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Full text of "Evidence study"

NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



EVIDENCE STU.'DY 
NO. 48 

OF 

THE COAT AND SUIT INDUSTRY 



Prepared by 

THE INDUSTRY STATISTICS UNIT 



November, 1935 



PRELIMINARY DRAFT 
(NOT FOR RELEASE: FOR USE IN DIVISION ONLY) 



THE SVlDSllCE STIDY SERIES 

The E7IDE1ICE STUTil'ES were originally lolanned as a Eeans of cjathering evidence 
tearing upon various legal issues Tdiicli arose under the Rational Industrial He- 
cover;/ Act. 

Those studies have value qiaite aside from the use for which they were originally 
intended. Accordingly, they are now made availahle for confidential use vrithin the 
rivision of Heview, and for inclusion in Code Histories. 

The full list of the Evidence Studies is as folloT^s: 



1. Automohile Manufacturing Ind. 23. 

2. Boot and Shoe kfg. Ind. 24. 

3. Bottled Soft Drink Ind. 25. 
4; Builders' Supplies Ind. 26. 

5. Chemical Mfg. Ind. 27. 

6. Cigar Mfg. Industry 28. 

7. Construction Industry 29. 

8. Cotton Carnient Industry 30. 

9. Dress Mfg. Ind. 31. 

10. Electrical Contracting Ind. 32. 

11. Electrical Mfg. Ind. 33. 

12. Eab. Metal Prod. Mfg., etc. 34. 

13. Fishery Industry 35. 

14. Farnitu-re Mfg. Ind. 36. 

15. General Contractors Ind. 37. 

16. Graphic Arts Ind. 38, 

17. dray Iron i'oundry Ind. 39. 

18. Hosiery Ind. 40. 

19. Infant's & Children's TTear Ind. 41. 

20. Iron and Steel Ind. 42. 

21. Leather 43. 

22. Lumber & Timber Prod. Ind. 



Mason Contractors Industry 

Men's Clothing Industry 

Motion Fictiaxe Industry 

Motor Bus Mfg. Industry (Dropped) 

lleedlevrork Ind. of Puerto Rico 

Fainting & paperhanging & Decorating 

photo Engraving Industry 

plumbing Contracting Industry 

P.etail Food (See No. 42) 

p.etail Laraber Industry 

Retail Solid Fuel (Dropped) 

Retail Trade Industry 

Rubber Mfg. Ind. 

Rubber Tire Mfg. Ind. 

Silk Textile Ind. 

Structural Clay products Ind. 

Throwing Industry 

Triacking Industry 

7;'aste Materials Ind. 

Tfnolesale & Retail pood Ind. (See lie, SI) 

Wholesale Fresh Fruit & Veg, 



In addition to the studies brought to completion, certain materials have been 
assonbled for other industries. These MATERIALS are included in the series and are 
also nade available for confidential use v,'ithin the Division of Rc-'-iew and for in- 
''lusion in Code Histories, as follows: 



'44. Wool Textile Industry 

45. Automotive Parts & Equip. 

46. Baking Industry 

47. Canning Industry 

48. Coat and Suit Ind. 



49. Household Goods & Storage, etc. (Dropped) 

Ind. 50. Motor Vehicle Retailing Trade Ind. 

51. Retail Tire & Battery Trade Ind. 

52. Ship & Boat Bldg. & Rerjairing Ind. 

53. Wholesaling or Distributing Trade 



L. C. Marshall 
Director, Division of Review 



I1A.BLES 



TilBLS I 



TADLE II 



laBLE III 



TA.BLZ IV ~ 



TABLE V 



TABLE 71 



TABLE VII 



TABLE VIII 



TABLE IJC 



TABLE 



Factor::^ EiT;lo;-nent, Payrolls, Hovjts, and 

i^Jages, 193G-1S35 4 

Value of Sales, "by Uarket Areas, Spring 

Season, 1SS3 and 1934 5-6 

IJ-uanlDer of All lleedle ITorkers and Needle 

TJor'iers, 10 to 17 Years of A^^e, in 

Selected Industries, '07 Soecified Areas, 

April 1, 1930 V 

ITage Earners and Average HoLirly Earnings, 

by Area, 1S34 8 

Average Hoiirlj- Ea.rnings "by liarkets and 

l.Ia.jor Crafts for tlie Eight ■Jee]:s' Period 

from February 5 to llarch 31, 1934 9 

Manufactijxing Er.vol03-ees Clasnified "by 

Earnings as E.elated to the Prescribed Code 

Standards, by Selected Crafts and Llai'ket 

Areas, for !7ee;r Ending Ilarch 9, 1934 10 

lianufacturing Snployees in lien York City, 
Classified ^oir Earnings as Helated to Code 
I.Iinirauin or Average "oj Occupation and Sex, 
for the VJeek Ending I.Iarch 9, 1934 11 

Lianufacturing Employees in the Eastern 

I.Iarket Area, Classified bj- Earnings as 

Related to Code Iliniaui:! or Average, by 

Occupation and Se::, for the TJeek Ending 

liarch 9, 1934 12 

Manufact-.iring ErnplO'-^ees in Baltimore, 
Classified by Earnings as Related to Code 
I.Iinimun or Average, ''oj Occjpation and Sex, 
for the Week Ending liarch 9, 1934 13 

Lianufact'jji'ing Enployees in the TJe stern 

Market Area, Classified by Earnings as 

Related to Code iiininim or Average, by 

Occupation and Sex, for the Ueek Ending 

March 9 , 1934 14 



9093 



-1- 



COAT MB SUIT IKDUSTRY 
General ITotes 



Code Definition 

The Coat and Suit Industry as defined by the code in- 
cludes: "The manufacture and/or wholesale distribution of 
women's, misses', children's axid infants' coats, jackets, capes, 
wraps, riding habits, Icnickers, suits, ensembles, and skirts' in 
whole or in part, made of woolen, silk (only when made into 
tailored garments), velvet, plush, and other woven or purchased 
laiitted materials. In such instances where a single concern is 
engaged in the manufacture eoid/or wholesale distribution of such 
commodities as well as the manufacture and/or \7h0lesale distribu- 
tion of other commodities not described above, such concerns will 
be deemed a part of the Coat and Suit Industry to the extent of 
that portion of their biisiness that lies in the field herein 
defined," 

The criteria by \7hich indtistry formulated code defini- 
tions were somewhat different from those used by the Bureau of 
the Census and other government agencies in making their classi- 
fications and for this reason figures from government sources 
are not applicable to the Coat and Suit Industry as defined by 
the code. 



Data from the Report of the Coat and Suit Commission 

Labor Data . - The analysis of earnings and costs is 
based upon payroll data which were submitted regularly to the 
Code Authority Vj manufacturers throughout the country. The 
breaicdown of hourly wages by the four major crafts and market 
areas shown in Table V is based upon an eight-week period be- 
ginning February 5 and ending March 31, 1934 and covers all the 
workers in these crafts in each of the market areas with the 
e::ception of that of New York City in which only those in 598 
selected shops are included. The data concerning weekly wages 
broken down bj^ crafts and market areas are based upon payroll 
returns covering all market areas for the week ending March 9, 
19S4. Whether they are based upon a sample or represent complete 
coverage is uncertain. 

Sales Data , - Sales data are based upon returns from 
ouestionnaires sent to "all the manufacturers and jobbers in the 



9093 



-2- 



Coat and Suit Industr" in the United Stctes." Of tlie 1,328 firms 
to riiich questionnaires v;ere sent, 908 or 58 per cent replied. 
The sanple, trhich is considered reliahle, includes large, nedium 
and snail concerns and represents a large section of each narket, 

Cor.iparalDle data for the trro jears, 1933 and 1934, nere 
siipplied 07 ap-oroxirnately 50 per cent of the firus to which ques- 
tionnaires nere sent, Tlie questionnaires called for the dollar 
volume of sales in the first si;-: months of 1953 and for the cor- 
res-Qonding nonths in 1934, In presenting the report of increases 
and decreases of sales in the several markets onl37- firms nhich 
nere in oiisiness in the spring of hoth 1933 and 1934 t/ere included. 
In cases in rhich a firm was in husiness during only a part of the 
spring season of 1933, the figures for the months corresponding to 
those for which it reported in 1933 were used for 1934. The data., 
conseauentlj', do not indicate the actiial increases and decreases 
for the entire industry, since firms that discontinued business or 
entered "business in 1934 are not included and since only part of 
the sales of firms, not in "business over all of the 1933 period, 
were included for 1934, The percentage of firms furnishing corn- 
parahle figiires varied from city to city so that figures for some 
cities, such as Chicago, ITevr York, and Los Angeles are under- 
statements comjarod to other localities as Connecticut and Kansas 
City. 



Data from Other Sources 

Lahor data from the Bureau, of Lator Statistics are "based 
on samples, the size of which, along with otiier descriptive ma- 
terials for these data, are presented in the notes accompanying 
the ta"ble from this source. Description of data from the Code 
Authority are inclu.ded in the ta"ble. 



Prepared hy 

Industry Statistics Unit, 
Statistics Section, 
Division of Review, IDA, 
lTovey:"ber 13, 1935 



9093 



-3- 



Hotes for Form ?i.-P~C 



COAT AND SUIT lEDUSTHY 
(Code IJo. 5) 



1, Employment, Payrolls, and Average Weekly Wages 

Data are "based upon a sample covering an average 
of 104 establishments and 3,018 employees in 1933 and an 
average of 144 establishments and 4,971 employees in 1934, 



2, Average Hours and Average Hourly Wages 

Data are "based upon a sample covering an average 
of 28 estalDlisbments and 983 employees in 1933 and an 
average of 85 establishments and 3,219 employees in 1934, 



Man-Houi 



The inde- of man-hours was derived by multiply- 
ing the inde:: of employment by average hours v/orked per 
week and expressing the results as relative to the 1933 
average. 



Industry Statistics Unit, 
Statistics Section, 
Division of Review, IdA. 
October 2, 1935. 



9092 



-4- 



FORM R-P 


-08 




TABLE I 




Code No. 


5 


COAT MD SUIT INDUSTET 
Fac+ory Employment, Payrolls, Hours, qnd Wages, 1933-1935 


MONTH 


INDEXES 
1933 = too 


AVERAGE 
HOURS 

WORKED 

PER 

WEEK 


WAGES 


AVERAGE 
HOURJ-Y 
(Cents) 


AVERAGE 
WEEKUY 

(Dollars) 


EMPLOYMENT 


PAYROLLS 


MAN-HOURS 


I93ri-JAN 


99.9 


82.5 


117.6 


39.9 


68.1 


27.72 


FEB 


121.2 


127.0 


157.4 


44.0 


64,5 


35,17 


MAR 


117.9 


103.6 


120.7 


34.7 


90.4 


28.84 


APR 


123. 4 


138.4 


142.0 


39.0 


83.9 


36.84 


MAY 


82.3 


58.7 


68.7 


28.3 


83.4 


22.70 


J UN 


49.9 


35.5 


39.3 


26.7 


75.3 


22.16 


JUL. 


93.4 


89.4 


114.4 


41.5 


65.9 


29.25 


AUG 


76.9 


71.7 


71.7 


31.6 


76.4 


27.24 


SEP 


135.0 


197.0 


144.5 


36.3 


93.0 


40.95 


OC-T 


126.6 


142.0 


106.1 


28.4 


93.8 


30,49 


NOV 


96.6 


87.6 


65.8 


23.1 


100.1 


24.93 


DEC 


76.9 


66.8 


51.7 


22.8 


102.5 


23.87 


AVERAGE 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


33.0 


83.1 


29.13 


1 




108.4 


114.4 


87.3 


27.3 


111.9 


28.59 


FEB 


132.2 


169.5 


126.0 


32.3 


103.5 


33.86 


MAR 


135.2 


182.7 


127.2 


31.9 


107.1 


35.90 


APR 


114.6 


118.6 


82.8 


24.5 


107.1 


27.69 


MAY 


80.0 


62.7 


51.5 


21.8 


101.5 


21.10 


JUN 


71.4 


58.5 


47.0 


22.3 


94.6 


21.61 


JUL 


108.5 


123.6 


90.9 


28.4 


104.4 


29.53 


AUS 


134.9 


161.7 


112.2 


28.2 


105.0 


31.19 


SEP 


136.0 


132.6 


90.3 


22.5 


108.8 


25.56 


OCT 


136.1 


159.9 


108.8 


27.1 


110.0 


30.86 


NOV 


119.9 


123.1 


83.9 


23.7 


112.5 


27.58 


DEC 


107.7 


94.1 


64.5 


20.3 


112.1 


23.34 


AVERAGE 


115.4 


125.1 


89.4 


25.9 


106.5 


28.07 


|l 


1935- JAN 


126.3 


133.6 


102.1 


27.4 


107.3 


29.92 


FEB 


135.5 


170.4 


125.9 


SI. 5 


U3.7 


S5:9? 


MAR 


141.4 


182.7 


138.9 


33.3 


107.8 


37.89 


APR 


124.7 


124.2 


85.0 


23.1 


113.7 


27.55 


MAY 


86.2 


64.6 


50.1 


19.7 


108.1 


21.54 


JUN 


78.3 


60.5 


48.3 


20.9 


105.1 


21.94 


JUL 


100.6 


95.9 


84.3 


28.4 


99.7 


E7.65 


AUG 


132.0 


155.8 


122.3 


31.4 


107.4 


54.77 


SEP 


103.0 


166.9 


127.6 


31.8 


114.3 


36,71 


OCT 














NOV 














DEC 














AVERAGE 














Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics In cooperation with the DlTlslon of 
Review, NRA. IKiring June and December 1933 and 1934 actlTltlea of the re- 
porting establishments were covered completely or (in a few eaeea) alaoat 
completely by the code definition. Figures reported were for the. period 
nearest the 15th of the month. 



DIVISION OF REVIEW, NRA 

Industry Statistics Unit, HHS, 8-12-35 



^5~ 



tabu: II 

COAT A:© SUIT DIDUSTRY 
Value of Sales, ty Market Areas, Sprinf; Season, 
1933 and 1934 a/ 









1933 




1934 


Per Cent 


Market Areas 




Thoi 


asands of 


Dollars 


Thousands 


of Dollar 


s Change 


Total 






64 


,417 




77 


,160 


19.8 


New York Metropolitan 


Area 




52 


,490 




62, 


,665 


19,4 


New York City and 


















Nev/ York State 






51 


,546 




61 


,570 


19,5 


New Jersey 








430 






376 


- 12.6 


Connecticut 








514 






719 


39.8 



Boston (including 
Massachusetts) 



1,082 



1,242 



14.8 



Philadelphia Area 
Philadelphia 
Scranton 




1,182 
955 
227 


Baltimore 




694 


Cleveland (including Ohio) 


1,S32 


St. Louis 




578 


Kansas City 




652 


Chicago Area t/ 
Chicago 

Districts outside 
Chicago _b/ 


of 


2,687 
2,533 

149 


Los Angeles 




1,516 


San Francisco 




859 


Portland 




457 


Seattle 




188 



1,180 


.1 


985 


3,2 


195 


- 14.1 


1,229 


77.0 


2,418 


25.2 


624 


8.0 


883 


35.4 


3,591 


33.7 


3,358 


32.4 


233 


55.0 


1 , 613 


.2 


946 


10,1 


565 


23.5 


204 


8.5 



(continued on next page) 



9C393 



Source: "Heport of the Coat and Suit Commission to National Recovery 
Administration," Somen's Wear Daily . August 2, 1934, p, 18. 
Figures are based on the returns from questionnaires to manu- 
facturers and johhers. The samiDles differed among districts as 
to the -oer cent of totality covered by the report but each is 
sufficiently representative that the "per cent change" figures 
can be taken as indicative of changes in sales in these localities* 
For further discussion of the study see the General Notes, 

a/ Firms were asked for sales in the first six months of 1933 and 1934, 
In cases where firms v?ere in business only d-uring a uart of this 
period in 1933, figures are included for only the months of 1934 
corresponding to those for which data were re-oorted for 1933. 

b/ Chicago Area includes Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin and 
Minnesota, 



Prepared by 

Industry Statistics Unit, 
Statistics Section, 
Division of Review, IIRA., 
November 8, 1935. 



9093 



TABLE III 



COAT Al^ SUIT Ix'TDUSTHY 
W-uraher of All Needle Workers and Needle Workers » 
10 to 17 Years of Age, in Selected Industries, 
■by Specified Areas, April 1, 1930 a/ 







Workers, 


Per Cent Workers, 




Total 


10 - 17 


10 - 17 Years, of 


Geographical Area 


Workers 


Years 


Total Workers 



Total 


278,886 


New York City 
Connecticut 
New Jersey 

(exclusive of Camden) 


130,656 
18,712 

13,090 


Boston 
Philadelphia 

(and Camden) 
Baltimore 


6,875 

20,617 
10,932 


Cleveland 
Chicago 
Kansas City 


6.361 

40,380 

2,181 


St. Louis 
Los Angeles 
San Francisco 


5,583 
3,911 
4,483 


Portland 
Seattle 


2,326 
2,776 



12,312 



4.4 



5,827 


4.5 


2,374 


12.7 


1,170 


6.5 


149 


2.2 


932 


4.5 


608 


5.6 


178 


2.8 


777 


1.9 


24 


1.1 


185 


3.3 


43 


.5 


4 


.1 


25 


1.1 


16 


.6 



Source: "Re-oort of the Coat and Suit Commission to the National Recovery 
Administration," Women's Wear Daily . July 27, 1934, p. 6. Data 
are based on the United States Census of Population. Needle v/orkers 
include tailors, dressmakers and workers in factories engaged in 
manufacturing Coat and Suit, Shirts, Collars, Cuffs, Corsets, Felt 
Eats, and Gloves. It can not he determined how many of these ^-'orkers 
are in the Coat and Suit Industry. 

a/ Data showing age distribution are incomplete. Out of a total of 
499,201 needle workers information is available for only 278,886. 

Prepared by 

Industry Statistics Unit 
Statistics Section 
Division of Review, NRA. 
November 6, 1935. 



9093 

















-8- 


































TABLBIT 
































COAT AMD SUIT INDUSTHT 


























f«ig8 Xamsrs and Average Hourly Xamings, by Area, 193^^ 
















— — — — — - 




























■ 


other Kun 


IP 




Total 


Cutters 




^Ijiishers 


yipigherff 

Number 


Average 


Preasftrs 




f^tn-^ing 


Worteii 


Tage Zamers 


NtsBber 


Average 


number 


Average 


Number 


Average 


Bomber 


Average 


Number 


Average 


Bomber J 


Lverag 






Per Cent 


of Wage 


Hourly 


of Wage 


Hourly 


of Wage 


HoTjrly 


of Wage 


Hourly 


of Wage 


Hourly 


of Wage 


Hovly 


Of Wage I 


Inrly 


lre«, 


Humber 


of Total 


Earners 




gamers 


Bamings 


gamers 


Bamings 




Bamings 


gamers 


Tftn^"ff? 


Tj^rmtf 


Baratiiif. 


l«m*rff 1 


Sarxda 


S. Tctal 


ab.172 


100,0 




























■rffiW 


iw Toxk Area 


l^.62»^ 


62.6 


759 


1.60 


5.401 


1.34 


2.938 


':^ 


1,028 


:g 


1.743 


1.52 


360 


if 


»5 


1.22 


iston irea-' 


498 


2.5 


31 


1.27 




1.20 


91 


87 


78 


1.24 


4 


20 


.88 


liladelphla Area 


876 


'^.3 


ll 


1.53 


1.14 


136 


.95 


122 


.67 


UO 


1.31 


55 


:n 


32 


.96 


Itlnore Area 


800 


4.0 




.95 


100 


.80 


76 


.62 


101 


1.18 


i 


18 


.90 


eveland Area 


1.531 


li 


138 


1.24 


1.01 


265 


.72 


212 


.59 


185 


1.10 


.48 


40 


.91 


ilcago Area 


1.325 


107 


1.36 


536 


1.11 


349 


.90 


105 


.61 


167 


1.30 


:?5 


35 


.94 


;. Louie Area 


293 


i,k 


21 


1.20 


106 


1.04 


52 


.85 


u 


.58 


28 


1.25 


21 


8 


i/ 


nsae City Area 


U2g 


2.1 


22 


1.08 


199 


.72 


9 


.66 


.59 


25 


.80 


67 


.45 


26 


.78 


B Angelee Area 


929 


k.6 


9* 


1.25 


w 


1.09 


219 


:S 


76 


.58 


126 


1.13 


10 


.49 


19 


1.01 


n Traneieco Area 


868 


»*.3 


87 


1.21 


.93 


148 


153 


.51 


113 


1.13 


10 


a/ 


13 


*/ 


oreei Code Authority fabuUtion, Table k. The figures 


are averages for the 


year and based on a 


senile which covers 


35 per cent of the 


wage earners in the industry. 




Too few caeee to Justify concluBions. 




























Prepared by 


































Industry Statistics Unit, 






























Statistics Section 
































Division of Beveiw. 


'mba 






























Boveniber 2, 


1935 

































TABLE V 

COAT Ai-ID SUIT INDUSTRY 
Average Hourly Earnings "by Markets and Major Crafts for the 
Eight Weeks' Period from February 5 to iiarch 31, 1934 
(Dollars) 



Market 


Cutters 


Operators 


Finishers 


Pressers 


New York City 


1,60 


1.37 




1.06 


1.62 


Boston 


1.37 


1.25 




.81 


1.31 


Philadelphia 


1.50 


1.18 




.81 


1,34 


Baltiraore 


1.14 


.91 




.66 


1.13 


Cleveland 


1.21 


1.01 




.65 


1.13 


Chicago 


1.27 


1.03 




.79 


1.28 


St. Louis 


1.00 


.80 




.63 


1.01 


Kansas City 


1.00 


.80 




.63 


1.01 


Los Angeles 


1.20 


1.09 




.65 


1.10 


San Francisco 


1.16 


.85 




.60 


1.03 


Portland 


1.16 


.85 




.60 


1.03 


Seattle 


1.15 


.85 




.60 


1.03 


Source: "Repc 


irt of the 


Coat and Suit 


Cominis 


;sion, to ' 


the National Recovery 


Admir 


Listration, 


, " Women' s Wear 


' Daily 


:, July 27 


, 1934, p. 7. Data 



are hased on an ana.lysis of payroll reports to the Code Authority 
from all markets. Figures include only (l) cutters, male; (2) 
operators, male; operators, female; (3) finishers, male; finishers, 
female; (4) under pressers, upper pressers, machine pressers and 
non-classifiahle pressers. All workers in these crafts are in- 
cluded in the out-of-town iiiarkets, but in the New York market 
area only those in 598 selected shops are included. 

Prepared ty 

Industry Sta,tistics Unit, 
Statistics Section, 
Division of Review, iJRA 
ilovemher 6, 1935 



9093 



YX 



0011 AID ami xuDsiBr 

ItanfMtanac IqplogrsM Claaalfl«A ^ iTilBgi m X*Ut«d 

to tka rrnen¥«d 0e4« 8taa««r4s. I7 S^«et«A Onf U 

•ad Mwlcat ir«M, for iMk »i«li« ItodI 9. 193^ 





BatlMtad 












»u*«r IB 


■avTaric 


laatara 




Waatarm 


,, Qrat% 




eitv 


Araaay 


laltlMM 




(P.M 


wtaca of BqploarM* 


at ar AkoTa Coda KLaina) 




Otttoro 

Ojptfaton. Mala 
Oparaton. Voula 


"S 


77 


s 


60 

8^ 


86 


Tlaiakara, Mala 


>^.«^7 


91 


73 


50 


90 


nalalwra. Tmalm 


•M9 


92 


73 


76 


M 


liaiahara, ia^ora. 












Mala 


363 


96 


« 


50 


im 


Tlaiahara, Ha^ara. 












raaala 


»».Un 


91 


90 


•9 


9:^ 


Praasara. Uadar 


1.986 


92 




73 


s 


Praaaara, Vjppw 


1.729 


?z 


96 


UO 


Praasara. Maehiaa 


1.105 


A 


61 


6t 


97 


Praaaara, 












aaB-elaaslfiabla 


2.592 


97 


H 


77 


95 


(Pareaataga of Sqplojraaa at ar Jib»r» Co4a Avaraca) 




Oparatora. Mala 




53 


36 


5^ 


^1 


Oiparatora. Poaala 


( 


1 


u 


15 


Plaiahars, Mala 


^^.8^7 


58 


17 




S 


Piaialiara. Paaala 


S,k99 


23 


11 


^ 


Halalura, Balpara. 












Mala 


363 


39 


Ik 


1^ 


96 


Plaiabara. Halpara. 












Paula 


»f,l»H 


2» 


6 


12 


6 




1.9S6 


fk 


17 


^ 


30 


Praaaara, l^ar 


1.729 


61 


50 


)« 


Z 


Praaaara. MaeUaa 


1.105 


23 


38 


Praaaara 












aa».elaaaifiabla 


2.592 


73 


62 


>I6 


39 



"liport of tha Coat and aoit Canlaalaa. to tba latloaal laeorocr 
AtelalatraUaa." »>-^«r »in' ^Ht *»^ 27. I934, p. 7. Pbr a 
dlaouaiaa af tha Caaadaaloa*a iaivaaticatioa. aaa tha Qaaaral lataa. 

laelndaa lav Tark Stata (azelxidlac >«w Tark Cltj), Cwmaetlast. 

lav Jeraior, Fhiladalphla aad Boataa. 

laolTxdaa Cloralaad. O^eac*. St. Loala. laaaaa Cltgr. laa Aacalaa, 

Saa fraaeisca. Portlaad aad Soattla. 

Bila ficora prokably ahoiald «a aomairtkat hl^ar haaaoaa of 

af a^E>lo]rara to elaaaifjr lacorraetly aaagr of thalr aal.ol 

oparatora aa foll-fladgad oparatora. 



okillad faaala 



Praparad kgr 

ladutrr Statlatlca Halt, 
Statiatiaa Saetlaa. 
StTlalaa of Bariav, IBA 
11. 1935 



-CI- 
TABLE VII 

COAT Al.ffi SUIT lUDUSTEY 
.■mufacturing Employees in Kev York Citj/-, Classified by Sarninss 
,"s Helated to Code Llinirainn or Average "b^;- Occupations 
and Sex, for the Week Ending I.Iarch 9, 19o4 







- 


.. _.. . . - 


Code 


Minimura 












Belou Code 


and Above but 




Code Average 


Occu-oation 




Sex 

Male 


Minimum 


Belov; 


Code Ave 


ra^e 


and Above 


Cutters 


5.1 a/ 




94.9 




_ 


Operators 




Male 


4.4 




42.8 




52,8 


Operators 




Female 


22.6 




71.3 




6.1 


Sl:irt 




Male 


8.0 a/ 




68.0 a/ 




24.0 a/ 


Skirt 




Female 


32.0 a/ 




63,0 a/ 




- 


Finishers 




Hale 


9.0 




53.5 




57.5 


rinisliers 




Female 


7.5 




70.0 




22.5 


Helpers 




Male 


4a 




56,5 




39.4 a/ 


Helpers 




Female 


9.4 




62.8 




27.8 


Skirt Basters 




Male 


- 




65.7 a/ 




55.3 a/ 


Skirt Basters 




Female 


- 




- 




100.0 2/ 


Pressers 
















Under 




Male 


8.5 a/ 




28.0 




55.7 


lt>per 




Male 


2.9 a/ 




23.0 




74.1 


Machine 




Male 


16.3 




23.0 




60.7 


ITon-classifiable 




Hale 


2,7 a/ 




24.7 




72.6 


Skirt Under 




Male 


88.9 i/ 




11.1 a/ 




" 


Source: "Report of 


the 


Coat and Suit Commission tc 


1 the llati 


.onal 


Re cove r3- 


ACiiini strati on, 


," Women' 


's Wear Mily, 


, Ju].y 


27, 1934, 


, p. ' 


7. For a 



a/ 



discussion of the Commission's i 
Ron^resents less thaai 50 \7orhers. 



Prepared by 

Industry Statistics Unit, 
Statistics Section, 
Division of Revievr, i^LA 
I'ovember 9, 1935 



9093 



-12- 



rABLE VIII 



COAT AKD SUIT IKDUSTRY 
Mamofacturing Employees in the Eastern Market Area, Classified "bj 
Earnings as Related to Code Hinimuin or Average, "by Occupation 
and Sex, for the Week Ending March 9, 1934 a/ 



Occu-oation 



Below Code 
Minimuin 



Code Minimum 
and Above "but 
Below Code Average 



Code Average 
Code Average 



Cutters 


Male 


Operators 


Male 


Operators 


Female 


Skirt 


Male 


Skirt 


Female 


Finishers 


Male 


Finishers 


Female 


Helpers 


Male 


Helpers 


Female 


Skirt Basters 


Male 


Skirt Basters 


Female 


Pressers 




Under 


Male 


Upper 


Male 


Machine 


Male 


Non-classifiable 


Male 


Skirt Under 


Male 



17.5 
6.1 h/ 

13.5 h/ 
44.4 
38.5 
25.7 

26.6 b/ 
11.6 

9.6 
20.0 
23.0 

5.0 

3.8 
39.4 
13.3 



82.5 


w 


57.6 


W 


85.7 


W 


44.4 




61.5 




56.0 


W 


62.8 


W 


74.4 




84.5 


W 


20.0 




38.5 




78.4 


W 


46.2 




38.0 




25.0 




.00.0 





36.3 


-V 


.8 




11.2 




17.3 




10.6 




14.0 




5.9 




60.0 




58.5 




16.6 




50.0 




22.6 




61.7 


^ 



Source: "Report of the Coat and Suit Commission to the National Recovery 
Administration," Women's Wear Daily , July 27, 1934, p. 7. For a 
discussion of the Commission's investigation, see the General Notes. 

a/ Eastern Market Area includes New York State (except New York City), 
Connecticut, New Jersey, Philadelphia, and Boston. 

b/ Represents 50 workers or more. All other figures represent less 
than 50 workers. 

Prepared by 

Industry Statistics Unit, 
Statistics Section, 
Division of Review, ITRk 
November 7, 1935 



9093 



TiBLE IX 



COAT Al^ID SUIT IKDUSTRY 



Manufacturing Employees in Baltimore, Classified "by Earnings 
as Related to Code Minimum or Average, "by Occupation 
and Sex, for the Week Ending March 9, 1934 



Occut)ation 



Se.T. 



Cutters 

Semi-skilled 
0-Derator& 
Onerf.tors 

Semi-skilled 

Apprentice 

ApTDr entice 

Skirt 

Skirt 
Finishers 
Finishers 

Helpers 

Helpers 

Button Sewers 

Ap-or entice 

Apprentice 
Pressers 

Under 

Part 

U-Q-oer 

Apprentice 

Machine 

Non-classifiabl; 

Lining I r oners 



Code Minimum 
Belov,' Code and Atove lout Code Avers 
Minimum B elow Code Average and Aoove 



Male 


40 „0 


Male 


100.0 


Male 


5.4 


Female 


59.8 


Female 


11.5 


Male 


„ 


Female 


- 


Male 


- 


Female 


71,4 


Male 


50.0 


Female 


24.4 


Male 


50.0 


Female 


.11.1 


Female 


5.5 


Male 


62.5 


FeraalP 


- 


Male 


26.7 


Male 


7.7 


Male 


_ 


Hale 


35.3 


Male 


37.5 


Male 


23.1 


Female 


_ 



a/ 



60.0 t/ 

40.8 t/ 

29.5 t/ 

54.7 
100.0 
100.0 

20.0 

25.0 

50.0 

51.2 

35.7 

76.5 'bj 

94„7 

37,5 
100.0 

53.5 
76.9 
53.8 
66.7 
25.0 
30.7 
50.0 



53.8 "oj 
10.7 h/ 
53.8 



80.0 
3.6 

24.4 
14.5 
12.4 



40,0 
15.4 
46.2 

37.5 
46.2 
50.0 



Source: "Report of the Coat and Suit Commission to the National Recovery 
Administration," Somen's Tfear Daily . July 27, 1934, v* 7, For a 
disci^.ssion of the Commission's investigation, see the General Fotes. 

a/ This fi:,::ure Toroliahly should be somewhat lower "because of the 
tendency of employers to classify incorrectly many of their 
semi-skilled female o-oerators as full fledged onerators. 

b/ R.epresents 50 or more workers. All other figures renresent less 
than 50 workers. 

Prepared "by 

Industry Statistics Unit, 
Statistics Section, 
Division of Review, KRA 
ITovember 6, 1935 



9093 



-14- 

TABLE X 

COAT AKD SUIT lilDUSTSY 
Ivlan-afact-ui-ing Employees in the Western Market Area, Classified "by- 
Earnings as Related to Code Minin-um or Average, "by Occupation 
and Sex, for the ..eel: Ending March 9, 19342:/ 









Code Minimum 






Below Code 


OJld 


Ahovu hut 


Code Aver, age 


Occuoation 


Se^: Jjiinimurn 


Below Code Average 


and Above 


Cutters 


Male 14,0 b/ 




86.0 h/ 




Semi-skilled 


Male 34.2 




55. 8 


" 


Canvas 


Male 23.1 h/ 




76.9 


-• 


Ap-orentices 


liale 




100.0 


•^ 


Cloth and Lining Filers Male 30.8 b/ 




69.2 


- 


Filers 


Male 




100.0 h/ 


- 


Operators 


Hale 6.5 h/ 




52.3 h/ 


41 vl b/ 


Operators 


Female 31.3 b/ 




53.5 h/ 


15,2 b/ 


Serai-skilled 


Female 5.7 




80,5 jb/ 


13.7 b/ 


AporenticG 


I.:ale 




100.0 


- 


Ap-orenticc 


Female ,8 




99.2 h/ 


- 


Skirt 


Male S.9 




65.5 


27.5 


Skirt 


Female 19.1 




66.6 


14.5 


Finishers 


hale 9.5 




75.3 h/ 


15.2 


Finishers 


Female 12.3 h/ 




63,7 h/ 


24.0 b/ 


Helpers 


Male 




44.0 


55,0 


Helpers 


Female 6.6 h/ 




87.1 h/ 


5.5 


Button Sewers 


Female 7.4 




84.6 h/ 


3.0 


Apprentice 


Male 




100.0 


- 


Apprentice 


Female 7.6 




92.4 b/ 


- 


Pressers 










Under 


Male 11.2 




53.4 b/ 


50.4 


Fart 


Male 3.9 




71.1 b/ 


20,0 


Upper 


Male 5 . 2 




44.3 b/ 


49.5 b/ 


AroxDrentice 


I.;ale 




100.0 


"* 


l.Iachine 


Male 3.1 




56.3 


40,5 


Kon-classifiahle 


Male 5.0 




56.0 b/ 


59.0 


Lining Irorers 


Female 54.0 




13.0 


33,0 


Source: "Report of the 


Coat and Suit Commission 


to the rational 


PLecover"" 


Adninistration 


." Women's '".'ear Dail^' 


, Jul 


.ir 27, 1934, v. 


7. For a 



a/ TJestern Market Ai-ea includes Cleveland, Chicago, St. Louis, Ilansas 
City, Lbs Ingelcs, San Francisco, Portland and Seattle. 

b/ Be-oresents 50 VTorkers or more. All other figures represent less thai 
50 workers. 



9093^; 



Pre'icred oy 

Industry Statistics Unit, 
Statistics Section, 
Division of Revici,', ITBA 
I'ovember 11, 1935