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CARVDIG BLOCKS 



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5ix6|-x9 

4|x4x9 

3|x4xl3 

O^X 0>jX Xm 

47^x5x10 

6x5x12 

4x4|'Xl0| 

4r^-x4|-xl2 

5x7-|x&| 

4x4x8|- 

4x8x10 

5x&|xlO|- 

3|x^ixl3 

3|-x5-o-xl3 

wj^X I "pX*/^ 

O oX kJ^JL i^ 

4|x4|-xll^r 

5x5x11-1 

&|x6|-x6^- 

5x6x11 

5x7x7 

O^X ÜoX \J ^ 

4x4x12 

5x8ix7-| 

6x8-|x8 

7x8x6 

4x5x9| 

5x7x10 

4x6x12 

4x7x11 

4^x5tx9 
4|x4|xl2| 

5x4ixll|- 

4x6|x8 

6ix7-|x6| 

3ix4#xll 

4|x4^10 

4x4gx^ 

4-k4|xl2 

3ix5ix9 

4x5xll-| 

4|x5xll 

5x5x12^ 

4|x5xll|- 

4|x6xl0 

4x4-|xl2 

5x4-öXl2 



$1.25 
.85 
1.00 
1.75 
1.00 
1.35 
.80 
1.15 
1.50 
.85 
1.40 
1.35 
1.00 
1.10 
1.80 
.85 
1.05 
1.25 
1.26 
1.50 
1.30 
1.25 
1.00 
1.30 
1.60 
1.40 
.90 
1.35 
1.25 
1.30 
.80 
1.20 
1.30 
1.25 
1.35 
1.50 
,90 
.85 
.75 
1.15 
1.00 
1.05 
1.25 
1.35 
1.10 
1.10 
1.05 
1.25 





Ivir-HOGANY 




49 


4-^x4?rxl3 


$1.15 


50 


4x4a-xl2 


1.00 


51 


4|x4-?,x9 


1.00 


52 


ö^yA-^xlZ 


1.25 


53 


5x4;^-x9|- 


1.20 


54 


4x6x12 


1.10 


55 


4x5äx8|- 
6x4|x8 


.80 


56 


1.20 


57 


5?7x4-i-xlOf 


.75 


58 


4x4|-:cl2 


1.05 


59 


4|x5|xl2 


1.25 


60 


5x6x9 


1.20 


61 


4x5x9?- 


.75 


62 




1.15 


63 


4-i-x6x9|- 


1.20 


64 


4x4|x9 


.75 


65 


4-^x5|-xl0^ 


1.25 


66 


5x5-|x9 


1.00 


67 


4x5x12 


1.15 


68 


4x5x12 


1.15 


69 


4^X577X8:5: 

«C ^^ *w 


1.00 


70 


4x5x11 


1.10 


71 


4x5x12 


1.10 


72 


4x5x8 


.75 


73 


5x5x8?t . 


1.00 


74 


5x5i:Äll 


1.35 


75 


4-|x4j-xll^ 


1.10 


76 


OX OoX J. J-'ä^ 


1.35 


77 


4i-x6x9 


1.20 


76 


4-^x5x11 


1.00 


79 


5x4irxll 


1.50 


80 


5x9x8 


2.00 


81 


4x5x9|- 


1.00 


82 


5x6x11 


1.25 


83 


3x5vix9^ 


1.00 


84 


3|x-ixl0 
4lx5x7^ 


1.00 


85 


.75 


86 


4x4x11 


.90 


87 


4.';x 5-5x9 


1.20 


88 


5ixllx6| 

5-1x6x8-?.- 

<^x5x9 


1.60 


89 


1.30 


90 


1.10 


91 


5i5ixlO 

J 0^ 


1.50 


92 


2|k7x9 


.75 


93 


4-|c6i|x7| 


1.00 


94 


5x6x9g- 


1.60 


95 


4^x4-1x11 


1.20 


96 


1.50 



97 
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IC 9 
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4^x5x&| 


$ .85 


5x6x9 


1.30 


6-pa5-^-xa| 


1.25 


4x4-i-xl0'^ 


1.00 


5x6|x8 
4x5|-x8 


1.25 


1.10 


8x6x7 


1.30 


4^5^-xl2 


1,25 


4x4x101- 


.85 


4x5xll-| 


1.30 


4b"X&?^xl2 


1.50 


4|x5ixl5 


1.50 


4x1x12 


1^00 


4|x5x9 


.85 


5x8|x6i- 


1.25 


7xlOx7t 


2.25 


4|x6|xl0 


1.50 


4x7x10 


1.35 


4^x4^x10-1- 


1.25 


4x4^x10 


1.15 


4ix5|x9-i- 


1.15 


^x5gX92" 


1.10 


3x5-^x10 


1.15 


6x5x9^- 


1.35 


4x4-|x9| 


1.00 


4^x4-|x9 


1.00 


4x4^x12 


1.05 


4fx5|x8 


l.OO 


5x4x9 


.80 


4x5x12 


1.25 


5x5-|xll 


2.00 


4|x5^8 


.85 


öx4-|-xl0-| 


1.25 


5x5x10 


1.25 


4x6x11 


1.40 


4x6t^x11 


1.60 


6x4^ 7i 


1.25 


5|x6x9i- 


1.25 


4x5x12 


1.25 


5|x6x8 


1.25 


5x&|x9-| 


1.50 


7-|x7|xll|- 


2.75 


5x4^^x12^ 
4x5|xl3| 


1.25 


1.40 


4|x7xl0 
3jx4r|^xl3 


1.40 


1.25 



T^e can also furnish Mahogany Blocks up to 12"xl2" square and from 12" to 36" in 
height . , 

Together with above vie carry Lignum Vitae, Black Ebony. Tulip, Pemambuco, African 
Blackwood, Walnut, Oak, etc., which we can furnish in Log form or in blocks. 

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Yie off er these carving blooks "as is'\ We believe them to be 
reasonably sound and as dry as circurastances permit. Blocks this 
size caniiot be kiln dried. TOiero thore aro soason ohocks or splits, 
"we have raade due allowance in the prioe. In most cases they are 
only slight and will work out or can be triramed out. 

Gare should be used in v;orking those blooks. They should be 
ßhollaood or paraff ined and kept away from any unduo amount of 
heat« 



BLOCKS ARE OFFERED SUBJEGT TO PRIOR SÄLE. 



PRICES ARE FOB NM YORK CITY. 



J. H. MONTEATH CO. 



2500 PARK AVENUE 



NEW YORK CITY 51, N. Y. 



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DETACH BEFORE DEPOSITING 




JEWISH EDUCATION COMMITTEE OF NEW YORK, Inc. 

1776 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

THIS VOUCHER-CHECK 18 IN FÜLL 8ETTLEMENT OF THE FOLLOWING: 



DATE OF 
INVOICE 



PARTICULARS 



AMOUNT 



A-16-45 



Vl^Jld For transporting clay work to and from the ^rt Exhibit;.on 



7.00 



SiGNED: 





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DIRECTOR, DEPT. OF STATISTICS AND ACCOUNTS 



DETACH BEFORE DEPOSITING 



JEWISH EDUCATION COMMITTEE OF NEW YORK, Inc. 

1776 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

THIS VOUCHER-CHECK 18 IN FÜLL SETTLEMENT OF THE FOLLOWING: 



DATE OF 
INVOICE 



PARTICULARS 



4»— 24'—4'4' 



#10969 Refund of taxl fare re: delivery of materials to the 

art exhibit - 6 r-t /^ /i J^^/^. /- 



SiGNED: 



AMOUNT 



3.00 




DIRECTOR, DEPT. of STATISTICS AND ACCOUNTS 



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PARENT-TEACHERS* ASSOCIATION 
Public School 144. Qujjens 
Forest Hills, N. yJ 



l'.Ts. Erna V/eil], 
1.35 Audley 5t . , 

ICew Cr( rdens, TT", 
Dear l'^rn. V/ei 11: 



Decemuei 30, 19^x3 



' •-- •■>»»#-' 



Pieabe gurgivü thib delixy in 
sendinp: ymi the accjümpauyirit; check, 

I do hupe ■ ^^u }'^^'>'"e eujuyed a 
pieacant holiday, and that you aiid ycur 



fainily have been in ;^ood health. 



Cui very best wishec to you 
and yaa rs f or a very hapoy and healthful ITevv 

Year. 



r;inij'^r^"ly vnirp. 



Chairman Ai ler Hchool 
Re er e at i onal Acti\ätiej3, 



ÄETTY CASH VOUCHER 



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Date. 



1/31 10 /i 



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A^Vv^' ^U-'i-TA-^-p^^,^ 



FOR 




HUNTER, NEW YORK 



Phone: hunter 3518 



Mrs. CLARA BERMAN 

175 EASTERN PARKWAY 

BROOKLYN. N. Y. 

STERLING 3-7207 



June S, 1943 



Mrs. E. Weill 
102-18 Ascan üVe. 
j?orest idlls, -u« !• 

Dear üT s. Weili, 

Auis Is to conflrra your application f or itrts and ^raf ts instructor 

for the month of otuly, 1945* It iß agreed that for your Services 

you will get a remuneration of ^even-ty-five doUars ($75 •00). 

It i? also understood that your Services will be rendered the veiy 



best to yoTir ability« 



CiÄmP ittÄiriiXP*^ xHc« 




ii^esident 



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PHONE JAMAICA 6-4524 



M, AO , 



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PAUL FREIGANG POTTERY STUDIO 

138-07 90TH AVENUE. JAMAICA, N. Y. 



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Telephone: HAvemeyer 4-8934 



The Jewish Center of Forest Hills West 



MAURICE H. SCHATZ, Rabbi 

HAvemeyer 3-7399 



63-25 Dry Harbor Road 
FOREST HILLS WEST, L L 

HAROLD L. STRAUSS, President 



MEYER M. ABRAMOWITZ 

CANTOR 



1GJ3-18 Ascan Avo. 
Foroüt xiillü. 



January :f, 104^ 



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Dour i.lrs . '•ftiill: 

I ßiva^t toll von 'loT sori'y I fool. Your check Ims hr^en 
lying around Tor öboüt "b.-'-o yr^el-s ".rith^vit Imviru^ b^^^en sent to 

•v\r:5li by t?i.'s tiino. Lhy I bic-.'- rrhon c3rd if you rü[;lTt: be a:>le 
t o r dt »i ni • V 

l.'ith büst wiühns to your family 



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öiiio«r:?ly youi's. 



iiabbi Maurico xi. Üohut 




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(jirl ucout Ijouncil oi vJrcatcr IMcw York 
670 Lexingtora Avenue 

JMew ioiK 



Novem'ber 5 t 19^2 



Mrs. Weill 

102-18 Ascan Avenue 

Forest Hills 

New York r - 



Mjr dear Mrs, Weill: 



We have sent out notice<? for the Novemter tenth 
pottery meeting* Unfortunatelyt most Öf the leaders 
contacted will te unable to attend at this time* It, 
therefore seems wlser to cancel this course* 

I am indeed sorry this has happcned* May we feel 
free to call on you again when the need ar^ises? 



Thank you for your kindness and Cooperation. 



Sincerely yours, 



Helen Withall 
Traihing Adviser 



•) 



County of Westchester 

RECREATION COMMISSION-WESTCHESTER 

WORKSHOP 

County Center 
White Plalns. N. Y. 



WESTCHESTER COUNTY 
RECREATION COMMISSION 

Mrs. Eugene Meyer, Chairman 
Mrs. Thomas Blain, Secretary 
Mrs. Henry R. Dillon 
Mrs. William L. Lefferts 
Miss Ruth Taylor 



E. Dana Caulkins, Superintendent 

TELEPHONE! WHITE PLAIN3 I300 



July 26, 1943 



Miss Sma Weill 
Cexap Mayfair 
Honte r, N« Y* 

My dear Miss Weill: 

lam in receipt of your letter of July 22nd and 
wish to State that we do firing for oamps and schools located 
in Westchester County only, tlierefore, we can not do your firing» 



CK:H 



Sincerely yoors, 

Charlotte Kizer, Direc 
Westchester Woikshop 




f 



SAMUEL WILLIAMS 

50 LENOX ROAD 
BROOKLYN. N. Y. 



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Tel. WHitehall 3-7887 
HAvemeyer 6-2031 



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WALTER ELY 

HOME and OFFICE FURNITURE 
POLISHING — REPAIRING 



Sold to. 



<^^^2^ 




TERMS:. 



61 Water Street 

NEW YORK CITY, 



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Plor . 30 Po st 



mil YORK UMIVSRSITY SCHOGL OF L'DUCATION 



W A R 



R E C R E A"""T"b 'if ;/ C R K S H F S 

l 9 ''^ 3 



'««^•«••»•^«•-•»•a M' 



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In Order to rneet tho prcc>sing need for röcreation vorkers fcr cur craied forces here 
rnd rcrord, in the vr.riouo scrvice orgrnlz: tions , in ♦*boom-to;;n*' industrir.l centors 
r:nd oOC.U:l cg'.noies^ Short intensive courses in r :cref.tion?:l lec.dorL3hip hcve beon 



orr'" ni?.'.ed . 



Courses Off ered 



Stud-nts v;ill select r.t lerst ono course frora er.ch of the follcwing groups« 



C-rcup I 

I eaac-rship in Community Recrer-ticn 

C-rour II 

Phiioaophy of Rocrcr.tion 

Adminiotrrtion of Rccrcc.tion 

Methods cnd Techniquc^s of Social 
R c r c Twt i o n , D r c.nv ^ c. nö, D ci n c o 

Whon hhe Courses Bopän 



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11 




Föbruary 2, 1943 - //ashi.ogton Square (8 v/oeks 
ivlc-.rch 29, 1943 - ^ssnington Square (8 v/ooks) 
Kay 30, 1943 - Lake oebago Ca.np (4 v/eeks) 
July 5, 1943 - Lake Sebago Camp (6 weeks) 
Soptornber 20, 1943 - V/ashington Square (6 weeks) 
Ncveu.cer 22, 1943 - T/ashington Square (t v;eeks) 



Group IX 

kothods of Lcc.dership in Cc^iiping c.nd Outing 

Socir.l '^Vork c.nd Socicl Agcncies 

CTr^oup III 

Skill Techniquos • Sports, ^^tunts, rnd C-rmes 

Skill Tcchniques in Dc.ncing - Folk, Square, 

and So cid 
Skill TechniquQs in Recr'jction - '.lusic 
Skill Techniquos in Rccr:'r.tion - Arts and 

Grafts ^•.^- 

Tho deman'd fcr trained recreation ' 
loadership is precipitating a 
crisls. Agencies needing trained 
loaders aro: 

Settlement Houses Y..vi«C.A, - Y.al.HJV. 
American Red Gross Y .V^'.C.A. - Y..'M-LA 

United Seaman *s United Service 
Service Organ izations 

Boys Clubs, Ca-nps, Churches, 
Schools , et c . 




Coursos v;iil be accerted for credit tov/ard a degree in the School of Sducation under 
tho regulations of that school. Those not iinüiediatöly interested in a degree may en- 
roll 'js special studentst ^ ?r '^^-^ kj 

For further details, write or call Dr. Jay ?:. Nash, or ..Ir.* B. E. Kughes, School of 
EaNCijtion, Nev/ York University, Washington Square, Nov; York, Spring 7-2000, exton- 
sion 416, or 406. r/ ^ r. I ^a '-'"?» ^ /' '^ 



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15^-^8 , 7B, ve ^ Kew ardcns 
Hills 

on Thurcd/y, Oct 1 , 194:^. 
at 5 / 3o p.'-. 

Kindly fill the attorhec! ^e/^ristratio: 
Bl.-^jik rind retu:m. 



t>culptre»ö 

rlQtiCh) 

I h«r«l)y Änroll 

for ths :r-okly ''Lil ITH CLAY" 
ancl llAl^f)l(;KM<T CO»)^ SKS ,hel(l by 
Kraa -11 J in tho Kind „:re:;art3n 

1 5-28 , 78 vo,Ke OardPüfi Hills 
on hurr;dny , Oct 1. , 1942 • 

at 3/5o • •'". 

onthly Tait Ion Fee Doller 25o , 
p ^yable in advarice. 

Date ♦•..»..., 

Kcme •••••••••••.••.....,,. 

ridrecs««« • ••••••••••••••••.. 

Telephone ••• 



ReöpeniÄg of the "PLAY WITH CLAY" 
andHANDIBJRAFT C0UR3ES in the r 
Kindergarten ^ 

135-2a , 78. Av« , K«if Garden» 

Hills 

on Tkmrsdaj, Oct 1 , 1942. 
at 5 / 3« P.M. 

Kindly fill the attached Registratioj 
Blank and return. 



Erna Weill 
tSculptress 



(detach) 



KEGISTKATIOH 



I hereby enrell 

••••••.•• ••• (name ) 

f or the weekly '»PLAY WITH CLAY" 
and HANDICRAFT GOURSES ,held by 
Erna #eill in the Kindergarten 

155-28 , 78 Ave,Ke^ Gardens Hills 
sn Thursday , Oct 1. , 1942 . 

at 3/50 P.M. 

Monthly Tuit ien Fee Dollar ^5« , 

payable in advance. 

Date 

Name •...•...• .•..•••.••••• 

Adress.« ••.••..••#.•......••....• 

Telephone .••. .•••... 



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BOA.RDING SCaOOL^ TOE GlRlS IN N^^ jTüRK STATdl 



Ardsley School for Girls 

Ardsley, New York 
ßnr o 1 Im -jn t ( bo a c di ng ) 
Tuiti:)n !|5£0 
Undenominati ^nal 



70 • Kindergarten, r-r^des 1-8 



Brantv.ood Hall, Brorixvllle, N. Y. 

iSllzabeth V^. La^tiiiier, Headmistress 
Girls: agss (bcarding) 6-18; day £-18 
ifinrollm^nt (boarding) 35 day 200 
Tuition (boardi^ig) i{;1000, day C17Ö-500 
Bo'irding, gr-^des 7-8, high school 1-4 
Accredited t ■■ collec-s ad^^itting by certificate 
Member Oniversity of the St' te of Nev; Y;)rk 



Cath9dral School if St. Mnry 

G^^rdsn City, Long Island, Navv York 
(Mrs.) Merion Reid Marsh, Principal 
Girls, Rges (boaidiag) 10-18j (day) g-lB 
Änr aiment (boardingj 49, day 150 
Tuition (boarding) C1200, day 1100-450 
Den :ainatijn - ä i sc 'pal i an 
CoulS^^s: nursery, pre-school, grad*-}s 1-8, 

coll:g9 :^reparatory, music, art 
Accredit^d by Middle St^it33 Association 
«niber ünive^sity of th3 State of New l'or 



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DvsVi Seminary for Yo mg l:):.en 

Carrael^ NevA York 
Dr» a9rb3rt £• YJrig t, '^resid^nt 
Girlsj p^g^s 10-^6 
finrollment (boarding) 1?0 
^ Tuition (boarding) |800 

Cour 3 es: gradss 5-8; high 
PO s t-gr adu '; t e ; art , 
Denomin- .ti ni: M3thodi st di i sco.oal 
Acer dit^d Middle Stat'es Association 
esib3r Üniv rsity of tne Stote -f Ne^^. York 



school 1-4, coli 93 9 prt)3^'ratory; 
mu sie, s ecr ot ari al , dr ama ti c s 



firiima ?/illard School 

Tr ny, Nev; York 

Givls, ages 13-19 

fcirollmmt 154 

Tuition (boarding) tl400-1600 

Ond enonii c a ti onal 

Cours^s: high school; colle'.j5 preoaratory; g^.neral; music 

art, drcamatics 
Accr^dlt::d Middie States Association 
Membor Önlver3ity of the St-te of Nev. York 



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Gardner School 

lb4 fiast 70th Street, Nevv York 

M. eiizabsth M-sland, Principal 

Girls^ ages (boarding) 14-<i0 

Änrollment (boarding) £0; (d?«y) 60 

Taition (boarding) $.1400-1660; (d?y) |ß50-600 

Ü n d en o m i n -x t i 'i n al 

Courses: ^jrades 1-8; high school 1-4; colleg» preoaratry 

advanced 1-g; rnusic; art; dr^inntics; secr-.tarial 
Member liiddlrj States A:'3ociatJon 



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School 

Dobbs Ferry, N w York 

tilvellna Pl9rce, R^admistr 

Girls, eges 14-18 

tilnrollnient (boardinij) 19< 

Tuition (boarding) ClSOO; (day) |500 

und enomin*- ti onal 

Cour s es: high school 1-5; College preparatory; gener b1 

A.ccredit-:;d Middle States Association 

Member üniver^iity o.f the v'.t^'ite of Nev. York 

Agnes School 

Albany, Nev York 

Blanche ?ittman, Principal 

Girls, ages^ (boarding) 10-18; (day) 5-18 

Änrollment (boarding; SO 

Tuition (boardlngj U^OO; (day) C100-S50 

Benominati an, ßpi scopalian 

Cours^s: (boarding) grades 4-6; high sch:>ol 1-4; 

day) kindergarteri, grades 1-8; high school 

music, crt 
Accr?dited bv Middle States Association 
Member ünive sity of the State of New York 

Faith^s School 

Saratoga Springs, Nev York 

Reverend F* Allen Sisco, Principal 

Girls, ages 6-18 

finrollment (boarding) 48 

Tuition (boarding) |500-600 

D en ?5!ii na ti on , & i s c > p a i i an 

Cours^'St gr^des 1-8; high school 1-4; coll^^^e preoarator 

l^usic; rrt; secrstarial 
Accr^dited to Colleges admitting by certificate 
Member üniversity of the St-te oi IJev: York 



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Peekskill, New York 

Sister Mary Regina, Supervisor 

Girls, ages 12-19 

?5nrollment (boarding) 66 

Tuitirm (boarding) Cl?^-00 (day) 

D en ;»iiii na t i on , tip i s c o p a 1 i an 

Courses: grades 7-8; high school 1-4; College preparatory 

Accredited b Middle otntes Association 



1275 



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Soencsr School 

£2 tiiast 9.1st Street, Nev, York City 

Dorothy Erockiftsy üsborns, Head.dstress 

Girls, (boarding) 15-18 

finrolimsnt (bo-^rding) ES (day) 210 

Tuition (bo^rding) |lo50-1950; (day) CSOO-700 

Courses: grade 1-8; high school 1-4; collsg? pr^.jaratory; 

art; music, ?xpr^ssiori; drauiaticsj languages; dancing 
Accrsditsd Middle otatss Association 



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LlEBER^i^N & SCHWARTZ PRINTING CO. 

146 WEST 26th STREET • NEW YORK CITY 

WAtkins 9-4692 ^, 



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Mrs* Weill 

102-18 Ascan Avenue 

i?'orest Hills, N*Y. 


August 15, 1941 


SHIPPED TO 


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CUSTOMER S ORDER: tOlepllOne 
TERMS: C,0«D. 


1 


5/r can 


Ceramite Clay 

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Plione JAmaica 6 — 3053 

C H R O M I N G 



Silvc^r 




Jamaica Electro-Plating Corp. 

Polishing - Lacquering - Plating 
87-83 . 139th STREET (off HiUside Ave.) 
All Kinds JAMAICA, L- L, N. Y. 

Automobile and Plumbing 
Work Our Specialty 



Customer*s 
Order No. 

Sold to 



^IZZLk 




O'^/X 7 



Salesman 



Rec'd by 



PRINTED IN US A 



FLATPAKIT PATENT NO. I. 884 47«-AMERICAN SALES BOOK CO. . INC. , NIAGARA FALLS. NY. 



CABLE ADDRESS. JOINER.NEWYORK 



EUROPEAN fi£PR£S£NTATIVES . 

LONDON 
JOSEPH HADLKY Ä: SON 

PARIS 

SOCIETE UASSUKANCES POUH 
LE C0MMERC:E et riNDUSTRIE 

HAMBURG 

HINRICH GAE DE 

AMSTERDAM 

LANGEVELDT SCHRÖDER 



I 



ESTABLISHED I87S 




yr// 



GENEKAI. INSURANCE 



EIGHTV MAIUKN LANE 




I 



TELEPHONE JOhN 4-1155 




'o/Ä', ^^^y ^■' -'-^' 



\ 



RE: 



FINE aRTS LiSüiihäÄEL 



Mrs» iiirna vfeill, 
30-4Ü Lefferts hlva* , 
iiev/ Garden s, L,I. 

Dear Madtua: 

We tlianK you for your letter eiiclosing a list 
of the articles vviiicii were covered unaer tue above jjolicy 
and confinn naviiiö obtained a provisionai binder from the 
Uomi.iercial Union Assuraiice c^ompany coverint^; the ^jpoperty 
at tlie Tempie Emanu- El in tne amount of ^|li)0. Vve would 
apjreciate your instructions wien tiiis insurtmce is to be 
cancelied so tnat vve can inform your underwriter^ accoruinöly 
and have tne policy issued* 

«»e are wonderin^ if you desire iai^ covera^e on 
the Tenple in ilushin^, inaaniucn ais you recently told our 
^^r. Salfeld by telephone that you desire sil50* on property 
while at this Tempie from i^lay 9th to 11 tn. 

-^^waitin^ your reply, vve remain 



Your/fe very tiuly, 



(KfciJKElL & 



WB : CP 





> 



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STATUARY 



T A B L E T S 



Bedi.Rassy, iNd. 

BRONZE FOUNDRY 

503-505 E. 76TH ST. 
New York City 



FRENCH SAND 



CIRE PERDUE [LOST WAXJ 



Tel. BUtterfielo 8-6258 



M 



Mrs. E. Weill 



Mav ifi. IQ.-^Q 



,19 



rts Blv c l . ,Kew Gftr fi ens. L . I . 




CABLE ADDRESS JOINER.NEWYORK 



EUROPEAN REPRESEMTATIVES : 

LONDON 

JOSLFH HADLEY «c SON 

PARIS 

SOCIETE DASSUKANCES POUR 
LE COMMERCE ET l'INDUSTRIE 

HAMBURG 

HINRICH CiAEDE 

AMSTERDAM 

LANGEVELDT SCHRÖDER 



\ 



ESTABLISHED I87S 




yy// 



GENEUAI. INSURANCE 



KIOHTV MAinEN LANE 



\ 

> 



TELEPHONE JOhN A-I 155 







RE 



Flivit .^KTb FLO^Ttii^ 



ch cc, l;^i59 



Mrs. Erna l^eill, 
aO-4Ü Lefferts u^iva. , 
Kew üaraens, ^.\. 

iJear iviadaia: 

Confirming jour instruotionii tu üur IViP. 
Salfeld, we nave liotiiiea tue Uoia-ercial Union 
iiS^uranoe Company tnat tne exiiiuition of tne slatues 
at 2b East 62nd Street will continae until -Mpril 17th, 

v.e woulä ciporeciate your ^ivin^^ us tne 
list of iteius to dg covered vdün tueir respective 
values so tnat v/e can na\re ^kjH^ poiicy ic^Lued. 

Assuring you tnat v;e are aiways at your 
Service, v^e remain 



19o9 



tfVb:GP 



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Youi-b vtry i.ruiy, 




'V-^^' .n • 






Telephone EVergreen 9-6033 



1 i 



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i 



} Eugene Gargani, President 



E. GARGANI & SOINS, 

Statuary Bronze Foundry 

Cire Perdue ( Loti Hux) Irocest 
175 GREEN STREET 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

April 4th, 1939 



Inc. 



Er 8. E. Weill 

80-40 Lefferts Blvd. 

Kew Gardens, N. Y» 



Your No. 



'Im 



^ 



Our No. 



Shipped 



We acknowledge with tHanks tnd following: 



TO Casting in Süver 
«SMALL PLAQUE" 






t. G^.KGftRl & SOHS. 1T-. 




18.00 



18.00 



Telephone EVergreen 9*6033 



I 



ISugene Gargani, President 



/ 



E. GARGANI & SONS, 

Statuary Bronze Foundry 

Cire Perdue ( Lo»t tfux) rrocets 
275 GREEN STREET 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Maroh 28tn, 1S39 



Inc. 



Mrs. Weill 

80-40 Lefferts Blvd* 

Apartment 6A 

Kew Gardens, L* !•> N. 



Y- 



Your No. 



Our No. 



To Casting in silver 



SMALL PLAQUE 



Shipped 



^.^SttMi $ 1^'- 



n^AoM 3^ ^"f^t 



tM 



22.50 



22.50 



Telephone EVergreen 9-6033 






E. GARGANI & SONS, Inc. 

Statuary Bronze Foundry 

Cire Perdue ( Lost Wax ) Process 

175 GREEN STREET 

BROOKLYN. N. Y. 

March 9th, 1039 



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Mrs. Weill 

80-40 Lefferts Blvd. 
Apartment 6A 
Kew Gaxdens, N* Y. 

Dear Mrs. Weill: 

We propose to furnieh you witn the following; 

Large Oandle Stick (bronze cast) $45.00 eaoh. "i^ 

Small « " (MM \ 40.00 « . ^^'" 

Spiod Aro ( M n ) 35.00 • • fX - 

Small Incense Burner ( bronze cast).. ..10.00 each. yu*''" « - 
■ • " (MM ).,.,45.00 for 5 oopies< 

Oup (silver cast) 50.00 each. 

N ( H " ) 48.00 eaoh f 0X3 . 

copies. 

Oup (Silver cast).. ..40.00 eadh for 

20 copies. 

Chip (Bronze cast) 22.50 eaoh. ^^ 

« (mm 5 20.50 each forr 2 

copies. 

Plaque (small) Silver 18.00 each. 

" * Bronze 10.00 each. 

Yoxars very truly 

E. GARGANI & SOi^S, IHC. 

GG:aG ^:: ' 

Plaque (Large) ... ...Bronze cast 14.00 each. 

more than ten (10) copies 10.00 eaoh. 



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Bedi-Rassy, Inc. ^ 

BRONZE FOUNDRY 

503-505 E. 76TH ST. 
New York City 



FRENCH SAND 
CIRE PERDUE [LOST WAXl 



Tel. BUtterfield 8-6258 



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Ttlephoac EVergreen 9-6033 



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E. GARGAJNl & SONS, Inc. 

Stutuary Bronze Foundry 

Cire Perdue ( Lost Wax ) Process 

175 GREEN STREET 

BROOKLYN, N. V. 

ilovember 27th, 1938 



ÖO-40 lefferts Blvd. 
JSbv! Gardens, II. Y, 

iJear laxt. ^dills 

T'e propose to furnish you rith the Standard bronze oesting 
ttie ''Lo6t ^'ax Irooets" the folloFing-: 



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Sr.all Litting ^oman . 

bf.all Dos 

bF.all Bo;^' on Shell 

Sriall Sitting Torso 

Ink Tra^ Top 

Paper Knife 

Leal btainp 

3adcla Plaque 

Ink Tray and Top 

Slot t er Jog vith base 

Blotter i)og v^lthout base 

Lying ^orran 

Sr.all Portrait 

an die 

Jish Tray 

Large Jandle-Stiok 

£n:a 11 

Spioe Atq ^ ^ 

Piaster oasts for three rarked 

Lask in 3ronze 

L'.ask iü Pia st er 

Top of Ink Tray cacle a 

Portrait 

tiask in Jeroir.ioa 

Book i.nds 

Small Standing figure 

Siriäli jjanoer 
Ash Tray 



• ••••* 



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box 



. .$5.Q0 

5.00 

6.00 

5.00 

5.00 

4.00 

3.00 

2.00 

50.00 

22.00 

20.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 

50.00 

45.00 

40.00 



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16,00 Eaoli 
15.00 

7.00 

7.00 
65.00 
45.00 
SO. 00 
22.00 
ILuÖO. 
25.00 



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The Sabbath (Umdlestick showe Mose tho leader of the Jev;ish i'ecple in the t.'O moot 
Imnortant "cment. of his lue . On the one sidö you see the youmr Jlose liBtening 
the flrft 'Se t the voice of Cod in the burning bush . The inscription reuds j 
" ?ut off thy shoos from off thy foet . for the plac« whereon thy standet is ho y 
cround,- On the other side Mose is receiving the ten conunandments on Mount .inai . 
?hne:ninrof th. inscription i» «. follov.3 : "t.iose «pake and Ood ansvered hxm 
by a voico •" 

Besainim Box« 



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In accord^.ncP with the idea of the Posamim Box whioh soek« to create r^.oa^nt feolia^t. 
towards the coaW -eek.b, umolline plc.sant spiee. , t pic-tured threc Bccneo ol the 
Tiltll Mch wouM refloot this a t.-no£:herc. Tho firat ncene sho^s the spys who 
were seitl^t b; ";.so to .euren the land of Canaan and who returned .vith tho fruxts 
oi th^lnc, , grapee ,0 rieh and heavy . that they needed t.o men to carry them . 
"The lana rhich -.e pa«sod throu^.l: to .earch it , i« an exooedmß L^ood l^nd . ' 
The second i^^ne sho.« Jacow and .achol at th. well , vhere J.cow feil xn lo.c to Rachel 

»'nd Jaco- V'^s.ed vechcl , anc. liftou t^p hi.s voice and wept, 
„na Jaco. kto.bj -^ v^e^on of the Sabbafch hb the triie an.! Israel os 



the brideßro'//n^ '»The coals thörcof ar^^ coals ol firo , v/hich has 



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On the tiddush ^'UT> you find tho grapes väth the inscrif^tion of the nerochofor tne vine, 
a prfji«6 Jef cereb^utin.- ^-^riday ■ vcnincr with his chil . in a Jo.vful mood . then the 
ol.i lion of Juda , tht- symbol of .-.treugth . 



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Kunst - N I EDER. Inc 

BRONZE FOUNDERS 

503-505 E. 76TH ST. 
NEW YORK CITY 



♦ 



Tel. BUtterfield 8-6258 



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PLAZA 8-0655 



Est. 1931 



SiLVERSMITHS 

Manufacturers of Fine Reproductions 

Gold and Silver Platings 

EXPERT REPAIRING OF SiLVER. OBJECTS OF ART. PEWTER. ETC. 

Refinishing - Engraving 



328 EAST 59th STREET 



NEW YORK 



Tel. BUtterfield 8-6258 



FRENCH SAND 
CIRE PERDUE [lOST WAXl 



BEDI - RASSY, Inc. 

Bronze Foundry 



R. G. KAADER 



503-505 E. 76TH STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 



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Kunst - Nieder, inc. 

BRONZE FOUNDERS t a b l e t s 

STATUARY 503.505 E. -/eTH ST. 

NEW YORK CITY 

Tel. BUtterfield 8-6258 

Decexnber I, I'Joß 

B040 Le-^^ferts rivc!*, 

L/ear l.'re. '"ei 11, 

\j.^: y-u ^-IJ] i'i-:ci the price list for the wjrk you irr^ 
rliown me. 

Tm-ll rotr:.it ..B.^C 

Jan rar.ks up to e-.rs 12.00 

Sm-^:!! Cnnc:ie Bticl: 7.^0 

Snr-il ^:ov 4.00 

Jirictll uo^!; 5.bC 

Llt'^iiiper •-^•^^ 

jlo''/er ink well lo.^C 

L^:^tter operier 4 .00 

Ly i ng woman 8,00 

oin^.ll lunt of v;oman 4*^^ 

Lo ; i ^i,r^ P'v.i r ^ I ^'' • CO 

Ink v/ell top ^.00 

Ink-v/ell tOij(::.B ink v/ell; 7.00 

P-ur.t with shjuluors 60.00 

Ilunninr: vvorn'-.n 10.00 

Jai^'.z v;orn'.;n 8.00 

'Tomen v/illi jjI?. te 12. '^0 

Soll ■-il"i woTfirn ac hanclls 30.^^0 

ICoti.er ..ith chilci 22#00 

'"eepii'if^ v/oinen • I ^^ • 00 

i'ricei: c:Uü.ject t) cil'>.nge v^ith in 30 ciüv^r. 

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Telephone EVergreen 9-6033 








E. GARGANl & SONS, Inc. 

Slatuary Bronze Foundry 

Cir« Perdue ( Lost Wax ) I'rocess 

175 GRü£N STREET 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Ref er en3es: -- 



Liss Jixj^e iiarrah 
2 Button fla^e 

ilev York, il. Yl 



i^adam Saeton Lacliaise 
ö2 ^'ashington Llers 
Her York, 1:. Y. 



A. Ltirling Haider 
51 ^est lüth Ltreet 
llev York, :i. Y. 




'cpuif^^^ ^-'l^QZ^ 



As requisitioned. 



E. Gargani Sc Sons, Ino , 




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Erna Weill 




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80 - ^0 Lefferts Blvd, 
Kew Gardens /L.I. 
Jan. 26 . 1938. 



Kxmst - Nieder Inc. 

5o3 £ f 76 St. 

New ioi^^r^^tlt 



Dear Mr. Nieder , 

As we spoke about on the phone , I send you herewith a copy of the 
price list , you gave me for my bronces . 



Inktray Budiha 


% lo.- 




2 " Base 


1 50.- 




Blocker 


1 15.- 




Letter opener 


1 5.- 


3.- 


Palr booekends 


1 22.- 


20.- 


small Portrait 


1 lo.- 


8,- 


Faun 


% 25.- 


22.- 


Sm.candlestick clay 


$15.- 


12.- 


Sm.dancing woman 


1 15.- 


12.- 


/vornan wlth plate 


$ 15.- 


12.- 


Crouching woman 


1 2ö.- 


15.- 


Äeepimg " " 


$2o.- 


15.- 


Sm. candlestick bronze35.- 


32.- 


Large " * 


1 50.- 


45.- 


Spiee Container 


$ 60.- 


5o.- 


Bell 


♦ 35.- 




«Vornan with childr. 


1 30.- 


28.- (with wood b 


Seated man 


$ 45.- 


42.- 


Alien you have some q 


uestion 


, please ring me up 



I expect a copy(sl 



of your li3t as soon as posslble 

J?ith kind regards 

yours truly 



Ira M. Y(»unkiT 
President 

Henry S. Hendricks 

First Vice-Presidcnt 

David 11. Sulzberger 

Second Vice-Prcsidcnl 

Edgar J. Nathan, Jr. 
Secretitry 



Jewish 




I 



lAL Service Association, i~ 

o/tHE CITY OF NEW YORK 

Forinerly United Hrbrew Charitie» 



71 West 47th Street 



Telephone BRyant 9-3670 



December 51, 1937 



Louis J. Crumbach 
Treasurer 

Edwin Blun 

Associate Treasurer 

Frances Taussig 

Executive Director 

Elinor Blackman 

Assistant Executive Director 



Mrs. Erna V/eill 

80-40 Lefferts Boulevard 

Kew Garden s, Long Island 

My dear Mrs« T.'eill: 

I should be glad if I v.ere eble to iielj you to 
dispone of the sculptures of viiich you speak in yonr letter. 
Hcv.ever, I think you could get much more assistance frorn the 
Office of the Greater Nev. York Coordinating Comirdttee, at 
221 VTest 57th Street* In making an appointment for an in- 
terview there, you may say that you are doing so at n^ Sug- 
gestion» 

bincerelj' yourc, 



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E5TABLI5HED \&)i 



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e go'B^HSA.M Company 

BKONZE DIVISION 

6 WEST 48th STPwEET - NEW YOKK. 



FOUNDlkY AND WOIU^5 
PM>VIDENCE RHODE I5LAND 



T E L E P H O N E 
5KYANT 9-4657 



Januf'.ry 3, 1988. 



Mrs. Erna Welll, 

80-40 Lefferts Boulevard, 

Kew Gardens, l. I. 

My dear Mrs. Weill: 

I have your letter of 
Deceraher 31st, and am sorry to say that we 
canriot take bronzes cast by another foundry, 
due to the fact, that whatever ;ve have here 
on exhiblt is subject to the dealers making 
selection for consignment to thelr galleries, 
and naturally, v-'e could not restrict them, 
when they select a piece, by stating that the 
bronze could not be sold but that they could 
take an order, because when a person selects 
a bronze they usually v/ant immediate delivery. 

Perhaps, et some later date, 
you may have some new rnodels that you plen to 
put in bronze, and I vv^ll be very glad to en- 
deavor to seil them for you, 

Very truly yours, 

THE GORHaM COMPANY, 
BRONZE DIVISION, 

WILLIAM a. DuME. 



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Erna Äelll 



80 - 4o Lefferts Blvd 
Kew Gardens /L.I. 
Febr. 15. 1938. 



Lear Mr. Kaader , 

As I never got any price list nor a call from a Mrs. Drogin 
and as I want to decide now , which foundry I will prefer , 
I would appreclate , to have your prices very soon . 
Please write me too if Mrs. Drogin is interested in my work . 
and include some references for your casting work. 



Truly yours 



f|?N4 Wflll 



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iiovlaf couple 

pHBQlOn 

S^'inming 

Pud Iha v»ox 

Chine r« "aperknife 

?*'oh :)Oir ( 1 freier) 
'' (Hronco) 
** ♦• i aporwelght 
aequt F'aun (laoter) 

Cod Ol ^;ood Luck (ilaötor) 

•• '* (rronce) 

Drtaain^ vomA ( t la. ter ^ 

•• '' ( Brofute ) 

J««(l;;h Thinker 
Snbllboy ieal 

V alt IHK 

Table '^ell (Srono«) 

'11 vor) 
»^otherhojd 
Slave .'^'Ith Tray 
Agalfißt thö Ind 

hoeplrif* 
SlBtln^ an 
Slosta ( ^ronce ) 

ortralt Flaqu« ( 'ilvf^r) 
.^abath Tanlle tick 

Cup (lironce) 



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Sabbath Candlestick. 



The Sabbath Candlestick shov/s Mose the leader of the Jev/ish People in the two most 
important moments of his life . On the one side you see the young |fose listening 
the first time to the voice of God in the burning bush . The Inscription reads : 
" Put off thy shoes from off thy feet , for the place whereon thy standest is holy 
ground,'» On the other side Mose is receiving the ten commandments on Moixnt Sinai , 
The meaning of the inscription is as follows : "Mose spake and God answered him 
oy a voice 



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Besamim Box. 



In accordance with the idea of the Besamim Box which seekwS to create pleasant feelings 

towards the Coming vveek.by smelling pleasant spices , I pictured three scenes of the 

Bibles , which would reflect this a tmosphere. The first scene sho//s the spys who 

were sent out by Mose to search the land of Canaan and who returned with the fruit s 

of the land , grapes so rieh and heavy , that they needed two men to carry them • 

**The land which we passed through to search it , is an exceeding good land .** 

The second scene sho vs Jacow and Rachel at the v/ell , vThere Jacov/ feil in love to liachel 

"And Jacow kisi..ed Rachel , and lifted up his voice and wept," 

Thetilird scene haa xu^ xwö theme the Vision of the Sabbath as the bride and Israel as 

the bridegroom* "The coals thereof are coals of fire , which has a most vehement flame'* 



Kiddush Cup« 



On the Kiddush Cup you find the grapes with the inscription of the Berochofor the wine, 
a praying Jew celebrating Friday Evening with his child in a joyful raood , then the 
old lion of Juda , the symbol of strength . 



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Ens^ar- Mad'amn 



Since speaklng with jou on l^st tuesrisy m^vc.-h ■• 
ip referenoe to mnkirn; olsst^r cf-sts fro-i your brorze moiels^ 



I arn very s or ry 



to sa^ I cpnrot do arythinq; about it at thia time 



83 I have e 3 f&mily house and do my own decoratirg and repairs 
also tr^king care of 3 Rardens keeps me very busy spring and suaiTier^ 



If st arytime in the future I can be of service to you In 



a 



nway I will cheerfully do so, wisbing you 



you tbe greatest suocens in your undertakirg, 



vours vei'y triily 



and sinoerly 

George Hampton 



9302 50 Ave 



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Tele ITA 4 96 i8 



f f 9 ^1 Est. f 3200 

RoMAM Bronze Works Inc. 

STAiUARY imON/E FRKMC H SAND & LOST WAX CASTINGS 

FOUNDRY ANb STUDIO 

KlNGSIAMD AVF.NUh t\ LUYDK. PLA( E, COROMA, L. I. 

SunSIDIARY OK 

(jFnfrai. Bronze Corroratiom 

Maim Office, LoMG IsLAMo City MY DoCCinber 23 j 1937 

liTJ« £• 7iei.ll 

80-40 L^ff-erts Eüulevurd 

Kcw Gardenn, Lon;;;; Irland 
Deur Lrc. 'V/eill; 

7fe have gone over our verbal estimates as ;'?;iven you yesterday 
and h'orev/ith send yuu a revised lict of prices as foilov/ü; 

Standing nude feinale vrith ^^hild lO'^ nigh 

Base 5" :: o" 

for the 3um of FIFTY DOLi^J^S ^bÖ.OO 

Walkinf^ nude inalo 3" high 

Bace 5" x 3^" 

for the GUi^üf THIRTY TViO DOLUIIS ^32 »00 

Dancer female 6'* high 

for the sum of T.r£iiTY EIGiIT DOLI^i^.S. $28.00 

Mother i Ghild 4" hij^h in plaster 

for the sum of KffiLVE DOu^ü.i^ ;ii;12.00 

Bell 8" higli - bottoni i" in dianieter 

for the suia of THI:':TY TIiR-KE DÜLUiJlS. $33.00 

Ash truy 7" in diametnr - ^reer. terr.^ cotta 

for the suxii of TüIRTY TIP.EE DOLL.'iRS ;;^33.C0 

Gandeljtiok - Both sidos :..odeled - 7" x 12" "Iwcscs" 

for tho suiTi of rORTY FI.E DOL^iPX ;;-i5.0G 

Spiee box - 91* x 9" 

for the 3nm of :^:l.wTY DOLL^J^S ^60. 00 

Seated male figure 8" hin;h 

Base 8" x 7" 

for the sum of I-IFTY FBE D"LUJ^3 iSG.OO 

;7eepin[^ v/ornan G" higri 

for the sum of ThIRTY Düi^u^vS 'i;30.00 

Woman holding plate 7" high 

for the sum of ThIF.TY DOLL.V S «•«.*•...««•. ♦ . • . :;r'30. CO 

Danciag female 7" high 

for the sum of TiiIRTY DuLj^aKü... ^30. 00 



^ 



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Croufihing woran 4" 'li^h 

Base 6" x 3" 

for tlie sum of T;ffiNTY EIGdT DOLiji^^S , ^28.00 

Book Ends 5^^ x 6" 

Man pressing u door ' I 

for tho sum of FCT.TY DOhLxF.Z ^40.00 (pair ) 

Gandlestisk Clay 7*' x 4" ' < | I 

for the sum of TV;ELVE DOLLARS , 412*00 

Kneeling female 

Ashtray 5" high • i j ■ 

Oval base 6" x 3*^ 

for the sum of THIRTY DOLLARS $30.00 

Seated boy on slieli 3^" high 

for the sum of IJINE DOLxJdx^ |9.00 

Chinese Paperv^^eight 

2^^;" in diameter 

for the suia of TIIHEE DOLLAI^Ü .^3*00 

Seated IJude Feriale % ' 

Terra Cotta 5" high 

Base oval 7^* x 4'^ 

for the sum of THIRTY EIG^:T DOLLiJ^S $38.00 

Seated baby - Plaster 

No base - 4^' high x 6^* long 

for the sum of TYffilJTY EIGHT DOLLARS #28.00 

Seated nude female 3** higli 

for the sum of TWELVE DOLLARS i>12 .00 

Faun Mask - plaster 

7^^ X 5" 

for the sum of EIOilTSEN DOi^i^tS 5?13.00 

Nude female bust - plaster - 3*' high 

FOR TiiE Smw OF TUELVE DOLiAtO ;;i)12 ,00 

Nude Tlegro vvoiiian 

lying do;m 7" x 3" x 3'* 

for the sum of T/ffiNTY DOLiARS ^20.00 

Candle holder - largest 

Bronze cc silverplated 

for the sum of SIXTY FIVE DOLLARS , ^f^5,00 

Lettor opener 

for the sum of FOIJH DOLLYS Hii4.00 




i ■ 

SmaH Portrait heü.d and hand with book 

for the sum of TV'^EirrY DOLIaK^ $20.00 

Ink tray "Budda" 

for the sum of i-'IFTS^üN DOLLtiRS ^15.00 

I ! 
I 

Chinese dog for rocker blotter • | 

for the sum of T'ffillTY DOLiihJ^S i20.00 

I 
I 

AS verbally statod by the vrriter, v:e will be very g].:. 1 to 
call to see you at t^ny timo ut yonr convenienoe if you will tolephone 
making an aj--;ointment* Should you prcvide us vrith photo.^raphG, vj-p ^vill 
ho -leaced to coo^^ercvto v/ith you in re^i^-rd to placing oome of yonr vrork 
Vi'-ith the ralleries. 

As the vrriter stated, whiie undoubtedly you may have had 
some lovror princ;3 qucted to you, still we foel that if the quality 
of workman3hip be taken into consirloration that it /.ill re-yait in 
your placing ycur orders /rlth us« 

Goliciting your valu?d orders, we are, 

Very truly yours, 

ROMIN PPON^E VyWKS FTC. 




FLHiRS 



F. L. liuber 




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t 



Erna 



Weill 



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80 - 4o Lefffrts ^Ivd 
Kew Gardens /L.I. 

Dec. 3i. 1937. 



Dear Mr. Drake > 



ffith reference to your letter of Dec. 17. i I want to make 
you a prppositlon as following : you certainly will appreciate 
that in this case I would not like to rlsk too much money , 
Therefore I think it would be a very good froposition that 
you bring the one or other of my bronzes in your shovn-oom or 
to some galleries . If you get somebody who is interested 
to buy some of these sculptures , I should be glad to let 
them Gast in your foundery . So you will get your comission 
of 30 i and in additlon to thöt you can make your regulär 
profit in the casting job . 

Please let me know 7/hether you are in the position to take 
up my proposition as mentioued horo. 

Sincerely yours 



;-» T t C 



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ESTABLISHED \&)\ 



fpße gO'Pj^.SAM COMPJANY 



BKONZE DIVISION 



6 



WEST 



4 8 TH 



S T K E E T 



NEW 



Y O K K. 



FOUNDRsY AND WORJ^S 
PRJOVIDENCE fU^ODE I5LAND 



T E L E P H O N E 
BPOTANT 9-4657 



December 17, 1937. 



Mrs. E« Weil!, 

80-40 Lei'ferts Boulevard, 

Kew Gardens, L, I. 

Dear Madam: 



conver;:^^ 
arrangem 
wlth the 
done by 
the artl 
which is 
not buy 
ings are 
process 
asbestos 



Vvlth reference to cur recent 
tion, we wish to advise that cur 
ents lor handiin-' sculptiire are 

undersl.anding that the casting bo 
the Gorham Company and paid for by 
st, v'ho tiien s€.ts the selling: price 

subject to 30;:^ commission. We do 
any modeis from the sculptors. Gast 

made for small worK by a special 
of our ovm by means of plaster and 



In Order to clarify this for you, 
preouming tiiat you had a small bronze to be 
cast and the cost of casting was C'Sö.OO, you 
vvould pay thib amount when the bronze casting 
was made and if you deüired to have -is place 
it on sale for you, the usual custom is to 
make the sellin,; price about three tlmes the 
cost of casting, which would makc this item 
$75,00, on which, ait^r the bronze is sold. 




er 



you deducted the cost of Cc^sting^of t25.00 
y/ould leave you a net profit of ^27.50. 

Trusting this is clear, 

Very truly yours, 

VjILLfiSrtr . DRiU<E, 
THB. GjRHi.M COMPANY, 
',,rifj-D:DML BhOMZE DIVISION. 



TieTr 



llSteeS of THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM 



OF ART request the pleasure of your Company at 
a MEMBERs' PREVIEW of a Special exhibitlon 

20TH CENTURY 



PAINTERS 



a review of 



American paintings, water colors, dravvings, and 
prints chosen from the Museum's permanent col- 
lections. On Thursday evening, June fifteenth, 
from eight-thirty to eleven o'clock. 



THIS CARD WILL ADMIT TWO 



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DESCRIPTION 



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GRAY A951 

MEDIUM GREEN A-1520 
CLEAR GLAZE 1ES 
CLEAR GLAZE 6646 
IMPERIAL DARK BLUE I5ES 
WHITE OPAQUE 22ES 
TURQUOISE IBiS 



POST INS. 



PRICE 



<» 



B. F. DRAKENFELD & CO.. Inc.. 45 Park Place. New York 7. N. Y. 




AMOUNT 



TOTAL 




15 



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15.63 






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Telephone EVevgreen 9'6033 




# 



E. GARGANI & SONS, Inc. 

Statuary Bronze Foundry 

Cire Perdue ( Lost IVax ) Process 

275 GRKEN STRKEl 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



( Joatinued) 



isri Tray in Piaster 

Danoing ToxiBn 

jjanJing ^'"onian in Piaster 

Lady on Pillor 

lady on Pillov in Pin st er 

Sitt ing Han 

CJup in Plast r 

Bell in Silver 

Bell in Bronze 



4.0J 
70.00 
24.00 
15.00 

7.00 
25.00 
12.00 
75.00 
Z5.00 



Yours very truly 

E. aar^ani & Sons, Ino. 



GGrÄS 



By 




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See Instructions on back and 



DESTINATION 



»^e A. D. L. 5336 



comply therewith. 



\ 



The Long Island Rail Road Company 



SyixlU iOOM 6 20 ly4ä 



4- 



The articies descr^bed l elow have boen roceived con- 
sigrecJ to you, and nre now re.uJy for delivery. Please 
send for same immediately and present this notice and 
bül of lading, when froight iscalied fcr. If not callod 
for in person, fill out order for delivery on hack hereof. 



ARRIVAL NOTICE 



Freiqht Bill No. 



Freight Bill Date 194 



STOP THIS CAR AT 



FOR 



WEICHT IN TONS 



GROSS 



TARE 



NET 



CAR INITIALS AND NUMBER 



C. L. Transferred to or L. C. L. Loading No. 



Jjom 



TO 



STATION 



STATE 



«MMA|cM.tNY 



RECONSIGNED TO 



STATION 



STATE 



AUTHORITY 



LENGTH OF CAR 



ORDERED 



FURNISHED 



MARKED CAPACITY OF CAH 



ORDEREQ 



FURNISHEü 



DATE 



ÜL 



i t V 



M£ 



WAYBILL No. 



FROM 



STATION 

• - ■ n ■ 

X 



21 Üj II 



STATE 



ORIÜIN AND DATE, ORIGINAL CAR, TRANSFER FREIGHT BILL AND PREVIOUS 
WAYBILL REFERENCE AND ROUTING WHEN REBILLED. 



ROUTE (Show each Junction and Carrier in rojte order to destination of waybill.) 



LI. H 



CONSIGNEE ANÜ ADDRESS 



UiHfk ■ ■XL^CI 



Sh«w "A" 
if Agenf s 
Routina or 

"S" rf 

Shipper's 

Routing 



FÜLL NAME OF SHIPPER. AND, FOR C. O. D. SHIPMENTS, THE STREET AND POST 
OFFICE ADDRESS. AND INVOICE NUMBER IF AVAILABLE. 



Am Akt CLAfCONC 



Moll> u2Nü ;>T 



FINAL DESTINATION AND ADDITIONAL ROUTING 



INSTRUCTIONS 'REGARDING ICING, VENTILATION, HEATING, MILLINÖ. ETC 
IF ICEb, SPECIFY TO WHGM ICiNG SHOULD BE CHARGED). 

1 



HJk ÜAhüiWcN (sY 



WEIGHED 



AT 

GROSS 

TARE 



ALLOWANCE 



NET 



Indicate Uy symbol in Column provided it how weights were obtained for L. C. L. Shipments only. 
R— Rail reati Scale. S — Shipper's Tested Weights. E— Estimated— Weigh and Correct. T— Tar'-'f 
Classification er Minimum. 



DESCRIPTION OF ARTICLES AND MARKS 



Commoüity No. 



*! 



WEIUHT 



läAG t-lt^u CLAV U'nOit. 



'J2 



lÜ.X f«l» -LZINu CWfüMl/ü 



$ 



t)e 



V^here 'reight is iinclaimed or undelivi{#AUiTir ^HU it will be subject to storage or 
cther dispoiition in accordance with the provisions of Section 4 of tfie terms and conditions ot 
It.e bill of lading under which the shipment is transported, whether UNIFORM STRAIGHT 
bILL OF LADING or UNIFORM ORDER BILL OF LADING as the case may be. 

This shipment is subject to demurrage or storage charges or both for detention beyond 
the free time prescribed in the applicable demurrage or storage taritfs duly filed as required 
by law, copies of which are on file at this Station; and at the rates named therein. 

MAKE CHECK PAYABLE TO THE LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD COMPANY 
(Over) 



RATE 



FREIGHT 



ADVANCES 



PREPAID 



TAX 
TOTAL 



«.I 



^ 



^ VAmount tu 
q2C be Paid 



Freight Age 



.,t ^4^1$ 



) 



PLACE SPECIAL SERVICE 
PASTERS 



DESTINATION FOR AUDITOR 
(TO TRAVEL WITH SHIPMENT.) 



'-Mffi \. D. L. ^6Mt 



The 



Long Island Rail Road Company 
local freight waybill 



ä>j|xlU 400M 6 20 1M8 



TO BE USED FOR SINGLE CONSIGNMENTS, CARLOAD AND LESS CARLOAD-LOCAL ONLY 

Freight Bill Date 194 



STOP THIS CAR AT 



WEIGHT IN TONS 



FOR 




CAR INITIALS AND NUMBER 



ü 



C. L Traiiöferröd to or L. C L, Loadnig Nn 



0524 



TO 



STATION 



STATE 



JAVlA ICALINY 



RECONSIGNED TO 



STATION 



STATE 



AUTHORITY 



LENGTH OF CAR 



ORDERED 



FURNISHED 



MARKED CAPACITY OF CAR 



ORDEREÜ 



FURNISHED 



DATE 



12 7 4ÖAJ0 



WAYBILl. Nu. 



2l8i?7l 



tJtU^^m,w 



FRÜM 



STATION 



STATE 



INOPLS IM) 



ORIGIN AND DATE. ORIGINAL CAR, TRANSFER FREIGHT BILL AND PREVIOUS 
WAYBILL REFERENCE AND ROUTING WHEN REBILLED. 



ROUTE (Show oach Junction and Carrier in route order to destination of waybiil.) 



LIkK 



LLQCi 



Show "A" 
if Agent's 
Routiny or 

"S" if 

Shipper's 

Routii'Q 



CONSIGNEE AND ADDRESS 



I 16II9 Ö2ND ST 



FINAL DESTINATION AND ADDITIONAL ROUTING 



INSTRUCTIONS (REGARDING ICING, VENTILATION, HEATING. MILlING, ETC. 
IF ICED, SPECIFY TO WHOM ICING SHOULD ÖE CHARGED). 



FÜLL NAME OF SHIPPER, AND, FOR C O. D SHIPMENTS, THE STREET AND POST 
OFFICE ADDRESS. AND INVOICE NUMBER IF AVAILABLF.. 



AMR '.AKT CLAYCONC 



NcW GAHONEN NY 



WtiQHEO 



AT 

GROSS 

TARE 



ALLOWANCE 



NET 



Indif ate bv symbol m Column provided • how weights were obtained for L. C. L. Shipments only. 
R-^-F^ailroad Scale. S— Shipper's Tested Weights. E— Estimated-- Weigh and Correct. T— Tanff 
Clasüi::c;ation or Minimum. 



DESCRIPTION OF ARTICLES AND MARKS 



Comrnodity No. 



IBAG FIRd CLAV ÜkUD £, 



IBX FHIT GLZiNG Cf^l>U\IÜS 



(IST) TRANSFER 



U A bHr (21^14 TRANSFER 




:3RD) TRAN6f E.^ 



Ocstination iMif.W Stainp Hefe:M Station Numbsr j J 
Namg, Uale \^^j{>.Lil, Frei£lit tili i.üniüer Oi.J »i.rTioü.K. 



JUNCTiON AGENTS' STAMPS AND ALL YARD STAMPS TO BE PLACED ON BACK OF WAYBILL 

THE LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD COMPANY 



FOR CONSIGNOR IF PREPAfD 



KOR CONSIGNEE fF COLLFCT 



'^^ AOL. 53.% 



FRE:GHT BILL 

FOR CHAHGES ON ARTICLES TRANSPORTED 

(OR TOBE rRAMSPORrCDi 

MAKE CHECK PA YABLE TO JHE LONG (SLAND RAIL ROAD < OMPANY 



FrelcjM B'H No. 



STOP TN IS CAR AT 



FOR 



CAR INITIALS AND NUMBER 



Frelght Bill Date 



^'unnj l^' roNs 



Qn086 i TAR£ 



NET 



C. L. rrtn«f«rr«d to or U. C. L. Lo#<fina No 



o^aj 



.194 



LENÜTH OF CAR 



ORDERE D 



FURNISHED 



. \hD CAPACITY OF CAR 



<>i:,yc.RED 



DATE 



FURNISHED 



TO 



«TATION 



STATE 



JA^i>^ Iv-ALl NY 



12 / 4v^>WÜ 



WAYBlLk No. 



FROM 



21 6p 71 



STATION 



STATE 



li^DPL^ IMJ 



RECONSIGNED TO 



STATION 



STATE 



AUTHORITY 



ROUTE (Show each Junction and Carrier in rout9 Order to destmation of wayb 



LI;^.R 



iii.) 



CONSIGNEE AND ADDRESS 



aRfiÄ .,uL..C "J 



Sfiow "A" 
if Agent's 
Routing or 

"S'" f 

Shipper'Jf 

Routinq 



w^V°E!lL*B\^..^RY,^te°SÄ'^RÖüfrN'?i 'wT^Van^l'^'"' '''' '^° ''"'^^'«^3 



FÜLL MAME OF SH •I-'PER, AND, FOR C. O. D. SHIPMENTS THE STREET AND POST 
OFFICE ADDRESS, *.ND INVOICE NUMBER IF AVAILABlI. ' ""^ *' ' "^^"^ '^^° ^^^'^ 



AMR AHT CLAYCOiMC 



Mölli^ u2M0 öT 






FINAL DESTINATION AND ADDITIONAL ROUTING 



INSTRUCTIONS (REGARDING (GING, VENTILATION, HEATING. MILLING ETC 
IF ICED. SPECIFY TO WHOM ICING SHOULD BE CHARGED; 



NiiWf uAKüiMcN ..Y 

AT 

GROSS 
TARE 



WifQKEO 



ALLOWANCE 



MET 



DESCRIPTION OF ARTICLES AND MARKS 



Commoflity No. 



Indicate by symbol in Column provided • how weights were obtained for L. C. L. Shipmentsonly. 
R— Railfpad Scjde. S-t;SjiiDper's Tested Weiyhts. E— Estimated— Weigh and Correct. T— Tariff 
Classification or Minimum. 



• I weTuht 



IbAb FIku CLAV CnUDlL 



Ib 



A 



F\\ n .LZINo Ci,\ 



RATE 



FREIGHT 



1>2 



UNü 



;3 



D' 



ADVANCES 



M 



b' 



TAX 
TOTAL 



Exceptions to freight charges or ccndition of lading 
should be presented promptly to Freight Agent. 



PREPAID 



Received payment for the Company, 



T^Jl 



194 



Freight Agent 



Araöunt to 
be Paid 



$ 



THE LONG ISLAIMD :--lAlL ROAD COMPANY 



-116 555 SC03.82E S 



m)/kxf6\MNGES OR REFUNDS 
//VmtUOUT THIS SLIP 



PAINTS 



{ DAPOPORT 
lx«'<'ELLER INC. 



WALL 
PAPER 



163-44 Jamaica Ave. 

JAMAICA 3, N. Y. 

REpublic 9-7900 



47 S. Main St. 287 Front St. 

FREEPORT, L. I. HEMPSTEAD. L. I. 

FReeport 8-0160 Hempstead 2900 



lyj^^ 




70)7744 



SEE OTHER SIDE 

MFO. BY THE BALTIMORK SALE3B00K CO.. BALTIMORE 28. MO. 




/^rA^^ 





NO EXCHANGES OR REFUNDS 
WITHOUT THIS SLIP 



DAPOPORT, 



163-44 Jamaica Ave. 

JAMAICA 3. N. Y. 

REpublic 9-7900 



47 S. Main St. 

FREEPORT, L. I. 

FReeport 8-0160 



287 Front St. 

HEMPSTEAD, L. I. 

Hempstead 2900 



Distributors of: 

DUPONT PAINTS ^ 
^ IMPERIAL WASHABLE WALL PAPER 
DUTCH BOY PRODUCTS 
CABOT'S PAINTS 
ARTISTS' SUPPLIES 

and 
Many Other Reputable 
- Paint Products 



7(1)7745 MFD. BY THE BALTIMORE 8AIESBO0K CO.. BALTIMORE 29. MD« 



/ 




C^Zy^^ 





o2^r Ö^ 




l/'^^t^ 



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iiladelpnia it was decided to mcrease the d 



At a meeting of the Council in Philadelphia it was decided to increase tne dues to the 
amount shown above due to higher cost of printing and the decision to print 12 issues 
oi the Journal per year. The fiscal year now begins Jan. Ist instead of June Ist, making 
this form ol invoice necessary. 

Dues may be paid through December 31, 1948 or to December 31, 1949. New membership 
Cards will be mailed only upon receipt of 1949 dues. 



/(^vfo^ //f. ^^ 



President fn/AJ^^ Secretary -Treasurer 



7// 



Jean Leonard 



Cziamia cStucL 



CO 



Instructions - Pottery Supplies - Electric Kilns 
Clays - Glazes - Complete Poured Pieces 



96-24 CORONA AVE. 



HA. 6-4120 



CORONA, L. I., N. Y. 



Customer's 
Order No. . 



Name 



nr: 




.Dale I'M^....lU.. 



19 



Address 



llL.£2ll£l:::2L:±r ^li^^ ' 



SOLD BY 



CASH 



QUAN. 




DESCRIPTION 



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F 






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ALL CLAIMS AND RETURNED GOODS MUST BE ACCOxMPANIED BY THIS BILL 



QUANTITY 



125 LBS MOI 
75 " DRM 

1 DOZ Sl 



DESCRIPTION 



ST MONMOUTH ART BODY 
JORDAN ART BODY 

R STILTS #12 



4> 




PRICE 



.06 
.075 

.60 



TRUCKING CHARGES 



B. F. DRAKENFELD & CO.. Inc.. 4S Park Place. New York 7, N. Y. 



AMOUNT 



,0 

3 
.60 



13.73 



i 



TOTAL 



]k.j6 



Jean Leonard 



Gzxa 



mia 



chtiuL 



CO 



Instructions - Pottery Supplies - Electric Kilns 
Clays - Glazes - Complete Poured Pieces 



SG-24 CORONA AVE. 



HA. 6-4120 



Customer's 

Order No CA 



V 



Name . 
Address 







CORONA. L. I„ N. Y. 






.Dat^ ./^...-T. : h.:r 



i) } 



u -i ,] y y . 



19 



Q..!.2..;..Lj}.'.'f 



SOLD BY 



QUAN. 




C. O. D. 



DESCRIPTION 




.1. j 







Name. 



dutU 2>eHice jßauen. 
CEl^/iMIC STUDIO 

135-06 ^K^tK\QK AVENUE 

JAMAICA, N. Y. 
JA/V^AICA 3-5658 



^^' 
.^.. 



-^ r 

H :'<> 



19. 



Address 




EXPIRATION 



MAY 22 
1950 



TERM 



T 



POLICY NUMBER 



BINDER 



COMPANY 



HOME 



COVERAGE 




APRIL 24, 1950 

FINE ARTS FLOATER COVER ING 

IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



FRENKEL & CO., Inc. 

EIGHTY MAIDEN LANE 

NEW YORK 7. N. Y. 



PAID BY CHECK NO.. 

DATF, 



AMOUNT 



ANYWHERE . 135- 



MTGEE; 




REMIUM 



5.00 



GIRL SCOUT COUNCIL OF GREATER NEW YORK, Inc. 

133 EAST Ö2nd STREET, N. Y. 21 TEmpleton 8-3200 



ANNUAL COOKIE SÄLE 



PURCHASER'S RECEIPT: 



@ 35c $. 
Scouf's füll name: 



boxes of Cookies 




Troop No -r/----"--?!?-.^.....^...... 




Borough.-.. 

If you do not recelve your Cookies within 60 days 
PLEASE NOTIFY US 

Book No 



DEAR CUSTOMER: 
The Scout from whom 
you ordered Cookies is 
one of 40,000 Girl Scouts 
in Greater New York. 
She is doing her bit to 
help reach our goal of 
$500,000. However, the 
sale of Cookies alone 
cannot do it and right 
now our Volunteer Cam- 
paign Workers ore in 
your neighborhood ask- 
ing for contributions to 
Support Girl Scouting in 
Greater New York. We 
hope if you are ap- 
proached you will want 
to give. 



HAvemeyer 6-2636 



Howard S. Cältoa 

Upho/sterer and Decorator 

Slip Covers and Drapery 

Made to Order 



42-02 LAYTON STREET 



ELMHURST, L. I. 



STATEMENT 




ROMA PLASTIUNA 

PLIATEX FLUID RUBBER 

DELLA ROBBIA MIRACLE CLAY 



SCULPTURC ACCCSSORICS 



Kino 




NATIONAL ARTS BUILDING 

304 WEST 42nd STREET 

NEW YORK 18. N. Y. 



r«^e^ 



LON6ACRE 3-3330 



DATE 



PLEASE INDICATE INVOICE NUMBER WHEN MAKING REMITTANCE. 



INV. NO. 



/ 
/ 
/ 

/ 



INV. DATE 



ßf/L 



>-> 



tJL 



'/^i 



0^^ 









(/!u^ 



W 







INV. AMT. 



CREDITS 



BALANCE 



/^f^ - 



:f^ 



<^r 




PLEASE COMPARE WITH YOUR RECORDS 
IF ANY DIFFERBNCE COMMUNICATE WITH US IMMEDIATELY 



VI LAGE MJ CENTER 

(j4 



ee- 



r 



Thank you for your contribution, We are glad to 
enroll you as a member of the Village Art Center 
and hope you will find the exhibitions we have 
planned and the work we propose to do both con- 



structive and interesting. 



President 



Jean Leonard 



e 



z*iamLC 



<:^tudi 



LO 



Instructions - Pottery Supplies - Electric Kilns 
Clays - Glazes - Complete Poured Pieces 



96-?.4 CORONA AVE, 



HA. 6-4120 



CORONA, T.. I... N, Y. 



Customer's ..-■ ; t 

Order No ./-V Dat^ 

Name 



\ A .^ -< ..r / 



19 



Address 



SOLD BY 



QUAN. 



/ 



/ 






♦... 



;• 



/ j 



CASH 



C. O. D. 



CHARGE 



Dr.S(J<Ii'i ION 




-^M^l/f 



uPU 




PRICE 



AMOÜNT 



/ 



,(/(} 



A » 







(ttnfform DoiBtrtU Straliht Bill «f Ladlng. adopted by Carrlers In Olllelal, Soathern, Western and Illinois Classlfleatlon Terrltorles. March 15, 1922, as amendeii Angnst 1, 1930 and Jane 15, 1941.) 

Uniform Straight Bill of Lading— Original—Not Negotiable, 

RECEIVED, subject to the classifications and tariffs in effect on the date of the issue of this Bill of Lading, 



V. M. Co. No. 



Your No. 



FROM Vermont Marble Company shjpper-. no. C/20b Agent-. no 

10418 DIR At CENTEF RUTUf^D VT 8/23/51 ^^s 

WE LCH 



'■"^M 



^'^Äfi^#^^-Ör:P^^'^^^'':^ 



R. R. Co. 



f'^4^&g^^'l?v^^T^^?#'^^^'^ii:/^ 



ihe property descrltrid be'ow, ,n opooront ^ooH ord^r, «xc^pt o-, nofod fcon»rn»5 ond rondi»lor of contenis of pockage* unknown), morkpH, consign»d, and df^tined a^ indica'ed below, whicK said Company (ihe word 
tomponv being under^tood »hroughoul «his contract o» menn.ng ony porsor or corpomtlon m po^se\Oon of »he property under ihe controc») agrees to cnrry lo its u\ual place of delivery ot soid deUinofion, if on its 
own read or its o-r woter Im», otherwlsn to deliver to cother rn'r.»r on the 'o.ite to sold deitinotion. I» is mutuolly ogreed, os »o eoch corrlc of o'l of ony of soid property over oll o' ony portion «' '""<' •;<>"'* 
to destinotion, o"d <is to eacK porty o» ony time interest-d in oM or nny of soid property, thot every service to be performed herewnder shoH be subiec» »o oH tfie condilions rot probibited bv low, wheffier printed 
or wnttr-n, herein contoined. inc'ijding tbe conditionj on bock fiereof, whicH ore fiereby ogreed to by the shioper and occepted for himself and Ki$ assignt. 



Consigned to 



Destination 



MFS ERNA V/EILL 
116^15 82ND DFIVE 
135 AUDLEY ST 
KEW GAR DENS NEW YORK 



State of 



( 



Mail or street address of consignee — For purposes of notification only. 



) 



County of 



Route 



?.€ LCH 



Delivering Carrier 



No. of Packages 



Boxes 



Grates 



1 



Pleces 



Car Initial 



Car No. 



Description of Articles, Special Marks 
and Exceptions 



Marble SAND RUBBED 



tt 



« 



<l 



•WEICHT 
(Sub. to Cor.) 



260 



Class or 
Rate 



Chk. 

Col. 



*lt the shlpment m«ves between two ports bf a cairier bf water, the law requirea tJiat the bill of lading shall State wliethcr it is "carrier's or shipper's wciglit." 
NOTE— Where the rate is dependent on value, shippers are required to State specifically in writing the apfrccd or dcclared value 
of the property. The agreed or declared value of the property is hereby specifically stated by the shipper to be not exceeding » 



.per. 



Vermont Marble Company, shipper,Per 

Permanent post-office address of shipper, PROCTOR, VERMONT 

Form 561 I5M.3-5I 




Subject to Section 7 of conditions, 
if this sliipment is to be delivered to 
the consignee without reconrse on 
the consignor, the consignor shall 
sign the following statement: 

The carrier shall not make delivery 
of this shipment without payment of 
freight and all other lawful charges. 



(Signature of Consignor.) 

If charges are to be prepaid, write 
or stamp here, "To be Prepaid." 



PFEP/ilD 



Received $ 

to apply in propayment of ihe charges 
on the property describcd hcrcon. 



Agent or Cashier 



Per 

(The signature here acknowledges 
only the amount prepaid.) 

Charges Advanced: 



^ -/-^yr^^ cj ^ A gPnt, Per. 




1 



D 



'^y^^jr-iZ/^* - ^> 



Jean Leon ard 



Csramic ^tudLo 



Instructions - Pottery Supplies - Electric Kilns 
Clays - Glazes - Complete Poured Pieces 



96-24 CORONA AVE. 



HA. 6-4120 



Customer's 
Order No. . 



Name 



Address 



SOLD BY 



QUAN. 



cy 



/ 



—^ 



XJORONA. L. I.. N. Y. 




l.i. 




:£'.l iL 



,19 






4 ^: 



/ > /' f '* 



/ 



CASH 



C. O. D. 



1/ 



CHARGE 



DESCRIPTION 



PRICE AMOUNT 



Xf V 



■^r 



V 






*-'-u\ 




ALL CLAIMS AND RETURNED GOODS MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY THIS BILL 



Jean Leonard 



(ls,\amia <:htiuUo 



Instructions - Pottery Supplies - Electric Kilns 
Clays - Glazes - Complete Poured Pieces 



96-24 CORONA AVE. 



HA. 6-4120 



CORONA, L. I., N. Y. 



Customer's 
Order No. . 



* ß 



.kDaie 



Name .... 
Address 



IIm:...m.^ .... 



SOLD BY 



CASH 



C. 



QUAN. 



DESCRIPTION 








19 




CHARGE 



AMOUNT 




ALL CLAIMS AND RETURxNED GOODS MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY THIS BILL 



@ 



A R T I S T S 



EQUITY ASSOCIATION 

New York Chapter 

NEW YORK. N. Y. ^^^ "^^ * 



Mr3. Hlrna IVelU 
135 Audley 3t. 
Kew ;)ardeng 15. :!• 



Y* 




(j? 




•qI "^h 



D U E 3 



195.^-53 



Arresrs 1951-52 

(Paid ^,^3.00 in Oct.Wö": 



Dues paid by professional Artists are deductible on Income Tax 




"To Protect and improre the economic Status of the sculptor, the pahiter and the graphic artist." 



NEW YORK SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN 



DUES FOR MEMBERSHIP ^ 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 1 igVV $ 

/ 



PROFESSIONAL 1 | NON PRO F P SSION A L j yi 

A N N U A l. I I A N N U A l I I 





PLEASE REMIT TO 


/^^'^^ 


,ls V.vs^ ^ ' ■■'- ^^<^'^ 









\ 



} 



/ i^ ü- ^ 



PAYMENT RECEIVED 






<i:;w 



TREAS 



;^ 



ÜATl 



n 






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i'^ 



-^ - 



/ 



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X 



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^^- 



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t^2 



Ce-t.^^, \/ ~t/ . 



_l 



ENCLOSE THIS CARD WITH YOUR REMITTANCE. IF ADDRESS IS NOT CORRECT PLEASE CHANCE. 
DUES ARE CHARGED UNLESS WRITTEN RESIGNATION IS RECEIVED BEFORE MARCH FIRST 




m 

IT- 15 

< :d 

00 --; 



PC 

w 




o 
o 
< 

u 

I 
u 



h 

(0 

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o 

Dl 
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in 

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in 



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U) 

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u 

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o 

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IS 

«0 

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A 7S7S 



Received 
from 



Address. 



NO. PCS. 



/ 



CONSIGNF" 



SHEPHARD WAREHOUSES, INC. 

667 WASHINGTON STREET, NEW YORK 14, N. Y. 




Teuephones CHelsea 3-7620 



if /ii^jU.eS. 



Transferred to 
Received from. 



1°"' ///^7 



DESCRIPTION 




JJ^ 



KKCEIVEI) ALL THK ABOVE ARTK LES IN GOÜD CONLUTIüN 




rt 




21 - 7622 



NO. 



-^t^^y^ 



/a^l^j^ 




XPi;l/ 



/i..ßcA ^^y^^ 



WEIGHT 




RATE 




SPECIFY ON Al^^IPMENTS 
IF PREPAID^RCOLLECT 



COLLECT D 



Prep'd Cash Q 



Prep'dChge. □ 



ADVANCE n 



TAX 



C. 0. D. G 



C. 0. D. FEE 



TOTAL 



3. 



i^S 



<^7y 



i?X 






>-! \ ^ / 



<. 



Date Del'v'd. 



1_ Driver. 



Rablway Kxpress Aoency 



LrrooRroBjLTJSJD 




>^. 






/^<^ 



UNIFORM EXPRESS RECEIPT— NON-NEGOTIABLE— TERMS AND CONDITIONJ-^ 



b 

o 



1. Th« nrovipiond of thin receipt, shs.ll inu'o to th«,henefit of «nd be 
binrlitiK upou the coiu:iRiu)r, tbe oonpifffieo and all «^arriers haudling this 
eliipmcnt aud shall apply to any recoufiijauient, or return thereof. 

1. \n cor)8idoration of thp rnte rliarRfvl for carrving «aid propprty. 
whiph is depcudent uyon the value thcirc«f and in baped u»>on au agrfed 
v.iluHticM of uot exoo«<din({ tifty dollur« for nny Bhipmeut of 100 pouuds or 
l«i-a aud uot escpodin« fiiiy ceatP per pouud, actual weieht, for any «hip- 
luiMit in exccss of 100 Dounda, unless t\ groater vulue is declared at tue 
timo (jf sbipmcnt, the snipper a(J:reo^^ that the Company shüll not be liable 
iu any event for ruore fhan fifty dollars for any shipnient of 100 pound-'- 
<ir le«s, or for more tban fifty ccnt.s per pound. nctiial weight, for uny 
t;hi')iueDt weigbinB more than 100 pounds, unless a r;re8ler value is 
-tat«! herein. Unless a croater value if declarcd and stated herrin tho 
Bhippor agrees tbat the value of tho phipment is as last above «et out 
ancf ths.t tue liability of tho Company shall la no event exceed auch value. 

3. Ualess causi^d by its owa negligence or tbat of its agents. the 
Company .sIikII not be liable for — 

a Dlfferente in weight or uuality caused by sbrinkage, leakauei 
or evaporation. 

Tho death, iujury, or escapn of live f reight. 

LosH of money. buliion, bonds, couponn, jewelry, i-ri^oiouH 
Htornis, valuc.ble papwrs, or other matter of extriiorrlinary value, 
unless such artides are oaumerated in the receipt. 

4. UulesB cauwed in whole or in nart by its own nei;ligenoe or that 
of it« agtnils, the Company shall not be liable for lona, damage or do^ay 
oaUHed ny — 

a The aot or d«fauit of the phipper or ownor. 

b Tho na'.ure of ibe prop^rty. or defeot or inherent vice'therem. 

c linpropcr «»r insiifficionf, packiug, securing, or addrossing. 

d Tho Act of Clofl, public enemiee, authority of law, quarantine, 

riots, Btiiktv^, perils of navigation, the bazards or danprers iu- 

cidenfc to ii state «f war, or occurrence in customs warehouse. 
e The exBinination by, or partial dclivery to tho consigneo of 

C.O.D. BhipmentH. 
f lelivory under instruntions of consipnor or conpjsrno© at 8ta- 

t onn wher« thern is no ngent of the corupany afier 8ucli pbip- 

mcutH hiivo becn lef t .it such .stations. 

5. PMckagcs containin« fraj^ilo nrticlos or artides conpiRting wholly 
or in part of ßlas« tnust ht! .^o iinukod and bo j>Hcked so aa to lußuro 
Bafo transportatioa >)y cxprotss with ordinary »•.ire. 

fi. "Wlion ron: ÜCTi-ed tri ji pl-icp at wliich the oxpresf« rornpany has no 
olluT,, -ii'piiKMitis ir-.ust. bo niHikcd uith the n.iine (;1 (b»r rsjire^s stntion 
vi wliicb dolivory \vil! b« ji'-i-.opti'd or l>o niHtked witb forwurding diroo 
tion« if lo Ko h.iyond tiwi exprost' coiiipiiny',« üue by a cari ler otbor thun 
aa cxproiiä Company, if uot so tuarkod bhipmuuie will be rcfuaeu. 



7. Ab coQditioDfl proeedent to recovery clainiH must be made In 
writing to the originating or delivering carrier witbin uine nioutb« after 
dulivery of the propertv or, in case of faiiure to make dclivery. (hon 
witbin niue rnonths and fifteen days after date of pbipmeut! aud fuiff« 
HhHll be inptituted only witbin two years and one day afier the date 
wtiun notine in writing in given by the carrier to the claiuiant that ihe 
carrier bas difiallowod the daim or auy part or parta thereof. 

8. If any C. O. D. is not paid witbin thirty dayn after notipe of non- 
delivory has been muilrd to tne shipper the Company may at its Option 
return the proporty to the consignor. 

0. Free delivery will not bo madeatpointswhere the Company tnain- 
tains no delivery servicei at nnints where delivery servioe is luaintainefl 
fre«: delivery will not be made at addresses beyond the establisbed and 
published delivery liirits, 

Special Additional Provislons as to Shipmcnts Forwarded by VcMel 
froin the United States to Placcs in Foreign Countrics. 

10. If the destination Bpcfilied in tbia receipt is in a foreign country, 
tbe firopcrty covwred bereby shall, as to transit over occan routes and by 
tbfir foreign connectiouö to such destination. be subject to all the terms 
iiml conditions of the receipt« or bills of lading of ocean carriers a.s ac- 
t f.pted by tht> Company for tho shiprnent, aad of foreign carriers partic»- 
raiinjj in the transportation, and a.s to .such tran.nit i."? accepted for trans- 
poitatioD and delivery subject to the ;icts, ladings, la'va. regulations. and 
cu.stoms of over.sep. and foreign carriers, custodians, and governments, 
thcir employeed and agenta. 

11. The Company shall not be üable for anV 1o«b, damage. .or delsy 
to '<aid sbipmeut over ocean rouie.s and tbeir foreign coanectious, tbo 
destinatirni of wbicb is in a foreign country. oecurring outbido tbe bound- 
ario-s of the United States, wbicn may bo occasiouod by any huch ai-ts. 
ladings, law.s. rcKularions, or (^^.^to^J^^. Claims for los.-*, damage or dcl»y 
mu.st be madf^ in writinii; to tbo otirrier at the port of export or to the 
carrier is.>iuing this roreipt, witbin uine montbs after delivery of the 
property at .said port or in case of faiiure to make such delivery tuen 
witnin nine iriontns anti fifteen days after date of sbuiment; and clninis 

igainst said delivering or issuing carrier. shall ,be dcemcd, to 



so m«'<> ..».....-u ,.,...-. .^-... „ .... ..........^ — .„,.-,_ j- 

h;ivn Veen tüiide acainst any «nrricr wbich may ne Manie hcreunucr. 
Su t..s sball b(! institutod only witbin two year.s. and one djiy after tbe 
date wben notice in writinK ih given by tbe rarnor to th»; c lammiit, that 
(he car:i<»r ba;i di.-<allowrd tho 'laiin or any part.or pnrts thereof. vvbere 
clHims iiro not so nuido. ond 'o^r .«uit.s are not lUKtitutcd tbereon in ac- 
oordancc witb tbe foregoin;; provisions, the carrier bhall not be lieble. 

12. Tt ip hereby aprrccd that Tho property dcstinod to such foreign 
rountrio« and ii.-.s«>h.-;alilo wiih foreign governmental or cu.stoms flutic; , 
I ^xes or char««.«. nuiy hn . toppod in trän it at foreign ports, frontiers or 
<|e[><)sii';ri«s, :iii(! therc held pendin;; examination, a- .<e.v.sinent.s aud Poy.: 
nients. aurj sutli dutics and charges. when advanced by the Company bhall 
bocouie 4. liuu ou tbe property. 



To DesllDAtion OSos 




"tCc^t^^ÄX^ 



t- - -» • f Y " " ■ • * • * • ' 

" — f\\ \ R gETTHIITp^Jr 



.i i ■» k /i 



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or NüD-A£enc7 Destioatioo 




Name of Forwwdlng Offlre- 



(S51-D) Eii0iewood, N.J. 



Artide 



L>ubcripiloo 






Shippcr 



Sbipper's Stre 



V OUIDDCD» 




PREPAID 

(Original) 



SHIPPER'S PREPAID RECEIPT 

NOTEy— Tlie Company will not pay over $10. In cast? of loss. or 50 cents per pound, actual weight, for any 
Shipmect in excess of 100 potLnds, unless a greaLer value is declarcd and charges for such greater value pald. 

Hadl-w AY Express Aoency 



INCüRPORATED 



Rccelved sbipmcnt described berecn, suDject to tbe Classificatious and Tariffs In effect on the date bercof, t«1u« 
bereia deciared by yhipper to be that enternd in space hereoii readlng "Declared Value," which the Company 
agrees to carry lipon tbe terms and conditions printed hereon, to wtiich the Shlpper agrees and aa evidenc» 
thereof acccpUä this receipt. 




^ 



IJ 



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ll 



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1^ 0««UutloB OOke 



^[ J ' " * >,!!f 'f V*' * '^' 'X. ' ^ 



mm^'-mm^\t Mi m Big j »!><w»— ^^■»■www^ 




n»»**pw^p#wp»»<!r^"^ 



CMifliene« 



V" 



S t/ '»• K. ■ .■SIN. 



^ 






Street Address or Non-Ae«ncy Dcstinalion>- 

Y-C 7 









105 



Receipt Number 



■4^ 
4' 



Name üf Forwarding Office- 



3.9 «-33^02 



/J5T-D) Englew/ood, N. J. 



^ I' 




riK«-! 



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▲rtlcle 



tv 






, Descriplioi^ ./ 



BbTpper 






r 






Shlpper's Street Address, 



Jy-: 



.v 



1 - 



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<-i.A.^>r'-^''^'.-^f 



B^iptfortolleC' 

■mmifTfCtiarges 

Prepaid 



ccl^ccd Valüc, 



Dccl^ccd 



Welgbt 



/ / Y 



Cia» I Paid Beyond 
XX J XXX 



^Wfl 



W or Rate 



Price^ by 



Value C.\itiXfe% 



I 



Exyress Cuärgea 



i T- 



) ^.* >. 



'i&efrigeraiion Chargea 



Lax 



} 



Storage 



Total 






TT (STD. 



raymcnt received by BiVILWAY EXPRÄSS AOENCY, Inc. for charges eutcrc^ btreon. 



.*.■ /n l-i.i-' ■/-:■ • 



■'I 



C. O. D. Service CUarge 
(Fönn"6ü83) 




*'k* 



For thc Company 



t 






.xVILWAV KXPRESS AgENCY 

To DestlnatloQ Offlee 



Röcelpt for Ch/fÖJs.SN^o'^^cted From Consignee 

Reoelpl Namb«c 



Consisnee 



g, '^.e.cJßjC 



Btrcei Address cT Non .\Keii£;y Destiikatloo 



WTcJtJu^ -c Cx 







/ 3001 \ 

\ 8-50 / 

Printed in U.S.A. 



Thank you — We appreciate your patronage. 



i^'.2^.^}fL 



.Hour 



rsf 



/yr^ 3 



C. 0. D. £cr?icti Ciiafies 



löTAL 



tJCP 



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JUN 5 



HOWE 




FRENKEL & CO., Inc. 

E'GHTY MAIDEN LANE 



COVERAGE 



MAY 9, ^9kQ - f^lNE ARTS FLÜATER 
COVER ING ANYWHERE IN THE CITY 
OF NEW YORK 



AMOUNT 



PREMIUM 



800. 



12.00 



PAID BY CHECK NO. 



MTGEE; 



DATE., 



/i^ mi li^ 



lt\\^ vj^fU COLlw" "^''^ 






1 ' It' 10 



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Püone 837-4210 FRANCIS SCHWARZ & SON 

SCHWARZ HARDWARE 

GENERAL HARDWARE &■ PAINTS 

1338 Teancck Rdi 5«^« Englcwoodj N* J. 07666 



Uolc 



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Sold to 
Adflrvi*« 



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HUbbard 7-5780 



presentations and awards 

DOLACK & DOLACK 

engraving and engroved products 

185 main street 
Hackensack, New Jersey 



ifomers 
ler No 






Dafe 




iress- 



>LD BY 



CASH 



C. 0. D. 



CHARGE 



ON ACCT. 



MOSE. RETD. PAID OUT 



janJity 



DESCRIPTICN 



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All claims and retumed soods MU5T be accompamed by tbis bill. 



Rec d hy 




Fhones 836 



3160 
3161 




TEANECK LUMBER & SUPPLY CO. 



ROOFING 

SASH 

DOORS 

MILLWORK 

TRIM 

SCREENS 



BUILDING MATERIALS 

WATER STREET & WEST SHORE R. R. 

TEANECK, N. J. 07666 



CEMENT 
LIME 

ROCKLATH 
PLASTER 
BRICK 
SEWER PIPE 



Customer's 
Order No.» 



M. 



Address. 



.Date,. 



^M i>ö — ' i^yic . iic 




r SOLD BY 


CASH 


C. 0. D. 


CHARGE 


ON ACCT. 


MDSE. RETD. 


PAID OUT 


^ 


QUAM. 


DESCRIPTION 


PRICE 


AMOUNT 


^ 


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€ ■ ^ . ^ . . . ä i -^ 




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All Claims and returned goods MUST be accompanied by this bill. 

Ko.D 2490 



Received by. 



Aoon« Z>atafr*phla Butln««* Syatams, Inc., South HackanMck, N. J. 



Form AR 58 





CiffircaiTW/iUe 'pinea and ^/le y^ardst^ooda a SfieciaÜy 




INDUSTRIAL LUHBCR 
SPECIAL WOOOWORKINa :.^ 
ORY KILNS 




BERCO. C 3039 



FULTON STREET • PATERSON, N.J. 07509 

Area Code 201-742 8300 



Name L^ /f/'f^ 




y-Datey— ^ 




/A 



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Address 



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Delivered 




tt 



Customer 
Order No. 



Shop Order No. 



FOR DEDUCTION WILL NOT BE ALLOWED UNLESS REPORTED WITHIN 3 DAYS AFTER DELIVERY OF MATERIALS 



7/ .^'c^ 3Ve./xyq ..y 




Received by 



CENTER LUMBER COMPANY 

85 Fulton Street, Paterson, N. J. 07509 Area Code 201-742-8300 



• « 



OT 



ASE SIGN AND RETURN YEI.LO^ 



» r r" ^^, 'wO 'v.'' i 



L-'O R 



VERIFICATION CF YOUR ORDE 



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IN 



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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION \ 



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PEKTINEN 



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O YOÜR ORDER 



WORK V/ILL PROCEED üi^N RECEIPT OE 



^-^ 



EQUIRED COPY 




CODE 516, WELLS 5-8780 
CABLE: AVSHAW 



AVNET SHAW 



MEMBER OF 

THE AVNET INC. COMPLEX 



COMMERCIAL STREET • ENGINEERS HILL • PLAINVIEW, L.I., N.Y. 



RECEIVEDFROM _ DATE... 



ADDRESS 



Y'^^'fc'^-"'^:^ 



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..,.........]..... 






PHONE 




DEPOSIT. 



BILLING # WT.: 



MODEL 
ESTIMATE 
MOLD 




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CASTING .^.. 

WAX 



DELIVERY DATE / 




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NO. OF VWES. 



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SHIPVIA 
CHASE 



t-f',"'"-^ 





PATINA. 
MOUNT. 



Clients' modeis, designs, wax direct modeis, and other 
property left at or sent to the Avnet-Shaw premises are 
accepted entirely at the clients' risk. Those desiring 
protection are advised to arrange insurance at their own 
expense. 



RECEIPT # C 



^858 



Modern Art Foundry, Inc. 

18-TO 41ST STREET 
LONO ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 11105 

(212) 728-2030 



<^:ei«w^8k:;^^:^^> 



jmmm. 






-:-Lji.r n 1 . - I ■• ■ •-- • • • ■ ■ '^ *V- -f--' • IIb ■ . ■ I ■ > > * -«^ . 



fci ® 



August 1, 1969 



Mrs. Erna Weill 
886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, New Jersey 



Dear Mrs. Weill: 



The cost to cast and finish in bronze the 12" high head 
of Dr. Pauling will be S250.00. 

Thank you for giving us the opportunity of quoting you a 
price. Hoping to hear from you in the near future. 



JCS:bl 



Sincerely , 

nODEEIJ A51? FOUNDRY, INC. 





n C. 









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SOLD BY 



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ON ACCT. 1 MOSE. RETD. PÄD GUT 



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ALL CLAIMS AND RETURNED GOOOS MUST B£ ACCOM-ANicO EY THIS ÜLL 



1 b 6 1 ** Received by 




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H. SCHABERG 



DI 2-6358 





To HACKENSACK 
BLUE PRINT SHOP, or 

Architects and Ettgineers Supplies 

Blue Prints • Photostat Prints • B & W Prints 

108 Anderson Street HACKENSACK. N. J. 



Cusfomer's 
Order 




:z^ 



Phorie 
.No 



-Dafe. 



<^'/>-/ 196-^ 



/ 



Address 




Please keep this copy for reference. 



Total 



3051 



Rec'd by 



MILLER REGISTER COMPANY, INC.. 



V 




280 c/infon p/ace • hackensack • ne\A/ Jersey • hubbarc/ 7-35/6 






/^^^^^ ? 







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33 .(To 




ff tiaViS • 2dO c/infon place • hacken sack* new Jersey • hubbarof 7-35/6 




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11870 
GOODMAN'S HARDWARE CO. 

Hardware -- Gifts — Houseware 

1415 QUEEN ANNE RD. WEST ENGLEWOOD. N. J. 

TEaneck 7-7465 6 . // (^ 



A mepioan 
Hardufare 



STOiwaa / J 

// / 



4^ *T 




ALL CLAIMS AND RETURNEII GC^DS MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY THIS BILL 



Rec'd By. 



R60709 



AUTOMATIC BUSINESS PRODUCTS CO., HARTFORD. CONN. 



Phone 837-4210 FRANCIS SCHWARZ & SON 

SCHWARZ HARDWARE 

GENERAL HARDWAm & PAINTS 
1358 Teuncik RtL W, Englewoodj Nj J. 07666 



Suld 



D«le__ 



//-^/'- 



ly 



AdHrt 







STATEMENT 



*'The First Aid Store far the Home'' ^ 



319-321 Queen Anne Road - Teaneck, N.J. 07666 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES TEancck 6-4991 GARDENING SUPPLIES 

FACTORY SUPPLIES ^ HOUSEWARES 

HARDWARE _ - /l PAINTS 

SHADE8 ^\'0/t / / / ' /l // GLASS 



DATE 



'^m^Mu 




V Kt ,C Jl£fj<./L k. A ^" 







PLEASE DETACH AND RETURN WITH YOUR REMITTANCE 



DESCRIPTION 



CHARGES 



CREDITS 



BALANCE 



AMOUNTS FORWARDED 




LUDEWIGS HARDWARE 

319-321 QUEEN ANNE ROAD - TEANECK, N.J. 07666 



PLEASE PAY 

LAST AMOUNT 

IN THIS COlUMN 




Phone 836-4991 




M 



LUDEWMC'S HJtRBWMRE 

HARDWARE - HOUSE FURNISHINGS - PAINTS - GLASS 

INDUSTRIAL AND JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 

319-321 QUEEN ANNE ROAD TEANECK, N. J. 0?,666 

nntA j ' --3 1 



Customer's 
Order No.. 




/r 



Add 



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ress. 



v\ 



/ SOLD BY 



1 



CASH 



C. O. D. 



CHARGE 



ON ACCT. 



MDSE. RETD. 



PAID OUT 



QUAM. 



DESCRIPTION 



PRICE 



AMOUNT 






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All Claims and returned goods MUST be accompanied by this bill. 

No. C 539 2 i^^'^'v^d by 



Form AR 58 



Acnie UatuKraphic ini-snics» s>sifm», Inc., Souili Hio-'ki-iikac'k, N. J. 





Phone 836-4991 

LUDEWMC'S HURDWURE 

HARDWARE - HOUSE FURNISHINGS - PAINTS - GLASS 

INDUSTRIAL AND JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 

319-321 QUEEN ANNE ROAD TEANECK, N. J. 07666 



Customer'$ 
Order No 



M. 






.Date,. 



5 




(1 



Address. 



SOLD BY 



CASH 



:. O. AkJ^lrtKRGE 



ON ACCT. 



MDSE. RETD. 



QUAN.^ 



/ 




DESCRIPTION 



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^ryi' 




PAID OUT 



PRICE 



AMOUNT 



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No. 



1009 



All Claims and returned goods MUST be accompanied by this bil 

Received by 



Form AR 58 



Acma DataKraphic Buiinaia Syitams. Inro., South HaokanaacK, i». ■<. 





Phone 836-4991 

LUDEWiC'S HüRDWaRE 

HARDWARE - HOUSE FURNISHINGS - PAINTS - 6LASS 

INDUSTRIAL AND JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 

319-321 QUEEN ANNE ROAD TEANECK, N. J. 07666 



Customer's 
Order No. 




Date,. 



6// 



.19. 



/^ 



Address. 



No. 



? ir'C ^ <i>'/^A..<.,././f 



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Ali ciaims and returned goods MUST be accompanied b/ this bil 

Received by 



1383 



Form AR 58 



Aetna Uatagraphic Buslnaii Syitcms, Iiro., Soulh HackanaacK, im. ■*, 



STATEMENT 



'*The First Aid Stare for the Home'' 



ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

FACTORY SUPPLIES 

HARDWARE 



319-321 Queen Anne Road - Teaneck, N.J 

TEancck 6-4991 



07666 



SHADES 



"^<2y ^le^^^ 



GARDENING SUPPLIES 

HOUSEWARES 

PAINTS 

GLASS 



rr^ ^^A 



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PLEASE DETACH AND RETURN WITH YOUR REMITTANCE / A 



vk/// ,o/;- 



DATE 



DESCRIPTION 



CHARGES 



CREDITS 



AMOUNTS FORWAROEO 



LUDEWIGS HARDWARE 

319-321 QUEEN ANNE ROAD - TEANECK, N.J. 07666 



BALANCE 




PLEASE PAY 

LAST AMOUNT 

IN THIS COLUMN 




Phone 836-4991 




LUDEWIC'S HßJRDWMRSS 

HARDWARE - HOUSE FURNISHfNGS - PAINTS - GLASS 
INDUSTRIAL AND JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 

319-321 QUEEN ANNE ROAD TEANECK. N. J. 07666 



Customer's 
Order No.. 



l 




M. 



Ad. 



~~W77W 



.Date,. 



vZ^ 



.19 




Address. 



^^6 ci.yji'H^ /J'^ ■ 



SOLD BY 



QUAM. 



I 



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Form AR 58 



CASH 



C. O. D. 



r 



ON ACCT. 



MOSE. RETD. 



desCription 






7 — '/-;' / 




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PAID OUT 



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All Claims and returned goods MUST be accompanied by this bill. 
No. ^ 4 Ü 1 Received by 



\cmo Datai;rii^liic Buüinps» System», Inc., South HackensacK iX. J. 



AMOUNT 



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7 



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7o 



SV 



7»-/^ 



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Phone 836-4991 




LUDEWIC'S HRRDWJIEE 

HARDWARE - HOUSE FURNISHINGS - PAINTS - 6LASS 
INDUSTRIAL AND JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 

319-321 QUEEN ANNE ROAD TEANECK. N. J. 07666 



Customer's 
Order No.. 



M. 



AA 



{ I 



# 



.Date, 




.,£i 



Address. 



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No. 



All Claims and returned goods MUST be accompanied by this bili. 



Z'l 



Received by. 



Form AR 58 



..■m,< r tl.ii; rjtiliic l-'i>p -N -«jsUnis. lue, S'-iitli II 'kruHiicl-., N. J. 



487-2955 



489-4241-2 



2 15021 



HARDWARE "TOOLS MNTS 

FACTORY AND CCiiTRACTOiv SUPPLIES 

248-252 RIVER STREET 




MERCHANDISF. NOT RE t WITHuUr TH ; - ^iXi-'. 

WE WILL CHEERFULLV ■■.. . Y O LJ R MOSIEY \lJRN :D IN 5 D 

CLAIMS ON ERROR OR SHORTAGE. MUST ßE Rt ^^IMEOl 



\ 



Phone CAnal 6-7452 

AAODELING CLAYS 
POTTERY CLAYS 
SCULPTORS' SUPPLIES 
CERAAAIC MATERIAL 
KILNS AND TOOLS 

SOLD TO 



STEWART CLA Y CD., Inc. 

133 MuLBERRY Street New York, N.Y. 10013 



DATE January 31, 19^9 

SHIPPED TO FEB 



Established 18 6 7 

PLASTICUAA 
PLASTALENA 
MODEL-LIGHT 
CLAY-CENE 
C L A Y- P LA Y 



11969 



Erna Weill Art School 

886 Alpine Drive 

Teaneck, New Jersey O7666 



Mr. Chiapelli 
Piasterer 

8th Floor 

1+3 East 20th Street 

Nev; York, New York 



Cust. Order No. 



Order No. 



9632 



Dept. No. 



\ 



Only CAN No. 277 govt - bronze 



metallic plating 



P.P, & INS. WITH 
SPECIAL HANDLINa INC 



'n^{ 






^%M, 




t{a i 



Invoice No. 



4TTT 



00 



50 








^i 




50 



%M 



£/' 



STEV/ART 



GAY CO., INC. 

133 toULSEPvSi' Sr 
NEW xh\{, N. Y. lb013 




Rhone CAnal 6-7452 

MODELING CLAYS 
POTTERY CLAYS 
SCULPTORS'SUPPLIES 
CERAAAIC MATERIAL 
KILNS AND TOOLS 



STEWART CLÄY CD., Inc. 



133 MuLBERRY Street New York, N.Y. 10013 



SOLD TO 

E^na Weel 
886 Alpine Dr 
Teaneck, N.J. 07666 



DATE Nov 18 I969 
SHIPPED TO 



Established 18 6 7 

PLASTICUM 
PLAST ALENA 
MODEL-LIGHT 
CLAY-CENE 
CLAY-PLAY 



Cust. Order No. 



Order No. 15467 



Dept. No. 



Invoice No. ß 3 8 3 



100 
100 

1 
1 



I 



Jordan w/Grog Clay 
Red Clay w/Grog Clay 
10 gram Liquid Gold ^ 
5 grain " Platinum ^ 






Less 10^ 



P.P. Ins. 




1U 

1U 

h 

-3 



35 




^0 

$0 

00 

7F 

86 



3^ 



7U 



PRINICD BY THE STANDARD NEGtSlER COMPANf U.^.A. -ZIFäEfQS^ 



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l^ 



" >■ *- 






Custom Built 

FURNITURE 

for Home or Office 



KITCHEN CABINETS 
Television, Bars and Bookcases • 



CHURCH FURNITURE 
Pews, Altars, etc. 



^v 



iHaöter Craft Cabinet^Ijop i^ 




Tel. 792-1179 
Res. 865-4145 



%k} l^" 



1103 GRAND STREET^, 
Hoboken, N. J. 07030 







oraw®öe 




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DUPLICATE 



rf €taViS • 280 c/inton place •hackensQck»new Jersey • hubbarc/ 7-36/6 







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CODE 516. WELLS 5 8780 
CABLE: AVSHAW 



•f 




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I 



jjflÜ '"''''''' 



THE AVNET INC COMPLEX 



I V. 

I 



COMMERCIAL STREET • ENGINEERS HILL • PLAINVIEW, LI., N.Y. 



m^MA 



RECEIVEOFROM ; OATE.. 




^AujJ..:^.M 




.../U J, 







Nw 



DEPOSIT: BILLING #, 



WT.=, 



.1 







MODEL J^h*:^Qc^ -rrrrr.^^^J /(J^'hr^ 

ESTIMATE y^:^<r:,,,^r^iy.. ./.....^jSr...r:...i. 

MOLD ^^Ji^'ät-^i^^ 

CASTING .-^.Q^J^^L-^^ .(O _/^^ 

WAX , , NO. OFWAXES 

DELIVERYDATE 7r....C^....4Ch>rr:^..,^..-. ^..^.Ä.dC.....^.. 




: /ez) , ~ 



SHIP VIA 



o 



CHASE ^^?}:^::rzt:^^ /trA/-.. 2rr.: 



PATINA. 
MOUNT. 










Clients' modeis, designs, waydirect modeis, and othe 
propcrty left at or sent to th<rAvnet-Shaw premises are 
accepted entirely at the clients' risk. Those desiring 
protection are advised to ar ränge insurance at their own 
expense. 





• ' 




• , ■ 



TEANECK 



HOPPER 



402 CEDAR LANE 



TEANECK, N.J. 07666 



836-5871 



OCTl 1968 






B86 Alpine Dr 



07666 



Sept* [|. 



11 



Chi 



18 
18 




^2. 10 
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2.10 
2.10 
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"110.50 



ALL BILLS PAYABLE UPON PRESENTATION 



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PETER SAMMARTINO 
PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY 

RAYMOND C. LEWIN. ED. D. 

DEAN 



AFFILIATED WITH FAIRLElGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY 

ISO KOTTE PLACE. UNIVERSITY PARK 

HACKENSACK. NEW JERSEY 

836-6300 - EXT 333-4 



You Are Cordially Invited To Attend 



The Reception For The 



MODERN ARTISTS GUILD 



on 



Sunday, May 5 



from 



2:00 until 5:00 p.m. 



at 



Edward Williains College 

150 Kotte Place 
Hackensack, New Jersey 



The twenty-six artists taking part in this exhibit will have 
their works displayed at the College from May 5 through June 7. 



GRamercy 5-1021 




adolph studly, ine. 



Photographers 



407 Park Avenue South 

New York, N. Y. 10016 



Date. 



•>/lA 



1. 



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Addressing 
Prospect Lists 

MiMEOGRAPHING 




Bergen County Letter Shop 

DiRECT Mail Advertising 

ESTABLISHED 1921 

396 Cedar Lane Teaneck, N. J. 07666 

TEaneck 6-6995 



/^V6f 




V7u '9J z£ /^d^^'^-'^ 



J 



Printing 

Engraving 

Addressograph Plates 



Your Order No. 



Our Order No. 



Terms: Net 10 Davs 




cO.<^^ 




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ORIGINAL INVOICE 



No. 



'i ^ :r Ji 'i ' f 



JACK D. WOLFE COMPANY, INC 

MFRS. CERAMtC MATERIALS S EQUIPMENT 
724-734 MEEKER AVE. • BROOKLYN, N. Y. 11222 

EVergreen 7-3604-5 



l^aSÄK ERNA VffilLL 

886 Alpine Drive 
SOLD TO Teaneck, NeiJ Jersey 



L 



■ ' S I ■ Same ' 

H 

I 

P 

T 

' II SAME AS SOLD TO UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED | 



INVOICE DATE 



june 11, 1968 



DATE SHIPPED 



OUR ORDER NO. 



3707 



YOUR ORDER NO. 

phone 



VIA 



Bilkays Wo. 2-1^26 



TERMS 

net 



SALESMAN 



F.O.B. 



f actory 



Ppd. or Col 



QUANTITY 



100 "^ 






100 

^ '-nli'y 



f i 



DESCRIPT ION 



COordan Clay, po'wdei'' 
Medium Grog 
Barnard Clay '^ 
Brown Grog Clay racist 
Buff " ^' »» 

Grams Liquid Pri^^ht Gold 



Home.. Phone 201- 837-1627 

To äend lotter menttoning rucker, aä 
Mrs Weill can call them and arran^^e for 
time of doli e^ry. • . . 

Have Trucker mako dellvery on Monday, June 17 
to make sure thatsomeone is home..... ^ 



PRICE 



.2^ 
.25 

13.00 

13.00 

?.5o 



Le,3 3 10/ 



-^ 



Total. .. 



bh and cal'. 






'V 



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Your Order vr s pi cke^l up Friday juno 1)4. 1968 
V/e"wröte fdr the t rucker to r^-et in toiv-h Ihh Jrou a na the 
deliver> ^p Monday.... If any nuostiors: 

VoTircan call the N.Y. office Bilkays - Woj^-l?OC 

Hewp-^' " - <5 6?:rT?2^ 

/ 




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"^ller rcpfesents that with respect to Ihe production ol the articl« and/of the scnrices lovcred by this invoice, it has fully complicd with the V«»'»'on$ of Ihe Fair Labor Standards Act ol 1938, at amcndcd. " 




n 



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AMOUNT 



1.25 

1.25 

1.25 

13.00 

13.00 

2.50 

T2T25" 

3.22 



(4' 



."•29.03 



e. 



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k-^H^f-^^^4^ 



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BILKÄYS EXPRESS CO. 

AFFILIATED WITH JERSEY COAST FREIGHT 

DATE FROM 

6 ik 6^ 




303 SOUTH ST., NEWARK, N. J. 07114 
(201) 643-1200 (212) 732-4922 



SERVICE THAT IS SUPERIOR 



No. E581551 

JACK WXrt CO INC 72^ 73*4 MltKt« AVtBKtrN 



TO 



NO. PCS. 



IBHk WtiLt 886 AM»iNt Ogi¥t fl^MUCK 



k 
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50 LB CüNS CCAV 

CTü cur 

SOi 837 i^T 

DUIVtRY MQflDAY OML TO HAKe SUffC 



WEICHT 



200 

tÖ 



RATE 



C.O.D. $ 



t 1 1;:? 



v...^.M ALLOWEH hnlESS WE ARE NOTJFIED OF DAMAGE WITHIN 48 HOURS. 




SPECIFY ^^ßdkcMl • ÜeMeu CooAt^' on every order 

f y 9 CONSIGNEIS MEi 



MEMO 



*7kaKk you 



® 



PACKING SLIP No. 

JACK D. WOLFE COMPANY, INC. 

MFRS. CERAMIC MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT 
724-734 MEEKER AVE. • BROOKLYN, N. Y. 11222 

EVergreen 7-3604-5 



3707 



r; 



i%; I 



SOLD TO 



ERNA WEIIX 

886 Alpine Drlv# 

Teaneck^ New Jersey 



Same 



~i 



L 



f SAME AS SOLD TO UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED | 



INVOICE DATE 



DATE SHIPPED 



Jime 11^ 1968 



QUANT ITY 



$ Ib« 
100 • 

100 " 

5 n^y 



OUR ORDER NO. 

3707 



YOUR ORDER NO. 

phone 



VIA 



Bllkays Wo.2-1226 



SALESMAN 



F.O.B. 



faotory 



Ppd. or Coli. 



DESCRI PTION 



^rden Clay, powder 
HedlUM Grog 
Barnard Clay " 
Brown Orog Cley meist 
Buff • ^ • 
OraiBS Liquid Brlß:ht Oold 



::::::::::: 
::::h::::: 



Horae^.pfone ?01- 837^16?7 

To Äend letter mentlonlng rucker^ se 
Mrs w#lll oan cell them and arrancje for 
tlme cf dell^ery..«» 

H«ve Trucker »ako dellvery on Monday^ June 17 
to make aure thatarmeone la home«««*« 







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RETURNS: POSmVELY NO GOODS 

□ ORDER COMPLCTE □ BAUNCE TO FOLLOW 

PACKED BY 



E ACCEPTED FOR CREDIT UNLESS OUR PERMISSION TO RE 

NOTIFY US IMMEDIATELY IF ERROR IS FOUND IN SHIPME 






UCH GOODS IS FIRST SECURED IN WRITING. 



DATE 



Phone CAnal 6-7452 

MODELING CLAYS 
POTTER Y CLAYS 
SCULPTORS' SUPPLIES 
CERAMIC AAATERIAL 
KILNS AND TOOLS 



STEWART CLAY CO., kc. 

133 MuLBERRY Street New York, N.Y. 10013 

DATE Dec. 6, 1968 



Established 18 6 7 

P L A S T I C U M 
PLASTALE NA 
MODEL-LIGHT 
C L A Y - C E N E 
CLAY-PLAY 



SOLD TO 

Mrs, Erma Weil 
886 Alpine Dr 
TeanecTC/ N.J. 



SHIPPED TO 

Miss Susan Weil 
7774 Litchfield Dr 
Mentor, Ohio 44060 



Cust. Order No. 



Order No. 



8355 



Dept. No. 



1 

1 

1 
1 
1 



Set ES - 1 

Dozen 9D Copper Shape 

Dozen 1 *• 

Dozen 22 •• 

Dozen 25 •• 



II 
II 



II 



p.p. INS 



Invoice No. 



8 
1 




00 
40 
40 
75 
80 



35 
35 



3 5 27- 




70 




I 1 



Phone CAnal 6-7452 

MODELING C L A Y S 
POTTER Y CLAYS 
SCULPTORS'SUPPLIES 
CERAMIC AAATERIAL 
KILNS AND TOOLS 



STEWART CL AV CD., jnc. 

133 MuLBERRY Street New York, N.Y. 10013 



SOLD TO 

Erna Weill Art School 

886 Alpine Drive 

Teaneck» New Jersey 



DATE Oct. 7, 1968 
SHIPPED TO 



Established 18 6 7 

P L A ST I CU M 
PLASTALENA 
MODEL-LIGHT 
C L A Y . C E N E 
C L A Y-P LA Y 



Cust. Order No. 



Order No. 



6753 



Dept. No. 



only 



5-GRAM 



Bright Gold 





Invoice No. 



1918 



75 




»6 



a^ 



75 



/o 




DOLACK AND DOLACK, ENGRAVERS 

185 Main Street 

Hackensack , New Jersey - 07601 



(20,1) 487-5780 



Vi4- 



Name 



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Artlcle 




Purchased At 



Phone 



r,./- /69'j 



ENGRAVING INSTRUCTIONS, 



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Date Recelved 



Est.Cost 



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PHOTCGRAPHER 

140, 7tb AVE., N. Y; 10011 

WA 4-0394 



Sold 
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Ji"! .P(^ 2 



DATE 




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SALESMAN 



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AD 70 



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GRamercy 5-1021 




adolph studly, ine. 



Photographers 



407 Park Avenue South 

New York, N. Y. 10016 



Date- 





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adolph studly, ine. 



Photographers 



407 Park Avenue South, 

NEW YORK 1 6, N. Y. 



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ADDRESS 

CITY & STATE 







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INVOICENO. 
Telephone GR 5-1021 

advertising 
architecture 
ort & sculpture 
color 

THIS IS YOUR INVOICE 

PLEASE RETAIN. IT WILL 

NOT BE REITEMIZED. 



6331 




DATE OF ORDER 



QUANTITY 



// 



SIZE 



^k(^ 



CUSTOMER NO. 



ORIGINAL 



GLOSSY 



MATTES 



ENLARGEMENTS 



MOUNTING 



COLOR TRANSPARENCY 



COLOR ORIG. PRINT 



COLOR DUPL. PRINT 



COLOR SLIDES 



OROERED BY 



DESCRIPTION 




'>^W^^/o 



GLOSSY 



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140/ ^iii Avo, N. Y. loon 
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AD 7e 



Addressing 
Prospect Lists 

MiMEOGRAPHING 



Beugkn County Letter Shop 

DiRECT Mail Advertising 
established 1921 

396 Cedar Lane Teaneck, N. J. 

TEaneck 6-6993 

:^:]Bli:.iAI•:y 17, 1967 



Printing 

Engraving 

Addressograph Plates 



Your Order No. 



]-l3s liJrna Vi o 111 
Alpi^^^^ Terr. 



Our Order No. 



Terms: Net 10 Days 



mim 0!-:B-ptiev-. luriii;^ 



n. j 







2.50 
.00 



j;; 2.Ö8 





SOLD TO _Z^ 
ADDRESS _ 
CITY & STATE - 



adolph studly, ine. 

Photographers 407 Park Avenue South, 

NEW YORK 1 6, N. Y. 






6583 



DATE OF ORDER 



QUANTITY 



:i 



SIZE 




INVOICE NO. 
Telephone GR 5-1021 

advertising 

architecture / 

ort & sculpture />- ^. 

color /^ ^ ^ 



7-<ia<i>*^L^l^ f // 



THIS IS YOUR INVOICE 

PLEASE RETAIN. IT WIU 

NOT BE REITEMIZED. 



ORIGINAL 



iü 



GLOSSY 



DESCRIPTION 






PRICE 



AMOUNT 




rt efavis • 280 c/mton place • hackensQck • new Jersey • hubbarc/ 7-35/6 







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OFFICE COPY 



RHO NE 
GLenview 6-4500 



j. j. CRESS CO. OF N. j. 

Ma nufocturers of Precision Sheet Metal Parts and Metal Fabrications - Electric Kilns 
Office ancJ Plant: Rt. 130 & Lincoln Ave. - W. Collingswood Hgts., N. J. 

Mailing Address: Box 67, Collingswood, N. J. 



INVOICE NO. 



8087 



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V-„.^ ii 



'«» ^- *' 



1 



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Sold To 



Erna ^j^eill 
aculptur« Studio 
8ö6 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck 



DATE 



QUANTITY 



P.O. NUMBER 

12/27/66 



DRAWING NUMBER 



Complete lld 



3-15 



JHT. 




»• "-ifc % ■ *■ ^. 



^4 



Shipped To 

1/27 • 67 

we are shipping in approx 2 wks 

We would apprec your check by tiien. 

Um ütevenbon 



SHIP VIA 



TERMS 



NET 30 DAYS 



ESCRIPTION 



Packing 




UNIT PRICE 



K.J. iiilBB Tax 



AMOUNT 



33.58 
1.00 



34.58 
1.04 



O O 



35.62 



The Seiler represenis i. has fully complled with the provisions of th. Fair Labor Standards Act o. 1938, os omended, in the manufocture of good> Cover«) by thi, invoice. 



n.J. 




417 CEDAR LANE 



ESTABLISHED 1937 



P. O. BOX 7 



SOLD AND/OR SHIPPED TO 

r 

Xvz. Vv'ejll 

886 Alpine Drive 

TeanecK, New Jersey 



TEANECK, N. J. 



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SHIP TO 

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TELEPHONE 
(201) 836-3450 



DATE 



. 5/6/67 



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CUST. ORDER NO. 



QUAN. 
ORDERED 



2Ü0 



DATE OF ORDER 



?-6-67 



SALESMAN 



TERMS 

NET 30 DAYS 
F.O.B. SHIPPING POINT 



CATALOG NO. 



Lb. 



DESCRIPTION 



Jordon Buff with Cray 



CARTONS 



QUAN. 
SHIPPED 





Sales Tax 



200 



UNIT PRICE 



INVOICE NO. 

37397 



EXTENSION 



10.00 



per 50 I-'^ 



)4.0.00 



7Y7V^ 



i'^O: 



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1.20 



TOTAL 



.20 



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ORIGINJ^L iNVOlCE-PLEASE RETURN PUPLiqTE ^pPY WI^H PAYM^hi 



ITEMS 

ORDERED^ 

BUT NOT 

SHIPPED 

HAVE BEEN 

lACK ORDERED 



NO CREDIT WILL BE ALLOWED FOR GOODS RETURNED WITHOUT OUR PERMISSION^ 
A?L PR?CES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR 
GOODS DAMAGED IN TRANSIT. 

ALL CLAIMS MUST BE MADE WITHlN FIVE DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF GOODS. 



PLEASE RAY THIS INVOICE 
NO STATEMENTS MAILED 





ü. 



TELEPHONE 
(201) 836-3450 



ESTABLISHED 1937 






417 CEDAR LANE P. O. BOX 7 


TEANECK. N. J. 




SOLD AND/OR SHIPPED TO 


"1 


SHIP TO 

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886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, New Jersey 







DATE 



■ 3A/67 



1 



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CUST. ORDER NO. 



QUAN. 
ORDERED 



DATE OF ORDER 



^£^ 



CATALOG NO. 



SALESMAN 



TERMS 

NET 30 DAYS 
F. OB. SHIPPING POINT 



DESCRIPTION 



CARTONS 



QUAN. 
SHIPPED 



UNIT PRICE 



INVOICE NO. 

37397 



EXTENSION 



TOTAL 



200 



Lb. 



Jordon ßuff with Gray 



200 



10.00 



per 50 I'b» 



PLEASE 



Sales Tax 



RETURN THIS COPY WITH P^YA^ENT. TfHANK 



14.0.00 



1.20 



1+1.20 



YOU 



ITEMS 
ORDERED^ 
BUT NOT 
SHIPPED 
HAVE BEEN 
'BACK ORDERED 



NO CREDIT WILL BE ALLOWED FOR GOODS RETURNED WITHOUT OUR PERMISSION. 
ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR 
GOODS DAMAGED IN TRANSIT. 

ALL CLAIMS MUST BE MADE WITHIN FIVE DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF GOODS. 



DUPLICATE 
INVOICE 






— _ ESTABLISHED 1837 


- 




417 CEDAR LANE P. O. BOX 7 


TEANECK, N. J. 




SOLD AND/OR SHIPPED TO 




SHIP TO 


r 


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-— — 


Mrs. 'vVelll 






886 AlT)ine Drive 






Teaneck, New Jersej 







DATE 



TELEPHONE 
(201 ) 836-3450 




/.- r 



5/20/67 



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SHIP VIA • 



CUST. ORDER NO. 



QUAN. 
ORDERED 



200 



DATE OF ORDER 



r ;""Q-67 



CATALOG NO. 



Lb. 



SALESMAN 



TERMS 

NET 30 DAYS 
F. OB. SHIPPING POINT 



DESCRIPTION 



Jordon Cuff wlth ?xi^^ 




CARTONS 



QUAN. 
SHIPPED 



lOOlb 



f^<A'^ 



Sales Tax 



UNIT PRICE 



12.9 

per G 



5 



INVOICE NO. 

37605 



/^ 



EXTENSION 



TOTAL 





13.34 




ORIGINAL INVOICE --PLEASE RETURN DUPLIC/fTE ^pPY WIlfH PAYM^NT 



ITEMS 

ORDERED"" 

BUT NOT 

SHIPPED 

HAVE SEEN 

BACK ORDERED 



NO CREDIT WILL BE ALLOWED FOR GOODS RETURNED WITHOUT OUR PERMISSION. 
ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANCE WITHOUT NOTICE. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR 
GOODS DAMAGED IN TRANSIT. 

ALL CLAIMS MUST BE MADE WITHIN FIVE DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF GOODS. 



PLEASE PAY THIS INVOICE 
NO STATEMENTS MAILED 






TELEPHONE 
(201) 836-3450 



417 CEDAR LANE 



ESTABLISHCD 1937 



P. O. BOX 7 



DATE 



TEANECK, N. J. 



3/23/67 



SOLD AND/OR SHIPPED TO 

r 

8ci6 Al--^'i)3e '')id .-e 



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SHIP TO 

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Ship Prlday 
9Am to 2o^ clock 



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New Jerse^/ 



U7666 



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SHIP VIA • 



CUST. ORDER NO. 



QUAM. 
ORDERED 



DATE OF ORDER 



/2 



0/5? 



CATALOG NO. 



SALESMAN 



TERMS 

NET 30 DAYS 
F. OB. SHIPPING POINT 



DESCRIPTION 



CARTONS 



QUAN. 
SHIPPED 



UNIT PRICE 



INVOICE NO. 

37621 



EXTENSION 



TOTAL 



lOU 



-uü. 



Jo V \o n 



Fack Cr der 



•Suff with Gr':^y 



R-23 



R 



asps 



Sales Tax 



100 



12.95 

per C 

2.95 

each 



h%h4A^ 




ORIGINf^L INVOICE -PLEASE RETURN DUPLiqTE "pPY WI1[h PAYM^NT 



12.95 




19.^2 



ITEMS 
ORDERED^ 
BUT NOT 
SHIPPED 
HAVE BEEN 
ACK ORDERED 



NO CREDIT WILL BE ALLOWED FOR GOODS RETURNED WITHOUT OUR PERMISSION. 
ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANCE WITHOUT NOTICE. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR 
GOÖDS DAMAGED IN TRANSIT. 

LCLAIMS MUST BE MADE WITHIN FIVE DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF GOODS. 



PLEASE RAY THIS INVOICE 
UO STATEMENTS MAILED 



. ü 




417 CEDAR LANE 



ESTABLISHED 1937 



P. O. BOX 7 



SOLD AND/OR SHIPPED TO 

r 

Krs. Weill 

8öD Alpine Drive 

Teaneck, New Jersey 




TEANECK, N. J. 



1 



TELEPHONE 
(201) 836-3450 



DATE . 



5 -icfc^ 



SHIP TO 

r 



n 



L_ 



J 



L 



j 



SHIP VIA • 



CUST. ORDER NO. 



QUAN. 
ORDERED 



200 



DATE OF ORDER 



^-20-67 



CATALOG NO. 



Ib. 



SALESMAN 



TERMS 

NET 30 DAYS 
F. OB. SHIPPING POINT 



DESCRIPTION 



GOVK-^CTSTJ INVOICS -f/yj^^l 



Jordon :juff with Grog* 



Sales Tax 



CARTONS 



QUAN. 
SHIPPED 




ORIGINJM INVOICE-PLEASE RETURN DUPLigTE "pPY WI^H PAYM^NT 



UNIT PRICE 



12.95 

per C 



INVOICE NO. 

37609 



EXTENSION 



25.90 



.81 



TOTAL 



26.71 

ä5? 



'ZPU^ 




ITEMS 

ORDERED^ 

BUT NOT 

SHIPPED 

HAVE BEEN 

'BACK ORDERED 



NO CREDIT WILL BE ALLOWED FOR GOODS RETURNED WITHOUT OUR PERMISSION. 
ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANCE WITHOUT NOTICE. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR 
GOODS DAMAGED IN TRANSIT. 

ALL CLAIMS MUST BE MADE WITHIN FIVE DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF GOODS. 



PLEASE PAY THIS INVOICE 
NO STATEMENTS MAILED 





^ .-t 



PURNITURE 

STATIONERY 

ART SUPPLIES 

PRINTING 



//It^ fCA.^n^A:^ 



W. J. LINN - INC. 



417 CEDAR LANE 
TEANECK, N. J. 



TEoneck 6-3450 



DUPLICATING & 

ADOING MACHINES 

TYPEWRITERS 

SALES & SERVICE 




PLEASE PAY FROM THIS INVOICE. NO STATEMENTS RENDERED. 



11078 



ALL Claims and returned goods 
MUST be accompanied by this bill. 



Received by 



W. ,1, LINN. INC.. TKAM ' K, N. J. 





ESTADLISHFn 1937 



417 CEDAR LANE 



P O BOX 7 



Ü. 



TEANECK. N J. 07666 



SOLD AND/OR SHIPPED TO 

r 

Mr. '^^rna ./eil]. 
886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, New Jersey 07666 



n 



SHIP TO 

r 



TELEPHONE 
(201) 836-3450 



DATE 



11-16-67 



n 



L_ 



J 



L 



J 



SHIP VIA • 



SALESMAN 




TERMS 

NET 30 DAYS 
F. OB. SHIPPING POINT 



DESCRIPTION 



ffiorclon Bui^f vvith Med» Grog 




less lO'fo 






ransportation 



CARTONS 



QUAN. 
SHIPPED 



200 



INVOICE NO. 

41724 



UNIT PRICE 



7-50 
per 507r 



Sales i'ax 








^1 e^^ 







i\<^ 




--a; 



//.6r' 




EXTENSION 



30.00 



3.00 



27 .00 
4.00 



.93 



:^ 



'-.IC 



mcc 



NO CREDIT WILL BE AI LOWED FOR GOODS RETURNED WITHOUT OUR PERMISSION. 
ALL PRICES SUBJFCT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR 
GOODS DAMAGED IN TRANSIT. 

ALL CLAIMS MUST BE MADE WITHIN FIVE DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF GOODS 



i ^■ 



I f» L -f 



TOTAL 



31.93 




Shipper's No.. 

Agent's c 
Carrier's 



Agent's or ) 
" No. } 



This Memorandum 



is an acknowledoment that a Bill of Lading has been issued and Is not the Original 
Bill of Lading. nor a copy or duplicate, covering the property nanied herein, and is 
intended soley for filing or record. 



.19- 



PHONES: 

PHILA.. PA. -WA 3-1210 

LINDENWOLD. N.J. - ST 3-2013 



CLENDINING EXPRESS 

101 N. LINDEN AVENUE 
UNDENWOLD. NEW JERSEY 08021 



% LCC MC 636 

RADIO DiSPATCHED UNITS 



RECEIVED, subject to the classifications and tariffs in effect on the date of the receipt by the carrier of the property described In the Original Bill of Lading, 

kh« proiortr deaerlbcd below, In «pparAnt (ood order, «xecot »• DOt«d (oont*ntt and oondltlon of eontant* of packacM onknown), marked, eonifcned, and daatinad aa Indicated balow. whloh Mid oompany (th* word aompAny being tmdaratood tfarouch* 
out tl '( i'iHilmr't AB meaning any peraon or oorpor«tion in poiBesaicn of tha property under the oontraet) acreeo to earry to Ha uaiial place of doHvery at Miid deHtination, if on H« own road or its own watar lin«, otharwlao to dellver to another oarriw 
OD the route to aaid dastination. It U mutually agraad. aa to aaob oarriar of all or any of aaid proparty ovar all or any portion of aaid route to destinatioo, and aa to aaob party at any tima intaraatad in all or any of aald property, tbat eyery aerriM 
lo be p0rf.;rine<l baraundar ihAll ba lubjaot to all tb« oondjtlon« not probibitad by law. whathar printad or writtan, barain oontaiaed, Inoiudin« tba oonditiona on baek baraof. whiob ara baraby acraad to by tba thippar and aooaptad (or himaaU and bla aaaicaa. 



FROM 






TD 












Routing 



Delivering 
Carrier 



Vehicie No. 
Car Initial & No. 



CO.D. $ 



AND REMIT TO: 



C. 0. D. CHaRüE 

TO BE PAID BY 



SHIPPER O 

CONSIGNEE D 



No. 
Packages 



DESCRIPTION OF ARTICLES, SPECIAL MARKS, AND EXCEPTIONS 



cP^fC <:///W/ f//(/A/(r /-/D 



t ^ C , 



y 



7^ 



♦WEICHT 

(Subject to correction) 



J 



Class 
or Rate 



Check 
Column 



If charges are to be prepald, write or stamp here» 
"Tu be Prepaid." 



CHARGES 
ADVANCED: $. 



Subject to Sectlon 7 of conditions, if this shipment li 
to be delivered to the consignee without recourse on th« 
consignor, the consignor shall sign the following State- 
ment: 

The carrier shall not make delivery of this shipment 
without payment of freight and all other lawful charges. 



(Signature of Consigpor.) 



ReceiTcd $ - — ■ . 

to apply in payment of the charges on the propertf 
described hereon. 



(Carrier) 



*If the shipment moves between two ports by a carrier by water, the law requires that the bill of lading shall State whether it is "carrier's or 
shipper's weight." 

NOTE — Where the rate is dependent on valuc, shippers are required to State speciflcally in writing the agreed nr declared valuc otihe property. 
The agreed or declared value of the property is hereby specifically stated by the shipper to be not exceeding , . _Pfl r , ,jf 

Shipper 



Per 



Per. 



(Signature here acknowledges only amount prepaid.) 
7^ 




Permanent address of shipper 



FORM #380 



RE-ORDER FROM MOTOR CARRIERS FORMS CO., 1028 ARCH ST., PHILA., PA. 19107 WALNUT 2-6634 



INVOICE 



PHONE 
GLenview 6-4500 




INVOICE NO. 



8087 



Manufacture rs of Precision Sheet Metal Parts and Metal Fabricotions - Electric Kilns 
Office and Plant: Rt. 130 & Lincoln Ave. - W. Collingswood Hgts., N.J. 

Mailing Address: Box 67, Collingswood, N. J. 

SNO INDUSTRIES 



Sold To 



. Erna, V/eil 1 



6 ul pture otud i o 
8üD Alpine Drive 
Teuneck 
N.J. 



DATE, 



P.O. NUMBER 

^/S<^'i\ 12/27/66 



QUANTITY 



1 



\ 



DRAWING NUMBER 



Oümole"üe lid 



5-15 



Shipped To 

1/27 • 67 

V/e are shippin^, in aoorox 2 v/ks 

V/e v/'ould apprec your check by -ulien. 

H. Dteve""^-or] 



SHIP VIA 



DESCRIPTiON 



'£aok±iiß 




NET 30 DAYS 



AMOUNT 



33.58 
1.00 



34.58 
1.04 



35.62 



The Seiler represents it has fully complied with the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act 



of 1938, OS amended, in the manufacture of gooas covered by this invoice. 





e^preas^PfiUe 'Pinea andTine y^ards^ood» a <^/^^^^ 




INOUSTRIAL LUMSCR 
SPCCIAL WOOOWORKINa . 
ORV KILNS 

SASM-OOOM 
STOCK MILkWOHK 




BERCO. n 



7724 



•>.- •* 



"^^^ ^ 



^5 FULTON STREET • PATERSON I. N.J. 

SHCMWOOO t-830O 




Name 



t^ u^ 



Date 



^^1^ 



Address 



?gc gj^ 



J 




Delivered 



.^^ 



Customer 
Order No.. 



Shop Order No. 



CO N TRAGT 
EXTRA 



CLAIMS FOR 



DEDUCTtON WILL NOT BE AlLOWED UNIESS REPORTED WITHIN 3 DAYS AFTER PEUVERY OF MATERIALS 



/- },^x/o'"' >^ ^ /4^o>»»»/ ^vi 



FEET 



PRICE 



AMOUNT 



// 



i Ö 




Received by 



CENTER LUMBER COMPANY 



85 FultofTStreet Paterson 1, N. J. 



SHerwood 2-8300 



o 



HL 3.RD 7-57Ba 



TROPHIKft 
M KüALiS 
GAVELS 
PLAQUES 



* . 



DOLACK 4c DOLACK 

i 

ENGRAVING AND Ef»JGRAVED PrDDUCTS 

1B5 MAIU STREET I 
HACKENSACK, NEV/ JERSEY 07601 







/. 



3 /<XX 2 



/'^ 



r 




SPECIAL AWAI^D^ 
AUTO EMBLEMJ-l / ^ () 
NAME-PLATES ^, ^ 



^_^^1_19^ 



'^ / ^, ^ / 




y^^sia^. 



Tf OQvis • 280 c/infon p/ace • hackensack • r)eu\/ Jersey • hubbard 7-35/6 




"•t 



>^, 



Iv- 



11 



Mrs . rxna .-/ei 11 
Teaneck, K. J. 



Aoril 25. 1966 



Originals <" S5.00 . . .' B20.C0 



reo.rints fe 'S 1.00 




11 . 00 



1151.00 



ff efsvis • 2dO o/infon p/ace • hockensack • ne\A/ Jersey • hubbarc/ 7-35/6 




Krs. Erna '.eill 



F e b r II ary 22, i S 6 6 



Gl 



i 



reprints & ^l.Z"^ %l1.cl^ 







14Q 7lh AV N, Y. 10011 

WA 4-C.'^^^ 




Sold 



/' / /f 9- ^ /t A//1 //t'^/ ^ 



//l-T/C C 



Srfpped lo 



Address 



<^?L /4^/^//u^ 



3 






CÜSTOME.TS ORDER 



SALESMAN 



Via 



TERMS 



F. O. B. 



tmmm^m »wi— » 





:^\rX^^-mr 



y'lr'^L^'^ . '^L.L 



/ ,0 



^£i^-J- 



'y'h' 



o 



;;^o 




AO 70 



047633 




Customer'a 
Order No._ 



C- . , 

/4d u^ ^ F' r? >Ö2^' ^ ^^ ■ 



DATE. 



.19. 



C^ 



SOLD TO. 



^Tn-i^i. ^. cUj^^^ 



ADDRESa 



/-f^ ^ 



lox^e^ 



2y2 . / ..e^-rv 




SALESMAN. 



.TERMS. 



CASH 



CHARGE 



C O. D. 



PAID OUT 



RETD. A/IDSE. 



RECD. ON ACCT. 



OUA,N. 



AMOUNT 




^QyüXL \ 



T d^.^yru?.rvf /(^^^J^^^ 



t52^'c<. 




''^L( cO 



tz 



t 



w 



17) TA^ 



ALL Claims and Retumed Goods MUST Be Accomponied By This Bill 



SIGNATURE. 



PiXrSBUKGH SALESBOOX JC.Q.« PJJJSBURjfiiM A. fA« 




adolph studly, ine. 

Photographers 407 Park Avenue South, 

NEW YORK 1 6, N. Y. 







SOLD TO llAyl^ (.^»^t^t^-^ /f -.-^^ ^^i^ 

ADDRESS J a ^ '^T/T^^ ^/5-ti^V-^ 



CITY & STATE 



INVOICE NO. 

Telephone GR 5-1021 

advertising 
architecture 
art & sculpture 
color 

THIS IS YOUR INVOICE 

PLEASE RETAIN. IT WILL 

NOT BE REITEMIZED. 



5740 






adolph studly, ine. 

Photographers 407 Park Avenue South, 



INVOICE NO. 



5598 



NEW YORK 1 6, N. Y. 



SOLD TO 

ADDRESS 

CITY & STATE 








T:jtA^^.jt^, CX^ y ' 



Telephone 

advertising 
architecture 
art & sculpture 
color 

THIS IS YOUR INVOICE 

PLEASE RETAIN. IT WILL 

NOT BE REITEMIZED. 



GR 5-1021 





rt cfaViS • 280 d/nton p/ace • hackensack^ne\A/ Jersey • hubbard 7-36/6 




Mrs. Erna v/eill 
äc6 aipine 3rive 

Teaneck , N. J . 



iVjarctL 25, IS.bo 



15 



re-orints ^ ifl.i^ 



If^ÖTT^ /fT^ 




•A/ OQViS • 280 c/i'nfon place • hackensock • ne\A/' Jersey • hubbarc/ 7-35/6 




Erna .eil 



May 23, 1966 



Originals (&. %'y.OO *10.00 

repriüts 4^ $1.00 9-0Ö 

$19.00 

passport-size photos 1.00 

$20.00 

// \\:X/ 1 





rf €/avis • 280 cUnton place • hacken sack • ne\A/ Jersey • hubbard 7-35/6 




Miss Erna .;eil 



July 9, 1966 




reprints © "$1.00 
previous balance 



.$6.00 
11.00 



51; 17 . 00 





jOp 



(SfA 



Q 



10 1 1^1 1%(, 



i^ 




I 




lö/i ^i (^^(p. 









'B'Ui), 



«. Q^B^ 



/ 



r(5^c 






'-^953 



•9 A 



I * 



EM NO. 



hile' 



ii.V 4^ ^ ■'2474 



/o 



COD. 



TON 



A * 



# 



KLY QUANTIT 



/ 



i>>/^ 



KEY 



f r-s 



PC 



8S> 



VJ- 



1 



^ 



y <>!^ 



^ 



1 



+0 



I w 



i v^ 



12474 



YOUi 





ll 







@lfe € 




nFi ln@a 



MFRS. CERAMIC MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT 



724-734 MEEKER AVE., BROOKLYN 22, N. Y. 



EVergreen 7-3604-5 



SOLD TO 



SHIPPED TO 



. J^ O ilia. .>. i ii.1 ' • «w» X ~u ^ 



Tcancok, -:e\7 Jei 






3t?.:.:G 



OUR ORDER NO. ,^j^j - j 



^* /- - 



DATE 



SHIPPiNG DATE 



VIA 



YOUR ORDER NO. 
DATE 3-^^- JO 



F.O.B. 



QUANTITY 



DESCRIPTION 



TERMS 



...e'C 



TOTAL AMOUNT 



1 00-", " 






1-"/^, 



1 



1 



•s 



•^-^rov/n -To^.; 



Joj.^dan \'it;i -ro. 



I. „1 



Tello\; Jlaze Lov/ lire ;/203 



Vial 



iquid 3rl _;;it ^-old (5^::ra..i3) 



■äÄli^-^ ±Q^^ ' r.iea'd^''-^lr*^rrtr-fcrTrü 



v^ ^ ■ '^ 




jLiI ■<'- 



• i 



/ ^ yy> 






1 j • J 






30 



. J3 



« ;r-rH" 



;^- 










^ f:^ 



y 



/ 



/ . ^ 



^ .^ 



^ 



'^. 7/ 



^- -^ . C/ 



.'' r> ^ 



INVOICE 



EST 



^IBI^ 



1872 



THE LUTZ COMPANY 

MANUFACTllRERS - DLSTRIBUTORS 
ENGINEERING & MEASURING EQUIPMENT 
GUTTENBERG, N.J. 07093 Phone 201-868-4000 



INVOICE DATE • 



T? 



eb, 1, 1966. 



r 



s 
o 

L 
D 

T 
O 



Mrs. Erna Weill 
886 Alnine Drive , 
Toaneck, N.T. 



n 



L 



j 



s 

H 
I 

P 
P 
C 
D 

T 
O 



r 



L 



ORDER NO 



YOUR ORDER NO. 



*hone 



DATE REC D 



OUR ORDER NO 

71Ü0 



(JÜANIITV 
ORÜtHU) 



Stewarfi 



200 

100 

1 

1 

1 



QUANIITY 
SHIPPtÜ 



200 

100 

1 

1 

1 



UNIT 



Ibs. 



ti 
it 



doz. 



Atttliur Brovrn 



2 

2^# 



2 






CATALOG 
NUMBER 



Co.Inc. 



SALESMAN 



SHIPPED VIA 



OESCRIPTION 



tt 



h Bro 



f?ordon clay vjith grog 
Hed.Mexiclay vxith ßrog 
Pasco Glaze dry #PA-3703' 
Bisque tiles 6x6 



UNIT 
PRICE 



DISCOUNT 



tt 



13.00 -^^v G. 

lp.33 
l.It-0 

3*30 

2.20 



it 



Ib. 

dz. 



ob 3 • 
Ib s . 



(21b 
corit . 



llalf liEe bust head 12»' 
) Roma Ho. 3 Oray Grn Glay 



lesJi lOy; 



2.25 
.90 



It 



/ 



oa.nt . 



n 





OVER 

90 YEARS 

OF SERVICE 



NO OF 
PKGES. 



TERMS 

2 % - 1 O DAYS 

30 DAYS NET 

F B GUTTENBLRG. N J 



AMOÜNT 



26.00 

15.33 

1J|0 

3.30 
2 «20 

1IB72T 



TOTAL 



[i.3. la 

lt.. 5^0 
22.50 



n 



oTTT 



206^ 



•'S 

the app 



NO GOODS CAN BE RETURNED FOR CREDIT WITHOUT OUR PERMISSIION 
ALL CLaVmS^MUST BE MADE WITHIN 5 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF GOODS. 

Her represents that ihe eoods or srnices c-oxered by ihis invoice haxe been produced or rendered in ar.ord_anre vMth 
appKTe prmb^^^^ ofthe Fair Labor Standards Art ot 1938 as amended, mclud.ns Serl.ons 12 (a) and 15 thereol. tTI f . 



INVOICE NO 





FURNITURE 

STATIONERY 

ART SUPPLIES 

PRINTING 



M. 



Otu^ IVmui. 



W. J. LINN - INC. 



Eaalhms,nt & ^a^/z/tei ^o% Sakool d^al Office, 

417 CEDAR LANE 
TEANECK, N. J. 

TEoneck 6-3450 



Date- 



Address. 
Del. to- 



^r ^ a 




^S0r-L^ 



SOLD BY 



Quantit/ 



CASH 



C O. D. CHARGE ^ 



ON ACCOUNT 



Description 



"W^ 




DUPLICATING ft 

ADDING MACHINES 

TYPEWRITERS 

SALES & SERVICE 



////:^ 



.19 



LL 



.Cust. Order No. 



-Via. 



MDSE. RETD. 



PAID OUT 







Price 



V^?^ 



PLEASE PAY FROM THIS INVOICE. NO STATEMENTS RENDERED. 



Amount 



/ 



2:Z 



1 



0579 



ALL Claims and returned goods 
MUST be accompanied by this bil 



Received by 



W. J. LINN. INC., TEANElIv, N. J. 




W. J. LINN - INC, 




FURNITURE 

STATIONERy 

ART SUPPLIES 

PRINTING 






AA 






417 CEDAR LANE 
TEANECK, N. J. 

TEaneck 6-3450 



DUPLICATING & 

ADDING MACHINES 

TYPEWRITERS 

SALES & SERVICE 



-Dafe- 



Address. 
Del. \o- 






ii-/r 









Cust. Order No.. 
Via- 




10575 



ALL Claims and returned goods 
MUST be accompanied by this bill. 



Received by 



\v . .1. I :n\. !m-.. ti-:am'K. \. j. 



/ 



rf efavis • 2dO cZ/nfon place • hacken sack • neu\/ Jersey • hubbard 7-35/6 




Mrs. Erna v7eil 
Alpine Drive 
Teaneck , N.d . 



December 10, 1965 



5 
6 



original photographs ^^ "I^.OO "i>15.00 

reprints &$1.00 6.00 



/ 




S21.00 




^.U S^. ^ci;iff 



tu •. ' 



107 WEST 86th STREET • NEW YORK 24, N. Y. • TELEPHONE: ENDICOTT 2-0485 



TG 



88(j ..Jpine Trive 

Toaneck ::T.J. 07666 



prints 8 x 10 



DATE 



Juno 1985 



OUR ORDER NO 



SHIPPED VIA 



loostct^e &. hiv.dli::.J 









(j 



\ 



z 






75 



t 



FOR REPRINTS KINDIY REFER TO THE FIIE NUMBER ON BACK OFTHE PRINTS 



3 
1 



4 




adolph studly, ine. 

Photographers 407 Park Avenue Soüth, 

NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 




SOLD TO 
ADDRESS 

CITY & STATE 



QUANTITY 



/ 



SIZE 



ni 



o 



ORIGINAL 



GLOSSY 



MATTES 



ENLARGEMENTS 



MOUNTING 



COLOR TRANSPARENCY 



COLOR ORIG. PRINT 



COLOR DUPL. PRINT 



COLOR SLIDES 



// 



/ 



INVOICE NO. 
Telephone GR 5-1021 

advertising 

architecture 

art & sculpture ^ 

color 

THIS IS YOUR INVOICE 

PLEASE RETAIN. IT WIU 

NOT BE REITEMIZED. 



4951 




\ 



DESCRIPTION 



ORDERED BY 



JL-^tÄiciÄjL Jiü'^'C^ /U^i'.iy l^^^ . 



PRICE 



GLOSSY 



MÄHE 




\.6r ^ y^"'^ c^Ä 



t^^^df 



AMOUNT 



P. fg /jt^ " ?^a<yc^^/ " ^^ 




i 




!2 /"- ^ 




SALES TAX 



O-ii 



»Vk-^-tS 



POSTAGE 



u 




adolph studly, ine. 

Photographers 407 Park Avenue South, 



INVOiCE NO. 



5343 



NEW YORK 1 6, N. Y. 



SOLD TO 

ADDRESS 

CITY & STATE 



Telephone GR 5-1021 

advertising 

architecture 

ort & sculpture %^ ,, 

THIS IS YOUR INVOiCE 

PLEASE RETAIN. IT WILL 

NOT BE REITEMIZED. 






adolph studly, ine. 

Photographers 407 Park Avenue South, 



INVOICE NO. 



4791 



NEW YORK 1 6, N. Y. 



^ 



SOLD TO X:-y^^U.^L. 
ADDRESS Q^^ 




CITY & STATE 



^J^.^i'L.L.^U^cJ?^ ^ Ot 



DATE OF ORDER 



QUANTITY 



t 



SIZE 



g^t€> 



CUSTOMER NO. 




Telephone 

advertising 
architecture 
ort & sculpture 
color 

THIS IS YOUR INVOICE 

PLEASE RETAIN. IT WIU 

NOT BE REITEMIZED. 



GR 5-1021 




ORDERED BY 



ORIGINAL 



GLOSSY 



MATTES 



ENLARGEMENTS 



MOUNTING 



COLOR TRANSPARENCY 



COLOR ORIG. PRINT 



COLOR DUPL. PRINT 



COLOR SLIDES 



DESCRIPTION 



/s^.f»o/ ^A- 



^^ 



.X^U,^f/,l£L^^ 



'^ii.lt;^ (/ /h^ 



i^pv ^ 



GLOSSY 



MÄHE 



/^:>&y. 



/ 



»V 



/-• 



rl^(i9/ 




SALES TAX 



POSTAGE 



PRICE 



i 



V^' 



AMOUNT 



- ou. 




rf efavis • 280 c/infon p/ace • hackensack •ne\A/ Jersey • hubbard 7-36/6 




10 



Erna Weill 



March 1, 1965 



original photographs 



reprints - 1 reprint each on 2 
2^ 4 reprints each on 2 



$20.00 



/ö*C<i 



• • • • 




^ '^.aö 



^n 





adolph studly, ine. 

Photographers 407 Park Avenue South, 



INVOICE NO. 



3793 



NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 



SOLD TO 
ADDRESS 

CITY & STATE 








DATE OF ORDER 



QUANTITY 



Z 



SIZE 



/^ 



/ 



l(v(f 



fj^.^iJd^<^ . ' A < 



CUSTOMER NO 




Telephone 

advertising 
architecture 
ort & sculpture 
color 

THIS IS YOUR INVOICE 

PLEASE RETAIN. IT WILL 

NOT BE REITEMIZED. 



GR 5-1021 




ORIGINAL 



GLOSSY 




MATTES 



ENLARGEMENTS 



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MOUNTING 



COLOR TRANSPARENCY 



COLOR ORIG. PRINT 



COLOR DUPL. PRINT 



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Phone CAnal 6-7452 

MODELING CLAYS 
POTTERY CLAYS 
SCULPTORS'SUPPLIES 
CERAMIC MATERIAL 
KILNS AND TOOLS 

SOLD TO 



STEWART CLÄY CO., Inc. 



133 MuLBERRY Street 



New York 13, N. Y. 



DATE Nov. 4, 1964 
SHIPPED TO 



Estabi ished 18 6 7 

PLASTICUM 
PLASTALE IM A 
MODEL-LIGHT 
CLAY-CENE 
C L A Y-P L A Y 



Mrs. Erna Weill Art School 
886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, N.J. 



Cust. Order No. 



2U0 



10 

1 



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Order N9 26634 



los* Gorden Ciay w/grog 
Underglaze Pencils BLi\Cü 
ibs. Medium Grog 
Catalogue 




Dept. No. 



.1333 



• 30 



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2b 






28 



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80 



46 



85 



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25 



61 



TEaneck 6-3321 



INVOICE 




M. 



ARGONAUT 

STUDIOS 

488 CEDAR LANE 

TEANECK, N. J. 








298^ 



GOLDSMITH BROS.. Stationers. 77 Nassau St., New York. N. Y. 10008. CO 7-7900- P. D. 148950 3 



WERNER BRAUN. PRESS PHOTO 



CRAPHER. 1 RAPHAELI STREET, JERUSALEM. ISRAEL, TEL. 27010 



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WALTER J. RUSSELL 
Photographer 

HOTEL CHELSEA 

222 W. 23rd ST. N. Y. I 

CHelsea 3-3700 




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FAIRMOUNT 

LUMBER CO., Inc. 

IN FROM JOHNSON AVE. & LAWTON ST. 

HACKENSACK PHONE 487 ■ 3227 

NAME liJil(iJf^ 

STREET f^<^-9j2 




WE HAVE A COMPLETE LINE OF BUILDING MATERIALS 




PLEASE ACCEPT OUR TH 

X 3197 



IR THIS PURCHASE. IT IS GREATLY APPRECIATED. 

MILLER REGISTER COMPANY. MONTVALE. N. J. 391-8710 



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407 PARK AVENUE SO. 
NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 

Tel. GRamercy 5- 1021 

72-0-60 



Mrs. JjiTOa ^»»elll 
886 Alolne Drive 
Teaneck:, N. J. 



ß 



hoTOörQpher 

adverlisino 
archilecfurc 
ort Ö sculolure 



Au'^ust IS 



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, i960 



1-8 X 10 original ohoto(?raoh of Sculptare 

"Father & Gh1 Id" 

I4. - 8 X 10 /ilossy duollcate nrints 

35 rrui slldes 

3 - 3 X 10 glp.3sy duolicHte prlnts - Dialo.<',ue 

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^R.on 

5.00 

7.00 

3 »75 
•^23.75 



BEACON ARTISANS INC. 



ESTABLISHED 1932 



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smon in mei 
301 WALTON AVENUE • NEW YORK 51, N. Y. 

CYPRESS 2-1 1 18 



JE N9 5130 



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JOB ESTIMATE 



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AHENTION MR.. 



Dear Sin 



Cur estimate, to manufacture the item, or items you requested, is a$ follows: 



DRAWING 
NO. 



QUANTITY 



J2. 



DESCHIPTION 



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UNIT 
COST 



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The above job, will take about ^ ^^ ^ weeks to be completed, all items are F.O.B. our factory. The above 

Job does not include installation costs, unless otherwise noted. 
A deposit of one third down is required on all Jobs. 

Trusting we moy be of service to you, 

Very truly yours. 



BEACON ARTISANS INCORPORATED 



WALTER J. RUSSELL 
Photographer 

HOTEL CHELSEA 

222 W. 23rd ST. N. Y. 1 

CHelsea 3-3700 



80929 



Customer's 
Order No 



SOLO TO 
ADDRESS 




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DATE_ 



/^/3 



'M'^<M 



.19 




MX 

SALESMAN- TERMS. 



RECD. ON ACCT. 




ALL Claims and Refrurned Goods MüST Be Accompanied By This Bill 



SIGNATURE. 



UNION 9-0005 



TEXACOUSTICA DESIGNERS 



MARIO CATANI 



MARIO CATANI CO. 

ORNAMENTAL PLASTERERS 
ARCHITECTURAL SCULPTORS 



8609 NEWKIRK AVENUE 
NORTH BERGEN. N. J 



TEL. UNion 7-5U25 




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SCAGLIOLA MANUFACTURING CO, Inc. 

Artificial Marble and Stone 

137 TWENTIETH STREET 

UNION CITY, N. J.,_...._S§_p_t.eral)er 2-otli. 



.19-57- 



_Mrs«_.JL,.jyeill 



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Por making mould and 3 casts of your 
figure as agreed on 






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Telephone FOundation 8-3539 



JOHN B- DALEO 



^rcUdurJ Wodeiö - Ornan^entJ Piaäennf 

C^omposUlon L^adtin^A 
77 OLD BROADWAY 

New York 27 



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Ordered For Job 



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Your Order No.. 



Delivered Date. 



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THORN'S TRANSFER, Inc. 

Bronxville, New York 



May 28, 1957 



Mrs. Erna Weill 
886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, Nev/ Jersey 



May 53/57 - #B0 5010 

6 Pieces sculpture & 
18 cartonsfrom Schoneman Galleries 
K.Y.C. , to Teaneck 



Federal transportation tax 



145.00 



1.35 



Kay 23/57 - #B0 5011 
Extra delivery to 885 
Madi son Avenue , N . Y . C . 

■3^ federan transportation tax 



5.00 



.15 



151.50 





SOICHI SUNAMl 

27 WFST lST!i STRFFT • NFV/ yu\<K II. N Y, 



Mrs. Erne Weill 
886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, N, J. 



October, 1966: 



CHiL'.ra 2 S'-AO 



November 8, 1956 



4 negatives maklng with 2 printa at $5.00 

each %^y, • . . 



$20,00 



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THE FUND FOR T HE RE PU 



BLIC, INC., SANTA BARBAR A, CALIFORNIA^ 



DETACH BEFDRE DEPDSITING 



I N V D I C E 



DATE 



NUMBER 



ESCRIPTION 



First payment 
Sculpture-Scott Buchanan 



AMDUNT 



I S T R I BU T I D N 



AMDUNT 



500.00 



CODE 



7005 



N9 41781 



"SÜPERIOR PRESS, INC., LOS ANGELES 



Phone CAnal 6-7452 

AAODELING CLAYS 
POTTERY CLAYS 
SCULPTORS' SUPPLIES 
CERAMIC AAATERIAL 
KILNS AND TOOLS 



SOLD TO 

LUTZ 
64 



CO 

70th 



GUTTEK BUllG , 




STEWART ßLAY 




133 MULBERRY Street 



NEW York 13. N. Y. 



STRLiiT 
NEV; JERSEY 



DATE 



SHIPPED TO 



Established 18 6 7 

PL AST ICUM 
PLASTALENA 
MODEL-LIGHT 
C L A Y- C E N E 
C L A Y • P L A Y 



Hrs. Eill 

8?- 6 Alpine Drive 

Tcencck, New Jersey 



Cust. Order No. 



200 



100 



Order 



Lbs. Gordon with G F G 
Lbs. Red Me>:iclay with GROG 
Lb. Pasco Glaze dry # rA-3705 
Bozen Bisquc tlles 6x6, 
Dozen Bisque tilcs m4 x ^\ 



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Dept. n£) 



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Phone CAnal 6-7452 

AAODELING C L A Y S 
POTTER Y CI.AYS 
SCULPTORS' SUPPLIES 
CERAMIC AAATERIAL 
KILNS AND TOOLS 

SOLD TO 

iiiraa >veil 

886 Al|)ine ür. 

feaneck, N.J. 



STEWART CLAY CO., Inc. 



133 MuLBERRY Street 



New York 13, N. Y. 



DATE Warch 15, 1967 

SHIPPED TO 



Estabi ished 18 6 7 

P L A S T I CU M 
PLASTALEN A 
MODEL-LIGHT 
CLAY-CENE 
C L A Y- P L A Y 



Cust. Order No. 



Order No. 15605 



Dept. No. 



1 

10 






5-gram Liquid lirite Gold 

Gram Liquid iirite Gold 

1-lb. pkg. Lou Fire Glaze (Jkefeld) 1*4 
*1 ea : Ciear, .»liite, Med Green 



Lb. J^olia^^e Green, fransp. Low A'ire 1.4 
*iJkid. 

Less 10% 



U/P/S 



Invoice No. 



7644 



50 



50 




02 



fiom CAr^ &74S2 
MOD?UH;i: CiAYS 

i^oTrenY ciays 

KtLMS AND KKH 



STEWART 







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asass 



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133 A-UÄi^l^Y SiRÜT < NEW TC-i; N'. Y. toai3 



INVOICE 
NO. 



fgMshed te<7 



PIASTICÜ 

MCOa-liGHT 
CtAY-CEH£ 
CLAt-riAV 



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SOLD 
TO 



Ertui Wetll Art School 
886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, New Jersey 07666 



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INVOICE 
DATE 



SHIPPED 
TO 




qXjantity 



YOUR ORDER NO. , J^ 

Mrs. E. Weltl 



ALESMAN 



dozen 



dosen 



Ib. 



Ib. 



only 



TERMS 



t DESCRIPTION 



IIA fl 



BRASS Findlngs "A 



BRASS Findlngs 



•if\ii 



Engobe N-7 gray 
Engobe N-20 brown 
lO-gram Brite Gold 




2=X3r: — STONE 







i 



SHIPPED VIA 






ffTl 



iPPD. OR COLL. 



PRICE 



AMOUNT 



Phone CAnal 6-7452 

f MODEUNG CLAYS 

POTTERY CLAYS 
SCULPTORS' SUPPLIES ^^^ 

CERAMIC AAATERIAL 
KILNS AND TOOLS 

SOLD TO 
Erna Weill Art School 

886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, Nev Jersey 07666 



STEWAR 




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133 MuLBERRY Street 



New York 13. N. Y. 



DATE 



Estabi ished 18 6 7 

PLASTICUAA 
PLASTALEN A 
MODEL-LIGHT 
C L A Y-C E N E 
C L A Y - P L A Y 



SHIPPED TO 

TO PAY 

WILL 



CALL SAT 



( ED WEISS & MORT BROWN TO PICKÜP ) 



Cust. Order No. e. WEILL 



Order 



Dept. No. 



can 



no. 277 X tnetallic play 



10 



50- Ib CANS H Jordan Clay WITH MED. GROG 



80 



* • 



less 10 7. school discount 



SCHOOL TAX EXEMPT 




82 



8 




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Invoice No. 



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00 



00 



20 



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73 



80 



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CßKlA lAJtICt COLLtC^'O'^- 



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WOMEM'S IMTERMATIOMAL EXPOSITION 

DIVISION OF 
.vJTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF HAND ARTS 

^his is to C^rtify that 

Al^....... ^TThr-^r^ 

is a member in good Standing and has agreed 
to conform to the rules and regulaticns of 
the Qrganization. 



Expirc 











Ckairman 



Klndly sign on the llne msrked wlth X 
attach e dollar and retum to the Woraen^s 
National Institute, 480 Lexington Ave, MC 
Thls payment does not constltute dues In 
the Federetlon. It l3 requlred to malce 
yovT contrcict bindlng and Is a necessary 
Obligation of our public llabllity 



Insuranca Doliclee» 



TharJc you 



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WOMEN'S IMTERNATIOMAL EXPOSITOM 

DIVISION OF 
IMTERMATIOMAL FEDERATION OF HAND ARTS 



^ ^his is to C^rtify that 
M ut<7C^....y^^ 



is a member in good standing and has agreed 
to conform to the rules and regulations of 
the or^Laoization. 



Expires 




/ 



Chairman 



Mi 






E. Weill 



8;^6 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, KJ 



To the NATIONAL SCULPTURE REVIE7; 
250 Eact 51st Street 
New York, N.Y. 10C22 



Please renew my cubscription whi ch expired 

FA! ! 

' "'••'' 1 sr.ue . 



with the 



Ida fCi 




1 



1 am enclosi'hs :r.y check for ^_Ji_ payable 



to the NATIONAL SCULPTURE SOCIETY. 



1965 Membership Dues 



$15.00 




\(P 





Pl„» mak. ch.d p.y.bl. f. Ne« Yorl Cl»pl.r .« Arfct, E,»itv A.»c.. Inc. 



209 




_ B ERGEN ÜOUNTY ARTI8T8 GUILD, inc. 

Payable September Ist, 10 

Annual Dues TiiROiTGii Ai;üust 31, 19 .19.53 

PMASE MAKE CUEOKS ''AYAB^LEJO^T.IE GUILD M^i^^ ^re^wr 



ARTIST-CRAFTSMEN OF NEW YORK 



DUES FOR MEMBER8HIP ,„/,/ ^/'l. 
YEAR ENDING JANUARY 1, IBttT %i~^ 



) ^ s 



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PROFESSIONAL | | 
ANNUAL 



NON -PROFESSIONAL 
ANNUAL 



r 



Ui33 "rna Weill 
8So Alpine Tr. 



D 



PLEASE REM IT TO 

KI33 I/Türil^L B/lRNrf^ 

33 GREENWICH AVE. APT. 'Z-L 
NEW YORK N. Y, 10014 



PAYMENT RECEIVED 



71 



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TREAS. 



DATK 



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American Friends of the Hebrew University, Inc. 



CHECK NO. 



890« 



1826 









tA 




( QUIUA. 




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INVOICE DATE 



10 



09 



68 



AMOUNT 



25! 



00 



ARTIST-CRAFTSMEN OF NEW YORK, INC, 



DUES FOR MEMBERSHIP 



YEA^^ 



ENDING DECEMBER 31. 19«^- S 






7 



f^ 



PLEASE /REMIT TO 



tDOROTHY JERVIS 
ai55 PARK AVENUE 



NEW YORK 10028 



PROFESSIONAL 
ANNUAU 



I I NON-PROFESSIONAL 

ANNUAL 



D 



PAY 




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S IS NOT CORRECT PLEASE CHANCE. 



T.rs^%;";:r.-"-— =-^^^ 



ARTIST-CRAFTSMEN OF NEW YORK, INC. 



DUES FOR MEMBERSHIP /.*- 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, ^9 b / 



/-r 



c 



PLEASE REMIT TO 



DO.. . - '• ' = »' J:*' V/iS 

1 155 PARK AVENUE 

NEW YORK 1O028 



PnOFESSIONAL LJ 
ANNUAL 



NON-PROFES 
ANNUAL 



SGIONAL I I 



PAYMENT RECEIVED 



TREAS. 



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ENCLOSE THIS SLIP WITH YOUR REMITTANCE. IF ADDRESS IS NOT CORRECT PLEASE CHANCE. 
DUES ARE CHAPGED UNLESS WRITTEN RESIGNATION IS RECEIVED BEFORE MARCH FIRST. 



J 



MEMBERSHIP DUES / 9 Cp S 



$15.00 




Tlie Natioiuil Council 
011 Art in Jewisli Life 



u ■ 



V, ■ 



James N. Rosenberg, Honorary Chairman 



■,'ssaf»>*>^^-?*"ä ■ :»■ 



15 East 84th Street 
New York, N.Y. 10028 

TRafalgar 9-4500 

Rabbi Moshe Davidowitz, Chairman 
Julius Schatz, Secretary 
Martin Cohn, Treasurer 



April 15, 1969 



Received $10*00 from Erna Weill, 886 Alpine^ Teaneck, New Jersey, 
in payment of her membership dues in the National Council on Art 
in Jewish Life for 1969, 




■v.^^ 





HATIOHAL COUNCIL »N ART iti JEWi3H Ü 
15 East 84th Street 
New York, N.Y. 1002S 
TRafalgar 9-4500, Ext. 827828 




ARTIST-CRAFTSMEN OF NEW YORK, INC 

YEAR -NDING DECEMBER 31. 19 % ■ 



\ 



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PROFESSIONAL 
ANNUAL 



[3 NON-PROFESSIO 

ANNUAL 



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NAL LJ 



Mi33 nrna V/eill 
886 Alpine Dr. 
Teaneck, N. J« 



PLEASE REMIT TO 

266 EAf-JT 7th ST- 
NrW YORK. N- Y. 10009 

PAYMENT RECEIVED 






TREAS. 



DATE 



n 



07655 



J 



ENCLOSE THIS 
DUES ARE C 



^ .^ Ar^r>RF«;S IS NOT CORRECT PLEASE CHANCE. 
5 SLIP WITH YOUR ''^'^•^^'^'^"; J^^^^^^^Ir^cEIVED BEFORE MARCH FIRST 
HARGED UNLESS WRITTEN RESIGNATION IS RECEIVEU 



ARTIST-CRAFTSMEN OF NEW YORK, INC. 



DV^S FOR MEMBERSHIP / -7 /,<) ^' 
YEAR fZNDfNG DECEMBER 31. 19 if I 9 *— 






s^ 



PROFE 
ANNUAL 



SSIONAL tu 



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L 



NON-PROFESSI 
ANNUAL 



ONAL I I 



f.:i33 'rna V/ailL 
836 Alpina Dr. 
Teancckf 11^ J« 



PLEASE REMIT TO 

MISS MUniEL BARNIMS 

265 EAST 7th STREET 
NEW YÖKK, N. Y. 10009 

PAYMENT RECEIVED 



TREAS. 



07566 



A-^-/- . 






DAT^ 



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j 



ENCLOSE THIS SLIP WITH VOUR REMITTANCE. ,F ADDRESS ,S NOT COR«ECT PLEASE CHANCE. 
DUES ARE CHARGED UNLESS WRITTEN RESIGNATION IS RECEIVED BEFORE MARCH FIRST. 



RFMITTANCE ADVICE 



DATE 



REFERENCE 
NUMBER 



AMOUNT Or INVOICE 



DEDUCTIONS 



DISCOUNT 




BALANCE 



(Portrait of dr. king 



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NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, INC. 



BY ENPORSLMENT THIS CHECK IS ACCEPTEO IN FÜLL PAYMENT OF THE 
ABOVE ACCOUNT. IF INCORRECT P.EASE «^^ ^ '^^ -i;^.,",^,^^' ;'^^^'/'''''' 

DETACH AT PERFORATION BEFORE DEPOSITING CHECK. 



HCR B-8523 

Papfr Patented By NCR Co. 
IEL-8074 



DOLACK AND DOLACK , ENGRAVERS 

185 Main Street 

Hacken s ack , New Jersey - 07601 



(201) 487-5780 




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Article 



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ENGRAVING INSTRUCTIONS 



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Date Received 
Est.Cost 



Promised For 



_ Deposit 



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This Certifies That 

Erna Weill 

has been recommended by the Board of Gov- 
ernors and the Committee on Associates to 
membership in the International Platform 
Association. 

Committee on Associates 

Ambassador Enrique Tejera 

Hai Holbrook 

John Henry Faulk 

Drew Pearson 

Senator Clarence Dill 

Ben B. Franklin 

John Morley 

Ambassador Julio Sanjlnes-Goytia . o, • 

Dlrector General and Board Chairnnan 





Chairman 



Board of Governors on Reverse Slde 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

of the 

INTERNATIONAL PLATFORM ASSOCIATION 

Lowell Thomas 

Ambassador Enrique Tejera 

Senator E. Gruening 

Drew Pearson 

Walter Lippman 

Ben Franklin 

Art Buchwald 

Ambassador Julio Sanjines-Goytia 

Anna Blair Miller 

Eleanor Sikes Peters 



Don 

Marl 



Wolfe 
owe 



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J. Herman O'Keeffe 
Emilie Jacobson 
Anne Guthrie 
Edward Wright 
Edward Clarke 
Halcyon Bryant 
John Conrad 
Cathy Allan 
Louis Bohmrich 
Nick O'Malley 
Rick Trow 
Mona Ling 
Bob Bond 
Neil Eskelin 
O. G. Fitzgerald 
Dan Tyler Moore* 



*Board Chairman 



The National Council 
011 Art in Jewisli Life 



15 East 84th Street 
New York, N.Y. 10028 

TRafalgar 9-4500 



James N. Rosenberg, Honorary Chairman 



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Rabbi Moshe Davidowitz, Chairman 
Julius Schatz, Secretary 
Martin Cohn, Treasurer 



TO: Mrs. Erna V/eill 



FROM: Julius Schatz 



April 23, 1966 



This is to acknowledge payraent of $10 membership dues for the year 



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VILIA(iE 




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224 WaV^rly Place 



Thank you for your contribution. Wa are glad to 
enroll you as a member of the Vi Hage Art Center 
and hope you will find the exhibitions we have 
planned and the work we propose to do both con- 



structive and interesting 



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D?%and l'rG.B.Zelnick 601 Mildred TM. Teanoclr,IT, J, 

Prof.J.^aston Mahler ColuriT)ia UniversJty Broadway & ll6th St 

Mrs. Helen Tamovor 440 Claren.or.t Ave, Teaneck II, J, 

Mrs.Lina(s) Preßabur{^er 165 Edcraont PI. Teaneck N,J, 

Mro,R,','ul!:an 615 ITorthumlDerland Rd, Teaneck,lT,J, 

Mrs, Anno Apfelbaxm 37 A.udubon Rd. Tean.cok N.J. 

I)r,& Mrs.Jos.Sheldon 682 Tilden Ave, Teaneck N.J. 

Mrs. Ruth ITiliamo 501 Granville ve. V/.Enf*lev;ood W.J. 

Mrs. David K.ITsuniann 303 Ogden Ave. Teaneck N.J. 

Mrs. Hertha Prie^^man 605 Standish Rd, Teaneck N.J. 

Mrs.Jcrone Gordon 251 Bana PI. Teaneck N.J. 

Mr. Michael T.Pield 697 Grant Terr. Teaneck N.J. 

Mro.J.B.;>ch\inian 1429 lludrjon Rd. Vv'.En levvood N.J. 

MrG.I.GruTjer 913 Phelps Rd, Teaneck N.J. 

Mrs. John A. Schauer 598 Ito.itland Ave. Teaneck N.J. 

Mrs.W.Manfred 71 Ayers Ct. W,Engle\700d TT.J. 

Mro.Peier sAi 097 Barbara -RtH^^t Te;meck N.J. 

I)r.& Mrs.Harold A.Ehy 00 Howland Ave, V/.Engleuood K.J. 

Mrs, Briggs» 1453 Hudson Rd. Teaneck N.J. 





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F^.TaKdwarcl Hanley Badford Pennsylvania 

"^-Änishe Sholom Jewioli Center ^SWr^Ernest Mohr 83--01 llGth St. 

Kicbiiond Hlll,L*Jt ,IUY^ 

Jev:iüh Con-xinity Center •'^^''r.I'orrir. Tiktun 16-36 ;l#^'eöt 13th Ave* 

Portland, 1^ Oregon 

Rabbi Ulrich Steuer 246 Beiden PI« ITunGter, Indiana 

Jerusalem University v'Prof •B^ITazar, President f Jerusalem, lorael 

Rabbi StIJeuijan 280 Oak 3t«,Manche3ter NtH» 

Congr gation Habonim ,'/'lJr.HußO Halm 20(3 Weot 72nd St. N.Y.e* 

Rabbi Mordochi Bressler Temple Eiaan;-el East LleadowG lUY. 

Rabbi Dov Revel »^Srashiva" 71-15 Auotin nt. Forest üills Ltl# 

N.Y 

Rabbi ?c MrQ#David Gninberg Westchester Reform Tom e 1 James St. 

Hartsdale IT.Y. 

Mian Evelyn Elloworth 2 Ridcewood Ave. Vlhltc PlainG,IT.Y. 

Dr. Karl ochr/artz 251Dizencoff St. Telaviv lorael. 

Brondelö University 7/altham Wass. 

Rabbi Norman Gerstenfeld 2329 California St. Ti^^aGhinc^ton D.C. 

Prof. Meyer füiaplro 

Mr.& Mrs.Frits llathan 640 Ft. Washington Ave. (Office 200 C.P.3.) 

Rid^^efiel Art Association Ridgefield II. J. 

Hackensack Art Association 

Mr.Abr-bam Chnnin 34 'est 65th ot« IT.Y.C. 

IJr. Theodor Zert^Townshend, Vermont 

lÄr.Itoccabi Greenfield 144 Pifth Ave, IT.Y.C. 

Mro.Lll Siaith 15? Romaine Ave. Mayv/ood N.J. 

MrcuCl-oriQi'e Ley 618 W.Englev/ood Ave. W.Enclowood II. J. 

Mro.Ical)clle (H.P.) Marvls 1033 V/ilcon Ave. Tennwck N.J. 

Mrs.Ruth (Miirrjr R. ) Plotnlck 1390 Somraerüct Gate West En^dewood ^i 



llr.RRodde, Toraahouse, Teaneck Rd. Teaneck N.J. 

llr.Leo Groodman 472 '.Inthrop Rd. Teaneck N.J. 

Llrs.lla2el(:'elvln) Bellet 91 V.Biiren Ave. Teaneck N.J. 

Prof. Morris Friedman 73 Bronxville Rd, Bronxvllle N.Y. 

llro.B.Psaty 895 Park Ave. N.Y.C. 

Mrc, Belle Krasney Tvibicoff 384 Parmingaale Rd. Iiai-tford Gönn. 

Ilr.arLf Mrs, Nathan Eohn 82 E;^ont PI. Teaneck N.J. 

Dr.-?: Lira. Samuel N.Porits 546 '.Vlllmerdinö; Ave. Teaneck N.J. 

Dr.Ä rirG.SchvTiiamer 746 Carrol PI., Teaneck N.J. 



N.J. 





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Photo£2raph rs 



ITr.Body Racoy 227 India nt. Brookl../n, N.Y. 
f.!r. Gelten 227 Eact 57 th :>t. N.Y.cl 
Mx.Soichi Sunami 27 iVeot 15th St. II.Y.C. 
Mr.Jolm Schiff 107 v/est 06th n. N.Y.C, 
r^r.Oppi Umtracht 604 Loßan St. Brooklyn. N.y. 
r.Tr.Adolp}i3tudly 122 East 25th :n. N.Y.C. 
llr.Prans Bamotaedter jSjewioh ITuseun 1109 Plfth 



Ave, 






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B-^oojdyn T'fuiGetmi of Art Eaatem Parkway Brooklyn, TI.Y, 

Brocia^m I'uceiun of Art Gchool Eaotem Parlavay, IT.': 
ITowork r/Mseun ^Misa Coffee Newark 1,1T,J. 

Mrn.T.Tarßaret Jardin 97 Procpect ':t. 
FiTi^al-w-in Albert 23 Judge St .Brooklyn IT.Y, 




Art New 



o 



T,Tar:a2lnes and Ilev/gpapera 
32 Eaot 57th 3t. N.Y.C. 



The Art Dißeot Inc., 116 Eaat 59tli Gt. N.Y.C. 

Magazine of Arts 22 Eaot 60th lt. IT.Y.C. 

Aufbau 2700 Broadv;ay ^SBr.T.Tanfred George 
ßane ^^Rfr. Arthur Holde 

Graft Horisons 601 Pifth Ave. IT. V.O. 

The ITew York Times 220 Weat 43rd St. N.Y.C. 
Section Book Review ^jIÜsg Grace Glueck ) 



230 v;est 41ot St. ^Sc.Burrows 



;'Mis3 Enely Genauer 



The New York Herald Tribüne 

same 

Three Lions Inc. ^^Mr.Lov/en 545 Fifth Ave. N.Y.C. 

American Artist Magazine 24 V/est 40th t. N.Y.C. 

Titie Magazine, AJ>t Dept. 9 Rockefeller Plaza N.'.C. 

Sunday Sun io Mrs. Mildred Taylor 362 Cedar Lane Teancck N.J. 

Bergen Evening Rocord i^ Lüc.Bemy Sklar 150 River St. Ilackenoack 



N.J. 





Plasterera 

Alexander Sculpturc Center 209 Eact 39th St. N.Y.C. ^Ifr.A.Tatti 

inrrVln e o nt flru co o — - 4trri7fnrtr±'Hh'f^, N*Y-*C.._ 

Mr. Bill Bet-^ko 47-16 4Bth St. L.I.C., N.Y. 
LTr.Renfe Lavagge 24-09 39th Ave. I.I.C, N.Y. 
Mri'SBiiyx8HHay:cc225fxiiiäiHXıx>'Braakiyn>">'»xXx 
Mr.Jolm Dalio 77 Old Broadway N.Y.C. 

Caoaver I.'^arbel 'TTr.Casnavan rt.Vemon St. Ridgefiel Park N.J. 
Schilp tu-r-e House fJlT.Ir.Ettl 304 v/.42nd St.N.^.C. 
Zampolin Co, >'Mr.J.Carvino 185 6th St. Port Lee N.J. 
Greenwich Houso Pottery :'I,1rs.IIertoock 16 JohnesSt, N.Y.C. 



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The Contcnporaries Gall-^ry f^Ms: Francio 902 ITadlson Ave, 

\ Artist' ö Gallcry f'Mr.Vemon "'tlx 051 Le::inc;:on Ave, 11, Y, 

^ Collector'o Callcry ^'Mr,D,Greer 4-9 W,53rd 3t, IT,Y,C, 
Mro, Tanina Gezari 68 V.'cot 87th ;>t, N,Y,C, 

Roko Gallcry '/j Mr.Proehlich 925 Wadiaon Avo, 
lIrG,Schul25 Great Heck 

Pietrantonio Gallery 26 Eant 04th it. N,Y,C, 

ITr.Tirca Karlls 1 Bonl: St. n.Y,C, 

Prenlcel & Co, 102 Maiden Lane N,^ .0. 



IT.Yi 






Union of American HelDrev/ Congroisationo 5th Ave, and 65th St, 

^ Rabbi Eugene Lipman 



w 

n 



Rabbi Kaufraan 
Miss Evans 
Miss Roma 



N 
N 

N 

m 



Union Theological Seminary, yS Dr,Tilliß Broadway at 120th 3t, 
Congrcsß forJewish Cxature <fo LIr,Lichtenatein 25 East 78th 3t. 

American Priends of the Hebrew Univeroity ;'Mr,V/illiatn Cohen 

9 East 89th St. 
same <fo ])r,P,R.Lachman 

The Hadassah Women'o Zioniot Org.of America, Ine, 65 East 52nd St. 
i> Mrs,Kraraarsky iI,Y,C, 

J/Ir,Paul Lobel 165 W, 4th St, M.Y.C. 

Kr, Morris Levine 12 East 17 th St, N.Y.C, 

lürs.Janet Lowenstein 365 Irving Ave, South Orange H.J, 

Prof, Franz Lanzberger Hebrew Union College Clifton Ave 

Cincinnati Ohio 

Mr3,P.Laguardia 5020 Goo Iridge Ave, Riverdale,N,Y, 

The Virginia I.!fus4um ^ Mr.Leslie Cheek S, Boulevard & Grove üt, 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Jev/ish Museum ?'Dr, Stephan Kaiser 1109 Pifth Ave, 

Institute of Pine Arto ^5])r, Guido Schoenberger 17 East 80i;h :^.t, 

N,Y.C, 

Montclair Art ITuseim ^'^Ilis K, Gamble S, Mountain Ct, & Bloomfiold 

Ave, Montclair 11. J. 

Metropolitan LTuseum Of Art Pifth Ave, at 82nd St, 1J.Y,C, 
V/hitney TTiiseun of American Art 22 West 54th St. 
ITuseum Of Modem Art 11 \''est 53rd St. 1I.Y,C, 



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Mr.^lllicjn Zorach 276 Hick Street Brool:l;m, IT.Y. 

risr; Rhyn C.Mpar;(/ 333 ^/cct 57th St. II.Y.C. 

rr.Jo'ji Hovannes 110 " cct !54tii St» N,Y.C, 

ITr.Ben 3hahn 73 ll.Cooperative RooüovoIö Il.J. 

I.!rtul!ina V.'inkol 185-36 Galway ve, Hollio L.I. 

lüao I'irifirri Somierburg 18-25 Pir: t ve, aijt,28 IT.Y.C, 

Uro, Ruth Yates 27 H.Third Ave, üoimt Vemon N,Y, 

llr/. >ara Shanes 64-59 82nd PI. Iliddle Villa^'o L.I. 

I,'r, A. Archipenko 19 47 Broadway If.Y.C. 

Mra.Grcte r>clnaier 116 Eaat 83ra 't. H.Y.C. 

Mr. r/jECoabi Greenfield 144 Fi-xth Ave. II. ".C. 

Mise Jotm Zinimet 106 ".Veot GQth St. IT.Y.C. 

Misii I'Tora Hers 425 Ridge Rd. IUArlini<:;ton K.J. 

llr.llathanjel Kaz 905 State 3t. Brooklyn, LI. Y. 

Art Asoociation 

Jev;lali Education Coramittee of IT.Y., Inc. 1776 Broadway IT.Y.C. 

Tho IT. Y.Society of CraftBinen 887 Firut Ave, IT.Y.C. 

llr. Albert Jacobson \7ilton Pottery, 11 ton Conn. 

llr.Janeö Cumrine 27 Weot 15tli it. IT," ,G. 

GoulpttLro Center 167 Eaat 69th r.t. IT.Y.C. 

ArtiotG Enuity ^T^r.Rothchild 9 Eaot 45th 3t. 

Mr.iiiraner Gruzen 80 Pifth Ave. N.Y.C. 

Eagen & Dreyfus 5:5l/'Ir.Kacen 123 Eaüt 57th 6t, 

llr.Max ..imon 18*.41 Broadv/ay M. i.C. 

Kr.Percival Goodman 40 Ea:-:t 49th St. il.Y.C. 

Mrs.Alicf Gundelfinger 444 Central Park V/tot 

llr.a lilrr, Joseph Xonzal 161 'est 25rd 3t. K.Y.C. 

Itrs.Gertrp.d Hartium 115 Eact 8Mth :>t. II.Y.O, 

Mr. Jack D.'Volfe 62 Horatio St. H.Y.C. 

Bergen Connty Artist Gtiild '/'Ilra.Gladii; GeiBhen 20 'Vlght PI. 

a'enafly IT.J, 
llr.IIahenia ?!ark 55 Sheridan Rd, LIt. Vemon TT.Y. 

TTrs.Irna Rothötein 27 cat 15th t, IT.Y.C. 
Colvinbia Artints ■:' I'rö.Ada Coopear* 113 'Veat 57th St. 

tftr,-^ l?ro4-3)olt!ln — 57-4^- ö-5t?t -:t* — Jat4i«en Helf-hta L.Il 

LIr.Ä :.!ro. Julius Carlcbach 937 Thircl \ve. H.T.c. 

';7ellona Gallery 17 Ea:-t r>4th 't. r.Y.C, ^; H^ Hctc^ä*\ 

Villacs Arb Center ?5 /^U^ icsä\ 39 Grovo ".t. TT.Y.C. 

3t. rniemie Gallery TfOtto Fallir 46 '..cot 57 th ^t. IT.Y.C. 



IT.Y.C. 



IT.Y.C. 



N , Y . 














l'ir.Carl •chulthelG 84-44 Bcverlcy Rd. Ken Cordens L.I. 

r;r.& T.irs.Jolm '-;chv;arts 270 West End Ave, n.^%C. 

rr.Hemarm E.Sinon 160 Broadway IT.Y.C, 

llrc.J.lliapiro 632 Saf^amore Ave. Tcnnecl: !T.J, 

Dc.narold Sinsor 7 Poplar r.t, Kloster IT.J. 

nr.<^c Uro. Harr:/ Smitli 155 Ronaine 'vc. Haywood II. J. 

ItTt-c T,Trs.Iludolpli Serkin 2004 Delancy ri. Philadelphia 3 l'e.nn 

TJro.Clariaoe (Theo) Ley 610 '^eot i:n:;lev/ood Ave. Tef.mock N.J. 

llr.S: Hrs.W.Thumaucr 628 ll.Poreat Vr, West Sn/;lev/ood Ii.J. 

IJr.Ä Ilrs.I.Thumaiier 440 Clpromont Ave. Tccmook II. eT, 

RaVoi ob L'ro. J.TrachtenlDcrs 801 Catalpa Ave. Teaneck N.J. 

MlsB Agnes Horten, Teaneck Public Library Teaneck Rd., Teaneck N.J. 

Mr.& Kro. Charles Turkenlcopf 117-01 Parle L ne S. Ke. Gardonu L.I. 

l^.Geort^c Tremicr 200 Ayliff Ave. Wectfield II.J. 

Rabbi Si I!rD.G.^:?aülicr 300 Vandorlinda 've. Teaneck II.J. 

Mr.& llrs.opjn r;einick 238 Pairaont Ave. Haokenoack IT.J, 

Mrs.ClarlGse .liite 12 Ehret Ave. Ilarrin-ton Park II.J. 

Mr..?: Mrü. Arthur '-Vendt ll-GO W.Laurelton Parkv;ay V/eot Enslewoog^j^ 

Mr.Ä Mrs.E. v.'elcs 821 East Lavm Dr. Teimeok li.J. 

Mr.A I,Ira.Ludv;is Weill 83-30 113 "t. Kev; Gardcns L.I. 

Mr,& Mrc. \'ß.n '.Verthclner 108-50 Continental Ave. forest Hills L.I. 

Mr.a uro. Karold Wolf 93 Gardner Ave. Ilickcville IJ.^'. 

Krö. Alice Wolf 324 V/eGt 87th 't. K.Y.C. 

I,Tr.& Uro. Peter V/cill 43 General Patton Dr. lTau£;atuck Conn. 

Dr. Alfred Werner 230 Wcüt l?4th St. II. '^C. 

Mr.^i I.1rs. Leo Weill Box 007 Wayneüville N.Carolina 

Dr.Ru-th Weyl 27-30 Weot lt3th PI. Chicago 111. 

rfir.Irvino V/achav/sky W.I'.II.A 211 EsGe:: St. Hackenoack II.J. 

Urs. Rose 21:.)iaerEi- n 369 Cgdon ve. Tecineek N.J. 

Rabbi & nrß. Erwin Ziianet 177 G.Cherry ;3t. PoiißhlceepoiG N.Y. 

Mro.Boöe Hurit 193 Vrjiderlind Ave. Te;^.ccl: K.J. 

Profesnio n al Telephone Book 
Mr.IIerman Ilcilborn 256 Kaplan Ave. Hackensack TT.J, 
Mrc.TTina Harkavy Hotel Aiisonia Broadway at 73rd St. 
L1r.."c (."rrs.Jooe De Creeft 218 Green St. N.Y.C. 

T.^ra.Lu Düble 27 Weot lOth 3t. IT.T.C. 

Mrs. Elisabeth Model 340 v/est 72nd St. IT.Y.C. 



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4 







, Mro.Elsie IiOr{;^ilaa 65 Brov/otor Rd. Scarodale,lT,Y. 
I.Tr.'c llrr.i.Eddy IIuoGbaiim 03 Villa^^e Rd, Roolyn lits, L.I. 
r,1r,Ä nra.Frits llat^'^an 200 l.'eüt 59 th ot, 
Mrs.Dorothy ^Tainan 1123 Cambridci;e Rd« Tc;meck,rT..T, 
Fr«": T'frG.E.Otten 547 llortliuraborland Rd. Teanecl:,lI.J, 



LTr,a I.TrG, Bernhard L.Ocer 
Mr#& Lirs#Rugiero Orljüido 
Dr«& Urs. Pai.il PrauDnitz 
Dr.'^b I!r3,'5o.^/moiir Pro^jor 



70-47 Ilarrov; St. Poroot Hills, L.I,, Tl. Y, 
185 Sftlvaf^e ve. V/er.t Enclev/ood 'I.J. 
77-'54 Auötin t. 
Oll Tine Farm Middlo Valley II. J. 

LTro.Paiila Prc,:;er 106-15 Queens Blvd. Poreot Hillo,L.I., ' .■'^'. 

Prof. & I.!ro. Raph el Patai 197 iniritan Ave. Poreat Hills L.I. 

D^.Ä I/lrs. Dpniel Penhara 100 Port WaGhin.;:ton Ave. ll.y.C. 

Ulrs.rrloria Roth 1115 Briar Way Cliffoide II. J. 

Mr.& IJrG. O.A. Robe Gon 554 S.Poroot Drive V/est Enclnvood IT.J. 

Vt,& Mrs.E.RuIcin 503 Winbliroo Rd, Teaneck N.J. 

Lira .Esther Rosen 243 Cherry Lane Teaneck II, J. 

Mrs,Violet Roditi 30 East u7th 3t. N.Y.C. 

Mr.Ä MrG,P, Rothbart 315 Shorman Ave. Teaneck, TT, J, 

Vt,Cc IJr3,Enerich Ealcos 69-25 Pleet St. Poreat Hills L.I, 

Llr.a i:rs,Robej-t J.Rubin 41 Lalce Rd. Rye IT.Y, 

IkÜG; Clara Ichindlor 118-11 04 th Ave. Kev/ GardcnD,L.I. 

r.Tro.H: len 3heldon 885 "Sheffield Rd Teaneck, !I.J. 

L'rs. Helen (Jack IT. )3iegel 1320 Tr-fal^'^ar St. '^.'est En^'-lev/ood Ü.J. 

I.-rs.Yvotte 3iraon(Hernan) 402 O^^dcn Ave. V/eat En^jlcwood T.J. 

LTrs. Esther Selicman 621 iYest öth ;t. Plairiö-field II. J. 

Krs. Hilde Stein 14-^'7 Esue:^: St. Teariock N.J. 

Mrs.Ruth Schuh ^-3 Karens Lane, Em^'ilev/ood, 11, J. 

rr.c^c rrs.ITerraan Sainer 263 Francis St. Teaneck H.J. 

Mr.-^x: I'rs. Melvin J^inilow 8 Dadndarow Rd. V/hitc Plains IT,\r, 

Mr:;,3,Bemy Sklar 999 Queen Anne Rd, Termcck 11, J, 

Kr,& Mrs, R, P.Stahl 105-25 63rd Ave, Porest Hills L,I. 
Mr3,B,Schats]-i 83-28 Abingdon Rd, Ke\7 Gardens L.I, 

Mr,& Krs, V/nlter .ichatski 5^ B,3chat.-:ki 83-28 /ibin;-don Rd, P,II, 

r.'r, ^: Mr3,'7altor St'ihl 117-01 Park Lone S. Egv/ Gardens L.I. 

Br.üb Wrs. Guido Ichoenberger 115-25 84th Ave. Richmond Hill L.I. 

L'r.v'i Wrs.Hu^h 3tcrn 255 Haven Ave, IT.Y.C, 

Dr.& I.trs.A.^elignan 41 Forest Ave. silver Lalce Staten Isl;:nd II. Y. 

T;''rs,..'.line Saarinen Blloorafiolu nill3,I'icli.ir^;in 






I 

I,;r4.;:i.V/.j;movei' 118!:^ Park Ave, N.y.o. 

Llr.&ulrs. Robert •^■inover ^75 Park Ave. ij.y.C« 

Mr.Ä Mro.II.t'' movcr 1135 Pari: Ave. N.Y.C 

The Jewisli Theolocical Geininary of Anerica, Droadv/ay at 122nd 3t. 

att.Dr.PinIcelstein 

Hadaaoah national Of .?ice 65 East 52nd 3t. att.IIrD.Emninaky 

llTü.Ada Ilolilreitor 101 Prospect :t. IlaclienGack, II.J. 

IJr. Koval 68-43 li^leet St. Porc-Gt Hills L.T.,:''.^. 

Kro. George Kaplan 603 Rutland Ave, Teaneok II.J. 

ITro.narey Koll (I.E.) 102 Ilerrick Ave. 

Mro. Helen IHLein 131 Bcmiett Rd. Teaneck ri.J. 

Dr. 5: I.Irs.S.Kircliheincr 508 V/est 139th 3t. II.Y.C. 

Mro. Carola Kern 34-58 74tli St. Jackaon Htc.I.I.,!!. . 

Mr.Ä Mrs.Pred Kahn 61-36 82nd PI. Elrahurst L.I. 

Dr. R. Kurzrock 1016 Pifth Ave. N.Y.C. 

llrs. Herta Karger & l!fT,Sz ITra.Katz 251 Worthinßton Rd.Elnsford IT.Y, 

Mrs.Clairc Kilhn fnTrs.Traugott 50 \^^ot 96th 3t. 11. -'.C. 

llr.S: Mrs.Paul Lcvine 5 Overlook Terr. N.Y.C, 

Lire, Jeanette loev/cnotein 365 Irvi.'ig Ave. ooiitli Orange n.J. 

Mr.S: Mrs.i.^ax Lclimjm 242 3, ^,7, Parkside Dr. Portland Oregon 

MrG.D.B.ITaser 1208 Eniorson Ave. Teaneck, II.J. 

Mr.S: Mrs.M. Mantel 202 Ilerrick Ave. Teaneck II.J. 

Mrs.G (M,A.) Mach 914 Phelpo Rd. Teaneck, II. J. 

Mrc. George (Rose) Miller 39 C^pley Ave. Teaneck K.J. 

LlTG. H.H. Mager 1013 Eastlawn Dr. Teaneck, N.J. 

Mrs.Sr'dy Leight 46 Anderoon 3t. Hackenoack N.J. 

Eür.Ä Mro.Lou linsey 630 V/indhan Rd. Teaneck, N.J. 

r,!r.& Mro. '.7,L oev.-enstein 2 V/oodlEaid 11. Great Heck I.I.,iT.i. 



LTr.(2: Iure.» ..all. 





Mr.S: Mra.3idney L'Voor. 598 Standich Rd. Teaneck N.J. 

l!\Tm& I'rü^IIax Locuenstein 04-09 126th St.llev; Grarden3,L#I# ,:!•¥• 

Vt.C: Mrs.IIuso Leuchtnoii 58 27 Slst St. :inhiirrjt L.I.,If.Y. 

Dr. 5: Ürö.IIeins Llppnann 597 ooiiclcrlrmd Rd. Teaneck, II.J. 

L-r.& I,:r 3. Leonard ITarcua (l.?uriel) 555 '/intlirop Rd. V/cßt Englev/ood N.J. 

Ur.Aiibrey L.T!osg 721 Carol PI. Teaneck r.J. 

£Tr..:c LTrs. Eddy T.Tark 15 Eai.>t G3rd 3t. IT.Y.C. 

LTr.fi: Urs. Harry T.Iookowitz 67 69 Groton 3t. Forest IIillStL.I.,IJ.Y. 



e- 



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Mr.Claude Franl: Con{p:'eöcior.al Hotel 463 'Voct End Ave.IT^Y.C, 

MrG.Liicie Peitlcr IK I'avcn Ave. IT. Y. 32, 17. Y. 

Ut,& riTs.Rudy Herzog 332 V/eot Eni-lev/ood Ave.,;?oat i:nclev;ood II. J» 

llro.r/Iaxine ( D.H.) Pischel 467 Palner \ve.,Teaneclc,i:.J. 

Mro.Dorothy Piah 8 Huguenot Dr. Larclinont II. Y. 

I.!rs.Lili!:in (Snul) Pine 1284 Payet 3t. Teaneck.li.J. 

TIr.& Lira. Louis Piohl 616 R.S.W. Ardmore,Oklc'ilio a 

Llr.^c Uro. Keneth PlacS 933 Circle Dr. Milwaulcee Wis. 

Mr. John Plütere 1632 Yale Station New naven,Conn. 

I,1rc5. Stella Gallant 081 Prince 3t.,Teanock,II.J. 

Ilro. Jeanette Grunotein 483 ''.Inthrop Rd. »Tean^ ck,!I.J. 

Mr.'x: Mrc.Irvins /V. Greenfield 732 Dov/nins 3t, Y/.Englewood N.J. 

Mr.& Mro.G.Guthery 117-01 Park Lane 3., Kew Gardens L.I.,N.Y. 

Urs. Tony Goldsnitii :. 119-14- Union Tiimplke, Kew GardenG,L.I.,II.''' 

Mr. ^4 Kro.I.Ta:: Gutenstein 72-15 37th Ave. Jackson TIei,'.;hts L.I.,ü.Y 

ITr.S: I/lrs. AI Garber 84-51 Bevorley Rd. Kev; Gardens, L.I., IT. Y. 

Mrs.Eraray Goldjnan 1045 S.Osdon Dr. Los AngeleF. Calif. 

Mr.Ä Mrs.Leo Grcenbc-'-g 83 Birohall Dr. Scarsdale II. Y. 

Miss Susan Graven 19 Eatit 06th St, II.Y.G. 

I.!r.5: LTrs. Irving Galpeor 135 Lakeview Ave. Hartsdale N.Y. 

l'*.& I/iTS.S.Gruzen 44 Oalcland Rd., I,!aplev;ood II. J. 

Mrs.Tamiria GeJ^ari 60 V/est G7th St., II.Y.C. 

L1r.<^: I.Irs.IIei'man Gundersheiner 532 Laverock Rd., Glencide Penn 

Mrs. Rose Helft 83-00 118th St. Kev; Gardens, L.I., IT. Y. 

Ito,& Mrs.Curtis L. Hereid 515 llorth St.,Teaneck,Tr.J. 

Mr. Alfred Hiller 155 Sealrock Dr. San Prancisco Calif. 

Mr3.Ethel(l.Teyer) Plillel 970 Garrioon /Vve. Teaneck II. J. 

tTrs.Rose üerssberg 27 Buckinghara Dr. Ramsey,I^J. 

Dr.Ä uro. Clen. Weinstein G6-76 208th St. Queens Village L.I.,IT.Y 

Kr.;"« l-rc. Peter Hohenstein 84-51 Bevorley Rd. Kew Gardens L.I. 

Mro.A.IIalbort 262 West 107th St. II.Y.C. 

Mr.Ä Itrs.Paul Ilalstead 28 Ocean Ave. Larchnont,n.Y. 

Wr..*!: Mrs. Ernst Halstead 90 Randolph Rd. l^aton Park, '.vhit-e Plalns 

II. Y. 

Llrs.Aenne Herta Hotel Coranander 240 V/est 73rd St., II.Y.C, 
LTr.ft Mrs. George Jaffin 22 Oal: L;^ne Scarsdale IT.Y. 
I'rs.?ridel Halntead 1547 Pliuilcett .lt. Hollywood Florida 



tt 



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Telephone - "book 



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AufT^au, f. ITr.Dolbin 2700 Broadway 

Mro.Kate Romney (Bachert) 154 Eaot 78th St. IT.Y.C, 

Bergsn^Bvoning Reoord 150 River St., Hacl:enaaclc,lT.J. 

Mro.LiKKy Lakos (Benedict) 342 Eaot 22nd St., IT.Y.C. 

Rlr.Wax Block 505 Pifth Av. N.Y.C. 

Mrs.Sliü-beth Bamberser 4210 Groveland Ave. Baltinore 15, Ud. 

Kis;3 Frieda Borchard 164 V,'eot 79th St. IJ.Y.C. 

l!r.S.Bemy Sklar 999 Queen Anne Rd. Teaneck H.J. 

ITr.^c MrD.Raymond H.Bohr 1260 Haßtines Ave. West Enclcv/ood IT.J. 

Mrs.I'arian Cerf 1106 Broraberg Ave. Teaneck, M.J. 

Arnold Conotatle ^^Fi^*^ ■ S^^- ti«^^ 355 Wain St..nacken3ack,lT,J. 

Mra.Vivian Churg 711 Ogden ve., Teaneck, N.J. 

LIr.A. Chanin 34 v;eßt 65th St., N.'.C. 

Llr."c Mro.Leo Cahn 30 Salem \7ay Glenhead L.I. 

IJIrs.S.Colenan 832 Grande Rd. Teaneck, N.J. 

Mrs.Pia Galston 282 Bev/y PI. Teaneck, N.J. 

Dr.Profl & Dr. Herta Pechner 863 Garrioon Ave. Teaneck, II. J. 

Dr. I?red Rothenborg 359 Hudson Ave., Englcwood,N.J. 

Dr. Ludwig Neusarten 936 Pifth Ave.,N.^.C. 

Dr.V.'emer Gould 283 Summit Ave. Ilackensack.N.J. 

Dr. Sarah Gerden 327 Cedar Lane Teaneck, IT.J. 

Dr.B.B.Greenberg 1010 Pifth Ave. N.Y.C. 

Dr.J.Ottenheiner & Dr.Iilly Ottenheiner 114 Bast 84th St. N.Y.C. 

Dr.Charle K.Prieaborg 1125 Pifth Ave. N.",C. 

LTr.Ä üro.Pred Daniel 125 Cedar Ive. Ilackensack, N.J. 

Miss Greta Daniel 854 lOth Ave., N.Y.C. 

Mro.Ruth (David) Eisen 1451 Jefferson Ed., Teaneck, N.J. 

Mr.5: r^s.A.Adelnan 968 Phelps Rd., Teaneck, N.J. 

Llr.fi: Iirs. Richard Einstein 6&54 Plect St.Porest Hills, L.I.,N.Y, 

Mr.& lürs.E^ilberstein 68 54 Fleet St. Forest Hills, L.I.,N.Y. 

l!r.& Mrs.Harold ICisönstein 135 Audley St. Kev; Gardens,L.I.,N.Y. 

BtTG. Paula Eliasoph 148-25 89th Ave. Jjimaica,L.I.,n.Y. 

I.!r.& Mrs. Matthew Feldman 138 Vandcrlinda Ave., Teaneck, 'I.J. 

r.!r.& Urs. Paul Preigang 138-07 90th Ave. Jamaica,L.I. 

Uro. Catherine Pistore 117-01 Park Lane S., Kew Garden8,L.I.,N.Y, 



/ 




24th aimual WCMEN« S IlWERNATIOK^jiL EXPOSITION 
CHAIRMEN OF THE VAI?IOUS DIVISIONS OF TUE IK'i'ERNATIONAL FEDERATION 

OF HAI© AKTS 7 



r 

/ 



ATGHAMS 

Mrs. M» Giere 

20 Shore Park Road 

Great Neck, L. !♦ 

Mrs, Melaide Bemer 
79-3ä 77 Road 
Glendale, L, I. 



BASKET MAKING 
Mrs. M. La France 
Box 105 
Hogansburg, K T. 



"rs. 



ORK, F IBRE. ETC> 



■Irs. Eose Wright 
i? Tane CoTirt 
Brooklyn, N. Y, 

CERAinCS, POTTEEY 

m^^am¥im ■ p *i » J » ■!■ ■ ■■■ 

Mrs. F. Chellborg 
201 Fi*aiiklin Ave. 
Seacliff, L. I. 
Glen Cove 2274 

CROCHETING IN COTTOK 



■.PüWi 



Mrs. M. Berle 

10 Locust Terrace 

West Hempstead, L.I. 

Mrs, Frieda Parker 
Post Office Box 419 
^opiaque, L.I. 

Mrs. Lillian Schwärt z 
879 East 27th Street 
Brooklyn, N* Y* 
Cl 8-1447 

Mrs. C. M. Hess 
571 So. Greene A.V¥. 
Lindenhurst, L.I. 

nSoLLS 
Mrs. k. Mears 
84-18 150 Street 
Jamaica, L.I, 
Re 9-1913 

Mrs. Bert ha Eombostle 
506 Beach 130 Street 
Rockav/"ay, LI 
Belle Earbor 5-0 768 

MBROID]^R Y>CRHVEL & GROSS STITCH 

Mrs. Russell Atkinson 
94-20 157th Street 
Howard Bnach, LI 
Vi. S-5983 



FMCY SEhlNG 
Miss Betty Corper 
8810 Whitney Ave. 
Elmhurst, L.I» 
Ha. 9-9113 

Mrs. Harri et Clements 
40-46 Gase Street 
Elmhijrst, L. I. 
Ea. 4-9218 

HiOVy^EK ARRA]^]GEg./tEKrrS,, 
PRES^JD FLOl-vIi^S 
Mrs. Vera Verity 
15 Ralph Ave. 
Oceanside, L, ,1. 
Rockville Center 1418R 

HDOKED RUGS 
Mrs. Ethel Cooper 
23-51 123 Street 
College Point, L.I. 
Flushing 9-3237 

Mrs. Ellen Butler 
55 Caml)ridge Ave. 
Garden City, L^I» 

Mrs. Gert rüde Matjen 
53-15 198 Street 
Flushing, L.I» 

taTTI NG IK COTTON 

I I ■ I I I I I m II I I 

»s. Frances Henning 
412 East 65th Street 
New York . NY 



M^. 



Mrs. Ria Behrens 
145-86 179th Street 
Jamaica, L»I» 

Mrs. Anne R. Pfister 
219-29 Murdock Ave. 
Queens Tillage, L.I. 

LAGE 

.■^■■■■i^Bal 

Mrs. Margaret G. Brooks 
W. Norwalk Road 
Darien, Conn. 
Norv/alk 6-9910 

Mrs. H. Frost 
249-24 Thebes Ave. 
Little Neck, L.I» 
Ba. 9-4177 

LEATHER, FELT, ETC. 
Miss Alice Conklin 
15-82 Lurting Ave. 
Bronx, N.Y. 
We. 7-2975 



METAL JE1(\1ELRY 
Mrs. C. Chandler 
6 7 Danfort h Ave. 
Jersey City, N. .J. 

• 

Miss Effie Mohrikern 
67 Danfort h Ave. 
Jersey City, N. J* 

Mrs. W, Gentes 
28 Alezander Ave. 
Lynbrook, L.I. 
Lynbrook OSISÄ 

MIl^ATURE DOLLS & FURMITURE 



^EDLEPOINT.PEIIT POINT, 
N EEDLE PAIInITING 
Mrs. V. G. Schroeder 
633 Scranton Ave. 
Lynbrook, L.I. 
Lynbrook 1122 J 

Miss Georgia Hafner 
90-21 215 Place 
Queens Villa^e, LI 
Eolliss 016 7V; 

iiIL,V/ATER COLOR> ETCEING, PEN & 

IMK, PASTELS, CBARCOAL 

Mrs. May A. Hauser 

76 Ebme Street 

Fairfield, Conn. 

Fairfield 9-0790 

PAPER DIVISKDN 
Mrs. C. E. Whitcomb 
39-07 210 Street 
Bayside, L.I» 
Ba. 9-6516 

Mrs. Kathrjm Codfrey 
536 Ft. Washington Ave. • 
New York 33, NY 
Wa. , 8-9612 

Mrs. Marcia Grane 
267 West 89th Street 
New York, N.Y. . 
Sc. 4-0830 

PEN PAIim[ll& & STENCILIi;iG 
Mrs. Theresa Kenton 
856 43rd Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y» 

PLASTICS 



• 



ttUILTS 

Mrs. Harri et Smith 
Vermont Koad RFD #1 
North Babylon, L.I, 

Mrs. Harry Buchanan 
7901 Eidge Blvd 
Brookljm, N.Y. 
Store Read 5-7351 

RÜGg, MISCELLAKEOIE 

Mrs. Ann Varga 
31-26 94th Street 
Jackson Heights, L,I. 

SEl'OiNG 

tps. M. Thiensen 
5 Ivy Street 
^-est Eempstead, L.I* 

SHELL WORK 



r 



i 



Mpi 



Mrs. D. Laphan 
77 Cushing Ave. 
Williston Park, L.I. 

Mrs. Louis Bernstein 
4 Oak Street 
Woodmere, L.I. 

SPIM^1N& 

Mrs. E. Bielman 

98 Pinebrook Ave. 

Eempstead, L.I» 

Rockville Center 6-1684 

^prs. M. Ernst 
Kewbridge Ave. RFD #1 
Eempstead, L.I. 
Wantagh 1860R 



sTENCiLiiv'&,HAi;a) :^'Aiim:E fabrics, 

BATIK, ETC. 
Mrs. Alice Steffner 
430 Brookside Place 
Cranford, N. J. 
Cranford 6- 2241 J 

TATTIMU 

Mrs. F. Arms 
1824 Weeks Ave. 
Broiix, N. T, 
Tr. 8-3506 

Mrs. Meta McDermott 
531 Fast Lincoln Ave, 
Mt. Ternon, N^ Y. 

WEAVINS 

Mrs. Ruby Eve 

10 Harri so n Street 

Hempstead, L.I. 

Eempstead 1517 

_' s 

WOOD CARVI N G. SOAP SCULPTUE E 

Miss Florence G. Mann 
40 Monroe Street 
New York, N. Y. 
Ca. 5-1180 

WQOL KUTTIl^G & CRQCHETI^jG-ADULT 

Mrs. Rose Koenig 
30-44 34th Street 
Astoria, L.I. 
Ra. 8-0400 

Mrs. E.P.Eifert 
19-43 77th Street 
Jackson Heights, L.I. 
As. 8-3995 



WOOL KMTTII^ & CBOCHEllNG 
IIIFAJNTS & CHILDREN 




SIGNED 



WOMEN»S mTIOrüU. INSTITUTE 

480 Lexington Avenue, Room 805 

New York 17, N. Y, 




/ 



^~:ijhm 



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.u.. uAr^THTiq ^TVTSTONS OF THE INTOIIATIONAL FEDEIIATION 
CHAira®^ OF THE VARIOUS DlVibiur.^i ur inr. 



OF H.lND ARTS 



n 




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# 



rT^nn^.TTNO I N COTTON 
Wlrs. M. Berle 
10 Locust Terrace 
West Ilempstead, L.I. 
Hempstead 7239 

Mrs. Ria Bohrens 
145-36 179th Street 
Jamaica, L,I. 
La 5-3332 

Mrs, C. K. Hess 

371 South Greene Ave. 

Lindenhurst, L.I. 

HAND PATNTED F.\I^RIC S 
llENCILINGJIAND..PA^ 

B ATIK. ETC . 
Mrs. Alice Stef frier 
430 Brookside Place 
Cranford, New Jersey 
Cranford 6-2241J 

EANCY^SSilNG 
Miss Betty Corper 
88-10 VJhitney Avenue 
Elmhurst, L.I« 
Illinois 8-4602 



/-IT ■» •T'm ( 



rs^ M^ Thiensen 
2$ Ivy Street 
West Hempstead, L.I. 
Hempstead 6248 

TEATHER '-'O RK. GLO^/ES. BAGS 
FELT> PL/iSTICS, ETC, 
Miss Alice Conklln 
15-82 Lurtin^ Ave. 
Eronx, N.Y, 
Fe 7-2975 

Miss Sara Goldsmith 
18-36 Ölst Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ee 2-8215 

NATURE MATER IAL. SHELLS , 
PRES3ED FL0'''T;RS, ETC. 
Mrs, V. Verity 
15 Ralph Avenue 
Oceanside, L.I, 
Rockville Center I4I8R 

Mrs, D. Lapham 
77 Cushing Avenue 
Williston Park, L.I, 
Garden City 2531W 

Mrs, H. Bernstein 
4 Oak Street 
Woodmere, L.I, 
Cedarhurst 2197 



PEN PAINTING &^TEIICILIIiG 
Mrs. Theresa Kenton 
856 /^3rd Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



MKTAL J]?.^-^IELRY 
Miss C* Chandler 
67 Danforth Ave. 
Jersey City, N.J. 
Dela\'7are 3-5888 

WOOD C/iRVING^JigySEKOI^Miim^ 

Miss Florence G* Mann 
40 Monroe Street 
Nevj York, N» Y. 
Ca 5-1180 



Mrs. Marion Ann Mooney 
839 Quinton & Trenton Avg 
Tronton, Ne\v Jersey 
Trenton 3-5637 

BASI^TjyjaNG 
Mrs. M. Lafrance 

Eox 105, 
Hogansburg, New York 

^^ISCXLLAIWOUS,.,_BEADV:pRK, 

lliMZBmi^TTiN^ 

ETC. 

Mrs. Row^^e ^^^right 
17 Famo Court, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



F.irs, Harri et Smith 

Vermont Road 

North Babylon, R,F.D.#1 

Lon,^ Island 

Babylon 397M 

Mrs, Harry Buchanan 
7901 Ridge Boulevard 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Shore Road 5-7361 

HOO KE D RÜG DIVISION 
Mrs, Ethel Cooper 
23-51 L?3 St. 
College Point, L.I. 
Flushing 9-3237 

Mrs. C, Boldt 
4141 221st Street 
Bayside, L.I, 
Bayside 3454 

CERMICS, PO TTERY 
Mrs. F. Chellborg 
201 Franklin Ave. 
Seacliff, Long Island, 
Glen Cove 2274 



FEAVING 

Mrs, M, Hamilton 

32-60 Henry Hudson Pkway 

Bronx, N, Y. 

Kl 3-0576 



Mrs. Ruty Eve 
10 Harrison Street 
Hempstead, L.I. 
HeuiDstead 1517 



TOTTT TMG IN COTTO N 
Mrs. Hannah Grie^singer 
21 Sylvan Pl^ce 
Valley Stream, L.I. 
Valley Stream 5837J 

Mrs. Annruthe Pf ister 
219-29 Murdock Ave. 
Queen *G Village, L.I. 



...idkAtV^ 



Mrs, E. Bielman 
98 Pinobrook Ave. 
Hempstead, L.I, 
Rockville Center 6-1684 

Mrs. M. Ernst 
Newbridge Ave. R.F.D.#1 
HemT^stead, L.I. 
Wantagh 1S60R 

WOOL miTTING & 

crogiieting ^-^ infants & 
chiidren"^ 

Miss eJorma Glasr.er 
633 Scranton Ave. 
Lynbrook, L,l. 
Lynbrook 112 2 J 

WpOL KMITTIKG,& 
CRÖCP^ETING ^~ ADULTSi 
SV^.ATSRS'T GARI'iNTS, HATS 

m^mm^wmmttmmmm^ mmmwm'^tuttmmti^^'^u- ammtm/m^-^-r^^mmmim^M' ^i**MflhK** »'.0^MiMirti^<4Bii» 

AI-JP FAGS 

Mrs, Kose Koenig 
30-44 34th Street 
Astorla, L,I. 
Ra 8-0400 

Mrs, E, P, Eifert 
19-43 77th Street 
Jackson Hei^-hts, L.I, 
As 8-3995 



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f 




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NEEDIETCRKj_EMBROIDE RY , 
CRETOL & CRC3S 3TITCH 
Mrs, Russell Atkinson 
9^-20 157th Street 
Howard Beach, L.I. 
Vi 3-5983 

ARTISTS : J^ATKRCOLOR, ETCHING 
!ErI±J^'-i P-*^T>^T^ T CHARCOAL 
Mrs. May A. Hauser 
76 Home Street 
Fairfield, Conn. 
Fairfield 9-0790 

Mrs, Marion Ann Mooney 
839 Quinten & Trcnton Ave, 
Trenton, N, J. 
Trenton 3-5637 

NEEDLEVJOm <, PETIT POINT . 
nVF.niE PAINTIMG 
Mrs. V. G. Schroeder 
633 Scranton Ave, 
Lynbrook, L.I. 
Lynbrook 1122J 

TV^^JL" MfTM^; , TATTTNG. B0B3IN 

l:..ce. etc. 

Mrs, F, Arms 
l82/!^ "'eeks Avenue 
Bronx, N.Y. 
Tr 8-3506 

8^^-18 150th Street 
Jamal ca, L,I, 
Re 9-1913 

Mrs. Bertha Hornbostle 
506 Beach 130th St, 
RockaT7ay Beach, L.I, 
Belle ilarbor 5-0768 

AFGHAN S . 
Mrs. M. Giere 
20 Shore Park Road 
Great Neck, L.I. 

Mrs. Adelaide Berner 
79-39 77th Road 
Glendale, L.I. 
He 3-9087 



miniatuije^li^Jl2LI5NII^ 

Mrs. W. Curran 
U06 Ogden Ave. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Jerome 7-2856 

Mrs. G. Cole 
588 Test Englewood Ave. 
VJest Englewood, New Jersey 
Teaneck 6-10296 



MISCmLA^10pSJ^^ 
Mrs. Ann Varga 
31-26 9Ath Street 
Jackson Keights, L.I. 



• 



/ 



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NEEDLE]TORK,_EMEROIDE RY , 
CREl^ffiL & CRC3S 3TITCH 
Mrs. Ruwssell Atkinson 
9^-20 157th Street 
Howard Beach, L,I« 
Vi 3-5983 

ARTlS TSj JjJATERCOI.OR^^CHING 
PENir'lNK, P-äSTEI.S , CHARCOAL 
Mrs, May A/lIauser 
76 Home Street 
Falrfield, Conn, 
Fairfleld 9-0790 

Mrs. Marion Ann Mooney 
839 Quinton & Tronton Ave^ 
Trenton, N, J. 
Trenton 3-5637 

NEEDLEWORI^ PETIT POINT , 
NF.EDLE PiilNTIMG 
Mrs, V. G, Schroeder 
633 Sc ranton Ave, 
Lynbrook, L.I. 
Lynbrook 1122 J 

j^r^r2_2!!lJ^^'^ i TATTING, B0E3IN 

LlGE, etc, 

Mrs, F. Arms 
1824 r:eel:3 Avenue 
Bronx, N.Y. 
Tr 8-3506 

8A-18 150t?i Street 
Jamal ca, L.I, 
Re 9-1913 

Mrs. Hertha Hornbostle 
506 Beach 130th St. 
RockaYfay Beach, L.I. 
Belle ilarbor 5-0768 

AFGHANS 

Mrs, mT Giere 

20 Shore Park Road 

Great Neck, L.I. 

Mrs. Adelaide Berner 
79-39 77 th Road 
Glendale, L.I, 
He 3-9087 



MNiMni2l?-20LLS_^UR|lI23S^ 

Mrs. W, Curran 
U06 Ogden Ave. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Jeromc 7-2856 

Mrs. G. Cole 
588 V'est Englewood Ave. 
West Englewood, New Jersey 
Teaneck 6-10296 



MISCELL4^10ySjt_RIJGS 

Mrs. Ann Varga 
31-26 9Ath Street 
Jackson Koights, L.I. 



• 



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SUBSERIES3: 

EXHIBITIONS 



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(^ah^ k;C|cc C ot v. tti'O«^^ 



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Pßore^S»(OfiA L ^KW^ 



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erna 




sculpture 



may 14-26, 1951 



erna weill is an artist who covrhines 
sensitivity with und er st an ding of the 
teckntical possibilities of sctäpture. 
whether she tises terra cotta, stone or 
bronze, her work is characterized by her 
desire to interprete emotions. 

the portraits and biblical composi- 
tions convey her faith in the importance 
of the Spiritual beyond the vtaterial 
values. jewish ceremonial objects which 
she created are successful steps toward 
the revival of a field of artistic Inter- 
pretation of great challenge. only an 
artist to whom the 7neaning of the ritual 
presents itself by personal emotional 
experiences coidd bave devoted so sincere 
an effort to tbis field. 

erna weill received her artistic train- 
ing in europe, she has acquired consider- 
able recognition as teacher of children 
and adnlts in this country whom she has 
been helping to express themselves in the 
sculptural media, the present exhibition 
will establish her standing as an artist in 
her own right. 

herman s. gundersheimer. 



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14. 



18. 



23. 

24. 






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SCULPTURE 



samson 



/ ^-^'^, (terracotta) P^^t 



^ 2. hanna praying for child^)^^ *-' 
f^ }. Jacob fights the angel %^.!) f "^^ 



V 4. one-ness 

1^" J. ruth 

p- 6. devotion 

7. bathing in light 

8. baal shem 

9. best drink 
. 10. embrace 

r 11. dreaming ecstasy 

X- 12. the young ones 

13. prayer 



) 10 






Q V* Xiimestone)^jX''0 v 
tV) (terracotta). 7^^ 



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C 

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PORTRAIT BUSTS 

n. mr. t. / ^*2? --(bronze) 

16. philosophical strect clcancr i ^^- (plaster) f^ 

17. yemenite girl | ^(terracotta) /i>^^ 



f» 



19. c. f. young pianist 

20. david listens 






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».*•*•*•'' 






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CEREMONIAL OBJECTS 

21. menorah ^^V^it^ronz^' silver plated) T^^. 

22. besamim box "2.^^- " b^f,*Z 
shabath candleholder *^ ^ ^^' 
challah basket li>^» 



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25. menorah 



(green glazed ceraniic) 



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ave. 
57st 



505 West Gheltenham Avenue 
PhiladelDhia 26, Pa 
April 8, 1951 



Dear Erna: 



I hope that the enclosed introduction to the 
catalog arrives in time. I signed It, bat shall ander- 
stand very well if yoa or Mr , Garlebaoh prefer to have 
it printed withoat my name , lo\i will certainly under- 
stand that no other chanfseii shoald be made withoat 
my apr>roval, 

My very best wishes for the exhibition. 
If I should be able to be in New York while it is on, 
I shall go and see it. 



Best greetings to all or yoa from Friedl and 



myself . 



As alvva\ s , 



yoars , 




4«- 



4 
1 



Erna Weill is an artist who combines sensitivity 
with understanding of the technical possibilities of 
sculpture. V/hether she ases ter a ootta, stone or 
marble, her work is characterized by her desire to Interpret 



emotions. 



] 



The portraits and biblical compositions convey 
her faith in the importance of the spiritual beyond the 



ma 



terial valaes. Jewish ceremonia] objects which she 



created are successful steps toward the revival of a 
field of artistic Interpretation of great challenge, 
Only an artist to whom the raeanlng of the ritual presents 
itself by personal emotjonal experiences could have devoted 
so sincere an effort to this field. 

Erna Weill received her artistic training in 
Europe. She has acquired consideaable recognition as 

T 

teacher of ohildren and adulti^; in this country whom she 
has been helping to express themselves in the sculptu^al 
media. The present exhibition will establish her standing 
as an artist in her own right. 



Herman S, Gundersheimer 



• 



.T- 



V 



.)V 



I 

\ 







,\ 



' if 



' '• IriiH eill is an artlBt vho combirif^s S'^xit^it' vity 

with uncieretanding of the technical possibilitieafof sculptu^e. 
Whether she uöeß terra cotta,stone or bronze? , her woi-k ia 
characlerized by iior desire to interprete emotioiio. 

The portraits and bib'ical compoHitions convey 
her faith in the irapürtance of the spiritual beyond tho matorit 
values • Jftwish cerf^raonicil objects which ahe created are succei^s 
ful s'seps tOATard the revival of a field of artiytic interpretR- 
tion of gr* at challenge.Only an artiat to whom the meMninf': of 
the *itual preöentö itoelf by personal emotional «/.periences 
could h.-ve devote d üo aincere an ff fort to to thiö field . 

. Pirna 'eill received her artlstic triining in 
Europe« she has acquired considerable recognition as teucher 
of children and adults in this countr/ whom ßhe ha« been hclpin^ 
to expröB.^ themi-elves in the öCulptÄral media /Phe present ex- 
hibition ^vill eatablish her aianding as an artist in her OA^n 
rie':ht. 




.-V 









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>•• 



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Herman 






Gundersheimer. 









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A|ipratsal 



THIS IS TO CERTIFY that I, Jo£.efH ..C.:rXeb«i.cti 

of the firm of C;^rleba.c.h..Gpl..e.ry.,...Inc.» 

located at 50;). . [•..•;.& t.33.rd. f." treet city or town Ne^ lork zone...i002?. 

State ^<?.w Xork,.. N, Y, telephone number !^?..7-?^i^.^ 

am a member of APPRAISERS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, INC. and a qualified appraiser of the articies 
listed below; that I have carefully examined said articies of personal property at the request of 

name Mr.&r..E.rnfi..)^elll 

address «^.6. Aloin®. ..^^i^® 



...tx 



Ter.-neek^-N-iJk- •Q7-666-- 
and in my judgment their current values are as follows. 



ARTICLE 



r\ 



n<* 



Note: 



DESCRIPTION 



Bronze He^ ^ of Fr. Martin Luther King 
nounted on mr. rble brse 
11" hi^h 



Collectionz ^3*Y. Public Libr\-ry 

w^^chaT.berg collectlon 

Fr* King Community Center 



APPRAISED VALUE 



?1, 000.00 




Signed 




s. 



f-H^ 




Date 



/^ ,7 



m 



(yJi-Ul- I 



Appraiser 



March 5 19 ..^. 




THIS ISTO CERTIFY that I, Josef^a Carlebach 

of the firm of Carlebach. GfaleI7J..I^c• 

located at 500 JEastSßrd Street cityortown New. York zone. 10023 

State New.Xork^JI.T* telephone number ^.^^^^^.^ 

am a member of APPRAISERS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, INC. and a qualified appraiser of the articies 
listed below; that I have carefully examined said articies of personal property at the request of 



name 



Mrs.. .Erna. Weil! 

ddress 886. AM^^^.^.^^. 



• Teanecki N,J•.07666... 
and in my judgment their current values are as follows, 



ARTICLE 


DESCRIPT ION 


APPRAISED VALUE 


One 


Bronze Head of Dr. Martin Luther King 






moiinted on marble baee 
11" high 


$1,000.00 




Collection: N.T. Public Library 


• 




Sch^berg collection 






Dr. King Community Center 






Paterson, N.J# 








\ 

t 


\ 








1 



Note: 




Signed 




Date 



March 5 19 . 69 



KppxmBui 



THIS IS TO CERTIFY that I, joaCfA CARLIÄaOH.. 

of the firm of CAWtf»AOM..CAtttRY..I.NQ. 



Nrw YOUK, NtY# 

Rf 7 •0116 



10028 



zone 



locatedat 500 ^ Ait 83 RO STRCfT cityortown. 

State Hf:w YORK telephone number 

am a member of APPRAISERS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, INC. and a qualified appraiser of the articies 
listed below; that I have carefully examined said articies of personal property at the request ot 



name ... 

address 

TCANICK^ N»d» 07^^ 

and in my judgnnent their current values are as foilows, 



MRi» rwwA wru 

886 AtRINC ORIVC 



ARTICLE 



ONC 



DESCRIPTION 



BRONZ«- HrAO RCRRtSrNTiNt 
ORt MARTfW LUTMrR K|Mt 
MOUNTFO ON A MARBtC BA8C» 



Note: 




APPRAISED VALUE 



I 1750.— 



Signed 



Date 




'^r< mn 3/l 



IQINJA UtfCL 



(iOl,K.\^C1 (0 



K_» 



ri,{Ä\\NE.^i Ccl^^2C^r-- r, ■ e^)Ce 



EP^A uc'i^L e>^K(ßt 



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A^ iMc 



SCfl N (> A-i^/\J 



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£^. f : L 



erna 





sculpture 

schoneman gallery 



63 casi 57th strcet 

april 23 may 16. 'H^^\ 



iiew York eity 

n 



7 i/^/7. 



called lipon to analyzc an artisi's oaivrc, 
onc is tempted to spcak about his sckooling, 
artistic anccsiry and individual style, tcch- 
nically and artistkatiy. — but in tkc casc of 
erna wcill this approack icuuld fad, bccause 
tkc driving force bchind her ivork is mainly 
rootcd in spiritual and emotional soil, 

ihat this artist was born and educated 
in frankfort'On-the-main, for ceniuries a 
centcr of german-jewisk culiure and arts, 
and became indoctrinated tvith thc thoughts 
of ihe jewish philosopher martin bubcr, ihese 
wcre circnmstances which left their imprint 
an her oeuvre not less, than dul her earbj 
schooling by a pupil of auguste rodin. 

ihe anguish and iorment of witnessing 
ihe horrlble faie of her jewish brethrcn in 
her homeland cngendered in her a conipassion 
which liftcd ihe cxpressionisiic power of 
many of her seidptnres to heights elose to 
ihe oeuvre of kaete kolhvitz, 

in her poriraits, adniiration for thc Spir- 
itual or aj'tistic achievements of her sitters, 
even adoraiion for them as human bcings 
are paramount movers, dietating style and 
ireatment of her sculpiural media. .. 

her devotional objects, because of thß 
inspired nse of triangle and pyramic^: as 
mysiic forms, bdong to her most individual 
achievements. and the deathless storics of 
ihe old testament with their cast of kings, 
prophets and patriarchs are a main sourcc 
of her sciUptural ideas. 

ihe ccstasics of love and commiseration, 
piety and supplication find cxpression in her 
most accomplishedy sometimes almost abstraci 
ivork. small ivonder that she tvas commis- 
sioned to do a sculpture for the cntranee 
hall of the jewish centcr in teaneck, n. j., 
ivere she lives, works and teaches. this bronze, 
''jacob's dream" belongs to the distinguished 
works of jewish artists that adorn some 
moderii synagogues in the tinited states, 

t' b. f. dolbin. 



critics from former exhibitions: 

larry camyhcll in thc '*art vcus": er na wcill f.s* 
concerncd with ihe rclationship of two fifjurca tn 
conflict — or in affcciion — . 

aline louchhcim-saarinc}!, *'ncw york iimcs'^: 
this is a sculpior who vianagcs to combinc cmolional 
approach with a trvc plustic scnsc, — onc uunhlc 
picce has a stolid conviction — . 

carhße hurrows in ihe '* herald tribunc**: erna 
wcilVs sculpture — resolute modcVing — üramaiic 
impact, — siiiccrity and deplh of fccling — . 



1. 

2. 

;]a. 

3b. 

4. 

5. 

(i. 

7. 

8. 

D. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
1:3. 
U, 
15. 
IG. 
17. 
18. 
11). 

20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24 



25. 
26. 
27. 

28. 
29. 
30. 



31. 
32. 
3o. 
34. 



sculpture 

bathing in liglit (liinestoue) 
blessings (vermont marble) 
elijah and elisah (luarble concrcte) 
elijah and elisah (bronze) 
dialoguc (art stoiie) 
lovers 
cercs 

waterbui'falos 
best drink 
twiliglit 
dance of love 
mother 
prayer 
chassid 
revelatiou 
dreani (bronze) 
outcry 

moses on the nioiuitiun 
inj^'atheriii;»" of lli(i exiles 
" — and she \n\\ moses dowii at tlie brink 
of the river — " 
haiinah 

the uiiknown politieal i)i'isoner 
jaeub l'iylits the aii^el 
photo of 'i>aal sheni'^ (luarbh;) 
plioto ot* ''Jacob 's dream" (bi-oiize) 

portraits 

martin buher 

e. \\\ 

Claude frank, x)ianist 

rudolf serkin, xnaiiist 

natlian niilstein, violinist 

yeinenite j^irl 

ceremonial objects 

eliallah platter 

niatzoh j) bitter 

nieiiorah 

sbabath candleholdur 



Sinne of ihese sculpturcs are in (hc pvrmancnt colheti(ni 
of ihe f/eor(/ia .stote mus<uin, athens, (/eor</ia; t)irniin(f- 
ham vm.seuni, alaboma; jewish ituisenm, n. y.; h(:ahl 
mnseum Jerusalem; jewish conimuuity ecuter, icantclr, 
n. j.; Jichrew university, j( rusahin. 



Original Graphics 

hv MATISSE 
CLAVE 
PICASSO 
ROI AI LT 
(CHAGALL 
KKNl 

& OTIIERS 



W€»c[4»sip:n and inaiiiifarture pictiir«» fraiiies 
of (li^itiiictioii and quality 



OSCAR KRASNER, Im 

1116 Madison, Cor. 83rd. REgent 4-61 10 



IN THE GALLERIES 



LOAN EXHIBITION 

ROUAULT 

April 23-May 15 

SCHONEMAN 

GALLERIES 

63 East 57th St. New York 



sculpture by 



crna 



Op'T 



23-lt\C»y 



16 



Schoneman 

.63 East 57, N.Y.C. 



X AVI ER 

GON7.ALEZ 

RECKN'J^ iWlNriNCS 

MARTIN WIDDTFIELD 

(;.\LLKR^ • (SIS Madison Ave., N. V. 



BYRON 



GOTO 



PAINTINGS 



THRU APRIL 27 



ZABRISKIE GALLERY 

835 Madison Ave. betw. 69 & 70 Sts, 



JAMES 



Paintings 



WATSON 

Apr. 22-May 4 

MORRIS 174 Waverly PI. 

GALLERY D at Christopher St. 



Laudsrafu' salv;ij;is ;in inlVrnal suhji'cl - an oil 
irliiuTV al iiij;lil- hom tlic ii'>l^'^ <»1 ()Vt'rslaU' 
iiKiU (»r ^comt'trical duplit ali(»n. I lic vvhiir 
lowcr la (radviiii- |)lani) is a ^liosllv sc-ntincl m 
Ihf warm siil|)hnri( (hirkiu'ss. wilh liulc red 
Harnes aioiiiul il likf dcmoiiir w()islii|)crs. (U'ul 
di(ic'l(i, Mauli 2() -Apiil 1,'0.)-V.V. 

Koben Kic-lirnhurK: Maiiv NCiirs ol cllorl liavt- 
hrt'ii cxpt'iuk'ci in tlic picparalion ol ilic 
(aiivascs, inonimuiital in si/c and uniqiu- in <<ni 
((•j)li()n and exet ulion. wliidi compiisc ihis lirsl 
ont' man shou. I hc anist has allcniplcd to com 
hint- Hat painlinj; and s(nIi)Unal rclitd. a(hit'\in^ 
iIk' lallcr l)V inrans oi i^lohuUs ol sand niixcd 
witli whitf Itad painl wiiiili adiinc lo tlic (an 
\as. Il wonlil hf nndt-isialinj:; tlu* east- draslicalh 
lo sav niciclv lliat llu- visnal ti-nsion rrsnlting 
Iroin tlu' sinuillanc'ous iwo-dimcnsional and 
tliice (linicnsional vicws generalis a scnsr ol nn 
lest. ;\ctnallv tlic dfctt is acuttlv distnihin««, as 
if ihe canvascs werc ciawlin^ with sonie l)a(illi( 
life, sonictiines as iinpicasant as il tliev wcic 
hideonslv aHlicted with lepiosv. It is uniortunale 
hecansc ihis is so lar honi ihc ait ist's protouiuily 
sciions inlentioii. In tac h (an\as thcre is sonie 
inotivating föne, wliclln-r it he ihf coiillict ol 
onc spreading color thicateiiin^ lo engulf an 
other or an cinerginp; form Irving lo asser t itself 
over the siirrouiiding fornis oi the clashin^ of 
light and dark forees in the interior of a (iothic 
cathedral. Biit in cach case the swarmingencrusta- 
tions distract from the painting itself and rendei 
it inefTectual. The Iarge»t painting is a Pielä, a 
donhle panel in which one diinlv perceives the 
tonligurations which give it its title heneath the 
drihhles which run down like the gray nioss 
from live oaks over the granidar hiack smlace. 
{ Artists. March 9-28.) -M.S. 

Kubert Keyser: Ihe ahstrattions of Roheit 
Kevser depend for their effect on a cinnnlative 
leading rathei than on the displav of physical 
energy or the nni)act oi hold forms and move 
inents. Ihe eve must slowlv take into accoiint 
each richly worked f)assage and each color detail 
helore encompassing the whole. Ihere is a lack 
of proclaimed scheine or striuture which inakes 
ihe paintings inore readilv conipiehensihle in 
the random fragment than in the entirety. 
Color is the priniarv ftrcc here; the palette is 
spilled in its fnll ränge like a casket of genis 
over soft, lilinv grounds of white which provide 
areas of trancpiilitv in contrast to the ariav of 
!)rilliant hiies. I he palches of color shift with a 
lilting niotion. tnrningon a lixed ;i\is or rcvoh - 
ing in an elliptiral paih; areas of light. pale 
vellows and salmon pink resisl the encroaching 
i)la(ks. geneiating a (pii( t lension. I)nt ultiniatc- 
Iv it is the light that liiiniiphs and (ontains the 
dark. Implied relerences to organic natiire are 
manilold. hnt hlithelv delv literal analvsis. In 
general it is the smalier canvascs which are the 
most sn(cessfnl, hecanse their si/c iniposcs a (o 
herencc; a largci woik Muh iis Crrcn Triano^lc 
snlfers from too hroad a dispcrsal of fornis, a 
proliferalion ol ellctts too diüusc to l)e resohed 
into a Single entily. (Parma. April 1) .Sl.)— Nf.S. 

Jeaiine Kronnian: 1 his lirsi oneinan show hv 
a \oimg \meii(aii is ii com iiuing rccord of dis- 
(ipline set med and a slvic attaincd; therc is 
nothing rudinicntarv ahont it. nothing i)rash. 
noihing presinnpti\('lv crvptic. Miss Kronman 
ii;is hnnid her wav hv sdiooling hcrself in the 
solid strndnics of ( uhist-inlinciucd American 
lealism — i.e.. c c)nser\alive ahsiraction. Sensihle 
cnougli to feel \estcnlav in ordci to expericiue 
lomorrow. she has ahcadv clcNclopcd aullioritv 
and a \ieu which is htis-that she has imagina- 
lioii. too. shonld go witliont s;iving-an cvolution 
plaiidv to he read in tlicse paintings. with their 
sieadv i ise of assnrancc to an in(<)ntestai)lc cli- 
max. the landscapc l<^tic<),us l}it ntsiofis, |)ainte(l 
ihis vear: an aiistcie personid canvas. spare ol 
detail hnt emphatic in its relining of clemcntal 
Statement arid rock, a single headless tree col- 
nmn. a huinished glonierate skv. The foimda- 
tions of this achiexccl )>jinting are \erifial)lc- in 
the olheis, in the inipec. ahlc if acaclemicallv ah- 
siract still liles no less than in Janiinry l'hmr, 
three hIack ticcs spaced hv cool dark hhie-gravs 



64 



and nmher, or in V/^roug// the lon.sl, a hrcjkcn- 
line ahstract of tree trnnks ahove a hase of hio- 
ken cnhes. or in Rock Forms. modnlalion per- 
sonilied hy a fngal surfacc expression which 
rivals l'icai)ia in ihis mode. l lior's Cuf>, a dra- 
matic steel-lonndry close-np, and Tln' CIkuoc trr 
ol the Cottntiunitv (i.e., tide rock, wood, occan 
waste and hlocks of granite) snmmari/e her dcht 
to the concrete powers of regionalism. Iiom hc-re, 
with hj^ncous Intnisiotis (snhlitled I lidden l'al- 
/rv). siie is readv to advancc into a \o M'>>»j» 
Land, geotropically snstained. (Cha.sc. .\pril 1.5- 
27.)-V.V. 

Koger Kuni/: \ California painter. Knnt/. 
pracliccs a modihecl illustrative realism. Snhorch- 
uation of pictorial to formal vahics is never 
strictiv atlained. hnt the intention shows mosl 
(Icarlv. perhaps, in Callle, where a nuancier of 
sicers (lihcrtv taken) forms a warped triangulär 
pattern across a reccding fininel of emplv high- 
wav. Moodwise, Fcny is the richest painting, 
mostiv a sheet of hlne with rnddy clepths, the 
lerrvhoat and a tank tower punctuating the ma- 
rine expanse with alhescent gieen. In the Mexi- 
can vistas ( Ilaxcala. Mitla and C.nadalajara) he 
concentratcs on harocpie forms of architectnre. 
vvarmlv niani[)ulated; he hrings a siniilar relax- 
ation of surfacc to an interior siudv (textile 
plaved against brick, wood paneling. llowers and 
a dog) otlierwise academic. Rock fragmentation 
gives Shell lieach its esseiitial charac tcr; ihe snh- 
ject would he niore memorahle if fnrlher ah 
siracted. (Barone, March 12-30.)-V.V. 

Rmlv Pozzatli: Hie ränge and skill of I'o//at- 
ti's graphic work, from the hlack and white 
woodcuts to the color etchings and engravings, 
are impressive. Ihe coniposition, particnlarly in 
manv of the architectural suhjects, is firm and 
orderly, and the feeling for the medium itself, 
the geneial cleanness of the work, is admirahle. 
It is the drawings. however. which for one viewer 
piesent the highpoint of this exhihition. VVork- 
ing with stick and hrush in India ink, he is ahle 
to produce a line varietv of line and toucli, from 
ihin delicacv of outline to broad accent, a neat 
calligraphv which sharpens one's perception of 
a co[)se of liees or of the nubby texture of a 
scpiash split in halves. The drawings also havc 
ihe acldilional virtue of cschewing the decora- 
tive elfects which occasionallv mar the graphic 
work. (Wevhe, March 12- April 10.)-J.R.M. 

David Levine: In ihis group of working sketches 
and watercolors. Levine sets forth the pleasures 
of sinnmer with beach scenes of figures wading 
or hasking in the sun. His drawings have a dry, 
siraighüorwaid cpiality, a matter of broad strokes 
and shadings, lliat siiggests the hard. uncom 
promising giarc of noon. Ihe watercolors, de 
voted to the same themes. adoi)t a softer atmos 
phere, as in the small Picfiir, one of his best, 
with i)alc warm washes of grays, browns ancl 
sellou^-beiges. I he technicpie. one of controUed 
nndeistatcment. of broad areas supplied at the 
right moment with bits of ])recisc detail, pro- 
dnces a niimber of happv results thronghonl the 
rntire show. (Davis. March 14-April i:^)-|.R.M. 

Madeleine Rupert! : It is la/y-fashionable to 
cleclare tlial anv new Licnch painter whose 
arrival lias not hecn tninipeled bv the morc in 
llnential organs of the }ness is a carbon copv ol 
Malisse or Dufv or Bonnard or Bullet, depend 
ing on the proveiiance of his mode. Certainlv 
the case wilh which minor Parisian schooled 
painlcrs manage to annex one or other of their 
maslers' tcchnicpies is startling; as a result. modi- 
lication ancl inert derivalion bcconie confused 
in the eves of not a few gallerv inhabitants. 
Mlle Riiperti-she's Diitch and rrench and an 
oft-lime resident of Sw it/erland — is derivative 
onlv in the best sense of liaving derived her 
(iilli\ation from the I'arisian continnitv, which 
seems to pro\ icle cndless resources for anv paint 
er hellt Icss on expressing his ecpiivocal seif llian 
on expressing another variant of the ecjuivocal 
object. Hins, in Mlle Rupertis lirst American 
show, those almost iconical still life elements of 
recent historv receive vet another embodiment— 



ARTS/.//>n7 7957 



Ihc icsulls li.i\c IxiM (()iisi(l('i;il)lc ;»n(l. lu» doubl, 
|>(isnii.ill\ u\v;ir(liii«; l<»r ilic iiilisl. ( 1 ;ni;igir, 
.\Liitli Ü!» April IS.) J.K.M. 

Paul Hrarli: l^üulis ahsliat I ioiis 1ki\c soimc- 
liiiu's hccn ( ()iii|);n cd to hirds in lli«;lil. I lu\ <l(» 
not l(M>k likc hiids. 1)111 iluMc is sonulhin^ ;d)(»ul 
his soll, bricht sirij)s ol (olor <tlu\ stein lo 
nii\c ii|)\v;u(ls and (niluards) tlial icmiiids oiu- 
ol tApcric'iHfs in waubin^ hirds. I lit- shii)s aif 
nol sba|)i'd likc icallicis but lbt\ liaM- a IIuIUia 
(|ualil\. aiid liiou^li llitrc is no IxkK lo liold 
ibcin in |)la(c. llu'ir ^loupin«; n»aki's onc kil 
(lial lluTc arc lo( i in tliat spatr uilli a dclinilt 
it dilitaU- siKiidiial |>nll. StAt'ial ol llitsc (an 
\asi-s havr bct-n tillcd loi iIk* inoxcmcnls ol a 
iiipc in a bnlHi^lil /V/r;/^/. l'rxmifd. l-uml: 
.irnni<l(i bas a (ond'nliat ion likc Ine; and in 
ilu'itniti- llu- \aiiations in iiiass. tbc soll sbadow 
arcas. tlic dclitalc (oloi waslus. ilic variclN ol 
IcMiiit' and brusbwork taldi oncs aiunlion. 
wbidi in ocncial is licld b\ llu- linllcrino bii*;bl- 
ncss ol a brillianlb \ ai ic«;al('d palcllc. ((.asiclli, 
April 18 MaN l.)-l..P. 

Malta: Mullas icdniiial lincssc is cnciv ulicrc 
in cxidcnd' in tbis cxbibilion ol bis painlin«»s; 
ibc ibin. brillianl (oloring. llu- dixUions iinc 
are pni to servier in a scrics ol billcr |)(>liii(al and 
social (oinincnlaiics. Hmnan and phinllikc lortns 
snilcr a tbanj^c. a landscapc ( 7 //r (.rccn ol 
II //rr//) bc((>nK's a lanlasli( macliincol wircs and 
sparkin^ ncrvcs. ibc lii>inc bei onus a onc cNcd 
robol slian^lin«; Uvo birdliki'. boinhlikc sbapcs 
(I .'Oi.scnus.sin ) or sils j^rapplinu hiilliaiil <«ifcn 
apj)lcs ili('i}i(r lirnulcous). Ibc Rosi'id)crj4 hial. 
anion^ olbcr conimcnlarics. is iiniochud in onc 
oi ibc Icss snc(cssfnl works. / r l'xxrs des xims. 
(lolas. Manb ."■) 2(i.) - | .KM . 

Chaiiiiiii^ Peak«» aiul llouaril Vi'arsliav^ : l^oili 
arc Calilornians. P>olb paini nnnalsi/c oi wilb 
a nnnalist coiucption. Botb arc prcotx upicd wilb 
ihi iioisc as a synTnoi ol j)o\m'I. i>oiii cinplov a 
rc(cnt plasli( (()n(i'|)lioM i lonnd cxcrwvhcrc 
froin Picasso lo I.cbrun) wilboul coiinnillint; 
thcniscivcs to fiirllicriiif; ils possibililics. War- 
sliau is tbc morc biininons bnl npon dose in 
.spcdion is sccn lo bc essen lialls a tballsinan wiio 
ini|)oses grandiose (olor as a snblci bii't': bis tol- 
laj^c. Siudirs for Math, is morc integral iban ibe 
otliers. i'cake's large absiradion. nua/ lin(i<^(\ is 
bold. nierelv; s(rnlin\ re\cals, as uilb Warsliau. 
ibe llavorless bod\ ol llic idea. and rctalls ibe 
perennial image so irrilalini; lo ( al ilornians— 
lu)\\ lasiclevs ilieir (pn(k ripened. (olossal Iruil. 
(Seli}>inann. leb. 2r)-Mar(b l().)-\'.Y. 

Dii'l/, Eclzard: Allliongli diese still lifes in oil 
ol llowers and innsiiai insirnments are solidh 
painled and i;(>nciall\ well (onslrui led, ibcv in 
dnige loo inndi. one leds. in i onianlic. swcel oi 
noslalji;i( senliinenls. Ihe subjeds ihc pink and 
Ncilow roses in prolnsion. ibe niandolins. ibe 
nnisiial siorc sliccls. ihe siri|)s ol bbnk M'hel 
ribbon are ones thal are now so liea\ilv laden 
wilb asso(ialions tbat tbe\ reipnre soinc restrainl . 
ansleritv even, il lbe\ are lo bc dcall willi al all. 
Ivd/ard's le( bni(pie— beaw . rieb sirokcs ol (olor 
and \ agne b)rins does nol sei-ni to ollei cnoni;!) 

Dit'tz h^dzartl. ( wARns; al llaunncr. 




resisiaiKc lo bis sni)jc' i nialti-r. One snspeits 
llial lo see inlo tbc heai 1 oiseniiinenl (and ibat 
u(.i(l nol iiscd disparaginoh) recpiires a veiv 
Id eve. (Mainincr. \laidi L'b \piil I."..) |.K.\I. 



( o 



JaiiH-> Ui-ook>: Uli' ^'iMclN <d Un.oks" lorins 
and rlnlbins, tlie dian.i-es (»I predonnnanl (olors 
ubidi odiir in eadi ol ibcse large abstrae t ions, 
a((()nnl b)r inndi ol llif iinpicssi\eness ol ibc 
exhibilion. In (.<n<li(>fi. aIiIi ils deep reds. blacks. 
ubites and pale bbies. ibe lorins are iliai-onal 
ibrnsts wbidi sei np st riu 1 in in^ likc binit planes 
a( ross a narrow bori/onlal s|)a(e. Pcnaloa is a 
niass ol soineuhal o\oid ( oidi^inalions in bri( k 
reds and \ar\ing ros\ liiils wiib ateenls ol bla( k 
and ligbl bliics. Nie l(»rinal rbvlbins in Anilcc 
aic s(Mne ol tbc niosl ^lacclnl in tbc ixbibition. 
bold aial)cs(pics ainl ibnisls ol (olor. I bc blaiks 
and browns (tele lo laige e\panses ol (reain\ 
uliilc llial deepen inlc» inlense pinks and oranges. 
Ibe Overall inipiession ol llie cxbibilion is one 
ol ridnu'ss. \ariet\ and (onlrol uilbin tbc sl\lc 
b»r uhidi ibc arlisl is well known. (Stabic. 
Mardi L'."» April LS.) j.K M. 

Caiiu-mn Hoolli: 1 li<^" Suggestion (.1 place, al a 
(criain linu (d dav. vvith ils cpialities ol bgbt or 
inolion. is (onveycd bv tbc artist tbn.ngb appro- 
priatc coloi and tbe cbarader of bis torins and 
ibeir relalionsbi|)s. ratber tbaii tbrongb any de 
sign (biet t In iraccable to a spee ilic ccpiiNalcnt in 
nalure. In Soriij; of tlu Dunes, Uoolb trics to 
((Mnniiinieale to tbc eye a Sensation pcKtivcd 
ibnuigh tbe car. tbat fc»l all tbc sounds one 
wonUi heai Uing aiind tbe sand dunes the surf, 
ibe birds. ibc inseds. llie brec/c rullling ibc 
ree(l\ grasses-and bc (on\e\s tbis tbr()Ugli a 
liesta ol wann (olors. dustering and rising to 
gelber in an iniproinplu (cntral eoluinii of vari- 
egalcd sbapcs. stirrounc'ed bv Hat vellow arcas. 
In Ol Ihr Sra bis (oncern bas beeii to approxi 
male the ro(king inolion of tbings alloat on tbc 
sca: and bere, altbongb llie sense of tbe bobbing 
hads and lorlh is preseul. tue sbapcs are mndi 
niorc sharplv delined even sligbtly niodeled) 
ibaii bas been distoinarv in bis work. It is true 
perbaps tbal all bis work bad bceonie ürnier dur 
ing tbe pasi two vears in tbe boldness ot tbe 
(olor and tbe iniposilion of a stronger (obereint' 
on (anvases whidi bave at tiines tendcd to bc 
disorgain/ed. hui it letains tliat a((uratc sngges 
li\it\ and ibc (oniplcx plav of sbifling bnnis 
across llie lield ol \ ision wbieb bave altraded at- 
tention in bis morc retenl cxbibitions. (^Sdiaeb'r. 
Marcb li.^i-April lli.)-M.S. 



Jam<»s Pt'iiiH'v: I lu'rc arc a innnbei ol dillet 
eni approadics to painling in tbis sbow. bot 
none of tbein arc fullv explored. citlicr in tbe 
realin of the probletns tbcv nngbl oMcr or in 
tbe feeling lbe\ inigbt express. Soine are well 
striKtuied long views of landsea|»e. su( b as 
Ouariw wbidi indirate (witb soine su((i'ss in 
iTus case) a knowli'dgcaMc (are for tbc ainl)ign 
ities of eonteniporary spate; otbers are slraigbl- 
forwaid inii)rcssions Of ligbt-struek objcds. sueb 
as Irres, W itiler: and sonic arc pastidics of (on- 
leniporarv inaiuicrs ibai eoinc out as not un- 
|)leasant dctoralion. I bc painter scems lo tarc a 
lillle hu a varielv of painling (oiHcpls. but 
w here his tontern riiiis deep is nol evident. 
(Kraushaar. April I 'J().i-\.\. 

Xavior (;<Hizalez: I» '»'^ li>b'sl work a sirugglc 
ulii(b sbould have long sintc been resolved, 
belwcen design slnuliire aiul 1 bcatrit alitv or 
)n\sti({\ie, (onlinues to nake itself b-ll. Ibe il 
lusiralive |)oinp of l.didseafx' in Con.sh n( lion 
is an unloilimale crior of tasle, and in l<»o nianv 
olhers tbcre is an easy dialedit of sirong lorc 
gronnd inasses againsl d'lluse batkgrounds. wilb 
iudirsions of "invsterioiis" bgbt. (.on/ale/ is at 
his best when Ixtinlin;^. whitb is lo sav when 
lies prcotxnpicd wilb die (pialilv of a subjett 
and nol ils proj)bcti( nsidue. when. as in C.on- 
i'cxoi 2 (U linker S/ioj>, \\c reiidcrs ibe otddt 
inilicu (d let bnologit al adivitv. wilb dia})ba- 
nous. irregulär lorins and a varicgaled surlatc 
wliitb his knowicdgeab'e use ol niixcd media 
has brougbl to rcseinbb (ollagc. liiizzards' liay— 
lirid'^e is neitber so eoiiiplex nor so absirati as 
ibesc but bas a line soaiing strengtb. and I e\ns 



63 



known 
for 

Creative 
framing 

expert 
restoring 




the house of 

heydenryk 

141 w. 54 St., n. y. 19 



Marilyn 1 Bernice Adrienne 

KLEINMAN I WINN CAMILLI 

April 22-May 4 

BURR GALLERY io8w 53St.,n.y.c 



EXHIBITION 



FIVE YEAR SURVEY 

HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN 

SCHOOL OF GRAFTS 

ARCHITECTURAL LEAGUE 



115 E. 40, N.Y.C. 



APRIL 1-13 



^IIJJA>I 



Apr. 22-May 1 1 



GROPPER 

Recent Paintings 
AC A 63 HAST 57, N. Y . 



1 ERNESTO 



Ist N. Y. Showing 



TRECCANI 



GALLERY 



john heller reosf 57 



ANNIE 



LENNEY 

Paintings Apr. 22-May 4 

Ward Eggleston Galleries 

969 Madison Avenue (at 76 Street) 



FRED 



MESSERSMITH 

First Showing ^P"l ''3 

barzansky galleries 

i^H^^Bl071 madison avenue, ar 81 street^^^»^"" 



EKTACHROMES 



_ PRINTS IN COLOR 



Peter A.Juley &Son 

PAotoarapAers of Fin% Art» 
225 U^»t 57* StreefNew York City 



AUFBAU 



Prtday, April 26, 1957 



WIR KAUFEN- 

GrapMscheKunsfwerke 

deutscher Expressionisten und 

Meister wie 

BECKMANN. FEININGER. 

I KIRCHNER, KOLLWITZ. NOLDE. 

SCHMIDT-ROTTLUFF elc 



HlwlÄRlCiÄfii 



|J193 Lexlnglon Ave.. N.Y. TR i-n^5 



sculpfure by —■"■■^ 

et«*** 



M' 



3.>A'c^V 



\b 



Schoneman 

63 Easl 57th 



Kunst 



"Trends in Watercolors 

Today" 

DiKS Brooklyn Museum, das für 
Brooklyn seit gut zwei Jahrzehn- 
ten die Rolle spielt, die in Man- 
hattan auf vier Institute (Metro- 
politan, Whitney, Museum ol" 
Modern Art und nun auch Mu- j 
seum of Primitive Art) vorteilt 
ist, konfrontiert in seiner 19. 
l7iternatio7ialen Aquarell - Au,s- 
stellung Italien mit den U.S.A. 

<?ö Amerikaner sind da, ioder mit 
einem Werk, 50 Italiener mit je Awei 
oder drei Arbeiten vertreten. Eina 
vortreffliche Massnahme, denn die ita- 
lienische Abteilung stellt vjcle neue 
Talente vor, deren Eigenart kaum 
durcli ein einziges Beispiel kennt litii 
ge)nacht werden könnte. 

Abstraktion dominiert — mit weni- 
gen Ausnahmen — beide Ciruppen. 
Souveräne Beherrschung des schwie- 
rigen Mediums ist ausnahmslos test- 
steilbar. Strenger organisierte Bild- 
k«mposition überwiegt bei den Italie- 
nern, treies Spiel mit amorphen For- 
men bei den Amerikanern. 

Sonderbarerweise macht sich, der all- 
mähliche Rückzug von extrem -ab- 
strakten Positionen in den Aquarellen 
der Amerikaner stärker geltend, ob- 
wohl es doch diese waren, die mit 
ihrem "Abstrakten Expressionismus" 
die westliche Kunst ansteckten. 

Mangel an Raum zwingt uns 
zur Beschränkung auf die Erwäh- 
nung weniger Künstler, wiewohl 
viel mehr es verdienten: die 
Italiener Afro, Ajmonc, derlei, 
Cremonini, Davico, Manzi, Mo- 
rand'i, Nuvolo, Santoniaso, Scia- 
lojd, Vespignani, die Amerikaner 
Bonge, Candell, Jimmy Ernst, 
Frasconi, Heideiireichy K^ncpncin, 
Peterdi, Salernme, Vicente, Tarn, 
Tobey, Max Weber, WUliam 
Zorach. 

Diese Schau, wie die "Nnv 
Presentation" betitelte Ncuoid- 
nimg von Skulpturen, Aquarellen 
und Keramiken im jüngsten Gale- 
rJp-Zubau des Museums lohnen 
einen Besuch reichlich. 

B. F. Dolbin 



ERNAH^EIU 

Schoneman Gallery (63 E. 57 Sl.) 

A low seasons back we wrole 
a lenglhy piece about this artist 
whose career as a sculplor was 
cut Short by the Nazis. We pic- 
lured Ihe muking oi" her artistic 
personulity against the back- 
Sround of her upbringing in the 
mlellectual and spirilual atmos- 
phere of her pateinal home in 
Franklort-o!i-Main— ior cenluries ! 
d center of Gcrman Jowish culture 
and arl-^ and her studies under 
the ^uidance of a pupil of Auguste ' 

Rodin. I 

The sculptures we saw in her Forest, 
Hills studio, linished ones as well as 
I oUiers. in diverse preparatory stages, 
1 reveaied a talent ol: undeniable m- 
I clividuality. that is worth watching. 
Since then. Erna Weill has had the 
success we predicted, culmmated in 
commissions lor tiie Jewish Commun- 
ity Center m Tenneck. N.J. (Site of 
her prescnt home and studio), arul for 
the new 3vnago;.;ue on Suund-view 
Avenue m VVhite Flains. N. V. 

Most of tlie 34 piecfs in her retio- 
spective exhibition at Schoneman s 
belong io a scries inspired by stories 
trom the Old Testament. with 
their imposing cast of kings, prophets 
md patriarchs. In some ol her sculp- 
tures notably "Moses on the Moun- 
tain". "Jacob Fights the Angel" and 
•Revelation"; she extends the Kodin- 
esque style for her pi)rtraits-out- 
Standing among the latter are busts ol 
Martin Buber. Rudolf Serkin, Claude 
Frank— tar toward tne borderline ol 
coinplete abstraction. 

"Outcry '. "Ingathermg ol the Exiles" 
and "The Unknown Political Prisoner ' 
are sc\ilputred expre.ssions of deeply 
lelt anguish and commiseration. 

Ceremonial objects — a bronze 
"Menorah", a ceramic "Matzoh- 
Platter" and silver "Challah Plat- 
ter'* — show craftmansltip as well 
as imagination in the use of tri- 
angle and pyramid as mystic 
for ms. 

Some of her neblest achieve- 
ments, such as the large bronze 
relief "Jacob's Dream" for the 



Eine Frau ohne Hass und Furcht 



Von Richard Oyck 



Der Verlag Beacon Press in 
Boston hat soeben ein Buch vcr- 
öfTentlicht, das jeden aufs tiefste 
bewegen wird, der durch die 
Schrecknisse der Hitler-Hölle ge- 
gangen ist und bemüht war, sich 
aus einem Europäer m einen gu- 
ten Amerikaner zu wandeln. Das 
Buch heisst ''The Unforgotien", 
und seine Autorin ist Ilse Staii,iey. 

Sie ist die Tochter des 
Oberkantors Magmis Davidsohn, 
der in dem berühmten Berliner 
Tempel der Fasanenstrasse bis 
zu seiner Niederbrennung in der 
''Kristallnacht" vom 9. November 
1938 als Chasan mit schöner 
Stimme seines Amtes waltete und 
den alle Leser des "Aufbau" als 
einen langjährigen Mitarbeiter 
kennen. Ilse Stanley war vor 
Hitler in Deutschland eine be- 
kannte Schauspielerin, Rezitato- 
rin und Theaterdirektorin. Doch 
in den Vereinigten Staaten, in 
denen sie und ihr Sohn Manfred 
seit Jahren ein Heim gefunden 
haben, wurde sie Millionen von 
TV-Zuschauern zu einer fesseln- 
den Persönlichkeit, als sie im 
vorigen Jahre in Hollywood von 
Ralph Edwards in seiner TV show 

synagogue in Teaneck and the 
imposing marble carving "Baal 
Shem" are, by necessity, shown 
only in photographs. Neverthe- 
less, this exhibition teils why 
Erna Weill belongs among the 
distinguished artists whose works 
adorn the most modern syna- 
gogues in the United States. 

'- " B. F. Dolbin 





"Jacob's 

Dream" 

by 

Irna Weill 

A sculpiure 
commissioned by 
Ihe Jewish Com- 
munity Center, 
Teaneck, N. J. 



Ilse Stanley, 

die Autorin der ungewöhnlichen 
Autobiographie 'The Unforgotlen' 



'This Is Your Life** vorgestellt 
wurde und ihre Lebensgeschichte, 
den Passionsweg einer deutschen 
Jüdin, erzählte. 

Dies war für Ilse Stanley ein 
di^nkwürdiger Tag. Man kann sa- 
gen, dass von ihm eigentlich ihre 
literarische Karriere in Amerika 
datierte. Nun hat sie ihr erstes 
Buch in ihrer neuen Heimat ge- 
schrieben — ein Buch, das auf 
dem Büchermarkt, und nicht al- 
lein auf dem amerikanischen, sei- 
nen Weg machen dürfte. 

Ob tna» es liebt oder nicht, nie- 
mand kann an Ilse Stanleys **T/ie 
Unjorgotteri' gleichgültig vorü- 
bergelien. Es ist die Geschichte 
ihres Lebens, und doch viel mehr 
als eine Autobiographie. Es ist 
zuerst und zuvörderst eine grosse 
Konfession, die Lebensbeichte 
eines religiösen Menschen. Ilse 
Stanleys Gott ist ein Gott der 
Lieb., der Versöhnung, des Ver- 
gebens, ein Gott der sie nicht zu 
hassen lehrt. Und ich bekenne 
ganz ofTen, dass ich zuweilen ihre 
Hasslosi^keit selbst gegenüber 
den braunen Folterknechten, 
recht irritierend fand. Ilse Stan- 
ley iiJbt auch zu, das.s selbst ihre 
besten Freunde ihr in dieser all- 
umfassenden Menschenliebe nicht 
immer zu folgen vermochten. 

Doch Il.se Stanley ist nic^t al 
lein ein Mensch, der in jedem 
Mitmenschen den Bruder sieht 
und an das Gute im Menschen 
mit eiserner Konsequenz glaubt, 
sie ist auch eine Frau von grosser 
Furchtlosigkeit Wenn man im 
ersten Teil des Buches, der der 
Hitler-Aera und all seinen Greu- 
eln gewidmet ist, liest, wie sie 
sich unerschrocken in das Haupt- 
quartier der Gestapo und sogar 
allein in die Konzentrationslager 
wagte, um Juden zu retten — 412 



Opfer Hitlers hat sie ihren An- 
gaben nach ganz allein aus den 
Klauen der brauneti Inciuisition 
herausgeholt — dann zieht man 
bewundernd den llul vor .«soviel 
Courage und Furthtlosiiikeit einer 
ganz allein auf sich gestellten 
Frau. 

Der erste Teil dieser Autobio- 
graphie, die für einen literari- 
schen Erstling auflallend gut ge- 
schrieben ist, enthalt einige un- 
vergessliche Partien. Selten ist 
die Niederbrenn ung der Synago- 
gen mit so erschütternder Wucht 
und Dramatik dargestellt worden. 
Oder ich denke an die aufregende 
Szene bei der Gestapo, als die 
Autorin anstelle ihrer vorgelade- 
nen Mutter bei diesen Bestien er- 
scheint und sie schliesslich, allein 
durch die Macht ihier Persön- 
lichkeit, zähmt und umstimmt 
Doch so erregend und lesenswert 
der erste Teil ist, den zweiten, die 
Geschichte ilires Einleljeus in 
Amerika, stelle ich höher. Dieser 
Teil ist eines der besten Lehr- 
bücher der Amerikanisierung, das 
ich je gelesen habe. Aus ihm kön- 
nen alle, die nach den Vereinigten 
Staaten kommen, viel, sehr viel 
lernen (und auch die. die schon 
hier sind und Fuss gefa.sst haben) . 

Ilse, die sich in Amerika mit 
dem Schauspieler Mihon Stanley 
nach der Scheidung vom ersten 
Mann verheiratete\ beschreibt ih- 
ren amerikanischen Lt^bensweg, 
der ganz und garnieht nur mit 
Rosen bestreut war, mit erfri- 
schender Lebendigkeit und nicht 
selten mit feinem Mumor. Sie 
beschönigt nichts, verniedlicht 
nichts und nennt die Din^c immer 
beim rechten Namen. Ihre Er- 
lebnisse an Bord auf der Ueber- 
fahrt nach New York sowie die 
Schilderung der ensten Wochen 
in der fremden Riesenstadt, in die 
sie, der englischen Sprache so gut 
wie unkundig, plötzlich veischla- 
gen ist, verraten das echte The- 
(Forlsetzung auf Seite 7) 

Die Rockefelier-Stiftung, 

die kürzlich wieder einen gros- 
sen Betrag für Forsehungszweke 
auswarf, hat de.m Germanisten 
Prof. Walther KiUy von der 
Freien Utnver,sitäi Borlni 5100 
Dollar überwiesen. Din- Betrag 
solidem Studium neuer deutscher 
Literatur in den Vereinigten 
Staaten und in Kanada dienen. 



Jüdische National-Biographie 
geplant 

S. Wininger, der in dvn Jah)en 1«)25 
bi.s 1936 eine Jüdisthe Nat iun.ilbio.i?ra- 
phie in siehen Biindon vcröflontliclit 
hat, in der Daten über das Leben und 
Schaffen von etwa i j.uüo .lüdischen 
Persönlichkeiten enthalten waren, lebt 
jetzt in Ramat Gan in Israel und ar- 
beitet daran, in hebraisi tier Spr.jclie 
eine auf den heutigen Stand «ebrachle 
Ausgabe dieses Lexikons /usammenzu- 
stellen. 



Bringen Sie Ihre Lieben 



l 



/ 



Thurs< 



1 



/ 



\ 






p 



Of Special InteresfTo Women 



COOK'S COUNSEL 



y 



Nutrition Week, May 5-9: 
Food Shapes' Your Future 

I By ALICE FIELD 



ANYTIME, of course, is a good 
tlme to begin a program of good 
nutrition, especially now. New York 
City's Food and Nutrition Council 
will help you along your way, as 
its eiglitli annual Nutrition Week 
begins Sunday and continues to 

May 11. 

The Slogan of th^ event is "Food 
ßhapes Your Future". which is 
true both ''figuratively" and liter- 
ally. But "figures" aside, even non- 
reducers might vvant to get on the 
bandwagon of sensible eating — 
In View of the latest data on the 
nutritional relationship to long 
life and good health 

A guide to good eating, sug- 
gested by the Council on Foods 
and Nutrition by the American 
Medical Association urges the fol- 

lowing: 

MILK: two or more glasses daily 
for adult; three or four for child- 

ren. 

VEGETABLES: two or more 
«ervings daily other than potato 
(one green or yellovv; "greens" 
often). 

FRXJITS: two or more servings 
daily, at least one raw; citrus fruit 
or tomato daily. 

three t( five a weck; 
[preferred. 

:heese. fish poul- 

or more servings daily. 
hs; peas, peanuts occa- 



ko «d •« 



AND BREAD: two or 
igs daily. Whole-grain 

jnriched. Added milk 

»utrvtional values. 
two or more table - 



make interesting salads are always 
welcome, and those that foUow 
have : tangy touch provided by 
golden brown prepared mustard: 

LUNCHEON SALAD 

2 cups diced cooked corned beef 

1 cup chopped celery 

2 tablespoons chopped sweet 
gherkins 

2 hard-cooked tg^?>, chopped 
2 tablespoons <6 teaspoons) 

mustard ^ 

I4 cup mayonnaise ^ 

Salad greens 
Combine first four ingredients. 
Add golden brown prepared must- 
ard to mayonnaise and toss with 
corned beef mixture. Serve on 
crisp salad greens. Makes 6 serv- 
ings. 

Salmon Surprise Salad 
2 Ulb.) cans salmon 

1 cup chopped celery 

2 apples, peeled and sliced 

1 tablespoon butter 
ia cup sour cream 

2 tablespoons (6 teaspoons) 
mustard 

tablespoon vinegar 
teaspoons horseradish 
teaspoon salt 
tablespoon lemon juice 
hard-cooked egg, fineiy ' 
chopped 

Salad greens 
Drain salmon and flake; add 
celery. Saute apples in butter until 
soft. S'ove. Add remaining in- 
gredients except egg and greens 
and beat until smooth. Four over 
salmon mixture and toss well. 
Serve on crisp salad greens and 



1 
2 

1 
1 




CAROL JOY NEUFELO 



MissNeufeld's 
Troth Told 

Mr and Mrs. Philip M. Neufeld 
of 365 West End Ave., New York 
City, announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Carol Joy to 
Mr. Daniel J. Heller, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Heller of New 
York. The couple will be mar- 
ried on Sunday, Junt 30 at The 
Savoy-Plaza. 

Miss Neufeld, an alumna of the 
Bentley School and Sarah Law- 
rence College '54, Is presently a 
member of the Press Department 
of Columbia Artists Management, 
Inc. She is Secretary of the Junior 
Board of the Grand Street Settle- 
ment House. 

Mr. Heller was graduated cum 
laude from New York University 
and from Brooklyn Law School. 
A member of the New York Bar, 
he practises as a C.P.A. and at- 



AROUiVD town 



By DEBOKAH FRANKEL 



In the one man exhibit at the 
Schoeneman Gallery, 63 Fast St.. 
New York City, there is a treat 
for the soul as well as the eye, 
the art of Erna Weill. 

Style, technique, and approach 
and a deep spiritual quality stir 
the Imagination, break tl^'ough 
the v^arious hard media that she 
employs, whether it be terra-cotta, 
bronze, marble or quick -drying 
plastic. 

She draws upon the scriptures 
and the history of the Jewish peo- 
ple for many of her devotional 
subjects. Deeply religious herseif, 
her subjects have an inner 
gleam. Small wonder then, that 
she was twice commissioned to 
sculpt entrances and side walls 
for temples. 

Born in Frankfort-on-Main. a 
center of Jewish culture, she early 
imbibed thoughts of the great 
Jewish philosopher Martin. Buber, 
whose humane principles she 
strove to incorporate in her work. 

Later, the Hitlerian reign of 
terror, with its anguish and mis- 
ery, evoked in her still greater 
comi)assion that emerged in her 
work. 

Her biblical subjects include 
Sampson, Hannah and Moses and 
many legends from the "Song of 
Songs". In these are evidences of 
mysticisrn .tragedy, humility, piety 
and supnlication. In others, there 
are love and hope and resignation 
— and the sense that such suffer- 
ing could not have been in vain; 
that, sometime in the future, a 



better race must emerge, glorious 
and triumphant. 

Erna Weill also designs cerc- 
monial objects — chalices, candel- 
abra, bible reliefs, sedar dishes, 
etc. She has even manged to get a 
biblical devotional flavor inlo a 
set of chess. 

Her Portrait modelling includes 
fcusts of F.D.R and Mayor La- 
Guardia, distinguished musicians 
and artists. Her treatment and tlie 
material she uses vary greatly, dc- 
pending solely upon the siibjeit. 

She is a forme; pupil of Aufrüste 
Rodin, the French master, whose 
influence left an imprint on her 
Vvork. While her early works re- 
flected the classic in form^ her 
later ones are more impressionislic 
and more abstract. Her studics of 
Moses, and his mother Hanna 1t, 
and Baal Shem, reveal a bent to- 
w^ards cubism, while still main- 
taining a healthy respect for llie 
human form. 

Erna Weill has also had a one 
man show at the Carlebach Gal- 
lery and her sculpture has been 
exhibited abroad and at home. 
Her work is currently in the perm- 
anent collections of the Birming- 
ham Museum, Ala. — the Georgia 
State Museum, Athens, Ga., tlie 
Hyde Park Library, H. P. Ny.,— '.iie 
Bezalel Museum and the Hebrew 
University in Jerusalem, and the 
Tel Aviv Museum. 

She will be exhibited r.t the 
Schönem an Galleries until May 16. 

Since her arrival to U. S. in 
1937, Erna Weill has created sev- 
eral hundred pieces of sculpture. 






RODIN EXHIBITION 
WILLÖPENFRIDAK 

French Sculpture to Co on 

View at Museum of Art — 

Hofmann at Whitney 



»Vl-av^ 



^"»n*V 



Among outstanding art events 
this week i> the Metropolitan 
Museum's exhibition. "Rodln and 
French Sculpture," open.ng on 
Frlday. The display will place j 
emphasis on the museum's ex-, 
tensive collections of work by, 
Rodin. Degas and others-exam- 
ples that have not been shown 
for some time. 

The Whitney Museum will 
op^n a retrospective exhibition 
of work bv the influential artlst 
and teacher Hans Hofmann on 
Wednesday. 

One-man shows include work 
by a number of well-known 
American and European artists. 
The Society of American Ab- 
stract Artists will h" ^ 'ts 
twentv-first annual exhibition 

A list of new art attractions 
for the weck followa: 

TOMORROW 
Cailvle Brown Catheiine Vivi- 1 
ano, 42 Käst Fifty-sevcnth 
Street. Paintings. ^v. i 

Donald Carrick and Chna fehel- 
ton-Barone Galle.y. 1018 Madi- 
-on Avenue. Paintings. 
Sholim Farber-Haiiy Salpeter 
Galleiy. 42 Käst Fifty-aeventh 
Sticct. Paintings. 
Groppei-ACA Gallery, 63 Last 
Fifty-seventh Street. Paintings 
and lithographs 
John Heliker- Kraushaar Gal- 
leries. 1055 Madison Avenue. 
Paintings. _ , 

Hang Jaenisch - Kleeman Gal- 
lerics. 11 East Slxty-elghth 
Street Paintings. 
Annle Lennoy Ward Eggleston 
Galleries. 969 Madison Avenue. 

Paintings. .,, , v m 

Raymond Mintz-Frank K. M. 

kehn Gallery, 683 Fifth Avenue. 

P^-^intings. ^ ... 

Santomaso - Grace Borgenicht 

Gallery. 1018 Madison Avenue. 

Paintings. . ^,.,.,.„ 

J-vmes Watson-Morris Galleiy, 

mWaverly Place. Paintings. 
Group Exhibitiom 
Burr Gallery. 108 West Fifty- 

sixth Street. Paintings by three 

Thrclntemporarles. 992 Madison 
/venue American Abstract 
Actists, 21st Annual Exhibition 

Davis Gallerics, 231 East Sixtieth 
St 'rot "An Intlmate Collec- 
tlon" of European and Amen- 
c.in paintings. ,„ tr. , 

SHnv Janis Gallery, 15 East 
Fifty-Peventh Street. Modern 
art fiom Brancusi to Gia- 

M^'i-ch^Gallcry, 95 East Tenth 
Street Work by thirteen mem- 
hers and thirteen guests 
The Studio Gallery, 22 East Thir- 
teenth Street. Portraits, char- 
actev studles, impressions of 
people. 

TUESDAY 
Fernando Bosc-Petite Galerie, 
129 West Flfty-sixth Street. 
Paintings. „ , 

Loonor Flni- Gallery SeventV; 
Five, 30 East Scventy-fifth 
SMeet. Paintings. 
ß:,bro Hasegawa-Wlllard Gal- 
lerv 23 West Fifty-sixth Street 
T^Temorial exhibition of paint- 

Eirofb'Hara -Grand Central Art 
r-ncrics. 15 Vandcrbilt Ave- 
m-. Water-colois. ^ , , 

Alt mir Osver-- Grand Central 
Modern«^, 1018 Madison Avenue. 

^l'^Uh^is^^Padua-Van Dicmen- 
LiUenfold Galleries, 21 East 
Fifty-seventh Street. Pi^'ntlnKS. 

Rouault -- Schoneman Galler.e . 
63 East Fiftv-seventh Street. 

T.onn exhibition of paint;"^«- „. 
Sf.fanelli Poindexior G.aller> 21 

West Fifty-slxth Street. Paint- 

Dl)"othy Sturm and Marie Taylor 
° n'tty Parsons Gallery, 15 East 
Flfty-scventh Street. Montages 
and sculptuvo. 

Ena Weill-Schoncman Gallery, 
63 East Fifty-seventh Street. 

Sculpture. 

Grnnp Exhibitions 
Deltsch Gallery. 51 East Seventy- 
third Street. New French pnnt | 

Martrn^'wSdlfleld Gallery, 818 
Madison Avenue. Pr;-Colum- 
bian Gold and .Tade ,from the 
Stendahl Collection. 

WEDNESDAY 

Paul Gcorgcs-Tlbor de Nagy ' 
Gallery. 24 East Sixty-seventh 
Street. Paintings. 

Hans Hofmann-Whitney Muse- 
um. 22 West Fifty-fourth Street. 
Paintings. Retrospectlve exhi- 

L^^Manso-N. Y. U. Gallery 80 
Washington Square East. Pamt- 

Manzu-World House Galleries. | 
Madison Avenue at Seventy- 
BBventh Street. Bronzes and 
drawlngs. ..^ 

Luis Qulntanilla-Wildenstein. 19 
East Slxty-fourth Street. Paint- 

Go"don Russell - .^P^r^^^^J^f'' 
Brothers, 11 East Fifty-seventh 
Street, Paintings and draw- 

Sof il'urrutia-West Tenth Sti-eet 
Gallery, 191 West Tenth Street. 
Paintings. 

Group Exhibttionfi 
The Archltectural League of New 
York. 115 East Fortleth Street. 
Seventy-fifth annual exhibition. 
The Museum of the City of New 
York. Flfth Avenue and 104th 
Street Currler & Ives Prints 
from the Harry T. Peters col- 
lection. 

THURSDAY 
Ralph Fasanella-James Gallery, 
70 East Twelfth Stre. t. Palnt- 

John"' Stanley- Fleisch ««". gal- 
lery 227 East Ter :h Street. 
Paintings, drawlngs, prints. 

friday 

Rodln and French Sculpture, 
?rom the museum's collection^ 
The Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, Flfth Avenue at Elgnty- 
secönd S*reet 

SATURDAY 
■elmagundi Club. 4V Flfth Ave- 
»ui. Annual water-color exhi- 
bition. , ^„, 
Not Previously Announced 
The Arts Gallery. 62 West Flfty- 
«Ixth Street. Group show. 
Jacques Bleny- Raymond and 
Raymond, mc ^4 East Flfty- 
thlrd Street. Paln..ing8. 

Title Restored to Laos Prince 

I HANG PRABANG. Laos 
aS 20 V/P)-The f tle of Mahr 
iCaj (second Wng) of Lac 
häs boen restored to rnnci 
Photsarath. home from self-im- 
pnsed exlle. The prlnco, eldesl 
nonhrw of King SisaVang Vong. 
;!rt into exile^welvo ycars ago^ 
rr-tor,»1ion of th. title s 

twellas holst cnngPhetjiraih. 

chaT\ce8 of becominr Premier 



f 



Üopartmcnl, ciills attention to 
tho piinciples of Zcn Biiddhism 
with its discipline freeing the 
ailist for a kind of automatic 
flnd spontaneous exprcssion. 
Chinese painting and Japaneso 
pi'ints pi-ovide notable forbcais. 
The impact of Japanese prints 
nn the imprcssionist painters in 
France coincidcd, strangely 
cnough, with the decline of the 
art in Japan lollowing the death 
of Hiroshige in the middle of 
the Nineteenth Century. Mech- 
anical developments, the intro- 
duction of different inks and the 
opcning of acquaintance with 
tlie westein world were all fac- 
turs. But after a lapse of half 
a Century there began a levivai 
of print-making and today with 
all sorts of innovations in meth- 
ods the Japanese print industry 
is again thriving. There was a 
big exhibition of both cid and 
new work at the Yale Art 
Gallery two or three years ago 
and novv the Weyhe Gallery has 
brought over a notable show of 
work by leading contemporary 
Japanese printmakors both in 
black-and-white and in color cal- 
ligraphy throughout. 

Japanese Modern» 

Among the cxaniples ' at 
Weyhe's are sonie of the figure 
subjects by Shiko Munakata to 
whoni was awarded the inter- 
national print prize at the 
Venice Biennale last Summer. 
These are crisply modern in 
Statement despite a kinship to 
certain medieval representations 
of Buddhist deities. Others rep- 
lesented in the show are Salto, 
who does marvelous cats as well 
as landscape and still-life; Onchi, 
who makes extraordinary use of 
butterflies, feathers and various 
Symbols in quite abstract or- 
ganizations; Sekino, whosecolor- 
ful "Girl with Fowl" has a 
quaint resemblance to some of 
Picasso's paintings; Shinagawa 
who employs the recurrent 
sword Symbol in abstractly 
intcrpreting a Kabuki dancer; 
Yamaguchi, who gives a half- 
framcd-in Icaf in an abstract 
design a sensitive symbolism; 
and Hadaki Yoshida who turns 
commonplace objects into strik- 
ing Symbols in abstract design. 
■ Finally, in the week's shows, 
theie is first New York ex- 
hibition by William Ronald, who 
won the Canadian award in the 
recent Guggenheim International 
Competition. In these paintings 
at the Kootz Gallery Ronald 
reveals with power and striking 
color a personal symbolism car- 
ried out through forms and 
shapes quite abstractly pre- 
sented as in "The Raven" (re- 
produced) which might well be 
an Interpretation of the ominous 
theme of Poe's poem. The work 
is non-figurative but convincing 
in spirit and mood and stamped 
with highly personal purpose. 
"Bastilc," for instance, might 
well have bccn inspiied by the 
painter's sense of confinement in 
art and the neccssity of trans- 
ccnding lU • • 



in the world, are impiisoned in 
portfolios, but carefully classi- 
fied and cared for, it is true. 
There are also many other 
valuable treasures not on view 
at the Louvre — tapestries, ce- 
raniics, ivories, jewels, as well 
as antiquities. For example, 
though 15,000 pieces are on show 
\n the Egyptian section (the 
largest after that at the Cairo 
niuseum), about 30,000 remain 
invisible. 

The other Paris museums are 
more or less in the same Situa- 
tion. At Cluny, the museum of 
the Middle Ages, are hidden 
away sufficient works of the 
Renaissance to fill a whole mu- 
seum devoted to the art of that 
period. The Guimot museum dis- 
plays only a feeble part of its 
treasures of Asia and the Orient. 
The Museum of Man, the Petit 
Palais, the Museum of Populär 
Arts and Traditions, the Museum 
of Modern Art have all of them 
abundant reserves. Why not 
Show them, then ? 

Before answ^ring this ques- 
tion, one may point out that 
these reserves have their uses. 
The provincial museums fre- 
quently dip into them to com- 
plete their collections. It is from 
the reserves again that paint- 
ings and precious objects are 
borrowed for the decoration of 
the apartments put at the dis- 
posal of distinguished guests of 
France: sovereigns or foreign 
statesmen. Finally, some ex- 
hibits, such as drawings, ivories 
or tapestries are too fragile to 
Support permanent exhibition. 

Yct all these reasons cannot 



Jeu de 

the Im- 



tially aristocratic art of Filie 
Nadelman occupies a lofty and 



expenditure? > 

At the present time, the na 
tional museums recoive for their jloncly niche in twenticth Century 
upkeep, the picsentation and sculpture. Secrecy shrouded his 
restoration of their collortionsjlast years but, since his death 
pressionist collection, has been|barely 120 million francs ($r>36,-lin 1916, a new gcneration of 
closed for the last two and one-'OOOj per annum, and 16 millionjcollectors has become aware of 
half years for repairs which give.francs ($4d.800) for evcntuallthe Singular beauty of his work 
no sign of approaching comple- purchases. For purchases fromjwhich is, conscquently, fast van 



public. 

Repairs Urgently Needed 

The Museum of the 
Paume, which housed 



tion. The Museum of Modern 
Art being threatened with col- 
lapse, urgent work was under- 
taken there over a year ago, 
then suspended three months 
later for lack of credits. Visitors 
from abroad this summer will, 
therefore, be unable to see the 
works created by masters of 
modern art during the last fifty 



and Orders to living artists, the 
State devotes a mere 60 million 
francs ($168,000) a year. 

The share of the State budget 
allotted to Arts and Letters is 
less than a tenth of one per 
Cent; in other words, for every 



ishing into private hands. 

For this reason, it is some- 
thing of a triumph that the 
current exhibition of his sculp- 
ture, drawings and prints at the 
Hewitt Gallery manages to pre- 
sent so many aspects of his 



thousand francs ($2.80) spent, esthetic explorations. "Praxitel 



the State earmarks one franc 
for the museums, the manufac- 



years; then there is the Museeitures, instruction in the Fine 
des Travaux Publiques (PubliclArts, plastic arts, literature, 
Works) which has purely and theatre and music. It may be 
simply disappeared to make reckoned that Louis XIV spent a 
room for the Conseil de l'Union hundred times more on the arts 
Franqaise (French Colonial As- 1 and letters than does the Re- 
sembly) ; and also the Musee des j public. 



Arts et Traditions Populaires 
(Populär Arts and Traditions), 
imprisoned for twenty years 
past in the cellars of the Palais 
de Chaillot. ' 



Then, in spite of the short- 
comings of the State and its 
scandalous stinginess, for a hun- 
dred years France has imposed 
on the World a practically un- 



.)> 



Evidently it is the republicjcontested artistic supremacy. 
that is responsible for this de-jHow can such a paradox be ex- 
fault. While in the United States iplained? On reflection, it is 
museums for the most part have perhaps this flagrant incapacity 
been built with private capitalof the democratic State which 
and their collections provided byjroused the great precursors of 
individual donations or legacies,;the XIXth Century to action as 
in France, as elsewhere in the: well as the innovators of con- 
majority of European countriesjtemporary art. For while the 
the artistic inhoritance, as well I State has dohe nothing for them, l - ., .- 
as the artistic life of the nation,lall that thev have done has been ^aughtily mdividualistic art was 
is administered by the public without, and even in spite of the ^^^^^^^ durmg his most produc- 

tive years 



man" was the appropriate nick- 
name given Nadelman in Paris 
before 1914 when he fashioned, 
in the teeth of advance^ taste 
for primitivism and intellectu- 
ahty, his unsentimental and 
tender heads, in their way as 
steeped in classicism, and as 
subtly romanticized, as the plays 
of Racine. 

On anoWier level is the acid 
sophistication of his wood figures 
where, tongue in cheek, he poked 
fun at modish types such as 
dancers, acrobats and hostesses. 
These dehghtful figures — heroes 
and heroines of a new Alexan- 
drian Age — are more truly re- 
flections of a temperament that 
defies Classification. Only the 
fact that art historians like 
pigeon-holes can account for the 
Strange neglect with which his 



During the Twenties in Paris, 
while the Surrealists were trans- 
figuring Freud, Jules Pascin 
(1885-1930) was painting por- 
traits of friends such as the 
pect, Pierre MacOrlan (below, 
left), as well as anonymous deni- 
zens of the half world. Pascin 
is the central figure in the cur- 
rent group show at the Pcrls 
Gallery which otherwise includes 
a miscellaneous selection of 
twentieth-century School of Paris 
pictures, early and late. Ad- 
mirers of Dufy, Braque, Pi- 
casso, Rouault, Van Dongen and 
Vlaminck will find here their 
favorites in good and often un- 
familiar form. 

The finesse of Pascin's color 
— those rosy and i-usty half- 
tints that linger slowly drawn 
over his figures — corresponds to 
the Visual inquisitiveness that 
searches out the shady, shadow^y 
modeis. Everything is slightly 
unsteady. Even the furniture 
looks groggy and the bitter- 
sweetness of mood tcnds to be 
cloying. But the acuity of 
draftsmanship is unfaltering. 




SANTOMASO 



STEFANELLI 



POINDEXTER 



21 WEST 56 
J'J 6-6630 



APRIL 22.MAY 1 8 i ««888888»^^ 




Igracc borgenicht gaUeryl^^^^ GALLERY ■' 



pril 22« 

May 4 




1018 MA DISON AVE. • 79 ST. 

TH^ artTaTr 

has fnUreed \t% quartm 
tn nippt the piithusiastiir 
fiomand for r/of>c/ C'onti-m- 
porary Amrricaii Art at 

LOW, LOW PRICES 

flül^THEÄRT FAIR 



108 W. 56 ST., N. Y. 19 




615 COLUMBUS AVE. fat HO ST.) 
Op«n Sat. Ä. Sun. ONLY 9 AM. to 9 P.M 



Marilyn KLEINMAN 
Bernice WINN 

Adricnne CAMILLI 

MARIE Apr. 23-May if 

TAYLO 

RECENT SCULPTURE 

BETTY PARSONS 

GALLERY • 15 E. 57 ST., N. Y. C. 

PAINTINGS'marsden 




OSVER 



GRAND CENTRArM'oDtRNs'HARTLEY 

(at79St.) 1018 MADISON AVE.I 

— Paintings 

BABCOCK GALLERIES 

-- zrr^— - 805 MADISON AVE. (at 68 St.) 

JOHN 



Three American« 



powers, that is to say, the State 
The great French museums are 
State museums. 
The State suffers from chronit 



State. 



Mr. El gar is an Art Critic of 
Carrcfour, Paris. 



?::::^*Kg?;:;iÄ::::::::::::: 





'1 



•*Mac Orlan/' by Julos Pascin, 
ebony, by Chaim Gross, 



Oll exhibition at the Perls Gallery. Kight— '*Prou(I Mother," 
in the one-man show at the Duveen-Graham Gallery, 



Veteran Surrealist 

Now that Surrealism as a 
movement has become a period 
piece and that the hterary 
Chorus declaiming- its pseudo- 
psychoanalytical mumbo jumbo 
has died away, we can make 
some effort to discern the es- 
thetic stature of its leading 
Ughts. Any great artist rises 
above the style he makes fa- 
mous. Just as Seurat is more 
than his dots and Mondrian than 
his gridirons, so Max Ernst, 
showing recont work at the lolas 
Gallery, is far more significant 
as a painter than as a guide to 
Ihe sub - consciou.«^, an "arch- 
sorceier" as Andre Breton called 
him. 

Most of these new pictures, 

painted with all the technical in- 

ventivcness and cunning- we 

might expect, make oblique ref- 

9rences to moon - Struck land- 

scapes and to the fabulous birds 

and animals haunting them. As 

Symbols of bemused states of 

mind they defy analysis or even 

exaot description. But then Ernst 

Is a poet and if these paintings- 

are comparatively calm in mood, 

We still accept his Identification 

of one of them as "A Project 

for a Monument to W. C. Fields." 

The horrcndous visions of thirty 

yeais ago have disappeared. The 

nightmare has slipped into a 

luminous dream and Ernst may 

be admired as one of the most 

delicate and beguiling cj-aftsman 



Chaim Gross' abstract figure 
sculptures in stone, wood and 
bronze, at Duveen - Graham's, 
rise into the air with the natural 
force of a geyser. They are 
energy ronductors, pulsating 
with health and vigor; knob- 
bly and bulbous constructions, 
usually of more than one figure 
(below, right), that could very 
well act as caryatids were they 
called upon to do so. Both a 
carver and a modeler, Gross ex- 
cels at the former, concentrating 
within smoothly locked together 
planes an intensity of feeling 
that tends to escape from the 
more excitable process of mod- 
eUng. • 

The impulsiveness that spring? 
so variously to the eye in John 
Grillo's abstract expressionist 
paintings at Bertha Schaefer's 
is never too turbuent to dostroy 
their over-all unitj'. His work ir 
as spontaneous as that of any 
of his colleagues but he seems 
to have an assurance and power 
to control bru.sh gestures that 
many of them lack. In other 
words, his painterly instinct is 
a formal one and the vitality of 
his pictures does not fritter away| 
in explorations of the dccorativc 
possibilities of paint. Their air 
of purposeful energy rescucr 
theni from chaos and meander- 
Ing. And color is sumptuous. 

Affectionate and straightfor- 
ward tributes to familiär scene; 
are paid in John Whorf's expert 
vvater-colors at the Milch Gal- 
Icries. Whorf excels in catching 
lature's more fugitive manifes- 
tations — the glitter of moonlight 
on waves; the mist rising from 
the ground during a snowstorm: 
and the curious stiffening ol 
light over a countrysidc as 
afternoon slidcs impcrceptibly 
into eveninp:. Lovers of New 
England's landsrape and archi- 



i amencan 
f abstract 
artists 

THE CONTEMPORARIES 

992 MADISON AVE. AT 77»h ST. 



M 



sculpturt by 



\b 



Atli Schoneman 



63 East 57 



WA NT ED 

paintingf • sculpture 

for summer and fall exhibition» • all media 

LYNN KOTTLER GALLERIES 
3 EAST 65 ST., N. Y. 

iir-conditioned REgent 4-3491 

"■"RECENT WATERCOLORS' 

ELIOT 

O'HARA 

APRIL 23- MAY A 

Grand Central Art Galleries, Inc. 

.^15 Vandcrbilt Av€., N. Y. C..^ 
JOHN 

HELIKER 

Paintings • Apr. 22-May I I 

KRAUSHAAR GALLERiES 

1055 MADISON AVE. (Entrance on 80th St.) 
Recent Paintings 

JACQUES BLENY 

through May 2nd 

RAYMOND & RAYMOND 

54 East 53rd Street 



BRZOSTOSKI 

PAINTINGS ' (0 M,,Y 9th 

AliriVIV ^AlJJJtV 

85 / Lexington Ävc. (64th Si.) 
32 East 51sf Street 

SPRING EXHIBITION 

DAVIS • O'KEEFFE • SHAHN 
SHEELER • WEBER • ZORACH 



FERNANDO 




Apr. 22-May 4 

PeUJc Galerie -1 29 W. 56 

Opcning Apr. 2? "■"■"■■^■^ 

SHOLAM 

FARBER 

New Paintings 
HARRY SALPETER GALLERY 

«.«««^ 42 EAST 57 ST. 



A NEW CONCEPT 

THE CHURCHILL GALLERY 

arthurTchwieder 

AT 

CHURCHiLL'S RESTAURANT 139 BWAY 



EAN 



Thru May 4 



Ol his eia. Nor, as his fantastidtccture will be solaccd here. 



APRIL 
17-27 



modern 
Japanese 
woodcuts 

WlYHl ^S^Lexington, near Bist 




Hansa Gallery 21O Central Park Soiül» 



For Addifional Art 
Advcrtising See Page 8 



z' 






Fifty-fiftli ycar 

of continiiwLi^ pul)licalion 

xMay 1957 Volume 56. Niimbcr 3 



I 



ART 



IVEWS 




•üon ..(form /-■•',, „5 in.-J- 




'1; 
a-i 



ivitin" toll"' 



II.D.II. 



^ < 



:Li 



V 



E r'^EW YORK »TIMES. SATURPAY. MAY 4. 




19S 




•e are two a^ects 
Erna Woiirs sculpture, a gro 
of which is displayed at the -1 
Sclioneman Gallery, 63 East 
Fifty-seventh Street. 
First are her portrait busts, 

bold and precise in execution 
and emphasizing the individual 
character of each sitter. Then 
comes her freely imaginative 
work, most of which is devo- 
tional in character and sym- 
bolizes episodes from the Old 
Testament. 

There is a sense of strain 
to this work, which owes its 
emphatic semi - primitivism. 
to Epstein. But as an imagina- 
tive style, her manner of car- 
ving is appropriate to the sub- 
jects of streng emotional ap- 
peal ta which she is drawn. 

1 n y-t 



> 




stf^ 




x^ 



SCHONEMAN GALLERIES 

NEW YORK CITY 




No. I rii:i{i;(>'i 



pKKi \(;k and acknowlkdcmknt 



W illi IVw ('\('<'|)li()Ms. all painlin^s cxhiMlcd licrc liavr \)vv\\ sold l)y 
this (iallciA (iurin^u ihr la^l ycars. Wc ar(* \c\'\ pioiid lo have placed surli 



( 



mc wo 



iks ol all in llic colIcclioMs oi oiir clicnl: 



11 



hihil 



IC pnrnaiv iiiUmiIiom ol Uns (^xhihilioii is lo pay Irihulc lo nuc ol lh( 



f Ih 



üianls o 



i Y 



vr\u 



\] all in ihis ccnlurv, — an artisl wliosc cn^alivc* *i;('nius i: 



rcvcrcd l>\ all oiicc loiichcd l»\ thc incomparahic power and sur^iiijzi heauly 



ihal 



s<'r\('s 



[is hiiluark ot a II liis crcalions, 



W(» wisli lo acknow Icd^c oiir ^raldul apprcciation lo llic rollovviii^ 
Iciidcrs. willioul whosc Indp and ^cncrous cooptMalion this cxhihilion would 
not ha\(* hccn possiMc. 



M 



(*ssrs, 



Jul 



lan aiu 



I j 



can 



Ahcihacli 



[IIH 



Mr. William W. Crocker 

Mr. and Mrs. Jaincs Dehncgc 

Mr. john Kis(Mil)(Mss 

Mr, 

Mr, 

Mr 

Mr 

Mr 



I Mrs. I{()h(Ml K. KisiuM- 

I Mrs. L. Jackson 

I Mrs. A. A. Juvilcr 

nd Mrs. Jaincs W. Johnson 



aiK 



aiK 



aiK 



I Mrs. Viclor Kiain 



Mr. Sidncy l\ Lipkins 
Mrs. Cläre lloothc \ Ain 



,nd Mrs. (;. K. MrCall 
I Mrs. Donald McKcnna 
I Mrs. John Morel 



aiK 



Dr. 
M r 
M r 

Mr. J. Saimiels 



[\\n 



Mr. 
Mr. 

And 



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[in( 



I Mrs. Norhcrt Scliinirnel 
] Mrs. FredtMick Server 



s('V(*ra 



1 oll 



KM* CO 



llcctors who prcl'er 



lo rcinain anonyniou 



sciioiNKMAN (;aiji:hiks 




No. 16 L\ \'\sK Dl«: F'j.Fn; 



/// /.s niiirc <^()(Uiki' lliaii .scieiue. 
Science discorers: hui ort creates.' 

OIMK 



l{()uaull. llic cicalor. staiicU (iiil as oiir ol' ihc "iifatcsl visionaiieis of modern 
tinu's. l'osscssiii«; tlic soiiiidcsl <ial'lsniaii>lii|» in iIk- Inidilional soiisc and a tlioroiifili 
inidcrslandinji of convcnlional lc(lMii(|n<'s. liis aitislic rvoliition towards final, per- 
sonal expression eniei<;e(l ihroii-ili a lon-i pciiod of oltscnrily. condenined l)y friends 
and l'ellow painteis. Iicld in Itondaiie liy llie Inrlxileiit seareli for iiltiniale eom- 
nuniicalion — at last, willi sinjiular elarily. 

liorn in Kwl in l'aii>. (ieoij^es Uoiiaiilt at llie aj^e of foiirteen l.eeaine ap|)ren- 
tice to a stained-jilass inaker. Tliere. aecDidin«; to liis own slalenient, liis task ol 
lielpin-i Oll tlie resloration of incdieval uindows iiispiied liini with an endniinf;; 
passion for >tain<-d jilass. W lietlier tliis. liis firsl trade. Iiad any serions inflnenee 
Oll liis later work. reinains prol)leii.ali<-. Aliending eveniiifi; classes al tlie Kcole 
Nalionale des All I)ecoratif>, lie later (>nroll«>d in tlie P:e<)le des Ueaiix Arts. wliere 
lie lieeanie Gustave Morean's favorile piipil. Alter tlie laller's deatli in 1898, Roiiaull 
was iiaiiie<l diiv.tor of llie Mnsee Oiislave Moreau, a posl lie retaiiis to tliis very 
day. Moreairs friendsliip and initial eiK-onragernent heeanie a very imporlaiil 
laelor in Koiia.ilt-s lue. for lien- li<- liad foimd a man of j^reat eiilüire, witli 
extraordiiiarv eoiieepli«»' «'l' "'l'»" "«''■•l '•" "'''n»"'' i"^pi''"i"" tl'^'" t'"" i»'«»v'«l«'«l 
l.v tlie tan-ild.-.- Afl<-r eoniplelin- liis firsl painlinjis. wliieli stroiifily redeeled Ins 
lut.ns eoiiN^i-ntioiial stvie aii.l exeessively literary preoee.ipalion.- Houault l.eeame 
,„„,, ,nd nioir auaie of liis ouii inner erealive nee.is. wliiel. sliarply rejeeled most 
reeognized s.Ii.m.Is of arlislie soiil-seareliinji, kiumii lo alllrue ereators. 

The i.nniensitv of i{oua..irs Ir.M- natinv. liis tormenl in ihe fa.e of mjnstiees, 
„•voll a..ainsl lli,- alniost inevilal.le. liis reeling <lisgusl of atro.'il.es falliiif^ hke 
l.lous lipon llie head of man. are iinniislakal.ly reveale.l in liis grotes.p.ely fas- 
..inaliii, niasterpieees of prostiliites. <lowns. pierrols. j„dj;es. 1 liere is a stark- 
...ked violeme and inleiis<> relndlion in every stiokc- .i llie l.rnsli, a. llie l.eslialily 
and stiipi.li.v ..f a livpoerili.al. loveless w<,rld f.ill of n.oral nnsery and physica 
....liness fi.ids iiltiinaK. expression on llie faces of liis sul,e<as, ll.al dark zones 
delin.-ate .ruellv will, llieir proiiouneed Ma.k liiies, ae-enliialnig Uie posil.ve. 



ll:!ll>('('ll( 



Aiid ihcii. uilh l(ir\ i:ii(l aii.-cr -\)rin — \\\> Iciocioii^ iiii;i:j(- -low -iMv\ 
i\ a -Icadilv incrcasiiiL' xMi^r of (•;)m|)a»i()ii. \- lii- ivli-ioii- l'jitl 



l(ul 



IxM'aiiK^ -troiiiicr. |)la.>lic (^pro-ion dcxclopcd a jMiivr. 1 ivcr ii r-c Iowa t;l Ili i tiionii 
('X|)an>i()ii. I'inallx. — lluMc \\a> a mk 



i-«.jii«' ol -II llciiiii: and ihmcc. (jI inhiiil« 



nudaiichoK and die inner s(M'(Mnl\ dial a!»>()liil<^ -pinhia lil\ hiiiiu-« ahoiil 



\\lial('\(a- die -iihjccl inallcf. lo die -cn-iliv c ex c die iiilcrioi a-pccN ol \i-ildr 
j-('alili('> aic it'xcalcd widi poclic dviianuMn. To (icoriKv- lioiiaiill. a i! I- a d(di\rr- 
aiicc^ ('\(Mi in die nnd.-l ol" darknc». \> \w x) rhxjiiciil l\ cnj )ic-^-('d il liitiiH'll': 

'The painlcr willi a licniiinc Ionc (d lii> aii i- a kin- in lii- o\\ ii i i;:li( liow- 

('\(M' dinnniitixc hi> kiiiL-doin. liowcNcr -inaN hi- owii -laliitc. ^oii iiocd iicxcr alxli- 
catc llic ilu'oiic lli.il \()ii won willioiil xiohMicc. ;iii<l von will lc;i\c n li,i|>|iii-i iiiciikuv 



tl 



lan nian\ a ( lowc 



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iN uiidri-kind \ Oll r w oi k and Ire! il- 



ni('s^a<i(' — lor aM liinc. pcrlia}).-. 



I^)!' -lieh aiii>l> il i> nol lorcc hiil lo\r. llial nik'- llio \\(nl(l 



,1/. l\'jt'(Li 




No. 32 HiiiiacAi. Lam 



)sc:ape 







J\o. 30 l,K I.OtClIIN — ViEUX (>n?(,)l K Foi!\l\ 



10 



C A TALOC; Ul 



I. IMKUIJOT ( 1911 ) 



1 



I 



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■li 



Rrprnducrd: KoLAll/r !)> Vcnluri, plalc #.'U) 

lioiAl LT l)y J. '\\ Sohy, pa^c ()2 

Kxhihitcd: Musniin ol' Modrni ArU N. Y., 195:i 

Los Alleles Coiiiity Miiseiini, 1 95.*i 



S 



k u 



in 



F 



raiu'isco 



Mus(Mif]i of Art, 1911 



Boston Institute of ModtMii Art. 1941 



Lent hy Mr. and Mrs. NofIktI Scliimim'l 



2. NOTKK DAMK DKS CIIAMPS 

29V4 l>y 21>A iiichcs. 



Lrnf hy Mr. and Mrs. Janics Dfltju-^f 



:\, NIDK 



:^2 l)v 21 uM'hv 



rproi 



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F 



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M 



Art. N. Y. 

f An 



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riiillips Memorial Miis(Minu Wasliiii<!,ton. I). (1. 

IJosloii Institute of Modern Art 

Lent hy Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Juvdrr 



4. TKTK DK CLOWN ( 1930) 

I 1.1.. i)v 12 iiichrs ( «jjouaclie ) 



1 



oiincM 



Iv Colleetion J JJoinfonl. London 



Kxhihited: Lusn Kxiiiiution ov Limnc; Aim\ DuLlin. 1911 



(]()!.!. KCTOlfs CllOICF 
#28 



IV, Gimpel Fils, London, 1954 



CIUCIFIXION 

2:r^ l>v 1 



< ) ' 



incrK's 



li 



Lent Anonytnously 



6. CLOWN AND DANCKK 



< > 



Froni the series Lk (]iK(.)liK DI 



1;Et()1LH Fu.antf 



Lent hy Mr. aiu 



1 Mrs. Norbert Schiiiiinel 



MADONNA AND CIIILD 

lOVo l)v U)' j iiiclics. 



F 



rorn 



the series Li: Cii^gt k d»' 



l/F/rOIl^i: FlI.ANTK 

Lent hy Mrs. Cläre \^nn[hr Liiec 



8. IHJITS DK JACOl? 

12-^/l by l^'Yi inches. 

Rrnroducrd: Sri:Li-A VKSPKirnNA p 



lale 



#« 



Lent 



hv M 



an< 



1 M 



rs. 



Victor Kiain 



11 



<>. CLAIIJ DK 1,1 NK 

1.'^ I»\ U> iiiclics. 

Rrpioilmcil: Stkij.a Vksi»kim'i\ \. philr #12 



Lf'nl hy Mr. and Mrs. NorlxTt Scirmimcl 



10. LK Kl crriF 

IT) \)\ \^) inrlic 



R('\)ro(lui'Cil: Sri'j.LA Vksi>ki{ ri\ \, plalc #1 I 



Lail hy Mr. Si(liir\ V. Lipkif 



IS 



II. CUKI'l'SCri.K 

11 ' ^. \)\ 16' .j inchcs. 

Hrpnxlucrd: Stki.la Vi':sn;i:'n\ \. plalc #M) 



Lcnt hy Mr. and Mrs. l. Scr^rr 



12. AlTOMNK 

11 VI» l>N "^j iiiclirs. 

Rcproducrd: S'l'Kl.LA Vkspki{ TIN \. platt» #.") 



Ar/// hy Mi. and Mrs. Norhcrt SchinitncI 



i;^. miJLICAL LANDSCAPE 

l.'^ I)\ \() inchrs. 



11. FLOWKHS 

22>4 U \WY\ inclu 



Lciil hy Mr. and Mrs. Kohcrt K. Kisncr 



15. FLOWERS 

23';, ])> V) inche 



Lvjit i)y Mr. and Mrs. Jamt's W. Johnson 



16. L\ VASK 1)F FLKIRS 

22» o h\ UP.. inches. 



Ia'hI hy Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Scliiinrncl 



17. l'iKRKK/rrK 

.*^1V4 l>\ 2.*^ inclics. 

Ex-CoUcction: A. VoliarcL [*ari; 



Lcnt hy Dr. and Mrs. (;. IL McCall 



1«. FEM ALK CLOWN 

24'Xi !)> l<)'^i inrlics. 



Lcnt hy Mr. and Mrs. Donald McKcnna 



19. LE FAL1U)UK(; 

2.'^ Vi l>\ 1" inclics. 



Lvnl hy Mr. and Mrs. John M(»rrl 



20. CIIKIST AN!) TWO DISCIFLKS 

2"VL* l^y 21 Lü inclirj?. 

Rcprodncrd: RoiMi/r liy J. Marita in 



l\(H \i i/r 



AI 



)rains l*ul)licali 



OllS 



Kx-('.idl('('ti()tis: A. VollarcL Pari 

De (iailia, Paris 



Lvjü hy Messrs. Julian and Jean Aht'rhadi 



21. CHRIST AND A DLSCIPLK 



22'V, bv 171 



y\ ny i < yo nicncs 



li 



J.rtit AnonyinousJy 



12 



22. I)()l ULK CLOWN 

17 l)\ 1'^ inchrs. 



2.5. LOKTHArr OK A (MHI 



Lcnl hy Mr. J. Samuel} 



IM. IIKAI) OK A CLOWN 

I2-1 l)\ l()>o inchcs. 



Y 



oniK 



riv ('ollcM'lioii Dr. J. ScIioiuMiiaii 



Lcnt hy Mr. John KiscMilxMss 



23. DIO 



rnroi 



7 



lucnl: Mastkkimkcks ok FiiKNcii Pai\tin(;s hy J. Lassaigi 



^.le, 



Skira. lMat(^ #1 



G\iJj':in OK Airr Skiuks, The Flyperioii Press. Color 
Plate #7 
Exhihitrd: WVI llieiiiiah^ Intenialional de TArt, Veniee, 1948 

lA'Tit hy Mr. aiul Mrs. Norbert Srhimniel 



2(). CIKCl s (;iKi 

2.") I>v lö iii(li(*s 



Lent Anonymously 



L i 



VIKWWVTVK 

22V4 hy lö iiichrs. 

Ex-(A)Uccti(ms: A. Vollard, Paris 

!\1. P'ontanes, l*aris 
Olaniiier, Paris 



2a. I5Ip>li(:ap landscapk 



IIIU I»\ 2\\\ i'^<"^ 



les. 



Lvjit hy Mr. and Mrs. L. Jackso 



n 



2<). PKASANT GIRL 

2:Wi hv löVi ''i<*^<^ 



M). 



LK LOl ClIIN - VIEIJX CIKQLE FOKAIN 

l.'r^/, hv l()l^ iiH'hos. 

Ex-CoUertions: A. Volhud, Paris 

GrifTin, Paris 



Lent Anonymously 



;U. TWO CLOWNS 

20 l)v 10'- iiK-lios. 

.{2. lUlJMCAP LANDSCAPE 

19 Vi! hy 25 Vi iiiches. 



/.fv// Anonymously 



Lent Anonymously 



X\, AI{AP> Kl NC 

11 «Vj hv 1 iVi! inchrs. 



V 



ornKM-ly A. Vollard, l'ans 

A Jen oj the fmintini^s are for sale 
Prices riuoted on rr(juesl. 



13 




\(). 13 I)ip.i.i( AI. T.\M)m:aim-: 




\o. 27 PlERRETTt: 



15 



SCHONEMAN GALLERIES, Inc. 



63 Kast 57tli Sivcvi 



N('u York Cilv 



n.aza r^-MYIi) 



iUriwrru l*ark \ Madison \\(\l 



We nuiintiiiii at all linics a larj^e stock of 

outstandifi^ FnMicIi Paiiiliiijrs of ihr 

\^)[U and 2()lli ('('nliiri(*s. 



fiOMBOIS 

BoNNAHl) 

BOUDIN 

BuAgiiK 
Chagall 

COKOT 

Degas 

Dkhain 

d'espagnat 

DUFY 

Fantin - Latoi k 

FüHAlN 

Gauguin 

guillaumin 

Laukencin 



Toi LousE - Faitkec 

FuiSIvAU 
MaKI^I KT 

Maiissk 
Mei/i\(;ki{ 

MoNKT 



OKISO'I' 

Picasso 

PlSSAlUiO 

Henoiij 

K(M XULT 

Si(;na(: 

SiSLKY 

Uthim.o 

Vlaminck 
Etc., etc. 



THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1957. 



43 






Jrmit 
head 
; ex- 
the 
ction 
th a 
; im« 
visi- 
lerity 

icenst 
)'Con- 
Lit tha 
.ckets. 
m for 
;, Inc., 
;ks to 
•tment 
plain- 
hreat« 
'» dur« 



ar will 
license 



brac- 
her 
Her- 
in 



STRIRES CÜRTAIL 
CHR YSLER OU TPUT 

Series of Wildcat Walkouts 

Affect 40,000 in 12 Plants 

in the Detroit Area 



$500 Jottrnalism Award 
Is Won by Tennessean 






By DÄMON STETSON 

Special to The New York Time«. 

DETROIT, May 3— Auto pro- 
duction of the Chrysler Corpora- 
tion was sharply curtailed today 
by a wave of wildcat strikes. 

Company officials feared the 
mushrooming dispute might close 
down all plants at a time when 
heavy May production schedules 
have been established to meet 
the demands for Chrysler cars. 

A spokesman for Local 212 of 
the United Automobile Workers 
Said, however, that all members 
had been ordered to report for 
work on Monday. The local has 
scheduled a formal strike vote 
for Wednesday. 

The Company reported that 
25,000 workers were made idle 
on the day shift today and 15,- 
500 on the afternoon shift as a 
result of the walkouts. A total 
of twelve plants was affected, 
some partially and some com- 
pletely. 

Tornorrow's Operations at the 
Chrysler Division, previously 
planned, have been called off, the 
Company said. 

Track Drivers Protest 

Today's trouble began when 
160 truck drivcrs, who transport 
body stampings between plants, 
failed to report for work. They 
said they were protesting the 
dismissal of a union committee- 
man the previous day. 

Later, the Company reported 
being forced to send home thou- 
sands of workers in key plants, 
including the big Mack plant 
that makes Plymouth bodies and 
the Plymouth assembly plant, 
both in Detroit, and the Dodge 
main plant in Hamtramck. 

Behind today's development 
there appeared to be two basic 
issues. One was the insistence 
of the leadership of Local 212 on 
transfer agreements for Office 
and engineering workers to the 
Company' s new stamping plant 
at Twinsburg, Ohio. The second 
was the company's insistence on 
its right to move equipment and 
to direct employes to do it with- 
out union interference. 

Union's Stand Cited 

Fat Caruso, president of Local 
212 representing the Chrysler 
workers, said that the union 
would not permit the transfer of 
tools, dies and fixtures from 
Detroit to Twinsburg until a 
satisfactory agreement covering 
the Office and engineering work- 
ers had been reached. 

The Company said that it did 
not foresee any displacement of 
salaried office and engineering 
workers in Detroit as a result of 
establishment of the Twinsburg 
plant. But the local union is in- 
sisting on an agreement cover- 
ing this eventuality. 

A transfer arrangement, cov- 
ering production workers here, 
was agreed upon bv Chrysler 




FORD IS PLANNING 
RA DIO CAMP AM 

Company Weighs $3,000,000 

Expenditure in Fall Aimed 

at Car-Radio Audiences 



Art: Contrasts in Mood ON TELEVISION 



Channtl 3 
Chann«! 4 
Channel 5 



WCßS TV 

WRCA-TV 

WABD 



Chann«! 7 
Chonn«! 9 
Channel 11 



WABCTV 

WOR-TV 

WPIX 



Full-Blooded Paintings by Annie Lenney 
and Royer's Ghostly Works on View 






Herbert G. Stein 



The third Borden Graduate 
Award in Journalisni has been 
won by Herbert G. Stein of 
Oak Ridge, Tenn., a student 
at the Columbia University 
School of Journalism. The an- 
nouncement was made yester- 
day by Edward W. Barrett, 
dean of the school. 

The 29-year-old Student, 
who is the Maxwell M. Geffen 
Scholar at the school, received 
the $500 award from the Bor- 
den Company Foundation, Inc. 
The award is given to a Stu- 
dent "deemed most meritorious 
on the basis of high academic 
Standing and professional 
achievement." 

Mr. Stein was graduated 
from Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity in 1951. He worked on 
The Oak Ridger for f ive years 
before coming to Columbia. 



PRACTICÄL NURSES 
BACK SCHOOL PLAN 



Spocial to The New York Times, 
ATLANTIC CITY, May 3 — 
The National Association for 
Practical Nurse Education voted 
unanimously today to strength- 
en its program of instructor re- 
cruitment for practical nursing 
schools. The action was taken 
at the closing session of the 
group's annual Convention here. 
Miss Hilda M. Torrop, exec- 
utive director, said that a fund- 
raising campaign, to be under- 
taken jointly with Purdue 
University would begin this 
summer. The association and the 
university will seek $500,000 for 
a Joint five-year eduction pro- 
gram, scheduled to Start in 
1958. 

The program, announced ear- 
lier this week, has been devised 
to meet the acute shortage of 
practical nurse instructors and 
school administrators. The 
shortage was accentuated by 
creased student enroUment 
caused by Federal aid to practi- 



By RICHARD F. SHEPARD 

The Ford Motor Company is 
studying the best way to spend 
about $3,000,000 on radio adver 
tising for a year starting in 
autumn. The radio networks 
are up in the air wondering 
where the sum, the largest to be 
lavished on their medium in 
many years, will land. 

The automobile Company and 
its advertising agency, J. Wal- 
ter Thompson, are particularly 
interested in reaching the car- 
radio public, which tunes in most 
heavily during peak traffic 
hours in the morning and eve- 
ning on weekdays. 

The Columbia Broadcasting 
System radio network has 
broached a plan that would offer 
a number of big names. The 
transaction would include a 
morning musical show starring 
Rosemary Clooney and Bing 
Crosby; a five-minute morning 
newscast; a variety musical 
show with Arthur Godfrey from 
5 to 5:30 P. M.; news commen- 
tary by Edward R. Murrow at 
7:30 P. M., and six five-minute 
week - end broadcasts by Mr. 
Crosby and Miss Clooney. 

The Mutual Broadcasting Sys- 
tem has presented a package 
that would embrace a morning 
musical show with Raymond 
Scott and Dorothy Collins; a 
morning newscast; a 5 P. M. 
half-hour adventure drama with 
the orchestra leader and singer 
as hosts; an evening newscast; 
and a ninety - minute variety 
show starring Mr. Scott and 
Miss Collins on Sundays and 
featuring guest stars. 

C. B. S. has not yet signed 
contracts with the talent that 
would be the mainstay of its 
project. In addition, it is not 
able to guarantee the Coopera- 
tion of its affiliated radio out- 
lets in the 5 to 5:30 o'clock time 
period, which they are not re- 
quired to devote to network 
programs. 

A C. B. S. official said, how- 
ever, that **we think our sta- 
tions would clear for us" and 
referred to a history of good 
working relationships in the 
past. He stressed that matters 
were still in the negotiation 
State and that "we don't know 
if we'll get an order" or what 
sort of a package an order 
would result in. 

Under its contract with its 
affiliat:«» Mutual can assure 
füll network coverage at 5 P. M. 
In addition, it has an agree- 
ment with Mr. Scott and Miss 
Collins to broadcast should the 
transaction be completed. 



LIFE looks good to Annie 
Lenney, whose fuU-blooded 
picturesque landscape and fig- 
ure oils are at the Eggleston 
Gallery, 969 Madison Avenue. 

Up hill and down dale in 
New England, where happy 
children gambol and where 
fruit trees explode into fire- 
works of pink and white blos- 
soms, she pursues Visual joys 
with happy abandon. And her 
deftness with the brush is well 
able to communicate these 
happy experiences. 

• 

Few greater contrasts in 
mood can exist between the 
pictures referred to above and 
those by the French contem- 
porary Royer at the Zodiac 
Gallery, 123 East Fifty-fifth 
Street. A ghostly submarine 
glow emerges from these flow- 
ers and vague landscapes 
weakly suggesting Rouault. 
Their spirits are low and not 
to be raised by incidental pas- 
sages of rieh, luminous color. 

Surrealist overtones pervade 
Dorothy Hood's immensely re- 
fined black-and-white draw- 
ings at Duveen-Graham's, 1014 
Madison Avenue. She excels 
in mastering linear complexi- 
ties and indulges this ability to 
the füll in tangled draperies 
of line that wrap and unwrap 
disquieting semi-abstract Im- 
ages. 

Work by two woman sculp- 
tors of widely different ap- 
proaches to style and subject 
matter is on view at two gal- 

Marianne Gold, whose figure 
statuettes are at Wildenstein's, 
19 East Sixty-fourth Street, is 
a sensitive artist in the tradi- 
tion of Maillol with whom she 
studied in Paris during the 
Nineteen Thirties. There is 
nothing markedly original 
about her small terra cottas 
but they show signs of such 



affectionate Observation that 
they are bound to give pleas- 
ure of a meditative kind. 

m 

There are two aspects to 
Erna Weill's sculpture, a group 
of which is displayed at the 
Schoneman Gallery, 63 East 
Fifty-seventh Street. 

First are her portrait busts, 

bold and precise in execution 
and emphasizing the individual 
character of each sitter. Then 
comes her freely imaginative 
work, most of which is devo- 
tlonal in character and sym- 
bolizes episodes from the Old 
Testament. 

There is a sense of strain 
to this work, which owes its 
emphatic semi - primitivism. 
to Epstein. But as an imagina- 
tive style, her manner of car- 
ving is appropriate to the sub- 
jects of streng emotional ap- 
peal to which she is drawn. 

S. P. 



Channel 13 WATV 



SATURDAY, MAY 4, 1957 



For its first anniversary pro- 

tirrU^ rk,-w/^r% -MinH" WlL 



May Exhibition 

FOR the May exhibition at 
the City Center Gallery, 
131 West Fifty-fifth Street, 
fifty-two painters were select- 
ed by Herbert Katzman and 
Louise Bouche, Jurors. 

Representational painters 
dominate the show, Among 
them, Lucy Eliot and Frank 
H. Mason show poetic inter- 
pretations of wooded land- 
scape; Beulah Basine and Ar- 
line Levin-E]pstein show still- 
lifes; Robert Finnigan and G. 
Hunter Jones show, repec- 
tively, an interpretive Por- 
trait and a figure group remi- 
niscent of the Rubens style. 

At the Barbizon Hotel, Lex- 
ington Avenue and Sixty-third 
Street, Denyse Claude, a 
French painter, shows tradi- 
tional landscape and still-life 
paintings. D. A. 



8-9 A. M.— Shariland: General entertainment for 

children. With Shari Lewis— (4). 
8-10:30 A. M.-Cartoon Festival— (7). 
8:80-9 A. M.-Hickory Diokory Dock: "Music 

Again," with Eleanor 01ha-(2). 
9-9:30 A. M.-On the Carousel: With Paul Tripp, 

host-(2). 
9-10 A. M.— Children's Theatre: Film variety, with 

Ray Forrest, host— (4). 
9:30-10 A. M.— Captain Kangaroo adventures, with 

Bob Keeshan— (2). 
10-10:30 A. M.— Howdy Doody Show: Doodyville 

gets a soda fountain— (4). 
10:30-11 A. 31.— Miffhty Mouse— (2). 
11-11:30 A. M.— Susanns Show for children and 

adults (Premiere)— (2). 
1:30-2— Right New: "What 's Wrong With New 

York City's Junior Hi.^h Schools?"-Mrs. 

Charles Schlaifer, Maxwell F. Littwin, John 

Towers, Martin Lobenthai, guests— (2). 
1:30-2— Educational Series: "Mathematics," with 

Dr. Ernest Nagel, Professor of Philosophy at 

Columbia University, host— (4). 
1:30-2— Junior Town Meeting: "Do Governments— 

Local, State and Federal-Spend Too Much?" 

—High School students, guests— (13). 
1:55— Baseball: Brooklyn Dodgers vs. St. Louis 

Cardinais— (9) ; New York Giants vs. Cincin- 

nati Redlegs— (11). 
2-2:30— Educational Series: American Government 

— "Bureaucracy"— John W. Maey Jr., guest of 

Professor Schattschneider— (4). 
2-2:80— Our Nation'» Roots: "To Link a Nation," 

about Immigrant labor- (2). 
2:30-3— Congressional Close-Up: Senator Irving M. 

Ives and Senator Clifford P. Case, from New 

York-(2). 
5-5:15— Kentucky Derby Preview— (2). 
5:15-5:45— The Kentucky Derby, from Churchill 

Downs, Louisville— (2). 
7-7:30— Rosemary Clooney Show: With Judy 

Canova, gfuest— (4). 
7:30-8— The Buccaneers: "Mistress Higgins* Treas- 

ure," with Robert Shaw and Adrienne Corri 

-(2). 



7:30-8— Rock 'n* Roll Revue: Alan Freed. hostf 

Guy Mitchell, June Valli, Sal Minco, Martha 

Carson, others, guests--(7). 
8-9-Jackie Gleason Show: With Art Carney, 

Audrey Meadows, Joyce Randolph and th« 

June Taylor Dancers— (2). 
8-9— Perry Como Show: With Patti Page, Gene 

Autry, Buddy Hackett, guests on variety pro- 
gram (Color)— (4). 
9-10«Caesar's Hour: Comedy and variety, with 

Sid Caesar, Janet Blair, Carl Reiner. Howard 

Morris, Shirl Conwav and Pat Carroll— (4). 
9-10— Lawrence Welk Show: Dance music front 

Hollywood— (7). 
10-10:30— Gunsmoke: Western series, with Jame« 

Arness as Marshai Dillon; Amanda Blake, 

Dennis Weaver and Milburn Stone in support* 

ins: roles— (2). 
10-10:30— George Gobel Comedy: With Erin 

O'Brien, Pat Buttram. guests— (4). 
10-10:30— Ozark Jubilee: Country music, with Red 

Foley, host— (7). 
10— Prcmiftro Performance— Film : "The Ghost 

and Mrs. Muir," with Rex Harrison, Gena 

Tierney, George Sanders. Young widow ha« 

spirited courtship— (11). 
10:30-11— Two for the Money: Quiz, with Sam 

Levenson, host— (2). 
10:30-11— Your Hit Parade: With Snooky Lanson, 

Dorothy Collings, Gisele MacKenzie and Rus« 

onii A.rnfis— (4) 
10:30— East- West Bowling (Film)-(9). 

Feature Film» 

5-6:li>-Movie: "No Hands on the Clock." with 
Rod Cameron, ehester Morris in private de« 
tective story— (4). 

10— Premiere Performance— Film : "The Ghost and 
Mrs. Muir," with Rex Harrison, Gene Tierney, 
George Sanders. Story of a young widow who 
has spirited courtship— (11). 

11:15-1 :30-The Late Show-Fllm: "Mr. Skeffing- 
ton," with Bette Davis, Claude Rains. Drama 
of a ruthless woman who dominates her kindly 
husband— (2). 

12— Movie: "Dark Mountain," murder mystery, 
With Robert Lowery and others— (4). 



(JrDENOTES PROGRAMS DESCRIBED ABOVE; (C) DENOTES COLOR) 



DAYTIIME 



BUFFALO ART DISPLAY 

40 Gift Paintings Will Go on 
View at Albright Gallery 

BUFFALO, May 3 (UP)— The 
first showing of forty gift paint- 
ings and sculptures, said to form 
an outstanding contemporary 
collection, was announced today 
by Gordon M. Smith, Albright 
Art Gallery director. 

The recently-contributed works 
will be displayed for the first 
time as a group in an exhibition 
titled "Contemporary Art — Ac- 
quisitions 1954-57." It will open 
at the Albright on May 15. Out- 
standing works in th-» coUection 

include paintings by Willem De 
Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Rob- 
ert Mothei-well, Franz Klinc and 
PhiUp Guston. 

Thirty of the new acquisitions 



CITY ART PUPILS HAILED 

Theip Work New on Display 
at Metropolitan Museum 

In a Salute to the talented art 
pupils of the city's High School 
of Music and Art, the Metropoli- 
tan Museum of Art is opening 
a show of their work today. It 
is a "coming-of-age" party, cele- 
brating the twenty-first birthday 
of the school as well as the *'ex- 
cellent work" of its pupils. 

"If we're encouraging quality 
at the museum, we should en- 
courage the work of these young 
people," James J. Rorimer, direc- 
tor of the Metropolitan, ob- 
served. Every style is apparent 
in the rieh selection. Robert 
3everly Haie, the museum's as- 
.^■ociate curator of American 
')aintings and sculpture. called 



7:00-(2) Film: Man of Confllct 
With Edward Arnold 

(4) Modern Farmer 
8:00-(2) News and Weather 

ifi^) Shariland 
*(?) Cartoon Festival 
8:15— (2) Laurel and Hardy 
8:30*(2) Hickory Dickory Dock 
9:00*(2) On the Carousel 
*(4) Children's Theatre 
(13) Roman Marynovvych 
9:30^(2) Captain Kangaroo 

(13) Fiesta Musical 
10:00*(4) Howdy Doody 

(5) Leon Errol Comedies 
10:15-(9) The Living Word 

10:30-^(2) Mighty Mouse 

(4) The Gumby Show 

(5) Renfrew of Mounted 
(7) Film: Tomorrow Is 

Forever 
(9) Cartoon Time 
(13) Le Prequenta Musicale 
11:00*(2) Susan's Show 

(4) Fury 

(5) Gene Autry Show 
(9) Cartoon Time 
(13) Perucho Show 

11:30— (2) Tale of Texas Rangers 

(4) Captain Gallant 

(5) Liberace Show 
(13) Echocs of Poland 

12:00-{2) The Big Top 

(4) True Story 

(5) Cavalcade of Progress 
(7) The Bontempis 

(9) Million Dollar MovIe 
(13) Padrc Adolfo 
J2:15-(ll) Six-Gun Playhouse 

(13) Italian Film 
12:30-(4) Detective's Diary 
(5) Films 



l:00-(2) The Lone Ranger 
(4) Home Gardener and 

Handyman 
(7) Studio 7 
1:15-(11) Off to Adventure 
1:30*(2) Right Mow 

(4) Educational Series 
(7) Film: AcLion in Arabia, 

With George Sanders 
(9) H^ppy Fclton 
(11) Baseball Hall of Fame 
-^(13) Junior Town Meeting 
1:40— (U) Jimmy Powers 
1:55* (9) Baseball 
*(11) Baseball 
2:00*(2) Our Nation's Roots 
tI^(4) Educational Series 
(13) Requestfuüy Yours 
2:30^(2) Congressional Close-Up 
(4) Film: Pick Up Your 
Troubles, With Laurel 
and Hardy 
(13) All-Star Movie 
3:00— (2) Film: Africa Screams, 
With Abbott and Costello 
(7) Film: Lulu Belle, With 
Dorothy Lamour 
3.30-(4) Film 

4:00-(2) Film: Coast Guard, 
With Ranaolph Scott 

(4) Library Lions— Film 
(13) Fun Tim? 

4:30-(7) Cartoon Club 

(13) Junior Frolics 
5:00^(2) Kentucky Derby Preview 
■^(4) Movie 

(5) Film 

(7) Hopalong Cassidy 
(9) Million Dollar Movie 
(11) Popeye the Sailor 
5:15*(2) Kentucky Derby 
5:30-{13) House Detective 



EVENING 

6:00— (2) News Reports 
(5) Range Rider 
(7) Rin Tin Tin 

(11) Buffnio Bill Jr. 
(13) Polka Party 

6:15-(2) Paul Paqe 

(4) Sports— Harry Wismer 

6:30-(2) My Linie Margie 

(4) Hy Gnrdner Calling 

(5) Looney Tunes 
(7) Frankie Laine 

(9) I am the Law 
(11) Sky Kinri Adventures 
(13) Harry McGuirk Show 
7:00-(2) If You Had a Million 

•^(4) Rosemary Clooney Show 
(5) Adventure of Long John 
Silver, With Robert 
Newton 
(7) Galen Drake 
(11) Superman 
(9) Fun to Travel 
(13) Songs of Yesteryear 

7:30^(2) The Buccaneers 

(4) People Are Funny 

(5) Crusade in Pacific 

*(7) Rock V Roll Revue 
(9) Million-Dollar Movie 

(11) Soldiers of Fortune 
(13) All-Star Movie 
8:0O'A-(2) Jackic Gleason 
*(4) perry Como (C) 
(5) Film: Mike Shayne In 

Threc on a Ticket,, With 

Huqh Beaumont 
(7) Film Festival: Frieda, 

With Mai Zetterling 
(11) Film: Captain Caution 



9:00-(2) Gate Storm Show 
ifU) Caesar's Hour 
(5) Film Play: The 
Rcdheaded Bandit 
(11) Film: Caotain Cautio« 
•^(7) Lawrence Welk Show 
(9) C-usarier 
(13) Film: Western Union 

9:30— (^) Hey Jeannie, Comedy, 
With Ijannie Carson 
(5) Wreslling 
(9) V/ar in the Air 
(11) Public Dcfender 

10:00-^^(2) Gunsmoke 
•^(4) George Gobel 

-^(7) Ozark Jubüee 

(9) Star Attraction 
*(11) Premiere Performanct 
10:30*(2) Two for the Money 
-^(4) Your Hit Parade 
(5) Address the Nation, 

With Norman Brokenshirl 
(7) Adventures of Falcon 
^(9) East-West Bowling 
(13) All-Star Movie 
ll:00-(2) News Reports 

(4) News Reports (C) 

(5) Not for Nervous 
People Theatre 

(7) PJight Show-Film: 

Flight Lieutenant, WitI 

Pat O'Brien 
U:10-(4) Movie Gcg, With 

Richard Egan 
11:15*(2) Laie Shov 
ll:30-(9) Million Dollar Movie, 

With Robert Lowery 
12:00*(4) Movie 
l:30-(2) Film; A Bedtime Story, 

With Frederic March 



(5) Films 5:30-U3) nOUSe UeieClIVe wi; rnm. v^aMiam uaui.ui. 

ON RADIO 



WMCA 

WVNI 

WRCA 

WOR 

WABC 



570 
620 
660 
710 
770 



WNYC 

WCBS 

WPAT 

WAAT 

WINS 



830 
880 
930 
970 
1010 



WMGM 
WNEW 
WLIB 

wov 

WEVD 



1050 
1130 
1190 
1280 
1330 



WBNX 

WNJR 

WHOM 

WQXR 

WWRL 



138(» 
1430 
1480 
1560 

1600 



9:30 A. M.— Monitor <«overs the annual Truth or 
Consequences Fiesta in New Mexico; also, 11:30 
A. M. and 1. 1:30, 4:30, 5:30, 8:30 and 9:30 
P. M.-(WRCA). ^^^ ^. 

9:30-10 A. M.— Young: Book Rcviewers» "Ladies 
of Courage," by Eleanor Roosevelt and Lo ena 
Hickok. Teen-age eritics will interview ,Miss 



6:06-6:3a-Backß:round8 of Music: With Prof .Mar- 
tin Bernstein commenting on Wagner s Wes- 
endonk Sonp:s"-(WCBS). 

6:30-6:55-The Last Word: Panelists are Waltef 
Lord. CathleenNcsbitt and John Mason Brown; 
Dr. Bergen Evans, host— (WCBS). 

7:05-8— The Strinif Quartet: Binaural broadcast 



•^' 



V\( ()) 



Ixnatino Alis Digest/ MAY 1957/73 ctnts 



HANS HOFMANN 

liv IJiznht'lU l'olh't 



SPECIAL BOOK SECTION 



n 



i'l'U'IVS 



hv Sitlnrv (,4'ist. VtriHni Yoiinff, 



Ulrivh }\ viss 



trin, Alfred W erner & othvrs. 




AN OPEN LETTER 
TO THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM 



MUSEUM OF PRIMITIVE ART 

By llilton Kramer 



^'•m^ 



'iMfe»- 




: k: i\ 



■.^> 'M 












't^:% ^ 






m: 



4 



#.C' 



«' .**» - 



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t# 






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t^fß 



(i. 



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WILDENSTEIN 



PAINTINGS 



by 



LUIS QUINTANILLA 



through May 1 1 



SCULPTURE 



by 



MARIANNE GOLD 



through May 18 



10 to 5:30 



Closed Suiiday 



19 East 64th Street, New York, N. Y. 



Reserve your copy now 

o/ the limited Publishe/s Edition of 



ARTS YEARBOOK 1 958 



The first in an annual scrics oj distinguislwd art 
hooks (leioted to the great thenies oj art, 

Each voIume of the ARTS YEARBOOK will be a self-contained and 
definitive antholo^y in picture and text. The series will form a color- 
ful permanent library of the world's ^reat art discussed by outstand- 
in^ writers and illustrated with beautiful reproductions. 

The first vohime, entit/ed 

THE TURN OF THE CENTURY, 

wi// he published in Oetoher 1957. in eo-operation with Doubledar & Co. 



You will find fascinatin^r articles on this fabu- 
lous period of artistic ferment and revolution which 
produced the cornerstones of contemporary art. 

You wont want to miss: 

"^Mo^lern Art al the Turn of {\\v Onlurv/" This bril- 
liaiit 1 5,()()()-w()r(l survey will traco the transitioii froni the 
older ji<^'ii^'''ati()n of Cezanne and Monet to the younj^rer 
artists like Matisse and Picasso, who created in Eauvisni and 
Cubisin the art of our Century. 

*^The World of ^The Ei^ht\^^ The whole panorania of 
American culture at the turn of the Century will be seen 
throujrh the eyes of the artists who called theinselves "The 
EiKht." 

^''NeM Pernpectives on th<* OIil Maslerj*.'^ This unusual 
study of the revaluation of Renaissance and Barociue ai*t will 
jrive special attention to the contributions of Bernard Beren- 
son and Heinrich Wolfflin, who were larj^rely responsible for 
establishinji: new perspectives and upsettin-^: old ti'aditions. 

**Arl and ihe Victorians/'* This excitinj^r period in En^lish 
literary and artistic life can boast of sonie of the niost bril- 
liant Personalities in modern times. The article deals with all 
the major tij^ures of the era, from John Ruskin to Roßfer P^ry. 



^^Th«» l)ij*ro\ery of Primitive Art/" This much-needed 
introduction to primitive art traces the artistic back^round 
which made its so-called "discovery" possible as well as its 
relation to contemporary art. 



Note: As a subscriber to ARTS you 
have the privile^e of orderin^ your 
copies of the limited Publisher's 
Edition at a special savin^^. 




Pill in and mail this coupon today to: 

ARTS, 116 East 59th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 

• for ARTS siihscrüfers 

□ Enter my order for copies of the Publisher's 

Edition of ARTS YEARBOOK 1958 at $2.95 each. 



• fifr iiiHi-sulpscrihers 

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copies of the Publisher's 

Edition of ARTS YEARBOOK 1958 at $8.95 each. 

□ Enter my subscription to ARTS for one year, in- 
cludinK ARTS YEARBOOK 1958, at $9.70. 

(Add $1.00 for forei^ün and Oanadian subscrip- 
tion.) 



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City _ Zone State 



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exfiimion in me 
llmted ^/ta 





PAUL ROSENBERG & CO 



ESTABLISHED 1878 



19th and 20th CENTURY 
FRENCH PAINTINGS 



20th CENTURY 
AMERICAN PAINTINGS 



SCULPTURE 



20 HAST 79th STREET, NEW YORK 



WATER COLOR 
BRUSHES 



SERIES 133"ALBANY" 

A fine brush 

at moderate price 

made of selected 

Pure Red Sable Hair 

with the 

craftsmanship 

that assures 

long-lasting quality. 

Available in sizes 00 

through 12. 



ÜEATED CARDINAL - 1938 - BRONZE - h. 20V^" 

Selection of Bronzes, Bas-Reliefs, and Drawings 

April 24 through May 18 

WORLD HOUSE galleries 

Madison Avenue at 77th Street, New York 21 



the worldwide 

Standard 

of IMPORTED quality 

that YOU can 

äff ord ! 




Canadian Aeents: THE HUGHES OWENS CO., LTD. Head Office. MONTREAL 
Californian Distributors: THE SCHWABACHERFREf CO., SAN FRANCISCO 



incorportiting Arts Digest 




CONTRIBUTORS 

Elizabeth Pol- 

let,w'li()rcvic\vs 
New \n\\ cx- 
liihitioiis regu- 
1 a r 1 V 1 () r 
AR IS, writcs 
this moiitli on 
tlu* Han.s Hof- 
inann exhibi- 
t i o 11 a t the 
Whitney Mu- 
seum. She is 
the author of a novel, // Family Roinatu c, 
puhJislied by New Direc tioiis, and of 
short stories and reviews which liave ap- 
peared in Partisan Rexnew, New World 
IVritinui and Hoticuhr osrura. She is 
niarried to the poet Debiiore Schwanz 
and lives in Fittstown. New [ersey. 

Txco Ami'ri((iu sadj^tors address thetn- 
selves in this issite to the suhjcct of 
"Sculpture nnd Arrhitccture." David 
Smith'^s leorh will he the snhject of an ex- 
hibitioti at the Museutn oj Modern Art 
in September. Sidney Geiste a freqnent 
eont) il)ut<)} , rerently liad a one-nian ex- 
hibition at the Tanager Gallery ia \ew 
York and is represented in sex>eral group 
exhibitions this spring. 

Patrick lleroii resunics Ins regidar (ontri- 
butions to nur pages with his profile of 
Roger Hihoii tliis niontli. His most re- 
cent publica tion in Kngland is tlie tcxt 
for a vohniic on Bracjue, publislied bv 
Faber and Fal)er. 

Atnong our booh evitics: Ulrich Woisstein 

is n m einher of the Lehigh Unix>ersity 
faculty . . . Kenneth Rexroth^ critie and 
poet, xvrites frequent ly on Japanese sab- 
jects: he is a rcgnhir eonlrihutor to 7 he 
Nation and nther magozines . . . Suzattne 
Burrey is a free-lance writer on art: her 
profdes of Karl Scfirag, B. ]. O. Nordfeldt 
and others Juivc appenred in our pages. 



FORTHCOMING : Ihc June issue will 
be a Special Paris Nuinl)er. Leading off 
with a loni> article bv Edouard Roditi 
surveying the artistic life of Paris, thcre 
will bc special features on "The School of 
Paris Today" by Alain Jouflfroy and 
Michel Lacoste, a report on "Aniericans 
in Paris" by Barbara Butler and reviews 
of important new books froni F'rance. 
Color platcs on French and American 
painters. 



m 



MAY 1957 



\ (A. 31, \o, S /75 Cents 




ON THE COVER 

Scutpture in stour. entitied ]\\vs 
UKAI). of Cettii oioin in France (fourth 
(culurx B.C.). Ihc work is in the 
pfnniaficnt (<)llc( tioti of the new Mu- 
seum of Ftimitivc .4rt in \cxr York. 
The tnuseum's oprning r\hihiti(m is 
dis(ussed f)\ Hilton Krufno in Month 
in licx'iexc i pa<^('s f2-f'>). 



20 



30 



FEATURES 

10 The A.F.A. Couveutioii hv Jonathan \tarshall 
17 Chicago's No-Jury Flxperiniejü \\\ ai.lkn s. wf.li.fr 

Sculpture and Arrhitecture in david smiih and slI)NF^ (;fist 

Fntrodudnn Roner Hilton in i'AIRIck hfron 

Heren t Acejuisitions 

Fi ans Ffofniafifi in fi.izabfth pdm.ft 

Spe( iai Book Section 

DEPARTMENTS 

7 F. ET FERS 
9 AU CT IONS 
12 SPECTRVM: OFEN FETTER TO THE MFTROFOETFAN 

14 PARIS 

42 MONTH IN REA IFAV 

46 MARCrARE/F BREI NI NO W RTF ES 

48 IN THE i, AFFERIES 

63 STUDIO FAFK 

65 JVHERE TO SHOW 

66 SUMMER PRINT CAFENDAR 

67 CAF.ENDAR OF EXHIBITIONS 



Editor CT- Pnblislier: 

loNAIHA-N .\1 ARSJIAI 1 

Managing Editor: Associate Editor: 

Hilton Krämer Francis Klofppi l 

Fayout and Prodiiction: Jamis R. Mm. low 



Assistant Edüor: 
Ann Pknnincton 



Associate Puhlishcr: Fi sin Okin 
Contrihuting Fditors: 

MARCiARKI BREl'NINC; 
BF.RNARD CHAET 
LAVERN E GEORGE 
ADA LOUISE HUXTABLE 
JERO.ME MELI.QriST 
ELIZABEFH POLLET 
MARTICA SAVVIN 
LEO STEINBERG 
ANITA VENTURA 
\ ERNON YOUNG 



Executive Assistant: Mk.s. Phyton Bosvvell 

Correspondents: 

cniCAGO: ALLEN S. WEH FR 

I()MK)\: PATRICK HFRON 

l'ARIS: BARBARA BC I I I R 

SAN FRANCISCO: KFNNIIH RFXROrH 

Adx'crt is i n ^ ; J a ( k I- \ i ) i r 

European Adi'crtising Representatives: 

]. ARTHUR COOK MARCFMI URCNSWK; 

\) IIOVI) SQUARE 19 RUF FOURCROY 

LONDON. W.C. 1 PARIS 17 



ARTS. (c^ 1957 by The Art Digest. Inc.. all rights reserved. Published monthly September through June. 116 East 59th Street, New York 22, N. Y. Telephone: 
PLaza 9-7621. Re-entered as second-class matter at the post office at New York. N. Y.. August 27. 1954. under tne act of March 3. 1879. Subscnption 
rates: Füll subscription. 10 months and ARTS YEARBOOK, $9.70 a year; regulär monthly edition only. $6.75 a year. (Foreign postage $1 a year additional.) 
Single copy, 75 cents Change of address: .send both old and new address and allow three weeks for change. Contents of each issue are indexed m Art Index. 
Editorial and advertislng Offices are at above address. Not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. The cover and the entire contents of 
ARTS are fully protected by Copyright and may not be reproduced in any manner vvithout written consent. Jonathan Marshall. President; James N. 
Rosenberg, Chairman of the Board; Edward M. Bratter. Secretary and Counsel. 



DUVEE N 



ESTABLISHED 1869 



Exhibition 
of 

OLD MASTERS 



Through May 



Distingiiishcd Portraits 



by 



ALFRED JONNIAUX 



May lst-25th 



lllustrafed Brochure on Requesf 



KENNEDY GALLERIES, Inc. 

Esfablished 1874 by H. Wunderlich 
785 Fifth Ave. bet. 59 & 60 sts. New York 22, N. Y. 



FUKNCII & COMPANViNc 



EsrAOLiSHEO leao 
210 EAST 57th STKEET • !^EW YORK CITY 



DUVEEN BROTHERS Inc. 

i8 EAST 79 STREET 
NEW YORK %i, N.Y» 




Portrait of a Boy 

John Singer Snrgeiit 
ajter Velasquez. 
One of a pair. 
Reduced froni 
$4,750 to $3,500 
ihe pair. 
i6»2" .r 22" 



1 hv above piece is one of the 12,000 itenis which are 

included in our inventory sale beinp: hold through 

May, in connection vvith the removal of our galleries 

to the Parke-Bernet Buihling, 978 Madison Avenue, 

which we have just purchased. Prices are reduced 

from 20% to 60%. 




n 




PROFESSOR MYERS REPLIES 

In the F.dilor: 

I havc watchrd wiili iiitcrcst llu' licallhN dt-vfl- 
opiiicnt ot AR IS iis an (nj;an of aitistic opinion. 
l 11(1(1 jc)innalisii( picssmcs. howi'MT, all niaga- 
/incs (KcasionalK tail inio the iiap ol hastv 
jiid^ineiU. Ihis sccins to lia\c liappcnccl in your 
\|)iil cvaliiahon ol iii\ pilot stiidv. Proltlons of 
t/tr ] oiuiircr American Artist. 

What. you ask, was ihr pur|)ose of this sliort- 
icrm sinvcv? Ilad \ow read our introduction 
niorc than (asuall\. von would havc sccn ihat 
uc ucic ((*n(('inc'd with (hc viahilitv of Xcw 
\'ork IS a (nllinai (cntcr and llic degicc lo 
which Liic Noungcr (i.e. the not \c'l successfui) 
aitist fa(('d prohlcnis in \he cxhihiting and the 
niaiki'ting of his woik, 

\'on (jucslion the need for inorc exhihiting 
Space fcM- artists in general and eile the facl 
thal iheie are inore ihan one hnndred galleries 
in New \()ik, CertainK true. i)nt of tliose proh- 
al)l\ onlv half are interested in eonteniporary 
American art, and of these it has heen estimated 
ihal alunn tweiUv hve show ahstract-expression- 
isi inaterial. Acxordin^ lo Mr. fiess's piece in 
the current Art Xcw.s, ijie avant-irardr artist 
has liad to create his own exhibition Space in 
the smaller co-oj)erati\e galleries ^vhere artists 
l(»ok al the work of oiher artists. Apart from 
this groiip. snrely we all know a great many 
"artists with real abilitv" who have become 
siiperannnated, passe? in terms of todav's search 
for noveltv or otherwise out of the swiin. and 
are therefore wandering abont without gallery 
((»nnections. Our "facile statistics"— whether von 
like them or not— show a lack of exhibiting 
s|>ace for artists who have bc'en judged worthy 
of admission to the imiseiim group shows and 
artist Organization shows of tlie past three years. 
Ihe vcrv practice of renting gallerv Space on 
Ihe basis of ability to pay rather than on c|ual 
ilN ineans that the poor but worthv artist is 
deprived of everv gallerv space taken iip by a 
Space purchaser. ^'on mav have overlooked this 
|)(>int in our report. logether with our Observa- 
tion that nianv galleiies coidd not sinvive with- 
out charging lor space. 

I am afraid that in our |)aragraph on "dilet- 
tantism" von completelv missed our intent. Ihe 
pur|)ose of cpiestioning artists on the ninnber of 
hours per weck thev worked at "their profes- 
sion" was lo c()n>j)are this amount of liine with 
that spent on other monev-earning activities 
(see p, 20) and to determine to what exteni one 
could still apply the term "jirofessional" to 
such |)e()ple. As to whether the author and his 
(olleagues reali/e that artists" work "is pari of 
their lives e\en when they are not j)hvsicallv 
erealing." please note on the \erv next j)age Ave 
sav: "If it were objec ted . . . tliat thev need not 
necessarily put in more than Ihirtv working 

con tinin'd oti /xii^c 62 



CORRECTION 

In Marticü Snxvin's "Ad ja Ynukcrs" [Ajnil], 
the contiuuitx of the tr\t was altcrcd h\ 
an unfortunatc tran.sfxisition of f)ara- 
irrophs. The cditors r\trnd aj>oJooctic rc- 
orets to tlir artist and the author. 






* ^^ ^ wm iw ^ ^ ^ ^ ip li» ^'^r^F'^ir v ip ^ ^» ^ 



^ - - - • ^ ^ ^ ^ I» ^ 


















1' 






i 



PARKE-BERNET GALLERIES • Ine 



980 MADISON AVENUE 



NEW YORK 21 



Lrubiic CAuction Sali 



es 



APPRAISALS FOR TAX AND OTHER PURmSES 



I 



öcile lliaij 8 at 8 p.m. 

OLD MASTERS 
CENTURY WORKS 



MODERN P A I N T I N G S 

Property of 

A MASSACHUSETTS PRIVATE OWNER 

AND FROM OTHER 80URCES 

OLD MASTERS by Salomon van Ruysdael, Lucas Cranach the 
Eider, David Teniers the Younger, Jan van Scorel, Giovanni 
Santi: Romney, Raeburn, Vigee^Lebrun, Willem Kalt and others. 

Vne Torrent dans les Romagnes CoROT 

XLX CENTURY AND MODERN PAINTINGS— Fantin- 

Latour, Mancini, Worms; Monet, Jawlensky, Raoul Dufy, 
Boudin, Vlaminck, Redon, Segonzac, Matisse, Degas: John Sloan, 
Childe Hassam, Waugh, Pushman, Hartley and others. 

A bronze by Daumier and a sculpture by Sintenis. 

Illustrated Cataloguc 75 f 



Seile 1 1 Lcitj g ot i:jfj p. lu. 

GRAPHR: ART • A GROUP OF DRAWIN(;S 

By MODERN MASTERS 

Prints by Matisse, Degas, Picasso, Braque, Utrillo, Lei][er, 
Bonnard, Duty, Marie Laurencin and others including an exten- 
sive coUection by Toulouse-Lautrec and a hne woodblock print in 
color by Gauguin. Drawings by Degas, Delacroix, Raoul Dufy. 
Matisse, Forain, Millet, Le Fresnaye, Despiau, di Chirico, Rodin. 

IWustratcd Cdtdlo(yuc 50(1* 
Both Collcctions On View from May 4 









»' 

.- 



>* 



1- 






ARTS/Af./v 1057 



SCHAEFFER 
GALLERIES 



983 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK 28 

Corner 83rd Street Tel. LEhigh 5-6410 



GALERIE PIERRE 

2 Rue des Beaux-Arts (corner r. de Seine) 



Telephone Dan. 53.09 

PARIS 6e 



BERNARD 



April 25 -May 



uDUFOUR 



May 16 -June 



, MACRIS 



June 1 - 22 



lAPOUJADE 




PAUL PETRIDES 



53 rue La Boetie 



Paris 8e 



Tel. Bai. 35-51 



MAY - JUNE 




AX PAPART 



Exciusive Agent 



Max Papart 



Still Life 



IN JUNE 
EXHIBITION OF THE BOOK 



THE TAMING of the SHREW 

ustrated by AIZPIRI 

With The Original Gouaches From Which The Lithographs 

lllustrating The Book Were Taken 




AUCTIONS 



MASTERPIECES FROM FIVE CENTURIES 
INCLUDED IN COMING PARKE-BERNET SÄLE 

AN extensive ^unii) ^** paimings, drawings and sculjnurcs by 
inasters ol the sixteeiuh to tweritieth centurics, dcriving 
fiom a Xfassaehusetts private (olleetion and other soiirces, will 
pass mider the auctioneer's gavel on Wednesday eveninj^r, May 
8. at the Parke Beriiet Galleries in New York. 

Best-kiiown anioiio the paintin.sr.s by old masters are Saloiiion 
Ruysdael's // Riverside Village with a berryboat, Liuas C:ranaeh 
the Klder's Johann I der Hestandige Kurfürst und Herzog von 
Saclisen, Ronmev's Captani llilliani Onilvie of Ardirlass, Ire- 
Innd, Raebiini's Sir Williani Houeynian and Giovanni Santi's 
Madonna and Child. Besides paintings by David leniers the 
Youngcr, Antonio Moro, Van Monthorst and Hendrick Pot, 
the categorv of ancient works in( Indes a still lile by Willem 
Kalt, Jan van Scorel's Portrait of a Lady and V'igee-Lebrun's 
Conti tess Savoroiian di lirazza. 

Aniong the inneteenth- and twentieth-tentun paintings are 
Corot's Un Torrent dans les Rotnagnes, a .S7/7/ Life by Fantin- 
Latour, Monet's Le Lac, Ghilde Hassam's In the Sunlight, 
Jawlensky's Blonde Fräulein and Duly's Le Piedestal ä la jatte 
aux fleurs. Also represented are Kondin, Vlanniuk. Segonzac, 
Redon, Dcgas, Friesz, Valtat, Henri Kdniond Cross, John 
Sloan, VVaiigh. Pushnian and Hartley. Sc ulptures iiulude pieces 
by Danmier and Sintenis. 

All works in the May 8 art sale will be on exhibit at the 
Parke-ßernet Galleries begiiniing Saturday, May 4. 

AUCTION CALENDAR 

May 2, at 1 :4.'5 p.m. Parke-Hcnict (.allcrics. Kgvptian anticpiitics, 
(.reck and Roman art, Gothic and Renaissance art. l»ropcrty of .\frs. 
Charles K. Ciawlev. New York, and fioni the tollcction of the lale 
Isahelle McKay Peck. Pittsburgh, sold by ordcr of her daughter. and 
froni othcr sourccs. Fxhibition now. 

May .3 and 4, at 1:45 p.m. Parke Ik'rnet (.allerics. Georgian and 
Regencv furnituie and decorations. Chelsca and other Fnglish 
porcelains. silver. rugs, Chinese arl. JMoperty of Nfrs. Margot A. 
Holmes, Mrs. Anna D. Griscom, the Childrcn's Aid Sotietv and 
other owners. Fxhibition now. 

May 7 and 8, at 1:45 p.m. I'arke-Bernet Galleries. Autograph 
letters and dotninents. niainly American. Collccted by the late Forest 
(i. Sweet. Battle Creek, Michigan. Included are letters and docu- 
nienls by Washington. Adams, Jeffersoii. Lincoln and others. Fxhi- 
bition now. 

May 8, at 8:00 p.m. Parke- Bernet Cialleries. Old masters, nine- 
tecnth-centinv and modern paintings. From a Nfassachusetts private 
owner and from other soinces. ( For details sec story above.) Fxhibi- 
tion from Mav 4. 

May 9, al 1:45 p.m. Parke-Bernet Cialleries. Graphic art, from the 
estate of the late Fiidwig Charell and other owners. Prints by mod- 
ern masters, incinding Malisse, Degas. Picasso, Bracpie. Lltrillo. 
I.c'ger. Boiniard. Dufy and Laurencin. Fxhibition from May 4. 

May 10 and 11, at 1:45 p.m. Parke-Bernet Galleries. French fur- 
niture and decorations, modern paintings, rugs. Property of varions 
owners, particularlv Mrs. Anna I). Griscom, lucson and Phoenix, 
\ri/ona. Fxhibition from Mav 4. 

May 15, at 1:45 p.m. Parkt- Bernet Galleries. Precious-stone and 
other jewelrv, all from private owners and eslatcs. Fxhibition from 
May 10. 

May 17 and 18, at 1:45 p.m. Parke-Bernet (ialleries. Fnglish and 
American fnrnitnre, decorations and paintings from varions owners. 
incinding fiunishings removed frotn the resiclence of the late Walter 
J. Salnion and sold by order of Mrs. F. Warrington Gillet. Fxhibi 
tion from May 1 1 . 

May 29, at 1 :45 p.m. Parke-Bernet Galleries. Ciarden and lerracc 
fiuniture and sculptures. faience. limestone, cast-iron and other 
decorative objects, assend)leci bv Mine Rcnc'e (inibal. HaiU-dn \'al. 
France, and sold bv her ord''»- Fxhibition from Mav 24. 



ARTS/A^/v 1957 



ANDRE 





RAIN 



DRAWINGS (FIRST SHOWING IN AMERICA) 



THROUGH MAY 25 



GALERIE CHALETTE 

1100 MADISON AVE (82-83 ST) 



ARTHUR TOOTH & SONS LTD. 



kj/ii 



r'\ 4.JL*, 



1^^m>-m 




riiUf dt' la Concorde, 1956 

Recent Paiii^iiic/.v 

bi:rxard bii fut 

30lli April - 2.itli May 19.i7 
diso paintintss bv 

THE IMI'RESSIOMSTS 

MOniGLIAM. SOITINE. PICASSO 

de STAEL am! RIOPELLE 

:t I KRITOIV STKKET 



RARE COLLECTION OF 

ANTIQUE JAPANESE 

COLOR PRINTS 

COLORFUL WATERCOLORS 




Kabuki Actor Prints 
by Shunsen (Contemporary) 

Size including mat 13" x 19"— SIO.OO 
iSef of six 550.00^ 

WM. LEE COMERFORD 

55 E. 55 St., N. Y. Plaza 3-3374 




Paintings by 



GEORGE BELLOWS 
H. V. ALLISON & CO. 

Paintings • Prints • Drawings 
32 East 57th St., New York 22, N. Y. 



THE A.F.A. CONVENTION 



Houston Hirrtifio frafnyrs DnrhaNi/) llrotlios rxhihition, Tr.xas (ulisls und 
nohihlr /}iivafr iollniions . . . niu.sruni dirrdors, ((hoa/ny.s, diti.sts, drulns 
and Inxnicn hrnr slx-nlns h\ Mcxrr SV// r/ />/><>. Hnndall fanrlL Will nun Srilz, 
l\U(l<)lj)}i .l)}ihcnn nnd oihcis . . . hn.stcrs rltu tcd 



BY JONATHAN MARSHALL 

AiMoM lillcfu liuiidrid |)t()|)lc iiiuiulcd llic 
^ \imri{;m I cdt liiiion ol Arls (oiiMinion, or 
i\lr;i\;ij»;in/;i. in Housioii (lmin)i» ilic lirst weck 
ol \|)iil. \si<|(' Irom ilu- mmihcr ;il (cndiii^. 
nioM- th;iii IkiII ol whom ucic I cxaiis. iliis 
ii^ianl )4;i(lu'iiii^()l ilu' an dans was noiahlf ior 
inaiu lliiiij>s. It prodiucd ilic (irsi aw air lift. il 
prodiKcd maiiv j^ood lalks and ol romsi" somc 
l)a(l oiu's. and ii did iniuli lo stimidatc an in 
I t'\as. Il was also umisiial in thal not onc I cxas 
jokc was loislcd oii ihc aiiditiuc-. 

One si^niluaiu aspcd ol ihc (oiivcnlion was 
llic c'lfi(i('ni jol) ol (>ioani/iii^ (Nuic hv tlir \.l". \. 
and ihf hual (oininilUr licadcd l)\ Sianicv Mar- 
cus, ihc (onxc'Mlioii (hainnan. and john de 
Mcnil and Prcslon Bolton ol Honsion. Inlikc 
inosi an cxcnis. this onc was well oigaiii/cd 
down lo iht' lasl dt'iail and rnt'ivcd cxtcllcni 
|)itss (oNciamf llnonj^houl ihc naiion. 

in addilion lo ilic \arious sj)cr(lics and paiu! 
discnssions. local nniscinns. gallcrics and i)n'\alc' 
grou|)s oij^ani/fd special cxlnhilions on a stalc- 
widf hasis. I licsc int Indcd tlic " I Intr Broilicis" 
at thc Mnscinn ol Finc Ans in Houston, "Tacc- 
niaktrs" al Houston's (;onic'inj)orarv Ans Musc- 
nni. ■Illnininalions" Kallcd l)\ onc waj» "F.Iiini- 
nalions") ol ldl\ maslcrpicrcs hcing (innlatcd 
hy Ijjc Mdo^aiinr. "Survev of Texas Anisls" at 
ihe Dallas Museum. "Sculplors ol I exas" al tlie 
Ion Wonh An Cenui. 'JirtN l'aiiuini^s Ironi 



I ill\ I exas ColUdions" al llie Nfaiion Koo,i;l( i 
M( \a\ \n insiiiiue and "( .oiUt inpoiaiA Reli- 
.Hious \n" (iot»eiliei wilh a llower sliou ) at llie 
Wille Memorial Museum in San \nionio. 

Museum exhihiiions ueie suppleinenied l)v 
lours ol Ihe |)ri\ale ((»lle( lions ol Miss lina Ho.ujl;, 
Mr. and Mrs. Rohen Sirauss and \h. and Mis. 
john de Menil in Houston. Mr. and Mrs. Rohen 
W indlohr and Mr. and Mrs. Vndrew luller in 
Ion Worth. and Mr. and Mrs. Stanle\ MaKus in 
Dallas. Ihe Dallas ((»niin):>eiH ol ihe an air lilt 
also \isiled llie new Jew isli ,S\ na<;()i»m' in that 
(il\ which ranks amoiio ijie mosi darin); and 
heaulilul ol new reli^ious sirudures answiiere. 
Another sii»nili(ant aspen ol thc ((unenlion 
wem ludieralded and deserves s|)e( iai nuntion. 
A((()rdin^ to a well-inlormed sourcc. ihis was 
ihe Inst timc thal \egroes uere admiiud as 
j;uests K» Ihe lamous .Sliainroik Iloiel wheie ihe 
(ouNention was held. 

I he re(()rd atlendance induded leadinj; mu 
seum diredors Irom all parls ol the counlrv, 
edmators. anisls. (oliedors. dealers and manv 
Ia\men. hoth dealers and (olledors Kx.k the 
o|)|)ortinnl\ to heconie a((|iiainted wilh I exas 
anisls and in a numher of tases to aeijuirc works 
ol an. 

1 hree new memhers were eleeted lo the A.F.A. 
lioard ol I nrsiees at ihc aniuial meeliiijr. These 
were Dudlev F. Fashv, Jr., Secrclarv of the .Met- 



Randall JanrlJ. Stuart Davis und Mrxrr Srhul>im al tlu Anutnun Frdrration of Art.s Convention 
in l tonst on. 




10 



hK\l May 1957 



n'l'ol'lan Museum ol \,,. U ilji,,,, ( . Murias 
l'ivsHieni <,1 ih(. Munson Williams j'nuior Insti-* 
""*•• •'>'<« '••iM^M C. Sd.e.Hk. Direclor of ihe 
HrooklNu Museum. Ollucs were ;dl re-eleded 
'<" ••"''•'hm Near. wilh James S. Sduarnm (c.min- 
um,n as President. 

fii his keNM(,te address lo ,!,(. eonvenlion 
J'x'lcssor McNcr S.hapiro ol (chni.l.ia I nivcr- 
NMN relra((d the shil, ioward thc- |,ers(,nal in 
llif ;iris (huu.o Ihr last hundre<l Ncars. Ihe re 
jfclm.s. of represenialion. he i>(,ii,i(><| (,„( |,as 
«iMU the uidiNi<lnal the power K» shape liis oun 
iH'hels: -1, has K-d i<, ^u-ater NaricU and nw.re 
•''l"'l (l'^m^cs in siNles and ideas . . . didies do 
'"»' l^'^l loiiK. • Dr. Schapiro remindrd ll.e audi- 
•"<^- "'«" •'" '^ virtualK ihe |;,st Ncsiioe of per- 
M.nal (lealion in o,n modern, n.ass pro(lu( t i.,n 
W(Mid. He (ompared ihe ad (,1 (,r;uin^ lo iju. 
;•<' <»' idkm^. in whid. words haxe an order 
•tnd esiahlisl, as well as depend ..p(,n a (onlext 
'" '»»"' '"' ;'n<l speeeh ihere is an elenient of 
"'»• uu(<)nsdo„s cnterinu im,, ,1,,. (,(.;nio„ ,>i 
■'(M(ler oul ol disorder." 

I" ilir sNinposinm thal loll(»wed, poei R;mi 
<l^»ll Jarrell Nic.JenlK atta<ked \l)sira(i Fxpres- 
sionisni. (allino ii tlu- -intensiNe exploiialion ol 
une |)arf ol ihc re\ohilionai n Iradilion ol Uon- 
«liMd. Maliss( and ricasso. Coniiniiinu |,is at- 
liuk. jarrell (oniparid Ahsirad Fxpressionisin 
"» ll'c luohh pul.li(i/ed r(Teni painting l,v a 
Baltimore monke\. In esseiue he <dl(d Ior a i 
'^""" "> natme. deelarino thal -Man and the | 
World are all thal thev exer were." In reply 
Dr. Sdiapiro poinKd out thal ^ainlin^ depends 
<»i. the ad.ieNenu-nt of (pialiiies" wluc h a n.on- 
kcv cannoi reali/e; spontaneity in itsdf does not 
(reale <»(>od or had. 

Ilu- serond panel. wilh William Sv\U as niod- 
eraloi. was ((»ndined wilh *" I he Creative Ad" 
and lormed one of the eonveiuion hif»lilij»hts. In 
liis iniroduelion Professor Seit/ deelarnl lliat the 
"ludrrn anist "(hose lo end)ark on a lile of 
<realion Ior ends enlirelv seif ovncated. and 
pnuhued Works Ior whieh liiere uaN iio .social 
«Iduand . . . let us face one hu l s(piarel\: while 
he is working. the Ivpicallv (()nien,p„nnN artist 
is unaware of what the |)ul)li( likes or dislikes. 
He is totalis (uxupied wilh the aiuhenli( itv of his 
t'xperience." Cominentin^ on ihis. Mar(el Du 
<liamp claimtd that the -creatiNe ad is not per- 
forined hv the artist alone. I he spedalor hrinos 
Ihe work in (onlrasi wilh the external worhl 
. . . inierprclin^ iis inner (pialilual ions and ihus 
addiiii» his ( ontribiuion. ' 

( «»miniunj^ tlie dist nssion. in oneof ilie (onven- 
nOns hest lalks. Dr. Rudcdph Andieiiii of Sarah 
l.awreiKc College dedared: "Creative ihinking 
l)elow the le\d ol awareness picserMs the pri- 
mordial umtv of tJion<»lit and ima^c. uilliout 
whidi an is impossihle. Our ( i\ ili/.uion pro- 
moies a Separation of ahsirad ideas Iroin whal 
Ihe senses i)er(ei\e -which is fatal Ior ihe artist. 
. . . It is also true thal |)rimiiive reasoning cen- 
lers lorever ahout the hasic (onterns wilh lile 
and death that must remain the hunulalion of 
llie work of an lesi it lose ilself in the shades of 
I>riNate sensiiixitv . . . | he apparent sin.plicilN 
ol some liul\ snhsiantial modern an is as derep- 
tiNc as the appareni sid)sian(e of sonie iruh sim- 
J>le modern an. " 

Ihe linal panel. disdissini. thc iiehulous topic 
"Irom Anist to l'nl)li(." disinlegraied at the 
heoinning wilh a h)rlv-li\e-!ninule sliowing of 
slides of |)ainlings that had changed in value 
siiue their (reation. Despiie ihe exccllcnt chair- 
maiiship of Fhilip R. Adams and strong State- 
ments l)\ jinniiN Frust and Kernard Reis, it 
proxed an anli(limadi( ending lo an olherwisc 
slimidating (oiuenlion. 

In (ondusion it (an he said that ihis was proh- 
al)l\ the hesl-organi/ed and inost livelv Ameri- 
tan an coineniion in hislorv. Mthough sonie of 
the lalks could cerlaiidv he improved lipon, the 
Standard as a whole \vill hedillidilt to live uj) to 
in llie future. 




The most exciting, most 
significant, and influential 
artists of the 20th Century^ 



tijE 



A SURVEY OF THEIR GRAPHIC ART 

Text hy Carl Ziqrosser, Curator of Prints 
and Drawwqs, Philadelphia Museum ol Art 

The work of Cranach, Goya, Ensor. 
Rousseau. Van Gogh, Gauguin. 
Kandinsky, Klee, Feininger. Kol'lwitz. 
Beckmann, Grosz, Picasso. Roualt. 
Chagall, Weber. Marin and others. 

122 hlack and white reproductions, 
8 pages in füll color—hand 
mounted—size 8V7" x U" 

$10.00 at all hookstores 
GEORGE BRÄZILLER, INC. 215 Fourth Avenue. New York 3 



DANIEL 



MAY 13-31 



SERRA BADUE 

THE CONTEMPORARIES • 992 MADISON AVE. AT 77 



ARTHUR OSVER 



PAINTINGS 
GRAND CENTRAL MODERNS 



TO MAY 17 
1018 MADISON AVE. 



Drawings 



J 



May 6th-29th 



IRVING MARANTZ 



BABCOCK GALLERIES 



Carmine Dalesio, Director New Address 805 MADISON AVE at 68 ST. 



158 W. 58 
Tel. JU. 2-3077 



HOMER 

COSTELLO 

THICKLY TEXTURED 

Sfreef Scenes, Landscapes 

Abstractions 

Low Budget Price 

WED. & SAT. 2-5 OR BY APPOINTMENT 



"NEW WORK" 



May 6-25 



BLUHM • BUDD • DZUBAS 

J. JOHNS • LESLIE • LOUIS 

MARISOL • ORTMAN 

RAUSCHENBERG • SAVELLI 

LEO CASTELLI • 4 E. 77 • 2-6 PM 



PAINTINGS BY 




PADUA 



STUART J. 



Thru May 21 



SCULPTURE 
Opening May 13 



s 



VAN DIEMEN-LILIENFELD 

21 E. 57 St., N. Y. C. 



GALLERIES 



CONTEMPORARY ARTS 

802 LEX. AVE. AT 62 ENTRÄNGE ON 62nd ST. 



May li'June 8 



L E o N o R 



MOTHERWELL i F I N 



Sidney Janis 15 East 57 



GALLERT 

75 

30 E 75 ST NY 



thru May 15 



II 



OPKN LKTTl^li T<> TIIK MKTR< )1><JI.ITAN 




S rt tu u e I F, B, 

Morse^ im muse— 

SUSAN WALKER 

morse; heq liest of 
Herbert L.Piatt. All 
photographs coiir- 
tesy of the Metro- 
politan Museum of 
Art. 



Mary Cassutln 

l \D\ AI IMF T1:A 
PARI. F. 




Winslow Homer, norihfasifr; gift of Geor<re A. Hea 



rn. 




Eight yenrs ago James S. Rosrnbcrg, xvriting as an artist 
and private Citizen, sent a series of nine open letters to the 
Metropolitan Musenm of Art rharging if with ''gross negiert" 
of contemporary American art. Since that time the Mnsewn 
has changed its policies and has heen collecting and exhibit- 
ing xvork by our conteynporary artists. 

In the near future the Metropolitan Museum of Art will 
oprn new rooms for American art. These galleries, tue agree 
xüith Mr. Rosenberg, are totally inndequate to exhibit perma- 
nently the Museum's vast American collection. We believe 
that it is time to hoiise this collection in its oxvn building, and 
tue arr honored to prcsent the folloxring open lefter froni Mr. 
Rosenberg, xvho is Chairman of the Board of this magazine. 

-J.M. 



A\/^». .,.^, 



April 29, 1957 
Mr. Roland L. Rcdmoiid, President 
riie Metropolitan Museum of Art 
New York, New York 

Dear Mr. Redniond: 

President Eisenhower's "people-to-people" program and his 
recent appointment of David K. I inley as ehairman of a na- 
tional ronnnittee for the purpose of a((juaintini,r the world 
with the art of the U.S.A. should demonstrate that our coun- 
try IS not merely an assembly line in the land of the dollar. 

It is in Order to implement the President's plan diat I now 
address this open letter to you. First of all, it is due to you and 
yoiir fellow trustees that the Metropolitan Afuseum has 
achieved a laudable change in poli(v within recent years. 
Whereas eight years ago I publidv diarged the Metropolitan 
Museum, and particularly its then direetor, with gross negiert 
of the contemporary art of our country, it is onlv just tliat I 
now applaud the actions of the Museum since then. and the 
devoted and able work of RoIkti Beverly Haie, which have 
resulted in die acquisition of over five lumdred examples, 
traditional and advanced, of such art. 

Notable as is this record, there is urgent need for your great 
Museum-here on Manhattan Island,' which has, so to speak, 
become the world's capital-to have an American Building so 
that our entire art from its pre-Revolutionary beginnings may 
be adequately and permanently on exhibit. Ihough I know 
you share niy views, you have told nie that it has up to this 
tinie been impossible because of lack botli of space and funds 
to accomplish this purpose. 

To judge whether your Museum's collection of the art of 
our country deserves such an American Building, I have, with 
Mr. Hale's aid, made a study of your Museum's possessions 
resulting in certain strong convictions: 

1. Ihe Metropolitan Museum's twenty-four thousand Amer- 
ican Works of art comprise, I believe, the greatcst collection 
of American art in the world. 

2. We Americans have an artistic tradition and heritage 
fully worthy of our great country. 

3. Our artists today are producing works rankiiig with ihosc 
of any other country. 

4. Conlionted with present international tensions, it is our 
imperative duty to place the American collection of the 
Aretropolitan Museum on füll exhibition for the world to see. 

In Order that the public may gain at least a liint of the 
Museum's treasures, I outline the result of iiiy explorations. 

The more than two thousand oils in your American collec- 
tion include many of the finest examples extant. Tliey trace 
the history of painting frcmi the early lininers throiigh West, 
Copley, Stuart and their contenijjoraries to the present day. 



12 



Ihey include iiinumerable famous portraits of our countiv's 
great men. I hev include examples of every trend our artists 
have fol Owc^d through the centuries-the vigorous Hudson 
River School, the works of the paintei -naturalists Audubon 
and Heade, our genre and still-lifr painters, twenty-two oils 
by Homer and Kakins. thirty by our expatriates Sargent. 
VVhistler and Cassatt, works by the revohitionarv "Eight"' and 
their followers. The vast contemporary collec tion, most cath- 
olic in taste, ranges froni Grandma Afoscs to Jackson Pollock. 
Ot American drawmgs. watercolors and prints, the Museum 
owns inaiiv thousands. How can I des. ribe this collection? 
Works bv Currier and Ives. a füll history of American prints 
and illustrations, a record of American cartooning. sixty water- 
colors by Marin alone. 

Vour sculpture collection numbers over four hundred works. 
certainly the largest in the land. Kvery great sculptor our 
country has produced is, I believe. represented. often by his 
greatest work. Ibis collection has not been on display for 
many years. J he Museum's assemblage of h>ur lumdred or 
more American miniatures surpasses in size and qualitv all 
other such collec tions. 

0{ this entire great American collection onlv the decorative 
ans Ol the Colonial and Early American periods have been 
on truly permanent display in recent tinies. Space forbids a 
further bst ol distinguished names l(,ngc>r than Homer's cata- 
logue ol ships. 

Ihis description calls to my niind a Erench collector wIküu 
I inet seNeral vears ago. Enthusiastic as he was about the Mu- 
seum's World treasures. especially the süperb Cloisters created 
by James J. Rorimer through Mr. Rockefeller's princely back- 
ing. he remarked that our "capture" (as he put it) of these 
treasures breeds envy of. rather than aclniiration for, "your 
rieh Uncle Sam," and deplored the fact that we display so little 
ot our own art at the Metropolitan Museum. His remarks re- 
call the onlv too well justifiecl Statement of Andre:' Maurois 
(in his book. ./ History of France) that "the great American 
museums. in partic ular so far as contemporary inovements are 
concerned, have become museums of Erench art." Is it not 
high time for us to answer such aniinadversions? 

Here on Manhattan Island dwell the delegates, their staffs 
and families, from eighty nations. Here are consulates and 
representati\es of foreign industries. In the past ten years 
more than twenty-three million visitors. not only from our 
lorty-eight states but from many foreign lands as well, have 
crossed the Museum's threshold without charge (costing vour 
Museum, you have told me, over one dollar per visit!). 

It is tragically clear that neither our World War victories 
nor our diplomacv, nor our outpourings of billions of treasure, 
have yielded us the world's friendship, or brought peace to this 
planet. Art. which speaks a universal language of peace froni 
"jH'ople to people." is entitled to a chance to speak out and 
help toward that better world which all niankind craves. 

Eor names of once-lamous emperors, soldiers, hnanciers and 

statesmen of past centuries, we have to thunib through dustv 

pages of history. But Maecenas and Eoren/o de* Medic] live on 

because of what they did for letteis. art. artists and die world. 

A challenge and an historic opportimity confionts von. 

your eminent fellow trustees and all of us who are friends of 

your great Museum. A noble structure permanently housing 

the art of our countrv should adjoin and be an integral part 

of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 1 piay the day niay be 

near at band when I shall see you dig the first shovelful of 

earth to start the foundations of the Metropolitan Museimrs 

American Buildini». 

Respectfully yours, 
James N. Rosenbeij: 




George W\ Hellows. i r im ui dson; gift of Hugo Rrisin"rr 




Walt Kuhn, cfown wmh rfack wig; 
C'.eorge A. Hearn Fund. 



Lee Catch, fhf ihor.n; tlic Fdward /. Calhiglirr 111 Memorial Collection. 



hX\%/May 1957 



23 




SAIDENBERG GALLERY 



Exfended to May 1 1 



LYNN CHADWICK 

RECENT SCULPTURES 



Exhibiilon 
Opening May 13 



HOMMAGE ä 

KAHNWEILER 

honoring Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler 
who over the last fifty years has 
represented the following artists: 

BRAQUE • GRIS • KLEE • LAURENS 
LEGER • MANOLO • PICASSO 



BEAUDIN • KERMADEC • LASCAUX 
MASSON • ROGER • ROUVRE 

10 EAST 77th ST. NEW YORK 



the Primitive Arts of the World 
Part I: 

FROM TLATILCO TO MAYA 

A Survey of 
Pre-Columbian Cultures 




May 1-31 

D'ARCY GALLERIES 

19 Eas» 76 New York 1 to 6 

LYceum 6-4848 



PARIS 



im 



Ihr hni^-incaücd Mofuhiau rrtr(t.spr( tivr-ni a dnnatr ni (ntual antitntcUeclualis 
a nnsinhj^ir survey nf Dada . . . Picayso thr oprtiin^ rxhihüin nl nnv /.oui.sr Leins i^^uUery 
. . . dnneinfrs hy Andre Derain . . . ( oinpre/iensive shows hy Jacques l'illon and Andre IJiöte 



BY BARBARA BUTLER 

Tills mujsualh hiiliiinil monih, just prcading 
tlu' hurst of adiviiN wliidi .iniiuallv cliarac- 
itri/cs hl ornnde saisoji o{ Mav and jiinc. has 
Ix'cn lor Ihc mosi pari a liiiif of sumniinj^s iip 
aiid .1 j^tiuraJ (IcploMiient of major forrcs in 
rc'vicw. lU'Uvrtii ilic North and Soulli l'olcs of 
Ihr Moruhian and Dada irlrosiuciives, exliihi- 
tions of IJiotc and Dtiain. \ illon and Picasso 
lic. at inicnnc'dialc ialiludts. ahoul a kind of 
(•(lualor: üw s|)lcn(lid shou 'Dcpuis lionnard" 
(Mgani/cd hy ihc Soc irU" des Amis du Muscc 
<r Art Moderne. I his last txhihition of sonic iwo 
hundrcd painlings from prixaic i*arisian rollcc- 
tions is in iiseif a kind of h\ in^r acadnnv, par- 
li(uhirl\ of tlic FauNc pcriod, hut tncompassing 
all of modern painting in France from Modi- 
gliani and lionnard lo \ ieira tia Silva. The levcl 
is uniform and unusuallv high, eslahlishing a 
sort of Standard wherehy lo measure currenl 
exhihilions. 

Ihe major exent at ihis moinenl. however. is 
inidoui)tedl\ the long awaited Mondrian exhihi- 
lion whidi is now at the Denise Rene gallerv. 
F he dehn in presentation is symplomatie not 
oidv ol the Situation of af)stra(t painting. hut of 
Ihe general esthetie and intelleetnal climate of 
postwar IraiKc. Hui herc at last, afler ten vears 
of |)rogressi\e entreiuhment of what is knovvn in 
the eneiiiN (ainp as "l'idfstraction jroide," is 
Mondrian in retros|)e( t i\e. One's lirst reaetion is 
to ask why the cvent was so long in (oming. Ihe 
oflitial explanation is that the Dutth nniseum 
autiKMities (whidi ineans primarilv W. Sand 
herg) wished to hold their own large-scale retro- 
spe(li\e heforehand. and that their Ireiuh eol- 
leagiu's were reludant to impose ihis exhihition 
on uhat the\ feit was an unprepared pid)lie. I o 
judge. however. from the response to this show. 
the puhlic has again heeii underestimated. and 
Ihe exhihition has heen almost as populär as the 
Rend)ran(lt engra\ings and drawings at the In- 
stitut Xeerlandais. hi Mondrian another Dutdi 
master (and. ii might he added. oiie who made 
Frame his home througli the greater pari of his 
(areer) has heen adnowledged. 

ihis small. admirahiv seleded exhihiiiou it- 
self is weil suited to introducc the artist. iiased 
on the Mondrian show at the Wnite liiennale 
this Summer, it in eilet l (l(»es for l'aris largelv 
what tiie SiducN janis exhihition of 1949 did 
for \ew ^ork. Highh sele(ti\e. as the great 
Museiuii of Modern Art lelrospective tould not 
l)e. it was e\en niore instrudive. Ihe twent\- 
two (an\ases ränge fronj the tree studies of \\)\() 
and 1911 to (the Museum of Modern .\rt's)B?Y;r/r/- 
?/Y/v liooi^ic-W Ooiric of 1942-4.'^. I hose first two 
\ears were. of (ourse. crucial — the hegiiuiing of 
Ihe assimilalion of Cidiisjn whieh a|)pears in the 
su((essive versions of thr Still J.ifr jrit/t Ciuner 
Pol. I Ins series represents a hreak, a point of 
departure. and nuist. I agree witli the current 
exhihition (atalogue. he dated 1911, rather than 
1912 as Midiel Seuj)h(M argiied in his reeent 
hook. (Seupiior also, with sid)slainiating evi- 
deiue. retards .Mondrian's arrival in Paris initil 
1912. as against 1910.) Ihis firsl series. like 
hloweriniT Irec and Coinjtositiou of 1911, which 
were followed hv the Sea nud Pier and Oeeau 
series. take their phne wilhin the ehorus of 
(-ul)ist painting and arc aniong the greatest of 
their kind. Ihe speed. the alacrilv with which 
Mondrian seems to ha\e grasped the lessons of 
.\nalvli(al Cjihism. the ease and the rigor with 



14 



whi(h from the fiist he manages. hy iising ihe 
soher shinuiier <»f the dassital Cuhist palelle, to 
<l(hne and lelale interhuking and reteding 
|)lanes to ilif Ihn (aiuas siufaee, express the 
liheration whidi Mondrian (whose own wotk 
had ahcath e\ol\ed in this direetion) found in 
(inhism. W e ha\e a detaiied (oidirmation of this 
in the small eomplementary show of pre l!H I 
.Mondrian at the Daniel Cordier gallery. Ihx 
are some lifieen of Mondrian's earliest woiks— 
(har(()al sketdies. suhdued landstapes in oil. and 
sironglv arti(ulaled groups of chry.santhenumis 
aiui(ipating. hut only just ami(ipating. the for- 
mal (laritN of Ihe tree studies in the laig( r 
exhihition. 

Mondrians palette suhsrtpjeiuU hetame moie 
personal in siu h pidmes as the ()v<d Conilxni- 
lion of 1914. and hv 1917 the dominam pinks 
and hhies are pul to the servite of a struetural 
lad and elegante. de\eloj)e(l owr the \ears of 
Cuhist adi\il\. to picdute the first "chesshoard" 
pidures. whose mo\en>ent and measuretl rliNthms 
of hright. pretise forms antieij)ate his last \ew 
^ork Boogie-\\ (K)gie paimings. Ihe 1917 line 
(omposition on \ iew is dearlv an outgrowlh of 
the pier and sea studies. in whidi dots and inter- 
erossed dashes pla\ ahoul the teiiter of gra\itv 
estahlished l)\ a deepening of value intensity 
elfeded l)\ (omeiüralion of these forins— an in- 
dired adaptation of an engraving tedmitpie. 
From 1920 on. of comse. the developmeni is 
slowcr, more gradiud. For Mondrian. Xeo IMas- 
ti(ism was, among other things. a relentless. pa- 
tient attempt lo define the limits of painting. 
and the series of \eo- Plast i( works. whidi aie 
extremely well represented here— in fad rightiv 
form the eure of the exhihition— show a steadv 
progress until 1942. when theie oedus the ex 
iraordinary leap to the higher-keved. faster- 
temixied Hroadieax liooiiieW Ooirie. 

One tomes awav from this verv great exhihi- 
tion sohered and dated. and with of eourse that 
feeling of ama/ement that genius always inspires 
— at the (laring, the palieme, the remarkahle sus- 
tained energv of Mondrian's (areer. the steadv 
seardiing. the ( ontradit tion. the hrilliant reso- 
lution. And one wonders at the distindly meas- 
ured atdaim of the piess (Chastel of l.e Moude 
and his moie adNemurous (olleague at Combat 
seem lo agree in an and)i\alent feeling of re- 
sped and uneas\ adniiration for his ".Moral 
Fxample") . Sudi reseixe seems to derive from a 
gciieral waxeof antipathv here, generali/ed sinte 
Ihe war. toward the explieitly intelleetnal in art 
generallv. towaid ralio( ination in literature and 
what is (onsidered extessive formalism in paim 
ing— a readion. perhaps. against the native rigor 
of the Cartesian tradition (or, one might add. 
the philosophi(al \idories of (lerman ideas as 
well as (.erman melhods of philosophy which 
ha\e hecoinc the donnuant intellectual inflnente 
in |)ostwar Fran(e). 

Till, readion against intellectualisin of cour.se 
is nothing new. as the current Dada retro- 
si)ective forcihlv reminds iis. One enters the 
(»alerie de riiistitm to fmd oneself in a nmse- 
um rather than a "show." Here is the anti-ration- 
alist insurrcdion institutionali/ed. ahstracted 
from context. In (ases and on shclvcs lic the 
"readv-madcs." the "Ciift" (a spiked iron) of 
Man Ray. the provocative invitations of the 
movenient-all of thein agcd and touching. One 



I 



m «il T* X ■+ I ■ ■' ■ ■ "^ !■ ■ ■" 

r'|i+f i-f. I. £| 1- u ' -»„i •- 

lUlTi'J-i i" • ■."i'i-4.'||t|"f' 



M J^ 



I ■ '■ 'i •■! 



I ■'••-' l-,_f- /'ti", l-,l- 







H ■ I - 






tt 






I 



I 



'.■?;«*>&v-ii;i;:V:>":>:-<Mi^.';^.;r 



p.^■:■?:^:":■"'•■■ :'■''■;>;■?»:■ 5^; '^^^ ^. S=?; fif^-r-^ 



Mondrian, link (.omi-osiiion i /<J/7 ,, ml/micn Kmllrr-M ül/rr Museum: at thr C.ahnir Druisr Hrue 



pauses in deliglit hdore legendary ohjects: l)u- 
champs mustached Morui Lisa, the "Ohjet a 
Detruire. Pitahias and Rose Selavvs camera. 
Ihe aimosphere is all nostalgia and admiration 
for the ea.se in whidi this giltled geneiation func- 
tioned. when siiddeiilv one is pre(ipitated from 
the plane of history lo that of art: tliere are h)ur 
Schwitters Mrrihildrrs, striking a note of unitpie 
elegame and origiiialitv. Fooking hof)efullv ahout 
for oihers. one does conie uj)on two Arp rdiefs 
of 1917, [)()werful and original, and two sliglit 
Riditer drawings in colorcd pencil, surprisinglv 
fresh and vivarious. 

Ihis period sliow is etlioed in the huge (ol- 
ledion of plioi()gra[)lis a.ssemhied h\ the I. C. A. 
in London and f)resenle(l in Paris at the Ij- 
hrairie Fa Huiie hv the maga/ine L'Oeil as 
"Picasso Lui-Memc." One follows the hiographv 
from Malaga lo tlie Hateau Favoir and througli 
the Rue des Cirands .Aiigustins to the \'illa Cali 
fornia. Lovers, tonipanions and friends. Dadaisis 
and Surrealists. Cuhists and (.onstrudivists weave 
in and out of this unprecedented hagiogiaphv. 
I his conslanllv pliotographed man knows how 
to look hack at the camera. 1 he demonic eye 
confronts the lens with tlie calm. natural mas- 
trrv of the Lion as lainer. No lens is his inatch. Hut 
the major Picasso-or the real Pica.sso-exhihition 
lies four amnidissernents away. Ihe newiv of)ened 
gallerv of Fouise r>eiri.s (Kahnweilers) on the 
Rue Monceau is the first reallv large-scaleattempt 
to create a tnodern gallery sinr e the war. Rather 
than insiall wall-to-wall car[)eling and a compro 
inise lighting systeiii in a remodeled hotel par- 
tuulier. the Leiris gallerv has wailed to accpiire 
premises fit for a collection of modern masters. 
Ihe gallerv is large. with a flexihle lighting svs- 
tem and a simple, eflective series of movahle pan- 
els which allow pidures to he i.solated orgrouped. 
Ihe onlv major delecl is the proximitv of the 



liK\%/May 1951 



oflice stall to the exiiihition aiea. One medilales 
(»n Picasso to tJu' rhvthm of tvpewriters. 

Ulis opening show teils us what Picasso has 
heen doing in the last two vears. One is Struck 
to hegiri with hv Ihe osci Hat ing movement helween 
Bracpie and Matisse, the need to re-pose and 
re solve certain (onimon pr(d)lems in what is, of 
eourse. a still dominantiv personal stvie. In a 
series of Ateliers dom- in (old white, giavs and 
hlues (with the greeii of palni trees seen througli 
i)ar()(jue-frame(l Windows), there is a progres 
Mon hackward from an extravagant use of ara 
hescpie toward a reduction of h)rms to piain. 
Hat areas of color. In some the eve is conslanllv 
solicited to read througli the detail covering 
each s(piare indi of canvas. so that in one paint- 
ing the tension which sliould have heen created 
l)N the wildlv curving Windows that endose the 
Irantic s(ene. rather like a pair of drunken 
parentheses. is ct)mf)letelv desiroved. Fliese proh- 
lems are resolved however in Scated Odalist/ufs 
and \\()T/iaii in Atelier and in a splendid \ude 
slung diagonal In across a gardeii s(ene: here 
"woman" is liealed in white, cold hhie and 
green. in a series of massive cahodionlike forms. 
Ihe impression of weiglit and movement is 
extraordinarv even for Pi(asso's recogni/ed mas- 
lerv of large Clements. 

Maeght this month is sliowiiig a numher of 

Derains drawings. Ihev were assemhied hv 

Madame Derain afler her liushands death and 

are i)iesenle(l untitled. undated. and tlutcfore. 

I presume. uiuataloguetl-as slie found ihem. 

I he drawings are almost uniformlv siatessful. 

allhough in various wavs. Miete are landstapes 

and manv nudes in chaicoal and in f)emil. these 

last executed with a verve almost reminiscent of 

Ladiai.se. What distinguishes tliem ahove all. 

however. is an infallihle seiise of misr m jxure. 

One line drawing of a nude is splaved out diag 



onallv against the page in an attitude <»f auio- 
cr(Ui< ahandon. her legs and one arm dividing 
tlie |)idure späte in two large heautifullv re 
lated areas. Mondrian. oue feds. would have 
appretiated this. f here are also a few ptntiied 
landscapes in whidi the lines. used uitli strid 
e((»nomv. at t as iiitisions wliitli seive lo aititu 
lale Ihe white spate of the paj)er work ihai 
allows a glimpse of the formalist mau<jU( . 

Onlv a Iew tloois awav. at the Ftxus (aire 
gallerv. is a i tt rospet t iv e of \ illon's eiigiavings 
<'•"'"« ''<"" Hdl to \'.)-k\. As iu ;,|| (.|'\i||,,M-s 
sln)ws. tlu- ainK.sphere. the eilet l generated, is 
of somelhiiig uol onlv hantlsome. hut exempjaiv. 
One is reminded ol this (»u prtKcetlino i,, ||,,. 
Miist-e dXri Moderne, where in a large shou ol 
"Fa jetiiie (.ravure (oniemporaine " there are 
'<»«n «>l ilic plales Oll tlisj>lav at (aries. It 
wt»ultl. of tourse. he unfair lt. jutlge aii\ ol ihe 
artists representeti in the large miiseum group 
agiiiiisi Ihe \ illon relKispet I ivc. I here ;iie. iiow- 
cvei. .1 large nuinhei ol at t omplislied plales 
manv ol whitli. like Fi ietllaentler's dhe exhihi- 
tion is t)hvit)uslv misnametl). to take hui tmt ex- 
aniple. go ou hom vear lo veai. heing jusi iIku 
anti pt)sing nt> prt)hlem eilher h)r ihe ;irtisi oi 
the Viewer. I here are two large Itncigii ton- 
tingents. |aj>anese and \ ugoslav. Manv ol ihe 
latter are toltn wotul hitxks. and liiere are 
lilht)graplis hv jt.sip Restek of /agreh whitli 
have Ihe sumptutms chic, am! not mutli more. 
-d Claves illust rat it)ns ol Rahelais. Ihe japa 
nese tome t.ff rather well tethnitallv. althoiigh 
what is hati lentis to i)e tpiite hati intleetl. 1 he 
tt)lor wt)t)tltuts lauge hom talemlai and tliil- 
dreirs-l)t>t»k stvIe t<» ihe ease antI sophisiit alitm 
of earlv Mtuherwell suggesleti iu Kaw;mislii's 
/irorauteur. 

Hut the lesst)!! of the \ illt)n exhihiiitm lies iu 
his lefusal It) he titxirinaire. Ins tt)nsisteiit de 
sire to re-pt)se prt.hlems tm tlilferent levels at 
tliflerent times. uitl his ahilitv tt) assimihue and 
niasier the past. In L'll<>)tnnr li.saut i l!>,-.:i). ihe 
npwartl mt>vement t)f planes, whitli rise in a 
slight Ihreat t)f disetpiilihrium iowaitl the heat! 
whidi is the onlv figurative area of ihe pitlure 
(anti ft>r that reast)n. lieated less insistenilv and 
mt)re suggestivelv than the rest). is (onstaiitiv 
related tt) the etiges ol ihe Irame. In / r Phihr 
sophr d9.M()). we have Daumier seen in the liglit 
of Analvlital Cluhism. Mt)re insistentiv edifving 
is Antirt- Fht)te. who is shouing a large grt)up 
t)f tanvases antI st)me uaieit t)lt)rs al ihe (.alerie 
(.alaiiis. Here, as alwavs wilh Fliöte. oue gets a 
sense t>f all the lesst)ns leained and applied, ol 
the line reteptive stutlent wlit) hetaine tlu tuas- 
terlv petlagt)gue. Ihe walerct)lors are al!nt)st 
vvitlit)ul exteptit)!! rigt)iouslv Ct'/annestjue aiul 
(jinte wiihtml extcptit)!! heauliful aiul siittess- 
Inl. Ihe tanvases represeni v ai v iiig degices ol 
svstematit a|)plitatit)n of ( uhisi tousinu i i,„, ;,,,d 
Fauve tt)lt)r. a kintl ol elahorale svuihesis t)l a 
whole area, t)r iA two. perhaps. Ihe hrilliani 
warm coltirs in ihe lantlstapes. ihe vellt)ws. pur- 
ples. pinks aiitl hlues wiiit h HomianI lusetl iiitt) 
a kintl of paratlt)\it allv told lighl. are here used 
to rett)iuile the real tiepth with ihe Hat pitture 
|)lane. In I a Loire a .\euill\ (1922). a hallot)!! 
antI Iwo Hat lloals swt)op wilh unexpet led tlv- 
namism t)ver the eiitrance tt) a suhurhan fair. 
I)ni sei t)ue wt)ntleiing what. for exainple. 
Fapittpjfs wii antI verve. as seen iu ln\ "\'ene- 
tian ' tanvases this vear. wt)ultl have tltme uitli 
this. In Cöte froide d Miraude (192:5). IhtUe 
Ilses pliimdike forms in green. hhie and vellt)w. 
(urling vet Mal. tt) give an nnpretttlenletl. rt)|| 
ing mt)vemenl tt) ihe lautlstape. Ce/anne. ihe 
Fauves. |u;in (.ris. Delaunav antI (.auguiii are 
all assimilaleti aiitl lusetl. if iit)t tränst cmled; 
rigor. mt)tlestv. high serit)usness antI civ ili/at itm 
latliale frtmi the ft)ur walls t)f the gallerv. I he 
paintings. if nt)t tlie water(olt)rs. have a "signa- 
tnrc": this is iit)t tpiiie ihe same thing as a 
unicpie \isit)n. of eourse. hut it is a great tleal 
neverlheless. 



15 



LPublic CAuction in [P( 



Goniinissioner-Appraisers 

Me. ALPHONSE BKLiJKR, 30 Place de la Madeleine 

Me. ETiENNK ADER, 6 rue Favart 

Important Collection 
of 

OLD FAIENCES PROM ROUEN 

Some wilh cjchre bases 

Old Faiences and Porcelains 

Paris, Saint Cloud, Sevres 
Pair of Chinese vases in porcclain fruni thc Kang lii [K^riod 

ART and FURNISHINGS 
from the period of Louis XIV 

bronze equestrian statue of l.ouis XI\ fioni the 17th Century 
pair of candelabra and salon furnishings 

froni the period of Louis XIV 

F^\I^TI^Gs by largilijrrf and monno^ er 

TWENTY-ONE DRAWINGS hy RIGAUD 

\ levvs of the Chateau, Lj:ardens and groves of X'ersailles 

From the 
GOLLEGTION of Monsietir jean hlogh 

Experts MM. G. and T. cathol x 

DAMIÜOT, LACOSTE, PROST 
Säle Tuesday, iMay 21, 1957 at 2:30 p. m. Public exhibition Monday. May 



ans 



Goniniissioner-Appraiser 
Me. ETIENNE ADER, 6 rue F'avart 

OBJECTS OE ART and EINE FURNISHING 

OF TUE ISth gentur^ 

OLD porcelains 

China — Marseilles — Saint Cloud 

LACQUERS 
SEATS and FURNLSHINGS 

stamped with the niark of master cabinetniakers 

Garnier— Jacob— Mantel— Riesenter—R\1A'—Satuiier 
sonie having furnished the study of 

Me. LOUIS VIGTOR PUIFORCAT 

and some from other collectors 



Experts: MM damidot, lacoste 



20, 1957 from 9 to 12 and from 2 to 6 and from 9 to 11 p. m. 



Gommissioner-Appraiser 
Me. ETIENNE ADER, 6 rue Favart 

PART I 

GOLLEGTION 

of 

S. A. PRINGE ALV KHAN 
MODERN PAINTINGS 
WATERGOLORS— DRAWINGS— GOUAGHES 

by Bourdclle, Corot, Derain, Dunoyer de Segonzac, 

Pascin, Renoir 

BEAGHES and SEASGAPES by E. BOL DIN 

Self'portrait by EDGAR degas 
Works by raoul dufy, maurige utrillo, 

MALJRIGE de VLAMINGK 

Experts: MM jacqües dubolrc;, pacitti 

PART II 

Modern Paintings 
Drawings — Watercolors 

by Boudin, Corou Dclacroix, Lebourg, Picasso, 

Pissarro, l'trillo 

From various private collections 

Säle: Thursday May 2Z, 1957 at 2:30 p. m. 
Public exhibition Wednesday, May 22, 1957, from 
9 to 12 a. m. and from 2 to 4 and from 9 to 11 p. m. 

SALES: (;alerie charpentier, 
76 rue du Faubourg Saint Honore, Paris 

Eor all Information write to: Me Etienne Ader, 6 rus Favart 
Paris (2«)— Telephone: Richelieu 71-98 



GALERIE de FRANCE 

3 rue du Faubourg St. Honore 



PARIS 8e 



Anj: 69-37 



ZAO-WOU-KI 



Recent Paintings 



CIIICAGO^S NO- JURY I^XPKRIMILXT 

Thc No-Jury Exhibition at Chirn^os Kavy Pier, 
numberinff ovcr two thousnnd cntrics, nndcrscorcs a dcprcssina 

conjusion bctween thc nmatcur and thc profcssiofujl. 




Eleanor Coen^ r.RowiNr. crrv. 



BY ALLEN S. WELLER 

THE vast Chica.j^o Artists No-jury Exhibition is now a matter 
of history, and ptrhaps thcre has nevcr becn anothcr event 
likc it. It is ccrtainly not oftcn tliat onc secs in one place 2,671 
works of an by 1.5:^4 diüerent artists. It took just about tTiree 
hours to walk througli the lui.ge exposition rooms at Navy Pier, 
withoiit ever stopping to study an individual work. Unlikc all 
other no-jury shows l have heard of, this one had lots of prize 
nioney-$8,825 of it-as the Art Institute devoted all of the 
funds earmnrked h)r the usual annual juiied C:hicago and 
Vicinity Show to this one. The nioney wem into twenry-seven 
awards, and the pri/e-winning works, plus about twenty-five 
others, will he cxhibited later in the year at the Art Institute. 
The awards were deterinined by Xavier Gonzalez, Daniel Cat- 
ton Ridi. Joseph Shapiro, Mario Ubaldi and John Walley. 
Ehe Show was a trenicndous succcss in terms of attendancc 
and enthusiastic loral newspaper (overage. 

I am sorry to turn in a minority rej)ort mvself, but it is not 
just because of sore feet and an aching ba(k that I liave 



WK\%/Mny 1957 



grave doubts about the (ultmal valuc- ol such \ast free-for-alls. 
My own feeling is tliat wiiat we need in the world of art today 
is more selectivity, not less. I know tliat therc lias been wide- 
spread rriticism of the basis of selec tion in manv national and 
regional shows. and 1 am wiliing to gram that ihere may l)e 
manv different vah'd Standards from wliidi works of art mav 
be judged. but 1 find it liard to l)e svmpatlieiic with the idca 
that positive values (that is. positive csllirlu \alues) emerge 
from such incbsc riminate e\hil)itioii. 

Belore the sliow opened. I think there werc- a good manv 
people who feit that j)erhaps it woiild l)e a good thing h>r 
thc publie to see what the juries of the (ihicago and X'icinitv 
Shows at the Art Institute ha\e l)eeii looking at and reject- 
ing h)r years, and that perhaps tlicv wouhl as a result have 
more imderstanding of ilir job tliese juries have done. Unh)r- 
tiuiateh, ihings didn't work out this way. I am afraid that 
great munbers of people were coinpletely delighted with thc 
iiiany unreali/ed or pretentious or eccentric or amateur objeets, 



17 



I 



c iiK ACio'js xj-ji Rv i:xpi:rimi:nt 




Kwok Wai Lfm, v\\\\\\(. i-(-4. 



i'Mcl iHccptrd tlu'in ;(II ;,s •':,ri.- I ;,m üln.id th;it ilu'iv was 
itnotlicr -roup uliidi ( ;mu' ;ivvay Irclin- Tvc aluavs thoiiolu 
wrrisis uvrc (la/y, and this piovfs it." I (aniioi luliiNf thai ihc 
sj>rra(l ol diese i(le;is is oood lor ilie cause ol a serious or 
re.s|)()nsil)le (<)nteni|)()rarv artistic niovemeiu. 

J he jiiolessional Chicjoo iutists responded lo tlu' no-jmv 
show superhJy, and were re|)reseiited in Ion c. Ihere weie 
niaiiv exccllent thin-s. and I liave tlie inipiession ihal ihe jmv 
did its Job well ;md ilial die sniall seiet (ive sliow uliidi ur will 
See laier at ilie Art Institute will he a ^ood one. Ihe top pi i/e 
ol .S|.:)0() was oiveu to Kleanor Coen's (hmrin<r r;//v. a lluent 
and sensitive ( oniposition. ori^anic and sopliisti(ated. Pi i/es of 
•Sl. ()()() and S7:)() went to Robert Anderson's Yrstrrdaw Today 
und r(>ni()rrinL\ a well-eoinposed eolla.oe. with lihns ol delieate 
e()I()r on transparent surhues, to kwok Wai Lau's Painting 
l-C-L a dark abstiad landscape iheine. with elledive llashes 
of ^old and brown, and to Ridiard Hunt h)r bis inia<^inative 
welded Strt'l lilonni, \o. 10. l>ri/es ol .SjOO went to^lartsl. 
Svlvia Shaw Judson and l'na Hollands h)r works wliidi in 
cacli (ase were sueeessiul. and whieh will add dist iiu lion to 
the later seiet tive sliow. Ainono the inanv otlier pri/es. I b)und 
James Walker's (olla-e. Crrallon nf Ex>c, parti(ularlv oood. 
with its eurious inte-ration ol old objeets and new movement. 
Hut the o(>o(| works were so overwhelmed bv the bad. and the 
numbers \vd to su( h eoniplete mental aiurvisiial exhaustion. 
that it was a struggle to see tliem. 

VTi r the show was enonnously iidormative. and I wish that it 
J. mi^ht have heen serioush analy/ed Irom several points of 
View. We would know niudi niore about the ideas whidi are 
nnllini» around in a sort of vast -eneral publi( sulxonsc ious- 
ideas about lile. ideas about art-eould su( h a so( iologital. 
psvdiolooieal and statisti( al analysis he niade. Wliv. lor instante, 
are there many inore (ats than doos, ;,„d roinparativelv few 



MarlyU uimik s( im . 






Robert James Anderson, \\st\r\)\\, iodav and iomorrow. 



James W alker, crfation of e\ e 



IS 



goats.^ Main ol the eats are looking out of Windows at lainy 
strcets; several ol the dogs are looking at birds. Why is the 
niotif of rearing, fighting horses so populär? (So are largc 
horses' heads.) Apparently the grcat populär heroes of the 
nioment (judging by amateur portraitists who have no hesi- 
taney m painting portraits of people thcv have never scen) are 
the Pope, Einstein, Toscanini and Vul Hivnner. Dead torea- 
dors m sharp foresliortening are also eurrentlv populär Idiere 
was an enornious aniount of "loniantic" landstape (mountains 
snow seenes, seascapes), a large amount of embarrassinglv bad' 
sickeningiy sentimental iinitations of niail-order religious art' 
niany eoinpositions built around the idea of reaehing Iiands' 
lots Ol illustrations of seience fiction, huge numbers of piroii- 
ctting ballerinas and eircus pictures (all downs are sad and 
most Ol them seem to be watehing aetidents on the high 
wires). One (an only be ania/ed at the braxerv of amateur 
artists in their tackling of the most tremendous tliemes: the 
number ol "eosmic" coiueptions, apparentiv with vast symbolic 
impluations, was inipressive. Ihere is soniething depressing 
about the idea of melting a piece of plastic, al'lowing it to 
drip down over a board, and tlien labeling it *\Soul." Ihe 
relative easiness of modern sculptural tediniques (insecure 
welding. synthetie inetals, painted plaster) has given rise to a 
whole sehool of makers of tinv grotes(jues. I saw niaiiv wiry 
inserthke fornis. usuallv (reeping in a sinister fashion very 
close to the floor. or eise lalling on each other in a rather 
savage way. Ihere was also a eonsiderable number of small 
scjuatting plaster iiudes, usuallv lirmly planted on enormous 
tcet. Amoiig the ''advanted" artists, die influence of Marca- 
RcIIi and Kline was strong. 1 he usual Joker had attadied a 
fake sign giving a thousand-dollar pri/e to a fircplug and hose 
m one eorner. Several artists had discovered the fasdnating 
motif of looking at their own feet. There was mucli work 
whieh can only be called 'nioderiiistie." Scmie of tliis was 



ARTS/.Uriv 1057 



painted on eorrugated (ardboard. at tiines with ccllophanr 
used not as wrapping, but as part ol the labri( of the composi- 
tion itself. There was srulptuie in soap, and a (onstnution in 
lump sugar. A special studv niiglit be iiiade of the remarkable 
painted frames. Ihere was a (()iisi(leral)le pornogiaphic ele- 
nient, of course, to be seen in the work of a group who paiiit 
female iiudes in strong, raking liglit. thus cieating remarkably 
powerlul shadows. Sudi a survev of what iiiight be called the 
populär subconseious shows that it h)llows cjuite delinite pat- 
terns. Indeed, it is alniost Irighteningh legimented. 

It is obvious that a tremendous number of people derive 
a peeuliar kind of satislaction irom seeing their handiwoik 
on a wall in a public place, even though tliev know that it is 
there through no recognized nierit of its own. But there is a 
danger that many of these people, as well as many visitors, 
will make no distinetion between serious work whieh is the 
result of intelligent discipline or significaiit intuitions, and 
activities whieh are simply enjoyable pastiiiies. Our great dif- 
ficulty, in the field of ait, is that we no longer clistinguish 
between professional and amateur. Ihere is no other lield in 
whieh WC wi\ up the two in anything like the saiiie wav. Ihe 
amateur athlete who plays a game h)r fuii o\er the weekeiid 
would never dreani of appeariiig publidv in an exhibition 
matdi with an Olyinpie champion. any nioie than 1 would 
think of issuing a reeord of mv plaving ol the piano. But be- 
cause ol the fact that iiiaiiv ol the nineteenth-cc iiiurv artists 
whom we iiow adinire were disniissed i)\ the academic: critics of 
their day as ineompeteiits. many amateur painters today think 
that tliey may be iiiisimderstoocl geniuses as well. Ihe public 
exhibition of great numbersof works whieh would auiomatically 
be exe luded by anv jury Irom a show todav may consequently 
be highly misleading, and mv bar is that it mav give thou- 
saiids of people an utterlv incorreet idea ol what coiitempo- 
rar\ art is all about. 



19 



SCULPTURE AND 



BY DAVID SMITH 

ScriPii RK. has Iroin llic csiluiic poiiii ol \ icw sIküccI 
litlk' uitli architc'duic al any tinu' in oui cciiuuy. 
Its vision, ((.( hiii(s, j)r()clii( lion aiul tlu* ( haractcr ol tlu* 
nun who (()n(C'i\c' il aic (jnitf (lilkrciu iioni thosc ol 
ai(hitc'( iure. Aiul vct xoii can still read and hcar tliat 
tlicy aic ic'Ialt'd and tlcpcndcnt, oi ihai cach iiccds thc 
otlu'i' in ordcr to luHill itscll. 

riu- souKc ol tliis nn'scoiu c'j)ii<)n is thc art historian, 
Avho has linkc'd sculptinc and ai(hiU'(linc togcthcr loi 
all linic- by (citain niislcading gcncrali/atioiis whidi 
cvcryhody has tonic to bclicvc— c'\cM\l)od\ c\(c*|)t sc ulp- 
tors and ardiitcc ts. 

S(ul|)iinc' in oui (cnturv has becn nmturcd on total 
liccdoni. 11 it has bccn linkcd with architcctmc, it is only 
by ein unistaiuc. Ils csthetics is shaicd only by painting: 
thc two havc bccn intcK hangcablc (onccjnually and pro- 
diK ti\c'ly sin(c (ad)isni. Hut ncithci j)ainting nor sculp- 
turc has bccn hclpccl by architcctmc. 

Are hitcc iure has conic c lose to thc point ol bcing thc 
prodiKt ol a (ollcctixc ol cnginecrs and biisincssnicn. 
Ihat part in it which is dcxotcd to "cnibcllishnicnt" is 
oltcn ruled bv c id)ic-lcx)t cost; thc niarblc and bron/c that 
wcrc once scid|)turc no\v Foiin walls and thc lixtiircs ol 
thc rcstroonis. Ihc c ollcc tivi/cd clicnt has acccptcd thc 
aic hitcc t's collccti\ i/cd c()nccj)tion vvithout Iccling thc 
nccd lor works ol art. At thc samc timc thc sciilptor has 
bcconic nu))c aiitononious and individiial, l)Ut not by 
(hoice ncccssaiily. Pmsuing his conccpt, lie projccts thc 
boundai ics ol sc ulj)tinc in thc othcr diicction. 

Thc sc idptor livcs within his cnvironnictu., crcatcs Irom 
his pcisonal natinc. No pait ol his lilc, or of his convic- 
tions, Ol ol his drcanrs, is on the sanie level as that on 
Avhich architcctmc works. 

His ciuironmcnt is piain, its walls havc cracks, yoii 
asccncl by stairs. Ihc larc is supermarket, the still lilc is 
in scason, the bottle is ol no sj)ccial \intagc. 1 he view 
Ironi thc window is rool and chiinneys. 1 he plc'ni an is 
thc Street. 

Scidj)tors li\e in lolts, gaiagcs and tcncinents; a few 
in Studios, a Icvv in countiy eonxcisions. Ihcir view ol 
conteniporary building is IVoni thc eclgc and at cjuite a 
distance. Hut Ironi them conies thc work ol art. 

In the sc ulj)tors' view, the work ol art is the prodiic t 
ol the labor and esthetie vision ol onc man, a \\'o\\ made 
pmely lor \isual icsponse. 1 he samc can bc said ol paiiH- 
ing. It is a Iree ancl indi\ idual ai t, without outsiclc relcr- 
ence or compromise, Ironi origin ol \ision to c()mj)lction. 

Hic sc idptor camioi turn cication on lor a clcmand 
outsiclc his naturc. Along with thc paintci, he has workcd 
Ironi j)crsonal choicc lor a himdied ycars. 

In this Century ancl this countiv the ereati\c' position 
has changcd lor both the paiiHcr and srulj)ioi ; pait ol 



that position haschangccl dming this clccadc. Artists havc 
won battles lor indepenclenc e, and they no longer Icel, at 
leasi not in cjuite thc samc anguished way, thc neecl to 
bc lo\ed l)v the public . Ihcir oj)inion, c\|>resscd without 
Organization or mctliod, cveniually dctcrinincs art taste. 
1 hcir (iv(i}it-a:(i)(le discovers and rediseovers nierit belore 
thc coimoissems arc aware ol it, and elevates its own pref- 
crcncc's, which c\cntually accjuirc legislative lorce. 

Ibis is a Situation that artists thenrsches still do not 
grasj) coniplctely, that art historians arc not comlortable 
with, ancl which is altogcthcr rejccted by thc architect, 
who sonichow Icels shclterccl by the myth that he is the 
lathci ol US all. Mowevcr, the thcorctic ians— art historians 
in thc niain— who aie icspoirsible loi such mvths arc clailv 
losing credit as thc lormulatois ol thc rclations bctwc"cn 
ai tists ancl contemj)C)iary esthetics. 

Aic hitcc tural iccognition or ap])licati()n ol sculpimc 
has not lurthered it by so nuich as an inch in om clay, 
Ashcthci materially or cjualitatively. The aehievements, 
thc imj)idscs, the great toncepts ol" om- age havc come 
Ironi tlic artist alonc. I he lact that no c ontcmpoiaiy 
scidptoi or painter has ever done anything on an arc hi- 
tcctural comnn'ssion that matches thc best things done 
out ol his own nccd suggests a laihne ol contac t in wliat- 
e\er relatic:)n has been established between the line arts 
ancl aic hitec iure. 

W'hen, and il, the sculptor iscallccl in 1)\ thc architect, 
it is as il by an alterthought. In any case, good sculj)tmc 
is not dccorative; it is not madc to lill thc sjxicc in which 
the architect used to applicjuc his own scrolls ol launa 
lorm. 

Paimcrs havc farecl no bettcr. 1 hey havc workcd in 
mural si/e since (loinbet, ancl yet in thc hunched ycars 
since Inn)ressionism began, the architects havc passed u|) 
manv works ol art that were on an architec tural sc aic. 
Monet, Roclin, Bonnard, Matisse, Picasso, ßrancusi, (»ai- 
gallo, Lamens, I.achaise, ancl Lipchit/, and a hmidied 
othcr modern painters and a clo/cn cjther nicjclern sc id])- 
tois, havc had their luU-scale works go imnoticed 
bv architects. Vhc latter have generally connnis- 
sioncd artlcss anccclote. Onlv raielv ha\'e thev commis- 
sioncd art; oltcncr, thc architect has designccl his own 
sid)stitute. To get (irt, architects will have to |)rej)are 
thcmsclves to take scul|)ture on its own indcpcnclcnt 
merits. And they will have to sid)oiclinate their own egos 
to the extent ol jK'rnhtting thc work ol scul|)tme to re- 
late itself tcj the work ol architcctmc as onc ccjntem- 
jK)iary autonomy to anothci, in a rclationshij) ol esthetie 
strength and Joint cxcellcnce. Tiiis is up to the architect, 
not the sculptor, and mitil the architect accjuircs thc 
nceded hmiiility, the two arts will remain thc strangeis 
thc\ havc long bccn to onc another. 



20 



ARTS/Ah/v 1957 



A R CHITE CTURE 



BY SIDNEY GEIST 

Tr Ol c;ht to bc cpiite clear by now to anyone interestecl 
^ in the themc that conteniporary sculptme and archi- 
tecture have nothing to do with eac h othcr. It is not only 
that sculptors do not design lor architecture and that 
architects rarely call upon the Services ol sculptors, bat 
that the very lorms, means, mcthods ancl cncK of the two 
clisciplincs arc divergent. As against the nnexamplcd 
exuberance ancl variety ol h)rms in scidptiirc, we have 
an ever-stric ter sameness {ov so it seems to sculptors) of 
recent architecture (in the Tnited States, anvway). As 
against thc incliviclualistic ancl personal that prevail in 
scnlpture we have the moilular and iinpeisonal in archi- 
tecture. Thc sculptor oll 'is a siatcment, thc architect 
provides a place (which is more often than not an 
object). The economies ancl w^orkshops ol thc two arts 
arc at oj)positc cnds of the soc ial world. 

W hat, then, is the mcaning oi thc recurrent laising c:>f 
the issue ol thc imion ol scnlpture ancl architecture? Is 
indccd such a union possiblc, necessary or even worth 
whilc at this moment, and il so, how? 

\\1icn the issue arises among sc ulj)tors, on the onc 
hand, it arises onlv too oftcn Irom a clcsire Icjr scll-aL»- 
giandi/cineiu: ancl this desire hides behind the senti- 
mental it\ that even bacl sc uljUiire is to be preferred to 
none, and more scnlpture io less. Lec's face it: some 
j)laces arc bettcr olf without sculptme, and nuich scnlp- 
ture is not lit lor the rough-and-tumblc of the architec- 
tinal Situation, riien, too, the desire lor public sculptme 
is often the projection of a vain historicism. Scnlpture 
in thc past, goes the argument, was always integratecl 
with arc hitcc t ine; why not now? The answer is simply 
that the conditions of past integrations no longer ex- 
ist, and that when it is made to appear that they do 
exist, historv does indccd repcat itself in the form of 
comecK. Historv, in this case, can teach us onlv that we 
can ha\c no othcr than om own. We must make our way 
within Olli own situatic^n. (If this souncls like laissez faire, 
it seems at the moment the only way to preserve the 
süvoir faire of thc modern sculptor. No onc wams to 
modilv his stvlc, or ck\sign moldings ancl dooi knobs.) And 
of coinsc a Situation can always be changcd. 

W'hen, on thc othcr hand, thc issue of thc sculpture- 
aic hitcc tili c rclation c rops up among architects, it is 
oltcn duc to bacl conscience, which is also |)artlv the 
result cjf traditionalistic thinking. Havcn't we left sc:)me- 
thing c:)ut? Does every architectuial moment havc to be 
like every othcr? We ha\e adapted so many ideas of the 
artist; (ouldn't we go to them directly? Ihe answers to 
thcse cpicstions ustially turn cjtit to be no, yes and no. 
1 he emptiness and sameness persist, ancl the architect 
turns to the cngincer and thc industiial clesigncr lather 
than to the artist. As a result, modern architecture has, 



it cannot bc clcnicd, a c larity of style; also, it salisfics thc 
economic ecjuation, ancl it works. But at a great price. 
Bacl conscience turns to fear, and fear indulgcs in ex- 
cesses as architecture Icaves out more ancl more in ordcr 
to maintain its identitv. 

Whilc it is barcly conceivable that sculptors might 
collaboratc with architects in thc desio-n of buildiniis, it 
is conccivable onlv in thc rarest instances. Such a col- 
laboration is certainly some timc oll and woulcl jnoduce 
a new architecture. In thc icalm ol thc more possible, 
howc\cr, it does seem unncccssarv to call uj)on scul|)tors 
to aid in thc decoraiu))! of architcctmc, since most of 
the traclitional j)rol)lems and solutions arc no longcr 
j)ertincm or intciesting. In any case, such a rclation is 
not likch to adcl auMhinü to arc hitcc tural st\ Ic* at this 
jjoint, \\o\ is it likely to prodiicc good sc ulpturc or c\cn 
scnlpture as good as that which the sculptor ordinarih 
makcs lor himself. 

In \ icw ol thcse lac tors it uould a|)j)car that a union 
of scnlpture ancl ar(hitcctuic is not casiK possiblc oi 
even necessary. l'hc two can go and arc going their sej)a- 
rate ways. It remains only to ask, is such a union worth 
whilc? Is it, in thc face ol logic , economies ancl clillcring 
esthetics, worth whilc to incorporate works of art in 
architectural settings? It would seem so as long as the 
issue arises in any sericjus cjuartcr. Bad icasoning ancl 
l)ad conscience aside, scul})tinc ancl architecture still 
call tcj cach othcr as if by a primordial urging. I he im- 
jicrsc^nality of the materials of architcctmc asks lor the 
sense oi toiich which the work of art pio\ ides; thc work 
of the band is transitional bctucen thc building and its 
user. As lor the contemj)oiary Situation, modern scnlp- 
ture has not bccn tested in the street, so to sj)cak; ancl 
modern architecture, h)r ils part, would do well to ic- 
lieve its nuditv. 

UNDi.R thc Special conditions that pcrtain, whai rcla- 
tion can be established between sc ulj)iurc atui archi- 
tec tinc? I he only prac ticablc onc that can bc cn\ isagcd 
is a rclation of juxtaposition or a|)j)osiii()n. cxcn to thc 
extent of diHercncc ancl coiuiast. (.i\cn thc contem- 
j)oiancit\ of sculptuial and aKhitcctmal moclcs, such a 
rclation would not bc as violcnt as onc might think. Bc- 
sides, it could have becn expected that a iicw scnlpture 
ancl a new architecture would bc in a new rclationship. 
W'c arc at a point where thc \cry lorccs that sent sc ulp- 
turc and architecture down dillcrcnt roacls can now be 
concci\ccl as having them mcct again, il not in thc old 
relations ol intcipenctration, collaboi ation and integra- 
tion, then \\\ thc new onc of (omplcmcmarx dilfercnce 
ancl (ontrast. (I his cllcc t is ohscrvablc in thc political. 

( (/fififiued on paue hl 



21 




Januar y\ 1953, 



INTllOÜUCING ROGER HILTON 



BY PATRICK HERON 

WHKN I first bcgan to writc for ARTS, al>()Ut two years ago, 
one of niy ambitions, pnx laiiiud in mv first artidc, was 
to pcrsuade an American aucliciice tliut tlicrc wcrc a nuniber 
of younger paintcrs working in England who were already 
making a contribution to the art ol our tinie whicli was com- 
parable in iniportance to those far bcttcr known dcvclopnicnts 
taking place in Paris and New York. You had already niade 
the acquaintance. of course, of a sniall selection of living 
British artists. And one or two of these (Ben Nicholson, for 
instance) were "exports" I thought we need not be at all 
ashamed of. But there were others— roniantics, niostly, both 
decorative and illustrational— whose merit is more apparent to 
minor English poets and literary journalists than to anyone 
who shares in those internationally accepted values that inform 
the plastic arts. 

I must say it seems to me likely that, comparcd with England, 
the United States today possesses an impressively numerous 
body of people who do participate in these values— that is, 
they directly apprehend the plastic and visiial abstract realities 
of which paintings and sculpture are actually constituted. Most 
American art criticism, for instance, is superior to most English 
in that it shows a wonderful instinctive readincss to focns dis- 
cussion upon the palpable formal realities of a painting. rather 
than (as in England) npon questions of iconography, Interpre- 
tation, symbolism or "mcaning"— indecd. upon anything that 
will deflect attention from the simple facts of color and form, 
of design or architecture, of textural cxpression. of spatial 
Organization or illusionistic (onfiguration— all of which, it 
seems, are facts too simple for the English critical mind to 
come to terms with. On the other hand, if thcre is an obvious 
danger confronting nuich American criticism, it is that the 
formal approach itself is showing signs of sprouting a new^ 
a(adenn'(ism all its own. It is not enougli nicrely to list the 
dominant (olors in a painting. vaguely enunierate instances 
of diagonal Stresses, vertical rhythms or planal counterpoint: 
these phrases are mere Jargon iniless Uicy are seen to be 
emerging out of an attempt to describe an actual passage in a 
particular pictiire. Mere description is the begitniing and end 



of good art criticism. And out of partiddar and ac uic descrip- 
tion will flow all the wider references and more generalizcd 
Statements that are necessary. 

During these last two years, however, New ^'ork has been 
able to see at first hand something of the younger generation 
of English painters about whom 1 have been entluisiastic in 
the pages of ARTS; and it seems that William Scott, Alan 
Davie and Peter Lanyon, in particular, have been well re- 
ceived. Eheir considerable separate successes (and already. 
after one show apiece, Lanyon and Davie might be considered 
more "successful" in New York than in London) are most 
encouraging to a number of their friends, whose work is, like 
their own, more closely related either to American or French 
non-figurative painting than it is to those more British forms 
that still find most favor with the artistic Establishment over 
here. 1 hese successes have also encouraged nie to write this 
profile of Roger Hilton— a paiiuer I have long believed to be 
in the front rank. 

On Hilton's work I have written several tinies in the past; 
and at the present momeiu there is no doubt that he at last 
enjoys a very serious reputation amongst fellow artists in this 
country; but the fact remains that as yet he is accordecl no 
rccognition here that is in any way cornmensurate with his 
remarkable achievement. So I begin this tribute witii the hold 
Statement that Roger Hilton is, in my view. destined in tinie 
to enjc:)y an international Status as high as that of any painter 
of his generation yet known to me. Such a remark as this 
nuist, of course, have the appearance of l)eing either an out- 
rageously biased or subjective assessment of the work of a 
personal friend— or eise of sheer prophecy. I believe it to be 
the latter, naturally! And I do indeed think that it will very 
soon l)e widely recogin/ed that there are English painters— 
Scott. Lanyon, Hilton. Terrv Frost and Brvan WHnter. for 
instance— who already have the look of complete cpiality when 
seen in the Company of the best painters of their generation 
in Paris or New York. It is true that one never knows what is 
"Coming up": an unknown genius may arise who will slightly 
invalidate these predictions. But what I am here drawing 



09 



ARTS/Af./v 1057 



attention to is something I consider to be a fact— which is that 
if these younger English pairuers had had behind them the 
füll machinery of "Ehe School of Paris" (numerous organiza- 
tions, ofhcial and unoMicial), then I am cjuite sure that their 
iiuernational Status woidcl difler in no wav at this niotnenl 
Irom that ol their lamous contemporaries in France— Soulages, 
Manessier. Poliakofl or Riopelle, h)r instance. 

ALL of which. the American reader of AR IS niay now 
nuitter, is putting the cart before the horse. Kor who is 
this Roger Hilton anyway? Born in London in 1!MI. he is one 
of the few English painters whose accjuaintance witli modern 
French painting is more intimate and profound than some- 
thing one picks up from a few visits to Paris and a habit of 
looking at exhibitions of French painting in the dealers' 
galleries in London. Hilton attended the Slade Srhool for a 
while, from the age of nineteen; but in l^'-Jl (when he was 
twenty) he took himself ort to Paris, and for the next eight 
years— until. in fact, he was prevented by the war— he spent at 
least half his time there, either working on his own or at the 
Acadthnie Ranson. where Roger Bissiere. as a visiting teacher, 
made the chief impression on him and where he recalls that 
Manessier, Le Mcjal and Francis Gruber, curiously enough, 
were or had been students, Manessier did not actually overlap 
with Hilton it seems: but his influence was nevertheless pres- 
ent: and indeed it was this influence that hnallv rec^istered in 
Hilton's first important non-figurative phase, whicfi lasted from 
1950 tcj 195,^, and which was revealed to the public in the first 
of three one-man shows at Ciimpel Fils in 19.52. 

Hilton. with his own wrv humor. his thin. tall. sli<>htlv 
round-shouldered figure. his small birdlike head with its sniall, 
very sharp, slightly dc^wn-turning beak of a nose that pecks its 
way iiuo anyone eise's arguments tili they resend)le torn bits 
of paper— Hilton hinrself would be the first to discourage the 
notion that the facts of a painter's physical existence and the 
historv of his personal life, his Comings and goings, his likes 
and dislikes, the precise character of the landscape or town- 
scape surrounding hiuL the inmd)er of his children or wives or 
hats. were of mc^re interest than the pic tures he achieves. 
Although I have here no intention of painting a füll portrait 
of this unusual man I cannot entirely pass over the facts of his 
life in writing a "j^rofile" of him. So let me briefly record that 
he lives in a smallish early A'ic torian house in Holland Park, 
London, where the neat grav-yellow brick faqaties of the streets 



scem curiouslv brittle and the rose or yellow haze of the Lon- 
don atmosphere [)resses against the elegant little window panes 
in winter, reducing the spiky black branches ol a row cif limes 
opposite to a VV'histlerish Silhouette ol tangled black lace. He 
is married, and the father ol two young children: he reads 
much, walks fast and hir, when in Cornwall, but slowlv and 
little when in town: talks provoc atively and ölten brilliantly— 
and not only about painting— sparing no one, great or small. 
at parties, wlien he is in the mood to analyze. with aggressive 
sharpness and wit. both character and works. 1 hus. a well- 
known art-school prolessor. encountered at a inoment when 
tlie oller of a teaching job would have greath assistcd llillon's 
linances, would be told outright that he (the professcjr) had 
long since forleited his c laims to be taken seriously as an 
artist; a lamous critic would be told the trnth about his writ- 
ing: a fellow j)ainter have his pic torial weaknesses piiipointed; 
and so on — until sucldcnlv the fire departs hom this slight, 
bespectacled figure a\u\ he shiinks iiiio a seil accusing silence, 
feeling he has o\erdone things a little. i hen the slow, well- 
educated drawl of his speech will be heard once again in a 
kindlier roie— in the neutral one of the pic toi ial theorist, for, like 
all adventurous painters, he is nuuh occupicd with speculative 
thought about the future of painting as well as with the urgent 
and more intuitive practice of the art itself. linallv, one should 
record that Hilton volunteered as a Commaiido during the 
war, was sent on raids to \orwa\ in 1!M(I and was captured 
by the Gernians in the raid on Dieppe in 1942. spending the 
next two and a half years in prisoners' camps in Silesia and 
ending up with a h)rcecl march (A hinidreds of miles on starva- 
tion rations before being released by the Allies in 1945. 

Hn.TON says that it was not until 1950 that his first con 
sistently abstract work was done: and that both Manessier 
and the Scottish abstract painter William Gear were at that 
point inlluencing hiuL 1 he long thin horizontal painting en- 
titled simply ]anuary, 1953 (all his pic tures are given the date 




Receni photograph of Roger Hilton. 



23 



iXTUoDi ( iN(; r<k;i:r iiii/roN 

ol tluir c'xcdilioii loi tluir solc litlc). is tlic l.isi j);iiiiiiiig 
whicli Ililton iiiadc in tliis maiiiKT— thal is to sav, in thc 
"inipicssionist" non-figurativc styk' whidi hv cxplorcd bctween 
1930 and 1953. Aficr this he cntcrtd thc niost austiii' pliasc ol 
his (arc'ci (he (alls ii liis nio j)lastic pcriod) ahandoning llu' 
ii(h. solt. hiriy. iniprissionist paint smlads. thc nuihiph-iolor 
schcnicsand die small Iragnicnicd loiins wliidi olicii (onsistcd 
ol iiothini; niorc (otistructiontil than a gi()U|) oi bnisli hiobs, 
snicars. strcaks. snmdgcs or sj>l()t(bcs ol lichlv scnsuous |)aint. 
////y. l^>^'y (it is in thc (ollcdioii ol thc Stcdclijk Mnscuni, 
AinstcKJain). is an cxanipie ol ihis nco-plastic style, vvilh its 
Hat. alniosi bhak arcas of knilcil tolor, its rag<>C(l hnnis rc- 
dnccd to liNc or si\ in nnnihcr, its (olois to ihicc oi ionr. 1 his 
j)hasc lastcd nntil cailv in 195') vvhcn, conliontcd bv a lo<>ic 
whidi sccnicd to insist on liic ahandonnicnt ol painting allo 
gcthcr (thc prcdoniinantly spatial intcrcst ol siuh woi ks point- 
ing to tlic niaking ol (onsii nc tions in solid niatcrials). llilton 
rcix'llctl and svvcrvcd back into a ioini ol cxprcssionist abstrac- 
tion whidi has. since that datc, bcconic dctidedly figiirati\c— 
nudcs, a tat, a fishing boat i)cin<» sonic of thc iniaucs onc linds 
in his work at thc prcsciu inoincnt. Dcccrnhcy, /V56, is an 
cxaniplc ol this third phasc ol scnn-liii'nrativc cxprcssionist 
al)stra( tion. 

To RKM RN to thc iinprcssionist pcriod. and look lor a nio- 
nicnt at thc long horizontal pancl ol Jauuary, 1933— onc is 
inimcdiately tonscious, I should have said, of two things: a 
brilliantly certain instinct for wiclding that instrinnent of 
Visual cxprcssion known as a brush; and a surc intcllcttual 
sduinc governing the balance of all the diverse forms— a 
(hcckcrboard of reetangular patches, in whic h thc dark rectan- 
gles are all di\idcd up, intcrnally, into blnnt, asymmetric 
triangles, or thi(k stripes. What yoii eannot sce iroin the 
photograph is the süperb color: Hilton is unsurpasscd as a 




July, 19^3; collertion Stcdelijk Museum, Amsterdam, 



(olorist in England ioda\. p.iitls on a((onm ol U\^ |)iolound 
sensc ol tone, and partly because ol his extraordinarx ränge. 
A schciiic ol his niav (onsist of Icnion. white. I)la(k and 
V^enctian red: or ol (araniel brown, tenc-\crte. bhuk and 
dicrry red: or of \ iolct, gray, white and einerald grecn. It is 
as tliongh the light brillianty of Matissc's sdicnies were added 
to thc hnr\ walnuts and khaki browns of Biacpie. Ihis (an\as, 
Jununry, l^>33, h)r instanee, is doininatcd i)\ wann \cllows: 
siibtlc beige-pinks, bluc-grays and bla( ks aic j)la(e(l in a 
(adniiinn-ycllow sctting, thc \ibrant rcsidt bcing snnny and 
(ahn. l*crhaps onc of thc niost extraordinarv (pialities ol 
llilton's work is this linal (ahn whidi the aj)parentl\ wild, 
cxprcssionist, gcsti( ulating sdibblcs ol brnsli and knile settlc 
down into: thc eoniponcnt h)rnis inay bc llappingb loj)si(le(l, 
raggcdly staring, explosively expressive: yct thc total (onligina- 
tion of thc desigii has always atlded np to sonietliing ntterlv 
resolvcd, soincthing fornially ininiaiulate and (oin|)lete. A 
wild, destriKtivc, gawky iniagcry is subjcdcd to the disc iplines 
of fmc painting. 

In this carlicst, "iinprcssionist" al^stract phase llilton iiiay 
be Said to have dealt onlv with what C^lcnient (»rcenbcru has 
(allcd, J think, "shallow Space." Writing at the tinie ol his 
show at Gimpel Fils in 1952, in whieli paintings in the nianner 
ol this Jauuary, 1953, were shown, I said: "llilton begins and 
eiids with paint. His whole System of pietorial tlionghi and 
emotion is centered in his brush strokes theniselves. I hc 
precisc charactcr, the texture, size, color, tone, direction anti 
rhythin of each ragged toiidi is his niain consc ioiis prcoctnpa- 
tion. And this is why hc is al)stract. I he qualitx of his paint 
surface fills his conscious mind and, thus obtrnding. prcNcnts 
him seeing round or beyond it to the need h)r a subject. 
Nevcrthelcss, what we call *the subject' is soincthing eternallv 
present in visual art. It is an Clement no conscious ellort on 
thc abstract artist's part ran snccced in eliniinating. . . . thc 



Janufiry\ 19^4, 




24 



ARTS /May 1957 



nnnd nisists on linding an e(|iiivalent h)r that rcalitN hryoud 
the paint whidi once was a iiudc on a bed. or two trees and 
a haysta(k . . . [our niin(ls| insist on reading a double ineaiiing 
into cvery graphic mark made on paper or <aii\as. So. into 
Hihon's Systems . . . we iiiNoluntai ilv read a thicc -dimensional 
meaning: we hnd a siibjed." And that siibjed ina\ bc said to 
consist, simph, ol a varictv of lorm in space . . ." 
^ I do not think 1 vvould now sav that the "realitv" the mind 
"insists on finding beyond the paint" was an c(|ui\aleni ol 
"the sul)jc(i" ol a figuratixc j)ainting. Ilie lad is tbai one 
eannot make aiiy mark on a Hat surbuc. bv iiicans of (oloi. 
which does not instantb ajjpcar to advaiKc belore, or rec cde 
behind. that sinlacc. So the surface ol a (an\as is ihr lirsi 
casualty wlien you j)ui jjaint on it: illnsionistic spate is iinnie- 
diatcly crcated, wlicdier or not thc marks you make ar. 
figurative or non fijgurative; and. il non-figuratixe. wliitliei 
or not thcy are geometric or '•organi(." Any scribblc involun 
tarily gencrates illusionistit space. So I would now put ii 
this way: the mind insists upon seeing not oiil\ the painted 
marks you place on a (anvas, but also a System of illnsionistic 
spatial relationships: somc color h)rins will come loi ward, sonu 
go back; some will bulgc convexh. oihers will seem britllr 
and rigid; .somc will seem opacjuc. others transparent; some 
hard, .somc soft: some hot. some cold. And all these clifTercnt 
qualities will bc intrinsic in the j)aintcd marks; thcy will not 
arise because tliose marks 'represent" objeds possessing thcse 
cpialities. It was prcciselv this sort of probleni that llilton 
bcgan to cxjdore in his next pcriod. the nco-plastic clcvelojj- 
ment I have mcntioiiecl. 

IN PAiMiNc.s like July, I'^53, or Jauuary. r>=>L Ililtoirs con- 
scious preoccupation was ahiiost cxclusively with space. 
In Jauuary, y^>5-/. the large central form (rather like a \cry 
fat in\ertcd L) is caclmiuin red: tlien there are thc sin<Tle 




December, 1955 (Ceiitattr), 



arca of j)ure black. the two white arcas. both hehiud the rcci 
lorm. and thc- dnll vcllow "gronnd" arca. I*aitl\ because the 
red Ol black or white in a pictnic such as this was ap|)lied 
almosi undiimcci. and j)aitl\ because thc drawing ol the 
outlines ol the dillercnt slabs oi color (which I lia\e c allcd 
"lornis." ahhough thcy c reale the sensc- ol solidii\ and mass 
(iitirelv bv mcans ol theii silhouettes and their opposed color) 
gi\cs thcm an aggressiM' jicrspcc tixc, a piclurc ol this nco- 
plastic kind l)\ llilton ina\ be said to inani|)nlatc actnal space. 
ratlicr than to create the illnsion ol pietorial space. I hat is 
to sa\. we no longer have the Icciing thal the Iraine ol thc 
j)icture is a wiiidow frame llnoui^h and hch/ud which we scc 
tlie lornis and thc space which the clesign c reales. On the 
contrary, the traditional illnsion of loims exisiing behind and 
beyond the canvas is here more or less rcNcrscd; and what we 
ha\(' is a set of forms so powerlul that thcy appcai to be 
|)rojectirig tlicinsehcs bodily oui Irom thc- surface ol the 
j)icture into the a(tual sj)acc of thc room. IhcN come loi ward 
Ironi thc- wall on which thc caiuas is han<'inu and almost 
seeni to pusb about the real objccts in ihc room. loi this 
reason, llilton's j>aintings of ihis kind ina\ be eonsidered as 
suprcnicly an hitec tural. liideed ihe\ ar<' aic hitc e iure: thcii 
presciKC call make a large room small or a small one laiger; 
a long wall niay contract, a sliort onc- c-xj)ancl with such a 
pictuic- upon it. And it was prcciselv because- he saw that 
thcy led in this piuelv construc ti\ ist direction (i.e.. painting 
hr(f)uiiuir ardiitecture bv way of thc construc ted rclief. for 
instanee) that Hilton changecl course once again early in 
11)55 and once more allowcd thc twitching, nervous energy 
ol bis esscntial seif füll frcedom of cxprcssion. Hut beforc 
niaking this return to a semi-figuraii\('. cxprcssionist abstrac- 
tioii in which his lull cnjovmcnt of scnsuous f)aint-and 
diarcoal textures (chaicoal for the lincs of drawing) is evident, 
Hilton diel make- one exhibition ol bis austerer neo-plasiic 



Deceiubvr^ 1955, 




25 



iNTRoDi c iNc; r<k;i:r im .ton 




Vecember, 1956* 



Gray Figure: March, 1937 




(;m\;iscs vvliidi woiild Iiunc bccii adinircd— ioi its modc of 
|)R'st*niati()ii as well as iis cxhihits— by iht* iiiost thcorctical 
lolloucrs ol ilu' latcr Moiuliian. This was in 1955 at the 
Simon (^uiiiii (».illcrv, in I Iiiddcislicld, \'orkslurc; aiul the 
"spact'-deatiiig" piopci lies oi tliese (anvases weie truly tested 
Olli l)v a niciliod ol disj^lay wliicli used a (aiivas like a screen; 
tlial is. ii would be allaihed at eadi eiid to a pole toniiertiiig 
llooi ;irul teilinj^, vvith the whole Irainework (poles and 
cinxas) staiidinj^ well clear ol ihe vvalls, thiis (illing ihc rooin 
vvith a soll ol j)i( ture-grid. 

ßelore toniini:» lo ins expiessionist phase, and lo his latest 
uorks. I iniist lirst poini out liiat he hiiled enliiely to (oneeal 
llie jnnely expressive, j^esiic ulalini; side ol his irealive seit 
in his neo-plastic pictiues. His iiitention was, ol couise, elas- 
sical: lie intended to suppress all the iintidy ieelint»s which 
the hai)itually lopsided balaiue ot his h)rins, tlie "inessy" 
trowelini» ol })igineiu and the splutterini> dianoal scribbles 
iiii,i»ht lead iis to suppose were integral to his artisti( per- 
sonality. \'et in all the works ol this \K'Y\od{]anu(ny, 1^>'>I, antl 
iuly, 1^K53, are hoth very iniuh eases in point) the lornis have 
the sanie (jualities ol raggedness and asynnnetry; they are 
l)limi('(l, roinid-cornerecL nioth eaten at the edges; they consist 
ol liinij)y blocks Ironi whidi shaky lines soinetinies hang down, 
trailing loose as it were; the sharp straight line is a teature 
unknowii to thein, and thev exhibit hardlv anv exaetlv hori- 
/ontal or vertical lines or edges. Ihey are. yoii inight say, 
the very antithesis ot C^onstnu ti\ isin and ot the neatness of 
Nicholson or Mondrian. 1 here is always, lurking beneath the 
pertectly adjusted pictorial econoiny ot the (oniposition, some- 
lliing disquieting, "soine immanent spirit at odds with the 
imniaculate formal toiuept. Despite all their training, Hilton's 
fornis break ranks and wave a scraggy arm ai one wildly; or 
let their heavy heads hang down, like lileless scarecrows." 

I(.)i()TE this last passage Irom sonulhing 1 wrote three years 
ago aboiit the forms in Hilton's neo-plastic paintings. Yet 
it could ecjually well apply to the first batch of semi-figurative 
works that have come since that time— e.g., December, 1956; 
December, 1955; or December, 1955 (Centaur). However, when 
we come lo lock at the pictures he has painted in 1957— 
mostly at St. Ives, Cornwall, where he has reeently been work- 
iiig lor three months— a new cpiality is apparent. Color is 
silkier in tone, subtler in luie. There is an altogether new 
lluency in the drawing and a greater elegance in the tc^n- 
ception; and in the handling. The march toward a greater 
degree of tiguration continues: we are even treated to titles, 
at last, that are specific in Suggestion, such as Gray Figure, 
or Bateau ivre. In the latter Hilton makes a retiirn to his 
iinpressionist cpiality, white incorporating the tigurative image 
of iu\ okl hulk. In (>ray Figure— 'wWmh. is one of the most 
hcautitul pictures he has ever painted, a work of great pres- 
ence, and hainited by a sort of nostalgic eroticism— he ap- 
proaches Matisse and Picasso ecpially, the former in tlie nature 
ot the drawing (a dark gray line on a paler gray ground), 
the latter in the nature of his Images: breasts like little cages, 
and a heavy right-angle along the top right of the canvas whicli 
serves to suggest both a chair back and the niide's left 
Shoulder and arm. The small oval head, with blank face, at 
the top left is more Matisse again, white the line round the 
helly (below the little circle of the navel) is, ecjually, a pair 
ot buttocks, thus suggesting Picasso's reversals of the backs 
and fionts of Ijodies at various parts of the anatomy of a 
Single tigiire. However, I point to these vague parallels with 
Matisse and Picasso only in order to show the distance Hilton 
has traveled in the last year and a half from his neo-plasticism 
—in whidi the rigorous non-figuration was stytistically allied 
to Serge Poliakotf, I might have Said. I think tlie essential 
cpialities of Hilton's painting— an apparent heavy-handedness 
l)eing h)inKl to enilKxly supreme pictorial science— show at 
their best in this inysterious, spacious and trancpiil picture. 
Wehere will he go from Gray Figure (painted in March, 
1957)? One has no right to predict his future style, onlv his 
great quality. 



I 



26 



ARTS/Mav 1957 



RIXENT ACQUISITIONS 



grapli the pattcru of prcsent-day Afueriran taste. 



Tiioi (.11 ranging o\c'r a \ast aiicl \aricd fidd ol art. ilie no- 
table accpiisiiions amioinKcd ot täte i)y American museums 
re\('al a disiind j)atieiii ol |)ieferencc' in the minds of oiir 
taste-niakers ac ross the nation. 

Perhai)s most signiticant ot a irend is the nimif)er of ^fonets 
eineiing miiseum (ollections toda\. 1 he cmphasis not iiriex- 
pectedlv bears on the "expiessionist ic" works ot ttie French 
niaster's last years at (.i\erny. It is only a httle more than a 
year ago that New \ ork's Museum ot Modern Art installed its 
huge exaniple trom tlie Water Lilies secjuenre, and now, from 
the sanie series of waterscapes, the City Ait Museum in St. 
Louis has accpnred one ot the Nynipheas exiiibited last fall at 
Knoculler's. A related work, Iris by the Fond, has been pur- 
chased bv the Art Inst imie ot (Jiicago— which at the sanie limc 
receivcd as a gitt an early portrait, M. Coqurret, Fils. Another 
early Monet. Fa Jajxijiaise, has been accpiirccl by the Museum 
ot fine Alts in Boston. 

Kveii if tlie Monets are lelt oui of the accounling, recent 
accessions iiiake clear that it is the French school of the past 
hundred years which currently cnjoys the greatest favor 
throu,<;h()iit the coinitry. Manet's Ffie Railroad has entercd 
the National (ialleiy ot Art. and Coinbct's llie l'alley of the 
lHach Sprijigs has been adcled to the (Chicago Art Institutc's 
extr.iordinary French collection. Seurat's Port-en-Bessin has 
gone to Minneapolis and the controversial Renoir bron/e, 
Venus l'ictorious, to Portland. Oregon, white the Wadsworth 
Atheneum in Hartford has accpiired works by Dcgas, Maillol 
and Rouclin. Another Boudin has just enteied tlie collection 
cjf tlie Santa Barbara Museum. 

In the tield of twentieth ccntiny Fur()j)ean art, the Museum 
of Modern Art has lately broiight a number of notable sculp- 
tiires to New York, among them works tiy Matisse, Braue usi, 
Picasso and Man/ü. In Chicago the Art Institute has installed 



p.M'ntin)L;s b\ Cris. M.itisse, Picasso and liancis Bacon, as well 
as sculptures 1)\ Chadwick and (ionsagra accjuired at the 
Venicc Biennale. The Santa Barbara Museum presents a 
f (helitchew and a Kandinsky, and a Lipchit/ bron/e has gone 
to the joslyn All Museum in Omaha. 

Among conteniporary Amcricans. Stuart Davis, Moiherwell. 
De Kooning, Tomlin. Mohol\ Na^v. Marca-Kclli. Clerk, Clas- 
c o, (»aiidy Brociie and Helen liankenthaler ha\c scen their 
works admitied to the Museum ol .Modern Art. I he Art In- 
stitute in (Jiicago is hanging works bv Stuart l)a\is, Hedda 
Sterne, (ieorge Mueller. Peter Blume, Okada and Lee (iatch. 
A Shahn and a Malclarelli have been installed at the Yirgiina 
Museum in Richmond. A Moses bv /oradi has been welcomed 
at Columbia Cniversity. and Walter Meigs* Haiti at Amherst 
C>)llege In the Xorthwest the Seattle Art Museum has pur- 
chasccl works by Wendell Bra/eau, Foycle (ilaussen, Steven 
Füller, Boyer (ion/ales and Richard Prasch. 

Signiticant Farly .American addilions ha\c' been announced 
by the Newark Museum, which is (urrently leaturing accessions 
that ine lüde works l)y W'ollasi ;ii, Pratt. Siill\. (iropsey and 
Hicks. Ihe Brooklyn .Xfuseum has pure hased [ames llannitoirs 
Founderifig and F/te Fast Days of Foaipeii. A poitrait by 
Ralph Farl and a still life by Peto have enterecl the Institute 
collection in Chicago, and the Wadsworth Atheneum hails the 
gitt of Miss Fggiugtou , Anierica's eartiest dated painting (Kibl). 

.\mong the old niasters, the Nc^rthern school at present 
scems distinctly to have eclipsed the Mediterranean— althougli 
the National (iallery has just welcomed a süperb Cioya, his 
Victor Guye,'d\\d the CJiicago Art Institute and the Wadsworth 
have both added to their llalian Barocpie (ollections. Fore- 
niost among recent old inasier accessions is the Rembiandt 
paired portrait at the Museum ot Fine Ans in Boston. Ihc 
Reverend Johannes Elison and II is Wife. A Rembrandt draw- 



Clande Monets WMrinAS. ncrjuired h\ Ihr (jt\ Art Museum, St. Fouis, 
Missoioi: Ihc work is a giff of llic S(ciubcr<:^ CJinritahlc Fund. 




27 



RIX 1 :>T AC <^>l ISITK >NS 



inj;, l'hc /ichctulino of Saifil John l/ic Iial)/isl, li.is just hccii 
a((jiiii((l l)\ ihc WOrttstci An Museum. Otlici icccnt ;i(I{li- 
tious \)\ NoithcMi iniislcis iududc I I;mis IVilduni; (.ricirs 
l'rnu.s (U\(l (:u/)i(l, ;n {\\v .\f innciipolis Institute: [oos \ an 
(ileNc's l'hc //o/v I'dtnily, .it the Curiiei (.;illei\ in M;m- 
(liesler, New I linnpshiic; Jan S.nideis \an I leniesseii's Judith. 
at the (;iii(a,i;() Art Institute: and Matthias Stoiner's Christ 
lioinid to the Colunin, at the ProN ideiu c Museum. 

In a cite^oiN to itsejl is the lom teenth-(t'ntur\ diuifix hv 
I'iancesco di \'amiu((i(). purdiased by the Roh [ones lhii\er- 
sity Museum in (ireen\ille. South (laioiiiia. 

In the doniain ol ancient sculplure. a lunnhei ol memora- 
l)le— and catholic — seiec tions have heen re|)orte(l. Ihe Metro- 
j)<)litan in New \()rk has phued on display a Sumeiian (opper 
Statuette (( . 2()()0 WX..) ol a mau. as well as an au( ieiit Teisian 
hron/e head ol au ihex. Ihe Minneapolis Institute ol Aits 
has a((juiic'd the renowned " I ihei Statue." the Hellenist i( niar- 
l)le inuse imearihed at Ronie in ISST). And the Philadelphia 
Museum ol Art has pmchased loi its permanent (ollection 
the most importaiu i^ioup ol Indian stone s(ulptuie to be 
scen oulside ol Jndia itsell. 




Mfilthias Stowor, f urisi hoind io thf coiimn, nrquirrd l)y 
the Providcricc Mu.snnn, l^rox'idctuc, Rhode Islcnid: this fusion 
of J\\thc)\s fitid Cnravao^a^io (mo;infnit.s a rca-ntty fonncd tnid 
r(ij)idty ir)()wi}ig cottcctioii of liaroffuc j)ninliiiirs. 




Francpsco di Vaiunivcla, CRicn-ix. acf/uiicd hy tlic li<)l) Jojirs 
( Hivcr.sily Mu.scmn, (.ycon'illr, Sout h ('.(nolifui; a jucc ioji.s rxnin hfc 
<>! ui('(li(-i'(d dn'oliontfl (nl. Ilic ()U(ili\ was l)(ii}il((l iti tlir srcond 
h(ii\ of llic foin (coli li (ciiluix. 



Fraiicisv€> dv (ßifya y Lucifntps^ \nn)R (a\\\ <i( ■ 
(jitircd h\ tlic Xatioudf (Udicry of Art, W'asliifiirlon, 
I). (..: llic i)nj)rcsswc (uict cfi;j:^nfri7i(j^ f)o)lrait is a 
ij^ifl of \Vi1li<nu \cl.\oii ('.roinwrll. 



2S 






John U ollaston, \ www (.Korr, accfuitcd h\ llic Xeicar/i Musniin, Nexcark. 
Xcw ./r;,vn'; f>ur<hasrd tliroiioh Ihe Mcnihcis Fiifid. Au iüiolish fxtititcr, 
Wolldsloii u'orlicd i)i America for two dccades just bejore the Rex'olution. 



Jan Satidf'rs van Henwsst'ii^ ji Diiu, ae- 

fiuircd h\ Ihe All hislilule of (:hi({i<^o: fmr- 
(hased Ihrougli llie Wirt l). Wtdlicr liuid. 




«.♦'• m».-l **- i 



Ht'tnhrandt ran Rijn, im iuiuai)I\(. oi saini |on\ rni: HAriisr, 
({((fuired hy ihe W'orcesler Art Muse um, l\ <ir<('sler, Mnssaeliusells. 



Anonrnious Allahabad svulptor^ ni ad 

in siw, (((■(/ ui red l>\ the l^hiladeljdiiu Mu- 
seum of Art: Ihe leiil h-ecutury head is oue 
of Ihr forty -nine fneces fnükintr uf) Ihe 
iiiosi iuiportauf (ollec tinn of hidian stone 
s( idj)t\tre to l>e toinid in llic Western jcorld. 



ARTS/A/^/v 1957 




IIAXS IIOIWIANN 



Tlic Jf^ liitncy M iisctini's rcfrospccflvc cxliibition 
iindcrsrorcs liis pcrsofu/l (uliicvotjciit in rcccnt ycars. 



BY ELIZABETH ROLLET 




Sel/-Portnüt {1902); coUection of the artist. 



Birth of Tmirus (J9-f5); coUection Mr. and Mis. Fred 11. Olsen. 




ON Hol mann's studio door. in a lyrical Script familiär to 
tliosc who hav(* laktii in a llolinanii painting, arc tlie 
words: hatis hojfndnti/ j)l(uise knock shono, ()n a |)ainting, 
the sioriaturc and datr. with an a|)ostro|)lu- lor the Cen- 
tury, have a (reative resonancc ol their own; thiy are not just 
a si.i^nature and a date, lor ihere is nothin,i> in a Holniann 
painiinj» ihat is not integrated inio the (reated wliole: every 
eienient has a color. a place, a pi^niented texture. His nanie is 
ne\er the saine. On his studio door. it has an outuard niean- 
ing and an inward ineaning, ior it opens into a studio where, 
in Maidi weatlier. the red eye ol an eiectric heater is glowing 
on a tahle top. into a studio surrounded l)v brilliaiU (olors, 
sketdies h)r niosaic nuirals. old paintings only parts of whith 
(an he seen. and new paintings upon whidi his (reative genius 
is now intent. Ihere is soniething monumental ahout the 
striuture of Hofinann's lile as there is alxjut the structure of 
his work. He kncxked loni> and loudlv at the door of a new 
World in tiie ereation of art. and in the third (juarter of his 
life entered with a ijurst of c reative splendor. 

If yoii ask hiin a Ijold cpiestion you will get a hold answer, 
Pointini» to a work done in the thiities that was still recog- 
ni/ahle as an iiUeiior with a tahle toj) and hooks, 1 asked 
what he feit was the majc^r dilierence hetween that painting 
and the one he is working on now. " riien," said Hofniann, 
"I was still nnder naturc, not that 1 was iniitating it; now 1 
am (d)ove nature. But everything (omes from nnture: I t(Jo am 
a palt of nature; my memory comes Irom nature too." And in 
trying to be helplul, he may (juote (ioethe lor you, in (iernian 
lirst, to the eilett that a painter's language is paint, n(Jt Speech. 



Ecstasy {19-17); lent h\ the Samuel M. Kootz Gallery. 




30 




Ma^eitta and lUue {J95l}}: coUection \\ Iiitncx Museum of .Imcrican Art. 



But thcn with a snn'lc he \vi\\ remind the world and you how 
nuich spcaking he himself has had to do, since the generous 
early support of his hrst patron was (ut off during World 
War I, and the hrst Hofmami School was h)unded in Munich, 
drawing many students irom all over lunope during the post- 
war years; and again ui Ameri(a. where the second Hofniann 
School was founded in New York in I9-i2, attrading inany of 
our most striking talents. 

Hans Hofmann was born at Weissenburg in Bavaria in 
ISiSO. His famiiv soon moved to Munich, and it was tiiere, 
wlien he was just sixteen, that the young Hofmann dec ided 
that his life would be a life of ereation, exj)loratioii and im- 
aiiination in a world of art and artists, and that it would not 
be spent, like his father's, in the petty bureaucracy of (ierman 
oflicialdom. l'iiis decision was to take liim. with his wife. whom 
he met a few years later, to France in 1 !)()!. h)r ten years spent 
in the center of ferment of modern art. "// apl)aYtenait an 
grou\)c Picasso, Bra(iuc et Derain et etait un travaillrur rc- 
serve," WTote Kmile Szittya about the Ih)fniann of that period. 
During the war years he returned to Ciermany. wlure Kan- 
dinsky and Klee and then the Bauhaus were |)owers; and in the 
early thiities he came to America, lirst as a summer lecturcr 
and teacher at the University of Calih)rnia. lierkeley, and 
hnally to stay. And it is in America that his art finally reaches 
its most decisive exprcssion. Starting in the late thirties with 
landscapes and interior still lifes. j)aintings in which an exte- 
rior vision is being creatively transh)rmed, Hofmamrs art 



ARTS/A/^0' 195\ 



gains morc and more frcedom. mit II, with an almost nianic 
burst in the forties, Ins locus is entireh shifted to an interior 
vision. Though he returns to still lifes and olher ol)jective 
points of inspiration, he is indeed no longcr undcr naturc 
but rather above it. 

WiiAT does it meaii to have an interior vision?— or to be 
above nature? lliis is a cjuestion wliidi the pres(nt Hof- 
inaii retrospective at the Wliitney Museum should answer. For 
the exhibition contains nuich of his major work of tlie past 
(ifteen years— a numbcr of paiiitings from the thirties whidi, 
(ine in themsclves, also show us what hc was working toward. 
and crayon drawings and watercolors. Nor must one folget to 
mention the delightful and very early Selj-Portrait (M)()2), 
Post-Impressionist in technicpie and one of a very few Hof- 
manns from his first thirty years as a painter to survive the 
historical debacle and destruction of two world wars. 

But beh)re we consider Hofmann's work itself. it would be 
well to look briedy at the inlluences \vliich, expanding in Hof 
mann, led to the ereation of that work.* 1 his may cast light 
too on tiie fact, which has surprisccl so many, that Hofmann 

*A detailed accoiint of Hofiiumn's life and work is prcscnted in 
Haus Hotmauu, hy Frcilcrick S. \\ ii^lit il ni\t'isit\ of ('anh)iiiia 
l'rcss. lU'rkdcN . $.").()0). pubbshccl coiuuncntly witli the \\ hiliu\ 
exhibition. Ihc volunic iiuludcs IIotiiKinn's cssay, "Ihc (.oloi 
Problem in Pure Paintin<r." 



31 



HANS IIOFMANN 

(lid Mol l>(\!L;in (o procliuc his Ixst work until he was in Amer- 
ica and alrcady ovcr (ilty. In Iraiuc, tlu' a( adtinic ism and mild 
I'.xprc'ssioiiism ol Ilolmaims sliidciit days was soon dissipaU'd. 
I hcorics ol Impression ism had already rcachcd liim in (icr- 
many; but lie anixcd in Paiis jusl in tinic to j)artic ipale in all 
thc ex(itc'inent whidi ihr sliockiii^ (anvases ol thc Fanvcs witli 
tlu'ir brilliant holts ol tolor stirrcd iij). And. as sivcral critics 
lia\t' j)()ini('(l out. ilic iulluciu c ol thc Fauvcs, and particularly 
ol Matissc. was iicNcr lonj^ doniiant in llofniann. it is evident 
not only in thc still lilcs ol thc thirtics hiit also in thc hrilliant 
l)la/c ol lii^lit, thc cxpic'ssivc (olor ol his latcr work. \i twcnty- 
livc, howcvcr. Iloiniami was still "//// Ixnuüllrurrrsrrvr." Latcr 
hc was to i^o l)a(k to Clc/annc morc directly, experimentinir 
somcwhat (antiously with thc prohlcm ol stnicturin«^ a land- 
scapc in space j)riiiiarily throui^h (olor; and niany years were to 
pass bclore a boldness comparable to that in the carly canvases 
ol thc Kauvcs wonld aj>pcar in Hoiniaini's own work. Cnbisni 
too is not without its inllucncc. In the end. thcre is no nicthod 
of ereatinji; volmne within a two-diniensional framework that 
llolmann iic<>lc{ts. 

r>ut in eniphasizin<; tlie inllncnce of thc French— wliidi Hof- 
mann hinisclf so readily aclmits— one shoulcl not föntet (icr- 
many. For it was in Gcrniany in 11)12 that Kandinsky publishcd 
Oti thc Sl)iritual /// Art, and in Germanv that a j)hilosophy 
of art as spiritual expression caine to thc forc. In the group 
aronnd Kandinsky. writes (larola Gicdion-Wckker, "an cssen- 
tially spiritual attitudc toward thc physical World was to 



kindlc a llamc ol Ircc ima^ination . . . color and form were to 
bc vehicles ol unhanij)crcd psydiic expression." For kan 
dinsky was not nicrcly obtaininii; a divorce ironi olcl objects 
and Images so that hc could transform onr visir)n of thcm by 
csthclie nieans; he was intent on breakinj» down those mcans 
into Clements of pmc (olor, |)nrc linc, ct(., until they coidd bc 
used as frccly as a coniposcr uses thc toncs of a inusical stalc. 
But whcrc Kandinsky and Klee, in thcir teachinj»;, both cin- 
phasized thc sc(|iicnec of events on thc picturc plane, thus 
addini; tinic as a part of a linear sccpiciue of cause and elfcct 
—one form cIropj)ini; on anolhcr. say. or a secsaw tiltinj.; up— 
what flofmann has cnij)hasi/ccl is thc simultancity of all the 
Clements in thcir impact on thc vicwcr. 

Thcre is too muc h analysis; what wc need is svnthcsis, Hof- 
mann insists— oncc aj^ain rcniinclin<» us of thc F'auvcs— and 
synthcsis "makcs strc)n|;»cr form acccntuation." Linear dcvcl- 
opnicnt is to Ilofinann priniarily dcsi<;n; what hc wants is an 
or!L»anic dcvclopment that makes a paintini^ a resonant color 
ficld with a stroii" structural unity. And it is in America that 
hc finally aecoinplishcd this, an America free from thc weicht 
of cstablished visual traditions, an America whcrc so littlc 
of our culture has bcen put into art that a wholc school is 
like one voite crying in thc wildcrncss. Not rennement but 
exj)rcssive power was what America ncedcd, and Ilofmann, giv- 
ini; his stndcnts thc mcans, also discovercd his own ends in an 
America whcrc. as hc says, he was able "to unfold all thc 
possibilitics of his mind." 



Orchestral Dominaiice in YHlow (/95/j; collcction Mr. and Mrs. D(wid M. Solinger. 





«••* 



The Frey iJ^^yhi: (o/Icctioji o/ ilic (ulist. 



Hoimann's work. in bulk. i^ a da//lin.i; siiL;ht. Ihcre is so 
nuic h hrilliant color. such assertixc |)aint texture: hills. 
\ alleys, splattcrs. slurps. tumblcs of color blocks. colors rising 
in swirls like an Arabian .i;cnic solidifyint; out of a bottle of 
snioke. Surroundcd by such paintinj^js. one fccls immcdiately 
that this is a world not of unrealitv but of ma";ical rcalitv. Here 
tolor is lifc: hcrc all that is ugly, horrifying. shockint;. pettv, 
clani^crous. clcstructi\c'. thc human marathon ol anxictv. fear 
ancl death. has no color encr^v and cannot survive. Fxpc- 
rieiicini( Hoimann's colcjr. his fantasv, his imai'inarv animais. 
his iniai^inarN intcriors sparklini; with color suns. Avith llashcs 
of skv vcllow. oran<^c, pink. red, this a\ riter ^^as rcmindcd of 
Hui^h Loftus and the ma.gical si^hts and sccnes cxpcricnccd 
hv Dr. Doolittlc. 

hl the enchanted world of Hu<>h Loftus. when Dr. Doolittlc 
and his aninials escaped from thc leed bills ancl ^ray dri//le 
of a drearv London suburb to thc adventurous intcrior of the 
African jun^le. thcv camc across a new animal for wliich thev 
coiiied a nanic: thc *'Push-me-I*ull-vou.'" VVitli two heads and 
two sets of front Icl^s but no hindcjuartcrs or tail, this beast 
could never go forward without going backward, or backward 
without going forward. And one might sav that hc had only 
one asynimctrical point. the point whcrc. if you cut him cx- 
.ictly in two. his two hahcs wcjidcl fall apart. 

Ihis is not so stränge an introduc tion to Hans Hofmann's 
creatcd world as it might seem. If you can imaginc one half 
of Dr. Doolittlc's Push-me-I*ull-you as an empty volumc out- 
lined on a picturc plane, thcn in Hofmann's magical world 
the other half will nctessarily bc a mass: plastically. the empty 
volumc secms to |)ush in, the mass out, while the point at 
which the Push-me Pull-you could bc c ut into two ccjual halvcs 
call bc callcd the fulcrum. thc pixot, the stabili/ation point. 
or thc Visual centcr ancl h)cus of thc painting. And what Hof- 
niann has formulatcd thcoretically as thc plastic unity of 
l?iish and pull on thc picturc plane is without doubt not only 
Iiisiiiost significant contribution to the dcvclopment of abstrat- 
tioii into Abstract Expressionism in America, but also a major 
factor in the dcvclopment of his own work. For oncc plastic 
unity as a balance of opposing forces has supplantcd in his 
work the objec ti\e unit\ of a landscapc or an intcrior still life. 



thcn Holmann is no longc i iindrr fnihnc but dhovc it. And 
bcing abo\(* it. hc is Ircc- to intcgiaK in nc w rclalionships 
innumciablc chincnis hom thosc lonii \<ais ol di\crsc ex- 
pciicncc as a paintci. 

lh)hnann's break imo a woild ol (n.iti\r painting. into a 
wcjrld, as hc puts it. dominated 'In iIk de niands ol thc me- 
dium ol cxjircssion." occuncci in iIk l.m thirtics .inci <arly 
lortics. Roughh lor a che ach . IM:i!M!^ Holmann cxjxi imciiKd 
with \arious waxs of atlaining jj|asti( dcj>th and unit\. harking 
liac k at Inst to Post hnpK ssioriist and Post(.ul>ist t(( liin'(ju( s. 
'Jims in paintings whidi might bc (alhcl iiiiaginaiv landscapc 
cxperiences. such as l r /tnd/n. 10 /sro/y. ////;v VV//r. Ejjrr- 
vcsccricc, hc uses an ovcrall bo(l\ ol paint. like a l>od\ ol 
\\atcr. And xvith a piolusiou ol (olois .ipj)li((l lor thc most part 
in separate units. thc suilacc secms to r is( ancl lall, mass or 
Nlackcn. not onl\ l>\ mcans ol its tcxtuics but also through its 
(olor clcnsiiics. lo bc litcrars: I .<- lardni is a licndi garcicn 
ol llovvcrs; '/O Ascojj, thc- f.nglish cournMsjch; l(nr\ Idlr, a 
landscapc (il lancv: I\ffrn'r\( mt r, n liglith ( loudccl S/iot/i und 
Drarii!;. Color is piimarilv mass in llicsc jj.iintings. gravitating 
tovvaicl one or .niothci color centcr. 

ßv contrast. in abstraciions such as lauihrftitiu:, l'nlillrd 
l^>n or Subtricrij^cd, color is jjiimarih spat c-volumc. Bcauti- 
lully clear colors arc applied in distinct atcas. (ach color tcrid- 
ing to sound one notc- in a total chorcl ol ic pcatcci. contrast- 
ing, opposing or c omplcmcriiar v colors. And though hcrc too 
ihc surlace bcgiris as a unit\. this tinic it is as a bocl\ ol space 
ratlicr thaii as a body ol mallcablc iiiatici. for in ihcsc paint- 
ings, thc surlace is di\idccl morc or Icss strictb ancl gcomctri- 
cally \uU) thrce or lour or six arc-.is b\ a prcicess of dixisive 
ccpn'valcrKc that immcdiately criiphasi/cs thc uniiv of thc- wholc. 
In thc same pcriocl, Hcjfmann also j>ro(hiccd paintings in 
which thc Space is de Inicd bv intrusiori. like a stage which is 
empty until thc pla\ bcgins. In Hirth oj 7V//////S. thc space- is 
dominated by oiie- Hat shajjc: in the- morc- reecnt '/'lir I'rry, 
In two— one thc bitel sh.ipt- ou ;i eentral stalk that iuris, 
a stream of black. Iroiii his bocI\ to ihe- top ol thc ean\as. thc 
second like a uhcel ihrowing ejll sparks ol eolore-el paint. \rid 
in woiks such as I dolatrcss, lüslasy and I'jnhxKr. the- space 
is dotriinatcd bv lonns. not Hat. but almosi seulptural in thcir 
impact. In Ijnljyacc, Icir cxamj^lc-. two lonns. hea\ilv contourcd 
and varicci in planes ancl (uincs. are- dra\vn toward a central 
locus in such a wa\ that the- wciglit ol thcir Separation secms 
to bc cxactlv balanee-cl b\ the jjowcr ol llicii attraction. 

Hcjimann's work. Ime- in thc lortics. be-eeimcs niagnilie cnt 
in thc liltics. As his mastci\ ol "thc de-mands ol the- meeli- 
um ol expression'" increases. he- gi\e-s a nme h Iree-r reirr 
to his \isual jjowcrs. As hc eombiiies sc\eial or all ol thc 
Narious mcthods he cle-\ clopccl lor the- ae liie-\ e-nicni ol plastic 
cicpih and \isual unity. his paintings, no longci aspeets of an 
iriiagiriarv world, seem to be- eae h a wholc world in itscll. At 
thc same tinic his surlaec-s be-c omc inlinitclv \ariccl. 

(.cometrical di\isions ol a singh- space- eulminatc. toward 
\\):){), in such hrilliant paintings as thc .\e-ube-rgcr ( lolh e t ion's 
Iruit Bowl, or thc W'hitney's Mdornhi nnd lilnr. or the- Hat 
color volumcs in such a magical piojeclion ol loniial unit\ as 
VfiHorji (I9l8-.")2)"a Hat icd beast in a Hat grcen world 
miraculouslv balanccd bv a \olumc ol white-. Organicallv re- 
lated Icjrnis rcappcai in a lie lel ol bicathing color in a work 
such as Elster (a (»erman blucbircl). or in Scotdi and liiir- 
ij^undy, whcrc irregulär rcci.jugles and jjaits r»f circics arc 
luscd on a paint surlace that is st ulptmal. it is so hca\ ilv rie h in 
color. And lor sheer brillianee . loj a piolile laiion ol eolois and 
texturcs and Spaces in a \ibrani ancl dramatie unit\. no jj.iint 
ing is a better cxamplc ol uhai llolmann can now aceomplish 
ilian thc Solinger (iollcc tion's ()r( he.stral DoniifKiru c ni Yelloiv. 
As lor thc artist. thc world ol bis an sccins now to ha\(- taken 
o\cr. I hcrc is no longcr an\ epicstion ol control. All is matter 
lor crcalion. Fach painting. oncc- bcgini. see ms to eoinmand its 
own development. I he artist. laithlul in the- pursuit of his 
own Vision, himscll bclic\e-s that he has onl\ to experiencc 
the first coruretencss ol the work ancl he- w ill inc\iiablv fullill 
its potent ialitics. 



ARTS/A/.iy 195\ 



33 











EST ABLISHED 1846 



EXHIBITION 



SCULPTURE and WATERCOLORS 

by 

CONTEMPORARY 

ARTISTS 



1 



MAY 7-25 



OLD MASTERS 

FRENCH IMPRESSIONISTS 

CONTEMPORARY PAINTINC 

AMERICAN PAINTINC 



PRAMINO • PRINTS • RESTORATION 



14 EAST 57th STREET 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



LONDON 



SPECIAL BOOK SECTION 

The nude in art . . . a study of Englishness . . . Ravenna mosairs 

. . . miiseums in portfolio . . .a monosrciph on Gliiberti . . . 

Abraliaw Rattrter . . . modern Japanese prints . . . 



The Nude: A Study in Ideal Art h\ Kfnuetfi 
Chnh. I^olliiigt'ii Sei its \\\\ . I'imiliccin. ST. .')(). 

II IS a pleasure Co emiiiRMalc llic \irtiics of Sir 
Kt'inu'tli (lark's inosi icccnt l)()<)k: a clclij^lit- 
ful tlu'iiu'. a wcaltli ot peiietiating anahsis and 
iiisi^hi, oiic ot thc liaiulsoincst prose stvles in 
(()iiU'mj>oiarv ai t iiistoritai writing, 29«S cxtcl- 
ieiit illiistratioiis in iialftone, almost taultless 
((Ictails of reproihK tioiis arc not alvvavs lahcleil 
as sii(li) piodnc lion, and rcasonablc pritc. 

In riir Siulc, as in his Latidscdlx' Paiiitiufr of 
H)49, Sir kcnncili writcs art liistorv as tlie his- 
torv of onc of its grcat iconographical divisions, 
and lu" lU'cds oiiK lo do a voliime on still lifc lo 
(onipk'lc tlic II iad of pcrson, j)lacc and lliiiig. If 
it is thc liisi oi ilicsc ihat lias pro\ idcd art witli 
ils mosl ( ha!k'n<^inj^. fii^rossinf» and cndurint» 
tlicinc. thc luidc. of all tlic possihilitics of thc hu- 
man, providcs thc inost sj)c( lacular oppoitunitv, 
Ihc (.reck iHidc, as Sir Kciniclli points out. \v;is 
at once a inanifestation of iclij^ious fcchng, ideal 
inspiration and scnsualitN. In niodcrn tinics it i^ 
the acadenii( proving groiiiul par c\cellencc: 
\oii (an fool Sonic of thc pcople all of tlic tiinc. 
etc., I)ut evcryhody knous thc liinnan ligurc. 

Sir Kennet h piirsncs severai esthetic thcnics 
whicli j)resciU insuj)eral)lc proI)lcnis hiit whidi 
ncver diiii his perccplion of iiulividual works of 
art. One of these is stated in tlic suhtitlc of thc 
voluiiie, and the anliior is forced to swcrvc froni 
it repeatcdly. Another is that the nude is not a 
suhjcct of art hiit an art form "invented hv the 
(.reeks in the hfth ccntiirv just as opera is an 
art form invented in seveiiteenth-ccnturv lialv." 
W'hile this tcrniinologv mav illinninatc an impor- 
tant inoincnt in the hisiorv of the nude. it is 
onc that not c\en its aiilhor maintains stricth. 
"ßefore tlie Cnit ifixioti of \richelangeio," he 
writes. "we reaii/e that thc nude is tlie inost 
scrious snhject in art." I hc amhignity which rc- 
sides in the term 'nude/' as in this qiiotation. 
arises often in Sir Rennet h's disciission; and onc 
sometimes wonders whethcr he is descrihing a 
work of art or a real personage: "the Marathon 
hoy is siiiiply a yoting body like a ripe fruit." 
But in siicxiinihing to this ambigiiity Sir Kenneth 
is not alonc; it is inorc than one artist who finds 
it difficiilt to distingnish hetween the attrattion. 
say, of a woinaii and that of a painting of a 
wo man. 

The eroticisiii that hoth the real and thc rep- 
resented nude arouse prescnts Sir Kenneth with 
the third of his problciiis and one that he han- 
dles in uneqiiivocal nianner. Early in this vol- 
unie he quotes Prof. S. Alexander to the efTecl 
that if the niide is treated so as to aroiise feel- 
ings "appropriate to the iiiaterial snhject, it is 
false art, and had morals. " Sir Kenneth, on the 
othcr hand, declares that the nude that contains 
no vestige of the erotic is "bad art, and false 



morals." Again. late in the \ohimc. of a Mnenad 
after Scopas, he writes. "she is still part of that 
aiui(pic rcligion of scnsualitN froin whith. in thc 
i^wd, thc nude dcri\es its authoritN and moincn- 
tuiii." \\ iiilc this is not thc onl\ attitudc onc 
mav have toward thc nude in art. it is refreshing 
in a Scholar, and releases Sir Kenneth for a suc- 
ccssion of 'readings*' of the nude that are elo- 
(jucnt and pcrtcptivc in a warmlv humanistic 
traditio!!. 

I hcse oftcn da/zling intciprctations couiplc- 
ment an ccpiallv da/zIing historical analvsis. Sii 
Kenneth tollovvs thc (hangcs in thc usc and 
trcatuicnt of the luidc in aii and is ablc cvcii t(» 
tiacc thc origins. miitations and (ombinatious ot 
inanv of thc vcrv poscs in which thc nude is rcp- 
rescnted. Hc inids two important ticatmcnts <»f 
thc fcinalc nuile: the C.reck. in which the stronglv 
accented hip caiised bv the shifting of the wciglit 
to onc leg establishes the ar( hitcctiiral chaiiic- 
tcr ot thc nude; and tlie Gothic, which hc calls 
"thc alternative Convention.' Lei him (lcscril)c ii 
in liis own words. 

■' I his is what distingiiisiics thc (.<)lhi( idc.d 
(»f thc femalc bodv; that whercas in thc anticpic 
nude thc tloininating rhvthin is the curve of thc 
hip. in the alternative Convention it is thc cuivc 
of thc stomach. Ihis change argucs a tund.i 
mental ditfercnce of attitudc to thc ixulv. 1 he 
curve of thc liip is created bv an upwaid thiust. 
Ikiieath it are l)one and muscic. suppoiting tiu- 
bodv 's weight. However scnsuous or geometric it 
mav bccoine. it rcinains in thc cnd an imagc <»l 
energv and control. i hc curve of the stomach is 
created bv gravitv and rela\ation. It is a heavv. 
unstructural curve. soft and slow, vet witii a kind 
of vegctable pcrsistcnce. It does not take its shapc 
trom the will but froni thc unconscious biolog 
ical process which gives shapc to all hidtlcn (»i 
ganisnis." 

In view of the richcs of this voluinc. it mav 
apj)ear as an ungralefulness to mention certain 
omissions. One would have wclcomcd a disciis- 
sion of that inost scnsuous— and most numcr(uis 
— of all nudes, the Hindu: incxplicablv. there arc 
onlv the scantiest referentes to India \\\ this 
volunie and only two reproductions of Indian 
examples. It is surprising. too. to find, in a tinal 
chapter entitied "1 he Nude as an F.nd in It 
seif in which Moore, Picasso. Branciisi. Matisse 
and Rouaull are disciisscd. that there is no men 
tion at all of Maillol. Lehmhruck. Modigliani. 
Pascin and Lachaise, for whoni the nude was 
not merelv a siibjcct but thc riindus operandi of 
their art. 

What of the futiire of the nude? Thc Paris 
correspondent of this Journal likes to insist that 
'the human tigiiie is through." Phe self-abne- 
gation and doctrinaire modernitv of this State 
inent are shared neither bv Sir Kenneth Clark 
nor by the present writer. Ihe latter takes the 



fighting Position th.it thc huinan tigurc will be 
through onlv whcn man. that is tn sav \I;m. is 
through. As for Sir Kenneth. hc writes. " Siu h 
an unsatiablc appctite for thc nude [as in thc 
sixtecnth (cnturv] is unlikcK to ic« ui . . . \oi 
arc WC likclv omc morc to ( ut ouiselvcs oll 
trom the bodv. as in ilie ascctic cxpcrimciii <»f 
medicval ( hristianitv . \\ i- m;iv no loiigci \\«ir 
ship it. but WC have (oiiic t(» terms wiih ii." .Sir 
Kcmicth writes. of (ouisc. as a Kuro|)caii. but 
liavc WC comc to terms with it? I hc nudes, or 
all-but-nudes. ot De Kooiiinu of four vcais auo 
make it appcar ihat wc have not and lliai uc 
are not likclv i<» for some tiinc. I Ins augins an 
iiitcicsting if discontinuous futurc h)i thc mide 
on this side ot thc \thmti(. Alwavs a supprcssed 
tliemc hcic. it (an crupt at thc most unfoicsccn 
moments. \nd thiseiuption will |)i(>(iu(c lom K 
and uiiusual nudes. Our Paris ( oi icspondeiit is 
probablv right: as a icsult ot thc (omhincd 
torces ot thc national moralitv and (»I rcccnt 
artisti( cvolution. thc hum.ni ligurc. as a viablc 
sul)jc(t. is through licrc. wherc. cxccpi tor 
l.adiaisc. it ncver IümI a (hamc. mi»\m (.msi 



The Eiig:li.shiies.*^ of Eii^li^sli .Art l>\ \if<ohnis 
Pewsnrr. Iredcri(k A. Praeger. Im. nJ.'.O. 

Tut title of Mr. Pcvsnci\ liook suggcsts liumoi. 
Its most amusing fcaturc is tlic autlinr> 
presumption that bv gcncrali/ing on an in terms 
of its national (hara(tci he is doing something 
(laring and |)erhaps not altogethcr rcspcct.ible. 
Herein lies the F.nglishness of Nikolaus Pevsncr— 
wlio is not in fact an F.nglishman. WCII awarc 
that "thc geogiaphv of art" lias had extensive 
trcatuicnt on the (.ontinent for over two (cn 
turies (he himscif names thc Xblx' Diibos as 
its modern staiting point). he is noncthcicss con 
strained. bv a(a(lcmi( (ourtcsv or a spc( ies of 
inelasticitv a((piircd from thc countiv of bis 
ad(j[)tioii. fiorn a((epting the morc penetrating 
approaches of suc h writers as Paine or Santa vana 
or P.li Faure. Pevsner Starts all over again as if 
the onlv theoreti( ians on the suhjcct hc had to 
modifv were William Morris and Roger Frv. 
C!onse(pientlv his book. although thoroughiv 
grounded in thc parti( ularities of British de(() 
rative and functional art. suggestive whcrever it 
engages a sc(picncc of (ontrasts. is unnecessarilv 
dillident in its principal detmitions. Pevsner's 
procediire is to accept certain Fnglish character 
traits as established— restraint. cmpirical Obser- 
vation, detachment. cthical preo( ( upation— and 
ilhistrate their e\f)rcssc(l (orrelatives in the mii- 
tations of the British arts of design— architecture 
and painting cspeciallv. Ihe demonstration. as 
far as he takes it. is niasierlv. But (aution or a 
failurc of perception stays his hand. Bevond a 



ARTS/A^O' 1957 



35 



SPECIAL BOOK SECTION 



KHKtssioii u> ilu- ii.j(liti(mal inliiiiuc <»1 (liiuaic 
as üw priiiK" shujJtr of (iisioius, hc dücsn't ciit 
iliKMigli lo ilic boiu- ol ilic (jiit'stion, nanich : 
ihi' noioiioiis sinsiKil (k'li(ic'iu\ of llie J-iiglisli. 
Howt'Ncr. siiKc l't'Nsiu'i's j)ii(Kcu[)ati()tJS ;iic 
mainU wiih an liiltc imi' aiul j)aiiitiiijj; daiul- 
stapc j^ardcniiij^ and s(id|)lim' ari' lonsidcicd 
iiu idtiilall\ ). lu- is foKi'd lo ac kiiow Ifd^c llic 
iiianitcst tonst TNalism anil ihc gtiurallv inli'iior 
plasiic st-nsf ol iht- IWitisli. wlun \\ti_nlifd in tlit* 
uni\trsal stalt-. I Ins lit- tlcals wiili in llit' nu)st 
j^allani ^^a\ j)t»ssil)lt': |)t»inlinji; out tlit- solid 
>irmc's antl anal\/in^. wiili cas\ ti ntliiion. ilic 
inii ana(it>nal ((»nnct tions ol ai( .intl sotial stantl- 
aitls. \t tlif t>ulstl lif lakt's tait' td tliosi- l)otli 
crstMiic tinalitics thal tliallcnjuc all promoti'is ot 
llic (.t'iuial Sialtnunt: 

I*t)laiiliis t\i(lcnt in twt) tonstt uli\ t- |)i'iit)tis aif: 
ihf I)ttt)raU'tl and tlic Ptj ptiulit ular Stvlf. \ an- 
l)iujj;^li am! Lou\ Burlington. Hogaitli and Rt'vn- 
(»Itls. W hat tliis hot)k st'ls t>ui it» tlo is to ana- 
\\sv lor t'atit td tlicsc intliv itlualK wliat is F.ng- 
lisli in ilifni. antl tlicn stc hon iai tlic rcsulls 
rcalh (ontiatiiil rath t)tlR'r. I or instancc . . . 
Dctoiatcd is thc Ht>\ving liiu-. l'tipcntlit ular is 
llic straight linr, hut l)t)th aic lint' antl ntn htuh. 
C'onstahlcs aini is irulh tt) natuit-, I uiiuis 
wt)rltl is a fantasniagf)iia. hut ht)tli arc tt»n- 
(crnctl willi an ainit)sp}u'iit \'iv\\ t)l tlic A\t)rltl. 
not with tiu' lirin phvsital t)hjctts in it. . . . It 
is iruf ihat in ihis (■t)nstal)lc antl I uincr alst) 
rc})rt'S('nt a Kuropcan antl nt>t incrth an F.ngiisli 
<lt'\c'lt)pinc'nt. hut tlicii s|>t't iiit all\ unst ul|)iuial. 
unplastit. (It)utl\ or stcaniN trcatincnt is, as will 
Ik* sht)un, Knglish all ihc sanic. 

Antl I*(\sncr ktcps Ins pitunisc. st) far as thc 
surfatf rcatling gt)cs. tlisttxirsing with instiiu- 
li\c rc'sults. (t>gc'nth suppt)itctl h\ pht)tt)grai)hs 
<d his (t>niparati\c niatcrial. t)n iht' narriti\c' as 
against thc csthctit hias td Knglish ait. tlispla\ttl 
carh in mctlicxal tapcsirics antl psaltcrs: t)n thc 
ulilitarian spiiit whith was alikc at thc hcait t)l 
lhc()r\ athantctl hv Ht)garth t)r Kcvnt)ltls or 
(.t)nstal)lc: t)n thc tlctat hiiicnt with whidi ar- 
cldlctts and [>aintcrs so t)ftcn "chosc" onc 
siNJc or ant)ihcr Irttni thc Kurt)j)can antl tlassi- 
tal pt)t)l: c)n thc cntluring t)pj)ositit)n t)l thc 
F.nglisJi as a wht)lc (cxtcptitms nt)tctl) tt) titarut 
or ahstrad c\]>rcssit)ns— tt)gcthcr with thcir irr;j- 
tional prcdilct tit)n for thc cctcntric ("thc rcla- 
lion of picturcstpic garilcning tt) lihcrtv") antl a 
convictit)!!. juritlital in t)rigin. that catli tasc 
sht)ultl hc trcatctl t)n its t)wn nicrit. whith l'c^s- 
ncr sccs rcfict icd in thc tliffcrcntiatctl priiui])lcs 
of tt)wn antl-tilN planning thcorv. 

I*c\sncrs anxicty tt) rc\cal harnit)n\ hctuccn 
sccining (ontrarictics in style and in thc tcnipcra- 
nicnts t)r attitudcs of indi\idual i)rat titit)ncrs 
Icatls hini into pcrsuasivc and untlulv knt)ttctl 
attcnif)ts at prt)ving that thc dissinular rcalh 
isnt. or that an antithcsis is but a jKiratlox. 

. . . forinally thc winding path antl thc Serpen- 
tine lake are the equivalcnt t)f Ht)gartirs l.inc 
of HeautN. that long, gentlc tlt)uhle curve whith 
dominatcs one kind of Knglish art fn)ni the 
Detorated style in archite(ture tt) W illiani Blake 
antl l)evt)ntl. C)n the other hantl. whcre Ht)garth 
himsclf nses these motifs t)f llic gartlcn to illus- 
tralc his pt)int, hc says that thev "Icad the eve 
a wantf)n kind t)f chasc." Ihat is clcarlv soine- 
ihing tlilfcrcnt. ... 

"Let nt)t each hcautv c\cr\ whcre hc spictl 
\\ hen half thc skill is dcccntlv tt) hitlc. 
He gains all pt)inls who pleasingK (t)nft)unds, 
Surpriscs. varies, and conceals the l)t)unds." 
These lines are froni Alexander I*t)pc. and though 
l'opc was a leadier t)f reason. and though it was 
I.ortI Biirlingtt)!! wht) csta!)lishctl in IHtli-cenlurv 



Inglantl thc darits antl thc tuhic siujplititv t)l 
l'allatlian art hitct iure. Binlingtt)n pt)sscsseti at 
( hiswick antl I*t)|)e at Iwitkctdiam twt) of tlic 
hrst ])ii turcstpic garilcirs t)l Inglantl. 

Ihis st)rl t)f üfid-yct cxpt)sitit)n inexitahh Icatls 
tt) (pialif\ing ext ursit)ns intt) thc spirit t)l tlic 
tenliUN uiuicr tlist ijssit)n. nuuatit)ns t)f inhan 
grt)wth. (t'ltic Clements in British genius antl 
so h)rth— all t»r \\hiih fastinates. while rcmain 
ing at thc lc\el t)f (t)n\cntional detcrnnnisin. 

I \vt)ntlcr if thc t(»Mipulsit>n lt)r rcst)l\ing dis 
paritics l)\ dcuNing thcni. t)i at Icast hx rcsisiing 
thcin, is not an Angio Saxon t)l)scssit)n— inhcritetl 
l)\ Aiiicriians ihit)ugh Pm itanisni -dcri\ed froin 
an ahitling fear t)f thc ps\(ht)lt)gital (whith 
niight. alter all. Icatl tt) irt)n\!). a siul)l)t)rn linii- 
tatit)n t)l thc tultural tcinpcr with whith Pcxsncr 
is nt)l prcj)arctl tt» tt)nlcntl. I ainc sj)t)kc t)f a 
'*|)ritlt)niinant nit»tif" in a (ulture— as in an 
intli\ itlual — whith. gt)\crniiig its art exprcssit)n. 
is thc special st)urtc ol its glt)r\ as well as t)f its 
tlt)t)in. I he distintti\t' natit)nal asset t)f thc 1 ng- 
lish is social itt iprot it\ —purthasctl at thc cx- 
j)cnsc t)f iinaginatit)n. an altrihutc tlc\('lt)pctl. 
nit)rc t)ltcn ihan nt)t. I)\ tränst cntlcncc t)f thc 
social. PaiuilN t)l iinaginatit)n has heen fatal to 
British art antl a inainsla\ t)f British (i\il (on- 
tlutt. antl t)f its gt)t)tl taste in prt)sc antl furnitiirc. 
( I lie Kli/al)cthan tiraina iniist hc a(cc[)tctl as 
well as cxtcj)tctl: if it is thought tt) tt)nstitute an 
insuiicrahlc harricr to thc prccctling gcncralilN. 
" .Nothing.' as an astulc Irish pt)cl saitl. "is per- 
fecl. I hcrc are lunj|)s in it.) I hc tpiintcssential 
s\nd)t)l of l)()th the \anit\ antl thc fitness t)l 
British eiiij)irit isni untlcr trial is |t)sci)h (.t)ii- 
ratl's 'l'\p}i()()T], whercin (.a[)tain MacW'hirr is 
"tt)t) stupid" tt) csiiniatc thc ft)rccs against whith 
hc is striving. antl iherehv hrings thc sliij) 
ihrt)ugh. \t)w thc prctlt)nunant niotif t)f an\ 
social group is ratit)nal. if t)id\ in thc scnse that 
it t)pcrates hy a set t)f tacit (t)n\entit)ns. But thc 
ortlcrctl siuface can he niaintainctl t)id\ l)\ snh- 
liinatit)!!: st)niewherc, st)oncr t)r later. thc suj)- 
prcssetl elcmcnts in cxj)criencc. thcrcft)ic in art. 
will rcveal thcmsehes. or erupt. ( Ihink I nia\ hc 
ft)llowing a half-reniemberctl hint froin a Jungian 
pro])t)sitit)n licrc.) .\s a singlc cxaniplc. thc oh- 
Ncrse of Japanese iinpassi\itv is self-discinl)t)wel- 
ment t)r. extcrnali/cd. raf)c. In Japanese ait. thc 
tcirsit)!! is apparent in the fcrt)(it)us arahcstpic 
antl in thc picxalcntc t)f thc re\cngc thernc in 
Kahuki tlrania. 

I he appli(alit)n tt» i'cxsncr's thcinc is surch 
perniissible. Ihere is nt)t st) nuuh (t)ntradi( tit)n 
as pavnient deferred in thc dual phcnt)nicnt)n 
t»f British saiiitv aird thc tlark ct)rncrs dhe (t)al- 
age hell and the Kcn\a tt)lt)n\): thc tt)ininon 
scnse antl thc (.t)thic reaclit)n las in thc tult of 
thc nivsterv storv as well as in tathetlral trän 
septs t)r Ivric [)t)etr\): the usual primae \ of thc 
I)t)ttt)r Jt)hnsons or the Rc\nt)ldscs antl thc less 
fretjuent appearance of a Hogarth. a lurncr t)r 
a I). H. Lawrence. C.irstom tcna(it)usl\ asscrlctl 
antl thc tcrrestrial pt)litel\ t)rtlcrctl ncctl tt) bc 
rcndntlctl that thc st)cial tt)mmitnicnl is alst) a 
tlen of beasts, that it is pt)ssible to scnse in thc 
atmt)sphere somcthing more (or other) than 
tlclitatch obscrvctl tints antl texture t)f rain 
(It)utls antl inscril,»ctl trces. and that st)cial rela- 
lionships attpnrc iheir niost \ital soiuccs from 
(arnalitv. 

Pe\sner. hiinself. offers the reallv tclling ancc- 
tlt)ic t)f thc British gand)it. crucial antl endear- 
ing. \\ hcn Blake coinj)liniented Constable bv 



extlainiing. "\\h\. this is nt)t tlrawiiig hut in- 
sf)iratit)nl" (;t)nstal)lc answercti- tlrilv . we niay 
iiiiaginc— "I ineant it ft)r tlrawing ' . . . Antl with 
wlit)m tlt) WC laugh'' 

\IR\<)\ ^t)l Nt, 



l<av«>iiiia Mosiiies. '/'c\/ />^ (•ius(l>l>( li(>vi)ii. 
New ^ork (.laphii Soticts. S'JO.OO. 

SiNc 1 ka\cnna. alt)ng with Rt)mc antl Salt)inta, 
is onc t»l thc printipal tcntcis in whith 
inipt)rtant mt)saics frt)m llic carK (Inistian tcn 
tmies still sur\i\c. il is nt)t surprising that it 
shoultl pn»\itlc l)N itsfll thc suhjctt h)r this \cr\ 
hantlst)mc antht»log\. I)c\t)tctl lo mt)saiis t)f the 
Idth antl sixili tcnlurics. thc book tt»ntains lortv- 
si\ largc antl beaulilul tt)lt)r rcprotlut tit)ns. a 
likinic at thc wcalth \\hith that tit\ on thc 
\thiatit hcgan to attpiirc whcn it bctamc thc 
wtstcrn tapilal t>f thc Rt)man I nipirc untlcr 
H(»nt)rius. It sttins uidt)rtunatc that st)mc of thc 
builtlings wcre nt)t mt)ic lull\ rcprcscnlctl thc 
Baptistcr\ t)f ihc Arians antl thc Basilita of San 
A|)t)llinarc in (lasse recci\e t)nl\ thrcc i>latcs 
a|»ictf— but in what must ha\c hccn a very 
cx|>cnsi\c \t)lumc tt» prt)tlutt'. t)nc \\t)ultl nt)t 
ha\c wantctl thc amt)unt t)f spate gi\en to the 
( liurth t)f San \italc curtailctl. It prt)\itlcs st)mc 
ol thc int)si beautifui pages in thc l)t)t)k, its 
laiiictl pancis t)f thc l-.mi)crt)r Justinian antl his 
wilc 1 lict»dt»ra antl its strikinglv Iau\c tlctail t)f 
\I(»unt Sinai amt)ng them. Ihere are. as well. 
st)iiie fmc pages t)n thc Basilica t)f San \pt)llinarc 
N'iit)\t). whith pt)ssesscs t)ne of the earlicst antl 
nidst toniplctc scrics t)f scenes from thc New 
Itstamcnl. Ihc l)t)t)k itsclf. tlcsigned b\ r.ugcnc 
\I. I-.ttcnbcrg antl cxtcllentiv ))rintctl bv Amil- 
tarc l*i//i of Milan, is a finc spetimcn t)f art- 
l)t»()k pid)lishing antl a tlistintt ]>lcasurc to lt)t)k 
I hrough. 

Ihc tcxl l)\ (.iusci)i)c Bt)\ini tht)ugh it con- 
taiiis rclcNanl histt)ri(al inh)rmatit)n antl plcas- 
aiu tlcs(ripti\c passages ft)r man\ t)f thc i)ancls 
whith are nt)t rcprt)thut'tl. is unlortunatclv tt)n- 
fusing. It gi\cs no tlcar itlca ol thc builtlings 
in whith thc nn»sai(s are ht)usctl. tht)ugh that 
sccms to bc onc ol its iutcntit)ns. nt)r tlt)cs it 
ui\c an\ tlcarcr itlca t)f thc sctpicncc t)f thc 
pancis thcmsehes. I hc scttit)ns tle\t)tetl tt) tat h 
t>f thc scNcn builtlings ct)verctl in thc \t)lume 
rcatl likc a scrics t)f rantlt)m nt)tcs strung alt)ng 
in |)aragraph ft)rm. I hc rcatlcr is hclpctl st)mc- 
what l)\ a ninnbcr t)f blatk antl while re|)roduc- 
tit)ns f)l intcrit)r antl cxlcrit)r \ iews. 

I AMKS K. Ml i i(i\v 



National (;allerv of Art, Was^hington, h\ Joint 

]]'<ilf{rr. Metropolitan Mus^euni ^v Theodore 
/ious.sraii. J). National (»allery, London, h\ ^n 

riiilif) lictid\. The Louvre /:v Miltoii S. Fox. 
l'ffizi i>\ I'ili{>l>o Rossi. The Praclo l>\ lUnry li. 
W'chlf. Harrv N. Abrams. Lach \t)luinc .S7.9.5. 

Ct)MPARr Burckhartll's classic Do Cicerone 
wilh this new sctjueiue of large-si/c ))t)rtft)- 
lit)s t)n thc trcasuics of F.uit)pean antl American 
collcclit)ns. Ihc "(.uide tt) thc Fnjt)vmcnt of 
Italvs Art." as Burckhartlls \t)lume was siih- 
litlctl. ran tt) tlt)sc tt) a half niillion wortls, but 
(t)ntainctl nt) illustratit)iis: thc travelcr— nt)tal)ly 
ihc niellH)tlital (.erman tt)urist — was expeclcd tt) 

coutimied ort pnil,e 3S 




Alhrvvht Dürer^ si i i -pokir aii : jnnn I lu- Lt)uvrc. flarry W Ahm 



ms. 



36 



ARTS/AW /'V37 



SPECIAL BOOK SECTION 




coiititiucd front püge 3ö 

c;iri\ llic l)iilky volmiic lo (Ijc llli/i, ilic lircia, 
Ihc (hmclics iiiul cailicdials, aiid icad llic 
IcaiiK-d comiiit'ius wliilc lacinj^ ilic individual 
paintiiig. In thc Al)riiins sfiics, liowfvcr, cvciy- 
lliiii}^ jK)ssil)lc is doiic lo savc llic purchascr a 
trip, cvcii U) such casil\ actcssihlc placcs as 
Washiiioion 's National (.allciy or New Vork's 
Mc'lropoliian Museum. In cacli hook lic can 
vic'w l\vcnt\ lour (in ilic Prado hook, Iwcnty- 
livc) |)aintin«;s in vcin gootl coior icprodiiclions 
lippcd in, plus ahoiil sixlv iiior' in occasionally 
hhincd sniall hiack and-whilc illuslrations cin- 
hcddt'd likc raisins in ihc k\t. 

I lu'ic arc scvcial novcl and ustful tcaliucs in 
Ihcsc poillolios. 1 hc huildings ihcinsclvcs are 
shouii. and whocvcr alladics associalions of ihe 
ancit'iu and iiusiical lo ihc nainc "l'iado" will 
hc iistonishcd lo scc a sohcr nco-(.rcck sliuctuic 
ol ihc cails ninctccnlli tcnluiv. I hc piohlcni of 
rcj)roducint>; vcry loii^r hori/onial picluics (c.g., 
Ruhens' JudonicfU of Paris or rinioicllo's lialtle 
hi'tnu'cfi Turks and Christians) or ol a iriplsch 
(c.<^.. liosth's C.ardi'n of Dcli<^lils) is solvcd hy 
toldin^ in thc pagc insicad of rcducing ihc re- 
prodiiclion lo llic formal. Details oi soiiic major 
pidurcs arc rcprodiiccd in color and/or l)lac:k- 
and white. I hc la\oul is pleasin«i^: a j)i( ture lliat 
does nol lill a page is not, witli slavish rij^idily, 
tonlined lo thc centcr of thc pai»e. 

Still thc voluines can onlv whel our appclitc; 
thc\ arc no suhslitule lor llic niusic thc lUirck- 
hardls and thcir suctcssors liavc hcard on hc- 
holding a niaslcrwork in its proper almosphcrc. 
Onh scleelions tan he given. In thc Prado vol- 
iimc, lor instance, wc scc onlv eiglit of thc 114 
Goyas, oidv live of tlie thirlv-iwo Kl Gretos 
owiied h\ thc niusemii. Evcryt)nc is likclv lo 
niiss a fa\(Hite, ycl lie will hc compensaled hy 
thc discoverv of painiings llial he niay havc 
overlooked. or j>aid loo litile allcnlion lo, so iar. 
Ihc volumes are niosi lavishlv illusiratcd for 
thc adual numher of jxigcs (lotaling sixlv). Thc 
tcxls— four l)\ curators or dircclors of thc insli- 
tutions— arc. inevitahlv, (piitc sliort. I he inlro- 
du(lor\ essav cc^vcrs thc hislorv of thc gallcry, 
niorc intcrestinü^ wherc thc huildinu's storv is 
romantic and long {inde thc Louvre, whicli may 
go hack lo a lifth-tctitury Frankish tower), Icss 
fastinating wherc thc institution is of nine- 
Iccnth cenliirv origin, or, in thc casc of Wash- 
ingtons .National Ciallcry, was opencd only a 
fcw vears ago. lo lill thc allottcd spacc, Curator 
(now Direelor) Walker teils thc littlc-known lale 
of thc capilal's carlier hrave altcmpts to actpiirc 
an. I hc lirst direelor of thc Gallcry's predeces- 
sor. thc .National Institute, also scrved as Sccrc- 
tary of War. lo sprcad taste, hc nrged— fortu- 
natch in vain— that copies of pictiircs. statnes 
and mcdals coinmissioned hv Congress hc dis- 
trihuted all over .\inerieal In our tinic, three 
of llie six gallcrics were threatened with coni- 
plele destruetion: thc I'rado was honihcd diiring 
thc .Spanish Civil War. thc UfFizi and London's 
National Gallery wcrc hit during thc Second 
World War. Yet all tlircc wcrc ahle to rcopen, 
and cvcn to "profit" from the catastrophe. As 
Sir Philip Hcndv writes ahout his niiiseinn in 
thc hcarl of London: "War damage . . . has 
hroughl opporlunities for rcconstruction. and six 



iiofiivr vaii dvr Werden, mrcin and chii.d; 
frutn Ihc Prado, Harry N. Abrams. 



38 



ARTS/A/fl> 1957 



ol the gallerits worsi alle( ted liave hcen com 
plctcK reinodeied :ind aii (onditioned." 

Ihe (oinments on the pidurcs here tontain 
all that's fit to know, iiuluding (sign of our 
tinie!) in the inslaiue of thc Alba Madonna in 
formal ion on all the prices |)aid for tliis Raphacl 
helween IS'JO and WKW). Ihe dioice of jMttures 
mighl he admired were it not hn the nionotonv 
with whi(h (crtain mastei j)ie(('s tum up again 
and again. to he seen in every histoiv of art, and 
familiär to everyone. Oiie iieed nol loallie thc 
Mona Lisa as Dudiamp or Pidihia did to jjrefer 
mceting on a (ONcr soiiie less widelv cxploiled 
and ahused masierwork. lo reprcsent the Anier 
iean genius in ihc (olor plates. instead of the 
nierely amiahle hiiigh;iiii a moic powerfui and 
signifi(ant arlist mighi iiavc hcen seleeted. sudi 
as RNcler, whose woik IxUh the Melroj^olitan 
Mnscinn and \\ ashinglon's National Gallery 
havc in ade(|uale sampling. 

Signiluant for our ri' cNalualion of cighlecnth- 
and ninelecntli (cntuiN art is the indusion of 
Gorot's lieljr\ at Douai: the se\enty-vcar-oI(l arl- 
ist had retmiied from the— oikc widcly admired 
— vaporons woodland s< cnes to tJic formal clarity 
of his Start, hiit now melling his color with Im- 
pressionisl ahaiidon. Hogarth's delightfullv fresh 
and painterlv Slirinift C.irl is shown in place of 
his niorali/ing salircs, and three of Daumicr's 
long unsalahle paintings are on view. 

Thc dexicc of pasting iirstcad of scwing thc 
pages löget her hardlv insurcs thc durability of 
hooks. Ihe |)ages come apart with a minimum 
of handling. It is to hc hoped, lliough. that in 
ncw printings this nuisaiuc will he ovcrcome. A 
fcw pellv details mighl also hc correctecl: Man- 
legna was ncitlier a "X'enctian ' nor a '*Paduan." 
hnl is gcnerallv listed as a North Ilalian painter; 
1.1 (ireco's Christian nanie was cithcr Domcnikos 
or Dominien, hnl nevcr Domenicos; it shonld 
hc Dürer, not Diircr. Since all titlcs are given in 
Knglish. Hals' ('.\f>s\ C.irl need not he called l.a 
lioliemicfuw. Yet on the whole, our verdict is 
aflirmativc: ihese volumes are holh instructive 
and füll of (pialilies that Berenson would call 
"life-cnhancing." 

AI.FRl Ü \VIRNtR 



Lort^n/u (;hilierti b\ iVuhard KrautJicimer in 
coüaboration witli Tfude Krautlieinier-lless. 
Princelon University Press. $:U).l)0. 

SiRANc.i as it may sccni. ihis is the hrst com- 
prchcnsive study in Knglish of Ghihcrti's 
lifc and work; for while the artist's oeuvre is 
fullv illusiratcd in a Phaidon volunie edilcd hy 
I.udwig (ioldschcider, we havc beeil lacking a 
[ulins von Schlosser, whose cdition of the Com- 
niftilarii still forms the hasis of all serious 
Ghiherti scholarship. 

Best knovvn as an architcttural hislorian, and 
particularlv as the Compiler of a nioninnental 
Corf)ns of early Christian hasilicas in Romc, 
Richard Kraulhcimer has devoled more ihan 
twü decades to thc study of the Floren l ine jack- 
of-all-trades. whose activitics extcnd well bc- 
vond thc lield of sculpture inlo those of painl- 
ing. designing and architecture. and who, likc 
Ben\cniilo Cellini a goldsinilh hy profession, 
gave a dctailcd account of his own achicvenienis 
in what may well hc called the first modern 
autobiography written bv an artist. 



I he dearlh of twciitietli cenlury literaliirc on 
Cdiiherti (an parlK he explaiiied l)\ thc fac I 
ihal Ihe ailist's work is so weil aulhcnlicated 
that it leaves litllc rootn for critical specuiation. 
liul ihere is also a niu( h (leepei rcasoii lor (»ui 
indiflerence toward a inaii who, aflcr all, was 
one of thc central ligures in thc c iillmal lifc ol 
MoiciKc during the lirst half of thc (Miattto 
(cnto. I he iinporlaiKc of his role. h\ thc vvay, 
is clearK rellec ted in the long, aiid paillv legend 
ary. lisl of his (ollahoralois and Workshop ap 
prenliccs. In our own (la\ . that is to sav. (.hihcrli 
is ollen considered as beiiig loo i cattioiiarv an 
artist to deserve the sarne alteiilioii accorded to 
thc innovators of his gcneration. In the estiina- 
tion of maiu of our inodern sc holars, Gliiherli's 
relation to Donalello or hrunellcsc hi appears lo 
resemhle that of Masolino and Masaccio. 

While nol outrigh.lv rejc(ling ihis peculiarlv 
loj)side(l point of \ iew of a gcneration whose 
laste is no longer ihat of the Komaiilic ists and 
the Pre Raphaelites, Krauthcinicr justK cleplores 
the inadecpiacy of an approadi that is liarcily 
justified bv the art-historical fads as we liave 
ihem hefore us. lully aware ol thc preclomi- 
iianth (.otliic anc;estrv of Cibihcrti's stvic, he 
neverlheicss sees to it that nonc of llic progres- 
sive features of that style, howcvcM irrcgularlv 
and inconsislentl) employed, reinain imnoticed. 
It is precisely this coexistence of iwo cssentiallv 
incompat ihle Clements in Ghihcrti's art which 
he undertakes to define in his critical stndy. 

In an excellent c haj)ter on Ciliiherti and the 
rrccenlo, Krauthcinicr traces thc cjrifi;in of the 
sculjjtor's art to thc Sienesc inaiiiier of })ainting 
(as exhihited in the works of Aiiil^rogio I.oren- 
/elli rathcr than in those of the more suave 
Simone Martini) as well as to thc Iianco Fleni- 
ish hook illustrations in thc International Style. 
It is hv referring lo these Iwo sourccs that oiir 
aulhor explains the ■"melodious svvectness, the 
precise workinanship and thc precious rcline- 
menl" of (diiberli's carl\ st\le. as it appears on 
the North Door of thc Baptisterv. In the rclicds 
of the second door, on the ollier haiiil. anlicjne 
modeis arc more frecpienti) encüuntercd, and so 
arc certain adapiaiions of linear perspective and 
otlier scientific modcs of artistic construction. 
Yet cvcn in these (ialcs of Paradise— as .Michel 
angelo is said to ha\c cbrislcned tlieni— "figures 
alwavs form the hasis of design: scltings . . . are 
relegaled to the backgrouiid: cvery objcct is 
drawn with ulmost claritv; volumes rccede in a 
succession of planes witlujut intcrruption; sj)acc 
is infinite, terininated hy a gilded backdrop." In 
other words: Ghiherti nevcr aspired to be one 
of thc ncw sct. 

As for the ancient inodcls available to Ghi- 
herti on the sarcophagi tlicn to he sccn in thc 
diurches of Romc. Florenee and Pisa and in the 
small numher of anticpie scidpliiics known to 
thc carK Renaissance and parllv describcd in 
his Connnentürii, they appcar in the panels of 
the second door onlv lo "illustrate the iinagina- 
livcness and almost dangeroiis virtuositv with 
which Ghiherti . . . played on anlicpic ihciiics. 
I lom one anlicpic motivc he would devclop 
two, three or possihlv more variants. each retn- 
inisccnt of the original in one or two of its 
features, but never in all of ibem and ne\cr in 
the same wav." Henec the difliculh of cstahlisb 
ing the identity of any of these prototypes. None 
of thc known anticpics. for instance. can be 
idenlified as the exact inodcl for ific Isaac of 



ihe (ompelilion icdief; and \et il is perfedlv 
oh\ ioiis that su(h a model musi lia\e existed. 
ll is similai with the heautilulb poised figure 
ol Samsoii. whi(l) Krautheimei shows lo he re 
lated to a lleicules on the jambs ol the Porta 
dclbi Mandoibi, and whidi X'asari, in his undcr- 
standahK (ool \ ila ol (.hibeiti. singles out lor 
piaise in thc light ol its derivation liom just 
such lleicules protot\|)es. I hiis the liand iisf of 
anticpics wl)i(h the authoi has appended lo his 
inonograph i)eais the stainp of a preliminary 
(atalogue ol su( h works as cithcr appeared in 
the now lost libri stadial um of the artist or 
were owned las l,eo Planiscig. in another mono 
graph Oll (diibcili. suggcsls) hy (.hihcrli the 
(olleclor. 

In spite of the inaiiN repetilions which his 
nielhod forccs upon him, Professor Krautheim- 
er's ridilv illustiated and exhausii\clv docii- 
iiiented slud\ will do miah to dissolve the 
dicholomv of progressi\c' and reactionarv art 
which modern scholarshij) has hcen so especially 
lond ol apphing lo the iransitional period he- 
tweeii the .Middle Ages and the Renaissance 
proper. Ihc aulhor's maiii conlrihuiion. hcjw- 
ever, lies less in thc thoiough, not Icj sav pains- 
taking, evahiation (d documentai\ and stvlistic 
cvidciKc than in the darification of certain 
hilherlo neglectcd aspe( Is ol (.hiherli's art: in 
thc suhlle aiialvsis of ihe laiiious (.usmin pas- 
sage from thc aiilohiograph\ . in the discussion of 
inlhicnces and in the elucidation of certain trends 
imdcriving the seleclion of hiblical matcrial 
for thc Gates of Paradise (notahly thc Solomon 
and Sheba panel). lUit, as Professor Kraulhcimer 
himself is the first lo admil. mucli remains lo 
he done before we can delinilelv teil how inucli 
of (diiherli the man is (onlained in (.hihcrli thc 
arlist; lor unlike his ralioiialistic conlemporaries. 
(diiberti was cithcr uiiahle or uiiwilling to let 
Ins inlellecl interfere willi his art. 

III RICK WI ISSIFIN 



Abruhain Hatliier. Introdu< tion and Notes b\ 
Allen S. Weller. l'nivcrsitN ol Illinois Press. 

To roi'MFRAcr what he (alls "the dust, the 
acc umulations of maus negative ihinking, 
falling over all, the greal cloud of thick obcur 
isiii likc a diil\ Neil keeping out the light from 
iiiaiTs cNcs. mind. spiril," Abraham Raltner has 
cicaled the sMiibol of the W indow Cleaner. I bis 
is a lrans|)arent ligiire. worked out in inan\ 
drawings lo dilferenl degrecs of explic ilness, 
stretched against a glow of multicolored glass 
j)anes. 1 his. Raltner has said. is (iod, Clearing 
awas ihe dusi that obsciires mairs vision. Likc 
ihe Seekers, also in Rallner's iiuenled iconog 
rapliN. it is a conccplion that has original force. 
With tlieii mcdieval overtones of color, thc scries 
of Window (leaners and Seekers arc incist char 
acteristi( of Rallner's stvlistic synthesis which is 
deepb iii()ti\ated h\ a siiong tnxstiffne. 

Fxplosivc and une\en. thc nature of holh the 
st\listic s\nthcsis and thc nixstique is now more 
fullv acccssihle ihroiigh this porifolio. replete 
with iniiniatc sketdies. Made up (d' an iniro- 
diKtorv text l)\ \llen S. Weller, whidi is largeh 
a stilching togelhcr of Rallner's own fiagmen- 
larv vvritings, and twcnlv-four re|)rodnctions of 
the artist's work in porifolio. this pnblication 



39 



THE CLEANING «"J 
RESTORATION of 
PAINTINGS 



Whether your pictures require re- 
lining, re-stretching, restoration, or 
a simple cleaning and a coat of 
varnish, we are equipped to offer 
competent Service. 

Please feel free fo consu/f us. 



SPECIAL BOOK SKCIION 



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gallery 

746 MADISON AVE. 



PASCIN 



and tha 



SCHOOL 
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Through May 

PERLS CALLERIES 

1016 MADISON AVE., N. Y. C. 21 



Thru May 18 

MILTON AVERY GEORGE CONSTANT 
CARL HOLTY SIGMUND MENKES 

WALLACE PUTNAM JOHN VON WICHT 

MELTZER GALLERY 38 WEST 57 



ALEX CERUZZI 
MORTON HOLLINGER 



MAY 1-15 



PIETRANTONIO 26 E 84 

HniirK 11.00—5.30 or by Appn.ntmttnf 




CHAVE 



of Uruguay 

de Aenlle 



Paintings 



59 w 53 



SOCIETY OF 2nd 

YOUNG AMERICAN group 
ARTISTS SHOW 

April 28-May 19 
RIVERSIDE MUSEUM, Ri verside Dr. & 103 St., N. Y. C. 

Painfings 



WALTER 

KA 




YS 



BERTHA SCHAEFER • 32 E. 57 



is A ( InoiKilo^icil s(>l(-( t ion. lü.SO ^(i. lli;il dis 
|)(-ns('s will) l>i(>^);t|)lii(al intoriiKition and ((iiucn 
liaU's on llu' ailisls work. It rt'\r;ils ;i in;in who 
(Ines noi ix'licM' that "tcchnicil spcc iilalioiis," 
howt'M'i |)r()V()(ali\t'. aic cnou^li. i)iil uho is 
iiilcnsi'JN (oiut'iiU'd uilh tiiccndmin^ |)n\\tr of 
ilic (ladilional iij^iircs ol thc Old I (staiiicnt . 
and uho has ahsorhcd into liis slicain ol \isnal 
(<)ns( ionsncss {\\v (Inistian Images kll along 
ihc IrtMuh lands(a|)c. so tlial his |t'\visli hcri 
tage (oinhincs with a (•othii iniagination. All ot 
(IjIs cxpt'i itiKi'. in(lii(ling \t'ais of rcsidtiu c in 
Paris, iit's hcliind Ins ifsponst- to l\\v American 
landscapi' in tlie several iraNcIs recorded in 
(liawings on tliese paj'es. \\ hat sa\es ihis kiuiwl- 
edgeahle st\listi( \arietv of Rattni'i's from man 
nerism re\tals itself as tlie ahilitv to respond to 
a stene— to an idea— with nnahashed eiuluisiasm 
and fei Nor. 

I he \olnme Starts uith a network of mesmer- 
i/ed ink lines. Iloatiiig and rhvthmi(: Shdlos 
(WVM)). At the \erv earliest. Rattner seeins to 
ha\e \)CL\\ {oncerned to uineil an inner inten 
sitv rather than anv e\j)e(te(i (ontonrs in his 
lines. Along the American highwav. traxeling 
witli llenrv Miller, he |)oured a diarged giaj)hie 
\italit\ (and (onsiderahle \('ri)al forcc) into draw 
ings on ihe s(ene. In this eolledion the dilfer 
eines in approaili aie extreme: lunlx Mortiifii^ 
in \ru' York is a \erv |)ale sketdi with ha/v 
ink lines: Dik htowii, rcuncsscc, is intricateh 
worked. with dark hilis; and a third is no draw- 
ing at all l)ni entirelv (alligraj)h\— ac tnalK an 
ori<»inal poem spread o\er a map ol ihe easlern 
part of the l'nited States written in red and 
l)la(k: "W'hen we met again and were onee more 
together"— a doseh pat ked stripl of eadeiued. 
free llowinj> phrases. of praises to the land. and 
ol words that snalched Rallner's faney— "]>ea- 
nnts, skviine. Ahe Lintoln. (orn. diewing gum." 
Having no rlivme and no ol)\ ions reason, the 
words simj)lv retord tlie (onsc ionsness of a hnm- 
ming jonrnev in an old Bnick. and \i\idly re- 
create it— a (()nd)inati(>n jonrnal-poem and e\- 
periment in lavont. 

Althongh the Sandburgian poem rej)resents 
a tonr de force of graphie design in Rattner's 
own natnral penmanship, it is hy no means the 
onlv instante of his verhal |)lav; he is highly 
(()irs(ioiis of calligraplii( effeets, and oflen words 
are intorporated to ami)lifv a drawing. On tlie 
(over, tliere is a i'ropliet, eaiight in a hia/e of 
st'llow siin. whose eyes are alive with distovery 
and whose ihonght Rattner. at the hottom of 
the page. in his jagged way. has iised as a de- 
sign element. nnuh like the spiked outlines of 
the fa(e: "Ihe ri\ers. the monntains. the sky, 
the sea, the earth. air. the stinks. ))lanls. par- 
fnme of llowers the trees in the air in the soil. 
the aninuds. hirds. hugs. the fishes and every- 
thing (reated . . . («od exists." Ihe strong role 
of words is perhaps more than an idiosvncrasy 
in Rattner; their nse (onlirms the fael that his 
prima! nrge is indeed a symholie one. W'iliiam 
Blake, after all, (an he pointed to as a kindred 
spirit, intontroMit ihiv motivated as a mvstie 
desiring to make drawing and poetrv one image. 
Rattner. possihK. is not snfli(ientlv (oidirmed in 
this (lire(tion to inake the mosl of it. 

In |)ni(' drawing Rattner's spontaneons force 
(an stiain the \ery margins of the page in 
strength of contrast. Sonietimes highly delitale 
and detailed. as in the erosshatehed Fiii^iLvc in 
f'lanir ( H)r)2). hnt also lightniiig (pii(k. he nses 



40 



the pen like a stolding tongne in Christ Snr- 
yonudcii h\ Ihonis (ll).")!.') or. from K/ekiel Wl , 
Ml. Ihc \'(iU(\ of I))\ /iotics, in a (low of 
jagged streaks. Ihree reprocha t ions ol oils are 
also indnded. I luv are e\i(leiue of Rattner's 
snperl) (oloi sense. and. of the ones (hosen, two 
hear ont the same religions spirit as the draw- 
ings. Ihe paintings are dcarly |)atterni'd from 
stained glass in their ridiness and in the reli 
ante npon a paneied (oherentt'— A/o.svs and Job 
parti( niarlv: Coni/xtsition irith OhI Shors, Xo. 
2. is looser and. in its inipointetl ahstrat tion, 
more of a tolor extra\agan/a. (hiile the oppo 
siie of the ink tlrawings. whith are at their best 
harsh and trilital. Rattner's svmpht)nie ridies 
of tolor attnally ontshine (and sonietimes nnitl- 
dle) the meaning he wishes to tonvev. An ex- 
t rennst, he has a tendentv to overdo too the 
lignre with stretthed or twisted arms; hnt even 
as the theine hetomes repetitions. he seems to 
ha\e the passion to deal with it persistentiv, to 
seek \ariety— alheit. sonietimes, without hiillitieiit 
tiarilv of pnrj)ose. 

lo retogni/e that the ingredients of Rattner's 
ait ritassoestpie form (lestin(tion. Romanestpie 
lignial distortions and traditional religions 
theines— are readih iiitelligihle and honiid to 
he j)oj)nlar in oni s\ nihol-hnngiv limes is not 
to dispaiage thein. Rattner's Images are \iolent, 
toitnred and exhilarating all al the same time, 
and. siiue they happeii to hear witiiess to tlie 
(ondition of man's religions sense in an environ- 
ment hostile to it. they are as exaet as they are 
erratit. As snth, ihev ha\e their momeiit as a 
gennine tontempoiary witness, and it is litting 
that Rattner's exjdosi\e gropings for a visioii — 
and ottasional flashes— and his large sense of 
landstape— are availahle in this et)mprehensive 
monograph form; tlie tolor reprodiution is es- 
peeially heantifnl. In tlimensions appioximatelv 
seNtnteen hv thirteen indies. this is a generons 
and nnnsnal pnhiishing \entnre in the United 
States— to imest so liea\ily in the works of a 
tontemporary artist. Fortnnatelv, Rattner has 
the snhstante for it, so the voluine inay set a 
|)re(edeiit. Tor laking the risk, the University 
of Illinois Press is to he (ommendetl. 

Sl'ZANM. lURRFV 



Modern Japanese l'rints b\ Ohx'er Stniier. 
Charles F.. Iiittle (lompaiu. ST. .')(). 

Ol IMK Si xii.iR. like so maiiy t)tlier soldiers of 
the Ameiitan Arni) of Ocenpation, heeame 
attrattetl to aiitl e\eiitiially tlee[)ly itlentilied 
with Japanese life aiitl tnitnre. He is ])rol)al)l\ 
the leading tolleetor of modern Japanese artist- 
exet nteti wood hiotk piints. He has written what 
is pia(ti(ally a hiographieal dittionary and en- 
tvtlopedia of the art. from its hegiiming at the 
end of the last eentnry to the preseiit. Manv 
Wt'sterneis are familiär with the modern ailisan 
prints. an onlgrowth of lratlitit)nal ukixoyc, tle- 
signetl hv artists like Hasni Kawase, Shinsni Ito 
and the eider ^'oshida. Ihev are deeorative, 
(ommertial. often sentimental, and of nt) great 
artistit importaiue. W hen Shiko Mnnakata won 
a (irst pri/e for artist-exeented wood-hlot k prints 
(the Japanese eall thein sosalm h(nii>^(i. "treative 
prints") at Säo l'anlo in H).').') and was featnred 
in a l SIS film, mtniern Japanese prints hetame 
World famons. Ihe (reati\e prinl is attnally a 



ARTS/.\/^/v A^^5 



p/ 



Western innovatioii. Ihe traditional print was 
onlv sketdieil and snpei\ised |)\ tht- artist. At 
the end of the last (enUn\ Japanese artists stndy- 
ing abroad distovered that Western ait was 
deepK iiiMnenttd bv ii/u\(>yr, and that. nnder 
Ihe mistaken noiion ihat lh(\ were artisi e\ 
etuted.a whole mo\t'menl of (leative wood bNu k 
had giown np. Not lo be oiitdone by their ind 
lalois. they too took np llie medium. Ihe fonnd- 
eis of the movement, and still amongst the best 
artists. are Kanae ^'amamoto. iniul) inlhiemed 
bv artists like MiiikIi and (..ingnin (imloiln 
naielv iiol bv the lader's wotuh nts). Koshiio 
Ondii. originally a laiue ailist and after the 
Se(on(l World \\'ar a de(orati\t' ahstrat tionist, 
and l'nithi lliralsnka, the most Japanese of the 
three lo Western eyes, greallv indebled lo the 
theap popnlar blatk and white linddhisi prints 
(»f both China and Japan ( I lie nearest parallel 
in the W fst is the "hob pic Iure " of the Mexiran 
peasantrN.) Ihese ihree artists. or anvwav Ihese 
Ihree tendtncies. still ulominate ihe (ield t(Mla\. 
I Ihis Saito and Shinagawa owe mndi to Ondii. 
Munakata to I liiatsnka. and iheie is a host of 
innre or less (le(()ral ixe. more or less eoinen 
liniial the tointntinn being a pretlided blenti 
ot Art Xnnvean, I-ame and Xabi stxles of the 
nineties and nineteeii himtlreds in the West — 
artists xvliose xvork is inexitablx populär. I do 
not think this latter t lass important. After all, 
there are thonsands npon thousands of tommer- 
( iai artists and ilhisiralors in the West whose work 
is tpiile as good — indisiingnisiiable. in hitt. I he 
detoratixf t ubism of the sdiool of Ondii is. again, 
too light. too (le(()ralixe. to tairv nnuh weiglil. 
Ihe stluud of lliralsnka. Mmiakala, Kaxva 
kann". A/etlii. Shimo/axva. Maeda and olliers is 
anotlier matter. 1 knoxv noihing exasperates the 
modern |a|)anese wriler or artist moit- than lo 
be told that he .shonid not imitale the West hnt 
stick to his own Iradilion. Siidi adxice has a 
drcadfnl somid of |)alioni/ing (hanxinism abont 
it. Nevertheless the adxice tarries xveight. \t)th- 
ing shoxvs this more than the taprit ionsness of 
tlie non-Ott idenlaTs taste in Western arl. A\ hen 
as great an artist as Mnnakata saxs that his 
faxorite painteis; are \'an (.ogh and Tiixis tie 
Chaxannes. one tan onlv be thankfui that he 
early retnrned to arlistic traditions w Iure he 
coiild be trnix oriented. I am not. I shonid 
confess. a passionate admirer of the wooticnt. 
as snth. xvhoexer tloes it. I think it is, bx and 
large, a linitkx medinni xvilh limitetl scope and 
siiperütial ap|)eal. and shoxvs iip best xvlieii it 
tloes not haxe lo carry the whole bnrden of 
eslhetit salisfat tion— as book ilhistration. Ihere 
is t)iie Ja|)anese artist xvlio in a sense prints from 
xvootl blotks. xvho xvorks with old barrel tops. 
xvorn-ont tlogs. tarpenters' straps. saxvn and 
planed seitions of rotten xvood. and who has 
doiie a lexv attual xvot)tlt iits— Sabio Ilastgawa. 
He is one of the fexv artists of xvorld importance 
in modern |aj)an, and he is missing from this 
book, as are st)me others xvho do not fit Olixer 
Statler's somexvhat (onxenlional taste. I bis is a 
pity. Anxxvay. heie is a lavishlv illnstrated gnide 
to the modern Japanese wooddit. Ihere are one 
Inindred plates. fonrteen in tolor. and a (olor 
xvootUnt as front isjiiete, aiitl in the text, por- 
traits of all the artists. On ihe xvhole it makes 
abont as good a slioxving as the best exhibition 
of xvoodtnts xou might enct)nnter anxxvhere in 
the West. 

KENNKIH RKXROIH 



•// 



there's an 
art to 
scratching 



THArS HOW FINE ENGRAVINGS ARE MADE. 



Our appreciation of this art of scratching and 
etching is proven by the quality with which we 
reproduce all fine engravings. 



And our quality of printing extends to allied 
fields, too — all coordinated under one roof, for 
quicker, more efficient service to the customer. 



• typography 

• prinfing 

• binding 

• electrofyping 

• plasfic plotes 

• mats 

• Stereotyping 




>vi:sti:rn 
ni:>vsi>api<:r 

^^ ^ ^ ^V >r^ ^ PRINTERS OF ARTS. 



A. L. RAMSAY. MANAGER, 
310 E. 45. N. Y. 17 
MU 9-47O0 







I 



Photos hy Charles ITht 



Mexico (probahly Southern Vera Cruz), jaguar, ühnee Style {500 B.C.-300 A.D.). 



42 



ARTS/Afr/v /05; 



MONTH IN REVIEW 

BY HILTON KRAMER 

IDi AS lathci instiimioMs. but at thc inoiiient ol birth llic 
ollspiiiii; may not bc iiimu'diatt'iy recogni/able. The \Iu- 
sciiin ol Primitive Art which lias recently opencd in New 
Volk, uitb Robert (ioldwater as acting director, would seeni 
al first j^lancc to Iiave little to do witli the idea ol primitiv isiii 
to \vhi(h artists lialf a Century a^o were so passionately (oin- 
niitted. Mere the <^alleries are thi( k-(arpeted and tbe objeets 
are handsomely spotliji^hted. An element ot ehic; is present. 
rbe \isnal lan^iia,<»e of modern interior design insinnates 
itsell eNtryvvliere. One almf)st expects to liear nuisi( piped 
into tliese elegant t^alleries. Notliing, it seenis. (ould be more 
reniote Irom tliat (omniitment to a Ireer, unl)ri(lled expres- 
si\eness wlii(h diarac teri/ed the artists' interest in, and eniula- 
tion ol, works ol primitive art filty years ago. \'et that com- 
niitment lias prodiaed this nuiseuni whose exhibits are now 
coiisidered as pure esthetic Statements. 1 he sott-carpeted 
atinosphere is simply one ol those interestin^ period irrele- 
van(ies— o?/r period irrelevaiuy— whicii will soon (if not al- 
ready?) look as dated as those laded photoj^raphs of the salons 
in whidi j)i(tures were lum«^ in tiers with scarcely any breath- 
in.g Space iroiii Irame to tranie. It speaks more to the social 
historian ol the lutiire ahout the class taste whidi Sponsors 
our art irrstitutions than to the observer interested in art here 
and now. 

J he \irtiies of this new settins^ are obvious; they all add 
up to the lad that one's attention (an h)c us straightway on 
the objett, and so lor the niost part we can lorget about 
the (hi(. (For the niost part, but not entirely. It has a certain 
esthetie role to play, about which I shall comment in a 
moment.) Moreover, one's attention is generously rewarded 
by the selection ot objeets which Dr. (ioldwater has presented 
for our enjoynient in this first exhibition. Dr. Goldwater is 
well knowii as a critic, and this selection is an admirable 
viiidication of his critical jucigment. Drawing largely upon the 
(ollection of Nelson A. Rockefeller, which fonns the l)asis of 
the new inuseum, and also from gifts by other notable col- 
lectors, he has placed on view a modest number of objeets 
whose variety, subtlety and complexity speak eloquently of 
that enormous ränge of artistic expression we condescend to 
call "primitive." 

\\1iat is most impressive about this exhibition is precisely 
its ränge of feeling. I he demonic. the violent, the erotic, the 
most bi/arre and the most classical as well as the subtlest 
degrees of sensibility-all are exhibited in the works on view 
here. Kar more striking than any connnon deiumiinator ot 
form or craft or cultural origin is the staggering abundance 
of artisti( ideas, and the vitality which marks the execution 
of nearly every piece. It shatters even some very sophisticated 
assumptions about the meaning of what is "primitive"; for 
this writer, at least, it shatters the term itself-it should no 
longer be applied to so many kinds of art. however (pialitied 
or vague or surrounded by equivocations. One is suddeidy 
a[>palied to realize that instead of telling us anything, it only 
masks our igiiorance. It is a subterfuge for our incomplete 
knowledge. It reniinds us ot the extent to which our con- 
ception of history has locked out some of the most brilliant 
civili/ations of the past. It underscores the imperiousness of 
our Western sensibilities. and exposes a kind of historical 
pr<)\ in( ialism. 

Tin ränge ot this first exhibition at the Museum of Primitive 
Art has beeil deliberate. of course. Dr. Goldwater remarks 
in his briet introduction to the catalogue that "paradoxically. 
the unifying theme of this exhibition is the diversity of the 
works that comprise it. Its stress is upon their immense variety 
of subject, of form and of expression." Coiisider two works 
induded in this "inunense variety": the large stone Jaguar 
from Mexico, dat (1 .^00 B.C.-.^OO A.D.. identified in origin as 



Polynesia, Easter Island, cERFMONrvi rvDDrr iuiueteentJi Century.^) 



43 



MONTH IN REVIEW 




Aboxfe: Costa Rica Highlands. FXKinioNF.R (11)00-1500 A.D.); riglit. 
Central Mexico, rai n isnakk, Aztec {1325-1520 A.D.). 



"|)r()l).il)l\ Soutlicm Wia du/: ()lin(( Sulc." ;i iiri il\iii<» 
si ul|>(iir.ij iin;i,i;c in ixciy iispcc t ol ils ( ()imKn;ni( t-its impos 
iiijL; iiKiss. iiN (li'm()iii(, liollovvcd (;i\iii(s loi cms, ilic jau .iiid 
moiitli and tctih ailiculatcd witli a lumiblv t'xad stnsc ol 
tlu'ii (;ij)a(ity to dcslroy, tlic wliolc < onc cj)! ioii spcakini; to 
oiir t'NC's ol a |)rolound. uiinu'diatcd. \)\\\\v i\\\v\{\ wliidi cvc ii 
ilic passai'C' ol liinc ^iiid thc vvcatlu riiii; ol tlic clcnK'Mls haxc 
not ht'tn ai)l(' to alicNialc; and tlun thc i*ol\n('si;m Ccrcfiionidl 
I*(i(l(llc ifi wood hoin Kastei Island, datfd unccitaiidv as ol 
llu' niiu'icciuh (cntury, a work ol tlu' niost «^lacious and 
dciicatc silhouc'tti' wliosc synnnctric al Mal mass is lasiiioncd in 
(UiM'd shapcs tlu' dcsi^n ol uhicli dtnotts an ini^cinions 
Clexane (' ol sj)iiit. Ilic vora( ious cruiitN ol oiic iind dir 
('\(juisitc' st'nsibilitv ol tlic otlici rcvcal dillcrciucs ol icin- 
pciaincnt wliicli inock llicir (oninion dcsi<>nation as "j>riiiii- 
ti\c." And as onc takcs stock ol tliis \aiictv. thc inockcrv 
bcconics inoic insislcnt. Tiicrc is thc tniious wood s(ulptiirc 
of a Motlicr Xnr.sing Cliild Iroiii thc ^'orul);^s ol Xiji^cria. 
Its cycs arc likc sonict!iin|L; in a dcpartiiicnt stoic (^hristnias 
doli: Icss \acant pcrhaps but no Jcss banal. It looks— as alinost 
nothini» eise iicrc docs— a bit aiiiatcm. I hcrc is a l^hiDi lladui 
Iroin \'cra Cni/— bliint, austcrc, prcc isc, uttcrly (old but com 
pcllini; in its stark ininicdiacv. Onc is rclic\('d to turn froiii it 
to an objcct which admits tlic eye niorc liospiiablv. And in 
tliis category none is more cngagini» than thc stone fnjwts 
Hcad ot Celtic origin in Fraiue (louitli (cniury B.C^.). a 
inagnirKcntly (arvcd hcad with tvvo lads. cadi ociupving onlv 
a sniall part of thc stonc mass, ea( h with its Icaturcs carvcd 
into thc stonc in bcautilul. simple loinis. I hcrc is not hing 
really dciicatc in this hcad (cxccpt possibh thc "linc" drawn 
by onc's eye aroiuul the Silhouette ol thc wholc mass Ironi 
some threc-quarter views). yet its over-all imagery sj^eaks lor 
an artistic integrity of a kind we associate in oiu' time with 
a delicaty of vision. 

Iherc arc many more notable exhibits than one can name 
hcrc. but I should point to sevcral others: thc Exccutioucr 
Irom the Costa Rica Mighlands (l()()0-ir)(M) A.D.): i\\c Aricestral 
Fiiiurr from Easter Island; the verv fine Kficrlinu; Man froni 
the MississipjM Valley in rennessee; the \iolent Double Ox 




I 









l'oly ncsia, Ea.ster Lslaiul^ ancisiral 
LRT, ilair ninctecfith (rnlun.^). 



IC- 



Mexico. Vera Cruz. i'Aimaii sionk. Idj'ni Style, 
(600-0()(f A.D.). 



Africa. Cameroon Cwrasalanth. c i i<i mo 
MAI. Hl AI), iiiinelreiil/i < rtilmM' ). 



< 



I 



44 



ARTS/Mfl>' 1957 



llead I lebnet-Mdsk from thc Sudan; thc Ceretnouial Hcad 
from thc C-amcroon (.rasslands, a work (in wood) to wiiich 
tiiiic has gi\c'n. more ob\ iously than elsewhere, a ravaged and 
decayed countenanee to what must have been cleanly articu- 
latcd features in its original state; and thc stunning Aztec 
Knttlesnake (1325-1.51^0 A.D.). 

What all of tlicsc works ha\c in common is thcir "other- 
ness" from the art of Western lüiropeaii and modern Amer- 
ican culture. lo that extent the designation of "primitive" 
inarks a usclul linc of Separation. We are so used to making 
critical distinctions aniong works in our owii tradition, and 
so used to regarding that tradition as a richly heterogeneous 
abundance of unic|iie works and radical artistic ideas, tliat 
an cxhibition likc this at the Museum ol Primitive Art has 
the elfect of underscoring an aimost oppressive samencss in 
the works of art we are most used to admiring. Ihey seem 
to be so fussy with personal claims. 1 hey seem to dwcll so 
cndlcsslv on nuances of fecling. on rclincmcnts ol style which 
are rehnements of ideas and emblems of personal, soniclimes 
heroic, ambition. I remember die shock I feit on lirst secing 
thc Arensberg Collection in Philadelphia a fcw vears ago: 
the Prc-Columbian works asserted sucli a brüte power that 
lor a whilc cverything in that da/zling collection of twentieth- 
(cntury art seemed to look the sainc. It was oiily through an 
effort of will that one w^as finallv ai)le to "see" thc modern 
works at all. ^ et such rcfinciiicnts and nuances form the 
natural habitat of our seiisibilities. They are the onlv lan- 
guage in which our artistic instincts can impress thcmsclves 
with meaning on our waking consciousness. riie cjuality which 
I have called "oihcrness" in primitive art separates it ulti- 
matcly from our fundamental conccrns, so that it can never, 
I bclicve, assume a role ecjual to the works of our own c ulturc 
and tradition, whatever romanccs-litcrary. aiitiiropological or 
estlictic— we niay fabricate to thc contrary. 

It is in the ellort to disguise aiicl domesticatc this othcrncss 
that the manner of exhibition takcs on an estlictic lunction. 
a rather dubious function I think. l'he elemciit ol chic in ihc 
presentation robs these primitive objccts of scmiic of thcir 
lorcc and power. It makes out of thcni a kind of adjunct to 
onr taste. Thc Olmec Jaguar on its Braue usistvlc pcdcstal 
is a brilliant display idea: it reveals a mind well stoc ked with 
thc h)rnial vocabulary of twentieth-century sculpturc. But ii 
has the eftect of reducing its capacity to impose itself on us. 
rhe samc is true of thc handsome blue background and 
special lighting provided the Ceremurüal Paddle from Kaster 
Island. Its artistic po^Mcr is inevitably niitigated by this ellort 
to place it entirely in our hands. 

Morcover, it is not onlv this blankct othcrncss of spirit 



which i^ domesticated hcrc; it is tlu ultim.itc Separation ol 
many ol these works from c.ic h oilicr which is glosscd ovcr 
as well. Regardless of thcir time and place ol origin or ol 
thcir disparate levels of intensity, diey are all dissohcd into 
a spectacle of thc 'primitive." transformed into a cocfhcient 
of our current intcrests, wliere in actuality they rcpresent 
many discretc traditions. Thc assumption of this cxhibition 
is that this disc retencss inattcrs Icss than a gencral survc\ 
of what may be said to constitute thc 'primitive" in art. It is 
this assumption which relates thc ncw muscum direc tly to thc 
interest in primitive art by modern artists at thc turn ol the 
Century, for thcir interest too was in annexing primitixc 
objccts to thcir own conccrns and not in confronting tlicm 
as artistic Statements in thcir own right, not in secing the 
thiiiLi-in-itsclf. But half a centurv latcr thc confii^uration 
cluingcs to some degrec. Fhc intcrests of a muscum arc not 
nccessarily thc intcrests of artists, even though thc muscums 
are now cjuick to assimilatc thc taste (if not .ilvvavs thc \alucs) 
of thc artists. Whcreas the artists invokcd thc primitive as ;i 
\ital counter dement to what they considered dcacl in our 
own culture, the museimi adjusts the |)rimitive (insolar as it 
call) to the taste of our time. It ccjualizcs what might better 
have remaincd an unccjual cxpcricnce. We all derixc some 
plcasurc from it. and this neu muscum promises to bc a 
distinguishcd xchiclc lor this plcasurc. but .dl thc samc onc 
has a nagging suspi' ion that some \ital part ol thc cxpcricnce 
has been sacrilucd in ihc process. 



The llüli(ni sculjytor 
Man zu '> haviuir his 
first one-nuni exhihition 
in \eu> York tliis nmnlh 
qt World House (.(d- 
leries (Af»il 2I-Ma\ IS). 
It will !><■ (liscw^sed in 
this dejuntineut tn\t 
tnouth toiiether with thc 
work of (tfiother llalitni 
seulf>tor. Mirko, show- 
ifi;j^ at the Catherine 
l'i^'itnio (iailerx iMtn 
/y-juue 1 '^ ). At r/i;///; 
.\ laaz Ü 's CARD! N A I r / '> ^ ^ ), 
'// WOrld House. 





45 



European and American 

DRAWINGS 



May 7-June 14 



HARTLEY 

Landscapes and Still-Lifes 

May 14-June 14 

32 East 69th St., N. Y. / 



WELLONS GALLERY 

+o 8 pm 17 E. 64 ST. 



VINCENT 

GLINSKY 



SCULPTURE • May 6-18 



PAULETTE 

COHEN 



OILS • May 20 June 1 



GALLERY 32 E 65 



JACK LEVINE 



S H O L A M 



FARBER 

New Pointings • to Moy 1 1 

HARRY SALPETER GALLERY 

—— 42 EAST 57 ST., N. Y. ^— ^^— 



RAYMOND 



Thru May 18 




I N TZ 

REHN GALLERY 

683 Fiflh Ave. (near 54th St.) 



-^ PAINTINGS BY 




'j^ ALEXANDER 


3f 


KING 




* MAY 6-18 




* CHASE GALLERY 


W 
* 


T Now At New Locatlon: 


4- 


i 29 East 64 St. LE 5-3991 


3^ 



Special Discount to 
Those Under Anolysis 



Q..r3 



BLONDELLE FRAMES 

153 WEST 56 STREET 



MARGARET BREUNING H'rites 



Thr o^roults (hat h/ootn in t/ic .s/>r/>/i^ . . . DornuniilVs tnnstcrh fK)rh<iils . . . llie Sanlo/naso 
prcmit'ic* . . . Pusciii atul tfic Sc/iool oj Paris . . . Sholam luirher's shiufKli fidelily . . . 



i\\ llic 1)1 fach li aiul siircty of thr (Icsijj^ns and 
in llic .scnsitixe selcctioii of tolor tlial accords 
willi inood and tcinpcraiiu'nl. Mortovci, slic 
lias diawn on a varicty of rcsources to ()l)!aiii 
a widc gainnl of cxprcssiNc rlfects. Al ciincs 
llu* liguic's st't'iii to l)C incr^cd in a fusion of 
(oloi in vixidiicss of sj)atial cxistciuc. Wi 
alwavs tluTc is prcrision of structurc, willi 
inany .suhtk'tics of liandlinj;. I hc aitist pos 
scssc's a gift of pro\()(ati\c' ai rangtiiu'nls foi 
\]vv sitters. anangtiiunts diii' iiol to (apritc. 
hui to a (orRspoiidcMuc with indivithial 
liails. Hoys and girls arc oftcn difliciilt sni) 
jc'cts for i"lfi'(ti\c portrailinv, hut shc cap- 
imcs thf frtshncss and cliarni of adolcstcnte 
uith no tingc* of scntiincntahtv. In this dis- 
tinji^uished groiip theic is no chstcinihlc hct- 
tcr or hcst, yct special nicntion inust hc niadr 
of the tMigapfing |)ortrait of Judith Dupont: 
of thc spiiitcd picsintincnt of tvvo lads, Mih's 
and Edward \rxrniaTi: of the sninining up of 
teniperanunt and pcisonalilv in the poitiait 
of Mr. Ccrald Cidwilz. llungarian l)\ hirth, 
Olga DoiMKnuh lias long resided and |)ainted 
in l'aiis. She lias held exliihitions prcvionslv 
in this countrv, hut this is her only one extlu- 
sivelv of portiaits. (Portraits. Inc., Mareh 
20- April ü.) 

0.\NTOMASC), a W'iietian artist who has re- 
^ ceived vvide acclaini in Italy, is now liold- 
ing his lirst exhihition in this (ountry, con- 
sisting niainly of landscapes on vast can- 
vases— the si/e so nuich in vogue with con- 
teniporarv ])ainters. He is, however, ahle to 
Cover these large areas with coherent if com 
plex designs. con\eying sensitive response to 
Visual experience. It woidd he idle to expect 
these personal translations of things seen to 
conforni to ordinary normal vision, for tfiey are 
hoth emotional and cerehral iniages evoked 
through the aitist's sensihilitv in intricatelv 
disposed planes and scintillating color. While 
the spontaneitv of these free-flowing designs 
is apparent, there is also an ohvious inipres- 
sion of the intelligente that has controlled 
theni; thev have passed through the alemhic 
of the artist's imagination into a new. com- 
pelling interpretation of realitv. principallv 
l)ecause of their color. Ihey recall Van (iogh's 




Olga Dormaiuli, i-ktkr (iidwiiz; al Portraits, Inc. 



A N iNFAi.i lui.i harlMuger of spring, inore 
-^^^ reliahle than weather reports. is the group 
show. (iroup showings possess a special ap- 
peal. ft)r the artists' works ohtain an aug- 
inented interest hv jnxtaposition. The current 
show at the .Man (iallery comprises only new 
works. not random selections from the stock 
room. In the sculpture di\ision. Calalonia, l)y 
Oliver Andrews, with its tremulous pendants 
like an excpiisite filigree, is a decided con- 
trast with tliis artist's soliditv of form in 
licad and the figure Speak, tfieir diversity 
revealing etpially fine craftstnanship. The 
hronze RccUninir Figure hy Jack Squier is an 
imaginative conception admirahly realized; 
his Arcli is developed in imposing architec- 
inral proportions. An alahaster Head hy Wil- 
liam King, a coinhination of sound structure 
and delicate inodeling, is a distinctively im- 
pressive piece; and his self-portrait in gayly 
painted wood, an amnsing tra\esty of por- 
traiture. William Brice's three oil studies of 
Figure in Landsrapc present suhtle diver- 
genccs in the placing of a nude figure in its 
setting in richness of color and textures. Burn- 
Ont, hy C'arroll Cloar, tempera on gesso, de- 
picts the tragic aftermath of a fire with piled- 
up dehris and skeletal forms, hut these details 
are skillfully suhordinated to hreadth of de- 
sign. Robert Knipschild's Coast Road is not 
so much a description of a scene as its syn- 
Lhesis in tenuous color and impalpal)le forms. 
Iwo industrial scenes hy Easton Prihhle pos- 
sess excellent relevance of intricate detail; his 
Apple 'Free shows a gigantic volmne of pro- 
liferating foliage, the heavy Icafage Struck 
out in |)atterns of light and shade. Charles 
Oscars Inferior witii Figures, held to an 
elfective conceniration of focal interest, and 
his idyllic Pastoral are induded with a sur- 
prising, realistic painling of feet, entitled 
Flight. (Alan, April ir)MaN 4.) 

TT'mi.rinc. the exhihition of portraits hy Olga 
'-^ Dormandi is like Coming unohserved upon 
a group of delightful |)eople, so naturally 
and spontaneously are the sitters presented 
in apparently unposed, characteristic atti- 
tudes. Ihe artist has done more than secure 
realistic likenesses in her portraiture, for ges- 
tures seem conditioned hy a mental and emo- 
tional compulsion. It is as though she has 
seized a single critical moment in the flux of 
individiial life that reveals the mystery of 
Personality. Finished craftsmanship is shown 




/«:..n-:..... <« 



Giuseppe Saniomaso, rHK rivkr; at lior- 
geflieht Gallery. 



I 



I 



46 



ARTS/A/«)' /"'; 



(ontention liial "C-olor in itself sa\s some- 
iliing,' for it is color that gives these canvases 
iheir vitality, .Vmong the paintiiigs that made 
especial appeal is Metnory of a Walk, a po- 
eti( , nostalgic vision of past experience, in 
linelv adjusted color planes. Also outstanding 
is inffiiiet .■iatunni, ils modulalions of glow- 
ing hues revealing hoth sensiiousness and 
deep inlelligence. 1 he smaller gouaches seem 
to evidence that large areas are not needed 
for fidl expression of a lyrical idea; they pre- 
sent the saine vivid metasiasis of visual expe- 
rience Mornifig achieves an almost cosmic 
eüec t through its white cloud masses and 
dee|) shadows. (Borgenicht, .\|)ril 1!2-Ma\ IH.) 

A N I XMMurio.N of oils and uatercolors hy 
■^^ jides l'ascin hears witness to his gifts, 
gifls so distinctive that they nced no signa- 
tuif for their at trihution— a fact which ac- 
counts for the failure of his would-he imi- 
(ators, I he suhjecis are usually nude. sensu- 
ous women, the forms defined hoth with 
precision and suhtlety of detail, the defining 
lines so llowing and delicate that details 
never hecome insislent. Ihe figiues are en- 
veloped in a luminous atmos[)heric cpiality, 
not of our familiär world, hut of a seductive, 
inescapahle lyrical essence. I he rliythmic con- 
linuity of their forms in lluent sequence of 
planes, creating hodily solidity, niight sug- 
gest sculptural modeling. hut they are too 
vihranllv alive for sculpture, the tension he- 
tween contours iniparting vitality, the caress- 
ing touch of the hrush endowing them with 
warmth of Mesh. Kach plane holds its place 
consistently with all olhers. Color is not l)ril- 
liant; fusing with light, it echoes the notes 
of hits of cirapery and hackground setting. 
Girl with liottle is one of the many canvases 
that illustrate the felicitous placing of a figure 
in spatial design. A gallery of watercolors dis- 
plays another fac:et of this artist's work. 1 hey 
are maiidy an efiective shorthand in linear 
patterns, silhouetted against pale grounds rep- 
resenting figures and laiidscape in an impetu- 
ous joie de x'ix're of movement. Even when 
forms are clearly defined in evanescent hues, 
as in Cavalier du desert, they are swept through 
the paper in a rush of motioii. In the last 
gallery of this exhihition a group of the art- 
ists of the School of Paris, the modern old 
masters, with whom Pascin was long and 
closely associated, forms an inipiessive show- 
ing hy itself. (Perls Gallery. April 15-May 18.) 

Quoi.AM Eariur is an artist who appears un- 
^ concerned with any modish contenipo- 
rary divergences of art expression; having 
developed his own ideology, he staune hly 
continues to employ it. His recent painting 
reveals an increased ainplitude of scope, an 
added surety of touch, hut it remains phrasecl 
in his personal idiom. He paints figures of 
almost massive projiortions. so solidly niod- 
cled, so relevant of gesture, that they i)ecome 
endowed with latent animation; his usual 
Palette of low earth colors develops the real- 
ism of their llesh textures. Ihey do not sug- 
gest synd)olism or fantasy, hut the vigor of 
powerful forms. A group. seated hy the edge 
of a pool. cnveloped in a inurky red. dis- 
plays his ahility to sustain an impressive spa- 
tial design, the attitudes of the figures rele- 
vant to the totality of composition. Fhe Blue 
lied, an interior scene, its figures adroitly 
disposed in a closed-in design, is another ex- 
ample of his suhtle handling of space. Per- 
sonal predilection chooses sMaking the lied; 
two huge forms, with hacks toward the viewer, 
are presented with such vitality of muscular 
co-ordination in their hending figures that 
thev hecome convincingly alive. (Salpeter, 
April 22-May 11.) 



Ancient Art of the New World 

GOLD AND JADE OBJECTS 
FROM MIDDLE AMERICA 

Ist TO 14th CHNTURIES A.D. 

through May I H 

MARTIN WIDDIFIELD GALLERY 

8 18 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK 



Exhibitions 



. 



JOHX HELIKER 

pmnlinyis • to May 1 1 

14 PAIi\Ti:R-PRI.\T>IAKI^R^ 

May 20'Janp 7 

KRAUSHAAR GALLERIES 

1055 MADISON AVE. (comer of 80th St.) N . Y . 



r 



> 



GORDON RUSSELL 



DURLACHER BROTHERS, 11 EAST 57 STREET, NEW YORK 

LACHMAN 



MAY 1-18 



1 E. 57 ST. HflmmERGRLLERIES new york 



NEWHOUSE GALLERIES 



INC. 
Established 1878 



Fine Paintings 



15 EAST 57th STREET 



NEW YORK 



47 



IN THE GALLERIES 



Trrml!* in \^ ah'rrolors Todav, Ilaiv und l .S. : 

(.cncial impRssions. sim|)Iilif(l: oiu' of ihr inosi 
<*X(inn<5; cNliihil ions ot (oiilcinpoiaiA ai I im 
a^inahlr (11.'» paiiiltrs. ^ITA picliiirs. scicc icd 
sinj^U'handcdlv in Iial\ ami Aiiu'iica hv (ohii 
Gordon. Ur(K)kl\n\ (inator oi paiiuin^s aiul 
sculptiiic); watt'Koloi iio longcr a restridixc 
medium, if i( was cvcr lliouglu so. Witliin llu* 
doniain ol Aimiican abstiad painiing, cMiciiu' 
or modt'ralc. thrsi- airrsi ihc eye by priniarily 
forceiul mcaiis: Cicero, (.iierrero, Hultherg, 
Kierd)iis(li and Ronald; diese appeal bv attrac- 
tive texluies oi tomposiiion or tlirough coii- 
(cpu'ons reacblv grasped: Borgenicbt, Frasconi, 
■Miubell. Olds. I am. Ihon; others, having sub- 
llelv ol means not instanllv apparent. vvliose 
value iiureases alter llie seeond look, inclnde 
U.nuei. D' Arisia. (.ra\es. Hartigan. Heliker. Keen, 
I.nnden. Shaw and Weber. I hen liiere are ihose 
who liase delmed tlieir sid)jeet wilh such puritv 
as to assure \on. l)e\ond vom dist rimination of 
technicpies or the momenlar\ (|ni(kening of vonr 
pulse, thal wliat thev've distilled from tlie tissue 
of a[)pearan(es has a \ivid relationship to all 
forms whi(h are ihe images of our sense of life: 
Averv, Uurdilield. IVterdi and Selirag. Ihat 
sense an i mal es progressiNc Italian painlers, vital- 
ly oc(U[)ied in workinj» through "<istratto-con- 
rrrto" lo re (reale tlu'ir own idionis in terms 
uhidi will reiiounce ihe \esiiges of l'uturist, 
Siirrealisi. C.onstnu tivist or Parisian Intimist 
niodes. I lieir Version ol ihe subjectixe move- 
meiil wliidi has arisen for this purpose univer- 
salis, and iiH Indes ihe so-callcd action painting 
of ihe l S.. is inhiiiieU rieh in chromaiic values, 
more mellowed in tone and (onteixcd witb 
uni(pie sublletv. even while il matdies our most 
eneigeli« lalenls in |)oini ol \irilitv (cf. Afro, 
Ajmone. Hiiolli. (.arino. Lieala, Santomaso. 
Scialoja, Spa//apan. Saroni. I ancrcdi). Hut just 
as ihe land ilsell looms beliind the conditioning 
of " \meri(an" artists. so behintl everv Italian 
waits the humani/ed objecl: ihe still life of 
Morandi, the slone-eut ligures of Mario Sironi, 
the X'enelian warmlh ol Maria Sbisa's coral-to- 
iiinber lacades, the audadous "studies for sculp- 
tine" of Man/ü or Ramous. the prcciselv ronian- 
li( dtvs(a|)es of \ cspignani— and thrit new. vet 
ai(liai( \ision ol ihe \oung Holognese. Leonardo 



(remonini. wliose (old dawn liglil monuiiienial- 
i/es woman and (liild on a bahoiu and endows 
the randd sibi'r |)laiu's and bollows ol the buM's 
eareass wilh reniinders iliat li\ ingand dea«! are bin 
sonrces for eteriial mulalions ol tlu' ( lassi( al spirit. 
(Urooklvn Museum. April 9-Mav !.'(). )-\.V. 

Interiiutioiial (*u$;geiilieini Awui'<l: As iiiighl 
be expeded. the pri/e winners of this inlerna 
lional tontest are generallv in the mitldle of the 
road. Ihe big awaril of .^lO.OOO was given lo lU ii 
Nidiolson, vvhose eiitry is eminenlb award win 
ning. A handsome rdinement of (hibist premises, 
it olfers a virtuous. solitl eombination ol iradi 
lional ( raflsmaiishij) and elegant detail in a stvle 
whiili is(learl\ modern, wilhoul being asstrliveK 
so. Ihe reniaining paintings. whidi. lor reasons 
of spaee. (annoi all be exhibited al tlu* same 
tinie. provide a (oiiiparable resume of past lon 
temporarv a(hie\ement. in wliose context the line 
Härtung and De kooning look wildlv radital. In 
geiieral. most ol these pittures. stemm ing from 
plates like ^'ug(>sla\ia. (lanada, Poland. allem|)l 
lo (onibine ligiirali\c' imagery witb tbe looser. 
more impulsive votabularv of the 19.50's and pro- 
(bue ralher lepid residls. Ihe best paintings. 
lioweNcr. bv no means eonform to this generali- 
/alion. I would (ile Man Davie's Alhir of Ihr 
Monii (Kngland), a j^olenl ieon reminiseent of 
Slonebenge in its criide, linn geomelric endo- 
sures animaled bv some binar magi( ; Pierre 
Alediinskv's Anthill (Befgium). a fasdnating, 
earlh-eolored labvrinth of insed ar( hite( Iure, 
wliidi swarms and bu//,es wilh adivity; Jens 
Sondergaard's Winter Landsrape (I)emnark). a 
powerful reprise of Nordic F.xpressionism. in 
whi(h migranl ligures are silhouetted againsl a 
bleak \ista below a brooding sky; john Uralbv's 
Jfdii (uid Still Life (Kngland). a sample of ihe 
"Kitdien Sink Sdiool." wliidi ollers a kindof Pre- 
Ra|)haelile fastinalion wilh sudi grimv domestic 
delails as (",orii Flakes boxcs; Rene Magrilte's 
ominous Doniaiti 'of IJjrlit (Belgium), one of bis 
familiär luniinarv enigmas of bliie, cloud-lilled 
skies above an inkv blaek street scene; or Fmilio 
\'viU)\ii\ Ironi the C\( h' oj l'rotest (Ilalv). whose 
\ igor and stridenev oNertome tlie ( rudeness of its 
primars colors. For all llu'se highlighls. ihough. 
T susj)<.'( I ihis groiip gi\es iio heller a sur\e\ of the 



Karl Sihruf^, dark irkk, dark wahr; al llrooklyn 
Museum. 



best in eonlempoiarv painiing than tlo theendless 
gallelies al tbe Nenue hieiinale. ((inggenheini 
Museum. Mardi 27-Ma\ P.).)-R.R. 

Midlzer (»rou|>: I he Understatement of Millon 
Averv 's paintings mighl be a key lo this group 
show. wbidi leans loward the wliispered diserc- 
lion. \\\ (onirast lo Avery's blue gulls. which 
almosi disappear in llieir blue loaslal setting. 
Walhue Puinanrs sea birds. batked bv wliile- 
(rested waves. almosi look vigorous in the haii- 
dling of paint, Ihe more abslrad painlers shown 
are e(piallv elegant, (.eorge ('.onstani provides 
deli(alelv nuaiued striKtines ol muled (olor 
|)aldies, like a magnilied Impressionist vision of 
sea. rock, or eartli. Carl llollv ollers coinparabb 
relined modulalions of eolor and shape. (on 
striicting (piiel (ounierpoinls of rectilinear edges 
and blurred foiins, jagged angles and ba/v eol 
ois. And even [olin \o\\ \\ idit's more brilliani 
Xordir, wilh its (old blue walers and icthergs 
\i\idlv ollsel by brisk orangi's and reds, belrass 
an underlving pielerenei' lor the disdplined 
detail ralher than the assertive wbole. Witbin 
lliis subdued (oiitext. Sigmund Menkes' Weber 
es(pie daiucr dressing is harshlv inlrusive in its 
(oarse energs ol line and (olor. (Afdl/er. April 
l(iMa\ I8.)-R.R. 

Abstraet Art hefore Colunihus: l)is[)!ave(l in 
this exhibilion are ohjeds dal ing as far back as 
i:»()0 B.C. shaped bv the inbabilants of North 
and Central America during the centuries whidi 
pretedecl the arrival of Furopean dvili/alion. 
ohjeds whicb have been selecled because ol 
(pialilies whidi evoke an esthetic response re- 
gardless of their original fundion. "1 hus whdber 
urn. bowl. matehead or pedoral pendant. tbev 
slir our admiralion lor their abslrad jjroper- 
ties ol shape, eolor. design— their signilKanl 
form. It is increasinglv apparent tbat signifuani 
form is a constant for all ages and all cullures 
and ihat. once rid of tranimeling preconceptions. 
we sliould be able to re(()gni/e it wherever we 
ciKounler il. Ihis seledion allords an oppor 
iuml\ to lest our readions lo objeds whidi lor 
US bave neither praclital (omiolalions nor super 
natural implications, bul whidi sbould conimu 
ni(ale lo us llirough the elo(juen(e of their 
forms something of how their crealois looked 
lipon tbe World. 

Flure is an illmninating \ariety botli in the 
cullures represenled and in the nature of the 
objeds. from the small, explicitlv shaped banner 
siones of ihe Ohio N'allev \Iomid Buildeis lo 




John von Wivht, norpic: hI Mcllzer Gallery. 



7^* »VI -t« 




f 



ihe bulbous. tripedal urn lium ihe dassical 
I>erio<l ()( (.olima. fiom the teremonial liadias 
and palmas (arxed ol rougli \ol(ani( sloiu- to 
Ihe transhuent white on\\ \Ie/(ala bowl and 
Ihe green jade axe head trom (.uatemala. I be 
sophistitated handling of maierials. the exploi 
lalion of grains and textures in the sioncs and 
ihe undersianding and a|)pre(iali()n ol their 
naiural properlies h)rm oiu- of the areas in 
whidi these artists make their estlieli( aware- 
ness inosi sirikingh fdt; anotlier is in the model- 
iiig in dav. the elegant proporiions. the marvels 
of invenlioii. the imaginalion and im|)ro\ isatioii 
whidi mak( a dav jug an original creation 
ralher than the replica of a Standard design. 
Menlion niiisl also be iiiade of the painied de- 
signs on tbe bowl and |)itdier from the Anasa/i 
Culture of Ari/ona. abstrad designs whidi are 
(onlimious and unbroken. deteptive in their 
simplidlN. (d maiked originaliu aiid freedom. 

A handsonu book published in (onjmidion 
wilh the exhibilion indudes pliologra|)lis of all 
Ihe items in the show bv Fee Boltiii ,llie photo 
giaphs demonsirate liow line j)lioi()grapli\ (an 
ollen be miskading in regard lo sculplme be- 
(ause ol o\('rl\ (lramali( lighling) and a per- 
ceptive text h\ Doic Ashlon. (Fmmerich. .May 

1 :n.)-M.s. 

New Tal<»nt — Cohen^ Kolin, Sriiapiro: Fhe 

fat I llial the (uirenl exhibilion is one of ihe 
li\('liesl and most iiialure in ils ollerings in tbe 
series ol New lalenl Fxhibitions presented by 
the Museum ot Modern Art siiuc 19,50 is pos- 
siblx (lue to a new poli(v which stipidales thal 
ihe ailisi not haxe liad a niujo} one-man sliow- 
ing (leim uuddmcd) ralher than, as foriiierlv, 
ilial he nol lia\e had ;i one-man show in New 
Nork. I he iwo painlers and ihe sculplor exliibit- 
ing al presenl will alread\ be lamiliar lo assidu- 
ous gallery goers. biii there is scarcelv space Iure 
Im (lis( ussion of a j)oli(v whidi seeiiis lo parallel 
ihe Imulion ol the ((mimer(i;ii galleries. lalliei 
llian sup|)lemeiiling it l)\ ollciing the oppor- 
timilN lor exhibilion lo artists who ha\e no gal- 
ler\ oiillel. \l aii\ rale, ihe show is a good one. 
l)olh in (pjalilv and in ihe (arefuIK !)alan(('(l 
selc(tion of thtce xcrv disiincl ituÜN idual lalenls. 
(.eorge (ioheii. a member of the lacullv of 
\oi ihwestern l iiiNcrsilv. exhihits read\!iiades of 
a \v\\ willN aiid eiigaging nature in whidi the 
disjoinU'd limbs of dolls plav a (iiuial role, bul 
iiie\ilabl\ the appearance is slighlb dated. His 
iiivcnlion wilh maierials (arries (i\er into bis 
painliugs. in ihe use of gold and ahiminum leaf 



(wohri*^! /vo/iff. \ii moriai. ro \; al Muse- 
um of Modo 11 Art. 




and ihe unexpeded bits of (ollage. riii(pi(' in 
con(eption ;is well as exedilion. his ima<»es lia\e 
a (Urions llaxor of something picvioiisK miseen. 
vet stirring dormanl memories of lliings seiised 
or imagined. loialls dillerent is the loilhrij^hl 
and imniedi.ite appioadi of Miriam Sdiapiro, 
whose large painliugs dej)eiul for elled on ihe 
acdimulalion ol imnuneiable swift. llueiil brush 
strokes in a wide ränge of brighl. vibranl (olois. 
A tompelling expendiiure of eiieigv is e\ideni 
in ever\ corner of lier(anvases. and her painiing 
vcxabulary is an exlensixc one; il is (liidK 
through these (pialilies ihal her painiing is iii- 
lelligible. 

Fliere is a slrong elemeiil ol the mastei (lafis 
man in Ciahriel Kolin, paili(ulail\ in his large 
consiriu tions in wood wilh their lo\inul\ woiked 
smfa(es. the intri(ate joinings. laminalioiis. (are- 
lul (oiiiuuling pegs and delails like the juxla- 
posilion of varving giains. Ilis momuneiilal Oh- 
}('(! (>\ the Sea is al oiuc ihe (realioii ol inairs 
delibeiale IkiiuIs and the j)i()dud of tbe lia/ards 
of liiiie and nature; its h)r(e is in the deadhxk 
of the Iwo dements. kohn's small s(nlplures in 
terra (otta Iia\e this same lomhination of llie 
deliberate ;iii(l llie laiulom in their (oinplex 
buildiip of hollows and ledges and pioluber- 
an(es; llie liile of C.alhedrul which lliev bear 
does nol seem api. lor lhe\ pr()(ee(l iipward in 
üts and stails ralher than wilh a soaring iiioticm. 
(Museum of Modern All. April <l-\ra\ I2.)-M.S. 

John lh'lik<>r: Fa!idscai)es wilh soft, broken 
(olors. sumiiiL'rN whites; the fragile oullines of 
a linear assemblage of botlles and friiits; small 
lan(ls(apes, more cul)isii(, and daiker in (olor— 
Heliker's work is exiremelv poeli(. biit not at 
all tenuous. Ihe earlier lan(ls(apes break loward 
abstraction, while the laier break ba( k toward 
a delicale realism. Easl Rix'er, for insiaiue. is 
primarilv a translation, of buiidings and water 
and heights into oulliiu's filled wilh dimiks of 
delicale eolor— violels. blues, light gravs. wliiles. 
Aniong the laier laiulscapes, those done al 
Cranberrv Isle are huA mixtures. \ariousl\ white, 
wilh j)ale. siimmer blues and \ iolels. and (xca 
sional jiini|»v bits of brighlncss— vellow. biiglil 
blue. red— wiiile those done in \o\a Scotia are 
riclier. darkei . and ha\e more spatial deplli. In 
his slill liles too. Hehker's realism is primarilv 
a maller of spating ov of outline. I hiis s//// 
Life wilh l-hneers. palenllv iwo-dimeiisional and 
realisli( in the lineh drawn oullines ol ihe 
hollles. \ases. liuits and lloucis. has an unie;il 
plasli(it\ as the modulaled gra\ whites of ils 



ba(kground aic drawn llirough atul Idl ihe llalK 
lranspar(iil obje( ts. Neliker's work is lin;K teni 
pere(l in an expiessive imit\ whi(h. lo dale, 
es(liews all \iolenl (onlrasts or extremes, i Krau- 
shaar. April L"J .Ma\ ll.)-F.P. 

I>avi<l von Sehle^ell: Fach of these huge. spare. 
inoo(l\ laiulscapes in oil is built up oul ol an 
econoniN ol means; a palelle limited, geneially, 
lo gia\s. bliuks. whiles aiul \arious earlli browns; 
an assemblage ol a lew broad. expansi\elv 
painied forms; and. Iure and liiere, the essenlial 
(lelmiti\e Ime thal sirikes out the edge ol a 
bouiidaiA. Sf)iin-^dal<' II , wilh ils broad. trec 
areas ol sand brown and bhuk. ils bold and vigor- 
ous rliNthms. and (.oasl tirai Caustraf», wilh its 
svveeping tides of brown and ils straKlied white 
delmitions. are parli( iilarh impressive. \\ lieic 
tbe painliugs somelimes fail is in their expan 
siveiiess; the areas are loo broad. llie painiing 
itself too shuk and thiu lo siistain inlerest. I here 
is also. stiangeK eiiough . ;iii opposite tenden(\; 
ibe liabil of drawing out ihe paint in onl\ (»ne 
or Iwo j)la(('s (in lletwreti the Mountains IL ihe 
f()(al spol ol llie (omposilion is built up almosi 
s(ulj)lmall\ lo au iiuh oi more ihi(k) uhidi 
does tu)l seem a paiulerK solulioii lo ihe |)r(il) 
lern in the same terms wilh whi(h the resi of 
ihe |>ainting is ilealing. Al their best. howc\ei. 
these are singulaiK \igorous and exdting uorks 
(Poiiulexler. \lav LS-June I.) J.R.M. 

Hans Jaeniseh: Jaenisdis lirst "showing" in 
Ameiita adualb look phuc o\c'r Iwebe \ears 
ago and was more (onsiraiiied. I)\ lar. Ile was .i 
|)ris()iiei ol war in a Soul hucsiern desert (aiiip. 
All.ihle. lo a degree uiuommon in ihal parli( u 
lar I.neiiiN . he was permitted to paiiU the W ( si 
ern scene. ;md his spiriied interprelations ol 
home-on-the-range were reprodiucd in the mai^a 
/ine A}i:.otui I lii^hieaxs. Fpon returning lo ihe 
ratherlaiid. lo discover thal his pre\ ious paitii 
iniis had been destroved 1)\ Allied bombardmeiii . 
he promptiv resohed to begin again. in aiiolliei 
pari ol ihe rums. I he fruit ol ihis resolution 
l)\ lepoit. the melandioK subjed stemmed from 
etUMiiv aircraft— was exhibited here. in pari, wiili 
a iraxeling show of Berlin painlers in 19') 1. 
Jaenisdi is liaj)pier now. if llie (urrent show. up 
wards of tliirlv laue \ -free pidures. has ans di 
red beaiing on their painlers fiamc of mind. 
.Somewhere in llie \e\er-.\e\ei Fand which 
haimted Klee and Mii('). jaenisdi has siaked out 
a cloud ol Ilis own, and on oi' in il he designs, 
like a pasi inaster diis paint has a matdiless 



John Heiiker, siiii i in wiiii i i ow rKs; at Krausluui) (.aUeiie.s. 




48 



ARTS/Af.iv wy7 



49 




Spaiiish. sTii r. i.iff wmi rnn si .• nt IVnJker C.allery. 




Arthur Osver^ (.rowiii; <it ('.Kind Cm hol Modcriis. 



luster aiul his color co-ordinatcs arc faulticss), 
lovclv-scrioiis ahstrac lions likc liird's \est, a niid- 
night hliie l)ut iin tragic Icarus, woiKicrful bulls 
and toacis and biconcavc horscs with tiny heads 
and doulile-jointcd ridcrs, a bluc rectangular 
beast with spikcs and Coronas adrift in hini, 
tilU'd l'yiicon], a jokc (ulk'd /s/^— surcly a 
whalci?), grav on scarlet. cliartreuse-tippccl tail, 
a ccjral tonguc, a rcar-center propcllcr (on him 
it looks good)— and creatuies that omc wcre 
mcn. (K Icemann, April 22- May 25.)— V.Y. 

SpaiUHh Still-Life Paintings: From the sev- 
enteenth and eigluecntli ccnturies, ihey have in 
common a gencrallv frugal palcttc and a tonal 
chararter which, since one's lirst iniprcssion is of 
succulcnce and al)undant sensuality, is paradox- 
itailv austerc. The Spanish hodegon painter 
workcd not for public delectation— he was often 
a reclusc— not even, perha])s, to rencicr, exccpt 
priniarily, the "kitchen ol)jcct" in itself, but to 
iulhli the divine in the ordinary. to invcst the 
fruit, the vegetable, the verv Utensils, with that 
sense of the arcane and the imniutablc which 
alone was reality for liiin. But the surface of 
this cheese (No. 8, Unknown Artist) is like an 
adobe wall absorhing sunlight and decanting it, 
sparingly, into the dark pool of tlie plate. Na- 
lure. scorned as hmdscape, has its epiphanies. 
\\v\v\\(\^7.'s Fruit s and Cucut)d)ers congregate in ac- 
(urate splendor, iiUerrelated and conipleniented 
hy leaf and stem and the faggoting ahove the 
(luster of wild strawberries. Ihe myster) is partly 
flie presence of that undeep space which sur- 
roinids and permeates all these paintings, with- 
in which the profilc of an um (in the Espinosa) 
Ol the shinnnering glass (as in Nos. 7 and 8) at- 
tends diffidently. like an aloof stranger wrapped 
in a (loak. Ihe "School of /urbaran, Brown and 
\\ hite" painting has the most taciturn pcrfection; 
esdiewing the bloom of grapes. tlie liquescence 
of amber or the melody of ripe-rcd curvatnres, 
Ihe artist presentcd his forms ahnost starkly, 
wiib dry surface against a backgronnd which 
neilber conceals nor concedes. Glasscs quivcr 
transparently and the olives arc treinulous. but 
the earthenware jug, the staunch apple and the 
frontally situated cardön, like a wreckcd ship 
with its bull planking exposed. soberly doniinatc 
Ihe picture. (Walker, April l-20.)-V.Y. 

(ieorge Segal: A largc group of sniall pastels, 
antl a small group of largcr oils revolvc for the 
inost part aroiind the sanie ibcme: one figure, 
usually a nude, draped in a coat. or cape, or 
cloak, in a space delincd bv large areas of rieh 
color. Ihe figiircs arc poscd dramatically: half- 



st? 



siiiing and half-lving. or half-reclining and 
cluuhing a knce. 1 heir e\pressi\e posiures cre- 
ate an arc of pbysical tension. as well as a 
|)sy( hological focus for the eve. In the pastels, 
the loose chalking in of color areas— walls, floors, 
patios. etc.— makes the wbole expressively light. 
So that in these, the figines— red or orange or 
greeii as the case mav be— seem to have been 
sj)ontane()usIy translated into color. In the oils. 
however, the dehn ition of the space is so rieh 
and so solid, so fidl of vibrant contrasts, that 
the figines themsehes tend to seem weak and 
sometimes freakish. Vet in spitc of this. several 
are cjuite impressixe— one in particular in which 
the inward sweep of a deep blue floor is blocked 
near the top of the canvas bv the arc of a sinall 
bhuk desk with a siraight top edge and to the 
left hy a red chair. (Hansa, May 5-26.)— E.P. 

Andre Lan»»koy: Intense sensations of color are 
used to build vibrations of form in Lanskoy's 
work. In his earlier still lifes and interiors. tiie 
(olors are mutcd bv brushwork which correlates 
ibem nu)re dehnitelv into local form. Lest one 
tbink Lanskoy's moderatelv thick paint-toiich 
surfa(es were stimidated bv recent tachist cur- 
rents. it is well to look at the dates. for a nmn- 
ber of these jKiintings were done in 1926, '27, *28. 
All of his work has a tightly integrated, vibrant 
color surfatc, sensiious and Ivrical as in FUnuers 
(1928): sensuous and decorative as in -S7/// lAje 
(1927), with its cbina bowls, wineglass, seeded 
watermelon and \aried mounds of fruit. From 
an earlier j)eriod too are several line landscapes, 
notably Cdatnnrf hlrur (1938); and Rue Vin- 
(ingctorix (1939). Lanskoy's recent work seems 
at first sight ahnost totally abstract by virtue of 
its radiant (olor breakage. Often. however, there 
are definite thematic shapes. sometimes qiiite 
obvious as in Summer Itself, a gay, lively cre- 
ation in yellow. orange, pink. bright bluc, üght 
green, with a roiuid table near the center; some- 
times much less obvious as in ßlue Evetiing, 
wbith is brilliantly repetitive in color, with a 
Hat surface sensuously broken bv the variegated 
shapes and si/es of the tactile blobs of color. 
Actuallv there are two figures in it, seated, one 
with a raised knee and an open book. "Lanskoy," 
wrote Dore Ashton in AR FS for March, 1956, 
"has been painting abstractionsobviously based on 
direct Observation of nature for more than fifteen 
years. [His] stance in the School of Paris is firm." 
(Fine Arts Associates, April 10-May 4.)— E.P. 

Arthur Osver: In his first show in six years, 
()s\er posits some im|:)ortant redirections for his 
always accomplished arl. Works like Edifice or 



Palatitie still relain his familiär adjustment of 
delicateh mianced (olor j)lanes to an architec- 
tonic grid and contiiuie to provide that fhin 
ainalgain of the intellectual and the sensuous 
that one has (ome to exj>e( t from Osver's work. 
lUit there are other nevv works which seem to 
have been re\ilalized by a large injection of 
Gorkv. A case in point is lilue Ishtucknee, with 
its nioist, swampy Floridian density; or, more 
conspicuous in its new organic freedom, Growth, 
where clotied colors churn, coalesce and dissolve 
in a frainework which no longer has the security 
of (he approximately rectilinear. Such pictures 
suggest a niore exploratory and original trend, 
ancl intlicale that the future may yield even 
more iiuisivelv personal Statements in this freer 
vocabidarv. ((irand Cxntral Modems. April 23- 
May I7.)-R.R. 

John SennhauM'r: In his watercolors, Scnn- 
hauser offers a Klee like sensibility to ihe inicro- 
scopic niagic of plant shapes seen as frail trans- 
parencies or the meandering organic line which 
s|)ells out forms suggestive; of fingerprints or 
knotted wood. I be (ollages, however. oller a 
more jjersonal Statement, while exhibiting com- 
parahlv elegant nuances of (olor and shape. 
Here, forms like spiderwebs or garden corners 
trace out kaleidoscopic i)atterns. among whose 
(lense iniricacies one discovers delightfidly unex- 
l)ected and irrele\ant newspaperand Photograph- 
ie fragments. (/abriskie, April 29-May 18.)-R.R. 

Claude Viseux: If, as seems possible to this 
observer (not hing up my sleeve), the next main- 
stream mutation is a new rapprochement of 
Surrealism and non-formal abstraction, Viseux, 
a thirty-year-young French painter, lately a 
fugitive from the halls of architecture, may be 
the most vital discovery to emerge from the 
Paris scene. Derived from the subjective manner- 
isms of American "action painting," with an 
adniixture of Fchelitchew's celhdar drifts, his 
hold execution of caiculated spatter is but the 
means to exciting conceptual interpretations 
which have no other recent kinship. Ihc bidl, 
the birds and the aircraft forms which make up 
the menacing near-figurative personae of these 
paintings are brush-modeled with terrible verve: 
labyrinths and funiform passages abound; the 
reds and blues are martial and their surfaces, 
when vitreous, seem to enliven the pulsations 
of the open-white areas. L\in(r in the Streets 
(the reference can only be to perspective) is one 
of the most indelible paintings of speed, per- 
sonified. since the hom of Balla and Roccioni: 
wedgcs and counier-wedges of diagonal shafts 



ARTS/A/./)' 1957 



i 



I 




Curnion (.Icoro. rorRisnu'.- <il Peridnt ('.alle 



r\ 



like siender rotkets (the color is of buriit grass) 
einlöse, while catapulting from. an iidernal 
hower. Motivated by premonition, \'iseux is a 
\olalile talent. He uniles with (onlemporarv 
imj)ulse a memory of form. Fhe (ombination 
is basi( for an important painter. ((.astelli, 
March 25- April I3.)-\.V. 

IWihfM't (»oodnough : Ihe abstiaded ship is his 
lour de force. an open basketwork of line and 
liglil in which dusters of small cubes. blue to 
green. like fiagments of a tile, concentrate and 
reinforce structmc and serve. where repeated in 
liie Iower areas of the (omposition. as prismatic 
mal ine rellec tions. I he Main is nearlv as spirited, 
with a hea\ier. more restrictive treatment of 
liie huu ing lines. gi\ing a Sensation of hectit 
mass. so to speak, ralher than of weather ih i\en 
l)U()\ancy. \ female figure. lirst a j)\ramid of 
iiUense red and blue \anishing behind furious 
l»la( k |)alings, undergoes total sid)mersi()n in a 
secpienlial storm of latticed imposition, onlv to 
re emerge as a lalm eiulosure of cubes and au 
gles with lo\el\ sliadowed \erti(es, and there 
we are— with Uracpie. 1911. 1 hese stages of sohl 
lion and resolut Ion are too pri\ate for the inter- 
esi of aiiNoue bul auother painter. A stränge 
hie/c of (iibifomi. loga dressed ligures, exd'l- 
leutl\ drawn. seems j)re|>are(l for a (omparable 
journev and lebirth. Meanwhile. ihe ship and 
llie train are self-evidentiv achieved: see ihem 
while tbev're "in the dear." il)e Xagv. Marth 
26 A])ril 2().)-\ A . 

Carmen Cicero: Cicero has de\elope(l a power- 
liil and easib idenl ifiable imager\: om* large 
splouh shape. animal in diaracter. is di'lined. 
like a negalixe. I)\ a surrounding solid (oloi 
area. ihe shape is not entiielv wilhoiil (oloi 
however. apart from the cainas oll white, for ii 
is usualb smudged and tinti-d. oi toned l)\ a lew 
<li()ps of (olor. (oiueiUrated in the background 
wideb disseminated in fhe shape. Ihere is a 
tliird element inoreover. Controlled bv the shape, 
l)ut ()(( asionallv ()\erste[)ping its boundaries. 
(iicero draws with a \eiv aiti(ulate brush. and 
his linear gra|)holog\ ( harac tei i/es and enei - 
gi/?es the so-calied "negatixe s|)a(e"' of the shape. 
In ///V/// on \\ hite. the tension between the 
grav-white ground and the shape with its prob- 
iiig (ur\es and angular extensions is relati\elv 
low: the whole is dominated bv a pure flow of 
linear energv with swooping curves dramaticalK 
piilied to the right. (,at, bv (ontiast, is domi- 
nated bv the tension created as the shin\ blatk 
of the outside area (loses in ( Jaustrophobic :iIIn 
— on the diagranimat i(allv awkwai«! shape. I Ik* 




i.arlyle Hroivii. siii i in i wiiii i \\i)S( \i'i wn i-.oi (^i ii. al l'ividno (.allerw 



shape iN not o\er|)owered, howe\ei, for the 
■'(al" is an action-image with its raised eai 
points accenied bv lines, and the four recian- 
giilai- spa(e-l)l()ck legs so irregulär in lengtli that 
the shape is eternallv caiight in lopsided mo 
tion. In ('ourtship. the shape in itself is a fasci 
naiing (onglomerale image— it inight be a (iah 
with raised nielallic fin-shields. or a shark wiiii 
a parrot penhed on its tail. But what<\(i th<- 
( hara( ter of ihe shape. il seems ahnost irides- 
(cnl in memorv with its [>ale blues and gra\s 
gla/ing a spa(c whi(li is inlinitcK more real 
than the dark niixlure whi(h mats it. In some 
of (.icero's work. tlie balaiue hetween the ihree 
Clements is not so perfediv siistained — the line 
makes the shape too a(li\e or in some (ases too 
gi()tes(pie. as in Ihe I.e.sson with a (loiuhini» 
shape read\ to spring whi(h mighl be a ( ross 
between a man. or ape. and a kangaroo: or the 
line instead ot eiiergi/iiig the spa(c seems to 
light with il as in /iitd of Prey. An«! in sev- 
eral smallei works. ihe shape is too large loi ihe 
area surrounding il. thus destroving the lension 
of "positive and negative" upon wlii(h so iniu h 
of the e\(iteniein of this work depcnds. (Peridot, 
April 29-MaN 2r).)~K.P. 

Dorothv Dehner: Ibis is wcnk ol (ine variety 
and ( laflsmanship. a series of s( ulj)iiires, gen- 
eialK sinall. in hron/e and siUer. Fhe pre- 
dominaiil ihemes ;ire the citv, the human ligiiie 
.111(1 sj)r(nitiii^ plaiil forms. liV/rr/o/ lletnrned 
(bron/e). one ol her best statemenis. is a fiision 
of me(hani(al and s|)ik\ grouing shapes won 
(ierliilb (omposed and xaiied in their relalion 
ships. jr)i( ho (broii/e) is a (<)in|)lex ol inlerjcuk 
ing. biuklelike pails tili iisi ing upward iiilo a 
biislling. piecaiiousK lilled slru(tiire. Her mosi 
(harming s(ulptui(' |)eiha|)s is I.illh- Forest, a 
(liinimilive (<)lle( t ion of hron/e planls.ea( h suind- 
ing priiiiK in the (()iis( iousness of its own iniegritN . 
\ii ('(pialK notable |)ie(e is the bron/e Meeha)!- 
i((d Sir, cast in ihe lost-wax |)r()(ess. a vcitical 
assemblage of neat. me( haiiic al (ant ilevcred parts. 
Fhe exhibit ion also iiu Indes a look al ibeartist's 
walercolois. a trealmeiit in dillerenl means of 
ihe l)asi( forms that ha\e inspired hei s(nlpluic. 
(Willard, .Ma\ 7 3I.)-|.K.M. 

iVlixh'i'M Art friMU |{raiieu>«i to (riaeoinelti: 

I his is a generalh admirable seledion wilh a 
niimber of lirst rate |)ieces. the iiramiisi lOt.so 
of a ) (Hui'^ Man (192.'») and the Mondriaii White 
(ind Ixcd (1936) among ihem. Ihere is a siiperb 
(.lei/es. li)idi^e.s of l'fnis (l!H2). wondeilulK 
(onstnuted wilh Mihile inodulatioiis in smok\ 
gra\s and browns. and ihe Uiacpie still Life \eilh 



Dtinhin;^ (.law (1910 II). wilh essciiiialb ihe 
saine palelle. is no less impressixe ;is ^in example 
ol ihe ( iibist ;i( liievemeiil diiiing ihal jxiiod. 
Ihe inajoi (lis;ipp(»inlmenl is ihc Mel/ingcr 
Madame S (1913). a imilliple \ iew porliail ol a 
wonian in greens and browns. whi(h seems a lii 
lle loo liiird and |)i()gi aininat i( . Kul thal is .i 
sinall atiair in llie (oiileM of a numhei ol line 
Pi(assos, Biacpies and ( .ia(oinet lis. Ihe suincn 
iiK Indes, as well, works b\ l.cgei. Klee. Ileibin. 
Arp and Mii('). ijanis, April 22Ma\ II.) J.K.M. 

(!arl>l«' Hrowii: I his American painlei's sol 
eninl\ Surrealist tone has been the effe( I of ob- 
jecls paintcd so exacllv that thev are lianslixed 
in the limeless almosphere of a still inleiioi. 
Fi\ing al presenl in Si(il\. he poses his ol)je(ls 
against the hieak lan(ls(ape. Ihe Iower rdin^v of 
the (aiuas often l)e(()mes ilie table sinla(c; ibe 
brown hol lies, odier jars, white eggs and nissei 
boiupiels are ga/ed al siiaighl on. lU'hind lliem. 
in Still liie wilh I .andsc iif)e and Hoiujuel. rises 
a id(k\ uliile (il\. whi(h disappeais inio the 
surrounding gl av. Browns inethod of tiansjixion 
applies now as siirelv to the lan(ls(ape as il has 
lo ihe objeds. and the combinalion of llie luo 
lieighlens. b\ ils exlension. his ( harac leiisi i( all\ 
str.iiige Sense of an isoiaied, unanimaled. soimd 
less World. As alwavs. llie paintings ha\e a dis- 
tinguished paini (pialilv. a beaulihilK inellow 
snrla(c that eidoKcs iheir sense of deliberaled 
expeiKiue. (N'ixiano. \pril 22Ma\ II.) \.\. 

\fasterw<)rks of .\nrienl I*eru: Ibis seledion 
id lexliies and polleix dated hom ihe fomtli lo 
ibe lomleeiilh (cnluix denionsii ales ihe re- 
inarkable .i(liie\emeni ol an agri( ull mal people 
inhahiling ihe (oasial \alle\s ol Peru in ihe 
da\s Ixiore ilie Iiuas. These jx'ople were skilllul 
lexl ilisis and wove iheii biighlb i\\vi\ \arn into 
iiilii(alel\ designed patterns x\hi(h iiuoipoiale 
sinall hirds. fisii. aniiiials. and hiinian lignres. 
will) a pailiciilai emphasis on llie exlicinil ies— 
all seini-geomeli i( in oiilline. \s ihe\ re|)eaied 
a niotil llicN xaiied the (oloi. building ii]) elabo- 
rate sxsieius ot iii\emi\e and MihiU- ( haiiges hom 
liguie to lignre. 

Ihe |)oIlei\ ol lliese people is noi espetialK 
d isiingiiished fiom ihe poini ot \ ieu of model- 
ing: whal atlra(ls om aiieniion is ihe painting 
whi(li de(orales ilie nn«;la/ed exterioi. 1 he li\e- 
liness of imagination wlii(h ga\e rise lo ibe 
spirited iinages. ihe in\enlion and wil lo be 
se('ii in in. ms ol iliein. parli(ularl\ in ihe toxes 
aiui (als whi(h (oiistanlK reciir. and llie skill in 
j)ainling and ilie iiiiii(a(\ ol liie design give 
this work a iinicpie pl.ue in llie lield ot j>iiinili\(* 



5/ 




BUDWORTH 



A name thaf is your guarantee 
of dependable service 

PACKERS and SHIPPERS 

OF WORKS OF ART 

SINCE 1867 

W. S. BUDWORTH & SON, Inc. 

424 West S2 nd St., New York City 

GALLE RIES 



MIDTOWN 



A. D. GRUSKIN, DIR. 



17 E. 57 ST., N. Y. 



25 



TH ANNIVERSARY 
LOAN EXHIBITION 



CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN ART 



PAULINE 



STEIGERWALD 



1 0!LS 



:il 



May 13-25 | 
LYNN KOrrLHR (iALLERIES 
3 East öS Street, N, Y. 



Exhibition of Watercolors 



RICHARD 



May 20-31 



D ELAN O 

GRAND CENTRAL ART GALLERIES, INC. 

■^^— ^■^g.jS Vond erbilt Ave., N. Y. C 

I G A L L E~R~Y 

IG R O U P 

I john heller ^^^^^ery 



JEROME 



63 East 57 



Draw'mgs & Colleges 



GOODMAN 

May 27— June 8 

P^A NORAS • 62 W. 56 S t. 

JAENISCH 

Paintings 

Thru May 

KLEEMANN • 11 E. 68 



IN THE GALLERIES 



arl. riu* Naz(a vcrc an aj^j^rcssivc. vvarlikf jxoplc, 
and llu' llaNc'il skins ol ihcii ciu'init's appcar in 
dccoralivi' hands t'n(ii(ling tlu'ir howls; llicy 
also weil' tond ol licads. and soine ot llu' jngs 
arc in llic lorni ol iropliv hcads wliidi liavc 
hirn pirid'd in iricinoniai killin}»;s. Ilu'v also 
di'|)i( t llu'ir ücnr waniors and piad'lid lishci 
nun on tlicir jngs. tlu'ii dniions and gods and 
inotils related to hoth. and (hat laxoiile niolif 
ol tlie lunnininj; hird— all in liij^hlv original 
treatnienls. I he exhihition is handsomeK pre- 
senled to show the ohjetts to hest advantage, 
and i( |)erlonns a Nalnahle ser\iii' in uidolding 
to the |)nl)li( \el another asped ol the cvcr- 
aina/injr art whiih \ve (all |)riinilive. (I)elaeorte, 
Mardi l,>r)-Mav ll.)-.M.S. 

Jean Xeeroii : These neu paintings hv \(eron 
h.i\e adopted a uaniier tone, a kind ol spon- 
laneitN, tiiat issnes oiit ol and vet dillers Iroin 
the cool pinit\ ot Ins earlier work. In general. 
ihe larger paintings in (he exhihition are the 
heiter, inore siistained works: Mo. 7 with its 
heantilid, doiidlike inodiilations ol hlnes and 
jxirpk's. its glowing accents of vellow and Iresh 
gieen: or A'o. 9 with its hiaik eonstrin tions. its 
passages ol soft fog-gravs. Ihe most exciting 
work is the lall verti(al coinposition, Xo. S, with 
its )nxla|)osition of roiinded aiul straight line 
inotifs. its phases of l)liie purple and inagetna 
thal a|>pear (o he woNcn oiit of the fahric of 
ihe soll grav gronnd. I here are a niind)er of 
sinaller paintings. all of thein with the saine 
niasterv in iheii niodiilations of tolor. Ixit tliev 
seein at tiines too deirse in their strnilnre, too 
lonlming. perhaps. wlien (()inj)ared with the 
laiger works. And the |)ainting Ao. (V, with its 
lightness, i(s airiness. i(s delieate halances. in 
the (ontext of the exhihition. seenis an idtiniate 
relinement of the thetnes with whieh the othei 
paintings are (oiucmed. (Rose I'iied, April Ki 
May ir.)-).R..\I. 

l.yiiii Cliadwirk: Althongh Lvnn Clhadwick's 
irape/oidal sttilplnres jnesent blank and inipas- 
sive faeades to the ohserver. thev liave a strangelv 
tominanding preseiue which doniinates the Space 
ihey ocenpv. He nses a iiielal annatiire and lills 
it in with a ( einen thke snhstaiue which leaves 
the rihs of the annatnre visihle, so that the 
siirfaccs are faceted hy these snhdivisions. Ihe 
granulär (ext nies are niiniKelv worked, and their 
eroded a|jpearan(e. togelher with the snhdiied 
and snhtle coloiing (like liie fadings and staiii 
ings of tiine). gives the sciilptiires the air of 
relics from an anticpie [)ast ratlier tlian the latest 
(realions of a prominent conteinporarv siiilptor. 
(Is il siiiiplv a desire to avoid the glossv finish 
of iiiachine-niade ohjccts that (()iii|)els so iiianv 
conteinporary scnl|)t()rs to create a tiiiieworn 
ap[)earan(e like the artiruial aging of fake an- 
ti(pies. or are there other reasons?) Chadwick 's 
shronded ligines on siender pronged legs coiiie 
iiiost often in pairs with odtl contignities. Ihcv 
confront eacli other with eiiiphatic gesticnlalion. 
as in Teddybn\ and (lirl III, or with eiiiginatic 
soleiiinity. as in Encoiniler T— as people whose 
exterior coiifrontation gives rise to no coinnui- 
nication l)etween their inner selves. Miere are 
akso Single fignres like the i)at-winged Stranger 
—all the lignies have short antennae in |)lace of 
heads—and several heasts and hirds. I he lattcr 
have the aggressiveh thrnsting. screeching heads 
ol hirds of prev; their streaiiilined fornis and an- 
gnlar wingspread give theiii an ecpiivalence with 
the jet-propelied hirds of prey of modern war- 
fare. (Saideiiheig. April 8-May 6.)— M.S. 

Dorolhy Sturm: Since the Cnhists first affixctl 
newspaper ciitouts to their paintings and revolu- 
tioni/ed the concept of materials lit for art, the 
iise of no\el and nnexpeited (oiiiponents lias 
hecome so widespread that todav anything goes 
withont stirring the slightesl protest. W'lien the 
Italiaii linrri hegan to make "|)aintings" hv 
stitching together siraps of hiirlap, his work 
could he read as nihilistic gestnie; hnt when 
Dorothv Sturm iiiakes hnge j)atch works of mate- 
rials on hnriap (I helieve "sewiages" was the 
work James Johnson Svveeiiey coiiied for ßiirri), 
her guiding impnise appears to he a pnrely deco- 
rative one. Her works are very large and tonsist 
of patdies of fahric. a hit of criimpled chillon. 



52 



a torii hathlowil. a piece of (piilted stnIT. a 
s(piaie of salin, stitdied onto roiigh hnriap 
groinids in hoki, handsoine arrangements (not 
to (piihhle, hnt snrgeon liurri's needlework is 
the liner). Ihe saving grate here is color; she 
dves her materials when the right (olor <aiinot 
he foinul to snit the verv lo\t'l\ toloi s( hemes, 
one of wliidi is vellow-dcniiinated in (!eli(atelv 
\aried sliades. another of soft pinks and |)ale 
hrowns with gold and white, and one in vary- 
ing (U'grees of white against hrown. I he siiiged 
or tattered edge, the stilfeiied ridges of fahric, 
the worn and faded s(rap, the tarefnlK plotti'd 
overla|)piiig are all nsed to adNantage. hnt the 
eiid j)U)dii(t la(ks hoth the excitement of a 
noveltv and the ineans to hold llie attention for 
very long. (l*arsons, April 22-Ma\ II.)— M.S. 

William (iropper: I he receiit lidiogiaphs iiiain- 
(ain (he satiric snhstaiue of (.ropper's ocmnc, 
extendiiig it, in siuh fantasies as \n(lt<ir Gods, 
llcroir.s, Ecar, l.iist, from the preciselv social to 
the ahstradiv universal domaiii. I his is inlrc- 
(pieiitlv a coiiimeiidahle expansion. not heianse 
his Vision of a diaholiial and seif distorting 
World isn't valid. hnt hecanse the illustrative 
leinper in oiir time lias heen challenged, hy 
iiiass media, radically to su!)tili/e its indnlgences: 
phantoin linrses, gorgons and vam|)ires have a 
diniiiiishing power of fright. A heetle-hrowed 
face in the oniinoiis skv. laheled Fate, is one of 
his hest in tliis groiip. Piece Work, of (he previ- 
oiis scuial inainstream. is a tellingl\ disposed 
composition. Biit Diogenes, for proplietic, sim- 
ple power and masterfnl draftsmanship, trän 
scends anvtlnng in the show. Ihe paiiuings arc 
most effedive where they enihodv (.ropj)er's 
caricaturist skill {Batliers and CJiorines), hnt 
ßotujuet and ihiartet convcy a deeper aiul moie 
stndious atteinpt at co-ordinating characteriza- 
tion with a plasti( wliole. Save for the indecisive 
role of the ligiire at the hotloni. Ouarlet is an 
organicallv spirited painting. a hron/e-and-verdi 
gris, l)la( k and-white (oiuert of involved lates, 
haiids and instrinnents. (A.C..\., April 21,* .May 
ll.)-V.Y. 

John (»rillo: Maiiv of Cirillo's works, especialh 
the sinaller ones. look like hatllegronnds of the 
AI)stract-Kxj)ressioiiist vocal)idary. One linds the 
veheiiieiit slasli. the deli(ate drihhie. the spread 
iiig color pat(h jnxtaposed in an ordei which 
implies, hnt never states. a (oiuealed retlilinear 
pattern. .At tiiiies, as in SV//;// (.eorgr and llic 
Dragoti, this Hofmannestpie langnage looks len 
lative. hiit there are snperh exceptions whidi 
eincidate a gifted and incisive personalitv. In 
Noetnrnal hnages. a more cohesive \iewpoint is 
alreadv evident in the emphati( (ontrasis ol 
valiies and die exciting (eiitrifngal desigii whidi 
nnexpectedly scattcrs the major pictorial accents 
to foin (orners. Bnt eveii liner are Met<nn<)rf)h() 
sis and Celestial Slairway. Ihe latter in particn- 
lar poses no douhts in its leeling ol linal riglit- 
ness. Its seiisnons iiiipad is imniediate and com 
pelling— a limiinons veil of |)ale vellows, whites, 
apple greeiis activated hv forcefiillv and snccii 
leiitlv l)riislied hooks and arts— and its snhtleties 
of deptli, in which liliiiv laveis are snddenly 
piinctnaled by nnderlving or overlving paini 
areas, snstain as well a closer sirntiny. Grillo 
is an artisl to he watdied. (Bertha Schaefer, 
April 1.5-May 4.)-R.R. 

Nojad: The 1 nrkish invasion— or. with greater 
proprietv, infiision— of Abstract Expression isiii is 
reiMeseiited luscionsly in the bizarre vcrsions of 
Nehemed I). Nejad which, with some inevitahil- 
ily, perhaps, owe iniich of their elfiilgent "tacli- 
ism" to the self-radiant domes and the non- 
ligiirative iiiosai( tradition of Islam. Oiilv one 
of these (M'lien I \\ as a Child. . . .), its aiireons 
tree shooting skyward, emplovs an *'appearance," 
or implies a foieign inllnente bevond the cnr- 
rent abstract niode (thongh Ilotnmage ä Tiepolo 
is a radiant parody of Banxpie s[)acc, paintcd 
withont Space— i.e., withont Nohniie in Space). 
Ihe otlicrs, with occasional ventnres of cool 
toiied overlavs, have the dense, constitnent glow 
of the Magian world. lestle.ss yct fixed, like 
iridesceiit solar svstems. scattered with sceming 
whini hnt actnal coherence. Most spcctacnlar 
of these is llie Firehird, a iiiniticolor fracas ol 



ARTS/A/r/v n>^7 






hroken forms magnetized. like filings. by an in- 
complete ultramarine circle, spinning-if the 
fignre is acceptable-in a darklv clioate voiil. 
(Zodiac, March 21 -April 7.)-V.Y. 

Castelli (»roup: Ihe exdtement of this gronp 
show is nnnsual, for most of ihe arlists in this 
new gallery are barelv kiiown and, jndging fiom 
this preview, heg for fnller attention. Take 
Jasper Johns' work. which is easily descrihed as 
an accniate painted lepliia of the American 
(lag hnt which is as hard to explain in its nnset- 
tling power as the reasoiiahle illogiialities of a 
Dnchamp ready-made. Is it hlasphemons or re- 
spectfnl, simple niinded or lecondile? One sns- 
pects here a vital neo-Dada spirit. Or consider 
David Biidd s Man flow, whose shrill, explosive 
tangle of blood-ied on white seems lo have 
coagniated on the canvas and whose feiocity and 
impnlsiveiiess pnt Mathien to shaine. Nor are 
the other works less arresting. Ihere is Angelo 
Savelli's relief of riistv sdews. bolts, wiies on 
painted wood. the whole ollering a poignant len- 
sion betweeii its coarse materials and lehiied le 
sult. And Ihe saine niight he said of Ranschen- 
berg's (doria Vanderbilt (ollage. whi(h is alter- 
nately rough-edged and elegant, hilarionslv fnn- 
nv and grimlv sordid. Marisol's sinlptnre Ollers 
crnder paradoxes— a familv gionp ruggediv 
carved in wood. whose frontal. rie-Colniiihian 
austeritv is conntered bv the mobile, fonr- 
wheeled tart on whidi its rests. Or for an ecpial- 
ly enigmatic object, (onsider (.eorge Orlman's 
Surrealist peep show of cir( umscrihed geometries. 
In this dis(piieting context. (he leiiiaining paint- 
ings alniosi look tradition honiul. Ihere is Al- 
fred leslies stunning Jlobokeyi Final, teeming 
with eneigv and succnlent in its paint handling; 
Norman Bluhm's expanse of no( tnriial hlues and 
gieeiis, a swaiiip of lusli deiisitv: Iriedel D/ubas' 
volcani( blaik eruption; and the Washington 
painter Morris L<niis' ahiiosl Xeai Kastern 
luxuriaiue of decoiativeh splattered paint. AU 
in all. this angurs a challenging seasoii. (Castelli, 
Mav () 2.5.)-R.R. 

Marino Marini: "C.ivc a man a horse he can 

ride. " l*or Marini it's a hohhvhorse. With oil on 

|)aper. tempera, gouache. pen and wateKoIor. 

Iith<)gia[)h. his successive versioiis of "Horse and 

Rider" (the rider alwavs more negligihle). le- 

souixefully indulged, are verv iiear to chic: 

evoked as a white-paper outline hv Scratch ing 

throngh dark paint, oiganized as a collocation 

of geometric fignres, given an elfective shadowy 

charader with watercolor (hrown horse, hine 

Standing man, gray rider, e.g.). Most siibtie of 

Ihe abstract treatments are Pink Horse atid 

Rider (delieate infringenieiits of fnchsia and 

red on vellow. 19.53) and Chorolate Horse (oil. 

195.5), open-formed, like a wootlcut. with red 

and bhuk. Ihe large, stockilv monumental 

broiize in the window should litly summarize 

lliis motif for some time; (ertainlv it vindiiates. 

wliile (onlounding, the iiianic variations on 

paper: from anv angle, it preseiits lieft and stub- 

born tension. slabilitv and threatening dvnaiiiics. 

I he roughiv criuiform rider. straddied in a 

ligorous tiansxerse position. willi short angnished 

arms oulllung. proxides (ounterthrust to the 

cylindrical torso; seeii from the front and from 

one side fiis adhering stmiipv leg contriluites 

volunie and teiisilitv to the long backward pull 

of the horse's columnar iietk. It's a sculptural 

dassic— not of elegaiue luit of neo primilivism. 

(Ihe ('.ontemporaiies. A|)ril I 20.)— V.Y. 

Paul-Emile Bordua.s: The Tust Canadian Ab- 
stract Expressionist to attia(t international at- 
tention. Hordiias briiigs to the lieid a personal 
Sense of what to an a( tor would he liniing. Spac- 
ing is prol)ai)lv an inadeipiale (erm. hnt on (an- 
\as this is a primarv result of his melodic intui- 
tion. " Ihe free form elemeiit — Jigsaw, trapezoid, 
torn fealher— will go just there. preciselv, or over 
iieie. sfuniato." he seems to lia\e said. In his 
blackvvithin (not r;;/)-wliite caiuases, this suhtle 
geomelrv is most appareiit, and their otherwise 
spatial frigidity is mitigated h\ delieate freak- 
ings of the open areas and i)\ a (rimping of 
the paint around the jet islands. Fronfron aign 
and Sous le i'ent de l'ile are the most sensiti\e and 
protcan of his polychromes. Iliough linked with 



5? 



THE LEFEVRE GALLERY 

STILL LIFE and FLOWER PAINTINGS by 

EDWARD BURRA 



Ist May - Ist June 



30 BRUTON STREET 



LONDON W1 



^^^B^^ ^^^. \v 








GIMPEL FILS 

50 SOUTH MOLTON ST. 


iKimb^^i 








LONDON-W.l. 


^^r llffl 








LEADING CONTEMPORARY 


^^^^^n jBl^S'^ ..^J^^^^^^BflBMl^^^l 


B E R N A R D 

M E A D O W S 
"T!ie Startled Bird" 
Bronze 1956 

H. 223/4 W. 163/4" 


BRITISH PAINTERS and SCULPTORS 

Agenfs for Ben Nicholson 

FRENCH XIXth and XXth CENTURY 

PAINTINGS 




:pr f>» '^' ^^^^^H 



CUBIST and RECENT WORK by 



Anj: 54-88 



HAYD 



GALERIE SUILLEROT 




N 



8 rue d'Argenson, Paris (8e) 



SIXTH ARTISTS' 



thru June 1 









Stahle gallery 



924 seventh ave. (at 58 st.) 



"^CHARLES LASSITER^ 



V 



May 8-25 

MORRIS GALLERY 174 Waverly Place at Christopher Street 



y 




"~"*!f*v 



Kxhibition 

POR TRAITS IN 
Rl Vir.W: 1956-57 

\I \^ l.-.m thru 

ji NE UM. 19-,: 



PORTRAITS, INC. 



PORTRAIT CENTER OF AMERICA 
136 EAST 57tH STREET, NEW YORK • LOIS SHAW 



HELEN .XPPLETON READ 




pk ^ 



NEW WATERCOLORS by 

JOHN WHORF 



thru May 4 



From May 6— Group Exhibition of 

PAINTINGS by 
CONTEMPORARY AMERICANS 

kÄ\ I ^LJGALLERIES 
IVl I L Vi^ n 55 E. 57, N. Y. 



Clara Onievsky 

Gertrude Stein Raffel 

Nelson Rodrigo 

Thru May 1 1 

LYNN KOTTLER GALLERIES 

3 East 65 Street 



GAULERV 
GROUP 



May 7-June 1 



New worfes by 

BERNSTEIN 

CROOKS 

FINK 

GELB 

GIBBS 

SKALING, etc. 



RUTH WHITE GALLERY 

42 E. 57 ST., N. Y. 



Ist U.S. exhibition— 



thru May 18 



TARRAGONA 

SUDAMERICANA 

866 Lexington Ave. (65 St.), N. Y. 



Paintings • Graphics 



May 13-23 



ROSA LIE 

SANDBERG-JOHANSSON 

AMERICAN - SCANDINAVIAN 
FOUNDATION 

127 East 73rd Street New York City 



JOHN 



BAGERiS 



PAINTINGS 
APRIL 29-MAY 23 



ROKO 



JIMMY 



GALLERY 

925 MADISON AVE. et 74th ST. 

May 20-June 15 



ERNST 

grace borgenichi gallery 

1018 MADISON AVE. • 79 ST. 



IN THE GALLERIES 



Olli '■;«(ii()n paiiilcis" in somr rcspcds. Ins iiuli 
\i(lual ttni|Kr is insoiKiant lalhn thaii juriosu. 
(Manila Jackson. Maith IT) April 30.)-V.Y. 

L<»wis Steril«': lo sntict'd linonj;!! siniplicilv, 
j»it'al an is ncctssaiN. \\h\ a canxas as \aianl as 
a linsiN windou waslud willi rain ntcds morc 
ihan <l('li(alf Nariations ot cni|)linc'ss lo rctoin 
nund ii. Surncs kcs is nioic olUii hiad and 
l)U>\vn Ihan a lij»hl wliilf grav: his sinj|)li(ii\ de 
pcnds nu)rf olun on llic dcliluraU' \aiialion ol 
tcMnic l)v ihf addition ol (ollagf tknicnis (hau 
on llic sliagj4\ i-dgcs ol \vattr\ liins. \\\\\ ilic 
|)rin(i|)lc rcinains ilit- sanii': l)la(ks arr not n(( - 
cssaiiK nioR' inU'icsiing htcansi' llicy satnialc 
|)i('(('s ol hnrla)). (onnj^ati'd pajHi . sirips ol lapc 
Ol tlu" longli snilaci' ol a sandpapti s(jnari'. It is 
llic ciids and not tlu- nuans ihat innst alkct onc 
as dclihcratr. Ahandoninj; (olla^i' as natnial 
phcnoiiuna on his lanxascs. Sttriu' iiscs shado\v\ 
sha|)("s. sonu'liincs (|iiitt' rlh'(ti\c'lv. Slonc/uni^r. 
lor i\am|)k'. uith a dark. dnii <>r('c'n sainiatinj^ 
its lonj^hwcavf snihuc and ihicc hnlkino shad- 
ous. two l)la(kir. oiu- j»ra\c'i gitcn. has power. 
Xnd ol liic- two taiuasts iiilitlfd Ixclahd Ares, 
ihe onc in ri'd is (piitc moxinj»: iht- two ans 
ncali' a sj)alial tcnsion in whidi tlic hottom oiu' 
inigilt hc ihc cdgc ol a plaiut carlli. thc top onc 
ihc cdge ol a distant inoon: two ans shadowN in 
.1 icd j^low. (I»anna. May 2-l,M.)-K.r. 

J4»hii l{n^<'ris: Icarns and IMioinix. a\ ian s\in- 
l)ols ol (Itath l)\ pic'snmption and ichirtii Irom 
dcslrn(tion. arc insisltnlh pitscnt in tlicsc 
paintings. whidi sliow mnch ardoi. soinc nn- 
(dlainlv and a siiucrc (picst lor c(pii\alt'nts ol 
thc artists idcas. lUsidc a singic hird. nsnallv 
hoiic-whitc Ol lic'iN. thicshing liis skclttal wav 
ihrongh a hinnislu'd \oid, hninan skcUtons, 
solilary <>r paiicd (cinl)ra( ing, in two instaiuts) 
constitnlc thc ri\al ohscssion. Ihc inost snh- 
stantiallv j)aintc(l is an iinpadcd gicaming nicsa 
ol honcs o\ciarchcd hv ra\crnous wings. sng 
gcsting iinmcroiis intcrprctations. dcpcnding on 
the sight linc Irom whidi noii \icw ii. (llic 
(icri\ali()n was Ironi I.oKa's poctr\.) \ sinallcr 
painling of (cntanis has thc frecst dcsign: onc 
sinalUi slill. a Ironlal \icw (itvscapc. its cpiiclndc 
iitlcrU rcinoNcd Ironi tiic picxailing snhjctt, is 
thc iiiosi Instrons snrprisc. Il has no exact 
Mcdilcnancan oi \cgcan inodcl hnt is Iranklv 
a pcl!n(i(l (()ntri\aiuc. onc ol thosc allnring 
(ilics ol thc inind. (Roko, April 1!9-Ma\ :i.)-\ .V. 

Collcclors*' C#roii|>: I uo paintcrs and thrcc 
scniplors who nsiialK show at thc Mardi («al- 
lcr\ cxhihit licrc: Boris Lnric and William 
(.ainhini arc thc paintcrs. Rocco Armcnto. 
(.corgc Sngainian and Ahram Sdilcmowit/ thc 
s(nlj)tors. I.nric's works arc rcalh |)rinls inadc 
l»\ (hiiwing on thc hack ol a paint-covcrcd can- 
\as thiit is prcsscd against thc Ircsh canvas. l'sing 
hotli lliick and lliin paints, hc gcts a \aricr\ ol 
linc. ;ind in appKing (olors simnltanconsl\ or 
in separate piintings. a \arielv ol tonal cllcc ts. 
\\ hell iinages do ap|)eai— a lignre ol a \onng 
,i;iil. a dancing gronp-lhcv sceni rehcaiscd. as 
indeed tlie\ ninst i)e in snc h a method. I he 
;ilteinati\e is accident. and its ])ossil)ilities arc. 
in Ulis ca.se, ccpialK attractivc. Rocco Aiincntos 
|)laster torsos recall Medardo Rosso in their ini- 
pressionistie treatment ol Iragmentcd hnman 
hodics. \\\\\ that recollcc t ioii stops at thc siirlacc: 
these h)rnis arc essenli.ilK giatnitons. thc work- 
iiig ol thc plastcr ölten slo\eiil\. (icoigc Sngar- 
iiian's ahslract woocl carxings iise convointed 
lorins against c\pansi\e |)lacid areas. Mis Mdiix 
Ihnhois, M(ni\ llccjs, in rieh colored woocl. is 
es|>eeiallN linc. Ahram S( hiemowil/'s ahstract 
inclal sculplnres, Inmpih gold hra/ed, conihinc 
loldcd slicels ol iiiclal witli spik\ |)rot nhcranccs. 
Hc also sliows an aninsing fonnd-ohjcc t pietc. 
/)<>;/ (.hiixotc. William (.amhinis paintings arc 
dark shades ol Monet. in whom so nian\ liavc" 
lateh loiind so inncli to misiisc. (dollec tors' Cial- 
IcrN, April IT). May l.)-A.\'. 

(*ubri<>l Daurliot: In his lirst New York show. 
ihis yoniig Frendiman demonstiates his native 
tradition ol elcgancc and eraltsmanship. I aking 
c ncs from I)iif\ and .Sontine. he prodnces a vivid 
style eniinentK palalahle Un drawing room eon 
sninf)tioti. In llic portraits. a verlical series of 



54 




Rene Mafiritte, ki \l)^ m \nr iu)i\)iii; nt lolas 
(•a/Irrx. 



lean hntleis. clowns. waiters eoiiihine a niodeiatc 
lainc paicttc and hrnsli slrokc with a siaj^cv 
psxdiological repertoire of inclaneholv. ner\ - 
oiiMicss (M nrhanitN. More ariesling. in terms of 
thc c iic iims( lihcd cliie of Dauchots ait. aic 
I)aN(i)io ;jiul Winic) l (Uidscdjx- , hotli of which 
oller a gieater spatial (omplcxils in their mi- 
expected \oids and witiv icnsions hetween loie 
gronnd and ijack^Kuind lignies. (|nsrci. \piil 
10 :i().) R.R. 

R«'iic .\1u^rilt(': I wo lovcrs, human from thc 
waisl down, lisli lonn ai)ovc, sit sadK cnihracin«: 
on a rotk while a shij) j)asses. Sliock nninher 
onc. that the c realnies arc half lish. is cpiickly 
assimilatcd. I lies arc also fxhificd creatnres— 
and thc passing sliip is a scpiare-riggcd sailing 
NC'ssel . . . lo classih Magiitte simplv as "Sm- 
icalist' is to relegatc liiiii, whicli is casier than 
to cvahiatc him as a |>aiiiter or to wail h)r the 
langh — Ihc last onc. Suriealism: "illogical j)la(e- 
ment of logical ohjccts." Or vice versa? A cres- 
(cnt moon (ihercs no such thing. /// rca/ity) 
sliines Irom thc loliage ol a tice (real c-nongh) ; 
an enormons greeii applc lits tiglith inlo a piiik 
room. and ihrongh thc wiiiclow a distant fadoiN 
is visihlc. / /r>;///>c-/*or/7 and thc csthelic ol the 
ahsurd-- Also |)oign;mcc': Ijcvoik! thc ohvions op- 
ti(al joke (coiiimon propertv in the Dada peri- 
od) is thc oiganicinoigaiiic aiilithesis; hcliind 
tliat l(»oms a compicx nietaphvsical jcsl. and tlic 
(picstion of ironx as (ontiiigent upoii thc histor- 
ical sciisc. (all Magiitte litcrarv, vet its thc 
j)ainted texinie. prccisclv. that suhstantiates his 
ellcct: he too rcdiscoNcis inatler. Or call Iiiin 
pliotogra|>hic. I his hegs thc cjnestioii. tcehnicallv 
and otherwisc. I he iiionoiilli rising hefore a deso- 
lation of sca and c loiids is not an uncoininon siih- 
jecl. W herein lies the terror ol Ma<>rittc's treat- 
ment. cxpeiiencc'd c\cii hefore sou know the 
title (f.rs Orii^ifirs de hniodi^c!)} Note thc modii- 
latioii of üglit j)ro(inc'd l)\ grecii Hecks on the 
frontal rock suilace. rainlecl as if photographed 
is part of the lioiroi. and in thc clear light of 
Ins Meniish. onc iimstnl forget. tradition: the 
veracitv of the hahitnal. the eiistomarv view. the 
familiär ohjccts— hnt something has been acicied 
(likc fonr centnrics). Is the verisiinilitndc of tliis 
pictnrc an\ less hair-raising tliaii his inetainor- 
|)lioses— thc granite lightniiig. the arid inonnlain 
(or wa\e) with an eagic's licad. towering onii- 
nonslv o\er a gieeii laiidsca|>e (or lirc)? Hcre hc 
pla\s thc dangerons gaine ol roinantie pessiniisiii 
more hroaclK. lint we can do hini thc lionor of 
recogni/ing its poeti( corrclatiNc; it lies closer 
to Robinson |elfers than to Dali. (lolas, March 
2.5 April I3.)~V.V. 

Artist»« Anonymou»«: 1 his cpiarterlv gronp show 
at the -Adain-Ahah (iallery— named Adam, for 
Adam and Kve. and Aliah aftcr Mclville («r so 



ARTS/Mö)' 1057 



WC weic tol(I)-is featnring thc work <.f se\eral 
ncweonuis. Sonya Hol/wirth !ias a nire Iceling 
lor Space, breaking it np bolclb. One ansirat - 
li<Mi. a Still life, is inosllv space arc:is. cxpaii- 
sivelv colored in a ligiit palet tc rnnniiig lo vcl- 
low. orange and tan. Her portraits too. thongh 
ihcN arc skcldiib hrnshed. arc boldiv spac cd and 
(<dored-one a girl with a white face and a vel- 
low jnnipcr against a dark grav gronnd: another 
a lignre. seated and tnrned. leaning awa\ . with 
a lall of black liair liiding onr \iew of her lace. 
Kli/abclh Kint/'s work is less ainbitions: her 
colors arc j)rctticr and her laiids(apc- ima^cs 
more decoialive in their naixctc. Sonic of her 
work is vcry gav with llic colors bricht l\ 
groundc-d; otheis— still lifcs— lia\e a niore brical 
llow with softer sliapes and coloiing. Rosalic 
N'ogcl is tiving abstraction. niixing colors on a 
lliick paint suilace with an intensitv tli;it is 
occasionallv cpiite stiiking. .\ncl R. Spedor's 
work is somelimcs luminons over a linear design 
abstracted from bnildings or what iniglit hc a 
(Unible clec ker cabiii (iniscr passin^ in the night. 
I lie proprictor ol lliis gallcrv lor talcnted primi- 
li\cs monnts six color mixes on a bright \ellow 
slieet — Uralims Varialions. he assnred ine some 
onc callcd theiii. Aniong works bv more regulär 
exhibitors. Hedi lucli's darkiv dramatic lignre 
studics and a laigc gicen Hat h)oted iiioiik bv **D" 
stand out. (Adam Aliab. April 1-May 10.)-E.P. 

IVcK'l Davi»«: Xocl Davis has recentiv made a 
Irip aionnd the countrv painting the members 
and actixitics of fiatcrnal oigani/ations such as 
thc Urotherhood of KIks. kihghts of Columbus, 
etc.. wliieli liavc |>ro\ide(l him with a variet\ of 
snbject matter, induding pitnics. parades. laiis, 
old people's hoines. all with their particular 
regional lla\or. Hc has done more than report 
on tliis aspeet of the American scene, liowever; 
he has made paintings lallici than lactnal ae- 
counts. Not that he isn't a slickler h)i detail, biit 
he is selective. knowing wlicn to coneenliatc his 
locus, when to omit ihe iriclcxant and liow tcj 
coinpose thc subjed at liand into signilicant ar- 
rangements, Hc scems to prcfcr \ast Spaces, tliin- 
I\ po|)ulated so that thc emphasis is on thc 
kolitarv isolation of the ligures; hiit sinee the 
thciiie is fratcrnal he iiinsl also deal with laige 
gallicrings, boisterous celel)rations and ihrong 
ing piocc'ssions whidi arc part of thc lolkwavs 
which he cxamines. I)a\is is a \onng painter ol 
cxliaordinarv abilits; bis handling of his media 
— oils. wateicolor. pcii and ink— is llawiess. as is 
bis drawing. at its best in thc elose-up studics of 
la(C's which hc renders with a Mcmish ])erlec tion. 
I hcre is lacking oiilv lliat nigencv of somelhing 
iiiipoitant lo sa\ wlii(h would giNc bis eanvases 
thc anthoritv and \italitv wliieh arc wanting. 
(.Salpeter, May I3-31.)-M.S. 

SaiiiM>ii Seliaiiies: "Sensitive" is a cltNaluated 
adjecti\c which is nonelhcicss indispensable to 
<lcsciibc fairlv thc personal treatment which cn- 
hanccs thc slill lilcs and landscapcs of Schanics. 
0\ci maii\ ol bis sui)jcds tlicrc hoveis an ini- 
pression ol sadiicss, as if the monntaiiis, boals 
and llowcis wcie \anisliing into an irredceinable 
Iwilight. A secpicnce of dving snnllowcrs is 
|>.iiiitcd with \arialions of lonalitv in thc inixcd 
iiicclia which inlorm precision with pallios. In 
llie best ol tlicin. Wilhcrcd Smilhfu'os. thc 
blaiK hed pot scems to he withdrawing into its 
backgionnd substancc. the llowcis in thc pot 
rcscmblc a maimed eiealnic. and onc s|)illcd, 
shiivclcd blossom biirns lilfullv likc (hing e\e- 
siL;bl. Idhlc and /'lowo.s dclincs the taste with 
which hc graces the appcaiancc ol niass and 
breacllh with modniatcd light and skill of binsli; 
ihe table, solid as a butclier's block, does not 
dominale llic rose and siher fraiiie behind thc 
bliie tipped llowcrs. noi the transluccnt jai 
which scciircs their cpiillcd form. (Kste, Mav 
I I(k)-\.Y. 

(»ranclma Moses: Ihe Mnsc'r de l'Art Moderne 
owns two American paintings, a Marin and a 
Moses. And Kurope has. lor the |)ast two vears. 
been ablc to see a more extcnsi\e displav of Mrs. 
Moses' work in the exliii)itioii that is sbowii 
liere hefore its dispcrsal. I he show toiired eight 
F.uropean cities; in (ireat Britain it was spon 
sorcd bv the Arts (!ouii(il. It was happiU re- 



(civc'cl, of course. as (irandma Moses" work al- 
vva\s has been. (One imagiiics that anvone 
displaying a "genuine- lack ol sophisticalion'— 
this (piotc from a Kuiopcan re\iew- would at 
tliis jiuictnre he a wehome \isitor on either side 
of the Atlantic.) Oiice again we can see lliose 
coinlortable views ol n|)statc New \ork laiid 
scapes. spaiscK white and gia\ in winicr. teil 
(lerl\ grecii and blooming in snmnier; again we 
(an maiAcl at thc comi)inalioii of dclicatc trees 
and childlikc ligiircs, at thc complcteiicss. the 
essenlial wholesomcncss possible to llic simple 
\icw. And, il so inclincd onc can also wondei 
wlicre arc ihc darkci visions. the uiuomlorlable 
inlimalions. thc implieatioiis ol another woild 
that arc ollen the gilt ol thc piimiti\e?' (.laiid 
iiia Moses gives iis a rainbow. a sign ol goocl lor 
tiine. (Galeric St. Klicnne, Ma\ Ii June 1.)— A.\ . 

IVew Aspeels of Spac«*: A cat(h all hin pro 
\ocali\c- title given lo a sluiwiiif; ol a gallciv s 
icgulai group lends lo iinile a discnssion <»l its 
iinplicalioiis rallicr than a dcs(iipii\c iinidouii 
ol the j)aiiitings iiKluded. I hcre was a liiiK 
when in ordci to lia\c sj)ace it was iic{(ssai\ lo 
ha\c' an ohjcct. lodav. sciciuc and Jackson l'ol 
lock liavc made space itsell an objcct; thc con- 
tinuniii Olli ol whidi all objeds llow has become 
the oiiIn \alid snbject lor iiiaiu contcmpoiar\ 
painleis. iiKluding a prcpondciaiKc of thosc 
repiesented in thc- current exhibition. lor tliem 
llic cliaina of hnman beings. thc strncture c»l 
hnidscapc. thc cpialitics and relationships of ob 
jc'c ts ha\c' all been absorbcd into thc cliama of 
clashing cneigics in an ölten stindinclcss sj)ace. 
lor some the cnergN or actioii of thc aitist lay 
iiig Oll his j)aiiil becomes clircctl\ ccpiivalcnt to 
ihis explosion ol cneig\ in space: sueli arc the 
iiiuscnlar paintings of Alfred Lcslic and Norman 
(lartoii. Otliers. less lcm|)ciaiiieiitall\ snitecl lo 
thc rawlicss of pure adion. ad witliin an im 
posed Schema based on contimious ie|)ctition 
rallicr than thc crescendo, as in thc work of Sam 
Iiancisand Norman Hliilim. Sc\ iiioni Boardman 
and lawiencc (lalcagno altempl to rexcal the 
natuic ol Space ihiough more strnclinal con 
cej)ts. Boardman lliiongh cxploring the tciinous 
rdations hetween solid and \oicl. (iaicagno 
through bis liori/onlall\ baiiclecl eanvases which 
iiiight rclale to the clillcrcnt states of matter. Of 
thc olhei artists rcprcscnted. (ciikins is laigcK 
pic-occupicd with thc nianipuiations of paint to 
ac hieve umisnai textuial cllcc ts. Hnitheig le 
peats his Standard lormiila which is nonelhcicss 
a clever onc. Appcl j)lasieis his j)aint on so 
thickiv that his initial iinages arc viitnallv lost, 
withoiil rccoiiij)ciisc. and l'aiil (ones. adhciiii!.' 
more closelv to visiial natnre. animates Ins laiid 
scapes tlirough niotion and eiiiphatie application 
of thc paint. wilhont losiiig thc essenlial soliditv. 
(Jackson. April !>Mav l.)-M.S. 

M. Pacliia: Nut all of M. Paduas works 
were avaihihle lor rev icw iioiic ol thc 'biilliaiil 
lindes" descrihed in thc calalogue. nor thc ))or- 
tr;iit ol ihc cabarct siiioti W'oltawa. "uiio bc- 
c;iine woild hinions with her song 'Oh Mein 
Tiipa' Irom thc niusical lix'irorhs." I he poiliait 
of the Freue h politiciaii Andre'' Franeois Poncet 
shows raehia acicpt at (ombiihng bravina paint- 
ing of head and liaiids (oii onc liand gicaiiis a 
white high lighled gold ring, (lashinglv .'M)) with 
a cjuick-skctchcd. drv binshed linc on lliinlv 
waslied canvas. In (,/adiohis and .izdlcds thc ait- 
ist is no less eonipelcnt. but in a dilfcrcnt iiiocie: 
rieb reds and bhics. oranges ;in(l grecns dcseiibc 
heavv llowcrs in solid v ases. sm lomided hv books 
Ol liiiil in dark outline. Oiit of eloors. as in 
( .ondolios and /// ICiiicc, the epiiek strokes and 
light j)alette ol Iin|)icssionisni arc clisplaved. In 
all of thc paintings seeii. a leaclv niacle attitude 
towarcl forms and a eonlident tedinicpie combinc 
lo oller a ))leasiiig sciise of heartincss. (\an 
Dicmcn-Ialicnlcld. \i)ril L\SMav l.M.)-\.\'. 

Micliaol Frary : Boldiv desi^ned. Fraivs work 
shows a patlerneel realism modilicd bv cmph.ui- 
callv decorative Clements, licd llousc on thc 
li((i(fi has a regnlai gcomelrv of Windows, ret- 
tangular sides and triangulär gables, stareelv 
modciateel hv an undcrpinniiig of sand broken 
to the right bv a tarlike rim which introduces 
a Stretch of water. A scaseape has waler likc red 




■«)»w»»''S3^^ lu^ X .J(LSa^.Ä..^J•l^S*^ 



KXIlIßlTION: 

A 11 i III a I S c u 1 p 1 II r e 

James L. Clark 

Mav Ist ■21st 

JAMKS (;kaham ä soiXS 

1014 Mai)iso\ Avenue 
New Yokk 21. N. Y. 




GRAND CENTRAL 
ART GALLERIES, inc. 

Work by 40 Leading 

PORTRAIT ARTISTS 

on Continuous Exhibition 



15 VANDERBILT AVE., NEW YORK CITY 

MU 6-4737 



:>•) 



DOROTHY HOOD 

recent drawings • to may 18 

LOUISA ROBINS 

recent paintings • may 7-25 



IN THE GALLERIES 



DUVEEN- 

l 



GRAHAM 



1014 MADiSON AVE. (78-79 St.) N. Y. 



CONTEMPORARY SWISS 
WOMEN ARTISTS 

Exchange Exhibition presented by 
The Nat'l. Ass'n. of Wom«n ArtisH 

May 13-June 1 

ARGENT GALLERY • 236 E. 60 St., N.Y. 



JOHNNY May 1 31 

FRIEDLAENDER 

etchings 

WliIIL 794 Lexington Ave., near 61 st St. 



DEHNER 

SCUIPTURES AND WATERCOLORS 
May 7-31 

WILLARD • 23 West 56 



EDWARD B. 



Paintings 



WEBSTER 

thru May 1 1 

P A N O R A S • 62 W. 56 St. 

Berkeley 
Express & Moving Co. 

526 WEST BROADWAY, NEW YORK 12, N. Y. 
Packing • Crating • Shipping • Moving • Storage 

GRamercy 3-5310 



FLAX 

artists' materials 

Ch icagp 
Los Ange I es 
New York 
San Franc isco 



FINE 
FRAMES 

/W. tmOv jumk h M4,ol 




hiva. whiif sails and a (hiinkv forcfpoiiiid; a 
snowsiapc, sculptiiird diills t()})pc(l with dfcora- 
tivc hhuk jj^rasscs. A j>n)filf(i slill lifr shows the 
nanow t()|) drawirs oi an oak dcsk loppnl hv a 
series of tcn or twrlvc itenis langinpf lioin Iwo 
shiny fggs— arc tlu'v real?— (o a nuj^gctv glass 
vasc. and a pit'(c ol pottcrv as caiclidiv U'xmrt'd 
in grcrn aiul hiack as tlu' skin on a Itopard. I.css 
real, nunc loloitnl aiid niore faiuiful arc two 
paintings— onc likc thc intorior of a circiis tont 
wiili iwisied stiips of sonie Hglit nictal; the other 
a (Riiclated line with a towcr ahovr. thuts he- 
low. and still fuithcr bclow a dianiond paüenu'd 
(oniiNard with scvtral laigc halls. I his Tcxan's 
skill in pattcrning (olors or in dccoiating shapcs 
with paiiitrd tcxtnics is considiMahlc. Oiic wislics 
he wonld applv it Icss oftcn to an ovcrohvions 
rt'alisni. ( IVtitc, May (MH.)— E.P. 

Eriicssto TrtMTaiii : Allhough irrccani is lodgcd 
in Ihr (atcgorv of "New Italian Rcalisin" it is 
evident that hc has arrivcd at this j)oint \ia a 
(ircnitous rontc and that hc kiiows as inudi 
ahout ('.('vaniu' and Pitnsso ns lic dot's ahout 
(.iotto. \u({r ifi Ihr Sludir) (lOK)) gixcs us a 
chic to his carlicr inlhuMites; the tolor is pure 
Matissc. tluMc is an iiiscrt of a (aihist still lifc 
ihat is straight oiit of Picasso and tlic iiudc is a 
(oinpositc of hoth. liiit this woik was donc im 
incdiatclv aftcr thc war whcn a ncw genciation 
of aitists feil the siuklen inipiut of Ireiuh ait. 
and he has long since tumed lo sohcr painting 
of the land aiul thc peoj)le wlio work thc laiul, 
imigorating his realisni with the Icssons of ah 
stract art. 1 he eniphasis is on hig, nigged fornis; 
niodeling is done ihiougli j)lanes: llic hiiishing 
is free and direct. and hc adhcies to no rides of 
perspective and projiortion. His On the Kartli 
rccalls in its hiiddicd gioiip of pcasants and 
donkevs (lourhet's llodd Mrndcrs or \'an (.ogh's 
Potato Katers, cxccpt th;it \'nn C.ogh with his 
intcnse lo\e of huinanitv (ould not havc lefl 
his faces so ernjitv of featiires and expression. It 
is a striking painting in the (oinpositional de- 
vices thiough which thc groiip is unilicd. in 
the strong light-dark contrasts and the intrac- 
tahilitv which thc hgiircs convev. in Jinln^e 
Time, a painting of a girl harvesting grapes, 
ihere aic ])articularlv hcaiitifid arcas of paint- 
ing, hoth in thc angular face and in thc pink- 
luicd skirt with faint toiichcs of ocheis and 
\iolcts. Althotigh all the paintings do not iTieas- 
urc np to those incntioncd, I rcccani elocpicntlv 
dcnionstrates that thc rctiirn to realisni need 
not he a retrogression. (Heller, April 9-27.)— M.S. 

Stuart J. Davi^: Although this is the sciilptor's 
hrst one-rnan show. il gives evidcnceof an honest 
and sensitive new talcnt. The variety of thc work, 
hoth in its materials and its stvles, is indicative 
of an artist working toward a distiiutivc per- 
sonal mcans of expression. hnt cac h of tlic |)ie(es 
is ( haraderi/ed hv a strict kind of intcgritv. The 
Cat, in \arions mctals, has a tall, slendcr cle- 
gan(e of its ovvn, and thc styli/cd male torso in 
plaster. /7/r Forest of Deaci Sons: A Free is 
notahlc lor its sleck gracc. llic niost sncccssfnl 
piece is the fcmalc torsf), Äoe, in drihhlcd lead. 
with its generoijs and aniple turves, its surface 
\arietv and gcneral lightncss siiccessfidly contra- 
dicting what is usiialK a diill and hcaw mate- 
rial. What onc fecls thc lack of in the exhibi- 
tion. pcrha|)s. is a (()m|)lexitv of ideas tlial 
wonld inlorm thc work witliout directing or 
dominating it. Onc has the fceling that the 
work here has takcn onl\ a single aspect of thc 
snhject and (icvclo|)cd thc scidptuic froni that. 
In cadi ease, however. il has devclopcd Ihal 
aspect with a kind of sj)are intensilv and pnr 
poscfidncss lhat secm promising ior the fiilurc. 
Tliat (oinplcxitv whi(h one woidd like lo fecl 
as o|)erative l)chin(l the work is, of conrse, thc 
gradual reward of vears of work. Dasis ;ippar 
entlv has thc tenacitv nccessarv to achicxc il. 
(Contemporary Arts, Afay IS-.^l.)— J.R.M. 

Coignard : Tmported froin France, thcsc sinall 
oils are extremely i'arisian. Only thc French can 
distort with snc h classical (alni and hewitch iis 
will) thc solidity of an image. flotnme a lar()iif)e 
has a hcad as solid as slone with a heard that 
overlaps what niight he a Hoating hih— thc howl. 
cleverly niasked and niassed with licptid and 



56 



fruit. I'icasso has iidlanicd thc jutting prolile 
in Les Fiolotiistes; wliiie ("aihisin is responsihle 
for tlie solid arrangenient of the foiir planes— 
two heads, two instrunients— thongh not for tlie 
dark piirplcs and the decorative richness. Nor 
has Coignard neglected the female whosc arnior 
is age, paint, hairdos and gall, sharpening the 
shape of thc face, (lattening the fealures, and 
matting her decorative armor into a decorative 
setting. Coignard's work is extremely piofession- 
al. His fancy is heavily masculine— even in his 
still lifcs, soine with vases and howls as solid as 
heads on tinv decorat i\e feet, and all remarka- 
hly rieh in linear, textmal and plastic detail. 
(Collectors*, April Ii9-May 11).)-F.P. 

Am<»riean Wat<»r<*olor Soeic'ly: I his vear's an 
niial. the Societv's ninetielh, is an impressively 
laige allair with soine 1^45 works hy memhers 
and non nicmhers. and a special exhihition of 
work hv modern Japanese painters. 1 he majority 
of the work is verv decidcdly traditional in its 
styles, and its tedniical competence is nowhere 
in (piesiion. Foi this viewer thcre was finc and 
interesling woi k 1)\ Fdmond (lasarella, whosc 
Al}f)roa< Il to Mistra is a clean, j)erfc(lly earricd 
onl ahslraclion in hrowns, whites and ( lear hhies, 
and (.crirndc Sc h weil /er. whosc Seated Fii^ures 
nmono^ Hil)is( us, thongh a hit too thin, possessed 
ils owii kind of dclicacy and softness. Fdith 
(«cigers At Diish, which won the hla Wells 
Stroud WOmcn's Award. was a finely mo(hdatc<l 
ahslraclion in nnitcd grays, uhites and vellows. 
Among Ol her notahlc works were paintings hv 
Fi/ Dauher, Harr\ Nfathcs, Fdward Betts and 
Norman Kcnt. I hc Japanese selection, a de- 
cidedlv worth-while iiniovalion on thc Socictv's 
part, was cspecially engaging for the variety 
of its stateiiienls. i he stvles ranged from thc 
Iraditional dclicacv of Kosngi's i\eiv Willow to 
ihc (alligraphic ai)straction of Feda's Fe<ur. \ 
mnnher of ihe artists (Masaki ^'amagiuhi. In 
kada and Suginuito. hn examplc) one wonld like 
to see in more extensive exhihitions. (National 
Academy of Design, \i)ril 1 lil.)-J.R.\F 

Joseph Stefanelli: Stefanelli maintains a singn 
larlv high pitch of intcnsity thronghoiit this 
exhihition. His hlinit, crnde. blocklike forms are 
gcnerallv structiired or interlaced with hlacks 
that strcngtlicn thc already forcefid color, the 
hcantifui sensnous pink, the hot reds and oranges 
of F.picure's Departiire or the hlistering vellows 
and siennas of Fate Julv. Bnt even in snch paint- 
ings as 'Fhe Sojourn with its grays and ochers. its 
hrilliant orangey-reds, where thcre is a less cm- 
j)hatic use of hlack structiiring and the linear 
effect is biiilt np out of thc placement of 
one vigorousiv brushed-in area of color next to 
another, thcre is no sign of relapse, the hnrst of 
color maintains its tropical intcnsity. (Poindex- 
ter, April 21^-May 7.)-J.R.M. 

Walter Kaniys: CMinging to the partic nlarities 
of a landsca|)e Nision, Kamvs gcnerallv hiocks 
ont his |)ictiires in terms of a Ingh, unpcopled 
icrrain with a thin inargin of sky above. lo en- 
li\cn tlicse simple preniiscs, he tends to break 
np rock and carth into a (Inrrv of confcllilikc 
pal(hes whidi follow thc irregidar contonrs ol 
the land. Wilhin this frainework, however, hc 
\adllatcs bclwccn thc atmospheric looscness and 
niist of llerhshire Fiuulsaipe, Sununer, in which 
carth and sky are alinost inclistinguishahle. and 
liic lirnier contrasi of hidinti Hills, in which 
copperv patches of snn-bakcd rock act as a foil to 
ihc monotone skv ahove. At his best, hc dc-viates 
Irom this facile h)rnHda. as in Mesahi Raui^e, 
wliic h liappilv providcs a niore complex airange- 
mcnt of horizontal liers and a gieatcr coloiistic 
\;nietv of bhicks and blucs pla\cd off againsl the 
liot brilliancc of solar hiics. (Berlha Schaefer, 
May (i-2r).)-R.R. 

William Ronalrl: A w inner of thc Guggenheim 
pri/e for Canada. Ronald exhihits here for the 
Inst tinie. Ihe strength of his abstractions in 
oil lies priinarily in his sense of color, in .S7. 
Pniilin, where a deiise hlack is cut open by rieh 
rcddish pnrples. whites and intcnse lilac-bhies, 
or in Requiem, with its litnrgical pnrple and 
hlack shapes centered in an expanse of grayrd 
white. Ihc forms themselvcs, however, lack a 



ARTS/A/riy l')57 



THE HANOVER GALLERY 



REG BUTLER 

Sculpture 

2 May — 14 June 



32A St George St. London W.l. 



Cable« 



Hanrica, London 



GALLERIA 
SCHNEIDER 

THE BEST IN 
CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN 
PAINTING and SCULPTURE 

Dr. Robert E. Schneicder, Director 

RAMPA MIGNANELLI 10, ROME, ITALY 



HELIOS ART GALLERIES 

208, Av. Fr. Roosevelt 

BRUXELLES-BELGIUM 

LEADING CONTEMPORARY 

PAINTERS 



known 
for 

Creative 
framing 

expert 
restoring 




the house of 

heydenryk 

141 w. 54st., n. y. 19 






PARIS 



GALERIE 

PENISE RENE 

Diiring May 

Arp, Taeuber-Arp, Bloc. S. üelaunay. Dey- 
rolle, Geer Van Vclde, Hayter, Herbin, Le 
Corbusier, Maj?nelh, Mortensen, Picabia, 
Schwitters, Seuphor, Vasarely. 

DENISE RENE EDITIONS: 

PIJBLICATION OF THE 

SERIGRAPH 

ALBUM OF TEN COLOR PLATES 

BY S. TAEUBER-ARP 

To Appear in June: Mondrian, album of 
twelve plates in color. 

124, rue La Bm tie, PARIS 8e, ELY . 93 1 7. 



siinilai authoritativeness, and ibe gcneral fceling 
of liis exhihition is one of looscness and diance 
dfects. (Koot/, Apiil inMay 4.)-J.R..\I. 

Paul (ieor߀*s: (.corjifcs's \ision is weddcd lo 
spe(ih( iiiia^es of landsiapc. still lifc or intcriois, 
which he ihen enlivens l)\ a thoroii^h drciuhing 
in a coloristic ha/e of ahnost palpahlc density. 
In ihe medinin si/c canvases, cspecially the still 
lifcs, ihese Streaming, hrealhing^ veils of (olor 
hecoine a florid nianncrisni, which is applied 
arhitrarily to vivify what would otherwise he 
rather indiflcrcnt airan^t'inents. At cxtreincs ol 
size, however, Geoiges's point can heconie con- 
viiuing. ('onsider the tiny landscapcs, whosc 
hriskncss and irnincdiacy arc coniplctcK cn^a}^- 
in^. Ol, ahove all. thc enomiows Family al F.asl- 
iKimjttoti, where ni(»thcr, fathcr and child in- 
(hd^( in a inomniicnlal Dejeutier sur l'lierhe, 
and lascinaling particulai itics of hgmc and 
lan(ls(ape are ineigcd with a vista of iniprcssive 
amplitiidc and vihrancy. (De Nagy, April l.^'^ 
May ll.j-R.R. 

Aflomas Galdikas: Mie ccclesiastical and mnsi 
cal lja(kground of this Lithnanian painicr in 
fonns his ahstract landscapcs as a ich Vibration. 
K\ce|)ting two. in tlu- Maine and Mc\i(() catc 
gories, rcscinhling the hlockcd ronghdace fornis 
of Rouaidt, they are more often than not jnngles 
of dendritic, intensely hued shapes iniposed on a 
Iranie of faintlv jcweled s(jnaies, irregnlar in 
size. At first a (oninsion to the eye, they stcadily 
assunie the individiial theinatic character clainied 
for iheni, with invasive overtones, as in an 
antnnnisca[)e, 77, where the nnderwehhing and 
the softlv Hoating hnlhs and scrolls might well 
relate to clefs and instrumental fragments. '1 bis 
is a cooler, more formal, less characteristic paint- 
ing than the rest: among the halance the re- 
viewer was again diverted hv thc illusivc bau 
(Hing of M'inter S, forms on the veige of dclnii- 
tion seeming to retreat within a blind ing enve- 
lope of snow. (Feigl, Maich 27- April 13.)-\'.Y. 

Charlotte Ornclorflf: In working on canvas. silk 
and rice pai>er in tempera. this artist rccalls 
Chinese scroll paintings. with their drv smfaces 
and suddenlv appearing linear detail against 
largc arcas of mntcd tone. I he thcmcs as well as 
thc materials of Oriental art are nsed— in lUisli- 
Ixihx, a dark giav-line monkcv laic j)ecrs ont of 
dclicatclv drawn grasses in greens and gravs; in 
Surf thc swirling aetivitv of the water is (are- 
fnllv dclincated helow a i)arclv indicated sweep 
of sky. Whcn the formal derivation is not so evi- 
dent, thc paintings are less attractivc; in an nn- 
rewarded seaich for form the artist tends to ob- 
scnre her most commcndablc abilitv, the cllc(- 
tive handling of her choseii materials. (^Wellons, 
April 1 13.)-A.V. 

Moskiii (»roup: I bis selection makcs its appeal 
at more than one level of susceptii)ility to occult 
expressionism, olfcring, as polarities. the poct 
Midianx, a modest painter, whosc inscrntablc 
watercolors (note F'Ftomtne qui rit) have gen 
nine pathos. and liranner, a verv com|)ete!it 
painter mistakcnlv bent on shock appeal with 
disUuations of a Grand Gnignol order. Nfvsterv 
hv Suggestion is the sum of Giacometti's Man in 
Studio, a caiefnlly slapdash studv in grav. as il 
is the snhstance of Congdons Plaza Saji Mareo 
{\9M)), painted with nnearthlv gold and silvcr 
(for thc facade and skv) which have thc con- 
sistency of lead, hlack h)r Ihe radial buildings 
and an abrupt (somcwliat too clever) acccnt in 
rnst for the topplcd tower. I he Surrcal i)oi(lcr 
is also bieadicd hv a characlcrislic if not out 
Standing Malta, an explosive fragmcntalion i)v 
Paul lirach (Coudor), an elegant spoof iMme 
Recamier) hv >[agritte and a durablv painted 
ahstract wonder hv the Chilean /anartu. tiearh- 
comher. (Moskin.March 'J.j-April 20.)— V.Y. 

Pre-Colunihian Seulptiire: rhere are a nnm 
her of exciting pieces in this exhibition. a survey 
of Prc-Columbian (ultures from Ilatilco to 
xMava. Ihc bandsome ccrcmonial bowl from 
Colinia and thc bcautitullv carvcd stonc voke 
( lotonac ) arc among the finest exhihits — parlic- 
idarlv the voke. with its sleck smfaces. ils Imelv 
worked ornamcntation. Thcre are also several 
fine jades (Olmec and (inerrero). figurcs and 
faces. smoothlv stvlized and elegant. I he laras- 
can and Nfavan clav figurcs. perhaps the mosl 



57 



GALERIE FRICKER 

177 BId. Haussmann 
Paris 8e Ely. 20.57 




R. LERSY 



RECENT WORKS 



May 10-31 



Galerie RENE DROUET 

104, fauhourg St. Honore 
PARIS 8e lel.: ELY 02-27 

DESPIERRE 



May 7.2.-> 



GALERIE JEANNE BÜCHER 

9 ter, Bd. du Montparnasse 



REICHEL 
COURTON 



PARIS 6e 



May 



June 



Oalerie 

DANIEL CORDIER 


/y\oy 

REQUICHOT 

8, Rue de Diiras. Paris Hv ANJ. 20.39 



Galerie Marcel Bernheim 

M O U A L L A Gouaches 
SURAUD Sculpture May 10-25 
35, rue La Boetie, Pans 8e. Tel. ELY. 14-16 



Galerie 

COLLETTE ALLENDY 



April 26-May 11 



BAILLARGEAU 



67 rue de TAssomption 



Paris 16e 






MIRKO 



Bronze Sculptures 



May 13 - June 15 



CATHERIIVE VIVIA^O 



42 e. 57 St. 



new york 



r 



N. y. Showing of an Exhibition of Pa'infings, 
Presented in Europe during 1955-57 



GRANDMA 

MOSES 



May 6— June 4 



GALERIE ST. ETIENNE 



46 We.^t 57 St. 



New York 



Pa'mtings in a new plasfic medium 

FRANK SMIK 

May 13-25 

P ANORAS • 62 W. 56 St. 



^' < 




A PAINTER'S SUiy\MER 



This is not a school. To a füll complement of 
ust 12 young, advanced artists, we offer 
selective lodging, fine food, süperb Studios. 
Our 8th season. $40 weekly, any period be- 
tween July 1 -Sept. 10. Write for prospectus. 

BAY STREET STUDIO 

BOOTHBAY HARBOR • MAINE 



Paintings by 



M 



N 



SCHAMES 



May 1-16 

ESTE GALLERY 32 E. 65 st. 106 



EARL STENDAHL 

Pre-Columbian Art 
Modern Painting 

7055-65 Hillside Ave. Hollywood 28, Callf. 

11 E. 68th St., New York 21 REgent 4-7664 



1 MAUD 



MORGAN 



1 PORTRAITS 



May 13-June 1 



BETTY PARSONS 

GALLERT • 15 E. 57 ST., N. Y. C. 



IN THE GALLERIES 



hiiniliar cxainpics oi i'rc'-(i()luii)l)i;tn work. mc 
notahlc lor tlu'ir (|u;ilitv of \v(>rkinanshi|). ll is, 
in tiul. onc ol llu* distiiul picasiiu's ol llu' sIkjw 
ihal vm\\ |)i('((' shoiiM so ohviousK \)v thr rcsuJ! 
ol (arcliil si'lcdion. (DAka. \j)ril I -.S().)-J.R.M. 

1'oiiiioka Tossai: liipancsc in liis ^ifl of icdnc 
in«; (•( l(( lii inllniMui's to a distiiul st\ii'. \v\ in 
llu- (.ihn massixciuss of liis (oiucj)! ioiis. llu* rc- 
la\(>(l fi(*(>(loni of Ins (oiu h <\vitli ink sti(k and 
hinsli) and llu- phiiosophit svnd)olisin to whi(h 
\\c was j;ia\t'l\ (U'dicati'd. It'ssai. sdiolar |)o('l 
arlisl ( I <S.S() l<)li I) sfcnis (onsunniiaicK ( liincsc. 
Nt'Nt'i nioif so tlian wluii \\v ^liinpsc, in ilicsc 
paintings on stiolls. of silk and papcr, ihc niani- 
iold I ar l.asit'in sonncs \vlii(h scparatt'K liaNc 
hunihlcd iis. tinic and a^ain, into a( know l('(l«;in«> 
thal tlu' Orient lias al\\a\s \wcu uluic uc aic 
alu.iNs «^oinj;. \ltlion<«li this cxhihition (tircn- 
latrd l)\ th(- Sniitlisonian Institntion) (an he fnlK 
a|>|)r(-( ialcd onl\ npon a((|uaintan(i' with ils 
(onnolalixc ri'lcri'ni es iSnions X'icucr is nr«»('d 
to stii(l\ ihc ( atalo<»nt'). ils Inst (halU'n<»c' is to thc 
whoU' _<»ainin and s|)iiit of whal for Nt'ars has 
hfiMi (allcd a modc oi F.xprcssionisin, i('|>rt- 
srnlcd \>\ \olde. kiKlnicr or Soulinc. Allowiii}; 
loi diliocMKi's in media and in fuiution oi color. 
\oii will lind tht'ir stvics rcpeatcdU prcdicalcd 
in tiicse Ncrtital landscapcs condivcd (•lli|>ti(all\ . 
set in shallou Space, niodeled in dis(rete niasses 
and (()n\ulsi\e hlatk livers of iine, detaiied l)\ a 
sla((ato nnion of linear and uasli elenients. as 
well as in ihe intiniale Anspicious IMants' and 
"Water WOild" stndies-lo sa\ nothin«;. wheii 
lhe\ (leseiAe a (lilicjne to iheinselves, of tlie two 
lahnlons Fuji sdeens (IS9S) . . . Note, espec iall\ . 
the fiee-fonn t()nd)ination of )>erspeclives in the 
"Red ("lilf" secpience, the red and hhie j)a<»()(las 
lidinj; up (i.e. "hack") thron^h the en(ir(lin^ 
!i»iavs of the landscape in YlNo-Chou, and the 
ahsiradion. as lorinidahlv executed as it is 
linipidlv titled. (,azinir al ti Wdlcrjall lo Clransc 
the Mifid, where the waterfall is what's lefl 
(white jiaper) after the lorins have heen prodi^i 
ousiy inked. (Metropolitan, April 1-May 3.)— \ .N . 

Hhoa Brown: Vhc (olor and atinos|)here of the 
tr()|)i(5 pervade the paiiuini»s of Rhea hrown. 
still life as well as landscape. Her drawin^s ol 
the Haitian (oast, of the tiered hills and pahn- 
Irinj^ed shores. are executed in stron^. dark lines. 
soinetiines with nnderKinji; washes of color which 
j;l()w like snnli^ht pierc ini; the* dense jun<'le. 
alwavs l)oldl\ and liandsomeK desi^ned. In her 
j^la/ed teinperas she |)aints hrilliant hned hlos- 
soins aniid their la\ ish folia^c and oranges 
aj>aiiist a gronnci that is hathed in \ellow oian^c 
li<»ht. and cleep pink sections of watennelon in 
slill life conipositions. In her oils she \iews a 
hliic sweep of \allevs and moniUains i)e\ond a 
inos:ii( of hrighllv colored rools. or the clense 
tropical j^rowth. hroad hendini; |)ahn Ironds and 
tree Irnnks in a stateh daiuc. seen in dark sil 
honette against llashinj; lighls of \ellow and 
oran.t;e. (hodley, AprilliDMas ll.)M.S. 

Artluir Sehw«'idt'r: I <> estahlish art exhihitions 
in a reslaurant near Wall Street inav he a serv 
iccahle idea. since art, cookery and purchasin^ 
power are not withont interreiation. Ihere's an 
indirect kind of appropriateness to Schueicler as 
lost (hc)icc'. for Ins classic Dainlinir from the 



Park, in niosi of these— which he painis with a 
palette rescMnhlin«; thal of Derain in one )>hasc. 
jnn<;le-j;reens sei aj^ainst sharp hlnes-iic^t for 
e\er\()ne*s laste. I)esij»ii is still Schwcider's chiel 
inerit; he uses Iine as a nnitin^ inediuin. sc reen 
in<4 shadowc'd rocks. grass or snow with an inter 
pla\ of curvilinear hranches, or lea\cs that 
reseinhie sails or. as in /itnilin»^, the scalloldini; 
of a toller coasler, ahoxc the purple patches of 
water. (Churchills, April I .S().)-V.V. 

'I'hree-Man Show: A collertion of vcry compc- 
teiit work. priinarilv drawings and scnlptnre, in- 
c Indes DoiotliN Cantor's stark iiuerior \ iews— 
the tinnsting perspec ti\c' of tiled siihwav stalions 
Ol tlie sharp clesccnt of oj)en stairwells — the 



drawini; ilself, in |)encil. spare and incisive, and 
Rohert hiiiiielin's dark, morbid aniiiial stnclies 
-a )i»rinning inonkev, in the conrse of Iwo elch- 
in<'s, swallowed np in darkness. or a charcoal 
stndv of a i igid hanginj; dog cac h in ils wav 
insisting lipon a hnman ecpiivalenl. Ihe onl 
standiuji» pieccs. for this Niewcr. wcre the sculp 
tnres ol Rasmond Rocklin. somewhat snj^j^cst i\e 
ol (ul fionvcdu, with leaflike and lendril lorms 
c losini; into roiinded hnds or spiralin<> iipward 
in gracc'fnl arahescpies. \/.i;/// lilossom, a sinall 
deep hrown, glossed terra cotta. its coiling \ines, 
lea\es, trinnpet-shaped llowcrs wiithinj; ahont 
an iinseeti dark core. is a singidarh (•lle(ti\e 
piecc and a peisnasi\e imaj^e ol the dream. 
( lanaj-er. April M>Ma\ <).) J.R.M. 

DoimmIiv IIoo<I: W iiat distingnislies Miss llood's 

( ral tsmaiisiiip in these semi ai)strac t drawinos. 
(piite as markedh as her decisivc- and snpple 
Iine. is her conirol of proporl ioiied Space. I he 
relationship of one j^raphic foiin to another or 
to the Space it inhahils. as well as the calcnlatecl 
\aiiants ol lexlure and distinctness (sharplv 
siinions. linespini. reticulated. lacv or celhilar), 
(onstitnies drama; her sni)jects are lUNcr jnst 
drawin<»s o// paper— thes iilili/e and makeaclixe 
the sin roimdinj; spa( e. I he siihjec ts themsclxes 
are ölten ehisi\e and woiild innre pre\alenllv 
recall lU-ardslcN il thev weic an\ less rigoroiisly 
(oiKciNcd. I heir ima<;er\ is fantastie. Ml severc- 
Iv composed. Mdo^fictizcd I'xscucrs, on soft hin 
ish paper, is her most extreme comhination of 
lantasN and stricl form, liool-liloom is hei most 
siriking execntion ol parallel lines as mass. an 
iindiilant (oinmn of hair (if you will) with iwo 
w is|)s accc'iunating the spacc throngh which il 
ri|)ples with the lense s\mmelr\ ol «>rainecl 
wood. ( l)iiveen(.raham. April .S()Ma\ lS.)-\ .^'. 



58 



IMarie Taylor: Il is rare to lind scniptiires so 
small in acinal si/e which ha\e such dii»nit\ and 
strenj;lh of form as the monolilhic stone carv- 
ini^s of Marie I avior. lo a cerlain exteiit ihe 
(oloiinj; and shape of ihe lieldstone she selects 
delermine the form the sculptine will take, as 
in the instance of Ancicnl l'isli iOiiu in which 
onlv polishing and a few ronnclings and indenia 
tions seem lo have heen necessarv to e\ol\e a 
signilicani form alreadv inherent in the shape 
of a stone from a (lanadian heach. I'erha|)s it 
was also the shape of ihe dapplecl. whilish grav 
slone which snggesied the o\al lorm of ihe Old 
Sliccj) with its long nose and folded limhs snhlly 
delmed, or the strangelv speckled i)lack slone 
ma\ ha\e inspired the cnrions ontlines of the 
Minister which it hecomes. I he stones are lov- 
ingl\ worked. the simple lorms slowlv evohed in 
a natural process of releasing the form which 
the stone contains. \'erv dillereiil in character 
are hei atlennated little lignres easl in hron/e, 
with sinfaees modeied in the manner ol diaco- 
metti~-a Hird ('Juninci with llving hircis sns- 
pended on thin chains and a snpple ./".i^i;/^''. 
(I'arsons, April 2L!Ma\ 1I.)-.M.S. 

Jay Hall Coiinaway: I Ids man has given dose 
scrntinx to the sea and its coasts for o\er half 
a lifetime— he once lixccl alone h)r three \ears 
on a Maine island wilh the resnlt that his 
painting. doggeclK natinalislic hiit iindislin- 
gnisiied in its earlier phases. has dexelopecl a 
realist icliom whicii \ ies h)r!ni(lal)l\ witii that 
of Irederick Waiigh. Sunsrt—dalc Winds depiets 
a com ine ingU w ind-walloped desolation. waves 
achancing like riinaway horses. an inlormal slah 
of swarthv rock, a li\erish skv. and a hieak lore- 
groiind sliore on which an ahnost prone tree 
screams for mcrc\. \\ ith less assistancc from ele- 
menlal crisis, two small pic tnres are rieh in 
marine textures: Monhci^^fin. an interwash of 
oc lierons rock and green pools within the heav- 
ing comhers, and Maine (axisI, a vortical wave 
rising like a giant carhnnclc in a frontal crevice of 
rock. Hefieetions— Winter, with vanishing snowy 
hills hehind the hric k-and-grav honse and harn, 
pale hroondike trees and an opaline sheet of 
water. hrings (oiniawav e\en c loser to the morc 
snhtle concpiests of contemporarv scenic realism. 
(Keiniedy, March Ki-.SO.) -\'.V. 

i.ron Sh<'rkor: Sherker is an ededic who seems 
to prefer plasing with snrface design and odd- 



ARTS/Afr/v /'^5i 




CO 

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^^ 



Ca 






KLEE t< MIRO 



<^ 






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A^>^ 



.c= 



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V 



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Fine Paintings 



aan 



f 1 II f3 

flflfl 




i IIIHSCIIL&ADI.ER 



alleries ine. 



21 KÄST ^)7TI1 SlRblET 
NKW YORK 21, N. V. 

LK 5-8810 



JOHN 



Ist one-man show • paintings 



GUTMAN 

MAY 20-JUNE 2 

COLLECTOR'S GALLERY • 49 W 53 



oils • sepias • drawings 
Marc 



K 



Apr. 29 -May 11 

LYNN KOTTLER GALLERIES 



3 East 65 Street, N. T. 



232 E. 58 ST. 
Hours n-5 P.M. 



CRESPI 

CARLOTTA ßaroque Italian 

Pt I D I NA After Exhibiting Abroad 

APR. 15 -MAY 4 



April 29 -May 25 



HANSON 

Recenf Painfings 
PASSEDOIT iet'portVlex' 



shaped hames to painting a serioiisis medilated 
conceplion. Man\ of his goiiac hes and some of 
the oils snggest tacile adaptation ol ihe \latisse 
odalis(pie manner: olhers displax no more than 
his considerahle \irliic)sit\ at comhined perspec- 
tive and the depioN meiit of lepealed shapes and 
snrface textnres (cf. Ihe Kiss, Intn;^ue and 
Southern Kit(h(ii). In two od landscapes he 
rcNcals a more signiluant power; one ma\ haxc 
reservations ai)out the c)\c'rstressecl massi\it\ of 
lli'^hhnid Mills, X. Y.. hiit Hoois is a scarcc-l\ 
cpialiiiahle ac hiexcinein. I he harmonic weight 
and slernls hlended siiiKtiire makc this a plas- 
lic achic"\ement hefore whi(li the supcrlKial 
(olor and rlnthiii of liis geinc painting are re- 
dncc'd to the liiiik of clexer ccmimercial iliiis 
tralion. (Newton. March lS-A|)riI '2.)-^V.V. 

(hiievsky, Kaffel, Hoclrij^o : ( hn a Oniev sk\ dis 
pla\s hei a(complishment in two media-scidp 
Inres in plaster, stronglv modeied heads. iiu hid- 
ing A hnsl of Ben (Mirion; and needlewoik paini 
iiigs in which she achieves a snrprising Ihiiditv 
considering the medium. X'arving her stitches as 
one wonid \ar\ hi nsh sirokes, she cieates dif- 
lereiiil textnres, cNcn dillcrent moods. m laigish 
lapcslries, one ilhisirating a rnshkin storv . an 
Ol her a hncolic \iew of Mniden.s Unthiii'^ in a 
Streani. (.erlrnde Stein Rallel coniposes hei' 
n(»wc'r pieccs adecpiateh. Init her handling of 
paiiit is wooden and lileless. and her clialkv 
whilc's are monotonons and imvaried. I \pical of 
\elson Rodrigo's salin smoolli landscapes is one 
of a low. desolate piain heneath a inrhiilent sk\, 
Ihe whole clominatecl hv a singlc- l(>wcring tree. 
or one of ecpialh nninxiling leirain hathed in 
ihe glowing tones of a simset. (Kollier, April 
21-May ll.)-M.S. 

AK'X Kiiiß: How far Ihrough the l.ooking 
(.lass can von get? King's theatrical (in the had 
sense) fanlasv is. with some exccptions, too dc- 
risive to he profoiind, too anecdotal to he artist- 
icallv serions. too loacled with phthalein color to 
he appealing (Ihe hhie-green nain Forest is 
a happy contradic tion of his iisnal palelle.) His 
snpcr harocjne designs (except in Mozartidna and 
the other Raiii Forest) affront sensihilitv. and his 
mnsical-marine diiineras, if comical, are merely 
from the world of Dr. Senss. 77/r /nnni<:r(riifs, 
an incongrnitA less en\ isioned than ohserved, 
snggests interpretative wit which is heing sc|iian- 
clered for the easy l)ite of parodv (cf. Child 
l*iodii>x and Old Actress, waspisli conctplions 
o\erplayed). (Chase, May ()-IH.)-V.V. 

(lliarh's Kilx-l: Exploring a varietv of textnral 
means. the artist exliihits ahstrac tions which 
ränge from the liea\ilv hnilt-np conipositions in 
which glass liher and sand are nsed to the 
smoolhlv sinfacecl oils which follow in the Jack- 
son Tollock school. Ihe majoritN of the woik 
is tastefnl hoth in its color and in its nse of 
forms. hiit it is chiedy sncccssfid where it a\oicls 
the extremes, Ihe \ertical composition in hro 
ken shapes of red, vellow and hlack is among 
the hest of these, with textnral ellec ts that are- 
rieh hnt nnohtrusi\e. Other experiments. the 
painting in whicii a coil of rope is emheclded. 
h)r example, are not siicccssfiil at all. (l.ggleslon, 
Mav l)-l>7.)-I.R.M. 

Mvslical Show: llu- nissticism. in this exhihi 
tic*)n, is generallv and (piite vidgarh cxploitcd 
as an inept tedinicpie of hack light ing. nietallic 
color, ghostlv shimmer. h)reign snrface matter 
and evangelical suhjecls. Patricia Allen, with her 
rock-stnclded transparent plastic. is ahnost the 
worst oflender, hnt she has strong compctition 
from Kdward Brvdiger. whose Inricl exhortations 
{'l'nhie Ol l.ite and ,\///// de rrofundis) wouid i)e 
offensive at the Iowest rnng of astrologs litera- 
tnre. William Wiison's l'ultures. thoiigh its color 
inasses need moclidation. is the oni\ item wliidi 
cpialiiies. h)rmalh, as a i)ainting. ( Biin . Maidi 
21 April ().)-V.Y. 

Macc-ahiCrtM-nfielfl: I hose h)r!ns whic h haven't 
heen snhmerged in a iielter-skelter ol color and 
hrnshwork are on the whole attracti\e. I he jux- 
taposition of a pink and a light-greeii wall, in 
Sjxmisli Courtxard, the green-t ine t nred sallron 
skv and the .serene partiticming ot the painting 
as a whole comprise (preentield s personal loiich, 
also evinccd in Hamlet irit/i In es and W harf. 
(Artists, Mav I I .S().)-\ .V. 



59 




• ANCIENT 
AMERICAN 
ART 



AAI{ON FüliMAN 



1 6 P.M. 

1 7 E. «2 
LY 6 5.513 



Points af vif'iv *.>7 

David LUND 
Alex KATZ 
Burton HASEN 
Raymond ROCKLIN 
Israel LEVITAN 

May (hjune l 

ASSOCIATKI) AMERICAIN AKTISTS 
712 Fifth Ave. 



COLLECTORS 

of AMERICAN ART, IINC. 

«02 l.<-xi.iKt<>ii Av.. (al 62 Sl.) N. Y. 21 

N AT I O ^ W 1 1) E — N C» X - P K C) Fl T 

T(» Ericoiiranf Vrt 0\vtierslii|i. W(irk< hv Anifiicati l'ainters 
."^t'lccli'd für l'iircliasf aii<l Distrilml i(»ri tn McinhtTS in 

DccfinlM-r 1!'57. ..,„•, , 4 » 

S.'.Od CJuaraiitcfs EACH iiitiiilur an Oruiiial Wuik ..f Art. 

Oll Kxhibilioii April 22 - May 10 

Frank Blazf Sidnfh I^vingston 

CaROLINK FaRBFR FoUS 1. MiLLKR 

RosAiJK Ffhrman Hildi \X fl\(;artkn 



EKTACHROMES 



PRINTS IN COLOR 




SCHWEITZER 

The Finest Collection of Antique 
Carved Wood Frames in America 

205 E. 54 ST., NEW YORK • Plaza 3-6750 



May 13-31 



NOEL DAVIS 

Paintings and Prints 

HARRY SALPETER GALLERY 

42 EAST 57 ST., N. Y. " 

* PAINTINGS BY 






WM. 



MEYEROWITZ 

May 20-June 8 

CHASE GALLERY 

Now At New loco'ion. 



^ 29 East 64 St. 



LE 5-3991 t 




()5th An Till ul Exhibition 

National Association 
of Women Artists 

Ma\ 'V-26 (closvd May 18) 
NATIONAL ACADEMY GALLERIES 

1083 FIFTH AVENUE. AT 89th STREET. N. Y. 
Hours I to 5 p.m., incl. Sundays Demonstration» 



RECENT WATERCOLORS 



ELIOT 



OHARA 

April 23 - May 4 

GRAND CENTRAL ART GALLERIES, INC. 



,15 Vanderbilt Ave., N. Y. C. 



Winner of the 18th Annual ACA Competition 

r-r DREYFUS 

and Gallery Group Show 



ACA 



63 EAST 57, N. Y. 



PROBLEMS OF THE YOUNGER 
AMERICAN ARTIST 

A pilot study of exhibiting and markefing in New York 

By BERNARD S. MYERS 

The City College Press New York 31, N.Y. 
TEL. AUdubon 6-7592 Price $2.25 



Ist American Exhibition 



May 9-30 



ABIDINE 



c a d a n 

1 50 EAST 78 



gallery 

Weekdays 10-5, Sundays 3-6 



Student Work From: 



May 19- June 1 



DORD FITZ 

SCHOOL OF ART 

AMARILLO, TEXAS 

BURR GALLERY • 108 w. 56 St., n. y 

MACCABI 

GREENFIELD 

PAINTINGS • May 11-30 

ARTISTS' GALLERY 

851 Lexinglon Ave. (64th st.), n. y. 



JOHN 



WATERCOLORS & COLLAGES 



SENNHAUSER 

THRU MAY 18th 

ZABRISKIE GALLERY 

835 Madison Ave. betw. 69 & 70 Sts. 



IN THE GALLERIES 



Marianne (*(>ld: 1 ikc Maillol uilli vvlioin shc 
stiidicd. M;iii;ii)iu- (ioid is ));ir(ial lo sinoothiv 
llowing (ontoiiis ;mil idcali/cd lorm. Iltr small 
terra lotta midts air j^riicrallv tidily. sviiimctri- 
callv c()inj)(>sc(l with lilllc or no <(>ntr(if)fH>st() 
to break tlic seil (oniaiiimciit of tlii- imits. It is 
a liarinonious pfrlcctioii oi lonii tliat s\\c sccks 
ralluM lliaii c'\j)rcssivc forcc, allh()ii};h shc al 
Iows licrsclf the inaniicrisiii of shortencd (ah es 
and diminisJR'd fccl wlicii il adds to llic halaiicc 
of a scatcd fi^iirc. liiere is a depersoiiali/ed as- 
|)e(t to the faces ol her figiircs. tlie mothers 
(radiing infants. llie hroii/e daiuer. even the 
)>ortrait hiisl. iiuli(atiii^ a deteriniiiatioii to hau 
ish all tainl of persoiialitv from her art. (Wilden 
stein. April .'^OMav 1S.)-M.S. 

Criiillernio Silva: I he C()lond)ian artist's sliow, 
of loo Short diiratioii here, is iiow oii view in 
Washington. I). i.. One trusts ]\v will retmn to 
he exhihited in more availahle surroundin^s, for 
his is a talent (oinpounded of wit aiul elegant 
(raftsuianship. Haxinj; sludied stained glass tech- 
nicpie in Irance. tanght drawing in Bogota and 
heen iinpressed hv l'ern\ian Indian scnlj)line, 
he has svnthesi/ed these (lisei|)lines and discov- 
eries in an ahstract fantasia of (olor engravings 
and drawings of siuh high (pialit\ aiid \arioiis 
matter as to ino(k atteiiipts at selccting the 
finest. Vw'o small xariations of Ixcd de pnjarns 
(i.e., "nets to (atch hirds "- iised 1)\ the peasantry 
in S|)ain and elseuhere during the inigration 
season) , a snhject he has also |)ainled, are en- 
chantinglv re-\isioned graphicallv; Citv rrith Foß; 
is a sidfiision of hrown gvometrv with |)ale gray 
poetrv, and Harros is a pnre miniature line 
drawing of whimsical hoats against a green mar- 
l)le grain sky. His harmoni( masterworks in oil 
are Red de pnjaros, Pescador and Rito lunar, 
showing tremendons gains in aiuhuitv of con- 
ception and in pliahililN of textnre and colorover 
the j)re\ious paintings. 1 liev ha\e a deep, inter- 
nal eohesion. (New Sthool, Mardi 18-31.)— V.Y. 

Luis Quiiitaiiilla: \\hile not neecssarily an in- 
novator, Spanish-horn ()uintanilla is an accom- 
plished j)ainter of solidly constriicted still lifes, 
landstapes and fignre paintings. Althongh his 
snrface treatment is iiionotonouslv nniform and 
all elemenls tend to he of ecpial weight withoiit 
dillerentialion. he (ompensates for these draw- 
hacks with an imaginative and poctie nsc of 
color, espe(iall\ in Wonuiu of the Sea with its 
ridi plnm (olor. violets and golden tones, and 
a daring (ompositional sense. at its best in the 
.S7/7/ Life xrith (jrapefruit. He has recentlv re- 
turned from Puerto Rico wherc he painted a 
Portrait of Pablo Clasals wliich will be int hided in 
the show. (Wildenstein, \i)ril 23-Mav I1.)-M.S. 

Ahiciin«*: Abidine Dino do give his füll name) 
is a I urkish |)ainter with a snhjeet, one of the 
big. sad sul)je(ts of oiir time, man at war. The 
mi(ro(<)sm be has chosen to crcate— in a style 
de Otlomani/ed bv contact with the W'est (i.e., 
with Kussia and Paris)— is a desert-plateaii land- 
s(ape whidi, on small canvases and large, he 
builds with shafts and ])lanes of earth color, as 
ominons as the shadows of cainion, bnt rieh in 
ibeir contrasts of spa(e and depth, of the hori- 
zontal and the vertical. If there were no ligiires 
indnded. these would rcmain noblv spacioiis 
al)slra(tions of snn wi|)ed solitudes. Uut there 
are hgures-never enongh to do more Ihan stain, 
or give scale to. the leafless, solar panorama— 
ligures with rifles, and sometimes bainiers, in- 
cl ist in(tlv engaged in what ap|)ears to he a list- 
less and imending retreat, or galhering for a 
skirmish with enemies nevcr visihle. Ihev rccall, 
e\(('j)t for thcir sunhurncd blies, those diilling 
S(('nes in the Kussian Ulms of Krinler and Iran- 
berg, where single men on snovvhelds at night 
were hxnsed in the mo\ing beani of a train's 
headlight. (Cadan, May l)-3ü.)-V.Y. 

Jviin Varda : A trancjinl Mediterranean world 
of snn-filled an hitectinal lands(apes and stroU- 
ing women is the snhject of these collages. bnt 
tbeir pittorial langnage sulfers from doving re- 
finements. (.littering fabrics, bils of suede and 
bnrlaj) are woven iiUo tolor chords of j^hosplior- 
cscent lilacs. oranges and pinks to |)roduce rcsnlts 
almost as |)uckish as one of the titles— C7</oro- 



X 

NEW 

FRENCH 

ACQUISITIONS 

KOOTZ GALLERY 

1018 MADISON AVE. AT 79, N. Y. 

X 




RICHARD 



FLORSHEIM 



MAY 6-24 



JACQUES SELIGMANN 5 E. 57 





lel (1 6-3869.70 






max 


granlck 

fine frames 
restoration 


fiftylwo 


weil rifty-iixth Street, new york, new york 





Contemporary 
I Painting and Sculpture 

= May 13-June 7 

FI]\E ARTS ASSOCIATES 

I OTTO M. GERSON 

^ 41 E. 57th St., IV. Y. C. ( 16th fl.) 



DAVID 



Paintings 
May 13-June 1 



VON SCHLEGELL 



POINDEXTER 



21 West 56th St. 
JUdson 6-6630 



An Intimate Collection 

April 22-May 25 

A private collection of paintings, 
drawings and sculpture. 

DAVIS GALLERIES 231 E. 60 St. 



American and French 
Paintings 

HARTERT GALLERIES 



22 East 58th Street 



New York 22, N. Y. 



CICERO 



Paintings 

P E R I D O T 



Through May 25 

820 Madison Ave. 
af 68 Street 



I 



GOLDIE 



May 6-18 



LIPSON 

Paintings • Sculpture • Prints 

barzansky galleries 

■■^«■^1071 madison ovenue, at 81 streetH^>M"^ 



RECENT PAINTINGS 



to May 11 



RHEA 



BROWN 



BODLEY GALLERY • 223 E. 60 ST., N. Y. 



MM^H^^^^ Exhibition of Watercolors «MR^-Ba^HM 

EILEEN and FREDERIC 

W H I TA K E R 

in Cooperation with The Spanish Institute 

May 7-17 

GRAND CENTRAL ART GALLERIES, INC. 



,15 Vanderbilt Ave., N. Y. C. 



WINNIE BORNE 




AN 



SHER 

May 5-18 

DÜRR GALLERY io8W.56ST.,n.y.c. 




You know those rare days when 
everything checks? Air smells good. 
Food tastes terrific. Even the old face 
looks good in the mirror. Today can 
be that kind of day. Just do two 
things. Call your doctor for a thor- 
ough medical checkup for Cancer. 
Then write out a check — a nice fat 
one — to the American Cancer 
Society, and send it to "Cancer" in 
care of your local Post Office. 
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY 



60 



ARTS/.u./v 1057 



l>li\U alter Alles. \ piclmc on ihc wall liauily 
scciiis ihc a[)|)i()j>rialt' vc"hi(ir for lliis (U'cora- 
livf, pauhwork (jiiilt sciiNibililN . which would 
he far inorc* comlortahly placfd in icxtilc or ce- 
lainic dcsign. (ßoissevaiii, April Hi May 5.)— R.R. 

Rirhurd Flörsheim: FloislK'iin suhmits the in- 
(liisirial Skyline and ils varioiis units lo the ro- 
inantic coniproinise in a style uliidi is hecomin^ 
in( rcasinglv familiär amon^ paiiilers wlio take a 
siinilar point for depailim'. Cities at ni^lit. vvater- 
Ironts. (Ieni(ks and oil lefineiies \\\v (clchrated 
seiiiiabstiadK lor the unintended heaiitv they 
assiiiiie in the {reali\e eve. and are re loiined as 
giills and giids ot drainaticallv tonlained (olor 
whidi iniplv tiiinscendental iiiysterv. Floisheim's 
paintings are suj)eii()r to iiiost in this (alegory; 
iiis parallel adivity as piinlmaker. no doiiht, 
gi\es him a tedinital (onscionsness whicli makes 
of ea( h (aiivas a dis(iplined entits with ils own 
unlaltL'i ing siruduie. And he knows how to 
inakf (olor the lile of his design, so that every 
painting is aniiiiated hv :i singnlai (hroiiiatic 
l)od\ ol light. (Seliginann. Nfav t)-24.) — \'.\ . 

Caned«»: ' ''*' hodx heaiitifnl is here evalled. to 
its greatei glorv in white line on masonile or 
peiuil on papei. to a soniewhat lesser stale in 
awkward oils (in whiih the ideali/ed laccs are 
alllided in (onnnon with red noses). I here are 
also hnidscapes in oil; smooth-snrlaced and hrit 
tie. thev look air-hriished. In eNcrv work. real 
f)l)ser\at ion seeins to ha\(' stopped short some 
tinu' long hefore the pittine was hegiin. What 
reniains is a < learlv fadle line at which some are 
still (ontenl to mar\el. (.iven as it is, however. 
lo tili painter's (hosen snbjeds. not even such a 
line (an rdrieve the works from a persistent 
and shallow decadeiue. (/odiac. April 8 27.) - \.\ . 

ßernard Childs: Ihe softly (olored. eldied ah 
stradioirs of this art ist emplov, it would seein, 
every possihle adxcnlure with a line. wcaving it 
across a fcvcred suhtexture. winding and unra\- 
eling it, tlii(kening and tiiinning, separaling it 
into (liscontiiuious bnt diredional segments. fray- 
ing it out as a dotted trail or a dentation. dis- 
peising il as a mass ol (onstituenl l)lols. Ihe 
conligurations which issue from this sensitive 
ingenuitv are as tantali/ing as thev are often rc- 
vvarding. Euphoria is as e\(piisile as a Chinese 
landscape. suggesting a lift of hirds in a dawn 
unlramincicd save hv the inkv teMiired emer- 
geiue of Ical -aiul-reed h)rms from a lighl out of 
this World. (\\ iltenhorn. April 22-.\hi\ 18.)-V.Y. 

John (^iitinan: («ulmans (aseins are intri(ate- 
Iv patleriu'd wilh networks of repeated lines 
huilding s(piares. rectangles. triangles. ar(s. Ihe 
colors too are repeated, emphasi/ing the design 
at tlie sanie time that they clarifv the image. 
Most of ihein are small vertical panels. 1 hree 
;\f^„_l)la(k-l)ear(le(l like thiee aiuient prophets 
or kings— is coloied in grav. lemon vellow and a 
light l)la(k. and one can imagine it enlarged as 
a niosaic mural. 1 axro l'iew is also verv ni(e. its 
roof lops biiilt into a cuhistic design of (ilied 
verticals. its colors keved from vellow to orange 
and a reddish hrown. Ares are less successfullv 
nsed in Colossemn Xiii^lil: the tilted tiers are too 
crowded. the pale hiues too (leli(ate. And in 
several more totallv ahstract works such as Mjrfit 
Fuo^ue, the lack of any definite image reduces 
thc^whole to a repetitive nelwork of l)la(k lines 
with a husv scattering of color stops. (Colledors*. 
Mas 20-|une 2.)-K.I\ 

John Br/osloski: He airs a cunent presump- 
tion that if von sovv a (anvas ireelv with stadalo 
l)iit undireded Makes in a consistent ke\ . and 
hold them together with aii)itrarv dividing lines, 
yoii ha\e interestinglv ahstract expressionism. and 
that if you go further (hut no more rellectively), 
hy dividing these areas svmmetricallv (like an 
e\celsi()r-|)a(ke(l Mondrian). or (omhine separate 
paintings in a single (vertical or hori/onlal) ar- 
rangement (and call it.e.g.. Trimono), \nu have 
Advanced Ahstract Expressionism. (Artists, April 
20- May 9.)-V.Y. 

Pre-Columbian Jewelrv: 1 Ids is an extensive 
showing. from the colledion of F.arl Sieiulahl. ol 
small jade and gold pieces-nose rings, eardrops. 
pendants aiid hreastplates-ritual jewelrv that is 
intricate and heautilul. wrought with all the 
linesse that one ordinarilv associates with the 



61 



NEW SCHOOL 

66 West 12th St., N. Y. 11 

Sianmer Tertn 

JUNE 3 -AUGUST 8 



ART 

Drawing, Oil Painting: for be 

ginners and advanced students 
(evenings) EGAS 



Fi 114' 
Arts 



Applied 
Art» 

Crafts 



Life Class (evenings) EGAS 

Painting (mornings) EGAS 

Sculpture, difFerent moterials 
(evenings) PASCUAL 

Color and Black and Wbite 
Woodcuts: Process ond technique 
(evenings) FRASCONI 

Workshop in Photography: basic 
(evenings— twice wkly.) ABBOTT 



Jewelry & Leather 



ASK FOR CATALOG 



SEGEL 



OR 5-2700 



JOHN HERRON 

ART SCHOOL 

INDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA 

Pdnt'tng, SculpiuTt, Commertüi Art, Testhert' Trsimmg 

Conjeti BFA.. MF.A. smdB.AE. Degreet. 
• DONALD M. MATTISON, Director • 



ST. LOUIS SCHOOL OFFINE ARTS 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Professional trainlng leadlng to the B.F.A. 
deifree in Painting. Sculpture. IllustraUon. 
Advertislng Art, Dress Design, Fashlon 
Illustration, CYafts. Teacher Training Course. 
ROT(?. Students may live in supervised re«l- 
dences and enjoy mtfny Unlversi-ty activitie«. 

Bulletins 




Kenneth A. 



Write for 
Hudson, 



Director, Room 20 



CLEVELAND 



Institute of Art 



»KOfESSIO NAl/ < otologuo 

TRAINING / , ,,4, EAST BLV 
^ 1 CLEVELAND 6, OH 



O. 
lO 



SCHOOL 
O F ART 



L AYTON 

Painting. Illustration. Advertislng De- 
sign, Far.hiori IllustratiDn, Srulpture, 
Phot();;rapliy ; Indiistrial, Ititerior and 
Afhitectural Design. Faculty of profes- 
sional artists. H.K..-\. degree. Coniplctfly rnuiiern neu huild- 
inu nvorlnokin',' Laki .Micliiyan lu-ar dowrituwii area. 
:?7th >»'ar. SutnimT. Fall. SpriiiK ttriiis. Catain-;'. 

Dept. 557, 1362 N. Prospect Ave., MMwaukee 2, Wis. 




OX-BOW'The SUMMER SCHOOL 

•of PAINTING at 



The Oldest 
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Sc h o o I in 
the Midwest 



• SAUGATUCK, MICHIGAN 

Comprehenslve courses in 

PAINTING'CRAFTS-GRAPHICS 



FOLDER AVAILABLE 



JUNE 24 ' AUGUST 24 



Mexico's INSTITUTO ALLENDE 

Year-round courses: Painting. sculpture. graphics, mural, 
photography, all crafts, Spanish . . . Begiiiners or advanced 
. . . International faculty . . . Oedits, .MFA degree . . . 
Fleid trlps, perpetual sunshine, room and board from $2 
daily In Mexico's most beaiitiful rolonial town. Illustrated 
prospertus?: INSTITUTO ALLENDE, Box 100, San Migu*i 
Allende, Gto., Mexico. 



IN THE GALLERIES 



l*.y;s|)fi.nis ii) thc fit'ld ol fasfiioiiiii^ personal 
(Mii.iiiK'tits. I hc work, lioin thc ri'^ioiis of Pana- 
ma, (losta Rica and Mcxito. iiuludcs soiiic par- 
ti<ularlv iinprcssivc Oliiuc jadcs and a iiiiinhcr of 
int'lic iiloush workcd slicll ( arvin^s. nian\ of vvhich 
Aic iK'iii^ shown for thc Inst t inu". Amon^ llit' inosl 
ht'aiitifui piccfs on txhihit aii' a |)aii of opi'ii- 
work )^i>\d caipliij^s in \\\v shapc oi toilcd siipcnts. 
(Martin U iddilicld, April 2:i-Ma) I8.)-|.R..\I. 

IOi-ii:i \\«*ill: Ol ^Mom^In I'Aprt'ssionisl unoi . 
llicsc siidptincs art' (onctTnccI al)o\t' all will) 
(Ifninila! luiinaii passions. (.lirf, loxc. lualcrnilN 
art' llic ahstrad ihcnics \vlii(li lakf tlu'ir place sidc 
l)\ sidc will) (cpialK cliMncnlal Kihlic ai suhjci (s. 
In sInIc. iIu'sc Works dcpcnd on llu* (lmnk\. 
jat»<>('d siiapcs of inasicrs liki- liarlat li. shapts 
whidi undcilinc thc |)livsi(al and ps\ t liologit al 
strain ((miinon to niost cd tlu* lij»inc's. I inonj^li- 
oiil. liowcNci. \\('ill hap|)il\ a\oids ovcrstalc 
iiu-nl. lor all thc inhcrcnt drania of her thcnics. 
(•cncralh. thc singic lij^mi's. whidi tcnd toward 
1()() hu ilc. (ompat I sl\ li/al ions. arc Icss rcwardinj; 
iIkim sU(Ii ^roups as l'.Hjdh <ni(l l'.lisha, whcrc 
ihcrc is a ^rcatcr spalial iiit(i|)hi\ of \oids and 
solids. (Sdioncnian. April L'.SMas l().)-R.K. 

Jolin Slaiih'v: I hc li<;iirc prominent satircs in 
oil icstih to an o\crpi<)lon*;cd i'\j)osnrc lo ihal 
iniUclIwiiofKi (uh ol ii^lincss ( harat Icri/cd l)\ 
(icori^c (•!<)>/ <7 (iL In onc print. C\(lc, hc c rc 
aics an o[)cn s|)a(c lonn in whith thc trcatnicnl 
lan hc (oiidortahiv attcptcd. And another hhick 
and white. 7'rrr.v. has a coinprcsscd artiddatioii 
whidi picascs. Oliio River, an oil, has an cas\ 
s[)alial fccl, hiit his hcst paintinj; is Slill Life, 
tlic shcrhct hiicd planes ni(cl\ niolded and 
shadowcd. ( f Icisdnn.ni. \ptil 2") Ma\ HO.) \ .N . 

Dirk Stark: Allhough thc eoniposition is cjiiite 
j^cneralh effcctive in ihesc sporting sccncs in oil, 
thc [)aintinp; itsclf ix rathcr thin and uncertain. 
(F.pgleston, April 8-20.) . . . Robert M/cKinney: 

Searoa.st witfi Sjiow, in icv white, bliies and 



ji^rccirs. is thc inost aetornplishcd work in this 
exhihitioii of j»;cnerallv ahstrattcd. riddv colored 
landstapcs. iKottlcr, April l.')-li7.) . . . Annie 
L<Min«\v: I iishK |)ainte(l. thesc landstapes in oil 
ran^c hetwecn thc dctoratixe stvlc of Pitik WOrld 
and thc soincwhat (onlriNcd primitive stvlc of 
lilur Mrrrtiaid. (K^rlt-ston. April L'l-'Mav 1.) . . . 
Loiiiidro Dt'l^ado: N'ery eoinpctcntlv workcd 
walcr(()lors. tri'iuia||v of \cw Knj^land seas(a|)es. 
Atudi^dusctt liax, in cool hines and j»;iccns. has a 
sensc of (ontiol. \ i^oi and j»(Micral airiness vvhi(h 
makcs i( onc of thc !)ettcr pieces on view. (kott- 
Icr. \pril 15-27.) . . . Knickcrborkor Artist« 
Anniial: l'ii/c winners in this tcnth ainnial 
showin^ of paintinjj^. sdilptiire and «j^raphit work 
iinludcd )ohn R. (.rahath. Iri-dcrick Whitaker 
and Naiuv R. Peasc. Othcr notahic work in a 
larjj^c and j^cncrallv inicM'n exhihition was (on- 
trihulcd hv Peter lakal. Haim Mcndclson, 
Kli/aheth Wmi/ and Natu \ Kllcn (raig. (River- 
sidc Museum. March 3-24.)-J.R.M. 

Marc Kovcn: Xiidcs arc treatcd in a varictv of 
manners. froin thc cxaclly cxcditcd drawinjis 
froni thc niodcl to (.re(ian goddcsscs and \ isions 
of j;reen h^incs in j^rceii landscapes in oils and 
in scpia. ( )((asionall\ a discmhodied head lloats 
hcNond a mist\ \cil. I hc draftsmanship is im- 
|)C((al)le. (kottler. April 29-Mav 11.)... Paula 
Sl«'ig;crwald: low er Manliattan sccii froni 
Brookivn hevond thc hridjjfc is portravcd l)v 
rows of Ncllow-whitc lij^hls againsl a grav-hlatk 
skv in a rathcr ( rudc hnt fonefnl |)aintinjif. wliilc 
a (ontiast in niood is j)ro\idcd hv thc hright. 
sun-dreiuhcd litllc paintinj» of a j)i( turcscjiic 
Mcxitan strect. Summer lan{|s(aj)c is (illed with 
(ool. refrcshin^ ^recns. hut thc (arcfnl ennmera- 
tion of lea\es on thc trees is unnctcssarilv lahori- 
ous. (Kottler. Mav LS 2.").) . . . Argenl: lisa 
l'olhcnuis has a dcft. light. ahsoliitelv |)rceisc 
toudi in her Dutr/t Flowers, a frcsh and dclicatc 
rcplita of thc most j)crfcet of Dntdi flowcr 
painting. and also in her S7/7/ Life with its faint- 
l\ tinted j»;ravs and harmonious i»recns. C.arv 



l.iston paints a galhcring of soleimi owls. Doro- 
tliy l'crriss givcs us a dose iip view of innleisca 
lifc in her Marine, and Marion llaldcnstein in- 
trodiues a l)rij»hl note with a huiuh of dallodils 
in her (omposiiion of studio props in winlerv 
hrouus. ( \piil I 20.)-M.S. 



LETTERS (ontimied frott} /wi^r 7 

hours. we woiild hasten to agrec. hut with oue 
pro\iso. uamclv ihat iIjc .nlisl lliinli jhout art 
a good deal. if not all of tlie time. \v\ ncilhcr 
in llic w ritten responscs nor in thc open end 
inter\iew's [i.e. direct, mdimiled inlerviews] was 
this point raised hy anv artist." Fiuther. wc sav 
(p. 20): " 1 he iinpoitant (onsideraliou in this 
(onnectiou is thc degree of seriousuess with 
whidi thc man takes his work as an artist; ihat 
he work out of real (oij\i( tioii and not Ironi ans 
spe(i()us lashi()nal)Ie or j>seiitlc) intcllcctual mo- 
ti\ation." 

It was fioni thc ahove ( ircunislantcs that our 
asso(iates gained thc imprcssioii that tlierc weie 
■■( Icar e\iden(es of dileltanlisin" and of pcople 
not oNcrwhclmiiiglv (oncerncd with (reativitv. 
In othcr words, it hetomes relativelv casv in thc 
metropolis at this |)oint for inanv to j»ain acccss 
lo laii»(* i>rouj) shows. as our sur\ev ( lc;ul\ iiidi- 

(ontiJiucd <>)} ffdi^e hf 



OBITUARY 

Arthur Everclt Austin, Jr., diredor of 
tlie |ohn and Mahd Ringling Museiun of 
\rt in Sarasota, Florida, died in Harth>rd, 
Conneeticut, on Mardi 29 after an illness 
of scNcral moiuhs. Prior to his assoeiation 
with thc Rinf^ling Museum. Mr. Austin 
ser\ed as diredor of Hartford 's \\ adsworth 
\tlieneum. He was liftv-seven vears old. 



No. 162 EASEL 




Dual purpose 
studio easel for 
oil and water color 
painting, adjustable 
to any angle 
including 
horizontal and 
forward tilt. Holds 
canvas up to 76" high, 
folds flat. Made 
In England from 
fine beechwood. 




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AUCTION PRICES for Paitulllu^^ 1953-56 (^I.IHK) ;ind ovcr) 

Pricc $17.50 H>- mail ;)iily. Payincnt with <»rdcr. 

MAS TAI Pri5LISIIIXG CO., 1\C. 
21 Käst 57th Strect. Xcw York 22 



62 



STUDIO TALK 

BY BERNARD CHAET 

WAX paintin^, cinploycd a^cs ago hy (hc Kji^yptiaiis, (irccks 
and Romans, is somctiincs (allcd "cru austi("— whidi 
litcrally incans "hurni in. ' Ihc incthod iniplics hcat. As 
practiccd todav. thc j)r<)(css involvcs thc hcatini; aiid niixinp; 
l()j:^('thcr ol (lr\ pi_i>inciii and vvax. \ j)()ital)lc hcatiiii; instrii 
nu'iit cnal)lc:> onc to "hiiin in" thc niixtufc. VVhv has this 
incthod hccn rcvivcd in modern timcs and adaplcd to (ontcin- 
porarv cxprcssion? Possihly l)C(ausc ol thc oj)ti(al (pialitics of 
vvax, its transluc (iK c and hrilliaiuc. Sudi. at .m\ latc. arc thc 
fcaturcs dicrishcd hy Ksthcr (»cllcr. who has hccn partici- 
patinji; in this rc\i\al aftcr cxpcriincntin^ with ciuaustic for 
scvcntccn ycars. In thc (oursc ol her work slic has dcvclopcd 
a nuinhcr of mcthods whidi should iiitcrcst paintcrs <i»cncrally. 

Miss (icllcr cniploys a two-hurncr clc(tri( plaic with rhco- 
stat hcat (onirol. Thc palcttc is an un^ahani/cd stccl hox (it 
shoidd hc notcd that ,L;al\ani/cd stccl discolors pii»mcnt). T Ins 
hox. whidi has lar^c holcs ( ut ont ovcr thc hcatin«; units, is 
placcd on top of thc clc( tric sto\c. ( jrc nlatinu;^ air kccps thc 
heat cvcn. T hc wax is heated on thc palcttc, iiiixcd with drv 
pii^nicnt and a|)|)licd to hoard or caiixas. whcrc it drics im 
nicdiatcly. Ihc 'hurniniL; in" can hc donc diirin^ thc proccss 
of paintiiii» or at its (oiulusion. T hc prcfcrrcd instrnmcnt is 
a tiin^stcn imit plii^^cd in to an ashcstos-covcrcd handle. iMiss 
(icllcr prefers this instrnmcnt to a hcat lanij) or hlow tordi: 
it is lij^ht in weicht and ,i»ivcs enoiiji»h hcat to fnse thc piji^nient- 
and-wax mixtnrc thorou,i»hly, so as to insure adhcsion and 
hardenin«» of thc smfacc. Xow Ict ns pnxecd to thc prepara- 
tion of thc wax incdimn. 

Expcrimentation and researdi Icd Miss (»cUcr to dioose 
hccswax, whidi she lonnd to hc thc most transparent of thc 
waxes. She prefers hlcadicd or white hccswax to thc yellow 
virgin hccswax. h)r thc vcliow wax discolors thc hlues. She also 
dis(()vcrcd that \iri>in wax (ontains pollcn, so that anyone 
with a slii>ht allcrjL»y might hc adected. Virzin wax, with its 
honev fra^raiuc, is plcasant to work with. hnt Miss Geller 
finds hlcadicd wax distiiutly inorc pra(ti(al. She advises thc 
pnrdiasc of a material stampcd "pnre i)ccswax," availahle at 
most art sliops or dru.<>stores. 

T hc hlcadicd wax is added to dammar crystals whidi have 
hccn mcltcd in a (an on thc stove j)alettc. Miss (icller's lormii- 
la is onc part dammar crystals to two parts wax, and siiue she 
uscs a rii»id snpport (,i»esso on masonite) no oil need hc added. 
HowcNcr. she ach iscs an addition of teil per (cnt linsced oil 
lo this mixtnic if onc slionld need a more pliahlc nicdinm lo 
paint on (an\as. I he medium is ( nt into cakes whcii cool. 

VVhen onc is rcadv to paint. a cake is rcmclted and drv pii;- 
mcnt added. T hc new mixtnrc is ready to hc applied to thc 
snj)port with pahtte knixes or hrnshes. Careful usc ol thc 




Ahove: Estlier (ieller *T;///7//?/^ /;/" n f)ainti}i}r u'ith n tuno^sleti iinit. 
The st(n>e, at rii^/il. is eiwered willi n uielnl [udelle. lii'^ht: 1'\rm)Isi-: 
scRKKN, eiuanslii with <^()ld lenf. 



En(atisti( : I ntcrvicic with l\stlicr Geller 

hiistle hrnshes |)rc\('nts tlieir hcini» scorched. lor ,i;l.i/in,L;. sahlc 
hinshcs arc rec ommended. Irne. turpentine (an hc nscd to 
ihin thc ula/c mixtinc hnt Miss (.ellei has learncd to dispense 
uith it. (Ol (omse she nses tnrpentine to clean her hrnshes.) 
"IWirnin^ in" (om|)lctcs thc pro(css. 

Ihe ahoNc is onl\ an outline of thc cn(aiisti( proccss,* hnt 
Miss (.cller's answers to specific (picstions filied in a nnmhcr 
ol details. W'hen asked il a (crtain proportion ol wax and 
dammar to pi^meiit is recpiircd to insnre permaneiux, she re- 
j)lie(l that "anv j)roportion is feasihic as Ioiil; as it holds on to 
thc snpport." .Miss (icller Imthcr inlormed me ihai she has 
not eiKonntcred an\ ladini; oi crackini; ol snrhue in her loiii; 
('X|>ei iciuc. Knt ihe proporiion ol wax and daimnar to pii;- 
mcnt. she cxplained. does inllneiuc thc snrlacc: a lot ol pi^- 
ment and little medium j)rodu((' a mal suihue. uhercas a 
^rcatci Proportion ol wax makcs it possihle to polish thc paint- 
ini; at thc end. .Morcover. a j^reat dcal ol dammar makes lor 
a i»lossier sinhuc. She poiiUcd out that throu<^h Ins lornuda 
tlie painter didates ihe kind ol snrfa(c hc desircs. K\(*n thi(k- 
ciiiiij.» a^cnls such as powdcrecl ( la\ and lithoponc (an \)v nscd 
to hei^hten thc impasto. ( )i if a j)olished-,i;old cllec t is desired 
.Miss (.cller recommends phuin^ ,i;ol(l Ical on the «•csso in thc 
traditional ,«;hie and dav-holc method: a hi.<;h ^loss (an therehv 
hc adiicved tlirou,<;h hurnishin«;. On the othcr hand. onc (an 
prodiKc a dull ,i;old l)\ appKin.i; Poivmer lemixra to the 
(hosen arca and applvini; Icaf while ihe Poivmer is wet. In 
ocncral. leaf is applied (irst lo whatcver arcas thc painicr desiics. 

Does thc nse of heatiiiL; apparalus niakc for si/e liinitation.-' 
"I nuscil find it possihle to work in any si/e." .Miss (icllcr rc- 
plies: 'Thc priiu ij)al limitation is adjustiiiL; to a ditlcrent tcmpo 
of paintini;. Kn(austi( has a tcmpo of its own." Bv this she 
nieans that althonj^h thc hol wax drics immediatclv on toudi 
ini; thc (aiuas. the pausinii; to "hurn in" se(tioiis ol the paint- 
in,^ does Interrupt n<»rmal oil-paiiitinii» workint; mcthods. Wax 
does not hlend: hlendin.i; of ed.i^cs. when desired. is adiicNcd 
in thc fusiii<; pro( css. \ i^reat deal of heatin,i4 softens hounda- 
rics, (ausino thein to niclt— hlurrin<> the hard ed,L;e. I hc 
"l)urnin.i;-in" j)r()(ess, thcrch)re. is not just .i me(hani(al pro 
ccdnrc. hut rathcr pari ol thc adnal paint int; pro(('ss. 

T hc cn(austi( method thus rccpiires not onlv sjxcial e(pii[) 
ment. hin a period of apprentic cship. \vi if one admircs the 
(olor hrilliaiKV. the iranshuent (pialii\ ol wax. immedialc 
drvino and thc (hallende of an adjusicd tcmpo, tiie time in- 
xcstcd will not seem a major ohsta(lc. 



*I'()r an exlended accounl of the i>r(Kess the reader is refened to 
Encaustic: Materials and Methods. bv Iraiues Prall and IU>( < a li/dl 
(l.car PnhlisluTs. New ^n^k. !!M9). 







ARTS/M^/v /95 



63 



the hans hofmann school of fine arts 

52 west 8th street • new york city • phone chelsea 2-4933 

personally conducted 
by m r. hof ma nn 



Summer session 



provincetown, mass. 



june 24 — aug. 30 



THE SCHOOL OF THE WORCESTER ART MUSEUM 



CATALOGIE ON REQUEST — ADDRESS: 55 SALISBURY STREET. WORCESTER. WAS3ACH tSETTS 



STUDY ART IN VERMONT 

JUNE 24 to AUGUST 16 

Studio classes in Oil and Water Color. Outdoor sketching in lovely New England setting. Abstract ond 
traditional. Also courses in History and Appreciation of Art for College credit. 

ADDRESS: Director of Summer Art Program WINDHAM COLLEGE, Putney, Vermont 




NSTITUTE 

OF CHICAGO 
Summer 
School 

Drawing and 
Painting, Outdoor Studios; Sculpture: Let- 
tering; Layout; Advertising Design; Ce- 
ramics; Fiat Pattern Design; Dress Design; 
Weaving; Interior Design; Accredited. 
Term begins July 1, 1957. Write for 
catalog. 

Michigan Ave. ot Adams St., Chicago 3, 111., Box 257 



BOSTON MUSEUM SCHOOL 

A DEPARTMENT OF THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS 

Est. 1876. Professional training withdiplomo course 
in Drawing, Graphic Arts, Painting, Sculpture, Jew- 
elry, Silversmithing, Commerciol Arts, Ceromics. 
16 Traveling Scholarships. Unlimited contoct with 
Museum collection. B.F.A. and B.S. in Ed. degrees 
granted by Tufts University. Catalog. 

5VEN/NG SCHOOL cerf/ficafe course in Graphic Arfs, 
Sculpture, Ceramics, Painting. Special courses in Cal- 
ligraphy, Lettering, Interior, TV, and Plastic Design. 

RUSSELL T. SMITH, Head of School 

230 Th« Fenwoy Botton, Mos». 



OHARA 



WATERCOLOR 
COURSES-1957 



Washington. D. C. through May 26 2025 St. N.W, 

Joplin. Mo.. June 3-15 . Mrs. D. J. Doan. 216 No. Byers Ave. 
San Francisco. July 15-Aug. 2.Artists' Coop.. 2224 Union St. 
Tacoma, Wash.. Aug. 12-31 

Mrs. Ruth Babbitt. 11605 Gravelly Lake Dr. 
Seattle. Wash.. Sept. 2-14 

Mrs. 0. T. Hansen. 5106 Palatine Ave. 



MORRIS 



DAVIDSON 

School of Modern Painting 

PROVINCETOWN 

Betöre June Ist — 65 West 56th Street 
coiumbus 5-7879 New York 19 



OGUNQUIT 

SCHOOL OF PAINTING & SCULPTURE 
ROBERT LAURENT SCULPTURE 

JOHN LAURENT PAINTINGS 

GRAPHICS 
July-August Cafa/og * Ogunquit, Me. 



MOORE 

INSTITUTE 

opART 



The Professional College for Ca- 
reer Women. Il3th year. Interna- 
tlonallv kiHiwii artist-lnstructors. 
State accredited 4 year B.P.A. 
or H.S. (leRree courses in Adver- 
tisioK' .\rt. .\rt Ediicatioti. Fashion 
DesiKM \- Illiistratitni. Interior «St 
Textile Design, I'aititiriK \: Illus- 
tration. Day t'v Saturday classes. 
G.I. approved. .New residence hall. 
I'hysician. I»w tuition. 

Catalog: 1326 N. Broad St. 
Philadelphia 21, Pa. 





ART CABINET 

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artists' materials. Extensively used in Studios 
and by schools, museums, golleries, agencies 
and churches. 

An eleven drawer cablnet of furniture steel. 
Cabinet size 29y2" wide, 40" high, 26%" deep. 
Inside drawer size 27%" wide, 25%" deep, 
2V8" high. Cole grey or olive green. 

No. 2526 . . . only $89.95 
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COLE STEEL EQUIPMENT CO., 415 Madlson Avenue, N. Y. 17 



catitinucd froin page 62 

(ati's. and wc uoiukr to "what cMtiu wc aie 
ohiigatcd to aitl aitists of ihis lype" (p. 1^1). 

Nor aic wc, as you say, "conceriud uitli statis- 
lics as puii'lv t'(()iioini(: facts." WC usv om inatc- 
rial to show tliat the wortliy aitist is vciv miidi 
toiucincd with his survival in the face of rom- 
pctiiion froin diUitaiitcs. Surcly von will have 
iiotcd how inany tinus we attack tlu« notion of 
c-ncoinaging ainatciii art. \ot onlv do tlusc arna- 
tcms pic cinpt a good propoition of tho avail- 
ahlc gallcry Space; worsc, they give a si/cahle 
j)cia'niage of thcir works awav giatis. It is diffi- 
ciilt for nie to iniagine how any toiiscienlions 
rcader conid have missed that onistanding i)oint. 
As to wlietlier or not a connnnnitv art center 
call solve the niany existing piohleins, we prc- 
scnted this idea nieiely as a possihilitv and far 
Icss dogmalically than von reject it. Neverthe- 
Icss, conipctent art people with as innth e.xperi- 
enee in this arca as anyone in the (onntrv do 
think it has possihiiities. 

In yom haste to nnderscore tlie studv's lack 
of "an nnderstanding of artists and the cieative 
act," yon overlook tlie anthor's associaies and 
aclvisors: iniisenin directors, art Organization 
executives. gallery owners, teacheis of art, and 
fiiialiy his artist colleagiies who did the per- 
sonal interviewing of liftv artists and thirty gal- 
lery diredors. Yonr concern "for the well-heing 
of (leative artists" does yon credit; I am reason- 
ahly (erlain that mv own concern is as great 
and as geiniine and of fai less recent date. 

Ikiiiaid S. Myeis 
(iity (lo liege of New York 
New York Clity 



SIDNEY GEIST 

continued jrom page 21 

scKJal and scientific s))lH'res; om (ontinned exist- 
ence depends npon it; and it is the ne(e.ssary prel- 
ucle to any fiitme developmenl.) Let ns not ask 
for sculpture "designed inlo ' a plate; this only re- 
siills in a mnffled Statement that (onfuses the 
\<)i(cs of the sculptor (uul the archited. Let ns 
ratlicr place the sculpture. in all ils unlampered- 
witli singularitv. heside. in or on the aichitec- 
turc. in all its innnodulated austeritv. 

Wliile the sculj)t()r would naturallv have such 
fadors as scale, massiveness and texture to con- 
sicler in a space given over to him. and while the 
ardiitec t would, in tiie siniplest lerms. have to 
proxide Space for the sculpture and take into ac- 
couiU the stvie of the sculptor wliose work he 
was (onnnissioning i^or eveii l)u\ing out of the 
studio), neilher sliould he asked to suirender a 
particie of the characler of his woik. 1 he hene- 
jits to hoth would he enoriiious: sculpture woidd 
he given a chance to operate in an atniosphere 
Iroin whicli it has heen ahsent for vears, and 
arcliilectuie would gain an elemenl that wotild 
\itali/e its impeisonal fiuic tionalisin and give it 
an added diinension. 

Aller it is admitted that inan\ sculptors are 
not inteiested in nor iitted for the arc hitectnral 
Situation, it is not the sculptor, hut the architect 
who neecls to he convinced in this disciission. He 
shoiild reali/e first of all that the sculptor is not 
his antagonist— willful. lacking in taste. inca|)ahle 
of iindeistanding aichitectuial necessities. The 
phvsical part of sculpture is nothing if not archi- 
tectural; and the sculptor is not a scidptor if he 
is not sensitive to cjnestions of mass. material, 
smface, halance, density, distance— cpiestions 
whicli architects too often feel thev alone arc 
(pialiliecl to deal with. And architects sliould re- 
meiiiher that if sculptors can inake sculpture for 
the iio-placc or any-place that is the conlempo- 
rarv nurseum, gallery or honie of an nnknown 
pnrcliascr, then they shonlcl have little trouhlc 
inaking it for the known place that an archi- 
tectinal setting provides. 

Biit in principle therc is here not necessarily 
a (piestion of inaking sculpture for a place, hut 
siniplv of effectiiig a confrontation of sctdptnrc 
and arc hitectuie. If the sculptor is tree to cx- 
press hiniself as he wishes the architect is free to 
choose the kind of voice that would l)c of most 
intercst to his project. His customarv raising of 
no voice hiit his own results in a prolonged and 
tiring single note. If to his own he adds the 
voiccs of our sculptors. he can create a harmony 
that will he new. heautifui and nnpredic tahly 
stiniulating. 



SKOWHEGAN 

SCHOOL OF PAINTING & SCULPTURE 

Faculty 

HENRY VARNUM POOR 

SIGMUND MENKES 

GEORGE GROSZ 

ANNE POOR 

SIDNEY SIMON 

HAROLD TOVISH 

Visiiing Artists 

ISABEL BISHOP 

GARDNER COX 

REED KAY 

SEYMOUR LIPTON 

AGNES MONGAN 

MAX WEBER 
WILLIAM ZORACH 

July — August 
Write for free Booklet ''IT' 

SKOWHEGAN, MAINE 



ART STUDENTS 
LEAGUE OF N. Y. 

announces its Summer Schools in 
Woodstock, N. y. and New York City 

June 3 to August 20, 1957 

Instructors in Woodstock 

Arnold Blonch 

Edward Chavez (July only) 

Zygmunt Menkes (August only) 

Frank J. Reilly 

Instructors in New York 



Charles Aiston Morris Kontor 
Richard ßove i Bernard Klonis 
Dagmar Freuchen \ Frank J. Reilly 

drawing/painting 

illustration/anatomy 

fashion illustration/landscape 

Füll or Part-Time Regist ration 

Write or phone for free catalogue 

Stewart Klonis, Director 

215 W. 57th St., N. Y. C. CIrcle 7-4510 



STUDY IN 

CALIFORNIA 



PASADENA 

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 

Send for prospectus no^r 
Frod« N. Dann, Director 

314 SOUTH MENTOR AVENUE, PASADENA 5, CAlIf 



6-/ 



ARTS u.n /'>57 



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ROLAND PIERSON PRICKEH 

Eastwind Studios Millerton, New York 



PENNA. ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS 



Special Summer Session 



July 1-August 9 



Unusual opportunity to study Landscape, Life Portrait, 
Graphics with notable artists at America's oldest and 
most distinguished Fine Arts school. Professional 
caliber. For catalogue write R. D. Entenmann. 

116 N. BROAD ST., PHILADELPHIA 2, PA. 



WHERE TO SHOW 



NATIONAL 

HYANNIS, MASSACHUSETTS 

iWVV. COD ARl ASSOCIMION SlIMMFR I XIIIIW IIONS. 

I) Mcmhcrs' Opcii Sliou. func 4 20; work diic 
May 31, junc I. 2) jiiiv Show, julv 2-.'U; work 
(hu- JnMc 27, 2H. 'S) Jnrv Show. Aii^^. (i-30: work 
(lue AiijT. 1,2. 1) F.vcryiiians Show, Sept. -VOd. 
2; work diic \\\^. 30. 31. All iiudia, iiKlu(liii<' 
sciilplme. riizcs. Memlu rshi[) fcc: $4. Wrilc: 
Cape C(hI Alt .Assn.. Iio\ S31, Hyaniiis. .Mass. 

NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND 

4()rii WNUAi I xiirumoN. Ai l Association of New 
porl. julv 3 2S. Open to li\in<; American artists. 
Nfediii: oil, walereolor, prints. sniall s(uli)ture. 
fury. Fee: .'iji2 (for non inenihers). Kntrv cards 
(lue jiuie S, work (lue june 17. \\ rite: Art Assn 
of Newport. li\ Bellevue .\vc., Newport, R. T. 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

AKrisis ^^()\^.^lOlIs 3ui) (HARTriuv, Adam Ahah 
Gallerv, J«mc f» 28. All painting media (no largc 
paintings). jurv. Awards: 3 man and nrroup shows. 
Fee: .Ifl, S2 or .53 arcording to size of work. AVork 
(lue Iv Nfav 17. Write: Xdani Ahai) Gallerv. 72 
Thompson St., New York 12. N. Y. 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

iioni.i.v ANNiiAf. nuAwiNc r.oMiM riTioN, Uodlev 
Gallerv. Junc 17 29. Oi)en (o all artists. ^^edia: 
hlack and -white in ink. peiu il or charco.d. Jury. 
Prizcs. Fee: S3 per entrv: limil of 3 entries per 
nrtist. Wriic: Rodley Galleiy. 223 F. GOtli St., 
New York 22. N. Y. 



OGUNQUIT, MAINE 

37iii ANNHAi, FXiuiniioN, OgiuKiuit Art Center, 
fime 30 .Sept. 2. Open to professional artists. 
^^(■(lia: oil :md watercolor. No jnrv. Pri/es. Fee: 
.1!;iO. Work (lue hv June 0, ^Vrite: N. Vavana. 
Ogiui(|iMt An r-nler. IfoMs l,;ine. Oguntpiit . \\v. 

SARANAC LAKE, NEW YORK 

ADiKONHArK A\N( AI . Dorotliv Yepe/ C;:dleries. 
Julv 1 20. Open to all arlisis. Nfedia: oil. water- 
color. pnslcl. scidpture. Fee: S3. Jurv. Pri/es. 
Fntrv rards dnc hv June I. work duc Jinie 21. 
Write: Dorothv Yepez (;alleries, TTappv Afanor. 
Bloom injrdale Road. Saranae Fake. N. Y. 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 

mrii.r.R in.stitutf. of amiritan Aicr 22m> anniai. 
MinvFAR .SHOW, July 1-Sept. 2. Open to all art 
ists in llic U. S. and terrilories. Nfedia: oil and 
watercolor. Fntrv fee. Judizes: IIoncI Goodrich, 
William Tlion. Over .'Sr),000 in pri/cN. ^\'ork (lue 
hv |«me 2. ^\'rile: Secretarv. Huller Inslitule of 
American Art. Youngstown 2. Ohio. 



REGIONAL 

ATHENS, OHIO 

MiH omc) vAM.rv ou and waifrcoiou rxinitt- 

TiON, Ohio llniversitv College of Fine Arls. Jidv 
1-31. Fntry cards diie hv June 1. ^Vrile: Fredrr 
ick D. T.eacli. Director, School of Painting and 
Allicd Arts. Ohio rni\ersitv, Athens. Ohio. 

CLINTON, NEW JERSEY 

4iii STAiF-wmF ixtnnniON. TTunlerdon Coinilv 
Art Center. June 2 30. Open to all N. J. artisis. 
Nfedia: oil. watercolor. sculpture. Jurv. Pri/es. 
\\V)rk (lue >rav 21. Write: llunlerdon GouiUv 
Art Center. Clinton. N. J. 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN . 

11 MI WM'M. Michigan Watercolor .Societv, June 
2-22. Open to all native and resident Michigan 
watercolorisis. Jurv. Fee. Five SIOO pri/es plus 
olher :iwnr(ls. F.ntrv cards due Mav II. work duc 
Mav 18. ^^'ri^e: Trene Miakinin. 8210 Hart well, 
Helroii 2S. Muh. 

NEW CANAAN, CONNECTICUT 

Sm WM AI \r\\ I \(.i AM) ixniiurioN. Silvermme 
Guild of Artists. |iuie 0-Julv 10. Open to artists 
hoin or resident in New Fngland states, N. Y., 
N. |. and Pa. Media: oil. water(()lor. casein. 
sculpture. |inv. Approx. SFOOO in pri/es. AVork 
due Mas 1(1-12. \Vrite: Revington Arthur. Silver- 
mine Guild of \rtists. Norwalk. Coiui. 



65 




TM 



THIS SUMMER 

studv al 

PENN STATE 

Course^ in <>il and water rolor 
pairitin;;, mural painting, art his- 
tory and appreciation, eraft*^, 
grapliie-, and the teadung of art 
linder >ueh speeialists a>: 

KEN.NKTir R. Hfittkl 

YaR (i. CnoMirKY 

Hafu)!.!) K. Dickson 
Syhil D. Kmkkson 
Jt LH s Hkllkh 

ViKIOtJ FoWKNFKLD 
l^DWAIH) L. \IaTTIL 
l^M I. F. NOHTON 
HolJSON 1^ ITT MAN 
AnDMKK Kl KLI.AN 
.|()HN TaYLOH 

Win.ston K. Wkismw 

jor huUftin injormntinn (td(brfss: 

i)ea.i (»f thr Sunnner Sessions 
ENNSYLVAMA STATE 

l N I V E R S I T Y 
ersitv Park, l'ennsvlvania 




25th ANNIVERSARY SESSION 
University of Alberto 

BANFF SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 

June 17th to September 7th, 1957 

Painting, Music, Piano, Choral, Strings, Compo- 
sition, Singing, Drama, Ballet, Weaving, Cerom- 
ics, Interior Decoration, Television— Radio & 
Playwriting, Short Story, Oral French and Pho- 
tography. 

for Calendar write: 

Director, BonflF School of Fine Arts 
BanfF, Alberto 




College Level 4- Year Courses 

Inferior Design, Commerciol Design, Painting, 
Illustration, Graphic Arts, Product Design, 
Sculpture, and Liberal Arts. Scholarships. 
Degrees. 13-acre campus. Dormitories. Many 
famous graduates. (Also Summer Sessions) 

KANSAS CITY ART INSTITUTE 
& SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

4415 -W Worwick, KansasCity, Missouri 




CHAUTAUQUA ART CENTER 

REVINGTON ARTHUR 

CIL and WATERCOLOR 

Syracttse I nivt-rsity (redits • Summrr Sports 

Symphony itrchrstra • imatrurs Invited 
July and .4usu«t • For Tatalog )X rite 

Mrs. RUTH SKINNER, Secy., Chautauquo, N. Y. 



COLORADO SPRINGS 
FINE ARTS CENTER 

lAincicccp ART TEACHING METHODS 

WUtLM-tK ^^^ HISTORY-CONTEMPORARY 

SABEAN DESIGN 

CHENOWETH g«*WlN<| 

GRALAPP JEWELRY 

SUMMER DAXES !.'^"^l"19 

JUNE 17.AUG 9 SCULPTURE 

Registrar: 30 W. Dole, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



WORKSHOP INSTRUCTION IN 

ETCHING • ENGRAVING 
UTHOGRAPHY • WOODCUT 



Füll professional equipment. Expert 
guidance. Continuous open registration. 



SPECIAL SUMMER PROGRAM 
LOWENGRUND • FRASCONI • ROGALSKI 



Write for detaiied Information to: 

Pratt — Conte mpora r i es 

GRAPHIC ART CENTRE 



1343Third Ave. 



New York 21 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF FINE & APPLIED ARTS 

Robert A. Choate, Dean 

Professional Training With a Streng Liberal 
Arts Background Towards BFA and MFA Degree 

DRAWING • PAINTING • ILLUSTRATION 

INTERIOR DESIGN • ART TEACHER TRAINING 

• ADVERTISING DESIGN • 

WRITE FOR CATALOG 
Dovid Aronson, Chairman, Division of Art 

29 GARRISON ST., BOSTON 16, MASSACHUSETTS 



jt. HARTFORD ART SCHOOL 




painting • graphic arts 
sculpture * advertising arf 

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SUMMER PRINT CALENDAR 

For (nnil>lrl(' itifoniuitioti write to Ihr l'rhit 
('.oufHil of Anu)i((i, ^^27 Mtidison Ax'innc, Jioom 
>//. \ru' York 22. \. 1. 

AKRON, OHIO 

ART INSTITUTE, Apr. 30-June 2: Annual Moy Show; 
July 6-28: Ohio Printmakers Annual 
ALBANY, NEW YORK 

PRINT CLUB, Moy 1-30: G. E. Cook, lithos. 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

FOGG ART MUSEUM, May 20-June 22: Gray col. 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

HUNTER COLLEGE, July 9-29: Kirchner & Neide 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 

ART MUSEUM, Moy 4-29: Annual Ohio Printmakers 
Exhib.; June 5-Sept. 25: R. Blum 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

ART INSTITUTE BLDG., May 15-June 23: May Show 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

GALLERY OF FINE ARTS, Summer: G. Bellows 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

WADSWORTH ATHENEUM, Mar. 20 June 1: Recent 

Acq. Prnts.; Apr. 5-June 9: Daumier lithos. 
HONOLULU, T. H. 

ACADEMY OF ARTS, May 2-June 2: Honolulu Print 

Mkrs.; June 4-July 14: Chinese Woodblocks 
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

ATKINS MUSEUM, May 2-June 2: Mid-Amer. 
KENNEBUNKPORT, MAINE 

BRICK STORE, May 26-June 30: N. Shore Prnts. 
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA 

ART ASSOC, May 8-28: Print Mkrs. Soc. of Cal. 
LAWRENCEVILLE, NEW JERSEY 

LAWRENCEVILLE SCHOOL, May 6-27: Cat Prints 
LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 

ART CENTER, June 2 July 20: K. Adams, lithos.; 

July 31-Aug. 31: H, Wolf, wood engrvngs. 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

L. A. COUNTY LIBRARY, May 1-July: Print Mkers. 

Soc. of Cal. 
LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

SPEED MUSEUM, May 1-22: G. Bellows; Moy 13-June 

3: Motisse; June 3-24: Kirchner & Noide; July 1-31: 

Cont. Brazil. 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

UNIVERSITY GALLERY, Apr. 8-May 31: Etchngs.; 

June 5-July 5: H. Sternberg, prnts. 

WALKER GALLERY, June 28-Aug 9: Matisse 
NEW YORK CITY 

INTERNATIONAL GRAPHIC ART SOC. (65 W. 56), 

May 1-Aug.: Internati. Contemp. 
MELTZER GALLERY (38 W. 57), May 21 June 17: 

Nat'l Serigraph Soc. 
MUSEUM OF CITY OF NEW YORK, Apr. 24-Sept. 

3: Currier & Ives 
N. Y. PUBLIC LIBRARY, (5th Ave. & 42nd St.), oll 

Summer: "Birds & Beasts," prnts. 
WEYHE GALLERY (794 Lex. Ave.), May: J. Fried- 

laender, etchngs. 
OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA. 

ART CENTER, June 9-30: "Jap. Woodcuts 11" 
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA 

ART CENTER, July 14-Sept. 15: "Amer. Printmakers" 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

PRINT CLUB, May: Bay Printmakers of Col. 
MUSEUM OF ART, May 20-Aug. 31: Expressionist 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE, Apr. 1-May 12: M. Cassott, 
prnts.; Moy 13-Sept. 29: Three Scipt.-Prntmkers. 
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

RUNDEL GALLERY, May 5-26: "Jap Woodcuts I" 
ROSWELL, NEW MEXICO 

MUSEUM, June 9-30: "Contemp. Ger. Prnts." 
SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 

FINE ART GALLERY, June 5-23: Contemp. Fr. Prnts. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

LEGION OF HONOR: June 8-July 7: Ger. Impres- 
sionism; July 13-Aug. 11: W. Hollar; Aug. 17- 
Sept. 15: "Our Daily Bread" 
DE YOUNG MUSEUM 

\ May 5-26: / "Jap. Fish Prn^s."; July 1-Sept. 15: 
} June 9-30: \ "Contemp. Ger. Prints." 
R. E. LEWIS, INC. (555 Sutter St.), May 6-25: Villon; 
June 3-29: Kollwitz; July 1-27: Hokusai 

MUSEUM OF ART, Aug. 15-Sept. 15: Cont. Brazil. 
SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO 

N. M. MUSEUM, Aug. 18-Sept. 30: Open-Door Exhib. 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

SMITH, Apr. 16-May 15: Amer. Print Soc. Annual 
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 

CITY ART MUSEUM, May 1-15: Flowers, Plants, 

Seasons; June 1-July 31: H. Siegl, L. Pierce 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

LIB. OF CONGRESS, Moy 1-Aug. 31: Nat'l. Exhib. 
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 

NORTON, July 1-31: Palm Beoch Art Leog. 
WICHITA, KANSAS 

ART MUSEUM, May 1-Aug. 31: Perm. Coli. 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

ART MUSEUM, Moy 20-June 17: Toulouse-Lautrec 




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CALENDAR OF EXHIBITIONS 









ATHENS, GA. 

MUSEUM, May 5-26: Amer. Arch. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

MUSEUM, to May 26: Baltimore 
W'cols.; May 3-24: Landscape 
Architecture 
BELOIT, WISC. 

SCHERMERHORN, to Moy 31: R. 

Marx, C. Fitz-Gerald 
BOSTON, MASS. 

DOLL & RICHARDS, May 6-18: M. 

Fan Tchun Pi 
MUSEUM, to May 28: New Eng. 

Miniatures 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

ART INST., to June 16: Ray Wielgus 

African Coli.; May 8-June 9: Cont. 

Amer. Art Soc. Annual; Prizewin- 

ners Annual 
DENVER, COLO. 

MUSEUM, to May 12: Pacific Arts; to 

May 19: Conquest of Space 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

WADSWORTH ATHENEUM, May 4- 

June 9: Conn. W'col. Soc. 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

HERRON MUS., to May 19: Design in 

Scandinavia 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

NELSON, May 2-June 2: Mid-Amer- 
ica Annual 
LONDON, ENG. 

GIMPEL FILS, Cont. Brit. 
HANOVER, May 2-June 14: R. Butler 
LEFEVRE, May 1-June 1: E. Burra 

TOOTH, to May 25: B. Büffet 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

FERUS, May 10-June 7: H. Levy 
HATFIELD, May: Mod. Fr. & Amer. 

STENDAHL, May: Pre-Col. & Mod. 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

SPEED MUS., May 6-27: Cont. Dutch 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 

BROOKS, May 5-26: Sargent W'cols. 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

ART INST., May 2-31: Wis. Annual 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

INST., to May 12: L. Feininger; to 
June 2: Scipt.; May 8-June 2: 
Peterdi 

WALKER, to May 20: S. Davis; May 

26-June 23: Cont. Brit. 
MONTCLAIR, N. J. 

MUSEUM, May 5-26: N. J. Artists 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 

STUDIO GALLERY, to May 18: C. 

Carter 
NEWARK, N. J. 

MUSEUM, to May 19: Eorly N.J. 

Artists; to June 16: Art in Judaism 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 
tA\»sevn\s; 

BROOKLYN (Eastern Pkwy.), to May 

26: W'cols. 
COOPER UNION MUS. (Cooper Sq.), 

May 23-Aug.: 6 Decades Collection 
GUGGENHEIM (7 E. 72), to May 19: 

Internat'l. Award Ptgs. 
JEWISH (5th at 92nd), from Moy 16: 

Strouss-Rothschild Collection 
METROPOLITAN (5th at 82nd), to 

Sept.: Greek Vases, Heorst Coli.; 

from Apr. 26: Rodin & Fr. ScIpt. 
MODERN (11 W. 53), to Moy 12: 

New Talent X; from Moy 22: Pi- 
casso 
PRIMITIVE ART (15 W. 54), May: 

Selections from Perm. Coli. 
NAT'L ACAD. (1083 5th), May 9-26: 

Nat'l. Assoc. Women Artists 
RIVERSIDE (310 Riv. Dr.), to May 

19: Soc. Young Amer. Artists 
WHITNEY (22 W. 54), to June 16: 

H. Hofmann retrospective 
Gaf/eries: 

A.A.A. (712 5th at 5S), May 6-June 1: 

Points of View '57 
k.Z.fK. (63 E. 57), to May 11: 

W. Gropper; May 13-25: S. Dreyfus 
ADAM-AHAB (72 Thompson, Tu., Th., 

12-2, 8-10), Artists Anon. 2nd 

Quart. 
ALAN (32 E. 65), May 7-25: J. 

Levine 
AMER. SCANDINAVIAN FNDTN. (127 

E. 73), May 13-25: R. L. Sandberg- 
Johansson 
ARGENT (236 E. 60), May 13-June 1: 

Swiss Women, w'cols., grophics 
ARTISTS' (851 Lex. at 64), May 11- 

30: M. Greenfield 



ARTS (62 W. 56), May 2-16: Di Paolo; 

Sugimoto; Wolowen 
BABCOCK (805 Mod. at 68), May 6- 

29: I. Marantz 
BARONE (1018 Mad. at 79), to May 
11: D. Carrick, C. Shelton; from 
May 13: ScIpt. Garden 
BARZANSKY (1071 Mad. at 81), May 

6-18: G. Lipson 
BODLEY (223 E. 60), to May 11: R. 

Brown; May 13-25: L. Weaver 
BORGENICHT (1018 Mad. at 79), to 
May 18: Santomaso; May 20-June 
15: J. Ernst 
BURR (108 W. 56), May 5-18: W. B. 

Sherman; May 19-June 1: Grp. 
CADAN (150 E. 78), May 9-30: Abi- 

dine 
CAMINO (92 E. 10), May 10-31: 

ScIpt. 
CARLEBACH (937 3rd et 56), Primi- 

tive Art 
CARSTAIRS (11 E. 57), May 7-29: 

Grp. 
CASTELLI (4 E. 77), May 6-25: Spring 

Show 
CHASE (29 E. 64), May 6-18: A. King; 

May 20-June 8: W. Meyerowitz 
COLLECTORS' (49 W. 53), to Moy 19: 
Coignard; May 20-June 2: J. Gut- 
man 
COMERFORD {55 E. 55), May: Japa- 
nese prints & w'cols. 
CONTEMPORARY ARTS (802 Lex. at 
62), May 13-31: S. J. Davis, scIpt. 
CRESPI (232 E. 58), to May 4: C. 

Petrina 
D'ARCY (19 E. 76), May 1-31: TiatiIco 

to Maya 
DAVIS (231 E. 60), to Moy 31: Inti- 

mate Private Coli. 
DE AENLLE (59 W. 53), to May 25: 

Echave 

DELACORTE (822 Mad. at 69), to 

May 11: Peruvian Textiles, Pottery 

DE NAGY (24 E. 67), to May 11: 

P. Georges; May 15-June 1: Por- 

traits by Ptrs. 

DOWNTOWN (32 E. 51), to May 25: 

Grp. 
DURLACHER (11 E. 57), to May 18: 

G. Russell 
DUVEEN-GRAHAM (1014 Mad. at 
79), to Moy 18: D. Hood; Moy 7- 
25: L Robins 
EGGLESTON (969 Mad. at 76), May 

6-25: C. Kibel 
EMMERICH (18 E. 77), May 1-31: 

Pre-Col. 
ESTE (32 E. 65), May 1-16: S. 

Schames 
FEIGL (601 Mad. at 57), May 1-June 

15: Cont. Amer. & Eur. 
FINE ARTS ASSOC. (41 E. 57), May 

13-June 7: Cont. Ptg. & ScIpt. 
FLEISCHMAN (227 E. 10), to May 20: 

J. Stanley 
FRIED (40 E. 68), to May 11: J. 

Xceron; Moy 1 1-June 8: Grp. 
FURMAN (17 E. 82), to June 25: Pre- 
Col. 
G. GALLERY (200 E. 59), from May 

7: Grp. 
GALERIE BOISSEVAIN (31 E. 63), to 
May 4: J. Vardo; May 7-28: A. 
Sims, scIpt. 
GALERIE CHALETTE (1100 Mad.), to 

Moy 25: A. Deroin 
GALERIE ST. ETIENNE (46 W. 57), 

May 6-June 4: Grandma Moses 
GALLERY 75 (30 E. 75), to May 31: 

L. Fini 
GRAHAM (1014 Mad. at 78), Moy: 

J. Clark, Animal Bronzes 
GRAND CENTRAL (15 Vand. at 42), 
to Moy 11: D. Boise; Moy 7-17: 
F. Whitaker; E. Monaghon; May 
20-31: R. Delano 
GRAND CENTRAL MODERNS (1018 
Mod. at 79), to Moy 17: A. Osver; 
Moy 21-June 14: H. Hensel 
HAMMER (51 E. 57), May 1-14: Loch- 



mon 



HANSA (210 Cent. Pk. So.), Moy 6- 
25: G. Segol 



HARTERT (22 E. 58), May 1-31: 

Amer. & Fr. Ptg. 

HELLER (63 E. 57), To Moy 18: Grp.; 

May 21-June 8: Scolini; Christiane 

HEWITT (29 E. 65), to Moy 18: E. 

Nadelman; May 20-June 15: Grp. 

HIRSCHL & ADLER (21 E. 67), Fine 

Ptgs. 
lOLAS (123 E. 55), Apr. 17-May 17: 

M. Ernst 
JACKSON (32 E. 69), Moy 7.June 
14: Europ. & Amer. Drwgs,; May 
14-June 14: M. Hartley 
JAMES (70 E. 12), to Moy 16: R. 
Fasanella; May 17-June 6: N. Bill- 
myer, V. Schnell 
JANIS (15 E. 57), to May 11: 
Brancusi to Giacometti; May 13- 
June 8: Motherwell 
JUSTER (154 E. 79), to Moy 25: A. 

Clave; E. Greco 
KENNEDY (785 5th at 59), May: A. 

Jonnioux 
KLEEMANN (11 E. 68), to May 25: 

H. Joenisch 
KNOEDLER (14 E. 57), May 7-25: 

Cont. ScIpt. & W'cols. 
KOOTZ (1018 Mad. at 79), Moy 6- 

June 14: Rec. Fr. Acq. 
KOTTLER (3 E. 65), to May 11: 3-Man; 
M. Koven; Moy 13-25: P. Steiger- 
wald 
KRAUSHAAR (1055 Mad. at 80), to 
May 11: J. Heliker; Moy 20-June 
7: Pointer-Printmokers 
LIBR. OF PTGS. (28 E. 72), to Moy 

23: 3-Man 
LILLIPUT (231V2 Eliz., by App't.), 

May: Adam-Ahab Vorionts 
LITTLE STUDIO (673 Mod. at 61), May 

1-15: A. Jegart 
LOWER EASTSIDE NEIGHBORHOOD 
ASSOC. (St. Marks, 2nd Ave. at 
10), to May 26: Annual 
MARCH (95 E. 10): Grp. 
MELTZER (38 W. 57), to May 18: 5- 

Man Grp. 
MI CHOU (36 W. 56), May 13-June 

15: Hua Li, w'cols. 
MIDTOWN (17 E. 57), May 7-June 

8: 25th Anniv. Show 
MILCH {55 E. 57), to May 4: J. Whorf 
MORRIS (174 Waverly PI.), May 8- 

25: C. Lossiter 
NEW (601 Mod. at 57), May 1-31: 

19th C. Fr. Drwgs., W'cols. 
NEW ART CTR. (1193 Lex. at 81), 

Moy 7-25: Die Brücke 
NEWHOUSE (15 E. 57), May: 18th 

C. Eng., Fr.; Old Masters 

PANORAS (62 W. 56), to May 11: 

E. B. Webster; May 13-25: F. Smik; 

Moy 27-June 8: J. Goodman, drwg. 

PARMA (1111 Lex. at 77), May 2- 

21: L. Sterne 
PARSONS (15 E. 57), to May 1 1 : M. 
Taylor, scIpt.; D. Sturm; Moy 13- 
June 1: M. Morgan; S. Sekula 
PASSEDOIT (121 E. 57), to May 18: 
J. M. Hanson; May 22-June 15: W. 
Crovello 
PERIDOT (820 Mad. ot 68), to May 

25: C. Cicero 
PERLS (1016 Mad. at 78), to May 31: 

Pascin & Schi, of Paris 
PETITE (129 W. 56), May 6-18: M. 

Frory; Moy 20-June 1: Grp. 
PIETRANTONIO (26 E. 84), May 1- 

15: A. Ceruzzi, M. Hollinger 
POINDEXTER (21 W. 56), to May 7: 
Stefanelli; Moy 13-June 1: D. von 
Schlegell 
REHN (683 5th ot 54), to May 18: 

R. Mintz 
ROERICH (319 W. 107), to May 26: 

C. Schwebel 
ROKO (925 Mad. at 74), to May 23: 

J. Bageris 
ROSENBERG (20 E. 79), Moy: 19th & 
20th C. Fr., 20th C. Amer. Ptgs. & 
ScIpt. 
SAGITTARIUS (46 E. 57), to May 13: 

Beldy; Moy 15-31: Vespignani 
SAIDENBERG (10 E. 77), to May 4: 
L. Chadwick; from May 13: Homoge 
to Kahnweiler 
SALPETER (42 E. 57), to Moy 1 1 : S. 

Farber; Moy 13-31: N. Davis 
SCHAEFFER (983 Park), Old Masters 



B. SCHAEFER (32 E. 57), May 6-25: 

W. Kamys 
SCHONEMAN (63 E. 57), to May 16: 

Rouault; E. Weill, scIpt. 
SEGY (708 Lex. at 57), to Moy 15: 

Abstr. Forms m Afr. Art 
SELIGMANN (5. E. 57), May 6-24: R. 

Florsheim 
SILBERMAN (1014 Mad. at 78), Old 

Masters 
STABLE (924 7th at 58), to May 4: 
J. Tworkov; May 7-June 1: Annual 
SUDAMERICANA (866 Lex. ot 65), 
to May 18: M. Tarragona; May 20- 
June 8: Latin Amer. Grp. 
TANAGER (90 E. 10), to May 9: 3- 

Mon; May 10-31: Grp. 
TERRAIN (20 W. 16), May: Black & 

White 
THEATRE EAST (211 E. 60), to May 

28: J. Rigaud 
THE CONTEMPORARIES (992 Mad. 
ot 77), to May 11: Amer. Abstract; 
Moy 13-31: D. S. Badue 
TOZZI (32 E. 57), Med. & Ren. Art 
VAN DIEMEN-LILIENFELD (21 E. 57), 

to May 21: M. Padua 
VIVIANO (42 E. 57), to May 11: 
Corlyle Brown; May 13-June 15: 
Mirko 
WALKER (117 E. 57), May: 19th, 20th 

C. Amer. & Fr. 
V. WEAR (436 Mad.), May 9-31: E. 

Vondyke 
WELLONS (17 E. 64), May 6-18: V. 
Glinsky; May 20-June 1: P. Cohen 
WEYHE (794 Lex. ot 61), May 1-31: 

J. Friedlaender 
WHITE (42 E. 57), bKo>i 7-June 1: 

Grp. 
WIDDIFIELD (818 Mad. at 68), to 

Moy 18: Pre-Col. 
WILDENSTEIN (19 E. 64), to May 18: 
M. Gold; to May 1 1 : L. Quintanilla 
WILLARD (23 W. 56), May 7-31: D. 

Dehner 
WITTENBORN (1018 Mad. at 79), 
to May 18: B. Childs; May 20-June 
1: R. Loubies 
WORLD HOUSE (987 Mad. at 77), to 

May 18: Manzu 
ZABRISKIE (835 Mod. at 69), to May 
18: J. Sennhauser 
PARIS, FRANCE 

ALLENDY, to May 11: Baillargeau 
BERNHEIM, May 10-25: Moualla, 

Suraud 
BUCHER, May: Reichel 
CORDIER, May: Requichot 
DE FRANCE, Zao-Wou-Ki 
DROUET, May 7-25: Despierre 
FRICKER, May 10-31: R. Lersy 
PIERRE, to May 14: B. Dufour; May 16- 

June 1 : Macris 
RENE, May: Grp. 
SUILLEROT, Hayden 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

PA. ACAD., May 16-June 9: Com- 

petition Works 
ART ALLIANCE, May 7-June 9: 
Tamuyo; A. Redein; May 16-June 
9: Realist Ptrs.; May 17-June 9: 
Philo. ScIpt. Trends 
MACK, Moy: S. Spaulding 
SCHURZ MEM., to May 31: E. Kauf- 
mon 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

CARNEGIE INST., to May 12: M. 
Cossatt prints; to May 19: G. M. 
Koren 
ROSWELL, N. M. 

MUSEUM, May 12-27: L. Nickson 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

MUSEUM, May 3-27: Wosh. Univ. 

Exhib.; Moy 5-26: Lesueur 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

LEGION OF HONOR, May: Pierpont 

Morgan Library Treasures 

MUSEUM, to May 26: T. Roszak 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

SELIGMAN, May: M. Tobey, P. Boni- 

fos 
TAOS, N. M. 

LA GALERIA ESCONDIDA, Moy: Grp. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

CORCORAN, to Moy 26: Amer. Stoge 
DICKEY, Moy 6-22: M. Bonkemeyer 
NAT L. GALLERY, 20th C. Fr., Dole 
Coli. 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

MUSEUM, May: African Art 



66 



ARTS/A^/v i'^'^l 



•tCi 



ancient man 



discovered tfie secret 



off 



in 







iwi^c^^^ 











v^^* 

•^-^c*^ 




"^Ä. 



Prehistoric Cow from the Cave of Lascaux 



/tK^-4t-^ .'*"* 5 



but Shiva 

was the first 

io stabil Ize It 



es»**. 



r^' j^ 



The ancient artist and the primitive painters utilized the binding quahties of 
casein for their pigments but Shiva was the first to stabilize these qualities in 
a tube so that Casein Colors retain their binding characteristics indefinitely 
• It was Ramon Shiva who developed these Casein Colors for Chicago's 
Century of Progress in 1933. Since that time, artlsts have been able to obtain 
this mcst complete line of brilhant permanent Casein Colors and to use their 
unique characteristics to revolutionize modern techniques in painting. 



SHIVA 



artist's colors 

433 West Goethe Street, Chicago 10, Illinois 
SHIVA a/ways originates...WATCH ! others will Imitate 




^ 



IARG£ 
TU6E 




to4 




confrolled drying Hme . . . 
und ccntrolieä textures 



M. O. WHfTS h what tttihH hove alwttyt dretimec* of — t|vlck 
dryli»9r «bsolqtely sttfe, whtt^ oil color for mixin^, unrferpaint^ 
Itt^t dtred pdltitiri^ or hedvy impdsto. 

M. 6. WHiTß fefs yoi/ tonfrol »he d[ryin9 time — $iVfe$ y<!>u ttny 
textMfe you <fe$fre — regardless of how you öppfy «olor — with 
o brushf o knife or direct from fho ttibö. 

Yoii QW9 H »0 your$olf , . . bny M. O, WHiTi Moy. 

OurCK-DRYiNG TITANIÜM WHITE oil COLOti 

Safe . . * ISever^yellotving* . . Permanent 
non-shrwelUng. . ^non-cracking 



M. GBUMBACBER 

482 W. 34th Street, New York h iV. Y. 



iiäc* 



Ask your dealer for instructive brochure 



ir PICASSO RETROSPECTIVE 



ic FRENCH SCULPTURE 







ON EX HI BIT 



ART 

SHDWS 



M/\Y 
1957 



35c 




f 



MAY EXIIIBITIO]\§ 



^n V (ew Ujom L^it 



'i 



A. A. A., 712 Fifth Ave. Group, May G-June 1. 
A. C. A., 63 E. 57 St. W. Gropper, to May 11 ; 

S. Dreyfus, Gallery Group, May 13-25. 
ALAN, 32 E. 65 St. J. Lcvinc, May (5-25. 
ALLISON, 32 E. 57 St. G. Hellows. May 1-31. 
AM ER. ACADEMY OF AKTS AND LETT ERS, 
Broadway and 155 St. Works by New Mem- 
bers and Award Rocipients, from May 22. 
AMER. MUS. OF NAT'L HISTORY, Cen. Park 

W. and 79 St. Works by Staff Members. 
ARGENT. 236 E. 60 St. Swiss Women, May 

13-June 1. 
ART STUDENTS LG.. 215 W. 57 St. Student 

Concours. 
BABCOCK, 805 Madison Ave. I. Marantz, May 

6-29. 
BARZANSKY, 1071 Madison Ave. G. Lipson. 

May (>-18. 
BERRY-HILL. 743 Fifth Ave. European and 

American Paintinjrs. 
BIJRR, 108 W. 56 St. Group, to May 4 ; W. IJ. 

Sherman, May 5-18 ; Texas Students, from 

May 19. 
BROOKLYN MUS. OF ART, Eastern Parkway. 

Water Color International, to May 26, 
CADAN, 150 E. 78 St. Abidint", May 9-30. 
CARSTAIRS, 11 E. 57 St. Group. 
CASTELLL 4 E. 77 St. S. Brach, to May 14; 

Group, May 6-25. 
CHASE, 29 E. 64 St. A. King, May 6-18; W. 

Meyerowitz, May 20 - June 8. 
CENTRAL SYNAGOGUE COMMUNITY, 35 

E. 62 St. Third Annual Members' Show, May 

7-20. 
COLLECTOR'S, 49 W. 53 St. Coignard, to 

May 19; J. Gutman. May 20-June 1. 
CONTEMPORARIES, 992 Madison Ave. Amer. 

Abstract Artists, to May 11; D. S. Badue, 

May 13-31. 
D'ARCY, 19 E. 76th St. Pre-Columbian Art. 
DEITSCH, 51 E. 73 St. Recent Print Acquisi- 

tions, to May 31. 
DOWNTOWN, 32 E. 51 St. Group Show of 

Drawinus, May 7-31. 
DELACORTE, 822 Madison Ave. Ancient 

Peruvian, to May 11. 
DUVEEN, 18 E. 79 St. Cid Masters. 
DUVEEN-GRAHAM, 1014 Madison Ave. C. 

Gross, to May 4; D. Hood, to May 18; L. 

Robins, May 7-25. H. Solotov, fi'oni May 28. 
EGGLESTON, 969 Madison Ave. A. Lenney 

to May 4 ; C. Kibcl, May 0-25. 
EMMERICH, 18 E. 77 St. Abstract Art Be- 

foie Columbus ; Modern PaintluKS. 
ESTE, 32 E. 65 St. S. Shames, May 1-16. 
FEIGL, 601 Madison Ave. Group to May 15 
FINE ARTS ASSOCIATES, 41 E. 57 St. Lans- 

koy, to May 4 ; Contemporary Painting and 

Sculpture, May 13-June 7. 
FRENCH & CO.. 210 E. 57 St. Cid Masters. 
FRIED, 40 E. 68 St. Xceron, to May 31 
FURMAN, 17 E. 82 St. Pru-Columbian Art. 
GALLERY G, 200 E. 59 St. (Jroup. 
GALLERY 75, 30 E. 75 St. Leonoi- Fini, to 

May 15. 

GRAHAM, 1014 Madison Ave. J. L. Clark 
Sculpture. ' 

GRAND CENTRAL, 15 Vanderbilt Ave. R 
Philipp, E. O'Hara, to May 4; D. Baise to 
May 11; E. and F. Whitaker, May 7-17-' R 
Delano, May 20-31. 



GRAND CENTRAL MODERNS, 1018 Madison 
Ave. A. Osver, to May 17 ; H. Hensel, from 
May 21. 

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, 7 E. 72 St. Inter- 
national Award Winners, to May 19. 

HAMMER, 51 E. 57 St. H. Lachman, to May 

18. 

HANSA, 210 Central Park So. J. Follet to 

May 5 ; G. So^al, May 7-26. 
HARTERT, 22 E. 58 St. Kreuch and American 

Paintin^is. 
HELLER, 63 E. 57 St. Group, to May 18; 

Sealini and Cristiano, May 21-June 8. 
HIRSCHE & ADLER, 21 E. 67 St. Modern 

Painlinjjfs. 
I. B. M., 16 E. 57 St., "Art Benins at 60," May 

1-15. 
lOLAS, 123 E. 55 St. M. Ernst, to May 17. 
JACKSON, 32 E. 69 St. Drawin^'s, from May 

7; M. Hartley, from May 14. 
JANIS, 15 E. 57 St. Modern Art, to May 11; 

R. Motherwell, May 13-June 8, 
JUSTER, 154 E. 79 St. (ireco and Clave, to 

May 25. 
KENNEDY, 785 Fifth Ave. A Jonniaux. 
KLEEMANN, 11 E. 68 St. H. Jaeni«ch, to May 

31. 

KNOEDLER, 14 E. 57 St. Pulitzer Collection. 

to May 4; Contemporary Sculpture and 

Watercolors, May 7-25 ; Small Fry, from 

May 6. 
KOTTLER, 3 E. 65 St. 3-Man Show, to May 

11; M. Koven, to May 11; P. Stoigerwald, 

May 13-25. 
KRAUSHAAR. 1055 Madison Ave. J. Heliker, 

to May 11; 14 Painter-Printmakers, from 

May 20. 
LITTLE STUDIO, 673 Madison Ave. A. Jepeit, 

May 1-15. 
MATISSE, 41 E. 57 St. Modern Paintin^'s and 

Sculpture. 
MELTZER, 38 W. 57 St. Five Artists, to May 

18; Serit>:raph International, from May 21. 
METROPOLITAN MUS. OF ART, Fifth Ave. 

and 82 St. Säo Paulo Collection. to May 5 ; 

Rodin and French Sculpture; Greek Vases ; 

T. Tomioka. 
MIDTOWN, 17 E. 57 St. 25th Anniversaiy 

Exhibition, May 7-June 8. 
MI CHOU, 36 W. 56 St. Scrolls, to May 11; 

Hua Li, from May 13. 
MILCH, 55 E. 57 St. J. Whorf, to May 4 ; Con- 
temporary Group, May 6-31, 
MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, 11 W. 53 St. 

New Talent, to May 12; Picasso Retrospec- 

tive, from May 22, 
NAT'L ACADEMY, Fifth Ave. and 89 St. 

Nat'l. Assoc. of Women Artists, May 9-26. 
NAT'L ARTS CLUB, 15 Gramercy Pk. S. 

Flowcr l*aintin«^s, to May 13. 
NEW YORK UNIV., 80 Washington Sq. East. 

L. Manso, to May 7, 
NEWHOUSE, 15 E. 57 St. Old Masters. 
NIVEAU, 962 Madison Ave. Modern French 

Paintings. 
N. Y. HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 170 Central 

Park W. Colon ial and Federal Homes. New 

York City Authors- 3 New York Architects, 

from May 15. 

(Continued on page 64) 



\ 



M 




ROUAULT 

LOAN EXHIBITION 

To May 15 

SCHONEMAN CALLERIES 

63 EAST 57th STREET • NEW YORK 



[1] 




!*4»SS'\ 



Selection of Bronzes, Bas-Reliefs, and Drauings 
April 24 through May 18 



WORLD HOUSE 

Madison Avenue at 77th Street, New York 21 



galleries 



[2] 



KNOEDLER 

Established 1846 


SCULPTURE and WATERCOLORS 


by 

CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS 


May 7-25 

• 



OLD MASTERS 

FRENCH IMPRESSIONISTS 

CONTEMPORARY PAINTINGS 

AMERICAN PAINTINGS 



14 EAST 57th STREET 



LONDON 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



[3] 




"Promenade sur la Seine 



// 



LACHMAIV 



to May 18 



HRmmER GflLLERIES " "" "" """ 



NEW YORK 22 



(1) 



London Editor 
HouACE Shipp 

Sii'iss Editor 
AfAiuA Netter 



ON EXHIBIT 



CHARLES Z. OFFIN, EdHor-m-Chief 

Paris Editor AUlan Editor 

EUrnett D. Conlan Tristan Sauvage 



Germ an Editor 
John A. TnwAiTrs 



Mexico Editor 
Muriel Reger 



Holland Editor 

CORNEI.IS DOELMAN 

Boston Editor 
Robert S. Taylor 



New Y(jyk Staff: Jackson' G. Barkv. Helen De Mütt. Ralph Fahrf. 
Althea H. Loshak. Al Newbill. George Stiles 



Vol. XX, No. S 



Mav, 1957 



/;; This Issue 



Picasso is not only to be seen 
in thc hiii^c retrospective open- 
ing on May 22 at the Museum 
of Modern Art in New York, 
hut also in a display of his 
very recent paintings in the 
new qiiartcrs of the Galerie 
Leiris in Paris, reviewed on 
page 34. 

160 Paintings on loan from 
the Musee d'Art Moderne in 
l^aris are being exhibited in 
London. See page 44. 



SixTY New ^'ork I-xhibi- 
TIONS. running the gamut from 
Pre - Columbian Art to con- 
temporary works by American 
and European painters and 
sculptors, are revicwed by our 
enlarged New "l'ork staff. Turn 
to page 1 2. 



TmF PICTURE on IHE COVER 

is a painted terracotta (1953) 
by Picasso, to be included in 
this artist's retrospective at 
New York's Museum of Mod- 
ern Art. It is from the collec- 
tion of Mr. and Mrs, William 
A. M. Hürden. 



CONTENTS 

Picasso, Liherator of the Vision . 
hVcnch Sculpture at the Metropolitan 
Gallcr)- Pre\ie\\s in New York . 

Report from Paris 

London NevvS and Views .... 
Somc London Modems .... 



On Exhihit in Germany 



6 

10 
12 
34 



44 



A9 



'S! 



NLiy Exhibiticms in New ^'ork (jty 

Inside I^Vonl ( o\er 



PICTURES ON EXHIBIT is published monthly except 
July, August and September by Pictures Publishing Com- 
pany, .30 East 60th St., New York 22, N. Y., U. S. A. 
Telephone PLaza 3-6381. Single copy 3^ cents. Yearly 
.subscription $3.00. Foreign $4.00. 

The magazinc cannot as.sume responsibility for thc 
rcturn of material submitted. Reentered as .second class 
matter November 8, 1946, at the post otiice at New 
York I, N. Y.. under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



[5] 




icasso 




t 



et'aioy o 




Vi 



i6ion 



S/x Decdcles oj H/s Work ConiN/emayatecl in New York 



IV /f IS i: UMS and private coUcctors 
-'^'^-''From all ovcr Europc and the 
United States have loaned outstand- 
ingly important exaniples of the 
work t)f Picasso for a huge com- 
memorative exhibition markinp the 
revolutionär)' artist's seventy - fifth 
birthday. Jointly organized by the 
Museum of Modern Art in New 
'^^)rk and the Art Institute of Chi- 
cago, the show will open in New 
York on the 22nd of May vvith over 
300 paintings, sculpti'.res and drav.- 
ings dating from 1898 through 
1956. 

It will, without doubt, be the most 
important Picasso exhibition to be 
held m this country, differing from 
previous large Picasso shows be- 
causc of the considerable emphasis 
placed on the sculpture. There will 
be forty-eight examples in wood, 
bronze, painted metal and p.iinted 
terra cotta. Contrary to the gcneral 
impression, sculpture is not a recent 
interest of this artist, for there are 
bronzes in this exhibition that g) 
back to 190). 

Also included are forty - cight 
drawings, and the large number of 
studies Picasso made for his Gner- 
n'icä. (Will Picasso now do a simi- 
lar epic horrendous lament for thj 



destruction of human life and liberty 
in Hungary? We doubt it.) In addi- 
tion to these studies, the artist has 
loaned from his studio twenty-ninc 
other works v\hich he has never 
wanted to seil. About one-third of 
the entire exhibition is devoted to 
the work of the past twenty years. 
The only media not included in the 
show are the etchings and litho- 
graphs of which Picasso did a formi- 
dable number. Tor these there will 
be no room, as the paintings, draw- 
ings and sculpture will occupy three 
gallery floors and part of the sculp- 
ture garden. 

The exhibition, to be shown Liter 
in the year in Chicago, will be an 
epochal Q\iix\i in the annals of art, 
presenting the living evidence of 
what the French poet Paul Eluard 
characterized as Picasso' s life - long 
search in his art for "the total truth 
that joins imagination to nature, that 
deems everything real, and that go- 
ing endlessly from the particular to 
the universal and from the universal 
to the particular, accommodatcs 
itrclf to all the conditions of cxist- 
cnce." 

Mr. Alfred H. Barr, tlie Modern 
Museum 's noted authority on 
Picasso, is the planner of the show. 



[61 




Sei \ -Portrait (1901): Pablo Picasso 

Shown dt the Museum oj Moder)! Art. Seir York 

Loaned by Mr. and Mrs. John Hay Whitney 

[71 





P'/errot ctnci Harlecjuiii (1920): Pablo Picasso 

On View at the Musen ni of Modern Art, New York 

Loaned hy Mrs. Gilbert W. Chapman 



I s I 



Mother and Cb'üd: Pablo Picasso 

Ou Exhih/t at the Museum of Modern Art, New York 

Loaned by the Art Institute of Chicago 



(9 1 




mnc 



k ^cvLiptvire 



f 



Keu Yorks MelropoUian AUne;n. HolJs A Timelj lishihn 



ONE of thc intcresting manifcsta- 
tions of the continuing post- 
war boom in art collccting, cspccial- 
ly on this sidc of the Atlantic, has 
beeil thc widcsprcad zcal for the 
ownership of sculpture. It is basical- 
ly, of course, a part of the ground 
swell of Investment motivation. Col- 
Icctors whosc avid acquisitivcness 
for paintings by thc international 
big-namc artists of the 19th and 
2()th centurics has made first-rate 
pictures.scarcer to tind — and there- 
for progressively zooming m pricc 
— have turned to the sculpture held 
where works by famous artists arc 
more readily available and, until a 
couple of years ago, relatively more 
reasonablc in price. 

In this context of current sculp- 
ture activity — amply reflected in 
the reviews of exhibitions that hll 
this issue of the magazine you are 
now reading - it is most opportune 
for the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art in New York to bring together 
for a special exhibition its extensive 
holdings in French sculpture. Ar- 
ranged along the four sides of the 
large balcony, the exhibit is particu- 
larly rieh in its Rodin and Degas 
pieces which dominatc the show. 

Displayed in two enormous glass 
cases that face each other from op- 
posite ends of the balcony are the 



famous serics of some seventy small 
bronzes by Degas: the ballet dancers, 
women bathers, and race horses 
which were cast from wax and clay 
modeis found in Degas' studio after 
his death in 1917. They were pur- 
chased by Mr. H. O. Havemeyer 
whose widow presented this large 
and fascinating group of action- 
study bronzes to the museum. 

The Metropolitan's Rodin collec- 
tion is rivalled by few others outside 
France — thanks chiefly to the gen- 
crosity of the late Thomas Fortune 
Ryan — and here we see the famous 
The Thinkey in a small bronze Ver- 
sion and also in a colossal plaster 
cast; the marble Häncl of GocL Pyg- 
malion and Galatea, Love and 
Psyche, etc.; and numerous plaster 
studies of heads, hgures and hands. 
Many of Rodin's wash drawings are 

also shown. 

Other sculptors included, but to 
a lesser degree, are Maillol, Bour- 
delle and Hernandez. The most mod- 
ern piece is a Brancusi head recently 
acquired from the Stieglitz bequest. 

Most of the museum' s French 
sculpture collect ion was acquired 
decades ago and it needs being 
brought more up-to-date. And a less 
distracting locale than the balcony 
would do more justice to the inter- 
esting exhibit now being presented. 





"n 


,,-5r;;'. ■■■■■'*■■■■<*» 




HH'.K'} 1 


-—«was 


^"'•x^im 


■'*t', '''^^'^' •,■ 1 






'< ,*', ' * "".• 1 






wOtfcfc 







o 



Hercules: Emile Antoine Bourdelle (1861-1929) 
„ View at Ihe Melwpolita>! Museum of Art, New \ ork 



[11] 



101 




aiiet' 



^ 



j-^reul 



n 



mviews in v lew 



B) Thi: Macazinh Siaft 




GKOKCKS Roi-Ari/r. ci.i;iuy->i.\-year 
()l(l (lean ot' iM-eiich painters and 
one of llie .tifeat masters n\ tiiis ceii- 
turv wlio is sure to be lield in lii.iih 
csteeni bv l'ntnre j^enerations as well, 
is ibe >nbiecl of a clioice loan exlnbi- 
tion ot tiiirtv-tbree ])aintini;-> at tlio 
Scbonenian ( lalleries. Witb fcw excep- 
tions. all the paintin.^s were plaoed ni 
private collections in tbis coimtry by 
tii. alt rirni. and niany are bein.^- imb- 
liclv exbibited tor tbe Hrst tnne. 
Tliouiib tbe cataU).i;iie i^ives no dates 
to tbe canvase> (Kotiatilt never dated 
lii> pictures) it is easy to identify niost 
of tbeni as fallini;- into bis niost .^low- 
iiio- und incandescent ])eriod ot tbe 
l'Ji30's and earlv l<)4(r>. Tbe earbest, 
Lr Uaubourcj, is a street scene done 
wben tbe artist still worked in ratlier 
tbin i)ij;inent. A niajestically otUstand- 
ing tigure subject is Duo, lent by Mr. 
and Mrs. Norbert Scbininiel wbo bave 
contrilmted >ix paintin.^s to tlie sbow . 
P>iblical landscapes are excei)ti()nally 
well represented in stieb Inniinous 
works as 1 .c l'ii(/itif ( froni Si(biey 1'. 
Lipkins). Crcpuscidc (froni Mr. and 
Mr>. l''. SerjLier). and Christ and tlic 
TiiU) Pisciflcs (froni Julian and Jean 
Auerbacb). Tbe exbibition will be 
cm-reiit tbrou.ub M«iy 1^^- ^- ^- ^^• 

:ii * * 

r^miuw: Bkllows worked at a tiine 
^^ üben ])ainting i)ictures was still a 
pleasnrable activity. His oils, at H. V. 
.\llison tbrout^b May. offer botb re- 
fresbinent and nostalmia. for be is not 
so lar aw-ay as to seeiii Olynipian. yet 
just tar enoui^b to enieriie as one (ü' tbe 



bt'sl j)ainter> in a robust era ot onr 

inniiediate pa>t. )'oiiU(i (iirl i^'itli n 

(irccti Hat (1*H5) seenis in no sense 

i'aded. for tbe artist's non-intellectual- 

i/.ed pleasiire in wbat be saw and 

transposed to the canvas witli >nccinct 

draw in.i;. deli.i^btful color and freijubted, 

Ibient brusb. is conveyed directly to tbe 

.iewer. Its air of niodernity conies 

from tbe conlident siniplicity of tbe 

coniposition. weii;iited a little to one 

side; tbe bold drawin.i;- in tbe tlattened 

planes of tbe ])ale face and in tbe loops 

of bair: and tbe elei;ance of tbe color 

— wbeat and .^old in the dress. inoss- 

.L^reen in tbe hat. This, and /{//////(/ /// </// 

Orcharcl {V)\C)), the only i)ortrait he 

l)ainted conipletely outdoors, are hi,L;b 

])oints in tbe i^-roup, bnt bis (kisbin.L;- 

brusb work is als(j to be ai)i)reciated in 

several ])leasant marines. A. l». L. 

♦ * »K 

iiAiM (Iross' new show at tbe Du- 
veen-(irahani exhibits a buoyaiit 
teni])eranient. an ener.^etic nature and 
a niature skill. Uns sculi)tor treats his 
sonietinies recalcitrant niaterial witb 
alTection and resi)ev:t. draw in,;;- froni tbe 
w-ood (niali()!-any, ebony. lii;nuin vitae 
and Mexican rosewood) tbe forins ol 
the rrond Mothcr, or the Ilappy 
Motlicr, or die VoinH/ Mothcr so rever- 
enced by the artist and so joyously 
coninieniorated. In the soarini;- inove- 
inent of Hirds, with its sli^btly sinister 
su.^mestions and the undulant rbythnis 
of Crouchiui] I'i(/iirc, in i)ink alabaster. 
tbeine. coniposition and niaterial are 
coniposed in a mratifyini;- aestbetic So- 
lution. A ,u:roup of sinall bron/es, play- 



C 



WILDENSTEIN 



& CO., Inc. 



P A I N T I N C S 
by 



LUIS QUINTANILLA 



through May I I 



SCULPTURE 
by 



MARIANNE GOLD 



( 12] 



through May 18 



10 +0 5:30 



closed Sunday 



19 East 64th Street, New York 



tisJ 



lul c'uul aninialed hm occasionally re- 
tiectin^' a iiiotif (le\ cloped in a iiiore 
massive form, completc the sliow alon.i; 
with a selection ot draw in.i^s by tliis 
versatile artist. Cl. S. 



ÜASCiN is represeiited hy teil oils 

(alonpf with a dozeii small water- 

colors) that are all so comi)letely de- 

veloped in color tliat tliey make tlie 

most im|)ressive re])resentation ot 

Pascin on tlie teclmical level that we 

liave had in this country. Startin.s: with 

two vividly colored C'uhan suhjects of 

1917, then to a 1<H8 slii^luly cuhist ])or- 

trait ot Herniine David, and on to the 

later nndes and "jeiine tille" suhjects of 

1925-26, we tin(l this artist's varyin^- 

concern for desijL^'n, hiit in all of the 

canvases color is rieh and ji^^enerously 

apj)lied. Also on exhihition is a i^roiip 

of the .uallery's recent accpiisitions in 

modern French paintini^'s : a faiive 

period harhor scene hy Raonl Dufy, a 

boy in a hlue suit by Soutine, and a 

circus ^irl by Rouault heini;" a few of 

the en,ii;ai^"inin" itenis in this section. 

C. Z. (). 
1^ t * 

"T^UKXDS IN W'aTKRCOLOUS 'l'oDAV 

^ Ttai.v, L'xitk!) Sta'iks" at The 
]^)rooklyn Museum is the 19th in the 
biennial international series pioneered 
by the niuseum to show the proj^ressive 
trends in contemporary watercolor 
paintin^s. The nmseum has elected this 
year to show work from italy in addi- 
tion to the usual lariL^e representation 
from the United States. 11ie show is 
com])rised of 22vS watercolors — two or 
three each by fifty-five Ftalian artists 
and one by each of ninety American 
artists. As in previous years. the niu- 
seum has included youiij^er and lesser 
known artists as well as tliose of estab- 
lislied reputation. Of the Italian artists 
re])resented in the show. a nuiiiber 
liave achieved international recoi^ni- 
tion. 1'liey include : Afro, Hirolli. Buri. 
IMorandi. vSantomaso and .Sironi. 



JOHN Hkmkkr's delicate. refined 
paintini^s (at the Kraushaar Gallery 
to May 11) are sensitively orjT:anized 
and conij)osed into harnionious rela- 
tions of color and form. The somewliat 
stylized canvases of 1^^54-55, cubistic 
in structure, are kiiowledi,a\'ible State- 
ments if lackini;' in pictorial vitality. 
The most recent works show many 
chaiifi-es. Heliker's intellectuality still 
reveals itself. but bis j^^eneral loosen- 
in.i;* up and spontaneity of attack really 
l)e,ii"in to create exciteinent. Color is 
heitiliteiied wliile ima.irinative play of 
form and calli.^raphy. i)lastically de- 
scrij)tive. all but dominates the literary 
source of bis pictures. Tlie>e are Heli- 
ker's tinest work to date. /-roni Craii- 
bcrry /sie and Harlcin /\{:rr IajihI- 
scapc are outstandini;'. A. X. 

ik >ii )|( 

CrR\KV OF rKl>C\)LlMi:iAX ClL- 

'ii'RKS at the D'Arcy is a stunnin.c: 
exhibition of terracotta urns. cere- 
nionial h.i^ures. iadite (»biects created 
between 1500 B.C. and A.D. 1200. The 
acute Observation, the cou])lin.ii- of di,^- 
nity and liumor. the teclmical skill. the 
respect for tradition that perniitted in- 
dividual ima.^ination, traits so charac- 
teristic of the art of this ancient world, 
are all manifest in this rieh disj)lay. 
]\\irrior and IJ'ifc from Xayarit : the 
polychrome I\uccliu(j W'oiuau and Ball- 
J^laycr from Jalisco: lari^^e sliell-carv- 
in.^s from Colinia; AEayan stoneheads 
of jL^M-eat power; and a jL^ray stone Fror/ 
from T^uala have an emotional no less 
tlian esthetic impact. R. F. 

»K ^ -f 

I) KCKXT Frencii Prixt Acquisi- 
Tioxs at the Peter Deitsch Gallery 
contain many rare as well as beautiful 
ii'rapbics, such as Toulouse-Fautrec's 
.]///('. MarccUc Lcudcr, Dchout: Mary 
Cassatt's Cup of Tca: an abstract 
color-woodcut by ( n'iujuuin : Bonnard's 
litboi^raphic series. La J'ic de Paris, 
incltidiniL^ the subtle .h'c de Tn'omplie. 
IMcasso is represented by classic and 
cuhist prints. A th'st-state proof of 



IUI 



DUVEEN 



Est 1869 



MASTERPIECES 

of 

PAINTING 
SCULPTURE 
PORCELAIN 
FURNITURE 
TAPESTRIES 



GOTHIC • RENAISSANCE 
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 



DUVEEN BROTHERS, INC. 



18 Hast 79th Street 



New York 21, N. Y. 



[15] 



J^edon'.s /'/'('//. r C'hrralirr is one of tlie 
iiiosl eiitranciiii^' pieces. hut also Vuil- 
lard, Dcrain. Rouault. Matisse, Degas. 
Pissarro aiul others wliose experi- 
nientations liave coiitrihiited so iiuicli 
to tlie imilti-faceted si)]eiulor of today's 
i^rapliic arls are represeiitt'd by ex- 
(|iiisite prints in tliis sliow . K. V. 



\A'ii.ij.\M M KVKkown/. HO iiewconier 

to llie art world. >lio\\s a deft 

paiiiterly toncli in tlie pleasant canvases 

at tlic ('hast' ( lallery startin^- May 20. 

llis suhjects: nuisicians. liorses. land- 

scape, and lii^ures are ronianticized by 

suave color and mracetui dra\vin,i;". 

)'ouu(i Sin (/er done in orani^e and 

brown witli tonclies of lenion is a deli- 

cate stndy of a j^irl. ( )raniie nioves 

tbron.^ii brown to touclies of red in 

Rliytliiiiic Piiiu'c to tbe stroni^er 

oran.i^e. red, and black of flic C cllist. 

'J1ie landscapes liave a toucb of 

Cezanne's coniposition, retaining tbe 

sanie fresb color of Meyerowitz's otlier 

works. J. ( i. B. 

* * * 



JrsTKR (iALLKRv otYers two interest- 
ingly contrasting artists tliis niontb : 
tbe Italian sculi)tor (ireco and tbe 
b^rencb ])ainter Clave. bjnilio ( Ireco. a 
vSicilian wbo bas been niaking bis lionie 
in Ronie, bas a bigbly ])ers()nal a])- 
proacb to tbe niodeling of tbe buman 
form, a Compound oi classical struc- 
ture and a ])oignantly syni|)atbetic in- 
sigiit into eacb subject as a sentient 
individual. Tbe iini(|ueness of lii> style 
bas won for Greco a widening circle 
of appreciators in ICnrope. culminating 
last smnmer witb tbe Italian scul])ture 
award in tbe Venice Hiennial. 'Tbis is 
bis first sbowing in America, consist- 
ing of aboiit fifteen small bronze bg- 
ures, and tbe tbree-foot niodel for bis 
large commissioned rinoccJiio. Witb 
tbe bronzes are being sbown a number 
of drawings and litbograpbs. 

riie Clave dis])lay consists of tbis 
gay fantasist's original gouacbe and 
watercolor |)icturizations for tbe Ro- 



land l'etit iJallet de Taris ])ro(hiction 
of "Carmen." A rieb ibeatrical llair 
being tbis art ist '> strong point in botb 
(lesign and color. le bas given lull 
reign lo 1 is inngi'i."ti\e fancy in tbese 
r(:m])s i'or tbe balicl. ( ". Z. O. 



/"^AiiKiii. 1). MC HOT. a voung I^'rencb 

VI- 1 1 '• • ' 

pamter wliose combniation ot m- 
gratiatingly tluent brusbwork and 
populär luinian-interest subjects bas 
gained bim con>i(lerable success in 
Paris, made bis \e\\ ^'()rk debut at 
tbe receuth oi)ened lu^ter ( lallerv. 
W'orking w ilb a ibick ini])asto of juicy 
paint. niodeling bis forins witb vigor- 
ons >uipes of tbe palette knife. Dan- 
cliot reveals a virtuoso craftsmansbip 
and tbe iiinate (lallic iiistinct for good 
color. At ])resent be is adliering to tbe 
safe stereotypes of clowns. liarle(|uins. 
inusical still lifes; but tliere is als(^ a 
dasli of tlie imaginative in bi^ work — 
especiall)' in tbe landscape> — tbat sug- 
gests niore inij)ortant tliiiig> to conie 
üben bis vision uncoNers inwardly sig- 
nificant niaterial. C. Z. (). 



\\^iLi.i\M ( ikoppK.u's ])aintings of 
politicians, lawyers. jaz/ nuisi- 
cians and ])ropbets will be at tbe 
A.C.A. (iallery tbrougb May lltb. 
(juite tiiie is tbe series of tiftx" litho- 
gra])bs also sbown, wbicli lias been 
pulled in a limited edition. riie>e are 
collectively entitled Capviccs, and tbey 
lia\e in fact a great deal of tbe mor- 
(lant fantasy of tlieir j)resuined proto- 
tyi)es by (loya, tliougb tbe liorrors, 
absurdities and beauties in wbicli tbey 
deal are niainly contenii)()rary, as is 
tbe formal idioni. (iro])i)er's ex])ressive 
capacities seem to be enlarged ratber 
tlian limited hy tbe grapliic medium; 
tbe elusive fragrance of lichocs, tbe 
])atlios of Piccc Work and tbe wbite 
blast of CJtrisis demonstrate tbe ränge 
of feeling- tbat be can exoke in black- 
and-wliite. A. B. L. 



[16} 



M 



ARixo Maium bas acbieved a mea- 
sure of fanie tbrougb scul|)tured 
piece.N in wbicli formal rbytbms are 
l)uib imaginativelv around tbe fornis 
of tbe familiär borse. In bis new sliow 
at Tbe Contemj)()raries, an explicit un- 
(lerlying stnicture is manifest, for 
example, in tbe bronze Siiiall Ilorsc 
and Riiicr w itli its stress on tbe muscled 
power of tbe animal and tbe stylized 
rigiditv of tbe rider. A visitor is con- 
fronted at once by tbe pyramidal bulk 
of Larijc Ilorsc and Ridcr and tbe 
less known grapbics, wberein are em- 
])basized pattern and line. ratber tban 
niass, an(l a playful fancy as well. A 
Single landscape is a beld of blues, 
glowing reds and greens packed flat 
and tigbt beliind tbe picture frame. 

G. S. 

* =i: * 

"Davmond Mixtz's landscapes and 
^*^ still lifes (at tbe Relin Gallery un- 
til May 15) are notable for tlieir tecli- 
nical bandling and strong. decorative 



design. Miiitz, an artist involved in tlie 

tactile (piality (jf pignient, produces 

niany visually apj)ealing textural varia- 

tions. W'bile tbese iM'encb-inspired 

landscapes are naturalistic in delinea- 

tioii. bis dramatic conipositional ap- 

proacb transfornis tlieni into bold. in- 

ventive i)ortrayals. .Iftcr Harrest, witb 

its strong linear sweeps of color leacl- 

ing rbytlimically into tbe picture plane, 

bnds Mintz at bis most imaginative. 

A. X. 
* * ♦ 

\ [iDTowx (Iallkky bas assenibled a 
group of drawings in conventional 
styles under tbe title (iood Praicinf/. 
Kingman's gouacbes and black ink 
drawings of construction scenes are 
vigorous and arresting. Isabel P>isbop's 
drawings of women and cbildren re- 
atKrm lier gift for deft cbaracteriza- 
tion recorded witb cliarm and insou- 
ciance. Slie adaj)ts ber style to book 
illustration for Pn'dr and Prcjndicc 
witbout impairing its f resbness. Xagier 



LOUISA ROBINS 



recent 
paintings 




May 7-25 

I DUVEEN- 

I 1 GRAHAM 1014 MADISON AVE., N. Y. 



[17] 



sliows stiulies for a Crucifixion; Vick- 
rey a series ot clowns' heads. l'adnms 
is represented hy stiulies of heads für 
liis lar.ne i)aintinij: Hur Italia and a 
^roup of nndes. Koenier shows delicate 
])eii and ink (lra\vin,i,^s of cliildren and 
liikers restin^. H. D. M. 

* * * 

Irving Marantz's drawin^s will be 
on view at the l^abcock Gallery 
froni May 6tli to 2^hh. An occasional 
gouache or sepia study varies the j^roup 
of pen-and-ink drawini^s. The artist's 
j)en nioves with the lij^ht sharpness of 
a burin as he traces the fi^anxs and 
hatches the fornis into planes of ad- 
vancing and retreatin^- li.£::ht and shade. 
^lany of bis subjects are allej2:orical ; 
the human fis^ures acconipanied by 
satirical, bird-form shapes of .s^ood and 
evil, as in All Mcn Hai'c Monsters. 
Miisic for the Family and the tenderly 
drawn portrait of Mary, on the other 
band, depart froni the philosophical 
])lane. A. P). T>. 



T IIS (JlINTAMLLA >h(>\\.s twentV" 

live neu canvases at the W'ilden- 
stein Ciallery in one of bis rare exhibi- 
tions in America. 11ie painter is known 
best for bis work in tresc(» and for bis 
forceful (lra\vinj4"s. His oils asj)ire to 
an interest of their own and eniphasize 
a vivid imaf^ination in conjunction 
with a rui^^i^^ed tecbnicjue. A curiously 
barocjue emotion prevails in Alnnid- 
oued Fanu — Vermont, where contours 
cut ruthlessly across the canvas. 
ll'onnni of the Sea, a sombre effort, 
^azes back at the viewer out of lidless, 
spectral, perhaps drowned eyes. G. S. 

i|c i|i Hc 

IX/Tarianne Gold's sculpture pieces, 
now bein.i;- sbown at the W'ilden- 
stein, testify to a supple stren^th in 
ali^"nment with a classical spirit. Her 
fif^ures are almost modestly invoked 
and derive j^race from the biirh Satura- 
tion and medium brilliance of terra- 
cotta, thouii^h in the formal nubile 
bronzes are displayed. in .tresture and 




MARY CASSATT 
Mother and Child 

Pastel 
24^2 X 18V^ inches 






898 




i HIRSCHLß'ADLER 

alleries ine. 



21 East 67th St., New York 21 

Tel. LE 5-8810 



[18 1 



rhythni. a fluency of line and an ex- 

pressiveness whicb recalls, as has been 

noted. her master, Maillol. G. S. 

* * * 

r^oi.u AND Jade objects from Central 
America, datinj^ ivom before the 
coniin.^- of ihe white man. and number- 
inj.^ some 200 ])ieces, are sho\N'n at the 
ALartin Widditield Gallery. the first 
exhibition of such works at a New 
York .gallery. Assenibled rjver a period 
of years by the Pre-Columbian spe- 
cialist l^arl Stendahl. the objects came 
orii^inally from tonibs and j^raves in 
Mexico. Guatemala, Panama and Costa 
Rica. ^Lasks. breastplates and cast 
pendants in human, anirnal and deity 
shapes are to be seen in the ^old objects 
whicb conie primarily from wbat is 
now ]\'uiama and Costa Rica. The 
ancient Mavans brougbt piain plaques 
of beaten ij^old from the south, to be 
decorated by their hi.^hly artistic 
craftsmen. The Miztecs excelled in 
delicate cast jewelry. In the jade 



medium. car\e(l pendants, i)la(jues and 

ti.t^urines predominate ; and here we see 

more sophisticatedly formal concepts 

of shape. The hnest jade carvin^s of 

ti,i;ures are attributed to the Olemic 

civilization. while the Mayans were 

noted for their (leei)ly sculpiured jade 

pla(|ues. C- Z. O. 

* * * 

JEAN XcEuox. whose recent canvases 
are on view at the Rose Fried Gal- 
lery has been exi)lorin^^ the abstract 
idirnn of Mondrian with distinction 
for some years. Xceron now employs 
a freer style admittin^ curves and ir- 
regulär shapes to the ^eometry of bis 
comi)()sition. Paint is applied tbin in 
these j)ure abstractions where color 
areas ed,t,^ed by incisively drawn lines 
take their appointed places in a deftly 
controlled space. #-/ is architecturally 
ccmstructed with botb force and feel- 
injL;- ])r()vidini^ stron,!^ movement and 
teiisi(m on the relatively small canvas. 
Tbree lar.5.ie paintinj^s containing ex- 



JUSTER GALLERY 



Currenf Exhibifions 



GRECO 

SCULPTURES - DRAWINGS 
LITHOGRAPHS 



Winner of the Sculpture Award 
for Italy. 1956 Yenice Biennial 



X 



CLAVE 

ORIGINAL GOUACHES 

AND DRAWINGS FOR 

THE BALLET 

including Roland Petit's 
"Carfflen" 



THROUGH MAY 25 



154 EAST 79th STREET 



Hours: 1 1 f o 5 



NEW YORK 21 



Tel.: TR 9-1007 



[19] 



cellenl jxissa.^es seenied to just iiiiss tlie 
perfection of tlie snialler works. 

J. (;. B. 



•H« 



TJoiMS OF Vi KW, an exliibition of 
relatively iinknown artists. features 
tlie work of tliree painters aiul tvvo 
scul|)t()rs. David l.iiiKrs beaiitifuUy ex- 
ecuted ahstractions tend to l)e over- 
rethied and style-concerned. Alex Katz 
is an imaginative colorist, sensinjLi" tlie 
plastic. forni-niakiii.i;' pr()])erties of 
color. wliile lUirton llasen's forceful 
iniai^ery lias iinpact desj)ite a disturb- 
iiijL;" eclecticisni. The sculpture of Israel 
Levitan is excellently liandled, and in 
sonie ])ieces. esi)ecially tlie cubist. the 
form beoonies exjilosive in its contained 
vitality. Raymond Rocklin. scul])tor, 
constructs a bizarre inter-weave of 
decorative form siiimiioninm' nj) tlie 
l)aro(|ue and tlie oriental. Beminnin.i;' 
May 6 at tlie Associated American 
Artists Galleries. A. N. 



/^^lACoMo ^Fanzi', one of tlie leadiiiii" 
contemporary Italian scnlptors. i^ 
liavinir bis first American exliibition at 
the World llouse (lalleries. b'ifteen 
bronzes (htiiiii- froni l^^.^S to 1*^^^) re- 
veal a forceful talent tliat lias evolved 
proi^ressively from the anatomically 
realistic ])ieces (Yoidkj Pu'i'id in a 
kneeliiii,'" posture is sine\v\ in its ])oise 
and balance). to the later ex])ressionist 
works of an austere siniplicity of form. 
Sharp planes and flattened. ru,«:-i:ed sur- 
faces. The Clo'wu, V^SA is one of the 
best of tbese. His well known thenie 
of a seated cardinal is sliown in several 
examples tliat underscore the develop- 
ment from classical to expressionist 
treatment. and tliere are al>o several 
versioiis of Mothcr aiiil Cliild. Manzu 
lias executed various comniissions tor 
churches and is now at work in bis 
studio in ^^ilan for a Stafious of the 
Cross for the Sant' Eu.^-enio in Roiiie. 

c. z. o. 



PAUL ROSENBERG & CO. 

Established 1878 



19th and 20th CENTURY 
FRENCH PAINTINGS 

20th CENTURY AMERICAN PAINTINGS 

SCULPTURE 



20 EAST 79th STREET, NEW YORK 21 



[20] 



A •\i>i'Ji". F.AXSKOv's exbihition at the 
"^ y'mv .\rts Associates reaches from 
\^)1() to the i)resent. and eacli i^Vd^t of 
liis development afhrnis tbe sheer 
painterly (|ualities of the man. W^iether 
it be a \^)2H still life or an abstraction 
of \^)S(). Laiiskoy revels in tbe joy of 
rieb pimnientation, in its emotional ex- 
pressiveness. The power ful pictorial 
elfects of bis earlier work are i)rodnced 
l)v a hold c()mj)ositi()nal sense based 
ui)on a keeii ol)ser\ation of and rap- 
])ort with nature. In bis abstractii)ns 
the sensiti\ ity and simple elo(|uence ol 
tbe older work are re|)laoe(l hy more 
(lecorati\e ^ensihility. A. X. 

.(. .j. .,. 

T^ouoTiJV Ilooi) discloses an alieii eye 
at tbe l)u\eeii-(lrabani sbowiiij^- of 
lier recent drau in^s. 1'be artist studied 
under Oro/co and is a secure drauiiiits- 
nian e(|ni))i)e(l \\ itb a ])oet's sense and 
a (juiet deportnieiit. In her i)ictures 
strukture and recession are achieved 
and niaintaiiied bv a coolv calculated 



movement of li.iLi'ht \()hiiiie> arouiid 
shaded areas. Her line is evocative and 
non-descriptive hut delicately exjjres- 
sive. Tboumh ti^ure> and ^uo-oestions 
do emer!:;e. these drawin.ii:s are evoca- 
tions eoncentrated, so t(> >i)eak. under 
such titles as Terror: Ou I'lr.vus of 
Limits. The Appareut \ ow und the 
.llieii Tye. Tbe artists Hoiriiu/e to 
Jiiisor e^f()rtles^ly Mistains an austere 
emotion. Cr. S. 

«I. .>. lU 

\ NDKK l''.M MKkICli ( i A 1 l.Kin' ba> Oll 

^ view sixteeii i)ictures from a mod- 
ern j)rivate collection. Tlie >lio\\ tea- 
tures a \^)27 Leiter jn-oiiache. >e\eral 
Miros datiniLi- betweeii 1*M5 and V).V), 
a niiniscule Picasso ink >kelcli and a 
nuinber of Kaiidiiiskys. Tbe t^roup of 
Klees includes soiiie iniportant ex- 
ani])les. A \^)2() ink and wa^b called 
ClosiiK/ Seeiie of a Ihuiiiui. a Llnssic 
/'t\s7/\-w/ ( P)J8) and Hird, lind of Oc- 
fober are in tbe artist's be>t vein. Tbe 
collection is beinii;- exliibited toi^etber 



^üii ifi|'ni,] i !J!;t i . i i i ff i iimjfl 



IPIP 




Boaf Landing 



May i-31 




Paintings by 



GEORGE BELLOWS 



H. V. ALLISON & CO. 32 East 57th St., N. Y. 

[21] 



with (ho Pi-e-( nlnmhiaii sciiljxures re- 
vieued lierc last inontli. Jl. D, :\[, 

>!• * * 

jQoKOTFrv Dkhnkk inio-ht he placed 
amon^- Anierica's '•Toteinist" sculp- 
tors. irarrior Rctunicd, with its riiioed 
aiul l)iin)()iis iiiodelled foniis. or Biblical 
Story uith its Hat pillars hiiilt c^f 
S(jiiari.sh tornis on which suiuh-v hiero- 
.dyphs are (h'awn. have private inean- 
iili^s. 'I1ie (lo-ures in lunuilv Group are 
endowed with the emotional rioi(h'ty 
ot childish or prinn'tive fetishes. The 
interest lies not in plastic form, luit in 
the almost punnin.^- details. The care 
with which the hronzes ( at the Willard 
(rallery. May 7th to .^Ist) are cast. hin- 
ished and snited with hases is ^Tatity- 
iii.i^'- W'atercolors hy the artist are also 
shown. \ R T 

* * * 

p^RKDKUk W'jfiTAKKR is rei)resented 

alon- with hj'Ieen Alona.^han. liis 

wite. m a showino- of the couple's new 

watercolors at the (irand Ontral \rt 



(ralleries. The exhihition. titled "I\al)u- 
lous Spain— Artists' Paradise". is pre- 
sented in Cooperation with the Spanish 
Institute. An inipressive list of Spon- 
sors lend wei.t;lny names to an im- 
posin.i;- display of pictures. mainlv hy 
y\\\ Whitaker, a self-taii-ht and. it 
appears. tireless painter and traveler. 
Sccrct of the Hcadcd Poor is hv Eileen 
Mona,i;han. thoiioh its romanticized 
and somewhat literary descriptiveness 
nii.^ht have heen the contrihntion of 
either of the W'hitakers. G. S. 

* * * 

'pm-: Alan- Callkry's exhihition of 
new works hy some of its Veteran 
artists. is diverse yet homo.^-eneous in 
its contemporary ontlook. The sculp- 
tors. Andrews. Scpiier and especially 
Kin.q: elicit the most interest. Kin,i;-''s 
.S(V/ Portrait, personal in iina,^ery. 
ntdizes the heautiful .i^-rain and natural 
eolor of the niaho<^-any wood from 
whicli it is sculpted. S(|uier is now 
workin,^- with more massive shapes. 



Ancient Art 
of the New World 

GOLD AND JADE OBJECTS 
FROM MIDDLE AMERICA 

Ist TO 14th CENTURIES A.D. 

throngh May 18 

MARTIN WIDDIFIELD GALLERY 

818 MADISON AVENUE - . NEW YORK 



concentratinj^- on the volunies created 
hy form itself. His Palling Ju'gurc is 
very satisfyin^'-. The painlers' section 
of the show is rather dull despite the 
technical ahility displayed. I^rice Stands 
out in the j^-roup with his curioiis nude 
fi.i^an-es posed in ahstracted settin,^-s. 

A. N. 
>^ * Hi 

T Tarrv Lachman, an Anierican-in- 
i'aris hetween 1913 and the mid- 
l^iO's. turned from paintin^cf to motion 
picture desi.^ning- and directin.ir thirty 
years aj.j-o. Recently he has returned to 
his first love. paintinj^. and is exlübit- 
inir sonie of his new landscapes to- 
.trether with a lar^i^e selection of his 
early views of F'rance and Italy at the 
Hammer (ualleries. These early works. 
many of theni quite lariL^fe. are solidly 
and impressively constructed. in a 
post-impressionist decorative style. His 
deep attachment to the landscape vistas 
of Southern France, to the quays of 
I'aris. and the hill towns of Italv'is re- 



dected in the thou,i;htful desi^i^nis and 

meticulous handlinj.^- of color. He seems 

to have profited not only hy an admira- 

tion tor the work of several of the 

noted post-impressionist h^renchmen 

hut also hy personal accjuaintance with 

tlieni. C. Z. O. 

* * ^ 

T^ 1 1 K f 1 A .\ s ] 1 o F M A x x r et r( >> pect i \- e 
at the Whitney Must'uni ot Ameri- 
can Art. contains oil paintinjL^^s, water- 
colors and drawin.t^s stn-\e\ injLT the 
artist's work from 10()J to the i)resent, 
with the emphasis stron.i:!}- on paint- 
iu.i^s done in America since 1035. To- 
day Hof mann, at the iv^g of seventv- 
seven. Stands out as one of our most 
Ai^orous ahstract painters and teach- 
ers. l^orn at \\'eissenl)nr,<:-. ( Jernianv, 
in 1880. he studied as a youth in 
Alum'ch. and worked for a ntimher of 
years in Paris. In H)15. he opened his 
own art school in Munich and has 
tau.i^ht almost continuously since then. 
In 1^30. he ilrst came to America to 



SAIDENBERC CALLERY 



10 EAST 77fh STREET 



NEW YORK 



Ex+ended 
to May I I 

Exhibition 
opening 
May 13 



LYNN CHADWICK 

RECENT SCULPTURE 

HOMMAGE a KAHNWEILER 

honoring Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler who over the last fifty 
years has represented the following artists: 

BRAQUE - GRIS - KLEE ■ LAURENS • LEGER 

MANOLO - PICASSO 

BEAUDIN - KERMADEC - LASCAUX • MASSON 

ROGER • ROUVRE 



[22] 



r23] 



Icach at tlic rniversity of C'ali fonii.i 
in llerkeley. Attor lioldin,^' siniilar posi- 
tions at tht' Art Student^ Leai;ue and 
tlie Thurn Scliool in (iloucester. lie 
aiLiain opened In's own scliools. in Xew 
^'()^k ( l<)3vV) and in Provincetown, 
Massachusetts {19.U). Tliroiijuii tliese 
liave passed a wholc .L^eneration of 
American art studcnts. includinii" some 
of our leadin.i^- y()nnt;cr artists. 

:"; Hi * 

,"1.101 ()*!1 \R\. a Veteran \vaterc(^lor- 
^ ist. is sliowin.ti' an exliihition of bis 
recent pictnres at tlie (Irand Central 
(ialleries. Tlic artist has a ready hrnsli 
and an itinerant's concern witli for- 
eii^n places. He works witli assurance 
and witliin tlio liniitations of liis ratlier 
restrictive interj)retation of a medium 
tliat lia> moro to connnend it tlian 
])leasinm- tonalities and scenic elYects. 
liowever exotic. In tlie slender, col- 
iininar Aftcnnatli tlie arti>t liints at. 
ratlier tlian altoj^^etlier fultills, tlie niore 
sul)tle possihilities inlierin^- in tlie art 



1 



form tliat lie lia> worked at so dex'oted- 

Iv for >o lonii'. Cr. S. 

' 5i< -M * 

A f AKcoT Kkmpk is primarily a crafts- 
^^^ man. a.s may be seen in her terra- 
cottas. shown at the Wellons ( rallery. 
Tier work, witli a certain bland mod- 
ernity. imitates forins or formal ideas 
but only occasionally rises to the level 
of expressinii" tliem. Owin^ to tbe re- 
straint of the roui^b terracotta sur- 
faces, there is little modulation of li.^bt, 
and small feelinj;- for plastic form. 
11iere is, instead. a self-effacinjL;- taste- 
fulness hi.^hly suitable to decorative 
pnrposes. A. R. I>. 

>j: * 5|! 

\ Trio at l.ynn Kottler's presents 
^^ Clara Onievsky's sculpture, includ- 
in.i;- a w ell-characterized liead of David 
P)en-(iurion. and so-called needle- 
])aintin.i;s. a conibination of eml)r()idery 
and tape>try tliat comes ot¥ best in tbe 
wbimsical illustration of tbe Russian 
j)oet Pn^bkin's Magic l^rcc. Nelson 



Exhihitions 



joiix iii:liker 



• _ • 



pfiinliniis 



to Mav 1 1 



114 paii\ti:r-prixtmaki:iis 



May 20 - Jum» 7 



KRAUSHAAR GALLERIES 

1055 MADISON AVENUE (cor. 80th St.) NEW YORK 



[24] 



Ro(lrijL;-()'s carefiiUy planned land>L*apes. 
anion.LT wbich Smiscf is dramatic in 
color: and ( iertrude Stein KatVers still 
lifes of decorative Howers that >tand 
out from an almost jet-black back- 
«rroiind. also li^ure in tbe exhibition. 

* ♦ * 

/^i.MDK ViSKix sbows ei.i;bt lari;e 
^ paintini^s in bis first sbow in Xew 
York at die Castelli (iallery. He iises 
ripolin i)aint in brii^bt colors with .^ay 
and lively eff ect. Some camases sbow 
a (lecided Pollcjck intiiience, a lar.^e 
lan(lscai)e called /.yciaui for exam])le. 
Fn otliers be iises a rhytbmic calli- 
^rapby of dots and dasbes. like Morse 
Co(le,'\vliicb lends liunior to bis bland 
over-simplifications. Lcs Voisiiics, in 
kinder.iiarten colors on a white back- 
o-roimd, recalls Miro. Lyiii(/ iu ihc 
Strccts is Imilt np in stroni;- linear 
rbytbnis of browns. blacks and reds. 
Tlie work is pleasant. clever, decorative 
and fashionable. ^T. 1). M. 

* * * 

T^'RXESTO Trkccam of Milan ])rem- 
^^ iers in America at tbe John Heller 
Gallerv witli work datiniL;- from PMO. 
11iese"years have taken bim from a 
Picass()'es(|ue style to realistic concern 
with tbe Italian peasants. The later 
l),'Mntin!L;s seem stron.uer. more i)ers()nal. 
The lari^e On ihc luirtli in typical 
earthy dark .üreens and .c:reys sbows 
seveii peasants restini^: by tbe wavside. 
tbree major fiirures lookini;- stolidly at 
tbe artist. A dark peasant t^irl knee- 
(\i^t^]) in i^reen foHa^e (Viiitac/c Time) 
is another .ij:enre work well painted in 
a hold inipressionist tecbni(|ue. J. C,. R. 



* 



5H 



M. Padi-a. now exbibitin.i^- at the Van 
Dienien-T.ilienfeld Galleries. is a 
conservative European painter of the 
old school who keeps abreast^ of tbe 
tinies inst enoui^h to infnse bis work 
with an inipressionist or expressionist 
feel. At tlieir best tliese paintin^s of 
landscape, still life and portraitnre are 



Parke -Bernet 
Galleries, Imc 

[Leslie A. IIyam, President] 

980 MADISON \\ KM K 
NEW YORK 21 

Seile II latj S (,'l S p.uL 

OLE MÄSTERS 
XIX EE^TLRY and 
MODERN WORKS 

Property of 

A MASS/\LHUSETTS 

PRIVATE DWIVEH 

^m DTHEHS 

\ an Kuysdael, Cianach the 
Kider, Teniers ihe Youn^^er; 
Romney, Raeburn, Vi2;ee- 
Lebriin, W illeni Kalf and 
otliers 

A Finc Corot 

Fanl in-Latour, Mancini, 
Worms: Monet, Jawlensky, 
Raoul üufy, Boudin, Vla- 
minck, Redon, John Sloan, 
Waugh, Pushnian, Hartley 
Childe Hassam and others 

A bronze by Daumier and 
a sculpture by Sintenis 

Illustrated Catalog 75r 
(Qu vieiv from lllayjt 



^2^ I 



suniptunuNl y exociilcd in a robust slyle. 
Jlardi)' a dai'iiii;- paiiitcr, I 'adua doo 
mauai^o to croalc a liltlc excitement 
willi coloi-i'orni ex|)eriniontati()n in 
several oi' hi> land^ca|)e>. A. X. 

* * * 

Tonx W'iioRK is not afraid to ])aint a 

J "picturo" — lia> in fact heen j)ainliniLi' 

tlieni for niruiy seasons. His det't. con- 

serva.ti\'e watercolors of I Boston, ot 

sea>.'ape> ai tlie C'apo. sailhoats |L;t)in.ti' 

füll tut and white claplxKird liouses in 

tlie snow . allow one to induli^e in nos- 

tal.s^ia lor ->oa^''.ore sunimers and \e\v 

]^n,i;land \\inter>. At times the hhies 

are too per>i>tcnt, and i^Teater solidity 

and dcfinition are occasionally wanted, 

l)Ut >urely ln'> work' woiild l)e |)leasant 

to conteniplate in a steam-lieated Xew 

^ ork apartnient. in drear\' l*'el)niai*v. 

A. 1^,. f.. 
^ ^ ^ 

\ i.KX AXDKR Kix(i oj)ens tlic ( 1iase 
^ (raller>'.s new (piartcrs on I^ast 
64tli Street witli Ins lusli surrealism. 



Kin.^'s alleL;"orie> are pkayed out niainly 
in tue World of theatre and music. 
ty|)ically ky (k)ll h^'ures wkose j)kastei" 
.skin crack> to reveal tke wood beneath. 
/// Cliilii rr()il{(/y tke>e li.^'ures applaud 
a \ iolin-pkayin,!^' boy inanne(|uin en- 
ch)sed in i^lass. \ leerini;- ba^' backed 
by a ])osturin|L;' erew of "supporting 
pkiyers" satirizes Tlic (Vd Actrcss. 
The artist'> fantasies are rendered in 
the painstakin.i;' (K'tail and j^arisb color 
of tlieatre (h"a])es and accessories. but 
are niore in the category of illustration 
than paintini^-, J. ( \. \\. 

* * * 

CTamsox Sc ha MKS has an interesting 
^ niixeckniecb'a techni(iue of water- 
cob)r and .^ouache. occasionally intro- 
ducing In(ba-ink lines and blobs of 
thick oil paint — all blended in an et^'ect 
of spontaneity in the a.i^itated interplay 
of mat and luminous areas. In his ctir- 
rent show at the l^ste (iallery, the siib- 
jects that are best served by this calli- 
^■raphic treatnient are the Alpine land- 




Jcan-Baptiste Leprince 
(1734 -.1781) 



Galerie Meissner 

KURT MEISSNER 



Florastrasse 1, Zürich (8) 
Switzerland 



[26] 



scapes and the Provincetown boat 
dienies. A still life titled limpty (Hasses 
is also anion.i^- the successfui works, 
convertin^^ enijjtiness into a sparklin.i,^ 
constellation of repeated fornis and 
.^■leaniin,!^- sin-faces. C. Z. O. 

djC dfc ^ 

/^LARA Haas, who shares a double ex- 
hibit at Pen and Brush. denion- 
strates an assured handlin^- of water- 
colors from a traditional 77/c ll'rcck 
to a fascinatinj^'- casein paintiuji;- C\- 
prcss (fordciis, uhere exact realisni 
has been abandoned in faxor of a 
\ery |)ainterly treatnient of \\0\t fdter- 
hv^ throu.^h trees. Kdna Pennypacker 
Stauffer, late professor of art at I lun- 
ter C\)llei;-e, is represented b\- lifteen 
litboo-raplis in this exhibit at the Pen 
and Hrush. ('lose Observation of nature 
and a sensitivity to atin()Sj)lieric condi- 
tions (sini breakini^- throii,iiii cloiids, 
77/ c Jiiul of the Cialc, late afternoon. 
etc.) ^ive zest to the^e traditional 
landscapes. niany tropical and niany 



dose to the sea. J. G. B. 

* * ♦ 

JOHNNY Friedlaendek's etchin,iis are 
beinjL,^ introduced to Xew York at 
the Weyhe Gallery, throu.i^h ^Tay. Ile 
enlarires the scope of the medium to 
include a .i^reat variety of technicpies — 
a(|uatint. dry point. tlie su.t,^ar method, 
and others not classifiable — on each 
plate, ol)tainin<:i- considerable richness 
of texture and tone within a niuted 
ran^'-e. ffis animals. spi;n sharply into 
die fretted and textured backjLiroimds, 
lia\e the totemistic quality of meclian- 
ized toys or of dreaiii syinbols in the 
Nein of Klee, thouj^-h more remote. His 
li.Ljures ha\e an almost nionumental air. 

A. w. r.. 

)(( if >(( 
A TokTox HoLLiNGER aud Alex Ce- 
^ KVA/A lia\e a dual show at the 
Pietrantonio Galler}'. Insj)ired by Max- 
Weher, Hollin<ifer j)aints callijsfraphic- 
ally emphasized musician^ in brii^dit 
liues. Cadcuaa interprets the ncdse and 



GUTEKUIVST & KLIPSTEII 



Klipstein & Kornfeld, Succrs, 
BERN, SWITZERLAND 

Dealers and Auctioneers in 
Old and Modern Prints and Drawings 



Laupenstrasse 49 



Announce 3 Aucflon Sales 

from June 4th to June 7th, 1957 

1. OLD MASTER PRINTS 

Säle No. 85, catalogue of 450 I+ems 

2. PRINTS AND DRAWINGS BY 
MODERN MASTERS 

Säle No. 87, catalogue of 800 items 

3. DOCUMENTATION LIBRARY FOR 
THE ART OF THE 20th CENTURY 

Säle No. 86, catalogue of 450 items 
All catalogues, richly illustrated, sent post free on request 



[27] 



GALERIE D'ART MODERNE 
MARIE-SUZANNE FEIGEL 

BASLE 
(Switzerland) 

LEADING 
MODERN ART 



Aeschengraben 5 

Phone: 061/34 Ol 46 

Daily: 10-12 a.m., 3-6:30 p.m. 

Sunday I 1-12 a.m. 



PAUL VALLOTTON 



S.a. 



LAUSANNE 

6 Gd. Chene - Switzerland 

PAINTINCS 

XIX and XX Century 



NEW TALiNIT 

R. Lytie 
R. Markman 
A. Plotkin 
S. Rosenthal 



May 18- 
June I 5 



Kanegis Gallery 

134 Newbury Street. Boston, Mass. 



color oi a ni.i^ht-spot witli e\lcinj)()r- 
;ine()ii> \ i\aciiy. Ceni/zi's arohitectonic 
t()nii> lia\t' tlic clialky dryness ot 
fre.scoo l)iit witli a distinct sense ot 
(leplli. Constniclioii in Rrd and tlie ini- 
a,i;iiiati\(.' Pisiiitr(/rati(>ii destM"\c at- 
tention. K. P\ 

H' H' T» 

T Ol -ISA l\oi!i.\s lias tau.q-lit liciself 
resolutely to paint after tlie nianner 
ot' tlio acadeniics. her current cxliihi- 
tion at tlie l)it\een-( Irahani reveals. 
'riie>e paint in.i^s are j)riniary in color 
and unanihitious in desi.ii^n. the central 
emotive ettect hein;^- sin^le and nos- 
tal.i^ic. Siiiuhiy is a i)ict()rialization ot 
nice sentinient. a .qirl lonesoniely or 
horedly po>ed heneatli a ])eacli uni- 
hrella. uliile iioldcu (iatc Hrid(/c sus- 
pends its tanious suhjeet under a 
iL;lanioroiis and iniprohahle sky, ( i. S. 

* * * 

/^iiAUi.oT'i K ( )k\I)()rff's watercolors 
on riee-pai)er and linen, sliown at 
tlie W'ellons (rallery in April, retlect 
an iiiia.tiinative talent fnrnislied with 
Visual sensations ohtained principallv 
froni tlie art ot liistorical cultures — 
oriental and Ilellenic. Surf sii,^-,i;ests 
tlie delicate tlirust and foani of waves 
ohserxed in ( hnt not copied froiii ) a 
Cliinese paiiitiiiii-. Otlier watercolors in 
the show have no such deliherate cul- 
tural reterence. The elusive. delicatelv- 
luied })atterns resiilt from the hlooniiim- 
and coa^-ulation of wetdaid color. into 
w'hich are drawn sliarper, defininc;- 

A. P>. !.. 

>H sfj ;j: 



— lines. 



r'^ASTKM.i (iALLKin- is sliow inji;- a 
.i^roup ot action painters. of the 
most radical win.^". Incktded are new 
Works hy ten artists. Marisal's wooden 
sculj)ture. (juasi-priniitive faniily «j^roup 
mounted on a ^^o-cart. is outstand- 
ini,'-. Alfred T.eslie's jLi:ran(lilo(|uent 11 o- 
hohcu I'inal sliows the emotional ran.^e 
|)ossil)le in tliis kind of paititin.i^- : 
An.i^elo Savelli shows a relief usini;- tlie 
hetero,i;eneoiis materials virtuallv or- 
thodox since Dada. h^-ie(ll D/uhas' 



JL'iirt I Aiud i> Iow-keyed and niy>ter- 
iou> : Norman Uluhm's li\':zantiuc 
Jiiirfli in hlues is subtle and iilowinir. 
'liiere i-> a faint aura of hi^j^er-and- 
hetter ahout the show; tliis reviewer 
failed to feel any sense of the adven- 
ture of the >pirit. II. I). AI. 

^i' ^ ^ 

T^'RNA W'kill's i)ieces at the Sclione- 
^ man (lallery jtrove her a forceful 
sculptie>> delxiiii^' with an expression- 
ist simplicity and exa.^'.i^eration into 
rieh litunan niaterial niany tinies on 
Jewish themes. Her larj^est piece, 
J)i'al()(/i(c, Catches the movement of 
arm-unient. 77/ (• l ' iikiiou'ii Political 
Prisoiwr surrounds the hust of a pris- 
oner with three threateniiii;- hooded 
slia|)es. llüiina lias stren.^th and a 
sui)ple movement. Stronji^- portrait husts 
and foin" liandsonie Jewish ceremonial 
ohiects coniplete the exhihition. 

j. (;. H. 

* Hj * 



j\ F Aiu KL Salixas, of Paris, exhihited 
landscaj)es and still Hfes in April 
at the llainmer Galleries. An air of 
roiitine Performance hovers over the 
still lifes with tlieir conventional and 
repetitive .^roupiiij^s of studio frtiit and 
lei^etahle.s posini^^ on a table top. The 
land>cape> have more to conimend 
tlieni. especially those painted in soft 
textures tliat achieve a serene atmo- 
spheric envelopment. stich as the excel- 
leiit 77/ 1' Sf()}ic IWiU in a hazy .^'reenish 
yellow key. C. Z. O. 

5}« * * 

\ (.kori' exhihition at the Ruth White 
(rallery, from AFay 7th to June Ist, 
inchido oils hy seven of the j^allery's 
painters : and sculpture in teakwood hy 
one of tlieir sculptors. Ray Fink. 
Amonii- the painters Mildred Crooks 
stand.N out \*^n' her Hicyclcs, whose ah- 
stract ctu'ves ride with in planes airly 
patched in mild hlues and pearly t;reys. 
Syl\ia P>ernstein handles watercolor 
with contident deep waslies. from 
whicli /h'rchcs are picked out in opa(|ue 
white. Afortimer Laiiii'hlin's fantastic 




NEW WATERCOLORS BY 

JOHN WHORF 

fhru May 4 

from May 6: GROUP EXHIBITION 
CONTEMPORARY AMERICANS 

MILCH «*""'" 

•^■■■■^•" ■ 55 E. 57 St.. N. Y. 



modern 
paintings 
and 
sculpture 



PIERRE MATISSE 

41 E. 57 NEW YORK 



[28} 



[29] 



GRAND CENTRAL 

ART GALLERIES, Inc. 

Porfraif Specialists 




15 VANDERBILT AVENUE, N. Y. 



^ 



MAX 
ERNST 



P A I N T I N C S 
AND BRONZES 



fo May 17 



lOLAS CALLERY 



123 E. 55 



N.Y. 



'ii 



landscapes with their chill color and 
taut expanses ot space siibtly sliaded 
into planes, liave a ten>e. xmiewliat 
oriental distinction. A. I). L. 



* 



'T*ARKA(i()XA, a youn.!;' Mexico City 
artist sliowin.ij- at Cialeria Siidanieri- 
cana. has fonnd ins])iration in cave 
paintinjT^ for a bold and personal treat- 
nient of waterculor. The tendencv in 
tliis medium for pii^nients to spread 
out in accidental patterns wlien apj)lied 
on a wet .i^i'^tind has been utili/.ed to- 
i^-etlier witli a simple line and warm 
color in an economical style tbat evokes 
tlie prell istoric. In Rcim'niscoicc of 
AUiiiiira 'l'arra.^'ona brini^s off tbe de- 
sired etYect admirably, as he does with 
Buffalo. W'here sujh au>tere scarcity 
of means is relied on. success can be 
close to failure and not every work 
jiere succeeds. J. (i. 1). 

9fC JfC 5(C 

JAMKS CoKiXARi) is havin^- bis first 
show in this country at the Col- 
lector's Gallery. The all-over patterns 
of the earlier canvasses sliown seem 
in process of beinj^' replaced by one 
major sliape derived from various still 
life objects whose forms are heavily 
I)ainte(l with a certain i^rim brilliance 
of luie — note a watermelon of virulent 
purple. Some heads of women suji^^j^'-est 
Chairall. thou.iih without bis poetry. 
There is an overtone of symbolism in 
which acerbity seems oddly mated with 
sentiment. A. P). T.. 

* * * 

CvLViA SiiAW Ji'Dsox shows sculp- 
tures of animals and a few humans 
in bronze, granite, marble and lime- 
stone at the Sculpture Center. Tt is 
garden sculpture. designed to Orna- 
ment private and public landscaping" 
and endure weatber. Some of the ani- 
mals are over-stylized in an arch man- 
ner. The sculptures of children have 
more spirit ; CraudcJiiJd in bronze 
shows traces of the artist's early 
master. Bourdelle. H. D. M. 



[30) 



\ i'.iDiXF.'s canvases at the ( "adan (lal- 
^ lery are strikinj.^ and dec( )rative. 
X'ibrant oran.i^es and l)ro\\n> warm 
these pictures to the intensity needed 
for sun on sand. Oesert warriors. sniall 
fi.nures in vast expanses, tie the sj)aces 
to^ether compositionally as they thread 
a |)ath up the canvas castin.i;- loniL;- 
shadows to the rig-lit. The tiieme is 
I)layed lar.i^e and small from canvases 
six feet to ei.^bteen inches. It is re- 
stated in several large black wash 
(lra\vini»s. a.iiain simple and bold. 

1. C. B. 
* * * 

jV/TAUf Ko\i:x, a jewelry desii^ner. 
Otters oils, pastels and drawin.^-s 
in a siu-realist vein at Lynn Kottler's. 
The countless details cannot camou- 
tla.^e the lack of sure draftsmanship, 
and a strenuous attempt at voluptuous- 
ness carries the works beyond the 
borders of i^ood taste. R .F. 

(Cofitiinicd on pagc 60) 




^ (0 



< 

(D 
> 



<D 
O 



May 1-31 



FROM TLATILCO TO MAYA 

o survey of Pre-Columbian Sculpture 

D ARCY CALLERIES 



19 East 76 New York 

LYceum 6-4848 



1-6 



PASC IN 



and the 



SCHOOL OF PARIS 



through May 



PER LS 



GALLERIES 

1016 Madison Ave. 

New York 21 



WELLONS GALLERY 



noon to 8 pm 



17 E. 64 ST. 



VINCENT 



GLINSKY 

SCULPTURE 

May 6- 18 



PAULETTE 

COHEN 

OILS 

May 20 - June I 



[31] 



jir ■i^-imi(imnffiiMnNi¥rtriii1i>:i 




'"^ y" '"'^ f^ -^ - 




Dcviciuii^ Mother: Chaim Gross 
At DNveen-Grabam Gallery, N.Y.C, 



Pr'Ditemps Pans'itnne: H. Lach man 
At the Hammer Galler'ies, N.Y.C. 




Idyll, II: Miriam Shapiro 
/;; fhe New Tdent Shoiv, Musejwi of Modern Art, N.Y.C, 

I 52) 



I' 



f 





Portrait of ]: John Heliker 
At the Kra/Lshaar Galleries, N.Y.C. 



Warrior: Colima. Western Mexico 
At the D'Arcy Galler/es, N.Y.C. 




ß//s Stop: Helen Beling 

Shoun at Uunersity of Illinois. Urbaiia-Champaign 

[33] 



DURAND-RUEL 

Established 1803 

37 Av. de Friedland, Paris 8 

Cable address: Durandruel — Paris 

MODERN PAINTINGS 

Mav 7-22 

LOISEAU 



GALERIE 

.TAPLil^ 

51 rue de Seine, Paris 6 

Dan: 91 -10 



APPEL 
SERPAN 



to 
May 16 



May 17 

to 
June 13 



GALERIE CLAUDE BERNARD 

5-7 rue des Beaux-Arts 

Paris (6) Dan: 97-07 

Paintings always in sfock by 
DUMITRESCO - MARFAING - MARYAN 
PELLOTIER MARCEL POUGET - 

MANUEL VIOLA 

Sculpfures by 
DODEIGNE - JONAS 



,i;e()niotric halance and (|uict Iiannonx' 
to tlioe scones. 

Z\ u . known in (Ireat Ijiitain, is 
showin.i;" a collection of ahstract com- 
])()siti()ns at the Henri l)enezit i;allery. 
He relies lar.i;ely on colour to i^'et liis 
effects. usin.i^- varied patterns ot red, 
.i;reen. niaiive, hlue and yellow in one 
canvas after another, each ot whicli 
strikes a dominant note. Tliere are 
paintini^^ in whicli the passaj^'e troni 
one tone to another is nianai^ed with 
.i;'reat suhtlety. 

Moualla. a Tiirkish artist showinj;- at 
the Marcel Bernheini ^allery paintiiij^s 
with stran,i;e characters, is uinisnal. He 
eniploys vivid colour to depict hoheni- 
ian types, niusicians, flower sellers, 
sonietinies a,i;ainst a backii^round of 
pure verniilion red or lii^ht .ii^reen. 11ie 
ti,i;ures at tinies recall sonietliinji;- of 
Lautrec and otliers by tlieir vital ity 
and "iiatiircl" reniind one ot h^)rain. 
Suraud. at the same i^^allery, is a 
h'rench sculptor troni St. I^tienne. His 
wood carvin,L;s are attractive and coii- 
vincinm" whether the subject l)e of a 
relii^ious character like the head of 
Christ or portraits of peasants. 

Sinol is showinj^' at the Galerie 
Creuze and at the Lucy Ivro.^h .^allery 
a total of tifty paintin.qs. His art, 
whicli has a traditional hacki^round 
and poetic iniplications, recalls sonie- 
thin^- of the world of Watteau and at 
other nionients that of Redon. He is 
nevertheless (piite orii^inal. He knows 
how to create an atnios])liere of niys- 



GALERIE MAEGHT 



13 RUE DE TEHERAN 



PARIS VIII 



BAZAINE 



RECENT WORKS 



MAY 








Le Port de Cannes: Bonnard 
Musee cl Art Moderne, Park 



Le Rot David: Achiam 
Galerie Lara Vtncy, Paris 



[38] 





Tete de Christ: SuRAUD 
Galerie Marcel Bernheim, Paris 



Enjant Torero: Jose de Lapayese 
Bernheim-] eune, Paris 



[35] 



i^lyplis. An air of witchcrafl perxades 
many of tliese scenes and tliere is a 
J lioenician llaxour in somc of tlie por- 
iraits. The enlire exliihition is a tour- 
(lo-force. ils aestlietic (|ualities are 
i|uite insiniiatin,^' and despite the fact 
tnat tliere are elenients tliat recall the 
arts Ol i)ast and present. he has created 
a han^ua.i^e wluch is liis and (juile 
nni()iie. 

The exhihition of (h*a\\ inqs hy 
Derain at the (lalerie Mae.^ht contains 
a collection of .sketches in san,i;iiine 
and crayon. not ()rii;iiially intended 
for show, and seen here tor the hrst 
time. Many of these are sketches done 
for iise in paintini;-. There is a sculp- 
tural (juality in tlie saniiaiine (h-awin.^s 
of niide h^ures seen in the round 
uhich show tliat, at lieart, Derain lield 
to the classic conception. And there are 
other influences such as African art, 
(lothic art and niuch eise fused into 
a uni(iue style with soniethinj;:: like a 
Chinese suhtlety and distinction. 

The collection of en^ravinji^s whicli 
Jac(|ues Villon is showin^- at the 
(lalerie l.ouis Carre Covers a ])eriod 
of niore than forty years. Descended 
froni a faniily of en.^ravers, Villon has 
exercised his craft iiow for niore than 
half a Century. The series wliich runs 
froni l^ni to 1953 niaintains a steady 
level of hi.i;h (|uality wliich is visihle 
at a i^iance. 'Jdie ])ortraits. wliether 
tliose of 1911 or \^)5?> are e(|ually at- 
tractive. The lan(lsca])es show tliat 
architectural order whicli we see in 
l'oussin and wliich is typically h^'ench. 
llis art expresses order, System, logic 
and .stahility and lic is perliaps the 
niost essentially h^'encli of all the 
artists of our tinic. 

Aristide C'aillaucl, who in sonie 
(piarters has heen consiclered to be a 
naive ])ainter. is rather an artist of a 
])oetic and iniaj^inative order. Ile 
knows how to secure the niost satis- 
factory pictorial arranjLTenient wliat- 
e\er he the suhject. His exhihition at 
the ( ialerie i'enezit contains a varietv 



of thenio all of uhich are extieinel\ 
orii^inal. II i> lorcador is attracti\e he- 
caii>e of it> structure. its personal 
style. 

The .Salon "1 'eintres-1 *oetes" at the 
k'ayniond Duncan ^alleries includes 
se\ent\ artists inore or less addicted 
to writin^ poetry. With Paul X'alery 
paintini;" was little niore than a "violon 
(rinj^res". Otliers like Raymond Dun- 
can. Cocteau. Tristan Klini^sor. W'aro- 
(|uier. Max jacoh and Henri lleraut 
are e(|ually at liome in hotli art.s. hanile 
IJernard. liourdelle, Andre Lhote. 
Met/iniier. and Morvan are hetter 
known for tlieir paintinjL;". 

"Des Animaliers" are lioldin^^ their 
salon in the hi,^" jL^allery of the C'ercle 
X'olney. Tiiis includes over thirty art- 
ists. with a .i;r()up of C()ntenij)orary 
Chinese and Indian painters. Sandoz, 
founder of the s(jciety. is well known 
as an expert of hronze alloys able to 
.i^ive life to animals of all sorts in 
hronze and in j)aintint;-. Hilhert is ahle 
to carve an ea.^le from .^ranite as only 
a few craftsmen caii. .Simon, Treniont, 
Piayser ( iratry, Ponomarew, Flehert 
C'oetVni. lirii^aud and P)ertlie Martinie 
are all interesting' for their work in 
hronze and stone. Dunand is one of the 
chief h'rench artists in lac(|uer. Rous- 
seau in ceramics and Marsa is noted 
for her ])aintinms of exotic animals in 
hrilliant colour. Anioui;- the Chinese. 
Chou Din,^" shows a classical art of 
i^reat linesse. Pan-yu-lin, known for 
her ])aiiitini;- wliich is a rare fusion of 
the art of I^ast and West. Kaiko Moti, 
an Indian artist froni l)omhay, exhihits 
an ensemhle of color eni^'raxin.^s of 
hi.i^ii (juality. 

.Seiler has returned from Holland 
with a collection of laiidscaj)es on show 
at the Cialerie Rocpie. Most of his work 
is in sniall forniat in wliich he con- 
denses a wealth of detail. His broad 
patches of colour recall Bissiere. 
l'eaceful Stretches of the Dutch pold- 
ers with the horizontal lines of the 
canals contrasted with the vertical out- 
lines of a sail ov a steeple impart a 



[36] 




CEZANNE 



Nature morte a la draperle 



BERNHEIM-JEUNE 

83 rue du Fg. St. Honore and 27 Av. Matignon, Paris (8) 

Tel.: Ely: 54-28 Cable Address: Berjeune. Paris 

Specialists in Art Books - - - Exhibitions of Modern Paintings 

May I I through June 29: Exhibition for the benefif of the 
"Sauvegarde de Versailles": 

VOICI Des FLEURS, Des FRUITS, 
Des FEUILL ES et Des BRANCHES 

LES VAGH WEINMANN 

Exhibifed in April 

JOSE De LAPAYESE 

through May 9 






[371 



( 



ß 



f 




epon rrom 




ans 



Bv Rarnktt D. Coxr.AN 



Ar llie nioment tlie royal P)ritish visit 
^^ to l'aris is al its iRM.^iit. In its way 
it is a work n\ art. and it is concerned 
larti'ely witli works of art. W'ith a 
niatiic toucli tlie (hieen's presence has 
at^ain broii^dit to life tlie pakices^ of 
tlie Kini^s of France — tlie Louvre, Ver- 
sailles and its .i;reat tlieatre. Xotre- 
Dame wliich has stood finn. like tlie 
En.^lish throne, for alniost a thousand 
years is lit up froni without and within 
iike a li.u:hthouse un a rock. The Seine 
lias ajLiain heconie a royal waterway 
and the capital and its fabulons his- 
tory a city of the Arahian Xi^dits. One 
lias only to inia,s:ine what such a visit 
in a modern nianufacturinm- town w ith- 
out niontniients would have been like, 
to realize die vahie of art. E\eu the 
crowd which was literally carried off 
its feet with enthusiasni niii^ht have 
acted differently in other surre )Undinii:s. 
11ie masses who act spontaneously ac- 
cordin*r to the coUective unconscious 
niay have recojLi'nized a synihol of sta- 
l)ility in a world of shiftin.^" sands. 
And the great monunients of the past 
also niake for this despite the fact that 
nuich conteniporary art is headin,^- to- 
wards disintegration in niany direc- 
tions. 

At such a tinie it is interestini;- to 
See what has heen achieved in the last 
few decades. The exhihition "Depuis 
Bonnard ..." at die Musee Nationale 
d'Art Moderne, which extends from 
Bonnard to De Stael. affords such a 
survey and allows us to detect certain 
Stahle values aniidst the constant 
chani^-es of the present. There are seven 



paintinj^s by Bonnard. one of which, 
Lc Port de Cannes has the delicate at- 
inosphere of Boudin and is on show for 
the tirst tiiiie. Lc salon rose of Vuil- 
lard. i)ainted tifty years a.^o, is still a 
rare piece of work. \Mllon has a coni- 
position of brilliant coloured architec- 
ture which is one of the best exhibits. 
'J'here are soiiie j)owerful ])aintini^^s by 
Soutine and five portraits by Modig- 
liani. Rouault is well represented with 
eight exhibits sonie of which are seen 
for the tirst tinie. A still life of Segon- 
zac has the permanent ([uality of 
C'hardin. A suite of Matisse ranges 
from 1(S08 to 1953. diagall P)ra(iue, 
Dufy. Derain, (Iruber, Utrillo and 
niuch eise composes this show loaned 
by the "Societe des .\mis du Musee 
d'Art Moderne." Among the i)aintings 
donated by this society to the Museum 
are a number l)y Nouiig artists such as 
Barat, Calmettes. Dniitrienko, Fusaro, 

(ianne and Jose J'alou. 

* * * 

'^FiiE new premises of the ( ialerie 
J.eiris have oi)ened with recent 
paintings by Picasso. .\11 were painted 
i)etween October 1955 and Septenil)er 
1956. 11ie sceiie is laid in the artist's 
large salon or studio, surrounded by 
die gardens of bis villa at the "Cali- 
fornie" near Cannes. There are fifty 
paintings in all — variations on die one 
tlieme, of the studio and a niodel. Ke- 
markably baro(|ue or ratlier rococo, 
diey show a j)roliferatioii of detail that 
recalls an Indian temple. The sign 
often replaces the form, so that certain 
j)arts of the canvas suggest liiero- 



C341 



tery e^i)ecially in tlie series of mystic 
painting> sliown at the (Ialerie ("reu/.e. 
That of the j)hantoni shij) is (|uite 
impressive. The collection of land- 
scai)es at the Lucy Krogli gallery con- 
tains some idyllic scenes with tigures 
and "baigneuses" on the shores of a 
lake. Ilere the artist, tliough lic does 
not follow Watteau or Corot. ne\er- 
theless seenis to capture sc^mething of 
their poetic atmosphere in h\> own 
way. 



t. 



nPiiK Spanish artist Lapayese di>plays 
^ an iiii])ortant collection of forty 
])aintings at die P)ernheini-Jeuiie gal- 
lery. highly imaginative in tlieiiie and 
treated with decorative fantasy. The 
artist has certainly mastered bis craft. 
Certain of diese panels with gold iiilay 
have almost a Far Fastern toucli and 
the sanie can he said of some of the 
portraits which remind one of certain 
classic Chinese works. liis sense of 
the arabescjue is likewise oriental as 



well as tlie care taken with the texture 
of the canvas which is worked over 
like that of lac(|uer. It is an art which 
sliows considerable distinction. 

At the saiiie gallery can be seen a 
collection of paintings by the brothers 
\\agli W'einmann who are of llungar- 
ian descent. Tliey coiiii)ose a triiiity 
which, despite certain dift'erences, 
niakes for unity of style. Tliey all dis- 
play a powcrful expressionisni in 
sombre tones and applied widi a thick 
ini|)asto. Religious subjects, country 
scenes, circus gruups are painted in a 
power ful niaiiner and often with a 
j)r()found sense of what is human. 

Lersy, at the Galerie Fricker, is an 
artist who has conie to "die front in 
recent years. His art is based on a 
x'igorous graphic Statement which al- 
lows liim to express dynaniic scenes 
such as a rughy niatcli or the movement 
of winter Sports. His large canvas of 
a footballer is quite impressive, füll of 

(Continited on page 42) 



STEPHEN HIGGINS 

PARIS 

19 Faubourg St. Honore 

Tel. ANJou 2910 

Master Drawings, Paintings 
and Sculpture 



Paintings by Renoir, Odilon Reden, de Stael, 
Bonnard, Braque, Menendez, Maggini and Solimena 

Drawings and watercoiors by Delacroix, 
Corot and Juan Gris 



[39] 





Are/ US a: Emilio Greco 
A/ the ]Nster GäHery, N.Y.C. 



Standing Horse: Marino Marini 
Galerie Alex Vöinel. Diissehlorf 









Bihlical LanJscape: GhOKGES Rouauli 
Exhihilecl at the Schone man Gallery, New York 

r 40 1 = 



Fen/n/e sur le Pont: R. MoNTANÄ 
Galerie Paul Vallottofi, Lausanne 



Dancer: Giac(3MO Manzu 
At World Ho//se Gallery, N.Y.C. 




Le Port du Havre (1906): Raoul Dufv 
On View at the Perls Galleries, New York 

[41] 



I 



Galerie Framond 

3, tue des St. Per« 
PARIS (6) Lif: 50-80 

OLIVIER DECAMPS 
J. BADORD 

Sculp+ures 

May 3- 18 



31 rue de Seine 



Paris 6 



are bringing over for 
the opening of their new 
Gallery in New York 
an important Group of 

living Parision Artists 



Galerie Suillerot 

HAYDEN 

Cubist and Recenf Pain+ings 
8 rue d'Argenson, Paris (8) 

fei.: an\: 54-88 



-ROR VOLMAR— 

MAURICE 

BDUILLOT 

RECENT PAINTINGS 

May 14 - May 27 
34 Avenue Matignon, Ely 47-74 



CALERIES 
RAYMOND DUNCAN 



REPORT FkOM PARIS 
(Coiitinucil froui paijc 3^|) 

life witli a sense uf poise. 'Hie i)revail- 
\\v^ coloiir is low in tone with .i^rey and 
pale yellow but liiere are tinies wlien 
as in bis lari,a^ canvas of a saxopbone 
])laver. be conies to iise brilliant coloiir 
constrnctively. Many of tlie larjLie still 
lifes ])lanne(i witb arcliitectural order 
(lisplay (piiet liarnionies sui^^iiestive ot 
cbaniber ninsic. 

Haydeii now sbowinK at the Calerie 
Sonillerot is one ot tlie artists of tlie 
"Kcole de Paris." wliose work dates as 
far back as V)W. Ot Polisli descent, 
be caiiie to l'aris in PK)7 and alter a 
l)eri()(l in wbicli be was inUnenced i)ar- 
ticiilarly by Cezanne be becanie con- 
verted to ciibism tbrouKb sucb Iriends 
as Juan Oris. IMcasso and Metzini^er. 
Tbe present sbow contains ])aintinKs o£ 
eacb ot tbese periods but consists 
cbiefly of bis later work wbicb is per- 
ba])s not so well kiiown. In certain still 



KÄTIÄ GRÄNDFF 

13 QUAI DE CONTI 
PARIS 6 

LAPRADE 
CLAUDE MONET 

May - June 



BONNARD VUILLARD 
ROUSSEL 

Selecfed Painfings 



H. BERES 25 quai Voltaire PARIS 

Exhibltlon from May 3 - May 30 



f 



I 



i 



I 



[42] 






lifes be ini|)arts a straiij;e life to tbe 
simple objects dei)icted, a l)owl or a 
kiteben knife. wbicb beconie si.^nibcant 
like Symbols; tbe laiidscapes are like- 
wise transposed in a way tbat su.c:^;ests 
tbey are part of anotber world. He bas 
Condensed a lifetime of researcb into 
tbese paintinj^s. arrivini^- at an art of 
^reat simplicity distilled as it were 
from all bis previous experience. 

Acbiam. wlio is >liowin.i;- a collection 
of sculpture at tbe Lara Vincy i^allery, 
is a Oalilean wliose art bas j:j:n3wn up 
from tbe >toiies of bis native land. In- 
spired by tbe substance of diese basaltic 
rocks be bas carved bis fi.^ures very 
mucb like tbe primitive sbepberds of 
tbe Old Testament. His subject matter 
— Job, David. 11ie propbet, A sliep- 
berd, etc. — is treated witb a sense of 
tbe block and tbe texture of tbe stone 
and carved witb a feelini;- for arcliitec- 
tural form. 

A collection of lari^e abstract com- 

(CoiitifiKcd Oll pagc 51) 



GALERIE H. LE GENDRE 

31 rue Guenegaud, Paris 6 

from May 8 to June 8 

Michel RAGON presents: 

EXPRESSION AND NON FIGURATION 

PAINTINGS by: Atlan - Arnal - Martin Barre - 
H. A. Bertrand - Camille - Clerc - Corneille - Dey- 
rolle - Doucet - Fautrier - Fichet - Gillet - James 
Guitet - Koenig - Maryan - Pichette - Poliakoff - 
Schneider • Soulages - Sugai. 

SCULPTURES by: Cesar - Hajdu • Etienne Martin - 
Marta Pan - Stahly. 

IN PREPARATION: "Gouaches and Collages" by 
Esteve to Sugai. 



CARDO MATIGNON 

32 Av. Matignon, Paris (8) 

MICHEL G.GILBERT 

Paintings of France and America 

PAINTINGS 

Watercolors - Drawings 

Mav 4- 18 



GALERIE FRICKER 

177 Bvd. Haussmann 
Paris (8) Ely 20-57 



R. LERSY 

RECENT WORKS 



Exhibition May 10-31 



MARCEL BERNHEIM 

35 ru8 la Boetie, PARIS (8) 

MOUALLA 

GOUACHES 

SURAUD 

SCULPTURES 
May 10-25 



S M O L 

Galerie Creuze 
Salle Messine, 4 Av. de Messine 

Mystlc Paln+ing 

Lucy Krohg, 10 bis PL St. Augustin 

Small Formats 



Mav 10-25 



[45] 



cJLondon r ji 



evu6 an 



Bx 1 lllKACK Sllll'l' 



d Wi 



iew6 



W^uv:\'uv.\< our in(le])te(lness is to 
cliance. to tlie iMitente C'ordialc 
whicli is so conspicuoiisly cordiaJc at 
tliis juncture. to tlie Arts Council, or 
to an amal.iiani of all tliese tliini;-s, tlie 
l.ondon art workl is in predoniinantly 
(lallic niood. P)y tlie tinie tliese notes 
ap])ear anotlier ini])()rtant Arts Council 
exliihition will be at tlie 'Pate (iallery, 
this of tlic Ciu^t^eiiheiin Museum of 
New N'ork: but nieantiiiie \ve liave die 
lar.^e R. H. A. (ialleries showiniLi- 160 
pictures on loan froni tlie Musee d'Art 
Moderne of Paris, a delii^litful one of 
Dra\vin.i»s l)y Ini;res froni tlie Musee 
Iii.^-res at Montauban. and one of 
Picasso. Ceraniics. 'bliese last two are 
at tlie Arts Councibs own i^alleries in 
St. janies's Scjuare. In tlie private j^al- 
leries Wildenstein's have planned an 
inipressive exbibition of Herain lor 
]\Tay: I^utfet is to return to 'bootb's. 
üben tlieir ])resent sliow " Paris- Lon- 
dres" is tinisbed; and Adams (iallery 
continue witli tliat j^roup of jL^ay iM-encli 
Neo-Realists wlioni they liave niade 
dieir own. thouj^b sonie of tbe tinest 
of tbeir pictures by Montane liave K<me 
to a bii^ exbibition of bis work at tlie 
Calerie I\aul Vallotton in Lausanne. 
Hie pictures froni tbe Musee d'Art 
Moderne teil fairly tborouf^ldy tbe 
evolvin^- story of tbe Scliool of l^aris, 
and tbe cataloj^me niay be looked upon 
as a succinct i^uide to tbe movements 
wbicb liave constituted it. This, and tbe 
bei pfui banjLa:inii- of die exbibition are 
entirely c()ninien(kd)le. Approximately 
cbronoloi^ical. tliey carry us from tbe 
precursors wlio followed Seurat's at- 



tempt to s^et order into lnipres>ionisni ; 
to tbe Xabis witb liiie Homiards and 
X'uillards; tbe b\auves wboconie rather 
nobly out of tbis. tbou.iib not witb tbeir 
niost b'auviste works. Derain beiiii;- 
represented by an absolutely classical 
bead study. /.(/ Bloudc and Dufy witb 
an early rHIiu/c Strccf of VH)() wbicb 
niakes bis otlier tive ])aintin|Lis look 
sballow. Matisse bas an inipressive 
sbowin.i;-: tbe Pccoratirc /'if/ure 
iu/iiinst (in Onunnciital (iroiniil is one 
of bis best paintin|Lis. So we i)ass to tbe 
])oint wbere ])aintin.^- ceased to be ob- 
jective and witb Cubism becanie an in- 
tellectual ratber tban a seiisuous con- 
cern. Picasso doininates tbe niain rooni 
witb bis black i;rey and wliite Milliii- 
cr's ITorkshop and bis classic .V//7/ Life 
■a'ith Aut'u]]ic llcad j)icture> wbicb 
niake one wonder wliy be could ])aint 
tbe bideous iroinuii in HInc. P>ra(pie is 
not \ery well rej)resented except by 
/.(• .V(//('// of PM4. one of bis best 
work^: and tbe arid disinteKi"«ilin!L;- in- 
tluencc of Cubism already dates tbe 
stvle. i'^-oni a ^roup sim])ly called "Tbe 
Older (ieneration" tbe ])()etry (lookinj;- 
a little sentimental ) of Cbairall. and tbe 
Utrillo townsca])es stand out: tbe latter 
])articularly lovely for tbey include 
L' Im passe C oft in and T.c I Aipin Aiiilc, 
surely two of bis tinest works. After 
tbat tbe I^rimitives seem just silly. tbe 
Surreali sts uninterestinji;- or unintelli,^-- 
ible, and niost of '*'J1ie ^^)un|Li•er ( Ien- 
eration" of non-tijuurative ])ainters all 
but nieanininless. One ratber noble ab- 
stract by Xicolas de Stael, and 'llie 
Library bv Vieira da Silva in lier 




^P^^^PWwA-^ 



■■■;jti»fl*tf.t..^->«fa^- -k«^ ;^Wiw«^i:Ai^-^ 





Oii! cwcl OuiHces: Edward Burra 

Al the Lefevre Gcillerj. London 



Study of Van Gogh: Francis Bac:on 
At the Hanover Gallery, London 




[44] 



Scinnois: Mauric:k Utrillo 
Sbouii dt Arthur Tooth <unl Sons. London 

[45J 



h 



ch.iracleristic style, a C'ar/ou in Siir- 
realistic niood, and a Realist Dcad 
i\)cL' l)v P>nftet. very ti^ly an^l defunct 
but nevertlieless powerftil, were oases 
in tlie (lesert of tlie tliird rooni ot non- 
li-nr.'iiive arl. Tliis critic at least feit 
il^at l'Art Moderne liad run its course. 

It \va> retreshin.i;-, therefore. to i>et 
hack to the .i;rass roots ot art at the 
other Arts Cotincil exhibition anionj? 
the Inj; res drawinKS. 11iey are more 
human than the paintin.i^s which canie 
froni theni. and niake one realise that 
the stndv of the human fi.i^ure yields a 
synthesi's ot mind. band, and feelin^-, 
which has disintemrated since art 
turned its hack on nature. 

The exhibition ot Picasso ceramics 

is not on in tinie for comnient bere, 

and anvwav do not ri,i;htly conie into 

"Pictures on Exhibit." but since 1 am 

niterlv allerj^ic to Picasso's efforts in 

this direction it may be just as well. 

* * * 

ANNE Said's drawin.cfs sbowin^^ at 
^"^ the Heaux Arts Gallery bave a 



basis ot i)aradox. Their techniqtie of 
lead pencil. chiefly line but sometimes 
rubbed for tone effect. used even for 
a complicated subject Hl Marg cover- 
injr api)roxiniately twenty-fotn- scpiare 
feet. and used in a ratber meticulous 
andpainstakin^^ fasbion, ^nve them an 
old-fashioned air. A^ainst this stancls 
a feelin.n- that everythin^^ depicted is 
not (piite itself btit is in a State ot meta- 
m()r])hosis. and so we are in the world 
of .^urrealisni. The stran.e:e thin.i;- is 
that a second look does not bear otit 
this subjective interpretation : they are 
])lants and bcmes, birds and sbells. 
P)lake's double vision of the old man 
|[rrey and the thistle across the way? 
h is dit'ticult to know. Surely she means 
those pots and handles half stibmer.i^ed 
in the water in El Marg to evoke the 
idea of beadless human forms? Httt 
])erhaps thev are, after all, only aband- 
oued pots in the water. The uniform 
t>reyness of the i)encil work. and its 
pedestrian thorou.Lihness all seems part 
of the paradox of this tantalizin«: 



MARLBOROUCH 

FINE ART, LIMITED 

Isf ivlay — ...Isf June 1957 

BETWEEN SPACE AND EARTH 

TRENDS IN MODERN ITALIAN ART 



Sculpfure by: 

CRIPPA and NEGRI 



n 



w 



Painfings by; 

AJMONE - 
CHIGHINE 
MORANDI 



BRUNORI - BACCI - CAPOGROSSI 
■ CORPORA - DOVA - FONTANA 
MORENI - MORLOTTI 



17-18 OLD BOND STREET 
Tel. HYDe Park 6195/6 



LONDON. W. I 
Cables: Bondarto, London 



[46] 



artist. Titles like Shells l'lyiiig and 
JUitlnug jtistify the Surrealist inter- 
])retation : and one may assunie that 
niar.i^e is not only the niari^in of a 
river but of different states of bein^. 
Soniethin^^ of the sanie evasive qual- 
ity is always in John Arnistron^'s 
work. He is sbowin.i: at the Leicester 
Oallery bis recent paintinjL^s. Most of 
theni are coniparatively sniall works : 
a few frankly symbolic in bis nsual 
style, this tinie using seated Henry 
^looreisb fi^tires as Gods Adrift. Dis- 
persinJ,^ Abandoned. and so forth : 
others bein,ir Still Life of pots and 
fruits built up with bis tisual concern 
for solid form in the sul)dued colour 
schemes we associate with bis work. 
The sketch for the enormous ceilin^ 
of the Cotincil House at Bristol is 
sbown and reminds us that Armstrong 
bejLr'tii ^li^ career as a stage decorator 
abie to desii^n for large surfaces. The 
very solidity of bis style susr^ests the 
nniral artist. and serves bim as an easel 



artist in that an Armstrong painting 
beconies part of the wall on which it 
hangs. 

The gallery is shared by Anthony 
Gross with landscapes so reduced to 
their basic C()ntt)ttrs expressed in a 
network of chromatic line that they 
are almost abstractions. They are most 
effective in rendering wide Stretches of 
open cottntry. bills and Valleys. Mr. 
Bensusan- Hutt's watercolour land- 
scapes in the entrance room are cbarm- 
ing and scholarly, and particularly stic- 
cessful when he works on a fairly 
large scale. 



I 



N the T.efevre Gallery during May 
that most able water-colourist. Va\- 
ward Burra. is exhibiting a number of 
very large paintings, chietlv Still Life 
and' Flowers. Oi^'I aud ()uinccs the 
largest of these ( it is SZyz bv 31 
incbes). if not entirely typical of the 
subiect matter, is a tour de force of 



ARTHUR TOOTH &. SONS 

LTD. 

(Established 1842) 

Specialists in Paintings by 

OLD AND MODERN MASTERS 

for Public Galleries and Private Collections 

EXHIBITIONS 

April 30th - May 25th BERNARD BÜFFET 

May 2 8th - June 22nd PHILIPPE BONNET 



31 BRUTON STREET 

Cables: Invocation, London 



LONDON 

Mayfair 2920 






[47] 



tlie >lyle. M()>t ol tlie |Kiintini;s are de- 
H.i;int'iilly (lecorative aiul — as \ve ex- 
pect ot' P)Uira's work — liave tlie solid- 
jty and >tren.^tli of oil i)aintinm* tliough 
lliey are in llie other medium. 

>ic «K i|i 

"P \Ris-I.(>M)Ri:s" at TootlTs (iallery, 
llieir anniial sliowini;- of works 
recently ac(|iiired in Paris, is an an- 
tholo.Liv of ,i;()()d P^rencli work. Out- 
>tandin,i;- are Monet's /.i\s- I'\ilaiscs 
d' l'.trctiit ( im])ressionism al ils most 
et'fective ) : P)Oudin at liis most eti'ective 
in ncanrillc. In riricrc inortc: Utrillo 
ai;-ain witli Snniiois, 1*M1; a tiny and 
ex(|uisite ( 'orot. .Irlcu.v du Xord: and, 
to hrini;- tlie story up to date. Plage 
diuis Ic M idi showiiiiLi' Xicolas de Stael 
ni<)\ ins;' away froiii ahstraction in 1055. 
The May exiliihition at Tooth's 
proniises Pernard Puffet, larj^ely witli 
those views of l^aris wliicli liave been 
liis recent preoccupation — a ratlier 
hleak Pari>. I tend to tliink, from 
whicli tlie J'arisians liave wisely, to 



use your laii.t;ua,i;e. abscjuatulated. 

i|c H« H( 

\ NKWcoMKR is Treuin ('oi)ple>tone. 
wlio liad liis tirst one-man show at 
tlie Piccadilly (iallery hut now lias one 
at Mattliiesen's. He is a Cornishnian 
and lias a metliod witli landscai)e whicli 
one nii,i;lit tliink derived from Ivor 
llitclieiis. hut tlien tlie suhject heconies 
further ah^tracted hy an explosion of 
white i)aint. The wliole effect is stiniu- 
latin,^;. thou.i;li upon analysis tlie 
splashes of slieer whiteiiess liave little 
meaniiij^-. Occasionally wlien witli an 
Intcrior they are window curtains in 
sunli.^ht. all' is well. W'hen they are 
out-of-doors in, say, Pcticortli Park 
tliev are unconvincint;'. ^'et curiously 
excitin.ii-. Is tliis the ])lace wliere 
strai.^iit landscape and Tachiste art 
meet? Perliai)s. Coi^plestone and dis- 
cipline mi.^ht well add up t(^ (piite a 
deal. An artist to watcli. H. S. 



ADAMS CALLERY 

24, DAVIES STREET. BERKELEY SQUARE 

LONDON. W. L 



MAYFAIR 2468 



FIREINICIHI 
DMIPI^iSSDONIDST 



ALSO PAINTINGS BY 



BELLIAS * LORJOU * MINAUX * MONTANE 

MOTTET * RAPP ^ YINAY 



I 



[48] 



i 



Sporne cJ^ondi 




on 



B\ Pa IRK K I I \^ MAN 



odi 



er WS 



T^^KAXc LS P).\coN i>. I !eel. one of the 
few really ()rii»inal i)aiiiter> work- 
\\Y^ in iMii^land today. liis paintin.c^s. at 
times visioiiary. at times iiiacahre to 
say the least of it, convey an imi)res- 
sion at once ])owerful. swee|)in.^: and 
courat^eous. C'oura.^eous in puttin.ij: 
forth holdly an imame. wlien today 
most ])ainters ahsolve themselves from 
the responsihility of ima^e iiiakin.i^^ 

Am()n,iist the many fnie new works 
in liis show at The liaiiover (Iallery 
are four studies for ])ortraits of Van 
Goi^ii and in tliese strauire pictures of 
the tormented .^enius. P)acoii creates a 
kind of iiiytholoi^y. whicli is hoth ro- 
mantic. in the hest seiise of the word, 
and emotionally stirrin.u. In tliese 
works he uses a much looser hrusli 



stroke tlian heretofore. The colour is 
niore violent and ex])ressive. all this 
niakinii; a niore explicit icono<iraj)liy of 
his own. The result is a develoi)ment in 
liis work which at times puts one in 
niind of certain (ierman expressionist 
painters and of .Soutine. The i)aintin.^s, 
however. remain strikini^iy ori.^inal : 
P)acon's ahility is on the iiicrease and 
in his work one sees a lari^eness of 
visioii and a mytholo!:;ic il awareness, 
umisual in this centtn'y. 

j|C I* vp 

T3k'i Kk 1\ixij:\- at thirty-one years of 
a]L;e is one of the most interestin.i;- ol 
the younj^-er ])ainters workin.i;- in 
J.onclon. Paintin^s in his exhihition at 
Crinipel Fils consist entirely of fis:tn-es 
and studies for fis^nires. In tliese near- 
abstract nudes, one feels his sense of 
Space, of lijuht and of colour. His paint 
really works and makes manifest his 
ima.i?ery. Kinley is nioviniL;- auay from 
I)ure al)Stractionism and is .^oin.q- holdly 
towards the discovery of a personal 



LEICESTER CALLERIES 



June lsf-27th 



MAX 
BEERBOHM 



Memoria 
Exhibition 



IVON 
HITCHENS 

New 
Paintings 



LEICESTER SQUARE. LONDON 

Cables: Ofort Lesquare 



[491 



THE HANOVER GALLERY 



REG BUTLER 

Sculpture 

2 May - 14 June 



32a St. George Street 
LONDON. W. 1 

Cables: Hanrica, London 



O'HANA GALLERY 

T3. CARLOS PLACE 

GROSVENOR SQUARE 

LONDON (Tel. Gro. 1562) 



April 25th to May I5th 

THREE PAINTERS 
PROM VENEZUELA: 

GRANADOS 
HEITER 

VALLMITJANA 



Also 
FRENCH IMPRESSIONISTS 

Catalogues and prices 
on applicaflon 



idioin. In thi> fruitl'ul appro.'icli l:e 
\]u(\> :i \v:iy ol' ret.'iininK tlie formal 
(|iialitics ()\ bis earlier work wliile de- 
\el()i)iii,ii" a new pictorial sense in liis 
painliniL;'. 

An artist whose work is i^radnally 
coniin-- to the fore is David Tindle. 
llis work (sliown at the Piccadilly 
( 'rallery ) ])articiiLarly tlie three very 
lar.^e canvases ot tlie Tlianies. sliows 
a looser and inore expressive liandlin.i; 
of i)aint and oi colour than fornierly 
was tlie case. Other new ])aintin,i;-s, 
niainly of Soottish fisliin.!^- villa^es and 
little roniantic ports like Arbroatli lind 
Tindle at bis niost recei)tive. His feel- 
inii" for place is borne out in tbe six 
])aintini;s wbicb be was conunissioned 
to paint in 1956 by The Royal Librar- 
ian. of Windsor Castle and W'indsor 
J*ark. These now han^- in tbe Royal 
Librarv at W'indsor. Tindle was born 
at lliiddersfield in 1932. 

The ])aintin,^s of I^nrico 15aj strike 
a sonibre. conteniporary note in bis 
lirst exhibition in lMii;lan(l. P>aj bails 
froni Italy. froni the industrial city of 
Milan wbere he was born in 19J4. Ilis 
l)aintinjL;s which declare both the .i^rav- 
ity and .qaiety of our world in a decora- 
tive nianner contain a so])histicated 
approacb with a seasonin.^;- of abnost 
every known style froni colla^e to 
tacbisnie. In 1952 be was one of the 
Promoters of the Nuclear Movement, 
a movement which he nanied himself 
as a kind of visiial ex])ression of spon- 
taneous style, held to^etber witli dots 
and streaky lines of paint bearin.e: a 
reseniblance to action paintin.L;-. P)ai has 
been showing- at Oallery One. 

John Read has made a number of 
brilliant art lilnis in recent years for 
Tbe H.n.C. Television Service. .Some 
of bis best are sbowin.g- in New N'ork 
at the Third International iMlm b'es- 
tival at the Metropolitan Museum. One 
of tbe best of Read's filnis is bis most 
recent work on tbe paintinj^^s of L. S. 
T.owry, the fanious seventy-year-old 
Lancashire i)ainter known for bis in- 



i 



[50] 



(lustrial townscapes. of bizarre build- 
inj»-s and little people burr\in|Lr about 
the streets. He adds to a keen sense of 
human di,i,niity. a ma.Liiiiticent feelinj^ 
for tone and colour. Read's otber fibns 
include ones on (irabam .^^utberland, 
Stanley .Spencer and John Tiper. I*. H. 

* * =H 

REPORT FROM PARIS 
(Continiicd from pagc 43) 

])ositions by tbe American Jenkins. at 
the (lalerie Stadler, sbows that the 
artist has evoked from bis earlier 
j)aintini;- towards a wider and more 
rhythmic phrasinf^»- in v.bich dark and 
li^ht contrasts of fulj^ent matter j^leani 
witb the vivid intensity of an atomic 
explosion. jenkins is evidently .^aiided 
by the spirit of our tinie to exj)ress a 
World of inner cataclysms. 

Maurice l-Jouillot is an artist who 
for many years has lixed in the coun- 
tryside and ^rown tlowers near J'aris. 
As a fiower j)ainter he is one of tbe 
niost orii^inal. Havin.q- made a s])ecial 
study of occult natural laus and the 
jL^eometric forms that g-overn plant 
life, he lias achieved a series of dower 
I)aintin£;-s which are in many ways 
cpiite new. His landscapes luider snow 
are tbe most subtle of tbeir kind and 
worthy to stand beside tbose of .Sisley. 
His ])resent display at tbe Ror V^olmar 
^allerv is a verv genuine contribution. 

An ini|)()rtant exhibition of Bonnard. 
Vuillard and Roussel is on sliow tbis 
nionth at tbe Galerie Ha.^uette Heres. 
The P)()nnard paintin.o^s rani^e from 
Tlic Portrait of J^niUard's Motlicr 
(1<S<)4) to tbe Paysa(/c du Cauct 
(PHO). Tbe Vuillard paintin.ti:s from 
a still life (1888) to a fine pastel 
Claycs dated 1935. Roussel 's paintin,t,^s 
extend from 77/t' Craiidiuotlicr (1888) 
to La Sourcc of 1925. Tbis show in- 
cludes well over tifty paintini^^s, draw- 
iniis and pastels by tbe three "Xabis" 
and is intended to show bow near the 
three artists were one to anotber. 
(Coiifijiucd on paqc z>^) 



THE LEFEVRE 
CALLERY 



Still Life and 

Fiower Paintings 

by 

EDWARD BURRA 



30 BRUTON STREET 
LONDON, W. I. 



BEAUX ARTS GALLERY 

PAINTINGS BY 

CYNTHIA PELL 



also 



PICTURES FOR GALLERIES 

May. 1957 
1-7 Bruton Place. London, W. 1 



BERRY-HILL 

Calleries 

PAINTINGS 
ANTIQUITIES 

743 Fifth Avenue. N. Y. 22 



t5»l 



ijn (Lxklblt In Lj^ 



ermaniA 



/,'v IniiN Anthony Thwauks 



T^ins was such n brilli.int nionth in 
i Cennaiiv, botli lOr old and modern 
art. tliat l' sliall liave to deal witli 
cvervtliinn- in tele.^ra])liic >tyle. Munich 
retui-ned to ihe lieadlines in botli tliese 
fields: with the (iabriele Muenler lie- 
(luest of earlv Kandinskys, sliown at 
the Municipal (iallery in the Lenhach- 
iKdais; the exhibition of Kenibrandt 
(h-awinus bv the Staatliche (;rai)hi>che 
Sannnluni^-; and the Lei;er i':xhd)iti()n 
at the Haus der Kunst. 

The Kan(hnsky collection l)e.^ins 
with fittv-ei.^lit early tenii)eras and ods 
Ol 1901-7. One sees the influences ot 
the Impressionists. Van Go.oh, Corintli 
and abov^ all the Juj-endstil. art nou- 
veau Then come forty oil paintni.iis ot 
the Murnau i)eriod (1908-11). where 
the movement towards abstraction is 
alreadv clear in the tlattenin^- out ot 
ti-ures and objects into colour areas 
and the tendencv to a relatively simple 
Palette based on l)lue>. yellows and 
o-reens. The twenty-two ,i;lass panitmj^s 
ot 1909-14 are rather disappointin.^- m 
their qualitv, but they do show the im- 
portance of this art for Kandmsky s 
develoiMuent. The Asiatic nitluence, 
too. which came out so clearly towards 
the end oi bis life, here shows its head. 
Then comes the clon ot the P.eMuest: 
twentv oils ot the P>laue Reiter i)eri()d 
(10ll'-14). These contain the drama 
ot Kandinskv's breakthrou.^h into ab- 
stract art and they include some major 
works of middle size. One extraordin- 
arv paintin^ is the I luprovisatiou No. 
]() (1911), which contains representa- 
tional fi^tu-e studies in line with colour 
absoluteh free. The etYects in blue 



monochrome are near to those which 
such voun.i;- Paris i)ainters as N ves 
Klein are trving for tcukiy. Ihe P>e- 
,|uest is rounded ott with fourteen 
watercolours and drawinj^s froni 1911 
to 1014, colour-\voo(lcuts froni 1901 to 
1911 and etchin.i»s of 1016. 

Hj * * 

Ar.üUT the Leger exhibition 1 need 
^ say little here. for it repeats almost 
exactlv that at the Musee des Arts 
Decoratifs in ]\aris last year. One feit 
depressed again that one of the real 
iiiasters of the iirst half-century could 
liave fallen to the banality of Lcger's 
last ten vears . . . 'Hie (iraphische 
Sammlung claims no more for its Reni- 
brandt exhibition than "a sort oi e\n- 
logue to The Rembrandt Vear ot 1956". 
hr return for its own loans to other 
nuiseums last year. it has borrowed im- 
l)()rtant items f rom Amsterdam, Perhn, 
Hamburg, Rotterdam and Stockhohn, 
as well as from private coUections, to 
add to its own considerable ])ossessions. 
The result is a show of thirty-nine of 
Rembrandt's drawings, with twenty- 
six more of uncertain authorship and 
tifty-seven etchings froni his band. 
The show has a (|uiet power— and ex- 
traordinarv actuality. The whole ot 
later art is ccmtained here: Fragonard, 
Manet. Kokoschka, right down to the 
dynamic line of Hans ll.artung in (mr 

own dav. 

* * ♦ 

DrssK.LUoKF has also had iniportant 
shows, of an old and of a modern 
master. The Staedtische Kunstsannn- 
hmg has been showing the exhibition 
of '^Johann TTeinrich ITiessli (alias 



[52] 



"ITiseli") a»enibled by the Pro Hel- 
vetia l'^oundation. It is an excellent rep- 
resentation of the oeuvre. Of the oils, 
there are tive early work>, before 
17S.^. including the tirst study for the 
\i(jlitinarc. There foUow thirty-six up 
to the end of the Century and half-a- 
dozen after it. with the Xifjluinarr in 
its la»t phase. L'nfortunately. as a 
ITiseli scholar poiiited out to me. there 
are also two oil studies (Comhat hc- 
t7<'ccn HiuilisJnucii aud Oricntal 
rinitcs. c. 1/95) which are certainly 
not lui-eli. hl addition there are some 
lumdred drawings. from all his jieriods 
and including all his theines ; though 
here again there is a sli]), a Fernst and 
Mcf^histo (c. IcSOO) and a Girl comb- 
iiKI her fhiir, 7^vU'hcd by a Hoy (c 
ISIO) which are not Ftiseli btit Theo- 
dor von Holst. 

In the contenii)orary tield, Alex 
A'oeniel continues his series of brilliant 
iiiiniature> ( following the Klee draw- 
ings and the hronzes of Alatare) with 
Marino Marini. Of the nineteen 
bron/e- from 1940 to 1050 only a 
Stdudi'nn n'oinuii (1945) is of much 
size. but ahiiost all are tirst-rate in 
(lualitv. One sees the iiiHiiencesiMail- 
lol in' the earlv nudes. Picasso in the 
Acndntt with 'cliild (1051). (haconi- 
etti in the Standiiu/ Horsc of the saine 
vear. a i)iece of extraordinary intens- 
'ity. And in the three Miracics (1954- 
5') tliere is a transcending of the object 
and almost of the material form which 
1 found exciting indeed. 

T_^^VKK >ince the exhibition at the Oer- 
^^ manische Xationahnuseum in Xur- 
emberg entided Auf(iau(j der Ncuccit 
in 1952 and the much larger show. 
'*n^-iuniph of Mannerism" at thejjijks- 
museuin in Amsterdam in 1955, the 
Mannerist painters and sculptors of 
the i)eri(Kl 15J0-U)40 have come into 
fashion in nuiseum circles here. Ihe 
exhibition at the reorganised Museum 
in Ldm of the Orzimek Collection was 
signiticant. The (irziniek faniily have 
been collecting for thirty years, spe- 



DR. WERNER RUSCHE 

COLOGNE • BRAUNSFELD 

WIETHASESTRASSE 22 

(GERMANY) 

Härtung 
MANESSIER 

SINGIER 
SOULAGES 



Paul Klee 



Galerie Aenne Abels 

Wallrafplatz 3 

COLOGNE 

Sermany 

MODERN PAINTINCS 
SCULPTURE 



GALERIE THEO HILL 

COLOGNE, SERMANY 
Schildergasse 107 

ERICH HECKEL 
E. L. KIRCHNER 
O. MUELLER 
SCHMIDT-ROTTLUFF 



[5}] 



Galerie 
Alex Vömel 

Düsseldorf, Germany 

Königsallee 42 

Jawlensky - Klee - Marcks 
Marini - Matare - Sintenis 

and others 



GALERIE 

WILHELM GROSSHENNIG 

Kasernenstrasse 13 
Düsseldorf, Germany 

• French Impressionists 

• German Expressionists 

"Bauhaus" "Brücke" 

"Blauer Reiter" 



MODERNE GALERIE 
OTTO STANGL 



JAWLENSKY 
KANDINSKY 
KLEE 
MARC 



HÄRTUNG 
POLIAKOFF 
SOULAGES 
ZAO WOU-KI 



MUNICH - MARTIUS-STR. 7 



Kunst Kabineh Ruhm 

Munich 

ORIGINAL WORKS AND GRAPHICS 

ALWAYS IN STOCK BY: 

Archipenko. Barlach, Baumeister, 
Beckmann. Feininger, Heckel, 
Hofer, Jawlensky, Kandinsky. Klee, 
Lehmbruck, Macke, Moholy-Nagy, 
Otto Mueller. Noide, Rohlfs, 
Schmidt-RottlufF. 

Franz Joseph Strasse 9/1 

Tel. 36 15 88 



ciaH^ini: in tlie Northern Mannorists 
and e^pf.'ially in I^'rans Floris ( Ant- 
werp 151<^-7()) by wlioni tliey have 
t'ourteen works. The coUection is coni- 
])lete(l hy JL^roiips of paintin^s attrihnted 
to niasters froni the i)eriod ])ef()re 
1500. h\- Moris' C()ntenii)()rarie>, by 
l)ainters of ihe Munich. Pra^ue and 
tinally of sonie French, Spanish and 
Utrecht ^chools and others c.l6()0, and 
Italian Mannerists ])r<)U.i^ht in to liive 
points of coni])arison. It is a notable 
|)rivate collection for these tinies. al- 
thou.^h niany of the attribiitions seeni 
to be rather niisure. 



H 



H^ -i* T^ 

A\iXG shown the leadin.^- dynaniic- 
abstract painter in 1 fans ITar- 
tun.e:. the Kestner-desellschaft in 
Ilanover now has a rei)resentative of 
what have been called the jrontalicrs, 
the frontiersnien of conteniporary art. 
(Instave Sin.^ier is not perha])S the 
leader: P>azaine and Manessier could 
certainly dispute tlie claini. P)nt he is 
a tlne ])ainter and shows the trend. 
He.uinnini^- ([uite ()p]H)sed to abstrac- 
tion. he is forced j^-radually by sonie- 
thint;' in the loi^ic of the tinie onto 
that bridi^^e which Paul Klee built. 
One end is ancliored to the object. to 
the sense-inij)ression. one Stretches 
to that other veri;e which Kandinsky 
hrst reached. In this journey Sintrier 
took on with liini (pialities from Ma- 
tisse. P>onnard and that tradition of 
decorative art which reaches back to 
tlie Windows of Chart res and P)ouri;es. 

:|c $}: >|C 

ÜOLF Cavaet. has kept up the notable 
inii)rovenient in bis work which 
was shown in bis New York exhibition 
last season. He has alniost eliniinated 
back.i^round colour froni the oils he is 
showin^ at the (ialerie Parnass in 
Wuppertal. This leaves bis linear ^iii•ns. 
as crisp as a steel sprinjjf, to echo back 
in independent colour patches towards 
infinity. His indian-ink (lrawin.i^^s, bunt;" 
in the other rooms. are a deli^dit. Plis 
use of the hiero^lyi)hic and of vibra- 



i 



[54] 



tion and the sj)ace-tcnsi()n of lii^ >ur- 

faces. niakebim alniost the onK- painter 

of hi> .i^-eneration ( b. IXOS) of real 

conteniporary interest in ( lerniany. 

Quite a .^roup of tlie under-thirty 

])ainters traxelled to Wuppertal for the 

openin.i;-. 

'Coiilriir :'rraiifc — Irhcndif/c luirbr' 

is the proinisinm- title of tlie b'ranco- 

( ierinan exhibition at the \\'ie>l)aden 

Aruseinii. It is annonnred a^ "the lirst 

major deiiionstration of the 'neu', the 

'other' art in (leriiiany;" and Hirector 

Dr. Weiler is proud to say he picked 

it all h inisei f. and ()aid for it from his 

mu.seum funds. A wortliy thrust 

a.^'ainst niuseum oli.ii'archy : but the 

Director sliould have learned bis sub- 

ject tirst. He has filled his show with 

Parisians of .i^reat insiiLi"nilicaiice ; but 

be shows no Wols. no Mathieu, no 

DubulTet. no Is'iutrier. no Michaux and 

no Riopelle. Only P)ryen is a wortliy 

and Serpan a stimulatinj^' painter, 

while Viseux and Georj^-es iiiay be in- 

terestiniL;- in a few years time. The 

German section was no better. save for 

ci m'ood tenipera by .Sonderbori;' and a 

.c^'roup of forceful and somctimes bril- 

liant ])aiiitin|L:s by b'red Hiieler — 

huddled to.juether in the furthest and 

the darbest room. 

* * * 

"J'lie rest of the exhibitions which 
crowd in I can do liardly more than 
list. The Kunsthalle in P)reiiien is 
sbowiiii;- the ( ierman Roniantic ])ainter 
Friedrich Nerly (1807-78). wlio from 
1828 until the end of bis life worked 
in Italy. This show is based on a lari^e 
collection of drawin.^s and oil sketches 
ac(|uired by tlie Museum four years 
a^-o and Stresses the early and more 
creative j)eriod . . . The Czwiklitzer 
.^allery in Coloi^ne has an exhibition of 
International Surrealisni. with paint- 
in^s by Arp. Rrauner. Chirico. Max 
Ernst. Maiiritte. Picabia and sonie 
others . . . The In.i^e Alilers Gallery in 
Mannheim exhibits throu.^h May a col- 
lection of Oskar .Schlemmer: sixteen 
oils and a dozen watercolours . . . 




ä^l'iM'' 






; ' 



ti 




RAOUL DUFY 



"Vernet-Ies-Bains" 



MODERN FRENCH PAINTINGS 
ROUAULT • GAUGUIN - MATISSE 

Renoir • Lautrec - Picasso 
Dufy - Vuillard - Bonnard 

Dalzell Hatfield Galleries 

Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles 



the«tt»estudioUd. 

•- Künv o ne>^ 
is openinq «n m^y .^^ 

c.„d »«^^«'•X"'o7 briUiant 
»"^ *'^arf.sts and sculptors 
younq artisTs . 

at . • • ' 



. • • 



openmg show 
ARTEMIS 

JEGART 



C»l 







^^, 



KLEE ^^ 



\\^ 



^^^ 



o 



^^i^ 



/ 



«> 



MIRO 



<?:, 



^s 



;• 



^N^ 



A^^ 



.c= 



> 



S 



>. 



V 



/ 



/, 



o 



ROSENB ERG 
and STIEBEL, Inc. 

PAINTINGS 
OBJETS D'ART 

32 East 57th Street. New York 



GOLDIE' 



May 6- 18 



LIPSON 



Paintings 



Sculpfure 



Prints 



barzansky galleries 

1071 madison avenue at 81 st. 



(iuenther Franke in Mnnich lias fol- 
lowed a sliow of tlic t'ij^ure sculptor 
(iustav Seitz, lately returned froni tlie 
D.D.R.. witli one of Xaver Fuhr, an 
l''\l)ressi()nist ol tlie second ij^enera- 
tion. l'^uhr lias irreal decorative (|iiali- 
lies and is in no sense an epi.ii:one . . . 
Tlic I-'rank furter Kunstkahinett of 
Hanna l'ecker vom Rath lias. as 1 
write. just opened tlie first private ex- 
liihition of (irahani Sutlierland. It con- 
sists niostly of drawini^s and .c:ouaclies. 
witli a few oils and a .^-roup of etcliin,{:is 
. . . Tlie Kunstverein in Düsseldorf lias 
been sliowin.ir F'elix Vallotton ( 1865- 
1025). unfortunately witli an enipliasis 
on later paintiiii^s. Tt will be foUowed 
hy an exliibition of P)ernard P)uffet 
wliicli just niisses tliis Report . . . Tlie 
Haus am W'aldsee in P)erlin lias a 
j^rou]) of live l)erliii i)ainters, all rela- 
ti\elv yount^-: Arno. P)aclmiann. P)er,^-- 
niann. Koet^ier and Winter-Rust . . . 
Tlie losef ]^\'issbender — Hann Trier 
sliow is now at tbe Municipal Museum 
in Wuppertal- I^^lberfeld . . . The new 
( ralerie fuer Moderne Kunst in Haii- 
over oi)ens witli Hein/. Troekes. The 
Hans Hartuiiii- exliibition is now at tlie 
Staatsiralerie in Stutt.i^art . . . Ha.^en's 
Karl-I^rnst-Osthaus Museum is sliow- 
ini; Werner Scholz and the active little 
Zimmeriialerie l^-anck in iM-ankfort, 
ir. P:. Kalinowski . . . The Xolde 
Memorial exhibit opens at the Kunst- 
halle in Hamburg on April 28th and 
will be dealt witli in my next report. 
I^nallN . there are a series (Ä exhihi- 
tions of irrai)hic work. of which 1 must 
.i^ive a bare list. The comi)lete ,ura])hic 
work of joan Miro, at the Museum 
Haus Lanme, Krefeld: Masters of the 
[a])anese Woodcut. at the Museum 
in Lübeck; drawin.^s by Ciacoiiio 
Mansu at the Staatliche r,ra])hische 
Sammluntr. Munich : contemi)orary 
iM-ench .t;raphics at PTella Nebeluni;-, 
Düsseldorf; "F'oeuvre Cn-avee. ( l'aris- 
Zurich)" at the Kunstkabinett Klilim. 
Munich: 1^. Mueller-Kraus (Sweden). 
Watercolours and ( '.raphics. at the 
Keoi)old-PToesch-Museum. Dueren. Of 



[5^11 



old-master work, ('. ( ). Boenier. Düs- 
seldorf, is >howin,i;- "Drawin^s from 
h'our C enturies", includinjLi early (1er- 
man. 17th Century Dutch. some 18th 
Century drawin.^s and sonie by the 
( iernian Romantics. The Kun>thalle. 
KarlMuhe. lia> the wiiidow desi^ni^ ^>f 
(Tri>t()pli Murer ( 1558-1614) ; and the 
( iermanisches Xationalmuseum. \u- 
remberiLi:. a fascinatinj^ collection of 
IM) drawini;s and i)ritits and over a 
hundred other documents, froni the 
liii^ii Middle Ai»es to the niiddle of the 
PHli Century froni Colo.^ne to Koenij^s- 
beri^- and the Hansa cities to the Harz. 
The title i> "C'ultural Documents of 

Northern (iermany." J. A. T. 

* * * 

XOTFS. Two museums in (Iermany 
have just added paintini^s by tlie late 
P^rencli arti>t Manessier to tlieir col- 
lections. The Kunstballe at Hanilmri;- 
bou,t;ht the Pete cu Zcclami, and the 
Kunsthalle at P)remeii y^oi a l'urris 
Pavidica. Hotli works were accpiired 
from the Werner Kusche liallery in 
(*()lo,i;ne. 

May 13 ' June 8 

MOTHERWELL 

Sidney Janis - /5 E 57 



PAULINE 

STEIGERWALD 

OILS • May 13-25 

LYNN KOTTLER GALLERIES 



3 East 65 St.. N. Y. 



FRENCH & AMERICAN 

PAINTINGS 



HARTER! galleries 




PORTRAITS, INC. 

PORTRAIT CENTER OF AMERICA 

I U, F ^7TH STREFT, NEW YORK 
I.ois Shaw Heien Appf.eton Read 



FRKNCH & CO. 



f( A T E ü 



one of the world's 
most extensive and distinguished 

collections of art 
210 EAST 57th ST., NEW YORK 



NIVEAU 

CALLERY 

Modern French Paintings 
Bought and Sold 

962 Madison Ave. (at76St.) N.Y. 

REgenf 7- 1094 



[57] 



ROME. ITALY 

SCHNEIDER ART GALLERY 

(American Management) 

RAMPA MIGNANELLI 10 

On stairs behind fhe American Express 

Director: Dr. Robert E. Schneider 



A reliable Consultant 

for coliectors of 

selected contemporary 

painting 

and 

sculpture 



GALLERIA 




VIA BRERA 14. MILAN 

Ainione - Baj - Birolli - Borra - Cagli 
Campigli - Cappello - Carra - Cassinari 
Consagra - Corpora - Crippa - D'Angelo 
De Chirico - De Pisis - Fabbri - Fiume 
Fontana - Gazzera - Giovanola - Guidi 
Manzi - Migneco - Mirko - Monachcsi 
Morandi - Music - Musso - Peverelli 
Prampolinl - Rosal - Sassu - Severini 
Sironi - Valenti - Vedova - Zuffi 

One-Man and Group Exhibitions 

Cafalogues sent on request 



ki^i'ORT FROM r.ARIS 
iCoiitinucii froin pagc 51 ) 

l'allyaiiis who is showiiiiL:- at tlie 
( lalerie j.''.C(|ues Duhoiirj^- and at the 
(iaieric Mouradiaii-X'allotton is of 
( rreek orimin and niany iA tliese can- 
\ases were j)ainttMl in (ireece. Ile is 
the cast' of an ahstract j)ainter wlio has 
.t^Tadiially conie to stress tlie lisL^iirative 
Clements in liis work. so that t!:e niost 
recent painting- hroii^lit back l'roni 
(ireece evokes the onthne of nioinitains 
and cvpresses in a senii-ahstract stvle 
wliich certainly is attractive, (Ireece is 
a land of crystal clear li^iit and Cally- 
anis siiffnses his paintini^s with this 
siKer white atniosphere. 

**l'k'iisir de La Peinture" is the title 
of a very interestinjn' exliihition which 
nins thron.L^di this nionth at the ( ialerie 
Daher. It contains j)aintin|Li:s hy Corot. 
Delacroix. (iericault. Comhet, ln,<^res, 
Renoir. h)n]Likin(l. P)ondin, Monticelli. 
Araillol, Puvis de C^iavanne and nnich 
eise. .\nion]L;- tliese are the i)ortrait of a 
l^^ranciscan nionk hy C'orot and a 
Sf^riiuf lAiiidscapc hy Monticelli that 
are very rarely seen, so that the show 
is well worth a visit. 

"Pes Peintres Tenioins de lein* 
'renij)s" are lioldini^- their annnal salon 
at t'ie Musee (ialliera. Sport is the 
thenie this year. There heinj^" near to a 
hundred artists. there is a ^reat \ ariety 
of suhjects. ran!^in,i4' front foothall and 



GALLERiA 

CADROILÄ 

VIA SPIGA 30, MILAN 

Tel. 794286 

CONTEMPORARY 
ITALIAN MASTERS 

Paintings - Sculpture - Drawings 



[58] 



horse racinj.;" to ])oxins^, niotor racinj:^' 
and hidl ri.^-htinj4-. Marcel (liniond in 
his hust of an athlete strike.s the tra- 
ditional note of Maillol and Desi)iau. 
A lari^e boxinj^f rini;" in oranj^'e yellow 
by Connnere is a tour-dc-fonw Ciw- 
ton. Pressniane. Van Donjen, Fonta- 
narosa, each in his own way, treat the 
sanie thenie. Wrestlin^ is presented in 
a cindous fiision of Ivist and West by 
Foiijita: Toffoli, (ini.^nebert and Col- 
laniarini treat the sanie thenie. Volley 
ball and basket ball have inspired Ber- 
nard Puttet to a beacli scene and 
Yvette Aide to a lari^e canvas. botli 
colonrful and robust. 



65th Annual Exhibitlon 

National Association 

of Women Artists 

May 9-26 (closed May 18) 

NATIONAL ACADEMY GALLERIES 

1083 FIFTH AVENUE, AT 89th STREET. NEW YORK 
Hours: I to 5 p.m. Demonstrations 



LA MEDUSA 

GALLERY 

124 VIA DEL BABUINO Tel. 680850 
ROME (Itoly) 

CLAUDIO ALBERICO BRUNI, DIR. 
AGKNT FOR SADUN 
WORKS OF DE PISIS - GUIDI 
MANDELLI - MORANDI - QUAGLIA 
ROSAI, ETC. 



GALLERIA BERGAMINI 

CORSO VENEZIA. 16 
MILAN. ITALY 

Works of 

Boccioni - Campigli - Carrä 

Casorati - De Chirico - De Pisis 

Morandi - Rosai - Sironi 

Soldati, etc. 




GALLERIA 

ÄVDCLI© 

Carlo Cardazzo. Dir. 



Agent for 

BACCI - BURRI - CAMPIGLI 

CAPOGROSSI - CRIPPA 

FONTANA - GENTIUNI 

MUSIC - SCANAYINO 

also works by 
Balla - Motto - Brouner • Jörn 

Itallan Futurist and 
Metaphysical Painters 



VIA MANZONI, 45 

MILAN, ITALY 

In Rome: 
Galleria Seiecto. via Propaganda 2 

In Venice: 
Gollerio Cavoliino. San Marco 1820 



galleria pater 



works of: 



AFRO 

BIROLLI 

CAPPELLO 

CASSINARI 

MUSIC 

VALENTI 



Via Borgonuovo, 10 Milan, Italy 



GALLERIA ANNUNCIATA 

VIA MANZONI 46, MILAN • Tel. 791102 

ITALIAN & FRENCH MASTERS 



CAMPIGLI 
CARRA 
CASORATI 
DE CHIRICO 



DE PISIS 
ROSAI 
SIRONI 
TOSI 



[59] 



ART STUDENTS 
LEAGUE OF N. Y. 

announces Summer Schools in 

Woodstock. N. Y.. and 

New York City 

June 3 — August 30. 1957 

ynstructors in Woodsfock 

Arnold Blanch 

Edward Chavei (July only) 

Zygnnunt Menkes (August only) 

Frank J. Reilly 

Instrucfors in New York 



Charles Aiston 

Richard Bov6 

Dagmar Freuchen 



Morris Kantor 
Bernard Klonis 
Frank J. Reilly 



drawing painting 

Illustration anatomy 

fashion Illustration 

FÜLL OR PART TIME REGISTRATION 
Write or phone for free catalogue 

Stewart Klonis, Director 

215 W. 57th. N.Y.C. CIrcle 7-4510 



PENNA. ACADEMY of FINE ARTS 

PAINTING - SCULPTURE 
MURAL . ILLUSTRATION 



Scholarships (European Study) 
Degrees 

Write: R. K. ENTENMANN 
Broad and Cherry, Phila. 2, Pa. 






CLEYELAND 



Institute of Art 

PROFESSIOMAt/ c«toU»»» 

TRAININGI II44I juNIPIR RD. 
I CL I VILAND 6, ON lO 



PKPA'II'ANS IX Xi:\\ >()Klv 
i^Coutiuncd froiii paijc })\ ) 

\ i.i.XA NDKK Cankdo. I.'ist seeii in New 

^ ^ NOrk in 1*MS. lias brou.L^lit froni 

C'alifornia (wherc 1r' now lives) a 

liToup Ol' ])aintini;s and ])encil (lra\vin.irs 

wliicli wcrc ])nt on cxliibition at tlic 

Zodiac ("lallery. Cancdo i> a virluoso 

Ol" tlie pencil medium, bis draw ini;s ol 

nude> liavc a tonal ^uavity and meticu- 

lousness tliat seeni to be an end in 

tliemseKes. Seasca])es are too fastidi- 

ously Innislicd to be convincin.in- : tbe 

l)est of tbe oils is l'orcst — a bisb mass 

of i^recn fobaj^e batbed in Inminous 

air/ " C\Z. (). 

* * * 

r^()\.\)\v: Lii'sox's ])nsy ^incbo bas 
^ ■* ])oured out i)aintin.üs. linoknim 
])rints. and sculpture for ber latent 
sbow at tbe Pjar/.ansky (lallery. 11er 
niajor effort is in ])aintin|Li- — two do/.en 
oils tbe best of wbicb are on familiär 
subiects like tbe ])leasin,ii- ilower ar- 



= PAINTINGS BY ALEXANDER I 

I KINC I 

= May 6-18 ä 

I CHASE GALLERY | 

= Now af New Locat/on: s 

= 29 E. 64 ST. LE 5-3991 = 



Jaenisch 

EXTENDED TO MAY 31 

KLEEMANN 11 E. 68 



Summer Session June 24-Aug. 3 



Courses for students of painting, sculp- 
ture, weaving, metol smithing . . . 
country atmosphere . . . pool . . . 

CRANBROOK Academy of Art 

107 Academy Rd., Bloomfield Hills 
Michigan 



[60] 



raniiement. Wcdijwood, wbere ber 
sonietimes Horid color bas l)een for- 
ttniately restricted to tbe blue .t^n-eens, 
and in l'lic Lake l'rcczcs Orcr wbere 
ber wbite impasto belps us sense tbe 
trodden snow. Tlie fiele] of sculpture 
bas been entered witbi facility Imt 
witbout particular distinction. |. (i. P>. 

W^issw. P)()KNK Shkrman's luipres- 
sionist watercolors render seasbnre 
and (lesert cactus seenes witb no at- 
tempt at startlini,^ eftects. Her portraits 
are in tbe realistic style, too. Probably 
tbe most promisini^- work in ber sbow 
at tbe P)nrr (lallery is Car(/o, ;i simple 
but nKnnunental conii)()sition in cbar- 
coal. Openin^- ^Tay 5. R. b. 

:}s * ^5: 

A '\\rN.sTUAr. Show" at tbe lUnr 
^ Crallery brou.^iit to|[i-etber tbe sensi- 
tive, almost (lotbic sculpture. Af 
Praycr, by tbe Rev. Antbony Lauck ; 
IV.iriU'y ^b'is.>on's delicate marble Picfa: 
a softdni'jd mos'iic bv Ratberine T>. 



SOCIETY OF 

YOUNG AMERICAN 

ARTISTS 

April 28 - May 19 

RIVERSIDE MUSEUM 

i||||||||||||||||03rd St. & Riverside DrivellllllMIIIIIII 



2nd 
GROUP 
SHOW 



Ecole de Paris 



Paintings 



COIGNARD 



First U. S. Show 



April 29 - May 19 



COLLECTOR'S GALLERY • 49 W. 53 



Clara Onievsky 

Gertrude Stein Raffel 

Nelson Rodrigo 

To May II 

LYNN KOTTLER GALLERIES 

3 East 65 St., N. Y. 



Points of View '57 

David LUND 
Alex KATZ 
Burton HASEN 
Raymond ROCKLIN 
Israel LEVITAN 

May 6 - June I 

Associated American Artists 
712 Fifth Avenue 



i:Lior 



Recent Watercolors 



0'IIAKx\ 

to May 4 

Grand Central Art Galleries, Inc. 

15 Vanderbilt Ave.. N.Y.C. 



BURR GALLERY 

108 W. 56 ST.. N. Y. 19 

Winnie Borne 



May 5- 18 



SHERMAN 



E. & A. SILBERMAN 

GALLERIES, INC. 

1014 MADISON AVENUE 
NEW YORK 21 



JOHNNY May 1-31 

FRIEDLAENDER 

Etchings 

WEYHE794Lex.Ave., N.Y. 



[61 ] 



Exhibition of Watenolors • May 7-17 
EiLEEl\ and FUEDERIC 

WIIITAKER 

in «o-operalion >vith The Spanish Institute 

Grand Central Art Galleries, Inc. 

15 Vanderbilt Ave., N. Y. C. 



Pain+ings by 

M. PADUA 

+0 May 21 

VAN DIEMEN-LILIENFELD 

GALLERIES • 21 E. 57 St.. N. Y. C. 



DEHNER 

SCULPTURES and WATERCOLORS 

May 7-31 

WILLARD • 23 W. 56 



Winner of fhe I 8f h Annual ACA Competition 

» .DREYFUS 

and Gallery Group Show 

May 13-25 

ACA GALLERY • 63 E. 57 

Paintings by 

l SCHAMES 

S May I - May 16 

N ESTE GALLERY 

32 Eost 65th St. 10-6 



GALLERY 32 E 65 



JACK LEVINE 



Heydert; (iuidn Borj^lii's iion-ohjective 
Bcqinuinq: the ,i,-ay. tolk-artish Trcc 
of^Lifc bv Mickey Falkenberi;- Wiv^- 
staft; ami Patricia Allen's coniixKsi- 
tions in baked pkistics, anion.i;- which 
the literally haiit-relief Xaturc's Ca- 
tJicdral was intri.i;iiin,i;- as well as 

sj)intual. ^^- ^ • 

* * * 

JOHN (Ittman's watercolors will be 
at the C'ollector's (lallery froin May 
20th to june 7th. 11 is subjects— Taxco. 
for exa*ni])le — are conscientiotisly 
transfornied iiito vertical pattenis of 
an an.^ular stnicture .uenerally dehned 
by heiivv black lines. The work based 
Oll the Colosseuni has .^reater variety 
and cohesion. Uuppy Touii has a niore 

personal air. ^^- '*• *^- 

in ^ ^ 

pAi'LiNK STEKiKKWALn a])])ears to be 
^ fascinated bv the sparklin.i;- li^iits 
of :\ranhattan ät ni.iiiit. rellections in 
the Käst River, the .^reat brid.t^es and 
skyscrapers. She also depicts ^roups of 

Student Work from: May 19- June I 

DORD FITZ 

SCHOOL OF ART • Amarillo, Texas 

Burr Gallery, 108 W. 56, N. Y. 



JOHN 



May 20 - June 2 



CUTMAN 

First One-Man Show Paintings 

COILECTOR'S CALLERY * 49 W. 53 



May 7 - June I 

RUTH WHITE GALLERY 



New works by 

BERNSTEIN 

CROOKS 

FINK 

GELB 

GIBBS 

SKALING. etc. 



42 EAST 57th ST. 



N.Y.C. 



[62] 



sailboats and trees. Her teclniiciue. 
however, is as yet not ecpiai to her In- 
spiration. At the Lynn K ottler (lal- 
leries. ^- K. 

* * ♦ 

q^o i'.K RKXiKWEi) NKXT MoxTH because 
^ the work was not available in tinie 
for previewinii" in this issue : Shirley 
J)reyfus at the A.C.A. Oaller\ ; jack 
I.evine at the Alan Ciallery; Texas 
Students at the F>urr Clallery; ( iuest 
]^:xhil)ition at the Downtown : Pre- 
Colunibian Art at the newly oj^ened 
Furnian Oallery; Max Ernst at the 
Tolas Gallery; Robert Motherwell at 
the Janis Gallery : Jonniaux portraits 
at Kennedy's; Contemporary Sciilpture 
and Watercolors at Knoedler ; 14 
]\ainter-l'rintniakers at Kraushaar : 
Artemis Je.i^ert at the Little Studio; 
25th Anniversary Exhibition at the 
Midtown Gallery; ^^allery ^roup at the 
Milch Gallery; NatT Association of 
Wonien Artists at the National Acad- 
eniy ; *iV)rtraits in Review" at Por- 
traits, Inc. . . . "Hommaire a Kahn- 
weiler" at Saidenberg- Gallery; Vin- 
cent Glinsky, Paulette Cohen and ''Ful- 
brii^ht Sculptors" at the W'ellons Gal- 
lery ; Society of ^'ünnjc: American 
Artists at the Riverside Museum; D. 
S. Badue at The Contemporaries. 



ALEX CERUZZi 
MORTON HOLLINGER 

May 1-15 

PIETRANTONIO 

26 E. 84 St.. New York 



Ist American Exhibition 



May 9-30 



IRVING 



Until May 29 



MARANTZ 

Drawings 

BABCOCK GALLERIES 
805 Madison Avenue (68fh St.) N. Y. 



= PAINTINGS BY 



WM. = 



MEYEROWITZ 

May 20 - June 8 

CHASE GALLERY 

Now of New Locatfon: 
29 E. 64 ST. LE 5-3991 



oils • sepias • drciwings 
Marc 

KOVEN 

To May 1 1 

LYNN KOTTLER GALLERIES 

3 EAST 65 ST. 



•■ May 6-25 



"NEW WORK 

LOUIS 

MÄRISOL 

ORTMAN 

RAUSCHENBERG 



BLUHM 

BUDD 

DZUBAS 

J. JOHNS 

LESLIE 



SAYELLI 



LEO CASTELLI • 4 E. 77 • 2-6 p.m. 



TARRAGONA 

thru May 18 

SUDAMERICANA 

866 Lexington Ave. (65 St.) 

GALLERY 



ABIDINE CROUP 



c a d a n 

150 EAST 78 



gallery I jojm heller 

u/.ol/4< in.$ Sun. 3-6 ■ 9 



gallery 
6 3 E . 5 7 



[63) 



DOROTHY 



HOOD 



drawings 

+o May 18 



DUVEEN- 
HGRAHAM 

1014 MADISON AVE., N. Y. 




modern and 

traditional 

frames 

expert 
restoring 



the house of 

heydenryk 

141 w. 54$t.,n.y. 



new 



thru May 



print 
acquisitions 

DEITSCH C ALLER Y 

51 EAST 73rd STREET, N. Y. 



The DOWNTOWN 

¥ ¥ ^CALLERY 

32 East Bist Street New York 
Edith Gregor Holpert, 0/recfer 

ÄMi^DCÄlNI 

DRAWINGS ART 



MAY EXHIBITIONS 
IIV NEW YORK CITY 

(Continued from inside front cover) 

PARKE-BERNET, 980 Madison Ave. Oid 

Masters. 19th an«! 2()th Century Pamtin^'s. 
May 4-S ; Graphics. May 1-9: KriKÜsh and 
Amerit-an Furniture, Decorations and Paint^ 
in^rs, May 1 1-17. 

PASSEDOIT, 121 E. 57 St. J. M. Hanson. to 
May 2') ; W. G. Crovello, from May 27. 

PEN AND BRUSH. 16 E. 10 St. Watercolor 
Kxhibition. 

PETITE. 129 W. .>6 St. F. Bosc. to May 4; M. 

Frary. May <i-lS; 5 Texas Artists, May 20- 

June 1. 
PERLS, 1016 Madison Ave. Pascin and School 

of Paris ; to May 18. 
PIETRANTONIO, 26 E. 84 Sl. Ceiuzzi and 

HollinKer. May 1-15. 

PORTRAITS. INC., 136 E. 57 St. Portrait« in 

Review, May 14-June 4. 
PUBLIC LIBRARY, Fifth Ave. and 42 St. 

Prints of "Birds and Beasts". 
REHN, 68.3 Fifth Ave. R. Mintz, to May 18. 
RIVERSIDE MUSEUM, 310 Riverside Dr. Soc. 

of Younjr American Artists, to May 19. 
ROERICH, 319 W. 107 St. C. Schwebe!, to 

May 2<>. 

ROSENBERG, 20 E. 79 St. F. Farr, Sculpture, 
to May 4; French and American Paintin^s. 




SINCE 1918 — THE FINEST IN 

CIHIDINIIESi ÄIR 

C. T. LO© 



FRANK CARO. Successor 

41 East 57th Street 
New York, N. Y. 



Telephone 
Plaza 3-2166 



LEONOR 

FINI 



to May 15 



GALLERY 




30 E 75 ST NY 




[64] 



SAIDENBERG, 10 E. 77 St. L. Chadwick, to 

May 11 ; HommaKe ä Kahnweiler, from May 

13. 
SALMAGUNDI. 47 Fifth Ave. Annual Watcr- 

c(dor Show, to May 21. 
SCHONEMAN, 63 E. 57 St. Rouault Paintin^^s, 

E. Wcill Sculpture. to May 15. 
SILBERMAN, 1014 Madison Ave. Old and 

Modern Masters. 
ST. MARK'S CHURCH, Second Ave. and 10 St. 

Lower Kastside Artists, to May 2G. 
SUDAMERICANA, 866 Lexin^ton Ave. M. 

TarraKona, to May IS; I^atin American 

Groui), May 2()-June H. 
TANACJER, 90 E. 10 St. :^-Man Show, to May 9. 
THEATRE EAST, 211 E. 60 St. J. Ri^^aud. to 

Mav 2(i. 
VAN DIEMEN-LILIENFELD, 21 E. 57 St. M. 

Padua. to May 21. 
WELLONS, 17 E. 64 St. Fulbrik'ht Sculidors, 

to May 4; V. Glinsky. May (5-18; P. Cohen, 

May 2')-June 1. 
WEYHE, 794 Lexington Ave. J. Friedlaender. 

May 1-1^1. 
WHITE, 42 E. 57 St. Gallery Group. May 7- 

WHITNEY MUSEUM, 22 W. 54 St. H. Hof- 
mann Ref rospective ; Recent Accessions, to 
May S. 

WIDDIFIELD, 818 Madison Ave. Pre-Columb- 
ian Gold and Jade, to May 18 ; A. Peck, Apr. 
2l-June 15. 

WILDENSTEIN, 19 E. 64 St. L. Quintanilla, 
to May 11 : M. Gold, to May 18. 

WILLARD, 23 W. 56 St. I). Dehner. May 7-31. 

WORLD HOUSE, 987 Madison Ave. Manzu, to 
May 18; Bourdelle, Japanese CalÜKraphy, 
May 21-June 22. 




IFI^IilNlClhil 
IPÄIIN1TBIM€ 

cyLiPiyi^ 



of the 19th & 20th Centuries 

FINE ARTS ASSOCIATES 

41 East 57th St. (I6th floor) N.Y. 



EXHIBITION OF 
IMPORTANT PORTRAITS 



BY 



ALFRED 



JONNIAUX 

through May 

Kennedy Galleries • 785 Fifth Ave. 



2^4U May 7 - June 8 

ANNIVERSARY 
EXHIBITION 

MI DTOWN 

GALLERIES • A. D. Gruskin. Dir. 
1 7 East 57fh Street. New York City 



IILIII^ 4i;allerie% 

0»» Fiflli A\e., New York 
(/Veai* 5^1/1 Si.) 








to May 18 



DANIEL 



May 13-31 



SERRA 
BADUE 

THE CONTEMPORARIES 

992 MADISON AVENUE AT 77 ST. 



JULIUJ^ LOW¥ 

Frame & Restoring Co., 
Ine. 

I'tlUOn FRAMES 

iiEsianmc 

l'ddü ümiiiiil Avü,, Muvv Yiiik 

(Bet. 64th and 65th Streets) 
LE 5 - 5250 



NEWHOUSE 

GALLERIES, INC. 

Fstablished 1878 




Still Life: Flowers 



by Ernst Stuven (1657- 1712) 



FINE PAINTINGS 



(3 EAST 57th STREET 



NEW YORK 



k PAINTINGS FROM SAO PAULO MUSEUM ^ GUGGENHEIM AWARDS 





ON EXHIBIT 



WORLD 

WIDE 

VIEWS 

af the 

ART 

SHDWS 



>^äis:" :4ki^ 1^. % 



APRIL 
1957 



35c 



vJN 










^C^f^^J 



■ *»■ . ^Sr; 









APRIL EXlllBITIOi\!^i 



^n If {ew {yjom L^iti 



'i 



A.C.A., 63 K. 57 St. Croup, to April 20; W. 
(Jropper, April 22 - May 11. 

ALAN. 32 E. 65 St. li. Tarn, tu April 13; 

(iioup, fioni April IT). 
ARTISTS', 851 LcxiiiKlon Ave. E. Snüth. to 

April 18. 
ART STUDENTS LG., 215 W. 57 St. Anmial 

Student Concours. 
BABCOCK, 805 Madison Ave. (i. Hoiulius, to 

Ai)ril 13; l'Jth and 2()th Century Americans, 

April 15-30. 
BARONE, 1Ü18 Madison Ave. lt. Kuntz, to 

April 6. 
BARZANSKY, 1077 Madison Ave. F. L. Mes- 

sersmith, April 1-13. 
BERRY-HILL, 743 Fifth Ave. ll»th Century 

American "Troinpe L'Oeil." 

B'KLYN MUS. OF ART, Kastern Tarkway. 

Watercülors in U.S.A. anU Italy, irom Ai)ril 

Ü. 
BODLEY, 223 E. 60 St. (iardner, April 1-13; 

E. Erlanger, April 15-27. 
BURR, 108 W. 56 St. Mystical Paintinus, to 

April G; Dahli-Sterne, April 7-20; (Jroup, 

April 21 - May 4. 
CADAN, 150 E. 78 St. R. (Jates, to April 6 ; 

C. Cloos. April 8-28. 
CARSTAIRS, 11 E. 57 St. M. (Irosscr, to 

April Ü ; V. D. Truex. April ü-27. 
CASTELLI, 4 E. 77 St. C. Viseux, to April 13 ; 

P. Brach, from April 15. 
CHASE, 21 E. 63 St. I. Nurick. April 1-13; J. 

Kronman, Ai)ril 15-27. 
CHINA INSTITUTE, 125 E. 65 St. Chu Art. 
CHURCHILL, 139 Broadway. A. Schwieder, to 

April 13. 
COLLECTORS, 49 W. 53 St. 4 Contemporaries. 
CONTEMFORARIES, 992 Madison Ave. Mar- 

ini, April 1-27. 
D'ARCY, 19 E. 76 St. Piiniitivc Art. 
DE AENNLE, 59 W. 53 St. Muro and (hilo, 

April 8-27. 
DEITSCH, 51 E. 73 St. Recent Print Acquisi- 

tions, April 9-27. 
CONTEMPORARY ARTS, 802 Lexington Ave. 

M. Jones, to Mar. 5; W. Story, April 8-lU. 
DOWNTOWN, 32 E. 51 St. (Jallory (Jroup. 
DELACORTE, 822 Madison Ave. Peruvian Pot- 

tery and Textiles. 
DUVEEN, 18 E. 79 St. Old Masters. 
DUVEEN-GRAHAM, 1014 Madison Ave. A. 

Rus.sell, to April 13; C. (Jross, Apiil 15- 

May 4. 
EMMERICH, 18 E. 77 St. Abstract Art Before 

Colun.bus, from April 15. 
EGGLESTÜN, 969 Madison Ave. R. Stark, 

Apiil .S-2Ü ; A. Lenn^y, April 22 - May 4. 
FEIGL, 601 Madison Ave. A. Galdikas. to April 

13 ; Contenii)orary Paintin}j:s, April 12 - 

May 15. 
FINDLAY, 11 E. 57 St. French Paintings. 
FINE ARTS ASSOCIATES, 41 E. 57 St. Lan- 

skoy, April «J-30. 
FRIED, 40 E. 68 St. A. Yunkers. to April (J ; 

Xceit)n. from April 1). 
(iALLERY G, 200 E. 59 St. H. Adrian, to April 

«; : (lallery Group, April l)-27. 
(JALLERY 75, 30 E. 75 St. liouvier, to April 

20; L Fini, from April 22. 



GRAHAM, 1014 Madison Ave. Saints in Art, 
to April 15. 

GRAND CENTRAL, 15 \ anderbilt Ave. (huim- 

hacher. to April (i ; R. Philipp. April Ki - 
May 4 ; E. ü'Hara, from April 23. 

GRAND CENTRAL MODERNS, 1018 Madison 
Ave. li. Browne, to April 18 ; A. üsvor, 
April 23 - May 8. 

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, 7 E. 72 St. Inter- 
national Awaid Winners. 

HAMMER, 51 E. 57 St. Dietz Edzard, to April 
13; M. Salinas, Ai)ril 16-27. 

HANSA, 210 Cejitral Park So. L. Brody, to 
Apiil 14 ; J. Follett, from April IG. 

HARTERT, 22 E. 58 St. M. Becker, April 1 - 
May 4. 

HELLER, 63 E. 57 St. A. Redein, to Apiil G; 
E. Treccani, April 9-27. 

HIRSCHE & ADLER, 21 E. 67 St. Modern 

l'aintinK's. 
lOLAS, 123 E. 55 St. Magritte, to April 15. 

JACKSON, 32 E. 69 St. P. E. Borduas, to 

Ai)ril G ; (Jroup, April 9 - May 4. 
JANIS, 15 E. 57 St. <S Americans. 
JEWISH MUSEUM, Fifth Ave. & 92 St. Young 

Americans. 
JUSTER, 154 E. 79 St. Dauchot, Ai)ril 10-30. 
KENNEDY, 785 Fifth Ave. J. Connaway, H. 

Lane, to April 20. 
KLEEMANN, 11 E. 68 St. H. Härtung, to 

Apiil 13 ; H. Jaenisch, fiom April 22. 
KNOEDLER, 14 E. 57 St. Joseph Pulitzer, Jr. 

Collection, April 10 - May 4. 
KOTTLER, 3 E. 65 St. E. Y. Tashjian, A|)ril 

1-13 ; R. D. McKinney, L. Delgado, April 

15 - 27. 
KRAUSHAAR, 1055 Madison Ave. J. Penney. 

y\pril 1-20; John Heliker, April 22-May 11. 
MARINO, 46 W. 56 St. 3 Artists, April G-27. 
MARCH, 95 E. 10 St. (Jroup, to April 18. 
MATISSE, 41 E. 57 St. Modern French Paint- 

ings. 
MELTZER, 38 W. 57 St. (Jroup, to April 15. 
METROPOLITAN MUS. OF ART, Fifth Ave. 

and 82 St. Paintings from Sao Paulo Mu- 
seum ; Tessai-Tomioka, from April 4 ; Rodin 

and French Sculi)ture, from April 2() ; (Jreek 

Vasos ; Ancient Egy|)tian Royal Treasures. 
MIDTOWN, 17 E. 57 St. H. Koerner, to 

April G ; (Jood Drawing, A|)ril 2-27. 
MI CHOU, 36 W. 56 St. K. Choy Ceramics. 
MILCH, 55 E. 57 St. L. Bosa, to April 13 ; 

J. Whoif, from April 15. 
MORGAN LIBRARY, 29 E. 36 St. Treasures 

Preserved and Interpreted. 
MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, 11 W. .53 St. 

Recent American Acipasitions, to April 21 ; 

International Travel Posters, to April 7 ; 

Buildings for Business and (Jovernment, to 

April 28 ; New Talent, from Ai)ril 15. 
NAT'L ACADEMY, Fifth Ave. and 89 St. 

American Watercolor Society, April 3-21. 
NEWHOUSE, 15 E. 57 St. Old Masters, 
NEW SCHOOL, 66 W. 12 St. S. (Jordin Sculp- 

ture, April 1-15. 
NIVEAU, 962 Madison Ave. Modern French 

Paintings. 

(Continued on page 04) 



KNOEDLER 



Established 1846 



LOAN EXHIBITION 



OF 



PAINTINGS, SCULPTURES 
AND DRAWINCS 

COLLECTED BY 

Louise & Joseph Pulitzer, Jr 



jov the benefit of the 
Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University 

APRIL 10 - MAY 4 



14 EAST 57th STREET 



LONDON 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



[1] 



WILDENSTEIN 


& CO., Inc. 


THE WORLD'S FOREMOST SELECTION 


OF OLD AND MODERN 


OBJECTS OF ART 


^ 


PAINTINGS 


SCULPTURE 


FURNITURE 


TAPESTRIES 


19 East 64th Street, New York 



[2] 




[3] 




"Clarinette, flageolet et flute' 



EDZA 





"Fleurs et Musique" 
to April 13 



HPmmER GPLLERIES 



51 EAST 57th STREET 
NEW YORK 22 



[*) 




Londofj Editor 

HORACE ShFPP 

Siviss Editor 
Maria Nf.tter 



CHARLES Z. OFFIN, Editor-in-Chiej 

Paris Editor Milan Editor 

Barnett D. Conlan Tristan Sauvage 



Holland Editor 

CORNELIS DOELMAN 



German Editor Mexico Editor Boston Editor 

John A. Thwaiies Muriel Reger Robert S. Taylor 

New York S/aff: Ralph Fabri. Althea Loshak, Helen De Mott. Ai. Xewdill 



Vol. XX, No. 7 



/;/ T/j/s Issue 

Piet Mondrian, the subject 
of two important exhibitions 
in Paris, is disciissed by our 
critic in that city. See page 28. 



Mario Morandi, the Italian 
artist who has been in seclu- 
sion for several years, exhibits 
bis latest work in Roine (see 
page 50) and also has paint- 
ings on vicw in London which 
are discussed on page 38. 



Seventy New York Exhi- 
bitions are previewed by our 
staff. Page 12. 



The picture on the cover 

is Litfle Girl with Sheaf of 
Com, painted by Renoir in 
1888. It is included in the 
loan exhibition of 75 paint- 
ings from the Sao Paulo, 
Brazil, Museum of Art now 
on view in New York at the 
Metropoh'tan Museum. 



April, 1937 



CONTENTS 

Paintings from Sao Paulo Museum 
Gug^'cnheim International Awards . 
Gallery Previews in New York 
Report from Paris . . 
London News and Views 
Some London Modems 
Exhibitions in Germany 
Report from Rome . . 
Here and There . . . 



6 
10 
12 
28 
36 
43 

46 

50 

58 



April Exhibitions in New York City 

Inside Front Cover 



PICTURES ON EXHIBIT is published monthly except 
July, August and September by Pictures Publishing Com- 
pany, 30 Hast 60th St.. New York 22. N. Y.. U. S. A. 
Telephone PLaza 3-6381. Single copy 35 cents. Yearly 
subscription $3.00. Foreign $4.00. 

The magazine cannot assume responsibility for the 
return of matcrial submitted. Re-entered as second cla$$ 
matter November 8. 1946, at the post oflice at New 
York 1, N. Y., under the Act of March 3. 1879. 



[5] 



I^aintii 



Inas tmm 



9 



J^ao 




au 



L 




viSeviyvi 



Ayi Astouish'ing Ach'ievenient In a Single Decade of Collect/ng 



JUST as thc many thousands of 
Europeans were astonished at 
thc magnificencc of the loan exhibi- 
tion from thc art muscum of Sao 
Paulo, Brazil, whcn an important 
selection from its collections toured 
thc European capitals last year, so 
too will New Yorkers find a treat 
in Store for them in its current 
presentation at the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art. 

When the Sao Paulo Museum of 
Art was founded in 1947 the only 
other art museum in existence in 
Brazil was the National Museum in 
Rio de Janeiro established in the 
19th Century and possessing nothing 
that could be considered of first-rate 
importance. \w the short Span of ten 
ycars thc museum of Sao Paulo, 
sparked by thc dynamic efforts of 
Senator Assis Chateaubriand (now 
Brazilian Ambassador to Great B rit- 
ain ) , Walter Moreira Salles ( former 
Ambassador to the United States), 
and with the sympathetic encourage- 
ment of the Brazilian government, 
it has built up such a süperb collec- 
tion of both old and modern paint- 
ings as to command attention. 

The works of art so quickly assem- 
blcd give evidence that Brazilian 
culture, like our own, has deep 
roots in European civilization and 



like the strikingly progressive archi- 
tecture of Brazil, the coUcction also 
shows that its people participate 
fuUy in thc modern spirit. 

The seventy-five paintings in the 
special loan exhibition arc about 
cvenly divided between outstanding 
old masters of various European 
schools, starting with the l4th Cen- 
tury Florentine Bernardo Daddi, to 
a brilliant galaxy of 19th and 2()th 
Century French paintings. In the 
lattcr group arc no fewer than eight 
major works by Renoir, five oil 
paintings by Cezanne, four by Tou- 
louse-Lautrec, two by Gauguin; 
three by Van Gogh, etc. 

Important schools of Northern 
art are also well represented — thc 
Flemish by Memling's V'/rg'in. St. 
John and Three Holy Wonien, and 
Rubens' fine portrait of Arcbduke 
Alber/ of A/zstr/a. From the German 
school are portraits by Lucas Cran- 
ach the Eider, and Hans Holbein 
the Younger. A Self-poiträit by 
Rembrandt and three likenesses by 
Frans Hals constitute an attractive 
group of Dutch paintings. 

Works by Spain's greatest artists 
include El Greco's Annunciation, an 
imposing painting of The Count 
Duke of Olivares by Valazqucz and 
three revealing portraits by Goya. 



[«j 








"■■>•,..., 



*#»» ; 



P(i//l Alex/S Reüä':)ig <i McJi.'/scnpt to Zntr.: CV-ZANM- 
Ou Exhihil dt the Metro pol '/(an ?Auseuni of Art. Wir York 

Lo.uK'd W; t!ic Sao Paulo, Brazil, Mu:>cum of Art 



f / I 





: ?*;.-, ;äai1S6^« 



Portrait of an Officer: Frans Hals 
ShoiDi dt ibe Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 

Loancd by the Sao Paulo, Brazil, Museum of Art 

I. S f 



Pr'iucess B/hesco, 1912: Edoitard Vuillard 
On View at the Metropolitau Museinii of Art, New York 

Loancd hy the Sao Paulo, Brazil, Museum of Art 



I ) 




/ 



ennenn 



^nt 



tlonal ^^ujards 



ernauona 



All Prize-W^/fuiers ctnd Cctrnl/clctle Selections Go on View in New York 



\ KTi-R hcMring so much for the 
^ past ycMr about thc labors of 
thc various national juries for thc 
lirst Guggenheim International 
Competition — and their selections 
for thc winners of the nineteen 
National and Continental prizes (a 
cash prize of Sl, ()()() was awarded 
to cach sectional winner by its own 
Jury), and then finally the award of 
thc $1 (),()()() International Prize, by 
thc international jury, to Ben Nich- 
olson of England — we are now 
afforded thc opportunity in New 
York of seeing the prizc-winning 
selections, as well as morc than sixty 
of the original candidate selections. 
These paintings are now on view 
in the temporary quartcrs of the 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 
at 7 East 72nd Street. The exhibi- 
tion includes all of the cighty-four 
paintings that first wcnt on display 
— following the announcement in 
Paris of the avvards — at thc Musee 
d'Art Moderne, except for four. 
Because of the limited wall spacc 
in the present quarters, the current 
shoM ing includes in its initial pres- 
entation eighteen sectional prize- 
vvinners plus as many of thc candi- 
date selections as could beeffectively 
installed. Every two weeks or so, 
the candidate selections will be re- 
placed by an ec|ual numbcr of others 



Lintil all of them will have been 
siiow n. llie eighteen sectional prize- 
winners, whose paintings will re- 
main on view throughout the exhi- 
bition period, are: Herbert Boeckl 
(Austria), Rene Magritte ( Bel- 
gium), Candido Portinari (Brazil), 
William Ronald (Canada), Alej- 
andro Obregön (Colombia), Jens 
Sondegaard (Den mark), Marcel 
Gromaire (France), Georges Bou- 
zianis (Greece), Emilio Vedova 
(Italy), Kazu Wakita (Japan), 
Corneille (Holland), Jan Cybis 
(Poland), Walter Bodmer (Switz- 
erland), John Bratby (United 
Kingdom), Mark Tobey (U.S.A.), 
Petar Lubarda ( Yugoslavia), Hans 
Härtung (Europe and Africa), E. 
Pettoruti (No. and So. America). 

As to the style of the work shown, 
it is very varied and could not be 
interpreted as representing the domi- 
nant trends in the respective coun- 
tries, but rather the taste and prcfer- 
ences of cach of the national juries. 

As a matter of fact, within cach 
national group of candidate pictures 
( hve for each country) there is 
considerable Variation of Standard; 
and as was observed wdien this ex- 
hibition was first unvciled in Paris, 
the national groups that stand out 
best for consistcncy of quality are 
those of Belgium and Ginada. 



(tol 




Le.\- Miro/rs: Vii-:ira da Silva 
Exhihhed at the Solof//oii R. Ci/i^i^e)ihe/f>i Mnseuni, \tu York 



' y , 



[11] 



Lj aller 



"i 




mviews m 



V {ew 




B) Thi; Magazin h Staff 



T;)i RIO I.\Ki)i RA. llali;m niodcrn sciilj) 
^^ tor iiow li\ iiig in Paris, lias liis first 
American cxhibition ai kiiocdlcr's 
(tlirougli Mardi -iO). aller a nimibcr ol 
exhibitioiis tlnoughoui Luiojk'. Forin- 
erly norking in a varictv ol niatcrials 
includiiig stoiu- aiul wood. hc is at prcs- 
ciit coiKcntraiing on (oiistiiulioiis in 
slict't nietal. The bhu k ol iioii and tlic 
^variu brown shccii ol (oppci arc 
brought iiito uxtural imcrplay as tlie 
gconietrical .slia[K's inttrscct and bal- 
ance onc anotlu'i in \aiioiis spacc- 
(Uttiiig coidiginaiions. Sonu' look likc 
lantastic sliip pioptdlers or airplanc 
tails lorniab/cd into ingcnious ck'signs. 
It is sculpturc (Icfiiiiicly related to tlie 
lornis ol nieclianital propulsion, al- 
tlioiigh the end result is niore a geo- 
iiietrv than a rush ol spa(e. 

c:. z. (). 

^ ^ ^ 

OtV£MV paiiuings, sculptures and 
*^ drawings Irom one ol the grcat pri- 
vate collections ol modern art in this 
eoinitry — that ol Mr. and Mrs. [osepli 
Pulitzer, Jr. ol St. Louis— will go on 
\ie\v on April lOth at Knoedler's. Mr. 
Piditzer, grandson ol the lanious 
lonnder ol the St. Louis PostÜisImich 
and the old Morning World ol New 
^'ork, got his art education and col- 
lectiiig impetus at Harvard Univeisity, 
and from the beginning lias souglit out 
major "works, particularly of the School 
ol Paris. Phe selection to be shown at 
the Knoedler Gallery will inchide, how- 
ever, a lew iniprcssionists and late I9th 
Century post-impressionists, several Ger- 
man expressionists and a tonteniporary 



Itaüan. Sonie f)r the Avorks have been 
shown previously in New \'ork in vari- 
ous iniportant loan exlnbitions, but 
tliis is the first time that the I^ulitzer 
(C)llection will be exhibited in New 
\'ork. Ihere will be an admission 
Charge ol (iO cents, the proceeds going 
to the logg Museum, Harvard Uni- 

versity. Ci. Z. C). 

# * # 

JACQi Ks Lu'CHir/'s exhibition of 
"semi-auloniatic " sculpture at the 
line Arts Associates was (ertainly in- 
triguing. lor it so beautilully illustrated 
ilie working ol the nnconscious and 
the irrational in modern art. A release 
Irom more intellectual. controlled for- 
mal problems, they are marvelously 
lluid and dance-like conceptions and 
their imagery at times bordering on the 
grotescpie is filled with Preudian fan- 
tasy. l'his irrational play is deceptive, 
however, lor dose Observation reveals 
many touches ol the classical and the 
willed. Ihough all ol these pieces are 
small in scale, IJpdiit/'s remarkable 
sculptural leel lor volume and lorm 
manilests tremendous plastic vitality 
and monmnentality. Several classically 
coniposed (ubist pieces dating back to 
1915 make an excellent loil lor the 
\il)rant emotionalitv ol the later works. 

A. N. 

# # # 

A kriiUR Osver's latest exhibition at 
^^^ Grand Gentral Modems reveals 
hini tiniiing clinuuticaliy to the ab- 
strad. Ihis showing ol his work con- 
tains what the artist himsell relers to 
as personal landstapes — adroitly 



c«i 



DUVEE N 



Est. 1869 



MASTERPIECES 

of 

PAINTING 
SCULPTURE 
PORCELAIN 
FURNITURE 
TAPESTRIES 



GOTHIC • RENAISSANCE 
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 



DUVEEN BROTHERS, INC. 



18 East 79th Street 



New York 21, N. Y. 



(13] 



biuslu'd. lioL (oloic'd (amascs ^lowini; 
with thc piiiiitcrs aroustcl response tu 
thc liglit. sj)a((' :iik1 iimbiciKc ol an 
Italy tliai he apjxars cxdtinoh lo 
havc clis(()\c'ic(l, or pcihaps ifcoMicd 
in Iiis own sc'k'(ti\c' idioni. 1 he rcla- 
ti\cly sniall l ji (Uun l)(ii^u(i is i^ra\(' and 
\il)rant. J hc aptly naiiicd I.ox'c Gar- 
(l('7i, in warm colors, sccnis harcly to 
rcvcal natural lorins cnicrLiinii as 
llnougli a (urrcnt ol dxnaniically re- 
lated j)lanc's anci cm ves. G. S. 

* # # 

Trvl\(; kRiisiii.RG's ingcnuitv in |)ro- 
^ vidiujf thc potenlial lor sixteen ])ir- 
tnres in one shonid not he dismissed 
as a ginnnick. Momited t^so and two 
on parallel posts. eadi ol the lour 
doid)le-side(l panels composini» a sinj^^le 
^vork call l)e rcvolved on its a\is to 
hring its voso into the c()ni])()sition of 
the other three. 'J'he spectator at the 
I)n\een-C;raham (;allerv can dierefore 
inakc for hinrself his j:)referred eoniposi- 
tion ol "I.overs"— as iiiost ol these 
gronps are tilled — hringiiig the ahstract 
fignral IVagnients and geslures into new 
sets ol' rclationships. A serioiis look 
shows that the coniposiiions are sensi- 
tively studicd, thc liiie and nioiitages ol 
colorecl canvas aiithoritatix elv handled. 

\. W. L. 

# * • 

\ T7ILLIAM Gkar and Sandra lii.ow, iwo 
British artists on view at the Said- 
cnherg Gallery, work cjuite dillerently 
from one anodier and yet share a com- 
mon intellectual approach. Miss Blow 
iitili/es a collaji^e tedinicpie ol plastcr 
and paint conihined with bmlap. The 
seeming irrational content oi her work 
is arrived at through too strong a sense 
ot style and reasonecl control. which 
suggest that she is niore inventor than 
Creator. Gear uses hoth tlie geonietric 
and thc free h)nn. A leeling ol inystery 
pervades his oils, cspecially those wherc 
hc pc:)scs a hlack fluid shape against 
liatly paintcd grcy or red grounds. 
Gear's Vertu ai Ufiity, a restrained 
ccmiposition ol rcctangidar units, is not 
only a handsonie pictiire hut heautihd- 



W 



1\ artic idattc! spatially. A. N. 

lP TP "Jr 

T ^w (:it\n\Mc:K. the 1- nglish artist 

"'who took thc (irst pri/c for scnlp- 
tmc at ilie \'enicc lÜcnnial last year, 
will ha\(' his first Anieiiran solo ex- 
hihition .11 tlu- Saidenberg Gallerv 
starting April S. Fornis that suggest 
giant moths and grassho|)pers, or in 
oiie's lervicl iniagination seem likc fan- 
tastic batnicn. filling the gallerv with 
their startling \isitations, introduce a 
Ircsh a))pi()ach to thrcc-dimcnsional 
iniagerv. 1 hc cast iron with a mottlecl 
patina ol whitish grcy looks morc likc 
ficld stone than inctal, conjnring up in 
thc scidpturcs on displav a petrified 
h)rcst ol \vcird gargantuan insccts on 
some ])lanet yet to be \ isited bv ontei- 
spacc loannng nnssiles, 

C. 7. O. 

# * # 

JoRiA) Molsi: Gai.i.i RH s is showing 

for the hrst time a serics of paint- 
ings by the scnlptoi Krancusi, carlv 
drawings bv Ciaugnin. aiicl fiftccn sniall 
Rodin sculptnrcs. 1 he Brancusi paint- 
ings, in the sanie pericct simplicity as 
his scnlptnrc. steal the show. Thev are 
largcly poi traits and figures of the carly 
1920's in t\vo or three caith colors re- 
minding one of Ah)cligliani and the 
Matissc ol lidlhcvs. 

Selections front sketch books of the 
(Kopenhagen |)eriod re\cal C»auguin's 
sensiti\ itv h)r drawing in sniall delicate 
^\orks. a lew in pastcls. Pains havc bccn 
takcn to nionnt thc Avorks tastefully 
and thcy are displayed in the interest- 
ing intcrior architcctural setting of 
Kicsler and Hartos. Unfortunately at 
thc timc at previcwing therc was no 
opportiinity to scc thc Rodin sculp- 
tnrcs. j. G. ß. 

* # # 

/^HAki I s Shaws new abstract oils, on 
^ view at thc Passedoit Gallery be- 
ginning April 8. are his most cvocative 
works to clatc. (:once|)iually they are 
inuch frcer, allowing thc romantic na- 
turc of his painting inipulsc to prcdoni- 
inatc morc fully. (iconictric Clements 



[14] 



of his carlier work still cxist. bnt are 
niore intuitivcly grasped as in his paint- 
ing Red-Tan lUack-White. Othcrs likc 
ihc outstandi ng Hurrica nc's Wake 
eincrgc froni landscaj)c commitinent: 
they are most reuarding for their elo- 
cpicnt simplicity and control of thc 

form, A. N. 

• • • 

r^iETZ Edzari) has come over froni 
*^^ Paris with his cxhibition of still 
life paintings cntitlcd ''Fleurs et Mu- 
siqiie" which was shown to the delecta- 
tion of Edzard adniircrs in Paris, 
(olognc and London, all of which ex- 
hihitions havc bccn reccntly discussed 
in these pagcs by the forcign editors of 
Pktures on Exhibit. Now installed at 
the Hanmicr Galleries in New York, 
these canvasses of Mo/artian insj^ira- 
tion combine lelicitouslv a pa<'c of 
sheet music. a itiusical instrument (a 
clari nette or a Inte), and soinc flowcrs 
either in a vase or lying casually on a 
table. In Sonic, thc llowers doininate 
the coriiposition; in othcrs it is thc 



nuisical instiuincnt that plays thc scjIo 
part to thc surrcjunding delicate ac- 
companiincnts; thus with numerous 
variations on the central theme, and 
the artists cnitivated ])crsonal leeling 
h)r color harnionies and brushwork, the 
pitfall of monotony is avoided and the 
decorative cpiality is liftcd to a level 
of scnsual beautv. G. Z. O. 



* 



T71GUT Ami;ric;ans at the Sidncy Janis 
^ gallery features the work of some 
of our most iniportant and intcresting 
abstract painters, and practically all in 
good form. Guston 's new work indi- 
cates further conccptual change as his 
color has become bolder, morc definite 
in shape. and his images are slowly ex- 
panding from the center to the edges 
of the picture. Kl ine and cleKooning 
are represented by strong, forccful 
wT^rks of mastcrful simplicity, while 
iMothcrwell steals the show with his 
rcally stnmiing Elegy to the Slmnish 
Hepuhlic XXXir, 1953. Light filled, 
Rothko's large abstraction displays his 



firsf Exhibifion in America 

LYNN CHADWICK 

RECENT 
SCULPTURES 

April 8 - May 4 




Stranger 



SAIDENBERC GALLERY 



10 EAST 77th STREET 



NEW YORK 



[iJl 



acute scusitivity to color and lo shilting 
plastic rclationships which aie alniost 
inipciTcptiblc. The theoretical specu- 
lations oii the s(juaie by Albers siill 
seeiii like lorinal exercises to this re- 
viewer aiul leave hiiii little rooin lor 
estlu'ti( enjoynient. A fine Gorky and 
roINulv are also iiuludecl. A. N. 

TT W ^^ 

T ouis BosA has tweiity-two oils, the 
resuh ol a recent trip lo Italy and 
Spain. at tlie Mildi Gallery. These 
new (amases are niore restraincd both 
in (olor and niood than his })ievious 
work. Ihe laniiiiar coniic figures re- 
tain tlieir warnitli and wit, bnt seeni 
less (arieatural. He paints the Italian 
lan(ls(ape bustling with people. A 
j)aiiitinjL; ol sun bathers wearin« paper 
noses recalls the |L>rotes(pie drollery of 
the 18th Century Venetians. Ale Again 
is the engaging title of a lumiiious 
self-portrait. Verona, a vertical conipo- 
sition, superposes fishermen, houses 
and a mountainside in the artist's 
(liara( teristie harnionies of blue, piuplc 
and pink. FT. I). M. 

# # # 

T^KNK Magritte, veteraii ßelgian sur- 
^^ real ist. appears here as a \ isionary 
gnome, creating historical aiul visual 
puns that express not so niuch humor. 
as poetic nostalgia. In f.a I.rirendc des 
Siecles, lor exaniple. a (hair in the style 
of the "Roi Soleil" rides tin\ and insig- 
nificant on a massy stone seat ^^'ordly of 
Uranus. Pandora's Box shows an end- 
lessly dull townscape against \\hi(ii are 
silhouetted "Everynian", |)resunial)ly, 
in his bowler hat — and a waxen white 
rose. Kvcryman and derby recur else- 
where; and syniboli/ing the poetry that 
niay lurk in the ( lerkly or schoolmaster- 
ly heart. a ereseent nioon Stands over 
his head. People in business suits be- 
conie ])oeked-stone nionunients: the 
deviee ol a piciure within a picture 
appears under dilterent guises. At the 
lolas Ciallery April 7tli through 3()th. 

A.B. I. 

• • • 



Oaims in Ari. ihe thenie show at 
Janus Graham (iallery. ranges in 
tinie Ironi the l.Sth to the 18th cen- 
tnries. and in painting style from the 
antheniicallv austere religious impact 
of the earlier epo(hs to the lush, füll 
bodied and sonietinies unsaintly saints 
depicted by the painting virtuosi of the 
lenaissance and post-renaissance peri- 
ods. Simon Vouet's .S7. Catherine is a 
beautilnlh drcssed woman. and a 17th 
(cnturx \'enetian .S7. Miehael is an opu- 
lent nobelman. Monsu Desiderio, the 
(Iramalisi in paint, is represented bv a 
pair ol \i\id stenes relating to the 
niartyrdoni ol St. Agatha. In this ex- 
hibit ol twenty-h)ur works. all of them 
well painted and preserved. the fincst 
in this re\ iewer's eyes is the tall panel 
on Avood ol St. Peter Standing in a 
rocky landscape. by the 15th Century 
Italian (iosimo Rosselli. Exquisitely 
simplilied in the sweep of its drawing, 
it is a masterpiece ol vertical coniposi- 
tion. C.Z.O. 

* * * 

/^ERRn lloxnii's's exhibit at the Bab- 

^^ co(k Galleries iiu Indes ni.inv circus 

and carnival scenes. This thenie has 

alwavs been a ri( h source for the .»rtist, 

and though Ilondiiis has a tendencv to 

illustrate his subject at the eost of niore 

painterh \alues he does numage to 

(apture the drama of the actor's life. 

'Po find more profomul painterly quali- 

ties we nurst look to such paintings as 

}Vo7nü)i, and the very fine landscape, 

77/6' L())ie ßeach. In these oils and 

others. ])lanes of color begin to develop 

form that has plastic control and pic- 

torial relevance. A. N. 



D 



TT W 

AV SciiNAiiEE is shouin 
sculptines done between 1951 and 
1957 at the Betty Parsons Gallery. 
Karliest works in this group are geo- 
nietric stone carvings, precise and 
austere. 77/r City, two pieces in lime- 
stone, and Fortns within a Cube have 
an alniost Egyptian severity. A series 
of small bron/es lollows, in which 



g fourteen 



[i«3 



plant motils relied a (hange ol mood 
toward more lluid, barocjue forms. Pwo 
'/^rufi.sfortnation.s, one in niarble and 
onc in bron/e. explore this tedinicpie, 
and its (uhnination is a large. complex 
l^laster ( on sti u( t ion. called Sphere, 
seven i)y six leet, on the tiienie of 
perpetual niotion. H. 1). M. 



t;j^i<i:i) Parr seems to find his scidpture 
ihenies in the metallic dank and 
angular movement ol knights in 
armor. resohing the drama ol their 
stances into the dMiamics of his l)ronze 
figines. Actualh it is the iliythm ol 
Space that is his thenie in these open 
s(uh)tures. a (oiuinuitv ol rhvthni tliai 
ne\er tonies to rest and activates the 
diaina i)eiween the thrusting lorms and 
the endosed sj)aces. Ihree latest works 
of arnied horses are more solid in 
modeling and indicate a tmn ol iiuei- 
est louard massive \()lunies. 

C. Z. (). 



JAMES Pexne\ 's new abstrac tions have 
grou n mudi more lyrical and in- 
tuitively (onceived, as he strives to give 
j)i(torial coherence to his sensations in 
conlronting nature. Obviouslv the Lily 
Pond series by Monet has liad a strong 
impact lipon liim, for sudi a ])ainting 
as Sununer ]\'()0(ts, cpiite beaulilul in 
color-h)rm striuture. re-evokes a shini- 
niering impressionism. Valley, a little 
tighter and unbroken in color. also 
becomes imj)ressi()in'sti( in its atmos- 
|)heri( light handling. W'hen Penney 
works too dose to his subject matter, 
as he does in Ouarry, he falls into con- 
ventional painting habits. ralher didl 
and without imaginatioir. Kraushaar 
(ialleries uiuil April 20. A. N. 



\ njA \ i XKERs' pastels on canvas. at 
'^ Rose Fried Ciailery to April 6th, 
demonstrate that j)astel is not a fragile 
niediimi in its expressive capacity. The 
colors. generallv rieh and waniE some- 





i HIRSCHL^^ ADLER 

jralleries ine. 



21 East 67th St., New York 21 

Tel. LE 5-8810 



[17] 



tiiiics acceiUcd by a pak' aiul bitter 
note. are masscd in big sti idiiig rhords, 
or closcly wovcn in ))arallels that ac- 
company and lollow. or break to revcal 
thc movin.s^ color ol tho js^round. A 
motu likc a hcavilv bianchino ticc rc- 
curs witli a ccrtain mtnarc. In thc 
black-and-wliite studies thc cxcitcment 
oi color is sugf^cstcd by thc rhythms of 
(hc movino band. A. B. L. 

# # # 

"p I ci NT Ami RicAN Ac()risn IONS, fifty- 
onc works acquired bv gilt or j)ur- 
chasc bv thc Museum of Modern Art. 
have been placed on \ icw through 
April 21. supplcmcnting tbc rcccnt 
similar display ot Euroj)ean acquisi- 
tions. Abstract cxprcssionism may bc 
Said to (lominatc thougb not to mon- 
opoli/c thc prcscntation: and thosc 
critits who lound so mucli to malign 
in thc European accjuisitions of thc 
past ycar should Iccl a bit happier with 
this oHcring. Kstablishcd names — so 
well proniotcd by their imj)rcsarios — 



are thc ones almost exckisivelv in c\ i- 
dencc: ibough haj)j)ily thesc are bal- 
anced b\ \cry worthy ncwcomcrs Irom 
Canada (Pierre Clerk). Ni(aragua (Mo- 
ralcs Se(jucira). Hra/il ( Aloisio Magal- 
hacs) and Irom other (ouniiies ol this 
hcmisj)jiere. C. Z. O. 

* * * 

^iii K^2nd Annual Kxbibition ol thc 
National Acadeniy ol Design in 
March compriscd roiighlv ]ji) paintings 
and 10 sculpturcs. Prizes gi\en to land- 
scapes in thc painting (li\ ision tendcd 
to go to compositions in which the 
abstract Clements, even when not ovcrt, 
dominatcd. Among thc figure pic(cs 
honors remaincd in more (<)nser\ative 
hands. [oseph llirsch's Memorial, 
though reproduccd in thc catalogue, 
niight well have rcccived lurther dis- 
tindion. llie sculpturc scction seemcd 
disappointing, with the exccption of 
Allen Harris's flucnt and elegant Torso. 
The Hil)j)olyte by Helen Haas had a 
fine, extited line. A. B. L. 



LOAN EXHIBITION 



ROUAULT 



April 23 -May 15 



SCHONEMAN CALLERIES 

63 EAST 57th STREET • NEW YORK 



[18] 



q^ni: collection ol modern TYcnch 
paintings formed by Peter and Eliza- 
beth Rubel is a saga in the adventure of 
cxpcricncing contemporary art that 
dates back some cighteen y^irs when 
thc couplc were married and j)ur(hascd 
theu' first painting. I'hc collection has 
now grown to a formidablc size, and 
a large j)art of it is on vicw (to April 
ES) at thc Pcrls (iallcrics. In thc lorty- 
hvc works shown, Raoul \)u[\ seems to 
bc the numerical favoritc (almost one- 
third are by this artist); with all of thc 
top School of Paris names included, 
with thc cxception of Matisse. One of 
the (inest Utrillos in America {Bistros 
de lldinlicur, \[)V2.) is oiie of thc high- 
liglus of thc exhibit; the most powerful 
painting is Picasso's hemme Nue 
Coiuhre {\{Vy>). Q Z. O. 

# • • 

/^^O.NrKMl'ORARV IrAMAN Pai.\ ri\(; AND 

ScurpTiRK. a varicd scle(tion 
at the World House C;alleries, indi- 
cates that thesc Italians cither base 
their works on reality or are conijdetc- 



ly (lecoraii\e. Borsato's glowing Ronen; 
Campigli's embroidery-like figurcs; the 
vclvcty tcxtiu'c of Gcntilini's Tower of 
Pisa and screne landscapes by (;ubel- 
lini are outstantling cxamples. Music 
(oml)ines soft laiidscapc with lantastic 
horsemen; Morandi öfters muted vari- 
ations on |)ots and \ases. Among the 
sculj)tors, Consagra is lasdnatcd by 
Conx'ersalion in xarious iiiaterials; Eaz- 
zini's Seated Sude is sensitive; Manzü 
makes a (olossus out of Cardinal, wiiilc 
Martini's sandstone portraits bave an 
cthcrcal cpiality. R. E. 

* * # 

Oi.LiJi.N Iam's iicw show at tbc Alan 
Ciallery is an exprcssivcly unified 
exhibition. 1 bc titles ol the pictures 
are a key to their content and the 
artist's absorption with thc shape and 
leel — one nnght even say — thc very 
sound of weatber. Ihcrc is an artlul 
coarsening ol tbc picture surfaces and 
(olors are held to a bold monotone, a 
slaty huc, as in the coniposed and re- 
ticem ()(('afi Mornino; aiid Surf and 



NEWHOUSE GALLERIES, Inc. 



Esfablished 1878 



FINE 
PAINTINGS 




The Dickson Brothers 



15 EAST 57th STREET 



by John Neagle (1796-1865) 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 



[ 19] 



(Uouds. '\\\v (lim aiul iiiikss hm ;im- 
bitioiis Monhciidfi \ii>ht is ;is clillt'iciit 
Ironi tlu' otlur (iunascs ;is ni!L»lu is 
Ironi ;i luislicd and hlurry. sca-liümued 

artcrnooii. (i. S. 

• « # 

X 7FI.A Zam ITI. Sj)anisli hörn artist 
Avorkiiii^ iio^v in ihc Anuiicas. shows 
recciu wölk al Siulanui i(aiia tlirouüh 
April (ith. \ stron^ mural tciukiKv 
(loniinatcs /anctti's lorms Avhidi poet- 
i/c thc nati\e avoi knien and Avoincn 
in rhvtlinii( poscs. (ioloi is stroii^ and 
dark: rrd and pnrplc ^vitli hiolilights 
rubhc'd ovcr lavers ol undcrpaintino 
hrinjn a vivacity to nis sni laccs. 

Enii(jn(' Rixcron takcs omi Aj)ril 
8th willi hold colorcd. csscntialh ah- 
stract works. I inniiig lioni (ionralivc 
jjainiings ol sliohtly By/antinc Iccliiii; 
in an imolvcd scratchhoard tcdinicjue 
to pure (omposition in sliarp edgcd 
flat (olor shapes. Riveron in liis latest 
works hreaks up these sliapes lor a 
ridiei \isnal experieiue. 

j. (;. H. 



]\ /TAsri RwoKKs Ol 1*1 RU. al the Dela- 
"^ (orte (.allery. is an exhihition ol 
Pre-Iiua pottery and textiles from the 
Ith (i'iiturx to the lltli. All the ter- 
ami(s are utilitarian, showini^ the tia- 
ditional \ariations on a limited num- 
her ol niotils. I)rinkint> Nessels ha\c' 
the shaj)es ol women, warriors, "cray- 
fishinen", (elines. hirds. Ihe huniming 
hird. Iiua svmhol ol enduraiue, is rep- 
reseiited almost as ölten as the stealthv 
Jaguar. A (eraini( Hute with thirteen 
iiotes is an unusual example. 1 he tex- 
tiles. ranufini» froni small rihhons to 
inaterials niiie leet loni^, are orna- 
niented wiili the hunians. animals, 
inonsters and plants so diaraeteristic: 
of Peru\ian art. R. V. 



TOoHiRi Kl vsi RS ahstrac tioiis contain 
^^ a divcrsity ol j^ictorial ideas that 
seeni the result both ol a prohing ec- 
( le(ti(ism and of a seardi lor his own 
painting identity. I he leeling ol Iree- 
doiii in his Avork is ( louded bv a eertain 



PAUL ROSENBERG & CO, 



Established 1878 



SCULPTURE 



By 

FRED FARR 



April 8 - May 4 



20 FAST 79th STREET, NEW YORK 21 



[20] 



sirained elled as il the stiixing lor 
Ireedoni is not yet compalihle with tlic 
(oiueptual iiieans. A dualisin helwedi 
leelino and intellect makes the ima<;es 
ol some ol his pidures loiccd or c on 
trived. I)esj)ite these elements. kexsei's 
paintings are alive and interesiin«», and 
two Avorks in partieular, Ovid /// 
jluciuc and Ml.shdl, are (|uite su( ( ess- 
lul Statements. Parma (.allery begin 
nino \j)ril 9. A. X, 

'Jr ^ vi" 

/^i.(;a Dormam)!, exhibiiiniL; ;ii Poi 
^^^ traits. Inc., has a llair lor (iitdiin^ 
the easy inh)rmality and natural (jualitv 
ol (hildren in an apj)ropriatelv spon- 
taneous style ol paintiii«» withoiit sa( 
iih(ing soundness ol construc tion and 
subtlety ol color. 1 Icr portiaits ol adults 
are also distinguished, but in the inore 
suave style ol h)rmal portraitine. A 
llunj^arian by birth and a resident ol 
Paris. .Mnie. Dorinandi has exliibiied 
Irecjuentlv, but this is her (irst sliow de 
Noted eniirelv to portraits. 

C. /. (). 



V'Ax n R (io.\/Ai.i-/. a painiei ot i^reat 
^ ^^ te(hni(al ability. (an do just about 
what he wishes with llie leinpira ined- 
iimi. lle <an (reate a (it\ sccnt that 
1 ises like a \ isioiiaiN dream. or Irai;- 
nient ;i |)i(ture inio an iinentiM* ab- 
siradion relaiiiinji; at all limes tlu ap- 
j)earan(C' ol thini;s. llardh. a (oloiist. 
(fon/ale/ p;iiiits iiiainh in tonal \alues 
smnmoniiig up a niood ol pessimism 
and soiroxv. Some depi(tions su( h as 
Aj)()lhi'()sis are lrau<.;lu wiih a sense ol 
lerror or tra_ged\. Martin W iddiheld 

(.allery uiitil April 20. A. \. 

# * * 

|V TAiRici-: Sir \ A.N. "elej^isi ol tlu sub- 
inbs." is Seen in a new ixhibiiion 
ol oil paintiiii»s ai the Passedoit. Ihe 
artist's tie is to the Kraiue ol tlu Ini- 
pressionists and the proxiiues. ol naps 
at noon and reposelul Ltreen idU (la\s. 
1 here is an ennui ol alternoons and 
siiniiners in the emotional (limate ol 
Rrhcdl. a beachscape with lollin«; lig- 
iires reali/ed pidorialh throui;h sini- 
j)hTied means. Woodslot hid isolates a 



// 



SAINTS IN ART" 

(l3+h to I8fh Centuries) 



EXHIBITION 

fhrough April 15 



Sf. Catherine 

by 

Liberale da Verona 




JAMES GRAHAM & SONS 

1011 MADISON AVE., N. Y. 21 



100 
YEARS 

1057.1957 



[21] 



^iv\ hnkid in a (liiulrcniii iind drciulicd 
ni (ornlort .nul in imKuciu csrapc 
fioin it. Hr' ;,1()<)( and (ontained Xnn- 
tuikci iMtidsiuju' Stands darkly alone 
ninon,«^ tluvsc olouin^ conipositions. 

(;. s. 



* 



\ 



^v\ I)v\ Iri i\'s uasli diawings of 
Iliilv and North Alrica Ai tlic' Car- 
stairs (;allri v (April \) to 27) arc in tlie 
sanic stvk' ol draniaiit Ii,o|u and shadow 
rendcrinos thai ( haia( tci i/cd his prc- 
vious cxhihitions. \ In'ghlv aaom- 
plishcd diaiiolusinan. Iic scts down 
with unni int» casc thr indication ol a 
Single wall Ol ihc swccj) ol a ^viiole 
town in thc (h\tan(('. lUa vww sd'nc 
is (Icpictcd uith thc samr mood and 
Jighting. as ihonoh thc anist woiild not 
pcrnnt wcathcr Nariaiions and thc 
chaiactciisti( lunnaii o\crtoncs ol cadi 
place to intcricrc uiiji ln\ dccorativc 
formnla. Ihc dark grcv and scpia 
washcs arc clJcdiNch dianiati(. 

c:. z. o. 



\ ru RKi Crossi R prcscnts landscapes 
ol (;rcccc and Bra/il at the Car- 
stairs (,allciy lo A|)ril (i. Hoth gronps 
ol (anvascs werc paintcd within thc 
Inst two ycars. Thc Grcck Islands ot 
Mydia. Santorini and Acgina piovidcd 
thcincs ol massive soliditv with the 
luigc rock h)nnations and' the dosely 
|)a( kcd l)l()ck-shaj)cd honses. Cold white 
toncs iy'iw oll littlc light. and diawing 
is better than color in this gronp. l'he 
Kra/ilian snbjcds, done last vear, arc 
iooser in hrnshwork, color has tropical 
brilliaruf, and there is a niorc spon- 
taneons inNolvcnicnt with the visnal 
im|)act. Pine Trcea, Aegina in the 
(irccian gnuij), and Chinrh of Torom 
in ihc lira/ilian snbjetts are ellectively 
simple and strong in design. C. /. (). 



\ 



I IRI n Rlsskli/s one man show at 
thc I)n\ccn-C;raham (to April 13) 
is one painter's (hallengc. it mav bc, 
/Unig '\u thc tecth ol twc'iuicth (cntury 
inodcrnism. Mr. Rnsscll is an artist 




The most exciting, most 
significant, and influential 
artists of the 20th Century-^ 




A SURVEY OF THEIR GRAPHIC ART 

^^^^y^ ^'^^^ Zigrosser, Curator of Prints 
and Drawings, Philadelphia Museum ol Art 

The work of Cranach. Goya, Ensor. 
Rousseau, Van Gogh, Gauguin, 
Kandinsky, Klee, Feininger. Kollwitz, 
Beckmann, Grosz, Picasso, Roualt, 
Chagall, Weber, Marin and others. 

122 Black and white reproduciions, 
6 pages in füll color— hand 
mounted—size 8V2" x U" 

$10.00 ai all bookstores 
GEOROE BRÄZILLER. INC. 215 Fcurth Avenue, New York 3 

[22 1 



who belicvcs in thc sublime riglit of 
thc image and the unc ()mpli( ated flow 
of (onnnnnitation Irom the pi( tiire snr- 
laee to thc spectator. Again and again 
(he artist \ehcmently undertakes to 
wrest thc luidc back to its old-timc 
eniincnce. Madajne V is a forthrightly 
sensnous nude and Polish (jirl n stately 
nude; while thc pale, linear (hisnillr 
adiicves a sensitive, poetic Statement. 

G. S. 



l'nder the title **AI)stra(t Art belore 
Cohnnbns." thc Andre Kmmerich 
CiallcrN is sliowing scxcnty lascinating 
pieces Irom thc North American con- 
tinent dating Ironi 1000 B.C. to the 
Spanish (oncpicst. Most impressi\c ol 
the collcdion are the l!-shapcd stone 
vokes w'orn inound the waist by 
|)riests. "Palmas," Mexican teremonial 
batons (arvcd out ol volcanic rock, 
date back to (iOO B.C. Ol thc clay 
urns lound in Mexico, the most re- 
markable is a large orange one Irom 



(iolima (Iccoraicd with bumps. An 
;irc hiicc tural ornament hom .1 j)vra- 
mid CNokes thc grandem ot the nionu- 
ment. Seals, banner sioncs and other 
objects all aic sclcc tcd to illustratc 
(heir allnn'iv with modern tunctional 
simpli(it\ in decoration and art. 

II. I). .\f. 

* # •■* 

1701 R ARiisis' pcisonal \ iews ot "scnn*- 
abstract" painting lillcd tlu \rgcnt 
C;allcrv lor die montti ol Mardi. Carv 
I.iston pcihaps best dcliius liei ap- 
|)r()ach in .S7/7/ /./fr ^vhcii- strenuth. 
coloi" relationship. and suitace treat- 
nicnt makc a \ery picasing painting. 
Doroiln H()\t is snbtlc and siiikini> in 
her coloi- hainionies (Full Moon and 
I'loirrriiiiy Sun). Her abstract idiom 
tragments thc subjcd inio iircgular 
laccts. (;iiarlo(ic W'hiiision is ucometric 
in her \ iews ot buildings and in an 
intcic'sting sccnc 77/j// thc Jil/fi(L \ 
tcchin'cjnc ot tin'n clabs ol oil gi\cs Klsie 
ject-Kcy's work suiprising dimension- 
aliiv. Hcic color seems to bc a wcak 



^3 



A YEAR • $5 FOR 2 YEARS 

(Foreign Countries $1 aciditional) 



Is All It Costs to Subscribe to ThIs Magazine 

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PICTURES PUBLISHING CO. 

30 East 60th St., New York 22, N. Y. 

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NAME 




[2.0 



cleiiieiu in .m oilurwisc inicix'sting 

iipproach. J. (;. li. 

* * * 

^Piu: IvNicKiRiuHKi K Akiisis Juicl tlicir 
teiuh aimiial show at thc River- 
siclc Museum. Oil, w a tcrcolor and 
(asciu. ,ora()hi(s aiul sdilpturc wcrc 
includcd; thc style most laxorcd was 
Kprcsciuatioiial. IMi/c- w inner Rose 
joselouit/ slioued a (jniet. poelic \ iew 
ol Ronie. sul)tle in tone and texture. 
Still-liles l)y Leonia Al)rains and Maini 
Mendelson were notal)Ie. Susan Kalin's 
Portrait 11'//// C/iild in harinonies ol 
j^rey was sensitive vet robust. Note- 
wortliy anioni; the landstapes were 
Violet Sigisinund's llay al Prox'ittci'- 
lown, iMay Heilonis' seini-al)straet eity 
s(eue, and Heatri(e [olnison's Morc 
(U)ustnuti()ti. Ralph Fabri's Ihii^id 
Sopliia, a tenement seene l)y Lola 
Frant/ and Don fordan's l'rnnori/ 
(hinryy excelled in the uateicolor and 
easein se( tion. | \, i). \[ 

# * « 



L_Fl^R^ koFRNER's receut exhihition 
at the Midtowu Gallerics leatured 
a <^roup ot paiiuings dealin^ whh life 
in X'ieiuia. Admirable teehnicallv. and 
\ivid representations ol e\er\(lay 
seenes. tliey are nonetheless illusirations 
because ol koerner's use ol garish jjost- 
(ard hnes and weak (olor lorni struc- 
tiue. koerner, essentially a draiights- 
nian, sliows up best in bis blaek ink 
drawings. Freely exedited, ohen sensi- 
tive ol line and lonn, they are bis niost 
personal expressions. Four stiulies ol 
outstanding personalities done lor 
Ti/nr maga/ine rouiuled out tbis large 
selection. \ js^\ 

# * # 

pAUi, Brach's first one man showing 
at the Leo Castelli (iallery drama- 
ti/es an a\id iniagination in the Serv- 
ice ol a knowledgeable te(bni(pie. 
His style is contenij>orary and the art- 
ist is in easy allianee with it. Fbis 
paiiuer is drawn as by a niagnet to 
thenies possessed (;l pietorial splendor. 



Exhibitions 



paintings • April 1-20 

joiix he:liker 

paintings • April 22 May 11 



KRAUSHAAR GALLERIES 

1055 MADISON AVENUE (cor. 80th St.) NEW YORK 



[24] 



Arrnadn is a Tunierescpie torrent of 
spirited and dantint; brushwork. Sav- 
agery llickers around the borders of 
his j)ietures and soinetinies tbrusis ri.i^ht 
tbroiigh the central design, as in the 
blood bot Vcronica. l'he swirling 
Fücna and the animated Farol (oni- 
bine in celebration ol the rage, sweat 

and agony ol the bulllight. ' C;. S. 

# # # 

Ooi.ANi) Boi'viKR is anotbei' \(>nn,<> 
painter to be introduted into this 
country from France by the (;allerv 75. 
His paintings depart Ironi the tastebil 
deeorative noini j^revailing aniong ai- 
rived young Frenchniei]. Into the dark 
hatkgrounds Avith their snggestions ol 
nioody lorm are serapecl groups ol 
straight. cmved and willlully beut 
strafnigs ol light, as though an exter- 
nalizcd electrie nerve \il)rated over 
the surlace ol the (anvas. Sonietinies 
thc eflect verges on the hysterieal: sonie- 
tiincs it is disciplined into nnisi(alit\. 

A. H. L. 

* * * 

poBKRT 1). MckiNNKv's seniiabstrac- 
^ tions are distinguished by solid 
forms, glowing colors against dark blue- 
gray backgrounds, deeisive brush 
strokes and a siniilitude to modern 
stained-glass Windows. CoastUnc No. 2 
is tlie most subtle in bues, Seacoast 
with Snoxü is the most dramatic ol 
these thoughtlully yet imaginati\c'ly 
j)lanned oil paiiuings to bc shown at 
the Lynn kottler G.illeries siart ing 
April 13. R. F. 

• * • 

A/TucciM, Urbinaii aiuI Vi spignani 
were leatured in Mareh at the 

John Heller Gallerv. Ol these three 
yoiuig Romans. Vespignani alone bas 
stature. His oils sbow Ronie as a 
modern industrial city; he lavors such 
subjects as Avenue of the (iasonieter, 
/nrii^/tl Yard. His realistic canvases are 
detailed, bnt not literal, and endow 
bis tbemes with a feeling of poetry. 
Muccini's drawings ol acrobats and 
ballet girls are rcminiscent of Degas. 
bu^ lack his deptb. llrbinati show^s 




CHÄIM 



GROSS 



sculpture 
drawings 



. 1 ■ 



april 1 5 - may 4 



DUVEEN- 
T GRAHAM 

1014 MADISON AVE., N. Y. 



r»j 



SAVOY 

ART & AUCTION GALLERIES 

5 E. 59 St., N.Y.C. Plaza 3-3941 

AT AUCTION 

Friday Evening 
May 3rcl, 8 p.m. 

OLD MASTER 
DRAWINGS 

So.UI hy ordir oj 
Robert llc'uitt ^otlicrs 

By or attribufed fo: 
Pater, Vernet, Raph- 
ael, Bramer, Michel- 
angelo, Poussin, Orlzonte, Van Dyck, 
Jordaens, Guercino, Van Huysum, 
Blarenberghe, Sharples, Rembrandt, 
Camblaso, Veronese, Carracci, Rani, 
Tinforeffo, Silvesfre, Bloemarf, Ti+ian, 
Polidoro, LeSueur, Boucher, Valllant, 
Van Orley, Terborgh, Ricci, De La- 
Fage, Piliemonte, Wolf, efc. 

EXHIBITION STARTS TUES., APR. 30 

Sfiui $J for l'rofiisrly illnstnifrd 
catalo<nic. 

ALSO 




Friday Evening, May 10, 8 p.nfi. 

OLD MASTER 
PAINTINGS 

Sold by Order of 
ir. Xordzciiid. Lynii. Mass. 6c for otlicfs 

By or attribufed to: Niccolo da Fo- 
ligno, Canaletto, Janssens Van Nuys- 
sen, Rigaud, Berchem, Franks. Leiy, 
Longhi, Noileicens, Van Orley. Pacher, 
Scorel, Seghers, Teniers, Van Dyck, 
Vouet, J. GiJlray, Poussin, SaftJeven, 
Van Toi. Ravelaer, Van Sehende!, Pala- 
medesz, Largilliere, Tilborgh, Mengs, 
Breughel, Hobbema, Rubens, Hogarth, 
Francken, Lairesse, Holbein, Bouguer- 
eau, etc. 

EXHIBITION STARTS TUES.. MAY 7 

.SV;/(/ $.^ for l^rofnscly illustratcd 

Ciitalo(/iii'. 

PAINTINGS. DRAWINGS & ART OBJECTS 

ACCEPTED FOR OUR EVE. ART SALES. 



Mibjc'ds ;ikiii lo X'cspijL^nani's but her 
litatiiR'iu hoixkrs on illustration. 

H. I). M. 

« # # 

j\Ti.iii\iii) Nijad's j);n'ntiM,^s aic 

showii at tlu' /o(li;u Gallery 

tiiioiigli \j)iil 7tli. I lu' siriKlurc ol liis 

abstj actioiis olicti Jias ;i ja<^<;c(l \i()l('n(c 

sui><>('siino j)iiiiiar\ «»coloiL^icil picxcsscs. 

I heil lorms rcstinblc tiu' iiitcrlcx kcd 
(iNsLais Ol M'iucd inoNcnuiUs obscrv- 
ablc in polislu'd «»ranitc' or iiiarble, 
ihoiij^li tlu- (olors arc vcrv briojit. Oiiiv 
onc j)i(tiii('. ratiu'i coyly litlcd liohisti 
\(i( hiniNsih , siiogi'sts iIr' arlist's cxotic 
ori^in by its opulent (ktp blues and 
luKpioisc's witli cnnniic acxcnts; he is 
,i>(.'iK'rally idcniilicd \\\[\\ the I*aris 
Mhool. ' A. B. L. 

# * * 

TT ANS jAi:.M,s(ai. AU an j)r()re,ss()r at a 
licrlin l'ni\crsity. is a |:)ainU'r ol 
(U'licatc srnsibility. hiudla tnally rc- 
(inccl. Ins sinal! caiixases abound in 
|)laylnl absiradcd inia<^cs t'xccntcd in a 
nt'at. prec isc style. Toads is in hniiinous 
bluc's and j>recns wiiich glow niystcr- 
iously, u'licrcas Jioc /iifiir Horse, painted 
in bold, bright colors, is a hnmoroiis 
depiction. Dcspite an inhcrcnt sense 
ol lun in nuu h ol liis ^vork, facnis(h 
snnnnons up emotional states bordering 
on terror, in whieh the humorous and 
the grini are curiously interniingled. 
Kleeniann (.alleries beginniiig .\pril 22. 

A. N. 

# # # 

jVyTALRicE Becker's best work in his 

cnrrent show at the Martert Cial- 
leries are the sniall jxniels he bronght 
l)aek Irom a recent painting trip to 
Mexico. Ilere the eolor is Iresh, linipid, 
atniospheric, and beginliiig to the eye. 
Ihe Wide e\])anse ol a pink stiicco 
wall, vibrant \\'\i\\ seiin-tro))ical light. 
serves the donble iniKtion ol a solid 
conipositional bnttress and ol a wann 
area ol color against which the squat- 
ting or strolling Indiaii lignres are 
sn(( iiutly painted. C. /, Q. 



[26] 



T^'sriHAN X'icKMi/s sliajK's glide in 
seareely disternible rectangnlar 
rhythnis over bland expanses ol canvas. 
1 he advance and retrcat ol these \agiie 
color patdics dcpcnd on the \arving 
reticeiue or brillian(e ol their hnes: 
and the lateral or vertical nioNcinents 
are snggested by the diredion ol \\\v 
inijxjsto brushwork diat (oniposes ilieni. 
In his paintings shown at the Rose 
Fried (iallery in Mardi. X'icente 
abandoned line and form in lavor f)l a 
niore direct appeal ol light. solt and 

attra( tive colors. A. U. L. 

* # # 

j\ /TAY Hi.iLüMs has twcnty-lour oils at 
^ the Petite Galerie, sliowing the de- 
velopment ol her style. Most success- 
ful are 77/ r Sca Borne and Oj the 
Forest, both bnilt on black verticals 
thrnsting upward against a sensuous 
backgronnd ol blue and grey. Loose 
brushwork and organic lorms (hanic- 
terize her present (anvases. l.arlier 
works diller from these by their in- 
(isixc line and high-keyed (olor. 

H. I). M. 

* * # 

T^^j.i/ABiiii ^. TAsnjiAN. in her first 
^^ show since 19^^8, has gone in lor 
the thenie ol nuts in a big wav. Her 
hazel and walnuts niake uj) in tre- 
mendous size wliat they lack in color 
and variety. Her niost personal work, 
howe\er, is in brilliant landscapes 
sndi as JUue Ihidire, a snow-c lad \ iew 
oF Central Park, and the poetic Pe<ir- 
tree Blossotns. Lynn Ivottler Ciallerv, 

to April 13. R. F. 

* * # 

pRi I) ^^l:ssl RsMMHs hrst New \'ork 
solo show, at the Harzansky Gal- 
lery. includes a niidtijjh'citv of stvles. 
He is best in his West Virginia sub- 
jects in which he transforms smoke- 
stacks and railroad freight yards into 
poetic pictures. Bridge of Sfo lief um 
is an imaginative cascin: Miner s Bath 
is the most arresting of the oils. All the 
work is three-dinieirsional. emphasized 
with outhnes in many hues. R. F. 

(Continued on finge 53) 



Färke-Berivet 

GäLLERIES, Inc 

[Lesi.ie A. Hyam, Prendent] 

')m MADISON AVENÜI'; 
NRW YOIJK 21 

U^uhlic cV//(? 

Cipnl 26- 2 'y af i:j,j 

FIIVE FREIVEH 
FFRIVITURE 

FRKNCH SILVER 

rALMINGS- DRWMXGS 

SAVONNERIK A.\D 
OTHER RIGS 

Sold hy Order oj 

GUSTAVE PIERRE 
BADER 

Paiiitinjrs and clra\\iii<;j. fea- 
lure Portrait oj <t Lady bv 
.Aattier and works hy Hubert 
Robert, J. B. Hiiet, a draw- 
ing; by Guarch* and works bv 
other artists < Terra cotta 
s tat nettes and bronzes l)v 
Barye and Pierre Jules 
Mene. 

Illustrated Ca/dlof^ur $1 . 
(sy/i i^iew fro/)i Cipril 20 



[27] 



i\eport jfwm j^ans 



Bv Barm 1 1 I). Com. an 



l)CC'ii moic iiinoN ;i( ioiis in (he liist 
filt\ \cars fh.m iti all thc (ciuiirics bc 
tuecn ,S()()(I li.C. aiul IH.iO A.D. I was 
rcnHiuiccl ol all tliis a Icw (la\s a<>() on 
scciii" a (ollcction ol caiK work b\ 
l*iel Monchiaii wliich lias just hccn dis- 
(overcd hcrc in Paris. I lusc ))aiiitiii<>s 
\K\\\i:\\ datc hctwcc'ii IHOO-IÜO!) aic all 
fimiiativr. Sonic i((all Pissano. otlicis 
rcniiiul onc ol \'an (.oi»h and tlicrc is 
a |)aintin,i> ol du \saniluMmnns \\hi(li 
ini,<»ht well l)c' hy Fantin Latour! The 
cnscnihlc is hcinj^ cxhihilcd at thc ncw 
(iak'iic Daniel Clordici and is pic 
si'iucd hy Midicl Sciij)hor wliosc nionii 
nuntal cdition with ()()() platcs on Mon- 
(hiaii and his work has just apjx'arc'd 
sinudtaiK'onsh in New ^ ork and Paris. 
\\ thc sanic tinic, an ini|)()iiaiu ictio 
sj)c'ctivc ol Mondrian's an is Ixini» luld 
al thc Dcnisc Rene <^alkr\. Ihc (oii- 
trasl hctwccn tlicsc two shows is as ujcal 
as tliat whicli cxists l)ct\\c'('n tlic old 
ordcr ol thin<>s and ihc scitinilu ina 
(liinc-niadc \v()ild ol ihc picscnt da\. 
Mondrian is sccn to havc hrid«^cd thc 
(hasni w'hidi sc|)aiatcs thcsc t\vo \v()ilds 
and in tliis \\a\ to ha\c l)C(()nic onc ol 
thc chicl proniotcis ol ahstrad art. lic- 
twceh ihcs'c cai ly landscapcs and fio^\•c^ 
paintin|.»s ol l!M)l and thc lliodduuiy 
lloogic W'oooic (oniposilion ol HltH 
dicrc is an in(ci\al ol oid\ loity ycars 
which nn<>lii well, il onc rcllccts, bc 
that ol lottN (cntuiics. Hcrc \\v find 
all thc diticrcnccs that di\idc die art 
World ol today. In this icspcci Ah)n- 
driaii can bc considercd to bc thc niost 
rcprcscntatisc artijjt ol oiu tiinc. In die 
last dccadc siiicc hc passcd away, ab- 



siract art has prolileiaicd in a luuuhctl 
dilleieni directions. It is, niorcoxcr, in- 
icrnational so that a \aricly ol (ultural 
l)a(k^ronnds Ikinc (onie to toniplicate 
it still Inrtlier. 



* 



\ I IUI MOMi.M thc [a|)ancsc havc 
aj)peare(l on thc lelt baiik ol thc 
Seine. Ihc Far Fastern raccs lake natti- 
lalh to abstraction becanse ol thcir 
traditio!! ol calb\iL»raphi( loüiiation, and 
ol thc lact that thc\ wcic piactisino a 
loiiii ol it !!!()!(' thaii twentv (cnturics 
ago. Su<^ai \\\v) is showino at thc ncw 
(ialciic Fe Ciendic and at Fa Rone has 
l)een attiactiii" attention now h)r sonic 
ycais. Mis bioad brush stiokcs sho\\- a 
nervous calli,<»iaphi( lile and his in- 
sj)iiation sn,o,<>esis pichistoiic nieniorics 
ol \\it(l!(ralt and caily de\il rituals. 

With lüiai at thc (ialciic Stadler wc 
ha\e Lo do with a lica\ \-\vciL>lit in evcrv 
scüsc ol thc tcüii. His innnense pancls 
thc si/c ol innials with an intiicatc all- 
o\c! |)atteiii (on(('i\('(l in tciins ol 
depth balMc analysis. Dense and Avcightv 
as cnaniels. \\itli a i i( h oricntal in- 
tciisity ol (oloni, they oller cndicss 
peiüiutations lor tliosc \\\\u tarc to fish 
in thcsc subtcüanean waters. 

Ol a dilleieni oidcr and nioic casih 
lc.L>ible is thc exhibition ol thc Anicri- 
(aii liill Parker at thc Galerie Kagano- 
\it(li. Fhc coUection tontains paintings 
uhicli are j)artly abstiact and othcrs 
which go into pure abstraction. These 
diu ereilt phases ol bis work arc sccn 
in thc sencs ol still liles hall ligurativc 
and at nioinents slightlv icniiniscent 
ol Bracpic. and a nunibcr ol abstract 
(onipositions ol an original c liara( ter. 



[28] 



The pattem built nj) in hnge (oloin 
patdics ol white and ncIIow as thc kev- 
note has a ridi (jualit\ suggcstixi' ol 
stained glass. 'Fhc \ i\ id cdairage adds 
depth to thc (oiujiosition whidi takes 
Ol! a sort ol ardiitcc tural nivstcrv. It is 
a type ol painting Avhidi is likcly to 

Avear well and stand thc test ol tiiiic. 

* * * 

/~\Lrri Ai'ARi Iroiii thc exceptional 

^^ beanty ol thc ( ity itscll I thiiik thc 

attia( tion ol Paris lies in its astonishinti 

(ontrasts. Fhc ncw and thc aiidcnt are 

found side b\ sidc. Fhcic arc nc^v i»al- 

lei ies (hat spiing iip alniost e\ei\ weck 

Avhidi contain thc \c!\ latcst pliase ol 

abstract art and there is thc Biblio- 

thc(jiie National whidi ai stated inter- 

\als appcars as thc guardian ol thc j^ast. 

.\t thc iiionient onc can sec there an 

exhibition ol Ficndi en<'ia\ in» ol thc 

b)th (cntniy. (lispla)ed ( hronological- 

Iv and linder thc head ol well knowii 

artists. During tlic Ijtli ccntiuy thc art 

WAS conlined largelv to wood blocks 

lor book illusliation and il is not be- 

loic ir)2() that WC lind ihe leading 

aitists ol thc linic like [ean Diivct 

nsing thc (()j)j)ei plate. At that nionicnt 

cn<>iavi!ii> bcj'aii to Irec itscll ol thc 

book. and its success as a separate art 

d'\d niudi to establish thc Fontaine- 

bleau Sdiool l)\ rcj)!()du( ing ihe work 

ol Priniaticc io and Rosso. A laige part 

ol thc exhibition is dcxotctl to this 

sdiool and to thc art ol Jean Duvet, 

|ean I)a\c!it. (lere can. Perissin and 

Fortorel. Fliis show also iiidudcs an 

intcresting scrics ol j)ortiaits in copper 

plate which bccaiuc thc lashion be- 

tween IjJ^KiOO. 

* « » 

\ MiDsi ihc pcll-iucll ol ihousaiids ol 

'^ artists stri\i!ig lor lame onc occa- 
sioiially coiucs across thc luore genuine 
type wlio has lived long, ölten in ])ov- 
crty, caring lor bis art alonc and only 
in the long lun ciucrginiL' into j)ublic 
notice. Fhis is the casc ol Simon Scgal 
\\ho until cjuite rccenlK worked alonc 
isolatcd in thc French coiintryside. Iii- 
vited last vear bv ihc Museuni al Albi 




Bictn;ni'j: SiMDN Shgal 
/./ c,u' c:ie Bcis.u/yj. Paris 




Still Life: Forissier 
Al CiAlerie ryaniojid. Paris 



[29] 




PISSARRO, rue de l'HermItage 
a Poitolse. 1879 

BERNHEIM-JEUNE 

27 Avenue de Mafignon, and 

83 fg. St. Honor4 • PARIS 8 

Cable Address: Berjeune, Paris 

SPECIALISTS IN ART BOOKS 
Exhibitions of Modern Paintings 

Les Vagh-Weinmann 

+o April I I 

Cora-Felice Verdi 

to April I I 

Jose de Lapayese 

April 13 - May 9 

Hubert Clerissi 

April 13 - May 9 

G. Kayser 

April 13 - May 9 



ROLAND 



BOUVIER 



FRENCH 

ABSTRACT 

PAINTER 

To April 20 



GALLERT 

75 



30 E 75 $T NY 



';> ^l'spl^.v his woik. Ins big cxhibiiion 
fluic niiiikcd hiin out ;is onc ol the 
'nyst ori^iuiil pi.iritcrs ol cur tinie 
AloMosHk' Ol \'illoM. Dnlv .nul Rouauit 
'y^;«MAv..s noi (lin.iiiislRd. In his show 
l'ns n.onih ;.t thr («McnV Hassano one 
( .ni s(r how ,is oiioinal loitv and frcsh- 
'H'ss scts hnn in a cjass apart. Rongh 
^^[nlumoulh, hisart trnds to sluuk and 
chstinl) all avIio an« unpicpared lor it. 
•V'.L'id IS a pnnntivc who has rctnrned 
f;> "h' carlv siniplidiirs, to man tillinir 
|Ik' earth, lishino thc scas. tcndin.n tlio 
UTds (.olour is rirhlv integratcd. hc- 
low thc surhuc and (onstiuctive Ilis 
poitraits Ol pcasants appcai like idols 
rnrvc'dout of wood and. at tin.cs, ccnie 
dangcrouslv ncar to (aricatiirc. The 
''••ndscapc with Inidocs such as thosc 
•" \i'>i or at Asinc'ics aie so transposcd 
tliat thcv takc on thc aspa t ol very 
.'tndcnt placcs translmcd to tapcstries 
'"Hl (onrcal a stranoc poarv of thcir 
(nvu. 

Ol a difkrcnt ordrr. Misatilc. pio- 
'"( and hrilliant, in his wav, Morvan 
uiio ^vas mcntly awardcd thc Prix du 
i cnun. has hllcd thr tuo oallcrirs at 
tlH' St. I>la( idc. His art is lit up with 
palc yc'llows and sapphirc hlucs which 
.^Ivc a Ivrical notc to his paintings 
^oinposcd oi scascapc's, landscapc;, 
niostly Ironi his nativc Hrittany 

Arauri(c Blond is a thoughtlul artist 
jWh) has accjuircd his prcscnt tcchnique 
l^y a sh,w and arduous process ol 
plumbnig thc dcptJi Ol appcaranccs. 
Hc IS n.decd a modern intimist pcne- 
tnuing the essence ol things through 
an unconnnon gilt ol intuition. Pro- 
lonndly hmnan he prelers the liumble 
;m(l snnple aspects ol ülc. His nrescnt 
Show at tlie Galerie Coard ol portraits, 
still liles. iandscapes and figures is 
(onvmcnig. His eolour has become at 
tnncs, brdliant, and in certain llowcr 
subjetts ol an oriental quality. 

rhe Salon ol Alsatian painters at the 
Raymond Dunean gallcries contains 
;\7[,^''ty exhibits. A landscapc oi 
VValch conianrs a rieh pattern like 
stanicd glass. Gicss. well kno^^.l in 



[30J 



Paris, exhibits a clcarcut landscapc. 
lircitwciscr shows iandscapes remark- 
ablv sensiti\c. Mlle. Brunschwiu. a hav- 
niaking scciic truc to lue and Ircsli in 
its conccption. kanuncrer is trcnchant; 
Kichl romantic; Schmal, rough: I rin- 
got displays a snowscape well managcd, 
Lucien Weil a portrait ol j)octic stvle. 

A group ol twcnty-five \ouug artists 
—La NouvcUe Vaguc — at the (ialcrie 
Framond represent prcscnt (la\ tcnd- 
encics. Forissier, spccilicalK "llc de 
France", is a serious artist, Gucco and 
Tcjero display exccUent temic. Ihasi- 
lier, Garcia Föne, (iuiramand. Fleury 
iMassalve, Sliart, are among thc most 
interesting. Thc show is onc ol thc best 
of its kincl. 

Hautain-Ciuiraut is sliouing his cle- 
signs on glass at the Marcel ßernhcim, 
Imaginative and Icrtile in thc produc- 
tion of lorms, he has liad to accjuire 
his art more or less alone. Inibcrt, Avho 
is from Marseille, is exhibiting an cn- 
scmble of paintings and watcrcolours 
(Continued an {mge :^i) 



GALERIE MAEGHT 

13 rue de Teheran 
Paris 8 



BAZAINE 

Recent 
Paintings 

MAY 



STEPHEN HIGGINS 

PARIS 

29 Faubourg St. Honore 

Tel. ANJou 2910 



Master Drawings, Paintings 
and Sculpture 



[51] 




Arf?/ecl P/g//t'e: Fred Farr 
/!/ Pd//I Rosen her g GaUery, S.Y.C. 




i 
I 



Les Pronieucules d'Einiidt: Magrit ri-: 
At tht lolcis G aller) , S Y .C. 




i 



w 



Antnnni: Georges Rouault 

Exh'ibited nt the Knoedler Gallery. New York 

C323 




Charioteer: Odilon Redon 

Al ihe Neu York Public Library 




Girl with Planer: G. HoNDlus 
At the Bahcock G all er), N.Y.C. 




Painti)i(r II: Pierre Clerk 
On Exhihitiofi at the Musetifii of Modern Art, New York 

[33] 



CALLIYANNIS 

Paris Exhibition 
26 April - 18 May 

at 
Galeries 

JACQUES DUBOUR 

126 BD. HAUSSMANN 
Paris 8 

and 

MOURADIAN-VALLOTTON 

41 RUE DE SEINE 
Paris 6 



GALERIE HENRI BENEZIT 

20 r. Miromesnil 

Paris 8 +el.: Anj: 54-56 



A. ZYW 

Recent Works 

March 29 - April 12 



On permanent view: 

Atlan * A. Caillaud * Chapoval 

Garbell * Gonduin * Hayden 

Helman * Herbin * Jansen ' Lanskoy 

A. Masson * Pichette * Schaar 

Tal-Coat 



RKPORI FROM PARIS 

(Conlifiurd fioffi jxii^c ^il) 

in uhidi hc is both forcciul aiul at 
tinu-s icfinctl. He is a rcinarkablc 
(Irau^htsniaii. 

Sciadour, a nativc ol >rarseillc, is 
showiiiK lii-^ rcccnt uoik at thc (;alcne 
Ror \'()linar. Hc cmploys pure coloui 
aiul (lear outline, and his portraits and 
Ijoincs painied in brilliant scarlet or 
icd iorni an art that is casily legibk'. 
Largc liower subjccts painted in sonie- 
tbinj,^ near to a irompc Voeil tedini(iue 
have a snniptuous character. His pies- 
ent show is painted to please. 

>r()retli is a young Italian who is 
soniethiiig ol a virtuoso able to rapidly 
execute portraits or still liles. He has 
ii fantastir iniagination able to map out 
large conipositions ol a grotcscpie or 
(haniatic nature Avith a certain brio. 
His painting may at dmes astonish but 
it is not the sort of art that convinces. 
His prescnt show at the licrnheini 
Jeiinc gallery is unequal. 

Guv Montis has fdlcd the big Durand 
Ruel gallery with a collection ol por- 
traits niostly ol cclcbratcd Parisians, 
artists, cinenia stars, daiicers, prolessors. 
He is a realist who does not go out of 
his way to llattcr his subjeets and his 
art ölten suceeeds in (onccntrating the 
essential nature ol thc peisou depictcd. 



Galerie Framnnd 

3, rue des St. Peres 
PARIS (6) Lit: 50-80 



R. Oudot, Rohner. Chapelain-Midy 

Humblot, Brayer. De Gallard 

P. Chieze. Andissone 

Michel-Henry 



[3-1] 



DURAND-RUEL 

Established 1803 

37 Av. de Friedland, Paris 8 
Cable address: Durandruel — Paris 

MODERN PAINTINGS 



GALERIE FRICKER 

177 Bvd. Haussmann 
Paris (8) Eiy 20-57 

GROMAIRE 

JAWLENSKY 

LEGER 

METZINGER, etc. 

Sole agent for LERSY 



Galerie Lara Vincy 

47 rue de Seine, Paris (6) 



Tel. DAN. 72-51 



ACHIAM 

SCULPTURES 
April 13 - May 9 



GALERIES 
RAYMOND DUNCAN 



31 rue de Seine 



Paris 6 



are bringing over for 
the opening of their new 
Gallery in New York 
an important Group of 
living Parisian Artists 



GALERIE BASSANO 

9 rue Gregoire-de-Tours 
Paris (6) 



SIMON SEGAL 

April 5-30 



In M< 



CAMPAGNOLA 
HENRI REY 



ROSENBERCi 
and STIEBEL, Inc. 

PAINTINGS 
OBJETS D'ART 

32 East 57th Street. New York 



NIVEAU 

GALLERY 

Modern French Paintings 
Bought and Sold 

942 Madison Ave. (at76St.) N.r. 

REgent 7-1094 



[35] 



cU.ondon r ji 



euu6 an 



Bv HORACI. SlIIIM» 



d wl 



levui 



I 



()M){)\ IS III a <^a\ 



n 



lood ol sj)riMjL;. 
\\ ma\ l)C' siniplv thc icsult ol 
l)C'in<^ l)\-|)ass('(I h\ tlu' wiiucr so that 
wf ha\c' alrtadv {iiioNcd wccks ol 
wann. sj)iini>likc' Aviathcr: or thc dis- 
(o\('r\ tliai in spitc ol bciiiL» told that 
thc Siicv (anal is our lilclint'. and that 
oni wholc Standard ol li\in<» dcjicnds 
on ii. tlu' politic ians now teil iis that 
it (locsn't matter nuuh: or thc other 
disto\x'r\ that pctrol rationin^ niakcs 
thinj^s inu(h niort.' j)lcasant lor most ol 
US. at Icast in London. In thc iiiore 
cxaltcd World ol ihc arts thcrc is a kind 
ol rcllc(tion ol this bri^htncss. Ihc 
priccs in thc i^rcat London salc-roonis 
(ontiiuic to producc <>asps ol astonish- 
nicnt: an Avcixanij) has just "madc" 
(1 always likc- that tcrni) £I7.()()(). Ihc 
private ji;allcrics srintillatc with thosc 
red Stars ^vhidi betoken salcs. Lrue 
thosc dealers ^^h() are devoted to Old 
Masters or thc i^rcat Impression ists 
(omplain that thc\ cannot (a) find or 
(b) alloicl first-rate spe(imcns; but 
this has the compeiisation that man\ 
fine pictmes by lesser known masters 
receive thc attention whicli they rcally 
deserve. And it ereatcs spacc h)r new- 
(omers. There's always room on the 
penultimate rimj» ol the ladder. 

Actiially the outstanding Old Master 
exhibition lor April does not call lor 
aiiy apoloji'C'tics. Ihc annual showinir 
of Diitch and Lleniish pictiires at Slat- 
ter's Gallery (an boast three lirst-rate 
\'an Cioycns, the most respendent Still 
Life by that master ol the resplendent 
Still Lile. Abraham \an Beyeren; a 
Frans van Mieris the Lider, Lady heed- 
nig a Parrot, ol süperb (piality with a 



j)lay lipon ri( li greens \\hi(h this artist 

loved: lan(ls(apes by (an Wyiiants, the 

\an de Veldes, and others: lloAvcr- 

pie(es. skating scenes. marines: in but. 

the whole gamiit ol that age ol j^ainter- 

ly well-(()ntent. 11 \ve ha(I not the cvi- 

dence ol historv and the ocuinc ol 

Rembrandt we nn'glit imagine that the 

17th (cntury in thc Nctherlands ^vas 

the golden age. Delightlul escapism in 

oiir own ])eriod. whcn art and (un^st are 

almost synonynioiis terms. Whether wc 

are looking at Adriaen van de Veldes' 

idyllic The Pi/)ifi(r Hcrdsman: an e\- 

({iiisitc Still Lile by Pieter Claesz. all 

Shilling glass, gold and pewter; Adriaen 

van de Venne's Lishionably tlad Shdling 

Party: or van Mieris's well-deshed lady 

at her dressing table, we are in a laiul 

ol pleiity and peace. 

# # # 

T3()gi:r diAi'KLAixMiDv at Looth's is 
an artist who is enjoying vnhnnc 
in bis native France and is exhibiting 
here h)r the first tinie in London. He 
is I'rolcssor at the L(()le des Beaux Arts 
in Paris, has had sjiows in iiiam parts 
ol the World, and iias a staggering 
re(()rd ()r adiievement and ol eritical 
adiilation. His ränge ol subject matter 
is so varied that at first ghuKc this 
exhibition looks like a mixed one: and 
eveii tliough at secoiid glaiKc the 
(jiiality and ajiplicatioii ol bis jxiint 
miifics snl)jeets as diverse as a boy's 
j)ortrait, Le petil Arlrquin: a seattered 
still lile, Le Büffel Blaue; a landscape, 
Paysage du Gdtinais: a thcatre seene, a 
llower study, there is still somethiiig ol 
a seanh lor the real Roger Cliapelain- 
Midy. He is part ol the reaction agaiiist 



[36] 



is?**^ y- 




Spanish Harhonv: Alistair Grant 

Al Zweninier Gallery, London 




V'igure 1)1 Bcdance : M . Ayrton 
At Leicester Gctller/es. London 




Les Rues: Massimo Campigli 
Exhlbhed at the Mctrlhorough fine Art Gallery. London 

[37] 



absli;K lioii. lor ('\cr\thinj^ lu' paints 
is niost (Icfinilc'lv and ncogiiisably it- 
scll. At liiiR'S too iniuli ilstll. too baldh 
statcd. His coloin is \vy\ bold and eni- 
phatic so arc his lornis. A tcasing 
cnii»nia. tliis aitist. 1 woiukrcd ai nio- 
nicnls wlu'tlu'i Uv had Ixtn discoNcicd 
l)C'r()iC' lic had dis(()\c'ix'd hiniscll. Pcr- 
haj)s hc liiis Ix'cn alto^cthci too hiis\ to 

do so. 

# # # 

An ('\hil)iti()n dcNott-d lo (iinclte 
^ Rapj) and Ro«»ci Montane' at 
Adams Hioihcrs puls into ju\ta]:)()si- 
tion iwo ariisis w idch (h'ssiniilar l)Ut 
both bc'lonoing to tliat dodiinc ol ncw 
rcalisni now so firndx csiabhsht'd. Mon- 
tant-'s M cd i terra nca n sun ^vorship 
floods his canvascs ^\ilh l)rioht vcHow, 
takcs all ihc shadoAvs oul ol his Uir^v- 
scalc ligurcs. and yiclds a sialic van 
Ciogh. Ginettc Rapj^'s cold passion h)r 
black. white and grcy with an enlivcn- 
ing dick ol red finds expression in hin- 
ter snow scenes. Montane is ahnost two- 
diniensional; Rapp is \ery solid, and 
designs in depth, her l)uildings, boats, 
(juays and roads running well back into 
her canvascs. There is in her work that 
fceling of permanence which is so grcat 
an asset ot thc Neo-Realist school. and 
nonc of thc iiglincss which niars so 
niuch of it. Ginettc Rapp niav find 
nalnre bleak. hm she does not find it 

nidx'autilid. 

* # # 

\ T the Zwenimer Gallery one of the 
'^^ yoiniger English artists is adding 
to his already growing reputation. 
Alistair Grant held his first onc-nian 
show at this gallery two years ago and 
was almost universally j^raised. Ihc 
present exhibition shows that the 
enihusiasni was not misphued. He. too, 
has an eye for form and tends to iise 
black or near blacks in his stnutiire. 
His Staffage of extremely initidy small 
girls and soniewhat dishevelled cats is 
rather a nianncrism. and 1 would sav 
that he can with advantage put niore 
draughtsmanship into these. On the 
other band they have amusing and at- 



tradiNc pcrsonality and \itality. His 
sensc oi the solidity of mountains. of 
streets. houses. boats. harhoiirs, of the 
forms ol swirling water, oi the effect of 
drcnching rain. ol the arresting sha]>es 
of plants: so nuich that he does is first- 
rate. His variety betokens an artist in- 
icrested in manv things lor their own 
formal sake and thc pictorial valnc they 
evoke; bnt in his (ase thc unity ol his 
techni(iue binds say, Hdifi dt l)icl)l)(', 
Artichohrs, a beach sccnc hcanii]), a 
stark Birdcage and the ([uite monu- 
mental Mountains, a \erv largc canvas 
which justifics its si/e, as so fcw icalist 

camases do. 

* # =«» 

'T^ni, Mari liORotcai Iink \kv liave 

been having an attrac tivc showing of 
the work of Harpignies. The earliest 
shown was dated 1847, thc latest 1915. 
All thc (hawings and |)ractically all the 
water-coloms hclongs to our Century, 
and Ibnpignics was tinncd eight\ vcars 
of age when that ccntiirv opened. He 
went on working for yct another fificen 
years with no loss of delicacy in the 
drawings, though the oils tend to 
coarsen a little. Nothing really diverted 
hini fnmi that conrse of natural paint- 
ing which arosc from his adnnration 
for (^orot. His is thc paiming of cjuiet- 
ude, and he is at his l)cst in those 
horizontal compositions ^\hcre the lines 
of meadow and ri^cr and distant trees 
swcep from side to side ol the canvas. 
A lyric poet. who like his master sings 
effortlcssly "as the linnet sings." 

The (urrent exhibition at Marl- 
borough is of those two challenging 
modern Italians, Mario Sironi and 
iMassimo Campigli. Both are highly in- 
dividual artists who have created their 
own stvles of strangely con\cntional- 
ised painting. Sironi is especially him- 
sell in his Molti/)li(aziofii in which the 
canvas is divided into a number of 
sections and the thcme repeaied with 
\ariations in cach: a far oflspring of 
that huturisni which heralded modern 
art in Italy and tried to introduce the 
(^Coutinued on poge 42) 



[58] 



MASSIM 



MARIO SIRONI 
o CAMPIGLI 



PA INTINCS 



through April 30 



^^ 



BETWEEN SPACE AND EARTH 

TRENDS IN 



CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN ART 



n 



May- June 



MARLBOROUGH 

FINE ART, LIMITED 



17-18 OLD BOND STREET 
Tel. HYDe Park 6195/6 



LONDON. W. I 
Cables: Bondarto, London 



[39] 





Portrait oj Marcel Duchanip: J. Villon 
Housto}! M/ise/ü}/ of Fine Arts 



Yelloiv Hat: J. F. Feto 
At Beny-Hill Galleries, N.Y.C. 









Chtn'ch oj Tororn: M. Gkossl:r 
/]/ h'je Car.wa/rs Ga/Ierj. N.Y.C. 



Night Vigil: Charles Shaw 
At the Pdssedoit Gallery. S.Y.C. 



Coniposition Ko. 1, 1957: Adja Yunkhrs 
Ou View at the Rose Fried Gallery. New York 

[40] 




Proiile ni DiagoiiaL 1932: Oscar Sc;hlemmf:r 
Show II ,/.' the Galerie Ae>nic Abels, Cologne 

[41 ] 



JX)M)()\ NKWS AM) X'IIAVS 

(Coutinucd Ironi />^/.ii<" :iS) 

elciiunt of tinic into ])ainting. It is, 
howcvcr. thc decorativf aiul paintcrlv 
(jualitics whith are the atiraction ol 
Sironi's an: his rieh ]r,\'i\M. his al)siia(t 
(Icsign. liis harnionious (olours. W'hcn 
hc painis dircTt lan(lsca]H' or tlu' hiiild- 
ings in tow iis in his typicallv rieh c*ai tli 
(olours the rcsnU is cxcellcnt. Campigh 
huikls Ironi priniiti\t' Ktniscan art, but 
ercds iipon it the sophistication ot our 
own timc. His wasp-waistcd figures, 
doli likc, irontal and bland, niake up a 
(jucer pattcin. 1 his highly stylised art 
is of the kind which one either likes 
innnensely or as cordially detests. It is 
fascinating to sce a whole exhibition 
in London ol these two artists, sonie 
oi whose work \ve niet in the Täte 
Gallery show ol Modern Itahan Art 

last vear. 

* * * 

'T^HK Li. icKsrKR CfALLKrv will be 
^ exhibiting in April the work of John 
Armstrong, that nietieuloiis svnibolist 



who (hastises oin liumaii l()llie> with 
the gavest ol colours and the niost (are- 
lul fonns. and ol Anthonv Gross who 
h;is soltened Ironi biting satire to give 
calni landsrape studics. 

I'hev have been showing an exciting 
niunber ol bron/es ol Nfidiael Ayrton 
and sonie (harniing and sensitive water- 
colonr Sketches ol travel by Lord 
Nfetluien. The thenie of nianv of Ayr- 
ton's sddpiures is the balance and ten- 
sion ol the body in acrobatic poses. 
These, usiially poised on skeleton erec- 
tions are ehallcnging arrangenients. 
Ihe niasses of the bodv and the cx- 
tended linibs in eounterpoise beconie 
a kind of jnne s(ulpturc divorted froni 
realisti( attitudes yet in theniselves real. 
A nnniber of earelul drawings for 
sculpturc supported the bron/es theni- 
selves. including a very large bronze 
figure of a male Ihülicr and (Jiihl, 
whkh was a connnissioned work. Ayr- 
ton has only been working at sculpture 
for about four years. and this exhib- 
ition was a remarkable arhievement. 



ADAMS GALLERY 

24. DAVIES STREET, BERKELEY SQUARE 

LONDON, W. L 

MAYFAIR 2468 

F^ilNiCIHI 
DMIPRESSDOINIPST: 



ALSO PAINTINGS BY 

BELLIAS * LORJOU * MINAUX * MONTANE 

MOTTET * RAPP * YINAY 



[42] 



Sporne oLoncii 




on 



H\ Pmrick Havman 



odt 



ernö 



B 



RYAN WvNTiR is a distiiiguished 
painter \vho until recently was 
noted for his romantir and evocative 
paintings, niainly of the Cornish scene. 
His work. however, has been gradually 
changing to an abstract idiom and now 
hc is hokling an exhibition of near 
tachiste work. at times reminiscent of 
the paintings of Mark lobey. Wvnter's 
new work has a good deal of the gentle 
approach and delicaty of his earlier sea- 
scapes, harbours and still lives. His 
paintings. mysterious and at times 
forest-like. remind one of scintillating 
taj:)estries. at once sombre and serene. 
I liked particularly I nil)rn('(}(ihh' Coiin- 
try with its luianees of the unseen and 
the illiniitable. />rr/; Curnnit with its 
dark. sea-deep suggestions is a painting 
of considerable power and imagination. 



Wynter's work is (urrently showing at 

the Red fern Ciallery. 

# # # 

TT-ir liARKtR, ai tlvL- Hanover C.allery, 
^ uses extremely delicate and sensi- 
tive colours in making soft outlincd 
shapes of still lives, nudcs and laiid- 
scapes. His work. which seenis to derive 
from de Stach is geiulc. at times gay, at 
times serene. One notices particularly 
in Womdu htoldim^ Drapery his fme 
colour sense and fecling for design. 
Barker is a restful painter, he uses no 
roll of drums to make a vehement de- 
mand on the speclator. but with 
oriental subtlety draws one into his 
own World of light. (olour and perman- 

ence. 

The Irish painter, well known for 
years in London. Louis Lc Brocquay, 
is showing new canvases at (iimpcl Lils. 
Lc Brocquav's tenuous presences, in 
prcdominantly small pictures, iinpress 
the onlookcr with a vision of white 
light which emanates from his can- 



ARTHUR TOOTH & SONS 

LTD. 

(Established 1842) 

Specialists in Paintings by 

CANALETTO • GUARDI 

GAINSBOROUGH • CONSTABLE • BONINGTON 

DELACROIX • COROT • COURBET 

THE IMPRESSIONISTS 

VAN GOGH • GEZANNE • TOULOUSE-LAUTREC 

BONNARD • VUILLARD • ROUAULT 

also 
De STALL • BÜFFET • CLAVE • VENARD 



31 BRUTON STREET 

Cables: Invocation, London 



LONDON 

May fair 2920 



[45} 



O'HANA GALLERY 

13. CARLOS PLACE 

GROSVENOR SQUARE 

LONDON (Tel. Gro. 1562) 



RECENTLY ACQUIRED 

IMPORTANT FRENCH 

PAINTINGS OF THE 

I9th and 20+h Centuries 



April 25th - May 1 5th 

GRANADOS 
HEITER 

VALLMITJANA 

Exhibition of 3 Venezuelan Painfers 



Prices on application 



THE LEFEVRE 
GALLERY 

XIX and XX 
CENTURY 
FRENCH 
PAINTINGS 



30 BRUTON STREET 
LONDON, W. I. 






NJisc's. Ilis loiins ;m(l firmes. umi;iII\ 
l);ir('l\ (lisd'i iiihlc. Ikinc a |)('(iiliai ;m(I 
iiiul ;it tinu's sinistcr simiificuKc. Ilc 
is ;i subtlc piiiiiUi uho (omncns ilic 
Iceliiij^ ol nioNcnicnl and ol Naiioiis 
cnioiional stiitcs in a dicani-likt'. ucav- 
:il).stra(t iniagcry, as in WOioidrd Prrs- 
('}}((' and Fioinr in Liu^ht. Lc Bioccjuax's 
luunily wnu ihc JMcniio da la Piiai- 
j>ina. tlu' second lar^^csi inK riiaiional 
pri/c a\\ai(k'd lor paintin«; ai die 
\^ciii(c liicnnalc last ycai. wIkic he 
rcj)rc.st'ntc(l hclaiid ^\ith a laiui' cx- 
hil)iti()n. 

Fal)ul()usl\ dn(k and licaw pis^nicnl, 
whidi niarks an obscssional scnsc ol 
dc'sioii, ( haia( t(.'i isc's i\\v paintin^s 
whidi look (1()\\ n at oiu' in soinbrt' 
lashion hoin die Avalis ol tlic lUaux 
Alls Ciallcry. This is tlic fiisi oiic man 
show ol a yonii^ paintei. l)a\id kossoll, 
wliosc work. (juitc ohx ioiisU. is oiioiii;i| 
and dceply kll. Kossoll rclics on the 
licavy emotional inipad ol aiuient 
thenies ol despair and ol liope. out- 
xvardly dothed in nioie ( onxentional 
aspeds ol the workl. such as liis seiies 
ol building-site pictines. 

Adrian Heath. one ol the heller 
known ol the Knj^lish ahslrad painlers, 
and aulhor ol Abstrdd Pd'nitiji^^, Its 
Oriiy'ni /nid Mranirio-, is workin^ on 
anolher hook. lliis linie on the (ail)ist 
painlers. Ilealli Avill he showiiiü new 
painiini^s at die Redleni (.alleix later 
in die year. 

fwo ol the youngcr generation of 
painlers Iure in London. llarr\ Mnndv 
and (iillian Ayrcs. who boih use an 
abstratt idioin. nill be lia\ ini^ a show 
ol llieir work in a Joint exhibition in 
Sweden this snninier. (iilh'an A\res 
will also be slioxving paintiiif^s at the 
Redlern Ciallerx hiter this vear. 



T^ni: Whitediapel Art Gallery will be 

showini» paintings hy the Australian 

artist Sydney Nolan hiter on in the 

\ear. Nolan, whose work is well re- 



[44] 



eeived here and on die (ontinent, Jias 
niade a series ol sirikingly orij^inal 
paintint^s, (lej)i(tin,i; the iiuredible ad- 
Ncntnres ol the I9lh (entmy biish- 
ianj»er Ned Kelh (a kind ol aiiti- 
podean Jess( janies). His paintings 
make an Australian invlholo<'\ ol the 
\iolent and (piixotic a(I\('iilines ol 
this baekwoods gini-inan. 

A showing ol a gronp ol British 
artisls arranged by (Iharles Gimpel will 
lake place at the Ans Club ol (Ihieago 
in the lall. Painlers are Peter Lanyon, 
S.mdra Blow. Rrvan Wvnter, AVilliani 
Scott, Ceri Ridiards, Louis le Broquay 
and Hamilton Fräser. 

I he C^ornish artist Peter Lanyon 
has beeil in New York recentlv for his 
one-man exhibition. Lanyon is well- 
known lor his near abstrad iniagery, 
drawn Irom the green, gre\ and white 
landscape and wild seas ol the Corn- 
isli peninsula. Lanyon lives at St. Ives 
with his wite and five children. 

Francis Bacon, well-kiiown British 
painter ol the ma(abre, whose shriek- 
ing Popes have at time (aused a Sensa- 
tion, is showing new paintings iiiclud- 
ing portraits, in Paris at the Galerie 
Rive Droite. He will be having a 
show in London at the Hanover Gal- 
lery next month. P. H. 



BEAUX ARTS GALLERY 

PAINTINGS BY 

BACON, DELVAUX 
SICKERT, REBEYROLLE 

e+c. 
May, 1957 

1-7 Brufon Place, London. W. 1 




PAINTING 1957 



RALPH RUMNEY 



Tachist-Metavisual— Abstract 
Painting in England Today 



a+ 



THE REDFERN GALLERY 



20 CORK STREET 



LONDON, W. 1 



THE HANOVER GALLERY 



FRANCIS BACON 

Paintings 

closing 26 April 

REG BUTLER 

New Bronzes 

May - June 



32a St. George Street 
LONDON. W. 1 

Cables: Hanrica, London 



[45} 



On C^xkibit in 




e^man 



^ 



By John Anthony Thwaites 



A j'.\^^ iMoi'ii in tlic Anieiicni imi- 
Mimi World will renienihcr Dr. 
I.conic Rcvireis. Djicdor ot thc Dort- 
niiind >riisenm. Iioiii her visit in 19.55. 
A great niany niorc will rcnienibcr the 
show of iiiodern dcrman j:^raphic art 
which shc scledrd and \\hi(h ran. il I 
rcmcnihcr riolit. tlnouoh ciohtccn 
Amcricini niuscuins thc lollowino vcar. 
One adnnrcd thcn her (ad ;ind wisdoni 
in a\c)idino thc hloodv ficld ol the 
fontcnijjorarv. All Dr. Reviers' Iricnds, 
known and unknown. will bc plcascd 
to hcar that the sa,oa oi Dortniund's 
^^u,sennl am Ostwall has reached a 
kiiid ol rliniijx, \vith thc first art-exhi- 
hition (Caiiadian Kskimo s(idj)tiire) in 
thc ?icw joonis ol thc jcconstruded 
.i;allcrv. 

l"o ;in cxtcnt which iniist hc \erv 
rare, this nurscmn is Dr. Re\gers' rhild. 
In 1911 iL w[\s the niin ol a h)rnier 
musemn lor ait and cidtural historv, 
an ini\v;intc(l possession ol the citv. 
W'ith onl\ ihc niost sh;idow\ kind cif 
rioht. shc o()t the help ol Russian pris- 
oncrs and thc eldeilv niiiseuni attend- 
aiils and l)eo;ni to rehnild. NO sooner 
li.id she heen able to niove in tlian it 
wiis honihed a,i;ain. In 1947. she began 
<)M(c moic with private lunds: and 
l)uiltu|) in thc ruin a lew roonis lor 
shouin,^ (onicnipoiary art. She bccanie 
their "diret tor" - with one attendant 
and her olluc in a corner ol the cellar. 
Froni thcn on iherc w;is no stopping 
her. liv 19 19 she had (ivc rooms and a 
*'galler\ " — and her shows were being 
lalkcd ol lor their (jnalit\. 1951-52 was 
the highj)oint ol this period. with inore 
rebuilding — 'lo preser\c the struiturc" 



— with |)rivate help and nuuh enthii- 
siasni locally. lUit siutess has its pcn- 
alties. A triie lebuilding (oidd hc donc 
by thc city alone: and Dr. Rcvgcrs 
found hcrscH ennieshed in the niachinc. 
Froni this shc has cnieroed. with a 
biiildino which ardiitectmallv is ccr- 
tainly not what shc wonld have wishcd, 
biit which her own creative taste is 
turnino into one ol thc most delightlul 
sets ol cxhibition gallerics I kiiow. If 
thc city lathcrs Ict her ha\c her way 
with thc cxtcnsions now. a set of ex- 
hihition-pavilions in glass siuToiinding 
a garden. one ol the iiglicst Ruhr towns 
will have achievcd an oasis h)r which 
its citi/cns will diank Dr. Rcvgcrs for 



gencrations to conic. 



As to thc Kskimo scnlptors. at fiist 
thcv j)u//lcd nie. One nionient one 
thought ol a good piehistoric collection 
(perhaps slightly inniierued bv Henry 
Moore . . .) thc next ol the gilt-coiintcr 
on an Indian Rcscr\ati()n. A rcniark 
ol the Dircctor's gave nie the ( lue. A 
nnniber ol the human (iguies ha\c the 
iruc. inner perception ol the prinntive, 
Coming more Ironi thc bcllv than the 
eye. Sonic ol the animals arc objcxts of 
symj)atheti( magic. expressions Ol the 
hunters will to master theni. Hm the 
Kskimos arc also observers. with a 
mar\('llous cjuickness ol c\c. So a avIioIc 
ränge, both of thc hunians and the ani- 
mals. arc simply typical: costuines, 
movements and exprcssion. with an 
interest as cpiickly cxhaustcd as all 
ii^cjirc art. Thcn a diird group comes 
Irom Kskimos in hospital. Its high 
polish betrays thc other instruincnts. 
At thc touch of ••ci\ilisation" naive 



[46] 



all witheis into "iiati\c art". 

Such pieccs as a Mollici <nid ilhild 
from (iape Dorset, rising in conccntric 
rings of c loak. arms, hood. heads, shows 
trcmcndous will to form, cvcn if it is 
more alfcctcd bv the visual surfacc than 
are African or Prehistoric art. Standing 
(Igurcs from (lapc Dorset, thc Bclchcr 
Islands and Sugluk do have the statu- 
cscjuc proportions, thc formal unitv, 
thc angular rhythm and almost thc wav 
of (utting thc stone which Moore 
Icarncd from the Mcxicans. Othcrs, 
from an artist at Port Marrison. in 
form, handling and depiction of the 
tyjK's show an astonishingly Oriental 
c haracter. Ihc animals go through all 
the \ariations in quality. but at their 
best have a ßranc usi-like simplilica- 
tion. It is sad to think that all this 
must lade soon — is fading now — but 
good mcanwhilc to sec it shown. with 
photos, fürs, etc.. (h'scrcctly brought in 
iicre and thcre to givc a contact with 
thc niakcrs and with lorins of lancl- 
scapc absolutcly dillcrcnt Irom our own. 




lANwnii.i: in the gallerics, thcre 
^^*' ha\c beeil soiiic intcKsting coUcc- 
tions shown. Ihc housc ol Hocrncr In 
Ducsscldorf, one ol the best h)r graphi( 
work of c\cry period. has had a group 
of sc\cntv-fivc Rcmbrandt ctchings. 
ranging from KkHO to \i\')[). Alex Voc- 
mcl has a pendant to thc largcr Munic h 
show in thirtv small paintings by thc 
cighty-ycar-olci Ciabriclc Mucnter: but 
I must say that the sculptuics ol \\\l- 
scventv-vcar-olcl Matart'. which a(rom- 
panicd them, interest nie much inorc. 
Ihc Sl('('j)'nig Hü) sc in wood ot 1927. 
unusiially large h)r that period, is lirsi- 
ratc work. Intcrcsting rctrospectively 
to coiiiparc it with the animals as sccn 
by thc Kskimos: in compact vitalit\. 
the subtic articulation ol h)rin and thc 
use of matcrial. I think that it outdoes 
their best. All thc sadder to sec this 
and other finc things from thc twenties 
against thc cocks, rcliefs and ornaments 
of thc fiftics. with their ccclecticism 
and cmpty dccorativc tharactcr. 

•JF "ff tP 



JULIUS BOHLER 



MUNICH 

Brienncrstr. 12 



Paintings by Old Masters 
Fine Works of Art 
Antique Furniture 



[47] 



Günther Franke 

i^lunieli 

Represenfing 

MODERN 
GERMAN 
ARTI STS 



fro 



m 



MAX BECKMANN 
fo E. W. NAY 

Stuck-Villa 
Aussero Prinzrcgentenstrasse 4 



Galerie Aenne Abels 

Wallrafplatz 3 

COLOGNE 

Germany 

MODERN PAINTINCS 
SCULPTURE 



Galerie 
Alex Vömel 

Düsseldorf. Germony 

Königsallee 42 

Jawlensky - Klee - Marcks 
Marini - Matare - Sintenis 

and others 



T^m: Ai'.NM. Abii.s (iAi.iiRN in Co- 

lognc is showini» ;i lar<;(' i;r()ii|) ol 
SchlciniiuTs. (ovcring tlu' \\h()k' ol his 
workiii}:; lue. Thcic aic a mimhcr ol thc 
wc'll-kiiown j)aintiii,t»s. sik h as llic HrsI 
Ron ff} (1925), thc Üliir W'omrn (1929) 
aiul thc (wYonj) of f'oinlrcu in /}na<rifi- 
ary Architcdurr {WVM)), oiic ol his 
finc'st works. whidi has i)C't'ii i)()ught l)\ 
a (icrniaii nuiscinn. Thc scrits ol watcr- 
colors. thoiigh, Iroin 1924 lo I9-W, was 
CVCI1 iiiorc cxciting toilcdivcly. Hoth 
thc carly skctchcs, niadc I supposc in 
coiincction with his staj^c work. and 
thc hirgc latc walcr-coloiirs avIicic hc 
brcaks \\p thc lorins (likc thc sj)lcn(li(l 
Profile ifi Didironals ol 19-i2) avoid 
thc tightncss ol his oils whilc kccping 
sj)atial and arc hitcctuial (juality. Also 
in Colognc, Theo Hill has bccn show- 
ing thc rare, carly watcrcolours ol 
Hc(kcl. Kirchner and Otto Muclier. 
C^omini» latc, 1 loiind niost ol thcni al- 
ready gone; but the lew Iclt were so 
unusnal as to niake nie vcry nuich 
regret niissing what nuist have i)ccn a 
ias( inating cxhibition. 

Also in Colognc. Hein/ Stuenkc has 
i)ccn showing at his (ialcrie der S|)iej^el 
thc Histoirr SatuvcUc ol Max Krnst. 
Ihis will surelv rank colku ti\elv 
ainon,^ his greatest \\()rks. I'lic way in 
which ii readies l)a( k to thc Rhcnish 
iniddlc aücs and to the Svmbolists. 
then lorward to thc ifijo) iticls ol todav, 
as well as the grajjhic lonc ol thc 
nicces individuallv. niakcs it absohiielv 
soNcreign. 

So nuK h (annot. indortnnately. bc 
Said lor the new oils ol Schnndt-Rott- 
hiH, a do/en ol which. with watercolors 
and early graphic uork, is being shown 
by Frau Hckker \()in Rath at thc 
Fraiiklnrter Kinistkabinctt. Still Icss — 
to reniain in Fraiiklort — lor (Christian 
Kruck, showinj^ at thc Zinnnergaleric 
Franck therc. Having tricd niost ol 
thc stvlcs. Herr Kruck seenis to have 
scttled h)r a niixliire ol Klee and I)ii- 
bullet. Another nirsucccsslul Klcc-inii- 
tator is Rucloll Kiicgier ol Berlin, show- 



[48] 



ing now at ihe Lcoj)olcl-Hoes( h-Mii- 
semn in Diicrcn. Jt is a riile. I think. 
that those who coniiniic Klce's outward 
style mulerstancl nothing ol his spirit 
— or his quality. 

Otherwisc, this seenis to bc the 
month ior nati\e sons. Ihe niirseuni 
in Wuppertal is showing Walther 
Wolfl; that in Hamburg. Diener and 
Lult; in Solingen, Willi Deuts/mann, 
and so on. Fhe snialler (and not so 
sniall) nuiseuins here secni to bc turn- 
ing into institutions lor llattering local 
sensibilities. An alternative is whcn 
they show earh other's coUections, as 
Afannhciin is doing lor the Saarland 
Museum. Jliat also does not require 
niueh imagination, courage or cnergy. 
Otherwisc the exhibitions already re- 
ported on continue to circulate: ßon- 
nard no^v in (Colognc, Flartmig in 
Stuttgart, the Diitch ])ainters in Wup- 
})ertal, and so on. It is all rathcr like 
niusical cliairs. J. A. T. 



GALERIE THEO HILL 

COLOGNE, GERMANY 
Schildergasse 107 

ERICH HECKEL 
E. L. KIRCHNER 
O. MUELLER 
SCHMJDT-ROTTLUFF 



SINCE 1918 — THE FINEST IN 

CIHIIIINIIiSi ^^ 




C. T. L 





FRANK CARO, Successor 

41 East 57th Street Telephone 



DR. WERNER RUSCHE 

COLOGNE • BRAUNSFELD 

WIETHASESTRASSE 22 

(GERMANY) 

Baumeister 

Härtung 

Manessier 

Poliakoff 

Soulages 



Jawlensky 
Klee 



GALERIE 

WILHELM GROSSHENNIG 

Kasernenstrasse 13 
Düsseldorf, Germany 

• French Impressionists 

• German Expressionists 

"Bauhaus" "Brücke" 

"Blauer Reiter" 



New York. N. Y. 



Plaza 3-2166 



MODERNE GALERIE 
OTTO STANGL 



Worfcs ot 



MUNICH 



HÄRTUNG 
POLIAKOFF 
SOULAGES 
ZAO WOU-KI 

• MARTIUS-STR. 7 



[49} 



4 



Kepor't front i\ 



ome 



Ii\ Ii)A IWaiimr 



A 



i'AiMi R ol ilic himc ol Mario Siioni 
c\( itcs oreat attention tvcrv tinie 
ho prcsmis his work to tho |)ul)lic. 
particularly now alter liavin^ l^een in 
sedusion for so lonj^. Sironi. ^slio in 
1922 toocther uith si\ other artists 
inaugurated the movement that went 
uFuler tlic iiame of "Noi'ocento", has 
also been active as a sculptor, (le(()r- 
ator. stage (lesi)[>ner and designer in 
glass aiul mosai(. W'ith the passing of 
years, he kept steadily refining his own 
pictorial world in whidi harmonies ol 
gray. blaek and white predcmiinated. 
The Bussola gallery. recentlv openecl 
on Via Gregoriana. just hcld an ex- 
hibition ol some twenty-five oils and 
temperas ])roduted by Sironi during 
the past six years, somewhat abstract 
compositions with figures ol men like 
rocks, and rocks like men. One was 
Struck by the new note in the color, 
vibrant, at times joyous — and the 
simpler compositions. the more direct 
touch. One may well speak of the con- 
temporaneity of this artist's present 
production. \t seventy-two Sironi 
seems to emerge in a second youth of 
vigorous expression, 

Anileto Sartori, at the Sagittarius 
gallery is showing seventy theatrical 
masks in ^sood and leather, striking 
psychological studies of real characters 
taken Irom the Greek and Latin thcater 
as well as the *'Connnedia delTarte", 
and such modern works as "The Angel 
of Vhe" by Prokofiev. Ihe series of 
preparatory sketches sho\\ the care that 
went into the seardi for eharaeterfiil 



expressioirs. Sartori has long had this 
skill in the old art of mask making. 

At the Bussola is one of the most 
interesting shows of the moment: a 
letrospective of Loren/o Viani who, 
dead some twenty years, has not vet 
been entirely revalued. His eolours, 
spread in compact masses in which dark 
ton es predominate, but otherwise 
\ibrant; and his cxpert technicjue 
whicli was enriched diniii" his lonir 
i'arrsian sojourn, scrve a j)roloiindly 
human content. The figures of the 
fishermen. the ]K)or peoj)le and the 
emaciated chilclren, however exasper- 
ating in their Exj^ressionisi mainier, 
conserve a measure and a grace that 
can be defined as Tuscan, like Viani's 
coinitry of origin. Sharing with his 
ardent sensibilitv in the life of these 
j)oor folk. the painter poet portrays 
them alive and beautiful in their 
poverty, as in the old man facing the 
sea — with eyes like sapphires — or the 
melancholy child sitting on the bench, 
who excites pity and tenderness. 

Aligi Sassu, a noted follower of the 
pmity of color of the "Novocento", 
continues to charm with his ])ictures 
when he stays on his j)ath of fiery 
chromatic abandon such as the three 
or four outstanding canvases at the 
Aureliana gallery— the Cruiijixion, a 
tunuüt of red and yellow: and Horses 
on a seething turcjuoise background. 
When lie tones down his colors to a 
purely decorative function, lie loses so 
much of his warmtli and poetry as to 
hardly seem to be the same painter. 



[50] 



\ 



i 



Ihc photographei De Antonis, well 
known in art ist ic circles for his high 
professional ai)ility. exhibited a series 
ol abstract pholos at the Obelisco Gal- 
leiy. These are executed in a manner 
all his own. which consists of fixing on 
a sheet of glass certain splashes of 
coloin' of an oily nnxtme in contact 
Avith drops of fluid ink. The good taste 
and skill of De Antonis brinir about 
with this |)layfidness some surprising 
results. I'hey are photographic images 
conipaiable to cosmic: visions and 
galaxies ol stars, \\ith niagic eflects of 
(laiity and a sense of space and 
distance. 

At the Medusa gallery is the work 
of Pompilio Manck'lli who is linked 
with two other painters in Bologna in 
a new trend in the clirec tion of a kind 
of im})ressionist abstrac tionism which 
evokes moocls of nature through the 
use of seasonal color tones and elTects 
of light. 

Another abstractionist is Antonio 
Scordia showing at the 1 artaruga gal- 
lery. Here we find greater turbulence 
of color, brilliant turciuoise and fierv 
reds bursting the bonds of a rigorous 
formal design. 

Orfeo Tamburi. who has lived for 
years in Paris. Irom time to time ex- 
hibits in Ronie the canvases he paints 
in the French capital. l'hose on \ iew 
at the Vantaggio gallery depict cjuiet 
little stieets, or the banks of the Seine, 
treated realistically in delicate har- 
monies of chaste colors. Also at this 
gallery are views of Naples by (iiacomo 
Sangiorgio, impetuously painted in 
rather violent colors and bordering too 
close to the obviously picturescjue. 

Luigi De Angelis, also known l)\ 
the Pseudonym of "Barbiere dlschia' 
(the Barber of Jschia) because of the 
trade he followed for many years on 
diat delightful island, sliowed a selec- 
tion of his work — all drawn from the 
everyday life of the people of Ischia - 
at the Fontenella gallery. Weddings, 
tipplers dancing the "intrezzata", "puli- _ 



NAVOCy© 

Carlo Cardazzo. Dir. 

Agent for 

BACCI - BURRI - CAMPIGLI 

CAPOGROSSI - CRIPPA 

FONTANA . GENTILINI 

MUSIC - SCANAVINO 

also works by 
Balia - Malta - Brauner - Jörn 

Ifalian Futurist and 
Metaphysical Painters 



VIA MANZONI. 45 

MILAN. ITALY 

In Rome: 
Galleria Selecta. via Propaganda 2 

In Venice: 
Galleria Cavallino. San Marco 1820 



GALLERI A 




VIA BRERA 14, MILAN 

Aimone - Baj - Birolli - Borra - Cagli 
Campigli - Cappello - Carra - Cassinari 
Consagra - Corpora - Crippa - O'Angelo 
De Chirico - De Pisis - Fabbri - Fiume 
Fontana - Gazzera - Giovanola - Guidi 
Manzi - Migneco - Mirko - Monacheti 
Morandi - Music - Musso - Peverelli 
Prampolini - Rosai - Sassu - Severini 
Sironi - Valenti - Vedova - Zuffi 

One-Man and Group Exhibitions 

Catalogues senf on request 



[31] 



ROME, ITALY 

SCHNEIDER ART CALLERY 

(American Management) 

RAMPA MIGNANELLI 10 

On sfairs behlnd fhe American Express 

Direcfor: Dr. Robert E. Schneider 



A reliable Consultant 

for collectors of 

selected contemporary 

painting 

and 

sculpture 



modern 

paintings 

and 

sculpture 



I -< 



PIERRE MATISSE 

41 E. 57 NEW YORK 



(inc'lhis" doiuL» tluir ;i(i.s. nnd otlicr 
livcly srciR's makc iij) liis subjccts. He 
avoids ilic j)i((urr j^ostrard prcttincss, 
wliidi natuic in tiiat rcgion posscsscs, 
by iising a ratlur gitv. nuhiiulioly 
palctte as (hastcncd as tlic rcality is 
exubcrant. lUit wli;it rrallv iiivcsts' bis 
paintings witb a tone bing (bann is tbe 
siruc'ic naive lantasy and tbc inj^cnuous 
aflFection bc Icels for bis localc - the 
(bildliko in.gcnuousncss \\in'(b be Iias 
not lost in Jiis scvcnt\-fi\t' vcars. 

The various pbases dirough winch 
the painting ol tbe Vmerican, G. F. 
Tempest bas passed are aniply doc- 
umented in tbe Schneider (;allery. 
Starting Ironi a rather sophistieated 
portraiture through expressionism to 
the al)stractionisni in which he shows 
a grcat technical tapacity, the exhibi- 
tion surveys the deveh)pment of a high 
Order ol skill seeking newcr anistic 
(f)ncepts. 



LA MEDUSA 

G A L L E R Y 

124 VIA DEL BABUINO Tel. «80850 
ROME (Italy ) 

CLAUDIO ALBERICO BRUNI. DIR. 

ACENT FOR SADUN 

WORKS OF DE PISIS - GUIDI 

MANDELLI - MORANDI - QUACLIA 
ROSAI, ETC. 



SCHWARZ 

via S. ANDREA, 23. MILAN 

Paintings by 

ALBERTO MARTINI 

( 1876 > 1954) 
ABSTRACT ART ^ SURREALISM 



[52] 



i 



JM<K\Ii:\\S IN NEW YORK 

{Conti jined frofii jxiire 27) 

T ii.v Kallav, whose j)aintings ^verc 
-"^shown at tbe WeHons Gallery last 
month, tonibines expressionist bold- 
ness ol design and color witb a \varnith 
of ieeling ior the poignant dement 
in people, leading to striking residts 
exeept when sbe overstrains b)r a styh- 
/ation ol teclnn'(pie. There is a lot Of 
experinientation witb various odd- 
ments of textin al treatnient: once tliese 
are out of her System and she settles 
down to less technically obtrusive 
methods, she should be well on her 

way. C. Z. O. 

• • • 

JAV CoNNAWAV is a devotee of the 
rocky (oast of Maine. Gale, snow 
and rain. sunsbine and mooidight over 
the surf, and the toiling of inen who 
bandle fragile boats serve as his Inspira- 
tion. Althougb tbe approach is realistic, 
as in Seine Ilodf and the nioiunnental 
Moofilit Skies, it is far froui photo- 
graphit. lieflectioiis — Winter is al- 
niost senii-ahstrac t in its siniplicity. At 
the I\enned\ Galleries. R. F. 



F 



* « * 

RLDLRICK Cinii.DS is esseutiallv a deco- 
rative painter who attains strong. 
dramatic effects through a dever niani- 
])ulatio!i of ligbt and dark values. The 
style of his Avork, sujierficially remini- 
scent of Picasso, is tastefid and visiially 
appealing in (olor. His niost inventively 
coniposed still-life arrangements are 
Knchina and (lords and Sxceet Williams 
and Foxij:;lovc,s. Tlie few figiire stiidies 
in the show are the weakest, falling 
into rather formal patterns of slight 
artistic merit. At the Passedoit Gallery. 

A. N. 

W ^F TP 

T I Oi\oR Fim's paintings, at the Gal- 
^ lery 7r) (Ai)ril 22nd to May 15th) 
represent a kind of symbolic reahsni 
in whieh tbe objeet or figure— tbe single 
important dement in her craft — takes 
on overtones of meaning by virtue of 



GALLERIA BERGAMINI 

CORSO VENEZIA. 16 
MILAN, ITALY 

Works of 

Boccioni - Campigli - Carrq 

Casorati - De Chirico - De Pisis 

Morandi Rosai - Sironi 

Soldati. etc. 



GALLERIA ANNUNCIATA 

VIA MANZONI 46, MILAN • Tel. 791102 



ITALIAN & FRENCH MASTERS 



BIROLLI 
BROGGINI 
CASSINARI 
GUTTUSO 



MELONI 
MORLOTTI 
SPILIMBERGO 
TOMEA 



galleria pater 



works of: 



AFRO 

BIROLLI 

CAPPELLO 

CASSINARI 

MUSIC 

VALENTI 




GALLERIA 

CÄOROLÄ 

VIA SPIGA 30. MILAN 

Tal. 794286 

CONTEMPORARY 
ITALIAN MASTERS 

Paintings - Sculpture - Drawings 



[53] 







NEW PAINTINGS BY 

LOUIS BOSA 

thru April 13 

MILCH ,«,t^ii«'«, 

From April 15: JOHN WHORF Watercolors 



WELLONS GALLERY 



noon fo 8 pm 



17 E. 64 ST. 



CHARLOTTE 

ORNDORFF 

WATERCOLORS 
April 1-13 



FULBRIGHT 
SCULPTORS 



April 15 - May 4 



its isolatc'cl. cmico liko s|)C(iiicity and 
its iinihimioiis dctails. \\v\ drcains arc 
ii^ivLU Status i)\ siio^tslions ot such past 
iniagcs as Craiidi's swollcn-ln'llied 
Eves. or j)C'a(()( k cloaks ol latc nicdicval 
rashioii. hl her perverse syinhohc ^\•()rhl 
a|)pear greeii-eyed wonien wiih hare 
lorelieads and hound hair. whose ( lotli- 
inj:» niay ^ro^ liom tlieii enaniellcd 
ilcsh; youths, (ii j)rcy h)r the Sphinx; 
l'antastic niouniains h"ke (orals or oil- 
(K)/ing sp()n.^es. A. ß. I,. 



"North and Soutli Ainericans and 
Kuropeans" is the sj>a( ious title ol the 
Group at the Meh/er. \ divcrting cx- 
aniplc ol the in\('nti\e or the in- 
.t»ein()us is the white reliels ol Clarlo 
Nant^eroin. The inteiestin«;> and self- 
tau^ht Miranda's V)ititli'd X umher 
One is diarac tcristic ol this Ar<»entin- 
ian artisi — disereet and ahnost anonv- 
mous <>reens duindlino into a ni^ht- 
(olored hlue. A lellow South Ameri- 
can, /uleiua DauiianoN i( h, presents an 
CMiioniatic Xino linvuclto, canvas 
niountcd on canvas, and Kchvard Lan- 
don olfers a series ol wood carvini^s. 
Mariusa \er Bru^oe's reticent still liles 
are clonicstic ancl soher and P. Sc haar, 
a Polish painter. adcls a c irrusy tone 
to a tastelul and (juieth uinTiccl exhi- 
l)ition. ' G. S. 



/^oNsiJi.Lo Cloos paints Irom a purcly 
^^ iiiAvard inipulse: hence her ^vork 
(an he viewed only as cxpressing ino- 
nients in the liheration ol personal 
l'eeling. concentrated hut not directed. 
The major lorm in eaeh ^\()rk scems 
like a colony ol nn'croscopic organisms 
in elndlition; harmonious color 
growths often lacccl with gold, seen in 
the process ot some minute extravasa- 
tion. The sensations provided by her 
work, at the Cadan Gallery (April 8th 
through 28th), are so intiinate as to 
escape at times, but these mystic blos- 
sonis are still very pretty in their deli- 
cate. exotic coloring. A. B. L. 



t 



[54] 



LM.i/Aiu in Kri.anükr's group ol water- 
^* color ancl gouaehe paintings at the 
ßodley (.aller'v (A|)ril i:)th to 27th), 
result Irom a trip through the North- 
west. Canada and Alaska. Ihc hril- 
liant backgroinid washes appear to be 
seen through sonie thick transparent 
medium traversed hv Irattures, whose 
daik and hlurred lines ellect an or- 
gatn'/ation ol the conipositioii. One ol 
the most successlul is the Mouni Edith 
('.(nx'lL the harsh rhytlmis ol arete ancl 
icy slope beiug well c\j)ressed in this 

devicc. A. li. L. 

# # # 

/^^HAki.is 1.. Marmn. the Xcw Yorker 
^^ cartoonist idemihecl l)\ his initials, 
has a group ol siuall watercolors and 
gouaches at the Ruth White Gallery. 
These landscapes depict Monhegan 
Island, its rocks, woocls ancl sea. Ihey 
ränge in style Irom the il lustrational 
gouache V7/r Brook to hold semi-ab- 
strac tions such as Squccher Cox'C. Most 
successlul is Sunlit (.on'cin which color 
applied in rihbon-like bancls ellec ti\ely 
suggests sun on water. H. I). M. 

# # * 

TJoi'.iRr (iAiis appears to have made 
^ his personal trucc with |)olenn"eal 
modernism. llis souncl ancl pleasing 
^\'ork may be seen at the (iadan (iallery 
through April 7th. A late-de|)artecl. 
gentle cubism appears in the gouache 
studies ol imdes, Irac tioned ancl ara- 
bescjued. Ihe landscajies are built in 
iike mainier Ironi tragnients ol reality, 
their almost roinantic note due to the 
sensitive tiansmission ol colors in na- 
ture. White Sun, lor example. j^oetical- 
ly reali/es a niood in rectangular 
patches ol velloAv ancl orange lilmed 
\\\{\\ l)ron/e, illuminated bv an immcj- 
bile, staring white. A. !>. L. 

# # # 

1\ Tai.coim CioRDON Andkrson spreads 
paint eveidy, in nicticulously per- 
leet scjuares ancl oblongs. in brovvn, 
bull, black, gray and blue. These oils 
at the Pietrantonio Gallery (April 16- 
30) suggest (ompositions ol tuiniels or 




OSVER 

RECENT PAINTINGS 

April 23 - May 17 

CENTRAL MODERNS 

1018 MADISON AVE., N.Y. 



at 
79th ST. 



To April 13 

THE 

PETER A. RUBEL COLLECTION 

OF 
MODERN FRENCH MASTERS 



Opening April 15 

PASCIN 

and the 

SCHOOL OF PARIS 



PER LS 



GALLERIES 

1016 Madison Ave. 

New York 21 



t55] 



i Hh^ 




RAOUL DUFY "Vemef-Ies-Bains" 

MODERN FRENCH PAINTINGS 
ROUAULT * GAUGUIN * MATISSE 

Renoir - Lautrec - Picasso 
Dufy - Vuillard - Bonnard 

Dalzell Hatfield Galleries 

Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles 



FRENCH & CO, 

• N C <) W P (' (; A T c l> 

onc of thc World 's 

most extensive and distin^uished 

collections of art 



210 EAST 5 7th ST., NEW YORK 



PAUL VALLOTTON 



s.o. 



LAUSANNE 

6 Gd. Chene - Switzerland 

PAINTINGS 

XIX and XX Century 



(MHinKcs, and iiii^lu seiAc as clciora- 
lions in uhranioderii officcs. No emo- 
tional (ontcnt scciiis lo lia\(' bccn 
iiitcnded. R. p. 

* * # 

r^TCK SiARK. j)lasti( siir^eoii-dini- 
paintcr. is iicilhcr a priniili\i' nor 
a j)ror('ssi()naI. IIowcNcr. Iic is probabh- 
nol stii\insj; to bc ciilici. I)ui sinijih to 
transniit his picasuic in thc coniposi- 
tions lorniecl by figurcs oiouprd in a 
l)asc'ball (bij^out, leanin^ into thc rain, 
workiiio (Hit at thc "j^yni '. Cubaii sccncs 
coniplcment tlic laniiliar siibjerts. His 
pcnchant b)r long horizontal canvases 
suggcsts an annahlc and Icisuiclv view, 
as do his liirht. simple colors. At ihe 
Ward l.oglcston Ciallcrv. April 8th to 

^^<^^J^. A. H. L. 

# * «* 

JKANM. Kronman's ( ubist-( rvstalliue 
oil painiings, ai thc Chase Gallcry 
Startino April ir>, are oec asionallv dra- 
inati( senii-absiradions of strurtures, 
su(h as thc brokcn-down picr in T/ie 
Clun-iK Icr of tlir Connmniity. A cokl, 
wintry niood doniinates Janunry Tlunc; 
thc brioht /iynroit.s hifnisiof? secms to 
(Jttdi a rock) inountain in the act of 
niotion. j^ p 

* * * 

T^). .\K^(>rl)-KA^sl k knows how to siig- 
gcst deep Space with horizontal 
and verti(al lines and a few deltlv iii- 
trodueed hobt tones. Rendering the 
stylized skeleton of the thcnie, her 
(i/iost l'lccl is espccially hlic itous. The 
intcrwo\en calligraphy of Xightfall 
expresses thc darkcning- of the skv inid 
(rcates a niood of traiujuillitv. At the 
Pictrantonio Gallcry. (rntil April 15) 

R. F. 

* * • 



\ xxn; TaNNv's work (at the \Vard 
^ ^ Kgok'ston (;allcries April 22nd to 
May 4th) niight be ralled genrc iiature 
l^ajnting. Jjcr sensitivity' to anthro- 
poniorphie moods in nature perniits 
her to cxpress, for exaniple. thc lusty 
hopcfnlncss of blossoming hin't-trccs 



[56] 



i)l()\\ing against bright sun in spiing. 
l'^xcepi whcre thcy arc adjuiuts to the 
Avoiid of landscapc, as are the (lots of 
iittle figiires wbecling o\('i a inoonlit 
skating j)on(L her liguics are duller 
^chi{le^. A. ß. L. 



T^ Aiui-Sii knk's first one -man show at 
^^ thc ßurr (iallery in( Indes ihirty 
oils. mainly lealistic landscape>. Ihc 
(oloi is bright and bea\ily a[)j)lied. A 
Si( iliaii Street sccnc (onvevs animation 
in more restrained color. Hei \cw 
^'ork vicws aie less su((Cssful than her 
Knropean scenes, wbidi are stated with 
\cr\v and assurance. H. 1). M. 



Ti<\L\(. Nlrick frankly cnjoys pietur- 
es(pic Street (orners, trees, loofs, the 
winding River Seine and otlicr subjctts 
t\|)i(al of France, with a lone fimire 
hcre and therc. liuc de Tours is pcr- 
ha[)s thc most solid of these nostalgic 
oils shown at the (Jiase Ciallerv initil 

April \1\. R. F. 

* • • 

T 1 ANDRo Dii.cADo cxliibits water- 
^^ colors for the first timc, at the Lynn 
Kottier Cialleiies Irom April 15 to 27. 
Dune (lud Sra and Hiiih Point are well 
constiucted and sj)ontaneous but all 
these acjuarellcs lack textural differen- 
tiation. Sk\. sand, water and houses are 
all done in the same licjuid niainier. 

R. F. 

# # # 

Maiilyn klcinman, Adrieinic (iamilli 
and Bcrincc Winn, showing at the 
Bnrr Galler\, arc intercsting Student 
talents, not fully arrivcd. Klcinman's 
(ity baekyard in subdued colors shows 
subtlety of liandling. A Wnice seene 
of gondolas silhouetted against thc 
lagooii by (iainilli revcals a scnsc of 
the pic turescpic, but its promisc is not 
dcNclopcd. U'inn, a niore real ist ic 
])ainter, uscs \ew \'()rk (iit\ motifs, 
and is inclined to oxerstate her ihcine 
in glaring color. All show the influcnce 



[57] 




PORTRAITS, INC. 

PORTRAIT CENTER OF AMERICA 

l^r. F 5^TK STREET, NEW YORK 
f.ors Shaw Helen Appi.eton Read 



I JULIUS LOWY 

Frame & Rcstoriii^ Co., 
Inc. 

F'Eninn fr/\ml'j 
nE.'iTnniNn 






l??n üi!i:iiiid All!,, IVi!w Yiiil. 

(Bet. 64Hi and 65th Streets) 
LE 5 - 5250 








NCIHI 

NlTDlNiG 

CULP^TUl^ 



of the 19th & 20tli Centuries 

FINE ARTS ASSOCIATES 

41 East 57th St. (I6th floor) N.Y. 



PENNA. ACADEMY of FINE ARTS 

PAINTING - SCULPTURE 
MURAL - ILLUSTRATION 



Scholarships (European Study) 
Degrees 

Write: R. K. ENTENMANN 
Broad and Cherry. Phila. 2, Pa. 






JOHN 



JOHN 



JÄCüL 

April 6 - 26 




R©©K 

April 27 - May 16 

Kanegis Callery 

134 Newbury Street. Boston. Mass. 



modern and 

traditional 

frames 

expert 
restoring 




ol llicii ;il)li' (c'iuluT. fciin Lihcrtc. 

II. I). M. 

# # # 

^T^O lU. RIMI Wl'.I) M Xr MONI II l)C( aiisc 

tlu' wölk \\;is not ;i\ail;il)lc* in tiiiic 
loi- |)rcvicA\ iiij4 in tliis issuc: W'illiaiii 
(.i<)|)j)cr at llu" A.CA.: "Myslicai Paini- 
iiijL's" at thc liuii; Maiini ;it TIr- (>)1i- 
triiiporaric's; (ili;iiiii (iross at Dunxcii- 
(iraliain: Laiiskov at Kinc Alts Associ- 
ates: Xccron at Rose Kricd's: 1 rccxani 
at [olm llcllci (.alk'i\: II. l,;iii(' ;i( 
Kciiiu'dx's: [oliii llclikcrat Kraiisliaai: 
"(iood Diawino" ;it ilic Midtown: 
Roiiauli paintin^s, Knia W'cill sddp- 
tuic at S( hoiuinans: Kciiipc and Oni 
doi 11 at tJR' Wciloiis: (iaficdo ;it tlu' 
/odia( : scuiptmc l)\ S\l\ia S. [iidson 
;it tlic Sddpimc (iciitti: pii/c ;i\\ard 
sliow al tlu- l*cii and Üiush: Diuuliol 
iit ilu' ncAvK opcncd [nstcr (.;ill('r\: 
(ilaudc X'isc'iix ;it I .co (iastclii's: Marcel 
S;ilinas ;it ihc Ihniniicr (i;ill('r\. 



JJ. 



em an 



d fixere 



D 



i iRoii. Mr. and Mis. lUniv Ford 
II h;i\(' niadc tluir first <^ilt ol ;i 
wölk ol alt to tlic Dciroil Institute ol 
Alts, a Rcnihraiidt piiintint^ cxccutcd 
l)\ tlic aitist in his pciik and latc 
pciiod. (ialk'd .7 Woinan MV'r/;/;/«^. tlic 
siiiall pi( tnrc is onc loi whidi his niaid 
I Icndric k jt' Siollcls poscd. Oiily 8i<> x 



WASH DRAWINGS BY 



April 9-27 

CARSTAIRS GALLERY 

11 East 57th Street New York City 

[58] 



()i., " in si/c. tliis poriiait biinj^s thc 
Detroit Institute ol .\its eollection ol 
Renibrandt paintinf»s to a total of six. 
Mrs. Ford receiitly accepted a position 
as a I'nistee oi the Detroit Museum ol 
Art Founders Society, an organi/ation 
whidi (ontrihiitcs in lar^e part to thc 
Institutc's su|)port. I he Ford laiiiily 
have h)r iiianv years been iin|)ortant 
(ontrihutors to thc ninscinn. 



* 



* 



XTi.wARK. N. f. ''Early Xc'W Jersey 
^^ Artist s'\ an exhihition ol paintin^ 
and sdilpturc hy artists who lived and 
worked in New Jersey during the 18th 
and 19th (cnturics, is an iniportant 
exhihition ;it thc Nevvark Museum. 

I hrough extensive research over 1000 
iiames of New Jersey artists have been 
uncovcred. and works by more than 

100 of these. most of which arc oii 
loan, are shown in the exhihition whidi 
is ini|)ortant not only as an extensive 
|)iesentation of cxaniples of these ar- 
tists. but also as a (ontribution to 



VAN DIEMEN-LILIENFELD 



GALLERIES 



21 E. 57 St.. N. Y. C. 



Madeleine RUPERT I 



To AprÜ 12 



ANNIE 



ART STUDENTS 
LEAGUE OF N. Y. 

announces Summer Schools in 

Woodstock. N. Y.. and 

New York City 

June 3 — August 30. 1957 

fwsfructors In Woodstock 

Arnold Blanch 

Edward Chavei (July only) 

Zygnnunt Menkes (August only) 

Frank J. Reilly 

/nstructors in New York 



Charles Aiston 

Richard Bov6 

Dagmar Freuchen 



Morris Kantor 
Bernard Klonis 
Frank J. Reilly 



dra wing /painting 

illustration anatomy 

fashion illustration 

PULL OR PART TIME REGISTRATION 
Write er phone for free catalogue 

Stewart Klonis, Director 

215 W. 57th. N.Y.C. Circle 7-4510 



LEN N E YMARINI 



Paintings April 22 - May 4 

Ward Eggleston Calleries 

969 Madison Avenue (at 76th Street) 



THE CONTEMPORARIES 

992 MADISON AVENUE AT 77 STREET 



molcolm gordon 



cils - pencils 



ANDERSON 

PIETRANTONIO 

2i East 84th Street April 16-30 



CLEVELAND 



Institute of Art 



»KOriiilOMÄi/ 

Training/ h 



[59] 



MAGRITTE 



+hru 



Apis lOLAS • 123 E. 55 



NEJAD 



fhru 



Apr6 ZODIAC • 123 E. 55 



ROBERT April 9 -30 

ICE YSER 

parma 

gallery im Lexington Ave. 

BURR CALLERY ^p;'" 

- May 4 
108 W. 56 ST.. N. Y. 19 

Marilyn KLEINMAN 
Bernice WINN 

Adrienne CAMILLI 



MAY 



Paintings 

HEILOMS 

April 8-20 

Petite Galerie '"^c" 



ERNESTO 



Ist N. Y. Showing 



TRECCANI 

jchn heller «^^llery 

' 63 E. 57. N. Y. 



know Icdoc oi tlic hisioiN ol New [t-rsey 
;iit. Works l)v siuli notcd artists as 
Asiur 1). Dmaiid. [oliii (. Aiiduhon, 
(icorjL»!' liiiu'ss. William Raniity. 
W'oi thiii^lon \\'himc'(l,nc'. pispcr (Irop- 
scv. Roheit W. W'cir, (icoioc Catlin. 
IlcniN limian and [olni Walson aic* 

iiKliuicd. (() iianu' a [vw. 

* * * 

\ ^\\siii\(, ION. 1). C. I he National 
(.ailciN ol Art has accjuiicd toi its 
pciiiiancnt (ollcdiou a maslcipircc l)v 
Oo\a. du- lidl-lcn^th. lilt-si/c portrait 
ol \'i(tor (iiiyc, wliidi. tliiou^Ii tlic 
( oin tt SN ol thc lu'iis ol |. Iloiact- llard- 
ino. has bccn on loaii at tlic (.allrrv 
siiKc l!)l(). Ihitil aboiit \\)\:\ \\\v pi(- 
tmi' rciiiaiiK'd in tlic sitttr's taniilv. 
SiiKc dun it has hccn show n in a 
inniibcr ol iinpoitant cxhihitions. It 
iiow han^s in Cialk'iv (il ol thc Na- 
tional (ialkr\. IIr' j)aintinj^ was Kpro- 
(hi(((I on ))a,t^c 10 ol thc .Nhinh W)')! 
issiic ol Pi(hn('s on Exhihit. 



FRED 



MESSERSMITH 



First Showing 



April \-\3 



barzansky galleries 

1071 madison avenue at 81 st. 



DAY April 2-20 

SCHNABEL 

SCU LPTU RE 

BETTY PARSONS 

Gallery • 1 5 E- 57 St.. N.Y.C. 



B. ARNOLD-KAYSER 

April 1-15 

PIETRANTONIO 

26 E. 84 St., New York 



/^isi\A. An i n l (• 1 n a l ioiia 1 cxhi- 

hitioii. "All and I.aboin". is bcing 
orj>aiiist'(l in (iciu-xa this sininiui bv 
thc International Labonr Organisation 
on the (Hcasion ol tlie 2r)lh ainiiversarv 
ol the death ol Albert I hoinas. thc 
first ILO Dircetor. M. (icorgcs Sallcs, 
I)irc( toi-C.cneral ol I'kiuIi Miisciinis 
and President ol the International 
Comuil ol Museum, will preside over 
thc Organ isinj^ Clommittcc, with Dr. 
R()cll, I)irc( tor ol the Rijks-nmseuni ot 
Amsterdam and M. Pierre lioulfard. 
Dircetor ol the (iene\a Musee d'Art et 
d'llistoiic, as members. 

J he (;enc\a c ity aiithoritics are co- 
operating a\ ith thc ILO in oiganisino 
thc exhibition whieh will bc hcld in 
tlu' (ity's Musec d'Art et d'Histoirc. 
Ihe exhibition will bring together Ibr 
thc first tinic oil paintings. ^vatcr 
colours, drawings. engravings. sculp- 
tmes and dccorativc works Ironi all 
parts ol thc world depieting human 
toil. ILO Dircctor-Gcneral David A. 



The DOWNTOW^^Mc 

* f * G A L L E R Y , c 

32 East Bist Street New York 
Edith Gregor Holpert, Dfrector 



DAVIS 

DOVE 

KARFIOL 

KUNIYOSHI 

MARIN 



O'KEEFFE 

SHAHN 

SHEELER 

SPENCER 

WEBER 



ZORACH 

WM. HARNETT (1848-1892) 

AMERICAN FOLK ART 



WILLIAM 

GROPPER 

Recent Paintings 

April 22 -May 11 

ACA CALLERY • 63 E. 57 



CONSUELO 



April 8-29 



ELIZABETH Y. April! -I3 _ ^^ 

TASIHIJIDAIN C L O O S 

oils - postels - drawings 

LYNN KOTTLER GALLERIES 



3 East 65 St., N. Y. 



cadan gallery 

150 EAST 78 Weekds. 10-5, Sun. 3-6 



HARRY LANE 

NATURE PAINTINGS 

to April 20 

Kennedy Galleries * 785 Fifth Ave. 



LEANDRO April 15-27 

delcäd© 

WATERCOLORS 

LYNN KOTTLER GALLERIES 

_ 3 EAST 65 ST. 



E. & A. SILBERMAN 

GALLERIES. INC. 

1014 MADISON AVENUE 
NEW YORK 21 



PAUL 



Paintings 



BRACH 

April 15 - May 4 

LEO CASTELLI - 4 E. 77 2-6 p.m 



[ r.() ] 



[61] 



< PAINTINGS OF PARIS 

I IRVING 



NURICK 

April 1-13 

PAINTINGS BY 



Morse h;is invitcd ihc OrgiUiisalion's 
scvciily-scvcn incnibcr (oiiiitiits to louii 
works ol ;nt to tliis t'\hil)ii. 



JEANNE 



C 



• • • 
^hi(;a(;(). In cclcbialioii ol ils TjOiIi 



KRONMAN 

April 15-27 

1 CHASE CALLERY » 

21 EAST 63. N. Y. 



thru April 27 



RIVERON 

SUDAMERICANA 

866 Lexington Ave. (65 St.) 



Masterworks of ^ 

ÄNCDilMT V 

Pil^y 4fh.l4fh Cent. ^^1 

DELACORTE GALLERY 

822 Madison Ave. at 69th Sf.. N. Y. 

\ 



annivcrsary, thc Pic'rj)()iit Morji^aii 
Library ol New York lias seilt on toiir 
ol thc IJnilcd States, lor tbe first tinie, 
an exhibitioii eoiisistinj» ot 108 mag- 
nificent art oi)je(ts. selectecl to sliow 
llie ian,i;e and (juality ol the library's 
eollection. I/he exhibition, "l'reasines 
Ironi tlie Pierpont Morgan Library," is 
])eing hold at the Art Institute here 
tbron^h April 10. 

* * « 

TJousroN. Mr. (ieorge \V. Staeni|)lli, 
(iurator ol the Museum ol I'ine 
Arts ol Houston. Houston. 'lexas. has 
l)een appointed C^oordinator ol the 
Line Arts I*roj;^rani in the Ollue ol the 
U. S. (>)inniissi()ner Cieneral to the 
Brussers W^orld's Fair. Mr. Staeniplli 
will direct with the assistance ol a 
rnnnnittee ol American Museuni direc- 



PAINTINGS 



ERNA WEILL 

SCULPTURES 

April 23 - May 15 

SCHONEMAN • 63 E. 57 



ELIZABETH 



HONDIUS iükNCER 



+0 April 13 

BABCOCK GALLERIES 
805 Madison Avenue (68th St.) N. Y. 



April 15-27 

BODLEY GALLERY 223 e. 60 



GALLERY 32 E 65 



TÄM 

To April 13 
NEW WORK from April 15 



WATERCOLORS & GOUACHES 
April 2-27 

Charles E. MARTIN 
RUTH WHITE CALLERY 



42 EAST 57th ST. 



N.Y.C. 



[62] 



\ 



tors, the American fine arts program 

at next \ear's exj)osition in lUlgiinn. 

# # * 

\Jiav ^()RK. "Rirds and Reasts". a 
'^ show ol animals in prints which 
has opened in the third floor Print 
(iailerv ol the Public Librarvs Filth 
A\eime biniding. Covers six c entin ies 
ol print-making and most members ol 
the animal kingdom. Beginning with 
early niasters like Dürer and (danach, 
the show langes up through tinie to 
inclucle the uork ol VVencelaus Hollai, 
fohann Ridingei, Cioya, Delacroix, 
I'oulouse - Lautrec, Honnard Picasso, 
Kokoschka, and Antonio Frasconi. 
K\'ery lorni ol print is represented. 

Karl Kuj), (lurator ol the Print ( Col- 
lect ion, who arranged the displax. was 
j)roni|)ted to do this exhibition by the 
üieat \ariet\ he lound in aitists' coii- 
ceptions ol animals. "I1ie selection ol 
the se\c'iity-n\c' prints shown was niacle 
j)inc'lv Oll the basis of illustrating dil- 
lereiucs ol c onccplion," he states. 



MAURICE 

BECKER 

April I - May 4 

HARTER! «f, h^,'»i^* 



ROBERT D. April 15-27 

McBCniNIINIiY 

OILS 

LYNN KOTTLER GALLERIES 

3 EAST 65 ST. 

Jaen isch 

NEW OILS • April 22 - May 18 

KLEEMANN 11 E. 68 



Group Exhibition 



March 19 -April 15 



NORTH & SOUTH AMERICANS 

Rainung, by & EÜROPEANS 



Bertrand • Damianovich 
Doucet • Kiley • Miranda 
Nangeroni • Robbins 
Schaar • Verbrugghe 



Wood carvings by 
EDWARD LANDON 



MELTZER GALLERY - 38 W. 57 



CLAUDE 



First American Showing 



VISEUX 

thru April 13 

LEO CASTELLI - 4 E. 77 2 6 p m 

JUDSON 



SYLVIA 
SHAW 



April I - 30 



Sculpture Center 1 6? e. 6?, n 



. Y. 




BURR CALLERY ,^';; 

108 W. 56 ST.. N. Y. 19 

PAINTINGS 

DAHLI-STERNE 



XCERON 

COMING: BERNARD CHILDS 

ROSE FRIED • 40 E. 68 



= DICK 



STARK 

Paintings April 8 - 20 

Ward Eggleston Galleries 

969 Madison Ave. (at 76 Street) 



[63] 



jl 



PAINTINGS 
April 8 - 27 



SHAW 



PASSEDOIT '" ' "• **' ^ 



bef. Park & Lexington 






UiLHJX Galle] 

««:i Fiflh Ave., IVew York 
(I>lear S4ih St.) 








W^^ 




new 



April 9-27 



print 
acquisitions 



DEITSCH C ALLER Y 

51 EAST 73rd STREET, N. Y. 



ALFRED 

RUSSELL 

recent painfings 

to April 13 

DUVEEN- 
" 1 GRAHAM 

1014 MADISON AVE., N. Y. 



APRIL EXHIBITIOIVS 
IN NEW YORK CITY 

(Continued from inside front cover) 

PARKK-BERNET, 980 Madison Ave. 18th and 
Eaily liith Century En«Iish Art Ohjects, 
April r).12 ; Arms and Arrnor, April 12-17; 
French Furnitui-e and Decorations, April 
13-KS ; isth Centuiy French Paintin^K, Riips, 
Silver, etc., April 2()-2<). 

PARMA, IUI Lexinfffon Ave. R. Keyaer 
Ai)ril U-lii), 

PARSONS, lö E. 57 St. I). Schnabel. April 
^'^':i^^J^- 'l'»>''"'-' r>- Stuini. from April 22. 
PASSEDOIT, 121 E. 57 St. M. Siovan. to April 

<) ; C. Shaw, April S-27 : J. M. Hanson, from 

April 29. 

PEN AND BRIJSH. 1« E. 10 St. (Iroup Show 

ot Oils : to Apiil «1; Prize Award Show, 

April 14-30. 
PETITE. 129 W. .-,« St. J. S. Snmrt. to April 

« ; M. Heilonis, April S.20 ; F. Bosc, April 

22 - May 4. 

PIETRANTONIO, 2« E. 84 St. Kayser, April 

l-lf); Anderson, A|>ril \V>-'M). 
PERLS, 1016 Madison Ave. P. A. Rubel Col- 

lection, to April 13; Modern French Paint- 

inpfs from April 1.'). 

PORTRAITS, INC., 13« E. 57 St. Contempor- 

ary Portraits. 
PUBLIC LIBRARY, Fifth Avenue and 42 St. 

Henri, to April i:, ; Prints of "Birds and 
Beasts." 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, 10 Seventh Ave. So. A. 

(Juerin, April 4-3(». 
REHN, 683 Fifth Ave. Watercolors, to April 
12; (Ii-oup. from Apiil 15. 



Prize Award Exhibifion 

CLARA HAAS 

WATERCOLORS 

EDNA P. STAUFFER 

(Memorial) 

GRAPHICS 

April 14-30 
PEN & BRUSH 16 E. 10. N. Y. 



CANEDO 

Paintings and Drawings 

April 8 - April 27 

ZODIAC GALLERY 

123 East55 Street 



f 



)-i 



RIVERSIDE MUSEUM, 310 Riverside Drive. 

"Cialleiy '27A\". to April 21. 

K()SENBER(;, 2(1 E. 79 St. F. Farr Sculi)ture. 
Ai)ril M - May 4. 

SAIDENBERG, 10 E. 77 St. S. lUow. \V. (iear. 

to Aixil () ; Lynn Chadwick Sculpture, Ai)ril 

>s - May 4. 
SAVOY, 5 E. 59 St. Old Master Drawinps, 

April 30 - May 3. 
SCHONEMAN. 63 E. 57 St. Rouault Palnt- 

in^s, E. Weill. Sculpture. fiom Aj.iil 23. 
SCULPTURE CENTER. 1<;7 E. 69 St. S. S. 

Judson Sculpttiro, April 1-30. 
SILBERMAN, 1014 Madison Ave. OhI and 

Modern Masters. 
SUDAMERICANA. 8r,6 Lexin'-ton Ave. V. 

Zanctti. to Ainil 6 ; K. Rivcrcjn. April S-27. 
WEAR, 43« Madison Ave. P. Mark, to April pi. 
VAN DIEMEN-LILIEM ELD, 21 E. 57 St. M. 

Ruperti, to Apiil 12 ; M. Padun. from April 

21' 
WELLONS, 17 E. «4 St. M. Kanii>e. Sculi)ture. 

to Apiil 13; C. Orndorir. to April 13; Ful- 

brij-'.ht Sculi)tors, April lö-Mav 4. 
VVEVHE, 794 Lexington Ave. R. Poz/atti. to 

April 10 ; (Iroui). Ai)ril 1 1-30. 
RUTH WHITE. 42 E. 57 St. C. Martin. April 

2-27. 
WHITNEY MUSEUM. 22 W. 54 St. • Younk' 

America", to April 14 ; H. Hofmann Reti-o- 

spective. 
WIDDIFIELD, 818 Madison Ave. X. (;onzalez, 

to Apiil 20. 
WILDENSTEIN. 19 E. «4 St. Old and Modern 

Masteis. 
WORLD HOUSE, 987 Madison Ave. Piancusi. 

(JauK'uin and Rodin. 
ZODIAC. 123 E. 55 St. Nejad. to April G; A. 

Canedo, Apiil 8-27. 



thron gh April 20 



8 Americans 



Sidney Janis • 15 E 57 



ABSTRACT ART 

BEFORE COLUMBUS 

April 15 - May 31 

ANDRE EMMERICH 
GALLERY 

18 East 77. N. Y. 1 1 to 6 



EXHIBITION 
April 2 -27 



Cood 
Dra wi n g 

MIDTOWN 

&ALLERIES • A. D. Gruskin. Dir. 

17 East 571h Street, New York City 



KAVIER 

GONZALEZ 

RFCFNT PAINTINGS 

thru April 20 

MARTIN WIDDIFIELD 

GAMERY O 818 Madison Ave, N. Y. 



BERRY-HILL 


C a 1 1 e r i e s | 


PETO 1 

TROMPE L'OEIL AND D 
STILL LIFE PAINTINGS | 

Exliibition through April 

743 Fifth Avenue. N. Y. 22 



American Debüt 

MARCEL 

SALINAS 

April 16-27 

HAMMER GALLERIES 

51 E. 57 ST., N. Y. 



{ 61 ] 



JUSTER CALLERY 




"Consolafion" 



Opening Exhibition: 

PAINTINGS BY 



DAUCHOT 

Represented in Many Important 
French and American Collections 



THROUGH APRIL 



154 EAST 79th STREET 



NEW YORK 21 



Hours: 1 1 f o 5 



Tel.: TR 9- 1007 




NEWSLETTER 



"11- r " » '4 



I 
t 

f 



NEW YORK SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN 
887 First Avenue, N.Y. 22,N.Y. 
Muriel Po Turoff, President 



? 
f 

f 

? 



May 11, 1957 



< » . i ' 1 1 •-* 



I ;:i .: . • 



ANMJAL 
MEETING 



The nev officers and Board were unanimously elected from the slate. They 



are 



CHAIRMEN'S 
REPORTS 



President: 

Ist Vice-President: 

2nd Vice-President: 

Treasurer: 

Corresponding Secy: 

Directors 2 
until 1958 

until 1959 • 
until i960 



Muriel Pc Turoff 
Vina Sarti 
Bernard Fischer 
Allen Syms 
Margaret Sussman 



Billy Bacharach; Charlotte Kizer, Oppi Untracht 

E, Byrne Livingston, Hans E. Prehn, George E. Wells 

Joan Zimet, Suzanne Pushman, Arthur Strom 



Jüan Zimet thanked all who assisted her this year and expressed hope that 
plans for a merger of the two Societies would be immediately considered 
by the new Board. Alice Gundelfinger^ on behalf of all^ expressed thanks 
to Joan on her fine leadershipo 

Exhibition Coinmittee by Rose Krebs and Anne De Carrael: 21^ pieces were 
shown by 97 craftsmeno Total expenses were $2^306.00 and the total in- 
come $518, leaving a combined total expense of $1,788.00^ or $894.00 
per Society^ which was raore than the planned allotment. At the time this 
report was given^ it was not entirely completeo Therefore, the overall 
cost may be expected to be somewhat greatero 

Membership Committee . The following new members were accepted. A warm 
welcome is extended to them, and we hope they will participate in our 
work with interest and enthusiasm. 



Kate Auerbach 

360 Central Park West 

N.YoCo Ri 9-2053 
Texture corapositions 

Lore Garrick Le 4-2231 
169 Eo 96 Sto N.Y.C* 
Jewelry 

Myra Jedwabnik 

130 Wo 57 Sto N.YoCc 

Enamel Ci 5-6962 

So Magnet Knapp 
106-82 Drive 
Forest Hills, NoY. 
Enamel Li U-5183 



.,i|r M T it^-,' ;• 



Elizabeth Reynolds, Le 5-91^0 
955 Lexington Ave., N.Y.C* 
Ceramics 

Emily Rose Re i^-ii710 Pottery 
520 E. 86 St,, N.YoC* 

Vivienne Sokol Mu 5-3725 Ceramics 
350 E. 30 St., NcY.C. 

Muriel Zimmerman En 2-8082 
110 W. 86 St., N.Y.Co 
Enamel & Tapestry 

Tini Pollak PI 7-71^2 Jewelry 
eh W. kb Sto, N.YoC. 



Jury . Phyllis Blundell reported on the Exhibition jurying and recommended 
that a better system be set up with more available Jurors including at 
least two in each category. It was generally feit that it should be re- 
quired of altemate Jurors to be present at the exhibition jurying. 



2. 



AMOUNCEMENTS 



SPECIAL 

TRAVELLING 

EXHIBIT 



MERGER 



MESSAGE FROM 
THE NEW 
PRESIDEM' , 
MURIEL P« TUROFF 



Mr. Hathaway was offered a choice of any one or more pieces from the show 
up to a total of $50.00 for the Cooper Union Museum 's collect! on. This 
was in appreciation of their hospitality. Mr. Hathaway graciously ex- 
pressed his thanks. He chose three pieces among which was a bowl with 
aventurine glaze by Anne De Carmel. 

Kate Auerbach and Priscilla Porter will represent our Society at the forth- 
coming Craftsmen's Conference at Asilomar, Cal. The sum of $18.00 each 
was voted for them as delegate's expenses. We wish them a joyful trxp, 
and will eagerly await their detailed reports. 

For Silver smiths ; The Sterling Silversmith Guild of America is sponsor- 
ing its first desi'in competition called "Sterling Today," Awards will be 
made for outstanding designs as follows: $500.00 first prize, $250.00 
second prize, $150.00 third prize, and four hon. raention prizes of $50.00 
each. Deadline is June iHh. Write for entry forms to Sterling Silver- 
smiths of America, 551 Fifth Avenue, N,Y.C. 

Arthur L. Strom 's plans for "Craftsmen Today", the travelling exhibit 
arranged for the N, Y. City Hi.gh Schoo.Ts, have already been launched. 
Accompanying this newsletter are detailed Information and forms. Fill 
them in and return promptly as instructed. We expect some fine publicity 
on this projecto 

Bernard Fischer reported the members of his Committee on Merging the two 
Societies are Adda Husted-Andersen, Phyllis Blundell, Alice Gradelfinger 
and Charlotte Keyser, They have had one Joint meeting with the Merger 
Committee of the Ceramic Society so far, and expect to meet agaxn m the 
near future to organize their facts for presentation to their respective 
Boards. A show of hands was asked to indicate whether we were interested 
in merging. There were l6 in favor, one opposed and 6 abstamed. A motion 
that the same members continue to serve on the Merger Commir^tee ujatil fur- 
ther notice was seconded and carried. The members present were asked 
whether they favored another Joint exhibition next year, ind.ependent of 
the merger o The majori ty were not in favor. 

"It is gratifying to know that I have your confidence. 

I'm accepting this Job, fully aware of the time-consuming burdens attached 
to it. For me this will be a year dedicated to administration. Let us 
face it; anyone in the presidency lias little time left for craftworK. 



I will try to administrate creatively for the best interests of all 



our 



members 



However, we must understand that our Organisation, like any obner, is a 
Plural phenomenon. It is not an artlficial person, nor is it your body of 
officerso It is all of us combined. Controv jrsies may arise, but we are 
all agreed that we must have a crafts Organization, and that we want to 
strengthen and perpetuate it. 

Understand yourself in relation to your Organization. Yo-or attltudes and 
thinking are directly related to the success or failure of our Society. 
We must all work together for the common good.. An Organization can be as 
strong as its members are willing to make it. Our greatest weakness has 
been that too often, the few have done the greatest amount of work, and 
given the greatest amount of time, often to the dissatisfaction of the many 



3. 

The past year has been a difficult one» We all owe Joan Zimet a deep 
measure of gratitude for holding on to the wheel at a time of crisis; the 
more so^ since Joan herseif was beset with a multitude of family difficul- 
ties. She deserves a big liand. 

It shall be the aim of your new officers to strengthen our organizational 
procedures so that we can depend on them for smooth Integration. As little 
margin as possible should be left for organizational troubles in times of 
crises. Organizational patterns will be established to make wide partici- 
pation simple for new members as well as oldo Coinmittees and chairmen 
must understand their functions and interdependence clearly; and what is 
very important, follow through on the ever evolving decisions as they 
arise. 



Your officers are ready to give their best^ but in return we shall expect 
from you the broadest possible participation and Cooperation. Our rela- 
tionship has to be a two-way street. Only thus will we grow. The Coming 
year may well be one of the most exciting years in our history. There is 
talk of a merger with the Ceramic Society. The visionaries among us are 
ready to. juinp in^ certain that it will work. The hard-headed^ practical 
ones among us say^ "We're from Missouri. First show us concretely that it 
will work^ and then maybe we will say yes." All this is healthy. We need 
the fiery visionaries^ as well as the restraining hard heads. Perhaps from 
these healthy tensions will be born a new^ combined Society which v7ill 
proudly live up to the philosophy expressed by Mr. Tibbs of the Contempor- 
ary Grafts Museum: that there is no division between the fine crafts and 
the fine arts. 



We shall look to our eiders for the benefit of their experience and wisdom^ 
and we will call on the younger members to contribute the spark and fresh- 
ness of their ideas . Let our Slogan for the year be„^ Participation and 
Cooperation^ and let us have faith in ourselves; for as Samuel Butler once 
Said, "You can do very little with faith, but you can do noxhing without 
it." 



NEWS OF 
MEMBERS 



■••"•^■»-«p" 



Glass by Maurice Heaton was shown at^^Ohio State University, Columbus, 0. 
in April. He will serve on the panel of the Conference of American CraftS' 
men at Asilomar^ California. 

Dorothy Fish is exhibiting at the Wichita Annual, at Wichita, Kansas. 

Oppi Untracht is showing enamels and Louis Mendez ceramics at the Willow, 
182 W. ^4- St. from May 2 to I8. 

Following members exhibited at the 19th Ceramic National at Syracuse: 
Kenneth Bates, Maurice Heaton, Margaret Israel, Phyllis Blundell, Estelle 
Halper, Margot Kempe, Hui Ka Kwong, Louis Mendez, Priscilla Porter, Rose- 
mary Taylor, Madeleine Vermes, and James Crumrine« 

Erna Weill is having a one-man show of sculpture at the Schoneman Gallery, 
63 E. 57 St. tili May I6. She also takes part in a group show on the Art 
of Judaism at the Newark Museum tili June l6th. 

A tape recording about the Joint Exhibition was made by Anne De Carmel for 
the U. S. Voice of America. It will be sent to Austria, 

Margot Kempe had a one-man show at the Wellons Gallery in April* 

Angela Tully exhibited at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts from Dec. 28, 
1956 to Feb. 2k, 1957. 



1^. 

Following members had work in the ppening exhibition of the Museum of Con- 
temporary Grafts^ which show is now being circulated by the American Fed- 
eration of Arts: Paul Lobel, James Crumrine, Adda Husted Andersen, Hui Ka 
Kwong, and George Wells. 

George Wells is also represented by two rugs in the Wall Hanging and Rüg 
Exhibition currently at the Museum of Contemporary Grafts. 

Charlotte Malten is having a one-man shov at Brentano 's this month. 

Two members von awards at the Miami Annual. James Grumrine received Honor- 
able Mention for Ceramics and Louis Mendez Honorable Mention for Sculpture. 



The Newsletter Editor has no facilities for gathering inf ormation on mem- 
bers' activities. Please co-operate, therefore, by sending your news in 
care of the Society. 



NEWSLETTER 



New York Society of Ceramic Arts 
tiOO E. 59th St., New York 22, N. Y. 
Freda Zuend, President 

i — l Uli — — — p— »—— »— »»fc»^»i^— i^ . I . — «M«p— W*^— »— P— ^^— ■■— ^»^ü^W— 



MNUAL MEETING 



Friday, May lOth, 1957. at 8 P.M. 

N.Y. Genealogical & Biographical Society, 

122 East 58th St., New York City 



EXHIBITION 



A füll report on the exhibition will be given at the 
May lOth meeting. We would, however, like to take this 
opportunity to express our appreciation to the many 
people who worked so untiringly to make it the beautiful 
Show that it is. Our sincere thginks to: 

Calvin S. Hathaway, Director of the Cooper Union Museum 
for the Arts of Decoration, Hedy Backlin, Keeper of 
Decoration Arts, and the staff of the Museum for their 
usual hospitality ajid Cooperation. 

Exhibition chairman Anne de Carmel and Billy Bacharach, 
Käthe Berl, Phyllis Blundell, Bea Groll, Gertrude 
Englander, Doris Klein, Roberta Leber, Hilda Hortens, 
Alice Gundelfinger, Charlotte Malten, Marion Minewski, 
Priscilla Porter, Suzanne Pushman, Margarita Socas, 
Muriel Turoff, Mar;:^^ Osborne, Oppi Untracht, and our 
President, Freda Zuend, for the many hours of theii' 
time and labor spent in the endless details that went 
into making the exhibition so lovely. 

Oppi Untracht for the fine catalog. 

The juries — Sculpture: Margot Kempe, Ellen Key-Oberg, 
Marianna Von Alles ch, Jane Wasey, Robert Cronbach and 
John Hovannes of Cooper Union Art School. Pottery: 
Dorothy Larsen, Charlotte Malten, Louis Mendez, Phyllis 
Blundell, Oppi Untracht, Albert Jacobson, Joseph Gre- 
banier and Mr. Calvin Hathaway. 

The demonstrators: Marge Israel, Margaret Sussman, Ilse 
Johnson, Robert Cronbach, Albert Jacobson and Louis 
Mendez. 

Publicity Chairman Hilda Hortens and those who worked 
with her. 

And while we are thanking people, may we say that the 
Society owes its most generous thanks to our President, 
Freda Zuend, who has given unsparingly of her time and 
energy. She has done a fine job, not only in her execu- 
tive capacity and in integrating all the various activi- 
ties, but also in generous ly assisting every committee 
with its work. 

There are 2l4 pieces in the show, representing the work 
of 97 exhibitors. There were a total of eleven members 



- 2 - 



PUBLICITY 



REMINDER 



MERGER COMMITTEE 



whose work vas totally rejected and at the final jurymg, 
approximately 135 were turned down. At the advance 
jurying, between 65 and 67 members submitted, of whom 
17 were rejected. 

Since the exhibition is still in progress, the report 
on Publicity, too, can only be partial and a fuller one 
will be presented at the May lOth meeting. Besides, so 
much work was done in this area that it would be impossible 
to Cover all of it in detail in this Newsletter. 

It Started with an advance press party on February 19th 
at the y.W.C.A., followed up with a release mailing to a 
list of more than a hundred editors, resulting in "otices 
in the exhibition calendars of such publications as Graft 
Horizons. Individual letters were written to editors 
of magazines; photographs and story material were sup- 
plied to trade magazines in the jewelry field, to decora- 
ting editors and art editors of the leading New York 
newspapers, to Long Island newspapers and cotnmunity news- 
papers . 

News releases on the exhibition were mailed to more than 
200 newspapers, news Services, news magazines, shelter 
magazines, trade magazines, radio and television programs. 

Posters promoting the exhibition were placed at Gooper 
Union, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Public 
Library (Main Branch at Fifth Avenue), Museum of Modern 
Art, Education Department, Graft Museum and Georg Jensen. 

About 1500 exhibition calendars were mailed by both 
Societies and an additional UOOO were mailed by Gooper 
Union to schools and Colleges, museioms, libraries, etc. 

Please call for pieces Tuesday, April 23rd, from 8 to 
9 P.M., or Wednesday, April 2Uth, 10 A.M. to 3 P-M. No 
insurance after that date. 

If you will refer to the minutes of the Membership Meet- 
ing of November 2nd, 1956, attached to the last Newsletter, 
you will note that it was the consensus of the meeting 
that a Joint exhibition be held, this to be entirely in- 
dependent of any question of merger, and that no further 
Steps be taken toward a merger until after the Joint 
exhibition at Gooper Union. 

Inasmuch as the exhibition was also to be considered 
experimental of Joint effort, no action has been taken 
by our committee to date, nor have the Joint committees 
met. As soon as possible, the merger committees will 
meet to evaluate the Situation and thereafter there will 
be a separate preliminary general meeting of our Society 
to give the general membership füll opportunity for 
free discussion. 



- 3 - 



NEW MEMBERS WELCOME i At a jurying held on February l6th^ the fcllow- 

ing new members were admitted to our Society: 

Robert L. Adams, 85 Morton Blvd,, Plainview, L.I.; K,Y. 

Käthe Berl, 19^^-7 Broadway, New York 23, N.Y. 

Sandra Ruth Brown, 1201 California Rd., Tuckahoe, N.Y. 

Arthur Floyd, 123 Rivington St., New York 2, N.Y. 

William Hoffman, I6 Jones St., New York 1^, N.Y. 

Virginia Briton Janes, U35 E. 79th St., New York 21, N.Y. 

Charlee Neubauer, llU E. Prospect Ave., Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 

Lilli Ann Killen Shore, 375 Riverside Drive, New York, N.Y. 

Helene Taterka, h^ E. 82nd St., New York, N.Y. 

Mrs. Sydney Taylor, 29 W. 6kth St., New York 23, N. Y. 

MEMBBRS' ACTIVITIES In addition to those who were listed in the last newsletter, 

the following members also were represented in the Syracuse 
Biennial: Phyllis Blundell, Edward Chandless, Joseph 
Grebanier, Estelle Halper, Maurice Heaton, Dorothy Larson 
Hotchkiss, Margot Kempe, Joseph Konzal, Walter and Mary 
Kring, Peter Lipman-Wulf, Louis Mendez, Margaret Israel, 
Polia Pillin, Priecilla Porter, Arpad Rcsti, Julius Taylor, 
Rosemary Taylor and Madeleine Vermes. Jacqueline Bartling, 
who is now at Newcomb College in New Orleans also exhibited 
and had one of her things selected to go on circuit. 

Ruth Vollmer had two ceramic reliefs on exhibit at the 
VillageArt Center in a sculpture show and was mentioned 
by Dori Ashton in the New York Times. 

Doris Klein exhibited in the show of the New Rochelle Art 
Association held in that City and won second prize. 

Erna Weill will have a one-man show of sculpture at the 
Schoneman Gallery, 63 East 57th St., New York City from 
April 23rd to May l6th. The work all has a religious 
theme and will be shown together with paintings by Rouault. 
She has also been invited to participate in a group show 
from April lOth to June l6th on the Art of Judaism to be 



held at the Newark Museum and will have three pieces 
that show. 



m 



Maurice Heaton has been invited to be on the panel of the 
first Conference of American Craftsmen at Asilomar in 
California to be held June 12-1^ this year. 



Please send all news items to editor, Bertha B. Mason, 
11 Hillcrest Avenue, Larchmont, New York. 



. V 



~ k - 



AGENDA FOR AMUAL KiEETING 
(Friday, May lOth, 1957, 8 P-M-) 



I I 



1. COMMITTEE REPORTS 



2 . EXHIBITION 



3. ELECTION 



SLATE 



The Nominating Committee, headed by Charlotte Malten, 
presents the following: 

President Joan Zafft 

Ist Vice-President Ellen Key-Oberg 

2nd Vice-President Gertrud Englander 

Treasurer --- - — -- Dorothy Jervis 

Corresponding Secretary Suzanne Pushman 

Recording Secretary Geraldine Driscoll 

Membership Chairraan Doris Klein 

Ways & Means Chairman _ - > - B. Einger 

Publicity Chairtnan Hilda Kortens 

Special Events Chairman Anne de Carmel 

Exhibition Chairman Lilli Killen Shore 

Newsletter Bertha Mason 

Pottery Jury 

Albert Jacobson ^ ,^. 

Ilse Johnson Alternatee: Alice Gundelflnger 
Roberta Leber Priscilla Porter 

Anne de Carmel 

Sculpture Jury 

Josef Konzal 

Winifred Lansing Alternate: Hilda Niedelman 

Bea Groll 
Marilyn Fox 



UhU^f^^^ 



ARTISTS EQUITY ASSOCIATION 
253 WEST 72 STREET • NEW YORK, N. Y. 



tenndlfät^ 



AEA 



VOL. 1 -NO. 3 



APRIL 1957 




mitastume 



Masquerade Ball» Th^aldorf-Astoria ' Grand Ballroom ' Friday, April 3, 1937 






u^ 



fllJ^cJJfii^C^ 



THE NATIONAL CONVENTION OF ARTISTS EQUITY ASSOCIATION WILL 
BE HELD IN PHILADELPHIA ON MARCH 29, 30, 31. 

FOURTEEN DELEGATES AND THREE ALTERNATES FROM THE NEW YORK 
CHARTER WILL BE GOING. PRELIMINARY MEETINGS HAVING BEEN HELD, 
THE NEW YORK DELEGATION WILL ARRIVE IN PHILADELPHIA WITH AN 
ACTIVE PROGRAM. THERE WILL BE A COMPLETE REPORT ON THE CON- 
VENTION IN THE NEXT ISSUE. 



PAGE TWO 



NEW YORK CHARTER AEA NEWSLETTER 



APRIL 1957 



253 WEST 72nd ST, NEW YORK 23, NEW YORK 



President 
JULIO DE DIEGO, 

Vice-Presidents 

JACOB LAWRENCE 

ANTON REFREGIER 

MINNA HARKAVY 
BERNARD SIMON, Treasurer 

HELEN GERARDIA, Recording Secretary 

NORMAN BARR, Corte sponding Secretary 

DIRECTORS 

M. TOMMY ATKIN 
J. A. BUZZELLI 
SAMUEL, BRECHER 
ALFRED CRIMI 
DOMENICO FACCI 
RUTH GIKOW 

SELMA GUBIN 

CLARA KLINGHOFFER 

MARY KOFFLER 

LEV-LANDAU 

JANE ROGERS 

H. BELLA SHAEFFER 

LOUIS TYTELL 

# # # # 

Editor 
DOMENICO FACCI 

Associates 
H. BELLA SCHAEFFER 
HELEN GERARDIA 
DAN GENIN 
A. RAYMOND KATZ 



NOTES 0>i Tk NEWSLETTER 

We would like to devote one issue to the activities and 
Problems of sculptors. May we hear from the Sculptors con- 
cerning this? If interested send in material that can be used 
for such an issue. 



All chapter members are urged to mall catalogues of their 
exhibitions and other interesting material to: 

DOMENICO FACCI, EDITOR, NEWSLETTER, 248 West 14th 
Street, New York 11, N.Y. 

All Communications should be typed and signed in order to 
be considered for printing. 

Deadline for May Issue —April 20th 

DOMENICO FACCI, Fhairman 

H, BELLA SCHAEFFER 

HELEN GERARDIA 

DAN GENIN 

A, RAYMOND KATZ 



EQUITY ELECTS NEW EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR - A REPEAT 



ELIAS NEWMAN has been elected as Executive Director of National 
Equity. He takes office on April 1 -Mr. NEWMAN has been Chairman 
of the public Relations Committee, First Editor of Improvisations, Editor of the Chapter Newsletter, has been Secretary 
of National Equity, has been a former Director of the New York Chapter and National, and has been Vice-President of 
the New York Chapter. Most of us have had personal contact with Mr. NEWMAN and know his capabilities so we will! 
look forward to a new era of goodwiU and understanding between the New York Chapter and National. We wish him well. 



We welcome back our President Julio de Diego who spent the last month in California, and we are glad he is with us 
again- Perhaps you can write an article of your opinion of West Coast Art Activities, Julio for the next issue? 



We were pleased to welcome Bob EUis of the Los Angeles Chapter at the last Board of Directors meeting. 



APRIL 1957 



NEW YORK CHARTER AEA NEWSLETTER 



\ 



PAGE THREE 



ABOUT THE ARTISTS 



BYRON BROWNE is having an exhibition of 10 paintings and 7 sculptures at Grand Central 
Modems from March 30 through April 19- 

MICHAEL CARVER will have a show in the Mezzanine gallery of THE BIG THREE 
RESTAURANT opening April 5. 

ALFRED D. CRIMI showed at the Ward Eggleston Gallery. His paintings were on view from 

March 18 to 30. 

MILDRED CROOKS will show paintings at the Ruth White Gallery open through March 30th, 

1957. 

RALPH DUBIN had a showing of paintings and drawings at the Kraushaar Galleries from 
March 11 to March 30. 

One of ELIZABETH ERLANGER'S casein paintings *'White Head»' has been recently ac- 
quird by Colby College Museum. Two lithographs purchased by the New York Library for 
their permanent collection. An oil painting invited for a month's exhibition in the Capitol 
of Louisiana, Baton Rouge Museum, also a print circulating for a year in the State of 
Louisiana. Elizabeth Erlanger will have a one-man Exhibition of Recent Casein Paintings 
April 15 - 27 at the Bodley Gallery. 

HELEN GERARDIA also had a one-man show at the Bodley Gallery March 4 to 16. 

HOWARD KUH is at the Roko Gallery from April 2 to April 25 with drawings and paintings. 

FLORENCE LISTON and CHARLOTTE WHINSTON both showed oils at the Argent Gallery 

March 11 through 30. 

ELEANOR LOCKSPEISER had an exhibition of recent paintings at the Pietrantonio GaHery 

from March 16 through March 31. 

MYRON MAYERS showed at the Bodley Gallery from March 18 through 30. 

CHARLOTTE ORNDORFF will have an exhibition of watercolors on rice paper and linen 
at the Wellons Gallery beginning April 1 and closing April 13, 1957. 

MARY RONIN recently had a showing of paintings at the Petite Galerie. 

CORINN ROWE'S still life, ''Old Masters' Story",, an ingenious arrangement of old masters' 
Adam and Eve paintings, keynotes the March exhibition of contemporary religious paintings 
at the Marino Galleries. 

LILY SHUFF sold a casein painting to the Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, Georgia. 
MAURICE SIEVAN is showing at the Passedoit Gallery through April 6. 

MIRIAM SOMMERBURG sold three color woodcuts **Angel" and '*Reincarnation" and ''Dance 
to the Metropolitan Museum. 



9f 



PAGE FOUR 



NEW YORK CHARTER AEA NEWSLETTER 



APRIL 1957 



Through Eleanor Mizzy, a letter arrived from the "Recreation Service for Children 
of Belle vue" asking for volunteers to help with their Art program. We quote - 
**CreaUve expression is high on the list of essential programminß for these children 

Perhaps among your many readers, there would be some whose schedule would 

permit th em to spend an afternoon a week with cur children. I know from personal 

experience, that the volunteers would find this service a rewarding and gratifying 

experience.*' 

Those interested please contact NORMA ALESSANDRINI at OR 9-5000 Ext. 2142. 



COMM/TTEE REPORTS 



The following letter is self-explanatory 

Board of Directors 
Members of AEA 



Dear Friends; 

Here I am home again feeling fine and my first letter goes to you. From my bed in 
the Hospital I overlooked Central Park -deep in snow and in my room was golden 
Spring; flowers sent by you good people and one thinks of Spring always with hope 
and reassurance that all will be well. Thank you so much. 

Please also do accept my thanks for the opportunity I had to join BLUE CROSS 
through your Organization. You can't imagine how nice it is when you know that no 
bills are piling up, adding worries to your misfortune of being ill. It hit me over 
night. This experience showed only too clearly how important some health protection 
is. I was not ailing and feeling fine, sometimes asking, *'Is this insurance necessary? 
Only a few weeks ago I inquired whether the BLUE SHIELD was not available too. 
However, I was told not enough members had rallied to the cause. I earnestly plead 
with you fellow members not to delay to avail yourself of this most important protec- 
tion. Although my hospital bills are taken care of through BLUE CROSS my doctor 
bills are my responsibility. Don't let that happen to you. See that BLUE SHIELD is 
available to all of us. This is more important than having a painting insured. I en- 
dorse Bella Schaeffer's wonderful report in the Newsletter and hope that the members 
heed her urgent call to make BLUE SHIELD a reality. 



f t 



Sincerely yours, 

(signed) FELICE CAPLANE 



H. BELLA SCHAEFFER 
Ch ai rm an 



••••••••••••**♦ 



HAVE YOU ENROLLED IN BLUE GROSS? HOW ABOUT BLUE SHIELD? 



APRIL 1957 



NEW YORK CHARTER AEA NEWSLETTER 



\ 
PAGE FIVE 



I i 



PERSONALS 



MAY IIEILOMS has been invited to show in Denver, Colorado Art Museum *'Man*s 
Conquest of Space" Exhibition March 11 - May 19. 

DOMENICO FACCI gave a lecture-demonstration for The School Art League at the 
Chelsea School on March 17. He also spent 3 weeks in Florida as a guest professor 
at Florida Southern College in Lakeland. One piece of sculpture is now on exhibit 
at the Jersey City Museum. 

VERA GIGER has completed a mural in cut paper for the 39 ft. Square basement 
dining room of the Wells Memorial Presbyterian Church at Argyle and Glenwood Roads. 

REMO BRAMANTI as usual has been working most diligently on the decorations 
for the Bai Fantastique. Our congratulations for a Job well done year after year. 

ERNA WEILL is having a show of Sculpture on a religious theme at the Schoneman 
Gallery, opening April 23 to May 16. Included will be paintings by Rovalt. Also 
at the Newark Museum she will have a show of Ceremoniäl objects in the Art in 
Judaism show. April 10 — June 16. 



WHERE TO SHOW 

EIGHTH ANNUAL NEW ENGLAND EXHIBITION at the Silvermine Guild of 
Artists -Open to residents of New York this year. Entry Fee $4.00. NO RE- 
FUNDS. Entries delivered May 10. IL 12 at the Guild -Silvermine. New 
Canaan, Conn. Many prizes -all monetary. Write in for prospectus. 

RAY FAUST takes part in the BRONX PARK - BOTANICAL GARDEN 
MUSEUM SHOW OF THE BRONX ARTISTS GUILD. Here is a place to show. 

This is the 35th Annual Exhibition. 



ERNA WEILL 

Schoneman Gallery <63 E. 57 St.) 

A few seasons bück we wrole 
a lengthy piece about this artist 
whose career as a sculplor was 
cut Short by the Nazis. We pic- 
tured Ihe rnaking of her artistic 
Personality against the back- 
ground oi her upbringing in the 
inteJlectual and spiritual atmos- 
phere of her paternal home in 
Frankfort-on-Main— for centuries 
a centev of Gorman-Jewish culture 
and art — and her studies under 
the guidance of a pupil of Auguste 

Rodin. 

The sculptures we saw in her Forest 
Hills studio, linislieci ones as well as 
others, m diverse preparatory stages. 
rcvealed a talent ot undeniable in- 
dividuality, that is worth watching. 

Since then, Erna Weill has had the 
suc'cess we predioted, cuiminated m 
Commissions lor the Jewish Commun- 
ity Center in Teaneck, N.J. (Site ol 
her present liome and studio), and for 
ihe new synagof^ue on Soundview 
Avenue in White Plains, N. Y. 

Most Ol the 34 pioecs in her letro- 
spective exhibition at Schoneman's 
belong to a series inspired by stories 
Iram the Old Testament, with 
their imposing cast of kings, prophets 
and patriarchs. In some ol her sculp- 
tures, notably "Moses on the Moun- 
tain", "Jacob Fights the Angel" and 
"Revelation"; she extends the Rodin- 
esque style lor her portrails— out- 
standing among the iatter are busts ol' 
Mariin Buber, Rudolf Serkin, Claude 
Frank -tar tovvard the borderline oi 
romplete abstraction. 

"Outcry". "Ingathering of the Exiles" 
and "The Unknown Politieal Prisoner" 
are scuiputred expressions of deeply 
Iclt anguish and commiseration. 

Ceremonial objects — a bronze 
"Menorah", a ceramic "Matzoh- 
Platter" and silver **Challah Plat- 
ter" — show craftmanship as well 
as Imagination in the use of tri- 
angle and pyramid as mystic 
forms; 

Some of her noblest achieve- 
ments, such as the large bronze 
relief "Jacobs Dream'* for the 



N 
E 
W 

Y 

K 
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u 

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A 
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M 
I 
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im^HHHpHHV gallery a 
j öcnoneman is showing a group 
^ of sculptures by Erna Weill 
(through May 16) which also em- 
phasizes the life of the spirlt. 
gjDrawn with deft Impressionist 
ardor and strength, Miss Weill's 



tnio V?elll: OF strong!7^Xp>i6si(1hi»t^t(gwe>f' 

thoHcfisciilptiitfes are concenuHi^Jhi)ve |||r|y4l|i 
de mental hunuin passion». Gncl,i<|^c. m^gite^ity 

air ilu .il)sti;i(t llunics u*hirh tftkrlfToir plaresMr 
h\ sidc wilh ((Hiallv clcuuiUal l^ihlical suhjccts. 
In sInIc. ihcsc woiks dcpfiul on tlic (hunkv. 
ja^|>('<l shapt's of maslcrs likc liarhuh, shapcs 
vvliidi undcrlinc the physical and psydiolo^icid 
sirain (oinnion to inost ot tlic (innres, llnoiigli- 
oiil, liowcvci. Weill iKippilv iivoids oveistate 
nieiit, lor ;dl tlie inliereiit drania of her Ihenies. 
(.eneralh. the siiigle lij^ures. uhidi teiid tovvaid 
loo la(ile. compact st\li/alions, aic iess rewarcling 
Ihan such groups as Elijah and l'Jislia, wliere 
liiere is a ^realer spatial interplay ol voids and 
solids. (Sclioncinaii, iVpril li.'iMay 10.) R.R. 

-jSt . ~JLi , t-M- 



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1 

9 
5 

7 



work also affirms the power of 
Spiritual and earthly love In cal- 
culated certainties. 



T^KNA W EiLLs pieces at the Schone- 
man Gallery prove her a foroeful 

sctilj)tress delvlni;- with an exprcs?;iori- 
ist siinplicity aiid exa^j^eration into 
rieh hniiiaii itiaterial inany tiiiies on 
jewish theiiies. Her lar^'est piece, 
Dialoguc, eatehes the niovenieiit of 
ar^'unient. llic riikiioii'n Political 
Prisoner surrcjiiiKis the bust of a pris- 
oner with three threateiiinj^i- hooded 
sliapes. Hanna lias stren.c:th and a 
siipple moveiiieiit. Stroti^" portrait busts 
and foiir haiidsoine Jewish ceremonial 
obiects coniplete the exhibjtioii. 

''^^ J. G. B. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 



synagogue in Teaneck and the 
imposing marble carving "Baal' 
Shem" are, by necessity, shown 
only in photographs. Neverthe- 
Iess, this exhibition teils why 
Erna Weill belongs among the 
distinguished artists whose works 
adorn the most modern syna- 
gogues in the United States. 



N 
E 



W 




jN^fiery at 

cnoneman is iihowing a group 

)f «culpturea by Stum, WeiUL 

Y (through May 16) which also em- 
phasizes the life of the spirit. 
T>prawn with deft Impressionist 
^"^hrdor and strength, Miss Weill's 
work also affirms the power of 
spiritual and earthly love in cal- 
culated certainties. 



K 



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,^iP..^^.ltlM'-**'«'<^^**'* 



''Jacob's 

Dream" 

by 

Erna Weill 

A sculpiur« 
commissioned by 
the Jewish Com- 
munity Center, 
T«aneck, N. J. 




HJOM. J3H 'sanSoSmiXs ujapoui 

s^iM/A pansinSunsip 9\i% jo »uo s« 
paqu^sdp uaaq sBii •ja^ua3 Ä^ 
-unuiuioo iisfAiaf iiMu^^x »m 1« 
anSoSeuXs am o^ 9;>u«j|U3 aqn m 
,^mv9Ja. s,qoa«f„ »zuoaq sjipM 
il\[ -uiBA snoiSiiaa b u| u»»jo si 
lOAi »soqAi Jd^uicd qouaaj snoui^j 
[ncno'H aSaoao Xq sSunui^d 
IHAi sy[MA\ 9UJJ J»q ^%}JA A'e\d 
|fp uo osiv '^OÄ ^*^N w! ^®l 
;0 u«iu3uoq»s ^Ml I* X^psanx 
)Ai aaq jo Moqs « iwdo ni^i 
hdinj« 3|4»aue3X 'HPM vuaa 







ART 

654 Madison Avenue 
New York 22. N. Y. 

TEmplelon 8-3730 



NEWS 






ROO 



OF ADVERTISEMENT 





Issue 



PLEASE F^OKE IN CORKECTIONS 



For immediate approval. Corrections MUST reach us BY 
Otherwise advertisement will be publißhed - ^hown here 

This is a rough proof «t tl.e advertisement set acoorting to your "''' ..ions in conforman.e will. o«r typographi.- regulalions. We 
«Lall .oneH, without .«st to you. any errors made by our ptfnr^"' wever, .^ sl^h<^ve to hill you at cos, for any olheraheratwns 
,kP in Ihis adverlisemenl. or any mechani.al work neoessar; on Futs in acrordan.;e will. Standard magazine publ.sl.ing custom. 



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sculpture ^ 

ero«. 




april 23 - may 16 

schoneman 

63 easl 57, n.y.c. 






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654 Madison Avenue 
New York 22, N. Y. 

TEiiipleton 8-3730 



NEWS 



ROO 



OF ADVERTISEMENT 





Issue 



For immediate approval. Corrections MUST reach us BY 
Otherwise advertisement will he puhlished as shown here 

This is a rougli proof of tlie advertisement set according to your instnictions in ronforniance witli our typographic regulations. We 
t.luill «orreH, witliout cost to you. any errors made by our printei. fJoiveier, we shall have to bill you at cost for any other alterations 
yoii make in ihis advertisemejit, or any niechaniial work necessarv on cuts, in aecordance uilli Standard magazine pul)lisliing custoni. 



ART NEWS APP 



sculpture by 

ern« . 




april 23 - may 16 

8choneman 

63 easl 57, n.y.v. 



X 



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FftSSS RELEASE 



Maroh 16, 1956 



An exhibtUtn •f FainUnf, S0ulßtur€ and <?«'*°'"*;/»^* 
-I.»- -^ i-ht Teaneok Jewiah Ctmmunity Center durin§ tht pasi 

Monday/April 2nd and o^ntinuinf thr.ufh Saturday, April 7ih. 

The mrt and o*ramio aetivitita at ihe ^«'»**'* •**'''»^* 
p^Tle •/ all äffen »tarting af the tender af« •/ five and 
§$tn§ »n up fe aduliheed» 

The 0eramio and »oulpture olasfiea are under *'»«/*"* 

directUn Vsrna f.ill. ^'•••/»'^^/t^;,; .!{ * anS Cm5J" 

^««>, +nkinm wart in oarvint a heauii/ul "Mether ana uniia 

Tn Jc^t r.frnlc IVne, -^'ohiakein, ah.u. at ihe Je.iak 
Muaeum in New Terk until April SOth. 

Eaiher Xesen direeU ihe arf and painiing 9laaaea with 
ihe ahle oellaheratien ef Eleaner ^rfV^-^^J.^;**;*"* «^^ 

hilit speaha elequently ./ the «'"*«* Wr?U.rjniflJt 
ar* olaases, whioh haoe mere than deiMUd du^tfig the paat 

year* 



The Art and Painting ex 



a) dge 5 te 9 — 





Jeff reu liif^an, Mif^erta Bandler, Lt^alie 
reuer, Steven Hee, ElUaa Mehkina, Ili>üketh 
Banker, Mek^rt^^tiuhj^Mrry Mriek, Traneine 
Meitaoh, IQq LeSS&lT *«»*<• Weinierger, 
Barbara Lowiihs^Lynn feritsf, Ahbey Zurit, 
Pamela Muttyji^rt Sidua, Ilene Memman, Ifyra 
Zeller, Kn^Xr^i^r, Martin Brewn, 



b) Age • U IV V "^ 

ahen. 



i89her, Jean palevo, Barbara j 
y Zern, Michael Kaufnan, Judy § 



e) Jr 



Arlene Stinmel, Judy Tannenbaum, 
,^^^d, Carel Jteider, Mark Clachke, 
e Tuoha, Marjery Ley, Bianne Ley, Miaa 
etß, Carel Letfit/on, Madeltne Leoiien, 
«iman« 

Mith 9reup — Anita Gehen, Evelyn May Ja aeba, Linda 
Luria, Oarele Mervia, Michael Marenatein, 
Stephanie Mebbina, Bebbie Zurit, 9eria Stein^ 



d) Adulta — Sari laufman, 

Sehaeffer, Boa 
Bariaen, Ulli 

Sillel ^^^^ 

Oeramio and Soulpture exfiiot 

Betty Weit», Mena Meimow, Ho 
Orlande, Themaa Banial, Bebb 
Sally fremarta, Martha Grube 
Janey Traenkel, Bianne Tuchs 
Lynne Mandel, ailbert Beeth, 
adult exhibitera* 



Br» Ruth Zuekerman, Traneea 
e Zurit, Ruth Selemen, Minna 
an Briok, Eather gershen, Ethel 



\ 



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iara are t Age B te ISt Jean Palew, 
noy Bialler, Mark Jaoeba, Raphael 
y Lipman, Beb Levy, Feggy Preuaa, 
r, Marylin Berger, Sandy Silverberg, 

Barbara aerahen, Carel Rauch, 
Freddy Bunaberg, Alae a greup ef 



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SCHONEMAN GALLERIES, inc. 



63 EAST 57TH STREET 
NEW YORK 22, N . Y. 



PHONE PLAZA 5 3O20 



CCU.^TY OF: 
STATE OF : 



NEW \ORK) 
NEW YORK) 



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AGREEME^r^ BETWEEN THE SCHONEMAN GALUfeRlES, INC., 63 EAST 57111 STRECT , 
NE:V YORK, N.Y., AND MRS. ERNA 17E1LL, 8G6 ALPINE DRl l'E, TEANECK, N.J. 

( 

1) The Schoneman Galleries agree to exhibit the sculpture of Mrs. Erna Woill 
in tieir Downstairs GalloryXfor a three (3) week ^priod during the month 

c " of April, 1957, Some appropriate piece^ will bo displayed in tie exhibition 
room upstairs. ^ • 

V, The sculpture will have to be delivered to the Galleries not later than 
March Ist, 1957. 

2) The prices of the different pioces of scupture shall be mutually agreed upon 



3) 



4) 



5) 



The sales comrnission to the Galleries on every item sold is thirty-three and 
one-third per Cent (33 l/3?0 of the füll price, and all sales during the 
exhibition have to be made through tiie Galleries, 

Wrs, Weill guarantees to tiie Galleries a net comrnission of at least four 
hundred dollars ($400.00), which has to be paid to tiie Galleries regardless 
of the amount of sales. This amount must be deposited ivith the Galleries 
before tie exhibition opens, 

The cost of printing catalogues and invitations and the mailing of same has 
to be paid by Mrs. Weill. Also the cost of all advertising has to be paid 
by Mrs. Weill. It is up to !\lrs. Weill to determine hoiv much she vvishes to 
spend for tie aforementioned. 

Mrs. 'Veill may handle these natters personally, in which case proofs of the 

catalogue, invitation and advertising must be shown to the Galleries before 

printing, 

Or, tie Galleries will take care of these matters for Hrs. Weill, in which 

case the amount of two hundred and fifty dollars ($250.00) must be deposited 

with t e Galleries not later t'^an March 15t :, 1957, in order to pay tiese 

expenses. 



November 21, 1956 



X 



AGREf D : 





(date) / 







;^ 



ERNA 'VEILL 



SCHONEMAN GALLERIES, mc. 




63 EAST 57TH STREET 


1 ! 


NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 


, 1 

1 j 


PHONE PLAZA 5 3020 


1 
1 


November 21, 1956 


1 

1 


' 



Mrs. Erna 'tfeill 
886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, N, J, 

Dear ^Irs. I'Jeill: 



We refer to your lotter and our telephone conversation and like 
to confirm that we are ivilling to give you an exhibition of your 
work in our downstairs gallery. However, ive shall also display 
sone appropriate pieces in our exhibition rooms upstairs, 

We intend to have an exhibition of paintings by Georges Rouault 
at the same time, and we could place some of your sculpture as 
a background for this exhibition. !Ve think it would be a wonder- 
ful idea since your sculpture has mostly a religious feeling too« 
\^'e do not know exactly what date the show will open, but it will 
be some time in April. We will inform you of the exact date. In 
any event, we have to make a catalogue and discuss the probability 
of reproductions in this catalogue. For this reason it would be 
good to have another discussion with you to go ovor further details. 

You should plan to have your work delivered to the Gallery not later 
than March Ist in order to be previewed by the press for April 
publications. 

We enclose a contract which you will be kind enough to sinn and 
return to us. 

Verv sincerelv vours, 

sc Iß NEMAN GALLERIES, INC. 




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Encl. 



r. J. Schoneman. 



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April 15 , 1957 • 



?'r«F»rohonomnn • 
63 '. 51 t 
* • Yorlr City 



ncor Kr. '^olioncmrn , 



^ ._ , I 3?GoclvcC your Ictter of 

pril lo, tmd Inolud« ohcok or ' A^^o.- 
whloh Ir In nai p-y^cn; of thr e-DcnrcB . 

to lulld up thc ©xhltltlon wlth yt^u . 

rlncjoi'Gly yoi ~ 



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icurult your cat-Iomrc of 



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^or».r Pt:^, '"hcneman # 



oonv^ rnr.l.loii v/e hr.c!. In your [^vlloiy Vot Mook , I 
Oi^-^' oo thc^conolunlon * tJir>t if l' -nl.oji r onr - r ji 

noT^ • _• ore I vroul:" npr)r ol^ato If you t;ou1c^ 

1' .. ■ 'oio^- , '.rhen - In tho /ory ncar .futv.re - you 
v/111 1)0 ir to vlclt ny ntucnp in ''.'ötmeolrt 

?hc •.■•.■■'.,! oijjfcfl^o.- , In oaße of no 

oi 5J oi' tii rrlcr^ -»n-'lce (e^cpen:-- r of or.rtin ',flrlr| 
aau rnntorlal clo^luotod)!- rllfci-ht^ ut -t dld not 
^ilrcunc rxlvc^vtXvln^ ^ oatalo^me nn^^ ^'*s 111-- , - r^ weil] 
" le^v-feli of o-:hlbit , c^^I r connrction rn ■ rctrilnjj 
of 'T)rl: :ln your rnll i'y. 

I \^oul-l :'';^'^'Tccl*i'^-€' a ß\xorly --.-r- 



Rinorrely yourr^ , 



SCHONEMAN GALLERIES, ikc. 

63 EAST 57TH STREET 
NEW YORK 22, N . Y. 

PHONE PLAZA 5 3020 



March 16, 1957 



Mrs. Erna Weill 
f»6 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, N. J. 

Dear Mrs. Weill: 

1 have your letter of March 13th. In answer to your different 
point$, 1 do not know what clippings you are talking about. Vou 
shoived me during your last visit different newspaper clippinqSt 
as well as catalogues, which you took with you. In my opinion 
there is nothing in this office. 

As to your inquiry about the one hundred envelopes, we do not 
have any envelopos yet for the Rouault show where we intend to 
include your catalogue. We therefore advise you to mail out 
your one hundred envelopes yourself when the time comes. 

As to the invitations, as soon as we receive the cards we shall 
have one hundred reserved for you. The time will read, April 
23d - 4 to 7 P.M. 



With best regards, 



Very sincerely yourSi 
SCriO NEMM GALLE RI ES , I NC . 



FLS/lgr 




Schoneman» 




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P.S.:- According to your instructions 1 spoke to Mr. Offin, Editor 
of Picturel Qn Exhibit , He will try to place a one inch iV) 
advertisement in the April issue of LtClMrc.? jOlil Ex^ibit as 
well as AjüL News . The Arts he says will take the advertisement 
for their May issuee which will appear late in April. 

4 f^^lcM ^''^^-'^ 



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SCHONEMAN GALLERIES, inc. 

63 EAST 57TH STREET 
NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 

PHONE PLAZA 5 3020 



April 19, 1957 



Mrs. Erna Weill 

086 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck. N, J. 

Dear Mrs. Weill : 

IVe are now about finished with tlie preparations for the exhibition^ 
According to our contract we ivould like you to send us your check 
for the following amounts: 



$400.00 
30.00 
20.00 

TOTAL $450.00 



As stipuläted in our agreement. 
Postage for 1000 catalogues. 
Signs, invitalions, etc. (a füll accounting 
will be qiven at a later date). 

Very sincerely your?, 

SCH0NB1AN GALLERIES, INC. 

F. L. Schoneman. 



SCHONEMAN GALLERIES, inc. 

63 EAST 57TH STREET 
NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 



PHONE PLAZA 5 3020 



July 9, 1956 



Mrs. Erna Weill 
886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, N. J. 

Dear Mrs. Weill: 



Mr^ Schoneman is away on a short vacation of about two weeks, 
lipon his return I shall call his attention to your letter, 
and he will be glad to discuss with you the arrangements for 



your proposed exhibition. 



Very truly yours^ 
SCHONEMAN GALLERIES, INC. 

L. G. Randall 





;cpt,lo. , 1956. 



rchonomrn fallcry 

63 ■ 57 t. 
lle-.' York City 



r«.ar lAi', ' choiicin-m , 



Ac per our telc-.hone convrrr'tlon 

gd. to om^ 'Aoue« . ^^^ .^^^^^ „,^ .-^^^e to 

rl^>lt ray studio -'^^^^^-^^Z^ ..-. ^reo to com«, 
p. ,j.iit. J-* ^ tel ""hone na ..'oi ii- 



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SCHONEMAN GALLERIES, inc 

63 EAST 57TH STREET 
NEW YORK 22, NY. 



PHONE PLAZA 5-3020 



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September Iti, 1956)2 



Mrs, Erna Weill 
t;e6 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, New Jersey 

Dear Mrs. Weill: 

1 am very sorry I could not find time to look at your sculpture. 
1 practically forgot the purpose of my visit. We do not buy 
sculpture. If you want to make an exhibition. let us know. and 
in this case 1 would come out to see your work. 

Very sincerely yours, 



SCfDNEMAN GALLERIES, INC 




Dr, J. Schoneman, 



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I!r,C. ""xtrrovrs 
K*y.Kerc,l<l ^ribune 
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Dcar Mr. ^^^irrowB , 



erhlbltlcn nt thc Carlcbach -rllriTT jo^ ^'^'^'' 
mc cuoh cn imclorctoivllnr cncl v:onclcrfull 
vrrit©-up , th.9.t I thou'-ht, you nltrht Joo Into« 
reotcd In rny comlnß ©xh'bltlon v,t the 

I' thcrc vfotad bo c chrnoe to 
como to TGcnecl: , I ::oulcl liltc co muc:_| to 
nho^' YOU a bronzc i^ellef , vfhloh I mado or 
the' Pernecl: Jr-lrii Community Center . pcßl< eo 
I am vjorlrlnc: nov; on a dcotn for a Templc in 

The cxlilbltlon In open rlrerdy 
for reportero • 



ßlncorly yours , 









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52 e 57 

Hev; York City 



Dear Hr.Cojnpbell « 



You ',/rotc pJbout my «hov; In the 
CorlGbach nr.llery(6 jreors aso^ '.^ith^GUch Bi;eat 
undcrotojidlns , tlmt I vranted to Inform you 
cbout lay coralnr cxhlbltlon at gchoneiaon, of 
vrhich I Inclucle a catalof^e • .,, , _ 

re*! l^loun themc , tliei^f or© Mr. ^-choneram t-pj- 
kö^f^Rlraoultant^ouoly c. collooti n of ^^oua\at. 

T^atntlnrs, Of oourno my ^'^^^P^^t:;;,.^;^^^^^'^'-^ 
be Boon m -tho eüJLlci'y no--, for the iKjnuhly 

maGaslnc rcrlerro .^ ^^^ ^^^^3_y ^^^.^^^ ,^^ ^xclted 
to ^'Ork noTT on 'y^ir-orm^ art.Cnebronr-.e pelle x 
»jr-oobftC Dreeja" A Tcot by 5 fc©t) Ir Injtcaicd 
in the^Xenneck Jovdcii ao-ratmity ':'!;^ntor .-nd I 
junt waß comlcolonod to de o soiapturö In a 

'Vormlc in '.'©Gtchentcr, 

•^ ^ If you could r-n,' :' to ooffic 

out höre to Tcrjicck to see the rellcf . pleace 
rftve me a rlnr, Jmd I oorad plclt you up o-t tho 
brldr;e . Ito' only lo mlnutoa fi^m tlicro. 

Slncorely yours » 



Thcre Are T^hotdo for public ot Ion anc 
of the rolicf at ^chonemcn • 



-'9 o '^"*' 



hoto 



4, / 5. 1957. 



ltP«H. Devreo 
lU\r York Tlmeo 

229 '^ -^3 

Hörr York 'Jity 



Dear Mr.Dovree , 

At ny In-Et ohov In tJie Crrlcbrch 
Gpllcry 'Jie Tlmeo vrroto thln vory \mderßtanclnB 
artlcle abcut It * (viiich I include) 

The cyjilblticii "111 hr.vo p. 
reli^louF, theme ßnä the ßohonemrjnt Grllrry 
therefore will shovr nt tho sniae tlmc pelntinec 

of Houault • 

I htxro füll undcrßtFJidinff thot 
It vlll not be r-osplblc to cend v. reportor ot* 
■to tcnjieck tö aee ihe bronse rellef I m'^dc for 
tm; Jovinh Conmtmity Ocnter h<^re , tharefore 
I hc.vc a photo o It In my eyJilbltlon « 



Slncerely yours « 




Vi »»1957 



Mr.Ch. Off In 
3o E 60 

H.X.C. 



Doar Ilr, Cffln » 



t Includo the p2?oof 01 lay /»rte oA 
Tor the Icyout In the 7 Ines cnd Horald Trl^-'ünc, 
LlöcBC , let mc oee üio pix)#f.ror both -Rapors r.ftcr ; 

70U i^oelvG It • Couli" you ßee 1:.o It that It '.rill hn nlcsereh. 
oed well, Simdr.y, ^prll 21, vrovld bo the dnte, 

Aß 70 1' told lao. the chrrre t?111 be 
the Gfuao aß IT I plftocd It directly, 

I hopo you "111 ree the €^:öl^ It, 
thorefore I Includc the cataloGU-e, 



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9 ni<)ckf-rllcr PI 
}fio*J' Yori: City 



April n, 10?7. 



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r>opj* lilnr. "eich , 



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I IncliKTc r, er.trlonio ''or ray orhl^ 
on rn.'^. v.-yjit to InforM you thrt thc o-hibit 
Ic ölroady open for r<^::.ort,crr only , 

„ ü „ 'Xho t:-on:-e rdlol' o? "Jr.cob'c 

mmm i-i 'tho '^ccncok Jcv;i.?h Comirrunit-/ "cnter 
canjbo -'.on tlco , bnt it v;nulf: Ix bot-tor to nrlz<^ 
fin nppc i:ritmon L bt for^: rÜ^ mr (?oan' c!: 7-1627) , 

II I an x,-o:'l:5.n-- no".- on r, ly^v: 

Syr.4VG.oru<. dcsli-tl, ::oi- a 'r<::^>plc in -cetohf cter , 



rlnoeroly youj.T. 




sculpture by . 

t\\ Schoneman 

*|J^%»' 63 Bast 57 



sculpture by 

et«»»/' 

.Atll Schoneman 

V4^^* 63Eost57 



Charles z. 

offin 



• • 



advertising 



30 east 60th street 



new york city ..... P'"« 3-6381 



Rough Proof ^* ^^" ^^ -*™^ 



to be inserted in: 



N. I. Times 



sxze 



issue 



TTTTT 



Herald-Tribune 



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Art N s w » 



Ptc ture^'^'tiflnr BtÄTtTÄt 







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Roari tevt carefully for accuracyj Please Telephone 
^^^^^t^ü:^^^^:^'' will appear as shown 



Kl:/: i^^e^ 



^erci-icü -'Tr. low^ne- 



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^*» 



Uarch 8,57 



Dear Mrs.Weill» 



Here is a copy of aay article,a8 requested» 
I Just recÜTt* thc tw© photographs «f your "Jacob* s Dream",They «how your « 
strong oculpture rery adTantageously.lut! :what/rf I had in mlnd waa a pbotograph 
of the alraady installod 'bronze»whieh shows also the lettering and giree an 
inkling of its size by the Inelusion of somc part of thc wall for comparison« 

It was the architectural contaxt of your werk that gare ne the idea to 
use a photegraph togather with one of a newly built synagogue in White Plaine* 
lut the iselated sculpture would ge well with the reriew of your foiöicomlng 



Show at Schoneiiian*8 



Best regards» 



A^fh^ 



Called upon to analize an artist's oeuvre,one is tempted to speak about his 
8chooling,artistic ancestry and individual style in terms of the art-lingo, 
measure his growth according to the artistic distance he travelled,and trace 

his development as a craftsman. ., . . . i '^ 

lut in the case of Erna Weill this approach would fail.because the driv- 
ing force behind her work is mainly rooted in spiritual and emotional soil. ^ » 
That this artist was born and educated in Frankfort-on-the Main,for centuries 
a Center of German-Jewish culture and arts,and tecame indoctrinated with the 
thoughts of the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber,were circumstances that left 
their imprint on her oe«T»e not less than did her early schooling by a pupil 

of Auguste Rodin. . . . .* 

And the anguish and torment of witnessing from afar -since emigrated to the 
U. S.A., 1937 -the horrible fate of her Jewish brethren in her homeland engender- 
ed in her a compassion which lifted the expressionistic power of many of her 
sculptures to heights close to the oeuvre of Kaethe Kollwitz. 



• • • 



In her portraits,admiration for the spiritual or artistic achierements of - 
her sitters.even adoration for them as human beings are paramount movers,dict- 



• •■ 



ating style and treatment of her sculptural media. 

Her devotional objects.because of the inspired use of triangle and pyramid 
as mystic forma »belong to her most individual achievements.And the deathless • 
stories of the Old Testament wlth theirs cast of kings.prophets and patriarchs 



*■ t 



are a main source of her sculptural ideas. 

The ecstagies of love and commiseration,piety and supplication find express- 

almost abstract 
ion in her most accomplished,sometimes/ ytB n MtrtHlcTK« works.Small wonder that 

she was commiesioned to do a sculpture for the entrance hall of the Jewish 
Center in Teaneck,N.J. »jümäk where she lives.works and teaches.This bronze, ' 
"Jacob's Drean" belong to the distinguished works of Jewish artists that adorn 
some modern synagogues in the United States. 



B.F.Dolbin 





. t„ analvze »n artlsfs oeuvre.one i. tempted to apekk about -■ 

Called upon to anaiyze an »iwao _. 




M. schooUng.artistlc anceetry and indmdual style, 

Hi^ ^ ^-1 ^».Äir,» t« •«ie-artt»«e-«tt'(*««ee-(»-«(»»ell«'i..v 



in* trac.e..-Ma-*OT»lop«iajt »i-*-»*«>* ; 

'^'»illlUMI I lOtt»-—**"'*^"" - _^ 



,„:n.Mnd H„ ,0.. i. »mly .ooted In Spiritual and emotional seil. __• 

T ^,h rulture and arte, and became indoctrinated with 
uries a center of German-Jewish culture ana ar^.^ ^^^ '''<^>^\ '. 

*li® 1- if-^t-sr, T^uh«rJrere circumstancea iipmv leii 

the thoughts of/Jewish philosopher Martin Buher ^^ere 

+ i^Rs than did her early schooling hy a pupil 
their imprint on her oeuvre not less than dia 

of Auguste Rodin. 



since 



... , .. •• • 




fTe »"8"!='' "* *"■"""* "' «itnesaing from afar -/* 



emigrated ; 
to tr..3.A..1.37 - t., .o,U.le fate of he. .e.ish ..eth.en in he, ho^eland 
.n.en^e.ed in he. a co„pa.,ion ..io. Uned tne exp.eesionietic powe. of »any 

- , -. tn v,«lirht8J^cl08e to the oeuvre of Kaethe Kollwitz., ._ 
of her sculptures to heights;^cj.ose uu 

in .er pon.aite.ad.iration for)§;iritual o. artistic achieve.ents of h r. 
3Ute„.e«n ado.ation fo. the. a, nunan .ein«e a„ pa.a^ount „o.e„.diotatt„. 
style and treatment of her eculptural »edia. '■'",„,. 

Her devotional o.Jecte..ecau,e of the inspired uee of trian«l. and pyra«.d 
.3 ^stic for.e..elon« to her »ost indi.idual aohie.e.ente.And the de.t leee 
3toIs Of the Cid Testament with their caet of Mnss.prophets and patHarohe 

are a main source of her sculitural ideas. •.- 

' ~ . 4.4rxv. 1^-iPtv and supplication find ex- 

The ecstaeles of lore and oommlBeration.plety PP 

her S03t_acoonpllBhed, ^°y ..„.ti wonder that ehe was 

pression in/so.etines almoat a.straot «-*,*-« 

con^issioned to do a sculpture for the entranoe hall of th .ew. 

V N J were ehe U„s..orlc3 and teaches.This bronze ." JaooV s Dream 
Teaneck,H.J»»were sne xxyc , 

«^ T-«4eV» artists that adorn some modern 
t,elong to the distinguished works of Jewish artists 

synagogues in the United States. 

B.F.Dolbin 





/ ^ 



Erna Weill 
••leauty is something wonderful and stränge 
that the artist fashions out of the chaos 
of the World in the torment of his soul." 



Called upon to analyze an artisfs oeuvre.one is tempted to speak 
about his schooling,artistic ancestry.indiridual style and derelopment 
in terms of the art-lingo.One would measure his growth according to the 
«ÖKfcciHXtl« artistic distance he travelled from his first step to his 
last, and trace his deTelopment as a craftsman. 

lut in the case of Erna Weill this approach would fail.hecaAse the 
driring force Dehind her accomplishmeu'ts in clay,wood.bron2e,stone and 
terra cotta is mainly rooted in spirltual and emotional soil. 

That this artist u:^i^^^^4^is:i^^ family^4 was 

hörn and educated in Fra.nkfort-on-(he-Uain,for hundreds of years a center 
of German^cuUure^rts and cfaftslwere circumstances that leave their - 
imprint on/ldut oeurre ,more-4is*i««*iy xnan uxu 



a for««-Ti3tptl~n!n^:KüTflSt«-^odi»*« 

And the anguish and torment of witnessing from afar-be cause she had 
left her »..«*.f*^ homeland in 1937 for the U.S.A. - the horrihle fate of ; 
her Jewish'hrJthren in the concentration ca«ps and extcrmination plants of 
GeVmany engendered in her / compa.sion which lifted the expressionistic ; 
power of many of her scul/tures to the artistic heights of a Kaethe Kollwitz, 
in her portraits,adJiration for the spiritual or artistic achierements.- 
of her sitters.eren adorition and love for him as a human heing are paramount 
morers.dictating style ald treatment of her sculptural media. 

Her »mall derotioniil and ceremonial ohjects -hecause of the inspired 
use of the »ystic forms'of triangle and pyramid -telong to her most indi- 
Tidual achierements.And'the/ dramatic and edifying symholic stories of the 
Old Testament with its immortal cast of iings and pr^hets.sinning and 
rightuous patriarchs ire the main source of her scJl^ural ideas. 



The ecstaeies of lore and commis^eration,piety and auppllcation find con- * 

vincing expression in her most accoraplished.sometimes aljnost abstract sculpt- 

ures.Small wonder that she was commissioned to do a large sculpture for the 

entrance hall of the Jewish Center in Teaneck,N.J. were she l4ve8,works and^ ^ 

/ 
teaches.This bronze," Jacob 's Dream" belongxto the best works of Jewish artists 

that adorn the newly built modern synagogues in the United States. 

/ 



,•• 



B.F.Dolbin 



/ 



New York, March 2,57 



Dear lärs.Weill, 

Kere ia the end product of cutting and 

compressii^g - a painful Procrustean feat for anyone loving his even 

not perfcct brain child» 

I Started with the elimination of the motto between quotation narke. 
That was easy.I then cut the fat,careful to avoid the livlng flesh of 
the sentences.And I heeded your and Mr.Schoneman's suRgestions. 

The illußtrious name of Martin Euter figures -I think - in proper 
connection with your backgroundinow labelled German-Jewish* 



The original article,plus motto, had 374 words. The shortened and 
partly revised one, minus the motto has 317« 

After much querying I furthermore suggest the elimination of the 

the 
6 lines which represent quasi an ouverture to/web of thoughts about 

your oeuvre -but only if a further cutting is unavoidable#And the 
headline ••Erna Weill** seems superfluou8# 

I marked this ultimate cut with red penciltThis would bring the 
length of the article down to about 250 words • 

I hopetyou and Mr.Schoneman will be satisfied* 



Sincerely yours 



^^#>»^ 





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2,. Page 



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/)>'' CRITICS FROM FORMER EXHI3ITI0NS 



Larry Campbell in the "J^xt Nevrs" ; --Erna Welll is concerned 
wlth the relationship of tvro flffures in confllct or In affectlon- 

Aline Louchhelm- Saarinen, "Ke^^' York Times" : Thls i? a 

sculptor v.iio manage s to comlDlne emotional approach with a tinie plastic 

sence, one marble piece has a stolld conviction . 

Carlyle Burrovrs in the "Herald Tribüne" : Erna T-,'eill,s 

sculpture — resolute modelllng dramatic impact, sincerlty and 

depth of feeling . 



_ « 



3 • Page 




V_...' 



SCULPTURE 



^ 



V 



V 

x- 



* 



* 



* 



5. 
6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 



1. Bathing in light (llmestone) 

2. Blesslngs (Vermont marble) 
3» Elijah and Elis?h (marble concrete) 
3b, Elijah and Elisah(bronze) 
4. Dialogue (art stone) 

Lovers 

Ceres 

V/aterbuffalos 

Best Drink _ 

Tvfllig^ht 
lovDaJice of Love 
ll.Mother 
12.Prayer 
13.Chassid 

l4,Revellation ^ /s. \ 
15.Dream ^ J^A^^A^^^^-) 
lö.Cutcry 

ly.Xoses on the Mountain 
iS.Ingathering of the Exiles 
19. — and .she put Moses down at the brink of the river-- 

2o.I'annah 

2i.The unknov/n politic.?l prisoner . lrT.^..J--'^^ 

22, Jacob flghts the Angel / JWJI ^' 

23, Photo of" Baal Shcm" (niarble) 

24, Photo of "Jacobs Dream"(bronze) 



•« •> 



( fj f €> M e 5^ ) 




iw / U 



Portrait s 



25 , Pro f , Mart in 2uber 
2^. E.V.' 




'/-i>^r' / 



PCRTRAITS 



27. 

28. 

29. 

3o. 



Claude Frank , plan! st 
Rudolf Serliin , planist 
Kathan Mii stein , Violinist 
Yemenite Girl ^ | 






'1 . 



:.A • 



CEREi:ONIAL OBJECTS. 



211. ChllcLh Platter 

32, Matzoh Platter 

33, menorah 

34, Shabath Gandleholder 



••«»•/••^r,'' 



*^\'''• 



^^|ln thel^erinanent collection of the : Georgia State Museum, Athen s/G?- 
Birmlnshajn ^!useum/Ala. , Jewish Museum/N. Y* , Eezalel Museum/Jeruscalem , 
Teaneck Jewlsh Community Center/N. J. , Hebrev; University/jernisalem/ 





/ - 






April 21.67 



Im» Wflll 



QallerT i 



A f., ,«..n. l,«k w. «.t. . l«,hty pl.c. .*.ut thU «tl.t wh... ..r..r 
•• > ■«ulptor w»» eut »hört by th« »»»li. 

I„ thl...»r -Fp.undlloh.r St.ckWl.f « Plotur.* th. -aklng of h.r .rti.tlo 
p.r..nallty a^ln.t th. h..kgr.cund .f her uphrlnglng In th. lnt.ll.otu.l and 
,plrltu.l .t-osphT. .f h.r p.t.m.1 hom. In Fr.nkf.rt-on-th.-l..in - f.r ..nt- 
„rl.. . ..nt« of a.™.n-J.wi.h «ultur. «d .rt- .nd h.r .tudi.. und« th. 

(uidano. of a p»pll 'f *ug»«t« Rodln. 

Th. ..ulptur.. ,. saw in h.r th.n in ror.et Hill. l..at.d ,tudi..finl.h.d 
on« and euch In dlT.r«. pr.p.r.t*ry atag...^ r.raal.d a tal.nt .f und.nlabl. 

lndiTld»alit]r,»»rth watohlng. 

Slno. th.n Erna Will had th. antlclpat.d ,ucc.....,.ul«lnating in com- 
.i.,i.n. f.r th. J..i.h 0.-unlty O.nt.r In T.an..lc.K.J.(th. .lt. of h.r pr...nt 
h.m. and .tudlo) and for th. n., .ynagogu. on Soundri., AT.nu. in Ihit, Piain.. 

M,.t of th. 5« pi.c.. in h.r r.tro.pooti« .xhlhltion at Sohon.«.».. h.long 
to a ..rl.. in.pl.r.d by th. d.athl... .tori.. of th. Old T..ta»«nt ,ith th.ir 

i-po.ing oa.t/ of king..proph.t. and partriarohB.ln .0». of th «Iptur... 

11k. ...... on th. Kountaln".- Jacob Fight. th. Xng.l".-Re«lation. .h. .xt.nd. 

th. R.di...,». .tyl. of h.r p.rtrait. (n.tabl, th. bu.t. .f Hartln »»b.r.R»*- 
.If 3.rkin.01aud. frank) far to«rd. th. b.rd.rlin. .f c.i*l.t. ab.tr.oti... 

Oth.r..lik. .Outory-.-Ingath.ring .f th. Exil.." and "Th. ünkno« J-.litioal 
Prlsonar- ar. ..ulp ur.d .xpr..3ion. .f d..ply f.lt «.gui.h and o.-l..ratl.n. 
Xnd th. ..r.«.nial objo.t. -th. br.na. .«.n.rah- .th. o.ra.ac -Uats.h-.latt.r" 
and .ilr.r "Ohallah Pl.tt.r" .h., n.t unly oraft.«n.hip b«t al.o i«.inati.n 
m th. u.. of triangl. and pyraBid a. By.tio for».. 

ET.n thou* .... .f h.r „.bl..t.a.hi.T.»«t..llk. th. largo bronz. r.li.f 

.,a..b'. Dr.a-" f.r th. .ynag.gu. in T.an.ok.and th. i.p..i»g ~rbl. oarTln, 
..al Sh.-" ara.by ......lt,..nly r pr...nt.d by phot.gr.ph..tlil. .«hiÄlo. 



V.T. 



t.ll. why irna W.ill Delongt today to th. distingui.hed froup .f »rti.te 
whtt« w»rk« »dorn tht most mod«rn iyiiÄgogut. in the ünlt.d Stat... 



I « 



* t 
I 



S.F*Doll3ln 

3746 85th Street 

Jackson Heights 72,N,Y. 



New York, April 27,57 



Ify dear Erna Welll, 



You cannot poesibly imagine my feelings 



» » 

* 1. . • 



at the sight pf thc many senseless distortlons.-corrections" and delctions 



* V 



perpetrated upon my article in "Aufbau • .....: 

Someone in the editorial department.Bcemingly in cahoots with compos- 
itor and proof-reader,rode roughshod over lines.syntax and gramar of my 

critique. 

To put it Btraight,! attach my copy of the original text,not yet 



adulterated in printer's ink. 



Ify apologies! 



Sincerely yours 



/W^'^ 



erna 





sculpture 

schoneman gallery 



63 cast 57tli strcet 



iiew york city 



april 23 may 16. 



called upon io analyze an artist's oeuvre, 
one is tempied io speak ab out his schooling, 
artistic ancestry and iiidividual style, tech- 
nically and artistkally. — but in tlie case of 
erna weilt this approacli would faü, because 
the driving forte behhid her work is mainly 
rootcd in spiritual and emotional sod. 

that this ariist was born and cducated 
in frankfort-on-ihe-main, for Centimes a 
Center of german-jewish culture and aris, 
and became indoctrinated with tlie thoughts 
of the jewish phüosopher martin buber, these 
were circumstances which left their tmpnnt 
an her oeuvre not less, than did her early 
schooling by a pupil of auguste rodm. 

the anguish and torment of witnessing 
the horrible fatc of her jewish Urethren in 
her homeland engendered in her a compasswn 
which liftcd the exprcssionistic power of 
raany of her sculpiurcs to heights dose io 
the oeuvre of kacte kollwitz. 

in her poriraiisy admiralion for the spir- 
itual or artistic achicvements of her sitters, 
cven adoration for them as human beings 
are i^aramount movers, dictaiing style and 
trcatment of her sculptural media. 

her devotional objccts, because of the 
inspired use of irianglc and pyramui as 
mystic forms, belong to her most individual 
achievements. and the deaihless stones of 
ihe old testament with their cast of kmgs, 
propheis and patriarchs are a mam source 
of her scidpiural ideas. 

ihe ecstasics of love and commiscration, 
picty and suppUcaiion find exjjression in her 
most accomplishcd, soinetimes almost absiract 
work small wonder that she was commis-%^ 
sioned to do a sculpture for ihe entrance 
hall of the jewish centcr in teaneck, n. j., 
were she lives, works and teaches, this bronze, 
''jacob's drcam'' bclongs to ihe disimguished 
works of jewish artists that adorn some 
modern synagogues in ihe united states, 

b. f, dolbin. 



critics from former exhibitions: 

larry camphell i7i the *'art ncws": erna weill is 
conccrned with the relationship of two figurcs tn 
conflict — or in affeciion — . 

aline louchhetmsaarinen, ''new york times": 
ihis is a sculptor who manages to comhine emotional 
approach with a true plastic sense, — onc marble 
piece hos a stolid conviction — . 

carlyle hurrows in the ** herald tribune": erna 
wciirs sculpture — resolute modclling — dramattc 
ivipact, — sinccrity and depth of feeling — . 



sculpture 

1. bathing in light (limestone) 

2. blessings (vermont marble) 

3a. elijah and elisah (marble eoncrcte) 
3b. elijah and elisah (bronze) 

4. dialogue (art stone) 

5. lovers 

6. ceres 

7. waterbuffalos 

8. best drink 

9. twilight 

10. danee of love 

11. mother 

12. prayer 

13. ehassid 

14. revelation 

15. dream (bronze) 

16. outcry 

17. moses on the mountain 

18. ingathering of the exiles 

19. '' — and she put moses down at the briiik 
of the river — '' 

20. hannah 

21. the unknown political prisoner 

22. Jacob fights the angel 

23. photo of ''baal slienr' (marble) 

24 photo of ^'jacob's dream" (bronze) 

portraits 

25. martin buber 

26. e. w. 

27. Claude frank, pianist 

28. rudolf serkin, pianist 

29. nathan milstein, violinist 

30. yemenite girl 

ceremonial objects 

31. ehallah platter 

32. matzoh platter 

33. menorah 

34. shabath candleholder 



some of these sculptures are in the permanent collcction 
of the georgia state museum, athens, georgia; hirming- 
ham museum, alahama; jewish museuvi, n. y.; hccalcl 
museum Jerusalem; jewish Community centcr, teanccl\ 
n. j,; hehrew university, Jerusalem. 



/ 




erna 





f^'. 



sculpture 



A 




schoneman gallery 

|63 oasl 57t h stroet 





I » 



"^ ^ new york eitv 

cxprn lyl /miav iß,,' 






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(f) ''a:>o^PcA 




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m\hd upon io anahjzt an artist', w,„fc-, 

rooUd ,n^Wüu„l and emofionai loil J 

Center of gcrman^^cunsh cultnre and arti 
and hecanie mdocfrinated tvith ihe thouahl 

V'^rfi r uxMimtanccswkich left thcir imprini 
schoohng by apupü of auguste rod7n. ' 
I^L^jmMe fate of her jewish brethren h, 

man „f hf. , "^'P^^'^'oni.tic power of 
many of her sciUptures to heioMs do.r L 
the. oi„vre of kaete kollwitz 

e'cn adnrltl f<'hte^^ements of her sitters, 

TeatZn^otf^'T:' ^:''"''«^ style aS 
'■tmtment of her seulptural media. 

. ^r devotional objects. becau^r nt th. 
inspirea use of; trmngle and vüramiri «.. 

StA- S"^;; j- -nsi:; 

prophets and patrZlt aZ n • ^ ^'''^'' 

metl^LT^"'^^- "f- ^"^'^ "«^ conimiseration ^' 
Tgtety and supphcation find exnres<iint, ,"« \1" 

siowfd /o rf,, 'o^^o^r that she was conimis- 

Znftr.-T^P^''''' for the cntrance 
fall of thc jewtsh centcr in tean^ck 7 7 

»irK ^/ I &l^'^«^s^o ^A. di.tingtmhed 

"""'"" ^*y'"'fi">i7«^Ä in thc united states 

b. f. dolbin. 



ÖxiBbitit>] 



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7 



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sculpture 

1. bathiü^^ in ligiit (limestone) 

2. blessings ( Vermont iiiarble) 
3a. elijah and elisah (marble concreto) 
3b. elijah and elisah (bronze) 
4. dialogue (art stoue) 

lovers 
ö^^eeres 

7. waterbiiffalos 

8. best drink 

9. twilight 

10, dance of loye, 

11. mother 
12.,^prayer 

"^ ßT' i;^\:eIation 

15. dEeam. (bronze) 
oiitci:^ 

njoses on the mountain 
ingathering of the exiles 

o/^tiSr^'^ 
hannali 

the unknown political prisoner 

Jacob fights the angel __^ -^ 




16. 
17. 
18. 
If). 

20. 
21. 
22. 



24;'fl.hoto or'jacoh's dreani" (brp.ze> 






1 



25. 

26. 
27. 
28. 
^. 



portraits 

martiii bubeiv 
e. w. 

Claude frank, piaiii.st 
rudolf serkiii, pia„i,sf 
nathaii milstein, violini.st 
.vemonite girl 




'3( 



:^. 



rnhr, from f armer exhibitions ■ 
aJine tou-chheimsanrin^„ << 



31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 



ceremonial objecto 

chalhUi platter 
matzoh platter 
menorah 
Jjihabath caadleholder 

I /Jerusnj,m.; je lish -o un / l 'y J?''^'"'*' "">«<>"«' 



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PRINTING - ENGRAVING 



172 STATE STREET 



WEST ENGLEWaaD, N. J 



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LEPHONE TEANECK 7-41A1 



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^■^ ^^ 



C:<ITICP FROM FOi^ER EXKIBITIONf! t 



Larry Crmpbell In the ^lArt Neirn^' x — Fma velll In oonccmed 
wlth the relatlonnhlp of t\ro flfruren In confllct or In affectlon — 

/'JLlne Louohlielm-Saprlneni "l'evr York Tlmer>" : Thlr Ir p 

Gculptor who mojir.f:e p. to cornblno emotional appror.ch idth a tmr plar^tlc 

sence, one marble plece hao a stolld convlctlon • 

Cr.rlyle Burroirs In the •^Heralrl Tribüne*' : Erna ''elll,© 

Gculpture— rrnolute modelllnij. — - dramatlc impact,*--- clnoerity and 
dopth of feellnp. -• 



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5. 
6^ 

7. 

8, 

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f. 3athln!:f in llr^it (limestone) 

2# BleeBinfrn (Vermont marblo) 

3a Klljaii r?nd • llß.ali (raarble concrete) 

3b^ iCLlJah and Elicah(T>ron:!;o) 

4* DialOfTue (art ctone) 

Lovcrs 

Geres 

^^-^torbuffaloc 

Best Drink 

Txvillfrht 
lo. Dance of Love 
ll^llother 
12.Pr:'yer 
13%?hacDld 

M- ^ " 

15Vi>renjn 

l6*Cutcry 

VJ. -otQB on the Mountain 

iB^Inratherlnf' of the Exllec 

19 # — and öliG put Mo BOG doi^ii at the brinlc 

2o#' arinah 

2i»Thc \mImo\m pollticnl prinonor 

22t Jacob flcl^itB the Anrel 

23» lioto of" Saal ^^^em" (-lar' le) 

24, Photo of ''Jo-cobB DrGam"( brenne) 




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:^idolf r-crkln , plonlnt 
Ilathrn nilsteln , vlollnlct 
YeracnltG Girl 



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V.;.: OHIAL OBJSCTS 



31, Chlloii Platter 

32, Matsoh Platter 

33, menors7li 

3^1-, ohabath Candleholdcr 






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Blrminf^am '■up.eum/Ala. , Jewidi I^unomAT.Y. t Besalcl ITureum/Jerunalem , 
Ternock Jex'^lsh Coiimmnlty Genter/N.J, , Hebrevr UnlverGlty/Jerusalöra« 



^sa^üi^ja iLüniBiL 



PRINTINB - ENGRAVING 



1'7 2 STATE STREET 



WEST ENQLEWaOD, N. d 



ELEPHONE TEANECK 7-41^1 





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Zistk anccstry and indwrdual / 4/'«; ';^J. 

rooted in spiritwal and emotional sml. 

thlttUs artist was hörn and educated 
i. Miort.on4he.mam, for centvries a 
Ltir Tgerrnan-jemsh culture and arU 

ZdlcLt indoctUnated -it;\J^J;Zm 
of the jewish vMos<>pher'mar m^^^^^^ 
were circumstances whieh left *'^«'^ J ^1^1 
Zher oeuvre not Im than did her early 

the anguish and t orment of , f ^"f _^i!zl 



CA\A'yOL''^'^-^<::^ 




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^Uiga^;^the horribU fate of her Jmish 

T^T^^in her homeland engendered m her 
Irethren in «''^ ""' , , ,j^ exsrpsstomsttc 

^mliirprrt^mfrp^^l'onf^^^^^ 
itml or artistic aehievements öf H ,mrs, 

e,,en adoration for them as J^^'^J/'^d 
cre paramomt movers, dfaUng sii)le am 
treaLent of her sculpt^al^^^^^^ 

her devotional ohjects, Ofcaim o(. » 

X^tsaTpatnarck. are a « souroe 
"^ 'TJÄS T^ve and conmiseration. 

M Zdoatulpture for the e.trance. 
^Tof thciewm center in tear.ech n. J., 
ttrel/ ^iSrÄs and teaches^ilfs Ironie 
^'Zcob'sdreäm'' helong to the dist,.ngM 
Jorks of lewish wrtists that adorn some 

' \ 

^pproach with a ine fasUc s^nse, 

^iece hos a «ioW <'7''»« ,7. ."^„w irihune": erna 
carlj/le hurrgms in the ««^ _ aramutio 



i)"^ 



'V 



exhibition april 23;r-niay 1^> df^'-.lr ^ • - : ^^ I(p > 



# 



I, 



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ßculpture 

I. bathing in liffht (limestone) 
2 blessiugs (vermont marble) 
3a. elijah and elisah (marble concrete); 
3b. elijah and elisah (bronze) 

4. dialogue (art stone) c. 

5. lovers 
6.^^ ceres •' ' 

7. waterbuffalo^r 

8. bestiJrink 

9. twiligbt 
10. dance of lave- 

II. mother 
12. prayer 

^. IS.^chassid ^^ ,^ 

14. pevrilatiott — ^^^^-' ' 

15. dream (bronae) 

16. outcry 

IT: moses on the mountam 
18. ingathering of the exiles ' ^ 

Ä ^ 19. j^— and she put moses down at tlu^ -n-infc 
/^•^i— ^ of the river — U 
f . 20, hannah 

2i; the unknown politieal prisoner 
2i jaoob fights the angel, 
' ^. 23.r photo of *'baal shem" (marble) 
\ 24.^ Photo of -jacofe^s dream " (bronze > 
■^ Portrait»,' ^ — 

/ SS. ^itf . martiu Tuber ; ;:> ^ 



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e. w. 



„^ claade frank, piaiust 

J8. rudolf serkin, piauist 

29. nathan milstein, violinisi 

30. yemenite girl 

^^^^ceremoniaL objecta ^^ « 

31. cijlrt platter 6^A^££Z^^fO 

32. matzoh platter 

33. menorah 

34. shabath candleholder 

• these sculptures are i^^,^^ P^/i^^^ 
lection of the: georgia ^^f \^^ ^^^^^,^' ^^se^^ . 
ga, birmingham museum/ala., J^^^^h mu^üi^ 
/n V bezalel museum/jerusalem,Qeaneck3. 
jewish' Community center^n. j., hebrl^nOn? 
versity/jerusalena. £ j ' 



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££ pjAO^ /^L^tiL. 



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V^. • 1957 



"Coranontr.ry" 
Art ")opt, 

^^criQcn Jevrloh C^ommlttoG 
34 vfcct 33 rt 
Tiei- York City 



Doar "Ir , 



?«::n r* ^» ^.lilch , ao you cr.n reo fi-on ^.ho In- 

in .ory deoply stln^a by ,1o.lä.^ibj^St'mrkor. 

to mr-Icc nn p.ppolntncnt. ~ -cncc. r-l,,..7 



X^^ 






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A/5, , 1957 



Mr. orln f^r^Alow 

Jcvrlr;h '■^elee-raphÄc "ccr.cy 

660 li'Qt ."-ve 

II. Y 



i % 



De er l!r, rmolor , 



I Includc DOmo catlortier of my 
evhil-ltlon , In vhlch I thourlit you mirht be In- 

torootcd , "bocauco "^y vor^- ic ?:r.liily Gtirinilnte'i 
by Jovrld:. cuLloct nattor. 

bronac; -^llcf Tor *iin 'reoiroolt Jr l'-Oa -or^npi* ty^"^^- 
Center ■■iif'. I ^-ri ircrklnjr. no" on r. dcclfii xor : icripie 

In* '.'ectchcetcr , , „«^ 

I I-.c-Df! rou v;ill hr\rr « chrono© 

to noü ".ho crlilblt , t-hlch^ In novr opcn to rc-^ortcre 
only. 



Slnoer-ely yoxirr... 




-. » 



«,-*» 



( 



^T'.; 



S' 




WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART 

22 WEST 64tli ST. • NEW YORK 19 • COLUMBUS 5-5300 



April 10, 1957 



GERTRUDE V WHITNEY, FOUNDER 
FLORA WHITNEY MILLER, PRESIDENT 



HERMON MORE 

Director 

LLOYD GOODRICH 

Associale Director 

JOHN L H. BAUR 

Curator 

ROSA LIND IRVINE 

Associate Curator 

MARGARET McKELLAR 
Executive Secretary 



Miss Erna Weill 
886 Alpine Drive 
Teaneck, New Jersey 

Dear Miss Weill: 

Thank you for your letter of April 5- ^y^?^?f, 
more of us will certainly try to see your exhibition 
at the Schoneiuan Gallery. 



Yoiirs sincerely, 




JTH3:pw 



EXHIBITION AT SCHONE AN GALLaRIES 



April 21 Issue: N I Times 

Herald Tribüne 



1 inch 
1 " 




V"" 



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A 



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§ 




% 30.33 

2U.gO 

$ 5U.88 



Rough Proof of your odv«rfisement in 

^ ^^^ To mss 




IStUf OF 




1 16 East 59th Street, New York 22, N. Y. • PLaza 9-7621 

FOR IMMEDIATE APPROVAL 



B«low ic a proof of your advertisement, set according 
to your copy and initructions, in conformance with 
oor typogrophic regulations. We shall, without cost 
to yöy, corracf any errors in wording made by us. 
r, w tlioü h<nre to bill you et cost (chorged 



by our printer) for ony other olterations you moke 
in this üdvertisement, in accordonce with Standard 
mogazine Publishing custom. Approvol must b« re- 
ceived by noon of press dote indicated above. 



SlUnce Means Appioval. 



scufpture by 



erna 



apif 



23-moV 



^6 



Schoneman 

63 East 57, N.Y.C. 



Rough Proof of your odvdrfisement in 

TO PIESS 



ISfUE OF 




116 East 59th Street, New York 22, N. Y. • PLoza 9-7621 

FOR IMMEDIATE APPROVAL 



Below ii a proof of your odvertisement, set occording 
to yoyr copy ond Instructions, in conformonce with 
ovr typogrophic reguiotions. We sholl, without cost 
to you, correct ony errors in wording made by us. 
r, W9 tholl have to bill you et cost (chorged 



by our printer) for ony other olterations you moke 
in this odvertisement, in accordonce with Standard 
magazine Publishing custom. Approval must b« re- 
ceived by noon of press date indicated obove. 



Sfience Means Approval. 



scufpture by 



erna 



Op^ 



23-moV 



^6 



Schoneman 

.63 East 57, N.Y.C.