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Full text of "Euclidian"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 



http://www.archive.org/details/euclidian32unse 




Dressed in her blue Miiil tiiild oiulii, anil carrying v;irious 
signs of I'.inlhcr nmnui. sophomore I inii:. Wuily shows 
Ih.il she hiis ihe spiril lo join ihc l-luchil High School 
sludenl body. 



Give Me An E ... . 




What Does It Spell? 

Euclidian 



Euclid Senior High School 

711 East 222 Street 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

Volume 32 



IT SPELLS 



Right: After a particularly hard day, Joel Mansperger clutches the only 
true friend he has left. 

Below: Barb Starr and Lorna Coyne break into their latest spirit dance. 




E stands for expressions. The optimistic 
smile at the beginning of each new day, the 
zaniness of extracurricular activities, the 
intensity involved when trying to do a job 
just right, the satisfaction of a report com- 
pleted on time — the normal events of any 
school day produce a kaleidoscope of ex- 
pressions. 

Righl: Sal Midolo lakes a break from his report to catch the 
camera's eye. 





XPRESSIONS 




Theme 1-13 

Activities 14-75 

Underclass 76-113 

Sports 114-149 

Faculty 150-173 

Seniors 174-237 

Advertising 238-271 



Left: Loretta Woods gathers up her folders, papers, and books 
for the start of another day 

Below, center: Larry Sartain concentrates on getting the job 
done to perfection. 

Below, right: Mr. Chambers can solve any wood shop prob- 
lem — even Rick Rudiak's. 





Like light bulbs illuminating his mind, the 
Life is never black and white, especially when illustrated in the paintings of Mrs. Wiersba's equations on the board open the wonderful 
art classes. world of physics to Paul Bauer. 



E is for education. At a compre- 
hensive high school like Euclid, 
that means everything from carbu- 
retors to calculus; from hemlines to 
Hemingway. Hundreds of classes 
to suit the interests and abilities of 
two thousand students. 



Lei's start with the basics. This is called a needle. 
Senior Angle Tyler gives sophomore Caroline Wilson 
some tips in Mrs. O'Donnell's sewing class. 




/Hfc f 



IT SPELLS 




The English elective program allowed most junior and seniors some 
control over the type of English classes they enrolled in. And while 
improving their reading and writing skills in their English classes, 
the rigors of English registration improved their skill in standing in 
line. 




Gsez! \o Kondcr She blacksmithing business 
died ou/.' Sophomores Mark Eros and Danny 
O'Donnell face the reality of a fiery forge in 
Mr. Germock's metals class. 




DUCATION 



IT SPELLS 




Right: Watch the birdy and smile! Euclidian photographer 
Judy Hasse frames her picture while her "birdy" (of the 
turkey species), Joe Porten. guarantees that Judy's subject 
will be smilin 



J^XCITING 



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E is for exciting, the high points in the sometimes hum- 
drum hours of high school life: the constantly changing 
scene in the hallways between classes, getting the right 
answer in math without asking the teacher for help, the 
agony and ecstasy of the football season — all of these add 
zest to the backdrop of Euclid High School. 



Above: We may not have been #1, but it's not because we didn't try. Here, Todd 
Barnard (68) and Kevin Durst (72) lead Euclid to a touchdown against Maple Heights. 

Left: Judy Braun definitely has no problems with her social life. 




.Aboie-The E-room can provide a perfect setting l> 
a leisurely game of backgaminon. 

Above, cfnlcr Be it McDonald's. Burger King. Bob 
Big Boy,, Wendy'.s, or Denny's; a burger and fric 
can'l be beaten after a hard day at school. 

/?;>/?I; Wade Small, Mike Ellenhest, Bill Maire. an 
Kevin Brady choose up sides for a quick gaine all-- 
school. 








E stands for enjoy: good friends, good food, quiet 
times, the changing seasons, the everchanging ex- 
periences of life at Euclid High School. 

Ahcxc. L'cnlfr. Tony Boschi and friend cnjox a soft aummn aCtLTnoon logelh- 



.4 den L\ Student Council vice president Charlie Booms is so democratic that he 
will even share his pi/za with )ou. 

Below, left: clockwise from the boliom. Pat Cotter, Nick DiTirro, Brian 
Brokate. Ed Cogan, and Dave Fowie practice their Juniors are number I 
cheer. 




NJOY 



IT SPELLS 






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Above, center: Mark Cefaratti finds that school can be fun, 
especially when it gives him the chance to work on his racer. 

Above: Euclid served as the meeting place for students from 
twenty area high schools to hear Josten's (the school ring 
and yearbook company) representative Mr. Mark Schoen- 
brach talk about school spirit. Here, Mr. Schoenbrach gives 
a Saturday Night Live type parody of high school life for 
Euclid's student body. 

Right: Although the skies may be overcast, every day is a 
beautiful day in Euclid to Mr. Daugherty. 

Below, right: Jennifer Thomas and Jena Vanek help to 
brighten the halls with their spirit signs. 




niQK5/00 .If ^ 



70 




nn... 





NTHUSIASM 





E stands forenthusiasm,'which we spell s-c-h-o-o-l s-p-i-r-i- 
t. School spirit means that you look at school as more than a 
place in which you can stay out of the rain between the hours 
of 8 A.M. and 2:50 P.M. You take pride in your classmates, 
your courses, your school. You involve yourself in extra- 
curricular activities. Do we have school spirit? YES! 

Above: Marv Richardson, Kris Shook, Monica Pockar, Paul Thornton, Jill Krawczyszyn, 
Jenny Jambor, and Lauren Hale find a way to cool off on a warm Saturday in September 
while raising money for the Junior Class. 

ieft; Sharon Sleith, Patty Brod, Jamar Tarr, Karen Knaus, Barb Starr, Lorna Coyne, Jena 
Vanek, Jennifer Thomas, Angle Boka, Fred Foskey, and Lori Sajn will always stand behind 
their school. 



n 



Gym classes utilize all of ihe athletic facilities available, such as 
baseball and football fields, ice skating rink, swimming pools, 
tennis courts, and the wide open spaces of Memorial Park. 



With pool tables, a telev 
place to relax during 



■James, and a soda bar. the E-Room provides a leisurely 




Sheila Laidlaw. Lisa Lea- 
sure, and Ed Maroli make 
use of the latest TV equip- 
ment for a project in Miss 

.Araca's art class. 



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Karen Harmon, Lori Sajn, ynd lill Nemccck help ■itir up school spirit al 
the St. Joe's rally. 




E Stands for environment, not only classes, but the cafeteria, the 
E-room, rallies, assemblies, hallways, entertainment, clothing, 
sports, TV, the outside world — all the things that affect the life of a 
Euclid student. 

BeloK every type of blue jeans, from Sears Toughskins to Jordache, can be seen in 
the halls of Eiiclirf l-i;oh each dav. 



One ol ihe most memorable pans 2:>(J marks the end of another day. 
of high school, the Friday night Some students rush home or to work; 
football game. others spend an hour or two involved in 

a school activity. 





NVIRONMENT 



13 




14 




15 



Bomw ™»; Mr. Kochan, Mr. Sydow, Virginia Balogh, Bev lafelice. Jearrnme Carlo, kareri Kowalkowsk, Carol Deason Madahne Bradach, Sue Paul. Ro. 
,»o Barry Milan Keith Young, Curt Rasmusen, Mark Shimonek. Brian Chapman, Ellyn Gleisser, Steve Anzells, Ruth Bierer, Rick Ham, Joel Mansperber, 
Judy Hasse John Davis. Rem Ihrcc: Eric Kosten, Diane Andrews. Marlene Joyce, Bill Bretton, Andy Powask,, Donna Francetic, Stan Matras. Paul Resnik. 
Russ Mazzaro Henry Stewart. Mike Bratton. Barb Spaur. Paul Glaser. Ro. four Jeff Westover. Janet Niccum Melame McChancy, Sue Dnenka Renee 
Sly Mike Lausin Linda Ratlmi, Destinv Morgan, l.inda Wudy, Sharon Tice, Beth Waltermire, Judy Krnc, Linda Hochevar. Rou-r/ve. Kevin Ke ly, Judy 
Braun Joe Vislocky Judy Stevko, Dale Grubb, Pete Joksimovich, Gary Summerhill. Peggy Hunt, Lesa Galer, Maureen Matras, Janine Valentine, Lou Ann 
Jones 'row svv Nick Selvaggio. Mike Vitantonio, Sam Pantalone, Bill Blevins, Marca Shutty. Mark Hansen. Marty Jones, Gary Buck, Geoff Pntchard 
Ernie Lackner,' Rob Hendershot. Top ro». Peggy Linn, John Harper, Janet Smith, Kim Rawlings, Betsy Pickel, Andy Morkunas, Vince Penny, Al 
Mulraney, Ray Tice, Kathy Brown, Chris Owens, Ruth Cook. Photography by LuikarL 




Those fancy maneuvers at football games weren't the result of good luck. They 
were perfected after hours of practice, practice, practice. 



16 




^Marching 
Band 



The Panther Band shows its pride by spelHng out 
EUCLID 



The Panther Band, under the direc- 
tion of Arthur Sydow, started its sea- 
son late in August with an on-campus 
band camp. Students met for 8 days of 
extensive playing and marching re- 
hearsals. The first two days were spent 
developing the sound of the Panther 
Band as well as learning to march Pan- 
ther Band style. Work was begun on the 
pre-game and half-time show for open- 
ing night. 

For each show a band member re- 
ceived a show guide containing several 
pages of routines, formations, and cho- 
reographic directions. In addition, each 
band member learned new music for 
each show. 

Each half-time performance took 
anywhere from 15 to 20 hours of re- 
hearsal time to learn and lasted about 
IV2 minutes on the field. 

The season was highlighted by the 
final home game show - "Script Eu- 
clid", led by this year's band president. 
Senior Dale Grubb. 

This year, three shows were designed 
by Seniors Diane Andrews, Judy 
Brown, Judy Hasse, and Judy Krnc. 

Junior Rob Hendershot acts as a trumpet stand. 



17 



It's easy to scream your brains out if 
your football team finished 10-0 or your 
basketball team is headed for the state 
finals. But what happens when your 
school's teams are average, as ours were 
this year? Then it takes a special kmd of 
spirit to cheer on the team in front of half- 
empty stands. Perhaps this is the greatest 
attribute of this year's cheerleaders. 

Right. The varsity cheerleaders look like they're mo- 
deling for a toothpaste commercial. 

Below. Late October and early November football 
games meant that sometimes those smiles were liter- 
ally frozen on the cheerleaders' faces 



Making The Spirit 



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[1 

}V CHEERLEADERS Bottom: Peggy Stibinger. Row 2 Kathy Ryder, Connie Papouras. Row 
3: Cheryl Johnson, Monica Parisi, Jill Krawczyszyn, Debbie Taylor. Top. Gayle Kubik. 




Katy Duffy 



Karen Harmon 



Kristen Yamane 



Jill Nemecek 



18 



Come Alive 



Left. Gayle Kubik stirs up spirit at October's Homecoming bonfire rally. 

Bdow, WRESTLING CHEERLEADERS Bottom Ro\v. Yvonne Leduc, Jill Midolo, 
Cindy Ritzu. Row 2. Pam Paradise, Kelly Taylor, Amy Raicevich. Row 3: Gina Evans. 
Row 4: Pammi Phillips. 





Lori Sajn 



Patty Brod 



Denise Nichting 



Jane Shunk 



19 



The Action Is 



The Bonfire 




Above: Euclid students tie up trafHc on East 222nd as they malce their 
way to Memorial Park for the Homecoming bonfire and rally. 

Right: There she goes' This year's bonfire rally was almost scrapped 
because of conflicts with local air pollution laws. 

The 1980-1981 Homecoming festivities began on 
Wednesday, October 8th, with a traditional parade and 
bonfire-pep rally and concluded with the Homecoming 
dance on Saturday night. 

The Homecoming parade and bonfire were highlight- 
ed by the float and car decorating contests, won by the 
Football Trainers and C.O.E. class respectively. Atten- 
dance at both of these events was at an all-time high. 

The announcement of the Homecoming Queen and 
her court came on Thursday at an all-school assembly. 
The winner was Kristin Yamane. Kristin and her atten- 
dants were presented to the crowd at halftime during 
Friday night's Homecoming game against Bedford, a 
game the Panthers won 24-0. 

Homecoming concluded with the annual formal dance 
held in the E-room. This year's theme was Down on 
Main Street. The 175 couples who attended the dance 
were entertained by the sounds of Teaser. 




20 



Down On Main Street 




A long line of Homecoming candidates await the announcement of tiie 1980-1981 Homecoming Queen. 




ALLLRIlGHT!!!Pam Brown lets heremotions out after Kristin Yamane accepts the congratulations of her friends after being named 
being named Junior Attendant. Homecoming Queen. 



21 




QJ 



Euclid's Homecoming Queen and her court: Junior Attendant Pam Brown, Senior Attendant Patty Bred, Queen Kristin Yamane, Senior 
Attendant Megan McLaughlin, and Sophomore Attendant Mindy Simon reigned over the couples during the Homecoming dance. 



C3 
DX) 




If I close my eyes, maybe my knees will stop shaking. Junior Attendant 
Pam Brown is presented to an appreciative crowd during the halftime of 
the Homecoming game. 



Diane Lorence and Steve Ortman match perfect smiles. 



22 




Nick Caplick, Kathy Ryder, Bruce Benedict, and Carol Otcasek take a break for quiet conversa- 
tion. 



The Dance 




I hope she doesn't ask me to dance. I hope she doesn't Kevin Durst and Allison Derreberry link up for an enjoyable even- 
ask me to dance. I hope she doesn't .... ing at the Homecoming dance. 



23 



^^: 



tever happened to Monopoly? 
And stick-ball in the street? And hang- 
ing out at the soda shop after school? 
Like most of the pastimes of our par- 
ents' generation, they are just memories 
now. High school students of the 1980's 
have developed their own games and 
sports. 

For example, while a high school stu- 
dent in the I950"s might have been con- 
tent to play baseball or football from 
morning to night, more individualistic 
and non-competitive forms of physical 
activity appeal to the student of the 
1980"s. Witness the growing popularity 
of jogging, skiing, judo, and karate. 

Another difference between our- 
selves and our parents is apparent in the 
board games we play. While our par- 
ents might have been satisfied with 
Monopoly and Parchesi, many students 
of the 1980's are joining the growing 
ranks of fantasy and wargames players. 
These games, which have rule books 
sometimes running up to a hundred 
pages in length, challenge the imagina- 
tion and appeal to the student who be- 
lieves that a game should offer a greater 
high than just owning Boardwalk and 
Park Place. 

Perhaps the most popular games of 
the 1980's, however, are the electronic 
ones. First appearing a few years ago, 
and ranging from Simon to Space In- 
vaders, these electronic wonders can 
now be found in any shopping center, 
game room, or student's locker, and are 
certainly a fair cry from the primitive 
shoot the bear penny arcade games our 
parents used to play at Euclid Beach 
Park. 



Above, right: Thank you. but I think I'd prefer to 
use my own razor. A martial arts demonstration 
held in the E-room stirred enough interest among 
students that a martial arts club was formed this 
year. 

Right, center: Just hold on there while I adjust 
my glasses. 

Right: Are you sure that this is an ancient Orien- 
tal way of curing a headache? 



Whatever 




24 



Happened to Monopoly? 




^^ittkC^ 




Top: A video football game can provide al- 
most as mucin excitement as a clash between 
the Browns and the Steelers. 

Above, left: Rats! Beaten by the computer 
again! 

Above, right: Tbe hands of destiny determine 
the flow of battle in Squad Leader, a board 
game depicting action on the Russian front in 
World War II. 

Left; Euclid students, shown here behind their 
barricade of war and fantasy games, formed a 
strategy and tactics club this year. 



25 



Harvey Appears At Euclid 



And another thing! Never upstage me again! 



This year's Fall Play was a comedy about a 6' 1 Va" 
rabbit named Harvey. The play was written in 1944 
by Mary Chase, and after a long run on Broadway, it 
was made into a hit movie. 

The main character, Elwood P. Dowd — played by 
John Eros — and his friend, Harvey, spend their time 
making friends and going to bars. However, Harvey is 
invisible to the rest of the world, causing most people 
to believe Dowd a mental case. His sister Veta Sim- 
mons, played by Tina DiBacco, tries to commit Dowd 
to Chumley's Rest Home, a mental institution, but the 
staff is confused and thinks Veta is the one who is sick. 
The comedy expands from this mix-up. 

Aside from the cast, credit for the success of the 
play is due to several other people. Ron LaBondano 
designed the set. Allen Black was in charge of the 
sound and lighting, and Amy Reno was the head of 
the prop department. Sue Bukovac acted as Student 
Director. Thus, the success of the play was not due to 
the efforts of any one person: it was a team effort. 





hrvl^r 



Joe Deoma finished up some last minute painting of the set. John Kisthardt and Aida Saracevic loolc in wonder at the holes in a hat left in their office. 



26 




Tina DiBacco, Mall Panlages, and Wendy Slroud work 
logelher in one of Ihe many comic scenes of the play. 



27 



spirits Haunt The Halls 



All those signs that plastered the 
hallways on Thursdays and Fridays 
didn't appear by magic. They were the 
efforts of the Spirits Club. The Spirits 
Club is an informal group of EHS stu- 
dents who spend each Wednesday night 
painting signs and posters to express 
their support for the school's various 
sports teams 



Right: Some Spirits Club members were even . 

ready to use their fingers when there weren't SSSKi:^^ 
enough paint brushes to go around. — ^ 




kM.i *^ 




Maybe it will look better if I use my tie. 



28 



Golden Girls Glow with Spirit 




Euclid High School's 1980-81 Golden Girls had a very 
active and successful year. Aside from performing at school 
functions, they entertained at various community affairs 
throughout the year. 

The majorettes practiced during the summer and daily 
during the fall for their performances at the halftime shows 
of the football games. The majorettes danced to such songs 
as TusA:— featuring Captain Jeannine Carlo's solo perfor- 
mance. Catch the Pepsi Spirit, and Knocl< on Wood. As an 
added touch, they used tambourines, lighted batons, hats, 
and canes in their various routines. 

Z-e/i.- Jeannine Carlo has practice this routine so many times that she could 
even do it with her eyes closed. 




.46c)ie, The majorettes run through one of their numbers at an all-school 
assembly at the end of football season. 

ieft Seared.- Jeannine Carlo. Anee/;n».- Carol Deason, Bev lafelice. Stand- 
ing: Karen Kowalkowski, Ginny Balough. 



29 



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The abilities lo swallow^tetof water and to' endure the pain of the eye are among the qualities of a good water 
polo player. , . 



The beauties ^nd the beasts among the swim set at Euclid 
High School are the members of the Wai Napolo Club and 
the Water Polo Team. Wai Napolo members, girls interest- 
ed in synchronized swimming, develop and put on a swim 
show each year. (This year's show was held in the spring and 
will be covered in the Euclidian supplement.) 

Although it certainly is a sport, water polo is classified as 
an activity at EHS; but whatever its designation, the Water 
Polo Team had a fine year, finishing 6-0 in district play. Its 
only losses all season were to Upper Arlington and Syca- 
more. The team finished a respectable third in the eight- 
team state tournament held at EHS in late October. 

WATER POLO TEAM Boltom Roh, Scott Gundling, Tom Coyne, Mark 
Francelic. Row 2: Eric Zebold, Scott Clines, Tom Mullen, Paul Thornton, 
Dan Greene, Eric Wuchter. Row 3: Paul Rossmann, Warren Schneider, 
Mark Hansen, Adam Race, Dave Fedakowski. 






30 




teft; Coach Rodriguez's water polo team Hnished first in their district with a 6-0 
record. 

Below: A helpless defense just looks on as Euclid's Tom Mullen closes in on the 
opponent's goal. 




WAI NAPOLO Clockwise from the honomMindy Peck, I.ori Schrock. Linda Cramer, Thercsc Nickel, Maureen Colling. Corinnc Duljr. Sue Remke, .Amy 
Ogrinc, Sherri Deuschle, Jean Busher, Diane Andrews, Lorna Coyne, Barb Starr. Sue Hickey, Linda Hanson, Wendy Wright. Jennifer Thomas. Amy Steele. 
Pam Brown, Monica Parisi, Kathy Kause, Kathy Kehn, Ellyn Gleisser. 



31 



Student Council: 




Above. STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS: Patty Hill, president; Charlie Booms, vice-president; 
Chrissy Ryder, treasurer; Meg McLaughlin, secretary. 

Right: Jane Shunk lights up the life of a golden ager at the Christmas party the Student Council 
sponsored. 



J2 



The Decision Makers 



She warns me to take her to the senior prom! Bill 
Perdue poses with some newly made friends. 




Among its various service projects 
this year. Student Council members 
iieiped to collect canned goods, paper 
products, and cash donations from the 
student body to give to the needy fam- 
ilies in Euclid at Thanksgiving time. A 
Christmas party was also held for the 
residents of the Euclid Villa Senior 
Citizens Apartment Complex. 

The Student Council also did a good 
job organizing school activities this 
year. Homecoming, for example, was 
very successful. A great parade and an 
excellent bonfire were among its memo- 
rable moments. The Homecoming 
Dance drew a record crowd. The Stu- 
dent Council also sponsored the Winter 
Festival, the Battle of the Classes, and 
the annual Pool Tournament. 

At the end of the year. Student 
Council members traveled to the junior 
highs to talk to ninth graders to interest 
them in joining Student Council next 
year when they enter EHS. 

Although the success of the Student 
Council this year was the result of hard 
work by all its members, special men- 
tion should be made of seniors Jane 
Shunk and Jennifer Thomas for the 
time and effort they contributed. 



STUDEM COUSCIL BOTTOM ROW: 

Sandy Snyder. Sue Paul, Beih Mabel, Dan Bauer. 
Lisa Rhone, Patrice Ware, .Amy Steele. ROW 2: 
Carol Campbell, Lori Tcpley, Megan McLaugh- 
lin. Chrissy Ryder. Mary Gallo«a\. Kalh\ Rvder, 
Bill Perdue. ROV\ .1; Pam Brown. Debbie T,ivlor, 
Jill Nemceck, Monica Pockar. David Chiudioni, 
Bob Znidarsic, Steve Lausin. ROW 4; t-d Maroli, 
Mitchell Glicken, Jane Shunk. Palty Hill, Charlie 
Booms. Jennifer Thomas NOT PICTURED: 
Robert Scott, Kalhy Drury, Heidi Draxier, Beth 
Franko. 



33 



Service 



Among the unsung heroes of Euclid 
High School are the members of the Soph- 
omore and Junior Classes, groups of spirit- 
ed class members who meet to plan activi- 
ties and money-making projects for their 
respective classes. The only compensation 
they receive for their efforts is the satisfac- 
tion of knowing that they helped make 
EHS a more spirited, exciting school for 
their fellow class members. 

The National Honor Society is a nation- 
al organization meant to recognize a 
school's outstanding junior and senior stu- 
dents. At EHS, National Honor Society 
members are selected on the basis of aca- 
demic standing and involvement in school 
activities. 



Right, above. SOPHOMORE CLASS Bottom Row: 
Lauren Jambor. Row 2: Karen Schulz, Connie Pa- 
porous, Amy Raicevich, Wendy Cicek, Lynn Prit- 
chard. Row 3: Lisa Cover. Mindy Simon, Lisa Berar- 
dinelli, Jenny Jaroscak. Row 4: Sheila Walsh, Sue 
Reinke, Vince Rattini, Miyung Surh, Shirleen 
Nurmi, Hillary Hook, Mary Ann Kelly. Row 5: Julie 
Koucky, Lynette Gilmore, Laurie Hanlon, Carrie 
Jackson. Row 6: Missy Cole, Mary Hromyko, John 
Hribar, Wendy Swyt. 



Right. JUNIOR CLASS Bottom Row: Jan Mihel- 
cic, Gayle Kubik, Jill Krawcyzsyn, Donna Zupan, 
Jenny Jambor, Linda Lewin. Row 2: Tom Coyne, 
Monica Pockar. Amy Steele, Kris Shook, Monica 
Parisi, Cheryl Johnson, Jane Stragisher. Row 3: 
Shiela Kelly, Beth Franko, Janene Selway, Sandy 
Ukmar, Aida Saracevic, Lisa Letcher, Nina Valenti. 



Right, below. NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 
Bottom Row: Megan McLaughlin, Judy Krnc, Linda 
Boone, Sue Lokar, Michelle Hinko, Sue Hickey. 
Row 2: Lori Tepley, Lisa Berzin, Sharon Fike, Anna 
Dovic, Lisa Barash. Row 3: Robert Golob, Dale 
Grubb, John Eros. Missing: Diane Andrews, Dave 
Beal, Lynne Blevins, Judy Braun, Linda Callahan, 
Tim Christianson, Dawn Ehrhart, Patty Hill, Beth 
Hook, Paul Hwang, Kathy Kehn, Linda Lawrence, 
Doug Leu, Beth Mabel, Bill Mason, Joe Porten, Bri- 
an Reno, Nav Singh, Marybeth Stragisher. 




34 




The Key Club is a youth organiza- 
tion which attempts to serve its 
school and community. In the past 
year, the Key Club has donated over 
$1000 to charitable causes. Besides 
financial assistance, the club per- 
forms purely service-oriented activi- 
ties such as holiday coffee stops, leaf 
raking, and Christmas caroling for 
the elderly. The club also holds so- 
cials frequently and has entertain- 
ment at each meeting. The Key Club 
is one of the largest clubs at EHS, 
with well over forty members in at- 
tendance at its weekly meetings. 

The Incredible Hulk? No, jus! a Key Club 
member helping to man the Euclid Kiwanis' 
Haunted House at the Euclid Square Mall 
during Halloween. 

KEY CLUB BoUom Row: Ken Zuro. Rober- 
ta Yuhas, Beth Kupfer. Nav Singh. Kevin 
Simon, Mr. McCallum, Debra Penicka. Lisa 
Grassi. Row 2: Miyung Surh. Sharon Tice. 
Sue Mooney. Marlene Joyce, Mark McNeils, 
Bev Kohler, Sue Lokar, Eileen \andeveer, 
Allison Mersnik, Mr. Hill. Row 3: Heidi 
Schultz, Linda Doremus, Scott Kost. V'ince 
Rattini, Bob Katcher. Carol Chase. John 
Grrgsby, Jeff Kosmelos, Lynne Blevins. Row 
4: Russ Oshaben. Tom Coyne, Dan Green, 
Curt Rasmusen, Al Black, Jenny Jambor, 
Dave Zagorc, Taeyung Surh. Don Kucera. 
Paul Glaser. 



35 



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^ 




Above: Geoff Pritehard was one of the few stu- 
dents willing to act as a guinea pig at the energy 
assembly. 

Far right: Mike Cotter leads the cheerleaders at 
the Powder Puff assembly. 

Right: The Varsity Chorale Christmas concert 
was missed by the sophomores and juniors. 



36 




School assemblies can serve sever- 
al purposes: to build school spirit, to 
give information, or to provide enter- 
tainment. While assemblies can't 
please everyone, the ones we had this 
year d/rf fulfill one of these purposes. 

The school year got off to its usual 
start with a rowdy rally for the St. 
Joe's game: a fiery speech by Coach 
Seymour, lots of yelling and scream- 
ing by the students, a surprise visit 
by Dr. Husarik and Darth Vader— 
and another shellacking that night 
from the St. Joe's football team. 
However, on a scale of 1 to 10, the 
St. Joe's assembly would rate a 9 on 
sheer intensity of school spirit. 

The next assembly, a one-man 
comic show by Mark Schoenbrach, 
was the best one of the year. Al- 
though its purpose was instructive- 
get involved in school and its activi- 
ties — the speaker's comic presenta- 
tion of slices of high school life kept 
most students concentrating on him 
rather than their watches. 
The homecoming assembly was a 



typical Student Council extravagan- 
za with the introduction of candi- 
dates to mood music as each paraded 
down white runners through the 
gym. It was exciting if your girl- 
friend was up for queen, but if you 
were unlucky enough to be in one of 
the homerooms sitting up in the 
rafters of the gym, the combination 
of distance and a poor sound system 
made it next to impossible to connect 
names and faces. 

The Bore-of-the-Year award went 
to the energy assembly. Although 
the intention was good — an informa- 
tional presentation on the energy cri- 
sis — the assembly was a complete 
bust. What went wrong? The sub- 
ject? The speaker's approach? The 
after-effects of that day's cafeteria 
food? It's hard to tell, but it proves 
one thing about high school assem- 
blies: sometimes the magic works 
and sometimes it doesn't. 

The Marching Band/Majorette 
assembly was highly entertaining for 
those students who just go to football 



games so they can watch the half- 
time shows or those who rate George 
Gershwin's music right up there with 
Bruce Springsteen's. For the other 
99% of the student body, listening to 
the Marching band perform at least 
cut their classes down by five min- 
utes each day. 

The Powder Puff assembly saw 
about one half of the senior class 
milling about the gym floor as girls 
of the Blue and Gold teams, coaches, 
officials for the game, and cheer- 
leaders parodied the excitement of a 
regular football game. What it 
lacked in organization, it made up 
for in enthusiasm. 

The Varsity Chorale Christmas 
Concert proved highly entertain- 
ing — to the seniors, who got to see it. 
Unfortunately, the underclass home- 
rooms only got a piped-in (and gar- 
bled) version of it over the P. A. 

While some of this year's assem- 
blies were better than others, they all 
helped to break up the day-to-day 
routine of school life. 




The homecoming assembly was O.K. if you were 
sitting near the floor. 



Mr. Mark Schoenbrach delivers a comic in- 
terpretation of high school life during the best 
assembly of the year. 



Dale Grubb's trumpet solo was really interesting for all 
the marchmg band enthusiasts in the school. 



37 



The Music Men And Women 



. . .and this is what is known as playing by ear. 

Below SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE Woodwinds Bottom Row: Judy Braun, Diane An- 
drews, Judy Krnc, Mike Lausin, Melanie McChancy, Janet Niccum. Row 2: Dan Bauer, Bill 
Bretton, Mike Bratton, Ruth Cook, Peggy Linn, Barb Spaur. Row _'; Joe Porten. Randy Martin, 
Jim Steffas, Eric Kosten, Ray Tice, Barry Milan. 




/iboveORCHESTRA Bottom Row. Angela Gubitosi, Chris Hoag, Jean- 
ine Swoboda. Row 2: Lisa Centa, Bethany Hook, Amy Reno, Nancy 
Smith, Alice Gregory. Row J: Donna Francetic, Janet Struna, Lisa Grif- 
fin, Dave Gaffney. Row 4: Mr. Hutson, Pete Salopek, Mark Lawyer, Jeff 
Griffin, Terry Boggs, Werner Hertzer. 

Right CONCERT BAND Brass Bottom Row: Paul Rcsnik, Andv 
Powaski, Jimmy Peck, Lance Haverlock, Judy Stevko. Ron 2. Curt Ras- 
musen, Ernie Lackner, Joe Vislocky, Marcia Shutty, Gary Buck, Mark 
Dzomba, Petar Joksimovich, Mark Shimonek. Row 3: Matt Price, Bob 
Cable, John Davis, Ellyn Gleisser, Ruth Ann Bierer, Russ Mazzaro, Steve 
Anzells, Henry Stuart. 



38 



The delicate fingers of Melanie McChancy coax sweet sounds from her piccolo. 




The sound of music, ranging from pop to the classics, can be 
heard coming from the many different bands sponsored by the 
Music Department. Students were busy this year rehearsing for 
the Solo and Ensemble Contest, which was held at Euclid on 
February 14th, and for the seasonal performances and concerts 
held throughout the year. 

Left: Who can you expect to play Musical Chairs belter than a member of one of 
Euclid High School's bands? 





Above SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE 
Brass Bottom Row: Gary Summerhill, Stan 
Matras, Scott Theodore, Paul Glaser. Row 2: 
Dave Bukovec, Mark Hansen, Rob Hender- 
shot, Dale Grubb, Brian Reno, Geoff Prit- 
chard. Row 3: Neil Bierer, Brian Chapman, 
Judy Hasse, Fred Ham, Joel Mansperger. 
Row 4: Mike Vitantonio, Kevin Kelly, Chris 
Owens. 

Left STAGE BAND Bottom Row: Bill Bret- 
ton, Joe Porten, Eric Kosten, Mike Bratton, 
Ray Tice. Row 2: Judy Hasse. Neil Bierer, 
Steve Anzells. Row 3: Nick Selvaggio, Dave 
Beal, Ward Thrasher, Linda Lewin, Wes Tay- 
lor. Jill Nemecek, Brian Reno. Geoff Prit- 
chard. Dave Bukovec. Rob Hendershot. Not 
Pictured: Jim Black, Joel Mansperger, Fred 
Ham, Dale Grubb. Kevin Kelly. 

Below, left CONCERT BAND Woodwinds 
Bottom Row: Destiny Morgan. Maureen Ma- 
tras, Marlene Joyce, Sue Leonard. Sharon 
Tice, Lesa Galer. Row 2: Mia Minerd. Sue 
Drienka. Linda Rattini, Kim Rawlings, Rick 
Hunt, Mary Ann Fratcher. Ron .?.■ Jeff Wes- 
tover. John Harper. Andy Morkunas. Jim 
Rossi, Al Mulraney, Vince Penny, Janet 
Smith. 



39 



Concerts, New York Trip 



Right CHORAL MASTERS Bottom Row: Cindy 
Parker, Denise Seheid. Judy Ludvik. Sherri Johnson, 
Nina Valenti. Linda Cramer, Lisa Berzin. Dana Sa- 
lem, Ken Ferlilo, Tim Coles, Jane Shunk, Linda Bo- 
zak, Linda Boone, Jill Nemecek, Lori Sajn, Audrey 
Wintle. /?0H :?, Kelly Norton, Audrey Lonchar, Gail 
Kubik. Jenny Jambor, Sue Paul, Jeanine Selway, 
Lmda Lewin, Jim Speer, Sam Carasso. Sue Sly, Jan 
Mihelcic. Julie Samuel, Debbie Taylor, Kathy Ca- 
van, Kelly Erne. Row 3: Bev Kohler, Jeanie Busher, 
Karen Lockharl, Dana Wood, Barry Milan, Mark 
Cefaratli, John Kislhardl, Steve Lausin, Marie 
Cheatham, Carol Chase, Marilyn Slruna, Denise 
Meyers. Row 4: Renee Mihelich, Denise Fetko, Tom 
Mullen, John Renshaw, Phil Mohorich, Jim Cater, 
Mike Durbin, Mike Cotter, John Eros, Carol Otca- 
sek, Lisa Letcher, Amy Wilson, Karen Kish, Lori 
Hall, Maureen Hildebrandt. 

The Choral Masters was composed of 
eighty students under the direction of Mr. 
Ronald Morgan, They sang in three con- 
certs: one in the fall, one at Christmas- 
time, and one in the spring. In addition, 
the Choral Masters participated in the an- 
nual GCC concert, which was held at Be- 
ford. A select group of twenty students 
composed the Varsity Chorale. These stu- 
dents, all members of the Choral Masters 
as well, were picked for spots on the Varsi- 
ty Chorale on the basis of auditions held 
last spring. Besides singing with the Cho- 
ral Masters at their concerts. Varsity Cho- 
rale members performed at their own 
benefits and capped their year with a trip 
to New York City. The president of the 
Varsity Chorale this year was Dana Salem. 

Right: Dana Salem, Ken Ferlito, and the other mem- 
bers of the Varsity Chorale helped put the school in a 
holiday mood at the choral assembly held for seniors 
before Christmas vacation. 




/,<='!-. -i^ 




40 



Highlight Choral Groups' Year 




l-cl't The songs and routines ihal the Varsii) 
Chorale used in its performances were the 
products of practices held every Monday 
evening at the high school. 

He/oH. left: Parents were entertained by the 
Varsity Chorale's songs during October's 
Open Housc- 

Below: Jane Shunic and Jim Cater share the 
spotlight together. 



Left V.ARSITV CHOR.ALE Bottom Ro»: 
Pam Paradiso. Lisa Berz-m. Dana Salem. Beth 
Mabel. Linda Boone. Roh J.- Renee Mihelich. 
Audrey Lonchar. Linda Bozak. Amy Wilson. 
Carol Otcasek. Ron .!, John Eros. Mike Dur- 
bin. Ken Ferlito. Phil Mohorich. Jim Cater. 
Kevin Simon. \ol Pictured: Sa\ Midolo. Jane 
Shunk. Mike Cotter. Julie Samuel. 



41 



Powder Puff Caps 
Fall Activities 



Hi-'^ilV' 













It's called Pow.der Puff football.but the ^wiior wom- 
en of the Blue and Gold teams played it with the kind 
of intensity you'd expect to find at a Eu'clid-St. Joe's 
ganie. ... 




The macho men of the cheerleading squad attempt to pyramid their talent. 



Who says girls aren't interested in football? 



42 




A reversal of roles takes place in a pow- 
der puff game: the girls play a game of flag 
football and the boys act out the role of 
cheerleaders. Besides being funny, powder 
puff football can be profitable. This year's 
senior class raised $900 because of the 
game. 

Approximately 120 senior girls partici- 
pated in this year's powder puff game, 
playing for either the Blue or Gold teams. 
Although in the past two years the powder 
puff game had ended in a tie. this year the 
Gold team won a resounding 38-6 victory. 

Above, left: Tht Gold team predicts victory. 
Left: The Blue team gets themselves psyched. 




Above: Hours ol highl) disciplmed practice under 
the watchful eyes of brilliant coaches helped prepare 
the girls for the BIG game. 

Left: The crowd was treated to the precision and 
grace of a spectacular halftime show. 



T-iT»<C2^raKSflHEa 



Sophomore Paul Leasure, dressed in white, 
was instrumental in getting the Martial Arts 
Club organized. 



i ^ __ 




Several clubs at Euclid High School 
exist for those students who take plea- 
sure in flexing their muscles. The tradi- 
tional ones — the Lettermens Club and 
the Girls Leaders Club — are more or 
less honorary organizations for students 
who are involved with one of the 
school's sports teams. The Martial Arts 
Club, however, is slightly different. 

The Martial Arts Club was formed 



for those students interested in and will- 
ing to learn the techniques of self-de- 
fense. The students were taught respect, 
self-control, and self-defense. The ma- 
jor martial arts studied were aikido and 
karate. The sponsor and instructor was 
Mr. John Berilla, who volunteered his 
time on Wednesdays and Saturdays for 
the benefit of the club. 

Club members learned relaxation 



techniques and self-defense methods. 
Instructors from other martial arts or- 
ganizations came in to provide students 
with information on what to expect in 
various situations. Club officers this 
year were Paul Leasure, president; 
Mark Botirius, vice-president; Nancy 
McCourt, secretary; and Beth Mason, 
treasurer. 



44 




Left SWIM LEADERS Bottom Row: Ellyn Gleisser, Mary Smith, Jenny Jambor Jill 
Krawczyszyn, Mary Ellen Eiermann, Brian Chapman. Row 2: Janet Smith. Tom Coyne. 
Scott Gundling, Paul Glaser. On Ladder: Jim Cater. Row 3: Boris DeGranda. Mark 
Francetic. Amy Steele. Karen Harmon. Tom Powell. Paul Resnik. Dan Green. Jeff Jaros- 
cak, Scott Clines. Row 4: Pat Cotter. Eric Wuchter. 

Be/oivLETTERMENS CLUB Bottom Row: Mike Guarino, Jeff Barnard. Mike Vella, Jack 
Richardson, Larry Longstreth, Redon Jones. Jim Speer. Joe Minardo. Keith Mahovlic. 
Kevin Callahan. Stacey Jones, Chris Hughes. Row 2: Craig Eyman, Dave Skiljan. Ron 
Suponcic. Rick Rohlke. Doug Hufford, Everett Wesley. Kevin Durst. Gary Caste. Pat 
Delaney, Dave Rojeck. Bob Rinderle, John Barndt. Vic Schembre. Row 3: Tom Deason, 
Mike Zusman. Joe lafelice. Geddy Jakubauskas. Paul Pallante. Tom Povirk, Brian Smith! 
Rick Schafer. Scott Sanford. Mike Szmania, Harry Yanchar. Greg Fondran. Darrin Gaff- 
ney. Tom Pappalardo. Vic Martin. Row 4: Lou Nieves. Dennis Morek. Frank Bauck. John 
Hnbar. George Caplick. Jim Mitch. Doug Grosel. 



/v, ^ 


r^ < '^ 


J pE"'ilO ^'^J^C 




\mmmL 


|/V> A, ' 




udy Krnc, Row 
Ryder. Kathie 
Swoboda, Au- 



45 



THE YEAR OF 



The inauguration of a new President 
would normally be considered the top 
news story of the year, but the events of 
1981 were anything but normal. 

On the local scene, Euclid resident 
Dennis Eckart was elected to Congress 
to replace the retiring Charles Vanik, 
congressman of the 22nd district. 

The Cleveland Browns were also win- 
ners — winners of the Central Division 
championship for the first time in years. 
The doors to the Super Bowl for them 
were frozen shut, however, in their 
playoff game against Oakland, held in 
an icy Cleveland Stadium where the 
windchill factor hovered around -30. 
With only minutes to go in the game, a 
Brian Sipe pass was intercepted in the 
end zone. Oakland won the game 14-12 
and went on to destroy Philadelphia in 
the Super Bowl 27-10. 

In contrast to the Browns, the only 
excitement caused by the Cavaliers was 
generated by the feuding between the 
new owner, Ted Stepien (a former Eu- 
clid School Board member) and the lo- 
cal sports writers, who questioned many 
of Stepien's trades. 

On the national scene, 1980 was a 
Presidential election year in which the 
incumbent President, Jimmy Carter, 
was challenged by Republican Ronald 
Reagan and Independent John Ander- 
son. Many pre-election polls showed 
Carter and Reagan remarkably close, 
witha large number of voters still unde- 
cided. A debate between Carter and 
Reagan held in Cleveland in late Octo- 
ber apparently helped the voters make 
up their minds as Reagan went on to 
win a landslide victory. 



In other national news, two Cleve- 
land missionaries, Jean Donovan and 
Sister Dorothy Kazel (whose parents 
reside in Euclid) were killed in political 
violence in El Salvador. Within a short 
period of time after their murders, local 
and national TV and newspaper report- 
ers began examining the United States 
role in El Salvador in detail. Back at 
home, several congressmen were con- 
victed in the ABSCAM operation, a 
bribery scandal in which FBI agents, 
posing as representatives of rich Arabs, 
passed bribe money to the unsuspecting 
congressmen for promises of political 
favors. 

The nation in general, and rock mu- 
sic fans in particular, were shocked by 
the murder of John Lennon, a member 
of The Beatles, who was fatally wound- 
ed outside his New York apartment 
building by a deranged fan, Mark Da- 
vid Chapman. Lennon's death triggered 
sales of his albums, and his latest album 
Double Fantasy and hit single "Starting 
Over" reached the top of the music 
charts immediately. 

While music lovers were mourning 
Lennon's death, the country was 
mourning the sour economy, which was 
beset with layoffs and high inflation. 
The flood of imported cars entering the 
country had a strong effect in the 
Cleveland area, where many auto work- 
ers found themselves in the unemploy- 
ment line rather than on the assembly 
line. 

The top news story of the year, of 
course, was the release of the 52 Ameri- 
cans held hostage in Iran. As a show of 
appreciation for their 444 days of cap- 



tivity, the hostages were showered with 
parades and gifts — ranging from free 
vacations to free baseball tickets for the 
rest of their lives — upon their return to 
the United States. 

In addition to its involvement with 
the hostages, Iran was also in the news 
as a war flared up between it and Iraq. 
The Russians used the instability in the 
area to continue their occupation of Af- 
ghanistan. Also occupying Russia's at- 
tention were events in Poland, where a 
number of strikes broke out as workers 
demanded more freedom. While politi- 
cal problems threatened the Middle 
East and Poland, North Africa and 
Italy were devastated by major 
earthquakes. 

In the world of entertainment, the hit 
movies of the season were The Empire 
Strikes Back. Friday the 13th, Stir 
Crazy, 9 to 5, and Ordinary People. The 
new TV season was delayed several 
weeks by an actors' strike; but when the 
strike was settled, audiences found that 
they really didn't miss much as the new 
TV shows, like Speak Up, America and 
Bosom Buddies left much to be desired. 
The top-rated TV shows of the year 
were Dallas (Do you remember who 
shot J.R.?), 60 Minutes, The Dukes of 
Hazzard, and The Love Boat. As the 
outstanding special of the year, Shogun 
scored spectacularly in the TV ratings. 

Besides John Lennon, notable deaths 
which occurred this year included mov- 
ie director Alfred Hitchcock, actor 
Steve McQueen, French philosopher 
and Nobel Prize-winning author Jean- 
Paul Sartre, and track and field star 
Jesse Owens. 




Dennis Eckart accepts the congratulations of outgoing Charles Vanik as he trades his job as state 
representative for that of congressman. 



John Lennon's death shocked those older music lovers 
who remembered The Beatles'lv/o concerts in Cleveland 
in the mid-'60's. 



46 





/46ove; Rather than yeliow ribbons around the 
old oak tree, the residents of this home on 
Lake Shore Boulevard used a flag and a mes- 
sage to welcome the 52 American hostages 
back from 444 days of captivity in Iran. 



Cleveland became less of a national joke when it was selected as the site for the only 1980 Presidential debate 
between Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. 



Clubs Provide Service 



Right AD CLUB Bottom Roh: Jackie Young, Sue 
Stephens, Amy Raicevich, Linda Lucas, Wendy Po- 
tokar, Nina Viatic. Nadine Lisac, Anna Lima, Kelly 
Taylor. Roi>> 2: Mindy Simon, Laura Morris, Aida 
Saracevic, Donna Zupan, Doreen Grosel, Lorna 
Coyne, Barb Starr, Sue Hickey, Jenny Jambor, Beth 
Pritchard, Lisa Letcher, Sandy Ukmar. Karen 
Schulz, Renee Evans, Amy Ogrinc, Mr. Raicevich. 
Roil J Kalhy Kehn, Lisa Berardinelli, Gina Cirino, 
Lori Hansen, Laura Bratina, Hope Doyle, Sharon 
Sleilh, Simone Lisac, Terri Nicke 




ilJ" i 'Hi 11" " '"' '! !''!,. j 'j "1 !? 



Above LIBRARY AIDES Vaughn Gofney, Kristi 
Berardinelli, Deia Rice, Cheryl Roberts. Not Pic- 
tured: Linda Shei, Gayle Kubik. 



Above, right: A-V CLUB Bottom Row: Kal Cers, 
Tom Velkos, Greg Kocin, Sieve Lausin, Robert 
Scott, Keith Bowes, Allen Black. Row 2. Jim Lyon, 
Russ'Mazzaro, George Miller, Brian Chapman. 

Many of the clubs at Euclid High 
School are service- oriented. Students par- 
ticipate in them because they are fun and- 
— corny as it may seem — they make the 
school a better place to be for their fellow 
students. The Ad Club, A-V Club, and 
Library Aides fall into this category. Ad 
Club members help to sell tickets and pro- 
grams for the school's sporting events. Li- 
brary Aides and A-V Club members keep 
the library and the audio-visual equipment 
of the school in good working order. 

While some clubs appeal to a student's 
sense of service, others, such as the Invest- 
ment Club and the Computer Club can 
provide him with after-school learning ex- 
periences. Members of the Investment 
Club learn economics by following stock 
market trends. Computer Club members 
improve their programming technique on 
a 6800 microcomputer, a recently built 
6809 microcomputer, and several TRS- 
80's. 




48 



And Learning Experiences 



Hit mc. R/4 re.' /'mofc-r/ Winning at blackjack is 
rough enougli. bul Computer Club member Gary 
Pelrick llnds it nexl lo impossible when ihe dealer 
is a TRS-80. 





Left. INVESTMENT CLUB Row I: Jose Lima. 
Mike Champa. Ann Wintle. Toni Jamison. Van 
Johnson, Mary Glover, Ron Trebec, Mark LoPresti. 
Jeff Hogan, Mr. Schonauer. Rou 2: Frank Matar- 
aza, Mike Kaselonis, Mark McNelis, Jeff Kosmelos, 
Rick Whitmore. John Turcinov. Sieve l.ausin. Todd 
Dickard, Joe Udovic, Todd Barnard, Jim Fakull, Jim 
Cater, Rick Smith- 
ied, COMPUTER CLUB Beth Kupfer, RobGolob, 
Milton Lau, Todd Nawor, Don kucera. Tom Coyne, 
Scott Kost. Eric Kosten, Gary Petrick. Rav Tice. 



49 



What happens when a football jersey 
gets ripped or a coach needs the statistics 
from the last track meet? Chances are that 
he drops the problem into the lap of the 
nearest angel, also known as sports aide. 
Each sport at EHS has its own support 
group of aides who assist in wrapping an- 
kles, timing events, keeping statistics, and 
otherwise solving those minor distractions 
which might keep a coach's mind off the 
game. 

Right: Sports aides are definitely number one to 
thirsty athletes in search of a drink of water. 

Below VARSITY FOOTBALL AIDES Bottom 
Row: Kris Shook, Mary Ellen Eiermann. Row 2: 
Angle Boka, Patty Hill, Nancy Matoh. 




INDOOR TRACK AIDES Bottom Row: Michelle Batya, Carol Chase, Gina 
Evans, Kathi Brown. Row 2: Linda Rattini, Joyce Suttle 



SWIM TIMERS Bottom Row: Tammy Philips, Michelle Snyder, Marlene 
Joyce, Sue Cermak. Row 2: Denise Fetko, captian; Terri Rodriguez, Kathy 
Hanratty, Jenny Jambor, Katie Cavan, Joannie Picciano, Joy Black, captain. 
Row 3: Jessica Smith, Lisa Tousel, Missy Cole, Maureen Colling, Shirin 
Razani, Jena Vanek. Not Pictured: Dana Salem, Lauren Hale, Donna Zupan, 
Avril Mclnally, Jeanne Busher, Jeanne Damiah, Jennifer Thomas. 



50 



HOCKEY AIDES Bottom Row: Lisa Cover, Joycelee Kronik. Row 2: Sherri Jacobs, Jean Immkc JV FOOTBAl 1 AinFS fi.„.™ D ,^ u cc 
J^udy Breining. «o. .. Sue_S.ep_hens, Laura Dav.dson, Lo,s Be.av.ch, S,.one L.sac'jane. ^^.ll'. Sue Zl'^^LTca.h? ''c^'^LLa^^ 

Caplick. 



Row 4: Laura Wachhaus, Beth Steele, Coach Homovec, Lisa Caplick, Mia Minerd. 





Left. What could be better than spending a little time after school taping 
hairy legs? 

/46ove. The Pink Panthers, whose main job is to repair torn uniforms, feel 
that their work load would be a lot lighter if football players would cut 
their finger nails once in a while. 

Above, left: WRESTLING AIDES Bottom Row: Cathy Carlo, Jackie 
Young, Kathy Cibrik. Ro^ 2: Sandy Neumann, Lynn Pauley, Chris 
Lauria, Lisa Krean. Row J: Deneen Zanghi. Diane Szukalski, Kris Shook, 
Laura Morris, Becky Tavano. Row 4: Debbie Conner, .Amy Ogrinc. Lisa 
Dezelon, Karen Malinowski, Karen Reminick. Row v Diane Roessler, 
Rence Evans, Mary Ellen Eiermann, Jacci Johnson. Sharon Szalay. 



51 



AFS CLUB Bottom Row: Kathy Drury, Philippe 
Feldman. Milton Lau, Fermin Guardiola-Madero, 
Beth Mabel, Bill Mason. Row 2: Ruth Cook. Destiny 
Morgan, Julie Samuel, Elaine Haupt, Mara Pinkava, 
Amy Wilson. Row 3: Angela Gubitosi, Kim Trbo- 
vich, Karen Pfriem. Not Pictured: Judy Braun, Judy 
Hasse. 

Far right: No, Fermin, in the U.S. we don't shave 
with a pen; we write with it. 

Right: AFS exchange students Milton Lau, Fermin 
Guardiola-Madero, and Philippe Feldman found 
American high school life a bit restrictive compared 
with that of their own countries. 

AFS Club Sponsors 

Three Exchange 

Students 

Euclid High School's AFS (American 
Field Service) Club is composed of stu- 
dents interested in learning about other 
cultures. AFS members are given the 
chance to do this by traveling overseas to 
live with a host family in a foreign country. 

During the summer of 1980, two Euclid 
students, Kathy Drury and Beth Mabel, 
traveled to Turkey and Finland respective- 
ly. They met many new people and have 
many interesting and exciting stories to 
tell of their travels. 

This year, Julie Samuel, an EHS junior, 
was fortunate enough to be chosen to go to 
New Zealand. She will spend several 
months with her sponsor family and go to 
school there with other young people her 
age. 

EHS was also honored this year to have 
three foreign exchange students: Milton 
Lau of Guatemala City, Guatemala; Phil- 
ippe Feldman of Dijon, France; and Fer- 
min Guardiola-Madero of Valencia, 
Spain. All three students are enjoying an 
eleven-month visit here. They all maintain 
A averages in their senior honors classes 
and say that they are learning English very 
quickly since they hear it so often. They 
are learning about the many cultural dif- 
ferences between their home countries and 
the U.S. by visiting here. 




AFS members gather for a going-away party for Julie Samuel. 



52 



he Comings And 



The first thing that they told me, Julie, 
is never to drink the water. AFS ex- 
change student Milton Lau gives some 
last-minute tips to Julie Samuel, who 
left for New Zealand in January. 



oings 
FS 




Finding Fun 
On The Slopes 

Sandy Ukmar, Lisa Letcher, Nav Singh. Dave 
Beal, and Jenny Jambor bask in the sunshine 
during the Ski Club's trip to Cockaigne. 




S/C/CL(iB KNEELING; John Albertone, John Kisth- 
ardt, Craig Wright. ROW 2; Joe Minardo. Steve Hof- 
fert, Lee Ferrante, Sue Davidson, Cheryl Johnson, 
Monica Parisi, Hillary Hook. ROW 3; Bethany Hook, 
Roberta Yuhas, David McCarty, Jane Evans, Richard 
Nagode, Laurie Hanlon, Jenny Jambor. ROW 4; Judy 
Mast, Gayle Kubik, Cheryl Warman. ROW 5: Donna 
Zupan, Janene Selway, Shirin Razani, Beth Finke. 
ROW 6: Beth Franko, Aida Saracevic, Lisa Letcher, 
Chris Hoag. ROW 7: Lori Springer, Sandy Ukmar, Jill 
Krawcyzcyn. ROW 8: Jim Brown, Sandy Clicker, Mike 
Durbin. MISSING: Jim Lyon, Elaine Haupt, Dave 
Beal, Pat Bost, Marie Caputo, Katie Cavan, Mike 
Danna. Jim Eder, Renee Evans, Sandy Frank, Stephanie 
Fuerst, Pete Glanowski, Maureen Hildebrandt, Carrie 
Jackson, Jenny Jaroscak, Dave Jerina, Greg Kanios, 
David Klemencic, Mark Lopresti, Duncan Maitland, 
Mike Malane, Tom Murphy, Bill Musick, Nestor Papa- 
george. Sue Paul, Wendy Potokar, Keith Sergent, Rick 
Smith, Mike Bauer, Pat Buccilli, Brian Carney, Marti 
Cefaratti, Anne Cerer, Kalvis Cers, Carrie Conway, 
Mike Cotter, Sharon Fike, Sadhna Gupta, Mike Hag- 
gerty, Dave Hanson, Linda Lawrence, Nina Matic, Ka- 
ren Harmon, Laurie Jambor, Cheryl Johnson, Dave Ku- 
cinski, Vicki Metzger, Sharon Millhof, Todd Nawor, 
Amy Ogrinc, Tom Powell, Frank Repar, John Schauer, 
Nav Singh, Doug Springer, Jane Stragisher, Taeyung 
Surh. Dan Vanch. 




54 



While some Euclid students spent the 
months between December and April 
cursing the cold, grey, and snowy winter 
weather in Cleveland, the Ski Club mem- 
bers were taking to the slopes of Boston 
Mills every Thursday night. To help offset 
the cost of buses and lift tickets. Ski Club 
members spent most of November selling 
candy bars to their classmates. In addition 
to their weekly trips to Boston Mills, the 
Ski Club members also took a trip to the 
Cockaigne Ski Area in western New York 
in January. 

Left: A bundled-up Dr. Bergem is prepared to lead 
sophomores Jim Lyon, Laurie Hanlon, and Hillary 
Hook on a charge down the slopes. 

Far left: Now, the first thing to remember is to al- 
ways ski forward! 

Left: Beth Hook, Euclidian Senior Section editor, 
takes a break from the eye-straining task of typing 
senior activities copy to enjoy the Ski Club's outing to 
Cockaigne. 




Do you think I'm ready for the run down Thunder Mountain 
yet, Steve? 



Mr. Dzerowicz spends a few seconds to clue in Laurie Hanlon and Hillar\ Hook to 
everything he knows about skiing. 



SS 



The Winter Play, a collection of 
three one-acts, was presented on Janu- 
ary 22, 23, and 24. The first play. Fam- 
ily Album, concerned the children of 
the Featherways family, who are reunit- 
ed at their old home after years of sepa- 
ration following the death of their fa- 
ther. In the beginning, they are respect- 
ful to their father's memory; however, 
as the evening wears on, the old house 
and the aged butler bring back memo- 
ries; and the children finally acknowl- 
edge that their father was a cruel, un- 
kind man. The central characters in this 
play were Burrows, the butler, played 
by John Eros; Jasper, the eldest son, 
played by Tim Coles; and Lavinia, the 
eldest daughter, played by Audrey Lon- 
char. Also appearing were Dana Salem, 
Carol Otcasek, John Kisthardt, Dawn 
Ehrhart, Ken Ferlito, and Sal Midolo. 
Jenny Jambor provided musical accom- 
paniment. 

The second play. The Will, told the 
story of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Ross. The 
story is told in brief glimpses as the 
couple makes various wills over a forty- 
year period. In the beginning the love 
that the two have for each other is re- 
flected in their goodness and generos- 
ity, but over the years, as Mr. Ross 
becomes more and more successful, 
Mrs. Ross becomes corrupted with the 
power that they hold and changes into a 
very snobbish person. Mr. Ross eventu- 
ally realizes what has been happening 
her — and to himself — but he is too late 
to change anything. Mr. Ross was 
played by Mike Smith, and his wife 
Emily by Janet Larkins. The lawyers 
were played by Ken Ferlito and Bob 
Katcher. Also appearing were Joy 
Black and Dawn Ehrhart. 

The final play was a series of vi- 
gnettes called Breaking Up Is Hard to 
Do. They concerned three couples deal- 
ing with the problems of separation. 
The elderly couple was played by John 
Eros and Tina DiBacco, the middle- 
aged couple by Rick Pelton and Wendy 
Stroud, and the teen-aged couple by Sal 
Midolo and Lori Springer. Also appear- 
ing was Dave Hanson. The play was 
narrated by Mike Smith. 



Winter Play Provides 
3 For 1 Entertainment 




All those hectic play practices can give anyone prematurely gray Aa/r'Tina DiBacco and John Eros portrayed 
an elderly couple facing the problem of separation in the one-act play Breaking Up Is Hard to Do. 




John Eros's stoop-shouldered posture was an added Well, you'd be mad too if someone was sticking 
touch that helped him to create the character of the old his tongue out at you! Audrey Lonchar reflects 
butler in Family Album. her anger at having to acknowledge her father's 

true personality in Family Album. 



56 



Lefl: Ken Ferlilo and Joy Black run Ihrough a scene from The Will. 



Below: I can remember my lines belter in keep my eyes closed. Bob Kalchcr discusses a change in 
plans with Mike Smith and Janet Larkins in The Will. 




Tim Coles, Dawn Ehrhart, Ken Fcrlito, and John Kislhardt relive some memories in Family .Album. 



57 



'■^W ' 





-*^ 



yk 



Don't complain! It's a wonder that it 
came out at all, John Eros, Wendy 
Stroud, and Paul Leasure should be 
smiling aft£ir helping the Survey sur- 
«^i«e a ,y^u^«of soaring printing costs 
and missed deadlines. 



"V^ 



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4« 



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<:. \ -v'Pri 



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u* ^f ' " * ".i 



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-I 



The 1980-1981 Survey staff was a 
combination of experience and inexpe- 
rience. With junior co-editors Jeff Wes- 
tover and Roberta Yuhas at the helm, 
the first several issues were put together 
with a lot of worry. As the new year 
broke, however, things seemed to go 
more smoothly. The sophomore writers 
turned out to be more skilled than first 
expected, especially Kal Cers and Mike 
Kucera. Mark Speck, a junior, turned 
out to be a superior writer who could 
tackle any story. Sandy dicker, a ju- 
nior associate editor, also took on the 
student business manager's job. Seniors 
Tom Tonkli and Wendy Stroud, as page 
editors, provided leadership to the few 
other seniors on the staff: Harvey Tau- 
lien, Eric Eckart, and Dawn Ehrhart. 
Head photographer Ray Tice, a junior, 
grew in skill all year as he combined his 
efforts with senior Brian Reno and ju- 
nior Steve Clay. Artists Paul Leasure 
and Kathy Ray turned out interesting 
cartoon strips for each issue. All in all, 
this year's Survey got better and better 
as the staff grew in experience. 





SURVEY STAFF: First Row: Jackie Young, Paul Leasure, Kal Cers, Wendy Stroud. Row 2: Sue 
Suponcic, Roberta Yuhas, Mike Kucera, Gary Danolfo, Jeff Westover. Standing: Sandy dicker, Laura 
Morris, John Eros, Dawn Ehrhart, Ray Tice, Harvey Taulien, Mark Speck. Nor Pictured: Tom Tonkli, 
Steve Clay, Brian Reno. 



58 



School Publications 
Experience Rebuilding Year 



SURVEY EDITORS Tom Tonkli, Roberta Yuhas, Mr. Anlonlni, Wendy The next time wc do a slory aboul violcnee in high school sporl-.. Id's lr> nol to gel 
Stroud, John Eros. Sot Pictured. ■^e{{ Westover, Sandy dicker. so personally involved. 




EUCUYO STAFF First Row: Lisa Barash, Lynn Blevins, Linda Boone, Sue Lokar. Row 2: Teri EUCUYO EDITORS Linda Boone. Nfr Henderson. Lynn 

Zakraysek, Bill Mason, Vesna Markon, Beth Kupfer. Row 3: Paul Glaser, Scott Kost, Jeff Blevins. 

Westover. 



Eucuyo members run the school literary magazine. Through 
the course of the year, they collect and edit plays, stories, 
poems, artwork, and pictures from EHS students for use in the 
publication. Their perennial problem — and this year was no 
exception — is simply getting students to submit material to 



them for possible use in the magazine. To supplement their 
choice of material and to exercise their own artistic abilities, 
they also spend time writing stories and poems themselves. The 
Eucuvo is published in May and sold for $1. 



59 



Give Me An E: 




And if you don 't get those pictures, I will personally boil you in oil! Euclidian adviser Mr. Petrovic uses his typical finesse to discuss picture assignments with 
Brian Reno, Steve Clay, Jim Ambrose, and Audrey Lonchar. 



The Story of the 1981 Euclidian be- 
gan in the spring of 1980 with the selec- 
tion of this year's staff and the choice of 
the theme, Give Me an E. When the 
1980 Euclidian arrived last May, it was 
submitted to the Columbia University 
Press Association for judging. It won a 
second-place award, and many of the 
suggestions for improvements have 
been incorporated in this year's book. 
Further ideas were picked up at a week- 
long workshop held last June at Deni- 
son University and sponsored by the 
Josten's American Yearbook Com- 
pany. The workshop was attended by 
Mr. Petrovic and eight members of the 
staff: Jenny Jambor, Belli Franko, Amy 
Ogrinc. Kelly Dunlevy, Amy Reno, 
Mike Cotter, Mike Durbin, and Jim 
Brown. 

In early August, the staff began its 
advertising campaign. "Through a great 
effort, the staff raised $5200 in adver- 
tising — 30% more than has ever been 
raised before, an amazing achievment 
when one considers that many busin- 
esses have dropped yearbook ads to cut 



costs. Much of the success of the adver- 
tising campaign was due to the efforts 
of Lisa Stupansky, who personally sold 
$1200 in ads. Because of the increased 
advertising revenue, the cost of the 
yearbook to students was the same as 
last year, $12, although the printing 
costs were 10% higher than last year. 

As Underclass editor, the burden of 
meeting the first deadline in October 
fell most heavily upon Amy Reno. With 
the help of Laurie Hanlon, Hillary 
Hook, Lesa Galer, Beth Pritchard, and 
others; the first deadline was met with 
ease, as was the second deadline in No- 
vember. The December and January 
deadlines proved more troublesome, 
however, as it was too early to submit 
pages covering winter sports and work 
on Judy Krnc's Activities section pages 
was slowed in November since the staff 
was concentrating on selling yearbooks 
to the student body. Beth Hook, Senior 
section editor, and Linda Lawrence, 
Faculty editor, picked up the slack; and 



because of their dedicated work, the 
deadlines were met with a minimum of 
delay. 

The biggest headache of the year 
proved to be the final deadline. In order 
for the book to be published in May, all 
pages must be submitted by the middle 
of February. Unfortunately, this year 
the final deadline date was a full week 
before the conclusion of the winter 
sports' season, a fact which presented 
special problems for Sports editor Beth 
Cramer. 

Although the production of a year- 
book at a school the size of Euclid is the 
result of the efforts of many people, 
special mention should be make of 
Mark Speck and Mike Kucera, who are 
the authors of much of the copy in the 
Underclass and Activities sections; Jim 
Ambrose, Steve Clay, Brian Reno, and 
Ray Tice, who did much of the photog- 
raphy for the book, and Bill Mason, 
who composed the artwork for the cov- 
er and the divider pages. 



60 




Left: With ideas gathered from a professional evaluation of last year's book and a 
summer workshop, this year's staff strove to top the Euclidians of the past. 

EUCLIDIAN STAFF Boltom Row: A. Mclnally. N. Lisac, B. Hook, J. Krnc, B. 
Cramer, H. Hook. Row 2.S. Lisac, M Kucera, R. Scott. S. Tice, J. Brown. K. 
Talty, S. Lausin, E. Maroli. W. Potokar, L. Hanlon. Top Row: ]. Ambrose, L. 
Stupansky, M, Speck, K. McLaughlin, R. Tice. Not Pictured: J. Black, M. 
Cotter, M, Durbin, K, Dunlevy, D, Fetko, J. Hasse. L. Lawrence, P. Linn, B. 
Mason, M. Meyers, B. Reno, A. Wintle, J. Hoon, V. Hrobat, L. Dezelon, R, 
Evans, B. Franko, E. Gleisser, L. lannicelli, L. Hale, J. Jambor, S. Kost, D. 
Kucera, L. Letcher, L. Lewin, A. Lonchar, J. Mihelcic. S. Neumann, A. Ogrinc, 
B. Pritchard, A. Reno, R. Yuhas. D. Kelly, D. Morgan. S. Clay. M. Colling. L. 
Galer, E. Haupt, B. Kime, P. Leasure, D. Matsko, T. Nickel, L. Rhone, L. Yuko. 




4 -,1 





Now you have a Euclidian staffer's eye view of what a page looks like when it is sent to the printers. To The cover that Bill Mason designed for ihc 1980 book 
see how it turned out, turn to pages 30-31. w" a regional art competition and was sent to New 

York for national judging. Bill also designed the cover of 
this year's book. 



61 



v^^> 



^\ 



COPING WITH THE 




Brian Reno is able to apply some of the skills he has learned in his computer classes at his job at Hudson Pharmacy. He works fifteen hours a week as a 
pharmacist's assistant and computer operator, filling drug orders for area nursing homes and institutions. 



Going to school certainly isn't cheap. 
A new pen here, a tablet of paper there, 
a new notebook for science class-all 
these things add up over the course of a 
school year. And if you have a car, 
where are you supposed to get the mon- 
ey for gas and insurance? The answer is 
obvious — you go to work. 

The part-time job seems to be grow- 
ing in popularity with students as they, 
like their parents, try to cope with infla- 
tion. Luckily, the numerous small bu- 



sinesses and fast food outlets in Euclid 
provide a number of opportunities for 
students who want to pick up a few 
extra bucks. 

While some people would say that a 
part time job has a detrimental effect 
on a student's schoolwork and ability to 
participate in activities, students who 
work seem to be divided in their opin- 
ions. Greg Yartz, for example, admits 
to being a bit tired in school the day 
after he works late; and Brian Reno, 



who ranks first in the senior class aca- 
demically, says that his job might have 
a small effect on his schoolwork. While 
Doug Arbogast felt that his job left him 
little time for school activities, Trish 
Pirsil managed to involve herself in 
girl's volleyball and track. 

Whatever the effects of a part-time 
job on students" schoolwork, as long as 
the price of paper, pens, and notebooks 
keeps going up, students will keep look- 
ing for ways to make ends meet. 



62 



COST OF LIVING 



Far left: Greg Yarlz puts in thirty hours a 
week at Gale's Bi-Rite as a stockboy. He plans 
to work there full time after he graduates this 
year. 

Left: Dave Marvin earns about $60 a week for 
the twenty hours he works at Armao's Pizza 
washing dishes and doing odd jobs. 

Below: Trish Pirsil averages 15-20 hours a 
week working at Arthur Treacher's on Euclid 
Avenue. She earns $3.35 an hour. 









Above, left: Doug Arbogast checks the rear 
end of a car at the Sohio station where he has 
been working for the past two years. He uses 
much of the money he makes for repairs and 
parts for his dragster. 



Left: The stores and shops at Euclid Square 
Mall keep quite a few EHS students busy with 



part-time work. 




63 



ALPHAEET 




OWE students John Deatsch. Bob Znidarsic, Alex Schiller. Mike Hardy, and Denise Glavan take time out from their busy schedules to make Dr. Bergem 
feel at home during the OWE Christmas party. 

DCT'^ DE? OWE? COE? To an out- 
sider, these letters might represent the al- 
phabet soup of abbreviations standing for 
some obscure federal agencies. But stu- 
dents at Euclid High School know that 
they are abbreviations of various work- 
study programs: Diversified Cooperative 
Training, Distributive Education, Occupa- 
tional Worl< Experience, and Cooperative 
Office Education. Under these programs, 
students spend half the day in classes to 
fulfill their requirements for graduation 
and half the day working in local busin- 
esses and industries to practice job skills 
and gain work experience. 



MR. HOFFARTS OWE CLASS Row 1: John Deatsch, Dave D'Amico. Row 2: Ann Buetlner, Gary 
Danolfo, Tony Franklin. Row 3; Bob Znidarsic, Mark Schultz, Wayne Frimel, Diane Corbett, Vicki 
Robertson. Standing: Eric Ladovich, Tim Breeden, John Schauer, Joe Braddock, Dave Roberts. 




64 



SCLP 



DCT CLASS BoHom Row: Karol MacArthur, Laura Giunla, Jeff 



Hegedus, Jim Slommski. Row 2: Lynn Murphy, Sharon Zeim, Fred DE Ci/\S5 Bottom Row: Ken Curtis, Dana Salem, Jeanetle Roper Stacy Pelilto Charlcnc 
Foskey, Bill Banaszek. Row 3: Ernie Elshaw, Connie Bell, Cynthia Gole, Jennifer Watson, Colleen Poe. Angela Krizanovic. Standing Mr Sibcrl Tony Pal- 
Ross, BobCek. Row 4: Jim Jazbec, Joanne Archacki, Mark Mar- field. Ken Schulz, Scott Siegel, Debby Szalay, Nick Fussell, Sharon Rymarczyk Bill 
olt, Wayne Davis. Row 5: Jim Harchar, Chris Fitzpatrick. Sowers, Kevin Zaller. 




MR. SATTLER'S OWE CLASS Row I: Gary Glick, Denise Glavan, Yvonne 
Miller. Row 2: Mike McLaughlin, Ron Gielink, Tom Newell. Row 3: Dino 
Insana, Bob Magruder, Mike Chinchar Row 4: Al Schiller. Tim Sweeney, Mike 
Hardy, Mike Kispersky, Pugs Scott. 



COE CLASS Seated: Nancy Valencic, Debbie Laska, Jena Vanck, Bonita 
Benedict, Eileen O'Brien, Jane Srnovsnik. Standing: Dorcen Scuffcrt. Linda 
Payne, Janet McCluskey, Lori Brinklcy, Lynnc Zak, Carol Schneider, Lisa 
Son, Natalie Fratlin. 



6S 



Education For 



The Vocational Machines and Voca- 
tional Automotives classes are two-year 
programs which allow students to ac- 
quire practical job experience while still 
in school. In their four- period classes, 
students learn the technical theory of 
machinery or automobiles as well as 
having the opportunity to apply that 
theory to projects using the equipment 
available in the classes. 

Right. In the Vocational Machines classes, suc- 
cess or failure on a project is sometimes measured 
in the thousandths of an inch. 




VOCATIONAL MACHINES II Jeff Bleigh, Tom Clasen, Bob Kinkoff. 



VOCATIONAL MACHINES I Row I: Greg Kanios, Mike Schiffbauer. Dave 
Horvat, Ed Thomas. Dan Cononie. Greg Kuhar. Paul Habat, Glenn Waters, 
Bob Hanck. Row 2. Mike Hribar. Bill Piatt, Mike Gishnock. Mr. Simpson, Scott 
Nebe, Mike Murray. Row 3: Tom Brnjic. Dan Kirchner, Dennis Gray, Rich 
Kaucic, Rudi Benedejcic. 



66 



Fun And Profit 



VOCATIONAL AUTOMOTIVES I Bottom Row. Ken Koncl, Jim Brucning. Gary Budnar, John 
Tomorowitz, John Albertone. Row 1 John Dombrosky, Tom Banning, John Ross, Darin Radat/, Doug 
Hufford, A! Kozlowski, Jeff Kovach, ScoU Rose, Dave Fowie, Tim Virl, Gary Ziegler. Row i Dave 
McCarty, Fred Wendcl, John Carter, Scolt Satava, Lou Zakrajsek, 




VOCATIONAL AUTOMOTIVES II Mike Andrews, Ken Burton, Paul Langdon, Dave Turner, Doug 
Winslead, Kim McKenna, Don Gla.ser, Mike Yentz, Dan Danzinger. Brett Dubecky. Ray Klimas, Rudy 
Knaus, Sieve Turk, Bob Willrich, Keith Keal, John Dea, Tim Golden. .A bsenc Steve Zak, Jim Brady, Lou 
Tortorici, Bill Buettner. 



When I change the oil, I change the oil! 



67 



What really is the job of a beautician 
or an artist? To bring out the best in 
people, naturally! And it's the skills 
needed to do this which the Vocational 
Cosmetology and Vocational Art stu- 
dents develop in their two-year pro- 
grams. Cosmetology students study un- 
der the direction of Mr. Lou Dipaolo at 
Euclidian Beauty College and return to 
the high school for their academic sub- 
jects. Vocational Art students work on 
commercial art skills for four periods a 
day under the supervision of Mr. Rich- 
ard Patton. 

Lori Schmidt practices her cosmetology skills un- 
der the watchful eyes of an instructor at the Eu- 
clidian Beauty College. 




COSMETOLOGY II Bottom Row: Sue Soeder, Robin Gielink. 
Row 2: Kelly Dezelon, Debbie Skula. Row 3: Maria Maniglia, Lori 
Schmidt. Absent: Bonnie Shady, Sherry Siefert, Tammy Vanbene- 
den. 



COSMETOLOGY I Bottom Row: Kathy Rupcic. Deanna Jeric, Connie Nelson, Sue 
Bolger Carolyn Medves, Susie Reider. Row 2: Charlene Moore, Linda Doremus, Patty 
Golden Valerie Ventura. Row 3: Mira Debevc, Traci Hammond, Shern Carter. Row 4: 
Nancy Patterson, Kim Frasher, Becky Wiegand. Row 5: Bernie Strle, Colleen Sandor, Sue 
Roper, Robin Willard. Row 6: Renee Siemen, Denise Harmon. Absent: Jackie Moore, bue 
Unick, Maryann Eichler 



68 



The Best In People 




VOCATIONAL ART II Sealed: Julie Koenig, Jim 
Ray, Cathy Jones, Laura Szozdowski- Row 2; Bob 
Jakovlic, Nancy Takiguchi, Nancy Bulick, Cindy 
Mascaro, Sharon Knack, Tammy Corbran, Joann 
Gilchrist- Row 3: Allen Bumbarger, Greg Santon, 
Bob Boyd, Brian Campbell, Steve Hurshman, Ray 
Williams, Gary Supinski. 



This is what happens to people who criticize our artwork! Do you think that if we organized it like an assembly line that we could produce a better picture? 




VOCATIONAL ART I Bottom Row: Dusty 
McKain, Michelle McKnight, Karyn Campbell, 
Kathy Ray, Peggy Biscoff, Denise Sobecki. Donna 
Riedel, Karen Malinowski, Bev Brown, Keith 
Childers. Row 2: Rick Roeder, Dave Just. Mark 
Pfleger, Dave Morgan, Joe Marschall, Dave lan- 
nicca. Norm Wonderly, Lonny Brewster. 



69 



Child Care Students Look Like 



The initials H.E.R.O. stand for 
Home Economics Related Occupa- 
tions. The Hero Club is a part of the 
Child Care I and H classes. Its goal is 
the promotion of community awareness 
for the need of quality child care ser- 
vice. 

This year, the club donated money to 
Rainbow Babies and Children Hospital 
for research. The Hero Club members 
also planned outings to various chil- 
dren's homes. Social events were also 
planned. A class trip concluded the 
year for the Child Care I students. 
Child Care II students ended their year 
with an awards banquet. The students 
also competed in district and state ral- 
lies demonstrating the skills they 
learned in class. 

Officers of the Child Care II class 
were Sue Markiewicz, president; Becky 
Surge, vice-president; Parsa McGraw, 
secretary; and Kim Antonick, treasur- 
er. Child Care I officers were Parris 
Rice, president; Barb Dearden, vice- 
president; Marie Udovic, secretary; and 
Linda Callahan, treasurer. 




HERO CLUB Bottom Rou- Lisa Mastrobuono, Lee Ferrante. Lisa Boyle, Peggy Laughlin, Darci Young, 
Tracey Daily, Joanne Janosky. Stacy Salit. Row 1 Barb Dearden, Margaret Henry, Kim Antonick, Parsa 
McGraw, Sue Markiewicz, Maria Udovic, Debbie Bagwell, Sherri Breeden. Ron 3\ Miss Noble, Kim Sotka, 
Linda Callahan, Becky Burge, Mary Sabetto, Kathy Jeffries, Jacci Johnson, Gerri Rutkowski, Tracy How- 
sare, Mrs. Arko. 




Ridmg herd on pre-school children isn't always as easy as it looks. 




And then Goldilocks said . 



70 



HEROES To The Younger Set 





Aboi'C Anyone who has to go to the potty, raise your hand. 



Lefr. Miss Noble takes time for a quick game of Ring-Around-the- 
Rosy. Vocational Child Care students spent four periods a day at 
Noble School where they worked with the children in the pre-school 
classes. 



71 



Vocational Business Students 



The Vocational Clerk-Typist and 
Stenography programs are two-year, 
four-period classes for those students 
wishing to learn and develop specific 
business skills before confronting the 
real world upon graduation. 

But the Clerk-Typist and Stenogra- 
phy programs are more than just 
classes. They are also clubs which con- 
duct service projects, money-raising 
activities, go on field trips, and partici- 
pate in regional and state-wide office 
skills contests. 

For instance, during the course of the 
year, these classes held a variety of pop- 
corn, candy, and Christmas-items sales 
to raise money for their activities. An 
example of their service projects, the 
Clerk-Typist I class gave a Halloween 
party for deprived children. 

All of the classes make use of field 
trips and outside speakers to broaden 
their understanding of the business 
world. Some of the offices visited this 
year by these classes included TRW, 
the FBI, the Eaton Corporation, IBM, 
and Ohio Bell. 



Top, right: Neat appearance and a pleasing smile are jusl as important for a future 
businesswoman as stenographic skills — as Stenography II student Joy Black demon- 
strates. 

Above: STENOGRAPHY I Bottom: Chris Lauria. Row 2: Sue Fedokowski, Julie 
Pavic. Row 3: Lisa Keith, Sharon Szalay. Kathy Cibrik, Row 4: Terri Smiddy, 
Sharon Millhof, Janine Valentine. Rowi.Sandra Clicker, Michelle Drasler, Michele 
Kacperski, Karen Sim, Maureen Matras, Samdi Klimek. Row 6: Denise Snook, Amy 
Griffis. Absent: Debbie Furman. 

Right: Practice mal(es perfect! Mrs. Rash gives a dictation exercise to Stenography II 
student Sandy Frank. 




72 



Gain 'Hands On' Experience 




Lcfl: CLFRKTYPISTS I Bottom Roiv, Tcrri Oberaitis, Annette Walker, 
Debbie Reid, Linda Plevelich. Row 2: Rosemary Hahn. Lori Seidel. Con- 
nie Larabee. Heidi Schult?-, Carrie Conway. Row 3: Karen Glover, Carole 
Sapatka, Angela Wallace, Mary Mokvic. 



Below: Let's see. First you put the paper in. Then you 




Above, left: CLERK-TYPISTS II Bottom Roiv.Toni Jamison, Lee Anne 
Hicks, Denise Martin, Jill Whaling. Row 2: Adrienne Perovsek, Diane 
Hamilton, Shewonna Gray, Allison White, Dianne Stipkovich. Absent: 
Joanie Kreckal, Vicki Voase. 

Left: STENOGRAPHY II Bottom Row: Mrs. Rash, Angle Boka, Bev 
lafelice, Kristin Yamane. Row 2 Christie Keller, Ann Wintle, Mary Lynn 
Fasham, Colleen O'Neill. Row 3: Sue Lokar, Joy Black, Denise Fetko. 
Row 4: Denise Strauss, Sandra Frank, Debbie Faight, Janet Faragov. Row 
5: Vesna Markon, Judy Lynch. 



73 



Learning To Do Things 



Right:Va\indii Walker and Wanda Remberl con- i 
centrate on their classwork in Accounting 1. t 



Vocational Accounting and Voca- 
tional Data Processing are four-period 
business class. They also act as clubs, 
and as such sponsor a number of mon- 
ey-raising projects to finance their ac- 
tivities. 

This year the Accounting classes 
raised money through bake and candy 
sales. They also worked on several ser- 
vice projects. For example, at Hallow- 
een they made pumpkins for the Mary 
Mavec Home. The classes also took 
field trips to area business. The junior 
class visited the library and the down- 
town post office. The senior class 
toured the Ameritrust Headquarters, 
The Cleveland Clinic, Lakeland Com- 
munity College, and Nela Park. 

The officers of the Accounting I class 
were president Al Peklay, vice-presi- 
dent Nick Caplick, recording secretary 
Karen Gordon, corresponding secretary 
Jan Mayerhofer, treasurer Vernita Ad- 
ams, and historian Angela Broxton. In 
the Accounting II class, Kathy Stanke 
served as president; Denise Santon, 
vice-president; Judy Mast, secretary; 
Jeannine Carlo, treasurer; and Lori Ap- 
pleton, historian. 

The Data Processing classes learn 
key punch, data entry methods, and the 
/an^ua^esof the computer: BASIC and 
COBOL. They raised money for their 
activities by selling candy and Christ- 
mas gifts. They also helped run the 
United Way drive at school this year. 
Like the members of the Accounting 
classes, they are members of the Ohio 
Office Education Association. 

In the Data Processing I class, Joe 
Minardo served as president; Dina 
Massaro, vice-president; Rich Cowie, 
secretary; and Tony Naglic, treasurer. 
In the Data Processing II class, Tony 
Zingale was president; Dave Jerinia, 
vice-president; and Diane Polaski, sec- 
retary. 



Above, right DATA PROCESSING I Seated: 
Pam Clark. Dina Massaro, Cheryl Smith, Chris 
Walczak. Maria Izquierdo, Cathy Collon. Stand- 
ing: Tony Naglic. Doug Blackman, Rich Cowie, 
George Opacich, Joe Minardo, Jim Catalano, 
Paul Spence. 

Right ACCOUNTING I Seated: Diane Hege- 
dus. Theresa Andresky, Robin Fryar, Paula 
Owen. Row 2: Keith Young, Karen Gordon, Jan 
Mayerhofer, Sharon Yeckley. Row 3: Louann 
Jones, Brian Schulz, Dan Wyman, Lori Harrah, 
Nick Caplick. Al Peklay, Vernita Adams, Angela 
Broxton, Valinda Walker, Carla Bornds, Wanda 
Rembert. 




74 



'By The Numbers' 



tell. ACCOUNTING II Sc:ilcd: .lc;inninc Carlo. Dcnisc Sanuin, Ion ApplcUin. 
Donna Dawson, Slunding: Chri)^ I ogan, Jim Gorjup. John Miklos. Judy MaM, Jeff 
Griffin, Kalhy ,Stankc 

Below: A! Pcklay, find.s oul Ihal Ificrc is more lo accounting Ihan jusl adding 
numbers. 




Above: DATA PROCESSING II Seated: Nancy Ivancic. Darlene Pan- 
gallo, Debbie Manassa. Carol Chase. Standing: Mike Zahorsky. Diane 
Polaski, Chris Zaffle, Dave Jerina, Anita Jankowski. Rich Horlon, Tony 
Zingale. Mark Fabec. 

Left: Mrs. Wiegand gives some ovcr-the-shoulder advice lo Jan Maver- 

hofer. 



75 




76 




77 



Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 




RAMLOW. FIRST PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Steve Green, Selma Ford. Marlene Joyce. ROW 2: Sheila 
Laidlaw, Mary Walsh. Debbi Manello. Julie Smith, Tony Furlan, Anna Papouras, Vesna Dures. ROW 3: Don 
Novotny. Tony Foskey. John Barndt. Joe Hoag, Lisa Lawrence, Russ Mazarro. 



LELLIS. FIRST PERIOD. BOTTOM ROW: 

Karen Schulz. Donna Juratovac, Paul Kolleda, 
Scott Barich. ROW 2: Cheryl Botts. Mike Colo. 
Joe Vislocky. ROW 3: Debbie Conner. Mike Mi- 
halick, Dan Schauer. Dave Franks. ROW 4: Jim 
Poklar. Greg Garland. Mark Botirius. Don 
Payne. ROW 5: Matt Hernan, Rick Hunt, Mark 
Archie. ROW 6: Ken Ospelt. Frank Glavan. Ken 
Porz. 





Nav Singh provides a confused sophomore, Selma 
Ford, with a helping hand on the first day of school. 



78 



Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 




PETROVIC. FIRST PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Jackie 

Young, Carolyn Torcr. ROW 2: Alice Mihelcic. Thcrcsc 
Williams, Patli Smith, Steve Oslrom, ROW 3; Sue Mooney, 
Sue Suponcic. Maureen Colling, ROW 4: ,)essica Smith, 
Donna Francetic, Bob Rinderle. Nancy Smith. ROW 5: 
Darin Dureiko, Deena Lucci, Jo Ann Zele. ROW 6: Laurie 
Hanlon, Cindy Green, Therese Nickel, Wendy Potokar. 
ROW 7: Karen Schuiz, Bob Daugherty. Greg Sopko. ROW 
8: Mark Medley, Kal Cers, Steve Hoffert, ROW 9; Darrin 
Wagner, Dan Moster, Jim Ambrose. Jim Lyon. MISSING: 
Linda Wudy. 



SPIGA. FIRST PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Linda Scott, Mi- 
chelle Marchesano, Frances Lloyd. ROW 2: Judy Stevko, 
Zelkja Sulic, Lisa Leasure, Lori Perna. ROW 3: Bill Bolton, 
Charlie Best, Jim Furman, Maria Kovac, Bruna Masera. ROW 
4: Dave Latkowski, Gary Browne, Joe McElwain. ROW 5: 
Mike Skebe, John Weissfuss. ROW 6: Brian Kime, Allan 
Smith, Jeff Grabinski. MISSING: Jeff Barnard, Dan Butler. 




HARRIS. FIRST PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Paul Jablonski, Ken Callahan, Brenda Laska. 
Monica Maio, Elaine Terzano, Kim Trebec, Geneine Cefaratti. ROU' 2: Cheryl Beuck, Tom 
Johnson, Christine Popovic, Sam Stewart, Jim Belavich. ROW 3: Phil Rose, Ted Keeney. Scott 
Bealko, Geddy Jakubauskas. Alex Beret. ROW 4: Larry Kravos, Stan Barnard, Petar Joksimo- 
vich, Paul McGraw. MISSING: Vicki Fuerst, Michelle Skora. Jim Zimmerman. 



79 



GALE, SECOND PERIODBOJTOM ROW: Tim Mays, Kris Beutler. Ingrid Simicali, Cheryl 
Burnett, Kathy Corbett, Michelle Watros, Ed Molesky, William Tolh. ROW 2: Sara Jones, 
Sheila Duncan, Ron Mueller, Jim Peck, Nick Fainacci. ROW 3: Pete Hadzima, Bill Breeden, 
Larry Longslreth, Art Werle, Mark Phillips, Jeff Springer. MISSING: Jean Immke. 



BENDER. SECOND PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Michael 
Vella, Chris Konchan. Karmen Kelly, Sue Leonard, Carolyn 
Schultz, Chris Testa. ROW 2: Shawn Evans, Michael Lausin, 
Janet Immke, Mia Minerd, Marie Cirino. Sheila Simmons. 
ROW 3: Chris Burris, Bonnie Black, Kim Armstrong, Dawn 
Bagocius, Sharon Briusko. ROW 4: Mark Eros, Dan Mullins, 
Robert Wilson. 









r 






J 



i 



9i 



/ 




McLaughlin. SECOND PERIODBOTJOM ROW: Eldred Cad- 
dis, Trish Pircil, Joanie Picciano, Sheri Deuschle, Kim Munici, Patri- 
cia Miklavic. ROW 2: Susan Turner, Mike Miller, Bob Peterson, Mary 
Hromyko, Patricia Schauer. ROW 3: Jeff Zingle, Dale Ponsart, Wal- 
ton Himes, John Richer, Vincent Penny, Ken Tomasseli, Dino 
Schembre, Ken Schmeltzer. MISSING: Jim Denihan, Tresa Eber- 
wein. 




Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 



80 



Euclid's own urban cowgirl, Tcrri 
Nickel, lakes advanlage of some E- 
room rcfreshmenls after a football 
game. 




GALE. THIRD PF.RIOD BOTTOM ROW: Dennis Dickard, Walter Kinkopf, William Maire. Randy 
Salter, John Meyers. Andrew Powaski. ROW 2: Barbara Benko, Mike Dickson, Cathy Carlo, Diane 
Szukalski, Rcnee Potts, Lisa Rhone, Bonnie Thornton, Susan Reinkc, Jacqueline Breeding, Linda LaVal- 
ley. ROW 3: Rebecca Tavano, Bill Brown, Jane Mast, Jack Richardson, Connie Papouras, Jeff Brown, 
Lisa Berardinelli, Lisa Tousel, Avril Melnally. 




HARRIS. THIRD PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Jim 
Labondano, Felicia Hughlett, Diane Plait, Christine 
Will. Row 2: Chris Campana, Jeff Baromir, Blaise 
Feslini. Row 3: John Theodosion, Tim O'Neill, 
Diana Sandrick. Row 4: Dean Pale, Stacy Jones, Tim 
Doyle, Gordon Bak, Lori Trebel, Kim Tianello, Row 
5: Frank Weissfuss, Mike KobeliLsch, Bonnie Kost. 
Missing: Ann Buetlner. Mike Faberl, Blair McLean, 
Rebekah Minaril/is, Bonnie Lucas. 




Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 



81 



Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 



SPIGA. THIRD PERIOD 

BOTTOM ROW: Joe Kucmanic. Mike Stegh, Marie Ca- 
puto. Mark Suchevits. ROW 2: Sandy Carpenter, Jamie 
Brannon, Linda Hoffart. ROW 3: Nora Haller, Lynn Pau- 
lev, Diane Moser, Maryann Fralcher. ROW 4: Jim Piper, 
Bob KrcaL Mike Peterson, MISSING: Dennis Ecker, Ro- 
berta Koester. Tammy Lesler. Diane Mastin, Brian Mita, 
Leslie O'Rourke. 





Are sophomore orientations always this enthralling? Th\s class of 1983's high school experience 
began with a class orientation and a half day session with their teachers. 




LELLIS. THIRD PERIOD 

BOTTOM ROW: Barbara Spaur, Sue Stephens, Tom Carlson, Steve Smith. ROW 2: Sue 
Drienka, Brenda Fumich, Michelle Beggs, Gina Brewer. Row 3: Tim Wootten, Randy Martin, 
Kevin Brennen, Bob Owen, Patric Delaney, Bill Blevins, ROW 4: Jim Moses, Matthew Price, 
Chris Hughes, Gordon McCance, Phil Gron. MISSING: John Boyle, Maryann Eichler. 



HAFFER. THIRD PERIOD 

BOTTOM ROW: Bonnie Hann. Jim Behra. ROW 2: Lisa 
Rowan, Michelle DeLuca, Jack Thompson. Row 3: Diana 
Mackell, Greg Hinton, Mike Budas. MISSING: Don Clere, 
John Szabo. 



82 



Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 



CARMODY. FOURTH PERIOD BOTTOM 
ROW: Darryl Ellul, Aubrey Ward. Dan O'DonnelK 
ROW 2: Gina Bregy, Tim Scaife. John Kastelic. 
ROW 3: Denise Glavan, Kelly Taylor. Ed Hender- 
son. MISSING: Kathy Barile, Tim Bene. Zobie Hill. 
Rick Johnson. Steve Popp. Sharon Laftwich. 




Smoking Survey Proves Habits Die Hard 








« 



Warning: The Surgeon General 
has determined that cigarette smok- 
ing is dangerous to your health. 

Although this has been printed on 
every pack of cigarettes sold in the 
United States for the past fifteen 
years, a great number of Americans 
— and Euclid students — choose to 
ignore it. 

A survey of random sophomore 
and junior homerooms showed that 
25 percent of sophomores and 30 
percent of juniors smoked. Although 
high school health classes do educate 
students about the adverse effects of 
smoking, apparently old habits die 
hard. 



Taking a smoke during lunch was a privilege 
reserved only for seniors. 




GIBSON. FOURTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Beth McArthur, Patty Lynch, Vic Knaus. Lynette 
Gilmore. Bob Bozak. Dave Malsko. Laura Davidson. ROW 2; Stacie Hrvatin. Bob Lloyd. Malt Koman, 
Mike Custer. Mike Albright. Vince Rattini. Dale Hector, Jeff Dauer. MISSING: Paul Leasure. 



Bill Bozak makes use of a table saw to begin his project 
for Mr. Chambers' Woods class. 



83 



LOWE. FIFTH PfR/OD BOTTOM ROW: Marie Medved, Diane Papouras, Clarence Brog- 
don. ROW 2: Wernhcr Hirzer, Diane Rolilt, Michael Zusman, Dave Ball, Susan Wachhaus. 
ROW 3: Thomas Williams, Scott Maitland, Joelle Maldonado, Terri Zakraysek. Barbara 
Bozich, Pamela Snyder, Eileen Vandeveer, Debra Penicka, Kathleen Hanratty. 



LELLIS, FIFTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Tom Jakovlic, 
Bill Rogers, John Cupar, Lynn Yuko, Leslie Urbas, Linda 
Miller, Sharon Golinar. ROW 2: Troy Cantini, Rajshree Ku- 
mar. ROW 3: Matthew Richards, Cathy Spooner. ROW 4: 
Mark Wardeiner, Brian Oberle, Bill Brochak, Curt Wells, Bob 
Nowac. MISSING: Paul Pallanle. 




Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 



84 



Dave Bcnncu lakes extra special care with his Eng- 
lish assignment for Mrs. Gibson's class 




SPIGA. FIFTH PFRIOD BOTTOM ROW: Tracie Taylor, Tina Palumbo. Sharon Buchner, Denisc 
Dean, Gary Leinweber. ROW 2: Linda Tinelli, Kim Men. ROW 3: Glenn Albert. Joe PIcsko, Betsy 
Wanderslcben, Jenny O'Brien, Bill Bai^el. ROW 4: Bryan Ross, Rich Meier, Jon Sajn, Rich Makuhan, 
Rich McNamara. Missing: Keith Imrie. 



HARRIS. FIFTH PERIODBOTTOM ROW: Shir- 
Icen Nurmi, Bob Hammonds, Lynn Cenla, Dawn 
Schmeling, Paul Pavlina, Susan Sidhu. ROW 2: Julie 
Koucky, Lisa Cover. ROW 3: Jill Rcminick, Beth 
Steele. ON STAIRS: Vic Martin, Jill Midolo, Kim 
Norton, Lisa Clarke, Miyung Surh, Scott Sanl'ord, 
David Rojcck, Tom Deason, Craig Lane, Keith Lexa. 




Soph Trades Jamaica's Shores For Euclid 



Si" 



4m 



Do you know where Vizog, India is? Then you 
can imagine the problems Akhilcsh Ganti has 
with American geography. 



Sophomore Akhilesh Ganti is not 
only new to the high school this year 
but also new to the United States. 

Born in Vizog, India, Akhilesh has 
lived and traveled around the world 
as his father, a heart surgeon, pur- 
sued his profession. After living six 
years in India, Akhilesh spent two 
years in New Zealand and the last 
six years in Jamaica before arriving 
in Euclid. 

Although Akhilesh admits that he 
misses the spectacular beaches of Ja- 
maica and the Carribean blueo( the 
ocean, he finds the cities in the Unit- 
ed States much cleaner than those in 
Jamaica. There's another benefit 
too: while a gallon of gasoline costs 
$1.20 here, it goes for S4.55 a gallon 
in Jamaica! 

Akhilesh's favorite sports include 
tennis, soccer, table tennis, and 
cricket. 



Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 



85 





Sophomores Give EHS StraigHt A's 


Willi sweau palms and a stomach 


class adapted itself remarkably well 


thai feels like a walkini! adverlise- 


to life at the high school. A survey 


menl for Turns, a supliomore opens 


given to six sophomore homerooms 


ihe door and cnlers the ca.vernous 


found that 7.V-; of the students re- 


halls of t-uclid High .School lor his 


sponding preferred life :\\ the high 


first day of school. His heart begins 


school to that of their old junior 


to pound as, wandering down the 


high. More imporlantl\'. X.s'r of the 


halls in a hopeless search lor his 


sophomores surveyed indicated that 


locker, he looks for a familiar face 


they like their teachers. The facullv 


from his junior high. On the \ergc of 


should be happy to learn that even 


panic, he spots a kid who sat behind 


the strcc[-\\isc juniors ga\e their 


him in his ninth grade, third period 


teachers a positive rating by a 79- 


studv hall. Although he didn't say 


21'/' margin. 


"boo" to him all last >Citr, he now 


.Studies of high schools show that 


hurries over as if he is about to greet 


students succeed best at schools in 


' a long-lost brother. Then, mustering 


which they are happy. If this is true. 


all his concentration to eliminate the 


the results of our survey prove that 


trembling from his \oice. he asks. 


the class o( IQK.-? and Huclid High 


"So what do vou think >)f this 


School have two fantastic \cars to 


place-.'" 


look forward to. 


Aside from the usual first day jit- 




ters and confusion, the sophomore 






PETROVIC. SIXTH PER/OD BOTTOM ROW: Akhilesh Ganti, Andrea Hudson. Hillary Hook ROW 
2: Belli Carman, Rick Kocjan, Lauren Jambor, Maryann Radisek. ROW 3: Jotin Webb, John Rahija, 
Elaine Haupl. ROW 4: Kalherine Brown. Mike Szmania, Allison Mersnik, Melanice Watkins. ROW 5: 
Mike Kucera, Rob Schoeniger, Mike Lang, Greg Fondran. MISSING; Wendy Cicek, Christine Davis. 



CARMODY. SIXTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: 

Norm Marolt, John Schauer, Bill Cunningham. 
ROW 2: Pally Dolson, Mike McCallion, James Wig- 
gins, ROW 3: Tom Koncar, Joyce Sultle, Mike Pe- 
terson. ROW 4: John Miklavcic, Mike Rendina. 
MISSING: Frank Bauck, George Bielfelt, Peggy 
Radabaugh, Ken Schoeder. 





I'm using gym class lo practice my benchwarming. 



86 



s 




TKAC, SEVENTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Kris 
Kempke, Urvashiben Palel. ROW 2: Patty Plavcan, Laurie 
Pappota, ROW 3: Randy Maxwell, Chuck Yecklcy. David 
Mzik. ROW 4: Alan Walch. Peter Totarella, Vince Indiano. 
ROW 5; Jim Holchneckl. Jim Parsons. ROW 6: Dan Tera- 
zano, Dave O'Neal, Dan Jasbec, Tom Bumbarger. 



Quick! Bring a handkerchief. I think she's going to burst into rears.' yells Lori Perna as she and 
Jennifer Jaroscak attempt to console a downcast Joanne Zele. Life at the high school can be 
confusing for a sophomore in September. 





GALE. SEVENTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW; Chuck 
Schroeder, Gail Griswold, Dave Kelmencic. ROW 2: Cindy 
Malone, Tammy Tichenor, Darwin Nemec. ROW 3: Linda 
Ziegler. Karen Brown, Laura Capretta. ROW 4: Mike Guarino, 
Barbara Pavlovski, Janet Schultz. ROW 5: Gary Bosco, Rob 
Moyer. Keith Makovlic. MISSING: Frank Betti. Rick Salajcik. 
Lezlie Smith, Kim Stamberger. 



HARRIS. SEVENTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Mike Danna. Lance Haveriock. Lynn 
Prilchard, Yvonne Lcduc, Sue Kernz. ROW 2: Corinne Dular. Lisa Griffin. Linda Hochcvar. 
Lisa Marrolt, Mary Modic. ROW 3: Vlaiko Oroz. Sam PantaUme. Dennis Morck. Michelle 
Scheid. Brian Wilson, George Thomas, Nanc\ McCourl, katc McLaughlin, Marianne Surovy. 
MISSING: Chris Roberts, Jackie Rose. 



87 



GIBSON. SEVENTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Michelle Ward, Jenny Breznikar, Tony 
Rupsic, Lisa Grassi, Laura Englebrechl, Joe Oyaski, Jim Dudziak, ROW 2: Dave Strell. John 
Harper. Peggy Stibinger, ROW 3: Ernie Lackner, Russ Ede, Mike Ellenbest, Dave Bennett, 
Chuck Herbst. Brian Stipkovich, John Minissale. MISSING; Dwayne Davis, John Donnett, 



SPIGA. EIGHTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW; Sue Arnold, 
Tammy Calogar, Donna Giunta, Andrea Pluta, Regina Stewart, 
Cindy Robinetle. ROW 2; Dave Leonhardt, Frank Sajn. Phil 
Massaro, Kim Hoffman, Lori Gamber. Michelle Martorello, 
Holly Jones. MISSING: Steve Nagy. 



£#■«""« 
*»«»» 




68 



C hcryl Robcrls is so good al Ihi: sewing .issignmcnls 
in Mrs, O'Donnell's chiss she c:m do ihcni wiih one 
eve. 




LELLIS. l-ICHTH PFRIODBOTTOM ROW; Paul Sehull/. Rulh Biercr. Lisa Sellers. Am\ Raicevich, 
Nina Malic, Lisa tenia. Anne MeNclis. Nadine Lisac. ROW 2: Jon Wallers, Chris JLirris. Lou 
Barlulovic. Kin Henkel, Palrick Kehn, Barbara Zupancic. Wend) Swyi, Bernic Champa, Mara Pinkava, 
Sue Cermak. ROW 3; Mike Brallon, Rob Clapacs, Craig Lyman, Luis Nicvcs, Mary Ann Kelly, Jenny 
Jaroscak, Carrie Jack.son, Passion Ware, Ann Langan MISSING; Pammi Phillips. 





HARRIS. EIGHTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW; 
Greg Malaney, Tina Zingalc, Vickie Fussell, Mari- 
anne Cieslinski. ROW 2; Joe Vohnoul, Melissa Cole, 
Lisa Caplick, Laurie Taylor, Dan Reynolds, Rick 
Schafer, Fd Bradac, Sieve Bocher, Larry Rowland. 
Alan Click. MISSING; Lisa Kinkoff, Dean Kipp, 
Donna Moore, David Robinson, Cindy Sopnicar. 



LOWE. EIGHTH PERIOD BOTTOM RONS; Ken C.odnaiec. 
Kordich. Karen Marando. Rod Reho. Carolyn Wilson. Belh Mason. 
George Miller. John Hribar. Hcaiher Matlson. Leo Troha. Shari J. 
Amy Kosl. Rulh Hcimberger. 



trie Lchols. C ind\ Drobnick. Ken 
Wendy Don. Calpurnia Lee. ROW 2; 
cobs. Denise DcMark. Lind.i Jordan. 



Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 



89 



Sophomore • Sophomore • Sophomore 



RAMLOW. EIGHTH PERIOD BOTTOM ROW: Rich Rozic, Mark Dzomba, Joe Picozzi, Mike 
Menhart, ROW 2: Kathy Martens, Sharon Tice, Yvonne Krofcheck, Cheryl Roberts, Michele Snyder, 
Laura Morns, Sheila Walsh, Mindy Simon. ROW 3: Caroline Brussee, Angela Jones, Justin Hornung, 
Darin Gaffney, John Grmovsek. 



Mclaughlin, eighth period bottom 

ROW: Susan Dymanski, Kim Buehner, Chuck Summer- 
hill, ROW 2: Mike Markiewicz, Teri Thomas, Lesa 
Galer, Kim Overholt, Patrice Ware, Carrie Wise, John 
Davis, Tom Smith, ROW 3: Mary Kane, Karin Ludvik, 
Kim Cartulla, Tim McLoughlin. ROW 4; Adam Race, 
David Marvin, Al Mulraney. MISSING: Frank Burke. 




Sophomore Index 



t 3 



Albert, Glenn; Spiga 5" 
Albright, Michael; Gibson 4" 
Ambrose, James; Petrovic 1" 
Anderson, Randy; Gale 8" 
Archie, Mark; Lellis /" 
Armstrong, Kimberly; Bender 2° 
Arnold, Suzanne; Spiga 8" 
Bagocius, Dawn; Bender 2" 
Baizel, William; Spiga 5" 
Bak, Gordon; Harris 3" 
Ball, David; Lowe 5" 
Barich, Scott; Lellis I" 
Barile, Kathleen; Carmondy 4" 
Barnard, Jeffrey; Spiga 1" 
Barnard, Stanley; Harris l" 
Barndt, John; Ramlow I" 
Baromir, Jeffery; Harris 3" 
Bartulovic, Ljuban; Lellis 8" 
Bealko, Scott; Harris 1" 
Beggs, Michelle; Lellis 3' 
Behra, James; Haffer 3° 
Belavich, James; Harris I" 



Bene, Timothy; Carmody 4" 
Benko, Barbara; Gale 3" 
Bennett, David; Gibson 7" 
Berardinelli, Lisa; Gale 3" 
Beret, Alexandre; Harris 1" 
Berus, Erik; McLaughlin 5" 
Betti, Frank; Gale 7" 
Beuck, Cheryl Harris 1" 
Beutler, Kristin; Gale 2° 
Bierer, Ruth Ann; Lellis 8" 
Black, Bonnie; Bender 2" 
Black, Brenda; McLaughlin 5" 
Black, Eldridge; McLaughlin 5" 
Bleigh, Brian; Gale 8" 
Blevins, William; Lellis 3" 
Bolton, William; Spiga 1" 
Bosco, Gary; Gale 7" 
Bosher, Steven; Harris 8" 
Bost, Charles; Spiga /" 
Botirius, Mark; Lellis 1" 
Botts, Cheryl; Lellis l" 
Boyle, John; Lellis 3" 



Bradac, Edward; Harris 8" 
Bozak, Robert; Gibson 4" 
Bozich, Barbara; Lowe 5" 
Brannon, Jamie; Spiga 3" 
Bratton, Michael; Lellis 8" 
Breeden, William; Gale 2" 
Breeding, Jacquelyn; Gale 3" 
Bregy, Gina; Carmody 4" 
Breining, Judith; Gale 8" 
Brennan, Kevin; Lellis 3" 
Brewer, Gina; Lellis 3" 
Breznikar, Jenny; Gibson 7" 
Brinsko, Sharon; Bender 2" 
Brochak, William; Lellis 5" 
Brogdon, Clarence; Lowe 5" 
Brown, Gary; Spiga 1" 
Brown, Jeffrey; Gale 3" 
Brown, Karen; Gale 7" 
Brown, Katherine; Petrovic 6" 
Brown, Kathleen; McLaughlin 5" 
Brown, William; Gale J" 
Brussee, Caroline; Ramlow 8" 



90 



Budas, Michael; H:iflhr 3' 
Buehner, Kimberly; McLaughlin S" 
Buehner, Sharon; Spiga 5" 
Buettner, Ann; Harris 3" 
Bukvic, Nicholas; McLaughlin 5' 
Bumbarger, Thomas; Tkac 7" 
Burke, Frank; McLaughlin S" 
Burnette, Cheryl; Gale 2" 
Burris, Christina; Bender 2" 
Butler, Daniel; Spiga I" 
Callahan, Kenneth; Harris I" 
Calogar, Tammy; Spiga 8" 
Campana, Christopher; Harris 3" 
Cantini, Troy; Leilis 5" 
Caplick, George; Gale 8" 
Caplick, Lisa; Harris 8" 
Capretta, Laura; Gale 7" 
Caputo, Marie; Spiga 3" 
Carlo, Catherine; Gale 3" 
Carlson, Thomas; Leilis 3" 
Carman, Elisabeth; Petrovic 6" 
Carpenter, Sandra; Spiga 3' 
Cartulla, Kimberly; McLaughlin 8" 
Cefaratti, Geneine; Harris I 
Centa, Lisa; Leilis 8" 
Centa, Lynn; Harris 5" 
Cermak, Susan; Leilis 8" 
Cers, Kalvis; Petrovic I" 
Champa, Bernadette; Leilis 8" 
Ciarlillo, April; McLaughlin 5" 
Cicek, Wendy; Petrovic 6' 
Cieslinski, Mary; Harris 8' 
Cirino, Marie; Bender 2" 
Clapacs, Robert; Leilis 8" 
Clarke, Lisa: Harris 5" 
Clere, Donald; Haffer 5' 
Cole, Melissa; Harris 8" 
Collier, Derrick; Gale 8" 
Colling, Maureen; Petrovic I" 
Colo, Michael; Leilis /" 
Conner, Debra; Leilis I" 
Conroy, Kimberly; Gale 8" 
Corbett, Kathleen; Gale 2" 
Cover, Lisa; Harris 5" 
Cunningham, William; Carmody 6" 
Cupar, John; Leilis 5' 
Custer, Michael; Gibson 4" 
Danna, Michael; Harris 7" 
Dauer, Jeffrey; Gibson 4" 
Daugherty, Robert; Petrovic I" 
Davidson, Laura; Gibson 4" 
Davis, Christine; Petrovic 6" 
Davis, Dwayne; Gibson 7" 
Davis, John; McLaughlin 8" 
Dean, Denise; Spiga 5" 
Deason, Thomas; Harris 5' 
Delaney, Patrick; Leilis 3" 
De Luca, Michelle; Hal'fer .?' 
De Mark, Denise; Lowe 8" 
Denihan, James; McLaughlin 2" 
Deuschle, Sheri; McLaughlin 2" 



Dickard, Dennis; Gale 3" 
Dickson, Michael; Gale 3" 
Donnett, John; Gibson 7" 
Dort, Wendy; Lowe 8" 
Dotson. Patricia; Carmody 6" 
Doyle, Timothy; Harris 3" 
Drienka, Susan; Leilis 3" 
Drobnick, Cynthia; Lowe 8" 
Dudziak, James; Gibson 7" 
Dular, Corinne; Harris 7" 
Duncan, Sheila; Gale 2" 
Durciko, Darin; Petrovic I" 
Dures, Vesna; Ramlow I" 
Dymanski, Susan; McLaughlin 8 
Dzomba, Mark; Ramlow /' 
Eberwein, Tresa; McLaughlin 2" 
Echols, Eric; Lowe 8" 
Ecker, Dennis; Spiga 3" 
Ede, Russell; Gibson 7" 
Eichler, Maryann; Leilis 3" 
Ellenbest, Michael; Gibson 7" 
Ellul, Darryl; Carmody 4" 
Englebrecht, Laura; Gibson 7" 
Eros, Mark; Bender 2" 
Evans, Shawn; Bender 2" 
Eyman, Craig; Leilis 8" 
Fabert, Michael; Harris 3" 
Farinacci, Nicholas; Gale 2" 
Festini, Blaise; Gale 3' 
Fondran, Greg; Petrovic 6" 
Force, Roy; McLaughlin 5 
Ford, Selma; Ramlow I" 
Foskey, Anthony; Ramlow I" 
Francetic, Donna; Petrovic /" 
Franks, David; Leilis I" 
Fratcher, Mary; Spiga 3" 
Fuerst, Victoria; Harris I" 
Fumich, Brenda; Leilis 3" 
Furlan, Anthony; Ramlow I" 
Furman, James; Spiga I" 
Fussell, Victoria; Harris 8" 
Gaddis, Eldred; McLaughlin 2" 
Gaffney, Darin; Ramlow 8" 
Galer, Lesa; McLaughlin 8" 
Gamber, Loriann; Spiga 8" 
Ganti, Akhilesh; Petrovic 6" 
Garland, Greg; Leilis /' 
Gilmore, Lynette; Gibson 4" 
Giunta, Donna; Spiga 8" 
Glavan, Denise; Carmody 4" 
Glavan, Frank; Leilis I" 
Glick, Alan; Harris 8" 
Godnavec, Kenneth; Lowe 8" 
Golinar, Sharon; Leilis 5" 
Grabinski, Jeffrey; Spiga I" 
Grassi, Lisa; Gibson 7 
Green, Cynthia; Petrovic / 
Greene, Steven; Ramlow I" 
Griffin, Lisa; Harris 7" 
Griswold, Gail; Gale 7" 
Grmovsek, John; Ramlow 8" 



Gron, Philip; leilis 3" 
Guarino, Michael; Gale 7 
Hadzima, Peter; Gale 2" 
Haller, Nora; Spiga 3" 
Hammonds, Robert; Harris 5 
Hampton, Randall; McLaughlin 5' 
Hanlon, Laurie; Petrovic / 
Hann, Bonnie; llalTcr 3 
Hanratty, Kathleen; Lowe 5" 
Harper, John; Gibson 7 
Harris, Christopher; Leilis 8' 
Haupt, Elaine; Petrovic 6 
Haverlock, Lance; Harris 7" 
Hector, Dale; Gibson 4" 
Heimberger, Ruth; Lowe 8" 
Heimsoth, Eileen; McLaughlin 5" 
Henderson, Edward; Carmody 4" 
Henkel, Kirt; Leilis 8' 
Herbst, Charles; Gibson 7" 
Hernan, Matthew; Leilis I" 
Hill, Zobie; Carmody 4" 
Himes, Walton; McLaughlin 2" 
Hinton, Gregory; Haffer 3" 
Hirzer, Wernher; Lowe 5" 
Hoag, Joseph; Ramlow / 
Hochevar, Linda; Harris 7" 
Hoffart, Linda; Spiga 3" 
Hoffert. Stephen; Petrovic I 
Hoffman, Kimberly; Spiga 8 
Holcknecht. James; Tkac 7 
Hook, Hillary; Petrovic 6 
Hornung, Justin; Ramlow 8" 
Hribar, John; Lowe 8" 
Hromyko, Mark; McLaughlin 2" 
Hrvatin, Stacie; Gibson 4 
Hudson, Andrea; Petrovic 6 
Hughes. Christopher; Leilis 3 
Hughleit, Felicia; Harris 3' 
Hunt, Rickey; Leilis I" 
Immke, Janet; Bender 2" 
Immke, Jean; Gale 2" 
Imrie, Keith; Spaga 5' 
Indiano, Vincent; Tkac 7' 
Jablonski, Paul; Harris I" 
Jackson, Carrie; Leilis 8 
Jacobs. Shari; Lowe 8' 
Jakovlic, Thomas; Leilis 5' 
Jakubauskas, Gediminas; Harris I 
Jambor, Lauren; Petrovic 6 
Jaroscak, Jennifer; Leilis 8" 
Jazbec, Daniel; Tkac 7 
Johnson, Thomas; Ham's I 
Joksimovich. Petar; Harris I 
Jones, Angela; Ramlo» 8 
Jones, Holly; Spiga S' 
Jones. Sara; Gale 2" 
Jones, Stacy; Harris 3' 
Jordan, Linda; Lowe 8 
Joyce, Marlene; Ramlow I 
Juratovac. Donna; Leilis I 
Kane, Mar\; McLaughlin 8 



91 



Kastelic John; Carmody 4" 
Keay, Emerson; Gale 8" 
Keeney Ted; Harris I" 
Kehn Patrick: Leilis 8" 
Kelly Karmen; Bender 2" 
Kelly Mary; Leilis 8' 
Kempke Kristen; Tkac 7" 
Kernz Susan; Harris 7" 
Kime Brian; Spiga I" 
Kinkoff" Lisa; Harris 8" 
Kimkopf Walter; Gale 3" 
Kipp Dean; Harris 8" 
Klemicic David; Gale 7" 
Knaus Victor; Gibson 4" 
Kobetitsch Micheal; Harris 3" 
Kocjan Rick; Petrovic 6 
Koenig Christine; McLaughlin 5" 
Koester Roberta; Spiga 3" 
Kolleda Paul; Leilis L 
Koman Matthew; Gibson 4" 
Koncar. Thomas; Carmody 6" 
Konchan, Christine; Bender 8" 
Kordich, Kenneth; Lowe 8" 
Kost, Amelia; Lowe 8" 
Kost, Bonnie; Harris 3" 
Koucky. Julie; Harris 5" 
Kovac, Maria; Spiga i 
Kravos, Lawrence; Harris /' 
Krcal, Robert; Spiga 3" 
Krofcheck, Yvonne; Ramlow 8" 
Kucera, Michael; Petrovic 6' 
Kucmanic, Joseph; Spiga 3" 
Labondano, James; Harris 3" 
Lackner, Ernest; Gibson 7" 
Laidlaw, Sheila; Ramlow L 
Lane, Craig; Harris 5" 
Lang, Michael; Petrovic 6" 
Langan, Ann; Leilis 8" 
Laska, Brenda; Harris I" 
Latkowski, David; Spiga I 
Lausin. Michael; Bender 2" 
LaValley, Linda; Gale 3" 
Lawrence, Lisa; Ramlow I" 
Lawrence, Timothy; Gale 8" 
Leasure, Lisa; Spiga / ' 
l^easure, Paul; Gibson 4" 
Leduc, Yvonne; Harris 7" 
Lcc, Calpurnia; Lowe 8" 
Lcinweber, Gary; Spiga 5" 
Leonard, Susan; Bender 2" 
Leonhardt, David; Spiga 8" 
Lesler. Tammy; Spiga 8" 
Lcxa, Keith; Harris 5 
Lieslinski, Marianne; Harris 8" 
Lisac, Nadinc; Leilis 8" 
Lloyd, Frances; Spiga /" 
Lloyd, Robert; Gibson 4" 
Longstreth, Lawrence; Gale 2" 
Lucas, Bonnie; Harris 3" 
Lucci. Decna; Petrovic I" 
Ludvik, Karin; McLaughlin 8" 
Lynch, Patricia; Gibson 4" 
Lyon, James; Petrovic I' 



Mackell, Diana; Haffer 3" 
Mahovlic, Keith; Gale 7" 
Maio, Monica; Harris I" 
Maire, William; Gale 3" 
Maitland, Scott; Lowe 5" 
Makuhan, Richard; Spiga 5" 
Malaney, Gregory; Harris 8" 
Maldonado, Joelle; Lowe 5" 
Malone, Cindy; Gale 7" 
Mannello, Deborah; Ramlow I" 
Marando, Karen; Lowe 8" 
Marchesano, Michelle; Spiga I" 
Markiewicz, Michael; McLaughlin 8" 
Marolt. Norman; Carmody 6' 
Marrott, Lisa; Harris 7" 
Martens, Kathryn; Ramlow 8" 
Martin, Randy; Leilis 3" 
Martin, Victor; Harris 5" 
Martorello, Michelle; Spiga 8" 
Marvin, David; McLaughlin 8" 
Masera, Bruna; Spiga I ' 
Mason, Elizabeth; Lowe 5" 
Massaro, Philip; Spiga 8" 
Mast, Jane; Gale 3" 
Mastin, Diane; Spiga 3" 
Matic, Nina; Leilis 8" 
Matsko, David; Gibson 4" 
Mattson, Heather; Lowe 8" 
Maxwell, Randall; Tkac 7" 
Mays, Timothy; Gale 2" 
Mazzaro, Russel; Ramlow I" 
Mc Arthur, Beth; Gibson 4" 
Mc Callion, Michael; Carmony 6" 
Mc Cance, Gordon; Leilis 3" 
Mc Court, Nancy; Harris 7" 
Mc El wain, Joseph; Spiga I" 
McGraw, J Paul; Harris I" 
Mclnally, Avril; Gale 3" 
McLaughlin, Kate; Harris 7" 
McLaughlin, Michael; McLaughlin 5" 
McLean, Blair; Harris 3" 
McLoughlin, Timothy; McLaughlin 

8- 
McNamara, Richard; Spiga 5" 
McNeils, Anne; Leilis 8" 
Medley, Mark; Petrovic I" 
Medved, Jadranka; Lowe 5" 
Meier, Richard; Spiga 5" 
Menhart, Michael; Ramlow 8" 
Mersnik, Allison; Petrovic 6" 
Metz, Kimberly; Spiga 5" 
Meyers, John; Gale 3" 
Midolo, Jill; Harris 5' 
Mihalick, Michael; Leilis I" 
Mihelcic, Alice; Petrovic I" 
Miklavcic, John; Carmody 6" 
Miklavcic, Patricia; McLaughlin 2" 
Miller, George; Lowe 8" 
Miller, Linda; Leilis 5" 
Miller, Michael; McLaughlin 2" 
Minarjyzis, Rebekah; Harris 3" 
Minerd, Mia; Bender 2" 
Minissale, John; Gibson 7" 



Mita, Brian; Spiga 3" 
Modic, Mark; Harris 7" 
Molesky, Edward; Gale 2" 
Mooney, Suellyn; Petrovic I" 
Moore, Donna; Harris 8" 
Morek, Dennis; Harris 7" 
Morris, Laura; Ramlow 8" 
Moser, Diane; Spiga 3" 
Moses, James; Leilis 3" 
Moster, Daniel; Petrovic I" 
Moster, Terri; Gale 8" 
Moyer, Robert; Gale 7" 
Mueller, Ronald; Gale 2" 
Mullins, Daniel; Bender 2" 
Mulraney, Albert; McLaughlin 8" 
Munici, Kimberley; McLaughlin 2" 
Mzik, David; Tkac 7" 
Nagy, Steven; Spiga 8" 
Nemec, Darwin; Gale 7" 
Newell, Gerri; McLaughlin 5" 
Nickel, Therese; Petrovic I" 
Nieves. Luis; Leilis 8" 
Norton, Kimberly; Harris 5" 
Novotney, Donald; Ramlow I" 
Nowac, Robert; I ellls .5" 
Nurmi, Shirleen; Harris 5" 
Oberle, Brian; Leilis 5' 
O'Donnell, Daniel; Carmody 6" 
O'Donnell. Timothy; McLaughlin 5' 
O'Neal, Daivid; Tkac 7" 
O'Neill, Timothy; Harris 3" 
Oroz, Vlatko; Harris 7' 
O'Rourke, Leslie; Spiga 3" 
Ospelt, Kenneth; Leilis I" 
Ostrom, Stephen; Petrovic I" 
Overholt, Kimberly; McLaughlin 8" 
Owen, Robert; Leilis 3" 
Oyaski, Joseph; Gibson 7" 
Pallante, Paul; Leilis 5" 
Pantalone, Sam; Harris 7" 
Papotta, Laura; Tkac 7" 
Papouras, Anna; Ramlow I" 
Papouras, Constance; Gale 3" 
Papouras, Diane; Lowe 5" 
Pappas, Thomas; Gale 8" 
Parsons, Jimmie; Tkac 7" 
Parsons, John; McLaughlin 5' 
Pate, Dean; Harris 3" 
Patel, Urvashiben; Tkac 7" 
Pauley, Evelyn; Spiga 3" 
Pavlina, Paul; Harris 5" 
Pavlovski, Barbara; Gale 7" 
Payne, Donald; Leilis I ' 
Peck, James; Gale 2" 
Penicka, Debra; Lowe 5" 
Penny, Vincent; McLaughlin 2" 
Perna, Lori; Spiga I" 
Peters, Janet; Gale 8" 
Peterson, Michael; Spiga 3" 
Peterson, Robert; McLaughlin 2" 
Peterson, Rudolph; Carmody 6" 
Phillips, Marc; Gale 2" 
Phillips, Pammi; Leilis 8" 



I 



92 



Picciano, Joanne; McLiwgbI'm 2" 

Picozzi, Joseph; Rnmlow 8" 

Pinkava, Pollymara; Leilis 8" 

Piper, James; Spiga 3" 

Pirsil, Trish; McLaughlin 2" 

Plan, Diane; Harris J" 

Plavcan, Patricia; Tl<ac 7" 

Plestto, Joseph; Spiga 5" 

Piuta, Andrea; Spiga 8" 

Pohi, Bernadette; McLaughlin 5" 

Pokiar, James; Leilis I" 

Ponsart, Dale; McLaughlin 2" 

Popovic, Christine; Harris I" 

Popp, Stephen; Carmody 4" 

Porz, Kenneth; LeIlis I" 

Potokar, Wendy; Petrovic I" 

Potts, Renee; Gale 3" 

Powaski, Andrew; Gale 3" 

Price, Matthew; Leilis 3" 

Pritchard, Lynn; Harris 7" 

Race, Adam; McLaughlin 8" 

Radisek, Maryann; Petrovic 6" 

Rahija, John; Petrovic 6" 

Raicevich, Amy; Leilis 8" 

Rattini, Vincent; Gibson 4" 

Reho, Rodney; Lowe 8" 

Reinbrecht, Claudia; Gale 8" 

Reinbrecht, Theodore; McLaughlin 5" 

Reinke, Susan; Gale 3" 

Reminick, Jill; Harris 5" 

Rendina, A. Michael; Carmody 6" 

Reynolds, Dandrick; Harris 8" 

Rhone, Lisa; Gale 3" 

Richards, Matthew; Leilis 5" 

Richardson, Jack; Gale 3" 

Richer, John; McLaughlin 2" 

Rinderle, Robert; Petrovic I" 

Roberts, Cheryl; Ramlow 8" 

Robinette, Cynthia; Spiga 8" 

Robinson, David; Harris 8" 

Rogers, William; Leilis 5" 

Rojeck, David; Harris 5" 

Rolik, Diane; Lowe 5" 

Rose, Phillip; Harris I" 

Ross, Bryan; Spiga 5" 

Rostankowski, Vena; Gale 8" 

Rowan, Lisa; Haffer 3" 

Rowland, Larry; Harris 8" 

Rozic, Richard; Ramlow 8' 

Rupcic, Anthony; Gibson 7" 

Sajn, Frank; Spiga 8" 

Sajn, Jon; Spiga 5" 

Salajcik, Richard; Gale 7" 

Salter, Randolph; Gale 3" 

Sandrick, Diana; Harris 3" 

Sanford, Scott; Harris 5" 

Savage, Jean; Gale 8" 

Scaife, Timothy; Carmody 4" 

Schafer, Richard; Harris 8' 

Schauer, Daniel; Leilis I" 

Schauer, John; Carmody 6 

Schauer, Patricia; McLaughlin 2" 

Scheid, Michelle; Harris 7" 



Schcmbrc, Dino; McLaughlin 2" 
Schmcling, Dawn; Harris 5" 
Schmeltzer, Ken; McLaughlin 2" 
Schoeniger, Robert; Petrovic 6 ' 
Schroeder, Charles; Gale 7" 
Schultz, Carolyn; Leilis I" 
Schultz, Janet; Gale 7" 
Schultz, Paul; Leilis S' 
Schulz, Karen; Petrovic I" 
Scott, Linda; Spiga I" 
Sellers, Lisa; Leilis 8" 
Sidhu, Susan; Harris 5" 
Simicak. Ingrid; Gale 2" 
Simmons, Sheila; Bender 2" 
Simon, Mindy; Ramlow 8" 
Skebe, Michael; Spiga I" 
Skora, Michelle; Harris /" 
Smith, Allan; Spiga I" 
Smith, Jessica; Petrovic I" 
Smith, Julia; Ramlow I" 
Smith, Lezlie; Gale 7" 
Smith, Nancy; Petrovic /" 
Smith, Patricia; Petrovic I" 
Smith, Stephen; Leilis 3" 
Smith, Thomas; McLaughlin 8" 
Snyder, Micheie; Ramlow 8" 
Snyder, Pamela; Lowe 5" 
Sopnicar, Cindy; Harris 8" 
Sopko, Gregory; Petrovic I" 
Spaur, Barbara; Leilis 3" 
Spooner, Catherine; Leilis 6" 
Springer, Jeffery; Gale 2" 
Stamberger, Kim; Gale 7" 
Steele, Beth; Harris 5" 
Stegh, Michael; Spiga 3' 
Stephens. Susan; Leilis 3" 
Stevko, Judith; Spiga I" 
Stewart, Regina; Spiga 8" 
Stewart, Samuel; Harris /" 
Stibinger, Margaret; Gibson 7" 
Stipkovich, Brian; Gibson 7" 
Strell, David; Gibson 7" 
Strong, Kevin; McLaughlin 5" 
Suchevits, Mark; Spiga 3" 
Sulic, Zeljka; Spiga I" 
Summerhill, Charles; McLaughlin 
Suponcic, Susan; Petrovic I" 
Surh, Miyung; Harris 5" 
Surovy, Marianne; Harris 7" 
Suttle, Joyce; Carmody 6" 
Swyt, Wendy; Leilis 8' 
Szabo, John; Haffer 3' 
Szmania, Michael; Petrovic 6" 
Szukalski, Diane; Gale 3" 
Tavano. Rebecca; Gale 3" 
Taylor, Kelly; Carmody 4" 
Taylor, Laurie; Harris 8" 
Taylor, Tracie; Spiga 5" 
Terzano, Elaine; Harris I" 
Testa, Christina; Bender 2" 
Theodosian, John; Harris 3" 
Thomas, George; Harris 7" 
Thomas, Teri; McLaughlin 8" 



Thompson, John; Haffer 3 
Thornton, Bonnie; Gale 3 
Tianello, Kimbcrly; Harris 3 
Ticc, Sharon; Ramlow 8 
Tichenor, Tammy; Gale 7" 
Tinclli, Linda; Spiga 5' 
Tomaselli, Kenneth; McLaughlin 2 
Torer, Carolyn; Petrovic I ' 
Totarella, Peter; Tkac 7" 
Tousel, Lisa; Gale 3" 
Trebec, Kim; Harris I 
Trcboc, Lori; Harris 3 
Troha, Leo; Lowe 8 
Turner, Susan; McLaughlin 2" 
Urbas, Leslie; Leilis 5" 
Vandeveer, Eileen; Lowe 5" 
Velkos, Thomas; Gale 8 
Vella, Michael; Bender 2" 
Vernon, Thomas; McLaughlin 5" 
Vislocky, Joseph; Leilis I ' 
Vohnout, Joseph; Harris 8' 
Wachhaus, Susan; Lowe 5" 
Wagner, Darrin; Petrovic I" 
Walch, Alan; Tkac 7 
Walsh, Mary; Ramlow I ' 
Walsh, Sheila; Ramlow 8' 
Walters, Jonathan; Leilis 8" 
Wandersleben, Betsy; Spiga 5" 
Ward, Aubrey; Carmody 4" 
Ward, Michelle; Gibson 7" 
Wardeiner, Mark; Leilis 5" 
Ware, Passion; Leilis 8" 
Ware, Patrice; McLaughlin 8' 
Watkins, Melanice; Petrovic 6" 
Watros, Micheie; Gale 2" 
Webb, John; Petrovic 6 
Weissfuss, Frank; Harris 3 
Weissfuss, John; Spiga I 
Wells, Curtis; Leilis 5 
Werle, Arthur; Gale 2" 
Wiggins. James; Carmodv 6 
Will. Christine; Gale 3 ' 
Williams, Theresa; Petrovic I 
Williams, Thomas; Lowe 5 
Wilson, Brian; Harris 7" 
Wilson, Carolyn; Lowe 8" 
Wilson, Robert; Bender 2" 
Wise, Carrie; McLaughlin 8 
Wolons. Edward; Gale 8 
Wootten. Timothy; Leilis 3 
Wudy. Linda; Petrovic I 
Yeckley. Charles; Tkac 7 
Young, Jacqueline; Petrovic I 
Yuko. Lynn: Leilis 5 
Zakraysek. Theresa; Lowe 5 
Zanghi. Dencen; McLaughlin .^ 
Zele. Joann; Petrovic I 
Ziegler. Linda; Gale 7 
Zimmerman, James; Harris I 
Zingalc, Tina; Harris 8 
Zinglc. Jeffrey; McLaughlin 2 
Zupancic, Barbara; Leilis 8 
Zusman, Michael; /-()iu' .■^" 



9i 



Myca Abraham 
Michelle Adam 
Sue Adams 
Paul Adkins 
Pally Albanese 
John Albertone 
Jon Alexander 



Theresa Andresky 

Sieve Anzells 

Denise Ault 

Paul Auslin 

Jim Avein 

Debby Bagwell 

Matt Bailev 



Sue Balazs 

Virginia Balogh 

Bob Banaszek 

Nick Barich 



kalh\ Barile 
Joe Barleld 
Dave Bauer 
Mike Bauer 



Joyce Beiclle 

Lois Belavich 

Tim Bene 

Rudi Benedejcic 



Bruce Benedict 

Kim Berlrand 

Vince Bevacqua 

Allen Black 

Doug Blackman 

Sharon Blankenshtp 

Chnslina Bognar 



Susan Bolger 

Wendy Born 

Tony Boschi 

Jane Bosl 

Lisa Boyle 

Keith Bowes 

Charlotte Bovden 




1982 • 1982 • 1982 • 1982 • 1982 



94 




Tom Braddock 
Kalhy Brady 
Donna Braucher 
Shcri Brccdcn 
Mary Brcntar 
Bill Brcuon 
Steve Brewer 



Tom Brnjic 
Bryan Brokale 
Beverly Brown 
Joyce Brown 
Kalhie Brown 
Pamela Brown 
Jim Brucning 



Administration Expands Attendance Rules 



Is there a form in your future? . . . There will be if 
you're absent from school or tardy to class too 
many times. 




A number of rules, instituted at the 
high school last year, were continued 
this year. To discourage class cutting, 
the two-cut rule stated that after the 
second class cut a student would receive 
an F for the grading period. 

The class attendance rule, meant to 
penalize the chronically absent student, 
stated that in any grading period every 
unexcused absence over eight would re- 
sult in the loss of one letter grade. In 
other words, a student would automati- 
cally fail a class if he were absent thir- 
teen days in any grading period. 



Since the administration felt that 
these rules had had a positive affect on 
student attendance, a new rule was in- 
stituted this year. Simple stated, each 
unexcused tardiness counts as one-third 
of an unexcused absence and is added 
to the absence total. Thus, a combina- 
tion of unexcused absences and tardi- 
ness could result in the lowering of a 
student's grade. 

Although the majority of Euclid's 
students have a good attendance re- 
cord, some students have begun to take 
a strong interest in their absence totals. 




Steve Bruno 
Lisa Brzozowski 
Gary Buck 
Gar\ Budnar 



R J Budway 
Joyce Buehner 
Sharon Buehner 
Sue Bukovac 



1982 • 1982 • 1982 



Linda Lewin and Mr. Von Benken mode! the latest in 
conservative fashions. 



95 













Chris Bukvic 

Ed Burrington 

Micheal Burrows 

Rick Burva 

Bob Cable 

James Calhoun 

Patli Callahan 



Karyn Campbell 

Lisa Cannon 

Linda Cek 

Marti Ceferatti 

Judy Caler 

Gary Casto 

Sherri Carter 



John Carter 

Dawn Carter 

Valdi Cervar 

Tony Champa 



Brian Chapman 

Tammy Chapman 

Marie Cheatham 

Jim Cherne 




Mark Chicone 

Keith Childers 

Dave Chiudioni 

Lisa Christopher 



£'A.& 'i^ 





Cheri Johnson hard at work. 



96 




Tom Coyne 
Belh Cramer 
Linda Cramer 
Cyndy Currie 
Tracy Dai ley 
Tim D'Anna 
Tom D'Anna 



John Davies 
Cind\ Davis 
Debbie Davis 
Denise Dean 
Barbara Dcarden 
Carol Deason 
Mira Dcbcvc 



97 



1982 • 1982 • 1982 



•'Who was thai /O;'" wonders Chuck Zele. 



Boris De Granda 

Rick De Lambo 

Veronica Delas 

Gina Deluca 



Paul Dennick 

Joe Deoma 

Alison Derreberry 

Lisa Dezelon 




Nick Di Tirro 

Dean Dixon 

David Dodaro 

John Dombrosky 

Linda Deremus 

Michelle Drasler 

Tessie Dudek 



Dragan Dugandzic 

Dave Duke 

Jennifer Dursl 

Kevin Durst 

Maryann Eichler 

Maryellen Eiermann 

Mark Emser 



98 



1982 • 1982 • 1982 • 1982 • 1982 




Kelly l-rnc 
Rcncc [:vans 
Shawn lagan 
Dale Fa/it) 
John fedakowski 
Susan fcdakijwski 
Lee Ferrante 



Belh Finkc 
Bcv Kinke 
Tom Fisher 
Colin Fitzpalnck 
Miek Fil/simons 
David Fowle 
Colleen Fox 



Mark Francetic 
Tony Franklin 
Beth Franko 
Kini Frasher 



Joe Fralino 
William Fryar 
Stephanie Fuerst 
Diane Fulton 



Debbie Furman 
William Gawor 
Angela Gill 
Paul Glaser 



^^^A ''\v'\ 



Jim Glavac 
Denise Glavan 
Frank Glavan 
Ellyn Gleisser 
Sandy Glicker 
Erich Gliebe 
Karen Glover 



Pally Golden 
Karen Gordon 
Jeff Grabinski 
Dennis Grag 
Dan Green 
Ramona Green 
Alice Gregory 



99 



Dave Griesmer 

Amy Griffis 

Doug Grosel 

Angela Gubitosi 

Mike Guemher 

Scott Gundling 

Sadhna Gupta 



Rosemar\ Hahn 

Lauren Hale 

Laurie Ha 

Tom Ha 

Fred Ham 

Tom Hanlon 

Bonnie Hahn 



Denisc Harmon 

Karon Harmon 

Scott Hayes 

Diane Hegedus 

Robert Hendershot 

Bob Henderson 

Margaret Henry 



Joe Hernan 

Bob Highsmiih 

Kurt HIebak 

Chris -Hoag 

Tracy Holmes 

Rob Horn 

Kim Horner 




Tracy Howsare 

John Huber 

Doug Hufford 

Ginnie Hufford 

Randy Hughes 

Peggy Hunt 

Danette Hurney 



Sandy Ukmar and Beth Franko are extreme 
enthused about their experiment. 



100 



Mark Urbas believes in bringing in visual aids Tor hi 
reports in science class. 




Ji)c lafclicc 
Joan lafigliola 
l.isa lannicelli 
Maria laquicrdo 



Dino Insana 
ivan Ivaskovic 
Bill Jahnlce 
Jenny Jambor 



Joanne Janosky 
DeAnna Jeric 
Bozana Jerkic 
Jay Jesberger 



Cheryl Johnson 
Dennis Johnson 
Jacci Johnson 
Perry Johnson 
Charisse Jones 
LouAnn Jones 
Redon Jones 



Bill June 
Dave Just 
Michele Kacperski 
John Kucmanic 
Ann Kamposek 
Bob Katcher 
Steve Kato 



Poll Finds 50% Of Juniors Have Licenses 



^^ 



T^ 



To a high school student in the 1 980"s 
there is no better sign of adulthood than 
a driver's license, and in Ohio it is not 
that hard to obtain one. The first step is 
to pass the written test for a temporary- 
license, which enables you to drive with 
a licensed driver in the car. After taking 
a driving course, lasting anywhere from 
two to nine weeks, you must pass a lest 
for a permanent license. On this test, 
which measures street driving and man- 
uverabilily. you must score a 76'^ or 
better. 

To measure the driving experience of 
this year's junior class, a survey was 
given to selected junior homerooms in 



September. The results showed that al- 
ready 50'v of the students had their per- 
manent licenses. However, only 1 5*^ of 
the junior class drove to school — per- 
haps reflecting the high price of cars, 
gasoline, and the general distrust par- 
ents hold for their sixteen year old sons 
or daughters driving. 

Every freedom present problems, and 
driving is no exception. Our survey 
found that 9'f of the junior class drivers 
had already received a traffic ticket, 
and that 6''f had been involved in a 
tralTic accident — although it wasn't 
clear whether they were dri\ing or a 
passenger in the car. 



Driving can present some problems. Nine percent 
of the juniors have alread\ gotten a ticket. 



101 



Rich Kavcic 

Kathy Kause 

Lisa Keith 

Debbie Kelly 

Sheila Kelly 

Wall Kelly 

Scott Kempert 



Chris Kibler 

John Kinsley 

Dan Kirchner 

Karen Kish 

Sandie Klimek 

Steve Knack 

Greg Kocin 



Trac> Koester 

Joe Konchan 

Ken Konet 

Denise Koratich 



Mark Kosir 

Scott Kost 

Eric Kosten 

Jeff Kovach 



Karen Kowalkowski 

Alan Kozlowski 

Beth Kupfer 

Don Kraince 



Jill Krawczyszyn 

Lisa Krean 

Michele Krenisky 

Joycelee Kronik 

Goyle Kubik 

Don Kucera 

Dave Kucinski 



Greg Kuhar 

Ron LaBondano 

Bruce Landrey 

Ivan Lane 

Peggy Laughlin 

Chris Lauria 

Pat Lavelle 




1982 • 1982 • 1982 • 1982 • 1982 



102 




Kalhy Lawicr 
Mike i.a/anich 
l-isa Lclcher 
l.inda Lcwin 
John i.eyda 
Ana Lima 
.SirTn)nc Lisac 



Frances Lloyd 
Hcidie Locke 
Karen Lockhart 
Audrey Lonchar 
I inda Lucas 
Judy Ludvik 
Jeanne l,udwig 




SomehoH I have the feeling this isn't the boys' gym. Euclid's size gave Sieve Wilson problems at firsl. 



A recent addition to Euclid High's 
junior class is Steve Wilson. Before 
coming to Euclid, Steve attended 
Victor High School in Victor, New 
York, a suburb of Rochester. Pre- 
vious to moving to Victor, he had 
attended Cleveland Central Catho- 
lic. 

Steve finds Euclid larger and bet- 
ter equipped than any of his previous 
schools. Victor High had about 1000 
students, and was small compared to 
Euclid. Features of Euclid High that 
Steve likes best include the E-room, 
the planetarium, and the indoor 
track. 

Steve's favorite pastimes are foot- 
ball and car repair. Among his favor- 
ite classes are Vocational Electonics 
and World Problems. Steve looks 
forward to graduating with the class 
of 1982 from Euclid — the best high 
school that he's known. 




Laura Lusky 
Ken Lulher 
Vicki Lyon 
Howard Mabel 



Bill Magas 
Craig Mams 
Karen Maiinowski 
Darlene Manassa 



1982 • 1982 • 1982 



Wes Taylor and Vincc India no \mI1 do ,in\ihing lo gel 
themselves in the Euclidian. 



103 



September Seminar Confronts Problems Of Drug And Alcohol Abuse 



A drug and alcohol abuse seminar for 
parents was held in the Little Theater 
on September 24, 1980. A panel of six 
people presided over the meeting. These 
six people were Euclid senior Char 
Gole, 1 Ith grade counselor Lynn Davis, 
Euclid Detective James Trobenter, Eu- 
clid Municipal Court Judge Robert 
Niccum, Mr. Michael Buscemi — for- 
merly with the State Department of 
Education, and moderator Barbara 
Zohn. 

Much of the discussion at the semi- 
nar was technical, but there was some 
down-to-earth information presented. 
Buscemi said that there are 500,000 
teenage alcoholics nationwide and an- 
other 500,000 teenagers who have prob- 
lems with alcohol. 



Both Buscemi and Ms. Davis felt that 
solutions to the problems of drug and 
alcohol abuse must start in the home 
and that communication between par- 
ents and their children is essential. 
Judge Niccum felt that most parents 
could discuss such problems with their 
children although real communication 
might be difficult with an overprotec- 
tive parent and impossible with one who 
simply didn't care. 

However, Char Gole claimed that 
most kids are not willing to talk with 
their parents about problems because, 
according to her, parents don't listen. 
She also felt that professional help is 
needed at the first sign of drug or alco- 
hol abuse before somethine worse can 
occur. Char also stated, "More kids are 



using it (drugs), but less are using it 
more." 

Detective Trobenter suggested that 
young people be educated about alco- 
hol and drugs as early as the second or 
third grade rather than waiting until the 
sixth grade. Trobenter also claimed 
that marijuana and hashish are the 
most common street drugs. 

There are several Euclid agencies 
that a person with alcohol or drug abuse 
problems can turn to: the Juvenile 
Court and the Center for Human Ser- 
vices. Euclid High School is also begin- 
ning a small counseling service of its 
own. At present, five faculty members 
act as counselors: Ms. Baraniuk, Ms. 
Davis, Ms. Jagger, Ms. Spiga, and Mr. 
Montani. 



Joel Mansperger 

Martha Marell 

Joe Marschall 

Mike Martens 

Ron Martin 

Dina Massaro 

Jill Mast 



Diane Mastin 
James Mataraza 
Maureen Matras 
Bruce Matthews 
Bill Mauser 
Jan Mayerholer 
Melanie McArthur 



Dave McCarty 

Melanie McChancy 

Joe McCoy 

Terry McCrary 



Denise McGill 

Dusty McKain 

Misty McKain 

Michelle McKnight 



Caroline Medves 

Vicki Melzger 

Karl Mews 

Ann Meyers 




Hc\' Whoic ihumb pnnl is that ' Joe Konchan puts 
the final touches on a project for his wood shop class. 



104 






^v/ -, A « * •!' \: 




Si. 









1 The Three Stooges (Debbie Taylor, PaU> 
L Hill, and Kris Shook) 



Sal Midolo 
Janice Miheicic 
Rence Mihelich 
Rich Mihelich 
Mark Miklos 
Mar> Mikovic 
Vicki Miller 



>'\onne Miller 
Sharon Millhof 
Joe Minardo 
Jim Milch 
Jim Mochan 
Phillip Mohorich 
Charlcnc Moore 



Jacques Vtoore 
l)a\e Morgan 
Desiin\ Morgan 
And) Morkunas 
John \lotu7a 
Rick Muir 
Mirko Mujic 



Paula Mulranev 
Drew Munlord 
Laura Murph) 
John Murray 
Mark Mun? 
Daryl Musick 
Tony Naglic 



Rick Nagodc 
Stephen Nag\ 
Scolt \ebe 
Connie Nelson 
Roman \enado\ic 
Sandy Nermann 
Tom \e\iell 



105 



Wally Skora must be smiling because his 
actually close to his classes. 



locker is 



1982 



Janet Niccum 

Kellie Norton 

Terri Oberaitis 

Steve O'Brien 



Amy Ogrinc 

George Opacich 

Russell Oshaben 

Carol Otcasek 




Vocational Programs Attract Juniors 



There are several vocational pro- 
i?rnnis thai juniors and seniors can take 
„. iuclid High School. These programs 
can help students prepare for a job 
when they graduate. In the business 
area, students may take Stenography. 
Accounting and Computing, Data Pro- 
cessing, and General Office-Clerical. 
Seniors may take Cooperative Office 
Education or Distributive Education. 
In the Home Arts Department, inter- 
ested students may take Child Care. 
Students pursuing a career in Industrial 
Arts may take Vocational Machines, 
Vocational Electronics, or Commercial 
Arts. Programs taught in cooperation 
with other'schools include Horticulture. 



Food Service, Communications-Elec- 
tronics, and Cosmetology. There are 
also special programs such as D.C.T. 
(Diversified Cooperative Training) and 
O.W.E. (Occupational Work Exper- 
ience). 

A special advantage of these pro- 
grams is the in-depth training and the 
individual attention given to a student 
so he can acquire the skills and tacts 
thai are essential to him when he gradu- 
ates from school and goes job-hunting. 

There are approxmtalely 47.S juniors 
and seniors who are enrolled in voca- 
tional programs at Euclid High School. 
The program wiih the largest enroll- 
ment is Vocational Auto Mechanics, 



while such programs as Child Care and 
Vocational Office-Clerical have the 



smallest enrollmenl- 

if a sophomore wishes to be in a vo- 
cational program in his junior year, he 
or she must have a good attendance and 
good grades. Two programs Data Pro- 
cessing and Computer- 
tests to students lo sec if they qualify. 

Vocational Director Mr. Sawyer says 
that of all students taking vocational 
programs, 81 percent are employed in 
the field ihey have trained for, while the 
rest go to college and further their stud- 
ies. Mr. Sawyer also reports thai there 
are no new vocational programs 
planned for the future at Euclid High 
School, 



Mike OToole 
Ron Paciorek 
Susan Palmer 

Robert Palumbo 

Mike Paparizos 

Bill Papouras 

Tom Pappalando 



Pam Paradiso 

Monica Parisi 

Cindy Parker 

David Parkinson 

Mike Parziale 

Nancy Patterson 

Julie Pavic 




106 



1982 • 1982 • 1982 • 1982 • 1982 




^PW§2 





"Homework always bums me out," says Sharon Sza- 
lay. 








Mindy Peck 
Phillip Pcrdan 
Tony Perovsck 
Cinry Pclrick 
Mark Pflcgcr 
Karen Pfricm 
Belsv Pickel 



Bill Piatt 
l-inda PIcvclieh 
Monica Pockar 
Tom Porlon 
Donald Porz 
Tom Povirk 
Tom Powell 



Bcih Prilchard 
Damn Radalz 
Stan Ragu? 
Donna Rail 



Vilija Ramunas 
Curt Rasmusen 
Lmda Rallmi 
Kim Rawlings 



Kath\ Ra\ 
Kellie Reicherl 
Debbie Rcid 
Susie Reider 



Wanda Rcmbcri 
Karen Rcminick 
Am\ Reno 
Derrick Rcschke 
Paul Resnick 
Dan Rham\ 
Parris Rice 



Marv Richardson 
Susan Ric/inger 
Donna Riedcl 
David Roberts 
Rick Roeder 
Diane Rocsslcr 
Rick Rohlkc 



107 



Sue Roper 

Scott Rose 

John A, Ross 

John M Ross 

Jim Rossi 

Carohn Rossmann 

Carole Ro7um 



Ricl^ Rud)ak 

kathy Rupcic 

Gerri Rutkowski 

Kathy Ryder 

Pete Salopek 

Julie Samuel 

Colleen Sandor 



Ed Santon 

Carole Sapatka 

Aida Saracevic 

Joe Sas 

Scott Satava 

Megan Sawyer 

Bill Scaletta 



Denise Scheid 

Warren Schneider 

Lori Schrock 

Heidi Schuliz 

Bill Schultz 

Brian Schultz 

Palli Schwenner 




Lorraine Seidel 

John Seleman 

Nick Selvaggio 

Janene Selway 

Keith Sergent 

Tony Shanklin 

Linda Shei 



A whole host of emotions can be seen on stu- 
dent's faces before the tardy bell calls the 
class to order. 



108 



BillScaletta finishes an assignment for Mrs, Barker's 
Home Arts class. 




krisline Shook 
Vlarcia Shull> 
Rencc Sicnicn 
I aura Sikora 



Karen Sim 
Barb Simek 
Silvana Simiccvic 
Kevm Simon 



Mike Simpson 
Dave Skiljan 
W alter Skora 
Tom Slavkovskv 



Susan SIv 
Terr> Smiddy 
Brian Smith 
Cher\l Smith 
Janet Smith 
Lisa Smith 
Robin Smooi 



Diane Snook 
Laura Snyder 
Denise Sobecki 
Shelley Son 
William Sonnie 
kim Sotka 
Mark Speck 



Events In Iran Strike Close To Home For Euclid Junior 



irin Razani recently returned 
10 the United Slates after spending 
most of her life in Iran. Shirin was born 
in Cleveland-her mother is from Eu- 
clid-and moved to Iran when she was 
two years old. She returned to the U.S. 
when she was seven and stayed at 
Berkeley, California. By the lime she 
was eight years old, she returned lo 
Shiraz. Iran, for the second lime. When 
she was twelve, she moved to Hawaii. 
From Hawaii she returned lo Iran and 
finally back lo her mother's home town- 
Euclid. The reason for much of this 
traveling was that her father is from 



Iran and is a professor of engineering at 
Shiraz University. Her father is cur- 
rently in Iran and can't get home be- 
cause of the war with Iraq. 

The city she lived in in Iran is called 
Shiraz. The people of Shiraz were very 
friendly. Despite what the Americans 
think. Iranians like Americans. One 
.store owner told her mom it's the gov- 
ernmenls who arc fighting, not the peo- 
ple. 

Shirin moved back to Euclid because 
Iran vvas becoming very dangerous. 
There was no due process of law. The 
government could just confiscate prop- 



erty. Shirin was against the Shah, bul 
she also is against Khomeini. He is not 
senile, but he is old-fashioned and an 
idealist. 

School in Iran was quite different 
than school in the U.S. for Shirin. She 
considered herself lucky bccau.sc her 
school was the only co-ed school in 
Iran. She had only ten kids in her class, 
and the teachers switched classes, not 
the students. Although Shirin likes the 
U.S., she misses Iran and her good 
friends back home. 



109 



Jim Speer 

Paul Spence 

Lori Springer 

Chris Slandish 

Amy Steele 

Jim Sleffas 

Jolin Stephens 



Rick Stermole 




H^ 


Daniel Stevens 




^^^ 


Henry Stewart 




L ^B 


Bernadelte Slrle 




M " 


Janet Struna 




fe^' 


Marilyn Struna 




K^ 


Ron Suponcic 


- l^ 


R^^ 




\vjr . 


\ 4 i 



Carol Swider 

Pat Switzler 

Sharon Szalay 

Chris Szukalski 



Katie Tally 
Jeffrey Tanner 
Debbie Taylor 
Greg Templar 



Lisa Templa 
Joe Testa 
Scott Theodore 
Eddie Thomas 



Carl Thompson 

Larry Thompson 

Paul Thornton 

Ray Tice 

John Tomorowitz 

Norene Torer 

David Toth 



Kimberly Trbovich 

David Tucci 

Tom Tuft 

Darrvl Turner 

Tom Ubl 

Sandy Ukmar 

Sue Unick 




1982 • 1982 • 1982 



1982 • 1982 



no 




Nina Valcnli 
Janinc Valcnlinc 
Rob Vance 
Sieve Vegei 
[•.mily Vendel 
Bryan Vendeland 
Val Ventura 



C olleen Vinkovic 
Sue Volanlc 
Ray Vorlicek 
Kann Wagner 
Robert Wagner 
Chris Walczak 
Annette Walker 




Chances are, according to statistics, that junior Debbie West has lived in Euclid 
for twelve years. 



Survey Reveals Underclassmen 

Are Long-Time Euclid 

Residents 

1980 was a year in which the national census was taken. 
And since the census not only counts us but also compiles 
all sorts of statistics about our habits, the Euclidian did 
the same with the student population. 

While Americans are supposed to be moving more fre- 
quently, our statistics showed that the average sophomore 
has lived in Euclid for eleven years while his junior counter- 
part has called Euclid home for twelve years. 41 percent of 
sophomores and 34 percent of the juniors have lived their 
whole lives in Euclid. 

Finally, 29 percent of the sophomores could be consid- 
ered world travelers. With Euclid located on the shore of 
Lake Erie, it is only natural that most of these out-of- 
country travels were across the lake to Canada. However, 
six percent of the sophomores have traveled to Mexico, and 
four percent have already been to Europe. 




Charles Walls 
Carol Walsh 
Beth Wallermire 
Ron Wamser 



Cheryl Warman 
Glen Waters 
George Weiserl 
Fred Wendel 



1982 



Although school is over, Michelle McKnight finds a 
few minutes to spend with her friends. 



m 



Junior Class Cabinet Plans Activities For The Class Of 1982 



The Junior Class is composed of 75 
outgoing, spirited members of the class 
of 1982. From its 75 members. 15 stu- 
dents are selected to be in the Junior 
Class Cabinet. This cabinet is in charge 
of Junior Class activities. These 1."^ 
members meet every Thursday morning 
at 7:30 under the direction of Dr. 
Crary. During these meetings, activities 
for their classmates are planned. One 
major activity they plan is the Junior 
Prom. The Junior Cabinet makes all of 
the decisions for the Junior Prom — 
decisions such as tmie. place, band. 



decorations, and food. Then ihcy report 
to the rest of the members to see how 
they like their ideas. 

An event such as the Junior Prom 
costs money. In order to meet the cost 
of their dance, fund-raising is planned 
and conducted by Junior Class mem- 
bers. In a September car wash, the Ju- 
nior Class raised over 70 dollars for 
their classmates. A Panther Power but- 
ton sale also added to the class treasury. 
Other fund raisers included candy, pom 
poms. baker\. doughnuts, and tlower 
sales. 



The Junior Class is a group of stu- 
dents who are out to reach a goal: to 
make Euclid High the best it can be for 
their classmates. All events, activities, 
and fund raisers center around this 
goal. 

A special activity at Euclid High 
School - Junior Class - is meant to help 
1 1 th graders solve the problems of class 
leadership and communication, some- 
thing created b\ a school the size of 
Euclid. 



Debbie West 
JelT Wcsiover 
Mike Wheland 
Tamm\ \V'hile 
Becky Wiegand 
Chn-. Will 
Robin Willard 



Dane Williams 

Amy Wilson 

Andy Wilson 

Audrey Wintle 

Dave Woide 

Bill Wojcik 

Patrick Uolowiecki 



Norm Wonderly 

Dana Wood 

Craig Wright 

Don Wright 



Erik Wuchler 

Dan Wyman 

Harry Yancher 

Dana Yalsko 



Chuck Yeckley 

Sharon Yeckley 

Denise Yerman 

Keith Young 




We're just getting acquainted. 



112 




If 1 clap my hands, it will 
turn into a Big Mac. 



Tom Coyne takes advantage of the free blood pressure check available in the high school clinic. 



113 




114 




ns 



Key Injuries 



Although the Panther football learn 
finished with a four and six season re- 
cord — good for third place in the 
Greater Cleveland Conference — the 
season was a disappointing one. Coach 
Seymour said that this year was par- 
ticularly frustrating because of the 
many injuries. Dave Manello, Steve 
Marinkov, and Doug Leu were among 
the twenty-seven players who were on 
the injured list during part or all of the 
season. These injuries made it nearly 
impossible to "improve in unison." 

However, there is a bright side to 
everything. Because of the injuries. 
Coach Seymour said that he was able to 
play many members of the team, thus 
enabling them to gain valuable exper- 
ience. He also stated that he was opti- 
mistic about next year because of the 
experience the team will already have 
had. 




Right: Suffering through a 4-6 season, this is 
about the only excitement fans saw in some 
of the games. 




116 



Spell Disappointment 




Bolldm Rok: Doug Leu, FrafiW Hfibar, Steve Marinkov, R-ic Groudel. Brian Vehar^fiave Mannello. Todd larnard, V^ke*'Brown 
^aryBrcSfn, Jack QeMpttr /*«»; Z: Mil«01ardy, PW PwlbnV! Joe.WfnMdo: iohn NBrofc/ChikM<-D«rs4.^-BilWiilPE'le^^tmc^_^_*_ 
Kevin Durst. Redon Jones. Row J: Rick Smith. Dwighl Haney, Van Johnson. Joe Museatefto.JocLcu'iiTSWrRtClt'NTenian. JTm bpeer, 
John McCoy. Butch Capassol Rou ^.Gary Casto, John Hribar. Al Peklay, Bob Bokar, Dave Skiijan, Tom Papalardo. Mike Yeckley! 
Jim Mitch, Chris Bremenourl Ron 5: Mike Whelan, Joe lafelice, Steve Knack. Tom Povirk. Rick Rolke. Doug Grose!. Wally Skora! 
Ron Suponcic. BrianSmith, Row 6: Dunne Calloway, Bob Cable, Doug Hufford. Daryl Laneman. Ken Yerman. Harry Yanchjr, Chris 



Hughes. John BariW. Paul Pallante. Row 7: Dale Eingelking. Jeff Hartman. 
Bortnick, Bill Attamante. Pete Schwenke. Photography by Luikan 



Bil 



Lane 
RoSTv 



well. Ron Seymour. Chester Nolan, Art 



I 







teft.- Assistant Coach Jeff Hartman asks for some 
help from the spotters in the press box while Assis- 
tant Coach Dale Lngclking surveys the action on the 
field. 



117 



Top The Euclid team is Ecstatic after a hard fought win 
against Maple 

Above: The "E" on the players helmets' stands for Effort, 
which they showed against Willoughby South. 




Mike Hardy lakes a breather on the sideline. 




119 



Strong Defense 




Hugging is an essential part of footbalL 



120 



Highlights JV's Season 



The JV football team posted a 5-5 record under their head coach, Dale F.nglek- 
ing. The JV's were beset with injuries all season and had a maximum of only 
twenty-eight healthy players for most of their games. However, the junior Panthers 
were held together by a powerful defense which allowed only eighty-six points to 
be scored on it all year. The offense fell into a slump in the midcic of the season, 
but managed to score 120 points. 

Belo»: Luis Nicves and Slacy Jones take a break from the 'Mud Bowl"- "Don'l lei my mom see me!" 




Bottom Row: Slacy Jones, Dave Rojeck. Pat Delancy, Bob Rinderle. Keith Mahovlie. Pat kehn. Larry Longstreth, Tony Foskey. 
RoK J. John Minisalle, Dennis Morek, Vic Martin, George Caplick, Mike .S^mania, Jack Richardson, Craig Eyman, Rick Schafer. 
Jeff Barnard. /?oh J. Chris Hughes, Greg A. Fond ran, Frank Bauck, Luis Nieves, .)ohn Barndt. Scott San ford, Mike Zusman, Stan 
Barnard, Gcddy Jakabauskus, Larry Rowland, Tom Deason. 



121 



We Finally Beat St. Joe's 




^- '. 








Euclid's 12-3 finish was good for second place in the GCC. 



The Varsity Soccer team, with an impressive crew of 
seniors, had their best season in years. The highlight of 
the season was their first victory ever against St. Jo- 
seph's. After massacring West Geauga 5-2, they finally 
bowed out of the state tournament when they were nar- 
rowly defeated, 2-1, in a grueling match against Gil- 
mour. The team ended the season with an overall record 
of 12-3. 

The team showed exceptional skill on the field, and 
outstanding players who contributed to the team's suc- 
cess included Zdenko Novkovic, Phil Pallante, John 
Turcinov, who was named to the 1st Team, All GCC, 
and Sean McCluskey, who made the 2nd Team, All 
GCC. Nick Spiranovich was most the Most Valuable 
Player in the GCC. Team awards went to Mike Durbin 
for Outstanding Hustle, Nick Spiranovich for Most 
Valuable Offense, and Phil Pallante for Most Valuable 
Defense. All GCC, 1st Team player, Zdenko Novkovic 
won the Most Valuable Player Award. 



Zdenko Novkovic entertains for teammates with a show of his agility. 



N */ 




'^■. 







'4 



122 



At Something 




JV's Finish 5-2-2 

The J.V. Soccer team had yet another 
great season. Starting strong and finishing 
even stronger, the team compiled an over- 
all record of 5-2-2. This record was good 
enough for second place in the G.C.C. 
Coach Hamovec was impressed with the 
dedication and combined team effort. 

J.V. SOCCER TEAM I si row: Mark Wardeiner. 
Tom Powell. Tom Carlson. 2nd row: Nick DiTlrro. 
Valdi Cervar. Sal Midolo. Tony Furlan, John Kasle- 
lic. 3rd row: i ay Jesbergcr, Dave Woldc, Mike Ren- 
dina. Don Novalny. 4th row: Dan Stevens. Milton 
Lau, Justin Hornung. Dave Leonhardt. Tom Velkos, 
Tom Birnich. 



JV SOCCER 



EUCLID 

3 



3 

3 

2 

1 

1 

1 

3 

Season Record: 



Lake Cattiolic 

Brush 

North 

Mayfield 

Mentor 

Brush 

North 

Mentor 

Mayfield 



OPPONENT 
1 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 

I 
2 



Won 5 Lost 2 Tied 



VARSITY SOCCER TEAM Kneeling:Stan Raguz, 
Marc Garland. Sean McClusky. Zdenko Novkovic. 
Phil Perdan. Vlatko Oroz, Mike Paparizos, Jose 
Lima. Sfandm^. Trainer Diane Snook. Phil Pallante, 
Nick Spiranovitch. Bill Papouras. Dave McCarthy. 
John Turcinov. Lou Bartulovic. Mike Durbin. Man- 
ager Brian Oberle. 



hven soccer matches have their dull moments. 



VARSITY SOCCER 








EUCLID 


OPPONENT 


6 West Geauga 









2 Lake Catholic 






1 


2 Brush 






3 


3 Willoughby South 






2 


3 Easllake North 









5 Ma> field 






2 


2 Mentor 






1 


4 Brush 






1 


4 Willoughby South 






3 


3 Eastlake North 






4 


6 Mayfield 









3 Mentor 






t 


2 St. Joseph 









TOURNAMENT 








5 West Geauga 






■) 


1 Gilmour 






2 


Season Record: Won 12 Lost 


3 





123 



>>i. 



if > 




Jiaifevioh V 



il " ^■■- 



124 



A Championship Round 




With feet apart, head down, and left arm 
straight; Chuck Gole demonstrates superb 
golfing form. 



Why did the golf team have such a good 
season'.' "We had five guys who could play 
very well I'or a high school team," an- 
swered Coach Raicevich. "These players 
could shoot 40 or better." 

The best meet for these hard-working 
men was at Mentor. Raicevich said that 
they beat Mentor on their own course, 
something they had never done before. 
Doug Drobnick and Jim Eder had particu- 
larly low scores at this meet. 

The worst meet was against Mayfield. 
The team was literally torn apart on the 
course. Raicevich concluded, "If you have 
a 12-1 record in one season and you win a 
championship, it gives a feeling of pride 
and accomplishment that is tough to 
match." 

Leli. GOLF TEAM Bottom Rom: Jeff Jaroscalt. 
Dave Bennet. /?ow-?: Coach Raicevich. team captain 
Doug Drobnick, Jim Eder, Chuck Gole, Joe Porten. 
Tom Porlen, Absent; Jim Brown 




Above: It 's all in the grip. The steady putting of Doug 
Drobnick led the golf team to the most successful 
season in its history and a GCC championship. 



12S 



Cross Country Teams Post 



Sandy Ukmar speeds toward the finish line. 



BO>'5XROSS COL/\T/?>'rE4MKnee/mg; Lance HaverloekJ. P. Walters, TonnJakovlic, Steve Fleck Mike 
cl Dave Woodruff. Sund,ns:G..y Buck, .lustin Hornung, Chuck Petraska Frank Walters, o^n Oshablovlen 
Steve Kato, Carl Mews, Chuck Zcle, Scott Theodore, Curt Rasmussen. John Blevtns, John Leyda, Don Porz, 
Perry Jordan, Coach Halbedel. 



is,- " 








p 



-a»^ 






»-^ 



^ 




GIRLS' CROSS COUNTRY TEAM Kneeling: Kathie Brown, Meg McLaughlin, Jeanine Swoboda. 
Standing: Coach Saywell, Sandy Ukmar, Diane Rolik, Cindy Parker, Kate McLaughlin. Absent: 
Lynda Lucas, Diana Mackell. 



'-f^_ ^^ -J ■:«#■■ 



1?6 



Winning Seasons 




Both the Boys" and Girls' Cross 
Country teams had successful seasons. 
The girls finished with a 3-1 dual meet 
mark and a number of respectable fin- 
ishes in invitational meets. Led by sen- 
ior Steve Fleck, the boys placed third in 
the GCC with an over-all mark of 6-3. 
Fleck went on to place 18th in the state 
meet, posting a time of 12:30, which 
bettered by six seconds the old school 
record set by Steve last year. 

Below: And they're off! Part of the trick of cross 
country running is not getting trampled at the 
start. 



t 








^'- \. >^M •"■ ^ ^fc ^fh ir^iJ 



rV 



.1 



V ' 



127 



Girls' Tennis 




The Girls" Tennis Team suffered a disappointing season, 
finishing with a record of 6 wins and 8 losses. Despite the 
season results, the team showed remarkable talent on the 
court. Bethany Hook, Judy Mast, and Denise McGill were 
among the best singles plavers, while doubles Judy Krnc and 
Linda Cramer finished with a 10-4 record, the best of the 
season. 

Sc-/oii Beth Hook and Denise McGill score a victory after a hard match. 



, ^ ^^ «.«.--,i*4*«'^ 




Linda Lewin readies herself for the shot. 




128 



Finishes 6-8 




GIRLS TENNIS TEAM 
Kneeling: Linda Cramer, Judy Mast. Bethany 
Hook, Judith A. Krnc, Sue Davidson, Sue 
Cermak, Denise McGill, Standing: Coach 
Dzerowicz, Jennifer Jaroscak, Linda Lewin, 
Suellyn Mooney, Beth Carmen, Hillary Hook, 
Sue Paul. 



GIRLS' TENNIS 




EUCLID OPPONENT 


Shaker Heights 


4 


I Hathaway Brown 


4 


3 Lakcwood 


"< 


4 Mentor 


1 


1 Baumount 


4 


1 Cleveland Heights 


4 


3 Regina 


■» 


Hudson 


5 


5 Normandy 





2 Brush 


3 ' 


3 Glen Oak 


2 


^' Mayfield 


3 


^^Hb Bcachwood 


3 


^^^P West Geauga 


1 


Season Record: Won 6 Lost 8 





A smashing serve 



129 



Varsity Volleyball 



The 1980 Girls' Volleyball team fin- 
ished their season with a 4-12 record, 
which did not reflect the ability of the 
team. Miss Buck, who has been coachmg 
for seven years, said, "The girls were one 
of the most talented and cooperative 
teams which I have ever coached." 

The team's victories against Mayfield, 
Cleveland Heights, Maple and Brush were 
lead by the cheering of a strong bench. 

The volleyball team defeated Conneaut 
High but lost to their rival Mentor in the 
tournaments. 

Miss Paderewski, the Junior Varsity 
coach was a new face at Euclid but was not 
new to the sport. She played for Kent 
State for four years and coached for Lake 
Erie College before coming to Euclid. The 
team's 8-8 record shows Miss P. 's coach- 
ing abilities and the teamwork of the girls. 

Below, right: "Go J.Vs!" Cheers Varsity as they 
watch the game. 

Below: VARSITY VOLLEYBALL TEAM Row I: 
Chrissy Ryder, Janene Selway, Lrsa Son, Lucy La- 
Valley Row 2: Karen Gordon, Beth Franko, Kathy 
Ryder Carolyn Rossman, Janet Struna. Standing: 
Donna' Zak, Karen Vulich, Mary Stragisher, Lisa 
Berardinelle, Kim Lorber, Linda Lawence. 




1J0 



Finishes 4-12 





Above: Mary Stragisher sets the ball for Euclid as they play a game 
against Brush. 

Left. Bottom: i\ VOLLEYBALL TEAM Row I; Betsy Wandersle- 
ben, Karmen Kelly, Wendy Potokar. Jean Savage, Sue Suponcic. 
Middle: Cr\i Konchan, Nina Matic. Lisa Clark, Trish Pirsil, Tammy 
Chapman. Standing: Coach Miss Paderewski. Wendy Born. Cindy 
Green. Barb Zupancic. Sue Fedakowski, Heidi Locke, Karen Lock- 
hart. 



131 



Right: The JV's give the varsity team some sidline 
support. 

Center: All eyes follow the bouncing ball. 

Lower right: Wendy Potokar stretches for the ball. 

Lower left: The makings of a spike. 




132 








c » 






VARSITY VUII.I-YHM I 




EUCLID 


OPPONP.NT 


15,15 


Cleveland Heights 


2,13 


4.4 


Lake Catholic 


15.15 


15,15 


Maple Heights 


12,11 


5,7 


Willoughby South 


15.15 


9,15,7 


Bedford 


15.12.15 


11,15,12 


Brush 


15.7.15 


16,15 


Mayfield 


14.1 


8,14 


Eastlake North 


15.16 


12,12 


Mentor 


15.15 


15,7,11 


Maple Heights 


7.15.15 


12,1 


Willoughby South 


15.15 


14,11 


Bedford 


16,15 


14,15,15 


Brush 


16,13,6 


3,15,15 


Mayfield 


15,12.15 


4,7 


Eastlake North 


15,15 


12,9 


Mentor 

Tournament 


15.15 


15,15 


Conneaut 


6,8 


5,6 


Mentor 
SEASON RECORD: 4-12 


15.15 



JUNIOR VARSITY VOLLEYBALL 



EUCLID 




OPPONENT 


12,2 


Cleveland Heights 


15,15 


7,15,10 


Lake Catholic 


15,12,15 


15,15 


Maple Heights 


10,12 


15,15 


Willoughby South 


10,4 


15,15 


Bedford 


12,1 


15,15 


Brush 


4,4 


15,15 


Mayfield 


11,12 


15,14.9 


Eastlake North 


3,16,15 


3.9 


Mentor 


15,15 


13.15.15 


Maple Heights 


15,12,6 


9,15.10 


Willoughby South 


15,13,15 


15,15 


Bedford 


6,8 


15,15 


Brush 


4,2 


12,14 


Mayfield 


15,16 


11,13 


Eastlake North 


15,15 


15,12,6 


Mentor 


3,15,15 




SEASON RECORD: 


8-8 


Left: Jean 


Savage wonders who put 


: the bubblegutn 


on the volleyball. 





Below, left: During a practice session before the 
game. Janene Selway perfects her technique. 



1» 



Flashes Of Brilliance; 




J 



As trite as it might sound, this year's 
basketball season certainly had its ups 
and downs. The team ended the season 
at .500 and mired somewhere in the 
middle of the GCC standings. Howev- 
er, among those lackluster statistics are 
the memories of sparkling perfor- 
mances, especially the two games 
against GCC powerhouse Mayfield. 
The Panthers took Mayfield in the first 
game by a score of 80-76, but dropped 
the second game — a seesaw affair 
played at Mayfield— by the score of 59- 
57. 

Rick Neiman and Gary Brown 
served as co-captains of this year's 
team. Scoring punch and rebounding 
power were added by Deon Lanier, 
Alex Brown, Doug Grosel, and Mark 
Miklos. Bruce Benedict, Paul Atkins, 
Bill Mauser, Brian Matthews, and Rick 
Mihelich turned in fine substitute per- 
formances all season. 

Right: Deon Lanier battles for the ball against 
Mayfield in one of the season's most exciting 
games. 



Right: The scoreboard tells the tale of a Euclid 
victory over Mentor. 




1 1 MOGAR 

1 5 Jl 
21 D 
23 P 



31 ASHBY 
33 SCHUT 
35 HAD 
41 IK 
45 
51 C 
53 Y 




V»S\TORS 




HOME 



Mm 



^a^T^vmi 



^^ mwtutv 



134 



Stretches Of Gloom 





Left: VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM Bottom 
RowTcssie Dudek, Beth Finkc, Dina Massaro, Bev 
Finke, Patty Hill, Sue Hromyko, Ron i. Alex Brown, 
Gary Brown, Mark Miklos, Bill Mauser, Paul Ad- 
kins, Row 3: Deon Lanier, Rick Mihelich. Brian 
Matthews, Rick Neiman, Doug Grosel, Bruce Bene- 
dict, Coach Daugherty. 

Below, far left: M^rk Miklos isn't intimidated by the 
defensive pressure of Mayfield. 

Below, left: The pause thai refreshes! Team co-cap- 
l.iin Rick Neiman gets a grip on his concentration 
before a foul shot against Brush. 





VARSITY BASKETBALL 


EUCLID OPPONENT 


44 


Geneva 


54 


67 


Cleveland Heights 


77 


51 


Mentor 


S8 


80 


Mayfield 


76 


62 


Brush 


45 


58 


Willoughby South 


73 


58 


Eastlake North 


62 


63 


Upper Arlington 


76 


63 


Bedford 


42 


46 


Maple Heights 


44 


70 


Madison 


56 


74 


Mentor 


68 


44 


Boardman 


56 


57 


Mayfield 


59 


63 


Brush 


57 


62 


Wickliffe 


50 


65 


Willoughby South 


67 


49 


Eastlake North 


62 


'■'; 


Bedford 


52 


)3 


Maple Heights 
Tournament 


51 


69 


Chardon 


62 


52 


Mayfield 

Season Record: 11-11 


63 



Left: A hustling offense by Rick Neiman (34). Alex 
Brown (44), and Mark Miklos (24) led the Panthers 
to a victory in their first game against Mentor. 



135 



Right: Deon Lanier was rewarded for his consistent scoring and rebounding by being named to the 
Plain Dealer Dream Team. 

Below: Rick Neiman (34), Alex Brown (44), and Gary Brown (32) get a chance to catch their breath 
against Mentor. 




Deon Lanier shows his STUFF. 



Mayfield's defense arrives a little too late to prevent Gary Brown from sinking 



136 




137 



Girls Finish On The 




^ 



y 



^ 



-55 



'r 



% 
4 



/Ibove. One reason for the girls' success this year was 
their teamwork, which helped them box in opponents' 
offenses. 

Rt^hl GIRLS VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 

Boltom Rou: Lisa Penny, Patty Young, Carol Camp- 
bell, Marcia Schutty, Kathy Brown. Row 2: Tracy 
Fioelli, Lucy LaValley, Marybeth Stragisher, Meg 
McLaughlin, Karen Walsh. 




138 



Flip Side Of .500 

Oof! Now I know what it feels like to be run over by a Mack 
truck! 





GIRLS VARSITY BASKETBALL 



EUCLID 

53 Wickliffe 

30 Riverside 

31 Maple Heights 

30 Mentor 
56 Geneva 
58 Mayfield 

31 Brush 

30 Willoughby South 
35 Lakewood 

Eastlake North 
50 Bedford 
*5 Maple Heights 
' Mentor 

Mayfield 

Brush 
18 West Geauga 
37 Willoughby South 
15 Eastlake North 
v3 Bedford 



Tournament 

52 Regina 

53 Eastlake North 



OPPONENT 



This year's Girls' Varsity Basketball 
Team finished their season one short of 
the .500 mark. Their success was the 
result of good coaching, hard work, and 
strong team spirit. Seniors who played 
for the last time in a EHS uniform were 
Carol Campbell, Tracy Fiorelli, Meg 
McLaughlin, Lisa Penny, Marybelh 
Stragisher, and Karen Walsh. The lead- 
ing scorers for the season were Meg 
McLaughlin and Lucy LaValley. Mar- 
ybeth Stragisher was the leading re- 
bounder. 



Season Record: 10-11 



Meg McLaughlin's shooting form against Wil- 
loughby South shows why she was one of the team's 
leading scorers. 



139 



The JV's: A Study In Contrasts 



The boys' 1980-1981 JV basketball 
team suffered a frustrating season. De- 
spite the high-scoring efforts of Keith 
Mahovlic, Dean Pate, and Bill Brown, 
the JV's efforts were futile. Bad breaks, 
close calls, and bouts with the flu pla- 
gued the team all season. 

After a dismal 0-5 start, the JV's won 
two in a row, which turned out to be 
their longest winning streak of the sea- 
son. The dismal season was epitomized 
by a double overtime loss to Eastlake 
North. 

Although not winners on the court, 
the JV's desire and determination was 
that of winners, making this year's sea- 
son a maturing experience for them. 





BO'iSJV BASKETBALL 




EUCLID 


OPPONENT 1 


24 


Geneva 




63 


31 


Cleveland Heights 




32 


36 


Mentor 




44 


30 


Mayfield 




56 


37 


Brush 




41 


58 


Willoughby South 




45 


45 


Eastlake North 




3« 


41 


Upper Arlington 




47 


22 


Bedford 




45 


46 


Maple Heights 




35 


56 


Madison 




65 


39 


Mentor 




53 


38 


Boardman 




56 


-42 


Mavfield 




43 


41 


Brush 




46 


42 


Wickliffe 




40 


35 


Willoughby South 




55 


55 


Eastlake North 




57 


52 


Bedford 




3X 


45 


Maple Heighf. 




36 




Season Record. 6- 


14 





BOYS JV BASKETBALL TEAM Bottom Row: 
Sam Stewart, Stacey Jones, Keith Mahovlic, Bill 
Maire, Thomas Williams. Standing: Joe Hoag, 
Russ Mazzaro, Dean Pate, Bill Brown, Ken 
Ospelt, Lou Nieves. 



Greg Fondran battles for a rebound "-*ifif, 
against Maph Heights, 




140 





Sophomore Sue Suponcic leads the parade up the 
court. She was an important part of the girls' fast 
break game. 





GIRLS JV BASKETBALL 




EUCLID OPPONENTS 


43 


Wickliffe 


18 


27 


Riverside 


12 


42 


Maple Heights 


25 


30 


Mentor 


19 


60 


Geneva 


10 


36 


Mayfield 


27 


28 


Brush 


17 


42 


Willoughby South 


17 


22 


Lakewood 


28 


17 


Eastlake North 


42 


30 


Bedford 


33 


24 


Maple Heights 


27 


34 


Mentor 


31 


29 


Mayfield 


23 


17 


Brush 


18 


29 


West Geauga 


32 


37 


Willoughby South 


25 


15 


Eastlake North 


34 


38 


Bedford 
Season Record 13-7 


26 



ir 40 -- 14 -1=2 -jr. (T, -* , 




Linda La Valley (52) takes the ball off the fingertips 
of her Brush rival. The girls' rebounding strength 
broke down after Christmas, causing them to drop 
four games in a row. 



Charlene DiFonzo, a first-year coach, 
led the girls' JV basketball team to a suc- 
cessful 13-7 season. The quickness of the 
team dominated its opponents. Sue Drien- 
ka's shooting ability was supplemented by 
the fast break of Sue Suponcic and Patrice 
Ware. The experience of four returning 
juniors: Joan lafigliola. Donna Reidel, 
Tracy Halmes, and Michele McKnight, 
also added to the team's assests. 

The girls romped through their first 
eight games undefeated. They posted five 
impressive wins over conference rivals and 
three victories over independents River- 
side, Wickliffe and Geneva (the highlight 
of the season, a 60-10 blowout in which 
everyone saw action. 

After returning from winter vacation, 
the girls dropped four games in a row. 
Rebounding — or the absence of it — was 
the fatal weakness. The remaining eight 
games saw five wins and three losses for 
the girls. 

GIRLS JV BASKETBALL TEAM Bottom Row: 
Michelle McKnight, Sue Suponcic, Lisa Rhone, Re- 
gina Stewart. Standing: Coach DiFonzo, Tracy 
Holmes, Joan lafigliola, Linda LaValley, Sue 
Drienka, Terri Nickel, Donna Riedel. \ot Pictured: 
Patrice Ware, Passion Ware. Leslie Smith. 



141 




SPIRIT ON ICE 



Although not the league championship team of 
the previous year, the 1980-81 hockey team fin- 
ished the season a winner. 



142 



HOCKEY TEAM Seared: Gordon McCance, Chuck Petraska. Chris Knight, Tom Carlson. Chris Brcmcnour. Jim Basilone, Bob Banas/ck. 
Standing: }im Slominski, Mike Parziale, Scolt Sanford, Steve Mackanos, Tom Borthwick, Coach Homovcc, Vincent Burke, Mark Marolt. lid 
Wolons, Bill Banaszek, 





HOCKEY TEAM 




EUCLID OPPONENT 


3 Rocky River 


2 


3 Lakewood 





2 St. Joseph 


2 


5 Cleveland Heights 


4 


8 Trinity 


2 


Padua 


7 


1 Kent Roosevelt 


4 


2 CenterviUe 


I 


3 Shaker Heights 


5 


2 Findlay 


1 


Toledo Waite 


10 


4 Toledo St. John 





1 North Olmsted 


4 


2 St. Ignatius 


5 


8 University School 


I 


Kent Roosevelt 


4 


2 Padua 


2 


4 Trinity 


2 


7 University School 


1 


Shaker Heights 


9 


6 St. Joseph 


4 


St. Ignatius 


6 


Season Record: 11-9-2 





Keep your eyes on the puck! 



Vince Burke practices his winning through intimidation 
exercises. 



The 1980-1981 Hockey Team posted Tournament, both held during the 



a fine 11-9-2 record in its matches 
against powerhouses from the local 
area and from around the state. The 
team finished third in the Thornton 
Holiday Tournament in Shaker 
Heights and second in the Findlay 



Christmas break. Outstanding individ- 
ual players included Gordie McCance, 
Bob Banaszek, Bill Banaszek, Tom 
Borthwick, Chris Bremenour, and 
Vince Burke. 



143 



Wrestling Season: 



Right: Euclid on the attack! Although the wres 
tiers had plenty of enthusiasm, they came up oi 
the short end of the score in most of their match 
es. 

Below: Nothing wrong with a little hair-pulling a; 
long as the ref isn't looking. 





If we don't make it as wrestlers, we can have a great 
career as a bowling ball. 



WRESTLING TEAM Bottom Row: Scott Theodore, Mike Simpson, Dave Budnar, Mike 
Redman. Row 2: Gary Budnar, Joe Colo, Mike Whelan, Jim Rossi, John McCoy, Tim D'Anna. 
Row 3: Mary Richardson, Justin Hornung, Jim Gordon, Steve Knack, Bill Papouras, Lou 
Capasso, Ron Rich, Mike Brown. 



144 



A Long Agony Of Defeat 




^ 




What a pain in the neck! 



Right: Euclid's wrestlers were pushed and shoved 
around through most of their season 




Although a lack of depth in the \ar- 
ious weight classes made for one of the 
most disastrous wrestling seasons in 
years, the 1980-1981 team boasted one 
of the finest wrestlers to ever wear a 
Euclid uniform. Senior co-captain Dave 
Budnar demolished a string of twenty 
opponents preparing for the challenge 
of the state championships. Dave's 
second place finish in the state 
tournament helped to balance out the 
disappointments of the season. 



Say uncle or I 'I 
mat! 



put your head right through the 



MS 




Above: With the deck crowded with swimmers, 
timers, officials, and coaches, a relay race at a 
swim meet might seem totally chaotic to a first- 
time observer. 

Right BOYS SWIM TEAM Bottom Row: Dave 
Hanson, Dennis Dickard, Rob Horn, Warren 
Schneider, Jeff Hogan, Jeff Jaroscak, Boris De- 
Granda. Row J. Mark Francetic, Darrin Wagner, 
Tom Coyne, Scott Gundling, Paul Glaser, Paul 
Rossmann, Todd Dickard. Row 1- Kevin Meaney, 
Doug Springer, Eric Zebold, Dan Green, Dave 
Fedakowski, Adam Race, John Theodosion, 
Scott Clines. Not Pictured: Tom Mullen, Eric 
Wuchter, Tom Powell, Phil Gron. 



(^ ^ O "^ A 




146 



Slow Start; Fast Finish 



1 






VKfitUSl 



^ISSfiSSSlk 







The swim team had a rough start to its 
season, winning only one of its first five 
meets. After that, the team became a con- 
sistent winner. Outstanding swimmers in- 
cluded co-captains Eric Zebold and Jeff 
Jaroscak. The diving crew of Jeff Hogan 
and Kevin Meaney added great strength to 
the diving unit. 

Euclid divers Jeff Hogan and Kevin Meaney showed 
a steady improvement all season. 



EUCLID 



BOYS SWIM TEAM 

OPPONENT 



43 


Berea 40 


86 


Orange 86 


68 


llniversily School 104 


85 


Cleveland Heights 86 


84 


Lakewood 88 


124 


Rocky River 44 


95 '.2 


Fairvicw 76'-i 


119 


Bedford 52 


114 


Brush 58 


119 


Maple Heights 53 


111 


Midpark 58 


113 


Mayfield 58 




Season Record: 8-3-1 



Perhaps the team mascot put a jinx on the Panthers 
rather than the opposition in the beginning of the 
season? 



Happiness is a warm shimming pool! Swim team 
members showed their dedication through their at- 
tendance at morning workouts, which started at 7:30 
AM 



147 



Led by tri-captains Anne Cerer, Barb Starr, and 
Jill Mast, the Girls' Swimming and Diving Team 
won their first GCC championship. A near-perfect 
season was climaxed by successful conference, dis- 
trict, and state meets. The dual meet record was 
the best that the team has ever achieved. Included 
in this outstanding effort was a new pool record in 
the 100 yard backstroke set by Jo Ann Zele. 




JP i- 



«4ik' 



Be/oH, Dedicated practice and fine individual efforts by all the 
members helped the girl swimmers to get the jump on the 
opposition all year. 



:-.«sji* 



^^^ 




^^^. 



.•^ 




GIRLS SWIM TEAM 
EUCLID OPPONENT 



120 


Solon 


45 


103 


Rocky River 


68 


96 


Cleveland Heights 


76 


91 


Kent Roosevelt 


81 


111 


Parma 


57 


104 


Bedford 


68 


108 


Brush 


64 


121 


Maple Heights 


SO 


39 


Lakewood 


44 


117 


Mayfield 


55 


91 


Orange 

Season Record: 10-1 


79 




Nothing brings smiles faster than a superb season record. 



148 



gi^LlS make MAVi^ 

, IN THE GCC 




-» %■• 




Sophomore Jo Ann Zele won a swimmer-of-the- 
week award from the Plain Dealer for her out- 
standing performances throughout the year. 




GIRLS' SWIM TEAM Boilom Ron. Janet Smith, 
Beth Carmen, Dawn Schmeling, Jo Ann Zele, Jean 
Savage, Corinne Dular, Karen Schuiz, Kim Conroy. 
Rou 2: Kim Metz, Jeanine Swoboda, Barb Starr, 
Anne Cerer, Jill Mast, Deena Lucci, Lisa Berardin- 
elli, Jennifer Jaroscak. Rou .?. Diane Fulton, Monica 
Pockar, Lorna Coyne, Sue Hickey, Lori Trebec. 
Sharon Millhof, Meg McArthur. 



149 




150 




151 



COPING WITH THE 





152 




The 19X0-19K1 school year broughl the beginning of a solution to 
the pressing problem of decreased school enrollment. The liuclid 
School Board, along with Dr. Husarik, concerned Euclid citizens, 
parents, teachers, and administrators, started to review the enroll- 
ment trends of previous years to try to predict the approximate 
enrollment size in the coming years. Even though it was only the first 
year for this group, many ideas and possible plans were constructed 
for reorganization in the 1980's to prepare for proper utilization of 
the secondary school buildings in the Euclid system. 

Below, EUCLID BOARD Of KDUCATION Sej(ed, Mr. Joseph M. .Suslersic; Mrs. 
Mary K. King, president; Mr. Waller N. Schweglcr, vicc-prcsidcnl. Standing: Mrs. 
Shirley M. Nurmi, Mr. Donald D. Smith. 



i 



Since future projected enrollment figures show a bjgnificani decline. Supcnnlendenl 
Ernest flusarik is preparing lor the b,ib\ bust by reviewing ihe options for ihc Euclid 

school s\slem. 



15i 



A Day With 




Right:DT Bergem finds time to chat with a group of 
students during one of the lunch periods. 

Right: If you ever look for Dr. Bergem in his office, 
this is what you will probably find since he is usually 
attending meetings, sitting in on classes, or roaming 
around the building talking with students. 

As principal of Euclid High School, Dr. 
Jerry Bergem leads a very hectic daily rou- 
tine, yet he always can be found sometime 
during the day smiling in the hallway and 
talking with students as they are changing 
classes. 

The class of 1981 is the first graduating 
class Dr. Bergem has seen through all 
three years of high school since he began 
as principal in September 1978. Many 
changes occurred during Dr. Bergem's 
time as principal. For example, this year 
there was a new tardy rule, inspirational 
assemblies, and the new gate house in the 
student parking lot. This year also marks 
the last year for the smoking area. 

Dr. Bergem began with the Euclid 
School System in 1948 as a math and sci- 
ence teacher at Euclid Central. Outside of 
his day here at school he still finds time to 
pursue his hobbies - swimming, sailing, 
and skiing. He also said he likes music and 
playing Mr Fix - it by doing odd jobs 
around the house. 

Below, right: Dr. Bergem pulls the dollar for an ID 
trick on an unsuspecting student. 



Below, far right: Not only does Dr. Bergem find time 
to talk with the students, he also maintains good 
relations with the staff. 




154 




■/•". A Right: Dr. Bergem poses wilh assistant principals Mr. I-rank 

r*^ p' Troglia and Mrs. Ruth Smith. 

Below: Hey, you in the back of the class! Sil upslraighi and pay 
a/(en/;on.' Sitting in on classes unannounced, one of Dr. Bcr- 
gem's favorite pastimes, helps him keep his hand on the pulse of 
the school. 




155 



Mr. Sawyer, Vocational Director, and Mr. Addis, Athletic Director, pose for the camera. 



Directors 
and 
Unit \ 
Principals 



The unit principals can be referred 
to as the middle men of Euclid High 
School. They try to prevent and cor- 
rect discipline problems be creating 
a better relationship between the stu- 
dent, his teachers, and his parents. In 
addition, they oversee administrative 
matters — such as scheduling and re- 
cordkeeping — dealing with the stu- 
dents. 

In conimenting about this year's 
student body, 11 th grade Unit Prin- 
cipal Mr. William McGuinness was 
impressed by the few number of seri- 
ous discipline problems. He said that 
compared to EHS students of the 
_past or students at other schools, this 
year's student body was very cooper- 
ative and friendly. 





m jM 




llth grade Unit Principal, Mr. McGuinness (stand- 
ing) poses with English chairman, Mr. Antonini. 



As 12th grade Unit Principal, if Mr. Medvick's 
smile won't win you over, his cannon will. 



Mr. Martin Retires After 
39 Years In Education 



An unruffled manner and an occasional cup of coffee 
helped Mr. Martin survive 39 years of high school 
teaching. 



Mr. Donald Martin, Sophomore Unit 
Principal, retired at Christmas time this 
year, closing the book on a 39 year ca- 
reer in education, the last 18 of which 
he spent at Euclid High School as a 
counselor and a unit principal. 

Mr. Martin began his career in 
North Canton as a teacher and basket- 
ball coach. From there he moved to 
Painesville, where he coached both 
football and basketball. Many fine ath- 
letes passed before Mr. Martin in the 
23 years he coached various sports, but 
the one that stood out in his memory 
the most was a boy from Painesville 
who played football for him in the late 
1940's. That boy's name was Don 
Shula, and he later went on to become 



the head football coach of the Balti- 
more Colts and the Miami Dolphins. 
Mr. Martin ended his coaching career 
here at Euclid leading the girls' varsity 
basketball team. 

Mr. Martin came to Euclid as a 
counselor 18 years ago, and after 
spending two decades here, is convinced 
that EHS has one of the finest staffs of 
any school. Although the decision to 
retire was a difficult one to make, Mr. 
Martin admitted that he is looking for- 
ward to spending time with his family 
and traveling. Mr. Martin was replaced 
by Mr. Robert Lombardo, former Eng- 
lish department chairman at Central 
Junior High. 



156 



Counseling Staff 




/■^^^^jT . 





Mrs. Krup 



Dr. Crary 



Mrs. Davis 



Miss Baraniuk 









Mr. Yocum 



Mr. Cliffel 



Peer Counseling 

Program Started 

This Year 



The purpose of the Peer Counseling 
Program is to allow students the oppor- 
tunity to talk with other students alDout 
their problems. "Some of them feel 
more comfortable talking to kids their 
own age. The feel less guilty. They think 
adults judge them," commented Mrs. 
Lynn Davis, llth grade counselor and 
sponsor of the program. She also stated 
that many students will learn to trust 
their counselors more after this exper- 
ience. 

The students involved in the program 
are primarily the organizers of the pro- 
gram as well. They have worked with 
the Teen Institute, an organization that 
promotes the whole aspect of drug and 
alcohol information. Mrs. Davis de- 
scribed herself as just an "organizer" in 
the Peer Counseling Program since the 
student volunteers involved do most of 
the selecting and interviewing. 

Among the positive effects of the 
program is the fact that 92 students 
signed up to work in Peer Counseling. 
Mrs. Davis considered this a very favor- 
able interest level. Another positive 
sign, according to Mrs. Davis, is the 
fact that more and more students seem 
to be confiding in each other. While the 
studcnt-pccr counselors do not give spe- 
ciHc advice, they do give information, 
listen, and recommend to students that 
they continue the discussion of a par- 
ticular problem with tjieir counselor 
when necessary. 



Miss Modie, 12th grade counselor, tries out a new, sophisticated counseling technique on an unsuspecting 
Steve Knack. 



157 



Right- Megan McLaughlin was one of only 800 stu- 
dents nationwide to be named winners of the Nation- 
al Council ofTeachers of English Essay Competition. 
She poses with Mr. Gerald Henderson, her 11th 
grade English teacher, for whom she wrote her 
award-winning essay. 

Right, center Robert Scott gets the specifics of his 
assignment from Mrs. Black for his Reading Review 
class. 




Above: Mrs. Severino has a sure-fire method to pre- 
vent students from goofing off in her class— she feeds 
them to her fish. 

Above.' right: Seated: Mrs. Jane Barber, Miss Judith 
Carmody, Miss Sue Harris, Miss Jane Lellis, Mrs. 
Dolores Black, Mrs. Jan Severino, Mrs. Emily Gale. 
Standing: Mr. Justin Antonini, Mr. Stan Bender. Mr. 
Ken Lowe, Mrs. Barbara Ramlow, Mr. William 
Brown, Miss Barbara Spiga, Mr. Robert Petrovic, 
Mrs. Judy McLaughlin, Mr. Frank Mularo. 

Right:T<lo one would dare come late to Mr. Mularo's 
class! 

Right, center: Miss Carmody leads her British litera- 
ture class in a discussion of the 19th century equiv- 
alent of Dallas— Wuthering Heights. 




158 



English Scores Buck National Trend 



The English Department, the largest 
department at Euclid High, saw a few 
changes this year. A new, nine-week 
course, American Short Story, was ad- 
ded to the elective program. In addi- 
tion, a new textbook was purchased for 
use in American Literature classes. 

Department chairman Justin Anton- 
ini was happy with the results of Euclid 
students' scores on two national tests. 
On the verbal section of the S.A.T., 
taken by the class of 1980 during their 



senior year, Euclid students' scores 
average 59 points higher than the na- 
tional average and 28 points higher 
than the Ohio average. In addition, the 
results of the California Reading Test, 
given to all EHS students in Septem- 
ber, showed that sophomores, juniors, 
and seniors were reading more than one 
grade level above the national average. 
Mr. Antonini said that these scores cer- 
tainly indicated that Euclid students 
had sufficient reading skills. On the 



other hand, he felt that there was room 
for improvement in students' writing 
skills. 

One student who presently has out- 
standing writing skills, however, is sen- 
ior Megan McLaughlin. Megan was 
one of only 800 students nationwide to 
win a National Council of Teachers of 
English Award in an essay competition. 
Megan wrote her prize-winning essay as 
a junior for Mr. Henderson. 




Tim D'Anna and Mike Whelan provide moral support as Steve Knacli and Harry Yanchar apply some sutle pressure to Mrs. Cowan bcrorc she grades 
their essays in her College Composition class. 



159 



Election Year 
With A Lesson 



Right:Thii is about the only time you won't see 
desk. 

ee/oiv; Mr, Weisenberg has published several historical articles including 
one that was printed in the best-selling Pcople^s Almanac. 




Left Sea!ed: Mr. William Demora, Mr. Forrest 
Diehl, Mr. Jim Englehart, Mr. David Schonauer, 
Mr. Leonard Weisenberg, Mrs. Mary Jagger, 
Mr. Jim Kelley. Standing: Mr. Michael Burns, 
Mr. Frank Hoffert, Dr. Earl McNeilly, Mr. 
Wayne Smith, Mr. Michael Raicevich, Mr. Rog- 
er Brown, Dr. Ronald Powaski, Mr. Jeff Hart- 
man. 



160 



Provide Students 
In Social Studies 




In the Social Studies Department, there 
were no new courses offered this year. 
However, several classes were taken on 
field trips: Humanities and Non-Western 
Studies classes visited the Art Museum. 
American Government classes visited sev- 
eral places, depending on the teacher. 
Crime and Prisons visited the Justice Cen- 
ter and a police station, and Death and 
Dying visited a funeral home, a cemetery, 
and a crematorium. 

This year, in the Phase American Stud- 
ies program, several courses were dropped 
due to lack of interest. However, four 
classes survived. They are Crime and Pris- 
ons, Death and Dying, Marriage and the 
Family, and Contemporary America. 
These courses are taught during the sec- 
ond semester of the senior year. The ad- 
vantage of this program is that students 
can study these subjects with some degree 
of depth. In addition, students are exposed 
to the style and methods of a different 
teacher. 

When asked if the average student of 
today was as interested in government as 
the average student of ten years ago, Mr. 
Hoffert, the department chairman said no 
because he felt that the average student of 
today is more cynical because American 
society today, in general, is more cynical. 

Left, center: As a member of the Euclid City Coun- 
cil. Mr. DeMora adds practical experience to the 
political theory he teaches to his .American Govern- 
ment students. 

Left. belOK: Euclid High doubled as a polling place 
on November 4th as Euclid citizens came to cast 
their votes in the 1980 Presidential election. 



161 



Math Adds 

To Students' 

Problems 

Right Seated: Miss Margaret Uhry, Mr^ Adam Paw- 
lowski. Mr. Richard Rose, Mrs. Jacqueline Toth. 
Standing: Mr, Paul Serra. Mr. Fred Sallach, Mr. 
Charles Reno, Mrs. Adona Miskinis, Mr. Richard 
Rackovan, Mr. Carl Clements, Mr. Donald Rinkes. 

Right: Mr. Rose guards the entrance to his office. 

Right, center: Mr. Sallach and his students find ge- 
ometry very amusing. 

Right, below: For once Mr. Serra doesn't have his 
trusty yardstick in his hands. 

Addition, subtraction, cosines, and an- 
gles; these are just a few of the things that 
math students at Euclid High School work 
with and sweat over each day. There are 
math courses offered for every need and 
type of student. These range from remedi- 
al math courses in basic math skills to 
algebra, geometry, and calculus. Euclid 
even has courses in computer math and 
computer science for those wishing to fol- 
low these fields of study. 

This year Mrs. Miskinis joined the math 
department staff of the high school. Al- 
though no new textbooks were put into 
use, the 70% of the Euclid student body 
which is enrolled in a math course were 
doing their best to wear out the old ones. 
Mr. Carl Clements, math department 
chairman, believes that most of the stu- 
dents graduating from Euclid have the 
necessary basic math skills. Therefore, he 
thinks that minimum competency tests are 
not really needed; tests and daily work 
point out weaknesses that are reviewed 
and discussed by the class teacher. 

Mr. Clements believes that calculators 
can be a valuable tool to the student, and if 
used properly, can enhance the education- 
al process. To use a calculator, one must 
first have knowledge of the problem to be 
solved so that the calculator can be used 
most efficiently. 



162 




Science Offers Something For All 



Although there are no new additions 
to the teaching staff or curriculum of 
the Science Department, there are spe- 
cial programs which students don't 
know about. The Phase Science pro- 
gram is for those students who are not 
particularly interested in science but 
need a science credit in order to gra- 
duate. The Phase Science program has 
classes in Backpacking Biology, Envi- 
ronment, and Greenhouse. 



Euclid's Advanced Placement Pro- 
gram in science has been called the fin- 
est in the state, and one of the finest in 
the country. This program allows stu- 
dents to complete their final year in 
high school and also earn credits to- 
ward their first year of college. Stu- 
dents from Euclid compete well with 
other areas, and the results are out- 
standing. 

Field trips are offered in Biology II 





and Backpackmg classes. Biology II 
classes attend a lecture scries at Huron 
Road and [Euclid General Hospitals. 
Backpacking classes go on many walks, 
and outstanding Backpacking students 
attend a three- day trip to Pennsylva- 
nia. 




Above: And if you spin it fast enough, you'll float 
right up to the ceiling. Mr. Reno explains the princi- 
ple of the gyroscope to his physics class. 

Above, left: Mr. Gooding helps iwo of his sopho- 
mores unlock the mysteries of biology. 

Below, left: Mr. Sheldon Freedman, Mr. Frank Sol- 
tesz, Mr. Donald Francetic. Mrs. Marilyn Lucas. Mr. 
Donald Steinbrink. Mr. William Starr, Mr. Stan 
Bender, Mr. John Barcza, Mr. Thomas Halbedel. 



163 



New 

Chairman 

For LA. 



Right Seated: Mr. John Germock, Mr. Embert Mar- 
tin, Mr. Al Galicki. Standing: Mr. Raymond Mon- 
tani, Mr. Ronald Chambers, Mr. Milt Kadlec, Mr. 
James Simpson, Mr. Richard Hungerford, Mr. Clif- 
ford Kirchner, Mr. James Goebel. 

Right: Kevin Kelly and Ricky Clark are about to get 
the presses rolling. 

Right, center: 1 sure wish I could figure this thing 
out. 

Right, below: I think he just nailed my fingers togeth- 



The Industrial Arts department, one of 
the strongest in the school, made no 
changes in personnel this year. However, 
Mr. VoUman, department chairman last 
year, left after 42 years of teaching and 
was replaced by Mr. Galicki. There were 
no new courses offered this year and no 
new equipment added in shop classes, al- 
though Mr. Galicki is hoping to have new 
equipment in the machine shop and in the 
graphic arts classes. 

When asked how many students took 
industrial arts courses, Mr. Galicki stated 
that a definite count could not be made at 
the time of this interview. Furthermore, 
the cost of materials in shop classes 
doesn't really pose a problem to industrial 
arts students because the cost depends on 
the project. 




164 



Business Adds Four New Teachers 



In the business department, the big- 
gest faculty change in a long time hap- 
pened this year. Four new teachers 
joined the staff. They are Mrs. Klein, 
who teaches the Junior Clerk-Typist 
program; Mrs, Rash, who teaches the 
Senior Vocational Stenography pro- 
gram; Mrs. Wandersleben, who teaches 
Senior Business Math and Typing; and 
Mrs. Zimmerman, who teaches Senior 
Data Processing. There is also a new 
department chairman, Mr. Manburg. 

This summer, three teachers took 



courses thai arc related to the courses 
that they teach. In addition, some 
teachers went to work in business and 
industry to learn about business skills. 

This year, the typewriting classes re- 
ceived new typewriters. Another 
change that may occur at press time is 
the fact that the Data Processing 
classes may use the HB 3000 computer 
in the other computer room. 

All vocational business courses bring 
in professionals lo talk about courses 
and job opportunities. Most of the typ- 



ing classes do this as well. Many classes 
to on field trips to learn more about 
business and industry. 

Mr. Manburg says that 850 studcnts- 
or 40% of all students - are enrolled in 
vocational programs, and many are en- 
rolled in more than one program. He 
also slates that there arc statistics on 
job placement for business students 
after graduation, which show athat they 
have a greater chance of getting a job 
than students without business skills. 





Above: Up-to- dale equipment and plenty of paper- 
work prepare business students for the real world o( 
work. 

Left Sealed: C3ro\ Williams. Eleanor Wiegand. Ma- 
rie Harshman. Carolyn Wandersleben, Toni Rash. 
Charlotte Bensusan Sunding: Thomas Davis. Jill 
Zimmerman. Ralph Sibert, Nancy Rutkowski. Mark 
Manburg, Gretchen Dean. 



165 



The Art Department introduces stu- 
dents to many unique forms of art includ- 
ing sculpturing, weaving, and tie dying. 
Many different pieces of student art are on 
exhibit throughout the year in the show- 
case by room 161. 




.A 



Above:Mr. Sydow gets ready to strike up the band. 

Right: Future composers are hard at work in one of 
EHS's classes. 

Through the Music Department, many 
students are allowed to develop and show 
their vocal and instrumental talents. This 
year Euclid held a Solo and Ensemble con- 
test which involved hundreds of students 
from around the Cleveland area. Mr. Sy- 
dow is the system- wide music coordinator 
and also the band director at EHS. Mr. 
Hutson takes care of the orchestra while 
Mr. Morgan is responsible for the choirs 
and the Varsity Chorale. 



M 



Art teachers Diane Wiersba, Anna Araca, and Richard Patton. 





Mr. Morgan takes a break. 



Mr. Hutson fiddles his time away. 



166 



Foreign Languages: Smaller But Better 



The sounds of far off lands are heard 
daily in Euclid High's foreign language 
classes. The students who take these 
courses not only learn a little about a 
foreign language and culture but also 
about our own language as well. 

Mrs. Baumeister, the head of the 
Foreign Language Department at EHS, 



said the department has declined in en- 
rollment since colleges have discontin- 
ued their foreign language require- 
ments and students do not seem to have 
the patience to learn a second language 
anymore. 

This year, a group of EHS students, 
enrolled in German classes, traveled to 



Europe where they spent a week touring 
Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. 
Some of the cities they slopped at were 
Innsbruck, Salzburg, Munich, and Zur- 
ich. 




How do you say / want a hamburger but hold the onions in French? 




Far Left: 

Foreign language teachers Donna 
Baumeister, Raymond Leopold. 
Judith Simonich. and Ahmed Fel- 

lague. 

Z.f/f: Beth Cramer .-ind Judy Krnc 
act out their parts in a play put on 
b\ the French classes. 



167 



Library 

LIBRARY STAFF: Margaret Lucas, Kathleen 
Marsh, Mary Jane Haverlock, and Margaret Tor- 
zewski. 

Tired of study hall? Then come to the 
library! The library has become an alter- 
native to study halls for many students. Its 
30.000 volumes and numerous magazines 
can occupy any student's spare time or 
provide useful information for a history 
report. 

Besides being a resource for informa- 
tion, the library has become an entertain- 
ment center. During various periods dur- 
ing the day, a movie would be shown. 
These films ranged from comedy to seri- 
ous drama and were well-received by the 
student body. 

Right: Mrs. Haverlock collects fines from a couple of 
students. 

Below, far right: We really don't want to study, but 
they made us do it. 

Below, right: A student finds that listening to music 
in the AV carrels makes studying easier. 




168 




Physical 
Education 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Row /Robert Ram- 
low. Hal DaughL-rly. Patricia Buck, Arlcnc Carter, Audrey Fox. Victor 
Rcsch. Ro» 2: Peter Schwcnke, Joseph Rodriquez. 



^^r 



^ v^ ^ 




Physical Education students have 
their choice of a multitude of subjects 
to fulfill their physical education re- 
quirements. These courses include 
archery, badminton, basketball, canoe- 
ing, dancing, touch football, golf, ice 
skating, jogging, lifesaving, swimming. 



Students practice first aid skills learned in their health cla> 

orienteering, physical fitness, soccer, 
Softball, tennis, track and field, voiles - 
ball, weight training, and .\oga. Hand- 
ball, which was offered last >ear, was 
dropped this year because of the num- 
ber of accidents which occured. 
This year, the volleyball classes re- 



ceived new eiquipment. In addition, the 
weight room received a new weight m.i- 
chine. Ph\sical (iducation department 
chairman Arlene Carter commented 
that she hopes to add more weight 
training equipment in the future. 



169 



Special 
Education 



SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS: David 
Saywell, Barbara Gates, Wilma Carroll, Joyce 
Haffer. William Attamante. 



Home 

Arts 



The Home Arts department offers gen- 
eral courses in clothing, cooking, and fam- 
ily living; and a two-year vocational course 
in child care. In addition to teaching stu- 
dents how to fry an egg and repair a ripped 
pair of blue jeans, home arts classes study 
nutrition, menu planning, budget manage- 
ment, and fashion design. 

Below, right: Whoever said only girls can cook? ^^ 

Right: Mary Galloway and Wendy Stroud wonder 6i» — ' ■,! 
what they have created this time besides a mess. ?// 

Below, far right: HOME ARTS TEACHERS: Bot- 
tom Row Patricia Arko, Edna Noble. Standing Jan 
Carlson. Brenda Barker. 




170 




Treasurer 



The job of school treasurer is quite a hectic one, but Mrs. 
Barry has a firm grasp on the situation. As treasurer, she is 
in charge of the collection of student fees at the beginning 
of the year. Throughout the year, she handles all of the 
accounts for the many different clubs and activities at Eu- 
clid High School. 

Left: A balanced book at the end of a long day always brings a smile to 
Mrs. Barry's face. 




Euclid High School? or a new toll booth exit for the Ohio Turnpike? 





No, that isn't a toll booth in the picture 
above, but the new gate house outside the 
student parking lot. The gate house was con- 
structed to create greater control on traffic 
on the school grounds. 

Far kfr. Warren Lobdel. chief of sccurily. can quile 
often be found out al ihe new gale house. 

Left: Media technician. Kurl Banford. has the responsi- 
bility for all the audio-visual aids al Euclid High School. 



771 



Serving 



It takes a lot more to keep a modern 
high school going than just a principal, a 
couple of teachers, and a student or two. 
Serving behind the scenes is an army of 
support personnel; nurses, secretaries, 
cafeteria workers, custodial and mainten- 
ance men. Euclid High School is no excep- 
tion to this rule. The cafeteria, under the 
direction of dietitian Rebecca Burger- 
— new to EHS this year— served thou- 
sands of meals efficiently each month. The 
school's secretaries coped effectively with 
the mountain of forms needed to keep a 
two-thousand student school running 
smoothly. And the presence of the para- 
professionals in the halls during the school 
day was enough to insure that no students 
got lost while walking to their 5th period 
class. 

Right: Your hall pass or your life! Some students 
complained that the paraprofessionals could use a 
few lessons at the Amy Vanderbilt School of Charm, 
especially those students who were caught trying to 
smoke a quick cigarette in the bathrooms between 
classes. 

School nurse Mrs. Regina Fellman administers a 
blood pressure test to a stoic Jim Brown. Such tests 
were available to students free of charge throughout 
the year. 




172 



Behind The Scenes 




hijr left: Mrs. McGill helps to direct the paperwork 
to the proper hands. 

Left: Mrs. Arko has a mere 40.000,000 more copies 
to run off and she can go home for the day. 



V 



i 




/^feoi'c.- Cafeteria workers prepare for the onslaught 
of hungry students at 4th period lunch. 

Above. /eft.SCHOOL SECRETARIES Front Row: 
Laverne McGill, Amy Bell, Fran Hall, Rose Davies. 
Row 2: Virginia Arko, Polly McRedmond, Judy 
Paul. Not Pictured: Rosalie Fettc. Jan Kchn. Rosc- 
marie Tonn. 

Left: Twenty teachers just came down with the flu, 
the copy machine's broken down, it's the last day of 
the grading period, and you had w schedule a hair- 
dresser's appointment. 



173 




174 




175 




Kimberly Ames 



Ann Anderson 



Tracey Anderson 



Diane Kav Andrews 



HARLAND ABRAHAM 
Basketball 11; Outdoor Track 11, 12. 



KENNETH ADAMS 

MARY ALABURDA 

Hairy 

Powder Puff 12. 

PHILLIP ALBERT 
Phil 

JOHN ALLISON 
Not Pictured. 



KIMBERLY AMES 
Kimba 

Basketball 10, Softball 10; Yearbook 10, 11; Pow- 
der Puff 12. 

ANN ANDERSON 
Swim Leader 1 1. 

TRACEY ANDERSON 

Football Aide 1 2; Spirits 10, 11, 12; Powder Puff 
12; Student Secretary 10, 11, 12. 



Mike Andrews 



DIANE ANDREWS 

Binky 

NHS 11, 12; Swim Leader 1 1; Concert Band 10; 
Symphonic Wind Ensemble 11, 12; Ad Club 11, 
1 2; Wai N apolo 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2; Student Secretary 1 1 . 

MIKE ANDREWS 

Vocational Automotives 11, 12. 



176 




Kimberly Ann Antonick 



Lori Appleton 



Douglas Arbogast 



Joanne Archacki 



Teresa Aspinwall 




Dave Bak 







Todd Barnard 



James Basilone 



Daniel Bauer 




Quick. Dale hide in here' 



SHERRY ANTENORI 
Not Pictured. 

KIMBERLY ANTONICK 

Kim 

Wrestling Aide 10; Vocational Child Care 11, 12; 

Hero Club President 11, Treasurer 12. 

LORI APPLETON 

Applesap 

COE Historian 11, 12. 

DOUGLAS ARBOGAST 

JOANNE ARCHACKI 

Jo, Joey Mo 

DCT Vice-President 12; Gym Leader 11. 



TERESA ASPINWALL 

Office Aide 11, 12; Sophomore Chorus 10; Cho- 
ral Masters 1 1. 

CHRIS AUSFLUG 

Not Pictured. 

DEBORAH GAIL AUSTIN 

Debi 

Not Pictured. 

Soccer Aide 10; OWE 11, 12. 

DAVE BAK 

WILLIAM BANASZEK 

Billy 



ELIZABETH BARASH 

Lisa 

Survey 10, 11; Eucuyo 10. 1 1. 12; IQS 1 1, 12; 

NHS 1 1, 12; Powder Puff 12; Senior Class 12. 

TODD BARNARD 

Football 10, 11, 12. 

JAMES BASILONE 
Hockey 10, 11. 12. 

DANIEL BAUER 

Tennis 10; Ski Club 1 1 ; Sludenl Council 1 2; Big 
Show Orch. II; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 10. 
II. 12. 



177 



PAUL BAUER 
GARY BEADLE 
DAVID BEAL 



PHIL BENCIN 

BENITA BENEDICK 
COE 12; Vocational Art 1 1 



CONNIE BELL 

Yearbook 10; Media Aide 10; Key Club 10; Win- CHRISTINA BERARDINELLI 

ter Play 10; Sophomore Chorus 10; Choral Mas- c , Christy 

ters 11; Ski Club 10, 11; Powder Puff 12; PA. Key Club 10; Pink Panthers 11, 1 2; Library Aide 

Announcer 12; Senior Class Cabinet 12; DCT 12;' Office Aide 11, 12. 

Treasurer 12. 



TERRI BELL 
Tee 

Not Pictured. 
Office Aide 10, 11, 12. 



CATHERINE BERLAN 
Ber, "K" 

Wai Napolo 10, 11; Track Aide 10; Swim Leader 
11; Powder Puff 12. 



LISA BERZIN 

Lisie 

Sophomore Chorus 10; Choral Masters 11, 12; 

NHS 11, 12; Varsity Chorale 12; Big Show 10, 

II. 

KARL BESSELMAN 

Ski Club 10; Concert Band 10; Football II. 

MICHAEL BIELEK 
Investment Club 12. 

CHARLES BIERER 

Swimming 10; Marching Band 10, 11, 12; Stage 
Band 10, II, 12. 




Oh no! What did 1 just eat? 



Connie M. Bell 



Phil Bencin 



Benita Benedick 




Christina A. Berardinelli Catherine M. Berlan 



Lisa J. Berzin 



Karl Besselman 



Michael L. Bieiek 



178 



ANGELIQUE BLACK 
Not Pictured. 



JOY BLACK 

JoyfuL Joyce 

Powder PulT 12; Swim Timer 10. II, 12; W'mter 
Play 10, II, 12; Big Show 10, 11; Spirits 10. II. 
12; Yearbook 12; Investment Club 12; Vocational 
Stenography President 11, 12. 

MICHAEL BLACKMAN 

Not Pictured. 

MARCIE BLASE 

Powder Puff 12; Inveslmeni Club 12. 



MARK BLASE 
JEFFREY BLEIGH 

STEVEN BLEISTEIN 

Not Pictured. 



ANGELA BOKA 

Angle 

Football Trainer 10. II. 12; Wrestling Aide 10. 

11; Spirits 10. 11. 12; Ciym Leader 11; .Senior 

Class 12. 



LYNNE BLEVINS ROBERT BOKAR 

Eucuyo 10. 11. 12; Powder Puff 12; IQS 11. 12; Bob, Bokc 

NHS 11, 12; Key Club 12; Senior Class 12. Football 10, I 1. 12; Basketball 10; Baseball 10. 

11. 12; Office Aide 12; Swim Leader I I. Spirits 
TERRY BOGGS 11. 12 




Charles Neil Bierer 




Joy Marie Black 



Marcic Ann Blase 



U ' \^ 



Mark Richard Blase 




Jeffrey Bleigh 




Robert J. Bok.ir 



Ych! Sure, we'll be on The D-Jling Oame.' 



179 



CHARLES BOOMS 

Boomer 

Spirits 10, 11, 12; Student Council 
11, Vice-President 12; Office Aide 
10; Powder Puff Coach 12; P. A. 
Announcer 12; Basketball An- 
nouncer 11, 12. 

LINDA BOONE 
Sophomore Chorus 10; Choral 
Masters 11,12; Varsity Chorale 1 2; 
Office Aide 12; Eucuyo 10, 11, 12; 
IQS 11, 12; NHS 11, 12. 

RAYMOND BOOTH 

Not Pictured. 

THOMAS BORTHWICK 
Tom, Icabod, BoBo 
Hockey 10,11, 12. 

THOMAS BOSCHI 

PATRICK BOST 
Pat 

Cross Country 1 1 ; Investment Club 
12; Ski Club 12. 

ROBERT BOYD 

LINDA BOZAK 

Bo, Woodv 

Softball 10, 12;Ofnce Aide 11, 12; 

Powder Puff 12; Senior Class 12. 

DALE BOZICH 

Not Pictured. 

FAITH BOZMAN 
Not Pictured. 

JOSEPH BRADDOCK 

Joezeppi 
Not Pictured. 

JAMES BRADY 

Vocational Automotives 11, 12. 

SCOTT BRADY 

Shady 

Ski Club 10, 11; Outdoor Club 11. 

LAURA BRATINA 

Swim Timer 10, 11, 12; Wrestling 
Aide 10, 11; Track Aide 10; Spirits 
10; Student Secretary 12; Quest 12. 

JUDY BRAUN 

Marching Band 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2; AFS 1 0, 
11, 12; Powder Puff 12; Swim 
Leader 11; Symphonic Wind En- 
semble 10, 11, 12; Concert Band 

12. 

ANTHONY BREEDEN 

TIMOTHY BREEDEN 

Not Pictured. 



A Smorgasbord Of Favorites 



For the class of '81, football was a clear 
winner as the favorite sport, followed by 
baseball and basketball respectively. 
There was no real unanimous favorite for a 
band. Instead, there was a long list of var- 
ious ones. The list included such names as 
Pink Floyd. Genesis, Air Supply, the Bea- 
tles, Michael Stanley, Bruce Springsteen, 
The Who, Led Zeppelin, the Rolling 
Stones, AC-DC, and others. Favorite TV 
shows also varied. M.A.S.H. was on top, 
though, along with Dallas. Other favorite 




Charles D. Booms 



Linda Boone 




Patrick Bost 



Robert Boyd 



shows were cartoons such as Pink Panther 
and Popeye. soap operas like General Hos- 
pital and One Life to Live, news magazine 
programs like 60 Minutes and 20/20, and 
family hour shows like Eight Is Enough, 
The Dukes of Hazzard, and Love Boat. 
Clint Eastwood was the overwhelming 
choice as favorite actor. Votes for favorite 
actress, however, varied from Bo Derek to 
Miss Piggy, with no one actress dominat- 
ing the voting. 





Thomas Scott Borthwick 



»^:^ 



Thomas Boschi 




<^i^k 



Linda M. Bozak 



James W. Brady 




Scott Tiel Brady 



Judy Braun 



Anthony Breeden 



180 




Senior Smiles! 




Christopher E. Bremenour Paul David Breskvar 



Lori Brinkley 



Patricia S. Brod 




Kathryn M. Bronkall 



James H. Brown 



Kenneth Gary Brown 



Michael A. Brown 



CHRISTOPHER 

BREMENOUR 

Brem 

Football 10. 11. 12; Hockey 10. 11. 

12; Baseball 10. 

PAUL BRESKVAR 
Bresk 

LORI BRINKLEY 

Brinks 

Powder Puff 12; Vocational Clerk 

Typist 11; COE 12. 

PATRICIA BROD 

Patty 

Cheerleader iO. 11. Captain 12; 
Spirits 12; Powder Puff 12; Home- 
coming Attendant 12. 

KATHRYN BRONKALL 

Kalhy. Katie 

Library Aide 10. Student Secretary 

12; Majorette Club 10. 

JAMES BROWN 
Golf 10. 11. 12; Indoor Track II. 
1 2; Outdoor Track II. 12; Year- 
book 11. 12; Ski Club 12; Invest- 
ment Club 12; Powder Puff Cheer- 
leader 1 2; Spirits I 2. 

JOHN BROWN 
Not Pictured. 

KENNETH BROWN 

Downtown 

Football 10. II. 12; Basketball 10. 

II. 12 

MICHAEL BROWN 
Football 10. II. 12; Indoor Track 
10. II; Outdoor Track 10. II. 12; 
Wrestling 12; Spirits II. 12. 



181 



ALBERT BRUSSEE 

PASQUALE BUCCILLI 

Pat 

Ski Club 10, 11, 12; Concert Band 10. 

STACIE BUDA 

Not Pictured. 

DAVE BUDNAR 
Bud 

Wrestling 10, 11, 12. 



WILLIAM BUETTNER 



DAVID BUKOVEC 

Buk 

Outdoor Track 10, 11, 12; Indoor Track 11, 12; 

Investment Club 12; Spirits 12; Stage Band 10, 

11, 12; Powder Puff Cheerleader 12. 

NANCY BULICK 

Powder Puff 12; Vocational Art 11, 12. 

ALLEN BLiMBARGER 



Al, Bum 
Not Pictured. 

REBECCA BLRGE 
Becky 

Vocational Child Care II, 12; Hero Club Vice- 
President 11. Vice-President 12. 

TAMMY BURKE 

VINCENT BURKE 

Vince 

Hockey 10, 11, 12; Swim Leader 11. 




Tammy Burke 



Vincent Patrick Burke 



HELP!! 



182 



KENNETH BURTON 

Fish 

Marching Band 10, 

JEANNE RUSHER 

Swim Leader 1 1 ; Swim Timer 12; Choral Masters 

12; Wai Napolo 10, 11, president 12. 

THERESE CALABRESE 

Not Pictured. 

kATHI CALLAHAN 

LINDA CALLAHAN 

Ski Club 10; AFS II, 12; Big Show 11; NHS 11. 
12; Yearbook 10; Media Aide 10; Office Aide 10, 
12; Senior Class 12. 

BRIAN CAMPBELL 

Indoor Track 10; Ski Club 10; Swim Leader I 1; 



Senior Class Cabinet 12; Office Aide 12; Wai 
Napolo Comedy Crew 11; Investment Club 12; 
Powder Puff Cheerleader 12. 

CAROL CAMPBELL 

Basketball 10, 11. 12; Softball 10. 11, 12;GLC 
11, 12; Ad Club 11. 12; Powder Puff 12; Student 
Council 12. 

LOUIS J. CAPASSO 

Butch 

Not Pictured. 

Football 10, 11. 12; Wrestling 10. 11, 12. 

JOHN CAPRETTA 

Woody 

Not Pictured. 

JEANNINE CARLO 

Majorette Club 10; Majorette 11, Captain 12; 



Office Aide 12; Language Lab Aide 10. 

BRIAN CARNEY 

MARYANN CARNEY 
Not Pictured. 

JAMES CATER 

Jim 

Big Show 10; Kail Play 11; Varsity Chorale 11. 

12; Science Seminar 10, II; Swim Leader 12; 

Senior Cla.ss 12; Investment Club 12. 

KATHERINE CAVAN 

Katie 

Sophomore Chorus 10; Choral Masters 11, 12; 

Swim Timer 11, 12; Junior Class 11; Ski Club II 

12; Powder Puff 12. 

MARK CEBRON 




Kenneth Neil Burton 




Jeanne Busher 



Kathi Callahan 



Linda Jean Callahan 



Brian Campbell 




James Cater 



Kalherine Cav.m 



Mark Cebron 



Throw a coin in my mouth; she'll dance and Til pla>. 



183 




Toni J. Chanakas 



Carol Ann Chase Timothy M. Christianson 



Gina Cirino 



Thomas Clasen 



MARK CEFARATTI 
Cef, Rat 
Wrestling 10, II. 

ROBERT CEK 

Not Pictured. 



ANNE CERER 
Swim Timer 10. 1 
Club 12. 



Swim Team 10, 11, 12; Ski 



NICHOLAS CETINSKY 

MICHAEL CHAMPA 

Investment Club 12. 



TONI CHANAKAS 
Powder Puff 12. 

CAROL CHASE 

Little Todd 

Key Club 10, 11, 12; Yearbook 10; Track Aide 
10, 11, 12; Powder Puff 12; Sophomore Chorus 
10; Choral Masters 12; Vocational Data Process- 
ing Vice-President 11, Historian 12. 

KEVIN CHERNE 

Not Pictured. 

TIMOTHY CHRISTIANSON 

Tut 

Baseball 10, 11, 12; Indoor Track 10; NHS II, 

12. 



GEORGE CINDRIC 

Not Pictured. 

GINA CIRINO 

Ad Club 12; Powder Puff 12. 

THOMAS CLASEN 

KELLY CLEVENGER 

GARY COLLINS 

Student Council 10; Winter Festival Attendant 
10; Survey 10, II; Sophomore Class 10; Junior 
Class Cabinet 1 1 ; Senior Class Cabinet 1 2; N HS 
II, 12; Powder Puff Cheerleader 1 2; Media Aide. 



184 




Kelly Clevenger 



Gary J Collins 



Joseph Colo 



Bryan Combs 



Darlene Conrad 




Mark Cowling 






Lorna Coyne 


John Cozart 


I've had more exciting days! 


JOSEPH COLO 










COLLEEN CORRIGAN 


11, 12; Wai Napolo 11, 12; Senior Class 12; Wa- 


Greasy Joe 












ter Polo Aides 10, 11, 12. 


Wrestling 10, 11, 12. 










MICHAEL COTTER 

Mac 


JOHN COZART 


BRYAN COMBS 










Yearbook 10, 11, 12; Marching Band 10; Indoor 




Bucky 










Track 12; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 10; Junior 
Class 11; Varsity Chorale 12; Big Show 11; Ski 


ANDREW CUNNINGHAM 

Not Pictured. 


DARLENE CONRAD 










Club 12; Choral Masters 12; Powder Puff Cheer- 




Big Show 10, 11; Swim 


Lead 


er 


11; 


Office Aide 


leader 12; Wai Napolo Comedy Crew 11. 




12; Powder Puff 12; Fall Play 


II: 


; Choral Masters 






11, 12; P. A. Announcer 


12. 








MARK COWLING 




TAMARA CORBRAN 










LORNA COYNE 




Tammy 










Swim Team 10, 11. 12; Swim Timer 10. II. 12; 




Vocational Art 11, 12. 










Spirits 10, II, 12; Investment Club 12; Ad Club 





185 



KEN CURTIS 
Bowling Club 10, 

J. BRAD DALLOS 

Soccer 10, 11. 


DANIEL DANZINGER 

SUSAN DAVIDSON 

Yearbook 10; Tennis 10, 11, 12;Spirits 10, 11, 12; 
Powder Puff 12; Sophomore Class 10; Senior 


DONNA DAWSON 

Vocational Accounting 11, 12. 

JOHN DEA 
John Doe 


DAVID D'AMICO 


Class 12. 


EILEEN DELEHANTY 


Not Pictured. 
GREG D'AMICO 


WAYNE DAVIS 

Not Pictured. 


KELLY DEZELON 


GARY DANOLFO 
Media Aide 10. 


ILONA DAW 

Not Pictured. 


TINA DIBACCO 

Fall Play 12; Winter Play 11, 12. 




For some reason, I don't believe him! 



Gary J. Danolfo 



Daniel Lee Danzinger 



Susan Davidson 





£^^ 




Donna Dawson 



John Dea 



Eileen Delehanty 



Kelly Dezelon 



Tina DiBacco 



186 



TODD DICKARD 


LAURA DOWNS 




Swim Team 10, II, \2: Swim Leader 1 1; Invest- 


Downs 


DOUGLAS DROBNICK 


ment Club 12. 


HOPE DOYLE 


Golf 10, 11, 12. 


MAUREEN DOHERTY 


Softball 10; COE President 12; investment Club 


KATHLEEN DRLRY 




12; Swim Leader II, Powder Puff 1 2; Spirits 12; 


Kathy 




Vocational Stenography Treasurer 1 1 . 


AES 10, II, 12; Student Council II, 12: Junior 


ANNA DOVIC 




Class Cabinet II; Senior Class 12; Big Show 10. 


Annie 


HEIDI DRAXLER 


II, 12; Powder Puff 12; Spirits 10, II, 12. 


NHS II, 12; PA, Announcer 12; Senior Class 


Student Council II, 1 2; Junior Class Cabinet II; 




1 2; Choral Masters 1 1 ; Student Secretary II, 12; 


Sophomore Class 1 0; Big Show 1 0, 1 1 ; Spirits 1 0, 


BRETT DUBECKY 


Big Show 10; Powder Puff 12. 


II, 12; Powder Puff 12; Senior Class 12. 


Vocational Automotives II, 12 




Todd A. Dickard Maureen Doherty 



Anna Maria Dovic 



Laura Downs 



Hope Rene' Doyle 




Kathleen L. Drur 



Brett D Dubeckv 



U'c stick together! 



187 



KATHLEEN DUFFY 

Duff 

Spirits 10. 11. 12; Junior Class 

Cabinet 11; Cheerleading 10, 11. 

12; Powder Puff 12. 

KELLY DUNLEVY 

MIKE DURBIN 

Soccer 10, 11. 12; Ski Club 12; 
Spirits 12; Big Show 11; Yearbook 
11, 12; Powder Puff Cheerleader 
12; Varsity Chorale 12. 

DAN DUREIKO 

Dandy 

Tennis 10. 

CHARLES DURST 

DAVID DZOMBA 

ERIC ECKER 

Eck 

Track 10; Survey 12; Powder Puff 

Coach 12- 

JAMES EDER 
Ede's 

Basketball 10; Baseball 10. 11. 12; 
Golf 10, II. 12; Ski Club 12; Pow- 
der Puff Coach 12; Close Up 12. 

DAWN EHRHART 

Survey 10. 11, 12; Choral Masters 
II, 12; NHS 11, 1 2; Cross Country 
Aide 10, 11; Fall Play II. 12; Win- 
ter Play II. 1 2; Big Show 1 1 ; Spir- 
its 10, 11; Track Aide 10; Office 
Aide 12; Sophomore Class 10. 

ROBERT ELLENBEST 
EB 

Basketball 10; Baseball 10. 11. 12. 

VINCENT ELLUL 

ERNEST ELSHAW 
Ernie 




Kathleen Ann Duffy 




He did it!!! 




Kelly Dunlevy 




Charles Durst 



David Dzomba 





Mike Durbin 




Dan Dureiko 



^^4^ 




Eric Joseph Ecker 



James Robert Eder 




Dawn Ehrhart 



Robert M. Ellenbest 



Vincent Ellul 



Ernest Elshaw 



188 




Catch that Senior Spirit!!! 




Teresa Erhardt 



John A. Eros 



Gina Marie Evans 



Jane Ann Evans 




Debra L. Faight 



James Fakult 



Janet Faragov 



Mary Lynn Fasham 



TERESA ERHARDT 

JOHN EROS 

Fall Play II. 12; Winter Play 10. 
11. 12; Big Show 10. U; Choral 
Masters 11.12; Varsity Chorale 1 1 . 
12; PA. Announcer 12; Powder 
Puff Cheerleader 12; Survey 10. 
II, 12; Swim Leader II; Wai Na- 
polo Comedy Crew II; NHS II. 
12. 

GINA EVANS 

Track 10; Cheerleader 12; Wres- 
tling Aide 10. II; Track Manager 
I I. 12; Gymnastics 10; Swim Lead- 
er 1 1; Gym Leader 1 1. 

JANE EVANS 

Bird 

Track 10. 11. 12; Spirits 12; Office 

Aide II. 

DEBRA FAIGHT 
Debbie 

Track Aide 10; Vocalionai Stenog- 
raphy Vice-President 1 1 , Secretary 
12; Investmeni Club 12. 

JAMES FAKULT 

Jim 

Marching Band 10. It; Golf 10. 

JANET FARAGOV 
"J" 

Vocalionai Stenography 1 1 . Secre- 
tary 12; Investment Club 12. 

MARY LYNN FASHAM 
Vocational Stenography II. 12: 
Nurse's Aide 12: Investmeni Club 
12. 



189 



KEITH FAZIO 
Faz 

DAVE FEDAKOWSKl 

Fed 

Yearbook 1 0; Swim Team 1 1 , 1 2; Water Polo 1 2; 

Swim Leader I I. 

PHILIPPE FELDMANN 
AFS 12, 



KENNETH FERLITO 

Kenlon, Fr, Ling, Kenny 

Varsity Chorale II, 12; Choral Masters II. 12; 

Sophomore Chorus 1 0; Big Show 1 0. 1 1 ; Fall Play 

1 1; Winter Play II, 12; Powder Puff Cheerleader 

12; P. A. Announcer 12; Sophomore Class 10; 

Senior Class 1 2. 

DENISE FETKO 
Fet 



Swim Team 10; Swim Timer 10, 11, 12; Sopho- 
more Chorus 10; Choral Masters 12; Winter Play 
1 0, 1 1 ; Investment Club 12; Vocational Stenogra- 
phy Treasurer II, 12. 



SHARON FIKE 

Fike-Face 

NHS II, 12; Track 10; Ski Club 1 2; Junior Class 

11. 




Denise Fetko 



Sharon L. Fike 



I'm just hanging around!!! 



190 



TRACY FIORELLI 

Basketball 10. II, 12; Track 10, II, 12; Ad Club 
11, 12; Investment Club 12; Powder Puff 12. 

CHRISTOPHER FITZPATRICK 
Fitz 

RICHARD FLECK 
Not Pictured. 



Indoor Track 10. II, 12; Outdoor Track 10 II 

12. 

STEVEN FLECK 

La Machine 

Cross Country 10, II, 12; Indoor Track 10, II, 
12; Outdoor track 10, 11, 12; Sophomore Class 
10; Junior Class 11; Senior Class 12; Spirits 10, 
II, 12; Swim Leader II; Gym Leader 10. 12; 
Powder Puff Coach 12; Nurse's Aide 11. 



BETINA FORMAN 
Powder Puff 12. 

FRED FOSKEY 

Fosk 

Baseball 10; Spirits 10, II, 12. 




Tracy A. Fiorelli 



Christopher Robert 
Fitzpatrick 




Steven Fleck 



Betina Foreman 



Fred Foskey 



A Class In 'Quest' Of Answers 







3%^*»^. 





The Quest class, headed by Mrs. 
Jagger, is a program to help students 
to learn to cope with personal prob- 
lems. Included in this class are such 
areas of study as self-concept, feel- 
ings, attitudes, friends, family, mar- 
riage, parenting, money, careers, and 
philosophy. This is an elective course 
taught for half a year with a limit of 
20 students per class, and it is for 
seniors only. To enter this course, 
students had to apply to their coun- 
selors. The counselors, Mrs. Smith, 
and Mrs. Jagger, the teacher of the 
Quest class, then looked over their 
records and applications for students 
who were genuinely interested in the 
course, not those who wanted an easy 
credit. 



Quest class members had to nil out an application and submit to an interview before being selected for the class. 



191 




Colleen Murphy tries out her Halloween costume. 



Wayne Frimel 



Nelson Fulton 




Nick Fussell 



Susan Gallagher 



Robert Gallo 



Mary Galloway 



SANDRA FRANK 

Student Secretary 12; Nurse's Aide 12; Powder 
Puff 1 2; Key Club 1 0; Spirits 1 0, 1 1 ; Ski Club 1 0, 
11,12; Swim Timer 10; Close Up 1 2; Vocational 
Stenography 11, Treasurer 12. 

NATALIE FRATTIN 

Powder Puff 1 2; Investment Club 1 2; COE Histo- 
rian 12. 



WAYNE FRIMEL 



NELSON FULTON 

NICK FUSSELL 
Wrestling 11; DECA 12. 

DAVID GAFFNEY 

Not Pictured. 

SUSAN GALLAGHER 

Sue 

Wrestling Aide 10, 11; Powder Puff 12; Spirits 

10, 11, 12; Investment Club 12. 



Marc Garland 



ROBERT GALLO 

Roberto 

Basketball 10, 11; Spirits 10, 11, 12. 

MARY GALLOWAY 

Basketball 10; Student Council 12; Powder Puff 

12. 

MARC GARLAND 

Soccer 10, 11, 12. 



192 




Charlene M. Gole 



Charles Gole 



This locker contains top-secret matter; hands Offl 



SCOTT GENCOPE 

Indoor Track 12. 

RONALD GIELINK 
Not Pictured. 

JOHN GILROY 
Dr. Phibes 

LAURA GIUNTA 
Office Aide 10, 11. 

SALVATORE GIUNTA 

DONALD GLASER 

Glase 

Basketball 10, 11. 

JOHN GLEASON 
Jay 

Soccer 10, 11. 



GARY CLICK 
Not Pictured, 

JOHN GLICKEN 

Not Pictured. 



MITCHELL BRIAN GLICKEN 

Mickey 

Not Pictured. 

Sophomore Class 10; Student Council 11, 12, 



EDWARD GLOVER 

Not Pictured. 



MARY GLOVER 

Office Aide 12; Investment Club 12- Library 

Aide II. •' 



TIM GOLDEN 

Swim Team 10; Swim Leader 1 1; Vocational Au- 
tomotives 11, 12. 

CHARLENE GOLE 

Golebird, Charcoal 

Ad Club 10, 11; Ski Club 10, 11; Sophomore 
Class 10; Junior Class Cabinet 11; Senior Class 
1 2; Track Aide 1 0; G LC 1 1 ; DEC A President 1 2, 

CHARLES GOLE 

Dave 

Golf 10, II, 12. 

ROBERT GOLOB 

Rob 

NHS 11, 12; Golf II, 12. 



193 



JIM GORDON 

Wrestling 10, 11, 12; Concert Band 10; Marching 
Band 10. 

JAMES GORJUP 

Not Pictured. 

DARRYL GRAUS 

Not Pictured. 

SHEWONNA GRAY 
OEA 11, 12. 

THOMAS GREEN 

JEFFERY A. GRIFFIN 
Griff 



Not Pictured. 
Orchestra 10, 11, 12. 



JOHN GRIGSBY 

Radio Club 10, 11, 12; Key Club 12. 

DORENE GROSEL 

Swim Timer 1 1 ; Spirits 1 1 , 1 2; Ad Club 12; Pow- 
der Puff 12. 

ERIC GROUDLE 

DALE GRUBB 
Big D 

Marching Band 10,11,12; Stage Band 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2; 
Symphonic Wind Ensemble 11, 12; Pep Band 10, 



1 1, 12; NHS 1 1, 12; Concert Band 10; Yearbook 
10, 11; Big Show Orch. 11. 

FERMIN GUARDIOLA-MADERA 

AFS 12; Tennis 12. 

HEIDI GUNDELACH 

Not Pictured. 

JOHN HABAT 

RONALD HALE 

DIANE HAMILTON 

Hammy 

Vocational Clerk Typist 11, Secretary 12. 




I'll become an author if he believes this story! 



John Gngsby 



Dorene Marie Grosel 



Eric Groudle 






Dale Grubb 



Fermin Guardiola Madera 



John Habat 



Ronald Hale 



Diane L. Hamilton 



194 



ANDREW HAMMAR 








Dave, Rimis 


JAMES HARCHAR 


NANCY HANCOVSKY 


Football 10, 11; Powder Puff Cheerleader 12; 


Harch, Jim, Perkins 




Swim Leader 11; Gym Leader 11; Wai Napolo 


Swim Leader 11, 12. 


MICHAEL HANDFORD 


Comedy Crew 1 1; Ski Club 12; Investment Club 




Mike 


12; Winter Play 12; Fall Play 12; Big Show 11; 
Sophomore Class 10. 


KEITH HART 


DWIGHT HANEY 




PATRICK HARTH 


Football 10, 11, 12. 


LORI HANSON 






Wai Napolo 10, 11, 12; Swim Leader 11; Ad 


JOHN JOSEPH HARWOOD 


DAVID HANSON 


Club 12; Spirits 12; Powder Puff 12. 


Not Pictured. 




^ ^ Ef^V 



mk^M^M 




Andrew Hammar 



Nancy Hancovsky 



Michael Handford 



Dwight Haney 



David Hanson 




Keith Hart 



Patrick Harth 



Santa Pritch checks his gift list with an elf 



195 



JUDITH HASSE 
Jude 

Marching Band 10, U, 12; Pep 
Band 10, 11, 12; Stage Band 10, 11, 
12; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 10, 
11, 12; AFS 11, 12; Yearbook 11, 
1 2; Office Aide 1 2; Big Show Orch. 
10, 11. 

JACK HEASLEY 

JEFF HEGEDUS 

DANIEL HEIMBERGER 

Not Pictured. 

LEYTON HEMMERT 
Space 

CHRISTOPHER HEPP 

Not Pictured- 

CHRISTOPHER HERNAN 

SUSAN HICKEY 

Sue 

Swim Leader 11; Swim Team 10, 

11,12; Wai Napolo 11, 12; Powder 

Puff 12; NHS 11, 12; Spirits 12. 

LEE ANNE HICKS 

Lou 

Office Aide 12; Vocational Clerk 

Typist 11, 12. 

PATRICIA HILL 

Patty 

Football Trainer 10, 11, 12; Spirits 

10, 11, 12; Basketball Trainer 10, 

11, 12; Junior Class Cabinet 11; 
NHS II, 12; Powder Puff 12; Stu- 
dent Council President 12; Senior 
Class 12. 

MICHELLE HINKO 

Gymnastics 10; NHS 11, 12. 

JEFFREY HOGAN 

Jeffro 

Swim Team 10, II, 12; Ski Club 

10, II, 12; Investment Club 12. 

LORRAINE HONE 

Lorrie 

Wrestling Aide 1 0; Swim Timer 1 1 ; 

Powder Puff 12. 

WILLIAM HONGOSH 



Seniors Prove To Be A Spirited Bunch 



Although school is primarily a place for 
study, it is also a place for enrichment in 
other areas. Extracurricular activities, such 
as sports and clubs, give a school that little 
extra which makes it a happier and more 
lively place to be. Through involvement in 
these activities, school spirit and pride are 
generated. Signs of this involvement range 
from the wearing of a jacket with the school's 
name on it to attending school functions. To 
check on the spirit of the class of 1 98 1 , sever- 
al senior homerooms were asked questions 
relating to these areas. 

The longer an individual attends schools in 



a certain area, the higher the chances that he 
will exhibit school spirit. Our poll found that 
63% of EHS seniors had attended Euclid 
Public Schools from kindergarten through 
the 12th grade. Other questions related di- 
rectly to school spirit were also asked. For 
example, 49% of the seniors questioned said 
that they owned a varsity coat or Euclid jack- 
et. 46% had attended at least one dance at 
EHS. 55% said that they generally went to 
school sporting events. 

From the above statistics, one can only 
conclude that the class of '8 1 was a spirited 
bunch. 




Judith Anne Hasse 



Jack Heasley 



Jeff Hegedus 



Leyton James Hemmert 




Christopher Hernan 



Susan Hickey 



Lee Anne Hicks 



Patricia Ann Hill 




Michelle M. Hinko Jeffrey Robert Hogan 



Lorraine Hone 



William Hongosh 



196 




There must be something quite strong under us!! 





Bethany Hook 



Joy Hoon 



Michael Horabik 



Richard Horton 




Daniel Horvat 



Peter James Hosa 



Franiv Hribar 



Valerie Hrobat 



BETHANY HOOK 
Beth 

Tennis 10, U. 12; Ski Club 11. 12 
Yearbook 11. 12; Swim Leader 11 
Cheerleader 10; Powder Puff 12 
NHS 11. 12; Sophomore Class 10; 
Junior Class Cabinet II; Senior 
Class Cabinet 12; Orchestra 10. 12; 
Big Show Orch. 10; Big Show 11; 
Nurse's Aide 10. 11. 

JOY HOON 

Yearbook 12; Powder Puff 12; 
GLC 11; Student Secretary 12; 
Nurse's Aide 10, II. 

MICHAEL HORABIK 

RICHARD HORTON 

DANIEL HORVAT 



PETER HOSA 

Moss Man 
.Astronomy Club 1 1. 



12. 



FRANK HRIBAR 

Football 10. II. 12; Indoor Track 
10; Outdoor Track 10; Senior Class 
Cabmet 12; Powder Puff Cheer- 
leader 12; Lettermen Club 11. 12. 

VALERIE HROBAT 

Yearbook 12; Vocational Cosme- 
tology 1 1 . 



197 



SUSAN HROMYKO 

Sue 

Football Trainer 10, 11, 12; Basketball Trainer 

10, 11, 12; Junior Class Cabinet ll;Spirits 10, 11, 

12; Powder Puff 12; Senior Class 12. 

JAMES HUBBARD 
Hubs 

DOUG HUFNAGLE 
Huf 



STEVEN HURSHMAN 

Vocational Art 11, 12. 

TINA HUTTON 

BEV lAFELICE 

Majorette Club 10; Majorette 11, 12. 

MARY IVANCIC 

Mare, Wiggle, Merf 

Powder Puff 12; Spirits 10; Office Aide 12. 



NANCY IVANCIC 

Track 10, 11; Powder Puff 12; Vocational Data 

Processing Treasurer 11, 12. 

TODD IVANCIC 

Wrestling 10. 

ROBERT JAKOVLIC 

Not Pictured. 
Vocational Art 11, 12. 




Susan Marie Hromyko James H. Hubbard 



Doug Hufnagle 



Steven Matthew 
Hurshman 



Go Away! We don't talk to strangers. 



Nancy Ivancic 



Tina Hutton 




Todd John Ivancic 



198 



VYTAUTAS JAKUBAUSKAS 

Vyt's 


JEFFREY JAROSCAK 




LINDA JOHNS 


TONI JAMISON 

Peanut 


Jeff 

Golf 10, 11, 12; Key Club 10; Swim 


Team 10, II, 


Not Pictured. 


Investment Club 12; Vocational Clerk Typist 11, 
Vice-President 12. 


12; Swim Leader 11, 12, 
JIM JAZBEC 




RICHARD JOHNSON 

Rick 


ANITA JANKOWSKI 

Basketball 10; Softball 10; Survey 10; Vocational 

Data Processing 11, 12. 


DAVE JERINA 

Spirits II, 12; Ski Club 11, 12. 




SCOTT JOHNSON 
VAN JOHNSON 


RONALD JANOSKY 
Ron 


GEORGE JOHNS 

Not Pictured, 




Football 12; Investment Club 12. 
CATHY JONES 




Vytautas Jakubauskas 



Jim Jazbec 




Toni Jamison 



Dave Jerina 




Anita J. Jankowski 




Richard Eric Johnson 




Ronald 


Janosky 


Jeffrey J. Jar 

m 


oscak 


r^PI 


1 fl||^l 


m^i 




y 


ftsm 


11 


J^HK" '^^^^^^1 


r 


.^^^^B^^^^^^^^M 



Scott Johnson 



Van Johnson 



Cathy A. Jones 



We do anything to get out of class! 



199 




Beth Mabel, Linda Boone, and Jim Cater warm up for a performance. 



Martin Jones 



Perry Jordan 




Tony Kalar 


Mike S. Kalka Michael Kaselonis 


Keith Keal Kathleen Kehn 


HELEN JONES 


Cross Country 10, 11, 12; Indoor Track 11, 12; 
Outdoor Track 12; Spirits 10, 1 1, 12; Gym Lead- 


KEITH KEAL 


JULIA JONES 


er 12; Library Aide 12. 


RANDY KEENE 


Julie 


TONY KALAR 


Not Pictured. 


MARTIN JONES 


MIKE KALKA 


KATHLEEN KEHN 


PERRY JORDAN 






P.J. 


MICHAEL KASELONIS 





200 




Christine Keller 



Kevin A. Kelly 



Christine Kernz 



Dyanne King 



John Kisthardt 




Rudy Knaus 



Christopher Knight 



Frank Kobetitsch 



Hi Mom!!! 



CHRISTINE KELLER 

Christ! 

KEVIN KELLY 

Stage Band 10. 1 1. 12; Marching Band 10, 1 1. 12; 
Concert Band 1 1; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 10. 
II, 12; AFS 12; Pep Band 11; Big Show 10. 

TATIJANA KERESTES 
Not Pictured. 

CHRISTINE KERNZ 

Chris 

Powder Puff 12; Nurse's Aide 12. 

DYANNE KING 



ROBERT KINKOFF 

Not Pictured. 

JOHN KISTHARDT 

Jam 

Choral Masters 1 2; Investment Club 1 2; Fall Play 

1 2; Winter Play 1 2; Powder Puff Cheerleader 1 2. 

RAYMOND KLIMAS 
Ray 

Vocational Automolives 11, 12. 

SHARON KNACK 
Hooter 

Ski Club 10, 11; Spirits 10; Key Club 10; Voca- 
tional Art 11, 12. 



KAREN KNAUS 
Naus 

Swim Team 10; Spirits 10, 11, 12; Sophomore 
Class 10; Football Aide 11; Vocational Account- 
ing President 1 1. 

RUDY KNAUS 

Vocational Automolives 11, 12. 

CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT 

Caesar 

Hockey 10, 11, 12; Football 10. 11; Investment 

Club 12; Powder Puff Coach 12. 

FRANK KOBETITSCH 



201 



JULIE KOENIG 
BEVERLY KOHLER 
JAMES KORDICH 

TIMOTHY KORYNOSKI 

Media Aide 10, 1 1; Radio Club 10; Concert Band 
10; Lab Assistant 12. 

JOHN KOSIR 

JEFFREY KOSMETOS 



GREGORY KOVAC 

Not Pictured. 

ED KOVELAN 

Ski Club 12; AFS 11. 

SANDRA KOZEL 

MARTIN KRAIG 

Not Pictured. 



MICHEAL KRAIG 

Not Pictured. 

RICHARD KRAINCE 
JOAN KRECKAL 

ANGELA KRIZANOVIC 

Gymnastics 10. 




Let me put it this way 



Timothy Korynoski 



John Kosir 



Jeffrey Kosmetos 




.L\^ y^.^y-- 



Ed Kovelan 



Sandra Kozel 



Richard Kraince 



Joan Kreckal 



Angela H. Krizanovic 



202 



JUDITH KRNC : 


DAVID KUl.BICKAS 


DARYL LANGMAN 


Judy. KrucKrunch 


Not Pictured. 


Football 10, 11, 12. 


Yearbook 10, 11, 12; Tennis 10, 11, 12; Powder 






Puff 12; NHS 11, I2;GLC 11. 12; Survey 10, 11, 


PAUL KURILLA 


MARK LANTZ 


12; Softball 10, 1 1; Big Show Orch. 11; Concert 


Not Pictured. 




Band 10; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 11, 12; 




CONNIE LARABEE 


Marching Band 10, 11, 12. 


ERIC LADOVICH 


Not Pictured. 


MARK KROFINA 


PATRICK LAMONT 


KAREN LARSON 


Marching Band 10; Concert Band 10; Outdoor 


Not Pictured. 


Not Pictured. 


Track 11. 








HEATHER LANE 


DEBl LASKA 


LISA KUHEN 


Not Pictured. 


Powder Puff 12; COE Vice-President 12. 


Cheerleader 10, 1 1; Office Aide 10; Senior Class 






Cabinet 12; Powder Puff 12 


PAUL LANGDON 


RICHARD LATKOWSKI 




Judith A. Krnc 



Mark Krofina 



Lisa Kuhen 



Eric Ladovich 



Paul Langdon 




Daryl Langman 



Mark Lantz 





Debi Laska 



Richard Latkowski 



Al Peklay gives Patty Brod some help with her jump rope. 



203 



MILTON LAU 
AFS 12;Soccer 12. 

STEVEN LAUSIN 
Steve 

Crosscountry 10; Fall Play 10, 11, 
12; Winter Play 10. 11, 12; Big 
Show 10, 1 1; Outdoor Club 1 1; In- 
vestment Club 12; Yearbook 11, 
12; Sophomore Chorus 10; Choral 
Masters 11,12; Media Aide 11, 12; 
Spirits 12; Junior Class 1 1; Sopho- 
more Class 10; Senior Class 12; 
Student Council 10, 11, 12. 

LINDA LAWRENCE 

Volleyball 10, 11, 12; Track 10, 11, 
12; Yearbook 10, 11, 12; Sopho- 
more Class 10; Junior Class Cabi- 
net 11; Senior Class 12; GLC 11; 
Powder Puff 12; Wai Napolo 10; 
Ski Club 12; NHS 11, 12; IQS 11, 
12. 

LAURA LEE LEDONNE 

Laurie 

Not Pictured. 

Softball 10; Office Aide 11. 

DEREK LEONARD 
Not Pictured. 

GARY LESNICK 

DOUGLAS LEU 

Dougie 

Football 10, 11, 12; Big Show 11 

Wai Napolo Comedy Crew 1 1 

Swim Leader 11; NHS 11, 12 

Powder Puff Coach 12; Yearbook 

10, 11, 12. 

JOSEPH LEWARSKI 

Joe 

Football 10, 11, 12; Outdoor Track 

10, 11, 12; Spirits 12. 

LISA LIGHTCAP 

Not Pictured. 

JOSE' LIMA 
Soccer 10, 11, 12. 

MARGARET LINN 
Peggy, Leggy Pinn, Thumper 
Swim Team 10, 11; Marching Band 
10, 11, 12; Yearbook 12; Powder 
Puff 12. 

CHRISTINE LOGAN 

Chris 

Vocational Accounting 11, 12; 

OEA 11, 12; Office Aide 10. 

SUZANNE LOKAR 

Sue 

Vocational Stenography 11, 12; 

NHS 11, 12; Eucuyo 11, 12; Key 

Club 12. 

CHRISTOPHER LONG 

Not Pictured. 

MARC LOPRESTI 

Wrestling 11; Football 11; Swim 
Leader 11; Ski Club 12. 



KIM LORBER 

Bo 

Volleyball 10,11, 12; Spirits 10, 11; 

Softball 10; Track 11; Powder Puff 

12. 

LAURIE LUCAS 
Not Pictured. 




Jeannine Carlo and Bev lafelice brave the winter winds. 




Milton Lau 



Steven Lausin 



Linda Lawrence 



Gary Lesnick 




Douglas A. Leu 



Joseph S. Lewarski 



Jose' S. Lima 



Margaret Rose Linn 




Christine A. Logan 



Suzanne M. Lokar 



Marc LoPresti 



Kim Lorber 



204 




Would you believe we're really 3 wild and crazy guys in disguise? 




Steven Mackanos 



EUGENE LUCCI 

Tennis 10. 

JUDITH LYNCH 

Judy 

Gymnastics 10; OEA VicePresi- 

dent 12. 

BETH MABEL 

Big Show 10, 11; APS II, 12; Stu- 
dent Council 12; Varsity Chorale 
12; NHS II, 12; Swim Timer 10, 
11, 12; Junior Class Cabinet II. 

ILONA MACIEJAUSKAS 

STEVEN MACKANOS 

Mac 

Golf 10; Hockey 10. II, 12. 

KAREN MACKELL 

Marching Band 10; Pink Panthers 

12. 

ROBERT MAGRUDER 

Bob 

OWE II, 12. 

DUNCAN MAITLAND 

Water Polo 1 1 ; Swim Team 1 1 ; Ski 

Club 10, II, 12. 

SHARON MAKELA 

Not Pictured. 

JOHN MALANEY 
Not Pictured. 

PATRICK TIMOTHY 

MALANEY 

Pugs 

Not Pictured. 

FootballlO, II; Student Council 

II. 



205 



MICHAEL MALONE 
DEBBIE MANASSA 
MARIA MANIGLIA 



DAVID MANNELLO 

Dave 

Football 10, 11, 12; Investment Club 12. 



STEVEN MARINKOV 
CARL MARKEL 




Steven Marinkov 



Carl Markel 



Meet my friend from the past; the Greek Mathematician, EUCLID! 



206 



SUSAN MARKIEWICZ 

Sue. Susie 

Vocational Child Care 11, 12; Hero Club 11, 

President 12. 

VESNA MARKON 

Ves 

Student Secretary 10, 11, 12; Eucuyo 11, 12; 

OEA 11, 12. 



EDWARD MAROLI 

Azog 

Yearbook 11, 12; Student Council 12; Wargame 

Club 10, 11, 12. 

MARK MAROLT 

Soccer 10, 11, 12; Hockey 10, 11, 12. 



ERIC MARK 

Not Pictured. 

DENISE MARTIN 

Powder Puff 12; Spirits 10; Nurse's Aide 12; 

Vocational Clerk Typist Treasurer 11, 12. 





A%^M 




Susan Marie Markiewicz Vesna Marie Markon 



Edward D. Maroli 



Mark Marolt 



Denise Martin 



Seniors Express Opinions 
On National Issues 



The 1980-81 school year will be re- 
membered by Euclid High School sen- 
iors for various reasons. Some will re- 
member the parties; some will remem- 
ber the teachers, homework, and tests; 
some will remember the nights at 
McDonalds after a sporting event, and 
some will want to remember nothing. 
But most seniors will remember that 
1980 was an election year and begin- 
ning of a new decade in which many 
controversial issues were faced and de- 
cided. These issues ranged from the de- 
bate over the Equal Rights Amend- 
ment, to the revival of the military 
draft, to the possibility of gasoline ra- 
tioning. To get the opinions of EHS 
seniors about these subjects, a survey 
was given to several senior homerooms 
at the beginning of the school year. 
Although only a few seniors could or 



actually did vote in the 1980 Presiden- 
tial election, most of them were prob- 
ably unhappy with the results, based on 
the answers of seniors surveyed before 
election day. When asked to indicate 
for whom they would vote for Presi- 
dent, only 11% answered Ronald Rea- 
gan, who won the actual election by a 
landslide. Interestingly, 45% said that 
they would vote for neither Reagan, 
Carter, or Anderson, mirroring the gen- 
eral apathy of the American public for 
the candidates in the 1980 election. 

On the issues of the Equal Rights 
Amendment and gasoline rationing, 
seniors were unified in their opinions. 
79% voted against the idea of the gov- 
ernment regulating gasoline consump- 
tion. 73% were in favor of passing the 
Equal Rights Amendment. 



Seniors has some interesting opinions 
on an issue that was, perhaps, closest to 
their hearts — the military draft of 19 
year olds. Only 35% were in favor of 
such a policy. However, if a draft law 
H'ere passed, 60% of the seniors felt that 
women should also be eligible for it. 

Since many states already require 
high school students to pass a compe- 
tency test of basic skill before they can 
receive their high school diplomas, we 
asked EHS seniors if Ohio should adopt 
such a test. Surprisingly. 58% felt that a 
competency test should be required. 

These were the opinions of some of 
the class of 1981. Now, they will go on 
to join the rest of the voting public, and 
only time will tell the outcome of these 
issues. 



207 




How would you like some ice cream on your camera? 



Irene Marie Masera 



Bill Mason 





Judy Mast 



\ 



Frank R. Mataraza 




Nancy Matoh 



MICHELLE MARTIN 
Powder Puff 12. 

CINDY MASCARO 

Cin, Skinny 

Powder Puff 12; Vocational Art 11, 12. 

IRENE MASERA 
Reen 

Powder Puff 12. 

BILL MASON 
Zschaz 



Yearbook 11, 12; Eucuyo 12; AFS 10, 11, 12; 
NHS 11, 12; IQS 11; Science Seminar 10. 

JUDY MAST 

Tennis 10, 1 1, 12; Sophomore Class 10; Ski Club 
10, 11, 12; Spirits 10, 11; Track 10, 11,12; Pow- 
der Puff 12; Junior Class 11; Senior Class 12. 

FRANK MATARAZA 
Investment Club 12. 

NANCY MATOH 

Sophomore Class 1 0; Wrestling Aide 1 0, 1 1 ; Spir- 




klt^ 



Stanley Matras 



Brian Matthews 



its 10, 11, 12; Football Aide 10, 11; Football 
Manager 1 2; Homecoming Attendant 1 1 ; Powder 
Puff 12; Senior Class 12. 

STANLEY MATRAS 

Marching Band 10, 11, 12; Symphonic Wind En- 
semble 10, 11, 12; Cross Country 11. 

BRIAN MATTHEWS 

Tree 

Basketball 12. 



208 




Lyie Mattson 



Karoline Louise McArthur Janet McCluskey Sean McCluskey 



John C. McCoy 




John McLoughlin Mark McNeils 


Robert J. McVey 








This book is sure exciting!! 


LYLE MATTSON 


DAVID MCGRAW 

Not Pictured. 








Swim Team 11; GLC 11; Student Council 11. 
Secretary 12; NHS 11, 12; Powder Puff 12; Spir- 


KAROLINE MCARTHUR 










its 12; Office Aide 10; Senior Class 12. 


Karol, Mac 












Wrestling Aide 10; Swim Timer 10, 1 1, 12; DCT 


PARSA MCGRAW 








JOHN MCLOUGHLIN 


12; Powder Puff 12; Swim Leader 11. 


Pars 








J.B. 




Vocational Child Care 11, 12 


; Hero 


Clul 


5 Secre- 


Basketball 10; Football 10, 11. 12. 


JANET MCCLUSKEY 


tary 11, 12. 








BRIAN MCNAMARA 


SEAN MCCLUSKEY 


KIM MCKENNA 








Not Pictured. 


Soccer 10. 11 . 1 2; Investment Club 1 2; Spirits 10, 


Squirt 










11, 12. 


Not Pictured. 








MARK MCNELIS 




Vocational Automotives 1 1 , 


12. 






Tennis 11. 1 2; Key Club 11. 12; Investment Club 


JOHN MCCOY 










12; Bowling Club 10. 1 1, 12; Radio Club 12. 


Wrestling 10, 11, 12. 


MEGAN MCLAUGHLIN 
Sweet 








ROBERT MCVEY 


COLLEEN MCCREARY 


Crosscountry 10. 11. 12; Basketba 


11 10. 


11. 12; 


Bob 



209 



KEVIN MEANEY 

Swim Team 10, 11, 12; Water Polo 10; Ski Club 

10, 11, 12; Powder Puff Coach 12. 

MICHAEL MEDVE 

Baseball 10, 11. 

MARY MEDVES 

ROBERT METCALF 

Ski Club 10, II. 

DENISE MEYERS 
Dee 

Key Club 10; Spirits 10; Ski Club 10; Sophomore 



Chorus 10; Basketball 10; Choral Masters 11, 12; 
Powder Puff 12; Swim Timer 10; Nurse's Aide 
11, 12; Close Up 12. 

JOHN MIKLOS 

Stats 

Vocational Accounting 11, 12; Basketball Man- 
ager 12. 

JOHN MISCH 

Not Pictured 

Football 10, 11, 12; Basketball 10. 

BARRY MITAN 



Boo, Berry 

Marching Band 10, 11, 12; Symphonic Wind En- 
semble 10, 11, 12; Big Show 10; Choral Masters 
12; Pep Band 10, 11. 

MICHAEL MIZEK 

Baseball 10, 11, 12. 

RICHARD MOLNAR 
RONALD MOSER 
ROBERT MOSES 




Euclid's newest exchange student!! 



Robert J. Metcalf 



Denise M. Meyers 



John E. Miklos 




Barry W. Mitan 



Michael A. Mizek 




V 

Richard J. Molnar 



Robert Moses 



210 



THERESA MULLINS 






Terri 


THOMAS MURPHY 




Majorette Club 10; Powder Puff 12. 








JOSEPH MUSCATELLO 


Powder Puff 12. 


MARY MULLOWNEY 


Musky 




Not Pictured. 


Football 10, 12; Wrestling 12; Spirits 12; Invest- 


TODD NAWOR 




ment Club 12. 


Tennis 10, 11, 12; Golf 12; Key Club 11, 12; Ski 


COLLEEN MURPHY 




Club 11, 12; Powder Puff Announcer 12. 


Murf 


BILL MUSICK 




GLC 11; Powder Puff 12. 


Investment Club 12. 


RICHARD NEIMAN 
Rick 


LYNN MURPHY 


MARCIA MYERS 


Football 10, 11, 12; Basketball 10, 11, 12; Out- 


DCT 12. 


Nurse's Aide 10,11,12; Survey 1 0; Yearbook 1 2; 


door Track 10; Investment Club 12; Spirits 12. 




Theresa Mullins 



Colleen M. Murphy 



Lynn Murphy 



Thomas F. Murphy 



Joseph R. Muscatello 




Todd Nawor 



Richard A. Neiman 



Don't worry about his picture, it's ours they want! 



211 



JILL NEMECEK 

Nem, Sis 

Cheerleader 10, 11, 1 2; Sophomore 

Chorus 10; Choral Masters 11, 12; 

Hockey Aide 10; Big Show 10, 11; 

Student Council 12; Powder Puff 

12. 

KEITH NICHOLSON 

Basketball 10, II. 

DENISE NICHTING 

Nicky 

Cheerleader 10, II, 12; Spirits 10, 
II, 12; Powder Puff 12; Investment 
Club 12; Student Council 11. 

TADEUSZ NOSAL 
Not Pictured. 

JOSEPH NOVAK 

Joey 

Marching Band 10; Concert Band 

10. 

ZDENKO NOVKOVIC 
"Z" 

Not Pictured. 
Soccer 10, 11, 12. 

JOSEPH NOZLING 

Joe 

Baseball 10, II, 12; Basketball 10, 

11; Spirits 11, 12. 

EILEEN O'BRIEN 
Pink Panthers 10; Wrestling Aide 
10; Vocational Stenography 11; 
COE Treasurer 12; GLC 11. 

JOSEPH O'DONNELL 

LISA OGOREK 

Not Pictured. 

COLLEEN O'NEILL 
Vocational Stenography 11, Presi- 
dent 12; Investment Club 12. 

BELINDA ORAV 

JOHN ORTMAN 

Ort 

Indoor Track 10, II, 12; Outdoor 

Track 10, 11, 12. 

PAULA OWEN 

Vocational Accounting 12. 

CHRISTOPHER OWENS 
Chris 

Marching Band 10, II, 12; Concert 
Band 10; Symphonic Wind Ensem- 
ble 11, 12; Tennis 10, 11, 12; Pep 
Band 11, 12. 



Seniors Polled On Future Plans 



A poll given to several senior home- 
rooms revealed some interesting facts 
about the future plans of the class of 1 98 1 . 

For example, 68% of those polled 
planned to go on to some form of higher 
education, 25% intended to go to work 
full-time upon graduation, and 7% intend- 
ed to join the service. 

Concerning the question of marriage, 
94%' said that they plan to marry sometime 
in the future. According to the survey, the 
most popular time to marry is between the 



ages of 22-25, with 26-30 age bracket 
placing second, and the 18-21 age bracket 
coming in a distant third. 

The final question asked concerning 
marriage dealt with the future marriage 
partner. Only 14% of those polled an- 
swered that they did expect to marry their 
high school sweetheart in the future. 

Thus, the average EHS senior plans to 
go to college, marry in his mid-twenties, 
but marry someone other than his present 
girlfriend! 




Jill Ann Nemecek 



Keith Nicholson 



Denise M. Nichting 



Joseph Novak 




Joseph S. Nozling 



Joseph O'Donnell 



Colleen O'Neill 




Belinda Orav 



John Ortman 



Paula Owen 



Christopher Owens 



212 




Don't bother me, I'm in the middle of a delicate operation! 





1^^^^ 





Philip Pallante 



Nestor Papageorge 



Anthony Patfield 



Susan D. Paul 




Linda M. Payne 



Lisa R. Payne 



Albert A Peklay 



Greg S. Penny 



PHILIP PALLANTE 

Soccer 10, 11, 12; Indoor Track 10, 

11; Outdoor Track 10, 11. 

NESTOR PAPAGEORGE 

Soccer 10. 

ANTHONY PATFIELD 

SUSAN PAUL 
Spunky 

Office Aide 10; Student Council 
12; Senior Class 12; Yearbook 11; 
Spirits 12; Marching Band An- 
nouncer 11, 12; Powder Puff 12; 
Choral Masters 12; Track Manager 
11, 12; P. A. Announcer 12. 

LINDA PAYNE 
COE 12. 

LISA PAYNE 
DCT 12. 

ALBERT PEKLAY 

Pek, Al 

Baseball 10, 11, 12; Football 10. 

11, 12; Spirits 10, 11, 12; OEA 12; 

Vocational Accounting President 

12; Lettermen Club 11, 12. 

RICHARD M. PELTON 

Rix 

Not Pictured. 

Fall Play 12; Winter Play 12. 

GREG PENNY 
Baseball 10; Spirits 12. 



213 



LISA PENNY 

Basketball 10, 11, 12; Softball 10. 11, 12; Powder 
Puff 12. 

ADRIENNE PEROVSEK 

Ad, Hoover 

OEA 11, Historian 12. 

RICHARD PERUSEK 
Ernie 

STACY PETITTO 

Not Pictured. 

CHARLES A. PETRASKA 
Chuck 



Not Pictured, 




Crosscountry 10, 11, 12; Hockey 10, 11, 12. 


Pirch 




Indoor Track 12. 


DAVID PETRI 




Not Pictured. 


DEBBIE PITTOCK 




Curly 


VINCE PICOZZI 


Student Secretary 12. 


MARCIA PIERCE 


COLEEN POE 


Wai Napolo 10, 11, 12; Football Aide 10; Sopho- 


Larry 


more Class 10; Yearbook 10; Powder Puff 1 2; Ski 


Nurse's Aide 1 1. 


Club 12; Student Council 12; Spirits 12; Big 




Show 11. 


DIANE POLASKI 




Moe 


MATTHEW PIRCHNER 


Powder Puff 1 2. 





Lisa A. Penny 



Adrienne R. Perovsek 



Richard J. Perusek 





Vince Picozzi 



Marcia J. Pierce 




Super Senior Spirit!! 



Coleen Noell Poe 



Diane Polaski 



214 



DARLENE PONGALLO 










DONNA POWERS 




Ponge 










Dunkin' Donna 




Softball 10, 11. 










Student Secretary 10. 11, 12; Powder Puff 12. 


LISA PYSELL 


DAVID PONSART 










WILLIAM POZUN 


Pie 


Zart 










Not Pictured. 


Not Pictured. 


Orchestra 10, 11; Big Show Orch. 


10. 








Track Aide 10; Office Aide 11. 












CHRIS PRINGLE 




JOSEPH PORTEN 












THOMAS RADCLIFFE 


Pudge 










GEOFFREY PRITCHARD 




Golf 10, 11, 1 2; Stage Band 11 


, 12; 


Pep 


Bar 


id 11, 


Concert Band 10, 11; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 


STEVE RADO 


12; Marching Band 10, 11, 12; 


NHS 11, 


12; 


Pow- 


12; Stage Band U, 12. 


Basketball 10, 11; Investment Club 12. 


der Puff Coach 12. 










BARBARA PRIZZl 


GIA RAFFAELE 


SANDRA POST 










Priz 


Raff 


DECA 11. 










Track 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2; Powder Puff 1 2; Office Aide 1 2. 


Basketball 10, 11; Softball 10, 11, 12; Powder 


Not Pictured. 










DIANE PURVIS 


Puff 1 2; Senior Class 1 2; Office Aide 1 1 . 


WILLIAM POTTS 










Pervert 


PAULIUS RAMUNAS 


Not Pictured. 










Pink Panthers 10. 


Not Pictured. 




Darlene Pongallo 



David Paul Ponsart 



Joseph Porten 



Donna M. Powers 



Chris Pringle 




Thomas Radcliffe 



Steve Rado 



Gia Raffaele 



What do you do if your fingers gel stuck'^ 



215 




Want an elf for your stocking? 



Brian Reno 



Frank M. Repar 





dLieil 




Deia Rice 


Ronald J Rich Edward C. Riczinger 


Cynthia L. Ritzu Brenda Roberts 


VICKI RASK. 


BRIAN RENO 


Library Aide 11, 12. 


Ski Club 11. 






JAMES RAY 


NHS 11, 12; Yearbook 10, 11, 12; Survey 12; 
Key Club 11, 12; Pep Band 10, 11, 12; Marching 


RONALD RICH 
Ron 

Wrestling 10, 11, 12. 


Not Pictured. 


Band 10, 11, 12; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 10, 




11, 12; Radio Club 10, 1 1, 12; BigShow Orch. 10, 


DIANE RAYER 


1 1 ; Lab Assistant 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2; Senior Class Cabinet 
12. 


EDWARD RICZINGER 


MICHAEL REDMAN 


Jake 


Mike 


JOHN T. RENSHAW 




Not Pictured. 


Big John 


CYNTHIA RITZU 


Wrestling 10, 11, 12. 


Not Pictured. 


Ritzy 




Wrestling 10; Sophomore Chorus 10; Choral 


Cheerleader 11, 12; Gymnastics 10; Spirits 10, 


DAVID REESE 


Masters 12. 


11, 12; Senior Class 12; Student Secretary 11; 


Not Pictured 


FRANK REPAR 


Office Aide 10, 11, 12; Powder Puff 12. 


JOHN REILLY 


Ski Club 10, 11, 12; Outdoor Track 10, 12. 


BRENDA ROBERTS 


Not Pictured. 




Road Dog 


Football 10; Outdoor Track 10. 


DEIA RICE 


Powder Puff 12. 



216 




Lori Sajn 



Dana Lynn Salem 



Denise Santon 



I just love all this attention! 



MICHAEL ROEDER 

STEVEN ROLIK 
Ski Club U. 12. 

JEANETTE ROPER 
JR. 

DECA II, Vice-President 12; Senior Class 12; 
Investment Club 12; Powder Puff 12; Swim Lead- 
er 11. 

JOHN ROSE 

Not Pictured. 

CYNTHIA ROSS 

NORMA ROSS 

Not Pictured. 



Concert Band 10, 11; Swim Leader 1 1 ; Spirits 1 1 , 
12. 

THOMAS RUZICH 

Water Polo 10, 11; Marching Band 10; Concert 
Band 10; Swim Team 10, 11. 

CHRISTINA RYDER 

Chrissy 

Volleyball 10. 11. 12; Sophomore Class 10; Spir- 
its II, 12; Powder Puff 12; Ad Club 12; Senior 
Class 12; GLC 1 1, 12; Student Council 1 1, Trea- 
surer 12. 

SHARON RYMARCZYK 

Powder Puff 12; DECA Treasurer 12; Senior 

Class 12. 



LORI SAJN 

Sis 

Cheerleader 10, II, 12; Spirits 10, 11. 12; Big 

Show 11; Powder Puff 12; Choral Masters 12; 

Swim Leader 11; Investment Club 12. 

DANA SALEM 

Swim Team 10; Swim Team Manager 11; Swim 

Timer 10. 11. 12; Wai Napolo 11; DECA 12; 

Varsity Chorale 12; Swim Leader 11; Fall Play 

10, 11. 12; Winter Play 10, 11, 12; Big Show 10. 

11. 

PETE SANELLI 

Wolfy 

Not Pictured. 

DENISE SANTON 



PAUL ROSSMANN 

Swim Team 10, 11, 12; Water Polo 10, 11, 12; 



FRANK SAJN 
Not Pictured. 



GREGORY SANTON 

Not Pictured. 



217 



RICH SCALETTA 

ROBERT SCHAFER 

Cross Country 1 1 ; Outdoor Track 1 1 . 

ALEX SCHILLER 
Tim 

LORI SCHMIDT 

CAROL SCHNEIDER 

Swim Leader 11; Volleyball Manager 11; Powder 
Puff 12;COE 12. 

WILLIAM A. SCHUHLE 

Bill 

Not Pictured. 

Football 10, 11, 12; Yearbook 11, 12. 

MARK SCHULTZ 

Not Pictured. 

KEN SCHULZ 
Not Pictured. 



Hockey 10, 11. 

PAUL SCHULZ 

Not Pictured. 

Water Polo, 10, 11; Swim Team 10. 

ROBERT SCOTT 

Pugs 

Senior Class 12; Student Council 12; Yearbook 

12; OWE 11, 12; Media Aide 12. 

DAMIR SEGINA 

Not Pictured. 

JANE SEIDEL 

Yearbook 10, 11; Horsemanship 10. 

DOREEN SEUFFERT 
COE 12. 

BONITA SHADY 

Not Pictured. 

DERICK SHARPLEY 



JOSEPH SHAY 

Not Pictured. 

AMY SHEI 

Not Pictured. 

CYNTHIA SHEI 

Not Pictured. 

ROBERT P. SHERIDAN 

Roach 

Not Pictured. 

MARK SHIMONEK 

Shimmy 

Marching Band 10, 11, 12; Concert Band 10, 11, 

12. 

JANE SHUNK 

Cheerleader 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2; Big Show 1 0, 1 1 ; Ski Club 
10, 1 1; Student Secretary II, 12; Varsity Chorale 
12; Student Council 12; Spirits 10, 11, 12; Powder 
Puff 12. 




Jane Seidel 



Doreen Seuffert 



Mark A. Shimonek 



Jane C. Shunk 



218 



SHERRI SIEFERD 



SCOTT SI EG EL 

Wrestling 10, 11; DEC A 11, 12. 

RAYMOND SIMKINS 
Concert Band 10. 

NAVKARAN SINGH 

Basketball 1 0; Tennis 1 0, 1 1 , 1 2; Key Club 11,12; 

NHS 11, 12; Ski Club 11, 12; Indoor Track 12. 

DEBRA SKULA 
PATRICIA SLAVEC 



Not Pictured. 








SHARON SLEITH 

Powder Puff 12; Senior Class 12; 

Club 12; Student Secretary 12. 


Spirits 


12; Ad 


WADE SMALL 

Malcolm 
Not Pictured. 
Outdoor Track 12. 


JAMES E SLOMINSKI 

Pollock 

Not Pictured. 

Hockey 12. 






RICHARD SMITH 

Rick 

Baseball 10; Ski Club, 10, 11, 12; Football 12. 


DONNA SLY 






SANDRA SNYDER 

Sandy 


Nay-Nay 

Marching Band 10, 11; Student Secretar 


y 12. 


Sophomore Class 10; Junior Class 11; Senior 
Class 12; Student Council 12; Powder Puff 12. 




Sherri Sieferd 



Scott Siegel 



Raymond Simkins 



Navkaran B. Singh 



Debra Skula 




Richard C. Smith 



Sandra Snyder 



May 1 help you? 



219 



LORI SOBECKI 

COE 12. 

SUSAN SOEDER 

LISA SON 

Volleyball 10, II, 12; Basketball 
10; Softball 10; GLC II; Wrestling 
Aide II; Powder Puff 12; COE 12. 

ANTHONY SORENSEN 

Tony 

Investment Club 12. 

WILLIAM SOWERS 

Not Pictured. 

NICK SPIRANOVICH 

Not Pictured. 

Soccer 10. 

TAMMY SPRAGUE 
Not Pictured. 

DOUG SPRINGER 

Swim Team 1 1 , 1 2; Office Aide 1 1 , 

12. 

JANE SRNOVRSNIK 
COE 12; Powder Puff 12; Invest- 
ment Club 12; Concert Band 10, 
1 1; Marching Band 10. 

GERARD STACK 

Not Pictured. 

KATHLEEN STANKE 
Kathy 

Powder Puff 12; OEA 11, 12; Vo- 
cational Accounting 11, President 

12. 

LORI STARMAN 

Not Pictured. 

Office Aide 10, II, 12. 

BARBARA STARR 
Barb 

Swim Team 10, 1 1, 12; Swim Tim- 
er II, 12; Concert Band 10, 11; 
Marching Band 10, 11; Ad Club 
II, 12; Wai Napolo 11, 12; Invest- 
ment Club 12; Senior Class 12; 
Spirits 11,12; Powder Puff 1 2; Wa- 
ter Polo Aide II, 12. 

KURT STEEBER 

Not Pictured. 

Hockey 10, II; Basketball 10. 

LAURA STEYER 

Not Pictured. 

DIANNE STIPKOVICH 

Stip 

OEA 11, 12. 

MARY BETH STRAGISHER 

Not Pictured. 

NHS II, 12; Basketball 10, II, 12; 

Volleyball 11, 12; Track 10. 

MARK STRAUB 

DENISE STRAUSS 
Vocational Stenography Historian 
11, 12; Wrestling Aide II; Office 
Aide 12; Powder Puff 12; Swim 
Leader 1 1; Volleyball Manager II; 
Majorette Club 10. 

RICHARD STRICKLAND 




Lori Sobecki Susan Soeder 



Lisa Son 



Anthony A. Sorensen 




Doug Springer 



Jane Srnovrsnik 



Kathleen Stanke 



Barbara Starr 




^^ 




Dianne Stipkovich 



Mark Straub 



Denise Marie Strauss 



Richard Strickland 



220 




We are Santa's elves. 




Gary Summerhill 



Gary Supinski 



Taeyung Surh 



WENDY STROUD 
Casper 

Track 10, 11, 12; Eucuyo 10: Sur- 
vey II, 12; Fall Play 12; Winter 
Play 12; Marching Band 10, 11; 
Office Aide 10; Symphonic Wind 
Ensemble 10. 

LISA STUPANSKY 
Yearbook 12; Powder Puff 12; Stu- 
dent Secretary 12. 

KEITH SUFKA 

KEVIN SUFKA 

MILAN SULIC 

Not Pictured. 

GARY SUMMERHILL 
Goose 

Marching Band 10, 11, 12; Sym- 
phonic Wind Ensemble 10, 11, 12; 
Pep Band 10. 

GARY SUPINSKI 

TAEYUNG SURH 

Tae 

Wrestling 10, 11; Key Club 12; Ski 

Club 12. 

MARK SVIGEL 

TIMOTHY SWEENEY 

Not Pictured. 
OWE 11, 12. 

KAREN SWIER 

Not Pictured, 



221 



JEANINE SWOBODA 
Space 

Cross Country 10, 11, 12; Track 10, 11, 12; Ad 
Club 10,11; Orchestra 1 0, 1 2; GLC 1 1 , 1 2; Sur- 
vey 12; Office Aide 12; Swim Team 12; Powder 
Puff 12; Spirits 10, 11, 12. 

DEBI LYNN SZALAY 

Luscious 

Not Pictured. DEC A 11, 12; Powder Puff 12. 



LAURA SZOZDOWSKI 

NANCY TAKIGUCHI 

Tak, Bun.E. 

Powder Puff 1 2; Ski Club 1 0; Sophomore Chorus 

10; Vocational Art 11, 12. 

JAMAR TARR 

Jake 

Indoor Track 10, 11, 1 2; Outdoor Track 10, 11, 



12; Investment Club 12. 

HARVEY TAULIEN 
Football 10; Survey 12. 

LORI TEPLEY 

Tep 

Track 10, 11. 12; NHS 11, 12; Marching Band 

10, 11; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 10, 11; Senior 

Class 12; Student Council 12. 




The Killer Tomato and friends! 



Harvey J. Taulien Lori Ann Tepley 



222 



BARBARA THEUS 

Barb 

Volleyball 10; GLC II. 

EDWARD THOMAS 

Outdoor Track II, 12; Indoor Track 12; Powder 
Puff Cheerleader 12. 



JENNIFER THOMAS 

Jen 

Swim Leader II; Big Show 1 1; Student Council 

12; Wai Napolo 10, II, 12; Track 12; Senior 

Class 12; Spirits 10, 11, 12; Powder Puff 12; 

Sophomore Chorus 10. 



WILLIAM THOMAS 



THOMAS THOME 

JAMES THOMPSON 

Jimmy 

Not Pictured, Bowling Club 10, 11, 12. 

JOHN THOMPSON 

Not Pictured. 





Barbara Ann Theus 



Edward C. Thomas 



Jennifer Thomas 



William Thomas 



Thomas Thome 



Senior Plays Army For Real 




Military service is one career decision that John 
Glicken won't have to make after graduation. 



For most high school seniors, military 
service is only a vague possibility to be 
considered if college or a full-time job 
does not work out. But for one EHS 
senior, John Glicken, the military is a 
part of daily life since he is a member of 
the active Army Reserve. 

Suffering from a chronic problem of 
students everywhere — boredom — John 
dropped out of school in his junior year. 
He signed up in the Army Reserve and 
began a six month term of active service 
in March 1979. John completed basic 
training at Fort Jackson, South Caroli- 
na, and went to Fort Lee, Virginia, for 
advanced training. John said that the 
uncertainty of the first few days in boot 
camp was the low point of the exper- 
ience, closely followed by chemical 
warfare training. The most enjoyable 
part of basic training for John was the 
firing range. Like all new recruits, he 
was taught to operate and fire the stan- 
dard model rifle, machine gun, grenade 
launcher, and hand-held, anti-tank 



weapon. But if you think that John's 
training has turned him into a fire- 
breathing warmonger, he admits that 
the night firepower display put on for 
recruits at the end of their training gave 
him a new appreciation of the phr,ase: 
War is hell. 

As a member of the active Reserve, 
John must attend meetings one week- 
end per month and a two-week summer 
camp each year. He also must go to 
Camp Perry, Ohio, each year for weap- 
ons qualification. For all this, John, 
who is a corporal in the 428th Reserve 
Unit located in Warrensville Heights, 
earns $80 per month. 

Finally, John's army experience 
showed him the importance of a high 
school diploma since he found it diffi- 
cult to advance — e\en in the 
army — without one. Since he has re- 
turned to school, John — a proud mem- 
ber of the class of 1981 — has main- 
tained a B average. 



223 




Kathy, get serious! 



Ronald Trebec 



Eric Treichel 




Patty Trost 



THOMAS TONKLI 

Tonk 

Survey 11, 12; Powder Puff Coach 12. 

PATRICK TOOLE 

Not Pictured. 

LOUIE TORTORICI 

Lou 

Vocational Automotives 11, 12. 

RONALD TREBEC 
Ron 

Investment Club 12; Tennis 12. 



Steven Turk 



David Turner 



ERIC TREICHEL 

Football 10, 11, 12; Investment Club 12. 

PATTY TROST 
Puddy 

JOHN TURCINOV 

Not Pictured 
Soccer 12. 

STEVEN TURK 

Steve 

Investment Club 12; Vocational Automotives 11, 

12. 



Angela Tyler 



Connie J. Ucic 



DAVID TURNER 
Dave 

Vocational Automotives 11, 12. 

ANGELA TYLER 

Angie 

Sophomore Class 10; Close Up 12. 

CONNIE UCIC 
Office Aide 11. 



224 





Joseph J. Udovic 



Andrew Ulle 



Michael D. Urbas 



Nancy Valencic 



James Valentine 




Dr. Bergem sits in on a Wednesday morning Senior Class meeting. 



JOSEPH UDOVIC 


MICHAEL URBAS 


NANCY VALENCIC 


Joe, Joey 


Mike 




Library Aide 10, 11, 12; Spirits 12: Senior Class 




JAMES VALENTINE 


12; Investment Club 12; Survey 11; DECA 11. 


ROBERT J. VAHCIC 


Rvax 




Rob 


Basketball 10; Golf 10, 11. 


ANDREW ULLE 


Not Pictured. 




Andy 







225 



DANIEL VANAH 
Dan 

TAMMY VAN BENEDEN 

JENA VANEK 

Student Secretary 1 1 ; Swim Timer 11, 12; Senior 

Class 12; Swim Leader 11; Spirits 12; Powder 


Puff 12;COE 12. 

BRIAN VEHAR 

Victor 

Football 10, 11, 12; Indoor Track 11; Outdoor 

Track 10. U, 12; Lettermen 10, 11, 12. 

SUZANNE VERNON 


Sue 

Student Secretary 11, 12; Spirits 11. 

RUSSELL VIDRICK 

Not Pictured. 

GARY VISAGE 




I'm afraid to go in alone' 



Suzanne Vernon 



Gary M. Visage 



226 



VlCKl VOASE 














Mrs. Myers 


Hockey Aide 12; Survey 10 


1; Spirits 12; 


GLC 


II. 






12. 










YVETTE WATKINS 


JOHN VOLOTA 












Gyna 


Marching Band 10; Concert Band 10. 


ANGELA WALLACE 










Not Pictured. 

Omce Aide 10, 1 1; Softball 10, 1 1; Nurse's Aide 


TERRY VOSS 


CAREN WALSH 










10. 


Concert Band 10. 


FRANCIS WALTERS 










JENNIFER WATSON 


KAREN VULICH 


Allah II 










Jenny 


Bear 


Cross Country 10. 11, 12; 


Indoor 


Trac 


;k 10, 


11, 




Volleyball 10, 11. 12; Softball 10, 11, 12; Spirits 


12; Outdoor Track 10, 12; 


Invest! 


nent 


Club 


12. 


TRAVIS WEBSTER 


10, 11. 


CAROL WARD 










Sir Duke 
Not Pictured. 


LAURA W.ACHHAUS 


Not Pictured. 










Basketball 11. 




Terry S. Voss 



Karen Vulich 



Judy, I think the ceiling is falling on us! 




Laura B. Wachhaus 



Angela Wallace 



Caren Walsh 



Francis David Walters 



Jennifer Watson 



227 



Entertainment '81 



DORI WEISS 

JENNIFER JILL WHALING 
Jill 

Not Pictured. 

Winter Festival Attendant 10; Vo- 
cational Clerk Typist President 11. 
12; PA Announcer 12; Powder 
Puff 12. 

DONNA WHELAN 

Vocational Clerk Typist Secretary 

11; COE 12. 

ALLISON WHITE 

RICKY WHITMORE 

Not Pictured. 

PEGGY WIEGAND 

Vocational Child Care 1 1 , 1 2; Hero 
Club 11, 12. 

CRAIG WILLIAMS 
Nick 

RAYMOND WILLIAMS 

Not Pictured. 

ROBERT WILLRICH 

Not Pictured. 

DOUGLAS WINSTEAD 

Bum 

Vocational Automotives 11, 12. 

ANN WINTLE 
Entwisel, Dimps 

Track Aide 10; Yearbook 10, 12 
Track Aide 10; Yearbook 10, 12; 
OEA 11, 12; Powder Puff 12; Sen- 
ior Class 12; GLC 11; Investment 
Club 12; Vocational Stenography 
11, 12. 

DONALD WOLFF 



Each graduating class has its own 
particular set of characteristics which 
make it different fronn those classes be- 
fore it. One characteristic is the enter- 
tainment that the class as a whole en- 
joys. The following is a sizing-up of the 
class of '8 1 on entertainment. 

80% of the class of '81 attended a 
movie theater between one and three 
times a month. 80% of the class also 
had been to a rock concert at some 
time. 

With entertainment comes food — 
most of the time fast food. The most 
popular fast food was pizza, and the 
most popular place to eat pizza was 



Armao's. Other favorite places includ- 
ed Carmella's and the Back Alley. 

For socializing after a game, McDon- 
alds was the unanimous favorite. Other 
places mentioned were going to some- 
one's house for a party. Armao's, and 
Bob's Big Boy. If there were no game or 
movie to go to, the most popular activi- 
ties included watching TV, listening to 
the stereo, or talking on the phone. 

To get to such places of entertain- 
ment as football games, concerts, and 
restaurants meant that transportation 
was needed. Obviously, most seniors 
drive to such events, and 35% of them 
drive their own cars. 




■w 



>':|fic1 



Dori A. Weiss 



Donna M. Whelan 



Allison White 



Peggy Wiegand 






Craig Douglas Williams Douglas Mark Wmstead 




Ann Marie Wintle 



Donald Wolff 



228 




Is that his idea of a Joke? 




mAti 




Robert Wolons 



David Woodruff 



Eugene Wrenn 



Wendy Wright 




Halle Wuchter 



Kristin Yamane 



Gregory James Yartz 



Jack Yatsko 



ROBERT WOLONS 

DAVID WOODRUFF 

Woody 

Marching Band 10; Concert Band 
10; Cross Country 11. 12; Outdoor 
Track 11, 12. 

EUGENE WRENN 

WENDY WRIGHT 

Wai Napolo 10, 11, 12; Ski Club 
10; Ad Club 11, 12; Senior Class 
12; Powder Puff 12; Swim Leader 
IL 

HALLE WUCHTER 

Bean 

Swim Timer 1 1. 

KRISTIN YAMANE 

Cheerleader 10, II, 12; Homecom- 
ing Queen 12; Vocational Stenog- 
raphy Historian 12; Office Aide 1 1 ; 
Powder Puff 12. 

GREGORY YARTZ 

CINDY YATES 
Not Pictured. 

JACK YATSKO 

Basketball 10; Powder Puff Coach 

12. 



229 



MICHAEL YECKLEY 
Yec 

Football 10, 11, 12; Outdoor Track 10, 12; Pow- 
der Puff Coach 12; Lettermen Club 11, 12; 
Puff Coach 12; Lettermen Club 11, 12. 

JOSEPH YEHL 

Not Pictured. 

MICHAEL YENTZ 
Wrestling 10, 11, 

KENNETH YERMAN 

Football 10, 11, 12. 

DOUGLAS YONKOUSKI 

Not Pictured. 



CHRISTOPHER ZAFFLE 

Chris 

Not Pictured. 

Vocational Data Processing Vice-President 11, 

12. 

DAVID ZAGORE 
Dave 

Soccer 10, ll;Wrestling 10, ll;Spirits 10, 11, 12; 
Senior Class Cabinet 12; Key Club 10, 11, Presi- 
dent 12; Gym Leader 10, 12; Powder Puff Coach 
12. 

MICHAEL ZAHORSKY 

Mike 

Vocational Data Processing 11, 12. 



STEVEN ZAK 

LYNNE ZAKRAYSEK 
Lydia 

Football Aide 10, 11; Pink Panthers 10; Voca- 
tional Stenography Secretary 1 1; COE Secretary 

12. 

KEVIN ZALLER 

Cross Country 10; Indoor Track 11, 12. 



MONICA ZAWOJEK 





Michael Yeckley 



Michael Yentz 



Kenneth Yerman 




David Zagore 



Michael Zagorsky 




Steven Zak 



Lynne Zakraysek 




Kevin Zailer 



Monica Zawojek 



Mike Redman strives for perfection! 



230 



ERIC ZEBOLD 

Swim Team 10, 11, 12; Outdoor Track 10, 11, 12; 
Water Polo 10, 11, 12; Wai Napolo Comedy 
Crew 10. 

SHARON ZIEHM 



EDWARD ZIGMAN 

TONY ZINGALE 
"Z" 

Basketball 10, 11; Spirits 10, 11, 12; Office Aide 
12; Vocational Data Processing President 11, 12. 



ROBERT ZNIDARSIC 

Bob, Stein, Sinbad, Ziggy 

OWE 11, 1 2; Senior Class 12; Student Council 12. 





Eric Zebold 



snaron z,ienm 



Edward Zigman 




Robert Znidarsic 



Euclid Known Around The World 




How did you spend last summer's vacation? 
Kathy Drury and Beth Mabel spend theirs in 
Europe as AFS exchange students. 



Euclid High School's influence is felt 
all over the world. This past summer, 
two EHS seniors visited foreign lands. 
Beth Mabel went to Finland and Kathy 
Drury visited Turkey as representatives 
of the AFS International Intercultural 
Programs. Kathy and Beth went 
through several interviews and a 
screening process to be chosen. Both 
girls spent ten weeks in their respective 
countries. 

Beth stayed with a family in Mikkeli, 
Finland. She spent much of the time at 
her host family's two cottages. Beth 
found that America was popular cultur- 
ally, but not politically. American jeans 
were especially popular, with Levi's 
selling for $40-S50 American dollars a 
pair. During her stay, Beth saw many 
Punk Rockers and New Waves, but the 



most predominant fad was the 
'50's — greased-back hair on boys and 
poodle skirts on girls. 

Kathy lived in the small city of Ordu 
in northeastern Turkey with a family of 
six that spoke English fluently. While in 
Turkey, Kathy visited many mosques, 
bazaars, and museums. She found Tur- 
key's largest cities, Istanbul and .Anka- 
ra, to be very modern. Turkish teens 
enjoyed many of the same things 
American teens do: movies, sports (es- 
pecially soccer), and music (particular- 
ly disco). 

Both Kathy and Beth enjoyed their 
trips and said that they hoped to go 
back for return visits sometime in the 
future. 




Hollywood only had three stooges. Euclid has eight! 



There's something about lunch period that just makes us want to dance. 




We always thought Leu had a screw missing. 



And now for Jane Shunk's solo at- O.K., Dale, Halloween's over. You can take off 

tempt at a balloon crossing of Lake your mask now. 

Erie. 




Oops!! 



Dr. Bergem! Don't sneak up on me like that! 



232 



These Pages Are Dedicated To The Students And Faculty 
Of EHS Who Endured A Year Of Flashbulbs In Their Faces 



iaffl 


Hii^-.. /^ 


LA 


fee-j >x;^ 




^^^^^^^ N , ^^S^^cS 


kr^B 




Hnnk 




Hi there! 



Chief cool< and boltlewasher. Dr. Bergem joins in the Halloween 
fun. 



233 




I 234 



Ad Index 



Armao's Pizza 


263 


Key Club 


241 


Big Bouquet 


237 


Knific Insurance 


236 


Bob Anderson Realty 


251 


Kollander World Travel 


267 


Bob's Big Boy Restaurant 


251 


Leo Baur Realty 


249 


Burger King 


247 


London Tyre Co. 


249 


Chase Brass & Copper Co. 


265 


Luikart Insurance 


269 


Chesterfield Steel Service Co. 


263 


Man-Gill Chemical Co. 


243 


Cleveland Bandag, Inc. 


263 


Mark Hairdressers 


269 


Dallos - Spies 


243 


Mario's Flowers 


268 


Den's Place Beauty Salon 


251 


McDonalds 


263 


Di Paolo House of Beauty 


262 


Mihelich's Restaurant 


254 


East 200th Convenient Food 


246 


Miller's Beauty Salon 


253 


Electric Motor Repair Co. 


257 


Model Meats 


261 


Euclid Auto Parts 


261 


Non-Ferrous Metals Fabricating 


Co. 259 


Euclid Blue Print & Suppy, inc. 


261 


Nottingham Auto Body 


254 


Euclid Boosters Club 


250 


Ozan Legal Clinic 


269 


Euclid Chrysler Plymouth 


261 


Palisades Bowling 


240 


Euclid Driving School 


252 


Papa Joe's Subs 


254 


Euclid Foreign Motors 


267 


Papp's Body Shop 


256 


Euclid, Inc. 


262 


Parkwood Realty 


244 


Euclid Public Officials 


266 


Patrons 


270-271 


Euclid National Bank 


263 


PTSA 


240 


Euclid-Race Dairy 


248 


Radix Wire Co. 


256 


Euclid Washe Parts 


260 


Raimor Studios 


238 


Euclidian Beauty College 


240 


Reliance Electric Co. 


254 


Europa Travel 


249 


Rieth Auto Stores 


247 


Fisher Body, Inc. 


260 


Russell Miller Garage 


253 


Flickinger. Inc. 


260 


Salter Auto Parts Co. 


256 


Fisher Body, Inc. 


260 


Sims Buick 


255 


Florama Flowers 


253 


Sherwood Collection 


268 


Flowerama 


246 


Sherwood Refractories, Inc 


259 


Forest City Auto Parts 


259 


Ski-Way Machine Parts 


265 


Frank Black Painting 


265 


Small World Travel 


268 


French's Pharmacy 


264 


Steve's Tire & Auto Center 


268 


Fritz's Tavern 


263 


Student Council 


239 


Gabriel Insurance 


257 


Tony's Polka Village 


267 


Gahr Machine Co. 


257 


TRW 


245 


Gingiss Formal Wear 


264 


Value City 


248 


Great Lakes Inn 


244 


Vargo's Pizza 


252 


Millwood Manufacturing Co. 


258 


Vassar Health Foods 


268 


Induction Brazing & Soldering Co. 


243 


Wai Napolo 


241 


Jackshaw Cheverolel 


264 


Warner & Swasey 


242 


Jackson Hardware 


252 


Wildwood Florist 


255 


Jay-Dee Cleaners 


254 


Wilke Hardware 


261 


Jay's Cards & Gifts 


251 


York Steak House 


240 


Kerr Lakeside 


269 







235 



KNIFIC INSURANCE 
SERVICE, INC. 

Serving The Euclid Area 
For 30 Years 

481-8918 481-7540 

For All Your Insurance Needs 



236 





PiecKt{ig You ^ 



^1 Our Pfeasure" 



■ y 



!l7 ■**'■ ■ ' 




'^ PHONE 



BEN DiGIOVANNI 




-4343 



480 EAST 200 ST. 



237 




Proudly Serving Euclid 



**e«-o»i" 



RAIMOR STUDIOS 



Your Official School Photographer 

750 East 185th Street 

481-1166 




239 



EUCLIDIAN 
BEAUTY COLLEGE 

22741 Shore Center Dr. 

261-2600 

Training Cosmetologists 
Is Our Business 



Congratulations Class Of '81 

YORK 

STEAK 

HOUSE 




Euclid Square Mall 




PALISADES BOWL 

1331 East 260th St. 

PALISADES TWO 

27401 Tungsten Rd. 

PALISADES FOUR-MENTOR 

7300 Palisades Parkway 



240 



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"<^ . "-ct 



- # t 



Congratulations To The Class Of 1981 



From 



WAI NAPOLO 



Compliments Of 

THE KEY 
CLUB 




We're not culling honc-st' 



241 



"If I dCMit go, 
I dont get" 



In the South was an old 
man with a rowboat who 
ferried passengers across a 
mile-wide river for ten cents. 

Asked, "How many times 
a day do you do this?" 
he said, "As many times 
as I can because the more 
I go, the more I get. And 
if I don't go, I don't get." 

That's all you need to 
know-all there is to know- 
about business, eco- 
nomics, prosperity-anc/ 
self-respect. 



fWjk WARNER &SWASEY 

IjCw Productivity equipment and systems in machine tools, textile and construction machinery 

^^^^^ THEWARNER&SWASEYCOMPAMY ExecutiveOffices 1 lOOOCedar Avenue. Cleveland. Ohio44 106 



242 



Best Wishes From 



iL 



Man-GiLL 
cHeMicaL 

METAL PROCESSING SYSTEMS 



23000 St. Clair Ave. 

Euclid, Ohio 44117 

(216) 486-5300 



INDUCTION 

BRAZING 

AND 

SOLDERING 



21850 St. Clair Ave. 

Euclid, Ohio 44117 

486-8283 




Dallos-Spies 

BUILDERS, INC. 

Specialists In Commercial & Industrial Development 

Dallos-Spies Builders. Inc., has the ability to handle any 

and all commercial and industrial development, be it large 

or small, from Inception to completion. 

261-6211 

COMMERCIAL— INDUSTRIAL 
22660 Shore Center Dr. 

BUILDERS, CONSTRUCTION MORS. 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 




I ,iKv.i\s whistle \\h\\c I uork 



243 




I'm a Saudi Arabian ex- 
change student traveling in- 
cognito while I'm in the 
United States. 



RESTAURANT \ 



GREAT LAKES 

INN 



22350 Lake Shore Blvd. 
731-1800 



244 




Today you're on your way. All the doors are 
open. There's a world of possibilities out there for 
you to explore, hundreds of paths to follow. One oi 
them may even brin^ you back to Cleveland, to 
the lush, green Bolton Estate in Lyndhurst, futurt 
head(juarters for a company called 

TRW 




pLOWERAMA 



WE'RE the "PLANT PROFESSIONALS" 

■■SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL TO SHARE" 




Euclid Square Mall 



Euclid, Ohio 



Randall Park Mall 

No. Randall, Ohio 



Open 

7 Days 

A Week 




CONVENIENT 
FOOD MART 



From 7 

Until 

Midnight 



Vernon Jones 



756 East 200th St. 
Euclid, Ohio 44119 



Al Jones 



246 



BURGER KING 

"Have It Your Way" 




400 Euclid Square Mall 



il_'y[^i^f'Erriy:'j^ 




RIETH 



Auto Stores 

22302 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

261-8010 



Congratulations 
To The 

Class Of 1981 

And 

Good Luck 

PTSA 



Euclid Senior High 

Parent Teacher Student 

Association 



247 



Congratulations Seniors 
'81 

VALUE CITY 



22400 Shore Center Drive 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

731-8530 




EUCLID-RACE 

DAIRY 

AND ICE CREAM 

CO. 

503 East 200th St. 
481-4700 




248 



CENTURY 21 

Leo Baur, Realtor 

• Residential 

• Commercial 

• Industrial 

• Farms 

21157 Euclid Ave. 
Euclid, Ohio 44117 



Good Luck 

To The 

Class Of 1981 




EUROPA TRAVEL 

911 East 185th St. 
692-1700 



LONDON TYRE CO. 




"WE HAVE A TIRE TO FIT 
YOUR CAR AT A PRICE TO FIT 
YOUR BUDGET " 



21217 Euclid Ave. 
249-5941 or 451-6565 



Shock Absorbers 
Oil - Lube Filters 

Batteries 

Complete Exhausts 

Disc Or Drum Brakes 

Custom Wheels 

Tires 

Expert Front End Alignment 



THE TIRE PROS 



THE TIRE COMPANY WITH THE | 
SO.OOO MILE GUARANTEED RADIAL | 



249 



The Euclid High School BOOSTERS CLUB 
Salutes our fine athletes, our coaches and fans 
and congratulates them for being *Good Sports' 




PANTHERS 




EUCLID HIGH BOOSTERS CLUB 

MiKE LAVIGNA, JR. . . .PRESIDENT 

SAM CARLO VICE-PRESIDENT 

JANICE lAFELICE . . . .SECRETARY 
VINNIE CARLO TREASURER 



250 



Super Cuts 
For Guys And Gals 

DEN'S PLACE 

BEAUTY 

SALON 



22400 Shore Center Dr. 
Euclid, Ohio 44123 

731-2233 



Good Luck To The 

Class Of 1981 

From 

BOB'S BIG 
BOY 



263 Babbitt Road 
261-9580 



BOB ANDERSON 
REALTY 



21801 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

261-3200 




251 



DAVE SPROCHFS 
EUCLID DRIVING SCHOOL 



Complete student courses in as 
little as ten days. 



Adult lessons by the hour or 
the course. 



Gift certificates for holidays 
and birthdays. "~~ 



Private individual lessons. Reimbursement letters accept- 
ed as cash for student courses. 

Special brush-up lessons for 
Home pick-up. Drive even- the driving and maneuverabil- 
ings. Days or weekends. ity test. 



s Pre-temp instruction before 
"~~ your 16th birthday. 

Located In the Zalac Building 

J^SfiO East 200th Street At Ormiston Avenue 

531-6173 



A Class-A school. Fully certi- 
fied educationally, and com- 
mercially by the State of Ohio. 



JACKSON 
HARDWARE 

22306 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

261-9015 

Congratulations 
Class Of 1981 

From Pat And Nancy 
1961-62 Graduates 



'- ' - AND jt'/ll » 

SPAGHETTI HOUSrf 
TJi-1035 "= 



VARGO'S 
PIZZA 

26199 Chardon Rd. 
731-1033 




252 



RUSSELL 
MILLER 
GARAGE 

21800 St. Clair Ave. 
486-3698 



WiiL ; 

(I3eautu ^alc 



on 



22410 Shore Center Dr. 

For An Appointment 

Call 731-9358 



FLORAMA 
FLOWERS 

Flowers 'Round The Clock 
Day Or Night 7 Days A Week 

• Funeral And Wedding Designs 

• Commercial Accounts 

• Specialist In Dried And Silk 

Decorative Arrangements 

East 222nd And Lake Shore 
731-0200 




li\ h.ird lo gel ps\«:hcd for these clavscs after lunch 



253 



Party Room • Weddings • Meetings 

MIHELICH'S 

Hometown Restaurant 
And Lounge 

830 Babbitt Road 

Euclid Ohio 44123 

731-9689 



NOTTINGHAM 
AUTO BODY 

18927 St. Clair Ave. 

Cleveland Ohio 44117 

481-1337 




PAPA JOE'S 
SUBS 

564 East 200th St. 
692-1068 




JAY DEE 
CLEANERS 



878 East 222nd St. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

731-7060 



Congratulations 

And 

Best Wishes 

To The Class Of 1981 




ELECTRIC 



We Are An Equal Opportunity 
Employer 



254 




WILDWOOD 
FLORIST 



Flowers By Donna 
For All Occasions 



• Weddings • Funerals 

• Party Flowers • Fruit Baskets 

Flowers Wired Anywhere-Delivery 



486-5100 



20020 Lake Shore Corner East 200th 



SIMS BROS. BUICK, INC 



21601 Euclid Avenue 

Euclid, Ohio 44117 

Phone: 481-8800 



255 




PAPP'S BODY SHOP, INC 



20980 St. Clair Ave. 
481-4333 



Congratulations 
From 



RADIX 

WIRE 

COMPANY 



26260 Lakeland Blvd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44132 

731-9191 




SALTER 

AUTO 

PARTS CO. 



21149 Euclid Ave. 

Inside Sherwood Plaza 

486-3798 



256 




Mr. Euclid meets the Wolfman. 



ELECTRIC 

MOTOR 

REPAIR CO., 

INC. 



19751 St. Clair Ave. 

Cleveland, Ohio 44117 

531-5995 



Congratulations To 
The Class Of 1981 

GABRIEL 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY 



22090 Lake Shore Blvd. 
731-6888 




257 



THE HILLWOOD 
MANUFACTURING CO. 



Helyx Drive Screws-Nails-Tacks 

21700 St. Clair Ave. 

Euclid, Ohio 44117 

Telephone: (216) 531-0300 



258 



STOP LOOKING!! 



The Odds Are 100 To 1 We Have It 



FOREST 

CITY 

AUTO 

PARTS 

22460 Lakeland 

Blvd. 

289-5000 

Daily 8a.m. -10p.m. 
Sat. 8a.m. -8p.m. 
Sun. 9a.m. -5p.m. 




OPEN 



All Credit Cards Honored 
Free Parking 




SHERWOOD 
REFRACTORIES, INC. 

16601 Euclid Ave. 
Cleveland, Ohio 44112 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

Leader In High Temperature 

Ceramic & Foundry Technology 

Best Of Luck To The "81" Graduating 

Class 



Congratulations 

To The 
Class Of 1981 



NON-FERROUS METALS 
FABRICATING CO. 



21721 Tungsten Road 

Euclid, Ohio 44117 

531-3585 



259 



EUCLID WASHER 
PARTS 



YOUR ONE-STOP APPLIANCE 
PARTS CENTER 



»> WASHERS \^ DRYERS 

t^ RANGES V^ REFRIGERATORS 

\^ DISHWASHERS %^ VACUUMS 

451 E. 200th St. 
Euclid, Ohio 

531-5200 / 531-1522 

Open Mon.-Sat. 8:30-5 



Who needs a cue ball to play pool as long as you look cool? 




BmkAmuicmo 




Congratulations 
Class Of 1981 





HslierBody 

EUCLID PLANT 



20001 Euclid Ave 
Euclid, Ohio 44117 



FLICKINGER, 
INC 




939 East 222 St. 



731-9200 



260 



EUCLID 

BLUE 

PRINT & 

SUPPLY, INC. 

yn 




908 East 222nd St. 
731-4662 




EUCLID 
CHRYSLER 
PLYMOUTH 



20941 Euclid Ave. 
692-3900 



MODEL MEAT MARKET 

FRESH MEATS 

Home Made Quality Sausage 

Smoked Meats and Cold Cuts of All Kinds 



610 East 200th Street 
Euclid, Ohio 44119 



Phone orders gladly accepted 
Bus. 531-7447 



EUCLID 
AUTO PARTS 



A Tremendous Stock Of 
Nationally Advertised Brands 

At Low Discount Prices 

AC-Delco-Monroe-Champion 

Arvin- Wagner- TRW-3M 

Plus The Odds And Ends You Need 

25801 Euclid Ave. 
732-7500 



PAINTS - GLASS - HOUSEWARES 

PLUMBING . ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

GARDEN SUPPLIES 



e09 EAST 222ND STREET 



EUCLID 23, OHIO 



261 




UCLID, IIMC 



Subsidiary Of Daimier-Benz AG 
22221 St. Clair Ave. Euclid, Ohio 44117 




DiPaolo House 
Of Beauty 

911 East 222nd St. 
261-7272 




jfe: 



"Beauty Is Our Business" 

We Specialize In 

Permanents And Haircutting 




262 



Congratulations 

To The Class Of '81 

From 

McDonald's 

22291 Euclid Ave. 
16910 Lake Shore Blvd. 


ARMAO'S 
PT77A 

25571 Euclid Ave. 
731-7446 




CLEVKTASD 
BANDAG, INC. 

19015 St. Clair Ave. 
Cleveland Ohio 
(216) 531-2900 


CHESTERFIELD 
STEET , 

SERVICE CO. 

1220 East 222 St. 
Euclid, Ohio 


^^^^^^^^■^^ 


Congratulations, Class Of '81 
Your Future Is Our Future 

EI JCLID 

SAllONAL 

BANK 

Member F.D.LC. 781-3333 


Compliments Of 

FRllZ'S 
TAVERN 

991 East 185th St. 



263 



Congratulations 

And 

Good Luck 

To The 

Class Of 1981 


Congratulations 

To The 
Class Of 1981 

JACKSHAW 


FRENCH'S 


CHEVROLET 


PHARMACY 


INC. 


26598 Lake Shore Blvd. 


543 East 185th St. 
486-4400 





^3 i.,.,. ^^^ 










What a grind! 



Congratulations 

To The 

Class of 1981 



gingiss f ormalwear 



EUCLID SQUARE 
MALL 



264 




FRANK L. 
BLACK, JR. 
PAINTING 

AND 
PAPERING 



All Types Of Wall Coverings 
731-5074 



Good Luck, 
Joy 






SKI-WAY 

MACHINE 

PRODUCTS 

CO. 

24460 Lakeland Blvd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44132 

(216) 732-9000 

Precision Metal Parts 



265 




ANTHONY J. GUINTA 
MAYOR 



With Every Good Wish 
To The Graduates Of 
Euclid High School's 
Class Of 1981 



YOUR EUCLID CITY OFFICIALS 

Robert F. Niccum 

Judge 

Frank W. Payne 

Chief Of Police 

George R. Langa 

Fire Chief 

Patrick R. Rocco 

Law Director 

John A. Piscitello 

Director Of Public Services 

Louis C. Dommer 

Director Of Public Works 

Frank J. Chukayne 

Executive Director 

Richard T. Balazs 

Finance Director 

Paul Oyaski 

Director Of Community 

Services And Development 



EUCLID CITY COUNCIL 

President Of Council 
Thomas Meros 

Councilmen 

William L. DeMora, Ward 1 

Donald A. Malone, Ward 2 

George Carson, Ward 3 

Nick Marino, Ward 4 

Council-At-Large 

Dorothy Burkhart 

Edward Eckart 

Thomas McNamara 

Michael Kosmetos 

Clerk Of Council 
Lucille Kucharski 




266 



Martin | 
Lisac B 



Milan | 
Dekleva 



foTeigh motor 




19901 

St. Clair 

Cleveland 

Ohio 

44117 

481-6106 



EUCLID FOREIGN MOTORS 

INC. 

Parts And Accessories 

Expert Service On Volkswagen Vehicles 

Importer Of Pirelli And Gislaved Tires 

Body Work And Painting, Foreign And Domestic 



"^m^ 

s^^^- 




Maia And August Kollander 

KOLLANDER 
WORLD 
TRAVEL 

971 East 185th Street 

Cleveland, Ohio 44119 

692-2225 



TONY'S 

POLKA 

VILLAGE 

971 East 185th Street 

Cleveland, Ohio 44119 

481-7512 




Ton\ Petkovsek At The Mike 



267 



SHERWOOD 
COLLECTION 



3625 Lost Nation Rd. 
942-1043 



SMALL 
WORLD 
TRAVEL 

24300 Chagrin Blvd. 
464-5351 




STEVE'S TIRE 

AND 

AUTO CENTER 

22781 Shore Center Dr. 
289-0668 



VASSAR 
HEALTH FOODS 



21933 Euclid Ave. 
692-1875 



268 




MARK 
HAIRDRESSERS 



22308 Lake Shore Blvd. 
731-1550 



limmncf / lMi€nr ^ 



216/261-7787 
Res. 732-8089 
731-0883 



LUIKART 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY, INC. 



Ken Saywell 



21812 Lake Shore Blvd. 
Euclid, Ohio 44123 



26841 Tungsten Rd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44132 

Phone: (216) 261-2100 

TWX 810-421-8412 Telex 

98-5467 

Socket Head Products 

Cold Headed Products 

Cap Screws 

Set Screws 

Automatic And Hand 

Screw Machine Products 



ATTORNEY AND CDUNSELOn AT LAW 

22578 LAKESHDRE BLVD. 

EUCLID. DHI D 44123 

731-3500 



269 



PATRONS • PATRONS 



Dr. R.M. Baldwin 

21771 Lake Sliore Blvd. 

261^3111 



Cleansviiy 
2269 1 Shord 

731-1 



Bali Hai Restaurant 

25649 Euclid Ave. 

731-4800 

Beachland Pharmacy 

20010 Lake Shore Blvd. 

531-0631 

Belanich's Tavern 

780 East 222nd St. 

731-9842 

Breslers 33 Flavors 

Euclid Square Mall 

261-3374 

Bronko's Beverage 

510 East 200th St. 

531-8844 



ConvenienI 

811 East! 
^261-J 

Dairy * 

435 East 200th St. | 
486-0929 

Dee Anne Ceramics 
843 East 222nd St. 

261-7452 

Dee's Deli 

21932 Lake Shore Blvd. 
731-1682 

East 200th Hardware 

673 East 200th St. 

481-8448 




270 



PATRONS • PATRONS 



Euclid Office Supply 

756 East 222nd St. 

531-5311 



Dr. Allan A. Rolfe 

22408 Lake Shore Blvd. 

289-8998 



Euclid Travel Bureau 

22078 Lake Shore Blvd. 

261-1050 



S + S Deli And Lounge 

22810 Lake Shore Blvd. 

289- 8777 



Handy Rents 

23560 Lakeland Blvd. 

731-6950 



Shore Center Shoe Repair 

22748 Shore Center Dr. 

731-9569 



George Knaus Real Estate 

819 East 185th St. 

481-9300 



Small Tools, Inc. 

19749 St. Clair Ave. 

481-9000 



Leader Discount Drug 
22824 Lake Shore Blvd. 

731-7474 



Michael Sweeny 

National City Bank 

285 Babbitt Rd. 

732-7800 



Martin's Dairy Bar 

20321 Euclid Ave. 

486-1325 



F.W. Woolworth Co. 
22830 Lake Shore Blvd. 

731-3878 



271 



FnHnntf ^^^ '^^' Euclidian grew out of brain- 
IZ/llUllULC. 3^Qrjj,ing by the Euclidian staff, sugges- 
tions for areas of improvement from on 
evaluation of the 1980 book, and ideas 
presented at a summer workshop attended 
by several staff members. In some ways 
the book is radically different from past 
Euclid yearbooks. We hope that the stu- 
dent body finds it both an accurate and 
entertaining reflection of the 1980-1981 
school year. 



Specifics: 



Editors: 



Photographers: 



Staff: 



1 200 copies of the 1 98 1 Euclidian were 
printed by the Josten's/ American Year- 
book Company. It is printed on Gloss 191 
paper and contains eight pages of full col- 
or and eight pages of spot color. The full 
color cover was original artwork designed 
by Bill Mason. 

Activities Editor — Judy Krnc 
Underclass Editor — Amy Reno 
Sports Editor — Beth Cramer 
Faculty Editor — Linda Lawrence 
Senior Section Editor — Bethany Hook 
Adviser — Mr. Petrovic 

Mike Cotter, Jim Brown, Mike Durbin, 
Brian Reno, Steve Lausin, Steve Clay, 
Ray Tice, Jim Ambrose, Judy Hasse, 
Carol Walsh. 

Joy Black. Kelly Dunlevy, Peggy Linn, Ed 
Maroli, Bill Mason, Marcia Myers, Lisa 
Stupansky, Ann Wintle, Joy Hoon, Valer- 
ie Hrobat, Robert Scott, Lisa Dezelon, 
Renee Evans, Beth Franko, Ellyn Gleisser, 
Lisa lannicelli, Jenny Jambor, Scott Kost, 
Don Kucera, Lisa Letcher, Linda Lewin, 
Simone Lisac, Audrey Lonchar, Jan Mi- 
helcic, Sandy Neumann, Amy Ogrinc, 
Beth Pritchard, Mark Speck, Katie Tally, 
Roberta Yuhas, Debra Kelly, Destiny 
Morgan, Maureen Colling, Donna France- 
tic, Lesa Galer, Laurie Hanlon, Elaine 
Haupt, Hillary Hook, Brian Kime, Mike 
Kucera, Paul Leasure, Nadine Lisac, Av- 
ril Mclnally, Terri Nickel, Wendy Poto- 
kar, Lisa Rhone, Sharon Tice, Lynn Yuko, 
Kate McLaughlin 



Special Thanks: 



The yearbook staff would like to thank 
Mr. Michael Kingery, our Josten's repre- 
sentative, for his assistance this year; Mor- 
rie and Doug Levine of Raimor Studios 
for providing photographic equipment and 
processing; the faculty of Euclid High 
School for their understanding of the oc- 
casional tardiness of a few Euclidian staff 
members to class; and especially the stu- 
dents of Euclid High School for being 
what they are — great subjects for a high 
school yearbook. 



EUCLID PUBLIC LIBRARY 





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