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Full text of "Euclid Shore High School - The Canteen"





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Euclid Public Library 



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FOREWORD 

We, the Annual Staff, chose a theme appropriate for the times 
and although we have treated it lightly, we are not unmindful 
of its seriousness. We hope that this book will prove ke be a 
permanent record for you of all your good times, your friends, 
and your life at school this past year. 



DEDICATION 

To America, her unselfish aid in the cause of freedom, her 
final victory over the enemy, and to the preservation of our dem- 
ocratic way of life, this book is dedicated. 

This school year will be one, no doubt, that you will long 
remember because of America's entry into the war. Because of 
what has happened, this year at school should have taken an 
added significance in your mind. You should have enjoyed to 
the fullest your friendships, activities and your classes. 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Title Page 1 

Forward 2 

Dedication - 2 

From Taps Till Reveille 4 

Army Staff Personnel 5 

Privates 11 

Appropriations Board 15 

Shore Breeze 16 

Corporals 17 

Reconnaissance Crew 21 

Tramp, Tramp, Tramp 22 

There's Something About a Uniform 22 

The "Voices" of the People 23 

Sergeants 24 

Junior Flay , 27 

Intelligence Department 28 

Shore Spirit 30 

The "Arsenal" of Good Time , 33 

"The Boys" 34 

Assemblies 36 

Senior Play 38 

Combat Maneuvers 

Football 40 

Basketball 47 

Baseball 58 

Wrestling 53 

Hockey 55 

Track 61 

Women's Auxiliary Force , 63 

Senior Memories 64 

"Canteen" Staff 82 

The Army Behind the Army 83 



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Trom Japs i ill Reveille. 

I a ream of uou Snore HiqIi 
Each niohr I ill I near ftevei lie 
I Ihmk of uou and si oh * 

The daus I 5pent cui/h/n uou 
Were ones of joy and 6/iss 
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ARMY STAFF PERSONNEL 



Chiei o/ Stail 

Mr. Erwine is the chief of staff of our army, the 
superintendent of the Euclid schools. He is at the 
head of the five divisions, Euclid Shore, Euclid 
Central, Upson, and Roosevelt. 

For the past three years his work in connection 
with our "armed forces" has proved heneficial. 





RUSSIZLL H. ERWINE 



Dralt Board 

The draft board operates with the idea of "drafting" or introducing ideas which will 
help the army move ahead. Euclid, a progressive city, finds it necessary to have an 
up-to-date army. The Board of Education of the Euclid schools serves as the draft 
hoard. The members are Mr. William Hecker, Mr. Ray Turk, Mr. Clarence Bliss, 
Mr. Loren Bullard, and Mr. Russell Class. 




CLARENCE W. BLISS RUSSELL G. GLASS WILLIAM F. HECKER ALICE RE SSLER 

LOREN J. BULLARD RUSSELL H. ERWINE FRANK MILLS 



Page Five 



General 

Dr. Leonard E. Loos, our general, devotes his 
time to helping Shore and its students. Under his 
able leadership, Shore has grown and Shore students 
have grown with the school until they have ac- 
complished tasks worthy of good "soldiers." His 
leadership has placed Shore in the spotlight for its 
fine work m Red Cross, Safety, and other aspects of 
Civilian Defense. 





DR. LEONARD E. LOOS 



General Stall Corps 




To consider and prepare plans for the future, is the duty of the General Staff Corps. 
Miss Albrecht, Dean of Girls, Mr. Peake, Dean of Boys, and Mr. Voorhees, Director 
of Pupil Personnel comprise" Shore's General Staff Corps. 

Our Dean of Boys and our Dean of Girls help the students prepare for the time 
when they will have finished their service in the army. "Soldiers" of Shore should 
feel free to consult the deans at any time. 

Mr. Voorhees, the Director of Pupil Personnel, checks up on the "soldiers" who 
are A. W. O. L. He is friendly with the students, but occasionally is forced to take 
drastic measures. 




B. HOWARD PEAKE 



ELSA ALBRECHT 



LEONARD B. VOORHEES 





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LESTER ANGENE 





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SPARTICIO DIBIASIO 



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ROY SHARROCK 



ELSA SMITH 



ROY HINCH 




JOHN BECK 



DALE HARPER 



Military Intelligence Corps 

The Military Intelligence Corps aids the 
students in expressing themselves well, 
whether the expression he written or spok- 
en. The corps offers four years of train- 
ing; during this time the student is assisted' 
in every possible way. 

Miss Aingworth, Miss Campbell, Miss 
Smith, Mr. Angene, Miss Pierson, Mr. 
Baumer, and Mr. Hinch are included in 
Shore's Intelligence Corps. Together they 
arrange a four year English program to be 
diligently followed. Correct speech and 
writing are the first requirements of an 
American citizen or an American soldier, 
anxious to serve his country. When this 
program, planned by the English Depart- 
ment, is completed, the student is well on 
his way to becoming a perfect "soldier," 
and is equipped to enter any "branch of the 
service." 

Chemical Wariare Service 

To benefit mankind in time -of peace, as well as 
war, is the purpose and duty of the Chemical War- 
fare Service. Science is not only responsible for the 
appearance of bombs and explosive gases, but also 
of water which combats these things. Mr. DiB:asio, 
Mr. Spangler, Mr. Gehhart, and Mr. Sharrock un 
veil science and its puszles to students of Shore who 
are interested in man's warfare. The world of today 
would not be so advanced were it not for science. 
Synthetics, for instance, have found their way into 
our everyday lives. 



Volunteers 

Volunteers keeping up the army's morale are 
Mr. Beck and Mr. Harper. By training Shore stu- 
dents to appreciate good music, they are helping' 
them to become better "soldiers" and better citizens. 
We should be grateful to them for the services they 
have rendered and the fine music they have brought 

to us. 

Page Seven 




IRA STUBBART 



BEULA WILSON 



PAUL RHOADES 



JOHN POHTO 




DOROTHY GILL 



JANE WILLIAMS ANTHONY VACCARIELLO 




Military Engineers 

Mathematics has gained a new prominence 
our modern world. To understands a problem is 
have it solved. Mathematics has a place in warfa 
hut its place in peaceful pursuits has reached .1 n 
height. The world of the unknown is explored a 
its intricacies revealed by Mrs. Wilson, Mr. Poh 
Mr. Stubbart, and Mr. Rhoades. 



Diplomatic Service 

World conditions being what they are, it is 
solutely essential that our Diplomatic Service 
efficient. Miss Williams and Mr. Vaccanello 
quaint us with the language, life, and customs 
countries foreign to us. Now, more than ever befc 
we should better try to understand the people 
strange countries. 



DR. J M. NAMEN 



IRENE E. HORVATH CLARENCE SWACKHAMER 



Medical Corps 



The well-being of any army depends upon the efficiency of its medical corps, and 
Shore's army is no exception. Dr. Namen, Miss Horvath, Miss Gill, and Mr. Swack- 
hammer are Shore's upholders of the principles of good health. 

Defense commences with perfect health, and defense is now uppermost in the 
mind of everyone. Shore's Medical Corps is striving to improve the well-being of 
Shore's students by encouraging the students to realize the importance of physical 
ritness. Physical activity aids in combating illness: it strengthens the body and stun 
ulates the mind. 



Page Eight 




JUNE PHYPERS 



ALEXANDER FARQUHAR 



LOUISE DARST 




Finance Department 

To "make both ends meet" is the aim of the 
Finance Department. The balancing of hooks, the 
writing of checks and hills and letters, the typing 
of important documents, are all left to the Finance 
Department. "Soldiers" who are espeeially inter- 
ested in this "branch of the service" receive the 
assistance of Miss Fhypers, Miss Darst, and Mr. 
Farquhar. 



ANNETTE PIERSON 



WALT SCHWEGLER STANLEY L. WHITESIDE 



Signal Corps 

Contacts with people outside of our own im- 
mediate city, state, and country are important, and 
more often than not, valuable. The Signal Corps 
makes such contacts possible. Miss Pierson, Mr. 
Schwegler, and Mr. Whiteside aid us in compre- 
hending the messages from distant countries. They 
bring to Shore students the straight, undistorted 
facts, thus furnishing them with the opportunity to 
form their own opinions. 




CHARLES VAUGHN 



FORD L. CASE 



PAUL WINTERS 



Ordnance Department 

The manufacture of ammunition is taken care of 
by the Ordnance Department. Shore's ammunition 
is an ammunition which helps to destroy the evils 
of war and bring about a lasting peace. Mr. Vaughn, 
Mr. Case, and Mr. Winters have charge of this 
department. The Shore Breeze, which brings to light 
the true facts, is one form of the ammunition with 
which Shore's "soldiers" are weil supplied. Mr. 
Case shows the boys how to use wood to the best 
advantage by making useful articles and repairing 
damaged ones. Mr. Case's ammunition may ade- 
quately be termed conservation. Mr. Winters in 
structs in the correct way of driving. Safe drivers 
provide ammunition against recklessness and care- 
lessness. 

Page 7\[me 



Aides to the General 




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MARY R. CRAMPTON 




To transmit the general's orders and otherwise 
assist him are the duties of the Aides to the General. 
They deal directly with the "'soldiers," imparting to 
them requested knowledge. Mrs. Crampton, Miss 
Chance, and Miss Castclli are General Loos' aides. 
They take care of important papers, answer tele- 
phone calls, and perform a host of other duties. 



ELIZABETH CHANCE 



BETTY CASTELLI 




PHILENE UOOLITTLE 



EDITH LEMON 



HETTY ROSENBERGER 




HELEN CHALFANT 



JOAN SULLIVAN 



ARTHUR BONES 



Page Ten 



National Guard 

An army, like other organizations, has its fine 
arts, and if the fine arts are to be preserved someone 
must he close at hand to do so. Miss Doolittle gives 
the "soldiers" practice in painting, carving, and 
other forms of art. Miss Lemon is helping with the 
clothing problem, for soldiers must be neat, while 
Miss Rosenherger is lending a hand with the cook- 
ing, because every soldier loves to eat. Miss Doo- 
little, Miss Lemon, and Miss Rosenherger deserve 
a great deal of credit for keeping the fine and use- 
ful arts alive. 

Department 

of 

Public Relations 

Sometimes we have a tendency to forget 
the people who are of service to us: never- 
theless, we are aware of the services they 
render. When we desire "that special book," 
or help in our jobs, or a piece of furniture 
moved, or any one of numerous favors, wc 
go to the people who will help us. Mrs. 
Chalfant, Miss Sullivan, and Mr. Bones 
make up the Department of Public Rela- 
tions. 

Miss Sullivan is of great help to those 
students desiring jobs. She keeps in con- 
tact with store managers and offers helpful 
suggestions to the students. 



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Betty Abromovic Ralph Allison Pat Anderson Joseph Baghone Paul Barclay Bee Bartlett 



Carl Banle Charles Bastick 



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Wallace Beerman Alfred Berthold Bob Bezdek 



Norma Birch Nancy Bloss June Bollenbacher Corinne Bowersox Anne Braddock 




Jim Braddock Bob Braden 



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Russell Brandt 



Ralph Branovic Peter Bukur Patsy Bundy Harvey Burwell Eva Calabrese 




Norma Cassidy Frank Celizic Martha Chalfant Frances Christopher Phyllis Clasen Betty Clover Mary Cohen Pat Conway 

PRIVATES 

A 



Fred Cook Jeanette Copley Tom Cox Lois Crockett Ken Daniels Jack D'Arcy John Debenedicitis Elaine Deluga 




Ed Fisher Mary Lou Forestek Mary Frabotto Carol Geddes 



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Clarence Gehrke Anna Mane George Frank Gienger 




can Hendnckwn Jack Hennkson Dorothy Hogan Regina House John Hiabak Dolores Ischay Rosemary Janenc Barbara Janovac 




Donald lensen Ciril Jevec 

Page Twelve 



Ralston Jones 



jack Julyan 



Herbert Kaley Ed Kalman 



Agnes Karaba Alice Ketcham 



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is Klotz Marie Kordic Dick Kraince 



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Ed Lamb 



George Lesh Dons Lewis 




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Bob McRae Wylda McVeen 




Jack Little Norma Longo 

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Bill Medved Carl Merchant Margaret Merrills 




[ane Meyer Clyde Middleton Viola Mihalich George Mitchell Norman Mlachak Mary Mlakar 



Bob Modic Bernice Nelson 




Sally Nelson Dave Newman Marilyn Niebes William CBrien Rita Otters Josephine Parziale Nick Percio 



Dick Pergler 



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Dave Perry Alberta Peterson George Popovic Blanche Prior Ralston Jone 



Bob Reeher 



Jack Relyea Jeanne Richards 




Shirley Ritter Jean Rogers Chester Rojeck Dudley Rolla Frances Roope 



Christine Rosa Dorothy Samuel Ray Sanders 

Pdffe Thirteen 



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Beatrice Scheid R av Schott Eddy Schuler Harry Schutt Paul Schmidt Janet Semple Bill Shafer 



Rae Sherrer 





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Bruce Sherman Be«y Sill 




kverly Simmonds Albert Skubic Dorothy Slokar Eleanor Smaltz Glen Smelts Tom Stanford 



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Gladys Straka June Stranahan Donald Stibich Glenn Stockhaus William Stopar William Strauss Steve Suhar Anthony Sullivai 








Lillian Tegel Douglas Tercck Leona Thompson Ray Tiber Vic Tomsk Jean Tnvison Joe Vihtelic Betty Von Hof Roger Votypka 








Allen Wade Carol Wagner Ken Wallace Howard Weber Jom Wells Jim Weybrecht Dick Wilcox Bill Wilson Ruth Wirtsi 




AM.- 



Charles Wojan Eugene Wonderly Jane Worthington Clifford Wyant Phillip Yan Frances Yuska Evelyn Zawada Frank Zoeller Bob Zook 



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TOP ROW: D. Theuer, F. Nevar, B. Cnswell, T. Mazick, 
P. Lang, F. Gara, F. Krauss, T. Gole, D. Stanford. 

SECOND ROW: H. Mlachak, D. Pergler, B. Barkinen, 
V. Ritchings, M. L. Haven, J. Hawks, J. Town, M. 



Johnson, A. Enkler, C. Enkler. 
FRONT ROW: K. Bates, M. Hauser, H. Henry, Y. 
Alexander, B. Miller, J. Horn, A. Knapke, J. Murray, 
J. Casson, Mr. Spangler. 



Appropriations Board 



The main duty of the Ad Committee is to sell 
tickets for all the school activities. Football games, 
basketball games, musical productions, and plays 
would be failures without the aid of this committee. 
First the members scout for the sales by placing 
posters in store windows and around the school. 
They advance closer to their objective by selling 



tickets to anyone and everyone. On the day or night 
of the event, they take tickets, sell candy, and 
usher, thus capably taking charge of everything. 
Their only reward for valor is the thanks of the 
school for doing a necessary job so well. Mr. 
Spangler is the moving spirit behind the Ad Com- 
mittee. 



Page Fifteen 



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FRONT ROW: J. Brinkman, J. Met;, M. Cannon, M. 

McCarthy, E. Holtcamp, P. Malm, H. Noch, L. Bcrndsen. 

SECOND ROW: J. Simon, J. Reed, M. Hopson, G. 

Drautz, C. Bill, A. Knapke, B. Wellington, M. Kazmarck. 
THIRD ROW: C. Coupe, J. McCandless, E Banna, 

J. Kuehlcr, R. Gibbons, M. L. Haven, A. Douglass, 

P. Wise, M. Johnson. 



FOURTH ROW: D. Wickson, ]. Horn, E. Heync, J. 

Warwick, J. Jenkins, M. Trivisono, E. Winkler, D. 

Wolfe, M. Parziale, J. Banle. 
TOP ROW: J. Bergoch, A. Bolon, J. Mekinda, R. Mc- 

Master, P. Darby, J. Cox, R. Montgomery, R. Krciiach, 

F, Krauss, Mr. Vaughn. 



SHORE BREEZE 



Volume XX — Number 22 



Shore High School, Euclid, Ohio Friday, April 24, 1942 



Sold only by Subscription 



Malin, McCarthy 
Are Co - Editors 

In order to reduce the large vol' 
ume of extra work weighing upon 
the shoulders of a single editor in 
connection with the publishing of 
the weekly Shore Breeze. Margaret 
McCarthy and Phyllis Malin were 
made co-editors. 



Roto Section Is 
Distributed Monthly 

The Scholastic Roto was an ad 
ditional attraction each month to 
the Breeze. This picture section, na- 
tionally distributed, gave the in- 
dents a splendid conception of the 
activities of high school students 
throughout the country. 



BREEZE IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY 



Page Two Is Unique 

The second page of the Shore 
Breeze contained many humorous 
and strange stones making it unique 
in itself. Among the articles fea- 
tured regularly were "Do Te!l" and 
"A Senior Portrait" 



This year the Shore Breeze has 
been printed weekly. To edit the 
Breeze each week meant that thirty 
issues were printed during the year 
compared to the seventeen issues of 
the previous years. 



Page Sixteen 




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Edward Arko Walter Arunski Lawrence Auckland Betty Barkincn Kathleen Bates Garolyn Blakely William Bluem Barbara Blucmcr 





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Bob Bosworth Elwyn Brace Norman Brandt Helen Brenemin Jane Bnnkman Bill Brown j om Burns Salvatore Calabrcsc 










Anthony Cek Florence Cerbin J oc Cestarich 





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Joe Chidley Josephine Christorihc Dorothy Cimperman Joe Conway Christine Curt" 





Gerard Cywinsk, Bob Cywinski Mark Daniels Edna Daugherty Donna Daye Kenneth Decker Edmund Diemer Louise DiSanto 

CORPORALS 




Page Seventeen 




Dolores Fondran Theodora Frank Bill Fnssell 



Evelyn Funk 



Helen Greene Bill Grossman Martha Hauser Audrey Hem 







Adel Heinnch Tom Herrick Dorothy Heuser Walter Hill 




Bob Himes Paul Hommel Bill Hoofe Marjorie Hopson 





Frank Hopton Cynthia Huggins Keith Hulsman Bruce Huston Christine Intihar Frances Intihar Bob Jenkins Hanna Johnson 





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Marilyn Johnson Reginald Johnson Walter Keal Adrian Keefe 




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John Kerr 




Marge Kirchner Ronald Klein 



Dick Kleve 







Ray Kollur 



Rollin Kollie 



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Bob Kozan 





Dick Kuhn Dorothy Lakan Tom Langa Dorothy Lesser Lois Lueders 



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^olly Matteo Marian McClurg John McDonald Ruth McMaster Carol Mead Jeanne Meyers Roy Miller 



Tom Miller 




Evelyn Morella Sheldon Munnings Gordon Netschke Dorothy Nowicki Shirley Olsen Dick Perkins 




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Dick Phifer Elefhore Pierc 



Wilma Pierce Aileen Polcar Genevieve Potts Joe Preskar 




Ray Proster Virginia Protz 








Bill Read 



Beverly Reese Bill Relyea Dorothy Rhoades Elizabeth Rosa Dic k Sadler Barbara Sanner Dcn S c haub 




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orothy Schmitt Jean Schmitt Rita Schroeder Lillian Shimrock Jeanne Shumway Joyce Simon 



Art Smith 



Don Smith 




Blanche Spangler 



Florence Speaker Frank Spino Jane Stevko 



Dorothy Stoiber Loisjane Stone John Strauss Joe Sullivan 



Marianne Sullivan 




Jean Sunagel 



Bill Switaj John Tarantino Donald Teske 



Don Theuer Lois UpdegrafF 








Lloyd Vandervoort Dorothy Vessel Bob Wach 



Jean Wade 



Jack Walsh Henry Walters Matilda Walters Bill Waters 





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Dick Weber Barbara Wellington Barbara Wells Marilyn Wells Dorothy Wcntlmg Rita Wessel Howard Weybrecht Jack Whitcomb Bob Wilcox 




tgraf Mary Ann Zepka Andrew ZiegleSI 





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Page Twenty 





TOP ROW 
D. Raybuck 
T. Herrick 
R. Giesse 
F. Nevar 
D. Netschke 
T. Gole 
B. Air 
B. Wilson 



THIRD ROW 
W. Hill 
J. Farrell 
M. McCarthy 
V. Ritchings 
M. Gibbons 
E. Chance 
B. Miller 
Y. Alexander 
B. Sanner 
T. Stanford 
S. Calabrese 



SECOND ROW 

J. Baglione 

S. Nelson 

B. Barkinen 

F. Cook 

J. Casson 

D. Lewis 

N. Cassidy 

J. Carlgren 

A. Johnson 

A. Hoffman 



BOTTOM ROW 
J. Adams 
J. Horn 

P. Zeroff, Vice-Pres 
Miss Aingworth 
J. Murray, Pres. 
J. Town, Secy 
T. Mazick, Treas. 



Reconnaissance Crew 



Every school and every army needs someone or 
some organization to provide entertainment for 
relaxation and to provide rewards for honors re- 
ceived. The Student Council is such an organization. 
This group, composed of representatives from every 
homeroom, has provided us with many free dances 
and several special ones such as the Football Dance 



and Victory Dance. Their greatest achievement 
was the purchasing of the electric scoreboard for 
basketball games. This was obtained by their spon- 
soring a magazine selling campaign. Another of this 
organization's revolutionary ideas was Stunt Night. 
The awards that the Student Council purchased were 
the gold baseballs, National Honor pins, gold bas- 
ketballs and metals. 

Page Twenty-one 



TOP ROW: E. Simon, E. Middleton. 
B. Winters, C. Easter, P. Hommel, 
G. English, H. Beerman, J. Bergcm, 
E. Shulson, B. Paulsen, J. Semple. 

FOURTH ROW: B. Abramovic, F. 
Hopton, J. Hendnckson, B. Grau, 
B. Braden, D. Alexander. J. Craig, 

B. McRae, G. Stockhaus, B. Howlin, 
R. Sherrcr, J. Shumway. J. Meyer, 
D. Daye. 

THIRD ROW: D. Heuser, M. Ehren- 
feld, J. Fischer. R. Pierce. B. Sher- 
man, J. Chidley. B. Sill, J. Stranahan, 

A. George, C. Mead, L. Vogelsang, 
P. Malm, B. Hansen, W. McVeen. 

SECOND ROW: D. O'Branovic, A. 

Chalfant, R. Oliver, F. Rohrcr, L. 
Giampoli, L. Shebanck, A. Tnvisano, 
N. Brandt, A. Rosa, J. McVeen, B. 
Seymore, A. Hale, L. Crockett, B. 
Wellington. 

FRONT ROW: K. Newton, D. Dykar, 

C. Middleton, C. Miller, J. Simon, 
P. Anderson, P. Buker , B. White, 
J. Mayer, J. Travers, D. Braden, G. 
Smeltz, A. Johnson. 




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Tramp, Tramp, Tramp 



Our band is marching to fame. Shore has just 
reason to be proud of its band for this year it has 
reached its greatest musical heights, claiming a uni' 
formed membership of sixty talented musicians. 

Mr. James E. Teeter, leaving to answer the call 
of his country, gave the director's position to Mr. 
Dale Harper. 

The band has given unanimous support to all 



activities it has participated in. Most outstanding 
was the spectacular exhibition of patriotism at the 
annual night football game at Willoughby; the 
splendid support offered by the band in the Pageant 
of Defense Bonds, at the concert at the Shore 
Theatre, and the North Eastern Ohio Basketball 
Tournament held the 4, 5, 6, 7, 13, and 14 of 
March this year. 



There s Something About a Uniform 



While the new brilliant uniforms of white, blue 
and gold may be first to attract the eye, there's no 
denying the agile ability of the girls wearing them. 

Headed by Arline Johnson, Shore's Drum Major- 



ettes have progressed rapidly in their single year of 
training and are well deserving of high merits. 

Active in the participation of maneuvers of the 
band, they have done much to add color and enjoy- 
ment to this highly successful organization. 



]. SHUMWAY 

J.MEYER 

D. HEUSER 

L. CROCKETT 

B.WELLINGTON 



Page Twentytwo 




A.JOHNSON 
D. O'BRANOVIC 
W. McVEEN 
B. ABRAMOVIC 
R. SHERRER 
J. SEMPLE 










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TOP ROW: J. Meyer, E. Winkler, B. Heyne, D. Cobb, 
R. Kollie, D. Wilcox, L. Luikart, B. Winters, B. Hug, 
J. Little, B. Bluem, B. Sherman, R. Miller, J. Kirchner, 

FOURTH ROW: J. Knific, R. Kollar, P. Darby, T. 
Malone, R. Knific, T. Miller, P. Lang, D. Sherman, 
B. Dorington, J. Telich, J. Vickerman, D. Weber, H. 
Weybrecht, V. Pearson. 

THIRD ROW: P. McClurg, J. Hawks, R. A. Hill, ac- 
companist, H. Merrills, J. Jenkins, A. Youngman, P. 
Hayes, J. Metz, L. Adams, R. Gibbons, M. Hopson, 
H. Johnson, A. Jonassen, M. Ogilvie, A. M. Royer, 
J. Bollenbacker. 



SECOND ROW: E. Middleton. J. Meyer, M. A. Zepka, 
B. Kisthardt, G. Merntt, M. Sill, B. Sanner, M. Healv, 
E. Heyne, J. Kueblcr, M. L. Haven, J. Warwick, 

A. Peterson, L. Lueders, J. Bnnkman, J. Town, R 
Sherrer. 

BOTTOM ROW: E. Funk, H. Green, R. Habcraeker, 
M. Kasmarek, D. Rhoades, M. Johnson, B. Sullivan, 
L. Zentgraf, C. Harrell, F'. Roope, L. Berndsen, J. Rich- 
ards, C. Geddes, C. Bowersox, S. Ritter, P. Bundy, 
D. J. Luikart, R. Anderson. 

NOT IN PICTURE: G. Doering, R. Miller, M. Young, 

B. Curry, J. Whitcomb, T. Romona, A. Hcinnch. 



The "Voices" of the People 



Symbolic of the hope and faith of the people 
today, the choir of seventy-five blended voices is 
doing its part in keeping up the morale of our 
country. Having already participated in affairs of a 
patriotic nature, the future promises that this sup- 
port of the choir will continue to be in demand. 

Most notable were its performances at the concert 



in the Shore Theatre, the Baccalaureate Service and 
the Commencement Exercises. 

The traditional Christmas program at Shore was 
a grand success. A celestial atmosphere of calm was 
achieved by the beautifully sung Christmas carols. 

Mr. John Beck is the able instructor and advisor. 
To him goes much of the credit for the success of 
this organization. 



Page Twenty-three 




HMP 



J -SET -££$•' 



Marilyn Blase 













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John Adams Leonards Adams Ruth Anderson |ane Backstrom 



Audrey Beachcm Harry Been 



Jerry Bcrgem Frank Bergocl 




Mary Jane Bolon Ila Mae Buell Gordon Burns Ralph Calabrese Ann Chalfant E-tcllc Chick'hcss Hugh Cobur. 





wm Jh~ 



Lucien Davirro Jerry Daye Dorothy Dietrich MiHc Donohoc Ann Douglas 




* d *% $$* 





Carmen Duco Mary Lou D'Vorak M.argaret Ehrenfeld Carl Enkle 



4CW 



Bill Ettengcr Wallace Ferrantc Margaret Finncrty Albert Fischer 1 



SERGEANTS 



Page Twenty-jour 




wmrmvmmwm 



:ssie Fischer 



Larry Fuerst Francis Gara Ralph George rj) an Gibbons Jim Gibbons Rita Gibbons Ray Giesse 




Betty Gole 



Paul Greve Russell Haak 



Carita Harrell Mary Louise Haven Jane Hawks 



Pat Haves 



Mina Heale\ 





/arren Jevnikar Agatha Jonassen Ralph Jones Margaret Kasmarek Glen Kerney Dorothy Kirk Betty Jane Kisthardt John Klein 

John Knific 



\ 

Harry Knaus 





Oft l^^L A J^iML. i ■•! U ! 

Betty Knipper j ean Kuebler Naomia Lavo Gilbert Lawnnson Annie Lebet Edith Little 




: lorence Longo 



Dora Jane Luikart Loyal Luikart Edwina Lynch Ed Malz, 



Marie Masitt Thomas Mazick Frances McKinc 

Page Twenty-fn 




1 



Fritz Medved Georgia Merntt Joan Metz Ethel Mae Meyer Eleanor Middleton Harvey Mlachak Mary Lee Moore Chuck Munninp 




Ruth Muzzio Neal Nelson Dolores O'Branovic Conway O'Brien Ella Mae Oergel Margaret Ogilvie Betty Jane Paulsen Virginia Pearson 




t \ L M 




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4k*^4 




Dorothy Perme Bob Pierce George Polsdorf Diana Popovic Edward Rauchfleisch Don Raybuck Ed Repasky Virginia Ritching 




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Dave Stanford Frank Stepic Owen Straka Dick Strain Bonnie Sullivan Stella Swech 



Janet Town J ' 1 " Telich Tony Vrh 



Sto'O 



l^H 








^1 rfW.ii 



Bcttv Waltermire Bill Weir Bob Wilcox Jane Wilde Eimlie Winkler Pete Wise Luke Wiskes Bob Youngblood Lucille Zgonc 




TOP ROW: P. Greve, T. Mazick. 



} 

jli u mmmmmmmmk 

MIDDLE ROW: J. Smith, R. Hug, T. Sullivan, R. BOTTOM ROW: A. Douglas, P. Hayes, M. Baumer, 
Youngblood, D. Raybuck. M. Moore, B. Wellington. 

"THROUGH THE NIGHT" 

By Florence Ryerson and Colin Clements 
CAST 

Sayre Holbrook Pat Hayes 

Bunny Don Raybuck 

Kay Stanton Barbara Wellington 

Gregory Stanton. Paul Greve 

Mrs. Alicia Keefe Mary Lee Moore 

Dwight Holbrook Jim Smith 

Calvin Driscoll Tom Mazick 

Smith , Tony Sullivan 

Bart Jessop.. Bob Hug 

Roberts Bob Youngblood 

Manager Ann Douglass 

Director Mr. Baumer 

"Through the Night" is a mystery-comedy with 
a plot that exposes the stability of a family when 
murder strikes. While entertaining in his summer 
home, prior to the coming marriage of his niece, the 
master of the house is killed by his business man- 
ager. The murderer cleverly disguises his crime and 
shifts suspicion upon the Owl, a prowler in the 
summer-colony vicinity. After the Owl begins to r help 
the poor and establishes his innocence, the murderer 
turns the ray of guilt to a strange and charming but 
absent-minded guest, Bunny. The awkward assist- 
ance of the village police results in the escape of the 
murderer while the stranger is more directly in- 
volved. Sayre, the bride-to-be, and the maid of 
honor by trigger-fast work halt the murderer. 

Page Twenty -sever. 




TOP ROW: Mr. Baumer, E. Rauch- 
fleisch, J. Kelly, A. Sullivan, Mr. 

Angene. 

BOTTOM ROW: R. A. Hill, M. Sulli- 
van, M. L. Moore, J. Murray, J. 
Casson. 




TOP ROW: A. Gole, R. Giesse, E. 

Holtcamp, E. Rauchfleish, T. Sadler. 
MIDDLE ROW- E. Heyne, E. Chance, 

F. Nevar, J. Murray, H. Noch, Mr. 

Whiteside. 
BOTTOM ROW: P. Zeroff, J. Hawks, 

J. Horn, J. Casson, F. Cook. 






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TOP ROW: M. McCarthy, G. Drautz, 

L. Mead, L. Berndsen, C. Bill, E 

Heyne. 
MIDDLE ROW: Mr. Angene, H. 

Noch, A. Knapke, E. Koracin, P. 

Zeroff', Mr. Vaughn. 
BOTTOM ROW: J. Warwick, M. 

Cannon, P. Malin, E. Holtcamp, L. 

Zdara, D. DiSanto. 



Page Twenty-eight 



INTELLIGENCE DEPARTMENT 



The National Forensic League 

Besides an active fighting army, every country needs a small separate army to 
incite civilians to aid their country. This problem was very ably handled by the 
Shore chapter of the National Forensic League. The subject of their debates was 
"Resolved: That as a Permanent Policy Every Able Bodied Male Citizen Should 
Be Required to Have One Year of Full-Time Military Training Before Attaining 
the Present Draft Age." The members of this society have obtained their goal by 
debates, oratory, declamations, and extemporaneous speeches. Each member becomes 
eligible for the Forensic League if he is in the upper two-thirds of his class and 
has earned twenty points by speaking in any of the above-mentioned activities. His 
final reward is the receipt of a silver key for a job well done. 



M7h> 




The National Honor Society 

Step forth for your award for valor! These are the words that each member of the 
National Honor Society mentally hears as he is initiated into this society. Each initiate 
has waited long for this occasion; he has worked hard to obtain his reward. Each 
member must have a fine character and a fine disposition, willing to undertake and to 
plan anything. He must be a good student, have good leadership, and lastly, willing- 
ness to give service— to his friends and to his school. Each and every member must 
have these qualities, and belonging to this society is recognition of one's work. 




The National Quill and Scroll 

Every army needs correspondents who can write important news correctly and con- 
cisely. The members of the Quill and Scroll are the best of these. They have been 
recognized internationally for their ability and effort as journalists. But not every 
journalist can qualify for this society. First, each member must be in the upper third 
of his class, for intelligent and clear writing is important. Second, he must be a member 
of the business or editorial staff of the school paper or Annual, since voluntary and 
productive work is needed for becoming a better journalist. Third, he must be recom- 
mended by faculty advisors for outstanding work. Fourth, a sample of his best 
work must be sent to the National Offices where, upon approval, he is accepted as 
a member. Thus, his reward comes after long and diligent perseverance toward a 
useful goal. 



<Q NTE fl N AT 1 Q /V A i. "^ 



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7 



Page Twenty-nine 



PEP 7 AND HOW 



'OLD SHORE HIGH HAS EVERYTHING' 



SHORE 




GUESS WHAT? ? ?" 





■BEFORE AHD AFTER' 




LU1KART IS ALWAYS AFTER' 




NEED HELP, BOYS 1" 





■'HEWS DISCUSSED IH TH£ CLASSROOM' 




•FAITHFUL DOM' 




'STUNT H1GHT" 



"PEP TALK' 



BEAT ME, DADDY' !' 





bFlIlll 





T'S THE COACH1HG THAT COUHTS' 



THE PORTALS TO WISDOM" 



FIGHT THAT TEAM' 





'OUR ALMA MATER" 




'HE'S ALWAYS THERE" 






VICTOR ■Y.' 







"TWIRL THOSE BATONS. GIRLS' 



OH WINGS OF SONG' 



•THEY HAVE A SEHSE OF HUMOR, TOO- 





TH RAIN 
OR SHIJiE 



'COME ON, TELL.' 




'THEY KNIT FOR BRITAIN' 



"STEPPING HIGH, WIDE 
AND HANDSOME" 




THE "ARSENAL" OF GOOD TIME 



In an inspiring and traditional ceremony, the girls 
of the Friendship Club again this fall dedicated them- 
selves to the ideals and principles for which the 
club stands. Maintaining that every girl has a mental, 
physical, and spiritual side, the club attempts to help 
its members grow in these three ways. 

In many club meetings they have had talks, dis- 
cussions, and demonstrations on how to improve 
their looks, figures, and personalities. Discussing 
such problems as dates, boy friends, and etiquette, 
this organization is bent on turning out poised, com- 
petent, well groomed young women with likeable 
personalities. 

Every year the Friendship girls and the Hi-Y 
boys have enjoyed a joint Christmas formal and this 
year was no exception. To the lilting strains of 
popular songs, gay couples danced amid bright dec- 
orations and twinkling Christmas trees which made 
the gymnasium almost unrecognizable. In the early 
spring, the girls had their own formal, also a suc- 
cessful event. 

Patriotism is by far no small part of their thoughts 
for in almost every class one can hear the "clackcty- 
clack" of knitting needles as some earnest member 
painstakingly "knits for Britain." At Christmas 
and Thanksgiving, baskets were made up and given 
to needy families in Euclid. Another custom of a 
charitable kind that they performed, was the dress- 
ing of dolls which were given to the Rosemary 
Home for Crippled Children. The girls are not 



only giving support to their country, but are also 
rooting for their school. They paid for one of the 
new cheer-leader's uniforms and they always buy 
space in the Annual every year. 

Early this fall, the girls had a rip-roaring time at 
their Hallowe'en party. There were all sorts of cos- 
tumes and a prise was given for the most original 
one. There was fun and laughter, dancing, and, of 
course, cider and doughnuts. 

A novel and successful idea was their box social. 
With appropriate decorations and to the chant of 
the auctioneer, Mr. Baumer, gaily decorated lunches 
were raffled off to the highest bidder. There was 
dancing until eleven and when the couples left, 
there was the feeling that another Friendship affair 
had been successfully completed. 

Among those events anticipated in the calender 
was the Mother and Daughter banquet, which is 
almost part of the tradition of the Club. Also a kids' 
party and, of course, the Seniors' farewell. 

No mention of the Friendship Club is ever com- 
plete without a word about Miss Campbell. She 
has been the sponsor of the club since it was first 
introduced to Shore. Her expert guidance, her inter- 
est in each girl as an individual, and her love of 
fun, have given back-bone to the club and provided 
a spirit which is felt by each girl. 

Every Friendship Club girl feels a sadness in 
leaving the club, but she also feels that the friend- 
ships made there, and the good times enjoyed, have 
made her high school days a little richer and fuller. 



Page Thirtv-fhree 



l'„*"»1 




•X 




>!' V 



•-&' 



II 



THE BOYS" 



During the past year, helping the U. S. Gov- 
ernment in National Defense was another purpose 
added to the outstanding acclaim already gained by 
the Euclid Shore chapter of the Y. M. C. A. 

Having found that we had the largest member- 
ship in the history of the school, Walter Schwegler, 
the adviser, agreed on allowing the ninety -seven 
boys to divide into three separate chapters in a man- 
ner which was agreed on by the majority. 

Four different plans for division were proposed 
by our boys who with Mr. Schwegler, inquired of 
authorities concerning their ideas on the different 
systems. After a great deal of consideration and de- 
bate the fellows finally decided on the plan that 
was used. 

The Hi-Y helps to develop the ordinary American 
boy into becoming a good citizen of this nation. 
This idea was brought out in a few programs, one 
of which was a talk by Mr. Whiteside on "Parlia- 
mentary Procedure" in which the boys were deeply 
interested because the regular meetings of the club 
must be run in an official manner. 

Mr. Pohto gave a very interesting talk on "Civil- 
ian Defense." This talk was extremely timely be- 
cause we are all connected in some way. Either we 
have assigned duties or we are members of the 
civilian group and must know what Civilian De- 
fense is> all about. 

Reverend Mayer brought out the Christmas spirit 
when he told all the boys about "The History of 
Christmas." 

Getting into the lighter and gayer side of the 
club's activities, the boys enjoyed an exciting bowling 
tournament which was won by Dick Krielach's 
team and the winners were presented with medals 
in recognition of their evident superiority. 

Later in February the boys devoted a meeting to 
an exciting four hours of basketball. The boys were 
divided into teams and " played off in a series of 
eliminations until finally Walter Maroney 's team 



ended an exciting evening victorious by a 32 to 16 
win over Don Sherman's team. 

The members picked four boys to attend Hi-Y 
Conferences at Springfield and Camp Nelson Dodd 
because all the boys could not possibly attend. 

The report of the four boys, Jack Heuser, John 
Cox, John Telich and Walt Maroney, was de- 
layed by a series of unavoidable incidents, but was 
finally given much to the gratitude of the rest of 
the boys. 

The formal Hi-Y initiation for the mid-year entries 
was held on Tuesday, Mar. 10, in which thirty 
new. members were admitted. 

After the initiation of the new members a plan 
for division of the Hi-Y into chapters was accepted 
and the group was divided three ways by drawing 
names out of a hat. 

The resulting clubs, namely, Alpha Upsilon, 
Beta Upsilon and Gama Upsilon had as their pres- 
idents Ed Holtcamp, Jack Heuser and Frank Ber- 
goch respectively. 

The other officers of the Alpha Upsilon were 
Ray Giesse, vice-president, Dick Netschke, treasurer, 
and John Cox, secretary. Those of Beta Upsilon were 
Paul Herrmann, vice-president, Thomas Mazick, 
treasurer, and John Telich, secretary. The other 
officers of Gama Upsilon were Warren Jevnikar, 
vice-president, Albert Fischer, treasurer, and John 
Adams, secretary. 

When new uniforms were presented to the cheer 
leaders by school supporters, it was found that only 
three had been purchased, so quickly following up 
the Student Council's offer of another, Walter 
Maroney, on behalf of the Hi-Y, presented another 
md so the five cheer leaders presented a very fine ap- 
pearance at the following games. 

Ending a very fine year the annual Hi-Y picnic 
was held much to the enjoyment of all concerned, 
and so the Hi-Y of 1941-42 leaves a fine record of 
activities and looks forward to another fine year. 



Page Thirty-five 







Assemblies 




This year, our assembly programs have shown a 
marked improvement. They not only have been 
educational, but interesting as well. 

To further our interest and appreciation of music, 
a great many of our programs have been musical. 
Our first assembly was to show off the band and the 
majorettes with their new uniforms. Later, in the 
spring, we were given a band concert under the new 
directorship of Mr. Dale Harper. To deepen our 
appreciation of symphony music, there was a return 
engagement of the W.I 5 . A. orchestra. Something 
novel in the way of music. il entertainment was the 
program presented by the Bell Ringers and Singers. 
They performed many songs on the musical bells 
and a quartet rendered madrigal songs. Our chorus 
has also done a great deal of work and has given 



us several concerts, including an inspiring Christmas 
program. 

Knowing that the mysterious and unexplainable 
is always fascinating, we were presented with two 
programs dealing with magic. 

Mr. Stuart Cramer, well known magician, baffled 
us with mmd-rcading and other tricks, such as 
suspending a student in midair, making water and 
flowers appear out of seemingly empty jars, and 
doing incredible tricks with large rings. This ma- 
gician, and another one who entertained us, left 
us all with a profound respect for the art of magic. 

In order that we may better learn how to express 
ourselves in public, we learned some of the tricks 
when a debating team from Western Reserve met 
a team from the University of Pittsburgh. 







Our own debating team here at Shore gave a 
demonstration of what they eould do in one as- 
sembly program. An American Legion Oratorical 
contest was also featured with four of our students 
competing. 

Nature is a fascinating subject but few of us 
know very much about it. Our interest was awak- 
ened and our knowledge enhanced by two programs 
dealing with nature. One was presented by the 
Washington Zoological Society, in which many 
actual live animals were brought on the stage and 
their habits and histories explained. Another nat- 
uralist showed us pictures and told us of life in 
the forests of the north. These colored movies left 
us all resolving that someday we'd take such a trip 
for ourselves. 



Each of us should have a deeper appreciation by 
now of the men who made this country, especially 
after hearing two speeches on Abraham Lincoln. 
One was given by our superintendent, Mr. Erwine, 
and the other by a prominent man who made a 
hobby of collecting facts about Lincoln. 

If we didn't know how to play Chinese games 
before, we do now. We learned much about the 
Chinese people; their customs, language and dress 
in an assembly program given by an American who 
was born in China. 

Knowing that keeping up morale, is an important 
phase of army life, the "draftees" of Camp Euclid 
Shore were provided with many morale-building as- 
sembly programs, — commonly called "pep rallies." 
In these programs, "our boys" were cheered on to 
victory and greater laurels for their alma mater. 




TOP ROW: H. Falkenstein, K. Rood, 
H. Hildebrand, J. Kelly, P. Lang. 



MIDDLE ROW: L. Angene, E. Simon, BOTTOM ROW: J. Murray, J. Casson, 

P. Zeroff, H. Nelson. E. Adams, L. Berndsen. NOT PICTURED: A. Knapke. 

"JUNE MAD" 

By Florence Ryerson and Colin Clements 
CAST 

Penny Wood Jane Casson 

Chuck Harris Jim Kelly 

Mrs. Wood Jane Murray 

Elmer Turtle.. Kenneth Rood 

Dr. Wood Henry Falkenstein 

Effie Elaine Adams 

Milly Lou Agnes Knapke 

G. Mervyn Roberts Howard Nelson 

Roger Van Vleck Howard Hildebrand 

Mr. Harris... Faul Lang 

Shirley Wentworth Lois Berndsen 

Ralph Wentworth Earl Simon 

Julie Harris Pauline Zeroff 

PRODUCTION STAFF 

Director Mr. Angene 

Business Manager Joyce Horn 

Direction Assistance Eileen Heyne 

Promptress Fat McClurg 

Properties Gertrude Drautz 

Art Audrey Youngman 

Lighting Don Cobb 

Stage Managers *Faul Herrman, Leonard Zdara 

Promotion Helen Noch 

The problems of light-hearted youth form as the 
basis of the plot for "June Mad." Penny Wood along 
with Chuck Harris, the neighboring boy, are in- 
volved in many difficult but amusing situations. 
Penny's Uncle Mervyn, a college student only five 
years her senior, brings a sophisticated college friend, 
Roger Van Vleck, home from the campus with him. 
While trying to bring herself up to the sophisticated 
standards of this irrestible young man, she discovers 
Roger is deceiving Mervyn by trying to gain the 
affections of his girl. This realization brings her back 
to normal and back to the attention of Chuck. 



Page Thirty-eight 



COMBAT MANEUVERS 



Supervised by: 

Walt Schwegler 

John Pohto 

Sparky DiBiasio 

Anthony Vaccariello 

Clarence Swackhammer 

Dorothy Gill 



4k iS ?i mi Ji/ 






... 






*m 




ANDY REP ASKY— "Light but full of fight," suits 
Andy. A good center, a gentleman, and a good 
sport who could get rough with the best of them. 
His smile and ability will leave a big hole in the 
Shore squad which will have to be filled next sea- 
son. How we' i someone can take Andy's place will 
go a long way toward deciding the success of the 
1942 season. 

DARRELL WICKSON— Shore's all-conference end 
— As Bedford said, "Where did he come from — 
we couldn't keep him out." What Darrell lacked 
in weight he made up in courage and fight. His 
performance should be a record for other small 
Shore boys to shoot at. 

ART BOLON— Shore's captain and leader for 1940 
lived up to his job 100 per cent. Respected by all 
teams as a leader, as well as a good guard, Art 
was highly recommended for the all-conference 
team. Had he been with a winner he undoubtedly 
would have been chosen on the first team; as it 
was he who was picked as the third best guard 
in the conference. His fine attitude and leadership 
will certainly be missed. 

JOHN COX — A fine tackier in the open field who 
wins his second football letter as an end. His all 
around athletic ability will he missed. 



Mayfield 



7 



Against Mayfield's champs, Shore showed plenty of power bat was beaten as a 
late scoring threat was stopped on Mayfield's own two yard line. 





ALBERT FISCHER — A sophomore letter winner 
as a guard and an even better player as a junior. 
Great things are expected of him next year as a 
player and leader and he certainly should be 
timber for the 1942 all-conference team. 

DOMINIC DISANTO— A real leader as well as 
a vicious tackier will be lost to Shore by his 
graduation. Many league opponents chose him 
on the albconference team but because of Shore's 
standing in the league he was placed on the sec- 
ond team. His courage, fight, and fine attitude 
were a real asset to Shore. 

BILL WEIR — A good end who will be hard to re- 
place especially as a pass receiver. Bill loved con- 
tact and that is football. 

HENRY WALTERS— "Hard to get started— but 
if started — harder to stop." Central will testify 
to this, we are sure. If Henry can start in Septem- 
ber 1942 and go until November, Shore will be 
heard from next year. 



Sh< 



Central 



Before the largest crowd of the year Shore gained revenge for the last years 
setback by riding over Central's Lions 6 to at Willoughby stadium. 




Page Forty-one 




BILL GROSSMAN— "Another Grossman'' means 
something to former Shoreites. To fill the shoes 
left by Bob and Jack Grossman is a big job and 
Bill does just that. Bill has a fine football career 
ahead and next year as a junior he should be one 
of the outstanding line men of the conference. 

ED MALZ — A very serious conscientious guard 
who lacked experience but had a wonderful at- 
titude and spirit. First out to practice and last to 
leave indicated his interest in football. It's too 
bad Ed didn't find his niche in football before his 
senior year. His experience should be an example 
to. other boys of Shore who early in school life 
have no interest. 

FRANK BERGOCH— He astounded Parma with 
his ability as a passer, but a shoulder injury kept 
his ability throttled all year. Frank is a fine runner 
and gave many a team a bad afternoon- as was 
especially shown at Bedford, where he rivaled the 
best backs of the league. Frank's senior year should 
find him a shining light on a championship team. 

HOWARD NELSON— Constantly plagued by in- 
juries and lack of weight, Howard's ability as a 
hard player kept him in the lineup. His specialty 
was tackling and running to the weak side, and 
these made him well-respected by all opponents. 



Shore 7 Brush 6 

Outgaining and outplaying the Brush eleven. Shore was victorious with a score of 



7 to 6. 






Page Forty-two 





NEAL NELSON — The most versatile member of 
the Shore team. Neal was picked by most every 
coach for the all-conference team, but because he 
was a junior they placed him on the second team, 
which inddendy is made up mostly of seniors. 
Next year Neal should take his place among 
EGCC greats, as well as such former Shore play- 
ers as Curto, Palko, Bezdek, Crockett, Montana, 
etc, all of whom were not only looked to in 
leage competition but by Greater Cleveland as 
well. 

RAY GIESSE— Never having been out for football 
before and being very light kept Ray in the 
background in the early season games. However, 
he soon blossomed into a good runner and a sure 
tackier, a combination hard to beat. With this 
year of experience and his desire to succeed, he 
looks like a sure bet for a good back next year in a 
good backfield on a good team. 

DICK KREILACH— For two years one of the 
Leagues smallest but scrappiest players. This year 
he took over the hard job of man-in-motion in 
great style, and produced several fine examples 
of ball carrying. The Central game showed bis 
worth to the squad as he consistently pepped up 
the Shore team. 

FRED MEDVED — Shore's quarterback who did a 
good job of play calling. In the last game of the 
season he found himself as a runner and if this 
continues into next season hell really be heard 
from. His prospects, for developing into a great 
back next year are good and there's no limit to 
the heights he may reach. 



Shore 



Bedford 



13 



Against a highly touted Bedford eleven the Admirals had many scoring threats 
but failed to capitalize and Bedford was on the long end of a 13 to 7 score. 



€ 



*♦ ^ 



# 




Page Forty-three 



p 





Shore 



Orange 



On a rain soaked gridiron Shore 
and Orange slashed and slid thru 
a scoreless and soggy game. 




Shore 



Garfield 



20 



WBm 







im»i in tm* hi "> »**mM*mmm^mmzz'-zz~~'r~'~- **■ 



Against last year's champs Shore 
was overpowered and at the end of 
the game were on the wrong end 
of the 20 to 7 count. 



Shore 13 Maple Hts. 21 

Showing their best offensive form 
of the season, Shore tallied twice in 
the opening quarter, only to have 
their opponents come back in the 
=<>cond half to score three touch- 
downs and a safety to win the 
game. 





MR. SCHWEGLER 

An athlete who ean make two 
All Ohio teams surely must he a 
£v\\l one. That is the honor be 
stowed upon Walt Schwcglcr, 
Shore's head football eoaeh tor the 
last six years. Coach Schwegler was 
an All Ohio end in tootball dnd 
All Ohio center in basketball while 
attending Baldwin Wallace Col- 
lege. 

'While at Baldwin Wallace he 
won twelve varsity letters. He is the 
only person who has ever won so 
many letters at Baldwin Wallace. 
After graduation he began his 
coaching duties at Shadyside High 
School where he coached for seven 
years. 

In the last six years he has won 
four championships. Frank Mon- 
tana, Lenny Palko, Ray Bezdeck, 
Joe Curto, Ed Heglaw, Babe Lipo- 
vec and others are a few of his 
products. 

Coach Schwegler brought the 
famous "T" formation to Shore in 
the last year. 



EDMUND RlDL'R 
Each year Shore's I not hall 
squad is Messed wit I > a tine man 
agcr, but this year's; lidmund 
Rider, tar surpassed his prede 
ccssors in his willingness, inter- 
est, and punctuality. His part in 
the l l Ml football season was not 
only a\\ important one, but one 
that will be long remembered, 
just as he will long remember 
the return from Willoughby on 
that famous Thursday night. 






98i 






"SPARKY" DIB1ASIO 
As often said, "Best things come 
in small packages." This tall Shore 
received a small package in the per' 
son of "Sparky" DiBiasio, new as- 
sistant football, basketball, and base- 
ball coach. 

An outstanding athlete during 
his high school and college days 
"Sparky" has proved very valuable 
in his chores of coaching the three 
sports. An all around athlete at 
West High School, Coach DiBiasio 
attained further laurels at Obcrlin 
College, where he starred in foot- 
ball, basketball and baseball. His 
reserve basketball team enjoyed a 
very good season due to his fine 
coaching talent. 



2- 



Page Forty-five 



V 
A 
R 
S 
I 
T 
Y 




TOP ROW: B. FrisseU, B. CnswelL, D. DiSanto, H. Wise, 

T. Herrick, E. Rider. 
FOURTH ROW: G. Cywinski, J. Telkh, D. Gibbons, 

T. Sullivan, A. Ziegier, F. Gara, R. Wflk, G. Netschke, 

Mr. Schwegler. 
THIRD ROW: Mr. DiBiasio, B. Wach, J. Klein, B. 



Grossman, N. Nelson, R. Giesse. E. Malz, A. Repasky, 

D. Kleve. 
SECOND ROW: J. Adams, H. Walters, T. Mffler, F. 

Spino, J. Heuser, W. Jevnikar, B. Weir, G. Burns. 
BOTTOM ROW: F. Bergocfa, F. Medwd, J. Cos, A. 

Fiscber, A. Bolon, H. Nelson, D. Wkkson, D. Kreflach. 



TOP ROW: J. Raybuck, J. Weybrecbt, E. Wonderiy, 

P. Yan, Mr. Pohto. 
THIRD ROW: D. Kraince, J. Vflrtebc, C. Wyant, J. Lebet, 

C. Barile, N. Percio. 



SECOND ROW: B. Medved, C. Rojedk, D. RoEa, R. 

Brandt, R. Jones, J. Julyan, P. Stegkamper. 
BOTTOM ROW: K. Daniels, F. Celeac, C. Jewc, P. 

Barclay, F. Cook, F. Karaba. 




1942 



CHAMPS 



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FRANK BERGOCH— Bing was 

shifted to forward in an effort to 
strengthen the scoring punch of 
the Admirals. Bing proved dead- 
ly on one-hand shots and was a 
fine team player. He scored 25 
points in two quarters in the 
Orange game to set a modern 
record for Shore. 




WALTER MARONEY — Walt 
was a regular from last year. 
He proved to he Shore's speed 
merchant; shot equally well with 
either hand; he was always pos- 
sessed with a fine competitive 
spirit. 



NEAL NELSON— Neal took over 
the arduous duties of running 
guard which is the most difficult 
in the style of play in vogue at 
Shore. Aside from being a great 
all-around floor man on both of- 
fense, Nelson was Shore's most 
effective two-handed shot. 



Shore 


46 


Willoughby 


26 


Shore 


33 


Shore 


45 


Kirtland 


29 


Shore 


45 


Shore 


25 


Fairport 


39 


Shore 


25 


Shore 


45 


Wickliffe 


23 


Shore 


84 



Youngstown Campbell 29 
Bedford 18 

Canton Lehman 46 

Orange 24 



TOM MILLER - - Tom is the 
sophomores' contribution to 
Shore's basketball features for 
the year. Tom improved fast and 
immediately stepped into the 
tough spot of center when vacat- 
ed at mid-year. 







ED CICENAS— "'Big Ed" was 
certainly a steadying influence to 
a rather eratic Shore team in the 
early season games. Back-board 
play at either end of the floor 
was his role and he enjoyed it. 
Ed graduated at mid-year after 
scoring 19 points against Orange 
in his last game. 




PAUL HERRMANN— Paul was 
a great team man and tine in re- 
covering defensive rebounds. He 
scored his points when they 
meant most. His long shot in the 
Mayfield game was made at a 





ON SHERMAN— Don turned 
out to be quite a basketball play- 
er, although this was his first 
year of participation in the sport. 
Don is fast, a good ball handler, 
and is rapidly improving i n 
shooting. 




ED HOLTCAMP— Ed played ci- 
ther forward, was speedy and a 
fine shot. Ed was high point man 
in several games. Ed's versatility 
took him to the center position 
on several occasions. 




JOE BERGOCH— A hard player 

and clean fighter, Joe was the 
first to score a field goal in the 
Admiral's rout of Garfield. Joe 
was one of Shore's most effective 
pivot men. 



Shore 


52 


Garfield 


38 


Shore 


26 


Parma 


35 


■ « 
Shore 


38 


Mayfield 


32 


Shore 
Shore 


46 
34 


Euclid Central 
Brush 


33 

14 


Shore 


30 


Maple Heights 


34 


Shore 


36 


Painesville 


30 



BARREN JEVNIKAR— "Red" 

was a much improved player this 
year, and fast becoming a fine 
two-handed shot. He was par- 
ticularly effective against zone 
defenses where h i s deceptive 
passing was most valuable. 



TED BULLARD— Ted played his 
first year of varsity basketball 
and was noted for his fight and 
famous "jump shot." Ted had 
this particular worked out to a 
nicety and proved unstopable at 
times. 



ART BOLON— Art was a fine ball 
handler and an excellent two- 
handed shot. Art was very fast 
and probably Shore's best man 
on assigned man-for-man de- 
fense. 









JACK SHAFER -- Jack worked 
equally well at either forward 
and was probably the best all- 
around shot on the squad. He 
featured in making the varsity 
look "ill" in practice sessions. 





TOM BURNS— Tom was an ex- 
cellent ball handler, fast, aggres- 
sive, and a fine shot with either 
hand. He may develop into one 
of Shore's better all-around play- 
ers. 



FRED NEVAR, Manager. An up- 
and-doing basketball manager, of 
our Admirals, he was a con- 
scientious and painstaking keep- 
er of equipment. Fred was a 
good player in his own right, but 
due to illness was unable to par- 
ticipate during this season. 



Tournament Scores 



Shore 


60 


Shore 


31 


Shore 


30 


Shore 


40 



Euclid Central 


35 


Ashtabula 


19 


Berea 


26 


Lakewood 


42 



Ford Case 



"Coach of all sports but a lover of one." This is how Mr. Ford 
Case is always referred to. He has coached all sports, but his main 
interest lies in basketball. 

He was first familiarized with the sport in 1913 and in 1915 he in- 
troduced basketball to Bolivar High School as its first basketball 
coach. 

Mr. Case came to Shore in 192? as assistant to Coach Van Dusen. 
In 1930, however, he became head coach, and it was in 1932 that 
Shore won their first undisputed basketball championship under him. 
With this as a beginning Shore has since tied or won six champion- 
ships in nine years, and has been runner up the other three years. 

Mel, Harvey, and Bill Riebe, Art Brown, Frank Montana, Bill 
Simmermacher and Lambert Hawks are only a few of the great bas- 
ketball players who have played under Mr. Case. 




Cagers Victorious 



Coach Case built this year's Eastern Conference 
basketball champs and runners-ups for the Class 
"A" District tournament around six returning let- 
termen from last year's squad. The returning letter- 
men were Walt Maroney, Neal Nelson, Ed Holt- 
camp, Art Bolon, Frank Bergoch^and Ed Cicenas. 

At the beginning of the season, Coach Case was 
experimenting with different combinations until he 
found one that would win basketball games for 
Shore. 

In the first two games Shore swamped both of 
their opponents, Willoughby and Kirtland, by large 
scores. Fairport Harbor's tall and experienced team 
then handed the Admirals their first of five defeats. 

Coach Case's chief worry then was to find a for- 
ward who could make points. He then shifted Frank 
Bergoch from backguard to pair with co-captain 
Maroney at right forward. 

With Bergoch and Maroney at the forwards, Nel- 
son and Herrmann at the guards, and Cicenas at 
center, Shore started rolling. 

They then defeated Wickliffe, Youngstown Camp- 
bell, and Bedford in order before dropping their 
second game to a tough and superior Canton Leh- 
man five by a lopsided score. 

Smarting from their defeat at the hands of Can- 
ton, the Admirals came back strong by pouring in 
84 points to Orange's 24, and setting two school 
records. The 84 points set a new scoring record for 
one game, and Frank Bergoch set a new individual 
scoring record for one game by garnishing 2? points 
and breaking Harvey Riebe's record of 22. 

The Admirals then were avenging the defeats 
Garfield handed them for the last two seasons by 
giving them a sound drubbing at Garfield for their 
third straight conference victory. 

Striving for their fourth successive win in con- 
ference play, Shore was able to defeat a strong and 
scrappy Mayfield quintet by 6 points. 

Maple Heights' Mustangs then turned the tide 
and defeated the Admirals on Heights' spacious floor 
in a heated contest. The loss of three of the starting 
five who went out on fouls early in the third quarter 



struck a severe blow to the Admiral's chances of 
winning the game. 

The tide was still flowing against the Admirals the 
next evening when they lost their fourth game to 
Parma's tall five. 

Euclid Central, our city rivals, was next on the 
Admiral's schedule. This game was played before 
one of the largest crowds ever to witness a league 
game in Shore s history. The fighting Admirals 
showed m this game that the last two defeats were 
a mistake by giving Central a severe walloping. 

Brush was the last hurdle for the Admirals to 
jump before being undisputed champs of the East- 
ern Conference. Playing a good defensive and of- 
fensive game, Brush proved an easy opponent for 
Shore. 

In the last game of the regular season Shore de- 
feated Painesville Harvey High Raiders easily. 

Shore was one of the four seeded teams in the 
tournament and reached the finals only to be beaten 
by Lakewood. In the first game Shore again swamped 
Euclid Central. 

Ashtabula, the team that beat Shore in last year's 
tournament, was Shore's second victim. At first 
this was a very close game, but our Admirals then 
pulled away and beat them by 12 points. 

The final hurdle for Shore before entering the 
finals was Berea, another seeded team and four- 
time champion of the Southwest Conference. This 
game was very fast and close all the way. A basket 
by Shore m the last 20 seconds was the deciding 
point of victory. 

Shore then had to play the highly touted Rangers 
from Lakewood in the finals. This game proved to 
be one of the toughest of the season for Lakewood 
and Shore and one of the best in the tournament. 

The Admirals who were the underdogs in the 
last two days showed their prowess by leading the 
Rangers the whole first half. Lakewood then lived 
up to their pre-tournament prediction by coming 
back strong in the third quarter to take the lead and 
never relinquishing the lead. 

With less than a minute to go and Lakewood 
four points ahead, Shore garnered another basket to 
climb within two points of Lakewood's lead. 



Page Fifty-one 




TOP ROW: A. Sullivan, R. Jenkins, J. Bergem, E. Flam- 

mang, J. Knific, B. Cywinski. 
SECOND ROW: B. Criswell, W. Ferante, B. Wilcox, 



B. Russell, B. Wach, W. Hill. 
FRONT ROW: Mr. DiBiasio, G. Netschke, H. Wise, J. 
Tarantino, F. Spino, J. Shafer. 



Second Team 



This year Shore's Reserve basketball team was 
one of the best in its history. The team lost only 
one game and that was to a strong and superior 
varsity team. 

The theory behind the Reserve team is to give 
the players valuable experience and teach them 
the fundamentals of the game before playing varsity 
competition. 



The Reserve team built their prestige by sending 
players to the varsity before this year's basketball 
season was half over. They advanced such players 
as "Red" Jevnikar, Tom Burns, Tom Miller, Paul 
Herrmann and Don Sherman. 

The present players on the Reserve team will 
be the future varsity. 




wiw" 



^ JS 



TOP ROW: F. Gara, T. Mazick, D. Strain. 
SECOND ROW: Mr. Vaccanello, A. Sugarman, A. 
Repasky, B. Frissel!, B. Bosworth, Mr. Swackhammer. 



BOTTOM ROW: H. Mlacbak, M Daniels, C. Enkler, 
W Arunski. 



Wrestling 



Coaches Vaccariello and Swackhammer built this 
year's wrestling team around two lettermen from 
last year's squad, Carl Enkler and Al Sugarman. 

The majority of Shore's grapplers this year were 
Sophomores and Juniors who were trying to keep 
Shore's record of having a state champion wrestler 
in Columbus. 

The first call for wrestling was answered by 
twenty industrious wrestlers. These boys practiced 
every day after school and it was very doubtful at 
first who was going to wrestle in the first meet for 
Shore. 

Out of eight dual meets Shore came out victor- 
ious in five. Their defeats came at the hands of 
strong teams. John Hay beat Shore 30-8, Garfield 



won 22' 12, and John Adams won by the score of 
26-18. 

Shore beat Euclid Central, Western Reserve 
Academy, Shaker Heights, East High, and Univer- 
sity. 

This year Shore placed more boys in the City 
finals than any other year. The boys who qualified 
were Mark Daniels, Al Sugarman, Bob Bosworth, 
Dick Strain, and Frank Gara. Al won a second 
place and the rest of the boys finished third with 
the exception of Daniels who placed fourth. 

The following boys' pictures do not appear with 
the team: Frank Celizic, Dick Kraince, Eddie Schul- 
er, Ken Daniels, and Glenn Smeltz. 



Page Fiffythree 




Mark Daniels, one of the oustanding 105 pound- 
ers in the city is only a first year man on the 
squad. Mark did excellently in the City Tournament 
until an injury stopped him. 

Harvey Mlachak did not secure his varsity S 
last year, but he more than made it this season. 
An aggressiv: wrestler, Harv will be with us next 
fall. 

Alvin Sugarman, one of the most feared 140 
pounders was beaten by a slight margin in the final 
round of the City Tournament at John Marshall. Al 
leaves us in June and his loss will be deeply felt. 

Dick Strain, an eleventh grader, also reached the 
semi-final round and won third place in the tourna' 
ment. He will have another chance next fall. 

Dick Kraince, Bill Frizzell and Carl Enkler are 
depicted in the picture. They are in a referee's 
position and are awaiting the signal to start wrest- 
ling. All three boys will be back nex,t year and we 
are expecting a great deal from them. 

Frank Gara and Bob Bosworth, both of whom are 
first year men, placed in the eliminations at Gar- 
field Heights, and each secured a third pjace in the 
final round. These aggressive boys will form a nuc- 
leus for the 1942-43 wrestling team. 




Shore 


28 


Western Reserve Academy 18 


Shore 


38 


East 1 3 


Shore 


18 


John Adams 26 


Shore 


12 


Garfield 22 


Shore 


28 


Euclid Central 13 


Shore 


8 


John Hay 30 


Shore 


22 


Shaker 12 


Shore 


24 


University School 10 



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TOP ROW: A. Doberdruk, J. Smith, R. Prostor, D. Stan- 
ford, B. Clasen, R. Giesse, J. Adams, P. Wise, Mr. 
Vaccariello. 



BOTTOM ROW: J. Kelly, L. Luikart, J. Cox, A. Fischer, 
M. Donohoe, E. Langa, H. Nelson. 



Hockey Team 



One of the best teams in Shore's history brought 
more glory to Shore, dropping only one game in 
seven engagements. This grand record, the icers all 
agree, is due greatly to the expert help from their 
coach, Mr. Vaccariello. 

Starting the season with a 9 to romp over John 
Marshall, the Admirals of the ice swept to victories 
over Cathedral Latin, East Tech, East, Holy Name, 
and a tie with a strong University team. The 4 to 4 
tie with the Preppers was the highlight of the 



season. It was the first time a U. S. team has been 
held to a tie in three years of competition. The only 
game in which the pucksters were on the long end 
of the score was against St. Ignatius, who were 
the league leaders. 

Darrell "Whitey" Wickson and Dick Kreilach, 
first line wings, paced the Shore attack until their 
graduation in January. However, the team kept 
going and won undisputed second place in the 
Greater Cleveland Hockey League. 



Page Fifty -five 





DICK KREILACH— Dick was one of the fastest 
and surest shots in scholastic hockey. His loss at 
semester was a real blow to the team. 

DARRELL WICKSON — High school hockey 
coaches are unanimous m acclaiming "Wickie' 1 
as the boy with the hardest shot. The "teamiest" 
of team players on the Shore squad. 

JOHN COX— Flanked by Wickson and Kreilach, 
Johnny was the setter-upper for our goals. His 
record for goals and assists speaks for itself. 



MR. VACCARIELLO 

Head coach of wrestling, hockey, golf, and sponsor 
of the cheerleaders surely keeps a man busy. Mr. 
Vaccariello is the teacher who is kept so busy. 

During the fall he is kept busy with the cheer- 
leaders, in the winter with the hockey squad and 
wrestling, besides his cheerleading duties. In the 
spring, with golf. 

As head coach of wrestling he brought Shore 
more honors when one of his wrestlers went on to 
win the city and state championship. 

This year his hockey squad went to the semi- 
finals in the Greater Cleveland Hockey League. 



JOHN TELICH— An operation cut John's hockey 
career, but watch him next season. 

AL DOBERDRUK, manager— Al has fulfilled his 
duty in an A-l fashion. He is a credit to the 
whole team. 



\L FISCHER — Al was a goalie respected by every 
team in the league. He has made sensational stops. 
We can look forward to next season and not 
worry about our goalie. 

:D LANGA — Ed finally came through after a slow 
start. He pulled the famous "ha^ trick" in the 
East game, netting three goals and one assist. 
There is action when Ed is in the game. 

DAVE STANFORD— Dave was a hockey player 
who baffled the goalie on many an occasion. 
Not a hard shooter but consistent and accurate. 

[AMES ADAMS— Jack, as he is called, never 
knows when to quit. A four-and-one-half-inch- 
gash on the thigh couldn't even stop him in the 
Benedictine game. 

SAY PROSTOR— Ray is a fast skater whom we 
should watch in the near future. Only a sopho- 
more, Ray played as well as the best of them. 

30B KOZAN — Appendicitis stopped Bob in mid- 
season. Keep your eye on him next year. 

SAY GIESSE — Ray is a good stick-handler and 
team player. Ray likes plenty of skating and a 
great deal of action. 

MERLE DONOHOE— Mike thrived on defending 
the goal. More than once, he has lent a helping 
hand to our goalie. 

HOWARD NELSON— Mike and Howie work 
well together. Their passing and checking were 
way above average. 

LOYAL LUIKART— Skippy will give his oppon- 
ent plenty of trouble. He has proven his ability 
to check and his skating is faultless. 

BOB CLASEN — Bob's first experience on the hock- 
ey squad made a lasting impression. We will lose 
him in June. 

JIM KELLY — An unusual skater and plenty of 
trouble for the opposite team. Kelly broke in a 
little late but made up for lost time. 

JIM SMITH — Jim is around when he is needed. 
A good skater with plenty of sip. 




Page Fifty-seven 









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CHAMPS 
J94I Baseball Summary 



Shore 


6 


Collinwood 


2 


Winning batteries 


Shore 
Shore 
Shore 


3 
13 

6 


Maple Heights 
University 
John Adams 


2 
10 

3 


Winning batteries 
Winning batteries 
Winning batteries 


Shore 


5 


Brush 


3 


Winning batteries 


Shore 


5 


Lakewood 


4 


Winning batteries 


Shore 


6 


Garfield 





Winning batteries 


Shore 


11 


Cleveland Hts. 


13 


Lost 


Shore 


3 


Shaw 


5 


Lost 


Shore 


12 


Mayfield 


3 


Winning batteries 


Shore 


3 


Central 


1 


Winning batteries 


Shore 
Shore 


11 
9 


John Hay 
Bedford 






Winning batteries 
Winning batteries 


Shore 


7 


Garfield 





Winning batteries 


Shore 


9 


Parma 





Winning batteries 


Shore 





Shaw 
WON 13 


6 


Lost 

LO 



Shafer and Weir 
Lipovec and Medved 
Holtcamp and Medved 
Tarantino and Medved 
Lipovec and Medved 
Holtcamp and Medved 
Lipovec and Medved 
Holtcamp and Medved 
Lipovec and Medved 
Holtcamp and Kastelic 
Holtcamp and Medved 
Nelson and Weir 
Lipovec and Medved 
Holtcamp and Weir 
Lipovec and Medved 
Holtcamp and Weir 
ST 3 



Page Fifty -eight 



SHORE SLUGGERS 



The Shore Admirals continued their high ranking 
in Metropolitan baseball by winning the Eastern 
Conference without losing a game. They were final- 
ly tripped by Shaw High in the Ohio sectional finals, 
5-3. 

This was the third season in four years that the 
Admirals have been on top of the Eastern division. 
They have made an enviable record of having lost 
but five league games in four years while winning 
27 games. 

The high lights of the season were Babe Lipovcc's 
no-hit-no-run game against Garfield Heights to make 
a clean sweep of the conference and Ed Holtcamp's 
one hitter against the same team in the play-off scr- 
ies. The scores were 6-0 and 7-0, respectively. 

The Admirals lost only to Cleveland Heights in a 
non-league game that had no bearing on the stand- 



ing, and to Shaw in the play-offs of the division and 
section. 

The starting line-up was made up of: Ray Giesse, 
right field; Neal Nelson, third base; Babe Lipovcc, 
center field; Dale Metts (C), second base; John 
Cox, first base; Frank Bergoch, short-stop; Fred 
Medvcd, catcher; Joe Bergoch, left field; Ed Holt- 
camp, pitcher. 

Other members of the squad were Frank Knaus, 
Bill Weir, Dave Buerkel, Art Bolon, Jack Shafcr, 
John Tarantino, Joe Roberts, and Rudy Kastclic. 
Dominic Disanto was manager. 

Of this winning combination Ray Giesse, Neal 
Nelson, John Cox, Frank Bergoch, Fred Medvcd, 
Ed Holtcamp, Bill Wier, Jack Shafer, and John 
Tarantino were back to form the nucleus for 1942. 
Joe Sullivan was elected manager for 1942. 





MR. POHTO 

Did you ever see a grown-up with a big jaw that looks like a tooth- 
ache while the Shore baseball team is practicing? This man is none 
other than John Pohto, Shore's baseball coach for the last twelve years. 

In Mr. Pohto's years at Shore he has been head or assistant coach in 
baseball, football and wrestling. Baseball is the sport he likes best of all. 
Shore has won the championship three times in the last five years. 
Before this Shore had won four championships and tied two. The Ad- 
mirals never have finished lower than second place. 

Some of the outstanding players that played under Mr. Pohto are 
Mel and Harvey Reibe, Herb Wagulemuth, Elmer Wemshneder, Joe 
Curto, Babe Lipovec, Art Brown, and Art Gezann. Harvey is now 
playing on the Detroit Tigers team. 

Page Fifty-nine 




EDWARD LANGA 



J. Sullivan 
W. Hill 



E. Holtcamp P. Medved 
F. Bergoch 



HARRY HUSTON 



ANDREW ZEIGLER 




JOHN KNIFIC 



RAYMOND GIESSE FRED MEDVED ROBERT CLASEN 



1942 SQUAD 



Page Sixty 










ft 




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- 



TOP ROW: Mr. Case, G. Burns, F. Gara L. Wiskes, 
W. Krivoy, E. Malz. 



BOTTOM ROW: T. Lasky, T. Burns, J. Knific, R. John- 
son, R. George, E. Simon, B. Youngblood, B. Schlund, 
J. Vickerman, D. Raybuck. 



Track 



Shore's 1941 track season was only fair. Of 
seven dual meets they won four and lost three. 

In the Eastern Greater Cleveland track cham- 
pionship which was held at Orange, Shore came in 
sixth. They had eleven and a half points. 

Reginald Johnson, a sophomore, came in fourth 



in the 880 yard run. Bob Odell, a senior, placed 
third for the lowest of Shore's trackmen in the high 
jump. 

Shore's freshman relay team looked like a prom- 
ising group of boys for varsity track by placing 
second in the Freshman Relay. 



Page Sixty-one 



feM 



(b fy £^ 




TOP ROW: D. Nowicki, E. Chance, M. L. Moore, E. 

Heyne, E. Adams, Y. Alexander, H. Noch, C. Harrell, 

J. Kuebler, P. Hayes. 
FIFTH ROW: J. Hawks, M. Healy, D. Perme, E. Winkler, 

L. Curto, A. Celezic, L. Berndsen, P. Zeroff. 
FOURTH ROW: J. Brinkman, B. Sanner, M. L. Haven, 

J. Fischer, B. Miller, D. J. Luikart. 



THIRD ROW: E. Funk, M. Ehrenfeld, M Kazmarek, 

D. Daye, A. Johnson. 
SECOND ROW: Miss Gill, R. Anderson, J. Town, 

F. Cook. 
BOTTOM ROW: J. Metz, Secy, C. Bill, President, 

B. Kuchenbacker, Vice-Pres. 



Women's Auxiliary Force 



Home defense! Physical fitness, a No. 1 factor 
for home defense is well promoted hy our women 
student directors of Physical Education. A restricted 
number, who are elected into the Girls' Leaders Club- 
each year, being qualified in leadership, character, 
physical ability, academic standing, dependability 

Page Sixty-two 



and personality receive one of the most coveted hon- 
ors awarded in the school. 

This year the organization has successfully di- 
rected a schedule of intramural athletics and super- 
vised the sale of United States Defense Stamps and 
Bonds for Shore. 

The club, under the able direction of Miss Gill, 
helps girls all over the school in all sports. 




Comments by Miss Gill 

CAROL BILL— "Billie," President 
of the Leaders Club brought rec- 
ognition to the school by win- 
ning a Physical Education Schol- 
arship at Oberlin. 

BELVA KUCHENBACKER 

We will miss "Cooky" and her 
"refereeing." 

BEATRICE MILLER— Now that 
"Bee 1 ' is gone we'll have to look 
for a new badminton champion. 

YVONNE ALEXANDER 
Yvonne always had a cheerful 
smile and was willing to work. 

ARLINE JOHNSON— Arline has 
been in the club three years and 
has helped the underclassmen get 
to the top. 

AGNES KNAPKE — "Aggie" 
keeps us well fed at our parties. 

ELIZABETH CHANCE - 

"Bucky" is another one of our 
capable members. 

LOIS BERNDSEN— Lois partici- 
pates in all intramural activities. 

PAULINE ZEROFF— "Polly" is 
always "ready, willing and able." 

ALICE CELEZIC— Alice will be 

remembered for her baseball abil- 
ity. 

HELEN NOCH— Helen is a loyal 
and conscientious new member. 

ELAINE ADAMS— Elaine is a 
new but helpful member. 

LUCILLE CURTO— "Lucy" too, 
instantly reminds us of baseball. 

EILEEN HEYNE— Eileen is good 
in both athletic and scholastic 
events. 



Page Sixty -three 



class or 



S\. /X. vi / 












YVONNE ALEXANDER 
JAMES ASHLEY 
CATHARINE BARRESI 
ART BOLON 
EDWARD CICENAS 



WALTER COKEN 
CONSTANCE COUPE 
LEONARD CRAFT 
HILDA HENRY 
JAMES HODGSON 



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ANNETTE IACOBACCI 
ARLINE JOHNSON 
FRED KRAUSS 
RICHARD KREILACH 
JOSEPH MEKINDA 
Page Sixty-six 




BEATRICE MILLER 
WILLIAM MITCHELL 
MARGARET PARZIALE 
JOSEPHINE PASSERALLO 
JEANETTE RUTLEDGE 








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LOIS STRAKA 


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HELEN WEYBRECHT 


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DARRELL WICKSON 


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ELAINE ADAMS 


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JOSEPHINE ARKO 


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JOSEPH BARILE 
ELEANOR BARINA 
JOSEPH BERGOCH 
LOIS BERNDSEN 
CAROL BILL 

Page Sixty-seven 




THEODORE BULLARD 
VIVIAN BURDICK 
MARVEL CANNON 
JANE CASSON 
ALICE MAY CELIZIC 

Page Sixty-eight 



ELIZABETH CHANCE 
ROBERT CLASEN 
DONN COBB 
JOHN COX 
LUCILLE CURTO 






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DOMINIC DI SANTO 
ALFRED DOBERDRUK 
GERTRUDE DOERING 
THERESA DRAGANIC 
GERTRUDE DRAUTZ 





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WILLIAM ETTENGER 
HENRY FALKENSTEIN 
RALPH GEORGE 
JAMES GIBBONS 

ANTHONY QOLE 

Page Sixty -nine 




HELEN GRICHER 
FRED HAWLEY 
PAUL HERRMANN 
JACK HEUSER 
EILEEN HEYNE 



HOWARD HILDERBRAND 
EDWARD HOLTCAMP 
JOYCE HORN 
HARRY HUSTON 
KATHRYN HUSTON 



Page Seventy 



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JAMES KELLY 
AGNES KNAPKE 
EMMA KORACIN 
WALLACE KRIVOY 
BELVA KUCHENBACKER 



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Rat 





PAUL LANG 
EDWARD LANGA 
GEORGE LARDNER 
THEODORE LASKY 
DOLORES LESH 

Page Seventy-one 




MARION LUEDERS 
PHYLLIS MALIN 
EDWARD MALZ 
WALTER MARONEY 
RAYMOND MATHEKE 

Page Seventy-two 



JEANNE McCANDLESS 
MARGARET McCARTHY 
PATRICIA McCLURG 
NORMA McKIMMY 
LORA MEAD 





BETTY JANE MERRITT 
HELEN MERRILLS 
LOUISE MEZZACAPFA 
VIOLET MIJACEK 
THEODORE MIZNER 



"^i*" 




ROBERT MONTGOMERY 
JANE MURRAY 
HOWARD NELSON 
RICHARD NETSCHKE 
FRED NEVAR 

Page Seventy-three 








JEAN NEWMAN 
HELEN NOCH 
ROSEMARY PARISI 
BETTY JANE PAULSEN 
MARILYN PERRY 

Page Seventy-four 





PHYLLIS PFEIFFER 
FRANCES PIERCE 
DON POWELL 
BETTY REICHE 
ANDREW RAPASKY 



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EDMUND RIDER 

TONY ROBERTS 
ELEANORE ROLOFF 
KENNETH ROOD 
WILLIAM RUSSELL 






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THEODORE SAD LER 

JACK SHAFER 
BETTY SCHLAEGER 
ROBERT SCHLUND 
MARTHA SILL 

Page Seventy -five 





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EARL SIMON 
FRANK SMALTZ 
ALVIN SUGARMAN 
MARY SULLIVAN 
BILL SYLVESTER 

Page Seventy-six 



LOUIS TOMSIC 
MARY TRIVISONNO 
JACK VICKERMAN 
JEAN WARWICK 
JOAN WATSON 






NOT PICTURED 



JEAN WATT 
ROBERT WIGHTMAN 
ALVIRA WILSON 
DOROTHY WINKLER 



rose pofek 

Wayne tiber 

harry leon 



DOROTHY WOLF 
AUDREY YOUNGMAN 

LEONARD ZDARA 

PAULINE ZEROFF 



Page Seventy-seven 



Ouuy Defense 

Jo <hk> cis Cl^xjcL 







SENIOR ACTIVITIES 



YVONNE ALEXANDER 

"The sunshine of her smile" 
Chorus 1, 2, 3; Class Officer 1, 4; Band 
2; Camera Club 2; G. L. C. 2, 3, 4; 
Noon Movies 2, 3, 4; Prom Committee 
3; Breeze Staff 3; G. A. C. 3, 4; Friend- 
ship 3, 4; National Honor Society 3, 4; 
Annual 3, 4; Student Council 4; An- 
nouncement Committee 4; Ad Commit- 
tee 4; Current Affairs 4. 

JAMES ASHLEY 
"Pretty Boy Ashley" 
Hi-Y 3. 

CATHARINE BARRESI 
"just depend on Katy" 
Chess Club 2. 3; Student Council 1; 
Senior Assembly 4. 

EDWARD CICENAS 
"The man on stilts" 
Student Council 4; Class Secretary. 4; 
Chorus 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Track 2; 
Banquet Committee 4. 

ART BOLON 

"Those dar\ brown eyes" 
Football 1, 2, (Captain) 4; Basketball 
1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1; Student Council 1; 
Breeze Staff 4: Hi-Y 4; Secretary and 
Treasurer (Class) 3; Vice-President 
(Class) 4; Baseball 4. 

WALTER COKEN 
"Remember me" 

CONSTANCE COUPE 

"Petite and evasive Connie" 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Breeze Staff 4; G. A. 
C. 2, 3, 4; Chorus 1; Noon Movies 3, 4. 

LEONARD CRAFT 

"Ambitious" 
Wrestling 1, 2, 3: Football 2; Chorus 1; 
Cheerleader 1; Hi-Y 2. 

HILDA HENRY 

"Give a cheer" 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Breeze Staff 2, 3; 
Chorus 1, 2, 3; Orchestra 1, 2; Cheer- 
leader 3, 4; Noon Movies 2, 3, 4; An- 
nual Staff 4; Ad Committee 3, 4. 

JAMES HODGSON 

"It's all right by me" 
Hi-Y 4; Wrestling 3; Movie Operator 

1, 2, 3, 4; Movie Club 1, 2. 

ANNETTE IACOBACCI 
"Straight from the heart" 
G. A. C. 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; Ban- 
quet Committee 4; Dancing Club 2, 3; 
Red Cross 4; Swing Club 1, 2. 

ARLINE JOHNSON 

"Strut on down" 
Friendship 3, 4; Band 4; G. A. C. 1, 

2, 3, 4; G. L. C. 3, 4; Noon Movies 2, 

3, 4; Annual 4; Camera Club 2; Na- 
tional'Honor Society 4; Chorus 1, 2, 3, 
4; Banquet Committee 4; Student Coun- 
cil 4. 



FRED KRAUSS 

'Busy man" 
Breeze Staff (Advertising Manager) 3, 
4; Ad Committee 1, 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 4; 
Annual Staff 3, 4; Chorus 3, 4; Con- 
servation Club 2, 3; Prom Committee 3. 

RICHARD KREILACH 

"The authority on Florida" 
Hockey 2, 3, 4; Football 2, 3, 4; Breeze 
Staff 3, 4; Class President 4. 

JOSEPH MEKINDA 

"We'll have fun at foe's" 
Wrestling 3; Breeze Staff 3, 4; Base- 
ball 4. 

BEATRICE MILLER 

"Badminton all the way" 
Ad Committee 2, 3, 4; Student Council 
4; G. A. C. 1, 2, 3, 4; G. L. C. 2, 3, 4: 
Friendship 3, 4; Noon Movies 3, 4; An- 
nual Staff 4; Breeze Staff 3; Red Cross 
3; Ring Committee 4; Prom Commit- 
tee 3. 

WILLIAM MITCHELL 

"He didn't have time" 
Hi-Y 4. 

MARGARET PARZIALE 

"She can do it" 
Breeze 4; G. A. C. 3, 4; Student Coun- 
cil 1. 

JOSEPHINE PASSERALLO 

"Very dependable" 
Student" Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Sr. Play 4; 
Prom Committee 3; Class Secretary and 
Treasurer 3; Class President 2; Chorus 
1, 2, 3; Friendship 2, 3; G. A. C. 4. 

ROSE POPEK 

"fust as\ Rose" 
G. A. C. 3. 

JEANETTE RUTLEDGE 

"Just a_ freckle jace" 
Breeze 4; Red Cross 4. 

LOIS STRAKA 

"N,arry a sound" 
Friendship 1, 2; Movie Club 1; Interior 
Decorating Club 2; G. A. C. 3; Red 
Cross 4. 

WAYNE TIBER 

"I'm a little Greyhound" 

HELEN WEYBRECHT 

"So sweet" 
Chorus 1, 2, 3; Friendship club 2, 3; 
Glee Club 3, 4. 

DARRELL WICKSON 

"Hi'ya chic\en" 
Hi-Y 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 
3 (All Conference) 4; Breeze 4; Class 
Secretary 2; Announcement Committee 
4. 

ELAINE ADAMS 

"A friend indeed" 
Girl Reserves 1; Friendship 2 ,3, 4; 
Student Council 3; Annual 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Debate 3; G. A. C. 2, 3, 
4; G. L. C. 4; Junior Play 3. 



JOSEPHINE ARKO 

"SJuiet as a mouse" 
Glee Club 2; Chorus 2. 

JOSEPH BARILE 

"The silent type" 
Wrestling 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 4: Breeze 4; 
Leaders Club 4. 

ELEANOR BARINA 

"fust a secretary at heart" 
Chorus 1, 3; G. A. C. 2, 3, 4; Dra- 
matics 3; Junior Play 3; Friendship 2, 
3, 4; Breeze 4; Annual 4. 

JOSEPH BERGOCH 

"Oh! that physique" 
Football 1 ,2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 4; 
Baseball 4; Hi-Y 3, (Treasurer) 4; 
Leaders Club 4. 

LOIS BERNDSEN 
"Rah! rah! rah'" 
Friendship 3, 4; Choir 4; G. A. C. 3, 
(president) 4; G. L. C. 3, 4; Glee Club 
I; Fencing 2; Modern Dance 3; Annual 
4; Junior Play 3; Prom Committee 3; 
Cheer Leader 3, 4; Quill and Scroll 4. 

CAROL BILL 

"Leader in sports" 
Friendship 2, 3, (Cabinet) 4; Glee Club 
2; G. A. C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Breeze 4; Annual 
4; G. L. C. 2, 3, (President) 4; Mod- 
ern Dance 3; Student Council 1; Prom 
Committee 3; Quill and Scroll 4. 

THEODORE BULLARD 

"Georgia on my mind" 
Football 1; Basketball 1, 4; Track 1, 3, 
4; Leaders Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Council 2, 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3. 

VIVIAN BURDICK 

'She'll give you that sweet tal\" 
Friendship 4; Chemistry Club 4. 

MARVEL CANNON 

"What an imagination" 
Girl Reserves 1; Friendship 4; Fencing 
2; Annual 4; Breeze 4; Foreign Affairs 
3; Quill and Scroll 4. 

JANE CASSON 

"Half of a good fight" 
Friendship 2, 3, (Secretary) 4; Student 
Council 4; Ad Committee 3, 4; Class 
Treasurer 3; Debate 3; Annual 4; junior 
Play 3: G. A. C. 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 4; 
National Honor Society 4; Forensic 
League 3, 4. 

ALICE MAY CELIZIC 

"A baseball teams delight" 
G. L. C. 4; Friendship 4. 

ELIZABETH CHANCE 

"Efficient to the end" 
Student Council 4; National Honor So- 
ciety 3, 4; Friendship 3, (Cabinet) 4; 
Cheer Leader 4; G. A. C. 3, 4; G. L. C. 
3, 4; Fencing 2; Prom Committee 3; 
Junior Play 3; Art Club 2; Class Secre- 
tary 3. 

ROBERT CLASEN 

"We all loo\ twice" 
Baseball 3; Hockey 4. 



Pas.e Seventy-nine 



DONN COBB 

"Candid fiend" 
Science Club 1; Radio Club 3, (Pres- 
ident) 4; Junior Play 3; Debate 3, 4; 
Chorus 3, 4. 

JOHN COX 

"Twin\le^ twinkle little star" 
Football. 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Hockey 1, l^X 4; Hi-Y 3, (Secretary) 
4; Prom Committee 3; Breeze 3 ,4. 

LUCILLE CURTO 

"Straight and true" 
Friendship 4; G. L. C. 4; G. A. C. 

1, 2, 3, 4. 

DOMINIC DI SANTO 

"Li\ed by all" 
Student Council 2, 4; Hi-Y 3, 4; Foot- 
ball 1. 2, 3, 4; Baseball (manager) 3; 
Basketball (manager) 3, 4; Breeze 4; 
Annual 4; Junior Play 3; Class Vice- 
President 4; Quill and Scroll 4. 

ALFRED DOBERDRUK 

"You \now what I mean" 
Hi-Y 4; Hockey (co-manager) 4; Scale 
and Triangle Club 3. ' 

GERTRUDE DOERING 

"Leaving before time" 
Friendship 2; Glee Club 2, 3; Chorus 

2, 3, 4. 

THERESA DRAGANIC 

"Champion in all sports" 
Glee Club 1; G. A. C. 1. 

GERTRUDE DRAUTZ 

"Strives for perfection" 
Student Council 1; Friendship 2 ,3, 4: 
G. A. C. 2, 4; Breeze 4; Annual 4; 
Junior Play 3; Prom Committee 4; Best 
Citizen 4; Quill and Scroll 4. 

WILLIAM ETTENGER 

"Swing that sax" 
Band 1, 2; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Hi-Y 4; 
Gym Leaders 1, 4; Football 3; Golf 3; 
Prom Committee 3. 

HENRY FALKENSTEIN 

"Beat me daddy 1 ." 
Hi-Y 4; Scale and Triangle 2; Junior 
Play 3; Prom Committee 3; Sen'or Play 
4. 

ANTHONY GOLE 

"Oh! that loo\" 
Class Vice-President 1; Basketball 2; 
Student Council 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; 
Football 3; Ad Committee 4; Annual 
4; National Honor Society 3, 4; Junior 
Play 3; Foreign Affairs 3, 4; Math Club 
(President) 4. 

HELEN GRICHER 

"What will you have" 

FREDRICH HAWLEY 

"May I par\ your car?" 
Hi-Y 3, 4; Wrestling 3, 4; Track 4; 
Leaders 4. 

PAUL HERRMANN 

"The other half of a good fight" 
Football 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 
3, 4; Tennis 2, 4; Annual 4; Student 
Council 3; Prom Committee 3. 



JACK HEUSER 

"Handsome is as handsome does" 
Hi-Y 3, (President) 4; Class Vice- 
President 2; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Base- 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 1; 
Prom Committee 3. 

EILEEN HEYNE 

"Do you need any help?" 
Friendship 3, 4; G. L. C. 4; G. A. C. 1, 

2, 3, 4; Annual 4; Breeze 4; Chorus 1, 

3, 4; Fencing 1; Junior Play 3; Madri- 
gals 4; Quill and Scroll 4; National 
Honor Society 4; Salutatorian 4; Sen- 
ior Play 4. 

HOWARD HILDEBRAND 

"He always says the wrong thing" 
Debate 3; Junior Play 3; Foreign Af- 
fairs Club 4; Hockey 4; Senior Play 4. 

EDWARD HOLTCAMP 

"Laugh and live" 
Hi-Y 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 
1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 3; Class 
President 3, 4; Breeze 3, 4; Annual 4; 
Prom Committee (Chairman) 3; Track 
1; Quill and Scroll 3, 4. 

JOYCE HORN 

"^ueen.of ^nou>!edge" 
Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Ad Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Debate 3; Glee Club 4; 
Friendship 4; Breeze 4; Annual 4; Na- 
tional Honor Society 4; Valedictorian 
4. 

HARRY HUSTON 

"A man of few words" 
Baseball 4. 

KATHRYN HUSTON 

"Quiet but sweet" 
Friendship 4; Antique Club 2, 4. 

JAMES KELLY 

"N.o one doubts his competence" 
Hockey 3, 4; Junior Play 3; Debate 4; 
Foreign Affairs Club 3;" Chemistry Club 
4; Hi-Y 4; Forensic League 4; Senior 
Play 4; Annual 4. 

AGNES KNAPKE 

"fust a ray of sunshine" 
Friendship 2, 3, (Cabinet) 4; G. L. C. 
3, 4; G. A. C. 2, 3, (Vice-President) 4; 
Drama 3; Breeze 4; Annual 4; Ad 
Committee 3, 4; Junior Play 3; Senior 
Play 4; Quill and Scroll 4. 

EMMA KORACIN 

"A charming redhead" 
Friendship 4; Glee Club 1; G. A. C. 2, 
3; Quill and Scroll 4; Noon Movies 4. 

WALLACE KRIVOY 

"just a little bus boy" 
Track 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 4; Camera 3; Junior 
Play 3; Scale and Triangle 2. 

BELVA KUCHENBACKER 

"A tailored Miss" 
Breeze 4; Chorus 3; Band 1, 2; Student 
Council 1, 2; Friendship 2 ,3, 4; An- 
nual 4; Junior Play 3; G. L. C. 2, 3, 4; 
G. A. C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 3; 
Prom Committee 3. 



PAUL LANG 

"I li\e mine straight" 
Hi-Y 4; Ad Committee 3, 4; Chorus 1. 
2, 3, 4. 

EDWARD LANGA 

"One of Vac's falling stars" 
Hi-Y 4; Hockey 2, 3, 4; Scale and 
Triangle 2. 

THEODORE LASKY 

"A flash on the trac\" 
Track 3, 4; Chorus 2; Printing 3, 4. 

HARRY LEON 

"Drummer man" 
Junior Play 3; Prom Committee 3. 

DOLORES LESH 

"Ta\e a letter Miss Lesh" 
Friendship 2, 4; Annual 4; Antique 4; 
Current Affairs 4. 

MARION LUEDERS 
"Queen of beauty" 
Drama 3; Modern Dance 3; Annual 4; 
Friendship 4; Prom Committee 3; May 
Queen 3; Football Queen 4. 

PHYLLIS MALIN 

"Have you heard this one" 
Girl Reserves 1; First-Aid 2, 3; Chorus 
1; Band 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Junior 
Play 3; Breeze 1, (Co-Editor) 4; Quill 
and Scroll 4. 

EDWARD MALZ 

"He things of everything" 
Hi-Y 3, 4; Football 3, 4; Track (Man- 
ager) 3; Boxing and Wrestling Club 
L 2 

WALTER MARONEY 
"Where's the boys?" 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 3, (Presi- 
dent) 4; Annual 4; Prom Committee 3; 
Baseball 4. 

RAYMOND MATHEKE 

"Stri\e! a perfect three hundred" 
Printing 3. 

JEANNE McCANDLESS 

"Independence leads her" 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 3; 
Chorus 2, 3; Breeze 4; First-Aid 3; 
Prom Committee 3. 

MARGARET McCARTHY 

"Hey Junior" 
G. A. C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Friendship 1, 2, 3, 
4; Breeze 3, (Co-Editor) 4; Chorus 3; 
Band 1, 2; Student Council 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Modern Dance 3; Quill 
and Scroll 4. 

PATRICIA McCLURG 

'"Watch the Ford go by" 
Friendship 1, 2, 3, 4; G. A. C. 1, 2, 
3, 4; Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama 3; An- 
nual 4. 

NORMA McKIMMY 

"just trust me" 
Glee Club 1, 3; Chorus 2; Friendship 
3, 4; Red Cross 4; Knitting Club 1; 
Bicycle Club 2. 

LORA MEAD 

"How yo' all?" 
Friendship 4; Quill and Scroll 4. 



Page Eighty 



ALBERT MEDVED 

"He speeds right along" 
Track 3. 

HELEN MERRILLS 
"Just a swell pal" 
Friendship 3; G. A. C. 3, 4. 

BETTY JANE MERRITT 
"Third finger left hand" 
Glee Club 1, 4; Chorus 2; Friendship 
3, 4; Red Cross 4; Knitting Club 1: 
Bicycle Club 2. 

LOUISE MEZZACAPPA 

"Willing to oblige" 
Glee Club 1; Friendship 2 3 4- G A 
C. 3. 

VIOLET MIJACEK 

"If it's capability you're looking for" 
Radio Club 1; Class Vice-President 1; 
First Aid 3; Friendship Club 3 4- G 
A. C. 2, 3; Glee Club 1; Chorus 2. 

THEODORE MIZNER 

"Keep your eyes on the road, Red" 
Band 1, 2. 

ROBERT MONTGOMERY 

"One of the best" 
Movie Club 2; Conservation Club 3 
Hi-Y 4; Track 3. 

JANE MURRAY 

"The meeting will please come to 
order" 
Friendship 2, (Secretary) 3, (President) 
4: Student Council 3, (President) 4; 
Ad Committee 3, 4; G. A. C. 3, 4; Glee 
Club 3; National Honor Society 3, 4; 
Prom Committee 3; Debate 3; Forensic 
League 3, 4; Senior Play 4. 

HOWARD NELSON 

"Hey Freshie" 
Class President 2; Wrestling 2- Hockey 
2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 3, (Vice-President) 4; 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 2; 
Band and Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 
2; Senior Play 4. 

RICHARD NETSCHKE 

"Live and let live" 
Hi-Y 3, 4; Student Council 4; Annual 
4; Prom Committee 3; Track 4. 

FRED NEVAR 

"Singing in the showej" 
Hi-Y 4; Student Council 4; Basketball 
2, 3 (Manager) 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; 
Annual 4; Ad Committee 4; Math Club 
(Vice-President) 4; Foreign Affairs 4; 
National Honor Society 4. 

JEAN NEWMAN 

"jitterbug deluxe" 
Friendship 3, 4; G. A. C. 3, 4; Annual 
4; Prom Committee 3; Modern Dance 
3. 

HELEN NOCH 

"She's in everything" 
Friendship 3, 4; Drama 3; G. L. C. 4; 
Student Council 1; First Aid 3; Prom 
Committee 3; Junior Play 3; National 
Honor Society 4; Glee Club 1, 2; G. A. 
C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Breeze 4; Annual 4; De' 
bate 3; Quill and Scroll 4. 

ROSEMARY PARISI 

"That uunning way" 
Friendship 2; G. A. C. 1. 



BETTY JANE PAULSEN 

It's the gypsy in her" 
Band 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 2, 3 4- Glee 
Club 4. 

PHYLLIS PFEIFFER 

"Seated one day at the oraan" 
G. A. C. 4. 

MARILYN PERRY 

"Types with the best of them" 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Red 
Cross 4; Handicraft Club 2. 

FRANCES PIERCE 

"Smile a while" 
Friendship 3; Antique Club 2. 3. 

DON POWELL 

"Roll out the barrels" 
Hi-Y 3, 4; Chorus 3; Prom Committee 

ANDREW REPASKY 

"Lady \iiler" 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 4- Base- 
ball 3; Track 4. 

EDMUND RIDER 
"Reverend Rider" 
Hi-Y 3, 4; Foreign Affairs 3; Football 
(Manager) 4; S. M. C. 4; Band 3, 4. 

TONY ROBERTS 

"Flying high" 
Movie Operator 3, 4; Leaders Club 2. 

ELEANORE ROLOFF 

"There's music in her laugh" 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Chorus 2, 3- Glee 
Club 2, 3. 

KENNETH ROOD 
"A grand fellow" 
Band 1, 2; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Hi-Y 4. 

WILLIAM RUSSELL 

'Aye, aye Admiral" 
Hi-Y 4; Student Council 1, 2; Basket- 
ball 4. 

THEODORE SADLER 

"Ship ahoy" 
National Honor Society 3; Band 3- 
Orchestra 2; Photography Club 1; Prom 
Committee 3; Automobile Club 2. 

BETTY SCHLAEGER 

Witty and winsome" 
G. A. C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorus 1. 

ROBERT SCHLUND 

"Wanted: wings" 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 1, 3- Print- 
ing 2, 3. 

GEORGE SCHMITT 

"Shoulders back, chest out" 
MARTHA SILL 

"In her own quiet way" 
Orchestra 1; Glee Club 1, 2; Friend- 
ship 3, 4; Girl Reserves 1, 2; Red 
Cross 4; Senior Choir 3 4 
EARL SIMON 

"Henry Aldnch forever" 
Track 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Junior Play 3- 
Debate 4; Senior Play 4 
FRANK SMALTZ 

"Silent sincerity" 
ALVIN SUGARMAN 

"This time the laugh's on me" 
Wrestling 3, 4; Hi-Y 4; Tennis 2; Band 
1, 2; Orchestra 1, 2. 



MARY SULLIVAN 

"That certain indefinable charm" 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 2, 
(Vice-President) 3; G. A. C. 1, 2, 3 4- 
Prom Committee 3; Junior 'Pl'ay' 3- 
Chorus 1, 3; Breeze 3, 4; Class Secre- 
tary 1,3; May Queen 2. 

BILL SYLVESTER 

"Laugh and the world laughs with 
you" 
Tennis 2, 3; Prom Committee 3- Movie 
Booth 3, 4; All Sports Club 2; Hi-Y 4. 

LOUIS TOMSIC 

"Dizzy fingers" 
Printing 3; Chess Club 2. 

MARY TRIVISONNO 

"Vagabond lover" 
Chorus 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2- Friend- 
ship 2, 3, 4; G. A. C. 3, 4; Breeze 4. 

JACK VICKERMAN 

"Stop, loo\ and listen" 
Track 3, 4; Hi-Y 3, 4; Junior Play 3- 
Camera Club 1; Chorus 3, 4- Hockey 4- 
Fencing 2; Basketball 3. 

JEAN WARWICK 

"Posture wins again" 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Junior Play 3; G A 
C. 3, 4; Chorus 3, 4; Breeze 4; Annual 
4; Red Cross 3, 4; Quill and Scroll 4. 

JOAN WATSON 

"Competent my dear Watson" 
Friendship 2, 3. 

JEAN WATT 

"Jeannie with the light brown ha<r" 
Breeze 1; Friendship 4; Whirlo Club 1; 
Glee Club 1; Chorus 1. 

ROBERT WIGHTMAN 

"What goes on behind those eyes ? " 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 4; Student 
Council 1. 

ALVIRA WILSON 

"A charming, timid Miss" 
Friendship 4; Red Cross 4. 

DOROTHY WINKLER 

"Not a care in the world" 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Red Cross 4; G. A. 
C. 4; Annual 4. 

DOROTHY WOLF 

"Happy as they come" 
Friendship 2; Chorus 2. 

AUDREY YOUNGMAN 
"Personification of ease" 
Friendship 2, 3, 4; Chorus 2, 3, 4 ; 
Class Treasurer 4; Annual 4. 

LEONARD ZDARA 

"Dance to your heart's content" 
Hi-Y 3, 4; Student Council 1, 2- Jun- 
ior Play 3; Annual 4; Quill and Scroll 
4; Senior Play 4. 

PAULINE ZEROFF 

"Captain my captain" 
Modern Dance 3; Friendship 3 4- 
G L. C, 3, 4; G. A. C. 3, 4; Annual 
(tditor) 4; Student Council 3 (Vice- 
President) 4; Breeze 3; Prom Commit- 
tee 3; Quill and Scroll 4; National 
Honor Society 4; Junior Play 3: Senior 
Play 4. 



Page Eighty-one 








W. Maroney. D. Netschke, F. Ncvar, E. Holtcamp, 
D. DiSanto. 
THIRD ROW: Mr. Farquhar, Y. Alexander. D. Winkler, 
A. Youngman, D, Lesh, P. McClurg, B. Kuchenbacker, 
J. Newman, J. Murray, E. Adams, J. Horn, Mr. Angene. 



SECOND ROW: P. Malm, M. Cannon, G. Drautz, 
E. Banna, B. Miller, H. Henry, A. Johnson, L. Berndsen, 
B. Rciche. 

BOTTOM ROW: H. Noch, C. Bill, J. Warwick, P. Zer- 
off, editor, E. Heyne, J. Casson, Bus. Mgr., M. Lucders. 



If you have turned all the pages through to this 
point, you have seen the editorial section of the 
1942 Canteen. And now that you have seen it, there 
seems only one thing left for us of the staff to say 
—we hope you like it. Some of you do not, of 
course, but we will try to swallow our pride and 
smile. 

Both fun and headaches are essential parts of any 
yearbook's construction; the Canteen is no excep- 
tion. The editor desperately hopes to be handed a 



diploma June 10 and wearily hopes you who have 
complaints will postpone their delivery until June 
11. 

In conclusion, the editor would like to express 
her appreciation and thanks to all those staff mem- 
bers who worked with her; to faculty advisor Mr. 
Lester Angene for his guidance; to Mr. Hinch, 
Mr. Vaughn, and Mr. Farquhar for their splendid 
cooperation; and to all students and faculty who 
aided the staff in the publication of this book. 



Page Eighty -two 



CANTEEN BOOSTERS 



J. V. Sanner 

H. T. Florence 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Drautz 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Heuser 

A friend 

Dr. and Mrs. H. A. Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hanks 

Mr. and Mrs. Hooker 

Dr. and Mrs. Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Smith 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles Bost 

Shore Beverage Co. 

Mr. and Mrs. Middleton 

Mr. and Mrs. Ettenger 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwine 

Mr. and Mrs. Neitin 

Dr. P. O. Mayer 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Casson 

Dr. and Mrs. Wise 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Shebanek 

Beachland Bakery 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Sugarman 

Mr. and Mrs. C. DiSanto 

Mr. Daniel Maroney 

Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Clason 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cox 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Nevar 



Mr. and Mrs. A. Noch 
Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Knapke 
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Rood 
Mr. and Mrs. Carmen Bill 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Murray 
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hildebrand 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Mijacek 
Euclid Quality Meat Market 
Methodist Youth Fellowship of 

East Shore Methodist Church 
Mrs. F. G. Gabriel 
Neil Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Rose 
Miss Belva Jejtn Kuchenbacker 
Miss Cornelia A. Kuchenbaeker 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Horn 
Marie Heyne 
Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Rider 
Mr. and Mrs. Watt 
Shore Dairy Grill 
Mr. and Mrs. Morella 
Mrs. A. Weber 
Keith Hulsman 
Mr. Darrell Wickson 
Mr. Justin J. McCarth 
Mr. William Weir 
Mrs. John M. Hahn 
William Grossman 
Mrs. C. F. Schreiber 
Mr. A. J. Straka 



L 



rage Eighty-three 



We, the business staff, 
would at this time like to 
express our sincere thanks 
and appreciation to the ad- 
vertisers and boosters in 
helping to make this book 
into what we feel is a suc- 
cess. 



Page Eighty- jour 






FOR GOOD SERVICE 

SEE 



13608 St. Clair Avenue 



a jyj 


CU L 


U tt i 


b 


/ 






i 

MU. 4000 











Congratulations to the 1942 Class 

Lion Variety Store 



R. L. CHRISTIE 



i.— 



C. ANDRONICO 

SHOE REPAIR 

21900 Lake Shore Blvd. 

"Use your shoes and save your tires" 

When we repair them — they look like new 






Wickliffe Lumber Co. 

LLOYD ROAD 

"Tell Us When and Where . . . 
We'll Be There" 

Your Country Cousin KE. 0624 

HARLEY L. CLARKE 












WILDWOOD FLORAL 



17750 Lake Shore Blvd. 
IV. 3215 



ORCHIDS 



Certainly! 






Page Eighty-jive 



King Cole Drive In 



17901 Lake Shore Blvd. 

Where Friends Meet" 






r-- - ....... 






Moss Point Hardware 

Sherwin Williams Paints 

Lawn and Garden Seeds 

Fertilizer and Tools 

Plumbing and Heating Supplies 



22030 Lake Shore Blvd. 



IV. 2757 






Robert S. Jameson 

REALTOR 

"Keeper of the Keys" 






Main Office 
18950 Lake Shore 
KE. 3164 



Branch Office 

21272 Lake Shore 

KE. 3166 



Herff- Jones Company 

Designers and Manufacturers of School 
and College Class Rings and Pins. 

Graduation Announcements, 
Medals and Trophies 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Representative, Virgil Wire 



IVANHOE 6868 We Telegraph to 

All Parts of the Country 

Lake Shore Florist 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
18322 Lake Shore Blvd Cleveland, O. 



Compliments of the 

HILLWOOD MFG 
COMPANY 















RECORDS 

BLUEBIRD - DECCA - VICTOR 

COLUMBIA - OKEH 

— AT — 

Herb Fitzgerald's 



RADIO SHOP 



635 E. 185 



KE. 1313 



Paramount Finance 
Company 

Auto Financing Personal Loans 

Thos. B. Roope, Manager 
6014 Euclid Avenue KE. 4340 






Page Eighty-six 



TOWN 
CLEANERS 

ODORLESS CLEANING 



Same Day Service in Euclid 

Garments Insured 
Against Fire and Theft 

Same Location Since 1912 

8523 Hough Avenue 
Ga. 2613 



• » — — --- T 



C L E T R A C 
CRAWLER 

TRACTORS 

Another Euclid Industry 

The Cleveland Tractor Co. 

19300 Euclid Ave. 






"Service With a Smile" 

EUCLID DAIRY CO. 



515 East 200 St. 



KE. 0515 






f ».««.! 


Cc 


>mpliments 








of a 






F 


R 


I E 


N 


D 



I 






RILL'S CLOTHIERS 

EVERYTHING FOR MEN 
AND YOUNG MEN 



TWO STORES 
618 E. 185 — St. Clair Ave. at 152nd St. 



Compliments of 

The Continental Products Co. 

Euclid, Ohio 
"Paint Manufacturers" 



Page Eightvseven 



»^»<» T -»« 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE EUCLID CRANE AND HOIST CO. 

EUCLID, OHIO 



Manufacturers of 

Electric and Hand Power Overhead and Traveling Cranes 

Electric Hoists and Trolleys 

Miscellaneous Hoisting and Conveying Machinery 






The 

EUCLID 

NEWS -JOURNAL 






S T U R M'S 
MARKET 



KE. 1881 



678 E. 185 St. 



Compliments 

of the 

AUSTIN COMPANY 






Page Eighty-eight 



The WRIGHT STORE 

696 East 185th St. 

Dry Goods — Furnishings — Shoes 

"It's Wright to be Thrifty" 









THE EUCLID 

ELECTRIC AND 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY 






Compliments 

B R D E N 

CONSTRUCTION CO. 



l~ 






Subsidiary of 
The Wean Engineering Co. 

Warren, Ohio 
22800 Lakeland Blvd. 






MANNER'S DRIVE IN 

CHICKEN ON THE ROUGH 



Always the place to go 
After a dance or show\ 



f~— —»—«»— —~« 






Compliments of the 

Dille Road Lumber 
Company 



1420 Dille Road 



KE. 0592 









BRAWN'S 

Confectionary & Dairy Store 



Ice Cream — Sodas — Sundaes 

High Grade Candies and Pastries 

22078 Lake Shore Blvd. IV. 1033 






TUCKER SHOES 



QUALITY SHOES — Expertly Fitted 

For dress or sport, always newest styles 

Fitted by X-Ray 






~~* 



Page Eighty-nine 



r------ 






PREPARED TO SERVE ANY BUSINESS 
... ANY ORGANIZATION 



Today, the watchword in business as well as government is pre- 
paredness ... to be so equipped in methods, machines, and man 
power as to meet every emergency that may arise. 

Just as a business should prepare to carry on successfully under 
changing world conditions, so graduates should continue their 
training. They should strive to gain knowledge by continued study 
and practical experience in office procedures. 

A working knowledge of Addressograph-Multigraph methods that 
bring better and more economical results from work necessary in 
every office, is a distinct advantage to young men and women just 
starting their business careers. It helps them obtain employment 
more easily because of the increased value of their services. 

ADDRESSOGRAPH-MULTIGRAPH CORP. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Sales Agencies in Principal Cities 






Page J^inety 



r-»« 



Compliments of 

THE TAYLOR AND 

BOGGIS FOUNDRY 

COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 
Light Grey Iron Castings 

1261 Babbitt Road Euclid, Ohio 



Nottingham Dry Cleaning 
Company 

ODORLESS CLEANING 

We own and operate our own Plant 
PRESSING - - - REPAIRING 



REMODELING 

18127 St. Clair Avenue 

We Call For and Deliver 



"Service is our Motto' 



Ke. 0595 



■~»~-—T 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

SHORE BOWL 
Shore Drive-in 

"Ohio's Finest Bowling Lanes" 

— AND — 

The Place to Meet the Gang for 

"Shore" Good Food 

22400 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, Ohio 







C O M P 


L I M E N T S 




O F 


THE 


SHORE 


P. 


T. A. 



7 



Congratulations 
To The Class of 1942 



CROCKETT 
CLEANERS 



22490 Lake Shore Blvd. 



KE. 6630 



'You'll Like Our Service' 






Page 'Ninety-one 



SEYWERT'S 

SERVICE STATIONS 



D 



Lake Shore Blvd at East 222 St. KE. 9779 



Lakeland Blvd. at Babbitt Rd. IV. 9578 



.---■ 



'It is Better to Know Us and Not 

Need Us Than to Need Us 

and Not Know Us." 

Silas F. Richards 



• -*&/&*» 



KE. 2900 



Cor. Huntmere Ave. 
15230 Lake Shore Blvd. 



Nottingham Hardware Co. 

PAINT — GLASS — BRUSHES 
Electrical and Plumbing Supplies 

18707 St. Clair Avenue 
IV. 0665 We Deliver 






EDDIE'S SERVICE 
STATION 



Texaco Gasoline 



A R K O'S 
RESTAURANT 

1170 Babbitt Road 
Euclid,Ohio 






Floyd B. Siein, Inc. 

"Our Coal Makes Warm Friends" 

Babbitt Road at Nickel Plate 
Euclid, Ohio 



Pace. NinetV'two 



Smith's Restaurant and Barbecue, Inc. 

"Good Food is Good Health" 



LUNCHEONS - - DINNERS 

ACCOMMODATIONS for PRIVATE PARTIES 

22305 Lake Shore Blvd. KE - 2792 

JOHN VIDRICK JOHN POLSON 



?— — 



All Types of Small Appliances 

Glenmont Home App. Co. 

21946 Lake Shore Boulevard 
KE. 5566 Euclid, Ohio 

Radios, Ranges, Ironers, Refrigerators, 
> and Washing* Machines 



The BLISS ROAD COAL 
AND SUPPLY CO. 

"We Also Carry Cement Blocks" 
22290 Lakeland Blvd KE. 0808 



St. Clair Coal and Supply Co. 



Building Material and Coal 

20300 St. Clair Ave. Cleveland, O. 

KE. 6000 



1 






r~— > 



The School on the Square 



Wilcox College of Commerce 
R. N. WILCOX, President MA. 2425 



Page l<[inety -three 



THE FRIENDSHIP CLUB 

...CODE... 

"AS A GIRL RESERVE I WILL TRY TO BE: 
veracious in manner 
1 mpartial in judgment 
K.eady for service 
Loyal to friends 

Reaching toward the best 
L arnest in purpose 
^ eeing the beautiful 
L ager for knowledge 
K. evereni to God 
V ictorious over self 
fc ver dependable 
^ incere at all times." 
PURPOSE: "TO FIND AND GIVE THE BEST" 






AUTHORIZED DEALERS for 

BULOVA 



CONVENIENT 
BUDGET TERMS 

No Extra Charge 



GRUEN 

ELGIN 

WESTFIELD 

and 
HAMILTON 
WATCHES 



ELWITT JEWELRY CO. 

690 East 185th Street 



— «Ml 



Compliments of 



A. S. C. 






Moss Point Cleaners 

Tailors and Furriers 

Established 11 Years 

Phone KE. 0719 
22044 Lake Shore Blvd. 



M. C. SMITH 

BUILDER OF QUALITY 



Ke. 

81 



2436 
East 216th St. 



Euclid, Ohio 



Pdge 7s[metyfonr 



THE 



PARADE 



STUDIOS 












Self-Powered Hauling Equipment 
For Earth, Rock, Coal, Ore 




uMCttSb 



The EUCLID ROAD MACHINERY CO. 



1361 Chardon Rd. 



Euclid, Ohio 



Page T^inety-five 



GREAT LAKES LITHOGRAPH COMPANY 

HIGH GRADE COLOR 

LITHOGRAPHING 

SPECIALIZING IN 

FOLDERS — CATALOGUES — BROADSIDES 
MAILING PIECES — LABELS, ETC. 

Exceptionally Fine Halftone Work 



REASONABLE PRICES 
112 HAMILTON AVENUE 



ESTIMATES GLADLY FURNISHED 

CH 5020 



Page Ninety -six 




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Mr. & Mrs. Edward Chukayne 
934 East 250 Street 
Euclid, OH 44132