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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 

;"36 - 



DIVISION OF REVIEW 



EVIDENCE STUDY 
NO. 12 

OF 



THE FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS MANUFACTURING AND 
METAL FINISHING AND METAL COATING INDUSTRY 



Preparad by 
TRISTRAM J. CAMPBELL 



JULY, 1935 



PRELIMINARY DRAFT 
(NOT FOR RELEASE: FOR USE TN DIVISION ONLY) 



TIIE EVIDEl'ICE STTOY SERIES 

The EVIDEl'ICE STUDIES nere orifiinally nlanned as a r.enns of gathering 
evidence bearing- upon various legal issues v.'hich arose under the National 
Industrial Recovery Act. 

These studies have value quite aside froni the use for which they were 
originally intended. Accordingly, they are no'.v made available for confidential 
use within the Division of Reviei.?, and for inclusion in Code Histories, 

The full list of the Evidence Studies is as follows; 



1. Automobile Manufacturing Ind, 

2. Boot and Shoe Mfg. Ind. 

3. Bottled Soft Drink Ind. 

4. Builders' Supplies Ind. 

5. Chemical Mfg. Ind. 

6. Cigar Mfg. Industry 

7. Construction Industry 

8. Cotton Garment Industry 

9. Dress Mfg. Ind. 

10. Electrical Contracting Ind, 

11. Electrical Mfg. Ind. 

12. Fab, Metal Prod, Mfg., etc. 

13. Fishery Industry 

14. Furniture Mfg. Ind, 

15. General Contractors Ind. 

16. Graphic Arts Ind. 

17. Gray Iron Fotmdry Ind. 

18. Hosiery Ind, 

19. Infant's & Children's V/ear Ind. 

20. Iron and Steal Ind. 

21. Leather 

22. Lumber & Timber Prod. Ind. 



23. 

24. 
25, 
2c , 
27. 
28, 
29. 
<i*0 • 
31. 
32. 
33. 
o4. 



37. 

38. 
33, 
40, 
41. 
42. 
43. 



Mason Contractors Industry 

Men's Clothing Industry 

Motion Picture Industry 

Motor Bus Mfg. Industry (Dropped) 

needlework Ind. of Puerto Rico 

Painting ?c Paperhanging '& Decorating 

photo Engraving Industry 

plunbing Contracting Industry 

Retail Pood (See No. 42) 

Retail Lumber Industry 

Retail Solid Fuel (Dropped) 

Retail Trade Industry 

Ri-.bber Mfg, Ind. 

Ruboer Tire Mfg. Ind. 

Silk Textile ind. 

Structural Clay Products Ind, 

Thro'.7ing Industry 

Trucking Industry 

Waste Materials Ind. 

Wholesa-le & Retail Food Ind, (See No. 

Tfinolesale Fresh Fruit & Veg. 3l) 



In addition to the studies brought to completion, certain materials have 
been assembled for other industries. These MATERIALS are included in the series 
and are also made available for confidential use within the Division of Review 
and for inclusion in Code Histories, as follows; 



44. Wool Textile Industry 

45. Automotive Parts & Equip, Ind, 

46. Baking Industry 

47. Canning Industry 
43. Coat and Suit Ind, 



43. 
50, 
51. 

53, 



Household Goods & Storage, etc. (Drop-' 
Motor Vehicle Retailing Trade Ind, ped) 
Retail/ Tire 4 Battery Trade Ind. 
Shi-p & Boat Bldg. & Repairing Ind. 
Wholesaling or Distributing Trade 



L. C. Marshall 
Director, Division of Review 



o^^^l (A^l» 



COHTEIITS 

Pg-se 

ForeT'ord 1 

CHAPTE^a I - TKS KATlUffi OF Tllb IimUSTxlY 2 

Size of the Industry 2 

Geographical Distribution 2 

iltunber of States in Wiich Specified Concerns Operate ...» 3 

C:voit8l Inveistnent 3 

Failures and FiuaJicial Conaitions 4 

Volume of Sales and Productive Ca'oacity 4 

CoHpeting Products S 

Market for the Industry* c products 3 

CHAPTER II - LA30E STATISTICS ? 

11-Uj.iber of Wage Earners ;and Total Wages 7 

Actual Hourly Earnings S 

Hours of Labor 9 

Actual Weekly Earninf^iG 10 

"Heal" Earnings 10 

i.iiscella:-ieous H 

Effects of the Code on Lahor 13 

Employees and Wages oy States 13 

Wc-ii-es Conpared vith Total Vrilue of Product 13 

Labor Complaints 14 

CHAP'TER III - IIATERIJUjS: RAW AM) SEMI -PROCESSED 15 

Princiiial Materials 1|^ 

Source of Materia-ls and Equipment 15 

Co?t of Materials Compared r.-ith Total V' lue of Product .. 15 

CHAPTER IV - PRODUCTIOU AilD DISTHIBUTIOlT 16 

Advertising 16 

CHAPTER V - TRADE PRACTICES 1'^ 

CHAPTER VI - GEIEBAL IHFOm-ATIClI IS 

. llethod of Transportation Used 13 

Trade Association Activity 1^ 

Relationr.hip hetv/'O^on Labor and Management 13 

Trade Union Activity , 1^ 

Effect of the Code on the Industry 13 

Use of Trade Marks 13 

Foreign Competition 19 

List of Erqperts •l^ 

SOURCE ^ 

APPEHDIX 21 

8314 -i^ 



TADLE 


I 


TA£LE 


II 


TA2LE 


III 


TA£L7. 


IV 


TASLE 


V 


TA3LB 


TI 



TASLS VII - 



TAILE VIII - 



TABLE 
TABLE 

TABLE 

TABLE 
TAJBLE 

ta:ble 

TABLE 
TABLE 



IX 



-XI - 

XXI - 
XIII ~ 

XIV - 
T'll - 



TABLES 

ITura-oer of Concerns, 19'"'8-1933 2 

Total mimber of Concerns oy States, 1935 2 

81 Concerns Classified According to the Ntunter 

of States in Which They Had Plants, 1934 .... 3 

Carjital Investment, 1929, 1931, 1933 3 

Fixed Assets of 166 Companies, 1929, 1932, 1933 . ,4 

ProductiTC Capacity, Vol-ome of Sales and 

Estimated Percenta.ge of Productive Capacity 
Utilized, 1928-1933 5 

Sales Value or Volume of Principal Product 

Groups, 1929, 1931, and 1933 6 

Kumber of Wage Earners and Estimated Total 
Annual Wage Payments at Current Hate, 1926- 
Septemter, 1934 7 

X''olrime of EiTiploj-ment and Wages 8 

Average Hourly Earnings for Unskilled Wage 

Earners, 1926 -September, 1933, . 8 

A.verage Hourly Earnings, hy Wage Districts, 

1929-1934 9 

Average Hours Worked Per Week, 1926-1934 9 

Average Hourly Earnings per Unskilled Wage 

Earner, 1925-Septera'ber, 1933 10 

Average Wee]:ly Earnings per Unskilled Wage 

Earner, 1929 and September, 1933 11 

Employment, Payrolls, Hours and Wages, 

1933-1934 12-13 

Percentage Relationship of Wages to the Value 

of Product, 1926-1932 15 



8314 



IX - 



-1- 

FABHICATZD iSIAL FKODUCTS i J-MFACTUTtlllG- AllD 
METAL FIi:iSIII];C aY,!) ISTilL COATING II.DUSTRY 

Forev'rjrd 

TLe ralDiicatGd Motai Products Manuf"ctr4.rinr and Metal Finishing and Iletal 
Coating Industr- corers a vor," troad crsJ diver-jified field of industr;' - all 
the vray fro:-! hos: ring and rinrers to artistic li fluting: equipnent. Tarioxis 
Censua clrssifications cove:.- oirtr o:f t'lo Industr" "but it is not pos^ji'ble to 
coinliine these so a.' to covei- e::act]" the Code clcp.sif ication. Sone branches 
of the Industry a.s covered 1)3" the Code a.re not included in the Census data and 
for others a hrea^cdoTm of the lore-inclurivc Census data, is not aveilahle. In 
vicTT of this difficulty Code Authorit;,- rlr.ta have "beeri -oresented rather tha" 
ori;';inal Census data. Tr-.e Code Aiithority "ibtained these data by rai:in,'=: the 
proper adjustment for tho differeace betv/eon Census classifications ejid Code 
class if ica.t ion. 

The Code Authority v/as oi-'-^^c^nis^ed out of the Fabricated Metal Products 
Federation, and, fnr the nost -part, the records of the Federation 'Tere incor- 
porated into tne records of th^^ Code Authority. These records list 7,075 
concerns in the Industry, and ".'rovide production p.nd flnsiicial da,ta. for a,bout 
40 per cent of the concerns, and T/ar,e data for only about one per cent,. Se- 
cause of the broad scope of the Industr;,!-, it has been difficult to obtain nore 
conplete statistical covera^-©. Of those concerns reporting, the najorit;,'- are 
probabljr the better orfranized "^nd cperated concerns of the Industr;''. 

The fi.-iures talcen from the applications for presentation of Codes of Fair 
Competition are narked esti:.iated tdierever they '7ere thus indicated on the code 
applications. As is indicated b;- the rounding off of other figures from the 
sarie source, it is likely they nere estimates also, but it i^. inpossible to 
determine to ~rhat extent tiiis is trae. 

The Bureau of La,bor Statistics data iiresented in Table JCVII constitate 
tne anlj Governnent statistics pertaining specifically to the Industry as de- 
fined by the Code. All of th^: material presented in the Appendix ras supplied 
by the Code Authority, and is subi-iitted in the forn prepared by it. 



8314- 



-2- 
CHAPOiJH I 

THE NATURE OF TIffi IimUSTRY 
Size of the Industr y 

The Patricatcd Hetnl Products iianufacturing aiid Metal Finishing and 
Metal Coating Industry is composed of ap:pro::irar/-.el7 7,075 concerns engaged 
in the production and wl\olesale distri"b\ition and fahricated metal "oroducts,!/ 
Due to the disorganized condition of this industry prior to the enforcement 
of the codes no reliable statistics of the total numlDer of concei-ns operating 
in pre-code years are availalDle, tut the folloning data for selected sub- 
groups of the industry as listed in the Appendix under Exliihit A may "be 
taken as a rough indication of the trend for the entire industr;/- during the 
years 1928-1933, 

TABiE I 

Humter of Concerns, 1928-1933 
(includes only those mrjiufacturing 
groups listed in Ejiiihit A) 



Year 


Hfjnber of Concerns 


1928 


3,145 


1929 


3,193 


1930 


3,112 


1931 


3,054 


1932 


2,984 


1935 


2,909 



Soxirce: Records of the Code Authority. 
See Appendix, Erdiihit A, for 
further infoms^tion. 

G-eog^ra'ohical Sistrihution 

In the Appendix u^ider E.xliihit B is listed the total nn^Aer of concerns 
in each State. The distri'bution among the leading maniii'act-aring States is 
indicated hy Tahle II, 

TABLE II 

Total ITuiiher of Concerns hy Stat ;s, 1935 



State 


ITumber of Concerns 


U. S. Total 


7,075 


Hew York 


1,383 


Illinois 


785 


Pennsylvania 


392 


Ohio 


678 


Massachusetts 


553 


California 


450 


Connecticut 


355 


He^; Jersey 


349 


Michigan 


328 


Other States 


1, 501 



Source: Records of the Code Authority. See 
jtopendix, Erdiihit B, for further in- 
formation. 



1/ As of Hay 25, 1935; from records of the Code Authority. 
8314 



TIius, of the total of 7,075 concerns in the FalDricatecL lietal Products 
Manvaacturing and I'letal JTinisLln;;; and Metal Coating Industry, 5,574 concerns, 
or nearly 80 per cent, are concentrated \7ithin the Boston-New York-Fhila- 
delphia trade area, the Lcke States trade area, and the San Francisco trade 
area. 

Ilumlier of States in iHiich S'oecified Concerns Oper ate 

The Code Axithority was a'olo to obtain detailed information on su'b~ 
sidiaries, 'braiiCJL plants, sales nfficjs and ue.rchoiiseG of concerns in the 
industry only to the limited c::tcnt shcvm in the i/ipendi:: under ErJiilDit J. 
Tatle III summarizes this Erdii'bit after all de'be.ta'ble items are discarded. 

1VlBL3 III 

81 Concerns Classified According to the Nnm'ber 
of States in ¥laich They Had Plants, 1934 



number of i-T'O-ulier of Injjnher of Plants 
States C o ncerns O'T'erated 

Total 81.. 258 

One State 31 65 

T\70 States 30 70 

Tlaree States 8 34 

Pour States 9 54 

Seven States 1 9 

iline States ?. 26 

Source: Records of the Code Authority, See Appendix, 
Exhibit J, for further information. 

This tabulation is indicative of the interstate character of the indus- 
try. Of 81 concerns \7ith 253 plants the activity of only 31 concerns auid 65 
plants TO.s coirlTiiied to a sin^'le state. The remainder were operating in two 
or more states. 

C<?.pital Investment 

Of the total capitp,l invested in the Fabricated lietal Products i.ianu- 
facturing sxiA. Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Industry, there is no 
available record, but for the industry sub-groups listed under Ejdiibit A 
of the Appendix, invested capital is indicated in Te.ble IV. 

T.^BLE IV 

Capital Investment, 1323, 1931, 1933 
(Inclnxles only those manvjfaxturing 
groups listed in Exhibit A) 



Yeor A r.o-jJit 

1929 $737,24^,263 

1931 673,603,283 

1953 525.332.097 

Source: Report of Po.bricated Lietal Products 
Federation. 



8314 



As c. supplement to Talilo IV, reference should "be made to Ezdiioit C of 
tlie Appendix showing the finrjicial strvjst-'.ire of 165 concerns reporting this 
type of informction. The firved assets of these concerns are given in the 
follo\7i:ig table, 

TABLE V 

Eirced Assets of 166 Companies 
1929, 1952, 1933 



Year Aaount a/ 

1929 $90, -290, 841 
1932 83,839,306 
1933 62,144,295 

Soui-cc: Fa'cricated Hetal Products i'oderation. 
See Appendix, Ejiiioit C, for f-orther 
ir-fornation, 

a/ Fixed assets include laiid, "buildings, ma- 
chinery ?iid equipnent less reserves and 
depreciation. 

These 15-3 concerns in 1935 reported their fixed assets as $62,144,295 
Paid their total assets at $153,350,494, as compared v/ith the $625,332,097 
of invested capital of the 2,909 concerns in Exhihit A. The conclusion may 
he dra\7n tlia,t these 166 concerns were the more important ones in the 
industry, 

Regsj-ding Exhihit C attention is called to the following facts: first, 
the maintenaiice of the liquid condition of these 165 concerns in the relation- 
ship hetT/een their cxTrrent assets ajid current liabilities; second, the decline 
to 63,8 per cent of 1929 valiies in the fixed assets (a decline in line uith 
the nrite-dovrn in the assets of other industrial groups); and, third, the 
rapid decline in surplus, and the change from net profit to net loss with a 
decline in sales indicating that these concerns must, in the aggregate, 
total some $119,000,000 in yearly sales in order not to incur a loss. 

Failures and Financial Conditions 

In 1954 there were 11 fail^ares in this industry, according to figures 
compiled from Dun and Bradstrect's hy the Cost Accounting Section of the 
Research and Flojining Division of HRA. 

Erdii'bits A and C of the Appendix give, for certain selected concerns, 
a limited comparison of the financial condition within the Industry for the 
years 1929, 1932 and 1953. For these concerns, the data for 1932 and 1953 
show a net loss, 

Volnme ox Sales and Productive Ca-paci ty 

For the concerns in the raanuJTacturing siih-groups listed in Exhibit A, 
the volume of sales is shoTrn in Table VI. 

The productive capacity, limited to the s-nme industries, and the 
estimated" percentage of prodactive crpacity utilised, are also shown. 

8314 



TJBLE VI 

Productive Capacity, VoItijuc of Sales and. 
Estimated Porcenta~e of Productive Capacity 
Utilized, 1023-1933 
(includen only those nanufactujring 
groTxos listed in Eidiiltit A) 












— — ■- ' 




Per 


Cent of Pro- 




productive Cn'o,- 


icity 






duct 


ive Capacity 


Year 


(In tlioris raids) 


Volume of Sc 


ilea 


Ut 


ilized a/ 


1828 




$613,377 




$625, 526 






77.0 


1928 




913,414 




685,799 






75.2 


19 30 




887,433 


» 


559,179 






53.0 


1931 




073, G70 




394, 305 






45.1 


1832 




856,807 




280,225 






32.7 


1933 




782,012 




265,062 






33.9 



Source: Records of the Code Axithority. See Appendix, 
Exhihit A, for f^ai■■ther information. 

cj Fercent,^^j^-e xitilized obtained by calciilatinj the 
per cent that sales are of total capacity. It is 
asGiijjed that the periods covered by production and 
sa3-es are identical, the fact that there may he a 
lag in sales "beins disregaj'ded. 

On the assumption tliat the information iras compiled without "orejudice 
and that the 2,209 concerns covered - being over 40 per cent of tlie total 
n-umber of 7,075 concerns l/ i;i 1833 - are representative of all concerns, 
the above percentages may be considered in a general v;ay to be character- 
istic of fie Industry as a whole. 

Table VII gives the sales value or volume for the principal product 
groiTiDS in the Industry for the years 1929, 1S31, and 1933. 1934 data sA-e 
not available. The table sho\;s the precipitoixs drop in the sales of most 
of the product grou,JS sin:e 1S29. Particularly noticeable is the drop In 
sale;j of railT.?" car appliance s rnd ferrous a:id non-ferrous produ.cts in 
the Chicago area. 



1/ See Tables I and III. 



8314 



-6- 



TA'BLE VII 



Sales Va,lti-c or Volvxio of Principal Product Grou-ps, 
1929, 1931, and 1953 



Annual S^les or Production 



Product G-rotrps 



1929 



1931 



1933 



Li;l'liting equipment 
Railway ca,r appli- 

CJICOS 

Electroplating 
Perrotis & non-fcrrouc 

products (Chica^^o) 
Steel Ijarrels 
Cutlerjr 

Tools & implements 
Wire c: iron fence 
Vitreoiis enajielcd 

nare 
Wrenches and pliers 
"Jire rope and strand 
ru^QTolar split & 

pronged rivets 
TJood screv:s 
Drapery & cai'pet liard- 

v;aj.-e 
Piles and rasps 



$1-14,965,706 $71,643,552 $ 



52,015,000 
23,727,916 

23,198,000 

23,145,897 

21,570,000 

17,740,00(Jt/ 

17,628,000 



9, 01-, 000 
13,084,240 

3,000,000 
12,969,675 
14,228,000 
13,317,000£/ 
11,752,000 



4,561,000 
9,500,000 

2,400,000 

6,767,430a/ 

8,913,000 

9,900,000 

5,875,541 



17,531,402 14,386,068 7,450,725 
15,000,000 7,000,000^ 4,500,000^/ 

159,398 tons 66,684 tons 22,928 tons£/ 



13,819,000 M 
11, 243,751k/ 



3,527,000 M 
7,788,S52£/ 



11,130,000^/ 10,002,075£/ 
11,000,000 5,000,000 



6,738,000 M 
3,874,53l£!:/ 

4,300,000 
6,000,000 



Source: Applications for Presentation of Codes of Pair 
Conpetition sulimitted l)y individua.l Code Au- 
thorities to the ITHA. 



=/ 

■^ 


7 nonths. 
1938 


Com-oeting 


Products 



c/ 1930. e/ 5 months, 

d/' Estimate sutraitted Isy Code Applicaaits. 



The industries coupetin- nith the products of the Pa.liricated Metal 
Products Man'afact-DJTing and Metal Finishing an.d Metal Coating Industry are 
nidely diversified, l)ut consist in the main of those industries nc?Jixafactur- 
ing wood, plastic rabher, and other prca.ucts which fall imder the juris- 
diction of other codes. 

Market for the Industry's Products 

The industries and trades using the products of the Pahricatod lletel 
Products Manufacturing azid Metal- Finishing and Metal Coating Industry ai'e 
widely varied. Por insta:ace, it appears from the records of the Code Au- 
thority thr.t in 1933 the Shoe Majiufactm-ing Industry used $792,477 worth 
of shoe shanlcs; the structural industries used $2,500,000 worth of metallic 
wall stro.ctures and $423,083 worth of metal safety treads; mining used 
$212,099 v.'orth of mine tools; and paper a:id pulp mills required $2,822,241 
v/orth of wire cloth. 



8314 



-7- 
Chapter II 

lilBor statistics 

Num"ber of Wage Earners and Total WaP'e s 

The numlDer of wage earners and estimated total annual wages paid "by 
the entire industry are given in Table VIII. Tlie data indicate an in- 
crease of 98.9 per cent in the ."unual wage rate as of Septemter 16, 1934, 
a"bovG the annual wage rate of April 1, 1333. 

TABLE VIII 

Humher of Wage Earners and Estimated Total Annual 
Wage PajTnents at Current Hate, 1926-September; 1954 

Annual Wage 
Period or Numher of Payment r; at 

Date Wa ge Earners C urrent Hate 

1926 average 373,927 

1929 average 413,053... 

April 1, 1933 204, 51£ $145,412,000a/ 

July 15, 1933 250,284 

September 16, 1935 313,752 

September 16, 1954 515,000^ 289 , 225 , OOOS/ 

Source: Compiled by the Codo Authority from the Census of Manufactures ^ 
and Trend of Sm-oloyment published by the Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics; other sources indicated in the footnotes. See E:-±iibits D, 
S, nnA. ? in the Appendix for further information. 

a/ Computed from the figure given as of Se-ntember 16, 1934, adjusted for 
the per cent increase in total weekly payrolls as stated at the Public 
Hearing on the P.M. P. Co.de. 

b/ Computed from the ijercentage increase in emplojnnent as stated at the 
Public Hearing on the P.M. P. Code, 

c/ CoraiDuted from the anntial weekly earnings as stated at the Public Hear- 
ing on the P.M. P. Code, adjusted for the total nun.ber of employees and 
the total number of weeks in a year. 

Volume of employment and wages represented as percentages of the May, 
1933, level are given in Table IX. This information taken from Ej±ibit D, 
Table VII, is not directly/' comnarable to that given in Table VIII bectoise 
of a difference in the periods covered. 



8314 



TABLE IX 

Volume of Enployment and ^n^,es 
(May 1933 =. 100) 



Period 


Inde~ of tho 


In 


dcj: of 




lumber 


of 'Sm-Dloyees 


Totax 


I' avrol 1 s 


May, 19S3 




100.0 




100.0 


Fet, 1934 




153.5 




177o9 


June 1934 




119.5 




138.1 


Dec. 1934 




127.2 




153.8 


Average, 1934 




127.0 




151.4 a/ 



Source: Records of the Code Authority, hased u-Don 2,700 to 

3,000 reports from the industry. See E:>iii"bit D, Tatle 
VII, in the Appendix, for further information. 

sj On "basis of 36-hour week. 

Actual Hourly Earning:s 

The average hoiirly earnings for unskilled wage earners as reported hy 
60 concerns are given in Tahle X. 

TABLE X 

Average Hourly Earnings for Unskilled 

Wage Earners, 1926 - Septenher, 1933 

(60 concerns) 



Period or 
Date 



Average Hourly Earnings 
Per Unskilled TIage Earner 
( C ent s ) 



1926 average 
1929 average 
1932 average 
A-oril 1, 1933 
July 15, 1953 
Septemher 16, 1933 



35.1 
31.8 
27.9 
25.7 

32.5 



Source! Records of the Code Authority. 

The average hourly earnings troken do;7n by wage districts are given in 
Table XI. 



8314 



-9- 
T/^LE XI 



Average Hourly Earnin?TS, "by Har.e Dintricts, 1929-1934 

(In cents) 





All 


Reporting 


Northern Wage 


Southern Wage 


Period or Date 


C( 


3ncern5 


District 


Di 


strict 


1926 average a/ 




50.3 






„, 


1929 avera£;e a/ 




54.9 


— 




— 


May 6, 1955 "b/ 




45.2 


43.2 




35.0 


Fet. 10, 1934 b/ 




50.5 


50.6 




41.0 


June 15, 1934 hj 




52.7 


52.9 




38.1 


Dec. 15, 1934 hj 




53.2 


— 




— 


1934 average t/ 




52.7 


— 




*"■" 



Sourcei^ Records of the Code Authority. Blanks indicate data not 
available, 

a/ Based upon reports from 60 concerns. 

'bj Based upon 2,700 to 3,000 reports; preliminary figures; 1934 
figure represents average for 52 weeks. 

Hours of Labor 

The average hours worked "oer week per employee may be summarized as 
follows: 

TABLE XII 
Average Hours Worked Per Week, 1926-1934 



All Rer>orting ITorthern Wage Southern Wage 
Period or Date Concerns District District 

1SS6 average a/ 48.6 

1929 average a/ 46.8 - r- 

1932 average a/ 31.9 ▼ 

A-oril 1, 1933 a/ 34.9 

May 6, 1933 b/ 38.9 38.9 41.7 

July 15, 1933 a/ 45.8 

Sept. 16, 1933 a/ 41.3 

Feb, . 10, 1954 b/ 38.5 38.5 36.0 

J-'a:ie. 15, 1934 b/ 36.9 56,9 33. C 

Dec. 15, 1934 b/ 37.2 - r- 

1934 average b/ 35,4 - - . 



Source : Records of the Code Authority, Blanks indicate data not 
available. 

a/ Based upon reoorts from 50 concerns, 

b/ Based UDOn 2,700 to 5,000 reports from the industry. 



8314 



-10- 

The fact that average weel':ly hom-s in th'i northGrn waf^e district are 
identical with those for all reportinf; firms suggests that there are so few 
plants and employees in the southern district that their hours have no ef- 
fect where an average is taken for the country as a whole. According to 
Exhibit 3 of the A-opendiz, however, some five per cent of all concerns - 
altho^ogh not necessarily of all employees - are located in the southern 
area. The erplanation of the identity of the northern and the United States 
average may lie rather in the fact that the percentage of routhern concerns 
reporting was too small to obtain proper weighting for that region in arriv- 
ing at the final average. 

Actual Weekly Earnings 

The average weekly earnings for the Industry tabulated in Exhibit G of 
the Append!" show a decline, from May 1935 to December 1934, in the weekly 
earnings for the southern wage district, a substantial increase in the 
northern wage district, with a corresponding rise for all reporting concerns. 

"Real".' Earnings 

The following analysis of "real" earnings is based on data submitted by 
the Code Authority. 

TABLE XIII 

Average Hourly Earnings per Unskilled 

Wage Earner, 1926-Sept ember, 1933 

(60 concerns) 







. - 




NM Cost of 


Heal 




Actual Earnings 


Living Index 


Earnings 


Period or Date 


(cent 


s per 


hour) 


(1929-100) 


(cents "oer hr.) 


1926 average 




33.1 




103.9 


31.9 


1929 average 




35.1 




100.0 


35.1 


1932 average 




31.8 




74.9 


42.5 


April 1, 1953 




27.9 




68.4 (AvTil) 


40.8 


July 15, 1933 




26.7 




72.7 (July) 


36.7 


Sept. 15, 1933 




32.5 




74.5 (Aug.) 


43.6 



Scarce: Records of the Code Authority, and IffiA. 

From the same source, and by means of the same method, the real weekly 
earnings for unskilled wage earners were computed as given in Table XIV which 
shows an average increase in real earnings per week of $lr,59, as corn-oared 
with an average decrease of $3e01 in actual average weekly earnings for the 
same class of wage earners and for the same period. 



8314 



-11- 

Ti^LE XIV 

Averages Weekly Earnin,'"s per Unskilled 

Wa^e Earner, 1C29 and September 1933 

(60 concerns) 



I 



IIRA. Cos-b of Real Earn- 
Actual Earnings Living Index ings 
Period or Date (dollars per T^ek. ) (1939=100 ) (dollars ner wk.) 

1929 average 16.43 100.0 1G,43 

Sept. 1933 15.42 74.5 (Aug.) 18.02 

Source: Records of the Code Authority. 

Miscellaneous 

In Erchibit H of the Ap-oendix is given a tabulation of the relationship 
between the size of wage groups and the comparative number and percentage of 
reporting concerns and reported employees in eadi group for 1935; 5,337 con- 
cerns having a membership of 225,162 employees comprise the groupings. An 
additional 25IIO plants v^rere not reported, 

Eiihibit K indicates that the najority of the concerns in the reporting 
industries employ less than t en workers, 

Eidiibit D of the Appendiv presents a variety of statistical information 
regarding wages, emplo^Tnent, and hours of labor. Tables I and II of E::hibit 
D indicate that about 57 per cent of the wage earners covered, receive as much 
as 45 cents an hour and that about 55 per cent of the office workers earn as 
much as $20.00 a week. Table VX of Exhibit D shows that about 43 per cent of 
the factory workers and about 71 per cent of the office employees work between 
37,6 and 40 hours a week. 

Table III of Exhibit D shows the number of workers by classes that, out 
of a total of 172,582, were receiving less thr'n the minimiim wage in 1934, In 
the northern wage district there were 2sl1'2 such workers - 1,2 per cent of the 
total workers - while the southern district reported only 20 workers. However, 
as has been suggested before 1/ the preponderant number of employees reported 
for the northern wage district is considered to be due to more complete re- 
porting in that district rather than to the actual geographical distribution 
of employees. 

Table IV of Exhibit D classifies these 172,582 workers into male and fe- 
male, office and factory, and gives the total workers in each class, with theii 
respective hours and earnings for the week ending December 15, 1934, Table V 
performs a similar service for the year of 1934 and gives, in addition, an anal- 
ysis of the equivalent weeks worked on a 40-hour week basis and the average 
yearly earnings of each class, 

1/ See above p. 9 and 10 



8314 



-1 '^— 



Effects of the Code on Labor 



TalDle XV presents data on employment, payrolln, hours and wages for 
1933 and 1934. These data are the result of a special tabulation undertaken 
■by the Bureau of Lator Statistics, in cooperation vdth the IIRA. Research and 
Planning Division, to provide rclialsle infornation reiSiarding the Industry as 
specifically defined ty the Code. They are not strictly comparable nith 
other data already given in this Chapter "because of the difference in the 
size of the sample and in the source supplying the information. 

Other material givin^^ a conroarison of the pre-Code and Code situation 
is given in Ei-iibit;; D, F, and G- of the Appendix. 

Table \i 

Enployment, Payrolls, Hours and Wages a/ 

1933-1934 



Month Taj 



1953 

Jan. 

?eh. 

Mar, 

Apr. 

May 

J-'one 

July 

Aug. 

Sept, 

Oct, 

llov, 

Dec, 

Average 



Inde-es. 1953 = 100 



Average 

Hours 
Worked 



Wages 



Aver- Aver- 
age ej age c/ 



Employ- Pay- Man- 

ment cJ rolls c/ Hours d/ Per Week eJ Hourly. y|g^^}gj,gj) 



B4,5 


75.9 


73.7 


86.9 


79.4 


79.1 


82.1 


69.0 


70.9 


84.3 


72.8 


76.3 


87.4 


85.0 


90.5 


94.5 


99.9 


107.2 


101.7 


109.0 


119.6 


112.3 


117.3 


119.6 


116.5 


120.8 


116.1 


118.9 


125.3 


118.8 


116.9 


123.8 


116.2 


114.0 


122.1 


111,4 



100.00 100.00 



100. CjO 



31.7 
33.1 
31.4 
33.1 
37.6 
41.2 
42.7 
38.7 
36.2 
36.3 
36.1 
35.5 

36.1 



45.4 
44.3 
44,6 
43.7 
43.4 
43.0 
42.1 
44.9 
48.4 
48.6 
48.5 
49.9 

45,6 



15.12 
15.39 
13.97 
14.35 
16,17 
17,61 
17.81 
17.33 
17.24 
17,53 
17,31 
17,60 

16,45 



1934 



Jan, 


110.0 


115,2 


104,2 


34.4 


50-, 5 


17.18 


Feh. 


114.7 


126,0 


115.9 


36.1 


50,1 


18.14 


Mar, 


120,5 


136,5 


123,4 


37,2 


50,2 


18.69 


Apr. 


124,0 


142,4 


127,3 


37,3 


50.9 


18.95 


May 


124,5 


144,4 


126.4 


36.9 


51.7 


19.07 


Jime 


121,1 


138,1 


122,0 


36.6 


51,5 


18,75 


July 


115,4 


124,6 


109.0 


34,3 


52.7 


17,80 


Aug, 


112.9 


122.0 


104,7 


35,7 


52,9 


17.82 


Sept, 


111,1 


117.9 


101.6 


35,2 


53.1 


17,69 


Oct, 


112.2 


124,7 


107.5 


34,8 


52.9 


18,44 


Nov, 


113,5 


128.9 


110.6 


35.4 


53.0 


18,80 


Doc, 


116,2 


139,0 


117.7 


36.8 


53.7 


19,79 


Average 


116,3 


130.0 


114.0 


35.6 


51.9 


18,43 








Continued) 









8314 



So-.orce: Urnroblit-hed data secured "by the Bir-'eau of Lator Statistics ir co- 
operation with the Division of Research and Planning, ITHA.. 

a/ Reportiiii,? establislirasnts considered to he almost completely covered hy 

the Fahricated Metal Products Code, 
h/ Pi.'ju.res reported were for the payroll period nearest the 15th of the 

month, 
c/ Based upon a representative sample covering an average of 525 estshlish- 

raents and nearly 54.000 employees in 193?. Tiie sample T7as somewhat 

large.' irx 1934. 
d/ CoariUued: Inde:-: of employment times avera,^e hours worked per weak re- 
duced to 1933 = 100. 
e/ Based upon a representative sample covering an average of 365 estahlish- 

ments and nearly 4y,G00 employees in 1933. The sample was considerably 

larger in 1954. 

Bmnloyees and Wa^'^es "by State s 

No statistics are available covering the total number of employees and 
the total amount of annual wages by states; but in S:^±.ibit I of the Appendi:?: 
is sho',7n the nvcjiber of eiirployees and the annual earnings for 1934 by states 
for the 2,752 concerns reporting this information to the Code Authority. 
These 2,762 concerns, vdth 162,302 emiployees and an annual pa.yi oil of 
$160,571,947, can bo assumed to constitute a fairly representative sample of 
concerns conservatively estimated to have had 225,000 1/ emiilo^ees in December 
19S4, and a calculated payroll of approximately $290,000,000. i/ 

A comparison of Szhibit B with Ebihibit I indicates that these data are 
reported more completely for some states than for others, and Exhibit I can 
therefore be considered only as a. rough indicator of the relative importance 
of the v3-rioti3 states. 

Wages Com-oared v/ith Tot^l Value of Product 

As shown in Table XVI, wages represent about 27 or 28 per cent of the 
total value of the ^iroduct, 

TABLE XVI 

Percentage Relationship of Wages to the 
Value of Product", 1926-1932 



Per Cent Wages are of 
Date Total Value of Produc t 

1926 27.8 

1927 28.1 
192S 25.7 
1932 "■ 25.9 



Source: Sstimates of the Fabricated I/ietal 
Pi-cducts Federation. 



ly' See Exhibit A, footnotes "b" and "c." 
2/ See Table VII I, abo^e. 



331 •■: 



-.14- 

La"bor Complaints 

Between the datas of i.Iay 9, 1934, and ITovemtor 23, 1934, the Compli- 
ance Division listed the following later complaints of infractions of the 
Patricated Metal Product:^ Code: 

Type of Violations IT-umher of Con-plaints 

Wag:e violations 

Art. Ill - Wages 48 

Reducing wa""eG 1 

Hot paid for oirertime 22 

Holdin:i; tack Dart of v/age 1 

Seeking tack wages 7 

Total wage violations 79 
Eour violations 

Art. Ill - Hours 33 

Hours and wages 53 

Working 7 days a week 4 

Art. IV - Falsifying time cards 1 

Total hour violations 91 
Other complaints 

Art, III - Home work 1 

Classification 6 

Section 7-A 4 

Child lator 2 

Art. IV - Lator provisions not posted 2 
Discrimination and intimida- 
tion 7 
Miscellaneous sutjects _4 

Total other complaints 26 

Grand total number, all 

complaints 196 



8314^ 



-15- 

Chapter III 

MTERIALS: PAW MTD 3Ei:iI-py.0CESS3D 



Principal tiaterials 

The -principal materials used in the Faliriccited Metal Prodacts Man^^- 
factv.rin:; end Metal Finishin.;: and Metf..! Coating Industry are iron, steel 
and ferrous alloys in the form of "billets, Lars, rods, sheets and shapes; 
copper in a variety of forms; leal, zinc, tin, e-nd altuninura. A large pro- 
portion of these raaterisls enter into the Industry in the secondary form 
and emerge as the finished product for the ultimate consumer. 

Source of Materials and Equipment 

Ho statistics are avail^hle as regards the source of these materials, 
their voli-jne or their amonnts, hut it may dp ansur^ed tnat the iron, steel 
and ferrous £illoy fabricators draw their material from the Pittsburgh and 
Birmingliam areas, the Lake States, and fi'om the small imports of ferrous 
products shipped in from the Etiropean industrial areas; tha.t they drar; on 
the Western and Lake States, Canada, and Chile as their principal sources 
of copper; on the Western States, Central States, Canada, and Meirico for 
lead; on the Western States, Central States, Canada, and &arops for zinc; 
on the Straits Settlements (t'lalaya) for tin; and en the New York, Tennessee, 
and Horth Carolina producers for aluminum. 

The jiiachinery and equipment used in the Industry is manufactirred 

primarily in the machine-manvifacturing and machine-tool centers of the 

Southern Kew England, New York, Pennsylvania, and Ilorth Central States 
areas. 

Cost of Materials Compared ^ith Total Value of Product 

On the statement of the Code Authority, the cost of materials plus 
the costs of managem'^nt comprise tijv-o-thirds the value of the product. 



8514 



-16- 

Chapter IV 
PRODUCT lOlT AlZ) DISTfilBUTIOK 

Iiecaij.se of the la.c]^ of Code Authority information concerning 
production £.nd distribution, and the overlappin:;; character of Census 
and Department of Commerce data, practically no reliable information 
is availaTDle on production and distrihntion for the Industry as de- 
fined "by this Code, Such relevant data as are available are given 
in Tables VI and VII above. The Code Authority advises that there have 
been no inrportant shifts in the centers of production from 1929 to 
1935. 

Advertising 

The Code Autiiority advises that ad.vertisinr: is conducted in 
all media,, and tnat some is local aud some national in scope. 



8314 



-17- 
Chapter 7 

TIUDS PILVCTIOJiS 



Su^senuent to the ^''^.-blisluient of tlie Cr.'k:-i, there existed vfirious 
practices which Crrlled for clearer interpret<',.tioii of Code provision;! ftid more 
definite r-.cheTenz? bo adTdnistrative ooltcies. 

Certain jn--:iber3 of the Conrplpte vTirs and Iron Fsr-cc Industry atteirryted 
to circuravcnt the. strict ohservsiTiCO of filed delivery prices thro'-.v2;h the 
■atilization of dealers who, hj rfcoatia;?; to castonex a a -oortiou of the dealer's 
Gtr,ndr.rv dii-cou.i.:t , cut price'- to t}i.e con^n'-er. 

The Code lu-Oiority- of the Joh 'J-elvp-ii-in^ ?'ot--!l Coatin,'^ Inda-itr^-- stteTTij- 
ted 'riO cloaely to restrict tnc form of pr-^cs f i1 ii!,;; i^-'tr.\ as to he inr;trj- 
mental in fixin;'^; ori'.e?'. . 

T::e Code Authovit;- o'' the :iet:aiic V/nll ^tr^'Ctir-t. IncMstry contended 
that certair. ;i,:lditional iDrovisionb rere a'.,c o^sar"/ as follc^rs: first, thf-t 
there Bhoii.ld he p. ten-d.'-y '71'itin.;- TcrJod in filing prices; second, Ihat pri- 
ces on special re.'uireraents r,r, voll as st{:")5."rd requirement '3 should he filed; 
ohird, that a pen-'ilty s3-ston should be re^;.rlrei to pr>..vent selling helo.? 
cost; and, foiu-th, that a li-ni t.n,tj ou on free sauplus shovJ d he ina,ucu;:-ated 
■^■0 .allo\; tho srnall r.pmxiT.v.ctuj.vrj; s to r.ore readily coiTioe'"? ■■■ith those Irrge 
in-i.rruacturers acle to faruVsii elahorate free sarnie s. The Code Authority 
f j.rther reciuested permission to establish and oper;\te a Central Quantit^/ Bu- 
repoi to standardize cjjantities and ^'vinda of 'naterials and services reqaired 
for each individurl Job. 

Tne Code Aathorit-- for the Cutlery, ivlcnicco't InoleHsrt, and Painters' 
and Paperhangers' Tool i/iairif ;vaturiup; Ir.dustry rec leiv-tcd a stay in the price- 
filing provisions of the Code because ofthe connlercitles of products and the 
difficolty in classifying^ then as re.gards cuality. It fLU'ther requested a 
stay in the .•?« termination of a uniform method of accounting, as well e,s a 
stay in the prohibition against sales below cost. Aniendjnents lyere proposed 
limiting; the return of unsatisfactory raerchandise .and the un'Jiraited s-juaran- 
teein^' of quality raerchandise. 

In the Hilk and Ice Crean Can ilanufact-jj-in,-^ Iridustry an attest was made 
to restrict the form of sales contract to certain avemies of distribution, 
to restrict the allowance on cash discounts, and to restrict the classifica- 
tion of consuiaers* 

In general, it is o". c-irved that there existed a r,trong tendency for the 
r'-.ithorities either to exceed their prescribed f'unctious or ijlao to favor 
certain industrial classes in their interpretations of the Codes. Tue in- 
dustrialist, on his side, so^J,*rht to maintain his ov/n ;^onersl practices as 
ethical and within the r.eanin^ of the i-ern "'fair trade," yet to consider 
the practices of his coi^oetitors f.-s unjustif iabDe restriction of his liberties 



8. '514 



-18- 
er VI 

GEISRAL lAtPORivIA-TIOK 

Methods of Trans'oortation Used 

Accordint; to the experience of tne Econoiaic Adviser the ferrous and 
non-ferrous kietals that enter into the man-ofacti-jre of Fa^bricated Metal 
Prodiicts are shi-ooed from the plants nandortal..in,^.: the initial conversion 
into the reauired forms, by railror^d, r.'ater, or ti-uck, to the plants of the 
Fabricated metal Products Manufact'orers. There the pu.nching, pressing, mold~ 
ing, machining, and conditioning operations create tho forn in which the 
product is again shipped - by means of railroad, or truck, in carload or 
less-than-carload lots - to the manufactiirers assembling the products with 
other commodities, or to the wholesale and retail distributors throughout 
this country and abroad. 

Trade Association Activity 

According to the Code Autnority the tmde associations and cooperative 

activities within this Industry vary. Scne associations are of long standing 

while others came into being only with the Code Authorit^r and the National 
Recovery Act. 

Relat ion ship betireen Labor nn.d Ma-iiagement 

Again according to the Code Authority, the relationship bet'?een labor 
and management within the Industry aT-ears cordial; as the ratio of one code 
infraction per 2,519 employees for the period from May 9, 1934 to November 
24, 1934, tends to indicate. 1/' 

Trade Union Activit y 

There has been little unioni'^ation among labor and such as has existed 
has been confined for the most part to compa.n^'- imions. The Code Authorit;'- 
knows of no organization of different labor gi'oups in this Industry. The 
American Federation of Labor has unionized very few shops. This lack of 
trade union activitjr has been ascribed to the fair treatment accorded em- 
ployees. 

Effect of the Code on the Indust ry 

The Code Authority affirms that the Code of Fair Competition has had an 
importezit effect upon the Indastry. It has materially aided in increasing 
employment and wages and in decreasing hours a,s a review of the preceding 
sections of this report - particularly Chapter II — will demonstrate. 

Use of Trade Mark s 

According to the Code Authority, practica.lly sill the products of this 
Industry are trade marked. 



1/ Compliance Division Rejort, December 10, 1934, 



8314 



-19- 



'FoTeiyzn CoiTfpetit.ion 



Again on the testimony of the Code Authority, some forei>^n inpo:^ts, 
such as steel pins, wire cloth. End electric shells for electric light duIds, 
have proven a material menace. In the majority of other fields, foreign 
imports have had little, if an:/, effect on the Industry, 

List of Experts 

As regards technical exnerts in the Fabricated Metal Products ManuiG.c- 
turing and Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Industry, Mr. W. A. Fisher of 
the Code Authority has furnished the following nai'nes and information: 

A. M. Ferry, 1427 I Street, Washington, D. C. 

Has had 20 years experience in trade 

associations and is an expert on wire cloth. 
D. S. Himter, Keith Bldg. , Cleveland, Ohio. 

Qualified as an authority on steel "barrels 

and druns, galvanized wire and fabricated 

metal prod acts in general. 
William Goss, Scovill Manufactxiring Co., 

Wo.terhur^'-, Co nne ct i cvit . 

A qualified industrialist. 
Leonard Mortimer, Interstate Tariff Co:amission. 

An expert on all metals. 
Joseph E. Peterson, Ref. George Hyrick, Jr., Chief, 

Former Economic Adviser on Fahricated Metal 

Products Code. 
W. A. Fisher, 729 15th Street, il. W. , Washington, 

D. C. 

Stati'.-tician, Code Authority for the Fabri- 
cated Metal Products Ifcinufacturing and 

Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Industry. 



8314 



-20- 



soimcES 

All statistical data iii this report, imlesr other- 
wise ST^ecificrll.y identified, have teen conpiled for this 
division by the Code Authority of the subject Industry. All 
opinions, unles-o specifically identified, have heen hased 
UT5on the data of the Code Authority, the "Applications for 
Presentation of Codes of Pair Comoetition, " the Research 
and Planning Pivision report entitled "::aterial Dearin^; on 
the Pahricated Metal Products Manufacturing^; and Hotal Fin- 
ishing and Metal Coating Industrjr," ?jid upon the ey^oerience 
of the T7riter, 



8314 



-21- 

IPPEKDIX 
List of Exliibits (as submitted "b:" the Code Authority) 

Exhibit A Size of Fabricated Metal Products Manufacturing and Metal 

Finishing and Metal Coating Ind.ustry, 1922-1933* 

Exhibit B Eumber of Concerns Listed nith the Code Authority of the 

Fabricated Metal Produ-cts Manufacturing and Metal Finish^ 
ing and Metal Coating Industry, by States. 

Ejiiibit C ......Data for Fabricated Metal Products Industry for Use of 

Durable Goods Industries Coi.miittee. 

Eidiibit D Fabricated Metal Products Manufacturing and Metal Finish- 
ing and Metal Coating Industry. 

Table I. .. .Distribution of Factory Workers 
According to Wage G-roups 

Table II. ,, Distribution of Office Employ- 
ees According to Wage G-roups 

Table III.. Workers Receiving Less Than the 
Minimum Wage 

Table IV,.. Volume of Eniploy-ient and Wages 
During Week Ending December I5, 193^* 

Table V. ...Volume of Enploji-ient and Wages 
During Year of I93U. 

Table VI. . .Distribution of Workers 
Accordine^ to Hour Groups 

Table VII..Vol-ume of Enplojrment and Wages 

Exhibit E Average llumber of Wage Earners in the Fabricated Metal 

Products Manufacturing and Metal Finishing and Coating 
Industry, I926-I933. (Tuo tables.) 

Exhibit F Comparison of Changes in Wa^-es and Employment in the 

Fabricated Metal Products Industry as Disclosed by 
Various Sets of Data, 

Exhibit G Average Weekly Earnings Fabricated Metal Products Manu- 
facturing and Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Industry, 
May 6, 1933 to December I5, 193^+. 

Exhibit H Number of Concerns and iJvjnber of Employees Reported, 

Form 10 and Other Sources by Size Groups. 

.Exhibit I Classification by States of IJiinber of Employees and 

Annual Earnings for 193^ Fabricated Metal Products and 
Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Industry. 

Exiaibit J Subsidiaries, Branch Plants, Sales Offices and Warehouses 

of Concerns in the Fabricated Metal Products Manufacturing 
and Metal Finishing and. Metal Coating Industry. 



-oOo- 
S31H 



KxHibit-A 



Sia« %t yabrloat«4 Metal Produote Maaufaolmring and Metal Plaisblng aad Metal Ooetiag Zaduatr?, 192&->I933 

(Includes onlr thoee products groups on attached list) §/ 



- 


I». of 

Oenotnt 


ffBB^Wf fff g""'^ «»«»«- 


InTanted OfteitAl 










^„ ^7Q,^0MoB Oaonalt's 






Amount 

Dollars 


Aat.Per 
Gonoem 

Dollars 


Amt. 
Per 

Sspl. 
Dole. 


Asount 

Dollars 


Aat.Per 
fJonoers 
Dollars 


Aait. 

Ptr 

Ks! 


AB»imt 
Dollars 


ABt.Per 
Oenowa 
Dollars 

258.625 


Aat. 

Par 


Teare 


ffttal}er 


Hoe Per 
Ooncera 


£?l 


19« 


5.1*5 


155.796 


»»9.5 


69«.2O0,?lU 


222,003 


\kst 


626.6?6.Mv4 


199,2«>5 


»l.022 


815,J7M59 


5,221 


1929 


5,193 


l6»».5«) 


51.5 


757,2*^2,263 


230.895 


h.hm. 


686.799,203 


215.095 


M75 


913,»H3,597 


286.068 


5.552 


1930 


5,11» 


1^.»^5 


H€.7 


712,l«»»,077 


228.851 


H.896 


559,178,6l»0 


179.685 


3,81^4 


M7.H63.253 


285,175 


6.1@l 


1951 


5,05*^ 


126,612 


4i.5 


678,603 283 


222, 201 


5,'»60 


39»^.50^,5ll 


129,111 


5,11*^ 


875.669.701 


286,07»» 


6,900 


1938 


2,9«'» 


10«,9'*5 


36.5 


645,1*7,»^5 


215.532 


5.905 


280,225.066 


95,909 


2.572 


856,807,075 


287 15* 


7,865 


1933 


2.909 i/ 


112,633 s/ 


5a.7 


625.332,097 


21^965 


5,552 


265,061,658 


91,118 


2.555 


782, 012, m 


268,825 


6,9*5 



iJ Seureet Ooa^iled by the Oodt Auttoritr froia Inforaatioa snpplied It by the Tarious groves listed, on Tera 50U— 

Applioation for Present «t ion of a Oode to HRA« 
a On Maj 21. 1935. ^^« figure can be accurately stated to be 7,075 for the Industry ^n a wiiole. 

, See Exhibit B. 

il For Deo. 1934. this figure any be ooneerratively eetiaated to be 225.000 for the Industry ae a whole* 

See Ixhibit X. 



-23- 



The attached data represent information from only a portion of the 
Fabricated Metal Products Manufacturinf; and Metal Finishing and Metal 
Coatir^- Industry. The data represent groups nanufacturing the follon- 
in.2; 'oroducts: 



Aluminum Wares 

Cutler3'- 

Cut Tacks, Wire 



!cks 



Fire Pots & Blo'j Torches 

Lift Tracks & Portable Ele- 
vators 

Wire Cotton Tie Buckles 

Brass For^^jij^s 

Bright 'iTire Goods 

Chain 

Chucks 

3Dra;oery <?= Carpet Hardware 

Electric Industrial Trucks 

Electro Plating & Metal 
Polishing 

Files 

Fle-dble Hetal Hose & 
Tubing 

Forged Tools 

Galvanized Ware 

Tools & Implements 

Hack Saws 

Hand Bag Frames 

Hand Chain Hoist 

Industrial Wire Cloth 

Wrenches 

Insulated- Containers 

Liquid Fuel Appliances 

Lock C: Builders Hardware 

Machine Screw Nut 

Machinist Precision Tools 

Metal Safety Tread 

Milk fo Ice Cream Cans 

Mine Tools 

Display Equipment 

Augur Bits 

Cutting Dies 

Job Ge.lvanizing 

Metal Spinning & Stamping 



Screw Machine Products 

Steel Partition 

Open Steel Flooring 

Won-Forrous Hot Water Tanks 

Perforated Metal 

Pipe Tools 

Porcelain Enamel 

Power & Gang Lawn Mowers 

Eailwa^^ Brake Beams 

Eailwa;- Car Appliances 

Refrigeration Valves & Fittings 

Shoe Shanks 

Snrp Fasteners 

Socket Screws 

Steel Barrels 

Steel ?ackage 

Therr.io static Bi Metal 

Ash Can 

Shoe Machinery 

Carp Screws 

Gold Leaf 

Machine Screws 

Wood Screws 

Vises 

Vitreous Enamel Ware 

Washing Machine Parts 

Wire Cloth 

Wire Sope & Strand 

Wheelbarrow 

Advertising Metal Sign & 

Display Equipment 
Artistic Lighting Equipment 
Corset Steel 
Furnace Pipe & Elbows 
Hog Pdngs 
Tackle Blocks 
Wire S: Iron Fence 



S31U 



-24- 



llojn'ber of Concerns Listed vdth the Code Authority 
of the Fabricated Metal Product:; Manufacturing and Metal 
Finishing and i.Ietal Coatinti' Industry by Stater, 



S tate h "o. of Concerns 

Alabama 22 

Arizona 5 

Arkansas 12 

California ^5° 

Colorado 33 

Connecticiit 355 

Dclai-zare 5 

District of Columbia 26 

Florida 2S 

Georgia 27 

Idaho 1 

Illinois 726 

India.na 17^^ 

Iowa 5^ 

Kansas 20 

Kentucky 27 

Louisiana. 19 

Maine 25 

Maryland 5" 

Massachusetts 553 

Michit^an 32' 



o 



Minnesota 113 

Mississippi 3 

Missouri 199 

Montana 1 

I'lebraska ' 3-'- 

ITerr H?3p shire 30 

Ueu Jersey 3^9 

i-Teu Mexico 1 

Hew York 1,323 

K. Carolina 15 

N. Dakota - 3 

Ohio b73 

Oklaiioma 29 

Oregon 33 

Pennsylvania 692 

Hii.ode Island SO 

S. Carolina 4 

S. Dal'ota 1 

Tennessee ^ 

lexB-s 72 

Utali 6 

Vermont " " ' '■ H 

Virginia 21 

Washington 62 

¥. Virginin, 21 

Wisconsin 179 

Total 7,075 
Source: Compiled by tiie Code Authority 



S3lH 



^J 



Ftnaaslttl Zafonuitiea 



Kxklbi% 



riMA A«Mt« at •&« of raa7 aasMe 
iBoltidt land, BailAiac** MaoUa^sr 
■ad Haipaaat lata vaaarraa aatf 
di^fteiatiaa 

TttaX A»Mta 

OvrMt liaMiltiaa at «aA «1 yaar aasadt 
Ia«l«ia— Aeeavats pajrabla, tanravad 
araar.Taxaa aoeraad aad paTs^l*, aooviMA 
paTMlla, aad Aividaada daa&affad and pay- 
akla 

Tttta Aaaata laaa lUMUtlM 

Otpital at mA af yaa? aaaaAi 
laoladt CtaMoa aat ^yafanrat ataeka at 
H* of daolavod valM. Oapital lotaa 



*n»l«a at tai af paat 
lot Pvof it •» Uaa fov j 
•tloo fot Taav 



19 2f 



JI2L 









fo.s^e.aM 8i»g^,3o6 



192,H53,^»W 151,Oi«»153 
1^,001,007 i30,»»io,f7« 



6l.9«5,Ol» 30.t53.9^ 

19,715.3^ 13,7S!.5« 

«*7.3«7.in 97,990,9i3 



f%T oaat 
193> io of 

T^m. 



100.0 
69. t 



98.9 



sm,l€3,iiOJ I73,77».35g T^-f 

27,709.955 St,Ǥ0,805 ft-9 



7<.5 

i9.9S 

-1«9.7 
59.< 



i921 



Fat oaat 
1933 lo of 



166 100. 

#91,^.199 70,«> 

6t,l^,S95 €i,f 

153,55©p8»f^ ^.« 






M,$tl^,6iO 

(Looa) 

3.7»7.33l 

ll3.X30,3t7 



69 96 

07.0 

-119.1 
•19.7 



P09 

1933 !• of 



lOt.O 

1S1.7 

lOd.S 



S5.3 
96.7 

93.3 

mgjA (Looo) 
115.* 



Data for 7ftteiea««4 Matal ProAiota Inlets? 
For Um af OoraUa OaaOa Xad^e^riaa OeoBiliea 
^iag«0 aad Basra 



njLJ-U.LLL.I". II .I'PIW I ^ H'tl, ,.»^ I 



ATwraga Qe^ire par ««9k g^rsa^ ^ Salary 



Itebar ef oa^aidias Hajian iag 
^Aay waak la %be aaeigafi^ad saat''* * 



&^ 


169 


^.B7 


i?.^7 


^.9 


33. s 


56.9 


»^5.'^ 


k6.€ 


33.3 


Hkok 


^3.0 



^Tstega Samiags Oe^ssa Labe? ^.9 33.S 61. 9 IS.9 7f.$ 1^.9 9@.f 

Per hour of ®*sp 
&a0l@?ees paid oa 
*£i«ttsly basis inolQAias 
9iece «ork aaraiaga All ot&ar labor 56.9 45.1^ 79.0 ^«g 77.7 ^^l 81. | 

AT«rae« bo%78 9«r vaak aottaally aorlead ^ 
Sbop BB|>leyea8 paid on bourly and for 
piooa aorb baeis M.$ 33*3 ^•f 39>S 00.7 39«i 73*7 



ll9 




19,13% 


if»7 


5S.5 


79.5 


U«S 


77.7 


39.$ 


do.7 



^2.8 ^.9 



s3=sseEsesB 



For oast ?er aaat 

Pej. 1953 ^^ S^f 1933 -^,. . 

is of Jtoy ie of 8oa«. la af 

1933 ^a^y 19if 1933 ^aly 19>9 1933 l»y 199 



it 



fiovs@%i 0^^106 by %h» Oodo &»%&»rity. 



-27- 

P.enorts ur.ed in F. M. P. F. Compilation 
For Use of Durable Goods Industries Committee 



Individuals 



Associations 



F. 3. Willierqe Co. 

C. B. Porter Co. 

Berger Biros. Co. 

Enil Steinhorst F- Sons 

By Products 3teel Corp. 

Standards Brass Llf^;, Co. 

Marquette Metal Products Co, 

National Standard Co. 

The Seng Co. 

Floj^-d Mfg. Co. 

Bridgeport Brass Co. 

Stefco Steel Co. 

Lj'-ons Mfg. Co. 

Dietz Co, 

Homestead Vaive Mfg. Co, 

Durant Mfg. Co. 

Bor,'en Prod. Corp. 

American Casting & Mfg. Co. 

Ashton Valve Co. 

lorrey Roller Bushing 

Dill Mfg. Co. 

Glascock Bros. Mfg. Co. 

Tut tie & Bailey, Inc. 

Consolidated Safety Pin Co. 

Oster-Williams 

Lufkin Rule Co, 

Manning, Maxwell & Moore 

Hauc]-: Mfg. Co, 

Roofing & Corrugating Co. 

Nat'l Metal Prod. Co. 

New Delphos Mfg. Co. 

Superior Sheet Metal W.cs. 

Central Valve Mfg. Co. 

Chicago Blow Pipe Co. 

W. H, Handy & Sons Co. 

Torrington Mfg. Co. 

Veeder Root, Inc. 



American Cutlery 

Lock & Builders 

Electrical Industrial Truck 

Hand Chain Hoist 

GcnSral Tool & Znpleaent 

D. S. Hunter & Associates 

Cycle Parts & Accessories 



8314 



-28- 



Exhibit D 



PalDricated Metal Products Haniifacturin^ and 
Metal Finishing and Metal Coatinc- Industr"- 

(2946 CO 

(2946 co-nplete reportn for Decem'ber, 1934 and Anmial 1934) 

TABLE I 



Distribution of Factory Workers According to Wage G-roups 



Hourly Wage Rate 



Nuinber of WorJcers 



Per Cent 
of Total 



Cunulative 
Per Cent 



Under 24. 0(^ 
24.0 to 27. 9f^ 
28.0 to 31.9^ 
32.0 to 34.9^ 
35.0 to 39.9^ 
40.0 to 44.9^ 
45.0 to 49.9^ 
50,0 to 54.9c,? 
55.0 to 59. 9j^ 
60.0 to 69.9f5 
70.0 to 79. 9j* 
80.0 and over 



75 

440 

1,747 

2,008 

20,131 

43,200 

21,581 

18,490 

13,012 

18,138 

9,867 

7,772 



.05 


- 


.28 


.33 


1.12 


1.45 


1.28 


2.73 


12.86 


15.39 


27.61 


43.20 


13.79 


56.99 


11.82 


68.81 


8.32 


77.13 


11.59 


88.72 


6.31 


95.03 



4.97 



100.00 



Total 



156,461 



100.00 



TABLE II 







Dist 


:ribution 


of 


Office 


Enployees 


Ac CO 


ird 


ing 


to 


Wa^e Groups 






Actual 

¥aj 


Wee! 
2;e 


ciy 




Wur.iber 


of 


EriTJloyees 






Per Cent 
of Total 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under $9,60 
$9.60 to 11.19 

$11.20 to 11.99 

$12.00 to 13.99 

$14.00 to 14.49 

$14.50 to 14.99 

$15.00 to 17.99 

$18.00 to 19.99 

$20.00 to 21.99 

$22,00 to 24.99 

$25.00 to 29.99 

$30.00 to 34.00 

$35.00 and over 



121 
76 
99 

248 
1,238 

232 
3,639 
1,562 
1,569 
1,552 
2,160 
1,505 
2,070 



.75 


— 


.47 


1.22 


.61 


1.83 


1.54 


3.37 


7.99 


11.36 


1.44 


12,80 


22.57 


35.37 


9.69 


45.06 


9.73 


54.79 


9,63 


64,42 


13.40 


77,82 


9.34 


87.16 


12.84 


100.00 



Total 



16,121 



100.00 



8314 



-29- 

TJffilS III 
Workers Receiving Less Than Minimim Wa^e 



ITorthern TTg^'^e District Southern ^p-e Dir.trict 

1111211)0 r of ITuin'ber of 

WaA'G fe.t.e ITorlco rn Vs^^rfi flate Workers 



Apprentices 

Male Icrjrnern; male 

himdicapped workers 
Peratxls learners; female 

. hanclicap'-ped woi-'hers 
Watcl:uaen 
iialc factor^/ workers; 

tracliuen; uainteuance 

nen 
Female factory v/orkers 
Office "boys and girls 
All other office work- 

ers 



40<f: per 


hr. 


151 


35{^ 


per 


hr. 





3LV per 


hr. 


125 


28 (^ 


per 


hr. 


1 


28{^ per 


hr. 


59 


24^^ 


■Dor 


hr. 





32^ per 


hr. 


82 


28^ 


per 


hr. 





4Uf; per 


hr. 


560 


35r/ 


per 


hr. 


17 


35',i per 


hr. 


402 


30^ 


TDer 


hr. 





$12 per 


vrk. 


79 


$12 


per 


wk. 





$15 per 


wk. 


634 


$15 


per 


wk. 


2 



TAEIS IV 
Vol^■une of Eaplo-ment ruid Wa^es Dm-ing Week Ending Decemher 15, 1934 



11x11:1110 r 



Total 
Hoiirs 



Total Average Average Average 

Actual Weekly Hourlj- Weekly'- 

Class of Workers uorlisrs Worked - Payroll Hours Eai'nings Earnings 

Factory, nale 131,333 5,032,834 $2,758,338 3G.3 54.8^ $21.01 

Factory, feaale 25,128 929,775 352,412 37.0 59.0^ 14.42 

Factoi-y, all 156,461 5,952,609 3,121,250 38.1 52. 3f;' 19.95 

Office, all 16,121 533,652 385,788 39.3 51. 0,;^ 23.99 



Total workers 



172,582 6,595,251 3,508,038 38.2 53. 2(^ 



30.33 



8314 



TABLI ▼ 
VolUM of K«pioT««at aM fi««t Dorlaf Tmt of 1934 



Olatt 
of 
Workers 



Of fie* 

tota 



liaib«r of 

fforkoro 



Total 
Man lu>wr« 

Worked 



Total Actual 
PaFToll 



ATOXago 
Wookly 

■our* 

<5? Wka.) 



ATovac* AToyaca Avoroco ATovaft Wiai¥ay af ArtraM 

Monxlf Wookly Bowra ko kouv oooke pn ToaHy 

Bagaiage larainfa Pay Toar yoa* fo> on)loyoo laraiaga 



15^,339 
15,960 

172. «9 



W6,197,7J»5 

30.^97.592 

3l6.«95,337 



11*7, 6H6. 639 35.2 

$ 19,lH*».063 37.0 

1167,060,708 35.* 



51.6/ 
63.24 

52.7/ 



tlfl.l6 
|23>99 
Hi. 65 



l.<3l 
1.923 
1,<39 



H5.« 
M.1 

I16.O 



I 9kh 
«l,tl6 
• 970 



TASbS Tl 
DlstrttmtloQ of Workofi Aocordiag to Koxur Oroupa 



a 



Actual Hour* Vorkod 



80.0 boar a and undo* 

80.1 to 89.0 iMVuro 
>.0 • 



8$.l to 
30.1 to 
35.1 to 

J 7. 6 to 
0.1 



37.5 
^.0 
, to H8.5 
U8.6 to 45.0 
45.1 to ki,0 
kt,l to 36.0 
56.1 and OTOS 

Total 






fftCtggy laplfiTMt. 

SwBbor of Per oont Caamlatlvo 
iorkovo of Total Pax oaat 



a, 359 

17,339 

11,080 
10,131 
10,959 



5.3* 

11. OS 

48.59 
7.04 
6.4i 
7.00 

8.10 
100.00 



io!67 
l4.3i 

25.3? 
30.84 

93.35 
97. « 

100.00 



Workova 



of Par ooaft Oonslatlva 



of Total 



805 

la 

660 

880 
843 

l6,lfl 




For oont 




100.00 



-31- 

TASLE VII 
Volume of Eiirolojinent and Wages 



Date 


Number of 
B.iployeee 


Total 

iian-Hours 

Uorked 


Total 
Payroll 


May 1933 
Peb. I93U 
June I93U 
Dec. 193^ 
Annual I93U 


100.0 

153.5 
119.5 
127.2 

127.0 


100,0 
152.1 

113.3 
12.14.9 

12^-^.0 a/ 


100.0 
177.9 
13s. 1 

153. s 

151. U a/ 



a/ On uasis of 36 iioui" iTeel:. 

Source: Compiled "by the Code Authority. 



Exhibit E 
TABLE I 

Average Kuraber of Wa-^'e Earners in the 
Fabricated Metal Products lianufacturing and 
Metal Finishing and Coating Ind^tstry, 1926-1935 

Iramber of Wage Per Cent Per Cent Increase 
Date Earners of 1<^26 Over Ar;ril 1, 1933 
(1) (2) (3) (^) 

1926 370,927 100.0 S5.3 

1929 ^13,653 109,0 102.0 



April 1, 1933 ... 20U,515 53. S 

Jul;; 15, 1933 ... 250, 2SU 6G.1 

Se-^t. lo, 1033 a/ 313,752 32. G 53*^ 



22. i:. 



Source: Compiled by the Code Authority from U. S. Census of 
Manufactures , and Bares,u of Labor Statistics data. 

a/ Result of projection of per cent in colunn h. Table II. 

TABLE II 

Average Iranaber of Wage Earners on the Payroll of the Fabricated Iletal 
Products Manufa-cturing and Metal Finishing and Coating Industry, 
1926-1933 a/ (Hepresentative concerns) 



Kumber of j?ujnber of Per Cent Per Cent In- 

Firms '>7r,ge of creace Over 

Date Reoorting Eo.rners 192b Aoril 1, 1933 

(1) "(2) (3) '(ii) (5^ 



1926 60 20,650 100.0 su.s 

1929 60 21,137 102,4 S9.2 

A-oril 1, 1933 ... 60 11,172 5^.1 

jLily 15, 1933 . . . 60 13,99^ 67. a 25.3 

Sept. lb, 1933 . . 60 17,Q"9 21a1 5 3. 

Source: Compiled b?/ the Code Av.thority. 

a/ For tyoical ^eeks, exce^^Dt rrherc other.7ise specified, 

831^ 



-3.?- 



-p 



■p 

0) 



cs 
-p 

O 

o 

'n 
•P 

<\> 

w 

pi 

o 



o 

Pi ''^ 



^ 



(X) 

ri O 

d H 

o 

ca w 



U 

m -p 
0) CO 

a ^ 

X l-H 

o 

Vi -P 
o o 

^^ 
o o 

•H Ph 
H 

c3 H 

\S. -P 
O 0) 

o :r: 

O 
+^ 
«i 
O 
•H 



a (A 

•H 

fn '•d 

■P U 

u. d 

p< o 

n a) 
o 



o o 

•H Ch 

■P f! 

Oi o 



o <a 

•i-i 
S ,^ 
o o 



o 



r-^^ 


r-'V — * 


ov-i- 


Hl-^ 


0-^ 


«H 


rH 


•» 


>.>= 


Ci U 


!Sl U 


0) ,Q 


Wtu 


f.1FH 


d 


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r^ 


r'^K^ 



to 

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rH ^J3 
O • 
O CM 

rJ g 
■p o 
d u 



I — o^oi 



o vr>^ 



d -p 
o (u 



^1 

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w 

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(!) 



d r-^ 

c3,o 

d [^ 

o o 
— '-p 



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^^ PL, 






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0) 


^p 



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d| 



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>._o 

•H 

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!irt P 
!-; (D 

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— '-P 





CO 


w 






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(Ajr~-vD 


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r^o^ 


^■ 


• • • 


• • • 


• • 


• 




Lr>HUD 


LTMAJ 


0'> 


K^rf 


K>r— H 


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+ + f 



+ + 



LOr-IO 

• • • 

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-i + I 



w 
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• • • 

t^r-ftO 

LntoH 



r^l 



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+=■ 

s .di 

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y> 



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^ CaH 

+ + 






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v) tn 








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(1) 


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r^^ MM 

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Al o o o 

cj '-d 

^ 0) 0) rt 

1-! d c-j 
d fn fH •1-"' 

+=0 0) d 

r-i •-» '-. 
C.l F* »-• 



ca o:> 

•rl -H 

o3 d o 
M Fn -rl 

iH r-j (X| 

'S 'O) tn 
ID 0) O 

0) a? !:l 

Cj d 

in fn -t^ 

0) CD C'u 

> t> 



-P 
•H 



(D 

o 



id 

CD 
H 

O 

o 



o 
to 



CD 
O 

Q) 

•H 

CD 



xn w 

fn "d 

« rn 

O d 

O O 

y +3 






|-. 

■H 
+3 

d 



Pi 

CQ o 



u d 
O 



0) 

■p 
o 

•H 
<D i 

fH H 

p- 



!'J3 
•H 

u 

d 

(D 

O 
H 

■;^ 

d 



<D O CO 

^( CO O 

Jh id H 

:•; ;d « O 

O O ri W 

q r-l 
•H 



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•-d 



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CD O ,;.< 

cf; • en +3 

cj '..o rl o 



"nn"ia|~ol^| 



S3lU 



—33— 

Exhibit G 



Avera,^e Weekly Earnings 
Pfxtricvated Metal Prod-actr. i.iant'-.facturin,^' and 
Metal Pinichint;' and Metal Costing Industry 
(May S, 1933 to Doc. I3, 193^0 



Northern Vfego Southern Wage A-11 Heoorting 
Period District Dir;trict Firms 



Mr.y 6, 1333 $16. S2 $i^:-,So §15. SI 

FeiD. 10, 1S3U 19.50 i}:,79 13 M 

June 15, 1S3U 19. 5'^ I-.57 19.^!-^ 

Dec. 15, 193^ not segregated 20.33 

193^'- Annual aj' not segregated IS. 65 



Source: Conpiled l)y the Code Ar.thoi.-itj- from the Industry; 
Deceniber and Annual :fi'igures preliminary. 

a/ Por R2 weeks. 



S3li| 























Kxhibit a 






lftwib«r 


of Ooncerns »nd Kumber of 


Siaplojreee, 


, fonfi 10 Rnd 


other Sources, by 


31«e OroupfH/ 










forra 10 

Per c«nt 


■^roul-vtlve 


I^oprprua- 


;^,eppitlT«g Ot[^; 
Per cont 


Other '^pTAjrpfifi 
Cunml!»tlve 




Per cent 


OWBttlatlT* 


Slse Group 


.vuiiber 


or 


Total 


Per cent 


Number 


of Total 


Per cent 


Muaber 


of Total 


Per o«at 





102 




2.S 


?.g 


185 


11.2 


11.? 


287 


5 4 


.4 


I 5 


^ip 




?« 


30. g 
%.5 


IS? 


4?.5 


53.7 


1»732 


32.5 


IV 


6-10 




^ 7 


364 


16.0 


69 : 


807 


18.4 


ll-?5 


m 




?0.b 


66.1 


?n 


13.4 


83.1 


982 


71.4 


?6-50 




12.5 


7«.6 


127 


7.7 


90.8 


590 


11 1 


82.5 

87 4 


51-75 


^J 




U 


gii.5 


47 


?.9 


93.7 

95.4 


?64 


49 


76-100 


l4« 




?5i?.5 


?8 


1.7 


176 


3.3 


90.7 


101-150 


iki 




k,0 


92.5 
911 u 


?8 


\l 


971 


176 


5-2 

1.5 


94 


151 200 


70 




1'? 


\l 


97 9 
98.8 


«3 


Hi 


?01-?00 

101-^0 


?7 




2.^ 


96. « 


:l 


101 


1.9 


k2 




1.1 


97.9 


I 


QQ.? 


49 


.9 


98 3 


401 500 


26 




.7 


98.6 


.2 


9*^.4 


J? 


.6 


98.9 


50l-iOOO 


kl 




1.1 


99.7 


6 


.4 


99.8 


.9 


9<».8 


1000* 


10 




.3 


100.0 


3 


? 


100 


13 


2 


100.0 


Total 


3.690 




100.0 


_. . _,„ 


1,647 

Number 


100.0 




5,3^7 


00.0 












of Ioiploy0©9 


Reported On: 












P'orm 10 






pther Sourpsa 




Per cent ' 








Pej 


r cent 


Oumulotive 




Per cont 


Gunnilntlvo 


Sunulatlre 


3lB« GroMp 


Numbar 


of 


Total 


Per cent 


Humber 


of Total 


Per oont 


Nunber 



of Total 


Per oeat 
















• 














1-5 


2,77« 




1.5 


1.5 


1,635 


*^.5 


5:? 


4.613 


?.o 


2.0 


6-10 


»*,ia3 




2.3 


3.8 


11987 


49 


6,170 
l6,?69 
20,954 


2-7 


4.7 


11-25 

?6-50 


if. 678 




6.9 
9.0 


10.7 
19.7 


3.691 
k, 85 


9 1 
10 8 


18.5 
29.3 


:i 


11.9 


51-75 


13,7*^5 




6.9 


27.1 

3^.0 
'^3.9 
50.3 
61.7 

69 4 


2,913 


7.2 


16.5 
46 3 


16,6^8 
16,848 


28.6 


76-100 


12,7*^2 




U,oo6 


9.8 


.5 


45!8 
52.1 


101-150 
l5i-?oo 


ia,2«5 
11,792 




U 


3 ^? 


8.5 

5.7 

8.6 


54.8 
60.5 


21,734 
l4,ii6 


u 


201-^00 
30i-I»oo 


21,0?9 
lU,?J40 




11.4 


3 505 
2,^5 


69 a 
75«0 


24,534 
16,655 


"7:? 


§3.? 
70.4 


401-R00 


11,»*85 




75.6 


1,680 


79.1 


13,165 
32.254 


^ 

9.4 


76.1 
90. S 


501«1000 


2f.l75 




15.3 


90 9 


U,079 


10.0 


89.1 


1000* 


16,756 




9.1 


1 j.O 


k',h^6 


10.9 


100.0 


PI, 192 


100.0 


Total 


IS', ^57 




100.0 




40,705 


100.0 




?25,l6? 


100. 





I 



3o«roet Conq)lled by the Oor* e Authority. 

^ In eddltlon there wore no reports received from approsiaately 2,110 plants tAich brings the total number of plants In the Indttetry 
to 7,447 (7,170 eonceraa). 



-35- 

Ejiiiliit I 

Classification "by States of lT-un"bei- of Employees and 
Annual Earnin^cs for 193^ Faloricated Metal Products 
Manufacturing and Metal rinichin{i; a.nd Metal Coating Industry 
(As reported on Code Authority's form 10 and compiled by it) 



Annual Earnings 
State Reports Em-oloyees I93U 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delavrare 

Dist. of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

1 01.7a 

Kansas 

Kentuclty 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missoiiri 

Nebraska 

Hew Haijp shire 

Hei;r Jersey 

Hew York 

l)Iorth Carolina 

ITorth Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Riiode Island 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 



Number of 


IJunber of 


Reports 


EriToloyees 


U 


120 


2 


163 


96 


2.392 


11 


123 


215 


33.273 


2 


32 


k 


J+3 


2 


7 


7 


3^7 


351 


12,1+31 


7S 


^.031 


15 


259 


1+ 


U67 


Ik 


6og 


3 


9^ 


6 


ISS 


21 


1,22s 


210 


11,533 


136 


3,05s 


33 


1,137 


2 


IS 


7S 


3,720 


H 


25s 


1^ 


731 


i^si 


7,562 


326 


15,260 


1 


11 


1 


2 


377 


25,670 


3 


Ug 


13 


111 


313 


15,72U 


3^+ 


3,03^ 


1 


7 


15 


1,17s 


22 


53U 


5 


Sh 


5 


122 


20 


262 


12 


3,662 


90 


7,262 



Total 2,76? lS2,o02 



$ 77: 


,161 


10 s 


,2511 


2,3^7 


090 


90 


,601+ 


30,750 


,2l+6 


3^ 


J6l 


65 


,S69 


4 


,407 


I3U 


,^13 


15,653 


,556 


3,505 


Iks 


220 


,766 


1+9 5 


»153 


559 


,S97 


5^ 


r6S9 


173 


,260 


i,0S7 


,222 


11,91s, 


»357 


9,393 


,S2S 


l,0S7, 


,oUi 


g 


,SU7 


3,UU6 


,62l^ 


35 


6U3 


so 5, 


,sso 


8,0SU 


,059 


12,7^6, 


,105 


1^1 


,171 


1. 


U3S 


25,371 


oi+i 


kk, 


S7S 


23 = 


762 


15,6S1. 


03s 


2,S56, 


555 


Dj 


,50S 


S66, 


2SS 


396, 


190 


SI, 


S2S 


102, 


2S7 


27s, 


556 


3,316, 


56s 


S,6in, 


379 


60.571, 


9I+7 



Source: Compiled by the Code Authority. 
S3ll|. 



ExliilDit J 



Si^lisiclira-ios, Brancli Plnnts, Sales Officon and. Warehouses of Concerns in 
tlie ZTabricatecl Metal F;:"Oi.;act.'. LloJiixfactriring and lietal Finishin;:^ SJid Hetal 
Coating Industry (As indiC8,ted "by the records of tlie Code Authorit/, 
ojid compiled l)y it) 



Aluminiiii Good;; Hfr;. Co, 
MaiiitoTroc, Wis, 



Plants: 

Two Fdvers, Wis, 
i'fenitovroc, Wis. 



Alioiainun Specialty Co, 
Manitov/oc, Wis, 



Branch: 

Chilton, Wis. 



Americaii Si'ass Co. 
Wo.ter'bxu'^-, Conn, 



Hills & Factories 
iinsonia, Conn. 
Btiffalo, II. Y. 
3-uffalo, IT. Y. 
Detroit, Ilich, 
Kenosha, Wis. 
Yorrin^'ton, Conn, 
Waterhiir;'', Conn, 

WaterhTU-y, Comi. 



(WaterDury Brass 
Goods Corp.) 

(Ajnerican Iletal 
Eose Co,) 



Offices & A^yencies 
Hevf York, H. Y, 
Washington, J). C, 
Heurrk, H. J. 
Providence, ?.. I. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Chicago, 111. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Da^yton, Ohio 
Fhila., Pa, 
Boston, Mass. 
St. Louis, IIo, 
Houston, Te::as 
Pittshurgh, Pa. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Americcm Cpx & FouLidry Co, 
Ue\7 York City 



Pl^mts: 

Detroit, Mich. 

prsssod Steel Dept., llllton, Pa. 



8314 



-37- 



Arnerican Ch?.in Co., Inc. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 



Associate Companies: 

Andrew C, Camptell Div. 

Manlejr Mfg. Div. 

Pai^e Steel & Hire Div., 

Ilonesson, Pa. 
Wright JIfg. Div., York,' ia, 
Anerican Ca"ble Co., Ind, 
Offices: 

Los Angeles, Calif, 

Atlanta, Ga. 

San Prancisco, Calif, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Houston, Texas 

Chicago, 111, 

ITew York City 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pord Chain Block Co. 
Hazard TiTire Rope Co. 
Highland Iron & Steel Co. 
0-.7en Silent Spring Co., Inc, 
Reading-Pratt & Cs.dy Co., Ind, 

Hartford, Conn. 
RtLhher Shock Insulator Coro, 



American Por]- & Hoe Co. 



Branches: 

Hartford, Conn. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Braddock, Pa, 
York, Pa. 

Branches: 

Ashtahula, Ohio 
Wallingford, Vt. 
Connerut, Ohio 
?t, Madison, Iowa 
G-eneva, Ohio 
Meinphis, Tenn. 
Charleston, W. Va. 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 
Cxiicajo, 111. 
NeT7 York, Yl. Y. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Forth Girnrd, Pa. 



American Hardware Corp, 
New Britain, Conn. 



Subsidiaries : 

Corhin Cabinet Lock Co., 

ITew Britain, Conn. 
P, <?: r. Corbin, Ue^v Srltaln, 
Conn. 



8314 



-38- 



Sutidiaries: (Cont 'd) 
KuBsell A Erv'in Mfg. Co., 

Hew Britain, Conn. 
Cor"bin Screw Corp., 
ITew Britain, Conn. 
Branches: 

Chica{^o, 111. 
ITev! York, IT. Y. 
Dayton, Ohio 
Philadelphia, Pcnna, 



American Machine & 
Fomidry Co. 
Brookljni, il. Y. 

American Steel & '!7ire Co. 
Clevelo,nd, Ohio 



Wahlstrom Tool Division 



(Suhsidiary of U. S. Steel Corp.) 



Warehouses: 
Atlanta., G-a, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Buffalo, K. Y. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Denver, Colo. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Par 20, H. D. 
Zansa.s City, Mo. 
Chicago, 111, 
Louisville, Xy» 
KeT7 York, N. Y. 
Pitts'bur.'^h, Penna. 
St. Lotiis, Ivlo. 



Plants and Factories: 
77orcester, Itass. 
De KalD, 111. 
Wau!<:e^^an, 111. 
Chicarj;o, 111. 
Kansas City, 1-io. 
Indiana 
Trenton, l\, J. 
Ohio 

Pennsylvania 
Minnesota 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Joliet, 111. 

Scott St, T/orks 

Hockdale Works 
1-Iew Haven, Conn. Works 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Cuyahoga Works 

Consolidated Wor]-s 



American Stove Co. 

2001 S. Kings highiiay 
St. Louis, Mo. 

. Factory Plants: 
Harve3'-, 111, 
St, Louis, Mo. 
Cleveland, Ohio (Oil & 

Gasoline Div. ) 
Loraine, Ohio 



Branch' Offices : 

San Francisco, Calif, 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Chicago, 111, 
Boston, Mass. 
Y.ev York City 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Philadeljjhia, Penna. 



8314 



-39- 



Ames Baldwin ViTyomirii^ Co. 
Parkersburg, W. Va. 



Pactorien : 

Main Plant, Parker sTmrg, ¥. Va. 
I'orth Easton, Mass, 



E. C. Atkins Co. 



Main Jrlant: 

Indianapolis, Ind, 



331^^ 



Branch Offices: 
Chicaf^o, 111. 
Nev7 York City 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Memphis , Tenn. 
¥.en Orleans, La. 
Portland, Oregon 
Seattle, Wash. 
Kltimath Palls, Oregon 



Atlas Fence Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Subsidiary of Manganese Steel 
Porge Co. , 

Philadelphia, Pa, 



Auduton Wire Cloth Corp, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Subsicliary of Manganese Steel 
Porge Co. , 
Philadelphia, Pa, 



Barrett-Cravens Co. 
Chicago, 111. 



Siibsidiary: Senple & Reddick Co. 
Hillside, N. J. 



C. J. Bates ^^ Son 
ilci.7 Haven, Conn. 



Branch Pr^.ctory: 
Chester, Conn. 



E. Sehringer iletal ¥ks. 
iNTenark, IJ. J. 



Subsidiary of Wisner iifg. Co, 



benjamin Electric Mfg. Co. 
DesPlalnes, 111. 



Brs-nch: 

Porcelain En^uneling cj Sta.'rping 

Div. 
DesPlaines, 111. 



3ohn. Al-ominum <£: Brass Corp. 
Detroit, Mich. 



PlantT.: 

Brass Forgin/;, 
Detroit, Mich. 

Car.itol Brass Div., Detroit, 
Mich. 



Breuer-Titchener Corp, 
Courtland, H. Y. 



Branches: 

Crandal Stone Div. 
Binghainton, II. Y, 



-40- 



Branches: (Cont'd) 

Cortloaid ToT^inr, Div. 
Coi-tlaiid, II. y. 

Cortlaiia Carriage Goods Div. 
Gortlnnd, IT. Y. 



Broderick & Bascom P.ope 
Co. (Ile.ir- Plant) 
St. Louis, ilo. 



Philip Carey I-Ifg. Co. 
Locl:land, Cincinnati, 
Ohio 



Branch Plnjit: 

lliddletoim, Ohio 



Warehouses: 

lle\7 York, II. Y. 
Houston, Te:cas 
Portl'-uid, Oregon 

Brejich Plants: 
Seattle, YJash. 
Peoria, 111. 
S. Eartonvill, 111 

Branch Offices; 
Atlanta, G-a,. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Boston, Mass. 



Charlotte, 



C. 



Chicago, 111. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
C o lura Dxis , Ohi o 
Dallas, Te::as 
Da;''ton, Ohio 
Indianaroolis, Ind. 
Jacksonville, Pla. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Louisville, K-j. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Iletr Orleans, Lr,. 
ilon York, il. Y. 
Oraslia, "Eeb, 
Phi la., Pa. 
PittSDiu-gh, Pa. 
Salt Lai-e City, Utaii 
Wlieeling, ¥. Va. 
Loclclsjid, Ohio 
Plymouth iieeting. Pa. 
East St. Lo^iis, 111. 
Salt Lalce City, UtaZa 



Champion Lighting Co, 
Phila., Pa. 



Sales Agent: 



Salmonson & Co, 
New York City 



8314 



-41- 



Chase Coinp;?iLies, Inc. 
Waterbury, Conn, 



Warehouses: 

New York, F. Y. 
Boston, Ma.ss. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
ITewark, IT. J. 
Phila. , Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Detroit, I.Iich. 
Chicago, 111. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
New Orleans, La. 
Los An.r^eles, Calif. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Seattle, Wash, 



Mills & Factories: 

Chase Brass i: Copper Co., Inc. 
Lighting Fixture Eept. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
Chase Rolling Mills, Waterhur;", 

Conn. 
Waterhury Mfg. Co. , Waterhury, 

Com. 
Chase Metal Wlcs. , Water1ji.iry, 

Conn. 
Consolidated Safety Pin Co., 

Bloomfield, N. J. 



Cherrsr-Burrell Corp 



Branch Plants: 

Cedrr PLa;oio.s, Iowa 
Little Falls, N. Y. 
Mi iTrauke e , Wi s* 
Bait i' lore, Md. 



Offices: 

Fittsta-i.rgh, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Boston, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa- 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Detroit, Mich. 



Chester Dairy Supply Co. 
Chester, Pa. 



Branch: 

A. H. Reid Creamery 

Supply Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Daii-y 



8314 



-42- 



Chicago RailT/ay Equipment Co. 
Chicaf:o, 111. 

Chicago Screw Co. 
Chicago, 111. 



Branch Plant: 
Franlclin, Pa. 

Subsidiaries: 

Western Automatic Machine 

Co. , Elyria, Ohio 
Hartford Machine Screw Co., 

Hartford, Conn. 
Detroit Screw Wl^s. , Detroit, 

Mica. 



Chroniiun Corp. of Aaerica 
New York City 



Branch Plants: 
Kilv/aiikee , Wi sc . 
Water"bury, Conn. 
Clevelaxid, Ohio 
Chicago, 111. 



Cincinna,ti Sheet Metal & 
Roofing Co, 
Cincinnat i , Ohi o 

C-K-R Co. 

Chicago, 111 



(Sulisidiary of Wierton Steel Co.) 



Branch Plants: 

Rittenhouse Plant, Akron, Ohio 
Cronk-Kohler Plant, Franlcfort, 

¥.. Y. 



Cleveland Chain e. Mfg. Co. 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Clevelajid Ts.ck TiJks. 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Clevelan.d TTire Spring Co. 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Coleman Bronze Div. 
Chicago, 111. 

Colemaii La^np £: Stove Co. 
Wichita, Ktmsas 



Consolide.ted Expanded Metal Co, 
Wtiesling, ¥. Va. 



Plants: 

Station D. , Cleveland, Ohio 
Eenry St. , Cleveland, Ohio 

(Subsidiary of Bishop <?; 
Bahcock Mfg. Co., Cleveldn.d, 
Ohio) 

Plant: 

Cayaiioga Hts., Ohio 

(Subsidiary of Kawneer Co.) 



Branch: 

Sunshine Products Co. 
Chicago, 111. 

Branches: 

Sonerville, Mass. 
Baffalo, M. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Detroit, Mich. 
Phila. , pa. 



8314 



-43- 



BranChes: (Cont'd) 
New York, 11. Y. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Beach Bottom, W. Va. 



Corona Corp. 

Jersey City, lU J. 

Creanerjr Poxkage L.fg. Co 
Chicago, 111. 



Cyclone Fence Co. 



Davidson Enamel products, Inc. 



Diamond E2cpansion Bolt Co. 
Garwood, iJ. J. 



S. R. Droescher, Inc. 
NevT York City 

Duplex Incinerator Div. 
Clevelajid, Ohio 

Eagle Lock Co. 
New York City 



Sales Agency for Ligiitolier Co. 



Plant r.: 

Derby, Conn. 
Arlington Heights, 111. 
Lake Mills, Wis. 
jTt. Atkinson, Wis. 

Branches: 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Detroit, Iviich. (Warehouse) 

ivlineola, 11. Y. 

De Kelb, 111. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Te cujnsaii , Mi ch . 

Greensburg, Ind. 

K. Chicago, 111. 

Newark, N. J. 

Fort Worth, Texas 

Branch Plants: 
Lima, Ohio 
Connersville, Ind. 

Branches: 

New York, K. Y. 

Phila., Pa. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Chicago, 111. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Los Aiigeles, Calif. 

Plant: 

Crawford, N. J. 

( Subsidiary of Consolidated 
Iron-Steel Mfg. Co.) 

Pl.'int: Eagle Lock Company, 
Terryville, Conn. 



8314 



-44- 



Empire Plov Company 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Enamelers Guild, Inc. 
Pitts'bvi.rgh, Penna. 

Evans Prodxicts Co. 
Detroit, Uich, 

PairbsJilrs Conxoany 
Nev7 York City- 



Ac sociated Company of Gtencral 
Wheelbarrovr Company of 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Subsidiary of 0. Eommel & Co, 



Sales Organization for Luiiber 
Products Coi-p, 

District Offices: 
Ner York, II. Y. 
Boston, Iv'ass. 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 

Branch Plants: 

St. Jo Im sb ary , V t » 
East Holine, 111, 

Pe.ctories: 

Binghamton, IT. Y, 
Rome , C-a. 



Federal Sere;? Works 
Detroit, Hich, 



Branch: 

Superior Screw & Bolt i.Ionu- 

facturing Co, 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Florence Stove Co, 
G-?a-"dner, Mass, 



Branch Factory: 
Kankakee, 111, 



Sales Offices: 
New York, IT. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
Atlanta, Gao 
Detroit, Mich. 
Dallas, Texas 
Sa,n Francisco, 



Calif. 



General Bronze Corp, 

Long Island City, N, Y, 



General Metal i;ra.re Co, (Main 
plant) 
Minneapolis, Minn, 



Plants: 

Polachek Plant, Long Island 

City, iJ, Y, 
Roman Bronze Works 

Corona, Long Island, ¥., Y, 
Guarantee & Steel Co., 

Chicago, 111. 

Branch Plant: 

Portland, Oregon 



8514 



-45- 



W. A, Gib OF. & Son, Inc. 
Ciiester, Pa, 

Gilbert & Bennett Mfg. Co. 
(Main plant) 
GeorgetOTm, Conn, 

Wm. Hodges & Co. 

Philadelphia, Penna, 

Howe Scale Co, 
Rutland, Vt. 



Indestro Mfg, Corp. 
Chic?,go, Illinois 

Ivanhoe Division 
Miller Co, 
Meriden, Conn, 

Jensen Creamery Machinery Co, 
Oakland, Calif, 

Edws.rd Kat singer Co, 



Kirsch Company, Inc. 
Sturgis, Michigan 



Plant : 

Oneida, Ne^? York 

Branch Plant: 

Wireton, Blue Island, Illinois 



Plant : 

Camden, New Jersey 

Subsidiary: 

Ohio Eovre Scale Co, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Subsidiary of Duro Metal 
Products Co, 



Branch of Bloorafield, IT, J, 



Branches: 

Edward Katzinger Co,, 

Baltimore, Md, 
A, & J, Kitchen Tool Co., 

Chicago, 111. 
Geneva Forge, Inc, 

Geneva, N, Y, 

Branches: 

ITew York City 
Boston, Mass. 
Oakland, Calif. 
St, Louis, Mo, 



A, Leschen & Sons Rotdb Co. 



Branch Offices: 
Chicago, 111, 
Denver, Colo, 
New York, K, Y. 
San Francisco, Calif, 

Plant: St. Louis, Mo» 



Lewis-Shepard Co. 
Watertovm, Mass. 

Lisk Manufact-oring Co., Ltd. 
Canaiidaigua, N. Y. 



Branch: 

Crawfordsville, Ind, 

Plant : (Branch) 

Geneva Plant, Geneva, N, Y, 
Newark, N. Y, 



8C14 



-46- 



Lowell ¥rench Co. 
Worcester, Mass. 



McKay Co, 

Pittsburf^h, Penna. 



Milcor Steel Co. 

MilY/a'olcee, T?i scons in 

Mitcliell- Vance, Inc. 
New York, U. Y. 

P. H, i.'iurphj- Co, 
Chica^^o, 111, 



National Enaaieling & 
Stamoing Co, 
MiltTa-jl^ee, Wise. 



National Lock Washer Co, 
Nevrark, IT, J. 

Nicetovm Mfg. Co, 

Philadelphia, Penna, 



Nicholson File Co, 
Provi6.ence, S, I, 



Koesting Pin Ticket Co., Inc, 
Mt, Vernon, K, Y, 



SuDsidiaries: 

Safety Wrench & Appliance Co. 

Worcester, Mass, 
Warnock Mfg, Co, 

Worcester, Masf^, 

Branch Plants: 
York, Penn, . 
KcKees Rocks, Penna, 

Branch: 

Canton, Ohio 

Selling Agency for Shapiro & 
Aronson 

Branch Plants: 

Standard Railway Equipraent Co. 
Railway Metal Products Co. 
Union Metal Products Co. 

(All located at Chicago, 111.) 

Branches: 

Laurel Hills, L. I., ¥, Y. 

Baltiaore, Md. 

New Orleans, La. 

Granite City, 111., Starj-rping 

Wl:s, Branch 
New York City 
Chicago, 111, 

Branch Plant: 
Milwaulcee, Wis, 

Suosidiaries: 

Philadelphia Lawn Mov/er Co, 
Fp.v.1 & Bee.nnan Mfg, Co, 
(same address in Phila») 

Factories : 

Arcade File Works, Anderson, 

lad, 
G, & H. Barnett Div, 

Philadelphia, Penm;, 
Paterson, N. J« 

Branch: 

Chicago, 111, 



8314 



-47- 



Pennsylvania Star^Din^: Corp. 
York, Penna. 



Perfection Stove Co. 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Division: 

Pennsylvania Crate Co. 
Red Lion, Penna. 

Bra^iclies: 

Cleveland, Oliio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Chicaifi'O, 111. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Omaha, Net. 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Brooklyn, IT. Y. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Boston, Mass. 
E. St. Lo^iis, 111, 
Albany, IL Y. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Dallas, Tercas 
Charlotte, IT. C. 
Oakland, Calif. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



Petrole^im Iron Works Co, 
of Texas (Office) 
Nen York City 



Brpjich Oi 



'fice of Beaiijnont, 



The Pfaudler Co. 



PittslDurgh Steel Co. 
Pittshurgh, Penna. 



Fayette R. Plur.b, Inc. 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Brmiches : 

Rochester, IT. Y. 

Elyria, Ohio 

Hew York, N. Y. 

Chicago, 111. 

San Francisco, Calif. 

BraxLches: 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Chicago, 111. 
Evansville, Ind. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Hew York, H. Y. 
Mono seen, Penna. 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
MejTiphis, Tenn, 
Dallas, Texas 
Houston, Texas 

Branch Plant : 
St. Louis, Mo. 



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.43- 



Pro^-pressive Service Co. 
St, Lnv-is, I;io. 

PjTene Kf,i. Co. 
Neuarl-:, IT. J. 

Eheon Hfg. Co. 
jilichnond, Calif. 

Revere Co roer & Braes Co. 



Re-pulDlic Stoel Coro. 
Chiceffo, 111. 



Eo^beson Rochester Cor-p, 
Rochester, K. Y. 



Jolm A. Roe-jlin^'s Sons Co. 
Trenton, Li. J. 
(Main Plant) 



Russel, 3-ujrdso,ll & I7ard 
3olt £: l"ut Go, 
Rod: lall?, 111. 



Sranch Plant : 

Karri sburn, Pemia. 

Branch ?} ant : 
llev/ar'r, IT. J. 

Branch Plant : 

South.^ato, Calif. 

3rnnches: 

F.oae I.iamifs-cturing Co. Div. , 
Rone, '■. Y. 

Dallp.s Division, 
Chicas^o, 111, 

3reaich Plant : 

Upson ll-at Division, 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Plant : 

Perry, H. Y. 

Offices: 

Eew York, II. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
Los An.^Teles, Calif. 
Rojral Rochester, Ind. 

Branch f f i c e s : 
Chicaro, 111, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ilew Yorl:', IT. Y. 
Birniingl-iarn, Ala. 
San Prancisco, Calif. 
Los An;?;eles, Calif. 
Seattle, Wash, 
Portland, Ore/;on 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Denver, Colo, 
Boston, Mass. 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Branch Plant: 

Port Chester, a, Y. 



8314 



-49- 



Scovill LIfg. Col 
Water'bvT''', Conn. 



Branch Offices: 
Boston, Mass. 
Providence, R. I. 
New York, II. Y. 
Pliila, Penna. 
Atlanta, Ga, 
Syracuse, IT. Y. 
Detroit, Ilicli, 
Chica:-;o, 111, 
Cijicinnati, Ohio 
San Fi'ancisco, Calif. 
Los An;;eles, Calif. 
Plants & Factories: 
Aivierican Pin Div. , 

Wat crbuxy, Conn. 
Morenc3'--Van Btiren Div. , 

Stiar;::is, Mich. 
Oakvilie Co. Div., 

Waterh'ujry, Conn. 
A, Schrader's Son, Inc., 

Brooklyn, H. Y. 
Hanilton Beach Mfg. Co., 

Bacine, Wis. 
Plunihers' Brass Goods Div., 

Waterville, Conn. 



Shapiro & Aronson 
Hew York City 



Selling Agency: 

Mitchell- Vance, Inc. 



Sheet Lletal S^oecialty 
Pitt shirr gh, Pemia. 



Branch of same company at 
Pollanshee, W. Va. 



Snap-On Tools, Inc. 
Kenosha, Wis. 



Branches: 

Alhany, il. Y. 
Broolcljm, K. Y. 
Bvvffalo, IT. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
JTe?/ark, N. J, 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
San Pi-ancisco, Calif. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
5:-racus'3, i-I. Y. 
Toledo, Ohio 
Allston, Mass, 
Baltimore, Md, 
RiclTiiiond, Va. 
Atlanta, G-a. 
1T3W Yorlr, II. Y. 
Seattle, Wash. 



8314 



-50- 



Stsjilev Woi-.rs 

llev Britain, Conn. 



Branches: 

:Jew Britain, Conn. 
Niles, Ohio 

Newark, II. J. (Atha Plant) 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., 
New Britain, Conn. 



Steel c: Tuhes, Inc. 
Clevelen.d, Ohio 



Branches: 

Detroit Works, Ferndale, iach. 
Superior Works, Elyria, Ohio 
Brooklyn Works, Brooklyn, II. Y. 
Cleveland Works, Cleveland, Ohio 
Ijlyria Works, Elyria, Ohio 

General C- Sales Offices: 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Stewart Iron ^orks Co. 
Covington, Ky. 

Truscon Steel Co. (ivlain 
Pl?jit ) 
Yo-oiigsto-'.Tn, Ohio 



Branch Ox'fices: 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Coltunhus, Ohio 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Chicago, 111. 



Branch Factories: 

Pressed Steel Division, 

Cleveleno., Ohio 
Berger i.ifg. Co. Div. , 

Canton, Ohio 



Union Fork i Hoe 
ColiuiDus, Ohio 



Branch Plants: 

Continental Works 
Frankfort, 11. Y. 



United Shoe Machinery 
Boston, Mass. 



Branch Plants: 

Die Plant - St. Louis, Ho. 
Beverly Factory, Beverl;-, Mass, 
Die Plant, Einghamton, N. Y. 



United States Register Co. 
Battle Creek, Mich. 
(Main office &. plant) 



Branches: 

Minneapoli s , Minn. 
Alhan.y, N. Y. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Denver, Colo. 



8314 



-51- 



Veeder Hoot, Inc. 
Hartford, Conn. 

Vitreous Steel products Co. 
ITapp ane e , I ndi ana 

Wacknian Welded Ware Co. 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Ware Bros. 

Chicago, 111. 

Washlfurn Co. 

Worcester, Mass, 



Branch: 

Bristol, Conn. 

Braiich of Cleveland, Ohio 



Branches: 

Sand Springs, Okla. , Section 

Line (Warehouse) 
Houston, Texas 
N. Kansas City, Mo. 
Hew Orleans, La. 

Trade ¥.8jae of Chicago Roller 
Skate Co. 

Branches: 

Andrews Division, 
Rockford, 111. 

Michigan Wire Goods Division, 
Niles, Michia;an 



Wheeling Steel Corp. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 



Branch Plants: 

(1) La Belle Works, Wheeling, W. Va. 

(2) Ackerman Factory, Wheeling, W. Va. 

(3) Martins Ferry Factory, 

Martins Ferry, Ohio 



Wickmre Spencer Steel Co, 
New York City 



Williajnsport Wire Rope Co. 
Williajnsport, Penna. 
(Main plant) 



Branch Plants: 

Clinton Works - Clinton, Mass. 
Wiclnvire Works - Buffalo, H. Y. 
Morgan Works - Worcester, Mass. 
Goddard Works - Worcester, Mass. 
Palmer Works - Palmer, Mass, 

Branch Plant: 

Sparrows Point, Md. 



Warehouses & Branch Offices: 
Phila. , Penna. 
PittsMrgh, Penna. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
New Orleans, La. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Tulsa, Okla. 
Houston, Texas 
Chicago, 111. 



8314 



-52- 



■JiTarehouses & Branch Offices: (Cont'd) 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
New York, K. Y. 
Blackwell, Okla. 
Odessa, Texas 
Tampa, Fla. 
HolDbs, Few Mexico 



Wilson « Bennett Mfg. Co, 
Chicago, 111. 



Branches: 

Jersey City, IT. J. 
Hew Orleajis, La. 



Woodings Verona Tool Works 
Verona, Penna. 



Plant: . 

Oakmont, Penna. 



Yale & Towne Mfg. Co. 



Branch Plants: 

Starflford, Conn. Division 
Phila. , Penna. Division 
Walker- Automatic Div. , 

Chicago, 111. 
S£.eg6.r Lock Works, 

Chicago, 111. 
llorton Door Closer Co. , 

Chicago, 111. 
Detroit Plant, Detroit, Mich. 
Walker Vehicle Co., 

Chicago, 111. 
Barrows Lock Works, 

Worth Chicago, 111. 



M. M. Young & Co. 
Chicago, 111. 



Artforge, M. M. Young Co. 
(same concern) 



8314-#