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Full text of "Evidence study"

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3 9999 06317 558 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 



OFFICE OF NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION ^ 



I 



If 
i 



EVIDENCE STUDY NO. 42 

OF THE 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL FOOD INDUSTRY 

By 

THE INDUSTRY STATISTICS UNIT 



February, 1936 



aHT -^o 



aoo"^ jiATSH awA a> 



waivaH ao woisivia 



THE EVIDENCE STUDY SERIES 



The EVIDENCE STUDIES rrure originplly planned as a mepns of gathering 
evidence herjring unon vari :us legal issues which ^rose under the National In- 
dustrial Recovery Act. 

These studies have value quite aside from the use for which they -^ere 
origina-lly intended. Accordingly, they are now made availahle for confidential 
use within the Division of Review, anc for inclttsion in Code Histories. 

The' full list of the Evidence Studies is as follows: 



1. Automohile Llrnuf acturing Ind. 23. 

2. Boot and Shoe Mfg. Ind. 24. 

3. Bottled Soft Drink Ind. 25. 

4. Builders' Supolies Ind. 26. 

5. Chemical Mfg, Ind, 27. 

6. Cigar Mfg. Industry 28. 

7. Construction Industry 2S . 

8. .Cotton G-armcnt Industry 30. 

9. Dress Mfg. Ind. 31. 

10. Electrical Contracting Ind. 32. 

11. Electrical Mfg. Ind. 33. 

12. Eatricattd Metal Prod. Mfg. etc. 34. 

13. Fishery Industry 35. 

14. Furniture Mfg. Ind. 36. 

15. General Contractors Ind. 37. 

16. Graphic Arts Ind. 38. 

17. Gray Iron Foundry Ind. 39. 

18. Hosiery Ind, 40. 

19. Infant's & Children's Wear Ind. 41. 

20. Iron aJid Steel Ind. 42. 

21. Leather Industry 43. 

22. Lumher & Tiinher Prod. Ind. 



Mason Contractors Industry 

Men' s Clothing Industry 

Motion Picture Industry 

Motor Bus Mfg. Industry ^DROPPED) 

NeedleTTorfc Ind. of Puerto Rico 

Painting & Papcrhanging & Decorating 

Photo Engraving Industry 

Pluialjing Contracting Industry 

Retail Food (See No. 42) 

Retail Lumher Industry 

Retail Solid Puel (DROPPED) 

Retail Tra.de Industry 

Ruhber Mfg. Ind. 

Rubber Tire Mfg. Inc. 

Silk Textile Ind. 

Structural Clay Products Ind. 

Thro'-fing Industry 

Trucking Industry 

Waste Materials Ind. 

Wholesale & Retail Food Ind. (See No.3l) 

Whole-sale Fresh Fruit & Veg. 



In addition to the studies "brought to completion, certain materials have 
heen assembled for other industries. These MATERIALS are included in the series 
and arc also made available for confiaential use within the Division of Review 
and for inclusion in Code Histories, as follows: 

44. Wool Textile Industry 49. Household Goods & Storage etc. (DROPPED) 

45. Automobile Parts & Equiioment Ind. 50. Motor Vehicle Rt;tailing Trade Ind, 

46. Baking Industry 51. Retail Tire & Battery Trade Ind. 

47. Canning Industry 52. Ship & Boat Bldg. & Repairing Ind. 

48. Coat and Suit Ind. 53. Wholesaling or Distributing Trade 



L, C. Marshall 
Director, Division of Review 



9653 



CONTENTS 

Page 
General Notes 1-6 

•"ffiOLES..\LE FOOD AlTD GROCERY TRADE 7-16 

TiBLE I - General Statistics, 1929 7 

TABLE II - N-oinber of EstalDlishments and Net 

Sales of Wliolesale Grocers in 1929, 

and Nujnter of Establishments in 

1953, by States 8 

TABLE III - Geographical Distribv.tion of Vi[hole- 

salere in food and Grocery Trade, 1929 . 9 

TABLE IV - Distribution of Sales of 40,431 
Llan'ofacturing Establishments 
Producing Grocery Items in 1929 10 

TABLE V - Sales to Wholesalers by Selected. 
Industries Producing Grocery 
Items, 1S29 11 

TABLE VI - Commodities Handled by Three Types 
of Fnolesale Establishments in the 
Food ajid Grocery Trade 12 

TABLE VII - Nmaber of Chain Store Warehouses, 
by States, and Net Sales of Chain 
Store Warehouses in Selected States, 
1929 and 1933 13 

TABLE VIII - Sales-Territory Radius Reported by 
Wliolesa^lers in the Whole sale Food 
and Grocery Trade in Eir^htecn Cities, 
1929 14 

TABLE IX - Operating E:q5ense Analysis of the 
Wliolesale Food and Grocery Trade, 
.Uy Tyoe of Establislment , 1929 15 

TABLE X - Length of Life of Establishments 
in the Vtoolesale Grocery and Food 
Specialty Trade, by Four T^y^es, 1930 . . 16 



9653 - i - 



Page 

RETAIL ?00D 11© GROCERY TRADE .... 17 - 29 

TABLE XI - Numlier of EstalDlishments and 

Sales, Total and Chain, 1929 and 1933 ... 17 

TABLE XII - llumter and Per Cent of Retail 

Grocery Stores, Total ajid Chain, 

ty States, 1929 and 1933 18 

TABLE XIII - Value of Net Sales of Retail 

Grocery Stores, Total and Chain, 

■by States, 1929 and 1933 19 

TABLE XIV - Retail Grocery Chain Stores: 
Establishments and Sales as 
Percentage of Total Grocery Trade, 
by States, 1929 and 1933 20 

TABLE XV - Averaf^e n'Omber of Employees in 
Retail Grocery Stores, by 
Principal States, 1929 and 1933 21 

TABLE XVI - Seasonality of Employment in 

Retail Grocery Stores, 1933 , . 22 

TABLE XVII - Total Annual Wages Paid by 
Retail Grocery Stores, by 
Principal States, 1929 end 1933 23 

TABLE XVIII - Total Value of Ilet Sales of 
Retail Grocery Stores, 
1929, 1933, and 1934 24 

TABLE XIX - Retail Grocery Stores, Classified 
According to Value of Sales, 
1929 and 1933 25 

TABLE XX - Total Value of Sales and Total 

Labor Cost of Retail Grocery Stores, 

1929 and 1933 . 26 

TABLE XXI - Prices; Selling 27 

TABLE XXI - A -Index of Retail Price of Pood 

(1915=100). 27 

TABLE XXI - 3 -Index of Retail Price of Pood 

(1929=100) 27 



9653 - ii 



TABLE XXII - Prices: Coct 28 

TABLE XXI I-A - Index of Wliolesple Prices of Pood 

(1925=100) 28 

TABLE XXI I-B - Index of ■ifnolesale Prices of Pood 

(1929=100) 28 

TABLE XXIII - Per Capita Bxi^enditure on Retail 
Groceries, Arranged in Descending 
Order, 1929 29 



******* 



9653 _ iii _ 



- 1 - 



THB WHOLESiiLE AKD RETAIL FOOD AlO GROCERY TRAIE 
(Codes Sos. 182 and 196) 
GEKERAl MOTES 



The vast amount of data pertpining to the Wholesale 
and Retail Food and Grocery Trade differs widely according 
to the compiler's conception of the Industry, The material 
presented here is limited as nearly as possible to the fields 
covered hy the two Codes Nos. 182 and 196, It in no way ex- 
hausts the sources of pertinent information, hut it does 
present in compact form a great deal of carefully compiled 
and applicahle data. For simplicity's sake, the figures have 
heen drawn almost entirely from authentic Census sources. 

TTholesale Food and Grocery Trade 

Definition of the Industry 

The term, "Wholesale Food and Grocery Trade," as 
defined "by Code No, 196, includes 

"... all selling or supplying to 
retailers, industrial buyers, restaurants, 
or institutions, or the selling on the cart 
of one wholesaler to another of food and/or 
grocery products, but shall not include the 
selling or supplying of meat products (except 
in cans) , fish or the selling or supplying of 
fresh fruit and produce, and provided further 
the term shall not include the selling or 
supplying of any food or grocerjr product which 
is now or may hereafter be governed by a 
separate code," 

Sources 

Uost of the data presented in^the following tables 
have been token from the United States Census of Wholesale 
Distribution, In 1933, establishments with annual sales of 
less than $1,000 were not covered by the Census canvass, 
while in 1929 all establishments were included. For this 
reason, Census data for 1929 and 1933 are not strictly com- 
parable. 



9653 



- 2 - 



The difference would materially affect the num"ber of esta"b- 
lishments but would have a negligible influence on the 
volume of business. Some of the detailed breakdowns pub- 
lished for 1929 axe not available for 1953; consequently it 
is not alv/ays possible to present similar data for the two 
years. 

The price data are U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 
material, 

Cou'Darability of Code and Census Classifications 

Code No. 458 covers Wholesale Confectioners separately. 
Therefore, the industry subject to Code Ko, 196 is comparable 
to the Census classification, "Groceries and Food Specialties," 
In the 1933 Census, the classifications are some'^hat different 
and it is necessary to combine "Groceries (general line)" and 
"Other food and grocery specialties" in order to get a com- 
parable group. 

Importers and exporters are included in the Census 
classification; there is some question as to whether or not 
they are covered by the Code, There is a separate code 
(No. 487) for the Importing Trade, However, whether a firm 
is subject to the Wholesale Food and Grocery Code or to the 
Inpcrting Code is determined by the proportion of strictly 
wholesaling and strictly importing business that it does. 
There is no way of knowing exactly how many importing estabf- 
lighrjents 0"oerate \mder each cede, but is likely that about 
'er cent of them come under the Fnolesale Food and Grocery 
^. There has never been any definite interpretation of 
the Code v/ith regard to exoorters. It is assumed that, being 
wholesalers and not subject to any other separate code, they 
would be included; though they might be exempted from the tra.de 
practice provisions. Because of the practical impossibility of 
determining \ihat Tjortion of exjDorters and importers to exclude 
from the Code, and also because together they constitute such 
a- small portion of the total (o per cent of the establishments, 
3,7 per cent of the net sales, and 2,4 per cent of the employees 
in 1929), it has seemed best to include them in the data pre- 
sented here. 




9653 



- 3 - 



Trade Association 

According to the tpstinony of llvo II. L. Toulme at 
the Code Hearing on October 3, 1&23, the most represent- 
ative trade association is the llational-Arierican tVhole- 
sale Grocers' Association, This orgaaization is a merger 
of the national and the American Winolesale G-rocers' 
Associations, and has 1,798 d-iies-paj^ing members represent- 
ing every state in the Uniono 



Retail ?ood and Grocery Trade 

Definition of the Industry 

According to Code ITo. 182 the term "Retail Food and 
Groceiy Trade" shall mean 

". . . all selling of food and/or grocery 
products to the consumer and not for purposes 
of resrle in aiy form, hut shall not include 
the selling of food in restaurants for con- 
sumption upon the premises, or the selling of 
confections in confectioners' stores, or the 
selling of -nilk or its products by delivery 
from house to house u'pon regular routes, or the 
selling of bakery products in bakerj- stores. 
It is provided, further, that the term shall 
not include the selling of any food or grocery 
product which is no?; or may hereafter be governed 
by a separate coder" 

A retail food and grocery establishment is defined as 

"... . any store, department of a store, 
shop, stand, or other pl^.ce vrhere a food ajid 
grocery retailer carries on business other 
than those places v/here the principal business 
is the selling at retail of products not in- 
cluded within the definition of retail food 
and grocery trade, " 



9653 



4 - 



Sources 

Practically all of the data in the follo;ving tables 
have been compiled from the U. S. Census of Retail Dis- 
tribution in 1929 f?Jid 1933, Some of the fi.fnires have been 
gleaned from Dun a,nd Bradstreet and the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, All sources are clearly indicated in the foot- 
notes. 

Comparability of Code and Census Classifications 

Since the Retail Meat Trade is covered by a separate 
code, the industry subject to Code LTo, 182 corresponds fairly 
well '.7ith the sura of the two Census classifications, "G-rocery 
Stores (without meats)" ;md "Combination Stores (meat and 
grocery)" — with tuo minor o^ualif ications: 

1, Under the Code, all grocery departments in 
department stores are included. However, 
no data on such departments are available 
and consequently no attempt has been made 

to adjust the Census totals to include them. 
Their effect on the total would probably be 
negligible, 

2, The Industry as defined by the Code includes 
delicatessen stores. The Census gives separate 
data for delicatessen stores in 1929, but not 
in 1933, Therefore, in order to keep the data 
for the two j^ears comparable, delicatessen 
stores have not been included in either year. 
In 1929, the inclusion of delicatessen stores 
would have made a, difference in the totals of 
3,5 per cent in number of establishments, 2,5 
per cent in n^ainber of em.ployees, and 2,6 per 
cent in net sales. 

Adjustment for £ :- :clusion of Small Towns 

To malie the Census classifications more nearly fit the 
Code coverage, a further adjustment is necessary. Under 
Executive Order #6354, all plpces having a population of 2,500 
or less are exempt from the Retail Food and Grocery Code, 
Statistical data on retail trade for this grour) are very 
limited. The estimates used in the Statistics Unit comriutations 
are based on all pertinent Census data that are available and on 
the following assumptions: 



9653 



_ 5 - 



1, That the rntios of stores pnd of sales 
in places of 2,500 or less to all stores 
and all sales respectively v;ere the sa:ue 
in 1933 as in 1929, Census fignxi-es show 
that this was tru.e of places of 10,000 
or less, 

2, That the ratio of grocery stores and com- 
"bination stores (meats and groceries) to 
all food stores was the saue in places cf 
2,500 or less as in Tjlaces of 10, 00 J or 
less. This ap^ilied to both nirnilDer of 
stores and net sales, 

3, That the average n'orater of enplc:-ees 
(full-tirae and part-time) per establish- 
ment was the same in places of 2,500 or 
loss as in places of 10,000 or less; 
tliat this ratio was slightly lower in 
1933 than in 1929. 

The estinates nade under these assuiapticns are: 



1929 



1933 



H-umber of stores in places of 27':a of all 27^^ of all 
2,500 or less stores stores 

iNfet sales in places of 2,500 17fj of all 17^0 of all 
or less sales sales 



Ifenber cf employees in places 
of 2,500 or less 



1,1 per 
establish- 
ment 



1 jjer estab- 
lisliment 



Where data have been adjusted as explained above, 
the fact is noted. If no adjustment is noted, the figures 
include all places. 

Labor Sata 

Fnile the Censiis iirrnishes inf cr..iation on envployment 
and aggregrate wage payments, there is no source cf information 
on wage rates and. hovirs of labor. The Industry Statistics 
Unit ha.s computed., from a Bureau of Labor Stptistics sample, 
sn average weekly earnings figure of $19,25 in 1934, 



9653 



6 - 



Finpncial Failures 

Aderiiaste data on fnilixres in the Retail Pood and 
Grocery Trade as defined ty the Code do not exist. How- 
ever, Dun and Bradstreet (Current Analysis of Insolvency 
Trends , Petruary 28, 1935, p. lO) estimates 1,455 failures 
in 19o4 among the establislii-aents under the Retail ?ood a.nd 
Grocery Code, 



9653 



- 7 - 

TABLE I 

TOOiaSALE FOOD AND (fflOCERY THADE 
General Statistics, I929 







Net Sales 




Kisnber 


of Bnployees 




Salaries 

and Wages 
(Thousands 
of Dollars) 


Total 

Expenses 
( Thouaands 
of Dollars) 


Nvanter of 
Type of Wholesaler Establishnents 


(Thousands 
of Dollars) 


Total 


Salesmen 


Executives 


All Other 


Total. All Types s/ 


13.6lg 


9.11g,6»+l 


187.766 


5l,ll»^ 


7.591 


129,061 


320.105 


677.246 


*AgentB and Brokers 


I.S5I 


l,75l.99i^ 


7.51'^ 


2. 803 


682 


't.029 


17,766 


34,260 


•Casb-and-Carry Wholesalers 


362 


101.188 


l.lflll 


281 


99 


1.034 


2,212 


^.563 


•Chain-Store Warehouses 
Exporters 2/ 


23I* 


i,»*57,'^08 


16.819 


— 


U62 


"•511 


24.195 


50.795 


66 


85.«3i 


698 


185 


51 


1.378 




Importers ^ 


335 


252.177 


3.833 


1.035 


278 


2.520 


7.782 


d'M 


Manufacturers' Sales Branches 


2.315 


l,UgO,l62 


39.059 


19.592 


1,081 


18,386 


72.233 


201,558 


•Wholesale Merchants 


















(General Line) 


»*.776 


2,660,450 


83.oUg 


15. 809 


3.»*11 


63,828 


13^.356 


241,648 


•Wholesale Merchants (Specialty) 


3.1^*9 


901.863 


25.023 


7.821 


1.296 


15.906 


»*3.877 


91.787 


•Wagon Distributors 


178 


18.999 


92I+ 


553 


U5 


326 


1.660 


2,929 


All Other Types 5/ 


352 


Uo8,569 


9.U3U 


3.035 


186 


6,213 


14.645 


29.458 


Source: Bureau of the Census. Wholesale Distribution. "Groceries 


and rood 1 


Specialties 


," 1929. Table 


6, p. 3^*. 






aj In 1933 the totals (not 


strictly comparable) were: 















Number of Establishnents - l4,906 

Net Sales - $6,014,005,000 

Average Pull-Time Bi5>loyees - 155.122 

Total Payroll (Pull-Time and Part-Time) - $233,849,000 

Total Esqpenses - $521,229,000 



c/ 



See text, p. 2. 



Includes II3 assemblers and country bviyers with net sales of $14,425,591; 117 wholesaling manufacturers, $32,3'*-8.365» 

31 district and general sales offices. $137,797,528; 28 cooperative marketing associations. $24,317,610; 19 purchasing 

agents and resident buyers, $125,531,513; I9 drop shippers, $5,768,346; l4 distributing warehouses, $7,583,984; 

4 export agents, $284,361; 3 import agents, $693,902; 2 cooperative sales agencies; 1 auction company; and 1 mail-order 

wholesaler. 

♦ Under Code for Wholesale Pood and Grocery Trade. No. I96. 



Prepared by; 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, NRA 



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10 - 



TA'BLE IV 

WHOLESALE i'COD MU) GEOCERY Ti'LADE 

Distribution of Srles of 40, 451 Man-jf- ct iring 
Establishments Producing Grocery Items 

in 1929 



I^Tje of 
Establislament 



Amount a/ 


Per Cent 


(In Thousands) 


of Total 


$7,994,433 


100.0 


3,317,690 


41.5 


1,279,109 


■15.0 


991,310 


12.4 


975,321 


12.2 


655,543 


8.2 


44-7,688 


5,6 


327,772 


4.1 



Total 

* Tfliolesalers 

M r?jruf B.c tur e r s ' 

TTholesale Branches 

* Chain Store \7arehouses 

Retailers 

Industrial Consvjners 

Home Consumers 

Manuf ac tur e r s ' He t ai 1 
Branches 



Source: Bureau of the Consus, VJholesale Distrilpution , 
"Groceries and Pood Specinlties, " 1929, 
pp. 18 pnd 19. 

a/ Total arriount is 11,4 loer cent of value of 
products of all manufacturing industries, 

* Under Code for T/liolesale Pood -ind Grocery Trade, 
llo, 196, 



Prepared "by; 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of "Review, iJ3A 



9653 



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- 12 ~ 



TABLE VI 

■TffiOLESALE FOOD AJ^ID GROCERY TRAliE 
Commodities Handled ty Three Types of ifnolesale 
SstaMishments in the Ecod and Grocery Trade a/ 



Commodity 



Total 



Bakery Products 
Canned Goods 
Ciga.rs, Ci-esrettes 

a.nd Tobacco 
Confectionery and 

Soft Drinks 
Da-iry Products and 

Eggs 
Pish and Sea Eoods 
Pruits and Vegeta"bles 

(Fresh and Dried) 
Groceries 

Meats and Meat Products 
Soaps and Toilet 

Preps ra.tions 
All Other Commodities 



Per Cent of Total Commodity Sales 



Wholesale 

Merchants 

(General 

Line) 



100.0 



Wholesale 

Merchants 

(Specialty) 



100.0 



0.7 


5.0 


18.8 


16.6 


6.0 


0.2 


7.1 


0.7 


3.9 


4.2 


0.3 


0.2 


4.6 


8.1 


47.3 


53.5 


1.3 


0.8 


3.0 


1.1 


7.0 


9.6 



Chain 

Store 

Warehouses 



100.0 

4.5 

6.4 

4.6 
2.1 

11,4 
0.3 

12.0 

48.8 

4.3 

1.1 

4.5 



Scm-ce: Bureau of the Census, Wliolesale Distrihutic n . "Groceries 
and Food Specialties," 1929, p. 54. 



d 



All three types of wholesalers listed here are under the 
Code for the" Wholesale Food and Grocery Trade. 



Prepared hy. 

Industry Sta.tistics Unit 

Statistics Section 

Division cf PLeview, ERA. 



9653 



-13- 



"31 






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m- 



TABLE VIII 



WHOLESALE POOD MD GHOCEHY THADi 
Sales-Territory BadluB Beported by Wholesalers In the Wholesale Tood and 
Grocery Trade in Elgjjteen Cities, I929 sJ 











Per Ceni 


; of Net 


Sales Made by EstablishmentE in the ?ollow1ng Territories 


• 


Number of 


Net 


Sales 






as Measured from their 


Headquarters 














Over 500 
But not 


Miles 






Amount 








Establish- 


(ThousandB 


Per Cent of 


Up to 


76 to 


151 to 


251 to 


Nation 


Nation 




City 


ments 


of Dolliurs) 


U. S. Total 


75 Miles 


150 Miles 250 Miles 


500 Miles 


Wide 


Wide 


All Other ^ 


U. S. Total 


h.nG 


2,660,1+50 


100.0 


— 


.M 


,^ 


,, ,, 


_ 






Total for 18 Cities 


632 


611,380 


23.0 


44.7 


7.3 


10.7 


11.4 


l4.2 


9.2 


2.5 


New York 


153 


123.368 


4.6 


47.3 


— 


0.7 


4.9 


33.6 


12.5 


1.0 


Chicago 


6U 


90,417 


3.4 


28.4 


4.2 


0.9 


3.0 


23.1 


40.4 




Philadelphia 


51 


1+6,0711 


1.7 


77.3 


9.8 


5.2 


4.3 




3.4 


— 


Detroit 


29 


22,799 


0.9 


96.1 


3.3 


— 


0.6 


— 


— 


— 


Los Angeles 


U5 


51.516 


1.9 


51.5 


5.6 


18.8 


23.7 


0.4 


— 


_ 


Cleveland 


13 


23.333 


0.9 


11.2 


10.2 


3.5 


75.1 


— 


— 


->. 


St. Louie 


28 


31.545 


1.2 


35.6 


7.2 


38.1 


9.0 


5.1 


5.0 


_ 


Baltimore 


29 


17.178 


0.6 


71.1 


4.0 


7.3 


17.6 






_ 


Boston 


31 


li+.gii+ 


0.6 


46.6 


17.1 


10.0 


— 


26.3 


— 


— 


Pittsburgh 


29 


2l+,12l+ 


0.9 


68.6 


24.1 


2.S 


'*•? 


— 


— 


..~ 


San Francisco 


1+0 


53.741 


2.0 


26.1 


11.9 


8.6 


28.4 


22.9 


2.1 


— 


Milwaukee 


27 


2l+,7l+2 


0.9 


27.5 


9.6 


46.8 


16.1 


— 


— 


— 


Buffalo 


12 


12.336 


X).5 


59.6 


40.4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


New Orleans 


2k 


16,032 


0.6 


53.3 


9.0 


1.9 


19.1 


-» 


— 


16.7 


Seattle 


21 


25.254 


0.9 


9.6 


4.1 


42.0 


0.1 


— 


— • 


V+.2 


Denver 


7 


16.236 


0.6 


0.2 


10.6 


50.3 


— 


38.4 


— 


..... 


Atlanta 


15 


6.579 


0.2 


100^0 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Dallas 


8 


11,292 


0.4 


89.1 


10.9 













Source: Bureau of the Census, Wholesale Distribution, "Groceries and Pood Specialties," 1929, Tables 11, 12 and 13- 

a/ Wholesalers represented here are those handling a general line of grocery items and selling mainly to retail stores. 

b/ Includes establishments engaged in foreign trade, in domestic and foreign trade, and a few establishments that did not report the sales 
territory covered. In Seattle a large ehare of the business was in sales to Alaska and the Orient. 



Prepared by: 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, NEA 



-15 



TABLE IX 



TOOLESAIE FOOD AND OBDCEET TRADE 
Operating Sxpenae Anaulysis of the WholesEile Food and Grocery Trade, 
by Type of Establiehnent, 1929 

(AmoTmta in ThouBandB of Dollars) 









Total E:5)enses 
Per 






Salaries 


and Wages 








Expenses of 
Salesmen 


Rent 


s/ 


All Ot 
Ezsens 


her 




Total 


Executives 
Per 


Salesmen 


All Others 
Per 


es 






Per 




Per 








Per 




Per 


Per 




Number of 






Cent 




Cent 




Cent 




Cent 




Cent 




Cent 




Cent 




Cent 


Type of 


Establish^ 


Net 




of Net 




of Net 




of Net 




of Net 




of Net 




of Net 




of Net 




of Net 


Establishment 


ments 


Sales 


Amount 


Sales 


Amoflnt 


Sale* 


Amount 


Sales 
0.4 


Amount 
112,956 


Sales 


Amount 


Sales 


Amotmt 


Sales 


Amount 


Sales 


Amount 


Sales 


Total 


13,6lg 


9.118.641 


e-n.2ks 


7.4 


320.105 


3.5 


4o.o48 


1.3 


167,101 


1.8 


33.400 


0.4 


22,731 


0.3 


301,011 


3.3 


Agents and Brokers 


1.851 


1.751.993 


34.260 


2.0 


17.766 


1.0 


4.471 


0.3 


7.838 


0.4 


5.^57 


0.3 


2,640 


0.2 


1,622 


0.1 


12,232 


0.7 


Cash and Carry 






































Wholesalers 


362 


101,188 


4.563 


4.5 


2,212 


2.2 


334 


0.3 


532 


0.5 


1.3^6 


1.4 


54 


0.1 


508 


0.5 


1.789 


l.S 


Chain-Store ffarehouses 


23I* 


l.k'JI.kOS 


50.795 


U 


24.195 


1.7 


2,626 


0.2 




— 


21.509 


1.5 


~ 


— 


2,411 


0.2 


24,189 


1.7 


Exporters _ 


66 


85.831 


3.563 


1,378 


1.6 


304 


0.4 


220 


0.3 


854 


0.9 


80 


0.1 


137 


0.2 


1,968 


2.3 


Importers 


335 


252.177 


16,686 


6.6 


7.782 


3.1 


1,881 


0.8 


2.270 


0.9 


3.631 


1.4 


870 


0.3 


827 


0.4 


7.206 


7.5 


Manufacturers' Sales 
Branches ^ 






































2.315 


l.U80,l62 


201.558 


13.6 


72,233 


4.9 


5.049 


0.4 


38.727 


2.6 


28.457 


1.9 


15.152 


1.0 


3.^11 


0.3 


110.761 


7.5 


Wholesale Merchants 






































(General Line) 


U.776 


2. 660,^50 


24l.64g 


9.1 


134.356 


5.1 


17.006 


0.6 


38.680 


1.5 


78,670 


3.0 


7.883 


0.3 


8,892 


0.5 


90.516 


3.4 


Wholesale Merchants 






































(Specialty) 


3. 1^+9 


901. S63 


91.737 


10.2 


43.877 


4.9 


6.777 


0.8 


18. 116 


2.0 


18.984 


2.1 


5.018 


0.6 


3.891 


0.6 


39.001 


4.3 


Wagon Distribution 


178 


18.999 


2.929 


15.4 


1.660 


8.7 


160 


0.3 


1.115 


5.9 


385 


2.0 


46 


0.2 


81 


0.7 


1.142 


6.0 


All Other Types S/ 


352 


U08,569 


29.458 


7.2 


14.645 


3.6 


1.379 


0.4 


5.458 


1.3 


7.808 


1.9 


1.656 


0.4 


950 


0.3 


12,206 


3.0 


Source: Bureau of the 


Census, Whol 


esale Distribution, 


"Groceries and Po 


od Specialties, 


" 1929. 


Table 21 


• 



















a/ Per ceat of net sales is based upon only tliose establishments reporting rent. For tills reason the detailed percentages do not alwsiys add to the same figure 
as total expenses. 

b/ Hot under the Code for the vnaolepale Food and Crrocory Trade. 

c/ All Other Types C'imprise drop shippers, cooperative marketing associations, assemblers of fara prodicts, etc. 



Prepared by: 

Industry Statistics Unit 

Statistics Section 

Divirion "^ Review, NHA 



-16- 



TABLS X 



WHOLESALE ?00D AND OHOCEHT TRADE 

Length of Life of Establlsbnezits in the Wholesale Grocery 

and Food Specialty Trade, by Tour Types, 1930 



Wholesale Merchants^ 
(General Line) 



Wholesale UerchantsS/ 
( Specialty) 



Manuf actxirers > 
Sales Branches^ 



Chain Store 
Warehouse s§/ 



Tears 




Per Cent 




Per Cent 




Per Cent 




Per Cent 


Established 


Number 


of Total 


Number 


of Total 


Number 


of Total 


Number 


of Total 


Total 


h.ne 


100.0 


3.H+9 


100.0 


2.315 


100.0 


234 


100.0 


1 Year 


181 


3.8 


228 


7.2 


191 


8.2 


11 


4.7 


2 Tears 


202 


4.2 


275 


8.7 


^ 


2.4 


35 


15.0 


3 Tears 


191 


k.O 


184 


5.8 


^5 


1.9 


9 


3.8 


k Tears 


175 


3.7 


154 


4.9 


33 


1.4 


8 


3.4 


5 Tears 


186 


3.9 


157 


5.0 


23 


1.0 


12 


5.1 


6-10 Tearm 


971 


20.3 


696 


22.1 


186 


8.0 


55 


23.5 


11 - l6 Years 


7^1 


15.7 


336 


10.7 


169 


7.3 


^ 


14.5 


17-30 Tears 


1.1^7 


2U.O 


601 


19.1 


849 


36.8 


17.1 


31 - 55 Tears 


639 


I3.H 


303 


9.6 


503 


21.7 


19 


8.1 


56 - 80 Tears 


231* 


k,S 


122 


3.9 


68 


3.0 


6 


2.6 


More than 80 Tears 


26 


0.5 


24 


0.8 


55 


2.4 


2 


0.9 


All Other s/ 


77 


1.6 


69 


2.2 


137 


5.9 


1 


1.3 


So-urce: Bureau of the Census, 


Wholesale 


Distributipn, 


"Groceries 


and Food Specialties, 


" 1929, 


Table 8. 



a/ Under Code for Wholesale Food and Grocery Trade, No. I96. 

b/ Not under the Code. 

0/ Established prior to 1924 but exact date not reported. 



Prepared by: 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, NRA 



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^ 


(U 


t-f 


CO 


P 



TABLE X7 



HETAIL FOOD AND OBOCERT TRADE 

Average N\anber of Bn5)loyee8 in Retail Grocery Stores, 

by Principal States, I929 and I933 s7 







1929 






1933 


" ' 




Full 


-Time 


Part-Time 


ruii- 


•Time 


Part- 


-Time 


State 


Number 


Per 
Cent 


Number 


Per 
Cent 


Number 


Per 
Cent 


Number 
134.041 


Per 

Cent 


U. S. Total 


337.139 


100.0 


106,489 


100.0 


320,240 


100.0 


100.0 


California 


lg,Ug6 


5.U8 


4,497 


4.22 


16.672 


5.21 


5.245 


3.92 


Illinois 


23.190 


6.28 


7.306 


6.86 


20,123 


6.28 


9,326 


6.96 


Maseachuaetts 


21.1+38 


6.36 


6.7^ 


6.33 


22,051 


6.89 


7.183 


5.36 


Michigan 


15.976 


4.7U 


4,299 


4.04 


12,984 


4.05 


6.170 


4.60 


Uis souri 


11.001 


3.26 


2.738 


2.57 


10,734 


3.35 


4,199 


3.13 


New Jersey 


13.1H2 


3.90 


4.312 


4.05 


13.859 


4.32 


5.161 


3.86 


New York 


3U.960 


10.37 


9.266 


8.70 


38.001 


11.87 


12.023 


8.98 


Ohio 


22,591 


6.70 


7,090 


6.65 


18,563 


5. 80 


10.640 


7.93 


Pennsylvania 


30,5S5 


9.07 


9.336 


8.77 


29,203 


9.12 


5^044 


9.06 


Texas 


12,640 


3.75 


4,20s 


3.95 


11.879 


3.71 


3.76 


Total. 10 States 


204,009 


60.51 


59.792 


56.14 


194,069 


60.60 


77.144 


57.56 


Total, all other 


133.130 


39. 49 


46,697 


43.86 


126.171 


39.40 


56.897 


42.44 


Source: Bureau of 


the Census, j 


ietail Di 


stribution. 


1929. Vol 


. I, Parts 


1 2 and 3, 


Tables 1-A and 1; 



1933. "U. S. Suranary," Table 2-A, and State Reports, Table J. Total of Census classifi- 
cations, "Grocery Stores (without meat)" and "Combination Stores (meat and groceries)." 

aj The figures are not adjusted for places of 2,500 or less In population, which are exempt 
from tl» Code. The total average number of full-time and part-time employees subject to 
the Code (see explanation, p. 4 ) is as follows: 



I 



Year 

1929 
1933 
1934 



Employees 

352.263 
372.231 

409,000 



The 1934 estimate is obtained by applying the per cent change in the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics sample to the Census base. 



Prepared by: 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, NRA 



- 22 - 



TiiELS XVI 

HETAIL PGOI) iil^ID GROCERY TIUI® 
Seasonality cf Emolojn-^ient in Retail Grocery Stores, 

1933 
(in thousands) 



TTeel: Ending ITearest 
the 15th 



Kumljer of Pull- 
Ti'ne Enrplc-.z-ees 



Niimber cf Part- 
Time Em-olo"ees 



Ja nua ry 

Eeor-uary 

llarch 

Jiroril 

Llay 

Jiine 

JvO-Zr 

August 

Septeryoer 

Octooer 

No venter 

Deceniljer 



307 
307 
307 
310 
312 
316 
320 
327 
332 
334 
335 
337 



124 
125 
126 
128 
130 
131 
134 
137 
141 
142 
144 
146 



Scui^ce: Biijreau of the Census, Retail Distrihution, 1933, 

"U. S. Sumnary, M Tahle 4-A, p. 31, Total cf Census 
classifications, "Grocery Stores (irithcxit meats)" and 
"Combination Stores (grocery and meat)." 



prepared by: 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, rIRA 



965c 



-23- 



TIBLS XVII 



EETAIL POOD AlTD GROCSHY THADE 

Total Annual Wages Paid by Retail Grocery Stores, 

"by Principal States, 1929 and 1933 a/ 

(Thousands of Dollars) 



State 



1929 



1933 



U. S. Total 

California 

Illinois 

Massachusettss 

Micliigan 

Missouri 

Hew Jersey 

New York 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Texas 

Total, 10 States 
Total, All Other 



437 , 702 



366,764 



26,673 


22,100 


29 , 729 


23,963 


28,711 


25,777 


22,ono 


15,276 


13,718 


11,516 


20,231 


18,478 


52,957 


50,411 


30,237 


22,736 


39,403 


33,890 


14,909 


11,438 


278,568 


235,577 


159 , 134 


131,187 



Source: Bureau of the Census, Retail Distrilution, 1953 , 
"U. S. SimmaTy," Table 3, p. 15, and State 
Reports, Tahle 1; 1929, "U. S. S-ummary," Table 
1-A, p. 45, and Vol. I, Parts 2 and 3. Total 
of Census classifications "Grocery Stores 
(without meats)" and "Combination Stores (meat 
and groceries) ." 



§J 



Wages include full-time and part-time, 



PreiDpjred by; 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, NEIA 



9653 



~ 24 - 



TABLE XYIII 

RETAIL FOOB MID GHOCERY TRADE 

Total VaLiie of Net Sales of Retail Grocery Stores 
1929, 1933, and 1934 

(iiillions of dollars) 



Value of Net Sales 



1929 1933 



1934 



Total T excluding places under 
2,500 popxilation a/ 

Total, including places under 
2,500 population 



6,103 4,153 4,376 



7,353 5,004 5,272 



Grocery Stores (without raeats) 

Combination Stores (grocery 
and meats) 



3,449 1,303 



3,904 3,201 



Source: Bureau of the Census, Retail Distribution, 1933 , 

"U. S, Summary,'' Table Ij p, 7, 1934 estimates based 
on Department of Commerce index of grocery store 

So>-L6 So 

a/ 17 per cent of total of all places has been deducted 
for places of 2,500 or less in population which are 
exempt from Code, (See e:-5)lanation, page 4.) 



Prepared by: 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, NRA 



9653 



25 - 



TABLE XIX 

RETAIL FOOD MD GROCERY TRADE 

Retail Grocery Stores, Classified According to Value of Sales, 

1929 and 1933 



Value of Sales 



iluEiDer of Establishments with Specified 
Value of Sales 



1929 



IxTumher 



Per Cent 
of Total 



1933 



Number 



Per Cent 
of Total 



Total Kumher of 
Establishments 

Total .Sales (Thousands 
of Dollars) 

$1,000,000 or more 
500,000 - 999,999 
300,000 - 439,999 
200,000 - 299,999 
100,000 - 199,999 
50,000 - 99,999 
30,000 - 49,999 
20,000 - 29,999 
10,000 - 19,999 
Less th?n 10,000 



307,425 100.00 



7,352,791 

47 

106 

335 

712 

7,026 

31,412 

43,779 

35,580 

57,822 

130,505 



sJ 

a/ 

0.1 
0.2 
2.3 
10.2 
14.3 
11.5 
18.8 
42.5 



303,910 100,00 



5,004,284 

18 

69 

205 

367 

3,691 

16,099 

29,657 

30 , 607 

54,408 

168,789 



a/ 


a/ 


0.1 


0.1 


1.2 


5.3 


9.8 


10.1 


17,9 


55.5 



Source: Bureau of the Census, Retail Sistrihution. 1929. 

"U, S. Summary, » Table 4-A; 1933, Vol. I, Table 4- A, 
Total of Census classifications, "Grocery Stores (without 
meat)" and "Combination Stores (meat and f;roceries) . " 

a/ Less th,?n 0.05 per cent. 



Prepared by: 

Industry Sta,tistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, NUA 



9653 



26 - 



TjSLE XZ 

EETAIL Food AIO GSOCilltY TE.\DE 

Total Valiie of Sales and Total Labor Cost 

of Retail Grocery- Stores, 1929 and 1933 



Year 



Total Laoor Cost a/ 

Affloimt Per Cent 

(i.illions of Value 

of Dollars) of Product 



Total Value 
of Sales 
(iviillions 
of Dollars) 



1929 
1933 



437,5 
366.8 



5.9 
7.3 



7,353 
5,004 



Source: Bureau of the Census, Retail Distri "buti on, 1933 , 
"Uo S. S-uriiinary," Tallies 1 and 2. Total of Census 
classifications, "Grocery Stores (without laeat)" 
and "Combination Stores (meat and groceries)." 



a/ 



Including v/ages of all employees. 



Prepared "by: 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Sta.tistics Section 
Division of Review, ICRA 



9653 



R-P 


-28 








-27 

TABLE 


XXI 




Code No, 


182 






RETAIL FOOD AKD GROCERY TRADE 
PRICES: SELLING 




1 




XXI-A 

1926 


Index of Retail Price of 
1927 1928 1929 1930 


Food (1913=100) V 

1931 1932 1933 1934 


19S5 






JAK 


164.3 


159.3 


155.1 


154.6 


155.4 


132.8 


109.3 


94-a 


lOR-?. 


iin.fi. 




FEB 


161.5 


156.0 


151.6 


154.4 


153.0 


127.0 


105.3 


90.9 


infi.3 


ip.?..n 




MAR 


1B9.9 


153-R 


151 .4 


153-0 


IRn.l 


l-?.R.a. 


in^^.n 


qn.."! 


lOR.i^ 


12.1..7- 




APR 


162.4 


153.6 


1 52 . 1 


151.6 


Ifil .?. 


isA-n 


103.7 


qn.4 


)n7.4 , 


124.1., 




MAY 


161.1 


155.4 


153.8 


153.3 


150.1 


121.0 


1 0| .3 


93.7 


inR.4 


1?,4.S 




JUN 


159.7 


158.5 


152.6 


154.8 


147.9 


118.3 


lon.i 


96-7 


lOQ-l 


123.n 




JUL 


157.0 


153.4 


152.8 


158.5 


144.0 


119.0 


ini.o 


in4-R 


inq.9 


1?,1.7 




AUG 


155.7 


152.4 


154.2 


160.2 


143.7 


119.7 


inn.R 


infi.7 


m.R 


12P..3 




SEP 


158.5 


154.0 


157.8 


160.8 


145.6 


119.4 


100.3 


107.0 


116.fi 


}Z7i»d 




OCT 


160.0 


156.1 


156.8 


160.5 


144.4 


119.1 


100.4 


107.3 


115.6 






NOV 


161.6 


156.5 


157.3 


159.7 


141.4 


116.7 


99-4 


10fi.fi 


114.9 






DEC 


161.8 


155.9 


155.8 


158.0 


137.2 


114.3 


98.7 


103.9 


n4.fi 






Avorajfll 


160.3 


155.4 


154.3 


156.6 


147.1 


121.3 


10^.1 


93.5 


110.9, 






XXI-B 


Index of Retail Price of 


' Food (1929=100) ^/ 








JAN 


104.9 


101.7 


99.0 


98.7 


99.2 


84.8 


69.8 


60.5 


67.2 


75.7 




FEB 


103.1 


99.6 


96.8 


98.6 


97.7 


Rl.l 


67.2 


SR.n 


fi9.?. 


77.9 




MAR 


102.1 


98.2 


96.7 


97.7 


95. R 


Rn.7 


67-0 


R7.S 


69.?; 


77.7 




APR 


103.7 


98.1 


97.1 


96.8 


96.6 


79.2 


66.2 


57.7 


68.6 


79.2 




MAY 


102.9 


99.2 


98.2 


97.9 


95.8 


77.3 


64-7 


59 -R 


69-2 


79.fi 




JUN 


102.0 


101.2 


97.4 


9R.9 


9A.4 


75.5 


63.9 


61 -7 


69-7 


7R-S 




JUL 


100.3 


98.0 


97.6 


101.2 


92.0 


76.0 


64.5 


fifJ.S 


70-2 


77-7 




AUG 


99.4 


97.3 


98.5 


102.3 


91.8 


76.4 


64.4 


Sfi.l 


71.4 


78. 1 




SEP 


101.2 


98.3 


100.8 


102.7 


93.0 


76.2 


64.0 


68.3 


74.6 


. 79.1 




OCT 


102.2 


99.7 


100.1 


102.5 


92.2 


76.1 


64.1 


fiR-5 


73 -R 




1 


NOV 


103.2 


99.9 


100.4 


102.0 


90.3 


74.5 


63.5 


68.2 


72.4 


1 


DEC 


103.3 


99.6 


99.5 


100.9 


87.6 


73.0 


63.0 


66.3 


73.0 




j 


^Vverapel 


102.4 


99.2 


98.5 


100.0 


93.9 


77.6 


55.2 


63j5 


70.8 
















! 




JAN 
















J 






FEB 
























MAR 
























APR 

























MAY 
























JUN 
























JUL 
























AUG 
























SEP 
























OCT 
























NOV 
























DEC 
















































■ 1 

a/ Bureau of 
b/ Index of F 


Labor Statistics price seri 
etail Price of Food' (XXl-A) 


as for "All Fo 
shifted to IS 


ods." 
?29 base. 







DIVISION OF REVIEW, 
Industi-jr- Statistics unit 



NRA 



R-P 


-28 








- 28- 

TABLE XXII 




Code 


No. 182 





RETAIL FOOD AUD GROCERY 
PRICES : COST 


TRADE 








XXII-A 

1926 


Index of Vfholesale 
1927 1928 1929 


Prices 

1930 


of Food 
1931 


(1926-100) l/ 
1932 1933 1934 


1955 




JAV 


102.6 


97.1 


100.9 


98.9 


97.3 


80-7 


64.7 


RS.S 


M.% 


79-9 


FEB 


100.6 


96.1 


98.8 


98-1 


95.8 


78.0 


62.5 


S?l-7 


RR.7 


8?,. 7 


MAfi 


99.3 


94.7 


98.2 


98.3 


94.3 


77.6 


f52.3 


fi^-fi 


R7-?; 


81 -q 


APR 


100.5 


94.9 


99.7 


98.0 


94.9 


76-3 


61.0 


fifi.l 


fifi.2 


fl4.fi 


MAY 


100.1 


95.3 


101.2 


98.0 


92.2 


73.8 


S9-?, 


B9.4 


67.1 


84.1 J 


JUN 


mn.B 


P4-R 


inn.?; 


M-1 


Pn.R 


77., ?> 


58,8 


61.? 


fiP-R 


R2.fi 


JUL 


98.7 


94.3 


102.2 


102.9 


86.8 


74.0 


fin-q 


65-5 


70.6 


fi2.1 


AUG 


97.5 


94.5 


103.8 


103.5 


87.6 


74.6 


61. 8 


64.8 


7?;-q 


R4.9 


SEP 


99.8 


96.6 


106.5 


103.3 


89.5 


73.7 


61.8 


fi4.q 


7fi.l 


86 -n 


OCT 


100.7 


100.0 


102.1 


101.4 


88-8 


73 .3 


60.?; 


fi4.?. 


',4.-8 


8B-n 


WOV 


100-4 


101-4 


100.0 


98-9 


86.2 


71.0 


fin,fi 


RA.T, 


75.1 




DEC 


inp.n 


ino.7 


98.1 


qa.7 


RP..4. 


fiq.l 


^R ■< 


K9,=; 


iF,.;^ 






ino.o 


26.7 


101.0 


99-9 


90-5 


74.e 


fiun 


fin.fi 


7n.fi 




XXII-B 


Index of Trtiolesale 


Price of Food (1929-100) V' 






1 


JAN 


102.7 


97.2 


101.0 


99.0 


97.4 


80.8 


64.8 


55.9 


64.4 


80.0 


FEB 


100.7 


96.2 


98.9 


98.2 


95-9 


78. 1 


6?..fi 


53.8 


fifi-R 


R?.,fl 


MAH 


99.4 


94.fi 


98.3 


98-4 


94.4 


77.7 


fi5>,4 


R4.,7 


fi7-4 


fl?.-n 


APR 


100-6 


94.9 


99-8 


98-1 


95-0 


76.4 


61.1 


56.2 


66-3 


a4-fi 


MAY 


100.2 


95.4 


101.3 


98.1 


92.3 


73.9 


59.4 


B9-F1 


fi7-?. 


84.?. 


JUN 


100.6 


94.9 


100.4 


99-2 


90.9 


73.4 


S8.q 


61-.-^ 


fiP-q 


a?., 9 


JUL 


98.8 


94.4 


102.3 


103.0 


86-9 


7^.1 


61.0 


65.6 


70.7 


82.2 


AUG 


97.6 


94.6 


103.3 


103.6 


87.7 


74.7 


61.9 


64.9 


74.0 


85.0 


SEP 


99.9 


96.7 


106.6 


103 .4 


89.6 


73.8 


61.9 


65.0 


76-2 


86.2 


OCT 


ICO. 8 


100.1 


102.2 


101-5 


88-9 


73.4 


60.6 


64-3 


74-9 


aR.i 


HW 


100-5 


101-5 


100.1 


99-0 


86.3 


71.1 


60.7 


&4-4. 


7B-?. 




DEC 


100-7 


100.8 


98.2 


98.8 


R2.n 


69-?. 


.S8-4 


fi?..fi 


7B.4 






ion.?. 


96. a 


im.i 


mn.n 


90.7 


74.7 


Hl.l 


fin. 7 


70.7 


i 


i 




JAN 






















FEB 






















UAH 






















APR 






















MAY 




















i 


JUN 






















JUL 






















AUG 






















SEP 






















OCT 






















NOV 






















pec 






















i 






















a/ Bureau oJ 
b/ Index of 


' Labor Statistics pr 
Wholesale Prices of 


iae sor 
Food (? 


"ies for 

:aii-a) 


"Food! 

shiftec 


1 to 19! 


15 base 


• 

— ' 



DIVISION OF REVIEW, N R A 

Industry Statistics Unit 



29 - 



TABLE XXIII 



RETAIL FOOD AlTD C-ROCjIRY THADil 

Pnr Capita Expenditure on Retail C-roceries, 
Arranged in Descending Order, 1939 



:;tate 



Per Capita 
Exoendittire 



State 



Per Capita 
Exrjenditure 



United States 



$50.00 



District of Colmnbia 


108.20 


Rhode I si. and 


100.90 


Massachusetts 


95.40 


Connecticut 


94o30 


New Hampshire 


87.40 


California 


77.40 


Hew Jersey 


77.40 


Delav/are 


77.20 


llevada 


76.60 


Michigan 


74.90 


Maine 


74,30 


Ohio 
Arizona 
Colorado 
Vermont 


72.40 
71.80 
71.40 
69,70 


Oregon 


68.80 


New York 


68.30 


Illinois 


65.70 


Indiana 


65.30 


Washington 


65.70 


Pennsylvania 


65,60 


Florida 


64.50 


Wyoming 


63,20 


Montana 


61.10 



Marjrland 


$60.90 


Missouri 


59,50 


Kansas 


59.00 


Wisconsin 
Iowa 


56.30 
52.00 


IJtaii 


51.40 


Tpxas 


50.50 


Minnesota 
Nebraska 


50.50 
49.60 


Idaho 


49.50 


Oklalioraa 


49.10 


West Virginia 
Virginia 
Kentucky 
Tenner see 
New i.iexico 
G-eorgia 
South DpJiota 


38.40 
38.00 
37.40 
37.40 
36.80 
36.30 
34.90 


IXorth Dal:ota 


33.00 


Nnrth Carolina 


32. 50 


South Carolina 


29.80 


Louisiana 


29.40 


Alabama 


28.70 


Arkansas 


26.60 


Mississiopi 


25.80 



Source: Computed by NRA, Division of Review, iron data in 1929 Census 
of Retail Distribution , and 1930 U. S. Population Census . 



Prepared by: 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, iiRA 



9653#