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Full text of "Euclid Shore High School - The Log"



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SENIOR CLASS OF 

SHORE HIGH SCHOOL 

19 3 4 

EUCLID, OHIO 




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OTANDING out from simple but appropriate surroundings, 
Shore represents a symbol of modern youth and education. 
New wings have been added to the building from year to 
year. The school has developed from a small village school 
to one of city rank since the enrollment has increased from 
a few hundred to over one thousand in only a short spacz 
of time. 

A Shore student can well speak with pride of his school. 
Quoting from an inscription in the auditorium, what can be 
more significant than to say that our school is dedicated to 
"the youth of this city for the development of mind and 
body." What more can be said? 



SUPERINTENDENT W. A. Franks, in his fourteen years of 
connection with Euclid Public Schools, has worked un- 
ceasingly for their advancement. In cooperation with him, 
Mr. D. E. Metts, durins his sixteen years as our principal, 
has maintained the reputation of being a true friend to all 
who have needed his advice. Shore owes much to Mr. 
Franks and Mr. Metts. 

Philomena Vidugeris is in charge of stenographic work, 
Mrs. Crampton is in charge of school records, and Marian 
Moffett assists in miscellaneous routine. 





D. E. Metts Principal 

B. A. -Wooster/ M. A— Columbja 
Mabel L. Falberg . / ^y. / ^.^B-^Jfc^t<itnglish 

B. A. — Illinois, M. A.— Illinois/ 
Lucille Aing worth English 

B. A. — -Flora Stone Mather/ Graduate 

work — Columbia 
Juanita Boucher English 

B. A— Ohio Wesleyan, M. A.~ 

Western Reserve 
Angel ine Cockerill French 

B. A .— Ohio Wesleyan, M. A - 

Middlebury College/ Vt. 

Mabel Crone Science-Math 

B. S— Oberlin 

Hetty E. Rosenberger Home Economics 

B. A. — Western Reserve, Graduate Work 
—Columbia/ Graduate Work — Chicago 

J. Calvin Oldt Commercial 

B. A. -Albright, M. A —Albright/ B. 
Ped. Ohio/ M. A —Western Reserve 

Leona F. Mitchell Social Science 

B. A.— Ohio State/ Graduate Work- 
Ohio State/ Western Reserve 

Robert Phillips Chemistry 

A. B. — Wabash, Graduate Work — Illinois 
Graduate Work — Indiana, Graduate 
Work — Michigan 

H. W. Spangler Science 

B. A.- --Heidelberg, Graduate Work- 
Western Reserve 

Norma Vernon English 

A. B. -Ohio University, M. A.— Ohio 

State 

c i i w/l-i j - (Science and 

btanley L Whiteside A .^* ... jr • i c • 

Ohio otate, Oraduate Work- 
Ohio State, Graduate Work — Wisconsin 
Meryl R. Baumer Dramatics 




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B. A. — Wittenberg, Graduate Work- 
Wisconsin 

Lola Bevington Music 

B. A. — Brenau College Conservatory 

Patricia Riddile Commercial 

B. S. in Education — Bliss Business College 

Louise Darst Commercial 

B. A— Oberlin, Graduate Work- 
Western Reserve, N. Y. University 

Dorothy L. Seigling Social Science 

A. B— Hiram, M. A— Ohio State 

Dorothy Gill Physical Education 

A. B — Ohio State 

Pera Campbell English 

B. A— Defiance, M. A.^Ohio State, 

Graduate Work — Wisconsin f ? M % * // 

r i i r (Manual Training 

rord L. Lase \™ . i T . . 

(Physical I raining 

Ohio University, Wooster 
Esther M. Russell Social Science 

B. S. in Education — Bowling Green, 

Graduate Work — Wisconsin 
H. B. Bullard Social Science 

B. S— Ohio State, M. A.— Ohio State 
Jane A. Williams Latin 

B. Ph. — Denison, Graduate Work — Ohio 

University, Graduate Work — Chicago 
John J. Pohto Mechanical Drawing 

B. S — Ohio State, B. A.— Ohio State, B. 

P. E. — Superior State College/ Graduate 

Work — Cornell/ Graduate Work — Idaho 
Bart Swindler Math 

B. S. — Ohio Northern/ Graduate Work 

— Western Reserve 
John F. Beck Music 

Graduate — Cincinnati Conservatory of 

Music in Public School Music/ Graduate 

Work — Baldwin Wallace Conservatory 

of Music, Graduate Work — Wooster 

Conservatory of Music. 



£ 



THE Student Council throughout this year has sponsored the 
hall-guard system, monitor duty in the cafeteria, noon-hour 
dancing in the gym, and the selling of tickets for a number of the 
school affairs. 

It has also become a member of the Inter-School Council 
which meets every two weeks downtown. Shore has sent repre- 
sentatives regularly to those meetings. 

Gradually the Student Council is getting more responsibili- 
ties placed on its shoulders. It gains in importance every year. 



Arthur Brown — I' resident 

Anna Hrovat 

Bud Keller 

Eleanor McMillan 

Marie Zwierlein 

Lodo Habrle — 1st V.-Pres., first 
semester ; President, second sem- 
ester. 

Alfred Nason — 2nd V.-Pres., first 
semester ; 1st V.-Pres., second 
semester. 

Theda Thorne — Secretary 

Joseph Hohl 

Donald Dixon 

Robert Bandlow 



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Mid -Year Class Officers 

President Robert Yochim 

Vice President Ella Mae Joslin 

Treasurer Rudolph Matko 

Secretary LaVerne Berglund 

Sponsor Miss Aingworth 



Members of National Athletic Honor Society 

Arthur Brown Buster Stewart 

Rudolph Matko Charles Wick 





June Class Officers 



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President John Yoger 

Vice President Celia Vojsack 

Treasurer Jean Perry 

Secretary Betty Stein 

Sponsors Mr. Phillips, Miss Mitchell 



Members of National "Athletic Honor Society" 



Harry Davis 
Lodo Habrle 
Robert Hill 
Rudolph Nosse 



Alfred Nason 
Melvin Reibe 
John Yoger 
Joe Tekavic 



John Zivich 



/•*"* 







[ 7 1 




THE LOG 



ROBERT YOCHIM 
Football 2, 3; Baseball 2, 
3 : Senior Play 4; Class 
President 4. 

ELEANOR McMILLAN 
Friendship Club l. 2. .*. 
4; Program Chairman 2: 
Ring Group Chairman 3; 
Student Council 1. 4; Ad- 
vertising Committee 1. 2. 
.?. 4; Basketball 1. 2. 3; 
Leaders' Club 4; Class 
Secretary 3; Business 
Stall of Senior Book 4; 
National Honor Societj 4. 

MARIE ZWIERLEIN 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Coun- 
cil representatives; Trias 
urer 4: Glee Club 2. 3, 4; 
Secretary 3; Vice-Presi- 
dent 4; Operetta 3, 4; Ad- 
vertising Committee .'. 4; 
French Club 4: President 
4: Student Council 2, 4; 
Basketball 2. 3; Leaders' 
Club 3, 4: Senior Book 
Staff 4; Shore Breeze 4; 
National Honor Society 4: 
Senior Play 4; Chairman 
Hall Guards 4; American 
Legion Popularit) Contest 
4; School Ring Committee 
2; Salutatorian. 



LA VERXE 

BERGLUND 
Friendship Club 1. 2. 3, 
4; (dee Club 4; Class Sec- 
retary 4. 

RICHARD FINAN 

Football 2, 3, 4: Track 3, 
4; Varsity "S" 2, 3, 4; 
Secretary 4. 

ANNE HROVAT 



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[ 8 ] 



chari.es wick 

Basketball 1, 2. 3. 4; Foot- 
ball 2. 3, 4; Baseball 1; 
(lass Secretary 1. 2, 3; 
(dee Club 4; Shore Breeze 
Staff 4: Varsity "S" 2. 3, 
4; Advertising Committee 
1, 2; National Athletic 
Honor Society 3. 

AMELIA SHIMROCK 
Library 1, 2, 3, 4; Sen- 
ior Year Hook 4; Scrib- 
blers Club 4; French Club 
4; Friendship Club 2, 3, 
4; National Honor So- 
ciety 4 ; Senior Year Book 
4. 

ANGELIXE NOVESKE 



ELLA MAE JOSLIN 
Leaders Club 3, 4; Vice 
President 4; Senior Play; 
Friendship Club .5. 4. 

RUDOLPH MATEO 
Advertising Committee 1, 
2, 3; Homeroom President 
] ; Class Vice President 
1 ■ Baseball 3. 4; Football 
4; Basketball 3; Boys' 
(dee Club 4, Secretary 4; 
Class Treasurer 4; Stu- 
dent Council 3. 4; Var- 
,i.v S ' 4 Mini, Cc- 
eralor 3. 4; National Ath- 
letic Society 4; .National 
Honor Society 4. 

VERNA PETERSON 
Entered from California 
,i ; Senior Play 4. 




THE LOG 





BUSTER STEWART 
Class President 1. 2; 
Homeroom President 1 : 
Varsity "S" Clul) 3. 4; 
Vice-President of Varsity 
"S" 4; Advertising Com- 
mittee 2. 3; Student Coun- 
cil 3, 4; Baseball 4; Foot- 
ball 3, 4; National Ath- 
letic Honor Society 3. 

VIRGINIA PEARSON 

MIKE HADYK 



AWE HROVAT 
Glee Club 3, 4; Operetta 
3, 4; Senior Play 4; Stu 
dent Council 4; Book 
keeper (School) 2. 3. 4 
Shore Breeze 3, 4; Na 
tional Honor Society 
Friendship Club 2, 3, 4 
French Club 4; Yaledic 
torian; Student Council 3 
French Club 4 ; Glee Club 
3. 4; Operetta 3. 4. 

FRANK MIESE 

Rand and Orchestra 1. 2, 
3. 

BUD KELLER 

Student Council 4; Senior 
Plav; President of Class 
1; Football 2. 3; Wres- 
tling 1. 2; Debating 1, 2, 
3, 4; Track 1, 2; Varsity 
"S" 1, 2, 3. 4. 



EARL STICK 
Wrestling 4; Football 2. 
3. 4. 

MAXINE NELSON 
Entered from Collinwood 
3. 

NORMAN JACK 
Glee Club 3, 4. 



MABEL ISAACS 
Entered from Mentor 2 

ARTHUR BROWN 

President of Class 3; Stu- 
dent Council President 4; 
Varsity "S" Club 1, 2, 
3. 4 (President 4); Glee 
Club, Vice Pres. 4; Base- 
ball 1, 2, 3. 4; Basketball 
1. 2, 3. 4; Football 3, 4. 

ROY HEIN 

Hi V Club 2, 3; Senior 

Play 4; Senior Year Book 

4. 




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[ 9 ] 



THE LOG 




DUANE STEWART 
Football 1, 2, 3; Baseball 
1, 2, 3; Glee Club 2. 3; 
Operetta 3; Varsity "S" 
(bib 2, 3; Vice-President 
2, 

RUTH LACE 

BETTY BINCKLEY 
Glee Club 1. 2. 3, 4; Op- 
eretta 1, 2, 3, 4. 



SYLVIA KRAMPEL 

Library 4. 

HAROLD OLSON 

Student Council 3, 4: 
Glee Club 4; Football 
Mgr. 4; Movie Operator 

3, 4. 



ELMER CAMERON' 

Student Council 1, 2, 3, 
4; Vice President 3, 4; 
Basketball 4; Library 1. 
2. 3, 4; Senior Play. 

MARGARET FARLEY 
Entered from Berea Higb 
School 2. 

ESTHER MEUNIER 

Friendship 2. 3; Senior 
Book Staff 4; Leaders 
Club 3. 



CATHERINE FARLEY 
Entered from Berea High 
School 2; Leaders Club 4. 

MILTON WOLFE 

Glee Club 4. 

LI LA BARLAG 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Operetta 1. 2, 3. 4; Senior 
Play 4. 



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OjU-i^t' '//Q^a**^ 



THE LO 




JOHN YOGER 
Student Council 3; Photo- 
graph Staff 4; Class Presi- 
dent 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4; Foot- 
ball 4; Athletic Associa- 
tion 4; Varsity "S" Club 
2, 3, 4; National Athletic 
Honor Society 4. 

ADELE WASEL 
Friendship Club 2. 3, 4. 
(Pres. 4); Glee Club 1, 
2, 3. 4, Leads 2, 3; Lead- 
ers Club 4; Senior Play. 

GEORGE MILLER 
Entered from Girard High 
School 1; Hi Y 2; Wrest- 
ling 2, 3, 4. 



JUNE WHITCOMB 
Entered from West High 
School. Columbus, O., 4; 
Friendship Club 4; Glee 
Cluh (Sec. 4); Leaders 
Club 4; Senior Play. 

ANTON LAURICH 
Hand 1, 2, 3, 4; Orches- 
tra 1, 2, 3, 4. 

LENORE OBERST 



ALFRED NASOX 
Class President 1 ; Class 
Vice President 2; Student 
Council 4; Student Coun- 
cil Vice President 4; Var- 
sity Football 2, 3, 4; Var- 
sity Basketball 3, 4; Var- 
sity "S" Club 3. 4; Na- 
tional Athletic Honor So- 
ciety 4; Senior Play. 

EDITH LEATHERS 
Friendship Club 1. 2. 3. 
4 (Sec. 1. 4); Glee Club 
2. 3, 4; Leaders Club 3. 

4. 




WARD l.'EJJGL-ER 

dentil/ Glee 

S^l : /£jfci r 'Wers Club 
4 ; y^atfenaTTF o r e n s i c 
League 4/ / 



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ALICE NEISER 
Friendship Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; French Club 4; Senior 
Play. 

JACK OVERACRE 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orches- 
tra 3. 



PEARL STRAY 
Leaders Club 3, 4; 
ketball 1 ; Business 
of Senior Book 4. 




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[ 11 I 



THE LOG 




JOE WATERWASH 
(Ilet Club 1; Year Book- 
Photograph Staff 4. 

HELEN HORWITZ 
Friendship Club 1. 3. 4; 
Glee Club 4; Year Book 
Staff 4; Operetta 4; 
French Club 4; Senior 
Play. 

RUDY NOSSE 

Student Council 3; Wrest- 
ling 1, 2, 3, 4; Foot ha' 
4: National Athletic Hon 
or Society. 



BETTE EUGENE 

Entered from Glenville 
High School 3; Glee Club 
3. 4; Debating 3 J French 
Club (Sec. 4); Operetta 
4; Senior Play. 

GEORGE R. COGHII.I. 
.Movie Operator 3, 4. 

DOROTHY 

■' JfJEI.S 



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EVERETT PEPIN" 
Senior Book ( Photograph 
Staff 4); Orchestra 1,2; 
Hoys' Glee Club 3, 4; 
Basketball .1; Wrestling 4. 

ELEANOR KELLER, 
Basketball Varsity 1. 2; 
Class Secretary 2; Friend- 
ship Club 1, 3, 4; Shore 
Breeze 3, 4; Leaders Club 
(Sec. 4). 

DWARI) BOZMAN 

Student Council 1. 2. 



MARCIA AHLMAN 

Basketball 1. 2; Friend- 
ship Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Glee 
Club 1, 4; Leaders Club 
4; Operetta 1, 4; Prom 
Committee 3. 

MELVIN REIBE 

Basketball 1. 2. .?, 4; 
Baseball 3, 4; Track Mgr. 

1. 

CELIA VOJSACK 

Friendship Club 1, 2. 3, 
4; Business Staff 4; Class 
Vice Pies. 4; Operetta 1; 
Leaders Club 3. 4 (Vice 
Pres. 4); Basketball Sipiad 
2. 



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THE LOG 




£&£&>*£* -ef 



WILLIAM GROVE 

MARGARET 
KETCHION 

Entered from Glcnbard 
High School 3; Glee Club 
4; Operetta 4. 

JOHN' CERJAN 

Basketball 2. 



MILDRED MARSHALL FRED VEII 
Friendship Club 3; (dee 



Club 
3. 4; 



3, 4; Operetta 2, 
Leaders' Club 1, 2. 



HENRY PICOZZ1 

Entered from Collinwood 
Hi';h School 4; Year Book 
Staff (Business Staff) 4; 
Glee Club 4; Operetta 
(Lead) 4; Wrestling 4; 
Varsity "S" Club 4. 

MARION CHAPMAN 
Entered from Shaw High 
School 3 ; Cheerleader 3 ; 
Operetta 3. 4; Leaders 
Club 3; Glee Club 3, 4. 



MARY McELHATTEN" 
Friendship Club 1. 

WALTER CONRAD 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Council 3; Advertising 
Committee 3, 4. 



FRANCES ANDERSON 
Art Club 1; Glee Club 
1; Operetta 1; Scribblers 
Club 4; French Club 4; 
Leaders Club 4. 

GORDON BALDWIN 

Orchestra 1. 

DOROTHY MILLER 




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THE LOG 




MARSHALL KENNY 
Band 1, 2. 3, 4; Senior 
Play. 

JEAN PERRY 
Entered from Shaw High 
School .5: Treasurer of 
Class 4; Friendship Club 
3, 4. 

BETTY STEIN 

("lass Vice-Pits. .? ; Class 
Secretary 4; Senior Boole 
(Business staff) 4; Bas- 
ketball 1. 2. 



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ELIZABETH 
WOODARD 

Entered from Lansing 
Central 2; Friendship 
Club 2. 3; Clee Club 3, 
4; French Club 4 (Pies. 

4). 

JOE TEKAVIC 

Valedictorian 

Baseball 2, 3, 4; National 

Athletic Honor Society. 

LILLIAN BUKOVEC 
Friendship Club 3, 4. 



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DAN A.MIIJJCK 
Scribblers Club 4: 
arv Staff 4. 



Liter- 



DOROTHY PAKDEY 
Shore Breezes 1 ; Port 
Hole Art Staff 1, 2; Op- 
eretta 4; Glee Club 1, 4. 



JOSEPHINE WHITE 
Entered jroif Cleveland 
Heights libjn 2; Senior 
Year Wool) (Business 
Staff 4). 




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AMELIA SETINA 

S tudent Council 1 ; 
Friendship Club 3 ; Lead- 
ers Club 3, 4. 

DONALD DIXON 

Student Council 4; Vice 
President 1; Wrestling 2. 
3, 4 (Captain 4); Shore 
Breezes 4; Sports Editor 
Annual 4; Varsity "S." 
1. 2, 3. 

BETTY ANN 

CA.MPLEJOHN 
Friendship Club Sec. 1, 
Vice Pres. 3, Treas. 4; 
Student Council 1 ; Class 
Secretary - Treasurer 3; 
Shore Breezes 2, 3, 4; 
News Editor 3; Editor 4; 
Year Book Staff 4; Bas- 
ketball Varsity 1, 2; Ora- 
tion Medal on Bicenten- 
nial 2. 




THE LOG 




EDWARD FRANKS 
Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 
3, 4; Debating I; Baseball 



THEDA THORNE 
Entered from Collinwood 
3; Student Council 4; Sec- 
retary 4; Leader's Club 4. 

JOE HOHL 

Wrestling Mgr. 1 : Wrest- 
ling and Baseball 2. 3; 
Student Council 4. 



LUCY PAREXTI 
Leaders Club 3, 4. 

RUDOLPH 

KRZXAR1CH 
Glee Club 4; Operetta 4. 

FRANK GERJEVIC 

Wrestling 1. 



ftiJlfeJta Of? fa 

ROIiEVr BAXDLOW BERN1CE 



BERXER 



Advertising Committee 2; 
Hi V 2; Student Council 

4. 

LOUISE KRUSER 
Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; 
Vice President 4; Glee 
Club 3, 4; Operetta 3, 4; 
Shore Breeze 4. 

RALPH RITTS 

Entered from Collinwood 
4: Glee Club 4; Wres- 
tling 4; Operetta 4; De- 
bating 4; Senior Play. 



Entered from Austin, Chi- 
cago, Illinois; Friendship 
Club 4; Glee Club 4; Art 
Editor (Shore Breeze) 4; 
Leaders Club 4; French 
Club 4; Operetta 4. 

JOHN CLYMER 

French Club 4. 

RUSSELL BALDWIN 
Shore Breeze Staff 4; Glee 
Club 3, 4; Operetta 4; 
French Club 4. 




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THE LOG 




BERTIL SWENSON 

Track 2, 3, 4. 

MARJORIE 

EASTERLING 

Operetta 1, 2; Friendship 
Club 1, 2, (Treas. 2); 
Orchestra 1,2; Adv. Com. 
2. 3, 4; French Chili 4; 
Library 1, 2. 

PAUL GORYANES 



EI. LEX GILES 
Glee Club Accompanist 1, 
2, 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4; 
Adv. Com. 2, 3, 4; Op- 
eretta 1, 2, 3, 4; Year 
Hook Staff 4; Class Treas- 
urer 2; Prom Committee 
3. 

EDWARD SUTMUUS 

Glee Ciub 1. 2. V 4; Sec- 
retary J?; OpeiVta 2. 3; 
Student Council 1 ; French 
Club 4; Shore Hreezes 2; 
Scho'ol Rmg Committee 2; 
An\erican Legion Essay 
Cftirtest 4; National For" 
. ci^ic League 4; Preside: 
f/L Debating 4; Track 

\ationnl Speech Tourn 
J ment 3; Senior Play. 



HOFFMAN 

Hook St 



J AXE 

Senior Hook Staff (4) ; 

Headers. Club f PrW. ) 4 

nrirBtiffiiMigriiili 1, 

2, /I 4; Glee Flub 4; 
OpMtta 4. 



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ROBERT HILL 
Freshman Track 1 ; Bas- 
betball 2, 3; Wrestling 4; 
Senior Play. 

HARRIET 

RICHARDSON 
Friendship Club 3, 4. 

BILLY CARSON 
Glee Club 4. 




RUTH MILLER 

LODO HABRLE 
Advertising Committee 3, 
4; Student Council 1, 2, 

3, 4 (Treas. 3, V. Pres. 

4, President 4); Track 1, 
2, 3, 4; Ring Committee 
2; Varsity "S" Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Shore Breezes 2; 
National Athletic Honor 
Society; American Legion 
Award; Salutatorian. 

JAMES CLIFFEL 




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THE LOG 



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ISETTV ACKER HARRY DAVIS 



Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Meg- 
aphone Club 1. 2, 3; Op- 
eretta 1, 3, 4; Debate 
team 1 ; Prom Committee 
3; Year Rook Staff 4; 
Friendship Club 1, 2. 3. 
4. 

I.OCIS BUCAR 

ROBERT WALL 
Hi-Y 1 ; Operetta lead 3, 
4: Student Council 4; 
Track 3, 4. 



Track 1 . 
President 
Staff 4. 



LEE ROY DIXON 
Class Secretary 1 ; Wres- 
tling 4. 

MAE JEHLICKA 
Friendship Club 4. 



ROBERT COVERT 
Football 3. 4: Glee Club 
4; Leader 4. 

ROBERT DAW 



MARY E. HOENE 
Entered from Ridgefield 
Park High School 4; 
Leaders Club 4. 




IN MEMORIAM 

ALLAN KOONS 

1916-1933 

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THE LOG 



Boys' Glee Club 




With Mis-, Bevington as director, 
Shore's boy's and girl's Glee Clubs 
have increased to the approximate 
number of one hundred and thirty. 
They sang at the commencements and 
at Gala Kite. Then, of course, the 
girls participated in the candlelight 
ceremony at Christmas. However, the 
feature of the year was the delight- 
ful operetta, "Pickles" or "In Old 
Vienna." The three seniors who had 
leads were : 

Henry Picozzi . . . ..Tigo, a Hungarian 
Gypsy King. 

Dorothy Pardey..Lady Vivian Delan- 
cey, a charming English widow. 

Helen Horwitz A gypsy woman 



Girls' Glee Club 



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While our school enrollment has 
been increasing, the orchestra, under 
the direction of Mr. Beck, has added 
many new members. It has played 
selections at Gala Nite, Commence- 
ment exercises, Senior plays, and it 
has accompanied the operetta. 



Orchestra and Band 



[ 18 



THE LOG 



The Shore Breeze, a student publi- 
cation which is issued weekly by the 
staff members, has kept up to the 
minute on school news and activities. 
Under the able direction of Mr. 
Baumer, the new sponsor, the staff has 
worked together to keep the paper out 
of the red and has succeeded ad- 
mirably. 

Because several new positions have 
been added to the staff the journalism 
students have been given more oppor- 
tunities and experience in reporting. 




Shore Breeze Staff 



( fl 



"A friend in need is a friend in- 
deed." This statement symbolizes the 
Friendship Club of Shore. 

Throughout the hard winter, they 
have helped others in numerous ways. 
The giving of Thanksgiving and 
Christmas baskets heads the list of 
their good deeds. 

One can never be happy if he has 
no friends. The Friendship Club is 
trying to make everyone happy. 
Through it the girls become ac- 
quainted, and are very happy here at 
Shore. 



Under the direction of Miss Gill. 
the Leader's Club has progressed 
smoothly. The club is composed of 
twenty-five members who are Juniors 
or Seniors. 

Their special enterprise this year 
has been the supervision of the girls' 
intra-mural basketball games. For 
each game certain girls are appointed 
to take charge of the scoring and 
time-keeping. 




Friendship Club 




Leader's Club 



19 ] 



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THE LOG 



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Varsity Basketball 



UNDER the expert guidance of Coach Ford L. Case, the Shore baskethall 
team captured its second Eastern Conference championship in three years. 
Defeating team after team by overwhelming scores, the varsity won the coveted 
title, losing but one conference game which was the game with Maple Heights. 

Seeking new laurels. Shore journeyed to Akron to compete in the Northern 
Ohio Tournament, against the best teams of this district. Here they were finally 
defeated but not until they had secured recognition by beating two of the strongest 
teams and gaining the semi-finals. 

Shore started the season with a veteran quintet composed of Riebe and Brown, 
forwards, Palko and Wick, guards, and Weinschreider, center. Captain Wick and 
Brown were lost to the team at midyear by graduation, but their places were filled 
by two capable men, Al Nason and Willard Riebe. Jim Palko was chosen to suc- 
ceed Wick as captain. 

No player can be given special mention without including the rest of his 
teammates. 

Art Brown was the spark plug of the team. Whenever a player became tired 
or discouraged. Art was always ready with a word of encouragement to put him 
back on his feet. 

Chuck Wick directed the team. Always cool and confident. Chuck was the 
perfect captain. 

Melvin Riebe proved that size is no handicap to a basketball player. His ac- 
curate shooting was one of the main reasons for the team's successful season. Mel- 
vin compiled 140 points in 15 games for a new school record of individual scoring. 

Richard Weinschreider was a silent but important cog in Shore's machine. 
Dick will be back next year. 

Melvin Riebe and Dick Weinschreider were chosen on the All-Conference 
team by the Bedford-News-Register. 

Jim I'alko took his basketball seriously. Always eager to play, Shore will be 
indeed lucky to find another player like Jim who seemed to play best in the toughest 
games. 

Al Nason played his first year on the varsity. For clean, hard playing Al will 
be hard to equal. 

Willard Riebe still has another year of basketball. Although he played but 
half a year, Willard scored fifty-four points for Shore. 

Jim Mattie proved valuable all year with bis ability to play either guard posi- 
tion. 



[ 20 ] 



THE LOG 



v. 






H 



O 



w-miMmmm 



Shore's Football Team of "33 



SHORE'S 1933 football team had one of the most successful seasons in the 
history of the school. Playing a hard schedule of nine games, the Admirals 
won 7, tied 1, and lost 1. Shaker was the only team that outpointed Shore. Mr. 
Case started the season with only six lettermen on his squad. He took the inex- 
perienced boys and made a team that was hard to beat. 

This is the first time that Mr. Case has had full charge of the football team, 
and he deserves a lot of credit for the fine showing that his boys made. 

Shore loses ten players from the first team due to graduation this year. The 
boys who are going to graduate are : 

Arthur Brown, 5'7" tall, weighs 150 pounds and played halfback. Played 
for two years on the varsity and was co-captain in his senior year. 

Robert Covert was 5' 10" tall and weighed 184 pounds. Bob was a varsity 
man for two years as a tackle and he was co-captain in his last year. 

Dick Finan weighed 190 pounds and was 6'1" tall. He played tackle on the 
varsity for three years. 

Rudolph Matko played guard on the first team for one year. He weighed 
160 pounds and was 5'7" tall. 

Albert Nason was an end on the first team for two years. Al was 6' tall and 
he tipped the scales at 170 pounds. 

Rudolph Xosse was 5 '8" tall and weighed 140 pounds. Rudy played guard 
for one year. 

James Palko played the fullback position for two years. He weighed 170 
pounds and he was 5'10" tall. 

Claude (Buster to you) Stewart called signals from the quarterback position 
for two years. "Bus" was 5'9" tall and weighed 154 pounds. 

Charles Wick was a one-year man who played end. He was 5'11" tall and 
weighed 185 pounds. 

John Yoger was the smallest and fastest man on the team. He weighed 135 
pounds and he was 5'7" tall. 

Mr. Case is going to find it pretty hard to fill the ten pairs of shoes that these 
boys leave unoccupied, but he is used to hard jobs and every one is sure that next 
year's team will be as good as this year's was. 



[ 21 ] 




THE LOG 



O 



Wrestling 



WRESTLING is a comparatively new sport at Shore. Four years ago 
Shore's first mat team met with indifferent success. Fast year our wrestlers 
tied for the league championship, while this year they were high point winners at 
the Eastern Conference Championship meet. 

Four lettermen reported for practice at the beginning of the season, Joe Hohl 
115, John Yoger 122, Rudy Nosse 135, and Captain Don Dixon 140. The first 
meet at University School was a critical test, as six men were wrestling their first 
match for Shore. The result was a tie, but Coach Pohto, by making a few im- 
portant changes, was able to present a more formidable team for the next match 
with Garfield Heights. The able coaching of Mr. Pohto was shown when two 
of the new men came through with falls to give Shore their margin of victory. 

(Continued on page 23) 




o 



Track 

FOLLOWING a successful basketball campaign, the track team started inten- 
sive practice for the many meets in its schedule. Coach Case plans to take 
the more promising stars to such notable contests as are annually held in Mans- 
field and Athens — and to the one at Columbus if any of his "thinly clads" place 
in the district meet. 



L 



[ 22 ] 



THE LOG 



The team developed rapidly for the Conference meet, losing but one match, 
to John Hay, Shore's last year co-champions. Fighting hard to retain their hold 
on the title, Shore surprised their opponents by capturing the championship with 
twenty points. Four wrestlers won their matches and qualified for the city finals, 
Joe Hohl 105, Jimmy Fowler 115, Don Dixon 135, and Earl Bbllenbocher 165. 
Although Shore failed to win the city championship, they made an excellent show- 
ing against the stronger schools with which they were competing. Joe Hohl won 
the city championship in his division and was awarded a gold medal. Captain 
Don Dixon was runner up in his class, receiving a silver medal, while Earl Bol- 
lenbocher won a ribbon for taking third place in the 165-lb. class. 

Seven lettermen will be lost by graduation, all of whom deserve special men- 
tion for their good work. 

Joe Hohl finished his third year of wrestling by becoming the third city 
champion from Shore. Two years ago Joe won the Silver Medal in his class. 
He was also high point man at Shore for three years. He had earned 105 3/2 points 
in that time. 

John Yoger was a versatile athlete. His prowess on the mat was equalled in 
all his other activities. 

Bob Daw won his first letter in wrestling this year. Bob wrestled his best 
in every match and usually came out on top. 

Rudy Xosse was the only four-year man on the team. Injuries kept Rudy 
from winning the medal which he deserved. 

Capt. Don Dixon won the City Ribbon two years ago and finished his wrestling 
career by winning the silver medal this year. 

Henry Picozzi wrestled his first year for Shore. His record is proof of his 
ability. 

George Miller was the strong man of the team. His record time of 37 sec- 
onds will set an example for next year's team. 

Jimmy Fowler, Earl Bollenbacher, and Benson Blackie are lettermen who will 
return next year. With wrestlers like these. Shore is sure to be represented by a 



Senior Year Book Staff 

THE Year Book has been compiled under the competent di- 
rection of Miss Michell, the business, art, and photographic 
director, and Miss Vernon, the literal')' adviser. 

Literary Staff Business Staff Photographic Staff 

Amelia Shimrock Betty Acker Everett Pepin 

Marie Zwierlein Helen Horwitz John Yoger 

Betty Ann Camplejohn Jane Hoffman Joe Waterwasb 

Ellen Giles Henry Picozzi 

Sport Staff Eleanor McMillan 

Dick Finan Betty Stein 

Donald Dixon Pearl Stray 

Typists Celia Voj sack- 
Marshall Kenny Josephine White 
Marion Chapman 

t 23 ] 



Art Staff 
Roy Hein 
Esther Meunier 
Buster Stewart 




THE LOG 



Around and About 



O 



SHORE 



t 24 ] 



THE LOG 






_ 




When You and I 
Were Young 

o 



I 25 J 



THE LOG 



June Class Will 

We, the Senior class of 1 ( >34. do hope to convince the public that our class is 
sane in mind and body. 

We bequeath our talent and ability to whosoever may benefit from them. 

1. Hetty Acker leaves her sophisticated mannerisms to "Midge" flora. 

2. Daniel Amidich leaves his scientific experiments to next year's chemistry 
students. 

3. Marcia Ahlman leaves her piano playing ability to Mr. Spangler. 

4. Frances Anderson wills her history book to the second hand book shop. 

5. Walter Baker leaves his track letter to any sweet young thing who 
wishes it. 

6. Gordon and Russell Baldwin leave their true brotherly love to the 
Shaughnessey boys. 

7. Bob Bandlow leaves his brilliancy to his sister, Betty. 

8. Frank Baner leaves his red hair and freckles to Janet Nason. 

9. Bernice Berner leaves her position as art editor of the school paper to 
Ken Sabine. 

10. Edward Bozman leaves a completely Idled notebook of absence slips 
to Bill Dill, hoping they can be of use. 

11. Louis Bucar leaves those engrossing novels to Miss Falberg. 

12. Lillian Bukovec leaves with the rest of the Alpha-Z's. 

13. Betty Ann Camplejohn leaves her editorship to Margaret Ray. (Who 
will be the Business Manager?) 

14. John Cerjan leaves the feminine element at Shore weeping. 

1 5. Marian Chapman — her petiteness to Dorothy Moffett. 

16. James Cliffel leaves his size 12 to Millard Downs. 

17. George Coghill leaves his blond complexion to Alvira Patti. 

18. John Clymer leaves his shyness to Clyde Steele. 

19. Walter Conrad leaves his track ability to Vincent Gracious. 

20. Harry Davis leaves his morning walk to Mr. Philips. 

21. Donald Dixon leaves Betty Pleis, but not for long. 

22. Le Roy Dixon leaves his model T. Ford to Mr. Whiteside. 

23. Marjorie Easterling leaves her long tresses to Doris Brown. 

24. Betty Eugene leaves her gift of gab to John Warren. 

25. Edward Franks leaves his red hair to the admiring freshmen females. 

26. Frank Gerjevic leaves all his class notes in one of the desks in 241. 

27. Ellen Giles leaves her neat appearance to Dick Lynch. 

28. Paul Goryanes leaves his reserved attitude to Bob Lang. 

29. Robert Wall leaves his singing ability to Floyd Overacre. 

30. Lodo Habrle leaves his well-slicked hair to Bill Webster. 

31. Robert Hill leaves his acting ability to Melvin Andree. 

32. Mary Hoene leaves her sister to the wiles of Shore boys. 

33. Jane Hoffman leaves her car to Lucille Jermain for future basketball 
games. 

34. Joe Hohl leaves his stature to Dick Weinschreider. 

35. Helen Horwitz leaves her infectious giggle to Mr. Bullard. 

36. Mae Jehlicka leaves her figure to Betty Loranger. 

37. Eleanor Keller leaves her lively personality to Mr. Phillips. 

38. Marshall Kenny reluctantly leaves his ability as an actor to future 
Shorites interested in plays. (Continued on page 30) 



[ 26 ] 



THE LOG 



June Class Prophecy 



Reading the latest best seller "Famous Fables of 1850," by Betty Acker, J sat 
in the lounging chair aboard a round-the-world Krznarich Air Liner. Television, 
rudely interrupting, revealed Lodo Habrle, the president of the largest coal com- 
pany in the world, lie was advertising synthetic coal developed by Ed 1'ergler, 
Harry Davis, and Daniel Amidich. 

After glancing through a review of Josephine White and Bertil Swenson, 
the famous dancing partners, I went to lunch in the rear of the liner. Imagine 
my surprise when I saw Elizabeth Woodward as hostess and Walter Baker as 
chief steward. Well, anything can happen. Elizabeth, who had just received 
a letter from Frances Anderson and Marjorie Easterling, said they were in 
Pueblo trying to teach French to the Mexican children. 1 was also surprised 
to hear that Helen Horwitz, the "It" girl of the Screen, had just arrived in Reno 
to get a divorce from John Clymer (on the grounds of usurping her pet slang). 

When I was almost through lunch, Ed Sutorius, accompanied by Alice 
Neiser, entered the diner. Just in case you haven't heard, Alice is writing the 
weekly speeches of President Picozzi. U. S., while Ed is delivering them. We 
discussed the present Palko Communistic Movement in Russia, as well as the 
breach in the Democratic party, the one faction being led by Joe Hohl, the 
other by George Miller. 

Then Ed told me an amusing incident of Mrs. Palko (nee E. Keller) who 
had a sprained wrist from spanking the children for trying to play basket ball 
in the house. The next item of interest and surprise was that Bernice Berner, 
who was painting oil portraits for her Rogues Gallery, had a picture of Lenore 
Oberst, Mary Floene, Alfred Nason, Betty Eugene. June Whitcomb, and Everett 
Pepin. Quite a collection, eh? Joe Waterwash and John Yoger, President and 
Vice President of the Metropolitan Opera Company, had been trying to get 
Dorthy Pardey and Marcia Ahlman to sign contracts. 

Next I decided to go into the recreation room where I heard the sweet strains 
of Ed Frank's violin, and heard Frank Gerjevic, comedian, advertising Dixon and 
Dixon's Coffee. Then I saw a slow Motion Picture of Melvin Reibe playing basket- 
ball, and one of Joe Tekavic and John Zivich playing baseball. The news reel 
showed Betty Ann Cample John in England trying to get an interview with James 
Cliffel, winner of the Rhodes Scholarships, and with George Coghill, U. S. Ambas- 
sador to England. 

Edith Leathers, Dean of an advanced Business School, was teaching Theda 
Thorne how to study. Margaret Ketchion and Louise Kruser, who came through 
the recreation room, were modeling clothes designed by Amelia Setina and Pearl 
Stray. Not far away, Ed Bozman, a member of the Ohio Board of Movie Censors, 
sat dreamily watching the Follies Girls impersonated by Mary McElhattan, Marian 
Chapman, and Lillian Bukovic. 

As our plane arrived at its destination, Euclid Air Port, Louis Bucar, selling 
the "Ritts Reporter", came aboard crying, "Miss Wasel sues the wife (Celia 
Yojsak) of Judge Kenny." Then I noticed Dorothy Vogelsang, the traveling com- 
panion of the wealthy Lucy Parenti, boarding a private airplane. 

While I was leaving the grounds, I was confronted by John Cerjan, the mayor 
under the military escort of Bill Grove and Frank Bauer. I walked with them as 
far as Moss Point where I saw Paul Goryanes, the druggist, who said jane Hoffman 
and Walter Conrad were vying with each other for swimming chamionship. I 
passed Baldwin Brothers "Dine and Dance" where Anton Launch was the cook. 
Across the street Bob Bandlow, the tonsorial artist, was working on Bob Hill. 

(Continued on page 29) 

[ 27 ] 



THE LOG 



Mid-Year Class Prophecy 

Extracts from my diary : 

January 15, 1955 

Up at sunrise to attend an Orthodox Protestant Church, where, much to my 
surprise, I found Elmer Cameron in the pulpit. 

January 16, 1955 

Decided to visit the city jail to gather information for a newspaper article. 
All needed information was granted me by the notorious gang leader Rudolph 
Matko. 

February 1, 1955 

Following the advice of a friend, I went to see a doctor about a mental ex- 
amination. At the office I was greeted kindly by an old classmate, Miss Ella 
Mae Joslin. Don't misunderstand me — she was not the doctor but a doctor had 
conquered her fear so completely that she was no longer "Miss" hut Mrs. Milton 
Wolfe. 

February 15, 1955 

Received a letter from Miss Eleanor McMillan who was in Africa serving as 
missionary. I might add that Bud Keller was in Africa too. 

March 3, 1955 

Visited an old-maids home where I was conducted by Ruth Lace, the man- 
ager, to the reception room. The group presented a pathetic sight. Among 
them I sighted Misses Verna Peterson and Li la Barlag. They had settled down 
to a state of single hlessedness and. as each had a pet cat, I concluded they had 
lost all hopes. 

April 7, 1955 

Taking an afternoon walk I was startled by the high-pitched voices of two 
women. Turning, I recognized Maxine Nelson and Angeline Novesky, two 
neighbors, having a few words with each other. As I understood it, Maxine Jr. 
had taken little Angeline's doll and then the feud began. 

April 30, 1955 

Went to see the new movie starring Mabel Isaacs who, after the decline of 
Zasu Pitts, met success. Homeward bound I stopped into the meat market of 
Stewart & Stewart. The store presented an atmosphere of "before and behind" 
— that is Duane was before the register and Buster was behind the meat counter. 

May 19, 1955 

About 12 M. the mailman, Harold Olson, handed me three letters. One was 
from Bob Yochim, who was in Alaska vacationing with the better half of the 
family — that is La Verne Berglund. The second was from Norman Jack, who 
is engineering in Russia. He writes that he will soon be returning with a 
muscular Russian lass. The third letter was from the Farley girls, who were in 
Ireland on the outlook for two pairs of "smiling Irish eyes." 

June 4, 1955 

Decided to visit the old high school. Saw Miss Aingworth teaching the twin 
daughters of a former Shore Valedictorian — Ann Hrovat. 

July 21, 1955 

Visited the home of a widow, the former Virginia Pearson but found that I 
was not wanted since Dick Finan, the funeral director, was there. 

(Continued on page 32) 

[ 28 | 



THE LOG 



Mid-Year Class Will 



We, the class of 1934, in 34 individual and distinct parts, being about to pass 
(nit of this sphere of education in lull possession oi a crammed mind, do make 
and publish this last will and testament. 

Those things which it has pleased hate and our own hands to win for us, we 
do dispose of as follows : 

The class as a whole — our whole-hearted appreciation to our beloved sponsor, 
Miss Aing worth. 

Lila Barlag — her walk to Marian Chapman 
La Verne Berglund — her sedate air to Ray Shaughnessey. 
Betty Binklev — her sophistication to Midge Hora 
Art Brown — his pleasing personality to Betty Bandlow 
Elmer Cameron — his refusal to part with his June Rose 
Margaret & Catherine Farley — their ability to get names mixed up by everyone, 

to Jean & Bud Rath 
Dick Finan — his height to Margaret Ray 
Mike Hadyk — his ability to blush to Bob Covert 
Roy Hein — his list of absence excuses to whosoever gets to him first 
Anna Hrovat — her book-keeping ability to Mildred Richman. 
Mabel Isaacs — her talkativeness to Edward Sutorius 
Norman Jack — his dancing ability to Edward Pergler 
Ella Mae Joslin — her long black locks to Bob Bandlow 
Bud Keller — his manly form to Margie Webster 
Sylvia Krampel — her "Hillbilly Boys" to Louise Kruser 
Ruth Lace — her demureness to Eleanor Keller 
Frank Miese — his saxophone to Marcia Ahlman 
Esther Meunier — her artistic ability to James Palko 
Rudolph Matko — his brilliance to Theda Thorne 

Eleanor McMillan — her combination of beauty and brains to Jack Stewart 
Maxine Nelson — her quietness to Clyde Steele. 
Angeline Noveske — all her homework to the faculty 
Harold Olson — his managership of the football team to whoever can run the 

fastest with a bucket of water 
Yerna Peterson — her childishness and giggles to Mr. Pohto 
Amelia Shimrock — her ability to plan programs to the members of the next senior 

class 
Buster Stewart — his way with the women to Art Disanto. 
Duane Stewart — his athletic ability to Dorothy Pardey 
Earl Stick — his place on the wrestling team to Betty Ann Camplejohn 
Milton Wolfe — his stuttering to Mr. Whiteside 
Bob Yochim — his fetching grin to Russell Baldwin 



(Continued from page 27) 



Being rather tired after my long trip, I inquired where there was a good hotel. 
I was informed that the Nosse Tavern had a very good reputation. I hailed a taxi 
driven by Betty Stein. Jean Perry, the treasurer, asked me to pay my bill in 
advance. Then she summoned Ruth Miller, the bell girl, to escort me to my room 
where I spent a delightful evening reminiscing. 

[ 29 ] 



THE LOG 



39. Margaret Ketchion leaves her mischievous manner to Doris Weir. 

40. Louise Krnser leaves a book on "School Dress and Manners" to the 
library. 

41. Rudolph Krznarich leaves that tongue twisting name of his to John Ink. 

42. Anton Laurich leaves his height to Betty Cochran. 

43. Edith Leathers leaves her typing table fnllv supplied with gum for her 
successor. 

44. Mary McElhattan leaves her quietness to John Buerkel and Earl Bollen- 
backer. They may fight over this to their heart's content. 

45. Mildred Marshall leaves Dick Weinschreider — alone. 

46. George Miller leaves his deep voice to Florence Felker. 

47. Ruth Miller wills her quietness to Joe Hoislbauer. 

48. Al Nason, after much thought, leaves his athletic prowess to George 
Wilson. 

49. Alice Neiser wills her elocutionary powers to Grace Gehring. 

50. Rudolph Nosse says he has nothing much to leave, but if there is any- 
thing, George Weber can have it. 

51. Lenore Oberst — her social duties to Barbara Blase. 

52. Jack Overacre leaves his saxophone to Mr. Whiteside for a physics 
experiment. 

53. Jim Palko — a framed picture to Miss Cockerill for her memory book. 

54. Lucy Parenti wills her basketball ability to Mary McKee. 

55. Dorothy Pardey wills her smile and nimble feet to Clyde Steele. 

56. Everett Pepin leaves his school books to Mr. Stray to start the furnace. 

57. Edward Pergler leaves his owl-like wisdom to Ray Shaughnessy. 

58. Jean Perry leaves her treasurer book to Miss Darst to straighten out. 

59. Henry Picozzi — his wrestling ability to Dale Winslow. 

60. Harriet Richardson leaves the school to get along as best they can. 

61. Melvin Reibe leaves his basketball suit to anyone it will fit. 

62. Ralph Ritts — his good nature to the teachers on Monday morning. 

63. Amelia Setina — her art of vamping to Betty Fowler. 

64. Betty Stein leaves her love for Latin to Marie Winch. 

65. Pearl Stray wills her woman's intuition to Mr. Pohto. 

66. Edward Sutorius leaves his speaking ability to anyone who needs it. 

67. Bertil Swenson wills his blue eyes and blonde hair to those dissatisfied 
brunettes. 

68. Joe Tekavic wills his history average to any future seniors in need of it. 

69. Theda Thorne wills her slenderness to Betty Stewart. 

70. Dorothy Vogelsang — her bashfulness to Jean Rath. 

71. Celia Vojsak leaves her English themes to Miss Vernon for her enter- 
tainment and intense appreciation. 

72. Adele Wasel leaves her singing talent to Ralph Moeller. 

73. Joe Waterwash wills his grin to Miriam Dreher. 

74. June Whitcomb wills her taking ways to the freshmen. Let's hope they 
appreciate them. 

75. Josephine White leaves her southern drawl to Mr. Baumer. 

76. Elizabeth Woodard leaves her scholastic record to Flelen Doyle. 

77. Fred Yeip gladly leaves his twin brothers still in school. 

78. John Voger and John Zivich will their fund of knowledge to astound the 
best of the Shore Students. 

Witnessed and signed 

J. Wellington Wimpy 
Mr. Bop 

[ 30 ] 



THE EVANGELICAL PRESS 

Printers • Publishers • Bookbinders 

Special Editions • House Organs 
School Annuals 



TT 

T 



Prospect 7700 1900 Superior Avenue 



THE NORTHERN 

ENGRAVING & ELECTROTYPE CO. 

CANTON, OHIO 






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Through Service and 
Quality Since 1906 



It was our privilege to co-operate with this annual board 



[31 ] 



Compliments 



of 



E. J. FREER 




July 31, 1955 

Walking down town this morning I bumped into Mike Hadyk and Frank 
Miese, both of whom turned out to be successful business men but stayed out 
late and dined at the club. 
August 5, 1955 

Visited the Cathedral when I met Marie Zwierlien, who, disappointed in a 
love affair, became a nun. 

This P. M. I attended a Women's Rights Association in a large hall where 
Miss Esther Meunier presided. Among the members I recognized Sylvia 
Krampel. The discussion was — "Shall men be allowed to vote?" 
August 10, 1955 

Was invited to the home of Earl Stick for dinner. My dinner was served 
me by Chuck Wick, a faithful employee. Earl was now one of the great money 
kings of the world. 
September 16, 1955 

Roy was the last member of the class of 1934 that 1 saw. The others — 
nevermore. AMELIA Siiimrock. 



[ 32 ] 




[33 ] 



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CALLING CARDS 

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 

WINDOW CARDS 

POSTERS 

Publishers of 

Community News 

Euclid's Business Stimulator 

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548 East 200th Street 

KEnmore 4421 



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Compliments 
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Storage - Moving 



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[34 1 



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I 35 ] 



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[ 36 



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[37 ] 



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[ 38 ] 



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Their Products Served in This School 



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[ 39 ] 



J 



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I 40 ] 



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[ 41 



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Compliments 
of 

RAE HORWITZ 

DRESS SHOPPE 

10523 Carnegie Avenue 



BIERBACH 

DANCE STUDIOS 

Instruction in 

Tap Dancing 

Acrobatic Dancing 

Ballet 

Toe 



Home Studios at 

Lloyd Road and Euclid 

Phone WIckliff 39-J 



Wickliffe 
Lumber Company 



Wickliffe, Ohio 



[ 42 ] 



Compliments of . . . 

FLOYD B. STEIN, Inc. 



Babbitt Road and Nickel Plate Ry. 



WHITE OAK GOAL 

'Less than a bushel of ash to a ton" 
Do Not Accept Substitutes 



FOLLOW THROUGH! 
A successful position awaits you. 

HP HIS is a message to graduates. Follow through! Take up special 
-*■ business training here, day or evening, and prepare for a well-paying 
position. We train you for business. We help you place yourself. We offer 
terms on tuition if desired. Call, telephone or write today. 

SPENGERIAN COLLEGE 

3201 Euclid Ave. HEnderson 3200 



[ 43 ] 



KRUSER'S 


Euclid Gash Market 


20973 Euclid Avenue 


at Ghardon Road 


Fresh 


Meats - Poultry - Fish 



SOLON DRUG 

22076 Lake Shore Blvd. 
KEnmore 0704 



SOLON DRUG 

21050 Euclid Ave. 

KEnmore 1135 



We Aim to Please with 

SOHIO QUALITY 
PRODUCTS 

Complete Lubrication 
Courteous Service 



AL BLEWETT, Agt. 
Service Station 

Corner of 
Babbitt Road and St. Clair 



Dependable . . . 

That's Wright 

SHOES, FURNISHINGS and 
DRY GOODS 



Wright 
Department Store 

18 in Greater Cleveland 
Bring You More for Less 



I 44 ] 



VOJSACK'S BARBECUE 



AND 



SODA GRILL 

E. 185th and Lake Shore Blvd. 



EDWARD A. STANTON, INC. 

Ford Dealer 
20941 Euclid Ave. 



Hearty C ongratulations 
to the 

SENIOR GLASS OF 1934 

STANDARD 
DRUG STORE 

High Quality — Low Price 



r 45 j 



Does Your Club 
Need Money? 

Hundreds of school and church organizations 
have successfully used our plan. For full 
particulars see 

THE WHEATGRISP COMPANY 

2104 Superior Avenue Cleveland, O. 

CANDY SPECIALTIES NUTS 



BILL'S 



Clothier 



NEW LOW PRICES 

on 

All Wool Graduation Two-Trouser Suits 

A Complete Line of Men's Furnishings 
and Hats 



Cor. St. Clair and E. 152nd St. 



EDdy. 7028 



[ 46 ] 



RICHMAN BROTHERS 




CLOTHES, all 


$00.50 


OVERCOATS - SUITS 




EVENING CLOTHES 




Direct from Factory to You — No Middleman's Profit 


Three Cleveland Stores 




746 EUCLID AVENUE 


5716 BROADWAY 


PROSPECT & ONTARIO 





Compliments 

from 

LINNERT DAIRY 

KEnmore 0222 : : EUCLID, OHIO 



CHRISTINE 


BEAUTY 


SHOPPE 




All Phases 


of Beauty Culture 


KEnmore 3913 






20920 Euclid Avenue 



[ 47 ] 



BOOSTERS 

Epicure Boegam Barbecue — 22281 Lake Shore Boulevard 

Moss Drug Store— 21939 Lake Shore Boulevard 

Kenneth J. Sims — Attorney and Counselor at Law, 814 Hippodrome Bldg. 

H. E. Arnold, Hardware — 22030 Lake Shore Boulevard 

Rosecliff Grocery & Meat Store— 542 E. 185th St., Cleveland, Ohio 

J. C. Mitchell & Son, Fancy Livestock — Linworth, Ohio 

Lipsky Delicatessen Store — 21932 Lake Shore Boulevard 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Shafner wish you all good luck. 

Compliments of Dr. C. E. Bost — 21937 Lake Shore Boulevard 

Compliments of Blum's Meat Market 

Trudy's Beauty Salon— 22090 Lake Shore Blvd., KEn. 3648 

Joe Modic, United Food Store — Cleveland, Ohio 

P. E. Dietrich & Sons, Music Store— 781 East 152nd St. 

Compliments of St. Clair Coal & Supply Co. — 20300 St. Clair Ave. 

Leonard S. Sutorius, Vice Pres. Rauch Nut & Mfg. — 1513 Aspinwall Ave. 

Compliments of Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Hoffman, No. 1 E. 219 St., Euclid, Ohio 

Gorden Fruits and Vegetables — Euclid City Fruit Market 

Moss Point Cleaner— 22064 Lake Shore Blvd. 

East Shore Cleaning Co., Pressing and Repairing — 21944 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Compliments of Miss Aingworth 

Compliments of Mr. Charles Doyle— 134 E. 212 St. 

Compliments of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Neiser 

Neil E. Smith, Grocer— 1040 Babbitt Road 

Willoughby Theatre, "Famous For Fine Sound," Willoughby, Ohio 

Compliments of Charles Schepis — 21443 Ball Ave. 

John Mavsar, Fancy Groceries and Meats — 23751 St. Clair Ave. 

Joseph Setina, Fresh Meats and Poultry— 608 E. 185 St. 

Compliments of Real Hardware— 620 E. 185 St., Tel. KEn. 0687 

Frank Poje, Custom Tailor, Cleaning-Pressing-Repairing — 631 E. 185 St. 

Compliments of J. R. Holcomb Co. — 1518 St. Clair Ave. 

L. M. Sprague Radio & Electrical Sales— 10 East 219 St. 

Beachland Beauty Shop— 628 E. 185 St., KEnmore 0630 

Peg Wilson's Garage and Service— 18816 Nottingham Rd., KEn. 2212 

Mandel's Hardware— 15704 Waterloo Rd. 

Compliments of Dr. F. E. Miller 

Compliments of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Orr 

The Florence Shoppe — 644 East 185 St., KEnmore 4332 

Frank Bricel Garage— 24465 St. Clair Ave., KEnmore 1087-R 

Uppole's Garage— 711 Babbitt Rd., KEnmore 3992 

Central Institute — 5200 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

Mr. Morhard, Quality Meats— 21951 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Compliments of The Auto Electric Service Co. 



I 48 ] 



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