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Full text of "Euclid Shore High School - The Port-Hole"

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From THE PORT-HOLE the traveler catches a glimpse of 
a doorway. It is a new one, and yet, old. Like every threshold 
it is a symbol of coming and going. Beyond that entrance the 
traveler knows he will meet faces of interest and tales of echoing 
courage and humor. 




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Now from THE PORT-HOLE, a closer view of the shore reveals- 




Daniel E. Metts 
Principal 



[2] 



WE did not ponder long when we came 
to dedicate this Annual. Unanimously 
we voted to dedicate it to one who put 
the "pal" in principal. What student does not 
know him for a friend? During his eight 
years of service at Shore, our school has ex- 
perienced its greatest growth. Instead of a 
high school of twenty-two students, we now 
have graduating classes of that number. This 
material growth in equipment and enrolment 
has been accompanied by a marked improve- 
ment in scholarship and athletics. 

In appreciation of the large part he has 
played in increasing the worth of Shore we 
dedicate this book to 

DANIEL E. METTS 



[3] 



TUB P @ H T - M © L 




THE FACULTY 

Wilbur Franks, 
Superintendent 
Back Row — 
Daniel E. Metts, Principal 

George Leonard 

Joseph Maddox 

Frederick Padgett 

Harry Spangler 

Dale Harter 
Second Row — 
Grace Stevens 

Millie Eby 

Byrda Owen 

Hetty Rosenberger 

Mabel Crone 

Clare Swartz 

Louise Darst 

Genavieve Doutt 

Alfaretta Saunders 

Bess A. Williams 
First Row — 
Leona Mitchell 

Mary R. Crampton 
Edna Neff 

Edna Woodworth 

Lucille Aingworth 

Eleanor Krauss 

Audrey Dally 

Gertrude Canfield 

Maude Faetkenheuer 
[4] 



THI PORT 



H 



LI 



SENIORS 



From his 
position at 
the PORT- 
HOLE, the 
Traveler 
spies a jolly 
voung fellow 
who is 
engaged in 
talking. 
"Apparently 
that young 
man loves 
to talk and 
talk and 
talk! Well, 
let him en- 
joy himself 
now. For 
when a 
man's mar- 
ried" — 
and the 
Traveler 
smilingly 
turns away 
to scan — 




William Poese, President 
"The world belongs to the energetic." 
Class President 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Leader 3; Operettas 2, 3, 4; Leading Parts; 
Senior Play 1, 2; Shoronian 1, 2, 3; 
Winner 2; Debating Club 4. 




— a lovely 
vision in red, 
gone in a 
moment. 
"How like a 
Southern 
beauty," 
sighs the 
Traveler. 
"Can she be 
hurrying off 
to basket- 
ball?" 



Margaret Clymer., Vice-President 
"Both heart and head active — both com- 
plete, and both in earnest." 
Vice President 2, 4; Varsity Basketball 
3, 4; Athletic Committee 2, 3, 4; 
Chairman; Student Council 2; Delphic 
2, 3; Magazine Staff 4; Salutatorian. 



Just then 
another 
strawberry 
blonde 
crosses the 
circle of the 
PORT- 
HOLE. 
"Arguing 
with Coach 
Van Deusen. 
eh? 

Persuading 
him to be- 
lieve that 
her basket- 
ball tactics 
are 

correct?" 
chuckles the 
Traveler. 




I 

Katherine Dowd, Secretary-Treasurer 
"In the right place is her heart 
And her heart is ready and willing." 
Secretary-Treasurer 4; Vice President of 
Class 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Delphic 1, 
2, 3; Athletic Committee 4; Manager of 
Basketball 4; Varsity Basketball 4. 




Lucille Aingworth 
Sponsor 



"Rendering 
momentous 
decisions 
for such 
a small 
body." re- 
marks the 
Traveler as 
from the 
PORT- 
HOLE he 
perceives 
the Senior 
Sponsor 
surrounded 
by a group 
of excited 
graduates. 



"I'll wager that they have voted for a rainbow 
graduation, too," he whispers. 



[5] 



IH 



P©HT - hOli 




Earl Cornwall 

"He makes up his lack of height in wit." 

Delphic 3; Orchestra 3, 4; 
Glee Club 3, 4; leader 4. 

When next the Traveler peers from the PORT- 
HOLE, he perceives a young chap demonstrating 
Darwin's theory to a group of feminine admirers. 
"Ah, these young people," murmurs the Traveler, 
gazing sympathetically at 



Joe Kremm 

"And all the nobleness of the place 
Is in thy heart and on thy face." 

Varsity Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1,2; 
Wrestling 3; Track 3; Delphic 1, 2, 3. 

A lad named Joe standing timorously in a corner. 
With flushed cheeks and adoring eyes he is listening 
to the words of one named Marge. 



Beatrice Andrews (Bee) 

"Deeply has sunk the lesson you have given 
And shall not soon depart." 

Shoronian 1, 2, 3; Debaters' Club 4; 
Associate Editor of Magazine 2. 

Startled by words that come distinctly to him 
through the PORT-HOLE, the Traveler hears a low 
mumbling "book, look, cook; rat, mat, cat; bake, 
rake, cake". 

Two bright brown eyes are staring thoughtfully. 
"A poet," surmises the Traveler. 



Brenton Herman 

"By diligence he wins his way." 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Operetta 3; Football Manager 4; 
Delphic 1, 2, 3; Music Appreciation Team 3. 

"There, hold that pose!" Click goes a camera. 
The Traveler catches his breath at the lively air 
of the young folks. Then he laughs to see — 



[6] 



T H 



pQiT ■ H©LI 



Ada Cornwall (Tiny) 

"An appearance of delicacy, yes, even of fragility." 

Glee Club 3, 4; President 4; Shoronian 3; 
Operetta 3, 4; leading part; 

Student Council 3, 4; Secretary 3; Vice President 4; 
Athletic Board 4; Secretary 4; Magazine Staff 3, 4. 

— a red bird. Dressed in red from hat to shoes, 
she is warbling more beautifully than any bird. 



Arthur Keck 

"The actions speak the man." 

Business Editor of Shore Magazine 3; 
Glee Club 3; Delphic 3. 

Nearer and nearer comes the picture of Shore. 
The Traveler stands entranced at his window. 
Across his vision flashes a boy bending over a paper 
and drawing the most grotesque images imaginable. 

"Cartoonist" the Traveler says to himself. 



Marie Guenther (Mickey) 

"To live in hearts we leave behind 
Is not to die." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary 4; Treasurer 3; 
Delphic 1, 2, 3; Orchestra 3. 

At that moment there is an interruption in the 
nature of a reluctant little dog, being pulled along 
by his mistress. The Traveler loiters fascinated. 
"But you must learn something," he hears her say. 
"Oh, oh," thinks he. "Do dogs go to school, too, in 
this day?" 



John Kleifeld (Johnny) 

"Let us enjoy pleasure while we can; it is never 
long enough." 

Varsity Football 2, 3; Varsity Basketball 3; 
Track 2, 3; Glee Club 3; Delphic 3; 
Athletic Association Vice President 4. 

Then his gaze fastens on a young lad eating ice 
cream. "He can't fool me," laughs the Traveler. 
"That boy is wholly absorbed in that beauty by 
his side." 




[7] 



TH I Pill - NOLI 



1926 





Laura Kinney 

"A woman's strength is most potent when robed in 
gentleness." 

National Honor Society 4; Shoronian 2, 3; 
Glee Club 3; Distinguished Roll 2, 3, 4. 
Valedictorian 

"Another blonde?" and the Traveler scrutinizes 
the naive face. "But no 'Iight-headedness' here. 
Much weight to that mind," he exclaims. 



John Luikart (Luke) 

"The elongated exposition of length." 

Football Manager 2; Delphic 2. 3; Cheer leader 3; 

Student Council 2, 3, 4; President 4; 

High Council 3, 4; Football 3; Basketball Varsity 4; 

Stage Manager 3, 4; Athletic Board 3, 4; 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Operetta 3. 

"W/za/'s this uproar? Why arc those girls so 
excited?" The Traveler contemplates the scene. 
"It's that charmer over there. He's run off with 
his pockets stuffed with gay colored handkerchiefs." 

"A Beau Brummel of the 20th century," murmurs 
the Traveler. 



Lillian Mann (Lily) 

"For she is wise if I can judge her." 

Delphic 3, 4; National Honor Society 4; 
Distinguished Roll 3, 4. 

A whirling figure makes its appearance next. "A 
toe dancer, upon my word!" declares the Traveler. 



Louis Tankard (Louis Fr.) 

"Perhaps it may turn out a song 
Perhaps turn out a sermon." 

Secretary-Treasurer 2; Delphic 2, 3; Winner 2, 3; 
Class President 3; Glee Club 3, 4; Operetta 4. 

The next voice to which the Traveler's attention 
is directed appears to come from a room labeled 
219, and the voice resembles a talking encyclopedia 
of science. 



181 



TBI Pill - l§L 



Eunice Mehlberg (Beans) 

"Her eyes are wells — her hair the clouds of dusk." 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Shoronian 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Secretary 2, 3. 

From his position at the PORT-HOLE, the Trav- 
eler overhears the conversation of two girls. "I got 
home from operetta practice at 2 o'clock — but I 
left at 9," said the curly-headed one. 



Dick Timms 

"Our deeds determine us as much as we determine 
our deeds." 

Shoronian 2, 3; Varsity Basketball 2, 3, 4; 
Captain 4; All Conference Center; 
Varsity Football 3, 4; Track 3, 4; 
Magazine Staff 2, 3; Athletic Board 3; 4; 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Operetta 2. 

The Traveler starts. Can that be a Knight and 
his lady? As the vision clears, a football hero Dick 
by name is distinguishable with his latest admirer, 
Clara. 



Josephine Lange (Joe) 

"Be not ashamed of thy virtues." 

Delphic 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 2; 
Music Appreciation Team 3. 

"Some one in a hurry, eh?" Before his intent 
gaze a young lady dashes madly up to the school 
entrance. The Traveler looks at his watch. "8:35! 
Late again!" 



Clara Nason 

"My thoughts and I are of a different world." 

Glee Club 1; Delphic 1, 2, 3; 
Music Appreciation Team 2; 4. 

Now the PORT-HOLE presents an unusual sight. 
There is one young lady among a group of students, 
appearing a "silent woman," one who knows how to 
listen. 





[9] 



TUB P 



R T 



ILI 



1926 




Agnes Weatherby (Brownie) 

"If a good face is a letter of recommendation, a 
good heart is a letter of credit." 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Shoronian 2. 3; 
Athletic Committee 2, 3, 4. 

The Traveler rubs his eyes, as he peers at the next 
revelation of the PORT-HOLE. In a typewriting 
room sits a dark-eyed maiden. 

"Typing a business letter?" he wonders. "But 'tis 
a queer business letter which begins 'Dear Eddie' ". 



Kenneth Vogel (Ken) 

"Self conquest is the greatest of all victories." 

Advertising Committee 3; Shoronian 1, 2, 3; 
Track Manager 3; Basketball Manager 4. 

"Oh, oh, oh!" roars the Traveler as he sees 
through the PORT-HOLE a young lad blowing his 
front teeth out trying to make a soft basketball hard. 






Here the view of Shore is clouded by a sudden 
gust of wind. The Traveler, leaving his position at 
the PORT-HOLE, sits down to rest. 



HONOR STUDENTS OF CLASS OF 1926 

Valedictorian — Laura Kinney 
Salutatorian — Margaret Clymer 



[10] 



Til Pill - I§L1 




Back row: Peter Althen, Nick Pilla, Coach Van Deusen, Tony Yurglich, Roxy Montana, 
Manager Brenton Herman. 

Second row: John Bestgen, Bill Gill, Joe Kremm, Captain Dick Timms, John Luikart, 
Lee Grand Jackson, Mr. Metts. 

Front row: Robert Jennings, John Kleifeld, Ed. Osborne, Herbert Watkins. 

FOOTBALL REVIEW 

Early in September Coach Van Deusen sent out the first call for football 
candidates. About 35 responded. Among them were several letter men of 
last year. 

Our new coach began by teaching the boys the fundamentals of the game 
and getting the men into form physically. He stressed most the scientific side 
of the game, teaching them to use their heads, and the easiest way of doing things 
correctly. He kept them hard at work learning to tackle properly, to run the ball, 
and to make themselves important cogs in the machine known as the football team. 

The squad was soon cut down and enough material kept to make a first and 
second team. Day after day the coach and boys worked and sweated, until at 
last a varsity was picked, and the team lined up for the season. The varsity was 
as follows: "Speed" Jackson and "Hack" McGrath, two good ends from last season; 
tackles, Yurglic, a new man, and Joe Kremm, of last year's team; guards, Nick Pilla 
and "Roxy" Montana, two green men. Dick Timms, a letter man, held down the 
center position. 

The backfield was the coach's big problem. The first starting lineup was 
Kleifeld at quarter, Jennings and Bestgen at the halves, and Osborne at full. 
Watkins was the utility man of the team, playing anywhere from one end of the 
line to the other and finally ending up in the backfield. 

Frequent changes were made in the backfield; Kleifeld's ability to run the 

(Continued on page 36) 
[11] 




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A FARMER'S INTERPRETATION OF BASKETBALL TERMS 

[12] 



fll P§If - H ® L I 




Back row: Coach Van Deusen, John Luikart, Eugene Borbely, Manager Kenneth 
Vogel, Dick Timms, Nick Pilla, Mr. Padgett. 

Front row: Hubert Watkins, Robert Jennings, Captain John Bestgen, Eugene Fryan, 
Roxy Montana. 

BASKETBALL REVIEW 

Now that we have a perspective on the 1926 basketball season we can see how 
Shore came out in the race. The team worked well as a whole, but at times the 
shooting was erratic. We all hope for a better season next year. The only member 
of this year's squad who will graduate is John Luikart. 

Opening the season of the conference games with only one letterman and a 
stage-frightened team, Shore met their first defeat by Shaker Heights. The next 
two teams in line were West Commerce and Longwood. The Shore basketeers 
were on their toes and victory proved an easy matter in both cases. Euclid, our 
next opponent, gave our boys a heart breaker by defeating them for the first time 
in four years in a non-conference game. Then the Rocky River leather tossers 
tossed baskets until they made a decisive victory over the Shore quintet. Euclid's 
powerful team then came over on our floor for a conference game and the Green 
and White steam roller tried to take revenge but after hard fighting the brave 
players lost the game by a few points. The last team that our boys played was 
John Marshall. Both teams had started the season with a defeat. So a fast excit- 
ing game was witnessed by Shorites and the boys brought home their third victory. 

Captain Bestgen deserves a great deal of credit for the fine display of basket- 
ball that spectators witnessed. Bob Jennings, our star forward, played a hard game 
all through the season and had some real scoring records, while Gene Fryan and 
Watty Watkins fought hard to keep up the team work. John Luikart and Gene 
Borberly showed Coach Van Deusen that they were both able to get the jump at 

(Continued on page 39) 

[13] 



fll P§1! - lill 




Back row: Coach Van Deusen, Nan Colquhoun, Margaret Clymer, Manager Katherine 
Dowd, Margaret Gill, Miss Aingworth. 

Front row: Priscilla Easterling. Captain Alice Smith, Alma Harwood, Lucy Mathews. 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

While the Shore girls' basketball season was not a shining success as far as 
winning was concerned, it had its bright spots. 

The team work, basket shooting, and floor work of our girls kept their opponents 
on a fast jump. Some of their victims were Berea, Andrews Institute, and the 
East Shore Community Club. The teams that defeated them were Bedford, Shaker 
Heights, and Euclid Central. 

Captain Smith piloted her team with the greatest care. She completed her 
duty by working along with Nan Colquhoun in piling up the score. Katherine Dowd, 
our faithful manager, proved to be also a faithful forward. Margaret Clymer, our 
powerful jumping center, and Priscilla Easterling, her side partner, kept the ball 
moving in their zone. Margaret Clark, Alma Harwood, Margaret Gill, and Lucy 
Mathews made up the guarding crew which proved to be very strong, owing to the 
fact that our opponents had a running score of 116 while Shore tallied 164 points. 

The bright spots will turn into a shining sun next year. The only ones to leave 
the squad will be Margaret Clymer and Katherine Dowd. The timber of this year's 
squad will undoubtedly be the manufactured product of '27. 



[ 14] 



TBI P©HT - iQLl 



LAST WILL OF THE CLASS OF 1926 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, That we, the Senior Class of Shore 
High School, being of unsound mind, and feeble memory, do hereby make, and 
declare this for our Last Will and Testament; hereby declaring null and void all 
previous will and testaments heretofore made. 

I. We direct that all remaining just debts and expenses be paid from the 
surplus of the athletic fund as soon after our graduation as possible. 

II. We give, bequeath and devise the following, to-wit: 

1. To the Class of '27: The right to assume Senior dignity and subdue all 
lower classmen. 

2. To the Class of '28: The large amount of unconsumed midnight oil which 
we have on hand. 

3. To the Class of '29: We leave them our sympathy (they will need it). 

4. To the Faculty and School: Our sincere good wishes. May they always 
remember our good points; we further request them to take charge of our rolling 
stock in the C. P. & E. 

5. To Miss Crone: A large supply of flypaper to catch the insects flying around 
Euclid. 

6. To Mr. Metts: A celluloid eraser and also an automatic admit writer. 

7. To Mr. Spangler: Laura Kinney leaves her unbobbed tresses to fill in 
the vacant places. 

8. Richard Timms leaves his Basketball ability to Ray Newcomb. 

9. William Poese leaves his speaking and acting ability to Margaret Clark. 

10. Arthur Keck leaves his original Charleston steps to Walter Cornblum. 

11. Brenton Hermann leaves the muddy football suits to next year's manager 
to care for. 

12. Margaret Clymer bequeaths her slender figure to Eleanor Hart. 

13. Clara Nason relinquishes her quietness to Louise Sherlock. 

14. Eunice Mehlberg leaves her collection of green ribbons to the school 
trophy case. 

15. Beatrice Andrews leaves her poetic ability to next year's class poet. 

16. John Luikart leaves his lankiness to Betty Schubert. 

17. Louis Tankard leaves his knowledge of Geometry to next year's Sopho- 
mores. 

18. Lillian Mann leaves her studiousness to Eugene Borbely. 

19. Ada Cornwall leaves her beautiful voice to Grace Oetgen. 

20. Agnes Weatherby leaves her wornout textbooks to the Juniors. 

21. Joseph Kremm and Earl Cornwall leave their love of the school to the 
coming Freshies. 

22. Katherine Dowd leaves her red hair to Alma Harwood. 

23. Marie Guenther's good looks go to Alda Mortimer by special request. 

24. Kenneth Vogel leaves his ability to manage a basketball team to the 
heir apparent. 

Having thus completed our will we appoint Miss Aingsworth, our class sponsor, 
as executrix. 

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, we hereunto set our hands this day of May 
in the Year One Thousand Nine Hundred and Twenty Six. 

Signed CLASS OF 1926. 

Signed, and declared by the above Class of 1926 as their Last Will and 
Testament in the presence of us, who have hereunto subscribed our names as 
witnesses. 

RED GRANGE. 
BUD FISHER. 
[15] 



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[16] 



Til P§lf - H O L 1 




[17] 



7 H ■ PORT 



OIL 




THE JUNIOR CLASS 



Betty Schubert 

Caleb Pickard 

Gene Fryan 

Jeanette King and John Luikart 

Miss Mitchell 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Student Councilors 
Sponsor 

Freshmen were we in '23, 

Green as green as "Freshies" could be. 

As Sophomores of year '24, 

To a lot of knowledge, we added more. 

Now as Juniors of '25 and 6, 

Our ideals of life are definitely fixed. 

And in our Senior year to come, 
We shall find life well begun. 



Aitken, Russell 
Anderson, Kenneth 
Armitage, Elton 
Barto, Marguerite 
Bickley, Lloyd 
Borbely, Eugene 
Brazee, James 
Brooks, Grace 
Brown, Phyllis 
Colquhoun, Nan 



Clark, Margaret 
Easterling, Priscilla 
Feldman, Jeanette 
Fryan, Eugene 
Garapic, Zora 
Gill, Margaret 
Gill, William 
Grimm. Carl 
Harwood, Alma 
Haw, William 



Jennings, Robert 
King, Jeanette 
Kovaoic, Emily 
Kurrle, Albert 
Klauminzer, Margaret 
Leibnitzer, Margaret 
Moffet, Elizabeth 
Montana, Roxy 
Mortimer, Alda 
Newcomb, Ray 



Parenti, Mike 
Pickard, Caleb 
Pilla, Nick 
Schubert, Betty 
Smith, Alice 
Smith, Donald 
Stockall. Florence 
Watkins, Hubert 
Whitworth, Arthur 
Yurglic, Tony 



[18] 



Til P © H T - iiL 




"Ye Juhiok li 



[19] 



TBI P§iT - 1§LI 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Sponsor 

Colors 

Motto 



Harold Book 

G°LUIE KoVACIC 

Lee Grand Jackson 

Miss Swartz 

Blue and Grey 

Aim high for Shore High 



Someone called us Miss Swartz's barbarians. We trust that by the time we 
become seniors, we shall have become civilized, dignified, and worthy. 



But just now 

We're barbarians 
Well, I guess 

Shore's barbarians 
Yes! Yes! Yes! 



Shore High's barbarians 

Have come out of the west! 
Through all Euclid Village 

Our pranks are the best. 
Except for a few 

We're wild — every one 
We don't love to work 

We love all the fun. 



Baumert, Matt 
Bestgen, John 
Black, Elizabeth 
Blanton, Tom 
Book, Harold 
Borgsteadt, Warren 
Brigleb, Lucille 
Budnick, Edmund 
Converse, John 
Cowin, Claire 
Disette, Kester 
Granger, Martha 



Hart, Eleanor 
Hart, Hanna 
Householder, Russell 
Jackson, Lee Grand 
Kieselbach, Bertha 
Kornblum, Walter 
Kovacic, Goldie 
Krause, Evelyn 
Kurrle, Elmer 
Latour, Jack 
Lauderbach, Pearl 
Lenhardt, Fred 



Luikart, Fordyce 
Luikart, Theoda 
Lynch, Robert 
Maloney, Margaret 
Mathews, Alice 
Miller, Daniel 
McKay, Muriel 
Neal. Harry 
Osborn, Edward 
Raeburn, Elizabeth 
Riddell, Marie 
Ryder, Mary 



Sava, Frances 
Schmidt, Clara 
Sezon, Charles 
Spurr, Allen 
Spurr, Virginia 
Sylvester, Ruth 
Teska, Marguerite 
Test, Ben 
Watkins, Frederic 
Wichern, Philip 
Zelle, Victor 



[20] 



T H E P O R T - HOLE 







"SUR-Ps^lieo? *' 



[21] 



THE P§lf ■ M © L 1 




THE FRESHMAN CLASS 



President 


- 


- 


Louise 


Sherlock 


Vice President 


- 


- 


Ralph Myers 


Secretary and Treasurer 


Lucy 


Mathews 


Student 


Councilor 


- 


Elsie Taylor 


Colors 


' - 


- 


- 


Scarlet 


and Grey 


Motto 


- 


- 


- 


Say a little, 


do a lot ! 


Sponsor 








Mr. Harter 




F is 


for 


faculty, 


our lovable teachers 






R is 


for 


razzing 


we get from the Seniors 


, 




E is 


for 


efficiency, we passed the test 






S is 


for 


Shore, 


the school which is best. 






H is 


for 


Harter, 


our sponsor so kind 






M is 


for 


memory 


, years hence to find, 






E is 


for 


effort, endless and grand 






N is 


for 


notability, that's how we stand! 




Ahlman, Marian 


Dimmock, 


Ernest 


Kremm, Walter 


Pfeil. Florence 


Althen, Peter 


Evans, 


Beatrice 


Larick, Helen 


Poljak, Doniela 


Bantel. Clifford 


Getler, 


Dorothy 


Mathews, Lucy 


Repka, Ruth 


Bauer, Johanna 


Green, 


Edward 


Merchant, Margaret 


Sherlock, Louise 


Bonnema, Ralph 


Guitano, Helena 


Mertek, Jennie 


Signoretti, Lenora 


Borgesteadt, Charlotte Herman, f* 


orman 


Myers, Ralph 


Spencer, Helen 


Bricel, Frank 


Hopric 


h, Matthew 


Nourse, Roswell 


Stein, Mildred 


Cheach, Mary 


Hoffart, Frank 


Oetgen, Grace 


Stillwell, Jeanette 


Cimperman, Alice 


Hutchins, 


fames 


Ogilvie, Margaret 


Stray, Helen 


Clement, Rachel 


Juratovic, 


Rose 


Parenti, Josephine 


Taylor, Elsie 


Conrad, Theodore 


June, 


D hili 


P 


Pearson, John 


Topping, Paul 


Cowan, Jeanette 


Karls, 


Frie 


da 


Petrick, Anna 


Vidugeris, Philomena 


Day, Marjorie 


Kostelic, Mary 


Petrowsky, Janet 


Walsh, Dorothy 



[22] 



Til PORT 



H 



LI 



IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE 

presented by the 

Senior Class, May 28, 1926 

under the direction of 

Miss Genavieve Doutt. 

Miss Doutt, who has during the last three years supervised with splendid 
success many of the dramatic programs, including last year's Senior play at 
Shore High, is a graduate of Beaver College (Pa.), School of Expression, of 
Southern College, Lakeland, Florida, and has done graduate work at Columbia 
University. 



CAST OF 

Mary Grayson 
Johnson 

Comtesse de Beaurien 
Rodney Martin - 
Cyeus Martin 
Ambrose Peale 
Marie - 
William Smith 
Donald McChesney 
Miss Burke 
Ellery Clark - 
George Bronson - 



CHARACTERS 

Ada Cornwall 

- John Kleifeld 
Margaret Clymer 

- William Poese 
Louis Tankard 

John Luikart 

Agnes Weatherby 

Robert Jennings 

Brenton Herman 

Kay Dowd 

- William Maclver 

- Kenneth Anderson 



The codfish lays a million eggs, 

And the helpful hen lays one, 
But the codfish doesn't cackle. 

To tell us what she's done; 
And so we scorn the codfish coy, 

And the helpful hen we prize, 
Which indicates to you and me, 

That it pays to advertise. 



[23] 



Ill Pill ■ M©L 




THE MIKADO 

Presented by the combined musical clubs, April 21, under the direction of 
Miss Maude Faetkenheuer. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 
Yum-yum -..•.. Ada Cornwall 

Peep-Bo Jeanette King 

Pitty Sing ..... Betty Schubert 

Katisha Goldie Kovacic 

Nanki-Poo Louis Tankard 

Mikado Eugene Borbely 

Pooh-Bah ------ Harold Book 

Ko-Ko William Peese 

Pish Tush Daniel Miller 



Phyllis Brown 
Eleanor Hart 
Emily Kovacic 
Margaret Clark 
Margaret Gill 
Nan Colquhoun 



Brenton Herman 
Albert Kurrle 
Matt Baumert 



CHORUSES 
Alice Smith 
Eunice Mehlberg 
Kay Dowd 
Agnes Weatherby 
Marie Guenther 
Mary Ryder 

BOYS 
John Luikart 
Bob Jennings 
Ben Test 



Hanna Hart 
Theoda Luikart 
Pearl Lauderbach 
Alda Mortimer 
Priscilla Easterling 
Florence Stockall 



Earl Cornwall 
Ray Newcomb 



[24] 



til p © it t - m~& l i 




GIRLS' GLEE CLUB Director— Miss Maude Faetkenheuer 




BOYS' GLEE CLUB Director— Mr. King 
[25] 



THI P©lf - H (} L E 




NINE B 




EIGHT A 
[26] 



Til POlT - 1§LI 




[27] 




THE VERDICT RETURNED 

A FARCE 
Written by Betty Schubert 

IT was a sultry afternoon in Facultyville. All the villagers had retired for the afternoon, 
undoubtedly waiting until the thermometer would come down to 98 degrees in the shade. 
Facultyville was a "hot" place. 

The dust had had a chance to settle in the old courtroom. The only sign of life was 
a fly, buzzing industriously about the Judge, who was snatching a little much needed 
beauty sleep. 

The screen door banged! The silence was broken. Judge Metts awoke with a start. 
In came Sheriff Stray, modestly escorting Susie Rosenberger and Sallie Doutt. The fly 
came to attention. Ah, here, at last, was some excitement. He careL.Hy settled himself 
and thus became the secret witness of the following dialogue. 

Judge Metts (yawning terrificly) — Hello, there. Don't bother to knock. What's the 
trouble now? 

Sheriff Stray (proudly) — Your Honor, I found these two prominent citizens of Faculty- 
ville having a heated argument. 

Judge (mops his brow) — It must have been about the weather. 

Sallie Doutt — Your Honor, Susie Rosenberger had the nerve — 

Susie Rosenberger — Your Honor, she's got it all wrong — 

(Enter Millie Crampton, the Courthouse secretary, with a brief case.) 

Millie (gayly) — What's this about nerves all wrong? I just got a fine prescription 
from Doc Leonard for soothing nerves. It's six tablespoons of vinegar, one teaspoon — 

Judge — Excuse me, but will you please summon the jury? It looks like an interesting 
case. Ladies, be seated. 

(The jury scrambles in.) 

Mike Padgett — Get off my chair. Can't you see I've got my hand on it? 

Joey Harter — I tagged it first. 

Lucie Aingworth — Don't rush, boys. There's lots of room in the back row. 

Henry Spangler — Save me a seat, Joe. 

Willy Maddock — Ouch! That was my foot. 

Miss Emmie Crone — I want to sit on the end. 

Jennie Mitchell (to Willy) — Take your finger out of my eye, please. 

Mollie Darst — Oh, Henry, move your head to the left; I can't see. 

(Judge Metts taps desk with croquet mallet.) 

Judge — Silence in the courtroom. Now, let's get down to work. 

Attorney Swartz enters. 

Judge — Ah, we shall now proceed. 

Miss Swartz — The first question — what? 

Sheriff Stray — A heated argument. 

Judge — No interference, please; there's enough static as it is. Continue. 

Miss Swartz— Who? 

Sallie Doutt — Susie Rosenberger — 

Susie Rosenberger — Sallie Doutt — 

[28] 



TBI P§lf - if © L 



Judge Metts — Yes, it is very apparent. Please continue. 

Miss Swartz — When? 

Sheriff Stray — At 2:15 sharp, Eastern Standard time. 

Miss Swartz — Next, where? 

Sally Doutt — In Susie's kitchen. 

Susie Rosenberger — No sir-e-e-e, it was out in the yard. 

Miss Swartz — Please be definite. I presume you mean the argument when you say 
"it". Well, let's compromise and say the argument took place on Susie's back porch. 

Judge (to the jury) — Is that satisfactory? 

(Lucie Aingworth sits up with a start.) 

(Mike Padgett hastily removes his feet from the railing.) 

(Miss Emmie Crone and Jennie Mitchell cease their chummy conversation.) 

Henry Spangler — Your Honor, we agree unanimously. 

Miss Swartz — Next, why? 

(Sally Doutt and Susie Rosenberger commence to talk and motion wildly.) 

Judge — Now, one at a time. Sally, you tell us what's the matter. Then Susie can 
tell us next. Please articulate clearly. 

Sally Doutt — Yes, Your Honor, as you all know, Susie lives next door to me. Well, 
my side porch faces her house, and unluckily, it is the only place where one can be com- 
fortable in the afternoons. I went out there this afternoon and was just getting settled 
when the most insulting odor reached my nostrils. What do you suppose Susie was 
cooking? Glue! ! ! 

Judge — What would she want with glue? 

Sallie — Well, you know how many dishes she breaks? I guess she just decided to 
have whole dishes for a change instead of just pieces — 

Miss Swartz — I see a flaw in your argument. How do you know it was glue? 

Sallie — I have a very good nose. 

Susie Rosenberger — Now let me explain. I was just cooking dinner. 

Sheriff Stray — What, do you eat glue? 

Susie — Who said anything about glue? I was just boiling cabbage! 

(Judge breaks the silence.) 

Judge — Har-har-har — that's a good one. Ha-ha. 

Sallie — But I know it was glue. 

Susie — Well, if anyone ought to know, it ought to be me. 

Judge Metts — Jury, you may adjourn to determine your verdict. 

(The judge prepares to sleep again.) 

(The members of the jury go to the next room and seat themselves.) 

Mollie Darst — Now, how should we go about it? 

Miss Crone — Let X be the unknown. 

Joe Harter — No-no let's debate the question. 

Henry Spangler — Well, however we do it, we must have a conclusion. 

Lucie Aingworth — Yes, by all means. 

Jennie Mitchell — Well, let's sum up the facts. First, Susie has been cooking some 
offensive food; Second, Sally Doutt objects; Third, They have a quarrel; Fourth, We all 
come here to decide. Now, what's the decision? 

Mike Padgett — I've got it I 

Lucie Aingworth — What? the measles? 

Mike — No, the decision. Neither one is guilty. 

Miss Crone — Prove it. 

Henry Spangler — Never mind the proof. We've got the conclusion and that is all 
that is necessary, so come on. 

(Judge Metts awakes, and the case is resumed.) 

Judge — The jury will now give the verdict. 

(Henry Spangler rises gracefully from his seat.) 

Henry — Your Honor, we have found that neither Susie nor Sallie is guilty. 

Judge — Eh? Not guilty? How's that? 

Mike Padgett — It's this way. Sally Doutt said her porch was on the side facing 
Susie's home. Susie has to eat, so she cooked something. 

Judge — Yes, go on. 

Mike — .Well, can Susie help it if the wind carries the odor of her cooking over to 
Sally's porch, if Sally's porch is there to get all the odors? 

Judge — Very complicated. Continue. 

(The jury in unison) — Then the carpenter who built the porch on the side facing 
Susie's home so all Susie's cooking can be smelled by Sallie is to blame because — 

The fly wearied with so much intelligence, flapped out of the room. 



[29] 




<«*w 






■•+?• 



N 






WW 



-~<PB'-, .'■ Tfc^ ^ ' ^ *y * ! ** » ^'^* 



,^ .Jul* ■//' » 




EDITORIAL STAFF 
Kenneth Anderson; Margaret Klauminzer; Harold Book; Margaret Clymer 
Betty Schubert 

John Luikart; Ada Cornwall; Louis Tankard; Eugene Fryan 

Russell Aitken 

Miss Clare E. Swartz Caleb Pickard 

William McIver; Emily Kovacic; Lillian Mann; Laura Kinney 

[30] 




[31] 



tii p O R t - hQli 



C&*< too ***Acr*j^ 




tp P@IT - hjOli 




THE STUDENT COUNCIL 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



John Luikart 
Ada Cornwall 
Jeanette King 



The Student Council meets every Monday, the meeting falling in a different 
period each week. Mr. Metts usually presides at the meetings, where discussions 
of school problems are taken up. The cleanliness of the corridors and the class 
rooms, the bulletin board notices, the conduct in the class rooms and in the lunch 
room, the school spirit at the games and the backing of activities of the school 
are a few of the problems discussed. 




* * ■-_ • • - 



Shore's New Annex 
[33] 



Tgl t P§lf - H ® L 1 




EIGHT B 




SEVEN A AND B 
[34] 



Compliments of 



The East Shore 

Community 

Club 




[35] 



I 

Tel. Kenmore 592 Tel. Kenmore 593 ' 

THE DILLE ROAD LUMBER CO. | 

LUMBER SPECIALISTS ] 

Anything in Lumber — Service and Quality Unexcelled 

i 

Yellow Pine Beaver Board 

White Pine Sheet Rock f 

Cypress Lath 

Redwood Shingles I 

Spruce Roofing 



CORNER NOTTINGHAM ROAD AND NICKEL PLATE RAILROAD 



Football Review 

(Continued from page 12) 

ball was held in check by his double responsibility; so he was changed from quarter 
to halfback. McGrath then became quarter, and because of his uncanny ability to 
snag a punt or kickoff, also played defensive quarter. Osborne by his terrific line 
plunging, kept his same place on the team, at full; Watkins, having the honor of 
being the lightest backfield man in the city, was a "big" man both on offense and 
defense, and held down a half position with Jennings. Jennings was himself a 
wonderful tackier and ball toter. 

The first games of the season were practice affairs. Shore ran roughshod over 
Mentor and emerged on top of a 23-9 count. The strong Bedford team, with a 
line averaging 185 lbs. was next played and Shore was nosed out by an 8-7 score. 

Painesville, co-champion of Lake County and conqueror of the Glenville 
Senate team, was humbled by a 21-0 count in the next practice tilt. 

The two Fryan boys were declared ineligible, under the Northern Ohio 
Association ruling, so Coach Van Deusen lost two of his halfbacks. The new 
backfield had just one week of practice together before the first of the Conference 
games was played. 

The 1925 season, as declared by the sport writers, was the worst in thirty 
years in regard to the weather and playing conditions. Every game, with the 
exception of one, was played on a sloppy field. A muddy field is a handicap to 
any light team and Shore's was no exception. They had to play heads up football 
to hold their own with their usually heavier opponents. 

The big West Commerce team was the first on the Conference schedule, 
and due to the condition of the field, Shore, after being within striking distance 
on many occasions, could not run up a larger score than 12-0. 

John Marshall was next encountered and with Shore leading throughout the 

[36] 



KENMORE 57 
1 

i i 

i i 

j C. E. LUIKART j 
i Insurance 



,-> 



O0 



18605 St. Clair Avenue 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 



" Oil Is 
Cheaper 
Than Steel" 



STEVENSON OIL 

& CHEMICAL 

COMPANY 

Euclid, Ohio 



game, a bad break enabled the West-siders to emerge on top of a 10-9 score. 

Rocky River, the Greater Cleveland Conference champions of two seasons, 
was next tackled on the Shore home lot. Shore had the ball in Rocky River territory 
all during the game, and after Osborne snagged a pass to score the only touchdown 
against Rocky River all season, they pulled the same trick on us and the game 
ended 6-6. 

Willoughby was next met and Shore lost 13-6. 

Our boys next journeyed to the Longwood field at Kingsbury Run, to tangle 
arms, heads, feet, and what not, with the "bottom ring" team of the Conference. 
Shore was doped to win by a fairly large score, and after crossing the Longwood 
goal line on two different occasions, was called back on account of penalties. 
The game ended in a deadlock. Hubert Watkins was the star of the fray, inter- 
cepting about four Longwood passes for big gains. 

Shaker Heights, the greatest scoring team in and around Cleveland, next 
invaded Shore's domain with their stars, the Kuliner brothers. And before the 
largest crowd in Shore's football history Coach Van Deusen's proteges turned the 
trick and upset the dope bucket by lacing the Hill-toppers 7-6. 

Then came the last game of the season and with our deadly rivals — Euclid. We 
shall not say much about the game except to inform you that we lost 24-6. "Speed" 
Jackson played a wonderful game at end. 

Eugene Fry an. 
The Seconds 

The second team must also be given credit for their fine work and loyalty in 
coming out all season just to give the varsity practice. They had a strong combin- 
ation and it brought out all that there was in the regulars, giving them harder scrim- 
mages than some of the teams on schedule. No games were carded for the scrubs 
but we are hoping and looking forward to a regular second "sked" for next season. 

I Continued on page 39) 

[37] 



Utopia Beach 



Is the most beautiful residential property in A merica. 

There is nothing finer. 

And yet this magnificent home community is not 
expensive. 

Low prices and easy terms place these homesites on 
Lake Erie within your reach. 

Get full details— Phone or Write 
I 

The S. H. KLEINMAN REALTY Company 

THIRD FLOOR NATIONAL CITY BUILDING 

I Cleveland's Largest Real Estate Organization 



QUALITY SERVICE \ 

NOTTINGHAM DRUG CO. | 

EXPERT PRESCRIPTION 
SERVICE 

E. 187th and ST. CLAIR AVENUE ! 
Kenmore 66 



J. F. LINNERT 
DAIRY 

Tuberculin Tested Milk 
and Cream 

331 EAST 186th STREET 
Kenmore 222 



"IT PAYS TO LOOK WELL" 

Compliments of 

H. S. WINTERS 

About July 1st ?ve will move 
our shop to the new block 

220th STREET and LAKE SHORE BLVD. 

A Beauty Parlor and Barber Shop 

Hair Bobbing, Marcelling, Shampooing 
and Clay Packs 



Eddy 365 Eddy 3687 J 

Robbins & Goodman 

Real Estate— Insurance 

Main Office 
152nd and Lake Shore Boulevard 

Eddy 1180 

Branch Office 

22303 Lake Shore Boulevard 

Kenmore 1026 



[38] 



j 

[ KENMORE 89 

FLOYD B. STEIN, Inc. 

PAVING AND SIDE WALK CONTRACTORS 

Steam and Domestic Coal of All Kinds 
YARD AND OFFICE: BABBITT ROAD AND NICKEL PLATE R. R. 



Baseball Review 

(Continued from page 37) 

The men are Elmer Kurrle, Kester Disette, Warren Borgstead, Peter Althen, Henry 
Kleifeld, Ralph Myers, Philip June. The backfield was made up of ineligibles, 
Gene Fryan, Vincent Fryan, and Gene Borbely. 

Next year will see several of them holding down regular positions on the 
varsity. 

Basketball Review 

(Continued from page IS) 

center. Our old standby, Nick Pilla, deserves credit for his excellent floor work. 

Ben Test proved to be an able substitute and will be a promising member for next 

year's varsity. Kenneth Vogel proved an able manager. 

Shore made a very good showing when it went up against such teams as Mentor, 

Painesville, Spencerian and Collinwood. In the tournament Shore defeated Bedford 

and then was eliminated by Springfield. 

Taking everything into consideration Shore can be proud that she has one 

of the cleanest teams known. So just wait until next year when Shore will have 

its old fast working machine to put up against any team that comes into its midst. 
The individual scoring record is as follows: 

G F T G 

Jennings 18 20 56 Watkins 4 

Bestgen 16 3 35 Fryan 4 

Timms 7 9 25 Borberly 3 

Luikart 10 1 21 Pilla 2 

Bob Jennings leads the squad of scorers by a total of 56 points. Jennings was 

(Continued on page 41) 



F 


T 


4 


12 


2 


10 


1 


7 


3 


7 



_ y ™_ y 

DayTei.Kenmore72i-NightTei.Kenmoreio86R | j Firestone Tires Exide Batteries 

THE EUCLID FUEL & SUPPLY i ! BEACHLAND BATTERY & 

COMPANY j I TIRE COMPANY 

~ , . ... ( AUTO ACCESSORIES 

Dealers in Quality \ 

s~* /^| AT I : Radio and Auto Batteries $1 1.95 j 

j Ford Parts - Tires 8.95 j 

L. E. Stevens, Mgr. Noble, Ohio j 642 E. 185th St. Kenmore 10 

.„_„_„ , „ _1 { „_, .,_ j. 

[39] 



j To High School Graduates Seeking Preferred Business Positions 



! 



Among the many reasons for securing one's training at the Spencerian are: 
A wide range of courses. 

A nation wide reputation for excellence in training young men and women. 
Four courses of collegiate grade leading to degrees. 
A placement bureau that receives several hundred calls a month, and serves Spencerian 

graduates without charge. 
Modern school buildings located in the heart of Cleveland on spacious grounds. 



COURSES OF STUDY 
Day and Evening Sessions 
Bookkeeping 
Shorthand 

Speed Shorthand and Typewriting 
High School for Adults 
Private Secretary 
English (Preparatory- Advanced) 
Commercial Spanish 
Commercial Normal (with State Certificate) 



ADVANCED COURSES 
leading to 
COLLEGE DEGREES 
Business Administration (with degree of B.C.S. 
Secretarial Science (with degree of B.S.S.) 
Commercial Normal (with degree of B.S. in Ed. 
Evening Law (with degree of LL.B.) 



Higher Accounting, Cost Accounting and Auditing 
(prepares for C. P. A. Exam.) 



Our Employment Service Bureau serves the graduates and the business public without charge. 
Send for bulletin of course in which interested. 



SPENCERIAN SCHOOL 

of COMMERCE - ACCOUNTS - FINANCE 



3201 EUCLID AVENUE 



I 



CLEVELAND 



Clair Marcelle 

PHOTOGR APHERS TO THE SENIOR CLASS OF 1926 

Clair Marcelle 

1620 EUCLID AVENUE : CLEVELAND 

TELEPHONE PROSPECT 2861 

Studios at 



NEW YORK CITY CHICAGO 



CLEVELAND 



PHILADELPHIA 



[40] 



STOP 

Wasting Your SMoney 




cA Savings ^-Account 
cAlways Has the Rjight of Way 



NOTTINGHAM SAVINGS C& 
BANKING COMPANY 

invites YOU to start YOUR Savings 
Account in Their New Bank, corner 
St. Clair Ave. and Nottingham Road. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Tel. Kenmore 631-990 



Compliments of 



\ Beachland Pharmacy 



f 




E. O. Rauchfleisch 
670 E. 185th St. 



Basketball Review 

(Continued from page 39) 

a substitute on the varsity during the season of '25 and proved to be a featuring 
star in '26. Captain Bestgen comes in second with a total of 35 points. Bestgen 
made an excellent showing as this was his first attempt at basketball. 

Our Second Team 

Coach Padgett's men also had a streak of bad luck this season. They met 
with seven teams and were able to take only two games. The second team was 
composed of the following players: Roxy Montana, Tony Yurglic, Bill Haw, James 
Brazee, Bill Gill, Dan Miller, Bob Lynch, and Bill Mclver. Coach Van Deusen 
will not lack material to build up a championship team from the remains of the 
varsity and second team. 



BEACHLAND 
DRY CLEANING 

Pressing, Repairing and 
Remodeling 

644 EAST 185th STREET 
A. STRAKAL Kenmore 10 



i 

j Nottingham Hardware Co. 

f 
i 
i 



KENMORE 665 



"The Community Store" 



Paints, Glass and Radio Supplies 
I Builders' Hardware a Specially 

! 

| 18708 St. Clair Ave. - Cleveland, Ohio 



[41] 




Shore's New Cafeteria 



WOULDN'T IT BE ODD IF 

Clara Nason argued as much as Bill Poese? 

Ada Cornwall wasn't full of suggestions? 

Kenneth Vogel became as studious as Laura Kinney? 

John Kleifeld lost his permanent? 

Margaret Clymer wasn't right on the job? 

Earl Cornwall was seen without Goldie? 

Joe Kremm would stop blushing? 



Whitworth's Service I 

! 

Moving - Packing - Shipping - Storage 

HONEST SERVICE— HONEST PRICE 

1313 East 105th Street - - Cedar 1123 



[42] 



Art (gaUrma 



1725 EUCLID AVENUE 



Leading Print Sellers 
and Frame Makers 



We have the largest line of 
school pictures in the 
country and give liberal 
discounts to the schools. 



i I 
$ i 
i i 
i i 
i i 
i i 

i i 
i { 
i I 

i ! 
i i 

i i 
i t 
i ! 
i ! 

i i 
i i 
$ i 

i ! 

i ! 
i ! 



6 STORES 

6 SUITES 

NEW 2 STORY BUILDING 

Corner Bliss Road and 
Lake Shore Boulevard 

B. KAPLAN 

Owner 

2501 NORTH BOULEVARD 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 



PHONE 
EDDY 7620 



Conversation between two husbands on a street corner: 

"Don't know what I'm goin' to do about that wife of mine getting so extravagant. 
Last Saturday she asked me for a dollar, yesterday she asked me for a dollar, today she 
asked me for a dollar." 

"Gosh, what does she do with all that money?" 

"Danged if I know! I aint given it to 'er yet." 



H. J. MERVISl 



Compliments of 

J. B. CLARK 



Prescriptionist 

I 

j MERVIS DRUG COMPANY 

638 E. 185th Street 



[43] 



Builders 




General 
Contractors 



662 E. 185th STREET - CLEVELAND, OHIO 

KENMORE 469 



Collegiate Styles 



<^7"> K£?\ 



for High School Men! 



The suits are tailored specially for younger men 
and are not merely men's suits in smaller sizes. 



With 2 Pairs Trousers 



$2752 



Hats, Shoes, Furnishings to Wear with Suits 



KO?\ 



The W B Davis Co 

The Men's Store of Cleveland - 327 Euclid 



Why do the BOYS and GIRLS 
go to the 

I BOSS Lunch Room 

because he serves them the best 

J ICE CREAM 

CANDIES and 

SOFT DRINKS 

I Keep on coming, always welcome 



Compliments of 

Roberts Hardware Co. 

676 East 185th Street 
Cleveland, Ohio 



[44] 



TCeWICKLIFFE LUMBER Co, 

LUMBER, SASH and DOORS 
MULE HIDE ROOFING 



Not a Kick in a Million Feet 



"You don't love me any more. I used to be all in the world to you once." 
"Yes — but I have gotten better in geography since!" 







Ice Cream 



Sodas 



i 
i 

"ODY'S" 1 

Moss Point Block 
21935 L. Shore Blvd. 



Candies 



Cigars 



H. A. Sterkel Co. 

22009 LAKE SHORE BLVD. 

Insurance and 
Real Estate 

List your property with us for results 

Kenmore 384 



Everybody does a lot of complaining about weather. "What we ought to do is to settle 
the question like Dinah did. 

"Ma'am," she announced one morning, "the thermometer's done broke. Nothin' to 
do now but to take the weather as it comes." 



\ 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 






Eat at the 

EUCLID PARK INIS 

Bliss & Babbit 



! 



M. C. PRATT 
Proprietor 



HOME MADE PIES 
QUICK LUNCH 



[ 45 ] 



I Why You Should Attend 



\ 



DYKE | 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



Student Body 

We appeal to students of high school and 

college grade only. 

Faculty 

The best teachers are employed. 

Courses 

All courses are organized to meet the re- 
quirements of a mature and discriminating 
student body. 

Results 

The graduates of this school are fitted to 

accept positions of responsibility. 

Positions 

Dyke graduates are placed in worth-while 
positions. Cheap positions are not filled 
by our Service Department. 



Permanent Service 

Once a Dyke graduate always a Dyke 
graduate. Our Service Department stands 
back of graduates for all time, whenever 
a need may exist. 

Location 

Conveniently located in new building at 

1001 Huron Road. 

Rates 

The cost of a course in the Dyke School 
of Business is in direct proportion to the 
ability of the student. The best school is 
the cheapest school for any good student 
to attend. 

Accredited 

Member National Association of Accredited 

Commercial Schools. 



Superior 180 



1001 HURON ROAD 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Superior 181 



HAPPY FELLOWSHIP for YOUNG PEOPLE 

I N 

SOCIAL, INTELLECTUAL and SPIRITUAL ACTIVITIES 

In the Community to Serve Young People — A Cordial Welcome — Ahvays 

S. C. VERNON, Pastor 



"The Lord hath laid on Him the iniquity of us all. " 

Isaiah 53:6 

' 'Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved. " 

Acts 16:31 



[46] 



Beachland 
Cash Market 

666 E. 185th Street 



Choice Meats, Poultry 
and Fish 



Free Delivery 



Kenmore 606 



Hemstitching Done 



14712 Lake Shore Boulevard 



STOP-SEE OUR 



Complete line of Dry Goods, 
Notions and Infant's Wear, 
before going Down Town 
Shopping. We can save you 
money :: :: :: :: 



- - - We Give Stamps - - - 

I 
J 

Florence A. Belville 

I 



I 



A doctor had just finished taking the temperature of a stock broker of Florida, who 
was suffering from a raging fever. 

"It's gone to 102," he announced in a tragic voice. 

The half conscious patient raised himself on his elbow: "Sell, sell!" he shouted. 



He: "I got Denver on the radio last night." 

She: "That's nothing, I know a fellow who got Los Angeles on a crystal set." 

He: "I'd like to see that set; where does the fellow live?" 

She: "Los Angeles." 



1 I 



KENMORE 34-W 

JOHN KLAUS 

DELICATESSEN and 
CONFECTIONERY 

614 E. 185th St. 



Compliments 

of 

A Friend 



[47] 




[48] 



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