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Full text of "Euclidian"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Euclid Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/euclidian35unse 



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EUCLIDIAN 

A Year . . . 

Between The Lines 

Euclid Senior High School 

711 East 222 Street 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

Volume 35 




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LARGE PICTURE: An important part 
of everyday takes place between the 
gold walls of the cafeteria. The 
"senior smiles" reflect the social and 
nutritional importance of lunch. TOP: 
Mike Baitt and Steve Morek practice 
their vocational skills when working 
in the auto shop. MIDDLE The 
library, lined with books, is a central 
spot for EHS students. BOTTOM: 
Jenny Metcalf and her lab partner 
share skill and knowledge in biology 
class. 



s the 1983-1984 
school year begins, so 
does the world between 
the lines of Euclid High. 

What are these lines? They 
are the various directions that 
the students take. They can be 
as limiting as time — 7:45 to 



2:35 — or as indefinite as the 
community, the nation, or the 
world. The students are caught 
between these lines for their 
freshman, sophomore, junior, 
and senior years, until enter- 
ing a new set of lines. 

— J. Majera 



Theme 



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CA UGHT! 



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TOP LEFT: Anthony Fimiani studies 
the lines of his program. LARGE 
PICTURE: Pre-game football practice 
under the watchful eyes of coaches 
lead to the success between the lines 
of the playing field. MIDDLE LEFT: 
Summer practice for the flag corps 
took place under the hot sun and on 
the lines of the parking lot. BOTTOM 
LEFT: The percussion section of the 
marching band lines up ready to 
perform. 



q] ow and why there is a 
J'world between the 
II lines depends on the 
people who are the lining of 
the school: those who come to 
school and participate, those 
who stay late to practice and 
perform, and those who are ac- 



tive all the other times. 

The pages of this book try to 
capture all the various lines 
that are Euclid High and pre- 
serve them for time down the 
line. 

— J. Majers 



Theme 






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Theme 1-4 

Student Life 6-35 

Activities 36-71 

Sports 72-121 

Academics 122-147 

Underclass 148-189 

Seniors '"* I . -j , 1 90-243 
Advertising~ib. J ?~&44-277 
Index ..,■...•• 278-277 
Closing 294-296 



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THE LINING 



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LARGE PICTURE: Sometime during 
his four years at Euclid, every student 
attends a Friday night football game 
and adds to the sideline scene. TOP: 
The Homecoming Dance brings 
together Eric Vrancar, Kathy O'Brien, 
John Dever, Mary Swider, and Greg 
Deardan. MIDDLE: The bleachers are 
lines with students, but each one is a 
clear face in the crowd. BOTTOM: 
Andrea Kosic and Cindy Black work 
for the Ad Club together. 




here do these lines 
exist? They are the sur- 
face of a student's life: 
his peers, his community, his 
work, his school. They can 
continue to expand within his 
boundaries or enter another 
dimension. What goes on be- 
tween the lines is entirely up 



to the individual. Euclid High 
provided for all its students an 
excellent education, activities 
and sports, while allowing for 
enjoyable times. The bound- 
aries for EHS students are 
limitless. 

— J. Majers 



Student Life Divider 



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iors Open To Reyea. 
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Sexy, but serious 




— tactically (very kcker at 
EHS has at liast one type of 
decoration hjanging on the 
door. 

Students who decotate their locker 
have a unique way o ' doing t. Some 
students cut phrase; out oF maga- 
zines and tape them on thje locker 



-deer-srdeWaysrherizontally, br verti 
cally. Photographs and pictures tak 
en from magazines are a must, as are 
drawings and mirrors. Music and, 
rock groups are items seen oh practi 
cally every locker door. 

But why decorate? Sophomore 
Bonnie Snitzy says, "If you don't pu 



things -en-yotrr lodrerr-it looks too 
plain." Paula Schaefer, a freshman 
adds, "Decorations give lockers char- 
acter." 

Decorated or not, a locker is still a 
locker. But one must admit, decora- 
tion brings out genius. 




Spirit Of '84 

Extracurricular Activities 
Help Inspire Panther Spirit 



ou need the super glue of 
spirit to hold together the 
2200 students of EHS. 
Sports, clubs, and organizations all 
provide outlets for the student 
body's energy. Many students dis- 
played their pride in the school sys- 
tem by helping with the levy cam- 



paign. Other students supported 
their school by attending games, 
dances, concets, and plays. Fans pro- 
vided the extra punch that helped 
some teams win championships and 
others to stick together in an unlucky 



season. 



—J. Ble 



TOP ROW: Bob Dzomba and Lisa 
Vihtelic shout out their spirit. Joan 
Mast and Sue Jazbec combine 
academics and fun. Eric Tomasch and 
Keith Parsons sharpen their cooking 
skills. MIDDLE ROW: Lisa Brisbine 
and Steve Ostrom enjoy a halftime 
break. Students find the library a 
comfortable place to relax. The loss to 
St. Joe's. Varsity Chorale members 
perform at a football game. Gabrielle 
Holland is a devoted marching band 
member. Nichting and Mayle, a great 
team. BOTTOM ROW: The flag corps 
and band get their act together. Tony 
Gholson paints up a storm. Chris 
Cahoon, Lisa Rocco, Kim Busch, and 
Chris Bednarik are EHS's die-hard 
fans. Volleyballers score a point. 
Carrie Fazio and Joan Cable share a 
moment together. The spirit hits the 
books. 




School Spirit 



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School Spirit 



Kardos Queen 



Homecoming Election And Dance 
Highlight The Fall's Activities 



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I Tuesday, October 11, where 
the Queen and her Court were 
crowned. This year's Court was com- 
posed of freshman attendant Shan- 
non Wagner, sophomore attendant 
Chris Chinchar, junior attendant Sue 
Szmania, senior attendants Danielle 
Nichting and Sue Herrick, and 
Homecoming Queen Faith Kardos. 

On Wednesday, October 12, a pa- 
rade traveled from Shore Junior 
High up East 222 Street to Euclid 
High School. After a spirited pep ral- 
ly, a bonfire topped off the night 
with the cheerleaders leading the vi- 
vacious cheers. 

The Homecoming Game against 
Willoughby South was exciting and 
filled with team spirit. The Panthers 
shut out South by a score of 17-0. 
The Homecoming Queen and her 
Court were presented to the fans at 
halftime. 



FAR RIGHT: Juliana Powaski, Sharon 
Kelly, Barb Tingley, and Joan Mast 
lead the junior cheering section for 
their favorite candidate. RIGHT: 
Gabrielle Holland, Chris Wright, Eric 
Schultz and Carol Trevarthen enjoy 
this Saturday evening in October. 
MIDDLE: Junior homecoming 
attendant candidates nervously await 
the final decision. 




Phil Karibinus and his date, in line for 
pictures at the dance. 





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Homecoming 




Homecoming 



Come Dancing 

Fast, Fancy Footwork Flaunted 
On Field And On Dance Floor 



he Queen and her Court 
ended their two week reign at 
the Homecoming Dance, held 
on Saturday, October 22, which was 
attended by 167 couples. The theme 
of the dance was Come Dancing. The 
E-room was decorated with musical 
notes and old photographs. Colorful 
ballons and streamers filled every 
nook and cranny. From eight to elev- 



en o'clock, the couples danced to the 
music of Thief. 

Kathy O'Brien summed up her 
feelings about Homecoming by say- 
ing, "It was a very memorable even- 
ing. I enjoyed the sounds of Thief, 
and the Student Council did a fan- 
tastic job on this extravaganza." 



BELOW: The Stage Band provides the 
Homecoming assembly muzak. The 
1983-84 Homecoming Court: bottom 
row, Chris Chincar, Shannon Wagner, 
Sue Szmania; top row, Danielle 
Nichting, Queen Faith Kardos, Sue 
Herrick. BOTTOM ROW: John Yehl 
and Dawn DeFillipo are joined with a 
rose. The Homecoming assembly 
brought joy to all who participated in 
it. Sue Herrick and her father are 
presented during half time. 




Homecoming 



14 





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LEFT: The dance floor was the center 
of attention at the Homecoming 
Dance. BELOW: Faith Kardos and 
Todd King cuddle up. Shannon O'Brien 
and her date are interrupted during a 
slow dance. Rich Wilson and Sue 
Herrick take a break for 
refreshments. BOTTOM ROW: Troy 
Davis sings lead for the Homecoming 
band. Thief. Cindy Engleking, Steve 
Morek, Mike Baitt, and Kim Zndarsic 
take time out for a chat at the 
Homecoming Dance. 




15 



Homecoming 



Working 5 To 9 

What A Way To Make A Living? 9 
EHS Students Often Wonder 



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hen a person thinks of high 
school, he may think of a 
class, like English or biology, 
of the clubs and activities. However, 
what he may forget is that most like- 
ly he will need or want to get a job. 

The average working student 
spends 10 to 15 hours a week on the 
job and earns $3.35 an hour. Not sur- 
prisingly, most students say that 
they are working for the money and 
that most of the money is being 
saved for college. 

Not all the students just see the 
dollar signs. Lorrie Miller, for exam- 
ple, has always wanted to work in a 
department store. She also plans to 
work in the field of psychology, and 
she feels that her job at the May 
Company "is a chance to meet all 
types of people." 

When students were asked if their 
jobs reflected what they wanted to 
do in the future, only a few said yes. 
Danielle Nichting works at the Casu- 
al Corner because she wants to go 
into fashion design and merchandis- 
ing. Pam Hogan hopes to someday be 
a chef, so she got a job at the Brown 
Derby helping to prepare food in the 
kitchen. 

The vast majority of students, 
however, don't plan on pursuing 
their present jobs forever. As Jeff 
Spencer, who works at McDonald's 
says, "I don't expect to be saying, 'Hi, 
may I help you?' for the rest of my 
life." 

— R. Phillips 



RIGHT: Tina Luther puts in 10 to 12 
hours a week at the Euclid Square 
Mall Burger King. MIDDLE: Willie 
Rembert spends 20 hours a week 
washing dishes at the Big Boy on 
Babbit Rd. FAR RIGHT: Dave Bell 
helps stock the clothing racks at J. 
Riggins. 




Student Jobs 



16 




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17 



Student Jobs 



The Big Picture 

Seniors Finally Get Organized; 
Picture Shows A Touch Of Class 



he Aardvarks came to Euclid 
in 1983. On December 13th, 
Aardvark Studios and the 
seniors worked together to photo- 
graph the entire class of 1984 in one 
sitting. 

After homeroom, the seniors were 
directed to the boys' gym. The girls 
and boys were separated, each going 
to a different balcony. In each loft, 
students were arranged according to 
height. Those students who wished 
to order a class picture could pay the 
$11 price at that time. 

The seniors then sat on the bleach- 
ers, the girls in the bottom rows and 
the boys above them. They were 
squeezed together so everyone would 
fit into the picture. Twelfth-grade 
unit principal, Mr. Robert Lombardo 
kept the 560 seniors in order from 
below. 

As the picture was about to be 
snapped, Tony Raffaele stood up and 
said, "Mr. Lombardo, since you're 
part of our class, you should be up 
here." As the approving seniors gave 
a standing ovation, Lombardo joined 
them for their picture. 




ABOVE: Carol Bammerlin and Cheri 
Smith tune up their smiles for the big 
picture. 




The Big Picture 



18 




19 



The Big Picture 



Fads & Fashions 



Care Bears, Cabbage Patch Dolls, 
Flashdressing Top Year's Fads. 



1983-1984 was a year to remember 
as Care Bears, unicorns, and rain- 
bow covered lockers, folders, pencils, 
and even shoelaces. 

Fashions ranged from miniskirts 
to camouflage outfits. Punk and 
preppy were coordinated; and oxford 
and polo shirts, pinstripe jeans, ar- 
gyle sweaters and socks, and skinny 
ties in pink, grey, purple, and bright 
colors were popular with everyone 
from freshmen to seniors. The movie 
Flashdance set the style of flash- 
dressing in sweatshirts. 

Flashdressing was both fashion- 
able and practical as everyone be- 
came especially conscious of physical 
fitness. Jazzercise was fun exercise; 
and Euclid's own Panthercise be- 
came part of the Physical Education 
curriculum. 

Dancing was also a favorite fitness 
and social affair. Pogo, slam, and 
break dancing were popular with the 
students. 

The video game craze was still 
around, but was updated as students 
brought the arcade home. Many stu- 
dents were investing in home com- 
puters and video games, saving their 
quarters to buy new cartridges. 

Buttons, pins, and other miscella- 
neous jewelry became popular; and 
even boys got into the action by 
sporting earrings from their pierced 
left ear. 

MTV began to replace records for 
who could resist being able to both 
hear and see their favorite music be- 
ing performed? Soap operas re- 
mained popular, with Laura Spen- 
cer's return to General Hospital be- 
ing the big news of the year. 

It could be said that everyone was 
active in setting the trends for for 
1983-1984 and no one was left out, 
for being yourself was definitely in. 

-C. Bednarik 



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ABOVE: Video games remained 
popular as ever in 1984. 



BELOW: The Cabbage Patch craze 
swept the nation in time for 
Christmas 




Fads 



20 




BIG PICTUlnirjaM»«»i*eJ^canie 
so popular that the Physical 
Education department offered a 
course in it. BELOW: Freshman 
Harry Murphy demonstrates his 
break dance moves. 




21 



Fashions 



Halloween '83 

Segulin Wins Costume Contest 
As Spirits Deck The Halls Of EHS 



alloween Dress-up Day 
proved to be the biggest since 
the tradition was established 
several years ago. 

Literally hundreds of students 
came to school dressed in all manner 
of costumes. The Student Council 
sponsored a class competition to see 
which class would have the most stu- 
dents in costume. The sophomores 
turned out to be the winners. 

Individually outstanding costumes 
were identified during the lunch per- 
iods by the teachers and paraprofes- 
sinals in the cafeteria. The students 
were invited to come to the Student 
Council meeting 8° for final judging. 
Senior Bill Segulin won the costume 
contest with his "Headless Substi- 
tute Teacher" garb. 

— H. Gauzman 



RIGHT: Bill Degulin won the costume 
contest with his rendition of the 
"Headless Substitute Teacher". FAR 
RIGHT: Many more students came to 
school in costume than for any other 
Halloween since the tradition was 
established. 




ABOVE: I woke up this morning with 
this strange feeling. 




Halloween 



22 





ABOVE: The true natures of the 
Student Council representatives 
shows through. FAR LEFT: Hi, I'm 
Peanut and this is my sister Plain. 
LEFT: Lisa Brisbine as Charlie 
Chaplin waddles through the 
cafeteria. 



23 



Halloween 



Special Places 

Like Students' Personalities, 
'Diversity' Describes Their Rooms 



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ill . F. Skinner would say that a 
person's environment forms 
— ill his personality. The holistice 
school, on the other hand, asserts 
that an individual's environment is 
formed by his personality. Although 
they disagree about the relative im- 
portance of environment and person- 
ality, both agree that there is an un- 
mistakable link between the two-es- 
pecially for teenagers. 

A room at home is the most per- 
sonalized element of a student's en- 
vironment. The character traits of a 
person are often revealed in the char- 
acteristics of his home. 

Students also view their rooms in 
different ways. EHS senior Andy Ca- 
labrese uses his room to get away 
from his parents with a barricade of 
dirty clothes. On a more sublime 
note, Jeff Tekanic said, "I go to my 
room to get beyond petty existence. I 
go there 'to be'". 

Whatever their individual views 
about their room, all students believe 
it to be a special place. 



RIGHT: Senior Carol Perovshek, a 
vocational art student, works on a 
likeness of Adam Ant in her room. 
BIG PICTURE: Patriotism would seem 
to be on the top of the list of Marv 
Spehar's personality traits. FAR 
RIGHT: Frank Hufnagle decides what 
to work on next now that he's finished 
cleaning his room. 




ABOVE: Ken Reichert catches up on 
some reading in his room. 




Room At Home 



24 




25 



Room At Home 



Getting There 

Using Two Legs Or Four Wheels, 
Students Make Their Ways To EHS 




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etting to school can present 
problems for some high 
school students. While driv- 
ing to school is the ideal solution, 
most students, if the truth be known, 
take the bus. 

Some students liked bus transpor- 
tation; others decidedly did not. Ka- 
tarina Oroz and Tracy Van Beneden 
disliked standing at cold bus stops 
and riding overcrowded buses. 

One of the best and healthiest 
ways of transporting oneself to 
school is to walk although it can be 
mighty cold in the winter. Riding a 
bike is also healthy but not very 
practical when the snow starts 
flying. 

The luckiest students are those 
who can drive to school. Although 
they do have to worry about scraping 
gas money together, people who 
drive (or get driven) don't have to 
worry about frozen toes or missed 
buses. 

— C. Wajahn, K. Benedum 



BIG PICTURE: Bicycles proved a 
popular method of transportation in 
the fall and spring. RIGHT: Naturally, 
driving was voted the best way of 
getting to school. CENTER: Some 
students actually walked to school! 
FAR RIGHT: Getting a ride was the 
next best thing to driving yourself to 
school. 




ABOVE: Bus riding got the lowest 
marks as a means of transportation. 




Transportation 



26 




27 



Transportation 



After Dark 



School Dances Pack E-Room 
As Students Search For Fun 



fter dark on various occasions 
the E-room is transformed 
into a chamber full of blaring 
music and faceless strangers. No, it's 
not the setting for a new horror flick, 
but an ordinary Euclid High School 
dance. 

Students gather in the E-room for 
a wild night of fun. As the dance pro- 
gresses, all sorts of characters lurk 
about, many of whom are dressed in 
bizarre sorts of attire. It doesn't mat- 
ter how foolish one acts because ev- 
eryone has been lured into a state of 
mutual nuttiness. 

The dancing itself is a world of 
constant movement. It seems that no 
matter how one moves, it is consid- 
ered dancing. 

The newest developments in the 
world of dancing can be seen: the 
moon walk, the line dance, and break 
dancing — a form of self-inflicted 
physical abuse. 

The dance-going crowd thinks life 
would be dull without their little fun 
sport. Marvin Spehar said, "Dances 
are a great way to have an evening of 
fun." Another dance-goer, Tim 
Obosky, commented, "Dances are a 
good way to meet new friends." 

School dances are a good place to 
socialize and let off a little steam 
after a hard week in school. 

•C. Majers 

RIGHT: A punk night club? No, just 
EHS students coming in costume for 
the Halloween Dance. 




Why do the sailors always get the 
girls? 




Dances 



28 





29 



Dances 



Sweethearts 

Nemecek Famed Queen 
in Winter Festival Election 



inter Festival activities com- 
menced on Friday, February 
3, with an assembly announc- 
ing the Winterfest Court. Student 
Council representatives, Lynn Ben- 
civenni and Rich Wilson hosted the 
event, and the Stage Band and Varsi- 
ty Chorale performing "Lady", pro- 
vided the entertainment. Last year's 
court made the long awaited an- 
nouncements of the King, Queen and 
their court. Freshman attendants 
were Dave Potokar and Amy Skiljan. 
Sophomore attendants were Arman 
Ochoa and Lynn Mayle. Chosen as 
Junior attendants were Bill DeMora 
and Cindy Clark. Senior attendants 
were Brett Molnar, Steve Morek, 
Chris Kane, Cindy Engelking and 
Tracey Wandersleben; and crowned 
as the 1984 Winterfestival King and 
Queen were Bob Nacinovich and 
Amy Nemecek. The King, Queen and 
their court were again presented at 
the basketball game against Wil- 
loughby South, on Friday night. 

Winter Festival activities contin- 
ued Tuesday, February 7, with 
"Preppy-Dress" Day, setting off a 
week of class competition. The high- 
light of class competition took place 
on Wednesday, with the annual Bat- 
tle of the Classes. Students showed 
their spirit by sporting the designat- 
ed color of each class' team. On 
Thursday and Friday, students 
dressed in fashions from the 40's and 
60's, concluding class competition. 

The dance, taking place Saturday, 
February 11, concluded Winter Fes- 
tival activities. This year's theme 
was "Winter Sweethearts", and en- 
tertaintment was provided by 
"Sound on Wheels". Tickets cost 
$14.00 a couple. 

-C. Bednarik 



RIGHT: Andrea Kosic congratulates 
Winter Festival queen Amy Nemecek. 
FAR RIGHT: Bill DeMora is 
congratulated by Barb Tingley. 




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Winter Festival 



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TOP: Judy Hufnagle and Chris Kane 
take a stroll in front of the student 
bodv at the Winter Festival assembly. 
LEFT, WINTER FESTIVAL COURT, 
BOTTOM ROW: Amy Skiljan, 
freshman attendant; Amy Nemecek, 
queen; Lynn Mayle, sophomore 
attendant; Tracey Wandersleben, 
senior attendant. ROW 2: Cindy Clark, 
junior attendant; Cindy Engelking, 
senior attendant; Bob Nacinovich, 
king; Chris Kane, senior attendant; 
Bill DeMora, junior attendant. ROW 3: 
Dave Potokar, freshman attendant; 
Arman Ochoa, sophomore attendant; 
Steve Morek, senior attendant, Brett 
Molnar, junior attendant. 



31 



Winter Festival 



Jackson's Year 

Entertainer Michael Jackson 
Is THE Story Of The Year 




he entertainment world saw 
old, familiar faces dominat- 
ing the scene. 

The drama of popular music fea- 
tured the same cast that had starred 
the previous decade. 

The music industry was dominat- 
ed by Michael Jackson. Jackson 
helped make M-TV marketable by 
producing music videos to accompa- 
ny his hits "Beat It" and "Thriller". 
Combining a disco beat, excellent in- 
strumental accompaniment such as 
Van Halen's lead guitarist, Eddie 
Van Halen, and his own distinctive 
voice, Jackson's music was universal- 
ly popular and thoroughly commer- 
cial. 

The greatest of the rock groups of 
the early 70's, Yes, re-formed and 
put out a hit album. Other groups, 
such as the Everly Brothers, the Ani- 
mals, and Simon and Garfunkle, got 
back together in 1984. Robert Plant's 
second solo album after leaving the 
legendary Led Zepplin established 
him as an international star in his 
own right. Heavy metal bands, such 
as Def Leppard, remained popular. 
An era in rock history closed when 
guitarist Pete Townsherd left the 
Who. 

Television and the movies were 
two areas where quality was evident. 
Cheers and Hill Street Blues were 
both artistic and commercial suc- 
cesses. Other popular shows were 
Dallas, 60 Minutes, The A-Team, 
Falcon Crest, Magnum PI, Dynasty, 
and Simon and Simon. 

Concerned over nuclear war boost- 
ed the ratings of the made-for-TV 
movie The Day After, which painted 
the picture of a nuclear strike on 
Lawrence, Kansas. The TV show 
proved to be one of the most highly- 
watched in TV history. 

Movies like Terms of Endearment, 
Sudden Impact, and Flashdance 
were among the biggest moneymak- 
ers of the year. 



The leading best-sellers of the year 
proved to be James Mitchner's Po- 
land and Steven King's Pet Ceme- 
tery. 

In sports, the Indians found them- 
selves mired in their traditional sixth 
place, with the Orioles sweeping the 
World Series in five games. 

The Browns had a disappointing 
record and failed to make the play- 
offs. Quarterback Brian Sipe jumped 
to the rival United States Football 
League. In the Super Bowl, the Los 
Angeles Raiders crushed the Wash- 
ington Redskins. 



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Senior Scott Wallace entertains E- 

r n crowds with a break dancing 

demonstration. BIG PICTURE: 
Headlines summarize the major 
entertainment stories of the year. 



Entertainment 



32 



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33 



Entertainment 



Year In Review 

Lebanon, Flight 007, Elections 
Major Stories Of 1983-1984 



s always, tragedies dominat- 
ed the news headlines in 
1983-1984. With Ronald Rea- 
gan as President, the United States 
assumed a more vigorous role in 
world affairs. 

On October 23, 1983, at 6:22 a.m., a 
truck carrying two tons of TNT 
smashed into the Marine compound 
in Beirut, Lebanon, and exploded. 
241 Marines, part of an international 
peacekeeping force, were crushed by 
debris. A FBI report called the ex- 
plosive the largest and most sophisti- 
cated conventional bomb ever seen. 
After the massacre, critics said that 
the Marines' mission had been poor- 
ly defined and demanded that they 
be withdrawn from Lebanon. 

Another early morning massacre 
ignited world outrage. On September 
1, 1983, Korean Air Line flight 007 
was shot down by a Soviet missle, 
killing all 269 passengers and crew. 
Violating Soviet airspace, the plane 
had flown over a highly sensitive 
military complex. For weeks, the 
USSR denied shooting down the 
plane; and when they admitted it, no 
justification was given. Nor was a 
reason for the plane's intrusion into 
Soviet territory ever explained. 

In November, American troops in- 
vaded the island nation of Grenada 
to prevent a Cuban takeover. A coup 
had resulted in a Marxist govern- 
ment. To restore democracy, the U.S. 
launch a ten-day assault to secure 
the island. The victory relieved the 
feeling of impotence the U.S. suf- 
fered after the Beirut massacre. The 
public reaction was positive despite 
the 163 American casualties, demon- 
strating that for the first time since 
the Vietnam War, the nation would 
approve of aggresive military action. 

In 1983-1984, the U.S. economy re- 
covered from the worst recession 
since the 1930's. Inflation fell to un- 
der 4%. However, future prosperity 
was uncertain. One in six Americans 



lived in poverty. The federal deficit 
grew to record size because of mili- 
tary spending and tax cuts. In 1984, 
13% of tax revenues went to pay the 
interest on the national debt. Deficit 
spending became a major issue in the 
1984 election. 

Another election issue was the nu- 
clear freeze movement. When the 
U.S. deployed Pershing nuclear mis- 
siles in Europe, the U.S.S.R. with- 
drew from arms control negotiations. 

People dominated world news. Po- 
lish Solidarity leader Lech Walesa 
won the Nobel Peace Prize. Mena- 
chem Begin resigned as Israeli Prime 
Minister. Exiled political leader 
Benigno Aquino was assassinated 
upon returning to the Phillipines. 
Soviet Premier Yuri Andropov died 
after a long illness and was replaced 
by Konstantin Chernenko. U.S. Inte- 
rior Secretary James Watt, noted 
for his political faux pas, was forced 
to resign after saying, "I have a 
black, a woman, two Jews, and a crip- 
ple" on a coal mining commission. 

Campaigning in earnest for the 
1984 Presidential election began, 
with President Reagan seeking re- 
election. Former Vice-President 
Walter Mondale and Colorado sena- 
tor Gary Hart emerged as the leading 
Democratic candidates when Ohio 
Senator John Glenn's campaign fal- 
tered. Reverand Jesse Jackson's bid 
for the Democratic nomination re- 
sulted in greater political participa- 
tion by minorities. 

In Ohio, voters rejected proposals 
to cut newly instituted tax increases 
and to raise the drinking age for beer 
from 19 to 21. In local elections, 
Mayor Anthony Guinta was re-elct- 
ed and the Euclid school levy was 
defeated by the paper-thin margin of 
86 votes. 

-J- Blevins 



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The Outside World 



34 





























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ABOVE: The flag nies at half-mast in 
honor of the 241 Marines killed in a 
Beirut bombing incident. FAR LEFT: 
Ohio voters soundly defeated an 
attempt to roll back Governor 
Celeste's tax increase. LEFT: 
Newspaper headlines summarize some 
of the major stories of the year. 



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35 



The Outside World 




.. £>" 'flrvi *i£r 







TOP: Euclidian photographer John 
Bolsar prepares to snap a picture of 
the Student Council. MIDDLE: The 
Senior Class Cabinet meets with Mr. 
Lombardo at its Thursday morning 
session. BOTTOM: Mr. Godfrey 
rehearses the ninth grade choir for 
the Winter Choral Concert. BIG 
PICTURE: Marv Spehar does his thing 
with the Marching Band 



B 



eyond the classroom, 
EHS students had ac- 
cess to a whole host of 
activites. Some were tradition- 
al, like the Key Club and the 
Student Council. Others, like 
the Peer Counselors and Peer 
Tutors, were adapted to the 



changing student concerns. 
These changes had a domino 
effect, creating more interest 
and increased involvement. 

After the final bell rings at 
2:35 these activities help to 
structure the outlines of the 
students' lives. 

-J. Majers 



Activities Divider 



36 



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UTLINE 



37 



Activities Divider 



Leaders 



hroughout the school year, 
the Student Council sponsors 
dances, spirit promotions, 
and various assemblies to make 
school a little more bearable and 
much more fun. 

Student Council's first and longest 
project was the Spirits Club, which 
met every Wednesday from 7-9 PM 
to paint signs in support of the 
school's athletic teams. The Student 
Council also ran the E-room snack 
bar, which was open until 3:30 every 
day, so students could get together 
and talk over popcorn, candy and 
pop. 

Various special days throughout 
the year were also sponsored by the 
Student Council. The Halloween 
Dress-Up Day and Battle of the 
Classes were two of these special 
days. 

The Student Council was also re- 
sponsible for organizing and decorat- 
ing for the Homecoming Dance and 
the Winter Festival Dance. 

-J. Allay 



STUDENT COUNCIL BOTTOM ROW: 
Karla Thompson, Sue Perdan, Susan 
Buettner, Amy Skiljan, Laurie Luther. 
ROW 2: Beth Lauver, Sue Sekerak, 
Kathy King, Diane Hallo, Missy 
Malone, Sharon Hansen. ROW 3: Mike 
Leyda, Gennie Donley, Laura Roberts, 
Shelley Aspinwall, Lynn DiPaolo, 
Sandy Furlan, Elian Barth. ROW 4: 
Paul Munz, Ed Wilson, Chris Wright, 
Rhonda Sterrick, Kris Fazio, Aretha 
Hennessee, Mary Swider, Jennifer 
Taylor. ROW 5: Paul Harris, Greg 
Knack, Martin Lisac, Lynn Mayle, Ed 
Gembarski, Catherine Barkley, Todd 
Schrock, Lynn Bencivenni, Kent Smith, 
Janet Brentar, Rich Wilson. NOT 
PICTURED: Jim Bowdouris, Kathy 
Ukmar, Pat Chrestoff, Diane Maroli, 
Beth Richards. 





Jim Bowdouris, Missy Malone, and 
Lynn Mayle work on decorations for 
the Winter Festival Dance. 


STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS BOT- 
TOM ROW: Mary Swider, secretary. ROW 
2: Lynn Bencivenni, treasurer; Rich Wil- 
son, vice-president. TOP: Kent Smith, 
president. 







Student Council 



38 




39 



Student Council 





Tracey Wandersleben and Rick 
Holcknecht help Senior Class Cabine 
members decorate the cafeteria for 
Breakfast with Santa. The event 
earned $250 for the senior class fum 



Class Cabinets 



40 






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FRESHMEN CLASS CABINET 
BOTTOM ROW: Tanya Lomac, Cary 
Sanders, Colleen Wajahn. ROW 2: 
Sonya Reno, Katarina Oroy, Luann 
Tomasi, Beth Lauren. ROW 3: Rob 
Carlson, Brenda Peterson, Andrea 
Hooks, Dawn Andresky. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS CABINET 
BOTTOM ROW: Rochelle Pittock, 
Diane Maroli, Karen Lorence, Mary 
Matsko. ROW 2: Amy Suponcic, Anita 
Yuhas, Kirsten Brown, Laura Elze, 
Kathy Eiding. ROW 3: Mary Segulin, 
Rose Gubitosi, Sharon Berke, Amy 
Waltermire, Jean Chen. ROW 4: Mary 
Penko, Thomas Daugherty, Dean 
Sopko, Gretchen Van deMotter, Laura 
Rattini, Sue Szmania, Steve Cooney. 




JUNIOR CLASS CABINET BOTTOM 
ROW: Jenny Stone, Beth Terango, Sue 
Tucceri. ROW 2: Darnise Stephens, 
Jackie Eddy, Jim Korzun, Juliana 
Powaski. ROW 3: Joanie Hodnichak, 
Leanne Sterbank, Launi Leaper, Bill 
DeMora. 




ENIOR CLASS CABINET BOTTOM 
OW: Sheri Corman, Carol 
revarthen, Kathy O'Brien, Laura 
iletrik, Renee Phillips. ROW 2: 
laron Hansen, Shelly Aspin wall. Sue 



Buettner, Karen Cook, Jennifer 
Taylor. ROW 3: Tony Gholsen, Cindy 
Black, Gary Tressler, Andrea Kosic, 
Mike Lange. 



Class 



he Senior Class Cabinet con- 
sists of sixteen elected mem- 
bers who were selected by 
their fellow-seniors to represent 
their class. The objective of the cabi- 
net is to raise $6000 and to have fun 
doing it. 

The cabinet tries to support fun 
activities for the senior year. Two of 
these events were Breakfast with 
Santa and Senior Talent Night. 

Mr. Lombardo said that he was 
lucky. "The class cabinet had people 
who were willing to work," he com- 
mented. He also added that Miss 
Harris had been a great help with the 
cabinet. 

The Junior Class Cabinet was 
composed of fourteen members 
whose essential goal was to raise 
money for the Senior Prom. This was 
accomplished through various mon- 
ey raisers. For example, this year the 
Junior Class Cabinet sponsored a 
Toga Dance and the New Year's 
Flower Sale. 

Like the juniors, the Sophomore 
Class Cabinet had the responsibility 
of raising money for their future sen- 
ior prom. They also represented 
their class in the hall decorating con- 
test and took care of the ordering of 
class rings. 

The Freshman Class Cabinet also 
sponsored dances and other activi- 
ties to raise money. Cabinet member 
Tanya Lomac stated, "Class cabinet 
is nice because you get to help your 
class. Besides you meet lots of peo- 
ple." 

R. Phillips, B. Terango, A. Geddes, M. Miller, S. Sper 



41 



Class Cabinets 



Dazzling 

he Flag Corps began prepara- 
tion for their season in late 
July, when the girls attended 



'-'^mrm'ya. 



a summer camp at Willoughby South 
and learned basic and unique flag 
maneuvers. 

This year's Flag Corps consisted of 
twelve girls, including Captain Anna 
Chanakas, and Co-Captains Janice 
Sauerman and Lisa Brisbine. 

In addition to the halftime shows, 
they performed at the Higbee Tri- 
bute to America Celebration, the 
Homecoming parade, Central Junior 
High School, and in the Marching 
Band Concert. 

Chris Brisbine, a first-year mem- 
ber of the Flag Corps stated, "I really 
enjoyed my first year on Flag Corps. 
Even though it was a lot of hard 
work, it was worth all the effort we 
put into it." 

They are the Euclid Panther Ma- 
jorettes, better known as the Golden 
Girls. Nevertheless, the Majorettes 
proved to be more than seven girls in 
gold-studded outfits. 

Led by Captain Denise Kacperski, 
the majorettes put in an average of 
two hours a day practicing routines 
and formations so they could per- 
form on the field. 

The Majorettes did a feature at 
each game, using different tactics, 
such as hoop batons and mock-fire 
batons. 

Each girl was "featured" at one of 
the home football games. Joanie 
Hodnichak added a special touch to 
her show with her mockfire baton. 
Featuring for the Euclid-St. Joe's 
game, with 10,000 people watching 
was the definite highlight of my sea- 
son," said Hodnichak. 

"Sometimes, with all the practice, 
it's not worth it. Yet, when I get out 
on the field, it pays off," acknowl- 
edged Kathy Mihok, who shared a 
feature with Monica Ubic. 

Also new for the majorettes this 
year were their gauntlets — studded 
wristbands that brought attention to 
their hands. This in addition to their 
uniforms brightened up the halftime 
shows. 

— L. Brisbine, A. Geddes, M. Miller 






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TOP: Lisa Brisbine concentrates on 
her routine at the summer Band 
Camp. MIDDLE: The Majorettes 
dance to the theme from the 
Broadway Musical One. BOTTOM: 
MAJORETTES, BOTTOM ROW: 
Denise Kacperski. CENTER ROW: Sue 
Reynolds, Kathy Mihok, Monica Ubic. 
TOP ROW: Shirley Bradich, Joanie 
Hodnichak, Sandy Schieman. 




Majorettes 



42 




43 



Flag Corps 




Marching Band 



44 





Tunes 



MARCHING BAND, BOTTOM ROW: J. 
Maher, E. Jaworsky, C. Hoppert, R. 
Braidich, J. Murowsky, E. Wilson, D. 
McArthur, D. Myles, S. Scherbarth, B. 
Valentine, C. Erdelac, C. Wright ROW 
2: S. Ivancic, R. Virant, D. Murray, D. 
Ivey, D. Theodosion, M. Sequlin, S. 
Thomas, R. Srnovrsnik, B. Kelly, T. 
Vincent, T. Klepac, B. Rohl ROW 3: B. 
Solnosky, J. Shuster, J. Broa, D. 
Swihart, A. Calabrese, D. McPeek, M. 
Spehar, J. Evans, B. Riha, M. Miller, E. 
Tepley, L. Moster ROW 4: B. Grubb, D. 
Braidich, D. Svigel, J. Grigsby, D. 
Katcher, J. Stokes, B. Fischer, D. 
Tressler, S. Burton, A. Serra, D. 
Kosten ROW 5: R. Gubitosi, A. Yuhas, 
K. Cook, J. Offerle, L. Leeper, H. 
Geddes, J. Sustar, R. Scherbarth, M. 
Penko, K. Benedum, L. Burtyk, M. 
Mehls ROW 6: J. Cable, K. Harrah, J. 
Minerd, S, Reno, C. Benedum, C. 
Penny, S. Miller, L. Saletrik, T. 
Marando, K. Pickel, S. Archacki, H. 
Rohl ROW 7: C. Brocone, C. Holland, 
M. Senitko, R. Taylor, S. Tucceri, R. 
Mazzaro, L. Statz, L. Testa, L. Elze, A. 
Hennessee, R. Meyer ROW 8: A. 
Sydow, F. Taddeo, A. Ponsart, S. 
Schieman, M. Ubic, J. Hodnichak, D. 
Kacperski, K. Mihok, S. Reynolds, S. 
Braidich TOP ROW: J. Sauerman, C. 
Brisbine, S. Ochoa, C. Mis, A. 
Chanakas, C. Trevarthen, L. Brisbine, 
K. Brickman, L. Miller, K. Thompson, 
K. Voigt, C. Kristoff. 



he 1983 Euclid Panther 
Marching Band began on Au- 
gust 15th with an on-campus 
band camp. During the eight-day 
camp, the marchers learned the pre- 
game and the first two halftime 
shows. Many new friends were made 
throughout the two-week session. 
According to freshman Brian Valen- 
tine "I never thought Marching 
Band as a freshman could be so much 
fun. I always thought the freshmen 
would be outcasts, but during band 
camp I found out that everyone is 
equal." Sonya Reno said, "It wasn't 
what I expected. I figured the seniors 
would have a group of friends, the 
juniors another group, and so on. In- 
stead, everyone is friendly with each 
other." 

The Panther Band performed five 
different halftime shows this season. 
The shows included salutes to 
Rocky, popular space films, Broad- 
way, and Maynard Ferguson, as well 
as the traditional script Euclid show. 
The show designers were Sue Tuc- 
ceri, Launi Leeper, Anita Yuhas, 
Laurie Saletrik, Robyn Scherbarth, 
Chris Wright, Gabrielle Holland 
Marvin Spehar, and Jim Evans. 

The Band was involved in many 
other things besides performing at 
the football games. They played at 
the GCC Band Festival and the Hig- 
bee's Festival. There was an in- 
school assembly, a performance at 
Central, the Homecoming Parade, 
and the Marching Band Concert. 

— L. Leeper, S. Murphy 



TOP: Cindy Hoppert displays true 
concentration as she marches through 
one of the shows. MIDDLE: Mr. 
Sydow watches Janice Minerd fumble 
with her busbey. OPPOSITE PAGE: 
The Panther Band exercise their 
musical talent as they watch the 
kickoff. 



45 



Marching Band 



Euclid! 




very time the varsity football 
cheerleaders performed, one 
could see the dedication, 
quality, and determination of the 
squad. 

The cheerleaders started their 
summer by attending a camp at Ohio 
Wesleyan University. There, they 
learned a new style, which helped 
them to capture first place in overall 
competition at camp. After camp, 
their dedication continued as they 
practiced twice a week during the 
summer and the school year. Money 
raised from car washes and spirit pin 
sales went toward purchasing uni- 
forms and practice outfits. 

None of the girls minded cheering 
in bad weather because they had spe- 
cial uniforms. Laura Culliton said, 
"Cheering is fun no matter what the 
weather is like." 

In commenting on this year's 
school spirit, Diane Gallo said, "This 
year's cheering section fell short of 
our expectations." 

The varsity squad was captained 
by Cheri Smith, who was responsible 
for leading practice, coming up with 
new ideas, and calling extra practices 
when they were needed. 

The JV football cheerleaders 
wanted the fans to feel the noise, the 
excitement, and the suspense of the 
football games. 

Over the summer, the squad went 
to a cheerleading camp at Witten- 
burg University. There, they learned 
new jumps, mounts, and cheers. 
"Camp was tough and tiring but 
worth it," said Laura Rattini. As cap- 
tain, Cheryl Newcomb's duties were 
to make sure the others came to prac- 
tice and to organize all information 
given to her. 

— L. Bencivenni 







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TOP: FRESHMAN CHEERLEADERS, 
BOTTOM ROW: Shannon Wagner, 
Kristie Scott, Michelle Woodcock. TOP 
ROW: Lisa Desico, Chris Zadnik, Chris 
Merencky. MIDDLE: JV 
CHEERLEADERS: Joelle Kudlak, 
Cheryl Newcomb, Diane Lucci, Karen 
Norton, Linda Halliday, April 
Westover, Laura Rattini. BOTTOM: 
VARSITY CHEERLEADERS, 
BOTTOM ROW: Jennifer Husarik, 
Beth Neiman, Laura Culliton, Diane 
Hallo, Vicki Zigman. TOP ROW: 
Brenda Hubbard, Mary Belavich, 
Cheri Smith. 




Cheerleaders 



46 




47 



Cheerleaders 




Cheerleaders 



48 





Cheers! 



VARSITY CHEERLEADERS BOTTOM 
ROW: Laura Vend, Diane Hallo, Beth 
Neiman. ROW 2: Jennifer Husarik, 
Cheri Smith, Michelle Simmons. 





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BELOW: The freshm/n 
cheerleaders sometin\es 
outnumbered the crow 
performed before. 




JUNIOR VARSITY CHEERLEADERS 
BOTTOM ROW: Chris Smolic. ROW 2: 
Laura Rattini, April Westover, Cheryl 
Newcomb, Sue Szmania. ROW 3: Diane 
Lucci, Missy Malone, Karen Norton. 














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FRESHMEN CHEERLEADERS 
BOTTOM ROW: Virginia Wagner. 
ROW 2: Lesley Ferrara, Shannon 
Wagner, Lisa DeSico. ROW 3: Kristie 
Scott. TOP: Kim Marvin. 



ake a dull, lifeless crowd, add 
a few cheers, and what do you 
have? The enthusiasm to 
bring on a winning score. This char- 
acterizes the 1983-1984 basketball 
cheerleaders. 

The group of girls had the talent to 
bring the fans to their feet and cheer 
along with them. 

This skill was not achieved by 
chance. The cheerleaders practiced 




long, hard hours. Practices were held 
two to three times a week to learn the 
new and more difficult moves that 
they incorporated during the games. 
In addition to the cheers and for- 
mations the girls used during the 
game, the cheerleaders entertained 
the crowds by the halftime dance 
routines. 

•A- Chanakas 

ABOVE: Laura Vend and Jennifer 
Husarik pause for a smile break. 



49 



Cheerleaders 



Curious 



he fall play, The Curious 
Savage, ran November 11, 
12, 18, and 19, and ran per- 
fectly except for a few minor prob- 
lems: Some actors skipped a few cues 
and a crucial lighting cue was miss- 
ing. 

The lead roles were played by 
Nancy Shimonek, Al Ponsart, Nick 
Zingale, and Michelle Micale. Other 
actors included Sue Jabecs, Paula 
Shaeffer, Jeff Meredith, Darlene 
Munford, Scott Wallace, Bruce 
Walther, and Dawn DeFillippo. 

The actors had six weeks to learn 
their lines, while the stage crew 
helped to construct the set. There 
were three scene changes, but that 
only meant adjusting some furniture 
and changing costumes. 

Since so much time was spent in 
preparation for the play, an extra 
performance was given on Thursday, 
November 17th. for senior citizens. 







TOP: Nancy Shimonek as Mrs. Savage 
reflects on the behavior of her 
children as she clutches her bear. 
MIDDLE: Michelle Micale is appalled! 
BOTTOM: Mrs. Savage is reluctant to 
enter the sanatorium. OPPOSITE 
PAGE: Residents of the sanatorium 
listen curiously as Mrs. Savage tells 
of her life story. 




Fall Play 



50 



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51 



Fall Play 



Get . . , 



he 1983-84 school year de- 
mostrated once again the ex- 
cellence of Euclid High's 
young and talented musicians. They 
proved it by various functions and 
performances. 

Mr. Arthur Sydow supervised the 
various bands, with the assistance of 
Mr. Al Demila and Mr. Joel Sarich. 
Sydow commented, "When com- 
pared to the bands in the past, this 
year's bands are improved." Much of 
the improvement had to do with the 
new emphasis on learning scales and 
other necessities in the mastering of 
a musical instrument. 

The Symphonic Wind Ensemble is 
the most difficult band to play in. 
Members described the rehearsals as 
concentrated and intense. The En- 
semble consisted of forty of the most 
talented band members. 



BIG PICTURE: Stage Band members 
practiced on Monday nights. They 
performed at shopping malls as well 
as school events. 




SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE, 
PERCUSSION: Jeff Tekanic, Mike 



Stokes, Jim Evans, Greg Brochak, 
Jerry Broa, Darryl Kosten. 



Bands 



52 




SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE, WOODWINDS, BOTTOM 
ROW: Robyn Scherbarth, Laura Burtyk, Anita Yuhas, Heidi 
Rohl, Steve Archacki, Mary Penko, Karen Cook, Rose 
Gubitosi, Launi Leeper. ROW 2: Janice Minerd, Sonya 
Reno, Melanie, Senitko, Connie Broccone, Renee Mazzaro, 
Lauri Saletrik, Lynn Skatts. ROW 3: Stan Miller, John 
Stokes, Angelo Serra, Bill Grubb. ABSENT: Dave Katcher. 



SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE, BRASS, BOTTOM ROW: 
Matt Kristoff, Brad Kelly, Eric Jaworski, Chris Thomas, 
Rich Braidich, Rob Srnovrsnik. ROW 2: Ed Wilson, Andy 
Calabrese, Chris Wright, Brian Valentine, 



53 



Bands 




STAGE BAND, BOTTOM ROW: 
Gabrielle Holland, John Stokes, Dave 
Katcher, Bill Grubb, Chris Erdelac, 
Angelo Serra. ROW 2: Chris Wright, 
Jim Evans, Chris Thomas, Ed Wilson, 
Doug McArthur, Brad Kelly, Bryce 
Riha, Chad Ramlow. ROW 3: Jim 
Duricy, Rich Wilson, Brian Valentine, 
Scott Scherbarth, Darryl Losten, Jeff 
Tekanic, Eric Jaworsky. ABOVE: Jim 
Evans tunes up before a Monday night 
Stage Band rehearsal. 




Bands 



54 




CONCERT BAND, WOODWINDS, 
BOTTOM ROW: Lori Moster, Sherri 
Jaworski, Louann Tomasi, Laura Elze, 
Sue Tucceri, Linda Thomas, Lori 
Testa, Robin Taylor, Connie Benedum. 
ROW 2: Carrie Sanders, Julie Sustar, 
Chris Penny, Terry Morando, Michelle 
Mackel, Kim Benedum, Denise Fair, 



Ann Geddes, Shirley Braidich, 
Marlene Miller, Aretha Hennessee. 
ROW 3: Barb Rosavich, Shirletha 
Taylor, Dan Svigal, Mike Mehls, Chris 
Erdelac, Dave Tressler, Jeff Grigsby, 
Scott Burton, Bill Furman, Dave 
Braidich, Mark Furlan, Marty Risko, 
Bill Fisher. 




The Beat 



he Concert Band was another 
group of dedicated students 
who were standing for wind 
ensemble. It had about sixty stu- 
dents in it. 

The Pep Band was led by Matt 
Kristoff. It was an informal group of 
musicians who practiced after school 
to perfect its performances for the 
basketball games. 

The Stage Band was basically a 
brass ensemble with additions such 
as a flute, drums, and an electric gui- 
tar. It met every Monday evening. 
The Stage Band played at school 
concerts and at shopping centers and 
malls. 

Part of the Panther pride this year 
was credited to the talent of Euclid's 
band members. The small perfor- 
mances equaled hours of practice in 
school and out. They were very much 
appreciated for their hard work and 
dedication. 



CONCERT BAND, BRASS, BOTTOM 
ROW: Debbie Murray, Scott Ivancic, 
Randy Virant, Dennis Ivey, Ed Tepley, 
Mary Segulin, Bryce Riha. ROW 2: 
Dennis McPeek, Marv Spehar, Jason 
Shuster, Rich Atkins, Bob Solnosky, 



Curt Majers, James Maher, Jeff 
Morowski, Tom Vincent. ROW 3: Mike 
Miheli, Darrin Swihart, Brad Rohl, 
Tony Clapacs, Cindy Hoppert, Scott 
Scherbarth. 




ORCHESTRA, BOTTOM ROW: Laura 
Saletrik, Lynn Statz, Sonya Reno, 
Janice Minerd, Mary Penko, Steve 
Archacki, Stan Miller. ROW 2: Andy 



Calabrese, Brad Kelly, Matt Kristoff, 
Ed Wilson, Brian Valentine, Chris 
Wright. ROW 3: Jim Evans, Greg 
Brochak, Darryl Kosten. 



55 



Bands 




VARSITY CHORALE SEATED: 
Angie McReynolds, Tracey 
Otcasek, Dawn DeFilippo, Vicky 
Ukmar, Jennifer Husarik. ROW 
2: Julie Parker, Christine 
Mihelich, Susan Campbell, Nancy 
Shimonek. STANDING: Mr. 
Godfrey, Kent Smith, Don Wylie, 
Sharon Hansen, Chris Montant, 
April Westover, Jim Alves, Terry 
Rabbitts, Mike Miheli, Troy 
Davis, Faith Kardos, Dave Fair, 
Christine Letcher, Nick Zingale, 
Todd King. 



Choral Masters 



56 



TOP CHORAL MASTERS 
BOTTOM ROW: Chris D'Anna, 
Missy Malone, Lorraine 
Weaver, Karen Norton, Becky 
Posavad, Kathy King, Monica 
Ubic, Todd King. ROW 2: Lisa 
Brisbine, Sue Jazbec, Janice 
Sauerman, Sue Tucceri, 
Branka Persic, Kim Mabel, 
Sue Sekerak, Kim Kralic, 
Craig Vernon. ROW 3: Julie 
Parker, Sue Grubb, Angie 
McReynolds, Carol 
Trevarthen, Sue Smith, Kathy 
Korb, Dawn Henkhuzens, 
Troy Davis. ROW 4: Debbie 
McDermott, Sharon Hansen, 
April Westover, Chris 
Mihelich, Amy Leu, Gwen 
Miller, Chris Kucera, Dave 
Fair. 



ORCHESTRA BOTTOM ROW: Beth 
Terango, Kelly McDernott, Tanya Lomac, 
Anna Chanakas. ROW 2: Cindy Mis, Jenny 
Brewer, Candy Kleckner, Aril Westover, 
Peggy Fischer. ROW 3: Kelly Thompson, 
Pam Miller, Stephanie Sper, Robin Ramlow, 
Marty Tomasi, Claudia Cummings. ROW 4: 
Amy Leu, Tom Wanamaker, Avinash Ganti, 
Sharon Goldrich. ROW 5: Chad Ramlow, 
Mr. HUtson, Mrs. Koleje, Jim Mataich. 







BOTTOM CHORAL 
MASTERS BOTTOM ROW: 
Nick Zingale, Don Wylie, Jim 
Duricy, Bob Sprague, Kerry 
Fazio, Kris Fazio, Gabriel 
Holland, Jennifer Husarik, 
Vicky Ukmar. ROW 2: Ron 
Lesnik, Lewis Berke, Kent 
Smith, Ron Zak, Laura 
Parceseppe, Kerry 
Brzozowski, Faith Kardos, 
Mina Tirabassi, Chris 
Letcher. ROW 3: Alan 
Ponsart, Chris Montana, 
Leanne Sterbank, Sue 
Zupanovic, Sherri Koucky, 
Margaret Zollars. Anne Buck, 
Carol Hart, Judy Nemecek. 
ROW 4: Dean Capasso, Terry 
Rabbitts, Jim Alves, Brent 
Evans, Dawn DeFilippo, Pam 
Kacperski, Sandy Schiemann, 
Sue Campbell, Amy 
Ohanessian, Nancy Shimonek, 
Kathy O'Brien, Tracey 
Otcasek. 



Songs 



hey're a very talented group 
of singers, very talented" is 
how Mr. Robert Godfrey de- 
scribed the 1983-1984 Varsity Cho- 
rale. It was obvious that if they were 
to live up to their name, the 21 sing- 
ers, 2 accompanists, and one drum- 
mer that made up the group had to 
be skilled in their arts. 

From the start of school, on the 
holidays, and all through the year, 
Varsity Chorale performed for senior 
citizens at various nursing homes. 
They were also busy performing at 
Euclid Square Mall, the Euclid 
Kiwanis Club, various private 
Christmas parties, and at the annual 
Spaghetti Dinner. 

Throughout the year, the Chorale 
was making preparations for a festi- 
val competition to be held in Orlan- 
do, Florida, in the spring. Dave Fair, 
Chorale president, said "We have the 
talent; all we have to do is get it to- 
gether, and I think we have a good 
chance for a medal." 

Varsity Chorale's year was filled 
with changes, but there were also re- 
wards. The year was summed up by 
Dawn DeFillipo: "Under the new di- 
rector this year, there were a lot of 
changes, a lot of people had to adjust, 
but we finally got it together, so we 
aren't 24 individuals, but Just one 
group." 

The Choral Masters program has 
grown considerably over the years 
and was composed of 78 juniors and 
seniors this year. 

The Choral Masters performed 
three times: the Christmas and 
Spring Concerts, and the GCC Choir 
Festival in February. 

— J. Wollmershauser 



57 



Varsity Chorale 



Amigos 




he AFS Club promotes inter- 
national and intercultural 
friendships. Each year the 
Euclid chapter hosts one or two stu- 
dents from foreign countries. The 
club also sends a Euclid student to a 
foreign country. This year Euclid 
High hosted Reiko Sato from Japan 
and Celso Garcia from Brazil. This 
past summer EHS senior Jennifer 
Taylor visited Japan. 

Sato joined AFS because she was 
interested a different cultures. She 
especially wanted to come to Amer- 
ica to learn English. Sato was very 
happy about her placement in the 
U.S. and enjoyed her year at Euclid. 

Garcia also joined AFS to learn a 
different culture and to share the 
Brazilian culture with others. He 
didn't care where he was placed; he 
just wanted a good experience. Gar- 
cia admitted that it was a bit hard 
adjusting to life in America, but it 
became easier after meeting people 
through the Euclid AFS Club. 

Taylor wanted to belong to AFS 
because she wished to develop a bet- 
ter understanding of the world's peo- 
ples and cultures. Although she had 
asked for placement in an English- 
speaking country, Jennifer was sent 
to Japan, where she spent the sum- 
mer. 

The AFS Club also sponsors an ex- 
change with students from different 
areas of Ohio. In November, seven 
students from John Glenn High 
School in New Concord, Ohio, vis- 
ited EHS as part of the exchange 
program. In return, EHS students 
visited New Concord in the spring. 

— Ft. Phillips 



TOP: Kim Mabel and Tammy Cantini 
are candidates to travel abroad. 
MIDDLE: AFS president Jennifer 
Taylor relates her experiences in 
Japan to an audience at the Euclid 
Public Library. BOTTOM: Reiko Sato, 
Celso Garcia, and Jennifer Taylor 
have traveled more than most high 
school seniors. 




BIG PICTURE: Reiko Sato, Kate 
Taylor, Renee Phillips, and Jennifer 
Taylor discuss their future AFS plans 



A.F.S. 



58 





AFS CLUB BOTTOM ROW: Kerry 
Fazio, Kris Fazio, David Steeves, 
Reiko Sato, Kate Taylor-secretary, 
^ Ma ry Muscarella, Jennifer Taylor- 
jBrfeident, Jean Chen, Chris Pe rrott i. 
ROW 2: Mary Jo Schc 
Matara 




Mable-treasurer. ROW 3: Zrinka 
Slat, Celso Garcia, Jason Sotka, Phil 
Radasek, Jim Korzun. ABSENT: 
Renee Phillips-vice-president, Joyce 
Bukavac, Colleen Coyne, Kristen 
Brown. 



59 



A.F.S. 



Ad Club members helped to se 
sports programs at the football and 
basketball games. 




AD CLUB BOTTOM ROW: Pammi Miller, Rhonda Sterrick, 
Michele Solnosky, Mary Muscarella. ROW 2: Laura Venel, 
Jackie Eddy, Faith Kardos, Judy Nemecek, Vicki 
Schmeling. ROW 3: Amy Suponcic, Sue Jazbec, Sue 
Szmania, Kathy Nickel, Janette Konrad, Julie Smith. ROW 
4: Leanne Sterbank, Tracey Wandersleben, Laura Rattini, 
Juliana Powaski, Bill DeMora. Darnise Stephens. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB BOTTOM ROW: Rose 
Gubitosi, Karen Cook, Susi Koch, Beth Terango. ROW 2: 
Sue Swyt, Mike Lange, Susan Hoffert, President, Mary 
Hribar, Vice-President Lorrie Miller, Jackie Majers. ROW 
3: Jim Korzun, Hans Botzki, Zrinka Slat, Jason Sotka, Stan 
Miller, Steve Archacki. 



L 



Foreign Language Club 
Ad Club 



60 




RIGHT 

CLOSE UP CLUB BOTTOM ROW: Bill 
Segulin, Jennifer Stone, Sue Larkins. 
ROW 2: Launi Leeper, Zrinka Slat, 
Terry Luda, Stan Miller, Kurt Rambis. 
BELOW, LEFT: Media Aides get 
themselves wired for sound at the 
Winter Festival assembly. BELOW, 
RIGHT: Marilyn Zupan awaits her 
next eager sports program customer. 



AY' 





!DIA AIDES BOTTOM ROW: Jeff Meyers, Lewis Davis, Dale Pate, Matt 
sigh, Scott Ivancic, Ron Meyers. ROW 2: Rob Cook, Mark Sterrick, Jeff 
chta, Tom Greenawald, Bernie Sauer, Fred Schwartz. 



Misc. 

zgm_\\ lose-Up Club raised funds to 
X~E go to Washington D.C. for a 
JJ week of study. Participants 



talked to the leaders of Congress, for- 
eign diplomats, and to military strat- 
egists from the Pentagon. They left 
for Washington D.C. on Sunday, 
March 18, and returned on Saturday, 
March 24. 

Ad Club members sold tickets and 
promoted school spirit at all sporting 
functions. When a student on the 
club is not selling tickets, he or she 
may enter any sporting event for 
free, even away games. Chris Hradek 
said, "I like working for Ad Club 
with Mr. Raicevich, It gives me a 
sense of responsibility that I never 
had before." 

The Foreign Language Club 
helped to promote the study of other 
cultures through its meetings and ac- 
tivities. 

Finally, the Media Aides assisted 
Mr. Black with the operation and 
maintenance of the various pieces of 
audio-visual equipment owned by 
the school. 

-1 Leeper, S. Murphy. H. Gauzman 



61 



Close Up 
Media Aides 




p_-i| he vocational classes at EHS 
£1^ offer students the opportuni- 
~*~ H ty to work in a business-like 
atmosphere while mastering busi- 
ness skills. 

The Ohio Office Education Associ- 
ation (OOEA) consists of classes 
which teach stenography, filing, typ- 
ing skills, data processing, and ac- 
counting. The classes last four per- 
iods each day. 

The Distributive Education Clubs 
of America (DECA) is a work-study 
program that the DE and DCT 
classes participate in. 



OHIO OFFICE EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATION 

BOTTOM ROW: Diane Dunlevy, 
Margie Sidhu, Janet Schneider, Marie 
Pavlovich, Julie Izquierdo, Vicki Turk. 
ROW 2: Lisa Osborne, Lauren Tonni, 
Edna Fromer, Leslie Roseboro, 
Marilyn Paulin, Lenore Brown, 
Melanie Mramer. ROW 3: Chris 
Sobecki, Jean Dennick, Sue Miller, 
Julie Sas, Barb Stout, Judy Groudle, 
Tracey Wandersleben, Tammy 
Argenti. ROW 4: Scott Szpak, Paul 
Doyle, Ratko Turkalj, Mike Schaefer, 
Keith Drake, Scott Wallace, Jesse 
Rodgers. NOT PICTURED: Katie 
Journey, Dina Colantonio, Sarah 
Schuenemann, Michele Zakrajsek. 



OHIO OFFICE EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATION BOTTOM ROW: 
Zelinda Atkins, Margaret Segedi, 
Regina Grey, Anna DeBoe, Leigh 
Brinsek, Mary Fleck, Gaye 
Springborn, Angelia McReynolds, Beth 
Nelson, Tina Hampton, Sophia Brown, 
Chris Perrotti. ROW 2: Michelle 
Micale, Darlene Strauss, Lori 
Putzbach, Kathy Bokar, Lisa Samsa, 
Marianne Volpe, Terry Scolaro, Diane 
Casto, Lynette Gildone, Jill Podmore, 
Melita Mejak, Barbara Dudley, Jill 
Waschura, Tomie Vincent. ROW 3: Bill 
Meyers, Shelly Peterson, Tammy 
Ferguson, Francine Mondok, Klaudia 
Kerestes, Karen Roller, Linda 
Halliday, Sue Glaser, Laura 
Shefcheck, Lori Parsons, Lisa Finke, 
Heidi Schiffbauer, Chris Turk. ROW 4: 
Tammy Battaglia, Kathy Hall, Paula 
Hutchinson, Wendy Jaklich, Sherri 
Winkleman, Denise Toth, Jim Vance, 
Wendy Ulle, Mary O'Neill, Tom Keller, 
Jeff Bowman, Frank Kovacic, Jan 
Dewalt, Bill Kimack. 



OHIO OFFICE EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATION BOTTOM ROW: 
Donna Daykin, Miriam Stanisa, 
Debbie Kempke, Linda Bucceri, 
Sandy Williams. ROW 2: Brenda 
Hubbard, Mary Ann Griesmer, 
Wendy McKain. ROW 3: Michelle 
Austin, Donna White, Michele 
Twoey, Diane Jankowski, Toni 
Travis. ROW 4: Julie Bryan, Joan 
Cable, Cindy Engelking, Robbin 
Chan, Anne Naglic. 






1 



I 



BIG PICTURE: Vocational business 
classes had plenty of time to 
practice their business skills since 
their classes were four periods 
long each day. 

i 1 




Ohio Office Education Association 62 



tIGHT 

)IVERSIFIED COOPERATIVE 
DRAINING BOTTOM ROW: Kathy 
eyduk, Kandy Senger, Rozella 
all, Kim Dale. ROW 2: Mike Ucic, 
orman Latsch, Jim DeRose, Dave 
rane. ROW 3: Kathie Wittreich, 
anielle Stefanik, Shirley Ochoa, 
lackie Marchesano. ROW 4: 
Cathryn Harrah, Tim Kuhen, Ron 
lerbert. ROW 5: John Benko, Dave 
iill, Linda Bildstein, Chanelle 
Vard. ROW 6: William Woods, Tina 
iolob, Reggie Wyman, Gus Kish. 



BELOW 

DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 
CLUB BOTTOM ROW: Mike 
Nunnally, Betty Strle, Colleen 
Flanagan, Debbie Simon. ROW 2: 
Mike Mochan, Sue Templar, Sue 
Nolan, Robin Speroff. ROW 3: Angie 
McSwain, Denise Mauldin, Linda 
Penko, Jill Fox. ROW 4: Harold 
Jones, Mike Royster, Darryl 
Blankenship, Randy Roeder. ROW 
5: Ron Lesnik, Ken Kirchner, John 
Young, Jeff Vandevender. ROW 6: 
Tony Valencic, Kevin Westover. Dr. 
Ralph R. Sibert. 





63 



Distributive Education Club 



\ 








KEY CLUB BOTTOM ROW: Pam Perdan, Dave Segulin, 
Mary Segulin, Todd Dickinson, Kelly Eubank, Chris 
George. ROW 2: Nancy Schulz, Mary Wirbel, Tricia 
Syracuse, Scott Ivancic, Bill Segulin, Jim Korzun, Cindy 
Hoppert, Cindy Limbert, Cathy Felden. ROW 3: Lisa Betts, 
Rob Collins, Jim Duricy, Mr. Walter Hill, Jan Minerd, 
Bryce Riha, Kelly McDerment: ROW 4: Tom Wanamaker, 
Jim Burkholder, Derrick Stewart, Dave Myles, Rose 
Gubitosi, Melanie Senitko, Jim Mausser. ROW 5: Mitch 
Sotka, Trevor Jurgensen, Ed Wilson, Dave Katcher, Tony 
Klepac. ROW 6: Phil Karabinus, Cal Eyman, Pat O'Brien, 
Joe Bisbee. NOT PICTURED: Allan Black. 



OFFICE AIDES BOTTOM ROW: Susan Reynolds, Rhonda 
Sterrick, Jody Cechura, Amy Suponcic. ROW 2: Joanie 
Hodnichak, Tracey Wandersleben, Karen Laurence, Susie 
Bratton, Barbra Tingley, Laura Elze. ROW 3: Nicole 
Jurgenson, Theresa Cecelic, Monica Ubic, Lynn Bencivenni, 
Mary Matsko, Lori Doesburg, Renee Zanghi. ROW 4: Chris 
Linderman, Carol Trevarthen, Sue Koch, Mary Hribar, 
Chris Lowery, Julie Mayerhofer, Candy Kleckner, Jennie 
Brewer. ROW 5: Kris Faletic, Denise Kacperski, Jean 
Hayes, Tammy Noonan, Tracy Crowell, Jim Dickinson, 
Jennifer Marrott. 



Key Club 
Office Aides 



64 



LEFT 

PEER COUNSELORS BOTTOM ROW: 
Larry Weakland, Sophia Brown. ROW 
2: Chris Cahoon, Melanie Senitko, 
Laura Mataraza. ROW 3: Paul McNeil, 
Terry Luda, Chris Bednarik, Lisa 
Rocco, Hans Botzki. BELOW, LEFT: 
Cindy Moore tries to put the chaos of 
the magazine files into order. BELOW 
LIBRARY AIDES BOTTOM ROW: 
Cindy Moore, Jean Chen, Nadine 
Antonick, Bonnie Snitsky. ROW 2: 
Steve Rahija. NOT PICTURED: Laura 
Moore, Renne Guillory. 




[NTER-RACIAL COMMITTEE BOTTOM ROW: Danielle D'Amico, Donna 
'jgman, Tony Powell, Mike Baker, Deidre Britt, Angie Fort. ROW 2: Tina 
Hawthorne, Michelle Crayton, Mary Kay Zahorsky, Sherri Bradford. ROW 3: 
Vfrs. Lynn Davis, Josie Jules, Rachelle Fannin, Aretha Hennessee, Scott 
Wallace, Darliene Munford, Denise Martin, Adrienne Walker, Ms. Wilma 
Carroll. 



Help 



nn ll he thirty member Key Club 

= l— volunteered their time to 
~' \ help needy people. The offi- 
cers include Phil Karabinus, presi- 
dent, Dave Katcher, first vice-presi- 
dent, Scott Ivancic, second vice- 
president, Mary Segulin, secretary, 
and Rob Collins, treasurer. 

Fund raisers included candy sales, 
Kiwanis Flea Market, a nut sale, and 
Kiwanis spaghetti dinner. The club 
volunteered their time at Baby Day 
at Euclid General Hospital, hosted 
the Kiwanis Special Olympics swim 
meet, decorated the Queen's car for 
the Homecoming Parade, put up a 
snowfence at the YMCA, helped at 
the Thanksgiving service at Euclid 
General Hospital, and at a Christmas 
toy drive for the Metzenbaum Cen- 
ter. 

Peer Counseling is made up of stu- 
dent volunteers. The program can 
help anyone with alcohol, drug, or 
family related problems. According 
to peer counselor Darliene Munford, 
the counselors do not give troubled 
students advice; instead, the counsel- 
ors help the students discern their 
options. Darliene became a peer 
counselor because she "wanted to 
help." Being able to help gave her a 
sense of satisfaction. 

The Committee on Racial Interac- 
tion gave students a chance to openly 
discuss racial problems at the high 
school. The Committee involved ap- 
proximately ten members of the fac- 
ulty and interested students. Among 
those adults involved were Mrs. Da- 
vis Dr. McNeilly, and Miss Carroll. 
The group met sporadically through- 
out the year and expanded its activi- 
ties. A clothing drive, to benefit peo- 
ple in Kenya, was held at Christmas 
time. There was also a cultural fair in 
May. 

The Office Aides and Library 
Aides were indispensible in helping 
with the day-to-day operations of 
the library and division offices of the 
high school. 

-L. Leeper, L. Sterbank. 



65 



Library Aides, Peer Counselors 
Inter-Racial Committee 



Words 

his year was extremely diffi- 
cult for The Survey, Euclid 
High's news-magazine. Not 
only did the staff consist of very few 
dedicated students, but the majority 
lacked the experience necessary to 
publish a quality paper. 

The head staff consisted of an edi- 
tor-in-chief and an assistant editor. 
The students in these positions, Lisa 
Vithelic and Jim Korzun, spent 
many hours trying to pull the publi- 
cation together. Both were first-year 
editors and thus learned as they 
made mistakes. Fortunately, Korzun, 
editor-in-chief next year, will have 
the experience of trial and error 
needed for that position. 

A few staffers played an important 
role. Ed Wilson was the layout assis- 
tant, and Sue Buettner was the art 
editor. 

The Eucuyo, EHS's literary maga- 
zine, produced a collection of original 
poems and short stories written by 
students. Advised by Mr. Henderson 
and Mrs. Cowan, members of the Eu- 
cuyo staff met to select, edit, and 
type poems for the publication. This 
year's co-editors were Sara Sezun 
and Beth Terango. 



EUCUYO BOTTOM ROW: Sara Sezun, 
Kate Taylor, Beth Terango. ROW 2: 
Angelia McReynolds, Tracy Otcasek, 



Robyn Scherbarth, Sonya Sezun. ROW 
3: Mark Ussai, Leanne Sterbank, Jim 
Korzun, Zrinka Slat, Michael Lange. 



L. VihWlic. L. Sterbank 




SURVEY BOTTOM ROW: Karen 
Balogh, Rose Gubitosi, Kerri Radaker, 
Beth Terango. ROW 2: Melanie 
Senitko, Jodi Wollmershauser, Ed 
Wilson, Angelo Serra, Nicole 
Jurgenson, Mike Lange. ROW 3: Dave 
Myles, Laura Mataraza, Jim Korzun, 
Gary Williams, Lisa Brisbine, Kerry 
Fazio. NOT PICTURED: Lisa Vihtelic. 
RIGHT: Kevin Nainiger is persuaded 
into purchasing a copy of The Survey. 
The papers are sold in the cafeteria 
during lunch periods. 




Eucuyo 



66 








ABOVE: Scrambling to meet a 
deadline, editor-in-chief Lisa Vihtelic, 
assistant editor Jim Korzun, and 
photographer Ed Wilson examine 
negatives for an upcoming issue of 
The Survey. LEFT: Lisa Vihtelic 
and Ed Wilson load up their cameras 
to photograph a soccer game. The 
Survey is present at all major sporting 
events. FAR LEFT: About every two 
months a Survey is published, and 
regular readers wait anxiously for 
their copy. Here a Survey enthusiast 
reads an interesting story to his lunch 
time friends. 



67 



Survey 




Euclidian 



68 




BIG PICTURE: Anna Chanakas and 
Mike Lange perfect their layout 
styles at a Denison University 
workshop. BELOW: Jackie Majers 
asks herself why anyone in her right 
mind would want to be a yearbook 
editor-in-chief. 



Points I 




EUCLIDIAN STAFF BOTTOM ROW: 
Claudia Cummings, Barbra Tingley, 
Jim Allay, Chris Cahoon, Lisa 
Brisbine, Colleen Wajahn, Cary 
Sanders. ROW 2: Karen Balogh, Kris 
Fazio, Leanne Sterbank, Chris 
Bednarik, Lynn Bencivenni, Beth 
Terango, Annmarie Geddes. ROW 3: 
Marlene Miller, Chris Betts, Jodi 
Wollmershauser, Sue Swyt, Dawn 
Henkhuzens, Amy Leu, Anna 
Chanakas. ROW 4: Kirk Dauer, John 
Bolsar, Jim Blevins, Curt Majers, 
Vicki Schmeling, Sue Tucceri, Sue 
Hoffert. ROW 5: Dean Theodosion, 
Jesse Rodgers, Bob Sarka, Marty 
Tomasi, Launi Leeper, Al Ponsart, 
Luann Tomasi. NOT PICTURED: Mike 
Boris, Jackie Majers, Pam Miller, 
Anslie Mclnally, Mike Lange, Sharon 
Murphy, Stefanie Sper. Harry 
Gauzman. 



ork on the 1984 Euclidian 
was a series of points on a line 
that began in the spring of 
1983, when Between the Lines was 
chosen as the book's theme and Jack- 
ie Majers selected as editor-in-chief, 
and ended on February 10, 1984, the 
final deadline for the book. 

Some of the initial points were 
made on the line in late June when 
Jackie Majers, Sue Hoffert, Anna 
Chanakas, Jim Blevins, and Mike 
Lange attended a four-day yearbook 
workshop at Denison University, 
sponsored by the Josten's American 
Yearbook Company. There, they de- 
veloped many of the basic layout 
styles found running through the 
book. 

Armed with ideas from yearbook 
camp and suggestions from the Co- 
lumbia Scholastic Press Association, 
which awarded a First Place rating to 
the 1983 Euclidian in its annual con- 
test, staff members began serious 
work on the 1984 book in August. 
Unlike previous years, when the staff 
was organized on a section basis, this 
year the staff was divided into four 
parts: layout, copy, photography, 
and advertising. 

The advertising staff, headed by 
Jackie Majers, was responsible for 
raising money through the sale of ad- 
vertising space. The more ads sold, 
the lower the price of the book to 
students. The staff, however, fell 
short of its $7000 goal, raising only 
$4600. Because of the shortfall, the 
price of the Euclidian was raised 
from $15 to $20. 

With advertising sales completed, 
the full attention of the staff was 
turned to the actual production of 
the book. The photography staff, 
headed by Kris Fazio, began the 
monumental task of trying to record 
on film all the sports, activities, 
events, classes, and people that are 
Euclid High School. 



69 



Euclidian 



Poin ts II 



nna Chanakas and Sue Hof- 
fert headed the layout staff. 
As such, they were responsi- 
ble for making certain that the lay- 
out styles of the various sections 
were maintained. They also doubled 
as co-editors of the senior section. 

The task of assigning stories and 
trying to maintain a consistent copy 
style was given to Jim Blevins. The 
copy section was the largest part of 
the Euclidian staff, being composed 
of 20 students. 

One major problem faced the Eu- 
clidian staff at the outset of the year: 
who would publish the book? In Sep- 
tember the decision was made by the 
Fordyce Building to put the book up 
for competitive bidding for this year. 
Bids were not opened until mid-Oc- 
tober, which meant that up to one 
week before the first deadline of the 
year the staff did not know which 
publishing company's materials and 
procedures they would be using. 

A second problem facing the staff 
was the early final deadline. Because 
the seniors' last school day is so early 
(May 24th), the final deadline had to 
be moved up to February 10th to in- 
sure that the yearbook would arrive 
early enough in May to be distribut- 
ed. The early deadline meant that 
winter sports' stories had to be writ- 
ten before the seasons were complet- 
ed and that the Winter Festival 
Dance (February 11th) could not be 
covered. 

Even with all the problems, the 
staff met all its deadlines. Certain 
individuals deserve special recogni- 
tion: Jackie Majers, who sold $1500 
in ads as well as serving as editor-in- 
chief; Sue Hoffert, who spent many a 
lonely winter night typing the senior 
activity lists; Leanne Sterbank, who 
was ready to sell ads, copy layouts, 
write copy, or index names whenever 
asked; and the entire copy staff, 
whose stories in the 1984 Euclidian 
reverse an old proverb so that it now 
reads: A word is worth a thousand 
pictures. 

-Mr. Petrovic 




TOP: Chris Cahoon shows the effects 
of too many hours spent in the 
yearbook office. MIDDLE: Bob Sarka 
prepares to record the AFS Club for 
posterity. BOTTOM: Anna Chanakas 
struggles with a soccer layout. BIG 
PICTURE: Survey editor Lisa Vithelic 
sneeks a peak at some color layouts 
while Jim Blevins and Jackie Majers 
stand guard. 




Euclidian 



70 




71 



Euclidian 






TOP: Jim Hall concentrates on his 
Richmond Heights opponent. MIDDLE: 
Jerome Young sinks two against 
Mentor. BOTTOM: Amy Waltermire 
serves up a storm. BIG PICTURE: 
Scott Burton and Ed Lunder helped to 
lead the cross-country team to a GCC 
co-championship. 




he predominate image 
for the athletic teams 
was streaks. Flying 
balls, moving feet, the waving 
hands of coaches and referees, 
the swimmer's wake, and the 



rows of athletes on the bench- 
es were all visible streaks, 
along with the sweat on the 
faces of the players. 



- J. Majers 



Sports Divider 




STREAKS 



73 



Sports Divider 



Roller Coaster . * 

Varsity's Miscues And Mistakes 
Add Up To A 6-4 Season 



he varsity's season was like a 
ride on a roller coaster that 
went up and down-but most- 
ly down. 

In the September 2nd season 
opener, the Panthers pounced on 
Cleveland Heights, clawing their 
way to a 23-14 victory. Senior Rob 
Wilson ran for 77 yards in 6 carries 
and scored two touchdowns. Junior 
Kurt Conway also collected 72 yards 
and one touchdown in 7 carries. Jeff 
Krofcheck made the Plain Dealer 
Dream Team for his fine job on de- 
fense. 

About 10,000 people packed Di- 



Biasio Stadium on September 9th for 
the Euclid-St. Joe's game. The Vi- 
kings took the lead on the first play 
of the game with an 80-yard touch- 
down run. The play set the tone of 
St. Joe's 14-6 victory. Euclid's only 
score was set up on an interception 
by Scott Carpenter. Three plays 
later, quarterback Mike Zuzek went 
in from the three. 

The Panthers balanced the 14-6 
loss to St. Joe's with a 14-6 win over 
Geneva. Euclid opened the scoring 
on Kurt Conway's one-yard touch- 
down plunge. Euclid finished the 
night with 234 total yards. 



I 




m^T?". 






•-I 






J* y -iM JUS*- 



* gi k *^mwmt ^ vim 



■-**A\'"eJmmti 









VARSITY FOOTBALL TEAM, 
BOTTOM ROW: J. Fair, P. Bernacki, S. 
Carpenter, J. Santoriella, S.D. 
Plevelich, S.D. Zele, S.D. King, R. 
Wilson. ROW 2: J. Penny, T. Zadnik, M. 
Pekol, B. Molnar, B. Evans, L. Lapuh, 
M. Ussai, M. Baitt, D. Horvat. ROW 3: 
M. Sheehan, J. Krofchek, M. Zuzek, S. 
Skiljan, T. Yuras, K. Conway, G. 
Kubik, D. Yamane, C. Cardwell. ROW 
4: E. Tomasch, B. Urquhart, S. 
Lorenzo, S. Szmania, N. Minardo, J. 



Gubanc, B. Nachtigal, V. Pringle, J. 
Minissale. ROW 5: B. Donikowski, M. 
Baker, T. Lett, D. Zusman, D. Olszens, 
W. Thomas, J. Bowman, D. McRath, D. 
Gollner. ROW 6: T. Ciuprinskas, A. 
Kozlowski, J. Buck, M, Hrusousky, J. 
Tousel, M. Francis, J. Immke, M. 
Clark, P. Kessler. ROW 7: R. Seymour, 
T. Wandersleben, T. Sharon, M. 
Barnouskas, P. Schwenke, J. 
Lardomita, C. Nolan, K. Sustarsic, B. 
Attamante. 




^ 



Varsity Football 



74 




gp^Mfc 



*il 



'ABOVE: Although giving up a 
touchdown on the game's first play, 
Euclid played St. Joe's even the rest 
of the game, losing 14-6. ABOVE 
RIGHT: Mike Hrusovsky (68) brings 
down the Joe's back. RIGHT: Jack 
Lardomita gives the quick fix to Steve 
Morek's helmet. 






V!^ 



r/> 







75 



Varsity Football 



BIG PICTURE: Mike Baker streches 
out for a pass. LEFT: Scott Carpenter 
takes off down the sideline with his 
interception against St. Joe's. BELOW, 
LEFT: Mike Zuzek confers with Coach 
Seymour. BOTTOM: Nick Minardo 
(42) pays the price for an incompleted 
pass against Willoughby South. 







. . . Heads Down 



Conway's Legs, Campbell's Boots 
Give Light To An Average Season 



pt] onway picked up 142 of those 
[*^ _ in 27 carries, and quarterback 
5=^! l Mike Zuzek added 59 yards in 
15 carries. Euclid's defense did a fan- 
tastic job holding Geneva on the 
three-yard line on a fourth-and-goal 
attempt with a minute amd a half 
left in the game. 

Next, Euclid slip-slided its way to 
a 7-3 victory over Eastlake North in 
a rain-soaked DiBiasio Stadium. 
Again, The Panter's defense did an 
outstanding job, holding the Rangers 
to only 3 points. Euclid's only score 
came in the second quater when Joe 
Santoriella caught a 23-yard pass 
from Mike Zuzek to start the march 
for a touchdown. Conway then drove 
to the Ranger's one-yard line. Zuzek 
then plunged in for the TD. Bill 
Cambell's kick was good, concluding 
the scoring. 

On September 30th, Mentor took 
Euclid for a 13-10 ride. On the open- 
ing kickoff, Euclid fumbled, result- 
ing in a Mentor TD. In the second 
quarter, Zuzek tossed a strike to 
Mike Baker, who ran for a 53-yard 
TD. Campbell's kick was good. Men- 
tor went ahead for good in the fourth 
quarter when a TD pass capped an 
eight-play, 72-yard scoring drive. 

Bill Campbell's 27-yard field goal 
with three seconds left provided Eu- 
clid with a 3-0 win over Maple 
Heights on October 7th. A Euclid 
drive ended when Zuzek was inter- 
cepted at the Maple 30 with 2:44 re- 
maining in the game. The next play, 
the Maple quarterback fumbled, and 
Mike Hrusovsky recovered on the 
Mustang 38-yard line to give Euclid 
one more chance. Euclid's last play 
was Campbell's decisive kick. 

Campbell's hot foot and a hard- 
working defense accounted for a 17-0 
shut out of Willoughby South. Eu- 
clid started off its scoring when 
Campbell hit a 25-yarder with three 
seconds left in the half. He added a 
32-yarder in the third quarter to give 
the Panthers a 6-0 lead. Senior Al 
Lapuh grabbed a 20-yard TD pass 



and followed with a conversion pass 
from junior quarterback Scott 
Szmania. After Lapuh's score, Camp- 
bell made another field goal from the 
25. The Panthers rolled up 409 yards 
in offense, 345 in the ground. 

Al Lapuh continued his fine re- 
ceiving against Bedford. He grabbed 
a 10-yard scoring pass from Szmania 
with 1:05 left in the game to lift Eu- 
clid past Bedford 19-17. The game 
had 209 yards in penalties, including 
a defensive holding call against Bed- 
ford on a Euclid punt late in the 
game that gave the Panthers a first 
down with two minutes to play. The 
key play in the final scoring drive 
was a third-and-five pass to Scott 
Carpenter that took the Panthers to 
Bedford's ten. Lapuh's TD reception 
followed. 

On October 28th, the Panthers lost 
their chance to take the lead in the 
GCC when they dropped a heart- 
breaking 6-0 game to league-leader 
Brush. Euclid suffered from penal- 
ties and turnovers at crucial times, 
the biggest of them leading to the 
game's only score. Euclid did reach 
the Arc's 15-yard line, but on that 
play, a 27-yard pass from Szmania to 
Conway, Euclid was called for hold- 
ing. The Panthers were able to recov- 
er and get a first down, but with 44 
seconds left, an incomplete pass on 
fourth down ended their hope of up- 
setting Brush. 

Euclid ended its season on a sour 
note on November 4th as they were 
defeated 13-0 by Mayfield in a driv- 
ing rain and sleet storm. It was all 
Mayfield in the first half, when all 
the scoring was done. Euclid 
bounced back in the second half, out- 
gaining the Wildcats 164-51 yards, 
but interceptions and turnovers 
killed the numerous drives. Al- 
though Euclid had the statistical 
edge, Mayfield owned the higher 
number where it counted — on the 
scoreboard. Thus ended the 1983 
football season. 

— B Tingley 



77 



Varsity Football 



JUNIOR Varsity 

Juniors Called To Assist JV's, 
But Team Ends Season 2-6-2 



he JV football team finished 
a disappointing 2-6-2. Lack of 
speed and mental mistakes 
were its biggest weaknesses. 

Due to injuries and a lack of many 
sophomores going out for football, 
many juniors played on the JV team. 
Sophomore George Beros, a two- 
way starter, was injured in the fourth 
game and was out the rest of the sea- 
son. This key injury proved to be the 
straw that broke the back of the JV's 
season. 

The freshman team, led by cap- 



tains Dave Potokar and Tony Lauria, 
had an undefeated 5-0-2 record. 

The team's success came from its 
ability to establish the running game 
along with a diversified passing at- 
tack. 

Bruce Hayes and Marty Lisac 
shared the tailback duties and ran 
for a total 525 yards. Lauria chipped 
in 226 yards from his fullback slot. 
Potokar completed 37 of his 59 at- 
tempts and gained 225 yards rushing. 

— B. Tingley 




— - * *^*^ """ 



JV FOOTBALL TEAM, BOTTOM 
ROW: N. McClain, A. McGee, M. 
Abbott, D. McGraw, C. Cononie, C. 
Jakubauskas, D. Kitchen. ROW 2: M. 
Miller, G. Knack, C. Stennis, T. Wojno, 
R. McCarthy, D. Mannello, M. Demora. 
ROW 3: J. Frisco, D. Potokar, J. 
Scolaro, W. Mramer, C. Rocco, R. 
Staso, R. Uhlir. ROW 4: K. Thomas, L. 
Davis, J. Martin, K. Clark, M. Mizek, 
D. Walsh. TOP ROW: W. Attamante, P. 
Schwenke, T. Sharon, T. 
Wanderslaben, K. Sustarsic, M. 
Barnauskas, C. Nolan. 





JV FOOTBALL 


Euclid Opponent 


8 


Cleveland Heights 12 





St. Joseph 36 


34 


Geneva 6 


6 


Eastlake North 28 





Mentor 28 


6 


Maple Heights 12 


6 


Willoughby South 6 


27 


Bedford 12 





Brush 18 





Mayfield 




Season Record: 2-6-2 




FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 
Euclid Opponent 

20 Maple Heights 

12 Mayfield < 

i Brush 
18 Eastlake North 1 

" Roxboro o 

! Wiley 6 

30 Bedford 12 

Season Record: 5-0-2 



JV Football 



78 




BIG PICTURE: George Beros breaks 
down the field against Cleveland 
Heights. ABOVE: A Heights defender 
gets in the way of junior Tony Lett 
and the ball. LEFT. FRE0HMEW* 
FOOTBALL TEAM, BOTTOM ROW: X. 
King, E. Anderson, M. Franklin, P. 
Brown, J. Sopko, B. Parmertor, B. 
Miller, D. Capasso, D. Hewston, C. 
Russo. ROW 2: T. Ford, B. Strowder, P. 
Haislah, D. Jones, B. Cole, M. Davis, 
D. Brodowski, M. Horabik, D. 
" g, K. Pekar. ROW 3: T. 
, E. Mcintosh, R. Lapuh, K. 
ic, R. Dakdouk, M. Fair, N. 
'. Skora, M. Seaman, T. Gillotti. 
'4: P. Harris, A. Plevelich, J. 
Harabinus, R. Johnson, R. Woods, M. 
Kekie, C. Campbell, C. Linderman, B. 
Hayes, D. Segulin. TOP ROW: T. 

auria, B. Fonovic, M. Mazzei, M. 
Lisac, F. Richardson, M. Adams, J. 
Bryan, B. Bealko, M. Loparo, C. 
Godfrey. 



79 



Freshman Football 




fS&t 








I 



80 




Not On The Ball 

Booters Slip To Third In The GCC 
Van De Motter Named To All-Ohio 
Team 



ith six of eleven starters re- 
turnings from last year's 
GCC championship squad, 
Euclid's Varsity Soccer Team was fa- 
vored to repeat. Unfortunately, the 
team failed to deliver and had to set- 
tle for third in the GCC with a 8-7-1 
record. 

Experience helped Euclid domi- 
nate midfield. Three-year starter 
and Co-captain Chris Van de Motter 
was moved from striker to attacking 
halfback. For his role as field-gener- 



al, Van de Motter. was named team 
and GCC MVP AND to the News- 
Herald, All-Area, and All Ohio first 
teams. News-Herald Honorable 
Mention Ed Stroberg was Euclid's 
most improved and physical player. 
Ironman Igor Grahovic played every 
minute during the season while 
marking the opposing striler. Graho- 
vac was named the team's Best De- 
fensive Player, and to the All-GCC 
team. 




I 





VARSITY SOCCER 


Euclid Opponent j 


4 


Cleveland Heights 


1 


St. Edward 4 


2 


Mayfield 





Mentor 3 


2 


Brush 5 


4 


Willoughby South 2 


1 


Eastlake North 2 


2 


Mayfield 1 





Mentor 2 


2 


Brush 3 


2 


Willoughby South 2 


2 


Eastlake North 1 


5 


St. Joseph 2 




Tournament 


1 


Chardon 


2 


Madison 1 





Eastlake North 6 




Season Record: 8-7 



ABOVE: VARSITY SOCCER TEAM, 
BOTTOM ROW: Rick Holcknecht, Bill 
Starr, Chris Van de Motter, Igor 
Grahovac, Tim Lindic. ROW 2: Jeff 
Jordan, Ed Stroberg, Jim Blevins, 
Derrik Stewart. ROW 3: Dave Crane, 
Mike Woodcock, Dave Hall, Nick 
Bogden. TOP ROW: Mike Bedzyk, 
Todd Schrock, Marko Prpic, Coach 
Sattler. BIG PICTURE: All-GCC 
goalkeeper Marco Prpic dominates 
the net against St. Joe's. ABOVE, 
LEFT: All-GCC forward Dave Crane 
(5) accepts the congratulations of his 
teammates after a score. LEFT: 
Striker Bill Starr clears to the wing 
under pressure. 






Jk 



81 



Varsity Soccer 







Un ders tudies 

dor Booters Learn The Ropes; 
shmen Field Co-ed Team 



mgm-l he JV team was characterized 
=1^ by good individual and team 
i\ skill and by intensity. Brian 
Polaski was a tough and consistent 
hustler on defense. Paul Thomas 
played the sweeper position with te- 
nacity and intelligence. Euclid's 
Greek connection of Lee, Chris, and 
Nick Paporous played at defense, 
midfield, and forward. Lee was the 
team's most improved player. Gor- 
don Dallos, even while recovering 
from a knee injury, used his speed to 
put goals in the net. Dave Hall and 



Chris Paporous saw action with the 
varsity. 

Coach Tom Turner's goal was to 
improve, and although the team 
seemed to tie more games than it 
won, the season was successful. The 
JV's worked on refining their skills 
and were greatly improved at the 
season's end. 

Although the Equal Rights 
Amendment was not passed in 1983, 
girls successfully broke the sex bar- 
rier on the freshman soccer team. 6 
girls were among 25 freshmen on the 




ABOVE JV SOCCER, BOTTOM ROW: 
Chris Papouras, Pete Papas, Lee 
Papouras, Anslie Mclnally, Ed Wilson, 
Steve Ault. ROW 2: Mike Shuster, 
Mario Novkovic, Mike Porter, Paul 
Thomas, Gordan Dallos, Nick 
Papouras. TOP ROW: Coach Tom 
Turner, Tony Cuisanovic, Bill Cambell, 
Brian Polaski, Steve 



team. 

Coach Richard Homovec, stepped 
down from the JV Team to instruct 
the freshman in soccer. His main ob- 
jective was to instruct in fundamen- 
tals while playing everyone on every 
game. The ten game season ended 
with a 3-6-1 record. 

The players had a wide range of 
experience, from none to seven years. 
What they lacked in experience they 
made up for in enthusiasm. 

— J. Blevins 





i 






JV Soccer 



82 






si ;*$*% Jm 


rl 


^^Hl^L 


1 

■ 





LEFT: FRESHMAN SOCCfflrTEAM, 
BOTTOM ROW: Dawn Turpfin, Tracey 
Stone, Bill Balis, Chad Ramlow, Mike 
Hall, Jerry Hodge, Carla Pappalardo. 
ROW 2: Paul Rose, Matt Phillips, 
Frank Boyden, Bob Miller, Bob 
Cambell, Bob Ehrhart, Dave Luketic. 
ROW 3: Nathan D'Gidio, Clark Bektal, 
Jonathan Lange, Lou Paroska, Andy 
Thompson, Sue Porter. ROW 4: Beth 
Richards, Paul Baird, Kathy 
Wadsworth, Julie Toth. ABOVE: Chris 
Van Demotter dribbles down the field 
and gets ready t6 pass. LEFT: Igor 
Grahovac fights for possession of the 
ball and Ed Stroberg waits to assist 
him. 



83 



Freshman Soccer 




Gary Paparizos' ho 
GCC tournament helpe 
sweep the league title. 



A Hole In One 

Hradek Leads Golf Team Charge 
To GCC League Championship 



^n 



uclid's golf team clobbered its 
opponents all season long in 
route to a 16-1 record and a 
league championship. 

At the GCC tournament at High- 
land's 6700 yard Blue Golf Course, 
Euclid captured the top four spots. 
Jim Hradek took first with a 73, fol- 
lowed by Scott Corras, Matt Bryda, 
and Mark Raicevich. Gary Paparizos' 
86 was highlighted by a 125-yard 
hole in one. 



Mark Raicevich and Jim Hradek 
led the team during the district com- 
petition with 36 strokes each. How- 
ever, Euclid bowed out of state com- 
petition with a third place finish at 
Windmill Golf Course in North 
Royalton. The team finished with a 
total of 337 strokes. Hradek led Eu- 
clid with an 80, followed by Raice- 
vich and Bryda with 83's. 

— M Lange 




•r*$wi 




^vUttgJF 






ABOVE, GOLF TEAM; M. Raicevich, G. 
Papazizos, M. Bryda, J. Hradek, S. 
Corras, Coach Raicevich. RIGHT: 
Mark Raicevich concentrates on 
keeping his head down and his 
shoulders straight. 









Ml 






85 



Golf 



Finishing First 

Teams Capture GCC Titles; 
Shut Out Of State Competition 



he boys' cross-country team 
had visions of a trip to Co- 
lumbus from the first day of 
practice. 

The season started out well with 
the team going undefeated in GCC 
dual meets. In the GCC meet, the 
team placed second, giving Euclid a 
co-championship with rival Mentor. 
Euclid advanced easily through 
the sectional meet to the districts. 
Then came the heartbreaking race at 
Akron's Goodyear Park. Fate was not 
on the team's side as they failed to 
qualify for state competition by one 
place. Only senior and school record- 
holder (16:05 over 3.1 miles) Gary 
Tressler would make the trip to the 
capitol. 

The JV team was also undefeated. 
Leading the JV's were Ed Lunder, 
Billy Bell, Mike McCandless, Al Ku- 
camanic, and Scott Burton. Lunder, 
Burton, and Bell also ran some varsi- 
ty races. 

— M. Tomasi 



wEzH ed by Coach David Saywell 
J3r and co-captains Norreen 
=5zJJ O'Donnell and Jenny 
Schwartz, the girls' cross-country 
team finished the season with an un- 
defeated dual meet record. 

The girls all turned in excellent 
performances, especially in the invi- 
tational meets. They started their 
string of invitational successes with a 
fourth place finish at the Akron Fire- 
stone Invitational. Next, the team 
took a second at the Colverleaf Invi- 
tational. The Laurel Invitational 
proved to be the team's best perfor- 
mance all season as they captured 
first place out of several teams. 

State competion proved to be an- 
other matter. The team missed a trip 
to the state meet by a few places al- 
though junior Kris Faletic did man- 
age to make the trip to Columbus. 

— J Wollmershauser, K. Balogh 







«r». 



ijfr^ « 



BOYS* CROSS COUNTRY 


Euclid 


Opponent 


15 Brush 




50 


21 Bedford 




37 


25 Mayfield 




31 


27 Mentor 




28 


16 Willoughby South 


46 


15 Eastlake North 




50 


25 Maple Heights 




34 


INVITATIONALS 






8 Firestone 


23 


teams 


2 Cloverleaf 


12 


teams 


6 Coaches' Classic 


14 


teams 


1 Cleveland Heights 


6 


teams 


2 GCC Meet 


8 


teams 


2 Chardon 


14 


teams 


2 Sectional 


17 


teams 


Season Record: 7-0 







GIRLS' CROSS COUNTRY 


fiUClid 


upponeni 


21 Regina 




40 


18 Madison 




44 


15 St. Joseph 






Academy 




50 


15 Maple Heights 




50 


15 Eastlake North 




50 


INVITATIONALS 






4 Goodyear 


29 


teams 


5 University 


14 


teams 


1 Laurel 


13 


teams 


2 Cloverleaf 


12 


teams 


5 Coaches' Classic 


11 


teams 


1 Cleveland Heights 


4 


teams 


2 GCC Meet 


6 


teams 


1 Hilltopper 


14 


teams 


2 Sectional 


28 


teams 


9 Districts 


16 


teams 


Season Record: 5-0 







FRESHMAN CROSS COUNTRY 
Euclid Opponent 

26 (boys) Roehm 31 

18 (girls) Roehm 29 

21 (team) Berea 35 

INVITATIONALS 

1 (team) University 7 teams 

1 (boys) Cloverleaf 7 teams 

1 (girls) Cloverleaf 7 teams 

3 (team) Coaches' Classic 13 teams 

3 (boys) Euclid 6 teams 

1 (girls) Euclid 2 teams 

2 (boys) Cloverleaf 7 teams 
2 (girls) Cloverleaf 7 teams 

Season Record: 3-0 



Cross Country 



86 




TOP, BOYS' CROSS COUNTRY, SITTING: J. Duricy, J. 
Korzun, M. Leyda, TTSlu«ser^JV. Mews. ROW 2: A. 
Calabrese, T. Madden, J. Ford, M. McCandless, B. Bel, J. 
Muscarella, J. Allay, A. Kucamanic, E. Tepley. ROW 3: K. 
Kause, C. Burton, -G.Tressler, D. Rymarczyk, M. Basler, M. 
Tomasi, E. Lunder, B. Evans. 

MIDDLE, GIRLS' CROSS COUNTRY, ROW 1: J. Schwartz, 
A. Nemeeek, N. O'Donnell. ROW 2: T. Day, J. Vanah, J. 
Bukovac, R. Ramlow, M. Simmons. ROW 3: D. Say well, K. 
FSletie, K. Korb, C. Coyne. 



FRESHMAN CROSS-COUNTRY, ROW 1: K. Smullen, R. 
Bukavac, M. Allay, K. Marvin, M. Simmons, K. Stupica. 
ROW 2: K. McCIuskey, M. Wacsmunski, R. Carlson, M. 
Smith, T. Karnak, V. Wagner, C. Trebec, R. Ramlow. 






#. 






BIG PICTURE: Gary Tressler follows ton the heels of a 
Mentor harrier. Euclid squeeked past Mentor in their dual 
meet 28-29. 



**f? 



8T 



Cross Country 









♦ 










* 



Euclid 
15-15 

7-6 
15-15 
13-9 

8-1 

8-6 



VARSITY VOLLEYBALL 

( 
Pains. Riverside 

Eastlake North ] 
Villa Angela 

Mentor ] 

Maple Heights ] 

Willouyhby South ] 

Bedford i 



-9-14 St. -Joseph Academy 12- 

" "5 Brush 4- 

3-10 Mayfield H- 

Regina 15. 

» Eastlake North 15. 

9-8 Mentor 15- 

9-15-15 Lake Catholic 15. 

15-0-15 Maple Heights 11- 

9-8 Willoughbv South 15. 

1-16-15 Bedford 15. 

15-11-15 Maple Heights 9. 

15-14-15 Brush 7. 

15-15 Brush 10- 

5-15-14 Mayfield 15. 



3 I 



BELOW: Rose Struna's and Margie 
McCance's determination wasn't 
enough to produce a winning season. 
BELOW, LEFT: Tammy Cantini 
prepares to blast the ball back. 



A Net Loss 



Determination Not Enough 
As VBer's Finish Season 9-12 



good attitude, a willingness 
to work, and a determination 
to win characterized the 
1983-84 varsity volleyball team. 

A young team, the lady Panthers 
had a few veterans. Rose Struna was 
the only player with previous play- 
ing time. Commenting on its 9-12 
season, Coach Paderewski said of the 
team, "It took half the season before 
they jelled, and it wasn't until the 
second round in the GCC when they 
really played together." 



The team won five of its last seven 
games, improving on a mid-season 
record of 4-10. 

Co-captains Cindy Black and Rose 
Struna were names News-Herald 
Players of the Week. Black was the 
team's best setter and missed only 
six of 240 serves. Struna, the stron- 
gest and most consistent player, was 
the best spiker. 




Varsity Volleyball 



Finishing .500 

JV's, Freshmen Battle Problems; 
Finish Seasons Above .500 




ith only seven players left on 
the team at the end of the 
season, the JV volleyball 
team pulled together to finish with a 
12-7 record. 

The team overcame the drain of 
players to the varsity. In fact, six of 
the ten JV players played in a varsity 
match at some time during the sea- 
son. 

Commenting on the JV's perfor- 
mance, Coach Pat Buch said, "This 
is one of the best teams I have ever 
coached as far as cooperation was 



concerned." 

An observer of the 1983-84 fresh- 
man volleyball team might have re- 
marked that the girls were stay-at- 
home types since they won all of 
their home games while losing five of 
their away matches. 

"The team had to learn to work 
together more. They tended to be in- 
consistent, but they had certain mo- 
ments when things would just go 
right," noted Coach Dan Maxson. 

— C Betts 




ABOVE, JV VOLLEYBALL TEAM, 
BOTTOM ROW: S. Larkins, R. Sato, P. 
Buck, J. Waschura, L. Tressler. ROW 
2: D. D'Amico, A. Waltermire, C. 
Zablotney, D. Rossmann, S. Tekieli. 
RIGHT, FRESHMAN VOLLEYBALL 
TEAM, BOTTOM ROW: L. Germano, D. 
Maxson, A. Skiljan. ROW 2: R. Staso, 
B. Parker, T. Van Beneden. ROW 3: K. 
Urdzik, K. Curtis, K. Benedum, S. 
Davis, L. Jones. 





JV Volleyball 



90 




mF 



«&*, 



■■<■ 



'■X.' 






FRESHMAN VOLLEYBALL 


Euclid 


Opponent 


10-15-7 


Brush 15-4-15 


8-16-9 


Willowick 15-14-15 


15-6-15 


Mentor Shore 9-15-11 


15-15 


Pains. Auburn o-l 


12-15-6 


Wickliffe 15-2-15 


15-15 


Brush n-9 


15-13-15 John R. Williams 3-15-6 I 


15-7-10 


Mentor Ridge 9-15-15 1 


15-15 


Wickliffe 13.8 1 


12-9 


Mentor Shore 15-15 1 


15-15 


Pains. Auburn 5.1 1 


Season Record: 6-5 1 

1 




^ 'wf L ., 



I 



BIG PICTURES Cmm Watral (14) and 
Rose Struna (8) lea? the team defease 
"af ainst Mentor. 



'fpwimai 






*«. 




sa *««te 




91 



FresBman Volleyball 








Girls Tennis 



92 







Bouncing Back 

Tennis Team Goes With Youth; 
Manages To Finish Near .500 



But 



osing six varsity starters 
made the girls tennis team as 
green as their tennis balls, 
like their balls, they bounced 



back to pull a .500 season, a hard task 
for such an inexperienced team. 

Coach Dzerowicz rebuilt his team, 
placing freshmen in the top two posi- 
tions. Chris Duricy took the first sin- 
gles spot. Katarina Oroz took the sec- 
ond singles spot. The only returning 
veteran, Darnise Stephens, took the 
last singles spot. The rookie doubles 
teams included three seniors and a 



sophomore. First doubles team in- 
cluded Norma Jalovec and Kirsten 
Freeh. Second doubles included Kim 
Zndarsic and Cindy Fekete. 

In Euclid's win against Richmond 
Heights, Chris Duricy crushed her 
opponent 6-5, 6-2, as Denise Ste- 
phens dominated her adversary 6-3, 
6-1. Freeh and Jalovec were also vic- 
torious 6-2, 6-1. With the help of 
Duricy's 6-0, 6-0 triumph and Oroz's 
5-7, 7-2, 6-3 win, Euclid defeated 
Mayfield 3-2. 

— M. Lange 





GIRLS TENNIS, BOTTOM ROW: Kim 
Znidarsic, Katrina Oroz, Dhris Duricy, 
Beth Waterman. TOP ROW: Coach 
Alex Dzerowicz, Cindy Fekete, Tracy 
Wandersleben, Norma Jalovec. BIG 
PICTURE: In total concentration, Kim 
Znidarsic awaits her opponent's serve. 
OPPOSITE PAGE: Katarina Oroz 
serves up. LEFT: Kim Znidarsic 
returns with a good forehand swing. 



93 



Girls Tennis 



On Edge 

Morning Practice Makes Perfect 
For EHS's Blade And Edge Girl's 



B 



efore most students are even 
up in the morning, eight EHS 
girls have already had a 
tough IV2 hour workout. Waking up 
at 4:45 a.m., they quickly gather their 
things and trudge to the Clifford E. 
Orr Arena for 5:30 practice. Before 
the school day has begun, they have 
slipped in and out of cold skates, fal- 
len a couple of times, and numbed 
their toes and hands. They are the 
members of the Euclid Blade and 



Edge Club. 

The Blade and Edge girls practice 
two kinds of skating: patch and free 
style. Patch is skating on the edges of 
the blade in a figure eight. Many 
variations exist. One can use the in- 
side, outside, forward, or backwards 
edges or a variety of all of them to 
skate patch. Freestyle is skating to 
music and doing jumps, spins, and 
other movements. 

Skating is an expensive sport. 




EUCLID BLADE AND EDGE CLUB 
Kris Faletic, Stephanie Sper, Chris 
Merencky, Kim Beuck, Michelle 
Woodcock, Barbra Tingley, Maria 
Newcomb, Patti Jones 



Skates cost quite a bit since the boot 
is all-leather and the blade is pur- 
chased separately. Another expense 
is paying for ice time, which runs 
about $3 per person for each session. 
Skaters show their ability in tests. 
Judges watch and grade the skater on 
her performance and skill. After 
passing a test, the skater moves up to 
the next test, which measures more 
difficult moves. 

— B. Tingley. S. Sper 





Sports Feature 



94 



BIG PICTURE: Patti Jones glides 
from a spiral into a layout (left) in 
one graceful move. 



li 



20 




'r 



FAR LEFT: "Why an I doing this?" 
Barb Tingley seems to be asking after 
taking an early morning fall. LEFT: 
Maria Newcomb uses a scribe to 
make a circle to practice her patches. 



95 



Sports Feature 



A So-So Season 

After Two Years Of Firsts, 
Cagers Settle For Second Place 



* 






aptained by Tony Gholson 
and Mike Zuzek, the varsity 
basketball team had a so-so 
season. Having won or tied for the 
GCC crown the last several years, 
this year they had to settle for sec- 
ond place. 

Euclid's cagers started the sea- 
son with a few players on the injured 
list. The Panthers lost their season 
opener to Cleveland Heights, but 
bounced back to win the next two 
games. As the season progressed, the 
team through hard work and deter- 



mination, improved their game. 
"They had excellent floor leadership 
and were very successful with re- 
bounds and foul shots. All these 
things go into a good ball club," said 
Coach Daugherty. 

Halfway through the season, a per- 
manent starting lineup was set, con- 
sisting of John Cayne, Tony Ghol- 
son, Terry Rabbitts, and Mike Zuzek. 
During the remainder of the season, 
the cagers were victorious enough to 
keep their second-place slot in the 
GCC. 

-K. Balogh 



4 




BOYS' VARSITY BASKETBALL 


Euclid Opponent 


64 


Cleveland Heights 


73 


52 


Maple Heights 


57 


69 


Mentor 


66 


72 


Orange 


40 


59 


Mayfield 


61 


54 


Brush 


51 


75 


Willoughby South 


50 


60 


Eastlake North 


68 


61 


Bay Village 


87 


85 


Bedford 


79 


60 


Maple Heights 


46 


61 


Madison 


62 


63 


Mentor 


74 


65 


Mayfield 


76 


72 


Brush 


43 


55 


Wickliffe 


53 


60 


Willoughby South 


46 


61 


Geneva 


48 


53 


Eastlake North 


52 


57 


Bedford 

Tournament 


51 


69 


East 


66 


65 


Mayfield 


52 


42 


Madison 

Season Record: 15-8. 


49 










' 






if 






Us 






1 






■'. 






■-£. 






. 






£' 






t 






fc' 





VARSITY BASKETBALL BOTTOM 
ROW: Carol Hart, Kathy O'Brien, Judy 
Nemecek, Andrea Kosic, Cindy Black. 
ROW 2: Randy Thomas, manager, John 
Cayne, Mike Zuzek, Terry Rabbitts, 
Jerry Murphy, Tony Gholson, Trevorr 
Jurgenson, trainer. ROW 3: Mike Hru- 
sovsky, Ed Tekeli, Mike Hoag, Keith 
Ellison, Ray Minis, Nick Minardo. NOT 
PICTURED: Jerome Young. RIGHT: 
Tony Gholson reaches out for a helping 
hand. 



Boys' Varsity Basketball 



96 






; » 



Boy's Varsity Bas 



BIG PICTURE: Tony Gholson drives in 
for a score in a losing effort against 
Madison. BELOW: Euclid surprised 
many of its fans by beating favored 
East High in its first tournament game. 



**• 






Boy's Varsity Basketball 




Tournament Time 

Euclid-Joe's Re-Match Derailed 
As Panthers Bow Out To Madison 






ans who hoped for a re- 
match of last year's tour- 
nament struggle against 
St. Joe's were disappointed as 
the Panthers were knocked off 
by Madison in district play. 

Coming off a six-game regu- 
lar season winning streak, the 
varsity basketball team kept 
rolling with a 69-66 upset victo- 



ry over third-seeded East High 
in tournament sectional play. 
Four Panther starters finished 
in double figures: Gerry Mur- 
phy had 20 points; Tony Ghol- 
son, 19; John Cayne, 12; and 
Mike Zuzek, 10. 

The Panthers stayed on the 
winning track with a 65-52 win 
over their GCC rivals, the May- 



RIGHT: Gholson's twelve points 
helped to down Mayfield. All five Eu- 
clid starters hit double figures in the 
game. BELOW, RIGH^: Mike Zuzek 
cans two of his ten points against 
East High. 





field Wildcats, in the sectional 
final. All five Euclid starters 
made double digits: Zuzek had 
15; Murphy, 14; Cayne and 
Gholson, 12; and Rabbitts, 10. 
Mayfield's poor shooting from 
the field in the first half contri- 
buted to Euclid's third straight 
sectional crown. 

The team's luck ran out when 
it met 19-3 Madison in the dis- 
trict opener. Euclid shot only 
30% (18 of 61) from the foul 
line. The loss snapped a six- 
game winning streak. Euclid 
bowed out of tournament play 
with a fine record of 15-8. 



Boys' Varsity Basketball 



■I' "":■■'-"■■-*■'•..■}■■ 



Twin Killings 

JV And Freshmen Hoopsters 
Rise To The Top Of The Heap 



he JV basketball team had a 
very successful season, cap- 
turing first place in the 
Greater Cleveland Conference. 

The season started slowly with the 
team being defeated by Mayfield and 
Brush. Midway through the season, a 
definite starting lineup was set. It in- 
cluded Tom Lewin, Dana Gollner, 
Lee Kooser, Mike Hoag, and Kevin 
Thomas, with Pat McLaughlin and 
Tom Daugherty coming off the 
bench. 

The second part of the seaon 
showed a specific improvement in 
defense, which was a major factor in 
the team's success. The JV's came 
back to show their revenge with re- 
match wins over both Mayfield and 
Brush. 

Individual recognition goes to Ke- 
vin Thomas for showing the most 
improvement throughout the season 
and to Tom Lewin as the team's out- 
standing ball handler. 

-K. Balogh 




BOYS' FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 
BOTTOM ROW: Merle Davis, Jeff 
Slattery, Tony Klepac. STANDING: 
Bill DeMora, manager, Frank Rich- 
ardson, Bob Yehl, John Karabinus, 
Paul Baird, Rich Johnson, Charles 
Shy, Aaron Loving, Mike Franklin, 
Bob Montana, Coach Tichnor. 




BOYS' JUNIOR VARSITY BASKET- 
BALL TEAM BOTTOM ROW: Lisa 
Finke, aide, Jim Bowdouris, Eric 
Croone, Tom Daugherty, Lee Kooser, 
Pat McLaughlin, Tom Lewin. ROW 2: 
Dana Gollner, Neil McClain, Tony 
Cvijanovic, Kevin Thomas, Ron 
Staso, Cedric Crawford, Bill De- 
Mora, manager. NOT PICTURED: 
Damon Jones. 



BIG PICTURE: Teamwork and goo 
fundamental skills helped the freshman 
team to an outstanding season. 



* 




Boys' JV Basketball 



100 



illFil 




BOYS* FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 
Euclid Opponent 

Mayfield 

Brush 

Bedford 

Maple Heights 

Mentor Memorial 

Mayfield 

Willowick 

Brush 

Painesville Harvey 

Bedford 

Maple Heights 

Monticello 

Wiley 

Season Record: 12-2 

(Scores unavailable at press 
time) 






BOYS' JV BASKETBALL 


Euclid 


Opponent 


62 


Cleveland Heights 


65 


50 


Maple Heights 


47 


61 


Mentor 


46 


61 


Orange 


41 


41 


Mayfield 


42 


33 


Brush 


46 


67 


Willoughby South 


36 


60 


Eastlake North 


40 


49 


Bay Village 


64 


63 


Bedford 


38 


47 


Maple Heights 


32 


55 


Madison 


43 


26 


Mentor 


28 


51 


Mayfield 


38 


63 


Brush 


42 


60 


Wickliffe 


43 


74 


Willoughby South 


63 


48 


Geneva 


31 


52 


Eastlake North 


49 


60 


Bedford 

Season Record: 15-5 


41 



«, 



101 



Boys' Freshman Basketball 



» 






BIG PICTURE: Laura Walsh displays 
her foul line concentration. BELOW; 
Joan Mast goes up for a bucket against 
Eastlake North 




GIRLS' VARSITY BASKETBALL 



Euclid 



50 


Regina 


52 


38 


Maple Heights 


33 


34 


Mentor 


48 


32 


Mayfield 


35 


36 


Brush 


32 


49 


Willoughby South 


56 


33 


Eastlake North 


55 


53 


Bedford 


51 


64 


Maple Heights 


45 


30 


Mentor 


37 


37 


Shaker Heights 


45 


47 


Mayfield 


32 


43 


Wickliffe 


24 


38 


Brush 


34 


50 


West Geauga 


49 


36 


Willoughby South 


53 


31 


Eastlake North 


51 


51 


Bedford 

Season Record: 9-9 


49 



*. 






Girls' Varsity Basketball 



,*■■ . ■'■ ■*■ <-■ ■ 



102 




Ups And Downs 

Girls' Basketball Team Record 
Bounces Around All Season 




he girls' varsity basketball 
team started out disappoint- 
ingly the first half of the sea- 
son, but bettered their record in a 
hard fought second half. 

There were many strong contri- 
butes to the team's starting line-up. 



Two starters from last year returned: 
senior Monica Kuhar and junior 
Joan Mast. The other starters filling 
the line-up were junior Margie 
McCance and sophomore Denise 
Holly. 
A big contributer in rebounding 
•-, fr*- 



W> wn *t w« i^— i nmn i „ , 




fe 



GIRLS' VARSITY BASKETBALL 
KNEELING: Coach Girimont, Stand- 
ing: Laura Tressler, trainer, Traci 
O'Hannon, Laura Walsh, Joan Mast, 
Margie McCance, Denise Holly, Tina 
Wade, Monica Kuhar, Darnise Ste- 
phens, Kent Smith, manager. NOT PIC- 
TURED: Chris Kucera. 



was Denise Holly, high in assists was 
Margie McCance, and high in shots 
was Joan Mast and Monica Kuhar. 
Juniors Laura Walsh and Chris Ku- 
cera also filled in on the starting line- 
up. 

Coach Girimont said, "The reason 
for our come back in the second half 
was better offensive ball movement, 
better all around defense and re- 
bounds. 



-B. Tingley 



103 



Girls' Varsity Basketball 



Stompers 



JV And Freshmen Cagers 
Crush Opponents All Season 



■m-iI he J.V.'s started off the sea- 
^i£^ son with a kick. By February 
~~*~ H they were 12 and 4 and in 
first place in their division in the 
Greater Cleveland Conference. One 
of the most exciting games was 
against Mentor. The Lady Panthers 
were ahead by one point at the final 
buzzer. In explaining their success, 
Marilyn Murphy said, "We have 
good players, and our coach is excel- 
lent." 

The Freshman girls' basketball 
team led a very successful 6-1 first 
half season. The freshman Panthers 
came out on top with a 19 to 16 win 
at Bedford in a very aggressive game. 
Lead scorers in the game were Renee 
Guilloy with five points and Kim 
Barber, Lisa Germano and Amy Skil- 
jan with four each. Karen Stupica 
also chipped in one. In the Mentor- 
Shore game, Shelly Tekieli groved 
five points, with Barber, Germano 
and Kathy Wadsworth canning four. 

•C. Cummings 





GIRLS' FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 
BOTTOM ROW: Eric Cantini, Kathy 
Voight. ROW 2: Bridgette Douglas, 
Yvette Williams, (aria Pappalardo, 
Lisa Germano, Amy Skiljan. ROW 3: 
Janeen Crowell, Renee Guillory, Beth 
Lauver, Sue Porter, Renee Staso, Coach 
Cantini. ROW 4: Karen Stupica, Michele 
Tekieli, Erin Kocjan, Zonarae Gardner, 
Kim Barber. 




GIRLS' JUNIOR VARSITY BASKET- 
BALL BOTTOM ROW: Danielle D'A- 
mico, Diane Rossman, Jacqui Vanah, 
Monice Simmons. STANDING: Coach 
Force, Missy Brokate, Audrey Motie- 
junas, Kim Kocjan, Jennie Metcalf, 
Kristen Petrie, Marilyn Murphy. 



Sophomore Danielle D'Amico drives 
toward the basket. 




Girls' JV Basketball 



104 



Aft 



m? 



GIRLS' FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 




Euclid 

19 J.R. Williams 

23 Mentor Shore 
37 Brush 

18 Auburn 

24 J.R. Williams 

29 Bedford 
26 Willowick 

31 Mentor Ridge 

44 Brush 

30 Eastlake 

28 Bedford 

29 Brush 

30 Monticello 
30 Bedford 

Season Record: 12-2 



Opponent 

16 
16 
13 
10 
11 
23 
30 
24 

2 
18 
17 

4 
40 
22 



GIRLS' JV BASKETBALL 



Euclid 



Opponent 



37 


Regina 


32 


35 


Maple Heights 


20 


36 


Mentor 


33 


31 


Mayfield 


14 


29 


Brush 


13 


58 


Willoughby South 


45 


32 


Eastlake North 


34 


40 


Bedford 


26 


47 


Maple Heights 


28 


28 


Mentor 


27 


61 


Shaker Heights 


20 


40 


Mayfield 


26 


44 


Wickliffe 


41 


24 


Brush 


23 


31 


West Geauga 


47 


47 


Willoughby South 


37 


27 


Eastlake North 


35 


58 


Bedford 


41 



Season Record: 14-5 





1 ^ 



HOCKEY 



Euclid 

6 
1 
3 
1 
2 
4 
6 
1 
16 
5 
5 
4 


3 
9 

1 
5 



Opponent 



■ 



Upper Arlington 
North Olmsted 
Trinity 

University School 
Cleveland Heights 
Kent Roosevelt 
St. Joseph 
Shaker Heights 
Garfield Heights 
Trinity 
Rocky River 
St. Joseph 
University School 
Cleveland Heights 
Kent Roosevelt 
Garfield Heights 
Shaker Heights 
University School 
Lakewood 

Holiday Tournament 

Kent Roosevelt 
Bay Village 

Season Record: 6-14-1 




Hockey 



106 




Ambushed! 



Season An Uphill Struggle, 
But St. Joe's Makes It Worth It 



he 1983-1984 hockey team, 
headed by their new coach, 
Mr. Fred Heyer, began its 
challenging season with a victory 
over Upper Arlington. However, be- 
cause of their inexperience and unfa- 
miliarity with the new coach's sys- 
tem, the Panther icers soon found 
the rest of the season a learning ex- 
perience. 

In the next five games, which were 
against some of Euclid's toughest op- 
ponents, the Panthers eked out one 
tied and four losses. At the North 
Olmstead Tournament, they were 
blasted by the tournament hosts 11-1 
in what seemed to be the team's 
worst game of the season. At the end 
of the same week, the icers tied Trin- 
ity 3-3, then were topped by Univer- 



sity School 11-1. The next two games 
were losses to Cleveland Heights, 6- 
2, and Kent Roosevelt, 11-4. Euclid 
finally bounced back with a 6-0 vic- 
tory over cross-town rival St. Joe's. 

The Panthers won only three of 
their last ten games. The three victo- 
ries included an excellent game 
against Trinity and a second defeat 
of St. Joe's in a fight-marred match. 

Leading the team offense were 
senior forwards Bill Starr, Chris 
VandeMotter and Brian Dolan. Aid- 
ing the defensive crew were seniors 
Chris Kane, Steve Knaus, and goalie 
Mike Mochan. 

In summing up the season, one 
member of the team said " It's been a 
tough season, but we've fought for all 
our victories." 



-J. Wollmershauaer 




HOCKEY KNEELING: Mike Mochan, 
Chris Linderman, Chad Ramlow, Mark 
Waksmunski, Jim Allay, Dennis 
McKeen, Len Purvis, Tom Salo, Dan 
Connors. STANDING: Brian Starr, man- 
ager, Chris Vandemotter, Joe Maroli, 
Chris Kane, Marty Lisac, Steve Knaus, 
Paul Borthwick, Bill Starr, Dave Poto- 
kar, Brian Dolan, Coach Heyer. 



The ref steps between Joe Maroli and 
his Shaker opponent as they are about 
to exchange cooking recipes. 



107 



Hockey 



\ing The Cause 



re's More Than Toting Water 
To Being A Football Aide 



ports aides are as important 
to the team as the players. 
They do much of the work on 
the sidelines that helps the team to 
keep going. Besides keeping score 
and taking statistics, many aides 
have to learn how to tape ankles and 
wrists. 

Football aides have to be very re- 
sponsible. The aides start in the 
summer by going to practices to fill 
water bottles and to learn how to 
treat injuries. During games, they 
have to fill water bottles. Before 
games they must locate the uniform 
of each player and make sure that 
the correct person gets it. The Pink 
Panthers repair torn jerseys. 

Wrestling aides are responsible for 
cleaning the mats before and after 
practice. The also function as score- 
keepers at the matches. 

-B. Tingley 




VARSITY FOOTBALL AIDES Mary 
O'Neill, Wendy Ulle, Eileen Meany, Kar- 
la Thompson. 




JV FOOTBALL AIDES Rochelle Pit- 
tock, Sharon Berke, Gretchen Vande- 
motter. 






WRESTLING AIDES BOTTOM ROW: 
Karen Lorence. ROW 2: Sue Laurenson, 
Lisa Rocco. ROW 3: Kathy King. 



PINK PANTHERS Michelle Mur- 
rary, Rose Struna, Holly Harris, 
April Adams. 



April Ada 



Sports Aides 



108 



Karla Thompson assists the football 
team physician in treating an ankle in- 
jury. 



•""•SKi 






•»«•*•«■*"' 



mm*** 




Track aides assist Mr. Halbedel in 
the timing of the dash events at an 
indoor track meet. 



Aiding The Cause 



Sweeping, Timing, Organizing 
All Duties Of Sports Aides 





SWIM TIMERS BOTTOM ROW: Su- 
zanne Redman, Mary Matsko, Michelle 
Mihalick, Jennifer Marrott. ROW 2: 
Cindy Kandoh, Julie Smith, Anne Buck, 
Rhonda Sterrick, Beth Terango. ROW 3: 
Carol Trevarthen, Sue Swyt, Susan 
Hoffert, Gwen Miller, Laura Mataraza, 
Sue Sekerak. 




HOCKEY AIDES BOTTOM ROW: Missy 
Allay, ROW 2: Chris Merencky, Barbra 
Tingley. ROW 3: Michelle Woodcock. 



BASKETBALL AIDES 
BOTTOM ROW: Karla 
Thompson, Andrea Kosic, 
Lisa Finke. ROW 2: Carol 
Hart, Cindy Black, Kathy 
O'Brien, Judy Nemecek. 
ROW 3: Randy Thomas, 
Bill DeMora, Trevor Jur- 
gensen. 




inter sports were supported 
by track aides, basketball 
aides, and hockey aides. 
The track aides helped at the in- 
door track meets by timing running 
events and keeping order in the field 
events. The hockey aides kept statis- 
tics such as shots on goal at each 
game. The basketball aides swept the 
floors before and after practice and 




TRACK AIDES BOTTOM ROW: Susie 
Bratton, Missy Dockry, Coleen Wajahn, 
Cary Sanders, Gabrielle Holland. ROW 
2: Lisa Riggs, Sue Tucceri, Amy Jaffe, 
Katrina Oroz, Laura Elze. ROW 3: Nat- 
alie Hopkins, Anna Bryzocki, Marie 
Pasquale, Linda Miller, Monica Cain, 
Luann Tomasi. 



the games. Swim timers manned the 
six lanes of the pool, timed the swim- 
mers, and ran the results to the 
judges. 

Although the sports aides rarely 
receive the recognition that they de- 
serve, the players and coaches on all 
the teams know that they are greatly 
appreciated. 

•B. Tingley 



111 



Sports Aides 



The Strong 
Survived 

Despite Injuries, Wrestlers 
Stand Their Own In The GCC 



D 



espite getting off to a rough 
start with losses to Lake 
Catholic and Madison, the 
wrestling season proved to be excit- 
ing. One problem that was overcome 
was a lack of interest. At the begin- 
ning of the season, seventy wrestlers 
signed up. By the end of the first 
week of practice, the team was down 
to fifty. According to sophomore 
Craig Molnar, "Only the strong were 
able to survive." 

Coming back from the opening 
loss, the matmen split a triangular 
meet, losing to Richmond Heights 
while defeating Cleveland Heights. 
Contributing to the team's effort 
were Todd King with a superior deci- 
sion and Tim Szalay, who had a pin. 

The wrestlers also faired well in 
the Richmond Heights Tournament. 
Contributing to the team's fourth 
place finish were Brad King, third; 
Jack DeBoe, runner-up; and Jim 
Budnar, second, in their respective 
weight classes. 

Standout meets of the year were 
the 39-14 victory over Bedford and 
the 49-24 win over Brush. As coach 
Harry King commented, "Despite 
the lack of numbers, we had a nice 
team. We had good results because 
the guys really wanted to give their 
all for the team." King's feeling was 
echoed by Bill Scolaro, who said, 
"We practiced for two hard hours ev- 
ery night, even if it took us four 
hours. This kind of commitment was 
summed up by Todd King, who said, 
"The wrestling team is the elite 
group at Euclid High School." 

-L. Leeper 



^ $ f> *y3)£ % 





TOP FRESHMEN WRESTLING 
KNEELING: Bob Parmertor, Jerry 
Hodge, Joe Aquila, Bruce Miller, Pat 
Lauria, Kevin Pekar, Dave Capasso. 
STANDING: Dave Segulin, Mark Smith, 
Mark Forker, Andy Young, Bruno Fono- 
vic, Tony Lauria, Tom Clifford. MID- 
DLE, JV WRESTLING KNEELING: 
Mike Porter, Jeff Marando, John 
Drage, Denny Whelan, Paul Piont- 
kowski, John Sigh, Jim Hall. STAND- 
ING: Pat Chrestoff, John Newman, 
Marko Prpic, Dave Jackson, Jeff Bow- 
man, Bob King. BOTTOM: Jim Hall has 
a lock on his opponent. 




Wrestling 



112 



***** 





& 



Y&O 



>* 



VARSITY WRESTLING 



Euclid 



Opponent 



Lake Catholic 43 

Madison 32 

Richmond Heights 28 

Cleveland Heights 20 

Bedford 14 

Maple Heights 18 

Mentor 36 

Mayfield 45 

Brush 24 

Willoughby South 26 

Eastlake North 23 

Geneva 50 

West Geauga 34 

Season Record: 6-7 




VARSITY WRESTLING KNEELING: 
Tim Szalay, Bill Segulin, Todd King, 
Matt Basler. STANDING: Dave Ya- 
mane, Jim Budnar, Joe Bisbee, Mark 
Ussai, Ed Stroberg. 



113 



Wrestling 



BELOW: Tony Lett and Scott Carpenter 
run neck and neck as they race for 
times during the meet against St. Igna- 
tius. 




Index 



Super Striders 

Indoor Track Team Continues 
EHS 9 Winning Tradition 





INDOOR TRACK BOTTOM ROW: Mike 
Royster, Vic Maciejauskas, Mark King, 
Dennis Rymarczyk, Rob Wilson, Chris 
Burton, Gary Tressler, Judy Jones, 
Gretchen Harnick, John Supinski, Tom 
Madden. ROW 2: Scott Carpenter, Julie 
Sas, Amy Nemecek, Noreen O'Donnell, 
Barb Tingley, Kim Znidarsic, Faith Kar- 
dos, Tracey Wandersleben, Werner 
Mews, Brian Dailey, Mary Matsko, 
Joyce Bukovac, Robin Ramlow, Kurt 
Conway, Jeff Tekanic. ROW 3: Coach 
Ramlow, Jeff Smith, Rob Lapuh, Joe 
Muscarella, Mike Baker, Tiffany 
Croone, Carletta Adams, Carl Adams, 
Tony Lett, Lenny DiPaolo, Kevin 
McCluskey, Joshua Ford. ROW 4: Coach 
Schwenke, Kevin Bartol, Dave Myles, 
Andy Calabrese, John Stokes, Terry 
Sheridan, Greg Mata, Scott Burton, 
Greg Jordan, John Rackar, Marty 
Green, Larry Books, Terry Nolen, Scott 
Szmania, Coach Halbedal. NOT PIC- 
TURED: Marty Lisac, Tom Slusser. OP- 
POSITE PAGE, BELOW: William Woods 
clears the high jump bar with plenty of 
room to spare. 



1 WW.,' *$*_ 




he 1984 Indoor Track season, 
the building and training sea- 
son for the spring sport, 
showed Head Coach Bob Ramlow 
what talent he could expect for the 
future. Continuing in the winning 
tradition of the sport (indoor teams 
have only lost five meets in EHS his- 
tory), the Panther thinclads domi- 
nated their meets. This year's team 
showed in its first meet that it was 
well on its way to greatness. 

Leading the team in the sprints 
were juniors Ray Ward, Mike Baker, 
Kurt Conway, and senior tri-captain 
Rob Wilson. The hurdle team of sen- 
ior tri-captain Mark King, Vic Ma- 
ciejauskas, junior Tony Lett, and 
freshman Xavier King added depth 
while the field events were repre- 
sented by Mark King and high jump- 
er Bill Woods. Sophomore John Su- 
pinski and senior John Stokes con- 
centrated on the triple jump, while 
Stokes and senior Jeff Tekanic 
manned the shotput events. The 
strong team of distance runners in- 
cluded sophomore Marty Tomasi, 
senior tri-captain Dennis Rymarc- 
zyk, and senior Gary Tressler. Chris 
Burton and Gary Williams ran the 
mile and 880. Dave Myles, Andy Ca- 
labrese and Cris Wright were half- 
milers. 

The outstanding girls included 
Carletta Adams, Faith Kardos, Anne 
Buck, Raya Shields, and Barb Ting- 
ley in the sprints; and Jenny 
Schwartz, Noreen O'Donnell, Amy 
Nemecek, and Robin Ramlow in dis- 
tance events. 

Ramlow speculated on the good 
things that occured this season: "All 
in all, this year's team was a fine 
team as opposed to the "teams" of 
individuals I've coached before." 



115 



Indoor Track 



Water Rats 




LeQuyea, Nacinovich Pace 
Swim Team's Rebuilding Year. 



he boys' swim team started 
off their season with a 124-35 
victory over Chanel. After 
that, the season went downhill with' 
losses outnumbering wins two to one. 
The season saw some bright spots, 
however. Pat LeQuyea set a pool re- 
cord at Solon with a time of 1:06.38 
in the 100-yard breast stroke. Senior 
Bob Nacinovich matched him by 
racking up a score of 204.10 in diving 




SWIM TEAM KNEELING: Mike Mehls, 
Ken Mance, Kevin Nainiger, John Reid, 
Matt Sweet. ROW 2: Chris Thomas, Ray 
Sekerak, Jeff Springer, Chris De- 
Granda, Lou Davis, John Milliard. ROW 
3: Jamie Vance, Billy Bell, Tom Cramer, 
Paul Doyle, Kevin Ayers, Tim Kuhen, 
Bill Johnson, Mike Jaszkewicz. ROW 4: 
Jason Sotka, Pat LeQuyea, Bob Nacino- 
vich, Kevin Golden. ABOVE, RIGHT: So, 
what's my time? RIGHT: Bob Nacino- 
vich lets fly in diving competition 
against Mayfield FAR RIGHT: Kevin 
Ayers waits for the starter's pistol. 



competition. 

Senior co-captain Pat LeQuyea 
said, "If it wasn't for our moral sup- 
port from our teammates, we could 
not have survived the season. Kevin 
Golden commented, "With the po- 
tential of the first-year swimmers, I 
think that in a few years, the boys' 
team will be number one in the 
GCC." 



-S. Murphy 







"^Bfc 



Boys' Swimming 



116 




s***$> 



*V% * » 







' - 1 










BOYS' SWIMMING 




Euclid 


Opp. 


jnent 


124 


Chanel 


35 


78 


Berea 


93 


108 


Orange 


63 


68 


Solon 


120 


66 


Cleveland Heights 


101 


78 


Beachwood 


94 


33 


Lakewood 


49 


90 


Fairview 


77 


100 


Mayfield 


72 


61 


University School 


111 


66 


Bedford 


106 


87 


Brush 


82 


103 


Midpark 


68 


100 


Maple Heights 


71 




Season Record: 6-8 





BIG PICTURE: Sophomore Billy Bell's 
times showed hope for the future. LEFT: 
Behind every good Euclid swimmer, 
there were always several swim tim- 
ers. 






\ ^ ■mm*. 



117 



Boys' Swimming 









GIRLS' SWIMMING 




Euclid 


Opponent 


86 


Beaumont 


86 


43 


Gilmour 


40 


55 


Orange 


117 


65 


Solon 


107 


80 


Cleveland Heights 


92 


94 


Trinity 


76 


105 


Fairview 


62 


112 


Mayfield 


57 


103 


Parma 


67 


86 


Bedford 


85 


117 


Brush 


54 


101 


Midpark 


70 


97 


Maple Heights 

Season Record: 9-3-1 


67 




** iwm 1 

BIG PICTURE: Splash! A" 
start, the girls ran^Jf-ia^strin 
pressive victarjg&Jg**, 







Girls' Swimming 



118 



Coining On Strong 



Slow Start, Fast Finish 
Mean GCC Title For Girls 




s the mermaids started off 
the season, some of their 
strong swimmers were start- 
ing to show their work. On Dec. 8, 
1983, their record was turned to 1-1-1 
with a loss to Gilmore. Co-captain 
Magie Gron, Sharon Kelly and Col- 
leen Coyne showed superior times as 
well as Amy Nemecek, Mary Kay Za- 
horsky, Kris Brown, and Danielle 
Nichting. Senior and co-captain Ma- 



gie Gron won the first Swimmer of 
the Week Award. She was a three 
year swimmer and did well every 
year. Sue Kelly, freshman, Sharon 
Kelly junior, Colleen Coyne, sopho- 
more, and Kecia Bell, freshman, also 
received Swimmer of the Week 
Awards to show their great effort. As 
their season wound toward districts, 
They had a winning record of 8-4-1 

-A. Leu 



J^^***- 

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m******^ 




GIRLS' SWIM TEAM BOTTOM ROW: 
Kecia Bell, Debbie Kacperski, Cory 
Spencer, Holly Harris, Debbie Jakcson, 
Lisa Perko, Pam Miller, Charlotte Man- 
tel, Janice Pavis. ROW 2: Sue Flowers, 
Eddie Gron, Sue Kelly, Kristin Brown, 
Colleen Coyne, Tracy Tuckerman, Mi- 
chelle Solnosky, Lisa Coyne, Dawn Tur- 
pin, Jackie Eddy, Adrienne McLean. 
ROW 3: Maggie Gron, Kirsten Freeh, 
Laura Burtyk, Mary Kay Zahorsky, 
Danielle Nichting, Sharon Kelly. NOT 
PICTURED: Amy Jo Nemecek. ABOVE: 
Danielle Nichting, Lisa Coyne, and 
Mary Kay Zahorsky take time out for 
some conversation. 



119 



Girls' Swimming 



The Great Outdoors 

When Mother Nature Calls, 
Students Head For The Hills 



B 



egun fifteen years ago, the 
Outdoor Club was originally 
called Kids for Earth. Now, it 
has developed into an outdoor ad- 
venture in which students get the op- 
portunity to discover, appreciate, 
and enjoy the great outdoors. They 
learn to preserve the wilderness and 
how to use it properly. 

The twenty members of the Out- 
door Club enjoy such activities as 
camping, cross-country skiing, and 
sledding. 

Mr. Frank Soltesz, adviser of the 
Outdoor Club, said, "The Outdoor 



Club is an opportunity for students 
to enjoy the outdoors from an educa- 
tional and recreational experience." 
While the cold winter may have 
caused some people to have second 
thoughts about camping, the Ski 
Club members enjoyed every minute 
of it. They spent their Thursday 
nights from December to February 
on the slopes of Boston Mills. The 
high point of their season came in 
January when they spent their Mar- 
tin Luther King holiday skiing the 
slopes of the Cockaigne Ski Resort in 
western New York. 

















-M. 


Miller 


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OUTDOOR CLUB BOTTOM ROW: 
Chris Thomas, Dave Kracheck, Vince 
Godina, Bill Johnson. ROW 2: Eric Glick, 
Rich Arlesic, Mark Mincek, Diana Ya- 
fanaro. ROW 3: Randy Bunbarger, Lisa 
Brisbine, Zrinka Slat, Steve Jager, Da- 
vid Jackson. RIGHT: The Ski Club at- 
tracted all levels of skiers, from the 
novice to the expert. 





Ski Club 



120 



t 



it 



* 




ABOVE: Ski Clubbers line up for a les- 
son at one of their Thursday night ses- 
sions at Boston Mills. 



121 



Outdoor Club 




WtV-^^j 






TOP: Juniors face the rigors of 
Algebra II. MIDDLE: Math teacher 
Mr. Carl Clements talks with a parent 
at Open House. BOTTOM: Freshmen 
diagram their way to happiness. BIG 
PICTURE: English teachers Mrs. 
Patricia Filsinger and Mrs. Barbara 
Ramlow discuss business between 
classes. 



he 1983-84 school year 
had a line connecting 
the old and the new. 
On one hand, Latin was re-in- 
troduced into the curriculum. 
On the other, the computer 
science classes changed over to 
Pascal programming. 



Doing their best to get each 
student on line in each subject 
area, the teachers acted as rul- 
ers- connecting the old to the 
new. 

— J Majers 



Academics Divider 



122 




R ULERS 



123 



Academics Divider 



Faculty Changes " 

Lombardo Takes Over 12th Grade; 
Eight New Staff Members Added 






'I 



ight new teachers brought 
their talents and skills to Eu- 
clid this year from various ju- 
nior highs and substituting positions. 
Art instructor Holly Copp had pre- 
viously taught at both Shore and 
Forest Park. Foreign language teach- 
er Gabrielle Hodgins had been on the 
teaching staff at Cleveland Heights 
and Forest Park. Elaine Sheridan, a 
learning disabilities tutor, had sub- 
stituted and taught at Central Junior 
High for three years. Bob Godfrey 
taught vocal music for five years at 
Central before becoming Euclid's 
choral director. Social studies teach- 
er Marilyn Bowker also came from 
Central. Ann Roberts had been a 
math instructor at Forest Park for 
fourteen years. Finally, Barbara Ely 
had substituted in a number of area 
schools before coming to Euclid, and 
home arts teacher Lillian Centa re- 
turned to the faculty at EHS after 
teaching at Central. 
Some staff members remained at 



MR. ROBERT ADDIS: Athletic 

Director. MRS. EDNA 

ANDERSON: Child Care I, 

Modern Living; Flag Corps 

sponsor, HERO Club sponsor. 

MR. JUSTIN J. ANTONINI: 

Ninth-Grade Unit Principal; 

Survey sponsor. DR. ANTONIA 

ARACA: Phase Art, Art II, III, 

IV. 



MISS CHERYL ARTHUR: Art I, 
Vocational Art I, II. MR. 
WILLIAM ATTAMANTE: Work- 
Study Coordinator. MR. 
RONALD A. BACKOS: Biology I, 
Science I. MISS SANDI 
BAMBIC: paraprofessional. 



Euclid with new positions. Former 
English Department Chairman Mr. 
Justin Antonini became the Ninth- 
Grade Unit Principal: When asked 
how his responsibilities this year dif- 
fer from last year, Antonini stated, 
"Now I'm mostly involved in disci- 
plining students, where last year I 
was supervising English teachers. 
There are days when I miss the class- 
room, but I'm learning to like my 
new job." 

Former home economics teacher 
Mrs. Brenda Barker felt that her re- 
sponsibilities were much different as 
the new tenth-grade counselor. She 
said, "My work is more individual, 
personal, and social than as a teach- 
er." 

The addition of new teachers and 
the promotion of faculty members to 
the administration helped Euclid 
High have a successful year. 



i 




Academics 



124 



LEFT: Mr. Lombardo confers with Mr. 
Serra. Lombardo assumed the duties 
if of Twelfth-Grade Unit Principal 
after Mr. Federici retired. BELOW: 
Mrs. Barker tries to solve the 
problems of one of her 10th graders. 
BOTTOM: New Assistant- 
Superintendent Mr. James Wilkins 
stops to chat with Mr. Raicevich. 





MISS VERA BARANIUK: 
Twelfth-Grade Counselor. MRS. 
ETHEL BARBISH: 
paraprofessional. MRS. 
DOROTHY BARRY: treasurer. 
MR. JOHN BARCZA: Biology I, 
Physical Science, Phase Science. 



MRS. BRENDA BARKER: Tenth- 
Grade Counselor; sophomore 
class sponsor. MRS. AMY BELL: 
secretary. MR. STAN BENDER: 
Biology I. MRS. CHARLOTTE 
BENSUSAN: Vocational 
Stenography I, Shorthand I; 
O.E.A. Junior Stenography Club. 



125 



Academics 



ationally, academics were 
stressed during the 1983-1984 
school year because of declin- 
ing SAT scores. However, Euclid had 
always stressed academics. As a re- 
sult, EHS's requirements had always 
been above the state standards. 

Assistant Principal Ruth Smith 
said, "The effect of the nationwide 
improvement in academics won't ef- 
fect the Class of '84, but the Class of 
'85 will be affected. This is due to 
another credit being added to gradu- 
ation requirements." 

When asked how she felt students 
would react to the new requirements, 
Smith said, "I think the students 
won't even know that there has been 
any change because the requirements 
here at Euclid have always been 
high. 

For the college-bound student, one 
of the new requirements of many col- 
leges was two years of a foreign lan- 
guage. The foreign language depart- 
ment had seen an increase in enroll- 
ment in the past few years and in 
1984, in response to renewed student 



DR. JERRY BERGEM: Principal. 

MR. ALLEN BLACK: media 

technician; Media Aides sponsor, 

Key Club adviser. MRS. 

DOLORES BLACK: Phase 

English, reading specialist; 

Right-to-Read Week coordinator, 

Back-to-School-Day coordinator. 

MR. AL BLEICH: Typing I, 

Business Math. 



MRS. MARILYN BOWKER: 

American History, American 

Government. MR. ROGER 

BROWN: Tenth-Grade Counselor. 

MISS PATRICIA BUCK: 

Physical Education; faculty 

representative for girls' 

athletics, JV volleyball coach, 

girls' track coach. MISS BECKY 

BURGER: Food Service Directer. 



Getting Tough 

The Making Of Better Students 
By Clamping Down On Academics 

interest, it re-instated Latin into the lenging tests and requiring their stu- 



curriculum. 

The teachers at Euclid contributed 
to the improvement of their stu- 
dents' academic performance by giv- 
ing more homework and more chal- 



dents to be involved in more class 
activities. All these efforts were 
made to better prepare students for 
the future. 

— J. Rodgers 




Academics 



126 




MR. MIKE BURNS: Spanish I, 
American Government, 
Psychology; Aftercare Support 
Group Director. MRS. 
CATHERINE CAMPOLIETE: 
paraprofessional. MRS. JAN 
CARLSON: Foods I, II; Home 
Arts Department Chairman. 
MISS JUDITH L. CARMODY: 
English II, Phase English, AP 
Drama; Spring Play Director. 



MISS WILMA CARROLL: special 
education. MRS. ARLENE 
CARTER: Health. MRS. 
LILLIAN CENTA: Foods I, 
Modern Living. MR. R. 
CHAMBERS: Woodworking II, 
III. 



127 



Academics 



Seats Of Honor 

School Desks Differ In Styles; 
Serve As Outlet For Frustations 






las, the school desk. A rather 
bland object even though it's 
used and abused throughout 
the day. Take, for example, the stu- 
dent who uses it. He or she may sit in 
it, do classwork on it, relax on top of 
it, or even stick old, unwanted bubb- 
legum on the bottom of it. Yes, it 
does everthing except feed the cat. 

The students also have quite a few 
models to choose from. There are old 
ones with wooden seats, desks that 
have revolving chairs, ones with 
plastic seats, and ones with shiny 
metal legs. 

Ever notice some of the graffiti on 
the desks? The most popular one is 
"Joe loves Sue", "Jane loves Mark 
forever", or some such combination. 
Then there are those who like to ad- 
vertise their musical tastes: "Heavy 
metal lives!", "Ban Led Zepplin", or 
"Judas Priest Stinks" and so forth. 



MRS. LINDA CLAPACS: 

paraprofessional. MR. CARL 

CLEMENTS: Algebra I, II, 

Geometry; Math Department 

Chairman. MR. LEO COLLINS: 

World History, Social Problems. 

MR. RICHARD CONTENZA: 

Wood I, Drafting Survey I. 



MRS. HOLLY COPP: Art I, 
Phase Art. MRS. NORMA 
COWAN: Phase English, English 
IV; AFS co-sponsor, Eucuyo co- 
sponsor. DR. ROBERT WALL 
CRARY: Eleventh-Grade 
Counselor; Junior Class Cabinet 
sponsor. MR. EDWARD 
CZYZYCKI: Ninth-Grade 
Counselor. 



Nothing like an artist from the 
previous period to liven up your desk 
with some of his work. Look closely 
and you will find pictures of Gar- 
field, flowers, smiling faces, and even 
an occasional Opus the penguin. 

There are many ways that the stu- 
dents sit in their seats. We have the 
sitting-straight look, the sliding-for- 
ward look, the feet-behind-the-desk 
approach, and the ever-popular 
hunched-over-doing-work model. 

Yes, these heroes of the school, 
these wood and plastic beauties, 
these oh-so-plain, drab, and vital 
parts of the school, what would we do 
without them? 



RIGHT: Some of Mrs. Severino's 
students demonstrate the sitting-up- 
straight-reading-in-class technique. 





Academics 



128 





LEFT: In a pinch, desks are a handy 
place to hide your hands when you 
don't know the answer to a teacher's 
question. BELOW: Vocational classes 
practice cluttering their desks in a 
business-like manner. 




MR. DOC DAUGHERTY: Health, 
Physical Education; varsity 
basketball coach, basketball 
aides sponsor. MRS. ROSE 
DAVIES: Eleventh-Grade 
Counselor; Peer Counselor 
sponsor. MR. TOM M. DAVIS: 
Consumer Law, General 
Business; bookstore manager. 



MRS. MERRY DOLTER: librarv 
aide. MR. AL DREWS: OWA; 
Concerned Persons Group 
Facilitator. MR. ALEX 
DZEROWICZ: American 
Government, Marriage and 
Family, Death and Dying; 
varsity girls' tennis coach, 
varsitv bovs' tennis coach. MRS. 
BARBARA ELY: Spanish I, II. 



129 



Academics 



. 



Stopping To Visit 

Forty-seven Community Leaders 
Attracted By Back To School Day 




a 



nee graduated, would you re- 
turn to school to teach for a 
day? Well, that is what 47 
community leaders did as the Euclid 
Teachers Association and the Euclid 
School Board sponsored the second 
annual Back to School Day. 

The program was organized by 
Mrs. Dolores Black "to acquaint 
community leaders with the real 
world of today's classroom." The 
citizens were able to better under- 
stand the teachers' role and see the 
opportunities available to Euclid 
students as a result of the day. In 
addition, the schools gained good 
publicity and the students acquired 
experience from outside the school. 
Mrs. Black sent over 200 letters to 
prominent citizens and placed an 
open invitation in the Sun-Journal 
to solicit guest teachers. 47 business- 
men, professional people, and just- 
plain citizens responded. 



MR. CHARLES EVERSOLE: 

Basic Math, Pre-Algebra, 

Algebra I. MR. PETER 

FASCIANO: parapropressional. 

MR. AHMED FELLAGUE: 

French II, III, IV; Foreign 

Language Club co-sponsor. MRS. 

ROSALIE FETTE: secretary. 



MRS. PATRICIA FILSINGER: 

English I, II. MR. WILLIAM 

FOISEL: Basic Science, Project 

Physics, Physics. MRS. AUDREE 

FOX: Health, Physical Education; 

Chemical Abuse Co-ordinator. 

MR. DANIEL FRANCETIC: 

Astronomy. 



Response to the program was also 
good from the students, guest teach- 
ers, and faculty. Students enjoyed 
fresh approaches to school; the 
teachers were able to provide supple- 
mentary instruction; and citizens 
were given the opportunity to par- 
ticipate in their school system. The 
guest teachers were pleased with 
their students' attention at courtesy. 
After the day, the participating 
hosts and citizens attended a recep- 
tion hosted by Mrs. Black. Guests 
and faculty were given momentos of 
the experience. Dr. Husarik and ETA 
president Fay Miller thanked all for 
their efforts. 



RIGHT: The second Back to School Day 
attracted 47 businessmen, engineers, 
and private citizens to the Euclid Public 
School classrooms. 








Academics 



130 



BELOW: Mrs Shimonek, mother of 
senior Nancy Shimonek, leads one of 
the choral classes. BOTTOM: Students 
gained a different perspective from 
their Back to School stand-ins. 








MR. SHELDON FREEDMAN: 
Biology II, AP Biology, Science 
Department Chairman. MR. H. 
FRIEDMAN: Basic Math, 
Algebra I, II; Peer Tutoring co- 
sponsor. MR. AL GALICKI: 
Woods I, Graphic Arts II, III, IV; 
Industrial Arts Department 
Chairman. MRS. THERESA 
GALICKI: Physical Education. 



MISS BARBARA GATES: special 
education. MR. JOHN GIBBONS: 
Physical Education. MRS. JANE 
GIBSON: Phase English, English 
II, AP English. MR. BOB 
GODFREY: Ninth-Grade Girls' 
Chorus, Choral Masters, 
Sophomore Chorus, Music 
Theory I; freshman football 
assistant coach, Varsity Chorale 
sponsor. 



131 



Academics 



The Iron men 

Phenomenal Attendance Records 
Held By Euclid High Teachers 




ome teachers at EHS can al- 
most always be counted upon 
to be in the classroom every 
day. In the past 10 to 20 years that 
they have taught here, they have 
built up exceptional attendance re- 
cords. 

English teacher, Mr. Jerry Hen- 
derson, for example, has only been 
sick two days in the past twenty 
years. That was in the 1970's, when 
he was suffering from pneumonia 
and Dr. Bergem actually had to order 
him to go home. Henderson said he 
likes teaching because it is rewarding 
and a creative position that lets him 
listen to students and their ideas. It 
is an interesting job that is never bor- 
ing. Each day, each class, and each 
year is different. "It is the kids that 
keep me coming," concluded Hen- 
derson. 

Mrs. Arlene Carter of the Phsyical 
Education Department also has an 



MR. JAMES F. GOEBEL: Pre- 

Vocational Automotives, 

Vocational Automotives I. MR. 

WILLIAM GOODING: Basic 

Science, Biology I. MR. THOMAS 

GUBITOSI: Latin I, Spanish I, 

French I; Foreign Language Club 

co-sponsor. MS. JOYCE 

HAFFER: special education; 

Occupational Education Club 

sponsor. 



incredible attendance record. She 
has not missed a day for personal 
illness in the past 26 years that she's 
taught at EHS. Carter said, "I 
haven't been sick. I'm lucky because 
I just feel good." 

Another member of the Physical 
Education Department, Miss Pat 
Buck, has missed only five school 
days in the past ten years-three days 
for her parents' funerals and two 
days for pneumonia. "Actually, I was 
sick a whole week, but we had three 
snow days that week," said Buck. 

Miss Gretchen Urhy, who teaches 
math, has another reason for her 
good attendance. "It's too much 
work to be sick," she said. She has 
been absent seven days in the last 
fifteen years. Two days were for fu- 
nerals; the other five were for illness. 
In trying to explain why she is rarely 
absent, Urhy speaks for many teach- 
ers when she says, "It's more trouble 



than it's worth." 

Finally, Mr. William Von Benker 
has taught science at EHS for the 
last fifteen years. During that time, 
he missed 23 days, all in his first year 
when he fell while rock-climbing, 
breaking a leg and seven ribs. He said 
he doesn't like to miss school since it 
creates more work. He also feels that 
if he is absent he is not doing his job, 
and since he likes doing his job, he 
doesn't even consider missing school. 
"I enjoy my job. I look forward to my 
job. I like the students. Teaching is 
like acting-you must prepare and 
then perform" commented Von Ben- 
ken. 

All of these teachers express a feel- 
ing of dedication to their jobs, and 
the students of EHS come out on top 
because of them. 

— C Betts 



MR. THOMAS N. HALBEDEL: 
Basic Science, Biology I; Student 
Council co-sponsor, cross 
country coach, indoor track 
assistant coach, outdoor track 
assistant coach. MRS. FRAN 
HALL: secretary. MRS. 
ARDELLE HARRELL: secretary. 
MISS SUE HARRIS: Twelfth- 
Grade Counselor. 




Academics 



132 




OPPOSITE PAGE: Graphic Arts 
teacher Mr. Al Galicki has rarely 
been absent during his 33 years at 
EHS. BIG PICTURE: English teacher 
Mr. Jerry Henderson once had to be 
ordered to go home. BELOW: 
Chemistry teacher Mr. William Von 
Benken has not missed a day for 
personal illness in the last 14 years. 




MR. JEFF HARTMANN: 
American History, World 
Problems; varsity baseball 
assistant coach. MRS. 
KATHERINE HARWOOD: 
library aide. MISS VARRA J. 
HASTINGS: Clothing I, II; Pink 
Panthers sponsor. MR. JERRY 
HENDERSON: English I, III, 
Phase English; Eucuyo co- 
sponsor. 



MRS. GABRIELLE HODGINS: 
German I, II, III, IV; Foreign 
Language Club co-sponsor. MR. 
THOMAS HOFFART: 
Occupational Work Experience 
Co-ordinator. MR. FRANK 
HOFFERT: American 
Government, American History, 
Economics, European History; 
Social Studies Department 
Chairman. MR. RICHARD 
HOMOVEC: DCT Co-ordinator; 
ninth-grade soccer coach. 



133 



Academics 



Teachers' World 

Teachers' Lounge Serves As Cover 
For Fantasy Training Institute 



B 



id you ever get the feeling 
that the teachers' lounge is 
actually another planet? 
Upon passing through the doorway 
into a room cluttered with chairs, ta- 
bles, smoke, and other teacher para- 
phernalia, the teachers enter their 
own little world. 

Everything in this world is teach- 
er-like. There are plaid pants, blaz- 
ers, vests, and even plaid socks to 
match everything. Chalk dust is 
sprayed through the air, which is 
scented with the smell of new books. 
Books line the various walks and 
streets and are replaced every 37 
years. There is not a child in sight, 
which is the basic reason the teach- 
ers enjoy being there. 

The teachers have a rather strict 
schedule in their world. Each quar- 
ter, half, and full hour a bell rings to 
signal the teachers to practice basic 



skills. Yelling is the most concentrat- 
ed course. Teachers must learn to 
yell for at least 29 minutes straight 
without hyperventilating. 

Teachers also practice writing on 
the board at record speed. They have 
races every Friday to see who can 
write the fastest and most illegibly. 

Disorganization is another major 
class. Teachers must race to see how 
quickly they can become so disorgan- 
ized that they can't remember to 
read their own mail. 

Oops! There goes the bell! Time to 
leave the private world of the teach- 
ers' lounge and return to reality. 

— B. Terango 



BIG PICTURE: The faculty marshals its 
forces in the first floor lounge before the 
start of the school day. 




MR. R. HUNGERFORD: Metals 

II, III, Pre-Vocational 

Electricity. MR. ROBERT A. 

HUTSON: Orchestra. MR. 

FRANK JABLONSKI: English I. 

MRS. MARY JAGGER: Quest, 

World Problems. 



MR. FRANK JIROVEC: Basic 

Math, Pre-Algebra, Algebra II, 

MR. MILT KADLEC: Metals I. 

MR. JOHN KALKA: American 

Government, Economics, 

Psychology. MR. JAMES KELLY: 

American History. 







Academics 



134 




BELOW: Mr. Hoffart, Mr. 
Bender, Mr. Homovec, Mr. 
Saywell, and Mr. Dzerowicz 
discuss the day's events over 
lunch in the teachers' cafeteria. 




MRS. JAN KEHN: secretary. 
MR. HARRY E. KING: Woods I, 
Industrial Drawing I; wrestling 
coach. MR. CLIFF KIRCHNER: 
Pre-Vocational Machines, 
Vocational Machines II. MRS. 
ELLEN KLEIN: Typing I, 
Vocational Clerk-Typist I; Ohio 
Office Education Club co- 
sponsor. 



MRS. RUTH KRUP: Twelfth- 
Grade Counselor. MR. PAUL 
LAURIO: paraprofessional. MR. 
CHARLES LARDOMITA: 
paraprofessional. MR. JACK 
LARDOMITA: paraprofessional. 



135 



Academics 




MRS. SUSAN LAWRENCE: 
secretary. MISS JANE LELLIS: 
English II, Phase English. MRS. 
JOAN LIDRBAUCH: English II, 

Phase English. MRS. JOAN 
LINDERMAN: secretary. 



MR. WARREN LOBDEL: 

security. MRS. MARY LOMAC: 

American History, American 

Government, Social Institutions. 

MR. THEODORE C. LOMAC: 

Pre-Algebra, Algebra I. MR. 

ROBERT A. LOMBARDO: 

Twelfth-Grade Unit Principal. 




■ 



Academics 



136 



Best-Kept Secret 

Treasures Of The Career Office 
Hidden From Most Students' Views 



he Career Office has some- 
thing to offer every junior 
and senior. Surprisingly, 
however, only 30% of the juniors and 
seniors have ever been in the Career 
Office even once to sign up for the 
PSAT, SAT, or ACT. Even more dif- 
ficult to believe, 10% of the juniors 
and seniors have never been in the 
Career Office. 

Career counselor Mr. Robert Yo- 
cum said, "I find it hard to believe 
that students don't know what we do 
here. We (Mr. Yocum and his secre- 
tary, Mrs. Judy Paul) went around to 
all senior classes and told them what 
we do." 

In describing the Career Office, 
senior Chuck Deptola said, "It is 
very helpful in the decision of one's 
future plans." Scott Corrao added, 




The Career Office is packed with 
college and job information. 



"The COIN (college and occupation- 
al invetory network) computer en- 
hanced my decision on college 
choices." 

Some services offered at the Career 
Office are job shadowing, the COIN 
computer, study materials for the 
SAT and ACT, and job information 
and applications. Mrs. Paul gives 
students transcripts and class stand- 
ing information, scholarship materi- 
al, and appointments for sessions 
with college representatives. Mr. Yo- 
cum gives students special attention 
that is sometimes needed when 
choosing a college. 

The Career Office may be one of 
EHS's best-kept secrets, and one 
that students should make every ef- 
fort to uncover. 











■^ 




SWF 




Wlj 





-P O'Brien 



MR. KENNETH LOWE: English 
I, Phase English. MRS. 
MARGARET LUCAS: librarian; 
Library Aides co-sponsor. MRS. 
MARILYN LUCAS: Chemistry I. 
MR. MARC MANBURG: 
Bookkeeping, General Business; 
National Honor Society sponsor. 



MR. TONY MANCUSO: Social 
Problems, World History. MRS. 
KATHLEEN MARSH: librarian; 
Library Aides co-sponsor. MR. 
EMBERT MARTIN: Drafting. 
MR. DAN MAXSON: physical 
education; Boys' Swim Team 
coach, JV Girls Softball coach, 
Freshman Girls' Volleyball 
Coach, Girls' Swim Team coach, 
Swim Timers sponsor. 



137 



Academics 



Extra Helpers 

Peer Tutors Help Smooth Out 
Students' Curriculum Mountains 



he Peer Tutoring Program is 
relatively new to Euclid High 
School. Created last year by 
Dr. Bergem and Mrs. Smith, the pro- 
gram is guided by Mr. Howard Fried- 
man and Miss Barbara Spiga. 

Students who wished to tutor their 
peers volunteered for the program. 
Their school records and schedules 
were carefully considered. Finally, 
the tutors were selected. They are 
students who have maintained a 
high grade average in their tutoring 
subjects and have sufficient time to 
help others. 

A student who felt that he needed 
help in a certain subject saw his 
counselor, who refered him to the 



MR. GEORGE MARTINSEN: 
paraprofessional. MR. WILLIAM 
MCGUINNESS: Eleventh Grade 
Unit Principal. MRS. JUDITH 
MCLAUGHLIN: Phase English; 
Fall Play sponsor. DR. EARL 
MCNEILLY: American History, 
Quest. 



MRS. POLLY MCREDMOND: 
Ninth Grade Unit Secretary. MR. 
WILLIAM MEDVICK: Tenth 
Grade Unit Principal. MRS. 
NANCY MEEK: Algebra II, 
Chemistry. MRS. ALDONA 
MISKINIS: Geometry, Informal 
Geometry, Algebra II. 



peer tutoring advisers. The advisers 
then assigned him to a tutor whose 
study hall coincided with his. The 
tutor and his student then met and 
worked together in the library during 
their study halls or after school. 
After approximately three weeks, a 
check was made on the student's pro- 
gress. Eventually, the student was 
able to work on his own. 

The program was a valuable learn- 
ing experience for the tutors as well 
as the students since the tutors 
learned how to convey their knowl- 
edge to others who had problems un- 
derstanding. 

— L. Sterbank 





Academics 



138 




ABOVE: Kecia Bell gets some extra 
help from Traci O'Hannon. RIGHT, 
PEER TUTORS, BOTTOM ROW: 
Tracy Otcasak, Beth Teran 
Allay, Jeff Coy, Dave^rfves, Connie 
Brocone, Karen GollinarTlWiJ^^red 
Kranack, Kim Morris, Sara Sezun, 
Rhonda Sterrick, Mary Muscarella, 
Sue Tucceri, Claudia Cummings, 
Lorrie Miller, Terry Purcell. ROW #: 
Rich Wilson, Traci O'Hannon, Rob 
Carlson, Dave Kaleal, Mark Mincek, 
Jason Sotka, Mike Lange, Leanne 
Sterbank, Doreen Tracey, Terry 
Rabbitts. 





':':.': ; .: 



MR. RAYMOND R. MONTANI: 
Pre-Vocational Automotives, 
Vocational Automotives II. MR. 
FRANK J. MULARO: Phase 
English. MRS. PATRICIA 
O'BREZA: Physical Science, 
Basic Science, Pre-Algebra. MR. 
ANTHONY J. PALERMO: 
German I, French I, II. 



MS. JOAN PASKERT: Algebra I, 
Vocational Clerk-Typists II; 
OOEA co-sponsor. AFS co- 
sponser, MRS. JUDY PAUL: 
Career Office Secretary. MR. 
ADAM PAWLOWSKI: College 
Algebra, Business Math, 
Computer Science. MR. HANS 
PESCH: Honors Biology, Basic 
Science. 



139 



Academics 



Old Timers 



Survey Discloses Interesting Facts 
On Teacher Longevity 



ave you ever wanted to know 
more about the teachers at 
Euclid High School — for in- 
stance, how long have they been 
around? Well, according to a poll of 
115 teachers and administrators: 
-19% have been at EHS for twenty 
years or more. 

-33% have been in the Euclid Pub- 
lic Schools system for twenty years 
or more. 

-43% have been teaching for twen- 
ty years or more. 
-41% have been at EHS for five 
years or less (a somewhat decep- 
tive statistic since many of those 
came to EHS when Shore Junior 
High was closed down). 
-38 faculty members or married to 
teachers or school administrators. 
Among those new to EHS this year 
was Mr. Robert Godfrey. Having pre- 
viously taught at Central Junior 
High, Godfrey said that he enjoyed 



working with older students. 

On the other end of the line, Mr. 
Frank Troglia, the assistant princi- 
pal, retires this year after 32 years at 
EHS and 37 years in the Euclid sys- 
tem. He commented that during the 
late 1960's and early 1970's he ob- 
served a change in the behavior of 
EHS students as they became "more 
acceptable to constructive criticism." 
Troglia has enjoyed working with 
students and regrets leaving. 

Another old-timer is Mr. Al Ga- 
licki, who has been at EHS for 33 
years. He finds students "a lot 
smarter than they used to be." 

— L. Sterbank 



TOP: Mr. Weisenberg unloads the 
wisdom of years of experience upon 
Tom Daugherty. RIGHT: Mr. Taddeo 
shows the effects of a trying 
Marching Band season. 




MR. ROBERT PETROVIC: 
English II, English IV, Phase 
English; Euclidian adviser, 
English Department Chairman. 
MR. RONALD E. POWASKI: 
American History; Astronomy 
Club sponsor. MR. RICHARD 
RACKOVAN: Math Analysis, 
Basic Math, Calculus, Computer 
Math. MR. MICHAEL 
RAICEVICH: American 
Government, Psychology; Faculty 
Manager of Athletics, AD Club 
sponsor. 

MRS. BARBARA RAMLOW: 
Phase English. MR. ROBERT 
RAMLOW: Health, Physical 
Education; Freshman Cross- 
country Coach, Indoor Track 
Coach, Outdoor Track Coach. 
MRS. TONI RASH: Typing I, 
Vocational Stenography II; 
OOEA co-sponsor. MRS. DIANE 
REIDER: Library Aide. 







Academics 



140 




MISS ANN ROBERTS: Algebra 
I, Geometry. MISS PATRICIA 
ROBINSON: Foods I, II; 
Freshman Cheerleader sponsor. 
MR. JOSEPH RODRIGUEZ: 
Physical Education. MR. FRED 
SALLACH: Pre-Algebra, 
Geometry, Math Analysis. 



141 



Academics 






Wrapping It Up 

EHS Loses 101 Years' Experience; 
Berg em, Troglia, Smith Retire 



he 1983-1984 school year was 
the last for the top three ad- 
ministraors at EHS: principal 
Dr. Jerry Bergem and assistant prin- 
cipals Mr. Frank Troglia and Mrs. 
Ruth Smith. 

Dr. Bergem started his career in 
the Euclid system in 1948. Looking 
back on his 36 years, he had a few 
regrets. 

Bergem spoke of the history of Eu- 
clid High. "At one time," he said, 
"the building was so crowded that we 
had ten periods, and students came 
at an early or late shift. There were 
almost 3000 students, and we had 
one-way stairs because of the traffic. 
Bergem said that the most trouble- 
some time was the late Sixties and 
early Seventies. 

Bergem enjoyed being principal. "I 
was able to try new ideas invloving 
teachers and students," he said. Ber- 
gem concluded, "I have known many 
wonderful teachers and students 



MRS. SANDRA SANBORN: 
Geometry, Basic Math, Algebra 
II. MR. GREGORY SATTLER: 
Occupational Work Experience; 
Varsity Soccer coach. MR. 
BENJAMIN SAWYER: General 
Business, Business Typing I, II. 
MR. DAVID SAYWELL: EMR 
English, Math, Science; Varsity 
Girls Cross-Country Coach. 



MRS. DONATA SCHULZ: Health 
Aide. MR. PETER SCHWENKE: 
Physical Education. MRS. 
MICKEY SEGULIN: Health Aide. 
MR. PAUL SERRA: Geometry, 
Basic Math, Algebra I; Spirits 
Club sponsor, Varsity Baseball 
coach. 



that have become my friends. I have 
had the pleasure of being associated 
with over 20,000 students during my 
career." 

Upon his retirement, Bergem 
plans to spend more time sailing, ski- 
ing, visiting with his family, and 
teaching guidance courses in local 
colleges. 

This was Mr. Frank Troglia's 37th 
year in the Euclid school system. 
Troglia said, "Although I really can- 
not compare Euclid with other 
schools because I have not worked 
anywhere else, I know students come 
back and say that Euclid is better. 
The system has been very good and 
fair to me. I've had an enjoyable 37 
years." 

Mrs. Ruth Smith, assistant princi- 
pal in charge of curriculum has been 
in the Euclid system for 28 years. 

Smith agrees with Dr. Bergem in 
describing the late Sixties and early 
Seventies as the toughest times for 



schools. Smith blamed the troubles 
on the Vietman War and social 
changes within the country. She sees 
the students of the 1980's as much 
improved over their older brothers 
and sisters. 

Both Troglia and Smith plan pos- 
sible moves to the Sunbelt. Troglia's 
retirement plans include a possible 
home in North Carolina. Smith in- 
tends to retire to New Mexico with 
her husband. 

-A. Geddes, M. Miller 



FAR RIGHT, TOP: Dr. Bergem checks 
out a basketball game from the 
sidelines. FAR RIGHT: Standing, Mr. 
Frank Troglia, Mrs. Ruth Smith; 
seated, Dr. Jerry Bergem. Together, 
they have more than 100 years 
experience in the Euclid school 
system. RIGHT: Dr. Bergem asks 
Santa for a happy and fulfilling 
retirement. Bergem plans to mix 
spending time on his hobbies with 
part-time teaching at local colleges. 




Academics 



142 




MRS. JANET SEVERINO: Phase 
English; Student Council co- 
sponsor. MR. RON SEYMOUR: 
Typing I, General Business; 
Letterman Club sponsor, Varsity 
Football coach. MRS. ELAINE 
SHERIDAN: Learning 
Disabilities. DR. RALPH R. 
SIBERT: DE Retailing, DE 
Merchandising; DECA sponsor. 



MR. ERROL SIKON: Computer 
Lab Technician. MISS JUDITH 
A. SIMONICH: Spanish II, III, 
IV; Academic Decathlon sponsor. 
MR. JAMES SIMPSON: Metals I, 
Vocational Machine Trades I. 
MRS. RUTH SMITH: Assistant 
Principal. 



143 



Academics 



A Family Affair 

Ever Call Your Teacher 'Dad'? 
Some Students Do Every Day 



eaching at EHS is a family 
affair for some faculty mem- 
bers who have their spouses 
or children at school with them. 

A number of faculty members are 
married to teachers, for example, the 
Lombardos, the Ramlows, the Von 
Benkens, the Severinos, and the Ga- 
lickis. 

Other teachers, like the Ramlows, 
the Lomacs, and Dr. Powaski, have 
their children at EHS with them. 

Mr. and Mrs. Galicki have been 
working together for most of their 
married lives. Mr. Galicki teaches 
Graphic Arts and Wood Shop and 
serves as the Industrial Arts Depart- 
ment Chairman. Mrs. Galicki is a 
Physical Education teacher. 

Working in the same building 
doesn't create any problems for the 
Galickis because they never see one 
another at school. They do drive to 
school together, although they do 
not eat the same lunch period. Since 
they both teach, they share the same 
experiences and problems. They also 
can relate to students' problems be- 
cause they have experienced many of 



MR. WAYNE SMITH: World 
Problems, World History; Close 
Up sponsor. MR. FRANK 
SOLTESZ: Physical Science, 
Phase Science, Biology I; 
Outdoor Club sponsor. MISS 
BARBARA SPIGA: English II, 
Phase English; Peer Tutoring co- 
sponsor. MR. WILLIAM STARR: 
Basic Science Physics. 



MR. DONALD STEINBRINK: 
Physical Science, Basic Science, 
Biology I. MRS. JUDITH 
STOBINSKI: English II, III, 
Phase English. MRS. ARTHUR 
SYDOW: Concert Band, 
Symphonic Wind Ensemble, 
Music Theory II; Marching Band 
director, Big Show orchestra 
director, music coordinator. 
MRS. CAROL TKAC: English I. 



the same things with their own chil- 
dren. 

Unlike the Galickis, the Ramlows 
have their entire family at EHS. Mr. 
Ramlow is a Physical Education 
teacher while Mrs. Ramlow teaches 
English. Son Chad is a ninth-grader, 
and daughter Robin is a tenth-grad- 
er. 

Mrs. Ramlow likes the idea of the 
four of them at the high school to- 
gether because she thinks it keeps 
the family involved in school activi- 
ties together. She thinks her children 
like the situation since it lets her see 
them every once in a while during 
the day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lomac were teaching 
together at Shore Junior High when 
they got married. At that time, 
school policy said that if two teach- 
ers were married they could not 
teach in the same building, although 
the Lomacs were exempted from the 
rule because they were teaching at 
Shore before they were married. 

Like the Ramlows, the Lomacs 
have a daughter, Tanya, a ninth- 
grader, with them at EHS. Mr. Gubi- 



tosi, who teaches foreign languages, 
also has his daughter, Rose, a tenth- 
grader, with him at the high school 
and as a student in one of his classes. 
Rose said, "Sometimes I'll raise my 
hand, and it seems he won't call on 
me because I'm his daughter." 

Dr. Powaski, who teachers history, 
has his daughter, Julianna, a junior, 
in one of his classes. He joked that 
there weren't any problems having 
her in class except that "she is al- 
ways worshipping me in front of the 
other students. Also, I can never give 
her more than a B for fear of being 
accused of favoritism." 

Finally, chemistry teacher Mr. 
Von Benken's wife teaches kinder- 
garten in Eastlake. He said that al- 
though they teach different age lev- 
els, they face similar situations and 
problems. One advantage he sees in 
being married to a teacher is that 
their vacations are at the same time. 
During the summer, they have more 
time to travel and do things together. 

-C. Betls 




Academics 



144 





MRS. PEGGY TORZEWSKI: 
Library Aide. MRS. 
ROSEMARIE TONN: Twelfth 
Grade Unit Secretary. MRS. 
CHARLENE TORER: Specific 
Learning Disabilities. MR. 
FRANK TROGLIA: Assistant 
Principal. 



MRS. PATRICIA TURK: 
Paraprofessional. MISS 
MARGARET UHRY: Algebra I, 
II, Informal Geometry. MRS. 
PATRICIA VANCE: Modern 
Living, Child Care I. MR. 
WILLIAM VON BENKEN: 
Chemistry, Honors Chemistry, 
A.P. Chemistry; Ski Club 
sponsor. 



145 



Academics 



-86 



Voters Turn Down School Levy 
In A November Election Squeaker 



traditional desire to work to- 
gether for the good of the stu- 
dents enabled the 1983-1984 
Euclid School Board to maintain 
educational excellence. 

In September, the Euclid School 
Board ratified a two-year contract 
with the Euclid Teachers Associ- 
ation. The contract increased teacher 
salaries 5 r c in 1984 and 5.5 r c in 1985. 
An early retirement incentive was 
also included in the package. 

Long time Board member Mrs. 
Mary King passed away in July, and 
David Zuro was appointed to her va- 
cant seat. Zuro later resigned when 
his company transferred him to New 



Jersey. In the November election, 
David Lawrence defeated several 
challengers to take over Zuro's seat. 

A projected 3.2 million dollar defi- 
cit prompted the Board to put a 4.7 
mill operating levy on the November 
ballot. Although the administration, 
teachers, and students campaigned 
tirelessly for the levy, Euclid voters 
defeated it by a margin of 86 votes 
out of almost 20,000 votes cast. The 
last Euclid school levy to pass was in 
1979. 

Finally, after several years of de- 
clining enrollment, the Euclid Public 
Schools showed an increase of eight 
students this year. 



TOP: Many Euclid citizens attended a 
spaghetti dinner at EHS in the fall to 
raise money for the levy campaign. 
RIGHT: Euclid's biggest booster, Super- 
intendent Ernest Husarik, spends some 
time with a Euclid voter at the spaghet- 
ti dinner. 








MRS. NANCY VONDRAK: 
Vocational Data 
Processing/Accounting I, 
Bookkeeping; OOEA co-sponsor. 
MRS. CAROLYN WANDER- 
SLEBEN: Recordkeeping, 
Shorthand II; varsity and JV 
cheerleader sponsor. MR. 
CHARLES WATKINS: 
paraprofessional. MR. 
LEONARD WEISENBERG: Non- 
Western Culture, American 
History. 

MR. THOMAS WHIPPLER: 

English I, III. MRS. ELEANOR 

WIEGAND: Shorthand I, Typing 

I, II. MRS. CAROL WILLIAMS: 

Business English, Cooperative 

Office Education; COE Club 

sponsor. MR. ROBERT E. 

YOCUM: career counselor. 




Board Of Education 



146 




School Board 



Mr. Walter N. Schwegler 
Mr. Daniel P. Flowers 
Mrs. Denise Grace-Turek 



CONTINUING R 



PROUD TRRDITION 




Despite massive publicity, Euclid voters again turned 
thumbs down to the proposed school levy. 





MR. RICHARD YORK: Special 
Education; EMR Department 
Chairman. MRS. JILL 
ZIMMERMAN: Personal Typing, 
Vocational Data 
Processing/Accountg II. MRS. 
PATRICIA GIBBONS: 
paraprofessional 



147 



Board Of Education 





TOP: Amy Leu, Debby McDermott, 
and Lori Bedzyk spend a minute to 
solve all the problems of the junior 
class. BOTTOM: Mary O'Neill shows 
Wendy Ulle the correct way to smile. 
MIDDLE: The juniors and sophomores 
aren't in class competion when it 
comes to friendship. BIG PICTURE: 
Freshmen bear down to high school 
work. 



hen something needs to 
be highlighted, it can 
be underlined. At EHS, 
the seniors are "underlined" 
by the ninth, tenth, and elev- 
enth graders. 

The underclass started off 
the school year quickly. They 



gained the respect of the sen- 
iors by pulling ahead in class 
competitions. All in all, the 
underclass "underlined" an 
important part of school. 

— J. Majers 



Underclass Divider 



148 







UNDERLINING 



149 



Underclass Divider 



Media Favorites 

'Porky 's', 'A-Team', 'M*A*S*H' 
Rated Freshman Favorites 



■*£^: 



elected freshman classes were 
polled in January to deter- 
mine their media favorites. 
The results were both predictable 
and unusual. 

The most popular movie of the 
class of 1987 was Porky's, which cap- 
tured 12% of the vote. It was followed 
by Sudden Impact, 11%; Flashdance, 
7%; and Risky Business, 5%. None of 
the freshman explained how they 
were able to get into R-rated movies 
with such great frequency. 

Favorite TV Shows were The A- 
Team, 12%; M*A*S*H, 12%; Three's 
Company, 12%; and General Hospi- 
tal, 4%. 

A whopping 45% chose WGCL as 
their favorite radio station. WMMS 
was picked by 24% and WRQC by 



11%. 

The video results were no surprise: 
Michael Jackson's "Thriller" was fa- 
vored by 55% of the students, fol- 
lowed by Rick Springfield's "Soul", 
4%; and Michael Jackson's "Beat It", 
4%. 

Def Leppard took top honors as 
the favorite band with 11%, of the 
vote. Michael Jackson followed with 
10%; Journey, 9%, and Rick Spring- 
field, 5%. 

-C. Wajahn, K. Benedum 



Freshmen had no runaway winners 
for favorite movie, band, or TV show. 
Radio stations and videos were 
another story. 





BOTTOM ROW: Tuesday Allen, Monique Tufts, Tracey Campbell, 
Shannon Stors, Helen Mislak. ROW 2: Tawnja Jackson, Kim Ford, 
Rich Henderson, Ken Mance, Pat Lauria. ROW 3: Doug Crowe, 
Henry Lewis, Paul Haislah, Danny Wilson. ROW 4: Kathy Werry, 
Darvin Freeman, Cary Bedzek, Mike Wootten, Greg Jordan. 



BOTTOM ROW: Tracy Tuckerman, Bonnie Parker, Kim Rees, 
Sandy Furlan, Chris Merency. ROW 2: Sue Porter, Kim Benedum, 
Kelly Eubank, Dave Segulin, Thomas Wirbel, Missy Ernst. ROW 3: 
Beth Pekol, Kim Lawrence, Stephanie Sper, Katarina Oroz, Nathan 
DiGideo, ROW 4: Martin Lisac, Jeff Smith, Brian Valentine. 



Freshmen 



150 





OTTOM ROW: Jan Sterbank, Luanne Tomasi, Cary Sanders, Pam 
wyt, Charlotte Mantel. ROW 2: Therese Pevec, Heidi, Rohl, Cindi 
imbert, Glen Meyers, Tom Wanamaker. ROW 3: Geoff Mazanec, 
lark Smith, Mike Peters, Mike Mehls. ROW 4: Mark Mincek, 
amon Ramsey. 



BOTTOM ROW: Lisa Norton, Kelly Bedzek, Missy Dockery, Pam 
Perdan, Julie Mayerhoffer. ROW 2: Tony Colantonio, Margaret 
Kriz, Michelle Elmore, Colleen Gibson, Tina Black, Mike Hall, Joe 
Aquila. ROW 3: Darren Beck, Tim Ivinskas, Greg Olson, Dave 
Luketic, Nick Kro, Howard Alick. ROW 4: Andrea Hooks, Mike 
Ketterman, Andy Young, Mike Kekic, Tom Greenawald, Jim 
Harrah. 



151 



Freshmen 



Siblings 



Freshmen Find Advantages 
To Older Brothers And Sisters 



hirty percent of the ninth 
graders surveyed have older 
brothers or sisters attending 
EHS. 

They believed that having an older 
brother or sister is an advantage be- 
cause they help you find your class- 
rooms and meet new people. They 
also believe that an older sibling 
could help them decide which classes 
to enroll in, which teachers to take, 
and how to do their homework. 

The freshmen with older siblings 
said they also had disadvantages. For 
example, an older brother or sister 
could tell your parents if you did 



something wrong. Furthermore, 
many teachers call them by their 
older brother's or sister's name or 
compare them with each other. The 
freshmen don't appreciate that be- 
cause they have their own personal- 
ities. 



RIGHT: Freshmen Jamie Cole and 
Scott Dooley were among the thirty 
percent of the freshman class that 
have older brothers and sisters 
currently attending Euclid High 
School. 




f) & o ft o 





BOTTOM ROW: Dennis Ivey, Lisa Paducci, Debbie Carroll, Kris 
Gray, Kim Kearns. ROW 2: Jeff Samsa, Fran Goode, Gina 
Timperio, Anna Drazetic, Sue Geyer, Mary Potter. ROW 3: Scott 
Franks, David Downing, Elliot Anderson, Nick Picozzi, Brent 
Fambrini, Maurice Seaman. Mark Waksmunski. ROW 4: Damon 
Franklin, Jim Bryan, Mike Primosch, Mark Kriz, Eric Templar, 
Danny Grabinski, Tony Berzinskas. 



BOTTOM ROW: Lynn Dipaolo, Dawn Turpin, Kathy Wadsworth, 
Patty Reed, Laura Brock. ROW 2: Glenn Barth, Wendi Madden, 
Renee Duchon, Rob Srnovrsnik, Darlene Perryman, Linda Thomas, 
Laura Moster. ROW 3: Merrell Davis, Adria Motiejunas, Anthony 
Judge, Becky Miller, Debbie Testa, Tonya Bennett, Shannon 
Jaynes. ROW 4: Bruce Hayes, Scott Pooley, Phil Touschner, Terry 
Trocheck, Bryce Riha, Dave Szpak. 



Freshmen 



152 



BOTTOM ROW: Shannon Wagner, Suzanne Redman, Tina Ferenac, 
Cathy Felden, Kim Clarke. ROW 2: Michelle Mackell, Anthony 
Judge, Jerry Hodge, Sherry Jaworsky, Kelli Dalesaio, Val Vogel. 
ROW 3: Matthew Bleigh, Paul Rose, Jeff Meyers, Colleen Clark, 
Kim Buick, Kristen Petrie, Cindy Moore. ROW 4: Bill Fischer, 
Chris Juratic, John Karabinus, Vince Godina, Bernie Sauer, Chris 
Harrison, Mike Kitis. 



BOTTOM ROW: Claudia Cummings, John D'Apollo, Missy Allay, 
Ken Smullen, Debbie Johnson. ROW 2: Todd Dickinson, Jon Lange, 
Renata Grahovic, Noel Santa, Tanya Lomac. ROW 3: Ryan 
Ehrhart, Janeen Crowell, Natalie Hopkins, Linda Franic. ROW 4: 
Vic Garlauskas, Kevin Lawrence, Rob Carlson, Dave Kaleal. 





BOTTOM ROW: Robin Taylor, Kathy Boskovic, Nicki Vitolo, Nina 
Lohn, Anne Marie Ticchione. ROW 2: Jackie Wheeler, John Kalby, 
Steve Grgincic, Deirdre Gray, Dean Brodowski, Cyndi Bedzyk. ROW 
3: Ralph Haubert, John Sheesley, Patti Kobetitsch, Chris Zadnik, 
Shareice Whitehead, Andrea Corbin, Laurie Workman. ROW 4: 
Rich Thompson, David Capasso. ROW 5: Vince Germano, Doug 
Alaburda, Corey Scott, Brian Sim, Eddie Petrich. 



BOTTOM ROW: Raynal Williams, Phyllis Venable, Linda Maxey, 
Darlene Sapatka, Chris Kollar. ROW 2: Kelli Curtis, Terese Yanko, 
Jennie Kittredge, Patty Palmer, Marilyn Murphy, Dennis McPeek. 
ROW 3: Tracey Halloway, Mary Delas, Jean Hayes, Rob Lapuh, 
Mike McCloskey. ROW 4: Miles McLean, Mark Horabik, Antonio 
Stoudermire, Steve Stegh, Tommie Ford. 



153 



Freshmen 



Eye Openers 

'Good Morning! Today Is ... ' 
Waking Up To The Bulletin, P.A. 



■HJTjl here are two ways for stu- 
IP: dents at Euclid High School 
~~ H to find out what is happen- 
ing: the student bulletin and the 
morning p. a. announcements. At the 
start of each school day, students 
find out about the day's events. The 
subjects range from an update of 
sports' scores to the day and time of 
club meetings. 

It's always exciting to hear your 
name on the p.a., especially if you are 
a freshman. Things like that make 
life a little easier for the "newcomer" 
to the school. 

Andy Tome, who had his name an- 
nounced on occasion, said, "The an- 



nouncements and the bulletin are a 
good way to start off the day." Jim 
Maher takes a different approach by 
saying, "It's a good time to get a little 
extra sleep before a hard day at 
school." That may not be true, but as 
Mike Mason says, "The bulletin is a 
good way to find out what is going on 
in and around the school." 

As the high school years pile up, 
all the present freshman will be ac- 
customed to the student bulletin and 
the p.a. announcements, but they 
will never be as exciting as they were 
in the freshman year. 

-C. Majers 






nivn, jjutuuT u 



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RIGHT: Kent Smith, Darlene Minford, 
Denise Martin, Laura Saletrick, and 
Robin Scherbarth were the 1983-1984 
P.A. announcers. ABOVE: The bulletin 
was students' main source of school 
information. 




BOTTOM ROW: Kristen Urdzik, Sue Kelly. Lauren Koeber, Karen 
Frye. ROW 2: Sinisa Mikulcic, Loui Paroska, Lavoi Nash, 
Dejarnette Lomax, Celestina Hawthorne. ROW 3: Jim Mausser, Jeff 
Murowsky, Jeff Sas, Todd Springborn, Jeff Kuchta. ROW 4: Dave 
Tressler, Jim Maher, Jeff Grigsby, Dan Frankos, Mike Piper, Paul 
Baird. 



BOTTOM ROW: Ann Marett, Patty Papotta, Harry Murphy. Dawn 
Ott, Wendy Summers. ROW 2: Charisse Ford, Shonda Coleman. 
Katrina Crayton, Karina Urbancic, Maryanna Asbury. ROW 3: 
Dearie Bradley, Ron Ramadhar, Barb Cvelbar, Antoenette Dean, 
Tina Phillips. ROW 4: Denese Parker, Kerry Cornelius. 



Freshmen 



154 




OTTOM ROW: Pam Wyman, Lisa Germano, Debbie Beining, 
ridgette Douglas, Sandra Gainer. ROW 2: Meghan Finnegan, Bruse 
tiller, Regina Hayden, Marlene Petho, Katie Boschi, Jenny Durbin. 
OW 3: Mort Peoples, Robert Yehl, Lisa Desico, Erik Glick, Joe 
rechun, Anthony Delzoppo, John McGregor. ROW 4: John 
ochneaur, Dwight Jones, Jim Ornduff, Brian Cotter, Tony Klepac, 
orman Fye, Michael Fair. 



BOTTOM ROW: Diane Dureiko, Susie Bratton, Alana Lindic, Kelly 
Kernz, Stacie Davis. ROW 2: Barb Frank, Jennifer Shusky, Dan 
O'Connell, Linda Miller, Kenda Ward, Maria Newcomb, Laura 
Whitlow. ROW 3: Jim Hribar, Amy Jaffe, Carla Maddox, Julie 
Toth, Virginia Wagner, Michelle Goodman. ROW 4: Paul Harris, 
Dawn Andresky, Dale Pate, Andy Tome, Dave Kracheck, Diane 
Smrdel. 



155 



Freshmen 



Walk, Don't Run 

When Faced With A Long Trek, 
Do A Little Thinking First 



ffl 



t's 7:52 a.m. Do you know 
where your first class is? Of 
course you do, but how do 
you get there quickly if your class if 
on the first floor and your homeroom 
is on the third? You have three 
choices. 

Door number one? Run. Most stu- 
dents run or walk fast to get to their 
class quickly. 

Door number two? Be late. Of 
course, that means detention, so just 
scratch that idea. 

Now for the big money. We're talk- 
ing door number three: short cuts, an 
idea that can usually solve your 
problem. 



Here's the game plan. Student X is 
in room 391. He has to get to room 
141. If X goes along the cross corridor 
and down the stairs at the middle, he 
is in the front of the library. Now, X 
can go to the right staircase and 
down the stairs again, and he will 
find himself on the first floor. If he 
turns right, walks down the cross 
corridor, turns right, turns right 
again-voila! Room 141. All it takes is 
a little thinking and a game plan. 

If you have a problem with getting 
from one point to another in the 
school, try a game plan. 




ABOVE: Through concentration and 
knowledge of the secrets of the Kung- 
Fu masters, Ray Leonardi is able to 
be on time for all his classes. 





BOTTOM ROW: David Celeste, Jeff Offak, Nina Lombardo, Kerry 
Radaker. ROW 2: Maxquitta Phelps, Paula McGraw, Martina 
Breznikar. ROW 3: Rob Cook, Paul Markuz, Chris Trebec. ROW 4: 
Dan Dekleva, Terry Butler, Jeff Trobenter. ROW 5: Kim Higgins, 
Dawn Cool, Mike Loparo. ROW 6: Renee Staso, Rob Nagode, Amy 
Kline. ROW 7: Joe Sopko, Karen Stupica, Shaun Johnson. 



BOTTOM ROW: Danette Rookard, Dyon Preston, Cindy Lawrence, 
Chris Karountzos, Amy Eichorn. ROW 2: Kevin Pekar, Kevin 
McCluskey, Dan Tekancic, Bob Allison, Vince Petruccelli, Michelle 
Highland. ROW 3: Frank Boyden, Michael Sullivan, Pat Deister, 
Marcel Chandler, Frank Henry, Phil Compton. ROW 4: Levelle 
Byrd, Scott Smith, Robert Cole, Charles Shy, Christopher 
Londerman. 



Freshmen 



156 



BOTTOM ROW: Theresa Haynes, Terri Hull, Sheryl Meeker, 
Corrina Jones, Liz Dushaj. ROW 2: Mike Franklin, Carl Adams, 
Vernell Arrington, Frank Monkton, Sue Flowers, Chris Smith. ROW 
3: Rich Skora, Dave Yatz, Brian Shaffer, Rob Sapp, Bill 
McCormack. ROW 4: Dan Neal, Gerry Murphy. 



BOTTOM ROW: Kim Novotney, Cynthia Schultz, Pam Vaughn, 
Paula Schoefer, Brenda Peterson. ROW 2: John Day, Dawn Sergent, 
Terry Marando, Dionna Howard, Gail Ward, Renee Rolik. ROW 3: 
Mike Mazzei, Mark Forker, Bob Yoke, Shane Dollar, Elaina Cirino, 
Chris Brisbine. ROW 4: Rick Dakdouk, Frederic Henry, Dave 
Massingill, Pat Weaver, Denise Fair, Jason Shuster. 




/"i CHI 






BOTTOM ROW: Lisa Crissman, Threasa Lovingood, Sadia Wheeler, 
Patti Fye, Sheila Browne. ROW 2: Mike Ridings, Mitch Sotka, Pat 
Sevack, Steve Clark, Diana Bliss, Cheryl Moore. ROW 3: Dave 
Weinke, Eric Franko, Marty Blase, Jerry Hillier, Ed Mcintosh. 
^OW 4: Dave McCandless, Aaron Loving, Jim Blomquist, Xavier 
frng. 



BOTTOM ROW: Monica Simmons, Amy Dolinar, Lisa Zaslov. ROW 
2: Chuck Lucas, Frank Miklaucic, John Lowery. ROW 3: Steve 
Woodard, Tammy Smoot, David Lonchar, Tom Vincent. ROW 4: 
Lavelle Ross, Billy Miller, Jon Toth. ROW 5: Paul Brown, Tim 
Pretchel, Bill Leonard, Kevin Grablovic, Bruno Fonovic. 



157 



Freshmen 



Finding A Niche 

Freshmen Discover Their Place 
In The Social Fabric Of EHS 



freshmen, however, are members of a 
school-sponsored sport or activity. 



■K. Benedum 



tudents' involvement in ex- 
tra-curricular activities such 
as sports, dances, and clubs, 
is just as much a part of high school 
life as English and math. 

A survey given to selected fresh- 
man classes showed that the class of 
1987 is easing itself into the main- 
stream of high school life. 

For example, 67% of the freshmen 
polled attended a varsity football 
game. The varsity basketball games, 
however, didn't pull such a crowd, 
with only 33% of the freshmen hav- 
ing attended one. 

The school dances were not popu- 
lar with the freshmen either. Al- 
though 37% had attended a dance 



this year, only 2% 
Homecoming Dance. 



attended 

47% of 



the 
the 



BELOW: Finding classrooms was the 
first adjustment freshmen had to 
make. RIGHT: A new school meant new 
friends for most freshmen. 





BOTTOM ROW: Marie Pasquale, Nicole Olson, Chris Duricy, Amy 
Skiljan, Michelle Tekieli. ROW 2: Lou Medved, Amy Terango, 
Becky Myles, Jeff Coy, Kim Marvin, Linda Miller. ROW 3: Debbie 
Murray, Joe Krance, Kelly McDerment, Jeff Slattery, Colleen 
Wajahn. ROW 4: John Flowers, Curt Majers, Pat Blau. 



BOTTOM ROW: Paris Zager, Erin Kocjan, Tina Marolt, Maureen 
O'Neill, Lisa Minadeo, Frank Richardson. ROW 2: Georgeann 
Schilling, Raymond Leonardi, Kecia Bell, Tracy Van Beneden, 
Gennie Donley, Korine Ward. ROW 3: Jeff Blewett, Kim Barber, 
Bill Roeder, Jill Hansen, Michelle Woodcock, Pamela Taylor, Carol 
Stennis. ROW 4: Steve Novak, Bob Anderson, Bob Montana, Rick 
Woods. 



Freshmen 



158 




BOTTOM ROW: Stacey Austin, Lynn Statz, Sonja Reno. Barb 
Zschuppe, Beth Lauver. ROW 2: Julie Krulc, Denise Zahuraky, 
Chris Porbett, Chris George, Nancy Schulz. ROW 3: Mike Mason, 
Anna Bujnocki, Bob Airhart, Brenda Piontkowski, Abigail Bell, Lisa 
Betts. ROW 4: Chad Ramlow, Dave Potokar, Dave Braidich. 




BOTTOM ROW: Beth Richards, Lori Luther, Lesley Ferrara, 
Denise Conklin, Carol Kristoff. ROW 2: Maria Mujic, Therea 
Cecelic, Amy Krcal, Matt Phillips, Renee Guillory. ROW 3: Carla 
Pappalardo, Tonya Wilkins, Sam Balante, Helly Fannin, Ted 
Karnak, Jeremy Culmer. ROW 4: Jehn John Jevnikar, Bob 
Schwenner, LeBron Paige, Rich Arlesic, Charlie Neidel. 



BOTTOM ROW: Bob Miller, Latonia Mitchell, Tina Hull, Carol 
Naglic, Bill Balazs. ROW 2: Sean Robinson, Bill Carmigiano, Rick 
Bliss, Jim Spinelli, Sean Bradford, Mike Park. ROW 3: Jeff Taylor, 
Bob Campbell, Clark Bechtel, John Shippitka, Louie Tadiello. ROW 
4: Matt Surrena, Rod Miller, Tony Lauria, Rich Johnson, Chris 
Campbell, Bill Bealko, Mike Parkinson. 



159 



Freshmen 



Michael Abbott 
Carletta Adams 
Holly Adams 
Gordon Alves 
Chanette Alvis 
Vicky Andrews 



Nadine Antonick 

Michael Aspinwall 

Tom Augustine 

Steve Ault 

Karen Balogh 

John Barcza 



Greg Barker 

Mike Barker 

Charles Bauck 

Laurie Beek 

Marshell Beemiller 

Dawn Beining 



Billy Bell 

Sharon Berke 

George Beros 

Heidi Besselman 

Theresa Bissett 

Derrick Blackmon 



Steve Blankenship 

Kelly Bock 

Sandy Bolivar 

John Bolsar 

Mike Booker 

Paul Borthwick 



Beorge Bowdouris 
Patty Bradac 

Charles Brandich 

Gina Brearton 

Jim Breeding 

Jenny Brewer 



Katherin Brickman 

Connie Brocone 

Missy Brokate 

Kristin Brown 

Barb Brozovich 

Jeff Bruening 



Raymond Bryan 

Judy Budas 

Joyce Bukovac 

Eric Burke 

Scott Burlison 

Scott Burton 










Sophomores 



160 



Tell It With Tees 

EHS Students' Backs And Fronts 
Advertise Personal Favorites 




s Euclid students roam the 
halls, displayed upon their 
fronts and backs are some of 
their personal preferences. 

When a student wears a T-shirt, he 
reveals to others something about 
what he may like or dislike. Tees 
may also tell where the wearer has 
been. For instance, common T-shirts 
include those which advertise rock 
groups, beverages, school, sports, 
stores, or maybe the wearer's special 
someone. 

Of course, some T-shirts are more 
memorable than others, but any T- 
shirt, as long as it's "in good taste", is 
acceptable dress in school. 

Although T-shirts are not quite 
dressy or preppy, they are comfort- 
able. And for some students, comfort 
is the top priority. 

— D. Henkhuzens 



LEFT: Rocks bands dominate the T- 
shirt styles at EHS. 



Paul Butler 
Carrie Capretta 
John Cek 
Jean Chen 
Ken Chetnik 
Kelly Chicone 



Linda Cieslinski 
Ken Clark 
La Donna Clere 
Kelly Cogan 
Dan Colantonio 
Brian Collins 



Steve Colton 
Phil Compton 
Davie Cononie 
Laura Conroy 
Steve Cooney 
Jim Corrigan 



Colleen Coyne 
Cedric Crawford 
Tom Cramer 
Michelle Crayton 
Eric Croone 
Nady Culliton 



161 



Sophomores 



Co-Ed Gym 



o-educational gym class is a 
rather controversial subject 
at any high school. But 
though many EHS students sur- 
veyed had recommendations for im- 
proving the the classes, few actually 
wanted to go back to the old all-boy 
and all-girl classes. 

According to a survey of ninety 
sophomores, one if the biggest disad- 
vantages of co-ed gym was having to 
look good while participating in 
sports. The gym uniforms them- 
selves were a popular complaint. 

One boy complained that the big- 
gest disadvantage for him was that 
there were no good-looking girls in 
his class. A few girls expressed the 
same opinion about the boys. 

Meeting new people was one rea- 
son why some people enjoy gym 
class. Others said thet it was just 
more fun overall. Quite a few said 
that it strengthened competition. 



Sue Cutwright 

Barb Cveibar 

Tony Cvisanovic 

Danielle D'Amico 

Thomas Daugherty 

Dianna Davis 



Glenn Davis 

Lewis Davis 

Patrick Dawson 

Tom Deakins 

MaryJo Deatsch 

Jack Deboe 



Michelle Debrevec 

•Jim DeMack 

Mike Demora 

Mona Denovich 

Matt Devictor 

Deann Devol 



Though Brawn Beats Beauty 
Co-Ed Gym Earns Good Marks 



However, some students felt that it 
got too rough, with girls stating that 
the boys were too competitive and 
would not let them participate. 

Some students admitted that they 
were embarassed to play games with 
members of the opposite sex. Thir- 
teen percent of the students sur- 
veyed thought that there was no ad- 
vantage to being in a co-ed gym class, 
but they were balanced out by those 
who enjoyed the class. Eighty-two 
percent of the sophomores were sat- 
isfied with their gym classes. Fifteen 
percent saw no purpose in gym at all, 
but seemed to think that co-ed gym 
was still better than gym with just 
one sex. 




ABOVE: Many girls felt that boys 
were too competitive in gym class. 
Others felt that they were just plain 
rough. RIGHT: Gym uniforms were a 
common complaint about gym class. 





Sophomores 



162 




Jim Dickinson 
Brian Dooley 
Chris Drage 
Larry Drnek 
Diana Dumendic 
Tracy Duracensky 



A Durant 
Pauline Dushaj 
Janet Dymanski 
Laura Elze 
Tim Emanvel 
Greg Emerick 



Marcie Emerman 
Edward Evilsizer 
Darlene Fair 
Debbie Fekete 
Joe Felden 
Tammy Ferguson 



Anthony Finiami 
Alison Finch 
Mike Fitzgerald 
Vincent Fleming 
Joshua Ford 
Nancy Fowle 



Rick Francis 
Lisa Frasher 
John Frisco 
Carin Fulton 
Kim Gamber 
Avinash Ganti 



Annmarie Geddes 
Eddie Gembarski 
Kim Gercar 
Richard Gezann 
Dan Gibson 
Adriane Gilliam 



Cheryl Gladin 
Dana Gollner 
Diana Gondeau 
Tracie Gore 
Zdavko Grman 
Joe Grmovsek 



Janine Grassi 
Karen Green 
Sue Greene 
Tracy Griffin 
Alicia Grillo 
Edie Gron 



163 



Sophomores 



Harry Groves 

Bill Grubb 

Rose Gubitosi 

Eric Hall 

Leonard Hanby 

Sue Haney 



Lori Hannan 

Gretchen Harnick 

Holly Harris 

Janet Harvey 

Andrew Haupt 

Debi Hector 



Dawn Heinz 

John Hilliard 

Shinette Hinson 

Paul Hoffert 

Peter Hogrefe 

Denise Holley 



Nancy Holtz 
Mike Horgan 
Tom Horton 
Bill Hughes 
Debbie Hula 
Walter Humbert 



Edwin Humphrey 
John Hurney 
Kim Ipavec 
Lisa Ipavec 
Lori Ipavic 
Tony Isgro 



Sharon Jackson 

Steve Jager 

Casey Jakubauskas 

Norma Jalovec 

Tom Jarc 

Eric Jaworsky 



Connie Johnson 

Danielle Johnson 

Bill Johnson 

Judy Jones 

Patti Jones 

Sandy Jones 



Greg Joranko 


^% 


Jeff Jordan 


J^ ^ 


Karla Journey 


M~ ~m 


Nicole Jurgenson 


^m ^r 


Debbi Kacperski 


nJ>' 7 


Debbie Kainec 


% v / 




A L 




Sophomores 



164 



The Plane Truth 



Difficulties With Geometry 
Multiply Sophomores' Problems 




ABOVE: Sophomores try to straighten geometry in Mrs. Sanborn's 7° 
out their ideas about the laws of geometry class. 



he study of geometry is as old 
as Euclid himself. For what 
seems like an infinite number 
of years, many sophomores have in- 
cluded geometry as an integral part 
of their school year. 

Sophomores dread geometry tests 
with an acuteness inversely propor- 
tional to their preparation. Many 
find the fine points of proofs too dis- 
tant to understand, as most math 
teachers will attest to. 

Geometry has many parallel func- 
tions in life. Boys have traditionally 
used their best lines to learn about 
ideal curves. Conversely, girls have 
to choose between the lines while co- 
ordinating their axes to complement 
their slopes. 

Undoubtably, geometry will serve 
important functions in the sopho- 
mores' future lives. 




Cyndi Kandah 
Claire Kardos 
John Karnak 
Jim Kendro 
Tammy Kent 
David Kern 



Brad King 
Denise Kirchner 
Karen Kirchner 
Don Kitchen 
Candy Kleckner 
Greg Knack 



Kim Kocjan 
Greg Koman 
Janette Konrad 
Lee Kooser 
Kelly Korb 
Vince Kovacic 



Steve Kovalec 
Scott Kovatch 
Christine Kreckal 
Tony Krizanovic 
Chris Krofcheck 
Debbie Kropf 



165 



Sophomores 



Cheap Thrills 

Too Young To Work; To Old For TV 
Sophomores Search For Some Fun 



teenager's life revolves 
around money: acquiring it 
and spending it. But when 
money becomes scare or tied up in 
other financial situations, it becomes 
necessary for one to find "cheap 
thrills". 

Gathering in groups is always pop- 
ular with high school students. Just 
going to the Euclid Square Mall and 
walking around with friends is a 
common way of wasting a Friday or 
Saturday night. 

Music still entertains. Radio and a 
money-maker called MTV are major 
sources of free musical entertain- 
ment to today's teens. 



ABOVE: Some EHS students enjoy 
their free time lounging around the 
Euclid Square Mall. RIGHT: Although 
video games are not necessarily 
inexpensive, video arcades are a 
popular place to hang out. FAR 
RIGHT: Even if nothing is bought, 
shopping is a favorite way to spend a 
Saturday. 



Al Kucmanic 

Leroy Lai 

Alex Lai 

Jerry Laska 

Sue Laurenson 

Bill Lawrence 



Terry Lepisto 

Steve Lewarski 

Tom Lewin 

Ben Little 

•James Lockwood 

Richard Look 



Karen Lorence 

Chris Love 

Greg Lowe 

Mary Ann Lucas 

Diane Lucci 

Dan Luketic 




Sophomores 



166 




Bob Lutz 
Doreen Lyon 
Lynette Lyons 
Tom Madden 
Bob Maher 
Dave Mann 



Natalie Mann 
Dan Mannello 
Michelle Marciante 
Diane Maroli 
Jennifer Marrott 
John Martin 



Greg Mata 
Laura Mataraza 
Mary Matsko 
Bob Maurer 
Todd Maxwell 
Lynn Mayle 



Jamie McArthur 
Kim McCallion 
Dave McCandless 
Mike McCandless 
Rick McCarthy 
Neil McClain 



Aaron McGee 
Floyd McGee 
Derrick McGraw 
Maureen McGraw 
Maria Mcintosh 
Pat McLaughlin 



Adrienne McLean 
Slavko Medved 
Jim Mervar 
Jeni Metcalf 
Werner Mews 
Michelle Mihalick 



Frank Milavcic 
Millie Milicevic 
Robert Milicevic 
Kim Miller 
Marlene Miller 
Marty Miller 



Wayne Miller 
Chandra Milline 
Michael Minadeo 
Cindy Mis 
Len Mitchell 
Jason Molakakis 



£lffWLl,LX& 



167 



Sophomores 



Mark Molkentin 

Craig Molnar 

Bobby Moore 

Erin Moriarty 

Kim Morris 

Lisa Morse 



Matt Morse 

Wayne Mramer 

Richard Mueller 

Ed Murray 

Mary Muscarella 

Robin Nagy 



Kevin Nainiger 

I >an N'eal 

Kurt Nebe 

Tom Nelson 

Kathy Nickel 

Scott Niemiec 



Ed Nocera 

Joe Noch 

Tina Nolidis 

Diane Novosel 

Jim Nowac 

Tim Oboczky 



Arman Ochoa 

Matthew Ospelt 

Ken Otis 

Sean Owens 

Gary Paparizos 

Chris Papoures 



Nick Paponras 

William Papouras 

Pete Pappas 

Lisa Parcesepe 

Smita Patel 

Janice Pavis 



William Payne 
Kelly Peck 
Cathy Pekol 
Brian Pence 
Mary Penko 
Kim Perkins 



Lisa Perko 

Tony Perry 

Mike Perry 

Rich Perusek 

Bobby Petrie 

Kris Petrillo 




Sophomores 



168 



Cabbage Crazy 

Adults Fight Over Child's Doll 
As Cabbage Patch Craze Strikes 



their original price. 

In trying to explain the sudden 
craze, a Coleco sales manager said, 
"The popularity of the dolls just 
shows that the American people are 
caring people." 

— K. Balogh 



he Cabbage Patch craze took 
place two years ago in Cleve- 
land, Georgia, where the first 
Cabbage Patch kid was "born." 

Today, there are two types of Cab- 
bage Patch dolls, the soft-art origi- 
nals by Xavier Roberts costing sever- 
al hundred dollars and the Coleco 
Toy Company version of the origi- 
nal, which runs about $20. 

At the end of the summer 1983, 
sales of the dolls were beginning to 
pick up. By late October, lines of 
people began forming outside the 
stores that claimed to have the dolls 
in stock. The Coleco Company took 
all the commercials for the dolls off 
the air because the demand was so 
great. 




As the dolls became scarce, ads be- 
gan to appear in the Plain Dealer's 
classified section for up to ten times 



ABOVE: Sophomore Julie Sustar finds 
herself up to her ears in Cabbage 
Patch dolls. 




Stacey Phillips 
Gary Pinta 
Rochelle Pittock 
Geri Podmore 
Christine Pohl 
Laura Podrug 



Ken Powaski 
Brian Polanski 
Charleen Pretchel 
Rick Powell 
John Rackar 
Len Purvis 



Robin Ramlow 
Steve Rahija 
Laura Rattini 
Debbie Ramadhar 
Susan Reynolds 
Ken Reiehert 



Sheldon Richer 
Lisa Restifo 
Lisa Riggs 
Jeannie Riedel 
Marty Risko 
Laura Roberts 



169 



Sophomores 



he sophomore year is usually 
a year of change, but most 
students agree that their 
tenth grade year had advantages 
over their freshman year. As junior 
Sue Swyt stated, "By the time stu- 
dents are in the tenth grade, they 
have a better idea of what they 
want." 

For instance, when the freshman 
students first began attending EHS, 
they were obviously new to the en- 
tire system. They had to adjust to the 
new school before they could really 
get involved with many activities. 
Gradually, they became more aware. 
By the time they were sophomores, 
they were able to take advantage of 
the several organizations, clubs, and 
sports that Euclid has to offer. 

— D. Henkhuzens 



ABOVE, LEFT: Chris Offutt dedicates 
his spare time to challenging the 
computer. ABOVE, RIGHT: Sue 
Cutwright and Danielle D'Amico are 
glad to be photographed with such 
good-looking guys. RIGHT: Mary 
Matsko, Kris Brown, Laura Mataraza 
and foreign exchange student Reiko 
Sato established mutual friendships 
this year. 



Matt Roberts 

Eugene Robinson 

Chris Rocco 

Brad Rohl 

John Ruffing 

Kelli Russell 



Tam Salo 

John Samsa 

Patty Sanner 

Robert Sanner 

Joe Scafidi 

Karen Schaefer 



Vince Schembre 

Jim Schuler 

Nick Schulz 

Rich Schulz 

Denise Zingle 

Billy Scimenes 



Feeling At Home 

Freshman Frustrations Behind, 
Sophomores Enjoy Second Year 




Sophomores 



170 




Joe Scolaro 
Sue Segina 
Mary Segulin 
Dave Zollars 
Ray Sekerak 
Melanie Senitko 



April Seward 
Sonya Sezun 
Darlene Shei 
Raya Shields 
Sandy Shriver 
Mike Sigh 



Judi Silkowski 
Maryana Simieevic 
Marin Simieevic 
Monice Simmons 
Stan Skodnik 
Zelka Skrtic 



Sandra Skula 
Sandra Sleith 
Chuck Sliskovic 
Glenn Smith 
Julie Smith 
Chris Smolic 



Don Smrdel 
Ron Sneperger 
Lisa Zdunczyk 
Bonnie Snitzky 
Michelle Solnosky 
Dave Sondav 



Dean Sopko 
Cory Spencer 
Jean Zaro 
Bob Sprago 
Jeff Springer 
Ron Staso 



Charles Stennis 
Mark Sterrick 
David Stipkovich 
John Straub 
Nancy Struna 
Ray Stuber 



John Supinski 
Amy Suponcic 
Renee Zanghi 
Julie Suster 
Dan Svigel 
Tricia Syracuse 



171 



Sophomores 



Sue Szmania 

Stephani Tassone 

Ed Taylor 

Kate Taylor 

Shirleth Taylor 

Lori Testa 



Chris Thomas 

Kevin Thomas 

Paul Thomas 

Tracy Thomas 

Dave Thompson 

John Thompson 



Mike Thompson 

Marty Tomasi 

Selena Tomola 

Laura Totarella 

Alex Toth 

Doreen Tracey 



Dough Trobbenter 

Bill Turk 

Ray Uhlir 

Claudia Ukotic 

Jacqui Vanah 

Gretchen Vandemotter 



Stacey Vasiavsky 
Gren Ventura 
Kathryn Voight 
Jim Vuyancih 
Kathi Wagner 
Dennis Walsh 



Amy Waltermire 

Ron Wanderslepen 

Tamika Ward 

Joe Warner 

Lisa Watros 

William Weaver 



Bill Weisert 

Gene Wheeler 

Fred White 

Richard White 

Robert Whitlow 

Starr Whitson 



Michelle Wiggens 

Antoine Williams 

Charles Williams 

Shante Williams 

Lisa Williamson 

Monica Willis 





Ofi§ 



Sophomores 



172 



Word Processors 

Word Processors Useful Tools 
In Students' War on Information 



II 




n 1983 it was predicted that 
70% of future jobs would be 
in the information industry. 
So it's a good bet that today's sopho- 
mores will be using a word processor 
sometime in their lives. 

Word processors have many func- 
tions. Data are saved on floppy disks 
and stored for future use. A word 
processor can also make easy correc- 
tions on work given to it. It is easy to 
do calculations also. Furthermore, 
word processors can individualize 
mass mailings and printed forms. 

Word processors are a useful tood 
that today's students may have to 
master. 

— K. Benedum, C. Wajahn 



The Business Department purchased 
several word processors for use in the 
vocational business classes. 



Kenneth Wilson 
Dan Wingfield 
Holly Winter 
Mary Wirbel 
Brian Wittreich 
Tom Wojno 



Jodi Wollmershauser 
Douglas Wood 
Mike Woodcock 
Maurice Woods 
Scott Woods 
George Wright 



Diana Yafanaro 
Tony Yehl 
Valerie Yentz 
Cathy Young 
Anita Yuhas 
Cathy Zablotney 



173 



Sophomores 



he class of 1985 is the first to 
need nineteen credits to gra- 
duate. The state of Ohio has 
raised its requirements to eighteen 
credits. In response, Euclid, which 
already had a eighteen credit mini- 
mum, raised its requirement to nine- 
teen. 

Students in the class of 1985 dif- 
fered in their responses to the 
change. Jennifer Stone said, "I prob- 
ably would have had nineteen credits 
anyway. It doesn't make any differ- 
ence to me." Kim McDaniels shared 
Stone's view. 

Tracy Otcasek commented, "I 
think raising the requirements was a 
good idea, but we should have been 
told a little bit sooner." In the same 
vein, Sue Larkins said, "They did 
what?" 

Laura Burtyk said, "The change in 
credit requirements to nineteen was 
probably made to make students stay 
in school. Just because they will stay 
in school doesn't mean they will 
learn more. On the other hand, Angie 
McReynolds said, "Raising the 
graduation requirements was a very 
good idea. Too many students are en- 
tering college unprepared." 

Finally, although Sharon Murphy 
said, "It's a good idea, but it's not 
going to keep the kids in school who 
want out," her view was balanced by 
Chris Betts, who said, "It may make 
some people work harder and learn 
more." 

— L. Leeper 



TOP: Vicky Ukmar, hard at work, 

strives for the required nineteen 

credits. 

RIGHT: Students discuss the situation 

aroused by the credit change. 



Tim Adkins 

Jim Allay 

Harold Anderson 

Brenen Ashley 

Zelinda Atkins 

Dan Augustine 



Maureen Bagocios 

Mike Baker 

Chris Banning 

Terry Barker 

Bob Barravechia 

Kevin Bartol 



Big Nineteen 

Class Of '85 To Be First To Need 
Nineteen Credits For Graduation 





Juniors 



174 




Tina Bashline 
Tammi Battaglia 
Jeanette Batya 
Chris Bednarik 
Lori Bedzyk 
Connie Benedum 



David Denko 
Mike Bergoc 
Christine Betts 
Laura Bildstein 
Eric Boettcher 
Kathy Bokar 



Jeff Bowman 
Shirley Braidich 
Kathy Brandich 
Eric Brehm 
Patti Brinkley 
Leigh Brinsek 



Greg Brochak 
Sophia Brown 
Matt Bryda 
Kerry Brzozowski 
Jeff Buck 
Randy Bumbarger 



Donna Bunting 
Sheri Burkett 
Julie Burrington 
Michael Burts 
Laura Burtyk 
Lisa Busdiecker 



Chris Cahoon 
Monica Cain 
Eric Cadlwell 
Priscilla Calogar 
Bill Campbell 
Tammy Cantini 



Tony Caputo 
Jim Caresani 
Diane Casto 
Paul Chambers 
Ron Champa 
Chris Chinchar 



Chris Chisholm 
Pat Chrestoff 
Tony Ciuprinskas 
Cindy Clark 
Mike Clark 
Gerard Clay 



175 



Juniors 



Joe Coe 

Tom Colbert 

Rob Collins 

Dionne Congos 

Kurt Conway 

John Corrigan 



Maureen Cotter 

Lisa Coyne 

Cindy Crane 

Tiffany Croone 

Tracy Crowell 

Emily Currie 



Brian Dailey 

Gordon Dallos 

Chris Danna 

Kirk Dauer 

James Dawson 

Tina Day 



Greg Dearden 

Anna Deboe 

John Defilippo 

Bill Demora 

Mike De Palma 

Janice Dewalt 



Lenny Di Paolo 

Bob Donikowski 

Mike Donofrio 

Milton Douglas 

Shaleen Douglas 

Dan Doyle 



John Drage 

Krystal Drake 

Pete Drazetic 

Dennis Dubecky 

Barb Dudley 

Denise Dureiko 



Jim Duricky 

Jackie Eddy 

Ken Edgar 

Ron Englebrecht 

Chris Erdelac 

Almira Eslin 



Brent Evans 

Lolita Exsentico 

Teresa Exsentico 

Kris Faletic 

Ed Felden 

Lisa Finke 




Juniors 



176 



''At Ne w Form a t 

Parents Pick Up Grade Cards; 
Faculty Available For Conferences 




Teachers were stationed by library. Parents were encouraged to 

department in the gym, cafeteria, and talk with their student's "favorites". 



he classroom doors slammed 
shut and the grade books flew 
open as this year's Open 
House turned into a massive parent- 
teacher conference. 

In the past, open house was just 
that, a "showing off of the school at 
which parents followed their stu- 
dent's schedule, meeting with each 
teacher as a class of parents for eight- 
minute sessions. 

This year, Open House was 
changed so parents could talk to each 
of their student's teachers for at least 
five minutes. Teachers sat at tables, 
by department, in the gym, the cafe- 
teria, and the library, talking to par- 
ents during the 2:30-4:30 and 6:30- 
8:30 sessions. Parents could also pick 
up their student's report card in the 
E-Room. 

Although teachers were initially 
skeptical about the change in Open 
House, they found it to be a welcome 
change. Mrs. Carol Tkac said, "It was 
nice to meet the parents of the chil- 
dren we have in class." 

The vast majority of parents also 
liked the change in Open House poli- 
cy, although some were put off by the 
long lines for some teachers. Most 
parents felt, however, that the 
chance to talk with each of their stu- 
dent's teachers was a definite im- 
provement over past 

Without a doubt, parents and 
teachers would give this year's Open 
House an A. 

— L. Tomasi, C. Saunders 




Peggy Fischer 
Mary Fleck 
Richard Force 
Angela Fort 
Jeff Foster 
Mike Francis 



Brenda Franklin 
Bill Furman 
Lucy Gabriele 
Mike Galloway 
Tom Gavin 
Mark Gaylor 



177 



Juniors 



A Matter Of Time 



peeding through the years at 
EHS, many of us didn't know 
which lane to choose and 
were often caught in a jam of deci- 
sions and changes. However, one des- 
tination was always clear: when you 
turned 16, you got your driver's li- 
cense. This fact was true of 58% of 
the junior class. 

Many students found their license 
gave them a great sense of freedom. 
Rob Collins said, "I don't have to ask 
my parents to take me everywhere." 

For some students, things aren't 
much different than before. Renee 
Mazzaro said, "I don't have any more 
freedom because my parents don't 
let me take the car." 

20% of the junior class have their 
own cars, and 10% drive to school on 
a daily basis. One of the biggest 
headaches proved to be paying for 
gas and insurance. 44% paid for their 
own gas, and 23% paid for their own 
insurance, with the average payment 
being $418. 74% of the juniors are 
able to change a flat tire, and 44% 
can change the oil in a car. Unfortu- 
nately, 12% had already been in- 
volved in an accident while they 
were driving. 



TOP: Eric Brehm, Joe Langan, and 
Jim Kronik, as the Pointer Sisters, 
give tips on hitchhiking. RIGHT: Some 
people still have to walk. 



Janien Gembarski 

Mike George 

Lynette Gildone 

Susie Glaser 

Sharon Goldrich 

Charles Goldstein 



Tom Gravizi 

Regina Gray 

Tonya Griffin 

Sue Grubb 

Joe Gubanc 

Pat Haggerty 



58% Of Juniors Have Licenses; 
23% Pay Their Own Insurance 




Juniors 



178 




David Hall 
Jim Hall 
Katie Hall 
Linda Halliday 
Jim Hamilton 
Tina Hampton 



Joe Harb 
Kim Harmon 
John Harris 
Thorn Harrison 
Sue Harth 
Diana Haubert 



Toby Hausrath 
Dawn Henkhuzens 
Ron Heyouk 
Rod Hirsch 
Mike Hoag 
Joanie Hodnichak 



Gabriell Holland 
Tim Holmes 
Tom Hood 
Cindy Hoppert 
Don Horvat 
Chris Hradek 



Mike Hrusovsky 
Judy Hufnagle 
Richard Hughley 
Jennifer Husarik 
Paula Hutchinson 
Laura Iannetta 



Jim Immke 
Kathy Insana 
Mike Ivancic 
Michelle Ivancic 
Scott Ivancic 
David Jackson 



Wendy Jaklich 
Joel Jalovec 
Rob Jankocich 
Sue Jazbec 
Julie Jevnikar 
Aleks Joksimovich 



Darryl Jones 
Joseto Jones 
Matt Jones 
Trevorr Jurgensen 
Judy Justus 
April Kacperski 



179 



Juniors 



Kim Kalous 

Shelly Kanios 

Vincent Kastner 

Tom Keller 

Brad Kelly 

Sharon Kelly 



Steve Kelly 

Klaudia Kerestes 

Kathy Kessel 

Paul Kessler 

Bill Kimack 

Bob King 



Darlene Kirchner 

John Kolleda 

Dave Koller 

Dean Koller 

Karen Koller 

Vince Koman 



Cathy Korb 
James Korzun 
Darryl Kosten 
Sheri Koucky 
Maria Koustis 
Valerie Kovak 



Adam Kozlowski 

John Krance 

Paul Krenisky 

Chris Kucera 

Joelle Kudlak 

Dawn Kuhta 



Laura Lamatrice 

Joe Langan 

Mike Laquatra 

Susanne Larkins 

Alicia Latham 

Rich Lawrence 



Launi Leeper 

Missy Lenz 

Rick Leonard 

Chrissy Letcher 

Tony Lett 

Amy Leu 



Mike Leyda 

Paul Lorenzo 

Chris Lowery 

Jim Lucas 

Kelli Lucas 

Terry Luda 




Juniors 



180 



Double Vision 



13 Sets Of Twins, Triplets 
Roam The Halls Of Euclid 



he next time you are walking 
down the halls, don't think 
you are seeing double. It is 
not your eyesight; it is just that you 
are seeing one of the thirteen sets of 
twins attending EHS. 

May Jo Scheid, who has a twin 
brother, said there are problems be- 
ing a twin. "You are always com- 
pared to the other one, especially 
when you are in the same classes." 
Korrine Ward, an identical twin, said 
it bothers her sister and her when 
people can't tell them apart. They 



are individuals and want to be treat- 
ed that way. 

It also upsets twins when people 
come up to them and ask if they are 
identical. Lorrie Ipavec, who has an 
identical sister, Lisa, said, "What are 
we supposed to say?" 

However, the Ipavecs found that 
the advantages sometimes outweigh 
the disadvantages. Lisa said it is fun 
to play games on their teachers. 
They can switch classes, and the 
teacher never realized it. Kris Fazio 
said if she gets into trouble, she can 




always blame it on her sister. 

Besides getting into trouble with 
their doubles, the twins said it was 
fun having someone your age with 
whom you can talk. When asked if 
they often thought alike, most twins 
replied yes. The identical twins 
found that many times they would 
go shopping and come home with the 
same clothes even though they had 
not shopped together. 

The twins agreed that it was fun 
being dressed alike when they were 
young. However, now that they are 
in high school, they want to be treat- 
ed as individuals. 

Finally, the twins feel that they 
have an advantage over all other 
people. They will always have a 
friend. They feel closer to their twin 
than any other member of their fam- 
ily or any other friend. 

— R PhillipB 



Although the twins admitted that 
their situation had its advantages, 
they kept coming back to the idea of 
individuality. 



Ed Lunder 
Tina Lusane 
Kim Mabel 
Matt Malaney 
Melissa Malone 
Jeff Marando 



Brian Martin 
Monique Martin 
Leslie Mason 
Joan Mast 
Elizabeth Mata 
Jim Mataich 



181 



Juniors 



An Academic Win 



LEFT: Steve Yoke finds running a 
computer progam a definite challenge. 
RIGHT: Mr. Petrovic's 1° class find 
themselves challenged by an 
American literature test. 



Euclid's Talent Shines Through 
On The Academic Challenge 




uclid student representatives 
again took honors on Chan- 
nel 5's Academic Challenge, 
scoring 440 points to defeat West 
Farmington and Brecksville High 
Schools. 

Euclid's team, advised by Mr. 
Adam Pawlowski, consisted of panel- 
ists Sara Sezun, Bill Demora, and 
Jeff Tekanic. Alternates were Kim 
Turk, Jim Blevins, and Leanne Ster- 



bank. 

Auditions for the show began in 
September. Students were judged on 
general knowledge and quickness of 
response to a variety of questions. 
For five weeks team members met on 
Mondays and Wednesdays after 
school to familiarize themselves with 
the format of the Academic Chal- 
lenge show. With Mr. Pawlowski, 
they went over hundreds of ques- 



tions to sharpen their recall. They 
also viewed and analyzed a videotape 
of an Academic Challenge show. 

On November 13, 1983, the team 
gathered at WEWS*TV to tape the 
show. The panelists overcame their 
nervousness to adapt to the studio 
setting. Once underway, the team 
had few problems in beating their 
opponents. 



Dave Mausser 

John Maxwell 

Renee Mazzaro 

Marge Mc Cance 

Kim McDaniels 

Debby McDermott 



Dennis McGrath 

Anslie Mc Inally 

Paul McNeil 

Brian McPeek 

Angie McReynolds 

Eileen Meaney 




Juniors 



182 




Tom Medved 
Joe Medves 
Melita Mejak 
Kim Menhart 
Steve Merencky 
Jackie Meyers 



Ronald Meyers 
Bill Meyers 
Michelle Micale 
Chris Mihelich 
Kathy Mihok 
Pam Miller 



Robert Miller 
Ray Mims 
Nick Minardo 
Dawn Minotas 
Harriet Mirtic 
Shelly Molnar 



Francine Mondok 
Chris Montana 
Dawn Moore 
Rick Morrison 
Paul Munz 
Sharon Murphy 



Joe Muscarella 
Dave Myles 
Veronica Naglic 
John Naro 
Beth Neiman 
Beth Nelson 



Judy Nemecek 
Cheryl Newcomb 
John Newman 
Sue Nolan 
Bobbie Noonan 
Tammy Noonan 



Karen Norton 
Pat Norton 
Mario Novkovic 
Paul Nozling 
Shannon Obrien 
John Offak 



Amy Ohanessian 
Dave Olszens 
John O'Neill 
Mary O'Neill 
Tracy Otcasek 
Kathy Overberger 



183 



Juniors 



Bob Paciorek 

Paul Papageorge 

Laura Parcesepe 

Diana Pardue 

Brenda Parker 

Lori Parsons 



Robert Pavis 
Mark Pekol 
Chris Penny- 
Chris Perrotti 
Darleen Perryman 
Branka Persic 



Shelly Peterson 

Mike Peterson 

Russ Pflieger 

Karen Pickel 

Paul Piontkowski 

Greg Plevelich 



Jill Podmore 

Randy Ponsart 

Scott Popp 

Mike Porter 

Becky Posavad 

Kim Potocar 




Juliana Powaski 

Kevin Powell 

Laura Pred 

Vic Pringle 

Marko Prpic 

Lori Putzbach 



Phil Radaker 

Laura Rado 

Mark Raicevich 

Laurie Ray 

Ron Redman 

Jeanne Reese 



John Reid 
Eric Rice 
Darrius Ridley- 
Lisa Rocco 
Mark Roche 
Joseph Rodgers 



Joanie Roessler 

John Roth 

Annette Ruffing 

Sue Sabol 

Bob Salo 

Ken Salter 



Juniors 



184 







A Junior's Dream 

Leanne Sterbank Visits Orient 
As A Singing Angel 



V- 




- 



he phase "unforgettable" and 
"once in a lifetime exper- 
iance", though true, do not do 
justice to EHS junior Leanne Ster- 
bank's trip to the Orient during the 
summer of 1983. On July 6, 1983, 
Leanne went on a tour of China and 
Japan with Cleveland's famous Sing- 
ing Angels, of which she is a four- 
year member. 

Leanne joined the Angels in 1979 
when her music teacher suggested 
that she audition. The Angels sing in 
Christmas shows and perform in a 
spring benefit at the Music Hall. 
Each member leaves the group after 
graduation from high school. 

Traveling first to China, the An- 
gels visited Beijing, wherethey met 
Madame Kang, a cultural leader and 




founder of the Children's Palace, a 
school for gifted children. Leanne 
also sang in Nanjing at another Chil- 
dren's Palace. Following that, the 
group visited Shanghai where they 
did some sightseeing. 

The Angel's last two stops where 
in Kamakura and Tokyo in Japan. 
They filmed a television special in 
Tokyo and did some sightseeing be- 
fore returning home. 

Leanne said the favorite part of 
her trip was her visit to the Great 
Wall of China. She was fascinated by 
the history of the Great Wall, which 
is 3,750 miles long and which was 
originally built in sections for the 
protection of various cities. Later, a 
Chinese ruler ordered that the differ- 
ent parts be connected. 

Returning to Cleveland, the An- 
gels were geven a surprise welcome 
by a band. Leanne had a joyful re- 
union with her family and friends. 

— S- Murphy 



ABOVE: Leanne models the customary 
clothing of the East. LEFT: East meets 
West as Leanne finds a new friend in 
Beijing, China. FAR LEFT: Leanne 
brought some momentos of her trip to 
the Orient. 




£ft £ fifl 




Lisa Samsa 
Eric Sanders 
Denise Sapatka 
Robert Sarka 
Lisa Sartain 
Suzi Satava 



Steve Sceranka 
Patrice Schaffer 
Robert Scheid 
Heidi Schiffbauer 
Cory Schlickert 
Vicki Schmeling 



185 



Juniors 



BELOW RIGHT: Even in gym class ju- 
niors are becoming more and more ac- 
tive. BOTTOM RIGHT: Sue Smith and 
friend think that academics and athlet- 
ics are number one. BOTTOM LEFT: 
These Juniors express their spirit by 
joining some of the many Euclid Sports 
and activities. 



uniors were more involved in 
activities during 1984. In 
their sophomore year they 



were just getting to know the school 
and its surroundings, but in their ju- 
nior year they came to life. 

Many juniors were starters in var- 
sity sports, especially in football. 
Their junior year was much more ex- 
citing than their previous years. 
Most juniors who were not in any 
activities before signed up for clubs 
and sports. 

Juniors had gotten into the spirit 
and pride of their school by the end 
of the school year, the beginning of 
their involvement for their senior 



Activated Juniors 



Juniors Come To Life As They 
Become More Active In Academics 



year. 



-B. Tingley 




: ; a 



Gary Schneider 

Chris Shonauer 

Glenna Schultz 

Mike Schuster 

Teresa Scolaro 

Erik Sebusch 



Margaret Segedi 

Jim Seidel 

Chanthip Sengchareut 

Angelo Serra 

Suzette Seymour 

Laura Shefcheck 












Vh 




w&& ' M 






i *, Jfl 


W f 




L - 




\ p 


} I 


w Ei 








v 




A. 


"a 



Juniors 



186 




Terry Sheridan 
Paulette Shimandle 
Marshall Siegel 
Ron Sim 

Michelle Simmons 
Jim Slattery 



Doug Smith 
Sue Smith 
Joe Smolic 
Jason Sotka 
Lucy Spiranovich 
Gaye Springborn 



Brian Starr 
Denise Stephens 
Leanne Sterbank 
Chris Stevens 
Derrick Stewart 
Mike Stokes 



Jennifer Stone 
Chris Stoneback 
Darlene Strauss 
Warren Strauss 
Todd Stroberg 
Matt Sweet 



Mike Swider 
Sue Swyt 
Scott Szmania 
Paul Tanner 
Justin Tarr 
Ed Tekieli 



Beth Terango 
Sandy Terrill 
Dean Theodosion 
Randy Thomas 
Karla Thompson 
Barbra Tingley 



Thomas Todd 
Eric Tomasch 
Dave Tonti 
Zdenka Tomic 
Ramona Toon 
Denise Toth 



John Tousel 
Lisa Tramsak 
Julie Trbovich 
Laura Tressler 
Bob Tressler 
Sue Tucceri 



187 



Juniors 



Chris Turk 
Vicky Ukmar 
Wendy Ulle 
John Ulrich 
Bill Urquart 
Jamie Vance 



David Varner 
Traci Vella 
Angie Velotta 
Laura Vend 
John Vihtelic 
Mark Vihtelic 



Tomie Vincent 

Randy Virant 

Travis Vobornik 

Chris Vogel 

Marianne Volpe 

Tiffany Volpin 



Laura Walsh 

Bruce Walther 

Tony Walton 

Larry Ward 

Ray Ward 

Jill Waschura 



Larry Weakland 

Lorraine Weaver 

Laura Webb 

Louis Weisert 

April Westover 

Raymond Wheeler 



Denny Whelan 

Chris Whitney 

Gary Williams 

Edward Wilson 

Mark Wintle 

Jeff Wollmershauser 



Mark Wootten 
Cris Wright 
John Wudy 

Deanna Wylie 
Don Wylie 

Kevin Wyman 



Ian Yearsin 

Cheryl Yoger 

Steve Yoke 

Theresa Young 

Mary Kay Zahorsky 

Ron Zak 




Juniors 



188 



The Dating Scene 

Euclid Juniors Express Their 
Views On Contemporary Dating 




CENTER: Juniors Chris Erdelac and 
Brad Kelly enjoy double dating. 
BOTTOM LEFT: If these juniors are 
like most, they will most likely go out 
to McDonalds or Taco Bell after their 
dates. BOTTOM RIGHT: "It took me 
three and a half hours to get ready 
for my date and he still is not here!" 



he Euclidian recently polled 
the juniors on the subject of 
dating. They can take any- 
where from five minutes to three and 
a half hours to prepare for a date. 
One junior said, "I'm always pre- 
pared." Most juniors said that the 
guy asks the girl and most of the time 
the guys pay. Some juniors said ei- 
ther the girl or the guy drives, but 
the overwhelming response was that 
the guy drives. The most popular re- 
sponse from the juniors on when 
they date is weekends. Barb Tingley 
said, "I usually go out on Friday and 
Saturday nights. When asked where 
they usually go, juniors' replies var- 
ied. The most frequent answers were 
sports events, restaurants, parties, 
concerts, dances, and movies. The 
most popular places to eat were 
McDonalds, Taco Bell Or Pizza Hut. 
Some juniors said, "We don't go any- 
where, we're broke!" Junior Chris 
Cahoon said, "I usually go out to eat 
at places like McDonalds or 
Denny's." Sports events are another 
favorite. As one junior explained, 
"Sports events are fun because there 
are a lot of people around and con- 
versation is easier." 



— S. Swyt 



Diane Zanella 
Lawrence Zaslov 
Laurie Zele 
Steve Ziegler 
Laura Ziehm 
Donna Zigman 



Nick Zingale 
Margaret Zollars 
Marilyn Zupan 
Jeff Zurilla 
David Zusman 



189 



Juniors 





TOP: Tim Austin and Julie Sas smile 
as they recall ther memories of high 
school. MIDDLE: Karla Thompson, 
Aretha Hennessee, Sue Sekerak, and 
Kathy King line up for a picture. 
BOTTOM: Joan Cable and Bill Evans 
try to shout over the noise at a school 
dance. 



he senior year provides 
a student platform 
from which to look 
back upon the important dates 
and events of his high school 
life: the first day at Euclid 
High School, the first deten- 



tion, a Homecoming Dance, 
Commencement. 

The senior year, then, is the 
end of an academic timeline 
that began in kindergarten and 
ends June 3, 1984. 



Senior Divider 



190 




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TIMELINE 



Senior Divider 




James A. Alves 



Gina Marie Amato 



Dennis A. Ames 




Stephen Archaki Tammy M. Argenti 




Michael J. Baitt 



Carol Bammerlin 



Marykay Barnes 



Allison Barravechia 



Ellen Anne Barth 




Matthew H. Basler 



Anthony Beasley 



Michael Bedzyk 



Mary C. Belavich 



Seniors 



192 



Activities 



TV FAVORITES 



JAMES A. ALVES: Big Show 10, 11, 12; 
Varsity Chorale 11, 12; Hall of Fame 
(Varsity Chorale) 11. GINA MARIE 
AMATO: Softball 10; Office Aide 11, 12. 
DENNIS A. AMES. STEPHEN 
ARCHACKI: Marching Band 10, Squad 
Leader 11, 12; Pep Band 11, 12; Survey 
11, 12; Foreign Language Club, treasurer 
12; Close Up 12; Big Show 11, 12. 
TAMMY ARGENTI. MICHELLE Y. 
ASPINWALL: Sophomore Chorus 10; 
Choral Masters 11; Cheerleader 11; 
Senior Class Cabinet; Student Council 
12; National Honor Society 11, secretary 
12; Office Aide 12. TIM AUSTIN. 
MICHELLE E. AUSTIN. KEVIN J. 
AYERS: Swim Team 11, 12; Water Polo 
11; Survey 10, 11, 12. JAY BAER: 
Tennis 11. MICHAEL J. BAITT: 
Football 10, 11, 12; Vocational Auto 
Shop 11, 12. TERRI E. BALOGH: Not 
Photographed. CAROL BAMMERLIN: 
Big Show 10, 11; Spring Play 10; Choral 
Masters 11, 12; Sophomore Chorus 10; 
Football Aide 10, 11; Senior Talent 
Night. MARYKAY BARNES: 
Cheerleader 10; Office Aide 10, 11; 
Survey 10; Spirits Club 10; National 
Honor Society 11, 12; Senior Class 
Cabinet; Peer Tutor 11, 12. ALISON 
BARRAVECHIA: Track Aide 10; 
Yearbook 10; Ski Club 10. ELLEN 
ANNE BARTH: Ski Club 10, 11, 12; Ad 
Club 10, 11, 12; Spirits Club 10, 11, 12; 
Student Council 12. MATTHEW H. 
BASSLER. GARY L. BARDORF. 
DARLENE BATTLE: Eucuyo, Poetry 
Editor 10; Vocational Child Care 11, 12; 
Peer Counselors 12; Hero Club 11, 12. 
ANTHONY BEASLEY: Soccer 10, 
Basketball 10, Swimming 11. MICHEAL 
BEDZYK: Soccer 10, 12; Wrestling 10, 
11. MARY C. BELAVICH: Cheerleader 
10, 12, captain 11; Spirits Club 10, 11, 12; 
Softball 10, 11, 12; Office Aide 12. 



Seniors Select M*A *S*H, Cheers, 
Dynasty As Their Tube Toppers 



r 




TOP: Seniors Al Lapuh and Rick Strah's 

favorite TV show is obviously Julia 

Child. 

ABOVE: Michelle Zakraysek and Paul 

Doyle' favorite TV show is M*A*S*H if 

they voted as the majority of Euclid 

Seniors did. 



fter the homework is fin- 
ished, most EHS students 
turn on the TV set to catch 
their favorite shows. And since they 
turn on the TV to relax, it's no won- 
der that situation comedies topped 
their list of favorites, interwoven 
with soap operas and adventure de- 
tective stories. 

M*A *S*H, now being shown in re- 
runs, was the seniors' favorite show. 
It was followed by Cheers and Dyn- 
asty. 

— J. Majers 



M*A*S*H (7) 
Cheers (7) 
Dynasty (6) 
Oh, Madeline (4) 
Hill Street Blues (4) 
Three's Company (2) 
Saturday Night Live (2) 
Simon and Simon (2) 
The A-Team (2) 
Fantasy Island (1) 
Riptide (1) 
Different Strokes (1) 
Get Smart (1) 
St. Elsewhere (1) 
Magnum P.I. (1) 
Family Ties (1) 
Knight Rider (1) 
Masterpiece Theater (1) 
Leave it to Beaver (1) 
General Hospital (1) 
Benny Hill (1) 
The Jeffersons (1) 
Hotel (D 
Gimmie a Break (1) 



(Results of a survey of five representative 
classes, The number is paranthesis after 
each item is the number of votes it 
received) 



193 



Seniors 



Favorite Flicks 

Romance And Violence Tie 
As Seniors' Favorite Movies 



G 



n a dull weekend night in Eu- 
clid, what better and more 
economical thing can one do 
but go to see a movie. 

With the Lake Theater being part 
first-run house and a part-low bud- 
get house and the Shoregate charging 
just $1.25, there is always an ample 
choice of movies. 

The favorite movies of EHS sen- 
iors were Sudden Impact and An Of- 
ficer and a Gentleman, followed by 
The Song Remains the Same, 
Stripes, and Flashdance, a summer 
smash that influenced the clothing 
industry tremendously. 

— J. Majers 



An Officer and a Gentleman (5) 

Sudden Impact (5) 

The Song Remains the Same (4) 

Stripes (3) 

Flashdance (4) 

Yentl (4) 

Raiders of the Lost Ark (2) 

Risky Business (2) 

First Blood (2) 

Fast Times at Ridgemont High (2) 

Terms of Endearment (1) 

Grease (1) 

Poltergeist (1) 

Play Misty for Me (1) 

It Happened One Spring (1) 

Trading Places (1) 

Body and Soul (1) 

Vacation (1) 




An Officer and a Gentleman and Sudden 
Impact were voted as the senior 
classes favorite movies although 
neither was a runaway winner. 



Valley Girl (1) 

Two of a Kind (1) 

All the Right Moves (1) 

Star Wars (1) 

Rocky III (1) 

48 Hours (1) 

Monty Python's Life of Brian (1) 

Scarface (1) 

The Sting (1) 

Dirty Harry (1) 

Animal House (1) 

Which Way is Up (1) 

Porky 's (1) 

(Results of a survey of five representative senior classes. 
The number in parenthesis after each item is the nubber 
of votes it received.) 



Activities 



DAVID BELL: Tennis 11. KEVIN A. 
BELL. LOUIS E. BELLE. LYNN M. 
BENCIVENNI: Euclidian 10, 11, 12; 
Class Cabinet 10; Student Secretary 11; 
Office Aide 12; Student Council, 
Treasurer 12. JOHN P. BENKO: Not 
pictured. LEWIS MICHAEL BERKE: 
Sophomore Chorus 10; Choral Masters 

11, 12; Tennis 11; Outdoor Club 11, 12; 
Euclidian 10; Big Show 10, 11, 12. PETE 
BERNACKI JR.: Football 10, 11, captain 

12. MICHAEL A. BEUTLER: Not 
Pictured. LINDA K. BILDSTEIN: Not 
Pictured. JOSEPH LEO BISBEE: 
Marching Band 10, 11; Symphonic Wind 
Ensemble 10, 11; Stage Band 10; 
Wrestling 10, 11, 12; Outdoor Track 10, 
11, 12; Key Club 12; Band 11; National 
Honor Society 11, 12. CYNTHIA ANN 
BLACK: Volleyball 10, 11, 12, captain 

10, 12; Basketball Aide 10, 11, 12; Spirit 
Club 10, 11, 12; National Honor Society 

11, 12; Ad Club 12; Softball 10. 
DARRYL B. BLANKENSHIP. 
ARTHUR BLASE. MICHAEL G. 
BLAU. JAMES EDWARD BLEVINS: 
Soccer 10, 11, 12; Euclidian, copy editor 
12; Eucuyo 11, 12; Buckeye Boys' State 
12; Ohio Academic Decathlon 11, 12; 
Academic Challenge Team 12; National 
Honor Society 11, 12. NICK BOGDAN: 
Soccer 10, 11, 12; Student Council 10, 11. 
ADRIANA BOLIVAR: Ad Club 10, 11, 
12; Softball 10; Student Council 10, 11. 
WILLIAM BOLTON. MICHAEL 
BORIS: Euclidian 12; Survey 12; 
Vocational Art 11, 12. HANS T 
BOTZKI: Tennis 10, 11; American Field 
Service 11; Peer Counseling 12; Foreign 
Language Club 12. GEORGE BOYLE: 
Basketball 10. SHERRI N. BRADFORD. 
RICHARD BRAIDICH: Marching Band 
10, 11, 12. 



Seniors 



194 





David Bell 



Kevin A. Bell 



Louis E. Belle 



Peter Bernacki Jr. 




Lynn M. Bencivenni Lewis Michael Berke 




Joseph Leo Bisbee Cynthia Ann Black Darryl B. Blankenship 



Michael G. Blau James Edward Blevins 



Nick Bogdan 



Adriana Bolivar 




Arthur Blase 




William Bolton 




Michael Boris 



Hans T. Botzki 



Sherri N. Bradford Richard Braidich 



195 



Seniors 




Michael J. Brechun 



Lenore J. Brown 

* » 




Susan C. Buettner 



li . 



Janet M. Brentar 



Patricia Brinkley 



Lisa Ann Brisbine 




Julie Bryan 



Linda Bucceri 



Anne Buck 



James Burkholder 



Kim Burrows 



m 

Christopher D. Burton 




Gerald Broa 




James C. Budnar 




Joseph Bush 




Joseph Butara 



Joan N. Cable 



Andrew Calabrese 



Donna M. Calabrese Laurie J. Callahan 



Seniors 



196 



Activities 



MICHAEL BRECHUN. KENNETH 
BREEDEN: Not Photographed. 
WILLIAM BREEDEN: Not 
Photographed. JACKIE BREEDING: 
Not Photographed. Cosmetology 11. 
JANET M. BRENTAR: Ad Club 10, 11, 
12; Euclidian 10; Ski Club 10; Junior 
Class; Student Council 12; Outdoor Club 
11. PATRICIA BRINKLEY. LISA A. 
BRISBINE: Flag Corps 10, 11, co-captain 
12; Survey 10, 11, feature editor 12; 
Euclidian 11, 12; Track Aide 10, 11, 12; 
Spirits Club 10, 11, 12; Outdoor Club 11, 
president 12; National Honor Society 11, 
12; Christmas Elf 12; Indoor Track 11, 
12; Track 11, 12; Choral Masters 11, 12. 
DEIDRE BRITT: Not Photographed. 
GERALD BROA: Marching Band 10, 11, 
12; Concert Band 10, 11; Symphonic 
Band 12; Pep Band 11, 12. LENORE J. 
BROWN. JULIE BRYAN. LINDA 
BUCCERI: Ad Club 12; OOEA 12. ANN 
BUCK: Volleyball 10, 11, 12; Basketball 

10, 11; Indoor Track 12; Track 10, 11, co- 
captain 12; Swim Timer 11, 12; 
Sophomore Chorus 10; Choral Masters 

11, 12. JAMES C. BUDNAR: Wrestling 

10, 11, 12. SUSAN C. BUETTNER: 
Senior Class Cabinet 12; Student Council 
12; Survey 10, 11, art editor 12; Eucuyo 
12; Ad Club 12; Spirit Club 10, 11, 12; 
Ski Club 11; Outdoor Club 11; 
Sophomore Class. JAMES 
BURKHOLDER: Indoor Track 10; 
Outdoor Track 10; National Honor 
Society 11, 12. KIM BURROWS: Office 
Aide 10, 11, 12; DECA 11. 
CHRISTOPHER D. BURTON: National 
Honor Society 11, 12; Cross-Country 10, 

11, 12; Indoor Track 10, 11, 12; Track 10, 

11, 12. JOSEPH BUSH. DONALD 
BUSSEY: Not Photographed. JOSEPH 
BUTARA: Vocational Automotives 11, 

12. JOAN N. CABLE: Wrestling Aide 10; 
Indoor Track Aide 10, 11; Track Aide 10, 
11; Marching Band 10, secretary 11, 
squad leader 12; COE historian 12. 
ANDREW CALABRESSE: Cross- 
Country 10, 11, 12; Indoor Track 10, 11, 
12; Track 10, 11, 12; Close Up 12; 
Marching Band 12; Pep Band 12. 
DONNA M. CALABRESE. LAURIE J. 
CALLAHAN: Office Aide 12; DECA 11. 



Radio Favorites 

WGCL Tops Senior Survey; 

'Top Forty 9 Sound Dominates Poll 



he Top 40 sound appears to 
be a favorite with EHS sen- 
iors since they voted WGCL 
as their favorite radio station. Sec- 
ond place was captured by WMMS, 
and third place went to WRQC, an 
amazing accomplishment consider- 
ing the fact that it had several format 
changes this year, most notably 
switching from a new wave to its pre- 
sent Top 40 format. 

— J. Majers 



WGCL-Top 40 (19) 
WMMS- Hard Rock (15) 
WRQC-Top 40 (7) 
WDMT-Contemporary (3) 
WMJI-Soft Rock (2) 
WZZP-Easy listening (1) 
WRUW-College radio (1) 



(Results of a survey of five representative classes. The 
number in parenthesis after each item is the number of 
votes it received.) 




TOP: Seniors Bill Starr, Dave Fair, 
Chris Burton, Chris VanDe Motter and 
Matt Basler most likely listen to 



WGCL. ABOVE: Rick Schultz can't wait 
until school is over so he can turn on 
his favorite radio station. 



197 



Seniors 



Christmas Cheer 

Annual Rent-An-Elf Day 
Raises $400 For Senior Prom 



7 2 seniors, girls and boys, par- 
ticipated in the traditional 
Elf Day held on the last day 
of school before Christmas 
vacation — December 21st this year. 
Any senior interested in being an 
elf had to sell $5 worth of chances to 
people he or she wished to have as a 
Santa. Santas could have the elf do 
what they asked as long as it was not 
demeaning. Many elves were seen es- 
corting and carrying books for their 
Santas. Some elves entertained their 
Santas by singing Christmas carols. 
Any elf selling $10 or more of 
chances was eligible to win a draw- 
ing. The prize was a $25 gift certifi- 
cate for a dinner for two at the Dry 
Dock Restaurant. The winner was 



Joann Golen. The top seller was Bob 
Nacinovich, who sold $35 worth of 
chances. 

The elves added a lot of holiday 
spirit and color to the halls of Euclid 
High. The jingle-jingle of their bells 
was heard around the school. One 
senior elf exclaimed, "It was a lot of 
fun walking around with bells on my 
feet!" Nancy Shimonek commented, 
"I had a great time being Mr. Lom- 
bardo's elf. He kept me busy playing 
'gopher'". 

All in all, Elf Day was a great suc- 
cess and raised $400 toward the Sen- 
ior Prom. 




To become a Christmas Elf Sharon 
Hansen and Bob Nacinovich had to 
sell at least $5 worth of chances, 
however, Bob sold $30 over his quota 
for a total of $35. 




CHRISTMAS ELVES, BOTTOM ROW: 
Kim Roberts, Sue Zupanovic, Vicki 
Zigman, Denise Dula, Lisa 
Duracenski, Rhonda Sterrick, Nancy 
Shimonek, Sue Sekrak, Lisa Vihtelic, 
Adrienne Bolivar. ROW 2: Kathy 
Ukmar, Betty Sterle, Sharon Hansen, 
Sue Herrick, Dawn DeFilippo, Lisa 



Brisbine, Laurie Saletrik, Eileen 
Galloway. ROW 3: Dina Colantonio, 
Jane Cononie, Vicki Shimmels, Kim 
Burrows, Sandy Henderson, Claudia 
Novotney, Monica Ubic, Sue Buettner, 
ROW 4: Robin Sherbarth, Joanie 
Cable, Marykay Barnes, Danielle 
Nichtine, Al Ponsart, Tracey 



Wandersleben, Cindy Black, Jenny 
Schwartz, Karen Cook, Renee Philips, 
Lauri Miller. ROW 5: Jim Blevins, 
Kris Fazio, Angie Liggett, Sue Hoffert, 
Anna Chanakas, Janice Sauerman, 
Karen Schmitt, Kathy O'Brien, Kathy 
King, Sue Koch, Janet Schneider. 






Seniors 



198 




Scott A. Carpenter 



John T. Cayne 



Jody Cechura 



Robbin Chan 



Anna Chanakas 



Activities 



CARL W. CAMPBELL. ROBERT G. 
CAMPBELL. SUZANNE L. 
CAMPBELL: Sohpomore Chorus; Flag 
Corps 11; Choral Masters 11, 12; Big 
Show 11, 12; Varsity Chorale 12. DEAN 
CAPASSO: Choral Masters 11, 12. 
THOMAS CAPRETTA: Wrestling 10, 11. 
CARLZO CARDWELL: Not 
Photographed. SCOTT A. CARPENTER: 
Football 10, 11, 12; Basketball 10; Indoor 



Track 11, 12; Baseball 10, 11, 12; 
Sophomore Class Cabinet. LASONYA 
CARTER: Not Photographed. JOHN T. 
CAYNE: Sophomore Class Cabinet; 
Basketball 10, 11, 12; Baseball 10, 11, 12. 
JODY CECHURA: Spirits Club 10, 11; 
Swim Timers 11; Office Aide 11, 12; Key 
Club 10, 11. CHRISTOPHER 



CHAMBERS: Not Photographed. 
ROBBIN CHAN: Track Aide 10, 11; Fall 
Play 10; OOEA 12. ANNA CHANAKAS: 
Euclidian 10, 11, layout editor 12; Flag 
Corps 11, captain 12; Orchestra 10, 11, 
12; Big Show 10, 11, 12; Spirits Club 10, 
11; Volleyball Manager 10; Fall Play 10; 
Christmas Elf 12. 



199 



Seniors 




Jefferey Clay 



Dina M. Colantonio 



Jane Cononie 



Karen E. Cook 



Sherri A. Corman 




Scott D. Corrao 



David L. Crane 



Laura A. Culliton 



Monte Curtis 



Kimberly R. Dale 




Dawn M. DeFilippo 



Renee M. DeLuca 



Jamie Delzoppo 



Jeanmarie Dennick 



Charles Deptola 



Seniors 



200 



Activities 



JEFFEREY CLAY. DONALD L. 
CLERE: Not Photographed. DINA M. 
COLANTONIO: OOEA 11, 12; Student 
Council 11. CHRISTINE COMPTON: 
Not Photographed. JANE CONONIE: 
Spirits Club; Ski Club; Outdoor Club. 
KAREN E. COOK: Marching Band 10, 
secretary 11, president 12; Pep Band 11, 
12; Senior Class Cabinet; Foreign 
Language Club 12; Symphonic Wind 
Ensemble 10, secretary 11, 12; Buckeye 
Girls State 11; Junior Class; 
Commencement Band 10, 11; National 
Honor Society 11, 12; Big Show 12. 
SHERRI A. CORMAN: Junior Class 
Cabinet; Senior Class Cabinet; Flag 
Corps, secretary 11; Spirits Club; Office 
Aide. SCOTT D. CORRAO: Golf 10, 11, 
12. DAVID CRANE. JOHN CULLEN: 
Not Photographed. LAURA A. 
CULLITON: Cheerleader 11, 12. 
MONTE CURTIS: Baseball 10. JEFFRU 
CUTWRIGHT: Not Photographed. 
KIMBERLY R. DALE. LOIS DA VIES. 
BARBARA M. DAVIS: Euclidian 10; 
Office Aide 11. KAREN DAVIS: 
Marching Band 10, 11; Ski Club 10, 11. 
TROY R. DAVIS: Big Show 11, 12; Peer 
Tutoring 12; Varsity Chorale 12. 
DONNA M. DAYKIN. DAWN M. 
DeFILIPPO; Sophomore Chorus; Choral 
Masters 11, 12; Varsity Chorale 11, 12; 
Fall Play 10, 11, 12; Big Show 11; Senior 
Talent Night 11, 12. RENEE MARIE 
DeLUCA. JAMIE DELZOPPO: Junior 
Class Cabinet. JEANMARIE DENNICK: 
OOEA. secretary 11, 12. CHARLES 
DEPTOLA. 



Video Madness 

Michael Jackson's 'Thriller' 
Stomps All Competition 



ichael Jackson's Thriller was 
a runaway winner as the fa- 
vorite M-TV video of the 
class of 1984. Jackson dominated the 
music scene to such an extent that 
his video Beat It came in second in 
the voting. Third place was shared 
by three different groups. 

— H. Gauzman 



Thriller (19) 

Beat It (3) 

ZZ-Top (2) 

Burning Down the House (2) 

Precious Time (2) 

Bad Girls (2) 

Total Eclipse of the Heart (1) 

Stand Back (1) 

Love is a Battlefield (1) 

Forever (1) 

In the Mood (1) 

Say, Say, Say (1) 

Men at Work (1) 

Cum on Feel the Noize (1) 

Yessongs (1) 

Maniac (1) 

New Drug (1) 

Gloria (1) 

Robert Plant (1) 

Queen of Broken Hearts (1) 

Jump (1) 

Syncronicity (1) 

Owner of a Lonely Heart (1) 

Modern Love (1) 



(Results of s survey of five represeetative senior classes. 
The number in parentheses after each item is the number 
of votes it received.) 



ABOVE RIGHT: Terri Pucell and Sue 
Campbell cannot wait to get home and 
watch their favorite videos. RIGHT: 
"Wasn't that Thriller video scary!" 
exclaims Lewis Berke to Darlene 
Munford. 




201 



Seniors 



An Ear For Music 

No Clear Winner Found 

In The Battle Of The Bands 



B 



iversity" was the key word to 
describe the musical tastes of 
the senior class. 
A poll of several senior classes 
found 29 different groups or indivi- 
duals voted as "favorite", with Jour- 
ney edging out Led Zepplin, the Mi- 
chael Stanley Band, and Michael 
Jackson for the top spot. 



A Chanakas 




Journey (6) 

Led Zepplin (5) 

Michael Stanley Band (5) 

Michael Jackson (5) 

Police (3) 

Def Leppard (2) 

Genesis (2) 

Asia (2) 

Rolling Stones (2) 

Van Halen (2) 

Emerson, Lake, and Palmer (1) 

.38 Special (1) 

Scorpions (1) 

Saga (1) 

Keith Green (1) 

Atlantic Star (1) 

Prince (1) 

Waylon Jennings (1) 

Billy Joel (1) 

Simon and Garfunkel (1) 

Robert Plant (1) 

Barbra Steisand (1) 

Bruce Springsteen (1) 

Fleetwood Mac (1) 

Carlos Santana (1) 

Loverboy (1) 

Frank Zappa (1) 

The Who (1) 

Neil Young (1) 



(Results of a survey of five representative 
senior classes. The number in parentheses 
after each item is the number of votes it 
received.) 



Activities 



JAMES DeROSE: Not Photographed. 
CHERI DEZELON: Ad Club 10, 11; 
Wrestling Aide 10; Child Care 11, 12; 
HERO Club 11, 12. MICHAEL 
DiFRANCO: Not Photographed. 
JACKLINE DODD: Cross-Country 10, 
11; Indoor Track 10, 11; Outdoor Track 

10, 11, 12; Basketball 10. LORI A. 
DOESBURG: Spirits Club; Office Aide 
12. BRIAN DOLAN: Hockey 11, 12. 
GARY DONNETT. JAMES DORADO. 
PAUL DOYLE: Swim Team 12. KEITH 
D. DRAKE: Sophomore Class Cabinet; 
Junior Class Cabinet; OOEA 11, 12. 
KENNETH DREES: Eucuyo 11, 12. 
CHRISTINE M. DUKE: Swim Team 10, 
11; Office Aide 11. DENISE DULLA. 
DIANNA DUNLEVY. LISA M. 
DURACENSKY: Ski Club 11; Fall Play 
11; Ad Club 11, 12; Spirits Club 10, 11, 
12. SHARON DYMANSKI: Child Care 

11, 12; HERO Club 11, 12. ROBERT 
DZOMBA: Baseball 12; Indoor Track 12. 
CYNTHIA L. ENGELKING: Football 
Aide 10; OOEA 12; Teacher's Aide 11. 
JAMES EVANS: Stage Band 10, 11, 12; 
Pep Band 10, 11, 12; Big Show Orchestra 
10, 11, 12; Concert Band 10, 11; 
Symphonic Wind Ensemble 12; Marching 
Band 10, squad leader 11, 12; Senior 
Talent Night 10, 11, 12. WILLIAM H. 
EVANS: Football 10, 11, 12. DAVID 
FAIR. KERRY L. FAZIO: Big Show 11, 
12; Fall Play 10, 11, student director 12; 
Choral Masters 11, 12; Junior Class 
Cabinet; Ski Club 10, 11, 12; AFS 11, 12; 
Vocational Clerk-Typist 11; Senior 
Talent Night 11, 12; Survey 12; Fashion 
Show, floor director 12; Office Aide 10. 
KRISTEN R. FAZIO: Euclidian 11, 12; 
AFS 11, 12; Choral Masters 11, 12; 
Junior Class Cabinet; Spirits Club 10, 11, 
12; Student Council 11; Ski Club 10, 11, 
12; Fall Play 10, 11, 12; Big Show 11; 
Spring Play 11. CYNTHIA FETEKE: 
Swim Timer 10, 11; Ski Club 10, 11; 
Tennis 12. 







A 




j Seniors' musical tastes 
! range from Led Zepplin to 
: Prince. 


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Seniors 



202 




Cheri Dezelon 



Jackline Dodd 



Lori Doesburg 



Brian E. Dolan 



Gary M. Donnett 




Paul T. Doyle 



Kenneth P. Drees 



Christine M. Duke 



Denise Dulla 



Dianna Dunlevy 




i fci 




Lisa M. Duracensky Sharon Dymanski 



Robert J. Dzomba Cynthia L. Engelking 



James A. Evans 




William H. Evans 



David Fair 



Kerry L. Fazio 



Kristen R. Fazio 



203 



Seniors 








Sandra Kay Fike 



David Fisher 



Thomas P. Fitzgerald Colleen M. Flanagan 



I " ' 



Anthony Formick 




Pamela Sue Fowle 



Jill M. Fox 



Kirsten H. Freeh 



Eileen M. Galloway 



Jerry Gansey 






Kathleen Gephart 



John Gervasi 



Anthony T. Gholson Laurence Giegerich 



Kris Gilmore 





Joann Golen 



Karen A. Golinar 






Tina Louise Golob 




Igor Grahovac 



Mary Griesmer 



Seniors 



204 



Activities 



SANDRA KAY FIKE: Concert Band 10, 
11; Student Secretary 10, 11. DAVID 
FISHER: Vocational Electronics 11, 12. 
THOMAS P. FITZGERALD: Vocational 
Electronics 11, 12. COLLEEN M. 
FLANAGAN. ANTHONY FORMICK. 
PAMELA SUE FOWLE: Vocational 
Child Care 11, 12; Hero 11, 12. DON 
CHRIS FOX: OWE 11, 12. JILL M. 
FOX: DECA 11, 12. RIZA C. 
FRANKLIN: Not Photographed; 
Flagcorp 11. THOMAS E. FRAZIER: 
Not Photographed. KIRSTEN H. 
FRECH: Tennis 10, 11, 12; Swimming 
10, 11, 12; Wai Napolo 10; Choral 
Masters 11; Ad Club 10, 11, 12; 
Sophomore Chorus 10. RAYMOND A. 
FUERST: Not Photographed. EILEEN 
M. GALLOWY: Volleyball 10, 11; 
Softball 10; Ad Club 11, 12; Hockey Aide 

10, 11, 12; Spirits Club 10. JERRY 
GANSEY. CELSO MOREDO GARCIA: 
AFS 12. KATHLEEN GEPHART: Fall 
Play 10, 11, Track 10. CHRISTOPHER 
GERCAR: Not Photographed. JOHN 
GEVASI: Wrestling 10; Football 10. 
ANTHONY T. GHOLSON: Basketball 

11, captain 12; Senior Class Cabinet. 
KELLY GILMETTE: Not Photographed. 
KRIS GILMORE: Office Aid 12. BARRY 
J. GLASSNER: Not Photagraphed. 
KEVIN PATRICK GOLDEN: Not 
Photographed; Swimming 10, 12. JOANN 
GOLEN: Volleyball 10; Vocational Art 
11, 12. KAREN A. GOLINAR: Ski Club 
12; Peer Tutor 12. TINA LOUISE 
GOLOB: DECA 12. IGOR GRAHOVAS. 
EDWARD M. GRAU: Not 
Photographed. JOSEPH GRAZIANO: 
Not Photographed. MARY GRIESMER. 



Senior Pin Ups 

Lombardo Showcases Seniors; 
Review Generally Favorable 



r. Lombardo started the Sen- 
ior Showcase for the class of 
1983. He continued the show- 
case when he became principal of the 
class of 1984. Mr. Lombardo started 
the showcase for notoriety: "Some 
kids go through high school without 
anyone knowing who they are. 
Through the showcase every senior 
can be identified." Mr. Lombardo 
also used the showcase to become ac- 
quainted with seniors before they 
graduate. 

Janice Sauerman thought it was 
nice: "It is a way of seeing people you 
don't know; even my parents came to 
see it!" Mina Tirabassi said, "You 



can at least see the people you don't 
know." Hank Parsons also thought 
the show case was a good idea, but he 
didn't like the poses. He thought 
they should show more action. Ro- 
byn Scherbarth felt the pictures were 
a good idea. However, Robyn 
thought the questions were a little 
odd. Karen Cook said the food ques- 
tion could come in handy in case you 
wanted to take a fellow senior to din- 
ner. The Senior Showcase was a 
worthwhile effort by Mr. Lombardo. 



-R. Phillips 





MnL^ 


I i* 1 


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ABOVE: The Senior Showcase is a 
good way to find out about the 
hobbies and goals of the class of 1984. 
LEFT: Willie Rembert and Rich 
Spencer compare the class of 1984 to 
Seniors in an old Euclidian. 



205 



Seniors 



Remember . . . 

Seniors' Memories Of EHS Years 
Material Of Situation Comedies 



... the baseball team winning the ... 8" workouts? 
state championship in 1982? 



the food fight in 1982? 



. . . the 16-inch snowfall that closed 
school on February 28 and 29? 



. shooting pool in the E-room? 



. . . when someone ate a live 
earthworm in biology class? 



. . . dodging paraprofessionals? 

. . . Mike Elzner? 

. . . the Battle of the Classes? 



. . . the Water Polo Team's trip to 
Cincinnati in 1982? 



. . . Spirit Week? 



. . . the ice storm in 1982 that 
closed the school after everyone got 
there? 

. . . Spirit signs? 



. . . the electricity being out for 
two hours on Friday, January 13, 
1984? 

. . . Right to Week? 

. . . the Big Show blackout in 
1983? 



BELOW: Seniors get their memories 
together in Mrs. Black's 2° class. 




Seniors 



206 




Katie Grigsby 



Maggie Gron 



Dean Anthony Grosel 



Judy Lynn Groudle 



David Hackathorn 




Rozella Hall 



Diane Hallo 



Lisa K. Hamm 



Sharon K. Hansen 



Kathryn A. Harrah 



KATIE GRIGSBY: Marching Band 10. 
MAGGIE GRON: Swimming 10, 11, co- 
captain 12. DEAN ANTHONY 
GROSEL: Baseball 10, 11, 12. JUDY 
LYNN GROUDLE. ROSEMARIE 
GUNDELACH: Not Photographed. 
DAVID HACKATHORN. ROZELLA 
HALL: Sophomore Chorus; Choral 



Activities 



Masters 11, 12; Basketball Manager 11; 
DECA 12. DIANE HALLO: Cheerleader 
11, 12; Student Council 12; Spirits Club 
11. LISA K. HAMM. SHARON K. 
HANSEN: Sophomore Chorus; Swim 
Timer 10; Varsity Chorale 11, vice 
president 12; Choral Masters 11, 12; 



Student Council 12; Senior Class 
Cabinet; Big Show 11, 12; Spirits Club 
10, 11, 12. KATHRYN A. HARRAH: 
Clinic Aide 10, 11; Track Aide 10, 11; 
Band Librarian 11, 12; Spirits Club 10, 
11; Key Club 10, 11; Pep Band 11; 
Marching Band 10, 11, 12. 



207 



Seniors 






Carol M. Hart 



Michael Harth 



Robert Heasley 



Sandy Henderson Aretha A. Hennessee 




Ronald J. Herbert 



Kim Hermon 



Devin Hernan 



Susan M. Herrick 



Kethleen M. Heyduk 




Steve Hogrefe 



Richard Holcknecht 



Lisa Ann Horgan 



James Hradek 



Seniors 



208 



Activities 



CAROL M. HART: Track Aide 10, 11; 
Basketball Aide 12; National Honor 
Society 11, 12; Sophomore Chorus 10; 
Choral Masters 11, 12; Peer Tutor 11. 
MIKE HARTH. BOB HEASLEY. DALE 
R. HECTOR: Not Photographed. 
SANDY HENDERSON: Soccer Aide 11, 
12; Hockey Aide 11; Spirits Club 11, 12. 
ARETHA A. HENNESSEE: Marching 
Band 10, 11, 12; Concert Band 10, 11, 12; 
French Club 10, 11; Foreign Lnaguage 
Club 12; Peer Tutor 11, 12. RONALD J. 
HERBERT. KIM HERMAN. DEVIN 
HERNAN: Baseball 10. SUSAN M. 
HERRICK: OEA 11. KATHLEEN M. 
HEYDUK. MICHELLE HIGHSMITH. 
DAVID HILL. GOTTHARD HIRZER. 
SUSAN M. HOFFERT: Sophomore Class 
Cabinet; Basketball Aide 10; Track 10; 
Euclidian 10, activities editor 11, layout 
editor 12; French Club 11; Foreign 
Language Club, president 12; Junior 
Class Cabinet; Swim Timer 11; National 
Honor Society 11, 12. PAMELA JEAN 
HOGAN: Volleyball 10; Swim Timer 10; 
Softball 10; Fottball Aide 11; Vocational 
Food Service 11, 12; Ski Club 12. STEVE 
HOGREFE. RICHARD HOLCKNECHT: 
Football 10; Soccer 11, co-captain 12. 
LISA ANN HORGAN. DOUG 
HORVAT: Football 10, 11, 12; Baseball 
10, 11, 12. DEANNA M. HOUSTON: 
Not Photographed. JIM HRADEK: 
Basketball 10; Golf, captain 10, 11, 12. 



Red Faces 



Seniors Wish They Could Forget, 
Some Embarrassing Moments 



ife is filled with embarrassing 
moments, some of which we 
would like to forget. Howev- 
er, twelve brave seniors decided to 
share with us one of their most em- 
barrassing moments from Euclid 
High School. 

— A. Chanakas 



"Cheering for basketball games, 
Butch Klimek used to get the stands 
to chant 'Go home Betty' which ev- 
eryone would say while we would 
cheer." 

—Betty Strle 

"John Cayne kidnapping me and 
taking me to a dance with sweatpants 
and moccasions on." 

— Danielle Nichting 



"Bragging about how well I drive, 
then get into an accident in my ju- 
nior year." 

— Rick Schulz 

"Cheering at a game one night and 
then running off the floor and the 
tail of my uniform fell off and I had 
to walk back myself to pick it up with 
everyone laughing." 

— Vicki Zigman 



"Losing a wrestling match (13-1) 
against Maple." 



"The first day of school when the 
teacher read off names, I said 'here' 
to the wrong name." 



"Walking down the aisle in the 
boy's gym for Winterfest." 



"My most embarrassing moment 
was when I was the only one who 
goofed up in Flag Corps in front of 
the whole school." 



— Angie Liggett 

"I was sleeping in study hall and 
the bell rang. Everybody left and I 
was still sleeping. Then the second 
bell rang and that is when I woke up. 
I ran up to class and the class started 
laughing because some of them had 
left me sleeping there." 



— Jo 



■ Jule: 



"On Halloween day I had a devil's 
costume on and skates. I was being 
dragged down the hall by my tail on 
the costume." 



_ien [Newell 



"Being seen eating cafeteria food." 



"My most embarrassing moment 
was on 'elf day. I had to stand up in 
the E-Room and sing Christmas Car- 
ols, thanks to Jim Budnar. 



— Debbie Simon 



-Tom Zagore 



209 



Seniors 



■I 



Shore Memories 

4° Tanning Club Top Memory 
Of Former Admirals 




Seniors who went to Shore Junior 
High found many of their former 
teachers following them to the high 
school when Shore was closed in June, 
1982. 



Remember . . . 

... the 4° Tanning Club? 
. . . Mr. Whippler's mystery A's? 
. . . having to run laps in the audito- 
rium for gym, but hiding behind the 
chairs in the back until the last lap? 

. . the ninth grade girls' choir? 

. . the ninth grade fashion show? 

. . seances in Mr. Vogt's class? 

. . porta-pit jumping? 

. . the seventh grade choir? 

. . penny fights? 

. . sliding under the auditorium 
chairs at the noon movies? 
. . . the shaving cream fight at the 
Almost Anything Goes Night? 



Activities 



JIM HRIBAR: Not Photographed; 
Swimming 10. MARY HRIBAR: Cross 
Country 10, 11; Track 10; Track Aide 10, 
11; Foreign Language Club, Vice 
President 12; Swim Timer 10, 11; Office 
Aide 11, 12; Big Show 11. OLGA 
HRIBAR: Not Photographed. 
GREGORY W. HROMYKO. BRENDA 
HUBBARD: Softball 10, 12; Spirits Club 

10, 11, 12; Cheerleader 10, 11, 12. 
FRANK W. HUFNAGLE: Basketball 10; 
Track 10, 11, 12. G. EDGAR HULL. 
JANET M. IVANCIC. JULIA M. 
IZQUIERDO: Vocational Stenography, 
vice president 11, parliamentary 12. 
JOHN J. JAKOVLIC: Soccer 10. 
SANDRA J. JAKSA. DIANE 
JANKOWDKI. MICHEAL D. 
JASZKEWICZ: Not Photographed; 
Swimming 10, 11, 12. RONALD P. 
JIVIDEN: Not Photographed. HAROLD 
JONES III: Track 10, 11, 12. 
KATHERINE A. JOURNEY: Vocational 
Stenography 11, historian 12; OEA 11, 
12. JOSIE M. JULES: Not 
Photographed. DENISE J. KACPERSKI: 
Majorette 11, captain 12; Office 11, 12. 
PAMELA JO KACPERSKI: Swim Timer 
12. ALBIN KAMPISEK. 
CHRISTOPHER J. KANE: Football 10; 
Hockey 10, 11, 12. PHILLIP J. 
KARABINUS: Key Club 10, vice 
president 11, president 12; National 
Honor Society 11, 12. FAITH KARDOS: 
Track 10, 11, 12; Cross Country 10, 11; 
Volleyball 12; Varsity Chorale 12; Ad 
Club 11, 12; Outdoor Club 10, 11. 
DAVID KATCHER: Stage Band 10, 11, 
12; Key Club 11, vice president 12; 
Marching Band 10, 11, 12; National 
Honor Society 11, 12; KURT F. KAUSE: 
Cross Country 10, 11, 12; Big Show 10, 

11, 12; Key Club 11, 12. 



Seniors 



210 




Janet M. Ivancic 



Harold Jones III 



Julia M. Izquierdo 



John J. Jakovlic 



Sandra J. Jak9a 




Katherine A. Journey Denise J. Kacperski 



Pamela Jo Kacperski 





Diane Jankowski 




- -4 

Albin Kamposek 



AlkA 




Christopher J. Kane Phillip J. Karabinus 



Faith Kardos 



David Katcher 



Kurt F. Kause 



211 



Seniors 



«l 




Steven J. Knaus 



Susi Koch 



Thomas S. Konchan 



Andrea R. Kosic Dawn Marie Kracheck 





Kimberly Ann Kralie 



Matthew Kristoff 



Jeffery Krofcheck 



Joseph Kronik 



Glenn A. Kubik 



Seniors 



212 



Activities 



MICHAEL R. KEMPERT: Big Show 10, 
11, 12; Spirits Club 12. DEBORAH 
KEMPKE: Sophomore Chorus; 
Sophomore Class Cabinet; Choral 
Masters 11; Office Aide 11; Spirits Club 
10, 11, 12; OEA 12. PATRICIA M. 
KEOUGH: Fall Play 10, 11; Big Show 
10; Office Aide 11. KATHLEEN MARY 
KING: Sophomore Chorus; Choral 
Masters 11, 12; Wrestling Aide 11, 12; 
Student Council 12. MARK KING: 
Football 10, 11, 12; Track 10, 11, 12. 
TODD W. KING: Wrestling 10, 11, 12; 
Big Show 10; Choral Masters 11, 12; 
Varsity Chorale 12. KEN KIRCHNER: 
DECA 11, 12. GUS KISH: DECA 12. 
BUTCH J. KLIMEK: Football 10, 11; 
Baseball 10, 11, 12. KAREN KNACK: 
DECA 12. STEVEN K. KNAUS: Hockey 

10, 11, 12. SUSI KOCH: Junior Class 
Cabinet; Office Aide 12; Foreign 
Language Club 12; National Honor 
Society 11, 12. THOMAS A. KONCHAR: 
Not Photographed. THOMAS S. 
KONCHAN: Vocational Electronics 11, 
12. CHRISTOPHER KOROSEC: Not 
Photographed. ANDREA R. KOSIC: 
Basketball Aide 10, 11, 12; Senior Class 
Cabinet; Sophomore Class Cabinet; 
Junior Class Cabinet; Ad Club 12; 
National Honor Society 11, 12. DAWN 
MARIE KRACHECK: Vocational Child 
Care 11, 12; Hero Club 11, 12. 
KIMBERLY ANN KRALIC: Choral 
Masters 12. MATTHEW KRISTOFF: 
Marching Band 10, squad leader 11, 12; 
Symphonic Wind Ensemble 10, 11, 12; 
Pep Band 10, 11, 12; Orchestra 10, 11, 

12; Stage Band 10, 11, 12; Big Show 10, 

11, 12. JEFF KROFCHECK: Football 10 
12; Baseball 10, 11, 12. JOSEPH 
KRONIK: Wrestling 10; Vocational 
Electronics 11, 12. GLENN A. KUBIK: 
Football 10, 11, 12; Baseball 10; Spirits 
Club 10 11. 



Signs Of Spirit 

Spirit Signs Become Bizarre; 
School Imposes Censorship 



pirits changed in 1984. In De- 
cember the administration is- 
sued stricter rules for the 
posting of Spirit signs. An Adminis- 
tration representative had to ap- 
prove all signs before they could be 
displayed. The signs had increasing- 
ly used double-meaning and innuen- 
do. In order to keep the Spirit signs, 
the administration had to impose 
censorship. 



Attendance at Spirits on Wednes- 
day night began to drop after the 
new rule was enforced. However, Mr. 
William VonBenken offered to spon- 
sor the group. With a new sponsor 
and responsible painters, interest re- 
bounded. 

-J. Blevins 










-a Zwm 



l '^ rt » *, d 



' 



\ 



P*o$k 






•-- 




RIGHT: Signs in support of 
Homecoming and Winter Festival 
candidates presented no problems, but 
the "off the wall" humor of some signs 
(TOP) caused the administration to 
start censoring the spirit signs. 



y [}^S 




213 



Seniors 



Santa's Helpers 

Breakfast With Santa Raises 
$250 For Senior Class Coffers 



e want the students to par- 
ticipate in school activities." 
remarked Miss Susan Harris, 
Senior Class Cabinet co-sponsor. 
"Breakfast with Santa is not only a 
fund-raising activity for the senior 
class, but a service project for the 
community." 

About forty students assisted with 
the Breakfast planning, decorations, 
entertainment, and clean-up. 

The seniors put much hard work 
and time into the Breakfast. Mr. 
Lombardo and his working crew, 
composed of eleven teachers, were 
very helpful and supportive. The en- 
tertainment was headed up by Mr. 
Godfrey and a few members from the 
Choral Masters, who sang Christmas 
carols. 



About 300 parents and children 
came to eat a breakfast of cereal, 
milk, doughnuts, and orange juice. 
Santa arrived with a bevy of elves 
and greeted the children with a "ho, 
ho, ho!" 

Kathy O'Brien, who worked on the 
Breakfast with Santa, commented, "I 
love helping and spending time with 
the kids. It was a lot of fun for the 
seniors." 

All the hard work and dedication 
of the students and teachers was 
worth the joy and Christmas cheer 
brought to the children, not to men- 
tion the $250 raised for senior activi- 
ties by the project. 

— L. Brisbine 





TOP RIGHT: Carol Trevarthen picks 
out her breakfast date. CENTER 
LEFT: Andrea Kosic, Susi Koch and 



Kathy O'Brien line up with two of 
their favorite friends for Santa's mug 
shots. CENTER RIGHT: "Wind me up 



and I'll sing you a song," says Brenda 
Hubbard to Carol Perovsek and her 
little friends. 



Seniors 



214 




Karen A. Kuhar 



Monica J. Kuhar 



Timothy A. Kuhen 



Timothy La Fountaine Christine M. Lake 




Michael G. Lange 



Darnelle M. Lantz 



Alan F. Lapuh 



Sean Latham 



Norman Latsch 



Activities 



KAREN A. KUHAR: Ski Club 10. 
MONICA J. KUHAR: Basketball 10, 11, 
12; Track 11; Cross Country 10; Spirits 
Club 10. TIMOTHY A. KUHEN: 
Swimming 10, 11, 12; Football 11; 
Baseball 10. TIMOTHY LA 
FOUNTAINE: Spirits Club 12. 



CHRISTINE M. LADE. MICHAEL G. 
LANGE: Euclidian 10, activities editor 
11, 12; Senior Class Cabinet; Junior Class 
Cabinet; Sophomore Class Cabinet; 
French Club 11; Foreign Language Club 
12; AFS 12; Investment Club 10, 11; Ski 
Club 11, 12; Eucuyo 12: Survey 12; Peer 



Tutoring 12; Tennis 11, 12; National 
Honors Society 11, 12. DARNELLE M. 
LANTZ. ALAN LAPUH: Football 10, 11, 
12; Baseball 10. BRENDA LASKA: Not 
Photographed; Hero Club 11, 12; 
Vocational Child Care 11, 12; SEAN 
LATHAM. NORMAN LATSCH. 



215 



Seniors 






- I 




* X 




Lisa Leibnitzer 



James M. Leonard 



Patrick LeQuyea 



Ronald A. Lesnick 



Angela Liggett 






1 ~ -* 




Scott L. Linderman Timothy J. Lindic 



Thomas M. Lograsso 



Patrick Lonchar 



Heidi C. Look 




Carla Dyan Loparo Christine A. Luther Victor Maciejauskas 



Allen D. Mackell 



Jacqueline Majers 




Jackie Marchesano 



Diana Marett 



Maria Markuz 



Joseph M. Maroli Denise Marie Martin 



Seniors 



216 



Role Models 

Heroes List Top Heavy 
With Entertainment Names 



Activities 



LISA LEIBNITZER: Ski Club 12; 
Sophomore Chorus. SUSAN LENTZ: 
Not Photographed. JAMES M. 
LEONARD. PATRICK LE QUYEA: 
Swimming 10, 11, 12; Water Polo 10, 11. 
RONALD A. LESNICK: Wrestling 10, 
11; Varsity Chorale 11; Big Show 11. 
ANGELA LIGGETT: Euclidian 10, 11; 
Sophomore Class Cabinet; Junior Class 
Cabinet; Spirits Club 12; Foreign 
Language Club 12. SCOTT L. 
LINDERMAN. TIMOTHY J. LINDIC: 
Soccer 10, 11, 12. ROBERT W. LLOYD: 
Not Photographed. THOMAS M. 
LOGRASSO. PATRICK LONCHAR. 
HEIDI C. LOOK: AFS 11, 12; French 
Club 11; Sophomore Chorus. CARLA 
DYAN LOPARO: Cross Country 10; 
Basketball 10; Basketball Aide 11; 
Softball 10, 11, 12; Spirits Club 10, 11, 
12; National Honor Society 11, 12; 
Academic Decathlon 12. MARK A. 
LOVE: Not Photographed. CHRISTINE 
ANNETTE LUTHER: Swim Timer 10, 
11; Track 10, 12; AFS 11, 12; Sprits Club 
10, 11, 12; Ski Club 10, 11, 12; French 
Club 11; Swimming 11. LY M. QUANG: 
Not Photographed. TERRY T. LYON: 
Not Photographed. VICTOR 
MACIEJAUSKAS: Track 10, 11, captain 
12. ALLEN D. MACKELL. 
JACQUELINE MAJERS: Euclidian 10, 
underclass editor 11, business editor and 
editor-in-chief 12; Orchestra secretary 10; 
French Club 10, 11; Foreign Language 
Club 12; Spirits Club 12. JACKIE A. 
MARCHESANO. DECA Treasurer 12. 
DIANA MARETT. MARIA A. 
MARKUZ. JOSEPH M. MAROLI. 
DENISE MARIE MARTIN: Spirits Club 
10, 11, 12; Basketball Aide 10; Ad Club 
10; Racial Interaction Committee 11, 12; 
Eucuyo Art Editor 12; PA Announcer 12. 



ho do this year's seniors most 
admire? According to a poll 
of representative senior 
classes, most of the seniors' living he- 
roes come from the entertainment 
world. 

LIVING HEROES 

Father, mother, brother (6) 
Olivia Newton-John (2) 
Barbra Steisand (2) 
Clint Eastwood (2) 
Mother Teresa (1) 
Jesse Jackson (1) 
Richard Nixon (1) 
Richard Pryor (1) 
Joan Rivers (1) 
Eddie Murphy (1) 
Julia Child (1) 
John Riggins (1) 



Prince (1) 
Rod Stewart (1) 
Bruce Springsteen (1) 
Jimmy Paige (1) 
Hugh Hefner (1) 
Richard Gere (1) 

DEAD HEROES 

John F. Kennedy (5) 

Jesus (3) 

John Wayne (3) 

Lartin Luther King (2) 

Bill the Cat (2) 

Charlie Chaplin (2) 

grandmother (1) 

Marines killed in Lebanon 

General Patton (1) 



(1) 



-L. St«rbank 




Willie Rembert shows Chris Gercar 
and Ken Breeden why they should 
consider him as their personal hero. 



217 



Seniors 



FP Memories 

Toronto Trip Major Memory 
Of Forest Park Graduates 




Ex-Forest Park Ranger Jeff Spencer 
builds up his muscles by carrying 
around Donna Daykin all day. 



Remember . . . 

. . . the science field trip to Toronto? 
. . . Mr. Federici directing traffic in 
the halls? 

. . . Mr. Vaccarrello's writing assign- 
ments? 

. . . dissecting frogs in Mr. Kolunder's 
biology class? 

. . . the wrestlers munching out after 
weigh-ins? 

. . . the big spring casual? 
. . . Mr. Roshong's red-checkered 
suit? 



. . . Mr. Abbott's piranha? 

. . . playing basketball at lunch? 

. . . Nancy Shimonek's scandalous 

editorial about cafeteria food? 

. . . Sue Buettner getting her finger 

stuck in a hole in a table in biology 

class? 

. . . the Jello-slurping contest? 

. . . the football game where the boys 

played the girls? 

. . . the Indestructible kettle-drum? 

. . . the interesting outcome of the 

Student Council elections in the 

ninth grade? 

. . . John Ogorek meditating in front 

of the DJ's speaker at the ninth 

grade party? 



Activities 

DENISE MAULDIN: Not Photographed; 
DECA 12. MICHELLE MAYLE: 
Commercial Art 11, 12; Track 12. 
MICHAEL McCANDLESS. KELLY J. 
McCULLOUGH. MICHAEL T. 

Mcknight, angela McSwain: Not 

Photographed. BARCIA MEDVED. 
MICHAEL J. MENART: Not 
Photographed. VIDA M. MERELA. 
RONALD MIKLAUCIC: Baseball 10. 
MIROSLAV MILICEVIC: Not 
Photographed. GWENDOLYN SUE 
MILLER: National Honor Society 11, 12; 
French Club 10; Swim Team Manager 
12; Science Labe Aide 10, 11, 12; Choral 
Masters 12. LORRAINE A. MILLER: 
French Club 10, 11; Foreign Language 
Club 12; Peer Tutoring 11, 12; Junior 
Class Cabinet, Survey 12; Senior Class 
Cabinet; National Honor Society 11, 12. 
PAMELA MILLER. STANLEY R. 
MILLER: Marching Band 10, 11, 12; 
Concert Band 10; Symphonic Wind 
Ensemble 11, 12; Pep Band 11, 12; 
Orchestra 12; Foreign Language Club 12. 
SUSAN MARIE MILLER: Vocational 
Stenography 11, 12. LANCE R. 
MILLHOF. MIA A. MINERD: Not 
Photographed. JOSEPH MINISSALE: 
Not Photographed; Football 12. BARRY 
CL MITA. MICHAEL MOCHAN: 
Hockey 10, 11, 12; DECA 11, 12. BRETT 
A. MOLNAR: Football 10; Track 10, 11, 
12; Basketball 10; Swim Team 11. 
WAYNE P. MOLNAR: Not 
Photographed. LAURA MOORE: Not 
Photographed; Library Aide 12. 
STEVEN MOREK: Football 10, 11, 12; 
Vocational Auto Shop 11, 12. KELLEY 
A. MORIARTY. STEPHEN E. 
MORROW: Vocational Machine Shop: 
11, 12. MELANIE MRAMER: 
Sophomore Class Cabinet; Ad Club 11, 
secretary 12; Stenography Club 11, 
president 12. 



Seniors 



218 




Michelle Mayle 



Michael McCandless 



Kelly J. McCullough Michael T. McKnight 



Baricia Medved 




\ 
Vida M. Merela Ronald Miklaucic Gwendolyn Sue Miller Lorraine A. Miller Pamela Miller 




Brett A. Molnar 



Steven Morek 



I X 

Kelley A. Moriarty 



Stephen E. Morrow 



Melanie Mramer 



219 



Seniors 







AiU I 



Gerald F. Murphy William A. Nachtigal Robert Nacinovich 



Anne Naglic 



> 



X 



+^ 


^s^ 


\\ -i 


iuL A - 


*' /* 






*0" 


) 



Amy Jo Ann Nemecek 




Kim Novak 



Claudia C. Novotney Michael Nunnally 



Kathleen O'Brien 



Riza R. Ochoa 




Shirley Ochoa 



Noreen T. O'Donnell Joan L. Offerle 



Traci L. O'Hannon 



Karen O'Neil 



: : : : :: : : : : 



Seniors 



220 



The Toughies 

Math Analysis Tops The List 
As Seniors' Toughest Class 



Activities 



DARLENE L. MUNFORD: Not 
Photographed. GERALD F. MURPHY: 
Basketball 11, 12; Vocational Auto Shop 
11, 12. MICHELLE A. MURRAY: Not 
Photographed. WILLIAM A. 
NACHTIGAL: Football 10, 11, 12; 
Basketball 10; Baseball 10, 11, 12. 
ROBERT NACINOVICH: Swim Team 
10, 11, 12; Water Polo 11; Wai Napolo 

10, 11, 12. ANNE NAGLIC: Office Aide 
11; OEA 12. AMY JO ANN NEMECEK: 
Cross Country 10, 11, '12; Swimming 10, 

11, 12; Track 10, 11, 12; Choral Masters 
11; Sophomore Class Cabinet; Junior 
Class Cabinet; Ski Club 12. JAMES 
NEMETH: Wrestling 11. GERRI ANN 
NEWELL: Key Club 10; Sophomore 
Chorus. DANIELE A. NICHTING: 
Cheerleader 10, 11; Swimming 10, 11, 
captain 12; Sophomore Class Cabinet; 
Junior Class Cabinet; Survey 10; 
Euclidian 10; Peer Tutor 12. SUE 
NOLAN. LEONARD F. NOSSE. KIM 
NOVAK. CLAUDIA D. NOVOTNEY: 
Spirits Club 10; Soccer Aide 10, 11, 12; 
Vocational Art 11, 12. DONALD J. 
NOVOTNEY: Not Photographed. 
MICHAEL NUNNALLY: Football 10, 
11; DECA 12. KATHLEEN O'BRIEN: 
Choral Masters 11, 12; Senior Class 
Cabinet; Survey 12; Basketball Aide 12; 
Track 11. PATRICK C. O'BRIEN: Not 
Photographed; Astronomy Club 10; Cross 
Country 12; Track 11, 12; Euclidian 12; 
Key Club 11, 12. RIZA R. OCHOA. 
SHIRLEY OCHOA: Flag Corps 11, 12. 
NOREEN T. O'DONNELL: Cross 
Country 10, 11, 12; Track 10, 11, 12; 
Basketball 10. JOAN L. OFFERLE: 
Marching Band 10, squad leader 11, 12. 
JOHN OGOREK: Not Photographed; 
Vocational Electronics 11, 12. TRACI L. 
O'HANNON: Basketball 10, 11, 12; 
Track 10, 11, 12; Peer Tutor 12; 
Sophomore Chorus; Nurse's Aide 10. 
KAREN O'NEIL. 



hat classes did the seniors 
consider to be their hardest 
in all their years at EHS? Re- 
sults of a survey showed that all aca- 
demic areas were covered, with — to 
no one's surprise — math topping the 
list: 

Math Analysis (8) 
American Government (5) 
AP Biology (4) 
British Literature (4) 
Chemistry (4) 
English (2) 
French (2) 
Algebra II (2) 



Computer Science (2) 
Science (2) 
Physics (2) 
Geometry (2) 
Typing (2) 
Consumer Law (1) 
American Literature (1) 
German (1) 



(Results of a survey of five representative senior classes. 
The numbers in parentheses after each item is the number 
of votes it received.) 

• L. Sterbank 




Although Mrs. Paskert's Vocational 
Clerk-Typist II class didn't make the 
"toughest" list, typing did get two 
votes. 



221 



Seniors 



he mere mention of "the 
hole" is enough to strike ter- 
ror in the heart of even the 
most intrepid Panther. However, 
most seniors managed to pass their 
years at EHS without having the 
"privilege" of spending a few days in 
the in-school suspension room. For 
those students, we include this de- 
scription of one student's "hole" ex- 
perience: 

"At the start of the day, Miss 
Bambic outlines the rules: no 
sleeping, talking or moving 
around the room. During the 
4th, 5th, and 6th periods, the 
restrooms were off limits. 

The three lunch periods were 
the worst part of a day in "the 
hole". During that time we 
could not use the restrooms. I 
regretted drinking coffee at 
breakfast. 

During 8" Mr. Lombardo 
drafted all able-bodied young 
men in "the hole" to clear the 
E-room of chairs in preparation 
for a dance. My knowledge of 
international law derived from 
watching Hogan's Heroes told 
me that this was against the Ge- 
neva Convention, but I said 
nothing as I welcomed a chance 
to move after remaining still for 
seven periods. " 

In general, "the hole" is a nice 
place to visit, but certainly not a 
place where one would want to stay. 



The 'Hole 9 Story 

A Day In The Hole Proves To Be 
A Genuine Learning Experience 




BE 

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205 
207 
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last 222 Street 



TOP: Contrary to its name, "the hole" 
was actually clean, well-lit, and 
provided with magazines and 
reference materials. ABOVE/RIGHT: 
For those who don't know, "the hole" 
was located in room 168. 




East 222 Street 



Seniors 



222 




Louis Orazem 



Joseph J. Orosz 



• #■, SSfcu- 


kM 


jyAL^i^ 


Efl—V ■ 


wW&* 


' E. 


^Tf C? 






^PJ 



Lisa Osborne 




Daniel Overberger 



■HI 
Steven Paciorek 



»kk 




Angelina Popo 



Julie Ann Parker 



Keith Alan Parsons Marilyn Sue Paulin 



/ 

Maria Pavlovich 



Activities 



PAUL J. OLSON: Not Photographed. 
LOUIS ORAZEM. JOSEPH J. OROSZ. 
LISA OSBORNE. DANIEL 
OERBERGER. STEVEN PACIOREK: 
Vocational Electronics 11, 12. JAMES F. 



PALMER: Not Photographed. 
ANGELINA POPO. JULIE ANN 
PARKER: Volleyball 10; Softball 10; 
Sophomore Chorus; Choral Masters 11, 
12; Varsity Chorale 12; Peer Tutoring 12. 



KEITH ALAN PARSONS: Spirits Club 
11, 12; Tennis 11, 12. MARILYN SUE 
PAULIN: OEA 11, 12; MARIE 
PAVLOVICH. 



223 



Seniors 







Frank Pekarcik 




Lynnet Perovsek 



Linda Penko 



James Penny 



Sue R. Perdan 



Carol A. Perovshek 



Thomas Perusek 



Robert Pevec 



Norkeo Phommavichit Raymond 0. Pirchner John P. Plevelich 



Brian M. Polley 




y " 



I Am ffll 

David John Poplstein Anthony D. Powell 



Daniel Perme 




Renee Phillips 




Allen E. Ponsart 




Janet E. Praskavich 



Teresa G. Purcell Terrance W. Rabbitts 






Seniors 



224 






Taskmasters 

22 Teachers Voted 'Hardest'; 
Math Department Tops List 



Activities 



FRANK PEKARCIK. LINDA PENKO: 
DECA 11, 12; JAMES PENNY: Football 

10, 11, 12; Spirits Club 12. SUE R. 
PERDAN: Track 10, 11; Track Aide 11; 
Student Council 12; Office Aide 12. 
DANIEL PERME. LYNNET 
PEROVSEK: Vocational Food Service 
secretary 12. CAROL A. PEROVSHEK: 
Cheerleader 10, 11; Swim Team 11; 
National Honor Society 11, 12; 
Vocational Commercial Art 11, 12. 
THOMAS PERUSEK: Spirits Club 12; 
Outdoor Club 12. ROBERT PEVEC: 
Track 10; MARC R. PHILLIPS: Not 
Photographed. RENEE PHILLIPS: 
Euclidian 10, 11, 12; AFS 10, 11, vice 
president 12; Sophomore Class Cabinet; 
Junior Class Cabinet; Senior Class 
Cabinet; National Honor Society 11, 
treasurer 12. NORKEO 
PHOMMAVICHIT: Swim Team 11, 12. 
NICHOLAS PIETRANGELO: Not 
Photographed. RAYMOND O. 
PIRCHNER. JOHN P. PLEVELICH: 
Football 10, 11, 12; Hockey 12. BRIAN 
M. POLLEY. ALLEN E. PONSART: 
Euclician 10, academic editor 11, 12; 
French Club 11; Junior Class Cabinet; 
Fall Play 11, 12; Big Show 11, 12; Choral 
Masters 12; Marching Band Announcer 
12; Spring Play 11, 12; National Honor 
Society 11, 12. DAVID JOHN 
POPLSTEIN: Vocational Machine Shop 

11, 12. ANTHONY D. POWELL. 
JANET E. PRASKAVICH. TERESA G. 
PURCELL: Volleyball 10; Softball 10; 
Outdoor Club 10; Euclidian 11; Peer 
Tutoring 12. TERRANCE W. RABBITS: 
Basketball 10, 11, 12; Peer Tutoring 12; 
Sophomore Chorus; Choral Masters 11, 
12; Varsity Chorale 12. 



eniors were asked to list the 
names of the teachers that 
they considered the hardest 
they had in their three years at Eu- 
clid High School. As with the har- 
dest class vote, all departments were 
represented in the hardest teacher 
category, with Miss Uhry of the 
Math Department coming in first: 
Miss Uhry (6) 
Mr. Freedman (3) 
Mr. Weisenberg (2) 
Mr. Steinbrink (2) 
Mr. Starr (2) 
Mr. Davis (2) 
Miss Carmody (2) 
Mr. Burns (2) 
Dr. Araca (1) 
Mrs. Cowan (1) 
Mr. Dzerowicz (1) 
Mr. Hartmann (1) 
Miss Hastings (1) 



Mr. Hoffert (1) 
Mr. Jirovec (1) 
Miss Lellis (1) 
Mrs. Miskinis (1) 
Mr. Palermo (1) 
Mr. Rackovan (1) 
Mr. Reno (1) 
Mr. Sallach (1) 
Mrs. Toth (1) 



(Results of a survey of five representative senior classes. 
The number in parentheses after each item is the number 
of votes it received.) 

-L- Sterbank 



Although Mr. Rackovan, Mr. Reno, 
and Mr. Pawlowski teach mostly 
juniors and seniors, they received 
very few votes in the hardest teacher 
poll. 




225 



Seniors 






Bestsellers 



Survey Of Reading Tastes 
Uncovers Attraction To Tragedy 



eading is an enjoyable way to 
kill time on a rainy Saturday 
or in an 8" study hall. Howev- 
er, reading a book for English class 
sometimes takes all the fun out of it. 
Remarkably, Euclid students truly 
enjoyed some of their assigned nov- 
els. John Steinbeck's Of Mice and 
Men was voted the favorite. It was 
followed by In Cold Blood, A Fare- 
well to Arms, A Streetcar Named De- 
sire and Wuthering Heights. 
Of Mice and Men (10) 
In Cold Blood (4) 
A Farewell to Arms (3) 
A Streetcar Named Desire (3) 
Wuthering Heights (3) 
Macbeth (2) 
The Outsiders (2) 
To Kill a Mockingbird (1) 
The Mayor of Casterbridge (1) 
Huckleberry Finn (1) 
Moby Dick (1) 



The Lord of the Flies (1) 

No One Gets Out Alive (1) 

The Omen (1) 

Father Figure (1) 

Alive (1) 

Charly(l) 

Ten Little Indians (1) 



(Results of a survey of five representative senior classes. 
The number in parentheses a/ter each item is the number 
of votes it received.) 

-A. Chanakas 



BELOW: Denise Kacperski catches up 
on some magazine reading in the 
school library. If her reading tastes 
were like those of her fellow seniors, 
she would vote for 'Of Mice and Men' 
as her favorite novel. 




Activities 



TONY RAFFAELE. IVAN RAGUZ: 
Soccer 10, 11, Student Council 11. 
WILLIE E. REMBERT: Not 
Photographed. RICHARD RENSHAW. 
KATHLEEN M. RITCHIE. KIMBERLY 
A. ROBERTS: Wrestling Aide 10, 11; 
Softball 10; Ad Club 12. TINA 
ROBERTSON: Not Photographed; 
Softball 11. DEAN A. ROBINSON: 
Track 10. JESSE RODGERS: OEA 
treasurer 11, historian 12; Euclidian 11, 
12; Track 12. RANCY A. ROEDER: 
DECA !. DOUGLAS ROSE. LSELIE 
ROSEBORO: Basketball 10; Track 10, 
11, 12; OEA 11, 12. MICHAEL 
ROYSTER: Track 10, 11, 12. DAVID J. 
RUZICH. DENNIS J. RYMARCZYK: 
Cross Country 10, 11, captain 12; Track 
10, 11, captain 12. LAURA J. 
SALETRIK: Marching Band 10, 11, vice 
president 12; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 
10, 11, 12; National Honor Society 11, 12; 
Softball 10; Volleyball co-captain 10, 11; 
Sophomore Class Cabinet, Junior Class 
Cabinet chairman; Senior Class Cabinet. 
DAWN SANGSTON: Not Photographed. 
JOSEPH M. SANTORIELLA: Not 
Photographed. GEORGE M. SARI. 
JULIE ANNE SAS: Cross Country 10, 
11; Basketball 10; Track 10, 11, 12; 
Vocational Stenography treasurer 11, 12; 
Office Aide 12. REIKO SATOH: 
Volleyball 12; AFS 12; Wai Napolo 12. 
JANICE K. SAUERMAN: Track Aide 
10, 11, 12; National Honor Society 11, 12; 
Sophomore Chorus; Choral Masters 11, 
12; Flag Corps 11, co-captain 12. 
MICHAEL A. SCHAEFER: Not 
Photographed; OEA 11, 12. ROBYN 
ANN SCHERBARTH: Marching Band 
10, squad leader 11, squad leader, 
secretary 12; Symphonic Wind Ensemble 
10, 11, secretary 12; Eucuyo 12; Foreign 
Language Club 12; National Honor 
Society 11, 12; Big Show 12. SANDRA L. 
SCHIEMAN: Spring Play 10; Majorettes 
secretary, treasurer 11, 12; Big Show 11; 
Choral Masters 11, 12; Office Aide 12. 
VICKI L. SCHIMMELS: Spirits Club 10; 
Ski Club 11, Outdoor Club 11. 






:, ' 



Seniors 



226 




vL t> 




Tony Raffaele 



Ivan Raguz 



Richard Renshaw 



Kathleen M. Ritchie Kimberly A. Roberts 




Michael Royster 



David J. Ruzich 



Dennis J. Rymarczyk 



Laura J. Saletrik 



George M. Sari 




Reiko Satoh Janice K. Sauerman Robyn Ann Scherbarth Sandra L. Schieman Vicki L. Schimmels 



227 



Seniors 




Susan Lynn Sekerak 



Kandice M. Senger 



HHBk 

Douglas Sergent 



Robert Seward 



Sara S. Sezun 




Michael J. Sheehan 



Brian Shelton 



Nancy Marie Shimonek 



Richard Schultz 



■■I 

Elizabeth Shusteric 



Seniors 



228 



Jitters 



SAT An Exercise In Ignorance 
Rather Than A Test Of Knowledge 



Activities 



KAREN SCHMIDT: Track Aide 10; 
National Honor Society 11, 12; Foreign 
Language Club 12. JANET LYNN 
SCHNEIDER: Track Aide 10, 11; Cross 
Country manager 11, 12. KURT 
SCHNEIDER: Baseball manager 11, 12. 
TODD H. SCHROCK: Soccer 11, 12; 
Student Council 12. SARAH 
SCHUENEMANN: Softball 10, 11, 12; 
Vocational Clerk Typing vice president 
11. JOHN D. SCHULER. ERICH 
SCHULZ: Sophomore Class Cabinet; 
Junior Class Cabinet. FREDERICK 
SCHWARTZ: AV Club 11, 12; Wai 
Napolo 10. JENNIFER R. SCHWARTZ: 
Cross Country 10, 11, 12; Track 10, 11, 
12; Foreign Language Club 12; National 
Honor Society 11, 12. WILLIAM M. 
SEGULIN: Wrestling 10, 11, 12; Key 
Club 12. SUSAN LYNN SEKERAK: 
Fall Play 10; Track Aide 10; Spirits Club 

10, 12; Choral Masters 11, 12; Office Aide 
11; Swim Timer 12; Big Show 11, 12. 
KANDICE M. SENGER. DOUGLAS 
SERGENT: Wrestling 10. ROBERT 
SEWARD: Fall Play 10. SARA A. 
SEZUN: Eucuyo 10, 11, editor-in-chief 
12; Foreign Language Club 12; National 
Honor Society 11, 12; Academic 
Challenge Team 12; Academic Decathlon 
Team 12; Peer Tutoring 11, 12. 
MICHAEL J. SHEEHAN. BRIAN 
SHELTON. NANCY MARIE 
SHIMONEK: Sophomore Chorus; Choral 
Masters 11, 12; Varsity Chorale 11, 12; 
Survey 10, 12; Fall Play 10, 11, 12; Big 
Show 10, 11, 12; National Honor Society 

11, 12; Hall of Fame (Varsity Chorale) 
11. RICHARD SCHULTZ. ELIZABETH 
SHUSTERIC. 



B 



day 



ZZZ! Your alarm reads 7:15. 
But it's Saturday. Why was it 
set? You remember that to- 
will determine your future. 



You're taking the SAT/ACT at 8:30. 
Three hours of grueling problems 
make your head spin and emphasize 
your ignorance. 

Perhaps this is an exaggerated pic- 
ture, yet it was the sentiment of 
many college-bound seniors at least 
one morning in November, De- 
cember or January. "The question 
that runs through my mind", said 
Cheryl Yatsko, "is, why am I getting 
up so early?" 

For other seniors, pre-test jitters 
were more effective than Weight 



Watchers. "I'm so nervous, I don't 
eat for a week," stated Robyn Scher- 
barth. 

The week before the exams, stu- 
dents read numerous review texts in 
an effort to memorize the necessary 
material. As Hans Botzki said, "The 
tests show me how much I don't 
know." Others are more fortunate. "I 
lucked out because I'd just covered 
the science material in school the 
week before," stated Laura Miller. 

The testing process was mentally 
fatiguing, but as Bill Segulin re- 
marked, "It's something you've got 
to do so I do it." 

— M. Lange 




ABOVE: College bound Mike Lange 
studies intently for a test which may 
influence his future. Preparing for the 



SAT/ACT demands numerous hours of 
reviewing material and memorizing 
formulas. 



229 



Seniors 



sw 



BELOW: Mike Menhart shows the 
after-effects of eating cafeteria food. 
BOTTOM: "Food? No thanks, we'll just 
read a book." BOTTOM RIGHT: Two 
Euclid students wonder about the ori- 
gins of the cafeteria's grey jello. 



In The Tradition 

Spaghetti And Pizza Top The List 
Of Seniors Past And Present 







he cafeteria, a school tradi- 
tion in food torture. It pro- 
vides students with a healthy 
diet of soybeans in various tasty 
combinations. For some, it raises a 
few questions such as "Exactly what 
flavor is grey jello?" 

The cafeteria is more of a break 
from all the boring classes of the day 
than a place to eat. It's a popular 
place in Euclid. As one student said, 
"It smells funny when I have a class 
near it." 

The favorite food of the class of '84 
is pizza lying in a pool of grease. It 
replaces the class of '82's favorite, 



spaghetti, a food "they really put 
away." The cafeteria often experi- 
ments with new foods and has hit a 
peak in the cuisine world with their 
broccoli soup and their baked cheese. 
Some students believe that nothing 
is more dangerous than last week's 
chuckwagon when cornered. 

In conclusion, however students 
might complain about the cafeteria's 
food, they'll appreciate how good it 
really was when they someday eat in 
different cafeterias. 

— S. Swyt 




Seniors 



230 







Margie Sidhu 



Deborah E. Simon 



Minica M. Sivillo 





Scott Skiljan 



Zrinka Slat 




Thomas E. Slusser 



Cheri Lee Smith 



Kent K. Smith 



William Smith 



Christine Sobecki 



MARGIE SIDHU: Vocational 
Stenography 11, 12. DEBORAH E. 
SIMON: Ad Club 10, 11, president 12; 
Spirits Club 10, 11, 12; DECA 11, 
secretary 12; Sophomore Chorus; Key 
Club 10. MONICA M. SIVILLO. SCOTT 
SKILJAN: Football 10, 11, 12; Track 10. 
TINA SKODNIK: Not Photographed. 
ZRINKA SLAT: Office Aide 11; AFS 11, 



Activities 

12; Ski Club 12; Outdoor Club 12; 
Hockey Aide 11; Eucuyo 12; Foreign 
Language Club 12; National Honor 
Society 11, 12; Sophomore Class Cabinet; 
Junior Class Cabinet; Library Aide 10, 
11. THOMAS E. SLUSSER: Cross 
Country 10, 11, 12; Track 10, 11, 12; 
French Club 10, 11; Ski Club 11, 12. 
CHERI LEE SMITH: Cheerleader 



captain 10, captain 11, co-captain 12; 
Vocational Commercial Art 11, 12. 
KENT K. SMITH: Basketball manager 

10, 11, 12; Student Council 11, president 
12; Varsity Chorale 12; Chorale Masters 

11, 12; Track 10; Spirits Club 11, 12; 
Racial Interaction Committee 11, 12. 
WILLIAM SMITH: Football 10. 
CHRISTINE SOBECKI. 



231 



Seniors 




Joseph Starman 



William A. Starr 



Danielle A. Stefanik Rhonda E. Sterrick 



John Stokes 




Steven Stokes 



Barbara Ann Stout 



Richard Strah 



Elizabeth S. Strle 




Edward Stroberg 



Seniors 



232 



Future Plans 

Seniors' Comments Portray 
Directions Of Class Of '84 



Activities 



DENNIS K. SOPKO: Ski Club 11, 12. 
ANDREA SPANJOL. MARVIN 
SPEHAR: Marching Band 10, 11, 12; 
Outdoor Club 10, 11, 12. JEFFERY G. 
SPENCER: Survey 10, 11, 12; Big Show 
11. RICHARD SPENCER. ROBIN 
MARIE SPEROFF: Ad Club 10, 12; Ski 
Club 10, 11, 12; DECA 12. SUE 
SQUIRE. JEFFREY W. STANICKI. 
MIRIAM ANN STANISA: OEA 12. 
FRANK STANKE: Chess Club 11, 12; 
Key Club 12; Ski Club 10, 11, 12. 
JOSEPH STARMAN. WILLIAM A. 
STARR: Soccer 10, 12; Hockey 10, 11, 
captain 12. DANIELLE A. STEFANIK: 
Ski Club 10, 11, 12; Ad Club 11; Office 
Aide 11; DECA 12. RHONDA E. 
STERRICK: Euclidian 10; Sophomore 
Chorus 10; Ad Club 11, 12; Peer Tutor 
11, 12; Swim Timer 11, 12; Office Aide 
12; Student Council 12; Wai Napolo 11, 
president 12. KIMBERLY L. 
STEWART: Not Photographed; 
Vocational Child Care 11, 12; Hero Club 
11, 12; Ad Club 10. JOHN STOKES: 
Track 10, 11, 12; Stage Band 11, 12; Big 
Show 11. STEVEN STOKES: Swim 
Team 11; Cross Country 12. BARBARA 
ANN STOUT: Vocational Clerk Typing 
11, president 12. RICHARD STRAH: 
Baseball 10; Vocational Data 
Processing/Accounting class 
parlamentarian; Key Club 11, 12; Ski 
Club 10, 11, 12. ELIZABETH S. STRLE: 
Cheerleader 10, 11; Euclidian 10; Ad 
Club 12; DECA president 11, 12. 
EDWARD STROBERG: Soccer 10, 11, 
12; Wrestling 10, 11, 12. 



ere's how seniors responded 
to the statement: "Ten years 
from now I'll be ... " 



". . . twenty-eight years old, working, 
saving money. I might be married, 
don't count on it. I'll be planning to 
visit my ten year reunion to see 
Murph, Butch, Horv, Zele, Plevelich, 
Lapuh, Nahs, Carp, and the guys." 

.John Cayne 

". . . driving my Excalibur to and 
from executive meetings and keeping 
all my employees in line." 



. living in Nebraska." 



-Kevin Weatover 



-Randy Roeder 



". . . working for the city of Euclid, 
making good money." 

-Jim Budnar 

". . . living in a southern state and 
having a well-paying career." 

-Colleen Flanagan 

". . . playing jazz fusion guitar." 

-Daniel Overberger 

". . . either in Florida studying ma- 
rine biology or getting ready to play 
in an NBA game." 

-Jerome Young 

"... a councilman for the city of 
Euclid." 

-Stan Miller 



". . . married, living in the mountains 
of Pennsylvania in a log cabin, rais- 
ing two children, and owning a four- 
wheel drive." 



-Rick Spencer 



"... a computer technician, making 
$25,000 a year, and residing in the 
Georgia-Florida area, or possibly 
New Mexico." 



-Barry Glaasner 



". . . married and a successful busi- 
ness woman. I'll have my own hotel, 
and it will have class." 



-Debbie Simon 



". . . married to J.R., having at least 
one child, and working as an accoun- 
tant in a famous accounting firm." 



•Carol Hart 




Senior Joanie Cable sneaks a peak at 
the camera on Elf Day. 



233 



Seniors 



Super Students 

Blevins, Katcher, Slat, Turk 
National Merit Semi-Finalists 



and 



ach year the College Board 
designates students with out- 
standing scores on the PSAT 
SAT tests as National Merit 



Semi-Finalists, Finalists, and Schol- 
ars. EHS students Jim Blevins, Dave 
Katcher, Zrinka Slat, and Kim Turk 
were named National Merit Semi-Fi- 
nalists in September. 

The process begins with the PSAT 
in the student's junior year. If he 
scores in the top 1% of all the juniors 
in the country, he becomes a Semi- 
Finalist. Semi-Finalists submit a 



grade transcript, teacher recommen- 
dation, and an essay to the College 
Board. They review these items and 
award scholarships to deserving stu- 
dents in April. 

Kim Turk said, "I am happy to be 
a Semi-Finalist because of the 
chance of scholarship money." Jim 
Blevins, in a sarcastic moment, com- 
mented, "It's an honor. It shows you 
did well for three hours." 

S Hoffert 




National Merit Semi-Finalists Zrinka 
Slat, Jim Blevins, Dave Katcher, and 
Kim Turk scored among the top 1% of 
all the juniors around the country on 
the PSAT. 



Activities 



FRANK B. STROHMEYER. ROSE 
STRUNA: Volleyball 10, 11, captain 12; 
Basketball 10; Softball 10, 11, 12; Swim 
Timer 12. ANTHONY R. STUMPF: Not 
Photographed. VESNA SULIC. PETER 
A. SVIGEL. MARY SWIDER: Not 
Photographed; Swim Team 10, 11; 
Student Council 11, secretary 12; Office 
Aide 10; Spirits Club 12; DECA 11, 12. 
REBECCA SWIFT: Sophomore Chorus; 
Ad Club 10, 11; Spirits Club 10, 11. 
DARRIN E. SWIHART: Marching Band 

10, squad leader 11, 12. ANTHONY J. 
SYRACUSE. TIMOTHY J. SZALAY. 
SCOTT M. SZPAK: Not Photographed. 
CHRISTOPHER C. TAYLOR: Not 
Photographed. JENNIFER TAYLOR: 
AFS 10, secretary 11, president 12; 
Volleyball 10, 11: Swim Timer 11; 
Sophomore Class Cabinet; Junior Class 
Cabinet; Senior Class Cabinet; Student 
Council 12. JEFFREY D. TEKANIC: 
National Honor Society vice president 

11, 12; Track 10, 11, 12; Symphonic 
Wind Ensemble 10, 11, 12; Marching 
Band 10, 11, 12; Academic Decathlon 
Team 11, 12; Stage Band 10, 12; Cross 
Country 10; Academic Challenge Team 

12, SUSAN TEMPLAR. EDWARD J. 
TEPLEY: Cross Country 10, 11, 12; 
Track 10, 11, 12; Marching Band 10, 11, 
12; Big Show 11; Concert Band 10, 11, 
12. KELLY A. THOMPSON: Girls 
Basketball manager, 10, 11; Girls Track 
manager 10, 11; Flag Corps 12; Student 
Council 12; Track 12; Orchestra 10, 11, 
12. MINA TIRABASSI: Cross Country 
10, 11, Track 10, 11, 12. ANDRE 
TOBOLEWSKI. JOSEPH L. 
TOMOLETZ. LAUREN D. TONNI: 
OEA 11, 12; Vocational Stenography 11, 
12. TONI G. TRAVIS: Not 
Photographed. GARY A. TRESSLER: 
Not Photographed; Cross Country 10, 11, 
12; Track 10, 11, 12; Spirits Club 11, 12; 
Senior Class Cabinet. CAROL L. 
TREVARTHEN. ANDRE D. TUFTS: 
Not Photographed. KIMBERLY R. 
TURK. VICKI A. TURK: OEA 11, 12; 
Vocational Clerk Typing 11, 12. 















Seniors 



234 




Frank B. Strohmyer 



Rose Struna 



Vesna Sulic 



Peter A. Svigel 



Rebecca Swift 





Darrin E. Swihart Anthony J. Syracuse Timothy J. Szalay 



Jennifer Taylor 



Jeffrey D. Tekanic 




Susan Templar 



Edward J. Tepley 



Kelly A. Thompson 



Mina Tirabassi 



Andrew Tobolewski 




Joseph L. Tomoletz 



Lauren D. Tonni 



Carol L. Trevarthen 



Kimberly R. Turk 



Vicki A. Turk 



aM « HmqMww — H ™ 



235 



Seniors 




Ratko Turkalj Sherrie Turner 



William Turner 



Michele Diane Twoey Monica Ann Ubic 




Michael J. Ucic 



Katherine Ukmar 




David Urdzik 



Mark Ussai 



Activities 



RATKO TURKALJ. SHERRIE 
TURNER. WILLIAM TURNER. 
MICHELE DIANE TWOEY. MONICA 
ANN UBIC: Majorette 11, 12; Fall Play 
11; Big Show 11; Sophomore Chorus; 



MICHAEL J. UCIC: Media Aide 10, 11, 
12; Fall Play 12; Big Show 11. 
KATHEEINE UKMAR: Ski Club 10, 11, 
12; French Club 10, 11; Foreign 
Language Club 12; Swim Timer 11; 



Honor Society 11, 12; Spirits Club 10, 11, 
12. DAVID URDZIK. MARK USSAI: 
Track 10, 11; Football 11; Wrestling 12; 
Eucuyo 11, 12; National Honor Society 
11, 12. ANTHONY VALENCIC: DECA 



Office Aide 11, 12; Choral Masters 11, 12. Tennis 11; Student Council 12; National 12; Key Club 11. 



Seniors 



236 



1994 



Sublime And Ridiculous 
Mark Seniors' Future Plans 



LEFT: Swimmers Kevin Ayers, Pat Le 
Quyea, and band member Jim Evans 
see paper banging as a possible 
future job. BELOW: Mike Boris 
believes that photography will help 
him to be an expert bell ringer and 
whale gutter. 




hen seniors were polled as to 
what they will be doing ten 
years from now, here's what a 



few responses were: 



"I will be a pharoah of a small South 
Pacific island and be worshipped as a 
god by the natives." 



"I will be touring Europe with the 
Rolling Stones." 



"I will be working in a hospital some- 
where as a nurse. I will also be enjoy- 
ing my life and saving for a trip to 
Europe." 



-John Stokes 



-Renee Phillips 



"I will be a buyer for a clothing chain 
traveling around the country and in 
Europe." 



-Danielle Nichting 



"I will be an executive chef cooking 
on a cruise ship in the Caribbean or 
teaching in France as established 
chef." 



-Lynnet Perovsek 



'A rebel in Nicaragua." 



-Hank Parsons 



"I will be married and chief execu- 
tive in a huge corporation. I will also 
be living in a big house and have a 
red Mercedes convertible in the ga- 
rage." 

-Anna Chanakas 

"I will be an occupational therapist, 
still "happily" married, and putting 
Richard III and Rayshaun into grade 
school." 



"During the week, I'll be an expert 
bell ringer at Notre Dame. And on 
weekends an expert whale gutter in 
the Arctic." 



-Mike Boris 



"I will be violently overthrowing the 
government." 



-Tom Capretta 



"I'll be in the Navy as a commisioned 
officer and happily married!" 



-Kurt Kauee 



237 



Seniors 






Future Plans 

Seniors Seek Further Education; 
Most Plan To Stay Near Home 



Seniors gave some idea of their fu- 
ture plans in their responses on a 
survey given to five representative 
senior classes. 

College is a definite part of the 
seniors' future plans. 60% said they 
plan to attend full-time, while an- 
other 23% plan to attend part-time 
while they are working. 6% of the 
seniors will be heading for vocational 
schools, and 11% will be working 
full-time upon graduation. 

As far as their social lives go, 17% 
of the seniors planned to be married 
five years from now, and 14% fully 
expect still to be single. 69% ex- 
pressed no preference. 



40%) of the seniors intend to re- 
main in the Greater Cleveland area, 
with another 20% expecting to re- 
main somewhere within the state of 
Ohio. 40% of the class intend to leave 
the Buckeye State for other sections 
of the country. 

Finally, only 18% of the seniors 
said that they would support Presi- 
dent Reagan in his re-election bid. 

-C. Cumraings 



BELOW: Chances are that these Child 

Care II students will be working in a 

pre-school program in the Greater 

Cleveland area five years from now. 




Activities 



CHRISTOPHER VANDEMOTTER: 
Soccer 10, 11, 12; Hockey 10, 11, 12. 
JEFFREY VANDEVENDER: DECA 11, 
12. LINDA VELLA. CRAIG VERNON: 
Cross Country 10, 11; Wrestling 11; 
Student Council 10. KAREN 
VIHTELIC. LISA MARIE VIHTELIC: 
Survey 10, 11, editor-in-chief 12; 
National Honor Society 11, 12; Junior 
Class Cabinet; French Club 11; Battle of 
the Classes 11; Track Aide 10; Spirits 
Club 10, 11, 12. CRAIG VISCI: Baseball 

10, 11, 12. JEFFREY VOHNOUT. 
MICHAEL J. VUYANCIH. LAURA K. 
WAGNER. ADRIENNE R. WALKER: 
Interracial Committee 11 12; Peer 
Counselor 11. SCOTT LYN WALLACE: 
Interracial committee 12; Vocational 
Data Processing/accounting president 12; 
Fall Play 12. TRACEY 
WANDERSLEBEN: Basketball 10; 
Softball 10, 11, 12; Tennis 12; Ski Club 

11, 12; Vocational Clerk Typing 11, vice 
president 12; Swim Timer 10; Ad Club 

10, 11, co-vice president 12; Sophomore 
Chorus; Choral Masters 11. 
CHANNELLE LATRICE WARD: Not 
Photographed. BETH K. WATERMAN: 
Swim Timer 10; Tennis 12; Ski Club 12; 
Ad Club 11, co-vice president 12. 
CAROL A. WATRAL: Volleyball 10, 11, 
12; Sophomore Class Cabinet; Student 
Council 11. KEVIN W. WESTOVER. 
DONNA J. WHITE. CATHERINE 
WILLIAMS: Not Photographed. 
STEPHEN D. WILLIAMS: Not 
Photographed. KEITH D. WILSON: Not 
Photographed. RICHARD P. WILSON: 
Student Council vice president 12; 
National Honor Society 11, 12; Stage 
Band 10, 11, 12; Survey 12. ROBERT 
WILSON: Football 10, 11, 12; Track 10, 

11, captain 12. KURT N. WINTER. 
LAURA JANE WISE. 






Seniors 



238 




Christopher VandeMotter Jeffrey Vandevender 



Linda Vella 



Craig Vernon 



Lisa Marie Vihtelic 



Craig Visci 



Jeffrey Vohnout 



Michael J. Vuyancih 



Karen Vihtelic 




Laura K. Wagner 




Adrienne R. Walker Tracey Wandersleben Beth K. Waterman 



Carol A. Watral 



Kevin W. Westover 




Donna J. White 



m 

Richard P. Wilson 




Robert Wilson 




Laura Jane Wise 



239 



Seniors 







Katharine Wittreich 



Michael Wojcik 



Lewis Gregory Woods 








William L. Woods 



Reginald B. Wyman 




David M. Yamane 



Joseph M. Yanko 



Cheryl Yatsko 



LeeAnn Yeckley 



Christina M. Yeckley 



Activities 



KATHARINE WITTREICH. MICHAEL 
WOJCIK. LEWIS GREGORY WOODS: 
Wrestling 10, 11. SHARLYNE JYNITA 
WOODS: Not Photographed; Volleyball 
10; Basketball 10, 11; Vocational Child 
Care 11, 12; Hero Club 11, 12. WILLIAM 



L. WOODS: Basketball 10; Track 10, 11, 
12; LORA A. WOODWARD: Not 
Photographed. REGINALD B. WYMAN: 
DECA 12. DAVID M. YAMANE: 
Football 12; Wrestling 12. JOSEPH M. 
YANKO. CHERYL YATSKO: National 



Honor Society 11, 12. LEEANN 
YECKLEY: Ski Club 10; Clinic Aide 11; 
Foreign Language Club 12; Waii Napolo 
11, vice president 12; Spirits Club 11. 
CHRISTINA M. YECKLEY: Survey 10, 
11, 12; Spirits Club 10; Ad Club 11, 12. 



WMBMBKESSW 



Seniors 



240 



Shorties 



Where Would We Be Without 
EHS, RTA, GCC, MMS, MTV? 



an is basically lazy and dis- 
likes tiring his tongue on long 
or frequently used words, 
the acronym. Acronyms are 
us. The turbulant world 



Hence 
all around 
around us has spawned such plagues 
as the PLO (Palestine Liberation Or- 
ganization), and AIDS (Acquired Im- 
mune Deficiency Syndrome). In an 
effort to reduce the number of MXs 
(the "peace-maker missile"), and 
ICBMs (Intercontinental Ballistic 
Missile), the world governments 
have engaged in SALT (Strategic 
Arms Limitations Talks) and 
START (Strategic Arms Reduction 
Talks) talks. 

On the more personal level, Euclid 
students rocked to Michael Jackson's 
song PYT ("Pretty Young Thing") 
on MTV (Music Television). More 
intellectual entertainment was of- 



fered on CNN (Cable News Net- 
work) and PBS (Public Broadcasting 
Service). 

As more Euclid students used the 
new HP (Hewlett-Packard) comput- 
er system, phrases like DDF (data 
file) and Writeln (write line func- 
tion) were heard among the clamor 
at the lunch tables. 

College-bound seniors took CALC 
(Calculus) and SATs (Scholastic Ap- 
titude Test). Students in driving 
class learned that DWI (Driving 
While Intoxicated) can result in 
DOA (Dead on Arrival). 

Acronyms will always be a part of 
EHS (Euclid High School) BKA 
(better known as) "Panther Coun- 
try". 

-M. Lange 






TOP: Carol Trevarthen guides parents 
around EHS on Open House night. 
ABOVE: A Child Care II student plays 
a word game with pre-schoolers to 
develop their IQ's. LEFT: Seniors try 
to eliminate FRAG's and RO's in Mrs. 
Cowan's Senior College Writing class. 



241 



Seniors 



Remember 



Let's Take One Last Look 
At Day -To-Day Life At EHS 



— the first-ever senior class group 

picture? 

— the You Are There movies? 

— Halloween Dress-Up Day? 

— clapping at assemblies. 

— playing Bingo with chocolate 

chips in computer science class? 

— the Toga dances? 

— the Poor Man's dance 

— the paint fight that closed down 



Spirits when we were juniors. 
— 40's Day? 
— 60's Day? 
— Christmas Elves? 
— the Senior Showcase? 
— Mr. Lombardo taking over Mr. Fe- 
derici's job? 

— Breakfast with Santa? 
— Preppy Day? 

— the Battle of the Classes' Pie Eat- 
ing Contest? 




ABOVE: Pat O'Brien will have many 
happy memories of the computer lab, 
thanks to Mr. Reno. RIGHT: Tracey 
Wandersleben and Noreen O'Donnell 
will certainly remember their 
experiences at the Toga Dance. 




Activities 



JOHN M. YEHL: Basketball 10; 
SPIRITS CLUB 11, 12. JEROME V. 
YOUNG: Basketball 10, 11, 12; Track 11, 
12. JOHN YOUNG: DECA 11, 12. 
THOMAS YURAS: Baseball 10, 11, 12; 
Football 11, 12. SUSAN M. 
YORKOVICH. ANTHONY J. ZADNIK. 
THOMAS ZAGORE: Wrestling 11; Key 
Club It. governor 10, 11; Eucyo 10; 
Spirits Club 10, 11, 12; Office Aide 12. 
MICHELE A. ZAKRAJSEK: OEA 11, 
treasurer 12; Office Aide 12; Vocational 
Data Processing/Accounting 11, 12. 
JOHN D. ZELE: Football 10, 11, captain 
12; National Honor Society president 11, 
12; Junior Class Cabinet 11. VICKI 
ZIGMAN: Cheerleader 10, captain 11, 12; 
Sophomore Class Cabinet; Vocational 
Stenography president 11; Spirits 10, 11. 
JAMES A. ZIVKOVICH. KIMBERLY 
ZNIDARSIC. SCOTT E. ZNIDARSIC: 
Vocational Auto Shop 11, 12. SUZANNE 
C. ZUPANOVIC: Sophomore Chorus; 
Sophomore Class Cabinet; Junior Class 
Cabinet; Choral Masters 11, 12; Big 
Show 11, 12; Track 10, 12. MICHAEL J. 
ZUZEK: Football captain 10, 11, 12; 
Basketball 10, 11, captain 12. KEITH D. 
DRAKE: Sophomore Class Cabinet; 
Junior Class Cabinet; OEA 11, 12. 
WENDY ANN MCKAIN: Vocational 
Stenography treasurer 11; OEA 12. 



/ / 






Seniors 



242 



■ 







h 

John M. Yehl 



' ^ 





Jerome V. Young 



John Young 



Thomas Yuras 




Anthony J. Zadnik 



Thomas Zagore 




Michele A. Zakrajsek 



John D. Zele 



James A Zivkovich Kimberly Znidarsic 



Scott E. Znidarsic Suzanne C. Zupanovic 




ft • 

£ " 

Keith Drake 




Susan M. Yurkovich 




Vicki Zigman 




Michael Zuzek 



243 



Seniors 













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ABOVE: Sophomore Jim Lockwood 
acted as a walking billboard to 
publicize yearbook sales week. BIG 
PICTURE: Although the price of the 
yearbook was raised to $20, 
advertising money helped keep it from 
going even higher. 



he bottom line of any 
business operation is 
money, and the year- 
book is a business. Staff mem- 
bers kicked off the year by sell- 
ing $4600 in advertising. The 
November yearbook sales net- 
ted only 700 subscriptions, 



well below the projected 1200. 
Several hundred additional 
books were ordered in the hope 
that there would be a demand 
when the book finally arrived 
in May. 

— J. Majers 



Advertising Divider 



244 













rr "^ — • 



ad contract * Qc f 







on 



tract 



BOTTOM LINES 



245 Advertising Divider 




Advertising 



246 




%jrtt '■• PHONE 

***** F A 486-4343 



BEN DiGIOVANNI 



V* 



480 EAST 200 ST. 



247 



Advertising 




Euclid 

SUn JOURNAL 



THE NEWSPAPER 
THAT SERVES ITS COMMUNITY 



CONGRATULATES 

THE CLASS OF '84 

GRADUATING SENIORS 



• EUCLID SUN JOURNAL 

• SUN SCOOP JOURNAL 

• SUN LEADER JOURNAL 

22630 Shore Center Drive • 261-7651 



NORWOOD DRUG, 
INC. 

808 East 185 At East Park Dr. 

Cleveland Phone: 531-1988 

Filling Your Prescription Is 

The Most Important 

Thing We Do! 




DOLLS & ACCESSORIES 



Super Cuts 
For Guys And Gals 

DENNIS & 
CO. 

Hairdressers 



22469 Shore Center Dr. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

731-2233 



22052 Lake Shore Blvd. 
Euclid, Ohio 44123 



Barbara Kramer ■ Owner 
1216) 289 0767 



Advertising 



248 



RICHMOND 

BEVERAGE AND 

WINE CO. 

Wine & Gourmet Shoppe 

Imported And Domestic 
Wines And Champagnes 

213 Richmond Road 

731-4424 

744 Richmond Road 

291-2883 



CONGRATULATIONS 

AND GOOD LUCK 

TO THE CLASS OF 

1984 



PTSA 



Euclid High School 

Parent Teacher Student 

Association 




249 



Advertising 



Uglij Duckling 



RENT-A-CAR 



ROSEMARIE MINTZ 



20950 LAKELAND BLVD. 

EUCLID, OHIO 44119 

(216) 531-8901 



14550 LORAIN AVE. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 44111 

(216) 252-3825 




YgMirit TV SERVICE RC/1 



• COLOR 

• BLACK & WHITE 

• STEREO 
COMPLETE ANTENNA INSTALLATION AND REPAIR 



SONY 
QUASAR 
SEARS 
MAGNAVOX 



PANASONIC 
SYLVANIA 
G.E. & 
OTHERS 



VISA' 



■ 531-8177 



21151 EUCLID AVE. IN SHERWOOD PLAZA 



c-^'JUST A LITTLE BIT BETTER' 



j^Em- 



m 



GEORGE KNAUS REAL ESTATE. INC. 

819 E 185th STREET 

CLEVELAND. OHIO 44119 

COMPUTER MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE 



INDUSTRIAL • COMMERCIAL - RESIDENTIAL 
ASPHALT DRIVE • SEALING 



G.M.B. Paving Go. 




481-9300 



man/ 
World 



Daily 10-5 

Mon. Thur. Fri. unfll 9 



Dos 216/701-124O 
Res. 951-7400 



GUARANTEED QUALITY WORK 
- INSURED - 



GEORGE BRENTAR, MGR. 

20151 ARBOR AVENUE 

692-3S8S 



Phone: 4S6-53C5 



22342 Lake Shore Blvd. 
Shore Center 
Euclid Ohio 44123 



SAVE UP TO 40 r o ON 
SUITS 

SPORT COATS 
TUXEDOS 
SCHOOL JACKETS 



Advertising 



250 







%»„ 



Who knows? 
Tomorrow our 
paths may cross. 



Today you're on your way. All the doors 
are open. There's a world of possibilities 
out there for you to explore,- hundreds of 
paths to follow. One of them may even 
bring you back to Cleveland, to the lush, 
green Bolton Estate in Lyndhurst, future 
headquarters for a company called 



Ri 



iixww 



A Company Called TRW 






251 



Advertising 



Sheet Pizza 
Sub Sandwiches 
Pasta Dinners 



fTlflRINO'S 



644 East 185 

St. 

486-6698 




We Deliver 

Quanity Discounts 

Available 



PIZZERIA 



Video 
Arcade 




"Good Luck 

Euclid Seniors" 

BEACHLAND 

HARDWARE 

630 East 185th St. 
531-0687 



STRASCO 
MACHINE 

19770 St. Clair 

Euclid, Ohio 

486-8544 



Advertising 



252 










SttIngham hardware comran 



Y 




NOniNGHAM HARDWARE CO., INC. 

PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

TOOLS - GLASS - PAINT 

18708 ST. CLAIR AVENUE CLEVELAND, OHIO 44110 

PHONES 481-0665 481-9194 



MIHELICH'S 
HOMTOWN 

Restaurant & Lounge 

830 Babbitt Rd. 
731-9689 







253 



Advertising 



CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS OF 1984 

Euclid Offset 
Printing Co. 

EUCLID OFFSET PRINTING CO. 

22740 Shore Center Drive 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

(216) 261-1235 


Congra tula tions 

And 

Good Luck To 

The Class Of 1984 

FRENCH'S 
PHARMACY 

26598 Lake Shore Blvd. 
731-6300 


^T^ 


CLEANSVILLE 

CUSTOM 

CLEANERS 

And 

LAUNDROMAT 

22681 Shore Center Drive 
731-9653 


Congra tula tions 
Class Of 1984 

PERKINS 
CAKE & 
STEAK 

22780 Shore Center Dr. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

732-8077 


^^"^ ^""^V Phone orders gladly accepted 

Sr \ Bus. 531-7447 

Sty 

MODEL MEAT MARKET 

FRESH MEATS 

Home Made Quality Sausage 

Smoked Meats and Cold Cuts of All Kindt 

FLORIAN & MARIE KONCAR 610 East 200th Street 
Owners Euclid, Ohio 44119 



Advertising 



254 



THE HILLWOOD 
MANUFACTURING CO. 



THE NAIL MAKER 



SINCE 1881 



CALL US 
COLLECT 
(216) 

531-0300 



S/l 



FULLY EQUIPPED TO 
SERVE YOUR NEEDS. 

Tacks, Staples, Nails, 
Pins, Drive Screws, 
Spikes and Fasteners — 
in stock and custom 
designed. Our Catalog 
section in Thorn Cat 
details more popular 
stock items. 

21700 St. Clair Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 44117 



WE SHIP WORLDWIDE 



6b 



PROTECT YOUR EYES! 
WEA R SA FETY CLASSES! 



"See us in the Thomas Register catalog file, 
located in your office or at your local public library." 



255 



Advertising 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 

THE CLASS OF 1983 FROM . . . 







216 731-6555 



ROGERSa^ 



■ClA- 



494 EUCLID SQ MALL 
EUCLID OHIO 44132 



I tit 

I/\A Reporter 



W. Wesley Howard III 

Editor 



a publication of 

Protean Financial C orp. 



P. 0. Box 32127 
Cleveland, Ohio 44132 
(216) 731-6001 



Congra tula tions 
Class Of 1984 




Advertising 



256 




EUCLID BLUE PRINT 
& SUPPLY, INC. 

908 East 222nd St. 

Cleveland, Ohio 44123 

731-4662/4663 

Pickup & Delivery 

Complete Reproduction Service 

Engineering Supplies - Rubber 

Stamps 



ASfHA©*# 

PIZZA & RESTAURANT 

OPEN 7 DAYS 
FOR LUNCH OR DINNER 

COMPLETE ITALIAN MENU 

SPAGHETTI "RAVIOLI • VEAL PARMIGIANA 

LASAGNA • SUB SANDWICHES • SALADS 

PHONE- 731-7446 

DINE IN OR CARRY OUT 

OPEN: Mon. Thurt. 11-1, Fri. 8. Sat. 11-2:30 

Sunday 3 ■ Midnite 

BEER - WINE- LIQUOR 
IN DINING ROOM 

25571 Euclid Avenue, Euclid 

VOTED # 1 BEST PIZZA 

BY CLEVELAND 

MAGAZINE 



Where are Seniors Troy Davis, Keith 
Parsons, and Jim Penny from, Egypt 
China, or the Congo? 





257 



Advertising 



Congra tula tions 

Class Of 1984 

From 

gingiss formal wear 

World's Largest Formalwear Renter 

Matt D'Amico, Manager 



378 Euclid Square Mall, Euclid, Ohio 44132 
216/261 7711 



Congra tula tions 

To The 

Class Of 1984 

LUIKART 
INSURANCE 

21812 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

261-7787 



OPEN 
PANTRY 



7 DAYS 'Til MIDNIGHT 



1\ 



355 East 200 St 
Euclid, Ohio 441 19 




jon p boyton 



DRIFTWOOD GALLERY INC. 
artist supplies • picture framing 

450 east 200th 

euclid ohio 44119 

531-6653 



Motofcraft^ 



A 












! 




I 






















. — 










It,' 


1 


5 


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HI 






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(■HHl£__ 








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STEVE'S 

Tike & Ai'TO Center. Inc. 

"WE SOLVE I'HUBI.EMH- 



Fl'LL SERVICE 
AI.l. DRAM) TIRES 



STEVE* NANCY YOKE 



22781 SHORE CTR. IJR 
ECCI.I1>. OHIO 44123 



CJ16I 2H9-00«M 



Advertising 



258 



The Euclid High School BOOSTERS CLUB 
So kites our fine athletes, our coaches and fans 
and congratulates them for being 'Good Sports' 




PANTHERS 



nrifF 




EUCLID HIGH BOOSTERS CLUB 



Sam Carlo President 

John Prizzi Vice President 

Vinni Carlo Treasurer 

Toni Eder Corresponding Secretary 

Doris Print Recording Secretary 



259 



Advertising 



*w 




625 East 185 St. 
Euclid, Ohio 44119 



692-3610 



Nationwise Helps 




PHIL SILLIA 

417 East 200th St. 
Euclid. Ohio 44119 

tel. C21E0 531-2122 

one mile north of 
the Lakeland Freeway 





Wall Color Sho 




Advertising 



260 



OZAN LEGAL 
CLINIC 

Initial Office Consultation 
No Charge 

• Divorces • Wills 

• Personal Injury "Adoption 

•Bankruptcy • Probate 

• Criminal • Traffic 

22578 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

731-3500 



rls to 






**, 



Weldins - Lisht Machinins • Assembly - Brazing 4 Soldering 

Induction Heat Treating and Annealing 

Projection Welding 

Induction Brazing & Soldering 
tor Industry, Inc. 



L.J. (BILL) SCHELL 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER 



216-486-8283 

21850 ST CLAIR AVENUE 

EUCLID. OHIO 44117 



Dallos-Spies 

BUILDERS, INC. 

Specialists In Commercial & Industrial Development 

Dallos Spies Builders Inc has the ability to handle any 

and all commercial and industrial development be it large 

or small Irom inception to completion 



261- 6211 

Commercial 

Industrial 

Residential 

22660 Shore Center Dr. 

Builders, Construction Mgrs. 

Property Management 



261 



Advertising 



KNIFIC^/ 

f. ASSOCIATES V , 




KNIFIC 

INSURANCE 

SERVICE, INC. 

820 East 185th St. 

Cleveland, OH 

44119 

481-7540 



FLICKINGER 
INC. 




good/year 




Brake Service And 

Front End Alignments 

939 East 222 St. 

731-9200 



Euclid Jalousies, Inc. 

PORCH AND BREEZEWAY ENCLOSURES 

ALUMINUM JALOUSIES AWNING TYPE 

WINDOWS 

STORM DOORS AND WINDOWS 

ALUMINUM SIDING 

AWNINGS AND RAILINGS ROOFING 

490 East 200th St. 

486-1112 

Rudy Lipovec Bob Dunmire 



CONVENIENT 
FOOD MART 

811 East 222nd St. 
Euclid, Ohio 44123 

Compliments Of: 
Wayne And Sterling 



Advertising 



262 



CONGRATULATIONS 



TO 
THE CLASS OF 1984 

RICHMOND 
RESTAURANT 



25911 Euclid Ave. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

261-5430 



h.;;I 

Freshman David Reinke is ready to show 
Senior Butch Klemik how the n«me is 
played. 




j£^ ^ t^ S 



CENTURY 21 



LEO BAUR, REALTOR 



A Trusted Name In 
The Real Estate Profession 

For Over 30 Years 
In Northeastern Cuyahoga 

And Lake Counties 

• Investment 

Counseling 
•Residential 
•Commercial 
•Property 

Management 
•Relocation 



21157 Euclid Ave. 
486-1655 




RUSSELL 
MILLER 
GARAGE 



21800 St. Clair Ave. 

Euclid, Ohio 44117 

486-3698 



263 



Advertising 



GLENGATE 

AUTO 

PARTS 



359 South Green Rd 

South Euclid, OH 

44121 

486-5013 

Business Hours: 

Sun. 10 am - 3 pm 

Mon. - Fri. 8 am - 9 

pm 

Sat 9 am - 5 pm 




EURO PA 
TRAVEL 



911 East 185th. St. 
692-1770 



R.K.B. 

SAW AND 
MOWER, INC. 

18816 Nottingham Rd. 

Cleveland, OH 44110 

531-8843 



DIPAOLO HOUSE OF 

BEAUTY 

911 E. 222nd. St. 

261-7272 

'Beauty Is Our Business' 

We Specialize In 

Permanents And Hair Cutting 



Congra tula tions 
Class Of '84 

EUCLID OHIO 
BEVERAGE 

635 East 200 St. At Miller 
486-0595 "Briggs" 




Advertising 



264 



Congratulations to the graduates! 




Euclid Senior High School Class of 1984 



...from your Euclid City Officials 
We recognize your achievements and wish you continued success in your future. 



ANTHONY J. GIUNTA 
MAYOR 

EUCLID CITY COUNCIL 

Michael Kosmetos 

President of Council 

Councilmen 

William L. DeMora, Ward 1 

Mark Jochum, Ward 2 

George Carson, Ward 3 

Nick Marino, Ward 4 

Council-at- Large 

Joseph Farrell 
Donald Malone 

Fay Miller 

Ed Sustarsic 

Lucille Kucharski 

Clerk of Council 




Robert F. Niccum 

Judge 

Frank W. Payne 

Chief of Police 

George R. Langa 

Fire Chief 
Patrick R. Rocco 

Law Director 

John A. Piscitello 

Service Director 

Lou C. Dommer 

Public Works Director 

Frank J. Chukayne 

Executive Director 

Richard T. Balazs 

Finance Director 

Paul Oyaski 

Community Services and 

Development Director 

Les Morgan 

Recreation Director 



A City of Superior Services 



265 



Advertising 



PAPPS BODY SHOP INC 




30 Year Anniversary 

Phone 481-4333 



BILL PAPPALARDO 

President 



20980 ST. CLAIR AVENUE 
EUCLID. OHIO 44117 





t-¥,^ 



Si^-^SWfllB 






~-f*/-^ 



fu%. j 



5/MS BROTHERS BUICK, INC. 

21601 Euclid Avenue 

Euclid, Ohio 44117 

Phone: 484-8800 



$ V^ 




Natural 
Organic 



Natural Organic Foods 
Are Much Better For You 



VASSAR HEALTH FOODS 

Complete Line of Vitamins & Dietary Foods 

"JftalklL U WealtS." 

HRS.: 9:30 A.M. TO 9 00 P M — SAT. 9:30 AM TO 6:00 P.M. 
21933 Euclid Ave. . Euclid, Ohio 441 17 • Tel.: 692-1875 



HOLZHEIMER'S I & II 

26588 & 22840 Lake Shore 

Blvd. 

731-3250 & 731-2680 



Fddd 



^tM ft* 




Advertising 



266 



PRESCRIPTIONS 



m; 



HUDSON PHARMACY 

922 E. 222nd St. 

(216) 732-8100 

"Working Together 
To Serve Euclid" 



i 




UPSON PHARMACY 
481 E. 260th St. 
(216) 731-1130 




jLonvs IPolka Village 



Records • Tapes • Specialties 
Ethnic Broadcasts 

Tony Petkovsek 



971 East 185th St. • Cleveland, Ohio 441 19 
Phone: (216) 481-7512 





MR. G'S PIZZA 



421 E. 200th St. 

486-0707 486-0721 

Call Ahead For Your 

Takeout Order 

We Deliver After 5 pm 

Hours: Mon - Sat. 11 am - 1 am 

Sunday 4 pm - 12 am 



MARK'S 



HAIRDRESSERS 

22308 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

731-1550 



267 



Advertising 



EUCLID 
IGNITION 



1062 E. 185th St. 

Cleve., Ohio 44119 

481-222 



SHORE CENTER 

Barber & Style 
22746 Shore Center Dr. 




RAFTER PRODUCTS 

Regular, Layer, Feather, 

And Razor Cuts 

Completely Remodeled 

261-2066 Sam Ventura, Owner 



Congra tula tions 

Class Of 1984 

THE CORNER STORE 

AND 

PIZZA PLACE 

840 Babbit Rd. 

261-6631 



STERN'S 
MEN'S WEAR 



688 E. 185th St. 

581-2640 

Personal Service - Alterations 

Tuxedo Rental 




AUTO PARTS 



A Tremendous Stock Of 

Nationally Advertised Brands 

At Low Discount Prices 

25801 Euclid Ave. 
732-7500 



Advertising 



268 




STUDENT COUNCIL 



Congra tula tes 
The Class Of 1984 

From The 

Highest Position 

In The School 



269 



Advertising 




JAY DEE 
CLEANERS 

878 E. 222nd St 
Euclid, Ohio 44123 



I 1*"' 



nuu 



1 ffl-33 




BLACKHAWK KOREK ® 
FRAME EQUIP. 



TEL. 481-1337 



NOTTINGHAM AUTO BODY & FRAME CO. 

TRAME STRAIGHTENING - UNITIZED BODY REPAIRS 

COLLISION REPAIRS - PAINTING 

AU WORK GUARANTEED 



MICHAEL BUKOVEC 
FUJI HASEGAWA 



18929 St. Clair Avenue 
Cleveland. Ohio 44110 



NORTH COAST 
SHOE REPAIR 

25923 Euclid At Richmond 

Rx Prescription Filled 

Games (In The Arcade) 

Expert Shoe Repair 



Advertising 



270 



THE ANTHONY INSURANCE AGENCY 

508 EAST 185th 

CLEVELAND. OHIO 441 19 

53 1 -5555 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE 



"Compare Our Rates' 





Congratulations To The 
Class Of 1984 



JACKSHAW 

CHEVROLET 

INC. 

543 E. 185th St. 

Cleve., Ohio 44119 

486-4400 






Congratulations 



nTTi 



Seniors! 



.ni)i-:pi:ndi:ni 
hvings 

1515 E. 260th, Euclid. Ohio 44132 • 731-8865 

920 E. 185th St., Cleveland, Ohio 44119 

486-4100 



WE Employ Mechanics Certified B> NIASE 



E3MM 

BRAKE SERVICE 




• COOLING SVSTEM5 

• LUBHICATION 

• EXHAUST 



EUCLID AUTO SERVICE CENTER 



Fast and dependable Service 



• STEERING a sue. PENSION 

• AIR CONDITIONING 

• CARBURETIOf. 

• electrical 

Tony & Vince Rozman 

222io lakeland blvd 

Euclid. Ohio 44132 

Phone 261 OI63 



271 



Advertising 



jfcisOafiesfiore SrapRics 



21946 Lakeshore Boulevard 
Euclid, Ohio 44123 



(216) 731-0234 



DONNA JOHNSON 

Printing Manager 



• We Print Graduation 
Invitations And Announcements 



Congratulations To 
The Class Of 1984 

GABRIEL 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

22090 Lake Shore Blvd 
Euclid, Ohio 44123 

731-6888 




am 



AUTO STORES 



461-0550 946-7696 946-7415 261-8010 

6570 MAYFIEID W> 36212 EUCLID AVE 7601 MENTOR AVE 22302 IAKESHOSE 

MAYHEID HTS OH WIUOUGHB* OH MfNlO«. OHO EUCLID, OHIO 

14124 "094 44060 44123 



Advertising 



272 



KOLLANDER WORLD 
TRAVEL, INC. 



971 East 185th Street 

Cleveland, Ohio 44119 

Phone (216) 692-2225 

Toll Free (800) 321-5801 



m 





The cafeteria food glued our lips together. 




ZORMAN AUTO BODY SHOP 

COMPLETE AUTO REPAIRING & PAINTING 

486-3240 



SINCE 1923 



ANNIVERSARY 



LUD ZORMAN 



19425 St. Clair Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 44117 



Best Of Luck To 
The Class Of 1984 

LAKE 

CINEMAS 

I, II, III 

22624 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Euclid, Ohio 44123 

731-1700 

• First Run Movies 

• Newly Remodeled 

• Comfortable 

• Stereo Sound 

• Excellent Popcorn 



GAHR 

MACHINE 

CO. 



19199 St. Clair Ave. 
Euclid, Ohio 44117 



273 



Advertising 



ACTION 

AUTO BODY & FRAME CO. 

SPECIALIZING IN COLLISION 

REPAIRS 



24 hour 




TOWING 
SERVICE 



22470 LAKELAND BLVD. 
EUCLID, OHio 

731-6161 
PAT PERRINO 



JACKSON HARMRE 




JACKSON 
HARDWARE 

22306 Lake Shore Blvd. 
261-9015 

Congratulations To The 
Class Of '84 



ATLAS ELECTRIC CO. 

19401 St. Clair Ave 

481-7272 




SHIPPING ROOM 
PRODUCTS, INC. 

19440 St. Clair Ave. 

Cleve., Ohio 44117 

531-4422 



Advertising 



274 



Pack P. nZecd 



^IXUddtnq ynuitatiom & aAcceaoiiei 

614 East 200th Street Euclid, Ohio 44119 

Phone 486-7008 

Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 6:30p.m. to 10p.m. By Appointment 

Saturday By Appointment only 



*K&vi JLake&icU Inc. 



You con rely on 




m 



COLD HEADED PRODUCTS • SOCKET HEAD PRODUCTS • CAP SCREWS 
SET SCREWS • AUTOMATIC AND HAND SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS 

26841 TUNGSTEN RD. • EUCLID, OHIO 44132 

Phono: 216-261-2100 TWX. 810-421-8412 T.lex. 98-5467 
800-321-7040 




EUCLIDIAN 
BEAUTY 
COLLEGE 



"Quality Of 

Education 

Is Our Goal" 

22741 Shore Center Dr. 
261-2600 



SALTER 
AUTO PARTS 



21149 Euclid Ave. 
In The Sherwood Plaza 

486-3798 
Featuring NAPA Quality 



^\<j j&Vj\£ 



II 




275 



Advertising 



PATRONS • PATRONS 




Advertising 



BALI HAI RESTAURANT 

25649 Euclid Ave. 

731-8400 



DEE'S DELI 

21932 Lake Shore Blvd. 

261-7270 



DR. R. M. BALDWIN 

21771 Lake Shore Blvd. 

261-0115 



EUCLID OFFICE SUPPLY 

756 East 222 St. 

531-5311 



BRONKO'S BEVERAGE 

510 East 200 St. 

531-8844 



EUCLID TRAVEL BUREAU 

22078 Lake Shore Blvd. 

261-1050 



CLEVELAND PLASTIC 

& FABRICATING 

25861 Tungsten Rd. 

486-7300 



KNAFEL'S SHORE MARKET 

20070 Lake Shore Blvd. 

481 4411 




PATRONS • PATRONS 



DR. DONALD PEPPERCORN 
35104 Euclid Ave 

946-0088 



SHORE CENTER 

VETRINARY CLINICS 

22686 Shore Center Dr. 

261-2649 



PRINCE PHARMACY 

.')61 South Creen lid. 

486-5250 



WILKE HARDWARE 

809 East 222 St. 

731-7070 



SAM AND PETE'S BARBER SHOP 

393 East 200th St. 

53 1 -5828 



F. W. WOOLWORTH CO. 

22830 Lake Shore Blvd. 

731-3878 



SHORE CENTER SHOE 
22748 Shore Center Dr. 



YALE TV. AND APPLIANCE 

842 East 185th St. 

531-2264 




277 



Advertising 



Student Index 



Abbott. Michael 78.160 

Adams, Carl R. 157, 115 

Adams, Carletta M. 160, 115 

Adams, Holly J. 160 

Adams, Laurice C. 

Adams, Mark T. 79 

Adams, Robert M- 

Adkins, Timothy W. 174 

Adrine, Kelly L. 

Airhart, Robert E. 159 

Alaburda, Douglas J. 153 

Albright, Scott A. 

Alick, Howard M. 151 

Allay, James A. 87, 174, 139, 69, 281, 107 

Allay, Melissa F. 87, 153, 111 

Allen, Tuesday 150 

Allison, Robert M, 156 

Alves, James 192, 56, 57 

Alves, John G. 160 

Alvis, Chanette 160 

Amato, Gina 192 

Ames, Dennis A, 17, 192 

Anderson, Elliott S. 79, 152 

Anderson, Harold M. 174 

Anderson, Robert J. 158 

Andresky, Dawn R. 155, 41 

Andrews, Victoria 160 

Antonick, Nadine R. 160,65 

Aquila, Joseph A. 112 

Archacki, Stephen R. 44, 53, 55, 192, 60 

Argenti, Tammy M. 192, 62 

Arlesic, Richard J. 159, 120 

Arrington, Vernell B. 157 

Asbury, Mary Ann 154 



AspinwaJl, Michael P. 160 
Aspinwall, Michelle Y. 192, 41, 38 
Atkins, Zelinda Y. 174, 62 
Augustine, Daniel M. 174 
Augustine, Thomas E. 160 
Ault, Steven A. 16, 82, 160 
Austin, J. Timothy 190, 192 
Austin, Michele E. 192, 62 
Austin, Stacey L. 159 
Ayers, Kevin J. 192, 116, 237 

Baer, Jay A. 192 

Bagocius, Maureen 174 

Baird, Paul D. 83, 154, 100 

Baitt, Michael J. 2, 15, 74, 192 

Baker, Michael L. 74, 76, 174, 63, 65, 115 

Bslante, Samuel R. 159 

Balazs, William J. 83, 159 

Balogh, Karen A. 160, 69, 66 

Balogh, Terri E. 

Bammerlin, Carol L. 18, 192 

Banning, Christine M- 174 

Barber. Kimberly A. 158, 104 

Barcza, Jobn C. 160 

Barker, Gregory A. 160 

Barker, Michael J. 160 

Barker, Terry L. 174 

Barnes, MaryKay 192, 198 

Barravechia, Alison R. 192 

Barravechia, Robert S. 174 

Barth, Ellen A. 192, 38 

Barth, Glenn A. 152 

Barth, Ramona R. 

Bartol, Kevin J. 174, 115 

Bashline, Tina L. 175 




Basler, Matthew H. 87, 192, 197, 113 

Batdorf, Gary L. 192 

Battaglia, Tamara L. 175, 62 

Battle, Darlene 

Batva, Jeanette 175 

Bauck. Charles K. 160 

Bealko, William J. 79, 159 

Beasley, Anthony 192 

Beasley, Samantha 

Bechtel, Clark A. 83, 159 

Beck, Darren H. 151 

Beck, Laura L. 160 

Bednarik, Christine M. 10, 175, 69, 65 

Bedzyk, Carey S. 150 

Bedzyk, Cynthia E. 151, 153 

Bedzyk, Lori A. 148, 175 

Bedzyk, Michael S. 81, 192 

Beemiller, Marshele L. 160 

Beining, Dawn M. 160 

Beining, Debra A. 155 

Belavich, Mary C. 46, 192 

Bell, David 17, 195 

Bell, Kathleen A. 159 

Bell, Kecia D. 138, 158, 119 

Bell, Kevin A. 195 

Bell, William A. 87. 160, 117, 116 

Belle, Louis E. 195 

Bencivenni, Lynn M. 195, 69, 38, 64 

Benedum, Connie M. 44,55. 175 

Benedum. Kimberly A. 44,55, 90, 150 

Benjamin, Richard 

Benko, David M. 175 

Benko, John P. 63 

Bennett, Tonya N. 152 

Bergoc, Michael J. 175 

Berke, Sharon L. 148. 160, 41, 108 

Bernacki, Peter S. 74, 195 

Beros, George 160 

Berus, Mark J. 63 

Berzinskas, Anthony J. 152 

Besselman, Heidi L. 160 

Betta, Christine A. 175, 29, 69 

Betts, Lisa A. 159, 64 

Beuck, Kimberly A. 94 

Beutler, Michael A. 

Bevack, Patrick W. 157 

Bezdek, Kelly L. 

Bildstein, Laura K. 175 

Bildstein, Linda K. 63 

Bisbee, Joseph L. 195, 113, 64 

Bissett, Theresa M. 160 

Bitker, Tina M 

Black. Cynthia 6, 89, 195, 198, 41, 111, 96 

Black, Tina M, 

Blackmon, Derrick L. 160 

Blankenship, Darryl B. 195. 63 

Blankenship, Stephen 160 

Blase, Arthur P. 195 

Blase, Martin D. 157 

Blau, Patrick E. 158 

Blau, Michael G. 195 

Bleigh, Matthew F. 153, 61 

Blevina, James E. 81, 195, 198, 69, 70, 234 

Blewett, Jeffrey J. 158 

Bliss, Diana B. 137 

Bliss, Richard C. 159 

Blomquist, James R. 157 

Boardman, Paul W. 

Bock, Kelly A. 160 

Boettcher, Eric H. 175 

Bogdan, Nick J. 81, 195 

Bokar, Kathleen 175, 62 

Bolivar, Adriana 195, 198 

Bolivar, Sandra C. 160 

Bolsar, John A. 160, 36, 69 

Bolton, Jacqueline M. 



"The Mid-west girls on a Saturday night, looking at the fire in their eyes 



Index 



278 



Bolton. William 195 

Bonner, Shernae M. 

Booker, Michael A. 160 

Boris, Michael J. 195, 237 

Borthwick, Paul A. 160, 107 

Boschi, Katherine 155 

Boskovic, Katherine A. 153 

Boswell, Catina J. 

Botzki, Hans T. 195, 60,65 

Bowdouris, George J. 160, 38, 100 

Bowman, Jeffrey R. 74, 175, 62, 112 

Boyden. Frank H 83, 156 

Boyle, George Y. 195 

Bradac, Patricia 160 

Bradford, Sean M. 159 

Bradford, Sherri N. 195. 65 

Bradley Dearie 154 

Braidich, David J. 44, 55, 159 

Braidich, Richard 44, 53, 195 

Braidich. Shirley K. 42, 44, 55, 175 

Brandich. Charles R. 160 

Brandich, Kathleen M. 175 

Bratton, Susan A. 155, 111. 64 

Brearton, Gina L. 160 

Brechun, Joseph A. 155 

Brechun, Michael J. 196 

Breeden, Kenneth W 217 

Breeden. William M- 

Breeding, Jacquelyn M. 

Breeding, James F. 160 

Brehm, Eric L. 175 

Brentar, Janet M. 1%, 38 

Brewer. Jennifer M. 160, 57, 64 

Breznikar, Martina 156 

Brickman, Katherine T 43, 44, 160 

Brinkley, Patricia L. 175, 196 

Brinsek, Leigh A. 175, 62 

Brisbine, Chris N. 43, 44, 157 

Brisbine, Lisa A. 10, 23, 42, 43, 44, 1%. 198. 57. 69, 120. 66 

Britt, Deidre F. 65 

Broa, Gerald J. 44. 52, 196 

Brochak, Gregory R. 52, 55, 175 

Brock, Laura E. 152 

Brock, Paul E. 

Brocone, Constance T. 44, 53, 160, 139 

Brodowski, Dean A. 79, 153 

Brokate, Melissa E. 160, 104 

Brokate, Scott R. 

Brooks, Lawrence J. 115 

Brown, Karen R. 

Brown, Kristin E. 160, 170, 41, 119 

Brown, Lenore J. 196, 62 

Brown, Paul A. 79, 157 

Brown, Sophia D. 175, 62. 65 

Browne, Sheila E. 157 

Brozovich, Barbara F. 160 

Bruening, Jeffrey S. 160 

Bryan, James J. 79, 152 

Bryan, Julie 1%, 62 

Bryan, Raymond A. 160 

Bryda, Matthew S. 85, 175 

Brzozowski, Kerry T. 175, 57 

Bucceri, Linda Ann 1%. 62 

Buck, Anne Mil, 196, 57, 111 

Buck, Jeffrey S. 74, 175 

Budas, Judy L. 160 

Budnar, James C. 196, 113 

Buettner, Susan C. 1%, 198, 41, 38 

Bujnocki, Anna Marie P- 159 

Bukovac, Joyce E. 87. 160, 115 

Bukovac, Robert M. 87 

Bumbarger. Randy R. 175, 120 

Bunting, Donna L. 175 

Burke, Eric P. 160 

Burkett. Sheri R. 175 

Burkholder. James R. 1%. 64 

Burlison, Scott R. 160 

Burrington, Julie 175 

Burrows, Kimberly 196, 198 

Burton, Christopher D. 87, 196, 197, 115 

Burton, Scott E. 44, 55, 73, 160, 115 

Burts, Michael D. 175 

Burtyk, Laura M. 44, 53, 175, 119 



Busdiecker, Lisa A. 175 
Bush. Joseph 196 
Bussey, Donald A. 
Butara, Joseph R. 196 
Butler, Terrance L. 161, 156 
Byrd. Lavelle C. 156 

Cable. Joan N. 11, 44, 190, 196, 198, 62 

Cahoon, Christine L. 10, 175, 69, 70, 65 

Cain, Monica D. 175, 111 

CaJabrese, Andrew 44, 53, 55, 87, 196. 115 

Calabrese, Donna M. 196 

Caldwell, Eric J. 175 

Callahan, Laurie J. 196 



Carter, Anthony M. 

Carter, Juanita E. 

Carter, Lasonya 

Casto, Diane M. 175, 62 

Cayne, John T. 199, 96 

Cecelic, Theresa M. 159, 64 

Cechura. Jody M. 199, 64 

Cek, John W 161 

Celeste, David V. 156 

Chambers, Christopher J. 

Chambere, Paul E. 175 

Champa, Ronald 175 

Chan, Robbin F. 199, 62 

Chanakas. Anna G. 43, 44, 198, 199, 57, 69. 70 




Sophomore men toast the waiter from this elegant restaurant as he brings the check. 



Calogar. Priscilla E. 175 

Campbell, Carl 79, 199 

Campbell, Christopher L. 159 

Campbell, Lisa M. 

Campbell, Robert G. 199 

Campbell, Robert J. 83, 159 

Campbell, Susan L. 199, 201, 56, 57 

Campbell, Tracey R. 150 

Campbell, William M. 82, 175 

Cantini, Tammy A. 11, 58, 86, 89, 175 

Capasso, David S. 79, 112 

Capasso, Dear. D. 153, 199, 57 

Capretta, Carrie M. 161 

Capretta, Thomas A. 199 

Caputo, Anthony 175 

Cardwell, Carlzo C. 74 

Cardwell, Tiffany S. 

Caresani, James E. 175 

Carlson, Robert A. 87, 139, 153, 41 

Carmigiano, William 159 

Carpenter, Annmarie 

Carpenter, Scott A. 74, 76, 199, 114, 115 

Carpenter, Steven S. 

Carroll, Debbie L. 152 



Chandler, Marcellus 156 
Chen, Jean T. 59, 161, 41, 65 
Chetnik, Kenneth M. 161 
Chicone. Kelly L. 161 
Chinchar, Christine L. 14. 175 
Chisholm, Christina 175 
Chrestoff, Patrick T. 175, 112 
Cieslinski, Linda M. 161 
Cirino, Elaina M. 157 
Ciuprinskas, Anthony J. 74, 175 
Clark, Colleen A. 153 
Clark, Cynthia M. 175, 31 
Clark, Kenneth A. 78, 161 
Clark. Michael T. 74, 175 
Clark, Steven M. 157 
Clarke. Kimberly A. 153 
Clay, Gerard 175 
Clay, Jefferey A. 200 
Clere, Donald L. 
Clere, Ladonna C. 161 
Clifford, Thomas W. 79, 112 
Coe, Joseph C. 176 
Cogan, Kelly K. 161 
Colantonio. Anthony J. 151 



279 



Index 




Foods classes have their own recipe for holiday spirit. 



Colantonio, Daniel M. 161 

Colantonio, Dina M. 198, 200 

Colbert, Thomas 176 

Cole, JameB 152 

Cole, Larry 

Cole, Robert T, 79, 156 

Coleman, Shonda L- 154 

CollinB. Brian W. 161 

Collins, Paul A. 

Collins, W. Rob 176, 64 

Colton, Steven R. 161 

Compton, Christine 

Compton, Philip 161, 156 

Congos, Dionne L. 176 

Conklin. Denise S. 159 

Connors, Daniel J. 107 

Cononie. David 78, 161 

Cononie, Jane 198, 200 

Conroy. Laura A. 161 

Conway, Kurt A. 74, 176, 115 

Cook, Karen E. 44, 53, 198, 200, 41, 60 

Cook. Robert L. 156, 61 

Cool, Dawn M. 156 

Cooney, Stephen M. 161, 41, 289 

Corbett, Christina J. 159 

Corbin, Andrea J. 153 

Corman, Sherri 200, 41 

Cornelius, Kerry L. 154 

Corrao, Scott D. 85, 200 

Corrigan, James W. 161 

Corrigan, John C. 176 

Cotter, Brian J. 155 

Cotter, Maureen 176 

Coy, Jeffrey A. 139, 158 

Coyne, Colleen J. 87, 161, 119 

Coyne, Lisa M. 176, 119 

Cramer. Thomas R. 161, 116 

Crane, Cynthia L- 176 

Crane. David L, 80, 81, 200, 63 

Crawford, Cedric 161, 100 

Crayton, Katrina J. 154 

Crayton, Michelle R 161, 65 

Crissman, Lisa M. 157 



Croone, Eric 161, 100 

Croone, Tiffany D. 176, 115 

Crowell, Janeen M 153, 104 

Crowell, Tracy J. 176, 64 

Cullen, John L. 

Culliton, Andre M 161 

Culliton, Laura A. 46, 47, 200 

Culmer, Darla J. 

Culmer. Jeremy Ralph S. 159 

Cummings, Claudia J. 139, 153, 57, 69 

Currie, Emily A. 176 

Curtis, Kelli S. 90, 153 

Curtis, Monte H. 200 

Cutwright, Jeffrey B. 

Cutwright, Suzanne G. 162, 170 

Cvelbar, Barbara J. 162, 154 

Cvijanovic, Anthony 82, 162, 100 

Dailey, Brian E. 176, 115 

Daily, Kelly M. 

Dakdouk, Ricky E. 79, 157 

Dale, Glenn E. 

Dale, Kimberly R. 200, 63 

Dalessio, Kelli L. 153 

Dallos, Gordon H, 82, 176 

D Amico, Danielle A. 90, 162. 170, 65, 104 

Danna, Christine E. 176, 57 

D Apollo, John J. 153 

Dauer, Kirk J. 176. 69 

Daugherty, Thomas J. 162, 140, 41, 100 

Davies, Lois A. 200 

Davis, Barbara M. 200 

Davis, Dianna L. 162 

Davis, Glenn A. 162 

Davis, Karen D. 3, 200 

Davis, Lewis G. 78, 162, 116, 61 

Davis, Merrell T. 79. 152, 100 

Davis. Stacie L. 90. 155 

Davis, Troy 15, 257. 200, 56, 57 

Dawson, James 176 

Dawson, Patrick L. 162 

Day, John H. 157 

Day. Tina M. 87, 176 



Daykin, Donna M. 200, 62, 218 

Deakins, Thomas A. 162 

Dean, Antoniette A. 154 

Dean, John S. 

Dearden, Greg R. 6. 176 

Deaton. Darren L. 

Deatsch, Mary J. 162 

De Baltzo, Deanna C. 

Debevec, Michelle D. 162 

De Boe, Anna M. 176, 62 

De Boe, Jack L. 162 

De Curtis, Tricia R. 

De Filippo, Dawn M. 14, 11, 198, 200, 56, 57 

De Filippo, John W. 176 

De Gidio, Alan P. 

De Gidio. Nathan 83, 150 

De Granda, Christopher 0. 116 

Deister, Patrick K. 156 

Dekleva. Daniel J. 156 

De Laney, Kimberly M. 

Delas, Mary 153 

De Luca, Renee M 200 

Delzoppo, Anthony M. 155 

Delzoppo, Jamie M. 3, 200 

De Mark, James 162 

De Mora, Michael J. 78, 162 

De Mora, William P. 176. 41. Ill, 30, 31, 60. 100 

Dennick, Jeanmarie 200, 62 

Denovich, Ramona L. 162 

De Palma, Michael A. 176 

Deptola. Charles 200 

De Puy, Michael 

De Rose, James P 63 

Desico, Lisa M. 46, 155, 49 

De Victor, Mathew F. 162 

De Vol, De Ann Y 162 

Dewalt, Janice D. 176, 62 

Dezelon, Cheri 203 

Dickinson, James W. 163. 64 

Dickinson. Todd A. 153. 64 

Dietrich. David 

Di Franco. Michael J. 

Di Paolo, Leonard J. 176, 115 

Di Paolo, Lynn M. 152, 38 

Dockry, Milissa D. 151, 111 

Dodd, Jackline 3, 203 

Doesburg, Lori A. 203, 64 

Dolan. Brian E. 203, 107 

Dolinar, Amy M. 157 

Donikowski. Robert W. 74, 176 

T nley, Genevra P. 158, 38 

D Onofrio, Mark C. 

Donnett, Gary M. 203 

D Onofrio, Michael J. 176 

Dooley, Brian D. 163 

Dooley, Scott A. 152 

Dorado, James R. 

Douglas, Bridgette 155, 104 

Douglas, Milton E. 176 

Douglas, Shaleen R. 176 

Downing, David H. 79, 152 

Downing, Mary M. 

Doyle, Daniel P 176 

Doyle, Paul T. 193. 203, 116, 62 

Drage, Christopher E. 

Drage, John J. 163, 176, 112 

Drake, Keith D. 243, 62 

Drake. Krystal D. 176 

Drazetic, Anna 152 

Drazetic, Peter P. 176 

Drees. Kenneth P. 203 

Drnek. Lawrence J. 163 

Dubecky, Dennis J. 176 

Duchon, Renee L. 152 

Dudley, Barbara J. 176, 62 

Duke, Christine M. 203 

Dulla, DeniBe 198, 203 

Dumendic, Diana 163 

Dunlevy. Dianna 203. 62 

Dunson, Kelly M. 

Duracensky, Lisa M. 198, 203 

Duracensky, Tracy A. 163 

Durbin, Jennifer 155 



Index 



280 



Durant, Adrienne D. 163 
Dureiko, Denene A. 176 
Dureiko, Diane M. 155 
Duricy, Christine L. 93, 158 
Duricy, James A. 54, 87, 176, 57, 64 
Dushaj, Elizabeth 157 
Dushaj, Pauline 163 
Dymanski, Sharon E. 203 
Dymanski, Janet L. 163 
Dzomba. Robert J. 3, 11, 203 

Eddy, Jacalyn R. 176. 41, 60, 119 

Edgar, Kenneth J. 176 

Ehrhart, Ryan G. 83, 153 

Eichhorn, Amy N. 156 

Eiding, Kathleen 41 

Ellis, Solodean 

ElliBon, Keith I. 96 

Elmore, Michelle E. 151 

Elze, Laura K. 44, 55, 163, 41, 111, 64 

Emanuel, Timothy J. 163 

Emerick, Gregory M. 163 

Emerman, Marcie S. 163 

Engelking, Cynthia L. 15, 203, 31, 62 

Englebrecht, Ronald K. 176 

Enos, Duke 

Epps, Dawnette S. 

Erdelac, Christopher J. 44, 54, 55, 176, 189 

Ernst, Melissa R. 150 

Eslin, Almira 176 

Eubank, Kelly S. 150, 64 

EvanB, Brent A. 87, 176, 57 

Evans, JameB A. 44, 52, 54, 55, 203, 237 

Evans, William H. 74, 190, 203 

Evilsizer, Edward D. 163 

Exsentico, Lolita 176 

Exsentico, Theresa 176 

Fair, Darlene C. 163 

Fair, David M. 74, 197, 203, 56, 57, 290 

Fair, Denise C. 55, 157 

Fair, Michael R. 79, 155 

Faletic, Kristine M. 87, 94, 176, 64 

Fambrini, Brent A 152 

Fannin. Rachelle L. 159, 65 

Fazio, Kerry L. 11, 59, 203, 57, 66 

Fazio, KriBten R. 59, 198, 203, 57, 69, 38 

Fekete, Cynthia 93, 203 

Fekete, Deborah C. 163 

Felden, Catherine M. 153, 64 

Felden, Edward M, 176 

Felden, Joseph A. 163 

Ferenac, Tina 153 

Ferguson, Tammy L. 163, 62 

Ferrara, James J. 

Ferrara, Lesley A 159, 49 

Fike, Sandra K. 204 

Fimiani, Anthony A. 4, 163 

Finch, Alison 163 

Finke, Lisa M. 176, 62, 111, 100 

Finnegan, Meghan 155 

Fischer, Margaret A. 177, 57 

Fischer, William H. 44, 55, 153 

Fisher, David L. 204 

Fitzgerald, Michael J. 163 

Fitzgerald, Thomas 204 

Fitzpatrick, Angela M. 

Flanagan, Colleen M. 204, 63 

Fleck, Mary C. 177, 62 

Fleming, Vincent N. 163 

Flowers, John L. 158 

Flowers, Suzanne C. 157, 119 

Fonovic, Bruno 79, 157, 112 

Force, Richard K. 177 

Ford, Charisse L. 154 

Ford, Joshua S. 87, 163, 115 

Ford, Kimberly D. 150 

Ford, Tommie L. 79, 153 

Forker, Mark D. 157, 112 

Formica, Daniel 

Formick, Anthony 204 

Fort, Angela M. 177, 65 



Foster, Jeffrey M. 177 

Fowle, Nancy T. 163 

Fowle, Pamela S. 204 

Fox, Donald 

For, Jill M. 204. 63 

Fox, Jo Anna L. 

FranciB, Michael A. 74, 177 

Francis, Ricky R. 163 

Franic, Linda A. 153 

Frank, Barbara A. 155 

Franklin, Damon C. 152 

Franklin, Brenda A. 177 

Franklin, Michael T. 79, 157, 100 

Franklin, Ruth A. 

Franko, R. Eric 157 

Frankos. Daniel E. 154 

Franks, Scott R. 152 

Frasher, Lisa J. 153 

Frazier, Thomas E. 

Freeh, Kirsten H. 204, 119 

Freeman, Darvin R. 150 

FriBco, Johnny A. 78, 163 

Frye, Karen C. 154 

Fuerst, Raymond A. 

Fulton, Carin A. 163 

Furlan, Sandra L. 150, 38 

Furman, William 55, 177 

Fye, Norman A. 79, 155 

Fye, Patti A. 157 

Gabriele, Lucy 177 
Gainer, Sandra L. 155 
Galloway, Eileen M. 198, 204 
Galloway, Michael F. 177 
Gamber, Kimberly D. 163 
Gansey, Gerald R. 204 
Ganti, Avinash L. 163, 57 
Garcia, Celso 58.59 
Garlauskas, Vykintas M. 153 
Gauzman, Harold A. 155 
Gavin, ThomaB 177 
Gaylor, Mark D. 177 



Geddee, Annmarie L. 44, 55, 163, 69 

Geddes, Diane D. 

Gembarski, Edward 163, 38 

Gembarski, Janien 178 

George. ChriBtine M. 159. 64 

George, Michael J. 178 

Gephart, Kathleen E. 204 

Gercar, Christopher J. 217 

Gercar, Kimberly A. 163 

Germano, LiBa A. 90, 155, 104 

Germano, Vincent A. 153 

Gervasi, John R. 204 

Geyer, Susan J. 152 

Gezann, Richard A. 163 

Gholson, Anthony T. 10, 204, 41, 99, 96 

Gibson, Colleen K. 151 

Gibson, Daniel N. 163 

Giegerich, Laurence D. 204 

Gildone, LyneU* M. 178, 62 

Gilliam, Adriane A. 163 

Gilmette, Kelly L. 

Gilmore, Kristine P, 204 

Gladin, Cheryl M. 163 

Glaser, Susan R. 178, 62 

GlaBsner, Barry J. 

Click. Eric B. 155. 120 

Gochneaur. John M. 155 

Godina, Vincent E. 153, 120 

Goldrich, Sharon P. 178, 57 

Goldstein, Charles H. 178 

Golen. Jo A. 3, 204 

Golinar, Karen A. 139, 204 

Gollner, Dana S. 74, 163, 100 

Golob, Tina L. 204, 63 

Gondeau, Diana L. 163 

Goode, Mary FranceB 152 

Goodman, Michelle K. 159, 155 

Gore, Tracie J. 163 

Grabinski, Daniel 152 

Grablovie, Kevin 79, 157 

Grahovac, Igor 81, 83, 204 

Grahovac, Renata 159, 153 



EHS juniors Jim Allay and Joe Muscarella avoid being identified at the library, their 
favorite hang-out. 



uuuitiLia mm/is m 

I I 111. AM 



1 






4 £ 






SKI 
II 




281 



Index 



Grassi, Janine M. 163 

Grau, Edward M. 

Gravizi. Thomas 178 

Gray, Deborah A. 

Gray. Deirdre L. 153 

Gray, KriBtine D. 152 

Gray, Regina A. 178, 62 

Grayer, Charles E. 

Graziano, Joseph 

Green, Karen D. 163 

Green. Martino D. 115 

Greenawald, Tommy G. 151, 61 

Greene, Jeffrey B. 

Greene, Susan E. 163 

Griesmer. Mary 204, 62 

Griffin. Tonya D. 178 

Griffin, Tracy A, 163 

Grgincic, Steve 153 

Grigsby, Jeffrey 44, 55, 154 

Grigsby, Katherine A. 207 

Grillo. Alicia M. 163 

Grman, Zdravko 163 

Grmovsek, Joseph J. 163 

Gron, Edith R, 119 

Gron, Mary M. 163, 207, 119 

Grosel. Dean A. 207 

Groudle, Judy L. 207, 62 

Groves, Harry R. 164 

Grubb. Susan P. 178. 57 

Grubb, William F. 44, 55. 164 

Gubanc, Joseph 74, 178 

Gubitosi, Rose A. 44, 53, 164, 41, 66, 60. 64 

Guillory. Renee D. 159, 104 

Gundelach, Rosemarie 




Hackathorn, David A. 207 

Haggerty, Patrick J. 178 

Haislah. Paul N. 79, 150 

Hall. David P. 81. 179 

Hall. Eric J. 164 

Hall. F. James 72, 179. 112 

Hall. Kathleen L. 179, 62. 

Hall. Michael J. 83 

Hall. Rozella 207, 63 

Halhday, Linda M. 46, 179, 62 

Hallo, Diane 46, 48, 49, 207, 38 

Ham, Kri9tine A. 

Hamby, Leonard B. 164 

Hamilton, James C. 179 

Hamilton. Lesley A. 

Hamm. Lisa K. 207 

Hampton, Tina M. 179, 62 

Hamula, Colleen M. 

Haney, Susan J. 164 

Hannan, Lori A. 164 

Hansen, Sharon K. 198. 41, 56, 57, 207, 290. 38 

Hansen, Jill L. 158 

Harb, Joseph 179 

Harmon, Kimberly A. 179 

Harnick, Gretchen W. 59, 164, 115 

Harrah, James E. 151 

Harrah, Kathryn A. 44, 207, 63 

Harris, Holly K. 164. 119 

Harris, John R. 179 

HarriB, Paul E. 79, 155, 38 

Harrison, Christopher J. 153 

Harrison, John P. 179 

Hart, Carolmarie 208, 57, 111, % 

Harth, Michael L, 208 

Harth, Susan M. 179 

Harvey, Janet D. 164 

Haubert, Diana D. 179 

Haubert, Ralph 153 

Haupt, Andrew W 164 

Hausrath, Tobias R. 179 

Hawthorne, Celeatine L. 154, 65 

Hayden, Regina 155 

Hayes, Bruce T. 79, 152 

Hayes, Jean M. 153, 64 

Heasley, Robert S. 208 

Hector, Dale R. 

Hector, Debra R. 164 



Amy Suponic and Kris Whitney sell tickets for kisses. 



Heinz, Dawn D. 164 

Henderson, Richard A. 150 

Henderson, Sandra M. 198, 208 

Henkhuzens, Dawn L. 179, 57, 69 

Hennessee, Aretha A. 44, 55, 190, 208, 38, 65 

Henry, Kenneth J. 156 

Henry. Michele L. 

Herbert, Ronald J. 208, 63 

Herbert, Terilyn 

Hernan. Devin 208 

Herrick, Susan M. 14, 15, 198. 208 

Hewston, Donald 0. 79 

Heyduk, Kathleen M. 208, 63 

Heyduk, Ronald A. 179 

Hickman, Sean M. 

Higgins, Kim L. 156 

Highsmith, Michelle 208 

Hill, David W. 208, 63 

Hilliard, John C. 164, 116 

Hillier, Gerald L. 57 

Hinson, Shinette, S. 164 

Hirsch, Roderick E. 179 

Hirzer, Gotthard 208 

Hoag, Michael R. 179, 96 

Hodge, W. Jerome 83, 153, 112 

Hodnichak, Joanne M, 42, 44, 179, 41, 288, 64 

Hoffert, Paul M. 164 

Hoffert, Susan M. 198, 208, 69, 111, 60 

Hogan. Pamela J. 208 

Hogrefe, Peter C. 164 

Hogrefe, Steven J. 208 

Holcknecht, Richard 81, 208, 40 

Holland. Gabrielle 11, 13, 44, 54, 179, 57. Ill 

Holland, Monique 

Holley. Denise 164, 103 

Holloway, Tracy 

Holmes, Timothy J. 179 

Holtz, Nancy R. 164 

Hood, Thomaa M. 179 

Hooks Andrea M. 151, 41 

HopkinB, Natalie E. 153, 111 

Hoppert, Cynthia A. 45, 44, 55, 179, 64 

Horabik, Mark S. 79, 153 



Horgan, Lisa A, 208 

Horgan, Michael R. 164 

Horton, Thomas J. 164 

Horvat, Donald R. 74, 179 

Horvat, Douglas J. 208 

Houston, Deanna M. 

Howard, Dionne A. 157 

Hradek, Christine A. 179 

Hradek, James W. 85, 208 

Hribar. James A. 155 

Hribar, James F 

Hribar. Mary 211, 60, 64 

Hribar, Olga 

Hromyko, Gregory W. 211 

Hrusovsky, Michael 74. 75, 179, 96 

Hubbard, Brenda K. 10, 19, 46, 214, 62, 211 

Hufnagle, Frank 25, 211 

Hufnagle. Judith 179, 31 

Hughes, William A. 164 

Hughley, Ricardo L. 179 

Hula. Deborah K. 164 

Hull, G. Edgar 211 

Hull, Terri E. 157 

Hull, Tina M. 159 

Humbert, Walter J. 164 

Humphrey. Edwin M. 164 

Hurney. John J. 164 

Husarik, Jennifer A. 46. 179, 48, 49, 56, 57 

Hutchinson, Paula A. 179, 62 

Hutter, Lome J. 

Hynes Theresa J. 

Iannetta, Laura A. 179 
Immke. James F. 74, 179 
Insana, Kathy 179 
Iorio. Anthony 
Ipavec, Kimberly 164 
Ipavec, Lisa 164 
Ipavec, Lori 164 
Isgro, Anthony B. 164 
Ivancic. Janet M. 211 
Ivancic, Michael J. 179 
Ivancic, Michelle M. 179 



Index 



282 



Ivancic, Scott E. 44, 55, 179, 61, 64 
Ivey, Dennis E. 44, 56, 152 
Ivinskas, James B. 
Ivinskas, Timothy 151 
Izquierdo, Julia M. 62, 211 

Jackson, David P. 179. 120, 112, 113 

Jackson, Sharon Y. 164 

Jaffe, Amy B. 155, 111 

Jager, Steven 164, 120 

Jaklich, Wendy A. 179, 62 

Jakopanec, Michael 

Jakovlic, John J. 211 

Jaksa, Sandra J. 211 

Jakubauskas, Kestutis J. 78, 164 

Jalovec, Joel J. 179 

Jalovec, Norma J. 93, 164 

Jankovich, Robert S. 179 

Jankowski, Diane 62, 211 

Jarc, Thomas J. 164 

Jaszkewicz, Michael D. 116 

Jaworsky, Eric W. 44, 53, 54, 164 

Jaworsky, Sherry L. 55, 153 

Jaynes, Shannon M. 152 

Jazbec, Sue E. 11, 179, 57, 60 

Jerina, Matthew J. 

Jevnikar, John A. 159 

Jevnikar, Juliana M. 179 

Jividen, Ronald P. 

Johnson, Connie L. 164 

Johnson, Danielle A. 164 

Johnson, Deborah A. 153 

Johnson, L. Richard 79, 159, 100 

Johnson, Shaun E. 156 

Johnson, William A. 164. 120. 116 

Joksimovich, Aleksandar 179 

Jones, Ayoola G. 

Jones, Darryl M. 179 

Jones, Corrina 157 

Jones, Damon A. 79 

Jones, Dwight A. 155 

Jones, Harold L. 63, 211 

Jones, JoBeto 179 



Jones, Judith 164, 115 

Jones, Matthew 179 

Jones, Patricia A. 94, 95, 164 

Jones, Sandra L. 164 

Joranko, Gregory P. 164 

Jordan, Gregory J. 150, 115 

Jordan, Jeffrey, A. 81, 164 

Journey, Karla E. 164 

Journey, Katherine A. 211 

Judge, Anthony J- 152 

Jules, Josie M. 191, 65 

Juratic, Christopher R. 153 

Jurgensen, Nicole L. 164, 66, 64 

Jurgensen, Trevorr 179, 111. 96. 64 

Justus. Judy J- 179 

Kacperski, April M- 179 

Kacperski, Debora L. 164. 119 

Kacperski, Denise J 42, 44. 226. 211, 64 

Kacperski, Pamela J. 57, 211 

Kainec, Deborah L. 164 

Kaleal. David A. 139, 153 

Kalous, Kimberly S. 180 

Kamposek. Albin 211 

Kandah, Cynthia M 165. Ill 

Kane. Christopher J. 107, 31, 211 

Kanios, Michelle L. 180 

Karabinus, John W. 79, 153, 100 

Karabinus, Phillip J. 12. 211. 64 

Karby. John R. 153 

Kardos. Claire E. 165 

Kardos. Faith S. 3, 14, 15, 89, 56, 57, 211, 60, 115 

Karnak, Jobn W. 165 

Karnak, Theodore 87, 159 

Karountzos, Christina I 156 

Kastner, Vincent A. 180 

Katcher, David W 44. 54, 234, 211, 64 

Kause, Kurt F. 87, 211 

KearnB, Kimberly 152 

Kearns, Scott 

Kekic, Michael J. 79, 151 

Keller. Thomas W. 180, 62 

Kelly, Bradley S. 44, 53, 54, 55, 180, 189 




Kelly, Kenneth L. 

Kelly, Sharon A. 13, 180, 119 

Kelly, Steven P. 180 

Kelly, Suaan M. 154, 119 

Kempert. Michael R 212 

Kempke, Deborah A 212. 62 

Kendro, James A. 165 

Kent, Tammara 165 

Keough, Patricia M. 212 

hi-r.-Hi.-i., Klaudia 180, 62 

Kern, David M. 165 

Kernz, Kelly L. 159, 155 

Kessel, Kathleen M. 180 

Kessler. Paul M. 74, 180 

Ketterman, Michael D. 151 

Kimack, William C. 180, 62 

King, Bradley S. 165 

King, Kathleen M. 190, 198, 212, 57, 108, 38 

King, Mark J. 212, 115 

King, Robert H. 74, 180, 112 

King, Todd W. 15, 212, 56, 57, 113 

King, Xavier R. 79, 157 

Kirchner. Darlene M. 180 

Kirchner. Denise M. 165 

Kirchner, Karen V. 165 

Kirchner, Kenneth D 212, 63 

Kish, Gus 212, 63 

Kitchen, Donald L. 78, 165 

Kitis, Michael 153 

Kittredge. Jennifer L. 153 

Kleckner. Candise M. 165, 57, 64 

Klepac, Tony P 44, 155, 64. 100 

Klimek. Robert 263. 212, 30 

Kline, Amy 156 

Knack, John G 78, 165. 284, 38 

Knack. Karen C. 212, 63 

Knaus. Steven J. 212, 107 

Kobetitach, Patricia A. 153 

Koch, Susi G. 198, 212, 214, 60 64 

Kocjan, Erin 158, 104 

Kocjan, Kimberly 165, 104 

Koerber, Lauren 154 

Kollar, ChriBtine A. 153 

Kolleda, John S. 180 

Koller, David S. 180 

Koller, Dean T. 180 

Koller, Karen L. 180, 62 

Koman, Gregory 165 

Koman, Vincent 180 

Koncar, Thomas A 

Konchan, Thomas S. 212 

Konrad, Janette M. 165, 60 

Kooser. Larry L. 165, 100 

Korb, Catherine D. 180, 57 

Korb, Kelly A 87, 165 

Korosec, Christopher J. 

Korzun, James L. 59, 87, 180, 29, 41. 66, 67, 60, 64 

Kosic, Andrea R. 6, 212, 214, 41, 111, 96. 30 

KoBten. Darryl E. 44. 52. 54, 55 

Koucky, Sherri L. 180, 57 

Koustis, Maria 180 

Kovac, Valerie E. 180 

Kovacic, Frank J. 62 

Kovacic, Vincent E. 165 

Kovalec, Steven 165 

Kovatch, Scott A. 165 

KozlowBki, Adam R. 74, 180 

Kracheck, David E. 155. 120 

Kracheck. Dawn M. 212 

Kralic, Kimberly A. 212, 57 

Krance. John C. 180 

Krance, Joseph M. 158 

Krcal, Amy L. 159 

Kreckal, Christine A. 165 

Krenisky, Paul B 180 

Kristoff, Carol A. 43, 44, 159 

Kristoff, Matthew 53, 55, 212 

Kriz, Margaret M. 151 

Kriz, Mark W. 152 

Krizanovic, Anthony S. 165 

Kro, Nick 151 

Krofcheck, Christine 165 

Krofcheck, Jeffrey A 74, 212 



The most innovative class room in Euclid High, utilized by Curtis Majers. 



283 



Index 



Kronik, Jame9 W. 
Kronik. Joseph E. 212 
Kropf, Debra L. 165 
Krulc. Julie A. 159 
Kub.k, Glenn A. 74, 76, 212 
Kucera, Christine M. 180, 57 
Kuchta, Jeffrey S. 154, 61 
Kucmanic, Albin 87, 166 
Kudlak, Joelle M. 46, 180 
Kuhar, Karen A. 215 
Kuhar, Monica J. 215, 103 
Kuhen, Timothy A. 215, 116, 63 
Kuhta, Dawn M, 180 

La Fountaine, Timothy 215 
Lah, Jill 
Lah, G. Scott 
Lai, Leroy L, 166 
Lai, Alei A. 166 



Laska, Jerry B, 166 

Latham, Alicia F, 180 

Latham, Sean F. 215 

Latkowski, Elizabeth 63 

Latach. Norman H. 215, 63 

Laurenson, Susan M. 166, 108 

Lauria, Anthony P, 79, 159, 112 

Lauria, Patrick S. 150, 112 

Lauver, Elizabeth A. 159, 41, 38, 104 

Lawrence, Cynthia A. 156 

Lawrence, Kevin M. 153 

Lawrence, Kimberly A. 150 

Lawrence, Richard P. 180 

Lawrence, Sandy K. 

Lawrence, William J. 166 

Leeper, Launi A. 44, 53, 180, 41, 69, 61 

Leibnitzer, Lisa 216 

Lentz, Susan 

Lenz, Melissa M. 180 




As Greg Knack does not help Missy Malone on with her coat, one wonders, 
dead at EHS?" 



'Is chivalry 



Lake, Christine M. 215 
Lamatrice, Laura L. 180 
Langan, Joseph J. 180 
Langdon, Patty K. 
Lange, Jonathan D. 83, 153 
Lange, Michael G. 215. 41, 66. 60 
Lang, Michael J. 139 
Lantz, Darnelle M. 215 
Lapinskas, Kenneth R. 
Lapuh. Alan F. 74, 153, 193. 215 
Lapuh, Robert A. 79, 115 
Laquatra, Michael A. 180 
Larkins, Susanne L. 90, 180, 61 
Laska, Brenda 



Leonard, James M. 216 
Leonard, Richard A. 180 
Leonard, William A. 157 
Leonardi, Raymond A. 156, 158 
Lepisto, Terry A. 166 
Le Quyea, Patrick 216, 116, 237 
Lesnick, Ronald 57, 216, 63 
Letcher, Christine F. 180, 56, 57 
Lett, Anthony 74, 180, 114, 115 
Leu, Amy D. 148, 180, 57, 69 
Lewarski, Steven J. 166 
Lewin, Thomas W, 166, 100 
Lewis, Henry 150 
Leyda, Michael F. 87, 180, 38 



Liggett, Angela R. 198, 216 

Lillie, Jonathon G. 

Limbert, Cynthia L. 151. 64 

Linderman, Christopher G. 79, 156, 107, 64 

Linderman, Scott L. 216 

Lindic, Alana M. 155 

Lindic, Timothy J. 81, 216 

Lisac, Martin M. 79, 150, 107, 38, 115 

Lloyd, Robert W. 

Lockwood, James L. 166, 244 

Lograaso, Thomas M. 216 

Lohn, Nina M. 153 

Lollar, Shane 157 

Lomac, Tanya M. 153, 41, 57 

Lomai, De Jarnette 154 

Lombardo, Jeanine M. 156 

Lonchar, David 157 

Lonchar, Patrick 216 

Look, Heidi C. 216 

Look, Richard 166 

Loparo, Carla D. 216 

Loparo. Michael D. 79. 156 

Lorence, Karen M. 166, 41, 108 

Lorenzo, Paul S. 74. 180 

Love, Christine T. 166 

Love, Mark A. 26 

Loving, Aaron T. 157, 100 

Lovingood, Threaaa M. 157 

Lowe, Adrienne S. 

Lowe, Gregory W, 166 

Lowery, Christie M. 180, 63, 64 

Lowery, John R. 157 

Lucaa, Charles B. 157 

Lucas, James E. 180 

Lucaa, Kelli S. 180 

Lucas, Mary A. 166 

Lucci, Diane C. 46, 166, 49 

Luda, Terry I. 180, 61, 65 

Luketic, Daniel I. 83, 166 

Luketic, David M. 151 

Lunder, Edward 73, 87, 181 

Lusane, Tina D. 180 

Luther, Christine A. 16, 216 

Luther, Lorraine D. 159, 38 

Lutz, Robert M. 167 

Ly, Quang M. 

Lyon, Doreen D. 167 

Lyon. Terry T. 

LyonB, Lynette 167 

Lyons, Marcella M. 

Mabel, Kimberly J. 58, 59, 181, 57 

Maciejauskas, Victor R. 216, 115 

Mackell, Allen D. 216 

Mackell, Michelle M. 55, 153 

Madden, Wendy 152 

Madden. Thomas H. 87, 167, 115 

Maddoi, Carla M. 155 

Maddoi, Sherri L. 

Maher. James M, 44, 154 

Maher, Robert W. 167 

Majers, Curtis B. 55, 168, 69. 283 

Majers. Jacqueline 70, 216, 60 

Maianey. Matthew J. 180 

Malone, Melissa A. 47, 181, 49, 57, 284, 38 

Mance, Kenneth W. 150, 116 

Mann, David 167 

Mann, NataJie S. 167 

Mannello, Daniel M. 78, 167 

Mantel, Charlotte R. 151, 119 

Marando, Jeffrey R. 181, 112 

Marando, Theresa A. 44, 55, 157 

Marchesano, Jackie A. 216, 63 

Marciante, Michelle 167 

Marett, Ann M. 154, 216 

Markuz, Maria A. 216 

Markuz, Paul 156 

Maroli, Diane M. 167, 41 

Maroli. Joseph M. 216, 107 

Marolt, Tina M. 158 

Marrott, Jennifer A. 167, 111, 64 

Martin, Brian P. 181 



Index 



284 



Martin. Denise M. 3, 155, 216, 65 

Martin, John E. 78, 167 

Martin, Monique Y. 181 

Marvin, Kimberly M. 87, 158, 49 

Mason, Leslie A. 181 

Mason, Michael J. 159 

Massingil], David S. 157 

Mast, Joan C. 11, 13, 181, 291, 102, 103 

Mata, Elizabeth C. 181 

MaU, Gregory J. 167, 115 

Mataich, James 181, 57 

Mataraza, Laura 59, 167, 170, 111, 66, 65 

Matsko, Mary 167, 170, 41, 111, 64, 115 

Mauldin, Denise 63 

Maurer, Robert E. 167 

Mauser, Diane M. 

Mausser, David F. 182 

Mausser, James J. 154, 64 

Maxey, Linda M. 153 



Mc Candless, Michael P. 87, 167 

Mc Carthy, Richard 78, 167 

Mc Clain, Cornelius E. 78, 167, 100 

Mc CloBkey, Michael R. 153 

Mc Cluskey, Kevin J. 87, 156, 115 

Mc Cormack. William T. 157 

Mc Cullough, Kelly J. 219 

Mc Daniels, Kimberly A. 182 

Mc Derment, Kelly C. 158, 57, 64 

Mc Dermott, Debra R. 148, 182, 57 

Mc Duffie, Michele D. 

Mc Gee, Aaron C. 78, 167 

Mc Gee, Floyd D. 167 

Mc Grath, Dennis E. 74, 182 

Mc Graw, Derrick D. 78, 167 

Mc Graw, Maureen D. 167 

Mc Graw, Paula 156 

Mc Gregor, John J. 155 

Mc Inally, AnBlie 82, 182 




Michelle Micale reflects on her performance. 



Maxwell. John 182 

Maiwell, Todd M. 167 

Mayerhofer, Julie M. 151, 64 

Mayle, Lynnette 167, 31, 38 

Mayle, Michelle T. 11, 219 

Mazanec, Geoffrey A. 151 

Mazzaro, Renee R. 44, 182 

Mazzei, Michael A. 79, 157 

Mc Arthur, D. Jamie 44, 54, 167 

Mc Callion, Kimberly A. 167 

Mc Callion, Michael J. 

Mc Cance, Margaret A. 86, 88, 89, 182, 291, 103 

Mc Candless, Daniel J. 167 

Mc Candless, David A. 157 

Mc Candless, Michael J. 219 



Mc Inally, Tracy 

Mc Intosh, Edward 79, 157 

Mc Intosh, Maria J. 167 

Mc Kain, Wendy A. 243, 62 

Mc Knight, Michael T. 219 

Mc Laughlin, Patrick R. 167, 100 

Mc Lean, Adrienne M. 167, 119 

Mc Lean, Miles W. 153 

Mc Neil, Paul C. 182, 65 

Mc Peek, Brian C. 182 

Mc Peek, Dennis 44, 55, 153 

Mc Reynolds, Angelia M. 182, 62, 56, 57, 66 

Mc Swain, Angela 63 

Meaney, Eileen 182, 108 

Mechle, Herman 



Medved, Barcia 219 

Medved, Louis J. 158 

Medved, Slavko 167 

Medved, Zeljko T. 183 

Medves, Joseph F. 183 

Meeker, Sheryl A. 157 

Mehls, Michael D. 44, 55, 151. 116 

Meier, Richard A. 

Mejak, Melita 183. 62 

Melton, Christine 

Menart, Michael J. 

Menhart, Kimberly A. 183 

Merela, Vida M. 219 

Merencky, Christine A. 46. 94, 150, 111 

Merencky, Steven F. 183 

Mervar, Jamea R. 167 

Metcalf, Jennifer A. 2, 167, 104 

Mews, Werner 87, 167, 115 

Meyer, Robert D. 44 

Meyers, Glen A. 151 

Meyers, Jacqueline A. 183, 288 

Meyers, Jeffrey A. 153, 61 

Meyers, Ronald A. 183, 61 

Meyers, William J. 183. 62 

Micale, Michelle 50, 183, 62, 285 

Mihalick, Michelle J. 167, 111 

Miheli, Joseph M. 56 

Mihelich, Christine A. 183, 56, 57 

Mihok, Kathleen A. 42, 44, 183 

Mrklaucic, Frank A. 167, 157 

Miklaucic, Ronald J. 219 

Mikulcic, Sinisa 154 

Milicevic, Miroslav 

Milicevic, Mildred 167 

Milicevic, Robert 167 

Miller, Bruce W. 79, 155, 112 

Miller, Gwendolyn S. 57, 111, 219 

Miller, Kim 167 

Miller, Linda A. 155, 111 

Miller. Linda J. 43. 44, 158 

Miller, Lorraine A. 126, 139, 198, 219, 60 

Miller, Marlene 44, 55, 167, 69 

Miller, Martin L. 78, 167 

Miller, Pamela 183 

Miller, Pamela J. 57, 219, 60, 119 

Miller, Rebekah L. 152 

Miller, Robert D. 183 

Miller, Robert M. 83, 159 

Miller, Rodney A. 159 

Miller, Stanley R. 53, 55, 219, 60, 61 

Miller, Susan M. 44, 62, 219 

Miller, Wayne E. 167 

Miller, William J. 157 

Millhof. Lance R. 145. 219 

Milline, Chandra R. 167 

Mims. Raymond D. 183, 96 

Minadeo, Lisa A. 158 

Minadeo, Michael C. 167 

Minardo, Nicholas 74, 183, % 

Mincek, Mark F. 139, 151, 120 

Minerd, Janice L. 45, 44, 53, 55, 64 

Minerd, Mia A. 

Minich, Christopher M. 

Miniasale, Joseph S. 74 

Minotas, Dawn M. 183 

Mirtic, Harriet E. 183 

Mis, Cynthia L. 43, 44, 167, 57 

MiBiak, Helen A. 150, 287 

Misiak, Richard C. 

Mita, Barry C. 219 

Mitchell, La Tonia M. 159 

Mitchell, Leonard J. 167 

Mizek, Mark W. 78 

Mochan, Michael P. 107, 63, 219 

Molakakis, Jason E. 167 

Molkentin, Mark D. 168 

Molnar, Brett A. 74, 31, 219 

Molnar, Craig D. 168 

Molnar, Shelly A. 183 

Molnar, Wayne P. 

Mondok, Francine M. 183, 62 

Montana, Christopher 183, 56, 57 

Montana, Robert J. 158, 100 



285 



Index 



Moore. Bobby J. 168 

Moore, Cheryl L. 157 

Moore. Cynthia A. 153. 65 

Moore. Dawn M. 183, 63 

Moore. Kathy M. 

Moore, Laura 

Moore, Lerena A. 

Moore, Serena V. 

Morek, Steven M. 2, 15, 75, 31, 219 

Moriarty, Erin 168 

Moriarty, Kelley A. 219 

Morns, Kimberly 168, 139 

Morrison, Rick 183 

Morrow, Stephen E. 219 

Morse, Lisa S. 168 

Morse, Matthew C. 168 

Moster, Laura J. 44, 55, 152 

Motiejunas, Adria 152, 104 

Mramer, Melanie L. 62, 219 

Mramer, Wayne A. 78, 168 

Mueller, Richard E. 168 

Mujic, Maria 159 

Munford, Darliene L. 11, 50, 155. 201, 65 

Munz, Paul D 183, 38 

MurowBky, Jeffery A. 44, 154 

Murphy. Gerald F. 157, 220, 98, 96 

Murphy, Gerald G. 

Murphy, Marilyn L. 163, 104 

Murphy, Sharon S. 183 

Murphy, Shawn P. 

Murray, Deborah A. 44, 55, 158 

Murray, Edward T. 

Murray, Michelle A. 253 

Muscarella, Joseph M. 87, 183, 281, 115 

Muacarella, Mary J. 59, 168, 139, 60 

Mylea. David W. 44, 183, 66, 64. 115 

Myles, Rebecca L. 158 

Mzik, David P. 

Nachtigal, William A, 74, 220 

Nacinovich, Roberto O. 249, 198, 220, 116, 31 



Naglic, Anne M. 220, 62 

Naglic. Carol A. 159 

Naglic, Veronica M. 183 

Nagode, Robert C. 156 

Nagy, Robin 168 

Nagy, Thomas M. 

Nainiger, Kevin J. 168, 116 

Naro, John K. 183 

Nash, Lavoi M. 154 

Neal. Daniel F. 168, 157 

Nebe, Kurt H. 168 

Neidel, Charles D. 159 

Neiman, Elizabeth A. 10, 46, 183, 48, 49 

Neligan, Traci A. 

Nelson, Beth A. 183, 62 

Nemecek, Amy J. 87, 220, 30, 31. 115 

Nemecek, Judith A. 183. 57. Ill, 96, 60 

Nemeth, James J 220 

Newcomb, Cheryl 46, 183, 49 

Newcomb, Maria E 94, 95, 155 

Newell, Evelyn M. 

Newell, Gerri A. 220 

Newman, John C. 183, 112 

Nicholson, Samuel C. 

Nicholson, Harold T. 

Nichting. Danielle A. 11, 14, 19, 198, 220, 119 

Nickel, Kathleen M. 168, 60 

Niemiec, W. Scott 168 

NikBick, Theresa A. 

Nocera, Edward D. 168 

Noch, Joseph A. 168 

Nolan. Suzanne M. 183. 220. 63 

Nolen. Collisha F. 

Nolen. Terrance L. 115 

Nolidis, Athena 168 

Noonan, Bobbie J. 183 

Noonan, Tammy L. 183, 64 

Norton, Karen 46, 183, 49, 57 

Norton, Lisa 151 

Norton, Patrick R 183 

Nosse. Leonard F. 220 




Novak. Kim 220 
Novak, Steven J. 158 
Novkovic, Mario 82, 183 
Novosel, Diane M. 168 
Novotney, Claudia C. 23, 198, 220 
Novotney, Donald J. 
Novotney, Kimberly G. 157 
Nowac, James M. 168 
Nozling, Paul R. 183 
Nunnally, Michael F. 220, 63 
Nykiel, Joseph H. 

Oboczky, Timothy J. 168 

O Brien, Kathleen A. 6, 198, 214, 41, 57, 111, 220, % 

O'Brien, Patrick C. 260, 64, 242 

O Brien, Shannon M 15, 183, 220 

Ochoa, Arman R 168, 31 

Ochoa. Riza R. 220 

Ochoa. Shirley M. 43, 44, 220, 63 

O Connell, Daniel J. 155 

O Donnell, Noreen T. 87, 220. 115, 242 

Offak, Jeffrey S 156 

Offak, John E. 183 

Offerle, Joan L. 44, 220 

Offutt, ChriBtopher J. 170 

Ogorek, John M. 

Ohanessian. Amy C. 183, 57 

O Hannon, Traci L. 139, 220, 103 

Olson, Bryan D. 

Olson, Greg R. 151 

Olson, Nicole M. 158 

Olson, Paul J. 

Olszens, David H. 74, 183 

O Neill, John T. 183 

O Neill. Karen M. 220 

O Neill, Mary T. 148, 183, 62, 108 

O Neill. Maureen P. 158 

Orazem, Louis M. 223 

Orndoff, Jim, B 155 

Orosz, Joseph 223 

Oroz, Katarina V. 92, 93, 150, 41, 111 

Osborne, Lisa M. 223, 62 

Ospelt, Matthew S. 168 

Otcasek, Tracey J. 183, 139, 56, 57, 66 

Otis, Kenneth 168 

Ott, Dawn M. 154 

Overberger, Daniel D. 223 

Overberger, Kathleen L. 183 

OwenB, Sean C. 168 

Paciorek, Robert A. 184 
Paciorek, Steven M. 223 
Paige, La Bron G. 159 
Palmer, James F. 
Palmer, Patricia J. 153 
Pantalone, Lillian J. 
Paolucci, Lisa M. 
Papageorge, Paul 184 
Paparizos, Gary 84, 85, 168, 289 
Papo, Angelina A. 223 
Papotta, Cynthie L. 
Papotta, Patricia A. 154 
Papouras, Christopher M. 82, 168 
Papouras, Nicholas T. 82, 168 
Papouras, William C. 82, 168 
Pappalardo, Carla 83, 159, 104 
Pappas, Peter G. 82, 168 
Parcesepe. Laura A. 184, 57 
Parcesepe, Lisa M. 168 
Pardue, Diana L 184 
Park. Michael S. 159 
Parker. Bonnie L. 90, 150 
Parker, Brenda S. 184 
Parker, DeneBe M. 154 
Parker, Julie A. 56. 57. 223 
Parkinson, Michael P. 159 
Parmertor. Robert M. 79, 112 
Paroska, Louis 83, 154 
Paraons, Keith A. 11, 257, 223 
Parsons, Lori A. 184, 62 
Pasquale, Marie J. 158, 111 
Pate, Dale 155, 61 



Cheerleaders show off their awesome skills: screaming, walking, clapping, bouncing and 
smiling. 



Index 



286 



Patel, Smita K 168 

Paulin, Marilyn S. 223. 62 

Pavis, Janice M. 168, 119 

Pavis, Robert L. 184 

Pavlina, Bart 

Pavlovich, Maria A. 223, 62 

Payne, William A. 168 

Peck, Kelly A. 168 

Peck. Lois E. 

Pekar, Kevin 79, 156, 112 

Pekarcik, Frank J. 224 

Pekarcik, Joseph S. 

Pekol, Beth J, 150 

Pekol, Catherine A. 168 

Pekol, Mark 74, 184 

Pence, Brian C. 168 

Penko, Linda A. 17, 224, 63 

Penko, Mary J. 44, 53, 55, 168, 41 

Penny. Christine 44, 55, 184 

Penny, James W. 74, 257, 224 

Peoples, Mort S. 155 

Perdan, Pamela V. 151, 64 

Perdan, Suzanne 224, 38 

PerkinB, Kimberly R. 168 

Perko, Lisa M. 168, 119 

Perme, Daniel M. 224 

Perovsek, Lynnet L. 224 

Perovshek, Carol A. 24, 214, 224 

Perrotti, Christine M. 59, 184. 62 

Perry, Anthony G. 168 

Perry, John R. 

Perry, Michael B. 168 

Perry, William J. 

Perryman, Darlene 184, 152 

Persic, Branka 184, 57 

Perusek, Richard G. 168 

Perusek, Thomas J. 224 

Peters. Michael A. 151 

Peterson, Brenda A. 157, 41 

Peterson. Michele C. 184, 62 

Peterson, Rudolph M. 184 

Peterson, Sarah 

Petho, Marlene 155 

Petrich, Edward J. 153 

Petrie, Kristen M. 153, 104 

Petrie, Robert H 168 

Petrillo, Kristen T. 168 

Petruccelli, Vincent W. 156 

Pevec, Robert A. 224 

Pevec, Therese M. 151 

Pfleger, Russell J. 184 

Phelps, Maiquitta R. 156 

Phillips, Marc R. 

Phillips, Matthew E. 83, 159 

Phillips, Renee E. 59, 126, 198, 41, 224 

Phillips, Stacy A. 169 

Phomma-Vichit, Norkeo 224 

Pickel, Karen S. 44, 184 

Picozzi, Nicholas A. 152 

Pietrangelo, Nicholas 

Pietrantozzi, Angela 

Pinta, Gary B. 169 

Piontkowski, Brenda K. 159 

PiontkowBki, Paul 184, 112 

Piper, Michael W. 154 

Pirchner, Raymond O. 224 

Pittock, Rochelle L. 169, 41, 108 

Piatt, Denyse A. 

Plevelich, Alan S. 79 

Plevelich, Gregory W. 184 

Plevelich. John P. 74, 224 

Pluth, Thomas 

Podmore, Geri A. 169 

Podmore, Jill M. 184, 62 

Podrug, Laura 169 

Pohl, Christine 169 

Polaski, Brian J. 82, 169 

Pollard, Valencia M. 

Polley, Brian M. 224 

Ponsart, Allen E. 44, 198, 57, 69, 224 

Ponsart, Randy P 184 

PoplBtein, David J. 224 




Helen Misiak keeps watch while her friend smuggles out homework. 



Popp, Scott C. 184 
Porter, Michael D. 82, 184, 112 
Porter, Suzanne M. 83, 150, 104 
Posavad, Rebecca F. 184, 57 
Potocar, Kimberly A. 184 
Potokar, David 78, 159, 107, 31 
Potter, Mary K. 152 
Potts, Terrence R. 
Powaski, Juliana 13, 184, 41, 60 
Powaski, Kenneth A. 169 
Powell, Anthony D. 224, 65 
Powell, Kevin C. 184 
Powell, Richard A. 169 
Praskavich, Janet E. 19, 224 
Pred, Laura K. 184 
Preston, Dyon M. 156 
Pretchel, Charleen 169 
Pretchel, Charles T. 157 
Primosch, Michael A. 152 
Pringle, Victor J. 74, 184 
Prpic, Marko J. 80, 81, 184, 112 
Purcell, Teresa G. 139, 201, 224 
Purvis, Leonard J. 169, 107 
Putzbach, Lori R. 184, 62 

Rabbitts, Terrance W. 11, 139, 56, 57, 224, 99, 96, 97 

Rackar, John F. 169, 115 

Radaker, Kerri L. 156, 66 

Radaker, Philip H. 184 

Rado, Laura A. 184 

Raffaele, Antonio 227 

Raguz, Ivan 227 

Rahija, Steven N. 169, 65 

Raicevich, Mark E. 85, 184 

Ramadhar, Debbie 169 

Ramadhar, Ronnie 154 

Ramlow, Chad O 54, 83, 159, 57, 107 

Ramlow, Robin E. 87, 169, 57, 115 

RamBey, Damon D. 141 

Rattini, Laura A. 77, 46, 169, 41, 49, 60 

Ray, Jacqueline M. 

Ray, Laura A. 184 

Razayeski, Dennis M. 



Redman, Ronald S. 184, 111 

Redman, Suzanne M. 153 

Reed, Patricia A. 152 

Rees, Kimberley L. 159, 150 

Reese, Jeanne L. 184 

Reichert, Kenneth S. 24, 169 

Reid, John A. 184, 116 

Reinke, David R. 263, 157 

Rembert, Willie E. 17. 205, 217 

Reno, Sonja L. 44, 53, 55, 159, 41 

Renshaw, Richard 227 

Restifo, Lisa M. 169 

Reynolds, Susan D. 42, 44, 169, 64 

Rice, Eric W. 184 

Richards, Beth Ann 83, 159 

Richardson, Frank D. 79, 158, 100 

Richer, Sheldon 169 

Ridings, Michael T. 157 

Ridley, Darpius A. 184 

Riedel, Jeannie L. 169 

Riek, Robert J. 

Riggs, Lisa 169, 1 1 1 

Riha, Bryce A. 44, 54, 55, 152, 64 

Risko, Martin 55, 169 

Ritchie, Kathleen M. 227 

Roberta, Anthony P. 

Roberts, Kimberly A. 198, 227 

Roberta, Laura R. 169, 38 

Roberts, Mathew A. 170 

Roberts, William B. 

Robertson, Tina M. 

Robinson, Dean A. 227 

Robinson, Eugene T. 170 

Robinson, George B. 

Robinson, Sean L. 159 

Rocco, Christopher J. 78, 170 

Rocco, Lisa M. 10, 184, 108, 65 

Roche, Mark 184 

Rodgers, Jesse 69, 227, 62 

Rodgers, Joseph R. 184 

Roeder, Randy 227, 63 

Roeder, William J. 158 

Roessler, Joan M. 184 



287 



Index 



Rohl, Bradley S. 44, 55, 170 
Rohl, Heidi A. 44, 53, 151 
Rolik. Renee M. 157 
Rookard, Danette 156 
Rose, Douglas R. 227 
Rose, Paul T. 83, 153 
Roseboro, Leslie 227, 62 
Ross, La Velle C. 157 
Rossmann. Diane M. 90. 104 
Rostankowaki, Dina A 
Roth, John H. 27, 184 
Royster, Michael T. 227, 63, 115 
Ruffing, Annette M. 184 
Ruffing, John L. 170 
Russell, Kelly J. 170 
Ruzich. David J. 227 
Rymarczyk, Dennis 87, 227, 115 

Sabol, Suzanne L. 184 

Saletrik, Laura J. 44, 53, 55, 155, 198, 41, 227 

Salo, Robert A. 184 

Salo, Thomas W. 170, 107 

Salter, Kenneth 184 

Samsa, Jeffrey J. 152 

SamBa, John H. 170 

Samsa, Lisa M. 185, 62 

Sanders, Cary E. 55, 151, 41, 69, 111 

Sanders, Eric J. 185 

Sangston, Dawn 

Sanner, Patricia D. 170 

Sanner, Robert 170 

Santa, Noel 153 

Santon, Susan D. 

Santorelli, James 

Santoriella, Joseph M 74 

Sapatka, Darlene A. 153 

Sapatka, Denise A- 185 

Sapatka, Robert W. 

Sapp, Robin M. 157 

Sari, George M. 227 

Sarka, Robert W. 185, 252, 69, 70 

Sartain, Lisa A. 185 

Sas, Jeffrey 154 

Sas, Julie A. 166, 190, 62, 115 

Satava, Suzi L. 185 

Sato, Reiko 58, 59, 90, 170, 227 

Sauer. Bernie A. 153, 61 

Sauerman, Janice K. 43, 44, 198, 57, 227 

Scafidi, Joseph 170 

Sceranka, Steven 185 

Schaefer, Karen M. 170 

Schaefer, Michael A. 62 

Schaefer, Paula D. 157 

Schaffer, Patrice Y. 185 

Scheid, Maryjo 59 

Scheid. Robert O. 185 

Schembre, Vincent A. 170 

Scherbarth, Robyn A. 44, 53, 155, 198, 227, 66 

Scherbarth, Scott M. 44, 54, 55 

Schieman, Sandra L. 42, 44. 57, 227 

Schiffbauer, Heidi A. 185, 62 

Schilling, Georgeann R. 158 

Schimmels, Vicki L. 198, 227 

Schlickert, Cory 185 

Schmeling, Vicki L. 185, 69, 60 

Schmidt, Karen R. 198, 228 

Schneider, Gary E. 186 

Schneider, Janet L. 198, 202, 228, 62 

Schneider, Kurt R. 228 

Schonauer, ChriBtine L. 186 

Schonauer, Kimberly A. 

Schrock, Todd H. 81, 228, 38 

Schuenemann, Sarah L. 228 

Schuler, James E. 170 

Schuler, John D. 228 

Schultz, Cynthia M. 157 

Schultz, Glenna E. 186 

Schulz, Erich M. 13, 228 

Schulz, Nancy S. 159, 64 

Schulz, Nicholas 170 

Schulz, Richard 170 

Schuster, Michael T. 186 

Schwartz. Frederick S. 228. 61 




Sue Swyt, Joanie Hodnichak, Beth Terango, and Jackie Meyers analyze the possibility of 
modeling the EHS '85 paraphenalia. 



Schwartz, Jennifer R. 3, 87, 198, 228 

Schwenner, Robert M. 159 

Scimenes, William D. 170 

Scolaro, Joseph A. 78, 171 

Scolaro. Teresa I. 186, 62 

Scott, Kristie L. 46, 49 

Scott, Newton L. 153 

Seaman, Maurice D. 79, 152 

SebuBch, Erik P. 186 

Segedi, Margaret S. 186, 62 

Segina, Susan 171 

Segulin, David A. 79, 150, 112, 64 

Segulin, Mary R. 44, 55, 171, 41, 64 

Segulin, William 22, 228, 113, 61, 64 

Seidel. James A. 186 

Sekerak, Raymond W. 171, 116 

Sekerak, Susan L. 190, 198, 57, 111, 228, 38 

Sengchareut, Chanthip 186 

Senger, Albert C. 

Senger, Kandice M. 228, 63 

Senitko, Melanie A. 44, 53, 171, 66, 64, 65 

Sergent, Dawn M. 157 

Sergent, Douglas R. 228 

Serra, Angelo 22, 44, 53, 54. 186. 66 

Seward, April Lynn 171 

Seward, Robert R. 228 

Seymour, Suzette M. 186 

Sezun, Sara S. 139, 228, 66 

Sezun, Sonya S. 171, 66 

Shaffer, Brian M. 157 

Sheehan, Michael J. 74, 228 

Sheesley, Walter J. 153 

Shefcheck, Laura A. 186, 62 

Shei, Darlene C. 171 

Shelton, Brian 228 

Sheridan, Terence P. 187, 115 

Sherman, Joseph C. 

Shields, Raya D. 171 

Shimandle, Paulette J. 187 

Shimonek, Nancy M. 11, 50, 51, 198, 56, 57, 228 

Shippitka, John 159 



Shriver, Sandra M. 171 

Shultz, Richard 228 

Shusky. James A. 

Shusky, Jennifer L. 155 

Shuster, Jason P. 44. 55. 82. 157 

Shusteric, Elizabeth A. 228 

Shy, Charles P. 159, 156, 100 

Sidhu, Margie K. 231, 62 

Siegel, Marshall A. 187 

Sigh, John M. 112 

Sigh, Michael 171 

Sikora, John A. 

SilkowBki. Judi A. 171 

Sim, Brian C. 153 

Sim, Ronnie L. 187 

Simicevic, Marijana 171 

Simicevic, Marin J. 171 

Simmons, Michelle 87, 187, 48, 49 

Simmons, Monica L. 87, 157, 

Simmons, Monice 171, 104 

Simon, Deborah E. 231, 63 

Sivillo, Monica M. 231 

Skedel. Andrew 

Skiljan, Amy E. 90, 158, 31, 38, 104 

Skiljan, Scott A. 74, 231 

Skodnik, Stanley 171 

Skodnik, Tina 

Skora, Richard J. 79, 157 

Skrtic, Zelka 171 

Skula, Sandra M. 171 

Slat, Zrinka K. 59, 120, 231, 66, 234, 60, 61 

Slattery, James P. 187 

Slattery, Jeff 158, 100 

Sleith, Sandra E. 171 

Sliskovic, Charles 171 

Slusser, Thomas E. 87, 231, 115 

Smitb, Cheri L. 10, 18, 46, 47, 49, 231 

Smith, Christine 157 

Smith, Douglas J. 187 

Smith, E. Scott 156 

Smith. Glenn W. 171 



Index 



288 



Smith, Jeffrey S. 150, 115 

Smith, Julie A. 171, 111, 60 

Smith, Kent K. 155, 56, 57. 231, 103, 38 

Smith, Mark M. 87, 151, 112 

Smith. Susan 186, 187, 57 

Smith, Thomas J. 

Smith, William T. 231 

Smolic, Christine A. 171, 49 

Smolic, Joseph E. 187 

Smoot, Tammy 157 

Smullen, Kenneth J. 87, 153 

Smrdel, Diane L. 155 

Smrdel, Donald 171 

Sneperger, Ronald A. 171 

Snitzky, Bonnie R. 171, 65 

Sobecki. Christine 231, 62 

Solnosky, Michelle M. 171, 60, 119 

Solnosky, Robert 44, 55 

Sonday, David J. 171 

Sopko, Dean C. 171, 41 

Sopko, Dennis M. 232 

Sopko, Joseph F. 79, 156 

Sotka, Jason L. 59, 187, 139, 116, 60 

Sotka, Mitchell L. 157, 64 

Spanjol, Andrea 232 

Spehar, Marvin A. 25, 44, 55, 36, 232 

Spencer, Corinne C. 171, 119 

Spencer, Jeffrey G. 232, 218 

Spencer, Richard A. 205. 232 

Sper, Stefanie M. 94, 150, 57 

Speroff. Robin M 231, 63 

Spinelli, James S. 159 

Spiranovich, Lucy 187 

Sprague, Robert A. 171, 57 

Springborn, Gaye R. 187. 62 

Springborn, Todd D. 154 

Springer, Jeffery T. 171, 116 

Spurr, Melissa L. 

Spurr, Stephenie A. 

Srnovrsnik, Robert W. 44, 53, 152 

Stanicki, Jeffrey W. 232 

Stanisa, Miriam 232, 62 

Stanke, Frank C. 232 

Stankivicz, Todd A. 

Starman, Joseph E. 232 

Starr, Brian A. 187, 107 

Starr, William A. 80, 81, 197, 232, 107, 

Staso, Renee L. 90, 156, 104 

Staso, Ronald A. 78, 171, 100 

Statz, Lynn M. 44, 53, 55, 159 

Steeves, David C 59, 139 

Stefanik, Danielle A. 232, 63 

Stegh, Stephen G. 153 

StenniB, Carol A. 158 

Stennis, Jr. Charles M. 78, 171 

Stephens. Darnise 187, 41, 103, 60 

Sterbank, Janet L. 151 

Sterbank, Leanne M. 185, 187, 139, 29, 41, 57, 69, 66, 60 

Sterrick, Mark A. 171. 61 

Sterrick. Rhonda E. 139, 198, 111. 232. 38, 60, 64 

Stevens, Chrispina D. 187, 63 

Stewart, Derrick A. 81, 187, 64 

Stewart, Kimberly L. 

Stipkovich, David M. 171 

Stois, JoBeph L. 

Stois, Shannon M. 150 

Stokes, John T. 44. 53. 54, 232. 115 

Stokes, Michael A. 52, 187 

Stokes, Steven D. 145, 232 

Stone, Jennifer L. 187, 41. 61 

Stone. Tracy 83 

Stoneback, ChriBtine L. 187 

Stoudermire, Antonio 153 

Stout, Barbara A. 232, 62 

Strah, Richard J. 193, 232 

Straub, John 171 

Strauss, Darlene M. 187, 62 

StrauBS, Warren D. 187 

Strle, Elizabeth S. 198, 232, 63 

Stroberg, Edward A. 81, 232, 113 

Stroberg, Todd D. 187 

Strohmyer, Frank B. 235 

Struna, Nancy M. 171 



Struna, Rosemary L. II, 86, 88, 89, 91, 23? 

Stuber, Raymond J. 171 

Stumpf, Anthony R. 

Stupica. Karen A- 87, 156, 104 

Sulic. Vesna 235 

Sullivan, Michael A. 156 

Summers, Wendy A. 154 

Supinski, John 171, 115 

Suponcic, Amy J. 89, 171, 41. 282. 60, 64 

Surrena, Matthew J- 159 

Sustar. Julie A. 44, 55, 169, 171 

Svigel, Daniel E. 44, 55. 171 

Svigel, Peter A. 235 

Sweet, Matthew D. 187, 116 

Swider. Mary E. 3, 6, 253, 38 

Swider, Michael J. 187 

Swift, Rebecca A. 235 

Swihart. Darrin E. 44, 55, 235 

Swyt, Pamela 151 

Swyt, Susan M. 187, 69, 111, 288, 60 

Syracuse, Anthony J. 235 

Syracuse, Patricia A. 171, 64 

Szalay. Timothy J. 113, 235 

Szmania, Scott R. 74, 172, 187, 115 

Szmania, Susan B 14, 41, 49. 60 

Szpak, David 152 

Szpak, Scott M. 62 

Tadiello. Louis J. 159 

Tanner, Paul M. 187 

Tarr, Justin H. 187 

Tassone, Stephanie 172 

Taylor, Christopher C. 

Taylor, Edward C. 172 

Taylor, Jeffrey L. 159 

Tavlor, Jennifer A. 58, 59, 87, 41, 235. 38 

Taylor, Mary K. 59, 172, 66 

Taylor, Pamela D. 158 

Taylor, Robin L. 44, 55, 153 

Taylor, Shirletha E. 55, 172 

Tekancic, Daniel 156 



Tekanic. Jeffrey D 52, 54, 236, 115 

Tekieh, Edward T. 187, % 

Tekieli, Michele A. 90, 158, 104 

Templar, Erik P. 152 

Templar, Michele A. 

Templar, Susan 235, 63 

Templeton, Michael 

Templeton, Susan M- 

Tepley, Edward J. 44, 55, 89. 235 

Terango, Amy L. 158 

Terango, Beth Jo 187, 139, 41. 57. 69. 111. 288. 66. 60 

Terrill, Sandra L. 187 

Testa. Andrea Z 

Testa, Deborah L. 152 

Testa, Lori A. 44, 55, 172 

Theodosion, Dean N. 44, 187, 69 

Thomas, Christopher J. 53, 54, 172, 120, 116 

Thomas, L. Kevin 78, 172, 100 

Thomas, Linda P. 55, 152 

Thomas, Paul C. 82, 172 

Thomas, Tracy L. 172 

Thomas, William E. 74 

Thome, Brenda D. 

Thompson, David M. 172 

Thompson, John W. 172 

Thompson, Karla R. 187, 252. 190. 108, 109, 111, 38 

Thompson, Kelly A. 43, 44, 57, 235 

Thompson, Michael D. 172 

Thompson, Richard D. 153 

Tianello, Dino W. 

Ticchione, Anne M. 153 

Timperio, Gina L. 152 

Tingley, Barbara B. 13, 94, 187, 69, 111. 30. 64, 115 

Tinker, Pamela S. 

Tirabassi, Mina M 166, 57, 235 

Tobolewski, Andrew T. 235 

Todd. Thomas R. 187 

Tomasch, Eric W. 11, 74, 187 

Tomasi, Luann M. 55, 151, 41, 69, 111 

Tomasi. Martin D. 87, 172, 57, 69 

Tome. Andrew J, 155 




Steve Cooney and Gary Paparizos model their favorite choices of winter bags for the 1984 
season. 



289 



Index 



Tomic. Zdenka M. 187 

Tomola, Selena D. 172 

Tomoletz, Joseph L. 235 

Tomoletz, Sandra M. 

Tonni. Lauren D. 235. 62 

Tonni. Renee 

Tonti. David A. 187 

Toon, Ramona L. 187 

Totarella, Laura Ann 172 

Toth. Alei 172 

Toth, Gary M. 

Toth, Jon 157 

Toth. Julie M. 83. 155 

Toth. Denise M. 187. 62 

Toth, Lori A. 

Touschner, Philip M, 152 

Tousel, John J. 74. 187 

Tracey. Doreen 172. 139 

Tramsak, Lisa B. 187 

Travis. Toni G. 62 

Trbovich, Julia A. 187 

Trebec. Christine 87. 156 

Tressler, David M. 44, 55, 154 

Tressler, Gary A. 87. 41. 115 

Tressler. Laura A. 90, 187, 103 

Tressler. Robert S. 187 

Trevarthen, Carol L. 13, 43. 44. 214, 41. 57, 111, 2; 

Trobenter. Douglas F- 172 

Trobenter. Jeffrey W. 156 

Troeheck, Terence B. 152 

Tuceen, Susan M. 44, 55, 187, 139, 41, 57, 69, 111 

Tucker, Ghana 

Tuckerman. Tracy J. 150. 119 

Tufts. Andre D. 

Tufts. Monique T. 150 

Turk. Christopher J. 188. 62 

Turk. Kimberly R. 234, 235 

Turk. Vicki A. 235. 62 

Turk, William J. 172 



Turkalj, Ratko 236. 62 
Turner. Sherrie A. 236 
Turner. William P. 236 
Turpin, Dawn M, 83. 152. 119 
Twoey, Michele D. 236, 62 

Ubic. Monica A. 42, 44, 198. 57, 236, 64 

Ucic. Michael J. 236, 63 

Uhlir. Raymond N. 78, 172 

Ukmar. Katherine 198, 236 

Ukmax, Victoria 188, 56, 57 

Ukotic, Claudia 172 

Ulle, Wendy S. 148, 188, 252, 62, 108 

Ulrich, John G. 188 

Unick, Stephanie J. 

Urbancic, Karina M. 154 

Urdzik, David P. 236 

Urdzik, Kristen M. 90, 154 

Urquhart, William J. 74, 188 

Ussai, Mark A. 74, 236, 66, 113 

Valencic, Anthony F. 236, 63 

Valentine, Brian A. 44, 53, 54, 55, 150 

Vanah. Jacqueline A. 87, 172. 104 

Van Beneden, Tracy A. 90, 158 

Vance. James D. 188, 62, 116 

Vandemotter, Christopher J. 81. 83. 197, 239, 107 

Van De Motter. Gretchen A. 27, 172, 41. 108 

Vandevender, Jeffrey A. 239, 63 

Varner. David E. 188 

Vaslavsky. Stacey L. 172 

Vaughn. Pamela D. 157 

Vella, Linda 239 

Vella, Traci A. 188 

Velotta, Angela M, 188 

Venable, Phyllis D. 153 

Vend, Laura M. 188, 49, 60 

Ventura, Gregory S. 172 

Verdone. Nicholas 




Vernon, Craig S. 57, 239 

Verrocchi, Larry C. 

Vihtelic, John N. 188 

Vihtelic, Karen P. 239 

Vintelic, Lisa M. 3, 11, 198, 202, 70, 239, 67 

Vihtelic, Mark L. 188 

Vincent, Thomas M. 44. 55, 157 

Vincent. Tomie L. 188, 62 

Virant, Randolph A. 44. 55, 188 

Visci. Craig L. 239 

Vitolo. Nicolette M. 153 

Vobornik. Travis 188 

Vogel. Christopher A. 188 

Vogel, Valerie A. 153 

Vohnout, Jeffrey J. 239 

Voigt, Kathryn M. 43. 44. 172, 104 

Volpe. Marianne 188, 62 

Volpin, Tiffany L. 188 

Voskion, Doriano 

Voss, Alan 

Vuyancih. James F. 172 

Vuyancih, Michael J. 239 

Wade. Tina C. 103, 63 

Wadsworth. Kathleen A. 83, 152 

Wagner, Kathleen M. 172 

Wagner, Laura K. 239 

Wagner, Shannon 14, 46. 153, 49 

Wagner. Virginia 87, 155, 49 

W'ajahn, Coleen 158, 41, 69, 111 

Waksmunski, Mark H. 89. 152. 107 

Walch. Alan E. 

Walker, Adrienne R. 239, 65 

Walker, Donna M. 

Wallace. Scott L. 62, 65 

Walls, Terry J. 

Walsh, Dennis M. 78, 172 

Walsh, Laura L. 188, 102, 103 

Waltermire, Amy L. 27. 72, 90, 172, 41 

Walther, Bruce A. 50, 188 

Walton. Anton L. 188 

Walton, Sherman C. 

Wanamaker, Thomas 151, 57, 64 

Wandersleben, Ronald R. 172 

Wandersleben. Tracey J. 93. 198. 40, 239. 31. 62. 60. 64. 

115. 242 
Ward, Channelle L. 63 
Ward, Gail C. 157 
Ward, Kenda M, 155 
Ward, Larry F. 188 
Ward, Korine Y. 158 
Ward. Raymond C. 188 
Ward, Tamika M. 172 
Warner. Brian K- 
Warner, Joseph D. 172 
Waschura, Jill A, 89. 90. 188. 62 
Waterman. Beth K. 93, 239 
Watral, Carol A. 89, 91, 239 
Watros, Lisa M. 172 
Watta, Lolita C. 

Weakland. Lawrence P. 188, 63, 65 
Weaver. Lorraine M- 188. 57 
Weaver. Patrick L. 157 
Weaver. William S. 172 
Webb. Laura A. 188 
Weisert, Louis A. 188 
Weisert, William J. 172 
Werry. Kathy A. 150 

Westover, April A. 46, 188, 49, 56, 57, 290 
Westover, Kevin W. 239, 63 
Wheaton. Michael L- 
Wheeler, Gene 172 
Wheeler, Jacqueline L. 153 
Wheeler. Raymond M, 188 
Wheeler. Sadia R, 157 
Whelan. Dennis M. 188. 112 
White. Cassandra A. 
White, Donna J. 239, 62 
White, Frederick. A. 172 



The singing of April Westover and Dave Fair puts senior Sharon Hansen to sleep. 



Index 



290 



*" J s ° 




Joan Mast helps Margie McCance use the handicap facilities. 



Whit*, Richard L. 172 

Whitehead. Shareice 153 

Whitlow. Laura L. 155 

Whitlow. Raychell Y. 

Whitlow. Robert 172 

Whitney, Kris E. 188, 282 

Whitson, Virginia S. 172 

Wicks, Brian P. 

Wiggins, Michelle 172 

Wilkms, Tonya D. 159 

Williams, Adriana L. 

Williams, Andre 

Williams, Antoine 172 

Williams. Catherine 

Williams, Charles E. 172 

Williams, Gary M. 188, 66 

Williams, Raynal Y. 153 

Williams, Shante R. 172 

Williams, Steven D. 

Willis, Monica L. 172 

Wilson, Daniel J. 150 

Wilson, Dyann M. 

Wilson, Edward J. 44, 53, 54, 55, 82, 188, 66, 67, 38. 64 

Wilson, Keith D. 

Wilson, Kenneth M. 173 

Wilson. Richard P. 15, 18, 54, 76, 139. 239, 38 

Wilson, Robert 74, 239, 115 

Wingfield, Daniel E. 173 

Winkleman. Sherri L. 62 

Winter, Holly A. 173 

Winter, Kurt N. 239, 63 

Wintle, Mark C. 188 

Wirbel, Mary 173, 64 

Wirbel, Thomas R. 150 

Wise, Laura J. 239 

Wittreich, Brian E. 173 

Wittreich, Katharine 240, 63 

Wojno, Thomas D. 78, 173 

Wollmershauser, Jeffrey 188 

Wollmershauser, Jodi L. 173, 69, 66 

Wood, Douglas J. 173 

Woodard. Steven 157 



Woodcock. Michael 81, 173 

Woodcock, Michelle 46, 94, 158, 111 

Woods, Lewis G. 240 

Woods, Maurice 173 

Woods. Richard W. 79, 158 

Woods, Scott A. 173 

Woods, Sharlyne J. 

Woods, William L. 240, 63, 115 

Woodson. Donnell 

Woodward, Lora A. 

Wootten, Jobn Mark 188, 

Workman, Laurie H- 153 

Wright, Christopher L. 13, 44, 53, 54. 55. 188, 38 

Wright III, George A. 173 

Wudy, John H. 188 

Wuicik, William J. 

Wylie. Deanna M. 188 

Wylie, Donald S. 188, 56, 57 

Wyman. Kevin R 188 

Wyman, Pamela K. 155 

Wyman, Reginald B. 240, 63 

Yafanaro, Diana R. 173, 120 
Yamane, David M. 74, 240, 113 
Yanko, Joseph M. 240 
Yanko, Terese M. 153 
Yartz, David M. 157 
Yatako, Cheryl K. 240 
Yearsin, Ian C. 2. 188 
Yeckley, Lee Ann T. 240 
Yeckley, Tina M. 240 
Yehl, Anthony Y. 173 
Yehl, John 14. 243 
Yehl. Robert C. 155, 100 
Yentz, Valerie E. 173 
Yoger. Cheryl A. 188 
Yoke, Robert A. 157 
Yoke, Stephen A. 182, 188 
Young, Andrew D. 151, 112 
Young, Cathy A. 173 
Young, Jerome V. 72, 243 



Young. John C. 145, 243, 63 
Young. Theresa A. 188 
Yuhas. Anita H. 44. 53, 173, 41 
Yuras. Thomas 74, 252, 243 
Yurkovich, David A. 
Yurkovich, Susan M. 243 

Zablotney, Cathleen A. 90, 173 

Zadnik, Anthony J- 74, 243 

Zadnik, Christine R. 46. 153 

Zager, K. Paris 158 

Zagore, Thomas P. 243 

Zahorsky. Mary Kay K. 11, 89, 188, 65, 119 

Zahursky, Denise A. 159 

Zak, Ron 188. 57 

Zakrajsek, Michele A. 193, 243 

Zaller, Steven T. 173 

Zanella, Carmen F. 

Zanella, Diane L. 189 

Zanghi, Renee L. 171, 64 

Zaro, Jean 171 

Zaslov, Lawrence M. 189 

Zaslov. Lisa L. 157 

Zdunczyk, Lisa L. 171 

Zele, John D. 74, 243 

Zele. Laureen F. 189 

Ziegler. Steven L. 189 

Ziehm. Laura J. 189 

Zigman, Donna 189, 65 

Zigman, Vicki 46, 47, 198. 243 

Zingale, Nicholas C. 56, 57 

Zingle. Denise M. 170, 189 

Zivkovich, James A. 243 

Znidarsic, Kimberly J. 15, 92, 93, 243, 115 

Znidarsic. Scott E. 243 

Zollars, David A. 171 

Zollars, Margaret A. 189. 57 

Zschuppe, Barbara 159 

Zupan, Marilyn A. 198, 61 

Zupanovic, Suzanne 198, 57. 243 

Zurilla, Jeffrey C. 

Zusman, David 74, 189 

Zuzek, Michael J. 74, 243. 98. 96 



291 



Index 



Faculty Index 



Mr Robert Addis 

Mrs. Edna Anderson 

Mr. Justin J. Antonini 

Dr. Antonia Araca 

Miss Cheryl Arthur 

Mr. William Attamante 

Mr. Ronald A. Backos 

Miss Sandi Bambic 

Miss Vera Baraniuk 

Mrs- Ethel Barbish 

Mrs. Dorothy Barry 

Mr. John Barcza 

Mrs. Brenda Barker 

Mrs. Amy Bell 

Mr Stan Bender 

Mrs. Charlotte Bensusan 

Dr. Jerry Bergem 

Mr. Allan Black 

Mrs. Dolores Black 

Mr. Al Bleich 

Mrs. Marilyn Bowker 

Mr. Roger Brown 

Miss Patricia Buck 

Mr. Mike Burns 

Mrs. Catherine Campoliete 

Mrs. Jan Carlson 

Miss Judith L. Carmody 

Miss Wilma Carroll 

Mrs, Arlene Carter 

Mrs. Lillian Centa 

Mrs Linda Clapacs 

Mr. Carl Clements 

Mr. Leo Collins 

Mr. Richard Contenza 

Mrs. Holly Copp 

Mrs. Norma Cowan 

Dr. Robert Wall Crary 

Mr Edward Czyzzcki 

Mr. Doc Daugherty 

Mrs. Rose Davies 

Mrs. Lynn Davis 

Mr. Tom M. Davis 

Mrs. Merry Dolter 

Mr Al Drews 

Mr. Alei Dzerowicz 

Mrs. Barbara Ely 

Mr. Charles Eversole 

Mr Peter Fasciano 

Mr Amed Fellague 

Mrs. Rosalie Fette 

Mrs. Patricia Filsinger 

Mr. William Foisel 

Mrs. Audree Fox 

Mr. Daniel Francetic 




' 



124 Mr. Sheldon Freedman 

124 Mr. H. Friedman 

124 Mr. Al GaJicki 

124 Mrs. Therea Galicki 

124 Miss Barbara Gates 

124 Mr. John Gibbons 

124 Mrs. Jane Gibson 

124 Mr. Bob Godfrey 

125 Mr. James F. Goebel 
125 Mr. William Gooding 
125 Mr. Thomas Gubitosi 
125 Ms. Joyce Haffer 

125 Mr. Thomas N. Halbedel 

125 Mrs. Fran Hail 

125 Mrs. Ardelle Harrell 

125 Miss Sue Harris 

126 Mr. Jeff Hartmann 

126 Mrs. Katherine Harwood 

126 Miss Varra J. Hastings 

126 Mr. Jerry Henderson 

126 Mrs. Gabrielle Hodgins 

126 Mr. Thomas Hoffart 

126 Mr. Frank Hoffert 

127 Mr. Richard Homovec 
127 Mr. R. Hungerford 
127 Mr. Robert A. Hutson 
127 Mr Frank Jablonski 
127 Mrs. Mary Jagger 

127 Mr. Frank Jirovec 

127 Mr. Milt Kadlec 

128 Mr. John Kalka 
128 Mr. James Kelly 
128 Mrs. Jan Kehn 
128 Mr. Harry E. King 
128 Mr. Cliff Kirchner 
128 Mrs. Ellen Klein 
128 Mrs. Ruth Krup 

128 Mr. Paul Laurio 

129 Mr. Charles Lardomita 
129 Mr. Jack Lardomita 
129 Mrs. Susan Lawrence 
129 Miss Jane Lellis 

129 Mrs. Joan Lidrbauch 

129 Mrs. Joan Linderman 

129 Mr. Warren Loebdel 

129 Mrs. Mary Lomac 

130 Mr. Theodore C. Lomac 
130 Mr. Robert A. Lombardo 
130 Mr. Kenneth Lowe 

130 Mrs. Margaret Lucas 

130 Mrs. Marilyn Lucas 

130 Mr. Marc Manburg 

130 Mr. Tony Mancuso 

130 Mrs. Kathleen Marsh 



131 
131 
131 
131 
131 
131 
131 
131 
132 
132 
132 
132 
132 
132 
132 
132 
133 
133 
133 
133 
133 
133 
133 
133 
134 
134 
L34 
134 
134 
134 
134 
134 
135 
135 
135 
L35 
135 
135 
135 
135 
136 
136 
136 
L36 
136 
136 
136 
136 
137 
137 
137 
137 
137 
137 






' 



*\ 







Mr. Embert Martin 

Mr. Dan Maxson 

Mr. George Martinsen 

Mr. William McGuinness 

Mrs. Judith McLaughlin 

Dr. Earl McNeilly 

Mrs. Polly McRedmond 

Mr. William Medvick 

Mrs. Nancy Meek 

Mrs. Aldona MiskiniB 

Mr. Raymond R. Montani 

Mr. Frank J. Mularo 

Mrs. Patricia O'Breza 

Mr. Anthony J. Palermo 

Ms. Joan Paskert 

Mrs. Jody Paul 

Mr. Adam Pawlowski 

Mr. Hans Pesch 

Mr. Robert Petrovic 

Mr. Ronald E. Powaski 

Mr. Richard Rackovan 

Mr Michael Raicevich 

Mrs. Barbara Ramlow 

Mr. Robert Ramlow 

Mrs. Toni Tasb 

Mrs. Diane Reider 

Mr. Keith Reider 

Mr. Charles Reno 

Mr. Francis Richards 

Mr. Hampton Richardson 

Miss Ann Roberts 

Miss Patricia Robinson 

Mr. Joseph Rodriguez 

Mr. Fred Sallach 

Mrs. Sandra Sanborn 

Mr. Gregory Sattler 

Mr. Benjamin Sawyer 

Mr. David Daywell 

Mrs. Donata Schulz 

Mr. Peter Schwenke 

Mrs. Mickey Segulin 

Mr. Paul Serra 

Mrs. Janet Severino 

Mr. Ron Seymour 

Mrs. Elaine Sheridan 

Dr. Ralph R. Sibert 

Mr. Errol Sikon 

Miss Judith A. Simonich 

Mr. James Simpson 

Mrs. Ruth Smith 

Mr. Wayne Smith 

Mr. Frank Soltesz 

Miss Barbara Spiga 

Mr. William Starr 

Mr. Donald Steinbrink 

Mrs. Judith Stobinski 

Mr. Arthur Sydow 

Mrs. Carol Tkac 

Mrs. Peggy Torzewski 

Mrs. Rosemarie Tonn 

Mrs. Charlene Torer 

Mr. Frank Troglia 

Mrs. Patricia Turk 

Miss Margaret Uhry 

Mrs. Patrica Vance 

Mr. William Von Benken 

Mrs. Nancy Vondrak 

Mrs. Carolyn Wandersleben 

Mr. Charles Watkins 

Mr. Leonard Weisenberg 

Mr. Thomas Whippier 

Mrs. Eleanor Wiegand 

Mrs. Carol Williams 

Mr. Robert Yocum 

Mr. Richard York 

Mrs. Jill Zimmerman 

Mrs. Patricia Gibbons 



137 
137 
138 
138 
138 
138 
138 
138 
138 
138 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
139 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
140 
141 
141 
141 
141 
141 
141 
141 
141 
142 
142 
142 
142 
142 
142 
142 
142 
143 
143 
143 
143 
143 
143 
143 
143 
144 
144 
144 
144 
144 
144 
144 
144 
145 
145 
145 
145 
145 
145 
145 
145 
146 
146 
146 
146 
146 
146 
146 
146 
147 
147 
147 



Mr. Medvick gives some fatherly advice about scheduling to one of his sophomore charges. 



Faculty Index 



292 















Hail to thee, Euclid High School, 
To thy name all praise we sing. 
Happy days of youthful pleasure, 
Learning, living, life so dear. 
Our hearts fill with gratitude 
For all that is to be; 
All our praise we bring to thee. 



Where the blue of Erie's waters 
Casts the sun's bright golden rays, 
There all Euclid's sons and daughters 
Sing the joys of student days. 
If alter days be dark and drear, 
And storms of life draw nigh, 
The memories of our frienships here 
Will lift our hearts to Euclid High. 



ADVERTISING INDEX 



Action Auto Body 
A Joy Forever 
Alexander's Restaurant 
Anthony Insurance Agency 
Armao's Pizza 
Atlas Electric Company 
Bali Hai Restaurant 
Beachland Hardware 
Big Bouquet 
Bronko's Beverage 
Cleansville Cleaners 
Cleveland Plastic Fab- 
Corner Store and Pizza Place 
Convenient Food Mart 
Custom Fit Pro Shop 
Dallos-Spies 
Dee's Deli 
Dennia & Co. 
DiPaolo House of Beauty 
Dr. Donald Peppercorn 
Dr. R.M. Baldwin 
Driftwood Gallery 
Euclid Auto Parta 
Euclid Auto Service Center 
Euclid Blue Print and Supply 
Euclid Boosters Club 
Euclidian Beauty College 
Euclid Ignition 
Euclid Jalousies 
Euclid Office Supply 
Euclid Offset Printing 
Euclid Ohio Beverage 
Euclid Travel Bureau 
Europa Travel 
Fisher Body 
Flickinger, Inc. 
French's Pharmacy 



274 F.W Woolworth Co. 

248 Gabriel Insurance 

270 Gahr Machine Co. 

271 George Knaus Real Estate 

257 Gingiss Formalwear 

274 Glengate Auto Parts 

276 G.M.B. Paving Co. 

252 Hillwood Manufacturing 

242 Holzheimer's II 

277 Hudson/Upson Pharmacy 
254 Independent Savings 

276 Induction Brazing 
268 IRA Reporter 
262 Jack P. Reed 

260 Jackshaw Chevrolet Inc. 

261 Jackson Hardware 

277 Jay Dee Cleaners 
248 Kerr Lakeside, Inc. 
264 Knafer's Shore Market 

276 Knific Insurance Service, In. 

276 Kollander World Travel 

258 Lake Shore Graphics 
268 Lake Theater 

271 Leo Baur, Realtor 

257 Luikart Insurance 

259 Mark's Hairdressers 

275 Man's World 
268 Marino's Pizzeria 

262 Michelich's Hometown Rest. 

277 Model Meat Market 
254 Mr. Build 

264 Mr. G's Pizza 

276 NationwiBe Auto Parts 
264 North Coast Shoe Repair 
256 Norwood Drug, Inc. 

262 Nottingham Auto Body 

254 Nottingham Hardware 



277 


Open Pantry 


272 


Ozan Legal Clinic 


273 


Papp's Body Shop. Inc. 


250 


Perkin's Cake & Steak 


258 


Postal Instant Press 


264 


Prince Pharmacy 


250 


PTSA 


255 


Raimor's Studio 


266 


Richmond Beverage 


267 


Richmond Restaurant 


271 


Rieth Auto Store 


261 


R.K.B. Saw and Mower, Inc. 


256 


Rogers Jewelers 


274 


Russell Miller Garage 


271 


Salter Auto Parts 


274 


Sam and Pete's Barber 


270 


Stern's Men's Wear 


275 


Sherwood TV 


277 


Shipping Room Products. Inc 


262 


Shore Center Barber 


273 


Shore Center Shoe 


272 


Shore Center Vet. Clinic 


273 


Sims Brothers Buick, Inc. 


263 


Steve's Tire & Auto Center 


258 


Strasco Machine 


267 


Student Council 


250 


Sun Journal 


252 


Tony's Polka Village 


253 


TRW 


254 


Ugly Duckling 


253 


Value City 


267 


Vassar Health Foods 


260 


Wall Color Shop 


270 


Wilke Hardware 


248 


Yale TV 


270 


Zorman Auto Body Shop 


250 





25H 
251 
266 
254 
272 
277 
249 
246 
249 
263 
271 
264 
256 
263 
275 
277 
268 
272 
274 
268 
277 
277 
266 
258 
252 
269 
248 
267 
251 
250 
256 
266 
260 
277 
277 
272 



293 



Advertising Index 



<^MH 





BIG PICTURE: EHS students go their 
own ways after Winter Festival assem- 
bly. TOP: A senior takes a last walk 
down the corridors of EHS. MIDDLE: 
Students leave for their various places 
in the world. BOTTOM: Upon gradu- 
ation, the class of 1984 will head in 
many different directions. 



vector is the magnitude 
of something and the 
direction it takes. What 
will be the vector quantity for 
the future of EHS students? 
Will they continue education, 
begin careers, or join the ser- 
vices? The fact that Euclid 
students have the potential to 
achieve whatever they choose 



to pursue is demonstrated in 
their daily work and place- 
ment in national statistics. 

The success and achieve- 
ment of each student will de- 
pend on the person himself, 
but his is going into the world 
well prepared by his exper- 
ience at Euclid High School. 



Closing 



294 



sffefsafc 







VECTORS 



295 



Closing 



STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief 
Jacqueline Majers 

Copy Editor 
Jim Blevins 

Layout Editors 
Susan Hoffert & 
Anna Chanakas 

Business Editor 
Jacqueline Majers 

Photographer Editor 
Kris Fazio 

Underclass Editor 
Dawn Henkhuzens 

Sports Editors 

Amy Leu & Anslie 

Mclnally 

Activities Editor 
Chris Cahoon 

Student Life Editor 
Chris Bednarik 



COLOPHON 



1050 copies of the 1984 Euclidian were printed by th 
Josten's/American Yearbook Company at State College 
Pennsylvania. The book is printed on Gloss 191 paper stoc 
and includes eight pages of natural color and sixteen page 
of spot color. Century Schoolbook type is used throughou 
the book, with body copy set in ten point size, caption cop 
in eight point size with a one point tool line above an 
below the caption copy, and index copy in six point size, i 
poster style dropped initial is used in all body copy. Th 
cover is a full color lithograph of hand drawn artwork, b; 
senior Michael Boris. The book has Flame 287 endsheets 
The final deadline to insure on-time delivery of the boo 
was February 10, 1984. 



THANKS 



There is line-up of thanks to those who made the 198 
Euclidian possible. Thank you to Miss Cheryl Arthur, fo 
her endless cooperation; Frank Troglia, for his toleranct 
Sam Carlo, for supplying all the sports team pictures; Ra: 
mor's Studio for the processing and printing of all picture: 
the advertisers, who help defer the cost of the book; D: 
Bergem and the rest of the faculty and staff for all thei 
support and willingness to lend a helping hand. Most of al 
thank you to the entire student body, for without thei 
there would be no Euclidian. 



Adviser 
Mr. Robert Petrovic 



John Bolsar, Mike Boris, Mike 
Menart, Kevin Nainiger, Bob 
Sarka, Jim Allay, Kirk Dauer, 
Pam Miller, Vicky Schmeling, 
Leanne Sterbank, Dean Theodo- 
sian, Sue Tucceri, Al Ponsart, 
Marty Tomasi, Karen Balough, 
Lynn Bencivenni, Lisa Brisbin- 
e,Annmarie Geddes, Mike Lange, 
Sharon Murphy, Renee Phillips, 
Jesse Rodgers, Jodi Wollmer- 
shauser, Launi Leeper, Marlene 
Miller, Barb Tingly, Kim Bene- 
dum, Claudia Cummings, Curtis 
Majers, Sheila Brown, Beth Pekol, 
Cary Sanders, Luann Tomasi, Co- 
leen Wajahn. 



END OF THE LINE 

The staff has recorded the 1983-1984 school year in Vol 
ume 35 of the Euclidian. Due to rising costs, we did no 
receive the financial support that was needed, but we sui 
vived. We have attempted to accurately identify all th 
names, faces and events of the school year, and if we ei 
rored, we apologize. What lies between the lines of this boo 
is an over-all interpretation of the year, but to each perso 
it has a unique meaning. As these lines come to an end, w 
hope you will carry this memory book out into the worl 
with as much pride as we will. 



296