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THE BUZZER 



YEARBOOK 
NUMBER 

1926 




Published by the 

STUDENTS OF EUCLID HIGH SCHOOL 

EUCLID VILLAGE, OHIO 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Euclid Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/euclidcentralhig1926unse 



ALMA MATER 

Euclid High School! Euclid High School! 

Hear our praises ring! 

Faith and loyalty forever 

Is the pledge we bring. 

Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Proud, we hail thee, 

We'll ne'er forget thee, 

Wherever we may be, 

Hail to our Alma Mater, 

Euclid High ! 



THE BUZZER 1926 



FACULTY 

WILBERT A. FRANKS— Superintendent of Schools. L.B. Ohio Wesleyan 1903. 
A. B. Colorado Teachers' College, 1910. M.A. Denver University, 1914. 

ROY B. SHARROCK— Principal of High School. A.B. Wooster, 1921. Summer 
Work Columbia University, 1923, 1924. 

AGNES M. BURGESS— Latin and French. Librarian. A. B. Western Reserve 
College for Women, 1915. Summer Work, Western Reserve College for 
Women, 1918, 1920, 1924. 

DOROTHY LEAMON— English. Dramatics. Journalism. A.B. Hiram, 1917. 
Summer Work, Ohio State University, 1918, 1920, 1921, 1922. M.A. Ohio 
State University, 1923. 

DONALD C. BAY— History. A.B. Otterbein, 1921. Summer Work, Otterbein, 
1919, 1920. 



EVELVIA MAE MEYER— Mathematics. Assistant Librarian. 
1922. Summer Work, Columbia University, 1923, 1924. 




A.B. Heidelberg, 

I l y - 

HELEN H. KING — Commercial. Assistant Librarian. B.S. Margare? Morrison 
Carnegie College, 1922. 

JULIET WELLER EAKIN— English. Latin. A.B. Muskingum, 1920. Summer 
Work at University of Chicago. 

RICHARD R. KEAY— Science. Assistant Coach. A.B. Miami, 1921. Special 
Work at Western Reserve University. 

ALFRED W. RADER— Manual Arts. Athletics Coach. Ohio University, 1913-16. 
Ohio State 1916, 1918. 

H. BELLE HILL— Domestic Arts. B.Ped. D.S. Bethany, 1913. Cleveland School 
of Art, 1923. 

MAUDE B. FAETKENHEUER— Supervisor of Music. A.B. Western Reserve 
College for Women, 1913. Summer Work, Cleveland School of Education, 
191,8, 1919, 1920. 

M. KING — Assistant Supervisor of Music. Orchestra. Dana Conservatory 
ofifMusic, 1922. Pupil of Arthur Beckwith. 

DORIS M. SAVAGE— Physical Education. Radcliffe 1919-20. Sargent, 1920. 
A.B. Oberlin, 1922. Western Reserve University, 1923-24. 

GRACE E. HENRY— Art. Cleveland School of Art, 1918. Summer Work, Kent, 
1914. Case, 1918. Berkshire Summer School, 1923, 1924. 



5] 



THE BUZZER 1 926 



CLASS OF 1926 

Colors — Blue and Gold. 
Motto — Facta non verba 

President John Hattendorf 

Vice President - - - Grace Chapman 

Secretary ----- Gertrude Fouts 

Treasurer Esther Martens 

Sponsor Miss Burgess 

In the fall of the year nineteen hundred and twenty-two, Euclid High School opened 
its doors to the nucleus of the present graduating class. As freshmen, these boys and 
girls trod the halls arrogantly, confident in their cleverness. Then their pride received a 
blow. Due to confusion in schedules, they spent half a period in the laboratory, waiting 
for a teacher. When the instructor finally arrived, he conducted them to study hall, where 
they were greeted with derisive cries of "green". 

Then came the long dreaded initiation. One day, the quiet was shattered by fiendish 
war cries, and the sophs bore down upon the fully terrified freshmen. The freshmen 
rallied their forces and met the sophs blow for blow. When the dust of the conflict finally 
vanished, the freshmen were seen marching victoriously away, bearing with them many 
trophies of the battle; while the sophomores feebly arose, murmuring, "Whose initiation 
was this anyway?" 

The year went by rapidly and, before they could realize it, the green freshies had 
become clever sophomores. Practically all of the class belonged to the glee clubs, and most 
of them were progressing famously in athletics. Miss Burgess was the class sponsor 
and was piloting them safely through all their trials. 

Then came the busy, brilliant junior year, bringing with it the class play "Come 
Out of the Kitchen" and the two parties, all of which were successful. Two juniors were 
admitted to the Honor Society, and several were given leading parts in the operetta. 

Too quickly, it seemed, they became seniors. Although glorying in their exalted 
position, they sighed faintly as they realized that soon they must leave the high school 
with all its joys and trials. The other classes would miss them, too, for the girls' 
basketball team was, except for one player, made up of seniors. Three seniors were on 
the boys' team and one was its captain. Two seniors had charge of the assembly pro- 
grams and one was leader of the girls' glee club. All in all, they had undeniably made 
a place for themselves in the life of Euclid High School. 

As their last year drew to a close, many seniors thought regretfully of the hours 
wasted and the studies neglected, half wishing they could begin all over again. At the 
same time they braced their shoulders, facing the world with a grin and the determination 
to do their best for the honor of the class of '26. 



16] 



THE BUZZER 1 926 



Elizabeth Ann Bliss "Liz" 
Glee Club (1, 2, 3), Class Treasurer (3). 
"/ loathe that low voice, curiosity." 



Grace Margaret Chapman "Chappie" 

Basketball (3, 4, Manager 4), "Come Out 
of the Kitchen" (3), "The Boomerang (4), 
Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4), Buzzer 
Staff News Editor (2), Class Offices — Secre- 
tary (1), President (2), Vice-President (4). 
"When once our Grace we have forgot 
Nothing goes aright." 



Cleotha Bernice Cook "Peggy" 

"Come Out of the Kitchen" Business Mana- 
ger (3), Glee Club (3, 4), "Mikado" Publi- 
city Manager (4), Buzzer Staff News Editor 
(4), Honor Society (3, 4, President '25), 
Class President (3), Journalism (4), School 
Reporter (3, 4), Music Memory Contest 
(3, 4). 

"Helter-skelter 
Hurry-scurry." 



Theodora Lois Deringer "Teddy" 

"Come Out of the Kitchen" (3), "Trysting 
Place" (4), "The Boomerang" (4), Glee 
Club (2, 3, 4, Librarian 3, Leader 4), "Cap- 
tain Crossbones" (3). Buzzer Staff Literary 
Editor (3, 4), Honor Society (3, 4, President 
'26), Glee Club Program (3), Journalism 
(4). 

"Independence now. 
Independence forever!" 



Ethel Marion Drackett "Speed" 

Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), Glee Club (1, 2. 
3, 4), Buzzer Staff Assistant News Editor 
(4), Class Secretary and Treasurer (2), 
Journalism (4). 

"Sparkling eyes has this maiden fair, 
A sunny smile and golden hair." 




[7 



THE BUZZER 1926 




Dorothy Helen Edwards "Dot" 
Shaw High (1, 2), "Trysting Place" (4), 
"The Boomerang" (4), Glee Club (4), Buz- 
zer Staff Feature Editor (4), Glee Club Pro- 
gram (3), "Nicette" (3), Athletic Association 
Advertising Secretary (4), Journalism (4). 
"She's pleasant to meet, though sometimes 
haughty, 
Chuck full of fun, but never naughty." 



Edith Eschbaugh 
Yale High, Okla. (1), Glee Club (2, 3, 4) 
"Not that I love study less, 



But I love fun more. 



Gertrude Fouts "Poutsie" 

Basketball (1, 2, 3. 4, Captain 4), Glee 
Club (1, 2, 3), Buzzer Staff News Editor (3), 
Class Offices — Vice-President (2), Secretary 
(3, 4). 

"In time of need, a friend indeed." 



Gerald Wayne Glover "Jerry" 

Basketball Manager (4), "Captain Cross- 
bones", Stage Manager (3), "Mikado", Stage 
Manager (4), Dramatic Club (2), General 
Stage Manager (2, 3. 4), West Park High ( 1 ). 
"A good sport, a willing worker, 
And an everlasting friend." 



John Edward Hattendorf "Hattie" 

Basketball (3, 4, Captain 4), Baseball (1, 
2, 3, 4, Manager 3), "Come Out of the Kit- 
chen" (3), "The Boomerang" (4), "The Mika- 
do" (4), Glee Club (1, 2, 3. 4), Buzzer Staff 
Business Manager (3), Class Offices — Vice- 
President (3), President (4). 
"I wonder if you possibly can 

Find a better model for a collar 'ad' man." 



[8] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



Dorothy Lucille Hess "Dot" 

Glenville High (1, 2, 3), "Mikado" (4) 
Glee Club (4). 

"Better the foot slip than the tongue." 



E. Gorham Hester 

Orchestra (3, 4), Athletic Association Sec- 
retary (4), "The Boomerang" (4), Warren 
High', Warren, Ohio (1, 2). 

"I swear his color is natural; 
I've seen it come and go." 



Helen Bart Irwin "Puck" 

"Come Out of the Kitchen" (3), "The 
Boomerang" (4), Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4). 
"Hath thy toil over books consumed 
the midnight oil?" 



Alice Frances Kline "Aliece" 

Glee Club (1, 2, 3, Accompanist 3), Or- 
chestra (2, 3). 

"A finer girl could not be found, 
If you went the world around." 



Elizabeth Kracker "Bettsy" 
Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Journalism (4). 
"The beginnings of all things are small." 




[9 



THE BUZZER 1 926 



y 




Paul D. Kurtz 

Glenville High (1, 2'_. ), Basketball (3, 4), 
Football (4), Track (3), Baseball (3, 4, Cap- 
tain 4), "Trysting Place" (4), "The Boom- 
erang" (4), Glee Club (3, 4), "Mikado" (4), 
Athletic Association President (4). 

"Tall, dignified, as a Senior should be, 
A mighty good fellow we all will agree." 



Merle R. Noles "Oh! Rollo!" 

Collinwood High (1), Glenville High (2), 
"Come Out of the Kitchen" (3), "The Boom- 
erang" (4), "Mikado" (4), Glee Club (3, 4), 
Accompanist 4), Orchestra (3, 4, Leader 4), 
"Trysting Place" (4), Music Memory Contest 
(3, 4). 

"Music exalts each joy, 
allays each grief." 



Esther Mayme Martens "Moses" 

Basketball (2, 3, 4). Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 
4), Class Treasurer (4), Music Memory Con- 
test (3, 4). 

"Favor to none, to all a smile extends, 
Off she rejects, but never once offends." 



Alberta N. Lyons "Bert" 

Glenville High (1, 2, 3), Buzzer Staff 
Business Manager (4), "The Boomerang" (4). 
"For I am nothing if not critical." 



Jennie M. Petkovsek "Iky" 
East High (1, 2), French Play (4). 
Ever a cheerful word as she passes you by.' 



[10] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



Robert McLaughlin Smith "Bob" 

Glenville High (1, Zyi), Basketball (4), 
Baseball (3, 4, Manager 4), "Trysting Place" 
(4), "The Boomerang" (4), Glee Club (3, 4). 
"The Smith a mighty man was he." 



Alyce Elora Strople "Shorty" 

Collinwood High (1). Glenville High (2, 
3), "Trysting Place" (4), "Mikado" (4), Glee 
Club (4). 

"Circumstances alter cases." 



Edith Mae Wadsworth "Wads" 
"Come Out of the Kitchen" (3), Basketball 
( 1 , 2, 3, 4, Captain 3 ) , Glee Club ( 1 ) . 
"Sometimes I sets and thinks, 
an' other times I jes' sets." 




Autogi~aphs 



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*- - *» 



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^ / i 1 1 » « - — 












THE BUZZER 1 926 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 

We, the Senior Class of Euclid High School, of the Village of Euclid, of the County 
of Cuyahoga and the State of Ohio, being of full age and sound mind and memory, do 
make, publish, and declare this to be our last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all 
wills by us heretofore made. 

ITEM 1 — We direct that all our just debts and outstanding expenses be paid from 
the surplus of the Senior Play by the sole executor of this Will, namely the Honorable and 
Distinguished Harry Farrel. 

ITEM 2 — We give, bequeath, and devise the following, to-wit : 

(1) To the School — (a) The memory of our quiet, orderly, studious attitudes in home 
room, (b) The reputation of having the best looking, best dressed, best behaved class 
that ever graced the corridors of Euclid High School, (c) Our ability to make and mar 
more characters than any class heretofore graduated. 

(2) To the Class of '27 — Our right to occupy the seats in Room 17 and to take 
possession of the initialed desks carved so artistically by us. 

ITEM 3 — We give, bequeath and devise the following, to-wit: 

To Mr. Sharrock — Our ability to drop and leave paper and scraps in halls and 
Room 17. 

To Miss Burgess — Our best wishes for a more agreeable class to sponsor and advise. 

To Mr. Keay — Our right to chew "Spearmint Brand" when and where we please; and 
our astounding theories relating to the mysteries of advanced science. 

To Mrs. King — All permits signed and unsigned, legally or otherwise. 

To Mr. Bay — The favorite joke book of the Senior Class and the hope that a new 
system of physical exercise will be introduced to keep future Civic Classes awake. 

To Miss Leamon — We leave our dramatic ability for future reference. 

To Mr. Rader — The hope that the loss of our athletic "stars" will not seriously affect 
the future of Euclid's games. 

ITEM 4 — We give, bequeath and advise the following, to-wit: 

1. Paul's ability to make students shake and shiver with his booming bass to Neil 
Shroeder. 

2. The great concentrating and sacrificing of Helen for her studies to Margaret 
Fancourt. 

3. The remains of Cleotha's powder puff and vanity case to the petite freshman 
Margaret Helberg. 

4. The wonderful record of attendance attained by Edith Eschbaugh to Alberta 
Laufer. 

5. Dorothy Hess's magnificent and cutting sarcasm to Gertrude Dubovicky. 

6- The roses in Elizabeth Kracker's cheeks and her wonderful complexion to Molly 
Recher. 

7. A gift much desired by many — getting along with teachers — to Marvin Saefkow 
by Alberta Lyons. 

8. Chappie's crowning glory, duly curled and waved, to the needy Helen Delaney. 

9. The romantic looks and signs bestowed by Merle upon shrinking damsels to 
Lenard Sadosky. 

10. Teddy's rousing and enthusiastic oratings to Easter Sanger. 

11. The least desired avordupois of Gorham to Elizabeth Heiss. 

12. Bob's ability to captivate fair maidens with his good looks to "Farmer" Telling. 

13. From sister to brother — "Wads" bestows her geniality upon Orin. 

14. Hard work and plenty of it gives Jerry when he bestows his stage managing to 
Edward Coltrin. 

15. "Hattie's" habit of perfectly creased trousers to Bernard Sadosky. 

We appoint Mr. Farrel sole executor of this Will and direct that he shall be required 
to give bond in qualifying as such executor. 

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, we hereunto set our hand this 16th day of April, in 
the year One Thousand Nine Hundred and Twenty-six. 

CLASS OF 1926. 

Signed, published and declared by the above named Class of 1926 as and for their 
Last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in their presence and in the presence of 
each other and at their request have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. 

Theodora L. Deringer 
Cleotha B. Cook 
Elizabeth L. Kracker 

[12] 



THE BUZZER 1 926 



PLEASANT MEMORIES 

A white-haired old gentleman dozed by the fire 

And puffed wreaths of smoke from his pipe. 

As his eyes grew dim, old thoughts came back, 

Of the times ere his own youth was ripe. 

"Yes, those were the days when we studied, 

And often we didn't half try; 

No wonder our teachers complained, 

Back there in old Euclid High. 

How much fun we thought we were having, 

When we played foolish pranks on the sly. 

But the studies and parties and games, 

Kept us going at old Euclid High. 

Yes, I'd give some years from my life 

To stand at an old game and cry, 

When the fellow had just made a touchdown, 

'Nine rahs, for old Euclid High!'" 



SENIOR SKETCHES I. 

That she's athletic — studious, too — 

We have no doubts. 
She's little, peppy, full of cheer; 

Her nickname's — »• 

SENIOR SKETCHES II. 
In love she's fickle, very fickle, 

And yet she does have lover's luck. 
Her nature is so very prim 

That we all call her — 

SENIOR SKETCHES III. 
"Hello, old dear," we hear her say, 

This clever girl, just made for play; 
Curly hair and manner snappy, 

Her friends and classmates call her 

SENIOR SKETCHES IV. 
She's forward, but she isn't bold, 

For southern climes she's professed a need; 
Her eyes are blue, her hair is gold, 

Because she's slow, we call her 

SENIOR SKETCHES V. 
He's cute. He's fat. 
He wears no hat. 

He studies the Roman forum. 
He flirts. He smiles. 
Falls for no wiles. 

His christian name is 

SENIOR SKETCHES VI. 

Want something done? Done right? 

Is your load too big to carry? 
If you need some help, given with a smile. 

Ask 

SENIOR SKETCHES VII. 
He heads his class, 
Steps on the gas, 

Thinks some of the girls are catty; 
Though his smiles are few, 
They're treasured too; „» 

Let's give three cheers for— 



L^] 




[H 



THE BUZZER 1 926 



SCHOOL ROSTER 



JUNIORS 



John Korencic 
Easter Sanger 
Laura Swartz 
Florence Lindeman 



Virgil Camm 
Hester Ensminger 
Margaret Fancourt 
Catherine M. Hall 
Ethel F. Harris 
Slava G. Kubic 



Sponsor — Miss Leamon 

Alberta Laufer 
Edward E. LeBreton 
Doris E. Linman 
Catherine J. Moeller 
Thurlow A. Phypers 
Esther M. Pittman 
Margaret Ranellucci 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



William E. Rogers 
Marvin F. Saefkow 
Bernard T. Telling 
Annette E. Walter 
Carl R. Wedler 
Orin L. Wadsworth 



Henry Powers 
Lee Pinney 
Pauline Johns 
Clara Hawk 



Virginia Bargar 
Gertrude Beck 
Maurice H. Berg 
Jack Chapman 
Paul E. Clasen 
Ruth E. Davis 
Justin E. Foldessy 
Armand E. Foldessy 
Catherine Glassford 
Richard G. Gent 
Helen A. Gibbs 



Kenneth Spuhler 
Helen Lake 
Virginia Fisher 



Carl J. Albrecht 
Victor C. CieChanski 
Arline Cline 
Archie H. Daniels 
Helen D. Delaney 
Robert DeTchon 
Gertrude Dubovicky 
Clair C. Eminger 
Stanley Fisher 
Virginia Fisher 
Stanley O. Fisher 
Harry L. Giles 
William F. Hall 



Louise Beck 
Willard C. Billheimer 
Thomas Caito 
Vincent Caito 
Edward D. Coltrin 
Robert H. Cook 



SOPHOMORES 



Sponsor — Miss Meyer 

Naomi Green 
Joseph J. Grilc 
Russell N. Hanslik 
Henry Koll 
Helen Kracker 
Dawson Lung 
Emil Maulis 
Clarence M. Moeller 
Evelyn M. Owen 
Molly Recher 



FRESHMEN— A 



Sponsor — Mr. Bay 

Dorothy L. Hattendorf 
Elizabeth C. Heiss 
Margaret H. Helberg 
Dorothy L. Jaquays 
Clifton N. Kimball 
Spence O. Kline 
Katherine A. Kluever 
Richard Koss 
Julius O. Krihwan 
Gwendolyn LaFollette 
Lyle J. LaFollette 
Anna J. Majer 
William F. Martens 

FRESHMEN— B 
Lennart H. Erickson 
William Gorman 
Kenneth Green 
Wilfred Jaffray 
Charles Kulwinskas 
Brannie Kulwinskas 
Harold E. Musser 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Lucille C. Shaffer 
Hilda S. Scheuring 
Neil R. Schroeder 
Arthur Simonelli 
Annabelle Stephan 
Edward G. Steinbrenner 
Mary Stirner 
Rocco Vinciquerra 
Jack F. Wedler 
Margaret M. Zelinske 
Bernard X. Sadosky 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretarv-Treasurer 



Grace Oetjen 
Gust Pontoni 
Wm. E. Pennington 
Louis Petti 
Lenard X. Sodosky 
Roy G. Simmons 
Lilian Somnitz 
Elmer E. Springer 
Joe Sintic 
Rudolph Tecancic 
Steve Trebec 
Charles Wanstall 
John F. Widmer 



Pauline M. Peskar 
William M. Ranellucci 
Ruth Rinzler 
Doris Simmons 
Rose Sojka 
Myrtle M. Yahrus 



[15] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



BLUE SEA 

Alberta Lyons '26 

When we first came to Blue-Sea, I was a little tyke, unusually impressionable after 
a spell of diphtheria, from which, they say, it takes a good year's time to recover. We 
settled in the midst of prominent Bohemians with such outrageous names as Sappho, 
Cappuch, Kryzanowski, and Schlenk. They all raised pickles. It seems to me that the 
sight of a pickle will always bring back the memory of long, low fields of that hardy, 
unlovely vegetable. The land, very mucky and dry, was fit only for the producing of 
pickles. 

Just above the meadow, east of our great rambling house, lay the immense forest. 
There I used to wander by the hour, eating huckleberries, the largest I have ever seen. 

Father's busiest season came at that time, and because I was too weak to pick the 
"cukes", as the darkies called them, I often sat in the swing playing the guitar for them. 
After a time I grew to be quite clever at twanging the strings and, according to the boys, 
we used to have some great old-fashioned melodies. The biggest of the colored men had 
an unusually sweet tenor voice. We never were tired of hearing him sing "Swing Low, 
Sweet Chariot." Now that I look back on those days, I realize how ludicrous it must 
have been for the chance-passer-by to see me — an ugly, tow-headed youngster — strumming 
on that old guitar, while Ulysses blended his quick, high notes with Brown's rough, deep 
ones. 

And one day, we had an addition to the pickle-farm in the shape of a tall, lanky 
darky named Jenkins. He was the most refined negro we had, very light in color. Mother 
always said there was something peculiar about his yellow-brown eyes — a queer in- 
scrutable look in them. He constantly looked behind him. and was always ready to run 
at the slightest alarm. 

Great was our joy when we found that Jenkins had a voice better than the average. 
A clear, melodious tone that used to melt into "Down in Honolulu, where the drifting 
waters play, In Honolulu." We didn't care anything about Jenkins' eyes, but Mother always 
worried about him. 

Every evening after supper we would gather on the porch, and make the darkies 
sing for us. Sometimes those days were insufferably hot; the dry, mucky earth fairly 
cracked with the intense heat. But oh — the evening! Cool sweet breezes would come 
wafting in like tall white ships from blue, blue waters. 

On the tenth of August about midnight, I lay in my little white bed, wondering how 
anyone could sleep on a night like that. Even the sky looked warm and sultry, while the 
moon sought refuge behind a cloud. I knew it would rain before morning. Slipping into my 
bathrobe, I crept softly down the stairs out into the open. A slight breeze had risen, and 
its gentle touch cooled my head wonderfully. It was then that I saw the Shadow, out by 
the cooling house. A long grotesque figure, flopping aimlessly in the breeze. 

Something told me who it was, but it seemed an hour before I could move toward 
it. Nearer and nearer I stole, my hands trembling violently, my whole body overcome 
with a feeling of nausea. I felt as if some weight were on my head, wearing my very 
soul down. 

There, staring at me, his black face swelled to twice its normal size, his lips purple 
and thick, hung the dead body of Jenkins, swinging lightly in the wind — like a rag doll. 
Dead; dead as a rock, as a stone — yet seeming so fearfully alive! 

Creeping back — if only I could overcome that dreadful feeling of nausea, that weight 
on my soul, the crushing shadows over me — creeping until that merciful darkness enveloped 
me, and I was conscious only of a great, glad splash of water on my cheek. Only the 
rain, coming in swift, clean torrents, could clear my mind of that vision. In my ignorant 
fancy I imagined the rain washing away the sight of that. 

As the days went by, I became stronger, normal again. The crushing experience 
had left me spent, weary; and it seemed to me, old. Yet the time came when I could 
run again, laugh again. 

It is all like an unpleasant dream, now. But I have never played a guitar since 
that night nor even heard one, without hearing, also, a clear melodious voice softly 
singing, "Underneath Hawaiian Skies, In Honolulu." 

I 16 1 



THE BUZZER 1926 



THE STRUGGLE ON THE TUNDRA 

Robert Smith '26 

Three men toiled through the powdery snow of a windswept tundra, a thousand 
miles north of Fort Dupre. The men in the rear stumbled along, falling often. 
Across their eyes lay a blood red film, which to men of the snow-country spells 
snow blindness. Encircling the waist of the leader was a rope to which the others 
clung. The faces of all three were grotesque in the black masks which their frozen 
breath had formed. No sound except the labored breathing of the men disturbed 
the intense quiet of the arctic night. Occasionally the sharp crack of a tree, split 
asunder by the terrific cold, broke the silence from the dark line of trees that marked 
the edge of the tundra. 

Trapping had been good that fall and the men had lingered at their lines until 
imminent failure of their provisions had forced them to pack and leave for the 
little post two hundred miles south. Their departure had been delayed too long, 
for about noon of the second day the mercury began to fall rapidly. By evening 
they were overtaken by a raging blizzard. The storm had lasted three days, during 
which time traveling was impossible. In their more or less snug shelter of a 
clump of scrub pine the men had watched with growing concern the rapid diminish- 
ing of their foodstuff. 

Toward the evening of the third day the storm had abated, accompanied by a 
further drop in temperature. The next morning had dawned clear and intensely 
cold. Then had followed a struggle across the tundra toward the line of timber 
just visible across the dazzling open. 

When night came, they were almost within the shelter of the timber. But 
the damage had been done. Two of the number were stone blind from the glare 
that had beaten itself on their unprotected eyes all day. As the three trappers sat 
huddled around the fire in the edge of the timber, two stared sightlessly into 
the leaping flames while the face of the third showed signs of an intense inward 
struggle. He looked from his comrades to the meager stack of supplies. Little 
more than half the distance to the post had been covered, the provisions were 
almost gone, his comrades were helpless. Without them he could easily reach the 
post and home. Where did his duty lie? With his family or his helpless friends? 

Then he thought of Marie, her raven hair, her rosy cheeks. He remembered 
how she had looked when he had last seen her, standing in the doorway of the 
cabin holding little Pierre up so he could see daddy before a bend in the trail hid 
him from view. 

A determined look settled on the trapper's face. Rising quietly, he moved 
rapidly over to the supplies and began to pack them into a small bundle. Then 
an ugly thought entered his mind. Would Marie welcome him under the circum- 
stances? He remembered how she had admired his fair play in rough and ready 
bouts with fellow trappers. Slowly, with bowed head, he resumed his seat. 

Three days later the factor at the post saw three gaunt, starved-looking men 
stumble down the trail. In the eyes of two of the men he saw the ravages of snow- 
blindness. In the eyes of the third he discerned a light that he was at a loss 
to understand. 



I 17] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



JUNIOR PLAY 



SEVENTEEN 
Cast 



William Sylvanus Baxter 

Mr. Baxter 

Joe Bullitt 

Genesis 

Johnnie Watson 

George Crooper 

Mr. Parcher 

Wallie Banks 

Jane Baxter 

Lola Pratt - 

May Parcher 

Ethel Boke 

Mary Brooks 

Mrs. Baxter 



- Virgil Camm 

Thurlow Phypers 

Orin Wadsworth 

Marvin Saefkow 

Carl Wedler 

Edward LeBreton 

John Korencic 

William Rogers 

Catherine Hall 

Annette Walter 

Alberta Laufer 

Hester Ensminger 

Florence Lindeman 

Catherine Moeller 



SENIOR PLAY 

THE BOOMERANG 

Cast 
Dr. Gerald Sumner ----- John Hattendorf 

Budd Woodbridge Merle Noles 

Preston DeWitt ------ p a ul Kurtz 

Emile -------- Robert Smith 

Hartley ------- Gerald Glover 

Mr. Stone Gorham Hester 

Virginia Xelva ----- Theodora Deringer 
Marion Sumner ----- Dorothy Edwards 
Grace Tyler ------- Helen Irwin 

Gertrude Ludlow Grace Chapman 

Mrs. Creighton Woodbridge - Alberta Lyons 

Guests at the party — Cleotha Cook, Alyce Strople, Robert 

Smith, Gorham Hester 



[18] 



THE BUZZER 1926 




MIKADO 

(Gilbert and Sullivan) 

Presented by The Musical Clubs 
of Euclid Central High School 

April 16, 1926 



Characters 
The Mikado of Japan - 
Nanki-Poo (his son, disguised as a wandering 

minstrel and in love with Yum-Yum) 
Ko-Ko (Lord High Executioner of Titipu) 
Pooh-Bah (Lord High Everything Else) - 
Pish-Tush (A Noble Lord) - 

Yum Yum] 

Pitti-Sing J- Three Sisters, Wards of Ko-Ko - 

Peep-Bo | 

Katisha (an elderly Lady in love with 

Nanki-Poo) 

Chorus of School Girls, Nobles, Guards 



Edward Le Breton 

Rocco Vinciquerra 

- Merle Noles 

- Paul Kurt; 

John Hattendorf 

{Pauline Johns 

- [ Alyce Strople 

[ Dorothy Hess 

Annette Walter 



[19 



THE BUZZER 1926 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Theodore Deringer 
Grace Chapman 
Ethel Drackett 
Catherine Hall 



Leader 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Librarian 



Grace Chapman 
Cleotha Cook 
Theodora Deringer 
Ethel Drackett 
Edith Eschbaugh 



MEMBERS 

Alice Kline 
Elizabeth Kracker 
Helen Lake 
Florence Lindeman 
Esther Martens 
Esther Pittman 



Lillian Sommitz 
Annabelle Stephen 
Alyce Strople 
Annette Walters 
Easter Sanger 



Helen Gibbs 
Catherine Hall 
Clara Hawk 
Dorothy Hess 
Helen Irwin 
Pauline Johns 

The Girls' Glee Club has entertained at various assembly periods before the 
school. One of its first appearances was just before the holidays, when Christmas 
carols were sung. The crowning event of the year was the presentation of the 
Japanese operetta, "The Mikado", by the combined boys' and girls' glee clubs. 



Edward LeBreton 
Henry Powers 
Henry Koll 
Merle Noles - 



BOYS' GLEE CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Leader 

- Secretary 

Librarian 

- Accompanist 

MEMBERS 

Merle Noles 
Thurlow Phypers 
Lee Pinney 
Henry Powers 
William Rogers 
Bernard Sadosky 
Lenard Sadosky 

The Boys' Glee Club has had a good year under the supervision of Mr. King, 
the new director. Modesty on the part of the members has limited the number 
of public appearances of the group, a phase of school life in which the boys are 
more than glad to let the girls outshine them. But the work done by the boys in 
the "Mikado" was decidedly to their credit. Graduation will remove several good 
voices from the club, so recruits are wanted for next fall. 



Carl Albrecht 
Virgil Camm 
Archie Daniels 
Stanley Fisher 
Harry Giles 
Gerald Glover 
William Hall 



John Hattendorf 
Clifton Kimball 
Spence Kline 
Henry Koll 
John Korencic 
Paul Kurtz 
Edward Le Breton 



Marvin Saefkow 
Robert Smith 
Bernard Tellings 
Steve Trebic 
Rocco Vinciquerra 
Charles Wanstall 
Carl Wedler 



Merle Noles 
Emil Maulis 
Erwin King 



ORCHESTRA 

OFFICERS 

Leader 

Secretary and Treasurer 
Director 



First Violin 
Emil Maulis 



Clarinet 

Gorham Hester 



Saxophone 

Thurlow Phypers 



Second Violins 
Justin Foldessy 
Bernard Telling 
Carl Wedler 



Cornet Piano 

Harry Giles Ruth Davis 

Merle Noles 

Drums 

Bernard Sadosky 

The orchestra is one of Euclid's institutions. It takes part in every operetta 
or play, and also in many Assembly programs. A certain finish which nothing else 
can give is added to the entertainment by the orchestra. 



20 



THE BUZZER 1 926 




21 



THE BUZZER 1926 



THE BUZZER 

The termination of this school year brings to a successful close the fourth year 
of the Euclid School paper, "The Buzzer." Each year has seen steady progress 
toward the accomplishment of the present day paper, and each of the successive 
editorial staffs under the supervision of Miss Leamon, along with the help and 
interest of the student body, has added to the credit of the paper. 

"The Buzzer" is all that its name implies. It fairly buzzes with news, editorials, 
literary writings, athletics and humor. It possesses all the journalistic qualities 
of a good newspaper. 

EDITORIAL STAFF OF 1926 
Hester Ensminger - Editor-in-Chief 

Laura Swartz ----- Assistant Editor 
Theodora Deringer - Literary Editor 

Cleotha Cook ----- News Editor 
Alberta Laufer ----- Athletics Editor 
Dorothy Edwards - Feature Editor 

Rocco Vinciquerra - - - Circulation Manager 
Alberta Lyons ... - Business Manager 

Faculty Advisor — Miss Leamon 

REPORTERS 

Margaret Fancourt Neil Schroeder Catherine Hall Helen Gibbs 

Elizabeth Kracker Jack Wedler Ethel Drackett Easter Sanger 

Russell Hanslik Slava Kubik 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

EUCLID CHAPTER 

Organized 1924 
Carl Schroeder '24 Concetta Ranellucci '25 Paul Kurtz '26 

William Hetrick '24 Theodore Deringer '26 Alberta Laufer '27 

Grace Pinney '25 Cleotha Cook '26 Easter Sanger '27 

Faculty Sponsor — Agnes M. Burgess 

THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

Paul Kurtz President 

Gorham Hester - - - - Recording Secretary 

Virgil Camm - Treasurer 

Dorothy Edwards - - - Advertising Secretary 

William Hall, Robert DeTchon - - Cheer Leaders 

Sponsor — Mr. Rader 

Athletics play a large part in the life of Euclid High School. The fact that all 
the major sports are encouraged and are managed without a financial loss is a 
matter of particular pride. Much credit is due to the Athletic Association, which is 
responsible for the business end of the various sports, as well as the morale of 
student support. 

[22 1 



THE BUZZER 1926 




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[23] 



THE BUZZER 1 926 




FOOTBALL 

First Team Second Team 

Saefkow (Capt.) Left End La Follette 

Hattendorf Left Tackle.. Albrecht 

Glover Left Guard Musser 

Powers Center Kimball 

Koll..._ - Right Guard Cie Chanski 

Wadsworth Right Tackle Springer 

Kurtz Right End De Tchon 

Korencic Quarterback L. Sadosky 

B. Sadosky Left Half V. Caito 

Phypers Right Half Hall 

Le Breton Forward Petti I Capt. ) 

Regular Substitutes — Kline, Smith, Telling, Berg, Camm 



[24 



THE BUZZER 1 926 



THE SEASON OF 1925 

Under the vigorous coaching of A. W. Rader and the inspirational leadership of 
Captain Saefkow, the football team of 1925 gave Euclid High School students and patrons 
a full season of real sport. 

Euclid's line of defense was generally conceded to be one of the strongest in the 
Greater Cleveland Conference. Definite evidence of this is shown by the fact that the 
opposing team seldom scored a touchdown. In offense, Euclid showed up equally well. 
Le Breton, heavy line-plunger, Bernie Sadosky, the fleetfoot, and John Korencic, the 
sure and steady, deserve much credit for the size of Euclid scores. 

The season started with a landslide victory in a non-conference game with Mayfield. 
The first conference game, with Shaker Heights, was a big disappointment, but that defeat 
was a stimulus for the splendid work done during the rest of the schedule. The boys 
were not defeated again until the very end of the season, when Euclid lost the Greater 
Cleveland championship to Rocky River. 

John Korencic, Euclid's quarterback, played in every game and was high point scorer, 
having a total of 61 points. 

Three players made the mythical eleven: Korencic, all-scholastic quarterback; Le 
Breton, fullback; and Phypers, tackle. Sadosky received honorable mention. 

Five letter-men will be lost to the team this year, but good football material is waiting 
to be developed. John Korencic is captain-elect for 1926. 

SCORES 

Euclid 77 Mayfield 

Euclid 44 W. Tech Seconds 

Euclid 7 Shaker Heights 21 

Euclid 19 John Marshall 

Euclid 26 Longwood 6 

Euclid 33 West Commerce 

Euclid 24 Shore 6 

Euclid Rocky River 12 



Total 230 Total 45 

THE SECOND TEAM 

The second team, made up entirely of freshman boys, was under the guidance of Mr. 
Keay, assistant football coach. In addition to the regular practice games, the boys played 
three games of their own. The first was lost to Prospect Junior High 6-0; the second game 
was a close victory over Superior, 13-12; the third game, with Roselle, was won with a 
large score to Euclid's credit, 24-6. 

Louis Petti was the freshman captain. 



[25] 



THE BUZZER 1 926 




BOYS' BASKETBALL SEASON 



First Team 

Hattendorf ( Capt. ) ..., Forward. 

Saefkow Forward. 

Kurtz Center... 

Korencic Guard... 



Second Team 

Powers 

Smith 

Kline 

Koll 



Wadsworth Guard Sintic 

B. Sadosky Guard L. Sadosky 

All-around athletes are the rule rather than the exception at Euclid Central, as is 
shown by the fact that the entire basketball team had made enviable reputations for 
themselves during the football season. Scarcely had the Rocky River mud dried on the 
football suits, before the boys donned basketball outfits and plunged headlong into a 
successful cage season. 

The boys played steadily and consistently this year. They won ten out of thirteen 
games, maintained second place in the Greater Cleveland Conference, and acquitted them- 
selves splendidly in the Berea tournament, staying in through the third round, when they 
were eliminated by their old rivals, Rocky River. 

John Korencic was given a position as rear guard on the Greater Cleveland Con- 
ference mythical team, while Paul Kurtz was given honorable mention as center. 

Only two regulars, Hattendorf and Kurtz, will be lost by graduation, so Euclid fans 
can look forward to a successful 1927 season under the leadership of John Korencic, 
captain-elect. 

THE SCHEDULE 



Euclid 13 

Euclid 29 

Euclid 18 

Euclid 18 

Euclid 24 

Euclid 13 

Euclid 19 

Euclid 19 

Euclid 21 

Euclid 16 

Euclid 17 

Euclid 19 

Euclid 11 

Total 237 



Chagrin Falls 6 

Strongsville 8 

John Marshall 12 

Shaker Heights 11 

Shore 14 

West Commerce 5 

Longwood 23 

South Euclid 14 

Shore 15 

Rocky River 31 

Medina 10 

Troy 15 

Rocky River 31 

Total 185 



26 



THE BUZZER 1926 




a< 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL SEASON 

THE TEAM 

Ethel Drackett Forward 

Grace Chapman Forward 

Esther Martens Center 

Alberta Laufer Side Center 

Gertrude Fouts Guard 

Edith Wads worth Guard 

Substitutes and second team: Catherine Hall, Clara Hawk, 
Helen Lake, Dorothy Hattendorf, Ruth Davis. 

Good team work was the outstanding feature of the work of the girls' team during 
the 1925-1926 season. In game after game, the girls showed the skill that comes from 
hard practice and good coaching. Five years of playing together has its results, too; for. 
outside of the side-center, all the regular team members had been out for basketball since 
the eighth grade. 

Especial credit should be given Gertrude Fouts, better known as 'Poutsie", who as 
captain was always cheerful, tactful, and efficient; and who as guard, was one of the 
snappiest, quickest players seen in many a day. Grace Chapman acted as manager of the 
team, and Miss Hardin as chaperone. 

Alberta Laufer, the steady side-center of this year's team, steps into the captain's 
shoes next year. 

THE SCHEDULE 



Euclid 14 

Euclid 28 

Euclid 11 

Euclid 23 

Euclid 27 

Euclid 13 

Euclid 33 

Euclid 12 

Euclid 16 

Euclid 11 



Shaker 21 

Chagrin Falls 7 

Rocky River 18 

Bedford 8 

Shore 10 

Bedford 11 

Berea 8 

Chagrin Falls 10 

Shore 13 

Rocky River 21 



Total 



.188 



Total 



.127 



[ 27 ] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



TRACK — 1925 

The first annual Greater Cleveland Conference track meet was held at Shaker 
Heights field in May, 1925. All G. C. C. teams had representatives present. 

It being Euclid's first attempt at track, there were not many out. Some honor 
was earned, however, by Bernard Sadosky, who took second place in the pole vault, 
clearing the bar at ten feet, two inches. Virgil Camm, while not winning any honors, 
did fine work in the broad jump and 220-dash. Sadosky and Camm are promising 
material for the 1926 meets. 

The freshman relay team, which was composed of Henry Powers, Bernard 
Sadosky, Rocco Vinciquerra and Maurice Berg, came out third. Many more fellows 
are expected out this spring. 

TRACK MEET STANDINGS 

West Commerce ^Vi points 

Shaker Heights 38 points 

Rocky River 21 ]^ points 

John Marshall 12 points 

Longwood 9 points 

Euclid Central 3 points 

Euclid Shore 1 point 



BASEBALL 1925 

THE TEAM 

Walter Grubb Pitcher John Korencic Shortstop 

Marvin Saefkow .Catcher Paul Kurtz Left Field 

John Hattendorf First Base Walter Grubb Center Field 

Frederick Lindeman Second Base Ed Le Breton Right Field 

Russell James Third Base Frederick Lindeman Captain 

Although practices must of necessity be an uncertain quantity, Euclid Central 
never has much difficulty in finding enough men for a baseball team. The keen 
rivalry that accompanies other athletic sports of the year is changed somewhat in 
baseball games, and. a spirit of real "playing for the fun of it" develops. 

The boys held their own during the 1925 season, except, perhaps, in the 
University school game. Only five games were played. 

New equipment and suits have been ordered for the 1926 season. Paul Kurtz 
is captain, and a number of new men are reasonably sure of positions on the line-up. 

GAMES 

April 17 Euclid 3 Shaw 5 

April 24 Euclid 14 South Euclid 10 

April 28 Euclid 11 Cleveland Heights 10 

May 5 Euclid 1 University School 18 

May 12 Euclid 5 South Euclid 6 

[28] 



THE BUZZER 1 926 



CALENDAR 

SEPTEMBER 
9 — -First day of school. "What a ' ya takin'?" 

18 — Freshmen were initiated in assembly. The Sophomores felt their importance. 
25 — Euclid vs. Mayfield — first football game of the season. Oh \ what a victory! 

OCTOBER 
9 — Euclid vs. Shaker. Oh! what a comedown! Hungry spectators raid the bakery 

wagons. 
16 — Euclid vs. John Marshall. Atta Boy — Euclid! And such a rain! 
20 — First snowfall. Those who know said we were to have a real old fashioned winter. 
21 — Every one appeared with new galoshes. 
23 — Euclid vs. Longwood. Out for blood! We stayed on top. 
24 — Sophomore Hallowe'en party. ??Who's Who?? 

NOVEMBER 
6 — Euclid vs. West Commerce. "Revenge is sweet." 
16 — Basketball season opens. Come on, Cup! 
20 — Euclid vs. Rocky River. Boo Hoo! Boo Hoo! 
24 — Senior class rings arrived. 
25 — Last football game of the season. Euclid 24, Shore 6. Red-White! Fight! Fight! 

DECEMBER 
1 — Football banquet. Chicken. Nuf said! 
2 — "Things That Never Happen" by Freshmen in assembly. 

1 1 — Shaker girls vs. Euclid girls. Nobody knows what a red-headed forward can do. 
18 — Play, "The Christmas Hat" given by the Juniors at assembly. The Girls' Glee Club 

sang carols by candle-light. 
18 — Euclid girls vs. Chagrin Falls. Keep up the good work! 
19 — Seniors entertain with Christmas Party. Santa in person. 

JANUARY 
4 — New ties and compacts in evidence, proving that Santa didn't forget the Euclidites. 
8 — Sophomores staged assembly program, "Fun in a Country Store." 
16 — Annual Junior party. Music by the "Bobbed Haired Bandits." 
19 — "The Trysting Place" by Booth Tarkington was presented by Seniors in assembly. 
25 — New semester. New freshmen. New teacher. New class-rooms. 

29 — Euclid girls vs. Shore girls. A broken heart. • 

FEBRUARY 
5 — Euclid vs. West Commerce. Another victory. 
12 — Euclid vs. Longwood. Wow! We didn't expect to lose that one. 
19 — Euclid vs. South Euclid. Exciting. Safe. 

20 — Junior play. "Seventeen" by Booth Tarkington. Sweet Lola Pratt. 
26 — Euclid vs. Shore. Shore sustained another broken heart. 
27 — Freshman Circus Party. 

MARCH 
5 — Euclid vs. Rocky River. We bow to the victors. The Great Orange Mystery. 
12-13 — Basketball tournament at Berea. School was as lively as a graveyard. 
15 — Informal debate. Resolved: Boys absent from school because of tournament should 

make up work. Teachers — affirmative; Boys — negative. 
21 — Spring! Farewell, galoshes. 

26 — Chemistry class gave public exhibition of its fire extinguisher.' *» 
30 — Where are my galoshes? 

APRIL 
1 — Miss Meyer got a mysterious phone call. April Fool! 
1 — Tryout for Senior play. Disappointments. Thrills. 
2 — French classes entertain in assembly with charming songs and dances. "Puck" and 

"Chappie" pleased all with pastoral. 
3-11 — Spring vacation. 

16 — "The Mikado." Merle Noles made a hit as Koko. 
17 — First baseball game of the season. 

MAY 
1 — Relay meet at Lakewood. 
8 — Junior-Senior Prom. 
21 — "The Boomerang," Senior Class Play. A doctor needs a nurse. 
29 — Senior Dance. 

JUNE 
4 — Commencement. Sweet girl graduates and nervous boys. 

[20 1 



THE BUZZER 1 926 



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[30 



THE BUZZER 1926 



GIRL'S BASKET BALL RULES 
(for the term of 1926-27) 

1. Present a good appearance. Don't let your nose get shiny. If you carry a com- 
pact with you onto the floor you can powder your nose if you realize it needs it. Don't 
wait until the half or quarter — do it immediately upon perceiving this fact. 

2. Do not jump around too much — it musses your hair. 

3. Be graceful. If a play requires an ungraceful pose, don't make it. 

4. Play up to your audience. Smile and wave your hands to them when they cheer. 

5. Be considerate of your opponents. If they want the ball badly — don't be self- 
ish — let them have it. 

6. Always let your opponent know what you intend to do next. 

7. Never give signals that are not understood by the opposing team. It isn't polite. 

8. Don't run. It isn't ladylike. 

9. Keep your arms at your sides as much as possible. Retain your poise in all 
situations. , , » ' 

10. Show that you have a book of etiquette at home. 



THIS MONTH'S PRIZE RECIPE 
Honeymoon Salad — Lettuce alone 



-Black Fez 



LOVE'S REVERSES 
Characters : KoKo and Katiska. 

Act I 
Ko — "Dearest!" 
Kat— "Yes!" 

Ko — "Will you marry me?" 
Kat— "No!" 
Ko — "Goodbye. I shall drown myself." 

Act II 

Ko — "Goodbye. I shall drown myself." 

Kat— "No!" 

Ko — "Will you marry me?" 

Kat— "Yes!" 

Ko — "Dearest!" 



A — ALIBI. That which is never as good as we thought it would be. 

B — BLISS. A state of being which comes through ignorance. Had chiefly by freshmen. 

C — CRUSHES. Sophomore girls' amusement. 

D— DIM. The future. 

E— ENTRANCING. The present. 

F— FORGOTTEN. The past. 

G— GREEN. We all were once. 

H — HISTORY. Interesting events made uninteresting by study. 

I — Most important to me. 

J — JOKES. Numerous in quantity but not in quality. Ask the editor. 

K — Our chemistry instructor. 

L— LUNCH PERIOD. Mid-day freedom. 

M— MYSTERY. How we got that 95. 

N— NOTHING. What we have against Euclid High School. 

O — OWE. What we do with our money for class dues. 

P — PAY. Our class secretary's favorite expression. 

Q— QUIZZES. Why pupils leave school. 

R — RESULTS. Did our school career bring any? 

S— SPORTS. What would school be without them? 

T— 'TAINT. Bad English. 

U — UNFAILING. Our teachers' devotion to us. 

V— VACATION. The best part of the school year. 

W— WORTHLESS. This. 

X — Not a mark to be cherished on test papers. 

Y — YOU. For whom this is written. 

Z — ZEST. What the students have for everything but studies. 

[31] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



Pussy — "I've just come from the beauty parlor." 
Cat — "You didn't get waited on, did you?" 



Ruth Davis — "What are you reading, Lee?" 

Lee Pinney — "Don't bother me. Darn it! Can't you see I'm reading a book of 
etiquette?" 



Mem'ries 
Girls — Remember the elastic you wore under your chin to keep your hat on. 



Mr. Bay (in Civics) : "Be ready to answer quickly. I'm going to jump around the 
room." 



ALL IN A STUDY HALL 

The student who assumes a studious facial expression for his own individual purpose. 

The student who is constantly beautifying herself by means of the indispensable com- 
pact and comb. 

The student who believes in preparedness, his lesson book open and in readiness for 
any immediate emergency. 

The student who casts coquettish glances at her masculine neighbor. 

The student who passes notes all period — carefully, quietly, but with a certain air of 
triumph at deceiving the teacher. 

The student who takes delight in creating a disturbance. Books and pencils fall 
innumerable times — accidentally of course. 

The student, who really is trying to concentrate. Forgetful of time and place, and 
regardless of classmates, he diligently masters a difficult lesson. 



BETWEEN ACTS 
Clang goes the bell. 
Up they jump; 
Seats go bang, 
Feet go thump. 
Classes changing 
To and fro. 
Up through the halls 
And down below. 
Fountain crowded, 
People drinking; 
Pupils thoughtless, 
Teachers thinking. 
Last bell ringing, 
Hallways clearing; 
Classes starting, 
Pupils fearing. 
Lessons hopeless, 
Teachers scolding, 
Bravely rules of 
School upholding. 
Peace descending, 
Noises ending; 
Tranquil stillness 
Reigns once more. 



HERPICIDE CLUB 

Going Thurlow Phypers 

Going Mr. Keay 

Gone Mr. Farrell 



Kitty Hall was discovered one day earnestly stirring some tea leaves in a cup of 
water. 

"For goodness sake, Kitty, what are you doing?" 

"I'm trying to make some tea," said Kitty, "and the darn leaves won't melt. 

It takes a clever person to act like a fool without being one. 

I 12} 



THE BUZZER 1926 



"Willard Billheimer : "It looks like rain." 
Miss Eakin : "What looks like rain?" 
Willard : "Water." 



Just a Bundle of Sunshine — Catherine Hall. 

When We Are Together — Alyce Strople. 

Who Loved You Best? — Ethel Drackett. 

Stop Flirting — Helen Lake. 

Breezin' Along — Marvin Saefkow. 

Dreamy Eyes — Gorham Hester. 

Isn't She the Sweetest Thing? — Pauline Johns. 

Take Me Back to Your Hearth — Orin Wadsworth. 

Who? — Gertrude Fouts. 

In My Gondola — Virgil Camm. 

Collegiate — Thurlow Phypers. 

Pretending — Helen Irwin. 

Just Around the Corner — Paul Clasen. 

Oh Hendriech — Henry Koll. 

Oh! Those Eyes — Robert Smith. 

We're Back Together Again — Paul Kurtz. 

Who Wouldn't Love You? — Florence Lindeman. 



RULES FOR FRESHMEN 

1. If you're fond of athletics and like good jumping, lift the mattress and see the 
bed spring. 

2. Freshmen wishing to do a little driving will find a hammer and nails in the 
Manual Training Room. 

3. If the room gets too warm, open the windows and watch the fire escape. 

4. Seniors find that if one wants to get up without being called, one can have 
self-rising flour for supper. 



WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF 

Grace Chapman ceased giggling? 

Florence and Easter weren't always together? 

No Senior said, "Aren't my proofs terrible?" 

Gorham Hester didn't blush? 

Pauline got her hair bobbed? 

Marv would shave more often? 

Mrs. King forgot to say, "The bell has rung, class"? 

Annette really knew her history lesson first period ? 

John H. wouldn't fall asleep eighth period study hall? 

If Hester Ensminger became fat? 

Elizabeth Heiss stopped eating? 

Archie Daniels hurried? 



Absence makes the marks grow rounder. 



A gentleman in the banking line was asked to say grace, and this is what he said : 
"Dear Lord, we thank thee for all of our favors of recent date. Permit us to express 
our heart felt gratitude. We trust that we may continue to merit your confidence and that 
we shall receive many more blessings from you in the near future. Amen." 



IN MEMORY 

OF 

The ]ost privileges of the Senior class 

The broken Chemistry paraphernalia 

The Boys' Glee Club program 

The Physic Class's electricians 

Virg's Ford 



[33] 



THE BUZZER 1 926 




34] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



For Good Things to Eat 

HOFFMAN'S ICE CREAM and 
CANDIES - BAKED GOODS 



The demand for a light lunch has been so that 
we are compelled to meet the demand. 

TRY OUR TOASTED SANDWICHES 



HILL'S QUALITY STORE 



There's A Difference" 



\t 



Faithful Service is Not Discarded 
Nor Consigned to the Scrap Heap 
It fcives on Indefinitely 



Drugs :: Sundries :: Cigars :: Stationery :: Notions 



W. B. HILL - Euclid at Chardon 



35] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



LINCOLN &ffi}nc6 FORDSON 

THE UNIVERSAL CAB 

CARS - TRUCKS - TRACTORS 



The K. F. Spieth Co. 

Authorized Ford Dealer 

Euclid Avenue at Dille Road 

KENMORE 562 



■Egff 



We are equipped to take care of 
all Ford Repairing with Genuine 
Ford Parts a* a* a* a* a* 



[36 



THE BUZZER 1926 



To High School Graduates Seeking Preferred Business Positions I 

Among the many reasons for securing one's training at the Spencerian are : I 

A wide range of courses. | 

A nation-wide reputation for excellence in training young" men and women. j 

A veritable city of successful graduates — 57,000 students having attended the | 

Spencerian. 

Four courses of collegiate grade leading to degrees. 

A placement bureau that receives several hundred calls a month and serves ( 

Spencerian graduates without charge. i 

Modern school buildings located in the heart of Cleveland on spacious grounds. 
Spencerian | 

Is accredited by the State Department of Education. 

Is chartered by the State of Ohio to confer degrees. 

Is a member of the National Association of Accredited Commercial Schools. 

Twelve Departments. J 

Send for catalog, address Registrar, or telephone Prospect 4500. I 

SPENGERIAN SGNOOL i 

o/COMMERCE - ACGOUNT8 - FIPHANGE 

3201 EUCLID AVENUE - CLEVELAND 



For Choice Meats 

Try the 

Euclid Cash 
Market 



Euclid Avenue 



Chardon Road 



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A Good Place To Eat 

®fyr Sillier Urn 

Bitting iRoom 

SPECIAL 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNERS 

A La Carte Service 

16341 EUCLID AVENUE 
JUST EAST OF EUCLID THEATRE 



ALLARD'S 

CLEANING and DYEING 
PRESSING and STEAMING 

While you wait 

21107 Euclid Avenue Kenraore 476 



I i The Scheumaim- Jones Co. ! 



\ Hospital Supplies 

I EAST NINTH STREET 



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THE BUZZER 1 926 



Compliments of the 



Euclid 

Community 

Club 




38] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



Euclid Gift Shop 



APPROPRIATE GIFTS CARDS 

AND NOVELTIES FOR 

EVERY OCCASION 

TALLY CARDS AND BRIDGE 
PRIZES 



Euclid Park Hardware 

Cutlery - Tools - Glass 
Paints - Oils - Varnishes 

17807 EUCLID AVENUE 
Eddy 4893 



| ST. JOHN'S DRUG STORE j | GEORGE W. OWEN 



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- PRESCRIPTIONS - 

KODAKS and FILMS 
PHOTO FINISHING 

17801 EUCLID COR. WAYSIDE 
I Eddy 6852 We Deliver 



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FRUITS OF ALL KIi\DS 
FROM OUR ORCHARD 

Confectionery, Delicatessen, Candy, 

Light Lunch, Cigars, Ice Cream 

Gasoline and Motor Oils 

26901 CHARDON ROAD - EUCLID, OHIO 

Phone: Wickliffe 2-1-W-1-2 



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THEATRE ! ! 



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Compliments of 



EUCLID 



EUCLID AT 
IVANHOE ROAD 

Showing 

the best in 

Cinema zArt 



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Jjlofaers 



Specialists in Snappy and 
Artistic Arrangements 

Always something new at 
Our Store 

Our Prices Reasonable 
" You'll do better here" 



Eddy 8983 





LUClid 



.- j 



[39 



THE BUZZER 1926 



Best Wishes of 



Euclid Crane £& Hoist Co. 



to 



c^.11 Pupils and Graduates of 

The Euclid High School 



SUMMER SESSION 

Dyke School of Business continues in session throughout the 
Summer months, day and evening. 






The Summer months are valuable — make the best use of them- 
enter immediately after Graduation — Investigate Now. 



DYKE SCHOOL of BUSINESS 

1001 Huron Road 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Superior 180 Superior 181 

Member National Association of Accredited Commercial Schools 



40] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



W. M. BAKER 

BARBER SHOP and 
BEAUTY PARLOR 



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j Ladies' and Children's Hair Cutting 
| a specialty 

I 18627 ST. CLAIR AVENUE 



' Best Values 



Lowest Prices 



I Leonard Mandel 

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j Shoes and Men s Furnishings ! 

; ! 

Complete Line of Hosiery j 



KENMORE 585 
18607 ST. CLAIR AVENUE 



j Nottingham Hardware Co. 

The Community Store 
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| Paints, Glass and Radio Supplies 

I Builders' Hardware a specialty 
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j 

I Ken. 



18708 ST. CLAIR AVE. 



668 



Cleveland, Ohio 



C. B. Knuth 

Grower of 

BEDDING PLANTS 




WHOLESALE 

Geraniums a Specialty 

STOP 10' 2 EUCLID AVE. 
Kenmore 444 W 



J. R. EMERICH, Pharmacist j 



DRUGS and JEWELRY 

18625 ST. CLAIR AVENUE 

EUCLID PARK MARKET 



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culliu r/-vi\.rv ivi/\i\r\.c i 

EDDY 645 17805 EUCLID AVE. j 

| L. Kresse 

I Quality Fresh, Smoked and Salt Meats 

Oysters and Fish in Season | 



Compliments 
of 

The Ajax 
Mfg. Co. 



141] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



Compliments 
ST 

Goff-Kirby 



[42] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



Storage M M M Long Distance 



Packing ||SERV1CE1| and 



j Shipping w w Local Moving j 

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LET US SHOW YOU 
WHAT SATISFACTION AND SERVICE MEANS 

\ 1 

I THE I 

I Windermere Storage Co. j 

j o< — >o i 

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j 14441 EUCLID AVENUE f 

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j 1451 HAYDEN AVENUE 

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COMPLIMENTS OF 

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| Euclid Valley Savings 

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! C& Loan 

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[43] 



THE BUZZER 1 926 



The Newman Studio 

Photographers of Quality 



<$x$x$x$y$«M><$x$x$xSx$> 



The Senior Pictures Were Made At This Studio 



&&&&&&&&&&&$> 



1 706 EUCLID AVENUE 



PROSPECT 527 







SHINGLES 




LUMBER 


SUMMER SPECIAL 


MILLWORK 






Did you ever consider 






modernizing 


Combination 


Consult Us 


your home 


Screen and Storm Doors 


GARAGE 


by laying stained 


at 


COTTAGE 


shingles over 
the siding? 


Attractive Prices 


NEW ROOF 
EXTRA ROOM 


PHONE OR WRITE 


COME IN OR PHONE 


NEW FLOOR 



THE DILLE ROAD LUMBER COMPANY 

COR. NOTTINGHAM RD. and NICKEL PLATE R. R. 

KENMORE 592 :: KENMORE 593 

"Of Particular Service to Euclid and Vicinity" 



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THE BUZZER 1 926 



Compliments of 

George J. Stevenson 

Compliments of 

Hermles Tire Shop 



If you want a Real Meal — Soup and all, 
I If you want but a lunch, If you long : 
I for a Sandwich, If you want a cup of 



| DELICIOUS Coffee, If it's Candy 
\ 



Sweets you crave, or if a Soda you desire, $ 
then come to - - - \ 

T3Ue Coffee Shoppe j 



E. Cleveland Y 



RINZIvKR,Prop 






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The J. J. Luikart Co. 

18605 St. Clair Avenue 

Cleveland, Ohio 

DRY GOODS and NOTIONS 



LAWN SEED 



FERTILIZERS 



Euclid Chardon Hardware 

PAINT HEADQUARTERS 



We Deliver 



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Kenmore 983 



Compliments 
of 



J. E. Schrock 



"Mack Has It" 

Nottingham Drug 
Company 

Kenmore66 Kenmore 1079 



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Gibbs Paint 



When you paint, see us, we have the \ 

best that money can buy at { 

factory prices. \ 



j The GIBBS PAINT MFG. Co. 

j Chardon Rd. and Nickel Plate R.R. 
( EUCLID, OHIO 



Expert Prescription 
Service 

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East 187th & St. Clair j 

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i Compliments of 



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The 



Altman Furniture 



Company 



[45] 



THE BUZZER 1926 



Henry Canning Why Not Investigate 



WILLYS-KNIGHT 

and 

OVERLAND 



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FRED cTVlECK j 

SANITARY j 

Barber Shop and Beauty Parlor | 

cAll Equipment and Linen 
Sterilized Before Using I 

| EDDY 7995 

| 16506 EUCLID AVENUE 



£ET us demonstrate to you 
this high quality car. See 
the lasting Duco finish 
and the rich upholstering. 
Then a ride in one at our ex- 
pense will be a revelation of 
its smooth performance and 
comfort. Others have exper- 
ienced this enjoyable surprise 
that has never before been 
possible in a low priced car. 
That is what accounts for its 
rapidly gaining popularity. 
"Chevrolet" is the world's 
greatest Closed Car value. 



cAllsix ne1t> improved models on display 
at the 

Larick Motor Sales 

Corner EUCLID at CHARDON RD. 

Kenmore 350 Euclid Village 



Compliments of 



The Euclid Electric and Manufacturing Co. 



CHARDON ROAD 



Kenmore 647 



EUCLID VILLAGE 



Welcome Euclid Girls 

M. Bukkhardt, Manar/er 

Permanent Wave Specialists 

Expert Male Barber 
Call Eddy 8960 



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15465 Euclid Avenue at Taylor Road 



Compliments 

of a 

Friend 



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