playing a very good brand of basketball, took the game by two points 42-40. 
It was probably one of the most thrilling games played at Taylor Gym all 
year. In the second Rutgers game the Lehigh team finally came from behind 
to win the best played game of the season. In the last two minutes the score 
was tied or the lead changed at least five times. Binder scored five points in 
the last minute alone and rang up the winning basket with a one-handed shot 
from near mid-court with less than ten seconds left to play. At Lafayette the 
team again lost a two point decision to the Leopards. Riemondy led the 
Lehigh team with twenty points but the rest of the team was held in check 
by a stiff Lafayette defense. 

This year's basketball team won only five games, yet the team played a 
much better type of basketball than this record shows. Four games were lost 
by two points, one by three, one by four, and altogether eight games were 
lost by less than seven points. Next year all but two men will be back and 
a good season is forecast. 



COACH: 


LEHIGH 




OPPONENTS 


Paul Calvert 


34 


Princeton 




49 




47 


Temple 




53 


captains: 


49 


Scranton 




52 


Bernard Briody 
Robert Reber 


58 
30 


North Carolina 
Duke 




6z 
66 




38 


Richmond 




40 




4« 


Rutgers 




51 


captain-elect: 


59 


Dickinson 




45 


Jack Lane 


51 


P. M. C. 




22 




45 


Muhlenberg 




47 


manager: 


45 


Gettysburg 




52 


John Bryan 


57 
49 


Muhlenberg 
Swarthmore 




66 
36 




56 


Haverford 




39 


JUNIOR MANAGERS: 


40 


Lafayette 




4z 


William Brooks 


47 


Rutgers 




46 


Robert Beck 


45 
LEi'lERMEN: 


Lafayette 




47 


Jack Lane, '43 


Robert Reber, '41 


Bernard 


1 Briody, '4 


I 


Augustus Riemondy, '41 


William Binder, '43 


Robert 


Bailey, '43 





BASKETBALL SQUAD - Rfiflr Row. Couch Calvert, Palmer, Ambrogi, Whipple, BaUey, Martin, 
Conforte, Bryan. Front Row: Norwood, Riemondy, Binder, Reber, Briody, Lane, Olinsky. 



230 



SOCCER 

The Lehigh soccer team, hopeful of a good season, got off to a poor start 
by losing their first three games, all by fairly high scores. Opening the season 
against Swarthmore, the hooters showed that they had the potential ability, 
but needed more practice. The Garnet defensive play was of the zone style, 
and new to Lehigh. Against Penn, the Brown and White fared no better, 
although Adams scored the first goal made by Lehigh in the season. The 
passwork of the Penn team was well nigh perfect, to the chagrin of our 
hooters. The Tigers from Princeton invaded Steel Field, and proved that their 
vaunted offensive was correctly predicted. They were just altogether too 
good a team. Against Rutgers, however, the Engineers showed that they too 
could put the ball into the net. They racked up four goals in the first period 
to defeat the Scarlet hooters 4 to i. In this game, two of the Lehigh goals 
were scored on freak plays by Rutgers men. The following week, the soccer 
team traveled to Hoboken to oppose the strong Stevens team. With Captain 
Riemondy out of the lineup, the team lacked the necessary punch, and lost 
by a 4 to o score. The Mainliners from Haverford proved too strong for the 
Engineers, who fell by a 5 to o count. Goalie Milbank, and fullback Schaeffer 
were injured in this game. A trip to Navy failed to bring back the bacon and 
the Engineers lost 2 to o in the heartbreaker. The last period when all the 
scoring occurred being played under arc lights. The Lehigh hooters won the 
Cornell game on a goal in the third period by Detwiler. Good passing fea- 
tured this game. Concluding the season with Lafayette, the hooters played 
98 minutes, ending up with a 0-0 tie. As a whole the team looked good, but 
poor offensive ball handling proved fatal. 



COACH: 

Harry Carpenter 

CAPTAIN: 

Augustus A. Riemondy, '41 

captain-elect: 

Raymond B. Anderson, Jr., '42 

manager: 

Harvey C. Griffith, Jr., '41 

JUNIOR MANAGERS: 

John S. Saylor, Jr., '42 
Chapin Heumann, '42 



Vernon H. Adams, '42 
Ra)Tnond B. Anderson, '42 
Ward A. Detwiler, II, '42 
Norman Hackman, '42 
Charles F. Kalmbach, '41 



RECORD 

Swarthmore 

University of Pennsylvania 

Princeton 

Rutgers 

Stevens 

Army 

Haverford 

Navy 

Cornell 

Lafayette 



OPPONENTS 

4 
5 
6 



LETTERMEN: 

John H. Milbank, '42 
Arthur M. Over, '43 
George W. Peterson, Jr., '42 
John C. Phillips, '42 



Augustus A. Riemondy, '41 
William D. Schaeffer, '43 
Robert H. Simonsen, '42 
John A. Thurn, '43 
Wnham E. Scott, '41 



soccer SQVAD-Rear Row: Dieter, Milbank, Phillips, Birckhead, RamsdeU, Adams, Saylor. 
Second Row. Heumann, Schaeffer, Stone, Hackman, Coach Carpenter, Donahue, Dellwigg, 
Scott. Front Row: Thurn, Anderson, Detwiler, Riemondy, Kalmbach, Over, Simonsen. 



233 



SWIMMING 

One of the potentially strongest teams in the history of swimming at 
Lehigh represented the Engineers this year, but the swimmers came oiit with 
victories on only three of their seven meets. Against the University of 
Pennsylvania, the first meet of the season, the team took three first places, 
but failed to win the relay event, which decided the meet 41-34 in Penn's 
favor. Captain Simpson was high scorer with twin victories in the 50 yard 
and 100 yard freestyle events. The meet was the fifteenth in a series. The 
next meet against Fordham proved also to be decided by the final event, 
again being captured by the opponents, 44-3 1 . This time, the relay team was 
disqualified as the anchor man "beat the gun." First places were taken by 
Simpson and Montbach in the freestyle and backstroke respectively. The 
following week Rutgers came to Lehigh unbeaten, and left also unbeaten. 
The Scarlet won decisively by a 52-23 score. Simpson again won the 100 
yard freestyle, and Hess captured the only other Lehigh first in the back- 
stroke. Two world's records were made by the Rutgers' relay teams, one by 
the varsity, and the other by the freshman swimmers. Delaware proved to 
be the long sought for chance for redemption as the Engineers captured their 
first victory of the season. Simpson captured his thirteenth consecutive 
victory whUe Chidsey won the 50 yard freestyle. Scranton showed little 
opposition as Lehigh won its second meet 57-18. Swarthmore presented more 
difficulty, but the Engineers overcame it in registering their third triumph. 
In the final meet of the season the Leopards of Lafayette nosed out the swim- 
mers by a 43-32 count. 



CAPTAIN: 

William B. Simpson, '41 

CAPTAIN-ELECT: 

Ralph F. Moss, '42 

manager: 

Richard L. Vockel, '41 

JUNIOR MANAGERS 

Frank E. Smith 
Richard E. Metius 



Francis A. Chidsey '43 
Albert W. Hess, '41 



SCORES 



LEHIGH 


[ 








OPPONENTS 


34 
31 






Pennsylvania 
Fordham 




41 
44 


23 
40 






Rutgers 
Delaware 




52 
35 


57 






Scranton 




18 


39 






Swarthmore 




35 


32 






Lafayette 




43 


LETTERMEN: 








Ralph F. 
Edgar R. 
Louis A. 


Moss, '42 
Mulhausen, 
Priolo, '41 


David H 
'42 WUliam 


. Schaper, '43 
B. Simpson, '41 



SWIMMING SQVAD- Rear Row: Metius, McConnell, Mayer, Chidsey, Moss, Schaper. Third 
Row: Smith, Nelkin, Scott, Coach Morrissey, Ryan, Melloy, Vockel. Second Row: Folwell, 
Hess, Simpson, Montbach, Hood. Front Row: Mulhausen, Lynch, Priolo, Rappuhn, Bushey. 



234 







— — ^f«i»?- 




BASEBALL 

For the first time since 1929 a Lehigh baseball team opened its season with 
two consecutive victories when Coach Paul Calvert's nine walloped Haver- 
ford 1 2-1 and the University of Connecticut 1 1-6 on successive days. The 
feature of the second game was a pair of four-baggers by Emery Loomis. 
Weak infield play offset Harry Leidich's fine twirling in the next fray with 
Penn State and the Engineers met their first defeat 7-2. With Loomis hot 
again at the plate, Lehigh blasted three Dickinson pitchers two days later 
thus gaining a 6-3 win for co-captain Budd Heisler. Falling under the spell 
of excellent pitching the diamondmen dropped two in a row, one to Ursinus 
2-0 and another to Villanova's Wildcats 14-2. In the following contest Harry 
Leidich avenged last year's loss to Drexel and pitched a three hit i-o shut- 
out. The Brown team next lost to Aluhlenberg 11- 10 as a result of a 5 run 
ninth inning rally by the Mules, and to Gettysburg 9-3 in a slugfest. A return 
game with Muhlenberg put the Lehigh nine back in the win column with a 
4-3 conquest. Beginning middle-three competition the Brown and White 
team chalked up a 4-3 win over Rutgers and lost the return game. The first 
of three games with Lafayette was a 14-6 defeat caused by shaky fielding 
which netted 10 errors. The second game with the Leopards ended with 
Lehigh on the bad end of a lo-i score. A four year quest for victory over the 
Leopards finally ended when the combined pitching of Heisler and Leidich 
gave the Engineers 33-2 victory in the season's finale. 



SCORES 



CAPTAINS: 

Alfred Cox 
Clifford Heisler 

CAPTArN-ELECT: 

Emery Looniis 

MANAGER: 

Ralph Johnson 

JUNIOR MANAGERS 

Laurence Dieringer 
John Muhlberg 



Charles Boyer, '42 
Alfred Cox, '40 
Robert Forster, '42 
Clifford Heisler, '40 



OPPONENTS 



12 


Haverford 




I 


n 


U. of Conn. 




6 


2 


Penn State 




7 


6 


Dickinson 




3 





Ursinus 




2 


2 


VUlanova 




14 


I 


Drexel 







10 

3 

4 

4 

5 

6 

I 

3 


Muhlenberg 
Gettysburg 
Muhlenberg 
Rutgers 
Rutgers 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 




II 
9 
3 
2 
6 

14 

ID 

2 


LEI lERMEN: 








Charles Griffiths, '40 




Leonard Rahn, 


'40 


Edward Kister, '41 




Frank Roberts, 


'4Z 


Harry Leidich, '40 
Emery Loomis, '41 




Jesse Smith, '42 
Harold Werft, 


'41 



BASEBALL SQVAD- Rear Row: Coach Calvert, MUbank, Heisler, Vockel, Loomis, Duane, Good- 
man, Forster, Rahn, Johnson. Front Row: Griffiths, Cox, Leidich, Werft, Anderson, Boyer, 
Roberts, Smith, Kister. 



237 



TENNIS 



The return of four lettermen and two veterans gave Lehigh's tennis team 
fine prospects for their coming season. However the team got off to a bad 
start because of unfavorable weather disrupting practices. Despite the efforts 
of Captain Phil De Huff and Coach Fritz Mercur to develop the team by- 
holding practices on the handball courts, the University of Pennsylvania 
defeated Lehigh in the opening match of the season by a score of 8-i. The 
doubles team of Kantrowitz and De Huff scored Lehigh's only victory. The 
rainy weather continued, and only three days of practice were held before 
the Princeton match. In this match the number one player, Marv Kantrowitz, 
won Lehigh's only match. The team's last defeat of the season was to the 
Blue Devils of Duke by a score of 5-4. The singles matches were divided, 
and Kantrowitz and Creitz lost the decisive doubles match in extra games. 
Finally the losing streak was broken when Johns Hopkins was defeated 9-0, 
playing only two sets in each match. In the victory over Haverford, Art 
Marvin won his match in two love sets. The winning streak continued as 
Manhattan, Swarthmore, and Bucknell bowed to Lehigh. In the Swarthmore 
match Kantrowitz prevented his opponent from winning a game. The sixth 
and seventh consecutive victories were from Rutgers and Temple, neither 
team winning a single match. The previously undefeated Mules from Muhlen- 
berg bowed to Lehigh by a score of 8-1, and the final match of the season 
occurred when a vastly superior Lehigh team defeated Lafayette. Thus the 
successful season closed with Lehigh having won 76 out of the 81 matches 
played in the last nine matches. 



COACH: 






RECORD 


Frederic Mercur 

CAPTAIN: 

Philip G. De Huff, Jr. 

manager: 
Robert C. Slingerland 

JUNIOR MANAGERS: 

James H. Bricker 
Frank E. Weise, Jr. 


LEHIGH 

I 

I 

4 
9 
9 
8 

9 

7 




OPPONENTS 

Pennsylvania 8 

Princeton 8 

Duke 5 

Johns Hopkins 

Haverford 

Manhattan i 

Swarthmore 

Bucknell 2 


FRESHMAN MANAGER: 

George C. Lennox 

CAPTAIN-ELECT: 

Marvin D. Kantrowitz 


9 
9 
8 
8 

LETTERMEN; 




Rutgers 

Temple 

Muhlenberg i 

Lafayette i 


John H. Colbaugh, '40 
Carlton E. Creitz, '40 


Philip G. De Huff, Jr., ' 
Marvin D. Kantrovi'itz, 


40 
'41 


John H. Norwood, '42 
Robert C. Reber, '41 



James A. Marvin, '41 



TENNIS SQUAD - Rear Row: Slingerland, Marvin, Norwood, Reber, Coach Mercur. Fro7it Row: 
Creitz, Colbaugh, De Huff, Kantrowitz. 








!_,\ 





TRACK 

An interclass track meet, in which the class of 1942 garnered the most 
points, preceded the opening of the 1940 track season. Inclement weather 
conditions forced the postponement of the Rutgers meet from April 1 3 until 
May 4, and flooded the Muhlenberg meet off the upper field. 

It was not until April 24 that the Lehigh cindermen were really able to get 
into action. On that date they defeated Swarthmore 89 '/^ to 36'/^, by taking 
eleven first-places. John Beriont was high scorer with 12 points. In the Penn 
relays a few days later, the Brown and White won a fourth place in the 
Middle Atlantic states mile relay. 

The meet with Rutgers on May 4 gave Lehigh only two firsts. Rutgers, 
gaining 92 points to Lehigh's 32, took its 19th win out of 21 starts against 
Lehigh. Wooters won the 440 and George Elliott took the lead in the 220 
low hurdles. In the Haverford meet on May 7, Lehigh, trailing 58-59 going 
into the last event, pulled ahead by virtue of Brenneman's first place in the 
discus throw to win by a score of 64-62. Beriont led with 12 points. 

In the Middle Atlantic Collegiate Athletic Association track meet held at 
Lafayette, Lehigh finished second to Rutgers, taking 3 i points to Rutgers' 
471/2- Constantine took first place in the broad jump; "Dukes" Wooters, in 
the 440; G. Elliott, in the 220 low hurdles, and "Cal" Murphy, in the 120 
high hurdles. 

A defeat at the hands of Lafayette closed the season. Score: 7 9 14 to 461/2- 
Murphy set a new meet and a new Lehigh record in the 120 low hurdles 
(15.6 seconds) and Wooters was high scorer with 14 points. 



captain: 
Preston Marshall 

CAPTAIN-ELECT: 

Dukes Wooters 

manager: 

Ralph Martin 

junior managers 

John Sipp 

Robert Uhiier 



John Beriont, '40 
Richard Brenneman, '42 
Leonard Constantine, Jr., 
George Elliott, '42 



SCORES 



LEfflGH 






87 K 




Swarthmore 


34 




Rutgers 


64 




Haverford 


31 




M.A.S.C.A.A. 


2nd place 






46 '/2 




Lafayette 


LETTERMEN: 






Herbert Elliott, '40 
Preston Marshall, '40 
Augustus Riemondy, 


'41 



OPPONENTS 
36 K2 

62 



79 '/a 



Dukes Wooters, '41 
Edward BUlstein, '40 
Arthur Mickley, '40 
John O'Meara, '40 



track sqvad- Rear Row. Ambrogi, EUiott, Bayles, Coach Kanaly, Martin, Wooters, Boore, 
Constantine. Second Row: Wise, Klickley, Smith, Brough, MarshaU, McClave, Munnikhuysen, 
Elliott, Ulmer. Front Row: Priolo, Metius, Riemondy, Beriont, Hume, BiUstein, Sipp. 



241 



CROSS COUNTRY 



coach: 
Morris E. Kanaly 

captain: 
Lawrence H. Compton 

captain-elect: 
James H. Bleiler 

manager: 
John W. Whiting, Jr. 

junior manager: 
Robert H. Marshall 



RECORD 






OPPONENTS 


Rutgers 
Swarthmore 


•5 

21 


Johns Hopkins 51 
Muhlenberg 
Lafayette 


Haverford 16 
21 



LEHIGH 
40 
34 
53 

34 
40 

LETTERMEN: 
Richard E. Metius, '42 James H. Bleiler, '42 

William L. Clark, '41 Lawrence H. Compton, '41 

William C. Walker, '43 



HOCKEY CLUB 





RESULTS 




CAPTAIN: 


LEHIGH 




OPPONENTS 


Joseph D. Scott 


3 


Union 


I 


MANAGER: 


2 


M.I.T. 


7 


Allen H. Zane 




Cornell 


5 


JUN lOR-M ANAGER 




Lafayette 


I 


Richard C. Paul 




Army 


8 


COACH: 

Charles W. Simmons 




Princeton J.V. 


10 






LaSalle 









Temple 


I 


LETTERMEN: 




Georgetown 
Penn State 


4 
4 


James L. Anderson, '41 
Freeman P. McKay, '43 
Alexander K. Wiggin, '42 





Pennsylvania 


I 


Philip B. Woodroofe, '41 





F. & M. 


I 


Joseph D. Scott, '41 



LACROSSE 



COACH: 

Tad Stanwick 

captain: 
A. Graham Delany 

captain-elect: 
Robert B. Steele, Jr. 

MANAGER: 

William H. Baker 

JUNIOR MANAGER: 

R. Harry Gunnison 





RECORD 




LEHIGH OPPONENTS 


I 

4 
6 


Maryland 

Navy 
Princeton 


10 

7 
7 


2 


Swarthmore 


4 


6 


Yale 


12 




Williams 


4 




Stevens 


7 




Penn State 


12 


13 
13 


Rutgers 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

Crescent A. C. 


9 

5 
I 

9 



LETTERMEN: 
John M. Stockbridge, '43 
A. Graham Delany, '40 
Robert B. Steele Jr., '42 
John R. O'Meara, '40 
Douglas C. Paul, '40 
Adolf F. Hafferureffer, Jr., '40 
Wilham T. Luce, '40 
John S. Croft, '40 
Ed. F. Dannemiller, '40 
John Adrian, Jr., '42 



CROSS COUNTRY -Rear Row: Whiting, Schneider, Pugh, Coach Kanaly, Pearsall, Brown, Mar- 
shall. Front Row: Clark, Walker, Compton, Bleder, Metius. 

HOCKEY - Rear Row: Coach Simmons, Bartholemew, Sherwood, Smith, Woodroofe, Hilton, 
McKay, Saviyer, Zane. Front Row: Giles, J. L. Anderson, Wiggin, Scott, R. B. Anderson, 
Frost, Dodson. 

LACROSSE - Rodgers, Adrian, Graham, Heinz, Holtvedt, Steele, Reese, Woodroofe, Smith, Gor- 
man. 



242 





\n 



n. 



4 



M ■ -^ /--# 



■■i«»;'^-.v ^ ; 



jmi 




p;f*lpk'^* 



r I 



GOLF 



coach; 
Ralph Hutchison 

captain: 
Peter Carpenter, '41 

CAPTAIN elect: 

Robert F. Ryan, '42 

\l-\nager: 
Harry D. Chandler, '41 

JUNIOR manager: 
John R. Penn, III, '42 





RECORD 




LEHIGH 




opponents 





Swarthmore 


5 


5 /a 
3 


Temple 
Franklin & Marshall 


3 '/a 
6 


4 


Pennsylvania 
Wesleyan 


s 



LETTERMEN 
Robert F. Ryan, '42 James H. McMillen, II, '42 

Peter Carpenter, '41 Daniel B. McAfee, '42 

Austen E. Jenkin, '42 





FENCING 




RECORD 






COACH: 






OPPONENTS 


Mr. Valentino Argento 


St. Josephs 




7 


CAPTAIN: 


Drew 
Seton Hall 




1 1 
20 


Harvey C. Griffith, Jr. 


Montclair State Teachers 


9 


MANAGER: 


Phila. College of Pharmacy 


and 


Science 8 Yz 


William A. Kuhar 


Lafayette 






FROSH MANAGER: 


Rutgers 




17'A 


Frank J. McGrath 



9'/2 



Richard R. Bright, '42 
Donald Eadie, '41 



LETTERMEN: 
Harvey C. Griffith, Jr., '41 
Alver H. Ives, Jr., '41 
Arthur L. Landesman, '43 



Robert A. Nicrosini, '43 
Richard E. Slee, '41 



RIFLE CLUB 



OFFICERS OF RIFLE 
CLUB 

PRESIDENT 

W. A. Siegele 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

C. V. Holby 

SECRETARY 

C. H. Carter 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

H. J. Olson 

Robert C. Boston, '43 
Charles H. Carter, '41 
Albert W. Hemphill, '43 



1940 SEASON'S RESULTS 



LEHIGH OPPONENTS 


1365 


Drexel 1342 


I381 


U.S.M.C. Basic School 1362 




Rutgers 1333 
Lafayette 13 18 


1409 


140 1 


Maryland 1399 


I4OI 


Navy 1379 


1377 


Army 1374 




ist place Eastern Intercollegiates 




2nd place National Intercollegiates 


LEllERMEN: 


George 


V. Holby, '41 William A. Siegele, '41 


John A. 


Kimberley, '42 David R. Smith, '42 


Henry J 


. Olson, '42 Henry C. Swartz, '43 


Theodore G. Scott, Jr., '42 



GOLF -Burke, Carpenter, Ryan, Sotzing, Jenkin, McClave. 

FENCING - Kwee/rag; Bright, Norlin, Eadie. Standing: Georgopulo, Griffith, Alexander, Savage, 

Hartdegen, Coach Argento, Slee, Swartz, Qark. 

RIFLE - Rear Row: Varner, Coach Gasda, Col. Leonard, Phillips, Siegele, Boston. Second Row: 

Olson, Kimberley, Carter, Smith, Scott, Holby. Front Row: Bradford, Eberts, Hemphill, 

Swartz. 



245 



The 1 94 1 Epitome 



A'OLUME II 



SENIOR CLASSBOOK 



GREETINGS! 



WE COLLEGE SENIORS, seeing graduation near, are wont to let 
scholastic as well as other school responsibilities slide somewhat, and 
spend more time in rather cynical contemplation of that part of our lives fast 
closing. Some of us regret our own shortcomings in not making better use of 
our opportunities; some few of us lay the principal blame on the institution. 
With varying degrees of impatience with school life after nearly sixteen years 
or more, we are anxious to finish. And for most of us graduation will bring 
the new and added responsibility of being on one's own. But before we glide 
quickly past the gateway into our new order of living, a good many will 
hesitate and look back with a warm, momentarily surging feeling of emotion 
as we think of the fine friends and of the swell times, and tough ones too, 
that we knew. And probably as 1941 becomes 195 1, 1961, 197 1, and even 
1 98 1, and as the members of our class scatter and gradually lose the unifying 
typings and characteristics that mark any group of men living together four 
years, each of us will many times stop a minute in sometimes chuckling, some- 
times sober reminiscence of these college days. 

Prophesying sentimentally perhaps, as 1941 is further and further behind, 
we'll recall our short, close-packed Lehigh experience in a broader sense. No 
longer will we consider the petty grievances against professors, nor the minor 
antagonisms of competing student organizations we once thought so im- 
portant, nor many of the everyday deadlines and small details that then irked 
us so. All these will have faded into dim but emphasizing lines in the back- 
ground of a deep, richly colored college memory. 

In the hope of striking a pleasantly retrospective mood while the recollec- 
tion of otir undergraduate days are still fresh, may I direct your memory to 
those activities in which the unity and co-operation of our class made for 
great success. Our Junior Prom, our Senior Ball, our class banquets, our class 
smoker, our Memorial Class Gift— these events notably should give every 
senior who helped, participated, or supported them a just feeling of pride in 
the Class of 1 94 1 . Retain that pride in your class and add to it the satisfaction 
you will enjoy as you and your classmates attain success in business, industry, 
academic circles, or in whatever field you choose. 

GOOD LUCK, CLASS OF 194 1! 

Al Lee 
May 1^41 

251 



FOUR YEARS OF LEHIGH 
A Chronological Review 

September 2 j, ip^j: 2 14 members of the freshman class of 595 pledge fra- 
ternities. The student body of 1750 is the largest to be registered in the 
history of the university. 

October 6, ip^j: The freshman class wins four events in the Founder's Day 
sports, thereby earning the right to shed their dinks on Sundays. 

October 20, i^^j: William Boyer is elected president of the freshman class. 
Luther Mohr is elected vice-president; William Barnard, secretary; and 
Alexander Darby, treasurer. 

October 22, i$S7' Sammy Kaye plays for our first houseparty at the old Coli- 
seum. Ground is broken for Richards house, first building in the new 
dormitory system. 

November ip, i()3J: "We pay no toll tonight!" Our first pajama parade over 
the New Street bridge culminates an inspiring pep rally and smoker at 
Taylor gym before the Lafayette game. 

November 20, ip^j: The much-disputed decision when George Ellstrom's 
touchdown was called back because he stepped out of bounds is the high 
point of the best Lehigh-Lafayette game in the history of the class of '41. 

December 10, ipsj: The Brown and White issues a 20-page newspaper com- 
memorating the 1 50th anniversary of the United States Constitution. 

January 20, ips^: Arcadia removes the regulations imposed on the class of '41. 

February 12, ip^S: Tommy Dorsey plays at Dorney Park for the Inter- 
fraternity ball. 

February i^, 1938: Arcadia overhauls freshman regulations. Dinks are dis- 
carded and enforcement of the regulations is placed in the hands of the 
Lehigh Union. 

February 1^, 1938: Cosmopolitan club is organized. 

March j, 1938: The Military ball, one of the four big dances of the year, fea- 
tures Larry Clinton. 

March 12, 1938: Lehigh wins the 1938 E.I.W.A. championship. 

April 22, 1938: Spring houseparty rhythms are furnished by Claude Hopkins 
and Joe Haymes. 



ABOVE -C. M. McConn, former Dean of Lehigh; N. A. Kellogg, former director of Athletics. 
CENTER - Taylor house quad scene; the late C. K. Peters, M.D. 
BELOW - Wrestling movies; the late H. W. Watkins, '41. 

252 



# 



i Nf't't'iiipf ^Pr 







■m. 




^^^iJAi^SiJimtm^:^'^^: 



May 5, ips^' Don Schoen is elected president of the sophomore class, and 
Gus Riemondy secretar>'-treasurer. Student body votes to retain name of 
Arcadia for the new governing body replacing the Lehigh Union and the 
old Arcadia. 

August I, ips^' Wray H. Congdon replaces Max McConn as Dean of Under- 
graduates. 

October 18, 1^38: Interdormitory Council is formed with Albrecht as its first 
president. 

October 2^, ip^S: Freshman Union abolished. 

Noveinber to, 1938: An investigation of managerial monopolies by O. D. K. 
discloses that swimming and tennis are the only sports in which real mo- 
nopolies exist. 

November 18, 1^38: The annual peace treaty between Lehigh and Lafayette 
is broken by both schools when four Leopards are caught in an attempt to 
steal the goal posts from Taylor Stadium. The anti-Lafayette displays by 
freshman groups are a feature of the smoker before the big game with the 
Maroon. 

Nove?}2ber i^, 1^38: Steve Smoke's great kicking almost mms the tide as 
Lehigh bows to its arch-rival. 

November 2^, 1938: George Melloy, promising athlete, shot in leg in hunting 
accident. 

February 10, 1^3$: Dr. Peters dies in a fire at his home. 

February /./, 1939: Town sections organized under new Town council. 

February 11. 1939: Nelson A. Kellogg retires as athletic director. 

Febnuiry 28, 1939: Charles L. Taylor, '76, is honored in a celebration of the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of Taylor gym. 

March 3, 1939: Glen Harmeson is named to the position of athletic director. 
March 7, 1939: Arcadia changes the method of selecting team managers in 
order to give team members a greater voice. 

March 11, 1939: The Engineers win the E.LW.A. championship for the sec- 
ond straight year. 

March 18, 1939: Lehigh places second in the Nationals as "Monk" Matthes 
wins the 165-lb. crown. 

April 1 1, 1939: Arcadia revises its make-up by eliminating the seats held by 

the president of Tau Beta Pi and the head of the i\Ilentown group. 
April 23, 1939: Walter Okeson is named vice-president of the university. 

Harry M. Ulknan Chemistry Laboratory, dedicated October 5, 1938. 



May I, ipsp: Dwight Long speaks at '4rs first class banquet at the Hotel 
Bethlehem. 

May 5, ips9- ^^ Lee is elected president of the class, and Riemondy retains 
his post of secretary-treasurer. 

May 7, ip^p: Hastings Watkins is killed in an accident. 

May ip, J 939: For the first time in fifty-two years, the senior class is given 
permission to graduate at the flag pole, weather permitting. Cyanide taps 
fourteen members of the class of '4 1 . 

June 8, ipsp: Money to be used in the construction of Grace hall is donated 
by Eugene G. Grace. 

October 13, 1939' Cyanide is given the power of enforcing freshman regula- 
tions, which was formerly done by the sophomore vigilantes. 

October /y, 1939- Forty students take flight theory course as the C.A.A. 
comes to Lehigh. 

NoveTnber 24, 1939: The Lafayette week-end is marked by a thrilling game 
which the Leopard takes by a score of 29-13; and by the appearance of 
Sophcopation. Henry Busse plays as the sophomore class sponsors its dance. 

November 30, 1939: Lehigh celebrates a Republican Thanksgiving. 

December 8, 1939: Bill Hauserman is elected captain of the 1941 football 
team. 

Decernber 12, 1939: Stanley Seyfert, head of the department of electrical en- 
gineering, dies. 

February 6, 1940: The cornerstone of Drinker house is laid. 

February 23, 1940: The Lehigh-Lafayette hockey game is held at the Hershey 
arena as an enthusiastic crowd makes this first excursion. 

March 9, 1940: Lehigh wins its third consecutive E.I.W.A. title. Frank Bailey 
is elected captain of the 1 94 1 wrestling team. 

April /J, 1940: Arcadia approves a new nominating and electing system. 

April 19, 1940: Tommy Dorsey plays to a record crowd at the Junior Prom. 

May 2, 1940: The junior banquet features Gene Venzke as its speaker. 

May 6, 1940: Arcadia revises the athletic award system. 

May 8, 1940: Al Lee and "Gus" Riemondy are reelected president and 
secretary-treasurer, respectively, of the senior class. 

June 3, 1940: The Lehigh Review, student-published magazine, is abolished 
by the faculty. 



ABOVE - Graduation scenes. 

BELOW - Seniors in "Who's Who among College Students": Bill Archer, Johnny Attwood, 

Harry Chandler 



256 



Septe?nber 24, ip^o: The Alpha Town house is organized. 

September 28, 1940: The Board of Publications accepts the Bachelor to take 

the place of the Review. 
October 8, 1940: "Matmen," a movie short, is being filmed at Lehigh. 
October /6, 1^40: 428 Lehigh students and faculty members register for the 

draft. 
October 22, 1^40: The cornerstone for Grace hall is laid. 
October 2^, 1^40: Benny Goodman swings the class of '41 at its prom. The 

Broivn & White begins a series of Lehigh news broadcasts from Stations 

WCBA and WSAN in Allentown. 
Noveif?ber j, ip4o: Lehigh students take advantage of an offer to fly home in 

order to vote for Willkie. 
Novejnber 8, 1^40: The class of '41 sponsors its pep rally before the Muhlen- 
berg game. 
Novevtber ^, 1940: Dad's Day is a hit, with 600 fathers enjoying a weekend 

at the university with their sons. 

Nove?nber 18, 1^40: Arcadia calls the first "Super- Arcadia" conclave, with 
Arcadia, the Interfratemity Council, the Interdormitory Council, and the 
Town Council taking part in a mass meeting. 

'November 22^ 1940: "Okie's" cup, prize for the best pep rally of the season, 
goes to the senior class. '44 builds a big bonfire, and this is followed by the 
annual traditional trek across the "Penny Bridge" to serenade Fem-Sem. 

December 11, 1940: Lambda Mu Sigma, local honorary marketing fraternity, 
is founded at Lehigh. 

January 75, 1941: Tabloid FAi's theme, "The steel workers of Bethlehem 
and students of Lehigh university don't play games together or hold joint 
bull-sessions," creates a mild furore among the student body. 

February 21, 1941: "Swede" Larson, Navy football coach, speaks at the senior 
banquet. Senior insurance plan becomes a tradition when '41 votes it as a 
class gift for the fourth straight year. 

March 21, 1941: Lehigh plays host to 140 wrestlers from 35 schools as the 
National championships are held in Taylor gym. 



Seniors in "Who's Who" (continued)— Top Row. Dick Dietz, Fred Gilmore, Bill Hauserman, 
Chuck Kalmbach; Second Row: Al Lee, Johnny Mathewson, Gus Riemondy, Don Schoen; 
Third Row: Bill Scott, BiU Simpson, Bob Ukner, Dick Vockel; Bottom Row: Walt Vogels- 
burg, Dick Ware, Dukes Wooters, Roy Zachary. 



259 



James Lee Anderson received his preparatory training at lona prep and has been 
a student in the Business college. Jim won his numerals in freshman football and 
has played baseball and hockey. He has a varsity letter in hockey and a J.V. letter 
in football. Jim's favorite hobby is sports, and all his spare time has been spent 
in furthering his abihties in that line. 

George Gordon Andrews came from Plainfield high school, Plainfield, N.J. As a 
member of the Business college, he has majored in accounting which he plans to 
make his vocation on graduating from Lehigh. As a member of Delta Sigma Phi 
"G.G." served as editor-historian his sophomore year, treasurer his junior year 
and secretary during his senior year. 

Joseph Elliott Andrews, Jr., who is majoring in Chemical Engineering, trans- 
ferred in 1938 from Westminster college where he was captain and manager of 
the varsity golf team and a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. Joe made the 
Newtonian society in 1938 and has been active in the student Chemical society. 
His home is in Pittsburgh. 

Edward Burdett Annett, Jr., is an Electrical Engineer and a member of Pi Kappa 
Alpha fraternity. Throughout his four years at Lehigh, Ted has developed his 
hobby of music by participating in Band, Glee club, and Symphony orchestra 
activities. He has also taken part in the E.E. society, Brown and White, a local 
dance band, intramural baseball, and the A.LE.E. 

William Lippiatt Archer, Bus., came to Lehigh from the Kent school in Kent, 
Conn. He is a Kappa Alpha and a member of Omicron Delta Kappa. Arch is 
this year's Epitoine business manager. He has his numerals and varsity letter from 
participation in lacrosse and has been a four-year candidate for a position on the 
wrestling squad as well as a member of Scabbard and Blade. 

John Charles Attwood is an Arts man majoring in business who graduated from 
Lakewood, N. Y., high school but lives in Chicago. "Lightning" is a member of 
Sigma Nu fraternity. He has been freshman soccer manager, Broim and White 
Editorial Council member and Editorial Manager, and a member of the golf team. 
Cyanide, Scabbard and Blade, Pi Delta Epsilon, and O.D.K. 

Elmer Percy Bachtell, Jr., a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity and an 
Industrial Engineer, comes from Hagerstown, Md. Elm was president of Phi 
Delta Theta during 1938-1939. He has divided his extra time between R.O.T.C. 
work and athletics, having obtained his reserve officer's commission and partici- 
pated in intramural bowling, softball, and swimming. 

Kern Churchill Badger, a native of Ridgewood, N.J., is a member of the Alpha 
Chi Rho fraternity, in which he has held office for three of his college years. Kern 
is a Business major and hopes to work in accounting upon graduation from col- 
lege. Pursuing his hobby of carpentry while in school, Casey received a patent 
in November, 1939, for an invention he developed. 

Frederic Newhall Bahnson, an Engineering Physicist and a member of Town 
section J, is president of the Debating council, of D.O.T., and of the Physics 
society, and is a member of Tau Beta Pi and the R. W. Blake society. A winner 
of freshman and sophomore honors, Fred also made the Newtonian society. For 
four years he has been in the band. Last year he was vice president of Town J. 

260 



Boris Baiko, an M.E., came to Lehigh from Northport, Long Island. In his first 
year at Lehigh, he carried off the 175 lb. interdormitory wrestling crown, and 
also won his numerals in the same sport. Boris repeated the performance in his 
sophomore year and has been active in the sport since then. He is a member of 
the Radio club, the A.S.Al.E., and the Aero club. 

Frank Harvey Bailey, a Chemist, was a member of the wrestling team for three 
years, and captain in his senior year. Other sports in which he has taken part are 
track, where he won numerals, and fishing. He is a member of the Chemical so- 
ciety. Frank also helped organize the College Repubhcan club. He was a member 
of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. 

Craig Warren Baker is majoring in Business administration. He is circulation 
manager of the Br own and White and president of Phi Sigma Kappa. In his junior 
year "Bake" was assistant circulation manager of the paper and vice-president 
of his social fraternity-. He was a sophomore manager of football, engaged in 
freshman track, and was a member of the hockey club. 

Norman Miller Barber, Bus., graduated from the Hill school previous to his 
entrance to Lehigh. Norm is a member of the Lambda Chi Alpha social fra- 
ternity. He has freshman numerals in both track and basketball and has played 
the latter sport throughout his four years. He is treasurer of the Interfraternity 
council and a member of Scabbard and Blade. 

David B.^rnecott was a student in the college of Business Administration and a 
member of the Chi Phi fraternity. Dave, who graduated in February, came from 
New York City where he attended the DeWitt Clinton high school. He was a 
member of the freshman track team, did experimental work for the Dramatic 
Work Shop, and was social chairman of Chi Phi. 

Kenneth Robert Bartholomew is an Arts man majoring in Metallurgy. He is 
a native of Bethlehem and lives at home. Ken took his sophomore year at Mor- 
avian, returning to Lehigh in 1939. He has been active in tennis, track, the Metal- 
lurgical societ\% and the orchestra. He likes to spend all his extra time in the 
outdoors, particularly the mountains. 

John Phillip Beal, Jr., is a graduate of Montclair high school in Montclair, N.J. 
Jack is a member of Sigma Phi social fraternity, and is majoring in Chemical 
Engineering. He has been a member of the Chemical society for four years and 
participated in the Photographic club. He was president of Sigma Phi and a 
competitor for varsity basketball manager. 

WiLLARD Paul Be.\r, an Electrical Engineer, lived in Taylor House. "Will" was 
interested in music and played in the band for three years. One summer he led 
his own dance band. He is a member of the Electrical Engineering society and 
for two years was active in the program for general education. Bill played in- 
tramural sports in the winter and worked during his sum^mer vacations. 

James Mercer Beauchamp, Jr., is studying Industrial Engineering. He is a native 
of Staten Island, New York, and a member of Delta UpsUon of which he was 
rushing chairman and president. He won freshman numerals as tennis manager 
and was an Epitome competitor. "Curly" was on the Dean's list, and was a mem- 
ber of Pi Tau Sigma and the Interfraternity council. 

263 



Donald Warner Bedell, who commutes from AUentown, is the town council 
member from his living group. He has been active scholastically, and Tau Beta 
Pi, the Newtonian society, freshman honors and the Dean's list are all on his 
record. Don is a Chemical Engineer and as such is a member of the student 
Chemical society as well as the DeMolay and Lehigh-Allentown clubs. 

Thomas Robert Bell, III, is a Chemical Engineering major. He is a member of 
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity of which he was vice-president during his senior 
year. Bob has been a member of the student Chemical society for four years and 
lists the Glee club as one of his activities. In addition to singing, "Tom Kat" en- 
joys the hobby of collecting "hot" jazz recordings. 

Donald Austin Bender, who is majoring in Chemical Engineering, is president 
of Taylor House E and treasurer of the Interdormitory council. Last year he 
acted as secretary for his living group. During his first, second, and third years 
Don played in the symphony orchestra. He spent last summer as head counsellor 
in a camp. His principal hobby is photography. 

Fred Willard Berger, E.E., came to Lehigh from the Port Jervis high school. 
While at school, Fred has followed his favorite hobby, radio. He has also been 
active in wrestling and has played in the Band for two years. Fred is treasurer 
of the Radio club and is an active member of the Sportsman's club and the E.E. 
society. His summers have been spent in summer school. 

John Beriont, a Beta Kappa from Linden, N.J., expects to enter the employ of 
the General Chemical company after graduating as a Chemical Engineer. He was 
a member of the student Chemical society and the student chapter of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers. Johnny has won letters in football and track, 
and is a member of the Spiked Shoe and Scabbard and Blade. 

H. Radford Beucler is a major in Business administration. He hails from Ber- 
genfield, N.J., and is a member of Alpha Chi Rho fraternity. "Rad" has been 
active in the Band and in the Collegians' dance orchestra during his entire four 
years at Lehigh. He has participated in three Tone concerts. His hobby is music; 
his instrument, the trumpet. 

James Kaufman Binder, Arts, has written a column in the Brown and White for 
three years, contributed to the old Review, and is associate editor of the Bachelor 
this year. Jim was a winner of the Williams sophomore prize in EngUsh composi- 
tion. Interested in music, he has written the score for a solo ballet and is a 
member of the Bethlehem Bach choir. 

Edwin Samuel Bishop is a member of the Town group and comes from Mor- 
avian preparatory school in Bethlehem. Ed was born in Nicaragua in Central 
America. He is studying to be a Mechanical Engineer and is a member of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He is in the Moravian Trombone 
choir and is associated with the Cosmopolitan club. 

Carl Lyndon Bixby, Jr., Arts, is a member of Beta Kappa. After going to Lehigh 
for two years, he transferred to the Junior College of Connecticut and then 
came back to Lehigh this year. "Bix" was a member of the freshman soccer team, 
of the Brown and White staff, and of the Chemical society. At the Connecticut 
school he was an editor of the newspaper and the yearbook. 

264 







W^'^ y 







tfiMk 



Walter Peyton Blamire, Jr., a resident of Washington, D.C., attended Fish- 
bume military school before he came to Lehigh. Pat is a Mechanical Engineer 
and a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He was a mem- 
ber of Pi Tau Sigma during his senior year. Pat wrestled during his freshman 
and sophomore years and participated in Intramural athletics as a member of 
Drinker house. 

William Charles Bley, Bus., names Hamburg, New York, as his home town. 
He is a Beta Kappa and has been chancellor and treasurer of that fraternity. In 
his freshman year. Bill was on the tennis team and competed in the yearling 
rifle tourney. He is an ardent camera enthusiast and has been a member of the 
Brown mid White photographic staff for two years. 

Robert David Board majored in Industrial Engineering after preparation at 
the Brooklyn Technical high school. Bob was on the freshman baseball and swim- 
ming teams winning his numerals in the latter sport; he made varsity swimming 
his sophomore, junior, and senior years. He lived in Drinker house his senior 
year. Bob has been a golf pro for two summers. 

Richard Arthur Bobbe, a member of Pi Lambda Phi fraternity, is majoring in 
Industrial Engineering. As a freshman, Dick played basketball and baseball. In 
his sophomore and junior years, he was a member of the Industrial Engineering 
societ\'. Dick belonged to the A.S.iM.E. society in addition to making the Dean's 
list during his senior year. 

George William Bond, a resident of New York City, attended DeWitt Clinton 
high school before matriculating at Lehigh. A student in the College of Business 
Administration, George became secretary-treasurer of Town Group D in his 
senior year. He also played freshman football and was a charter member of the 
College Republican club. 

John Mich.ael Bontya is a member of the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. 
His home town is Trenton, New Jersey, where he attended the Central high 
school. Johnnie lived in Richards house while at Lehigh and was a member 
of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. His hobby is drawing, and 
he plans to take up aeronautics when he graduates. 

Warren F. Boyer, a graduate of Mercersburg academy, lived in town during 
his four years at Lehigh. He is a Chemical Engineer and has been a member of the 
Chemical society for four years. Warren was a member of the Glee club. Sym- 
phony orchestra. Collegians, and the Band, having served as student director of 
the latter. Warren was also a member of the track team. 

Alvin Leon.\rd Breen shows interest in both chemistr}^ and astronomy. For 
three years he was a member of the E. W. Brown Astronomical society finally 
becoming its president. AI is a Chemistry major, and his last two summers have 
been spent working as a chemist. Music being his hobby, Al has devoted some 
time to the Glee club and the Band. 

J.AMES H,armon Bricker is a Business student and a member of Sigma Phi of 
which he has been the treasurer for the past two years. Jim won scholastic 
honors in both his freshman and sophomore years, made the Newtonian society 
in his first year, and became a member of Scabbard and Blade, and Brown Key 
his junior year. He is the present freshman tennis manager. 

267 



Bernard Aloysius Briody, Jr., Arts, is a member of Delta Tau Delta. Co-captain 
of this year's basketball team, he has participated in that sport since his freshman 
year. He is a member of the R. W. Hall Pre-Medical society, the R. W. Blake 
Philosophical society, and Alpha Epsilon Delta. Participation in debating and 
cross-country competition complete his activities. 

Douglas iMacgillvary Brown, a graduate of Magdalen College school, a pre- 
paratory school at Oxford, England, is an Arts major. Doug lives at his home in 
Bethlehem. He is a member of Eta Sigma Phi, honorary classics fraternity, and 
was president of the Rugby club his junior year. He is interested in flying and 
has been in the secondary C.P.T. 

Edwin A. Brown, a native of Bethlehem and a graduate of Liberty high school, 
is a geology major in the Arts college. He received freshman and sophomore 
honors and became a member of Phi Eta Sigma in his freshman year. Ed was 
also a member of the Mining and Geological societ^^ During his spare moments, 
he worked N.Y.A. and took hikes in the interest of geology. 

Robert Nash Brown, an I.E., is a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity. Bob re- 
ceived freshman honors, sophomore honors, and was on the Dean's list as a junior. 
He is in the Newtonian society. Pi Mu Epsilon, Tau Beta Pi, and Pi Tau Sigma. 
He has been secretary, steward, and president of Kappa Sigma. Bob has been 
in the Band and is a member of the I.E. society. 

John Harvey Bryan, Jr., prepared for his Industrial Engineering studies at 
Westfield high school, Westfield, N.J. He is a member of Lambda Chi Alpha 
fraternity. Jake was freshman football manager during his first year, receiving 
his numerals; he managed basketball as a sophomore and junior, and in his senior 
year was varsity manager. He belonged to the I.E. society. 

Marion Clayton Burgy came to Lehigh from Peoria Central high school, Peoria, 
Illinois. Clayt is a Chemical Engineer and is a member of Sigma Chi fraternity. 
While at school he has been active in the Band, Symphony orchestra. Ensemble, 
and Tone. He has also been a member of the Glee club. Double Quartet, and 
Chemical society. Clayt was vice president of Sigma Chi his senior year. 

William Joseph Burkavage, Civil Engineer, is a transfer student from Scranton- 
Keystone Junior College. At Keystone "Burke" was active in intramural sports 
and was president of the Concert association and the Band as well as a member of 
the Glee club. He plays four musical instruments and pursues his hobby, photog- 
raphy, in his spare time. He resided in town. 

David Warden Burke, Jr., attended the Cranbrook school, Bloomfield Hills, 
Michigan. "Baron" who lives in Pleasant Ridge, Michigan, is president of Alpha 
Tau Omega and a member of the Interfratemity council. He has been an honor 
student during his four years in the Arts college where he is majoring in finance. 
"Baron" is a member of Alpha Kappa Psi and manager of the golf team. 

Richard Alvin Buser is a Metallurgical Engineering student whose coUege home 
was the Kappa Sigma fraternity. Dick earned freshman and sophomore honors, 
and made the Dean's list his junior year. He is a member of the Newtonian so- 
ciety. Phi Eta Sigma, Pi Mu Epsilon, the Band, the Camera club, and the Metal- 
lurgical society. Dick's hobbies are music and photography. 

268 



Charles Robert Bushwaller, a member of Town Group B, has taken the 
course in Business Administration. Bob earned his numerals in fencing and was 
a member of Cut and Thrust society in his sophomore year. As a senior he was 
on the art staff of the Lehigh Bachelor. Bob would like to follow adveitising 
after graduation. 

Frederick Cadwell Butler, Industrial Engineer, plans to enter the personnel 
management field. The "Baron" has been very active in intramural wrestling, 
football, basketball and baseball throughout his four years at Lehigh. He also 
played in the Band for three years, was a member of the A.S.M.E. and the LE. 
society, and was vice-president of his living group, Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Paul Harold Butler, Jr., is a Mechanical Engineering student and resides at 
Beta Kappa. As a freshman, "P.H." was in the Camera club. He was photographic 
editor of the Bronxn and White in his junior year and has also been Interfraternity 
council representative, secretary, and president of his fraternity. He is a member 
of the A.S.M.E. 

Robert Caemmerer, a Mechanical Engineer, is from Westwood, N.J., and is a 
Phi Sigma Kappa. Known as Cammy, he has been president of his course society, 
secretary of the Army Ordnance association, treasurer of Pi Tau Sigma, a mem- 
ber of Scabbard and Blade, and president of the Machine Shop club. He plans to 
spend next year in active army service. 

Harold Caplan is in the Arts college. An Allentown commuter, he is better 
known as Cap among friends. He is a member of Eta Sigma Phi, was treasurer as 
a junior, and has been a prominent committeeman as a senior. He holds sopho- 
more honors and the H. W. Wright Latin prize for 1938-39. He has worked on 
a Virginia farm during his summers and collects coins as a hobby. 

Anthony Ralph Carcione, an Arts major, is a native of Bethlehem but lives in 
Drinker house. Tony earned letters in varsity wrestling his junior and senior 
years. He worked up to news editor and sports editor of the Brown and White 
and edited the 1^40 Freshman Handbook. He is the treasurer of Pi Delta Epsilon 
and a contributor to the Bachelor. 

Charles Henry Carter, Jr., Chemistry, is a sportsman with militaristic interests. 
He has been a member of the rifle team for four years, helping to capture the 
1940 National Championship, and captaining the team this year. "Chuck" was 
appointed Cadet Colonel of the R.O.T.C. in his senior year. His summers have 
been spent working in the Atlas Powder company. 

Robert James Caverly, a member of the Delta Upsilon fraternity, is a Business 
student and comes from South Orange, N.J. Cav was business manager and an 
executive council member of the Brown and White, and was on the Pi Delta 
Epsilon committee for revision of the Epitome business staff of which he was a 
member. He was also a sophomore manager of cross-country. 

Harvey Hine Chamberlain, a member of Kappa Alpha, earned his numerals in 
freshman swimming and continued on the varsity squad during the ensuing three 
years. Harv is a student in Electrical Engineering and comes from Maplewood, 
N.J. He has been president of the Radio club and secretary of his living group. 
He plans to enter the communications field. 



Henry Deshons Chandler is a Business man and president of Chi Psi. He is a 
member of Alpha Kappa Psi, Cyanide, O.D.K., Brown Key, Pi Delta Epsilon and 
Newtonian society. Harry was manager of freshman soccer, manager of golf, 
senior section editor of the Epitome, copy supervisor, financial manager and 
business manager of the Brown and White, and a member of the S.C.L. com- 
mittee. 

Hazen Park Chase, a Business Administration student, comes from Holyoke, 
Mass., and is a Kappa Alpha. "Chuck" has been the business, ticket and publicity 
manager of A-Iustard and Cheese. He earned his numerals at tennis and was finan- 
cial manager of the Review as a sophomore. He was elected vice president of his 
living group in his senior year. 

Wilbur Chase, Jr., a student in Business Administration, is president of the 
Interdormitory council, and a member of Arcadia and Alpha Kappa Psi. In his 
freshman year Wil received scholastic honors and was elected to Phi Eta Sigma. 
He was also connected with the College Repubhcan association. He has spent 
his summers playing semi-professional baseball. 

Charles Edward Clain, who is a student in the curriculum of Mechanical En- 
gineering, is a resident of Richards house III-B which he served as president this 
past year. "Bud," whose home town is Ridgewood, N.J., spent the summer fol- 
lowing his freshman year in traveling, the next summer at home, and last summer 
working. 

William Lawrence Clark, who lives in Mountain Lakes, N.J., is a student of 
Metallurgical Engineering. "Clarkie" has been a member of the Hockey club 
during his four years at college. His college home is the Lambda Chi Alpha fra- 
ternity. He is a member of the A'letallurgical society and was assistant manager 
of baseball his freshman year. Bill's hobby is skating. 

Charles Victor Clarke, a student of Industrial Engineering, is president of 
Town section E and is a member of the American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers and of the Army Ordnance association. Charlie was assistant manager of 
swimming during his freshman and sophomore years and has participated in 
intramurals for four years. 

Charles Benjamin Cole is a resident of Union, N.J., and a member of Theta 
Delta Chi fraternity. Charlie has received the nickname "Scoop" from his work 
on the Broivn and White and as charge editor of The Shield, Theta Delta Chi 
national magazine. He also served his fraternity as secretary. Cost accounting in 
the Chemical Engineering field is his goal. 

Lawrence Hamlin Compton, an I.E., is captain of the cross-country team and 
has participated in track for four years. In his junior year Larry was vice presi- 
dent of Town section K. He is a member of the Industrial Engineering society 
and of the A.S.M.E. The last two summers he worked for Pennsylvania Power 
and Light company. 

Barton Conchar graduates as an industrial engineer. Bart came to Lehigh from 
the Millburn (N.J.) high school and is a member of Delta Upsilon. He is a mem- 
ber of the Newtonian society, played football during his freshman and sophomore 
years, was secretary of his fraternity, and has taken both the primary and sec- 
ondary Civilian Pilot Training courses. He expects to enter the Army Air Corps. 

272 



Joseph Lawrence Conneen, Business Administration, was president of Chi Phi 
this year and vice president during his junior year. Joe won his freshman nu- 
merals in tennis and wrestling and competed for the Mustard and Cheese program 
committee in his first vear. EpitODie competition, J.V. wrestling, and varsity 
wrestling competition have been his other activities. 

Charles Henry Coxover of Alt. Lebanon is an Arts man and a member of Phi 
Delta Theta. He received his numerals in freshman football, basketball, and 
baseball. "Chuck" was a member of the varsit)' football team and president of his 
fraternity in his junior and senior years. He also was the business manager of the 
1940 edition of the Freshman Handbook. 

George Seaimer Coopey is a Metallurgical Engineer and a resident of Richards 
house. Coop received Freshman scholastic honors, was elected to Newtonian so- 
ciety and played freshman basketball. As a sophomore, he became secretary of 
his dormitory section. In his junior and senior years, George was on the Dean's 
list. He has held several jobs while in college. 

Maxwell Michaux Corpening, Jr., from Marion, North Carolina, is a student in 
Electrical Engineering and a member of the Theta Xi fraternit)'. Max who at- 
tended Georgia Military academy before coming to Lehigh won his numerals 
in swimming and has since participated in swimming and J.V^. football. He is in- 
terested in flying and took the C.A.A. course last year. 

Martin Harrison Cortright is a student in the Business college. Dutch is a 
member of Town Group E and has been very much interested in all types of 
intramural athletics. He started his school career in Industrial Engineering but 
shifted to the Business college after his second year. Dutch hopes to go into 
personnel work after graduation. 

Alexander Mahon Craig, Jr., a student of Business Administration, belongs to 
the Kappa Alpha fraternity. "Sandy," a graduate of Kent school, was manager 
of tennis during his freshman year and served as president of the Aero club this 
past year. His hobbies are flying and sailing, and he has participated in inter- 
collegiate meets in both these sports. 

Robert Craig, a Business Administration student who comes from Bloomfield 
Hills, Mich., is a member of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. "Axil" has won nu- 
merals and letters in soccer, wrestling and track. He was a member of the Inter- 
fraternity council and secretary-treasurer of Cyanide. He was vice president of 
his Hving group as a junior and as a senior. 

Samuel Stephen Cross, Jr., prepared for Lehigh at the Upper Darby high school 
and is a resident of Newton Square. "Steamship" is a member of the Newtonian 
society, Phi Eta Sigma, the Chemical society. Pi Mu Epsilon, the MetaUmrgical 
society, the American Society for Metals, and Tau Beta Pi, and won freshman 
and sophomore honors. He has lived in Richards house. 

Charles Leslie Crouse, Jr., is a Business man and a member of Delta Phi. In 
his senior year he was a reporter on the Broivn and White and won his numerals 
as assistant manager of basketball. Charlie, a member of the R.O.T.C., has been 
treasurer of his fraternity for two years. He has been active in the Sportsman's 
club and was secretary this year. 

275 



John Frederick Croushore, an Arts student from Bethlehem, has participated 
in boxing during the past two years and was a member of the Glee club in his 
junior year. During his freshman and sophomore years, John was active in 
tennis. For three summers, he has served as sexton of his church. John's principal 
hobby is music. 

John Edgar Culliney, Jr., a Business Administration student, lives in Bethlehem 
and is a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. Johnny played freshman base- 
ball and football. He is a member of the Sportsman's club of which he was cor- 
responding secretary his senior year. He has spent two summers working for the 
Bethlehem Steel company. His hobby is music. 

Thomas Patrick Cunningham, Jr., a student of Civil Engineering, comes from 
Richmond Hill, L.I. "T.P." is a Theta Kappa Phi and has been active in the 
A.S.C.E. during the past two years. He won his numerals at cross country and 
participated two years in track. He likes and is experienced in surveying, and 
enjoys golf and bridge as hobbies. 

William Danshaw is an Electrical Engineer and was president of Phi Sigma 
Kappa fraternity. For four years Bill played football, and he wrestled during his 
first three years at Lehigh. In his junior and senior years. Bill was an Interfrater- 
nity council representative and belonged to the A.I.E.E. He has been married for 
four years. 

Hugh Roswell Davidson is an Engineering Physicist and a town student. From 
scanning his list of musical activities at Lehigh, we can guess that this avocation 
will turn into a vocation. Dave's composition, "Suite in C Aiinor" Avas performed 
by the Symphony orchestra this year. Dave was a member of the Newtonian 
society and a recipient of the Williams prize in English. 

Richard Stoliker Davis, Jr., a member of Sigma Chi fraternity, has majored 
in Business Administration after preparing at Blair academy. Stol was secretary 
of the Sportsman's club his sophomore year and has acted as associate editor, 
historian, and secretary of Sigma Chi. After graduation Stol plans to enter the 
merchandising field of the steel industry. 

Robert W. Dech, whose home is in Bethlehem, is a graduate of Liberty high 
school. Bob is a Business student and plans to study law after graduation. During 
his junior and senior years he was a member of Mustard and Cheese and follows 
art as a hobby. As for activities not connected with the University, Bob was a 
member of DeMolay and the Ride and Hunt club. 

Gene Michael De Giacomo from Port Chester, New York, is a Civil Engineer 
and a member of Town Section F. A freshman soccer player. Gene also made the 
Dean's list and participated in intramural sports. Gene expects to continue his 
work here next year under a research lab fellowship. His hobby is model building 
and he is doing a thesis on structural model analysis. 

David Robert Dehm is a transfer student having come to Lehigh last fall from 
the University of Michigan. While there he was a member of Alpha Sigma Phi 
social fraternity and participated in intramural athletics. Dave is a Mechanical 
Engineer and plans to enter engineering production after graduation. Dave's 
home town is Elyria, Ohio. He is a member of the Town group. 

276 



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1 








Warren Edwin Deifer, an Industrial Engineering student, comes from Allen- 
town and is a Kappa Sigma. "Meatball" is a member of Pi Tau Sigma, A.S.M.E. 
and the I.E. society. He was active four years in the Band and two years in the 
Lehigh-Allentown club. He was an assistant to Professor Luce the summer of 
his junior year. His hobby is raising fancy pigeons. 

Harry Grover Dennis, a Business Administration student, came to Lehigh from 
Bordentown Military Institute. Denny who lived in Drinker house was a member 
of the Glee club and the Symphony orchestra and competed for the baseball and 
fencing teams during his freshman year. He was active in the Bethlehem Hiking 
club and the Sportsman's club. His hobbies are skiing, hunting, and bridge. 

Jack Redding Dennis has lived in Taylor house while majoring in Electrical En- 
gineering. Jack has been a member of Lehigh's Band for four years as well as 
being a member of the Electrical Engineering society and a student member of 
the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. He was treasurer of his dormitory 
section during his junior year. 

August Descheemaeker from Hanover is a Chemical Engineer and a member of 
Theta Xi fraternity. Desch won freshman honors and was a member of the 
Newtonian society and Phi Eta Sigma. He was secretary and vice president of 
his fraternity and a member of the Interfraternity council. He is interested in 
model railroading and flying. 

Alton Paige Dieffenbach of DuLryea, Pa., was elected to Tau Beta Pi in his 
senior year as well as to the presidency of Town group C and the vice presidency 
of Eta Kappa Nu. He has been a member of the Symphony orchestra for three 
years. In addition to these societies, he was a member of the Newtonian society, 
the E.E. society, and Pi Mu Epsilon. 

Laurence Fred Dieringer, a Chemical Engineer from Dumont, N.J., lives in 
Richards house. During his sophomore and junior years, he was assistant mana- 
ger of baseball and became varsity manager in his senior year. He was a member 
of the Chemical society for four years and was also in the Brown Key society. 
Collecting stamps has been a special interest of Larry's. 

Richard Milton Dietz, a M.E., is a member of Tau Delta Phi fraternity, of 
which he was elected president in his sophomore year. During his first year, he 
won freshman honors, became president of Phi Eta Sigma, and went out for 
the swimming and tennis teams. "Hogan" made Tau Beta Pi in his junior year. 
He has been a cheer leader for the past two years. 

Robert Carl Dimmich graduated from Liberty high school and is a member of 
the I.E. society having joined his sophomore year. While a junior he became a 
member of Pi Tau Sigma and a student member of the A.S.M.E. During his sum- 
mer vacations, he clerked at the Bethlehem National bank. Bob plans to enter the 
field of maintenance after graduation. 

Leonard Albert Domlesky is the only senior member of the Civil Engineering 
curriculum majoring in Sanitary Engineering. He is a member of Section A, 
Taylor house. Lenny obtained his numerals in baseball and since then has made 
the varsity team every year. While a junior "Dommy" was athletic manager of 
his Town section. Minersville is his home town. 

279 



Howard Vane Donohoe, an Arts man majoring in Chemistry, is a member of 
Alpha Kappa Pi. Don has participated in intramural sports and was out for wres- 
tling his first two years. He belonged to the Chemical society for four years, was 
fraternity vice president and a member of the Intercollegiate Debating team. Next 
year he plans to work for a Chemical Engineering degree. 

Jerome Richard Dorkin originally started Lehigh with the Class of 1942, but by 
taking extra hours he will graduate on Founder's Day this year. Jerry is a pre-med 
in the Arts college and plans to continue his studies in medical school. "Dork" is 
vice president of Pi Lambda Phi fraternity and a member of Phi Eta Sigma, Cut 
and Thrust, and Alpha Epsilon Delta. 

Thomas Grebe Drustrup, who, by commuting from Upper Black Eddy, wUl 
have driven over 40,000 miles to and from school by the end of this semester, is a 
student in Chemical Engineering. "Dusty" has been a member of the Chemical 
society for four years and appeared on the Dean's list during his junior year. His 
principal hobby is stamp-collecting. 

James Joseph Duane, Jr., a member of Theta Kappa Phi fraternity, has majored 
in Business Administration. "Jogger" earned his numerals in football and baseball, 
and competed for basketball. He was a member of the Brown and White staff. In 
his senior year, he won his J.V. letter in football. He was executive secretary and 
president of his fraternity. 

WiLLARD Wilson Dunham, Jr., is a member of Beta Kappa fraternity and majored 
in Chemistry. "Red" prepared for college at the Woodbridge high school. Wood- 
bridge, N. J. His freshman year he played basketball, and when a junior he joined 
the Sportsman's club. "Red" has been a four-year member of the student Chem- 
ical society and has done organic research for two years. 

Frank Rothwell Dunn, Jr., prepared for Lehigh at Olney high school in Phila- 
delphia. Frank, who is a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, is a Chemical Engi- 
neer, and was a member of the Chemical society for four years. During his fresh- 
man year, "Roth" was on the freshman fencing team. Although not connected 
with Lehigh, the Order of the Arrow took some of Frank's time. 

Donald Eadie, an Electrical Engineer, has represented Lehigh as a member of the 
fencing team and belongs to Cut and Thrust, honorary fencing society. He resides 
at Price house and is a member of the Newtonian society, the student branch 
of the A.I.E.E., and the Army Ordnance association. Don did some cartoons for 
the Lehigh Bachelor in his senior year. 

Donald Eggleston Eastlake, Jr., is a student in the College of Business Admin- 
istration and a member of Phi Delta Theta. Don played freshman football and 
was on the varsity football squad during his junior and senior years. In these 
two years, he was also historian of his fraternity. Don is from Ridley Park, Pa. 
He intends to go in the army upon graduation. 

Charles Taylor Edwards, a transfer from Penn State college in his sophomore 
year, is a native of Bethlehem and graduated from Bethlehem high school. Charlie, 
a member of Delta Upsilon, was in the Metallurgical society for three years. He 
was in the Rifle club and won a varsity letter in wrestling in his junior year. He 
had previously won wrestling numerals at Penn State. 

280 



Leonard Harden Edwards, an Industrial Engineer who lives in Bethlehem, is 
president of the Fountain Hill High School Alumni association. He is also a former 
president of the Lutheran Student association, a member of the Industrial Engi- 
neering society, and a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 
His summers were spent working. 

Herbert Paul Elliott, Jr., is a Business student. He is treasurer of his fraternity, 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. In his freshman year Herb played football and baseball and 
was a basketball manager. He was on the track team for three years, was a junior 
editor of the Epitome, and was the treasurer of Cyanide. During vacations, he 
worked for the Sinclair Refining company. 

Robert Cassel Engle, an Industrial Engineer from Trenton, N.J., is a member 
of the Industrial Engineering society. "Bengle" was active in the Glee club, in 
Mustard and Cheese, and was a member of the Army Ordnance association. He 
was secretary of his fraternity, Pi Kappa Alpha, and edited the chapter paper 
during his senior year. 

Stevenson Monroe Enterhne, a Mechanical Engineering student, comes from 
Ashland, where he prepared at Wyoming Seminary before his entrance at Lehigh. 
Steve lived in Taylor house. He was a member of the American Society of Me- 
chanical Engineers as a junior and senior. He has been to surveying camp and to 
R.O.T.C. camp during his summers. 

WiLLL'iM Johnson Feigley's extra time has been mainly devoted to intramural 
athletics including football, baseball, and basketball. For two years he was 126 lb. 
interdormitory wrestling champion; he represented Taylor house. Bill's home is 
in Quakertown, and he will receive his degree in Chemical Engineering. He at- 
tended the R.O.T.C. camp at Aberdeen last summer. 

Robert Irving Fetch comes from Hyde Park, Mass. Bob is a member of Pi Kappa 
Alpha fraternity and is an Industrial Engineer. Since coming to school, he has 
been active in the Glee club. Rifle club, I.E. society, Alpha Phi Omega and Pi 
Tau Sigma. He also was chairman of the senior banquet committee and a mem- 
ber of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

John Reeve Findorff is a transfer student from the University of Wisconsin. 
"Swede" is a Business Administration student and a member of Delta Upsilon fra- 
ternity. During the summers he sailed through the Panama Canal and worked as 
a timekeeper. He was rushing chairman of his fraternity in his senior year. After 
graduation "Swede" plans to enter construction work. 

Robert Ernest Finn is a student in Industrial Engineering. He comes from Wyn- 
cote and is a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. He was out for wrestling 
for four years. Bob was historian of his living group in his junior year. He has 
spent his summers at surveying camp, at the Anthracite Industrial Stoker School, 
and working for the Bethlehem Steel company. 

John Charles Fisher, a student in the College of Business Administration, comes 
from Hammond, Indiana. Johnny, who is a member of the Delta Phi fraternity, 
was on the staff of the Lehigh Brown and White in his freshman year. He has 
also been active in the Radio club. Last year he attended the summer session of 
the University of Chicago. 

283 



William Francis Foley is a student in Business Administration and a member of 
Theta Kappa Phi fraternity. His home is in Bridgeport, Conn. He has been an In- 
terfraternity council representative both in his junior and senior years. Bill was 
rushing chairman of his fraternity as a sophomore and played junior varsity foot- 
ball in the same year. 

Nathan Thomas Folwell, a Business Administration student, comes from Allen- 
town and is a member of Delta Upsilon fraternity. He earned his "L" in swim- 
ming as a sophomore and has been on the team ever since. Nate is a member of 
Alpha Kappa Psi, and was secretary of the Lehigh-Allentown club as a junior. 
He taught life saving in his freshman year. 

Albert Canute Foss, Jr., E.E., hails from Ramsey, N.J. He carried away fresh- 
man honors in his first year at Lehigh and in the same period was active in the 
Newtonian society. Al also rated honors in his second year at school and was sec- 
retary-treasurer of the Radio club. He is a member of Eta Kappa Nu, Tau Beta 
Pi, the E.E. society and the A.I.E.E. He lived at Richards house. 

Philip Gray Foust, Jr., is a Chemical Engineer from Wilkes-Barre. Before at- 
tending Lehigh, he prepped at Wyoming Seminary. Phil won the freshman and 
sophomore mathematics prizes and was elected to the Newtonian society in his 
freshman year. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Phi Eta Sigma, and Pi Mu Epsilon, 
honorary mathematics society. His campus home was Drinker house. 

Vincent Alan Frantz came to Lehigh from Springfield Township high school 
in his home town. Pleasant Valley. Vince, a Mechanical Engineer, roomed in 
Bethlehem while attending Lehigh. During his junior and senior years, he was a 
member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has spent his sum- 
mers working at home and with the Bethlehem Steel company. 

William Rue Frederick, a student of Business Administration, is a member of 
the Chi Phi fraternity. Bill received his numerals in freshman football, competed 
for freshman wrestling, and received his varsity football letter in his junior year. 
He has spent the past three summers doing refinery construction work and in- 
tends to follow this field upon graduation. 

Roy Howard Fredrickson is an Electrical Engineer who comes from Hillside, 
N. J. Roy, when not selling automobiles or milk or repairing radios, was active 
in the Newtonian society, the Radio club. Eta Kappa Nu, and the Electrical En- 
gineering society. In his junior year Roy was vice president of Eta Kappa Nu and 
treasurer of Section B in Taylor house. 

Mervin James Fry, who is an Arts major, was active in the Band and the Orches- 
tra for four years. In his last two years he was the librarian for the Orchestra and 
was the Band's assistant student conductor and librarian in his senior year. A 
Bethlehem boy, he was also a member of the Bethlehem and Allentown bands, of 
the Lehigh Valley Symphony orchestra, and of Tone. 

William Earl Fry is an Industrial Engineer. He won his numerals in rifle and 
was out for track for two years. He is a member of the Industrial Engineering 
society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. In his sophomore year 
he participated in intramural wrestling. Bill is a member of Pi Kappa Alpha 
fraternity. 

284 



FiLMORE Oliver Frye, majoring in Business Administration, comes from Tower 
City. He has been active in advanced military work and will receive a Reserve 
Officer's commission upon graduation. Fil is a member of Alpha Kappa Psi, and the 
Archery club. He was active on the rifle team as a freshman. He was married to 
Miss Elsie Oliver in September, 1940. 

George Joseph Gabuzda, Jr., a student in Arts and Science, comes from Freeland. 
He lives in Town group E, and was elected to Arcadia as member-at-large. 
"Chic" has been president of his living group, vice president of Alpha Epsilon 
Delta, member of the R. W. Hall society and the Symphony orchestra. He won 
freshman and sophomore honors and was on the Dean's list two years. 

Michael Carmine Gallo, Jr., studying in Civil Engineering, comes from Net- 
cong, N. J. "Will" is a Theta Kappa Phi and was a member of the Band for three 
years. He took the C.A.A. flight course as a senior. He has done research in civil 
engineering by working on and studying a bridge model. He is a member of the 
Civil Engineering society. 

John Gantner is a student in the Business Administration curriculum. He comes 
from Nutley, N.J., where he attended Nutley high school before entering Lehigh. 
John, who was a resident of Richards house, has developed his hobby of drawing 
and painting while at school. He specializes in portraits and does water colors, 
oils, and charcoals. 

Richard Angle Garling, a member of the Town group, has majored in Chem- 
istry and comes from Shippensburg. He has been a member of the Band for two 
years and played on the freshman football squad. Dick was secretary-treasurer of 
his living group in his junior year. He waited tables in a local restaurant as a 
sophomore. He has definite plans for a career in chemistry. 

David Stichter Geissinger comes from Macungie. Dave is a Civil Engineer who 
transferred from Wyomissing Polytechnic Institute in September 1939. For two 
years he has been a member of the student chapter, American Society of Civil En- 
gineers. During his senior year, he was treasurer of that organization. After grad- 
uation, Dave plans to take up structural engineering. 

Claude Denis Gilchrist, an Industrial Engineering student, comes from Maple- 
wood, N.J. He lives in Town. Denny is vice president of Pi Tau Sigma, presi- 
dent of the I. E. society, and a member of Tau Beta Pi. He was a member of the 
freshman dance committee, secretary of the Newtonian society, and assistant 
wrestling manager as a freshman. 

Edward Michael Gilmore, Jr., from Altoona, Pennsylvania, is majoring in Chem- 
istry. He graduated from Altoona high school where he was a member of the na- 
tional honor society. Ed who lives in Price house on the campus has been very 
active in intramural sports during his four years at Lehigh. He was a member of 
the freshman football squad and lists bridge as his hobby. 

Frederick Richard Gilmore, a student in Arts and Science, comes from Blooms- 
burg. He lives in Taylor house and is president of the Combined Musical clubs. 
He is a member of Arcadia, O.D.K., Tone, R. W. Blake society, Student Con- 
certs-Lectures committee, and president of both Alpha Epsilon Delta and the 
R. W. Hall society. He is the ninth Gilmore to attend Lehigh in 38 years. 

287 



Louis George Gitzendanner entered Lehigh in 1936 as an E.E. but left school 
during the following year to work. "Gitzy," a Price hall tenant, earned freshman 
and sophomore honors and membership in the Newtonian society. He is a mem- 
ber of Pi Mu Epsilon and Eta Kappa Nu and has been secretary of the former 
and president of the latter. He was elected to Tau Beta Pi. 

Richardson Gray is a Alechanical Engineering major and member of Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. Dick was a Brown and White reporter his freshman year, and competed 
for the Epitome photographic staff the year after. He played in the Band his first 
two years and during his last two years was active in the Shop club. He belongs to 
the A.S.M.E. and the M.E. societies. 

Frank Joseph Gress is a pre-med student and a member of town section A. At the 
end of his sophomore year he transferred from Bloomsburg State Teachers' col- 
lege where he had been a member of the band and orchestra. Frank is a member 
of the R. W. Hall society and has been active in intramural sports. He worked 
for several years as an assistant lab technician in a Bloomsburg hospital. 

Henry Jacob Griesemer has lived in Taylor house and majored in Mechanical 
Engineering. Hank, who commuted for three years from AUentown, was awarded 
freshman honors, made the Newtonian society, and joined the Astronomical so- 
ciety his freshman year. As a sophomore he joined the A.S.M.E., and when a 
junior was elected to Pi Tau Sigma. 

George Leslie Griffith comes from Cranford, N.J., and is a Town man with 
a major in Mining Engineering. His freshman year "Grif" made the freshman 
fencing team, receiving his numerals, and joined the Fencing society. A member 
of the Mining and Geological society, he was treasurer of the group as a junior 
and president his senior year. 

Harvey Conrad Griffith, an Electrical Engineer, is a member of Phi Gamma 
Delta. "Griff" received his numerals for fencing, rifle, and track. He has been 
manager of soccer, and a member of the varsity fencing team for four years. He 
belongs to Cyanide, Cut and Thrust, and Brown Key society and is president of 
the fencing society. He was also chief clerk of the infirmary. 

William Vincent Groeger has been active in the rather unusual extra-curricular 
field of civic affairs while majoring in Business Administration. Bill, a Town resi- 
dent, has been associated with the Bethlehem Boys' club, the Community chest 
and the Lehigh Valley Safety council. A N.Y.A. worker, Bill is a member of 
Alpha Kappa Psi and the Cost Accountants' society. 

Stanley Grossman, student in the College of Arts and Science and letterman in 
football, has played that game for four years. "Grossy," who comes from Prov- 
idence, R.L, is president of Pi Lambda Phi fraternity. In his freshman year he 
participated in wrestling. Looking forward to becoming a textile salesman, Grossy 
has worked in a textile mill for the past four summers. 

William Dietrich Gruber, whose home town is Bethlehem, is a Business Ad- 
ministration student. A member of the Chemical society his freshman year and 
the Industrial Engineering society while a sophomore. Bill has joined the Sports- 
man's club and the Bethlehem Fish, Forestry and Game association. He spent 
his summers working and has built several model engines while in school. 

288 



RoLLA Harry Gunnison, an Art student, is a member of Delta Tau Delta. 
"Gunny" has been a member, actor, publicity director, and president of Mustard 
and Cheese. Besides winning his numerals in baseball, he has been a member of the 
Band and the Symphony orchestra. Harry was a member of Cyanide, Arcadia, 
and the Brown Key society as well as manager of lacrosse. 

Clarence Winton Hackney, Mechanical Engineer, comes from Pleasantville, 
N.J., and is a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon. He won his numerals as a freshman 
on the golf team and has served on his fraternity's house committee. "Hack" 
worked last summer at a ferro-manganese blast furnace, and has made a special 
study at Lehigh of pressure in engine cylinders. 

John Howard Hageny, Arts, came to Lehigh from Jersey City. Jack is a Beta 
Kappa and in his junior year represented that house on the Interfraternity council. 
He has been a member of the Sportsman's club and the International Relations 
club. During his freshman year. Jack was a member of the debating club. He lists 
reading as his favorite hobby. 

Robert R. Halligan, an Electrical Engineer from West Orange, N.J., lives in 
Taylor house. "Robin" has been an active member of the Radio club and of the 
E.E. society for four years. He has been a delegate to the Interdormitory council 
and president of his living group as a senior. He was also active in intramural 
sports. 

John Frederic Hamblin, Jr., Arts, is president of the International Relations 
club of which he has been a member for four years; recording secretary of Eta 
Sigma Phi, vice president of the Middle Atlantic International Relations Club 
Conference, and deputy secretary-general of the A4odel League of Nations of 
Lehigh. "Jake" served as treasurer of Leonard Hall during his junior year. 

Fletcher Hanks, Jr., Bus., a Sigma Phi, has competed in soccer, track, and 
wrestling. In his freshman year he was a member of the Newtonian society and 
this year was the promotion manager of the Lehigh Bachelor. Fletcher's hobby is 
flying and he has received a restricted commercial license and is a member of the 
National Aeronautic Association. 

Carl Hartdegen, III, of Maplewood, N.J., is a Mining Engineer. "Timer," as he 
has been nicknamed, lives in Taylor house. He has been active in fencing, lacrosse, 
and intramural athletics, and has been a member of Cut and Thrust, the Band, 
the Mining and Geological society, and the A.S.M.E. He worked last summer 
in the Bethlehem Steel company. 

William Francis Hartnett, a student in the College of Business Administra- 
tion, is a member of Beta Theta Pi and a transfer from Purdue where he was 
registered for his freshman year. In his junior year at Lehigh, he played varsity 
golf, continuing the sport into his senior year. He is vice president of his fra- 
ternity. 

William Foley Hauserman is a member of Phi Gamma Delta and an Industrial 
Engineer. As a freshman he won his football numerals, and became a member of 
the I.E. society. "Baron" was awarded his varsity football letter as a sophomore 
and this year was captain of the team and a most outstanding player. He is also 
corresponding secretary of his fraternity. 

291 



Edward Daniel Heins, a Mechanical Engineer, hails from Philadelphia. Ed's fine 
academic record is evidenced by his membership in the Newtonian society, Phi 
Eta Sigma, Pi Mu Epsilon, Pi Tau Sigma, and Tau Beta Pi as well as his achieve- 
ment of scholastic honors in his first two years. Ed plays with the Lehigh Col- 
legians and is a member of the Lehigh Band. 

James Ralston Hendry, a Business Administration student, is a member of Alpha 
Tau Omega. "Wahoo" has wrestled junior varsity and won first place in inter- 
fraternity wrestling his senior year. He was a member of Scabbard and Blade, 
vice president of Alpha Kappa Psi, and treasurer of A.T.O. He has also been 
active in golf and photography. 

CLAtiDE Elias Hensinger, a graduate of Allentown high school, has studied Me- 
chanical Engineering at Lehigh. A commuter, Claude has been an active member 
of the Lehigh-Allentown club for four years. He has also been a member of the 
Newtonian society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Claude 
has done contractor's work during the past three summers. 

Edgar Herbert, Jr., attended Slatington high school before entering Lehigh. He 
commuted to Lehigh from Orefield, Pennsylvania, and was a member of the Allen- 
town living group. Ed has spent his summers driving trucks and working for the 
Bethlehem Steel company. A Civil Engineer, Ed is interested in music, boxing and 
tennis. 

Frank Vernooy Hertzog graduated from Bethlehem high school before he came 
to Lehigh as a pre-med student. A member of Theta Xi fraternity, Frank has re- 
ceived scholastic honors in each year. He has been president of the Robert W. 
Blake Society, and a member of the Robert W. Hall society. Alpha Delta Epsilon, 
and Tone. Hiking is Frank's hobby. 

Albert Wesley Hess is a Metallurgical Engineer from Scranton and a member 
of Alpha Chi Rho fraternity. Al won his swimming letter in his sophomore year 
and has followed the sport since then. In his freshman year Al went out for foot- 
ball and wrote for the Brown and White. Al's favorite recreation is hunting or 
fishing and he has been active in scouting. 

Edwin Warren Hine, II, an Electrical Engineer, prepared for Lehigh at Tabor 
academy. "Bigby," who comes from Short Hills, N.J., was president of Psi Upsi- 
lon and a member of the Band and the Mustard and Cheese club. He plans to be- 
come an aeronautical engineer for the U.S. army and later to continue this type 
of work in civilian life. His hobby is model building. 

William Kenneth Hodson hails from Flushing, N.Y. He is a member of Pi Tau 
Sigma and has been associated with the Industrial Engineering society. A mem- 
ber of Scabbard and Blade and the Army Ordnance Association, Bill is the vice 
president of his Town section. He graduated from George Washington high 
school in New York city. 

Robert August Hofstetter came to Lehigh from Westfield high school in New 
Jersey. Bob is in the Business college and lives in Taylor house. For the last four 
years he has played the French horn in the University Band and the Orchestra. 
As a junior he was secretary-treasurer of his Town group. He plans to enter re- 
tailing upon graduation. 

292 , 



Walter Stephen Holmes, Jr., came to Lehigh from Philadelphia. Walt is a Busi- 
ness student and lived in the Town group. He completed his course at Lehigh in 
three years' actual attendance by attending summer school at Penn and Syracuse, 
and night school at Temple. He was a freshman baseball manager, a fencer, and a 
Brown and White reporter. 

John Merrill Hood, an Industrial Engineer, prepared for college at California 
Prep in Corina, Calif. Hood has been social chairman and president of his frater- 
nity. Alpha Kappa Pi; on Interfraternity council; and a member of the Interna- 
tional Relations club, the I.E.-M.E. society, and the A.S.M.E. He has participated 
in intercollegiate swimming. 

Henry Joseph Horn is an Electrical Engineer from Ashland, Pa. He is a member 
of Town section C. During his freshman and sophomore years he played on the 
University Band, and in his junior and senior years became a member of the Elec- 
trical Engineering society, and the Radio club. His ambition is to enter the com- 
munications field. 

Philip Roberts Hornbrook, Jr., a Business Administration student, comes from 
Allentown where he attended Allentown high school. "Horny" is a member of Phi 
Delta Theta and vice president of that fraternity. He won his numerals for fresh- 
man football and is a representative on the Interfraternity council. Horny spent 
two summers in summer school and worked at Bethlehem Steel for one. 

George Houck, Jr., of Scranton, is a member of the College of Arts and Science. 
He received sophomore honors, and last summer obtained the rank of captain in 
R.O.T.C. camp. George intends to study law at the University of Pennsylvania. 
Previous to entering Lehigh, he prepared at the Blair academy in Blairstown, N.J. 

Frederick Henry Housel, an Electrical Engineer of Audubon, N.J., was a mem- 
ber of the Newtonian society, vice president of the Radio club, and president of 
the E.E. society. He became the corresponding secretary of Eta Kappa Nu this 
past year, and was elected to Pi Mu Epsilon in his sophomore year. Fred is also a 
member of Tau Beta Pi. 

George William Howland, Jr., of Rumson, N.J., is a Civil Engineer and a mem- 
ber of Theta Kappa Phi. Bill became a member of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers in his freshman year, and financial secretary of his fraternity during 
his sophomore year. For three summers, he spent his vacation on construction 
work. 

Thomas Reed Hunt, a member of the Arts college, plans on graduate work at 
the Harvard law school, and then a career as a lawyer, after his graduation. Three 
years of intramural debating, golf and riflery have been some of his activities at 
school. President of both Phi Alpha Theta and Sigma Chi, he has won a Williams 
prize in English. 

Raymond Chester Huntoon, a student of Business Administration, comes from 
Scranton, and is a member of Alpha Chi Rho. "Frenchie" earned his varsity letter 
as manager of freshman football, gained his numerals in the same way, and won 
membership in the Brown Key society. He has been steward at his fraternity this 
year. 

295 



Alver Homer Ives, a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon, is a Mechanical Engineer. 
Hfe was a member of the fencing team for four years, and captain of the fresh- 
man team. He was a member of Cut and Thrust during his last three years, and 
joined the A.S.M.E. as a junior. This year he is a member of the art board of the 
Lehigh Bachelor. 

Joseph Harry Jacoby, a Business Administration major, prepared for Lehigh at 
Harrisburg academy. Jake, whose hobby is saihng boats, is a Sigma Chi. He is a 
member of the Sportsman's club and was treasurer during his sophomore year. 
Jake has spent his summers working, going to summer school and to the R.O.T.C. 
camp at Ft. Meade. 

CovEL Thurber Jerauld, a Mechanical Engineer, has been active in intramural 
athletics. As a freshman he won numerals in swimming. Jerry has been a member 
of the Glee club for two years, and was section treasurer of Taylor E in his 
junior year. He was a member of the Mechanical Engineering society for two 
years, and joined the A.S.M.E. in his senior year. 

Robert Andrew Johler, a Mechanical Engineer, transferred from Scranton 
Keystone Junior college at the beginning of his junior year. While there he won 
letters in basketball and tennis, and was a member of the Student council. He 
was also secretary of the Engineers' society. Since coming to Lehigh, he has been 
a member of the A.S.M.E., and has played intramural sports. 

Charles Henry Johnson, a C.E., transferred to Lehigh from Scranton Keystone 
Junior college. At that school, "Joe" captained the wrestling team, was president 
of the Varsity club, and vice president of the Student council. He won the 1 3 5-lb. 
class title in intramural wrestling in his junior year at Lehigh. Cabinetmaking is 
his hobby. 

Richard Barney Johnson is an Arts student and lives in Drinker house. He has 
been a member of the program in general education for four years, and was on 
the Dean's list for three semesters. Dick has been a member of the Robert W. 
Blake society for two years, and as a senior he was a member of Phi Alpha Theta 
historical society. 

Ralph Barkley Johnston, a member of Delta Phi, is from Wilmington, Del. In 
his freshman year "Bark" was manager of the tennis team and a member of the 
Chemical society. He was elected secretary of his fraternity the next year and in 
his junior year became a member both of the Interfraternity council and the 
Rugby club. As a senior, he was president of Delta Phi. 

Harry Furlong Jones comes from Scranton, where he attended the Central high 
school. Jonesy, a student of Business Administration, has lived in Section 3A 
Richards house. While at school he has been active in the Glee club for four years 
and has been a member of the Double Quartet during his junior and senior years. 
His hobby is golf. 

Charles Frederic Kalmbach, a Sigma Nu, has studied Mechanical Engineering. 
Chuck has been the Brown and White's editor-in-chief, won numerals and a 
letter in soccer, and was a member of Tau Beta Pi, O.D.K., Pi Delta Epsilon, 
Cyanide, Arcadia, Scabbard and Blade, Pi Mu Epsilon, Phi Eta Sigma, and the 
Newtonian society. He was also a Wilbur scholarship winner, and an Epitome 
junior editor. 

296 



Marvin Daniel Kantrowitz, a member of Sigma Alpha Mu, is from New York 
City. "Gish" is a Business student. As a sophomore he was Middle Atlantic Inter- 
collegiate tennis champion, and a member of the tennis team. He continued as 
"champ" in his junior year and was elected junior representative to the Inter- 
fraternity council from his house. He is captain of the 1941 tennis team. 

Morton Fischel Kaplon has majored in Engineering Physics. Mort has been a 
resident of Richards house, where he participated in intramural sports. He has 
been a member of the Physics society for three years, was elected to the New- 
tonian society, competed for a position on the Junior Varsity football team, and 
belonged to the Sportsman's club. 

Anthony Michael Karwacki, a Mining Engineering major, is a Town resident. 
He has been a member of the Glee club for the past three years, and joined the 
Mining and Geological society his sophomore year. An advanced R.O.T.C. stu- 
dent, Tonv was elected to Scabbard and Blade as a junior, in which year he also 
joined the' student A.I.M.E. and the Army Ordnance association. 

Joseph Kaszycki, who comes from the state of Washington, is a major in Electri- 
cal Engineering and a Town man. "Ski," or "Poopdeck Pappy," has played foot- 
ball for three years, and is a member of the E.E. society. He served as an enlisted 
man in the Navy before entering school, and is a transfer student from the U.S. 
Naval Academy. 

John Augustus Kaufmann, an Arts major in history, is a Richards house resi- 
dent. Johnny is a charter member of the Alpha Alpha chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, 
national honorary history fraternity. Besides receiving freshman and sophomore 
honors, he made the Dean's list his junior year. Johnny spent his summer vaca- 
tions working. 

Joseph Francis Keating, a graduate of Bethlehem Catholic high school, is a 
student in the College of Business Administration. "Bus," as he is called, won his 
freshman numerals in basketball. He has helped earn his college expenses by wait- 
ing on tables in a restaurant during his four years at Lehigh, and has spent his 
summers working. 

William Edwin Keiser is a Town resident and a Chemistry student. Bill has been 
a member of the Chemical society for four years, and participated in intramural 
debating during the first three. Elected to Delta Omicron Theta, debating society, 
as a freshman, he joined the Chess club as a junior. Bill did research work last 
summer in organic chemistry. 

Aldrich Frederick Kendall transferred from Washington and Jefferson in 1938, 
where he participated in boxing and swimming. An Arts student and a Lambda 
Chi Alpha, Al joined the Chemical society as a sophomore and the R. W. Hall 
pre-med society as a junior. He has worked during the summers in a chemical 
plant and an advertising agency, and plans medicine as his vocation. 

Wallace Crane Kendall, a Metallurgical Engineer, is a member of Beta Kappa. 
Wally was circulation manager of the Brown a?td White and the Lehigh Review, 
member of Pi Delta Epsilon, Interfraternity council. Glee club, and the Sports- 
man's club, and secretary of the Metallurgical society. Wally's home town is 
Summit, New Jersey. 

299 



Charles Raymond Kiefer, Jr., from Easton, roomed in town while attending 
Lehigh. A pre-med student, Ray was a member of the R. W. Hall society, Alpha 
Epsilon Delta, the R. W. Blake society, and Arcadia and president of his town 
section. He belonged to the debating team as well as the band and symphony 
orchestra. Ray was a member of the General Education Program. 

Harold King, a student in the Arts college, plans to enter the ministry upon 
graduation from Lehigh. He has spent his summers doing church mission work. 
He was a member of the International Relations club, the R. W. Blake society, 
Eta Sigma Phi, and the Glee club. Hal lived in Leonard hall and was president 
during his senior year. 

Richard Leslie Kirk has studied Chemical Engineering while living at Beta Kappa 
fraternity. Dick won the R. W. Blake prize in general education in his first year. 
He has played with the Lehigh Collegians during the past two years and has been 
a member of the Chemical society. Dick has done extensive research under Dr. 
Thomas. 

Edward Arthur Kister transferred to Lehigh from Middlebury college at the 
end of his freshman year. Ed is a resident of Brooklyn and was graduated from the 
James Madison high school in that city. He has been treasurer and house manager 
of the Delta Upsilon fraternity, and was awarded a varsity "L" in baseball. A civil 
engineer, Ed is interested in structural work. 

Donald John Kline, from Catasauqua, came here upon graduating from North- 
ampton high school. Don earned his freshman numerals by competing for the 
freshman rifle team. He is a student in the Arts college and has spent his summers 
as a drug store clerk. While in college Don pursued his hobby of golf. He is a 
member of the Allentown group. 

Frederick Schlosman Klopp is a Chemical Engineer from Shillington. Fritz 
has been interested in sports throughout his four years. In his freshman year 
he was a member of the freshman football team and since then he has competed 
for the tennis team. Intramural baseball, football, and basketball have kept him 
busy. This year he was president of his dormitory section. 

Thomas Joseph Kochuba prepared at Wyoming Seminary in Kingston, before 
coming to Lehigh to study Chemistry. Tommy, a resident of Wilkes-Barre, lived 
in Richards house. He is a member of the Symphony orchestra, the Glee club, 
and Tone. In his senior year he was student leader and concert master of sym- 
phony. Tom has also composed music as a hobby. 

Arnold Jerome Koller, who transferred from Muhlenberg at the beginning of 
his sophomore year, was active in basketball, debating, and publications at the 
Allentown school. Arnold was on the Dean's list for two years and held a scholar- 
ship during his last year. He spent the past two summers in the employ of the 
Bethelhem Recreation department. 

Seymour Howard Kott attended DeWitt Clinton high school in New York 
City. His fellow Tau Delta Phi's know him best as "Zeke." A Business student, he 
won freshman honors and has been treasurer of his living group. He has spent 
two summers traveling through Europe and South America. Music, art, and 
philosophy are Zeke's deepest interests. 

300 



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Francis Andrew Kotulak, a Mechanical Engineer, comes from Nanticoke. He 
lives in Town group A. Fran has played freshman and varsity football for four 
years, earning numerals and letter. He is a member of Pi Tau Sigma and a student 
member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has waited tables 
and done N.Y.A. work to earn a large portion of his expenses. 

Stephen Kowalyshyn, Jr., an Electrical Engineering student, is a commuter from 
Northampton. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, Delta Omicron 
Theta, the R. W. Blake society, and the E.E. society. He won the R.O.T.C. medal 
as a sophomore, and the WilHams prize in English composition in his junior year. 
He won freshman and sophomore honors. 

Frederick Franklin Kramer, III, a student in Business Administration, comes 
and commutes from Allentown. "Fritz" is a member of Alpha Chi Rho fraternity 
and secretary of that group. He has been active in junior varsity football, soccer, 
and wrestling, having won the ii8 lb. interfraternity wrestling championship as 
a freshman. He plans to work with an aviation concern. 

Edward William Kraus, a Mechanical Engineering student from Maplewood, 
N.J., is a member of Theta Kappa Phi fraternity. Ed is a member of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the Mechanical Engineering society. He 
was active in the Industrial Engineering society and took part in freshman tennis. 
His summers were occupied in working. 

John Joseph Kuczynski, a student of Business Administration, worked in Drown 
hall cafeteria for his meals and did N.Y.A. work in his spare time. He earned a 
free scholarship for his senior year. He did research in accounting and expects 
to continue work to be a C.P.A. John won his numerals in freshman football. 
Reading is his chief hobby. 

Robert Willis Leavens is a Business Administration student and comes from 
Rochester, N.Y. He is a member of Theta Delta Chi fraternity and has been its 
Interfraternity council representative for two years. He competed for soccer, 
track, and Mustard and Cheese as a freshman. He also competed for an Epitome 
junior editorship, and has taken part in intramural debating. 

Albert E\trett Lee, Jr., a Chemical Engineer, was president of his class for two 
years, president of Tau Beta Pi, president of Arcadia, president of his living 
group, a varsity wrestler, and a member of O.D.K., Phi Eta Sigma, Pi Mu Epsilon, 
and Cyanide. He comes from Moorestown, N.J., and lives in Drinker house. 
He won freshman and sophomore honors. 

William Haller Lehr comes from Elkins Park, and is majoring in Mechanical 
Engineering. He is a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. "Lew" earned his 
numerals and letter in wrestling, where he has seen varsity action for three years. 
He is a member of Pi Tau Sigma and was on his class banquet committee as a 
junior. Photography is his chief hobby. 

Otto Gay Leichliter, of Pittsburgh, Pa., is a Metallurgical Engineer. He has been 
a member of the Radio club for four years. In his freshman year he was sound 
technician in Mustard and Cheese's "Knights in Armoiu:," and was on the fresh- 
man rifle team. He is photography editor of the Brown and White, the Bachelor, 
and was a member of the Aero club. 



John Donald Leighton, who comes from Cranbrook school, Bloomfield Hills, 
Michigan, is a student in the college of Business Administration and a Kappa 
Sigma member. "Red Dog," as he is styled, participated in competition for J.V. 
football and basketball his sophomore year, and for basketball as a junior. He 
spent his summer vacations working. 

George Leroy, a Business student, has lived in Richards house. "Red" spent his 
freshman year at Northeastern University, in Boston; since coming here he has 
been on the business staff of the Broivn and White, becoming copy supervisor and 
local advertising manager his senior year. He was treasurer of his dormitory sec- 
tion his junior year. Red worked two summers. 

Thomas Jenkins Lewis, Jr., a student in the Business Administration college, is 
a resident of Price house. Tom competed for the business staff of Mustard and 
Cheese in his freshman and junior years. In his sophomore year he was initiated 
into Alpha Phi Omega and was elected treasurer and historian. Tom was a 
charter member of Lambda Mu Sigma, the Lehigh marketing society. 

Valentine Lichtenstein, Jr., comes from Lincoln high school, Jersey City, and 
has majored in Mechanical Engineering. Val is a member of the American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers, and has done research in motor fuels while at Lehigh. 
Active in the Young Republican club, he spent his last summer working. He is 
interested in short-wave radio. 

WiLLARD Andrew Litzenberger, Arts, is a native of Bethlehem. He is a Theta 
Xi, a member of Scabbard and Blade, manager of the combined musical clubs, 
vice president of the R. W. Hall society and Alpha Epsilon Delta, chairman of 
the last military ball, and a member of Tone, R. W. Blake society, rifle team, and 
the Dramatics club. He is also chairman of class day. 

Harold Zelophehad Llewellyn, M.E., has been a member of the Mechanical 
Engineering society for four years. A participant in intramural sports since his 
freshman year, he was athletic manager of Town group section C during his 
junior year. Lou engaged in freshman track competition and is a member of the 
Camera club and the Machine Shop club. 

Emery Wight Loomis, Jr., from Lansdowne, is a major in Business and a mem- 
ber of Sigma Nu fraternity. Bill won numerals and letters in football and baseball 
and was captain of the latter team in his senior year. He was elected to Cyanide 
and Alpha Kappa Psi. Bill spent his summers playing baseball and doing road 
work; last year he attended army camp. 

John Freeman Loose, an Industrial Engineer, played football his freshman year, 
as well as intramural basketball and baseball. A resident of Taylor house, Johnny 
joined the Industrial Engineering society when a sophomore, and became a 
Camera club member his senior year. He was athletic director of his dormitory 
section for two years, treasurer for one. 

Robert Jacob Loose is a dormitory student living in Taylor house, and is an 
Industrial Engineer. Bob comes from West Orange high school in New Jersey. 
He competed for freshman basketball and baseball. He has been in the Industrial 
Engineering society for two years, and was on the varsity basketball squad his 
junior and senior years. 

304 



George Elmer Lowe, Jr., of Kingston, N.Y., is a Chemical Engineer living in 
town. During his freshman year George was a member of the Glee club, and 
during the last three years he belonged to the student Chemical society. In the 
summer vacation of his senior year, George worked for the Apollo Magneto 
corporation. 

Stephen Tener Lowhy, a Civil Engineer, lived in Drinker house the past year. 
Steve was engaged in both intramural and intercollegiate debating for four years, 
and in his freshman year he won a Williams prize for debating. He was president 
of his dormitory section and of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He was 
for two semesters on the Dean's list. 

Howard George Luley, a Civil Engineer, was for three years a member of the 
American Society^ of Civil Engineers, of which he was student vice president 
in his senior year. Last summer "Bottle" worked in the research laboratory of 
the Aluminum Company of America. He is a member of Theta Xi fraternity, and 
has played in the band. 

Andrew Philetus Luse, a student in Business and a Lambda Chi Alpha, was a 
member of the band and debating team in his freshman year. He managed sopho- 
more swimming and wrestled in the interfraternity tournament "Pappy" was 
president of his fraternitv' and a member of the summer dance committee. He 
worked for two summers with an insurance company. 

George Rufus Lutz, Jr., a Mechanical Engineer and resident of Taylor house, 
section B, has taken part in intramural sports for four years. He has been athletic 
manager for his dormitory section during that time. For his efforts in these sports, 
"Dutchy" received four championship medals. He is from Reading, Pa. 

Stanley Gulick Macnamee, a graduate of the Hun school and student in the 
college of Business Administration, is vice president of Delta Tau Delta. In his 
freshman year Stan participated in baseball, intramural baseball, basketball and 
football. He competed for the junior managership of football. Stan is from Prince- 
ton, N.J. 

Stephen Gabriel Maco is a Metallurgical Engineer and a resident of Bethlehem. 
He joined the Metallurgical society, and has been a member for three years, as 
well as joining the American Societ)' for Metallurgical Engineers. He played in- 
tramural football, and is a member of the Sportsman's club. Steve plans to enter 
the steel industry. 

Edwin Sitgreaves Malloy prepared for Lehigh at the Admiral Farragut academy 
in Toms River, N.J. He is a member of Psi Upsilon, and a Mechanical Engineer. 
Ed belongs to the Mechanical Engineering society, Pi Tau Sigma, and A.S.M.E. 
During the summer of 1939 he worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture; 
last summer, for Ingersoll-Rand. 

Keron Martin Manion from Clifton, N.J., is a Chemical Engineer and a member 
of Theta Kappa Phi. Keron became a member of the Newtonian society in his 
freshman year and enrolled in the extra-curricular reading course. He joined the 
Camera club as a sophomore. Last summer he worked for the American Viscose 
company. 

307 



Theodore Miller AIantis, I.E., a resident of Taylor house, has been interested 
in football— freshman, junior varsity, and intramural. He has also engaged in 
intramural wrestling. Theo has waited on tables and has performed clerical work 
while at school. The summers of 1938 and 1939 he spent as the driver of a pastry 
truck and last summer he worked as a bookkeeper. 

Brookman Jack March came to Lehigh from Shillington, Pa. He lives in Taylor 
house and is a student in the Chemical Engineering curriculum. Jack is a member 
of the Chemical society, took part in intramural sports, and in freshman and 
junior varsity football. He spent two summers in the color laboratory of a paint 
manufacturer. In his spare time Jack works on radios. 

Seymour Margolis plans definitely to begin a career in advertising after finishing 
his study of Business Administration. Si was once secretary of Pi Lambda Phi 
and is now its treasurer. He has had roles in two Mustard and Cheese productions 
and has had experience in intramural debating, freshman baseball, and freshman 
basketball. 

Edwin M. Markel, whose home is in Conshohocken, attended high school at 
Friends' Central in Philadelphia. Ed is a Business man and hopes to enter business 
with his father upon graduation. While at Lehigh he lived in Richards house, was 
a member of the International Relations club, and pursued his hobby of amateur 
photography. 

Richard Oliver Marsten has found time to be active in four music groups in 
addition to studying Mining Engineering. Dick has been a member of the Glee 
club, orchestra, and band for four years, and has been a member of Tone since his 
sophomore year. Dick plays in the AUentown band during the winter seasons 
and is also active in course societies. 

Donald Sherwood Martin spent three of his four college years here at Lehigh, 
having attended Lebanon Valley during his junior year, then returning to gradu- 
ate. He is a Business student and a member of Phi Gamma Delta social fraternity. 
He has been particularly active in basketball, playing in all of his college years, 
and has also pursued his hobby of hunting. 

James Arthur Marvin, Jr., Met. E., is president of Kappa Alpha. A letterman 
in tennis, he has engaged in that sport for four years. Art has been a member of 
the Metallurgical society for three years and he was a junior cheer-leader during 
his third year. Membership in Tone is evidence of his interest in music. His 
summers have been spent in working or in traveling. 

William Angus Matheson, Jr., a Business student, comes from New York City, 
and is a Chi Phi. "Muscles" has been costume manager for Mustard and Cheese 
during the past two years. He was the secretary of his hving group for three 
years, and a member of the International Relations club. Last summer he was 
a salesman at the New York World's Fair. 

John Hards Mathewson is a member of Alpha Chi Rho, of which he was presi- 
dent his senior year. "Matty," a Chemical Engineer, belongs to Mustard and 
Cheese, Omicron Delta Kappa, Pi Delta Epsilon, the Army Ordnance association, 
and Interfraternity council. He was business manager of the Brown and White 
last year and interfraternity sports manager. 

308 



William Bruce McConnell, from Mount Lebanon, has been studying Business 
Administration, and is a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He earned his 
numerals as freshman basketball manager and this year was varsity football man- 
ager. Mac, who was active in dramatics, \\as treasurer of his fraternit}* and sec- 
retar^'-treasu^e^ of the Brown Key society. 

W1LLLA..M Saxdborx McConxer, an Industrial Engineer, lives and attended high 
school in Pittsburgh. While at Lehigh Bill lived at Drinker house, and during his 
senior year he was president of Drinker house and one of the section heads. For 
three years Bill was a member of the Industrial Engineering society. In his last 
year he ser\'ed as the chairman of the senior ball committee. 

WiLLL\M Pershixg McElroy is a student in the College of Business Administra- 
tion and a member of the Theta Kappa Phi fraternity. Pat is married and has 
a son, bom last October. He won numerals in baseball and football and has 
played r\vo years of J.V. football. He is interested in dramatics and has partici- 
pated in interfraterniu' sports. Pat is going into accounting work. 

James Gates McGixxis is a Civil Engineer and is vice president of his social 
fratemit}-, Theta Xi. jMac prepared at Peddie school; his home is in Bridgeton, 
N.J. He was a member of the freshman baseball and soccer squads and is now 
president of the student chapter of the A.S.C.E. .Mac's hobby is photography. He 
has done work in aerial photography during the summer. 

Leox.'Uuj Johx McKixxey comes from Mount Vernon, N.Y., where he attended 
A. B. Davis high school. He is a Chemical Engineer. Mac is a member of Phi 
Sigma Kappa. He wzs a freshman honor student and a member of Phi Eta Sigma, 
Ne^\^:onian socieu", the student Chemical sociers', the Army Ordnance associa- 
tion, and the sophomore and junior Class Banquet committees. 

Roger James xMcN.amar.\, an Industrial Engineer, lives right next to Lehigh 
University on Warren square. "Rog" has been active in Scabbard and Blade and 
the Army Ordnance association during the past two years, and is a member of the- 
student chapter of the A.S.M.E. He has spent his summers at sur^^eying camp, 
R.O.T.C. camp, and summer school. 

Arthlti Ruxyox Melick will graduate as an Industrial Engineer. Living in Al- 
lentown. Art has commuted back and forth to school. He has not only done con- 
siderable N.Y.A. work while at school, but has also worked during his summer 
vacations for various construction companies, including the Mack Manufacturing 
company and Lehigh Structural Steel Co. 

George Franklen Messinger, kno^\-n to his acquaintances as Sut, is a Mechanical 
Engineer whose home is in Tatamv. At Lehigh he lived in Price house and was a 
member of the Newtonian society, Alpha Phi Omega, the Army Ordnance as- 
sociation, and the A.S.M.E. Sut's hobby is aviation, in connection with which 
he took the C.A.A. flight theory- course. 

John Daxiel Mettler, Jr., has obtained scholastic honors at Lehigh every' year 
for four years despite the fact that he worked four years before entering as a 
Chemical Engineer. Among the honoraries of which he is or has been a member 
are the Ne\\T:onian society. Phi Eta Sigma, Pi Mu Epsilon, and Tau Beta Pi. Jack 
has also obtained the Chandler chemistry award for two years. 

3" 



Raymond Chester Miller, a student in the College of Business Administration, 
is a member of the Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity. Ray is a New Yorker and came 
to Lehigh from the Columbia Grammar school. In his first two years he was one 
of the assistant swimming managers and is at present house treasurer of his fra- 
ternity. Ray intends to go into shoe manufacturing after graduation. 

Robert Donald Miller is a resident of Upper Darby, Pa. He has majored in 
Chemical Engineering and is a member of the Town group. Bob has been a mem- 
ber of the student Chemical society for four years. He has also made some in- 
vestigations on oils in his extra time. A member of the advanced R.O.T.C., Bob 
plans to enter the technical development work in the oil industry. 

Warren Hasbrouck Miller, Bus., of Bogota, N.J., is a member of the Lambda 
Chi Alpha fraternity. He has been treasurer of that organization for three of his 
four years at Lehigh. "Heinie" won his numerals in freshman basketball and also 
played on the J.V. squad of that sport in his sophomore years. He was one of 
the members of the C.A.A. group and plans to go into accounting. 

Robert Francis Mincemoyer is headed for a civil service position in psychology 
after graduating in June. Mince, who is a student in the Arts college, is a resident 
of South Williamsport, Pa. His Lehigh residence has been in Drinker house. Dur- 
ing his senior year. Mince supervised the athletic activities of his dormitory sec- 
tion. He spent last summer at the Bucknell summer school. 

James Mitchell is a Metallurgical Engineer and a member of the Town group. 
During his stay at Lehigh, Jim was a member of the Physics society for one 
year and was president of the Metallurgical society. After graduation from 
Bethlehem high school, Jim spent two years on the U.S.S. Annapolis and worked 
for two years as an engineer on the ships of the United Fruit company. 

Luther Albert Mohr, Met. E., was president of the class during his freshman 
year. He has been a member of the Metallurgical society for four years and this 
year was president of Taylor house, section A. His money-making activities were 
collectively a cleaning and pressing agency and a milk route. Lou prepared for 
Lehigh at the U.S. Naval Academy preparatory school. 

Robert Eugene Montbach has attended Lehigh as a commuter, going back and 
forth from Hellertown. Mai studied Metallurgical Engineering. He received 
swimming numerals, breaking two records as a freshman, and made the varsity in 
his sophomore year. On the elections committee, he was also a Cyanide member 
and an officer in the advanced military course. 

Arthur Edward Moog, a student of Industrial Engineering and a member of 
Kappa Sigma, is secretary of his fraternity, a member of the Industrial Engineer- 
ing society and of the A.S.M.E. Art transferred from the University of North 
Carolina, where he participated in track and cross-country. He played lacrosse 
here in his sophomore year. 

William Howard Morse is a student in the Mechanical Engineering school. 
Bill took both freshman and sophomore honors and was a member of the New- 
tonian society. He is a dormitory man and has received the honors of Pi Tau 
Sigma and Tau Beta Pi. He has been a member of the student A.S.M.E. and has 
been the athletic head of his dormitory group. 

312 



Thomas Albert Mostyn is a graduate of Hamilton high school in Trenton, N.J. 
Tom, who is a member of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, is an Industrial Engin- 
eer and was a member of the Industrial Engineering society for four years. A 
member of the Aero club, Tom is very interested in aviation and plans to make 
it his vocation upon graduation. 

John Henry Mowen, a student in the College of Business Administration, comes 
from Chatham, N.J. A charter member of the honorary marketing fraternity, 
Lambda Mu Sigma, Jake has lived in Price house while at Lehigh. He also is a 
member of the Sportsman's club and earned his numerals in freshman track. 
Jake's favorite recreation is target shooting. 

Richard Berlinger Mover, an Engineering Physicist, spent his first two years 
at Wyomissing Polytechnic Institute. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi, secretary- 
treasurer of the Chess club, and vice president of the Physics society. In his 
junior year, during which he appeared on the Dean's list, he was also a member 
of the Radio club. Dick's living group is the Alpha Town house. 

Richard William Mueller, Jr., I.E., came to Lehigh as a graduate of Shadyside 
academy, Pittsburgh. Max is president of the Phi Delta Theta house and a soccer 
player. In his freshman year he won his numerals in the sport and followed that 
achievement by getting his varsity letter two years later. He is a member of the 
I.E. society and lists sports as his hobby. 

Richard Thomas Musselman graduated from Liberty high school in Bethlehem. 
Dick, a student in the college of Businese Administration, commuted to Lehigh 
throughout his four years. He has worked for the Bethlehem Steel company dur- 
ing the summer months and plans to follow accounting upon graduation. A mem- 
ber of the Sportsman's club, Dick's hobby is photography. 

Raymond Reever Myers, Arts, is a resident of Taylor house. As a freshman, Ray 
made Phi Eta Sigma, Newtonian society, and Tone and participated in the Band, 
Orchestra, and Brown and White. Since then he has continued with his musical 
activities in addition to obtaining scholastic honors. In his junior year Ray made 
the Dean's list, and in his senior year he joined the Camera club. 

Frederick Walter Nadig, a Chemical Engineer, joined the Newtonian society in 
his freshman year, and was a member of the Chemical society during his freshman, 
sophomore and senior years at Lehigh. For the past two years he has belonged 
to the Lehigh-Bethlehem Post of the Army Ordnance association. Fred has 
commuted to Lehigh from Allentown. 

Alexander Bold Neill, Jr., of Montclair, N.J., is a Chemical Engineer and lives 
in Richards house. During his four years at Lehigh he has been a member of the 
Chemical society and has participated in intramural sports during that time also. 
Al has attended summer school at Lehigh for the past two summers. His hobbies 
include chemistry and stamps. 

Raymond Amandus Newhard, of Northampton, is a member of the College of 
Business Administration. In his senior year he was elected vice president of the 
newly formed marketing honorary society. Lambda Mu Sigma. During the past 
summer, Ray worked for the Pennsylvania Power and Light company. He gradu- 
ated from Northampton high school. 



Frank Novitski, a student in Chemical Engineering, comes from New York 
City and lives in Town group G. He is a member of Delta Omicron Theta and 
was active in debating as a freshman and sophomore. Frank won freshman honors 
and is a member of the Newtonian society. He has done N.Y.A. work in the 
Chemistry department for three years. 

Ernest Rudolf Oberholzer, a Chemical Engineering student, lives in and com- 
mutes from Allentown. He has been a member of the student Chemical society 
for four years. Ernie received both freshman and sophomore honors and was 
on the Dean's list as a junior. Stamp collecting is his chief hobby. He has held 
N.Y.A. jobs while in school and worked in his summer vacations. 

Benjamin Ojserkis will graduate in Industrial Engineering. He comes from 
Atlantic City and lives in Drinker house. Ben is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Pi Tau 
Sigma and the Industrial Engineering society. As a freshman he won the Pi Tau 
Sigma prize awarded to the highest freshman in his curriculum. He was in 
Newtonian society and on the Dean's list as a junior. 

Richard Ostheimer who comes from Rockville Centre, N.Y., has pursued the 
Metallurgical Engineering course while residing in Taylor house. Dick has been 
a member of the Metallurgical society for three years; besides working on his 
hobby of photography he has divided his time between intramural debating and 
N.Y.A. work. He has played intramural football and baseball. 

Allen Maxwell Paget, a Business major, comes from Harrisburg and is a mem- 
ber of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. "Ace" founded and is president of Lambda Mu 
Sigma. He is the financial manager of the Epitome, freshman wrestling manager, 
treasurer of his living group and a member of Alpha Phi Omega. He has spent 
his summers waiting tables in Canadensis. 

George Welch Peterson, Jr., who comes from Ridgewood, N.J., is a Business 
Administration student and a member of Delta Sigma Phi fraternity. Pete partici- 
pated for four years in soccer and was out for freshman track. He was a member 
of the Interfraternity council and social chairman of his living group. He at- 
tended summer sessions at the University of Vermont. 

James Mitchell Phelan, a student in Chemical Engineering, has shown a love 
for music in his many musical activities. Jim is a member of the Glee club and 
the Double Quartet, and was in the student musical show as a sophomore. He 
is president of Delta Sigma Phi and a member of the student Chemical society. 
He comes from Wayne. 

Leon Henry Plante, majoring in Arts and Science, comes from Fitchburg, 
Mass., and lives in Leonard hall. Lee is corresponding secretary of Eta Sigma 
Phi, treasurer of the International Relations club, and a member of the Glee club. 
He was athletic director of his living group as a junior. Last summer he was en- 
gaged in Church Mission work. 

Julius Plucker, III, comes from Verona, New Jersey, and prepped at Blair 
academy. He is a Chemical Engineer and has done special research in organic 
chemistry, having had his work published. "Pluck" is going to work with the 
Socony- Vacuum Oil company when he graduates. He has developed his hobby of 
photography while here at Lehigh. 

316 



John Ward Prinkey, a student in Industrial Engineering, comes from Yonkers, 
N.Y., and lives in Drinker house. Cy has been active in varsity and freshman 
track, and in intramural baseball, basketball, and football. He is a member of the 
Industrial Engineeiing society and the American Society of Mechanical Engin- 
eers. He attended summer school for two years. 

Louis Anthony Priolo has lived in town while studying Metallurgical Engineer- 
ing. Lou won his numerals in freshman track, and varsity letters in both swim- 
ming and track. While at Lehigh he has been recreational director of the 
Y.M.C.A., and assistant director of the Boys' club. A member of the Metallurgical 
society, he was also on the Y.A4.C.A. state council. 

Joseph Henry Quinn, a Business Administration student, comes from Balti- 
more, Md., and is a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He has wrestled on 
the varsity squad at 145 lbs. for two years. As a junior, "Crash" won the Alpha 
Kappa Psi medallion, awarded to the highest ranking junior in Business Admini- 
stration and the Alumni junior prize in Business Administration. 

Lewis Parker Randall, Jr., plans to enter public utilities when he graduates. 
He comes from Trenton, N.J., and is a member of Theta Xi fraternity. An Elec- 
trical Engineering major. Lew has been a member of the Band, Symphony Or- 
chestra, Tone, and the Electrical Engineering society for four years. He also 
sang in the choir of the Fritz Methodist church. 

Richard George Rasmussen, a student in Business Administration, comes from 
Garden City, L.L, and lives in Town group G. Dick is a charter member of 
Lambda Mu Sigma, newly founded honorary marketing fraternity, and has 
participated in intramural athletics for four years. He expects to go into account- 
ing work after graduation. 

Clarence George Reber comes from Reading and is a Mechanical Engineering 
student. He lives in Town. Clancy is secretary of Pi Tau Sigma and became a 
member of Tau Beta Pi, Pi Mu Epsilon, and the A.S.M.E. in his junior year. He 
is vice president of the Shop club, a member of the Newtonian society and was 
active in the Glee club as a freshman. 

Robert Clark Reber, a Business Administration major, comes from Allentown, 
and is a member of Delta Upsilon fraternity. Bob is co-captain of the basketball 
team and has been on the varsity for three years. He is also on the varsity tennis 
squad and won his letter in that sport as a junior. He has been vice president of 
his living group for two years. 

Robert William Reese, a student in the Arts college, comes from Winnetka, 
111. Bubblenose is a Sigma Nu and prepared for Lehigh at the Manlius school. 
During his junior and senior years, he was a member of the lacrosse team. He 
worked during his first two summer vacations and last summer attended the 
R.O.T.C. camp for men in the advanced military course. 

Rudolph Louis Renker, a student in Business Administration, comes from Mont- 
clair, N.J., and lives in Town group E. Rudy was director of athletics for his 
living group in his senior year. During summer layoffs he has vacationed in 
Canada, attended summer school, and the R.O.T.C. camp for advanced military 
students. Rudy's hobby is photography. 



David Richards, Jr., transferred from Scranton-Keystone junior college in 1939. 
While there he made the Dean's Ust, was president of the Keystone Camera club, 
president of the engineering society, vice president of the sophomore class, and 
a member of Keys honorary society. Davy is now studying Chemical Engineering. 
He is a member of Town group C. 

Augustus Anthony Riemondy, a secretary -treasurer of his class for the past three 
years and treasurer of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity for the same number of 
years, is a Chemical Engineer. Gus, who was married to Miss Mary Elizabeth 
Homan in 1939, has earned varsity letters in soccer, track and basketball. He is a 
member of Cyanide and Omicron Delta Kappa. 

John Traver Riley, a member of the College of Business Administration and a 
native of Bethlehem, won both freshman and sophomore honors. He made Phi 
Eta Sigma, Newtonian society, and Delta Omicron Theta in his freshman year. 
Band, wrestling, and track are among his other activities. Sub-total was athletic 
manager of his Town group as a junior. 

George Moland Ritchie is a Mechanical Engineer and a member of the Chi 
Phi fraternity, of which he was treasurer during the past year. During his first 
two years he made scholastic honors. He has also been a member of Newtonian 
society. Phi Eta Sigma, Pi Tau Sigma, and Tau Beta Pi, and won the Wilbur 
second prize in mathematics his freshman year. 

Robert Arthitr Ritchings is a member of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. Before 
entering Lehigh as a Civil Engineer he attended Lower Marion high school. He 
has been a member of the track team for four years and has been cheer leader 
for the past two years, having been elected head cheer leader his senior year. 
Stinky comes from Overbrook Hills, Pa. 

Thomas James Ritter, Arts, a resident of Allentown, is a member of the R. W. 
Hall Pre-Medical society. Alpha Epsilon Delta, and the Glee club. Tom was the 
winner of the Wilbur prize for the freshman ranking highest in German and he 
appeared on the Dean's list in his junior year. After graduation he plans to attend 
the University of Pennsylvania Medical school. 

Philip Baker Robeson was graduated from the Friends' school in Moorestown, 
N.J., before attending Lehigh as an Industrial Engineer. Phil is a member of 
Richards house. In addition to being his living group athletic manager, Phil has 
been a member of the I.E. society, and the American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers. MerchantvOle is Phil's home town. 

Philip A. Rodgers, a Business man and member of Phi Sigma Kappa, has partici- 
pated in football, wrestling, lacrosse, and hockey while at Lehigh. In his third 
year Beef was given honorable mention in the All-Eastern Football poll. He 
"belonged to the Metallurgical society during his sophomore year. He has done 
N.Y.A. work and was employed at Bethlehem steel in the summer time. 

Edwin Woods Roedder is a transfer from West Chester State Teachers' college 
and a student in the Arts college. At West Chester he was a member of the 
Science and Geography clubs and was on the Dean's list. Ed lives in Price 
house. Interest in geology has caused him to join several geological societies. He 
also lists chemistry and target shooting as hobbies. 

320 



John Ramsay Romig, an Industrial Engineer, commutes from his home in Allen- 
town. John has been a member of the Lehigh-Ailentown club for four years 
and has served the club as treasurer and president. He has been a member of the 
Industrial Engineering society. Alpha Phi Omega, national scouting fraternity, 
and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

Robert William Rosenquest, a student in Business Administration, is a member 
of Lambda Mu Sigma, new honorary marketing fraternity. A resident of Richards 
house, Rosie has participated in intramural sports and at one time acted as 
intramural athletic manager for his living group. This past year he was a member 
of the Hockey club. 

John Ryle, Jr., a student in Business Administration and a resident of Richards 
house II-A, has served his section as sophomore representative, as secretary, and as 
treasurer. This past year John was a member of the archery team. He prepared 
for his studies at Lehigh by attending Montclair academy in Montclair, N.J. 
John's own home town is Paterson, N.J. 

George Henry Schaeffer, a student of Electrical Engineering, is athletic manager 
for Taylor house section A. A member of the Electrical Engineering society. Red 
Knight played varsity basketball in his junior year and has been active in intra- 
mural sports for four years. He has participated in intramural football, baseball, 
basketball, wrestling, and swimming. 

JosEF William Schall, a student of Chemical Engineering, has been a member 
of Phi Eta Sigma and of the Newtonian society. He received sophomore honors 
and made the Dean's list the first semester of his junior year. Joe, whose main 
hobby is following sports, served his town section as athletic manager during 
his junior year. In summers he has worked for the U.S. Gauge Co. 

Fred John Schineller, Metallurgical Engineering, a member of Theta Kappa 
Phi, has been social chairman and executive secretary of his fraternity. He has 
been a member of the Metallurgical society for three years and has participated in 
intramural sports. In his sophomore year Fred was on the staff of the Freshman 
Handbook. His hobbies are golf and bridge. 

William Rodman Schnell, a student of Industrial Engineering, is president of 
Drinker house section I. In his sophomore year Moxie was president of his town 
section. He has been active in intramural sports for four years, having partici- 
pated, in basketball, baseball, football, and wrestling. His principal hobby is 
photography. 

Donald Robert Schoen, Arts, is a member of Delta Upsilon. President of the 
sophomore class, editor of the Epitome, news editor and editorial manager of 
the Broivn and White, president of Tone, a founder of the Symposium, Don was 
a member of O.D.K., Cyanide, Phi Eta Sigma, Delta Omicron Theta, Newtonian, 
R. W. Blake, the combined musical clubs, and concert-lecture series committee. 

E. Leonard Schorch, who is a student of Chemical Engineering, transferred to 
Lehigh from Georgia Tech in 1938. During his three years at Lehigh, Lyman 
has been active in interdormitory sports. His summers have been spent in sailing. 
In his freshman year at Georgia Tech he won scholastic honors and was freshman 
basketball manager. 

323 



Louis Kossuth Schwarz, Jr., prepared for Lehigh at Blair academy, Blairstown, 
N.J. Lou is a Business student and a member of Chi Phi. A member of the golf 
squad for four years, he was in competition for Mustard and Cheese during his 
freshman year, and received numerals as wrestling manager. Lou, who is man-ied, 
worked for a real estate broker all three summers. 

William Elliott Scott is a Business major and a Beta Theta Pi. Scotty won 
soccer numerals and captained swimming when a freshman; as a sophomore he 
won varsity letters in cross country and swimming. He is a member of Cyanide 
and O.D.K., Alpha Kappa Psi and the Spiked Shoe society. Scotty has also ob- 
tained a varsity soccer letter, run track, and been an LF. representative. 

Charles Bach Seib, Jr., is a Journalism major in the Arts college, and a resident 
of Drinker house. Charlie transferred to Lehigh from Muhlenberg his sophomore 
year; since then he has worked on the Brown and White, holding the positions of 
news editor, make-up editor, and news manager. He was elected to Pi Delta 
Epsilon, and was dormitory section president last year. 

Richard Creighton Seltzer, Business Administration, a member of the Chi Phi 
fraternity, was captain of the freshman track team and established a record for 
the number of points scored in his first year. His sophomore year saw him win 
his letter in track and in his third year he took part in two Mustard and Cheese 
plays. Dick plans to go to South America after graduation. 

Lemuel Ellsworth Sentz is a Chemical Engineering major who lives in Taylor 
house. Lem has been a member of the dance band, the Lehigh Collegians, for his 
full four years here. He was elected to membership in the Newtonian society, and 
has been active in such intramural sports as basketball, football, and baseball. 
While at school he has also pursued his hobby of trap-shooting. 

John William Sheibley, a graduate of Mercersburg academy, is a Metallurgical 
Engineer and a member of the Theta Xi fraternity. Baldy, who is treasurer of his 
fraternity, was manager of the freshman swimming team this year and competed 
for the business staff of Mustard and Cheese in his freshman year. He is very 
interested in flying and took the C.A.A. course in flight theory. 

Richard Montgomery Shepherd, a Chemical Engineer and member of the 
Chemical society, received freshman honors. He has been historian, secretary and 
president of Alpha Phi Omega, treasurer of Alpha Kappa Pi, president of the 
Army Ordnance association, and treasurer of Tau Beta Pi. Shep was a member of 
the senior ball committee and the Board of Publications. 

William Agustus Siegele, a Chemical Engineer, came to Lehigh from Caldwell, 
N.J. A member of Alpha Tau Omega, Bill has, as a member of the rifle team, won 
both his freshman numerals and his varsity letter. He was elected to Scabbard and 
Blade his junior year and was president of the Rifle club last year. He spent two 
summers working. 

Jonas Silverberg, a Business man who is president of Town group section A and 
social chairman of the Town council, was a member of the business board of the 
old Lehigh Review for two years. A native of Bethlehem, "Jony" plans to work 
at the Bethlehem Steel company after graduation. His last two summers he spent 
in working. 



William Brown Simpson, an Arts man from Elizabeth, N.J., is a member of 
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. Bill, a graduate of Mercersburg academy, was an 
outstanding football player at Lehigh and ace sprinter on the swimming team of 
which he was captain. He was president of Cyanide and representative from his 
fraternity^ of the Interfraternity council. 

John Louis Fr.\ncis Sipp from Staten Island is an Arts man majoring in Economics 
and a member of Theta Kappa Phi. Jack, who graduated from Tottenville high 
school, is the manager of the varsity track team this year. He won his numerals 
for football and was a member of the Dramatic Work Shop, LF. Council, Brown 
Key, and Spiked Shoe society. Jack's hobby is outboard racing. 

Edgar Chester Slack, a student in the Arts curriculum, lived in Taylor house. 
His interest in music led him to join the Collegian's dance band, of which he has 
been leader this past year. He also traveled to Europe with the band one summer. 
He has participated in intramural football. Edgar intends to do chemical labora- 
tory work after he graduates. 

Richard Edmunds Slee, of Stroudsburg, Pa., has taken the Arts curriculum. 
During his four years he has been a member of the Glee club. Cut and Thrust, and 
the R. W. Hall Pre-Med society. He was elected president of his dorm and 
member of the Interdormitory council. After graduation Dick plans to enter 
pubhc health work which has interested him very much. 

Stanley Edward Sliwka from Bayonne, N.J., is an Arts man and a resident of 
the Cosmopohtan club. Stan who graduated from the Bayonne Senior high school 
has been very active in intramural sports and was house chairman of the Cos- 
mopohtan club. He is an ardent tennis fan and has spent most of his summers per- 
fecting his game. His chief hobby is photography. 

Cephas Cornelius Smith, a Business Administration major, comes from Baltimore 
and is a member of Alpha Chi Rho fraternity. Ceph was freshman basketball 
manager, a member of Alpha Kappa Psi and Scabbard and Blade, and a vice presi- 
dent of his fraternity. As an underclassman he was active in soccer and lacrosse 
and as an Epitome competitor. His hobby is sailing. 

Stephen David Smoke is an Arts man majoring in Metallurgy, and lives at Phi 
Gamma Delta. "Smoky" received freshman numerals for football, basketball, 
and baseball. He has been a varsity letter man in football for three years, is a 
member of Cyanide and the JVIet. E. society, and was business manager of the 
annual Freshman Handbook. He has also competed for varsity wrestling. 

Burd Edwards Smyth is majoring in Business Administration and is a member 
of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. Ned received his numerals for swimming during 
his freshman year, and has also been a member of the Glee club. This past year 
he was president of his fraternity. Ned spent two of his summers working in a 
coal mine, and attending Duke University. 

Ellis Raymond Snovel, Jr., a member of Psi Upsilon, comes from Easton, where 
he went to high school. A Mechanical Engineer, Ellis belonged to the Mechanical 
Engineering society for three years; he was its secretary in his junior year, and 
its treasurer this year. During his last two years, EUis played in intramural sports. 



Clinton Creveling Snyder, a transfer Mechanical Engineering student from 
Keystone Junior college, has lived in town. Clint was a member of the Key 
society at Keystone; here he has joined the A.S.M.E., and made both Tau Beta 
Pi and Pi Tau Sigma. Summers have found Clint working in machine shops and 
in a blacksmith shop. His hobby is psychology. 

Matthew John Stacoim, Jr., comes from Flushing, N.Y., and is a member of 
Alpha Tau Omega. He played freshman and junior varsity football and was secre- 
tary of his fraternity for two years. He was a member of the Interfraternity 
council as a senior. For two summers he did research on cellulose and rubber in 
the Stacom Process corporation. 

James Clayton Stephens, a Business Administration student, is a resident of 
Hamden, Connecticut, and a graduate of the New Haven high school. President 
of section IV-B of Drinker house, Jim has been manager of the Lehigh Col- 
legians dance orchestra for the past two years. He has a position waiting for him 
in the Dayton Power and Light company of Dayton, Ohio. 

John Henry Stives, an Industrial Engineer, is a member of Delta Upsilon social 
fraternity. He has been recording secretary, president, and steward of his living 
group. Other activities have included the management of the "eats" concession, 
freshman and J.V. football, and track. Long John was a member of the Penn 
Relay team in his freshman year. 

Edward James Stone is a member of Kappa Alpha and has taken the Industrial 
Engineering curriculum. Jonah earned his numerals as a member of the freshman 
rifle team. He also competed in freshman wrestling and track, J.V. football, and 
hockey. He plans to enter the Engineering Sales department of the Ilg Ventilating 
company. 

Ralph Daniel Stoneback, from Quakertown, Pa., is a member of Pi Kappa 
Alpha. In his freshman year he was a member of the International Relations club. 
He was treasurer of the Sportsman's club and of Lambda Mu Sigma. "Stony" was 
historian of his fraternity as a junior. During the summer of '40 he took a two- 
week course from the Pennsylvania National Life Insurance Co. 

Carl Clemens Stotz commutes to school from Easton. He made freshman and 
sophomore honors and is a member of the Newtonian society. Phi Eta Sigma, Pi 
Mu Epsilon, and Eta Kappa Nu. The E.E. society and the Radio and Chess clubs 
have occupied C. C.'s extra time, as well as his hobbies of radio and photography. 
His summers have been spent working. 

Robert Paul Stoldt, a Business man from Riegelsville, is a member of the Sigma 
Chi fraternity. Bob has been affiliated with the Sportsman's club during three 
of his years at Lehigh, and has twice been president of that organization. He 
transferred to Lehigh from the University of Virginia in his freshman year. Bob 
hopes to go into construction work following graduation. 

Henry Joseph Strenkofsky, a Business man, and a resident of Taylor house 
section B, has participated in intramural sports for the past three years and is a 
member of the Sportsman's club. Hank has also taken the C.A.A. flight course. 
N.Y.A. work here at school and employment during the past three summers have 
occupied the rest of his free time. 

328 








K\.i, 



\ 




im^^. 








Everett Carlton Strickland graduated from Waterport high school, Waterport, 
N.Y., but he hves in Cranbury, N.J. Carl is an Electrical Engineer and lives in 
town. He has worked for Joe Kinney as a bartender, but when he graduates he'll 
trade this job for one constructing power transmission lines. He is a member 
of the Electrical Engineering society. 

Richard Brinton Strode, of West Chester, prepped at A'lercersburg academy be- 
fore coming to Lehigh. He is a Chemical Engineer and a member of the Chemical 
societ>\ In his junior year, Dick was elected treasurer of his fraternity. Delta Tau 
Delta. He won his numerals in swimming, and in his sophomore year was a 
candidate for baseball manager. 

Robert Lamb Stubbings, a Chemistry student, comes from Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., 
and is a Delta Sigma Phi. Stubby was elected to Tau Beta Pi, was chairman of the 
1940 Junior prom, and a member of the Senior ball committee. He has waited 
table for three years and has worked during the summer as an assistant golf pro. 
He plans definitely on chemical research after graduation. 

Bernard Valentine Stuber is a Mechanical Engineer from Buffalo, N.Y., who 
plans to be a research engineer in the motor industry when he graduates. He be- 
longs to Phi Eta Sigma, the Newtonian society, and Tau Beta Pi. In his senior 
year, he won the Wm. B. Haines scholarship. Spare time finds Bernie either work- 
ing in the C. E. department or out after some pictures. 

Edward Anderson Sutherland attended White Plains high school in White 
Plains, N.Y., where he lives. Big Ed is a Mechanical Engineer and lives in Town 
group B. He played freshman football and was a member of the Orchestra for 
two years. Big Ed is a member of the Aero club and the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers. 

Frank Anthony Szabo lives in Bethlehem, where he attended Bethlehem high 
school. Frank is a major in the Business college; he lives at home. In his sophomore 
year he helped to organize the Lehigh Sportman's club; as a junior he was sec- 
retary and as a senior he was vice president of the club. He is a member of Lambda 
AIu Sigma, honorary marketing society. 

Gordon Edward Tait, an Industrial Engineer, lives in Wood-Ridge, N.J., and 
graduated from Rutherford high school. Tad makes his home at Lehigh in Price 
house. He has earned two varsity letters in soccer as well as participating in that 
sport during his freshman year. During his summer vacations. Tad has worked, 
last summer being spent at sea. 

Julius Edwakd Tangel, an Electrical Engineer, is a member of Theta Kappa 
Phi social fraternity of which he has been social chairman and athletic manager. 
Jule, who comes from Cranford, N.J., plans on electrical research after graduation. 
Jule took a trip through A'lexico last summer and held a welding job during his 
two previous vacations. 

Charles Baker Taylor, Jr., graduated from Millburn high school before com- 
ing to Lehigh. He lived in the Cosmopolitan club and studied Civil Engineering 
while here. During his senior year Chick was a member of the A.S.C.E. Charlie 
worked during all of his summer vacations in the office of the Millburn Town- 
ship Engineer. 



John Peyton Taylor, a Business man coming from Wilmington, Del., is treasurer 
of the Sigma Chi fraternity. In his freshman year Johnny was a member of the 
Freshman Union. He was elected to the Interfraternity council during his junior 
year and went on to be elected secretary of that organization. He has no definite 
plans for the future, but expects to join the army. 

Maurice Eugene Taylor, a Chemical Engineer and a member of Drinker house, 
transferred from Scranton-Keystone junior college at the beginning of his junior 
year. While there he was in the Chess club. Engineers' society, and took part in 
intramural sports. Maurice has continued his interest in intramural athletics at 
Lehigh in basketball and football. 

Michael Temoshok was a member of Phi Eta Sigma and the Newtonian society. 
In his second year he was awarded sophomore honors and began participation 
in intramural sports in which he was very active. Mike made the Dean's list in 
his junior year and became a member of Eta Kappa Nu. He is an Electrical En- 
gineer and commutes to Lehigh from Northampton. 

Kenneth Roderick Templeton is a member of the College of Business Admin- 
istration and has commuted to Lehigh from Easton for the past four years. In 
his junior and senior years he was elected president of Town group L. Rod's plans 
for after graduation are in industrial accounting. He has attended the meetings 
of the National Association of Cost Accountants. 

Alva Hummer Thomas from Hackettstown, N.J., is a member of Kappa Sigma 
and is a Metallurgical Engineer. As a freshman he received his numerals for 
swimming and made honor marks. Al is a member of the Metallurgical society 
and has been house manager of his fraternity as well as athletic manager. Last 
summer he went to R.O.T.C. camp. 

Graham Fellowes Thompson, Jr., of New Haven, Conn., won his freshman 
numerals as manager of the freshman fencing team, and became a member of Cut 
and Thrust. Gray, who prepped at Deerfield academy, has been a member of the 
Brown and White staff for the past three years. He was the publicity director 
of the Town council in his junior and senior years. 

John Alden Tifft, Jr., from Medford Lakes, N.J., is a member of Phi Gamma 
Delta. He won numerals in tennis in his first year and was a sophomore football 
manager. He is a member of Scabbard and Blade, and Alpha Kappa Psi, and is 
treasurer and steward of his fraternity. In his senior year he was elected captain 
of Scabbard and Blade and treasurer of Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Robert Lansing Tilton, a Chemical Engineer, comes from Toms River, N.J. 
Bob lived at Richards house while at school. He has been a member of the 
Chemical society during his entire college career, and was section chief and In- 
terdormitory council delegate from Richards house as a sophomore. Bob's sum- 
mers have been spent in working. 

William Joseph Toohey, Jr., a Chemical Engineer, comes from Bethlehem. He 
has participated in junior varsity football since his sophomore year and was cap- 
tain last fall. Bill served as athletic manager of Town section K for two years 
and has been a member of the Chemical society. He spent his summers working 
for the highway department and Bethlehem Steel. 



Robert Mason Ulmer, a Business major, is a member of Delta Tau Delta. While 
a freshman. Bob won numerals in soccer and baseball, and received freshman 
honors. He was advertising and business manager of the Lehigh Review and 
business manager of the Bachelor. Bob was manager of freshman track, a mem- 
ber of Pi Delta Epsilon, Alpha Kappa Psi, O.D.K., Cyanide, and Arcadia. 

Robert J. Valleau transferred from Bergen Junior college where he was class 
salutatorian. Bob is a Chemical Engineer and was a member of the Chemical 
society during his two years at Lehigh. He was on the Dean's list in his junior 
year and in his senior year he was secretary-treasurer of his living group in 
Taylor hall. 

Warren Corbin Van Blarcom, Jr., is a Business student and resides in Taylor 
house. As a transfer student from Maryville College, Van came to Lehigh after 
his sophomore year there. While at Maryville he sang in the college choir, glee 
club, and male quartet. At Lehigh Van participated in intramural football, 
basketball, track, wresthng, and Softball. 

Chester Arthxjr Van Brunt came to Lehigh from the Rumson, N.J., high 
school and lived in Town section F. Chet, a student of Business Administration, 
became a member of the Chess club in order to spend his spare time on his pet 
hobby. In his freshman year Chet participated in intramural debating and was a 
member of Delta Omicron Theta. 

William Albert Vanderclock, a student of Business Administration, lives in 
Ridgewood, N.J. Van, as he is called, was Town G's athletic manager as a senior, 
and \^'as captain of all of Town B's athletic teams as a junior. He has won nu- 
merous intramural medals and his hobby is following sports. He organized a 
basketball team, and refereed intramural contests. 

Richard Landis Vockel, a Chi Psi and an M.E., is a member of O.D.K., Tau 
Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, Pi Delta Epsilon, Cyanide, Brown Key, A.S.M.E., and 
the Interfraternity council. Dick was both art and sports editor of the Epitome, 
and managed varsirv' swimming. He has been vice president of his fraternity, 
winter sports director, and was on the baseball team for three years. 

Fred Henry Vogel comes from Hoboken, N.J., but he prepared for Lehigh at 
Franklin and Marshall academy in Lancaster. Fred is a Chemical Engineer, and 
lives in Town group A. For three years he was a member in good standing of the 
Chemical society and during his junior year he was secretary of his living group. 
Last summer he worked for the United States Testing company. 

Walter Herbert Vogelsberg, an Electrical Engineer, lives in Orange, N.J. 
Vogel is president of Delta Tau Delta besides being a member of Omicron Delta 
Kappa, secretary of Eta Kappa Nu, E. E. society treasurer, and student concert- 
lecture series committeeman. His unique and interesting hobby is designing and 
playing organs. 

Thoal^s Alexander Wallace, Jr., a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity, 
is majoring in Chemistry. He was president of his fraternity in his senior year 
and Interfratemitv' council representative in his junior year. "T" also went out 
for freshman football. He served as a seaman on an oil tanker during a recent 
summer vacation. "T" intends to get into airlines work after graduation. 

335 



Harlow Elwood Ward, Jr., an Industrial Engineer, is a member of the Town 
group and belongs to the Industrial Engineering society. He was a member of 
the University Band in his freshman and sophomore years and played in the 
Symphony orchestra. Harlow has competed in intramural athletics and held sev- 
eral remunerative jobs. He comes from Carbondale, Pa. 

Richard Anderson Ware, Arts, is chairman of the student concert-lecture 
committee, vice president of Phi Alpha Theta, of which he was the organizing 
president, and a member of the Blake society, International Relations club, and 
Alpha Phi Omega. Dick was secretary-general of the Model League Assembly 
held at Lehigh this March. He is listed in the 1941 collegiate "Who's Who." 

Richard Nichols Watts, a Business major and member of Kappa Alpha, was 
junior tennis manager and secretary-treasurer of the Brown Key society during 
his third year. This year he acted as secretary of Kappa Alpha. Dick was a mem- 
ber of the Chemical society for three years and spent the past two summers 
working as a dock-master in a boat yard. 

Albert Schofield Weigel, a student in Industrial Engineering and a member 
of Delta Tau Delta, entered Lehigh with the class of 1936 but later left school 
for five years. Al won his numerals in freshman track and was a member of the 
band for two years. In his junior year Al made Pi Tau Sigma. His home town is 
East Orange, N.J., and he attended prep school at Blair academy. 

Martin Auram Weil, a student in the College of Arts and Science, is a resident 
of Richards house. Matt is a member of the Sportsman's club and of the Inter- 
national Relations club. During his freshman year he played soccer and in his 
second year he engaged in intramural sports. Matt's summers have been spent in 
traveling— in Canada, in Europe, and across the U.S. 

Stephen Weinrib, a student of Arts and Science, is music editor of the new 
Bachelor. Steve made Delta Omicron Theta in his freshman year and Phi Alpha 
Theta in his junior year. His principal hobby is writing, although he plans a 
career in the profession of law. Steve is a member of the Pi Lambda Phi frater- 
nity. He prepared for Lehigh at Oakwood school in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

Frank Earle Weise, Jr., a Metallurgical Engineer and member of Phi Delta 
Theta, is varsity tennis manager and vice president of the Metallurgical society, 
of which he has been a member for four years. In addition to competing for the 
manager's job, Frankie has been active in intramural sports and in wrestling, 
and was president of the Brown Key society in his junior year. 

Richard Carter Wells, Industrial Engineer, was vice president and secretary 
of Pi Kappa Alpha. Aldous has been a member of the I.E. society and the 
A.S.A4.E. for four years and has played interfraternity softball and football for 
the same length of time. A resident of Baltimore, Aldous attended Johns Hop- 
kins University summer school last year. 

Harold Hoover Werft, E.M., is secretary of Tau Beta Pi and vice president of 
the Mining and Geological society. Dutch won his numerals on the freshman 
baseball team and has been a varsity letterman in the same sport ever since. A 
member of Alpha Kappa Pi fraternity, he won freshman and sophomore honors. 
Last summer he worked for a Pittsburgh coal company. 

33<5 



Henry Gabriel Werner, a Physics major and a member of Chi Phi, is vice 
president and debating manager of Delta Omicron Theta. Winner of a WiUiams 
intramural debating prize in his first year. Gabe has engaged in intercollegiate 
debating for three years and was vice president of the 1941 Penn State debaters' 
convention. He won his numerals as assistant manager of freshman football. 

John White Whiting, Jr., a Business Administration major, was treasurer of 
Phi Delta Theta for two years. Jack was chairman of the board of the Fresh- 
vnm Handbook this year and won his letter as varsity manager of cross-country. 
In his first year, he received numerals as basketball manager and served on the 
Interfraternity council in his sophomore year. 

Walter Wieland is a student in Business Administration and a member of Alpha 
Chi Rho. A native of Scranton, Walt spent his first two years of college at the 
Keystone Junior college where he played football and baseball and was a member 
of the Student Council. Here at Lehigh he has been active in intramural sports. 
Last summer he worked at the Bethlehem Steel plant. 

Jaaies Ellsworth Wigg, a student of Business Administration, has sung in the 
Glee club for four years. In his junior year Wiggie was rushing chairman of 
Sigma Chi fraternity and this past year he was social chairman. He was a fresh- 
man swimming manager and, in his sophomore year, was an Epitome competitor. 
Last summer he attended Rutgers summer school. 

Edward Franklin Williams, a student in Chemical Engineering, is a resident 
of Taylor house section D. Ed has been active in interdormitory football and 
basketball during his stay at Lehigh. He lists photography and amateur radio 
as his two principal hobbies. Eddie is a member both of the Bethlehem Hiking 
club and of the Bethlehem Cycling club. His home town is Ashland. 

Roger Williams, Jr., a student in the College of Business Administration, is a 
member of the Town group. This year Roge became a member of Alpha Kappa 
Psi, professional fraternity in business administration. A graduate of Blair acad- 
emy in Blairstown, N.J., he has devoted his past three summers to sailing, his 
principal hobby. 

Clyde Patrick Williamson, a student in the College of Arts and Science, trans- 
ferred from the United States Naval Academy, where he participated in foot- 
ball and wrestling. Clyde has been working for the Bethlehem Steel Co. since 
1937. He was out of school for the fall and spring terms of 1938-1939. On Decem- 
ber 2 he married Miss Evelyn Hoffses. 

Fredric Woodbridge Wilson, Jr., a member of the Theta Xi fraternity, is a 
student in the College of Business Administration. Fred participated in football 
during his first two years and was a member of the Bachelor staff this past year. 
He has spent his summers working— as life-guard, shipping clerk, or machinist. 
His home town is West Point Pleasant, N.J. 

Robert Alexander Wilson, M.E., is secretary of Alpha Kappa Pi, which he 
served as house manager during his sophomore and junior years. A member of 
the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, he has also belonged to the 
Machine Shop club, of which he was secretary-treasurer this year. Baldy has 
played interfraternity football and baseball and engaged in freshman soccer. 

339 



William James Wise is a member of Delta Upsilon and a student in the College 
of Business Administration. Bill was graduated from Liberty high school in Bethle- 
hem but is now a resident of Bellevue. He was a member of the Brow7i and White 
staff for three years, was out for varsity track his junior year, and played J.V. foot- 
ball during his senior year. 

George Wilmot Woelfel is a Civil Engineer and president of Psi Upsilon. He 
was a letterman in swimming, won numerous intramural first-place awards, 
has been on the Dean's list, and was a member of the relay team breaking the 
Eastern Collegiate swim record in 1938. George has taken first place in both 
intramural swimming and interfraternity wrestling. 

Irwin Damascus Wolf, Jr., a student of Business Administration, is a member 
of Pi Lambda Phi fraternity. Irwin was on the staff of the Broivn and White 
during his first two years and participated in wrestling his first year. His prin- 
cipal hobbies are stamp-collecting, photography and fishing. In the summer of 
1939, I. D. traveled in France, Belgium, and Holland. 

Roy Edgar Woodling, Jr., E.M., a member of the Town group, has been a 
member of the Glee club for four years, is secretary of the Mining and Geo- 
logical society, and belongs to the A.I.M.E. and Alpha Phi Omega. Roy won 
his numerals on the rifle team, and participated in track in his sophomore and 
junior years. He attended Colorado School of Mines last summer. 

J. Dukes Wooters, Jr., Bus., secretary of Delta Tau Delta, is captain of the 
track team, president of Spiked Shoe and of Mustard and Cheese, treasurer of 
O.D.K., and a member of Arcadia. His junior year Dukes was vice president of 
Cyanide, financial manager of the Review, and won the Middle Atlantic cham- 
pionship in the 440. He was a National A.A.U. champ in '39 and '40. 

Kenneth Clinton Wotring, a student of Industrial Engineering, is a resident 
of Taylor house A. Noody has been a member of the I.E. society for three 
years and made Pi Tau Sigma in his junior year. He played in the band for two 
years and won his numerals in basketball. His principal hobby is photography. 
Noody has also been active in intramural sports. 

John James Yankevitch, Jr., a student in the College of Arts and Science, is 
vice president of Town section E. Yank has been a member of the R. W. Hall 
pre-med society for four years and a member of Alpha Epsilon Delta for three. 
He received his letter in J.V. football and has appeared on the Dean's list twice. 
His summer vacations have been spent camping or working. 

Jacob Forney Young, Jr., I.E., is house manager of Phi Delta Theta, which he 
has also served as vice president. Jake transferred from Western Maryland col- 
lege in 1937. A member of the I.E. society for four years, he was a member of 
the Aero club in his third year. Jake, a graduate of West Nottingham academy 
in Colora, Md., has played intramural football and baseball. 

Roy Shackleford Zachary, Arts, is president of the Interfraternity council and 
of Sigma Nu, manager of wrestling, and a member of O.D.K. Zack was a mem- 
ber of Cyanide in his junior year, was on the Broivn arid White two years, and 
has been in Mustard and Cheese and in Tone. In his sophomore year he won 
English honors. In July, 1940, he married Miss Eleanor Crowl. 



Allen Herbert Zane, Jr., an Industrial Engineer and a member of Delta Sigma 
Phi, is senior manager of the hockey team, vice president of the I. E. society, 
and a member of Tau Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, the A.S.A'I.E., and the Army Ord- 
nance association. He made Phi Eta Sigma and the Newtonian society, and, in 
his third year, won the Alumni Junior engineering prize. 

Bernard Hysler Zane, an Industrial Engineer and a member of Theta Kappa 
Phi, has played freshman football, J.V. football, and intramural football, basket- 
ball, and Softball in his four years at Lehigh. Bud was once one of the candidates 
for sophomore track manager and in his junior year, served as vice president 
of Theta Kappa Phi. He is a junior member of the A.S.M.E. 

Frank Andrew Zimmerman, a student in the College of Business Administra- 
tion, has been a member of the Glee club since his sophomore year, and sang in 
the double quartet this year. A graduate of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, 
Zimmy has spent part of his last two summer vacations in retail selling and ad- 
vertising work. His principal hobby is photography. 



ALMA MATER 

Where the Lehigh'' s rocky rapids rush ]rom out the West, 
Mid a grove of spreading chestnuts, walls in ivy dressed; 
On the breast of old South Mountain, reared against the sky, 
Staiids our noble Alv^a Mater, stands our dear Lehigh. 

Like a xoatchman on the mountain stands she bravely bold. 
Earth and Heaven^ s secrets seeking, hoarding them like gold; 
All she wrests front 'Nature's storehouse— naught escapes her eye- 
Gives she gladly to her dear sons, while we bless Lehigh. 

We will ever live to love her, live to praise her name, 
Live to make our lives add luster to her glorious fame; 
Let the glad news wake the echoes, joyfully we cry, 
"Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! Hail, all hail, Lehigh!" 



343 



APPENDIX 



ALPHA EPSILON DELTA 

President: Frederick R. Gilmore 

Vice-President: Willard A. Litzcnberger 

Secretary: Jerome R. Dorkin 

Treasurer: Frank V. Hertzog 

Members: Bernard A. Briody; Frederick 

R. Gilmore; George J. Gabuzda; Frank V. 

Hertzog; C. Raymond Kiefer; Willard A. 

Litzenberger; Thomas J. Ritter; John J. 

Yankevitch; Jerome R. Dorkin; George R. 

Gaughran; S. Brooks Longley; William M. 

Spears; A. Forrest Mann; James A. Shafer. 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI 

President: Robert A'l. Ulmer 
Vice-Preside7it: James R. Hendry 

Secretary: Henry D. Chandler 
Treasurer: John W. AVhiting, Jr. 
Faculty Meiiibers: Ward L. Bishop; Elmer 
C. Bratt; A. Copeland Callen; Neil Carothers; 
George B. Curtis. 

Student Mejubers: David W. Burke, Jr.; 
Henrv D. Chandler; Wilbur Chase, Jr.; 
Nathan T. Folwell; Filmore O. Frye; Wil- 
liam V. Groeger; James R. Hendry; Emery 
W. Loomis, Jr.; John H. iVIilbank; War- 
ren H. Miller; Richard M. Palmer; Preston 
W. Parvis, Jr.; Arthur H. Rich; William E. 
Scott; Cephas C. Smith; John A. TiflFt, Jr.; 
Robert M. Ulmer; John W. Whiting, Jr.; 
Roger Williams, Jr. 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA 

Presideiit: Richard M. Shepherd 
Vice-President: Robert I. Felch 
Recording Secretary: Harry W. Jones 
Correspondi7ig Secretary: 

George F. Messinger 
Treasurer: Thomas J. Lewis 
Me7?ibers: Joseph A. Arnold; William E. 
BeUinger; Richard R. Bright; Jon Conforte; 
Roy B. Cowin; Richard K. Eberts; William 
S. Eisner; Clarence F. Fehnel; Robert I. 
Felch; Ernest Gamble; WiUiam E. Gheen; 
C. Denis Gilchrist; Frederick R. Gilmore; 
Milton W. Harper; Dale A. Harris; Burt 
L. Heimer; Alan D. Hinrichs; Raymond W. 
Hinterleiter; John J. Hucker; Floyd E. 
Ivey; Harry W. Jones; Donald W. Kurtz; 
Thomas J. Lewis; Philip Lutters; George 
A. Lutz; Thomas C. MacAllister; John J. 
McGee; Robert J. McGregor; George F. 
Messinger; Warren K. Morgan; Edgar K. 
Muhlhausen; Carl Neuendorfer; Allen M. 
Paget; James F. PfefFer; Sumner W. Reid; 
John R. Romig; Charles H. Schumacher; 
Theodore G. Scott; Richard M. Shepherd; 
Richard A. Ware; Roy E. Woodling. 



ARCADIA 

President: Albert E. Lee 

Vice-President: Robert M. Ulmer 

Secretary: George G. Gabuzda 

Treasurer: Archie D. Tifft 

Facidty Adviser: Claude G. Beardslee. 

Members: George A. Brenker; Hazen P. 
Chase; George J. Gabuzda; Frederick R. 
Gilmore; Charles F. Kalmbach; C. Ray- 
mond Kiefer; Albert E. Lee; Archie D. 
Tifft; Robert M. Ulmer; Robert P. Whip- 
ple; J. Dukes Wooters; Roy S. Zachary. 

LEHIGH BACHELOR 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Editor-in-chief: Edwin H. Klein 
Business Majiager: Robert M. Ulmer 
Managing Secretary: Forrest V. Schumacher 
Promotion Manager: Fletcher Hanks 
Facidty Adviser: Charles J. Moravec 
Editorial Staff: James K. Binder, Fiction; 
William J. Meikle, Feature; Roger A. Tam- 
bella. Art; Otto G. Leichliter, Photo; Ste- 
phen Weinrib, Music. 

Business Staff: David E. Gregory, Adver- 
tising; Philip H. Powers, Financial; William 

F. Boore, Jr., Circulation; James L. Reiley, 
Distribution; George R. Lutz, Assistant Cir- 
culation; Richard C. Hardenbergh, Assistant 
Advertising. 

BAND 

Student Director: Warren F. Boyer 

Manager: Richard A. Garling 

Dnmi Major: Alfred W. Pedrick 

Band Master: T. Edgar Shields 

Members: Richard C. Aldinger; Edward 

B. Annett; Robert W. Appleton; Maynard 

G. Arsove; Elwood B. Backensto; Frederic 
N. Bahnson; Luther R. Bartholomew; Rob- 
ert H. Bartholomew; Willard P. Bear; Rob- 
ert K. Beckwith; Robert A. Bennett; James 
H. Bleiler; Alexander H. Bolyn; Donald E. 
Boughner; Charles E. Boyer; Warren F. 
Boyer; Earl A. Brawn; Ray E. Brawn; Al- 
vin L. Breen; William T. Buhrig; M. Clay- 
ton Burgy; David J. Carrigan; John F. 
Clark; Irving R. Collmann; Warren X. Coll- 
mann; William M. Conway; James M. Cor- 
rey; Jack Coriell; Robert L. Courts; 
H. Roswell Davidson; Cortland V. Davis; 
Edward S. Davis; Robert E. Davison; Wil- 
liam S. Dawless; Warren E. Deifer; Jack R. 
Dennis; Ray R. Dimmick; Robert H. 
Doney; Kenneth D. Duggan; Bernard J. 
Egan; Edward T. Finnerty; George E. 
Funk; Hugh B. Frey; Mervin J. Fry; Jos- 
eph C. Gabuzda; Richard A. Garling; Fred- 



347 



erick R. Gilmore; Joseph R. Gilmore; Jos- 
eph H. Goth; Charles R. Hacket; James G. 
Hamilton; Richard C. Hardenbergh; Albert 

E. Hartung; Edwin W. Hine; WUliam B. 
Hinman; Howard A. Hoch; Robert A. Hof- 
stetter; Floyd E. Ivey; Malcolm S. Johnson; 

C. Raymond Kiefer; Francis W. Kopyta; 
Robert C. Kramer; Donald E. Krebs; Fred- 
erick H. Krone; Charles G. Kucher; Alfred 
B. Laponsky; George A. Lutz; William H. 
Lutz; Creighton L. Lytle; Sterling E. Mayo; 
Richard O. Marsten; John VV. Martin; 
James C. Meighan; George F. Miller; Cour- 
ter D. Mills; Andrew A. Mitchell; Neal S. 
Moreton; Harvey D. Moll; Robert C. 
Moore; Raymond R. Myers; Jacob S. Nolf; 
Mason P. Pearsall; Alfred W. Pedrick; 
Theodore Peters; James F. Pritchard; Leon 
G. Reimer; Irving B. Remsen; Charles L. 
Rosenthal; Robert W. Rouse; Richard W. 
Sauer; Rudolf W. Samer; William D. 
Schaeffer; Richard G. Schenck; James S. 
Schwartz; Robert A. Schwarz; Richard B. 
Seals; Rodney D. Shaffer; Victor E. Smith; 
Samuel I. Snyder; Emerson D. Spengler; 
Carl L. Sturgis; William R. Sultzer; Oscar 

D. Sumners; Robert S. Swoyer; Joseph N. 
Tomlinson; John H. Transue; David I. 
Troxel; WiUiam P. Vamer; Glenn C. Wan- 
ich; Robert O. Warwick; Earl L. Weaver; 
Charles M. Wetzel; Arthur J. White; John 
D. Williamson; Nathan L. WUson; Richard 

F. Wood, Jr.; Paul E. Wright; Franklin H. 
Young; Whitney J. Young. 

BROWN AND WHITE 

Editor-in-chief: Charles F. Kalmbach 
Neivs Department: Charles B. Seib, news 
manager first semester; John M. Roach, 
news manager second semester; John M. 
Roach, make-up editor first semester; Albert 
L. Thalhamer, make-up editor second se- 
mester; L. Edward Klein, Tuesday news 
editor first semester; Tom C. Mekeel, Friday 
news editor first semester; Samuel J. Davy, 
Tuesday news editor second semester; Roy- 
don S. Margolies, Friday news editor sec- 
ond semester; Francis H. Acherd; George J. 
Bleul; Hugh Boyd; David J. Carrigan; Carl 
Creidenberg; Charles L. Grouse, Jr.; Ray- 
mond D. Czapko; James J. Donahue; Leo W. 
Dieffenbach; E. Walter Edwards; Danal P. 
Epstein; William B. Farrell; Frank E. Felt; 
Edward T. Finnerty; Tom Fleisher; Stephen 
Hart; Harold W. Haines; Wilbur E. Henry, 
Jr.; R. William Hinterleiter; Thomas F. 
Humphrey; Ralph R. Johnson; Joseph F. 
Kemmer; Frankhn B. Kern; Arthur L. 
Landesman; George A. Logan; Donald R. 
Lowry; Robert M. Lynch; Harry W. Lynn; 



Nicholas J. Mesirow; George F. Miller; 
Howard H. Ockelmen; Theodore Peters, 
Jr.; Fred M. Selkregg, Jr.; H. William 
Shawhan; Harvey F. Soule; Graham F. 
Thompson; Albert E. Vetrosky; Peter J. 
Weigel; Wallace R. Wirths; George W. 
Wolfsten, Jr. 

Editorial Depamnent: John C. Attwood, 
editorial manager first semester; William J. 
Meikle, editorial manager second semester; 
Lynn C. Bartlett; Jesse F. Beers, Jr.; James 
K. Binder; Malcolm F. McConnell; Tom C. 
Mekeel; Donald R. Schoen. 

Sports Department: Anthony R. Carcione, 
sports editor first semester; Edward M. 
Biggs, sports editor second semester; James 
L. Anderson; William L. Archer; Charles 
Balough, Jr.; John E. Doxsey; Kay T. 
Franck; Alfred L. Haft; Theodore G. Heck; 
John A. Hunt; George Melloy; Richard B. 
Palmer; George Ramsden; Wayne O. 
Riddle. 

Photographic Depart^nent: Otto Leich- 
liter, photographic editor first semester; 
Myron L Buchman, photographic editor 
second semester; David W. Armstrong; 
Norman C. Chorest; John S. Curtis; Mark 
H. Schwarz, Jr.; Grendon K. Sebold; John 
D. Scouller; Victor E. Smith. 

Busiiiess Departme7it: Robert J. Caverly, 
business manager first semester; Henry D. 
Chandler, business manager second semester; 
Henry D. Chandler, financial manager first 
semester; Craig W. Baker, circulation man- 
ager first semester; Craig W. Baker, circula- 
tion manager second semester; Howard M. 
Williams, copy superviser first semester; 
Robert E. CuUen, copy superviser second 
semester; Robert E. Cullen, local assistant 
first semester; George H. M. LeRoy, local 
assistant second semester; Howard M. Wil- 
liams, national assistant first semester; Lloyd 
A. Croot, national assistant second semester; 
Robert M. Baker; Ralph Bown, Jr.; Donald 
H. Davies; William W. Doniger; Musa J. 
Eways; Anthony C. Fortosis; Richard F. 
Goeiael; James A. Gordon; David N. HUle- 
gass; Charles A. Johnson; Gaynor O. H. 
LeRoy; James F. Lucker; James M. Morris, 
Jr.; Robert S. Newcomb; Charles M. Nor- 
lin; Robert F. Ryan; John M. Skilling, Jr.; 
WiUiam B. Tilghman; Thomas W. Williams. 

BROWN KEY SOCIETY 

Fresideiit: Archie D. Tifft 

Secretary-Treasurer: Richard E. Metius 

Members: Robert W. Beck; Horace W. 

Boynton; WiUiam A. Brooks; Albert W. 

Foster; James A. Gordon; Chapin Heu- 

mann; William H. Lindsay; John L. Lough- 



348 



ran; Robert H. Marshall; Richard E. Alet- 
ius; John R. Muehlberg; Stewart VV. Mun- 
roe; John S. Saylor; Frank E. Smith; Robert 
S. Struble; Archie Tifft; Lindsley D. Van 
dcr Veer. 

CAMERA CLUB 

President: Francis H. Rockett, Jr. 
Vice-President: Victor E. Smith 

Secretary-Treasurer: John Gressitt 
Members: Christian A. Anderson; David 
W. Armstrong; Myron I. Buchman; Rich- 
ard A. Buser; Jack Coriell; Edward W. Ed- 
wards; John Gressitt; James F. Lucker; 
Hubert McDonnell, Jr.; Arthur H. Morse, 
Jr.; Raymond R. Myers; Francis H. Rock- 
ett, Jr., Rudolf W. Samer; John D. Scoul- 
ler; Charles B. Seib; Victor E. Smith; Ralph 

D. Palazzo; Stuart H. Vogt; Edward F. 
Williams. 

CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

President: John Beriont 
Vice-President: Charles H. Carter, Jr. 
Secretary: George E. Elliott, Jr. 
Treasurer: John S. Saylor, Jr. 
Members: John P. Allen; Walter L. An- 
ders; Christian A. Anderson; Joseph E. An- 
drews; Joseph F. Arbogast; Joseph A. Ar- 
nold; Elwood B. Backensto; Frank H. 
Bailey; Lester R. Bartron; John R. Beal; 
Robert K. Beck\vith; Donald W. Bedell; Al- 
fred M. Belcher; Thomas R. Bell; Donald 

A. Bender; John Beriont; William T. Bos- 
tock; Robert C. Boston; Harry L. Boyer; 
Warren H. Bradford; Alvin L. Breen; Sam- 
uel Breskman; Carl F. Brown; Robert K. 
Brown; Myron I. Buchman; William T. 
Buhrig; George W. Burgers; M. Clayton 
Burgy; Philip G. Butts; Paul R. Carl; 
Charles H. Carter, Jr.; John G. Cella; Al- 
bert Clark, Jr.; Willard S. Clewell; Charles 

B. Cole; James M. Cordrey; Arthur J. Corn- 
ish; Samuel I. Cory; Samuel R. Cox; Wil- 
liam J. Crowe; Robert E. CuUen, Jr.; Ed- 
win H. Dafter; Edward S. Davis; Robert C. 
Deckard; August Descheemaeker; Charles 
J. Dick; Lawrence F. Dieringer; Howard V. 
Donohoe; Thomas G. Drustrup; Willard W. 
Dunham; Frank R. Dunn; Edward W. Ed- 
wards; Willet E. Egge; William S. Eisner; 
George E. Elliott, Jr.; Norman J. Faber; 
Edward A. Fehnel; William J. Feigley; 
Richard K. Fenstermacher; Blaine D. Fer- 
rell; Ray H. Forner; Richard M. Foster; 
Philip G. Foust; Lewis Friedman; Robert K. 
Gailey; Ernest Gamble; Richard A. Gar- 
hng; Robert J. Gill; Edward M. Gilmore; 
Ludwig E. Godycki; James Gore; Rudolf 

E. Gosztonyi, Jr.; Joseph E. Gross; Robert 



C. Haas; Robert A. Hammond; Edward A. 
Hanudel; Robert E. Harnish; Milton W. 
Harper; George S. Hartman; Richard P. 
Hazard; Louis J. Hillenbrand, Jr.; Warren 
A. Himmelwright; Raymond W. Hinterlei- 
ter; Ralph C. Hird; William C. Hittinger; 
Chester A. Hoffman; Bernard E. Hoffner; 
Thomas S. C. Holberton, Jr.; Seymour L. 
Hollander; Alfred E. Horka; John J. 
Hucker; Isaac M. Hunsberger; Floyd E. 
Ivey; Ralph B. Johnston; John Kellett; Wil- 
liam E. Keiser; Joseph F. Kemmcr; Aldrich 
F. Kendall; Richard L. Kirk; William C. 
Kirschner; Louis E. Klein; Frederick S. 
Klopp; Thomas J. Kochuba; Robert C. 
Kramer; Donald E. Krebs; Frederick A. 
Krone; Charles G. Kucher; Richard L. 
Kulp; Joseph J. Kurtz; Stephen Kutosh; 
John C. Lampert; Arthur L. Landesman; 
Elwood D. Latimer; Theodore C. Laube; 
Donald W. Lay ton; George H. Leach; Ross 
W. Leaver; Albert E. Lee; Howard C. Leif- 
heit; Jess B. Loucks; George E. Lowe; Rich- 
ard M. Luckring; Creighton L. Lytle; Rob- 
ert R. Macy; Keron M. Manion; Brookman 
J. March; John H. Matthewson; William 
McGee; Frank J. McGrath; Robert J. Mc- 
Gregor; Robert M. Mclnerney; William C. 
Mcjames; Chandler H. McKaig; Leonard J. 
McKinley; William J. Meikle; John D. Mer- 
rier; Richard E. Metzger; Robert D. Miller; 
E. Montford Mortimer; Rafaele F. Muraca; 
Harold R. Nace; Frederick W. Nadig; 
James W. Needles; Alexander B. Neill; 
James W. Niemeyer; Frank Novitski; Ernest 
R. Oberholzer; Howard H. Ockelmann; 
David C. Osborn; Robert L. Oyler; Preston 
Parr; James jM. Phelan; Harry P. Ponisi, 
Jr.; Philip J. Prang, Jr.; Robert J. Priestley; 
James F. Pritchard; David Richards, Jr.; 
Hugh W. Richards; Augustus A. Riemondy, 
Jr.; Arthur T. Robb; Robert E. Roberson; 
Ross B. Robinson; John A. Ross; Austin W. 
Ruch; James L. Sawyer; John S. Saylor; 
William D. Schaeffer; Josef W. SchaU; 
Richard G. Schenck; Robert K. Schmoyer; 
Leonard A. Schneider; Lemuel E. Sentz; 
Nym K. Seward; Rodney D. Shaffer; Rich- 
ard M. Shepherd; Harold D. Sherwood; 
Robert R. Shively; William A. Siegele; 
Robert E. Siegfried; Robert N. Simonson; 
Frank E. Smith, Jr.; Jared S. Smith; Robert 
C. Smith; Wilson P. Snyder; John J. Som- 
ers; Harvey F. Soule; Charles S. Steiner; 
William L. Stump; Robert S. Swoyer; 
George C. Tabor; Maurice E. Taylor; 
Boyd U. Teufer; Philip A. Thomas; Rob- 
ert L. Tilton; William W. ToUey; Robert 
J. Valleau; Fred H. Vogel; Harold O. Voll- 
mer; Edward L. Walter; Glenn C. Wanich; 
Robert P. Whipple; Edward F. William; 



349 



Kingsley G. Williams; Nathan L. Wilson; 
William G. Willmann; Thomas R. Winco; 
William R. Woodruff. 

CHESS CLUB 

Vresident: Lowell K. Oliphant 

Vice-President: Maynard G. Arsove 

Secretary-Treasurer: Richard B. Moyer 

Members: Maynard G. Arsove, W. Berto- 

let Bovvers, Theodore C. Gams, Robert A. 

Hammond, William E. Keiser, Kay F. Mis- 

kinis, Richard B. Moyer, Herbert MuUer, 

Lowell K. Oliphant, Chester VanBrunt, 

Louis A. Waters. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING SOCIETY 

President: Stephen T. Lowry 
Vice-President: Howard G. Luley 
Secretary: James H. Boucher 
Treasurer: David S. Geissinger 
Members: John M. Adams; George J. 
Bleul; James H. Boucher; Sidney B. Bowne; 
William A. Brooks; Gene M. DeGiacomo; 
Ward A. Detwiler; Edward L. Diehl; Rob- 
ert J. Fisher; George E. Funk; David S. 
Geissinger; Richard L. Gerhart; John Gres- 
sitt; Daniel Karpowich; Edward A. Kister; 
Stephen T. Lowry; Howard G. Luley; John 
J. McGee; John L. McGonigle; George W. 
Randall; Robert A. Ritchings; William R. 
Schmoll. 

COLLEGIANS 
Leader: Edgar C. Slack 
Manager: William S. Dawless 
Members: John F. Belcher; Robert A. 
Bennett; H. Radford Beucler; Warren F. 
Boyer; I. Reid Collmann; William S. Daw- 
less; Walter H. Gaedcke; Richard L. Kirk; 
James P. Mulhern; Lemuel E. Sentz; Edgar 
C. Slack; Victor E. Smith. 

COMBINED MUSICAL CLUBS 

President: Frederick R. Gilmore 
Glee Club Manager: 

Willard A. Litzenberger 
Symphony Orchestra Director: 

Thomas J. Kochuba 
Faculty Adviser: T. Edgar Shields 
GLEE CLUB 
1st Tenor: Glenn W. Boyer; Clarence F. 
Fehnel; John E. Gehr; Harry F. Jones; Har- 
old King; Elwood D. Latimer; Sandor 
Mark; James M. Phelan; Frank E. Smith; 
Kenneth H. Smith; Robert O. Warwick; 
William R. Williams. 

2nd Tenor: Edward B. Annett; Robert 
M. Bowman; Alvin L. Breen; Alan H. 
Conklin; Edgar R. Conover; James J. Dona- 
hue; Philip G. Foust; Joseph C. Gabuzda; 



Harvey G. HoUenbach; Anthony M. Kar- 
wacki; Charles G. Kucher; Alan C. Merr- 
mann; Courter D. Mills; Leon H. Plante; 
Abram Samuels; Q. John Schwarz; O. Davis 
Summers; Philip A. Sweet; Kingsley Wil- 
liams. 

ist Bass: Robert K. Beckwith; Creighton 

D. Bickley; Donald W. Bedell; Frank F. 
Berman; Frank H. Bower; David J. Car- 
rigan; John K. Cochran; John F. Clark 
Richard K. Eberts; Robert D. Gilmore 
Frederick R. Gilmore; Irvin W. Gilmore 
Richard Hardy; Caleb W. Holyoke; Floyd 

E. Ivey; Willard A. Litzenberger; George 
H. Leach; Philip Lutters; Robert J. Mc- 
Gregor; John W. A'lartin; Preston Parr; 
Thomas J. Ritter; Robert W. Saylor; Rich- 
ard E. Slee; George C. Stone; Charles G. 
Thornburgh; Franklin H. Young. 

2nd Bass: Alexander H. Bolyn; Robert M. 
Longley; A. Ward Canizares; James H. Cal- 
lahan; Samuel I. Cory; Robert G. Eitner; 
John L. Gretz; Covel T. Jerauld; Wallace 
C. Kendall; Basil W. Logechnik; Richard O. 
Marsten; Warren K. Morgan; Henry D. 
Moll; P. William Marshall; Henry C. Ost; 
Robert M. Paddock; Richard B. Palmer; 
Kenneth H. Rahn; Robert R. Ressler; Gil- 
man B. Smith; James W. Woods; Roy E. 
Woodling; Robert E. Weltz; Frank A. 
Zimmerman; Robert L. Coutts; Henry C. 
Farrand. 

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Violins: Thomas J. Kochuba; Fred F. 
Berman; Alton P. Dieffenbach; James Gore; 
Vincent F. Grasso; Michael Guidon; Ste- 
phen Kutosh; Harvey G. HoUenbach; Law- 
rence A. Mosier; Jesse E. Reed; Donald J. 
Rentz; Preston W. Parvis; Bernard J. Egan; 
Arthur F. Mann. 

Cellos: Carl Neuendorfer, David E. Rich- 
ards. 

Bass: Robert W. Rouse; Kenneth H. 
Smith. 

Flutes: Robert H. Bartholomew; May- 
nard C. Arsove; Richard O. Marsten; 
Frankhn H. Young; William D. Schaeffer. 

Clarinets: James M. Cordrey; C. Raymond 
Kiefer; Raymond R. Myers; Richard B. 
Seals; Whitney J. Young; Donald E. 
Boughner. 

Cornets: Theodore Peters; Louis E. 
Sharpe. 

Trombones: William M. Conway; Ed- 
ward B. Annett; Kenneth H. Rahn. 

French Horn: Hugh B. Frey; Courtland 
V. Davis. 

Oboe: Marion C. Burgy. 

Piano: Donald R. Schoen. 
Tyijipani: H. Roswell Davidson. 



350 



CUT AND THRUST 

President: Harvey C. Griffith, Jr. 

Vice-President: Richard R. Bright 

Secretary: Donald Eadie 

Treasurer: Lynn C. Bartlett 

Members: Lynn C. Bartlett; Richard R. 

Bright; Jerome R. Dorkin; Donald Eadie; 

Chester L. Finch, Jr.; Panos B. Georgopulo; 

George L. Griffith, Jr.; Harvey C. Grif- 

fitli, Jr.; Carl Hartdegen, III; Alver H. 

Ives, Jr.; Donald E. Krebs; William A. 

Kuhar; Arthur L. Landesman; Robert A. 

Nicrosini; Charles M. Norhn; Francis H. 

Rockett, Jr.; Charles H. Savage; Richard 

E. Slee; C. Arthur Stearns, Jr.; Kurt H. 
Weber. 

CYANIDE 

President: Archie D. Tifft 
Vice-President: Frank E. Smith, Jr. 
Secretary -Treasurer: Arthur H. Rich 
Facidty Adviser: Claude G. Beardslee 
MeDibers: Joseph N. Ambrogi, Jr.; Harry 
L. Boyer, Jr.; A. Bruce Brown; Richard H. 
Brenneman; Geors;e E. Elliott, Jr.; James 
A. Gordon; Edwin H. Klein; Wilkes Mc- 
Clave, II; Malcohn F. McConnell, Jr.; Rich- 
ard E. iMetius, Frank S. McKenna; Ralph 

F. Moss, Jr.; John H. Norwood; Arthur H. 
Rich; John M. Roach; Robert N. Simonsen; 
Frank E. Smith, Jr.; Robert B. Steele; Rob- 
ert S. Struble; Arthur D. Tifft. 

DEBATING COUNCIL 

Presidetit: Frederic N. Bahnson 
Vice-Preside7it: Henry G. Werner 

Secretary-Treasurer: Albert W. Foster 
Faczdty Adviser: J. Calvin Callaghan 

Delta Omicroji Theta: Frederic N. Bahn- 
son; William H. Barnard; William F. Boore, 
Jr.; Charles J. Dick; Howard V. Donohoe; 
Albert W. Foster; C. Raymond Kiefer; Wil- 
ham E. Keiser; Stephen Kowalyshyn, Jr.; 
Robert W. Leavens; Stephen T. Lowry; 
Charles F. iMeyer; John R. Penn; Arnold O. 
Putnam; S. WaOace Roberts, Jr.; Donald R. 
Schoen; Henry G. Werner. 

Intercollegiate Group: Frederic N. Bahn- 
son; William H. Barnard; William F. Boore, 
Jr.; Charles J. Dick; Howard V. Donohoe; 
Albert W. Foster; C. Raymond Kiefer; 
Robert W. Leavens; Stephen T. Lowry; 
Charles F. Meyer; John R. Penn; Arnold O. 
Putnam; S. Wallace Roberts, Jr.; Henry G. 
Werner. 

Intramural Group: Hugh Boyd; Frank E. 
Felt; Richard R. Bright; Richard L. Hey- 
niger; James J. Donahue; Richard B. Palmer; 



John H. Norwood; Donald R. Schoen; Ed- 
win H. Dafter; Joseph F. Kemmer; Roy B. 
Cowin; Walter R. Robinson; George J. 
Bleul; Herbert C. DeValve; Frank J. Mc- 
Grath; George R. Potter; Francis H. Rock- 
ett; Grendon K. Sebold; George T. McKin- 
ley; Richard Ostheimer; Donald B. Parish; 
Sumner W. Reid; Dale Y. Freed; Theodore 
C. Gams; Lynn C. Bartlett; Robert W. Neu- 
ber; Neal G. Bergstresser; Ludwig E. Gody- 
cki; Albert Clark; Edmond C. Fetter; Rich- 
ard M. F. Davis; Lewis W. Hill; William T. 
DeLong; Robert H. Holland; Anthony C. 
Fortosis; John H. Gross; Andrew E. B. 
Funk; David P. Scoblionko; Albert G. 
Fulton; Leonard C. Schwab; Phihp J. Prang; 
Robert J. Priestley; Ross B. Robinson; John 
E. Doxsey; Alfred L. Haft. 

DE MOLAY CLUB 

President: LeRoy A. Wiley 

Vice-President: Irving B. Remsen 

Treasurer: Alfred E. Horka 

Facidty Advisers: 

Carl O. Keck; John C. Mertz 

Members: Walter L. Anders; Joseph F. 
Arbogast; Donald W. Bedell; James E. 
Davis; Somers H. Endicott, Jr.; Donald T. 
Foster; Randall C. Giddings; Richard C. 
Gottschall; Howard A. Hoch, Jr.; Alfred 
E. Horka; WilUam J. Meikle; Irving B. 
Remsen, Jr.; Richard M. Treco; Robert W. 
Rouse; LeRoy A. Wiley. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
SOCIETY 

President: Frederick H. Housel 
Vice-President: Albert C. Foss 
Secretary: Stephen Kowalyshyn 
Treasurer: Walter H. Vogelsberg 
Members: Joseph N. Ambrogi; William 
H. Barnard; Willard P. Bear; Fred W. Ber- 
ger, Walter B. Bowers; Stanley Caplan; 
Harvey H. Chamberlain; John F. Clark, Jr.; 
WUliam H. Clark, Jr.; Theodore R. Cort- 
right; Jack R. Dennis; Alton P. Dieffenbach; 
William A. Eisele; Albert C. Foss; Roy H. 
Fredrickson; H. Bardey Frey, Jr.; Louis G. 
Gitzendanner; Frederick H. Housel; Peter 
Koromitz; Stephen Kowalyshyn; Donald W. 
Kurtz; Frank P. Librizzi; Roderick W. 
Link; Robert H. Mathes; Richard D. Mun- 
nikhuysen; John A. Quincy; George H. 
Schaeffer, Jr.; Kenneth H. Smith; Carl C. 
Stotz; Everett C. Strickland; Michael Tem- 
oshok; Walter H. Vogelsberg; Stuart H. 
Vogt; Richard R. Waer; Raymond S. Wil- 
lard, Jr. 



351 



THE 1941 EPITOME 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief: Donald R. Schoen 

Assistant Editor: Richard L. Vockel 

Senior Sectioti Chief: Henry D. Chandler 

Living Group Editor: Jesse F. Beers, Jr. 

Organizations Editor: A. Bruce Brown 

Sports Editor: Frank S. McKenna 

Class Editor: William J. Meikle 

Photography Editor: Robert N. Simonsen 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager: William L. Archer 
Financial Manager: Allen M. Paget 
Faculty Adviser: Kenneth K. Kost 

Sophofnore Competitors: Lynn C. Bartlett; 
Thomas M. Buck; John S. Curtis; Edwin H. 
Dafter, Jr., Samuel J. Davy; John Gressitt; 
Alan D. Hinrichs; Joseph F. Kemmer; Don- 
ald E. Krebs; Ralph D. Moyer; Richard B. 
Palmer; Robert W. Pugh; John M. Stock- 
bridge; William R. Sultzer. 



E. W. BROWN ASTRONOMICAL 
SOCIETY 

President: Alvin H. Breen 

Vice-Presidetit: Francis H. Rockett, Jr. 

Secretary-Treasurer: Lynn C. Bartlett 

Faculty Adviser: Ralph N. Van Arnam 

Members: Lynn C. Bartlett; Alvin L. 
Breen; Albert Clark, Jr.; Jack Coriell; David 
W. Green; John A. Karas; Robert E. Rob- 
erson; Samuel W. Roberts, Jr.; Francis H. 
Rockett, Jr.; Albert L. Thalhamer; Walter 
S. Titlow, Jr. 



ETA KAPPA NU 

President: Louis G. Gitzendanner 
Vice-President: Alton P. Dieffenbach 
Recording Secretary: Albert C. Foss 
Corresponding Secretary: 

Frederick H. Housel 
Treasurer: Stephen Kowalyshyn 
Bridge Editor: Walter H. Vogelsberg 

■ Members: W. Bertolet Bowers; John F. 
Clark, Jr.; Alton P. Dieffenbach; William 
A. Eisele; Albert C. Foss, Jr.; Roy H. 
Fredrickson; Louis G. Gitzendanner; Fred- 
erick H. Housel; Stephen Kowalyshyn; 
Frank P. Librizzi; Clarence M. Sanderson; 
Grendon K. Sebold; Carl C. Stotz; Michael 
Temoshok; Walter H. Vogelsberg; Ray- 
mond S. Willard, Jr. 



ETA SIGMA PHI 

President: Harold King 

Vice-President: Welles R. Bliss 

Treasurer: Carl G. Konolige 

Recording Secretary: John F. Hamblin, Jr. 

Corresponding Secretary: Leon H. Plante 

Sergeant at Antzs: Douglas M. Brown 

Facidty Adviser: Horace W. Wright 

Members: Welles R. Bliss; Douglas M. 
Brown; Harold Caplan; John F. Hamblin, 
Jr.; Harold King; Carl G. Konolige; Leon 
H. Plante; John R. Pohnsky; Robert C. 
Ramsdell; George H. Ried; James A. 
Shafer; William R. Williams. 

FRESHMAN HANDBOOK 
COMMITTEE 

Mei7ibers: Robert M. Ulmer, Chairman; 
Anthony R. Carcione; Henry D. Chandler. 

INDUSTRIAL MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING SOCIETY 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING SOCIETY 

President: C. Denis Gilchrist 
Vice-President: Allen H. Zane 

Secretary: Robert L Felch 
Treasurer: Warren E. Deifer 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SOCIETY 

Chairman: Robert Caemmerer 

Vice-Chairtnan: John A. Kimberley 

Secretary: John H. Dudley 

Treasurer: Ellis R. Snovel 

Members: Boris Baiko; Walter P. Blamire; 
Edwin S. Bishop; Robert D. Board; Richard 
A. Bobbe; John M. Bontya; Frank T. Brun- 
dage; Irwin R. Burkey; Frederick C. Butler; 
Robert Caemmerer; Charles E. Clain; 
Charles V. Clarke; Edward J. Coffey; Law- 
rence H. Compton; Charles P. Davidson; 
David R. Dehm; Warren E. Deifer; Rich- 
ard M. Dietz; Robert C. Dimmich; John H. 
Dudley; Leonard H. Edwards; Stevenson M. 
Enterline; Robert L Felch; Robert E. Finn; 
Vincent A. Frantz; William E. Fry; Wil- 
liam E. Gheen; C. Denis Gilchrist; William 

E. Good; Richardson Gray; Henry J. 
Griesemer; Clarence W. Hackney; Donald 
J. Hawkins; Edward D. Heins; Robert A. 
Heironimus; Claude E. Hensinger; William 
K. Hodson; Caleb W. Holyoke; John M. 
Hood; Alver H. Ives; Robert W. Jensen; 
Covel T. Jerauld; Robert A. Johler; Charles 

F. Kalmbach; John A. Kimberley; Francis 
A. Kotulak; Edward W. Kraus; William H. 
Lehr; Valentine Lichenstein; Harold Z. 



352 



Llewellyn; John F. Loose; Philip Lutters 
George R. Lutz; William S. McConnor 
Roger J. jMcNamara; Edwin S. Malloy 
George F. Messinger; Arthur E. Moog 
William H. iMorse; Richard W. Mueller 
Benjamin Ojserkis; Philip H. Powers; John 
W. Prinkey; Clarence G. Reber; Joseph T. 
Riley; George iM. Ritchie; Samuel W. 
Roberts; Philip B. Robeson; John R. Romig; 
Clyde C. Ruffle; William R. SchneU; How- 
ard O. Schroeder; Charles H. Schumacher; 
William J. Skinner; Ellis R. Snovel; Clinton 
C. Snyder; Robert B. Spilman; Bernard V. 
Stuber; Edward A. Sutherland; Lindsley D. 
Van der Veer; Richard L. Vockel; Richard 
C. Wells; Robert A. Wilson; Kenneth C. 
Wotring; Jacob F. Young; Allen H. Zane; 
Hysler B. Zane. 

INTERDORMITORY COUNCIL 

President: Wilbur Chase 
Vice-President: Robert C. McMichael 
Secretary: Ray S. Willard 
Treasurer: Donald A. Bender 
Facidty Adviser: Claude G. Beardslee 
MeiJibers: Price House— Wilbur Chase 
Taylor House— Section A: Luther A. Mohr: 
Section B: Frederick S. Klopp; Section C 
Richard E. Slee; Section D: Robert R. Halli- 
gan; Section E: Donald A. Bender; Richards 
House— Section 1; Section II-A: Robert N. 
Gusdorff; Section Il-B: Howard O. 
Schroeder; Section III-A: William T. Bos- 
tock; Section Ill-B: Charles E. Clain; Sec- 
tion IV-A: Robert C. McMichael; Section 
IV-B: Edward M. Biggs; Drinker House- 
Section \: William R. SchneU; Section II-A: 
Charles B. Seib; Section II-B: John H. Dud- 
ley; Section III-A: William S. McConner; 
Section III-B: Stephen T. Lowry; Section 
IV-A: Eugene R. Springer; Section IV-B: 
William S. Dawless. 

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

President: Roy S. Zachary 
Vice-President: William L. Archer 

Secretary: John P. Taylor 
Treasurer: Norman M. I5arber 
Alpha Chi RI}o: Senior, J. H. Mathewson; 
Junior, A. W. Foster. Alpha Kappa Pi: 
Senior, H. V. Donahoe; Junior, J. N. Am- 
brogi. Alpha Tau Omega: Senior, D. W. 
Burke; Junior, O. W. Cooke. Beta Kappa: 
Senior, W. C. Kendall; Junior, O. W. 
Cooke. Beta Theta Pi: Senior, W. E. Scott; 
Junior, R. H. Brenneman. Chi Phi: Senior, 
J. L. Conneen; Junior, R. L. Heyniger. Chi 
Psi: Senior, R. L. Vockel; Junior, A. F. 
Lechie. Delta Phi: Senior, R. B. Johnston; 



Junior, J. O. Phillips. Delta Sigma Phi: 
Senior, G. W. Peterson; Junior, E. L. Pinto. 
Delta Tau Delta: Senior, W. H. Vogelsberg; 
Junior, W. McClave. Delta Upsilon: Senior, 
J. Beauchamp; Junior, H. M. WiUiams. 
Kappa Alpha: Senior, W. L. Archer; Junior, 
R. O. Symmes. Kappa Sig^na: Senior, R. N. 
Brown; Junior, A. H. Thomas. Lambda Chi 
Alpha: Senior, N. M. Barber; Junior, S. R. 
Barker. Phi Delta Theta: Senior, P. R. Horn- 
brook; Junior, R. M. Palmer. Phi Gamma 
Delta: Senior, W. B. Simpson; Junior, R. F. 
jA'Ioss. Phi Sigma Kappa: Senior, C. W. 
Baker; Junior, E. H. Klein. Pi Kappa Alpha: 
Senior, R. I. Felch; Junior, H. W. Jones. 
Pi Lajnbda Phi: Senior, S. Grossman; Junior, 
F. H. Rich. Psi Upsilon: Senior, G. W. 
Woefel; Junior, W. R. Hitchcock. Signia 
Alpha Ma: Senior, R. J. Berg; Junior, W. 
H. Olinsky. Sigj}ia Chi: Senior, J. P. Taylor; 
Junior, H. T. Reuwer. Sig7m Nu: Senior, 
R. S. Zachary; Junior, R. B. Steele. Sig?na 
Phi: Senior, j. P. Beal; Junior, A. H. Rich. 
Sig?m Phi Epsilon: Senior, T. A. Wallace; 
Junior, R. N. Simonsen. Tau Delta Phi: 
Senior, A. Samuels; Junior, S. A. Mark. 
Theta Delta Chi: Senior, R. W. Leavens; 
Junior, V. H. Adams. Theta Kappa Phi: 
Senior, W. F. Foley; Junior, C. E. McGrath. 
Theta Xi: Senior, J. G. McGinnis; Junior, 
A. Descheemaeker. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 
CLUB 

President: John F. Hamblin, Jr. 
Vice-President: Arthur H. Rich 
Secretary: Welles R. Bliss 
Faculty Adviser: Leon W. Godshall 
Members: William L. Archer; Welles R. 
Bliss; Donald E. Boughner; Raymond D. 
Czapko; Robert N. Davis; John L. Dia- 
mond; Norman J. Faber; Kilbourn Gordon, 
Jr.; John F. Hamblin, Jr.; Wilbur E. Henry, 
Jr.; John M. Hood; Harold King; Conrad 
E. Kluger; Roydon S. Margolies; Edwin S. 
Markel; Robert W. Neuber; Leon H. 
Plante; Arthur H. Rich; Clyde C. Ruffle; 
Abram Samuels; James A. Shafer; Ralph 
D. Stoneback; Richard A. Ware; Robert 
M. Wertz; George W. Wolfsten, Jr.; Shel- 
don S. Zalkind. 

LAMBDA MU SIGMA 

President: Allen M. Paget 
Vice-President: Raymond A. Newhard 

Secretary: Thomas J. Lewis, Jr. 

Treasurer: Ralph D. Stoneback 
Members: Donald N. Bachman; Donald 



353 



E. Boughner; Donald T. Foster; Thomas J. 
Lewis, Jr.; John H. Mowen; Robert S. 
Newcomb, Raymond A. Newhard; John J. 
Nitti; Z. Edwin Nowicki; Allen M. Paget; 
Richard M. Palmer; Theodore D. Propper; 
Richard G. Rasmussen; Howard W. Rie- 
mer; Robert W. Rosenquest; Theophile 
Saulnier, Jr.; Ralph D. Stoneback; Frank A. 
Szabo; Normand J. Wilhelmy. 

METALLURGICAL SOCIETY 

President: James Mitchell 
Vice-President: Frank E. Weise, Jr. 
Secretary: Wallace C. Kendall 
Treasurer: Stephen D. Smoke 
Mejnbers: Kenneth R. Bartholomew; 
Jesse O. Betterton, Jr.; Richard A. Buser; 
James E. Chafey; William L. Clark; Charles 
H. Conover; George S. Coopey; Samuel S. 
Cross, Jr.; John F. Croushore; Wilham T. 
De Long; Ezequiel C. Dominguez; Charles 
T. Edwards; Arthur L. Fischer; Harold A. 
Grubb; Albert W. Hess; Wallace C. Ken- 
dall; Otto G. Leichliter; Stephen G. Maco; 
James A. Marvin, Jr.; Robert C. McMichael; 
Albert M. Miller; James Mitchell; Luther 
A. Alohr; Robert E. Montbach; Donald Q. 
Morehouse; Charles M. Norlin; Richard 
Ostheimer; John L. Peterson; James B. 
Price, Jr.; Louis A. Priolo; Charles H. Sav- 
age; Fred J. Schineller; John W. Sheibley; 
Eugene M. Smith; Stephen D. Smoke; Al- 
vah H. Thomas; Gustavo M. Valenzuela; 
Frank E. Weise, Jr. 

MINING AND GEOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY 

President: George L. Griffith 

Vice-President: Harold H. Werft 

Secretary: Roy E. Woodling 

Treasurer: Richard B. Palmer 

Members: Faculty: A. Copeland Callen; 

Bradford WUlard. 

Students: Thomas P. Bradford; Edwin A. 
Brown; George L. Griffith; James H. Kid- 
der; John J. Maloney; Richard O. Marsten; 
John J. Matzko; Richard B. Palmer; George 
W. Phillips; Harry A. Reichenbach; George 
C. Russell; RusseU M. Seward; Harold H. 
Werft; Roy E. Woodling; Frederick W. 
Wright. 

MUSTARD AND CHEESE 

President: R. Harry Gunnison 
Vice-President: J. Dukes Wooters 

Secretary: Wilkes McClave 

Business Manager: Hazen P. Chase 

Technical Director: William H. Barnard 



Members: William H. Barnard; Richard 
J. Berg; Everett A. Britton; Lewis J. Caulk; 
Hazen P. Chase; Oakley W. Cooke; Robert 
W. Dech; Harry J. Friedman; R. Harry 
Gunnison; Robert N. Gusdorfl; Conrad G. 
Kluger; Thomas J. Lewis; WiUiam A. 
Alatheson; John H. Mathewson; Wilkes 
McClave; Arthur H. Rich; Walter H. Vo- 
gelsberg; Everett F. Warner; J. Dukes 
Wooters; Roy S. Zachary. 

NEWTONIAN SOCIETY 

President: Frank H. Bower 
Vice-President atid Treasurer: 

Maynard G. Arsove 
Secretary: Walter S. Titlow 

Members: Maynard G. Arsove; Robert 

D. Bailey; Robert K. Beckwith; Charles S. 
Bennett; Taylor A. Birckhead; Sidney R. 
Bowen; Frank H. Bower; Samuel Breshman; 
A. Ward Canizares; Stanley Caplan; Wil- 
liam H. Clark; Charles D. Curtiss; Willet 

E. Egge; William A. Eichlin; Edward A. 
Fehnel; Wheeler Gilmore; Ludwig E. 
Godycki; Robert M. Hammer; Alan D. 
Hinrichs; Walter R. Hoerner; George W. 
Houston; Isaac M. Hunsberger; Max Kris- 
siep, Jr.; Arthur L. Landesman; Claude O. 
Messinger; Robert Metzner; Robert C. 
Moore; John H. Mueller; Hans Nelken; 
Howard L. Nielsen; Allen H. Okamoto; 
Donald B. Parish; Kenneth Porter; Philip 
H. Powers; Clarence O. Prinkey; Robert 
W. Pugh; Hugh W. Richards; Richard C. 
Roth; Robert W. Saylor; Robert E. Sieg- 
fried; William L. Stump; Walter S. Titlow; 
Walter S. Tompkinson; John P. Townsend; 
David L Troxell; Richard R. Waer; Wil- 
liam C. Walker; Glenn C. Wanich; Joseph 
A. Wantuck; Robert Weller; Forwood C. 
Wiser; Franklin H. Young. 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

President: Charles F. Kalmbach 

Vice-President: Henry D. Chandler 

Treasurer: J. Dukes Wooters, Jr. 

Secretary: Claude G. Beardslee 

Adviser: Charles A. Seidle 

The Active Circle: Student Members: 
William L. Archer; John C. Attwood; 
Henry D. Chandler; Frederick R. Gilmore; 
Charles F. Kalmbach; Albert E. Lee, Jr.; 
John H. Mathewson; Richard E. Metius; 
Augustus A. Riemondy; Donald R. Schoen; 
William E. Scott; Robert N. Simonsen; 
Frank E. Smith, Jr.; Robert M. Ulmer; 
Richard L. Vockel; Walter H. Vogelsberg; 
J. Dukes Wooters, Jr.; Roy S. Zachary. 



354 



Alumni Members: Walter R. Okeson; 
John I. Kirkpatrick. 

Faculty a/id Ad?ninistrative Members: 
Claude G. Beardslee; A. Copeland Callen; 
Fred V. Larkin; Philip iM. Palmer. 

The Inactrce Circle: Resident Former 
Undergraduate Members: Donald C. Bar- 
num; Franc H. Burnett, Jr.; John K. Con- 
neen; Warren P. Fairbanks; Frank C. 
Rabold, Jr.; Howell A. Scobey, Jr.; Charles 
K. Zug. 

Faculty and Administrative Members: 
Neil Carothers; Wray H. Congdon; Gilbert 
E. Doan; Howard Eckfeldt; Augustus H. 
Fretz; John W. Maxwell; Howard R. 
Reiter; Charles A. Seidle; Paul E. Short; 
Bradley Stoughton; Clement C. Williams. 

PHI ALPHA THETA 

President: Thomas R. Hunt 
Secretary-Treasurer: Raymond R. White 
Faculty Adviser: Dr. George D. Harmon 
Faculty Adviser: Dr. Lawrence H. Gipson 

Me7?ibers: George Bartlett Curtis; Walter 
Francis Daney; Lawrence Henrv Gipson; 
George D. Harmon; Thomas R. Hunt; 
John A. Kaufmann; James L. Shearer; Rich- 
ard Anderson Ware; Stephen Weinrib; 
Raymond Robert White; Russell S. Beaz- 
ley; C. William Freed, Jr.; George Houck, 
Jr.; Richard B. Johnson; Gene Joseph 
Musso; John Richard Polinsky. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

President: Frank C. Becker 

Vice-Presidefit: Jonathan B. Severs 

Secretary: PhiKp M. Palmer 

Treasurer: Roy B. Cowin 

Members: Bernard Altshuler; John C. 
Attwood; Frederic N. Bahnson; Frank C. 
Becker; Frederick A. Bradford; James H. 
Bricker; Carl F. Brown; Edwin A. Brown; 
Sydney M. Brown; Robert A. Buerschaper; 
David W. Burke; Leonard P. Burton; J. 
Calvin Callaghan; Neil Carothers; Preston 
B. Carwile; Glenn J. Christensen; Roy B. 
Cowin; George B. Curtis; Edward H. Cut- 
ler; Hugh R. Davidson; Herbert M. Dia- 
mond; Jerome R. Dorkin; Adelbert Ford; 
Frank J. Fornoff; Walton Forstall; Mervin 
J. Fry; George J. Gabuzda; Eugene R. L. 
Gaughran; Frederick R. Gilmore; Lawrence 
H. Gipson; George D. Harmon; Frank V. 
Hertzog; Garth A. Howland; Thomas R. 
Hunt; Charles F. Kalmbach; John A. Kauf- 
mann; John L Kirkpatrick; Kenneth K. 
Kost; Stephen Kowalyshyn; Charles R. Lar- 
kin; Voris V. Latshaw; Albert E. Lee; Wil- 



lard A. Litzenberger; John C. Mertz; Robert 
P. More; Raymond R. Myers; Harvey A. 
Neville; Philip M. Palmer; Donald T. Per- 
kins; Arthur E. Pitcher; Joseph H. Quinn; 
Joseph B. Reynolds; Edgar H. Riley; Don- 
ald R. Schoen; James P. Sell; Jonathan B. 
Severs; James L. Shearer; Lloyd L. Small 
Benjamin L. Suavely; Robert B. Spilman 
William R. Transue; Francis J. Trembley 
John S. Tremper; L. Reed Tripp; Richard 

A. Ware. 

PHI ETA SIGMA 

President: Lynn C. Bartlett 
Vice-President: Walter S. Titlow 
Secretary: William C. Brower 
Historian: Maynard G. Arsove 

Members: Maynard G. Arsove; Lynn C. 
Bartlett; Robert K. Beckwith; Charles S. 
Bennett; Frank H. Bower; William C. 
Brower; Arlington W. Canizares; Stanley 
Caplan; Edward A. Fehnel; Wheeler Gil- 
more; Ludwig E. Godycki; Walter R. 
Hoerner; Fenwick P. Horn; Isaac M. Huns- 
berger; Arthur F. Mann; John J. Meehan; 
Robert C. Moore; John H. Mueller; Pres- 
ton Parr, Jr.; Robert W. Pugh; Hugh W. 
Richards; Robert W. Saylor; Walter S. 
Titlow; Walter S. Tomkinson; Franklin 
H. Young. 

PHYSICS SOCIETY 

President: Frederic N. Bahnson 

Vice-President: Richard B. Moyer 

Secretary: Max Krissiep, Jr. 

Treasurer: A. Bruce Brown 

Faculty Adviser: Charles R. Larkin 

Members: Charles J. Apolenis; Frederic 
N. Bahnson; George H. Brower; William 
C. Brower; A. Bruce Brown; Jack Coriell; 
Hugh R. Davidson; Robert H. Ewing; 
Leonard R. Greene; Morton F. Kaplon; 
John A. Karas; Max Krissiep, Jr.; Alfred 

B. Laponsky; Robert M. Maiden; Richard 
W. Mason; Roy E. Mathews; Freeman P. 
McKay, Jr.; Richard B. Moyer; John T. 
Ransom, H; Theodore H. Redman; Joseph 
B. Reynolds, Jr.; Rudolph W. Samer; Louis 
E. Sharpe; William L. Strouse; Albert L. 
Thalhamer; Kurt H. Weber; Henry G. 
Werner; L. Robert White. 

PI DELTA EPSILON 

Presidejit: Charles F. Kalmbach 

Vice-President: Robert M. Ulmer 

Treasurer: Anthony R. Carcione 

Secretary: Henry D. Chandler 



355 



Members: John C. Attwood; Anthony R. 
Carcione; Robert J. Caverly; Henry D. 
Chandler; James A. Gordon; Charles F. 
Kalmbach; Wallace C. Kendall; Edwin H. 
Klein; John H. Mathewson; William J. 
Meikle; John M. Roach; Donald R. Schoen; 
Charles B. Seib; Frank E. Smith, Jr.; Rob- 
ert M. Ulmer; Richard L. Vockel; Howard 
M. Williams. 

Faculty Members: Allen J. Barthold; Dale 
H. Gramley; Robert F. Herrick; Kenneth 
K. Kost; John W. Maxwell; Charles J. 
Moravec. 



PI MU EPSILON 

President: John D. Mettler, Jr. 

Treasurer: Philip G. Foust 

Secretary: Louis G. Gitzendanner 

Members: Jesse O. Betterton, Jr.; A. 
Bruce Brown; Robert N. Brown; Richard 
A. Buser; John F. Clark, Jr.; Samuel S. 
Cross, Jr.; Alton P. DiefFenbach, William 
A. Eisele, Philip G. Foust, Harry J. Fried- 
man; Louis G. Gitzendanner, Harold W. 
Haines, Edward D. Heins, Frederick H. 
Housel, Charles F. Kalmbach, Albert E. 
Lee; Frank P. Librizzi; Robert M. Maiden; 
Frank S. McKenna; John D. Mettler, Jr.; 
Lowell K. Oliphant, Clarence G. Reber; 
George M. Ritchie, Jr.; Henry A. Seebald; 
Louis E. Sharpe; Robert N. Simonsen; John 
J. Somers; Carl C. Stotz; L. Robert White. 



PI TAU SIGMA 

President: Robert L Felch 

Vice-President: Claude D. Gilchrist 

Corresponding Secretary: Edward D. Heins 

Treasurer: Robert Caemmerer 
Recording Secretary: Clarence G. Reber 

Metnbers: James M. Beauchamp, Jr.; 
Walter P. Blamire, Jr.; Robert M. Bow- 
man; Robert N. Brown; Irwin R. Burkey; 
Robert W. Clark; Robert Caemmerer; 
Warren E. Deifer; Richard M. Dietz; Rob- 
ert C. Dimmich; Robert L Felch; Claude D. 
Gilchrist; William E. Good; Henry J. 
Griesemer; Edward D. Heins; William K. 
Hodson; Charles F. Kalmbach; Francis A. 
Kotulak; William H. Lehr; Phihp Lutters; 
Edwin S. Malloy; Malcolm F. McConnell; 
William H. Morse; Frederic S. Nolte; Ben- 
jamin Ojserkis; Clarence G. Reber; George 
M. Ritchie; Charles H. Schumacher; Clin- 
ton C. Snyder; Robert S. Struble; Richard 
L. Vockel; Albert S. Weigel; Kenneth C. 
Wotring; Allen H. Zane. 



Faculty Members: Joel F. Bailey; Thomas 
E. Butterfield; A. Copeland Callen; John R. 
Connelly; Walton Forstall, Jr.; Thomas T. 
Holme; Thomas E. Jackson; Fred V. Lar- 
kin; Chester H. Powers; Milton C. Stuart; 
Cecil F. Warner; Clement C. Williams; 
David R. Williams. 



RADIO CLUB 

President: Harvey H. Chamberlain 

Secretary: John Burgio 

Treasurer: Fred W. Berger 

Metnbers: Henry L. Abbott; David W. 
Armstrong; Boris Baiko; Fred W. Berger; 
John Burgio; Harvey H. Chamberlain; John 
F. Clark; Kenneth L Day; Albert C. Foss, 
Jr.; Roy H. Fredrickson; Paul W. Fritsch; 
Charles J. Herzer; Rudolph Kerchmar; 
Charles C. Leaf; Otto G. Leichliter, Jr.; 
Nathan G. Lesh; Thomas J. Loucks; James 
F. Lucker; Richard B. Moyer; Carl C. 
Stotz. 



R. W. BLAKE SOCIETY 

President: Frank V. Hertzog 

Vice-President: H. Roswell Davidson 

Secretary-Treasurer: David E. Richards 

Me?nbers: Frederic N. Bahnson; Lynn C. 
Bartlett; Wells R. Bliss; Bernard A. Briody; 
A. Bruce Brown; Albert Clark; H. Ros- 
well Davidson; John L. Diamond; Frederick 
R. GUmore; Frank V. Hertzog; Richard B. 
Johnson; C. Raymond Kiefer; Harold King; 
Stephen Kowalyshyn; Willard A. Litzen- 
berger; John J. Meehan; George H. Reid; 
David E. Richards; Donald R. Schoen; 
Richard A. Ware. 



R. W. HALL PRE-MEDICAL 
SOCIETY 

President: Frederick R. Gilmore 

Vice-President: Willard A. Litzenberger 

Treasurer: Bernard A. Briody, Jr. 

Secretary: George J. Gabuzda, Jr. 

Members: Walter L. Anders; Stephen F. 
Balshi; Creighton D. Bickley, Jr.; Bernard 
A. Briody, Jr.; Myron I. Buchman; L Reid 
Collmann; Warren X. Collmann; Neil S. 
Culliney; Jerome R. Dorkin; Donald M. 
Feigley; Edward T. Finnerty; George J. 
Gabuzda, Jr.; George R. L. Gaughran; 
Frederick R. Gilmore; Frank J. Gress; Dale 
A. Harris; Frank V. Hertzog; Robert I. 
Jaslow; C. Raymond Kiefer, Jr.; George F. 
Kister, Jr.; Willard A. Litzenberger; S. 



356 



Brooks Longley; Arthur F. Mnnn; George 
Melloy; Richard C. Paul; Everett D. Ras- 
siga; Thomas J. Ritter; Richard B. Seals; 
James F. Shafer; John J. Yankevitch, Jr. 

SCABBARD AND BLADE 

Captain: John A. Tifft 

First Lieutenant: Norman M. Barber 

Second Lieiitenaiit: Charles F. Kalmbach 

First Sergeant: William L. Archer 

Members: William L. Archer; Joseph A. 
Arnold; John C. Attwood; Norman M. 
Barber; John Beriont; Edward F. Bodine; 
James H. Bricker; Richard R. Bright; Rob- 
ert Caemmerer; Charles A. Carter; John H. 
Dudley; Henry C. Farrand; James R. Hen- 
dry; William K. Hodson; Harry W. Jones; 
Charles F. Kalmbach; Anthony M. Kar- 
wacki; Willard A. Litzenberger; Roger J. 
McNamara; Theodore G. Scott, Jr.; Wil- 
liam A. Siegele; Cephas C. Smith; David R. 
Smith; John A. Tifft; Walter H. Vogels- 
berg. 

SPIKED SHOE SOCIETY 

President: J. Dukes Wooters, Jr. 

Vice-President: Lawrence H. Compton 

Secretary: John Beriont 

Treasurer: George E. Elliot, Jr. 

Maiiager: John W. Whiting, Jr. 

Honorary Member: Morris E. Kanaly 

Meinbers: John Beriont; James H. Bleiler 
Richard H. Brenneman; William H. Clark 
Lawrence H. Compton; George E. Elliott: 
Herbert P. Elliott, Jr.; Robert H. Marshall 
Richard E. Metius; Augustus A. Riemondy 
William E. Scott; Richard C. Seltzer; John 
L. F. Sipp; Robert M. Ulmer; WilUam C. 
Walker; John W. Whiting; J. Dukes 
Wooters. 

SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 

President: William P. Varner 
Vice-Preside7it: Frank A. Szabo 

Secretary: John E. CuUiney 
Treasurer: Ralph D. Stoneback 

Members: William L. Archer; Fred W. 
Berger; George H. Brown; Charles L. 
Grouse; John E. CuUiney; Niel S. CulUney; 
Robert N. Davis; Richard S. Davis; War- 
ren R. Dix; William W. Doniger; Roy L. 
Duncan; James Dunwoodie; Charles B. Dut- 
ton; Richard K. Eberts; Arthur H. EUiot; 
John H. Hageny, Jr.; Edgar J. Hall; Wil- 
liam M. Hall; John A. Kimberley; Kenneth 
R. Knoll; Roderick W. Link; BasU W. 



Logcchnik; Donald M. Lorimer; John F. 
Mengel; Stephen G. Maco; Courter D. 
Mills; Richard T. Musselman; John H. 
Mowen; David K. Nichols; Robert E. Ny- 
lin; Robert E. Pollock; Theodore Peters; 
George R. Potter; Charles T. Robertson; 
Clayton A. Rugg, Jr.; Irwin H. Schram, Jr.; 
Ralph D. Stoneback; Robert P. M. Stoudt; 
John P. Stupp; Frank A. Szabo; William P. 
Varner; Wallace R. Wirths; Alfred L. 
Zanoni. 

Facidty Members: Frederick R. Ashbaugh; 
Fay C. Bartlett; Claude G. Beardslee; Ray- 
mond G. Bull; Wray H. Congdon; George 
F. Gasda; Morris E. Kanaly; Francis J. 
Trembley. 



STUDENT CONCERT-LECTURE 
COMMITTEE 

Members: Richard A. Ware, Cloairman; 
Frederick R. Gilmore; Charles F. Kalm- 
bach; Donald R. Schoen; Henry D. Chand- 
ler; Walter H. Vogelsberg. 

Faculty Mejnbers: George B. Curtis; Dr. 
T. Edgar Shields; Dr. Clarence A. Shook. 



TAU BETA PI 

President: Albert E. Lee 

Vice-President: Charles F. Kalmbach 

Corresponding Secretary: Harold H. Werft 

Recording Secretary: John D. Mettler 

Treasurer: Richard M. Shepherd 
Members: Frederic N. Bahnson; James 
M. Beauchamp, Jr.; Donald W. Bedell; Ed- 
ward F. Bodine; A. Bruce Brown; Robert 
N. Brown; John F. Clark; Samuel S. Cross; 
Alton P. Dieffenbach; Richard M. Dietz; 
Robert C. Dimmich; Robert L Felch; Al- 
bert C. Foss; Richard M. Foster; Phihp G. 
Foust; C. Denis Gilchrist; Louis G. Gitzen- 
danner; Edward D. Heins; Frederick H. 
Housel; Charles F. Kalmbach; Richard L. 
Kirk; Stephen Kowalyshyn, Jr.; Albert E. 
Lee; Philip Lutters; Robert M. Maiden; 
Richard E. Metius; John D. Mettler; Wil- 
liam H. Morse; Richard B. Moyer; Fred- 
eric S. Nolte; Benjamin Ojserkis; John T. 
Ransom, II; Clarence G. Reber; George M. 
Ritchie, Jr.; Clarence M. Sanderson, Jr.; 
Charles H. Schumacher; Grendon K. Se- 
bold; Richard M. Shepherd; Robert N. 
Simonsen, Clinton C. Snyder; Robert B. 
SpUman; Robert S. Struble; Robert L. Smb- 
bings; Bernard V. Stuber; Michael Temo- 
shok; Albert L. Thalhamer; Richard L. 
Vockel; Walter H. Vogelsberg; Harold H. 
Werft; L. Robert White; Allen H. Zane, Jr. 



357 



TONE 

President: David E. Richards 

Vice-President: Mervin J. Fry 

Program Director: Robert K. Beckwith 

Secretary: Frank V. Hertzog 

Treasurer: Richard T. Berg 

Members: Wilham L. Archer; Robert K. 
Beckwith; Richard T. Berg; Fred F. Ber- 
man; James K. Binder; Alvin L. Breen; A. 
Bruce Brown; Marion C. Burgy; WilUam 
C. Christine; Albert Clark, Jr.; Robert L. 
Coutts; Hugh R. Davidson; John L. Dia- 
mond; Jerome R. Dorkin; Mervin J. Fry 
Frederick R. Gilmore; Frank V. Hertzog 
Charles F. Kalmbach; Thomas J. Kochuba 
Willard A. Litzenberger; Arthur F. Mann; 
J. Arthur Marvin, Jr.; Raymond R. Myers 
Carl Neuendorfler; Preston Parr, Jr.; Al- 
fred W. Pedrick; Lewis P. Randall, Jr.; 
Irving B. Remsen; David E. Richards; John 
M. Roach; Francis H. Rockett; Robert W. 



Rouse; Paul R. Schlenker; Donald R. 
Schoen; Frank E. Smith, Jr.; Kenneth H. 
Smith; George C. Stone; William B. Todd; 
Kingsley G. Williams; William R. Wil- 
hams; James W. Woods; Roy S. Zachary. 



TOWN COUNCIL 

President: George A. Brenker 

Vice-Preside?7t: C. Raymond Kiefer 

Treasurer: Henry C. Louden 

Secretary: Arthur Tallaksen 

Facidty Adviser: Claude G. Beardslee 

Members: Donald W. Bedell; George A. 
Brenker; Albert Clark, Jr.; Charles V. 
Clarke; Alton P. Dieffenbach; George L. 
Griffiths, Jr.; Robert H. Holland; C. Ray- 
mond Kiefer; B. William Logechnik; Henry 
C. Louden; Lowell K. OUphant; Jonas Sil- 
verberg; Arthur Tallaksen; Kenneth R. 
Templeton. 



358 



CLASS OF 19^2 

HEXRY LA\VRENCE ABBOTT, E.E., Sigma Chi Fairmont, WA^a. 

JOHN' MARION AD A.MS, C£., Town Group Allentown 

VERNOX HO\AARD ADAMS, I£., Tlieta Delta Chi Hempstead, N.Y. 

JOHN ADRIAN. JR., Bus., Tavlor House Orange, Mass. 

JOSEPH N. A.MBROGI, JR., E.E., Alpha Kappa Pi Lansdowne 

RAY.MOND B. ANDERSON, JR., M£., Chi Psi Eggertsville, N.Y. 

JOSEPH F. ARBOGAST, Ch.E., Town Group Harrisburg 

GEORGE EDA\'ARD ARCHBOLD, Bus., Lambda Chi Alpha Ridgewood, N.J. 

JOSEPH A. ARNOLD, Ch.E., Town Group Meadville 

ROBERT E. ASHLEY, C£., Chi Psi Muskegon, Mich. 

HARRY .MONTGO.MERY ATKINS, Arts, Price House Kittanning 

DONALD NO^TS BACH.MAN, Bus., Town Group AUentown 

ROBERT MARTIN BAKER, Bus., Alpha Tau Omega York 

STEPHEN F. BALSHI, Arts, Town Group Bethlehem 

ROBERT SCOTT BARKER, Bus., Lambda Chi Alpha Montclair, N.J. 
UlLLIA-M HO^\'ARD BARNARD, E.E., Town Group North Arlington, N.J. 

ROBERT H. BARTHOLO.MEW, Ch£., Richards House Palmerton 

CHARLES DRU.M-MOND BARTLETT, JR., Bus., Sigma Phi EpsUon Bangor, Me. 

JAMES HENRY BASHFORD, Bus., Phi Delta Theta Drexel Flill 

KEN'XETH CAS\\TLL BAUDER, Arts, Tavlor House Lansdowne 

ROBERT AMLLIA.M BECK, JR., I.E., Phi Gamma Delta Johnstown 

JESSE FR.\NKLIN BEERS, JR., Arts. Sigma Phi Epsilon Mahwah, N.J. 
JOHN FULLA.M BELCHER, Bus., Drinker House Mount Vernon, N.Y. 

GEORGE BE\T:RLY BENT:DICT, Arts, Drinker House Albany, N.Y. 

"l\TLLIAM .MILTON BENESCH, Arts, Sisjma Alpha Mu Baltimore, Md. 

ROBERT ALLAN BENNETT, M.E., Town Group Northampton 
RICHARD JOSEPH BERG, Arts, '42, Sisjma Alpha Mu New RocheUe, N.Y. 

JESSE OATMAN BETTERTON, JR., .Met.E., Richards House Santa Ana, Calif. 

ED^\^\RD .MacCLELLAN BIGGS, JR., E.E., Richards House Garden Cit\-, N.Y. 

\^T;LLES ROYCE bliss. Arts, Leonard HaU Glen Ridge, N.J. 

ED\^'ARD FLT.PER BODINT:, .M.E., Lambda Chi Alpha Fairfield, Conn. 

WTLLIA.M FILSON BOORE, JR., Met.E., Sigma Chi Teaneck, N.J. 

WTLLIAM THO.MAS BOSTOCK, JR.. Ch.E., Richards House RoseUe Park, N.J. 

JA.MES HENRY BOUCHER, C.E., Tavlor House Catasauqua 

DONALD EARL BOUGHNER, Bus., Pi Kappa Alpha Scranton 

W^ALTER BERTOLET BOWXRS, E.E., Richards House Reading 

ROBERT AIcCLAREY BOW'MAN, IT., Sigma Phi Epsilon Wyncote 

RALPH BO\A"N, JR., Bus., Theta Delta Chi Maplewood, N.J. 

SIDNTY BREESE BO'W'NT:, JR., C.E., Sigma Nu Glen Cove, N.Y. 

CHARLES ED"\\'IN BOYER, Bus., Town Group Bowmanstown 

HARRY LESTER BO\TR. JR., Ch.E., Alpha Kappa Pi Drexel HiU 

GEORGE ALDEN BRENTCER, Bus., Town Group Red Bank, N.J. 

RICHARD REISER BRIGHT, li., Chi Phi Davids 

E\T:RETT ALLAN BRITTON, Bus., Delta Tau Delta Wilmington, Del. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER BROOKS, C.E., Richards House Newark, N.J. 

SAMLTL RITCHIE BROUGH, JR., I.E., Theta Delta Chi Greenwich, Conn. 

ALFRED BRUCE BROAA'N, Phvs., Town Group Essex FeUs, N.J. 

GEORGE HONGENAE BRO\\'N, Bus., Town Group New York, N.Y. 

JAMES HARXXY BRUEN, JR., Bus., Richards House Morristown, N.J. 

ROBERT BRUNT, Bus., Beta Theta Pi Brooklyn, N.Y'. 

JOHN BURGIO, E.E., Delta Sigma Phi Caldwell, N.J. 

IRAMN RUSSELL BURKEY, I.E., Town Group Hamburg 

PHILIP GLT:RNSEY BUTTS, Arts, Town Group Bethlehem 

PETER CARPENTER, Bus., Chi Psi Coming, N.Y. 

LEAMS JONES CAUT.K, Bus., Sigma Phi Pasadena, Cal. 

JA.MES ED\\'ARD CHAFFY, .Met.E., Town Group Clayton, N.J. 

ROBERT EL.MER CHA.MBERLAIN, MS.., Town Group Lyndhurst, N.J. 

HAZEN PARK CHASE, Bus., Kappa Alpha Holyoke, Mass. 

ALBERT CLARK, JR., Chem., Town Group Nanticoke 



359 



GORDON jMANSON CLARK, M.E., Beta Kappa Hamden, Conn. 

JOHN FULMER CLARK, JR., E.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon Wyomissing 

N^ELSON RAYMOND CLARK, JR., LE., Beta Theta Pi La Grange, 111. 

ROBERT WESLEY CLARK, LE., Sigma Nu Lakewood, N.Y. 

WILLIAM LEE CLARK, Bus., Phi Sigma Kappa Garden City, L.I., N.Y. 

WILLARD STANLEY CLE WELL, Ch.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

RICHARD HENRY CLIFF, JR., M.E., Town Group South Temple 

ALLISON WALTER CLOKEY, I.E., Drinker House Rutherford, N.J. 

FENTON RULON CLOUD, I.E., Richards House Norristown 

EDWARD JOHN COFFEY, JR., M.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

ROBERT HENRY COLEMAN, Bus., Theta Kappa Phi Flushing, N.Y. 

LAWRENCE HAMLIN COMPTON, I.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

ALAN HOLDING CONKLIN, Arts, Alpha Tau Omega Upper Montclair, N.J. 

JOSEPH LAWRENCE CONNEEN, Bus., Chi Phi South Orange, N.J. 

OAKLEY WATTS COOKE, JR., Bus., Beta Kappa Caldwell, N.J. 

THEODORE ROBERT CORTRIGHT, E.E., Town Group Berwick 

SAMUEL ISAAC CORY, JR., Ch.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon, Town Group Towaco, N.J. 

ROBERT CRAIG, Bus., Alpha Tau Omega Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 

CARL CREIDENBERG, Arts, Town Group New York, N.Y. 

ROBERT EMMETT CULLEN, JR., Ch.E., Phi Gamma Delta Kennett Square 



JOHN PHILIP CURRAN, Arts, Theta Delta Chi 
FRANK PETER CZIGUTH, Bus., Town Group 
JAMES EDWARD DAVIS, Bus., Drinker House 
WILLIAM SAMPSON DAWLESS, Bus., Drinker House 
GEORGE NESTOR DE COWSKY, E.E., Town Group 
HARRY GROVER DENNIS, Bus., Drinker House 
WARD ARNOLD DETWILER, II, Bus., Psi Upsilon 
JOHN LAKE DIAMOND, Arts, Kappa Alpha 
JEROME RICHARD DORKIN, Arts, Pi Lambda Phi 
ROBERT WALPER DOSTER, Arts, Town Group 
JAA4ES JOSEPH DUANE, JR., Bus., Theta Kappa Phi 
JOHN HERRON DUDLEY, M.E., Drinker House 
KENNETH DWIGHT DUGGAN, Arts, Theta Delta Chi 
ROY LESLIE DUNCAN, JR., M.E., Richards House 
CHARLES BOCKOVEN DUTTON, I.E., Kappa Sigma 
DONALD EGGLESTON EASTLAKE, JR., Bus., Phi Delta Theta 
WILLIAM ADOLPH EISELE, E.E., Richards House 
LARRY RAY EISENHART, Met.E., Town Group 
ROBERT GAYLORD EITNER, Bus., Drinker House 
GEORGE EARL ELLIOTT, JR., Ch£., Sigma Nu 
SOMERS HARRISON ENDICOTT, JR., Met.E., Town Group 
ROBERT CASSEL ENGLE, I.E., Pi Kappa Alpha, Town Group 
PAUL PUGH ESTRADA, Bus., Town Group 
EDWARD GORDON EVANS, I.E., Drinker House 
BUCHANAN EWING, Arts, Phi Delta Theta 
HENRY CARROLL FARRAND, Bus., Drinker House 
CLEMENT ROGER FERLAND, Arts, Town Group 
WILLIAM AUGUST FETSKE, M.E., Richards House 
EDMOND CRAWFORD FETTER, Bus., Town Group 
KENNETH EDWARD FIEDLER, Bus., Phi Delta Theta 
STEPHEN HOPKINS FINKLE, Met.E., Town Group 
ARTHUR LOUIS FISCHER, Arts, Chi Psi 
PAUL B. FITZELL, Bus., Town Group 
THOMAS FLEISCHER, M.E., Cosmopolitan Club 
HARRY WILLIAM FLUESO, Bus., Town Group 
ROBERT FIELD FORSHAY, Bus., Beta Theta Pi 
ROBERT HENRY FORSTER, Bus., Town Group 
ROBERT HENRY FORSYTH, I.E., Phi Sigma Kappa 
ALBERT WOOD FOSTER, Bus., Alpha Chi Rho 
DONALD THOIUPSON FOSTER, Bus., Town Group 
HAROLD EARL FOSTER, Bus., Richards House 



Bridgeport, Conn. 

Allentown 

Taylor 

Hamden, Conn. 

Pennsburg 

Southbury, Conn. 

Grosse Pointe Park, Mich. 

Bethlehem 

Camden, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Flushing, L.I., N.Y. 

McKeesport 

Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. 

West Hartford, Conn. 

Morristown, N.J. 

Ridley Park 

West Orange, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Summit, N.J. 

Washington, D.C. 

Pleasantville, N.J. 

Trenton, N.J. 

Havana, Cuba 

Scranton 

Trenton, N.J. 

Bloomfield, N.J. 

Middlebiu-y, Vt. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 

Media 

Garden City, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Plainfield, N.J. 

New Britain, Conn. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

AUentown 

Hempstead, N.Y. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 

Red Bank, N.J. 

Philadelphia 

Scranton 

Philadelphia 



360 



RICHARD iMacDONALD FOSTER, Ch.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

JOHN ADAM FREDERICK, JR., Bus., Town Group Catasauqua 

WILLIAM RUE FREDERICK, Bus., Chi Phi Cranford, N.J. 

CHARLES WILLIAM FREED, JR., Arts, Pi Kappa Alpha Quakertown 

HARRY JEROME FRIEDMAN, Ch.E., Town Group Throop 

PAUL WARREN FRITSCH, E.E., Town Group AUentown 

WALTER HERMAN GAEDCKE, Bus., Kappa Sigma Roselle Park, N.J. 

ROBERT KING GAILEY, Ch.E., Sigma Chi Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

ERNEST J. GAMBLE, Ch.E., Delta Sigma Phi Langhorne 

GEORGE RICHARD LAWRENCE GAUGHRAN, Arts, Town Group AUentown 

RUSSELL CHARLES GEBERT, JR., IJE., Richards House Elkins Park 

ROBERT EDWIN GENGENBACH, M.E., Taylor House Bristol, Conn. 

\VILLIAM EVANS GHEEN, M.E., Taylor House Jersey Shore 
WALTER WILLIAM GLAEDALL, JR., Arts, Sigma Nu Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

GEORGE ZIEBER GOETZ, JR., Bus., Phi Delta Theta Reading 

SANFORD DAVID GOLDSTEIN, Bus., Town Group AUentown 

JAMES ALLISON GORDON, Bus., Delta Tau Delta Short Hills, N.J. 

KILBOURN GORDON, JR., Bus., Kappa Alpha Bronxville, N.Y. 

RICHARD CAMERON GORDON, JR., Bus., Richards House New York, N.Y. 

JAMES GORE, III, Ch.E., Town Group Coraopolis 

RUDOLPH EDWARD GOSZTONYI, JR., Arts, Town Group Bethlehem 
GREGORY GOULD, I.E., Town Group North Tarrytown, N.Y. 

JOSEPH ALBERT GOULD, Arts, Phi Delta Theta Watertown, N.Y. 
WALTER OAVEN GRAHAiM, M.E., Kappa Alpha Upper Montclair, N.f. 

ARNOLD HERBERT EDWARD GRANDAGE, Arts, Town Group Montclair, N.j. 

JOHN THOMAS GREEN, Bus., Phi Delta Theta AUentown 

HAROLD ALEXANDER GRUBB, Met.E., Phi Sigma Kappa North Hills 

MFCHAEL GUIDON, III, M.E., Town Group Freemansburg 
ROBERT NEUMAN GUSDORFF, Bus., Richards House Hasbrouk Heights, N.J. 
NORMAN HACKMAN, Bus., Sigma Alpha Mu New Rochelle, N.Y. 

HAROLD WOODBURY HAINES, Ch.E., Drinker House Short Hills, N.J. 

DOUGLAS MATHISON HAIRE, Bus., Alpha Chi Rho Maplewood, N.J. 

DONALD HALBEDL, Bus., Richards House New York, N.Y. 

JAMES GRAY HAMILTON, E.M., Alpha Chi Rho Duluth, Minn. 

ROBERT ARRISON HAMMOND, Ch.E., Town Group AUentown 

RALPH LEIGHTON HANEY, E.E., Richards House Norristown 

GEORGE WARREN HANSON, Bus., Richards House Scarsdale, N.Y. 

EDWARD ALFRED HANUDEL, Ch.E., Drinker House Roselle, N.J. 

MILTON WILLIN HARPER, Ch.E., Town Group Seaford, Del. 

DALE ACKLEY HARRIS, Arts, Town Group Trenton, N.J. 

RICHARD PARSE HAZARD, Arts, Taylor House Morrisville 

JOSEPH HUMMEL HELLER, JR., Bus., Town Group Bethlehem 

RICHARD LAMBERT HEYNINGER, Bus., Chi Phi Waterbury, Conn. 

JOHN BALMAIN HILL, JR., M.E., Beta Kappa Hamburg, N.Y. 

LOUIS JOSEPH HILLENBRAND, JR., Ch.E., Town Group AUentown 

WARREN ALFRED HIMMEL WRIGHT, Ch.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

RALPH CRAVEN HIRD, Ch.E., Theta Delta Chi Englewood, N.J. 

WILLIAM PAIGE HITCHCOCK, Arts, Psi Upsilon Syracuse, N.Y. 

HOWARD ADDISON HOCH, JR., Bus., Town Group Bethlehem 

JAMES JONATHAN HOCH, Arts, Town Group Bethlehem 

CHESTER ADAM HOFFMAN, Ch.E., Town Group AUentown 

BERNARD EARL HOFFNER, Ch.E., Town Group Bethlehem 
THOMAS SEIR CUMMINGS HOLBERTON, JR., Chem., Delta Sigma Phi 

Hackensack, N.J. 

GEORGE VERNON HOLBY, Ch.E., Taylor House Riverside, Conn. 

SEYMOUR LAWRENCE HOLLANDER, Ch.E., Pi Lambda Phi Maplewood, N.J. 

CALEB WILLIAM HOLYOKE, M.E., Town Group Milwaukee, Wis. 

ALFRED EDWARD HORKA, Ch.E., Richards House Passaic, N.J. 

PHILIP ROBERTS HORNBROOK, JR., Bus., Phi Delta Theta AUentown 

WILLIAM EDWARD HOWARD, III, Bus., Psi UpsUon Montreal, Canada 

DONALD CLINTON HOWE, E.M., Town Group AUentown 



361 



JERRY CHARLES HUBENY, I.E., Richards House 
DAVID LINDSAY HUME, I.E., Sigma Nu 
JOHN ASHBERRY HUNT, Arcs, Lambda Clii Alpha 
THOMAS REED HUNT, Bus., Town Group 
EDWIN JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, Bus., Town Group 
JASON HYUN, M.E., Town Group 
FLOYD EMERSON IVEY, Ch.E., Town Group 
AUSTEN ERAVIN JENKIN, Bus., Town Group 
HARRY AVITMER JONES, JR., Pi Kappa Alpha 
HENRY THOMAS KALINOSKI, Bus., Taylor House 
WILLIAM RICHARD KAMPFE, Bus., Richards House 
JOHN KELLETT, III, Ch.E., Taylor House 
JAMES HENRY KIDDER, Arts, Delta Phi 
JOHN ARTHUR KIMBERLEY, M.E., Taylor House 
EDAVIN HOWARD KLEIN, Arts, Phi Sigma Kappa 
LOUIS EDWARD KLEIN, Ch.E., Richards House 
DONALD HENRY KLEPPINGER, Met.E., Town Group 
EUGENE LEONARD KLINE, Arts, Sigma Alpha Mu 
CONRAD ERWIN KLUGER, Arts, Pi Lambda Phi 
CARL GEORGE KONOLIGE, Arts, Town Group 
FRANCIS AVINTON KOPYTA, M.E., Tau Delta Phi 
EDWARD WILLIAM KRAUS, M.E., Theta Kappa Phi 
MAX KRISSIEP, JR., Phys., Town Group 
FREDERICK ALBERT KRONE, Ch.E., Town Group 
STEPHEN TOHN KUCEY, Bus., Town Group 
RICHARD LINCOLN KULP, Ch.E., Town Group 
DONALD WAYNE KURTZ, E.E., Taylor House 
JOHN CARL LAMPERT, Ch.E., Richards House 
JOSEPH PETER LARKIN, III, Bus., Beta Theta Pi 
ELWOOD D. LATIMER, JR., Ch.E., Taylor House 
DONALD WILLIAM LAYTON, Ch.E., Richards House 
ROSS WILBURTON LEAVER, Ch.E., Lambda Chi Alpha 
OTTO GAY LEICHLITER, Met.E., Town Group 
JOHN DONALD LEIGHTON, Bus., Kappa Sigma 
MONROE LEVY, Arts, Sigma Alpha Mu 
FRANK PAUL LIBRIZZI, E.E., Town Group 
WILLIAM HENRY LINDSAY, JR., C.E., Beta Theta Pi 
WILLIAM CHRIST LINGE, I.E., Town Group 
GEORGE ALEXANDER LOGAN, Arts, Richards House 
BASIL WILLIAM LOGECHNIK, I.E., Town Group 
STEPHEN BROOKS LONGLEY, Arts, Delta Phi 
JESS BRODBECK LOUCKS, Ch.E., Taylor House 
CLARENCE EARL LOUDEN, JR., Arts, Chi Psi 
HENRY CAMERON LOUDEN, Bus., Town Group 
JOHN LOUIS LOUGHRAN, Bus., Delta Tau Delta 
CHARLES TWEED-DALE LOVELESS, I.E., Town Group 
RICHARD MICHAEL LUCKRING, Ch.E., Taylor House 
HOWARD GEORGE LULEY, C.E., Theta Xi 
PHILIP LUTTERS, M.E., Taylor House 
ROBERT MERRILL LYNCH, Arts, Sigma Phi 
JOHN STANLEY MACDONALD, E.E., Theta Kappa Phi 
ROBERT RUSSELL MACY, Ch.E., Richards House 
HAROLD EDWARD MAHONEY, Bus., Theta Kappa Phi 
ROBERT MERCIER MAIDEN, Phys., Town Group 
WILLIAM THOMAS MAINWARING, Met.E., Sigma Nu 
SANDOR MARK, C.E., Tau Delta Phi 
PAUL WILLIAM MARSHALL, I.E., Theta Kappa Phi 
ROBERT HENRY MARSHALL, I.E., Delta Tau Delta 
DONALD SHERWOOD MARTIN, Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 
RICHARD MASCUCH, I.E., Delta Sigma Phi 
WILLIAM ANGUS MATHESON, JR., Bus., Chi Phi 



Elizabeth, N.J. 

Tulsa, Okla. 

Great Neck, L.I., N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

AUentown 

Delano, Cal. 

Bethlehem 

Bellerose, L.I., N.Y. 

Harrisburg 

Scranton 

Morristown, N.J. 

Springfield 

Philadelphia 

Dalton, Mass. 

Paulsboro, N.J. 

Easton 

Bethlehem 

Trenton, N.J. 

Paterson, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Somerville, N.J. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Wyomissing 

Freeland 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 

Phoenixville 

Carlstadt, N.J. 

Jersey City, N.J. 

Scranton 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Chester, N.J. 

Pittsburgh 

Port Huron, Mich. 

Trenton, N.J. 

Newark, N.J. 

Haddonfield, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Maplewood, N.J. 

York 

Kittanning 

Nutley, N.J. 

Philadelphia 

West Farmington, Ohio 

Canton, Ohio 

New Kensington 

Shelton, Conn. 

Greenwich, Conn. 

Haddonfield, N.J. 

Kensington, Md. 

Pawtucket, R.I. 

Trenton, N.J. 

Pittsburgh 

New York, N.Y. 

Pottstown 

Kennett Square 

Narberth 

South Orange, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 



362 



JOHN JOSEPH MATZKO, Arts, Drinker House 
FRANKLIN BLISS iMAYER, Arts, Chi Psi 
DANIEL BOS^^'ORTH iMcAFEE, Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 
WILKES McCLA\^, II, Bus., Delta Tau Delta 
JOHN DONALD McCLAY, Bus., Richards House 
MALCOLM FINDLEY McCONNELL, JR., M.E., Delta Upsilon 
JOHN LEO McGONIGLE, JR., C.E., Town Group 
ROBERT JOHN McGREGOR, Ch.E., Drinker House 
A^'ILLIAM CHARLES McJAMES, Ch.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 
FRANK SHIRLEY AIcKENNA, Met.E., Delta Upsilon 
ROBERT CHARLES MciMICHAEL, Met.E., Richards House 
RAYMOND THEODORE MECKBACH, Bus., Richards House 
TOM CHARLES AIEKEEL, Arts, Richards House 
NICHOLAS JAMES MESIROW, Arts, Drinker House 
RICHARD EDWARD METIUS, Met.E., Phi Gamma Delta 
RICHARD EDWARD METZGER, Ch.E., Town Group 
ROBERT AIETZNER, Bus., Drinker House 
JOHN HENRY MILBANK, Bus., Alpha Tau Omesja 
ALBERT /MARSHALL MILLER, Met.E., Richards^House 
LEONARD HANMER MILLER, I.E., Alpha Kappa Pi 
RICHARD EARLE MILLER, Arts, Town Group 
ROBERT BRUCE MILLER, M.E., Town Group 
GEORGE FRANK MINDE, Arts, Richards House 
JOHN FRANCIS MIRAGLIA, Arts, Town Group 
RALPH FRANKLIN MOSS, JR., Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 
JOHN RICHARD MUEHLBERG, Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 
EDGAR KIRTON MUHLHAUSEN, C.E., Pi Kappa Alpha 
RICHARD DALLAM MUNNIKHUYSEN, E.E., Drinker House 
STEWART WALRATH MUNROE, JR., Bus., Richards House 
WILLIAM BEHL MUSSELMAN, Arts, Town Group 
JAMES WARDEN NEEDLES, Ch.E., Drinker House 
PAUL LAVERN NESTLEROTH, Met.E., Town Group 
ROBERT SHAW NEWCOMB, Bus., Lambda Chi Alpha 
CYRIL ANTHONY NEYHART, I.E., Town Group 
DAVID KIERSTEAD NICHOLS, I.E., Town Group 
JOHN JAMES NITTI, Bus., Taylor House, Town Group 
FREDERIC STUART NOLTE, M.E., Taylor House 
JOHN HUGH NORWOOD, Met.E., Delta Upsilon 
ZENON EDWIN NOWICKI, Bus., Town Group 
JOHN BRANGS O'HARA, Bus., Taylor House 
ALLEN HISAYOSHI OKAMOTO, Ch.E., Cosmopolitan Club 
LOWELL KENNETH OLIPHANT, Bus., Town Group 
HENRY J. OLSON, JR., C.E., Drinker House 
DAVID CHITTENDEN OSBORN, Ch.E., Richards House 
RICHARD MERCER PALMER, Bus., Phi Delta Theta 
GEORGE EARL PARSONS, JR., E.E., Theta Delta Chi 
PRESTON WILSON PAR VIS, JR., Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 
CHARLES ANTHONY PATTEN, M.E., Town Group 
RICHARD CHADWICK PAUL, Arts, Alpha Tau Omega 
JOHN LEWIS PETERSON, Met.E., Richards House 
JAMES FISHER PFEFFER, JR., M.F.., Alpha Kappa Pi 
JOHN ORMSBY PHILLIPS, Bus., Delta Phi 
JOHN RICHARD POLINSKY, Arts, Town Group 
WALTER VALENTINE PRELLE, Bus., Town Group 
THEODORE DAVID PROPPER, Bus., Pi Lambda Phi 
JOHN ADAMS QUINCY, E.E., Delta UpsUon 
KENNETH HAUSER RAHN, Met.E., Richards House 
JOHN THOMPSON RANSOM, II, Phys., Theta Xi 
JOHN ARNOLD READ, M.E., Sigma Chi 
THEODORE HOSMER REDMAN, Phys., Town Group 
SUMNER WILLARD REID, M.E., Town Group 



St. Clair 

Erie 

Rye, N.Y. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Tenafly, N.J. 

Pittsburgh 

AUentown 

Dunmore 

South Orange, N.J. 

Crafton 

Chester 

Bogota, N.J. 

Easton 

Philadelphia 

Narberth 

Turtle Creek 

Albany, N.Y. 

Bloomfieid, N.J. 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Northampton 

Bethlehem 

Summit, N.J. 

Port Chester, N.Y. 

Merion 

Montclair, N.J. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Bel Air, Md. 

Grosse Pointe, Mich. 

Bethlehem 

Cape May, N.J. 

Elm 

South Orange, N.J. 

AUentown 

Nutley, N.J. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Park Ridge, 111. 

Hamburg, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Newark, N.J. 

Willow Grove 

East Cleveland, Ohio 

Oyster Bay, N.Y. 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Reading 

Marion, Md. 

Wilmington, Del. 

AUentown 

York 

Wood-Ridge, N.J. 

Brookline 

Pittsburgh 

Mildred 

Old Greenwich, Conn. 

Woodmere, N.Y. 

Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. 

Palmerton 

Haddonfield, N.J. 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 

Louisville, Ky. 

Westlawn 



363 



JAMES LOWTHER REILEY, Bus., Drinker House Clearfield 

HENRY THOMAS REUWER, Bus., Sigma Chi Harrisburg 

JOSEPH BENSON REYNOLDS, JR., Phys., Town Group Bethlehem 

WILLIAM PAINTER RHOADS, M.E., Sigma Chi Harrisburg 

ARTHUR HERBERT RICH, Bus., Sigma Phi Palm Beach, Fla. 

FRANK HART RICH, Bus., Pi Lambda Phi Washington, D.C. 

DAVID EMRYS RICHARDS, Arts, Leonard Hall Scranton 

HOWARD WILLIAM RIEMER, Bus., Tau Delta Phi Maplewood, N.J. 

JOSEPH TULLY RILEY, M.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

JOHN A4ARVIN ROACH, Arts, Taylor House Alerchantsville, N.J. 

FRANK FREDERICK ROBERTS, Met.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

CHARLES THOMPSON ROBERTSON, III, Bus., Cosmopolitan Club Philadelphia 
GORDON BROWN ROBERTSON, Bus., Town Group Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

FRANCIS HAYNES ROCKETT, JR., E.E., Richards House Rockville Centre, N.Y. 

DOUGLAS HILL RODGERS, C.E., Town Group Port \Vashington, N.Y. 

ROBERT ELL WOOD ROW AND, Arts, Town Group Swarthmore 

AUSTIN WILLIAAI RUCH, Ch.E., Town Group SchnecksviOe 

CLYDE CHARLES RUFFLE, I.E., Taylor House Queens Village, N.Y. 

ROBERT FRANCIS RYAN, Bus., Alpha Tau Omega Schenectady, N.Y. 

RUDOLF WILLIAM SAMER, Phys., Richards House Elizabeth, N.J. 

ABRAM SAMUELS, Bus., Tau Delta Phi AUentown 
CLARENCE MARCELLUS SANDERSON, JR., E.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon South Orange, N.J. 

THEOPHILE SAULNIER, JR., Bus., Richards House Swarthmore 

CHARLES HENRY SAVAGE, Met.E., Drinker House Morristown, N.J. 

JOHN SELTZER SAYLOR, JR., Ch.E., Lambda Chi Alpha Reading 
JOHN SCHNEIDER, III, Bus., Town Group Little Eldon, Cambridge, Md. 

LEONARD ADOLPH SCHNEIDER, Arts, Chi Psi Clifton, N.J. 

HOWARD OSCAR SCHROEDER, M.E., Richards House Bloomfield, N.J. 

CHARLES HENRY SCHUMACHER, I.E., Taylor House Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

FORREST VEIL SCHUMACHER, Arts, Phi Sigma Kappa Bellevue 

JOSEPH DOTY SCOTT, E.E., Alpha Chi Rho Millburn, N.J. 

THEODORE GOURDIN SCOTT, JR., Met.E., Kappa Alpha Orange, Va. 

MURL WOLFE SEARS, M.E., Town Group CatonsviUe, Md. 

GRENDON KENNETH SEBOLD, E.E., Richards House Elizabeth, N.J. 

HENRY ALBERT SEEBALD, Arts, Town Group AUentown 

JACQUES SEGAL, II, I.E., Tau Delta Phi Flushing, N.Y. 

RUSSELL MELVIN SEWARD, JR., Arts, Town Group Altoona 

JOSEPH MATTHEW SEXTON, Arts, Theta Kappa Phi Newark, N.J. 

WARREN RAYMOND SEYFRIED, JR., Arts, Town Group Coopersburg 

LOUIS EVERETT SHARPE, Phys., Cosmopolitan Club Larchmont, N.Y. 

WILLIAM SYDNEY SHUTTLEWORTH, Bus., Chi Psi Scarsdale, N.Y. 

ROBERT NIEL SIMONSEN, Ch.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon Mount Lebanon 

WILLIAM JAMES SKINNER, M.E., Richards House Madison, N.J. 

AUGUSTINE NICHOLAS SMITH, JR., Chem., Town Group Mahanoy City 

DAVID RAHM SMITH, E.E., Alpha Chi Rho Towanda 

EUGENE MONROE SMITH, Met.E., Town Group Philadelphia 

FRANK EDGAR SMITH, JR., Ch.E., Chi Psi Clifton, N.J. 

JESSE TAVENOR SMITH, I.E., Theta Delta Chi Shaker Heights, Ohio 

KENNETH HERBERT SMITH, E.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

RICHARD PHILLIP STEERE SMITH, I.E., Alpha Chi Rho Philadelphia 

VICTOR EUGENE SMITH, Bus., Taylor House Norwalk, Conn. 

JOHN JOSEPH SOMERS, Ch.E., Town Group Philadelphia 

RALPH FRANKLIN SOTZING, Bus., Town Group Bethlehem 

LESLIE ORMAN SOUTHGATE, JR., M.E., Drinker House Jamesburg, N.J. 

WILLIAM McINDOE SPEARS, |R., Arts, Drinker House Shaker Heights, Ohio 

EMERSON DANIEL SPENGLER, Met£., Town Group Northampton 

EUGENE ROY SPRINGER, M.E., Drinker House Houston, Tex. 

ROBERT BRECKENRIDGE STEELE, JR., Met.E., Sigma Nu Great Neck, L.I., N.Y. 

CHARLES STANLEY STEINER, Ch.E., Town Group Baltimore, Aid. 

JOHN HENRY STIVES, I.E., Delta Upsilon White Plains, N.Y. 

EDWARD JAMES STONE, I.E., Drinker House New York, N.Y. 

364 



ROBERT WALTER STOVVBRIDGE, III, Bus., Price House 

ROBERT SAMUEL STRUBLE, M.E., Beta Theta Pi 

CARL LINDSLEY STURGIS, Bus., Richards House 

ARTHUR TALLAKSEN, Bus., Town Group 

RAY ORME TAYLOR, Bus., Town Group 

ROBERT GORiVL\N TAYLOR, M.E., Phi Sigma Kappa 

BOYD ULLMANN TEUFER, Arts, Town Group 

FRANK RAYMOND THAEDER, LE., Sigma Nu 

ALBERT LEO THALHAMER, Phys., Taylor House 

JOSEPH SIMON THOMAS, Arts, Taylor House 

CHARLES GARLAND THORNBURGH, JR., Arts, Beta Theta Pi 

ARCHIE DeWITT TIFFT, Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 

FREDERICK CARL TILLBERG, JR., Met.E., Town Group 

FLORENT JOSEPH TOKARCZYK, E.M., Town Group 

AVILLIAM WOOSTER TOLLEY, Ch.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

JOHN HENRY TRANSUE, Chem., Town Group 

KENNETH WILLIAM TRONE, Bus., Theta Xi 

ROBERT FRANKLIN TURNAUER, Bus., Town Group 

lOHN DAVIS VAN BLARCOM, M.E., Taylor House 

LINDSLEY DODD VAN DER VEER, I.E., Sigma Phi 

WILLIAM PAUL VARNER, Bus., Richards House 

STUART HENRY VOGT, E.E., Taylor House 

SA/MUEL ROBERT WALKER, Bus., Town Group 

THOMAS ALEXANDER WALLACE, JR., Chem., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Kew Gardens, L.I., N.Y. 
EVERETT FRAZAR WARNER, Arts, Sigma Phi 
EARL LEWIS WEAVER, JR., A/I.E., Town Group 
KURT HEINZ WEBER, Phys., Cosmopolitan Club 
DAVID FRANCIS ^VELLS, Ch.E., Town Group 
JEFFRY STEVEN WETRICH, Bus., Psi Upsilon 
POWELL JOSEPH WHALEN, EM., Sigma Nu 
EMMET TALMADGE WHITE, Jr., Bus., Alpha Kappa Phi 
LEE ROBERT WHITE, Phys., Town Group 
JAMES ELLSWORTH WIGG, Bus., Sigma Chi 
ALEXANDER KING WIGGIN, I.E., Alpha Tau Omega 
NORMAND JOSEPH WILHELMY, Bus., Taylor House 
RAYMOND SENTMAN WILLARD, JR., E.E., Drinker House 
HOWARD MISSION WILLIAMS, Bus., Delta Upsilon 
KINGSLEY GRANT WILLIAMS, Chem., Theta Xi 
WILLIAM GODFREY WILLMANN, Chem., Town Group 
WALLACE RICHARD WIRTHS, Bus., Richards House 
JAMES A\'1LLIAM WITHERSPOON, IV, M.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 
EL^VYN WOLFE, E.E., Town Group 
AHLERT DIEDRICH WOLFF, Bus., Delta Tau Delta 
WILLLVM RUSSELL WOODRUFF, Ch.E., Taylor House 
FREDERICK WALLIS WRIGHT, JR., Arts, Delta Phi 
ROBERT ROCHESTER YOUNG, M.E., Richards House 
WHITNEY JAMES YOUNG, M.E., Town Group 
RICHARD JOHN YURKANIN, E.E., Town Group 
ALFRED LEWIS ZANONI, I.E., Drinker House 
GEORGE GLENN ZIPF, Met.E., Town Group 



Roselle Park, N.J. 

Ben Avon 

Morristown, N.J. 

West Orange, N.J. 

Ashland 

North Hills 

Bethlehem 

Manhasset, N.Y. 

Clifton, N.J. 

Flushing, N.Y. 

Carnegie 

Medford Lakes, N.J. 

Philadelphia 

Coaldale 

Richmond Hill, N.Y. 

Portland 

York 

Allentown 

Aliquippa 

Somerville, N.J. 

Scranton 

White Plains, N.Y. 

Riverside, N.J. 



Short Hills, N.J. 

Allentown 

Tenafly, N.J. 

Long Beach, N.J. 

Hempstead, L.I., N.Y. 

Burlington, Vt. 

Hillside, N.J. 

Middletown 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Marlboro, Mass. 

Coatesville 

Allentown 

Woodbury, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Grantwood, N.J. 

Tuckahoe, N.Y. 

Easton 

Easton 

Teaneck, N.J. 

Boonton, N.J. 

Philadelphia 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 

Raritan, N.J. 

Bryn Mawr 



CLASS OF 1943 

DONALD BUXTON ADAMS, M.E., Sigma Chi Montclair, N.J. 

JOHN PURDON ALLEN, Ch.E., Taylor House Upper Montclair, N.J. 

AVALTER LESESNE ANDERS, Arts, Town Group Bethlehem 

VICTOR MAURICE ANIDO, JR., Arts, Lambda Chi Alpha Valley Stream, N.Y. 



365 



CHARLES JOHN APOLENIS, Phys., Town Group 
ROBERT WYLIE APPLETON, Bus., Theta Delta Chi 
JOHN PETER ARBIZZANI, Met.E., Town Group 
MAYNARD GOODWIN ARSOVE, E.E., Taylor House 
ELWOOD BRUCE BACKENSTO, Ch.E., Town Group 
ROBERT DUDLEY BAILEY, I.E., Phi Gamma Delta 
CHARLES BALOUGH, JR., Arts, Town Group 
LUTHER ROTH BARTHOLOMEW, E.E., Town Group 
LTlTVN CONANT BARTLETT, Arts, Town Group 
ARTHUR KIRKE HARTLEY, Bus., Theta Delta Chi 
LESTER RAY BARTRON, Ch.E., Town Group 
RAYMOND IRVING BASHFORD, JR., Bus., Phi Delta Theta 
BURTON EBERMAN BAUDER, M.E., Town Group 
WARREN HARDING BEAUMONT, E.E., Town Group 
ROBERT KINGDON BECKWITH, Ch.E., Town Group 
WILLIAM EDWARDS BELLINGER, Bus., Taylor House 
CHARLES SURFACE BENNETT, E.E., Taylor House 
RICHARD TURNEY BERG, Arts, Delta Upsilon 
CHARLES RICHARD BERGH, Arts, Delta Phi 
BRUCE ATKISSON BERLIN, Arts, Phi Delta Theta 
RICHARD HENRY BERNASCO, Bus., Town Group 
WILLIAM GOTTLOB BINDER, Bus., Delta Tau Delta 
TAYLOR ALBERT BIRCKHEAD, E.E., Delta Phi 
ROBERT LOUIS BIRD, Arts, Alpha Tau Omega 
MORTIMER LAWRENCE BLANKET, Bus., Drinker House 
JAMES HARRY BLEILER, M.E., Taylor House 
ALEXANDER HAMILTON BOLYN, Bus., Town Group 
ROBERT CARLTON BOSTON, Ch.E., Phi Gamma Delta 
FRANK HUGO BOWER, E.E., Taylor House 
EDWARD GEORGE BOYER, M.E., Delta Upsilon 
GLENN WINFIELD BOYER, M.E., Taylor House 
THOMAS PAISLEY BRADFORD, E.M., Beta Kappa 
ANDREW HARRISON BRENNAN, Bus., Pi Kappa Alpha 
RICHARD HENRY BRENNEMAN, E.M., Beta Theta Pi 
SAA'IUEL BRESKMAN, Ch.E., Sigma Alpha Mu 
ALEXANDER BRKICH, M.E., Town Group 
WILLIAM CONNER BROWER, Phys., Town Group 
ROBERT KNOX BROWN, Ch.E., Richards House 
JOHN HENRY BRUBAKER, JR., C.E., Town Group 
MYRON ISAAC BUCHMAN, Arts, Sigma Alpha Mu 
THOMAS MATHIEU BUCK, M.E., Kappa Sigma 
WILLIAM THOMAS BUHRIG, Ch.E., Beta Kappa 
HERBERT EDWARD BUNNING, I.E., Theta Kappa Phi 
ROBERT CHARLES BURCHILL, Bus., Town Group 
GEORGE WARREN BURGERS, Ch.E., Town Group 
ROBERT FORREST BURROUGHS, JR., Bus., Lambda Chi Alpha 
JOHN HENRY BURRUS, II, Bus., Alpha Chi Rho 
THOMAS LEE BUSHEY, I.E., Theta Xi 
JAMES HARVEY BUSS, II, Arts, Richards House, III-A 
ARTHUR GEORGE BYRNE, Arts, Chi Psi 
SOLOMON PUSEY CALDWELL, I.E., Town Group 
ARLINGTON WARD CANIZARES, C£., Chi Phi 
STANLEY CAPLAN, E.E., Town Group 
JOHN DANIEL CAPRONI, I.E., Theta Delta Chi 
PAUL REVERE CARL, JR., Ch.E., Drinker House 
GERALD VINCENT CARROLL, Arts, Taylor House 
WAYNE HANLEY CARTER, JR., Arts, Sigma Nu 
EDWARD JEROME CAVANAUGH, M.E., Town Group 
BOYD DARYL CHAMBERLAIN, E.E., Drinker House 
WARREN BLANCHARD CHAPIN, Bus., Lambda Chi Alpha 
FRANCIS ARNDT CHIDSEY, JR., Bus., Chi Phi 



Allentown 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Rochester, N.Y. 

Emmaus 

Summit, N.J. 

Canton, Ohio 

Quakertown 

Bethlehem 

Forest Hills, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Drexel HiU 

Bethlehem 

Summit, N.J. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Fort Plain, N.Y. 

Nazareth 

Coraopolis Heights 

Ebensburg 

Lansdowne 

Trenton, N.J. 

Steelton 

Baltimore, Md. 

Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 

New York, N.Y. 

Palmerton 

Freeland 

Wilmington, Del. 

Rutherford, N.J. 

Norristown 

Hershey 

Wheeling, W.Va. 

Paterson, N.J. 

Pottsville 

Philadelphia 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Allentown 

Chester 

Easton 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Philadelphia 

Mount Vernon, N.Y. 

Bronxville, N.Y. 

Allentown 

Grantwood, N.J. 

Pennington, N.J. 

Scranton 

Haddonfield, N.J. 

Elmhurst, N.Y. 

Great Neck, N.Y. 

West Grove 

Wayne 

Allentown 

Spring Glen, Conn. 

Paulsboro, N.J. 

Meriden, Conn. 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Forty Fort 

Shamokin 

Westfield, N.J. 

Wayne 



366 



WILLIAM CREVELING CHRISTINE, Arts, Town Group 

WILLIAM HENRY CLARK, JR., E.E., Taylor House 

HARRY SAINT CLAIR CLARKE, Bus., Psi Upsilon 

WARREN XAMER COLLMANN, Arcs, Drinker House 

OAKES MAXCY COL WELL, M.E., Delta Sigma Phi 

JON CONFORTE, Bus., Town Group 

EDGAR RUSSELL CONOVER, JR., M.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

CHARLES MIDDLETON CONRAD, Bus., Theta Xi 

ARTHUR JOHN CORNISH, Ch.E., Theta Xi 

JOHN HUGHES CORSON, Met.E., Richards House 

HENRY HOBART CORAMN, Arts, Chi Phi 

WILLIA.M CLARK COSFORD, Bus., Richards House 

ROBERT LLOYD COUTTS, JR., Bus., Delta Tau Delta 

ROY BURFORD COWIN, JR., Arts, Sigma Chi 

LLOYD ALEXANDER CROOT, Bus., Town Group 

NIEL STAHLEY CULLINEY, Arts, Town Group 

JOHN SEATON CURTIS, M.E., Theta Delta Chi 

CHARLES DWIGHT CURTISS, JR., C.E., Delta UpsQon 

EDAA'IN HAROLD DAFTER, JR., Ch.E., Lambda Chi Alpha 

CHARLES PARKER DAVIDSON, III, I£., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

DONALD HENRY DAMES, Bus., Town Group 

EDAA'ARD STOWiMAN DAVIS, Ch.E., Delta Sigma Phi 

ROBERT NATION DAYIS, Bus., Kappa Alpha 

SAMUEL JACKSON DAVY, E.E., Sigma Phi 

LOUIS RUDOLPH DAZE, Bus., Richards House 

BERNARD AMLLIA.M DEEHAN, Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 

JOHN GOODFELLOXA' DE GROUCHY, Bus., Chi Phi 

LOUIS FIELD DELLAMG, Arts, Richards House 

WILLIAM THOMAS DE LONG, Met.E., Town Group 

HAROLD DAMEL DEVERAUX, Ch.E., Town Group 

JOFiN ED.MUND DE\TTT, I.E., Town Group 

CHARLES JOSEPH DICK, Ch.E., Town Group 

LEO AA'ORTH DIEFFENBACH, Bus., Town Group 

FRANK RODNEY DIRKES, JR., Bus., Richards House 

JAMES JOSEPH DONAHUE, JR., Bus., Theta Delta Chi 

ROSARIO ROY DRAGONE, CZ., Town Group 

JAMES DUNnVOODY, JR., I.E., Richards House, Section I 

DONALD PENFIELD DYER, Bus., Price House 

RICHARD KISTLER EBERTS, Arts, Town Group 

EDWARD WALTER EDWARDS, Ch.E., Drinker House 

WILLET ELLSAA'ORTH EGGE, JR., Cham., Town Group 

WILLIAM STANLEY EISNER, Ch.E., Kappa Alpha 

BADGLEY ALLEN EL.MES, I£., Phi Gamma Delta 

VERNON E\'ANS, Bus., Theta Xi 

MUSA JOSEPH EWAYS, M£., Town Group 

ROBERT HENTIY EWING, Phip., Town Group 

NORMAN JOSEPH FABER, Ch.E., Pi Lambda Phi 

CLARENCE FR-\NKLIN FEHNEL, JR., Bus., Taylor House 

EDWARD ADAM FEHNEL, Chem., Town Group 

GEORGE SCHERMERHORN FERRIS, JR., I.E., Drinker House 

CHESTER LEE FINCH, JR., I.E., Chi Phi 

WILLIAM FREDERICK FINNEY, JR., Bus., Chi Psi 

IRA LE\\1S FISHER, Bus., Sigma Alpha Mu 

ROBERT JOSEPH FISHER, C£., Taylor House, Section C 

JAMES HENRY FLICK, Bus., Town Group 

ROBERT HIGH FREEMAN, M.E., Price House 

HUGH BARTLEY FREY, JR., E£., Richards House 

LEWIS FRIEDMAN, Arts, Town Group 

ROBERT WATSON FULLER, I.E., To^\'n Group 

WILLIAM WHITSLAR FULLER, I£., Sigma Chi 



Stroudsburg 

Rutherford, N.J. 

Jamestown, R.I. 

Wilkes-Barre 

CaldweU, N.J. 

Stony Brook, L.I., N.Y. 

Fort Washington 

Barnegat, N.J. 

Roslyn Heights, LJ., N.Y. 

Oakmont 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

AVestmount, Quebec, Canada 

Morristown, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

North East 

Bethlehem 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Che\-v Chase, Md. 

Overbrook HiU 

Clarks Green 

AJlentown 

Philadelphia 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

New Castle 

Carteret, N.J. 

Belleville, N.J. 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 

Westmoreland Hills, Md. 

Bethlehem 

Shamokin 

Mountain Top 

Bethlehem 

Lopez 

Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Garden City, N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Erie 

Belmont, Mass'. 

Bethlehem 

Batavia, N.Y. 

Allentown 

South Orange, N.J. 

Ridley Park 

Fort Benning, Ga. 

Reading 

Tulia, Texas 

Trenton, N.J. 

Nazareth 

Bethlehem 

North Tarrytown, N.Y. 

Washington, D.C. 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Oreland 

Bethlehem 

Reading 

Dunellen, N.J. 

Belmar, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 



367 



JOSEPH CYRIL GABUZDA, E.E., Town Group 

JOHN WILSON GALLAGHER, JR., Bus., Theta Xi 

JAMES HENRY GALLI, C.E., Richards House 

THEODORE CHARLES GAMS, E.E., Price House 

HENRY WATTERSON GARVIN, JR., M.E., Town Group 

MICHAEL LOUIS GEIGER, Bus., Town Group 

PANOS BASIL GEORGOPULO, Bus., Cosmopolitan Club 

RANDALL CLINTON GIDDINGS, Arts, Leonard Hall 

WHEELER GILMORE, JR., M.E., Price House 

CHARLES ALBERT GINTER, JR., Chem., Phi Delta Theta 

LUDWIG EDWARD GODYCKI, JR., Ch.E., Town Group 

RICHARD FARRAND GOEBEL, Bus., Delta Upsilon 

GILBERT SA.MUEL GOLD, Arts, Sigma Alpha Mu 

THOMAS HERMAN GOLDEN, III, Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 

GORDON BENNETT GOODMAN, Bus., Town Group 

WILLIAM DAVIS GORDON, JR., Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 

WILLIAM DEAN GORMAN, Arts, Beta Theta Pi 

JAMES FREDERICK COVER, Met.E., Taylor House 

JOHN RAYMOND GRAY, C.E., Theta Kappa Phi 

ROBERT LEE GREEN, M.E., Town Group 

LEONARD ROBERT GREENE, Phys., Tau Delta Phi 

CARL LEHNERT GREENER, Arts, Town Group 

DAVID EVANS GREGORY, Bus., Chi Phi 

JOHN RICHARD GREINER, M.E., Town Group 

JOHN GRESSITT, Arts, Richards House 

JOSEPH EUGENE GROSS, Ch.E., Sigma Alpha Mu 

PHILIP SCOTT GUCKES, Bus., Phi Sigma Kappa 

ROBERT CHARLES HAAS, Ch.E., Alpha Chi Rho 

ALFRED LEWIS HAFT, Bus., Sigma Alpha Ma 

ROBERT MOHR HAMMER, Bus., Town Group 

RICHARD CHARLES HARDENBERGH, Bus., Sigma Phi 

ROBERT EDWIN HARNISCH, Ch.E., Drinker House 

STEPHEN HART, Arts, Pi Kappa Alpha 

GEORGE SOLOMON HARTMAN, Ch.E., Town Group 

RICHARD MILTON HASLET, E.E., Town Group 

GILBERT POND HAVEN, Bus., Richards House 

WILLIAM DANIEL HA^TS, I.E., Delta UpsUon 

BURT LEWIS HEIMER, Bus., Drinker House 

BARTON ROYAL HEINZ, Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 

WALTON FRANCIS HELEY, JR., Arts, Theta Kappa Phi 

ALBERT WEIMER HEMPHILL, JR., M.E., Drinker House 

HARRY ALBERT HEROLD, JR., I.E., Drinker House 

CHAPIN HEUMANN, Met.E., Delta Upsilon 

FRANKLIN HIMMELBERGER, Arts, Town Group 

WILLIAM BUSHNELL HINMAN, Bus., Alpha Kappa Pi 

ALAN DABNEY HINRICHS, M.E., Sigma Chi 

RAYMOND WILLIAM HINTERLEITER, Ch.E., Town Group 

WALTER RUSSEL HOERNER, Bus., Taylor House 

DUYANE ALLAN HOFFMAN, Bus., Theta Xi 

WARREN EDWARD HOFFMAN, E.E., Taylor House 

WILLIAM BANE HOLBERTON, Bus., Delta Sigma Phi 

ROBERT HARRY HOLLAND, E.M., Town Group 

JOHN ROFF HOLTVEDT, Bus., Sigma Nu 

RICHARD CHARLES HOPKINS, M.E., Alpha Kappa Pi 

FENWICK PECK HORN, M.E., Taylor House 

JOHN LEONARD HORN, Arts, Sigma Nu 

JOHN HOUSEMAN, C.E., Town Group 

GEORGE WILLIAM HOUSTON, Ch.E., Beta Kappa 

JOHN JOSEPH HUCKER, Ch.E., Richards House 

DOUGLAS HAMMOND HUMM, Bus., Town Group 



Freeland 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Portland, Me. 

Newark, N.J. 

Gettysburg 

Bethlehem 

New York, N.Y. 

Uniondale 

Secane, Delaware County 

Winonah, N.J. 

Hellertown 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Trenton, N.J. 

Pottsville 

Bethlehem 

Philadelphia 

Swarthmore 

Wilkes-Barre 

Richmond HUl, N.Y. 

TitusviUe 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

AUentown 

Norwalk, Conn. 

Bethlehem 

Evanston, 111. 

Philadelphia 

Elkins Park 

Irvington, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Allentown 

Newburgh, N.Y. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Pelham Manor, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Easton 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Windber 

Binghamton, N.Y. 

Westfield, N.J. 

West Hartford, Conn. 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 

Bristol, Conn. 

Sewickley 

Coopersburg 

East Orange, N.J. 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

Allentown 

Hummelstown 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Union, N.J. 

Hackensack, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Great Neck, N.Y. 

Narberth 

Lansdowne 

South Orange, N.J. 

Allentown 

Port Washington, N.Y. 

Norristown 

Flushing, N.Y. 



368 



FRANK ADDISON HUNOLD, M.E., Town Group Port Washington, N.Y. 

ISAAC MOVER HUNSBERGER, Ch.E., Town Group Quakertown 

ROBERT MARV'IN lOBST, Bus., Town Group Bethlehem 

WILLIAM EDWARD IRVIN, JR., M.E., Theta Xi Gary, Ind. 

ROBERT CLIFTON JACKSON, M.E., Town Group Pen Argyl 

JACOB THORSTEN JACOBSEN, Ch.E., Town Group Camden, N.J. 

GREGORY ALBERT JAHN, Arts, Town Group CHfton, N.J. 

WILLIAM DONALD JARDINE, Ch.E., Town Group Buffalo, N.Y. 

ROBERT OTTO JENSEN, Arts, Taylor House Freeport, N.Y. 

CHARLES ARMOND JOHNSON, Bus., Chi Psi Maplewood, N.J. 

HOWARD ALEXANDER JOHNSON, Met.E., Price House Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

JACKSON TIPTON JONES, Arts, Theta Xi Sweetwater, Tenn. 

ROBERT EDWARD JOSLIN, Bus., Delta Tau Delta Greenville, Del. 

THEODORE KELECHAVA, I.E., Town Group Allentown 

JOSEPH FRANCIS KEMMER, Ch.E., Town Group Larchmont, N.Y. 

RUDOLPH KERCHMAR, E.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

LeROY ORDWAY KING, JR., Bus., Beta Kappa Washington, D.C. 

WILLIAM CASPAR KIRSCHNER, Chem., Sigma Nu Flushing, N.Y. 

DAVID LYLE KISTLER, Met.E., Town Group Hamburg 

JOHN FLOYD KIZER, JR., Arts, Phi Delta Theta Towanda 

PETER KOROMITZ, E.E., Town Group Allentown 

ROBERT CLAYTON KRAMER, Ch.E., Town Group Duryea 

JOHN ALFRED KRAWCHUK, E.E., Drinker House Bridgeport 

DONALD EUGENE KREBS, Ch.E., Lambda Chi Alpha Marietta 

CHARLES GIERMAN KUCHER, Ch.E., Theta Xi Irvington, N.J. 

WILLIAM ANTHONY KUHAR, E.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

JOSEPH JAMES KURTZ, Ch.E., Town Group Northampton 

ARTHUR LE\MS LANDESMAN, Ch.E., Sigma Alpha Mu Morris Plains, N.J. 
JOHN PRINCE LANDIS, M.E., Town Group Old Greenwich, Conn. 

JACK EMMETT LANE, I.E., Phi Delta Theta Mount Lebanon 

ALFRED BAER LAPONSKY, Phys., Town Group Brownsville 

LEONARD DALE LARSON, M.E., Beta Kappa Shaker Heights, Ohio 

GEORGE HAROLD LEACH, Arts, Taylor House Roselle, N.J. 

CLAUDE FRANK LEAMAN, JR., Arts, Alpha Chi Rho Westfield, N.J. 

BENJAMIN CLARK LE BLANC, JR., Arts, Taylor House Troy, N.Y. 

ANDREW FREDERICK LECKIE, JR., Bus., Chi Psi Columbus, Ohio 

JACK KIEHL LEHMAN, Bus., Kappa Sigma Port Huron, Mich. 

ARTHUR MORTON LEHRER, Bus., Tau Delta Phi Brooklyn, N.Y. 

HOWARD CLIFFORD LEIFHEIT, Arts, Taylor House Queens Village, N.Y. 

NATHAN GEORGE LESH, E.E., Town Group Wind Gap 

GUSTAV MARTEN LEVIN, Bus., Town Group Bethlehem 

CHARLES LOWELL LIEBAU, JR., Bus., Alpha Kappa Pi Nutley, N.J. 

NICHOLAS JOSEPH LUCARELLE, Bus., Theta Kappa Phi Bridgeport, Conn. 

GUST AVE FREDRICH LUEDDEKE, JR., Ch.E., Town Group Maplewood, N.J. 

GEORGE ARTHUR LUTZ, Bus., Town Group Mahanoy City 

ROBERT JAMES LYONS, Ch.E., Delta Upsilon Steubenville, Ohio 

JOHN EDWARD MALLEY, M.E., Price House MinersviUe 

WALLACE WARD MALLEY, JR., Bus., Drinker House Hamden, Conn. 

JOHN JOSEPH MALONEY, JR., E.M., Psi Upsilon Forty Fort 

ARTHUR FORREST MANN, Arts, Town Group Bethlehem 

DONALD ALTON MARCKS, Bus., Town Group Nazareth 

ROYDON SEYMOUR MARGOLIES, Arts, Pi Lambda Phi Long Beach, N.Y. 

GENE MARUSI, Met.E., Drinker House New York, N.Y. 

RICHARD WITHINGTON MASON, Phys., Sigma Phi Foxboro, Mass. 

ROY ERAL MATHEWS, Phys., Town Group Washington, N.J. 

WILLIAM BLAKE McCLENACHAN, III, Arts, Lambda Chi Alpha Trainer 

LEON JOSEPH McGEADY, Met.E., Town Group Freemansburg 

JOHN JOSEPH McGEE, C.E., Town Group Allentown 

WILLIAM McGEE, Ch.E., Town Group Allentown 

CHARLES EDWARD McGRATH, Bus., Theta Kappa Phi Scranton 



369 



FRANCES JOSEPH STEPHENS McGUINESS, M.E., Richards 
CHANDLER HAYES McKAIG, Ch.E., Phi Gamma Delta 
FREEMAN PARKE McKAY, JR., Phys., Kappa Alpha 
JOHN JOSEPH MEEHAN, Arts, Town Group 
QUENTIN DEWEY MEHRKAM, Met.E., Town Group 
JACK ROOS iMERCER, M.E., Richards House 
CLAUDE ORINSON MESSINGER, LE., Town Group 
CHARLES FRANKLIN A-IEYER, Bus., Town Group 
DONALD MAYO MIDDLETON, Bus., Delta Upsilon 
PHILIP HORACE MILLER, Bus., Tau Delta Phi 
KAY FELIX A4ISKINIS, E.E., Town Group 
JACKSON FROELICHER MITCHELL, I.E., Psi Upsilon 
FRANK JOSEPH MOHAP, Bus., Town Group 
HARVEY DONALD MOLL, M.E., Taylor House 
ROBERT CONDIT MOORE, C.E., Kappa Alpha 
DONALD QUIMBY MOREHOUSE, Met.E., Richards House 
FRANKLIN LECRON MORGAL, Bus., Phi Delta Theta 
WARREN KING MORGAN, JR., E.E., Town Group 
JAMES MAURY MORRIS, JR., Met.E., Delta Tau Delta 
BERTRAM HOWARD MORROW, Bus., Town Group 
EWEN MONTFORD MORTIMER, Ch.E., Town Group 
JOHN HAINES MUELLER, M.E., Taylor House 
JAMES PAUL MULHERN, Bus., Theta Kappa Phi 
GEORGE MUNDORF, Arts, Price House 
RAFFAELE FRANCESCO MURACA, Chem., Town Group 
JOSEPH FITZROY MUSANTE, Bus., Town Group 
HAROLD RUSS NACE, Chem., Drinker House 
HANS NELKEN, M.E., Phi Lambda Phi 
WILLIAM ALBERT NELSON, Bus., Lambda Chi Alpha 
CARL NEUENDORFFER, M.E., Taylor House, Section B 
ROBERT ALEXANDER NICROSINI, Arts, Richards House 
HOWARD LEROY NIELSON, M.E., Town Group 
JAMES WALTER NIEMEYER, Ch.E., Taylor House 
JACOB SEBASTIAN NOLF, I.E., Taylor House 
CHARLES MacMILLAN NORLIN, Met.E., Sigma Chi 
KENNETH HAROLD NORRIS, JR., I.E., Alpha Chi Rho 
JAMES BARRETT NUTTING, Arts, Theta Delta Chi 
HARRY WILLIAM OLINSKY, Bus., Sigma Alpha Mu 
HARRY LESTER OLMSTEAD, M.E., Phi Sigma Kappa 
HENRY HABEL OTTO, JR., Bus., Taylor House 
ARTHUR MEAD OVER, M.E., Delta Phi 
WILFRED ROBERT OWEN, Ch.E., Sigma Nu 
LESTER EUGENE OWENS, Bus., Taylor House 
RALPH DOMINICK PALAZZO, C.E., Town Group 
ELBRIDGE WILLIAM PALMER, Bus., Beta Theta Pi 
RICHARD BRADBURY PALMER, Arts, Town Group 
DONALD BRUCE PARISH, Bus., Taylor House 
RALPH BRUCE PARKINSON, M.E., Phi Sigma Kappa 
PRESTON PARR, JR., Ch.E., Richards House 
ARTHUR BARRETTE PARSONS, JR., Bus., Kappa Alpha 
HARRY GORDON PAYROW, JR., Bus., Town Group 
MASON PRATT PEARSALL, Ch£., Sigma Phi 
WILLIAM CECIL PEARSON, Bus., Town Group 
CHARLES KARL PECK, JR., Bus., Tau Delta Phi 
WILLIAM JAR VIS PECK, I.E., Delta Tau Delta 
ALFRED WINSLOW PEDRICK, Bus., Theta Xi 
ROBERT FRACK PEGG, M.E., Town Group 
LEONARD FRANCIS PENITSCH, Bus., Town Group 
JOHN ROBY PENN, III, Bus., Chi Psi 
RICHARD GRAY PETERSEN, Arts, Town Group 



House 



Swarthmore 

Wilmington, Del. 

Somerville, N.J. 

Freeland 

Allentown 

Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Doylestown 

Pittsburgh 

Rahway, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Larchmont, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Lansdale 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Watertown, N.Y. 

Harrisburg 

Morris Plains, N.J. 

Pittsburgh 

Easton 

Bethlehem 

York 

Wilkes-Barre 

York 

Easton 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Haddonfield, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

North Tarrytown, N.Y. 

Bayside, N.Y. 

Chicago, 111. 

Dunmore 

Nazareth 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Maplewood, N.J. 

West Roxbury, Mass. 

Trenton, N.J. 

Staten Island, N.Y. 

Scranton 

Pittsburgh 

Grosse Pointe, Mich. 

Derrick City 

Trenton, N.j. 

Kingsport, Tenn. 

Bethlehem 

Portville, N.Y. 

Glenside 

Wyncote 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

New Canaan, Conn. 

Bethlehem 

New York, N.Y. 

Riverside, Conn. 

Millville, N.J. 

Coraopolis 

Allentown 

Fort Worth, Tex. 

Pittsburgh 



370 



GEORGE WESLEY PHILLIPS, E.M., Delta Phi 

EUGENE LeROY PINTO, Bus., Delta Sigma Phi 

HENRY ERNST POHL, JR., Ch.E., Town Group 

ROBERT EDWARD POLLOCK, Bus., Richards House 

KENNETH PORTER, JR., Bus., Delta Upsilon Roc 

HENRY CHRISTIAN POSTEL, E.E., Town Group 

PHILIP HENRY PO^VERS, JR., M.E., Delta Tau Delta 

PHILIP JOHN PRANG, JR., Chem., Town Group 

ALAN EDA^'ARD PRICE, Arts, Sigma Alpha Mu 

JAMES BRUCE PRICE, JR., Met.E., Town Group 

CLARENCE ORLAND PRINKEY, M.E., Theta Xi 

ROBERT AVILLiMAR PUGH, Ch.E., Taylor House 

ARNOLD OSCAR PUTNAM, I.E., Town Group 

PAUL GEORGE RAJCOK, I.E., Town Group 

ROBERT COLE RAMSDELL, Arts, Town Group 

HENRY WALLACE RAPPUHN, E.E., Theta Xi 

EARL JOHN REDDERT, JR., Arts, Chi Psi 

JOHN SAMUEL REICHARD, Bus., Town Group 

LEON GEORGE REIMER, E.E., Town Group 

IRVING BAKER REMSEN, JR., Ch.E., Taylor House 

WILLIAM K0U\A'ENH0\T:N REMSEN, I.E., Town Group 

DONALD JOHN RENTZ, Bus., Town Group 

HUGH AVARREN RICHARDS, Ch.E., Taylor House 

WAYNE DIXON RIDDLE, Arts, Town Group 

GEORGE HORACE RIED, Arts, Leonard Hall 

WILLIAM EDWARD RITTER, JR., M.E., Town Group 

ARTHUR THOMAS ROBB, Ch.E., Richards House 

DONALD WORTHINGTON ROBINSON, M.E., Drinker House 

DONALD ESTON RODENBACH, Bus., Town Group 

ROBERT ELLIOTT RODGERS, Ch.E., Town Group 

ARTHUR ELFORD ROSLUND, M.E., Taylor House 

RICHARD CHARLES ROTH, I.E., Town Group 

ROBERT AVILSON ROUSE, M.E., Town Group 

ROBERT SEYMOUR RUMSEY, Arts, Delta Upsilon 

JOHN DONALD RYAN, Bus., Delta Sigma Phi 

PHILIP AVALES SAITTA, JR., Bus., Richards House 

DONALD GEORGE SANDER, M.E., Price House 

DONALD BELSHAW SANDS, Arts, Drinker House 

ANTHONY JOSEPH SANT ANTONIO, M.E., Town Group 

RICHARD AATNFIELD SAUER, Ch.E., Town Group 

JAMES LEWIS SAAA^^R, Ch. E., Town Group 

ROBERT AA/EBSTER SAYLOR, M£., Town Group 

WILLIAM DAVIGHT SCHAEFFER, Chem., Taylor House 

ROBERT LY'ND SCHAFFER, Bus., Price House 

ROBERT MACK SCHANTZ, Bus., Town Group 

DAAID HENRY SCHAPER, C.E., Phi Gamma Delta 

RICHARD GREY SCHENCK, Ch.E., Town Group 

AVILLIAiM RUDOLPH SCHMOLL, C.E., Town Group 

GEORGE JOSEPH SCHNEIDER, Bus., Phi Sigma Kappa 

AVILSON BOHNETT SCHRAMM, M.E., Richards House 

WARREN JOSHUA SCHWAB, Met.E., Town Group 

JAMES ALAN SHAFER, Arts, Town Group 

RODNEY DANIEL SHAFFER, Ch.E., Town Group 

ROBERT REX SHIVTLY, Ch.E., Richards House 

EDWIN IRVING SHUTTLEWORTH, Ch.E., Alpha Chi Rho 

CARL EDWARD SIEBECKER, JR., Bus., Town Group 

CHARLES ELIAS SIEGER, Met.E., Town Group 

ROBERT EDWIN SIEGFRIED, Ch.E., Town Group 

KERAVIN HOWARD SILFIES, Bus., Town Group 

ANDREW PETER SMITH, Met.E., Town Group 



Edgeworth 

Scarsdale, N.Y. 

St. Albans, L.I., N.Y. 

Elmira, N.Y. 

kville Centre, L.I., N.Y. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Pittsburgh 

Easton 

Pittsburgh 

Bethlehem 

Yonkers, N.Y. 

Great Notch, N.J. 

Springfield, Vt. 

Bethlehem 

Trenton, N.J. 

Great Neck, N.Y. 

Madison, N.J. 

Allentown 

Bath 

Trenton, N.J. 

Staten Island, N.Y. 

AVest Lawn 

Union, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Bronx, N.Y. 

Plains 

Rockville Centre, N.Y. 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Allentown 

Flushing, N.Y. 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Bloomfield, N.J. 

Norristown 

Lebanon 

Passaic, N. J. 

Middlebury, Conn. 

Pen Argyl 

Haddon Heights, N.J. 

York 

Harrisburg 

Laureldale 

Ambler 

Allentown 

Erie 

Rutherford, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Demarest, N.J. 

Bayside, N.Y. 

Freemansburg 

Easton 

Allentown 

Washington 

Philadelphia 

Bethlehem 

Allentown 

Allentown 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 



371 



JARED SCOTT SMITH, Ch.E., Town Group 
JOSEPH EARL SMITH, JR., M.E., Phi Sigma Kappa 
PETER CARLTON SMITH, Arts, Alpha Chi Rho 
JOHN ARCHIBALD SMYTH, Arts, Taylor House 
QUENTIN CLETUS SOPRANO, M.E., Town Group 
JOHN FRANCIS SPIRK, Met.E., Town Group 
CHARLES WESLEY STAHL, Ch.E., Delta Sigma Phi 
EDWARD WILLIAM STARKE, JR., Cham., Delta Sigma Phi 
CLARENCE ARTHUR STEARNS, JR., Arts, Chi Phi 
ORVILLE JAMES STEPHENS, Bus., Town Group 
HENRY CHARLES STIEGLITZ, M.E., Richards House 
JOHN MONTAGUE STOCKBRIDGE, M£., Chi Psi 
ROLAND CLIFFORD STOEHR, Bus., Beta Kappa 
JOHN STOGDELL STOKES, JR., I.E., Town Group 
GEORGE CHICKERING STONE, Arts, Chi Psi 
WILLIAM THOMAS STRAEHLE, Ch.E., Drinker House 
CARL ARTHUR STREULI, Chem., Town Group 
WILLIAM MOSS STROUSE, E.E., Pi Lambda Phi 
WILLIAM LESTER STUMP, Ch.E., Town Group 
JOHN PHELPS STUPP, Bus., Kappa Sigma 
WILLIAM ROBB SULTZER, Arts, Delta Sigma Phi 
HENRY CARPENTER SWARTZ, JR., M.E., Price House 
ROBERT STANLEY SWOYER, Ch.E., Town Group 
GEORGE CARL TABOR, Ch.E., Town Group 
ROBERT LINKLETTER TAYLOR, Arts, Theta Delta Chi 
WILLIAM ROBERTS TAYLOR, Arts, Town Group 
JOSEPH PIDGEON THOMAS, JR., Bus., Theta Xi 
PHILIP ADAMS THOMAS, Ch.E., Alpha Chi Rho 

CHARLES McDowell Thompson, i.e.. Kappa sigma 

JOHN ALEXANDER THURN, M.E., Drinker House 
LESTER EDWIN TITLOW, M.E., Town Group 
WALTER STOCKTON TITLOW, JR., E.E., Richards House 
WALTER SCOTT TOMKINSON, Bus., Taylor House 
JOHN PLATT TOWNSEND, M.E., Richards House 
RICHARD MITCHELL TRECO, Met.E., Town Group 
TOWNSEND NEWTON TREESE, Bus., Town Group 
ALBERT GEORGE TROMER, Bus., Town Group 
DAVID IRVIN TROXELL, E.E., Town Group 
JOHN PARKER TROY, E.E., Richards House 
ALBERT ROBERT TUCKER, JR., Ch.E., Sigma Chi 
ROSS PETER VACHON, Bus., Town Group 
PHILIP THOMAS VARRICHIO, Bus., Town Group 
HAROLD OTTO VOLLMER, Ch.E., Town Group 
ALBERT FRANCIS VON BLOCK, Bus., Beta Kappa 
RICHARD ROLLAND WAER, E.E., Town Group 
WILLIAM COMSTOCK WALKER, Ch.E., Chi Psi 
RICHARD RAYMOND WALLING, E.E., Richards House 
EDWARD LOUIS WALTER, Ch.E., Town Group 
GLENN CREASY WANICH, Ch.E., Town Group 
JOSEPH ANTHONY WANTUCK, Chem., Price House 
PARKER VINCENT WARD, Bus., Lambda Chi Alpha 
ROBERT OREM WARWICK, I.E., Delta Sigma Phi 
ROBERT DOUGLAS WATT, Arts, Theta Kappa Phi 
JAY LOUIS WEENING, E.E., Pi Lambda Phi 
PETER JOHN WEIGEL, Arts, Richards House 
ROBERT WELLER, I.E., Alpha Tau Omega 
WILLIAM TAYLOR WENCK, Bus., Town Group 
ROBERT PARSONS WHIPPLE, Ch.E., Delta Tau Delta 
PHILIP CHARLES WHITING, Bus., Kappa Alpha 
THEODORE WIELKOPOLSKI, M.E., Town Group 



Spring Valley 

Philadelphia 

Baltimore, Md. 

Merchantsville, N.J. 

AUentown 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 

Ridgewood, N.J. 

Philadelphia 

Cranford, N.J. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Bayside, N.Y. 

Huntingdon Valley 

Pawling, N.Y. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 

Tuckahoe, N.Y. 

Harrisburg 

Bethlehem 

Clayton, Mo. 

Mount Vernon N.Y. 

Gwynedd Valley 

AUentown 

Boyertown 

Short Hills, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Haddonfield, N.J. 

Scranton 

Rocky River, Ohio 

Philadelphia 

AUentown 

Norristown 

Glenside 

Glen Ridge, N.J. 

North Quincy, Mass. 

Pittsburgh 

West Brighton, S.I., N.Y. 

Quakertown 

Schenectady, N.Y. 

Wilmington, Del. 

New Haven, Conn. 

AUentown 

Roosevelt, L.I., N.Y. 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Easton 

MUwaukee, Wis. 

East Cleveland, Ohio 

Fort Lee, N.J. 

Bloomsburg 

Perth Amboy, N.J. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Wayne 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

New York, N.Y. 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

AUentown 

OU City 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Arlington, N.J. 



372 



JOHN A'lICHAEL WILLIAMS, M.E., Kappa Sigma 

JOHN ROSS ^VILLIAMS, Arts, Town Group 

WILLIAM ROBERT WILLIAMS, Arts, Leonard Hall 

NATHAN LELAND WILSON, JR., Ch.E., Drinker House 

FORWOOD CLOUD WISER, JR., M.E., Richards House 

QUINTUS PETER WITTE, JR., Arts, Richards House 

RALPH WITTMAN, M.E., Richards House 

ALLAN EHRMAN WOLF, I.E., Sigma Alpha Mu 

GEORGE WILLIAM WOLFSTEN, JR., Arts, Pi Lambda Phi 

RICHARD FRANCIS WOOD, JR., Arts, Sigma Chi 

PHILIP BENSON WOODROOFE, Bus., Alpha Tau Omega 

JAMES WILLIAM WOODS, Chem., Drinker House 

WILLIAM STEWART WOODSIDE, JR., Ch.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

GUY CRAWFORD WORRELL, JR., M.E., Psi Upsilon 

STEPHEN COLE WRIGHT, Arts, Richards House 

JOHN CARL YASTRZAB, E.E., Town Group 

FRANKLIN HALDEMAN YOUNG, Bus., Sigma Phi Epsilon, 

SHELDON STANLEY ZALKIND, Arts, Pi Lambda Phi 



Maplewood, N.J. 

Nanticoke 

Scranton 

Downingtown 

Chester 

Munsey Park, L.I., N.Y. 

Philadelphia 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Melrose Park 

Larchmont, N.Y. 

Albany, N.Y. 

Winnetka, 111. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Westfield, Mass. 

Coatesville 

Northampton 

Phoenixville 

New York, N.Y. 



CLASS OF 1944 



FRANCIS HERMANN ACHARD, JR., Arts, Drinker House Westfield, N.J. 

ALFRED ARON ADLER, E.E., Sigma Alpha Mu Philadelphia 

RICHARD CARL ALDINGER, Bus., Town Group Bethlehem 

CHRISTIAN ANDREW ANDERSON, Ch.E., Town Group Perth Amboy, N.J. 

DAVID BERESFORD ANDERSON, Bus., Drinker House Larchmont, N.Y. 

HARRY ^^^\LLIS ANDERSON, JR., Bus., Town Group Altoona 

NORMAN CLARKE APPLEGATE, JR., C.E., Pi Kappa Alpha RiegelsviUe 

DAVID WILLISTON ARMSTRONG, E.E., Chi Psi North Plainfield, N.J. 

RICHARD LOUIS ASHBROOK, Met.E., Price House Mt. Airy, Philadelphia 

WALTER HAMILTON AYERS, Ch.E., Richards House Indiana 

GERALD HERSTER BACHMAN, Bus., Town Group Bethlehem 

STEPHEN ALEXANDER BACSKAY, Beta Kappa Fords, N.J. 

ALBERT LUNDY BAKER, JR., Ch.E., Phi Gamma Delta Summit, N.J. 

CLIFFORD CLARENCE BALDWIN, C.E., Town Group Philadelphia 

THOMAS SHERIDAN BANNAN, Arts, Town Group Clearfield 

ANDREW MURAD BARDAGJY, Bus., Richards House Jersey City, N.J. 

ROBERT JOHN BARR, Ch£., Drinker House Yonkers, N.Y. 

MYRON KNOX BARRETT, JR., I.E., Taylor House Newark, N.J. 

KENNETH WHITMORE BAUMANN, Bus., Kappa Sigma Chevy Chase, Md. 

WILLIAM ROBERT BECHDOLT, Ch.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

RODNEY DENNETT BECKEL, Met.E., Town Group Allentown 

CHARLES ROLAND BEDDOWS, JR., Bus., Lambda Chi Alpha Westfield, N.J. 

ALFRED MURRAY BELCHER, Ch.E., Drinker House Mount Vernon, N.Y. 

MAX WILLIAM BELLIS, E.E., Taylor House Rochester, N.Y. 

WILLIAM EDWARD BELSER, Bus., Delta Tau Delta Plainfield, N.J. 

DAVID LANGHAM BENNELL, Bus., Phi Gamma Delta Shaker Heights, Ohio 

PHILIP JAMES BERG, M.E., Delta Upsilon Sewickley 

NEAL GRUBE BERGSTRESSER, Bus., Town Group Hellertown 

FRANK WOLFGANG BERMAN, Met.E., Cosmopolitan Club CresskiU, N.J. 

FRED FRANCIS BERMAN, E.E., Cosmopolitan Club CresskUl, N.J. 

JOHN RICHARD BEVAN, Met.E., Town Group Pottsville 

GEORGE WILLIAM BEWLEY, Bus., Drinker House Lockport, N.Y. 

CREIGHTON DANIEL BICKLEY, JR., Arts, Sigma Phi Epsilon North Caldwell, N.J. 

JOHN CHARLES BLACK, I.E., Town Group AUentown 

JOHN HARVEY BLAKE, Bus., Beta Theta Pi Garden City, N.Y. 

HOWARD ALLEN BLANK, Met£., Town Group Lehighton 

RICHARD KILLINGTON BLESER, I.E., Alpha Tau Omega Lynbrook, N.Y. 



373 



GEORGE JOHN BLEUL, C.E., Drinker House 

EDWARD LUDLAM BLOSSOM, JR., Arts, Drinker House 

MURRAY DATTNER BLUM, Bus., Pi Lambda Phi 

RAYMOND JOHN BOAKS, Arts, Town Group 

JOSEPH FRANK BONIN, C.E., Pi Kappa Alpha 

CHARLES EMMETT BOSSERMAN, LE., Drinker House 

WILLIAM GEORGE BOURNE, III, M.E., Kappa Alpha 

HUGH BOYD, M.E., Delta Tau Delta 

JAMES JOHN BOYLE, Arts, Town Group 

WARREN HENRY BRADFORD, Ch.E., Drinker House 

EARL ALBERT BRAWN, I.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

RAY EDWIN BRAAVN, I.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

ROBERT EUGENE BRODT, Ch.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

GEORGE HARVEY BROWER, Phys., Town Group 

GEORGE HAFER BROWN, Bus., Town Group 

REX SELDEN BROWN, E.E., Phi Delta Theta 

DONALD HENRY BROWNLEE, M.E., Phi Gamma Delta 

CARL ROBERT BRUNS, Bus., Delta Phi 

JOSEPH JOHN BUCZ^TSfSKI, JR., Ch.E., Town Group 

ALVIN NEWTON BUGBEE, JR., C.E., Taylor House 

HARRY JACOB BUNCKE, JR., I.E., Theta Delta Chi 

EARL ROLAND BUSS, JR., E.E., Town Group 

GEORGE TOHN BUSSMANN, Bus., Psi Upsilon 

ROBERT EMMETT BYRNE, JR., Ch.E., Richards House 

JAMES HOLMES CALLAHAN, Ch.E., Chi Phi 

FRANK VINCENT CAMARDA, Ch.E., Drinker House 

DAVID JOSEPH CARRIGAN, Arts, Taylor House 

JOHN LANGLAND CARROLL, I.E., Taylor House 

KEVIN CASEY, Bus., Kappa Sigma 

RICHARD EDWARD CASTIELLO, M.E., Town Group 

JOHN GEORGE CELLA, Ch.E., Richards House 

C. NOR.MAN CHAREST, E.M., Drinker House 

JOHN CHRISTIAN, E.E., Town Group 

ALDO NICHOLAS CIAFFARDINI, ALE., Town Group 

JOEL GERHARD CLEMMER, JR., Bus., Phi Sigma Kappa 

JOHN LEWIS CLEMMEY, JR., Bus., Sigma Nu 

JOHN KERR COCHRAN, I.E., Alpha Tau Omega 

CHARLES NELSON CODDING, III, C.E., Richards House 

ANDREW CHARLES COLANDO, Arts, Richards House 

DUDLEY COLES, C.E., Beta Theta Pi 

IRVING REID COLLMANN, Arts, Drinker House 

JOSEPH GORDON COMPTON, E.M., Theta Kappa Phi 

DOUGLAS METCALF CONGELTON, Bus., Sigma Phi 

CHARLES RUSSELL CONKLIN, |R., Chem., Alpha Tau Omega 

WILLIAM MARTIN CONWAY, E.E., Theta Kappa Phi 

JOHN STAIRS COOKE, I.E., Theta Delta Chi 

RONALD LOYAL COOPER, Bus., Sigma Nu 

ALBERT DIMERY CORBETT, JR., M.E., Town Group 

JAMES MILBOURNE CORDREY, Ch.E., Beta Kappa 

JACK CORIELL, Phys., Drinker House 

ALFRED JOSEPH CORNELIUS, C.E., Delta Upsilon 

PINCKNEY MORRISON CORSA, C.E., Psi Upsilon 

HOWARD WRIGHT COURTNEY, JR., Bus., Richards House 

DAVID FREDERICK COX, E.E., Sigma Chi 

BRUCE CRAIG, Bus., Alpha Tau Omega 

THOMAS JAMES CROAKE, Theta Kappa Phi 

WILLARD LONG CROFT, I.E., Phi Delta Theta 

WILLIAM JAMES CROWE, Ch.E., Town Group 

HAROLD ARLINGTON CUNNINGHAM, Ch.E., Town Group 

STREIT WAKEFIELD CUNNINGHAM, C.E., Town Group 

WILLIAM ROBERT DABB, E.E., Kappa Sigma 



Northport, L.I., N.Y. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Scranton 

Plymouth, Mich. 

Scranton 

Newport 

New York, N.Y. 

Doylestown 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Mansfield, Ohio 

West Orange, N.J. 

West Orange, N.J. 

Bangor 

Allentown 

Bethlehem 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

New York, N.Y. 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

Exeter 

Catasauqua 

Rumford, Me. 

Easton 

New Haven, Conn. 

New York, N.Y. 

Media 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Lansdale 

A'leriden, Conn. 

Waterford, Conn. 

Bethlehem 

Baldwin, L.I., N.Y. 

Hazleton 

Philadelphia 

Bethlehem 

Glenside 

Fall River, Mass. 

South Orange, N.J. 

Beverly, N.J. 

Yardley 

Newark, N.J. 

Wilkes-Barre 

Flushing, N.Y. 

New Hartford, N.Y. 

Catonsville, Md. 

Rutland, Vt. 

Short Hills, N.J. 

Little Neck, N.Y. 

Bloomfield, N.J. 

Salisbury, Md. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

Narberth 

Westfield, N.J. 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 

South Orange, N.J. 

Trenton, N.J. 

Haworth, N.J. 

Trenton, N.J. 

Washington, D.C. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 



374 



DAVID KEENE DARCY, I.E., Theta Kappa Phi 

COURTLAND VAN HORN DAVIS, JR., Ch.E., Taylor House 

RICHARD MURRAY FRANCIS DAVIS, E.E., Town Group 

ROBERT EDWIN DAMSON, Ch.E., Sigma Nu 

JOHN MONTGOMERY DAWSON, Bus., Simia Phi 

KENNETH IRVING DAY, E.E., Alpha Chi Rho 

JOHN JOSEPH DEACH, JR., E.E., Beta Theta Pi 

ROBERT CARL DECKARD, Ch.E., Town Group 

HENRY EDWRAD DE JONGH, E.E., Richards House 

HERBERT COVERT DE VALVE, JR., E.E., Drinker House 

CARSON FREYjMAN DIEFENDERFER, C.E., Town Group 

EDWARD LEWIS DIEHL, C.E., Drinker House 

ROBERT FREDERICK DIETER, Eng'r., Town Group 

RAY ROBERTS DIMMICK, Arts, Town Group 

WARREN RICHARD DIX, Met.E., Alpha Tau Omega 

ROBERT LESTER DOBSON, JR., Bus., Kappa Sigma 

JOHN FRANCIS DONAHUE, Met. E., Chi Psi 

FRANK THOMAS DONATO, Met.E., Theta Kappa Phi 

ROBERT HENRY DONEY, I.E., Pi Kappa Alpha 

WILLIAM WOLFE DONIGER, Bus., Pi Lambda Phi 

JOHN EVANS DOXSEY, I.E., Sigma Chi 

ALAN FREDERICK UBIN, Chem., Pi Lambda Phi 

JACK FRANKLIN DUELLY, E.E., Richards House 

FRANK JOSEPH DUNIGAN, M.E., Phi Gamma Delta 

RUSSELL WILLIAM ECKERT, Ch.E., Town Group 

HORACE BUCK EDWARDSEN, Arts, Chi Psi 

BERNARD JOHN EGAN, E.E., Drinker House 

WILLIAM HARRISON EICHLIN, JR., M.E., Town Group 

LUTHER WILLIAM EISENHART, I.E., Town Group 

ARTHUR HENRY ELLIOTT, JR., Arts, Theta Xi 

STUART MARSH ELLSWORTH, JR., Arts, Richards House 

CARL ALBRIGHT ELMES, Bus., Phi Gamma Delta 

RAYMOND WILTON ENSTINE, Bus., Phi Sigma Kappa 

DANAL PAUL EPSTEIN, Bus., Pi Lambda Phi 

WILLIAM ALLEN ERNEST, E.E., Alpha Tau Omega 

PAUL SEBASTIAN FALCO, C.E., Kappa Sigma 

WILLIAM BARTHOLOA/IEW FARRELL, JR., Bus., Sigma Nu 

DONALD MALCOLM FEIGLEY, Arts, Taylor House 

FRANK EDWARD FELT, Bus., Chi Psi 

RICHARD KOCHER FENSTERMACHER, Chem., Town Group 

ALBERT GUY FERDINAND, Arts, Town Group 

BLAINE DONALD FERRELL, Ch.E., Phi Sigma Kappa 

ROY NORMAN FIGUEROA, Bus., Phi Delta Theta 

EDWARD THOMAS FINNERTY, Arts, Drinker House 

DONALD TANTUM FISCHER, Arts, Chi Phi 

CHARLES WILLIAM FISHER, M.E., Theta Xi 

WILLIAM HENTRY FISHER, Bus., Sigma Phi EpsUon 

JACK CLIFFORD FITCH, Ch.E., Town Group 

DWIGHT JOHN FLEMMING, E.E., Richards House 

RAY HENRY FORNER, Chem., Town Group 

JOHN BURR FORSYTH, Bus., Phi Sigma Kappa 

ANTHONY CONSTANTINE FORTOSIS, Bus., Town Group 

CHARLES HATHERLY FOSTER, I.E., Town Group 

CHARLES HUFF FOSTER, JR., Ch.E., Taylor House 

OSCAR EDWIN FOX, JR., I.E., Phi Delta Theta 

KAY TEDDY FRANCK, M.E., Lambda Chi Alpha 

DALE YOUNGMAN FREED, Bus., Taylor House 

WILLIAM SNIVELY FREY, Bus., Delta Upsilon 

GUENTHER HILMER FROEBEL, JR., ME Chi Phi 

EDWARD LYSTER FROST, Met.E., Sigma Phi 

ALBERT CLIFTON FULTON, M.E., Town Group 



Rockville Centre, N.Y. 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Butztown 

McKeesport 

Norristown 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Pottsville 

Marysville 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Baldwin, N.Y. 

Fullerton 

York 

Port Washington, N.Y. 

Hellertown 

Little Falls, N.J. 

Rutherford, N.J. 

Garden City, N.Y. 

Dunmore 

Pen Argyl 

Cedarhurst, N.Y. 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Harrisburg 

Hellertown 

Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Emporium 

Easton 

Bethlehem 

London, S.W. i, England 

Central Village, Conn. 

Ridley Park 

Southampton, L.I., N.Y. 

New York, N.Y. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 

Great Neck, N.Y. 

Quakertown 

Jamestown, N.Y. 

Allentown 

Freeland 

Roslyn 

Garden City, N.Y. 

Millville, N.J. 

Beverly, N.J. 

Hammonton, N.J. 

Philadelphia 

Scranton 

Newburgh, N.Y. 

Catasauqua 

Red Bank, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Cheltenham 

Reading 

Hackensack, N.J. 

Williamsport 

York 

Swarthmore 

Kenmore, N.Y. 

Kenoza Lake, N.Y. 



375 



ANDRE^V ERNEST BENJAMIN FUNK, JR., Bus., Theta Kappa Phi 

GEORGE EHRENFELD FUNK, C.E., Pi Kappa Alpha 

PHILIP JAMES GAHAGAN, I.E., Town Group 

JAMES WESLEY GALLOWAY, JR., C.E., Theta Kappa Phi 

WILLIAAl CHARLES GALTON, Chem., Theta Kappa Phi 

HENRY AUGUSTUS GARDNER, Bus., Sigma Nu 

GEORGE GAWTHROP, JR., Ch.E., Taylor House 

DAVID FRANKLIN GEARHART, Arts, Phi Gamma Delta 

JOHN EDWIN GEHR, Bus., Price House 

RICHARD LEE GERHART, C.E., Richards House 

SAUL GERSON, Arts, Drinl^er House 

CHARLES KENNETH GILES, Ch.E., Theta Kappa Phi 

ROBERT JOSEPH GILL, Chem., Price House 

IRVIN WILLETS GILMORE, Arts, Taylor House 

ROBERT DALE GILMORE, Arts, Taylor House 

WILLIAM PIUS GLESSNER, Met.E., Town Group 

WILLIAM OLIVER GOLD, Arts, Delta Sigma Phi 

JOSEPH HERA/IAN GOTH, JR., Arts, Town Group 

RICHARD CARL GOTTSCHALL, E.E., Pi Kappa Alpha 

VINCENT FRANK GRASSO, Bus., Town Group 

DAVID WAGENER GREEN, E.E., Richards House 

JOHN LOUIS GRETZ, Met.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

EDWARD KENNARD GROSS, M.E., Lambda Chi Alpha 

JOHN HAiMMES GROSS, Met.E., Town Group 

FRED SOLOMON GRUENWALD, Chem, Tau Delta Phi 

ERNEST JOHN GSELL, Arts, Alpha Kappa Pi 

MICHAEL GURAK, Ch.E., Town Group 

CHARLES RALPH HACKET, Ch.E., Town Group 

CHARLES DONALD HAGEY, Arts, Town Group 

EDGAR JAMES HALL, E.M., Taylor House 

WILLIAM MITCHELL HALL, Bus., Phi Sigma Kappa 

STUART LINDSLEY HAMMOND, Bus., Alpha Tau Omega 

RYLAND TRUSCOTT HANGER, E.E., Drinker House 

RICHARD HARDY, M.E., Town Group 

ALBERT EDWARD HARTUNG, Arts, Town Group 

DONALD JUDSON HAWKINS, M.E., Taylor House 

WILLIAM HOWARD HEBRANK, M.E., Richards House 

GEORGE WALLEY HECK, JR., Met.E., Town Group 

THEODORE GUY HECK, Arts, Town Group 

BRUCE WHITE HEERDT, Bus., Drinker House 

ROBERT ALLEN HEIRONIMUS, M.E., Chi Psi 

DONALD RAUB HELM, I.E., Sigma Chi 

JERRY NUGENT HENDERSHOT, Arts, Lambda Chi Alpha 

WILLIAM EBERLY HENDRIAN, C.E., Alpha Chi Rho 

RICHARD BALDWIN HENDRICK, Met.E., Alpha Kappa Pi 

JOHN HOWARD HENRY, I.E., Price House 

WILBUR EDWIN HENRY, JR., Arts, Phi Sigma Kappa 

CHARLES JOHN HERZER, JR., Arts, Drinker House 

EDGAR WILLIAM HESS, Chem., Town Group 

FREDERICK GEORGE HESS, E.M., Town Group 

GEORGE FRANK HEWITT, M.E., Pi Kappa Alpha 

ROBERT HOLLIDAY HICKS, JR., I.E., Richards House 

LEWIS WARNER HILL, M.E., Town Group 

DAVID NELSON HILLEGASS, Bus., Drinker House 

CHARLES CARLSON HILTON, Met.E., Richards House 

ARTHUR DOUGLAS HIRD, I.E., Theta Delta Chi 

WILLIAM CHARLES HITTINGER, Ch.E., Town Group 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HOFF ACKER, JR., Bus., Delta Upsilon 

CLAIR ADAM HOFFMAN, Ch.E., Town Group 



White Haven 

HoUidaysburg 

Bethlehem 

Miami Beach, Fla. 

Madison, N.J. 

Lakewood, N.Y. 

Philadelphia 

Palmerton 

Binghamton, N.Y. 

Ephrata 

Great Neck, N.Y. 

Lowell, Mass. 

Philadelphia 

Hughesville 

Harrisburg 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 

Scranton 

Kingston 

Easton 

Wayne 

Montclair, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

New York, N.Y. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Scranton 

Allentown 

Bethlehem 

Ridgewood, N.J. 

Red Bank, N.J. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Haddonfield, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Freeland 

Palmerton 

Baltimore, Md. 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 

New Canaan, Conn. 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Lancaster 

Newton, N.J. 

Mechanicsburg 

East Orange, N.J. 

East Orange, N.J. 

Glen Cove, N.Y. 

AUentown 

Catasauqua 

Catasauqua 

Harrisburg 

Baltimore, Md. 

Bethlehem 

Quakertown 

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada 

Englewood, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Pittsburgh 

Palmerton 



JOHN VINCENT HOGAN, Arts, Sigma Phi Epsilon 
RALPH EVERETT HOHMAN, M.E., Taylor House 



Forest Hills, L.I., N.Y. 
Orange, N.J. 



376 



GEORGE MORRIS HOLDERER, Bus., Kappa Alpha 

HAR\'EY GRANVILLE HOLLENBACH, JR., LE., Taylor House 

JA.MES ALLISON HOSFORD, M.E., Theta Delta Chi 

HERAL-XN ARNOLD HUBER, Arts, Cosmopolitan Club 

THOMAS FREDERICK HUMPHREY, M.E., Beta Kappa 

WILLIAAI BOYD HURSH, Mct.E., Town Group 

ALFRED JOHN INDERRIEDEN, Ch.E., Sigma Nu 

CARL RICHARD INGEMANSON, E.E., Price House 

ROBERT IR\VIN JASLOW, Arts, Pi Lambda Phi 

JAMES STAFFORD JEFFERSON, Bus., Drinker House 

ROBERT WILLIAM JENSEN, M.E., Delta Tau Delta 

ALFRED PITT JOHANSEN, I.E., Drinker House 

MALCOLM STANLEY JOHNSON, I.E., Drinker House 

RALPH RICHARD JOHNSON, Arts, Town Group 

ALAN FRANCIS JONES, Ch.E., Pi Kappa Alpha 

EVAN JONES, Met.E., Beta Theta Pi 

JOHN LADELL SEWARD JORALEMON, JR., I.E., Taylor House 

RUSSELL CORNELIUS JORDAN, I.E., Richards House 

JOHN ATHAN KARAS, Phys., Drinker House 

DANIEL KARPOWICH, C.E., Town Group 

ROBERT EDWARD KEENAN, Bus., Town Group 

RICHARD JOHN KELLAR, M.E., Town Group 

GEORGE FREEMAN KELLER, Arts, Drinker House 

JOHN EDXX'IN KELLY, M.E., Town Group 

CARL AUGUST KENDZIORA, JR., Arts, Taylor House 

JOHN MARIUS KENNEDY, I.E., Town Group 

FRANKLIN BROOKS KERN, I.E., Sigma Phi 

PAUL J. KERVICK, I.E., Sigma Nu 

ALTON HA\^VARD KINGMAN, JR., I.E., Delta Tau Delta 

CHESTER LYMAN KINGSBURY, JR., Bus., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

GEORGE FREDERICK KISTER, JR., Arts, Delta Upsilon 

ROBERT CHARLES KLEINKNECHT, Ch.E., Drinker House 

CARL THEODORE KLEPPINGER, Chem., Town Group 

WILLIAM CHARLES KNIGHT, Ch.E., Taylor House 

KENNETH ROBERT KNOLL, Bus., Theta Xi 

GEORGE HENRY KOCYAN, JR., M.E., Taylor House 

JOHN LEWIS EDWARD KRATZER, E.E., Town Group 

WILLIAM LOUIS KRONTHAL, C.E., Tau Delta Phi 

ROBERT WARREN KRUMSCHEID, Bus., Alpha Kappa Pi 

CLAUDE JENNINGS KURTZ, Ch.E., Phi Delta Theta 

STEPHEN KUTOSH, Ch.E., Town Group 

ARNOLD LASSER, Bus., Sigma Alpha Mu 

RALPH RUPP LAU, E.E., Pi Kappa Alpha 

THEODORE CHARLES LAUBE, Ch.E., Drinker House 

BERNARD VOLGER LAWSHE, M.E., Alpha Tau Omega 

THOMAS ALLAN LAWSON, Ch.E., Pi Lambda Phi 

CHARLES CLAY LEAF, E.E., Alpha Chi Rho 

RICHARD HENRY LEEDS, Bus., Sigma Alpha Mu 

EDWIN LESLIE LEFT, C.E., Chi Phi 

CHARLES ELLIS LEHR, Bus., Town Group 

LEONARD JACK LEIDIG, Bus., Town Group 

FRANK NICHOLAS LEITNER, Bus., Taylor House 

LEONARD HARVEY LEMPERT, Bus., Price House 

ANDRE JEAN EMILE LEROUX. Arts, Cosmopolitan Club 

GA\^OR OTTO HENRY LE ROY, Bus., Richards House 

JAMES SIGMUND LEVI, Bus., Sigma Alpha Mu 

RODERICK WYLIE LINK, E.E., Drinker House 

F. ROBERT LINKER, Arts, Sigma Alpha Mu 

ROBERT WESTFALL LOGAN, Ch.E., Town Group 

RAYMOND WILLIAM LOH, Bus., Taylor House 

ALFRED ARTHUR LOMAR, Ch.E., Theta Xi 



Scarsdale, N.Y. 
Harrisburg 
Maplewood, N.J. 
Narrowsburg, N.Y. 
Woodbridge, N.J. 
Bethlehem 
Tulsa, Okia. 
Succasunna, N.J. 
Reading 
Larchmont, N.Y. 
Springdale, Conn. 
Hasbrouck Heights, N.J. 
Luzerne 
Fasten 
Philadelphia 
Clairton 
South Orange, N.J. 
Hasbrouck Heights, N.J. 
Lebanon 
Allentown 
Allentown 
Allentown 
Elizabeth, N.J. 
Rio Grande, N.J. 
Harrison, N.Y. 
New York, N.Y. 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 
Springfield, Mass. 
West Orange, N.J. 
Middletown, Ohio 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Grantwood, N.J. 
Allentown 
Westfield, N.J. 
Crestwood, N.Y. 
Kingston 
East Fogelsville 
New York, N.Y. 
Paterson, N.J. 
Berwick 
Bethlehem 
New Rochelle, N.Y. 
Harrisburg 
East Orange, N.J. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
New York, N.Y. 
South Orange, N.J. 
Larchmont, N.Y. 
Westfield, N.J. 
Bethlehem 
York 
Maplewood, N.J. 
Montclair, N.J. 
Philadelphia 
Newburgh, N.Y. 
New Rochelle, N.Y. 
Glen Rock, N.J. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Coatesville 
Teaneck, N.J. 
Ridgewood, N.J. 



377 



ROBERT MARTIN LONG, Met.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

DWIGHT FRANCIS LONGLEY, Bus., Delta Phi Maplewood, N.J. 
DONALD McFAUL LORIMER, E.M., Taylor House Douglaston, L.I., N.Y. 

THOMAS J. LOUCKS, E.E., Town Group Maplewood, N.J. 

DONALD RANDOLPH LOWRY, JR., M.E., Beta Theta Pi Flushing, N.Y. 

JAMES FREDERICK LUCKER, M.E., Delta Tau Delta Lansdowne 

WILLIAM HARRY LUTZ, ME., Town Group Mahanoy City 
HARRY WASDELL LYNN, JR., Bus., Drinker House Floral Park, L.I., N.Y. 

CREIGHTON LAMAR LYTLE, Chem., Richards House Minersville 

HERMAN RALPH MAACK, Ch.E., Alpha Chi Rho Pottstown 

WALTER AUGUSTUS MACKEY, E.M., Psi Upsilon Millburn, N.J. 

JOHN LINNAEUS MacMINN, M.E., Phi Delta Theta Williamsport 

VINCENT JOHN FRANCIS MARGIOTTI, Ch.E., Taylor House Newburgh, N.Y. 

JAMES SUTHERLAND MARSH, I.E., Sigma Chi Washington, D.C. 

JOHN WITHROW MARTIN, M.E., Town Group Sadsburyville 

FERDINAND MASCELLI, E.E., Town Group Carbondale 

ROBERT HARRIS MATHES, E.E., Theta Xi Millburn, N.J. 

STERLING ELLIOTT MAYO, E.E., Alpha Chi Rho Metuchen, N.J. 

JAMES JOHN McCarthy, Bus., Town Group Bethlehem 

HUBERT McDonnell, jr., I.E., PsI Upsllon Greenwich, Conn. 

FRANK JOSEPH McGRATH, Ch.E., Drinker House Yonkers, N.Y. 

ROBERT MICHAEL McINERNEY, Ch.E., Town Group AUentown 

WILLIAM AUSTIN McINTOSH, M.E., Town Group New York, N.Y. 

GEORGE THOMAS McKINLEY, Arts, Taylor House Palmerton 

GEORGE WILLIAM McKNIGHT, M.E., Town Group Freemansburg 

JOHN WARREN MEACHAM, E.E., Town Group TrucksviUe 

THEODORE GEORGE MEGAS, Ch.E., Drinker House Mauch Chunk 

JAMES CHARLES MEIGHAN, JR., M.E., Town Group Northampton 

GEORGE MELLOY, Arts, Town Group Bethlehem 

JOHN FRANKLIN MENGEL, M.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

ALAN CAMERON MERMANN, Arts, Beta Theta Pi Baldwin, L.I., N.Y. 

WILLIAM FOWLER METTEN, JR., Bus., Delta Tau Delta Wilmington, Del. 

ROBERT EDWARD MEURY, Bus., Richards House Rutherford, N.J. 

EDGAR HANMER MILLER, Bus., Alpha Kappa Pi East Orange, N.J. 

GEORGE FREDERICK MILLER, Chem., Town Group West Reading 

JACK LESLIE MILLER, Arts, Drinker House Clifton, N.J. 

MARTIN ELMER MILLER, JR., M.E., Town Group Harrisburg 

WALTER ERNEST MILLER, Chem., Town Group Ehzabeth, N.J. 

COURTER DICKINSON MILLS, Arts, Price House Clairton 

ROBERT STANLEY MILTENBERGER, AIet.E., Town Group Easton 

SAMUEL RUSSELL MINK, JR., Arts, Drinker House Bristol, Conn. 

ANDREW MITCHELL, Ch.E., Kappa Sigma Philadelphia 

STANLEY THOA4PSON MOODIE, Bus., Theta Xi Grove City 

CHARLES FREDERICK MOORE, Arts, Drinker House Claymont, Del. 

NEAL SAMUEL MORETON, I.E., Alpha Chi Rho Erie 

MARCY LEE MORRISON, Ch.E., Pi Lambda Phi Buffalo, N.Y. 

ARTHUR HOLMES MORSE, JR., Arts, Richards House Cincinnati, Ohio 

LAURANCE AUSTIN MOSIER, Arts, Alpha Kappa Pi Chevy Chase, Md. 

ROBERT IRWIN MOSS, C.E., Sigma Alpha Mu Brooklyn, N.Y. 

JOHN WESLEY MOTTER, Met.E., Pi Kappa Alpha Towson, Md. 

RALPH DAVID MOYER, Ch.E., Alpha Kappa Pi Bogota, N.J. 

HERBERT MATTHEW MULLER, Ch.E., Taylor House Bergenfield, N.J. 

GLENN ALLAN MURRAY, M.E., Phi Delta theta Larchmont, N.Y. 

RICHARD LIVINGSTONE MURRAY, M.E., Phi Gamma Delta Westfield, N.J. 

ROBERT DEXTER MUSSINA, I.E., Delta Tau Delta Williamsport 

ROBERT WILLIAM NEUBER, E.E., Taylor House Drexel Hill 

HOWARD RAYMOND NEUREUTER, Bus., Richards House Buffalo, N.Y. 

LOUIS ISRAEL NOTHESTEIN, Ch.E., Drinker House Mauch Chunk 
ROBERT EUGENE NYLIN, Bus., Theta Xi Rockville Centre, N.Y. 

JOSEPH FRANCIS O'BRIEN, Arts, Phi Sigma Kappa Jersey City, N.J. 

HOWARD HENRY OCKELMANN, Ch.E., Richards House Union City, N.J. 



378 



FRANK ROBERT O'NEILL, ME., Alpha Kappa Pi 

HENRY CHRISTL\N OST, JR., Bus., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

JOSEPH HOAVARD OSWALD, Bus., Delta Tau Delta 

ROBERT CONSTANTINE OTTENS, E.E., Town Group 

ROBERT LEE OYLER, Ch.E., Price House 

ROBERT .ALARTIN PADDOCK, Bus., Town Group 

LEAMS FRANKLIN PAGE, E.E., Town Group 

REGINALD SCHLEGEL PARKER, Phys., Town Group 

JOHN \A1LLIAAI PARSONS, E£., Town Group 

BRUCE .McKENZIE PEACOCK, ALE., Beta Theta Pi, 

CHARLES LEH.MAXN PELZEL, ALE., Drinker House 

LEON MACK PETERS, M.E., Town Group 

THEODORE PETERS, JR., Ch.E., Sigma Phi 

JOSEPH LEONARD PIAZZA, E.E., Drinker House 

VMLLIAAI JOHN PILLAR, Alet.E., Town Group 

HARRY PAUL PONISI, JR., Ch.E., Drinker House 

DAMS THOAIAS POOLE, JR., I.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

GEORGE RICHARD POTTER, I.E., Drinker House 

ROBERT JOSEPH PRIESTLEY, Ch.E., Town Group 

JAAIES FLORY PRITCHARD, Ch.E., Kappa Sigma 

JOHN JOSEPH PROBST, I.E., Sigma Phi 

SAAIUEL CLIFTON PRUETT, Ch.E., Beta Theta Pi 

JACK BURDELL RADER, I.E., Town Group 

RICHARD LEV AN RAHN, Ch.E., Delta Upsilon 

CLIFFORD THOMAS RAIDLINE, E.E., Town Group 

GORDON ARTHUR RAAIBERT, Alet.E., Taylor House 

GEORGE RAAISDEN, Arts, Delta Upsilon 

GEORGE WATSON RANDALL, C.E., Town Group 

WILLIAAI GRAHAAI RANKIN, Bus., Richards House 

E\T:RETT DOLPH RASSIGA, Arts, Town Group 

THEODORE ALVIN RASSLER, Ch.E., Town Group 

PAUL JAMES RAY, ALE., Town Group 

JOHN EBERLIN RAYAIER, JR., Ch.E., Delta Sigma Phi 

MALACHI JOSEPH REDINGTON, Bus., Theta Kappa Phi 

JESSE EDWARD REED, Ch.E., Richards House 

CHARLES DANIEL REGAN, Ch.E., Theta Kappa Phi 

PAUL LESLIE REIBER, JR., Met£., Beta Theta Pi 

HARRY ARCHIBALD REICHENBACH, JR., E.M., Town Group 

NELSON REIFSNTiTDER, E.E., Richards House 

GEORGE BARTON REINEKING, ALE., Drinker House 

JAAIES CLYDE REISCHER, E.E., Pi Kappa Alpha 

ROBERT ROLAND RESSLER, Chem., Town Group 

RALPH HENHY RHOADS, E.E., Town Group 

FRANKLIN JACKSON RHODES, I.E., 

DOUGLAS CHASE RICH, Arts, Sigma Chi 

WARREN CHARLES RIEGER, Ch.E., Price House 

JAAIES HAAIILTON RIEHL, Bus., Chi Psi 

ROBERT SAAIUEL RIPPEY, JR., E.M., Theta Xi 

JOSEPH RAYAIOND RISTORCELLI, Ch.E., CosmopoUtan Club Venezuela, South America 

CHARLES AIARTIN RITTER, JR., Ch.E., Town Group Allentown 

ROBERT ERROL ROBERSON, Chem., Drinker House Teaneck, N.J. 

GORDON THOAIAS ROBERTS, E.E., Town Group New York, N.Y. 

SAMUEL WALLACE ROBERTS, JR., I.E., Richards House Elkins Park 

ROSS BROIAT^J ROBINSON, Chem., Town Group Kingsport, Tenn. 

WALTER ROSSITER ROBINSON, JR., Ch.E., Sigma Chi Wihnington, Del. 

CHARLES AIONTGOAIERY ROGERS, Bus., Sigma Phi Dallas, Tex. 

GILBERT DANIEL ROMBERGER, Arts, Delta UpsUon Allentown 

GILBERT MORRIS ROSENBERG, E.E., Town Group Bethlehem 

ALFRED LINCOLN ROSENER, JR., C.E., Pi Lambda Phi West Deal, N.J. 

CHARLES FULD ROSENTHAL, E.E., Pi Lambda Phi Scranton 

ROBERT THADDEUS ROSPOND, Met.E., Taylor House Irvington, N.J. 



Drexel Hill 

Pottsville 

Nutley, N.J. 

Allentown 

Mercersburg 

Wolcott, N.Y. 

Pelham, N.Y. 

Allentown 

Palmyra, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Charleston, AV.Va. 

Allentown 

Chambersburg 

Great Neck, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Somerville, N.J. 

Rockville Centre, L.I., N.Y. 

Larchmont, N.Y. 

Neptune, N.J. 

Bangor 

Woodhaven, N.Y. 

Teaneck, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Allentown 

Bethlehem 

Rochester, N.Y. 

West Orange, N.J. 

Fairmont, W.Va. 

Jamaica, N.Y. 

Elmhurst, N.Y. 

Allentown 

Bethlehem 

Puerto Rico 

Wilkes-Barre 

McKeansburg 

East Hampton, N.Y. 

Pittsburgh 

Bethlehem 

Norristown 

ArUngton, N.J. 

Chester 

AUentown 

Allentown 

Bloomiield, N.J. 

Cato, N.Y. 

Staten Island, N.Y. 

Fredonia, N.Y. 

West Norwood, N.J. 



379 



JOHN ALEXANDER ROSS, Ch.E., Drinker House 
GEORGE ALBERT ROTHLISBERGER, Arts, Delta Sigma Phi 
CLAYTON ANTHONY RUGG, JR., Bus., Sigma Nu 
ARTHUR JUSTIN SABATINO, Cli.E., Richards House 
JOSEPH PETER SAEMMER, Bus., Town Group 
PAUL WILLIAM SANDER, M.E., Town Group 
ROBERT KISTLER SCHMOYER, Ch.E., Town Group 
JOSEPH SCHA'IUK, Met.E., Town Group 
RICHARD LUTHER SCHOCH, Bus., Town Group 
IRWIN HERBERT SCHRAM, JR., Ch.E., Drinl^er House 
HERBERT OWEN SCHUTT, M.E., Town Group 
CARL MAXWELL SCHWAB, Ch.E., Town Group 
LEONARD CHARLES SCHWAB, M.E., Tau Delta Phi 
JAMES SECHLER SCHWARTZ, M.E., Richards House 
MARK HERMAN SCHWARZ, JR., Bus., Drinker House 
Q. JOHN SCHWARZ, M.E., Chi Psi 

ROBERT ADOLPH SCHAVARZ, Arts, Lambda Chi Alpha 
DAVID PHINEAS SCOBLIONKO, Arts, Town Group 
JOHN DONALD SCOULLER, Bus., Town Group 
RICHARD BELL SEALS, Arts, Beta Theta Pi 
PETER CHARLES SEATON, C.E., Town Group 
LOUIS ANTHONY SEFRANEK, Met.E., Town Group 
HAROLD JOSEPH SEIGLE, Ch.E., Town Group 
FREDERICK MILLS SELKREGG, JR., Bus., Drinker House 
WALLACE ALFRED SENTEN, Met.E., Drinker House 
NYM KENNETH SEWARD, Ch.E., Town Group 
RICHARD CHARLES SHAFER, M.E., Town Group 
STANFORD HENRY SHAW, Bus., Delta Tau Delta 
HUBBARD WILLIAM SHAWHAN, Ch.E., Sigma Phi 
HARRY PETER SHEEVERS, Ch.E., Taylor House 
SMITH SHELDON, I.E., Price House 
HAROLD DeWITT SHERWOOD, Ch.E., Drinker House 
TOSHIAKI SHINTAKU, C.E., Town Group 
JOSEPH BENJAMIN SICKLER, Arts, Town Group 
AROL JOHN SIMPSON, Ch.E., Taylor House 
JAMES ROBERT SIMPSON, III, M.E., Beta Theta Pi 
JOHN MORRISON SKILLING, JR., Bus., Sigma Chi 
DOUGLAS CARLETON SMITH, M.E., Delta Tau Delta 
GILMAN BRAYTON SMITH, III, Arts, Psi Upsilon 
JOHN DAVID SMITH, Bus., Phi Sigma Kappa 
ROBERT CHADWICK SMITH, Ch.E., Town Group 
ROBERT LEE SMITH, JR., E.E., Town Group 
ROBERT LOUIS SMITH, C.E., Sigma Chi 
GEORGE WHITNEY SNYDER, Arts, Psi Upsilon 
SAMUEL IDELL SNYDER, ChJE., Town Group 
WILSON PERSHING SNYDER, Bus., Beta Theta Pi 
HARVEY FRANCIS SOULE, Ch.E., Taylor House 
RICHARD DeWITT SPRADLING, Arts, Cosmopolitan Club 
SHERMAN STAIR, Bus., Town Group 
DAVID TRUMAN STEELE, I.E., Phi Gamma Delta 
JULIUS VICTOR STEVANCSECZ, E.E., Town Group 
WILLIAM CHARLES STOECKLE, MJE., Alpha Kappa Pi 
TRACY FREDERICK STORCH, Ch.E., Town Group 
EUGENE SEWELL STOWERS, JR., I.E., Taylor House 
RODMAN EGBERT STREET, Ch.E., Town Group 
OSCAR DAVIS SUMMERS, E.E., Richards House 
THOMAS GILLMER SUMMERS, Arts, Sigmu Nu 
KENNETH GILBERT SWAYNE, M.E., Taylor House 
PHILIP ANTHONY SWEET, JR., M.E., Taylor House 
STANLEY CHESTER SZYMAKOWSKI, Bus., Town Group 
DUNCAN ARTHUR TALBOT, JR., Met.E., Theta Xi 



Williamsport 

East Orange, N.J. 

Lakewood, N.Y. 

Elizabeth, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Maplewood, N.J. 

Schnecksville 

Easton 

Allentown 

Glen Rock, N.J. 

Easton 

Allentown 

Cumberland, Md. 

Hazelton 

Lake Hopatcong, N.J. 

Rutherford, N.J. 

Westfield, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Philadelphia 

Newton, N.J. 

Allentown 

Bethlehem 

Philadelphia 

Plainfield, N.J. 

New York, N.Y. 

Luzerne 

Allentown 

South Orange, N.J. 

Charleston, W.Va. 

Yonkers, N.Y. 

BelleviUe, N.J. 

Englewood, N.J. 

Pahala, Hawaii 

Fair Haven, N.J. 

Stratford, Conn. 

Ambler 

Wilmington, Del. 

Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Montclair, N.J. 

Garden City, L.I., N.Y. 

Allentown 

Frederick, Md. 

Charleston, W.Va. 

Sewickley 

Windber 

Minersville 

Albany, N.Y. 

Buenos Aires, Argentina 

Rosemont 

Plandome, L.I., N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Drexel Hill 

Allentown 

Bluefield, W.Va. 

York 

Oyster Bay, N.Y. 

Warren, Ohio 

George School 

Scranton 

Greenfield, Mass. 

Rahway, N.J. 



3«o 



ROGER ALFRED TAMBELLA, Arts, Beta Kappa 

FRANK MARTIN TAYLOR, Bus., Delta Tau Delta 

BRUCE WILLIAM THAYER, M.E., Delta Tau Delta 

NATHAN TO^\^NSEND THAYER, JR., Bus., Drinker House 

PAUL VERNOR THEVENET, Bus., Town Group 

WARREN HARDING THOMAS, Ch.E., Town Group 

WILLIS GRANT THOMAS, JR., Arts, Town Group 

ALBERT HARVEY THOMSON, Bus., Taylor House 

AVILLIAM BEAUCHAMP TILGHMAN, III, C£., Theta Delta Chi 

HAROLD AMDDALL TILLEY, Bus., Taylor House 

ALFRED HOWE TODD, C.E., Taylor House 

JOSEPH NEWKIRK TOiMLINSON, Ch.E., Theta Xi 

WALTER TRAPPE, JR., Bus., Alpha Tau Omega 

PAUL STEPHEN TREMEL, Bus., Town Group 

JAMES LUKE TROY, Bus., Drinker House 

JOHN WILLIAM VAN CLEVE, Bus., Theta Xi 

STE^^'ART VAN VLIET, JR., Arts, Phi Delta Theta 

WILLIAM JOSEPH VARGO, Bus., Town Group 

EARL ROBERT VELIE, E.M., Beta Kappa 

MARLIN GERRIT VERBEET, Bus., Delta Phi Ward 

ALBERT EUGENE VETROSKY, Arts, Town Group 

STEPHEN THOMAS VETROSKY, Bus., Town Group 

VITO JOSEPH VITELLI, M.E., Taylor House 

RICHARD FRANCIS VOSBURY, Bus., Sigma Phi EpsHon 

GEORGE JACOB WALBORN, Bus., Chi Phi 

EARLE AVILBUR WALLICK, JR., E.E., Phi Sigma Kappa 

GERALD EDWARD WALSH, JR., C.E., Drinker House 

MERLIN PAUL WALTERS, M.E., Town Group 

HARRY BEAMES WALTON, Ch.E., Drinker House 

WaLLIAM ALBERT WEISKOPF, M.E., Town Group 

ROBERT EARL WELTZ, Ch.E., Chi Phi 

WILLARD TILGHMAN WERKHEISER, Ch.E., Town Group 

ROBERT MAXWT:LL WERTZ, Bus., Town Group 

THO.MAS DONALD WETRICH, Bus., Psi Upsilon 

CHARLES MARK WETZEL, II, I.E., Richards House 

ARTHUR JOHN WHITE, I.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

ROBERT JAY WIEDENMAN, Ch.E., Richards House 

ROBERT ARTHUR WILEY, Bus., Richards House 

WILLIAlM WALLACE WILEY, Bus., Town Group 

ARCHIBALD LYNN WILLIAMS, JR., Bus., Beta Theta Pi 

JOSEPH ADOLPH A\'ILLIAMS, Ch.E., Town Group 

THOMAS WHIGHT A\'ILLIAMS, III, Bus., Chi Psi 

JOHN DAVISON WILLIAMSON, Bus., Town Group 

CHARLES DENGLER WILSON, Bus., Town Group 

ROBERT HENRY WILSON, Bus., Town Group 

THOMAS R. WINCO, Ch.E., Drinker House 

STEPHEN CLARKE WOODRUFF, Chem., Taylor House 

HARRY KIRKE WRENCH, JR., Bus., Chi Phi 

PAUL EUGENE WRIGHT, Ch.E., Town Group 

ROBERT WRIGHT, JR., I.E., Taylor House 

DONALD HOWARD WYTHE, JR., E.E., Cosmopolitan Club 

GEORGE SMYLIE YOUNGLING, M.E., Richards House 

ROY TYSON ZACKEY, M.E., Sigma Phi Epsilon 

WILLIAM ZUCKER, Bus., Theta Delta Chi 



Canadensis 

AVilmington, Del. 

Evanston, III. 

Flushing, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 

AUentown 

Dallas City 

Salisbury, Md. 

Avoca 

Richmond, Va. 

Bridgeton, N.J. 

Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Washington, D.C. 

Haddonfield, N.J. 

Shrewsbury, N.J. 

Bethlehem 

Painted Post, N.Y. 

Hill, Staten Island, N.Y. 

Bethlehem 

Bethlehem 

Trenton, N.J. 

Falls Church, Va. 

Reading 

Washington, D.C. 

Roselle, N.J. 

Fullerton 

Asbury Park, N.J 

Bethlehem 

Swarthmore 

Nazareth 

Belleville, N.J. 

Hempstead, L.I., N.Y. 

Wayne 

Valley Stream, N.Y. 

Harrisburg 

Ridgewood, N.J.' 

Plainfield, N.J. 

Westfield, N.J. 

AUentown 

Orange, N.J. 

Upper Black Eddy 

Bethlehem 

Baederwood 

Philadelphia 

Westfield, N.J. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Newport 

Haddonfield, N.J. 

Rizal, P.I. 

Freeport, N.Y. 

Roslyn 

Mount Vernon, N.Y. 



381 



FACULTY 

CLEMENT CLARENCE WILLIAMS, LL.D. 

President 

PROFESSORS EMERITUS 
JOHN HUTCHESON OGBURN, C.E. 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics a7id Astronomy 
CHARLES LEWIS THORNBURG, LL.D. 

Professor Emeritjis of Mathematics and Astronomy 

B.S., VanderbUt, 1881; B.E., 1882; C.E., 1883; Ph.D., 1884; LL.D. (Hon.), Lehigh, 1925 
HARRY MAAS ULLMANN, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Cheniical Engineering 

A.B., Johns Hopkins, 1889; Ph.D., 1892 

PROFESSORS 
ALLEN JENNINGS BARTHOLD, Ph.D. 

Professor of Roviance Languages, Head of the Department of Romajice Languages 
PAUL LEVERNE BAYLEY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics 
CLAUDE GILLETTE BEARDSLEE, Ph.D. 

Professor of Moral and Religious Philosophy, Head of the Department of Moral and Re- 
ligious Philosophy, Chaplain of the University 
JACOB LYNFORD BEAVER, Sc.D. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering 
LOYAL VIVIEN BEWLEY, M.S. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering, Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering, 

Director of the Curricidiim in Electrical Engineering 
CHARLES CLARENCE BID WELL, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics, Head of the Deparmient of Physics, Director of the Curriculum in 

Engineering Physics 

A.B., Rochester, 1904; PhD., Cornell, 1914 
FREDERICK ALDEN BRADFORD, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics, Head of the Department of Finance 
SYDNEY MacGILLVARY BROWN, M.A. 

Professor of European History 
RAYMOND COOLEY BULL, M.D. 

Director of Students^ Health Service 
THOMAS EDWARD BUTTERFIELD, M.E. 

Professor of Heat Power Engineering 
ALLISON BUTTS, B.S. 

Professor of Electrometallurgy 
ALFRED COPELAND CALLEN, M.S. 

Professor of Mining Engineerijig, Head of the Department of Mining Engineering, Director 

of the Curriculum in Mining Engineering, Dean of the College of Engineering 
NEIL CAROTHERS, Ph.D. 

Macfarlane Professor of Economics, Dean of the College of Business Administration 
WRAY HOLLOWELL CONGDON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Education, Dean of Undergraduates 
ROY BURFORD COWIN, M.A. 

Professor of Accounting, Head of the Department of Accounting 
GEORGE BARTLETT CURTIS, A.M. 

Registrar and University Editor 
HERBERT MAYNARD DIAMOND, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics, Head of the Department of Economics and Sociology 
ALPHA ALBERT DIEFENDERFER, M.S. 

Professor of Assaying and Quantitative Analysis 
GILBERT EVERETT DOAN, Ph.D. 

Professor of Metallurgy, Head of the Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Director 

of the Curriculum in Metallurgical Engineering 

382 



HOAVARD ECKFELDT, E.M. 

Professor of Mhihig Engineering 
WARREN WALTER EWING, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physical Clieniistry 
ADELBERT FORD, Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology, Head of the Deparnnent of Psychology 
TOiXILINSON FORT, Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathe^natics, Head of the Department of Mathematics and Astronomy , Dean 

of the Graduate School 
LAWRENCE HENRY GIPSON, Ph.D. 

Professor of History and Governfnejit, Head of the Department of History and Govern- 

ment 
ROBERT WILLIAM HALL, Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 
GLEN WALTER HARMESON, B.S. 

Professor of Physical Education, Director of Intercollegiate Athletics 
PERCY HUGHES, Ph.D. 

Clara H. Steivardson Professor of Philosophy 
ARTHUR WARNER KLEIN, M.E. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
FRED VIALL LARKIN, M.E. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineeri?ig, Head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, 

Director of the Curricula in Mechanical Eiigijieering atid Industrial Engineeri?ig 
HOWARD SEAVOY LEACH, M.A. 

Libraria7i 
JOSEPH STEPHENS LEONARD, Col., U.S.A. 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Head of the Departmefit of Military Science and 

Tactics 
BENJAMIN LeROY MILLER, Ph.D. 

Professor of Geology 
HARVEY ALEXANDER NEVILLE, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Head of the Department of Chemistry 

and Chemical Engiiieering, Director of the Ctirriciila in Chemistry and Chemical Engineer- 
ing 
PHILIP MASON PALMER, A.B. 

Professor of German, Head of the Depart}nent of German, Dean of the College of Arts 

and Science 
MAX PETERSEN, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics 
HOWARD ROLAND REITER, M.A. 

Professor of Physical Education 
JOSEPH BENSON REYNOLDS, Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Mechanics 
THOMAS EDGAR SHIELDS, Mus.D. 

Professor of Music, Head of the Department of Music 
CHARLES WELLINGTON SIMMONS, M.S. 

Professor of Cheinical Engineering 
LLOYD LeROY SMAIL, Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics 
EARL KENNETH SMILEY, M.A. 

Director of Admissio7is 
ROBERT METCALF SMITH, Ph.D. 

Professor of English, Head of the Departmefit of English 
BRADLEY STOUGHTON, B.S. 

Professor of Metallurgy 
MILTON CALEB STUART, MJE. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
HALE SUTHERLAND, S.B. 

Professor of Civil Engineering, Head of the Department of Civil Engineering, Director 

of the Curriculujti in Civil Engineering, Director of Fritz Laboratory 



383 



EDWIN RAYMOND THEIS, Ph.D. 

Processor of Chemical Engineering 
HAROLD PRESCOTT THOMAS, Ed.D. 

Professor of Education, Head of the Department of Education, Director of the Simimer 

Session 
STANLEY JUDSON THOMAS, Ph.D. 

Professor of Bacteriology, Head of the Department of Biology 
BRADFORD WILLARD, Ph.D. 

Professor of Geology, Head of the Departmetit of Geology 
HORACE WETHERILL \^^RIGHT, Ph.D. 

Professor of Latin, Head of the Department of Latin 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 
CARL ELMER ALLEN, Ph.D., C.P.A. 

Associate Professor of Accounting 
HAROLD VICTOR ANDERSON, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
SYLVANUS A. BECKER, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
ROBERT DOMINICK BILLINGER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
WARD LESLIE BISHOP, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Econo7nics 
ELMER CLARK BRATT, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Econoviics 
PRESTON BANKS CARWILE, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Physics 
JOHN ROBERT CONNELLY, M.E. 

Associate Professor of hidustrial Engineering 
EARL Le VERNE CRUM, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Classical Languages, Head of the Department of Greek 
MAURICE EWING, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Geophysics 
DONALD McCOY ERASER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Geology 
AUGUSTUS HENRY FRETZ, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Geology 
MERTON OTIS FULLER, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
WILSON LEON GODSHALL, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Diplomatic History and International Relations 
JAMES LAMOUR GRAHAM, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
DALE HARTZLER GRAMLEY, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Journalism, University News Editor 
GEORGE DEWEY HARMON, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of American History 
THOMAS HUGER HAZLEHURST, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
NELSON SHERK HIBSHMAN, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
GARTH AHYMAN HOWLAND, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Fine Arts, Head of the Department of Fine Arts 
CYRIL DEWEY JENSEN, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
HENRY CARL IVAR KNUTSON, M.E.E. 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
THEODORE THOMAS LAFFERTY, Ph.D. 

Selfridge Associate Professor of Philosophy, Associate Professor of Education 
KENNETH WORCESTER LAMSON, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 



384 



CHARLES ROZIER LARKIN, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Physics 
ARCHIE ROSCOE MILLER, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
ROBERT PATTISON MORE, M.A. 

Associate Professor of German, Executive Secretary of the Graduate Faculty 
GEORGE EMIL RA\'NOR, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
EDGAR HEISLER RILEY, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 
ERNST BERNHARD SCHULZ, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Government 
JONATHAN BURKE SEVERS, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 
CLARENCE ALBERT SHOOK, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
ERIC SPENCER SINKINSON, B.Sc. 

Associate Professor of Ore Dressing and Fuel Technology 
LAWRENCE WHITCOMB, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Geology 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 
WILLIAM MORTON BARROWS, JR., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
FAY CONANT BARTLETT 

Assistant Professor and Director of Physical Education 
FRANK SWAN BEALE, Ph.D. 

Assistafit Professor of Mathematics 
GEORGE CARLTON BECK, A.C. 

Assistant Professor of Quantitative Analysis 
FRANK CHESTER BECKER, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of PIMosophy, Chairmati of the Department of Philosophy 
CHARLES EDWARD BERGER, Ph.D. 

Assista7it Professor of Physics 
ADRIAN ROBERT BRIAN, Lt. Col., U.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
CLEDO BRUNETTI, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
ROBERT DEXTER BUTLER, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Geology 
JOSEPH CALVIN CALLAGHAN, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English and Speech 
JAMES LOWRY CLIFFORD, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Efiglish 
EDWARD HUTCHINS CUTLER, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
WILLIAM JOSEPH ENEY, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
AUSTIN ROGERS FREY, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
JOHN H. FRYE, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Metallurgy 
HOWARD JOHNSON GODFREY, M.S. 

Engineer of Tests 
HOWARD DIETRICH GRUBER, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
ARTHUR THOMAS IPPEN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
WILLIAM LEROY JENKINS, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 



385 



BRUCE GILBERT JOHNSTON, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Assistant Director of Fritz Laboratory 
THOMAS FREDERICK JONES, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
VORIS V. LATSHAW, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
ROBERT WALLACE MAYER, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Econoviics 
HARRY GORDON PAYROW, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Sanitary E?igineering 
CHARLES EDGAR PHILLIPS, Capt., U.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
ARTHUR EVERETT PITCHER, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
JOHN GRIFFITH ROBERTS, Ph.D. 

Assista7it Professor of Romance Lajtguages 
RAYMOND FREDERICK SCHULTZ, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
JOHN FRANCIS SCHWARTZ, Capt., U.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
FREDERIC ALLEN SCOTT, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
CHARLES AUGUSTUS SEIDLE, M.A. 

Assistant Director of Ad?nissio7is 
EARL JAMES SERF ASS, Ph.D. 

Assistajit Professor of Chemistry 
EUGENE HULSE SLOANE, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of E7iglish 
HILTON ALBERT SMITH, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
JUDSON GRAY SMULL, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
BENJAMIN LICHTY SNAVELY, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
RAFAEL ARCANGEL SOTO, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 
FRANCIS JOHN TREMBLEY, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
JOHN SCHRADER TREMPER, Ph.D. 

Assistatit Professor of German 
EUGENE HENRY UHLER, C£. 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
RAYMOND HARRY WHITE, Ed.D. 

Assistant Professor of Education 

INSTRUCTORS 

EDWARD DELBERT AMSTUTZ, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
JOEL FURNESS BAILEY, M.S. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
PAUL ROBERT CALVERT, BJ>.E. 

Instructor in Physical Education 
JAMES DUNCAN CAMPBELL, Lieutenant, U.S.A. 

Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 
GLENN JAMES CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D. 

Instructor in English 
CLARENCE DANHOF, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Economics 
JAMES VanDEUSEN EPPES, M.E. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

386 



GEORGE DORMER FARNE, M.A. 
Instructor in Romance Languages 
FRANK JUNIOR FORNOFF, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
WALTON FORSTALL, JR., B.S. 

Instructor in Mechanical E7igineering 
THOMAS TIMINGS HOLME, M.S. 

Instructor in Mcclhrnical EngineeriTig 
THOMAS EDGAR JACKSON, M.S. 

Instructor in Meclianical Engineering 
MORRIS EUGENE KANALY 

Instructor in Physical Education 
KENNETH KARL KOST, B.A. 

Instructor in Journalism 
HENRY AUGUST KREIBEL, M.A. 

Instructor in Accounting 
INGVALD ELIASS MADSEN, M.S. 

Assistant Research Engineer 
WILLIAM ANDREW McDONALD, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Latin 
GORDON WELLS McKINLEY, M.A. 

Instructor in Economics 
ROBERT FRANCIS A^cNERNEY, JR., Ph.D. 

Inst7-iictor in Romance Languages 
JOHN CLEWELL MERTZ, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Chefnistry 
DOUGLAS EWART MODE, M.S. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
BASIL WALDO PARKER, A.M. 

Instructor in Biology 
DONALD THEODORE PERKINS, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Mathematics 
SAMUEL PIERCE, JR., Lieutenant, U.S.A. 

Instr^lctor in Military Science ajid Tactics 
ALBERT AUGUSTUS RIGHTS, A.M. 

Instructor in English and Speech 
DAVID GALLUP SCOTT, M.A. 

Instructor in Ro7)iance Languages 
JAMES PLATTENBERGER SELL, M.S. 

Instructor in Biology 
WILLIAM SHERIDAN 

histnictor in Physical Education 
PAUL EDWARD SHORT, B.S. 

Assistant Director of Athletics, Instructor in Physical Education 
MALCOLM FINLAY SMILEY, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Matheinatics 
ROBERT DANIEL STOUT, B.S. 

Instructor in Metallurgical Engineering 
CARL FERDINAND STRAUCH, M.A. 

Instructor in ErigUsh 
LOUIS REED TRIPP, A.B. 

Instructor in Economics 
RALPH NEWCOMB VanARNAM, M.S. 

Instructor in Mathematics and Astronomy 
JOHN LIVEZEY VANDERSLICE, Ph.D. 

Instrxictor in Mathematics 
CECIL FRANCIS WARNER, B.S. 

Instructor iti Mechanical Engineering 
MARTIN BRUCE WESTERMAN 

Instructor in Physical Education 



387 



ASSISTANTS 
BERNARD ALTSHULER, B.S. 

Graduate Assistant i?t Physics 
CARL DANIEL BAUMANN, B.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Physics 
JOHN FRANKLIN BECK, Sergt., U.S.A. 
Assistant in Military Science attd Tactics 
ROBERT AUGUST BUERSCHAPER, M.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Physics 
LEONARD PATTILLO BURTON, M.A. 

Graduate Assistant in Mathematics 
JOHN HARRY CARPENTER 

Assistant in Physical Education 
THOMAS H. DUBY, Sergt., U.S.A. 

Assistant in Military Science and Tactics 
GEORGE FRANCIS GASDA, Sergt., U.S.A. 

Assistant in Military Science and Tactics 
ROGER SHINKLE HAWLEY, A.B. 

Graduate Assistant in Che?nistry 
EARL HEINS, B.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
KENNETH BAKER HORNING, M.A. 

Assistant in English and Speech 
EVERETT LEE JONES, A.B. 

Graduate Assistant in English 
JOSEPH ADREON KELLER, JR., B.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Mechanical Engineering 
WILLIAM STANLEY LANTERMAN, JR., M.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Physics 
HAROLD SAMUEL LEVENSON, M.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
JAMES JOHN MAHONEY 

Assistant in Sivinrini^ig 
WILLIAM DONALD McCAA, B.S. 

Assistant Football Coach 
WILLIAM ANTHONY McGRATH, B.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Chemical Engineering 
FREDERIC MERCUR 

Assistant in Physical Edtication 
CHARLES JOHN MORAVEC, B.S. 

Assistant in Jojirnalism, Assistant University News Editor 
PETER JOHN MORRISSEY 

Assistant in Physical Education 
OTAKAR ONDRA, M.S. 

Assistant in Civil Engineering 
EUGENE PARK, A.B. 

Graduate Assistant in Matheitiatics 
CHESTER HOWARD POWERS, B.S. 

Graduate Assista?it i?i Mechanical Engineering 
CHARLES HENRY REICHARDT, B.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
KENNETH BERLIN SHIFFERT, M.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Physics 
WILLIAM AUGUST STAUTH, B.A. 

Assistant in Ore Dressing and Fuel Technology 
JAMES HARVEY STEELE, A.B. 

Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
ROLLASTON GEORGE STILES, M.S. 

Graduate Assistant iti Physics 
PAUL THEODORE WEINERT STRUB, B.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Cheinistry 



31 



WILLIAM BURTON TODD, B.A. 

Graduate Assistant in English 
WILLIAM REAGLE TRANSUE, M.A. 

Assistant in AlatheiJiatics 
LOUIS ADDISON WATERS, A.B. 

Graduate Assistant in English 
DAVID ROWLEY WILLIAMS, B.S. 

Graduate Assistant in Mechanical Engineering 



389 



THE 1 94 1 EPITOAIE was designed by robert c. pettin- 
GELL, JR., line drawings contributed by Beatrice wunnen- 
BERG, and production management controlled by Charles c. 
JOHNSON, and edward a. reisman. 

The coated stock is cantine's ashokan, natural; the text 
is printed on oxford antique, natural. The type employed 
is eleven-point janson, with caslon 5^337 display lines. It is 
bound in Bancroft buckram with genuine leather back and 
side strips and is stamped in gold. 

Photography by the McCaa Studios of Bethlehem, Penn- 
sylvania. View photography by joseph stefel of the Apeda 
Studios, New York City. 

All engravings were supplied by the Horan Engil'^ving 
Company, New York City. The book was completely 
printed and bound at the Country Life Press Corporation, 
Garden City, New York. 



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