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Full text of "Executive Documents, Minnesota"

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EXECUTIVE DOCUMENTS 



STATE OF MIMESOTA, 



FOR THE TEAR 1875. 



VOL. I. 



PRINTED BT AUTHOBITT. 



SAINT PAUL: 

THS PIOMBIR-PBBBS OOMFA^tY. 



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Hennepin Co. Law lie 



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EXCHANGE 

ONtVERAITY Of CH CACO' 

LIBRARr 



INDEX. 



Tlie Slate ViDknces 

Becetpta and BxpflDdltDiee 

Treuiuy 

Tile Rftilnwds 

The JndlclArj. 

CoiMUtnttoiial Amendments 

Attomej Oenei&l'B Beport 

Adjutant Qenena'e Offlce 

Innnnce 

Lnnber Int«r«tts 

St. Cnlz and Lake Superior Canal 

The Common Scbools 

Tbe State nnlvenlty 

State Nonnal Schools 

State Beform School 

InsUtate for the Deaf and Dumb, and the Bllod- . 

Soldiers' Orphans' Home 

Hoapltal for the Insane ... 

TheSUte Prison 

The SUte Historical Society 

State Board or Health 

Tbe Centennial Exposition 

nab Commission ■..• 

Tbe StaUsUcal Barean 

Tbenvepet cent. Vniid 

How toSecnielnunlgntlon..... 

Wisconsin Ts. I>nlnth 

Tbe Kew Legislative Apportlonmeot 

Belief of Destitate Settlers 

' Grasshopper InvestlgatloD 

Capital Pnnlahment 

MbuMMte SUte BaUroad Bonds 



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IT 



DTDBX. 



iMAneoRAT. HssaAOB— Ho. S. f 

Bedondant Currency 

Local Debt 

B«treDchment 

Length of Legislative Session 

Fnbllc PrlnUog 

GronplDg of Onces 

Legislative Apportionment 

Redoced Becelpts 

Centennial BzpoBltlon 

ImmlgratloD 

TreeCoItnre 

Capita Pnnlsbment ... 

Tax Law 

iDBUie and Inebriate AsylomB 

Official Examination of Accoants of Pabllc Officers 

Indian Tronblea 

Minnesota State Railroad Bonds 

Railroads... ■■ 

NorUi^m PaolAc Railroad 

Navigation 

Agrlcoltore 

WarehonsemeD ^ 

Sales of PabUc Lauds 

SEOBKTABr or Statb— No. 8<. 

iDCorportlons 

Paper and Stationery 

PnbMc Printing 

TbeCensDB / ■.... 

List of Notaries Pobllc , 

List of Commissioners 

Llsfof County oafcers v 

Scbedale of Proposals tor Pobllc Printing 

Schednle of Proposals fbr Furnishing Paper for Uie Pablic Printing 

Census of the State of Minnesota 

RecapltnlatloD by Coanties 

Table sbowlng namber of cities, &c., having not less than 1,S00 

inhabitants 

Table showing nnmber Deaf and Dnmb, utd the Blind 

Table showing Nativities 

Table showing Talnatton of Cbnrcb Property 

Table showing Talne of Cbnrch Property by DenomlnatloDS 

Recapitnlatlon by Counties and Denominations 

List of Convicts Pardoned from Ulnnesota State Prison 



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IHDBX. r 

Aci>iTOB OP Stats— No. 4. paqb. 

Becelpt^ and DlsbnrMinents Of the State TreMury dtnlng tlie 

jeareDdlsg Hot. 8U, 1876 4 

DlstmrMmeiita C 

Warrants Drawn on the Treasoiy 7 

LeglalatlTe Appropriations 7 

State Debt 7 

Disputed State Debt 8 

Statement of Berenne from Taxes 8 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements bf Funds— Qeneral 

Berenne Faod 8 

State Instltatloos Fnnd 10 

State Interest Fnnd 11 

Sinking Fand II 

Permanent School Fnnd 12 

Cnrrent School Fnnd 12 

Permanent University Fond 18 

Carrent UnlveraltT Fnnd IS 

Internal Improreraent I^nd Fnnd 14 

Inebriate Aaylnm Fnnd 15 - 

Internal Improrement Fand • U 

Interest on Ballroad Bonds 16 

Estimated State Bevenne and Bxpendltore fbr the jeor I87S 17 * 

?<» General Berenne 17 

Stau Inatltntioiu Fund 18 

Interest Fond 18 

Staking Fond 1» 

Stat«inent sboKrlng the accnmniations and Investments of tiie 

several Trust Foods 19 

Permanent School Fnnd 19 

Permanent Dnl vers It; Fond 20 

Intemallmprovement Land Fnnd 21 

loebriate Asylnm Fond -■.. 21 

Sinking Food 21 

State Finances 22 

State Tax of 187fi 34 

The State Debt 24 

Taxes and Tax Laws 36 

Connty Assessors t 2fi 

The General School Tax 28 

Taxation of Lnmber, Logs, and Kne Lands . ; 29 

Taxation of Ballroad Lands 80 

Taxation of Telegraph, Express and Traosportati4»i Companies.. SO 

Collection of Corporation Taxes 81 

The Inebriate Asylum License Tax 81 

DeUnqnent State Taxes 81 

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Ti imwx. 

AntiTDS ov Stats— pa(^ 

InTMtmeiit of tbe Sdncatioiutl Fond 89 

8*rliig> Buka .'■ U 

Lwid Depftitment 15 

Tabnlar sUtement sbowlnf; the result of tlt« 84l«t of Scboo) Luid 

* In 1876 M 

Tibnlar statement showlDg the condltloa of the School LandB In 

Counties where Sales h«ve been made 97 

TabaUr stktement showing the total Sales of School Land each 

rear K 

Tabnlar statement showing the result of the Sales of Agrlcnltnre 

College Lands In 1876 89 

Tabnlar statement showing the contUtlon of the Agricnttnral 

College Land Grant W 

Tabnlar statement showing the total Sales of Agricnltnnl College 

Lands each year 40 

Tabnlar statement showing the Sale of UntversltT Land In 187B ■ ■ 40 
Tabnlar statement showing the condition of the lint Grant to the 

tJnlTenltj 41 

Tabnlar statement showing the Bales of Internal Improrement 

Land In 1876 41 

Tabnlar statement showing thecondltton of the Internal Improre- 

meut Land Grant 41 

Tabnlar statement showing the total Sales of Internal Improve- 
ment Land each Tear 42 

Tabnlar statement showing the condition of the several Giants 

of Swamp Lands 48 

Tabular statement showing the nnmber of acres of Swamp Lands 

patented to the State and conreTed or set ^>arteBchjear..<> 44 
Tabnlar statement of Uie certlfled lists of BaUroad Lands filed 

dnrlng the 7ear 4j[ 

Tabnlar statement of Deeds of Congressional Lands to BaUroad 

Companies dnrlng the year W 

Tabnlar statement of Deeds of Congressional Lands to Ballroads 

each year, and a^regate conTeyed 48 

Tabnlar statement ofezpenaesofState Land OOlce each year.... 47 

School Lands 4g 

Agricnltaral College Lands 48 

University -Lands— Plrst Grant....'. 49 

Second Grant 48 

Salt Spring Lands 50 

Internal Improvement Lands SI 

State Swamp Lands^ SI 

Fnblic Bnildlng Lands E8 

Sute Land Stnmpage and Collection of Si 
SalailM 



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IHOBX. Til 

Adiotok ow Stats— rtam. 

Appendlz , 55 

BhDwlDg AppropriatloiiB of 1876, baluicw of fonner yean, 
unonnta drawn by wurant and balances remaining Nov. 

80, 18T» ■„ 67 

Showing condition of tax acconnta with the sevenl cotmtles 

Not. 80, IgW ; 08 

Second of FroceedlngB of State Board of BqnallsatloD. S4 

Abatnct of Aaaessment of Personal Properly es 

Abstract of Tax Lists 74 

. Talnatlon of Property by Conotiea from 1862 to 18711 n 

Total Valuation of Property ftor each year since the organisa- 
tion of the State Government 88 

Beoelpta and Dlsbnrsemente of the State Treasury since tlte 

organization of the SUte OoTemment 86 

Bzpenses of the State since its organliaUon 84 

Total amoant expended for Support of State Institntiona .... 86 

Total cost of Buildings far State Institntlons 80 

Bonded Indebtedness of Conntlea 87 

Disbursements by Warrants i, 88 

Condition of Savings Banks ISO 

ConditloB of Banking AssoclatlonB organised under Qie Oen- 

eral Banking Laws.... ISO 

Townships tn^anized dnring the year 1S9 

Statb TsaasuKKB— No. 6. 

Becelpts S 



BerenueTnnd 

Interest Fund 

BinUngFand 

State Inmtntlons Fnnd 

Permanent School Fund i.-. 

Qeneral School Pond. , 

Permanent VnlTersity Pnnd ■■-' 

General UnlTerslty Vnnd 

Internal Improvement Fund 

Internal Improvement Land Fnnd •' 

Interest on BsUroad Bonds Fond 

Inebriate Asylum Pond 

Frontier Belief Loan 

Minnesota State Railroad Bonds 

Interest on Deposits 

Showing in detail the Beceipts Into the Treasury flrom Dec I 

1874, to Not. 80, 1876 

Becetpts from HIseeUaDeoas Sovices 



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VIII 



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State Tbba8ubxr— faob. 

Snmmai; of Receipts nrom Coontles 46 

Becapitnlstlon of RecelpM, Bxpeudltares and baluiCM during 

fiscal ;e&r ending Not. 80, 1675 47 

Becfeipts for Inebriate Aejlam Ftmd 48 

Expendltares fiscal je&r ending Nov. 30, 1676 49 

ATTOitNBT QxMKRAi. — No. S. 

■Criminal Coses argned and determined in the Supreme Conn.-.. 3 

Civil AcUons T 

Anuosl Beport of Connty Attorneys IS 

Adjdtawt Qenbbal— No. T. 

Military AiBUrs 7 

TheMllltla 7 

The National Qnard 8 

Enrollment of the Hllltla 8 

Military Schoo'a 8 

State Arms « 9 

Condemnation of Stores 9 

The Centennial 9 

Beglmental Colors 9 

Soldiers' Becords 10 

Soldiers' Orphans 18 

Work of the Board IS 

The Orphans' Home IS 

Hoster Boll of the Home 14 

Discharges from the Home ]6 

Fntnre Admissions i..| IS 

On UwBefbnn SchooL 17 

OntaldeReUef 17 

Expenses of Members 17 

Certlflcata of Discharge 17 

Expendltores 17 

Appropriation 16 

Report of Superintendent of Home 19 

Report of Snigeon of Home l!l 

Beport of Superintendent of Instruction of Orphans tis 

State Claim Agency IS 

Continuance of the Plan 29 

Work of the Agency 30 

Work dnrlng the past year 80 

The New Claim 31 

Prospective Legislation 31 

Statement showing a (totalled account of the transactions of 

Bnreau of Claims as 

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INDBX. IX 

Adjutant Ozmnur— fAOm, 

Statement ahowlug the nunbei of Clalme for Widows', Mothers' 

tnd Oiphans' FeoBlona U 

Statement ehowlng the total number of CUlma for InTSUds' and 

FaOiers' PeDslona U 

Statement ahowtng the total number of Claims fbr Arrears of 

PmyandBoanty 8S 

Statement showing the total nomber of Claims for Additional 

Bonatf 86 

Statement showing tbe number of Claims prepared and filed each 

year 87 

Btatm LiBKUUAir— No. 8. 

List of Books Purchased 5 

Books received by Exchange 7 

Btatv Pwbok— No. ». 

Inspectors' Report S 

OOceiB of Prison 9 

Warden's Beport 11 

Popnlatian 11 

Bspenses for Prison during the year 12 

Statement showing sitnatlou of earnings IS 

Estimated receipts of Prison for 1876 18. 

Feieonal Property, valoe of 18 

• Heal Estate, value of. 18 

Assets of Prison.... 1< 

Good Conduct Fond n 

Total Cash ReceipU 1« 

Total Cash Disbnrsemeuts U 

Inventory of Personal Proper^ belonging to Prison IS 

- From whence Convicts were received since last report 17 

Nativity and Crime of Convicts received since last report 18 

Ages and Terms of Sentence of Convicts received 19 

Social Belations of Convicts tn Confinement M 

EdncaUon 20 

Habits 20 

Occnpatlons 20 

Ust of Convicts in Prison Dec. 1, ISTS 21 

List of Convicts Pardoned fiscal year of 1876 M 

Cb plain's Beport 81 

niyslclan's Report U 

Stats Bsroui Sobool— No. 10. 

Beport of Superintendent 8 

Healtb 8 

Discipline S 

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X INDEX. 

Stati RaroBH School— faob. 

Biunbei of Inioktefl • * 

ConDtr Commlisloiiers * 

What hu the Inatitntlon done * 

Does It pk; tbe counties to get the boTS out before Omit an 

lefbrmed • 

One day In tlie Reform Bcbool 7 

The Library « 

StatlaUcs 8 

BeUUTe to Supply of Water 18 

Boys and Olrls whoaie not Proper SabJ acts IS 

Feiaonal Property, ralne of. U 

Beal Property, raloe of 1* 

Financial Statement 17 

Laws pertaining to 18 

HoBFiTAi. roB In8*ii»— No- H- 

Beport of Trnsteea ■ • 

Beportof Dr. A. Beynolda 11 

Beport of Bnlldiug Committee 18 

Treasnrer'B Beport 14 

Steward's Beport 17 

Beportof Superintendent 98 

Condition of those Discharged 28 

Causes of Death S8 

Building Improvements ^ 

Farm, how condncted 38 

List of papers sent giatnltonsly to the Hospital 29 

Appendix— Hospital Statistics aS 

Dkat AMD DnuB, AUD THE Blimd iKBTrrum— No. IS. 

Board of Directors S 

Intellectnal Department 6 

Domestic and Indnstrlal Department T 

Report of the Directors 9 

Saperintendent's Report : 13 

Health of the Inatltute /IS 

Graduates dnrlng the year 18 

OradoateB— List of U 

Admissions — List of 16 

Attendance— Statistics of... 16 

List of Text-Books IS 

Indnstrlal Classes 31 

Blind Department 33 

Beport of Prlndpal of Blind Department 3S 

ImpTOTftmenta 38 

Aoknowledgmenta 29 



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INDEX. XI 

DmiF AXD DOXB, AMD TKB BUMD IHBTITUTI — PAQI. 

PhyilcUn's Beport SS 

Treunm^ Beport 8S 

SUteroentof Shops 4t 

Items of KzpenditDras 44 

FnpUs la Ue Demr-mnte Depirtm«Dt 4S 

PnpOi In the Blind Deputment 47 

List of Uneducated Deaf and Dumb, and Blind Children tn the 

State who hare not attended the School 48 

Ziiat of employee 60 

List of Neirspapera and Periodicals printed gratnltonaly. 61 

Prognmrneor Annnal Hnslcal Berlew SS 

Teime of AdmisslOD SS 

Compositions of Faplls ST 



r Statistics— No. IS. 

Letter to the QoTemor 8 

Agriculture 9 

TabnUi Summary for 1874-1876 10 

Progreu of Agricaltnre In 36 reus 19 

Land Statement IS 

Agrlcnltnre tn 1874 IT 

Comparative Summaries • 17 

Crops In 1874 ^ 90 

General Tables— Crops byConnttes 41 

Onaahopper Damage by Connttes B7 

Betonuibr 1876 .. 69 

Oeneral Tables OS 

Births and Deaths 70 

Sommaries 70 

Table— DeaUis and Popnlatlon by Ages In 0. S. Census year, 

187»....'. 84 

Oeneral Tables 88 

Popnlatlon— SUte Censns of 1876 110 

Sommarlei for 1876 110 

The Increase In popnlatlon — by Immigration- by births — Na- 
tlre Htnnesotlans In the Census yeare — popnlatlon and 

deaths • 113 

Increase by Special Nativity lt« 

Increase In SB years 118 

Increase t^ Age 118, 

General Tables ISO 

Popnlatlon of Cities and TUlsges 189 



Vlie and Ifarine Insurance 

Oon^anies wUhdrawn and admitted. ■ 



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Xir IKDEX. 

iMstnujicK CoHXTssioNm— pass 

Compsnles ftnthoriEftd to tnuuact boBtness 

CompantlTe r«snlte 11 

Amonntor C&pltal reqntred to trmnuct bnslness 13 

FertklDlngjto assets of companies doing bnsliteas It 

Margin on Collateral Loans 16 

Total Income 17 

Total expendttares 18 

Table eshtbiting the general condition of Companies operating in 

this State 20 

Table showing items comprising the Assets of Companies doing 

business In tills State 28 

Table showing Items comprising liabilities of Companies operat- 
ing In this State H 

Table showing soarce of income of the Companies doing boslness 

In tbis State •••■ 29 

Table showing the Tarioos expendltores of the Companies operat- 
ing In this State 82 

Table showing the total and relatlTe Income and expendttares... 8S 

Table showing the total premiums received and losses paid S8 

Table showing the lialrs written and premiums received 41 

Table showing the names and location of all Companies doing 

bnslDess In this State 44 

Business tn Minnesota— ?lre and Inland Companies 47 

Table showing bnslness transacted respecting risks, premiums 

aodloases SO 

Table showing risks written and premlnms received, together 

with average premium rates U 

Home Companies H 

The New York Surplus Law SV 

'Service of process .: 62 

Township mntnals tS 

Abstracts from Statements of Fire and Marine Insoraoce Com- 
panies 67 

Lift Insurance 318 

Companies withdrawn and admitted 214 

Comparative results 215 

Total admitted and unadmitted assets 116 

Total liabilities 217 

Total Income 217 

Total expenditures 218 

Exhibit of policies 218 

Table exhibiting the assets, liabilities and expenditures of the 

Companies operating In this State 320 

Table showing Items comprising total admitted assets . - . > , 232 

Table showing the nature of the total liabilities 224 



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INDEX. XIII 

iKBUmtXCM COHMISUQNKR— FAIM. 

Table exhibiting tlie eevenl sonrces from whlcb toUl locomtt is 

dertTed S36 

Table showing the ezpendltores 2S8 

Table showing the namber of pollclea In force at the beginning, 

and the net nanlt at the close of the rear S80 

Table showing the nninber and amount of policies tennlnated 

dnrtug the year, and the maoDer ol their termination 2S9 

Table ahowlDg nune, location and nnmea of officers of Companlea 

operating In this State 284 

Boalnese In Ulnnesota— Life InsontDoe SH 

Standard of Beserre 240 

Statement showing In detail all monera recelTed Ibr licenses and 

fbes far 7ear ending Jul; 1, I8T5 S44 

Abstracts trovi Statements of Llfb Insurance Companies S47 



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[BZKCCTITB DOCUHBNT, NO. 1.] 



ANNUAL MESSAGE 



GOVERNOR C. K. DAVIS, 



LEGISUTIRE OF MINNESOTA, 



DELIVERED JANUARY 7, 1876. 



PRINTED BY AUTHORITY. 



BAIHT PAUL, 

TBI FIOnKB-PBKK OOHPAXT. 



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ANNUAL MESSAGE 



GOV. C. K. DAVIS. 



State op Minnesota, ) 

EXBCDTITB DePABTMENT, > 

Saint Padl. Jan. 7, 1875. ) 
Gentlemen (^ the Senate and House (f E^tresentatives : 

It m customary in this state for the retiring goTemor to 
conunuuicate to the legislature such information of the trans- 
actions of the year as will aid that hody in the performance 
of its duties. 

I shall perform that tssk as adequately as may be consis- 
tent with the restrictions of this occasion, referring for fuller 
details than can he presented here to the reports of the 
various officers. 

THE STATE FINAKCBS. 

The report of the state auditor presents a detailed exposi- 
tion of the financial affairs of the state. The accompanying 
condensed statement will inform you of the substantial facts 
pertaining to the administration of that ofBce. 

He states the actual value of taxable property to be at least 
9300,000,000, making allowance for all exemptions. 

He found that the special state tax of one-half mill im- 
posed by the act of last winter would probably be unnecessary, 
and therefore took the responsibility, with my approval, of 
certifying to the county auditors two and one-tenth mills only. 
The amount which this per centum will yield will be found 
sufficient, with delinquent taxes to be collected, and other 
sources of revenue, to meet all deferred appropriations, the 



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4 GOTEBNOB'S HG8SAGB. 

expenaes of the state government, and all other necesaarT 
public dighursement for the ensuing year. 

The auditor renews hia approval of the present tax law, and 
illustrates its efficiency by a comparison of its results with 
those yielded by the former statutes. 

He recommends the re-enactment of that provision of the 
act of 1874 by which a penalty of ten per cent, was imposed 
upon all amounts returned delinquent on account of taxes up- 
on real estate, and be also advises the restoration of the 
penalty of five per cent, as to personal property taxes so re- 
turned. 

He animadverts with just severity upon the practice of 
undervaluation of property for purposes of taxation, and re- 
commends the abandonment ot the present system of towU' 
ship assessors and the substitution of comity assessors, citing 
the favorable results which the operation of the plan last 
named has secured in the coanty of Ramsey. 

BBCEIFTS AND BZPBNDrTDRBS. 

Totkl receipts daring the flscal year ending Nov. 20| 

1875 ; |l,ieS,75BOT 

ToUl dtsboTSemaQts 1,088,609 78 

LeavlDg a general bftlance of. ' tlSO.SU W 

Tbo recetpts came ftom the general sources : 

Balance In treasary department Dec. 1, 1874 9IS8,1G0 91 

From tax collections 46,798 88 

From railroad companies In lien of taxation 106,878 II 

From Insnrance companies In Hen of tazaUon SG,760 Si 

Income from permanent school nind 300,299 74 

Income from permanent nniverslt; fDnd 18,370 28 

Income from Internal Improvement land fund 3,769 OT 

From Bales of school Unda 48,477 69 

For sale ol timber on school land 34,104 01 

FromsBleofnnlverslty lands 8,S£0 08 

From sale of timber on nnlversity land 7,397 49 

From sale of Internal improvement land • 4,898 09 

From Bale of timber on Internal improvement land 4,086 99 

From loan for erection of pnbllc boUdlngs 3Q,000 00 

From alt other sonrcea 46,G00 G9 

•1,168,766 OT 

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OOYEBNORS MESSAGE. 5 

The dlabarsements were made for the foltowlng purposes •■ 

Tor leglalatlre, ezeontlTe and Judicial ezpendltares.... $168,947 11 
Tor iopport or state Donnal acbools, iDsane uflam, 
deaf, damb and blind instltutei^, state prison, relbrm 

■chool and soldiers' orphans 21B,E69 98 

For erectlog, repairing and fDralahiiig public buildings 78,S86 18 

Forpajment of apportioned Bchool ftind 186,021 3C 

Expenses of state DnlTetBity 80,001} 00 

Payment of Interest on loans .'. 88,600 00 

Public printing 86.646 SI 

Parchase of bonds for school flind 78,088 88 

Paichaseofbondsfbr onlversit; fund 19,666 49. 

Farchaae of bonds for Internal Improvement land fond. 9,838 06 

Purchase of bonds for loebrlate asylom fQod 2,488 tt 

Frontier relief and relmbarsemeat of counties and iodl- 

rtdnals 72,800 00 

Forstate census 16,081 61 

HlaceUaneODS expenses 67,968 S4 

Total #1,088,609 78 

Balance in tbe treasury Not. 80, 1876 180,346 S9 

To the credit of the following funds : 

InUreat fUnd 29,426 91 

State Instttntlons fkind 48,7SS 69 

Permanent school fund 11,248 61 

General school fUnd 17,888 07 

PermaDCDt QulTerslty fund 4,627 94 

General nnlTerslty fund 4,686 OS 

Internal improTement land Itand 4,117 88 

Internal Improrement fUnd 3,103 84 

SlnUngftaDd #82,088 96 

Less over draft revenue fund... 819,476 96 
Less over draft Inebriate asylum 

ftind 167 92 

819,684 88 



Total 1180,348 SO 



The administration of the treaaory and Its present condition Is pie- 
Muted In condensed form In the UGcompuiying recapituUtlon of re- 
ceipts, expenditures and balances during the fiscal year ending Nor- 
ember 80, 1876: 



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OOTSRNOB'S MESSAGE. 7 

THE BAIUtOASB. 

The railroad commissioner presents in his report some in- 
teresting statements of the cost of construction and operat- 
ing roads of the standard gauge, and suggests the feasibility 
of narrow gauge roads in those portions of the state where 
new railroad facilities are needed. 

There are now in Minnesota 1,954^ miles of railroad in 
operation. These roads are represented by ^6,105,920 of 
stock, and carry a total funded debt of $86,684,539, and a 
floating debt of $5,735,192. 

The reported gross earnings of these roads for the year 
were $4,952,152.99, a decrease of $1,242,516.19 from the 
earnings of the preceding year. The operating expenses 
were $3,925,322.14, leaving the net earnings only $1,026,- 
830.85, showing a decrease from the net earnings of the 
previous year of $867,969.66. 

The agitation and discussion of the relative obligations of 
the railroad companies and rights of the people have resulted 
in a better understanding, and in sentiments of concession 
and conciliation in both parties to the controversy. These 
sentimente found expression in the act approved March 8th, 
1875. I feel authorized to state, from the entire absence of 
complaint, that the act has given satisiaction, and that no 
farther legislation will be necessary so long as the present 
situation remains unchanged. 

THK JUniCIAKY. 

In some of the judicial districts of this state the labor im- 
posed by the increased business, which has resulted from in- 
creased population and wealth, has been found too great to 
be disposed of by one judge. It has been the judgment of 
the I^al profession that under the constitution there can be 
only one judge in a district. It has been found necessary, 
therefore, as to the counties of Ramsey and Hennepin, to es- 
tablish courts of common pleas, with powers co-ordinate 
with those of the district courts. The existence of two 
courts with equal powers is in itself anomalous, and &b 
practical result has been to complicate the important records 



zedbyGoOgle 



8 QOVERNOBB UE8SA0E. 

mcident to judicial proceedings —an inconvenieace which in- 
creases in the progress of time. 

The last legislature accordingly submitted to the people an 
amendment of the judiciary clause of the constitution, by 
which it is provided that in each of the judicial districts, as 
the legislature may prescribe, one or more judges may be 
elected by the electors thereof, whose term of office shall be 
seven years, and that each of said judges shall severally have 
and exercise the powers of the court under the limitations 
prescribed by law. 

This amendment also provides that in case any court of 
common pleas heretofore established shall be abolished, the 
judge of such court may be constituted by the legislature, 
one of the judges of the district court of the district wherein 
such court has been so established, for a period not exceeding 
the unexpired term for which he was elected. 

This amendment was adopted at the last general election, 
and it will become your duty to give by law such effect to its 
provisions as the public interests may seem to require. 

I am not aware that any of the counties except Ramsey and 
Hennepin require at present any legislation under this amend- 
ment. Each of these counties has a court of common pleas 
for which there is one judge in Hennepin county and two 
judges in Ramsey county. A statut« which will transfer these 
judges to the district court will simplify records, systematize 
the judicial system of those counties, and materially diminish 
the expeuBe of the courts. 

WKSrmJTIONAL AUBNnMEKTS. 

In each of my former messages the attention of the legis- 
lature was directed to the unsatisfactory provision of the con- 
stitution relative to the investment of the school fund. 

An amendment was adopted at the last election by which 
the legislature is directed to make suitable laws for the in- 
vestment of the principal and interest of this fund in bonds 
of the United States or of this State, or of such other state 
as the legislature may &om time to time direct. 

An amendment to the constitution was adopted at the last 
election by which the legislature is empowered to provide by 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



OOTEBKOB'B HS88A0S. 9 

lav that any woman of the age of twenty-one years and up- 
wards may vote at any election held for the purpose of choos- 
ing any officers of schools, or upon any measure relating to 
schools, and may also provide that any such woman may be 
eligible to hold any office pertaining solely to the manage- 
ment of schools. 

It will be observed that this amendment does not of itself 
confer this limited elective franchise upon the women. It 
Buuf^y authorizes the l^ialature to grant it. I am persuaded 
that the legislature ought to proceed to exercise the power 
thus conferred upon it. It is doubtless the intention of the 
people that oar schools and their administration shall be 
sabjected to the direct influence of women, who, by nature are 
the first teachers and the best. Their discipline and tuition 
imparted before the youth are subjected to the training of 
the schools, are at once the earliest and the most permanent 
of all educational influences. All that is acquired in those 
maturer years after the youth has graduated in that domestic 
school where the loving teachings of his mother form his 
character and mind for all time, is built upon the foundation 
which she has constructed. To say that, at the time her 
child becomes teachable at school, the institutions in which 
it is taught should be removed &om her direct influence and 
given over to the exclusive control of men, is to advocate a 
system of education in which the councils, the experience) 
the intuitions which sometimes are wber than the wisdom of 
the wisest men, shall be entirely wanting. 

I have regretted, in the administration of the duties of my 
office, that I could not appoint women to positions which will 
give them a voice in the management of some of the state 
institutions. They are needed in the institute for the deaf, 
dumb and blind, to guide their sisters through the labyrinth 
of darkened or deadened senses. They are needed in the 
hospital for the insane, to aid in the removal of the cloud of 
deUrium or delusion in which so many women walk. They 
are needed at tiiie state reform school, where little girls are to 
be reclaimed by gentler means than man knows firom the 
pattis of vice or temptation toward which they have b^un to 
stray. This subject is earnestly commended to your dispas- 
noniUe and unprejudiced consideration. 
2 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



10 QOVEBNOR'S MK88AOB. 

ATTOBSEY fiEKERAl'S BEPOBT. 

The report of the attorney general is aubmitted for yoar 
consideration. It contains a statement of the l^al businesB 
transacted by that officer during the year in the coarts on 
behalf of the state. In cases where decisions have been 
reached, the points decided are stated in this report. 

It will be seen upon exdmination of this document, that 
many questions of great importance hare paased to adjudica- 
tion, and it is gratifying to note the promptitude and success 
with which the rights of the public have been maintained. 

Perhapsthe most important of these questions is the one 
which involved the coi^titutionality of the act of 1873, en- 
titled: " An act to establish a fund for the foundation and 
maintenance of an asylum for inebriates." The supreme court 
has beld the law valid. An examination of the act has con- 
vinced me that some amendments will be required in order to 
render more efficient the instrumentalities by which the tax 
is to be collected. 

ADJirrAjrr qknebal's office. 

The transactions in the adjutant general's office are exhib- 
ited in the accompanying report. The most important 
function of this ofiico is the administration of the law of 
1873, by which it is made the duty of the adjutant general 
to act as claim agent fur alt j>ersous liaviiig claims against 
the United Statest for i^nsions, bounty or back pay arising 
out of the late civil war, and to prosecute such demands 
without pay from the claimant. This system was adopted 
in the state in 1865, and since that time the adjutant general 
has collected 1497,646.44 of these claims. The office is now 
in prosecution of claims amoimting to about ^400,000. This 
office protects the soldier from the rapacity of the claim 
agent, and it should be continued if for no other reason. 

INSURANCE. 

The fourth annual report of the insurance commissioner 
is herewith submitted. 

It appears Irom this report that the number of fire, marine 
and fire, and marine companies authorized to transact busi- 



zedbyGoOglC 



OOTEBNOB'S MEE8AOB. 11 

ness in this state on the first day of May, 1875, was eighty. 
Of this amnber two were Minnesota companies i sixty-seven 
were organized under the laws of other states of the Union; 
eleven were from foreign countries. 

The aggregate assets of all these companies is, |85,050,176 34 
Their aggregate reinsurance reserve is, 30,907,087 37 

Their a^regate surplus as to policy holders ia 48,729,828 19 
A^regate premiums received was, 59,552,833 23 

Total losses paid were, 25,647,559 47 

Their transactions in Minnesota for the year 1874, gi*e 
the following result: 

Risks writtMi, $60,842,209 00 

Premiums received, 940,137 67 

Lossespaid. 251,357 77 

Losses incurred, 247,712 60 

The commissioner recommends that no change be made in 
the statutes by which the minimum amount of paid up cap- 
ital is fixed at two hundred thousand dollars in order to ena- 
ble a company to transact business in this state. 

The act of 1873 authonzed the service of original process 
in suite against a company upon the insurance commissioner 
or upon an agent of the company named by it. This law 
was afterwards so amended, as to the American companies, 
as to omit the requirement of service upon the commissioner. 
That officer states iu bis report that cases have arisen where 
agents have removed from the state, or died, thereby causing 
delay and difficulties to suitors seeking legal redress. He 
recommends that the provisions of the act of 1873 be re- 
stored to the extent at least of allowing service of process 
apon the commissioner in cases such as he has referred to. 

The commissioner advocates the enactment of a law in this 
state, similar to what is known as the New York surplus law, 
providing for the creation and maintenance of surplus or 
safety funds by fire insurance companies, for the greater 
security of policy holders, in cases of extraordinary confla- 
grations. This law is intended to better secure, not alone 
the interests of policy holders whose property is burned, but 
also the interests of that large class of policy holders whose 
property has not been burned, but who have purchased in- 



zedbyGoOgle 



12 GOTERNOK'8 HE88AQB. 

Burance and are entitled to receive it, or a return of the un- 
earned premiums in case of a failure on the part of the 
companieB, from any cause, to carry out its contracts. The 
importance of any legislation which will enhance the secu- 
rity of policy holders, is at once apparent. The grounds 
upon which the commissioner's recommendation is hased, 
are fully set forth in his report. The subject is respectfully 
cconmended to your consideration. 

The number of life insurance policies issued in Minnesota 
during thf year covered by this report was 3,588. The 
amount insured thereby was $6,053,259, for which the pre- 
miums collected were $497,704.26. The amount of losses 
paid was $201,797,46. 

The commissioner renews his recommendation that the 
law establishing the standard of reserve be changed irom six 
per cent, to four and one-half per cent, interest, in conformity 
with the action of nearly all the other states. 

LUHBBB INTERESTS. 

The condition of our lumber interests is exhibited in the 
reports of the surveyor general. 
In the first or Stillwater district, there were 

scaled 177.316,829 feet. 

In the second or Mirneapolis district, 149,350,820 feet. 

In the fifth or Dnluth district, 955,761 feet. 

BT. CBOIX AND LAKE SUPERIOR CANAL. 

By an act of the legislature approved March 9th, 1875, a 
board of commissioners was constituted and named in the 
act, whose duties were prescribed by the statute. To cany 
out its provisions $3,000 was appropriated. Hon. W. G. 
Ward, one of the board, declined to act. Their duties were. 

First — To examine the country, rivers and lakes lying be- 
tween the bead of steamboat navigation on the St. Croix 
river and the waters of Lake Superior at the head of that 
lake, to determine the most feasible route for acanal cpnnect- 
ing those points. 

Second — To make a careful and correct survey of the 
route which promises most for the Biture development of the 
country. 



zedbyGoOglC 



ootebnob'b message. 13 

Tliird — To make report to the legislature, which report 
shall be accompanied with maps and drawings, showing as 
near as practicable the features of the country over which 
such surrey may pass, and a careful estimate of the cost for 
the construction of such water channel or canal. 

They were also required to extend their survey so as to be 
able to include in their report a correct statement regarding 
the feasibility of a canal from Duluth to some point upon 
the Mississippi river near Sandy Lake in this state. 

The report of the commissionehi is herewith transmitted. 
It will be seen from this document that the board has per- 
formed only the first of the duties prescribed by the act, viz. : 
thai of preliminary examination. The commissioners state 
that they had not time or means sufficient to make a survey. 

Three routes were examined, and the conclusion to which 
the board arrives is that the preferable one is via the Bois 
Brule and St. Croix rivers, noting as the greatest and only ob- 
jection to this route the fact that there is no natural harbor 
at the mouth of the Brule river — an objection which, without 
explanation, would seem decisive against the conclusion of 
the board— the report stating that this stream enters the 
lake where it has a straight line of shore for many miles, 
affording no natural harbor whatever. 

Another route examined was from the Dalles, at Taylor's 
Palls, to the mouth of the Namecogon river, thence up that 
rivet and across the sommit to the waters of White river, or 
some stream to be ascertained to be moat feasible to connect 
with the waters of Lake Superior. This line is two hundred 
and fifty miles long. The report does not state explicitly 
how many miles of c^ial excavation will be required. It 
does state that it will involve the construction of nineteen 
dams and nineteen locks, and indeterminately speaks of 
"several more." 

The third route examined lies via the St. Croix, Kettle, 
Black Hoof and Left Hand rivers, a distance of about two 
hundred miles. There is a fall of forty-five feet in nine miles 
above the mouth of Kettle river, to overcome which dams 
will be manifestly necessary, though how many the report 
does not state. The &lls of Kettle river make a descent of 
nearly eighteen feet, and from the head of lower falls, so 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



14 oovbrkok'b UESSAOB. 

ciJled, to the head of upper falls, a distance of four and oue- 
h^f miles, the river falls a distance of twenty-five feet. How 
many dams or locks will be found necessary to overcome 
these obstacles is not stated. 

It is to be regretted that the board bad not time and means 
to come to more explicit results. It is for the legislature to 
consider whether the conclusions of the commission warrant 
fiirther appropriations. 

THE COUUOX SCHOOLS. 

On the third day of April, 1875,1 appointed David Burt, 
of Winona, to the office of superintendent of public instruc- 
tion. This officer brought to the discharge of his duties litf^ 
experience in our common schools, warm sympathy with the 
cause of popular education, and the special qualification of 
finished and tolerant scholarship. His report is a practical 
document, and deals with several questions which will engage 
your consideration. 

I am unable to agree with the superintendent in his anim- 
adversions upon the act of 1875, by which it was in sub- 
stance provided that an annnal tax of one mill on the amount 
of a^essment shall be levied, and when collected distributed 
by giving to each school district the amount of tax collected 
in that district, ^rior to the passage of this act, an annual 
tax of two mills was levied and apportioned among the sev- 
eral school districts of the county in proportion to the num- 
ber of persona in the district between the ages of five and 
twenty-one years. It will be perceived that the operation of 
these statutes differs in this, that the former law, while it ex- 
acted taxes of the entire county, distributed them on a per 
capita basis, whereby the large towns or cities were made as 
ageneral rule to contribute for the support of schools in the 
country, while under the present law each district receives 
just what it pays. 

Under the former system, the city of Winona raised $9,274, 
of which $7,014 went to the support of the schools in that 
city, while $2,260 was applied to the support of schools in 
every district of the county outside of Winona. It hap- 
pened in one instance that the system worked the other way. 



.vCoogIc 



OOVERNOB'd HBE9A0G. 15 

for St. Paul received from Ramsey county f 1,000. But this, 
too. seeiiLs onjnat. The citizens of Minneapolis, as I am in- 
formed, ascertained that under the former law the city would 
be obliged to contribute nearly 810,000 to the support of the 
rural schools of the populous and wealthy county of Henne- 
pin, and therefore for the special relief of that city a statute 
was pas.<ied before the date of the enactment of the present 
law, excepting Minneapolis from the operation of^ the former 
system. I am unable to see why the citizens of the city of 
Winona should be taxed to support the schools of St. Charles, 
for the reason that there may be in that county some pour 
and sparsely populated districts outside of both these towns 
which encounter difficulties in paying for their own schools. 
It must W considered that the rate of taxation in the cities 
for municipal and other purposes is much higher than in the 
countrj' towns, and thii) fact see?us to be a valid answer to 
the argument that the pre.fent law tends to exempt the 
wealthier communities from helping the poorer communities 
in the education of their children. 

It is declared by the constitution of Minnesota, that the 
income arising from the lease ur sale of school lands shall he 
distributed to the different townships throughout the state 
in proportion to the number of scholars in each township 
between the ages of five and twenty-one years, and shall be 
faithfully applied to the specific objects of the original grants 
or appropriations. By the same article of the constitution, it 
is made the duty of the legislature to establish a general nnd 
auiform system of public schools. 

The statutes require the superintendent of public instruc- 
tion to apportion semi-annually, the available school funtis 
in the state treasury among the several counties in propor- 
tion to the number of persons between the ages of five and 
twenty-one years. In other words, the constitution requires 
the money to be distributed in proportion to the number of 
scholars, while the statute makes the number of persons tlie 
baeis. 

The important question arises whether the basis upon 
which this money has heretofore been distributed is not in 
contravention of the constitutional provision? The super- 
intendent thinks that it is, and in this I ^ree with him. 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



16 oovernob's message. 

The word "scholars" has a definite meaniiig, more limited 
than the word "persons," and was doubtless used by the 
iramers of the constitution with a view to precision. The 
primary definition of the word "scholar" is "one who learns 
of a teacher." It is perfectly obvious that there must be in 
every community many persona who are not described by 
any definition of which the word "scholar" is susceptible. 
The answer to this question concerning the validity of the 
statute is found in a mere statement of the proposition, and 
seems to be conclusive. 

The subordinate question then arises, does the word 
"scholars" as used in the constitution mean pupils in all 
schools or only pupils in the public schools ! 

I have come to the conclusion with the superintendent that 
the townships are entitled to this money upon the basis of 
scholars in the public schools. Without stopping to support 
this conclusion by any elaborate exposition of the constitution 
upon this subject, it must suffice for present purposes to ob- 
serve that the provisions of that instrument pertain solely to 
- a.system of public schools, and require the legislature toestab- 
lish them generally and uniformly. It cannot be supposed 
that, while imposing this duty, it was intended to attack and 
weaken the system by a basis of apportionment which should 
be unafi'ected by tjie number of pupils attending the public 
schools. It is found that under the present law the 
number of scholars enrolled in the city of St. Paul in 1874 in 
the public schools was 2,760, white it reported 15,114 persons 
between the ages offive and twenty-one years. The citythus 
secured a basis of apportionment over five times the number 
of scholars enrolled. The same advantages resulted in other 
large towns in the state, who have thus obtained an undue 
proportion of the school monej's at the expense of the rural 
districts. 

These subjects, with others presented by this report, are 
commended to your attention. 

THK 8TATB UKIVERSITT, 

The university of Minnesota has made substantial pro- 
gress during the year. There are now two hundred and 
thirty-seven students in attendance. By the construction 



zedbyGoOglC 



uovernor'6 message. 17 

of new buildings and the important acquisition of laboratoiy, 
geological cabinet, and otber instroments of infitruction, 
the bcilities of the university have been very much in- 
creased. 

The r^ents report that about thirty-one sections of salt 
spring lands are due to this state from the United States 
imder the act by which Minnesota was admitted into the 
union, and they request the legislature memorialize con- 
gress for leave to make selections of this quantity of land. 
[ hare had occasion to examine the facts upon which this 
claiin is based. They are too complicated to admit of ade- 
quate statement in this i)aper, but I have no doubt of the 
entire justice of the claim. You will find a full exposition 
of the fiicts in the special report of Prof. Winchell which ac- 
companies the report of the board of regents, which will en- 
able yon to fiilly apprise our senators and representatives in 
congress of the grounds upon which this demand is 
founded. 

From the financial statement, the following facts ajJiwar in 
relation to the permanent university fund. 

Whole number of acres granted by Congress, ^02,000 

.\cres sold to pay debts, 14,000 

Acres sold for permanent fund, :)8,626 

Acres unsold. 149,374 

The total productive permanent fiind is now $246,648 78 

The board concludes its report with an upiieal to the 
friends of education in all sections of the State to aid our 
youth in their efforts to attain this free higher education 
which the university of Minnesota now offers, by making 
the town and city schools conform their courses as far as 
|i08sible, so as to prepare students for the university, and in 
this way make our school system complete, and a collegiate 
education accessible to all. 

In every annual message which I have written, I have urged 
the legislature to make this idea a working element in our 
sj'stem of education, and I regret that the present adminis- 
tration must close with that result unaccomplished. 

When it is considered that the idea of self-government, 
made visible as it is in our republican institutions, is vital 



zedbyGoOglC 



18 qovbonob's hbssaoe. 

'Only upon the condition of &ee thought and tlie judgment 
of electors acting upon the machinery of state, uncontrolled 
by any repressive influences, and limited only by the capac- 
ity of the human mind, the importance of the prerogative of 
the state over the forces of education presents itself with 
.such overwhelming force of demonstration as to make Uie di- 
rection of these forces to their fullest capacity a primary 
•duty of the government. 

STATE NOBSIAL SCHOOLS. 

The oiieration of the state normal schools, as detailed in 
the report of tlie state board, have been conducted in a satis- 
factory manner. 

The enrollment of the year is : 

At Winona, 49« 

At Mankato, 259 

At St. Cloud. 222 

Total. 979 

Average attendance vras : 

At Winona. 220 

At Mankato, 79 

At St. Cloud, 113 

Total, 412 

These institutions have graduated since their foundation. 
415 pupils, and it is the concurrent testimony of all who are 
■ connected with the administration of our system of education, 
that the influence of these graduates is now felt most benefi- 
cially throughout the state. The superintendent of public in- 
struction, acting under the authority conferred upon him by a 
resolution of the state normal board, has called upon the 
principals and teachers of these schools for services in the 
institutes. He has thereby secured an extensive application 
of the methods of teaching which form the chief excellence 
of the normal system. 

The state normal board report that in addition to the 



zedbyGoOglC 



gotesnob's message. 19 

usual appropriation of $5,000 to each acbool, there will be 
required to de&a; expeuseB: 

For normal school at Winona, $6,000 

For normal school school at Mankato, 5,000 
For normal school at St. Cloud, 4,000 

A special allowance of $1,100 for books and apparatus is 
asked for the three schools, and also |1,000 to grade and 
fence the grounds at Winona, The building at Mankato is 
in a precarious condition by reason of imperfect construction. 
and it will be both economical and wise to have it thor- 
oughly repaired before it shall become irreparably injured. 

STATE KEPORH SCHOOL. 

The transactions of the state reform school are disclosed 
in the report of the board of managers. It has been conduct- 
ed with economy, and its beneficent effects become more 
Hpptirent every year. Sufficient time since its foundation 
has now elapsed to enable its practical results to be cited to 
attest its usefulness. It has discharged 171 pupils, and of 
them only three or four have relapsed into vicious habits. 
The others are useful members of society, sustaining tl\eni' 
selren by trades taught them in the institution. 

The. managers are decided in their riews of the impolicy 
of the present laws by which each county is compelled to 
pay for the support of inmates sent from it to Uie school. 
They are persuaded that the usefulness of the institution 
and the end of its establishment are thereby thwarted in 
many instances, and they recommend that such expense be 
borne by the state, as in the case of the prison, the institute 
for the deaf and dumb and the insane asylum. 

A permanent supply of pure water is needed, to procure 
which an appropriation of $3,000 is asked. 

The amount asked for ordinary expenses is the same as 
last year, yiz. : 

For officers' salaries, wages and expenses, $10,000 
For general current expenses, 17,000 



.V Google 



20 aOVEBNOB'S ME8SA0E. 

DKAF, DUMB, AND BLIND. 

The report of the directors of the institute for the deuf 
and dumb and the blind accompanies the message. 

An appropriation was made last winter of |I5,000, for the 
erection of the main building, connecting the wings, which 
ure lUready constructed. The basement has been built for 
about $9,000, leaving an unexpended balance of about 
$6,000. The estimate of the sum necessary to complete the 
building is $44.000 ; deducting said balance, $6,000, leaves 
$3ti,000, for which an appropriation is asked. 

The Dumber of pupils in attendance during the year is 110 
in the deaf and dumb department, and 21 in the blind de- 
partment. 

SOLDtKRS' ORPHANS' HOME. 

Soon after the close of the war, the state took charge of 
the children orphaned by that strife, and established a home 
for them at Winona, in which they are prepared to act an 
honorable and usefol part in life. The present number of 
these children is 74, showing a diminution of 11 during the 
year. The duration of this institution is limited in the 
nature of things, and the trustees state that they hare acted 
upon the theory that the tax>payers expect its work to be 
finished at as early a day as may be found consistent with the 
object of its establishment. They have accordingly made 
the tests for admission more stringent on each year. They 
ask an appropriation, to meet the expenditures of the ensuing 
year, of $16,000 — a reduction of $2,000 from what was 
granted in 1875, and of $4,000 &om the grant of 1874. 

HOBtTTAL FOB THE INSANB. 

The trustees of the hospital for the insane have submitted 
their aunnal report. They announce the completion of the 
asylum, and express tiieir belief that it will compare favorably 
with any similar institution in tiie country. 

During the year, M9 patients received treatment; 135 have 
been discha]^^, leaving 434 inmates on Dec. 1st, 1875. It 
is estimated that tiie average daily attendance for the ensuing 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



OOTBRMOB's HE8BAQE. 21 

year will be 461 patients. Estdmating the coat of their 
nuantenance at $3.75 per week each, makes the total cost 
$89,895. This includes extraordinary expenses, salaries of 
officers, wages of attendants, repairs, fuel, rations, clothing, 
medicines, replacing bedding and furniture. Deducting from 
this snm the surplus of the appropriation of last year, leaves 
$83,500 requested for the expenses of the year 1876. Yon 
are referred to the very able and interesting report of the 
SQperintendent for a detailed history of the institution dur- 
ing the past year. 

THE STATE PRISON. 

The report of the inspectors of the state's prison contains a 
detailed statement of the operations of that institution during 
the past year. 

The present number of convicts ia 146. The average num- 
ber during the year is 138. The expenses of the prison have 
been $39,999.07. Deducting ti-om this the earnings of the 
prison and the value of supplies on hand. $20,678.88, leaves 
the balance, $19,320.18, the actual cost. This is $139.16 for 
«ach inmate, and is $19. 1 1 per capita less than last year. 

The appropriations made at the lost eession for improve' 
menta have been economically administered, leaving an un- 
expended balance of $1,510.60. The prison building has been 
enlai^;ed by the addition of fifty-two cells. Iron corridors 
liave taken the place of wooden ones, and a stone floor has 
been placed in the cell building. By the condemnation of 
an adjacent tract of land, the state has secured some never- 
fiuling springs of water and ground for a resen'oir. 

This reservoir, which has a capacity of 5,000 barrels, bus 
been constructed at an elevation of about one hundred and 
fifty feet above the prison grounds, connected with tlie build- 
i^S by pipes with hydrants at convenient points, so that 
water can be thrown to any part of the buildings. It ia 
grati^ing to remark that the improvements contemplated by 
the appropriations of the last legislature have in no case 
exceeded the amounts appropriated, and in several instances 
have been made for less. 

During last summer the roof and upper story of the boiler 
and engine building were destroyed by fire, rendering imme- 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



22 oovbrnob'b hebsagb. 

diate repairs necessary. These were made at an expense of 
(3,807.70, for wliicli an appropriation is asked. 

When the reservior was completed it was fonnd that about 
1,000 feet of hose was needed in order to make the water sup- 
ply available in case of fire, to which institutions ofthischar* 
acter are peculiarly liable. There being no appropriation for 
this purpose, I authorized the inspectors to procure the same 
on credit, which they did at a cost of |1,124.40. 

The board requests the following appropriations, viz. : — 
$15,000 to complete the wall around the prison grounds, 
$12,000 to build a laundry and a bath house. 

The inspectors call attention to the fact that while the law 
requires the deputy warden to reside at tiie prison, the state 
has provided for him no accommodations in the place where 
it requires him to live. Either the law should be changed or 
provision made to enable the deputy warden to comply with 
it. 

For the details of the management you are referred to the 
reports of the warden, and the subordinate officers. The in- 
stitution in all its departments has been conducted so unex- 
ceptionably, that I have no criticisms to offer or improve- 
ments to suggest.' 

STATB HIETOKICAL SOCIETY. 

The executive council, in presenttug the report of the 
State Historical society, call attention to the inadequacy and 
unsafeness of the rooms now occupied by the library and 
collections. The library now contains over 16,000 volumes, 
and IB especially rich in records, written and printed, per- 
taining to the historj' of the state, and of that region which 
was known as the Northwest Territory, long before civiliza- 
tion appeared in any permanent form between the great 
lakes and the Mississippi river. Such a collection should 
not be subjected to risk of destruction, and the request of 
the council for more commodious and secure rooms is ap- 
proved for your favorable action. 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

I have been furnished with an abstract of the report of the 

.DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



OOTKBKOB'S H£S8AQE. 2;^ 

Stut^ Board of Health, irom which it appears that the geu- 
tlenien of the medical profeEBion of whom it is composed, 
have been diligent in the performance of their very important 
diiiiep. They have inspected the state institutions, and re- 
imrt them to be in a satisfactory sanitary condition, except, 
in H iew minor jtarticulars. 

The board expresses its sense of the importance of an ine- 
briate asylum, stating that within the last twenty years 
many of these institutions have been established, and 
that thirty-five per cent, of the inmates have been per- 
manently restored to habits of sobriety, and have resumed 
their places as useful members of society. 

Attention is called to the fact that our laws make no suit- 
able provision for the education and care of feeble-minded 
children, and an inexpensive plan is proposed in this report. 

The report contains suggeationa in regard to additions and 
iniiirovementa to existing institutions, and recommends the 
erection of another prison and asylum, for the insane. While 
I apt>reciate the force of these recommendations, I feci bound 
to state that I do not think that the state is in condition t» 
engage immediately in the construction of new jiublic insti- 
tutions involving direct appropriations fromithe treasury. 

The board expresses its approval of the act of 1B75, 
which provides for the appointment of inspectors of illumi- 
natuig oil, and disapproves any reduction of the present 
standard by whi^h it is tested. The law is of great 
public importance, and should be rigidly enforced. The 
inspectors are appointed by the judges of the district courts, 
but no officer is empowered to remove them for inefficiency or 
malfeasance in the perfonnance of their duties. It should bo 
amended in this respect so that the governor, upon cause- 
shown, may have the power to depose unworthy appointees. 

THE CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION. 

The legislature at its last session appointed a boanl of cen- 
tennial commissioners, and made a small provisional appro- 
priation to enable them to enter upon their work. It appears 
from their report that they have taken steps to collect a cabi- 
net of ores, minerals, fossils, soils, and building stones of the 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



Si 0OVEBMOR'8 HE66AOE. 

state, aud apeciruens of our forest trees and [ilnutH. Tliey 
liave aiicceeded by personal efl'orts in awakening a lively 
intereMt among our manufacturers. They express very 
emphatically their conviction that the occasion is one which 
should be met by the state h» a stat«, and they recommend an 
appropriation of $3i,O00 for that purpose. They recommeud 
(IB to follow the example oi other western states, and to erect 
a building to be exclusively uaed for the exhibition ot our 
contributions. 

We are now at the beginning of the hundredtli year of 
our national indeijeudence. For one century the idea of self 
government us embodied in our constitution hu-s been snb- 
jecied to all the tests which try the stability of uations and 
it has withstomi them all. Foreign war. territorial aggran- 
dizement, the canker of peace, the disintegrating influence 
of slavery, civil dissension ending in civil war, have by turns 
attacked our institutions with all their powers of destruction, 
only to leave those institutions firmer and more glorious than 
before. 

At Philadelphia, in 1776, it was pronounced that all men 
are created equal and that all governments derive their just 
power from the consent of the governed, and it is now pro- 
posed that at that city in the year 1876, the nations of the 
earth shall meet iu comiuemoration of that event and vie in 
exposition of the products of art and industry. 

This occiwion is one which appeals for rec<^nitif)n to 
everj' patriotic heart. This commemorative act is to Ix" 
pertbrmed at a time when our country is at peace with all 
nations; when the animosities of fraternal strife are nearly 
effaced by the sweet oblivion of restored love for our country: 
.when statesmen from every state are laboring together to 
make the assurance of our future doubly sure; when no wont 
is heard, no argument spoken for dismemberment of the 
onion, when every thought is for its iwrpetuity: when the 
influence of education has suffused the very being of every 
citizen of the republic ; when art and science, keeping pace 
with the advance of <nir country in prosperity, exhibit their 
results on every hand, not only in the luxurious appliances 
of eiviliz.ntion, but also in the satisfaction of the daily wants 
of life. 



zedbyGoOglC 



gotirnob's message. S5 

You will find upon enquiry that other states hare made 
liberal appropriations with which to enable them to take 
their part in this historic pageant with dignity and propri- 
ety, and I trust that Minnesota will appear among her sister- 
hood in such guise that no comparison will put her to shame. 

FISH COMUlSSIOy. 

The report of the fish commissioners presents an interest- 
ing account of their labors during the year. 

They have placed in the waters of the state about 30,000 
California salmon; 19,000 Atlantic salmon; 4,900 land-locked 
salmon, dividing; them among the lakes and rivers of twenty- 
two counties. In October last 400,000 eggs of the California 
salmon were placed in hatching houses at Stillwater and Red 
Wing. These eggs hatched with a very small percentage of 
fidliire, and during the coming year the fry will be deposited 
in our waters. The commissioners have also oi-dered 100,000 
whitefish frj-. 

The history of the cultivation of fish extends over very few 
years. Within this short period it has been demonstrated 
that results of startling economic value can be produced 
where until recentlj' no influence was felt except the sponta- 
neous and unregulated operations of natural causes. All civ- 
iHzed nations have made the subject one of state policy and 
control, and science has, in few instances, more conclusivelj- 
proved its intimate relations and creative power in regard to 
those questions which affect the well-being of the people in 
their most primary and material aspects. 

As a matter of economy, the whole subject deserves, and 
will doubtless receive your careful attention. The commis- 
sioners request an appropriation of $5,000 for the necessary 
expenses of this year-, and in doing so they call attention to 
the fact that when the work of planting the fish is finally 
thoroughlj- done throughout the state, the necessity for ap- 
propnations of this character will cease. 

THE STATISTICAL BUREAU. 

The commissioner of statistics has filed his annual report 
of the labor of that difiicult and important department. Its 

4 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



36 OOVEBKOR'e HE88AQB. 

fimctiona, though they have been enlarged every year, are 
yet-felt by that officer to be inadequate in many respects, to 
present a complete exhibition of the resources and progress 
of the state. The ecmimisaibner therefore recommends 
aeveral amendments to the statutes, which are commended to 
your consideration. 

The report of the present year, comprehending as it does 
the results of the census, is a document of universal im- 
portance, and a statement of the leading results to which 
the statistician has arrived may not be deemed uninterest- 
ing. 

It exhibits the progress of agriculture for twenty-five 
years. When the territory of Minnesota was organized in 
1849, its population was 4,057. In 1850 there were only 157 
farms, comprising about 3,000 acres, from which were pro- 
duced 1,400 bushels of wheat, 6,000 bushels of com, and 
le.flOO bushels of oats. A quarter of a century has worked 
wonderful changes. Our population is now 597,279; the 
number of tilled acres is 2,816,413. From these the pro- 
duction in 1875 was 31,475,000 bushels of wheat, 15,775,000 
bnshels of oats and 9,500,000 busheb of com. In ten years 
the population has increased 138 per cent., while the number 
of tilled acres has increased 302 per cent. 

The following comparative tables demonstrate our progress 
since 1860. 





"'\]m. 


" 


IncruBB. 






per cenl. 


p 1 tlon 


1 


«o.'doo 

(.816,413 
SlitTn^MM 

2.«M.3a4 
I2T753.7M 


6,668,MS 

is.cnolooo 
a.3ifi,B-..4 

*» ,812.000 
»33.S47.6(» 


347 1" 


No.ofF»rn« 


....1 18.08 


1.S3S 

7W 


m 


Simiib'^i;:::::::::::-.:::::: 


'.'.','.\ a,t8e!»9 ' 


uo 


Corn, bliah.1 


.... a,»n.»n ! 


00 


OntB. huabslB 

StiprinotpBl grain, RCPM 

?i:;':?ftrcS,r'."-;::;:; 


.... !,1T«,0(», 
.... tM.O.KI. 


!S 


Vslue of >licp[incl|»1 crops .... 


....■(2.H0,9N) 


i» 



The area of the state in acres is 51,701,760, of which 
14,106,269 acres have not yet been surveyed by the United 
States. In the 37,595,491 surveyed acres are 60,000 tajnaa, 
of which, as above stated, 2,816,413 acres are under tUlage, 



zedbyGoOglC 



ootbrnor'8 hesbaoe. $7 

tmin which haye been produced during the paflt year the re- 
sults which are presented in the foregoing table, showing an 
actual product frcon agriculture alone of nearly thirteen 
dollars from each cultivated acre, the area under tillage be- 
iug less than five and a half per cent, of the lands comprised 
within the boundaries^of thej state, or a product of about 
t)ixty-oue dollars to each man, woman and child in the state. 
I regret that the limitatious to which the occasion re- 
stricts this paper preclude a more detailed exp<fflition of 
these marvelous demonstrations of our prosperity. The; 
show what results can be compassed under the providence 
of God, by an industrious people, upon a scene of action, 
which, when they entered upon their labors only twenty- 
five years ago, was an uninhabited region, merely to visit 
which was then esteemed an act of hardihood. 

TH8 FIVE PES CENT. FUND. 

By the act of congress admitting Minnesota into the union 
the United States stipulated to pay the state £ve per cent, 
apon the sales of public lands situate therein. Large bodies 
of these lands were afterwards disposed of by the federal gov- 
ernment for land warrants or set apart for permanent Indian 
reaervatioDB or for other purposes, for which the United 
States has hitherto declined to pay tbefiveper centum. Min- 
nesota, in common with several other western states, deeming 
this position an erroneous one, has endeavored to secure a 
recognition of this claim by the general goverrunent. 

By joint resolution of the legislature, approved March 9, 
IS74. the governor was authorized to appoint an agent or 
attorney to co-operate with the agents or attorneys of other 
states in presenting and prosecuting this claim, and to stipulate 
with said agent or attorney for a reasonable compensation, 
payable only in case of a successfiil issue of said prose«utioa 
and only out of the moneys realized. 

I ascertained by correspondence with the govemore 
of the states similarly situated that Wisconsin had agreed to 
give the agent five per cent, of the moneys collected without 
dispute by the United States, and fifteen per cent, of all dis- 
puted amounts collected. 



zedbyGoOgle 



28 ootbbnob's messaob. 

The governor of Michigan made a contract which em- 
braced only matters not deemed to be in real controrersj-, and 
agreed to pay the agent of that state ten per cent, on the 
first tS.OOO collected; five per cent, on the second f5,000. and 
two and one-half per cent, upon the remainder. 

The state of Iowa agreed to pay the agent thirty-three and 
one-third per cent, of all Hums realized on account of lands 
which had been taken by warrants, and twenty-five per cent, 
on account of lands disposed of as reservations. 

The state of Nebraska agreed to give the i^nt one-third 
of all that ahould be realized. 

I accordingly, on the 5th day of November, 1874. signed 
a contract with Gen. John B. Sanborn, of St. Paul, obligat- 
ing the state to pay him fifteen per cent, of the amount actu- 
ally realized and collected aa the result of his services, to 
be paid only in the contingencies expressed in the resolution. 
Upon further reflection I became dissatisfied with the con- 
tract, and requested of Gen. Sanborn a modification to the 
advantage of the state, with which request he readily com- 
plied. The contract was accordingly modified on the 9th 
day of November, 1875. and by its terms as it now stands the 
state agrees to pay Gen, Sanborn fifteen percent, of the sum 
actually realized and collected as the result of bis services in 
all cases which are disputed or contested by the United 
States, and five per cent, only of the amounts actually real- 
ized and collected as the result of hie services in all cases not 
disputed of contested. This contract also contains astipula- 
tion that the rate of compensation may be modified by the 
present legislature. 

HOW TO SECURE OlMlOaATION. 

Minnesota is now in the eighteenth year of her existence 
as a state. Within that period she has grown from a mere 
outpost of civilization to be a populous, powerful and wealthy 
commonwealth. She possesses two thousand miles of rail- 
road. She holds as tributaries two great water systems, the 
one bearing her products to the gulf, the other carr^'ing 
them over the great lakes to the sea. Her school system is 
admirable both ui conception and operation. Under the 



zedbyGoOgle 



OOTEBHOB'S HB68AOE. itf 

infiueuce of a salubrious climate tlie people are wholly exempt 
from many diaeuses which in other reg^iona form a part of the 
daily ills of life. More wheat is raised in Minnesota than in 
uny other state. The universal failures of crops which make 
the occupation of agriculture a hazardous one elsewhere have 
never occurred here. Such visitations here are local, compara- 
tively insignificant and affect very little the grand and cer- 
tain u^regate of annual prosperity. Hitherto no adequate 
effort has been made to bring these facts to the attention of 
those who both in the old world and the new are anxious to 
improve their material condition. We have suffered the tide 
of immigration to pass us without any serious effort to 
deflect it. 

While we have thus been inactive, other states have not 
beeu idle. They have been wisely liberal in setting forth 
their advantages by pamphlets and advertisements judiciously 
distributed, and by personal representation and solicitation 
by their public agents. 

Michigan employs one agent ataaalary of f2,50O per year 
to reside in Germany, and the governor is authorized to ex- 
))end ^,000 per annmn to pay his expenses in traveling and 
printing and distributing circulars. The state has also a 
local agent resident in this country, at a salar}' of |1,500 a 
year, to act in concert with the foreign commissioner. 

The State of Kansas has always displayed exceeding energy 
m this matter and with most fruitful results. The governor, 
with two commissioners appointed by him, constitute a board 
of immigration, whose expenses are provided for by an an- 
iiutil appropriation of $5,000. 

A similar policy has been adopted in Nebraska, by the con- 
Htitntion of a bureau of immigration consieting of three com- 
missioners, one of whom is the president of the board and its 
executive officer. He receives for his services fl,200 a year 
and $800 for incidental expenses. The other members of the 
board receive only their traveling expenses. An agent is 
appointed in each organized county, who co-operates with the 
board and reports once in three months the letters received 
and such other information as the board may require. These 
i^ents receive each $50 per annum for services and expenses. 



zedbyGoOgle 



30 qovbrnok's message. 

The expenses of the bureau are met by an annual appropri- 
ution of *5.000. 

The atate of California has manifested great liberality in 
inducing immigration with reaults which are too well known 
to make necessary their recital. The southern states hure 
also made strenuous efforts in the SEune direction. 

The agents of these states meet the immigrant when he 
lands at New York, and in many instances before he leaves 
his native land. He ia cared for. His desire for information 
is satisfied by statements printed in his own language and 
expounded to him by his own countrymen, setting forth the 
advantages of the states competing. for his preference. We 
have no such representatives, and we have lost thousands 
who by proper efforts could easily have been induced to cast 
their lot with us. 

The unsettled condition of industry and the financial strin- 
gency,which for the past two years have been felt so severely 
in the eastern states, havecausedmany of their people to turn 
their foces westward. The emigration from those states has 
been very large, and it is growing in volume. We have taken 
no measures to secure our share of this most valuable incre- 
ment to our prosperity. The subject is earnestly commended 
to your consideration. 

WI8CON8IN VS. DULDTH. 

In my last message I called the attention of the legislature 
' to the suit instituted in the Supreme Court of the United 
States by the state of Wisconsin against the city of Duluth. 
by which it is sought to obtain a decree of that tribunal 
enjoining the defendant from keeping open and requiring 
it to fill up the ship canal across Minnesota Point. 

A demurrer to the complaint was interposed by the city 
and was overruled by the court without prejudice to 
the right of the city to insist in its answer or upon the final 
hearing upon the questions raised by the demurrer. It will be 
observed that the order by which the demurrer was overruled 
was merely formal, and that no substantial right of the de- 
fendant is prejudiced by it. An answer has therefore been iu> 
terposed which seems to present all the matters of defence. 



zedbyGoOt^le 



aoTEBNOB'S HESSAOe. 31 

The Supreme Court has ordered testimony to be taken in the 
case. 

I am advised by counsel, and such is my own opinion after 
a careful examination of the questiouB of fact and law 
involved, that the grounds of defence by the city of Duluth 
are ample and perfect. 

It is certainly to be regrett«d that two .states which have 
hitherto been so friendly in all their relations, and v/hoae 
general, interests are so nearly identical, should be involved 
in any litigation. Concerning the particular subject involved, 
there is no fact or circumstance, either of natural or acquired 
advantages, which makes the prosperity of either community 
whose interests are especially the subject of the controversy 
dependent upon the injury of the other. The federal govern- 
ment has hitherto appropriated money for the improve- 
ment of both harbors. The suit may cause the suspension 
of appropriations until a judicial determination is 
reached. If the litigation can be amicably determined, the 
joint claims of the states for liberal expenditures upon the 
great harbor so providentially formed at the head of Lake Su- 
perior will doubtless be productive of most liberal action. It 
is suggested that a committee be appointed to conter M'ith 
the authorities of Wisconsin to the end that our interests and 
those of that state may be made harmonious. 

THE NEW LBSI8LATIVB APP08TIONMENT. 

It is provided by section 23 of article 4 of the constitution 
that the legislature shall provide by law for the enumeration 
of the inhabitants in the middle year of each decade, and 
that at the first session after each enumeration the legisla- 
ture shall have the power to prescribe the bounds of con- 
gressional, senatorial and representative districts, and to 
apportion anew the senators and representatives among 
the several districts according to the provisions of section 
two of said article. 

The census wag taken during the year 1875, giving 597,- 
278 as the population of the state. 

The object of the constitutional provision by which a census 
is required is to provide equality of representation throughout 



zedbyGoOgle 



32 QOVBRHOR'S dtESSAOE. 

the state on the basis of population, imd to meet that require- 
ment every five years, during the lapse of which regions here- 
tofore unsettled have become populous. It has been thought 
that the power of the legislature is a discretionary one, and 
reading section 23 of this article alone there is some warrant 
for this construction. I suggest, however, that this view is 
not correct. It is a principle of legal construction that all 
parts of an instrument are to be construed together and effect 
giTen, if possible, to every provision which it contains. 
Keeping this rule in view, it will be found that section 23 
provides that the legislature shall have the power to 
make the apportionment according to the provisions 
of the second section of article VIII of the constitutibn. 
Now the second section of article VIII prescribes that the 
number of members of the legislature shall be prescribed by 
law, but the representation of the senate shall never exceed 
one member for every five thousand inhabitants, and in the 
house one member for every two thousand inhabitants, and 
that the representation in both houses shall be apportioned 
equally throughout the different portions of the state in pro- 
portion to the population thereof. It will be perceived that 
the language of this section is imperative. It is prescribed 
in section 33 in what years the legislature shall have the 
power to make operative the right conferred by section 2 of 
equal representation. It must be done at the first session 
after the census is taken. If not done at that session it 
cannot be done until after the next enumeration in 1880'. 
The census is taken at great expense for this purpose solely, 
and the legislature cannot decline to make the apportionment 
except by denying to the new counties the rights which sec- 
tion 2 was intended to give them. 

RBUEP OP DESTITUTE SETTLERS. 

By act of the legislature approved March 5, 1875, the sum 
of f75,000 was appropriated for the purchase of seed grain 
to be donated to the destitute settlers of several of the fron- 
tier counties which were devastated by grasshoppers in 1874, 
and the governor was authorized to appoint three commis- 
sioners, who, by the terms of the statute, were invested with 
tlie full care, management and disbursement of the fund. 



zedbyGoOglC 



tiOTERI^OR'a MESSAGE. 33 

I appointed as coimmssioiieis Oen. R. W. Jotmson, Dr. 
Darid Da; and Wm. Lindeke, Esq., of St. Paul, who at once 
addressed themselves with great industry to the performance 
of their duties by sending circular letters to many persons, 
and by personal inspection of most of the counties needing 
relief involving over one thousand miles of travel. It was 
fomtd that the object of the statute could be effectually ac- 
complished with $50,000, and accordingly the commissioners, 
with the concurrence of the state auditor, the state treasurer 
and the governor, were placed in possession of that sum only, 
thus effecting at the outset a saving of $25,000 to the state. 

They expended $49,981.44, and purchased at most favora- 
ble prices, obtaining in many instances liberal concessions, 
48 bushels of beans, 556 bushels of potatoes, 31 bushels of 
peas, 2,030 bushels of oats, and 46,764 1-3 bushels of wheat, 
all of which was distributed so equitably that no complaint 
has been made. 

Their report, which exhibits their transactions more fully, 
is herewith submitted, and they are entitled to thanks for 
the ability with which they have performed their duties. 

OBABSHOPPEB INTEBTIGATION. 

I was so impressed with the necessity of obtaining exact 
information upon the subject which has made such large ap- 
propriations necessary, that immediately after the last har- 
vest I appointed Messrs. John C. Wise, of Mankato; Warren 
Smith, of Graham Lake; and Allen Whitman, of St. Paul, 
to investigate and report upon the following topics: 

1. A history of grasshopper incursions into Minnesota at 
varions times. 

2. Their origin. * 

3. The time of their arrival and departure. 

4. The time when they deposit their eggs, and the timt 
of hatching. 

5. Manner of deposit. 

6. The character of land where eggs are deposited. 

7. The best practicable means for their destruction. 

8. What, if any, grains or vegetables are exempt from 
their ravages. 

DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



34 qovebnok's hessaqe. 

9. Acreage ravaged by them lq 1875, and money amount 
of damage done. 

10. To what extent and (spec'Scally) where, they have 
deposited their eggs this year. 

11. Such other useful information as may be brought to 
their knowledge. 

These gentlemen, after yisiting quite thoroughly the fron- 
tier counties and examining all the pertinent historical aiad 
scientific writings to which they had access, made the ac- 
companying report, which will be found a most important 
contribution to the subject of their labors. 

Any attempt to summarize the report would do it injustice, 
and it is submitted with the recommendation that it be so 
widely distributed among the people that the remedial meas- 
ures which it suggests may receive a. fair trial in case any 
portion of our state shall again be subject to ravage. 

The last legislature placed at the disposal of the Qoyernor 
the sum of twenty thousand dollars, for the relief of suffering 
settlers upon the frontier, to be expended in providing for 
them necessary food and clothing. It was found not neces- 
sary to expend the whole of this sum, and there accordingly 
remains in the treasury $11,445.09, the unexpended balance 
of the appropriation. 

CAPrrAl PUmSHMBNT. 

I took occasion in my last message to animadvert upon the 
defects of the statute relating to the pimishment for the 
crime of murder, and I deem it my duty to bring the subject 
again to the attention of the legislature. By the act of 
March 5, 1868, capital punishment was abolished except in 
those cases where the jury, in addition to a verdict of guilty, 
also <^termine and direct that the culprit shall suffer death. 

The objections to this law, both in theory and practice, 
are manifold, irrespective of the main question whether capi- 
tal punishment ought to be inflicted under any circumstances. 

The arguments against it which present themselves to my 
mind are as follows: The penalty i^ an uncertain one, and 
wUl vary with the various dispositions of the juries. It 
affords a pretext for disagreement of juries in capital cases. 
A juror may be willing to give a verdict of guilty, and yet 



zedbyGoOglC 



oovbrnor's hessaob. 35 

be unwilling to agree with his fellow jurors that the greater 
penalty shall be inflicted. He will thus agree upon the fact, 
bat will dissent as to the law of the case. It enables a crim- 
inal to elect that he will suffer the penalty of imprisonment 
with a chance of a pardon, rather than undergo tiie risks of 
a defence with the risk of being hanged. It results &om 
this that the murderer who is certainly and provably guilty 
will not take this risk, but will pronounce the milder sen- 
tence upon himself by admitting his guilt. 

In my last message I illustrated the defects of this statute 
t^ supposititious cases. Since that document was written lacts 
have rendered unnecessary any effort of the imagination. 

Daring tiie year 1875 three persons, Lautenschlager, Rapp 
and Rapp's wife, were tried in Ramsey county for a murder 
which they were accused of having committed jointly. The 
facts were such that if they were guilty there was no shade 
of difference in their criminality. Equally guilty, they 
deserved equal punishment. Separate trials were had, and 
Lautenschlager was tried first. The public were clamorous 
that justice should exert upon him her fidlest powers of retri- 
bution. An intelligent jury summoned Irom the body of 
that public gave to that desire the sanction of a verdict that 
the accused should undergo the penalty of death. In course 
of the same term the man Rapp was tried in the same court. 
But by this time the desire of which I have spoken had 
become partially satiated by the verdict of the jury in the 
first case, and the result was that the second jury found a 
verdict upon which he was sentenced to imprisonment for 
life. Mrs. Rapp was also tried at the same term, upon 
the same evidence, and the jury disagreed. She was after- 
wards tried in another county atfd received the same sentence 
that her husband had received. 

The results of these cases reduce themselves to this, that if 
Lautenschlager deserves his sentence, justice has been de- 
frauded of what is due her from the Rapps ; while, if they 
deserve no greater penalty than has been exacted of them, a 
shocking injustice ha^ been worked upon Lautenschlager. 

In Hennepin county, a man shot his wife dead. He elect- 
ed his punishment by pleading guilty, thereby depriving the 



zedbyGoOgle 



3t> OOTEBNOR'B MB8SA6E. 

court of the power to prono|ince any other sentence except 
that of impriaooment for life. 

These illoBtrations, drawn &om the judicial records 
of the past year, are so convincing of the inherent imperfec- 
tions of this atatute, and of its capacity for injustice, that I 
am persuaded that you will so amend it that it will denounce 
its penalties with a certain voice, and will not delegate a power 
of option to the caprice, the obstinacy, the lack of judgment 
or the false humanity of the panel. 

MINNESOTA STATE OAILROAD BODDB. 

1 should feel self reproach from the consciousness of hav- 
ing left an important duty unperformed should I suffer this 
occusioQ to pass without expressing my views upon a subject 
which has been a topic of reproach by our creditors, and re- 
crimination, excuse and defence by many of our citizens for 
more than fifteen years. I allude to the obligations, moral 
and legal, to which the state is subject by the evidences of 
- its indebtedness commonly known as the Minnesota state 
railroad bonds. 

They were executed so long ago, that of uur present popu- 
lation, over lour hundred thousand hare become inhabitants 
since the date of these securities; so many popular ideas 
upon the question have been the creation of hasty, angiy or 
insufficient assertion, that it does not seem improper to pre- 
sent here a concise historical statement showing precisely 
what was done by the state in the premises. I give it in the 
hope that it may be infiuential in clearing away some of the 
distorting and erroneous assumptions of fact which have 
obscured the subject, and,a8 I^hink, darkened the conscience 
of this people. 

By the constitution of Minnesota, as it was framed by the 
convention, it was prescribed that the credit of the state 
shall never be given or loaned in aid of any individual, as- 
sociation or corporation. It was also prescribed that the 
public debt of the state shall never in the a^regate exceed 
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. When these pro- 
visions were framed ir£ 1857, the territory had been invested 
by the United States with grants of land in trust to bnild 



zedbyGoOglC 



QOTBBNOB's MBSaiOE. 87 

certain specified railroads, which landa had been granted 
to fonr companiea; the whole country was apparently bo 
prosperotis that capital sought employment without invitation 
and with unprecedented eagerness in the construction of 
great public works. In this deluaJTe prosperity, Minnesota 
had an ample share. 

While the question of- the admission of the state into the 
Union under the constitution was pending, the memorable 
crisis of 1857 supervened, and the result was an overthrow of 
private fortune and public credit, complete, disastrous, and 
sudden. It bore with peculiar severity upon Minnesota, for 
our people were heavily indebted, and the process of payment 
involved the extinction of individual credit and the sacrifice 
of many estates. 

The result was that capital took &ight, and would not en- 
gage in enterprises for which it had lately competed. Immi- 
gration ceased and industry came to a stand still. The 
future was ao precarious that the grants of land, munificent 
as they were, could not induce the investment of a dollar in 
the construction of the roads for which they were made. 
These lands were given to aid in the construction of about 
thirteen hundred miles of railroad, and the statute which 
conferred them contained a clause working a reversion to the 
United States of a large portion of the lands unless the roads 
were completed within ten years. The desire of our people 
for the construction of the roads was so intense that projects 
to remove the difficulties of which I have spoken occupied 
the public mind to the exclusion of nearly every 
otiier topic, and this desire found its expression 
in an amendment to the constitutional provisions to 
which reference has been made. This amendment was 
adopted April 15th, 1858, by a' popular vote of 25,023 in its 
&Yor against 6,733 votes against it. It provided in substance 
that the credit of the state shall never be given or loaned in 
aid of any individual, association, or coTx>oration, except for 
the purpose of expediting the construction of the railroads 
for which these lands had been granted. In other words, 
this amendment authorized the state to loan or give its credit 
in aid of these particular enterprises, and it limited the 
unoont for which the state was authorized to become re- 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



38 OOVEBNOE'S MK88AGE. 

sponsible to $5,000,000. The amendment also provided irith 
great precision of direction when and how the aid 
or loan was to be given, which provision was, that 
whenever either of the companiea produced to the gov- 
ernor satisfactory evidence by affidavit of the chief engineer, 
treasurer and two directors of the company, that any ten 
miles of the road were actually completed and ready for plac- 
ing the superstructure thereon, then the governor should 
cause to be issued and delivered to the company the special 
bonds of the state bearing interest at seven per cent, per an- 
num, payable in New York, as a loan of public credit to the 
amount of one hundred thousand dollars. Issues in the same 
amount were also required to be made upon furnishing 
like evidence that any ten miles had been actually com- 
pleted and cars running thereon. By this amendment the 
faith and credit of this state were expressly pledged for the 
payment of the interest and the redemption of the principal 
of the bonds. 

As this was merely a loan of the credit of the State, the 
amendment providently prescribed by what security the State 
should be indemnified in case the companies should default in 
payment. It was therefore provided that each company 
should make provision for the punctual payment and redemp- 
tion of these bonds, and for the punctual payment of the in- 
terest which should accrue thereon, in such manner as to ex- 
onerate the state from any advances of money for that pur- 
pose, and t|S security therefor the Governor was required to 
demand and receive from each of the companies, before issu- 
ing any of the bonds, a mortgage of the net profits of the road 
and a conveyance of the first two hundred and forty sections 
of land, free from prior incumbrances, in trust, to secure the 
state from loss on the bonds, and as further security, the 
Governor was directed to exact of the companies an 
amount of first mortgage bonds on their roads, 
' lands, and franchises, corresponding to the state 
bonds issued, to be transferred to the treasurer of the state 
at the time of the issue of the atnte bonds. It was also 
provided that in cuse the companies made default in pay- 
ment of interest or principal due on the bonds issued to 



zedbyGoOglC 



GOrBKNOft's HBS8AOB. 39 

them, DO mure state bonds should be issced, aod the gov- 
ernor was required to sell the bonds of the delaaltiDg com- 
panies, or to sell the swd two hundred and forty sections of 
land, or to require at foreclosure of the mortgage which 
covered all the roads, lands aud irancbises. 

The companies accepted these provisions, and work upon 
the roads was commenced immediately. Governor Sibley 
iu his reqnisition upon t^e compsuies for the first mort- 
gage bonds upon the roads, lands Hud tranchises, demand- 
ed that these bonds should specify a priority of lien, but 
fais coustraction of the amendment was overruled by the 
Supreme Court of the state, which held that the bonds 
need only be the ordinary first mortgage bonds in common 
with other bonds of that character. 

After the companies bad commenced work and had 
earned a large amount of these securities, a warfare was 
made upon them, which was so far successful that distrast 
was excited; the companies were unable to negotiate them 
and obtain funds to carry on construction, and they ceased 
to be marketable. Work was thereby stopped and the 
companies made default in the payment of interest. They 
had l^ome insolvent. The state then proceeded to fore- 
close its becnrities. By these foreclosure proceedings 
it acquired about two hundred and fifty miles of graded 
road, the franchises of the compauies, the lands of the 
companies — in tact it acquired the title to all the securities 
which it had taken lor its indemnity, including nearly five 
million acres of land, as security for its liability npon 
$2,275,000 of bonds with interest. Hero then we see the 
state— a surety — become the owner of assets enough to 
satisfy all this claim over and over again. 

In the meantime another constitutional ameadment had 
been adopted, by which it was provided that no law levy- 
ing a tax or making {other provision for the payment of 
the principal ur interest of these securities shonid take af- 
fect until submitted to a vote of the people of the State 
and adopted by them. 



zedbyGoOglC 



40 qovbssor'b hbbsaoe. 

The dnt; of the State at thia stage was an otrviona one. 
It waa to make proviaion for an adJDBtmeDt of the quee- 
tion by meana of the aecuritiea which it held for that pur- 
pose. But this duty was wholly 'neglected. The lauds 
and road bed and franchisea which it held for its indemnity 
were granted by it to existing companies free and clear, 
Hnd the roault has been the development of our railway 
system to its present proportions. ' 

One legal objection has been raised to this amendment. 
It is said that the constitution waa adopted Oct. 13, 1857, 
while the amendment was adopted April 15, 1858. Min- 
nesota was admitted into the Union, May 11, 1858, by an 
act which, while it recognized in terms the constitution 
as originally framed, did not mention the amendment. 

This objection is specious, yet aophistical. The originet 
constitQtion provided tor its amendment It was amended 
aa therein provided, and it will not he presumed that con- 
greaa, while it accepted the constitution, practically de- 
prived it of one of its most vital fanctiona. namely, its 
capacity to be thus amended. 

It this consideration is not a sufficient answer to tiie ob- 
jection, it is sufficient that the state acted nDoer this 
amendment, contracted under it, received securities nuder 
it, foreclosed iinderit,ianowenjoyiDgbenefitBunderit,aQd 
should be estopped from denying obligations under it, 
except upon terms of rendering satisfaction from what it 
received. 

It is asserted by aome persons who have embittered our 
people by the infliction of unqualified censure upon them, 
that we have planted ourselves upon an explicit denial that 
there is anything due upon these securities. Such is not 
the sentiment of our people. But many of them 
do think that the transaction is affected by cir- 
cnmstances which ought to abate materially 
from the obligation to pay these aecuritiea at their face in 
the case of those who hold the bonds with notice of the 
tacts. This is a defence that any debtor has the right to 
make. But in making it he ought not to bar every avenue 

DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



qotbanob's HBSBAGE. 41 

to adjadication> and make hie defence as to part n pre- 
tence for not paying anything. As to the portion which 
we do wTonghilly refnse to pay the world will hold tliat 
we repudiate as long as we deny jnrisdictioit to any tribn- 
Dal tt> entertain the qneation involved. I etippose that 
when the claims of this government against Qreat Britain 
were first advanced on acconnt of the damages done by 
coniederat« crnisere, the English people were as firmly 
persuaded that they owed nothing, and were as firmly re- 
solved to pay nothing, as any of oar people to-day are. 
Bat DO man and no nation onght to be the jodgeiu its 
own canee, and accordingly these great governments con- 
Btitoted 8 court at Geneva, snbmitted to its jarisdiction 
and abided by the judgment of that nnimpassioned fomm. 
It is an example worthy of our imitation. If a board oi 
commisffioners composed of men of or not of this state, em- 
inent for integrity and judicial wisdom, conid be invested 
with jarisdiction to bear and determine the qnestions involv- 
ed by a consideration of every equity, legal or moral, exist- 
ing on either side of the controversy it cannot be presumed 
that oar people would hesitate to perform the award. It 
these bonds were void in their inception for any reason, 
or if they were procured by fraudulent representations 
or nnfaitbfnl performance of conditions precedent or if 
there is a class of nnfortnnate persons who invested in good 
faith, for value, witbont notice, so that the last named de- 
feoce ie not applicable to tbem, or if they are wholly due, 
let na meet each roBponeibility as becomes a great state, 
holding its honor dearer than anything else. 

1 am Bware that kn over prudent calculating judgment 
might not prompt a public man to whom the immediate 
commendations of those who have honored him are very 
gratifying, to speak such words. ButI kuowthat there i« a 
higher rale of action which requires that states no less 
than men chall do justice, no matter how onerous may he 
the performance. This rule bears upon our people now. 
It cootaiDS forces of self-assertion against which no oppo- 



JigiLizedbyGoOt^lc 



eoTBRROB's nssAcm. 



ritioD not fouDded iu right can stand with any perma- 
oeDcy. We have disregarded it too long. 



Having now performed this final official act, I cloNinj 
conDOction with the high poaition with which the people 
have honored me, with the expresmon of an earnest wieh 
for the prosperity of the state, and that the eminent citi- 
zen who has been chosen as my snccessor may receive your 
most efficient aid in making his administration beneficial 
to the people and honorable to him. 

CUSHMAN K. DAVIS. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



[EXICUTIVB DoOUHBNT, No. 2.] 



INAUGURAL MESSAGE 



GOVERNOR J. S. PILLSBURY. 



laEQIpLATUl^E OF ^INNE^OTA. 



DELIVERED JAN. 7, 1876. 



PRINTED BY AUTHORITY. 



D,j.,.db,Google 



,.db,Googlc 



INAUGURAL MESSAGE 

OF 

OOVEMOR JOHN S. PILLSBUHT. 



Gentlemen of the Seriate and House of Rqtresentatives : 

Id making, for the firat time, tbat communtcatioii to ;ou 
toQching the condition of the State, which both the conatitu- 
tion and invariable caetom enjoin upon the Executive, I de- 
iire to ezpreas my deep sense of the respODsibility I have as- 
sumed, and to invoke your aid and co-operation in the faithful 
performance of the duties which the people have devolved 
alike apon na. 

The perioj] we have reached in the development of Otir State 
affords an occasion both for congratulation and for warning. 
We cannot bnt indulge feelinga of pride and gratitude when 
we reflect that where, a quarter of a century ago, there was 
«D a Dbrokeo wildemesa, inhabited only by wild beasta and sav* 
age men, there exists to-day a vigorous young commonweHlth 
of 600,000 people, blest with all the appliances and comforts 
of civilized life ; that solitary wastes have been supplanted by 
illimitable grain fields ; that idle rivers have been bound to ti>e 
myriad naes of productive industry; tbat the young State, 
which, upon her admission to the Union, imported breadstuSs 
to feed the speculators in her unproductive lands, is, in her 
eighteenth year, the first wheat State of the Sisterhood ; tbat 
where fourteen years ago there was not one mile of completed 



zedbyGoOglC 



4 IHAOOURAL HB9SAGB. 

railroad, 3,000 milfls are now taxed to their utmost to carry off~ 
the snrpluB products; and that everywhere tbrooghont the State, 
church and Bchool-hooae, thriving cities and basy indastrieSr 
mark the abode of a prosperous, energetic and happy people. 
Forprogress so unexampled, and prosperity so bountifnl, our 
grateful thanks are due to Almighty God, who has wonderfully 
upheld us in adversity, and brought us to the verge of great op- 
portunities ; bat, while thankful for such blessings, we should 
not be nnmiodfnl of those opportunities, nor of the responsi- 
bilities which they impose. 

RESDNDAHT CURBEMCT. 

For an active people, released from the strain of the great 
civil war that closed ten years ago, the pursuits of peace natu- 
rally possessed new attractions. Recovering from the prostration^ 
of that dire conflict, the country under the stimulas of a redun- 
dant currency, embarked in productive enterprises with an 
enei'gy and snccess wholly unparalleled. With an aagmented vol- 
ume of currency advancing the cost of all commodities, and aa 
abnormal activity in all branches of industry resulting in uni- 
vertul overproduction, the final result was inevitable. A spirit 
of wild speculation, the lust for sudden wealth, and a reckless 
extravagance and disregard for tbe adaptation of means to ends, 
seized the hearts of the people and shaped the aims of all classes 
and conditions of men. Patient toil, with its modest rewards, 
was second in the race for quick results, and an nosubatantial 
prosperity with a fair semblance lured its victims to a false' 
gauge of their resources and liabilities. The culmination was- 
reached, as we all know, in the financial collapse of two years 
ago, from the eSects of which the industries of the country hav& 
since langaisbed; and although in our favored State, owing 
to the primary connection of tbe people with the soil and its 
bonntifnl products, we have been measurably exempt from' the 
extreme depression elsewhere prevalent ; yet the people of 
Minnesota, especially in the chief centres of population, share 
the inevitable suffering resulting from an anwarrauted expan- 
sion of credit and a continued extravagance in business and 



zedbyGoOglC 



INAUGURAL HE8SAOB. 5 

JtOQMhold a&irB, which, if persisted in, cao lead to but one re- 
nit 



It is against haLifs aod tuilueDces that thus concur io leading 
to inflvitable dieaater, that vise communities will promptly take 
warning. Io keeping with, and growing out of this state of 
Ihiogs, the readiness of the people to burden themselves with 
mnnicipal, county and township debt, is perhaps the strongest 
tendency threatening the public good. Of the total taxation 
for all purpoaea, but a small fraction in any community is con- 
tributed to the support of the State Government, the principal 
bnrden being for purely local objects in moat instances, while it 
is not unfreqnently augmented by the extravagant and corrapt 
jnaoagement of local affairs. A fiitl statement of sach indebt- 
edness woald doubtless afford a startling exhibit. With a few 
«xceptioD8, it would probably be fouud, that in the face of 
recent and multiplied warnings, there has been a steady accn- 
mulatinn of debt since the crisis of 1873, coupled with con- 
stantly increasing taxes throughout our State, especially in the 
larger municipal corporations. 

From official reports it appears that the aggregate bonded 
debt of four of the leading cities of the State amounts to 
$3,374,720, which ia an increase of more than fifty per cent, 
during the past five years, while the combined tax levy of these 
•cities, for municipal purposes, exceeds $800,000 tor 1875, being 
an increase of about eighty-five per ceut. for the same period. 
There would be less discouragement in this exhibit, if either 
■by reason of the heavy tax levy the debt was being decreased, 
■or if because of an increase of debt the present burdens were 
Jigbtened by the funding of fioating debts; but the simultane- 
ons increase of both debt and taxation affords little ground for 
couBolatory reflection. It is doubtless true that much of this 
burden was assumed for the prosecution of local improvements 
of a durable cbaructer incident to legitimate growth, and es- 
pecially for the erection of those imposing educational atruct- 
ares, for which the people delight to tax themselves. But it is 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



6 IKAUQUKAL MBSSAOB. 

obvions that ench an expaDsion of credit for whatever caase i» 
too great for healthful progress, and ia full of public danger. 

There are few sources of mischief id an eDterprising commu- 
nity more specious or seductive thau the facility with which 
the people avert a present burden by the issue of bonds to be 
paid by their deacendaots. There would certainly be far less 
prosecution of premature onterprisae, if present rather than fu- 
ture payment were required for them. In view of the mani- 
fest evils thus arising, I feel warranted in suggesting a proposal 
for ft constitntional limitntion of the total accumulation of local 
debt for any and all purposes, similar to that which now res- 
tricts debt in aid of railroads ouly. 

RETRBtrCHUEMT. 

Whatever may be the merits of the various measures proposed 
for a restoration of the common prosperity, there can be no doubt 
that the first essential to that end is the practice of a close, me- 
thodical and persistent economy, alike in all public and private 
aSairs. lu my judgment the conditions requisite for the pro- 
motion of the public welfare are precisely those essential to suc- 
cess in private affairs. Neither can permanently prosper unless 
outlays are resolutely restricted to legitimate income. 

The obvious inference, both from these considerations and 
from the demands of the times, is thnt the subject of retrench- 
ment of public expenses should occupy a prominent place in 
your deliberations. I am well aware that so far as relates to 
the salaries of State officers and those of their employes, a rigid 
economy has always been practiced. In all the ordinary run- 
ning expenses of the government, and especially in the employ- 
ment of alimited force for the performance of the onerous labor re- 
quired in the several State departments, Minnesota may well chal- 
lenge comparison for eSicient and economical management with 
any State in the Union ; yet in the more general conduct of af- 
fairs, I believe there Is room for retrenchment without impair- 
ing the efficiency of the public service. 

LEHQTH OP SESBIOM. 
The firat practical step in that direction is obviously to abbre- 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



IHAUOUKAL HBeSAOE. 7 

▼nto the length of the legiBlative Mssioii. The cbnstitatio&al 
)imit«tioD is sixty days ; yet I know of do proTisioo in that 
iDBtmment or elsewhere rendering it obligatory upon the Leg- 
iristore to oonaome the entire period to which they are tfans 
limited. Such, however, has been the invariable custom, with- 
out reference to the urgency or laxity of public bosinesa. I 
respectfully ask yon to consider whether all the basioess yoa 
will be called apon to transact may not as well be completed in 
a much shorter time than that constitntionally allotted yon. 
If ^he session ooald be contracted to forty days, it would result 
in a direct saving of about $23,000 in legishitive expenses. I 
am well aware that the plea usually urged for much apparent 
idleness during the early part of the Heasion, is that business is 
being matured by the several committeeB. This plea has not 
the force nsnally claimed for it, while it is notorious that the 
tardy consideration and frequent postponement of impor- 
tant measures not merely wasteB valuable time, but, by 
crowding imperative buaineas into the last few days of the 
session, subjects it to the serions risks incident to harity 
legislation. Perhaps the legislative session most charac- 
terized by efScient and laborious conduct was the extra 
session of 1862, the duration of which was but twenty days. 
Some of the best considered and most important legislation 
pertaining to that gloomy and trying period in our history 
was enacted during that short session. It is true that at the 
preceding regular sesBJon the two houses bad been organized, 
thus saving the time usually consumed in that process, never- 
theless I am constrained to believe that the masterly and speedy 
legislation of that brief session was chiefly the result of resolute 
industry springing from a deep sense of grave and imperative 
duty. I trust that motives no less commendable may impel you 
to a like dispatch of basinese. In this connection, if you should 
prepare for submission to the people an amendment to the coo- 
stitntion providing for a specific annual salary for members in 
lieu of the present legislative per diem, or should resubmit to 
tbem the amendment for biennial sessions, either would meet 
my concurrence. The first baa been found to work well in other 
States, Should the proposed salary be fully equal to the total 



zedbyGoOgle 



8 IMAUOnBAI. HB88A&B. 

p«r diem uow paid for a sixty days' seasion, the State would nev> 
erthelesa gain by a redaction of printing and iDcidental expenses 
of the shorter sessions that might be expeote(i With respect 
to the second proposition, our State having now passed tbftt 
stage of development when the neoessities of coastractive and 
experimental legislation require frequent seaaions, I cannot 
escape the convictioD, notwithstanding a recent contrary ver- 
dict of the people, that a resort to biennial sessions would be a 
wise step, both on the score of economy and the avoidance of 
mnch needlesii and confased legislation inevitable from the too 
freqaeot amendment of notried laws. 

PDBLIO PRIMTDia. 

A.nother large item of expenditare which in my jndgment 
will admit of cnrtailment, is that for the public printing, which 
has DOW reached an anoaal sum approximating t^l^'l^OO. This 
has increased for some years past ont of all proportion to the 
advance in other disbursements. The cost of the public print- 
iog proper of the several required classes, has swollen from $i,- 
^43.89, iu 1868, to |21,937.35, in 1S75, or, including cost of pa- 
per, from a total of $8,191.7^, in 1868, to t27,380.88, the past 
7ear, while the mass of printing for the several departments anit- 
ed in the volume known as"Elxecutive Documents," has grown in 
the same period from a single volume of 598 pages to two pon- 
derous coUectious of 1,000 pages each. Much of this, it ia 
tnie, is a legitimate increase, resulting from the creation of new 
departments) made necessary by the growth of the State, but it 
is for you to consider whether there is not room hero for a ju- 
dicious curtailment of expense. The public printing has always 
been done at comparatively low rates, and these have moreover 
steadily declined for many years past, but inconsequence of 
the enormous increase in its bulk, the total cost, notwithstand- 
ing reduced rates, has rapidly increased as before shown. So 
far as my knowledge extends, the amount of printing done in 
(his State for public purposes, considerably exceeds the aggre- 
gate in other States of similar size and wealth. 

If the tabulated and minute details which swell the bulk and 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



IHAUOURAL MBSUQB. 9 

iocreaae the cost of most of ths roporta, could properly be con - 
deased or abridged, it would cauae a not ioconsiderable redac- 
tioD of the total coat of prioting, while, if the Dumeroiia local, 
monicipat aod private purposes which aonnally absorb so large 
aahare of your deliberations, and swell the bulk of printing, 
could receive coneideration in some other manner, or be mnde 
to defray at least the increased expense they entail, the reeult 
would be a decided gain to the State treasury, on both the 
printing and Legislative accounts. The steadily inoreaaiug 
amount of this special legislation has long been felt to be a se- 
rions and unwarranted burden upon the public, and any meas- 
ure promising its arrest and curtailment is not unworthy of 
your attention. The repeated amendment of laws before they 
have been long enough in operation to test their practical 
workings, is an evil before referred to as one of growing mag- 
nitude. 

GROnPTNO OF OFFICES. 

To what extent, if any, expenses may be further curtailed 
by a consolidation of existing offices, is commended to your in- 
quiry. The comparatively nominal duties now required of the 
Adjutant General in a military capacity warrants, I suggest, a 
considerable reduction of his salary and the maintenance of 
his office chiefly as a State claim agency, by which the State 
renders effective assistance to deserving recipients of the na- 
tional bounty. 

The merging of the office of Railroad and Insurance Com- 
missioner has been suggested, bat I am satisfied tbht the intri- 
cate and technical nature of the duties required of an officer 
charged with the supervision of insurance interests, demand- 
ing, as their proper performance does, the knowledge and skill 
of an expert, aod the time necessary for proficiency in either 
office, renders the combiuation of the two offices impracticable. 
The usefulness of the Insurance Department as a protection 
against the inroads of irresponsible companies and the losses 
they inflict has already been exemplified, while at the same time 
it is a source of revenue to the State rather than a burden up- 
on its treasury. The office of the Railroad Commissioner, as at 
2 

DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



10 INAUGURAL HEBSAOE. 

present constituted, is not of Bufficient benefit or importance to 
justify its cost. Under the amended law of the last session it con- 
templates little more than the collection of railroad stAtistice, to 
which end the expense is disproportionately large. If confined to 
this, the duty might as advantageously be performed by the Com- 
missioner of Statisticsjwhose powers could be enlarged for the pur- 
pose, with a considerable annual saving to the treasury. Bat in 
my judgment both the duties and the powers of the Railroad Com- 
missioner qhonld be materially enlarged. In addition to his exist- 
ing power to inspect the financial condition of railroad compa- 
nies, he should be invested with summary authority to condemn 
bridges and other insecure structures, as well as to correct such 
abuses as, from the public emergency, cannot await remedy by 
the slower process of the courts. It should be made his duty 
to maintain a constant surveillance over the condition of the 
several tracks, connections, highway crossings, and other works 
and appurtenances, with a view to securing the public safety 
and convenience, and he should be clothed with power for these 
purposes to summon competent engineers and other experts to 
his aid when necessary. The disastrous wreck of the railroad 
bridge at Brainerd last summer, strikingly exhibits the necessi- 
ty for supervision and prompt exercise of corrective power. 
Moreover, with lapse of time, unless seasonable precaution be 
taken, it may not be unreasonable to expect a repetition of ac- 
cidents of this kind, as much of the railroad work in this State 
was constructed, perhaps necessarily, with less regard to its dur- 
ability than to the exigencies of speedy completion. With 
such objects, the Commissioner, clothed with adequate power 
for their enforcement, could ronder timely and efficient service, 
and I trust that the law will receive amendment to that end. 
Unless the ofiice be so changed in its scope and enlarged in its 
powers as to subserve a more obvious public use, I recommend 
that it be abolished as a needless expense. 

LEGISLATIVE APPOBTIONUENT. 

Under the constitution a new apportionment of the members 

of jour two houses, based upon the recent State census, will 

devolve upon you. The proper performance of this important 

duty will involve patient and dispassionate consideration. The 



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IKAUGtrBAL HESSAGB. 11 

tiieory which, in imitation of the Btrnctnre of the federal gov- 
ernmeDt, devolves all practical legislation upon two representa- 
tive bodies, doabtlesa reete npoD the assamption that they act 
as a check npoo each other, and especially that by reason of the 
dignity and experience resulting from the longer dnration of ser- 
vice in the smaller body, that wing of the Legislature shoald 
act as a conservative restraint upon the more popular impulses 
of the larger branch- Whether or not snob theory receives 
support in practice, I am unable to see why consistency should 
not be lent to it so far as to make a greater numerical difference 
between the two houses. But without reference to auy such 
difference, the relative policy of large or small representative 
bodies may be deemed as yet an open question. At least, the 
advantages of the one over the other are not so pronounced ns to 
justify the commendation of either for unquestioned adoption. 
Under these circumstances, the question of economy assumes a 
promineut attitude. In the New England States, as is well 
known, very large representative assemblies are employed, and 
it 18 believed with generally excellent results. Upon the as- 
samption that large bodies are less subject to corrupting iuflu- 
encee than smaller ones, loth of your houses were considerably 
increased in numbers by the apportionment of five years ago. 
I am not aware that any marked improvement resulted from 
the change. In this problematical state of the question the ne- 
cessity for retrenchment would warrant a numerical reduction 
of both houses. At all events, I am decidedly of the convic- 
tion that neither should be enlarged. 

If, pursuant to the original theory of your representative 
structure, the House should be retained at about its present 
size, and the Senate be somewhat reduced numerically, both 
policies alluded to would receive countenance, wLile the ques- 
tion of economy would not be wholly ignored. The present 
annual cost of the legislative session is about (70,000, conati- 
tntiug the largest item in the ordinary running expenses of the 
State. The subject is commended to your careful consideration. 

BEDDCED BECBIPTS. 
I have given prominence to the necessity for retrenchment, both 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



12 INAUQUBAL HB88AQE. 

ID the iDterest of simple prudence, and upon the broader con- 
sideratioD that coaples duty with opportunity. I believe that a 
Bobler appreciation of the exceptioual bleesings we enjoy, ia 
shown by judicious care of what we possess, than by lavish 
ezpeuditares that draw upon the future. - 

A. coDBidoration of still more practical urgency, is the fact 
which I teara from the State Auditor, that the receipts from 
railroad earnings the past year, fell about |23,000 short of those 
of the preceding year, and that the total tax collections] owing 
chiefly to the smaller levy and decreased amount derived from 
delinquent taxes, are about $114,000 less than those of the pre- 
ceding year. In view of these facts, and impresoed aa I am 
with the importance of keeping your appropriations strictly 
within your resources, I recognize the practice of persistent 
retrenchment as a duty connected with a due regard to thtt 
preservation of the public credit, with the maintenance of those 
educational, charitable and reformatory institutions which attest 
the highest claim to Christian civilization, and with the share 
which every wqrthy motive impels os to take in the proper 
celebration of the approaching one-hundredth Anniversary of 
our National birthday. Disbursements for these several objects 
will be necessary, hut it is difficult to see how they can be made 
consistently with adherence to restricted appropriations, unless 
the needed amounts can be saved by curtailment of the ordinary 
azpenses' heretofore incurred. 

CBNTEHNIAL BXPOSITION. 

It is difficult, in my judgment, to exaggerate the importance 
to Minnesota of a full presentation at the Centennial Exposi- 
tion, to commenc^ in Hay next, of her varied and ample pro- 
ducts. Of the eve\it itself, it is no exaggeration to say that it 
will, and ought to prove to Americans, at least, the most signifi- 
cant occurrence of the century Other nations have had in- 
dustrial expositions evidencing the achievements of the arts and 
sciences, and attesting the progress of the age. Ours will com- 
memorate a nation created, and a nation saved. It will exhibit 
Dot merely the progress of the original members of the Union, 
bat the matured industries of new States. It will not only vin- 



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IHAU6DBAL HBSSAGB. IS 

dicate the cliAractsr of popular inBtitntioos, bnt army the ^eo" 
ciea by which the laboring man of to-day possesBes more com- 
fortflthan did the monarchB of past ages. Except for the use of 
steam, the most potent agency in material acbievementB, it 'is 
safe to aay that the entire Northwest would yet have remaioed 
a wilderoeeB. Ib it not fitting that Minnesota ebonld pay a 
tribnte to tbo agency to which she owes her existence, and add 
to thediaplay of a nation cf which she is so prosperoDS a mem- 
ber? She should esteem it a privilege to bear part and lot in 
snch an exposition. 

But from a more practical view, the opportunity afforded 
to encourage immigration, by an exhibition of agricultural 
and industrial products, and of other evideuces of the resources 
and attractions of our State, will be so extraordinary, that to 
neglect it will be, in my opinion, a grave mistake. Host of the 
neighboring' States which compete with us for immigration are 
erecting separate bnild'nga upon the Centennial grounds for the 
exclusive display of their own products. Would it not be a 
matter of policy for MinnOBota to follow that example? As it 
is an event not likely to occur again within the lifetime of any 
person now in existence, so it is not likely that the century will 
furnish another occasion justifying so clearly an adequate 
expenditure for the realization of its highest' purpose. The 
matter is commended to your consideration with a recommend- 
ation for such pfompt and just action as will secure the end 
desired. 

lUinGBATION. 

In this connection, I invite you to inquire whether the time 
has not arrived for the renewal of a systematic annual effort for 
the encouragement of immigration. In a young frontier State, 
recognizing labor as its prime oecesaity, there can be few more 
legitimate objects of legislation than those which contemplate 
the early peopling of its unoccupied territory and the culture of 
itsidle soil. While I deem a creditable display of our products 
at the Centennial Exposition the best possible effort toward that 
ob)ect, I suggest that in connection therewith, a revision of the 
State Immigration ,pamph)et, so as to embrace the latest statis- 
tics pertwoing to population, crops, schools, lands, railroads, 



zedbyGoOglC 



14 ' INADOURAL lU)88AaB. 

&c., with adeqn&te means for its wide dietribution, wonld pro- 
vide an effective aid toward the desired purpose. The circala- 
tion of that modest volnme has accomplished excelleot results 
in the past It is a concise and forcible exhibit of our resonrces, 
progress aod ttdvaDtages, and its accurate statistics and dispas- 
sionate statements, afford information most desired by intelligent 
and industrious settlors, without lending encouragenaent to that 
restless and undesirable class who are attracted by overwrought 
statements, and become, through subsequent discoDtent, rather 
a hindrance than a help to the State. We should not forget 
that the location of our State above the central current of travel 
through which immigrants move, renders a double effort on our 
part necessary to obtain our just share of immigration. Besides, 
the persistent and systematic efforts of other States, and of paid 
agents in the interest of powerful railroad combinations, have 
resulted in the diversion of much immigration destined for Min- 
nesota, to more central and southerly latitudes. From this 
cause, Kansas, upon a smaller basis, shows an actual gain of 
population greater than that of our State during the pnat five 
years. It should be your aim, by a counteraction of these ad- 
verse influences, to secure to Minnesota the immigration to 
which she is justly entitled, both by great advantages and supe- 
rior prosperity. 

TREB CDLTUBS. 

As closely connected with the question of immigration, I in- 
vite your attention to the subject of tree-culture as one of vital 
importance. It may well be doubted whether any question so 
lar^ly experimental is fraught with the promising solntioo of 
so many and important problems pertaining to successful agri- 
culture. The promotion of a feasible and easy general growth 
of forest trees would remove the greatest obstacle to the settle- 
ment of the broad, fertile prairies that form so large a part of 
our territory and constitute the great wheat areas of the North- 
west. That the cultivation of young groves of natural origin, 
as well as those of planted trees, has already been followed by 
most salutary results elsewhere, is sufficiently demonstrated by 
the fact that the prairie States of Iowa and Illinois, after largely 
furnishing fuel for their rapidly increasing populations, are poa- 



zedbyGoOglC 



INADOHKAI, HESSAdB. 15 

SMBed to-day of more timber than when the first pioneers set- 
tled within their limits. Id oar own State the results of a com- 
paratively brief trial are so favorable as to justify saDgiiinQ 
liopes for the futore. 

The enterprise of the First DlvisioD St. Paul & Pacific Rail- 
road Company and the intelligent zeal of Hon. Leonard B. Hod- 
gas, its capable Superintend ent, as sbown in their practical 
achievements in tree culture, are worthy of all commeodatioD. I 
deem thii subject of so much importance that I invite you to in- 
qnire what further action you may judiciously take in further- 
ance of the practical results aimed at. 

Owiug to a recent decieion of the Gommiseiouer of the Gen- 
eral Land Office, the Coogressional act to " encourage the 
growth of timber on western prairies," approved March 3d, 
1873, and favorably amended the following year, is threatened 
with the defeat of all practical use. By what seems to me an ar- 
bitrary and unwarranted construction of the provisions of that 
act, the actual growth of timber, by what experience may prove 
to be the best and most practicable means, is not deemed a com- 
pliance with the law unless the trees be actually transplanted, 
which, with some of the most valuable bard woods, is known to 
be impossible. It is difficult to comprehend how a ruling so at 
variance, no less with the intent of the law than with the dic- 
tates of common sense, could be seriously made. 

I need not repeat that the matter is of great importance to 
oor State. A considerable amount of lands have been taken up 
under the act iu question, and both because of the general wel- 
fare involved, and in justice to the settlors, who have acted in 
good faith in the expenditure of their labor and care, I recom- 
mend that you promptly memorialize Congress to so amend the 
law as to insure a practical result to its plainly beneficent inten- 
tion. 

CAPITAL PDNKHMBHT. 



I direct your attention to that provision of the present law 
relating to trials for murder which gives to juries discretionary 
power to determine the character of the pooiahment to be in- 
flicted, as well as the guilt of the accused. In my judgment the 
operation of that law has not proved salutary. Considering 



JigiLizedbyGoOt^lc 



16 INAUGUBAL MESSAGE. 

the grave asd complicated nature of the duties of jnrore in such 
cases, 1 think the aimple finding of the facta in the case is as 
mncli as ought to be expected of them, leaving a determinate 
result to follow in all cases. Whatever may be thought of that 
treatment of prisooers for minor offenses which contemplntes the 
good of offenders as well as of the society against which they 
offend, I am satisfied that a capital crime deserves a capital 
punishment, and I believe that justice and expediency alike de- 
mand SDch an amendment of the existing law as will secure 
that end. 



Uj attention has been called to one feature of the present ef- 
fective but rigorous tax law, that is liable to work great hard- 
ship. In caee of absence, sickness, or other cause preventing 
payment of taxes when due, the owner is liable to loss of his 
property by accident or inadvertency, there being no definite and 
uniform date fixed terminating the- allotted period of redemp- 
tion, which is dependent upon the action of the authorities in 
the several conuties. I suggest that the law be so amended as 
to require timelyand conspionous notice to be given to owners 
before final forfeiture of their delinquent property, similar to 
the requirement in other States in like cases. 

IKSINE AND INEBBIATE ASYLUMS. 

The report of the State Board of Health abonnds in valuable 
information and advice. I especially invite your attention to 
their recommendation for the early establishment of an Inebri- 
ato Asylum, and to the necessity, forcibly dwelt upon, for en- 
larged accommodations for the insane, the greatest capacity of 
the present Hospital having already nearly reached its limita- 
tion. 

OFFICIAL EZAHUTATION. 

The accomnlating evidences of public embezElement and mis- 
conduct in office, throughout the country, illustrate the necessity 



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INAUOUSAL MESSAGE. 17 

of holding pabtio offioers to the strictest acconntabitity. Noth- 
ing, perhaps, ao much ensurea correctDess aod care on the part 
of officials, as frequent and exhaustive examinations of their 
Bcconnts.* Without the aid of experts, however, the Legislative 
committeee nsnally appointed for this purpose cannot give 
practical tborongbn^u to their labors, and hence the result is 
nsnally a report of a general anil caenal character of little utility. 
i suggest that the employment of a persevering and compe- 
tent accountant, to examine the accounts of all public officers, 
and those in charge of our public institutions, whose visits 
thereto should be at irregular periods, would be followed by a 
measure of the excellent results produced by the unexpected 
visits of the financial examiner of the general government to 
the banking institutions of the country. For the present, dif- 
ferent experts might be employed for this purpose, at different 
times, to be compensated only when in actual service. 

IMDIIN TfiOUBLBS. 

Host of the offenses committed by Indians and the trouble 
growing out of tHem, result from the non-rmpousibility of that 
barbarous race to any law whatever. Though residing within 
the borders of an organized Territory or State they are not 
* amenable to its laws and are equally without any controlling 
law exercised by the General Government which has always, by 
a fatal policy, dignified them as a separate nationality, posses- 
sed of full treaty powers. The evils of this system justify ao 
effort for their correction. I suggest that you memorialize 
Congrss either to provide a government of law for the Indi- 
ans or bring them under the operation of the lews of the State 
or Territory which includes their reservations or within which 
the offense may have been committed. 

xnrassoTA btatb bailboad bohds. 

I come now to a subject, the speedy and proper disposal of 
which I believe to be demanded by every consideration alike of 
policy, justice and honor. I allude to the adjustment of the ob- 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



IS INAUGURAL HBBBAQE. 

ligations of the State reprwented bj the long-BtBiidiag "Min 
tiesota State Railroad Bonds." No daty surely can be more ob- 
ligatory upon those entrusted with the highest public interests 
than the vigilant maintenance of a sensitive pablic credit. 
Without that, indeed, little is left worthy of pnblio preservation. 
The fact that the holders of these obligations are debarred the 
ordinary remedy provided by courts of justice, asd are forced to 
rely wholly upon the honor of tlie State, ehoald deepen rather 
than weaken the sense of such obligation in the minds of hon- 
orable men. 

I will not insult yoar understanding or sense of justice so far 
as to attempt a serious argument in support either of the valid - 
ity or equity of this claim upon the State. The parpoee to 
evade a just obligation is never, indeed, without a pretext, 
whether in public or private affairs. In this case it will suffice 
to say that there is, if possible, less than the customary excuse 
for a resort to sabterfuge. The measure providing for the is- 
sue of these bonds underwent an unusually protracted and 
aearchiug diBCuesion dnring the longest legislative session ever 
held in the Territory or State. Its various provisions were sub- 
jected to close inspection and criticism by the people convened 
in public meetings and by a jealous and watchful public press, 
and finally, followiag the maturity of the scheme, ample time 
was given for its further discussion prior to its submission to 
the people, whereupon it received the popular approval by an 
affirmative vote of nearly four to one, and thus became, not by 
hasty and inconsiderate action, but by succesi^ive, deliberate 
steps, a part of the Constitution, entrenched within the impreg- 
nable sanction of organic law. Moreover, the bonils thus pro- 
vided for were finally issued only apon the moat rigid compli- 
ance by the obligees with every legal pro-requisite, insisted up- 
on by a faithful and vigilant Executive. 

It is not, of course, pretended that the passage of the measure 
was wholly uninfluenced in the Legislature or before the people, 
by those undue and illegitimate means which unhappily too 
often impair the purity of legislative and popular action ; but 
it is certain that its success was not more due to the influence 
of those who were supposed to be directly interested in its pas- 
sage, than to that widespread zeal in ita behalf, which was 
founded upon an honest faith in its benefit to the people at 



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ZNAUOTIRAL UKSBAQB. 19 

luge. That the BchemB itself wsa, at the time] premature and 
unwise, the people quiokl; discovered, to their coat, bat the at- 
tempt to charge upon the other party to a bad bargain, the 
reanltB of an act of folly deliberately committed by themselves, 
evinces a cbildisb and ignoble disposition, which I should be 
sorry to think coald fairly characterize the people of this State. 

The bonds thns deliberately issned are held by persona in all 
parts of the country. They express an unmistakable obligation 
attested by the great seal of the State, but they convey no hint 
of qualiSed payment nor intimation that conld, by any possibility, 
serve as a warning to innocent purchasers. Every day they thus 
remain dishonored, threatens the lasting dishonor of our State. 
Bnt the cooclnsive estoppel of the last plea for non-payment, 
whether upon legal or equitable grounds, is the fact that the State 
long ago obtained by foreclosure, the property which was the con- 
rideration for ber assumption of the debt to secure which such 
property was pledged. Except for her obligation to pay such 
debt, she had no right to the property securing it. And moreover, 
this property thus obtained, consisting of lands, road-beds and 
franchises, by a re-grant from the State, served to forward the 
canatmctioo cf the existing railroads, whose benefits we have 
since enjoyed. Can there remain a possible plea for the non- 
payment of a debt thus honestly contracted, and where the 
object for which it was contracted has beeo attained aud en- 
joyed? 

However the plea of poverty may have heretofore justified 
the non-payment of the interest upon these bonds by a people 
barrassed with the various hindrances and hardships incident 
to frontier life, it no longer excuses refusal, by the producers of 
agricultural products worth 150,000,000 annually, and the pos- 
eessors of taxable property approximating (220,000,000. If a 
succession of disasters covering many years of our early exist- 
ence — the exigencies of a great civil war, and of a devastating 
Indian outbreak, the shortening of oropa by a two years' drouth, 
and the repeated ravages of grasshoppers, have heretofore 
caused rather an inability, titan an indisposition, to meet our 
iust obligations, their prompt recognition and liquidation 
ie note demanded, both by a proper sense of long delayed 
laatice, and a due appreciation of the prosperity we enjoy. 
And, now that our edaoational, charitable and reformatory 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



80 IHAUODftAL HEBSAQB. 

institatioDB, whose claims coald not well be deferred, hare been 
provided for, there onght to be no fnrtfaer poetponemeat of a 
simple act of justice whoee performance is demanded b; the im- 
perative voice of expediency and honor. 

Moreover, the 600,000 acres of so-called internal improve- 
ment lands, which fortnnately — may I not say providentially — 
came into our poasesBion a few years since, if judicionsly need 
will render easily practicable the course to which honor plainly 
points. Fortunately these lands have been placed by constitn- 
tional protection beyond danger from the various schemes 
threatening their absorption and waste, and wisely subjected 
to the same supervision which has proved so successful with the 
school lands. Under such management the sale of these lands 
has already commenced, and a fund accumulated of about 
$100,000. With such proceeds, a reliable sinking fund is created 
with which, and the practice of that retrenchment in general and 
local affairs which I have recommended, and which prudence 
demands, these old obligations can easily be provided for by an 
issne of new bonds ranning a long period at low int«rest, with 
tittle or no addition to temporary burdens. I am profoundly 
impressed with the conviction, that the longer postponement 
of action looking to the honest and full adjustment of this long 
deferred indebtedness, must inflict upon the fair name of our 
State, the inelfaceable stain of repudiation : and I venture 
with the beginning of my official duties, to commend this sub- 
ject to your serious and favorable action 

BAILROADS. 

The grave qnestions growing out of the various relations of 
the producing to the transportation interests of the country, 
are necessarily of commanding importance. The constant ten- 
dency of indastrial development toward the growth of special- 
ties, and that division of labor producing the best results, 
necessitates a constantly increasing interchange of commodi- 
ties, and multiplies the pnblic dependence upon those means for 
quick intercourse and active trade, that are famished by oorpo- 
rations which are rapidly absorbing all other modes for carri^e 



zedbyGoOglC 



mAUODBAI. HBSeAOS. 21 

b; land and water. With sach tnterdepeodeDt interests, it might 
be supposed that a commoa instioct would iaduce that consider- 
ate action which recognizes " the highest right as the highest 
expediency," bat unfortanatelj through the imperfections of oar 
common natare, such relations are anbjeot to the same necessity 
for the intervention of law and regulation of commercial nsage 
that is everywhere acknowledged as requisite for the common 
good. 

For railroad corporations which are purely the creatures of 
law and the recipienta of the public bounty, and yet are public 
corporatioDB, to claim the title and control of the property they 
bold npon precisely the same tenure as that upon which pri- 
■ Tate property is held, involves not merely an absurdity, but a 
menace of the public weal. It cannot for a moment be sup- 
posed that grants of land were blindly lavished upon these 
corporations for the mere pleasure of enriching them> with- 
out reference to the public good or the necessities of com- 
merce. Creatures of law, nourished by law, they are subject to 
regulation by law, for the promotion of that common welfare 
contemplated in their creation and endowment. 

As trustee, the State stands between the grantors and grant- 
ees of the munificent endowments which are the basis of our 
railroad construction, and she cannot, without proving false to 
her trust, avoid exacting full compliance with the conditions, 
both expressed and implied, in such grauts. Duty alike to the 
people at large, and to the corporate recipients of these grants, 
demands the exercise of those sovereign functions, of which the 
State has no power to divest herself, which contemplate such 
eqnitable adjustment of powers, obligations and privileges, as 
will ensure the largest measure of public good. Not to exercise 
such powers, is not merely to fail in the performance of a duty 
clearly obligatory npon the State, but to expose its most vital 
interests to the liability of irresponsible and rapacious ex- 
actions. 

Xrsnaportation is the first consideration in the production 
and moving, especially of gross, weighty commodities. Its 
cost is what chiefly constitutes the difierence between the value 
of land near and remote from markets. With a wide aepara- 



JigiLizedbyGoOt^lc 



SS DTADOOKAL HKBBAOB. 

tion of prodactioD from conaamptioD, and a growing depen- 
dence of the pFodacing interests npon common carriers, both 
the value of real property and the prices of its annual pro- 
dncts become thas, in the absence of lawfal regnlation, less 
controlled by their private owners than by the combined power of 
those who determine freights at their pieasnre. There are cer- 
tainly few functions pertaining to valid authority, the exercise 
of which is at once more legitimate and obligatory than that 
which concerns the just determination of the respective rights 
of producers and carriers. 

While the enforcement of impartial jnstice between these in- 
terests in all the practical details embraced in tariff rates, is 
attended with formidable difficnlties, I esteem it a cause for 
public congratalation that the fundamental principal, vesting 
tite power of sncb regulation in the legislature, has been asser- 
ted in such unmistakable terms by the highest judicial authori- 
ties of the State. If this decision shall be affirmed by the Su- 
preme Gonrt of the United States the people at large may well 
rest content. The victory will have been substaDtially theirs. 
The corrective power being thus placed clearly within their reach 
they can, well afford to accord considerate treatment to corpor- 
ations to which the public prosperity is so much indebted. The 
assertion of the State sovereignty in their control was required 
indeed less because of actual abuses than as a precaution against 
the inevitable evils resulting from the exercise of irresponsible 
power. The simple assertion of such sovereignty will probably 
have had every effect iutendod or desired. With that mutual 
forbearance which will be the dictate of wise policy on either 
side, it is not probable thai its re-assertion or the detailed re- 
strictions resulting from it, will soon be required. Danger from 
that source being thus averted, it becomes a generous and grate- 
ful people to pursue a policy of liberal forbearance toward or- 
ganizations through whose agency the public welfare has been 
so unquestionably and continuously subserved. Through their 
enterprising and liberal policy of anticipating the development 
of the conntry, they have hastened the settlement and cultiva- 
tion of wide frontier areas which would otherwise have 
remained indefinitely an unproductive wilderness. In the 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



INAUGUKAI, KESUOS. S3 

pnrniit of this policy, tbej have beoome inToWed in embar- 
rasBinents which call for the same coneiderate action that often 
BQccessfally marks the wise management of private affairs. 
We ahonld not forget that Uinnesota ia the prosperous off- 
spring of that enlightened system of land grants in aid of rail- 
roads, which seems to admit of no loeing party to its beneficent 
operation, but beoefita alike donors and recipients, the State as 
dispensing trustee, and the people at large as ultimate benefi- 
ciaries. From the happy results of a system affording the foun. 
dation for the construction of our railroads, may we not obtain 
a bint for their wise, practical management '? 

The actual identity of interests, apparently conflicting, it ia 
believed, can be no where more susceptible of practical exem- 
plification than in the reciprocal advantages of a wise adjust- 
ment of the claims and obligations of producers and carriers. 
Hotives of simple policy not less than those inspired by love of 
fair dealing, require snch just treatment of railroad interests as 
will reassure the alarmed capital embarked in them, and induce 
its re-entraoce into our State for the completion and extension 
of the comprehensive railroad system so essential to its welfare. 

KOBTHBRM PACIFIC BAHJtOAD. 

The importance of the subject induces me to direct attention 
to the condition and prospects of the Northern Pacific railroad. 
No State, with the possible exception of Oregon, has so much 
at stake as Minnesota, in the early completion of that great 
work i and it affords me pleasure to be able to congratulate oar 
people npon the improved prospects of the company charged with 
its prosecution. Instead of resorting to a tedious and expensive 
adjustment of their interests through a receiver, or wasting their 
substance in litigation, the various parties concerned quietly came 
together in a spirit of conciliation, and effected a speedy and eooQ- 
omical settlement, the result of which is that the reorganized com- 
pany is in poraession of650 miles of completed road and the large 
landed domain appertaining thereto, wholly free fromdebt. The 
road in its structure and appointments is unsurpassed by any in 
the country. It traverses a region from Duluth to Bismarck nn- 



zedbyGoOglC 



S4 iNAnaUBAL UESSAas. 

equalled od the coatiDent io wheat growing capacity, which is 
hordered oq the North by the rapidly settliflg Caoadiao Prov- 
ince of Manitoba. An extension of 5O0 miles weutward will 
carry the road into the heart of the rich mining Territory of 
Montana, and thus furnish an additional market for the agricnl- 
tnral products of the State, and greatly aid the general govern- 
ment in the difficult transportatioa of Indian and army supplies 
to that inaccessible region. On all accounts the construction 
of at least the additional section of 600 miles should be pushed 
with the least practicable delay. The portious of the road already 
completed, although bat fragmentary, are paying their expenses, 
aud give an earnest of what the greater work will do for the 
country. * 

The land grant of the company will expire in 1877, and in view 
of the sacrifices made by the men of faith and enterprise who 
have liberally contributed to the work, in view of the com- 
mendable dispostion they have shown to help themselves in sur- 
monnting difficnlties; considering the vast scope of the enter- 
prise; the muniScent aid already extended to the Union and Cen- 
tral Pacific Koads, and the concerted effort beins made for the 
extreme Soathern line, we have a right to expect kindly treatment 
at the hands of the general government from whom there should 
at least be no difficulty in securing a renewal of the grant I 
commend the matter to such favorable action by resolntion or 
memorial as you may deem advisable in furtherance of the ob- 
ject desired. 

NAVIQATIOH. 

1 desire to call your attention to the iiiteredtd of the people 
in regard to perfecting the navigation of the Mississippi river 
and its tributaries, now in progress under the auspices of the 
general government. In common with all other States lying 
between the Alleghenies and the Rocky Mountains, our leading 
productions are bulky in their nature and to be made remuner- 
ative must have cheap and easy access to the markets of the 
world. 

A generation has passed since the work of improving these 
rivers was commenced, but the progress has been slow owing 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



INAUOUKAI. MES8AOE. 25 

to the meageroeaB of appropriations. The time has arrived 
when the people demand tbat the Nation's great free highways 
should be improved to their mazimam of utility in order that 
freights may be carried at the lowest possible rates. 

I nuderstand the jettie work at the month of the Mississippi, 
is being pushed with commendable vigor by the bold and enter- 
prising contractor. The obstructions at the Des Uoines and 
Bock Island rapids will soon be overcome, and if these works 
are supplemented by wing dams and reservoirs at the points 
indicated in the able reports made heretofore by Gen. Warren 
and Col. FarquHur, of the U. S. Engineer Department, the main 
river will at all times, during seasons of navigation, give to the 
people a cheap and common highway to the ocean. 

We, in Minnesota, feel a deep interest in the thorough devel- 
opment of all the tributaries of this great river, but are more 
efipecially interested in the continuous navigation of the parent 
stream, in the improvement of the Minnesota river within our own 
borders, and in the perfection of the water-path to the great 
lakes via the Fox and Wisconsin Rivers in Wiaconain. I deem 
it an agreeable dntv to commend the action of our delegation 
in Congress, for their efforts in the furtherance of the several 
projects for cheapening the heavy and bulky transportation in 
which our people are so vitally interested. 

In this same connection I would commend to your oareral 
attention, the project of connecting the waters of the Misais- 
nppi with those of the great lakes by canal, a survey for which 
baa jnst been completed. 

AORIO0LTDBB. 

'Agriculture is the primary source of wealth. Through all 
the ranificationa of indnstrial development and the combina- 
tions of art and science, runs that underlying necessity for food 
which renders the cultivation of the soil the first essential of 
any real prosperity. Where that great interest languishes, 
there can be no durable basis for any other form of industry. 
It should therefore he your first duty to foster the great pur- 
suit which is thus the wide foundation of our welfare, and I 
4 

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26 mAUODBAL HBWAOE. 

sfaall be happ7 to co-operate with you in all reasonable measnreit 
lookiDg to that end. Wliile the wonderful capacity of oar soil 
and climate for wheat-growing, and the recently improved pro- 
cess for floor manufacture, have strongly tended to render that 
branch too much a specialty, I am glad to welcome vanoas evi- 
dences of that diversiflcation of products which I think essen- 
tial to wise and safe husbandry. 

The rich grasses, pnre water, and stimalating climate of onr 
State, combine advantc^ea for stock-raising which I am glad to 
observe are being more generally recognized. Oar improved 
facilities for transportation promise remunerative retarns from 
the shipment of fat cattle to the markets of the South and East. 
I learn with gratification of a single dealer who forwarded 
3,600 head to Chicago within the past year ; while the extent 
to which the commendable efforts in behalf of improved breeds 
of cattle and horses are raising the grade of stock throughout 
the State, is welcomed by all who desire the best results of agri- 
culture. The unquestionable advants^s we possess for sheep 
and wool prodaction, deserve more thorough and persevering 
efforts for their profitable development. The experiments in 
the culture of hops, flax seed, and the various products hereto- 
fore deemed among the minor results of agriculture, serve a 
valuable purpose in exhibiting the favorable conditions enjoyed 
in Minnesota for a diversified husbandry. 

The improvements in the manufacture of flour by the millers 
of this State, although comparatively little known as yet, have 
already given us an enviable reputation. Wherever the flour is 
known it leads all other brands in price and consumption, while 
the enhanced price of oar spring wheat resulting therefrom has 
added millions to the value of this crop. Five years ago our Min- 
nesota wheat sold much lower than the winter wheat grown sonth 
of us, but the growing reputation of our flour as the finest in the 
world, has greatly appreciated oar wheat, while the vastly in- 
creased mannfacture of flour within the State has given an ad- 
ditional profit to our people. 

WABBH0D8BIIBH. 
I would suggest, whether in view of the magnitude of tba 

" DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



INADODRAI, MBiBSAQB. 27 

grain interests of the State, more legislation is not reqaired to 
protect owners of wheat and other kinds of j^rain who are com- 
pelled to entrnst their property to the haods of warebonsemen. 
The farmers and dealers in grain shoald have al) the protection 
that the most stringent laws can give them against irresponsi- 
ble, nnfortnoate, careless or dishonest warebonsemen. In the 
absence of law regnlating the etori^e and grading of grain it has 
been decided by the United States Courts that the title of the 
property passes from the farmer to the warebonsemen when the 
grain is delivered for storage and is liable for any outside debts 
of the warehoDsemen. This should be prevented by wise legis- 
lation, BO that no title or claim to snch property aboald pass nn- 
til actually sold. I ask yonr oarefnl attention to the matter. 

SALBS OP PUBLIC LANDS. 

The absorption of the public lands is an interesting subject 
as affecting onr agricaltural development. From the several 
United States Land Offices in the State I learn that the total dis- 
posal of the public lands under the several modes provided by 
lawduring the past year comprises an aggregate of 734,325 acres, 
of which 427,666 acres were taken under the Homestead Act and 
62^6 acres nnder the Tree-Culture law, both indicating whole- 
some tendencies in the absorption of onr unoccupied lands. 

OOMOLOBIOM. 

The coodiUon of the State finances and of onr various pub- 
lic institutions has been fully and ably presented in detail by 
the Executive, whose creditable administration closes to-day. 
It only remains for me to congratulate you and the people at 
large upon the favorable auspices under which our State goes 
forward to a promising future. If thus early in her career, 
Minnesota is the largest producer of breadstufis in the Union ; 
if her facilities for transportation have bo soon beon re-inforced 
bya railroad construction grasping her utmost boundaries ; if her 
common-school system has reached the best condition of prac- 
tical development, endowed by a fund ranking the fourth in the 



zedbyGoOgle 



38 IMAOGOBAI. ICBSBAOB. 

coontry, while her higher edacatioD&I interests are on a footiog 
of the most promieing nBefalness, and if those charitable iosti- 
tations whose tender care constitutes the crowning honor of 
onr civilization, already attest the wide sphere of their bene- 
ficence', it ahuald fill onr hearts with the deepest gratitude and 
inspire them with the highest hope. 

If we shall press forward in this coarse — foster the potent 
and kindly agencies which conserve the bigheat pablic good — 
attain and guard with jealous care a spotless public credit, and 
above all reverently follow the guiding hand of God as the be- 
ginning and end of the highest wisdom, it will be difficult 
to limit the prosperous career of our young commonwealth in 
the boDodleas pathway of the fatare. 

JOHN a PILLSBCET. 



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[ExKonnvK DocpuzMT, No. 8.] 



ANNUAL- REPORT 



SECRETARY OF STATE, 



LEGISUTURE OF MIHUESOTA, 



FISCAL TEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30th, 1876. 



ST. PAUL; 

FIOMIR-FRKSa COHFAMT. 

1676. 



DiaiLizedbyGoOt^le 

J 



,.db,Googlc 



Stitx or UnrMsatnA, \ 

Officz of thb Szcrktast of Statx, > 

St. Paul, December 11th, 1876. ) 

Si$ JBaeeOcncy, Otuhman K. Davia, 

Oovemor of th» State of JUmnttota : 

Ss : — I have the honor herewith to tr&ngmit the annn&l report of 
this department to tiie Legislature, for the year ending November 
aoth, 1875. 

Very Seapectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

S. P. JENNISON, 

Secretary of State. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



,db,Googlc 



REPORT. 



lb th« LegitkUure of the StaU of Minnesota : 
The Annaal Beport of this Department is herewith anbmitted. 

IMCOHPORl.TI(niB. 

There bare been filed and duly recorded during the past year 
eixty-nine inatruments creating corporations or modifying formflr 
articles, under the several statutes relating to corporations. The 
names and dates of filing thereof are as follows : 

Wh*n FUmI. 

RMgolr Orang* HaII AsBodatloD Ju. «Ui, ISn 

Tbe Owatoana Library AssodaUon Ju. 5th, 187S 

The Medina HUlCompuir Jan, eUi, 1871 

The Dnlnth and Iron Range Railroad Compaiqr Jan. 9th, 1871 

Plonear Farmtng Company Jan. lltb, 1876 

Tbe St. Clond and BL Peter Railroad Company Jan. ISth, 1876 

Sank R^tldB and Taylor's ?aUa Railroad Company Jan. Wtb, 1871 

UercbutalDtarDatlonalSteamboatLlne Jan. SOtb, 1875 

Minnesota Tempentnce Union Tebr. iOi, 187B 

Taylor's Taos and Leke Snperlor Railroad Company Febr. SUi, 1875 

The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engtoeers Febr. 10th, 187B 

Balnt Lonli River Boom Company Febr. lltb, 1875 

Tbe Saint Lonls River Dalles Improvement Company.... Febr. lltb, IBTI 

Appleton Lyceam and Ubrary Association Febr. 13tb, 1S75 

Baytown Tront Company Febr. tSth, 187S 

De If ordlske Forbond Febr. ISth, 18T6 

Mlanesota Tbal Bote Company Febr. ITth, 187S 

Minnesota State AgricDltoral Soclet;^ Febr. Utb, 1875 

Tbe PettengUl Antomatlc Car Coupler Company Febr. 19th, 18T6 

Mlonesota Farmers Mntnil Fire iDsnraace AsBocIatloD.. Febr. 10tb, 1876 

Snperlor and Sonthwestem Railway Company Febr. 36tb, 1S76 



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6 ANKDAL BBFOBT. 

'Whanmiad. 

The Bed Wtng and Treoton Transtt Compaoy Febr. a6Ui, 18TS 

Tbe Pioneer Company March Stb, 187S 

TaopI HtU Company (certificate of pnrpoM ot corpora- 
tion) March 8th, 191& 

Tbe Qraad (Jrove of the Dntted Ancient Order of Dmtda 

of the State of Minnesota March ISth, I87fi 

The SwedeBenerolent Society of Minneapolis UarchSOth, 1875 

MfnneapoltB, St. Fanl and Iowa BUliray Company March S5th, 1S7G 

The German Christian Ben eTOlent Society of St. Fanl... April 2d, 1S7& 

Mower Connty Agricnltnral Society April 8th, 18T» 

The Qerman American Hall Insnrance Company of Balnt 

Penl, Minnesota April 10th, 1S75 

Weill Hanafactnring Company {certlllcate of parpose of 

corporation) April IStfa, 18TG 

The Taopl Farming Company April 91st, 187& 

Hokah Library Aesoclatloo April 2tst, 187K 

St. Patrick's Catholic Hen's Soole^ April 28d, 18TS 

Austin Driving Park AsBociatlon April 80th, 1ST5 

RiceCoDn^QrangeMllICompany (amended articles). ■■ May Etb, I8TB 

8t. Pant Academy ofNataral Sciences Hay Stb, 1676' 

Owatonna HInneral Springe Company May 71b, 1875 

The Famen' and Mechanics' Savlnga Bank of Mlnne^fo- 

lle (amended articles) May 11th, ]87» 

Manhattan Marble Company (certiflcate of pnrpoee [of 

corporation) H^ 11th, 1875 

Key Btone Lodge Number Klnety-fonr Uaj IStb, ISTfi 

Society of Oblate Fathers for Missions Among tbe Poor Hay HHi, 1875 

Red Wing Hotel Company (amended articles] May IGth, 1S75 

Kasson and Bed Wing Telegraph Company May 17Ui, 1875 

Tbe Pioneer-Press Company May 34th, 1875 

The Catholic Printing Company of MlnnesoU May Slst, 1876- 

Sed Biver Valley Railroad Company Jane UtA, 1876 

Anoka Lumber MtlU June 18th, 1875- 

Masonic Hall Building Association Jiine 91st, 1875 

Rochester Lodge Number Twenty-one, Ancient Free and 

Accepted Masons Jnne aSUt 1876 

Fillmore and Hower County Agricultarsl Society (consti- 
tution and by-laws of] Jnly Srd, 1876 

Swedish Pioneer Printing Company July 6th, 1B76 

Cannon City Hill Company Camended articles) July lOth, 1876 

Winona Carriage Woriu (certiflcate of purpose of corpo- 

raOon ■ jnly Iflth, 1876 

Patron's Warehouse Company of Wli^iebago City July 2Tth, 1875 

The American Tube Well Hydrant Company Aug. Ilth, 18TS 



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SBOEBTABT OF UTATE. 7 

Whan mM. 
Saint Cloud Graaite Quarrying and Mannfactarlng Cahi- 

P«ny - Aug. letli, 1876 

Paribaolt Library Aug- Sfttti, 1876 

The Cottage Grore Comet Band Sept. 6th, 187J( 

Lake Clly Lumber Company Sept, lOth, 1876 

Tba Hlnneaota Academy of Natarat Sciences Sept. 14tli, 187S 

The Dulvtli TamTereln Sept. ISth, 187S 

The LttcbHeld Library AHociatlon Sept. leth, 187B 

The Bidnt Faol Gymnastic AHSoclaUon Sept. SSrd, 1875 

Dorer Center Patrons' EleTBtor Company Oct. 2nd, 187S 

The Waaeca Tnmverelii Oct. 91st, 18711 

HorrlBtown UlU Company Oct. 80th, 187B 

The Peterson Mill Company Not. Gth, 1876 

The German American Hall loanranee Company (amended 

arUcles) Not. ISth, 1876 

Alesandrla Llbrai? Association Hot. SOth, 187S 

AffldaTita of the pablication of articles of incorporation were filed 
in tbirty-one cases, as follows : 

WbraVtltd. 

Dnlnth and Iron Bange Railroad Company Jan. Snd, IS76 

The Co-oparatlTe Barrel HaanAtctoring Company....... Jan. IStb, 1S76 

The Medina Milt Company Jan. 2Snd, 1876 

Sauk Baplds and Taylor's Falls Ballroad Company Jan. SStb, 1875 

St Lonls Blver Dalles ImproTement Company Febr. 4th, 1676 

St. Lonte River Boom Company Febr. 4th, 187G 

Merchants International Steamboat Line Febr. 9th, 1S75 

Trior's Falls and Lake Soperior Railroad Company Febr. 18th, 1S75 

The HlDoesota Fanners' Matnal Fire InsnraDce Assocla- 

UoD Febr. l»th, 1876 

The Automatic Car Coupler Company. Febr. 19th, 1876 

BrownsTlUe and Root BlTer Interest ImproTement Com- 
pany Febr. Slrd, 1876 

St. LonlB River Dalles Improvement Company March Gtb, 1876 

St Louis River Boom Company Marcb 5th, 1875 

The Pioneer Company March 16th, 1876 

MinnesoU Orthopcedlc Instltnte April 6th, 1876 

Minneapolis, 8t PbdI and Iowa Railway Company April IBth, 1876 

Pioneer-Press Company May lOtb, 1875 

St. Clond and St. Peter Railroad Company May ISth, 1876 

Taopl Farming Comrpany Hay SZd, 1876 

The Catholic Printing Company May SIst, 1876 

Owatonna Mineral Springs Company Joce 10th, 1676 

Bed RWer Talley Railroad Company Jone ]8tb, 1876 

Masonic Hall Building Association Jane 21st, 1876 



zedbyGoOgle 



8 AHMDAL BBFOBT. 

I 

CannoD Cit/ MIU Compftoy (notice of meetlnc of stock- 
holders) Jul; lOth, -ISZC 

WInoM CirrUge Works July l»Ui. 1876 

Lake City Lumber Compuj Sept. 10th, ISTE 

The St. Clond Qranlte Qaarrylng and HaDoAotDilOK 

CompaDT Sept. SBth, ISTS 

The DoTer Center FatrouB' Blev&tor CompanT Oct. 18th, ISTfi 

HorristowD HUl Companr Oct. SOth, UTS 

Tribune PDbllBhlDK ComptuQ' ^■••■ Hot. Uth, ISTS 

The Feteraon HUl Company Mot. ISth, ISTfi 

FAFEB AMD STATIOMBBr. 

Th« contract for furnialiiDg the stfttioaery for use of the LegiaU- 
tare anci the varions departmeats, waa dnly let to T. S. White & 
Co., of St. Panl, irhose proposals were the lowest of four receiTod. 

Two proposals only were receiTcd for fhmiBhing the paper nocei- 
ear; for printing, IJie lowest, quality of samples considered, being 
that of ATerill, Bossell & Carpenter, of St. FanI, with whom a 
contract was completed. The deuils of all the bids will be found 
in the appendix. 

The appropriations estimated to be necessary for the ensuing year 
are, for paper for printing, $8,000, for stationery, (2,000. 

The stationery return of this department for the year ending 
NoTember SO, 1875, is exhibited in the appendix. The issues to 
the different departments of the goTemment are separately giTOn, 
for which issues Touchers are on file in this office for examination 
of the proper committee. 

PUBLIO PSIHTIMO. 

The very liberal maximum rates for printing and binding under 
the act of March 8, 1875, easily secured contracts for each class of 
the public printing, and at rery fsir discounts in cases where com- 
petition had not been banished. David Ramaley, of St. Panl, Is 
the contractor for the prisling of the flrst and second classes ; Nor- 
man Wright, of St. Paul, for the third class ; J. J. Lemon, of St. 
Paul, for the fourth class, and J. K. Moore, of St. Peter, for the 
fifth class. The year covered by these contracts commenced Nov. 
iBl, 1675. 

The printing and bindiug of the Gieneral and Special Laws of 
1875 was done Jby Norman Wright, whose proposed discount of 
12^ per cent, was the highest offered. 



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SBORSTART OF STATE. 9 

A propoauion was raceived from a responsible source to purchase 
the entire edition of special laws of 187fi, except such as might be 
Jadged necessary to retain for official use; but neither the Treas- 
urer, who under the present law sells the Special Laws, nor the 
Secretary, who furnishes those to be sold, believed that such a sale, 
wtUi ita evident consequences, was the policy of the law. This fact 
is here mentioned, in order that, If a similar proposition shall be 
made hereafter, the precedent which exists for its rejection majr not 
then be ODpubtished and unknown. 

The method adopted last year through necessity, of numbering 
the various docoments which go into the bound volumes of the Ex- 
ecutive Documents, instead of repaging each document so that the 
volumes may be " conaecntlvely p^ed," has many advantages. It 
is more conveDient in making up the book, and no leas so in using 
them. It saves time and money. Tbennmberingof the documents ' 
will enable the printer also to make up the volumes in such a man- 
ner that the same reports will be habitnally found in the same vol- 
ume and in the same order. For these and other reasons, and 
becaose the numbering of the documents answers every end aimed 
at in the consecutive pagiof;, it has been held to be a snbstantial 
compliance with the purpose of the law, and the contractor has been 
authorized to number the documenu and to omit the delay and save 
the coat of consecutive paging. 

The Increase in the number of towns and counties, and the growth 
of the population, makes necessary the publication of 8,000 copies 
of the General Laws. A law should be passed requiring the prlnt- 
ine of that number. 

The Superintendent of printing disclaims responsibility for the 
publication in the Transactions of the State Horticultural Society 
of a catalogue of the plants of Minnesota, made in 1805 by a Wis- 
consin naturalist. The right lo cut down, mutilate or trim a report 
hiu never been claimed by this department for itself, but its right 
to reject and prevent the printing of that which Is known to be no 
report nor any part of transactions authorized to be printed is in- 
disputable. The publication of the matter referred to was nnaa- 
thorised, a trick npon this office as well as a fraud upon the state. 

It was a fraud upon the state because the catalogue never was in 
the possession of the Horticultural Society, was never made part of 
its transactiotas, and never directed by it Lo be published. The 
reasons assigned in the exculpatory preface to the publication that 
the work is of great value, that it properly belonged in another re- 
port, and that the author is lately deceased, are all Immaterial. 
3 



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10 iXKTJAL KBPOBT. 

The publication waa a trick upon this departmentniecause the 
matter had been rejected by it, bat was taken surreptitiously to the 
printer after the copy fortheentirebook,ae waaauppoBed.hadbeeii 
transmitted to him. If it bad been possible to infer a knowl- 
edge on the part of the contractor that the catalogne was not a part 
of the transactions, and not authorized to be included, the bill for 
printing should never have been paid by the state. 

THS CENSUS, 

Forms of schedules tor the enumeration of the inhabitants of tbe 
state were prepared by this department and duly distributed. The 
blanks were designed to show every thing required by the statnte 
to be ascertained, and nothing more ; and they were prepared also 
t with a view to secure the greatest particularity and completeness in 
regard to such matters. The law was printed upon one cover page 
of each schedule, and instructions for using the blanks, explaining 
every possible point in the plainest of language, was printed on the 
other. But a large number of assessors disregarded tbe instrnctions 
to a wonderflil extent. So that there is less deflniteness than was 
designed, and less reliance to be placed on the completeness and 
accuracy of the whole. For Instance one column was prepared in 
which assessors were directed to indinate the insane, idiotic, deaf 
and dumb and the blind, by designated words and abbreviations. This 
column was headed by the word " condition," in order that it might 
be referred to and its use explained in the " Instructions." Quite a 
number of assessors, who did not read the instructions, used that 
column to mention that sncb and such persons are " healthy," " In- 
firra," " twins," " triplets," "guests," or " drunk," Whether sncb 
assessors, without knowing what the column was for, have after all 
accidentally put all the insane, idiotic, deaf and dumb, &c., in their 
several towns, into their proper place, is a matter for conjecture. 
But it is after all likely that the data are as accurate as are ob- 
tained at any enumeration in a frontier state. 

Seventy-four counties have made and returned enumerations, 
showing tbe totals following : 

NniabnrlngorFamllteB 111,220 

NnintieTof Whites— Males 811,7GS 

" " —Females 280,118 

Namberof Negroes— Hales 290 

" " —Females SIC 



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/ 

SEOBBTAKT OF STATE. It 

Nomber of HnUtttoea— Hales 172 

" " — Female! 187 

Namber of Indians— Halea 161 

" ■■ — Females 1G8 

Namberof Half Breeds— Males 60S 

" —Females 647 

Total Hales 81S,97ft 

Total Females 281,986 

Total popnlatloD of tM State.....^ t M7,407 

Nnmber of Males over 31 years old » 160,919 

Nmnber of Persons between S and 21 years old S!S,8ez 



The discrepancy between the sum of the known nnmber of males 
and the known ntimber of females and the total population, is ac- 
counted for b; the omission to give age or sex of some 146 persons, 
CDomerated. To the proportionate extent of that nnmber, 145, the 
nnmber of males over 21 years of age, and the number of persons 
of school age are to be increased. 

Tbe rate of increase of the population of the state appears from 
the following comparison according to the official enumerations 
made since the organization of the state : 





Pop»:.,.o». 


ABSOLirrx 


PBK CIMT. 




172,032 
2B0,O99 
440,114 
697,278 


78,077 
190,01fi 
167,164 





















The schedules show the following numbers of the classes desert- 
ing the charitable care of tbe state : 

Deaf aad Dumb 268 

Blind Ill 

Insane ■••■-• •- ■ 620 

Idiotic l08 



The tables showing the nativities of the population enumerated 
are not completed at tbe present writing, nor are the tables show- 
ing tbe valoation of chnrch property in this state. It was not 
deemed best to stop the printing of this report to await the knowl- 
edge of the a^regate reaolts fn these respects, but to refer to tbe 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



12 ANKTTAI, BEPORT. 

appendix In which th«y will be incladed without delay or incon- 
v«nience. 

No attempt has been made to prepare an abstract of the parent 
naUvities, although the aohedDles akooat uniformly show them 
with great completeness, bot there has not been time to <vomplete 
the abstract without a largely increased clerical force, and the 
allawance for employing such assistance has been insufflcieat for 
the nearer and more neoeasary woik already accomplished. 
Respectfully submitted , 

S. P. JENNISON, 

Secretary of State. 



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A.ppE3srr>ix. 



LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC 



m COHHISSION, DECEHBEB 1, 1675. 



AUen, W. F 

AckBnnum, JnlliiB H.. 
ArautrouK, Qeo. H..-. 

Arnold, W. J 

Atklna, Howard H.... 

A1I«D, OrmaiiEO 

Adaina, 8»mael E 

Atcit, 811u 

Aiken, Jobo 

AnUioDf, DaTld 

Allen, Charlei P 

Amutrong, Tbomu H 

AmutroDg, J. A 

AUcn. Clurlea 

Andrews, C. 8 

AUlB, Frederick 

Ames, Angler 

Allen, WUllKD A 

Aveiy, Henrj H 

AUen, J. F 

ATery, WataonG 

Arctuider, John W--- 

AdamB, David A 

AthenoD, Comtltns... 

Abbott, W. S.M 

Arnold, Geo. B 

Armstrong, Jno. A.... 

Arnold, J. K 

Alder, Arnold 

Abbott, S.J 

Alley, Joacphua 

Barker, A.F 

Baxter, Geo. N 

BoBtwlck. C. E 

Bntler, Natban 

Blasell, Arthor H 

Butlett, A.B 



HlDDeapolla, Bennepin coanty 

Carrer, Carrer coanty 

Hlnneapolla, Hennaplu coanty 

Wabasha, Wabasha county 

St. Cloud, Stearns coan^ 

ADBtlD, Hower eonnty 

Moatlcello, Wright eonnty 

Flaaaant Grore, Olmsted coanty... 

Caledonia, Hooston eonnty 

KasBon, Dodge coanty •'... 

Beltrami coanty 

Albert Lea, Freeborn eonnty 

Winnebago Ctty, Farlbanlt eonnty. 

Hlnniapolls. Hennepin eonnty 

B;ota, Olmstad eonnty 

St. Paal, Bamsey coanty. 

SI. Pani, Ramgey coanty 

Winona, Wtaona coanty 

Jackson, Jackson eonnty 

St. Paul, Ramsey eonnty 

Concord, Dodge coanty 

Hlnnespolts, Hennepin eonnty 

Hntchlnson, HcLeod eannty 

Wasloja, Dodge conaty iFeb. 24,lSTfi 

Mlnne*polts, Heanepln county iFcb. tO, 1ST6 

UsntorvUle, Dodiie eonnty 'Jane 15, 1875 

Falrmonnt, Martin county 'JolySS, 1876 

St Faal.Bamsey eonnty |Aag.28,1876 

Kasson, Dodge coanty 'jolySl, 1676 

Winnebago City, Farlbaalt county. . Not. 10, 1676 

Howard, Wright eonnty INot. 11, 1676 

Princeton. Utile Lacs coanty Dee. 2, 1873 

Farlbaalt, Rlee eoonty <Dec. 16, I8T8 

Dalnth, St. Lonls COnnCy Dec. 80, 1878 

UinneKpolle, Hennepin coanty Dec 81, 1678 

Winona, Winona coanty Jan. 6, 1874 

Albert Lea, Freeborn eonnty Feb. 16, 1874 



Vec.lS, IS71 
Dec. 18, 1878 
Jan. 6, 1674 
Jan. 36, 1874 
Jan. 30, 1874 
Feb. IB, 1874 
Feb. IS, 1874 
Fab. 19, 1874 
Mar. S, 1674 
Hay 8, 1874 
9, 1874 
Apr. t6, 1874 
Hay 1, 1874 
Hay 18, 1874 
June IS, 1874 
jDly IE, 1874 
Sep. 16, 1674 
Oct. 31, 1874 
Not. S, 1874 
Oct. 1, 16T4 
Dec. 9, 1874 
Dee. Se, 1874 
Jan. 13, 1876 



zedbyGoOgle 



AKKnAL EBPOET. 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Contiuued. 



.^. 


™™»» 


DAT! or 

COHKKMOH. 
































Bocklar, JoMph 

BnKl,J.B 

Bardlck. A. M 

Bndd, Charles H 






Ulnne&polla, Hennepin coanty 

HewAabnrn, Slblay county 

Honte video, Chippewa coanty 


Har. 28, 1874 
Kar. 2, 1874 
Feb. 88. 1874 














Brown, Frank G 

Brown, J. E 

Btmes. giiwW 

Baxter, Lather L 






Uapleton, Bine Earth conntj 


Har. IS, 1874 
Har. 84, 1874 


lAke City, Wabasha county 










CoUlngwood, Heeker conoty 

bf ankato, Bloe Earth oODDty 

Sank Centre, Bteain a coanty 




Barney, Sbeldon F 


Feb. 14, 1874 
Apr. 4, 1874 
Apr. IS, 1874 
Apr. 19, 1874 
Apr. 17, 1874 
Apr. S9, 1874 
Apr. e, 1874 










AaatlD, Uower connty 


BanDlwell, Henry T 


Blabop, James L 


tflnneapoJla, Heonpeln cooDty 




BesUey, A)lt«d N 


Har. 16, 1874 
Apr. 10, 1874 
Hay 1, 1874 
Hay IE, 1874 
Hay 18, 1874 
Hay 4, 1874 
Hay 18, 1874 
Hay 14, 1874 
Hay as, 1874 




S^l B. W. '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'•'.'. 




Bryant, Robert 8 


























Bamei, George A 








Jaly 28, 1874 
Aag. ]0, 1874 
jDly 30, 1874 
AnB.il, 1874 
AaR.as, 1874 










BentoD.C. H 
















Ang.«,l874 
Sept. 8, 1874 












HlnneapollB, Hennepin coanty 












Barttng, Theophll 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Dec. 1, 1874 


Best, William H 


Uloneapolls, Hennepin county 


Dec. 18, 1874 



,.db,Googlc 



8ECRETART OF STATE. 
LIST OF IfOTAEIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



RBStDKKCI. 



COMMISSION. 



BnrweU, Chul«B H 

Baldwin, O. O 

BeU.J. K. 

BndFard, AdolpbDS 

BerT7,ChsrlM H 

BoUer, Wlllts O 

Bam&rd, J. H 

BAmes, Wm. A 

Benton, C. H 

BntDtuun, J. T., Jr 

BowdlMh, James 

Brewster, Oeorge H.... 

Brrant, B. B 

Blxler, Moaes 

Bracken Tldge, Walter L. 

Brown, Horace W 

Baonhager, Herman .■• 

BaJtea, PeterJ 

Beltoy.F 

B«rg. Ole Segnr 

Barllngame, J. U 

Beinla,£«vl 

Borer, Felix A 

Bnrilng Edward 

Bradley George 

Bnckbaoi, Thomas 8.... 

Bntler, HeniyC 

BalLW.T 

Borlapg, Botolf 

BlalideU. H. H 

Beman, Samael S 

BlUs, T. H 

Brownell, Lewla 

Bartleson, Charles 

Brown, L. H 

Baker, Charles D 

Burke, Fraok, Jr 

Braden, John Q. A 

Bryant, James 

Bonner, Thomas F 

Brigga, Tbomaa B 

BowBD, H. D 

Bradberry, Wm. H 

BuwelJ, Qeorge W 

Brown, Z. B 

Baldwin, Dwlsht H 

Barber, Llojd 

Baldwin, BeaJ.C 

Banker. A. E 

Beals, James B 

Bargees, J. L 

Barbaraa, Qeorge 

Bryant, CbarlM 8 

CanIo:io, I. N 

Carter, T.G 

Chtftman, G«orge H 



Hlnneapolts, Hetinaptn county.... 

Bocheater, Olmsted coonty 

HinneapolU, Hennepin conntj.... 
Mlnueapolts, Hennepin cooDty . . . - 

Winona, WlQona connty 

Clearwater, Wrlgbt county 

Sank Centre, Bteams connty 

U Inneapolle, Hannepin connty • ■ ■ • 

Dodge Centre, Dodge county 

LitchBetd, Meeker county 

Wloooa, WlDona county 

Mankato, Bine Barth connty 

Uloneapoli^, Heune pin county 

St. Pani, Ramsey coonty 

Bocbester, Olmsted coonty 

WlUmar, Eandlyohl coDQty 

Sbakopee, Scott connty 

Sbakopes, Scottconnty 

LItchfleld. Meeker connty 

, Fillmore county 

Owatonna, titeele county 

Chatfleld, Fillmore connty 

lieSaenr, LeSneur coonty 

Alma City, Waaeca county 

Mlnneapalis, Hennepin connty.... 

Farlbaott, Bice connty 

Rochester, Olmxted coanty 

Detroit, Becker connty 

Norway, Goodhn^connty. 

Palrmoant, Uartln connty 

St. Cbarlea, Winona connty 

Rochester, Olmsted connty 

Waseca, Waaecaconnt; 

HloneapoUs, Hennepin connty.... 

Shakopee, Scott connty 

Alexandria, Doaglas connty 

Dnlnth, St. Louis county 

LItchfleld, Meeker connty 

HlHneapolla, Hennepin conuty.... 

8t. Pani, Ramsey connty 

Howard Lake, Wright coanty ...• 

LI tch tin Id, Meeker county 

Chatfield, Fillmore county 

Bine Earth City, Farlbanlt conn^. 
Minneapolis, Hennepin connty.... 

Red Wiqg, Goodbne connty 

Winona, Winona connty 

St. Pani, Ramsey connty . 

Nortbfleld, Rice coan^ 

St. Paul, Ramsey coonty 

JaneSTltle, Waseca I'-onnty 

Uaallngs, Dakota connty 

St. Pani, Ramsey connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

St. Peter, M IcoUet connty 

— , Stearns coonty 



Not. 7, 
Not. so, 
Sep. 10, 
Dec. 19, 
Aug. 1. 
Sep. IT, 
Aug. 2, 
MoT.ia, 
Oct. 87, 
Not. 16, 
Dec. SO, 
Dec. 27. 
Dec, SI, 

Jan.' K. 
Jan. £S, 
Jan. 17, 
Jan. 80, 
Feb. 6, 



Feb. 1, 
Feb. 26, 
Feb. SS. 
Mar. 17, 
Mar. 2S, 
Mar. as. 
Mar. 2, 
Mar. SI, 
Apr. IT, 
Apr. 6. 

Apf: l! 
Mar. 26, 
Apr. 28, 
Apr. 19, 
May 6, 
Hay M. 
Apr. 18, 

June G, 

Hay 26,' 

Jnne Ifi, 

Ang. u! 
Ang. 12, 
Sep, 1, 
OcL 1, 
Oct. a. 
Not. S, 
Not. 10, 
Not. 17, 
Dec. 9, 
Dec. 9, 
Dec. S, 



1874 

16T4 

1874 

18T4 

1871 

1B74 

1874 

1874 

1S74 

lS7t 

1874 

lb74 

1874 

1876 

1876 

1»75 

187S 

1876 . 

1876 ' 

18Tfi 

IBTS 

187G 

187S 

187& 

187C 

1875 

187S 

1874 

187G 

IB7G 

IfiTC 

1676 

1875 

1876 

1S7S 

1875 

1875 

1876 

1876 

1875 

1815 

IBTS 

1875 

1876 

1876 

1875 

1875 

1875 

1875 

1875 

1876 

187S 

1875 

187S 

187S 

187S 



zedbyGoOgle 



ANKDAL OEPORT. 
LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Contlnaed. 



CooD, W.L.. 

CKneron, George U.. 
Crosb;, ChulM W . . . . 

CAirer, Oscftr F 

CUrk. HerriUM 

Cliow«ii, O«orge W... 
Cbue, (tjrlTMtei-B.... 
Cbtwdler, Junes . . . . 

Cupenter, NUea 

CoUlDS, H. B 

Carrer, Frederick A.. 

Chtplii ArUiarQ 

Collester, H. D. L.... 

duwe, Beiij 

Cuneron. Duiiel 

Cool, Jobs M 

CmUs, Henrr a 

ClBike, Z. B 

* Crane, BoKene B 

Comatock, Blbrldge O ■ 
Chadbonrn, Nathaolel. 

Cbm, Adalbert C 

Crocker, Banben 

Coffln, William F 

GatletoDi Frank H...< 

CaaOe, Ira W 

Canon, WlllUm 

Cooper, Jobn 

Case, John H 

CbitteDden, Ednln S" 

Caab, Daniel G 

CUrke, 8. C 

Chllstrom, P. O 

Caster, O. L 

CoDDtryman, A. D..- 
Cleveland, Geoi^eS.. 

Capeban, A. R 

CoUlns, L. W 

Cbapman, Cbarles A.. 

Crowell, Albtu U 

Care;, Jobn T 

Cbeney, WUllam 

Cochran, Tbomas Jr.. 

ConsUns, H. B 

Cbaproan, Tmman D ■ ■ 

Cbase, H.S 

Case, John H 

Chadboorae, Cbas. H. . 

Corleas, E. B 

Clark, Emory 

Child, H. A 

Cameron, Dnncan 

Corliss, J. W 

Craadall, Wm. H. 

Cah HI, Tbomas 

Cochran, J. Z 



ItESIDaKCB. 



Usokato, BlDeBarthcoan^... 

Anatfa, Mower connij < 

Hsstlngs, Dakota county 

Bank Centre, Stearns coanty . . . 
Garden City, Bine Earth connty. 
HlcneapollB, Hennepin coanty. 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county. 

JsnesTllle, Waaeca connt; 

Bnsbford, Fillmore connty 

Alden, Freeborn coanty 

St. Fan), Ramsey coanty 

Hlnneapolla, Hennepin connty.. 

Waaeea, Waaeea coanty 

Wells, Faribault connty 

La Crescent, Hooston connty .... 

Winona, Winona oonnty 

St. Panl, Ramsey connty 

Lac qni Parle, Lie qnl farle coanty 

Aastln, Mower connty 

Avr, Qoodhne coanty 

Bine Earth City, Farlbaalt connty 

Hlgb Fareat, Olmsted oonnty 

RnshClty, Chla«EO connty 

Hankato, Bine Barth coonty 

St. Panl, Ramsey connty 

Stillwater, Washington coanty..., 

High Foreat, Olmsted county 

St. Clond, Stearns coanty 

Farlbanit, Rice coanty 

St. Paul, Ramsey coanty 

Dnlnth, St. Lonls county , 

St. James, Watonwan coanty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.... 

Sbakopee, Scott coanty 

Hlnneapolla, Hennepin county.... 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county.... 

St. Faal, Ramsey oonnty 

St. Cloud, Stearns county 

Manltato, Bine Barth connty 

Long Pnirle, Todd county 

Austin, Mower connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty — 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Brown county 

Sunrise, ChlaiRo conntf 

White Bear, Ramsey connty 

MonteTtdeo, Chippewa county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

FergQS Palle, Ottertall connty 

Wlndom, Cottonwood county 

Carrer, Carver county 

White Earth, Becker connty 

CUtberal, OtterUil connty 

Austin, Mower connty 

Faribault, Bice coua^ 

Howard Lake, Wright county 



DiTK OP cox. 



Mar. 

Mar. : 
Mar. 
Mar. : 
Uar. i 
Mar. 1 
Apr. 
Apr. ; 
Mar. 1 
Apr. 
Mar. i 
Mar. 1 
Hay j 

Jan. S 
June : 

June : 
jDly : 
July I 

Jnly' S 
Aug. : 
Aug. i 
Ang. ; 
Sept. 



, 18T4 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 

1874 ' 

1874 
, 1874 
, IST4 
, 16T4 
, 1874 
, 18T4 

1874 
, 1874 

1874 
, 1874 

1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 

1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 

1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 

1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1074 
, 1874 

1874 



, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 18T4 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 
1874 
, 1874 
1874 
1874 
>, 1874 
, 1874 
, 1874 
, 18T4 
, 1875 



Jan. 9, 1875 



zedbyGoOglC 



BBOBBTART OF STATE. 
LIST OF NOTARIES PUBUC— Continaed. 



CarletoD, Haon^. 

Cluipmaii, A. 

CiiiTll, Meil 

Child, Wm. C 

Crsln, Chu. W 

Clsgatt, Jobo K 

ChaDdlur, jAmea 

ClagboTD, J.L ., 

CbadderdoD, Josepb. . . . 

Coach, G«orge Jr 

Can, J. D 

Cory, Henry W 

Clark, KenneUi 

ComMrtiO. H 

Canon, Bobert B 

Colbttrn.N.P 

CaM, BoUm A 

Crandall, Cbu. 8 

Cbaae, Frank 

CaUa, BQBseU W 

Campbell, S. L 

Cbapcl, Albert 

Cook, Levt L 

Cammlngs, R. W. ■■■ 

Conrerae, A. S 

Cole, Gordon B 

ChambeTtaln, Geo. C... 

Coming, J. W, L 

Clark, Geo. H ■ 

Cutle, James N 

Collender, J, W ■ 

Cbanibers, James 

ClereUDd, J. K 

Clark, Ovo U 

Ctst, Lorla ' 

Chamberlain, D. T 

Clonsh, W. P 

Corostock, 8. a 

Carbon, Aagost 

Clark, A. W 

Clarke, Z. B 

Carina, Chaa. D 

Cadwell, Francis 

Cook, Jacob U 

Cornlsb, W. D 

Coner, B. S 

Davidson, A. Y 

I>aiislnxbur7, Feter X-. > 

DarJa, C.H 

Dye, WalterQ 

Denton, K. W 

Donton, H. G 

Dmh, Wllllui J 

Drew,M. K 

Donaldaon, JoMph 

DoriTa1,N.S 

3 



BKSIDBHCK. 



DATS or COM. 



UlDoeapolis, Hennepin connty. ■ - 

Janesrllle, Waseca county 

Marray connty 

Bed WIdk, Good hne connty 

Wykoff, Fillmore county 

Hastings, Pftkcta connty 

Jaoesvllle, Waseca connty 

Waseca, Waseca county 

Jordan, Scott connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county. .. 
^4a^k Centre, Stearns county.... 

St. Pan), Ramsey connty 

8t. PanI, Bamser county 

Stillwater, Washington connty.. 

Frazee City, Becker connty 

Preston, Fillmore county 

Cfaatfleld, Fillmore county 

Owstonna, .Steele county 

Stillwater, Washington connty.. 

Farlbanlt, Rice connty 

Wabasha, Wabasha connty 

Farmlngton, Dakota connty 

UiDneapolls, Hennepin connty.. 
Hiuneapolli', Hunneplu coauiy. -. 

Dester, Mower connty 

Faribanlt, Bice connty 

Jackson, Jackson county.. 



Jan. 13, 
Feb. 16, 
Mar. 17, 
Feb. IS, 
April 1, 
Feb. 18, 
March 1, 
Feb. 18, 
Feb. SS. 
Feb. SO, 

March g| 
Feb. 10, 
March 8, 
Har. 26, 
Mar. 22, 
Mar. 3i, 
April 1, 
ftpril 17, 
April 19, 
March t, 
Oct. 13, 
April 17, 
May IS, 
April 10, 
June 9, 

It. Paul, Rimsey county 'June 17, 

'■"■'"" June IS 

Mar. IB, 
May 21, 
June 26, 
July 



Hankato, Blnu Earth conuty. 
Stillwater, Washington connty... 

Jordon, Scott county. 

Hianeapolls, Hennepin connty... 

Man kato. Blue Earth connty 

Koche.-ler, Oimsted loimtj 

Lake Crystal, Bloe Earth county. 

Hastings, Dakota county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Clay connty 

Appleton, Swift connty 

CoUingwnoil, Meeker connty 

Benson SnlFt connty 

St. Paul, Bamsey connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 

St. Paol, Ramsey county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

HlDueapolla, Hennepin connty... 

Bochester, Olmsted county 

St. Peter, Nicollet connty 

Winona, Wlnooft oon&ty 

Rochester, Olmsted connty 

Rochester, Olmsted connty 

SL Panl, Ramsey connty 

Winona, WlDoea connty 

Fannlngton, Dakota connty 

Caledonia, Honston connty 



: 2C, 



July 1, 
July 20, 
Ang. 26, 
Oct. 11. 
Oct. 16, 
Oct. II, 
Ocu 26, 
Oct. 26, 
OcL 21, 
Oct. 27, 
Ang. 26, 
Not. 1, 
April 7, 
Dec. la, 
Jan. 1, 



Jan. 81, 
Jan. 21, 
Feb, 9, 



zedbyGoOgle 



ANNOAL REPORT. 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continned. 



DddIop.A. O 

Duhtell, John L. H 
DeainoDd, MicbtwlJ — 

Donglasa, B 

Duw, WiUismB.. 

Denny, H. R 

Degnon, Jobo F--' 
Dickey, William B 

Dann, L. A 

DeFlon, John F.I 
Doiree, Thomu>> 
Dryer, George W. 
DaJtoo, Loren---- 
Dnon, Andrew C- 

Dodge, H. H 

Dntbgr, P. A 

DsTldson, John. ■ ■ > 
DoDglta, Soward> . 
Dayion, LymtDC. 
DonaldBOD, E. l!I-.< 
Dibble, wmiamS.. 
Doagbty, J.Bd-.. 

Drew.CH 

Dean, F. B 

Donahower, J. C. 

Daniels, M. J 

Darby, John W ■■ 
.Drew, Walter.... 

Dftfls, C. R 

DartdBOn, C. B... 

DeDt,LewleD 

Dann, L. A 

Demenles, Z 

Delany, Andy 

Dixon, A. C 

Dd Tolt, George A 
Doliy, James A • . • . 
Demeulca, AlphomeJ.. 

Dalley, M. A 

DanleU, J. T 

DeKiy, W. H 

Dlcken, JameaF.-. 

Drew, Wm. L 

Donaldson. A. B--. 
Dyckaon, Jamea W . 
DlUman, ClanaH.. 

Evans, J., Jr 

Eaton, Samnel W.. 

Edwards, C. F 

Bmmel, Henry J... 
Evarett, Hahloa R. 
Eygabroad, John J. 

Eaton, J. 8 

Edgerton, A. J.... 

Bagan, James J 

Baton, Cbarlei A... 



Minneapolis, Hennopln connty...- 
HlnneapoHs, Hennepin county... 
Rusbfurd, Fillmore county........ 

White Earth, Becker county 

Bear Valley, Wabasha connly 

Carver, Carver county 

Brainerd, Crow Wing county 

Zumbrota, Ooodbue conntf 

St. Jumes, Watonwan county 

Alexandria, Dooglas county 

DnlnLh, St. Lonia county 

St. Peter, Nicollet county 

Rocheater, Olmated county 

Winnebago City, Faribault county. 

8t. Psnl, Ramsey county 

Hi. Paul, Ramsey county 

Bralnerd, Crow Wing connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Rnshrord, Fillmore county 

EasBon, Dodge county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Beaver Falls, RenTlUe connty 

, HcLeod connty 

St. Peter, Nloollel county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Faynesvltle, Steams connty 

Audnbou, Becker county 

St Peter, Si collet connty 

Anslln, Mower county 

, MlUe Laca connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Oasej, Hennepin county 

St. Peter, Nicollet connly 

Winona, Winona connty 

Chaaka, Carver county 

Hastings, Dakota connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Kochester, Olmsted connty 

Hastings, Dakota connty 

Alexandria, Douglas county 

Wluona, Winona connty 

Alexandria, Douglss county 

Winona, Winonaconuty 

Sttilwater, Washington county.... 

Rocbester, Olmsted county 

Rochester, Olmsted connty 

St. James, Watonwan connty 

Melrose, Sleams coanty 

Le Sueur, Le Snenr connty 

Winnebago City, Faribault county. 
Lac qui Parle, Lac qnl Parle connty 

HantorTllle, Dodge connty 

Dulnlh, St. Loals connty 

HiDDeapoIis, Hennepin county 



DATB 


OF 








Feb. ao. 


1874 


Feb. H, 


mt 


Feb. fi. 


1874 


Mar. S6 


1S74 


April I 


1874. 


April ST 


1874 


Feb. at 


1874 


tfay 19 


1874 




1874 




IS74 


Msy 4 


1874 


June 17 


1374 


June 28 


1B74 


June 6 


1874 


July 23 


1874 


Aug. 11 


1874 


Aug. 18 


IS74 


Sept. 1 








Sctr. IG 


1874 


Dec I 




3ot. 3 


l«74 


Sept. 11 


1874 




187S 


Jan. 13 


1876 


Jan. 16 


187* 


Jan. 11 


1874 


Jan. 1 


187S 


Feby. 16 


1876 


Feby. 18 


1878 


Peby. 31 


1876 


Harch 8 


1876 


April 1 


1H76 




1876 


April 16 


1876 


Uay 21 


187C 


May 39 


1876 


June S 


IH7« 


July 1 


1876 


July 16 


1876 


Sept. 1 


1876 


July 18 


1876 




1878 






3ct. e 


1876 


Dec B* 


1878 


March 2 


1874 


Mar. 90 








April 1 


1874 


May 28 


1874 


June 1 




Aug. 2G 


1874 


lug. V 


1874 


Oct. 8 


1B74 



,.db,Googlc 



SEOBBTAST OF BTATE. 19 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



mtngtoD, Lewis 

BUer, H»merC 

Bdsoa, Junes C 

Bliaaon, GasMr 

Ebob, C. N 

Bagui.Pblllp 

Elliott, Adolpliaa F 

EriesonErlc 

Emerj, O. B 

Elchhorn, Edmnnd 

B^Q, J. J 

Edwftrda, H. F 

Echboldt, H. A 

Fuller. Israel 

Fanner, Daoiel B 

FlDley, H. H 

Fowler, Andrew J 

FoUett, DbddIh 

Ford.OrTllle D 

Forman, Edward B 

Fanner, B. F 

Folsom. Tmmao 

Fanner, James D 

Fales, Grenvllle 

Frink,F. W 

Farb«r, 8. W 

Fewson, TlLomaa B 

FalrchUd. Frank 

Freoden retell, Qeorge A. 

French, P. O 

Fnrber, J. Warren 

Frldler, A. H 

Flynn, D. H 

Fiorer, WlllUm J 

Famham, B. H 

Flanagan, James 

Francis, Orin W 

Fowler, Giles H 

Found, Walter A 

FrolBeth,B. A 

Fitch, A- P 

Fahner, N. B 

FnlEer, M. A 

Flanders, Joseph 

Falrchlld, E. H 

Ferris, Allen D 

Flelschman, F. C 

Frjer, Edwin L 

Freeman, E. P 

FltKgerald M 

Ontswlller, Ignatz, Jr.. 

.Graves, John T 

Orethen, Anton 

Gorman, B. 8 

Gabrlelaon, Gabriel 

QonM, O. B 



BBBIDKMCB. 


niTE OF 
COMMUSIOK. 


Blooming Prairie, Steele county. .. 
St. PbbI, Ramsey county 


Not. le 
Feby. 6 
Feby. 12 
Oct. 16 
Feb. aa 
Mar. 11 
April 1 
May 28 
June 7, 
May 3, 
July 17, 
July 1,' 

Aug. 20, 
Dec. 19, 
Dec, 18, 
Dec. 8, 
Dec. 18 
Dec. 80 
Jan. 1, 
Jan. 27, 
Feb. 8, 
Mar. 13 
Feb. 28, 
Mar. U, 
Mar. 12 
Mar. 80, 
May 1, 
April la, 
July 16 
Aug. 15 
Oct. 1, 
Sept. 7 
Oct. 19 
May lt>, 
Sept. 21 
Oct. 10 
Nov. 2, 
Deo. 8. 
Dec. 21, 
Jan. 20, 
Beb. 16, 
Feb. 21, 
Feb. 20, 
April 8 
April 19, 
July 2, 
Jnly 1, 
Sept. 10, 
Sept. 20 
Aug. 28, 
Dec. 36, 
Dec. 80, 
Jan. 19, 
Jan. 28, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 10, 


1874 

1874 


Montevideo, Chippewa county 

Rashforil, Fillmore county 


1S74 
1H76 


Minneapolis. Hennepin county 

Beaver Falls, Beori lie county 


1876 
187B 




IST6 


Eaatoa, Farlhaalt county 

Rochester, OlmsteJ coaoty 

St. Peter, Nicollet coaoty 

Minneapolis, Honnepln connty.... 


1875 
1876 
1878 
1878 


Lake City, Wabasha connty 


1878 


Wabasha, Wafjasha county 


1874 


Spring Valley. Fillmore county .... 


1874 


Spring Valley. Fillmore county — 
St. Pant, Ramsey county 


1S74 
1874 


Cottage Grave, Washington connty 


1874 


St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Alexandria, Douglas county 


]874 
1874 


CotUge Grove, Waahlnglon county 
Becker, Sherbnrne connty 


1874 
1874 


Wabasha, Wabasha connty 


1874 


Dover Centre, Olmsted county.... 


1874 


Newport, Washington connty 

Wlllmar, Kandiyohi comity 


1874 
1874 






Alexandria. Douglas county 

Hinneapolla, Hennepin county.... 
Madella, Watonwan county 


1874 
1874 
187* 


Belle Plalne, Scott county 


1874 






Mankato. Blue Earth connty 


1874 






Wlndom, Cottonwood county 

HinnespDlls, Hennepin connty,... 


1878 
1874 


Winona, WiDona coanty 


1874 
1874 



,.db,Google 



AintUAL KKPOET. I 

LIST OP NOTARIES PUBLIC— Contioned. 



Qallfonl, Jonas 

Oribble, Edwin 

Orovenor, Abal 

GralUn, H.T 

Gilbert, O E 

6 ranger, JftmcB N...- 
Goodnow, Charlea C-- 

Gale, Winiam 

Guklll, LnclDsH 

Orammons, Wm. F... 
Greene, Haniler W... 

Goto, B. H 

Gardner, C. W 

Gove, B. A 

Greel«7, Otto K 

GregoTj, Charles P..- 

Qoald. H. S 

Oale, Samnel 

Getty, Daniel 

Ganlt, J. B 

Giebain, S. W 

Getleys, J. C 

Gcrdlzeo, Graat A..... 

Green, J. U 

Graves, J. T 

Gala8lia,B. B 

GrlBwold, W. W 

Grlsnold,H. 8 

Goodrich, F. N 

GriBwold, P. C 

Gonniii, Blchard L — 

Greene, Jerome P 

Qommel, Frederick.... 

Gardner, Chae. H 

Greenmau, J. U 

Oaylord, S. D 

Gores, Francis 

Ga«tOD, W. R 

Galea, B. P 

Gley.FredC 

Galtch. Wm. A 

Gale, F. A 

Gnlbrandson, Gilbert. . 

Oale, Gnorge 

Hoard, J. 8 

Habbard. C. A 

Howell, S. L. 

Htll, Wm. B 

Hamnatrom, Charles... 

Hnrlbnt, Walter 

Herrick, B. W 

Hathaway, B. I) , 

Hazen, h. 

Hinds, Henry 

Ffluning, F. W 

HunllD, H.0 



Hi nneapoUs, Hennepin coonty.... 

St. Paul, Bsinsey county 

St. Clond, Steams county 

PrestoD, Fillmore conu^ , 

Qlencoe, HcLeod county 

St. Paul, Bamsey coanty 

WorthlDgtoD, Nobles coanly.'..... 

WlnoDa, Wloona county 

High Forest, Olmsted conoty 

Renville, ReDTllle connty 

Wells, Faribault con nty 

Rochester, Olmsted conn ty , 

Blooming Fralrle, Steele connt;.. 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county..... 
Minneapolis, Hennepin connty.... 
Stillwater, Washington connty.... 

Anstio, Mower coanty 

Hlnnespolia, Hennepin coonty.... 
White Bear Lake, Ramsey connty. 

St. Peter, Nicollet con nty 

Blae Barth City, Faribaolt coonty, 

Dodge Centre, Dodge coonty 

WlDOua, Winona coanty 

New AnbDm, Sibley connty 

Hankato, Blue Earth conn^ 

St. Paol, Bamsey county 

Morris, Stevens county 

Cliatlleld, Fillmore coonty , 

BoQstOD, MouHton county 

MlDDe^oUa, Heuneplo county.... 

St. Paol, Bamsey coanty 

Albert Iiea, Freeborn connty 

New UliQ, Brown county 

Glencoe, McLaod coonty 

Austin, Mower coonty 

Garden City, Blue Earth connty. ■ 

New Trier, Dakota couuty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Lake City, Wabasha connty 

Shetek Station, Lyon connty .... 

Dnlnth, St. Louis coanty 

Winnebago City, Faribault connty 

Freeborn county 

Winona, Winona county 

Bed Wing, Goodhne connty 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Austin, Mower coonty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Litchfield, Meeker connty 

Bocheater, Olmsted coanty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin coonty... >. 
Pleasant Grove, Oimsted connty.. 

Medford, Steele coonty 

Shakopee, Scott coanty « 

Chaaka, Carver coonty 

Uinueapolis, Henoepln county.... 



Mar. IS, 1S74 
May 11, I $74 
Jona 10, 1874 
Feb. 14, 18T4 
Har. 8, 1874 
April 18, 1874 
April 14, 1874 
Mar. 28, 1874^ 
Joly 17, 1874 
Jan. 18, 1874 
March 3, 1S74 
Mar. 18, 1874 
Har. 37, 1874 
Hay 6, 1874 
May 36, 1874 
Sept. SC, 1874 
Oct. B, 1874 
Mardi S, 1874 
Dec 8, 187* 
Not. 38, 1874 
Nov. 27, 1874 
Sov. 1, 1874 
Dec 12, 1874 
Sot. 17, 1874 
Jan. 5, 1874 
Jan. 6, 187ft 
Feb. ], 1878 
Feb. S3, 1876 
March 4, I87S 
Feb. IB, ISTft 
April 8, 1876 
Mar. 27, 1876 
May 1, 1876 
May 11, 187ft 
July 16, 187S 
Joly 34, 187G 
July 38, 1876 
Aog. 34, 187S 
Sept. 3, 187S 
Aog. 81, 1876 
Sept. 16, I87G 
Not. 1, 1875 
Oct. 16, 1876 
Not. 9, 187S 
Dec. 18, 18TS 
Dec 7, 1873 
Dec. 30, 1B7S 
Dec. 80, 187S 
Sept. 8, 1878 
Dec. 81, 1878 
Dec. 86, 1878 
Feb, 6, 1874 
Feb. 38, 1S74 
Feb. 13, 1874 
March 8. 1874 
Uay 1, 1874 



zedbyGoOgle 



SBORBTABT OF 8TATB. 
LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— ContiAied. 



Hmrr, John W 

Blf[bl«, DeloB 

HirrlDgtoo, L«wta ■ . • ■ 
HeffernaB, Patrick.... 

Howes, B. C 

UarriBoo, Wm. H 

House, David 

HilHT. O 

HamuoD, W. Scott- .■ 

Hanson, Andrew 

HendenoD, G.'L 

Kill B 

Hant, Sun. M 

Ho«le,N. T 

Hatch, D. r 

Hale, Wm. D 

Ulcks, HenryQ 

Holding, Randolph . > - . 

Hiiard, I.V.D 

How. Sqnire D 

HlW»,D.lt. P. 

Bazen, John M 

Haghes, Twlford E... 

Uonon, James W 

HeKtmiaD, John 

Howe, William M 

Hewson, Stephen 

Bsge, Sirre 

HBUderson, J. A 

lUfDlln, Erneat 

Hlmef, James L 

Barkens, Eadolpb.... 

bolgtHOu, Nerl 

Hopkins, Joseph B . . . . 

Uathoro, John U 

Herbert, C. UUl 

Sowe, Joseph P 

Hnmlstone, Henry D.. 
UarrlngtOD, Charles U 

HutchtuD, E. H 

Hodglns, AbnerP 

Hlgbain,S 

UartweU, A. B 

Hnsevuld, K.J 

Holllster, Milea 

Hale. W. B 

U^, GenrueW 

HIcka, W. D 

Hawley, W. B 

U;meti, H. B 

Hadley.C. W 

Hodzson, E. J 

Harries, W. H 

Romtr, E.A 

Hawkins, HP 

Hoicbklsa, B. A 



Uankato, Bine Earth coouty 

OwatoQoa, Steele connty 

Hotchlnson, HcLsod eoauty 

St. Psnl, Ramsey connty 

HasllDgri, Dnkota county 

Winnebago Agency, Bine Earth co 

Hokah, Ho na tun count; 

KasBon, Dodge county 

St. Paul, Bamaey connty 

Bmetal, Faribault county 

LeBoy, Mower county 

St. Charles, Winona connty 

Granger, Slllmore conoqr 

Yellow Medicine, Yellow Med. co. 
Fergns Falls, Uttar TaU county.. 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 
HlnneapalfK. Hennepin county.... 

Holding, Steams county 

St. Panl, Ramsey county 

Bbakopee. Scott connty 

Albert Lea, Freeborn connty 

Mankaio, Blnt^EarLb cuuuty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty — 

Bocbester, Olmsted county 

OsHoo, Bennupln connty 

Austin, Mower connty 

Osfbrd, Isanti connty 

Brown connty 

LeUuy, Mower county 

Waienown, Carver county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.... 

Long Prairie, Todd county 

Rushi'urd, Flllmure connty 

Morriston, Rice connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county — 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county . ■ . . 

Bristol, Flit mo re connty 

Wo rthington. Nobles connty 

Rochester, Olmsted connty 

Wlnnitbago City, Farluault connty. 

Winona, Winona connty 

Cannon Falls, Ooodhoe connty.... 
HlnneapulU, Hennepin connty — 

Hader, Goodhue county 

Farihanlt, Rice county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.... 
Ulnneapollij, tiennepln connty — 

' — NlcoUet county 

Alexandria, Donglas connty 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Otralonna, Steele county 

Red Wing, Goodhue connty 

Caledonia. Bonn ton connty 

Houston, Honston county 

Minneapolis, Utnoepin county. .■• 
Winnebago City, Faribault county. 



OOMHisa 




M„„ 


1874 


June 3T, 




May 80, 


187* 


June 18, 


1874 


Jan. is 


1874 


Jan. 14, 




Jan. ST, 


1H74 


Jan. 20, 


1874 


Jan. 80, 




May 11, 


1874 




1874 


Jan. 9, 


1874 


Feb. B, 




Uar. 18, 




Hay aa, 


1874 


July 18, 


1874 


Feb. 6, 


1874 


Feb. IS, 




Feb. 14, 




Feb. H, 


1874 


Mar. 1 


18T4 


Feb. 91, 




Jan. le, 




Uar. 1. 


lfiT4 


Feb. 27, 


1874 






Jan. 8C, 




April at 


1874 


May 10, 


1874 






May a. 


1874 






April 17, 


1874 




1874 


June 33 




July 8, 


1874 






Sept. 16 


1874 


Oct. 16, 




Oct. 1, 


1874 


Nov. 9, 


1874 


Oct. 1. 


1874 


Oct. 1, 




Oct. 1, 


1874 


Oct. 81, 


1874 


Dec. S4, 


1874 


Jan. 6, 


1876 


Jan. 20, 


187S 


Jan. 26, 


1S7« 


Jan. as, 


1870 


Feb, 12, 


1876 


Jan. 1, 


187B 


Feb. 18, 


187S 


Har. 28, 


1876 


April 21 


1876 







,.db,Googlc 



imrCAL BBFOBT. 
LIST OF NOTARIES FDBLIC— Continued. 



Hamilton, G. A 

HngbBOD, E. E 

naRler, 8. J 

Harklns, Alex 

H8ll,0.M 

Hoyt, P. W 

Hoyt, A. D 

Hall, H. P 

Uaakoes«, Hans 0-. 

HahD, W.J 

Hacklos, J. W 

Hattmin, C. W 

Hamel, J. 

Hill, Henrr 

Hotchklss. Seih 

iiovorka, Thoa. Jr. . 

llanser, N. T 

Huctdleston, T. B... 

Hallork, Caleb 

Uuimes.E.G 

Herbert, B. B 

HnnnnoDB, Everett.. 
Uolmu), Albert K... 

lllckman, A. C 

Hadl«7, R. S 

Hall, D.8 

Hanimond, L, U. ... 

Ivea, G. S 

Iven, Prank 

Irnin, Uobt. A 

Inniaii, Hiram 

JohoHon, Laclen A.. 

Jones, John R 

Jobs, Frederick 

Jones. £. 8 

Johoeon, Albert 

Jor,P. U 

James, Henrj C 

Jonsrud, T. Q 

Jerome, Charles T .. 

JuhDSOD Petet 

JacobsoD, John P.... 
JobDton, Olln H.... 

Jennings, P. A 

JsqDSB, W. D 

Johnson, H. E 

Jaynes, John M 

' John«on, Charles J.. 
Jordan, Ednard....< 

Juues, R. U 

Jacobson, J. T 

Johnson, Richard W 
Johndon, D. B, Jr. .. 
Johnson, Marcus.... 
Jndson, Roswell..... 
Jones, J. H 



KBSIDBMCK. 



St. Paul, Ramsej connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Red Wing, Ooodhae connty...^... 

West Newton, Nicollet coanty 

Red Wing, Goodhne county 

Red Wing, Guodhue county 

Red Wing, Goodhue connty 

St. Paul, Ranicey county 

Albi:rt Lea, Freeborn coanty 

Lake City, Wabasha coanty 

Dnndan, Hlce connty :.. 

Henderson, Sibley county 

Leuz, Hennepin county 

Granite Falls, Chippewa conaty. .. 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Helena, Kt-ott coanty 

"'-leapoilH, Hennepin county 

'nul. Ramsey connty 

Janesville, Waseca connty 

Detroit, Becker coanty 

Red Wing, Goodhne connty 

Anoka, 4noka connty. _. 

Spring Vallry, FlllmorB coanty .... 

Owatonna, Bleelo county 

St. Paul, Ramsey conni; 

Beaver Falls, Renville county 

LeSueur, LeSnenr county i. 

St. Peter, Nlcoilel county. 

Red Wing, Goodhue connty 

BellePlalne, Scott connty 

Dresbaeh, Wlauna cuonty 

Cbatfleld, Fillmore county 

Chaifleld, FlUmnre county..... .... 

Red Wtng, Goodhue county 

MinneapuUs, Hennepin coun^ 

Ulnneapoliii, Hennepin connty. — 

Hadelia. Watonwan coanty 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

HInnespoll?, Hennepin county 

Spring Valley, Fillmore county.... 

Kerklioveu, Swift Funnty 

St. James, Watonwan connty 

Aantln, Mnwer county 

Aaatln, Mower county 

Uwatouua, Steele coanty 

Austin, Mower coanty 

Point ]>oa(;laa, Washington connty 
Hamilton, Scott county.. 
Minneapolis, Heuueplu co 
Lac qui Parle, Lac qui Parle connty 
St. Ptnl, Ramsey coanty... 

Austin, Mower county. 

Atwater, Kandlydbl connty 

Dakota county 

Winona, Winona connty... 



April 10. IB75- 
Feb. 1, UU 
April 16, ISTfi 
April 10, 1B76 
May 6. 18TR 
May 10, Ie75- 
May 3G, 1875 
May 2B, 18T» 
May 4, 187(> 
Jane 4, 1B75 
Jnne it, 1876 
April 16, IS7S 
June 26, 187& 
July 1, 1675 
July 26, 1875- 
June 24, 1670 
Aug. 9, 1676 
Aug. 13, 187S 
Aug. 18, 1876 
July 27, 1875 
Sept. 1, IST6 
Sept. 18, 1878 
Oct. 13, 1876 
Oct. 18, 1876 - 
Sept. 10, 1876 
Nov. 18, 187t 
Nov. 17, 1875 
Oct. 1, 187* 
Oct. 10, 187* 
Feb. 6, 1876 
Mar. 84, 1876 
Mar. 16, 1874 
Jan, 24, 1874 
Mar. 7, 187* 
Mar. 14. 1874 
Mar. 21, 1874 
May 18. 187* 
Jan. 7, 187* 
March 1, 187* 
Jane *, W* 
June IG, 1b7< 
Jan. as, 187* 
Jan. 2i, 1«» 
Jan. 80, 187* 
Feb. 12, 1874 
Mar. 20, IB" 
Jane 25, 1«* 
Dec. !4, 18" 
Dec. lU. 18" " 
Jan. 11. 187» 
Nov. 28, 1874 
Feb. 9, 1876 
Jan. 8, 1875 
March I, 1875 
Har. 29, 18^ 
Apr. 18, 187B- 



zedbyGoOglC 



SBOBBTABT OF STATS. 
LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continoed. 



, Wm. P.. 

, K. B 

ion, H. E. ■ 



», Wm. B... 

B, B. A 

iion,U. B... 



Kendall. Joseph B. .• 

Kocb, E. G 

KiftuK, N. F. W 

Siiinit, CtiartesF... 
Kln^^bf, GeorKS B.- 

Kell..g(t, W. L 

KL.th. WilllsiD 

Knlbmau, George... 

KelK Loraii 

KcUtiti,, Thumasr... 
Ecllej, WUllumL... 
Roner. WtUlam H... 

Kelllbar, Jobn 

KDi-!), Qpatfie W.... 

Enhn, Heary U 

Kern, WlUlam W... 
Ktiok Thorans J.... 

Kcclev. H. H 

KalKlii, A. H 

Kllgxre, William.... 

K'llev. W,H 

Kenoedr, J. B 

Etpp, U.Tln 

Kins, Henry C 



1, (lie.. 



EDisH, Pierce J 

Kerr, Cbarlea D 

Kcyef, A. D 

Kempe, Cbarlea 

Eirllar, C. B 

KIpp, SylvcsUr 

Kpyes, John 

LitU«, HoaeM 

LambertOD, AKred J.. 

LftDar, A...., 

Lowry, Thorns? 

LewjB, Joaepb 

Ulnuickc, R 

LamprFy, UrlL 

Lamprey, Morris 

LoreuiiCD, Beary 



. B. W.. 



Ic^ls, J. A 

Lacrolx, Joaepb. - 
Lvwia, Abner.... 
LetRird, John 8.. 

L«mb, C 

Leaicr, Rlcbard..- 



RUIDKNOE. 



St. Paal, Itamaey coDUty....^. .■ 
Ma^8bB1l. Lyon county 

HInneapolla, HenceplD coanty... 

Wlllmai', KnniJIyobl cunaty 

Excelalnr, Hennepin conniy 

Rochester. Olmsted connty 

Owuioiiua. titeulc county 

St. Pan), Rftin 9 ey connty 

ByroD, Olmsted county 

New Ulm, Brown cunnty 

Hastings, Dakotu county 

St. Pan), Ramsey co'intv 

Blue Earth Oity. Farl))aQ It county 
" ■ Vullty, Iflllniore coanty.. 



.unty.. 



Net 

New Ulm, Brown 

Centrp, RtearnB cnnnty. .. 

Zumbruui, GoudbueuoutiLy 

'iiul, Ramsey county 

Sbakopre, Saitt coanty 

St. Paul. Ramsey county 

Luverne, Rork connty 

bt. Paul, Raiusey ctiuuty 

upolis, HeDiiupin county.- 

JscksoD. JachHoii county .. 

Faribault. Rice county 

Glcncoe, MuLeod cuuniy 

Glencoe, McLeod connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin coanty.. 

Nkollel, Nicollet coanty 

HuudeiHou, Sibley couuty 

MailellR, Wntonwancnanty 

Holmes City, Douclas coanty . . , 

Luvcrne, Uock county 

St, Paul, Ramsey county 

Parlbaalt, Rice county , 

Red WiDK,Goodbue connty. ... . 
Albert Lea, Freoburu couuty... 

Henderson, Sibley county 

Winona, Winona cnnnty 

Beaver Falls, Ht^uvllle county.. 

St. I'eter, Nicollet county 

Mantorrllle, Dodge connty.... . 
Minneapolis, Hennepin coanty. . 

St PbuI, Ramsey coanty , 

Stlllwattr, Waililnatoo connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty < 

St. Psnl, Rsmsey connty 

Frunteuac, Ooudbue counlv... 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Hlnoesota Falls, Yellow MediclneCo 
Ulnneapolls, Hennepin county 

Winona, Winona county 

Ga1d<>n Gate, Brown connty.. 

Frankfnrd, Mower county 

Caleduula, Uuuaton connty..., 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



UTKUAL BBPOBT. 
LIST OF NOTAEIES PUBLIC— CoBttnued. 



MAKK. 




„r,"„?,'. 


LoweU, Cliwles L 

Lewis, Geone W 




Mar. SO. 
Uar. as. 
May 14, 

Msy XI, 
June G, 
July as, 
Aug. 18. 
Feb. 2S, 
Oct. la, 
Oct. 20. 

Oct. ao, 

Not. 27. 
Sept. ISl, 
Jan. I, 
Jan. 1, 
Jan. u. 
.Tan. 7, 
Feb. 1. 
Dec. siS. 
Feb. 13, 
Mar. m. 
April S, 
April 6, 
April U 
May 3 
May 16, 
May ai. 
Jane » 
Jaly 1. 
June 81, 
May la, 
Oct. in. 
Ang. a 

Aug. IS 

An|. 24 
Sept. 1 
Aug. IB 
Aug. 2 
Sept. 9 
Nov. -J 
Dec I 
Dec. sa 
Dec. 27 
Mar. 24 
Feb. n 
Feb. 18 
Feb. 19 
Mar. 18 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 21 
Mar. la 
April 7 
Auf. 15 
Jan. 26 
Feb. -M 
Feb. 2S 








LorgPrarle, Todd county 

Minneapolis, HenneplD coDOty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

abakopee, Scott con nty 

Wlnated Lake, HcLeod county 




Lane, Freemao P 


1874 


LQChMD, William 

LiDcoln, BdgarB 

LewlB, B. F 

Langgnth, CbrUtlan 

Lawther, Samael D 

LorentKen, Henry 


1874 

1874 
1874 


Red Wing, Goodhue county 

rrontenac, Goodhue connly. 


1874 
1874 


LeavlU, Charles H 


Pine Island, Good has county 

Albert Lee, Freeborn connty 

LitUe Falls, Morrison connly 


1874 












BrownsTllle, Honnton county 

Garden City. Blue Earth county... 
Minnckpolla, Hennepin connty.... 

White Roch, Go ndhue county 

Stillwater, Wmblngton county.... 




Lyon, 0. S 


1675 


LlrtdholiB, A.. T 

LItUa, M. 

t:ri.=.±:::::::: 


1876 
1876 


Lake City, Wsbwba county 










Eoehester, Olmsted cunnty 

Stillwater, W»hingtoD county — 

MlaneapollB, Hennepin county 

Mlnneafolts, Hennepin county .... 

Tellow Medicine connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 












Larman, J.O 


li76 


UTlngston, S. B 


1876 


Lawrence, Jaa. W 

Lewis, M.W. 


Minneapolis, Hennepin connty.... 


1874 
1BT5 


L«wla', Hiibert P 






PlaluTlew, Wabasha county 

Monkatn, Blue Karth county 

Mloneapolls. Hennepin county.... 
Albert Lea, Freeborn connty 








LenDOD, Jas. A 


1876 






McUlllan, Pntoam D.... 


18TS 




Hlnneapulls, lienaepin county.--. 








McClner, Wm. M 


HtlUwster, Washington county-. . 

Albert Lea, Freeborn connty 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Wabasha, Wabasha county 


1874 






McDongall, Geo. A 

Mattliew8,S.T 


1874 


WasCedf), Gondhue county 

Faribault, KIce county 








MeioUr, Tracy M 




















Miller, Chas. N 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county.... 


1874 



,.db,Googlc 



8ECRBTART OF 8TATK. 
USX OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continaed. 



HcUnlleD, Rotwrt H 
Horcr.L. B 

HMcair, Bdwudl... 
Harray, Bli-hard. . 
McCarger, AIb«rt L. 

UlUheU, W.H 

McAfee, NIcholM. . . 

Menrtck, W.H 

Hutlieira, U. B 

Ulner, N. H 

MartlD, NathtD C.. 
HcCanneil, J. 

Hcanuud, B. a... 

Morrlaoii, OeorgeH. 
McDonald, John L - . 
Martin, JadmbH.... 

Mackenroth, f 

HcKenna, Patrick... 

Morrta, J.8. W 

Morgan, W. f 

McEmer7,S 

MlUer, Samnal R 

Moore, Jolm 

UAr*chfer, Albert F 
MolstertlegeD, K. O. . 
McElurIck, James... 

Hssdo, J. F 

McNalr, J. M 

Heacliani, A. J 

Mead, W. H 

Marsb, Fayette 

McUonald, J. J 

Markell, D. W 

Mammy, Joaepb.... 

MUler, Lake 

Htller, EniBt 

Hnrdock, U.R 

McLellan, D. 8 

Miratou, W. <■ 

McDoDgall, Qeo. A. 

Halnzer, Jacob 

HeKinDer, Q»o. T.. 

Uoore, Wm. 8 

UeClDre, J. C 

UeOoveTE, Peter. . • 
McClelland, B.H... 

Merrick, A. U 

Mloer, F. S 

McArthar, Geo. D.. 

Haaon.L. J 

HcBalr, U.B 

Miller, M. I 

HaMD,J. W 

MecH, J 

Morrow. J.C 

Meyer.J. A 

4 



MtnneapollB, Hennepin connty---. 

MoDtBTtdeo. Cb I ppewa county 

St Pinl, Ramsey county 

Rashford. Flilmore connty 

Wnimar, Kandiyobl count? 

NorthBeld, Rice county 

St. Paul, Ramney conaty 

Mower county 

NewUlm, Brown county 

Sauk Centre, Steams connty 

Lttchfleid, Meeker coan^ 

, Stevens connty 

Watertown, Carver connty 

Leech Lake, Cass county 

Sbakopee, Scott coanty 

Lake City, Wabasha connty 

Delano, Wright connty 

Shleldflvllle. Rice connty 

Rochester, Olmsted connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.... 

LakeCUy, Wsbashaconnty 

Beaver Falls, Renville county. ... 

Scamble, Otter Tall connty 

St. Paal, Bamaey county 

Cokato, Wright connty 

New Ulm. Brown county 

Uluneapolis, Hennepin connty.... 
Cannon. Falls, Good bne connty ... 
HinneapollB, Hennepin county. .-■ 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Stillwater, Washington connty.... 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Dnndas, Bice county 

Lake City, Wabasha connty 

Lanetthoro, Fillmore connty 

Wlneted Lake, HcLeod county.--- 
Stillwater, Wanhtngton connty . •• 
Minneapolis, Hennepin connty.... 
Lake Crystal, Blue Barth county. .. 

Wabanha, Wabasha connty 

St. Paul, Kamsey county. 

Atwater, Kandiyohi county 

St. Paul, Ramsry county 

Red Wing, Ooodhne county 

Waseca, Waseca county 

Howard Lake, Wright connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Dexter, Mower county 

Winnebago City, Faribanlt county. 

LeKoy, Hower coaniy 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Faribault, Klce county 

Fergus Falls, Otter Tall connly . . - - 

St. Paul, Ramsey conniy 

Faribanlt, Bice connty 

West Newton, Nicollet coon^.... 



Jan. 80. 1871 
39, 18T4 
July 39, 1B74 
- ■ 2, 1874 

6, 1874 
Feb. 19, 1874 
Feb. II, IH74 
April 1, 1874 
April T, 1874 
April 4, 1S74 
April II, 1874 
April 14, 1874 
April 87. IR74 
Hay 4, 1874 
May 11, 1874 
Jane 13, 1874 
Jane 34, 1B74 
July 7, 1B74 
Jnly IR, 1874 
Sept. SO, 1874 
Oct. 23, 1874 
Nov. 3, 1874 
Nov. U, 1874 
Dec. 34, 1874 
Sept. 39, 1874 
Oct. a, 1874 

1, 1874 
S, 1874 

34, 1874 
3, 1874 

IS, IB76 

7, 1875 
36, 187S 

Jan. SO. I87C 
Jan. 38, 1875 
3, 1875 
S, IBTfi 
Feb. 13, 1875 
Feb. SO, IB7S 
feb. 18, 1876 
Mar. 6, 1875 
Mar. 1), 1875 
Feb. 5, 187S 
Mar. 17, 1875 
Mar. SO, 1875 
April 8, 1876 
April 18, 1875 
April IS, 1875 
April 18, 187S 
April !1, 1875 
April 30, 1R75 
April 28, 1875 
April 33, 1876 
April 17, 1876 
Doc. 37, 1874 
May 1, 1876 



zedbyGoOgle 



2ti AHMDAL BluXOBI. 

LIST OF NOTARIES PDBLIC— ConUnaed. 



Merrill, E. A-. 

MwTM, Wm. P 

Morgan, W. W 

MunBnn, A. G. 

Mix, rrank T 

Morrill, G«o. W . . . . 
MeDi'enhall, Lttiher. 

Hobfck, Alex 

Mejinice.L.F 

Mellilm, Bottoir •-. 

N*whart, Jndas 

Nnr'oD, Cbarlea 0.. 

Nelr.oa,L.G 

KulaiiD, Knate 

Nintno, Anselo 

^,^lo^, W.H 

Nic, JohnC 

Helfon. Jacob 

Norgord, Charles E. 

Newel, sun ford 

Nichols, Browning.. 
Northman, Olric — 

Norton, J. C 

NclfDD, Peter H 

M«weU, FrankA-.- 
Neaie, K.O 

Netil-ton, F. Blmey 

Nftbtm, H. G 

Norton, H. P 

Nichols, Brownlng-- 

Nortlirop, F. W 

Omcer. Harvey 

Old", A. J 

OBilcn", J. D 

Old*. GeorgeE 

O'Qurman, Henry. . . 
O'lirleo, James ¥••• 

ONeale, B. H 

OsDorn, SananelL... 

O'itrleil.C. D 

OTerraU, 3. F 

Odegard.Hans T... 

Olson, H.W 

O'Ltary, Charles M. 

Utii-, Uharlea S 

Od.giird, JohnT.... 

FK'klt, Daniel. 

Pope, EdmondM. .> 

Peiklus, T.H 

I'lUher, OrrinO."- 

PeUer, Wm 

PariridKe, H. A 

Fiers. W. C 

Parker, James A - . ■ . 
I'rait, BUM 



RBSIDEMCK. 



Minneapolis. Ilennepla county.... Jniw ] 

St. Paul, Ramsey county April 

Lakeland, WashlDgton county May 

St. PftDl, Ramsey coanty Jul^ 

St. Pan 1, Ramsey county Joly 

AnokS) Anokftconnty July 

Daluth, St. Louis county Aug. 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.... Aug, 
Mlnneapolia, Hennepin county.... Oct. 

Madella, Watonwan county Aug. 

New Ulm, Brown county Dec. 1 

Sank Centre, Stearns county.. 

Kasbou. Dodee county 

Alexandria, Douglas county. . 
Rochester, Olmsted county.... 

NorUiQeld, Bice coDDtr 

Hankato, Blue Earth coanty. . . 

, Otter Tall county April ■ 

Stillwater, WashlnRton county.... April I' 

HinneBi>o)ifi, Hennepin county Hiiy f 

Lac qui Parle, Lac qui Parle county Not. 

Bt. Clond, Stearns coanty Sov. 

Hastings. Dakota county jDec. 

, Mower county Feh- 

Waseca, Waseca county IMar. 

Stone; Run, Yellow Medicine Co.. 'Mar. 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty April 

St. Paul, Ramsey county May 

Waseca, Waeeca county July 

Mankato, Bine Earth coanty Aug. 

St. Faul, Ram Hey county Sept. 

St. Paul, Hamsey county Dec. 

St. Charles. Wluooacounty Mar. 

Hloneapolls, Hennepin county Aug. 

St. Pau4. Ramsey county Mar. 

TellowMedlcine.YellowMedlclneCo April 

I'aul, Ramsey con uiy Ang. 

Paul, Ramsey connty Sept. 

Kelloge, Wabasha county Sept. 

Mankato, Blue Earth county Jan. 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty Dec. 

Chalfleld, Fillmore coanty Feb. 

WUlmar, Kandiyohi connty Mar. 

Vickabarg, Renville connty July 

Roclicster, Olmsted county jjuly 

St. Panl, Ramsey county Aug. 

St. Faulj Ramsey coanty Not. 

Henderson, Sibley county JDec. 

Mankato, Blae Earth county Jan. 

Red Wing, Qoodbne county Jan. 

Mankato, Bine Earth county I April 

Winona, Winona county | July 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty Jan. 

Itead'fl, Wabasha connty iHar. 

Albert Lea, Freeborn connty iHar, 

Anoka, Anoka county 'April 



zedbyGoOglC 



aeOBBTART OF STATE. £7 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



RBSIDENCI. 



Pringle, W. DeW 

Pelermaii, Jonali 

Farauna, S. D 

PaSitaTsiit, Cb&rlea.... 

Flnne;, 8. B 

Pearee, L. B 

PerehaU, J.R. 

Parks, Charles 

PlODioeD, Joa«pb 

PeDn«y, Fred. C 

Poner, B. D. B 

Pnlit&m, Edgir P 

PetKlergnati Llojd Q .. 

Peasp, Jay 

Piper, M.W 

Pfto, A.R 

Pope, John F 

Parker, AddlHOD J 

Pierce. 8. L 

PnlDcy, D P 

PutersoD, If. C 

Peny, Leonard B 

Puntcbed, Ifewton Q.. 

Praxel, AnthoDy A 

Panona, Asa A 

PaHavant. Angost.... 
PrcDtlaa, Smnnel J. . . . 

Patteo, Jobn E 

Pattenton, Wra. C... 

ParvoDS, Frank 

Preixlergaat, T. H.... 

Pearaall, F. W 

Phelps. Thos. W 

Parker, Jas. L 

Peterson, 8. D 

Flnmly, 8. A 

misbnry, CliarleaF... 

Peck, H. J 

Poweli, M. E 

Pemtergaat, W. W-... 

Price, C. V 

Plant, James.. 



Hastings. Dakota connty 

• LenlstoD, Winona coanty 

Mankato, Bine Eartb county 

St. Pan I, Ram!iey coanty 

' St. CloQil, StearoB coanty 

Qraud MefuJow, Mower county.... 

' Si. Paul. Ramsey connty 

' Cannon Falln, Goodhne connCy 

' Sbakopee, Scott conn Cy 

I Minneapolis, Hennopln coanty 

St. Paul, Ramsey coonty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connCy 

Colllnwnrib, Meeker county. 

Sleepy Eye, Brown county 

Atnster, Kanillyohl county 

Hankato, Bine Rnrth connty. 

Plalnvtpw, Wabasha county 

Dville, Big Stone county 

St. pMUl, H»m.*ey county 

Frsnkfon. Motver conniy 

Hluneapolla, Hennepin coanty 



< Pomme de Terre, G: 

Lamberton, Redwood county 
. Hercey, Nobles conniy. . . 

"". Paul, Ramsey county 



oty.. 



Har. 13. 
Jane 10. 
Hay It, 
April 3T, 
Jan. iS. 
Feb. 38. 
Feb. 28, 



Feb. M, 
Mar. 11, 
Mar. 31, 
April SS, 
May 1, 
Hay la. 
Jail. 2*, 
June 19, 
Jnly I, 
July 3. 
July fl, 
July SU, 
OcL 27, 
Oct. 26, 
Nov. 8, 
Dec 17, 



1874 
18T4 
187* 
1874 

1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1S74 
1 874 
lrt74 
1S74 
1874 



. Hokab, Hill 



Mil county. . 



Rarbrord, Fillmore county. 
'Ilnneapolis, Huunepln county., 
pring Valley. Fillmore coanty. 

Daasell, Hnpkpr coDnty 

Lac qui P«rle. Lac qui Paris county 

Cheater. Olmsted county 

Minneapolis, llunnepia coanty. .. 

New Ulm, Brown county 

Litchfield. Ueeker coanty 

HinDeapoll)', Hennepin county... 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Redwi>od Falls, Redwood coanty. 

Rntchlnson. HcLeod coanty 

'Wlllmar, Kandiyobl county. 

Dayton, Heonepli 



Oct. 18, 1874 

" " IS75 

1875 



. Jbo. 14, : 



pQtnam, A. Z JHlnnetaka, Wabasha county 

l«..bl«^. /\D I»..-ii I. nr__ ._ ^ 



Perkins, O. P. 
P«ndergast. Thoa. A 

Perkins, C. C 

Peterson, P 

:hrllmaii, E 

Patten, John E 

ParsuQs, fieo. I 

Pntnaui, Wm. H.... 

Phelps, Wm. B 

Piuney, W. W 

Pratt. A. W 

Plaisanee, L. O 

Quack en bosh, L.... 



. Faribault, Rice county.. 

. St. Paul. Ramsey county 

. Faribault. Klce county .V... 

. Glenwood, Pope county 

. Hastings, Dakota county 

. Hoanton, Houston county 

. WiDonu, Winona county 

. Red Wlog, Goodhue county 

. Winona, WInonA county 

. New Loudon, Kandiyohi county.. 

. Bee! Wlog. Qi)odhae coauty 

. St. Paul. Ramsey coanty 

■ LeSnear, L« Bnenr county 



Feb. 1, 
Feb. .19, 
Feb. 37, 
Feb. -'-■!, 
April I, 
April 29. 
prll 16, 
prii 10, 
April 16, 
May 30, i 
June 4, 
May 8, 
May 35, : 
June 24, 
. July 10, . 
July 8, 
Aug. B, 
Aug. 2, 
Aug. 9, 
Aug. 11, 
ug, 36. : 

July 29, 
Sept. 1, 
Oct. 33, 
Nov. M, 
Jnly is, 



1876 
1875 

1876 
187S 
1876 
187G 
1876 
1876 
1875 



1876 
1876 

iHTe 

1875 
1876 



zedbyGoOglC 



AXSUAL BBFOBT. 
LIST OF NOTABIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



RBSrDBNCR. 



Quick, John A 

ItUn,O.C 

RobtDBon, Cttftrles>.<-< 

Roblnn, Marcus 

BoBS.C. H 

RochebniDA, Phtlllp de 

Bogers, J. N 

Boss, W.E. C 

BDM«U,BeiO-S 

B«i«, Oeotge 

BejDOlds, R 

BoMnbnrg- J- W 

Bndolplt, John C 

Bou,WUllam W 

Bextord, J. M 

WgbT. Pr«l 

BobtuBoa, J. E < 

BlttenbooM, C. B 

EMliig,F. A 

Rowell, Cbu. F 

Boblnson, Jno. T 

Bogen, L- Z 

Boiler, John < 

BandiU, J. H.... 

Bobbins, A. B 

Blma, L. W 

Bejnoldi, B 

Bedfleld, Wm. H 

Bofen, C. T 

Boag«», B. D 

BoMndBbl, P. H 

B«7noldB, B. Q 

Booa, Chtrlet 

Bing, H. J 

Bast, Geo. H 

Bovrley, L. W 

Rogers. F> L 

Raadolpli, Jobn S-.--> 

BlchardsoD, N 

Beldt, Loom 

RnsMll, L. G 

Bktbi, Jno. F 

Blo«, John W 

Rogera, B. O 

Roae, Robert H 

lUebe, F. C ■.... 

Bntledge, Tbonua 

Roberts, Wm. F 

Bosamao, B. W 

Boas, Oscar 

Bobertaon, Wm. O 

Boblnson, Geo. B 

Roir,B. W 

Bedding. D. P 

Rom, W. H 

Sherwood, Chu. D.... 



Dasaell, Ueefcer conntjr 

lEIIzabetb, Otter Ti^l connt; 

Minue^polla, Henneplii conntf 

'Flllniors, Flllmare connty 

New Ulm, Brown coaotr 

St. Fan], iiamsey county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Bine Earth City, Fartbanit coanty. . 

Dnluth, St. LodIb coanty 

St. Faal, BamsB; connty 

Detroit, Becker coanty 

Bine Fartb City, Farlbanlt coQnty.. 

New Ulm, Brown connty 

Hlnneapolla, IleDiieptn county.... 

Etna, FlUmore coanty 

Hlnneapolia, HenDspln coanty.... 

Winona, Winona coanty 

St. Fan], Bamaey county -.... 

Winona, Winona coanty 

Winona, Winona county 

Hank&to, Blue Earth coanty 

WatervUle, LeSnear connty 

8t. Cloud, Steams county 

St. Paol, Bamsey county 

WlUmar, Kandiyohi county 

Leaf Valley, Douglas connty 

Detroit, Becker county 

Long Prairie, Todd county 

Lake City, Wabasha conn^ 

Frbeborn, 7 reaborB county 

Spring Qrove, Houston county.... 
Winnebago City, Faribault connty. 

New Ulm, Brown coanty 

Whalen, Fillmore connty 

Hinneapolle, Hennepin county.... 

□tlca, Winona ecuaty 

St. Fanl, Ramsey county 

Hlnneapolla, Hennepin connty.... 

Little Falls, Morrison tsonavj 

Htnneapolis, Hennepin county.... 
Lake Crystal, Blue Earth coonty.. 

Minneapolis, Hennepin coanty 

JLewlstOQ, Winona connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Mankato, Blue Earth coanty 

Qlencoe, McLeod county 

HaJella, Watonwan county 

Ulnoespolls, Hennepin county.... 

ChatQeld, Plllinore coanty 

Taylors Falls, Chisago county.... 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Hlnneapolla, Hennepin connty 

St. PanI, Ramsey conuly 

Hlnnenpotls, Hennepin county--. - 

Crooksion, Polk count; 

Bushford, Fillmore county 



Ang. 2fi, 1876 

Dec 1, 1878 

Jan. ». 1874 

Mar. !;>, 1874 

Jane Ifi. 1874 

June 1, 1874 

Ang. S, 1S74 

Jan. a, 1874 

Jan. 9», IBT4 

Feb. IT, 1874 

Mar. 10, 18T4 

May M, 1874 

Jane 1, I8T4 

June 8, 1874 

Aug. 1, 1874 

Ang. T, 1874 

Hot- 7, 1874 

Nd7. 19, 1874 

Dec- 4, 1874 

Oct. 9, 1874 

Oct. 10, 1874 

Not. 16, 1874 

Not. 18, 1874 

Dec. 13, IS74 

Jan. 6, ie75 

Feb. 1, IB7B 

Feb- «, 187B 

Feb. H, I87B 

Feb. 30, 1875 

March 9, I87S 

Jan. 99, IS7E 

March 6, I87S 

Harcb 4, 137S 

Mar. 94, I87S 

Mar. IS, 187S 

Mar. 98, 187S 

April 7, I87S 

April 1, 1S7S 

Mar. 19, 1875 

April 10, lers 

Mar. 81, I37S 

April », 1S7S 

May S, 187S 

May IT. 1875 

June 1, 1876 

May 6, 1876 

Jane 24, 1876 

July 31, 1876 

Ang. 91, 1875 

Aug. 24, 1875 

Jnly, 11 1875 

Jan. 20, IS75 

Oct. 16, 1875 

Oct. 80, 1876 

Nov. 18, 1875 

Dec. 8. 18T3 



zedbyGoOglC 



SECBETART OF BTATB. 
LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



Btowe, Manln 

Skog Andrew L 

StuumoD, Chu. £..... 

Secombe, Dnvld A 

Simmons, H 

fihUlock, DBTld a 

8uob«c, Cbu.H 

Suden, WllUam H. .. 

8«lp, Albert N 

Sencerbos, J. W 

8t«wart, Jobn 

Smith John H 

Slocoin, Jamea, Jr.... 
Bl«geiitb«Ier, QoOttey. 

SchelTer, Albert 

Btocker, UcDryD . 

SanbocD, Walter H. . . 

StmpaoD. Thoinai 

Smltb, John T 

Scwle, Martin B 

Bhaw, J.C 

SaoTord, Philander. .., 

Seagtr, J. W 

SchuBBcber, J. J 

Searle, D. B 

BUncsby, E. T 

Stone, a. W 

SUwarc, U. B 

Sperfy. Wedley 

SlaolFy, DsTld B 

Street, A. H 

SteieLB, EdiDQDd... 

Sbank, J. T 

Schmidt, Heiuuu) 

Severens, 3. H 

Sdieid, AdAm 

Smith, Lather B 

SuDlao, MichaeL 

Strati, W. W 

Bandeis, Joaeph E.><. 

Bliaiiks, H.E.L 

Sprite, C. H 

BODde, B. 

Sweet, Daniel B 

Saxton, S.B 

SlmontoD, £dwatd. . . . 

8t«*eus, tj. F..^ 

Solberg, C.V 

Sqolerea, Oeone C, . . . 

Stone, E. K., Jr. 

Strong, M. I. 

Bchneldec, Feter 

Btowe, I>wla 

BUnner, F. W 

Sandine, Jobn 

Swift, P. H 



RCSIDIMCI. 



BTandon, Doaglaa conntf 

Beveo'S Creek, Carver coonty.... 
Mlonesota Falls, Tellow Hed. oo.. 
MlDUeapolle, Heunepln county-.. > 

FortRldgely, Nicollet county 

Hinneapolls, Hennepin coauty.... 

Lltcbfleld, Meeker count; 

Alexandria, DoD);1a8 county 

Dalutb, St. LouU coantj 

Shakopee, Scott connty 

Wabasha, Wabasha connty 

Brownsville, Honaton connty 

Tonng America, Carrei connty.... 

St. Paul, Bamaey connty 

St Panl, Ramsey connty 

Lake City, Wabasha connty 

bt. Pan], Ramsey connty 

Winona, Winona county 

Heron Lake, Jackson county 

Worthlnglon, Noblea county 

St. Paul, Bamsey county 

Bed Wing, Qood hue county 

St. James, Watonwan connty 

Leavenworth, Brown county 

St. Cloud, Stuariis county 

StlUwaier, Washtn^ston county..... 

Montevideo, Chippewa county 

Dulnlb, St. Louis county 

Hsntorville, Dodge county 

Maine Prairie, Stearns connty 

Albert Lea, Freeborn connty 

Winnebago Valley, HooBton connty 
Shslby vlUe, Bine Earth county. . ■ . 

Owatunna, Steele connty 

Montevideo, Chippewa connty.... 

Eaton, Faribault connty 

High Forest, Olmsted connty 

Lanesboro, Fillmore coun^ 

Jordan, Scott coonty 

Wadena, Wadena couuty 

Fslrmount, Martin county 

Sauk Centre, Stearns county 

WlUmar, Kandiyohi county 

, Pi p«stone county 

Good Thunder, RIne Earth connty . 

St. Paul, Ramse; connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty — 

81. Fan 1, Ramsey county 

St, Paul, Uamsey county 

St. Fanl, Rnmsey connty 

Owatonna, Steele connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

White Earth, Becker connty 

Cliatfleld, Fillmore cOnnty 

Carver, Carver county 

Beaver Falla, Renville county ■ ■ , • 



16, 18TS 
6, 1878 

23, 187» 

10, 1874 
30, 1 874 

18, 1ST4 

11, I8T4 

17, 1874 
1, 1874 
fi, 1874 
1, 1874 

80, 18T4 

I, 1847 

SS, 1847 

12, 1874 
IT, 1874 

25, 1874 

15, 1874 

29, 1S74 

30, 1874 

16, 18T4 
la, 1874 
16, 1874 

19, 1874 
1, 1874 
«, 1874 
9, 1874 

14, 1874 

15, 1874 
11, 1874 

6, 1874 

19, 1874 

20, 18T4 

27, 1S74 
20, 1874 

24, 18T4 

26, 1874 
1, 1874 
1, 1874 

20, 1874 

1, 1874 

1, 1674 

10, 1S74 

18, 1874 
37, 1874 
14, 1874 
14, 1874 

11, 1874 
2G, 1874 
10, 1874 
18, 1874 

5, 1874 

6, 1874 

28, 1874 

7, 1874 
9, 1874 



zedbyGoOglC 



30 ANNUAL REPORT. 

LIST OP NOTARIES PUBLIC— Oontinoed. 



Bhnck, Jobn 8 

Sawyer, J. S 

Stont, J. C 

Sawyer, Cbarl«BF>>. 

Sleeper^ C. 

BattOD, George W>>- 

SUiart, C. J 

Seemau, T 

SoDle, S.H 

Sawd«D, Qeorge J.... 

StereiiB, J. C 

BevereDce, H. J 

Seavey. L.O 

SliQDdreir. Chaa 

Stewart, D. Qrant ... 

Sweuson, Peter 

Smith, A. C 

Sanford, David 

Seymoor, Geo. W.... 

Bbeirdown, J. M 

Smill, 8. 8 

Scbweltser, Peter.... 

Sbotwell, J. J 

Stevens Geo. G 

Sktnaer.G. W 

8Joberg,H.S 

filmmoDS, H. B 

Schnltz, JoBeph 

Sbelby. Cbaa. H 

Stewart, L. M 

Streeter, T. H 

8plc«r,R. B 

Spencer, W. Q 

Smttb, A. J 

Stowers, S. H 

Sklnoer, Geo. E 

Studdart.!. 7, A 

Snallldge, J. W 

Smltb, W. K 

Smltb, Wm. C 

Snyder, S. P 

Slacy.E.C 

Sacketi, J. B 

SoDtbwortb, Ell 

Sctaaller, C. C 

Sbotwell, James 

8nialiey,F. J 

Sbarer,U.B 

8elp,A. N 

Smltb, William 

Smith, Albert 

Swift, Laclan Jr 

Sbanbnt, Fraok 

Sawbrldge, J. C 

Btoau, Sam. G 

Slmmooa, i 



Kaaaon, Dodice coanty 

ChatBcId, Fillmore county. . 
Lake City, Wabasha county 
St. Cloud, Stearns coaDty .. 
Brownsdale, Alowsrcoanly 
Spring lAke, Scott coamj. 
Wadena, Wadena coanty.. , 
Rocheater, Olmsted coonty. 
Honntalu Lake, Cottonwood coanty 
Stillwater, Wishlngton county... 

Zambrota, Good bae coonty 

Mankato, Blue Eartb county 

Grand Rapids, Itasca county 

8 1. Paul. Ramsey couDly 

Hamilton, Klllmore county 

Sweden Forest, Redwood county. 

LItcbdeld, Meeker county 

St. PanI, Ramsey connty 

Taylors Falls, Chisago county. .. . 

WIdoub. Winona county 

Minneapolis, HeDDepm county.... 

Mankalo, Blue Earth coanty 

Cottai;e Grove, Wasblngton count; 

Rush ford, Fillmore connty ' 

Batb, Freeborn county 

Willmar, KandlyobI connty 

Golden Gate, Brown county 

Red Wing, Gonahue coanty 

Lake Crystal, Blue Earth county 
MlDneapoIls, Henuepln county... 

Nurtbfleld, Rice county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn connty 

Minneapolis, -Hennepin county.... 

Sank Centre, Steams connty 

Owatonna, Steele coanty 

Farlbanlt, Rlceconniy 

St. Paul. Ramsey county 

Easson, Dodge cuanty 

Sleepy Eye, Brown county 

Minneapolis. Henaepin coanty... 

Minneapolis, BenaoplD county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn coanty 

St. Peter, NIcoIIvl counry 

Shakapee, Scott county. 

Hankato, Blue Eartb coaoty 

Alexandria, Douglas county 

Caledonia, Hoasio a coonty >. 

Kasson, Dodge county 

Dulutb, Si. Loais county 

Le Sueur, Le Sneur county 

MlDueapollB, HonneplD county... 
Minneapolis, Heunepln coanty.. - 

New Ulm, Brown connty 

Alexandria, Donglaa connty 

St. Panl, Bamaey county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 



Dec. 29, 

Dec. 2», 

Not. 28, 

Dee; 80, 

Jan. 20, 

Feb. I, 

Feb. 1 1 
Feb. I. 
Sept. 25, 
Feb. 16, 



Feb. 14, 
F<'b. 9. 
Mar. 1, 

Feb. 6, 
Mar. u, 
Mar. 6. 

Mar. IS, 
Mar. 13, 
Mar. 22, 

April 6, 

April b, 
April U, 
May 1, 
Mar. 4, 
April 6, 
Mar. £f;, 
May 1, 
April 38, 
May 16, 
June 8, 
Dec. 28, 
June 12, 
May 14, 

May K, 

May IG, 

Hay 1, 

May IB, 

June 24, 
June 24, 
June S8, 
Jnly I, 
July 18, 
Feb. 18, 
July 29, 
July 26, 
Aug. I, 
Aug. 14, 
Jul> 20, 



1874 
1874 
1875 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1876 
1676 
1876 
187G 
1876 



1876 
1875 
1S7S 
IHTG 
)8T5 
1876 
1876 
IB76 
1876 



1876 
1876 
187S 
1874 
1876 
1B7S 
1S7S 
1876 
1876 
1876 
1876 
1876 
ie7S 
I87S 
1876 
1876 
167S 
1S7S 
1876 
1876 
1876 
187A 
187S 



zedbyGoOglC 



8B0R&TART OF STATB. 31 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



Stone, H. W 

SpraKne.T. W 

Shaw, JobD U 

Smltb, A. M 

SpnfEiie. D. 

SallsbuiT. J. F 

Sherwood, M. h-.-. 

Seeley, Isftac C 

SUrt, C. H 

Smltb, C. H 

ShsnnaD, George C. 

Stepbena, A. D 

Smltb, J. B 

TnthiJI, C. D 

TbompPOD, John H. 
Tbornton, Fniik H. 

Truk, J. F 

Tbompaon, Andrew. . 

Taylor, Robert 

TltDD, S^monr 8... 
TbompaoD, Jacob F 
Tbompson, EbeaF.. 
Tedcbont, William.. 

Tniradell, J. E 

Tbompaon, John W. 

Taylor, Oscar 

Taber, David M 

TbomaoD, Clifford ■ . 

Tibb«t8,Tlll 

Tltua, T. H 

Thompson, H. F -• 
Traesdell, Verdlne.. 
Tavcmer, John 8.. 

Tacker, Henry 

TerwUllger, S. T 

TbompaoD, C- J.... 
Tbompaon, Peter.. 

Tyrer, A. M 

Teeple, A. O 

Taylor, Cbarlea 

TaUmaD, 8. £ 

TharlD, E 

Taylor, N.T 

Tobey, C. C 

Tiylor.J. W 

TbompaoD, P B 

I'reulwell, C. B 

Tbompaon, Bagb 

Ti^Ior.Jobn W 

Tanner, Wm. P..... 
Tmeley, Chartea H.. . 
Thomas, William... 

TIBaoy.H. A 

Tfa^er, S. B. 

TanBoeaen, F. B... 
T«BSlyck,L. S 



RKBIDBirCB. 



BeDBOu, Swift county < 

Aleiaudrla, Douglas county 

Mlnneapnlls, Hennepin county — 

Worthington, Nobtra connty 

Caledonia, Hou!«iau coaoty 

St. Paul, Rimaey coanty 

Maokato, Blue Eartb coanty 

Hlnneapolts, UuDDCpIn counly 

Rochester, Olmsted connty 

Wlndom, CottoDwood coDoCy 

Rochester. OlmBted county 

Atwater, Kendlyobl county 

St. Cload, Blearns connty 

Dodge Centre, Dodge cuiioty 

Dulutb, St. Lonls connty 

Benson, Swift connty 

Le Boy, Mower county 

Wheatland. Rice county 

Winona, Winona connty 

Sank Centre, 8tearu» county 

Swan Lake, Nicollet cunnty 

HtnneapollH, Hennepin connty... 

Sis Oaks, Olmsled county 

Owatonna, Steele connty 

Letter, Rice connty 

St. Cloni], Steams coiuity 

Redwing, OoodUae county 

Ulnnenpolls, Hennepin coanty-.i 
Redwood Falls, Redwood connty 

Rochester, Olrnated connty 

Dnluth, St. Lonls connty 

Mtnneapolla, Hunnepln county... 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 

Oronoco, Olrnated connty 

St. Paul, Hams p; connty 

Worth I ngtou. Nobles connty 

Albert Lea, Freeborn connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

NorthSeld, Rice county 

BrnuBwick, Kanabec connty 

Atwater, Kandiyohi connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

St. Cloud, Stearns county 

Sleepy Eye. Brown county 

Braluerd, Crow Wing connty.... . 
Ulnaeapolls, HenDepln county... 

Winona, Winona conniy 

St. Paul, Rimney county 

Cannon Falls, Goodhue county... 

Dnintb, St. Lonla county 

, Bine Earth county 

Owatonna, Steele connty 

Ulnneapolls, Hennepin connty.., 

Alesandrta, Donglaa conn^ 

Hastings, Dakota connty 



COMHIHSIUH. 



6, I8TG 
to, 1876 
», 1876 

1, 1876 

14, IHJB 

2, 187B 
28, 1875 

15, 1876 
SO. 187S 

I, IS76 

15, 1HT6 
22, 1S76 
28, 1876 
26, 1878 
12, 1874 
26, 1874 

1, 1874 
17, 1874 
17, 1874 
19, 18T4 
19, 1874 
12, leT4 
e, 1874 
1, 1874 

16, 187** 

16, ltlT4 
10, 1874 
28, 1874 

1, 1874 

4, li»T4 

24, 1871 

26, 1074 
9, 1874 
I, 1874 

15, 1874 
6, 1874 

27, 1ST4 
26, 18T4 
26, 1876 
12, 1876 

I, 1876 

5, 1875 
10, lliT6 
81, 1876 

1, 1876 
26, 1876 
10, 187S 

17, 1876 
26, 1876 

a^, 1876 

16, 187S 

28, 1876 
IS, 1876 

25, 1876 

6, 1878 

17, 1874 



idbyCoogle 



ANNUAI. BBPOBT. 
LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continaed. 



Van VUet, Leonird. 
TanaeTe, B. H... 
Van Renssellar, J. B 
Van Troth*, Clande. 

Van Brant, W 

VIrtne, Qeo. J. 

Vlnlag, M. P 

VoD HadelD.Hcrmui--.- 
Van Dyke, Bobert. ... 
VerTB,lB, Joseph O — 

Van Dyke, T. S 

Van Emau, Wm. L ■ ■ . ■ 
Vanderflnls, Geert.... 

White, C. B 

White, MlcsJohC 

Wilcox, David 

Warner, W. P 

WbUne;, JoaepbC-..- 

Wllaon, Thomas 

Wilson, H.P 

WiUon, William 8 

WIlBon, JoiephF 

Williams, HeDryL 

Webb, Edward 

Watson, David 

Werner, NllUO 

Wjckoff, J.M 

Welomann, Joseph • • ■ • 

Wells, Henry E 

Wheeler, Daniel T 

WUllama, George V. B 

Walsh, James R 

Welser, J. H 

Wilde, Francis F 

Welch, William 

Webb, NathanF 

Wagner, J.Daniel.... 
Weathover, Hernum... 

Wheeler, B. O 

WUllama, 0. H 

Webb, Charles 

Whitlock, F. J 

Wusoo, S. M 

Wasgall, David P 

Wwde, A. Q 

Wade.EdwardP 

Wiiitsmn, JohnP 

Wsish, J S 

Walker, Charles 

WiBvrell, James A 

Watson,PK 

Wadswonh, H L 

Winston, P. B 

Wood,E.H 

WmianiB, E.T 

Wsckerhagen, B. G 



RBSIDIHCS. 



Lake City, Wabasha conn^ 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county-... 

8t. Clood, Steams connty 

Minneapolis. Hennepin connty.... 

DalDth, S*. Loals connty 

Cleveland, LeSneur county 

Grand Meadow, Mower county — 
Marlon Lake, Otter Tall connty... 

Wabasha, Wabasha connty , 

St. Paul, Ramsey connty 

Wabasha. Wibsha connty 

Delano, Wright connty 

8t. Panl, Bam«ey connty 

Fine Island, Goodhue connty 

MInneipoliB, Hennepin county---. 

Hankato, Blno Earth connty 

St. Panl, Kamsey connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county. .... 

Winona, Winona county 

PIsinvlew, Wabasha county 

8t. Panl, Ramsey county 

St. Cloud, Steams county 

St. Paul. Ramsey connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Redwood Falls, Redwood county.. 

Red Wing, Goodhne connty 

LeSoy, Mower connty 

Farlbanlt, Rice county 

Preston, Fillmore county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty 

" :k Centre, Todd connty 

Paul, Ramsey connty 

Btownsdale, Mower connty 

St. Panl, Ramsey county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Wabasha, Wabasha county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Delavan, Faribault connty 

Aastln, Mower county 

WIdodb, Winona connty 

Preston, FlUm >re connty 

Belle Flalne, Scott connty 

Minneapolis. Hennepin county 

Winnebago City, Farlbanlt couuty . . 

Cokato, Wright connty 

CedarviUe, Hartlc connty 

Fergus Falls, Otter Tall connty .... 

LeSueur, LeSneur connty 

Sank Centre, Stearns connty 

Mankato, Blue Earth county. 

Wells, Farlbanlt county 

Litchfield, H«eker connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

, Dakota couuty 

St. Paul, Etamsey county 

St. Panl, Ramsey county 



Har. S, 

Sept. 1, 

Kov. 30, 

Jan. 4, 

Jan. IS, 

Fob. W, 

Mar. 1, 

Mar. 16, 

Oct. 10, 

Ang. 16, 

Oct. 18, 

Dec. II, 

Dec. S, 



Mar. S, 

Feb. SO, 
Mar. 24, 
Mar. 25, 
April 24, 
May S, 
Feb. 1, 
Sept- 26. 
Nor. 6, 
May 18, 
Feb. 14, 
Jnly 26, 
Feb. le, 
Feb. 16, 
April 18, 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. T, 
Jan. 10, 
Jan. 24, 
Jan. 18, 
Jan. 28, 
Feb. S, 
Fob. 24, 
Har. ST, 
Har. 8, 
Mar. 2, 
Mar. 16, 
April 16, 
April 6, 
Ha; e, 
June &, 
May 10, 
July 6, 
Ang. 8, 
Ang. B, 
Apm IT, 
Sept. •, 
Nov. 9T, 



1ST4 
1S74 

ieT4 

I8T4 
I87S 
1876 
18TS 
1876 
1876 
1ST6 
187S 
1876 
1878 
18T» 
1878 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
I8T4 
187* 
1874 
1874 
I8T4 
18T4 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
18T* 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
IB74 
1874 
1874 
18T4 
1874 
1874 
18T4 
18T4 
1874 
ieT4 
1874 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



SECBETART OF STATE. 
LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continned. 



WIIUdb, OnataT 

Weed, 0«y C 

Wakeman, Walter. . . 
Welbeler, WlUiamH. 
Wigoer, OcorgeL... 

Wootaej, T. B 

WIIUoii,B.E 

Wollan, H. A 

Williams, Charles J. 

WUU, Sdwln 

WfllistoB, W. C 

WMt,L.L 

Walton, W. S 

WUlard.M.G 

Wbiie.JohnW 

Willford, William.... 
WeBUnau, QiuUtqs. 

WillsoD, Charles 

Wood, Ednard E.... 

Ward, Albert L 

Walbrldge, C. P.... 
Wooldredge, E. S.... 

Whipple, A. O 

Wise, JohDC. 

WillsoD.B. 8 

Waltz, Wm. G 

Warren, George H . . . 

Walmark Olto 

WoiTertoD, J. A..... 
Woodboarae, Fred... 

Walker.P. E 

WUlspd, 8. J._ 

Whipple, Charles H 

Webber, B. F 

WaililiiB, 8. J 

Wilklns, Peter 

WllsoD, H. A 

Woods, Charles H... 

Wells, Adelbert 

Williamson, A. W.... 

WlllsoD, Msrk 

Whilelej, R. K 

WiUon, Jno.N 

Webber, Charles L... 

Waldron, J. M , 

WlieeIer,R.B 

Wakefield, 0. N 

Whlilns, 8amael Jr 
Wheauto, Charles S. 

Ware, J. L 

Wilwx, A G 

WUlIaios, D. H 

WUbob, Tbonus C... 

Wbeeter, J. 8 

Tale,WUlUm H 

Zapp, John 

5 



KRSIDKDCB. 



St. Paul, Ramse; couDtf Jane 11, 

St, Paol, Ramsey county ■ Nov. 28, 

Marshall, Lyon county Dec. 1, 

Belle Flatne, Scott connty Sept. 16, 

Charlestown, Redwood coanty.--. Hot. 1, 

HlDDeapollB, Hennepin county Nov. S, 

Garden City, Bloe Eiirth county Dec. IS, 

Gleowood, Pope coQsty Jan. 1, 

Rosemonnt, Dakota connty Dec. 2S, 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty Jan. 4, 

Red Wing, Goodbne county Jan. 18, 

Sank Centre, Steams connty Jan. 14, 

Wabasha, Wabasha county Jan. 1. 

Mankato, Blno Earth coanty 

St. Fan 1, Ramsey county 

Lenora, Fillmore connty 

Cannon Falls, Goodhne county -.. 

Rochester, Olmsted coanty 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Fairmount, Martin connty. 

Minneapolis, Hennepin conniy.... 

Olmsted coanty 

Noctbfield, Rice coanty 

Mankato, Blue Eartli connty 

Madella, Watonwan connty 

Mankato, Blue Earth connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty. ■ . . 

Chisago City, Chisago connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin coanty. ... 

St. PanI, Ramsey coanty 

Marine, Washington connty 

Red wing, Goodhue connty 

Faribanlt, Rice connty 

New Ulm, Brawn connty 

Hankato, Blue Earth connty 

New Anbnrn, Sibley connty 

St. Paul, Ramsey cennty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty. ... 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Sleepy £ye, Brown county 

WInoua, Winona councy 

Bralnerd, Crow Wing county 

Lanesboro, Fillmore connty 

Walnnt Station, Redwood county. 

LlIchBeld, Meeker connty 

Austin, Mower connty 

Winona, Winona connty 

Clearwater, Wright connty 

Elk RWer, Sherburne connty 

Kasson, Dodge county 

HInneapollB, Hennepin connty.... 

Rochester, Olmsted connty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin connty.... 

St. Charles, Winona coanty 

Winona, Winona coanty 

St. Clood, Stearns coanty 



Nov. IB, 
Feb. 4, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 18, 
Feb. IB, 
DfC. 1, 
Feb. 4, 
Feb. 21, 
Feb. 87. 
March S, 
March 1, 
Feb. 10, 
Mar. IT, 
Feb. 13, 
April e, 
Har. £G, 
April 21, 
■prll 21, 
May 6, 
May 4, 
May 6, 
May 8, 
April s, 

May 2o', 
May 10, 

May 24^ 

July e' 
July 14, 
July 20, 
Sept. 10, 
Sept. 30, 



Nov. la, 
Feb. 17, 
Dec. 14, 



1S74 
1874 

1874 
1874 
1874 
18T4 
1874 
1876 
1874 
187* 
1875 
I87II 
1879 
1875 
18TG 
1875 
I8TG 
1875 
1874 



1874 
1875 
1875 
1876 
1875 
1876 
1876 
1876 
1876 
18TS 
1878 
1875 
1876 
1876 
1BT5 
1873 



1!7B 
1876 
1876 
1886 
1876 
1676 
1B76 
1875 
1875 
187S 
1875 
1875 
1876 
IBT4 
187* 



zedbyGoOgle 



ANNUAL BBPOET. 



LIST OF COMMISSIONERS 



RUIDKMT IX OlUrOSKU. 



vutm. 


.-.»0. 








April, n, 1874 
September 9, UTS 




Sm Fnnclsco 





PUot, JoaepbT. £■■ 



RKBtDKHT DT OOKMiencnT. 



Fttch, Lacloa 

Qoodmui, Bdwud 
Gordon, D&TldG-. 
Talntot, Henij E ■ ■ 



New Haven ■ . 
Huirord ■•■■ 
Hartford .... 
Hutford 



RUlDKia' DT aiOBOU. 



Borrawa, John W.. 



jdbyGoOglC 



SBCKBTABr OP STATE. 
BSBIDENT IM nXlIfOU. 



Gonld, John 8-- 

Boyoe, FhlHp A 

KlDC, Simeon W 

Enoo]««lorli; ClUkrlaB 



Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 
Chicago 



M&r se, 1878 

Febraat7 IS, 1874 

Angnat 5, 1878 

Jane S, 18T« 



RBBIDINT IM LOtJUUKA. 




New Orleans 

NewOrleuiB 

NawOrieMe 


March 


8, 
26. 


1878 
1871 
187t 








BHIDKKT DC KABYIAMD. 






May 
April 


IS, 
8. 


1878 
1871 






locK, nij 















Angell, OeoTgeT.... 

BeU. JuneaB 

Jonea, Edward J. . . . . 
UeiTlhew, Edwara T 

Fntt, C. C. K 

Hill, Henry J 



BoatOD 

Boston 

Boston 

Boaton 

N. Hlddleborongh. 
Worceater 



April 

Angost 

Hay 

Angnst 

April 

April 



17, 1B74 
SG, ISTl 

18, 1878 
27, 1S7S 

G. 1878 

17. 187* 



RUISKIIT nr XICHiaAM. 




An Aab 


AagQBt 


G. 
16, 


1876 
1871 










BKBIDKNT IX MISSOUBI. 






December 

Angnst 

Much 


IS, 
18 
», 


1873 
187S 
1878 















j,j.,.db,Google 



ANNUAL BBPORT. 
RUIUBNT IK HBW TORK. 



Anderaon, Armour C- ■ 
AoderBon, Fred. B. . . . 
Anderson, Charles W.. 

BDBhDell, Chas. 3 

Bagley, H. A 

Banks, Hear; C 

Baroe;, Charlet T 

Brono, George W 

Collea, George W 

DdBoIb, Jacob 

Ooddart, Calvin 

Hlllery. John A 

How, L. W 

Jackson, Eleater 

Knapp, Arthur W 

He Adam, David 

Uercahnt, Harrln J.... 
UcKlnlajr, Jamea H. ■. 

Nones, Joseph B 

OslraDder, Alex. 

Oaboni, Wm. B 

Bobenson, HacktntOHh. 

Crannell, Monroe 

Clifford, ThoB. B 

Falrtborne, F. 

Goodale, S. B---- 

NetUeton, Charles 

Taylor, James 

VIele, Sbeldou 



New Tork. 
New York. 
New York. 
New Tork 
New York 
New Tork. 
Hew York 
New York 
New York 
Neir York. 
New York. 
New Tork. 
New York. 
New York. 
New York. 
New York. 
New Tork. 
New York. 
New York. 
New Yoi*. 
Brooklyn . . 
New York. 

New York. 
New York. 
New York. 
New York. 
New York. 
BnlfolD.... 



DATJE or IPPOtMT- 



December 


1t> 


1873 


Juoe 


M>, 


1RT8 


April 


17, 


1S74 


April 


». 


1873 


December 


IH 


1S7S 


Jnne 


24, 


1874 


Febrnary 




ISTB 




19, 


1878 




117 , 


1876 


May 


8- 


1874 


February 


w, 


1878 


Hay 


16, 




March 




1878 






1875 


rebmary 


e. 


187S 


aecember 


ifi, 




Hay 


H), 


1878 


Noveiaber 


fH 


1878 






1874 


febrnary 


aa, 


1874 




17, 




•November 




1878 




i*. 


1674 


Way 


1«, 


1874 


Septembei 


V, 






4, 


1874 




» 


1874 


February 


». 


1874 









BBBmEHT IN NEW JEBSET. 



Cassldr, James H. . 



BSaiDENT IH PBHNarLTAHIA. 



Diver, J. Paul 

Franktsh, Joseph.... 
Janvier, F. Herbert. 

Hoore, BeoJ. T 

Phillips, Henry Jr... 

Bnssell, John 

Band, Theo. D 

Keed, Heory 

Taylor, Samuel L... 
Wheeler, J. H 



Philadelphia 
Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia . 
Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia. 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia. 
Ptilladelpbla. 
Philadelphia. 



January 


M, 


1874 




1«, 


18T8 


Jaanaiy 


25, 


I8T8 


April 


IB. 


187B 


December 


ft 


1871 


April 


17. 


1874 


M*y 






August 


7, 


1878 






1874 


Uarob 


its. 


1874 



j,j.,.db,Googlc 



8B0ESTABT OF STATS. 
KE81DKVT IM OHIO, 



nan. 


K«II.«.0. 


D*TX Ol AFFWBT- 






Marah 
JalT 


30. 
S6, 
















RBBIDENT IX WAIHINQTOK. 


CftUU.H. P 


IwMhlngton, D.C... 


Harch 


>, 


IBTS 


SMawm n wisoombik. 


J 




Superior CIt7 


JtD<»c7 


SI, 


ISTS 


' 




RUIDEMT IX FUXOE. 








Febrwry 


M, 




' 






BWDBNT IM RMaLAXD. 


VftlTcblld, LdcIub... 


..juwrpool 


Hv 


10, 


1876 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



AMMaAL BBPOBT. 



LIST OF COUNTY OFFICERS 



n TBI 8ETBRU. ORQAHIZBD CODItTtBa OF THE 8 
POB THB TBAK 1876, 



. or miniBflOTA. 



AITKIN COUNTT. 
oomnr be&t, aitijn. 



OOo*. 


laeunbMit. 


TBinof 0«i». 








Fonr 7«»r». 








Si 






tolomonciiro";";;.'! 




Itoc)nM- of Dswta 

Jnano(Prob.U 
















a;?k&u:Mrt6;>'<irt::: 


W.H.W1UUMI^ 


juiSS 1. iBn. 



ANOKA COUNTY. 



COUNTT BKi.T, AKOKA. 



BigltHr of 'i] 
JodgeafProt 



O. L.Cntt»r 

O. B.OndarlBD 

J-CProat 

Wm.W.Flteli 

Hlnn Tharnton... 
" <i. Battsrflald.. 



Blnn nioniton... 



lUrch 
Htnsh 



Amditor 

aims ....'.'.'.',.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 
BaKlitn of DMdi . . . . 

jgilfa of ProbM* 

Altani«7. 

Clark mitrioVaiart!! 
Conrt CdDuiiluloDar, 



Jahn Cromb 

A.B. Wlloei 

ThaodoraHolUn.., 
JobnHeOlallul..., 

E. AndanoD 

J. O. UeOrew 

WC. Dirllng 

C. A.lampKiJiu.... 

X.S. HalmM 

A.B. H'AlUitaT.... 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



SEOtBTABI OF STATE. 
BENTON COUNTT. 

OOUKTT 8U,T, aAVK KIFIDS. 



oae*. 




T»nn of OBo. 


OoDiDMicMontofTdm. 




SiS-SZi.;::..:: 

8<una*]P. CarpCDUr.. 


ss',?:.-. 


ir.r«h . 18IE. 










^«s-;e 










fesr •■■-■•• 


mfi R?i°"'''' 


Jss:? • ISJ 


gSSSSSta-.:; 


Jnitiu CirpMiUr. 


JSStJJ ; iSS: 



BIG STONE COUNTT. 



oomrrr skat, obtomtili.k. 



Bhnlir.... 

BHfRar or UMdi 

Jadt>ot Fnbata 

dark DUMct'Cciartii 







r-~ 


JUDUT 


• iS! 














MXar;:;::;: 


Sf 






FrlnkA. F^w':::": 


K 



BLUE EARTH COUNTY. 




OOUNTT SKAt, lumATO. 



Arrold... 

if.CKttni 

8.B. Plncb 

J.O.Faw)*r 

I.E. Porter 

A.R.Pf»n 

Jobn Lilly. 

BMlunlnDiirkM .. 
Wllllim 0. DnrkM. 
V.B.Tsrraj 



lu;^ 
































Anurr 


, IBJfc 



BROWN COUNTY. 



CODNTT 8XAT, XKW UIJI. 



B^atn oT DMd*. 
Jiog* of Pn>b*U.. 
Atlo'^W 



BroitO.Soeli 

K*lsC.Bikk«..- . 
OMrnBlokalkkiipt 
B. A. B>uaiuiB ■ . . 

AWattpbal 

R.F. Wabbar 

Jnllia Barodt. 

Dr. C. Waachck* .... 

A. BlaiKhard 

B.a.Koob 



Two rtwi. 


Varcb 


, 1S7B. 


















































Thraa raara. 







j,j.,.db,Google 



ANKOAL EEPOHT. 

CARLTON COUWIT. 
counrr ssiT, thohbom. 



OMm. 


Inonnbwit 


TnrmofOmoe. 


t?omDncaD*Dt<>f Tam. 






fsi.'ss. 














srs i: S 
r::3 !; S: 

JiniuiT 1, IS7a. 


S>Kl>t^ror D^i .... 


J. w. Ltichisia. 

A. H. TowDHnd 

A.M.Bolm 

Binl.Farklnn 




CiM-kDlitrlctConrt... 
CoortConunlMlonor... 


j-'aS^".;;;." 



CABVEE C30UNTY. 



COUKTT SEAT, OHABKA. 



RwrtBtdr of Deadi 
Jndgs of Probftte 

Clark Dlitrlet (ioi 
Com- - ■ ■ 



PMcrWtrgD 

Frsd.K. Datolt.... 
Prtdarlek Orabitr. 

J. A. Sarnnt 

Kmmt HkluliB — 
JohnC. BrunBlni. 
PredarlnkObarll.. 
O. KnrMbDliI 



CASS COUNTY. 



Auditor 

SJmiS..... '.'.'.. '.'.'. 
Rwlitsr of Di>di 
Jadga of FrDb4t«. 



COHNTT BUT, WHT BKAIHBKD. 

P. K. ataoS ! Two jwr*. 

S.S.T<nnl> 

Oaont OowftD { " 

" A. KoffH i " 

F. H»rll»r I 



Hireb . 11 


Mirtm , 1 













CHIPPEWA COUNTY. 



Jndga of Probata... 



Clark Dlitrlet Coart. 
Court Commlaalonar.. 



OOUHTT SKAT, HONTKVIDKO. 

. J. H. Baiaranca Two raan. 

. OlaA. Jargo " 

, Ennd StaTenion " 

, A.A,J«^o ■■ 

, J.J.Btawarl " 

. HanrrHIII 

L-R. Movar 

. C. J.C. Eldrad 

. J.D.Bikar FourTaan, 



JmS"' 1 
Jannarr 1 



zedbyGoOglC 



SECbBTABT OP STATE. 

CHISAGK) COUNTY. 
ooamT BKAT, OHiuao oitt. 




OttoWmllDUrit 

JohsBlulMii '..'.. 

AndnirWillnurk... 

N. M. Bamohny 

Dlabojs Hmith 

Hrary H. Nawbarr.... 

LClDnlU 

RolMTtCBrrl* .. 

' B. CUrk 



a, iai(. 



Uirch 
Huch 

juBu? 1, len. 

JaDHrx 1, ISM. 

JvmiJ I. WO. 

Jamnirr 1, UK. 

Janurr 1, UT4. 



litfitOT of D—Ji 

Jail* of Probst* 

Attmw 

OaA Dbtriet Ooa'iti ! .' 
Coart ~ ■ ■ 



CLAY COUNTY. 

OOUVTT BBiT, XOOBHMU). 



Jvbn Tbonpard'..- 

J.B>Bl>Dohud 

C. A.IIlcboli 

01* J«»bioB 

a. a. ComaMak 

JobnEdTts 

■Tobn KiigkMa 

Susaal Partrldfa. . . , 



Manh 1, tn>. 

Haroh 1, Wi. 

Jaoaari I , UtS- 

Junarj I, IBII. 

Junaiy 1, ihD. 

Janoaij 1, IMB. 

Jisaarr 1, Un> 

innrj 1, IWB. 

JanDaTr 1, ini. 

JauuTT 1. 1871. 



COTTONWOOD COUNTY. 



COUMTT SSAT, WIMDOH. 



BailtUr'oi 

JadiaofPi 



_D.P*rklB*... 
A. D. Farklni... 
OrrinNMOn. .. 

ll.Da»all 

J. O. Saddlnc . ■ 
J.Q.Itaddliic.- 



JanaaiT 1. Wt. 



Bbartf- 

RarliMraf Deadi... 
jRJcaaf FrobaM.... 

OoroBor 

caark DMrtet Comrt. 
Coin OonuuiuWaar. 



CROW WING COUNTY. 

OOUMTT BUT, BBAINSBD. 

V.C. BaiHll Two raan. 

N.HcFaddan ■' 

Gaorge W. Whltiay... " 

P. B.TrhompaoB " 

D.O.PrMlon '■ 

QaorgaW. HoUand.... " 

O.B. lUiop 

J.C. Rouar " 

W.W. Bartlar FonrrMre. 



lUnb I, 1B7S. 

Hamli 1, Ure. 

Janurr 1, 1371. 

JaanuT 1, UM. 

Jinnirr 1, 1S7S. 

J*Daai7 1, 1870. 

juinarr 1, 1871. 

JaniuTj 1> 18Tt. 



,.db,Google 



AHIfUlL BKFOBT. 
DAKOTA COONTT. 

OOUMTT BBAT, HASmiOB 



OSce. 


InGDmlMDt. 


Term of OOefc 




Auditor 


Hlchul HaliMii 


^'X^ 


Huch 1, Un. 


RMlatsrof D«dl 

Joli»ofProb»t« 


luiuiT I, 










WtUIam raltoB 

S».'=i5S,Tr?:::: 


Cl.rkDl»lrlclOonrt... 


js^i; 



DODGE COUNXy. 



Auditor 

Bberiir ..".'".'M'.'.W 

Ja<fg«orFrot»t* 

Attorna; 

Bantfar 

Coranar ■•. 

OlarkDIgtrlst Court.. 
Conrt CoBmlMlonor.. 



COUNTT BKAT, MAlfTOKVnjJt. 



J.Grlnoon..... 
D.K. Dibble... 
E. K. Wbltlns 
OllbartH. Higt 
J. A. Norton... 

B~'3.'Pnrj7.'.'. 
J.H.OnTM... 
J.P.Browar... 
Qk>. W. Bloenm 



Hkrcb 1, ISH. 

Janour 1. ISIt. 

JU1DU7 1, IBM^ 

Juwr; 1, W(. 

Junarir 1, 1S7e. 

JknouT 1, IBIS. 

JuDUT 1, 187t. 

JknnuT 1, 1814. 



DOUGLAS COnHTY. 



Trtwinror 

Bhoriir. 

BwlaMrorDoodi 
JudEB of Probftli 

Attorney 

HnrTsyor 

Coromr , 

Clark DlatrletCoi 









COUKTT BKAT, ALKXAMDRIA. 



Vrod. VoD BiDiBbacb. 
Honrr K. WhlM 

" ■ NolMIll 

.FBimaJ',;";;;;! 

-. .RlDll 

a.VtTlan 

iPardoD 

esacbulti 



Two 


TMn. 


llueh , 
H>roli 






i§ ■ 


Foot 




J»nn«rT , 







FARIBAULT COUNTY. 



BRAT, BLUK URTH CITY. 



Auditor [W. W. WhlM. 

TrBMorar lE-B. Johnaon 

SherlS A. B. DitI«... 

RagleterorDaada :F. h. Browu.. 

Judga or Fiobat* J. A, Slsatar . 

Altornay iM.W.Qnian.. 

Surrajor O.A.Wiar 

Corosvr H. P. Toani.. 

Clark Dlalrlct Coort. . . H. J. Snl .... 
onBr...!J. A. Klaatar. 



Jannar; 1, ISTt. 



zedbyGoOglC 



BEOBBTABT OF STATE. 



FILLMORE COUNTY. 



OOUVTT SUIT, PRESTOS. 



. Comiii*nc«DMit of Torm. 



S«mvatI>Hd>... 

loan otProbftM 

AHon«T 

Ooart CoBMluhncr. 



AUU Barttitt. 

W. W. BndBD 

Ctirictlu PaMrcm... 

Un O-Himua 

Hsnn S. Suiatt. 

». P. Colbarn 

John GroTor--..>'M.H 

a. A.Biaiaiii.',. .'.'.".', 

RanlMii W^i 



Uueti 1, 1670. 

lUreli 1. IBTl. 

JuHwrj L IS7B. 

Jinuirr 1, UT6- 

Juninr 1, ins. 

JiDBuy I, WS. 

JuiDkrf 1, ISn. 

Jnmrj 1, IST1. 

JmoQirj 1, IBH. 



FREEBORN COUNTY. 



BtcliMr or DMd*. . 
IiJ^orPrabaM.... 

CItrk DIMrietCoBrt. 
Cnrt Commlfalonar. 



BaniBd Bktchaldar . 
"harlMKIttlwm... 
'. J. ebMhu) 

Ubwt < 

„. G. Wsdn.. 

W.J.KtIUr 

John Fro>h(w . 

A.W. Whlls. 

S.B. BpMl*. 



Jutury l', ' 
Jannuj I, 



GOODHUE COUNTY, 
oommr skit, md mso. 




g.J. WUImrd 

L. A.HmD00«k 

Uartln 8. Ghudlar -. . 



R S. Purk - 
Hu» JobDWi 



JaDurT 1. IBTfi. 

Jmnurr 1. 1B7S. 

JlDDUT 1, Ut!S. 

Janmrj 1, 1874. 



GRANT COUNTY. 



OOCltTT BIAT, BHRHAH. 



Baclitar of Dtadi 
JodS* of Probata. 
Vlrrajor ....,..., 



Huch «, isrs. 

HBrch I, 1S7S. 

Janaary 1, Itm. 

Janaarr I, laTC, 

Jauoarr 1, ISTA. 

JvDMTr 1, i<ns. 

AoBarj 1, 1S7A. 



j,j.,.db,Google 



JUTKUAI. BBPOST. 



HENNEPIN CODWTT. 



OOUITTT BBAT, HIKHXAPOUa. 



OOm. 


L,™.,».l 


Tsrm orODM. 






HtU Bluk 


Twojeit. 


M»roli 1 
M«ch 1 

KDUTT 1 


1S76 




SiMSffiS:::; 


]^ 


WS?rK;.::: 








AlbM Smith 






ISIB. 


g-SffSa:?,;:: 





HOUSTON COUNTY. 



OOUNTT SKAT, CALBDOKIA. 



Builtw of DMdl 
JaSgaorPrDbiU. 

AHormaf 

a>rv*r(ir 

Clark mitrletCanrt! 
Oonr*- 



JobnF. Snuall.. 
H. Hirnita.. .. . 
Jmdm HcU*huu. 

J.W.Cook 

JsmM.O'BrJra... 
I. ThampHB..... 
e.L. OttM 

JOMpb yMHB>- 



Jmniurj 1, 18TA. 

Jtniury 1, ISTE. 

Juury li ISn. 

Jsnury 1, ISTI. 

JuuTT li UT4. 



Andltor 

Shirlff.....'.'!'.!"! 
KtcliUr or Dxdi 
JDOfe of ProbMa. 

Attorn*r 

Bnneiror 

OoroD*r. 

Olark DlMrtct Court. 
0»nrt~ ■ ■ 



ISANTI COUNTY. 

OOOHTT SKAT, OAUBRIDOl. 



T. C. Wblta 

Tboa, H. Otna 

B. F, fltffnrd 

Andraw Itantalaon. 

A.B.Oda]l 

O.ClodCh 

A.CoIbDrn 

J.'K.'DaCaDi«ii!li. 



Uarefa t, 1B». 

Mucb 1, I9IS. 

JuHurr 1. inn. 

Junarj 1, Wi. 

JuiuiT 1, lS7t. 

JaanuT 1, IBTE. 

Jamiurj 1, 187B. 

juiDBrj 1, ina. 

Janiurr 1, )9]'4. 

JuiauT 1, ISn. 



AsdltoT 

Bhartir...."""!!"!! 
RaglaMrof Datda... 
Jndcaof Probato.... 
Attonuf. 

OlarkDlatVlat Coort! 



JACKSON COUNTY. 

r BKAT, JACKSOK. 



Wm. T.Eln*.... 
loBTT KDodaoB 
-ana J. Jobnaon 
Kdmrd Orr..... 
~ in Enndaon. 
I.V. King.... 

Ola A. Brown..., 
Carl BIrdlor.. .. 



zedbyGoOglC 



BBOBBTABT OF BTATB. 
KANABEC COUNTY. 

OOdNTT SBAT, BKUHSWICK. 



OBW. 




T«nii of OttM. 




Hsiaii?::.-:: 


CW.LmfMl 

B.B.CbMlay 

I.M.Harlbart 

SWr.'-.:::::;;:. 


Twora.n. 


Mar«h 1, BITE. 
llarch 1, um. 

SSK !; ISJ 

Imaux 1, ISn. 

Jjj^fy 1. JTO. 

JaniiarT l! 1878^ 









ShMiff. 

BaclatorarDeadi.. 
JidgaMProbaM... 

BDrraror 



Qark IMitrlct Conrt. . 



Aadltsr ... 



Clark DlatrM Oonrt.. 



KANDIYOHI COUNTY. 



COUNTS SKAT, WUUUX 



LAC QUI PARLE COUNTY. 



COaMTT SB&T, LAO urn PARLS. 



Jobs B. Oidio: 



LAKE COUNTY. 



COtmrr SKAT, BBAVBR BAY. 



LE SUEUR COUNTY. 



Hkrch S 

Harch 1 



Clark IHitrlcl Court.. 



COUNTY BBAT, CLXTX1.AND. 



Patrick MctUaay... 

Hlebaal QradT 

Frank W.Kobra... 
loba L. Haachar... 

L.' H.'BallJr ! !.' 



H. B. Unphrer.,.. 
Fr«Dk W. E<&n. 
J-B-Blaadorff.... 



Maroh 
March 






JigiLizedbyGoOt^lc 



ANNDAI, BBPOBT. 
LINCOEN COUNTT. 

COCMTT 8SAT, lUMHPIKLD. 



Ofl«. 


,..™^. 


Term of Offlco. 




Auditor 


t'6.'^&::.:::: 


Two^oan. 

:: ::;:: 








JXTrHSS.-.:::. 

AttorasT 

fiorvaror 


ffe'iT^:;::-::: 


L.Tom»r 


SSf"uMVici.n::: 


ii.B.FbuiiH 







LTON CODKTY. 



AaUtor 

8b»rnr....r.!iii.''.'".'. 

BMlaMr or DMdi 

Jndia orProbito 

Coronar 

dark Dlitrlct Conrt. . . 



l.W. vmimi... 

- WabaMr 

T. Oroaaback 
K Jawatt 

.. .Wakamu ... 

□.L.YiuFlaat... 

D-lLTarlor. 

OlaDibl 



JUDUT 1, ISIB. 
Junarr I, ISn. 
Jinaarr t, 18I>. 



McLEOD COUNTT. 



COUNTY SKAT, OLBNCOB, 



Andllor 

BaflitarOfDeada 

Jdoga of Probata 

BarraTor 

CoroDar. ■ 

Clark Dlalilet i 



lEathtu Tboaor. 
aa. Hlmi 

A a.Koblaa 

L.W. Latter..... 
T.T.BaTRant.... 
J. V, V. fawb... 

J.Daan 

DsnlMNoMaa... 
A. J. aiTdtr 



Jannarx 1, tSfi. 

Juaarr t, 197^ 

JaonaiT 1. 1871, 

January t, 1S7>. 



Clark DUtrlct Conrt. . 



MARTIN COUNTT. 

COUNTT BUT, FAIBUOnifT. 



/amat Bottamlar.,, 
H.B.T.Hhanka.... 

O.H. DawlDE 

B.H.Hntt 

AUlunl^nclin.... 
F. S. LlTanoora ... 



iaiiauj 1, UM. 

.,.db,Googlc 



8B0BBTAST OF BTATE. 



HEEKEB CODWTY. 

CODMTY >BAT, LtTOHF»IJ>. 



osm. 


Incnmbaot. 


Ttrm ol Offlea. 


0....:^„,.,t™ 




?^i'iLB'i-«.n:..;..: 


Two^awi. 
TbrMfiui. 


Ibicb , 






III 




k'.A C>aip<Mii 








J.H.BMom 



HILLE LACS COUNTT. 

OODMTT SKAT, FBWOVrOM. 




Jannftrr 



MORRISON COUMTr. 



MnorProbiila.. 
A tlonttjr . 

OUrt DiiuietConi 
Oowt ComnlMloiii 



COOMTT BKAT, LITTLa FAIXO. 



3.D. lACbuM 

JonathuTVlar'..., 
T.l.Btjt* 

TbAOdor* B*Uaf*DUl< 

' - Btianka. 

FoMcr 

L.DOW 

^ohnT. BtlUwaU.... 

J. D. IdChuiM 

~ P.FnUir 



Hirob 1 
Hirch I 



HOWER COUNTY. 



oomrrr siat, austim. 



KMtitaref Dwdi 
lA» of Ftobata. 
AtUnwT. 



r-KSffi.::::;;;; 

R.07H.1I 


TWO jam. 


JunuT I 


tSTE. 

un. 

IBIt. 


ssr------;.-' 


\m' 














CharlH Smllta 





j,j.,.db,Googlc 



AKHDAL RBPOBT. 



MUERAT COUNTY. 

COITKTr SKAT, CUMUX. 



OIBm., 




Ttrai of OHM. 




Aodttor 


NawloD P. Sbciord... 
Z W. M.nib...„ .... 
J.P.Corbln 


Poor ifrt. 


JunwT I 








i't^'^^J.^^".'"::::"' 


» 












Si'^.^J.'i.tri.vc.iiVi::: 


NeliCnrrla 

B.CFr«eh 


li 



NICOLLET COUNTY. 



Andltor, 

TreMOTti 

BhiriS 

Baglttar at Daedi 
Joaga or Probila. 

ClatkDiitrlct'coi 
Court Commlialoi 



OOUKTT SEAT, ST. 



Zarlel a. Gmalt.... 
Fredniclc Frllcbo. 

C. Q. 8Urk....i'!i 

JobaPaLirHD 

a. 8. Iiaa 

8.H. BrUn 

Wllltun Elaln 

LawlaBiraiiaoD... 
L. Gronliind 



NOBLES COUNTY. 



AQdllor 

Sb«i(r....-!l!!^ill 

B«i;l>tarDrDHtU.. 
Jadga of Probite. . 

Atwroay. 

CbrkB^trleVcaDi 
OoBrt Commlulom 



ooinrrr bbat, iforthimoton. 



Wm.M.B*u 

Honry b. HDmlatoB.... 

J. A.Toim 

T.C.Ball 

R. D. Barbar 

M.B.Sonla ... 

B, W. WolaUuecoft... 

J. V. Barlow 

B. N. Cirriar.... 

J.Cisn 



Uwcb t, ins. 

Hareli 1, int. 

Jinnarj 1, 1«*. 

Junar]' 1, IBM. 

JaBBarj t, im. 

JuDirf 1, I9n. 

Junarr 1. ISIS. 

J*Boarj I, 1870. 



OLMSTED COUNTY. 

COUNTY 81 



Bbatlir. . 
Malor or 
fadg* of Pp 

Sorviiot.., 

CUrkDIatrietOoort! 
. Ooirf" ■ ■ 



AdolphBlamui. l Two jaua. 

J.L.Vright 

J.A.BIIIton 

L. B.CowdarT " 

J.W. Pnlkamm. 

B.C.BDilat I 

Tbomaa Hnnlar. t " 

O. W. Nicbola 

H.J.Bbbdob Voir Tarn. 

O. O. Baldwli I TbrooTMn. 



Marcb 1. IBTK. 
Uucb ], IVt. 
JanoaiT I, IBTB. 



zedbyGoOglC 



SKOKETAST OF STATE. 
OTTER TAIL COUNTY. 

CODHTT SBAT, TBK6U8 FUXS. 



. OBm- 


IncBinbMit. 


Ttm Df Offl». 




St^tourorDMAil"" 
Jn£|»ofProt«U..... 


SirNS".?.^: 


Tw.,.^. 


ill 


ikI: 














i:^S?"i-:;; 


if 


%. R.F«l<»alt 


1KB. 



PINE COUNTY. 



CWUNTY BBiT, P1K« CITT. 



BwliMi 



D.L.'wiium.^ 

~ - HoLcblDM 

wrwiiooi..!': 

M. A. Bnwiar. 
D. L. WllUrd. 
A. C. HOOglBDd 



POLK COUNTY. 



S&'tS 



Comaar 

a«ik DUtrkt Conn. , 



OODKTT 811T, CKOOKSTON. 



Artbnr TtmnM... 
Jah n CbrlitaMOD ... 
B.E.HBB*y 



P. W, T»ylor 
J. Radland.... 
J.R.Slrb..,. 
1. P. Johmoi 



POPE COUNTY. 



oouutt but, aLxnwooD. 




K. J. Elnnar 

Erick SaidanoD.. 
•lo**pb Paacock... 
J. w. Simmon*.... 
Nonnu Btuwk..., 

Dor RaihbDni 

OleBlig. Jr 

D. A. BHTtk 

TosfTbortoB . .. 
D.KhtXloba.... 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AMHDAI. BBPOBT. 
RAMSEY COUNTT. 

OOUITTT SU.T, tT. FAUL. 



Ottce. 


!....«.. 


ivmor omw 








Pc.iirr«riu 
Ttaraa jmh. 


}S:s i; iS: 


Atton.*, 


CbkrlstH. Boria 

P»Wr OibrUwD 




OlwkSlatTlctCaDrt... 



REDWOOD COUNTY. 



OOUNTT SBAT, BKDWOOD TALLS. 



S£^ 



Oonrt CamialulODac. 



.U-VuSchuek. 

imMDuriuall.... 

'01.Tlbb«l» 

[.D. Baldwin 

[. B.Powall 

I. L.BIshBm 

I. L. Brwbeoek.., 

[.D.BaldwiB 

;.D. Poat 



RENVILLE COUNTY. 

OOUMTT SBAT, BBAVZR FALLS. 



Traaautar... 
Bberiff..., . 

Jndca afpro: 



Clark SIMrlct Court. 



0. O. Johnion... 
F. H. Bharvln. .. 
D.B.Hall 



Utnh 1 
March 1 



Junarr 1, 1S7I. 
tunuTj 1, isn. 
Junarr 1, 1811. 



Coon Oommlailonar, 



RICE COUNTY. 

OOQKTT SKAT, FARIBAULT. 



. IFradarlckW. Frti 

. B. F. Elm1) 

. AnBanou . ... 

. H. JalTen 

. JobDB.Qnlnn.... 
. Qao. N. Saitar... 
. R. H. L. Jawatl... 
. W. W. Wangli.... 
. CbarlMA. Allar. 
. J. A. StrsaUr..... 



Xareb 1, 1B7S. 

Jaauarr 1, IttlV. 

Jtnairr I, 1871. 

January 1, U». 

JaooaiT 1, IBTt. 

Jinnar; 1, IBIt. 

Jatiurr I, ign. 

Jasaarj 1, UTS. 

Jannu? 1, ifn. 



zedbyGoOglC 



•aEGBKTABT Ofr STATE. 
EOCK CODNTT. 
OOCIfTT ai 



OSm. 


IncomlMnt 


T«nn of one*. 




Aadltar 


rnncU Howard 

J. F. Sh<Miiia« 






UST' 


as i K 


Ji^iitrntiou 






Msls. JscotnoD 

t.?;,n3S::::::: 



SAINT LOUIS COUNTY. 



COVXTV MAT, DULCTH. 




IFruik Bnrka 

Baa]. OlllMt 

"-ornBerkslmu.... 

M^B. Halsw.... 

H.Psikn' 

_. 8. Btowart. 

Q.B.8lBBti 

jBanaal t. TbODiHon. 



...iB.F.Pwkw... 



Hanh 1, 187*. 






SCOTT COUNTY. 



OODMTT BUT, eBAKOPBK. 




HitUuHayar.. 

John J.RiDB.... 
Dannto Phhany. 
HaTinin Bamihi 
WUIltm WlMaoD 

...i'. A. Fsllar!!. 
ClurlH Bourth. 

F.j.'whiuMi'.:; 



JUrch 


, WE 




































, Wl 



SHERBUENE COUNTY. 



COUKTT IBAT, ILK BIVEB. 



trktms 

KMJMar of Daadt... 
Jus* of Probata 

Clatk Dbtirtel boirti 
OMTt CwnmlMlOBar. 



F.A.EliKtalr 

J, Q. A. NIckarMD . 

B. B. DaTli 

Wm.KMaU 

B.P. BnrraB 

H.T. Hall 

B.F. 8now 

fchn A.Wagnar 

X.A.JelU»ii 

B.P.BniMll 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc _ 



ANKVJX REPORT. 
SIBLEY COUNTY. 

OOUNTT iXAT, HKRDRRSOH 



OfllM. 


iDCDmbmt. 


T«rinoroaM. 








roirfstn. 

ThrHTMn. 










Bnlxtr Of DMdB 

JbSi* ol Pcobkt* 

Attomoy 


P«trlckC.BA^ 


Ularj , IdTG. 












JmbI^t : m*. 

Juurr , ISK. 












!.A.Klwn 



STEARNS COUNTY; 

oouirrr sb&t, st. clovd. 



SJSSi;-.::;: 




Four irurt. 


sa t 


S3r.',"p',!!r-::::- 


Q«or;«aeliaM 


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JSSS i; 







STEELE COUNTY. 



BeflhU'r or U 
JoSg* of Prot 



C0ni4TT BUT, OWATONMA. 



3.P*d||h>in.-. 

rti ChrnDbc^s! 



Utttb 
Mtreh 



STEVENS COUNTY. 



BittiS'^'.'.'.".'.'.'.' 
Bcfltler of D«Wb 
Jug* of PlOlttU. 

Atlornar 

OotDDcr. 



k Dim 






Oout ConBlMtonw.. 



OOUTT BUT, MORRH. 

W. W. Gri»*old ] Two Tsir*. 

PuBnel LaraoB |' 

R. M. BichirdKin " 

R M. RlebirduB 

K E folfetb t " 

v.J.ritbv t 

Mictiul amMn . . .... " 

TboniaiJ. AroTT. FonrTMn. 

H.B. WoUr. I Ttmajmn. 



March •, Un. 



zedbyGoOgle 



SEOKKTABT OF BTATR. 
SWIFT CODNTT. 

OOnHrr BBAT, BBMSQK. 



oata. 




i^rm or om«. 


CaDinnMnirat of Tarm. 






?£';=;. 


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TODD COUNTY. 



oomrrr skit, lonq pkaibix.. 




durlMB.BnM.. 

M. Dlnkal 

JohnD. JoBM...< 
Wm.O.BrjWi.... 

A.U. Croirall 

J.H.8h««U 

FmnMorrli 

CluTlM Harkln. 



WABASHA COUNTY. 



OOIINTT SKAT. 






Owk DMrlct Court. 



aidserH. Smltb.... 
J>mn O. LftirT«nc*< 
I.F. PojM 

l.'j.'BMtj.'.'.'.'.'."'. 

Cbulm/.BUiJi..'.'. 



JUHUTf 1, 1876. 



WADENA COUNTY. 



COTHITT BKAT, WADIHA. 




































S-OtTdmar 


Poor 



Juotiy 1. 18T«. 



.V Google 



ASBDAL BEPOBT. 
WASECA CO0NTr. 

OOUMTT SEAT, VASIOA. 



OBm. 


Inaambtat. 


T.n«iof oat*. 


CammaoMiiiaDt or Term. 


A dlMT 


Edgmr Cionkhlta 

ffireSS;:::::-:: 

HlnmA. MOBfatr 

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J.nn»rT 

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WASHINGTON COUNTY. 



COUNTY SEAT, BTILLTATUt. 



Auditor 

Traunm 

Bbarll. 

Baclatar of Daadi. ... 

Jndgaor PnbBt* 

Atton>«T 

Clerk Dlitrict Court! 
Coart" ■ ■ 



0«.D**ia 

Hrron Shapturd. . 

J. A. JohDMm 

A.M.Dodd 

E.a. Baita 

FaralU Mirsh.... 
JamaaSlawut,... 

J.C.RbodM 

H>ri>y Wllwn .. 
Ckab C. Nargord. 



Tbraa fair*. 



WATONWAN COUNTY. 



Hharlff. 

Baclatw orDsada. . . . 
Jaoge or Probal* 

SsTraror 

Ooroaar 

Olark DUIrlet Court. . 



Junaa dllapco- 

■ r Clark. ... 
J.J. Thornton. 

1[.B.Md11«i.. 
O. H. Ororholt. 

C. U. Pamaror 



WILKIN COUNTY. 



COONTT BKAT, BBECKBHIUIMIX. 



RaglBlcr or Daadi. 

jDdgeorProlata.. 
Attomar 

Clerk DlatrVct CODi 
Conn CommliBlDi 



Chu. B. Tenay. 
Andrew Brandr 
J R. Harria... 

Campbiil'.: 
lea I^rna. 



zedbyGoOglC 



8E0BBTABT OP STATE, 
WINONA COUNTY. 

CODSTT »AT, VIHOMA. 



OMo*. 




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0. M. WllllMM 


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WEIGHT COUNTY. 



AwllUii 

JlMittaiii'Dteii'.".'.'. 
J*i|*orPnibM* 

Owk DtotrtctCoort^l! 



OOU»TY B«iT, 

..'m.Tnbb* 

John Tonng 

■-"C. NBCBnt.... 
[ W. Oormin. 

jlFUh 

J. H.Wendtll 

JohoT. Aller 

"- E.O C»i)y 

^rci A. Holftn*!, 

T-nTBrlgg* 



YEtLOW MEDICINE COUNTY. 



couxTT BEAT, -rxLLow uxDicusm. 



S«l■Mrof'Dwiu^^'^ 
J^^sIPMlMta 

Ckik DINri^'otart" i 



Harr BerdBwleb 

K. T. ainlllMrg 

ii.o.Haii!!.'."::^^'.'i 

Gorbmiu Pow«n,...., 

GM.B.OIda 

WUMuiiA.UaDrM... 
W.K.McSobnt 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ANNUAl. CEPORT. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPOSALS 



For the Public Printing, <u Bteeived and Opened by the CommisBion- 
ert of Printing, June 16, 1875. 



Nkme of Bidder. 



Per cent. Dis- 
count trota 
" Im'm Rts. 



. DsTid Bamaler — 
. D&Tid Hftmft1ey.>>> 
. NomiBn Wright ■-• 

. J. J. Lemon 

• Norman Wright ... 

. J. K. Hoore 

. Sew&rd<& Taylor.. 
. David Ramaley . . . . . 
. J. J. Lemon 



DigiLized by Google 



SEOBBTABT or STATE. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPOSAI-S 

tbrSStmlAing the Paper for the Public Printing, and the Suoion- 
try /or uteo/the StcUe, a$ Received and Opened by the Secretary 
ttf State, S^ember M, 1875. 



D«scripUaD of Pftper. 

Book Paper 

?<dlo Foat and Flat Cap. 

Colored Uedloms 

HeaTy Taa 



12{ cents per poaod. 
19} centa per poaod 



"i.," 12} cents per pound. 
"B," IS " 
"C," lU " " " 
Excelsior, 2li eta. pr. ponod. 
Florence, 2<i " " " 
Peno. 19 •' " " 

Alva, 18 " " ■' . 

S4.50 per Ream, 24 poaods. 
»6.I10 " " 86 " 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



.AlrirUAL REPOBT. 
STATIOKERT. 



,„,„„.„„ 


nor. OF MTO- 


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BOainxA OAK- 


^SSiSr-c^- 




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cap. wblta bent 
^nalltj 

30 reama,!* lb. latter 

»',■£>«::£ 

S0reemB,8lb.p«ck*t 

triple tblek....r:.. 

36 U, Ho. 6 BDTalopea, 
tilplatblck 

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7 30 " 
3 10 ■' 

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BB eta. per dot 


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BxcMalor, SB eta. 

Bamaaa above. 
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Eicelator, 3Bcta. 

■4 60p«'H. 


SSeanla pat lb. 

» '• " 
30 ■* '• 

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M36p„M. 
4 TO 
3 70 

B 60 pet doc 
BOO 
100 
100 


taeOperrMln. 

140 " 

3 00 ■' 
110 » 

4 SO per M. 
BTO 

aiG " 
lOOpatdoMD. 

BOO •■ 


6 7B pet dO»D. 


lfidoien4oonoa Ar- 

■rleti Ink atindi.,. 
8 doaaa qaarU eitra 

srnVifar.""-.'"' 


1 00 p« doiao. 

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S00pargto». 

70 eta. par doi. 

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7 60 

8 00 
BBOpetgroaa. 

06 ct«. a doaeo. 
70 eta pat !b. 


IBdoeeotoa- mnelt- 




""^^Si^T^.'f^ 


*»0 pargroai. 


Bane, American Lead 


ID doE. Itatcbaider'a 


TBcta.perdoMD. 
latWcta. paHb. 


lOlbeitalionararnt 

s?r>=?b;'r^;.;^-.-..^- 


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eBeantapargto... 


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10 " 


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■6 00 " 

IHperH. 
too ■> 

S 44 per doiaa. 


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•6 60 " 
1 >8 per U. 
3 3« "1 
1 00 pat dot. 


2doi.I41nclirDbbar 
rnlera, lleilbla.,.. 


|4 00 pet doaen 



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98 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

TABLE 

Showing the number of the Vitiet, Boroughs, Villagea and Towtu of 
Minnesota, having not less than 1,500 inhabitants, oixordiitg to 
the State Csjisua May 1, 1873. 



Anokft S,430 

Hanbato 6,116 

NewUlm 3,180 

Hastings 3,644 

CarroltOD S,036 

Chatfleld 1,768 

PreBtoD 1,693 

Spring Valley. 1,8T0 

Albert Lea :.. 1,897 

CauQOoFalla 1,766 

ReawiDg. 6,680 

Waoamliigo l,fiBB 

MiDiieapolls Town 1,8S4 

Ulnneapolla Cliy SS,73l 

HatcbiDson 1,681 

AnatlD Lclty] 2,699 



St. Peter 2,680 

llocheater [cUyl *,8« 

St. PftQl 88,178 

Farlbanit [city} 6,5SS 

NorthQeld 2,140 

Daluth S,9e8 

Sand Creek 1,885 

Shakopee City 1,820 

St. Clond [city] 2,080 

OwatoDDa 2,799 

Lake City 2,«2 

W&batjba 1,886 

Marine .*. 1,6«T 

Stillwater [dty] 6,760 

PrankllQ 1,692 

Winooa 10,787 



Showing tAs number of Deaf and Dumb, Blind, Insane and Idiotic in 
Minnesota, aoeording to the State Census of May 1st, 1875. 



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Skotcing the valuation of (Ae Church Property/ of the State, 6j eoun- 
tiet, according to the c«nsu« taken by authority of the State, May 1, 
1876. 

[ConntieB not nuned made no returns.] 

ANOKA OOUKTT. 

St. 8t«phenB, Catholic, Anoka #3,600 

Pint miTenallBt, Anoka S,000 

First Baptist, Anoka 10,000 , 

Pint CoDgregatlonal, Anoka ls,000 

Trinity, Anoka 1,S00 

Method let EplEcopal, Anoka 8,000 

Swedlab Lniberao, Anoka 3,500 

««,600 

BICEBR OOUNTT. 

Baptisi Chnrcb of Detroit. Detroit 11,100 

BBDTON OODHTT. 

HetbodtHt Chnrch, Sank Rapide 93,800 

Congregational, Sank Rapids '. 3,000 

Episcopal, Sank Hapids 1,200 

Catholic, SankRapldB BOO 

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BLUB KABTH COUNTY. 

Bethel Cal7lTiIstlc Methodist, BotUmat Valie; $600 

Salem Calvlolstli;, Bnttern at Valley 800 

MetliodUt, Bntt«rnDt Valley 1,400 S,800 

CalilnUtIc Methodist Church, Cambria. 1,000 

Congregational, Cambria 800 1,800 

Lotberan, Danville 1,000 

Boman Catholic, DaDTiUe ' 1,000 

Methodist Episcopal, DanWUe i 3,000 4,000 

Begolar Baptist, Oaiden City.. > 3,000 

CalTlnlHtlc Methodist, Jadsoo 3,700 

Fresb} terlan, Jiidson 3,100 

CalTlDlHtIc Methodist, Jndson 3,000 6,800 

Freebyterlan, Lake Cmtal 1,500 

Methodist Episcopal, Lake Crystal 1,000 9,500 

Bomsn Catholic, McPberson 1,870 

14 



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100 AMHtTAI, BBPOBT. 

Cbarch of All SftlDts. Cftthollc.Haakato City.. ■% .... 41,000 

' Cnten 117 He thodlHt Episcopal, Hukato City 19,000 

Pmbjteriin, Minkato Clt; B,IOO 

ChrlBttaD, Haokata City S,EOO 

Saint John's Episcopal, Maalcato City 8,100 

JernsalemETaDgelicalLDtbersD. HankatoClty 8,600 

Tint CaiiKregitlonaltst, Maakato Cltj 3,600 

Baptist, Mankato City SS6 

Erangellcal Lattaereo, HanhatoCtty 200 

TrlD It J Evangel leal Lntberaa, Hankato City 1,SOO 

NorTreglan ETanKellcal LntbaraD, Uaakato Cltj 1 SOO 

Bwedlsh Latherap, Maokato City 1 ,SOO 

Advent, Mankato City 1,000 '79,8SS 

St. JotiD's Lntberan, Pleasant HoDod 800 

House of ZIon, Soath Bead 100 

CongiegatloDsl, Sooth Bend SOO 

PreBbTterlaa.HouthBend.... 300 500 

Congregational, SterlloK 650 

Norwegian Lotheran, Sterling 600 1,250 

Hetbodlst, Yernoa eso 

Total tl04,696 

BBOWH oonsTT. 

Lntberan, Linden .- (3,000 

Rt FaarB EviDgellcai Lutheran, Kew Ulm VatOM 

Holy Trinity, Catholic, New TJlm 13,500 

HethodtHt, New Ulm 4,000 19,800 

Total M1,000 



CAKTBR COUMTT. 

Catholic, Benton .*. .. (ioo 

Lntberan, Banton SSO 

Evangelical Beform, Benton 300 

Union, Benton 300 fB50 

Roman Catholic, Carver • 2, GOO 

Lutheran, Carver 1,000 

Hetbodlst, Carver 800 4,800 

Catholic, Cha»ka 6,000 

HorsTlan, Chasba 4,500 9,500 

Oerman BefoTmad, Dahlgren 1,000 

Swedish Lutheran, Dahlgreo 6,000 7,000 

Lutheran Weal Union, Hancock 1,000 

Assumption, Catholic, Hancock 880 1,880 

Victoria, Catholic, Laketown 4,300 

Moravian Laketown, Laketown 100 

Uoravlan Zoar, Laketown 400 

Scand la Baptist, Latetonu 50 4,7M 

Swedish Lutheran, Watertown 1,250 

Catholic, Watertown 500 1,750 

6t. John's Lutheran, Xonng America 3,000 

St. Panl, Catholic, Yoang America 1,000 

Saint Fanl lUformed, Yonng America 1,000 

Vrledeu's Chnrcb, German Evangelical, Young America GOO 

Bmanoei Evangelist, Tonng America S,0OO 7,500 

Total U7,080 



zedbyGoOgle 



SaOBSTABT OF STATB. 101 

CHIPPEWA COUNTT. 

lAthenn, Lecnthrop 9800 

Methodist, SpsrU OSO 

CongregatloDftl, Sputa 2S0 SOO 

ToUl «00 

oaiuoo COUNT r. 

Swedish Lntherkn, Chisago Lkke tS.OOO 

Methodist EpUcopsl, Chlasgo Lske SOO 

Bvuigel leal Lutheran, Chisago Lftke COO 8,000 

Lutheran, Fish I.aka 703 

Methodist, Franconla • 61G 

Sacred Kame of Jcbds, Rush City 8,C00 

Methodist Episcopal. Wyoming 800 

Lnthenui, Wyoming 800 600 

Total •7.415 

OBOW wmo cotJinT. 

Methodist Episcopal, Bralnerd 91,098 

Baptist, Brainerd 920 

Congregational, Bralnerd 3,a0n 

Episcopal, Bralnerd £,T0O 

CatboUc, Bralnerd 800 

•7,683 

DODQB COUNT V. 

■Church of Concord, Baptist, Concord 91,800 

West St. Olaf's Norwegian Lntheraa, Temon 8,000 

Total •U,800 

DOUOLAS COUNTY. 

LnthrnD, OsaklB $3S6 

Baptist, Oaakls S86 

UethoeUt, OaaUB ZOO 

Total 9960 

VARIBADI.T OOUKTT. 

Zlon Cbnrch of the Evangelical Christian Association, 

Ulnnesota Lake •1,800 

St. Panl La theran, Minnesota Lake 200 3,000 

Method iB t G pis copal, filQe Earth Cltj' 1,800 

Presbyterian, Bine Earth City 4,200 

ETange Ileal Association, Blae Earth City 2,000 

ChDi^ of Qood Shepherd, Episcopal, Bloe Earth City. 4,700 13,700 

Total 14,700 

VILLMORB CODHTT. 

Evangelical Lutheran, Arendahl •S.OOO 

HorwegianLntheran, Arendahl 8,fiOO 6,100 

Motwcgian Lotheran, Bloomfleld 8,600 

Jlorweglaa Latheran, Bloomfleld 1,000 4,600 



zedbyGoOgle 



lOS AlnniAX, BBPOBT. 

Uethodlst Episcopal, Cuiton l.OCO 

Presbyterian, Cinton 1,000 

UethodiBt Eplacopsl, Canton 1,000 S.OOO 

Csibollc, Carlmonii 1,600 

Hetbodliit, C&rroltaa I,0C0 

FresbTterian, Carrolton.. 10,000 

Catholic, Carrolton 13,000 

LntheraD, Carroltou 6,000 18.000 

PreHbyterUo, ChatBetd 2,EO0 

BapclBt. Cbatfleld 600 

St. Matthew's Episcopal, CbaUleld 1,000 

CsUiolic, Chatfleld 7,000 ll,00fr 

Lntherau, Barmouy 8,BS0 

Blgblaod Norwegian LatheraD, Nonvt^ 9,000 

Lntberan, Pilot Mound 8,H0 

Catholic, Kushtord City SOO 

Immannel ProtesttLiit Eplecopsl, RDshford City 800 

Lalberan Trlalty, Uasbford City SOO 

Meihodlat EpiHcopal, Bashford City 800 

Congregational, Knshford Ctty 800 

Norwegian Lntberan, Bnahford Cit; 800 4,7M 

Reform Dntch, York 4,000 

Norwegian Latheran, York 8,000 T,OOI> 

CungregaUonal, Spring yalley S.OOO 

BapilHt, Spring Taller i.GOO 

Latberan, Spring Valley 3,600 7,000 

P^e^b;te^lan, Sumner 1,000 

FIrM Friends, Snmner 1,200 

Cougregatlonal, Snmner < > 8,000 6,300 

Total «98,»S0 

FRKKBORM couirrr. 

First Preibyterlan, Albert Lea tl.SSO 

NorwegiaD Lutheran, Alb«rt Let, 1,400 

Catholic, Albert Lea 226 

First Congregational, Albert Lea 1.100 

Baptist, Albert Lea 1,100 S,aTS 

Norwi!glan l!,iither*n. Freeman 1,800 

Norwegian Lntberan, MancbSflter 600 

Norwegian Lntberan, Nnnda 1,000 

Lntberan Datch, Nnnda 200 

United Brethren in Cbrlst, Nanda 400 

Free-will Baptlat, Nnnda 60 4,560 



Total.. 



QOODHUK COUHTr, 



St. . eter'B Norwegian Latheran. Red Wing 92,000 

Swedish Methodist, Bed Wing l.£00 

Norwegian Methodist, Red Wing 1,200 

NorwigianLutbeian, Red Wing 8,600 

Gerniun MetbodlaC, Bed Wing 1,000 

Stredliih LaLberan, Red Wing 10,000 

Scandinavian Lntberan, Red Wing 2,600 

First Pre} bjterian, Red Wing 10,000 

Catholic, Red Wing 7,000 

First Bap tlBt, Red Wing 4,000 

CbrlBt L'hurch Episcopal, Red Wing 92,600 

German Lntberan, Red Wing 8,000 

first Methodist Episcopal, Red Wing 18,000 



zedbyGoOglC 



BBOBBTABT OF STATE. 103 

SplBcopal, B«Ue Creek 1,500 

Catbollc, Belle Creek 1,000 2,500 

<}enDftn Latheran, BeUldere 8O0 

ScaudlniTian Lutheran, Belvldere 3,600 

ScandliMTlui Methodlat Eplscopsl, Belvldere 1,200 4,500 

St. Ansgftril Snedlah Lotheran, CuinoD Ftlls 3,500 

-BwedlHh Lutheran, Can no d If alls 800 

Cbnrch or the Redeemer, Episcopal, CaoDOn Falls 4,000 

Congregational, Cannoo S'allH 3,500 

Catholic, Camion Falls 3,000 

Methodist Episcopal, Cannon Falls...' 500 11,800 

Uethodlst, Featheratone GOO 

Oamuui Allbrlght Chnrcb, Lntherao, Feathentona.... 600 10,000 

German Lntheran, Florence 2,000 

Chrbt ChQTcb, Episcopal, Florence 8,000 

West Florence Presbfterlan, Florence 2,000 7,000 

First PreabyUrlau, Ooodhne 1,200 

Swedii>b Lntheran, Goodhue 600 

German Lathe ran, Goodhae 700 S,600 

Oeiman Lntheran, Hay Creek.- ■■ 800 

Qerman Lntheran School, Ha7 Cieek 1,500 

German Methodist, Hay Creek 3,500 4,600 

Morweglan Litheran, Holden 4,000 

God'a Latheran, Kenyon.^ 5,500 

Haoges Lutheran, Kenyon 1,500 

AsoenHion Episcopal, Kenfon 1,400 8,400 

Swedish Lutheran, Leon 400 

Norwegian Lathersn, Leon 4,00i) 4,440 

Xotheran, MinneoU 2,000 

Mlnneola Lntheran, Mlnneola 3,500 

Bnpttat, Mluneola 3,000 

Hethwllst Episcopal, Mlnneolft. 2,S0O 

St. John's Latheran, HInneola 3,.S00 11,600 

Hetbodlst Epl scops 1, Fine Island 2,uoo 

Bplacopal, Pine Island 2,000 

Cerman Lntheran, Pine Island. 500 4,600 

Swedish Lniberan, Vasa 26,000 

Methodist Episcopal, Vasa BOO 

Swedish Baptist, Vasa 1,000 36,800 

Holiien Lutheran, Wanamlngo 14.000 

Immannel Lntheran, Wanamingo 8,000 

Dahle Lutheran, Wanamlngo ■ 8,600 

Wananilngo Lntheran, Wanamlngo 8,500 28,000 

ToUl tlS7,600 



Methodist Bplscopal, Minneapolis $900 

St. Boniface, Catholic, Minnespolls.....* 6,700 

SlaurSt. Joe, Cstholtc, Minneapolis 6,300 

St. AnthoDjor Fadna, Catholic. HlnneapoUs 11,000 

St Anthony Tamers' Society, Minneapolis 11,000 

Baptist, Minneapolis 300 

Unlversallat. Minneapolis. 12,000 

Episcopal, Minneapolis 13,600 

CoDgregatlonal, Minneapolis 18,000 

Colored Methodist, Minneapolis 200 

St. Andrew Fresh} terlan, Minneapolis 10,000 

BaptUt, Minneapolis 6,000 

Holjr Trinity, Minneapolis 10,000 

AdTeot, Minneapolis 1,600 

Oetnuui Methodist Eplscopsl, MlonespoUa 3,500 



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104 ANKUAL BEPORT. 

TeBtern ATenoe MlHlon, HlDneapoUa 1,600 

Catholic, MinneKpollH ,..' U,OOD 

First Bapttiit, MlnnekpoUs 20,00" 

St. Mark's Episcopal, MID neap ollB 63,000 

Free-will Baptixt, MIoaeapolla 12,000 

Ptymoatb CongregMtlocal, HlDneapollB 70,000 

Westmlaster Presbyterian, Minneapolis 16,000 

Society of Friends, Minneapolis 10,000 

Hettiodlat Episcopal. Minneapolis 66,000 

First ITnlversallit, Minneapolis 70,000 

Oerman Methodist Episcopal, Mlnneapolla IG,000 

All Saints Chnrcb, Episcopal. MinneapollB 1,600 

Hobart Chapel, Methodist, Minneapolis 800 

Swede nborglan, Mlnaaapolls S,600 

Finh Avenne Baptist, Mlnneipolls 6.000 

Oethsemane, Episcopal, MinneapollB IS,000 

Oerman Latberan Trinity, Minneapolis 7,600 

Norwegian Lntberan, Minneapolis 6,000 

Methodist Episcopal, MinneapollB 10,000 

Third Street Tabernacle, Hethodlat, HlDoeapolls 600 

Norwegian Lutheran, Minneapolis 7,000 

First Presbyterian, HlnoeapoliB 21,600 

Eighteenth ArenatiUeUiodl8tEplBeopal,MlDneBpollSw 1,600 

Second Congregational, Minneapolis ; 12,000 

Franhlin Avenne Presbyterian, MinneapollB 3,000 

Bwedl:<h Methodist Episcopal, Mlnn«BpoliB 4,000 

Swedish Lntberan, Minneapolis -••- 8,000 

Swedish Baptist, Minneapolis 4,000 

Tenih Ward Baptist Mission, MinneapollB 1,600 

Oak Grove Presbyterian, Bloomlngton 

Catholic, Crystal Lake 1,200 

Free-will Baptist, Crystal Lake 1,600 

Lutheran, Qreenwooil 

St. John's Episcopal, Hassan 

P. M. Advent. Independent 

Hetb od is t Episcopal, Maple Grove 

Presbyterian, Medina 2,000 

Oerman Catholic, Medina 4,000 

French Catholic, Medina 3,000 

Oerman Catholic, Medina 2,000 

Methodist Episcopal, totrn of Mlnpespolts 

Catholic, Mlnnetrista t 255 

Catholic, Minnetrlsla 235 

Catholic, Mlnnetrlsta 235 

Catholic, Mlnnetrlata 400 

Catholic, Mlnnetrlsta 850 

Baptist, MInnetrlsU 300 

Bplt-copal, Hlanetouka, 

Roman Catholic, Osseo 

Medicine Lake, Flymoatb 400 

Methodist, Plymouth 1,000 

Total ~ 

HODSTOM CODMTY. 

Norwegian Lntheran, Black Hammer 

Episcopal, Brownsville (300 

Lntheran, BiownsrlUe 1,000 

HethodlBt, BroWTiBvllle 500 

Prei-byterlan, Brownsville 1,200 

Catholic, SrownsflUe 16,000 



zedbyGoOgle 



8E0BETABT OF, STATE. 

Uathodlflt Eplacopftl, CkledonU 1 ,S(» 

Trlnltr Eplaoopal, Caledonia 1,500 

PreabjUTlan, Caledonia l,SOo 

St.Feter's Catholic, Caledonln 36,000 

8t . Jobn'i, Catbollc, Caledonia 6,000 

Bt. Jf icbolaa, Catholic, Crook Creek 

CoDTeat, Notre Dame, Catholic, Bokab 8,600 

Hethodlst, Hokah AOO 

Oermau Lutheran, Bokab 1,000 

Presbyterian, Hokah 800 

Episcopal, Houston 800 

Catholic, HoTiBton 8,000 

Bt. Patrick, Catholic, Jefferaon 

Catholic. La Crescent 1,000 

Methodlat, La Creaceat 8,000 

Prtisb/terlan, La Crescent S,000 

Baptist, HonejCpeek 8,000 

UelhodUt, Money Creek 1,000 

iTaDReltcal, Hound Fialrie 

PresbTterlan, Sheldon SOO 

Latbaran, Sheldon fi,000 

Lntherao, Spring Qrove 

Lutberan, Wilmington 

First LDth«ran, Winnebago 8,500 

Second Lutheran, Wlnne Dago 3,000 

Third Lnthenu), Wlmiebago 1,000 

Total ~ 

KAMDirOBI OOtlMTT. 

Svea Lntberan, Whitelleld 

Vorweglan and DanUh ETaog«Ilcal Lvthcnui, WUlmar #1,400 

Presbftertan, WlUmar 3,16a 

8C. Lake's Episcopal, Willmar 3,000 

' Norwegian Latheran, Willmar 1,400 

Catholic. Willmar 600 

LQtberan, Nevr London 

Uamre Lund Latheran, Harare 400 

Saleui Lntberan, Hamre 276 

Boman Catholic, KandtyoDl 1,000 

Latberan, Kandljohl 600 

Baptist, Kaadlfohl 600 

Hethodlst, Kandiyohi ],S0O 

fiTredlsh Methodist, Qenesee '. 1,<KX) 

' Swedish Latheran, Genefeee 1,000 

BcandlBavtan Lotheran, Dover 150 

TIker, Dover '. 150 

Norwegian Lntberan, Burbank 

Total 

LI am 

Methodist Episcopal, Clereland f 1,000 

Presbyterian, CleTelend 800 

Boman Catholic, Cleyeland 800 

Lntberan, Cleveland 360 

Methodist Episcopal, Kasota 

Bplscopal, LcSnenr 1,000 

Boman Catholic, I^Suanr 1,500 

First Baptist, LeSneur 600 

Presbyterian, LeSuenr I, BOO 

Lutheran, LeSoenr SOO 

Metbodiat, LeSiMiii • BOO 



6,500 
3,200 
8,600 



'6,600 
»M,IOO 



8,600 
S,000 



zedbyGoOgle 



106 AVNUAL BEPOBT. 

Sl MlcbMl's CUtaoUc, HoDtgomerr 1,3E0 

UethodiBt, Ottawa 1,500 

EplBcopat. Ottawa J,200 

Welsh Methodist, Ottawft GOO 8,800 

St. UeDiy, Catbollc, Sbaron.. 

St. John's or the EvanceUcal AaaoctittoD of North 

America, Sbaron 1,000 

Uethodlst Episcopal, Sharon 600 

Qeniian Lotheran, Sbaron 1,600 

0«rman Baptist, Sharon I,iOO 

Chnrch or Christ, Sbaron 1,000 7,TO0 

Total IW.IOO 

iClkos codmtt. ^ 

Hetboaist, Oleneoe tOOO , 

Congregational, Glencoe 1,200 

Caltiolic, Qleneoe 1 ,000 98,100 

Methodist Episcopal, Hatchlnson 8,400 

Lntheran, Untcblnson 1,000 1,400 

Lutheran, Bergen 1,200 

Lntheiran, Bergen 800 

Parsonage Methodtst Episcopal, Bergen 800 

Latheran, Bergen 600 3,900 

Evangel tea!, A en ma 1,100 

Latheran, Acoma l,GO0 2,700 

Lnlheran, Helen 1 600 

Catholic, Rich Valte; 1,200 

Catholic, Kiel) Vallej 800 3,000 

St. Mathew Latheran, Penn 1,800 

Catholic, Wlnated 2,360 

Total »kO.S60 

HUKBB OOCNTT. 

Arendal Lutheran, Acton #1,000 

' TbtODdhtiim Lntberan, Acton 800 

Swedish Baptist, Acton TOO 92,800 

Freabjterlan, Ellsworth 1,000 

Catholic, Forest City 2,000 

Preabylerlaa, Oreenleai 460 

Catb otic. Green loaf 900 1,850 

Trinity, LltchHeld * 1,600 

Methodist Episcopal, LItcbfleld „... 1,000 

Christian, LitchQeld 1,000 

Swedish HethodlBt Episcopal, Litchfield 800 

Chnrcli, Litchfield 600 

PTeabyterlaa, Litchfield 1,000 

Lutheran, LitchQeld 800 6,600 

Latheran, Swede Grov« SOO 

Total lis, 750 

MOBBUOK OOUNTT. 

Boman Cathtrflc, Belle Prairie 9800 

Saraan rathollc, Little Falls 9600 

Bplscopsl, Little Falls 800 

CongTegaUooal, Little Palls 200 1,100 

Boman Catholic, Plera 500 

Roman Catholic, Two Blfera 400 

Tolal 92,800 

DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



SHOBBTABT OF STATE. 11)7 
UOVBK OOCTtlTY. 

Cittaollc, Adama ^ |S,900 

LnthenkD, Aduaa 1,400 #5,100 

Episcopftl. Austin 2,000 

CoDgreg&tlou&l, AaatiD.>>. i,C00 

Fretbytetian, Aii»1il 1,200 

Lntheran, AaatlQ 1,200 

Methodist, AnBUn 2,000 

Baptist, Austin 1,200 

Boraan CatboUc, Aastln 6,000 

UDlvenallst, Aaatln 1,200 

HlHsloQ, Austin 700 18,000 

Methodist Episcopal, town of Anstln 400 

ScandlaaTtan Methodist Episcopal, Qrand Meadow-.. I,000 

HethodUt Episcopal, Itanalag l.JOO 

First Baptist, Le K07 8,100 

Lntheraa, LeRoj 250 

Presbyterian, LaSoy 4,100 7,410 

Lathenui, Nevada 1 200 I 

Baptist, Bed Bock 2,600 ' 

CODgregatlonal, Bed Bock 1,000 

Methodist Episcopal, Bed Bock GOO 

Disciples, Red Bock I,SOO 

FieeHaaoDs, Red Bock.... MO 6,000 

Congregational, Wlndom 1,000 

Total «41,(HU) 

NICOLLBT CODMTY. 

Lntheran, Bernadotte fg 800 

Lntheran, ConrCland '^qq 

SwedUh Evangutlcal Latheran, Lake Pntlrle #1,900 

Norwegian Ef angelical Latberan, Lake Prairie 2 000 S,EKX) 

First Norwegian Lntheran, Oabawa 1,000 

Second Norwegian Lutheran, Oshawa E,B00 

Swedish Lutheran, Oshawa 2,S00 

Zlon Oermae Latheran, Oshawa 1,801) 

Oermaa Lntheran, Oshawa 2,500 

Catholic, O.^thawa 6,000 

Methodist, Oshawa 8,600 

Presbyterian, Oshawa 13,000 

Episcopal, Oshawa 10,000 

Christian, Oshawa 800 42,600 

Lutheran, Rtdgely 4gg 

St. Nlcholaii, Traverse 1 S50 

St. George's, W«ai Newton s'oOO 

Total »iS^ 

OLHSTKD aODNTT. 

M«thodlat Episcopal, Byron 94.000 

BapH8t.Brron 8,000 •7,600 

United Brethren, Elmtra .- 4fi0 

Methodist, Elmira 1,000 1,430 

Latheran, Farniington S,74U 

Methodist, FarmlngtOD S,000 

Baptist, Farmiogton 1,900 8,6iO 

Presbyterian, High Forest 1 200 

DIadples of Christ Baptist, Marlon 1,000 

Methodist, Marlon 1,000 2,600 

15 



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108 ANNUAL BEFOBT. 

Boman CKtholtc, St. Bridget, PlMnnt Qn>T« 10,(00 

Chorcb of CbrlBt, Fleuant Qrore B,OtO 

Hethodlst EptBcopal, PieMUl QrOTe 3,0(0 

BvangeMBt, Piusant QroTS 560 15,180 

Balem, Qalncy S,800 

XiTBngellcal Association, N. A., Bochester 3,800 

Bt. John's BomBD Catholic, Rochester 3S,E0O 

ScSiDdinivlan Lotberau Cougregatloo or Rochester, 

Rochester 3,000 

First Baptist, Rochester 16,000 

CoDftregatlooal, Bocbeatar 6,000 

German Lutheran, Rochester 1,000 

Method iBt Episcopal, Rochestar ]S,000 

Calvary Parish, Rochester 8,000 

First PreHbrterlan, Rochester 10,000 

UnlTersallet, Rochester 3,500 

OertnaD HetbodUt, Rochester 3,000 M,80l> 

SI. Olars Latheraa, Rock Dell 19,000 

Hangeaner'a Lutheran, Salem 1,500 

Total «1U,040 

POP* oomnrr. 

Lntheran, Baraness flOO 

Roronga. Ben Wade ' gSOO 

SU Pant, Ben Wade 100 MO 

Relbnned Preibyterlan, Reno 1,010 

First District Lake JobaoDa, CongregaUonal, Lake Jo- 
hanna 547 

Indberrld, White Bear Lake 350 

Total ta,j07 

BUUBT COWTY. 

First Baptist, St. Paul •CS,000 

Swedish, St. Paul 6,000 

Norwegian Lutheran, Sk Paul 1,500 

Z Ion Lntheran, St. Paul 8,000 

First German Methodist Episcopal, St Paul 7,600 

ScandlDSTlan Methodist Episcopal, St. Paul 3,EO0 

Uoltj, Bt. Paul 8,600 

Womans Christian Homes, St. Paul 8,000 

Fllgrlm Church Baptist, Bt. Paul 1,000 

St. Louis Catholic, St. Paul 4,G00 

Free Cborch of Good Shepherd Episcopal, St. Paul... 8,000 

Mount Z<on Chnrcb. Hebrew, St. Paul S,000 

Jachsou Street Methodist Episcopal, St. Paul 18,000 

Central Presbyterian, St. Panl 18,000 

Chnrch of the Meslah, Unl vers alist, St. Paul 80,000 

St. FsnlETaDgellcal, St. Panl 2,600 

Cathedral of St. Pan), St. Paul 60,000 

Assumption Church, Catholic, St. Paul 86,000 

Christ, Episcopal, St. Paul 14,000 

Plymotith Congregational, St. Paul 12,000 

German Lutheran, St.Papl 8,060 

Uonse or Hope PresbyterUn, St. Patil 80,000 

St. Joseph's Church, St. Paul 8,600 

St. StsnIslaoB, Catholic, 8t, Pant S,60O 

Salem Evangelical Association, St. Paul 3,000 

First Methodist Episcopal, St. Paol 17,000 

Dayton Avenue Preabyterian, St. Paul 1,800 



zedbyGoOgle 



SBOBBTAST OF 8TATB. 109 

Qennsn HetbodlBt Episcopal, Bt. Fuil 1,500 

8t Joseph's Hospital, St. Pinl 10,000 

Hoateof Good Sbephen), St. FmI S0,000 

Protostsnt Orphsn Asylam, St. Paul 10,000 

St. Joseph's Academy, St. fani 30,000 

Qemiaii Readtnn Society, Bt. Pag] fl,000 

St. Mary's, St. Paul 18,000 

St. Paul's Episcopal, St. Pul 18,000 

Broanoel Evangelical AssoclftUon, St. Fani >,SC0 

Swedish. St. Paul 1,000 

Bt. JohD'«La(beran. St. Panl 8,000 

First PresbyterlsD, Bt. Paal 10,000 

First Methodist, St. Paul 1,300 

Catholic Orphan Asylum, Bt. Paul 11,000 

Home of the Friendless, SL F*Ql 6,000 

Academy of VislUtloa. St. Paul 7,000 

St. Hlchaefs, St. Paa!..... S,S00 

Sixth Ward Methodist, St. Paul...... 3,400 

Total tMaiTOO 

MCI OOUMTT. 

Frotestaot BplMoptJ, Brldgeirater tlfiiSOO 

Methodist Epiocopal, Bridgenater 4,000 

Preabyterlan, Bridge water 3,000 f3l,30V 

Plymoatb CongreKatlooal, Farlbanlt IE,000 

Norwegian BTaogcUcal Lutberai), FulbsDlt 3,800 

Methodist Episcopal, Farlbanlt..^ 1,600 

German Methodist, Farlbanlt 8,000 

German Latheran, Farlbanlt 4,600 

First BaptUt, Firibaalt 4,000 

Scandinavian Evangelical Lntheran, Farlbanlt 600 

Charch of the Immacnlate Conception, Farlbanlt. 30,000 

Cathedral of oar Merciful Savlonr, Faribanlt. 47.000 

Memorial Chapel of the Good Shepherd, Farlbanlt .. . 30,400 

German Catholic, Farlbanlt 2,000 130,900 

Lotheran, Forest 400 

Bt. JobD's, Horrlstown 1,000 

Methodist, Horrlstown TOO 

Baptist, Horrtetown SOO 

Christian, Horristown 100 3,800 

Congregational. No rthfleld 8,000 

Baptist, Nortbfleld 3,G0O 

Hetbodlsi EplRcopsl, NorthQeld 2,000 

Episcopal, NorthQeld 2,B0O 

Lutheran, Mortbfleltl 1,S00 

CatfaoUc, NorthBeld 2,000 

Public School, Northfleld 80,000 

Carlton College, Hortblleld 60,000 98,600 

German Methodist, town of Northfleld 1,000 

Methodist Eplscojnl, Richland 800 

Chnrch of St. Patrick, SkleldsvUle 1,600 

Methodist Episcopal, Warsaw 3,000 

Bpiscopal, Warsaw 3,600 4,E0D 

Catholic, Wheatland 1,200 

Catholic, Wheatland SOO 1,700 

ETangeilcal Latberan, Wheeling 2,000 

Salems Chnrch, German, Wheeling 1,500 

BvoDgellcal St. John's Charch, Wheeling 6,000 

A. C. E. Chnrch, Qerman, Wheeling 2,600 11,000 

Total 9268,300 

Lc-,:...dbv Google 



ANKUAL RKFOBT. 



8T- lOVIB OOUHTT. 



Klc« Point PKBbj'tariui, Dulath 92,000 

Bvedlah Uethodlst, DalDth 3,000 

FInt PresbjUrltn, Dalath 16,000 

PUgTlni CoQgregation&l, Dolntti 8,600 

Methodlat Eplacop&l, Dalnth 8,000 

Flnt BapttBt, Dalath 4.000 

Swedish LnthNU), Dnluth !,E00 

ToHJ t«S,000 

900TT OOUHTT. 

Concord EplAcopkl Uethodlst, Spring Lake flOO 

Bt. Catherlne'B, Catholic, Springlike 400 

Pish Lake Lnthenn, Sprlnfc Lake 300 800 

St. John's Lntheran, Sh&kopee , 2,600 

St. Marcns, Catholic, Shakopee S0,000 

St. Mary's, Catholic, Shakopee 7,000 

St. Mary's, Episcopal, Shakopee S,000 

Hethodlat Episcopal, Shakopee S,GOO 

Pint Preabyterlaa, Shakopee B,000 

St. Oertrodei Convent, Shakopee 12,000 

St. Benedict's Orphan Asylnm, Sbakopee 1,800 Sl,800 

St. John Baptlste, Catholic, Sand Creek S.OOO 

St. Paul Lntheran, Sand Creek ; 1,000 

Presbyterian, Band Creek . S.SOO 

St. Joseph, Catholic, Sand Creek .« 0,000 18,600 

St. Harien, Catholic, LonlBvllle 8,600 

St. Nicholas, Catholic, New Market 4,000 

St. Benedict, Catholic, Helena 6,050 

St. Wenclslaoa, Catholic, Helena 6,800 II 860 

Catholic, aiendale 6,000 

Presbyterian, Qlendale 800 6,800 

St. Peter's Chnrcb, Catholic, Credit BWer, 4,080 

St. Patrick's Cbarch, CatboUc, Cedar Lake 10,000 

The Chnrcb of the Transflgnratlon, Episcopal, Belle 

Plalne ; 6,000 

Presbyterian, Belle Plalne 8,000 

Baptist, Belle Plalne 3,000 

Church of St. Peter, Qennan Catbollc, Belle Plalne. ... 6,000 

Church of the Sacred Heart. Catholic, Belle Plalne.... 36,000 46,000 

Total »166,880 

BIBLBT CODNTT. 

LnthL-ran, Arlington f600 

Lntheran, Arlington 800 

Methodist, Arlington 2,000 f3,800 

Boman Catbollc, Psion 500 

Roman Catholic, Henderson »... 10,000 

Bvungellcal, Uendenion • 1,000 

EplKopal, Hendercon SOO 

Methodist, Henderson 600 tIS.OOO 

Methodist Episcopal, New Auburn lioOO 

Jeasenlaod Chnrcb, Catholic, Jesaenland 2,300 

Boman Catholic Washington Lake v!oOO 

St. Johannes Lntheran, Drydon lOSO 

Evangelical Lotberan, Qreen Isle 'l80 

Total «31,740 

DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



BEOBBTART OP STATB. 



•TPARKS 

Sl SUrven C'>llege, Brockmy 9S90 

8t. Johiit. Ciitholic, Grovu 8,000 

St. NIcbulu. Cathollr, Lozembari 900 

Cirar Water Lodge, Ljndeu 100 

Uetfaodlst Episcopal, Maine Fralrle 1,RD0 

St. Heter ftDd Faal, Catholic, Manson COO 

St. MiriA, Catholic, Oak 8,000 

Hethadlnt Episcopal, FarDesvllle 1,7G0 

Congngatlonal, Pa;ne8Tllle I,UO 

■ Germao, PayuL-sviUe 1,200 *,M0 ' 

GermaD Cathulic, SalDt AoKattK. IB.OOO 

Catholic, St. Cload 40,000 

CoDgKgatiooal, St. Cload 6,000 

Methodist, St. Cloud 8,000 

Episcopal. 8L ClODld 2,600 

FretibTterlaa, Bb Cload 1,600 

Baptist, St. Cloud 1,000 58,000 

St. Joseph Catholic, St. Joseph 80,000 

Catholic, St. Martin 2,000 

Methodist EpUpocal, Sank Genter 1,000 

CongregaCloD, Saak Center 1 600 

Caibullc. Sauk Center 1,000 

EptHc opal. Sauk Center. 3 000 6,600 

Bt. Htchael, Catholic, Spring Valley 1,000 

St. James Wakefield t,600 

Oennao Heihodlat Episcopal, Zlon 1,000 

Total $127,820 

StKXLB OODNTT. 

BoiDBD Catboltc, DeerlleM fJMO 

Oe rm an Lntberan, Havana t3,600 

Norwegian Z.nUie HID, Havana 600 

Ffm Meibodlst, Havana 100 8,600 

ConRregailonal, Uwatonna ., 6,196 

Baptist, OwatoDDa 8,676 

MeihodKt Ep<scopa1, Owatonna 1,676 

Epiacopul, Uwatoana 3,026 

First Fresbjtertau, Owatonna S26 

Univeniailst, Onatonna 1,736 

Boman Catholic, OKatonoa 1,760 17,770 

Total #31,870 

WABABBA OOUKTT. 

Christian, I'lalaview «I,000 

Methodist, Plalnvlew.... 4,000 

Congregational, FlalnvluTr 6,I2S 911,136 

EpiHcopat, Luke City 8,000 

CunKregailonal, Lake City 6,600 

Catholic, Lake City 3,600 

Presbyterian, Lake City 4,000 

Mc thudlst, Laka City 4,600 

fiaiitlst. Lake City 4,700 

Swedish, Lake City 1^ 96,800 

First Congregational, Mazeppa S,S00 

Lntheran, Oakwood 8S0 

Methodist, Oakwood SSO 

CaLbollc, Uaknood 800 1,960 



zedbyGoOgle 



m AUSUAIj befobt. 

CongreKfttloual, Wibaaba Ctty l,SOa 

Old Catbn] ic, Wftbashs City S.fiOO 

New Catholic, Waba^ba City as.OOO 

Bplscupal, Wabasha City 2,000 

Oennai] Lutheran, Wabafha City 800 

If ethodlat Bplscwpal, Wabasha City l.BOO 34,SO0 

ToUl »TS.e75 

^ WASKCA COUNTY. 

, St. HiT7 Church, Catholic, St. Mary «SI2 . 

Lntheran Congrfgatlooal, Otlsco 500 

Cougregationil, Waaeca tMOO 

Baptist, Waaeca 1,000 

Oermaa Methodist, Waneca 8,000 

Evangelical. Wsseca. 2,000 

Methodist, Waseca 8,000 

Episcopal, Waseca 400 

Catholic, Waseca !,S00 16,W0 

Total , ilTiSia 

WASHIKOTOM CODNTV. 

Congregationai, Aftou $>,:00 

Swede Methodist, Afton 1,000 

OermaD Lutheran, Anon . 1,400 94,800 

St. Johns, BaytowD 800 

Congregational, CottMge Orove 3,000 

Hathodlst, Cottage Orove 11,000 

Catholic, Cnttage Giove 1,500 7,500 

St. Mark's Episcopal, DeamaTk I.AOO • 

81. Mark's Episcopal, Denmark 1,000 

Lntheran, I)enmar)t 1,200 S,T00 

Baptist. Lahelind 1,1^6 

Congregational, Lakeland 1,125 

Lntheran, Lakeland T3S 

Lntheran, Lakeland J2i S,TOO 

Swedish Lntheran, Marine 2,U0O 

Swedish Lutheran, Marine l.SUO 

Congregational, Marina 1,800 

Swedish Methodist, Marine BOO 6,100 

Methodist Eplicopa], Newport 3,500 

First Baptist, Newport 1,600 

Methodist Episcopal, Newport 8,000 

University, Newport 750 8,060 

Lntherac, Oakdale 4,E00 

Catholic, Oakdale l,S0O 8,000 

St. Michael's, Stillwater 55,000 

St, Mary's, Stillwater 4,003 

First Presbyterian, Stillwater 5,000 

Second Presbyterian, Stillwater 8,500 

Methodist, Stillwater 5,000 

Germsn Lntheran, Stillwater 2,000 

Swedish Lutheran, Stillwater A,000 

Ascension, Stillwater 7,000 

Uiiiver8a)lst,Silllwater 5,000 89,G0O 

German Methodist Episcopal, Woodbury 5,000 

German Lntheran. Woodbar; 1,000 

German Lntheran, Woodbury SOU 6,800 

Total »lil,06ti 



zedbyGoOgle 



SEOaETAKT OF STATE. 113 
WATOKWiH CODHTY. 

Latharui. LongL&ke 1800 

PiesbyterlkQ, Uadelia #1,500 

Malhodii-l. Maddla 1,100 

BomaD Cstliotic, Modella 1,300 

Hadella Asuoclttlan, HadelU 800 

Korwegtaa Lntberaa, Madelia 400 4,500 

Bomtm CatboUc, St. James 1,000 

Metbodlet Episcopal, 81. James ],000 

Baptist, St Jamca I.OOU 

ScandlnaTlan Lotheran, St. James 1,500 4,500 

Total t9,800 

WINUMA CODNTT. 

Catholic, Elba •8,000 

Frekbyterlan, Fremont 8,000 

Catholic, Hart #1,400 

LaUieraa, Uart 1,600 a,900 

Episcopal, Ulllsdale 3,100 

Hf tbodlst Episcopal, Hillsdale 3,000 4,300 

LnthersD, Homei 1,600 

Oerman Eva Djte Ileal ZIon, Moant Ternoo 1,000 

HerDhater, Mortoo 1,800 

Boman Catholic, Pleasant Hill I.TOO 

HolyTrlult;, Catholic, KollDgstone 4,000 

Baptist, Rollngatone ),20D 6,200 

Congregatloaal, St. Charles 1,800 

Methodist Episcopei, st.Charlea 4,300 

Preabjterian, St. Charles. 4,000 

Baptist, St. CharieA 8,000 

Splscopal, St. Charles 3,000 

Catholic, St. Charles 4,000 19,000 

CoDgregsttonal, Saratoga 1,000 

Metr IiDtherao, Utica SOO 

Old Lutheran, UtUs TOO 

Bolted Brothers, UtIca 1,S00 2,700 

HethodUt Kpiscopa], Warren 3,140 

DUDkers. Warren 1.400 

Qerman Presbyterian, Warron I,'J00 4,740 

BTangellcal, Wilson 1,200 

Latheran, Wilson 1,800 

CatboUc, Wilson 8,000 6,000 

Second Advent, Winona 3,000 

First Baptist, Winona 7,000 

St. Joseph, Oerm&D Catholic, Winona. 11,000 

St. BtanislaUH, Catholic, Winona 9,000 

St. Thomas, Catholic, Winona S9,000 

St. Haitina, Lntheran, Winona 14,900 

First Cougregatlonal. Winona 10,000 

St. Pauls, Episcopal, Winona 80,000 

ZioD, £TaDg«llca1. Wlnoaa 4,600 

Norwegian Lutheran, Winona 4,200 

First Methodise Episcopal, Winona. 82,800 

Weat bod MlaaloD, H. £., Winooa 2,000 

Usibodlst Episcopal, Winona 4,500 

Fnt Presbyteilaii, Winona. 11,500 

0«rm an Presbyterian, Winona 0,300 

UnlUilao. Winona 3,800 178,400 

Hatbodist, Whitewater 1,300 

Total. #286,840 

DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



ANKCAi; BKFOBT. 



WBIQBT OODKTT. 



CoDgregatlODst, ClurwaWr 9600 

Hetbodlst, Clearw&ter , SOO 

CaOioilc, CleMW»ter 2S0 

Unlverailiat. Cleanrater 100 tl.ilO 

Lntberati, Cokato 1.100 

Lotherao. Cokato S20 

B«ptl8t, Coksto 1,100 3,«0 

8C. Mlchnel's Cstbolic, Ftmnkfort 6,000 

Bontnn Cacbollc, Franklin 1,000 

FrexhjurlaB, Town of Franklin 1,400 

HetbodUt. Town or Franklin 3,000 

Bomen Catholic, Ddaao 8,800 

LDCberan, Delano 800 6,000 

Normand Bom »n Catholic, Frfloch Lake 1,000 

CaUioltc, Maple Lake 1,!00 

WkTerlf Roman Catholic Cbarch Arcb, HarjSTlIle.... 1,800 

HuysTUle Catholic, Hu7S*111e SOO 1,600 

VriendB Hiffhlands, MJddleTllle SSO 

Friends SjTvaD Orove, HlddleTllle SOO 660 

HetbodUt Episcopal, Honticello 8,100 

Cengregatlona], Honticello 3,000 

Baptist. Ma Dtlcel Jo S.OOO 

Advent, MontlceUo 3,600 9,«O0 

Methodist Episcopal, Otoego S,460 

Lntheran, Rockford SOO 

Fresbjftedan, Rockford 1,100 

Methodist, Rockfbrd SSO 2,050 

Methodist Episcopal, Silver Creak .>.... SOO 

Good Latheran, Stockholm 600 

Friends, Victor 99S 

Christian, Victor • 1,86^ 

Methodist Episcopal, Victor 900 

German Lntherao, Victor SEO 4,6SG 

Total •43,SU 

YELJjOV MKDICDIB 00UHT7. 

LotheruSjDodiStonej'RQn «4» 

To a demand tor reinma from Dakota connty, Ihe countjr auditor forwards 
bis estimates of the aggregate valaatlon of chnrcb propert; In the several 
towns, and a elmllar estimate at the assessor of Hastings, of the valaatlon 
o( Bach property In the city of Hastings, bat witboat indicating the name or 
d«DOmlnBtlOD of the several churches. The estimates are : 

HaetlDKB •38,000 

Bnmsville 1,700 

Castle Kock 1,000 

DoDglas 1,000 

Bareka 600 

iDver Grove 1,900 

Lakevlllo 1,600 

Lebanon GOO 

Marahao •... 860 

Hendota 1,600 

NewTtler. 8,300 

Rosemonnt 1,S00 

Vermillion 1,000 

West St. Fanl, [RamseT conntyf] 8,000 



Total.. 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



Showing the value of church ^property belonging to the tevercd i>enom- 
JMilfmu, aeoording to the State Oeneue, taJcen May lit, 1675. 



BlDoBarth $1,000 

HflDoepln S.OOO 

WlDODa 2,000 

Wright 3,500 

Total ♦7,500 



ADOka 910,000 

Becker 1,800 

BlBeEacth 2,82S 

Carrar SO 

Crow Wing > 920 

Dodge 1,600 



DODgUl 

Fnfmot 



. BTmore s.ooo 

Freeborn 1,160 

Ooodhne.... 7,000 

Hennepin M,400 

Homfton S,000 

KudlTohl 600 

L«Snenr r.. £,000 

Meeker 700 

Hower 8,800 / 

Olmeted '. S2,400 

Ramaey 6I.O0O 

Bice 7,000 

SkLoQla 4,000 

8coH 2,000 

Steams 1,000 

Steele »,fi78 

Wabaaha 4,700 

Waseca I,B00 

WaaUngton 2,92fi 

Watonwan ■ 1,000 

WlnoDB 11,200 

WrigW 4,100 

Total .'. W1B,B80 

D,g,L,zeclbyCA>Ogle 



ANKUAL BEFOBT. 



OATHOUO. 

Anobi ? WiSOO 

Benton 800 

Bla<Eartli 48,870 

Brown * 12,H» 

C«rT« 18,7(» 

Ctalugo. 2,SO0 

CrowWtog 800 

PiUmore 21,100 

Fweboro 2» 

Ooodhne 10,000 

Hennepin - 7 1,S56 

HonstOD 06,000 

Ksndljohl 1,600 

LeSnenr S,050 

McLeod..- 6,880 

Heekar 2,»00 

Morrtson 3,800 

Hower 8,900 

Nicollet 8,000 

Olmsted 8*,000 

B«nseT 2M,000 

Bice BT,800 

Scott 110,880 

SIbler 1*,700 

BteUDI 101.720 

Steele 2,3S0 

WabMha 81,800 

-Wasec* 8,112 

VublDfton .'■ 62,000 

WktonwAD 2,200 

WInon* 66,100 

WrighL 14,860 

Total fWeiWi 

Bine Earth 9S,Sm 

LeSnenr 1,000 

Ueeker. 1,000 

Nicollet 800 

Olmsted.. 8,060 

Bke. •« 100 

Wabulia 1,000 

Wright, 1,S60 

Total 12,800 

ooMassaATioHAi- 

Anoka #16,000 

Benton 2,000 

BIueBarth 4,aso 

Chippewa 3M 

Crow Wing. 2,200 

TUlmon ■ 6,800 

Freeborn 1,100 

Qoodhne 3,600 

Hennepin 100,000 

HoLeod 1,200 

Honleon 200 



zedbyGoOglC 



ntORBTABT or BTATB. 

Mower 4,500 

Olmsted 8,000 

Pope H7 

JtuDM7 IS.OOO 

BlM 18,000 

SLLoals 8,S00 

StMTDB T,9fi0 

Stetio 6,196 

Wibuha lB,as 

W»«c» S,800 

Wuhliigtoa 8,426 

WlnooA 12,800 

Wright. 1,600 

Total «2S»,44r 



Uower fl,SO0 

xracovMh. 

Anok* tl»0 

Benton I.SOO 

Bla« Earth ^ •••• 8,100 

Crow Wing 8,700 

Faribanlt 4,700 

PHlmore i,aO0 

QoodhDe 84,400 

Hennepin 92,160 

HonatoD 2,800 

KandaTohl 2,000 

La Snear 2,200 

Ueeker 1,600 

UottlMD 800 

Mower » 2,000 

Blcollet 10,000 

Olmated 8,000 

70,000 

88,600 

BOOK 8,000 

Slhlej 600 

Stoama 4,600 

Steele .••■•- 9,026 

Wabanha 6,000 

Waaeca 400 

WaahlDgton 2,600 

Winona »4,J00 

Total •SB<,0T6 

■VAKeXUOAL. 

Carrer #8,700 

Faribaolt 8,800 

Houston 1,400 

LaSnenr 1,600 

HcLeod 1,100 

Olmated 8,860 

Bamiey 7,800 

Bice 2,000 

Sibley 1,000 

Wasac* 2,000 

Winona 6,700 



Total- 



.vCoogIc 



AKNUAI. KKeOBX. 



«,J00 

Heoaepln 10,000 

Winona > 1,100 

Wright 1,*76 

ToUl ♦U,0T5 



SBBKAK BXrOBM. 

Carver 13,000 

TUlmore 4,000 

Total ; «6,000 



Anoka IS.GOO 

Bine Earth 9,400 

Brown 4,800 

Caner 11,500 

Chippewa 800 

Chisago 8,500 

Dodge 8,000 

Donglaa 22( 

* Faribawlt ■. • 200 

Fitlraore 88,780 

Freeborn 7,400 

Ooodhne 104,100 

BcnneplD 28,900 

HooBton.., SS,«00 

Kaadljrohl 8,178 

LeSnenr 2,e50 

McLeod 8,100 

Meeker 8,000 

Mower 4,080 

Nicollet 18,76fi 

Olmsted 90,9(0 

Pope 7i0 

Ranwey 17,800 

BIcM 11,200 

Bt. Lonia S,S0O 

Soott 8,800 

fllbley 2.040 

Steele 8,800 

Wabaaha 2,620 

Waseca £00 

WaahlDgtOD 19,160 

Watonwan 2,200 

Winona 26,100 

Wright 8,470 

TeUow Medicine 476 

Total «40S,B«0 



zedbyGoOglC 



sBOBiTABr or aZATE. 



AMk» «8,000 

Barton S.BOO 

BlMBarth » S£,1M 

Biown 4,000 

Ctxrtt 800 

Chippewa 2B0 

Chicago ' 1,41B 

CrowWlng I,0«8 

Doigiu aoo 

nolbMlt I,SOO 

Ooodhm SMOO 

Heueptti 94,8EO 

Bouton * «,B00 

KawDyoU a,200 

LaSnenr S,WO 

HcLaod 4,600 

Heakoz 1,800 

1I0W«1 8,100 

mcollet 8,600 

OltnaMd .'. 80,850 

Bamw/ 46,100 

Bice 16,000 

8L Lonlt. 10,000 

Bcott 8,600 

Slbler 8,500 

"" : 8,M0 

2,076 

10,880 

VaMca 8,000 

WiaWngton 20,000 

WMOBWtn 8,100 

WlnoB* 46,840 

Wright 10,600 

Total..'. t416,678 

IfOKAVUM. 

Carrer 96,000 

Vreeboni 400 

Otnwtod 450 

WlDou 8,8jlM 

ToUI «&,160 

PBBSBTTKRIAN. 

Bla«S«rtti 911,900 

VaribMilt 4,S00 

riUmon 14,600 

Freebora 1,280 

Ooodhne ie,SO0 

HennepliL 52,060 

Houton 8,000 

Kudlrobl S,l8tf 

LeSnsar 2.800 

Heeker 2,450 

Mower 6,800 

HUmllet 18,860 

OUnatcd 11,200 

Pope J,010 



zedbyGOQt^l 



ADKUAI. BKFCOT. 

.' a,K» 

Bice 8,000 

8t.Lonla 18,000 

Scott U,SOO 

Shuds 1,B00 

Steele SSS 

WalMsba «,(lBo 

Wuhlngton 8,fi00 

WatoDtran... 1^ 

WlDODk 99,900 

WHght S,«00 

Total 1969,800 



Heniiepln. . 



8,600 

WlBODft 9,800 

Total 90,800 

aiavtxBAUBT. 

Anoka. WiOOO 

HeDnepln 89,000 

Mower 1,«00 

Olmeted 9,G00 

Ramsej 80,000 

Steele '. 1,726 

WaBblneton G,750 

Wright 100 

Total ♦198,9T» 

Unknown 14S,700 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



SBQKBTABT OF STATfl. 

RECAPITULATION BY OOUNTIEa 



AMtai •u.n 

Becker 1,81 

Benton 9,SI 

BlaeEftrth 10(,fil 

Brown I1,<| 

drrer 87,0: 

Chlppemi » 

Oilsmgo T,4 

Cmw Wlnj 7,61 

DodK« »,8i 

Doflglu 91 

PwlBaalt 14,71 

ruimora M,9I 

Tmbora Il,s: 

QoodliM 187,0 

HeniMplii 609,81 

Hocuton M,li 

KamUroU 16,r 

LeSnenr 4 S3,li 

HcLmmI !0,8< 

II««ker IS,7. 

Morrison a,8i 

Uower ll,6i 



NIcoUet 4KA1S 

Olmsted 144,010 

Pope a,80T 

Runsej 648,700 

Blc« , 2s$,aoo 

St. LoDls 86,000 

Scott 1S5,8S0 

Sibley 21,740 

Stearns 187,830 

StMle 81,870 

WAbuha 76,675 

Waseca 17,813 

Wubinffton 187,050 

Watonww 9,800 

WlDona 286,840 

Wright 48,646 

TeUow Medicine 476 

18,372,688 

DakOU (f) 65,950 

98,888,688 



RECAPITULATION BY DENOMINATIONS. 

Adrent «7,B00 

Baptist 316,980 

Catbollc 866,163 

Christtan 12,000 

CongregaUonal 889,U8 

DiBclplee of Cbrist 1,600 

Episcopal 886,076 

BTsngellcal 40,860 

Friends 14,076 

OermaD Befonn 6,000 

Hebrew 2,000 

Lniberan 40S,8«o 

HethodlBt 415,673 

HoraTlan 9,160 

Presbyterian 269,800 

Swedenborglan 8,600 

Unitarian 6,800 

XJnIvenaUst « 126,376 

Unknown ■301,660 

Total .fS,888,683 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AtmUAL SBFOKT. 

I |i I III |||l||l| I eIII 11 g II 

SoioSioSSllcloEoSioloS'"'"'' 

IIIIIIIHIIIIIalllll^llll 

i ^ ■ I II 
1: ^ i III 

! 

5- s ! I- 
SI L- I il I 

I.. I .s.sS '. 

iili I jjjjj »3 

ll^JI'^s t'. Ill* 11 J' 

6B.p«spg MP pgwp pw Pi 



■"•'■'^■'•''■'SsiiiiiiiiiitiU 



Hi 

e1| 
Hi: 



,db,Googlc 



j»...db,Go6glc 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



[ExtOUTTVB UOOUMBMT, VC. 4.] 



ANNUAL REPORT 



AuDiTOE OF State 



LEGISLATURE OF MINSESOTA, 



FISCAL TEAR ENDING NOVEUBEB 30, 1876. 



SAINT PAUL: 

PIOnUt'PKKSS COMFAITT. 

1876. 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



,.db,Googlc 



REPOET. 



Stub of MimtSBOTA, > 

Auditor's Office, \ 

St. Paul, Jan. 6. 1876. } 

7b the Honorable the Legiilature of Minneaota.- 

I have the honor to present the following report of the flnuicial 
operations of the State, and the business of the State Land Ofllce, 
for the laat fiscal year, embracing the following subjects : 

L A general summary of the receipts and disbursements of the 
State Treasury during the year, showing balances remaining to the 
credit of the different flinds. 

IL Statement of warrants drawn on the treasury during the year, 
showing amount outstanding December 1, 1875. 

m. Statement showing amount of unexpended appropriations, 
amount expended and amount canceled during the year, 

IV. Statement showing the total revenue from State taxes during 
the year, the amount abated and canceled, and the amount remain- 
ing delinqaeot. 

V. Statement of bonded indebtedness. 

VI. Statements of receipts and disbursements by flinda. 

VII. Statement showing the accumulations and investments of the 
eereral fhnds under the care and management of the State. 

VIII. Estimated revenue and expenditures for the year 1876. 

IX. Remarks and suggestions referring to matters pertaining to 
tiie foregoing subjects. 

X. Statement of the business of the State Land Office, showing 
everything relating to the sales and status of the State lands, in- 
cluding the school, ^ricnltnral college, university, salt spring, 
pablic building, swamp, and internal Improvement lands. 

XI. Appendix contt^ning general tables and detailed statements. 



zedbyGoOgle 



4 ANKUAL BEPOBT. 

BECBIFTS AMD DISBUBSBUENTS OF THB STATB TBEASUBT 
DUBINO THB YBAB ENDING NOTEHBEB 80th, 18T5. 



There was remaining in the Treaeary December 1, 1871, to the 
credit of the following fandB — 

Qeoeral Bemme Fand UOitie 63 

StaU iDsmatloDi Fond 08.616 IS 

Interest Fand 40,8S0 68 

Sinking Fond S,8*9 38 

Apportloaed Bcbool Food S,48S 74 

FermBnent School Fand.... 6,646 91 

Current School Fund 7,862 88 

PermtDBiitUnWenlty Fand 1,870 44 

Cnrrant UnlrenltT Fnnd S,8S8 SS 

Inteniil IroproTeinent Fnnd 10,768 16 

Internal Iinpror erne Dt Land Food 1,SS6 44 

Interest on Sailrond Bonds 1,797 67 

Inebriate Asrlant Fnnd 7H 80 

•188,150 n 

The following amoanLs were received during the 
year on account of — 

Bute Taxes «461,79S S» 

Taxes onOnMS Receipts of SaUroad Companies 106,878 It 
Taxes on groH Becetpts of Insnrance Compa- 
nies 15,760 81 

Taxes of Telegraph Compaoles 710 40 

Sales of SUte Bonds 20,000 00 

Fees of Insnrance Companies 6i977 00 

Interest on State Deposits 6,786 82 

Labor of State Prison Convicts 11,002 88 

Board of U. 8. Convlcta 4,888 74 

Sundry Conntles In payment of Beform School 

Indebtedness of 1S7S and 1874 7,7»2 64 

Bales of School Land!, 18T6 20,016 88 

Sales of School Lands fbnner years 28,471 81 

Sales of Pine on School Lands 84,104 01 

Interest on School Land, Stnmpige account... 3,110 22 

iQtereeton Permanent School Fund 107,680 82 

Sales of Qrass on School Lands 678 70 

Sales of University Lands, 1876 2,020 II8 

Sales of IJtitTenilif Lands former years 1 >499 60 

Sales of Pine on Unlveralty Lands 7,297 42 



zedbyGoOgle 



A0DITOB or STATU. 5 

laterMtonFermuientUiilrenltjFnDd. ...*.... I8,S89 68 

Interest on UDlvonlty Stnmpnge accoddU SO 60 

SalMof InterDBl ImproTament Lands, 1879.... 3,325 54 
Salea of Internal ImproTement Lands fonaer 

I"" 3,602 6S 

Sales or Fine on Internal ImproTement Lands. 4,086 M 
Interest on Intemal Improvement Land, Stnmp- 

sgeaccooDta 6S9 »S 

Interest on Internal Improvement Land Fond.. 3,!39 00 

Inebriate Asylnm Fnod 805 SO 

Interest on Inebriate Asylnm Fnnd 720 00 

Intemal Improvement Fond 6,067 M 

Interest on Bonoa Railroad Bonds 524 gg 

Interest on Invested Sinking Fand S,600 00 

HlscelUneoas Ij3 jq 

M0,601 II 

"^^^ ■■— iLlSajM 07 

DitbuTtementa. 

Paid dnring the year on acconnt of Legislative 

Per diem. Mileage, £c ^2 18S 82 

Legislative election contests 3,047 50 

Legislative Prison and Insane visiting commit- 

"•• 185 BO 

Legislative Defldenclea of 1874 ggg 93 

Legislative Investigating CoramitCea of 1874, 

(ex-Andltor) Inclndlng printing report S,430 77 

Legislative Printing, ist and 2d classes «,688 88 

Legislative, Printing Ueseage 871 50 

975,892 74 

Ezecntlve Expenses 49,615 01 

Judicial Expenses 50,870 87 

State Printing 16,096 67 

State Printing Deflciencr 11,984 64 

Printing Paper 6,804 41 

Printing Laws In Newspapers , 7,917 so 

Printing Laws In Newspapers, Deflclency, 1874 5,863 30 

Sopport of State Prison 86,058 62 

Snpport of Retbrm Scbool 37,000 00 

^npportofD. D. and B. Instltate 36,000 00 

Snpport of Hospital for Insane 78,500 00 

Support of Normal Scbools 38,800 DO 

finpport of 1st Normal School DeDdencj 4,771 00 



zedbyGoOgle 



6 ANNUAI. BBFORT. 

Sapportof SUte Unlverait; 30,000 00 

State Board ar Health 1^5 87 

Erection of Fabllc Balldlnga 70,486 18 

HcAtlDgorFtratNannM S^ool, DcHdenc;. ■. B.IOO 00 

iDtereston Suite Boods 3S,800 00 

ApportlODed School Fund 195,081 2S 

Pardtue of Bonds for iDveated Fnnds 109,871 66 

Appropriktlons from Int. Imp. Fond 18,738 14 

BonoiB.B. Bonds iatereat 2,aSS 6fi 

PtonUer Belief 72,800 00 

Stale Cenaas 16,091 61 

Snpport of Agricnltanl Societies 2,88! 86 

QeologicEl Survey 2,000 00 

Teachers' Instliaies and Training Schools 2,44fi 84 

Support of State HIstoriul Socletf i,8S4 10 

Sbeclff's EzpeDses S,9B8 17 

Fnel and LIgtata 8,951 74 

Personal Appropriations 5,180 16 

IllflcetUneons Appropriations 37,900 71 



Balance In Treuar;, November 80, 1875. 

To tfae credit of the following foods : 

Interest Fond 929,426 9t 

Stata iDStltntlonH Fnnd 4S,TS8 69 

Permanent School Fnnd 11,248 St 

Current School Food 15,898 08 

Apportioned School Fnnd 1.989 99 

F«nnanent Dniverslty Fond 4,6S7 94 

Cnrrent TTulTersIt; Fnnd 4,S8S US 

Internal Improvemen I Land Fnnd 4,117 58 

Internal Impro re ment Fana S,102 81 

Sinking Fond #32,088 96 

Leas Berenne orerdrawn. tl9,476 96 
" Inri). AsjI. " 1S7 93 

19,684 88 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOB or BTITK. t 

WAKRAMTS DIUWIT OM THE TSKABDBT. 

AmooDt or Andltor'B WwnDta oMitandUig 

D«>. 1,18T4 «8,008M 

Amount Iscoed dnrliig the jear 1,047,S74 69 

«t.o«,sra W 

Amount redeemed dnrloK tlie y«u 1,08S,S0B TS 

Amoont ontitudlng Not. SO. 187B Vl.SeS W 

Fayftblfl from the fotloning fuodB : 

BeTeonerand #18,728 60 

Apportioned ScboolToitd 1,889 98 

IstenulImproTemest Food l,iSO 00 

ai,B88 f» 

UtOUliATITI AITROPRlATIOMa. 

Amount of ApptoprUUona oQezpeoded Dec 1, 

1874 •87,678 i» 

AnooDt of ApproprUUODB or 187S 1,186,887 S> 

TotAl •1,968,810 69 

It of AppioprlatlonB of Ibimer je*n, can- 

618,6*7 68 

itorApproprlKtIouof 187e,canGeled.... 47,882 06 
AmooDt of ApproptUttoDS expended dnriog the 

je»r 1,0*7,874 69 

1,108,86* 4S 

AmooBt of ApproprUtlona nnexpended Hot. 
80, 1876 •164,901 K 

eXATB DBBT. 

Amonnt of the rMognlzed Bonded State Debt, Dec 1, 18T4. •460,000 00 
Amonnt of State Bonds iaaned darlDg the year 30,000 00 

Total rocognUed Bonded State Debt.NoT. 80, 1S7B •800,000 W 

ConaitUog of the following loane authorized for erec- 
tton of btUldingi for State IiiBtitDtioiia: 
Ixianori867, 7 per cent bonds due In 1877. -.. •100,000 00 
Loan of 1888, 7 p«r cenL bondi, dna in 1878>.- 100,000 00 
Lo«non86S, 7 percent, bonds, doe tn t879-.. 60,000 00 
Iioan of 1878, 7 per cent, bonds, dot tn 1888. ■ ■ . 360,000 00 

600.000 00- 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



8 AXNUAL BBFOBT. 

DUPVrKD BTATI DEBT. 

BoBda iMDod In 1858 to aid in tbe coutinctloii 
of lUllroadi, bearing T per cent. Interest and 
dMlnlSTe J 

■TATBMKHr Of KCTBHUB FSOH TAXIS. 

.AmoddI of Taxes levied for State porpoaea on 
llatofl874 

For the following parpoaes ; 

Oeoeral Bevenne - fl99,8CS OS 

Sapport of SUtelnstltntloaa 14I,«1 W 

Intereat on State Debt 60,719 84 

BinklagFund »,8BT St 

Amonnt of Delioqnent Stata Taxea dne Decem- 
ber lrt,18T4 4l*,0M n 

AmonntorStatoTaxescollecteddDrlngthercar 481,788 88 
AmoQDt of Stite Ttxea abated and canceled 
doling the year 8,49110 



AnonDt of Dellnqnent SUt« Taxea Norembar 
SO, 1876 



8TATBHENT OF BECEIPT8 AND DISBnBSBHBHTS BT FUNDS. 

aUtERAL BETEiniB FIMD. 

ReceijOt. 

Balance In tbaTreaanrj December 1, 1874... tS0,418 C 

Becelved daring the year on accoant of State 

Taxea 8800,111 08 

TranaAsr n^om Intereat Fond 14,108 08 

Bent of Shopa and SUte Prison Labor 11,003 88 

Board or United SUtea Conrlcta 4,888 74 

Feea ftom Insurance Companies S,977 00 

iDtarest on HUte Defosits S,T86 81 

Sales of State Bonds 30,000 00 

Sales of SpecUl Laws 08 00 

, OnaccoontofBefarmScliool Indebtedness.... 7,788 84 



zedbyGoOglC 



AUDITOB or 8TATB. 

Betnrnwl bj Sheriff, nD«zp«iided balance dnwn 
OD reqalaltloii TIO 

Vnlght retDrned bj anlted SUtes od Cou- 
gresalonal Laws T 8* 

Betnnied by Altorcey Qaneral, nDezpended 
amoODt dravrn from Con Ungent fond- la 00 

Uoezpended balance of Seller ITuDd 18 S8 

OreTpftjrmeiit returned by J. F. WlUlami 10 



I^alaUve pel diem members of Senate 912,SOO 00 

" perdicmofflcersandclerksofSenate 0,fil6 00 

" PMUge of Senate 890 00 

•■ Hllea^ or Senate 1,144 85 

■* Reporters of Senate 400 00 

" Newspapers of Senate ES6 4C 

" Eagroaslng:aQd GnrolllngofSenate 69180 
" Indexing and Transcribing Jonmale 

ofSeaate 250 00 

" HUcellaDeons 198 90 

•* Per diem members of H. B 81,600 00 

" Per diem officers and clerks of H.B. 4,130 00 

" Postage of H. R »T0 00 

<< HIleageofH. B 2,868 65 

" Reporters of H.R BOO 00 

" Newapipera of R. B 1,799 20 

" BngrossIngandEarolllngotH. B.. 429 55 
" Indexing and transcribing Jonmals 

of H. B 260 00 

" UlscellaaeODSorH. B 222 83 

Election contests 8,047 60 

•■ TlaltlDg Committees ISS 60 

'< Deflclences of 1S74 688 93 

" InTesttgatIng Committee of IST4, 
(Bx-A<tdltor Ucllrath) iDcIndtng printing re- 
port 3,«0 77 

LagtaUtlre printing, let and 2d clsMes B.6S8 88 

871 60 



Kxecntlre expenses 949,616 01 

Jadlclal exponaes. 60,870 87 

State pilDlIng 16,098 87 

- '• deflclenclesoribrmerjears 11,984 64 

i 



zedbyGoOgle 



10 ANNUAL SBPOBT. 

PrlntlDg p4per 6,80* ii 

Statlonerr A>r Leglslitnre and State offlcen ■ • • 2,000 SI 

Frlatlng laws In newapapera 7,917 SO 

FrtDtlDK Uttb la newspapera, deflclatacj 1S74.. 6,863 30 

Bepain of Capitol 8,49S SO 

Bapalra of Capital, deficiency of 1S74 1,S00 00 

TeotllatlDg Oapttol, deflcieacj of 1874 STB 6S 

Fitting of Secretary's oflloe, deflcleDCj of 187*.. 698 16 

fDrDUhlDg Judge*' room ISO DO 

OulTcnlt J building. S.OOO 00 

Untreraltr beating and fnrolshtag 3,8S<I CO 

First trormal School heating, deflclenc; 8,100 00 

State Prison balldlng 84,886 18 

Deaf, Damt) and Blind InstltaM balldlng 7,000 00 

Insane bnllding 90,800 00 

Frontier relief. 79,800 00 

Agaicnltaral Societies 3,989 49 

Teachers' InsCltDtes and Tialalng Schools 9,446 84 

Slate Historical Society 1,8S4 10 

Sheriff's expenses 8,969 IT 

State Board of Health 1,286 87 

Oeologtcal Snrrej 9,000 00 

Fuel and Lights 8,961 74 

State Ceostu 18,091 81 

Appraising and Selling Stale School and trnlver- 

sity Lands 1,817 68 

Express and Mileage 667 S7 

Fish Commissioners 1,100 00 

Centennial Exhibition 807 98 

Dnlnth Harbor 830 SO 

Personal ApproprlalloDS 6,IS0 16 

Hlecellaneoos Appropriations 8,993 64 

Showing Fund overdrawn 

STATB UTSTITUnOKB TOtm. 

Beeeiptt. 

Balance to Treasar; Dec. I, 1874 

Recfd dnring the rear on accoant ol State TaxM (gs.SSS 78 

Taxes from R. R. Companies 106,878 11 

Taxes ttom Insarance Companies 33,760 81 

Taxes fMm Telegraph Companias 740 40 

Total t994,S18 89 

DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



439,109 U 
«10,476 9< 



068,618 19 



935,709 SO 



AUDITOR OF BTATB. 11 

Disbunem«7it», 

Fkid daring the j«u on kcconnt of Transfer to 

Camnt Dalrenlt? Faad #19,000 00 

Support of Winona Normkl School 10,7S0 00 

Snppcrt of Winona Normal School, D«llcleDCT.. 4,771 00 

Support of Hknkkto Normal School 10,050 00 

Snpportof St. Cloud Ifonnal Sctioal 8,000 00 

Support of Beform School 37,000 00 

Sapportof State FrlBon 86,0(8 SS 

Snpportof Soldiers' Orphans 18,480 41 

Sopport of Deaf, Dnmb mad Blind Instltate 30,000 00 

Snpportof Hospital for Insane 78,800 00 

SelmbDrsemeDt of PermaDeDt0nlTeraitTFnad. 19,000 00 

SE0,6S9 as 

Balance Not. 80, 1876 #48,TB8 80 

BTATB QITUtBST TDKD. 

Balance In Treasuiy Dec. 1, 1874 »*0.»80 88 

Becelved daring the rear on Bcooant of State Taxes 48,389 84 

T*"**" •87,189 OT 

DiaburtemenU, 

Paid daring the jear on account of Interest on 

State Loans Jannarr 1, 1876 918,800 00 

Interest on State Loans Jaly 1, 1876 le.flOO 00 

Tnuwftr to Rerenne Food 34,188 08 

67,788 08 

Balance November 80, 1878 f39,438 91 

SIHKIKa FCHD. 

Beceipta. 

Balance on hand December 1, 1874 88,899 38 

RecelTod dartns tl>e year on accoant of State 

Taxes....'. #38,084 78 

Interest OD Bonds of Invested Fund 8,800 00 



Total 

DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



IS ANKDAL BBPOBT. 

rKBMuaat bobool ntSD. 

SeeeipU. 

Daltncs Id the Treunry December 1, 1874 

BflceWed daring the rear on accoaat oT Sales 

of Ltnds for former jeare 118,471 SI 

Bales of Lands 18T5 9ZS,SS4 29 

Less aupald Drafts on Co. Tnasoren B^T7 91 

»,016 S8 

flalea of Pine Timber »4,10t 01 

Total 



DiMbitraementt. 

Paid daring the year on acconnt of pnrcbaae 

of HlnnesoU State BoDda 110,000 00 

Farchaseof Ulssoari State Bonds S7,9W 00 

77,095 00 

Balance NoTember 80. 1875. •11,S« 01 



OCRBUTT SCHOOL WUSD. 

Jieeeiptt. 

Balance la Treasary Dec. 1| 1874 

Interest on Land Contracts 9128,496 44 

Interest on Minnesota State Bouda SS,S50 00 

Interest on Mlssonri State Bonds 14,210 00 

Interest on U. 8. Bonds 26,668 00 

Premlnm on Oold CoajMna 7(7 b8 

Interest on Stampage scconnte 2,119 21 

Sales ofQrasBon School Lands 6TB 70 

Bent collected In Scott Co U 00 



Total.. 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



ADDITOB OF STATE. 13 

DilAwKmenta. • 

P«td dnriDg the year on sccounl — f 

Hircta Apportlonmont to Coanttes (t0,39* 00 

October ApportlonnieDt to CobqIUs US,tT&tO 

BxpMta«a Mid loU on Etonda parchaaed 184 M 

^ I91,7fl2 U 

BoUnceBoT. SO, 167S 918,808 08 

PBKIUIIBIIT OHITKBanT WWfD. 

Beceiptt. 

BaUnce Id Tnasarj D«c. 1, 1674..'. 91,870 U 

B«caived daring the year on Moonnt of — 

ApprapriatloDfromStUftlaaUlatlotiaraDd.... #13,000 00 
Balea of Agrlcoltaral College Landftrtormar 

J*«r« 1,4M « 

8al«a of AgrtcnUiiral Collega and 

DnlTeTsltyLuda for 1875 94,881 58 

Leas RDpald D*fto on Co. Tnasnrera 9,861 00 

*,0M «8 

galea of Pina timber on UnlTenltT Laada 7,S87 4S 

M,B17 60 

Total 184,187 04 

P^d during the jw on Mcovnt of Parcbaae of Ulaaonrl SUte 
Bonds 18,S60 00 

Balance Dor. SO, 187S 94,887 94 

CDRBKBT mnTBKBnr rOMD. 

SeceipU. 

Balance In TraaantT Dec. 1, 1874 9S,8S8 SS 

BecelTed daring the year on accoant of Appro- 
priation from Sute IntUrations Food 919,000 00 

Interest on Land Contracts 10,899 88 

Jstereat on U. S. Bonds 800 00 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



14 AHHDAI, RBPOST. 

Interut on HinnejoU Bondi 1,060 00 

lalereston Uliaonri SUte Bonds 1,690 00 

toterest on Stampkge acconot SO 60 

8!,S70 !8 

Totol »S4,«»8 M 

Ditt>ur»emetUa. 

Paid daring the year on arcooant of order of Board of BegenU : 

Junmrr*, 1876 tSiOOO 00 

March IS, •• 8,000 00 

April 2, " 8,000 00 

April IT, " ..' 1,000 00 

Uv «> " 8.000 00 

June 2», " 8,000 00 

July 81, " 8,000 00 

Aug. SI, ■' 3,000 00 

Sept. 1*, " 8,000 00 

Not. bo, " »,000 00 

Bxpeuea and accraed Intereat on Bond* por- 

diaied 88 Ot 

30,068 0< 

BaUnceNoT. 80, 1875 ♦*,885 M 

IMTIRSAL mFBOTUmfT LAND FOMD. 



Balance in the Treuniy, Dec. 1, 1874 

Received doring the year on account of Salea of 

Land forrormer year #8,603 56 

Sales of Land for 1875 - 3,235 64 

Interest on Land Contracts. 3,869 09 

iDterest on D. S. Bonds 860 00 

Sales of Fine 00 Int. Imp. Land 4,086 93 

Interest on Stnmpage accoanta 839 9S 

total 

Diiimraemmta. 
Paid dnrlngthe year on acconnt of Fnrchaae of 
U. S. Bonds 

Balance Not. SO, 1675 



zedbyGoOgle 



ADDITOR OF BTATK. 
INBBRIATB ASTLUH FDMD. 

IteeeipU. 

Balance In the Treunrr. Dec. I, 18T4 

Becelred dnrlng the year on accotint of LImdsm 

iHUed daring tbe yaar fM 

Interest on U. 8. Bonds 7! 

Total 

DUtniTsemenU. 

Paid dnrinji the year on account of Parchaae 
of n.8. Bonds 

Showing the Fond overdrawn Not. 80, 187E.... 

INTBIUIAL nfPBOTBHBMT rUKD. 



« Id the Treainry December l, ISTi flO,768 IS 

Beeelved during the year on account ot Are per cent, on sales 
of pabUc lands 5,0e7 M 

Total «U,8S6 06 

Di^uraement*. 

Paid daring the year on account of Chippewa 

Rlrer bridge. Douglas connty #200 00 

Bmsb Creek bridge EOO 00 

Lac qal Parie Rlrer bridge 850 00 

riah Lake bridge 800 00 

Ponme de Terre RWer bridge 200 00 

Otter Tall Blver bridge »B 97 

6U Prands River bridge 20O 00 

CU^pewa BiTer bridce, Swift coDuty, 1874.'.. 900 00 

Port BIdgely Creek bridge 400 00 

Ch^pewa River bridge. Swift coon^, I876»-< 400 00 

Crow River bridge, HcLeod coanty 400 0" 

Lake Irene bridge, Douglas cotmCy SOO 00 

Crow River bridge. Meeker coanty 800 00 

FommedeTerreRUer bridge, Swift county... 800 00 

Bed Rlrer bridge, Otter Tall connty 4O0 00 ,.j 



zedbyGoOgle 



16 ANNUAL BBPOaT. 

Oknbeiik Creek bridge, Jackson cotinty 600 OO 

Esndlyobl L&ke bridge, Kaadlyohl coant; fiOO OO 

Crovr River bridge, Wrigbt conaty !00 00 

Cottonwood Blrer bridge. Redwood coQDty.... BOO 00 

Dead CooD Lake bridge, Lincoln coont; aoo 00 

Crow River bridge, Wright coanty BOO 00 

WortblDgtoD ftud Larerae roul IGO 00 

Daluth ud FlgeoD Rlv er road 970 TO 

Long Prftlrle River Im prove me at, Todd county 2,000 00 

Fnue City tnd Pelican Rapids Road ^400 00 

Barobaiusville and Sank Center Road 600 00 

Canal Snrver L. S. &8t. Crolz 2,062 fiT 



Balance Hot. SO, 16TS . 



DTTEBKBT OM RAOAOAD BONDS. 

BecetpU. 

Balance In the Treunry Dec, 1, 18T4 91,7>7 S 

Received from Treaanrer Mower Co SM S8 

Total $1,B>S S 

Ditburaenenla, 



Fftid during tbe year on acoount of— 



Oonpona redeemed— Fillmore Co $76i $5 

•' " —Freeborn" 140 00 

M " — Hower " 8E0 00 

Treaaarer Faribanlt Co 14 49 

" Fillmore " 41 18 

- Freeborn " 14s 87 

Mower « 847 81 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AUDITOR OF BTATB. 



■STIHATSD 8TATB BBTBKUE AND EZPBNDITDBB FOR THE TEAS 
1876. 

The BsseMed Talaatlon of taxable property in the State for thfr 
year 187S uoonnU to $218,8^5,713, an increase over the aaseument 
of 1874 of $1,428,682. 

The State tax for tbe year 1875 of two and one-tenth milla, ia 
levied npon this amount and dietribnted as follows : 

For General B«TeDDe Fund $298,744 SS 

For Support at State loatltntloiM 91,931 81 

For Interest on SUte Debt 46,960 8& 

For SIqUdk rnnd 21,980 a 

Total •UB,e06 6S 

The Receipts and Disbareements of the State Treasury daring 
tbe ensning year may be estimated as follows' 

rOB QRNBRIL RIVXHUI. 



From cnrrent and dellDqaent taxes v<$8SS,000 W 

From State Prison labor and other soarcea 50,000 W 

Transhr from Interest Fnnd 11,910 91 



DMurtemenU. 

t«gUUtlve expenses tU.OOO 00 

SxecnOve 50,000 00 

indlclsl 58,000 00 

PohllcPrinUng 30,000 00 

Laws in Newspapers 7,000 00 

DeHdeecles 5,000 00 

Unexpended Appropriations 98,979 94 

Oatstandlng Warrants 18,7i8 60 

Overdrarts 19,478 M 

HIsceUaBeons Appropriations 80,000 00 



ABoant of Barptns Bevenne Fond estimated.^ 
3 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



19 ANHUAL KBFOBT. 

•TATk imnTDTlOKB FOSD, 

Seetipt$. 

FtomTaxM 9100,000 00 

From Ballroada 130,000 00 

Wtova Inanranee Comptnlei • 89,000 00 

Vrom Tclegnph Companies TOO 00 

Balance in Treaaary <S,76B 69 



Vor Inaane Boapltal tSS^fiOO 00 

ror SUM Priwin 40,000 00 

Vor D«ar, Domb and Blind InatltDte 96.000 00 

For Soldlera' Orphana 16,000 00 

Vor Sum Befi)Tin School 97,000 00 

For Normal Schoola 80,000 00 

For State UnlversltT 81,000 OO 

Unexpended Appropriatloua S4,H0 B» 



Btobtble exceaa or recelpU orer dUbarsamenta 



ViomTaxM ■ 

Balance In Tieasnr7 . . 



«S0,000 00 
99,496 91 



Tor InUreat on State Debt tU.OOO 00 

TnuuAra to Bevenne Fnnd 11,996 91 

Amount nec^UT to meet Intareat payment 

January 1, 1677 I7JM» 00 

Probable ezceaa or receipts subject to transfer 
Jannary 1, 1877 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AVDTtOR or STATB. 19 
BOXXISa FDKD. 

BeceipU. 

9nm Taxoa 116,000 00 

Interest OD Invested Fgud 8,600 

Bftltace IQ Treuniy 82,083 98 



STATEMENT 8H0WIHQ THE ACCUMDLAiyONS AND INVE8T- 
MBNTS Off THB 8BTBBAL TRUST ffONDS. 

PKBlUHSirT SCHOOL FCKD. 

AccumvlatiOM. 

8*iM ofLud «S,e8S,e59 60 

Amonnts psid on forfeltnres, right-of-waT, tte 10,463 U 

Bftles or Ttmb«r ST8.51B SI 

FrofiU on sales of Bonds In 1869 and 1874 S4,419 86 

Total.— 98,191,043 81 



177,800 U. S. E-208 at par 977,800 00 

10,000 V. 8. 6s of ISSl, at 91.0S 10,(00 00 

100,000 Minn. 78ori8e7, atpar 100,000 00 

100,000 Mlon. 7BoflS68. atpar 100,000 00 

80,000 MiDn.7sof 1869, atpar 60,000 00 

286,000 Ulnn. TsoflSTS, atpar 888,000 00 

'l4C,000 U. S. 6s (currency) St 991c 148,781 35 

140,000 U. 8.8b (cnrrencj) at 91.06} ...1 149,450 00 

10,000 U. 8. 6b (carrency) At 91.061 10 687 SO 

H,000 U. 8. 6B(cQireocy)at9l.07i 38,878 00 

10,000 U.S. 6s (cnrrency) at 91.091 10.93£ OO 

36,000 U. 8. 6s (cnrtftDcy) at 91.091 37,28136 

14,000 UiBSODri6sat 92)c. 13,988 00 

38,000 HissonriessteSc S6io40 00 

£7,000 HlMourl 6b at 831c 88,296 OO^ 

34,000 HlsBoarl Ss at 98|c 19,500 00 



zedbyGoOgle 



30 AKNUAX. RBPOKT. 

69,000 MiMonri 8s At BSe 56,060 00 

46,000 MlBSODrl 6a ftt 92Jc f 8,650 OO 

14,000 MlsiODrl6B U 9Sc I8,T») 00 

12,000 Miasonri 6i at f 1.031 13,270 00 

66,000 Mluoarieaat«1.08i 86,22-00 

«l,8IC,e00 |I,S17,8S6 00 

Luid Contracts bearing T per cent 1,966,888 09 

Cuh tnTreosur; 911,348 61 

Unpaid DnAs In bands of Conoty Treasor«n.. G,KTT 91 

18,831 6» 



PEBMUfKHT DMIVBBStn FDMS. 

, Aeeumviationa. 

SalMof Land 

Amount paid on forfeltnres 

S&t«s of Pine Timber $86,617 70 

Less amonnt tnnsferred to Carrent Unlversl^ 
Fund 52,707 27 

Appropriation flrara Stata iDsUtnttone Fnad by 
Chapter 134, General I>awa of 1874, for par- 
ttal relmbatsement ol above amonnt trans- 
ferred to Cnrreot Fnnd 

ToMi 

inveftnwut*. 
tfl.OOOlI. H. Bonda(cnrrenc7}6aat|1.09i.... 

16,000 Minnesota 7s of 1878, at par 

12,000 Missouri Ss at 931c 

8,000 MlMoari 68 at 980 

1,000 MiMonri es at 94c 

13.000 Mlssonri 68 at esc 

2,000 Hissoori 8b at 11.03^ 

6,000 HlBsonriBs at fl.OSi 

•80,000 

Land contracts bearing 7 per cent 

Cash InTreaanry tM87 94 

Unpiid Drafts InhandsofCoantjrTreaanrers.. 2,881 00 

Total ProdactlTe Fond 

Experimental Farm 

' Total Permanent Fund 



$217,888 W 
894 00 



11,100 00 

7,840 00 

S40 OO 



t247,l'87 98 
8,600 00 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AUDnxn or stati!. SI 

nmRMAI. IMTBOTXHXXT IMXD rDMV. 

AecMttuiiatUms. 

8alMof land MS.HOT 87 

I nterMt on Land Contracts 4,308 18 

Interest on Bonds 410 00 

Sales or Timber 4,666 97 

•fi4,BB7 97 

Inveatments. 

#!,000 U. 8. bonds (correncj) es at #l.lSi #I,2fiS 00 

BzpevM of parcbaM ) SO 

8,000 U. a. bonds (cniTenGj) 8a at«l.I7| S,S» 00 

Expense of parcbaae 10 61 

0,000 U. S. bonds (cnrrencj) 6sattl.2St 4,375 00 

Expense of porcluse is 4s 

•10,000 412,100 S8 

Land CoDtncti bearing 7 percent 86,770 86 

Cash Is thsTreunrj 4,117 58 

tfl *,»87 Iff 

DtXBBUn ABTLIW WOKO. 

Accumviationt. 

Licenses Issued In Tarions conntles $1R,E2B 28 

Interest on United 8Ut«a bonds 1 ,820 00 

Over drafL 1S7 9> 

•15,006 15 

/nvssfmmta. 

•18,000 United States bonds (cnrrencj.) •18,006 IS 

atMKDIO FUND. 

Accumuiatiotu. 

From State Taxes •84,806 BS 

Interest OD InvsetedFand 8,600 00 

Total. •ST.WW 88 

DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ZS AKSUAL 

Inveatmenta. 

f60,000 Mluourl 6 per cents •fiS.SSI 9> 

Casbla theTreunrr S3,0SS 9S 



BIATB riMAKCBB. 

The cooditioQ of the State Treasary at the close of the last fiscal 
year as shown by the firat statement in this report in comparison 
with the same statement for the preceding year, should be carefully 
considered in connection with the estimated receipts and disbnrse- 
ments for this year, and the appropriations of this Bession kept 
within the probable ability of the treasury to meet them. 

The special appropriations of the last legislature were $100,000 in 
excess of the estimated receipts orer current expenses, and if there 
had Dot been a large amount of these appropriations saved, the credit 
of the State would have been seriously impaired. The reckless leg- 
islation of last year, in this respect, cannot be repeated without dis- 
astrous results. 

It should be borne in mind that there is a limit to the resonroea 
of the State treasnry, and that all expenditures must be restricted 
accordingly. The present financial policy of the State, initiated 
with the enactment of the new tax law has for its object a redaction 
as well as an equitable adjustment of the burdens of taxation, but it 
cannot be sustained and accomplished without the assistance and 
co-operation of the Legislature. 

The assessed valuation of taxable property for the year 1871 was 
1217,427,211. From this amount, however, should be deducted 
over $2,SO0,O00 of fictitious assessment of personal property re- 
turned from Ramsey county and afterwards canceled', really re- 
ducing the assessed valuation of 1874 to about 1215,000,000. 

The assessment of new lands and improvements with the annual 
aaaessment of personal property for 1875, increases the taxable 
property of the State to $21 8,855,743, an apparent increase over the 
preceding year of $1,428,432, but an actual increase of nearly 
$4,000,000, which consists almost entirely of additions made to the 
real estate assessment. The actual value of the taxable property of 
the State, making allowance for all exemptions if properly assessed, 
woald amount to at least $800,000,000. 

With an actual increase of nearly $4,000,000 in the taxable prop- 



,.db,Googlc 



AnDITOB OF BTATB. S3 

erty over lut year, there hu been a redaotion of more than- 
1200,000 in the aggregate taxation, the State tax haviag been- 
rednced $50,000, and a slight reduction of local taxes haviiig been 
accomplisbed in some localities, while the average rate per cent, or 
taxatiOD stands at less than one and tbree-foarths per cent, against 
about one and nine-tenths per cent, for 1874, and orer three and 
one-third per cent, for 1878. 

The abstract of tax lists, Appendix "£," shows the taxes raised 
in each county for different purposes, and the total taxation of the 
Slate for all purposes aggregating 93,892,482, against 14,102,835 
for 1874. The largest item for any purpose is the city and town- 
ship taxes, including taxes for all general manictpal purposes, 
amonnting to tli249,553. 

The next largest item is for educational purposes, whfch, inclad- 
ing the ono-raill general school tax, and the special school district 
taxes, amounts to 11,108,259. - To this amount of direct taxation, 
for educational purposes may be addq^ the expenses of the County^ 
Snpfirintendents and State Saperintendent of Public Instruction^ 
the Normal Schools, State UniverBity, Training Schools and Insti- 
tutes, and the income of the public school fund, making the annual 
expenditure in the State for educational purposes about $1,400,000. 

The total taxes for all county purposes are $1,046,606, and for 
SUte purposes, $459,606.55. 

However onerous taxation may be in various localities in thtt 
State, it cannot be attributed to an excessive State tax, the aggre- 
gate amount of which has been reduced $50,000 per year fur two 
years past, and the rate per cent, reduced from five mills in 1873» 
to two and thirty-three hundredths mills in 1874, and two and one-^ 
tenth mills in 1875. No public expenditure should be authorized 
that will ever again require a rate exceeding two mills on the dol- 
lar valuation. Larger amounts of State tax may be necessary, but 
the increasing taxable basis of the State will raise the amount 
needed at this limited rate. 

If school district, town, city, and county taxes were as low com- 
paratively as the State tax for 1875, the average rate of taxation in 
the State would not exceed one and one-half per cent., however, the 
preaent rate of about one and three-foanhs per cent, is very low 
when compared with former years. There is very little, and with 
equitable assessments there would be no oppressive taxation outside 
of our lai^e towns, and wherever there is exhorbitant taxation as- 
above shown, it is for inunioipal and educational purposes. These 
taxes should be limited to a maximum rate the same as county taxefr 



zedbyGoOglC 



SI AHNCAL BIPOBT. 

axe now restrioted, rendering absolntel; oppressive Uxation impo*- 
«lble. 

THK STATE TAX OF 1875. 

The State constitution requires the legislature " to provide for so 
annual tax sofflcient to deft-ay the estimated ordinary expenses of 
the State each year." 

Pursuant to this requirement the last legislature imposed a tax of 
4^0,000 for the year 1875, this being the estimated amount neces- 
sary to raise by taxation to meet the probable demands upon the 
State treasocy during the year 1876. Subsequent to the passage of 
the act providing for this amount and in consequence of the extra- 
ordinary appropriations made for the benefit of grasshopper suf* 
ferera, a supplemental act wse passed impoasing an additional 
tax of one-half mill, equivalent to an increase of the aggregate 
amount $109,427, nbich it was assumed would be necessary to meet 
other special appropriations tbat could not be paid from the re- 
-ceipts of the treasury during the current year and consequently 
WO^ld have to go over and be paid from the colleci-ions of 1876. 

Of the $112,000 appropriated for the relief ot grasshopper euffer- 
«r8 $86,000 was unexpended and canceled. This amount thus 
saved to the State with sundry other unexpended appropriations, 
and 120,000 realized fh)m the balance of the State l>onds authorized 
by the loan of 1873 for the erection of public buildings which it 
became necessary to issue on the first of July, made a difference in 
the receipts and disbursements of the treasury during the year of 
455,000 in favor of the State, and in my opinion rendered the extra 
half mill tax unnecessary ; consequently I assumed the responsibil- 
ity of ignoring it, and only certified to county auditors two and one- 
tenth mills State tax for 1875, being the approximate rate required 
to raise $460,000, which with collections of delinquent taxes, of taxes 
firom railroad, insurance and telegraph companies and miscellaneous 
receipts, will be amply sufBcient to meet all deferred appropriations, 
the ordinary expenses of the State government, and all other neces- 
sary public expenditures for the ensuing year. 

THK STATK DBST. 

The regular bonded indebtedness of the State has been Increased 
$20,000 during the year by the issue of the balance of the l>onds 
«Dthorized under the loan of 1873, which brings the amonnt of the 
bonded debt up to the constitutional limit of $500,000. 



zedbyGoOglC 



ASDITOB OF STATB. IS 

The bonds mature as fotlovs : 

#100,000 Juiuar7 1, U7T. 

100,000 ■' 1, 1878. 

BO.OOO " 1, 1879. 

3SO,000 " 1, t88i). 

To meet these boods sb they mature there ts dot $92,088.96 in 
the sinkiug ftind, which will be increased by the probable receipts 
daring the year to 1120,000. This amount will meet the bonds 
maturing January 1, 1877, and leave a balance of $20,000, which, 
with the receipts fh>m delinquent taxes, and the usual annual levy, 
will be sufficient to cancel the entire debt as it matures ; perhaps, 
however, it may be necessary to increase the amount levied for 1876, 
in order to meet the $100,000 maturing January, 187S. 

TAXBS AND TAX LAWS. 

An experience of two years in the administration of the amended 
tex law baa demonstrated its efficiency aud superiority over the 
old law, especislly in its provisions relating to tax sales, which are 
regarded by eminent Jurists as sufficient to ensure a perfect tax 
title. 

Unlike nearly if not quite all of thb other States in the Uuion, 
wo can secure collection of real estate taxes only by sale of the 
property, hence the absolute necessity for a law that cannot be 
evaded or set aside. In consequence of this peculiarity of our 
revenue system, and of the general inefficiency of the old law, tax 
payers have become more and more negligent, and the amount of 
delinquent taxes has increased from year to year, necessitating the 
levying of taxes each succeeding year lai^ly in excess of the 
amounts actaally needed for current expenses, tn order to cover 
deficiencies caused by delinquent taxes, burdening the tax-payers 
with excessive taxes, in consequence of the failure of the non-iax- 
pagtn to meet their public obligations. 

Ttie delinquent State taxes, as shown by Appendix "B," amounted 
at the close of the last fiscal year to $460,902,68. The Sute tax 
being ftom one-sixth to one-eight of the aggr^ate taxes of eaoh 
year, this amount shows a total delinquency of State, county and 
other local taxes of about $8,500,000, and this amount of delln- 
^ent taxes, almost equal to the total amount of taxes for all 
purposes levied in tiie State for 1875, represents the excessive 
taxes levied daring past years to carry delinquencies. Had these 
4 



zedbyGoOglC 



26 ASSViL BBPOBT. 

dellnqaent taxes never accnied, the t^gregsta tszation of ttie State 
daring the time they have been accumulating woald have beeo this 
amoant leas, and our State would have been saved fVom mach of 
the odium justly incnrred by exorbitant taxation. A tax svstem 
that admits of snch laxity is alike detrimental to private and pub- 
lic interest, cauaing high taxation and entailing nnneceBsary ex- 
penses and possible loas of property upon the delinquent tax-payer. 

The groat desideratum of low taxation can only be attained 
throogtt a system that will secure an equitable assessment of prop- 
erty, and by compulsory process or oppressive penalties, secure 
payment of taxes before delinquency. 

The amended law of 1874 Imposed a penalty of ten per cent, upon 
all real estate taxes returned delinquent on the first day of June, 
which resulted in securing the payment of $475,000 of State taxes 
before the June settlement of 1874. The legislature of 1876 re- 
pealed this penalty clause and only $405,000 of State taxes were 
collected before the June settlement of 1875, showing a direct fall- 
ing off of at least $70,000 in collections, one-half of which may be 
attributed to tl^s unwise legislation. 

The large amount of unpaid appropriations and the present deple- 
ted condition of the State treasury will, without doubt, suggest 
to the present legislature the necessity of reviving this penalty in 
order to meet the expenditures of the ensuing year, and preserve 
the credit of the State which has so long been unimpaired. 

1 would al^ recommend the restoration of the five per cent, pen- 
alty upon personal property taxes on the first day of February, and 
the compulsory collection of all delinquent personal property taxes 
before the March settlement. The preseut law allowing these taxes 
to remain unpaid until June, imposes unnecessary labor and respon- 
sibility upon the county treasurer and results in loss to the public 
funds through failures and removals, besides the receipts ^m per- 
sonal property taxes are always needed in March to meet legislative 
expenses which invariably burden the treasury at this time. 

CODMTT ASSESSORS. 

The greatest evil, however, of our entire revenue system, is in 
the assessment or valuation of property for taxable purposes. 
This determination or establishment of the basis of taxation — the 
most important pMt of the whole scheme, requiring the greatest 
care and the finest discrimination in its adjustment — has been 
treated as of the least importance, having been generally entrusted 
to the most unskillfhl and incompetent hands, and so long rcf;arded 



zedbyGoOglC 



AITDITOR OF STATB. 27 

SB a trivial matter, that it has broaght about a complete pablic de- 
morftlizatioQ in reference to this question. Asseaamente of prop- 
erty at its (rue andfiiU value tn money, aa required by law, are the 
exceptioD and not the rule. 

Under valuationa are made through favoritism or bribery, ezcess- 
ive TaluatioDS through spite or revenge, and a syatematic OTer-as- 
aesBment of the land of non-reaidenU has been common for year» 
in many localities. All of these outrages have been perpetrated 
under aemblance of the authority of law, and in flagrant violation 
of its plainest provisions. 

While these oSenaea are directly chargeable to the assessors, 
they are not alone responsible for them ; they have been abetted 
by county commiseionere, and sanctioned and encouraged by the 
people. 

The practice of making incorrect liats of tangible property, 
and false statements of intangible assets, and managing to secure, 
through evasion, concealment or bravado, a false and fVaudulent 
return of property for taxation, Is so common throughout the State 
that it hardly excites comment, and those who succeed to the great- 
est extent in this nefarious business of bluffing the assessor and 
defVaading the public, are oftentimes commended for shrevrdness 
and management, while those who meet their public obligations 
fairly and honorably, by making correct returns of their property, 
in strict compliance with the letter and spirit of the law, are liable 
to ridicole and abuse. 

The troth of theae statemente is too patent to admit of contradic- 
tioD. The questioti ariaea how shall a reform be initiated and a sys- 
tem devised that will not allow such abuses to exist ? 

The legislation of 1874 and 1875 was designed to do something in 
. this direction, but it has become apparent that it never can be ac- 
complished through the preaent system of township assessors. 
While many of them are competent and well qualified in every re- 
spect, performing their duties with a conscientious regard for the 
law there are so many more entirely incompetent that it is vain to ex- 
pect that any immediate results in this work of reform can be secured 
throagb the present system. The question of changing to a system 
of county assessors was considered hy the last legislature and was 
finally adopted for Ramsey county. Its operation in this county 
during the past year has been prodoclire of ao many good results and 
promises so much for the future that J am constrained to recom- 
mend ita adoption for the entire State, being satisfled that if it is 
made an appointable office by proper authority, and subjected to 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



S» IVHUAL BBFOBT. 

reosoiuible revtrictiona, it will be ioflnitely preferable to the present 
system of townehlp usessors which most be pronounced s faiiars. 

THE OKMBBAL SCHOOL TAX. 

Early in our territorial existence provision was made for tlie main* 
tenance of pablic schools by a general tax of one-fourth of one per 
cent. npoD all taxable property, which with fines and proceeda from 
licenses constituted a general conaty school fiind to be apportioned 
among the diObrent school districts according to the nnmbcr of per- 
sons therein between the ages of five and twenty -one years. 

Hiis tax and the manner of its apportionment was continued 
under the State goyernment antil 1862, when it was rednced to one- 
fifth of one per cent. — in view of an income from the public school 
Aind which was established that year — the distribution remsining the 
same. 

In 1867 Mi. Dunnell entered upon the duties of the office of Super- 
intendent of Public Instroction, and in his first report, and persist- 
ently each year during his term of office, recommended that the law 
be amended bo as to provide for the payment of the money realized 
fix>m this tax into the State treasury, to be apportioned with the in- 
come of tbe public school fbnd, making it a general Stale school 
tax, iostead of a general count; school tax. No such amend- 
ment was made, however, and the law remained unchanged 
until 1875 when it was amended reducing the tax to one- 
tenth of one per cent., and providing that each school district should 
receive the amount of tax levied upon the property within its terri- 
torial limits, making it a general school district tax, instead of a 
general county school tax as before. 

This reduction was made in consequence of the increased assess- 
ment of 1874, which, being nearly double the amount of any pre- 
ceding year, increased the amount of the tax in the same ratio, 
and made it burdensome in many counties, and the distribution wss 
changed in consideration of the question of the injustice of taxing 
one locality for the benefit of another, which became more apparent 
,than ever before, through the excessive tax conspquent upon the 
increased taxable valuation. 

Our public school fund is a common property derived fl-om sales 
of land donated by the General Government, and it seems eminently 
Jast and proper that the annual income realized from its investment 
should be distributed throughout the State upon the basts of school- 
able children, or more strictly in compliance with the constitutional 
requirement, as suggested in my report for last year, upon the basis 



zedbyGoOglC 



AUDITOB OF BTATB. 29 

of Bcholars or pupils altending the public schools ; but to dialribate 
In thiu manlier a flind derived from direct tazatioa, seems clearly > 
inequitable. While the entire SEate was sparsely settt^, and 
before there waslas ^income from the school fund, public schools 
could hardly be sustained only through this general system of tax- 
ation, and the necessities of the case justified the means ; but since 
these conditions no longer exist, a conUnaance of the system can- 
not be urged upon [the plea of public necessity, or defended upon 
any equitable grounds. Section 84 of the general school law sat« 
iafies the reqnirement8|of section 8, article 6 of the State constitu- 
tion, wbichlprovides that " The Legislature shall make such pro- 
Tiaions, by taxation or otherwise, as, with the income arising from 
the school fbnd, will secure a thorough and efficient system of 
public schools in each township in the State." While section 34 
only requires the tax payers of each school district to levy the neoes- 
aary taxes for the maintenance of schools, this amended section 42, 
nnder consideration, goes fnrther, and directly Imposes a tax of 
one mill npon each dollar of taxable property in the State, the in- 
novation npon the old law simply giving the tax thus imposed to 
the district in which it is collected, and leaving the amount realized 
from unorganized territory to the general fund. 

The law should be amended so aa to prevent the formation of any 
oonntry school districts with an area of lees than four square miles* 
and a taxable basis of a less amount than $26,000. 

If it is held that the State is bound to fUrnish equal educational 
privileges to all, then the system of compulsory education should 
be adopted, ever; public school In the State shonld be in session a 
certain length of time, during which the attendance of all schoola- 
ble children shonld be enforced, and all taxes raised for the support 
of schools should be paid into the State treasury, and apportioned 
with the income fh>m the sctiool fund. The right to impose a geo* 
eral tax for the support of public schools involves the authority to 
compel attendance of Uie schools, and to prescribe the time they 
shall continue. This would be a great Innovation upon our present 
educational system, which it is notpossible, if it should be consider- 
ed desirable, to make at present; yet . no other 'conaideration will 
justify a system of yenerai taxation for the maintenance of pablio 
schools. 

' TAXATIOM OF LUIIBSB, LOOS, iXD PIKE LAin>3. 

Fartiee engaged in lumbering complain of the effect of Section 8, 
o( the General Tax Law, aa amended at the last session of the Leg* 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



jtO ANinjAL KBFOKT. 

iilatare, aTerring th&t it aabjeots tbem to doable t&xation. A niod- 
iScatioD of the law aeeniB oecessary, to preclnde th^ pouibility of 
such inrjnstice; and while this matter Ib nnder consideration, 1 
would suggest the need of aome provision to enforce payment of 
taxes upon pine lands. It has been a common praotice to clear off 
the timber from these lands, and let them become forfeited to the 
State for taxes. La:^ amounts of taxes are annnally lost in tiiis 
way. The taxes npon sach lands should become a lieu upon all 
logs taken therefirom, and the logs should be subject to seizure and 
Bale wherever found by the county treasurer, to satisfy snch taxes. 
If personal property were made liable to seizure and sale for all 
taxes, OS it is in all other States, it would remedy this evil, and 
prevent many other abuses incident U> our anomalous system of 
taxation, which does not recognize personal liability for taxes upon 
real property. 

TAXATION OT BAILBOAD LAUDS. 

The fbllowing extract from my last report, referring to this aab- 
fubject, is again submitted for consideration : 

'* All rulroad lands are required to be listed for taxation when- 
ever they are sold, or cotUracUd to be aold, and yet by special pro- 
vision of law the taxes are not a lien upon the land in case of re- 
version to tlie company by forfeiture of the contract. Considerable 
amounts of taxes are lost to the local and State funds each year in 
consequence of such forfeitures and reversion. The railroad com- 
panies should be required to provide for the payment of these taxes. 
or else the interest of the purchaser in the lands should be assessed 
as personal property, the same as improvements npon homestead 
lands are now assessed. School, University, Internal Improvement 
and Agricultural College Lands purchased of the State arc in the 
some situation in case of forfeiture on the part of the purchaser, 
the taxes have to be canceled and are consequently lost." 

TAXATIOM or TILSOBAPB, EXPaBSS AND TSANBFOKTATION OOMPAKIBS. 

Unsuccessful efforts were made the last two sessions of the Leg- 
islature to secure the taxation of the gross receipts of telegraph 
and express companies, to correspond with the taxation of railroad 
and Insaranoe companies. To these should be added sleeping oar 
companies, and the various lines of independent transportation 
companies which derive la^ incomes from the bosinesa of our State. 

These corporations are all taxed in other States, and they should 



zedbyGoOglC 



AUDITOS OF BTATB. 81 

be compelled to coatribute Bomething to oor revenne, in return for 
the privileges and benefit s they receive ftom onr protecting lawa. 

The tax of forty cents per mile now imposed upon telegraph 
companies is absurdly low eoinpared with what tbey ought (o pay, 
and would be obliged to pay if taxed two or three per ceot upon 
their groea receipts. There is no valid reason for continuing this 
nominal tax upon telegraph companies, or allowing the corporations 
named entire immunity Arom taxation. I urgently comntend this 
matter to your consideration. 

OOLLBOnOM OF OOSPOBATIOH TAXXS. 

I would respectftally renew the following suggestion in my last 
report, which failed to receive consideration. " The manner of pay 
ing railroad and other corporation tazea into the State treasury is 
not in aocordance with the system that controls moat other trans- 
actions of that department, under which the Aaditor's office directs 
all payments into, and all disbursements fVom the treasury. 

To aooomplish this, reports of all amounts due the State should 
be made to this office, and the Treasurer should collect on the An- 
ditor's draft for the amount reported or found due." 

THE UnCBBUTB ASJVJK LICKK8K TAX. 

The recent decison of the Supreme Court declaring the coostltn 
lionality of the law under which this tax is imposed will render a 
revision and amendment of the law necessary. 

Tlie county auditors should be required to report the amount of 
all moneys received by the county treasurer under the provisions 
of this act to the State Auditor, and payment into the treas' 
nry should be made on auditor's draft iu the same manner that oth- 
er funds are covered into the State treasury. Provision should 
also be made tor compensating all officers upon whom the duty of 
ooUecting Utis tax is imposed. 

DKLIMQDEMT STATX TAXES. 

As beftHe stated, there are t460.902.68 of delinquent State taxes. 
His amount would be considerably reduced if full returns of all 
abatements and erroneous taxes were received thim the dlferent 
eonuties. It was proposed to obtain snch retume during the past 
year, bat as yet they are only partial ; they will be completed early 



zedbyGoOglC 



B8 ANNUAL BEFOBT. 

this yev. It is «tao proposed to aacfirtain the unoant of delinqnent 
tftzea actually standing on Uie tax-hoolu of eaob coaDty. 

There will be a considerable difference, in many of the oonntiM, 
between the delinqnenuy charged to them and the amonnt of taxes 
uncanceled on their books. The amount of Uiis difference will rep- 
resent illegal abatements, and other items of indebtedness to the 
State, that should be provided for by a special State tax for each 
eonnty, if not otherwise met, before tbe levying of the next general 
SUtetax. 

In connection with this matter, provision shoold also be made for 
closing ont all lands forfuted to the State under the provisions of 
the old tax law at whatever price can be obtained for them, and 
clearing up in this way all delinquent taxes. 

The accumulated taxes agunst many of these lands largely 
exceed their valne, and so long as they remain uncanceled tko sub- 
sequent tax can be realised from them. If the extinguishment of 
all back taxes can be secured, with proper and legal assessments in 
tbe future, and with the ten per cent, penalty restored, there will be 
but very little land returned delinquent, and most of that will be sold 
at the deliuQuent sales, so tliat tbe entire tax-list may be collected, 
and a clean balance sheet shown at the end of each fiscal year. If 
this policy is followed, the lowest possible taxation may be secured, 
and there will be no excessive sums annually required to cover de- 
linqncDcies. 

Tht general tax law eboald be amended by re-enacting the pro- 
vision of the old law, declaring lands bid in for the State and re- 
maining unredeemed for two years, forfeited, and the absolute 
property of the State, with the provision before mentioned for sell- 
ing them at whatever price can be obtained ; and the fiirtber pro- 
vision that all lands becoming the absolute property of the State 
shall be stricken ftom the tax-lists, and no longer subject to taxa- 
tion until sold to an actual purchaser. If the old law had con- 
tained this provision it would have saved Uie old settled counties 
no inconsiderable expense in carrying these lands on the tax-lists 
and advertising them year after year. 

IMTKSTIIBin' or THB BDVCATIOIUL FCDDS. 

The inveatment of the permanent school and university ftinds 
will soon become a question of serious oonoem, such investment 
DOW being practically limited to Hissouri state hoods on account of 
the high rate of premlnm on United States bonds and all oUier 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AUDITOR OF 8TATB. 89 

■tate bonds we are authorized to purchase, vliich preclades the pos- 
■ibility or making a profitable iDvcslment in them. 

Miosoari six per cent, bonds having heretofore been below par,oar 
iDTeetments in them liave been profltable, but they are now at par 
and will probably ere long be at a premium, and bceidca this con- 
sideration it is a qneslion of sound financial policy whether we 
shoold increase our iDvestmenta in these bonds, which, including 
orders now being filled by our agent in New York, amount to over 
1400,000. 

If some other investment is not authorized, we shall very soon b» 
obliged to invent in United States five-percent, bonds, which at 
present rates of premium would rednce the interest to about four 
and one-fourth per cent. Sneh an investment would materially re- 
dace the annual income from these funds, which will cause pi'onor- 
tionate increased taxation for educational purposes. In view of 
these facts it is important that this question shonld be considered 
by this legislature. The State Trcasnrer of Wisconsin, in bis last 
report, referring to these investments, says ; " Tlie high rate of 
premium tin the purchase of United Slates bonds, or on the bonds 
of Eastern States of nn questionable security, almost precludes the 
possibility of making advantageous invesioients in these bonds. 
The Commissioners of the School and University Lands have 
deemed, therefore to the best interests of the State to confine theit 
iDvestments to loans to school districts, to aid them in the erection 
of school-houses, and to such counties as by law were authorized 
to make loans. 

The laws to that efliect are very stringent, aud surrounded with 
all the necessary safeguai-ds to amply secure the loan, at the same 
time, also, providing for annual redemption in installments. In case 
of a failure to pay either Interest or principal, the amount unpaid 
is to be assessed as a tax upon such delinquent school district or 
county, and to be collected. with the other State taxes." 

A constitutional amendment providing for legislation that will 
onthorize aacb investments of our funds will be of immense benefit 
to our State. There are hundreds of thousands of dollars of city, 
county and school district bonds, many of which would not be ex- 
changed for United States bonds, issued within our own State, 
now onlst&mllng, at rates of tntercst varying from seven to twelve 
per ci-nt., and many, if not most of them, have been sold to eastern 
capitalists, at rates considerably below par. The discount, and ib- 
tereat exceeding seven per cent., on all of these bonds now existiag; 
Id this State, must amount to an exceedingly large sum, all of 
5 



zedbyGoOgle 



34 UXVTJAL SEFOBT. 

which might have been saved to the tax-payera of the State, and a 
seven per cent, loan secared to our State Ainds, if the moDey had 
been invested in local bonds, instead of being sent oat of the State 
for HisBonri six per cent, bonds, which aSbrd no better secoritj 
than OUT local bonds would under proper legal restrictions. 

BAmtaB BAITKB. 

The law providing for the incorporation of Savings Banks sub- 
jects Uiem to the Inspection and examloatlon of this ofltce. In the 
discbarge of the duty implied in this provision, I oommisaioned 
Hr. T H. Titns, of Rochester, an experienced back cashier, to make 
the examination required. His inspection was oritioal and thw- 
oo^, and indqded all of these institatlons in the State, except the 
Savings Bank of Dnlnth. The result of this examination will be 
foond is Appendix " N," to which is attached the report of the 
Savings Bank of Duluth, which together show tita condition and 
bnsinesa of these institations. 



zedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOB OF STATE. 



L-A.NX) DEPARTMENT. 



RIPOKT or THR BOSDIBSS OP TBB NATB LAKD OmOB. 

I. Tabular st&tement Bbowiug the result of the Bales of School 

Laod in 1875. 
n. Tabular statemeDt ahowing the condition oi the School Lands 

in eoanties where sales bafe been held. 
m. Tabular etatenaent showing the total salea of School Land 

each year. 
IV. Tabolar statement abowing the result of Hu sales of Agricul- 
tural College Lands In 1875. 
T. Tabular statemeut showing the condition of the Agrlcuitoral 

C<ril^e Land Grant. 
VL T^ular statement showing the total sales of AgricultorsI 

College Lands each year. 
Vn. Tabalar statement showing the sale of University Land in 

1975. 
Tni. Tabalar statement showing the condition of the first grant 

to the University. 
TX Tabular statement showing the sales of Internal Improvement 

Land in 1675. 

X. Tabular statement showing the condition of the Internal Im- 
provement Land Grant 

XI. Tabular statement ahowing the total sales of Internal Im- 
provement Land each year. 

Xn. T^nlar statement showing the condition of the several grants 
of Swamp Lands. 

XIII. Tabular statement slwwing the number of acres of Swamp 
Land patented to the State and conveyed or set apart each year. 

XIT. Tabular statement of the certified lists of Railroad Lands 
filed daring the year. 

XT. Tabular statement of Deeds of Congressional Lands to Rail- 
road Companies during the year. 

Xn. Tabular statement of Deeds of CongTessional Lands to 
Railroads each year, and aggregate eonveyed. 

XTII. Tabular statement of expenses of State Land Office each 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ARKDAL BBPOKT. 



I. Tabular StatemeiU akotaing the reauU of the Saiet of School Land 
in 1875. 



Beoton 

Blue Earth.. 

Olilppeira.. . 

Ohl-asjo 

Dakota. .... 

Dodge 

Duugl:ia 

Faribault.... 
Fillmore 



Ooudbue. ... 
H^DceplB ... 
Hou^Wll. ... 

JuckBon 

Kandiyohi.... 

t<eSpeiir 

McLeod .... 

NlcnlleC...'! 

Olmsted 

OtierTail... 

foiia 

RutD^ej 

Keuvllle 

lUue 

Scott , 



Stetlc 

TodJ 

Wabuba- 



<S1.40 
40.00 
173. C3 
2n,7S 
GOa.OO 
280-1 
220.00 

l.GiiO.OO 

l,2l7.07 

1,001)00 
210.00 
(ISO.OO 
80.00 
8-.8 78 

1.480.0^ 
BO.OO 

2,430 05 
178-80 

1,0811.16 
Si)9.81 

2,»20.00 
40.00 
160. 00 

1,280.011 

1,S:KI 8G 
12i).00 
810.00 
440 
S9T.80 
40 00 
8U0 OO 

1,838. IS 
flCOOO 
SiO.96 
4(<.<>0 

1,040.00 
718.76 
200.00 
S.)I.hO 
COJ.93 



$2,336 

4H0 DO 

1,143 to 

l.CIS 00 

8,423 00 

1,!»70 00 

1,210 00 

9,olO 00 

G,84T 5. 

B,11D 00 

1,830 on 

2,410 00 

813 80 

4,010 16 

7,C^0 00 

4-0 00 

14,7GS 2i 

891 00 

S,640 73 

1,8(9 Oi 

16,740 00 

200 00 

800 on 

8,ft7."i 40 

9,316 n 

GOO 00 

4,7^0 00 

2,370 OO 

2,0rt!t 00 

340 00 

1.900 OU 

S.Ote 7S 

4,SQ0 00 

1,93li [iS 

HOO 00 

S,300 00 

8,032 60 

1,000 00 

4,0G0 00 

B,8^B 37 



9SD4 87 

80 110 
2^3 10 
241 36 
0i)8 60 
835 60 
80 H GO 

l,42(i EO 

IflVl 29 
771 OO 
^83 00 
SG'i 00 
833 80 
Oil 01 

I,fiOO 00 
73 00 

2,312 32 
184 10 
043 1» 
277 8C 

2,478 SO 
30 OO 
120 00 

1,274 4J 

1,(104 13 
90 00 
7GJ 00 
376 SO 
813 86 
8l> 00 
SGS OJ 

1,078 26 
744 00 
ISO 50 
80 00 
920 00 
644 87 
160 00 
634 Oi 
988 26 



3,074 09 

230 00 

8,3a9 16 

6,o;o 00 

tOi 00 
lS,66ti 03 

759 90 
4 638 S6 
1,671 
13,201 

170 OU 

680 UO 
6,801 00 
7,011 10 

610 OU 
8,937 00 
1,901 60 
1,776 66 

2<i4 UO 
1,686 OO 
6,887 50 
4,SI6 00 
1,6 '0 15 

170 00 
4,380 00 
8,087 63 

860 00 
S.426 86 
3,840 12 



37 63 
66 98 
10^ 76 



264 34 
J79 37 
66 24 
85 15 
9 03 
188 88 
246 12 
18 6S 
535 08 

84 94 
193 14 

07 41> 

641 67 

6 94 

27 »t 
286 91 
883 4t 

XO 86 
103 42 

81 SI 

73 60 
8 87 

G2 79 
941 73 

173 08 
87 57 

6 97 

174 79 
126 6* 

85 00 
140 63 
123 66 



Total 3G,483.75 tlig.eoa 50 ♦26.591 89 1124,209 21 »5.l«8 4» 

ArencB per un, tUMJ. 



jdbyGoOgle 



ICDITOB OF STATE. 37 

n. Talntlar Statetnent ihowing Ike number of Acres of School Landt 
in ihe Countien where Eolea have been held, the number of Acrea 
sold and vntold, and the number appraised and unappraiaed. 



ADokft 

BentoD 

BlnaEMtb... 

ChlppewA 

Chloiijfo 

Cook 

Coll OD wood. . 

DakoU 

Dndge 

Donj^lu 

FarihaulU.... 
Vlilniore 

Ooodhae 

Hennepin.-.- 
Boa»Mn...... 

Jackson 

Emodl jobl . . . 

Uka 

LcBoMir 

Hartln 

HcLeod 

Meeker 

Mllla Lua... 

How«r 

Mnrray 

Hloolkt- 

Olmsied 

Ou«TTalL... 

Pino 

Pope 

Banuey 

Benfllle 

Bice 

ScoU 

SberboiiM -.. 

81hl»y 

Steariu 

Steele 

Bt. I.oals- 

Todd 

Wtbaaha 

Wi-«« 

Wiahiofton . 
WaioniraD. . . 

Wlnou. 

Witgtit 



No- of acres 
appraised 
■ud aold. 



T,S>J(> 16 

ll,GSO fil 

800.00 

7,0S«.2I! 

752-88 
18,710.02 
lt,f40/)0 
4,1&9 4S 
!T,835.T4 
H>,8 10.00 
!O,807.8a 
!1,033 90 
18,178 <7 
l8,6iU 61 
1,184.41 
8,918 48 

ew.oa 

lB,93l.0a 
1,873.20 
IG,8S1 89 
18,811.04 



[1,848.80 
S,904.G8 
S,041-83 
800.00 
1,SB0 66 
4,118.11 
t,1fiff.28 
17,247.19 
11,031.68 
3,668.18 
11,706 47 
IS,I82.B4 
14,264 20 
1,780.00 

sgo.9s 

S.774.46 
1,268.82 
.0,0^4,17 

3,9^8.8 



1S,2: 



No- of a 
■pprsl^ed 
Aod unsold. 



11 iss.e^ 
3.87074 
2,026.60 
9.64 7.T0 

aoo.oo 

7,160 00 

T,2j2.fiT 

fi64.ar 

7,I02.6S 

S,44!l.01 

200-00 

18,0^9.63 

8,826.66 

930.00 

G,09G,90 

240.00 

1,2»8 1S 

8,241.64 

12,118.11 

18,8Hr-U 

640.00 

178.10 

14,687-18 

4,S48.8C 

9,667.88 

1,280.00 

820 00 

2,448-84 

2,204.84 

18G.87 

88,841 81 

■ 480.00 

24,671.41 

440 00 

1G,T83 85 

8U6-4A 

1,099.48 

2,562.60 

«,TS9.1S 

17,S49 76 

769.75 

31,620.68 
i72.40 
460.00 
8,070.88 
8,486.18 
2,821.77 
10,038.85 

398,549.99 



13,155.57 

7,486.06 

IndeAnlte. 



15,944.05 
57,831.18 



9,556.28 
1,136-68 



Total No. of 

B aures Schnol 

land tn tbe 

CoQDty. 

16,766.70 
14,51486 
17,567.57 
17,543 86 
11.7;,0.Gt 
2«,078.48 
14,341.88 
iDdeflulU. 
23,4.-,7.28 

21,169.08 
14,440.00 
32,209,08 
26,152 40 
80.240.00 
25,9J8.79 
21,1:72.90 

1 4. 4118.6;; 

18,771.17 
35 588.09 
80.292.08 

IndeflolM. 
16,108.16 
26,609.05 
19,678 94 ' 
22,876.42 
17,231,06 
25,61)0.00 
60,270.02 
14,018 24 
33,040.00 
67,431.88 
48,274 86 
26,262.28 ' 
4,658.11 
44,669-60 
18,138 04 
13,120 »S 
15,220 98 
31,495.61 
46,677.16 
16,038.95 

Indednita. 
81.068.91 
7.846 86 
12,0fi8.83 
18.0S4-M 
16,918.38 
22,105.08 
28,213.85 

l.Oe2.W8.0t 



zedbyGoOyl 



AmnJAL H3BF0BT. 



III. TMvlar ttatetMiU Bhotoittg the rtauU of Ae talt* of StAool 
land each year, the average price per acre, and the totalprodtie- 
tive fund and aU •oure«« from w&i«A it hat bmn derived. 

Tbk Mo. at urw 

•Old. Mid. 

18SS 88,347.41 

1868 fiS,S20.8S 

1864 4!,t8S,S8 

ie6e S4,S4I.98 

1866 S4,496.2S 

1867 S4,630.ai 

1868 76,910 IB 

1869 89,877.33 

1870 14,802.lifl 

1871 7,49S.iO 

1872 S7,606.78 

1ST8 S3,164.13 

1874 20,041.74 

IS76 3S,4S2.75 



47!,6S4.S8 98,883,663 60 

AmonDts p«id on fbrftitorM, right of mtj, etc . . 910,462 14 

Balaa of tlmtwr S78,51S 81 

Total from Bftlu of lud mnd timber 98,166,629 »S 

Praflta on BilBS of boDda 14,413 86 

ToUl productive And 98,191,043 61 



Parcbua ATanga prloi 




parser*. 


342,876 10 


9<U 


809,740 06 


S 82 


287,269 27 


6 92.6 


144,980 OS 


S 07.8 


889,781 93 


6 SS.S 


909,288 18 


8 04.6 


464,840 61 


e 04.4 


388,204 46 


6 97.S 


89,696 41 


6 06 


49,086 00 


6 64.9 


166,081 07 


6 01.6 


IBS, 487 66 


6 11 


118,489 83 


E 81.3 


149,808 60 


»e«.7 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



AQSnoa OF 9ZATB. 89 

IV. TbXndar Statemmt, ahowhtg the reault of the tales of Africvl' 
tural OoOega Lande in 1876, 



BloeBartb 
Brown...- 
Dodge 

FrMborD . . 
llel.rad... 

BIblsj 

StMla 

Wkhnwaa. 
WrigM.... 



40.00 
80.00 
278.16 
T4T.83 
l,OS».tl 
1,400.00 
S60.00 
480. 6S 
1S0.00 
408-1 



4,9SS-1 



9340 00 
400 00 
1,846 G7 
S,800 00 
e,19S 56 
8,100 00 
1,800 00 
S,4(KIO0 
610 DO 
S,410 86 



•88 00 
60 00 
aT6 B9 
670 00 
7T9 84 
1,S6S 60 
2iO 00 
U7 60 
96 00 

eo»sG 



•S04 00 
840 00 
I,S6B tm 
8,180 00 
4,416 21 
7,086 GO 
1,630 03 
8,08S SO 
«44 00 



1,98 



94,381 68'«23,8&I 40 



•8 S8 

18 94 
64 OS 
182 62 
181 80 
886 67 
82 64 
86 60 
aa 38 
88 6S 



•949 96 



Awtngt per acre, |S 49.8. 



T. Tabvtar Statement, ihowiitg the number ofaerea of Agrie^Utwrat 
OoBege Land* in the State, the counties lohere iituated, the number 
of aerea told and unsold, and the nuri^er of aeree appraised and 
unappraised on the SOtk November, 1875. 



BlMEuth 

Brown 

Dodce 

VaribMlt 

Vrvcborn 

LacqaiPaile... 

MeLMd 

Meeker 



Hkoltet.. 



BravUle'.. 
Blbler.... 
Steuiu-.. 



lo. or Acres 
■pprelaMl 
mi eold. 



Mo. of Acres 
appraised 
•nd DDMld. 



8,687. «• 

880-00 

878.16 

4,681-00 

7,888.16 



6,616.60 
8,886.07; 
1,769.62- 
1,800.00 



840.00 
i,190.04 

988.46 
MOT. 84 
.,880.46 



9,417.04 

V,soiIe4 



88,648.88 41,898.88 



1,921.89 
9,844*27 



Total No. or 
acres Agr"!. 
Col. Land 
lo CoQDty. 



1,877. 6ft 
1,070.04 
,876.80 
,688.64 
1,666.81 
SSO.DO 
1,876.87 
;,029-91 
,769.68 
,160.00 
,600.00 
,931.80 
1,877.04 
,244 '27 
i,6SS.7l 
',714.66 
,688-<» 
i.698.Sl 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



40 ANKDAL BSPORT. , 

VI. Tabular Statement Mhowing the result of the aal*t o/Agrlculttiral 
College Land each year, and the total productive fund and aU 
eoureeefrom which it haa been derived. 



1367 l.lSO.Oi 

I8» T,1E7.16 

1BS9 0,i>05.,'a 

1870 8,481.87 

1871 640.00 

1872 4,010*8 

1S78 8.040 00 

1874 4,083.33 

•187S 6,038.89 



95,000 00 
44,802 88 
88.539 01 
17,800 81 
8,408 00 
!8,IiG 01 
14.260 00 
26,698 77 
!T,613 98 



•8 00 

G S6.8 
5 eG.5 

5 10.8 

6 88. !l 

5 3S.1 

6 40.) 
S 70.3 
S 49.S 



Deduct (brfelted lands re-aold. . 



88,080 68 4217,283 60 

Sales or timber 18,910.43 

Amonnl paid on forfeltDKB 894 00 

ApproprlattoDS of 1874 and 1875 34,000 00 

ToUl permanent nicd «9M,037 08 

• lodadM CD (ens CnlTanttr linda proptr. 



Til. Tabular Statement ahoaing the r»$uU of the SoUb of UnimreUii 
Lands in 1875. 



CovDtT- 


Acres Amount Principal 
Sold. or Salo. I Paid. 


PHnclpal 
Doe. 


lutereat 
Paid. 


Heeker 


80.00 «400 OOl 900 00 


9340 00 


•14 60 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



AUDITOR OF BTATB. 



41 



Vlil. Thbutar SbUement thawing the number ofacrtB of UhiverUt]/ 
Land* sflecled under grant of February 19, 1851, the countiea 
where ntuated, Ike number ofacrea mid by Board of Regents, tht 
number ofaeret told by Gommtssioner State Land O^.c, and tht 
number ofaeret appraited and unappraiied. 



Coantlea. 


No. of 
AcrcB aold 
by Beg-M. 


Ko. or 
Acres boM 
by Com. 
8. h. 0. 


No. of 

Acres «p- 

prnlsed 

and unsold. 


Ho. of 
Acrea un- 

appralscd. 


Total No. of 
Acres Unl- 

verelty Land 
10 CoUBty. 


Dikote 


],89S.09 














9.7S3.47 
4,640.3! 


9,768.47 
4,6t0.3S 












8*0.00 


80 00 


8,232.70 




»,8« 78 

1,920.00 

G18.2G 


9,S4S.7« 






















U.*+S.05 
aBO.46 






11,44^.06 
1,814.61 








1,606.06 








ToUl 


H,784.7f 


80-00 


8.233.70 


28,880.83 


4«.468.88 



XX. Tabular Statement thowtng the result of the ScUes of Internal 
Improvement Landt in 1875. 



Coantie*. 


Ac». 
sold. 


Amonntor 
tjale. 


PrInolpU 
Paid: 


PriOClpBl 
Dne. 


iDtareat 
Paid. 




1,000.00 
80 00 
80.00 
789.17 
640.00 


^6,800 00 

430 00 

400 00 

4,778 01 

8,!» 00 


•867 60 
68 00 
GO 00 
793 04 
488 00 


. «4,489 GO 

887 00 

840 00 

4.020 97 

2,787 00 


919B-49 


3^iSou''.'.y ".'.'.'." 


















Tot«( 


8.839.17 


14.118 01 


2.S25 E( 


11,887 47 


lie H 


iTctage per acre 


»6.46. 











D,j.,.db,Go'oglc 



ARHUAI. 

TWmiar Statement ehomng the number ofacrei of Internal /m> 
provement Landa, the counties token eituated, the number of 
acres told and unsold, and the number of acres appraised and 
unapprai»ed. 



CoDDUes. 


No. of •crM 
appraised 
ud sold. 


No. of MMie 
■p praised 
and oDioKl. 


No, of *cres 
DDtppialwd 


Tot.! Ho. of 
aiirealnt. 
Imp. Lud 
In Connty. 








18,811.26 
B.BiW.O' 
19,200 00 

we'.6e 

U,0C8.78 
888.01 
28,261.97 
e,0o0.00 
4,799.90 
SS.»4B 87 
2.K40.(XJ 
18,7G9.4I 
12,i0i.2U 
14.9J4.66 
S20.0U 
£S.S£8.4a 
50,441.46 


18,81 1. M 
9,920 00 












S,MO.0O 
U,11S.S2 


DonglM 


3,88T.»0 


18,960.48 








14,0S8.7B 










*00.00 


80,ew.S7 


69,807.84 
8,000.00 
4,799.90 
40,0^1.19 
2,240 00 
13,769.41 
41,811.88 
14,954.86 












80.00 


»i,m.ta 












S,840'.H 


U,S<S.80 






640.00 


u,08e.oi 




6S.638.4S 
69,882.17 






18.880 71 
11,620.» 










10,8S1.70 
8,120.00 
8.648.81 
8,198.99 

ao,4uo.oo 

18.797.88 


10,861.70 
6,120.00 
9,918.81 












1,280.00 




















18,797.88 








ToUl .... 


T,rS8.45 


160,288.W 


841,648.88 


499,<81.tt 



Tabviar Statement showing the result of the sates of Intemat 
Improvement Land each year, and the total produeiive Jknd 
and aU sources from which it has been derived. 



Tear sold. 


NomberDf 
urea aold. 


Pnrc&aae money. 


Avertge price 
per MM. 




3,169.54 
S.049.T4 
8,589.17 


914.844 41 
17,860 45 
14,118 01 


•« 64.1 












iDtereat on Lud Con* 


7,798,45 


45,B07 97 

4,808 18 

410 110 

4,666 »7 


6 87.8 
























64.997 97 









,. Google 



AUDITOB or BTATB. 



XII. Tabuiar Statemna, ahawingtke condition of the Mevertd Grantt 
of Swamp Lands, date, grantee. No. of acres in grant, eitimaUd 
or ttatsd, the No. of acre* aet apart or convened, and the No. of 
aeres required ioJiU the grants. 



Date or 

■SSI 


■r of 


Ho. o/ Mm 


Wa. B,II 
" 12, ' 


IH.T4 


»,IW.3» 




36.29 
K.J 

11 

04.70 






IS 

lB.SW.tS 
















,.,— ^JO.H 


mm.as 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



is 



II 



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■si 
11 



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i 



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II ^ 



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AUDITOB OP STATB. 4ft 

XIV. BaUroad JAndi. Durtnp the ytar certified liita and Patent 
for Congrtationai lands have btenJUed in lki» office for benrJU <4 
BaQnad Compainea aefoUowa, vix: 

Naino of Compinj. Mo. of Acna, 

Bt. FanUnd PaciOc R. B. Co. (HalD Line) la.ibS.it 

UtonesoU Central R. R. Co 3,833.80 

Haitinee antl DakoiaR.R.Co 480.00 

I.ake8DperIorfti)dMlul9>lpolR. R. Co lG8,M0-8t 

St. Pant Md Sloox Clt7 R. R. Co S,6S7.SS 

WlDona and St. Peter R. R. Co., (UiniissoU Iftndi) S,l09.0f 

WlDonaandSb Peter R. R. Co., (DakoU lands) 448,818.48 

Bootbern UlnD«80taR-R. Co 10,9!3.Tr 

688,794.03 



XV. Since the last annual report, there have bean exeeuied by ih* 
OovtmoT eight deedi conveying congreeaionai land* to railroad oom- 
paniee,jbr vhoae ben^ the State hold* londi in (rtut. 



DkteofDeed. 


Nam«ofCon>p»ny. 


Acres CoDYersd. 


April 13, 18TS.... 

Marl), 187S 

July 31, 1876 

AUK- G, ISTS 

Bept. 1, mTS 

•Sept. 7, 18TE 

Koy. 12, 1876 

I>«!. 16.1878 






Btlllwoter 4 St. Paul U.K. Go 

St. P-nl ft Slonx City R. B. Co 

Lake Superior ft MtBslsslppI R. R. Co.. 
WlDonaABI Peter R. K. Co 

St. P»l & Pulllc (UalD) R. H. Co 


18.648.40 
t,!8t.l8 
4,448. ST 
1I4.277.0T 
448,814.07 
8.m.80 
I3.4GS.43 

673,971.88 



■Lsnda In Dnkotft Territory. 



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48 ANynAL bbport. 

BODOOL I^NDB. 

All of tbe ECbool lands remaining UQdppraised Id Douglas, Siblej 
and Wa§bmgton counties, also a partial list of tbe lands or Cotton- 
wood county, and tbe entire list of Pope county, bsve been ap- 
praised during tbe past season, amounting in tbe aggregate to 4t,- 
812.40 acres. 

Tbe annual sales amounted to 20,482.75 acres, about tbe usual 
quantity, but at an average rate per acre slightly less than former 
years. 

Tlie total sales made during tbe last fourteen years amount to 
472,534.88 acres, at an average price or $6.10 per acre, prodacing a 
fhnd of t2,8S2,C52.G0. This amount baa been incresBed $273,515.21 
by sales of pine timber, $24,412.66 byproflls on sales of bonds, and 
$10,462.14 by forfeitures of lands purchased, making a total pro- 
ductive fund of $3,191,042.61, an increase of $163,533 96 during 
the year. 

There are $1,056,886.09 of this amount due upon land certificates, 
bearing seven per cent, interest, $485,000 invested In Minnesota 
seven per cent, bonds, $289,000 invested in Missouri six per cent, 
bonds, and $442,800 invested in United States bonds of vaiions 
Issues. 

The income nx)m the fund as at present invested will be about 
$216,506.90 for tbe ensuing year, a sum equal to $2.02 for each 
scholar in attendance upon tbe public Bchools, as shown by Lhc last 
report of tbe Superintcudent of Public Instruction. 

Measures are being talcen for seleuting deficiency lands duo the 
State on account of pre-emption,' homestcnd and scrip entries, and 
for deficiencies from natural causes, and all illegal entries and pre- 
emptions are being contested. 



AOBICULTDKAL COLLKOB LANDS. 

The appraisals of agiicnJtural college lands, during the past year, 
comprise the entire listof these lands in the counties of Dodge, Pope 
and Sibley, aggregating 4,896.60 acres. 

Tlie annual aalea amounted to 6,033.89 acres, at an average prios 
pet acre of $5.49.8. 

The total amount of land inuring to the State for the benefit of 
agricuttural colleges Is as follows : 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AUDITOR OF BTATB. 49 

AetuI taa»et. Nimbar aracni 

SlBgte HlDtmnm 68,928.08 ' M,»26.08 

]>OBUe BlnimuD !fi,Bl].20 S1,0S9.40 



The total UDODut of the grant was 120,000 acres. 



OBlTKBfiITT LADDO— FIRST OBAMT. 

Under the act of Coogresa approved Febniary 19, 1851, there 
were located for the use of the Uaiversity 46,468.33 acres of land, 
of which amount 23,861. 71 acresara pine lands, and 23,106.64 acres of 
agricoltaral lands. Of the latter, 1,193,26 acres were sold to pay 
indebtedness, b; the Board of Regents, in 1862. 

By act of the L^islature, approved March 5, 1863, the State Aa- 
ditor, as ex-officio Commissioner of the State Land Offloe, was re- 
qaired to take charge of the University lands. By the act of March 
4, 1864, a new Board of Regents was appointed, and ievested with 
special powers, for the parpose of Hqnidating the indebtedness of 
the Institution, and authorized to dispose of 12,000 acres of the 
aniversity lands, which was subsequently increased to 14,000 acres. 

Their reports show that a total of 14,734.76 acres have been sold, 
of which amount descriptions for 12,541.67 acres have been obtained 
by this office. 

The lands remaining unsold in Meeker oonnty, 3,812.76 acres, 
were appraised under the direction of this office, in 1872, and 80 
acres sold during the past year. 

Reference to the tabular statement will show the present condi- 
tion of this grant. 



BBOOHD OBUrr. 

By the act of Congress approved July 6, 1870, an additional grant 
of serenty-two sections of land was made to the State Univei^ 
irity. 

The selections under this grant are incomplete, as shown by the 
following table of the approved lists of selections filed in this office. 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



M AHHTJAIi BEFOST. 

mtflat. Data of ApproraL A«r«a. 

AlBxmndria. Uij IS, 187S 6,0U.ST 

Now Dim S«Fteii)ber 24, lS7t T,SI9.T1 

Dniath Angaat 29, 1ST8 821.89 

St. Cload August 29, 18TS 4,888.94 

Oak Lake AnjpistS}, 1873 4,788 iM 

Alex*DdrlA December 27, 1878 2,880.00 

Total 2S,239.9S 

It jet doe the 8Ut« 19,840.04 



All HlectioDB of UniTsnity lands are made ander the direction of 
the GoTcraor. 



8ALT SPRnO LAVItS. 

The original grant covered 46,080 acres. Of this the State was 
unable to avail itself of 11,Q20 acres, that amonnt being situated 
ontaide the area surveyed by the general government. This fact re- 
daced the origlaal available grant to 84,560 acrea. 

As the United States government was tardy in certifying the se- 
lected lands to the State, settlers were allowed to occupy and receive 
patents Tor 6,762 acres. About 1,600 acres were also previously 
covered by the terms of the act granting swamp lands to the State. 
The remainder, 26,435 acres, have been certified to the State. Of 
this amoant the Belle Plaine Salt Company were granted 7,648 aores, 
«n complying with the acts of the Legislature. The rest of the cer- 
tifled lands, amounting to 18,771 acres, are now available. Of the 
nncertifled portion of the original grant, ag^pregatlng 19,872 acrea, 
tiie various sums lost to the State were as follows : 

Sltosted ODtslds of the surveyed porUon.... 1],BM 

Patented to settlers 6,7U 

PnTloDslf covered by swamp lasd grant 1,600 

Total 19,872 

By act of tiie Legislature, approved Mareh 10th, 1878, these lands 
were transferred to the custody and control of the Board of Regents 
of the University of Minnesota. The act also provides that they 
nay be sold in such manner, or in such amounts, consistent with 
the laws of the State of Minnesota, aa they may see fit, the proceeds 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOB OP BTATB. 51 

^ing held Id trnst by tbom, and only diBbarsed in accordance witb 
the law ordering a geological and natural history sarvey of the State. 
I would respectrully saggest that the lawa relating to the sale of 
University and Salt Spring lands be amended, placing them directly 
ander control of this department. 

UrrUtMAL IMFBOVEUUTT LANDS, 

AH of the Internal Improvement land in the counties of Pope 
and Sibley were appraised during the past year, amounting to 85,- 
518.27 acres. The annual sales were 2,S89.17 acres, at an aferage 
price of $5.45 per acre. 

The request from the Department of the Interior for a relinquish- 
ment of a portion of the lands alleged to be included in the grant 
of the S^nt Paul and PociQc Railroad Company, to which referenos 
was mode in ray lost report, boa not been complied with. The 
lands included in this grant are of good quality and probably most 
of them will be sold within the next five years. 

The proceeds of these lands constitute a TuaA that cannot be dis- 
posed of except by legislative enaetment approved by a vole of the 
people. It may nltimately be used in settlement of the so-called 
Sute Railroad Bonds. 

STATE BWAKF LAUDS. 

The estimated area of the state is 53,459,840 acres, of which ten 
per cent, has been estimated to be " swamp or over^flowed lands," 
within the meaning of the act of Congress approved Sept. 28, 1850, 
the provisions of which were extended to the state of Minnesota 
by act of Congress, approved March 12, 1860, The surveyed area 
of the State, according to the report of the U. S. Surveyor General 
to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, Aug. 26, 1875, is 
87JS95,S91.65 acres, exclusive of water surfooe. 

In 1 860 the surveyed area was about 18,400,000 acres, and owing 
to loss trora prior grants, pre-emptions and entries, it is estimated 
that the state will realize only about 3,000,000 acres. 

There have been paUntetl to the Sute 1,142,458.18 acres, 
and probably about 500,000 acres more will be received from the 
lands at present surveyed, complete lists of which have been trans- 
mitted by the U. S. Surveyor G-cneral to tlio Commissioner of the 
General Land Office, and they now await the action of the Depart- 
ment of the Interior. 

The tabular statement shows that 835,989.83 acres have been 



zedbyGoOgle 



St AHKUAL BEFORT. 

deeded to the seTersl railroad companies to whom grants have been 
made, and 4,563.71 acres deeded to the assignee of the commUsion- 
ere of the Uadelia State road. 

By act of the Legislature approved Harcb 12, 1861, all thesvamp 
lands in McLeod county were donated to the Agricultural College 
of the State of Minnesota, subject to the control and disposal of 
the Governor, president and executive committee of the State Ag- 
ricultural Society, for the erection of bnildings oc endowments of 
professorships oaly. None of these lands have been sold. 

By act of the Legislatnro approved February 13, 1865, the even 
nnmbered sections of swamp lands to the amount of 100,000 acres 
each, for the Hospital for the Insane, the Deaf, Damb and Blind 
Institute, and the State Prison, and 75,000 acres for each of the 
three Normal Schools, were required to be set apart for the benefit 
of these Institutions. The tabular statement of these lands shoirs 
104,178.21 acres thus set apart, and 165,653.16 acres now. subject 
to formal transfer, making 269,831.37 acres that have already in- 
ured to the institutions mentioned under this grant. 

By act of the Legislature approved March 9, 1875, these lands 
were made subject to sale under the general provisions for the sale 
of public lands, but no disposition can be made of them until the 
snit of the St. Paul and Chicago railroad company against the Trus- 
teea of the Hospital for the Insane, referred to in my last report, 
has been decided. 

I am informed that it will be at^ed before the Supreme Court In 
April. For further information in reference to this suit, I would 
respectfully refer to the reports of this office for the last two yeare. 

By act of the Legislature approved March 2, 1865, 300,000 acres 
wore granted to the Cannon river improvement company, to aid in 
eecuring slack water navigation on the Cannon river. No lands 
have been conveyed to this company. 

Ad act of the Legislature approved March 3, 1865, provided that 
the title to the remaining swamp lands, after the prior grants had 
been satisfied, shoidd be vested in the Board of Directors of the S(A- 
diers' Orphan Asylum. 

By act of the Legislature approved Harcb 3, 1875, aid to the Da- 
luth and Iron Range railroad company was granted to the amount 
of ten sections per mile, from the swamp lands in the counties of 
St. LoQJs, Lake and Cook. The estimated amount of the grant is 
422,400 acres. 

Under the Congressional grant of May 5, 1864, in aid of the Lake . 
Superior and Mississippi railroad, and of July 2, 1864, to the Nor> 



zedbyGoOglC 



ADDITOB OF STATE. 53 

them Pacific railroad, large amounts of swatnp laods, inuring to the 
State ander the act of March 12, 1860, lying within both the granted 
and indemnity limits of the road'a, have been selected and certified 
to the respective companies. 

(Complete lists of all the surveyed swamp lands are being pre- 
pared and will be transmitted to the Department of the Interior 
when completed for the purpose of obtaining a patent for all lands 
to which the state is entitled, and to ultimately secare an adjust- 
ment of all existing grant«. 

PUBLIC BUIUtDIQ LAMDS. 

The aet anthorizing the formation of a state government granted 
ten sections of land to the state for the erection of public buililings. 
Under this grant 6,S95.12 acres were selected in Kandiyohi county, 
and the selections have been certified to the Stale by the general 
government. I would eoggest the passage of a law authorizing the 
sale of these lands upon the same conditions as school lands are 
now sold, and providing for the investment of the proceeds as a 
-Capitol building fUnd. The present value of these lands at com- 
pound interest will produce a much larger fund than can be realized 
from their sale years hence, when the proceeds will be used in the 
erection of a new capitol, besides the State, and the county of Kan- 
diyohi will be beuefited through the settlement and cultiration of 
these lands. I would t^rther suggest the setting apart of all re- 
maining swamp lands after existing grants are satisfied for the bene- 
lit of this proposed Hind, at the same time, providing against the 
extension of any existing grant. 

aT«TE LAKD BTUHPAOB AND COIXEOTIOH OF STDUPAGE AOCOUHTS. 

No new cuttings of pine timber have been authorized during the 
past year, and all cutting nnder old permits is nearly at au end, 
the policy being to protect and preserve the timber on state lands 
until increased prices can be obtained. Collections of stumpage 
acconnts have been secured as fast as the circumstances of the par- 
ties would allow. All unpaid accounts are secured and will be 
covered into the treasury during the coming year. For reccom- 
mendations in reference to this matter, I would respectfully refer to 
my remarks nnder this head, on page b3 of my lost report. The 
interest of the State in pine land atump^e is under the direct su- 
pervision of the Surveyors General of Logs aad Lumber subject to 



zedbyGoOgle 



54 IHITOAL BBPOBT. 

the direction of this office. Id addition to the inspection of th» 
aorveyors and their depuLies ; specisl agents are employed e&ch sea- 
son in connection with the TJ. S. Surveyor General's office for the 
fnrther prevention of trespass apon these lands. 



In condnding this last report of my first official term, and in view 
of my incumbency anotlier term, I am impelled to ask an increase 
of compensation for services rendered in tbis office, as it is now en- 
tirely inadequate and unjust, as compared with other State offices, 
especially the Treasurer's office, the salaries of which amount to 
five thousand dollars per year, against five tbousind two hundred 
dollars, and one thousand dollam for extra clerk hire, in tlie Audit- 
or's office, which inclndes the increasing business of the State Land 
Office. The labor performed in the two will not bear comparison ; 
the correspondence alone in the Auditor's office being at least equal 
to the entire clerical work of the Treasurer's office ; while the re- 
BpoDsibiliLics Imposed upon the Auditor and Land Commissioner 
equal if Ibey do not exceed those of the State Treasorer. 

I snbmit this question, trusting tbat it may receive the considera- 
tion it deserves, and that simple justice demands. 

In its determination, it may be well to consider the propriety of 
an entire readjustment of the salaries of State officers. 

The salary of the State Treasurer is fixed at three thousand flvfr 
hundred per year, while the salary of the Governor is limited to 
three thousand dollars. The insufficiency of this salary bos been 
recogniied by the Legislatnre, for years past, by an annual contri- 
bution of eight hundred dollars for house rent, placing the Gover- 
nor in Uie apparent position of a recipient of Legislative favorr 
which is humiliating and unworthy the dignity of a great State. 
The salary of the Governor, and of all other titate officers, should 
be deOnitely fixed, at whatever amount may be considered just and 
reasonable ; and no salary, above all tbat of iho Governor, should 
be eked out by nn annual donation fi-om the I.egislature. 
Bespectfully submitted. 

ORLEN P. WHITCOMB, 

Auditor of State, and 
eK-offlcw Commissioner State Land Office- 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



APPENDIX. 



coimnnMO TRB 

A. Showing •pprapilatlons of I87S; bslancaa of former jemrB, tmomit* 
drawn by wuraot and balances remalDiDg, Not, SO, ISTS. 

B. Sbowlng condition of tax acconnta wlih the seTeral conntlea NoTemhar 
SO, 1875. 

C. Becord of proceedlnga of State Board of Bqnalliation. 

D. Abstract of asmaament of Personal Property. 
B. Abstract of Tax LtsU. 

r. ValnatioD of Property by conntles from 1881 to 1B7S. 

Q. Totftl valnatlon of Property for eacb year aince the organlaatlon of tb» 

State Gaverament. 
B. Becelpta and DIebDrsements of the State Treasoiy aloce the orgaotia- 

tlon or the State OoTernment. 
L Bxpenses of the State since Its organization. 
It Total amonnt expended for sapporc of State InstltotioDS . 
K. Total cost of bnlldlnga for State laetltntlons. 
L. Bonded tadebteduess of conntlea. 
H. Dlsbtirsementa by warrants. 
B. CoodltloQ of Savings Banks. 
0. Condition of Banking Associations o^anlted nndsr Uw general bank 

ing laws. 
P. Townshlpa organited daring the year. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc ^.^ | 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



AUDITOB OF STATB. 



STATEMENT " A." 

Showing the Vne^iended Balances of Appropriation$ for 1865, 1670, 
1871, 1872, 1873 and 1874 on December 1, 1875, the total Appro- 
priitliotu for 1875, the amount* of Warrants drawn therefrom 
during the Fiscal Tear 1875, and the Balances remaining unex- 
pended on the &Oth of November, 1875. 



APTROFSUTioHs OF 1865, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1879 i 



• 1874. 



Board or Andtlor* 

Laailai Landa 

H.Rrdn- 

Back Namlwn Bop. Court Raporti. 

Oakland <;*mater)r 

WachlDilon National MoBomsnt.. 

VllUam W.U 

luna llcNaal 

MBlTarBrldg* 

Asdllor't Otork 

IaW Library 

flkartlTa Fnnd 

rial and LiKkti. 

DnlDlb HarEor 

iMd Wheal CarllflcatM (doT. IBTl}. 
Cd. " B" id Minn. Volnalvara 

8«naM Co D rt o f ImpaaekDunt of 18T3 . . 

Saaala Slattanarj 

Prlntlni Haaaacan 

Laglalauva CommlUM on Ca*i Connt; 
" " " Slavalon- 

Andltor and Land t^m'r'a ulacf.. 
Attoraar Qenara?! iaUry'.""',','.'*'.! 

AdjDUnt Qananl's nlarr 

Bapt. Pub Inatrnedoji'i aalarr 

a^ CoimnlaglDnar'a aalary 

B. K. Cofflmlailonara, Board of IST4. . 

laaaranea L'ommlnlanar'a lalary 

Librarian's -a Larjr 

Janltor'a ularj 

Aialatant JaDltar'aaalary 

mchtWaiclii BnatooM' aad nr«nan. 

IllIlUrjSlo™k.apar 

OoTamor'a Prima SacraUry. 

AHlatanlSfcralarTofSlaM. 

ABdlior'aOhlifOlDrk".!!.!'.'.'!!^ 

Land Clark 

Andllor'n Clerk 

Dapalr Traaaorar 

Pnbllc loitmcUan dark 

AUoTiar Oaoaral'a Clark 



IWOO 
9)1 K 



BH 33 

47 DO 

100 00 
SIM 

st» 

I2t 00 

leoM 
■woo 
raoo 
too 00 

woo: 



*$i.oei 36 

•W DO 

800 00 

1,000 



14« of IMS- 

131 or lero. 

188 of IB'O. 
IM of IBTl. 



183 of ll^- 
4&«paclal]an. 

lag ot len. 

241 of 1973. 
341 or UTS. 



2rn 



zedbyGoOglC 



AnmAL BEPOBT. 

STATEMENT "A."— CoDtinned. 

AFFBOPRIATIONfl Ot 1874. 



BMcaUia OmXliigaDt 

Amlllor'K ContliiMill '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Tr<««ttrer'» ComloMnl.... 

Atlornay Otnsnl-lConUnteitt 

PaWle Initrnellon ConUBgrnt 

AdJaiHDl OenBril'i CenliDfanl 

Ubnr/ ContinEnl 

eiUrlMorJndgai 

Cltrk orSop™in«Conrt 

KcporMror Saprina Coart. 

Hinhil of Biprami Conrt 

Soprema Coart CaiillDg*nt 

fiDprrmaCogrtBaparu, Vol.lO 

Law Llbrsrj. 

FHnUDE.AdTarllilnlBDd Blading .. 
Prtnilng and AdTartrHDK Uadtlancr. 

I'rtnllnK fapar Daaclancr 

Boldlan' OrptiBiw 

Prleon flnrrantKipaniaa 

Iiaana Support 

Bacond Normal ftcbool Bpppon 

Tb I rd Normal School Bapport 

Prtaon Bulldlnn 

Univenlty, HMtlni and Fgrataklnf. 

iDtaraatan LcMDa 

Ballaf 10 SMUara ob Horthera Fadflc 

R.a Land! 

BallaT to ImmicruiU 

BbaririFBpd 

BallliK Stat* Land 

SOMIlng tJnlT«rtll7 Landa 

FdbI and Llfhla 

Train Idi »c]iodI8 uid InBtllatw . 

HIatoHcal SoolatT 

Wlnoaa and St. Patar R. R. Ti. B 
Blationny lot LaslalatiT* aid Stat* 

BUI* Board of BMlib 

e*war la Opltvl 

Falntlat Capitol 

BiprauKnd HIlMga 

KaaturOaTarncT'i Houa 

R«l«r Araanal 

Trial Hnrdarar'i Cook aad Swada 

Piralllaa 

Bah for BiacDtlvaOBIu 

FIth ComDilgaloaara 

CbrlatlaD BvabiOB 

Cblppawa RiTar Brldia (DddbIb* Co.) 
Chlppawa Rl'ar Brlriia iHwllT Co.).. . 

Lacqal PatlaRlTar Brtdn 

roit Kldialy CraakBrldn 

Bruah Ur.ik BrIdM 

Bpnnii Brook aodTwo RIvar* Brldg*. 

Ht. Francla Rltsr Brldia 

FKhLaktBrldia 

Pamina da Tana RlTarBridca 

OttarTallRliarBrldia 

•Cinealad. 



BiIbp 



11,000 00 

no 03 

3.000 00 



moo 

tiroo 
(00 oo 

100 0«| 






iraoo 

100 00 
csooo 



"aMoi 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AUsrroB OP statb. 
STATEMENT « A.**— Oontinoed. 

APPBOPBUTtOHa OF 1874. 





BHinen 
30.1B74. 


W.rr.nt. 
dniwn In 


».187(. 


PattofUn. 


PwMlatnt UnlTanllr Ra-lmbam- 


•■OOOO 




tSODOO 








ToUl ippr'n* of 1B7« lod prior ^Mri 


tsi.s«« 


«3[.1]1 T4 
U.St7 w 





AFFB0FBIATIO1I8 OP 1876. 



AppTOprlatlaai. 



CtrtianW Ko. OTS *.. 

No. 2t3 

CoBBlttM, VlaltlDg Prlaan 

ti.(Bi-Aad.lIetlr*th). 

tiOBIlHoDM) 

OoT«TBDr'i nlirr 

SaenUi7'> ulmrr 

Aodllorud Laid Camidr'i ■■Imrj. ■ 

Tnuanr'tnlirr 

AMorp*r OManPm ulBiy .... 

AdJqlkil OMarel'i m1*it 

Sop(.pDblleIiiUTBeUoB^ikbrr 

BillrHd CoBnlHlonM'> uttrr 

iMUkDC* OoBimlfiloiiar'* nlirj 

UbnrUii'i aaUrr 

Itattor't niarjr 

AvtiUatlulMr'i 

muurraMNkMHr. 

MlCbt Watch, BntloMT asd nr«a*B , 

Oorarocr'a Print* e*'»Urj' 

AHlaUnt Bac'r Slata ud SUtlaUclu 

Aadltor'aChlar Clark 

Laad Clark 

D«nol7Trman™r!.'.'.''j;.*!!!'".'.'!', 

Ptbtlc Inairacllon Hark 

Attoraair Oaninl'a Clark 

Ooianor'a Clark . . 

baeailva Oontlaiiant 

Saeratarr'a CoBtlannt 

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Tmwarar'a COBttofaat 

AUanej Gananil'a CoatlniaBl 

AttorBajr Oaaarar* Coata 

Piblle [DMraellon CoBllniait 

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•alartaa or JBteaa 

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ANNUAL BBFOBT. 

STATEMENT « A."— Oontinaod. 
APPSOFSiATiom or 1875. 



ApproprUUooi. 



derit of Saprcm* Oonrl 



Lew Ltbn 



BapwU, TOl. SI . . . 
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II laim Snp. Court Bo 

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drr Conntlaa 



8barUr«Fnii_ 

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aatllDg StiM Land! 

Pnal and LlghW 

TnlDlDg Scboola and InatlialM... 

M«l»an Centannlal 

HlaloBcal Boclatf 

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QaologLeal Snrrar. 



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•W7 80 


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11,000 00 

7,000 m 
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160 00 

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ADDITOB OF 8TATB. 

STATEMENT " A.»— Oontinned. 

APPROPSIATIONB OF 1876. 



Approprlmtlami. 



Ptah UanmltilODvri, DeOcltDCy 

RMiot GoTirnar'a BoDi* 

Hwt of Ananil .■■" 

Buie Board or H«Uli 

ArnatmndConvlet'B of HorM Thlsrai 

WiUnwan Co. "ArrwIlInrdanrB".. 

Wmd>naCo, "Indtaii TronWW' 

Wn, Locbnn 

Dvliht M. SUdWin 

J. P. Winisma 

NgtarfH' F«« . . 

Jobn Bollar 

HC- Wilkin Mn 

Chit, lljoiiaborg 

I. H.Bnirm 

A. B. Bill 

Pollock, Donaldiop * Osdon 

O.C. MilM 

lUnlaf A MODUGh ' . . 

C.H.BUrt 

Moraun Wright. 

ADDOa Conawall 

lCJ.Toh.r 

S.kl. Rarnalda,...- 

Jokn Qrae* 

Mm J. R. Lbgu 

A. M-IUdeliar 

CCwU 

Joamal Printtni Co 

CallafbaRACo 

Caoal Sumj, L. B. and SI. Croli 

Chlppawa RiTor Brldga Swllt Co 

CrovBlvor Brldga, HcLaod Co 

LakalrnaBrldiv.Donflaa Co 

Crow River Brldio, Kaakar Co. 

Bob RlrarBrldn, Mill* Lacs Co 

Blaa BarU RWor Bridn. PanbaaltCD. 
Pommada Tona RIt. B'aa., Bwirt Co.. 
WoTlblRflOBandLDrame Road... 
Cklppawa Blrar Bridsa, Grant Co.. 
BlMB»nbRmrBr<d«.FirlbanltCa. 
Rad RlTBT Bridge, Otter Tall Co.. . 
DolDth and Pteaoo Rlrar Road . . . 
Okabana CraaE Brldca, Jackaoa C< 

Lanaibnrj and NorlbSaid Road 

Kandlrobl LikaBrldia, Kaodljobl Co. 

LakaOaear BrId|«,fiouLiai.o 

Crow RI'arBildn. Wright Co 

CotloD wood BIT . BrI dga , Badwood Oo 
fiaad Coon Laka Bridga. Lincoln Co. , 
LonfPralrlaRlT. Imp'l, Todd Co.... 
Praia* ntr and Pelican Ripldi Raid . 
BarBhama*llI* and SaDkCantar Bead 

Boll daa Sloni BlTir Brldi* 

FalteiD Blrar Brldg* 

LlItlaCblppawiRlTir Bride* 

Crow RlTor Bridn 

Oner Tall IUT*r%rldn 

Uke 8b*M^ Brldcarr. 

Biamrd'i Creek Brtdga 

BaOUoRlTaT Brldn 

Blaa BirU RIf ar IMd» 

Tellaw HadldD* Rlrer Bridge. 



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400 00 


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ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

STATEMENT " A."— Oontinaed. 

AFPROPRIAnOKS Or 1875. 



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Amounli 


Wirnita 


B*]>acM 


P*S«ofbwi 




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ADDITOR or STATH, 



63 



STATEHBHT " B."— Si-rerfnff 1A« totil chargei on aeenunt of State Taxei 
omlaM the Mtveral coanllet of the Slitt during iht Jt^c^l s""' tiding Noitm- 
ttrtO, IMS, iadudinff the balance* d'la at the euvfiienetvitnt of the year, 1A« 
ertdite given durfng (Ac j/ear, ami Ike balance* remuintug delinquent at iA« 
ciote oftheyeiT. 



ConnllM. 




T.U.C,«I,.. 


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AimiTOB OF BTATB. 65 

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AKNUAL BEPOST. 





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ADDITOB OF 8TATB. 



" D."— ConUiittw] . 



w 




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lonr'iTooli, 

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AHNUAL BBFOBT. 





n. Ximni of 

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1 

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1,870 


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ACDITOB OF STATE. 



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AHHUAI, SBFOBT. 

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BtM* TaiM. 














IHIBTu. 


SpMlal SdHwl. 


jt«.m 


siii;; 


«!S 


>.%S 


•tas 




l.as7M 


T.UT 47 


(4(18 


888188 




WE 


1,83147 


188 88 


(.MBit 




■8 77 


■ M 




7^,Mt 


w.m !i 


■JSS 


7,343 31 


sV.oiaii'" 


^S" 


U^MM 


a,«i9i7 


10,087 78 


««« 


B3Son 


83188 


a3(« 


1.738(1 


ajo7.M> 


II0,1«1H 


B,a«78 


l,IiOT«ft 


ii,m 03 


i;t».ua 


U^H 


144I4B 








MlMsa; 


■bio 81 


8M"8i'" 






N,W8U 


3,884 18 


l,B»7 11 






14.9Mn 


1.MBM 


090 10 






wnn Yt 


1,28188 


•11 18 






11.1S7 M 


788 08 


178 88 


846 77 




m.UB M 


14.147 78 


(,7M41 


3B.8«ea 




4(,aiB4o 


B.108SB 


3,8(1 Oi 


18,108 8( 




IT.I8SM 


B.m 41 


1,814 83 


7.487 10 




n.Hi ot 


7,480 31 


8,(KW 


•am 78 




UOOHU 


17M113 


8,!B3 81 


44(43 88 




(S,HlSt 


t,ses IS 


3,183 81 


84,8«el8 




1«B,413 M 


11,088 88 


10,047 11 


41,4(3 11 




«,1M 77 


801 t» 


H«88 






HB;U113 


B8.B74 71 


18.030 88 


88.148 07 




Sl.Ml IB 


io,ioe B8 


(.818 7( 


1.4M48 




•>«S4 


1,886 84 


(OS 48 


1,«7 U 




11^78 80 


1,187 81 


870 13 


<,0I17B 


«40,4M 




831 81 


440 44 




!i,in^ 




4,He85 


!.1S3 81 


■ (iiaioi ■' 


!lf,U8 




4(1 88 


lllOE 




SNMI 




BSSll 


Win 


880 41 


BALIW 


4>;eii 47 


^887 84 


1,8(108 


10,941 » 


»,*46 


i,tMia 


DSSt 


Si w 


130« 


Bhl.T8I 


17,568 M 


1.T18 86 


811 86 


■jnor 


UU,DU 


38^ St 


4,804 88 


3488 88 


u.0Tiei 


ijn3,iM 


»,M0 11 


b;iB8 84 






CllMllS 


a.«8«- 


8*47 88 


OT43W 


1I.MI1K 


1,417 M 


VH88 


l,<7t48 


M,H3 


t2,C81U 


1.080 48 


80IM 


1,880 88 


■,JM.ilT 


8S^U83 


11,4M(8 


0,404 80 


3a,(«8 88 


MI,«7 


t.r<)iu 


888(8 


173 10 


(ai8< 


l^MH 


ii,m)M 


B,B0 13 


1,978 18 


14.181 88 


I82.SM 


IS M7 31 


1^34 


DM 73 


(.497 117 


In^Eli 


lOiwsft 


18,388 30 


8.788 81 


44.819(8 




MjMn 


s,«a 88 


l.fi78 8S 


7.)»1 18 




9S.O1B0 


1,180 07 


lAuai 


8.348 81 




3,393 U 


3M04 




344 7T 


W7.43a 


U,«lt IS 


1,80(17 


887 81 


0.133 11 


M^3B^«M 


Ml,«8 79 


83,883 48 


80.M8 81 


7,881 » 


1,»»^ 


U aa ai 


1,108 80 


10U3B 


4 181M 


i.nia.m 


!»JWlt 


1,31(88 


1,10178 


4,MS7T 


r,Mos« 


Ii8,>n 95 


18,98101 


7,800(0 


31.183 88 


m.ow 


t,win 


«0 48 


BTM 


4.389(8 


MT»«' 


74.788(8 


B,1M H 


1,474 88 


■.(MBO 


t.lBl.«3 


48.484 M 


(,1M 4t 


1,931 «( 


10.101 48 


-»■» 


I7.M8aB 


1808 07 


8(0 M 


8.0(1 38 


a,iK^ti 


^^«07aB 


8,4(0 88 


XfMVI 


»'^S 


>^l,GM 


8>.el7B8 


11,019 H 


8,108 K 


MEB,23| 




8,8(4 »4 


1,888 1( 


1184148 


U8.m 




aon 


138 81 


400 93 


S^S! 




■80 40 


S»l (8 


3A1 88 




1,808 91 


H7« 


B.eeo 77 


s.M,in 


11 7 874 88 


11,444 18 


(,«>4T 


41^4(8 <3 


io,<M 


1.888 M 


1(8 S( 


■^80 47 


(81 (S 


i,m.m 


MM*n 


8,3(8 11 


3,001 IS 


19,910 19 


•.«s.a7 


13^'mao 


U,^80 


(^088 88 


34,890 83 


•M.<»B 


u,a<Bn 


t,aEBDl 


fmm 


2,»tl88 


<»,«» 


7,113 U 




41B81 


(ST 81 


l«.TM.4n 


»8,7B3 27 


IS,IS614I 


10.T(« 48 


44 BOB M 


■.MlklU 


41,(41 M 


8,470 73 


9^«U3e 


14,183 88 


IM,1«I 


13,808 83 


1,130 W 


M8 00 


4',048OT 


nuu.T«> 


B.Bn,«188 


488.808 Bt 


■18.070 84 


888.188 91 



,db,Google 



AXSVAL SBTOBT. 



STATEmirr 



OautlN. 


COUNTY TAXES. 


^XZl. 


P«ir. 


Iiit«Sil. 


Brtdg.. 




ffi^rrr;::;:::.:;;:: 


•!:iaS 

as I 
■ills 

Mi 
!:S!S 
IS!! 

■as 

19,731 ■ 
U,MO 9 

1,4M 00 

}£!£ 
;:££ 

i,<«asi 

1,SUU 

4oiSSS 
7,77«« 

lolBSStB 
S^4 30 

<,tT9 to 

iitlooozi 

4,USI7 
«,819 « 

» Ml 47 
9.UR8B 
19,371 M 

t.3M » 

-as 

"■JSi? 

10,4 13 >1 




$1,114 M 


tMSW 




"«S 




mii 


ti.4tt a 


a.m 7S 
■■ww 


iiiri 














aS^::::::::;:::::::;:;:: 




"«;ii 


iSlS 


WW 
^3410 

veti S3 
i,iat 3D 




SJ1BW 


tiiN 










sioaoiT 

iSliS?* 






1^17 07 










4U10 

as 


6KIW 


7H01 

e,3sss< 






»,9»ir 


SS.'K;;- .-■:■;:::: 




S73M 




»■:;::■=:::::::::: 


■■.■.:;■■".!! 


;;::;;::;::: 


WM 


'&•!? 


■,S£ 












■uo* 

...1! 

■11 

i,mBS 














M".'.f"''-""::-;: 


»lfl3 


»I» 


EivEi^rEE 


■■■i.«ii-.! 


l.'SMBB 


""■ijMi'ik 






ESi;:;;-::;;;;;:;::;:; 


\^Z 


MoblM 


■■is 

i.oeosi 
ana 

1E,141 » 


1.8WM 


■■■■i^oaas 

1:466 « 


-■-«i8 




'■■as 












pS^:'.v.;::::::::::::;;.v..;: 






M4 63 




1B,1MH 




i,o»a( 








11 






i'JMii 


S^EEr-r;;;; 


T,42t0t 

....!?s." 

1,151 












fSS 














MT ii 










«02 84 










1^07 01 


1»1W 


■■■■t;»ii-ii 




-■V,rai3 

4»S1 


■•gift 


9,44Stt 




B,t8«OT 








SIS n 

B.OWSI 










■■■■\Um» 


WtUM" 


e>7«7 

W34 


'SS 


MM 








ToUl* 


T.H.isa a 


•e,73t74 


]Ot.lSB M 


7B,0M«e 


ixnii 



..dbyCoOglC 



•• 1."— <!oii»na«d. 



ADDnOB OF BTATB. 



TOWN TAXRS. 



Towt ■ 


atj. 


B(Mu)*Brid|*. 


Bond! 




fSs 












■«■■■ 

1,107 00 






M68W 







til 

MHBl 

mto"" 


■■"ilB,WM"" 


i.7Mn 
Ann"" 

1,411 78 

'•IS 3 

lis 

ift'S 

MiVia "" 

lis 

uiii" 

. tin','. 


8,MGE3 
lIlSSlB 


'^^S'" 


H<;4 


i;mi« 


iitii 


213 » 










if" 

ii 






yjm'ii"" 


:::::::.::;:::;::;:: 









MI7» 


;:::::::::::;::::: 












::::::;;:::::;:::: 


.::: ■.:::■.::::::;•■:: 


■*■»•••■ 




MOM 




:,:::::::::::::: 










MM 






viio 




m 




nsM ' 



















■•Is a 


1,173 31 




i.i«o»"" 


ITS 

m 


S.BTISS 


••as 

T,t9C IS 

:ll 
III 

■11 

ii 


::;;;•.•.:::::•.::'::; 


;;;;;;;«;;; 


■■■'iii^S"" 






•i^'i 





taiiV' 








iSiS 


uCosi'Ti"" 
















an 


'SS 


»»•" 


JlSiii— 




««■" 






ijSS 










>^» 













MBO "" 










ii'-noM"" 


iii-ii-;;; 


i'M'it)"" 


'■■'mn"" 


;;;;;;;|"||".V." 






IUMM13 




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,.db,Google 



AHHUAL BBFOBT. 



HOTK TO BTATBMENT " E." 

Th« rolloirlBI oorrMpoDdanoa In rafiranc* lo tba kbitnct or Ui llaC rataread tmm Run- 
§*t eountj for tha U»t jear ti hatawith iabmltted ; 

Btiti op MnnaiaoTi, t 

AcDirom'a Ornoa, Saut Paul, Dae. 31, Un. | 
j8. £m OMt, A;., AwHtor, Ramttt Gmmtv; 

DiAB Sib : I bava racalTad voni abaliact or Ui Dat tat 187B, and aftar eoDiparlDg It irltb 
roar ratun of lait jaar, I lad tbat tha anonot of jonr rail prapartx *> Tatarncd Tor ISTB, 
U I8H.7W laia Unut tba amooBt raUrpad tor U74. notwItbatwidiDg an imtraua of MS aena 
of laaaaaad aeraags at land, an addlUon of a part of DakoU cannt; to yonr laiabla nat 
Mtata. unoiutlag to ^SMfXHl and tba aaaaaamant of naw alnuitona and ImproTaBiaBta, 
Wblah. altosattaaT, ongfat to laeraaaa ths amonnt of fonr laublt real propanr for le7^ at 
laaat t<0O,<IW atOTa tba imoDDt Tatnnied fbt )S14. I an uUiaed that iha amooat of (ua- 
bla praparly In Rlmaay coooly aa abown In yoor retarn abOTa rafarrad to. hai not beoi 
Iliad la accordaocs with tha provlalona of lav, and I harewlth ancloaa yonr abitnot aheat 
/or corractlon. 



O. P. WHrreoK*, 



Vary raapaotftilly yonn, 

~ Andltor, 

CoDMTT AumiOB'a Omoi. RABiar ComTr, Ham., I 

ar. Paul, Dacambar aOtb, 1379. \ 
Bon- O. F. mdttemi. Auditor nT t** Btat* qf Jflwusita.' 

DaiB Sib : I barawltb ratnrn to yon tha abalract of Iba tax llata of Bamiay eontity, ftr 
tha yairlBTB, aiDTtglBally mada onl. Tha dlaerapaacy io tha amount of 1974 and that of 
)BIG,laaltr1batabl« lo thenbatamanta miida by tha CltyTai C'oramltU* (io-ca]lad| of tbla 
city nndar lactlon 10 of ctaaptar S ol City Chartw of 1874, alao tha abatamfnta mada by tba 
Soard of Coaaty ComnilBilcinata of Ramaay conoty, and a larga amonnt of railroad proparty 
and cbnrcb proparty, all or which iraa omftlad by ma from tba tax llata oflSTS. 

ThaorMnalamouDloftba tax roll of tbla connty for 1S74, not Indadlnc panonal proparty, 
waa tU,a7<).«S. Tbaravara iibsaqnani addltloni mada tharato of ttM),4tO, maklni tba 
total taxabia raal proparty Ibr that yaar t2t.3S0,813. AaanmlDg that tha dadacUoDB and 
■batonanta rafarred to abora bad not baan mada. apd tha roll aflovad to reiaaln a* origin- 
ally ratnrnad, and adding to tha laal namad asm tho naw Improramanla nlirood tor taxa- 
tion thia yaar, togotbor wltb tba aaiaaBinaut of tba Blith Ward, and aome laoda In tha 
townablpa, tho total taubla Talnallon of raal properly for 1S7E woold amoant to tM.TOO.dO. 
Tha roll (br tbat claoa of propnty thIa yaar inonDta to |ag,iri,38g. ibowlni a dacroaaa In 
tha Talnatlon by raaaoD of Iha dadnctlooa and abalamanta of tl,6U,t3E. 

Ton wUI call to mind tba oonTanatlon I bad with yon la ragird to my having dodnetad 
the abBtoBsnU mad* on lb* raloatlon of tba Ui of 1374, from tba original aaaaumOBt, 
Whan making ont th* lax llata far 18711. 

Hy action In that matUr wa* gnldad by ni 
qaoetlon cam* np at aa aarllar data and t-'"' 
th* Traaaarar, a dilfaranl eonrae coold hi 

Ton ara awara of tba fact that It 
ontanstbar aat ofbookalbr theOo 

I will nport to yon, taparatdy, tha an 
omlttod from tba roili at 181ft. 

HopIbs that all tlua* mattara oan ba ai 
I baTa tha honor to 



Thlamittar h ratpactfnlly rafarrad to tba conaldaratton oflbalagtaUtnra. 

BaMdaa lUagal abalamanta ibova ifaown Taiga amoDBta of Btata taiaa bava baaa cancoled 
by tba aothorltlaa of Bamiey county, during fOmar yaara, throogh a gancral abatamant of 
tan par mat. on laxaa paid prior to dallsqnancy. 

Aa abown lu Appvndlx " B," •108,027 of Iha «160,M1 of dallnqDant Blale tax** ai* dna 
fMn Ramaay connty. 

Probably an >d]nilmaBl of lb* aoeonnt batwcan tbaGtalaand thl* oennty, can b« B*cnr*d 
Ihroagb IB* ganarat lagtalation alaawbera racommeudad In rafaranc* to dallnqnnt fitala 



DigilizedbyGoOglc 



Okt wlmg Of nial 



AUDITOB or 8TAIB. 



8TATEMBNT "F." 

Vitiualion of Taxaib Pnptrty In lath Cou»tf far ISN to IC 



o-Mtu.. |^»i"!Sg-'"- 


™1&«"« 


TalMtiOD ft>T 

1814. 


YalnaUokfOT 


T.I«.Uw(ttr 


^:-'::;:::::" 


•laolflw w 


■ «««■,»■« 


"»ii»;iMM 


■■iBi>ii» 


'"v«(i»M 




■■"«i#i«oo 

■■■«»;»» 06 


iB».li«T » 

""BOjra'fib 


aii^oo 


si8.tni» 


«1,1M*0 

■"!CM4,76B'aO 
*O6«8 0i 




SSo'.'.".?;:::::- 




""BBsliBi'ob 

■■■'MS 




■■■'mww'oo 

■■■fflSHS 


■•"mlooiii 


a;!.;;«s-v.;:;: 


Ss'.... ■;.■.:;:: 




'Sis 


"Ss 


820.741 Oil 

•ass 


"i:A6i:7i3-i6 

2,831 lis 0» 
M6.8S1 W 




Bmu*pI> ...... 


5fii 


'■ «;ui 00 


s,6Wjeeoo 

t,40(i;i34 00 
""iwlKS'H 


...":::■•?." 

"■'"aooiMi'io 


"3.B4't:moi 




S^^hV 


^"r:-;;;;;;;; 


m,otsm 
""m»a"*a 


IM^OO 

""mow» 


triil-r..;:::;;-.:: 


■mjssvi 


760.194 00 


"-iimM'fk 




aw.iuco 


sa.Tst 00 
fiBMlOO 
STE,!SS0O 


•is 

1»,3U00 

""SMiSMOO 

H8.I08 00 

■-»i;B«'oo 

"aMiiioo 


IBV lis 00 

sao.Hooo 

3BS,>6«00 

va'fOAV. 

■■"wiias'oo 
■"i,iKi;6«'oo 


144.4GS W 

9I1.WSI0 

'■■«H>'«flO 
l.lHWl 0» 

■■i;iiiSi» 


IfcLHid 




■"■Bi3,iMM 

"'i\5«;«iio6 


176377 W 

;;;»■!! 

""k8>m'm 


EM..:.:::::::::-; 

J|oI*.... 


■"3,m;«i'oi 


4H,tS7 00 

'"imm'vi 


us.ua 60 
'"V.4m;«6oo 


43e'.3aiB6 

" (i'.308',D6a 00 


■••■wS'ii 
■■■7j»;ia'» 


gj^— — ■ 




xfofAHi 


•"wiaiib 


•^1^163 00 

■■■■ii».«7ioo 

Ml.tOODO 

ssaa 

TW.S7144 
8811.446 00 




Bt.LOBl«'.'..'..'.:l'Ii 


78^707 'io 

Ml.Wl 00 


""'isiOMOO 

Kiss 

S73,Bai« 


"iiuoaw 

MS 

«8,780 «0 






&;;;;:;;;;;:; 














SSiii.::;::-.;:::: 


i.iOD,m 00 


■'Vjownw 


■V,8»;iiBoo 


■iWlKTW 




^e:-;;; 








T^ii;did^';::: 


'&f;s 


i,m)uo 06 
^osjiooo 


"KSS 


"Kffi 


'^WS 


Te*ri« 


M.8»2J1» 71 


•a,an.3a( n 


41ja3.IMW 


46,187.318 67 


B7.S74jea •» 



* TtfipMwIlr UiorgamliMl Id c«iu*qaMM of Indfau bMtUlU**. 



,.db,Google 



ASnVAL REPORT. 
STATEMENT " 7."— Contlnned. 



Ooutlw. 


Valoiuan tot 


Vri«g«»tor 


V.Ua^aftr 


Vdi^for 


Anok. 


"iMiiiMiio 


•■•iia;mi. 


■"ifloiiili'oi 


■■■$a«,"»oioi 


^EE:;=£E: 


■■"iMw»« 


"1^7.901 no 
■■),»»;o»oo 


iM,«aoa 

■■■'■si'« 


49t,0»7« 

■■■•ffi^ffiS 


&:::::::::::::::::::-.:::;:.;:; 


••■i,wie» 


S|=i;;i;:i 


■■".ass 


■■■'wi^'oo 


■••■«*;«» 


MS 

1,0U,TT4 00 


gililiii 


!;K'S 

ssss 

E.Mn,48(0.i 


3,iM^ 00 

loo'.nnoo 

4I>I,M0 00 

svg,«aoa 

a.TM.KIE 00 
1,!»1,73S 00 


!;S:2IS 

MR.917 00 
I.>00,4.T6 00 
), 3 11,900 00 

i,»Ta,iittoo 


'SI 
iSis 


g;;iEE;E;E; 


ill 

4i,n<oo 

HITGOO 

inj»oo 


i,«i.iw 00 

t,7«l,2r3 00 

i,s;tjwa oc 

119,919 00 

»,07e 00 

Si 

■"ijBi,si3*oo 


47w.m 06 
E,Br8 103 00 

m.sKoo 

73 47100 
31,39100 


»s 

'MS 
SSiSS 

4a MB 00 


littidpiH. 

lii'r ■■■■;;;;;: 


■■'i,iBi;i»'io 




■viib;i«i6 


1,1»,3M M 


iiutiB"ii'.ll-!--- ill! ".'!!!. ".ir. 


■■■'iw.ireoo 

4S,OAH00 
■17 303 00 
4I1,KS00 

iwa^^oo 

■■"sra;*!! 00 

ifiufui 00 


■■■■■■2« 

an,2j8oo 

3*7.4 ta 00 

•«4>63 00 
1,W1.»2< 00 


'■■sJi;ai7cio 

47.44SO0 
7!)7,«at 00 

699,237 » 
SM,W1 00 


""iwiTicob 

!!<%■£ S 


S7sjm 60 

1,9<U,700 00 


.A*!fS 


SS¥li::::;;-.:-.;::::::-.;:;;;:::: 


l,tW,tH 00 

■"i,TiV,e»ot 


■"i,i»7-,Mioo 

"4,»4>B0b 


l,3H,m 00 
■■V,6W»'00 


i,4H,euoo 

"4,4«Viss'M 

:S:SS 




M1,7S3 00 


S8I,S7I 00 


W,433 00 




"S:1SS 




349,079 00 

■■£!;SS 
■•iWS 


■•■iiss 
••s,tss 


Bi. LooU. 

tSS^ira;:;:."::::::::;:;::;::::;: 

Biu*r 

Ssr;:""-.-."-:-::;;::;-' 


■Ss 


■ejss 

1,716 ,3M OD 


618,903 I'D 
S94.9II 00 

a,i7s.9«3 00 

l,771,l>7» 00 


•Ss 




Swtlt.... 

5a*:.;: 


■■■«'!8 


""iTo'.sra'oo 

!,0SS,K4«> 


""siijjebob 
a,8sa,40i 00 


a.m,w« 




^S^£EEEE 


-SI 


'teS! 


i,mifiBt 00 

■fflSIS 


•'s;s!s 


ySSwiiMidiV 


rsss'^sffl 


JfflSS 


usss 












TMall_ 


eS.140,3U 00 


■«,I»U««OD 


7i,aia.*i« 00 


S1N«,9MM 



• Taponrllr dlMqcMlMd la « 



zedbyGoOglC 



ATTDnOK OF STAIX. 



STATEMENT " F."— Continued. 
at MhaMoa V Tantlt nvpirtr tn radt CmuUf far It 



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ANNUAL BBFOBT. 



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AUDITOB or STATE. 



STATEMENT " H." 

JStatem«nt ahotoing rtceij>t» {iwiuding balantxt) dUburBemerUa and 
bt^ncM in treaaury Jrom January 1, 1858 to Decen^ter 1, 187fi, 
during aach year ainee the formation of the State Oovemment, 



1WS-. 
1H9-. 

UTO.. 



>e,8«2 03 
)9,B2a 62 
)G,46S 88 
!l,091 7fi 
15,864 86 
16,482 58 
99,120 46 
t»,ibB 22 



S,186 64 
'9,861 6S 
4,102 65 
1,210 8T 



«282,S>e 80 
96,877 86 
188,846 84 
101,732 96 
184,636 88 
670,639 82 
403,952 16 
410,626 24 
461,266 29 
704,683 62 



762,81 



90 



886,767 07 
695,906 01 
716,966 17 
786,861 69 
1,166,704 80 
l,14S,0i9 96 
1,088.609 78 



•4,063 5S 
1,014 16 
676 78 
4,729 42 
86,666 87 
1I9,S!6 68 
98,680 86 
78,694 S9 
68,189 98 
51,286 89 
74,284 IS 
91,858 06 
186,164 00 
196,180 87 
248,800 06 
218,898 86 
188,160 91 
180,246 29 



« total rec«lpU exclnslre of ycftrl; baUucea a 
« total dlabarMinfliitB amoant to 



It to. 



910,604,113 98 
10,878,868 64 



SbowlDg « tHdanc* Of |180,346 tt 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 




b,Googlc 



AUDITOE OF STATE. 



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ANMDAL BEFOBT. 



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AODITOB or STATE. 



8TATBII«NT"L." 




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ANNUAL RBFOBT. 



STATEMENT " M." 



Showing the total di<6«paementa by warrants on the TVeaaury for lAe 
Jlical year ending IfovettAer 80, 1875. 



Seastore, mileage »1,106 84 

Senators, p 08 Cage 870 00 

SanatorB, perdtem 18,80000 

omcers of the Senate, mileage 87110 

Officers or the Senate, poatage 2000 

Offlceraofrhe Senate, per diem 8,816 00 

Representative 9, mlleaga 8,847 8B 

Repreaentallve^, postage 870 00 

Representatives, per diem 81,600 00 

Officers of the House, mileage 21 00 

Officers of the Hoase, per diem. 4,120 00 

R«portlug for the Senate • 400 00 

Reporting for the House 600 00 

Extra engrossing and enrolling of the Senate 69180 

Extra engrossing and enroUlng of the House 42>U 

Newspapers of Senate 885 46 

Newspapers of House 1,728 20 

MiKetUmeotu of SenaU. 

' I. DoDDelly, Poatage, Certiflcale No. 638, 1874.... »18 00 

H. Sharman, Asstsunt Sergeant-at-Arms SS 00 

G. R, Morton, Lamps. 4c 27 40 

D. D. Merrill A Co., Sweeper 6 00 

C. A. Boee, Washing Towels 1 50 

C. Proa], Repairs Mall Sack 60 

Chaa. W. Johnson, Extra Postage 38 00 

R. J. Keenan, Clerical Services 18 00 

C. W. Johnson, Poatage for Hcllrath Report 46 00 

T. Jefferson, Marking Stataies 8 40 



MUetUaneoHi of Houat. 

3. B. Hopkins, Expenaes Com. D. D. and B t28 20 

F. C. Bnrgeaa, Clerk Special Com. :■■ 60 00 

Geo. Morton, Lamps, Ac 16 90 

Metcoir A Dlzon, Mlacellaoeons Articles 19 70 

D. Ramaley, MlBcellaneoDs Printing, Boose and 

Senate 106 02 

J. T. Dodley, H, R. Laws fof Com 6 00 

Legislative Committee ristting Insane S3 00 

Legislative Committee vlsttlDg Prison 63 50 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AUDITOR or STATE. 

LegUtatiM IDtficUncg 1874 ) 
1IT5. 

Hudi S,W.D. Hawkins, BDrolllnglSTi, H.B.. flOS9 

•' S, W. D. Hkwktoa, EorolltiiK 1674, SenaU 18 14 

" S, W. H. JobiMOD, BnroUIng 18T4, Senate . 16 47 

" S, H. H. StebblDK, EnTolltn^ 1874, Senate.. 1 6S 

" e, Geo. D. Oopslll. BarolllDg 1874, Senate ■ <t $4 

" e, Alice B. Wick, Earolilng I8T4, Senate .. 17 87 

'• 6, Wm. DobBon, EnrolllnK 1S74, Senate.... 61 

" 4, H. J. Brwler, BnroUliig 1874, Senate ... 4 8S 

" 8, B. F. Bnrnnm, Enrolling 1874, Senate ... 8 SI 
■* B, V. L. Vlnceot, Balance due on Legtila- 

ttve Certlttcate 1874, No, 288 40 

" i, E. D. B. Porter, Enrolllag 1874 Senate,. 9 68 
<■ 9, Ed. A. Steveng, Newspaper Certlflcate 

No. 499 18T4, H. B 4 00 

" IB, Qeo. N. Hll1maD,£nrolilDgl874, H. R.. Ufil 

" IG, 8. D. HtllmaQ, BDrolllag 1674, H. B 60 18 

. " 19, J. V. Brower, Transcribing H. B. Jonr- 

oal, 1874 160 00 

<• SO, W, B. Towue, Enrolling 1S64, Senate... 86 8S 
" SO, T. O. Anderson, Tcanscrlblng Senate 

Jonm&l, 1874 160 OO 

■• SI, ThoB, Jtffereon, BDrolllng Senate. 1874. 6 36 

April », D. D Uerrlll, Enrolling Honse, 1874.... iS 80 

1IJ17 t, B. F. Drake, I>eg. Cert 1ST4, postage... 16 00 

June 10, 3. F. WlUlams, Enrolling Honse, 1874 ... 6 80 

Harch 6, Chas.W. Johnson, certlflcate No. 278, 

18T4 

" 8, W. L. Tincent, certlflcate No. 368, 1874 

SenaU— Rc-8taU A}idtlor {MeTlrath^lnveHigtUion. 

J. L. MacDonald, eerrioas as msmber.. 500 00 

" " mileage. " 27 OO 

Wm. IfcEosIck, serrlces " 800 00 

" " mileage '■ 21 oo 

L. F. Habbard, serrlces " 800 00 

" " mileage " as 65« 

Bdwin Dnnn, serTices as Sergt.-at-Arms 180 00 

« ■> mileage and expenses as 

Sergeant-at-Arms 281 76 

G. N. Hfllman, eerrlces as reporter.... 378 88 

Geo. Giles, serrlcesaa Clerk and Expert 60 00 

Bdwtn Eldtedge, ■> " ■• 60 CO 

Wm. Smitit, " " " 100 00 

Wm. WhItehlU, " " " 93 00 

Witness' Cms 66 80 

Stationery, postage and telegrams 63 86 

A. AlleD, rent of room 80 00 



CoMwted Sltetion$—Binue. 
IS76. 

■aroli 4, J. A. Jackaon, expenses 

» S, J. J. Mallen, " 

" 6, D. Benson, *' 

" 8, B. L. Fraiee, " 

■< 6, Bdward Drar;, •' 

■< 8, E. B. Cbambers, " 



zedbyGoOgle 



AiniUAL BBPOBT. 



SaUnriei of OgUtrt and OltrJci. 

C.K. Davis, OoTemor tSiOOOOO 

W, L. WllsoD, Oovernor'a Private Secretary 1,500 M 

A. C. Uacj, Oovemor'a Clerk 82S 00 

F. FalrchUd, Governor's Clerk 399 98 

Geo. Sfmonda, Hesaetiget Ezecnttve Defartmeot.. lao 00 

Beat ot Qovernor's House 80006 

BiecQtlve ConUDgeat S.SSO 40 



Sterttaty of State. 

6. P. Jenlnaon, SecreUry of State •! ,800 00 

C. r. Bolberg, AsalaUnt SecreUrj ofSUte 1,000 00 

C. F. Solb«rg, State SUtlstlclaa 911 IS 

Chaa. HJorlsberc, Comp HI dk Statist Ics 100 00 

P. Odegaatd, Labor ou Ag'l Statistics 80 00 

Stamps and Postage on Statlallcs 88 20 

Secretary's Contlngeot 80! SS 



Auditor of Slat* and Land Oommttttoner. 

0. P. Whitcomb, Andltor and Land Commissioner 9it,M9 90 

J. B.Lncas, Auditor's Cbler Clerk STS 00 

M. D. K«nTOa " " '< 1 ,000 00 

M. D. KenyoD, Land Clerk 400 00 

W. P. Jewett, •' " 800 00 

W.L. Vincent, Andltor'a Clerk 944 00 

Chas. HJortsberg, labor od Auditor's Report 90 00 

H. 8. Hnrter, " " " S 00 . 

E. D. B. Porter, labor on Land Books 1126 

Mrs. A. FUklngtoD, copying 6 00 

Auditor's coDtlngenI , SIO 10 



TWosurer of State. 

M. W. Dike, Treasurer M.AOOOO 

H. 8. Hnrter, Deputy Treasarer 1,600 00 

Trvasarer'a conttDgent 19010 



Jaomeg Oeneral. 

Geo. P. Wilson, Attorney General (1,50000 

J. F. Wmiama, Attorney Geaeral's Clerk 20000 

Attorney Qeueral's costs 618 OS 

" " contingent 973 80 



AJ^ant Qentral. 

U. P. Flower, Adjutant General t1,8T6 00 

H. A. Castle, " •' 128 00 

Adjutant General's contingent 169 71 

A- lUcbardson, UlUtary Storekeeper 466 66 



zedbyGoOglC 



AODITOR OF &TATB. 

Superlnundtnt of Public Iiutmetton. 

H. B. WUmii, Snperlnteodeat PnblFc Instraction.. 1874 99 

D. Bart, SvparluteadeDt Public iDstractlon 1,634 9T 

0. Deumore, pQbllc InatrnctloD Clerk 1,10000 

Pabllo Inatncdon CoDtlDgatit 88S08 



Board of B. B. ConntitttoHert of 1874, 

Wm. B. HftrthiUl, S. R. CommlBSloner 9816 66 

J. J. BaniUll, R. R. Commlulouer 816 6fi 

A. J. BdgertoD, R. R. CommlaaloQer 816 66 

ISTC S. D. B. Porter, SecraUir to Bokrd R. 

B. Com m miss I on era 836 SO 

Mueb SS, B. C. WlllUaa, Dally Presa S 00 

March SS, PIODMr Co., Dally Pioneer 8 Oa 

Hanli SB, A. J. Uflid, Servlcea aa Expert In 1874. 600 00 

Hay 6, B. D. B. Porter, Poatage, Ac 6 97 

t8,E88 7» 

Bttitroad OommUHoHer, 1876. 

J. J. Randal), Railroad Commfaaloner #9,183 $t 

E. B. Porter, Secretary to R R. Connnlasloner.... 174 20 
C. T. Bandall, " " " — 100 00 

»a,4a7 64 

tnnnMe Convattuiatior. 

A. R. HcOllI, iBBDrance Commlaalooer «l,990 96 

J. C Bdserton, " ■> Clerk 916 40 

A. P. DnDBinston " ■■ " T00S6 

•3,616 61 



J. C. Slww, State Librarian tl.SOOOO 

LibrarUn*! Condngent 808 08 

tl,608 0» 

JRtcefloneoKj. 

Chaa. B. C%^^, Jaoltor 1 1,088 S3 

H. C. Rigby, Aaslatant Jwltor 195 00 

Geo. R. Hortoa, Engineer 1,200 00 

J.O.L. Bnrke, Night Engtueer SOOOO 

H. Radmond, Asa IsUot Janitor 328 00 

H. Redmond, Fireman and Night WatduuBn 481 00 



BXICUTITB CONmOBNT. 

1874. 

D«c tt, Z. B. Clark, Bxpenaes Gnuabopper Envoy 976 00 

" IS, W. !<. Wilson, Expensea Traveling 7 T5 

" 9S, J. A. Wheelock, Postege Depoait SCO 

" St, A, C. Hacy. Postege Stamps 81 0(^ 



zedbyGoOglC 



9X AHNCAL BEFOST. 

18TS. 

Jan. 2, N. W. TeleK»ph Comp&ny , Telegrams 18 SI 

" 3, A. C. Hacy, Services In December tOOOO 

" 2, W. L. Wilson, TravellDg Expenses U 80 

'• 4, Ales. PlpptD, Night Watch Id Capllol 10000 

■' e, A. C.Hacj. Paid for Copying 8 00 

" 12, A. T. Andreas, State Atlas ICOO 

" 16, James Davenport, Stationery 11 10 

" 16, 8t. Paol Llth. and Enx- Co., Printing lOOOBayelopea S 00 

" 20, H. D. Flower, Postage Stamps 7 00 

" 2S, A. C. Hacy, SOO Stamped Envelopes 10 3S 

■■ 30, A. C. Macy, Services tn Janaary 100 00 

Feb. i, H. W . Telegraph Company, Telegrams 18 12 

" 3, O. Brown A Son, Sabscrtptton MankatoBecord- ■■ 2 00 

" 6, A. C. Macy, Pottage Stamps 16 00 

" 9, St. Faiil Lith. and Eng. Co , PrlDting 1,800 Letter 

Heads 1160 

" 18, A. C. Macy, Express Charges on Books 416 

" 26, Cnrtlce & Stateler, Map IB 00 

" . 24, S. McCullongb, Dally Pioneer 1)00 

March G, A. C. Macy, Serrlcea In February 10000 

" 9, A. C. Macy, postage Stamps S8 00 

" 9, James Dave Dp ort, Stationery ^ 22 OS 

" 9, 8. C. Williams, DaUy Press 7 « 12 00 

" 16, C. B. Chapel, PItciier, ic 4 78 

" 16, F. A. Taylor, Desk and Flxlnres UOO 

" 17, N. W. Telegraph Company, Telegrams 20 4< 

" 28, A. C. Macy, Envelopes 1710 

" 24. H. H. Schroeder, Shelves 6 60 

" SI, C. E. Chapel, Shoveling Snow 8 00 

April 2, N. W. Telegraph Company, Telegrams 2 90 - 

*■ 6, A. C. Hacy, Expenses of Indian, Keg-wa-do-sa. > . 20 00 

" 7, J. A. Bea, Minneapolis Trlbane 14 00 

*' S, Qeo. HortoD, Locks, cartalns, &c 6 00 

" 12, A. C. Hacy, Postage Stamps SBOO 

■' 16, C. E. Chapel, Washing windows and sondrles.... GOO 

" 28, J. Davenport, Stationery 10 20 

" 24, St. Panl Lithograph Co., Printing letter heads.... 26 00 

" 80, A. 0. Hacy, Services In office 26 00 

May 1, N. W, Telegraph Company, Telegrams 1 42 

" 8, D. D. Herrill, SUUonery 8 S8 

" 8, A. C. Hacy, Sundries 14 00 

" 7, A. C. Hacy, Stamps 18 00 

" 12, W, H. Parrls, Cleaning windows 4 T6 

" 16, A.M. Lowell, Police service SCO 

" IT, J. Davenport, Envelopes 18 20 

" 18, A. C. Hacy, Express charges paid 4 60 

" 18, C. E. Chapel, Sundries 165 

" 20, 1. Donnelly, Advertising revrard 10 00 

" 21, A. C. Macy, paper purchased 6 SO 

" 22, J. B. A. Paradis, SnbscrlptlonforL'Etolleda Nord 2 SO 

'■ 26, John Harley, Freight on books and cartage 7 84 

" 28, Ploneer-PresB Company, newspapers 16 H 

" 81, F, Brossean, Police Services at Capitol 6 00 

Jnne 1, N. W, Telegraph Co., Telegrams I... 7 71 

•■ 8, W. B. Mitchell, Sabscrlption to SL Cload Journal 4 80 

" 8,1. y.D. Heard, Services in Case ofSbeahan SO 00 

■■ 4, A. C. Hacy, Papers and Letter Heads 10 TS 

" 6, W. M. Campbell, City Directory S 00 

" 6, James Davenport, N. Y. and Chicago Newspapers 10 60 

'• 10, Mrs. J. 6. UcCatchen, Cash Advanced 1600 

" 10, C. C. Miles, Repairing Locks; 1 7S 

" 12, Wm. O'Keefe, Police Service at Capttol 6 00 



zedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOE OF 8TATB. 90 

16, H. B. BoblniOD, Sarrlces Bendered SOD 

16, A. C. Mocf, Foatage Sumps SS BO 

16, W. L. WlUon, Traveling Eipenses Incarred 18 75 

17, Geo. PuloD, Hire or Carriage 8 00 

31, A. C. Macr.Eztn charges palduidBBDdry trarel- 

Ing expenses 1600 

!4, W. P. Jawett, Express Charges Paid 3 40 

26, A.M. Lowell, Police Services SOO 

38, J. A. Wheelock, Poatage Deposit 10 00 

80, C. E. Chapel, WialilDg f ownla 7 60 

IS, C. K. Davis, Sandrr EipenaeB TrarellDg 800 00 

18, F. BroBieaD, Police Services 6 00 

34, Wm. i/Eeefe, Police Scrric<s 6 00 

26. Anne Evan, Relief 30 00 

SI, W. L. Wllaon, Carriage Hire 3 00 

8, S. W. Telegraph Co., Teiegrama Jnoe 89 36 

8, N. Vf. Telegraph Co., TelegruDS Jalj 8 60 

e, A. C. Lobde 11, Lightning Kod Tor Smoka Slack.... SO 00 

7, M. BedmoDd, Labor Cleaning Capitol Gronnds .... 6 00 

10, A.M. Lowell, Police at Capitol...". g 00 

11, N. W. Chronicle, Bnbscrlptlon for 1 year 3 60 

31, J. C. Wise, Expanses grasshopper InvesUgaUon 60 00 

31, A. WhUman, " " " 60 00 

81, W. Smith, " " " 5000 
18, C.Gntherz, Portrait of Qov. Bamiej 160 00 

35, T. Tamer, Trans porlatton of Arms 4 60 

37, A. R. McQllI, Bxpeoses attending Orassbopper 

Convention k 18 00 

81, C. B. Chapel, Postage Stamps BOO 

3, S. 8. Sqnlre, Citizen Newopaper 3 60 

4, Wm. O'Keefe, Police at Capitol 6 00 

6, 1. W. Webb, Carriages at fdneral of C. Scheffier-. 10 00 

7, St. Panl LItb. and Eng. Co., 1,000 Letter heads... 8 00 
SO, A. H. Lowell, Police at C^itol 600 

38, Tlios. Mara, TransportatioD and cartage on books 6 11 
34, A. Whitman, addlUonal expensea Grasshopper Iq- 

vestlgatloD 36 00 

84, A. C. Macf, B. B. Fare and Bxp«n««s man to 

Rockfbrd 16 00 

37, A. C. Macr, Postage Stamps 85 0a 

30, Am. Ex. Co., Freight on books ftom Pann 8 06 

1, A. C. Mac;, Services in Ex. Dept. to Oct. 1 50 00 

1, A. C.Hac;, Paid P. 0. Box rent (Qovenior) 3 00 

1, W. L. Anderson, Carpet border, Oovr'a room 10 00 

1, N. W. Telegraph Company, Telegrams, Sept 8 46 

6, A. C. Hacy, Express charges paid 18 60 

6, Boddstlkkeo, Publishing Election FroclamatloD . . 9 00 

8, Wilson ft Rogers, two Stoves and flxtnres 68 00 

13, A. C. Mscy, Stamped Envelopes 17 10 

It, C.E. Chapel, Paid I. Webb for Livery for Gov't.. SOOO ' 

14, C. B. Chapel, Hacy's Expenses to MlDoeapolls 

(University laod baslness] 4 66 

14, C. E. Chapel, paid Trausportation on N. T. Reports 8 60 

16, H. Redmond, Extra work at Capitol 16 00 

18, A. R. McG 111, Postage for Ins a ranee Department.. 6 00 

21, C. B. Chapel, Postage BUraps fbrBx. Dept 8 00 

31, C. E. Chapel, Dl'patch Printing Co., fbr papers... 9 00 
31, C. B. Chapel, Pioneer-Press Printing Co.,rar papers S 00 

38, Street Sprinkling Co., Sprinkling Streets at Csp- 

itol 63 00 

SS, A. C. Macy, Paid Expenses, Williams' Immigrants 86 00 

1, *H. Scfaroeder, Wardrobe 30 00 

Ir'N. W. Telegrsgb Co., Telegrams, October 1 06 



JigiLizedbyGoOt^lc 



AKHOAL RBPOBT. 

8, *F. A. Tkylor, PorUble Desk and Oitnrea 

5, J. B. Cook, Taam to convey Indians and Baggage 

to Depot 

6, L. 8. & M. R. R. Co., Transporiatlon of fodlans... 

9, C.E. Chapel, Scamps -. .. 

10, C. A. RaHco, ExaDilnlnf; Indiao troubles, Leech 

Lake 

18, A. C. Macy, Carriage hire and RIbboDS 

U, E. OlHOD, Relief 

29, Pioneer-Press Co., Kor tar paper for Eoglaeer.. .. 

SO, N. W. Teleicraph Co., Telegrams 

SO, Si. Paul LUh. & Eng. Co., Llth. prlDl, paper and 

Envelopes 

80, Pioneer-Press Co., Cash paid for cats, Grastbopper 

80, C. B. Cbapel, Washing towels, &c '..•. 



Its DO 
18 SO 
SOO 
SCO 
SS8 

iOIO 



*To be Bcconated for by A. C. Mac; as salary 
Secrttary't ContlngttU. 



10, C. B. Chapel. Postage Stkinps 

E, Cbaa. BJoitaberg, Serriees Id ofllce 

!,C.C. Miles 

7, St. Paul P.O., Postage Stamps. 

1, N. W. Telegraph Co., Telegrams 

8, American Express Co , Express chai'ges 

2, N. W. Tel Co., Telegrams 

0, J. F. Williams, Services In office 

S, 8. C. Wllllame, Dally Press 

5, B. H. Scbroeder, Repairing Desk 

6, W. M, Campbell, City Directory 

6, J. 0. L Burke, Ventilating Van It 

1, St. PanlLitb. & Eng. Co., Printing Envelopes 

0, St Paul Post Office, COO 8 cent stamps 

1, Hetcalf A Dixc)ii, Worcoscer's Dictionary 

8, Cbas. Hjortsberg, Service In Office AngDst 

7, St. Paol Uth. and Bng. Co., Prtotlng 600 Enrelopea 
H), C. B. Chapel, Postage Deposit 



!fiOO 
7C00 
8 76 
73 00 



lyeaturefi Contlngtia. 



Jan. 4, E. W. Dike, State Atlas and Stamps 

" 80, Pioneer Company, Receipt Book 

V«b. 8, B. W. Dike, Sundries 

" 17, F. J. Olesen, Printing and Binding 

April 12, B. W. Dike, Stamps, &c 

Mar 23, W. H. Parrls, Cleaning Windows 

■■ 81, E. W. Dike, Foatage SUmps 

Jaly 81, E. W. Dike, City Directory, Wall Street Joomol 

and Stamps 

Oct. !, E. W. Dike. Dispatch April 4, 1874, to July, ISTfi. 

•' S, E. W. Dike, Tribune to January, 1878 

" I, E. W. Dike, Posuge Stamps 

" 91, Ploneer-PresB Co., 600 Treasurer's Becelpta 

" SO,E. W. Dike, Ploneer-Preaa 



«10 
1S7S 
18S6 



600 
SI 00 
860 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



• . ADDITOB OF 8U.TE. 95. 

Hor. 1. H. 8. Hnrter, 200 8 cent SUtnps SOO 

" SO, St. Paul Lttb. and Bag. Co., EograTlDg and Print- 
ing 1,000 No. 6 Envelopes SOO 

•190 10 
AudUofa CofUingent. 
1BT4. 

Dec 29, H. D. Keufon, Bspreas Cba^ee Paid tl IS 

I8TC. 

Jan. IS, A. P. Connolly, Dispatch, Jannarr 1 to Jnly 1 4 50 

" G, Dapgett & Jonbert, Lltcli Held Ledger 4 BO 

" 11, A. C. Hawlej, State Atlas IS 00 

F«b. 1, Jamea Davenport, Statloneir S SO P 

'• 16, P. Q. Ames, Centennial Gazetter 5 7fi 

" 85, J. A. Leonard, Snbacrlptlon to Rochester PoM..< 3 00 

Mar. e. St. Panl LJth. and Eng. Co., Env, and I>«tter Heads TO 00 

" 8, B. HcCullough, Dallj Pioneer IS 00 

" 9, C. E. Chapel, Postage Stamps 2S 00 

'■ 9, " " Otaasee and snndrtoB 3 10 

" 9, 8. C. WllllamH, Dally Presa IB 00 

" 10, M. D. Keoyon. Foetal Cards, £c 4 65 

April B, C.C Miles, Opening Safe IfiOO 

" 16, C. B. Chapel, Express Stamps COO 

May IS, " " Postage Stamps 2S 00 

•' S3, W. H. ParrlH, cleaning wiadona, £c 8 00 

" SI, O. E. Chapel, Postage Stamps 6 00 

Jane I, J. Davenport, Brash, Twloe, &c I 66 

" 1, J. A. Rea, Dally Trlbone 13 00 

" 1, M. W. Tel. Co., Telegram SS 

'■ 8, J. T. Dadley, Shears and Stationery 6 60 

" 5, W. M. Campbell, City Directory 8 00 

■> It, C. A. ZlmmermuD, India Ink Portrait of J. R.Locas 20 00 

■' SS, TV. r. Jefvett. State Map 8 00 

July 8, St. Pant Lith. and Eng, Co., Envs. and LItb. Print. 84 00 

" 10, C- B. Chapel, Postage Stamps and Whlsp Broom... 10 86 

" 34, St. Panl Lith. and Eng. Co., Book of Treasury D,na 34 00 

" 26, M. D. Keny on, Postage Stamps, Ex. ch'gs & Paper. 3 10 

Ang. 7, C. B. Chapel, Postage Stamps 16 00 

" 10, D. D. Merrill, Allen & Co., Holing Fen and Twine.. 1 6S 

" 21, St. Panl LUh. and Eng. Co., Printing 3,000 let. h'da 16 00 

" 38, A. F. Connelly, Dispatch July 1 to Jan. 1, 1876 .... 4 60 

Sept. IB, C.B. Chapel, Postage Stamps 8100 

" 38, C. E. Chapel, Postal Cards and Bnvelopes 33 60 

•• SO, D. Day, Postage Deposit BOO 

Oct 1. Metcalf ADIxon, Box Pens 76 

" 6, D. D. Merrill, Allen & Co., letter presa copy book 

aodspongecnps 4 80 

•■ 30, A. E. Mellgren, Seal of Land Com'r 600 

'• 26, C. E. Ch«pe1, Postage and Ri. Stamps IBOO 

Nov. IS, C. E. Cbapel, Express Stamps and Foatage 6 00 

" SO, C. A. Zimmerman, balance on Portrait J B. Locas.. 9 00 

" SO, C. E. Cbapel, Postage Stamps and Postal Cards 30 00 

" SO, Mfitcalf ft Brown, Binders 20 00 

" SO. N. W. Telegraph Co., Telegrams, Oct.andNov.... 3 00 



Public Inttrvetion Contingent. 

U7S. 
Jui. 80, H. B. Wilson, Snndry Expenses Bnperinteadent.... 
Veb. 9, 8t. Panl Lithograph A Engraving Co., Engraving of 
Horthfleld School Bnlldlog 



zedbyGoOglC 



96 ANKUAL BBFOBT. * 

VA. 19, H. B. WllaoD, Postege 18 M 

Uarch 17, St. FanI Lttbograpb & EngnYlog Co., Letter heads 

and Envelopea IS 00 

April B, H. D. Wilson, Postage and SUmps S2 » 

" 6, H. S. WIlBOD, Postage UUmps ICOO 

•' 7, 81. Panl Press Comp&o;, Blading 7 00 

Ha7 5,D.Bart, Expenses S8 SS 

" 18, 8. C. WIlLianis, Daily Press 1100 

" 37, D.Bort, Sundry Expenses BOT 

Jgna 8, W. H. Campbell, Cit; Directory 8 00 

" 28, W.P. Jewett, Stste Uap 8 00 

" iS, O. Bnrt, Sandry Expenses at Instllntes Iff 80 

*Jaly 18, D. Bnrt, Lounge and Poatsga Stamps SB 00 

Ang. 19, D. Bnrt, Blank Book and Postage Bt«mpe, &c 17 S5 

Oct. 18, D.Burt, Postage 19 78 



AUomes Oenerari Coils. 

Hard) fi, J. W. Sencerbox, KeAscee, StMe tb. Toong, et al. •MOO 

April 8, Geo. F. Wilson, Sheriff's and Clerk's fees 48 91 

9, Oeo. P. Wilson, " " " 7 80 

" SB, Oeo. H. Johnson, ■• ■' " SO 00 

Hay S6, H. 8. Hnrter, Abstract stonipage account, HcIlmUi B 00 

Jnne 8, Oeo. P. Wilson, Sheriff's lees BS5 

■■ 8, O. A. Brackstt, statements of logs cat IT 00 

July 84, Geo. P. Wilson, Sundry fees. Hell rath case SO 00 

" 19, Qeo. V. Hlllman,EeportlDgcase, 8UU vs. Ucllrath 70 00 
Sept. 4, Geo. N. HUlman, Transcribing testimony. State 

TS. Hdlrath 104 80 

" 10, Oeo. P. Wilson, Sundry costs. State vs. HcIlrMh. SO 00 

■' 18, B. Hongb, Copy of Appeal, State vs. R. R S 80 

Not. U, 0«o. P. Wilson, Fses and mileage oOcers and wit-' 

nesses, State ts. Toong 70 IB 



AUorneti General'* Continnem. 

1674. 

Dec 88, Oeo. P. Wilson, per dlam, mileage, Ac f 76 78 

1876. 

andpostage 90TS 

Feb. 1 , " " Dictionary and Dally Press 8S 00 

Much 3, " '■ per diem and postage 6500 

AprU 8, " " '• telegrams 4186 

■ '" ... jj(m, 



3olj 
Sept. 10, 
Oct. 



■* " " Ac 8666 

" . " " State map, Ac 78 « 

" • " " 9400 

" " Hlleage, Telegramsand Postage.. 10 06 
" " " and per diem. State ts. 

ToDng lOS 86 

Geo, P. Wilson, Per diem sod Telegrams SO 96 

" " " and mileage, Ac, case C. 

D.Karr , 1S8 16 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 



Adjutant General'a GonUnffent. 



April 


15. 


M.T 


t. 








27, 


Jano 






7, 




IS, 




2«, 




Sfi 


J air 


m, 


Ann. 


2, 








81, 


Hept. 


in, 




6, 



8. McCulloDKb, Da1l7 Pioneer tia 00 

U. H. Clark, Services GOO 

W. H. CaiDtf, " 6 00 

J.C.Shaw, '■ making report 1874 1000 

C. £. Cbape], Foaul Cards and Sumps u sO 

Mlnneapolla Tribune, Dally Trlbaue 13 00 

, Cbas, E. Cbape), Postage titampa IS 00 

H. Bed mo Dd. Cleaning room SOO 

A. r. Couaollj, Dal); Dispatch 1 60 

W. H. Campbell, City Directory 8 00 

Pioneer- Frtsa Co., Plonuer and Press.... 4 7s 

J. E. Cbildfi, Balance due Tor Waseca News i CO 

W. P. Jeireti, State map 8 OO 

C. B. Chapel, Postage tjtamps 1800 

1800 

Cntlg ft LarkiD, Pitcher, &c 4 90 

C. B. Chapel, Postage Btampa SO 00 

A. A. Harwood, Hower Co. Tranacrlpt, 4 l-A jean 8 40 

0. Brown & Sod, Uankalo RecortI to Hov. ], 1876. 4 68 

C-B. Chapel, Stamps and Poatal Card^ 19 00 



Ltbrarg COtUingent. 



1878. 
Jan. a, U. 8. BzpieM Co., charges. 


tSflO 
18 00 
6 4S 




S, C. E. Chapel, SoDdrles aod waabing 


;; 


Ifl, C. W. Palmer, Services removing books 


18 00 
46 70 






H^ 


Sft, W. H. Caloe, Services removing books 

81, T. JeffbrsoD, Services removing books... 

1, U, H. Express Co., charges 


800 
IB DO 
8 60 






12 00 










8000 










180 
600 
700 
16 00 


"S^ 
















IB, A. E.Mellgren, Rubber Stamps 

20, I. DoDDelly, Subscription to A ntl- Monopolist 


200 
2 IS 
2G0 




4, J. C. Shaw, Binding; and Sabscrlptlon Law Joorual 


700 
800 








10, Bonle, ThonjM & Wentworth, Central Law Journal 


600 
SOO 

»00 
066 
228 


" 


ie, J. C- Shaw. Hepairlng lock, Ex. chgs. and carpenter 


Jal; 


28, J. C. Shaw, Blank book and SQDdrleH 


13 



,db,Google 



98 ANNUAL EEPOBT. 

Jaly 14. J. C. Shaw, Postage Stamps and Deposit 

" Vi, Thos, O. Mara, Freight and Drayage 

'■ SI, C. E. Cbapsl, nashlag towels, &c 

Oct. 29, J. C. Sbaw, Qaa Lighter and Rspreaa charges paid. 



Salartei of Judges. 

S. J. R. McMillan, Chief Justice, a 1-tO mos. to Uarch S, 1876.. «(75 00 

J. OUQllan, Chief JDStlce, 8 £-3 mas. to June SO, 1870 1,2S3 SS 

Oeo. B. YoQDg, Asdoctite Justice, 4 fi-S mos. to Jan. 10, ISTS-. 1,308 SS 

F. R. E. Cornell, Associate Jaettce, 10 3-3 mos, to Not. SO, 1870 S,416 69 

John M. Berry, Associate Ja^tlce, 9 mos . to Aug, 81, ISTf. .... 2,740 68 

F. M.Crosbj, Judge lat District, year endlDK Nov. 80, 1B76.... i,tn 9S 

W. WIlklQ, Judge 2d District, 6 mos. to March 31, 13T6 1,250 00 

William Hltchi^ll, Judtre 8d District, year ending Oct. SI, 1875 M99 06 

C- E. Vaoderberg, Jadge 4th District, year eDdlug Sept. 80,1875 3, BOO 00 

Samuel Lord, Judge 6th District, 11 mos. In 18T4-5 a.OeS SI 

A. C Woirolk, Judge 6tb District, 3 mos eodlog Jan. 3), 1876 62S 00 

D. A. Dickinson, Judge 6 tb District, 8 mos. in 1875 1,686 66 

James M. ilcKeivj. Judge 7th District, year eu'g Sept. 30, 1876 2,600 00 

A. O. Chatfleld, Judge 8th District, year ending Sept. 30,1875 2,500 00 

M. G. Uanscome, Judge 9th lM:<trlct, year ending Sept. 80. 1876 2,600 03 

Sherman Page, Judge 10th District, year ending bept. 30, 1875 1,600 00 

0. P. Stearns, Judge llth District, year ending Nor. 80, IS76.. 2,499 96 

J. H. Brown, Jadge 12tb District, 7 2-S mon^. to Oct. 31, 1876.. 1,697 St 
Wm. 8. Hall, Judge Common Fleas, Ramsey Co,. 6 moDS. to 

Feb. 28, 1876 1,041 fi7 

H. K. Brill, Judge Common Pleaa, Ramsey Co., 9 mons. to Not. 

80, 1876 1,876 00 

0. Simons, Jadge CommoU Pleas, Ramsey Co., 6 I-a moos, to 

Sept. 80, 1376 1,S»4 17 

A. H. Tonng, Jndge Tommod Pleas, Hennepin Co., year ending 

Sept. 80, 1876 2,600 00 

•48,866 89 

Salaries of Judge*— D^/leUnejf of 1874. 

D. 1. DIcklnaoD, Judge Sixth District, two months In 1876.. #416 66 

W. Wtlkln, Jadge Second District, three months la I8T6 6S6 00 

U. O. Hanscome, Jndge Ninth District, October, 1876 208 SS 

Samuel Lord, Judge FIRh Dlatrlct, two months In 1816 416 67 



Clerk, Shorter attd JforaAoI Supreme Court. 

Sherwood Hough, Clerk Supreme Conrt, 14 mbntha to No* 

vember SO, 1876 •1,750 00 

Wm. A. Speaoer, Repoirter Supreme Court 81 moDlhs to June 

16, 1875 426 00 

Oeo. B. Ynnng, Reporter Supreme Conrt, 6^ monlha to No- 

Tember 80, 1875 27B 00 

H. Sherman, Harebal Sopreme Court, Special term, Jannary, 

1875...- 88 00 

J. C. Edgerton, Marshal Supreme Court, April and October 

terms, 1876 200 00 

•2,682 00 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ADDITOE OF STATE. 



Svprem* Court JlsporU. 



copies vol. SO 

Lata Library. 

J«D. 18, Soule, Thomu & WeatTrorth, Purctiaae of books.. 

April 8, " " 

Uaj III J- C. Shaw, Periodical!) and books 

jalr 17, Sonic, Tbomas & Wentwortb, Pnrcliafie ot boofcs.. 

.. 80, .. 

Aug- 31, J. T- DDdle;, Lacey's Dliiest 

Sept. 26, Sonle, Thomas & Wentwonh, Parcbase of Books.. 

Hot. 36, '■ '• " " " 



26 00 
105 39 

22 4S 

800 00 

460 00 

8 75 



Lam LUmtry Btniing. 



Haj 1, P. J. Olesen, BtDdlnt; Books, contract.. 



Supreme C«urt Contingent. 



Jan. 14, C. P. Chapel, Postage 

" 16, J. Davenport, Record Book and Stationer; 

Feb. 8, 8. Honab, Copytog Opinions aod Syllabns 

" IS, St. PaaT LIth. and Eng. Co.. Kagravlng and Print- 
ing 4,000 EnrelopsB 

Hanh 9, C. B. Cbapel, Postage 

" 9, 8. C. Wllltama, Dally Press 

Maj 16, C. E. Cbapel, Stamps for J adges 

■• 18, C. E. Chapei, Cleaning Office 

■' 20, H. Iledmond, Janitor of Court, April Term 

June 3, W . H . Farrls, Cleaning Rooraa 

'■ 7, Sherwood Hough, Copying Opinions and SyllabQB 

" 12, St. Paul Llth. and Eng. Co., Engraving and Print- 
ing Letter Heads 

" IB, W. M. CampbKll, City Directory 

" 38, W. P. Jewett, State Map 

July 16, Ploneer-PressCo., Adr, Snp. Ct. Rales 

Aag. 6, Diapatch Printing C<i., Adv. Sap. Ct. Bales 

'■ SI.C.K. Chapel, Postage Stamps 

Sept. 4, C.C. Miles, Work on Lock and Key 

" 14, S. Hough, Copying Opinions and Syll&bos 

" 14, B. Hough, Parcbase State Atlas 

27, H. BreWert, Yale Lock 

Nov. 88t C. E. Chapel, Postage Stamps aoU Cards 

" 2S, Plooeer-Press Co., Ploneer-Fresa G months 

" 29, M. Redmond, Jaultur CooitBoom Oct. Term-... 



PRINHMQ I.AW8 II 



NEWBFAPKRS, DEnCIEMCT 1674. 



1876. 

Jlarch B, St. Feter Advertiser ■ #97 96 

" 6, Falrmonnt Chain 9796 

" 6, Wells Atlas 97 96 

" e, Weekly Valley Herald 97 9S 



jdbyGoogle 



ICO 



AHNDAt. BEPOBT. 



Mar- 6, Redwing Arffns 97 95- 

" 6,»QflhroriJ SUr 8TB6 

" e, Wester D Progress 97 86 

" 6, Pine Connty News 97 BS 

" 8, Central Mlnnesotlao 97 9S 

" 6, Now Ulm Herald 97 9* 

" 6, Dodge Count; BepDbllc»a 97 9fi- 

" 8, KasKOD Telegrapli 97 95 

6, Tajlor's Falls Journal 97 9S 

" 6, Bed River Gazette 979ft- 

" 6, Brtlnerd Trlbnne 97 96 

6, Winnebago Cltj Pmsb 97 95- 

" 8, Dtlevan Bee 97 95 

•> 8, Redwood G&zette 97 96 

" 8, FarnilDgton Press 97 95- 

" 6, Meeker Conoty NewB 97 95 

"' 8, St. Cbarlet Times 97 95 

■• 6, St. Charles Herald 97 95 

■• 8, Jackson Republic 97 91 

" 6, Wright County Eagle 97 6S 

" 6, GoodtiDe Coonty Repabllcao 97 95 

•' e, Kecordand Union 97*6 

" 6, Sauk Center Herald 97 95 

6, 8t.Jarae8 Herald 9798 

'■ 8, Janesvlllc Argna 97 96 

'< 6, EyoU Advertiser 97 96 

" 8, Hochester Post 97 96 

•> 8, Prairie 8c booner 9795 

•• fl, Fillmore Co. Republican 97 95 

" 6, LacqMl Parle Co. Press 97 96 

•> 8, Chataeld Democrat 97 96 

•• 6. GlKDWood Eagle 9795 

" 8, Houston Co. Jonnial 97 95 

u 8, Lake CIt,; Leader 97 96 

" 6, FergiiH Falls Advocate 97 96 

" 6, Renville Weekly Times 9795 

•• 9, Bastings Osxette, balance dne 7890 

" 9, Andubon Jonrnal i795 

" 8, Sleepy Eye Arxni 97 96 

8, Wright Co. Times 979S 

" e, Kice Co. Journal 97 96 

■' 8, Cltliea 9796 

'• 8. Bine Earth City Post 97 *S 

8, Red Riser Star 97 9» 

■> 8, Alexandria Post 97 96 

•• 8, New Ulm Post > 9795 

•■ 8, Mantorvillu Express 97 96 

8, Detroit Weekly Record 979S 

•• 8. RockCo Herald 9795 

March 8, Fergus Falls Journal 9796 

Jane S2, Daloth Weekly Herald 97 95 



rKINTlHG LATS . 



4 MKWSPIPERS, 1875. 



1875. 

Ifarch 27, Chao. HJortsberg, Reading proof 67 00 

April 2, Anoka Uepulntcim 6345 

" S, WlllmarlUpubllcan 63*5 

" 2, OlencuoRi'KlHter 6S43 

" S.Dululb MliiueKulian 6115 

'■ >, Eendeison Times 63*6 



zedbyGoOglC 



ALDITOB OF flTATC. 101 

3, Ftrlbkoll CooDty Leader «S 4S 

9, Bin* Earth CI t; Post 63 IS 

S, FiioplH's fresB 6S 4S 

1, AnobB Conntj Union t... 6S U 

2, he Saenr Sentinel 69 46 

3, Commercial Advertiser — 68 46 

S, St. Cloud Times 63 46 

3. News Ledger 68 46 

>, HutlDgs Union 63 46 

2, Parlbanlt Democrat 68 46 

S, Beobicht«r 68 41 

S, Mankato Review 63 46 

3, Sank Rap Ida Sentinel 61 4S 

5, Rice CoDDtT Jooraal 68 46 

2, Winona Adler 68 46 

3, Wabaaba Sentinel 63 46 

2, HlnueaoU Volksblatt 68 4S 

3, Svenska Njb;gxaren 63 46 

a, L'Biolle du Nord 68 46 

3, Sibley Conntj Independent 68 41 

3, WlunsbiRO City Press 68 46 

3, HastlDgH Gazette 68 46 

2, Bnddstikken 63 48 

3, St. Panl Presa 68 46 

8. Wlndom iteporter 63 46 

3, Daily Tribane, Mloneapolla t8 46 

2, Winona Repobllcan 63 46^ 

3, Homer NoTBlty Frees 68 40 

8, CItlEsn 68 46 

3,8t.Clond PraM 68 48 

2, Mankato Record ■ 63 46 

3, St. Peter Tribune 63 46 

3, Farmers' Union 63 46 

2, Erenlng Mall -a 40 

8, B«dwood Oazett« 04t 

8, PloLeer 6S45 

6, ParnlDgton Press 68 40 

0, School Boom 68 4B ' 

6, Western Progress 63 45 

6, Wabasba Herald 63 46 

0, WlDona Herald 68 40 

6, Goodbne Count; BepnbllcaD 68 40 

S, Transcript 63 46 

5, Lake i;U7 Leader 63 40 

6, Pine Connt; News 63 46 

6, Mankato Uuloa 68 46 

0, Sberbome Connt; Kews ii8 46 

6, Alexandria Post , 68 40 

6, Isanti Connt; Press 68 46 

6, NonbBeld Standard 68 40 

5, Hadella Herald 63 46 

6, Awtnlteglster 63 46 

5, Freeborn County Standard 68 46 

6, Northwestern Chroolcle 63 40 

6, Weekly Record (Detroit) 63 40 

S, Minnesota Frele t*r«BH S8 40 

0, MantorvUle Bxpress 63 46 

5, StaaU Zeltnng 63 4S 

8, Laneeboro Jonrnal 68 40 

8, Dodge County Republlcau 6S 46 

8, Owaionna Jonrnal 68 46 

8, Madel[B Timsa 68 40 

S.MinnesoU Radical 68 40 



zedbyGoOgle 



102 ANNUAL REPOBT. 

April 6, Wtndowr «S « 

•■ 6, The Bee (Bloe E«rth City) 6S 48 

" 6,Diiloth Trlbtin* 88 « 

" 6, Janesville Argoa 96 ii 

" <, adbUd Indepeudent *8 *6 

" 6,8t. CharlesTlmes 6846 

" 6, Wright Coonty Times «»« 

" 6, Little Falla ConrUr «8 *6 

•■ 6, Dallj ErenlDg Dlspitcb 88 *t 

" 6, Western Times 68 » 

" 7, Princeton Appeal ■ 68 46 

•• T, AnU Monopolist 88 46 

" 7, St. CloudJonrnal 6848 

" 7, Wortlilngton Advance 68 48 

" 7, Jackson Republic 6846 

*' 7, Rochester Post 68 46 

" 7,8BnkCentrB Herald 6846 

•' 7, Red River Gasette 8846 

" 7, Tajlor-s Falls Journal 68 46 

" 8, Minneapolis Mirror 88*6 

" 8, Record and Union 6»U 

" 9, AadnbOQ Jonrnal 68 46 

" * S, Stillwater Gaiette 68*6 

" 8, CsDDOD Falls Echo 88*6 

" 9, Wright Connt; Eagle 68 46 

" 9, NordlHk Folkeblad 6848 

" 18, NewUlm Post 63 48 

" 18, National Ponltry Jonmal 68 46 

" 18, N. W. Poultry Joorual 68 48 

" 18, Pope Coonty Press 68*8 

" 18, Albert Lea Enterprise 68 46 

" I*, Sbakopee Argns 68*6 

" U.EyoU Advertiser 68 4S 

** '14, Weekly Valley Herald 63*6 

" 14, Cbatfleld Democrat 6816 

" 14, Martin County Sentinel 68*6 

■■ 14, BatchlnsoD Enterprise 68*6 

" 14, HoQstoD Co. Joornai 6S *6 

" 14, Red Wing Argns 68*8 

" 14, Fergus Falls Joamal , 68*6 

" 16, Faribault Republican 68*6 

" 16, RedRlverSMr 6846 

" 16, SewUlm Herald - 88*6 

" 19, Perbam News 68 *6 

" 19, RuBhrord Star 88*6 

" 19, Minnesota Falls Sentinel 68 46 

•< 19, StUlwater Messenger 68 46 

■' 21, Hock Co. Herald 68 46 

" 21, RcDvllle Times 6846 

" Si, Dalnth Furald 68 45 

•• 28, Lacqnl Parle Co. Press 68 46 

" M, Bralnerd Tribune 68*6 

" 26, Prairie Schooner 68 46 

" 28, Ora&ce Advance 68*6 

Hay 10, FlUmore County RepnbUcan 68*5 

" 14, Fergus FalU Advocate 6846 



FRIMTIKO AMD ADTBRnSIXG (DKFIOIBMtJT 18740 

18T5. 

Hatch 8, St. Paul Press Co., R. E. Corn's Rate Tariff 

" 8, St. Paul FressCo., So odry Bills, Adv. and Bd'g, Ac. 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOR OP BTATB. 105 

Uuoli 8, Pioneer Company, PrlDtlng R. R. CominlsBloDer's 

TirlirR. R. BBt« S,S80 00 

>' 16, N. Wrigbt, Printing, iMUnce da« nnder contract, 

1874 2,119 48 

April 1, PtoDcer Company, Adv. Heed Whea', 1874 4 SO 

" 7, J. A. Reft, Adv. for Ina. Com. 3 7fi 

" 7, Liberty Hall, Adv. Proposa'a for Paper 80 00 

'* 16, Tbeo. Sander ft Co., AdvertlelDg 9 00 

Uar 14, DIspatcb Printing Co., Adv. Qovr's Proclamation. s 2G 

Ang. 20, T. H. Preanell, Adv. In a. Notice 6 00 

Sept. 16, W. H. Hltcbeli, Adv. Land Sale 1S78, Bice Co.... is 18 



rRItmNO. ADVBRT19IKO AKD BINItlNO, IST5. 

1876. 
Uarch 6, Pioneer Prtnting Co., od ftccoaot TG percent, com- 
pleted work •1,897 67 

■■ 6, D. Ramaley, OD accoant 76 percent, completed work !t,400 00 
■• M, at. Panl Prtiss Co., Printing Treaanrer's Report in 

Newspapers S42 60 

" 8, St. Paul Pre^a Co., Record Book Attorney General 

and SoDdrlea 82 80 

" 9, St. Panl Press Co., on acconnt 7S per cent com* 

plated work 8,287 88 

9, Tbos Roblnaon, Bag. for Qeological Report 16 00 

<■ 16, J. K. Hoore, Gth claaswork on contract 146 40 

" 17, St. Pant LJtb. and Eng. Co., G.OOO copies Eng. fbr 

Report Snperlntenileni of Public Instrnctlon - . . . 20 00 
>' 26, J. K. Moore, on acconnt 76 per cent, completed work 806 00 
" 27, Press Printing Co., on acconnt 76 per cent, com- 
pleted work 280 87 

" SO, H. C. RoHSell, Adv. Proposals for Printing 8 00 

April 1, D. Ramaley, od acct., 7S per cent completed work tl,0T6 4B 
" I, Pioneer Co., adv. bids for wood and graasboppei 

relief law 8 25 

" IE. D. O. Parker, adv. bids ft>r Printing S 00 

" 16, Tbeo. Sander & Co.,' adv. Proclamation, Amend- 

ment to Constltntlon 7 60 

'• 17, St. Pan] Llth. and Eng. Co., Llth. print Envelopes 

Snpt, Pub. Ina TOO 

Hny S, Chas. HJortaberg, Reading Proof 60 00 

■' 4, D. Ramaley, on sect, bal, of 1st & 2d clasa work.. l.SISSl 

" 4, G. C. Cbamberlain, adv. proponala ftjr Printing... 7 60 
" S, Press Printing Co., Preparing Governor's Message 

and Sundries 6846 

•' 6, Press Printing Co., on acct. 8d class work 967 41 

" S, Pioneer " " " " ■' ae3 66 

" 10, J. K. Hoore, 6th cIosH work 866 67 

" 14, DiapatchPrlntlngCo.,adv. FroposalsforPrintlng 1100 

" 16, J. K. Moore, Etb class work 148 00 

" 20, 266 60 

Jvoe II, Chas. HJortsberg, reading proof Special Laws.... SOOO 

" IB, Pioneer-Press Co., TS per cent, work of 4tb class . . 2,000 00 

" 16, I. Donnelly, adv. Proposals for Priming SO 26 

" 16, J. A. Hea, ■' " for Boilers, Ac 1186 

" 16, PloneerPress Co., adv. andsnndrlBS,6tbclaH.... 122 38 

" 17, Jennlaon & Ferklua, adv. Proposals for Printing.. 22 60 

'• 86, Faribanlt Hepibllcan ■' '' >• •' ,. le 00 

Jnly 2, Cbas. BJortsberg, preparing laws fbr publication.. 50 00 

'• 7, N. Wright, 76 per cent, ol bills 4tli class woik 1,000 00 

" 16, J. K. Moore, •■ " " 6th " » 146 92 



DigilizedbyGoOgle 



104 ANKDAL BEPORT. 

JdIt 34, Tribnoe Fob. Co., m)v. Proposals IbrPrinUag 12 7S 

" S», J. K.Moarp, work of 5th class I,!!7 » 

Ang'st 11, D. Kanialr;, Work of flnt and aecood class (third 

class ftand) 788 tt 

" IS, C. E. Chapeh, 81 boxes for packing laws, tc, (4th 

clasF) St 00 

'■ 14, Dispatch Printing Co., Adverttalng Sale of Arms.. 16 3S 
" la, U. 8. Express Co., TraDsportatlon of pUtas, &c, 

8d class 16 W 

" 34, JohDSOD A Smith, adv. proposals for paper'aod stA- 

tloneiy ' 28 35 

" 34, F. Drtacnll, 75 per CCDC. OD corapleted work 1,523 15 

" 24, V. Driscoll, advertising lor various departmcDts. . 63 19 

" IB. D. 8lnc1a>r A Co., aJv. proposals for prlntlug 20 25 

" 28, HnsscU t PrrsDell, adTertlsiog proposals for pa- 
per and stailonery 26 15 

" 80, Jenal^oD & rerkloa, advertlitlDg proposals for pa- 
per and stationery 36 25 

Sept. 2, Photo. Cog. C»., N. Y., plates aad maps for Qeo- , 

logical Report 429 60 

" 8, C. E. Chapel, packing and bblpplng Lans to Coaa- 

tles SO 00 

" 18, J. A. Rea, advenUIng Oovurnor's Proclamatlou of 

Election in 2Sih district 1183 

" 31, T. L. DeVlnne, Mesanrlng composition Insarance 

Commla 8 loner's Itcport 500 

Oct. 23, J. K. HoorE, work of Gtli class.... G03 75 

" 23, Ploneer-l'ressCo., balance due on contract work.. 283 9S 

>' 32, Fioneer-Press Co , work orsthdaM 34 00 

" 3-, Geo. ]{. Morton, Shipping poll lUf iOOO 

Nov. 6, P. J. Qlesen, ISO election blanks, 5th class 7 60 

" 5, St. Paul LItb. & Eng. Co., coloring Cleogrspbhal 

Haps of Frefboin Connty 18 94 

" 30, Pioneer-Press Co , adv. Governor's Proclana'n, &c. 60 II 

■- 80, M. Wright, printing Horticultural Report, Sd clSSS. 443 65 
'■ SO, N. Wright, Oeoinglcal Reports of Hower and 

Freebo^ ConnLies 85 65 



PBIKTINa UBSSAaB. 

1878. 

March S, Ellis E. Ellis, Printing Message In Welsh tl5l) 00 

" 8, J. B. A. Psradli>, Priming Message in French 365 00 

" 8, Bodsiikken, Printing Message in Morwegtao 163 50 

" 8, Bndstikken, Printing Message la Bwedlsb 184 OO 

" 8, Q. Lene, Printing Message In Oerman 110 00 



PRINTIKO PBIEOH BKFOBr (IdTS). 



$87150 



•lis 00 



PRISTINO RKFORT M'U.KATB INVESIiaATlNG COHHITTKE, (1874). 

18TB. 

April 18, Minneapolis Ttlbane Pab. Co., on account Print- 
ing Report $7W 00 

Hay S, Minneapolis Trlbane Pub. Co., on accoaat Print- 
ing Report, balance due 310 93 



zedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOB OF STATH. 



PMIUIUNa AMD INDBXUiO LAWS. 



IMDBXINO AND TBANSORIBINO BKNATI /OCRNAI- 



18T8. 

Chu. vr. JohDson, Indexing JoUTDal--. 
W. U. Rawklna, Transcribtog Journal.. 



IMDHXIKQ AND TKAMSORIBINQ UUUHB JOUBMAL. 

ie7s. 

Hb; IB, S. H. Nichols, Indextng JonrDal 

JoDe 8, O. V. Bnswell, Traoscrlblng Jonroal 



PRINTIXa FAFBK. 

« 

I8TB. 

March S, Averlll, Bnssell S. CaTpenter, Papar. 95,60049 

'• 9, C. E. Chape), Labor Id diattlbating laws 38 !fi 

" 15, Chai. HJorUberK, Labor, cars at paper, Ac- ••'•••• 100 00 

April IS, Averlll, BoMell & Carpenter, Paper 816 88 

'> 26, I). D. Merrill t Co., Tbree letter scales 11 00 

June 21, C. B. Chape', Care of Paper and Docnmeota 6 00 

jQly I, Averlll, Russell & Carpenter, Paper . 3G8 58 

Sept. 10. ATerlJl, Raasell ib Carpenter, Paner 16S S8 

No*. 28, Averlll, Rnaaell & Carpenter, Paper 815 U 



STATIOMKRT FOR LKGiei.ATi;RB AKD BTATK OFPICBBS. 



SOLDIKRS' ORPHANS. 

1874. 

D«c. SS, C C. Qoodnow, wood to Dean, orphans $18 50 

" 28, C. Z. Sotler, Floar to Dean & Smith, orphan 8 00 

** 38, Peter Thompson, Sapplles to Uean, orphans IS 00 

1876. 

Jan. 5, H. Q. Hicks, Board of G. H. Partridge, Dec, 1874 it 71 

-' 6, C. C. Locke;, Snpplles to Deao, orphans IS 88 

" 6, C. F. Smith, Supplies to Bonbam, orphans 15 00 

" 7, 0. B, Ooiild, Expenses of Hnme, Dec, 1874 1,615 80 

1, Francia Bingham, Ground Rent, Boost, Orphans... 14 t)0 

" 28, U. D. Flower, Postage, 1376 20 00 

" 81, B. L. Baker, Expeosea 9 20 

14 



zedbyGoOgle 



106 



ANMDAL BBPOBT. 



Jan. i1 O. B. Oonid, Expenses 

" 27, J. B. West, Exp eases 

" ST, El. O. Hicks, Eipeasea 

" ST, R. D. Bsrber, Expeoses 

>' 9T, AnBsrton, Expenses 

" SO, Berlandl & Knsrr. SOO CertlBotes D1scb«rge 

Feb. I, H- J. Smith, Board uf G. H. PsrtrldgB 

" IS, O. B. GoaM, Expeuses of Uame, JkD. 1876 

Mar. IS, Peter TboTDpnoD, Sapplles to Deao, orphans 

" 18, B. W. L;on, Supplies to Dean, orphans 

" 18, C. C. Lnckej, Supplies to Dean, orphans 

■■ 18. H. Jay Smith. Board of G. H. Fartrldze 

>■ IS, O. B. OoDid, Bsl. Expenses of Home, Jan. ISTS .... 

" 18, 0. B. Gould, Expennesnf Home, Feb. 1R7G 

April 7, Mrs. W. P. Hood, Cluthiug tbr Bishop, orphaos... 

'■ 9, O. B. QoDld, ExpenxeH or Home for Marcb, 1S7S... 
April S, H. J. Smltb, Board of G. A. Partrldice 

'■ 19, U. A. C&slte, Eipensrs to Wlaona and postage... 

>• 19, H. N. Smllb<& Co.,BDpp]les to Shirley, orphaua. .: 

•' 19, E. L. Baker, Eipeiises meeting oT Board 

>• 19, Ara Burton, ExpeDset meellag or Board 

Hay 34, O. B. Gould, Eipeeses of Home for April 

'■ 21, H. J. Oraot, sappUes to Dean, orpbans..'. 

" 24, C. C. Leclte;, supplies to Ueac, orpbans 

" i4, H. Jay Smith, Boarl of G. H. Partridge 

" 24, C. E. Smith, i^applies to Bonham, orphans 

" S4, Parmer & Barlow, supplies to Morrell, orpbans. •• 

" 24, Farmer & Barlow, supplies to Boss, orpbans 

June IS, 0. B. Gould, Expensea of Home ftir Hay 

•< 14, H. Jay Smltb, Hoard ofG. H. Partridge fbr May.. 
Jnly 6, Farmer&Barlow.sDppUes to Boss and Morrell, or* 

" 6, R. D. Barber, soppltes to Eugeee 8b«Dk 

" 6, C> C. Lackey, aupplles to Dean, orphans 

" 18, O. B. Ooald, EzpenseD of Home for Jane 

" 18, H.Jay Smith, Board of Partridge.. 

AngDBt 4, O. B. Gould, Expenses of Home for Jnly 

Sept. 7, O. B. Oou Id, Expenses of Hnnie for Aagnst 

0<^ 7, 0. B. Gould, Expenses of Home fur September.. •• 

" T, H.G. Ulcks, Espenses attending meeting of Board. 

" T, J. E. West, Expenses attending meeilng of Board. 

" r, H. A. Castle, Expenses attending meeting of Board. 

" 7, K, D.Barber, Eipeneei attending meeting of Board. 

" 7, K.D.Barber, care of E. Shenton, soldier's orpbao. 

Hot. 18, 0. B. Gould, expenses Home, October 

■> IS, H. J. Smltb, Board G. H. Partridge, Sept. and Oct. 

" IS. D. Burke, Conveying Orphans to Kefonn School.. 

" 28, C. C. Luckey, Supplies. Dean Orpbana 

" 80, O. B. Gould, Expenites Home for Not 

80, H.J. Smith, Board G.H. Partridge Nov 

*> SO, C. F. Smltb, Sappiles, Bonbam Orphana 

" SO, DaTld Daj, Poatege Stamps for Secretary 



ISW 

8S5 
26 80 

910 
9000 

17 71 
1,4S4 78 

18 60 

19 08 
16 80 

16 00 
146 69 

1,418 II 

25 00 
1,664 83 

17 Tl 
19 60 

26 00 
10 40 
22 60 

I,E01 61 
790 

18 09 
IT 16 
36 00 
26 00* 
1600 

1,491 OS 
IT 71 



16 00 
21 SI 

1,8T61» 

16 00 
M8S08 
1,401 86 
1,868 88 

17 16 
33 10 
17 36 
84 80 
S6 00 

I,S70 44 
32 90 
800 
80 TT 

1,S41 94 
IT 16 
26 00 
IS 00 



PRISON CURHBMT 
ISTG. 

J*n. 6, J. A. Seed, Expenses bal. ofreq. Nn*. 80 

Feb. 6, J. A.Beed, Expenses bal. of req. Not. 80 

March 6, J. A. Keed, Salaries officers, qaarter ending Feb. 28 

April 7, J. A. Reed, Expenses April 

May 4, J. A.Beed, Expenses May 



93,000 00 
3,000 00 
8,498 69 
3,000 00 
8,000 00 



AUDITOB OF STATE. 107 

Jana 8, J. A. Reed, Fxpenses Jane 2,000 00 

« 8, J. A. Reed, Salories officers, qnmrMr eodlng May SI 8,761 68 

Jil7 8, J. A. Reed, Bipeasas Jaly 2,000 00 

Aog. 8, J. A. Reed, Expenses August 2,00000 

Sept. 7, J. A. Reed, Expenses September 2,000 00 

'■ T, J. A. Reed, 8al*rle§offlcer8, qaarter ending Ang. 81 8.8 U 80 

Oct. fi. J. A. Reed, Sxpanses October 2,000 00 

Not. 8, J. A. Reed, Expenses NovemlMr 8,000 00 

<■ IS, W. W. WUllams, Revard paid for return Bills and 

Welch 200 00 

" 80, J. A. Reed, SaUrlesoOlcers, qaarterendingNoT. 80 8,78310 



SUPPORT OF INSAHX. 

1S7S. 

Jan. 5, Pint National Bank, St. Peter, Janaary Expenses tT.OOO 00 

Feb. 2, First National Bank, St. Peter, Febraarj Expenses 4,000 00 

March ll. First Natioaal Bank, St. Peter, Marcb Eipenses.. T,SOO 1)0 

April I, First National Bank, St. Peter. April Expenses.... 7,600 00 

Maj I,Flrst National Bank, St. Peter, Ha; Bxpenees.... 7,600 00 

Jnoe <, First National Bank, St. Peter, Juae Expenses.... 7,fi00 00 

Jul; a. First National Bank, Hi. Peter, Jnly Expenses .... 7,G0D 00 

" 81, First National Bank, St. Peter, Aognst Eioeni>eB . . 7,600 00 

Bept, 6, First National Bank, St. Peter, SepCeni>>ar Expenses 7,000 00 

Oct. 1, First NailODBl Bank, St. Puter, October Bipeuses. 7,S00 00 

Not. 1, First National Bank, St. Peter, November Expenses 7^00 OO 

«78,SOD 00 

DCar, DUMB AND BLIND SUPPORT. 

187S. 

Jan. 6, &. Wilson, Tr., Dec, '74 and Jan., TS, Expenses.. (6,000 00 

Feb. 8, H. WUsoD, Tr., Febniary 2,600 00 

Harcli S, H. Wilson, Tr., March 3,600 00 

April T, H. Wilson, Tr., April 2,600 00 

May 6, H. Wilson, Tr., May 2,500 00 

Jane 9, H. Wilson, Tr., Jnne 2,600 00 

Jaly 10, H. Wilson, Tr., Jnly 8.000 00 

Aug. 4, H. Wilson, Tr., Augast 2.000 00 

Sept. 8, H. Wilson, Tr., September 2,000 00 

Oct. 8, B. WUsos, Tr., October f. . 2,G000C 

#28,000 00 

RKrORM SCHOOL SDPPORT. 

1876. 

March 6, D. A. Monfort, Tr. Expenses Dec. Jan. and Feb . . tS,760 00 

April 1, D. A. MonfOrt, Tr., Expenses March 2,260 00 

May 1, D. A. Monfort, Tr., Expenses April S,aso 00 

June I, D. A. Monfort, Tr., Expenses May 2,260 00 

Jnly 1, D. A. Monfort, Tr., Expenses Jane S.SSOOO 

Jnly 81, D. A. Monfort, Tr., Expenses July 2,260 00 

Sept. 1, D. A. Monfort, Tr., Expenses Augast 2,260 00 

Oct. 1, D. A. Monfort, Tr., Eipeimes September 2,250 00 

Nor. 1, D. A. Monfort, Tr., Expen<)ej October 2,260 00 

Mot. 80, £). A. Honfort, Tr, Expenses November 2,2S0 00 



|ST,000 0l> 

DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



ANNDAI. BBFOBT. 

TIHST XORMAL SCHOOL SDPrOBT. DFCT. 



1878. 

Maicli Iff, T. Simpson, Order of Boud.. 
M«7 IS, T. Slmptton, OrderofBoud.. 



nBST NOIIMII. SCHOOL SttPPORT. 

1876. 

J«D. S, T. Simpson, Jsuaarr Expenses t^BOOOO 

Feb. S. T. SlmpFoD, Febrnanr ExpenseH 1,000 DO 

If arch 10, T. OlmpBon, H&rch Expenses 1,S00 00 

April 20, T. Simpson, April Expenses 1,000 00 

Maj 12, T. Simpson, Maj' and June Expenses 2,000 00 

Sept. 30, T. SlmpaoD, September Expenses 1,200 00 

Oct. 4, T. Simpson, Balance of September reqglsIllOD 60 

■' 28, T. Simpson, October Expenses 1,260 00 

Mot. sa, T.Simpson, NoTembar Expenses 1,350 00 



SKCOMD NORUAL SCHOOL SUPPORT. 

■ 187*. 

Dec. 23, O. W. T. Wright, November Expenses tTSOOO 

1876. 

Jan. S, Q. W T. Wrlj^ht, Jsanarr Expenses 1,30000 

Feb. If, a. W. T. Wright, February Expenses, 1,00000 

March B, Q. W. T. WrUbt, March Expenses 1,200 00 

April 8, Q. W. T. Wright, April Expenses 1,00000 

May IB, O. W.T. Wright, May Expenses 2,000 00 

Sept. IS, O. W. T. Wright, September Expenses 1.000 00 

Oct. 18, G. W. T. Wright, October Expenses 1,000 00 

Nov. 22, G. W. T. Wright, November Expenses 80000 



TBtRD NORMAL SCHOOL 
187*. 

Dec. 3>, J. Q, Smith, November Expenses 81,00000 

1876. 

Feb. 18, J. O. Smith, Januarv Expenses 1,000 00 

Msrcb 16, J. G. Smltb, February Expenses * 1,000 00 

April li, J. G. Smith, March Expenses 1,000 00 

Hay 11, J. G. Smith, April Expenses 1,000 00 

Sept. 21, J. G. Smltb, September Expenses 1,000 00 

Oct. 18, J. G. Smith, October Expenses 1,00000 

Nov. Ifl, J. O. Smith, November Bzpenses 1,000 00 



FRISOH BUILDINQ. 

187B. 

Jan. fi, J. A.Ree<l, Order of Board 418 00 

July 1, D. A.Monfort.OrderofB'd, (Seyraoar, Sabln &Co.) 2,976 00 

" 9, Scymoor, Sabln & Co., Order of Board 7,668 00 

" 16, Wilson & Rogers, Order of Board • 1,200 00 



zedbyGoOgle 



AVDITOK OF STATE. 109 

Anft. B, Seymonr, Sabln&Co., OrderofBoard 8,230 00 

Sept, 7, A. U. Badcltff, Order of Board SOOOO 

" 7, J. A. Beed, Order of Board 73 00 

'- 7, Seymour, Babin A Co., Order of Board l.SS'l tS 

" 7, J. A. Seed, Order ofBoard, Condemning Lud SST 07 

Not. le, A.M. RadcllS, Order of Board SOOOO 

■* SO, Seymoar, Sabin & Co , Order of Board S,948 CO 

" SO, BeTmoor, Babin & Co., Order of Board 4,Site IE 

■' 80, Seymour, Bablu & Co., Order of Board 268 00 

" 80, Seymoar, Sabln & Co^ Order of Board, CoDdemo- 

iog Land I,flOOOO 



FRIBOM BUILDINQ COKTDIOBMT. 

1676. 

B«pt. 7,1. k. Beed. Order of Board 

" 80, S«T.aoiir, Sabln ft Co., Order of Board < 



PBUOH OA8 FiXTUU 



PXUOM RUKRTOIB. 

187S. 

Sept. 7, Bermonr, Sabln & Co., Order of Board 98,888 IS 

Ho*. SO, Se/moiu-, Sabln A Co.,Order of Board 1,716 86 

" 80, Seymoor, Sabln & Co., Order Of Board 801 76 



PBUOM ovnH. 



FBuuK warden's HOuan. 



m&UIR BDlLDDia. 

1876. 
Aa|. 18, nrsl National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board... 
Bov. 19, Flrat NaUonal Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board... 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



ANNtTAL BBPURT. 

nNIVKRMTV BVILDINU. 



18, Paris Gibson, Order or Bo&rd . . 

T, Farla GlbsoD, Order of Buard . 

2, Paris Qlbson, Order of Hoard.. 
IB, Paris 01b^on, Order of Board . . 
26, Paris Qlhson, Order of Board.. 
^6, Paris Olbson, Order uf Board.. 
2S, Paris QlbaoD, Order of Board. - 



•2,3(0 DO 
3,000 00 
S.OOOO0 
8,000 00 
8,000 00 
S.U00 00 
6,000 00 

«2S,BW00 



DSar, DUMB AND BUND BUILDIKO. 



RBPAIBS CIPITOL. 



18T6. 
March 6, 8. L. Bailey & Co., desk and Uble for Qovtntot'B 

•• 8, Wiley Bros., labor and material Id 1BT4 

" 8, C. Berabard, ash buckets, sprinkler, &c 

*' 9, H, Scbroeder, cbaira and repairs 

" 9, C. E. Cbapel, matUng, carpel aod cleantDg Legis- 
lative Hall 

" 9, Stees Brothers, loniiKe, chair and tables, lasnrance 

ComrolsBloner's Office 

" 10, Frees & Uorand, repalrliw boiler 

" 16, J. 0. L. Barke, 1 10)0 r on Auditor's vault 

" IS, Parker, Bailey, Ronton £ Co., castings for tenon- ■ 

" IT, Theo. Rank, frescoeltiK 

■> 13, J. H. WoolHey&Co.,flxtnrea for pendant lamp.... 

'' S8, J. H. Woolsey t Co., window glass and snodrlM.. 

" SS, Onstave Mnncb, lumber 

" 28, Nlcots t Dean, patent wrench 

" 28, J. H. Woolsey (E Co., lamp, shade and chimney... 

" 80, JadsoQ t Brack, balance dne on repairs of fence.. 

April 6, C. C. Miles, balance doe on repairs locks 

" 16, C.B. Chapel, repairing chaira, tc 

" 24, Jadson & Brock, painting 

" 24, O. B. Morton, labor and material 

" 24, James Cnllen, plastering Secretary of State's Tanlt 

'' 28, U. O. Strong & Co., paper, &c., for Judges* room ■ . 

May 1, B. C. Wiley, stairs In Judges' room 

" 1, L. B. Wall, grass seed 

" 4, Wnt.Walshe, awnings tor library room 

'' 4, Deflel & Hardy, cleauing capUol gronnds 

" 10, J. H. Wiley, on acconnt of windows In Governor's 

Hajr ^, J. H. Wiley, on acconnt wlodows and repairs, 

Governor's room 

" 26, Martin Btnkley, Sharpening lawn mower. 

" 27, Wm. H. Farrls, Cleaning windows, Ins.Com'r.... 
'■ 28, H. Breldert, Yale lock, 4c 



tlSI 00 
6S96 
1S3E 
6SM 

28180 

61 98 

880 
199 60 
4140 
106 00 
5 98 
S40 
498 
176 
t IS 

12 62 
22 2G 

S60 
14171 
100 00 
21 25 

13 76 
162 60 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ADDITOB OF STATE. Ill 

4, A.R. HcOlll, Office Ubla IS 00 

8, John Matbels, Carpet, Ac, Adjc. Ofa.'a Office.... 183 S7 

IS, Oeo. R. MorCoD, CLeanlng LeglHlaUve Halls 50 00 

19, A. C. Hacj, RepiiinuK Desk, ttc 10 00 

St, H. 8belru & Bro., Bal. due on coDtract work, IB73 ISO 00 

28, H. Bedmond, Work oa grounJa 8 3S 

25, H. Laller, Basket 8 GO 

26, H. Bedmond, UemDvIng bolter walla SB 00 

29, Jotin Nowork, CleaolDg brick I 60 

2, J. H. Keller, Lamber 6 45 

5, D. C. HonoD, Labor on Hteaio pipes 9 00 

8, H. Hobaii, Repairing basemeoL walls . 6 00 

8, J.O. L. Burke, od accouDt citlmoer contract 60 00 

12, D. C. Morton, Labor on steam pipes tO 00 

17, D. C. HortoD, Labor on steam pipes IS OO 

IT, J. 0. L. Burke, on account cblmney contract. 60 00 

19, J. O. Freeman, Tongs and ralves 48 OS 

SI, And. Hoban, Repairs on baaement walls 2 00 

2, Depew, Howsou&Cd., Castings for boilers 54 B9 

8, J. O. L. Burke, on account chimney contract II 00 

8, J. L. Burke, on account chlmnej contract 14 00 

8, Parker & Bailey, Castings for fUmace 63 65 

8, Tbos. Preaton, Trimming trees IS (N) 

6, H. P. Hugg, Steam flitlnga, ic 7 88 

6, Wll0on & Rogers. Sieum and Qas Plttlogs 69 60 

6, J, O. L Bnrke, on accoant chimney contract BIO 00 

21, Frees & Mora n, on acconnt Boiler contract S94 no 

1, Beck ft Rank, Painting Hand-ratl, Judges Boom.. 3 00 

7, Frees & Horan, on account Boiler contract. 206 40 

18, M. Barkley, Labor on Boiler 8 46 

18, J. 0. L. Barke, Labor Setting Boiler 75,00 

12, Roblnaon & Gary, Payment on Steam Pomp ITS DO 

27, H. Breldert, Htep Ladder, Hammer, Square, &c... 7 66 

4, Pollock, Donaldson & Ogden, two Washbowls 1 00 

18, Clirlat Eelsh, Pipe reamer, &c 4 60 

IS, H. Bnrkley, use of Forge by Eoglnesr 6 06 



KKPAIBS CAPITOL, DBTICIBNCT 1874. 

1875. 

Iluch 6, B. O. Strong & Co., Hdse. In 1874 97468 

6, H. Breldert, Mdtie. In 1874 U 6S 

•< 6, Wilson A Rogers, Mdse. In 1874 63 80 

" 6, W.C, WtlBon, U. S. PlaglB 187* 16 00 

" 6, JamesCalleo,PlaalericgVaaU,&c., Auditor's office 83 64 

6, Wil«on A. Bogeis, Hdae. ]n 1874 240 8S 

" 6, Edwards t Oagood, Laoot and Material on Smoke 

Stack 248 10 

'• 6, Wiley Bros., Labor and Material In 1874 80 00 

■' 6, U. Redmond, Labor Cleaning Gtounda In 1874 28 86 

•■ 8, Jno.Mathels, Carpet Lining and Laying Carpet-... 2 80 
" 8, J. O. L- L. Bnrke, balance due on brick. Auditor's 

Vanlt 400 02 

8, Wiley Bros., Labor and Material In 1874 808 81 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



lis JkHNDAL BBPOBT. 

rDRMISHtMO JUDOKS' ROOH. 

1876, 

April 28, R. O. Strong & Co., Carpet uid mat #18 18 

May 6, DeCoatei t Clark, Furnltare tI7 00 

" 17, Pollock, D. t Ofcdea, Farnltare 8» 

•' £2. DeCoFter A Clark, Wash Stand SOD 

Oct. 8, J. H. Berry, Tli«riiioin«ler, Lamp Shade, Ac Sit 



nrrmo bkcbktart op eraTa'a koom.— (DEncutKor 1874.) 



8, Jobn Hatbles, Carpets, Ac 92809S 

8, J. 0. L. Barke, Brick for vault * IIT 17 

8, Wtlej Bros., Material and labor 18180 

9, R. 0. Strong £ Co., Paper, &c STB 

IG, J. 0. L. Barke, Lubor on Vanlt 90 M 

SS, J. E. Woolaey & Co., Cbandellera, Ac CStS 



VEimLATiNa CAPrroL.--(oapicuMOT 187i.) 



1876. 

Uarcb 6, WIIbod & Rogers, bal. on Contract 

" ' 8, Reaer & Dress«l, Material and labor 

JuDe It, B. F^ Basaford, Flans aod 8aperiat«ad)Dg ■ 



FIBAT MOnilAI. BtmOOL HKlTIHa.— (DHnoiBMcr 1871.) 

18TS. 
Much 8, National Marine Bank, Appropriation $8,10000 

IHIKRB8T on Bran lou(b. 

187«. 

Jbd. e, E. W.DIke, 48Acoapon8 redeemed $16,80000 

July 1, £. W. Dike, 180 con pons redeemed 18,800 00 



rsOXTUS RKUEF (SKBD (UUIN.) 

1875. 

Uarcfa IS, R. W. Johosoii, Pnrcbaae of aeed grain 98,260 00 

" 15, R. W. JobiuoD, Parcbaae of seed grain fi.EAO 00 

'< 16, R. W. JohnsoD, PurctiaaeofBeed grain 12,60000 

" SO, H. W. JoiinHon, FurchaEeof eeed grain 13,600 00 

" 8U,R. W.Johnaun, I'arcbase of seed grain 6,i6n00 

" SO.lt. W. Johnson, Purchase of seed grain 6,!60 00 

•60,000 00 

FRONTIBR RBLIEr (DIBTRRSB.) 

I87S. 

reb. 8, C. K.DavU, Belief of Settlers 110.00000 



DigiLizedbyGoOt^le 



AUDITOB OF BTATE. 113 

ooHFAinr "r" 3nd num. vols. (1878.) 

18TS. 

April 11, Ben]. W»rrHDt, MIIHir; service $7 60 

JqIj 20, CarlBnpeTt, MllUury service 7 BO 

«lfi£0 

FBONTIBB HKLIBF RXIUBUBSKMKKT. 

1876. 
June 18, Treur. Pine coitDty, Retmbnnement Pine conot?.. (100 00 

" IS, Trewr. Hoaston county, KelnibnrBemcnt Houston 

county 1,000 00 

" SI, And. Todd cooDtj, ReimbnrBeineDt Todd coaaty... 100 00 

" 21, Treasr. Freeborn conmy, BeimbQrsement Freeborn 

cooDly £00 OO 

" 25, TresBr. Douglas connty, Kelmbarsement Dooglas 

cODDt; 2f0 0O 

" iS, Treasr. Meeker connty, Kelmbunnnient Meeker 

CoODty 8EO00 

JbIt T, Treasr. Ooodbae conoty, Belmbareement Ooodbne 

county 2,000 00 

" 7, Tresar. Wabasha county, Retmbursement Wabasba 

county 1,000 00 

" 9, B. J. BaldiTiD, KelmbarEement B.J. Baldwin and 

Others 6,000 00 

" 16, Treasurer Mower County, relmbarscmeDt of Mow- 
er Counly SOO 00 

" SO, H. U. Bell, reimbursement St. Louis CouDty 500 00 

Ang. 17,1). B. Uffurd, relmhunemeDt WIuous CoDutj 1,000 00 

•12,800 00 

KBLiir OF umiQiuMTs, 1871. 

1875. 

July 4, D. B. Case, relief 120 00 

" IS, QeorgeD. Pblnney, cellef .- so 00 

" ET, HsryJeuDlnea, relief : 10 00 

Feb. 4, A. t\ Macy, relief of J. Sennedy U 00 

" 17, A. C. Macy, rellerof Hni. Lucia DlckeosoD as 00 

" SO, A. C. Macy, rellel of Sarah Landstom 10 00 

April 18,J. CbrlBtla^Bon, relief ISTfi 

9182 TB 

BSUKV OF BITTLUIS OK N. p. B. R. LAITD*, 1874. 

1874. 
Dee. 28, Uoon and Kerr, services In coartii..... 9280 00 

1878. 
Jan. 16, Charles D. Eerr, Berrtces Id courts 260 OO 



1874. 

Dec 23, John Grant, one prisoner. Bice county - 950 T$ 

" 2S, J. A. Ellison, one prlsooer, Olmstvd county 66 76 

" 2S, H. J. Toher, three pnsonerB, Steele connty MOO 

15 

DigiLizedbyGoOyle 



114 "^ AIFHDU. BBTORT. 

1875. 

Ju. 6. Jobn Grant, reqniHitlon case ofC. C. Qatt IBS 1> 

■< 6, J. C. Slater, reqatsitloD cue of G. W. Sweetier... 18i DO 

7, John Haller, reqnlsltian cue of Q. H . GriawoW. . . n » 

" 8, G. W. Juhnsou, seven prlRoners, Hennepin connlj. 73 U 

" 14, H. B. CbADdler, one prisoner, Goodhne county .... BO 00 

" 31, A. B. Dikvli, two prlHonera, Farlbanlt connt; .... 98 60 

" £8, J.C. Frost, one prisoner, Anoka coanty 81 00 

March i, F. E. Newell, tbre^e prisoners, Dakota connty S7 60 

" 8, J. C. Nugent, one prlBoner, Wright connty S7 0O 

" 8, E. K. Wblting, oae prisoner, DodRe connty. 7660 

>■ 36, It. O. Hall one prisoner. Mower connty 8175 

April 2, L. O. Benjamin, one prisoner, Olmsted conDty.... 73 M 

" 8, A. G. Wedge, reqnleltion cose, A. M. Pngh 161 M 

" IS, B.W. Woolstencron, reqnlslllon case, Nat. Cox.. 80 00 

" 20, Chos. Wheeler, reqalsltioD case, C. C. Hart and 

F.C.CMtello 18186 

*' 31, Q. H. Johnson, one prisoner, Hennepin connty.. .. 28 SO 

" 27, W. H. Dili, seven prlsrtners, Wloona connty 168 00 

H&y 7, J. R. Cleveland, reqaUltlon, Bird Seeley 60 00 

" II, M. Hargresves, two prisoners, Houston conaty"' til 00 

" 20, J. B. Blonchard, one prisoner. Clay connty 123 00 

" £9, J. K. Cleveland, trsosrer or Insane convict 81 U 

June 1, John Grant, six prisoners, Rice county 118 00 

" S, John Grace, Ave prisoners, Haniaey cunnty 87 60 

" 11, J. R. Harris, one prisoner, WllklD coanty 48 60 

" IG, C. Peterson, three prUoaerd, Fillmore coanty 138 96 

'* 21, J. A. .lohnson, two prisoners, Washington county. 10 00 

Jnly 8, F. Newell, one prisoner, Dakota county ....' 30 60 

■■ 16, J. C. Frost, one prUoneT, Anoka cooDCy. 2980 

" 16, K. Webster, one prisoner, Lyon connty 118 26 

'> 10, John Grace, three prisoners, Ramsey connty 31 80 

Aug. 26, M. Miller, one prisoner, Ramsey connty 8 60 

Sept. lU, H. S. Chandler, one prisoner, Ooodhae coanty S8 60 

•> 18, M. Orady, one prisoner, LeSuear county 24 80 

" 2», K. O. Hall, one prisoner, Mower county 80 76 

Oct. 4, Geo. U. Johnson, Four prisoners, Hennepin Co... 26 26 

" 80, A. F. McKay, One prlnoner. Crow Wing coanty... 99 36 

Not. 8, C. K. Uavls, Bxpenses apprebendlns murderer C. P. 

Hubbard 300 00 

" 4, S. W. Long, One prisoner, Woscra coanty 84 66 

" 4, H. Hargrenves, Two prlsonrrs, Houston coanty.. 11000 

•• 4, W. U. Ulil, Six prisoners, Wlaons coanty 188 76 

" 8, Q. H. Johnson, Two prisoners, Hennepin connty.. 29 75 

" 11, Jobn Grace, One prisoner, Ramsey county. 3 60 

" IS, S. W. Long, One prisoner, Waseca county 68 05 

" 18, James King, occoual requisition of Reed A Pler- 

- son XHOb 

" IS, J. C. Nugent, One prisoner, Wright county El 76 

*' IS, J. A. JoliiiBOD, One prisoner, Washington connty. 500 

" 23, C. Peterson, Two prisoners, Fillmore county 98 00 

" 24, John Graut, Thre< prisoners, Rice coanty. .: 76 16 

" SO, S. H. Smith, Four prisoners, Wabosba county.... 74 46 

" 60, 8. U. Smith, Wat>aBha, '7S fund S1S5 

" SO, Jobn Grace, One ptloaner, Eomsey connty 8 00 



WATONWAN covmr [arxmt op mubdxkkr.) 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AUUITOB OF STATE. 
wii>RN& couNrr (inpiam TiouBLsa.) 

U75. 

April S. Treaanrer Wad«DA conaiy 

8BLUNO UNlVUtSITT LimM, 18T4. 



BXLUKO BTATX LANDS. 

UT4. 

I>«e. IS, W. W. TOD De;ii, 3S Pl&ts Oovemnieiit SarTeys... $6S SO 

" S3. W. W. White, Clerk Lftnd Sale, Fartbantt Co. 1874 S 00 

" IS, L. Bogen, AdT.LRcd Sale, Brown Ho 9 00 

" 3S, W, R. Walton, Adv. Land Sale, WiibaBhaCo 10 50 

" 81, J P. Williams, Clerk Land Sale, Mower Co., 1874. 00 

" 91, W. F. VOD De;n, 22 PlaLg Qoremmeiit Sarvejs. ... 47 GO 

" L. S. Padeham, Clurb Land Sale, Steele Co., 1874.. .. 800 
187S. 

Jan. 6, Liberty Halt, Adv. Land Sale, HcLeod Co 10 SO 

" fl, W. A. Hotcbkls', Adv. Land Sale, Fillmore Co ... IS 75 

" », D. S. Hlbbard, Clerk Land Sale, Olmxttd count;.. 8 00 

" S9, J. A. Jacobaon, Clerk Land Sate, Randlyotil coant; 8 00 

Feb. 8, St. Paul Press Co., Adv. Land Sale— Oenersi 89 00 

" 8, (it. Paul Preas Co., Patent Record Buok 8600 

" II, J. C. Bradeo, Abstract Entries on School Lands-.. S 00 

" S6, C. B. Tjler, Abstract Entrtt^a on ScliopI Land^ 6 00 

" tS, T. C. Shapleigh, ADstruct Entries on School Lands 2 00 

" 25, J. T. Broner, Abstract entrleD on Sibool Lands.. 10 00 

" 25, L. K. Aaker, Abstract Entries on School Lnnds - . ■ . 8 00 

" 15, J. P. Onens, Absl ract Entries on School Lnnds ... 6 OO 
Jfftrch 8, B. C. Saoborn, Adv. Land Sate, Watonwon coanty, 

1874 » 19 

" 6, Bobert Miller, Snodrj Accounts, sppralsiug lands 

InOtUrTallconniy 18818 

" 6, D. D. Merrill A. Co., Blank Books 28 80 

" 19, Ben. F. Sml'.h, Abstract Entries on Scbool Lands.. 8 40 

April 1, W. F. Toa DeyD, 83Flut« U. S. Surveys 69 35 

" 16, Tfaeo. Sander t Co , General Adv. Land Sale 1S74. 18 87 

Hay 12,W.F. von Dejn, 30 Plats U. S. Surveys 66 45 

Jnofl 14, A. E.Metlgrtn, Klbbon, Stamp and Die 12 60 

" IB, Hods. Giinager, Abstract entries on school lands. 8 00 
" se, O 8. King, Advertlalnjt Land Sale, Otter Tall 

county 9 00 

July 8, W. F. von Deyn, 47 plats D. 8. Surveys Iu4 46 

" !B, F. E. Snow, 11 plats U. S. Surveys 2S 90 

S<pt. 9, J. H. Suule, Appraising scboo? lands, Washington 

county, two dsya 8 00 

" 9, H. Berkey, Appraising school lands, Washington 

county, two days S 00 

" 9, J. H. Spencer, Appraising school land*, Washing- 
ton county, two da) s 600 

" 10, J. H. Clark, Appraising Agrlcnltursl College lands, 

Dodge county, one day 8 00 

" 10, T. Lyncb, Appraising Agrlcnltural College lands 

Dodge county, one day ■ S 00 

" 10, W. H. Parmerlee, Appraising Agricultural Collage 

lands. Dodge conuty, oqe day 8 00 

" S7, Gilbert Sargent, Appraising ectaonl lands, Dong- 
las coanty, 15 days 46 00 



zedbyGoOgle 



ANNDAI. BEPOBT. 

37, Gilbert Sargent, Appr&tfribg sclioal luds, Dong- 

1u counly, IGtiflyii, team 4C0O 

37, O I Iberl Sargent, AppriiisingTnterQKlI;npravemei)t 

laads, Douglu county, IS days WOO 

37, Gilbert Ssrgeat, AppraislDglmertiil Improvement 

liDdj, Douglas coDDiy. IC days, team UOO 

37, T. EvensoD, Appralsiog Bcbool loads, Dooglaa 

coonvy, IB days 4100 

37, T. EvensoD, Appralalng loternal Improvement 

lands, DoDglaa i^onoty, IS days 46 00 

37, V. D.Nlcbol*, Appraising school lands, Po agios 

coQDty, 16 days 4S0O 

37, V. U. Nlcbola, Appraising loteroal Improvement 

landp, DongUs county, IS days i&W 

1, Adam Buck. Appraising Schnoi, iDteroal Impr'-ve- 
meat and Agrlcultaral College lands, Sibley 

county, 83 days WOO 

1,T. 0'Nei:i, Appraising School, Internal Improve- 
ment and Agrlcaltaral College lands, Sibley 

county, 88 days 99 OO 

1, Ang. Gchubert, Appraising School, Internal Im- 
provement and Agricultural College lands, Sibley 

county, 83 days 99 00 

I, Bodstlkhen, Advertising Land Sate, general 18 3* 

18, Minneapolis Tribune, Advertising Land Sale, gen- 
eral 17 0« 

18, A. W. Scott, Advertising Land Sate, P >pe county. 7 83 

32, Pioneer- I'ress Company, Advertising Land Sale, 

general, in dally, weekly 17 OS 

2G, Daggett & Joobert, AdvertlsingLand Sole, Meeker 

eoQDty 10 50 

as, The Herald Company, Advertising LandSide, Wa- 

biBha connty 10 SO 

86, A. J. Underload, adv. land sale, Otter Tall connty. 18 U 

6, Todd & St«bblns, adv. land bliIq, Dali<)tac>anty... 10 50 
Stf, llariln County Sentinel, advertising land sale, Mar- 
tin county 10 SO 

M, 8. ft E. C. Uantington, advertising Und sate, Cot- 
tonwood county 10 BO 

98, T. A. Perrlne, adv. land sale. Wright county 10 50 

38, New Ulm Herald, adv. land sale. Brown county... 7 89 

se, W. B. Mitchell, adv. land sale, Stearns county... 10 50 

86, Johnson t Smith, adv. land sale, Hennepin connty. 13 IS 

86, Wlllmar Bepubllcan, advertising land sale, Kandi- 

yohi connty 8 37 

36, A. L. DnTolt, adv. land sale. Carver connty 10 60 

23, Alexandria Post, adv. land pale, Douglas connty.. 10 50 
36, J. 8. Brocheltinrst, advertising land sale, Hille 

Lacs county 10 50 

36, 0. S. King, adv. land fale, Otier Tail connty 10 50 

26, O. C. Chamberlain, advertising land sale, JacksoD 

connty 1111 

ST, 8< H. Soule, appraising school lands, Cottonwood 

connty, two days 6 00 

27i 0. Nason, appraising school lands, Cottonwood 

county, three duyi S 00 

87, 0. Naeoa, appraising school lands, Cottonwood 

coniitj, team, three diiys 9 00 

87, C. H. Smith, appraising school lands, Cottonwood 

connty, three days S 00 

37, F. von Banmbach, clerk land sale, Douglas connty. 1 00 
37, F. von Banmbach, clerk hire land sale, Duoglas 

connty -. tOO 



zedbyGoOgIC 



ADDITOB or STATB. 117 

tr, K. J. Elttfier, clerk land lale, Fope connty SOO 

IT, J. A. jBGobaon, clerk Und sate, Kand1;oIil connC;. 8 00 

ST, J. A. AnDSiroDS, clerk UaA sile, UartlD county .. SOO 

ST, W. V. KI119, clerk land aale, Jackson coantr BOO 

80, NorthwBitern Cbroolele, advertlalDg general land 

Bale 18 H 

4, H. P. Kotila, ad?, land a^le, Plna ooanty 10 BO 

4, RenTllle Times, adv. land sale, Beavlle coonty. .. T 87 
4, Hanuitvllle EipTesa, Adv. Land Sale, Dodge 

county 10 60 

4, J. K. Hoore, Adv. L«nd Sale, Nicollet county 10 50 

4, F. D. Caraon, Adv. Land Sale, Sberbnrne coaoty . . 10 SO 

4, J. U. & ». Slmontan, Adv. Land Sale, Steama Co. 10 SO 

4, W. H. Campbell, Adv. Land Sale, Anoka county. .. T 87 

4, Leonard h Boatb, Adv. Land Sale, Olmsted coaoty 10 50 

8, D. Sinclair, Adv. L«nd Sate, Winona conaty 10 SO 

8, Seward & Taylor, Adv. Land Sale, WashingtoD Co. 1080 

8, Tribune Pub. Co., Adv. Laud Sale. General 17 06 

9, H. Thoeny, Clerk Land Sale, McLeod coaaty 8-00 

9, B. Voaberg, Clerk Land Sale, Steams county 8 00 

fl, E. Croakblte, attending Land Sate, Waaeca countr 8 00 

9, B. H. Spencer, attending Land Sale, Benton county 8 00 

0, 8. J. Wlllard, attendtnit Land Sale, Goodhue Co. . . S 00 

8, H. Stevcna, atteudlng Land Sale, Meeker county . . 8 00 

5, A. Bartlett, attending Lind Sale, Flllraire county. 8 00 

9, E. Erlcson, attending Land Sale, Renville connty. . 8 00 
S, O. L. Cutter, attending Land Sale, Aaolia county. . 8 60 
9, P. A. Sinclair, attending Land Sale, Sherbarae Co. 8 00 
9, F. W. Frink, attending Land Saie, Rice county.... 8 00 
9, ChrlitL Didra. atteadlog Land Sate. Sibley county. S 00 
9, O. Brown & Son, Adt. Land Sale, Blue Earth Co.. T 87 
9, E. O. Koch, attending Lind Sale, Brown county.. 100 
9, Hahlon Btack,atteDrilngLand8ale,Heaneplnoaanty 8 00 

9, Wm Tubbs, Clerk Land Sal^ Wright connty 800 

9, Geo.DavIa, attending Land Sale, Waablngton connty 8 00 

11, Dispatch PrInt'KCo., Adv. Land Sale, Ranwey Co.. IS 18 
11, Uouiton county Journal, Avertlalng Laud Sale 

Houston coaoty T 87 

11, LeBnenr, Sentinel, Advertising Land Sale, LeSueor 

county 10 60 

11, M. Mayer, Attending Land Sale, Scott county 800 

II, J. Grinnell, Attending Land Bale, Dodge county... 8 00 
11, W. U. Campbell, Attending Land Sale, Wabasha 

county SOO 

11,8. Batchelder, Attending Land Sale, Freeborn 

county 800 

11, H. C. Lacy, Clerk. Land Sole, Freebomcounty.... 8 00 

II, L, Strenkena, Attending Land Sale, Carver conntj. 3 00 

] 1, Liberty Hall, Advertising La'.d Sale, McLeod connty 18 19 
li, A. W. HcElnitry, Advertising Land Bale, Rice 

county 10 60 

IS, H. M. F. Irgena, Appraising State Lands, Pope 

connty 818 00 

18, Q. C. Warren, Appraising State Lands, Pop« 

connty 4S8 60 

IS, A. Brayman, AppraUlng State Lands, Pope connty 884 00 

18, M. Heloen, Attending Land Sale, Dakota county. . . 8 00 

15, L. S. Padgbam, At'cndlog Land Sale, Steele county 8 00 
18, Crandall £ Bnckham, Advertising Land Sale, 

Steele county 10 50 

16, Z. 8. Qault, Attending Land Sale, Nicollet county.. 8 00 
IE, A. A. Uatwood, AdvertUiog Land Sale, Hower 

eonniy 10 60 



zedbyGoOglC 



ANITDAL BEFOBT. 

, 16, H. ?. L&s^le'r,An«ii(lliigLaiidSde,Toddiy»in^>Tt 8 00 

IS, H. F. LastahT, Attenulog Land SAle.Todd coantj TS 8 OD 
je, Junes E. Child, AdvertUlDg Land S&le, Wueca 

county 10 00 

IT, E. Hoerschfien, Clerk, Land Skte, Sibley ctrantv.... 8 00 
SO, Daniel Pickett, AdvertlHlng Land Sftle, Sibley 

connt; 10 SO 

33, O. Wallmkrk, Attending Lied Ssle, Cblisgo coDDty 8 DO- 
SS, J. FUndera, Anendlng Land Sale, Watonwan conntj 8 00 
2fl, A. BlormaDn, AtteEdlng Land Sale, Olmsted conatj 8 00 
S7, N. B. Ufford, Attending Land Sale, Winona cann^ 8 00 
27, Bcq]. O. Sanborn, Advertising Land Bale, Waton- 
wan coant; 8M 

IT, E. W. Tnub, AltendlDK Laikl Sale, Hoaaton coan^ 8 00 

80, P. T. Hclntyre, Attending Land Bale, Mower coaotr 8 OO 
80, Q. W. Benedict, Adverttslng Land Sale, Benton 

conntj 10 6(^ 

SO, a H. Blocnmi Advertising Land Sale, Fkrlbantt 

coanty 10 80^ 

ao, O. P. Whitcomb, Bzpeneea collecting stampage and 

selling lands tM SB 



VUBL AKD LIOHTS. 

w*. 

Dm. SB, 81. Faol Water Co., Water Jalj 1, 1874, to iaa. 

1, 187S «7S0O 

" 81, Leonard A Seeger, Pattern 140 

1876. 

Jan. 7, St. Fanl Qas Light Company, Qas, December .... IHOS 

Hanli 8, Hill Bros. A Fowble, ten Cords Wood 6000 

" 8, Saandera t Bairlsoo, Coal 1,880 88 

" 8, Sb Fanl Gas Light Company, Oas, Jan. an Feb... SS8 88 

" 8, Drela* Hltach, Otl and Sundries 7 86 

" 28, St. FaalGaa Light Compaor, Lantern for Porcb.. SO 00 

" !8, H. Lankenbelmer, Oil and Sundries 18 30 

April 1, J. H. Keller, one card pine wood 8 60 

" 1, Smith & Lewis, ISO corda wood 783 00 

" 3, Sanndera ft Harrison, Coal SS4 11 

8, Smith & Lewis, 4 Cords Wood SO 40 

" 8, Bt. PaalGa« Llgbt Company, Gas, Htrob 110 86 

'■ 9, Baondersft Harrison, Coal 81 >6 

" 38, Satmdera & Harrison, Coal 14 88 

MV 8, Htll, Grlgga & Co., three Cords of Wood 18 00 

4, Deflel ft [lardy, Ice 600 

" 6, St. Fanl Gas Ltgbt Company, Gas, April 17 30 

JtiM 1, J. M.Keller, one Cord Stabs 8 60 

<• i, St- Paul Coal Company, 1) Tons Coal 10 60 

" 4, Bt. Pan) Ohs Light Company, Gas, Hay 9 TO 

" 33, St. Panl Watei Company, Water Jan. 1 to Joly 1, 

1876 75 OO 

July 1, Drels ft Mitach, on, Ac 96 

9, St. Panl Oas Light Company, Gas, June 9 66 

Ask. 6, St. Panl Gas Light Company, Gaa, July 14 06 

•' 17, J. B. Sajiders, Fire Brick and Clay 8176 

Sapb 1, E. N. Sannders, G barrels cement 10 36 

» 3, SreisftMltBch, oil and lead 3 86 

" 8, A. DeKay, 8 barrels lime SCO 

". 8, St. Paul Gas LIgDtCo., gas, Aagust 16 40 

" 8, John Bell, 8 barrels lime 3 3B 

•' SI, John Bell, 6 barrels lime 8 75 



zedbyGoOglC 



ADDITOB OF STATE. 1J9 

T, St. PMlOu LlgbtCo., gas, September 3830 

2B, J. H. E«l)er, 8 cords alcbs.. 10 SO 

S7, 3. H. Scbnrmeler, wood wbeelb&rrow 7 TE 

4, St. FbdI Qis LIfEhtCo., Kss, October 41 96 

5, M. R. Baldwin, 47,169 ifoiiiids coal 285 84 

10, H. Lankenbeimer, candles, &c II OS 

80, E. H. Saanders, 1 barrel cemeot 800 

80, St. Faal Gas LIgbt Co.. gas, VoTember 70 80 

80, M. R. Baldwin, 40,840 poonds coal 176 83 

80, J. H. WooIserA Co., 8 gallons otl 4 SO 



TKAimMQ SCHOOLS A 

187S. 

Ihrob 1C, H. B. WllBon, tralnlag acbool, Ltke 0117 

'■ 81, H. B. Wilson, traluloK scbool, Excelsior 

April 13, D. Bnrt, inHtituieB at Aooka, UendersoD, KassOD, 

and W lUmar 

" 28, D. Bart, iDStltntes at Wortblngton and Lltchfleld. 
Aug. 81, D. Banjlnstltates at Alexandria, ValrmoDt, Aus- 

tin, Wortblngton and Now Ulm 

Sept. 38, D. Bnrt, Instttutea at Elk lUver, Moorhead and Bea- 
ver Ealls - 

Not. 18, D. Bnrt, balanoe onlDstttnte atOratiUe Falls 

" 19, D. Bart, balance on Institute at Uoorbead 

" 80, D. Bort, balance on Inatitote at Rochester and 
Aaatln 



400 00 
78 St) 
80 04 



MAMiaaBS CBNTXMMLli. HXBIIUTION. 



4, Bamaley & CnunlogliaiD, printing 800 ctrcolars,... $6 41 
28, N. H. Wincbell, expense* collecting or«s and min- 
erals EOOO 

18, P. Pas«j, cspenses as specie agent as 00 

IB, J. F. Williams, stamps and Telegrams 18 40 

8, R. C. Judson, expenses as special agent 99 OS 

10, Bamoley & Cnnnlngbam, 200 circulars 8 10 

80, F. McCnrnilck, llttiDg room 18 00 

SO, W. W. iTulffull, uxpdDse* to Fbllodelplita 50 00 

SO, Price A Mltcbell, prlDtlDK leoo tags 9 00 

80, Aaerbach, Flucb & Subefler, 300 grain bags 88 00 



1874. 
Dm. 

1878. 
Harch 



BISrOKlCAL SOCIBl'Y. 

S1,J.F. Williams, salary, Dec 9116 18 

8, Wiley Bros., book cases 48 00 

9, H. U Schroeder, 8 tables 18 60 

W, £ngel A Vogt, binding 9 toIs. papers 18 00 

S4, J. F. Wtlllsmg, salary, Jan. and Feb 8S0 00 

18, J. P. Williams, (alary, Marcb 120 00 

89, J. H. Wiley, ihelving 86 89 

4, J.F. Williams, salary and sundries, April 185 B8 

81, J. F. WtUUms, salary and sandries. May IS8 10 



jdbyGoOglC 



120 liraUAL BEPORT. 

Jma 3S,W. P. Jewett, State Ubp 8 00 

" 30, J. F. Wlllltima, salary and BandrleSiJODa IS8 70 

" 80, J. Sablo & Sons, DletloDarjr -■■■ 8 00 

Jaly 24, Jodson & Brack, painting and gtalDlng book caM.. S 00 

Aug. 8, J. F. WllUanu, eiUary and aondrld, Jalf 117 86 

" 4, Ramalev & CaDDlDsham, binding 10 75 

" 81, J. F. WIlllamB, SaUr;, Aag^ist US 00 

8«pt. 35, Kuualey & CanDlngham, SIndiag 19 00 

Oct. 4, C. Bernhard, Stove and ttxtarea 65 

" 8, J. F. Willlains, Salar; and intidrlea, September ... liS 80 

Hot. 8, J. F. Wllltams, Salary and anodrlea, October 180 60 

" 10, Ramaley A CnaDlagbain, Binding 7 95 

*' 18, Tboroas Mara, Freight and drayage, box of books t IS 

<■ 34, St. Pant Fire and Marine Inaaraiice Company, In- 

anranoe Policy IWOO 

" 80, J, F. Wllllanis, Salary and anndries 180 95 



aOiuc(n.TDBai. soohties. 

I8T6. 
Aug. 7, W, B. Barwell, Appropriatlao for State Society. ■ • 91,000 00 
Sept. 16, Bine Earth connty Agrlcalloral Society, appro- 
priation lor 1876 58 81 

" 16, Becker connty AgrlcQltnral Society, appropriation 

for 1876 58 81 

" 16, Brown connty Agricultural Society, appropriation 

fbr 1876 58 81 

" 16, Cblaago and Pine connty AgrlcnltaTa] Bocletlea, 

appropriation fbr 1S7S 68 81 

" 15, Cottonwood connty Agrlcnltnral Society, appro- 
priation for 1876 58 e> 

" 16, Carver coanty Agrlcnltnral Society, appropriation 

fbr 1876 58 81 

" 15, Dakota connty Agrlcaltnral Society, appropriation 

fbr 1876 68 81 

" 16, Dodge connty Agrlcnltnral Society, appropriation 

for 1876 • 68 81 

" 16, Fillmore connty Agrlcnltnral Society, appropria- 
tion for 1875 58 89 

" 10, Farlbanlt connty Agrlcnltniat Society, appropria- 
tion for 1876 • 68 SI 

" IG, Fillmore and Mower connty Agrlcnltnral Society, 

appropriation for 1876 68 SI 

" 15, Freeborn county Agrlcnltnral Society, approprla- 

Uonfor 1875 68 SS 

" 16, Ooodhne connty Agrlcnltnral Society, appropria- 
tion for 187G 68 81 

'■ 16, Jackson county Agrlcnltnral Society, appropria- 
tion for 1876 68 SI 

" 16, Le Bnear connty Agrlcnltnral Society, appropria- 
tion for 1876 5S83 

SepL IS, Lyon connty Agrlcnltnral Sodety. an>ropriatloti 

of 187S 68 81 

" 15, Lac qnl Parle connty Agrlcnltnral Society, appro- 
priation of 1875 68 89 

■- 16, Uartln connty Agrlcnltnral Society, appropriation 

of 1876 68 81 

" 16, Meeker connty Agrlcnltural Society, appropriation 

of 1876 58 S3 

" 16, HcLeod connty Agrlcnltnral Society, appropriation 

of 1876 58 8) 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



Atn>in» or nArm. ISl 

8«pt, 18, Hicolktconiit; Agrteoltanti Soele^, apptoprtaUon 

otl87B. was 

It. Olnrntrd conntj AgrlcaUanit Society, appropriation 

of 1ST5 S8 8f 

15, Sam^Qj county Agrlcnltarat Society, approprlptlon 

orid75 .SBtt 

IS, nedwood couii'.y Agrlcnltnral Soclol;, iqiproprla- 

ttonoflSTS SS8S 

15, Rfce coDDijr Union Agricultural Society, appraprl- 

ailoDof 18?5 fiSSS 

15, Bteeld coDnty AgrlcnUnral Society, approprlatlan 

of 1S7G KM 

IS, Stevena conn^ AgrlcvltitrK] Sodetji appropriation 

of 1876 68 81 

15, 8t«ams couaiy Agricaltnral Society, appropriation 

of 1876 S8 88 

IS, Scott connly Agrlcnltorai Society, appropriation 

of 1876 S8 8S 

15, Sibley county AgricnltDral Society, appropriation 
of 187B 58 8* 

16, Wadena connty Agricultural Society, appropriation 
of 187S 88 88 

IS, Wabaiba cnnmy Agricultural Society, appropria- 
tion of 1B75 58 88 

18, Waafalagtoo cnunty AgrlcDltnral Society, approprl- 

atlonofisrs 68 88 

IB, Wright coon^ Agrlcultunl Society, ipproprlatlov 

of 1875 58 88 



1, J. B. Caryle, taking Censna Bock Creek, Pine Co.. 93 07 

21, A. McF&dden, taking Centos Crow Wlug connty. .. 16 W 

H, F. Z. Gouiet, making retarns Crow Wing coauty . . 10 06 
20, Joseph Freeman, CenHDa of White Bear, Baouey 

eoonty 19 41 

8, C. C. Knox, census and returns Crow Wing county. 16 16 

7, J. J. BIni;, Census of Scott county 885 55 

7, M. Miyer, Retarns of Scott coanly 83 78 

10, U- A. Larson, C«neus aod Returns of Lao qui Parle 

county SS M 

10, P. A. Oalcheli, Cenaui and Rt lurbs of Wndena Co. . 16 SS 

10, H. HalgersoD, Cen'-na and Ketnrns Swift county... 80 61 

14, T. H. C:<lne. Centiua and Kelurne leantt county.... 18S 86 
23. O. A. Jargo, Census aud Returns Clilppewa county 89 84 
ti, J. H. BeTerens, returns Chippewa county 18 98 

15, Treasarer Grant Cn.. Crnsus runt county 86 76 

23, H. T, Kaofiird, returns Grant county 10 88 

23. J. L. Wright, census 01 mated county 850 28 

33, A. Biermann, reiurna Olmsted rouuty i9M 

33, K. Henderson, cen>us and lelnrnB Fope countr-.- 188 SS 

S3, W. H. Fletcher, census and rrturas Uenton connty 71 38 
23, Sara'l Laraon, ceasDsand relninaof Trarerse and 

Stevens counties 8S68 

82, H. Gronnerud, censns and Returna Renvilla county S97 87 

39, C. H. Tleaelman ceuaus Mnrtin county 113 80 

39, J. A. Armatioiig, returns Martin county 16 48 

3, H. K. White, census D-)uf:lus county 1B9 67 

2, L. F. Robinson, census Itedwood county 89 49 

S, E. A. Chandler, returns Redwood county 18 T7 

16 



,.db,Google 



t ANIIDAL BKKWr. 

;. £, F.'tod Banmbaota, retnniB Doaglu coantj SOW 

S, J. Taylor, censDs and retorns Morrlsoo coantjr.... >T 18 

S, r*. H. Smitli, ceDsnsof uuitoDwinMi conntj 8106 

S, R M. Eep«y. ratnrba of Cottoawood coDOtr I8H 

S, W. Smitti, c«Deat or Waseca conatj H9 77 

. S, E. nroDkhite, returoB of Waseca roaoty S7 99 

S, B. Toflberg, censas and returns of gteams eono^. M6 54 

8, L. A. Hancock, oensas ot Goodhae conoty 717 M 

5, 8. J. Wlllard, returns of Qoadtiiis county.... 66 00 

G, C. B. GuderlBD, censna and retorna Anokft cooBty 1S9 U 

10, M. Bhepard, cvnsna and retnras of WaahlogtOD 

Ctiontj 888 91 

11, J. A. WIlftOD, MMOS or CsnnoD FaJla, OoodtiH 

coDDty W48 

18, O. O. Llnde.ceDsuaaiid retnnia of Tellow UedlclBe 

coanty 87 4> 

IS, Treisarer Pine conoiy, ceiiBDS and retarna of Floe 

connty, esc^'pt Rock Creek 81 81 

18, ThoB. Hee, cenaaa and retnrnBof Rice oonnty tC6 It 

18, C. F. Leland, censua and retnniH of Carlton cood^ 84 88 

18, AuBon Fierce, ccdbdh and returns Wabuha oonntyi U8 U 

18, T. HaBsenstab, rensua of Carver county 881 87 

18, L. Str>akenB, returns of Carver county 84 07 

18, O. Wallniark. returns of Chisago con nty 30 08 

18, Treasurer Chisago coanty, census Cbteago oonn- 

ly icon 

IS, H. Sanderaon, cenana and returns of Kandiyohi 

coanty SH 60 

18, TreaBurer Wrlgfat county, censns and returns of 

Wright county 448 SS 

18, B. J. Veto, censas and returns of Honston county. 498 10 
IS, Treasurer Polk county, ceoaos and returaa of Polk 

county 88 11 

17, J. A. JocobsoD, balance dneforretams of Kandlyo- 

bt coDCty 8 00 

17, P. Fritsche, census and returns of Nicollet county. 886 80 

19, J. F. Shoemaker, census of liock county SB 88 

19, F. Howard, retuma of Rock county 1173 

19, A. K. Bunlick, census and retnrns, Lincoln coanty 2i 89 

19, B. H.Cblsley, cenins Kanabec county 9 38 

19, C. W, LcDfest, returns, Kanabec county 10 00 

19, T. Thompson, census, Stfcle county 275 61 

19, L. S. Pudgham, returns, Steele county S9 50 

IT, W, W. Huntington, census and retarns, Hennepin 

county 1,076 03 

20, Cbas. KIttelson, censos, Preehora county 895 67 

SO, S. Batcbelder, returns, Freeborn coQLty 34 88 

IS, W. T. King, censoB and returuB, Jackson county... 1(0 06 
38, T. Poebler, Jr., census and returnsi, tllbley coanty. 380 83 
38, Treas. Hharborne county, census and returns, Sher- 
burne county 10* 41 

SO, P. HcKa-'-ey, census nnd reinms, LeSnenr county.. 415 00 

. 2, 8. P. Jenaisori, compiling returns 800 OO 

6, C< R' Mima, census and returns, McLeod county... 3T8 13 
6, A. J. Parkrr, ceoaos and returns, Bii; tjtone coanty 19 16 

6, W. W. Brad en, centos Fillmore county TT9 39 

6, A. Banlett, reiurnfl, Fillmore county 64 73 

6, G. A. Scliutue, census, Lake and Cook counties.... 15 58 

6, C. Wlelasd. returns. Lake and Uook counties 10 00 

6,0 A. Boe, census aud returns, Becker county 8019 

6, Cbr. Arvolu, centus and returns, Blue Earib county 693 18 

8, Jena. Torsen, census. Watonwan county 11088 

6, J. Flanders, retnrns, Watonwan coanty 1606 



zedbyGoOglC 



ADIHTOB OV 8TATB. HB 

Mpt. a, H. SteroDB, retnrna, Meeker conn^ 2fi 19 

■■ fl, A. N. Fosen, catiras, Meeker coaoly MS 30 

" 8, N. Haletl, census and returns, Bt. Loots coanty .... 70 25 

" 8, J. W. WtlllamB, ceDBns sod retnret. Ljoa coaotj.. 89 67 

" 8, D. K. Dibble. Census, Dixlge couotj S70S9 

" 8, J. GrlnDell, Betnnia, DcHHtre connt? 38 02 

>' 10, I. luKiaanABOB, Censas and Returns, Mofrer ooont; 403 8S 

" 18, C. E. Bass, Ceiuns Todd con nty lliSS 

" SS, H. V. Lssbler, Returns, Todd coanty 15 64 

" 28, H. D. HoniiBtoD,CeDsi)saiii] Returns, Nobles conntj 89 00 

Oct. &, Oottlleb Hjaer, Census sud Returas, Wilkin county SS S7 

Hot. 9, C. B. Ullne, Census five Cowna, Rnmsey county... 76 88 
" 10, Junes ComptoD, Census and Returns, Otter Tall 

county 198 U 

" 10, N. C. Rnkke, Census and Returns, Brom) county. 189 SB 

" 10, 8.L. Staples, C«nBua and Retariis,MllleLacscoQiitT 49 60 

" 10, RuftiB Tbomas, Returns, Murray county 10 tT 

" 10, J. L. Corbett, Census, Hurray coanty 40 08 

" 17, John Tborsgaard, Ceuana and Retarna, Clay county Of $i 

" 80, Wm. EUrrlngton, Censiu, Dakota coun^ 4KS86 

■■ 80, H. Hetuen, Returns, Dakota county 49M 

" 80, D. V. Brawley, Ceoatu and Eetoma, Pembina 

conqty 20 Iff 

" 80, J. W. MeClnng, Censns and Returns, ith and Stb 

wards, St. Paul 20719 

" 80, H. B' Johnson, Census and Returns, Fulbsull 

coQDty 848 U 

•16,857 U 
QEOLOOICUL SURVKT. 

187S. 

JwM S, Paris Otbson, order of Board tl,000 00 

risu (KtuMiMiUNUts. 

U». 

Kay 17, D. Day, expeoees hatching, &c. 9100 OO 

*■ 17, D. Day, tixpenaea dlalrlbutlng BOO 00 

Sept. 20, H. Auatin, expeoaas 800 00 

Oet. SO, R. 0. Sweeny, expenses on account of flsh eggs.... 100 00 



U7S. 

Jan. 28, H. N. Setier, services in suit Wis. vs. Minn. ■ 

March 8, Ramaley & Cannlngbam, printing brief 

April 14, H. N. Setzer, expenses In suit 



WIHOIIA AMD ST. PXTXK R. R. vs. BLAKB. — 1874. 

187S. 

Feb. 18,17. P. Clougb, legal services 9250 00 

April 10, Pioneer Co.. printing brief 168 00 

Oct. 8, W. P. Googh, legal serrleea..... SOOOO 



zedbyGoOgle 



IM AMinTAL RBFOBT. 

KXPRKBS AND MILKIOK. 
18H. 

Dm. SS, B. J. Velo, Treaanrer Eooalon coanty tS W 

■< S6, B. L. SUplM, Tnaanrer HUie LkoscftDD^ 4 00 

" 28, C. £■ Bdbb, TretBurer Todd coanly 1100 

18TS. 

Jtn. 4, B. W. Dike, cbargea paid » 60 

■' IS, H. KandBOD, TreMorar JacliflOQ coanty 4 00 

Uaicli 6, Aid. Express coanty, serrlcaa qnarter ending Feb. 

1, 187B «7» 

" IS, H. Oronnernd, Treaaarer KenvlIU conatj 8 00 

" S9, John YouDg, Treaeorer Wrizlit conntj S 00 

April 9, L. f BoblnsoQ, Treasurer Redwood conaty 9 00 

" 8, 0. W. Oleson, Treasurer OntDt connty 8 60 

<■ 7, 8. L. Staples, Treasurer HUie Lacs coanty 4 00 

'• la, S. W. Dike, Express Charges paid. 8S Sfi 

" 14, B. H. Cblsley, Treaanrer Kanabec conuty 4 00 

" 34, American Express Co., Express Charges 81 M 

** 90, B. B. Johnson, Treunrer Faribault coanty S 00 

'■ 80, H. A. Larson, Treaanrer Lac qni Parle coanty . • • • • 00 

Hky 4, J. F. Bhoemaker, Treasarer Rock connty SI 00 

" B, H. Knndaon, Treaanrer Jackson connty 4 00 

'■ 8, Ole O. Llnde, Treasurer Tellow Medicine coanty. 7 00 

" 20, Ole A. Jargo, Treasarer Clilppeira connty TOO 

June 7, J. L. Cabot, Treasurer Hn my coanty 00 

" B, O. W. Olaon, Treasarer Grant county 8 W 

" 14, B- A. Larson, Treasurer Lac qnl I'arle connty .... 6 00 

" 18, T. H. Calne, Treasurer Isaiitl coanty SM 

" 18, H. Oronnerod, Treaanrer Ben vlUe connty 8 00 

" 23, L. F. Robinson, Treasurer Redvrood county 9 00 

" 2S, E. J. Velo, Treasurer Houston connty 2 80 

" 19, American Express Co., Forwarding Coapona to 

New Tork SB IS 

" 80, O. A. Jargo, Treasarer Chippewa connty TOO 

" 80, H. Knndaon, Treaanrer Jackson connty 4 00 

Joir I, H. K. White, Treaanrer Donglsscoaniy U 10 

" 2, O. 0. Llnde, Treasurer Yellow Medicine county.. 7 00 

" B, H. Qronnemd, Treasurer Renville county 8 00 

" 12, C. H. TIeselman, Treasarer MarUn county 4 00 

" 18, J. L. Cabot, Treseorer Hurray county s 40 

" 10, John Young, Treaanrer Wright county 1 60 

" 81, E. W. Dike, Express charges paid 11 60 

'■ SI, American Express Company, on account contract 40 00 

Aug. 3, B. B. Chleley, Mileage Treasurer Kanabec coanty. 4 00 

" IS, R. B.Johnson, Hlleige Treaanrer FaribanltcouDty 2 00 

" 20. O. A. Jargo, Uileage Treasarer Chippewa county. 7 00 

Sept. It, 8. L. Btaples, Mileage Treasurer MlUe Lacs county 4 00 

Oct. It, O. W. OlesoD, Mileage Treasn re r Grant county... 8 60 

" 19, B. B. Cbisley, Mileage Tressnrer Kanabec county. (OO 

" 25, B. K. White, Mileage Treasarer Douglas county.. 7 80 

" 80, E. W. Dike, Express charges pUd 88 10 

Hot. 4, B. Oronnernd, Mileage, October eettlement Ren- 

Tllle ooDQty BOO 

" 9, C. B. Vleselmon, Mileage, October settlement 

Hartin county 4 00 

■■ 11, N. P. fihepard, Mileage, October setUement, Hui^ 

ray connty 9 60 

'■ 19, B. F. Warner, on acconut contract, August 1 to 

November 1 ST BO 

•' 23, 0. A. Jargo, Mileage, October settlement Chippe- 
wa connty 7 00 



zedbyGoOgle 



ADDITOB or STATB. 125 

36, H. Enadson, llilflig«, October MtUement Jackson 

eonotj ( OO 

80, Ole O. Lencl«, Hlleige, October setUemeot Yellow 

Medicine cooDty 7 00 

SO, H. K. White, Mileage, October act dement Dotiglu 

coQDty 7 60 

BO, C. U. Ttesselman, Hfleage, October MttlemeDt 

HartiD conntj' 4 00 

80, H. Oronuemd, Mileage, Land Sale Benvllle conotj 8 OO 

80, E. W. Dike, Express cba<-ges paid U. S- Express 

Compaoy ■ S709 

SO, B. W. Dike, Express cbarges paid U. 8. Express 

Compony , S2 80 

SO, 8. J. Yelo, Mileage, October setUement Hooston 

connty 9 80 

SO, John Tonog, Mileage, Land Sale, Wright coantj.. 2 SO 



RBNT or oorauiaB's hoitsb. 

IS7S. 

Jan. 8, C. K. Davis, rentofhoose, Dec, '74 (86 li 

April IS, Sam'l. R. Tbayer, rent of faonse, i to March Si, 78 300 00 

Hay IS, C. K. Davis, reot of house, April 66 60 

June 12, C. E. Davis, rent of bouse, May 6S67 

Jnly 14, C. K. Davis, reotorhonae, June 66 68 

Aog. 11,C. K. Davis, rentofhonse, July 68 67 

8epU 11, C. K. Davis, rent of bouse, Angnst 66 66 

Oct. 13, C. K. Davis, rentofhonse, September 66 67 

Not. 18, C. E. Davts, rentofhonse, October 68 68 

" SO, O.K. Davis, rentofhonse, November 66 67 



•800 06 

RXMT or ABsntAU 

187 B. 

Jan. 18, L. Ksmmetter, J ending Dec. 81, 1874 #188 00 

July 8, L. Remmetter, 6 monibs ending Jnly 1, 1875 360 M 

Oet. 1, h. Bemmeiter, rent for 1 ending Sept. 80. 1876.. ■• 13S00 



BTJlIU BOAXD of HBU.TH. 

187S. 
Jan. 4, C N. Hewitt, salary Secretary, 1 ending Dec. 8t, 

1874 wseoo 

April 1, C. N. HewKt, saUry Secretary, i ending March 81, 

1876 1!6 00 

■■ " 38, C.N. Hewitt, expenses of Board 9TS5 

Jnne 80, C. N. Hewitt, aaUtry Secretary pending Jane SO, '7S 12S 00 

Jnly 3, C. N. Hewitt, expenses or Board 39103 

Oct. 1, C. N. Bewttt, saiaiy Seoreiary i endingSept. 80, 76 138 00 

Not. n, C. N.Hewitt, expenses of Board 8(6 M 



zedbyGoOglC 



CANIL SORTKT UKK BUPaitlOB AMI) ST. OROIX. 
187S. 

Ha; 18, L. K. Stann&n), ezpeofles In organiilag Board. «Dd 

ontflt 

" IB, L. K. StaoDard, expenses making pnllmlnnry anr- 
vey, tlncldentala) 

Aog. SS, L. K. SMDDard, expenses making pnllmiDUj sor- 



9U7M 

100 00 

1,614 ST 

ts,06ssr 



187S. 
Hnrdi *, Wm. Locbren, aerrlces Id Hcllratb caa«.. 
H^ 16, Wm. Lochren. services In Mcllntth cas«. . 



NOTAUBS VBKS. 

' 1676. 

Hnrcb 8, 3. C. Shaw, admlnisUrlDg o«ths, A^Jiunt Oensr- 

al'e Office 

" 6, 8herwoo<1 Hongb, administering ouhs, A()]nUtBt 

OenersI 'a Office 



KKS. J. K. LUCAS. 

tSTS. 
Apiil 9, Hrs. J. K. Lncas, o:i ac*l approprlitton 

" 80, Mrs. J. R. Lucas, on ac't sppTOprlatlon 

Ma; ST, Mrs. J. R. Lncas, on sc'V appioprlMIOD 

Jnlf S, Mrs. J. R. Lncas, balance orapproprlsUon.. 



1875. 
Jan. II 
March I 



INDITlDUAt.. 



, C. SwauBon, balance orspproprluton.. 960 00 

, C. A. Kuffee, appropriation 926 00 

M. 8. WUklnsoD, appropriation 800 CO 

. CiillahBn & Co., appropriation 600 00 

C. C. Miles, appropriation.^ M 00 

N. Wright, appropriation 8,836 83 

C. HJortsberg, sppruprlatlaD £600 

. A. E. Ball, appropriation SI B8 

I, Hsmsey & Monasnh, appropristlon 46 00 

I, B. H. Keynolds, approprintioa 100 00 

), C. M. Start, appropriation ISO 00 

i, A.M. Bodclltr, Appropriation 46000 

I, Jdo. Holler, appropriation 60 00 

, Pollock, Donaldson and Odgen, appropriation. .. 84 67 

, B. H, Barrltt, appropriation 8 60 

I ^t^J. Tober, appropilatlon 76 00 

, Amos Coggsweli, appropriation S16 16 

, C. Caill, appropriation 100 00 



zedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOB OF 8TATB. 1X7 

April 10, Joaml Printing Gonp«nr, &ppropcUU«i 8S00 

•' 18, J. F. WUIiama, appropriation ■ 12S00 

Umj 1. Jno. Orac«. approprlactoa 97 71 

JcuM S, D. H. Baldwlo, approprlaUon IBOOO 

Nor. SO, M. D. Kea;on, Secretary Board of EqaalUatlon '76 13S 00 



ROADB AMD BHIDaU. 

U7S. 
Jan. S, Hartlii Stove, Chippewa Blrer Bridge, Douglas Oo. fSOO 00 

" 6, Treaaorer Farlbanli coancf , Brash Creek Bridge . • SOO 00 

" IBi TrBaanrer Lac qai Parle county, Lac qui Parle 

coanty Bridge . SAO 00 

" 18, Tieaaorer Wright county, Flah Lake Bridge BOO 00 

Mareh 9, TTsaanrerOraDt county, Pumme de Terre Bridge. 300 OO 

" ai, Treasnrer Otter Tall couDty, Otter Tall Klver 

Bridge 289 97 

Jnne ID, Treasurer Moek«r county. Crow Klver Bridge .... SOO 00 

July S,Trea6DrerEandlyohlcoijnty,Kandljalil Lake Bridge SOO 00 

" 19, TreasDrer HcLeod county, Crow Klver Bridge.... 400 00 

Ang. S, B. D. Humttston, Wonlilngton and LoTerne road . 500 00 

" II, H. Spragne and others, BurnhaniBvllle and Sank 

Center Road SOO 00 

log. IS, A. E. Bnrdlck, Dead Coon Lake Bridge, Lincoln 

cotiDty SOOOO 

" IS, Wright county, Crow River Bridge, Wright county SOO 00 
" 19, W. U. BoultoD, St. FrauclD HIver Bridge, Sher- 
burne county SOO 00 

" 81, B. Coates and O. Cronk, Lake Irene Bridge, Dong- 
las ciiunty SOOOO 

Sept. S, JackHon conuty, Okabens Creek Bridge, Jackson 

county 500 00 

'■ IS, Swirtconoty, ChlppewaRlver Bridge, ijwirt couuty 900 00 

" IB, Swill county, Chippewa lllver Bridge, Swlfk coanty 400 00 

" 18, Todd county, Loog Pralilc Blver Improvement, 

Todd county 3,000 00 

" 18, Treasurer Wright county, Crow River Bridge, 

Wright county 60000 

" 32, Bedwocd couuty, Cottonwood River Bridge, Bed- 
wood county GOD 00 

" 80, W. W. SpaldlDg and N. Ball, Dnluth and Pigeon 

Blver Boad ' 970 70 

Oct. 28, H. Nelson, Bed Blver Bridge, Otter Tail county... 400 00 

" 36, Treasurer Swift county, Pomme de Terrs Biver 

Bridge 80000 

" Stf, F.Frilache, Fort KIdgely Creek Bridge 400 00 

Hot. 19, Ole Amandsou and others. Lake Oscar Bridge, 

DoDgtas county < 80000 

'- 80, L. Weymouth and others, Frazee City and Pelican 

Eaplda Road 400 00 

" 80, Treasurer Yellow Medicine county, Tellow Medi- 
cine Biver Bridge SOOOO 



IHTBKNAL mntOVKUBNT LAND FUND. 

UT8. 

Jan. 14, E. W. Dike, 98,000 U. 8. currency bonds at 117| ^,6Sa 00 

Interest ou same lOdsys 6 86 

Commlsalon 8 75 



zedbyGoOgle 



iUINttAL BBFOBT. 

80, E. W. Dike, «6.000 C. 8. 6 per ct. camatj tx 

at ISS| 

lDter«8t OD um« 10 d«;a 

Commlaaloii 



•>,8S«(W 

aiKXRAI. tCBOOI. VUHD. 

1875. 
ho. SI, B. W. Dike, Mcmed iDtereet on 110,000 Mo. boDdi •» «T 

'■ 21, B. W. Dike, cammlBSlODODtlO.OOO Missouri bonds 13 GO 

March S, Sundry conaUes, apportlonmuniSapt. Fab. Insb, 

March 1 4«,169I0 

" 9, T«llow Medicine couDtj, apportionment Supt. Pnb. 

Inst., March 1 IJ&W 

Oct. i, Sandrj cooalles, apporilonment Snpt. Pub. Inat., 

October* 1«,8T8 » 

Not. 80, E. W. Dike, lot. and Com. on 9SB,000 MUaoarl 6 

percent, bonds 114 19 



tlSI,T£S 66 



nnicAKXNT BCaooi. vtniD. 
1876. 

Jan. S1,E.W. Dike, 410.000 Mo. bonds at 95c 99,600 00 

jDlr !0, E. W. Dike, CSO.OOO Minn, bonds, I87S, at par.... EO.OOO 00 

Sept. S4, B. W. Dike, ClS.OOOMo. bond!, itti.O!! •1S,808 88 

Hot. 80, E. W. Dike, HG,Oao Mo. bonds, at tl.OSt 80,U8j 00 



■Note— 984.8S tranaftrred from Oeoeral to Permanent ftind. 

omuui. uNiTKnanr fund. 

1878. 

Jan. 4. PBHsQIbsoD, Older of Board 98,00000 

■■ 29, E. W. Dike, accToed Int. and Com. on bonda 

parchued 807 

" 21, E. W. Dike, acoroed Int and Com. on bonda 

porcbaecd 87 17 

March IS, Paris Qlbson, Order of Board 8,000 00 

April 2, Paris OlbHon, Order of Boaid 8,00000 

■< 17, Paria Gibson, Order of Board 4.00000 

May 4, Paris GlbsOD, Order of Boitrd 8,000 UO 

Jane 19, fans Olbeon, Order of Board S.OOOOO 

jDly 81, Paris Qlbson, Order or Boaid 8,00000 

Aug, 81, Paria Gibson, Order of Board 2,000 00 

Bept. 14, Parts GIbsou, Order of Board 8,OiO00 

Nor. 80, Paris Gibson, Older of Board 8,00000 



ion^Oi 
w. Int. 



80, B. W. Dike, Int. and Com. on |S,000 Mo. Bonda. . IS SI 



•80,056 H 



»Rlf AMKNT DMIVERBtTT. 

1878. 

Jan. 31, E.W. Dike, 912,000 MlMonrl Bonds, at gSc 911,400 00 

22, E.W. Dike, 81,000 Miasoorl Bonds, at 94c 04O00 

Bept. 24, E. W. Dike, •2,0<C Missouri Bundii, at (LOi^ •2,Ufill» 

Not. 80, B. W. Dike, «G,000 MUsonri Bonds, at tiM^.... S,1TS00 

91»,fi<6U 

•Hote— #6.49 tiansferrad Aram Qeneral to Permanent fkind. 



. DigiUzedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOfi OF STATE. 139 

INBBRUTK ASTI.ini. 
ISTfi. 

Jm. 14, B. W. Dike, 91,000 U. S. BoDda, 6 |>«r cent, cor- 

reocy, *t»1.17| il.lTe 00 

" 14, B. W. Dike, JO dftys' interest B 28 

" 14, E. W. Dike, commission 1 25 

Not. 80, B. W. Dike, tJ.OOO n. S. Bond, 6 per cent, cor- 

rency. at (1.26i .' l,MS 00 

" 80, B. W. Dike, 10 days' Interest 2 44 

" SO, E, W. Dike, commission 1 SS 



•3, 4SS 32 

umntEn om railroad BONi>a. 

1874. 
Dec. 30rW. P. CloDgh, 9 Conpons, '71, town or Spriog 

Valley. ■••■ 9680 00 

80, W. P. aonBb, interest on above IH 86 

1676. 
Jan. 26, E. W. Dike, tiro Conpons, one '78 and one '74, Al- 
bert Lea .'. 14000 

" 26. E. W. Dike, one ConpoD, '74, Grand Meadow 70 00 

" 2«, B. W. Dike, four Coupons, 74, Red Bock 380 00 

April 99, Treasurer Farlbanlt connty, Balance in Treasury 

appropriated to cnnnty 14 49 

*' 29, Treaeurer Fillmore county. Balance In Treasury 

appropriated to county 41 18 

" 89, Treasnrer Freeborn county, Balance In Treasury , 

appropriated to county 14S 87 

" 39, Treasurer Mower coauty. Balance In Treoanry 

appropriated to county 847 21 



t2,82S 66 

ABKUT ixai coMTicriOK or horsb thibtu. 

1876. 
Jane 28, C. 8. Ullne, Arrest and conviction one thief, Bam- 

sey county t200 OU 

Oct. 29, W. W. HnetlngtOD, Arrest and conrlctloB one 

tbier, Hennepin county SOO 00 

9400 00 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AMIfOAJ. BBFOBT. 



STATEMENT " N." 



Shotoinqthe condition of Savings SanJu organixed under the provis- 
ions of Chapter 28, Qaneral Laws of L867, and ChapUr 84, Qen^ 
oral Lam of 1875. 

£bn. 0. P. WhUcomb : 



SftTlngH S&nk of St. Paal, St. F&al, 

BetmeplD Conntj' SftvlDgs Btiolt, Minneapolis, 

StUlnater Savings Bank, Stllliraler, 

St. Crolz Valley SavingB Bank, Stillwater, 

Farmers and Hecbanlcs Savlags Bank, UlDneapalia, 

Ooodhne Coauty Savings Bank, Red Wlog, 

WlDona SarlDgs Bank, Wlsona, 

and have examined tbelr condition as shown by their books, have careftillT 
looked over their "Loans secared by Itortgages on Beat Estate" and "Bills 
Receivable," on the Bonndness of which, the secnrlty of depositors In great 
measure depends, and would report that wMle some of the banks named s;« 
not actlntc in strict compliance with the law In making their iDvestmenta, 
the; all appear to be doing business npoo a xaCj basis aed worthy of public 
GonOdence. All the banks, wlthooe eiception, claim to be acting nnder the 
law of 1867. 
UenwICb Hod detailed statement of the condltloD of the banks named. 
Bespectfhlly, 

T. H. Tixns. 

St. Paul, December IS, 1S7S. 
RSPOBT or THB cOKBrnoN or ooodhdk coontt BAvmaa bank, rkd wiko, 

DBCUIBKK IBT, 1S7B. 

LfabilUlet. 

Total deposits received to December 1, 18TS 910S,T28 78 

Amonnt paid depositors to December 1, 1875 68, lU 30 

Due depositors, December 1, 1876 •87,544 28 

Bills payable 1,600 00 

Interest account 1,6(1186 

Paid inbytmstees 1,060 00 



BtKitroe*. 

Loans secnred by mortgages on real estate f 24,290 79 

Bills receivable 10,79166 

Fnrnitnre and HztDTes. '• 669 TB 

Dae from banks 8,984 68 

Expense account 618 88 

Cash 1,240 41 



•41,696 18 

zedbyGoOglC 



ADDITOB OF BTATB. 131 

WtSOHA SATDTOB BANK, DBCBHBaiC IST, 197E. 

ToUl depoBllB received to December 1, ISTS MSieiS 98 

AmDimtdrftWDaQitD December 1, 1875 88,875 16 

Dae depoBtton to December 1, 187S 923,748 80. 

Dae C. J. Camp i,Q2S 64 

ProHtUldlOM 655,99 

Inteieat and commlaaioiu 1,846 28 

•81.174 61 

B«$ourw. 

LoKDB aecnred bj mortgages on real estate 938,896 00 

Bills receivable 1,899 00 

Expense 482 69 

Cash 1,003 08 

881,174 81 



uaNKBPIN COUMTY BATINOB BANK, MIKHBAPOUS, SBOBUBUt 11, 1875. 

Liabauie*. 

Capital stock 961,000 00 

Snrplns 9,000 00 

Bxctiange 469 66 

IntereHt 7,400 47 

Sn^penee scconnt 189 77 

Doe depositors on demand 66,766 70 

CerttOcstes or deposit 47,688 90 

Special deposits 24,000 00 

Dae banks 830 88 

CertlQed checks 277 SO 

Savings deposits 121,208 66 

Bills re-dtscoanted 10,00000 

f8S8,756 17 

Be$ouTett. 

Loans on mortgage •80,94197 

Bills discounted 178,110 61 

•264,058 68 

Heal estate 606 78 

Flxtnres building 1,137*8 

Flxtnres 1,860 94 

Profit and lose 108 60 

Eipeose account 806 26 

Revenne stamps 68462 

Error accoQot 85 IS 

Daerrom banks 68,816 86 

Cash OB band 31,897 01 

•888,768 17 



zedbyGoOgle 



132 AHNDAL BKFOBT. 

rABMXBB AMD lUCHUtlCB ti^.TUfOB BAKK, WHMKAFOLIS, DBC IS, 1871 
IMMUOM. 

Capital Stock paid In 119,649 76 

DueS&rlDgB Depositor* 17,968 SS 

Interest Accoont 8,419 61 

Excbange Account 44 88 

•69,991 09 



Bills BeceWable 9S4,44«!9 

Loans aecnred b7 Mortgages on Beat Estate 36,980 86 

Ci^ Orders 3,083 69 

Expeose Account 2,867 SO 

Fixtures 1,204 IS 

Cash 2,964*0 

$69,999 09 



8TILI.WATKB 8AVINQB BAME, DBC. 14, 1876. 

LMHlttia 

Due BaTlngs Depositors 916,193 37 

Aewurcet. 

Bills BeceWable «471 50 

Loans secured bj mortgages on real estate 6,479 83 

Interest Account 396 86 

Cash (deposited In Lambennan's National Bank) 8,946 10 



ST. OBOIZ SAVI!IOB BANK, DIC. It, I87S. 

LiabaUiet. 
SavlDgs Deposits 



«16,193 17 



Cash, deposited In the First National Bank, Stillwater tl4,869 SS 

DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



ADDITOB OF STATE. 

BAVIMaS BAMX OF 8T. FAOI., DMO. 1, 1876. 



Paid to DaposttoEB yeu ending D«G. I, 1876 168,663 79 

Doe I>eptMtb>n Dec Ist, 1876 (S&rings) •93,928 Bl 

Certlflcates of depoBlt 4,067 76 

Dne depoatUin on demand 16,26109 

Frofltand loas 4,812 68 

DoeBkoksand Baoken..- 1,46060 

CiVital Slock paid In 20,000 00 



Loans aecnred by mortgagee on real estate t8S,8T2 88 

BUIa recelrable ■ • • ■ 48,814 42 

CertUvates of lodebtednesB, Cltjr of St. Panl 16,863 [ 

St. Panl Elevator Bonds 4,000 00 

Pine CoUDt7 Bonds 2,700 00 

RealBsUte 10,687 76 

Dne Trota aanirj lodlTldoals— open acoonot 4,023 07 

Doe from Banks and Bankers 4,43311 

Doe from Brokers 1,276 81 

Expense Account 1,873 87 

OlBoe flxmrea 8,408 91 

Caah 16,687 6» 

«14l.»30 68 

Or" Bills BeceWable" tbe anm of 118,806 80 la In farm of an overdraft 
J. 8. Prince, secured by collaterals, viz. : Btock Certificates of Sc. Panl and 
Slonz City Railroad, and on which overdraft Interest Is competed and paid 
every nlne^ days. 



■miLUTH SAVQIOfl BUfK. 

LlabauUt. 

Capital Stock paid in 93fi,300 00 

Savings Deposits, Dec 1, 1874 •10,868 66 

BeceiptB to Dec 1, 1876 10,810 78 

•21,070 41 

Dlsbnrsementa to Dec. 1, 1876 16,180 37 

. •6,890 14 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



134 AXH0AL KBFOET. 

Oeneral Deposits, Doc. 1, 1874 M.SSl 9S 

Beceipla to Dec. 1, 1875 216,987 86 

(228,989 ea 

DlflbDrsementa to D«c 1, 187S 216.64182 

•7,298 01 

Certtflutes of Deposits S.BIO 00 

Bills PiTsbto 6.00000 

Interest ftod Ezchuige 1,874 SI 

Saspease BCcauDt 260 04 

20,823 70 

»4G,fi22 70 

Setoureti. 

Bills Discounted •12,125 64 

BoDda and Mortgage 10,7SI 14 

County snd City orders and Street Certidcates — 8,626 60 

Baal Estate 9,886 05 

Fnrnlture and Flxtaree , 2,629 58 

Revenue Stamps 120 98 

Expeoses 745 70 

Profit and Loss 2,098 61 

Due (torn otber banks 1,768 S2 

Cftsb 3,110 88 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AUDITOK C^ STATS. 



STATEMENT "O." 



Shooing the cmdition of Banking AitocicUiona organiiud uncfor the 
proviaiona of the GenenU Bating Laws of the State, on the first 
Monday of October. 1875. 



FUMBIU' ADI 


> UBOHANIOB' BUiK OV ST. PAC 


'L. 






„ 






8.4810* 
























•Itl.STt 97 



CaplUl Stock patd In «SO,000 00 

Doe to Banks 4S4 99 

Un« Depositors od demsod 8i,fllB 76 

nudiTided Proau 6,6ai2s 



aKBlf«M AHBHKUN BAHK, BT. PAUL. 

Be»t»tree*. 

Loans and Dtscoonto tSMfiSiVI 

Doa m>m Banks and Bankers 66,9S4 81 

Bank Building, Fa raltai«, etc fl.MS n 

Overdrafts 2,8SS «7 

Culiltenu 48,806 76 

Camnt EzpeDses a,GOT 81 

Dne from United State* Treasaref 8,000 00 

Sundry Debtors 1,7SI 43 

United States and other Bonds, par valne 70,678 67 

Pramlom on Bonds e,2S& 78 

»6SS,849 &fi 
LlabaUUa. 

Capital Stock paid In fSOO.OOO 00 

Snrpliw Fund 18,00000 

Dae Depositors 891,367 86 

Doe Banks and Bapkers 8,861 88 

filtU Payable 1,861 68 

Dndlvlded Frofltd 84,876 08 

688,849 98 

DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AHKUAL BBFOBT. 



crnr bamx of mikkkapolik. 



Lo»D8 *iid dlicoants 

Orerdraftfl 

Camnt expeoMe 

PereoDBl property 

TaxM 

U. S. ■tunpa 

Doe ttom banks 

Cull 



C»plttl stock •171,000 00 

SnrpliiB 10,260 00 

Dtacoant ADdexchaoge 17,817 09 

IndlTlduBl d«postt)i 184,04S» 



■^» OITT BASK. 



Bills ReceiTftble 998, 66 6 S4 

Orerdrsfts 1,317 14 

Besl eeute 6,8^8 >7 

BatldlDg acconut 12,8>8 79 

Fnniiture and flztnres 1,125 46 

Expenses paid 1,874 S6 

Taxes paW 422 81 

Dae from Banks C,4902S 

CMhonhaDd 14,476 77 

tlS6,970U 



Capital Stock 900,000 00 

Deposits 77,697 00 

UndiTtded proflia 7,769 40 

Dae Banks 1,(84 18 



DAKOTA OOUKTT, BASK Of HASTDrOO. 



Bills Recelrable «M,74Z01 

Miscellaneous Bonds and Orders 90 00 

Dne from Banks ane Bankers 17,668 70 

Cash OD Hand 11,411 $8 



zedbyGoOgle 



AODITOB OF STATE. 187 

LtabatUe: 

C4plUl paid la «BO,000 00 

UndWlded Proflts S,298 4S 

Certlfled Cb«olu 400 00 

Depoelta 68,108 96 



TABXEXa AND TBADKIU BUIK Or HASTIMOB. 

Baouret*. 

Dm from Banks 92S,661 SI 

SpMle 41 6T 

CublCema 843 GO 

Bills of BolTeot Banks sod U. 8. iune 14,105 29 

Louia and DlBconnta 80,469 61 

Overdrafu 464 48 

Banking Office and Flxtans 2,000 00 

86] 88 

•186,687 BO 



Capltsl 921,000 00 

Dae Depositors 110,411 67 

Dn« to Banks 82 26 

Interest and Bzcbanfe 1,144 08 



WAUCA OOOKTT BAKX, or WASKU. 

Baourcta. 

BUlB Receivable t87,8SQ69 

Overdrarts 17^ ^ 

Expense B,17i 44 

Cash to Bank 8,110 08 

Cuh witb Correspondenta 6,004 66 

BealEsUte 6,201 17 



•66,695 86 



Stock •86,000 00 

Deposits 18.068 44 

Dlicoont, Interest and Exchange 8,686 9! 



zedbyGoOgle 



ANNDAL BEFOBT. 



Betovreet. 

Bills Dlsconoted «se,741 60 

Faniitare and Fixtures S.S49 8S 

Expense 1!,S2S 62 

Tsxea 1,89212 

Rents.. ■■■■ 1.28189 

Bond Acconnt 69 00 

Due from otber Bante 42,768 68 

Cash 4,042*0 

9148.420 24 

LlabattUi. 

CapltAl «60,000 00 

DeposlU 42,898 SS 

loterest aod Excbauge 8,076 77 

Reveaue Stamps S3 00 

Dne other Banks 87,412 66 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ADDITOB or STATE. 



STATEMENT ' 



Showing Tovnu organixd and T^yyrted to thU offlw durirtg the year 
ending Nov. 80, 1875, wnder the provitiona of Chapter Id of Ote 
Ghnerat Statutes. 



TowDSblp. 


County. 


Organized. 


Brmdfbrd 




April 17, 1876. 
Jnly 28, 18TS. 
Jnly 28, 1876. 
Jnly 26, 1876. 
April 1. 1876. 
January E, 1876. 
Janoary 6, 1876. 












Martin 




















Jnly 27, 1876. 
July 19, 1876. 











*Nun« changed Ita>m Hermui. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



,.db,Googlc 



[Exxounvx DoomnDfT, No. 6.] 



ANNUAL REPOKT 



STATE TRBA8UKER 



MINNESOTA, 



FISCAL TEAS ENDING NOVEMBER 30tb. 1875. 



D,j.,.db,Googlc, 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



State or MnnnsOTA, 

TBSAeVBMB'B OfTIOK, 

St. Paul, December 1st, 



:, 1875. ) 



3b Htt Bxoettencit, 0. K. Davia, Coventor ofJUnnMota: 

Sib: — I hftve the honor to tninBmit herewith the report of the 
tnuiMOtioiis of this office for the flsoal year ending November 30th, 
1876. 

Very reepectftillj, 

E. W. DIKE, 

State Treasurer. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



,.db,Googlc 



EEPOKT. 



Stati or IfimnsoTA, \ 

Tbxasubkb'b Offiox, \ 

St. Path., December iBt, 1875. J 

3V> tke Stmorabte Smatt and ffoute of BepreMntativea . 

GnrtLKiCEN :— In obedience to the reqairementa of law, I hsre the 
honor to aabmit my &nna&l report of the tran^Mtiona of this otBoe 
4br the flacol year ending November SOth, 1676. 

The receipts were m followa : 

Tor rervnoe Amd gg^f j42.gj 



Vor Interest flmd.. 



46,IS9 H 



For sinking ftind 28,684 78 

For 8tat« Inatltntlons fttnd 23S T02 60 

For pennanent school fQnd ,. gj gj^j jq 

For general school ftind 2qq 392 74 

For permanent nnlTeraltr ftind 10 gij 50 

For general nnlrerallj land 18 870 38 

For Internal IniproTement fluid 5,0^7 93 

For Internal Improvement Itnd Aind 13,634 IS 

For Interest on ndlroad bonda Aind 524 88 

For Inebriate Mjlnm ftiDd ifiss to 

■T"**' •980,604 IS 

BalsncelD treasnij December lat, 1874 188,180 91 

Total receipts •1,168,788 07 

Hie disbursements were as follows : 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



6 ANNUAL BBPORT. 

Prom reTsnpe ftind t40C,0S6 89 - 

from Interest fQnd 88,600 00 

Vrom SUte instltnttoDB ttand 960,U& 98 

From permaaent icbool ftand 77,996 00 

Tiom general school fond % 190,SOS 39 

From permftDent anlveralt; find 7,660 00- 

Trom general nnlTeraltr ftind 11,0S8 04 

From Internal ImproremeDt ftind 1S,7S8 U 

From Internal ImproTemont land And 9,888 06^ 

From Interest on railroad bonds land a.SSi 65 

From Inebriate asylnm ftind 1,488 SS 

Total .s (1,088,E0» 78 

LeftTing balance In treasury, December 1st, 1875, belonging to- 
the Mveral funds as foUowa : 

Dr. Cr. 

forevenne Amd #19,176 96 

To tnterest Amd |S9,1W 9t 

To slDklnc fdnd 8t,0SS 96 

To State Inatltattons Aiod. 48,768 6» 

To pennsneDt school Ibod ....-- 11,148 61 

To general acbool ftind 17,888 07 

To permanent uQlversltr ftand 4,687 91 

To g«Q«r«l unl vers Itj fond 4,68S SI 

To. Internal improrement ftud 1,101 84 

To iDteroal Imprarement land fDnd 4,117 68 

To inebriate asjlnm fDnd Dr. |167 SS 

Total Dr.»I9,6ti 6> «149,S80 17 

Dednct amoants overdrawn 19,884 88 

Actual balance in treaanrj 1180,146 1» 



BeeeipU. 

From connty tTeunreia, see statemeDt "A" #806,919 00 

From miscellaneoDB aoarces, see statement "B"- •• 48,128 81 

Transferred from Interest fkind 24,168 06 

Balance In treasary December 1, 1671 80,116 61 

Total t409,7SS 19 

DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



8TATB TBBUDKSH. 7 

Ditbwrtemtttti. 

Paid BUta wditor'f womuta ^4^ j^ ^ 

LMTlDgKD oTerdraftlD tnaaarj I>ec«mberl, ISTS.. $l»,i78 06 

ThU fact is due to the annBnally large apprppriatiom made last 
winter, and the redaction in amount of taxes collected, there being 
I11M70.77 less than In 1874. 

To meet the warrants drawn on this ftind, the treasurer has bor- 
rowed temporarily, from the sinlcing aDd other flinds, which the law 
allows him to do. 

niere were received dnriog the fiscal year of 1876 : 

from InUrMt on 8Ute deposits 9C,78S 8S 

From fees received br liunruce camnOsstoner {,977 oo 

homuls of ipectal laws .- BS 00 

T«tal 111,806 68 

iSTutBST nmu. 

Saeeipts. 

From county traaiorers, see statemeut "A." #ie,SS9 64 

BaUnce In Treuory December Ist, 18T4 40,980 68 

Total $87,189 87 

DUburaementa. 

Fsld State auditor's warrant 988,600 00 

Tnutsferred to rerenae ftind St,l6S 06 

Total #67,766 06 

Learlng balance In treaaoiT DeMmber Ist, 1876 t39,U6 91 

BiKKino rusD. 

Btcetpta. 

rrom comity treaenren, see autement "A" 438,081 78 

Trom mlscellaneou aonrcas, see statemeut "B". 8,800 00 

Balance in treasury Decembei lat, 1874 6,890 S8 | 

Total •83,088 96 

LeaTlDg balance to treaaory December 1st, 18TS #83,088 06- 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



fi AmrUAL BBPOBT. 

The Binking ftmd now holds the following secuiitiea : 
HiBSOorl 6 per «nt. cnrrency hondB ■ |«,000 00 

STATR niRITOTIOirS FDMD. 

BtceipU. 

From county treuaren, see autement "i" m,SU 78 

From mlHeUaoeoDB sonrcea. see statemeiit "B". U8.S4S 72 
Balwice In treasniy December l8t, ISTi 68,616 13 

, Total •aw^Bises 

Ditbwraements. 

Paid Bute Anditor-B w«rrant« WW.BM 98 

Truufarred topermui«ntnnlTeraltT 1S,000 00 

Tnuuftrredto general milverilty 19,000 00 

Total WM^eWSS 

LeavlDK balance In Treasury December iBt, 18TG |4S,TG8 N 

There were collected during tiie fiscal year of 1675 : 

From railroad companlea ^ ♦106,878 U 

From telegnqth comp&nlei 7*0 40 

From loaorance companies ..-.-•• 2S,7G0 21 

•188,8611 n 

PKRHAMENT SCHOOL WXJKB. 



From coonty treaaarers, see atatement "A" t48,48T 69 

From mlBcellaneons aoorcea, see statement "B"- M,101 01 

Balance In Treasnry December lat, 187i 6,646 91 

ToUl 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



BTATB TRBABDBBB. 9 

Jknuarr 18, paid tOi f 10,000 Mteaonrl 6 per cent. 

cnrrenc; bonds t 9|B00 00 

July 1, paid for |30,000 HlimesoU 7 per ceat. 

lOMiof 1878 90,000 00 

Sept. 34, pttid for #13,000 MlsaoaH S per cent. 

cturencT bonds 13,970 00 

Hot. 80, paid for $88,000 Mlasonrl 8 par cent. 

currency bonda 86,925 00 

Total $77,995 00 

LearlDg balance in Treaanry December 1st, I8TS tll)9U 81 

The following seonrities are now beld hy the p«rmaneat school 
flmd: 

UlnDeaoia 7 per cent, bonda, loan or 1887, (cnirencyj * 9100,000 00 

Hlnaesola 7 per cent. b«nda, loan of 1888, (currency) 100,000 00 

HlDoesote 7 per cent, bonds, loan of 1889, (currency) 60,009 00 

If lonesota T per cent, bonds, loan of 18711, (currency) 285,000 00 

U. S. Ba, bonda of 1881, registered, (gold) 10,000 00 

U. S.5-Z0 bonds, registered, (gold] 77,800 00 

U. 8. 8 per cent, currency bonda, registered 855,000 00 

Mlasonrl 6 percent, currency bonds 989,000 00 

QEKESAL BCHOOL FUND. 

Receipts. 

Prom county treasurers, see statement "A,". tlSB.fiOS 44 
FrommiBceUsuttousaoarceB,seestAtemenC "B," 78,788 80 
Balance in Tressoiy December Ist, 1874 12,796 62 

Totnl 1918,088 M 

Diibureemtnts. 

Paid State Auditor's warrants #195,905 99 

Leaving balance In Treasury December let, 1875 #lT,e88 07 

or the ftbove balance the sum of $1,989 99 belongs to the appor- 
tioned acfaool fand oa outstanding warrants. 
2 



JigiLizedbyGoOt^Ic 



ANNDAIi RBPOBT. 



From GOOD t7 treunrers, see' aUtement "A." %8,SiQ 08 

Srom mlacellaneoQS sonrces, sea atAtement "W. 7,297 iS 

Traaafer from 8ut« iDstltatlons taaA 13,000 00 

Balance In treasarr Decomber Ist, 1S74 1,870 U 

Total »M,18I M 

Diabwtemente. 

JannaiT 13, paid for tl9,000 HIaaoari 6 per caat. 

curranoT bonda 911,400 00 

January 18, paid Ibr tl,000 Missouri S per cent. 

cnrreDcy booda MO 00 

September 34, paid for t3,000 Hlssanrl S per 

ceoL carrenc? bonds 8,0M 00 

November BO, paid for #S,000HlBsourl 6 per cent. 

cnrrencj bonds S,175 00 

Total tlS,HOOO 

Leaving balance in treaaorr December lat, 1S7S |4,6S7 9* 

Hie permanent DDiversity fbnd now holda the foUowiDg securities i 

U. 8. e per cent, carrencj bonds registered feS.OOO 

Hlnnesou T per cent, carrenc; bonds, loan or 187& 15,000 

HUsoarl 6 per cent, currency bonds 88,000 

OIHSBAL UHITKRSIXT FUKP. 

Sf^iplt, 

Tiom connty treasnrets, see statement "A" tlO,3B9 88 

Trom mlacellaneons soorces, aeeatatement "B" 8,970 80 

Balance In treasury December 1, 1874 3,828 S8 

Total •10,698 88 

DMntriemeatt. 

Paid State auditor's warrants tll,08S 04 

Leaving balance In treasury December 1 , 187S 9 4,8>S tt 



DigiLizedtoCoOgle 



STATE TBEASURBB. 11 

niTKBlUX IMPBOTUIKKr WUXD. 

BeceipU. 

From mUcallAneoDs aonrces, tee statemeot "B"-...t S.OGT 88 
Balance Id treuury December 1, 1874 10,768 IS 

Total «1S,S86 08 

DMuraemenU. 

Paid State aodltor'a warrants .' 118,783 M 

Lea*lug balance lo treasDrr December 1, 1876 • 3,102 8t 

DITtBMU. IHFBOrBKEMT LAUD TDMD. 



from connty treaanren, aee statement "A" t 7,e&7 18 

From mlaceUaneooB soarc«8, see statement "B" 4,928 97 

Balance In tieuar; December l, 1874 1,8S6 44 

Total <l8,9fO 69 

Ditbvriements, 

Janury 11, paid tor 18,000 C. 8. 6 per cent, cor- 
renqr bonds, registered 9S,S89 81 

November SO, paid tor 96,000 U- 8. 6 per cent, 
cnrrency bonds, registered 6,298 4B 

ToUl fS-StS OC 

LaavlDg balaow In Treasnry December 1, 1876 tt,117 68 

The internal ioiproTemeDt land fund now holds the following 
Mcnritiea ; 

U. 8. 6 per cent, cnrrency bonda, registered. ^10,000 00 

DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



18 ANNTTAL BBFOBT. 

raTKBBBT ON BULSOAD BONDS rDKD. 

From coniitjr treuarera, see statemeiit "A" fl,79T G7 

Balance In Treuni7, Becember 1, 1874 S21 98 

Total t8,S22 69 

Diaburtements, 

Paid SUte Aadttor'i warrtDU 4S,S2S ce 



Prom mlscelBDeoQfl sonicas, see statemeDt " B"- $720 00 

From county treasarera, aee statement "C" SOG 60 

Balance In Treasury December 1,1874 764 80 

Total 12,380 80 

Di$buraetMiU9. 

Jannary 11, paid for 91,000 U. 8. 6 per cent, cur- 
rency bonds tl, 1T9 68 

KoTember SO, paid for 91,000 D. 8, 6 per cent, 
currency bonds 1,868 S9 

Total 92,488 S2 

Learlng an OTer draft In tlie treasaiy December 1, 1875, of. . 1G7 92 

The ioebriate asylum fund now holds the following secarities : 

XJ. 8. S per cent, currency bonds registered 918,000 00 

The following table shows the State collection of taxes fhim 1860 
to 1876, viz. : 

Tax coUected In 1860 9111,918 SI 

Tax collected In 1881 100,188 S3 

Tax collected In 1863 188,001 73 

TaxcolUcted In 1868 177,170 48 



JigiLizedbyCiOOgle 



STATE TBEASUBTB. 18 

Tkx collected in 1864 196,416 n 

Tu collected Id 1866 218,988 8S 

Ttxcollftcted In ises 262,646 98 

Tuc collected In 1867 sei),44T 87 

Tiz collected In 1868 278,186 W 

Tax collected In 1869 818,568 86 

Tax collected in 1870 886,460 88 

Tax collected Id 1871 410.069 86 

Tax collected Id 1879 418,388 71 

Tax collected In 1878 487,086 60 

Tu collected In 1874 676,164 66 

TucoUecled lnl876 461,788 88 



FBOHTIES RELIXF LOAK. 

By Joint resolntion of the last Legislatare, the State Treasurer 
waa authorized to borrow temporarily for the use of the revenue 
i^nd, a enm of money not to exceed eeventy-flve thousand dollars 
(175,000.) A loan of fifty thousand dollars, for the purchase of 
seed wheat was n^otiated with the First, Second, and Merchants' 
National Banks of St. Fanl, the State paying interest at the rate of 
seven per cent, per annum. July Srst the revenue rund was enabled 
to repay this loan. The interest on the loan was nine huudred and 
r<Hliy-8even dollars and ninety-four oenta (947.94-100,) which sum 
was paid from the interest received on daily balances of State fhnds 
deposited in National Banks. 

UmtEWTA STATE BAILROAD BONDS. 

1 would respectfully call the attention of the Legislature to these 
bonds. Believing that States, equally with individuals should hon* 
estly and Justly redeem their solemn pledges when made, as a citi- 
zen of Hinnesota and member of the State administration, I 
would respectfully recommend that this Legislature take some 
action looking to their eventual payments in a just and equitable 
manner. The people by their votes and the Legislatare by their 
acts deliberately entered into a. contract by which the State of 
Minnesota guaranteed the payment of these bonds. There was no 
fk'aud or illegal aet in their issue and delivery by Governor Sibley. 
Now, as representative men and law makers of the iitate, is it not 
your duty to show by your acts that you believe in honesty, and 
desire that justice be done, and thus remove the foul stain of repu- 
diation which now blights the fair fame of the State of Minnesota. 



zedbyGoOgle 



14 ANpDAL REPORT. 

IirrBBUT OH DEPOSITS. 

The Treasarer has received during the pa^t year, aa intereat os 
deposit of State flinds, six thoasand six haodred and eighty-four 
dollars and seTeuty-four cents, it6,684.74-100,) making the whole 
flam received on State deposit flroni April Ist, 1873, to December 
1st, 1875, twenty-two thousand nine hundred and seveuty-nine 
dollars and forty-one cents, ((22,979.41-100.) 

The current expenses of the Treasury department during tiie 
■ame period has been thirteen thousand eight hundred and thirty* 
six dollars and flfty-soven cents, (|13,83A.5^-1000 leaving a balance 
in fiiTor of the IVeaaury department of nine thoasand one hundred 
and foHy-two dollars and eighty-four cents, ($9,142.84-100.) This 
gratifying exhibit shows that this office under the new system has 
become a source of revenue instead of a burden to the tax-payers 
of the SUte. 

In closing my official duties as State Treasurer, and my connec- 
tion with the State administration, I desire to Uiank my brother 
officers and assistants of the former and present administrations, 
for the many favors and courtesies received at their hands. 

I woald sincerely thank Governor Austin for the honor conferred, 
and the confttlence implied in appointing me Treasurer, to r^orm 
and restore confidence in the admialBtration of the Treasury de- 
partment. It is a matter of congratulation to state tiiat the 
reforms then inangnrated are now foUy established. They have 
been approved by the people, and confirmed by legislative enact- 
ments. His exoellency. Governor Davis, in bis annual message of 
1875, has added his official testimony, in saying : " The Treasury 
has been conducted with that skill and integrity by which the 
administration of the present Treasurer has restored canfldence in 
that department of the State government." 

Having completed the task required of me, and restored public 
confidence in this department, I now deliver up its cares and respon- 
sibilities, having the conviction that I have endeavored to do my 
duty in caring for and managing the ftinds entrusted to me, in the 
interest of the State, and for the sole benefit of the people to whom 
they belonged. 

All of which, with the tables hereto annexed, are respectniUy 
submitted for your consideration. 

E. W. DIKE, 

Treasurer of State. 



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ANKUAI. RBPOST. 



STATEMENT " C." 



RtteipU from Ctunty TrtamT«r» /jrf /n«6rt'aie Atyhim Fund. 

Kuaes or Conotlea Amoont. 

HenneplD «H0 00 

Hower 160 00 

OttertaU 10 00 

Hn« flO 00 

Pope 10 00 

Rock 26 50 

Total tSOfi 60 



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8TATB TBBAflUBBB. 



EXI>ENr>ITTJRE8 

PVom Deoemhar lat, 1874, to Ifowmbtr iOth, 1876. 



1, 187S •908*8 

8«iiinK SUtalwda, 187S I 00 

Voel and llgtita, 18TS 140 43 

IhUatli Harbor, 1878 830 80 

Co. ■' B" Sd Minn.. Vola., 18T8 U » 

Aodltor"! extra Clark's salarj, 1879 at UO 

AasUtut Janltor'a salarr. 1874 47 00 

Baprenw Court Report, Vol. SO, 1874 1,300 00 

iDterast on loans, 1S74 10,800 00 

Sta(« Board of Health, 1874 136 00 

Kent of ArMna), 1874 ISC 00 

riali CommlMlonera, 1874 100 00 

Ooremors BSlsrj, 1874. 177 9o 

Secrotar j> aalary, 1874 ISO 00 

Aoditoc'a and Laod CommlHloner'a salary, 1874 S08 88 

Treaaarer'H aaUT7, 1874 Ml 66. 

Attome; General's salary, 1874 1S6 00 

Adjutant General's do t 136 00 

Snpt. labile InstniGtlou do 416 69 

S. R. Commiaaloner's do 8,668 96 

IoSBranc« Commlsaloner'B aalarj, 1874 166 «6 

librarian do 100 00 

Oorernor'a private secretary's do ISB 00 

AtslBtant secretary'* do 88 S3 

StatistlcUD'a do M SS 

Andltofs Chief aerk'e do 126 00 

Depnty Tr«aanrer"B do U6 00 

Land Clerk's do 100 00 

Auditor's extra clerk's do S80 00 

Pnbllc I ostmctlon clerk's do 100 00 

Attorney General's clerk's do 50 00 

Janitor's do 88 88 

NiKht Watch, Eoglmeer and Fireman's salary, 1874 198 00 

Military Storekeeper's salary, 1874 100 00 

Clerk Snpreme Cnnrt, salary 1874 STfi 00 

Reporter 8 nprsme Court, salary, 1874 160 00 

Marsbal 8 Dpreme Conrt, salary, 1874 83 oo 

ftcecntive contingent. 1874 6Bi 09 

Auditor's contingent, 1874 S6 40 

Treainrer's contingent, 1874 81 80 

Attorney General's 00 ntlngeot, 1874 368 SO 

Pnbllclnstractl on contingent, 1874 88 t6 

Library conttngent, 1874 3 06 

Snpreme Conrt Gontlngent, 1874 IBt 10 

Salaries of Judges, 1814 6,626 00 

Shertff'a fond, 1871 60 7G 

Sddlers' Orphans, 1874 8,888 E2 

Insane support, 1874 11,000 00 

Prison current expenses, 1874 4,000 00 

Second Normal School support, I8T4 760 00 

Third Nonntl School snpport, 1874. 1,000 00 

Prison Bntldlngs, 1874 1,860 07 

UwUbrarr, 1874 104 1» 

Pael and Ugbts, 1874 40 08 



zedbyGoOglC 



50 



ANHOAL REPORT. 



ExprMSRDd Hllaftge, 187( 7X 

Rellefto Settlers odN. P. R. B. Landa, 1874 6U0 do 

Belief to Immlgnuita, 1871 lis TS 

SalllDC SUte Luids, I8T4 1,028 H 

Selllnfc UitvsniQ' Lutda, ISTt 541 85 

HiBtorlul SoctetT, 18T4 118 U 

AgrlCQltnnl Societies, 18T4 57 14 

VlnoDB ft St. Peter Rkllroid, (versne Bltke,) 1874 918 00 

Bent of QoverDor's Hooae, 1674 66 74 

UDlTenlty, RelmbnrMmeat or Pennaaeut Vnsd, 1S74. S40 00 

tJUtlonery for Le|UIatlre and State Offlcen, 1874 SI 

LeglsIitlTe Fnnd, 1875 8S,18B U 

LeKlelatlve Fond, (deflclency 1874) 1875 S1» 4t 

Oovernor'B mImtj, 1876 tfiti K 

SecTetar?-!! aalarj, lt7B 1,650 00 

Auditor's and Land CommlsBloner's lalarr, 1870 2,S9i 68 

Tremanrar'fl salarj. 1875 8,908 85 

Attorney OeDeral'B Hkluj, 1875 1,875 00 

Aiijatant General's do 1,876 00 

Siipt. Public InBtractlon do - S,M1 6> 

Bailroad CommlsBloner'B do 8,188 84 

InaniaDce CommlsBioner'B do 1,SS8 SO 

GoTemor'B PrlTite Secretarir'B ealary, 1875 1,875 00 

ABBiBtant Secretary and SUUsttclan's salaiy, IS7S I,&17 67 

Andltor's Chief Clerk's salarr. 1876 .>. 1,876 00 

Depot; Treaaurer's Balaiy. 1876 1,875 OO 

Lwidaert'B Bo 1,10000 

Auditor's Extra Clerk'B do 781 15 

Public Instrnctlon Clerk's do 1,100 00 

OoTernor'B Clerk's do 9S4 96 

Insamnca Clerk's do 916 66 

Attorney Oeoeral'a aerk's do 150 OO 

Librarian's do 1,100 00 

Janitor's do 1,000 00 

Nlgbt Watcb, Engineer aad Fireman's salary, 1675 1,7H 00 

Asalatant Janitor's salary, 187S 871 00 

HUltary Storekoeper'a do 866 66 

Clerk Supreme Court do 1,875 00 

Keportir Soprema Court do 5H) 00 

Harshal Supreme Court do 300 00 

BxacnUve conUngeet, 1875 9,861 St 

Secretary's eontlDgent, 1878 80> 81 

Andltor's coDtlntent, IS7B 474 70 

Treasurer's contingent, 1875 108 50 

Attorney Oenersl's contingent, IS70 714 60 

Adjutant Qeneral's contlDgent, 1876 160 II 

Attorney Qeneral's costs, Ac., 1875 515 Ot 

Public InstmcHoa contingent, 1878 >«• 49 

Library contiugent, 1876 800 00 

Supreme Court contingent, 1878 848 78 

Soldier's Orphan's, 1875 16,041 88 

Prison Carrent Bzpensea, 1875, 89,088 81 

luane Support, 1874 67,500 00 

Deaf, Damband Bltud aapport, 1878 98,000 00 

Belbrm Sdtool support, 1876 97,000 00 

First Normal School support, 1875 10,750 00 

Second Normal School support, 1878 9,800 00 

Third Normal fleboo) support, 1878 7,000 00 

tInlTerBlty8npport,ie76 19,000 00 

Maries of Jndges, 1876 86,860 91 

Salaries of Jndges, (ueflclency 1874)1875 1,866 68 

SberifTi Fnnd, 1875 8,000 00 

Law Library, 1875 996 40 

Printing, A dnrtising, and Binding, 1875 91,880 00 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



ITATB TBBABCRBK. 51 

Prtotlng, AdvertlilDg, and Bindlnit, (deficiency 1871)1876.... 8,195 81 

PrlnttDg Laws In If evipapeiB, 1876 7,917 60 

Printing Laws <n NewspA^en, (deflclencj 1874)1876 6,383 30 

AepKlra of Capitol, 18TG 8.W6 60 

BepalTB of Capttol (defldencr 1874) 187ff 1,600 00 

aelUng HUteLanda, 1876 3,749 86 

Vneland Llgbta, 1876 8,766 79 

Bxpresa and Mileage, 1876 684 87 

Hiatoiical fioelety 1,787 87 

Agrtcaltaral Soclettea, 1876 • 3.883 86 

Cenaaa, 1876. '. 16,091 GI 

Bent of Qovernor'a House, 1876 TSS S3 

Bent of Arsenal 876 00 

Bute Board of Health, 1876 1,1)0 87 

Canal Barvey (Lake Superior and Bt. Croix) 1876 2,063 S7 

VroQtter Relief (seed wheat,) 1676 60,000 00 

Frontier Belief (dlatresa,) 1876 10,000 00 

From lar Relief (relmbnnement,) 1876 ; . . . 12,800 00 

Intareaton Loans, 18T6 16,800 00 

Prlaon Bnlldlngs, 1876 V7,t08 00 

Prlaon Gas Ftzturea, 187B 369 00 

PilaoD Reservoir, 1676 4,656 DO 

Prison Orcn, 187S 368 SI 

Prison Warden's Honse, 1876 100 00 

Prison Contingent, 1878 390 SO 

Insane BnlldlDgs, 1876 30,800 00 

Deaf, Dnmb and Blind Balldlnga, 1875 7,000 00 

Vntverslty BDUdlQgB, 1876 6,000 00 

tJnlTeralty, Heating and FDmlshlnR, 1876 3,860 00 

University, Reimbursement of Permaneot Fond 1876 13,000 00 

First Soimal Bchool support, (deficiency 1874)1876 4,771 00 

Tblrd Normal School Heating, (deflciency 1873,) 1876 8,100 00 

Fitting Secretary's Booms, (deficiency 1874,) 1876 698 16 

Fnmlslklng Supreme Jndges Boom, 1876 160 00 

Leglalative Certlflcate No. 378, 1876 100 00 

Legislative Certificate No. 368,1876 9 60 

LeglslatiTe Committee on Priaoa, 1876 63 10 

L^lstatlvs Comtalttee vlsltlDg Insane, 187S 83 DO 

Senata Investigating Committee (McUratit) 1876 9,464 61 

Contested Election Cases, 1876 8,047 SO 

Hassenger's Salary 1876 130 00 

Law Library (binding,) 187S 160 OO 

Printing Heaaages, 1876 8TI 60 

Printing Prison Report, (deflciency I87S.) 1871 116 OO 

FriBtlDg Report, HcIlrstA Committee, 1876 976 38 

Printing Fapsr. 1876 8,804 41 

Stationery for LMlslatlve and State OOcsrs, 1876 3,000 OO 

~ Urlng and Indexing Lawa, 1876 300 OO 

mating Capitol, (deficiency 1874), 1876 878 66 

Training Schools and InatltQtea, 1876 3,446 84 

Oaologtcal Snrrey, 1876 2.000 OO 

risb Commissioner's, 1876- 1,000 OO 

Mansgers Centennial Bzhlbltion, 1876 807 98 

Watonwan Connty, {arrest of mardarera,) 1875 600 00 

Wadsna County (trial of Indians) 1876 33t 1* 

Amat and conviction of Horse "Thlevaa, 187B 400 00 

Christian Swanson, 1874 60 OO 

CUppewa Blver Bridge, (Donglaa Coon^,) 1874 SOI 00 

Braab Crsek Bridge, 1874 600 00 

LseqnIParleBlver Bridge, 1874.. 850 00 

Fish Lake Bridge, 1874 800 00 

Pomrae ds Terre River Bridge, 1874 300 OO 

OttsrtaU Rlvar Bridge, 1874 39» 97 

St. Fnnds Blver Bridge, 1874 300 00 



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52 ANNIIAt. BBFORT. 

Ctitpp«w« RlTflT Bridge, (Swift CotUtT) 1874... ■■■- lOO 00 

Fan Rldgely Craek Bridge, ISM ; 400 00 

Wm. Lochreo, 1876 1,000 00 

Dwlght M. Baldwin, 18TS 160 00 

i. p. Williams, 1875 133 00 

Jobn Holler, 1874 50 00 

M. 8. Wilkinson, 187B 800 00 

Cturles Hjorlxberfc, 1876 26 00 

E. H. Barrett, 18T6 8 SO 

E. E. Ball, 1876 85 38 

Pollock, Donaldson & OKd«n, L876 3f BT 

C, C, Ulles, 187B S4 00 

C. A. Rnffee. 1876 92G 00 

Ramsej & Monssh, 1876 46 00 

C. H. CitaTt, 1876 130 00 

Korman Wright, 1876 8,623 83 

Amos Coggswell, 1876 316 IS 

M, J. Toiler, 1875 75 00 

Dr. B. U. Beynolda, IS76 100 00 

John Grace, 1876 97 71 

Mrs. J. B. Lacas, 1870 600 00 

C. Carll, 1878 100 00 

A. M. Kulcllff, 1875 450 00 

Jonmal Printing Company, 1876 66 00 

Callagban & Co., 1876 500 00 

Notaries Fees, 1876 96 75 

Chippewa Biver Bridge, Swift Co., 1376 400 00 

Crow Blver Bridge, MoLeod Co., 1876 400 00 

Lake Irene Bridge, Dong) as Co., 1876 300 00 

Crow BlTer Bridge, Meeker Co., 1876 300 00 

Pommede Terre Rtver Bridge, Swift Co., 1876 800 00 

Red BWer Bridge, Ottertall Co., 1875 400 00 

Okab«na Creek Bridge, Jackson Co., 1876 600 00 

Kandiyohi Lake Bridge, Kandiyohi Co., 1876 600 00 

Crow River Bridge, Wright Co., 1875 300 00 

Cottonwood River Bridge, Redwood Co., 1876 800 00 

Dead CoonLakd Bridge, Lincoln Co., 1875 SOO 00 

Crow BWer Bridge, Wright Co., 1S76 600 00 

Worthlngton and Lorerne Road, 1876 150 00- 

Dalnth and Pigeon River Road, 1876 970 70 

Long Prairie Blver Improvement, Todd Co., 1876 3,000 00 

Frasee City and Pelican Rapids Road, 1875 400 00 

BnrnhamsYllle and Sauk Centre Boad, 1876 5<)o 00 

Interest on Railroad Bonds, 1876 2,831 E5 



Total •739,765 17 

Permanent School Fnnd Loan, 1873 tSO.OOO GO 

permanent School Fond, Mlasoori 6 par cent. 

Bonds 57,996 00 

General School Fund, Apportionments 196,031 35 

General School Fnnd, Expenses PnrchastDg 

Bonds 184 04 

Permanent Ualrerslly Fnnd, Mlasoar) 8 pet cent. 

Bonds 7,280 00 

General University Fnnd, nnlverslty Support... 11,000 00 
General University Fond, Expenses Parchaslog 

Bonds «» 04 

Internal Improvement Land Fond, U. S. 6 per 

cent. Currency Bonds 9,SS8 OG 

Inebriate Asylum Fond, U. S. 6 per cent. Cai^ 

nency Bonds 4,438 23 



Total $1,088,609 78 

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lEzKCirTivK l>ocoMieNT, Ro. 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

or TBI 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, 

FOK TBI 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1875. 

TO THE GOVERNOR. 



8AINT PAUL: 

THE PIOHBKR-PUtn COMPINT. 
187*. 



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REPORT. 



State of Miknebota, 

Attorhet G-ENER\L'a OrriCMf 

December 1, 1875. 

To Hit Exc^leticy Cuahman K. Davis, Qovemor of Minnttota : 

8iB : — I have the boDor lo submit to your Excellency my second 
annual report, showing the number, character, and result of the 
actions, civil and criminal, pi-osecuted or defended by me in behalf 
of the State for the year ending November 30, 187fi. To my 
report is appended the customary tabular statement of otfenses 
reported to this olQce by the County Attorneys of the several 
counties of kbe Slate, purporting to show the number, character 
and result of all criminal cases prosecuted by them during the 
current year, together with the cost of each of said prosecutioDS 
to tlie county or State, and the amount of fines or penalties col- 
lected. 



The State vs. John Vadnais. 

Indictment for assault with intent to commit rape. Found 
guilty of simple assault. Judgment of the District Court affirmed, 
and sentence pronounced directed to be executed. 

The State vs. Thomas New. From Hennepin County. 

Indicted for the embezzlement and n-audnlent conversioD of 
money under section 23, chapter 95, of the General Statutes, and 
judgment of the conrt below affirmed. It was held in this case, 
among other things, that such indictment properly accuses tho per- 
son indicted of the crime of larceny ; also, that a verdict finding 
the value of the property embezzled at a given sum is consistent 
and proper. Evidence that the ofibose charged was committed 



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4 ANMDAL RBFOST. 

before the timQ laid m tho inlicttn^at U ojiii>otQat, and is not 
excluded by section 23, chapter 103. Where there has been an 
actual embezzlement and fVaadnlent appropriation of monej 
intmsted to a servant for delivery — a demand and refusal are not 
necessary to constitute a conversion of the same. 

Hie State vs. Emit Munch. From Ramsey County . 

Two indictments for embezzling State funds, while Treasurer of 
State. One of the indictments held sufficient and th e other insuffl- 
cient. The case remanded to the District Court for farther pro- 
ceedings, according to the views given in the opinion of the court. 

It was decided in this case, that the number of the Judicial dis- 
trict is no part of the title of t^e District Conrt, and if errone- 
ously given may be rejected ; that it wa« competent for the Legis- 
lature to declare the improper neglect or rofiHal to pay over the 
State funds, according to the provisions of law, embezzlement ; 
that au indictment ^^{nst a Sute Treasurer for embezzlement of 
Stat« tanda need not state the character or amounts of the various 
fiinds embezzled, nor that the same i« unknown to the Grand Jnry ; 
tiiat by section 13, article 9, of the Cinstitntion, the oonveraion to 
his own Qse, or loaning, depositing in banks or exchanging for 
other fnnds, of any portiou of the Tanda of tlie State, without 
authority of the Legislature, by any ofBcer o r other person charged 
with the safe keeping, transfer or disbursement of the same, is the 
crime of embezzlement and afelony, without any farther legislation. 

The State vs. Henry R. Kent. From Ramsey County. 

Indicted for embezzlement. Defendant was collector of pew 
rents for a church corporation, and acted as such under a special 
and express agreement, by which, as compensation for his services, 
he was to have " five per cent, of all pew rents, nn matter who coU 
lected them," It was held that the effect of this agreement was 
to give defendant an undivided one-twentieth interest in the renta 
collected, so that the same b ecame the joint pioperty of the cor- 
poration and of the defendant, and th at he was therisfore not properly 
indictable under section 23, chapter 95, of the General Statutes, 
for an alleged embezzlement and iVaudulent conversion of the 
same. The money or property must be the property of another 
than the person indicted. 

The State vs. Frederick Gummel. From Brown County. 
Indicted for an ai^iilt witd intent to do great bodily harm. 



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ATIOBNBT ORNBBAL. 5 

Held, thftt a person charged iritb an assault with intent to do great 
bodily harm, being armed with a dangerous weapon, ia charged 
with as assault with intent to commit a feloay, within the provis- 
ions of section 12, chapter 91, Greneral Statutes. 

The State vs. Henry S. Bliss. 

Criminal action for assault and battery before a Justice of the 
Peace in Wright county, and an appeal taken on questions of law 
alone, to the District Court. Judgment of the court below was 
affirmed in the District Court, and an appeal taken ftom such 
judgment to the Supreme Court, and judgment affirmed^ It was 
held In this case that witnesses for the State in a criminal case are 
entitled to fees for their attendance, and mileage , and they may be 
taxed in the costs. Also held, that it is not necessary that a 
Justice of the Peace should sign judgments entered by him. 

The State vs. Charles Ehrig. 

Indicted for larceny, Hennepin county. Held, that a criminal 
case cannot be removed from a District Court to the Supreme 
Conrt by an ^peal taken from the verdict of a jury therein. 
Appeal dismissed . 

The State vs. J. Frederick Swanson. ' 

Convicted of manslaughter in the second degree . Error trom 
District Court, Nicollet county. Orderentered afflrming Judgment 
of court below. 

'Hie State vs. Richard Gesaert. 

Indicted in Washington county, in this Sta te, for the crime of 
mnrder. The fatal wound was given in Washington. uonnty, but 
death ensued in Pierce county, Wisconsin, which fact was alleged 
in the indictment. Held, b/ the court, to charge the commission 
of the offense in Washington county. The death, though it went 
to characterize the acts committed in Washington county, was not 
an act of the defendant committed in Wisconsin, but the conse- 
quence of his acts committed in Washington county, against ihc 
peace and dignity of this State. 

The State vs. Jay Owens- 
Indicted in the District Court, Ramsey county, under section 1, 
chapter 9, Laws of 1873, for procuring abortion by administering a 
drug. Appeal ftono judgment, and Judgment of court below 



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ANNUAL KBPOST. 

It was held in this case, among other tbiogs, that an 
indictment is not insafflcient because it alleges in the alternatiTS 
the ase of difTere'ot means in the commission of the crime, lliat 
it was not necessary to allege that the drug was swallowed by the 
person to whom it was administered. That such person wonld not 
be regarded as an accomplice, and that to convict of the offense 
specified by section 2, chapter 9, Laws of 1873, it is not necessary 
that the Jury find that the drug or medicine administered was likely 
to produce abortion — nor the character, nor quality of snch drng 
or medicine. 

The State vs. Edward Cassiday. 

This action was brought in Justice's Court, iu the (dty of Roch- 
ester, Olmsted county, under an act of the L egielatnre, approved 
March 10, 1873, entitled "An act to establish a fund for the ' 
loundation and maintainance of an asylum for inebriates. " The 
defendant admitted the allegations ia the CDiniilaiut to be true, but 
claimed the said act to be uuooastitntional, and moved his dia* 
charge upon that ground. He waa convicted, and ordered to pay 
a fine of $25.00, and costs of prosecution. An app eai was taken 
to the District Court for that county, where the Judgment of the 
coort below was atBrined, and an appeal taken to the Soprcice 
Court, where Lhc act was sustained as a legitimate exercise of the 
police power of the State, and not repugnant as respects its title 
to section 27, article 4, of the constitution. 

The State vs. Joseph S. Brady. 

Appeal from Judgment. District Court, Sherburne county. 
Appeal dismissed on motion, at April term of Supreme Court. 

The State vs. Nicholas liulladore. 

Writ of error fVom Dieti-ict Court for Anoka county. Appeal 
dismissed, or withdrawn by counsel for the appellant. 

The State vs. D. E. Dwyer. 

Appeal ftom Freeborn county. In this case it was lield compe> 
tent tor the Legislature, in the absence of constitutional restraint, 
to invest the supen'isors of a mnnicipal township, though a quasi 
corporation, with the power and authority to grant licenses and to 
regulate all 'persons vending or dealing in intoxicating liquors ; 
and beld further, that the provision that no license should be 
granted for a less term than one year, does not deprive the super- 



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ATTORNET GEmtBAL. 7 

riion of tbe right. In tbe exercise of their power of regal&tion, to 
revoiie a ticenae before the expiration of the year for which it was 
granted. 

Ilie State vs. Oscar H. CcHufort. 

Indicted la District Conrt for Beaton county, under section 1, 
act of March 6, 1871, for prevention of cruelty to animals. Appeal 
from Jadfnnent. 

Held, when a demurrer to an indictment is allowed, the order or 
judgment allowing it is a bar to ftartlier proMcntions, unless the 
conrt at the same time allow an amendment of the indictment, or 
wder it re-sabmitted to tbe Grand Jury ; such an allowance of 
amendment or direction to re-aubmit must be by matter of record, 
and ought to be made in the order or judgment allowing the de- 
murrer. 

The State vs. Frank Sbenton and Mary A. Auhir. 

Indicted in the District Court for Dodge county, for aasaolt, 
being armed with a aangerous weapon, with intent to do great 
bodily harm. Appeal fVom judgment, and judgment of the court 
tielow affirmed. Held, that an indictment under section 33, chap- 
ter 'J4, of the General Statutes, is sufficient, if it directly charges 
the defendant with acts coming fully within the statutory desorip- 
tion of the ofleuse, in tbe substantial words of the statute, wiUiout 
any (tirther expansion of Ihe matter. 

.The State vs. Edmund Lee. 

Indicted for rape, in the Dbtriot Court for Ramsey county. 
Appeal from judgment. Argued and now pending. 

The State vs. George Lantenschlager. 

Indicted for murder, in the Court of ConoDon Pleas for Ramsey 
county, and convicted of murder in the first-degree. Appeal ftom 
an order denying motion for new trial. Argued and now pending. 

OIVUi jiOTIONS. 

The State vs. D. Morrison. 

Thia case arose under the new tax law, in Mille Laos county, 
and waa certified up by tbe Judge of the District Court for thai 
cooDty. The court held in this case that under the act of Match 
9, 1874, entitled an act to provide tor tbe assessment and collec- 
tion of taxea — that so detect in tbe affidavit veril^ing tbe liat filed 



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K ASNtJAI. BBPOHT. 

wltii the clerk of the conrt, effects the JoriBdiction of the conrt 
over the proceedings. If the list is filed, kdc) the list kui] notice 
prescribed by the act are in fact published as the act provides, the 
eoortbaa Jorisdiction, althocgh no affidavit of pQblication is 61ed, 
and the conrt may (certainly at any time before Judgment) allow 
proof of the publication to be filed. The parties to such proceed- 
ings are not entitled to a trial by Jury of any issue except the 
issue that the tax has been paid, or that the property is exempt 
from taxation. 

The State vs. The Winona and St. Peter B. B. Co, 

This case was certified up from Waseca county, under the act of 
Haroh 9, 1874, providing for the assessment and collection of taxes. 

This company became entitled to receive and received lands for 
oooBtmcting its road under the act of May 22, 1857, and acts 
amendatory thereof and supple at entary thereto. Befwe the lands 
were conveyed by the State to the company, it being indebted to 
certain parties for moneys advanced to it, and for constructiiig 105 
miles of its railroad, made a contract with them in writing whereby 
it i^^eed, in part payment of such indebtedoeas, to sell, and as 
soon as it should acquire the title from the State, to convey to 
them, or agcb persons as they might designate, so many acres of 
Uie land to which it was entitled, as it should be entitled to and 
receive for constructing the 105 miles, to be selected by commenc- 
ing at Winona and proceeding westward, taking all the lands along 
the line of the road, till the number of acres should be got. There 
was a clause in the contract which in eflect gave to the said par- 
ties, so contracting with the company, the option instead of taking 
a conveyance, to leave the title in tbe company, and have it dis- 
pose of the lands for their benefit. The lands were claimed to be 
exempt from taxation onder section 4, chapter 2, of the act of 
May 22, 1857. 

The Supreme Court held in this case, that as the entire consider- 
ation for the lands had been received by the company, tbe entire 
equitable and beneficial ownership of the lands was vested by the 
contraat in the parties so contracting with the company, and that 
the company held the legal title, from the time of the (Xtnveyance 
by the State to it, only in trust tor them. That tbe contract was 
suoh a sale as section 4, chapter aforesaid, contemplated, and that 
the lands were subject to taxation' — afiSrming Uie Judgment of the 
court below. 

This case was subsequently re-ai^;aed, ob a motion for leave to 



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ATTORNEY GRNERAL. 9 

re-argae it, and the motion denied. Thia decision la one of very 
great importance to the [leople or the State, as it brings under tax- 
ation a vaat body of land, eatimated at 600,000 acres, which has 
hitherto escaped taxation. 

The case of the State vs. The Southern Minnesota R. R. Com- 
pany, ariaing also nnder the tax law of 1874, and certified up from 
Olmsted county, was decided adversely to the State. The court 
held the lands in question to be exempt from taxation. 

The case of the State va. Henry Young and the dureties upon 
his official bond as County Treasurer of Sibley county, to lecover 
the sum of eight thousand fonr hundred and fifty-three dollars, col- 
lected by Young for the State, but not accounted for or paid over, 
was tried at the September term, 1875, of the District Court for 
Sibley county, and reaulted in a diaagreement of the jary. Thia 
case will be tried again at the March term of said court next year. 

The suit of the St. Paul & Chicago (Railway Company va. the 
Trustees of the Hospital for the Insane and the Governor, to re - 
cover certain swamp lands theretofore selected and set apart for the 
nae of the Hospital for the Insane, by the Commisaioner of the 
State Land Office, was argued and submitted to the court (Diatiict 
Court, Ramsey county) several months ago, but has not yet been 
decided. 

The snit of the State vs. A. Cutter and T. Reardon, to recover 
9500, was discontinued by me upon the defendant. Cutter, giving 
new notes for tbe amount, with approved sureties, and notes turned 
to the State Treasurer, to whose order they were made payable. 
Thia course was taken by me in view of the act of 1872, relieving 
Mr. Cutter) and for other reasons which it is unnecessary to state. 

In the suit va. Munch Bros. & Co., pending in the Common Pleas 
Court for Ramsey county, at the date of my last report, judgment 
waa recovered in favor of the State for the amount claimed, viz., 
94,634. 22 and costs, against Gnstav Munch and Adolph Stierle. 
No judgment waa recovered against Emil Munch, for the reason 
that he was not a member of the firm of Munch Bros. & Co. at the 
time the obligation was given, upon which the suit was brought. 

No property found upon which to levy execution. 
2 



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10 AMNUAl. KBPOBT. 

Th€ amonnt of the judgment against the Anoka Lamber Com- 
pany, viz., $764.65, has been made, aince my last report, npon ex- 
ecution in Anoka county. 

The Judgments against Brown & Brocknay, Crocker Bros. & 
Lamoreauz and Crocker Bros. & Lamoreauz and Mendenhall, 
heretorore reported^ still remain uncollected. Executions have 
been issued into Hennepin and Anoka counties, but have been re- 
turned unaatisfled. I may state in this connection that William 
Brockway, of the firm of Brown & Brockway, baa made a proposi- 
tion to pay thirty-tbree cents on the dollar in f\ill of the judgment, 
by note, with indoraer, payable in six months. I do not feel at 
liberty to accept his offer unless directed or authorized so to do by 
the Legislature. The amount of the judgment against Brown & 
Brockway is tl|443 and interest thereon from July 1, 1874. 

The suit of the State against Charles Mcllrath was, by stipula- 
tion and order of the court, referred to fireenleaf Clark, Esq., of 
St. Paul, April 17, 1875, to take the testimony, hear, determine and 
repoi't a judgment. ^ 

Tliia case has been on trial, at intervals, f)-om the last named 
date until the 22 day of November last, when the testimony waa 
closed. In the taking of the testimony the referee sat in St. Paul, 
Miniieapolis and Stillwater, for the accommodation of witnesses, 
and to expedite the trial. A great many witnesses were examined 
on behalf of the State. Written arguments have been made on 
behalf of the State and defendant, and case finally submitted to 
the refeiec for his decision. 

The State vs. D. E. Goulding, et al. 

This is a suit brought in the District Court for Mille Lacs 
county, t^ainst D. E. Goulding, defaulting treasurer of that 
county, and his auroties, to recover a small balance due the State. 
This suit was begun in May, 1875, and waa noticed for trial at the 
September term of that court, but being unavoidably detained in 
Sibley county, it was continued, at my request, until the next term. 

Suit was also brought in Jackson county, against the ex-trcas- 
urer of that county and hia aureties, to recover a small balance 
due to the State, but it subsequently appeared that the amount 
claimed ({84.60) had been paid over by the treasurer to the county, 



zedbyGoOt^le 



ATTORNET OENEEAI.. 11 

by mistake. The money nas reftinded, aod paid into the State 
treunry. 

The claim of the State vs. The West Wisconsin Railway Com- 
pany, for tax (one per cent.) on the groaB earnings of that road 
within this State, for the year 1872, namely, t372, was paid into 
the Treasury April 28, 1875. 

The L^islature, in 1874, passed an act to provide for obtaining 
title to lands by the State of Minnesota, for the use of the State — 
see chapter 36, Laws of 1874. Proceedings have been had during 
the past year under this act, for the condemnation of certain real 
estate adjoining the State University gronnds, and also adjoining 
the State Prison grounds, for the use of those institntions respect- 
ively. Tbe otScers ot those institntions will doubtless report ftilly 
as to what has been done in the premises, and hence it is unneces- 
sary for me to say more in my report. 

I may say in this connection that in certain proceedings had to 
enforce the payment of taxes on real estate remaining delinquent 
in and prior to the year 1873, for the connty of Washington, cer- 
tain pieces or parcels of land within the inclosure and occapied by 
the State Prison, were included. I filed an answer in the District 
Court for that county, objecting to the taxes so assessed and lev- 
ied, upon tbe ground that the said pieces or parcels of land were 
the property of the State at the time of the levy, and therefore 
exempt from taxation. A decree of the court was entered dis- 
^arging the same from all taxes and penalties. 

There have been, during the year, a number of actions brought 
under chaptered of the General Statutes, to test the title to local 
offices, in which I have appeared, nominally, as attorney for the 
State and relators, but with which, as a matter of fact, I have had 
but little to do. The cases having been managed chiefly by local 
attorneys, and the State having no particular interest at stake, I 
do not consider it necessary to include them in my report. 

In reporting the civil and criminal cases, I have considered it 
proper to give briefly aonte of tbe points which have been decided 
in tbe Supreme Court, with the hope that it may be of some ben- 
efit to Connty Attorneys and others — into whose possession this 
report will come long prior to the publication of the cases in the 



zedbyGoOglC 



12 ANNUAL REFOBI. 

Minnesota Bdports. I have given only sacb points as it occurred 
to me woald be understood without a statement of the case. 
With a few exceptions I have not given all the iroints decided ia 
any case. 

Bespectfully submitted. Your obedient servant, 

GEO. P. WILSON, . 
Attitmey General. 



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I BZBCUTIVR DoCUMKlIT, Mu. 7.] 



ANNUAL REPORT 



ADJUTANT GENEEAL 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1876. 



1. MILITAKY AFFAIRS. 
U. SOLDIERS' ORPHANS. 
111. SOLDIERS' CLAIM COLLECTIONS. 



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QiKiBU, Headquabtbhs, State op Mihmbsoti., 
Abjvtamt CrRtrEBAi.'s Ofuce, 

Saint Paul, NoTember SO, 1876. 

Bit BxMUeney, Oushman K. Davis, Oavemor of the State of 
Minnefota. 

Sib: — In compliance with law, I have the honor to prcBent here- 
with, for transmission to the L^isUture, toy annnal report, em- 
bracing also the traoaactions of the Board of Trastees of Soldiers' 
Orphans, and of the State Claim Agency. I have but recently 
assumed the duties of this office, on the resignation of General 
M. D. Flower, who for more than five years acceptably performed 
tbem, bat the report covers the work for the entice year ending 
this day. I am, very respectfkilly. 

Your obedient servant, 

HENBT A. CASTLE, 

Ac^i^taU Gtneral. 



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I. 

MILITARY AFFAIRS. 



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GOV. C. K. DAVIS, 

Oommandar-in-Chi^, 

BRIG. GEN. HENBT A. CASTLE. 

AdjvtatU General. 

CMJL. I. F. A. STDDDART. 

Chief of Artmery. 

COL. CHAS. S. BUNKER, 

Aide de Camp, 

COL. JAMES N. GEANGEE, 

Aide de Camp. 

CAFT. ALFRED B. JOHNSON, 

Mtatering Officer. 



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MILITARY AFFAIRS. 



Tli« work of this office DKturally arrang'eB itself Dnd«r three 
heads, that of SUte military Afihirs, that of the Board of Tnis- 
tees of Soldiers' Orphans, of which I am ea-offlcio a nemher, and 
that of the Collection of Claims of ex-soldiers against the United 
8tatw for pensiona, bonntiea, etc. For greater fkollity of refer- 
eace, I hare dirided this report into thrte departments, coires- 
ponding with the above srrangemont. 

THE MlLmA. 

The laws of Lhe United States provide lor the oi^^anisation of 
the militia of the several States, even prescribing in detail many 
points as to their eqalpment, etc., but in order to render these 
laws effective they mast be Bnpplemented by State Legislation. 
The laws of the United States (Bevised Statates, sections 1,684, 
1,685, 1,696), provide fbrthermore, in sabstance, that ** There shall 
be an Adjatant Oeneral appointed 'in each State, whose dot; it 
shall be to distribnte orders trora the Commander in Chief, of the 
State ; ftimish blank forms and explain them ; receive retams ; 
report the aotaal sitnation of arms, equipments, etc., and the state 
of discipline ; and also to make returns of the militia of the Stats, 
with their arms, accoutrements and ammanition, ^reeable to the 
' provisions of law, to the President of the United States, annually 
on or before the firat Monday of January in each year." It will 
thus appear that, independently of Sute legislation, theAtlJQtant 
General is the official medium of conununicatioo between the United 
States War Department and the Sute. It is little to the credit of 
so important a State as Minnesota, that the annual report of her 
military sfiitirs, laid before Congress by the President, shows so 
little activity and efficiency. But this state of things is due to the 
entire lack of efficient military le^slatlon ; to which lack my pre- 



zedbyGoOglC 



ANNUAL BEPORX. 



deceasors havs so often vainly called attention, that it may almoat 
be considered presumption in me to again reter to it. 



TBE HATIOKAL QDABD. 

Our' statutes provide for the organization of the militia ander 
the name of the National Guard, but as sucb oi^anlzatio'n is wholly 
volantary and almost without inducement, not a Bingle regiment, 
or even company, has maintained Its discipline, and it is now dii- 
banded and -extinct, with no signs of & revival. Three independ- 
ent companies which have been supplied with arms by the State, 
are anoffloially known to be in exlstenoe. The terrible and costly 
lesson learned by the people at the breaking out of the rebellion, 
eeema to have been forgotten. Our exposed frontier poution is 
ignored. The direct benefits to our mixed population that would 
arise fh>m even a partial system of military discipline, are loot. 
We sleep in fancied security, and will doubtless continue to sleqi 
nntll awakened by ihe shook of another war, unexpected and un- 
provided for. 

EMBOLLHBNT OF THE HILmA. 

The statute requires that tiie militia of the State (conaiating of 
all able-bodied male persons between the ages of 18 and 46 years, 
with certain exceptions), sliall be enrolled once in two yean, by 
the aeseasors of personal property, when returns shall bo oonsoli- 
dated by the county auditors and forwarded to the Adjatant Gen- 
eral. The Governor is empowered to suspend this enrollment at 
his ^discretion. The enrollment having been snspended several - 
years since, has not been taken since Uiat time, and the law is 
practically inoperative. 

ULrrABT SCHOOLS. 

In the absence of needed military training of the citizens, it is 
gratifying that at many of our private educational institutions, and 
even at the better class of oar common schools, as well as at the 
Normal Schools and the State University, the rudiments, and in 
some cases more than the rudiments of drill and discipline are 
taught. Since this is all we have, we should acknowledge and 
encourage it, as our only aasu;-ance that after the veterans of our 



zedbyGoOglC 



AninTANT QBNERAL. a 

Ute ff&r shall h&ve passed away, all knowledge of the drill will 
not be lost to the mass of our citizens. 



The Report of the Arsenal Keeper, on file in my office, for the 
year ending Noreniber 80, 187K, shows the operations of the Ord- 
nance Department of the State during that period. Three hundred 
" breech-loading " rifles, of the new pattern, have been received, 
of which one hundred and twenty have been issued to efflcient in- 
dependent companies. Five field gODS ; about 650 maskets of all 
kinds ; nearly 2,000 sets of accoutrements, and 40,000 musket 
cartridges are among the articles on hand in the arsenal and maga- 
zine. A considerable number of breeoh-loading riflea are due us 
from the United States, which are promised at an early day. 

001(DX1[N1.TI01I or 8T0BB8. 

May 28, 1876, my predecessor convened a Board of Survey, 
consisting of Oen. R. W. Johnson, Gren. John B. Sanborn, and 
myself, with instructions to inspect and report on certun ordnance 
and ordnance stores in tbe arsenal. This board reported June 14, 
that the following articles were unserviceable, and recommended 
that they be sold, viz. : 82 rifie muskets, (contract) ; 218 Austrian 
rifies ; 184 muskets, caliber .69 (smooth bores) ; 71 Prussian mus- 
kets, caliber .71 ; 274,000 ball cartridges, caliber .69. They were 
accordingly sold at public auction, after due advertisement, and 
realized the sum of twelve hundred and twenty-six 05-100 dollars, 
which was placed in (h^ State Treasury. 

THE CRKTEmnU.. 

I have received from the Centennial Committee at Philadelphia, a 
request for information as to how many of our uniformed military 
companies will visit the Exhibition. I have referred the matter to 
the commanders of the three companies, and there are expressions 
of a desire to attend. If the Legislature makes any appropriation 
for ' ' Centennial " purposes, the propriety of encouraging a credita- 
ble display of our military may properly be coosid'^red. 

BXaiXRHTAL COLORS. 

About the only duties connected with the part borne by Hinne- 
2 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



10 ANNUAL REl'Oltr. 

sota in the war for the suppression of the rebellion, now devolving 
in this office, except those referred to in subsequent divisions of 
thia report, are the preservation of the regimental flags, and of the 
records of service of our soldiers. The torn and faded fli^ have 
been carefnlly preserved, and being tasteAiIly arranged in a glass 
case, constitute one of the principal attractions of the capitol 
building. 

soldiers' rkcobdb. 

Tfae rolls and returns of the several companies and regiments of 
Minnesota soldiers daring the war, are on file in this office, and 
are of great value to the surviving veterans, and the represenbt- 
tives of the deceased. Almost daily requests are received for in- 
formation from them, to be used by ex-soldiers of Uinnesota, many 
of whom now reside in other States, in establishing claims, or se- 
curing homestead and other benefits under the numerous and com- 
plicated Uwf which have been enacted in their interest. The im- 
portance of preserving these I'ecords will be readily apparent. 
The Adjutant General's report of 186t> gave an abstract of the 
" Pinal Record " of the Minnesota troops, but from ifae haste with 
which it was prepared, and the carelessness of its printing, it is 
utterly untrustworthy. Its inaccuracy having become apparent, . 
the Legislature several 3'ears since provided for the compilation of 
a new record. The work was prosecuted faitbfhlly, and the record 
BO far as completed, is, 1 believe, as accurate as it can possibly be 
made. But the appropriation was exhausted when about one- 
I'ourth remained to be done, and the' work baa been pnspendcd. I 
would respectfully recommend the appropriation of a sum suffi- 
cient to complete it, and on its completion tbe manuscript volume 
may be deposited in one of the fire-proof vaults of the capitol UDtil 
such time as the people of the State feel able to print it — and tbaa 
the irreparable disaster which would now result fVom the destruc- 
tion of the records of this office by fire would be in a measure 
averted. Tlie surviving soldiers of the Minnesota regiments cer- 
tainly have a right to demand that the records of their bonormble 
service, of which they are so justly proud, and which, moreover, 
are, and have been, and will continue to be, of great pecuniaiy 
value to them, shall not longer be left exposed to the imroineot 
risk of destruction. which now^ threatens them. 

HENRY A. CASTLE, 

Adjutant General. 



zedbyGoOgle 



II. 

SOLDIERS' ORPHANS. 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



BOARD OP TRUSTEES OF SOLDIERS' ORPHANS. 

HBNBTQ. HICKS (1889) MlnnoBpolU. 

HENBY A. CASTLB (18TO) St. Pwil. 

J. B. WEST (1S<9} 8t. Clond. 

0. B. GOULD (18T1) WluouL 

ABA BABTOM (1B73) Northllsld. 

B. L. BAEBB (1871) Bed Wlug. 

B. D. BARBBB , (.1871) Woitliingtoii. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



SOLDIERS' ORPHANS. 



Od behalf of the Board of Trustees of Soldiers' Orphans of Hin- 
aasota, the following report of its transaotiona daring the year 
ending November 30, 1675, is respectAilly submitted. 

irOBK or TtfZ BOABD. 

Afl haa been explained in previona reports, Uiis Board is charged 
with the dnty of disbursing the appropriations of the State for the 
maintenance of tbe Soldiers' Orphans tbrongh two channels, that 
of the Home at Winona, and that of temporary aid to children living 
with widowed mothers who are partially able to anpport them. 

Tbeae duties are of late somewhat complicated, and rendered 
more laborious to the Board, though at a saving of expenae to the 
State, by tbe necessity of partially providing, in individnal cases, 
for a limited period, for some of the orphans discharged fVom the 
home before arriving at the age of 18, and placed in positions where 
they are learning occupations which will very soon render them self- 
sapporting. A statement of these is submitted below. 

TBE orphans' HOHE. 

The Orphans' Home is established at Winona, a local associa- 
tion of ladles and gentlemen having charge of the details of its 
administration. To this association the State Beard pays on 
monthly certified rolls four dollars a week for the maintenance of 
each child. This compensation is in full of all expenses, clothing 
food, education, books, rent of building, medical attendance, every- 
thing. Without disparaging other institutions, we willingly place 
the Soldiers' Orplyins' Home in comparison with them as to expend- 
itures. And yet through the admirable workings of the system of 
enlieting local Interest and aid, this small expenditure is made ample 
for all the neceasities of the inmates. Our board maintains a strict 
snperviaion of the administration at tlie Home, meeting semi- 



zed byCoOglc 



14 V ANNUAL BEFOBT. 

annually at iWinona, and vieiting ttie Home occasionally on nnan- 
noanced tours of inspection. It is a pleasure to say that we hare 
always found occasion to commend almost every detail, and very 
little even to suggest by way of improvement. The children are well 
sheltered in a new and comfortably furnished building ; their food 
is varied, wholesome and abundant ; their clothing is-equal to the 
average of that of their associates in school. Their conduct and 
discipline is satisfactory, the inevitable frictions of so large a 
family being smoothed by the tact and firmness of* the matron, aided 
by the general good impulses of the children, and their appreciation 
of the benefits they are receiving. They are being well educated in 
the difiSerent departments of the First State Normal School, (see 
report of Prof. Fbelp0, Principal of that Institution, herewith) near 
which the Home is located ; and their religious instruction is given 
by the churches and sabbath schools secflected by the mothers or 
guardians who placed them in our hands. For fhrther details refer- 
ence is made to the reports of Major Goald, Prof. Pbelps and Dr. 
HcGaughey, herewith tran emitted. 

:.L OF THE HOMB. 



As a matter of interest, and for the information of the Legiala- 
tnre, we append a muster roll of the inmates of the Home, Sep- 
tember 80, 1875 (Ihe close of the year for the institution, and to 
which date, it will be noticed, the reports of the local officers are 
brought down.) It will be seen that the present number of chil- 
dren is seventy-four — a decrease of 11 during the year, and that 
the oldest is now seventeen and the youngest 10 years of age. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ADJUTANT GBNEKAL. 15 

MUSTER ROLL, BOLDIERS' ORPHANS' HOHE, BEPTEUBBIt 30, 1675. 



Namo. [Age! Connv.. 1 F.th<.r-B Nama. 


Co. and Reglmant. 


iSiKlSi'.*......: 

S. Chow, n;.™ E 

4 Cab ow, Fran kllD 

5. ComalockChnrlwB.... 
e.CBrpai.ar. Cbarl,,.. 
;. CQmmlnCT. Irwin t 

tSl:S- »,.'.::.:::::■ 


1 

11 

14 
13 
13 


Hi"!""'' 

;: 

Wabaiha. 

Qoodbna, 

Olmitad, 

HonitoD, 

Rlc*. 
CLiryer, 

La Bnenr, 

Faribault, 
Olmaiwl, 

Winona, 
limited, " 

Hennepin, 

Olmttad. 
Le Ba.t<;. 

Qoodbne, 
RBm»7, 

b";&, 

S: 

Olmsted, 

Wl.ona, 

L«8n*or, 
01 mated, 
Dakou. 

aimalad. 


Hugh DDrna. 

AmbrofB L. Conwlock. 
Aug. CHtpenter. 
JoffoH Cnramlnga, 

Ala Dtilej, 

Loran Dndlaj, 

Saml. 0. Dtan, 

AmaiUhBddr, 
Juo. W. ^Poramar, 

Wm. Foraj-ih, 

S-'i'SS,., . 

Geo. Holberl. 
FrancLaJ.Hellar, 
a.o"Hltoh«ct, 
LntherHaiOT, ' 

B. P._ Kaln, 

ChB.._Lang, 
J. R. UcNItt, 

John UcBUr. 

A. H. ParafaBli, 
Qoo. C;_P»K10, 

0. B. Roadaald, 
Ranaom HlcbBrda, 
Patrick Radigan, 
H. W. Bbenwo, 
hUrtIn Short, 

«.H.86Bldo^ 
N. Swab, 

TbM.Bpergl.r. 

A. WeDtworlh, 
Q. W. Waahborh, 

W. YoOBllB, 


••A.'- lOth Minn, 

"C'-lMh Mich. 

■■D.- isth Wk. 
;'G.;; aih Minn. 


10. DaUar, Addli A 

11. Dallcy.Emma Q 

12. nallmannR. AUda 

13 Deltniarlnl, Banrlatta 

14. DndUy. AfBia 

le, Dndlo- »o«n 

U. DMn. Edward 

IT. aan,MBT>C 


•■H." Bth Hlon. 

"B." ai-t wi^ 

■■H," t«h Wla. 

¥?&"•'• 

"F.'M.tH,T.M.B. 

;;H.;;s«h Mich. 

■■B," Tlh Minn. 
"F." 0th Vlan. 

• B ■■ lab wiB, 
"C." Brb Uino. 
Sd N. T. Cbt. 
'■B," 9lb Wli. 

"I," 4th Hlnn. 

::?:«;& 

■•VlaltF.S.Kng. 
"B," Bth Minn. 
"A," lOth Mlpn. 


IS.' onman, ConialigaE.. 
3D. oraman, Don A 

a orti{h'Ha°M.iA:::::: 


2 
S 

t 

1 

< 




i 
1 


^- SrBd^.^:r:::::.- 

M. BoIbart.Angallna 

«: HSiurTwa'irt?""".':: 

U. Han~»o. LoulBB 

SigfnSSIJ:^;!:™;::.:::; 


(S.Johna<>D, Norton S ... 


41. Eirmot, Edward. !i!M! 

4»-Kali.. SallB 

41 8*lo. Lincoln 

44. Lans. Heorr 

U-LaoK, WlllUn 

S:l!i;!:Jt"l:;:::;:::: 


4«. 11 cSlay. Edward 

50. Hc-'UT, Harah 

Sl.PntDBib, Ow. F 

a. Porer.Marr Allca 

S3. Parahall. Lann F 

U. r-elile. I.awli L 

U. Pettle. Datid C 

«. ReadHold, 0«o. R 

E7. BtchardB, Nina (' 

». Radlcan, ManlaJ .... 


UUnoK. 

"A," lOth Minn. 

si'"'"- 

"K," 7th Hlnn. 

•■0." »lh Minn. 
1S8(b Peon. 


«1. BhorLOeoTgeH 

K. Bw»b. Flora L.... 

s;lsS?-E!i:::--: 

Tl. Wantwortb, 0«. B 

71. Wantibani. Janata M. 

S?:SB:Ka.t.:.::: 



,.db,Google 



16. ANNUAI. REPOBT. 

DtSCHASQES FROU THE HOME. 

As was ftDiicipated in last report, the discharges from the Home 
duridg the year have so far exceeded the admissiODS as to leave a 
net reduction of eleven Id the number or inmates. A portion of 
those discharged are acquinng a knonledge of trades or professions 
that will render tbeni useful ciiizens, vbile the remainder have bc^n 
reclaimed by their mothers, nhoae improved ci reams tun ces enable 
them to provide support, and to whose tender care they may safely 
be entrusted. When brought to consider this question of dis- 
ohai^es, the members of the Board first began fully to realize the 
weight of their responsibility. Each individual case mnst be care- 
fully considered — the attainments, capacity, disposition, tastea, 
inclinations of the child, and its adaptability to the position open. 
A mistake would be disastrous, and carelessness would be criminal. 
Our closest attention and best Judgment has been given to each 
case, and the results have vindicated that Judgment to a gratifying 
degree. 

PDTDBB ADHISSIOMB. 

The Board has acted on the theory that the tax-payers expect its 
work to be closed up at aa early a day as is eoosistent with a dae 
discharge of the incalculable debt we owe to these children of the 
men who died for the Bepublic. Accordingly, since as with each 
succeeding year the children who had not sought admiasion-to ^e 
Borne were getting nearer an age capable of self-support, while 
their introduction therein, with their now firmly fixed habits, was 
detrimental to its established discipline, we have been disposed 
each year to establish stronger tests of admission, until w* have 
now reached the point that we require exceptionally good reasons 
for opening our doors. We Still have many applications, but they 
seem, on investigation, to oome principally from three classes — 
children whose mothers have remarried, and whose step>fatfaera, 
though able to support them, would prefer to shift the burden on 
the State ; children, often as young as three or JiTV years, whose 
fathers have died since the war, from causes more or less directly 
traceable to their army service ; and children of such nngovernabls 
depravity that their mothers or guardians desire as to take them 
for the pucpOBu of reformation. We feel that a due regard for the 
administration of our sacred trust prohibits us IVom receiving sucb 
as these — and unless required to do so, by some positive expreasion 
of the Legislature, we shall consider our policy approved. 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ADJOTANT OBMSRAT.. 17 

IN THE SZFORH SCHOOL. 

Poor of our boys wbo before coming to us had formed bad hab- 
its, which, after long and patient trial, we fonnd incurable by any 
means of discipline at onr command, have been sent to the Reform 
School at St. P^ul. We pay for their maintenance out of the fund 
at our disposal, and keep informed of their progress, etc. We are 
glad to know that under the stronger arm of authority wielded 
there, their prospects are improving. It is creditable to the sol- 
diers' orphans, that out of probably one hundred and fifty who 
have been inmates of the Home, only four have failed to yield to 
its mild family discipline. 

OtrrSIDE RELIEF. 

The relief extended to orphans residing with their mothers in 
different parts of the State has been continued under increasingly 
strict aarvelliance, and its aggregate amount will be found below, in 
no case baa more than $25 for each child during the year been 
given, and in all cases we are sure the help has been worthily 
bestowed. 

EXPENSES OF URIIBEBS. 

The members of the Board serve without pay, and thehr traveling 
expenses, postage, Ac, paid from the fund as given below, will not, 
we think, be deemed excessive. 

CERTinOATE OF DJSCHAROB. 

The engraved nertificate of discharge anthorized by law in 1874, 
has been procured and delivereil to those entitled to it, and it 
will hereafter be given to all who shall be honorably discharged 
from the Home. Its cost for engraving and printing was ninety 
dollars.. 



The amoDDts and purposes of the expenditares from the appro- 
priation are as follows : 

December, 1874, OjplianB' Home, Toucher #1,61C 89 

JanouT, 1875, Orpbans' Home, Toucher 1,S6I 47 

3 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



18 ANNDAt. BBPOBT. 

Tebrnaiy, igTS, Orphans' Home, Yoncber 1,415 14 

Hftrch, 1875, OipliauB' Home.Vondier l,S6S 31 

April, 1876, Orpbaas' Home, Yoncber 1,601 61 

Hft7, 1S76, Orphans' Home, Yoncber 1,471 OS 

Jane, 1876, Orp bans' Home, Yoncber 1,S76 SI 

Jnly, 1875, Orphsns'HoniB, Voucher 1,43! M 

August, 1876, Orpbins' Home, Yoncber 1,401 8« 

September, 1876, Orpbana' Home, Yoncber 1,858 SB 

October, 187B, Orpbans' Home, Yoncber 1,870 74 

, November, 1S7E, Orphans' Home, Yoncber 1,841 H 

Total f 17,898 a 

Special aid to Orpbaos' residing with Widowed Mothers ••■- ■■■• «94 1> 

Special aid to Discharged Orphans' serving ApprentlcesUpa, eto. 273 84 

Bogravlng and Printing CetUflcate of Discbarge MOO 

ExpeDsesof Members of Board ■■• 161 SE 

AgKregate BxpeQdltoruB #18,418 61 

AI^BOPEIATIOM. 

The Bo&rd estimates ite expenditures for the ensuing year at 
116,000, (a reduction of $2,000 f^om 1875, and $4,000 from 1874) 
and would respectfully ask the Legislature for an early appropria- 
tion of that amonnt. 

Bespectfiilly submitted, 

HEN&T Or. HICKS, 
President. 
HzMBT A. Castlb, 

Secretary. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



EEPOET OP STJFEEIHTENDENT OF HOME. 



OvriCE OF SDPKRIKTKNDrar, 1 

SOLDIEBS' OrPHAMS' HoHK, \ 

Winona, Sept. 30, 1875. } 
To the Board of Trutleea of Soldier$' OrphanB: 

GmTLBMBN : — The " Soldiers' Orphana' Home of Minnesota," 
presents its Fifth Aminal Report, at the same time congratulating 
itself, your honorable body, and the good people of the Stats, upon 
its prosperity and the physical, mental and moral welfare of its 
ehildren. 

As predicted in uar last report, the number of inmates has 
decreased since that time, and a further reduction during the ensa- 
ing year may be reasonably anticipated. With less nnmbera comes 
greater efficiency in the control and education of those remaining, 
thongh at greater expense per eapita. 

We had eighty-flre children last year at this time. Ten have 
since been admitted tjizteen have been dischai^ed. One (Albert 
Pence) died, and one boy deserted soon after his admission. So 
that we now have on the rolls seventy-seven. Of these latter three 
are absent with leave and about to be discharged, leaving seventy- 
foar actually at the Home, tliirtj-seven of each sex. 

No change has occurred in the management of the Institution 
during the year, either as to its officers or the manner of conducting 
its affairs. These are so fiiUy set forth in our report of two years 
^o that it seems unnecessary to state them now. 

Mrs. Eemp^n, as Matron, vindicates her peculiar fitness for the 
poaition more and more with the lapse of time, and together with 
ber assistant, Mrs. Claghom, merits the renewed thanks of the in- 
mates and officers of the institution. 

The educational and saniUury condition of the Home will be 
shown by the accompanying reports of Prof. Phelps and Dr. 
HcGanghey. All that baa been heretofore said in rec<^DiUon of 



zedbyGoOgle 



20 AMKUAL BEFOBT. 

the efficient service reiulered by tbe Norioal Sohool, ita officers and 
teachers, aod by our excellent physician, may be appropriately re- 
peated in considering their aid during the past year. The health of 
the children has been excellent, and their educational progress has 
been better than ever before. 

Expenditures classified as nearly as practicable are as fcdiows : 

Groceries and ProrlsioDS • 8,800 ST 

Dry Ooods 1,995 86 

Employees 3,198 K 

Bent 1,800 00 

PoroilDre 478 27 

Repairs and ImproTements SS8 00 

Shoes and Hats 80G 46 

Fenl M» 87 

Sewing . 667 6S 

Rstlroad Pare »1 78 

Books and Stationer;.... 289 7S 

Gas ia» 10 

Insnrance 68 ST 

UndasBlfled Items 891 88 

Total #14,088 t» 

Besides several hundred dollars outstanding claims not yet pre- 
sented. The above does not include moneys paid through this office 
for childjeu residing with widowed mothers. 

Tour personal observaticn of the workings of the Home renders 
further report unnecessary. Thanking you, gentlemen, for your 
unirorm coartesy and assistauce, we renew our pledge to contribute 
all in our power to advance the objects you have here undertaken, 
during the few remaining years that this institution will be needed, 
and we fully believe that when the task is ended we shall all be able 
to discern ttiat your labors have not been in vain. 
Respectfully submitted, 

0. B. GOULD, 

Superintendent. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



EEPOKT OF SUKGEON OF HOME. 



To tkt Board of TnuUet of Soldiers' Orphan* ofMinnetota: 

Tfa« inmatea of the " Home" during the year ending September 
80, 1875, enjoyed good health the greater portion of the time am- 
braced in this report. 

The epidemic of Opthalmia, which bad prevailed toward the close 
of laat jear, completely sabsided within one month ftom date of 
last report ; eince which time foor casea have occarted at irregnlar 
intervals ; none of these were severe. 

In the winter of 1874-5 a few cases of Bronchitis and Pneomo- 
nia were produced, bat they were of mild type, and oonTalescenoe 
was speedily established. 

The only severe illness that appeared in the following spring wag 
that of Albert Fence, aged 15 years, who died on the 11 day of 
April, 1875, of inflammation of the brain, following abcess of the 
ear, disease proving fatal within five days fVom date of attack. 

He displayed remarkable natural abilities for one so yonng ; was 
noiversally beloved by bla comrades for his many excellent qnal- 
ities, and his death was deeply regretted by all who knew him. 

On the 24 day of April, John Hennesey, while attending a picnic 
on the bluffs near the city, fell from one ledge of rocks to another, 
snatainlng a compound fracture of ooter table of frontal bone, and 
severe contnsions of face. He was oonveyed home and his wounds 
dressed ; a high grade of inflammation followed, after which pieces 
of bone became detached and were tlux>wii ofl^. Recovery event- 
nally resulted, with slight deformity. 

Is the oases last mentioned I bad valuable aid and counsel from 
Drs. F. Staples and A. B. Stewart, of this city. 

The immunity from intestinal diseases during the snmmer months 
was doubtless owing to the good quality of the food furnished, and 
the ftvorable hygienic condition of the building and its surround- 
ings. 

The children, almost without exception, are now in perfect 



zedbyGoOgle 



22 ANNDAZ. BBPOBT. 

health ; tbeir clothing is comfortable and kept im good order ; in 
fact there ia oothing in theii appearaoce to indicate that they are 
not all aa properly oared for as In the well regalated homes of the 
better claues of the oommnnity. Very respectfkilly, 

J. B. UoOAUGHT, M. D. 
Winona, October 1, 1876. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



EEPORT OF SUPERINTENDEIfT OF INSTETJCTION OF 
ORPHANS. 



To the TViMtMf of the Sotdlm' Orphcmt of the State ofMinnemta: 

Grntlihck : — The toUl number of Soldiers' Orphans ander tn- 
Btroction in the different departmente of the State Normal School 
during the year paat has been, Including thou not in the Home : 

HalM 40 

Female! U 

Total SB 

The coarse of f nBtmotlon and the methods of discipline heretofore 
reported hare been oontinned without suhetantial modiDcation 
during the year, yielding results that are a source of gratifloation 
and pride to every fHend of the beneficent institution committed to 
your paternal care and guardianahip. The progressiof your wards 
in their studies, in self control and in growth of character is 
Btrikingly Indicated by the fact that they are now to be foand dis- 
' tribnted through every division of the Normal School, from the 
primary model to the graduating class in the Normal department, 
while two have already graduated as teachers, one of whom, a young 
lady, is now employed in that capacity In the public schools of 
Winona at a salary of fifty dollars per month. The other, a young 
gentleman, has taught successfully for two terms, and Is now a 
Btadent in the ITniveraity. Two others, a lady and gentleman, are 
nembers of the class that will graduate on the 2jd of December. 

The present distribution of the Soldiers' Orphans through the 
several classes is as follows : 

Class k. Normal S 

CIsM B, Kormal 1 

Class C, Normal t 



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24 ANNUAL HEPOKT. 

ClMSD.Noraiftl 5 

ClMs E, Normal B 

Third Model ClMs 80 

Second Model class 21 

MistModel CUvw IS 

All who have ha^ an opportunity to note the progress of tbese 
children ^om their adtnUaion to the Home to the present time, have 
abundant cause for gratitude and rejoicing at the results to which 
their actual condition now bears witness. Many who came to as 
but a few years since as little children, in the previous enjoyment of 
the most scanty means for social, moral and intellectual culture, are 
to day affording the moat gratifying proofs of the possession of 
every manly and womanly virtue, and of a good preparation for a 
life of honor and usefiilnesa. Tli&nks to the beneficient influences of 
the Home,.and (he school in which, dnrisg their tender years, they 
have been carefully traioed and nurtured, the State may look with 
■atisfoction upon a noble work thus far conscientiously, fbithflilly 
and' worthily performed. 

Th4 undersigned has heretofore suggested that in strict Justice to 
these ehildrcn, as well as inobedienceto a wise public policy, such of 
them as show the proper degree of aptitude for the work, should be 
allowed to remain both at the Home and the school until they bhall 
graduate as teachers, and he placed in a useful and self-eupporting 
position. This policy is especially to be urged as applicable to 
the females, who are naturally more dependent than the opposite 
sex, while they are conceded to possess a special aptitude for the 
duties of the teacher. 

Should this plan be pursued, it may be fairly estimated that by 
the close of the next year from eight to ten of the orphans will . 
have been thus prepared and sent forth to discharge the duties of a 
noble and useful calling. 

It is a fact worthy of notice, also, that several of the boys who 
have been employed during the past year in some of our banking 
and commercial establishmentB, have given the highest satis faction. 
As a manifest result of their discipline asd training, they are char- 
acterized by promptness, obedience, industry and fidelity, as well 
as intelligence in the discbarge of their duties. It may be 
safely affirmed that the children of the Orphans' Home will com- 
pare favorably as to Intelligence, good conduct and character, 
with any eqnal number to be found, even among the more highly 
favored classes. They affoid as a whole a most instructive illus- 
tration of what can be accomplished by good school and home infla- 



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ADJUTADT aBNEBAI,. 85 

ances in the fonnatloD of character. That their fhttire lives will 
amply joatiiy the wisclom of the proTision which haa been made for 
their inatraction and maintenance there is no good reaaon to donbtt 
for aa effects are certain to follow their cansea, eo a noble manhood 
and womanhood are sore to resalt form the persistent application 
of right Inflaencee during the anaoeptible period of childhood and 
yonth. 

Respectflilly anbmitted, 

WM. F. PHELPS, 

Sap't of Inatraction 

S. 0. Home. 
WnoHA, October 1st, 187fi. 



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III. 

SOLDIERS' CLAIM AGENCY. 



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HEHBT A. CASTLE, 
AdjvbiMt General, and Ba-Offleio 3tale OlaifA Agtni. 



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STATE CLAIM AGENCY. 



The Uws, (Gen. Laws 1673, page 234,) make it " the daty of the 
Adjntut General of this State, to act as claim agent for all persona 
haying olainu i^ainst the government of the United States, for pen- 
lioiis, bounty, or back pay, when saoh claims have arisen out of, or 
by reaeon of the late war ; and he shall prosecute such claims withont 
pay or compensation from the party seeking such pension, bounty 
or back pay." This system was originally adopted in this State in 
1^65, and has been of incalculable advantage to the ex-soldiers, and 
the relatives of the deceased, as will be seen by reference to the 
Btatements hereinafter given. These numerous olaims have been 
proaeoQted at a small expense to the State — but a Iraction of what 
the legitimate and well>e&rned fees of Attorneys would have been, 
to say nothing of the extortions t^ unpriucipled agents, and thus 
the ftall amount of the pay or pension, which at best is but a pit- 
tance, has been placed in the hands of the recipient. The statlstioa 
show that the work is by no means finished. Very many old claims 
remain yet unadjusted, owing to the slowness of the Departments 
at Washington in reaching them, and- the slowness of claimants in 
supplying evidence called for. And many new claims are annually 
presented, the annual amendments by Congress to existing laws 
opening the door to many fVesh esses. 

COMTINDUIOB OF '^K PLAH. 

I make no argument for the continuance of llie woi^ of tiiis de- 
partment of the oflSce. Tlie facts show a necessity of that contin- 
uance, if the obligation of the State to her soldiers is still reoognized. 
' There are probably over thirty thousand ex-«oldiers living in Hin- 
nesota to>day, over one-half of whom served in regiments from other 
States, and have been largely drawn hither by the extra induce- 
ments offered them as settlers on the public lands. They abure In 
the benefits of this work, and it is proper that they should. They 



zedbyGoOgle 



80 ANHUAI, BEFOST. 

' fought, not for New York, or Ohio, or Illinois, but for the whole 
country — Minnesota included, and Hinuesota owea as muoh to them' 
aa to her own gallant sons. They are now oitizens and taz-[>ayerB, 
but are strHggling with the hardships of frontier life, and, as well 
aa the men. who enliBted from Minnesota, moat gratefully appreciate 
the favor of the State in this regard. Whenever the number of 
claims presented or pending ceasua to be sufflcient to Justify the cost, 
the work ahonld stop. Otherwise it must continue, until Uie State 
ceaaes to feel its obligation to perform it. 

VrOBK OF THB AQBKCT. 

By an inspection of the tables below, it will bo seen that the total 
colleotions af the i^^ency during the eleven yeara of Ita existence is 
$497,016.91. But this gives an inadequate idea of the money value 
of the oolleotioDB, since in the oase of penaiona only the amount 
ao<»rDed at date of receipt of certificate is counted, while the trae 
method is to capitalise the certificate at its income-producing value. 
On this basis, Lhe penaion certificates, producing on an average one 
hundred dollars a year each as income, are worth to their owners 
an average of one thousand dollars each. Hence the money v^ne 
of the 981 pension certificates procured during eleven years is nearly 
0N< million doHars, while our atatement places tbefa at only a little 
over tl50,000. , 

WORK DUBIMQ THE PAKI TXAB. 

The tables show a slight decrease in the number of claims filed 
during the year 1875, but a very large increase in the number col- 
lected, and a considerable increase in the amount collected. Thia 
amount, on the old basis of calculation, is 116,221 00, but on the 
true basis, above indicated, is 179,052 72. The work done on re- 
jected and unfinished claims, old and new, is, of course, greater 
than on those collected. In addition to this, hundreds of letters of 
inquiry Irom aoldiers concerning penaion and bounty laws have 
been answered ; certificates of service have been flirnished ; ad- 
dresses of officers have been given to Minnesota soldiers now resi- 
ding tn other States ; and written or verbal information has been 
givoi upon every conceivable matter relating to our work. All 
this has been done without a dollar of expense to individuals inter- 
eated. Hie labor of prosecuting claims has been of late greatly 
Increased by the increasing strictness of tests applied by the de- 
partments at Washington. This is doubtless made necessary by the 



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ADJUTANT OUrHRAL. 81 

Ispee of time ; nd since it l» ao part of the doty of this office to 
praMnt fraodnlant cl&ims, we bftve no right to oomplain. 

1B» MEW CLAIIU. 

Surprise is frequently expressed that bo many new olaims an 
being presented at this late day. The experience of this office 
shows that very many very clear cases of persons deserving pensions 
have I>een withheld ftvm the not very worldly-wise but certainly 
patriotic and honorable feeling on the part of the ex-soldier, ^at 
being able to earn a enbaietence in spite of his disability, he would 
not call on " Uncle Sam" for help until obliged to. But a change 
of oiroamstances or an increase of the disability, or the advice of 
more " ifrndent" friends constrains bim at length to ^ply. This 
motive mastbehonored,and the claimant has certainly not forfeited 
bnt has rather increased his rights, by so long reflraining from de- 
manding them. There are andonbtedly many names on the pension 
roll which have no right there, but on the other hand there are 
many Justly entitled to a place who have never sought it, and the 
government saves large sums every year by this generous forbear- 
anoe of some of her best and bravest sons. 

PBOSFXOnVX LZaiBLi.TION. 

The bill for the equalization of bounties, which having passed 
ttiTongh the last Congress, was only defeated by the veto of the 
President, is a measnrex>f Justice which will yet, in some shape less 
detrimental to the financial interests of the country than the plans 
heretofore proposed, be riealized. An increase of the allowance to 
pensioners of certain classes should be made and andonbtedly will 
command the early attention of Congress. 

TABUiaTKD STATUUMTB. 

The following tables give a detailed extiibit of the transaotions of 
the claim department during the past year, and during the eleven 
years of its existeace. 

HENBT A. CASTLE, 

Adjutant General, 
and ex-ojfficio Claim Agent. 



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[UXRCUTIVK DOOUMBNT, Nl). 8 I 



ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE LIBRAEIAN 



MINNESOTA, 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30th 1876. 



ST. PAUL: 

riONHK-PRICBB COMPINT. 
IS7« 



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HmiMOTA State Librart, ^ 
St. Pacl, November SO, 1875. i 

His Exeeileney, Cuahman K. Davit, Governor of JUinnetola : 

Sn : — I hcve the honor to Ir&nBinit herewith the annQal report of 
this depsrtmeiit. 

Very respecti^Uy your obedient seirant, 

JOHN C. SHAW, 
State Librarian. 



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REPORT. 



HiMNKSOTA State Libbart. 
St. Padl, Nov. 30, 1875. 

To the Honorable StruUe and Mouse of BepreMntativea : 

GEMTLEMKif : — Ab directed by Btatnte, the following report of the 
department in my charge is respectfully aubmitted : 

The Lt^alature of 1875 appropriated (1,000.00 for the purchase 
of law books, which has been expended as follows : 

BODOHT OF SOULS, TBOMAS * WEMTWOSTH, 208 SOOTH 4tB STKBBT, ST. 



VOLS.' COST. 



Wallace {U. S.) Kcpurts, vol. 30 and postage ' I • S SO 

Abbott's Practice, vol. IB 1 | 8 M 

D. Cblpman'B Reports S 1: 

Brayton's Reports i 1 5 IS 00 

Coart of Clalma. (U. 8.) TOto. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 '5 21 25 

BlatcbfOrd, vol. 11 .' \ 1 ' 6 SO 

Benedict, vol. 6 ' 1 , BOO 

Wbeaton's(U. S.} vols. 1 to 19 , 13 100 00 

Wharton on Homicide 1 6 SO 

Clark and Flnelly, (House of Lords) vols. 1 to la i 12 ! MOO 

EDglish Chancer;, toIs. « to 69 | 4 | » DO 

Smith's Probate Law i 1 I 1 TB 

Browiw on Trade Harks I 1 [ tin 

Hawkins on Wills I I 8 60 

Appleton on Evidence ' 1 j 1 75 

Wharton on Negligence I 1 SOO 

Sedgewlck on Statutory and Constltntlonal Law { t 600 

Tbacher's Criminal Cues 1 6 00 

Schooler's Domestic Relations , 1 625 

Horee on Arbitration 1 6 00 

phUlipson Mechanics' Liens ' 1 o U 

^ler on Boondaries, Ac , 1 4 76 

Coolej's Constitutional Limitations { 1 6S6 



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ANVDAL RBPOBT. 



AnsUn'a JnrlipnideBca--" 

Hadley's Bom&n Law 

Tyler on Ejectment 

DttOolyaran Oaanntee, Ac 

Dean's Conveyance 

Coke on Littleton 

Smith's CommeDtarleB. 

Angel and Ames bo Corporations — 

Bonvler's Law Dictionary 

Germain's Doctor and Stodent-.. 

Sawyer's (U. S.) Reports, vol. S 

Blsaell's (IT. 8.) Reports, *ol. t 

Daly (N. T.), vols. 8 and ( 

Bngllati's (Ark.) Reports, vol. 8 

Howard's Practice, vols. 1 to 48..... 

HoQckoD Rivers 

Louisiana Reports, vtz ; 

Martin's, SO vols, in 10 

Lonlslana, vols. 1 to 12 

LoalBlana, vols. 17, 18. IE> ' S 

Robinson's, vols, 1 to 12 

Lonlslana Annnil, vols. 1 to 9 

Lonlslana Annnal, vols. 14 to IS 

English Law Reports, viz: 

Equity Cases, vols. 17, 18 

Chancery Appeal, vol. 9 

Qaeen's Bench, vol. 9 

Exchequer Cases, vol. 9 

Common Fleas, vol. 9 

Privy Conncll Appeals, vol. S 

In Parte : 

Privy Conncll Appeals, vol. *, part 1 

English and Irish Appeals, vol. T, part 1 

Probate and Divorce, vol. 8, part 2 

Scotch and Divorce Appeals, vol. 2, part 6 ! 

Admiralty and Ecclesiastical, vol. 4, part 3 : 

Crown Cases, vol. 2, part 2 

D. S. Digest, vol. 6, I at eerlee , i 

Jones i Spencer, (N. T.) vols. ItoG ' C 

Crancb, (U. S.) vole. 1 to 9 I 9 

Shacwood's Legal Ethics ! 1 

Simmon's Wisconsin Digest, vol. 2 1 

Wallace (D. S.) Reports, vol. 21 : 1 

Hardin, (Ky.) 1 

Klrby, (Conn ) I 

Barbour's Chancery Practice i 2 

Price's Exchequer, (18 vols. In 6] : 8 

Brscton s Treatise 1 

U. 8. Digest, N. 8., vol. 6 1 

Daallas, (U. 8.) vols. lto4 ; 4 

U. 8. Digest. Ut series, vol. 7 i i 



vou. oovr. 



I 96 

s ss 

S 00 

S IS 



9 OO 
S 60 



6U 

88 00 
98 OO 
1 60 
6 60 
S 00 
lOO 
7«0 
11 00 
16 00 
I » 
S15 



BOnOBT OF DODLBT BROTHBSB, ST. PAUL, lOini. 

Lacey's Digest of Hallway Decisions 



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STATB LIBBAKUN. 



RECEIVED BY EXCHANGE. 



CALIFOBNU. 



BaporU, voU. U, U, 47, 4$. 



8«m1ou P^ptn, t vols. 

Censni, I rol. 

Hlftoi7 of tbe Law ot Cuuula, 1 toL 

SUtntes of Cauula, 2 vols. 

B«porU ofDeputiiMDU, 6 vols. 



LaWB of PakoU, 1B74, 70, 1 vol. 



BaporU, volomet 49, SO, SI. 

Lawi, 1ST6. 

Scuate and Honae Jonroal, 1876. 



Lawa of 18», 74. 
z.awaaf 187S. 
School Kcpon, 1 vol. 



Report!, M, 37, 88. 



BeporU, 4G, 4<, 47, tS. 
Lawa, UTS. 
Ooologlcal anrray. 



lAWi, ia7S. 

Agricaltdral Bepott, IB74. 

Public DocameDto, 187S. 



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8 ANirOAI, BEPOttT. 

LOUISIANA. 

KoporU, SS. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

lUporU, 111, IIS, 118. 

HABTLAND. 

B«porU, 86, 89, 40. 

Laws, 1874. 

Sanau aod Bonae Joarnal, 1ST4, 2 vola. 



MISSISSIPPI. 



RepoTta, GO. 

IfKwa 1876, Seulon Knd Bxtrm do. 

8enat« and Hoiue Journal, 1878. 



MINNESOTA. 

Report*, TOla. 19, 90, 6 copies each. 
Lawa, I87S, t coplea each. 
BlBsela Stntntea, 8 coplea each. 
Senate aod House Jonmal, 1B75, 6 coplea. 
Bzecntlve DocnmenU, 1878, 6 coplea. 



MISSOURI. 



R^Wrta, SO, 97, SS, W. 
Laws, tS74, 

Territorial Lawa, vol. 8. 
Pobllc AcU. 1876. 
Joint Docntaenta, 187S, 8 Tola. 
Joint DocninentB, 1874, 1 Tola. 
Reporii of Library, 1B74, 1 toI. 
Report of Board of Health. 
Report, A^cnltoraJ. 



NEW HAHPSHIRB. 



NEW JBR8ET. 
ReTlaed SUtntea, 1874, 'TS. 



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I 



STATE LIBKAHIAN, 
NEW TOEE 



Beporta, S6, 57, iS. 

Han's do., 3, 3, i. 

Hegenta do. 

BouBOarlce. 

TrikI ofPrlndle, CortlB, And UcCnne. 



OREQOH. 
Laws ftud DeclaioDS of !}upreini; Court, 1874. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
Reports, vola. "4, 76, 76. 

RHODK ISLAM). 

•76. 

80DTH CAROLINA. 
Reports, KlchBrdsOD'H vols. 8, 4. 

TEXAS. 



TENNESSEE. 



Reports, Relskell, 6, 6, 7. 
Acta, I87S. 

Senate and House JoDrnal, 1871!. 
Appendix to do. 



Reports, Tol. 46. 

Reports of Qovernor and Coancil. 

Laws, 187*. 

Leglslatl ve Directory . 

RegtotratloD Docnmenta. 

i 



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ANHDAL BBPOBT. 

WEST VraGINIA. 



WISCONSIN. 



Reports, (Reprint) I, 2, 8, 4. 
Hepnrts, (Current) 34, B6. 
Laws, 1S76. 
BxecQtIve DocomeDta, 187B. 

The following Legal Periodicals have been subscribed for by 
direction of the Judges of the Supreme Court ; 

JuiQftr7 1, 1876, American Law HeglBt«r, 1 year t B 00 

April 1 , 1876, Soatbero Law Review, 1 year 5 00 

Hay 1, 1878, Albany Law Journal, lyear C 00 

May 1, 187S, Cblcago Legal News, 1 year S SO 

Total flT SO 

Under instructions from Jadges of Supreme Court I have sold the 
following duplicate and out of date Text books. The proceeds are 
applied by the Judges to payment for Law books : 

Peters CoDdensed Reports, (U. S.) 9 Tolamea, sold to W. F. Smith, 

per J. W. Taylor — • 8 OO 

Boavlers Law Dictionary, 2 volomes, sold to J. W. Taylor 4 00 

Angel and Ames on Corporations. 1 Tolama, sold to J. W. Taylor. . . S 00 

Cooley on Cocstltntlonal Limitations, I volame, sold to H. C. James 8 00 
Sedftewlck on Statutory and Constitutional Law, 1 Tolame, sold to P 

H. Carlton 8 00 

Total »18 00 

I have transmitted the following books to each State and to Can- 
ada, Congressional Library and Smithsonian Institute. 

Laws, 1874, General. 

Executive DocamentR, 1874, '75. 

Minn. Reports, vol. 20. 

Journal, Senate and House, Minn., 1874, '76. 

The Legislature appropriated |150 for binding books. Expended 
as follows : 



JOHN C. SHAW, 

State Librarian. 



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[EZBODTm DOOOMMm, No. 9.] 



ANNUAL REPORT 



INSPECTORS AND WARDEN 



THE STATE PEISON", 



TO THE LE6I8UTUEE OF MINSESOTA, 



FISCAL TEAR ENDINO NOV. 30, 1876. 



SAinT PAUL; 
I nomiB-FBaaa oompuit. 

1876. 



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INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



OmcE OF Warden State Fxuom, I 
Stillwatke, Dec. 10th, 1875. ) 

To his EMseOencg, C. K. Davia, Governor of Minneaola: 

We have the honor to hereirith Bubmit our report of the oonditioD 
of the PrUoD for the fiscal year ending Nov. SOth, 1675. 

The number of convicts in the Prison at the dale of our laat re- 
port was 134. 

The whole number received daring the year was 96, and the num- 
ber discharged, during the same period, was 84. 

The number in prison, Nov. 80th, 1875, 146. 

Average number during the year, 188 5-6. 

Tbe expenses at the prtBon during tbe past year were Wi,99t OT 

The earnings of the prUon, including anppUes on hand 30,ST8 8V 

Z«aTiDgttie actnal oet cost * (IdiSSO 18 

Or $18946 per capita. This is a redaction of the per capita cost 
of last year of tl9.11. 

The appropriations for improvements, last year, were aa follows : 

Wot extensloa of prison 9SS,866 SO 

Tor boIIdiDg clatera 4,84fi 70 

for contingent Auid 1,000 00 

VorboIldlDg OTen 60000 

Vor repairing warden's boose 100 00 

There remains unexpended of the above fhnds as follows : 

DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



4 AmnjAi. EBPOBT. 

la:teiia1ou of priaon $I>»GS<^ 

Contingent ftuid A84 U^ 

BalldlDg oven 3S1 00 

Total 91^10 60' 



The other fbnds have been ftilly expended for the parpoeea for 
which they were respectiTely appropriated. 

The priaon boilding haa been enlarged by the erection of fifty-two- 
additional cells. Iron corridors have taken the place of.tbe woodeD 
ones, and a good stone floor has been placed in the cell building. 
The worb has been done under the superintendence of A. M. Rad- 
liff, architect, and we are satisfied that it is well done. This com- 
pletes the cell building in aocordanoe with the reoommendatioaB 
made by us one year ago, and it is not contemplated by ttie BoarA 
to ash for anything flirther in this direction. 

The amoQDt expended out of the contingent fhnd was for the cap- 
ture and return of escaped convicts, and we ask that a like amount 
be q>propriatcd as a oontlngent fund for the ensuing year. 

Under the act lor condemnation of laud for the use of State in- 
stitatious, we have caused to be condemned, laud enough to secure 
oertain never-failing springs of water, and ground for a cistern to 
hold &,000 barrels, as a water supply and protection against fire. 

This enterprise has been completed within the appropriation for 
that pnrpoee. The cistern Is located on an elevation about 150 feet 
higher than the prison grounds, oonneoted with pipes running into 
the yard, with hydrants at convenient points, eo that water can be 
thrown to any part of the prison buildings at any time, and is the 
most perfect protection against fire yet devised. 

The Warden's report gives in detail the expenditures and earnings- 
of the prison, to which attention Is invited. 

It will be seen that all expenditures have been made strictly in 
accordance with the laws appropriating thom, and In no case has 
the cost of the improvement exceeded the appropriation, while, in 
several of the dififerent funds, there remains a balance unexpended 
amounting, in the aggregate, to 11,510.60. 

Owing to an accident by Are we have t>een obliged to incur an in- 
debtedness, for which an appropriation is asked. 

The fire destroyed the roof and upper story of the boiler and en- 
gine building, leaving the machinery exposed, but fortunately un- 
injured. It was imperatively necessary that repairs be at onoe 
made. This we caused to be done nnder the supervision of oar ar- 



zedbyGoOglC 



IKBPECTOBS OF 8TATB PRISON. 5 

'ddteot; alto hftving the billB examined and improved by Um. 
Tbay are as follows ■* 

•ajmonr, Sabln A Co., lalxtr and nMteiUls tt,40l Tl 

Ferkbu 4 B«lt, Iron roof. Mi 00 



•S,BOT 71 



Tbeie Mils hare not been pud as there was no fkind oat of wbieb 
-the Board could pay them. We earnestly ask that an appropriation 
be made to cover them. 

We have &lso been compelled to prOTtde 1,000 feet of hose for 
the nse of the State, the old having become rotten and unreliable in 
-ease of Are. We have contracted witb J. J. Bandall, of Winona, 
fin- 1,000 feet of the New York Bnbber Co.'s best hose, inclnding 
-couplings, noszlea, nipples, and 4^6 inch iiose pipes, to be delir- 
-ered at Stillwater for the snm of 11,124.40, on 90 days' time, said 
wnonot to l)ear interest after 90 days, llie price is low and terms 
favorable, and we ask that an appropriation be nude to cover tbia 
•mount, or that anthority be given the Board to apply the moneys 
temalning unexpended for this purpose. 

Steam pipes have been placed in the cell building, and connected 
irith the boilers in the engine building, for ttie purpose of heating 
with steam. 

Plans and estimates were made and submitted to the Legislature, 
last winter, showing the desired Improvementa and extension for 
tiie prison. All improvements made during the past year have been 
In aooordauce with these plans. No appropriation was made, how- 
ever, for completing the wall around the prison grounds. The old 
board fence still remains a constant invitation to attempts to eso^w. 
We ask that an appropriation, Bofflcient, at least, to build the wall 
4m one aide of the ground, be made. The estimates for a wall SO 
Ibet high on the north side is 116,000. 

We also repeat our request for an appropriation to build a laun- 
dry and bath-house. The estimates for this improvement is II 2,000. 

We call attention to Che necessity of a change in the law in re- 
gard to a bouse for the Deputy Warden, llie law compelle him 
to reside at the prison, but the State has no suitable place for him 
to live, and this <^Soer is obliged to rent a hoose, as Dear as practi- 
cable to the prison, tiie rent of which he pays himself. It would 
seem that if the Deputy is required to "reside at the prison," the 
State should furnish him a suitable residence. 

We cordially endorse the suggestions and recommendations made 



zedbyGoOgle 



6 ASSUJJ, BEPOBT. 

by the Wuden, and bear teatimony to the efficient and anocessfal 
oondnot of the prison under his management. 

We refer you to the accompanying reports of the Physician and 
Chaplain for a fall aoooant of (he sanitary and moral condition of 
the prisoners. 

As the nambers increase it becomes more and more evident that 
the services of a permanent chaplain and physician, to reside at the 
prison, are desirable. 

The estimated expenses for tbe ensniog year are as follows : 

SsJtrlHof offlcerg $1S,0W 

Carrent expenses SO,000 

Contingent fDDd • 1,000- 

Total 9K,V» 

For which an appropriation is asked. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. a BUTTS, 

J. B. M. GASKILL, 

J. H. CLEVELAND, 

Inspectors, 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



WAllDEN'S REPOKT. 



D,j.,.db,Go'oglc 



,db,Googlc 



OFHCEES OF THE MINNESOTA STATE PRISON. 

DECEUBEB 1. 1875. 



B. O. BUTTS, J. B. H. QASKILL, 

3, B. CLETBLAND. 



J. A. BBBD. 

INBTIFTT WiXDMa, 

W. W. WILUAlfS. 

J. H. UACOHBEB. 

raraiGuir, 

O. U. LAHBBBT. 

OLSBX, 

VBAHE CHABE. 
anwAMD, 
ABE HALL. 



B. V. BOBNS. 



WAU, aUAKDB, 

WM. SMITH80H, H. C. PIBBCB, 

BBHJAUra CATON, J. C. OAKDNXB, 

ALBZ. ABH8TB0NO. 

aHOF aOABM, 

C. C. BOKDITKLL, A. BOTTIHG, 

HOWABD PACKABD, BAILBT UADISON, 

WM. P. STICKNBT. 

NSIL UOKAT. 

mOBT aUARDB, 

aBOBGB 8BNCBBB0X, A. WIL80H. 

WH. HALL. 
t 



.V Google 



I 



,.db,Googlc 



REPORT. 



Otficb Wabdxn Minnksota Sta.ts Pbisok, > 
Stillwatkb, December 6th, 1875. | 

To the Board oflrupeetort Minnesota StaU FHaon: 

GraiTLKmN ; — In scoordftnce with the provision of the iaw for 
the government of the State Prison, I have the honq^.t^ epbmit the 
annnal report of the Warden for the fiscal year ending November 
80tb, 1876 : 

FOIinjlTIOH. 

The namber of prisoners in oonfinement Nov. 80th, 1871, were : 

lum. fmwIm. 

From U. 8. mlUtarT coarts IS 

From U. B. district courts 8 

From coaatr coortA lOT 1 



Received dnring the 7 



From U. 8. mtllury courts.. 

From coBBtj coarts 

Beeqitired 



Total conflnemeiit during the year 

Number discharged during the jear ; 



zedbyGOQt^lr 



12 



AHNUAI. BBPOBT. 



Upon expiration of ■entonce • 8 

Upon explntionof Hotenoe 1«M a portloa of Ume allowed by law 

fcr good oondnct M 

Upon expiration orseatonoe leas (Oil anonat of time allowed bj 

law tor good oondnet SI 

Pardoned b7 Freeldent U. 8. Grant 1 

Pardoned by Goreroor C. K. Davis U 

Pardoned br Couu^fandtng OOcer Department of Dakota 10 

Tranirerred to Port LeaTeaworth, Kanaaa, by order of Seeretair of 

War • 

Sent to laiane Aajrlmn 1 

ed I 

Number remaining In Frlao* Not. MHh, IKS • 

Halei. rraulea. 

FromU. 8. HUItarr Conrta S 

FromTJ. 8. Dlatrlot Conrti 5 

IhomCoantr Conrta 184 S 

lU t 



The total number of cbtys in oonfloement are clusifled as follows : 

No. of days labor tor oontraotora n,SH 

No. of dare labor for Bute «,TM 

Ne. ofd^nalsabled 9,nt 

No. of dsTB under pBnlihmeat Itt 

Koof Snadtra 7,014 

No.orho11dar 4M 

No. ofdariloatbTdrelnBhope tf 

Total 50,<n 



Making an averpge of 188 5-6 prisonem in oonflnement daring the 
year. 



for the prison daring Uie year have been as follows : 





»Sr' 


BlVMd'd 


«SF 


AetuI 
total 






'iSSg 
'1SS 


.^1 


•its 5 
'•ffiS 


aothlniKnd t«ddtn| 


S| 


tMQO 


^si^^Xi^iif&E:-:}— 




■ss 


^ssr-'^-—"—-''' - 














•iMMei 


|S>,9W07 


tu^u 


taM«> 



The eamings for the year tiave been as followa : 



zedbyGoOglC 



WABDBN OF 8TATH PBUON. 18 

BaDtorsbopsaDdgronnda 9100 00 

CoBTlctUbor U,000«9 

BoirdingD. 8. tntllUiT conrlcts l,SM4f 

Boarding n. 8. district court conTicta MSi 70 

Bmrdor J. CotsU ud otherB tftU 

SalfloflsrdburelB, ftc 18000 

Gatefeea 170 31 

Porftlted b7 cooTlcta flrom good conduct fund UM 



<l9,flM 08 



Total «xp«iuea 189,99907 

TotiJeunlngB « 19,684 08 

BxcaMof lnvontoi7 OTerlutyear •. . I.IUSI 



$20,976 89 



Actual nuinlDB axpensefl of prison for flacsl 7«ar. • 



statbhuit SHOwne sruatioh or aAsinReB. 

Caafa paid State Treasanr for rent and convict labor t9>409 88 

Caab paid State Treasurer for Boarding U. 8. UillUrr cootIcU. 8,906 98 
Caah paid Stata Treasurer for Boarding 0. S. Dlatrtct Court 

convlcta 1,248 4S 

Due from Bejmonr, Sabin & Co., for rent and convict labor 3,488 M^ 

DnefromU. 8. for Boarding Military oonvlcta 819 81 

Due from U. S. for Boarding District Conrt conTlcts 174 16 

Carried to Good CoDdact Fncd 8^ OS 

Paid from Gatefbes for Books, ftc, for Library SO OO 

Casb on liand. Gate fees 84 U 

Caah carried Carrent Expense Fnnd, mlsceUaneons rec«lpta.... 808 OS 

«1»,BS4 08 

BmiUTKD BK0XIPT8 OV PRUOK TOB 1878. 

Kent olahopa and gronnda • #100 00 

ConTtct labor 17,000 00 

Boarding U. 8. UllltarjcoDTlcta 800 00 

Boarding U. S. Dlatrict Conrt convlcta 1,800 00 

Gate fees and miicellaaeona 600 00 



•19,900 00 

Pencmal property Nov. 80th, 1875 #13,809 U 

Value of Real Eetate as valoed by Board of Inapectora, Decem- 
ber, 1, 1869 #73,261 10 

ImpravemeDtalnlSTO ii,soo uO 

Improvemente lnl871 68,484 38 

Inprorements In 1872 6,81)3 60 

Improvementa In 1878 40,000 00 

lBproTementslnl874 8,800 OO 

Improvements In 1876 84,628 08 

#289,366 08 



JigiLizedbyGoOt^lc 



ANNUAL BBPOKI. 



ABsrrs or psuom. 



Be&lEaUte |2S9,2Se OS 

Pereooal propertr 13,509 41 

Doe from Sejmour, Bablo k Co. for rent and convict I ftb or 8,4S8 66 

Du« rrom United States Ibr boarding military prlflonen 329 61 

Dne from UnttMl States for boarding Dlatrlct Coart prlaot>eTa<<. 174 8G 

CMhonhMUl 8,396 91 

#U8,1U i>S 

OOOD CONDUCT rtlMD. 

The convicts hare been accredited with 8,6S7 dajs earned by 

good conduct during the jear, at 16 cents per day (8,886 65 

Cuh on hand Dec, 1. 1BT1 (08140 

Jan. 10. Amount deducted Ttata cath received for rent and la- 
bor, and dOB conrlcts Tor good coodnct Ibr October, HoTem- 

ber and Decemljer, ISTt SSI Ot 

April 10. AmoDDt dedacted ftom cash received for rent and la- 
bor, and dne convicts far good conduct for January, Febrn- 

ary and March, 1876 966 80 

April 16. Interest on deposits 7 74 

July 10. Amount dedncted from cash received for rent and la- 
bor, and dne convicts for good condnct lor April, Hay and 

Jnne, 1876 983 36 

rAng. !6. Interest on deposits M 46 

Oct. 10. Amount deducted fMm cash received fbr rent and la- 
bor, and dne coDvicls for good condnotfbrJaiy, August and 

September, 187G •1.03)88 

tM,77SM 

rash paid convicts fh>ni good conduct fund #S,S77 41 

Cash on hand WB» 

Cash deposited Id St. Crolz Valley Savlaga bank 1,0S14S 

Cash forfeited by bad condnct 44 40 

•4,776 98 
TOTAL 0A8H BKCSIPTS. 

Cash on hand Dec, 1, 1874, carreat espenae flind f 4.894 GO 

Cash on band Dec. 1, 1874, good condnct (tand 984 40 

Cashrecelvedon Inspectors' orders topiyaalarlesof officers... 14,868 61 

Cash received on Inepectora' orders to pay current expenses.... 11,000 00 

CarhrocfllTed rornntand convict labor 18,17! 71 

Ca»>h received (br boarding n. 8. military convicts 3,)06 84 

Cash received for boarding U. S. District ConrtcoDvlcts 1,148 U 

Caah received from mlscelUneoas aonrces 478 90 

Cash received. Interest on Deposits, good condnct fund 38 30 

•68,667 66 

TOTAI, 0A8H DUBDBaUIUm. 



JigilizedbyGoOglc 



WABDIH or STATU PRISON. 15 

Paid State Treuonr cub received for boKnUog U. 8. mJlltuj 

ooD'lctt S,»6 88 

Paid State Treunrer cuh recetred for boarding U. S. District 

Conrt eonrlcta 1,148 41 

Paid coDTlcU ftom good condact fand a,t3l 87 

FaM fOi; books, Ac, for library from gate fbea 86 00 

Catili on liand, current czpeDse ftand 8ST 60 

Cash on band, good conduct fQitd 9,1M 06 

Cash on hand, gate fbea mod M 25 

•S8,6«7 90 



INVENTORT OF PERSONAL PROPERTY BEL0N01N& TO 
^MINNESOTA STATE PRISON, NOV. SO, 1875. 

CXLL BOOK. 

CknOaog, bedding, flimltnre, stoves, Ac 95,884 90 

CBAPKL. 

Orgao, stoves, chain fSfilOO 

aoapiTAL. 
Bvddding, Aunltuie, hospital stores, ftc #427 40 

HBBS BOOH. 

Tin wan, stora, ketUe, cooking ntensUs, *c •SOfi 89 



Stove, Aimltiiro and cooking ntenslls - r..>. 9166 80 

PAMTBT. 

Crodcarr, to 910917 

nOBB BOCW. 

dntenslls 9Ul SS 



I, Aoar, *e 9148 S9 

' DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



16 AHKUAI. BKFORT. 

Dnfno BOOK. 
TablM, Cham and store ynOD 

8UABDS* SRTINO ROMf. 

TablM dMin and store (lOau 

OLOTBDIO BOOH. 

Clotti, leather and clothing #sn TO 

SHOE SHOP. 

81i0«MUEei*B toole, shoe flndlngs, leather and fkiniltiire..r 9H 90 

TAILOS SHOP. 

Cloth) clothing, tailors' tools and ftirnltare fUB u 

amraRoa boom. 
I^rnlton 9SI fiO 

eUABDS' BBDBOOK8. 

Fnniltim and bedding tX7» 

VnULBOILU. 

' Bedding and ftmttnie. 9110 U 

OELLABS. 

i ntenege |SU 10 



Washing macUnee, .clothing and ftiniitnre HOS U 

PBISOK TASD. 

Wood, coal and implements 9S,41C00 



Firearms, amouttlon and nimitnie |M> U 

OFTIOB. 

Pnnltan, blank )x>oks and atatlonerj •NDU 

fUiMOtf 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



WABDBN OF PTATB FBISOX. 



FROM WHENCE OONVIOTfl WEBE RECETrED SINCE LABT BEPOBT. 

U. 8. milltarr conrtfl 8 

Anokft coQDtj 3 

OIkt couDty .' 1 

Crow Wing connty 1 

Dakota coanty... 4 

Dodge couDty M 

Faribault cuQOty-.. .....' 3 

Fillmore conD^ , 5 

Ootxtbne cotmty 3 

Hennepin roDDty 13 

HoDBton connty , i 

Lyon connty I 

LeSaenr connty 1 

Howor connty 3 

Olmated coouty 3 

HIce coantr 13 

Ramsey con n^ 10 

Steele connty 8 

Wabaiha connty i 

Wrlgbt coQDty 3 

Winona connij 18 

WUklD connty 1 

Waablngton urniDtj '... S 

Waseca cooDty 3 



D,g,L,zeclbyG00gIc\ 



ANNUAL BETOBT. 



MATtVm AKD OBIKES OF CONVICTS RECEIVED BIMCE LAST RBPOBT. 



NAtlTlty. 


ii 


1 
II 

-1 


i 


1 


6 III 

||sl 


1 1 


1' 

51 


1 


il 
1 

o 


1 


i 






3 

I 
1 
1 


1 










, 










1 ■ 


1 '■ '■ 




Sweden .•.* 


































I 












1 
































3 . 












































1 
































District Colombia. 
















































































1 




















































































I 




































■8 


- 


1 


1 


8 8 


8 < 













D,j.,.db,Googlc 



VABDBH OF STATS PRiaON. 



> TSUU or •BMTBNOB OV OOKTIOT8 BIOZITED SOrCB LUT 





t 


1 


i 


F 


1 


ll 


i 














1 
1 






2 


S 


1 


.... 


'.'.V. 














I 
« 
1 

1 






3 


4 


4 














S 

1 


S 






















1 

s 

"«' 

s 














S 

1 


4 
B 


1 


1 












8 


» 


.... 














S 














1 
1 




.... 








1 


s 
1 












s 
















1 














1 














8 


4 


9 


1 














18 


M 


88 


IS 


8 


4 









D,j.,.db,Googlc , 



ANNUAL HBPOBT. 



SOCIAL BiLATiom Or Qcomcn ik omiFDnmHT mot. "90, 1875. 



OOOVPATIONS. 



Agent 

Bkrber 

Batcher 

Blftcksmtth 

BookbiDder 

Broom maker 

Brick maaon 

Cook 

ClTll englDeer 

CaDTtaaer 

Ctrpeoter 

Cooper 

Dragglit 

Bngtucer... 

BspreM meMcnger.. 

Farmer 

OUh blower 

Oloiem«ker 



Laborer 

Lambennan.... 

Macblnlat 

Uerchant 

Hlller 

Monldxt 

Hloatrel 

Paloter 

Pall maker 

Pilot 

Sboemaker.... 
Scroll Bawrer.. 

Soldier 

Stone cotter... 

Tnrner 

Tailor 

Tioner 

Wheelwrixht... 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



WAKDEN OF STATE PBISOlf. 




II lain 
B ^ § § s ai 

. .:-:■_..- -..:- sr--,. 



:i I gsa gsassasgitfe asssasagssss'isas^s ggaaag 



ill UtiMi ^isptiliitiililii ilirA 



I ii 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



ANNDAL BEFOET. 



jdbyGoOglC 



WABDBN OP STATE PKISOK. 



i 

1 


^Lliili 


ii 
Ml 


1 1 , 


i 


SI 


1 ! 


1 

i 
s 


isiiiili 
iiliilfl 


iiisi 




i 

i 


is 


iiiii ii 


i 


nil 


«j4 
111 


liytlfit 

lii 


{ 


It 

!l 

II 


tflft If 

iiim 



i » i 



i 

ili 
it 

Hi 



lillllH' liM il?i!|Nis i 11 ii^ll If 



d . ^ {{• ' i s^ . . ^ . dl ^ ^ 

Iflsills fis-l •lirsilllB s II l«!l! Is 

tiiisitl nisi SiBlUSsBi I i» »»-la {I 



D,j.,.db,GoOglc 



ANKDAL BBPOKT. 



it t- E^ ecE g^sEset- ^i i iiiii 
lU'iU lli'lUllll'l' 11 i «l4lHSJ 



simis arsm 



a 3ra„.:;; 



I liilJ^il llills^llllill II f ia^lllii 



I I sisaaasss 8$8$;;ss»ssssss sst s sasss^sks 



|:|l|t|£ Ms:1^^3si:ill II I Uhihl 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



WARDEN OF STATE PBIBON. 



1 


iilkil 


i 

1 
1 


II III II 


1 


fill! 
Ilili 


1 


.1 

a 
1 

Mil 


s 


Btsaasa sa 


i 


.31 1 


1 


ill 


^ 


5*53-2 23 



,db,Googlc 



ANNUAL REPOKT. 

i i iiiii iii 

£2aai3Qe^2a5e'S^sO£asscQaaA 
MlidM|UadiM:^Mii|.£oi>UMB.i.^Mlidl 
tSuciaduadiicJaeiaaePuuBaouudi 






■ i i .is 






1 



II 



1 ill f 






it 5 S S -s ■: S= s 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



WARDEN OF STATE PBI80N. 37 

The past year baa been one of more than ordinary qnlet anti 
bamtoDy at the prieon, with few exciting events. 

On the afternoon of July IStL, oonvict Leonard Soper made hi« 
escape from the yard, where be had been at work. He dodged be- 
hind an angle it the fence, which sheltered him trom tbe view of 
the guards, when it waa the work of but a moment to cat bis way 
ODt with tools previoasty secreted abont bia person. He has not 
been recaptured. 

Tbe fence was at once straightened, hut is still a poor enbatiluCe 
for a inbetantial stone wall, such as should surround the yard, and 
without which absolute immunity f^em escapes can never be at- 
tained. It has been only by the exercise of the utmost vigilance, 
that more seriooe consequences have not occurred from the failure 
of tbe 8tate to bnild this wall. I would recommend that an accv- 
rale survey and estimate be made for a wall on the north side of 
the prieon yard, and that yon aak the Legislature for an approprift- 
tion to build at least that much. 

Abont four o'clock on the morning of September 22d, flame» 
were discovered issuing trotn the taok-ioom, over the boilers, in- 
the workshop. By the prompt action of the prieon ofltcers and em- 
ployes, the flre was kept in check until the arrival of the olty Sre 
coDpaniee, by whose aid and that of citizens generally, it was con- 
lined to the room where it origiirated and the adjoining room used' 
B« a paint shop, and was alllmately extinguished without damage 
to the workshops. When tbe combustible character of tbe material 
with which the shops are necessarily filled and the then existing^ 
bcilities for eztlDgnishing flre are taken into consideration, this oc- 
currenoe eanitot M regarded otherwise than as a most miraculous 
escape bom a general conflagration. 

The earnings of the prison is a matter over which we have bnt 
slight control. The receipts for labor during the past year were 
$8,278.04 more than for the preceding year, while the total amount 
<a earnlnga is only $272.69 more. This small increase arises prin- 
cipally ftvm the fact that the earnings for boarding United States 
Distriot Court and military prisoners during the post year amount 
to only t8,9fi9. 19, while tbe receipts for tbe previous year fVoi» 
that source were 16,499.47. The military prisoners, with the ex- 
ception of Ave, have been removed to the military prison at Fort 
Leavenworth, Kansas, and it is not probable that any additional 
ones will be sent here, thus cutting off that source of revenue. 

By tbe exercise of tbe strictest economy, tbe expenses of tbe 
prison have been kept within the amount of the approprtatitfu, not- 
withstanding on additional guard was employed and tbe salaries of 
the Physician and Chaplain were increased upon the recommendo' 
tioD of the Legislative Committee, after the estimate of current ex- 
pense for the past year bad been made up. 

"Die expenses are seemingly large for the population of tbe prison^ 
bnt by referring to tbe summarized statement of current expense, 
elsewhere submitted, it will be seen that nearly one-half of the anm 
U expended lot sahu^es of officers, fuel and lights. These items 
woold be bnt a trifle larger were the population five hundred instead 



zedbyGoOglC 



S8 ANNCAL asroBT. 

of one hundred and fifty. The increase of twpaUtion must, thure- ' 
fore, gradually bring the prisoa nearer a Belf-sostaining condition. 

Desiring to bring my report i^ithin the smallest possible oompasa, 
1 have omitted an itemized statement of disbareements. Vouchers 
for every dollar disbursed for current expenses are on file in the of- 
fice of the State Aaditor, and also in this c^ce. 

Hany valuable and permanent improvements have been made 
during the past year : Fifly-two addiUonal cells have been built ; 
the old wooden oorridors and stairs have been replaced with iron ; 
the cell-room floor has been relaid with fl^s, and steam and gas 
have been introduced for heating and lighting ; thus, rendering the 
building practically fire-proof and more easily kept clean and whole- 
some. Pure spring water has also been introduced luto the oeil- 
room and cellar kitchen at a slight expense and proves a very great 



The reservoir, holding 4,500 barrels of water, has been oomplrted, 
and a six-inch water pipe, with fonr hydrants, has been laid throogfa 
the yard, between the work-shops and the prison building, from 
which eight streams can be thrown simultaneously over the highest 
part of the buildings, thus affording a reliable means of extinguish- 
ing fires independently of the steam pomp in the engine room oX 
the shops. The facilities for extinguishing fires are now so great 
and BO quickly and easily put in operation that it seems impossible 
for any extensive conflagration to occur. The bell and hose tower 
has also been completed, and is not only an omament to the bnild- 
ing, but is a safe and convenient store-room for hoae. A new oven 
has been placed in the bake-room, which gives complete satiafaction. 

The sanitary condition of the prison has been excelleoL No 
deaths have occurred dnring the year, and the sickness, of which 
there has been very little, has been confined mostly to chronio casea 
of long Btanding. For more complete information upon this mat- 
ter I would refer you to the report of the Prison Physician. 

BecogniziDg the fact that there can be no healtJi without cleanli- 
ness, and no prosperity without health, it is our ponstanb endeavor 
to keep the prison and its inmates in as clean condition as posailde. 
The building contemplated in the plan of the prison, to be used as 
A laundry and bath-house, would be a great help in this regard, and 
is an urgent want of the institution. 

As to the moral and spiritual condition of the prisoners, I wonld 
refer you to the report of Bev, J. H. Macomber, Priaon Chaplain, 
who has been earnest and faithful in his endeavors to improve them 
in this respects. I have reason to believe that his efforts have been 
attended with good results. Father JIurphy has also held freqneat 
and acceptable services in the prison during the year. 

The conduct of the prisoners has been, in the main, good. No 
doubt, there has been a very substantial improvement iu this re- 
spect, for while the discipline of the prison has not been relaxed, it 
liaa been found necessary during the past year, (with an average 
population of 168 5-6, to inflict only 142^ days of puniahmeot; 
while during the previous year, with an average population of 
112.66, the number of days of punishment inflicted was 207f. 
fitiiot discipline has been maintained, with a firm, unyielding, bat 



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WARDEM OF STATE PRUON. 29 • 

kind and fanman* management. TriSing with and abase of prison- 
en is atricUy prohibited. If a prisoner violates a rale of the 
prison, he is sent to his cell, and the fact reported to this ofBeo ; 
when, after a careful examinatioii of the circumstances attending 
the offense, he ia dealt with by us directly as the case seems to 
demand. Very often a kind word is more potential thaa Revere 
puaishment. The State has made very liberal provlsioa to encour - 
age those who are deairoaa of doing right, by enabling them^ 
through good behftTior, to shorten their terms of confinement. The 
State haa also made a generooe provision by which they can earn 
a anm of money, while liere, with which to assist their destitute 
funilteB or aid them in starting again in the world when disohargedr 
without necessarily resorting to crime. Certainly one of the chief 
aims of an institution of this kind should be the reformation of 
those committed to its keeping. The moral nature of an inmate of 
a prison cannot be at a standstill during his incarceration ; in thia 
reepeot he must either progress or retrograde. Id other words, 
when dischai^ed, he goes into the world either a better or worse — 
infinitely worse — man, and in the latter case, especially, becomes 
i^in a terror to society, an, expense to the State and curse to him- 
self and his fHends. If no higher motive ptevaila, the safety of 
the community and the economy of the State demands tliat person» 
oonvicte<t of crime and committed to prison for the pnnishment 
thereof should be reformed as far as possible before they are again 
restored to liberty. When thus withdrawn from the influence of 
evil associations and deprived of the power to exercise bad habits- 
and impulses, their baser passions can be toned down, and the de- 
sire to commit crimes greatly weakened. They are very thoroughly 
schooled in self-government and often for the first time find them- 
selves under the control of a power that compels their turbulent 
spirits to yield to wholesome restraint which can hardly fail to have 
a salutary influence on their subsequent career. Many, very many, 
are here for the commission of crime while in a state of intoxica- 
tion or under the influence of liqaor. Here they have ample oppor- 
tunity to practice the virtae of temperance and to leaiii, by experi- 
ence, that the use of strong drink is necessary neither to their health 
or bsppiness. 

It is reasonable to suppose that some will permanently reform and 
become useful citizens, upon their return to the world Others are- 
here who, fortunately for themselves, were apprehended and broaght 
to punishmeat for the first offense ; they find to their satisfaction 
that " the way of the tran^ressor is hard," and many, no doubt re- 
solve to " go and sin no more." There are, cf course, some upon 
whom all efforts at reformaUon are in vain. Some are seemingly 
predisposed to commit crime; while others have grown old and 
hardened in the violation of law and the endeavor to gain a liveli- 
hood without labor, or the pursuit of a legitimate occupation. The 
reformation of snch, I believe, requires the exercise of a power 
higher than that possessed by man. 

While it is undoubtedly true that intemperance is the great pro- 
moter of crime, I have been very forcibly struck with the fact that 
almost all persona oonunitted to this prison while it has been under 



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so AMKDAL BBPOBT. 

my charge have bad no regular occupation or skilled trade ; this is 
'best shown by the figures. Out of prisoners sent here duriax the 
past year, only very few claimed to be artisans, or in the possession or 
any regular means of support, and many of these latter had but > 
«light knoirledge of the calling which theyclaimed to pursue. The 
pusaessioD of a regular avocation no doubt oonduoea to the forma- 
tion of habits of industry and integrity and also gives to the pos- 
«ossor a Armor respect for the rights and property of others. He 
«ees that property Is gained only by patient labor, and learns to re- 
spect its possession. lam firmly convinced, that if parents would 
make it a rule to teach their children to labor, and see that they 
■Mn taught some useful trade, crime would rapidly diminish, and 
their ofi'spring would leas freqaently bring them to ahame and dis- 
grace. 

In closing this report, 1 desire to tender my thanks to Deputy 
Warden Williams for his ever ready co-operation and aid in the 
general management of the prison ; to Hr. Frank Chase for the 
^cient and satisfactory manner in which he has discharged the 
■duties of bookkeeper and usher; to lir. and Mrs. Hall ^ for tbsir 
unceasing attention to the afi'airs of their department ; and to the 
guards generally for their vigilance, fidelity, and gentlemanly de- 
portment. 

To bia Ezcellenoy the Giovernor, and to your honorable Board, 1 
am under many obligations for timely suggestions and decided 
marks of approbation. 

Bespectfally yours. 

J. A. BEED, 

Warden. 



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CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



HiNNBSOTA State Pbisox, 1 
SiiLLWATKE, Not. 30th, 1875. f 

7b tk» SonorabiU Board of Inaptctora : 

QwwrLBMtx ; Ab Chftpl&ln of the Wnnesota State Prlaon, in pT«- 
seDtfng my uina&l report, I woul<1 Brat of «11 exprau my gratefal 
thaoks to Almighty G^, the great soarce fVom whence oometh all 
oar bnlp, for His UesBing bestowed upon me aad my work, io thU 
c^woity, dnring the year, and for the frequent tokens for good Id 
my eflbrts to raise these fallen men. Qnite a number hare been in- 
dooed to forsake a sinful life, and have become praying men. 

Preaching services have been regatarty maintained on Sabbaths at 
9 o'clock i.. U; and it has been very gratifying to witness the close 
and earnest attention on the part of the convicts to the presentation 
of God's word. We have earnest alnging, led by a good organ. 

We have organized a religiooa society called the Prison Christian 
AsBOoiation. All those who are endeaToring to live a Cliristisn 
life, and also those who are earnestly desiring so to do, are permitted 
to come Into the meeting of this association. These meetings are 
held Sabbath afternoon. The services consist of reading the Sorip- 
tarSt silking, prayer and conference, and iuatrnotion by the Chap- 
lain with reganl to a religious life. And very many good resolutions 
luive been formed and expressed In these meetlngBy which we hi^ 
Bi^ IM lasting. 

ia all my labors and intercourse with the men, I endeavor to im- 
pnaa the advantage and importance of living up atriotlr to all the 
rolM of the prison, and present as incentives : 

Jst. — That it is according to the spirit of Ood's word, that we 
be obedient to those wbo are properly in authority over us. 

Sd. — That it will have a tendency to cultivate a law-abiding dis- 
position In themselves, which will be of valne to them when they 
again have their liberty. 

Sd. — I refer them to the good-time law, which, by the way, Z oon- 
^der a good thing as a he>per to good discipline. I have been hap- 
pily disappointed since my connection with the prison to find a 



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SS AmniAL RBFOBT. 

general dispoaitioa od the part of the prisoners to render oheertni 
obedience. While they ocknoitledge iVarden Beed to be a strict 
disciplinarian, he, at the aame time, has the high esteem of all com- 
mitted to his charge, as he gives evidence of a large and hamane 
heart in his constant endeavors to promote their well-being, both 
physical and moral. 

It is a pleasant part of my duty to visit each man at bis cell, 
shake hands and pass a fevr words, qnote now and then a passage 
of Scripture, and distribute religious papers and tracts, and urge 
them to reformation. 

It has been my privilege to witness many tears, and to receive 
many warm pressures of the hand on the part of those addressed at 
such times, as they have freely acknowledged their sin, and in Uirsi 
have received a word of exhortation and encouragement. 

While there are some men here who are professionals in crime, 
for whom we can have but a faint hope of their permanent reform- 
ation, there are a great many more who are young and have known 
comparatively liitle of the world, bnt have been well raised and 
have honorable parents — on going ont from home have fallen into 
temptation and are here for th* first crime committed in their lives. 
Others are here who have been allowed to grow up in ignonuoe, 
and were a very easy prey to the tempter. Still others are here 
who, in other years, have been in good ciroumstaDces, but by some 
misfortune have lost their property, and in the hour of dejection, 
have given way to the tempter, and to the great grief of their aonlt, 
have landed in prison. Among these classes we have a hopefhl 
field. In the great majority of oases, these men claim thatitis* 
(directly or indirectly,) through the influence of the terribly " ntsi 
Jlend " thai they are here. 

I wish to say that some of the most pleasant momenta of my ex- 
perience daring the year have been realized in connection with my 
efforts to encourage these unfortunate men to reform and U> become 
Cluristians. And I find my love for the work on the increase. I 
only regret that I have not more time to devote to it. Having 
charge, as I do, of a church in the city, as its preacher and pastor, 
my time and strength must of necessity l>e divided. 

The importance of the Ciiaplain's work seems to me to be so 
great, that it ia my honest conviction thsX he should be grantod a 
fair support in the way of salary, so that he might devote all lui 
time and energies to it, as they do in other prisons. Then tie ooald 
have a general snpervision of the library, hold Bible schools, and 
also have charge of a secular school, in which many might obtain 
Uie rudimente of au education, and be belter prepared for usenil- 
oest when they go out. 

I am much pleased with the disposition manifested on the part of 
many to learn and to read. Very many are obtaining a great 
amount of good information, by reading the books furnished them 
ttom the prison library, and many of them read more or less in 
their Bibles every day. When we can get men to read, they will 
think, and there is hope In their oaae. 

In closing my report, I wish to acknowledge my obligations to 



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WABDBir OF STATB PKIiON. 38 

Warden Heed for his ever ready spirit manifested to facilitate my 
•mork as Chaplain in every possible way. 

I would also gratefatly acknowledge the uniform spirit of ooartesy 
and kindness extended to me by your honorable Board and Deputy 
Warden Williams, and, ki short, all the officers of the prison. In- 
deed, onr relation ifhroagh the entire year has been of the moat 
pleasant character. 

I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, 

J. H. UACOMBEB, 
Chaplain. 



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AHMDAI. fiSfORT. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



MnmsBorA Statk Pbison, ) 
Stillwatxb, Nov., 80, 1875. f 

To the Hon. Warden and Board of Inapectora : 

Gbntleken: — Permit me herewith to hand you my report for the 
year ending Nov. 30, 1875. 

Tod will, I am certain, find canae for congratulation upon the 
marked advance and improvement in the sanitary as well as otber 
departmeDts of the prison. In the first place you will percieve that 
the prisoners have been singularly exempt from any endemic or 
epidemic disease, even such as have occured in private practice out- 
side. 

So for, the prisoners have shown no indication of Goncamination 
or the effects of local or distributed disease of any form. 

The fact that men of that character which places them where they 
now are, are in a great man}' instances, the victims of various forms , 
of excess, accounts for a large part of the sick list. Constitutional 
aud specific diseases require almost constant treatment. So far, it 
bsB been my good fortune to cure or repress most serious manifesta- 
tions and to supply the duty-list to a degree that seemed impossible 
at the start. 

To the earnest endorsement of my efforts by the Prison Warden 
and his subordinate officers I am indebted beyond all power of cor- 
rect expression. Further along these facts explain themselves. 

In considering the list of diseases herewith appended, I would 
call attention to the fact that for a considerable portion of the time 
repairs have been going on in the elevation of a part of the prison 
building, which Left the men in that part exposed, in a greater or 
less degree, to atmospheric changes. Though considerably more 
than necessary ventilation was thus afforded, there has been but lit- 
tle increase in sickness ; less, eertatnly, than would have been look- 
ed for. None know better than medical men the result of atmos- 
pheric changes upon men afflicted with specific disease. The pe- 
ouliar variations of temperature marking our previous aommer have 



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WAXDm or 8TATB FEISOR. 85 

■bown tbenuelTfis, to & certain degree, particatarly Id syphilitic 
rtieiimatiam. That no worse resnltE have ensded are due to the 
anfailing and anremitting zeal aad eaergy displayed by the Warden 
and his Depnty and assistants generally. Let me hsre say that 
tboogh, as physician, I have heartily endeavored to «lo my duty, 
yet, withOQt the cordial and sympathetic aid flimlshed me by the 
presiding officers of the prison my endeavors would have been, to a 
great measnre, negatived. 

Id regard to idiopathic diseases, the list will show that they have 
been comparatively few in extent; what there has been, by close 
watching and attendance, were kept in bonds. To the Honorable 
Board of Inspectors, I desire to acknowledge my indebtedness for 
the furtherance of all reasonable requests for assistanoe in the san- 
itary reqairements of the prison. Again, to the members of the 
State Board of Health, it is no less a duty than a pleasure to ac- 
knowledge the benefits due for their kindly and courteous sugges- 
tioDB which have in no case failed to prove their value, and to de- 
monstrate, in effect, their necessity. 

To the Warden is attached, In the highest degree, credit for his 
personal and immediate efforts in seconding the application for a 
new and perfect supply of the purest and only respectable supply 
of drinking water so far ever afforded the oonricts. 

Personal cleanliness has been rigidly enforced by tjhe Warden's 
orders. 

The food furnished has beeo of uniform and excellent quality, 
and its preparation by the Steward and his ezoellent wife, (Mr. and 
Mrs. Hail,) all that could be wished for, and I desire to return 
thanks to both for their uniform courtesy and attention to the wants 
of those patients immediately under my care, as well as to myself 
individually, as an officer of the prison. 

The Chaplain, Mr. Macomber, and the visiting eleigy — Bev. Fa- 
Uier Murphy and others, are entitled to great praise for the benefl 
cial care and influence exerted on behalf of the unfortunates con- 
fined in the prison. Every pfaysician appreciates the value of moral 
teaching under such conditions as exist in au institution of this 
kind. It is an important adjunct to his own success. 

The Board of Health suggest the use of zinc buckets in place of 
wooden ones. I concur moat heartily in the suggestion. I here- 
with present detailed report of sick, etc. 

Finally, let me call your attention to the fact, in lieu of 93 pris* 
ooera at the end of last fiscal year the amount has fiuctuated be- 
tween that number and 150, since. Ton will percieve that my sick 
average, to-day, is little more than one-half of that embraced in the 
year previous, over which I had the honor of partial supervision. 

lAst of diseases, not including others-than those who were excused 
from duty; but only such as were necessarily confined either in 
hospital or sick cell : 

Abcasa 8 

AmpntaUons (minof) 8 

*«tl(n^ 4 



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AHNUAI. KBPOBT. 



Cbolera Morbus 

ChtllB {CoQgestlTe) 

CODtnslODB 

ConieltlB 

Chuicres 

ClrrfaoaiB (Hppktatls) 

CatUixb (iQtestin&l) 

C&Urrh (NmrIIs) 

CollM (UriniB) 

CardtalKlB 

CoUcft Bullosa 

CephtJtlgla 

Cnmps 

Constipation 

CUheritlsm for Stricinre 

Dropny (Abdominal) 

Debility (Qeneral) 

Dyspepsia 

Dysentery 

Diarrhea 

Dislocation (Clavicle] 

Excision (Sypbllltlc Fangna).. 

ErysipelEui (Facialis) 

Enteritis 

Excision (CtoU) 

Febrls (Intermittens) 

Fsbrls (Bemlltens) 

Febrls (Commnnia} 

Fractnre [Finger bones) 

Oastmis 

Bepattils 

BBmorrholds 

Hernia (IngolnaJ) 

Insomnia 

InBammstlon Bladder 

Jaandlce 

I^nnibBgo 

Hastnrbstlon 

Neorosls (General) 

Neuralgia 

Opthalmla 

Odontalgia 

Operation Cataract 

Operation Iritis 

OttoTTbea 

Fslpltstlon Cardls 

Pbthlsls Pnlmonallfl 

Fbsryn^tla 

Pericarditis 

PleorUy . . • 

Retention Urinn 

Bbematlsm, Chronic 

Kheamattsm, Syphilitic 

Bheamatlsm(lDtlainmatar7)->- 

Bhenmatlsm (Artlcolaris) 

Sperm at torrhes 

Syphilis, Cbronlc 

Stricture, Urethra 

Sprain 

Sciatica 



TonslUtes.' 
TesUtas.... 



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WAHDUI OF BTATB FBUOIT. ■ 87 

Tynipaiiltes- I 

Uniuria 1 

Ulcer (Syphilitic) 1 

UntheralcU. 3 

VulcoM Velna 1 

Wonna (Iiit«sUD*i ud Bectal) 18 

Wonnda (Incised) t 

Wounds (Slight) 8 

TaiMl nombor tresMd and reqnlring freedom from datj.. 4S8 . 

Total DDmbar ofFresc 8,381 

Total DnmberTlBlts 489 

Arerafe daily sttendaacc IndadiDg all clasaei of pstleDts T 

Deaths VorcK. 

N. B. — An excess of visits was occasioned b; the serioas condi- 
tion of Convict Ditch, who lost his eye after operation; also, by 
reason of several serious cases of stricture. 
All of which is respectfully referred, 

GEORGE M. LAHBEBT, 
Physician Minnesota State Prison. 



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D,j.,.db,Googlc 



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[ExEOtiTiTv DoouuBNT, No. 10.] 



NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



MINNESOTA 



'STATE REFORM SCHOOL, 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING NOV. 30, 1875. 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



BOAED OF MANAGERS. 



D. W. IN0ER60LL, St. Paol, President. 
Hon. OEOKQE L. OTIS, Bt. Pwl. 
HOK. C. H. PETTIT, Ulnaeapollg. 
X. 6. BLASDEL, St. PmI. 



F. HcCORMICK, SecreUry. 

D.. A. UONFORT, Treuarer. 

J. a. EIHELDAFFER, SnperlDtoDdent. 



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EEPOB.T. 



To Si» EceceUency, Governor Ouahman K. Davis; and to the Hon- 
orable, the Legislalure of the Slate of Minnesota : 

The Managers and Superintendent of the Minnesota State Befo^m 
School, hereby present this their Niotb AdduhI Report. 



We acknowledge with gratitade to God, the great blessing of 
«ninterrnpted health of the inmates and employees thronghont the 
year. We have hod do sickness. 

One boy was committed on a charge of larceny who had been an 
Invalid all bis life, afflicted with asthma and heart disease ; he was 
flo fflfble that he could not perform any labor, aor come under the 
discipline of the school. When. he had been a few weeks in the 
institotion, and we saw that he was a subject, fit only for a hospital, 
or a mother's core, we wrote to his parents and requested them to 
remove him. But they did not think it best. Soon after the boy 
died of heart disease. His remains were taken charge of by his 
parents and bnried in the cemetery of East Minneapolis. 

The work entrusted to onr care hu been pursued as in former 
years and with the same encouraging results. 

As the years pass the boys who have been inmates of the institu- 
tion and honorably discharged, become young men, commanding 
the coofldenoe and respect due to a life of honest industry ; we see 
more and more the salutary effects of onr care and training, and 
are more deeply impressed with the sense of the importance of tbe 
peculiar work intrusted to the State Reform School. 

DISCIPLIXE. 

From the first tbe institntion has l>een under subatantially the 



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4 AininAI. BBFORT. 

Bftme mftnagement, snd mKiifiged apon the same flmdamental prin- 
ciple. 

That principle iu that every child, in order to his proper devet- 
opement, phyaically, mentally and morally, needs the inflaence and 
diaoipltne of a well ordered home ; and this mnst be to him as much 
of a home and aa mach like a family as it is possible to make it. 

There is no difference. In kind, between the management and 
bringing np of ten children or a hundred. The same rules of dis- 
cipline vill apply in the one case as in the other ; there are more 
dispositions to study ; a greater amount of responsibility, and 
Taatly more patience and labor required in the latter case than in 
the former ; in all other respects the work ia the same. 

KDHBBB or nniATBS. 

There baa been bat a slight increase in the number of inmates 
since a year ago. The discharges have about kept pace with the 
commitments. If this indicates a decrease in the number of delin- 
queat youth in the State, it is matter of congratulation. We 
cannot, howerer, attribute it wholly to this canae. The impedi- 
ments in the way of securing the commitment of " incorrigible 
youth" to the Beform School, are so groat, that some, at least, who 
are suffering for these privileges, and whose future welfare, as well 
as the public good, would be promoted by their temporary confine- 
ment here, are kept out. 

COUNTI COUICISSIOMEBa. 

We beg leave respectfully, to call the attention of your Excel- 
lency, and of the Legislature, to the fact, that the County Commie- 
aioners of each county, are the ultimate authority for tlie commit- 
ment of an incorrigible boy or girl. 

This, if it stood alone, and each case had to be decided upon its 
intrinsic merits, might not be objectionable, but might serve as a 
protection against improper commitmiinta ; but when taken in con- 
nection with the further fact that each county ts pecuniarily respon- 
sible to the State for the clothing, maintenance and instruction of 
the inmates sent from it, the motive to prevent becomes unduly 
potent. , 

We cannot see the Justice of taxing each coanty for the support 
of its juvenile criminals any more than for the support of its adult 
criminals. Those sent to the State prison are supported by the 



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BBTOHU eOHOOI,. 5 

State; many are sent to the Reform School for ofibDoes that would, 
but for their youth, send them to the penitentiary. 

The ]aw very properly provides, " That whenever any infant 
anderthe age of sixteen years, shall have been convicted in any 
of the courts of this State, of any crime punishable by imprison- 
ment, except of the crime of murder, it shall be the duty of the 
m^istrate, before whom such conviction Is had, to commit the said 
infant to the guardianship of the Managers of the Minnesota State 
Beform Sobool." Why, then, should the county in which such con- 
viction is had, and such humane sentence passed, be made to pa; 
the expense of this exercise of hamanity on the part of the State ? 

We respectfully submit whether the State Beform School has not 
earned a right to be placed upon the same footing as to the source 
of its support, as the other State charitable institutions. And hav- 
ing been appointed to manage this institution for the State, we 
•claim to have given to it more thought and attention than would 
naturally be given to it by those who have not this personal respon- 
sibility in the matter. Hence, we give it as oar Judffment, that it 
would greatly promote the usefulness, and facilitate the management 
of the Beform School, to relieve it from the necessity of the inter- 
ference of every county that may happen to have inmates in the 
institution. 

WHAT HAS THE INSnTDTlOH DOME? 

Of the 280 youths who have had the benefits of its training, 171 
■have gone oat into the world, either to the care of their fi'iends, or 
to make their own way in life, and by their conduct to prove to the 
-community the fruits of the training they have received, whether 
beneficial or otherwise. We are happy to know that their record, 
as a whole, is alike honorable to themselves and to the Beform 
School. 

With but a few exceptions these boys and young men give good 
evidence that the training furnished them by the State, in this in- 
stitution has not been in vain. We cannot claim that all who have 
left the school are conducting themselves as we oonld wish ; we 
know of three or four, out of tliis 171, who have been arretted for 
disorderly or criminal conduct. 

But these exceptions are not of the number of those who have 
been cordially diechai^ed upon their own merits. Tbeir dischai^ 
was procured by the persistent importunities of their friends ; 
backed up witii petitions numerously signed, often by prominent 
4nd inflnential citizens ; sometimes the complaining witness, the offl* 



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6 JUmUAL BEPOBT. 

cerB uid coarts that were instnunental in their comtnitmetit, ue 
foand on such petitions for the discharge of snoh inmatei. Thus 
an almost irresistible pressare is brought to bear, and boys are 
fiirloughed whose best interests would be promoted by their longer 
detention in the institntion. 

The greatest kindness men can do to a boy whose bad condnob 
has brought him to the Reform School, is to let him ramain there 
until those who have him in charge and are laboring for his refor- 
mation, are satisfied that he is prepared to be discharged. 

Not nnfrequently strenaoas efforts are made by county boards to 
get boys out of the Reform School, simply to save the expense of 
their support. We beg these gentlemen to estimate if they can, 
the value in doUara and cents, to the connty and State, of making 
a good citizen out of a bad and almost ruined boy 1 

DOKS TT PAT TBI COUMTIKS TO OBT HOYS OUT BBFOKB THET ARE RK- 



We cite two of the cases above alluded to. One 16 years of age 
was sent to the institution. After be had been there four months, 
his release was procured in answer to a petition signed by officials 
of the city and county from which he came and by officers of the 
court. Since his release he has been frequently arrested and Im- 
prisoned; recetttly after a protracted confinement in the county 
Jail he has been tried by the district court and found gailty of 
larceny. 

The other, whose discharge was urged to save expense to the 
county, went home to his county, where he was arrested for horse* 
stealing, awaited his trial in the county Jail for Beveral months, 
subjected the county to the expense of a trial in court, and bis 
transportation to Stillwater, where he is serving a term in the peni- 
tentiary. We believe that these two boys would have been saved, 
if they had been left to the regular course of the Reform School. 

We have had boys committed for larceny nnd incorrigibility ; Uiey 
came to us ragged, filthy, ignorant and vicious. They were washed, 
clothed, put to school and to work ; their training careftilly looked 
after ; they Improve wonderftilly ; their friends come to see them, 
perhaps inside of a year ; and after congratulating them on th«r 
improvement, all at once it occurs to them that a great injustice is- 
being done in keeping the boy a whole year or more in school, for 
an ofilbnse that would not have kept Aim in the cojoUy jail six monlhi. 
A i» hard to be an orphan ; it ie worte to have such proteclort I 



zedbyGoOgle 



BUPOBH SCHOOL. 7 

Om DAT JX THE BKFORII SCBOOt. 

We cannot better conrey an idea of the means need to train and 
refbrm the jontb committed to our care, than by drawing a word 
picture of a single day's work at the Reform School. 

At six o'clock In the morning, the risiiig bell rings. Boys rieo 
immediately, dress themselves and make their beds ; they then fall 
into line and march in military order to the wash-room ; wash and 
comb; no conversation is permitted during these duties. They 
again fall into line and pass to the school rooms ; here they Join in 
singiDg a few verses ; the officer in charge reads a portion of Scrip- 
ture, then all rise, and standing repeat, in concert, the Lord's 
Prayer. Again they fall into line and pass quietly to the dining hall 
where breaki^t is in waiting ; all sit down at the same time, and 
eat their breakfast in an orderly and quiet manner, in the presence 
of an officer, who sees that each is saitably provided for, and that 
proper decorum is observed. 

Breakfast over, all pass in the same order to the wash-room, 
where they stand in line until the detail for the forenoon is made. 
Half of the boys are sent out to their respective school-rooms, 
where they are met by their teachers, and proceed at once to the 
duties of the school ; the shop boys are sent out, under the care of 
the ioremen of the shops, to their respective places of work ; the 
rest are detailed to the various branches of domestic and out-door 
work, as may be required. This arrangement continues until half 
paat eleven o'clock, when the bell rings and all report in line ; from 
which they pass to their wash-rooms to wash and prepare for 
dinner. 

Dinner over, one hour is given to play in tbe presence of the 
officers m charge, when line is ^ain called and the detail made as 
in the morning. Those who were in school in the morning become 
the work force of the afternoon. 

At five o'clock the bell rings for the close of school and work. 
After snpper, in winter, the boys assemble in the large school room 
where the time is spent, until half-past seven, in hearing reports, 
etady, and reading- At half-past seven tbe bell rings for evening 
devotions, which are conducted by the Superintendent, or some one 
called upon by him, and consists of reading a portion of Scripture, 
einging, and a prayer. At this exercise the whole family is assem- 
bled. 

The work of the day is now over and the boys proceed in military 
order to their dormitories, where each one takes his position beeid« 



zedbyGoOgle 



8 AWKtTAl BBPOHT. 

his bed, and at r giTen Bignal all kaeel down, and each one ntten 
a Bilent prayer according to bis own desire or previous training. 

All DOW retire to rest, aad no tallclDg or dUoider ia permilted 
until they leave the dormitories the next morning. This day is sub- 
stantially the same as every other day in the year. 

TBK USB AST. 

One great source of improvemeat and pleasure is the library 
which has been well preserved and well read ; the books are glvea 
out and taken la once a week to all the boya who are able to read. 
If a boy violates any rule of Uie library be is deprived of a book tlie 
next week oi- longer, according to the amount of damage done by 
such violation. We have now In the library 850 volamea, 

MCKBBB 07 INMATES. 

There were in the Institution December 1st, 1874, 108, duringthc 
correntyear 28 have been received and 25 disohai^ed, and one died, 
leaving in the school December 1st, 1875, 110. 

The whole number in connection during the year has been 1S6. 

Those received during the year have come from the following 
named coanUes : 

HenneplD C 

Chippewa 1 

DakoU 1 

Scott 1 

Bomsey 7 

Rice 1 

WuhlD^D S 

Wabssha B 

WlDooa [Soldiers' Orphans' Home) 3 

Wrtghl. 2- M 

MATivrrr or PARanTS. 

Oermuu 9 

AmertcsDi ]| 

Irish e 

Norwegians 8 

French S— 17 



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RBTOBK SCHOOL. 



LaruDf 

iDcorrlglbUitf 

Attempt to commit rape • • 



PI^OS OF B 



Ulooeaota 16 

Illinois a 

Norway 1 

CallforDlft I 

New Jersey 1 

IndUiu 1 

Hew Tort 8 

Not known S—" VI 

socui. ooNDrnoN. 

Farantsllrlng 19 

OrohaoB 4 

HotheraoiilTlWliig B 

Have step-fathers S 

Step-mother I — VI 

AOK WHEK COUHRTBD. 

7 years old S 

Byears old S 

lOyaara oU 1 

11 years old S 

12 years old. 4 

18 years old 8 

14 years old S 

15 ypare old 8 



BDCOATIOKAL tlATDB. 

Can not read % 

Canrsad Ist Reader 8 

Can read 2iid Reader 4 

Can read ard Reader 14 

Can read 4Ui Reader 4— 8T 

2 



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10 JUXMXJAh BIFOKr. 

Whole namber received Blnee the opening of tha institntion, 2ftl 

BDDOATIOtr. 

Conld not read U 

Conldreftd lit Reidec 61 

Coold read Snd B«Mler 113 

CoDldretdSrd Buder i% 

Conldnkd IthBekder SS— Ml 

AaSS WHKM COHVimD. 

16 rears old 85 

IS jearBold 48 

U jean old 41 

18 years old S9 

IS rears old 18 

11 rears old 88 

10 rears old 33 

9 years old 13 

S rears old 4 

7 rears old , 4—381 

OM VBAT OHABOB8. 

Larcenj 137 

Incorrlglbllltr 186 

Arson 5 

Borglary S 

Vagrancy 7 

Potsooiag 1 

TmaDcy 1 

Attempt to coDUDlt rape 1—361 

ITATITTTT OF FARRHTB. 

Americans 131 

OernittDS 49 

Irish U 

French is 

Swedes 8 

Bngllsh l(y 

Csnadlnos 4 

Norweglaaa 8 



zedbyGoOglC 



BolMmluii ■ ■ 

Scotch 

HoUuideTS.. 

lUllanB 

Swlu 

Unknown ••• 



BBFOBM SCHOOL. 



WOBK, BTO. 



^rm and Oarden. 



We have cnltivated all the land belonging to the institotion— 
sixty-three acsea — less what ie occupied with buildings and play 
groands. 

The following table will abow the products : 

Oats GT4bi]stael»- 

Corn 540 " 

FotatOM 1,080 " 

Carrots ....; 290 " 

OnloDS '. 185 " 

BeeU 136 " 

Beans 80 " 

Cabbage? 2,000 beads, 

A variety of other garden vegetables, such as are used in the 
growing season, have been grown in abundance ; and such as can 
be preserved into the winter have been stored away. 

Grapes. 

We bad 500 grape vines old enongh to have borne a good crop 
last season ; but about half of them were injured by the last hard 
winter, and those that fruited did not ripen perfectly, so that the 
crop was very small. We have 3,000 young vines ready to plant 
next spring, and have the ground trenched for 1,000. 

We have IfiO of the best varieties of crab apple trees large enough 
to bear, besides a sufficient supply of the native plums. We 
planted and have in good condition 10,000 strawberry plants. 

CarperUer and Notion Shop. 

This is a new branch of indostry started during the current year. 
The intention is to manufacture all kinds of wheelbarrows, boys' 



zedbyGoOgle 



12 AMNDAI. EBPOBT. 

sleds, wagons and carts, and a variety of things in plain ftunitan 
as we may find a market for them. We expect this shop also ta 
keep np repairs aboot the buildings, and to make such improTemeDU 
as are necessary (h>m time to time. 

The following statement will show what has been done thns (ti 
In this department : 

Dr. 

To machinery, tool and stock tl,K> IG 

Cb. 

Bj work sold for cub 9 7B SO 

By garden wbeelbarrowB on hand, 8S ISl 00 

By boys' sleds on hand, 6 dozen 91 00 

By boys' wagons on hand, 6 12 00 

By bojs' carls on hand, 11 16 60 

By toy wagons on band, 6 6 00 

By toy carts on band, 6 S 00 

BQlldlngaod work done for Instltation COO 00 

9SUO0 

TIK SHOP. 

I>E. 

To Stock and wages of foreman and wages of tlD peddler $ S,S15 H 

Cb. 

By cash recelrod for sales 99,S9S 58 

By work done (i>r lustltntloo fiU U 

By msnnRtcta red stock on hand 843 70 

By stock anmaoafactared S12 SO 

|8,»18 le 

sbok shop. 

Dr. 

To stock and wages of foreman •■ CSAi ti 

Cr. 

By cash for castom work (109 DO 

By work done for school 6SS IS 

By stock on hands, estimated 13S 00 

tses M 

T^or Shop. 

The work in this shop is confined to the making and mending of 
all the clothes worn by the inmates. * 



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REFOBH SCHOOL. 13 

To make Bnmmer and winter nlotbes for over one hnndred boys 
anch M we b&ve, and to keep them mended and in readiness to put 
on wben needed, reqnires a great deal of sewing. 

WATBB I WATER ! ! 

The State Board of Health, having, a year ago made an exami' 
nation of the water in the wells near the buildings, pronounced it 
nnflt for drinking, &o. In pursuance of this fact, we respectfully 
suggested to the laat legislature the necessity of an appropriation 
necessary to provide a supply fVom a deeper source. While the 
committee of the legislature to whom tbe subject was referred re- 
commended the appropriation, it was thought by the members beet 
to delay granting the necessary relief on' account of the low state 
of Hinds in the State treasury. 

Since then our whole dependence for water has been upon a well 
500 feet from the buildings. This well is but 38 feet deep, and in 
^ dry time the water in it sinks to some extent. The fountain of 
these wells is the chain of small marshes that surround the Reform 
School grounds on two sides, and they are gradually drying up 
from year to year. This is caused not alone by evaporation, but 
also by drainage constantly going on with the progress of improve- 
ment in the surrounding territory. 

The water is pumped IWim this well by a wi nd-mill , and in order 
to store up a sapply, when tbe wind is blowing, sufflcient to last 
throogh calm days, we have erected a tank that will hold 400 bar- 
rela. This tank is high enough to throw the water into alt the 
buildings, and is large enough to serve as a reservoir into which to 
pomp water when the State shall have provided us with a deeper 
well. 

From experiments which have been made in the city of Miuneap- 
olis, it is tboQght to be demonstrated that at the depth of not more 
than 800 feet, an inexhaustible supply of water for pumping can be 
obtained; the cost of a well this deep, with the necessary tubing and 
pomp, w« think would not exceed t.1,000. In view of the great ne. 
cessity for a sufficient snpply of water, which must be apparent to 
every one, we most reapectnilly urge upon the present Legislature 
tbe importance of this appropriation. 



BOTS IMD OIRLS WHO ABK HOT PBOFKB ( 

Onr attention has been called by the Secretary of the State Board 



zedbyGoOgle 



14 ANNUA]^ BEPOBT. 

of Healtb, to tbe necessity of calltog attention to the wants of those 
weak minded children who are not thought to be fit aubjeots, either 
for the Hospital for the Insane or for the Reform School. While 
our observation would not warrant ub in recommending, at present, 
any separate instltntion for this class of anfortunates, we would b^ 
leave to suggest that the needs of this class may be sufficiently 
met in existing inslitutions without any additional expense to the 
£tate. 

The best reason we can give for this opinion will appear in the 
Bubjoined notice of the cases that have come under our care. 

1, A boy who had been subject to fits from a very early age, 
was committed to the Reform School. He was an iumate for five 
years. No treatment given him by tbe physicians in atteadanoe 
afforded any permanent relief. He grew gradually worse, and his 
mind perceptibly gave way fVom year to year, until at last he heoame 
imbecile, and at times insane. As it was no longer possible to keep 
him with tbe other boys ; he was adjudged insane and with the 
usual authority, sent to tlie hospital at St. Peter. The aathorities 
«f that institution would not receive him, and the officer retonied 
him to OS. He was subsequently taken charge of by the oommia- 
flioners of the county to which he belonged and placed on the Poor 
Farm, where he still remains. 

2, For four years past we have bad in tbe school a boy subject 
to epileptic fits ; the attacks id this case have nevu- been so tn- 
i]uent as in the case of Uie first mentioned, but they are much more 
Bcvere. This boy has improved in both mind and body ; Uie attacks 
are less n-equ^nt, occurring not more than once in three months 
during the past year. 

If these two conid have been placed in the Hospital for Inaane, 
all the wants of the Reform School in this direction would have 
been met. 

If such cases can be benefited by medical treatment, it is mani- 
festly proper that they should be placed where snch treatment can 
be had. 

For tbe sake of other children in the Institution, it is important 
to exclude from the Reform Schools epileptics. The (error excited 
to the minds of some nervous children, at seeing one tail in an 
epileptic fit, is painful to witneas, and in some cases almost throws 
others into apaams. We hare known some to faint away at the 
Bight. 

8. We have had three cases of boys only a amall remove fVom 
idio<^, two of them had mind enough to learn to read, very imper- 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



REFORM SCHOOL. 



19 



f«ctly ; tbe other, now in the Initttation, cannot learn a single letter 
of the alphabet ^ if yon attempt to teaeb him he will at once com- 
mence to cry. Bui be has mind enough to comprehend common 
labor ; and at most work in the garden and on the farm he does 
well. He cannot be subjected to the strict discipline of boys of 
sonnd minds, but a smile and a Icind word makes him moat happy 
and anxions to please. As a class, lliese boys of weak minds, hnt 
healthy bodies, with kind and patient treatment are not very troa- 
blesome. They have all greatly improved, and we have been glad 
of the privilege of doing for these poor unfortunates, even the little 
we have been able to do, to make their lives brighter. 

1. The only other case tc which we can call attention, was that 
of a boy with a congenital malformation of the chest, who had been 
tbe most piUable invalid all his life ; he was not a fit subject for the 
Reform School, or any other institation, so long as he had a moth- 
er's love to cherish him. 

So long as kindness and humanity govern the discipline, we see 
no objection to placing weak minded children, who have committed 
offenses, and who have healthy bodies, in the care of the Reform 
School. But we would be glad of some provision for those subject 
to epilepsie. 

PXnSONAL PROPBBTr. 

Six horses ' « 600 00 

Bight cows 820 00 

WagoDB, him«BS, sleighs, bobs, plows, &c 1,S00 00 

One hundred and flfty tons coal 1,6C0 00 

Two handled cords wood 1,060 00 

Fomltnre. 6,200 00 

Tin shop, tools and stock 1,400 00 

Shoe shop 400 00 

Oats, corn, roots, Ac 610 00 

Cloth and resdj-made clothing • 800 00 

Other supplies estimated 400 00 

VAKCS or BIAL PSOFXBTT. 

lU orlglntl cost np to December let 78,800 00 

Total real and personal 98T>B70 00 

Hie Board would respeotfhlly recommend to the present l^^la- 
tare. The following appropnations for the current year : 



zedbyGoOgle 



10 ANlfDAI. asPOBT. 

Toi Offlcera' flalari«i, wftgea and repairs 410,000 00 

For genaril cnnent expenses 17,000 00 

To provide anpplj of water 1,000 00 

Signed by order of the Board, 

J. G. RIHELDAFFER, 

SnperfDtendent. 



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BETOKM SCHOOL. 



FINANCIAL STATEMEKT. 
Minnesota State Reform School, December \ , 187''). 



Bftlaace Id Trewary Iwt umnal report 92,381 40 

State of HlonesoU ST.OOO 00 

Tin Shop- ■ 3,698 G3 

SbM Shop 109 00 

Wood HAnafttDrea 75 SO 



9,0*4 S3 



Expenditures. 

Office expenne $ 148 60 

Salariea otBc«n and employeen -... 6,7M AD 

Wood mumfictoiy madilDeTy, Ac 1,569 10 

Clothing 1,658 36 

Medlaa IIT 70 

iDiarance 184 oo 

House flinilsbtDg 467 49 

Booka, fltationerj ind prlotiag 194 60 

BlackstnltUDg 48 30 

LlTlng 8,418 64 

I<l*eT7 S3 M> 

Intereat and dlsconnt 11 90 

Stock, harneea and Implementa 848 73 

IroproTementa 1,573 17 

Tin shop 8,886 81 

Fnel 8,494 14 

Steam heating and Tentllatlng 387 80 

Shoeabop 881 63 

Incldenlal expense 130 15 

«3»,406 11 

Balance In treaaarj 9,888 41 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AmrUAL RBFOBT. 



THE L^AV 



An Act to secure proper eommitmenU to the MinTtetola State B^form 
School, 

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Minnesota : 

Skciiom 1. Tliat wheDever any iofant aDder the age of sixteen 
years, shall have been dulj conricted in any of the courts of this 
State, of any crime paaisbable by ImpriaonmeDt, except of the 
crime of murder, it shall be the duty of the magistrate before whom 
such cotiTiction is had, to commit the said infant so convicted to 
the guardianship of the Board of Managers of the Minnesota State 
Beform School. 

Sec. 2. That no Justice of the Peace shall have power to com* 
mit any infant to said Beform School upon a charge of incorrigi- 
bility, unless such charge is proved by at least two disinterested 
witnesses, and no commitment for incorrigibility shall be sufficient 
to justify the admission of the said incorrigible infant into the Be- 
form School, unless such commitment be accompanied by the written 
consent of at least three of the County Commissioners of the proper 
county to which said infant belongs, and which is chargeable with 
the expense of clothing, maintenance and instruction of such infknt. 

Sec. 8. That in case any infant under the age of sixteen years, 
shall have been duly convicted of any other crime, except that of 
incorrigibility, then no consent of the County Commissioners shall 
be necessary to authorize the commitment ; but in all cases of cwn- 
viction before a Justice of the Peace, the Justice shall reduce all the 
evidence taken by him to writing, and state the name, age and resi- 
dence of each witness examined, and transmit the same forthwith 
to the chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, who shall 
without delay, submit the same to the Judge of the District Court 
for said county, whose duty it shall be to examine the same and 
approve or disapprove of such conviction. If the conviction of the 
justice is approved, the minor shall forthwith be committed to the 
said Board of Manageis ; if disi^proved, no other proceeding ahall 
be had. 

Sec. 4. That if it shall appear to the Coaaty Conunlsaioners 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



RBFOBM SCHOOL. T.) 

that Um pftrents of sny infftnt oommltted for incorrigibility are able 
to pay the expense of clothing, maintenance and inatraclion of anch 
infant, then, and in that uaae, the said county having paid to the 
State Befonn School the charges for the clothing, maintenance and 
inHtrnction of sach infant, may recover the eaine of the parents of 
anoh infant. 

Skc. ft. This act shall be in force and take effect fVom and after 
ita passage. 

ApproTod February 26, 1872. 



An Act mfUkd an act to ctmsolifUUe the varums aett relating to the 
Mitmaota Slate Reform School, and to amend the same. 

Be it enacted bg the Legislature of the State of Minnetota : 

SscnoN 1. That the Minnesota State Reform School shall be 
managed and condacted on behalf of the State and aa a State insti- 
tntion, by a board of four managers, three of whom shall constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business. That the persons now 
constituting said board shall continue to serve as managers for the 
term for which they were respectively appointed, and on the second 
Monday of January of each and every year hereafter, the Governor 
of this State shall appoint one competent person to serve as mana- 
ger in said board for four years ; and within twenty days after snch 
annual appointment, the Governor shall designate one of said man- 
i^ers to act as President of said board for the period of one year, 
and until his successor shall be designated ; and the Governor shall 
duly notify said board of such appointment at their first regular 
meeting thereafter ; and the said managers shall always, at their 
flrsb regular meeting after the appointment of their President, elect, 
by a plurality of votes, such other officers of the said board as may 
be deemed by them expedient ; and whenever any vacancy shall 
occur in said board by death, resignalion, or otherwise, the Gover- 
nor shall fill the same by appointment, and the appointee shall hold 
ooly tbr the unexpired term of the person whose place he is appoint- 
ed to fill. The managers in said board shall in all cases hold over 
After the expiration of the term for which they shall have been re- 
spectively appointed, until their successors respectively shall have 
been appointed and qualified. No member of the board of managers 
shall receive any compensation for his services. 

Sao. 2. That the board of managers shall keep said institution 
provided with suitable buildings and grounds in the county of Ram- 
sey, and shall establish such regulations respecting the religious 
and moral edacation, training, employment, discipline, and safe 
keeping of its inhabitants as may be deemed expedient and proper. 

Skc. S. That it shall be the duty of the board of managers to 
receive, to the extent of the means placed at their disposal, and of 



zedbyGoOglC 



20 ANNOAL BBPOBT. 

the accommodations afforded by the buildings and grooDds belong- 
ing to said school, all infanta under their care and guardianship, 
and the same to keep during their minority, or until discharged 
under the rules of said board ; males under the age of sixteen years, 
and females under the age of fifteen years, committed to said school, 
in any of the following modes, to-wit : 

Firat — ^Infante committed by a justice of the peace, on the com- 
plant and due proof thereof, by the parent, guardian or next friend 
of said infant, that by reason of incorrigible or vicious conduct, 
such infant has rendered his or her control beyond the power of 
parent, guardian or next friend, and made it manifestly reqoinU 
that from regart' to the morals and future welfare of such infant, be 
or she should be placed under the guardianship of the managers of 
the Minnesota State Reform School. 

Second — Infanta committed by the authority aforesaid, when com- 
plaint and due proof have been made that such infant ia a proper 
subject for the guardianship of the managers of the said Minnesota 
State Reform School, in consequence of vagrancy, or Incorrigibly 
vicious conduct, and that from the moral depravity or other insu- 
perable obstacle, on the part of the parent, guardian or next ftieud 
in whose custody such infant may be, such parent, guardian or neit 
friend is incapable or unwilling to exercise the proper care and dis- 
cipline over such incorrigible and vicious infant. 

Third — Infants who shall be taken and committed as vagrants, or 
upon any criminal charge, or duly convicted of any criminal offenses, 
such as in the judgment of the court before which such conviction 
may be had, may be deemed proper reason for such commitment; 
and the said managers shall have the power to place the said chil> 
dren committed to their care during their minority, at such employ- 
ment, and cause them to be instructed in such branches of useful 
knowledge as may be suitable to their years and capacities ; and 
they shall have the power at their discreiion to bind out the said 
children, with their consent, as apprentices, for the period of their 
minority, to such persons and at such places, to learn such trades 
and employments as, in the judgment of the said managers, will be 
most conducive to their reformation and amendment, and will tend 
to the future benefit and advantage of such children. 

Skc. 4. That it shall be the duty of anj' justice of the )>eace, 
committing a vagrac t, or incorrigible, or vicions infant, as afore- 
said, in addition to the adjudication requited by the third section of 
this act, to annex to the commitment the names and residences of 
the different witnesses examined before him, and the testimony 
given by them respectively, on which the said abjudication was 
founded. 

Ssc. 5. It shall be the duty of the sheriff or any constable of 
the respective counties, or in case of their absence, of any suitable 
person appointed by the court for such purpose to convey any infant 
committed as aforesaid, to said school, and justices of the peace 
and constables and sheriffs performing services under this act, shall 
be paid the same fees as are allowed for similar services in criminal 
cases, and the offlcer conveying any infant committed, aa aforesaid, 
to said school, shall receive therefor the same compeasation ms is 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



allowed for the oonTeyaooe o( prisoners to the State prison ; snch 
re« snd oompensation to be p&id out of the treasury- of the county 
from which such infant was conunitted. 

Sec. 6. That the children received b; Baid managers, under the 
conviction of any court within this State, shall be clothed) main- 
tained and instructed by the said maDSgere, at the public expense 
of the proper county from which they game ; and the accounts of 
said children shall be kept by the managers in an intelligible and 
proper manner. 

Sec. 7. That the said managers may, from time to time, make 
by-lawB, (»dinancea and r^ulations relative to the management, 
government, iDBtrutition, discipline, employment and disposition of 
the said children, while in the said Befoim School, as they deem 
proper, (the some being not contrary to law) and may appoint sacfa 
officers, agents and servants as they may consider necessary to 
transact the bnainess of said school, and may designate their duties 
and salaries. And further, the said managers shall annually lay 
before the Legislature of the State, on ^e first day of each session 
thereof, e, report setting forth the number of children received into 
the said school, the disposition which shall have been made of them 
by instructing them or employing them therein, or binding them out 
aa apprentices ; the receipts and expenditures of said managers, and 
generally all such facts and particalars as may tend to exhibit the 
effects whether beneficial or otheiwise, of the said institution. 

8kc. 8. That all persons committed to the Minnesota State 
Reform School, shall be allowed in all cases of sickness spiritual 
advice and spiritual ministrations from any recognized clergyman 
of the denomination or church to which said inmates may respect- 
ively belong ; such advice and ministration to be given within sight 
of the person or persons having chai'ge of such inmates ; but if the 
sick person or persons seeking it, desire religious consolation out of 
hearing of any officer of said institution, they, in such cases, shall 
not be debarred the rigbt by any rule of said school. 

Sec. 9. That the grounds and bnildings erected thereon, for the 
use of the said school, shall be exempt from taxation. 

Sec.. 10. That no person or persons, corporation or body politic, 
shall be permitted to open, lay out, or constmct any road or high- 
way, either public or private, nnder any pretense whatever, apon or 
tbrongh any ground owned or occupied by said school, withont the 
consent of the managers thereof. 

Sec. 11. All acts or parts of acts heretofore passed for the in- 
corporation of the said Minnesota State Reform School and all act 
amendatory thereto, not necessarj' to carry out any provisions of 
this act, not contained in or incorporated herein, and idl acts incon- 
sistent with this act, are hereby repealed. 

Sec. 12. This act sh^l takeefll'ect and be infiwcefrom ud after 
its passage. 

Approved March 3, 1870. 



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ANITUAL RUOET. 



^n act for an act tnliUed an act to appropriale moneys for the »i^ 
port of the Minnesota State Reform, Sckool for the year A. D. one 
thoutand eight hundred and seventy three. 

Beit enacted 6jr the Legislature of the State of Minjiesota : 

SxcnoK 1. The sum of slxteeo thausand dollars, or ao mach 
thereof as may be necessary, be and the same is lierelsy appropria- 
ted oat of any moneyB in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
for the general current expenses of the Minnesota State Reform 
School for the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy- three. 

Sec. 2. And the further Bum of ten thousand dollars, be and the 
same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the treaanry not 
otherwise appropriated, for repairs and other expenses appertaining 
to the real estate of the said Reform School, paying salariea of offi- 
cers, teachers, and employees, furoiture and addition to library. 

Sec. 3. That section six of an act to consolidate the various acts 
relating to the Uinnesota Slate Reform School, and to amend the 
same, approved March third, one thousand eight hundred and sev- 
enty, be amended to read as follows, viz. : 

Sec. 6. That the children received by said managers under the 
conviction of any conrt within this State, shall be clothed, main- 
tained and instructed by the said managers, at the public expense 
of the proper county from which they came ; the accounts of said 
children shall be Icept by the managers in an intelligible and proper 
manner, and shall be presented to the State Auditor at the end of 
each year, and the State Auditor shall thereupon cause the amount 
due from each county to be entered upon the tax duplicate of said 
counties respectively, and the same shall be collected and paid into 
the state treasury, like other state taxes. 

Sec. i. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after 
its passage. 

Approved March 10, 1673. 



An act to secure Liberty of Conscience and BgwU Bights in Matter* 
of Religion, to inmates of State Institutions. 

Be it ena^ited by the Legislature of the State ofMinneeota: 

Skction 1 . That all persons committed to any state prison or 
reform school or other place of conflnement in said state, shall be 



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lOOL. S3 

allowed spiritiul advice and Bplritnal ministration ttoia any recog- 
nized clergyman of the denomination or church to which Buch per- 
aone so oommltted or received may respectively belong, and have 
belonged prior to thoir being eo committed or received into snch 
Btate prisor or reform school, or other place of conQnement, auch 
advice and ministration to be given within the prison or reform 
Bcbool or other building where the inmates thereof are required by 
law to bo confined or imprisoned in snch manner as will secure to 
■nch person the fVee exercise of hie religious belief; and such reli- 
giooB consolation, advise and ministration shall be allowed separate 
and apart, and out of the presence and hearing of any person other 
than the clergyman who is ministering to saoh inmates. Such cler* 
gyman shall have the right, at the time fixed as hereinafter provi- 
ded, and in all cases of Beriona sickness, without regard to time, to 
rlait either of such institudonB and to see and commnnieate Iteely 
and nntrammeled, with such of said inmates as belong to the church 
or society of which be is a clergyman* 

Sxc. i. It ehall be the duty of the board of managers, or per- 
sons or ofllcers having the control or management of said institu- 
tion, to set apart not less than one hour (and more if necesBary) on 
the first day of each week, in which any of the clei^ymen in good 
staDdittg of any church or denomination may fVeely minister to and 
impart ntoral and religious instruction to those of the said inmates 
or children who reapectively belong thereto prior to their beiug so 
committed or received therein, and to afford and grant to such cler- 
gyman Buch reasonable and proper facilities as may be necessary to 
enable' them to freely and properly discharge their duties as minis- 
ters and spiritual advisers to the said inmatee ; and to provide and 
foraish to such clergymen on such occasions a room or apartment 
whereby he may be enabled to fVeely and properly discharge his 
duties as such clergyman ; Provide^, That the religious denomina- 
tion to which the parents of any child or minor so committed oi re- 
ceived into either af said institutions belonged or was a member, 
shall be considered the deoomination to which such child or minor 
belongs, provided all such religious ministrations shall be given be- 
tween the boors of nine o'clock in the forenoon and five o'clock in 
the afternoon, except in special cases, such as sickness, when auoh 
ininlstrations may be given at any hour, and that the board of offl- 
oera in charge of snch institutions shall designate to eaeh denomi* 
nation which of the hour or hours so designated when a clergyman 
of such denomination shall commence and impart such ministration 
and instmotion, and the lime they shall occupy, which time shall be 
in accordance with the rules of such denominations, giving to each 
denomination an equal amount of time, without partiality or oi^aat 
diacrimination whatever. 

Su. 8. All sectarian praotioea, except by said clergyman as 
aforesaid, are hereby prohibited, and no officer of any state Instita- 
ti<Mi, or other person, shall inttj^'ere with or attempt to influence, 
control or change the religiooB belief or opinions of any of said in 
mates ; nor shall any of said inmates be required to attend any re< 
ligioDB services or devotions in any of said institntions against their 
own free will, if they have attained their nu^rity, and If minors 



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24 Ainru 

shKll not be bo required contAry to the ezpresa directtonB of the 
parent or gaardian or clergyman having spiritual charge or said ia- 
matea respeotively, and in all matters appertaining to religion th« 
rights of coneoience and the Tree eTerciae thereof, shall be scrapa- 
lonsly respeeted and guarded, provided that nothing herein con- 
tained ahall be constmed to prohibit or limit such freedom of speech 
among the employees or inmatea of said institutions as is permltled 
by the rules and r^^Iations thereof not in ooufliot with the spirit of 
this act. 

Sec. 4. A.11 acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this act, are 
hereby repealed. 

Sco. 6. This act shall take efibot and be in force ttom and after 
ite passage. 

Approved March 5, A.. D. 1874. 



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[KrKCTiTB DOCPMKHT No. 11.] 

NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 

or THE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 

or TBB 

Minnesota Hospital for Insane, 

(LOCATED AT ST. PETER.) 

, TO TH« 

GOYEESOE OF THE ST.iTE OP MINNESOTA, 

FOR THE rlSClL TEIR ENDING NOV. 30, 1875. 



ST. PAUL: 

FIOXKKR.PUM COHFABT. 

1876. 



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MINNESOTA HOSPITAL FOR INSANE. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

HoM. C T. BROWN, Si. Peter, FrasldanL 
HOM. H. B. BTRATT, 81wkope«. 
Box. WIIXIAH 8CHIMHEL, St. Peter. 
Bav. A. H. KEBB, St. Peter, Secietair uid 
Box. LOBBN PLBTCHEB, HlnneftpoUa. 
H<nf.FBSEHAtI TALBOTT, CleveUiid. 
NATHAinBL a. TBFrT. U. D., PUlnTlew. 



RESIDENT 0FF1CEBJ5. 

CntnS K. BABTLBTT, H. D., 

SaperiDtendent and PbjslcUii. 
JACOBS. BOWBRS, H. D., 

AflslsUnt RiyklcUs. 
GEOBQB W. DBTBB, 

Steward. 



SUBORDINATE OFFICERS. 

FBAHCIS DUNN, 

SnperriAor Hale Departmuit. 
ET ALINE DDHN, 

- SnpeiTlaoT Bemale DepirtnMBt. 
WILLIAM H. PBABCE, 

Engineer. 
WILUAU HoFASDBN, 



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TRTTSTEEri' REFORT. 



Hia ExaeOmcs, C. K. Damia, Governor of JfiuMMta ; 

We herewith present oar ninth Annual report as tnistees of the 
HinnesotA HoepitiU for loeane. 

As the gnwdisDa of this great State charity, it Is with pecaliar 
pleamire we report that the Hoapital bnildings, gradually going np 
for the past eight years, are so nearly completed that we regard the 
laat ^>propriation saffloient to finish them, entire, and secure, also, 
all the needed improvemeuts. The State has generoosly provided 
for this afflicted class of our citizens and, as a resait, there stands 
a noble straotare, capable of accommodating about 600 persons, 
beautifhily located, and with appotntmenta all of which, we think, will 
diallenge comparison with any similar Institution in the land. We 
have sought to erect a solid, substantial, and thorouglily eqaipped 
Hospital, with the recent and most approved appliances for com- 
fbrt, safety, and 'sanitary purposes. We htive not aimed at expen- 
rive architectural display but, rather, at permenancy, fitness, and 
the necessities of the insane. The Idkiatlon has been peculiarly fk- 
▼orable fbr securing the heavy and most expensive materials of this 
itructnre, abundance of pure water and ease of access. 

And now with our oompleted bnildings filled with patients almost 
aa rq>idly as acoommodations could be provided, we urgently re- 
oommend the L^islatnre t6 ioaugurate plans for the future. To 
this end we invite the special attention of the Executive and our 
public men to the suggestions of Snpt. Dr. C. E. Bartlett, in his re- 
port, bearing on this subject and as we heartily endorse them we 
need not add thereto. 

Daring the year, 669 different patients have been the recipients 
of the benefits of this Institntion, and we commence the new year 
with 4S4 patients under b«atment. 
2 



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10 ANNDAL BBPOBT. 

For the eusaing year we wk only for the neceuary onrrent ex- 
penses. This, estimated at the asnal ratio of increase, gives us an 
aTerage daily attendance of 461 , and at 98.75 per week for each pa- 
tient, amounts to (89,895.00. This ia twenty-^ve cents less per 
week for each than the estimate of last year, and inclndes any ex- 
traordinary expenses that may occur, salaries of officers and attend- 
ants, all repairs, fuel, clothing, medicines, refiimishing of bedding 
' and fhrnitnre, and all table sopplles. By the Treasurer's atatement, 
however, we hare a snrplus sufficient to warraut us in reducing this 
amount more than $6,000. We, therefore, respectfully ask an ap- 
propriation of t83,500.00 far current expenses for the year 1876. 

For the main expenditures of the year in building operations, we 
refer yon to the report of the bnilding committee. 

The Treasnrer in his report presents the condition of the finances. 
We are gratified that a sufficient amount is unexpended, of current 
funds, to carry us through the expensive winter months. 

Our temporary buildings in the city have become in a great njess- 
iire uDflt for occupancy, and we propot^e in a short time to abandon 
them entirely, unless the State should otherwise order. In that 
event, they must be completely overhauled, and at considerable ex- 
pense. 

Dr. A. Reynolds, Superintendent of the Iowa Uos[iltal for lasans 
at Independence, being present at our December meeting, was re* 
quested to accompany the Board in their quarterly inspection. We 
append hie report, feeling that the impressions of such visitors are 
pnhlic property. Besides quarterly, we have also monthly visita- 
tions of the inspeotion, the committee being asually acoontpanied by 
some citizen of the State invited for this pui^se. Beports of these 
vleitations are placed upon record. We cordially invite oar State 
officials, public and professionld men, to visit tills Institntion, and 
carefully inspect its administration, its appointments, and its neces- 
sities, too. 

Thankful for the past success of this Institntion, we commend It 
to the sympathy of a generous public, and the cordial support of cor 
State authoiitlee. 

C. T. BEOWN, 

A. H. KEBB, 

W&L SCHIUMEL. 

H. B. STEAIT, 

L. FLETCHEE, 

N. S. TEFT, 

FREEMAN TALBOXT, 

Trustees. 



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REPORT OF DR. A.REYNOLDS. 



Id the compftny of the Bitard of TrnsteeB, Dr. Bartiatt, the bq- 
perintendent, Dr. Bowers, assistant physician, and Hr. Dryer, 
steward, I visited all the wards of the Hospital, and while finding 
everytiiing in uniformly good order, desire to speak particularly of 
the absence of excitement and terbnlence on the part of the pa- 
tienta and the marked gentleness and attention of the attendants. 

Hie patients were all neatly and plainly dressed, very little dis- 
airaogemeDt of the clothing, so common in disturbed wards. I was 
partlotdariy atmok with seeing so few under mechanical restraint, 
two in camisole and two or three with wristers and body-belt, the 
simplest and least trrluting of any restraint, not excepting secla- 
aion or holding by an attendant. I am sarprised that good female 
attendants can be secured for the sum paid, which is mnch less than 
ill meet similar institutions In the country. The wards were well 
ventilated and warmed. We also visited the store-rooms, kitchen, 
bakery and laundry, finding uniform system, neatness and dispatch, 
in each of those departments. I was particularly interested in the 
apparatus and process of manufacture of gas, which appears to be 
the best possible for an instilntion of this character. The location 
of the building, comprising those prime necessities — heatthnitness of 
situation, facility of access and, last but not least, an abundance of 
pore water, shows conclnsiveiy that tliose having the matter in 
<Aarge were guided by good judgment, impelled by good motives. 

When the character of the material and the manner of constrac- 
tion of the building la considered, it is true that no State Hospital 
for the Insane has been constructed at so low a cost per capita, as 
the Minnesota Hospital for the Insane. 

A. REYNOLDS, 
Supt. Iowa State Hospital for Insane, 

Independence, Iowa. 

Dec. 1875. 



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ANNUAL SBFOBT. 



REPORT OF BUILDING COMMITTEE. 



ZV the Board of TVuttaw .* 

G-KKTi-EMEN : — ^Toat committee on baUding beg leave to submit 
the followiDg report ; 

The extenaion of the north wing, and the east addition, complet- 
ing the permanent hoepital bnilding, according to plans, Iieing ready 
for plastering at the dateof onr last report, in December, 1874, the 
work of finishing the same and preparing it for oocnpanoy was di- 
vided, for convenience, into four separate classes, viz. : Mastering, 
carpenter work, painting, and plumbing and heating apparatus — 
and proposals for doing the work in this manner were invited from 
builders by advertising, according to law. On the 14th day of April, 
the bids were opened by the Board, and Mr. R. Roberts, of Uanka- 
to, being the lowest bidder for plastering, the contract was given to 
him at tweuty-flve cents per yard, the contractor finding all ma- 
terials. 

The lowest bid for the carpenter work was made by Henry Camehe, 
of St. Peter ; but on aocotmt of the terms of payment made neces- 
sary by notice trom the State Treasurer, concerning the fhod tar 
building purposes, he declined to enter into contract, having made 
his estimates on a cash basis. The next lowest bid for the same 
work, was ofi'ered by Patow & Borneman, of St. Peter, and they 
having given the required bonds, received the contract for $5,725, 
finding all materials except the hard fiooring. 

The painting was awarded to Mr. W. O. Powell, of St. Peter, for 
$599 f he finding all materials. 

The contract for plumbing and heating apparatus was given to 
Samuel I. Pope & Co., of Chicago, 111., for $4,180, they finding all 
materials. 

The first and last contracts have been completed, and the second 
and third partly, and the work is now going forward. The whole 
was to be finished by the first of November, but your committee 
did not desire the finishing wood-work to go in too soon after the 



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HOSPITAL FOR DTBIMB. 13 

pIuteriDg w&s don«, aad before the wkUs and Joiato were thoroogh- 
1; dry, and the time allowed, flrom the fifteenth of September, when 
the plastering waa completed, to the flrtt of November, was not 
anflScient to complete all the work in good order, 

Yoor commiltee feel that the work of the several contracts, nn- 
der the constant aupervialon of Mr. B. R. Damren, of St. Peter, 
who is familiar with the work required, will compare favorably with 
(he rest of the bailding. 

Yonr Board, at their meeting in June, aatborized this committee 
to bnlld a suitable gaa-houBe ; haying contracted with Mr. A. C. 
Band, of Minneapolis, to pnt in the necessary apparatus for mana- 
fectaring gaa for lighting purposes, for $3,800, and a sacceastbl 
operation gaaranteed before any payment was required. The com- 
mittee employed Mr. Harry Downs, with necessary assistants, to 
erect the honse, which ia 88x30 feet and 13 feet high above the 
water table, with tinned roof. It is located north of the boiler 
honse and though Joining is really a distinct building. It is now 
completed and the gas apparatus in SQCcessftil operation. For a 
fbrther description of which we refer you to the report of the Super- 
intendent. The honse is built of stone and lined with brick, with 
dead air space, and cost $1,600. 

The contract for fhrnisbing the gas fixtures throughout the hos- 
pital was given to Mr. James L. Spink, of Minneapolis. The fix- 
tares are made by Cornelius A Sons, of Philadelphia, Pa. They 
are not yet completed, but the cost will be abont $1,500. 

The reservoir at tbe spring for water supply has been enlarged to 
double its former capacity, and a second steam force pomp, called 
the "Atlas," and manufactured by Smith, Telle & Co., of Dayton, 
Ohio, purchased — the cost of these two items being $803.05. 

The mtun sewer has been extended north to the new addition, 
and the area walb south of the laundry and boiler bouse completed. 
These were alt necessary expenses, and could not be longer delayed. 

We hope and trust our action will be approved. 
Bespectfhlly submitted. 

C. K. BABTLETT, 
A. U. KERR, 
WM. SCHIMMEL, 
L. FLETCHER, 
C. T. BROWN, 
F. TALBOTT, 

Building Committee. 

Dec. 1, 1676. 



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AaaUAL BKPDBT. 



TBEASUEEE'8 BEPOBT. 



Tnatut Minnttola Hospital for Iiuane : 

Gekflkksii : — Herewith yon will find a Btatement of receipts snd 
expenditures for the fiscal year ending Iforember SO, 1875. 



Caab— Setdng registers for contractors, bj H. Downs, while 

BnUdlng Saperlntendent 91ITOO 

Casb— State TrsMnrr BO,SM00 



Etqtendituni. 

frlntlDft and advertising (69 GO 

God plotlon of ceatral portico 450 H 

On oak flooring contract 1,000 00 

Drains and sewers 660 89 

Work on center bnlldlog SOTB 

Enlargement of reservoir 9TTU 

Expenses bntldtng committee, and treasnrer's salary 884 00 

Plssterlng north sectloD and return S,>T9Tt 

Stone steps, fligglng and painting coDuecUons 4SGt6 

On carpenter contract 4,9M0O 

Haterlsla and soperlntendence orcarpentar work 421 N 

Begietcrs far north fectlon ind retnm 810 <4 

New holler, mssonrr and celling holler room 8,SS0S0 

On contract tor steam fitting, plomblng, and gas pipes S,4M80 

FlpesandfltttngatocouDectbollerbonse with extreme wings... 8>S ST 

Oss house 1,(00 04 

Ongsa works contract 68 IS 

On painting contract, north section and return ISO 00 



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HOSPITAL rOB INSANE. 19 

TIagglig, itora rooms 140 81 

SoperlnMiuleDt of bnlldlngs 26S 00 

Ares wslla ind atone aMps eas SI 

Treasnnr'a pattf kccoDnt 80 50 

Betnnied to cQireot find 8,08S 4S 

CmIiIo balADce-w. 7S0 U 

•SO,&tT 00 

cuBBurr rcHD. 

Beceipts, 

Cub, December 1st, I8T4 «189 8t 

Cub, Stftta treaanry, bslADce of 187< 18,000 00 

Cub, State tretwarT, I87S BT,S00 00 

Cub, retiUDed to carrent ftind 8,086 4S 

Cub, board Ibr prlTate patients S78 70 

Cash, Steward's Becelpts, aa follows i 
Casb, nftuidMl (h>ia bDlldlag Aind, tor freight on steam 

boUers 196 «8 

Cash, reflinded, orercbuge ft«1gbt on range 1810 

Cash, fbnn stock, hides, tallow, etc., sold US 07 

Cash, gid mower sold, (part pkyment} SS 00 

Cash, old ateam boiler sold ■ ISO 00 

Casb, Are brick, cement. Iron pipe, etc, sold 48 tl 

Cash, clotbins sold 90 00 

Cash, anndrlea sold 88 00 

1,052 93 

$0S,O»Ol 

Monthly cnrrent ezpendltnres paid on certlfled Touchers 976,813 83 

Cash to balance 18,318 48 

«95,0>0 01 

Besfdea the balance on hand there is still to onr credit, in the 
SUte Treasarr, 119,500. This it BUfflcient to carry as through the 
winter months ; also to fiirnish the north seciioa and return which 
will soon be ready for occupancy and will take about 14,000 and 
leave some t6,000 ( see tmstees' report ) to ^ply on the expenses 
of the enaning year. We need to onr credit, at the olose of the 



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16 AKHnAL HBPOBT. 

fiscal year, ftom 125,000 to 928,000 to meet our payments prompt- 
ly bofore a new appropriatioo becomes available. Id the Steward's 
report yoa will find the expenditures, under approprlMe headings, 
carried oat as nuDutely as practicable lor a report. 
Beepectfally submitted, 

A. H. KERB, 

Treasurer. 

MiMMEsOTi. HosprrjjL for Ikune, 
Dec. 15th, 1875. 

GtnOemm: 

Your committee on finance have this day examined the books and 
Tondiers of the Treasurer and Steward of the Hospital for Insane 
for the year ending Nov. SO, 1870, and find the same correct. 
Respectfhll;, 

C. T. BKOWN, 
WH. SCHIHUEL, 
FBKEMAN TALBOTT, 

Finance Committee. 



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STEWARD'S BEPORT. 



2V> the Tnutttt of tha Minneiota Hospital for Iwane: 

Gentlbhicn ! — Herewith is respeotrully aabmitted a report of the 
Steward's department for the year ending Nov. 80, 1875 ; 

Z)faftvr«emento. 

For aildltlonx, alt«rat1onB, xaA repairs 3,757 48 

For attendants, usifltants, and labor 13,14709 

For books, stationer; andpriDtlng ISSIW 

For thaprl (rellglooi |ervlcB9 In) 250 00 

For clotblDK G.OSOGS 

For rurm, bom, garden and groands l.OvSBG 

Fdr frelgbt and exprc^sage 790 31 

For ruel and beating 9,S97 S3 

For furnltare 8,ID0 G9 

For rnrpl!>blagr«i]ter bDlldlng 878 02 

ForAiml-blng aucood section, soatii mlag 1,039 43 

For ftarnlablng second section, nortii wing 1,045 SO 

For gas (coke and naphtha) 882 18 

For library and amDsemenis 680 83 

For lights and oil lamps SOT 18 

For medicine and medical sap piles 648 79 

For mlMcrllaneoDS expeosies 1,195 20 

For otDcers' salaries 4,850 00 

ForpHtlenta mlscel la neons expenses 5^4 IS 

For pruvlslons and boasohold sapplles ST,04D 81 

For ate ward's petty expanses \ 851 76 

For rent ISO OS 

: tT6,SI2 53 
8 

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18 ANNUAL BEPOKI. 

Ntitt. — The item, " farm, barn, garden and groasds," is detailed 
as foliovra : 

ForUlwr 11,860 <l 

Forelock 803 00 

For hiy, oats aad feed 4S0 8S 

For irapleinents and repairs to anine 8T0 4S 

For seeds 140 66 

Forrenclns 148 01 

For baraeas, robe, blanhets and rrpairs to same ISS 30 

Forshoelnichoree«*nd osea IM <G 

For trees, Trait and orDsmental 83 63 

For straw 11 00 

For flnrveylng meadow !00 



•4,05S 6« 



The item, " fuel and heating," ia detailed as follows : 

For wood (2.7G7 cords) 97,817 6S 

For cosl (TOi toDs) 706 90 

For rliarcoal S9 10 

For steam fitting and plnmblng sopplles for exteoslon of aad gen^ 

era! repairs to heating appuratua and waier supply 904 37 

For Bleam p>imp at sprlogi (see SuperlDtendeni's report) Ala fiO 

For Are brick und claj, bolls, rods, etc., for boilers lOii St 

For boiler scale pTerentive * 61 IS 

ForlDbrlcttlDgoll^ 46 97 

For BtoTesaud pipe (lemporarf hospltsl) 44 48 



#9,897 S« 



*' Attendants, assistants and labor," includes wages of superri- 
aors, engineer, firemen, bakers, cooks, watchmen, seamstresses and 
attendants. 

*' Furaitnre," includes beds and bedding, crockery, and all other 
kinds of household furniture required for increase of patients and 
to replace that worn out and desti-oyed. 

"Furniabing centre building," and " Furnisliing second section 
south wing," includes additional furniture required for those parts 
of the houBO, respectively, and paid for from balance of the legis- 
lative appi-opriatiOD for that purpose, unexpended at close of last 
year. 

" Furnishing second section, north wing," is for material for bed- 
ding purchased for tliat part now nearly ready for occupancy. 



jdbyGoogle 



HOSPITAL FOR IMSAHE. 19 

" ICiacellaneous ezpeoses," inclndes traveling expenses of Trns- 
teea and other officers, tees for legal services, four Babcock Are ez- 
tinguishera, and other Uema that cannot properly be otherwise 
«Ifts8ified. 

" Patients' miscellaneous expenses," includes undertakers' charges 
«Dd cash to discharged patients. 

" Bent," is for taxes on town lots and land used for hospital par- 
ftoses, 

" Steward's petty expenses," includes pa«tage, telegrams, and 
small purchases not exceeding five dollars in amount. 

The farm and garden products are shown in the annexed list. 
Though Buffering considerably fVom the locust scourge the yield is 
(tally equal to that of former years. The values affixed are estima- 
ted at average market prices : 

AsparaeDS, 1,000 banchea. flOO 00 

Beans, (dry) 6 bnnhels IS CO 

BeBDB, (green) 25 bashels 2S 00 

Celery, 400 hesds 40 00 

Cora, (sbellod] 1,600 bosIielB 610 00 

CornsUlks, 60 tons 150 00 

Cncnmbera, SS bosbets 88 00 

Crab apples, 4 bushels f 00 

Har, (wild) SO toDS <80 00 

Ha;, (liinoth; sod clover) 10 tons SO 00 

Lettuce, ten bushels 7 SO 

Hllk, 61,S!0 qnarU 2,56100 

Onions, 6 boshels 7 SO 

OjTitar plant, E bnahels S 00 

Feas, (di7]S3 boahels 50 00 

Peas, (green) SO bnabels 75 00 

Pieplanl, SOO bnacbes EOOO 

Potmtoes, (Irtab) 6,100 bnsbela 1,220 00 

FotKtocB, (sweet) 10 baabela 80 00 

FompkJDS, G,SOO .' 165 00 

BaspberrleB, IB qoarts 7 20 

Strawberries, 96 quarts 14 40 

Sqnuh, (sainnier) CD bushels 46 OO 

Bqnash, (winterl 600 48 00 

Tomatoea, IIT bushels 11700 

Tnrnlps, 850 bDshets 87 EO 

#C,MS 60 



zedbyGoOglC 



20 ASNITAL BBPOBT. 

VbIdq ofbceraliDghterad fir Die ofboiue (T,i06 poonds) S70S( 

ValDeorporksliaKhteredfbr lueofbonBO (11,720 ponads) 761 ao 

AmoDat received from sale of stock, hides, Ullow and pUata.... 153 OT 

Aside from cultivation and harvesting of crops, caro of stock, 
and ordinary farm improvements, tbe patients, assisted by the farm 
latMrers and teams, nnder the supervision of the farmer, have em 
ployed their time in grading about the bnlldings, making roads, 
excavating for gas-house, enlarging reservoir at springe, etc., a> 
folio tre : 

Labor of men 97B dajs 

Labor of tesms 179 days 

This is exclusive of catting and storii^ tbe ice crop ( about 100 
tons) and the drayage of supplies, tue\ and building material. 

The farm stock coosists of five tiorses, two yokes of oxen, one 
ball, tirenty^one cows, six heifers four calves and Kfty-five piga. 

The following is a carefully compiled Inventory of hospital pro- 
perty of ail descriptions on hand at this date, Nov. 30, 1875 : 

Faimaaent hospital bolldlDKi coDslstlDgof center building, two 
aectloiu and re'.nrn wings Bontb,ODe section and retDmwIng 
north complete, second section and rittorn wing north nearly 
completed; lanndrj, engine house, water aopplj, Inctndlng 
Steam boiler and pamps and wind engine, drainage, beating 
apparatQBigashanBeand gas machines, steam wash machlaea, 
steam cooking apparatns, bath tnbs, cars and railway Tor 

transporting food #488,16000 

Temporary hospital bnlldings, consigtlDg of one tbree-story 
stone bnilding, 60x03 leet, with two-atory L, S0s2i feet, and 
one two-story (Irame building, 9As3t feet, with heating appa- 
ralns for both, one-atory frame oBlce building, one frame 
barn, £BxS6 feet, Ice house, and six bnilding lota, (at coat).. I3,SW 00 

Farm, 8i8 acres 13,40000 

Farm atock and implements. Including buggies, cotters, robes, 

blaokets, Ac 1,849 00 

One three-stor; tniao bam, (4x72 feet, witb granary attached, 

ItiSfl feet 7,000 00 

HoDsehold fnroltnre, of all kinds 26,171 OS 

Medicine and medical supplies, surgical Instruments, dtc 700 00 

Library and cabinet, consisting of medical ind iDlscellaDeous 
books, engravingr, chromo% fitereoscopes and views, magic 
lantern and views, ainfft^ birds, games, musical Instru- 
ments, 4c 1,776 00 



zedbyGoOglC 



HOaPITAI, FOR IN8AKE, fil 

dotblng and iDat«r1i]ftirdotblDg 1,11* IS 

FrovlaiODS ind HDpplles, coDshtlog of groceries, vegetables, bnt- 
t«r, wond, bay, oats, bnlldiog naMrial, steam (IttlDg eap- 
pU«a, ftc 1S,140SS 



RcBpectftilly sabmitted. 

GEOBGE W. DBTEE, Steward. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



ANBVAL BBPOBT. 



BEPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Trtat«e»: 

G£irn.Eitxi( ; — Again it becomes my duty to report to yon a aant- 
mary or the history of this hospital for another year. So far as- 
yon are personally concerned this wonid be unnecessary, ae yonr 
regnlar meetings and. ^quent investigations have made you fami- 
liar with the details of business and general admin strati on, bnt cus- 
tom and statute law nnite in this Judicious public requirement, 
whether the facts and progress of oar worli are pleasant and satis- 
factory cr not. The institution exists as an outgrowth of tbe feel- 
ings of the people, and it is right to inform them of its condition 
and wants, that they may have such an interest in its welfare as to 
cherish and support it in a proper manner. Although we have not 
accomplished all we desired or hoped for at the beginning of Uie 
year, still the measure of anccesa granted, and the escape from 
serious ills vouchaafed, by a kind Providence, challenge our sincere 
gratitude. A lai^e addition to our number was anticipated, as the 
rapid growth of our State, in the past, led us to eX|>ect, and in this 
we have not been mistaken ; but no proper subject has been rejected 
for want of room, although the department for males has beeu over- 
crowded and will be until the opening of the new portion of the 
north wing, now being prepared. When this is completed Minneso- 
ta will stand in the front rank of States making ample provision for 
the care and treatment of the insane; a worthy record for thi» 
young but vigorous State. It is now only ten years since the first 
appropriation was made for the support and accommodation of thi> 
unfortunate claae of persona within our own boundaries, and the re- 
sult is highly creditable to the philanthropic and liberal spirit of the 
people. A flrst-ciass building in all its appoint events has been 
erected, and mostly paid for ftom the yearly revenaee, and its cur- 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



HOSFITAI, FOB CfSAlTB. 23 

rent expenses promptly met without a mnrmar of complaint ftom 
any intelligent or humane person. No st«p has been taken back- 
ward, and I trust none will ever tie advocated by the most ardent 
advisor of retrenchment. 

This is a charitable institution, butitia prepared for all, rich or 
poor, who may find it necessary to seek its aid. Its base is broad 
as the State, and its rotief is freely olTored . 

The general statistics of the patients, for the year 1875, are as 
follows 

Men. Women. ToM> 

Wbole nnniber December Ut, 1874 208 1T8 SSI 

Narabcr admitted during tbo year 106 S2 IS8 

Nnmber under f.reatmeDt 811 235 3G9 

Number discharged (Including deaChc) 76 GO IBS 

Nnmber remslDlDK November SOtb, 18Tfi 339 195 484 

DatJy areTBge throaghant the jear 418 S47-8GS 

Five of the above, four men and one woman, have been admitted 
aince the 26th of August, as private boarders, IVom Dakota Terri- 
tory, under llio arrangement made by you tliroiigh the GoTemora of 
our t>tato and that TeiTitory. 

CONDITIOH Qy THOSE DiaCQaRQED. 



Recovered JS 

Improved jO 

Unimproved 8 

Died 16 



One hundred and two patients have been returned to their frieada 
recovered and improved during the jear. 

CAUSKS OF DKATH. 

Mn. Womsn. ToUI' 

Kpllepsy 4 4 8 

Maraiimni 8 S S 

Fanlysis ■ lis 

^tblaU 9 0S 

Haolacal ezbaastion lift 

Apoplax; 10 1 



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24 ANNUAL REFOBT. 

Paeamonla 1 1 S 

Paresis 10) 

Salclde 1 1 

BeoiorrhtEe, Kcldental 10 1 

T7pboii»Dta 1 1 

1< 11 ST 

Tlie general health of the iDtnatea has been excellent, and most 
of the deaths occurred among chronic cases and those who had 
been residents of the hospital for some years. 

It will be seen by the above statistics that the number has in- 
creased, during the past year, fifty-three, or, leaving out the five 
committed I^om Dakota Territory, forty-eight ; and this is the aver- 
age yearly gain for the last seven years. The growth of the State, 
and the cases derived ftom the present population will warrant the 
predictioB that the number will not be less in years to come. The 
question of fvlure provision is then near at hand, as the hjgienic 
capacity of this hospital will be readied the present year, if the 
temporary buildings are entirely abandoned, f^ve handred patients, 
with the necessary attendants, congregated in one house, and on 
one farm, constitute as large a family as desirable for suitable classi- 
floation, provision and treatment. Some years ago the Association 
of Medical Superintendents of Hospitals for Insane recommended 
twa hundred and fifty as the most proper number for a hospital, 
and some years later an amendment was made, that the number 
might, under some circumstances, be five hundred. But the latter 
opinion was probably expressed more in faver of economy than for 
the best interest of the patients to be treated. 

How, then, must the future necessity be met? The plan of sepa- 
rate institutions for the chronic and acute cases, or, as generally ex- 
pressed, incuTObte and curable subjects, has been advocated, and in 
some instances adopted, under the impression that a saving might 
be made in the cost of support, by providing cheap lodgings for 
the chronic insane. The scheme, I believe, unwise, impracticable, 
and inexpedient, and the final reanlt, wherever tried, a failure; m- 
wiM, as we cannot select the cases for each division and consign 
them to definite quarters, some to what may seem to them a final 
doom, without danger of great injustice, and, perhaps, cruel mis- 
takes ; impracticable from the fact that cases of both descriptions 
are developed in all parts of the State, and sanding one to a re- 
mote section for treatment, away IVom accommodations for a differ- 
ent class, to be returned, it may be for final keeping, at great ex- 



zed byCoOglc 



HOSPITAL FOB IKSAKB. 25 

peoae for traasportation, would seem oDncceasay and impoUlIo; 
<nexptdimt, as the cost saved by. a separation in the one class would 
be made up by tlie extra paid altendance necessary for a class wholly 
Acute, and tUe whole plan a failure from a combination of the above 
ditBculLfes, and the gratlusl degeneration of such cheap receptacles 
into mere pens for the herding of patients to be supported, perliaps, 
eventually by the lowest bidder for the contract. Any movomeuts 
in favor of such plans would fully illustrate the anecdote related 
by the distinguished expert in insanity, Dr. Pliny Earle, of an or- 
der given by a military officer drilling his company, " advance in » 
retrograde direction." 

It is a well known fact that the friends of patients avail themselves 
of hospital treatment in propwtion to their proximity to its doors, 
and tliat patients, remote from accommodations, are often retained at 
home, hoping for a favorable change, until too late to derive sub- 
stantial beneQt fi^m any treatment, and then they become a perma> 
sent charge lo their friends or the Sute. A better, and in the end 
a more economical plan would be to provide suitable and curative 
hospitals for all within reasonable distance of the centres of popu- 
lation. For this purpose, in this State, two central paints migitt be 
selected as proper locations, and such provision made, from time to 
time, as necessity demands. Extensive and costiy buildings need 
not be projected and provided at once, but suitable plans adopted, 
capable of extension, and completed when needed. The whole or- 
ganization and preparation of these several institutions should re- 
main under one board of trustees, to secure harmony of action and 
aniformity of admlnstration. 

Ip this Gonnecliou I have been requested to call your attention 
to a class of patients, though not strictly belonging here, yet have 
been received because there seemed to be no other place for them, 
and the number is increasing. I allude to the idiots and young im- 
beciles. They have been regularly committed, not from any expec- 
tation of benefit by treatment, as that can be merely custodian, in 
most coses. They arc generally children of poor settlers, located 
in thinly inhabited counties, where little or no provision has been 
made for the helpless poor. They are troublesome at home and at 
times dangerous from their violent dispositions and propensities for 
mischief, with Are and other agents. They must be cared for, but 
the insane hospital is not the best or proper place for them. Un- 
der patient teachers, accustomed to such a class of pupils, theh: 
oooditioo can be vastly improved, and sometimes the most degra- 
ded and revolting specimeos of humanity made comparatively corn- 



zed byCoOglc 



26 ANNUAL REPOBT. 

fortable and happy. What, then, can be dODe for these anfortunate 
little ones if you refuse to admit them here? If they oould be col- 
lected into a family by themselves, as a school, on a farm, in a 
healthy location, and cared for and taught by some competent per- 
son, snbjt'Cl to public examination and the control of the State, the 
expense need not exceed the estimate now allowed for each inmate 
here, and the Bdvantajres to them would be greatly multiplied, and 
the hospital, in some degree, relieved. I make these suggestions in 
the hope that some action may be taken by tbose in authority that 
may result in benefit to these feeble-minded yonth. 

Improvements. — ^Tho most important of these is the preparation 
for occupancy of the addition to the north wing, occupied by male 
patients, which symmetrically completes the hospital building, and 
gives us nine distinct wards for eac*J sez. 

The introduction of gaslight, in place of candles, and moveable 
lamps filled with inflammable oil, is one of the most important im- 
provements, adding much 10 oar comfort as well as safety from fire, 
and giving a cheerful look to the halls during the long winter even- 
ings otherwise not easily obtained. The gas is manufactured from 
naphtha, stored in an iron tank of 34,00') gallons capacity, a quan- 
tity sufficient for a year's supply, and located outside the building, 
mostly under ground, from which it is pumped as required for use. 
The process of making this gas is by heated retorts, and is the pa- 
tent of A. G. Rand, Esq., of Minneapolis, Minn., who supplies the 
apparatus. His process differs from the older methods of manu- 
facturing in the fact that the oil is not permitted lo flow directly 
npon the inside of the retort, but first enters the vaporizing pan 
placed in the front end of the retort, the object of which is to first 
vaporize the oil, and then the vapor passing through the retort is 
oonverted into a fixed gas. This plan prevents the thick tarry mat- 
ter and asphalt from stopping up the various conduits ending in the 
gasometer, they being held back in the pan, which can be removed 
and cleaned occasionally, thus prevenung stoppages tn the works. 
In the older methods, to prevent these difllculties, the retorts are 
kept at a low beat, so that considerable condensation may ensue as 
the result of said low temperature ; this will wash out of tlie pipes 
the thick tarry substance, but it is a great waste of material. An- 
other important feature of these works is the water column washer, 
which is furnished with a spray, through which the gas passes on 
its way to the holder. By the use of this, all particles of dry car- 
boa are taken out of the gas. The vaporizer and washer, com- 
bined, make the works perfectly safe as no stoppages and the result- 
ant explosions can ever occur. 



zedbyGoOgle 



HOSPITAL FOR INSANE. S7 

The gasometer will hold 1,900 feet or gas, estimated to eqnat, in 
oandle power, 9,500 feet of coal gaa. 

The building, S8 x 30 and 13 feet high, vrith tinned roof, covering 
the gasometer and other necessaiy apparatus for manufacturing goa, 
and storing coke for fuel, is of stone, aimilai- to the other baililinga, 
and lined iriih brick, trith dead-air apace, making it nearly frost- 
proof; but as the works are not in daily use, two eteam coils, for 
healiog, when necessary, have been put in. 

I have tbuB described this apparatus and the process of making 
gas at some length, as it is comparatively of recent date and, its 
■access now assured, is of considerable interest to parties outside 
onr own neigliborbood. We have not been using this liglit long 
flnongh to state its cost accurately, but estim.ite tlie expense of oil, 
ftael and labor not to exceed three dollars per day, throughout the 
year, for three hundred burners. 

Some other improvements of less cost bnt of great convenience 
have been made, perfecting the arrangemcnlsfor water supply, cook- 
ing, and store-rooms. For the fli-at, the reservoir, at the spring, has 
been enlarged to double its former capacity, and a new steam force 
pomp procured, as an extra, to guard against acuidenta. The wa' 
ter supply for an inatitulion of this character and number of in- 
matea, is too important to risk a fiiilure, even for a single day, if It 
can be possibly avoided. The range, for the kitchen, tliat had been 
io nse aince the opening of the lioaae, being now too small, it was 
removed to the temporary hospital, anil its place supplied with one 
of larger aize. For storing supplies, the basement of the west side 
of the south wing flrat hall, has been prepared by plastering the 
ceilings and walls and flagging the floor with stone laid in cement. 
It is convenient of access, directly from the kitchen, aud fiom the 
outside, through a door, for lieavy packages. 

Grading alHiai. the building has been continned as the farm help 
and teams could be spared from other work, and a variety of shade, 
firoit and ornamenUl trees set out. 

The appropriation for current funds, last year, was based on the 
Mtimate of four dollars per week for eac\ paliejit, and this amount 
was Intended to meet all expenses for board of patienti and aiten' 
danta (this year tlie latter numbering sixty-six,) all clothing nece^-tary 
for patients, building and furniture, fuel and light, medical supplies, 
«ll necessary repain, and some extraordinary expenses for improve- 
ments, oflJcers' salaries and support, and wages of attendants, aud 
it has been sufficient and something to spare, as the treasurer's ac- 
oonnta will show. If allowence is made for the same increase of 



zedbyGoOgle 



S8 AKNDAL BBPOST. 

patleoUi this year, the daily average will be 461, and at the rate of 
$3.75 per week, a reduction of twenty-five cents per week, for each, 
from last year's estimate, t8&,8iJ5 will be required. This amount, 
with ^the osubI economy of expenditure, may be sufQcieat; sbould 
it, however, prove othorwise, the batanoe or cost at the end of the 
fiscal year will be redaced and known in time for relief by tite fol- 
lowing legislature. 

Farm. — This has been conducted as formerly, and although the 
locusts damaged the early vegetables, corn and otber plants to a 
considerable extent, still the crops, as a whole, exceed in value 
those of any previous year. The care of stock, and the variety of 
labor ftirniBhed for the convalescing patients by the cultivation of a 
farm, gives opportunity for healthful exercise and recreation for 
which a substitute is not easily found — 975 days' labor have been 
performed by patients and farm bands In addition to the regular 
farm work, in grading, making and repairing roads, and excavaving 
trenches for sewers and foundation for gas-house and area walla. 

Occupaticn Is also furnished, as far as possible, for the female 
patients : assisting in the kitchen, laandry and sewing room, and 
general bouse work in the balls. The following is a list of the new 
articles made in the sewing rooms. The repairing, the largest item 
of needle work, is done mostly in the female wards by patients and 
attendants of which no account is kept : 

Aprons GB 

Bedspreads SO 

Carpet Hats Bonnd SO 

CbemlHs SOt 

Clothes Bags Sf 

Cupboard Shelt Covers SOO 

Drawers, Pairs Ill 



Bandkercblela IM 

Holders U 

Ladles' HaU, Trimmed 41 

Mittens, Pairs. IT 

HattreSB Tick! 4 

NapkioB U 

night Dresses 9 

Night Caps 10 

FsDts 10 

Pillow Cases 4TS 

Pillow Ticks m 

BheeU SW 



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HOflPITAL TOB IHeAHB. 29 

Sklrte tO» 

Shroads >t 

Socks Footed, Pftin U 

Sock! Knitted, Ptln M 

8hlrt« '. 100 

StnwTtckB IM 

BDfpendera, F&ira H 

Towels 8S8 

TartB S 

Window Cntl&liu 31 

Wrappers 1S8 

4,030 

Religioos Mirices tutva been conducted every Sabbath afternoon, 
fn the chapel, by the several clergymen of St. Peter, and two even- 
ings every week entertainments have been given by lectnrea, read- 
lugs and singing, and magic lantern exhibitions; a fkir proportion 
of the inmates are regular and attentive listeners to these exercises, 
•Ten slight disturbances are exceptional. 

We are under great obligations to the publishers of the foltowiog 
papers sent gratuitously to the hospital. The list has been mnoh 
enlarged, this year, through the efforts of one of your Board, the 
Hon. F. Talbot, and to him we are indebted fbr prooorlng all the 
Canada papers and part of those from this State : 

St. Paul PloQMr- Press, dsilr. 

Minneapolis TrlSnne, dally. 

Nonhweatern Chroolcle, weekly. 

Minnesota Staats-ZelianK, weekly. 

Hlonesots Polksblalt, weeklv. 

Nonllsk Polkeblad, weekly. 

RedwooU Falls Qasstie, weekly. 

Benvllle Times, weekly. 

Minnesota Radical, weekly. 

Btlllwater Qasette, weekly. 

Badatlkken, (EforweglsD) HiDneapoIIa, weekly. 

New Ulm Herald, weekly. 

Sveaskft Njbyggarea, t)i. Psal, weekly. 

Wabufba Herald, weekly. 

8'. Cloni] Pri!B.', weekly. 

Rtca Coanij Junrna], week'y, 

MIoneBotii Buobachter, weekly, 

SkandinaveD, Cblcago, weekly. 

Wallaceburg Western Advocate, Canada, weekly. 



zcdbvGoOgIc 



$0 ANNUAL BEFO^T. 

Parkhlll Gazette, Caoadt, weekly. 

St. ThoiQAs Weeklj Di^patcb, Canada, weekly. 

The Natloo, (Torooto) Caoada, weeblj. 

St. Mary's Argos, Canada, weekly. 

Westero Advenher, (Londoo) CaDada, weekly. 

CaDBdlan Home Joanial. (St. Tbtnaa; Canada, weekly. 

Oltervlile Argu*, Canada, weekly. 

London Weekly Herald, Canadri, weekly. 

Onilla Packect, Ciaada, weekly. 

Btratbroy Age, Canada, weekly. 

WallacetowD OiKecce, Canadu, weekly. 

HarallloD Dally Spectator, Canada, dally. 

St. Cloud Joaroal, weekly. 

Treebotn Conoty Standard, weekly. 

Hantorvllla Express, weekly. 

Anoka CoDDty RapabKcan, weekly 

Hastings Ojictte, weekly. 

Olencoe Kvgi^ter, weekly. 

I^ke City Leader, weekly. 

Jackson Repnbllc, weekly. 

Litchfield News Ledger, weekly. 

Aasvln Register, weekly. 

Sibley CoQDty Independent, weekly. 

Henderson Tlmea, weekly. 

Bt. Peter Tribune, weekly. 

St. Peter Commercial Advertiser, weekly. 

Wlndom Reporter, weekly. 

DonatioDB from individiiaU am also gratefully acknowledged u 
follows : 

From Rot. A. H. Kerr, of St. Peter, papers and pamphteU. 

From Bev. Edward Livermore, of St. Puter, one lecture and pa- 
pers add pamphlets. 

From Mrs. Heary C. Swift, of St Peter, books, and papers and 
pamphlets. 

From Mra. Henry Jones, of St. Peter, papers, weekly. 

From Mrs. Loren Fletcher, of Ulnneapolis, a collection of ma- 
gazines and illustrated papers. 

From C. U. Loring, Esq., of Minneapolis, a floe collection of 
plants and bulbs for the halls. 

Fiom Mr. Atwater, Mrs C. M. Lorring and Mr. Grossman, of 
Minneapolis, each a canary bird. 

From J. S. Pierson, Esq., of New York City, 60 stereoscopic 
views, and 68 volumes books, also magazines, papers and pictures. 



zedb^Google 



HOSPITAL FOB INSANE. 81 

From J. K. Moore, of St. Peter, several pictures. 

From the Andrews Troupe, an excellent concert. 

From the cbildrcD and adults' singing classes of St. Peter, one 
concert each, under the direction of Messrs. Smith and Johnson. 

These were very much enjoyed by the patients. 

Hon. F. Talbot has favored us with several readings, and Miss 
Grace L. White, of St. Paul, one. Rev. M. D. Terwilllger and 
Rev. J. H. Rohrer, of St. Peter, have lectured one evening each. 
All these were highly interesting and acceptable. 

In addition to the regular meetings of your Board, the hospital 
baa been visited monthly, and sometimes more, by one member, 
aenally accompanied by some gentleman, by invitation. These 
Bpecial inspectors have made reports in writing which are before 
you. Among these is one from Dr. A. Reynolds, Superintendent 
of the Hospital for Insane, at Independence, Iowa, to which I al- 
lude, as he is the only superintendent that has visited ns since my 
connection with the institution. 

No change baa occured in the staff of officers, and to them, and 
ftll those associated with me in the labor of conducting this insti- 
lutioD, I desire to express my thanks for their cheerful and hearty 
co-operation. 

Again thanking yon for your unwearied interest in the hospital 
and Its inmates, I congratulate you in view of the near completion 
of those extensive buildings, and the consequent release from » 
portion of your official tabor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CYRUS K. BARTLETT, 
Saperintendent. 

Deo. lat, 1676. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AMNOAI, BBPOm. 



^FPEISTDIX. 



TABLE I. 

MOTBlfUrr OF THE FOPDLATIOII. 



Nninbrr «t bcfftonlng of the jaar.. 

Admlitfd dariDg the jcar 

Total pregi-nt Id Ihe yvftr 

DWbariied. r«co*Fred 

DlHchargHtl, Improved 

DkcbkTueU, DUilouarr 

Dird 

Dally ft*rrsge 

Remaining >t end of year 



TABLE n. 

ADMIMIOMS AHD DOCHAKQEa FBOH THE BEOINKIKa OF THE HOSPITAL. 



Admitted since openlDg.. 
l)lBihir;.'Fd. ivcoTert'd... 

DlKtli irged. Improved 

DlH''harK>-<l. stHtioDkry > • • 

Notpio,>.;ri«Dt>JecWi 

Died 

B«m>lnlng at end of yor 



Heo. 


Womea. 


6flS 


E80 


£03 


KO 




9a 


16 


16 


8 




104 


fiS 


W» 


IW 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



HOSPIUI. n>B imAHB. 



TABLE lU. 
cnvu. coMDiTiov or tbosi AmnnxD. 





DDBOIO THX TEAR. 


UNCI omnKD HOSPITAL. 




H«n. 


Women. 


Toul. 


Uen. 


Womep. 


Tottl. 




w 

88 
8 

1 


106 


E8 

fiS 

8 



8i 


SI 

It 

1 


188 


300 
34 
8 
11 

686 


158 

817 

S3 

< 



4S0 


881 


















1,196 





I AT KACH AOB WBU AOHimD DUBINO TBS 1 





WHBT ADMTITKD. 


WHMM ATTAOXMD. 




H«n. 


Women. 


Total. 


Hen. 


Women. 


Total. 




21 
19 
18 
18 

13 
106 


17 
12 
12 

10 

89 


8 
11 
26 
30 
SB 
97 
21 
IS 
32 
4 
8 
1 

188 


fi 

1] 

' 16 
19 

106 


10 


88 


IS 






8] 






25 





































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TABLE V. 

OCODPATtOM or THOgB ASIOXrKD. 



DortngUieTear. Sine* Opanlog. 



Fftrmerauid flmneis'soDB.. 

lAboren 

RoiiBekeepera 

Hotuework (damestlcs) 

PfttDlers 

Tftllora 

CtrpttDten ■ 



TflBchera 

Clockinkk«K 

Laiiib«riiieD 

Bntehen 

Printers 

Bftken 

Cabinet Makers 

School Cblldren 

Bookkeepers 

Stodents ...: 

HecbsDlcs 

BrlckmkkeTB 

BIscksmlibe 

Bank Clerks 

Sboemsksra 

Merchants 

Uaeous 

HarncsflmaJcers 

Oardenersx. 

Cooks 

Weavers 

Beat EsUte Agents... 

Confectioner 

HqsIc Teachers 

Teamsters 

Boiler Maker 

Miller 

Cigar Maker 

Clerks 

Hanterand Trapper. 

Dragglst 

Barber 

Hotel Keepers 

Coopers 

LlvArymen 

Stenographer 

Clergymen 

8tav«inaker 

Locksmith 

Stone Cattsr. 

Barke«per 

Poddler. 

Nnrseryi 

Dentist 

Pbjeiclane 

Seetlon Boss. . 

No Oooapatlon. 




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Hosnux. FOB nnuTB. 

TABLE VI. 

NATirnr or tArtxKTs ^AtnarrmD. 





DDBIMa m TEAB. 


8IH0B OPBMIMO HOSPITAL. 




M«n. 


Women. 


Total. 


H«0. 


Women. 


Total. 




U 

40 

9 
IS 

86 


si 

18 
11 
1$ 

SI 


20 

10 

71 

28 

M 
22 

117 


66 

95 
S 

12 

IS 
8 
1 
« 
1 

10 
7 

19 
1 

19 

10 
4 
S 
I 
1 
1 

18 


isi 

7S 

9S 
75 
84 
41 

se 
la 

5 

7 
» 
2 

1 
8 
1 
28 

43S 


62 
IB 

15 
14 
15 
2 
18 
18 

1 


2 


7 
1 

199 

78 
70 
69 
26 
19 
14 
21 
9 
7 
1 
2 



IS 

S81 


127 
40 

7 
IS 
98 
11 

8 
10 

7 
25 
21 
84 

3 
S2 
22 

6 

5 






MawachaMttfl 

New Himpibire 

BbodeLUod 




















M«ni»S.v.v.v: ::." 


MlMonri 


S 






20 




ToUlMUTebom.. 


480 

161 
168 
144 
8! 
60 
89 
88 
14 








Dominion of Caouta. 
OrMtBriUlD 


Boli«mU 




10 


















88 
T86 


Total Foreign 



C PATIKEm OOIOHTTXD TO TBK HOSPITAL TBMX AKXI 



iratiTo Bom. . 
Forelcn Bom. 

Total 



40 
66 

106 


81 
61 


71 
117 

188 


281 
4S6 


199 
881 

680 





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AIHfUAIi BBPOKT. 
TABLE Vn. 

SHOWINa THE irUHBKS FBOH XiCH COmTT. 







BIOMOpralifHoaplUI. 




Hui. 


w.™, 


TOUl. 


H*n. 


w-«. 


Total. 


Anoka. 


I 


T 


J 

11 


3 

! 

3 

1 


il 

■■■■«■ 

i" 

....... 

I 

i 

....... 

"■'.!'■ 

i" 

""i 
■f 

'1 

u 
u 

!' 

11 

J 

11 

i" 




Kn'.'aitt '.'.'■'■"' 


1 


Br»wn 


', 




2 

....... 


i" 


.. ... 

1 


i 




11 


4 
U 
11 


i 




x,^S^i,z\]"'""''.'.':'.'.''.'.'.'.. '.'.'..'.'.. 
OOOdtO 




Sas- :;;; 




i 


3> 

i 
s 

3 

1 

J 

1 


J 


■s 


tSi"°"::::::: :::•:::;::::::;:;;: 




KSU;::;:::: ::::::::;":::::; 

SS".'r,;::;.- ■.:■■.■.::■■..;.;:;;•.:::: 


; 


« 

i" 




S^'-r"'-'- • 


1 

1 








^iiEv--::--- 




jji^iU' 


> 




?K.™:::::::::::::::::::;:::::;:::::: 




KS^::;::::::::::;::::::::::;:;::::: 


« 


"! 




11 


4 
1 

1 


> 

'! 
I 










mW"'.-.--::;:; 








IKT::::::.:::;:.::::::;::;::;:::;:::: 

Swift 


1 




K 


^^^ee::ee-}?e 








» 






ToUI 


sw 


IW 


4M 


Ml 


no 


i,m 



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Hoepiru, Fo^ mum. 
TABLE vnL 

ALLXOBD OAUSIS Of IHBAinrT. 



OwtralUlhMaih 

lU baalcb from oranroTk, 

lBt*np«nBea 

DomMllB troBbI* 

PKanUiT dlttcnltlM. 
DluppolBtad --— "" 

WutBrbailOB. 



RallCiODI •KClMDMDt.i 

Polliteal txMr——' 
Oonp daSolJdl. 
lajorr K> >>*^ 
FrtfM 



ApoplaiT 
TrpboM 




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AHirtTAL BBPOBT. 



TABLE IX. 

SBOWIMO TBI TOBM Of KBKTU. DISKA8E. 



1 

Acute HanU 

Cbronic kUnlA 

Eplleptto HmU...- 
ParnlTtlc MsdU---- 
Paerperal Huiln . . . 
Periodical H«iil&--. 

Nymphomania. 

HoDomaola 

H«lanchft11a 

Dementia 

Seclle deraeotlt- ■. 
Idiots and Imbecile . 
Kot proper ant^dcia, 

Total 



DTTRIMQ TUB TKAK. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


41 


29 


S8 


28 


20 


48 






5 






8 






8 
2 


as 


, n 


88 




* 


6 




s 


S 






7 









106 


as 


188 



StNCB OPBNOra HOSPITAL. 



TABLE X. 
aBOwma the kcmb^ of attacks ix tbobi admithd. 



First 

Second 

Third 

Fonrtb 

Fifth 

Sixth 

HotSabJecU. 
Unknown . . . 

Total.... 



DUKINO THS YKAB. 



Women. 


Total. 


60 


188 


11 


li 


» 


14 




















1 


10 


8S 


ISS 





Hen. 


Women. 


Tot^. 




87G 




78 


60 


IBS 


SS 


17 


40 


7 




U 






8 


2 




G 


S 




6 


m 


64 


191 








666 


680 


1,196 



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HOSPITAL TOB INBAIIE. 



TABLE XI. 
DDBATIOH or DfSABITT BErOBt ADHIBStON. 



DUBne TBB YB&B. 



nuder 1 ««ek 

Under 1 montb 

1 to Smonths 

S to 6 months 

8 toft moDtlu 

9 tolSmcntthB 

IS to ISmoDtlu..... 

18 toSrean 

S toS jCftra 

8to4 jeanL 

4 toSyeus 

Sto lOyuLis 

10 to ISyeuB 

I»to20;«an 

30 to S5 jean 

XStoSO 

SOandorer 

NoC SabJectB 

IdtoM and ImtMcUe 
Unknown 

Total 



Hen. 


Women. 


Total. 


U 




U" 


IS 


10 


ss 


36 


30 


u 






16 












10 












12' 












18 




































10 


106 


89 


188 



srooa OFXHiNG hospital. 



Hen. 


Women. 


TotaL 


as 


« 


38 


lis 


78 


191 




SO 


167 




«S 


1)8 




SS 


68 


IS 


14 


SS 


89 


18 


87 


in 


8 


37 


88 


S6 


78 


8S 


ST 


S9 




S6 


40 


8T 


47 


84 


SI 


80 


SI 


7 




IB 






16 


8 





8 




6 


8 


8 




5 


4 


3 


7 


100 


SI 


- ISl 








666 


S80 


1,196 



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AinniAI. KBPOBT. 



TABLE XII. 
nncBKB or dsatbs and tbub cavbks. 





Dnilag tbe Teir. 


Since Op«t)lBS Hm. 




H«D. 

S 
2 

1 
1 
4 
1 


Wo- 


Toud. 


Men. 
22 

la 
11 

8 
18 
S 

8 

$ 
4 
8 
1 
1 


Wo- 
16 

i 

9 
66 


ToUL 


Uaimenins 


a 

"i" 

1 

4 


B 
3 
8 

1 










































1 
1 


1 

S 






I 
















































I 






















1 
4 

a 




































1 




X 


6 
1 
I 








































1 
1 

16 




1 
1 


1 
1 

104 














11 


169 





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B08PITAL lOB IMSAHB. 
TABLE XIU. 

AQBS AT DBATH. 





PUBIMO THB TSAS. 


BINOC OPBNUia HOSPITAL. 




Hen. 

16 


Women. 


TouL 


Hen. 


Vomen. 


ToUI. 


Uiid«UT«u» 


I 
11 





2 
6 
IS 
17 
18 
10 
10 
U 
11 
6 
6 
3 

104 


2 

I 

10 
6S 


» 
18 
H 
2S 












le 
u 


WtoM 


Wto 70 

TO to SO 

WtoW 


11 

8 
S 







TABLE XIV. 

SHOWtMe KUIfBBB Or ADHIBSIOKB BACH HOIfTH. 



H«o. Womeo. Totkl. 



Men. Women. Toul. 



December. 

J40I1UT--- 

Haieli ..: 

Apra 

Mu 

Jane 

Jnly 

AogOBt.... 
Septamber 
October... 
Novvmber. 

Toul. 



I - 



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[XxacuTivx DocuuMT No. 19.] 

THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

t or TBB 

DIKECTOES MD OFFICERS 

OF THE , 

MIMESOTA INSTITUTION 

FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE 

DEAF AND DUMB,, AND THE BLIND, 



LOCATED IN FARIBAULT. 



TO THE GOVERKOfi OF MINNESOTA. 



FOR THE "YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30th, 1876. 



wamox, I87«. 



8AIMT PADL: 
1876. 



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ALPHABET OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

As Bb Oc Dd Ee 

Ff Gg Hh li Jj 

Kk LI Mm Nn Oo 

P p Q q R r S ■ T t 

hi) 



UuVt Ww Xj Ty 




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BOABD OF DIEECT0K8. 



Hia Esoxllhtct, C. K. DAVIS, Gotksxos or MnnrasoTA, n-oriTOio. 

'Hos. D. BUBT, SDFKBnmHDXNT or Fublio IniTRuonoN, Elz-ornoio. 

GB0B6E M. GILUOBE, or Fabibaolt, 1871 to 187S. 

H. E. BABBON, or Faribault, 1866 to 1871 ; auo, 1872 to 1877. 

B. A. MOTT, or FABiBAnLT, 1663 to 1866 ; al80> 1868 to 1678 

AMD 1878. 
HUDSON WILSON, or Fabibault, 1666 to 1874 ; also, 1874 to 1879 
T. B. CLEMENT, or Fabibadi.t, 1875 n> 1880. 



OPPlCEfiS OP THE BOARD. 



pbbsidznt, 
H. £. BABBON. 



V1CB PBBBIDEMT, 

GEOBGE M. 6ILM0BE. 



SlORITABr, 

B. A. Morr. 



TttBASCBKB AXU mWABD, 
HimSON WILSON. 



,:.dbvC00gIC 



IKTEUECTUAl DEPAETMENT. 



OFFICERS AND TEACHERS 



SDFEBINTBMD KNT , 

J. L. NOYES, A. 1 



B OF THE DEAT IMD DDXB, 

GEORGE WING, 
D. H. CARROLL, A. B., 
PENDER W. DOWNING, 
JOSEPHINE PIETROWSKI, 
ISABELLA H. RANSOM, 
MARION WILSON, 
JENNIE 0. CRAMER. 

TRAOetBRS OF TBB BLIND, 

JAMES J. DOW, A. B. Acting Pboicifal, 
MILUE MOTT. 

TBAOHERS or TOCAL AMD INSTROKBHTAI. ItDSIO, 

WILLIAM MANNER, 
CORA J. SHIPMAN. 

TZACHES OF DKAWIXe, 

MARION WILSON. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



DOMESTIC AHD ISDUSTEIAL DBPAETMBSTB. 



8DFEBIMTBNDI3IT) 

J. L. NOTES. 

MATROlf OF THE DEAF AMD DUMB, 

ADELINE B. HALE. 

AMieiAUT MATBON, 

SABAH M. FERRT. 

HATBOM OT THE BUMS, 

LYDIA AUSTm. 

PHieifilAM, 

Z. B. NICHOLS, M. D. 

mWABD, 

HUDSON WILSON. 

ASSISTANT BTEWABD, 

F C. SHELDON. 

nr CHABQZ OF SHOPS, 

O. S. BLAKE, FoBBKAK of Shoe Shop. 

D. M. ETANS, FoBEKAK of Tailob Shop. 

JEREMIAH EELLET, Fobehak of Coopeb Shop. 

SABAH H. PERBT, Imbtbuctbebs iit Needle asd Faxot Wobk. 

GABDKHBB, 

NILS P. ROOD. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



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REPORT or THE DIRECTORS. 



To Si» SxcelitJUS!/, 0. K. Davit, Qovtmor: 

nnder the special appropriation of 115,000.00, made last winter, 
we have put in the basemeot of the main center of the bnildings 
for the Deaf and Dumb Department, and have secured in all re- 
spects a first^laaa Job ; a small portion of the cat stone remains 
to b« laid in the spring . 

We desire to commend the contractors, O'Neil & Palmer, for their 
faithfnl performance of this contract, taken at Tery low fignres, and 
M»J. A. B. Sogers, for hie soperintendence of the work. 

After defl^ying the expense of this improvement, together with 
the aqaednct hereafter explained, there still remains unexpended, 
of last winter's appropriation, about six thoasand dollars. 

Onr architects, U. Shiere A Bro., of St. Paul, after a carefhl es- 
timate, report : That it will cost to enclose the main center, ia- 
oluding slate roof, irith cupola complete, sash set and glazed, ver- 
andaha and steps complete, joists and lining floors laid, all neces- 
sary partitions set for the support of Joists, and all outside painting 
done, the sum of forty-two thousand five hundred dollars. Add 
fifteen hundred dollars for cost of suuerintendence, and for changes 
in the wings to adapt them to the center, we have forty-four thou- 
sand dollars. Deduct six thousand dollars undrawn and unex- 
pended, we shall need an appropriatjon of thirty-eight thousand 
dollara the enauiug session of the Legislature, and we may add 
that it is probably the last large appropriation for building pur- 
poses that we shall ever ask at their bands. We shall, of coarse, 
need a considerable sum next year to finish, fhmieh and heat the 
building, bnt the entire sum will fall far short of the one hundred 
thousand dollars originally estimated as the cost of the main cen- 
ter, with its flltings. 

Onr experience has taught us ttiat in any institution which be- 



JigiLizedbyGoOt^lc 



10 AKNDAL BHPOBT. 

comes the home of & coDai<)erable namber of children and youth, 
one easenti&l condition of safety, health and culture, in an ample 
supply of pnre water. For years a fine Bpring, Sowing by gravita- 
tion through the bnildings for the Deaf and Dumb, has, in our 
opinion, largely contributed to the remarkable immunity fVom 
sickness and death which has been a prominent feature in the his- 
tory of the Institution. The Blind Department, until lately, has 
been supplied flrom an Imperfect cistern and feeble well. Dnrinfif 
the sumxer it was ascertained that 0. F. Brand, one of our citi- 
zens living upon and owning the old farm of Judge Berry, for the 
mere nominal sum of one hundred dollars, would deed us the per- 
petual flow of a fine spring upon the farm, and right of way bctdm 
his premises, on condition that we would improve the same. The 
altitude of the spring was found to be twenty-three fbet and eight 
inches above the third floor of the Institution building. The water 
problem, which had puzzled ns, was solved. We immediately 
proceeded with the work. We have built a reservoic, with water- 
tight wing dams — carried the water, four feet under ground, 
in prepared wooden pipes of two-inch bore, a distance of 3,400 
feet, — provided conyenient stock water, and for a fonntain in 
the yard, and distributed the water through the building, at a 
cost of about eighteen hundred dollars (the plumbing bills are 
not all in yet.) The cost was charged to the special appro* 
priation of last winter. The water is clear, pure, sweet, abundant, 
and nearly soft. 

You may remember that we found in a previous report that 
1260.00 per pupil was somewhat below the average cost of main- 
taining the D. db D. & B. Instttutions of this country. Upon this 
basis we have done the work of over $dO,000.00 for »26,000.00 dur- 
ing the last year. With the constant apprehension of our first defi- 
ciency at the close of this financial year, the Directors have pud 
the strictest personal attention to the items of expenditure and 
are able again to return the uniform report : "A small balance in 
in the Treasury." But we feel that this extreme economy ought 
soon to be modified. The bare walls of our buildings shonld bear 
a few good pictures. More rooms and especially the hospital should 
be carpeted. Apparatus is needed for both classes, and some t^- 
pliances for amusement, and a special need is a good library for the 
blind, who are voracious hearera of general literature. 

We hesitate to mention these wants, for we know fVill well the 
pressure applied to the lean Treasury of onr new state. We only 
suggest, that should some rich bonanza be discovered this winter 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



THB DEAF AND DUMB, AHD THB BLDTO. 11 

among oar virgia rasoarcee, that great joy can b« broogbt to the 
e}'eleu and earless papils of this institation by an extra gift to be 
expended fbr their comfort, amasement and art education. 

We are oonstantly surprised at the amonnt of work performed 
and the general improTement of the pupils in the several shops, bat 
the intelleotoal, indastrial, domeaUc and financial oondition of the 
Institution is fhlly set forth in the accompanying documents, which 
we herewith reBpectfhUy sabmit on behalf of the Board. 

H. E. BABRON, Pres. 

R. A. MOTT,.Sec. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



fb the Sonordble Board of Direetort : 

GxHTLKMKH : — llie Thirteenth Annokl Report of this Inatitotioii 
is now dne. Ib it onlj a very brief notice will be attempterl, in 
speaking of the variotia departmenta of labor and learning. 

The whole nnmber of pnpila in attendance during the year has 
been 110 in the Deaf and Dnmb, and 21 in the Blind Department — 
total, 131. Of the former, 70 are males, and 40 are females; of 
the latter, 18 are moles, and $ females. 

As the pnplls of tbe Blind Department have been cared for and 
taught in departmente and by officers specially selected for tbe 
work, they will be brought before you in another part of this Report. 



Good health has prerailed, in tbe main, throughout the year. 
I^ast spring, the measles broke out among the pupils, and for a 
short time made lively work In onr hospitals ; but with faithful, 
watcbftil care, and skillful medical treatment, ali in dne time wera 
perfectly restored to health. One of the older pnpils had a severe 
ran of rheumatic fever, from which, however, he recovered. Provi- 
dence has so graciously blessed our care and treatment of the side 
hitherto, that we fondly hoped death woald not iavade our family 
circle. For nearly thirteen years in saccession — a period covering 
the entire history of this Institution, fh>m its opening to the 29th 
of last May, not a death occurred among onr pupils. But the pe- 
culiar charm of that thought is gone, for the family circle has been 
invaded, and, within the past six months, two of our pupils have 
died — one while here at school, the other at home. 

ADA AMD SUSAN. 

Tbe former, Ada Jenks, of Lake City, died Hay 29th, 1875. Tbe 



zedbyGoOgle 



THI DKAF AXm DUMB, AKJ> TBM BLDID. 18 

olrcDnutaiioes of her death are these : From infancy the hod beea 
troabled more or less with a tumor npon the back of her head lear 
the base of the brain. It hadigrown to snch dimensiona that it wa» 
difBcnl t to conceal it with her hair. Two days previoas to her death, 
she was npon the lawn gathering flowers with some of her play- 
mates, and by some mishap fell and braised this tumor. At first, 
nothing serions was apprehended, — prompt atteation was given — 
bat she grew worse and despite the best of care and medical treat- 
ment, in forty-eight hours from the time of the All, she calmly passed 
away. In her last moments she had the affiectlonate care of her 
mother. Ada was a gentle, affectionate, obedient child, and al- 
though her attainments were humble, yet her brief sojourn in the 
institution was not in vain. 

t>u8an J. Dallas, of Clearwater, Wright Co., who had been at school 
one term died of diphtheria at her home, and was buried Sept. 8th, 
the very day her mother had set apart for her return to schooK 
She was a bright, amiable child, with a sweet disposition that had 
won the respect of all. Her widowed mother has the sympathy of 
hearts made sad through her loss. 

Ada and Susan are the severed links in the chain hitherto nnbrO' 
ken, and in years M come their smiling faces and gentle mannera 
will often be remembered by their schoolmates and teachers. 

OBADUATBS. 

By referring to the report of 1868, it will be seen that at the 
commencement of the term, after entering the north wing, the a^ 
tendance of pupils was almost doubled. Of the twenty-six who 
entered the Deaf-Uate D^artment at that time, thirteen graduated 
the 16th of last June, This is the largest number that ever re- 
ceived the honors of Uie Institution at any one time. 

The majority of these have obtained sufficient knowledge of the 
English language to enable them to converse with ease, and to 
transact the ordinary business of life under standingly. The boys 
also have a good knowledge of one of the trades taught, and the 
girls are well acquainted with plain sewing, fancy work and ordi- 
nary housework. They are already giving evidence by their labor 
and efflciency, that they are no longer dependent on friends, hut 
are able to care for themselves and provide for their own wants. 
The institution has done mnch for them. They are conscious of 
it, and an increasing sense of their obligation to the Instttntion 
and to the State that has educated them, will ever abide with them. 



zedbyGoOgle 



14 ahuuai. bbpobt. 

LIBT or OHU>ni.TU. 
Nam*. lt««ld«<* 

JnUa F. Ashley Jadcsoti, JftcksoQ cotiiity. 

Catharine CoBej Shleldsfllle, Bloe conn^. 

Florence A. Cole UlnDeapoils, Hennepin conn^. 

NkDCf CoDltbart Alma City, Waseca connty. 

Ototg^ Crane MantorTtlle, Dodge county. 

Jennie C. Cramer Anstln, Uotrer county. 

Wm. E. Dean .' HlnueapolU, Hennepin coanty. 

Wllllim S. Darose Stillwater, Wuhlngtoa coan^. 

NUaEBteDBon Norsiand, Nicollet coanty- 

Michael Harty Oeneva, Freeborn conn^. 

Wm. F. Nass Hutcblnson, McI<eod connty. 

Hicbael O'RIley Wabaslia, Wabasha coanty. 

DftTld O'Rtley Wabasha, Wabasha connty. 

BesideB theae gradaates, twelve others have not aa jet returned for 
varioDB reasons. Three were not proper EQbJects ; two have died ; 
two are in feeble health ; one has left the state and the rest are re- 
tained at home for Uieit services, or for want of means to fit tbem 
ont properly for school. It is to be regretted that any shoald leave 
aohool before completing a AiU coarse, or obtaining sofflcient knowl- 
edge of the English language to enable them to express thdr ideas 
ciearly and uoderstandingly. Bat in this respect an institntion for 
the deaf and dnmb is snbject to laws and experiences very similar to 
ordinary schools. Stadents become tired of study and seek freedom 
ttom reetraint, and some desire to try their hand at making a for- 
tane before thetime. A year's experienoe in the world sometimes 
teaches them a good lesson, and they return to school with renewed 
energy and devotion. 



From the United States censas of 1870, and by private corres- 
pondence, the names, ages and residence of seventy-one auedacated 
deaf-mutea within the state have been determined, and the same 
wore published in the report of last year. Of theae only one has en- 
tered school, while eleven, concemisg most of whom nothing what- 
ever had been heard, have appeared and are now members of the 
various ctaases. 

There are others who have made application and are expected in 
dae time. 

Notwithstanding there have been present during the year three 



JigiLizedbyCoOt^le 



THE DEAF AND DUMB, AHD THE BLIND. 



15 



boys lees thui one year ago, atill oar dormitory is TuU. The quar- 
ters occnpied by the girls, however, are not crowded. Several of the 
girls who have not completed their course are detained at home, 
bat are expected to return a year hence. The new comers are all 
proper sabjeots and they are all doing well. 



Frederick Belts 

Catberine Brsncb < 

Bertha Frick 

Hu]' Ella Orsbam 

David Edward Johnsoo... 

Caleb Alllton Morton 

Uottlieb Neeeer 

Harsbal Oscar Robert 

Harper Alden Slianks.... 

Iiara Xiarson < 

Cadwallader L. Waahbom. 
fanny Tlvlahn 



Cbuka, Carver coDotjr. 
Lttsembarg, Stearna conntj. 
Watertowo, Carver coant;. ' 
MlDnespolU, Henoepla coiratj. 
Wat^rtown, Carver connty. 
Faribault, Bice connt;. 
West 8t. Paul, Dakota County. 
Nortb Branch, Chisago county. 
FalrmoDnt, Martin county. 
Bvanavllle, Douglas county. 
Minneapolis, BeonepiD connty. 
Oak BIdge, Winona conoty. 



Three of these, or twenty-flve per cent, of the whole, are semi- 
mates, and are members of the class in artioulation. They have 
some knowledge of langnage, and apeak qnite clearly. Only two 
had Bufflcient knowledge of written language to enable ttiem to 
join an advanced class. Thirteen and one-half is the average age 
of the beginners. 



In the Deaf and Damb Department: 

Uales present list year W 

remales SS 

Total 101 

Nnmber not to be reckoned In this report 6 

TJader-gradaates 98 

Namb«r or males admitted 8 

" " females " ♦ 

Total admitted — 1* 

Whole number of male deaf-mutes ;•■■ 78 

" " " fbmale " W 

Total "0 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



L6 AHNUAI. BBPOBT. 

In the Blind I>«pftrbm«nt : 



Uaiea present, as per last report . ■ 
Femalee " " " " 



Total » 

Nnmb«r not to be reckoned in this report 1 

noder-gradiuttes tl 

Whole DQiuber In Deaf-mute Department..* 110 

" " Id Blind " « 



NATIONAUTT. 



Swede 

Kotweglan.. 
Bogllsh 



Tbe assigned caoses of dealhess : 

imUiamatlon in head I 

Congenital 1 

Fever I 

Measles ; 

Scailet fever 1 

Typhoid ferer I 

Fits 1 

Cerebro eplnal meningitis 1 

ToUl U 

Age at which deaAiess occnrred : 

Congenital 1 

One year or ondet ' 

Over two and nnder three > 

Over Ave bat not over six > 

At sixteen I 

Total " 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



TKB DEAF AND DOMB, AND THE BLIND. 



ANNUAL 

Jtti. Dttt >nd Dnmb. 

lees SPnpIla.. 

1884 !0 "' ... 

IBftS 38 " ... 

1S« 38 " .. 

1867 37 " ... 

18Se 81 ■' .. 

1869 86 " ... 

1870 61 " .. 



1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 



*IIU1IBKS OF TSARB Dl ATTBIDAKCB Or ALL DISCHABQID TO 1875. 



[n att«iidu>ce Oti« jear. .■ 

" Twoyeara. .. 

" Throe" 

" Four " 

•' PlTe " .. 

Six ■' .. 

" Seven" 

Arerage ;ean In attendance ot each, 8.38. 



Th« pupils Are divided Into the aame nutnlMr of olasses, taaght 
b; the same teachers, as one year ago, with a single exception. 
Anna Wing, who accepted a position aa teacher temporarily, labored 
faitbraUy to the close of the term in June, and then retired. One 
of our ovu graduataa, Jennie C. Cramer, was selected to fill her 
place. She has charge of the youngest class, and is doing her work 
well. 

Four lady, and three gentlemen teachers, moat of whom hare had 
conaiderable ezperieace in this kind of work, are in the employ of 
the lostihition, and they are giving their best days and efforta to 
tbe eduoation of the deaf-mntes of Hinnesota. They all live in 
the Inatitotion, and devote mnch of their time and energy out of 
Bohool to their peculiar calling. They are doing tbdr work well, 

■ A part of ft reur li n»mt«d ■ wkal* jMT. 



zedbyGoOglC 



18 AHDUAI. BIPOBT. 

and seeking Tor Improvements in manner, matter, and methods of 
teaching the deaf and dumb, as time and experience direct. The 
number of persons possessing the requisite qnaliflcations of body, 
mind and heart for teaching th<se children, is comparatively small ; 
and when once they have obtained the necessary experience, tbeir 
services become valuable. A goodly proportion of those engaged 
in teaching oar classes are well fitted for their work, and they are 
making their labors and influence felt among the deaf-mutos of the 
state. It is very important that all such should make it their life 
work, and institntions will do well to encourage them in such a 
course. The only addition to osr corps of teachers which I would 
respectfhily suggest, is that of a teacher of il rawing. 

Speciid attention is given to this department of study in our best 
public schools, and it is even more important to the deaf and dumb 
than to children possessing all their faculties. It appeals directly 
to the eye, the queen of the seoaes to a deaf-mute. 

cuas wouK. 

The studies taught in the seven classes- of the deaf-mnte depart- 
ment embrace those of an ordinary common school course. 

Beginning with simple object teaching, by which the letters of tha 
alphabet are first taught ; then qualities ; the construction of sim- 
ple sentences ; the addition of simple numbers ; we pass to the uaa 
of text books on Geography, Arithmetic, History, and Grammar, 
as fast as the attainments of the various classes will admit of it. 

A single class of semi-mutes is also taught articulate speech. 
In this class text books are employed, and the pupils are required 
to use their knowledge of spoken language In recitations and in 
tbelr commnnioation with their teachers, and the oBScers of the 
Institution. 

Usually about ten per cent, of the pupils are semi-mutes, but 
twenty-five percent, of those admitted this fall belong to this class. 
Generally these are the best scholars, for the reason thay have had 
hearing long enough to get some idea of the construction of lan- 
guage, and have obtained some little dieoiptlne of mind before en- 
tering the Institution. 

The classes are under instruction four and a half hours during 
the day, with an hoar's study in the evening, under the superriaion 
of one of the teachers. Some idea of the studies pnrsned by the 
dassaa may be obtained by examining tha following liat of text 
books and exwoisaa uqw in use in the variooB oIhms. 



zedbyGoOgle 



THB DEAF AND DmiB, AMD THE BLIND. 

LIST 07 TEXT BOOKH. 

mter clabs— taooht bt qso. irma. 

Division A. 

1. ' LoflBlDg'fl Commoii School Hisioij of tbe United SUtes. 

3. Peck's Oftnot's Natoral Pbllosophr. 
t. Kerl'B Common Scliool Grunmar. 

i. Eaton's Common School Arithmetic. 

6. Orlglnat CompoHltlon. 

6. Peomansbtp — Eclectic Series No. 5> 

Division B. 

1. Farler's UnlTersal History. 

5. SwUt's Natnral Philosophy— part II. 

8. Boblnson's Badlments of Written Arithmetic. 

4. National Second Header. 

6. Original Composition. 
«. Analysis. 

7. Penmanahtp— Eclectic Series, No. 5. 

8B00ND cuss— TAUQHT BT P. W. DUWlflNG. 

Division A. 

I. Farley's Vnireraal History. 

i. The Complete Arithmetic, by D. W. Pish. 

5. QoackenboB's First Book in Grammar. 
4. Original Composition. 

fi. Penmanship— Eclectic Series, No. i. 

Division S. 

1. Honteith's First Lessons In Geography. 

3. Swift's First Lessons In Philosophy— part n. 
t. First Book In Arithmetic, by D. W. Flsb. 

4. The National Second Reader. 
i. The Cbildren's Picture Roll. 

5. Original Composition. 

7. Penmanship — Eclectic Series, No. 2. 

8. Tbe National Primer for JnTsnllea In Articnittlou. 

THIRD CLASS —TAUOHT BT D. H. CARKOU.. 

1. J. Bjrae^ Pktnre Teaching In G«ogniphy and Nabml HIMoiy. 



zedbyGoOgle 



30 AHHDAI. BBFORT. 

8. Dr. Feet's Course of iDstracUon — part III. 
8. French's Mental Art tbmetlc— part II. 

4. Original Composition. 

6, FennuuiBhlp. Eclectic Series, No. t. 

roCRTH OLASB— TAUOHT BT I. B. IUN80H. 

]. Montelth's First Lessons Id Geogntphy. 

5. Dr. Feet's Elementary Lessons. 
8. Dr. Feet's Scripture Lessons. 

4. French's Mental Arithmetic— part IL 

E. Original Composition. 

e. Fenmansblp. Bdectlc Series, No. 8. 

H>TB CLASS— TAUGHT BT J. PISTBOWaXI. 

1. Dr. Latham's First Lessons. 

3. School Stories, b^ Rer. J. K. Keep. 
8. Dr. Feet's Bcriptnre Lessons. 

4. Slate Exercises In First Three Rales of Arithmetic 

6. Original Exercises In Language. 

6. Fenmansblp. Eclectic Series, No. 2. 

SIXTH <n~48S — TAVUHT KT M. wiLeoH. 

I, Dr. Feet's Blementar]' Lessons. 

5. Original Exercises la the nse orLangnage. 
8. Simple Addition and Snhtractlon. 

4. Penmanship. Eclectic Series, No. 1. 

SKTKNTH CLASS— TADOHT 8T J. C CRAMKB. 

1. Object Lessons. 

5. Dr. Latham's First Lessons. 

8. Nomerals and Simple Addition. 

4. Primary Book of Eclectic Series with Lead Pencil. 

CLASS IN DRAWmO— TAUOHT BT M. WILBOM, 

Walter AnWi'i Method Uisd. 

1. Exerdses in lines and cnrres. 
3, Drawing from objects. 

^e o1m8 in drawing is composed of fourteen of ttie older ud 
more wUvMioed pnpile. They receive one leuon a week, while » 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



THE DEAF AND DUMB, AND THE BLIHD. 21 

pwtioD of the jonnger scholars are taught the first principles of 
dnwing apOB the btackboard, The acquiaition of language is SO 
Important to these childrea that this is all the time that can con- 
sutentl; be devoted to drawing, until the school is large enough to 
warrant the employment of a teacher who shall give all her time to 
teaching this beautiftil and useful art, or until the regular teachers 
twoome proficient in the same. 

nniDBTBIAL CLABSBS. 

For the purposes of intellectual work and discipline, the pupils 
lue divided into seven classes taught by as many teachers, bot in 
the industrial work they are divided into four, and taught by three 
gentlemen and one lady. Four hours and a half each day, Sunday 
excepted, the papils are employed at one of the trades taught, or 
the girls at plain sewing, dress-making, fancy-work, or ordinary 
housework. It should be borne in mind that the shops are not, nor 
«ver will be, a source of income \o the institution. We hope iu time 
to make them self-supporting. The object of them is to teach every 
boy and every girl irhile in school some kind of work, or handicraft, 
by which each may, if circnmstances require it, earn an honest liv- 
ing and not depend on others. Some idea of what has been done 
during the year, may be seen by the following statement ; 

Cooper Shop. 

■Iflven bofs are employed here. 

Number of Boor barrels manDfaclDred daring the y ear,'S,TT8. 



'Thirteen boys employed here. 
UanafkctDred 216 palra or shoes. 
■■ 28B " boots. 

Bepalrs tor instltntloo, amonntlDg to 9186.40. 

Tailor Shop. 

Twelve boys and fonr girls employed In thia shop. 
Hanafkctored 18 foil snlM of clothes. 

" 808 pairs of overalls and Janets. 

Becelved for repairs, #60.00. 



zedbyGoOyl 



St AimUAI. BBFOBT. 

ffovMtutld and Fanef Work. 

Tmtn\y-toaT glrli «iDptor«) here. 
HM»ilkctn»d dnrlDg the ;mt— 
81 Comforta, 

49 SheeU, 

50 PUlow stipe, 
79 Towetfl, 

9 T&ble-clothf, 
at Napkins, 
11 Window cnrUlna, 
27 Dreesea, 

51 A prone, 

IS UnderKftmients, 
11 Pftin of mItteiH, 
SS Pieces of hncy work. 
Besides s large Bmannt of repairs for the pnplls and the iBaUMtlon. 

The work tnrned off by these four indnstrial duses in the »^gf- 
gata amooDta to considerable, bat the real value of the shops con- 
siBts in the knowledge of a trade imparted, and the skill acquired 
in the practice of the same, together with the formation of habits- 
of indastr;, punctuality, system and good order. The graduates 
begin to understand this, and some of them would gladly oonUnne 
this work longer, in order to obtain more skill at their trade. 

In the management of the shops, and teaching these four indna- 
triat classes, much credit is due to the patience and perseverance of 
those who have been in charge of them. Undoubtedly even more- 
and better work will be tamed ofi daring the next twelve monUu. 



THE BLIND DEPARTMENT. 



Good health has prevailed among the pupils of the Blind Depart- 
ment during the entire year. A few exceptional cases of sickneBS- 
are all that have occurred. 

They have been made both comforti^ie and happy in the eq}oy- 
ment of their acoommodatioos, separated ftom the deaf and dumb. 

At the end of the school year, in June last. Prof. A. N. Ffattr 



.V Google 



THE DBAF AND DUMB,: AHD THE BLIND. 38 

Actiog Principal, and two of his assistuita, John J. Tncker and 
UCaria £. Crandall, declined a re-appointment. Mr. Pratt accepted 
the position for only a year, and notwithstanding the delays, inoon- 
Teniencea and positive annoyances incident to the change, and 
•tarting in the new quarters, he latfored cheerfully and faithfully tO 
the end, and with regret hia resignation was accepted. Mr. Tucker 
and Sfiss Crandall, who were graduates of this department, desired 
rest and a change. The latter for the benefit of her health, and the 
former to make the necessary preparation for an operation to re- 
move the cataract from hia eyes. The best wishes of all their as- 
sociates here attend them. 

These Taoancies have been well filled. Prof. James J. Dow, in 
the short space of three mouths, as principal, has gathered up the 
reins let fall by his predecessor, has classified the pupils, and sys- 
tematized his work in a manner that gives great promise for the 
future. His aBsistants, Imth in the school and household work, are 
efiScient and faithful. For further particulars concerning this de- 
partment, I commend to your careful consideration the following 
trom Prof. Dow himself: 

REPORT OF THE FRINCIPAL OF THE BLIKD DirARTKEKT. 

During the past year 21 pupils have been in attendance ; of these, 
eighteen are now present. Ho new pupils were received at the open- 
ing of the present tei'm, Sept. 8. 

Tlie Scliool. 

The re^lar work of the school naturally falls into the two dt- 
-visions : Literary and Musical. In the first of these are included 
all the pupils in attendance ; in the second all those who show any 
aptitnde for mosio. 

The literary division is nnder my immediate supervision with 
the very efficient aid of my assistant. Miss. M. Mott. Seata and 
desks of the most approved style have been placed in one of the 
school rooms in sufl^cient numljer to accommodate all of the pupils. 
. Here, each pupil has his or her seat assigned, and, from this room, 
classes pass to the recitation-room of the assistant and to the mu- 
sic rooms for lessons and practice. The pupils have thus far shown 
a very commendable spirit in pursuit of their btudice, taking up 
difflcuit branches with an almost incredible ease and intelligibility. 
One class has just completed Robinson's Practical Arithmetic and 
another Guyot's Intermediate Ge(^i;aphy, i>oth of which works are 



zedbyGoOglC 



34 ANNUAL BEFOBT. 

in raised print. The studies now being ptii-sued by the difl^ent 
olassM may be aeen Crom tbe following copy of the daily programme. 
The classes in the left hand column are taught by myself, those in 
the right by Miss Mott : 

9:00 A. U. DeTotlonal Exercises. 



»!l6 ■' 


Physiology. 


Readlag. 


8:40 " 


Oayot's Int. Qeograpliy. 


Primary Arithmetic. 


MM " 


English Llterstare. 


Colburn'a Arithmetic. 


10:80 " 


Recess. 




10:46 " 


Qeog. ("Onr World," No. 3.) Primary Geography. 


11:16 " 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


11 :fE " 


SpelUne. 


Spellicg. 


12:00 H. 


Dlabtsslon. 




2 :00 P. M 


. Natural Philosophy. 


U. 8. History. 


2*0 " 


Grammar, (advancsd.) 


Onmmsr, (beglnulog.) 


8*0 " 


Writing. 


Reading. 


«r80 <• 


DerotloDsl Exerdsea. 




7to8 " 


StQdy hoQr auder snperTislon of one of tlie teacbei 



The classes in the above branches compare very favorably with 
those of similar grades in public schools ; and, as with them, differ- 
ent individuals manifest varying degrees of diligence and intelli- 
gence. 

Special attention has been given this term to writing, and some 
of the pnpils have improved quite rapidly, for instance : two pupils 
have in two months from the time they made their first letter, ac- 
quired a clear and legible hand. The apparatus is very simple : A 
lead pencil and a " writing board," consisting of a stiff pasteboard 
somewhat larger than the ordinary letter sheet, with grooved chan- 
nels aljout one elgbth of an inch deep and one-half an inch apart. 
This is inserted between tbe leaves of tbe sheet of paper, which is 
preased into the grooves of which the upper and lower edges serve 
as guides to the height of the letter. The characters employed ar« 
flimilar to the ordinary printed letter, with various modiBcatlons, 
according to the ability or taste of the writer. In a few oases, where 
there is especial aouteness of touch or where the pnpil has learned 
to write before losing the sight, the ordinary script is employed. 
The value of this means of communication with the seeing world 
can hardly be estimated, and warrants us in giving time, care and 
attention to it. 

For purposes of communication with each other and for taking 
notes, keeping memoranda, etc., different systems of tangible point 



zedbyGoOglC 



THE DEAF AND DUMB, Ain> THE BUKD. 25 

writing are employed, ohief among which are the Hyatem of M. 
Braille, which is andentood by most of our popiU, and the more 
recent and far more popular system of Snpt. Wait, of the N. T. 
Institute for the Blind, known as the " N, T. point system." The 
latter is being adopted quite generally in the U. S., and is in some 
important particnlars, superior to the former. Onrpapils are grad- 
Q&lly learning it, and its adoption has been materially advanced by 
the nse of several interesting works in this character published by 
the American Frinting House for the Blind. 

Booka. 

The library in raised print comprises nearly all of the works 
Issaed from the different presses in this country, and furnishes an 
excellent variety for general reading, study and reference. 

Book$ in Railed LettwB. 

Life and Beantltts of Shakespeare. 
Shakespeare's Macbeth. 

" Mercbant of Venice. 

<■ Uldsammer Kl^hVa Dream. 

" King Lear. 

>< Hamlet and JqUiih Cnsar. 

PoetT7 of EngUod. 

" America. , 

Byron's PriBoner of Chlllon. 
Selections for Declamation. 
Dickens' Old Cnriosltr Shop, {8 Vols.) 
" Btstor; ofEnglaDd, (3 Vols.) 
" Cricket on the Hearth . 
Pilgrim's Progress. 
Koblnsan Cmsoe, (8 Tola.) 
Bngllab Beader, (Writers of ITth CentarrO 
Washington, befbre the ReTolntlon. 
' Hordhoff 's Politics for Toang America. 

Lardner'a Outlines of lllstorr, (3 Vols.) 
Paley'a ITalnral Tbeology. 
Combe's Conatltatlon of Han. 
Proctor'a Wonders of the Firmament. 
Selections (h>m Swede nborg. 

Pope's Bssar on Uan, and Diderot's Essay on the Blind. 
Fables for Children. 
Gay's Fable. 



zedbyGoOgle 



Se ANKUIL BKFORT. 

Book of CommoD Pimrer, 
Bonuu CfttboUc CatechUm. 
EptacopAl CBtechlim. 
Collection of HyuDa. 
SelectloDs of Charcb Hnsic, (S rols.) 
Stadent'a Hagazlne, (S Vola.) 
Select Library for BllniJ, {2 VoU.) 
Bible, Old TeaUmeDt, (6 Yola.) 

" New *' (2 Vola.) 

" Qoapela. 
BoblnsOD'a Practical Arithmetic 
Colbnm's Mental " 

Elemeotary " 

Gnyot'a Fhyalcal Oeograpliy. 
" Intermediate " 
" Primary " 

Anderson's Orammar Bchool Hlatoiy of tbe C 8. 
Blind Child's lot Book. 
.. aa « 

« <. 4U, .< 

Second Claaa Reader, Speller and Deflner. 
Primer, McQnffey'a Speller, (2 Tola.] 
Bntler'a Primer and Readers, [8 Tola.) 
QospelofSL John, Id S. Y. Point. 

Hawthorne's RU1 from Town Pump, and Hra. BnUIhig, in N .T. Point. 
Broirn'B Bab and his Frlenda, In N. Y. Point. 
Worcester's Dictionary, Abridged, (8 Tola.) 
Blctlonary of Unslcal J'erms. 
Astronomical DIctlonaiy. 

Mutie. 

Prof. Wm. Manner has general charge of this dlviaion of \ibt 
acliool work, and is aaaiBled by Miss Cora I. Shipman. Prof. Uanner 
spends two balf days each week in the Institution, giving instnc- 
tion to the orcheatra, and teaching the more advanced pupila on the 
piano. Hies Shipman, who resides in the building, teaches the re- 
maining pnpila on the piano, gives instraction in vocal music and ' 
•nperintends the daily practice of the pnpils. This department re- 
ceives conaiderable attention and forms a prominent feature of oar 
work. 

The Houtehold. 

The arrangements of tbe household are designed to corre^xwd, 
so far as Uie circumstances will allow, to those of a well-r^nlated 



.V Google 



THE DBAF AND DUMB, Ain> THfl BLOTD. 27 

ftmily. Every eSbrt la made toooltivatfl habits of order ind neat- 
nwa, and to fit the pupils to mingle with the outer world, without 
Awkwardnesa and embarrasBment. At certain apeciSed houra the 
teachera read aloud, to auch ot the pupils as may choose to listen, 
from works of standard writers In Action, history, eto., and a Kum- 
mary of the news of the day is ^ven for a half boar two or three 
times a week, thus tending to inspire a taste for literature and to 
Impart a knowledge of the world, outside of the regular school 
work. 

Tbe introduction of running water into the building, which has 
Jost been accomplished, wilt undoubtedly aid the work of the house- 
bold very materially. 

Work. 

It is to be regretted that, as yet, no regular provision has been 
made for instmction in the different occnpationa practicable for the 
blind, nowever beneficial to the mental and moral nature of the 
blind a purely literary education may be, it will leave its possessor 
bot poorly equipped for tbe struggle of life unless sapplemented by 
a practical knowledge of some handicraft. It has been thoroughly 
demonstrated in the older institutions of our land that tbe blind 
can be trained todo different work in a variety of trades, such as 
broom-making, working In cane, basket, brush and mattress making*, 
and, with the more expert, in much more dilficult and complicated 
trades. Nearly all can do aometbiug at these trades, and many can 
support themselves by the labor of their hands, thus relieving 
Mends or perchance the oonnty of the lifelong burden of their 
m^ntenanoe. Music will, to a few, f^iruish au adequate means of 
support, and, for a thorough training in this, the Institution provides 
ample means, but some have no natural aptitude for music and 
many can never attain snch proficiency in it as to assure them of 
support. 

Another reason for the introduction of aome trade of the kind 
indicated, and one of no email weight, is that tbe amount of unoc- 
cupied time cannot fail to foster & habit of indolence whleh is ex- 
ceedingly injurious in its influence upon tbe prpsent and future 
welfare of the blind pupil. We seek to guard i^ainst thia by en- 
couraging outKloor Bports and exercise, and auch in-door employ, 
ment as bead-work and pl^n sewing, in which some of tbe pupils 
have become qaite proficient, and some simple bousebold work ; 
but nothing can fiilly meet the case except regular employment io 



zedbyGoOt^l 



S8 AKNUAL BBPOBT. 

some asetnl work. Hence the pressing neceBsity for some fartber 
occuputious for tlie blind. 

JAHES J. DOW, 

Acting Principal. 

IKFBOVBHBtrrS. 

The year 1875 will be memorable in the history of this Institution 
AS the one in which two important improvements were inaugurated. 
The first is the laying of the foundation of the main center build- 
ing and erecting thereon the basement story to the water table, a 
piece of work that has been done in a thorough manner and at 
very low figures. The other is the introduction of a never-failing 
supply of pura spring water into the building occupied by the blind 
pupils. This will not only promote cleanliness and health but 
facilitate housework and household comforts. Both of these im- 
provements are of prime importance, and together, mark the year 
as one of special importance in the mat«rial growth and reaoorces of 
the institution. It ia earnestly hoped that the building so well b^nn 
and so much needed, will be carried forward to completion with as 
little delay as possible. 

In the work contemplated the coming season, I most respectfully 
urge npob your attention the importance of the following points in 
the erection and finishing of the 

HAW CBNTBB BDILDIKS. 

Health, comfort, convenience, durability and safety should never 
be lost sight of in a building to be occupied by so many persona 
for generations to come. 

To facilitate health and comfort, the Tery best modes of heating 
&nd ventilation should be introduced into all the apartments. Due 
preparation for epidemics should be made. And Just here it would 
be well to adopt the plan carried out in the State University, of 
providing open fire-places on every floor, to be used as ventJlators, 
or for Srea in times of sickness. 

Ample provision for the inflow and outflow of fresh and foul air 
is indispenaible In every room. Special prominence and great ca- 
pacity should be given to this in the basement rooms, to be occa- 
pied as kitchen and servants' dining-room. Also in the conatruc- 
tioD of the dumb waiter, to avoid fllling the house with steam, 
smoke, and fumes from the kitchen and basement. 



zedbyGoOgle 



THB DBAF AMD DmiB, AND THE BLIND. S9 

Considering tb« size and nature of the rooms to be provided 
here, health and comfort irill call for unasaal painstaking to let Id 
snnllght and troah air in saffloient qnantities. Better make one 
large room with plenty of light and air, than two with do direct ean* 
light, and fresh air in one of Ibem. A living room, to be healthy, 
ebonld receive the direct light of the bud at least a portion of the 
time daily. 

For convenience and comfort also it wbnld be well to provide 
ample closet room in all the living rooms and the school-rooms. 
Books, maps, cards, and class findings generally are often prema- 
tarely worn oot, wasted or lost, for want of some snch provisioa. 
In a family, where its members are reckoned by scores and 
handreds, many articles of wearing apparel, bedding, household 
fiztares, et cetera, are to l>e kept, not in balls, to be run over and 
broken, bat in some safe place and preserved for futurie nse. 

Durability will naturally suggest that all the school-rooms, halls, 
dining-rooms and kitchen fioors be made of hard wood — ash or 
maple. Oak stains badly, and does not wear so well. 

The school-rooms, dining-room, chapel, pl%y-room and halls 
should be waiDBCoted. In the case of the halls it should be at least 
Ave or six feet high. 

A proper regard to both health and safety will require great eare 
and extraordinary pains in protecting the house from the odors and 
gases arising'from the sewer running the entire length of the main 
building. Just beside and above Uiis are located the cold air ducts 
and stacks of steam pipes for heating the building ; hence the great 
importance of making the sewer tight beyond a doubt. Let no 
nook, comer, or crevice be neglected, through which foul gases can 
escape, to carry poisonous and pestilential air to the lungs of the 
household. 

Thus far in building this Institotion you have mad^ no great mis- 
take, and cra^tainly yon would not make one in the erection of the 
main center building, which completes the plan bo long held in 
contemplation. Let it be the best of all — best in its design, 
arrangements, conveniences and general appearance, giving sym- 
metry, finish and completeness to the whole. Il Is to this end these 
few suggestions are made, as the result of oonsiderable experience 
and observation. 

iCKMOWLKDOHEMTS . 

Friends and patrons of the Instibi^on have ftom time to time 
remembered the wants of our pupils, and manifested their tntereek 



zedbyGoOglC 



30 ANKUAL BSPOBT. 

in tiiem in some tangible iray. Althoogh the names of all sncb ore 
not knoirn to the writer, atill he is nona tlie leas grateral for the 
favors received. The foUowiag persons in particular have onr moat 
hearty thanks ^: 

1. Rev. Di'. E. D. Neill, for a copy of his History of Minne- 
«ots, elegantly illustrated, for our lustitation library. 

2. Oqaissima, a ChriBtian Indian, who, throngb Bishop H. B. 
Whipple, presented $6.00 for the blind pupils, which has been ex- 
pended in purchasing portions of the Scriptures in raised letters) 
for those not able to purchase the same for themselves. 

8. Mrs. J. M. Hodgman, of Red Wing, for usefol presents for 
the pupils, and a copy, each of the Youth's Companion and the 
Wide Awake, for the Boys' Reading Room. 

4. The president, directors and officers of the Gannon Valley 
AgriculturaUand Mechanical Association, for the free admission of 
tbe schools to their annnal fair. 

5. Rev. Jnstns Doolittle, for a free lecture on China and the 
Chinese ; also for Chinese curiosities for our cabinet. 

6. J. M. Hod([man, Esq., of Bed Wing, for $3.00 with which to 
purchase Christmas presents for some of the poor children. 

7. Oliver Do Kicty, Esq., for specimens of foreign coin for the 
Institution cabinet. 

S. Those citizens of Faribault, who kindly aided in making 
Ohristmas a merry time to our pupils. 

9. The editors, publishers and fHanda, who hare gratuitously 
furnished reading matter of fresh interest to the pupils. A list of 
these publications will be found appended to this report. 

OOKOLDSIOM. 

In this brief review of the institution and its work for the year 
■many things «f interea'.. have been omitted. 

The diligence and dntifulness of pupils, both in the schoolroom 
and the shop ; their good deportment, tbeir cheerful obedience and 
willing submission, have contributed much towards making the year 
both a pleasant and a profitable one. 

All the officers and teachers in both departments have labored 
diligently and con sole ntionsly to make the institution successflil in 
all its work and influenee. For their hearty co-operation they have 
my gratefbl acknowledgments, and I doubt not, your commendation. 

The recess of thr^ weeks which you kindly granted me last spring 
to visit some of the Western institutions of a stmilar ofaamcter Is 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



THE DBAF AND DUMB, AND THB BUHD. SI 

ranembered not only with fresh interest, bat also with an abiding 
oonvictioa of the real service it has been to me in my work. The 
oordial manntr in which I was received and the facilities for ob- 
MTvation afforded me in all the institutions visited have awakened 
new and ^troDger desires to make this institution ali it ought to be 
for the deaf-mutes of the state. 

The number of pupils in attendance is not as large as it ought 
to be considering the number of deaf-mutes and the blind in the 
state. Some undoubtedly are waiting for the completion of the 
main building and will be here in due time. Special effort ought to 
be made to spread reliable information concerning this school in 
every county of the state, showing the people the terms of admia- 
sion, manner of operation, and how important an education is to 
these children. 

An increased current fund will be needed at do distant day , as 
■at forth in the last report. The effort to maintain and educate one 
hundred and thirty pupils with what should be expended on one hun- 
dred oogfat not to be carried to such an extent as to embarrass the 
benevolent design of the Inetitation. 

One of our teachers brought with him, trom the East, a small 
printing press, with which he has been experimenting, practically 
Ulastrating how usefhl a press can be made to the pupils and the 
Institution. As soon as funds can be spared for that pmrpose a 
small printing office, well fhrnished, would be a valuable addition 
to oar indnstrial department. 

The year has been one of great activity and success in all that 
pertains to the best Interests of the school. The high standing for 
intelligence andintegrityof most of the recent graduates; the eitent 
of tiie improvements already inaognrated ; the hearty commendation 
by parents of the work done for their children ; the continued favM 
and sympathy of the people ; the mercy of God even in death, give 
evidence of success, and also inspire one with courage and hope for 
the future. 

Belying upon you for wisdom and oounsel in all matters of doubt 
and difficalty ; upon my associates for their efficient and hearty co- 
operation, with a willingness to spend and be spent -in the good 
work to which, by the grace of God, I have given my life, I would 
enter upon the duties of another year in hope. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. L. NOYES, Sapt. 
IftmruoTi. Imrrrcnoir fob thb Eddcatioh i 

OF THX DkAT AXD DdMB, AKD THB BuifS, > 

Faubault, December 8th, 1875. ) 



zedbyGoOglC 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



Z\> lAe JSoard of Diractora of the MinneKda Itutautionfor the Bdu- 
ectlion of the Deaf and Dumb, and the BIfnd.- 

GniTLKiaR : — It becomes my duty at the end of another ye«r to re- 
port to yon tiie sanitKry conditioo of the InBtitutioa under your 
oare. 

There have been daring the year two epidemics of an infectiooi 
type — one of searlet fever, and the other of measles. There hare 
been, also, a few cases of diphtheria, and two of erysipelas, and one 
severe case of rhenmatic fever, besides several oases of pharyn^tis. 

Altogether, there has been no year since my connection with this 
Institntion in which I have made so many calls and prescriptions, 
as during the past year ; yet there lias been no death from disease 
or its seqnel. ijtill, I cannot say, as I have said for the last twelve 
yean, " No death has occnrred." The death of one of the pnpils 
last spring, was purely accidental. No blame can possibly rest on 
aoy officer or employee of the Institution. The Matrons and Su- 
perintendent have been watohfhl and energetic in their efforts to 
provide for the health, comfort and general welfare of the pupils. 
Respectfhlly sabmitted. 

Z. B. NICHOLS, M. D. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



THB DEAP AND DUMB, AND THE BLIND. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



S. Wilton, Trtaturer, in oceoKnt with the Minneiota IntttivHon for the Dtaf 
and Dvmh and the Blini, 



187S. 

Jan. 1. To amount or approprifttloD of 1874, nnespended 91,167 SS 

Jan. 4. To warrant fVom State Andltor on Btate Treaanrer.. C.OOO OO 

Teb. 1. To warrant from State Auditor on Stats Treaaar«r.. 2,G0O OO 

Har. 1. To warrant n-om State Auditor OD Stale TreasDrer.. 2,600 00 

April 6. To warrant Itom Stat« Auditor on State TreasDrer.. 3,n00 OO 

Hay B. 1 o wantnt Uom state Auditor on State Treai-arer.. 2,600 00 

Jane 7. To varrant ^om State Auditor on t>tate Trcasarer.. 8,600 DO 

Jaly S. To warrant IVom State Auditor on State Treasurer.. 2,000 00 

Aug, 2. To warrant nrom SUte Auditor on SUta Treasurer.. 2,000 00 

Sept. 6. To warrant from State Aodltor on State Treaeorer.. S.OOO 00 

Oct. 7. To warrant from SUte Auditor on State Treasarer.. S,500 00 

To amount received tuition for E. Fox, one-tialf year. ISO 00 
To amonnt received. J. B. Hopklna, «ipenB« Leglsla- 

tlye Committee 26 20 

To amonnt received W. Tracy per J. L. Noyea 18 76 

To am on nt recelTed voucher 147, American Educa-' 

tora'refanded 16 00 

To amonot received J. L. Noyes 19S 18 

CaBb received lor work manufactured in sboe shop... 1,064 76 

Cash received for work mannfactored in tailor ahop.. 600 62 

Cash received for work mannfactured in cooper ahop 216 B8 

Cash received for work in sewing room 48 76 

Cash received Dyim F. C. Slieldon for aondr; things 

sold and received from pupils 284 85 

$29,709 8S 
By amount of money expended as per 

Toncbera Noa. 1 to 868 Inclusive 928,578 07 

By amount In the treasury unexpended.. 1,186 2G 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ANKUAL BBPOBT. 



H. miaon, Treasnrer, in account with the Minnesota Inatitute for 
the Deaf and Dvtab and the Blind. 



ODRBENT EXFEKfiKS BEPOBT OF VOVCBEBS PAID BT THB T&BASDRKR. 



D4TI. 


NiMI. 


.: 


iMOCKT. 


187G. 
JtD. 4. 




I 

8 

4 
S 

? 

B 
9 
10 
11 
12 
18 
14 
IG 
16 
17 
18 
1» 

to 

21 
22 
23 
24 
IS 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
SI 
S2 
S3 
84 
86 
86 
87 
88 
89 
40 
41 
42 
48 
44 
4S 


«»00 
ISO 00 

26 00 

82 »4 
147 24 
US 60 

35 85 

65 00 
24 TO 
40 GO 
71 M 
31 60 
SO 69 
20 GO 

495 
22 BG 

4 64 
184 00 
698 91 
136 34 
U 20 
8(t SO 
16 66 

3 67 
81 S3 
11 G9 
38 GI 
87 SI 
20 IS 
24 40 

66 31 
38 61 
16 00 
76 27 












































































































































18 10 
70 46 
800 
61 00 
S>00 
65 Ott 
178 89 
21 SS 




































DIcklDBOD & Smith 


18 75 



,db,Google 



THE DEAF AVD DDMB, AND THE BLIND. 85 

CUBBENT BZPXBBK — BBPOBT OF T0UCBBB8 PAID BT THX TasASDKIB. 




1. J. C.N. Cottrell 

Q. C. Wooster 

Weed Sentng Machine Co.. 

P. A. TheopoM 

Harper &, Str&ub 

E. S. Baldwin 

A. W.HneUer 

A.N.PrftU 

Cathoart £;Co 

P. H. Ward 

Earing & Cavanangh 

A. W. McKlnatry 

J. I.,. Noyes 

Anerbach, Flncti & Scbeffer 

D. Flscbbach 

Btackborn Brothers , 

W. B. Sanborn 

W. L. Turner 

O. M. Gllmore 

Faribault Oas Co 

Aodrewn & Palmer -.., 

iBecker A Ootzloger 

I. Catbcart&Co 

Harper& Straab 

C. R. Beymour & Co 

W. B. Sanborn 

N. P. Rood and otben 

AssiataDt Steward.-.- 

FarlbanltQaa Co 

O. H. Qilmors 

J. B.HopblDS 

Harper Brothers 

O. C. WooBter 

M.CTaodall 

T. B. Lo;hed 

Steward acconnt. 

Wm. Mnrdock 

D. O'Brien 

A.L. Hill 

W. I- Tamer 

E. 8. Baldwin 

Anerbadi, Finch & BcbeSbr. 

P. R. L. Hardenljnrg 

A. B. Haven 

Becker & Qotzlneer 

3- B. Wheeler 

D. Pischbacfa 

Y. A. Theopold 

R- R. 8mUb 

J. C. K. Cottrell 

Andrews & Palmer 

J. L. Ko;eB 

A. N. Pratt 

George Wing 

P. W. Downing , 



jdbyGoOglC 



86 AinniAi, xkpobt. 

ousBorr KXPCsaEB — bbpobt or vouCHiBg paid bt thk tsxasukib. 




I. D.H. Carroll 

Hrs.A. K.Hale 

UIsbH. Wilton 

J. PletroHskl 

F. C. SbeldoD 

I. H. Ranaom.... 

Un, B. H. Perry 

A. CWlog 

L. Aostln 

J.J. Tucker 

0.8.BUke 

Z.B.Nichols 

D. M. Evanfl.. 

i. Ingram A Leach 

Farlbaalt Oaa Company. 
P. B. L. HardeDbarg.... 
P. M. Scales and oihera. 
Becker & OotEloger . .. 

0.8. Blake 

Wm. L. Tnrner 

A.L. Hill 

D. O'Brien 

D. M.Bvana 

Sheffleld, Leaiy ft Psgh 

Peter Rood 

Q. C. Wooeter 

Chaa. Degeo 

J.B. Wheeler 

Andrews is Palmer .... 

G. M. Qllmore 

E. 8. Baldwin 

F. A. Theopold 

B. B. HgntooD 

J. C. N. Cottrell 

B. Harper 

Stewanl'e acconnt 

W. B. iianbom 

S. P. Knod and others. . 

i. J. O. Clark 

Steward's accoDut 

A. L. Hill 

F. A. Theopold 

J. B. Wheeler 

J. C. N. Cottrell 

E. S. Baldwin 

American Edncatora.... 
H. Stmona and others.. . 

Andrews ft Palmer. 

Dickinson A Smith 

Pike & Hastings 

Charles Degen 

0. C. Wooster 

W.B. Sanborn 

Becker & Outslnger. .. . 

W. L. Tnrner 

T. H. Lojhed 



jdbyGoogle 



THI DEAF ABD DUMB, AHD THE BLIHD. 37 

<niBBBrr ixrsiieu — rkpobt of TODcmsB paid bt the tbi^sorbb. 




I. A. B. Haren 

J. CParihall 

E. S. RoUIdh 

FRribkDltGu Compsor 

D. M. Etbdi 

Steward's Accoant 

N. P. Rood and others 

0.8. Blake 

Wtrd ft KlDSiley 

r. Cathcart & Co 

£. S. Baldwin 

Andrews & Palmor ' 

C. DegcD 

J. C. N. Cottrell 

H. Rlmnas and otben 

Becher & Ootiluger 

W. B. SsDbom 

J. B. Wheeler 

T.H.Loyhed 

J. L-Bo/es 

D. M. Evans 

U.S.Btake 

I. H. Ranvom 

Z. B.NIcbola 

A. N. PraU and others 

HlasH. Wllaon 

M™. A. C Wing 

J. Ftetrowskl ' 

J. L. Noye ; 

Mrs. A.R. Hale 

Mrs. 8.M. Perry 

O. C. Wooster 

D. H. Carroll 

P. W. Downing ■ 

F. C. Sheldon. 

George Wing 

A. Anderson. 

r. A. Tbeopold 

A.L. Hill 

Adams B. A L. Pob. Co.... 
Frlnk, Andrews & Stolford. 

D. O'Brien 

D. Plshbach 

P. R. L. Hardenbnrg 

B. Harper 

W. L. Turner 

Steward's account 

M. P. Rood and others 

Steward's acconnt 

). Rice County Grange Mills. . 

L. D. Neweomb 

Fsrlbaalt Qaa Company.... 

J. B. Wheeler 

Andrews & Palmer 

J.L.lIoyes 

Steward's account 



zedbyGoOglC 




Flint Brothers 

W. B. Sanborn 

F. A. ThAopold 

Farfbmlt Ou Comptuij. . ■ 

Dickinson & Smith 

F. Eoblwlng 

0. Devann; 

Brnno Harper 

N. P Eood and others — .. 

Becker & Ootzlnger 

B. 8. Baldwin 

H. BlmoDs and otliers 

J. C. N. CottreU 

HIsB C. J. SlilpinBii 

J. p[etrow8kl 

MlsaH. WUsen. 

1. B- Kansom 

F. W. Donning 

D. H. Cam)Ii, 

A. H. Pratt 

Hiss Maria Crandall 

Qeorge Wins 

Mr*. AnnaC. Wing 

J. J. Tacker 

Z. B. Nichols 

O.B.Blake 

J Ooodman 

J. B. Wbeeler 

H. Simons and others.. .. 
Faribanlt Oas Companr-.. 

W. B. Saoboro 

Steward's acoonnt 

A. E. Haven 

O. De\anDj 

K. P. Bood and others — 

B. Rnggles 

R. H. L.JeWBtt 

Becker k Qotzlnger 

Kinney & Hndoer 

0. S. Woodniff 

Andrews & Palmer 

A. L. Hill 

B.S. Baldwin 

J.C. N.Cottrell 

Assistant Steward 

F. A.Theopold 

J. B.Wheeler. 

Stewart, Thayer & Wlnt«r. 

O. Chrlstopherson 

M.Perry 

H. Simons and others 

W. B. Sanborn 

Mrs. Sarah M. Perry 

N. P. Rood and others 

VlDcent & Chnrchhlll 

J.L. Nojee 



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THE DEAF AXIt> DDMB, AND THB BUND. 89 

OOBBBMT KXPSKSB — BBPOBI OF T0DCHSB9 PAID BT THB TRKABCBEB. 



t. Hri. A. R. Hale 

F.C. Sheldon 

I. Satnoel Barnard 

O. M. Bennett 

E. A.Orni 

D. Flschbacli 

Sawyer & Nichols 

Pratt, Baker & Co 

Faribault Gas Co 

W. B. Sanborn 

L. D. Neweomb 

Steward accoant 

M. Simons end Others 

Btackbnrn & Brothers 

E. 8. Baldwin 

D. M. Evans 

I L. Anstin 

O.S. BJahe 

O. Chris topheraon 

A.L. Hill 

T. H. Loyhed 

C. Degan 

Andrews ft Palmer 

Farabault Gaa Co 

W. L. Tamer 

F. A. Theopold 

J. B. Wheeler 

J. C.N.CottreU 

Becker & OotiluKer 

C. W. Downing. 

I. OlbaOQ ft Tyler 

D.Flschoach 

O. S.Blahe 

J, Sbonts 

W. L. Tomer 

D. H. Brans 

F. A. Theopold 

Cbaries Dexen .>.l 

E.S. Baldwin 

O. W . Dickinson 

D. O'Brien 

J.B. Wheeler 

N. P. Rood and others 

Island Woolen Co 

P. M. Skahlll and others... 

|T. H. Lnyhed 

,L. D. Neweomb 

Isteward accoant 

EhrmaotraQt & Bodewald. . 

Andrew; & Palmer 

FarlbanllOas Co 

H. A. Tamer 

E. A.Orme 

J.L. Noyes 

W. B. Sanborn 



.V Google 



40 AliHDAL REPORT. 

ODHBBHT KXPSMBE — BKPOBT OF TOS0HBB8 PAID BT THI TRBAinREB. 



. Steward 
{ L. AustiD. 

Wm. MsDDer . 

D. B. Carroll 

MtBB M. Wlllaon 

Hiss Con J. Shtpmui. 

J. Cramnr 

Htas Millie Hott. 

J. J. Dow 

Z. B. Mlcbola 

F. W. Down log 

Hra. Sarah U. Perry. 

I. H. Ransom. 

Qeorge WiDg. 

J. PletrowBkl 

Hie. A. R. Hale. 

3. h. Noyes 

F. C. Sbeldoo 

F. A. Theopold 

Charles Degen. > 

Andrews & palmer. 

h. T). Newcorab 

Faribault Gaa Co 

N. P. Rood and others. 

Steward 

EbrmaDtraut & Rodewald 

W. B. Sanboro 

B. A. Orme. 

DyerA Howard < 

D. FlscbtMch 

D. H. Etsds 
O. 8. Blake 

P.M. Skabill and others 
W. N. Sanborn. 
A. L. Hill 

E. 8. Baldwin. 
J. C. N. CortreU. 
J. B. Wheeler. 
A. W. Hneller. 
W.L. Turner. 
R. A. Mott 
Becker & Ootzinger 
H. WUson 
Stewart sccoant. 

Total 




DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



TBM DIA1> AND DUMB, AND TEN BLIND. 



STATEMENT OP SHOPS. 



To mUerlBl fdrnlAhed I1.7U 14 

" mmoont paid Mlar7 of Ibremfto $M 00 

OONTBA CB. 

By cwBh receipts for work muiaRusiared fl.oei 7S 

" amonni One tor work manDhctured on accoant 83 75 

" stock Bad mBteilal od hand 1,094 02 

BbIbdm 143 93 

•3,3M 44 •3,S84 44 

TAILOR SHOP. 

To Stock and iiiBt«rlBl ftinilBhsd T8S 39 

*' aaKmnt paid salary of foremaD 449 Sfi 



By cash receipts for work 600 6S 

•' amoont dae n>r work sold 900 ST 

" stock and material on band 197 47 

Balaoce IBO 18 

*I,1B4 84 Vl.lU S4 

COOPBB SHOP. 

By amoDDt received tor making 8,77S banela 91S Si 

SEWING ROOM. 

By cash ncelpts for work 4S TS 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



ANN0AJL BIPOKT, 



E. WiitOK, TreamT«r, in Accoutd toUk MinMtota Institate for the 
Deaf and Dumb and the Blind. 



BUILDING- FUND. 

r TODOBEBB PAID BT THE TBKASDaiB. 



). J. NelMD and otberi 

O. Devaaoer 

H. Cooper 

B, Hup«r 

B. TowDMod 

J. Morui 

8. Saolt 

H. JobDBOD ■■■ 

P. Blow 

B. C. H»ra 

J.O. DeTMney 

J. Ehbluige 

B. Harper and olbers 

8. Gaalt and otbers • 

H. JobtlBOD 

Cittseua Natlooal Bank 

1. B. Qoodman and others 

A. B. Rogers 

C. Boahley 

B.Harper and oth«n 

Pratt ft Jordan 

0'N«U 4 Palmar 

8. Oaalt 

H. A.Turner 

I. A. B. Bogera 

T. McMahan 

E. Goodman 

P. Cromn 

W. Madsen 

C. Johnson and others 

Kinney ds Hudner 

O'Nelfft Palmer 

Northwestern Gas and Wat«r Pipe Company. . 

Citizens National Bank 

Steward acconnt 

0. P. Brand 

i. U'Neil ft Palmer 

A. B. Sogers 

W. Johnson 

Failbaalt Oas Light Company 

W. Hadsen and others 



#tl BO 
27 00 
12 00 
M 00 
7 50 
9 00 
1> GO 
9 00 
6 00 
» 00 
26 SO 
12 00 

ISO es 

IS 60 
9 00 

eo 00 

198 63 
69 10 
11 63 

172 61 
S9 00 



104 00 
69 IB 
MS 42 

6 BO 

g 7A 

46 00 

■ 7* 78 

1,172 M 

6S7 25 

900 00 

161 50 

100 10 

1,882 79 

130 00 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



THB DEAT AND DQUB, AND TH> BLIND. 

BuiLDiHO FunD—voucaKRS— Continued. 



G. F)eckeiut«ln 

0. r. Braod 

B. H. L. Jewett 

D. W. Hnmpbre; 

W. Hodgson 

B.Be»Iey 

L. RnggleB..----" 

A. Horrow 

First Nstlonal, (Tortbfleld 

E. Ooixliiiaa 

H. A. Tamer 

E. Qoodman 

L. Boggles 

Kinney ft Hndner 



1 



•8 Stf 
S 00 
13 M 
40 00 
9 65 

1S6 00 
10 00 
SO 00 

100 00 
84 00 
84 68 

184 80 
2T 19 
87 B8 



S. Wilton, Treantrer, in AeeouiU viith (Ae Minnesota Inatitntue Jor 
ths Deaf and Dumh and the Blind. 



BOILDIKO pdhd. 



Db. 



Wi. 

Dec. 6. To balance Id IktDdB orTreasarernoexpanded 963 at 

Aug. 9. To warrant from State AudltoTon Sute Treasarer.... G,000 00 

Nov. 1. " " " " " ■' .... 2,000 00 

To amoant recetved, E. Qoodnum, refkiDded bill B4-... S8 35 

To amount reftiQded interest on State warrants 335 00 

To balance due H. Wilson, Treasnrei, overdrawn 878 59 

•8,903 05 
Cb. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AMHCAL KBFOBT. 



ITEMS OF EXPENDITURE. 



Minjietota InitUuu for th- Dtafand Dumb and the Blind, for the Current 
Tear Ending November SO, ISTS. 



fialulei o01c«n and teacbera 9S,it5 00 

Serraats' wages • 2,89! S8 

Batter nod egga '. < 898 81 

Orocerles 2,067 S8 

Heats and poultry I,6S< 81 

ITurQltare aod repairs U6 49 

Flour and feed .^ 798 58 

Hardware and tinware 6M 09 

Bread and crackers 79 S9 

Books and stationery 418 49 

FlqmbiDg and repairs 871 i8 

Crocker; and glaaaw&re lis 9S 

Dry goods and clothing 164 84 

Salary or foreman, material and tools In shoe shop 9,SS7 09 

" " " " " tailor shop 1,218 68 

Labor and grading ISS 76 

HlacellaaeoDB labor 296 60 

foBtage 67 16 

Printing y 70 87 

OaaandoU 778 99 

Black am Idling 60 86 

Freight and ezpreesage 76 9S 

Inanrance 160 00 

Traveling expenses 148 08 

Indigent pnpllB SS 09 

Ha steal instramentB and music 64 07 

Fnal 2,78* M 

mmber, stone, lime, brick and cement 119 19 

Bedding 199 29 

DcQgB 81 18 

Fish 122 86 

Frutt 267 68 

Cows lOOOO 

Field and gardea seeds 89 94 

Vegetables 68 78 

lAHudry stove 116 00 

Christmas gins and rewards 2S 84 

Slelgb MdTap robe 68 76 

Straw and hay 47 49 

Soap 6B 60 

Beads and wire for blind 8 76 

Total #28,678 07 

DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



THE DKAF AHD DVHB, AITD THB BLIHD. 4S 

FUFILB IIT THE DBAF-HOTE DBPARTHBNT. 



IU.HI. 


s 


„-».„». 


POBT-OVFICX. 


CO0NTT. 


Allen, George H 


n 


Not. 2S, 1878. . . 


Chattleld 


Fillmore. 


AuderBon, John 


23 


Jet. 80, 1869.... 


SorBland 




ABbler. JulU ? 




3ept. la, 1867. . . 


Jackson 


Jackson. 


Babe, Chas. F. W 


IK 


Sov. 12, 1869... 


:?ottage Grove 




Beliz, Frederick 


1(1 


3ept. 8, 187S.... 


:ha»ka 








Sept. B, 187*.... 
Oct. 20, 1874..,. 


Redwing.... 
Delano 


Goodhue. 


Bens, A.Edward 


11 


Bossard, Daniel 8 


11 


Sept. 9, 1874... 


BaglaLake,.. 


Bine Eartb. 


Braekelt, Emm* 


•26 


Sept. 13, 1865... 


mnneapollfl... 




Braf.FrankM 




Sept. 12, 1878... 






Brancb, CatherlDe 


Ifi 


Feb. 20, 1876.... 


[.uxemburg... 




Bnsctimann, Lonla 


In 


Sept. 12,1872... 


St. Paul 






9* 


Hayll, 1868.... 






Coffey, Catherine 


30 


March 20, 1868.. 


ShleldsvUle... 




Cole, Florence A 


IH 


Oct. 10, 1888-.., 


HlnneapollH.. 




Cooper, Leonard L 


lU 


Oct 21,1878.... 


Dover 




Corrlgan, John 


16 


Oct. 4, 1070 






Cowleg, Wm.H 


Ifi 


Feb. 24, 1874... 


Minneapolis . 




Conlthart. Nancy 


17 


Oct. 28, 1868.... 


Alma City.... 


ETaaeca. 


Clnky, Fbltomene 


IN 


Sav. 10, 18TB... 


Rocky Bun... 


tfcLeod. 








Uocky Run... 


McLeod. 

Dodge. 






Sept. 9, J868.... 
April 27, 1868... 


Cramer, Jennie C 


17 


Austin 






Sept U,1871... 
^epU 9,1874-... 




Ramsey. 

Wright. 


UaliaB, Susan J 


11 


Clearwater.... 






April 14,1868... 
Sept. 8. 1869.... 


Minneapolis .. 
Stillwater .... 


llenneplu. 
Wasblogtoii. 


DeCnrtlns, Joseph 


IT 


Uehlor, J. George 








ftamsey. 






Sept. 16,1868.,. 
Sept 9, 1874..,. 
Sept. 9, 1874.... 


Maryabarg ... 


LeSUBur. 
Wright, 
Fillmore. 






Dongherty, George .... 


11 






20 


Sept. 16,1868... 


SllUwaler..., 




Kills, Theodores 


a« 


Sept. 28, 1871... 


Wykoff 


^lllnuire. 


Enckaou, Anna 


11 


Sept. 9, 1874.... 


Spencer Brook 


[sautl. 


BrlckBon, Charles 


IK 


Sept. 9, 137*.... 










Aprils;, 1868... 




Nicollet. 








Flliatranlt. Joseph 


Ifl 


Sept. 16, 1872... 


Faribault 




Fltipatrlck, Mary 


n 


Sept. 10,1878... 




Olmsted. 






Sept. 9, 1874.... 


E;auClalre,W!f 














Gage, Tberon T 


in 


Sept. 23. 187B... 


Winona 


Winona. 






Sept. 14, 1870. . . 
Sept. 8. 1876.... 






Graham, Mary E 


10 


Minneapolis.. 


Hennepin. 




m 


Oct. 8, 1872 




Wluona. 




IK 


Oct. 18, 1878.... 


HorristowQ .. 






11 


Oct. 13, 1878.... 


Morrlstown ■. 


liice. 


Gnpllll, WllberL 


■n 


Oct. 11, 1872... 


Maine Prairie. 




HalTonon, Julia 


in 


Sept. 12, 1872... 


Willmar 


Kandiyohi. 


Haggard, Newton 


It) 


Sept. 9, 1873.... 


Wortbington.. 


Nobles. 


Harty, Michael 


in 


April 21, 186J... 






Hartnagel, Arthnr E... 


ifl 


Oct. 29, 1873.... 


St. Paul 


Ramsey. 


Baneniitela, Roberl.... 


i» 


Oct. 36, 1872.,.. 


NewUIm 


Brown. 






Sept. H, 1870... 
Sept. 16,1878... 








12 


Redwing... 


Ooodbne. 












Hnichloaon, Jaha C---> 


]9 


Sept. 14,1871... 


Dandas 


Rlc«. 



,.db,Google 



46 AHNCAZ. BBPOKI. 

PUPILS IS THE DEAF-MUTE DEPARTMENT.— ContlDoed. 



ADMISSION. POST-OFFICE. 



Jenka, Ada 

Johnson. August C.- ■ 
JohDSOD. David £-.■• 

Eelle;, Jeremiah 

Suske, Robert 

Lampman, DooKlas.. 

Larson, Lars 

I/cFever, Leon H.,.. 

Mndden, Emma 

HcGraw, Lizzie 

Meade, Margaret. . . ■ . 

Heade, James 

Morton, Caleb A 

NasH. Wm. F 

Neeeer, Qotlieb 

NeumaDD, August 

NUsoD, Mary S 

Horllnff, Olof O 

O'Brien, John 

OlBOD, OleK 

O'Riiey, Michael 

O'Rlley, David 

OskeraoD, Betse; 

Peterson, Erally 

Plelfer, Maria 

Qnlnlan, Mary A 

Robert, Marshal 0>-. 

RDSselt, Abbte M 

Sachs, Anna 

Sacks, Sophia 

Schneider, Gmma 

Sexton, Mary B 

BhiDks. Harper A > . . . 

Shaw, Abby 

Shay, Mary A 

Simpson, Lllile M.... 

Simon, Anthony 

Blttkus, Edward 

Smith, James L 

Spear, Anson R 

Stlckney, S. Gngene . 

Thompson, Alice 

ThompaoD, Cbarles ■ > 

Vlvlohn. Fanny 

Washburn, Caddie L... 

WalineT, Julius 

WaUnsr, Pauline.... 
Watlner, Frederick ■ 
Wallaer, Onstav.... 
Wanhotz, Frederick .... 
White, Spurgeon 8... 
Wlsbart, Joseph D... 
Zaelfldorf, Fred. W... 



I lOct. 10, 1S72... 

r 'Sept. 14, 1870. 

) jSept. ifi, 187fi. 

r lOct. £9, 1870... 

) jOct. 26,187* .. 

J Sept. 10, ieS9. 

I Oct. 21, IS7S . . 

1 Sept, 27, 1873. 

1 Sept. 9, 1873.. 

; Sept. 9, 1869. . . 

i Oct. 9, 1873 

I Oct. 9, 18T8.... 

) Oct. 26, 187,'>... 

7 Sept. 9, 1868. . ■ 

] Sept. 24, 187fi.. 

} Sept. 12, 1872. 

) Sept. 80, IS69.. 

J Sept. 10, 18T8. 

I Sept. 9, 1873... 

) Sept. 9, 1873... 

r Sept. 10, 1868.. 

3 iSept. 10, 1858. 

1 Sept. 9, 1874.. 

) Sept. 18, 1873. 

S Not. 29, 1873. 

) |Sept. 23, 1870.. 

) I Sept. 13, 1875.. 

I Sept. 9, 1874.. 

3 Sept. 9, 1873... 

i Sept, 9, 1873... 

I I Sept. 28, 1871,. 

3 I Sept. 9, 1874., 

J ISept. 8, 1876.. 

r ;Sept. 9, 1868.. 

I [Sept. 28, 1873. 

) iSept. 17. IB72. 

1 March 13,1868 

i Oct a:, 1889.. 

5 Sept. 9, 1873.. 

1 Sept, 14, la74. 

r Sept. 8, 1869.. 

i Sept. 10, 1873. 

L Sept. 10, 1873. 

i Jan. 28, 1876.. 

t April 2, 1875.. 

> Oct. 18, 1871.. 

r Ocl. 18,1871.. 

i I Sept. 16, 1873. 

L Jan. 23, 1874.. 

I Sept. 9, 1874.. 

3 ,8epl. », 1874.. 

i SepL II, 1873. 

[ 'Sept. 9. 1874.. 



■ Lake City.... 
.[Red Wing,.,. 
ilWaiertown. .. 
.'Stewartvllle.. 
.iHash Kiver... 

■ lAlexandrla , ,. 
' ETaDBvIUe., .. 
. Spring Valley. 
. Hendersan — 

■ Rochcsier .... 
. Belle Plalne.. 

■ Belle Plalne.. 

, Faribault 

' Hutchinson. . . 
, St. Paul 

■ St. Paul 

. Norway Lake- 

. Wlllmar 

. Kochester 

. Rushford 

. Wabaaha 

. Wabasha 

. Kenyou 

. Wall Lake.,., 

. Okaman 

.'Ilaverhlll 

. North Branch. 

. Faribault 

. NewUlm 

. New rim 

. AIb«rt Lea. .. 

• Janesvllle 

.'l^alrmonnL... 
. May 

. gl. PanLlXil 

. Madella 

. Hastings 

. Kedrou 

• Minneapolis .. 
. Wyativllie..., 
. Garden City.. 

,lst. Paul 

. Oak Ridge.... 

■ Minneapolis .. 

. Wheeling 

. Wheeling 

, Wheeling 

■ Wbeeling 

. HeDderson . . . 

. Lake City 

. Minneapolis .. 
, Henderson ... 



Carver. 

Olmiited. 

Sibley. 

Doaglas. 
iDoaglas. 
'Fillmore. 

Sibley. 
lOImsted 

Scott, 

Scott. 
'Rice. 
iHcLeod. 
.Ramsey. 
.Ramsey. 
I'MoLongalia. 

Kaodlyohi. 

Olmsted, 

Fillmore. 

Wabasha. 

Wabasha. 

Goodhus. 

Otter Tall. 

Waseca. 

Olmsted. 

Chisago. 
'Rice. 

Freeborn. 
I Waseca. 
Martin. 
Marti D. 

.Waseca. 

iWatoowao. 
Dakota. 

Plllmorc. 
UenneplD. 
' Winona. 
Bine Earth. 

Winona. 
' Hennepin. 
I Rice. 
I HIce. 
iRlce. 
'■ Kf ce. 

Sibley. 
I Wabasha. 

Hen DO pin. 
iSlbley. 

TO 

40 



Total Id Deaf-mnte Department.. 



zedbyGoOgle 



THB DB&F AKD DVHB, AND THB BLIND. 



PITPILS OF THB BLIND DBPABTMBNT. 



»»,. 


11 


ADHTTTBD. 


POST OPFICB. 


COUNTV. 


Androia, John C 


Sept. 9, 1874 


Ceoter Creek.. 




Brown, Henry J 


itt 


OcLie. 1871.... 


UlDneipolls... 




Odwell, OiTlUe C 


14 


Sept. 1*, 1870... 


rslnnoDt 


Harttn. 








Chatfield 

St. Paul 


Fillmore. 


Fernioli, Willie 


IB 


t-ept. 12,1878... 


Qetchell, Ellen A 


[A 


Sept. 18, 187B... 


BloeEortli.... 






)U 


Sept. 9,187*.... 
Sept. 10, 1S78... 
Sept. 19, 1878... 


faribaiiit.. . .,. . 
KeoyoD.....'.. 

Faribault 

Faribault 

St. Paul 


Rice. 

Goodhue. 

Kice. 

Rice. 

Ramsey. 






If 




HalluT. Chftriee A. C.-. 


19 


Sept. 14, 1874... 






Sept. 8,1869.... 
Sept. 17, 1872... 
Sept. 8, 1889.... 


Hntchlnaon... 
Breckenrldge. 
BroWDSvlUe . . 


McLeod. 
Wilkin. 






Smith, Blchird 


Ifi 


SwansoD, Ollvlft 


17 


Oct. 26, 1874.... 


St. Paul 


Ramsey. 




1H 


Sept. 14, 1S70 ... 


North Star.... 


Martin. 


Thompaon, WlUiam.... 


21 


Sept. 29, 1870... 


Waseca 


Waseca. 


TorgQBon, TorgQS 






Farlbaalt 


Rice. 


Tncy, WllllaiD 


IH 


Oct. 11,1870.... 


Geneva 




V»dDer, AIM. E 


17 


Sept. IS, 1869... 


Maple Lake... 


Wright 


Wetaert, George 








Bamsey. 



NumlMr of males . . . . 
Knmber of females.. 



Total Id Blind Department 

NnmbeT In Deaf-mnte Department. . 



Total In botii departments.. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AMHUAL BBFOBT. 



J.Litt of the UNEDUCATED DEAF and DUMB and the BLIND OkQ- 
drtn in tht Stait, " who hava not attended Ae School." Bequired bjf the 
Btatuu* of Minneeota. 



Allen, Wesley L 

BRckman. Bunmon.. 

Bates, Delia 

Batting, Albert 

BiUaid, Bertba 

Becker, FranceB J — 
Becker, Margaret W.. 

Bergwall. SigrI B 

Borcbardt, Ids 

Berglit, Askersoe.... 

Brlaaette, Bessie 

Bracbtoer, Hary 

Carl, Aona 

Carr, Joseph H 

Core, AtuoQ E 

Coleman. Liara 

Coorteaa. Almira 

CraveD, Josepb 

Crand^l, Prances 

CunnlDgham, Miss.... 

Delbeler, QeoTge 

Dodge, Clins. H. U.-.. 

Bugler, Alice 

Engle, John P 

Ferber, Heary 

Poggerts, Catberloe. . . 
Qnttermson, Thomas.. 

atisks, Bobert. 

OolbrandaeD, Fred.... 
GreeDtrood, Frank . . . . 

Holborseu, Lleve 

Heffermnlr, Sophia. ■ - ■ 

HerlMr, 

Hebeg, Jobn C 

HenderHOD, Master... ■ 

Holenbans, Fred 

HoltOD, Edward 

HoltoD, Grant. 

Hoade, Marie B 

Jackson, Carrie 

Johnson, Ibert 



Kuzer, John 

Klage, Frederick.. 
Layman, Mar; B. . 



J^rbat,lstiral.. 



CONDITION. 



Blind 

Blind 

Dear and Dnmb. 
Blind ..... 

Deaf and Dnmb. 



Deaf and Domb < 

Blind 

DeaX and Dumb. 



Deaf and Dnmb. 



POSTOFPtCB. 



Utlca. 

Castle Bock. 
Shell Rock.. 

Lakefllle 

Jackson 

Wabasha 

Wabasha ..... 

Stark 

Stillwater.... 
Minneola. .... 
Maple Grove. 

Hale 

Lekerllle 

Backet t'aBl'ge 

Merlden 

Shakopee .... 

St. Paul 

Stillwater ■... 

Madella 

Green Isle.. .. 
Mlnns'ta Lake 
Spring Talley 
Chasks... 
Owatonns 
Oronoco .. 
VemoD Centre 
Walnnt Lake. 

St. Peter 

Wilton 

Jackson 

Ashland 

Bed Stone... 

Kochester 

Granger 

EsstPratr'v'le 
Faribault... 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Bt. Panl ... 
Bocky Bnn. 

Ilocky Ban. 

Jordan 

Winona .... 
Winona.... 
Minneapolis 



Winona. 

Dakota. 

Freeborn. 

Dakota. 

Jackaon. 

Wabssha. 

Wabasha. 

ChlBBgO. 

Washington. 

Goodhne. 

Hennepin. 

McLeod. 

Dakota. 

Honston. 

Steele. 

Scott. 

Ramsey. 

Washington. 

Watonwan. 

I Sibley. 

Faribaqlt. 

Fillmore. 

Steele. 
Olmsted- 
Bine Earth. 
FaribaalL 
Nicollet. 

Jackaon. 

Nicollet. 

Olmsted. 

Plltmore. 

Rice. 

Rice. 

Wabasha. 

Wabasha. 

Ramsey. 

HcLeod. 

Steele. 

McLeod. 

Scott. 

Winona. 

Winona. 

HenneptD. 



zedbyGoOgle 



TBB DEAF AMD DUMB, AND THE BUND. 49 

Uttof VNBDVCATBD DEAF aiti DUMB and tht BLIND— ContiMud. 



Hid, H&ry OIbod 

Iten-h, SaiDoal 

Mead«, Jobo 

Meade, Tbomta 

Mlddletoa, Qeorg«. ■ ■ . 

HllltT, Fred 

Hack. Stephen 

HoDett, Roaetu 

Hnller, Bertlu. 

Maiphy, Thomu. . . . . . 

Hnrpby, Mary 

Honsoi), Chrlsilna. <■■ 
We»catt, H;rtle Belle. 

Httgel, Joseph 

Newell, Ellea 

Kllson, Cbrlallftn 

M1l9011,NllB 

NIIsoD, HenTT J 

OlsoD, Halver 

OlsoD, Edwin 

OI*on, John 

FkniBon, nteen 

PriitiFs, Feter 

FetcraoD, Panllne 

Ffausted, Wm 

Pierce, Lnkens U 

PlKDC, Feter 

Poppiiz, Muter 

Palkz, Josephine 

band, Hsrr E 

Raod, Joseph B 

Randall, Uminah 

Bandalt, John 

Randall, ElUJ 

Shlverty, John 

Scott, Laarena 

Blmona, Albert 

SkolBery, Frederick.-. 

SlaTcn, Master 

Tboreen, Ollns 

Whalen, Joseph 

WelJmark, Albert 

Weymouth, Allen 

Williams, Theresa.... 

Wolf, Henrj 

Wolff, Henry 



Deaf ud Dnmb. 



Blind 

Deaf and Dumb. 



Deaf and Dumb. 



Uonterldeo. ■ . 
Marine Mills.. 
Belle Flaine.. 

HendenoQ 

NewUlm 

Oak Springs.. 
Graham Lakes 
KocheBter. 
Winona .. 



Holly Wood. 
Jickson ... . 
Hlnncapolh . 
Wlaona 



POST omoi. 



Boffklo 

Gitchrlst. ... 

Albert Lea 

Rasbfbrd.. .. 
Shell Rock... 
Brush Fralrle 
Winamlngo.. 
Stillwater. .. . 
BoMTllle... . 

SUPanl 

LeRoy Station 

Merlden 

Obcrlia Corn' 
Kosevllle... .. 
ByroD ■ . . 
Byron . . . 

Unom.. 
LeRoj... 
Wabtfha. 



Jackson . . . 
FlalnTlBW. 
Green Isle 
Gilchrist.. 
St. Paul... 
Chisago City. . 
Madella.. .. 
Alexandria . 
Fergoa Falls 
Mlnneapolla. 



Chippewa. 

WashlDgtoD. 

Scott. 

SlWey. 

Brown. 

Nobles. 
Olmsted. 
Winona. 

HoUHtOD. 

Jackson. 

Hennepin. 

Winona. 

Wright. 

Freeborn. 

Fillmore. 

Freeborn. 

McLeod. 

Goodhne. 

Washlnfiton. 

K&ndlyohL 

Mower. 

Steele. 

Carver. 

Kandiyohi. 

Olmsted. 

Olmsted. 

Fillmore. 

Fillmore. 

Mower. 

Wabuha. 

Benton. 

Jackson, 

Wabatha. 

Sibley. 

Pope. 

Ramse;. 

Chisago. 

Watonwan. 

Donglas. 

OtterUll. 

HenneplD. 



Number of Unedncated Deaf-Uotes 74 

Nnmber of Unedacated Blind. 18 

Total of Both Classe ■ 9S 



DigilizedbyGoOgle 



ANNUAL KBFOtt. 



Peraons employed in the Minnesota Institution for the Deaf and 
DmA and the mind, Nov. SOlA, 1875. 



DEAr HUTK DKPABTKKHT. 



J.L. Noyefl 

Oeorge Wing 

D. H.Carroll 

P, W. Downing 

IsftbelU H. StDsom. .. 

HkrioD Wilson 

Josepblue Pletrowskl. 

Jennie C. Cramer 

Hr<>. A. R. Hole 

Hn. 8. M. Petry 

P. C. Sheldon 

Dr. Z. U. NtcholB 

Hddioii WUbod 

B. A. HoU 

0. 8. Blake 

D.H.Kv&ns 

NilsF.Kood 

Jobn Mo»D 

Wllllaro Johnson 

Charlotte Anderson- .. 

Christina Erlckoou 

IfaryKeenftD .-' 

Josephine NUson 

I^na Johnson 

Louisa Anderson 

jDsephlDG Carroll .... 
H. Clement Kennedy.. 

Nora Benrlgan 

Mary Cuskelly 

Margraret Kennedy .•■-■ 



OOOUPATIUK. 



Saperintendent 

Teacher 

Matron 

AaslBtant Matron 

" Steward 

Physician 

Treasurer and Steward. ■■ 

Clerk of Board 

Foreman of Shoe Shop . . . 

" Tailor Shop 

Gardener 

Laborer 

Cook '. 

Assistant Cook 

Baker 

Washer andlronei 

Dining-room Qtrl 

Girls' Hospital Attendant. 
Boys' " " 
Chambermaid 



OOHPKHMTIOM. 



BLIXD DEf ABTUEMT. 



Jainea J. Dow.... 
*Wni. Manner ■•.. 

Millie Mott 

Cora J Shipman.. 

Lydla Austin 

Dr. Z.B. Nichols. 

P. M. Skshltl 

Hary Hendrlcka . . 

Serih Burns 

Maggie Burns ..... 
Sarah A, Burns. . . 



Matron 

Fbyslclan 

Laborer 

Cook 

Washer and Ironer.. 
Dining-room Qirl... 
CbamberiDBld 



OOHPSMUTION. 



• Bmplorsd ODlT two halt iUr> «Mti VMk Uuhlng mni 



zedbyGoOgle 



THE DKAF AND DUMB, AND THE BLIND. 



Tk« following 2fewtpap«r$ and Periodical* havo been lent (o Uie IntMtMon 
gratuitouilt/. The Edlton and Fublithert of the same tofll pleoM aeoept 
the Mijieere thankt of both Pupil* and Oglcen. Their eontinuanee i$ rv- 
ipec^itllv tolietted : 



PIoneer-PresB, Trl~ weekly 

Dispatch, Trl-weekly 

Northwestern Chronicle, w'y 
HlnneapoIlK Trlbane, we'l; 
WlnODS RepubllcBD, weekly 
H&nkato Union, weekly... 
HftDkato Record, weekly. . 
St. Peter Trlbiine, weekly. 
. Rice CoDnt.y J onrDBl, weekly 
NortbBeldi Stand ard, weekly 
8t. CloQil Preas, weekly . . . 
St. Cload Jonmal, weekly. 
Anstln Register, weekly . . . 
Sibley Co. Independent, w'y 
U&atlDgs Gazette, weekly. 
Chicago Jonr. of Com., we'l. 
Central Kepnbllcsii, weekly 
Psribuult IJemocrat, weekly 
The Silent Wocid, weekly-. 
Deaf-Mute'sJoaraal, weekly 
The Mule's Cbron1cie,2, w'iy 
Beaf-Mute Advance, weekly 
Seaf-Mnte Mirror, 3, weekly' 
Hate Juurnat ofNebraska.. 

The Goods on Gazette 

Kentacky Deal -Mate, S 

Deaf-Hote Index 



Ploneer-Prexs Company 

Dispatch Company 

Manly Tello 

Trlbnoe Company 

D. Sinclair & Co 

G. K. Cleveland 

O. Brown&Son 

G. K. Hoore 

C. A. Wheaton 

W. H. Mitchell 

C. B. HcKenney 

W. B. Mitchell 

DavldBOD t Basford 

David Plcklt. 

Todd&Stebblns 

Tappan, McKlllop & Co 

A. W. McKlnstry. 

A. E. Haven 

JohnB. Elllgood 

Henry C. Rider 

Ohio Inst. Tor Deaf & Dumb, 

Frank Read 

Mich. Inst, for D. &D. &B. 
Nebraska Inst, (br Deaf&D. 
Va. Inst forD. &D. &B... 
Instliate for Deaf and Dumb] 
Instltate farBeftTandDnmb 



St. Panl. 
St. Paol. 
St. Paul. 
MlnDeapolis. 
Winona. 
Mankato. 
Mankato. 
St Peter. 
Northfleld. 
Nortbdeld. 
St. Clond. 
|St. ClOQd. 
iAostln. 
'Henderson, 
j Hastings. 
IChlcago, HI. 
{Faribault. 
Faribault. 
Wa«blngtou, D.C. 
iHexIco, N. T. 
Columbus, O. 
'Jacksonville, HI. 
! Flint, Mich. 
'Omaha, Neb. 
IStanntoD, Va. 
'iDauTllle, Ey. 
Col. Springe, Col. 



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AHNDAI. RBPOBT. 



SEVENTH ANNUAL MUSICAL REVIEW 

or THB 

PUPILS OF THE BLIND DEPARTMENT, 

JtuftauU, JuM 14, 187&. 

Teachen— JoKN J. Tdckbr uid Haxia E. Cbampalu 



PROaBAMME. 



FART FIB8T. 
I. Orertare — Zampft Boulnl. 

OltCBESTBA. 

9. Piano Solo— What are the Wild Waves Saying? Belcluudt. 

RICHABD SUITH. 

*. Cbonm— Tbe Foot Traveler Abt. 

4. Daet— The Naatllns Shell 

OARBIB RICH AND RBBECOA FUaH. 

5. 8oDg— I'm Afloat BuaelL 

WILUAK THOHPaOM. 

6. TeU-a-tete Galop — 

orohbstba. 



FART SECOND. 
1. nsQoSola • '- 

OBBISOADWKLL. 

9. CboTDB— Ob, Hall ns ye Free I Verdi. 

8. SoQg— Pnt It down to me 

JOHM ANOB098. 

4. violin Bolo— Maggie Hack. 



B. Song— Allan Percy 

Hisa SHirauit. 

«. Cboina — Come with the Gipsey Bride Balfe. 

T. Remembrance Waltzes ■ • Oatteraon. 

0BCBB8TEA. 



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THE DBJlF and DUHB, AHD THE BLIND. 



TERMS OF APMISSION. 



I. The luBtitotlon is frte, and open to all the deaf and dumb, 
and the blind, in the State, between the ages of Mn and twfi^jive 
who are capable of receiTing Instrnction. The only charge ie for 
incidental ejq>eu8es. 

II. All applicants for admlsBion should be in good health, free 
ttoxa immoralities of condnct, and fK>m offenslTc and contagions 



m. Application for admission, and all letters of inquiry con- 
cerning pnpils, should be addressed to J. L. Hfoyat, FartbavU, Bice 
OowUjf, Minneaota, Superintendent of the Institution, and to avoid 
any nnneceaaar}' expenses or disappointments, applicants, before 
leaving home, should obtain a written communication trova the Su- 
perintendent, certifying- that application bas been made, and stating 
the time when the Institution will be ready to receive them. 

IV. The 'commencement of the term is the only proper time for 
the admission of pupils, and none will be received at any other time 
except for the best of reasons. The term commences on the sbcovd 
Wednesday of September, and continues Foarr weeks. 

V. Applicants, and all pupils returning &l the beginning of the 
term, should come well supplied with clothes — at least two snita for 
aummer, and two for winter me, and three towels — in a good trnnk, 
and every article marked in the name of the owner. 

VI. Five yearg is the regvlar oonne of instruction, and all wbo 
are admitted should remain this length of time, except for leasons 

* Tha prtMDt tarm bImn Jbd* ltUi>aDd llit nait eotDintiioM HapMmtMr Ulh, iB2i. 



zcdbvCioOgIc 



bi AHinru. BBPOBT. 

satisfactory to the SoperintendeDt. At tbe expiration of tlie rega- 
lar coorsfl, a tpecUU course of two years may be added, upon tbe 
recommendatiouof the SnperiDteodent.and the approval thereof by 
the Board of Directors. 

VII. There is bat one vaeation in the year, oommeDClng on the 
close of the term in June, and continuing to the sbookd Wednesday 
of September. 

VIII. No provision is made for boarding pupils at the Instita- 
tion in vacation, hence parents and guardians of pupils should be 
particular to malce arrangementB to convey their children home at 
the close of the term, and inform the Superintendent of the same, 
at least two weeks before the school closes. 

A small sum of money, not less than five dollars, shonld be de- 
posited with the Superintendent, for incidental expenses, such as 
repairing clothes, boots and shoes, providing text boolis, postage, 
stationery and the like. 

No parent or guardian should remove a pnpil daring term time, 
without first consulting the Superintendent. 

It is specially Important that parents be particular to return their 
children promptly at the comm&noement of each term. The Super- 
intendent will endeavor to make arrangements with the difibrent 
railway companies, by which pupils going home and returning 
promptly at the time named above, will be conveyed at ka^ fim, 
while at other times ^11 fare may be demanded. 

When an applicant comes to the Institution, some person should 
accompany him prepared to give the following information, onlesa 
previously rendered, or bring, in writing, definite answers to these 
qaestioDS, to-wit : 



1. What is the full name of the applicant ? 

X. In what place, year, moath and d%y was the applicant born? 

5. What are t^e Aill names of the father and mother? Are both 
living? 

4. What is the occupation of the father, and to what nation do 
the parents belong? 

6. What is the post-ofi9ce address and residence of the pareDts, 
or gnardian, giving township and county In which they live? 

6, What is the nearest railroad station, and on what road is it? 



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THE DBAF AND DUKB, AND THE BLIND. 55 

7. Whftt an tfae nuoes of the iq>plicanf t brothars and sisters, in 
order) oommencing with the oldest? 

S. Hu the applioant nny brotbere, siatere, or reUtlves, who are 
deaf and dnmb, or blind, or even partially so, Kiving 'name and 
oaose of each case ? 

9. Was there any blood relation between the parents before mar- 
rii^? If so, what? 

10. What IB the eanse of the applicant's deafness, or blindness, 
and at what tige did it ocoar? If born deaf or blind, can yon as- 
sign any eanse? 

11. Can the applicant hear or see any? If so, what? 

12. Has the ^plicant ever been to school any? If so, when, 
where, and how long? 

IS. Is the applicant of a sound mind, in good health, and Aree 
from bodily deformity, immoral habits, and ttom contagions dis- 

14. Has the applicant been vaccinated, had the small pox, the 
scarlet tbver, the measles, the mamps, or whooping congh? 

15. What ohnrch do yon wish the applicant to attend on the Sab- 
bath? 

16. Is it yonr purpose to give the applibant a fhll conrse of stndy 
in thialnstitntion? 

17. Are yoa a citizen of Minnesota, and by what name are yoo 
known? 

SPECIAL KOnOB. 

All tetters, or packages, sent to members of the Institution, 
shonld contain the words, " Hinn. Inst, for the Deaf and Dnmb," or 
'• Minn. Inst, for the Blind," as the case may be, foi a part of the 
address, in order to secure prompt delivery. 

The pnpils are required to write home once a month, and may 
write oftener if desired. 

Letters are written for those who cannot write themselves. 

Parents who desire to fkimlsb their children with spending money, 
are advised to deposit it with the Superintendent, who will keep 
account of'the same, and endeavor to secure both safe-keeping and 
proper expenditure. The Institntion cannot be responsible for 
money sent directly to the pnpils. Express packages, or money to 
the amoant of fifty cents and upwards, when sent to the Superin- 
tendent, will be duly acknowledged by mail. 

The Institation is not responsible for the safety of pnpils while 
traveling to and trmn the Institation, or in case of tmancsy. All 



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56 ARNDAL BIFOBT. 

reasonable assiatance in anch cases, however, will be obeerfnlly ren- 
dered by the otBcers of the InBtitntioo. 

The parenta and guardiaDS of pupils will ple&se bear in mind that 
there is do vacation, or recess, of school daring the holidays ; henoe 
they should not expect their children home, or encourage their go- 
ing at this inclement season of the year. 

The Terms of Admission require parents to oonsall the Superin- 
tendent in regard to a pupil's absence, even for a few days. 

Careful attention to the above will be of special service to the 
pupils and to the officers of the InsUtntion. 

J. L. NOYES, 

Superintendent. 



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COMPOSITIONS. 



Friends and patrons or the Institntion often desire to see speci* 
mens of compositions by the deaf and dumb at different stages of 
their pr<%ress. The following will give the reader some idea of 
their pecaliar manner of thought and expression. They are selected 
ft-om their school room exercises, more with reference to the thought 
conveyed ttian the accuracy and completeness of the sentence in 
which the thought is expressed. 

rKKDINO THB PIGBOHt— (A FICTUBB.) 

I see a picture of a pretty little girl standing by a window. Her 
name is Lucy. She is feeding her little pigeons. She is very liind 
to them every day, and never forgets to feed them. She feeds them 
every morning, noon, and night. She is very fond of her pigeons. 
See how tame they are ! One of them spreads its wiugs out and 
looks as if it would fly on Lucy's shoulder. They do not seem to 
be afraid ; they love her very much ; they perch on the window sill 
every morning, when she comes to feed them. I see Lucy has 
golden hair, tied back with blue ribbon. She has a pretty smile on 
ber face. I see an ivy climbing over the window. Lucy has a bas- 
ket in her hand out of which she feeds the pigeons. I love pigeons 
very much. I think it is a pretty picture. 

M. E. Q. 

[Lost hearing at six. In school three months.] 

THE Lrrri.E carpenter — (a pictdrk,) 

There is a picture of a little boy named Freddie. He is a little 
carpenter. He has a hammer in his hand. He is going to drive 
nails into something. He has a little carpenter's work bench. He 
bas his foot on a box. He has not made the box cover yet, bat he 
will. He has on blue pants and vest, and a red shirt. His slook- 
ings are striped red and black, and he has curly hair. I can see 
shavings on the floor and a saw hanging on a nail, and some oar- 
t>6nter's tools. His shirt sleeves are rolled np and his arms are 
bare. His coat is banging oo a book. He has made a nice little 



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58 ANKUAL mPOBT. 

ablp ; it Ib painted blue and red. There is a long bench behind liim 
tot people to sit on when they come to see him working. He loves 
to work. There are some large iKiaids that he has planed to make 
a large box. L. L. 

In school two years. Lost hearing at eight. 

A OOLD sroKH. 

A few years ago, it was very cold. A farmer told my brother 
that he most go to Worthington early in tbe morning. He had two 
email oxen. He had a small sled. He put on a yoke on the oxen's 
necks. He went to Ihe city with faia oxen and aled. It was some 
warm. He tied his oxen to a sled. He went into tbe store. He 
bought some flour, coflee and sugar. By-and-by it was very 
windy. The wind blew tbe snow about ao the people could 
not ste the houses. He wished to go home. The merchant sud 
that he must stay till next morning. He would not stay there. 
The merchant thought that he would be ftozen. He did not think 
80. Ho went to his oxen. He got in his sted, but he could not see 
the road. He could not see his home. He rode sway. He could 
not find his hpme. He took the oxen out of the aled and let tbem 
go. The sled stayed there. He walked away. He waa very cold. 
By-and-by he waa frozen on the small lake. In three days the wind 
did not blow. • Hy brother saw something black in tbe road one or 
two miles away. My brother thought that it waa a man's sled. My 
brother wished to see the things. My brother went to the things 
and found tbe sled. The man was out of the sled. Uy brother 
looked for him and found the oxen on the ice. They were ftozen. 
Again my brother looked for him, bnt he could not find him. An- 
other man found him on the ice. 

N. H. 

In school two years — lost hearing at fonr. 



A baby aometimea sleeps in tbe cradle, or bed. It has no teeth. 
It is dressed by its mother. It cannot walk on the floor, because 
its legs are short and weak. When it is some months old it smiles 
and sometimes wondera at a large dog. It likes to hear a rattle. 
Its parents are very careful of it. When it ia very hungry 
it cries loudly. Its mother hears it crying and she runs to it and 
sbe gives aome warm bread and augar to it. 

When it is about one or two years old, it tries to walk to ita 
parents. It can apeak some words to its papa. J. H. 

In school three years. Deaf from infancy. 

THB BIKDS. 

In the spring I saw many birds coming fhun the Bouthem bemis- 



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THB DEAF AND DUHB, AND THB BLIND. 50 

phera, and they MI sat down in the green, aweet grass, lliey snng, 
and flew to the high, tall treaa, where they made nests Tor their 
yoaog onee. I sometimes saw the birds fly from the trees to tha 
ground and pick up hairs and straws and oatry them ap on the 
trees. Iliere the old birds built a nest on the great tall tree, where 
I could only see a little of it, because they made it so high that ttie 
bad boys could not see it, for the birds are sometimes afraid of the 
boys. They often thought what they should do with their nests to 
save them from the robbers. Last year I found a lark's nest on 
the ground. It was very little, but it was beautiful. I saw lour 
speckled eggs in it. When the lark came flying in the air she saw 
me, but I did not take the eggs from the nest, and I walked easy 
troia it. When she was in her neat I walked back and looked la 
it. The lark saw me and she flew out, but she did not fly away. 
She flew over her nest and looked at me. I walked away from it| 
and the lark flew back to her nest. When I came home I told my 
brotlier about the nest. He said it was a pretty neat and he would 
go and get it. Itoldhin: if he found the nest he must not take the eggs 
from it. He promised and walked away. Canary birds are very 
nice and beautiful. We often keep them in cages in our rooms. 
Miss T. had some pretty canary birds which she kept in a small 
cage. She gave the little birds crackers and sometimes the deaf 
dumb boys looked at the pretty birds, but Miss T. did not like it, 
and she was sometimes cross to them. 

A. 8. 
In school 2 years. Lost hearing at three and one-half years. 

THB WORLD. 

The world is very large. It is beautiful. Many people live in 
the world. The world goes round the sun in one year. The moon 
goes round the world in twenty-eight days. God mode the world 
and the sua and the moon. The sun shines on the moon. The 
moon reflects thi light on the world. God causes it to rain on the 
world, and trees and flowers and leaves grow. The world rolls over 
every day. The sun is larger than the world and the moon. The 
world goes round the sun, 550,000,000 miles. The sun ia 93,000,' 
000 miles from this world. The moon is half dark. God takes 
oarc of the people in the world. He is very kind to the world. 

J. H. 

In school 2J years. Lost hearing in infancy. 

AN XAQLE. 

Last summer while my father and sister and [ worked at tho 
oats, an e^le flew in the air, over our heads. We saw it flying to 
a large tree, and it sat on a braueh of the tree. My father ran to 
bis faomn and put bi-« gun on his shonlder and walked softly toward 
the eagle. He shot at the eagle, but he did not hit it. The eagle 
flew away over the lake. It had a white head and tall, bat ita 
breast, back and wings were very black. Sometime ago many ea- 



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ftO ANHCTAL BVPOBT. 

gles made many nesta on the moaatainB, and they had many green 
eggs in their nests. Many young eagles began to walk on the 
mountains, and their mother eaglea gave them some dead animala. 
They began to fly low, and they became strong eagles and fiew rap* 
Idly. They became large eaglea, and they can fly high in the air 
now. 

J. H. 
In Bohool two and one-half years — lost hearii^ in lafanoy. 



Once a man thongbt how to catch a lion. He got a good horse 
that could run fast. He rode on hla horse, to go into the woods, 
to look for a lion. By and by, be saw two young cubs. He 
got down and went near them. Before be took ttiem he looked to 
see if a llOnesB was not coming. Then he took them. He got upon 
bis horse with them In his arms. He rode very faat. While he was 
riding away the lioness came to the same place and saw them gone. 
Bbe chased the man who stole them, by smelling on the gronad on 
which he rode on his horse, and she ran toward him. By and by he 
turned bis head to look at her rnnning toward him. He was afraid 
that she would catch him and tear him in pieces. He was obliged to 
drop one of the cubs. She came to carry it to the same place with 
ber month. She put it down ; but she did not chase him again. 
He thought that she would come again. He rode very fast. He 
escaped to reach home. When be kept the cub after it was full 
grown, he put him in a strong iron cage so that he could not get 
away. Every day he liked to feed him some raw meat that he loved 
to eat. Often some people came to look at him. They knew that 
the lion was stronger than any otber animal. He is sometimes called 
the *' King of Beasts," Iwcause be can tear a large bnll in pieces. 

J. C. 

In school 6 years. Lost hearing at S years. 

TBE SHEPBRRD AND HIS DOO. 

Some years ago a shepherd had a great flock of sheep. He was a 
good shepherd. He had a pretty large dog. 'X'he shepherd loved 
bim very much. The shepherd had a little sweet child. His name 
was Charlie. The dog loved the child very mnch. The dog played 
with the child. One morning it was a beautiful day. The child 
said, " Oh 1 papa, may I go with you tp take care of the sheep?" 
Tlie shepherd eaid, '' Yes, my child, yon may go with me." His 
wife put a red frock and a hood on the child. The child was two 
years old, snd it was proud. The shepherd look the child on his 
arm. The child said, " Good bye, my dear mamma." The (Aild 
kissed its mamma, and the shepherd went away and drove his sheep. 
The dog followed the sheep. The child was very glad when they 
were on the hill. The child played with the dog. The shepherd 
sang. The child liked to hear its father sing. The child was 
pleased on the hill. It began to be dark. The shepherd counted 



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THE DBAf AND DUMB, AND THE BLIND. 61 

bh sheep. One or them wm gone. The Bhepherd told his dog to 
take oare of his child. The shepherd tsoked for bia sheep aad 
foQDd it. The dog and the child playud about. The child fell into 
a hole. It coald not get out. It crawled into the cave. The dog 
would not leave the child. The shepherd came to the plaoe again, 
but be did not see his child, and he thought the child had goue home 
with the dc%. He walked home, and put the aheep with the other 
sheep. He walked into the house. He asked his wife if the dog and 
the child came home. She said "No, I have not seen them." 
The shepherd called his friends. They looked for it, but could not 
find it. The dog came home at night. The wife gave him bread. 
He would not eat it. He ran away and gave it to the child. The 
wife told the shepherd that the dog had come home. The next day 
be came again. She gave him bread. The shepherd followed the 
d<^. By-and by the dog was disappeared. The shepherd could 
not see him. He saw a cave. He thought that his child was in the 
cave. He pulled away the bushes, and saw the child. The child 
smiled and bit a piece of bread. The shepherd took it out, and he 
patted the dog on his neck, saying, " Uy good d(^, you have saved 
my child's life." 

The dog was pleased, and the shepherd went home. When his 
wife saw her baby, she ran and hugge<l it and kissed it. She was 
very glad to get her child again. The shepherd and his wife loved 
the dog. 

8. 8. 

In school two years. Lost hearing at four yeara. 

ANOIZMT XSa HODERM TIUBS. 

How surprised would our forefathers be if they could know what 
simple things we regard their mechanics and farm implements. It 
was only a few hundred years ago when the only plows possessed 
by men were crooked trees cut up in some shape fit to turn over 
sods. That was - a very poor contrivance indeed. There is a 
vast difierence l)etween ancients and moderns. Now-a-days every 
farmer finds machines convenient to hie use on a farm in every city 
in the Union, and can obtain them, if able to purchase them. Bat 
in olden times a farmer could go through a large city and find not 
one farm implement fur sale lit for his use in tilling the soil. Now- 
a-days a man can readily obtain things convenient to the enjoy- 
ment of life, while in ancient times a man's scanty hoard would be 
sufficient to obtain his daily necissaries. Farmiiig was known 
among the ancients, but they only lacked the skill to invent such 
useful things as we have, or they regarded farming as an inferior 
business, and had littleor no interest in it. A few hundred years 
ago women used to sit up half the night by a wick candle, plying 
their needle to and fio, sewing, and it seemed an awful big Job for 
them to do. But now-a-days a woman can sew as easy as she can 
rock a cradle. Our forefathers used to travel by means of stages, 
and never thought of a more convenient method of traveling. But 
now it is far different. A man can go as far now-a-days in on* 



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^ 



£8 ANKDAL KBPOBT. 

hoar as he could go id one day long &go. Morse, the inveotor of 
the telegraph, was so poor he was compelled to ask Congress for 
moncT to carry out his plan, bnt he was only laughed at as insig- 
nificant by the CongresameD. All this shows the darkness of aa- 
cnent times, and in modern times we may WiA pro8i>erity and snccess 
to all who strive to pat new and useful instrnments in the place 
of old ones. 

J. K. 
In school 6 years. Lost hearing at 7. 

ABODT m LIFE. 

Well, I am going to tell you about my life. When I was a child, 
I did not know many things. I remember I lived with my parents 
and sister, at home. I did not know bow many people lived on the 
nice of the earth. I was a deaf and dumb girl, bo I did not know 
how to talk, and could not speak to my sisters ; but I did not un- 
derstand it or get trouble from it. Uy mother sometimes felt bad, 
or cried for me. I looked at her and wondered what she said, for I 
was deaf and dumb. I told her that I did not feel badly, but I had 
a good time because I loved my sister, when, sometime, I would be 
happy to play with her. I thought that I was the only deaf and 
dumb girt in the world, because there was nobody deaf and dumb 
among our neighbors. I never looked at one of the mate boys or 
girls before I came here to school. I did not know my name, or 
what were the different names of the animals, and persons, and 
things in the world, because I never learned anything at school be- 
fore; I tliought that the sun seemed to be red fire. I supposed 
that another new sun was going above the earth every day. I 
thought that the moon bad no body, but only its face was shown to 
the people. It was alive because it could move in the sky. The 
night was so dark on the earth when the full moon was in the 
heaven. I was surprised to look at it. going very slowly, as if it 
was looking at me. I was frightened that it chased me, and it al- 
ways followed me in going every way. Often I hid behind one of 
the bushes, or the house, but they could not help me. I thought 
that it could follow somebody everywhere. Many sparkling stars 
were in the heavens, shining with great beauty. They seemed to be 
fire, because many red sparks were like them. I was surprised to 
look at the sparks which often flew faster and faster everywhere. 
I did not know wbat to make of them. I thought that the earth 
seemed to be a great plain ; but I did not think who made it. I 
loved my mother because she always took care of me and my sister. 
When she had been very sick, I was mad at somebody becaose I 
thought he would kill her ; but I wished her always to live, many 
long years. My sister warned me not to be mad at him. I did not 
know about God. I knew before, that persons must die. When I 
was a little girl, I never torgot about this. I remember because she 
said that they must die. I did not know about tite Sabbatb day. It 
seemed to me that it was the same as other days ; but my sister told 
me not to work on that day. I often went to church ; then the priest 



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THE DBAF AND DUMB, AND TUB BUND. 63 

Btndy things. TeacLera taaght me the names of aaimala, etc. I 
mingled with the papils, who told nte many new things by signs. 
1 had never studied before ; but now the world seems to be better 
than ten years ago, because I know the difference better between 
right and wrong, and I can read and know about what happens in 
tiie world. Also I have learned to know God and love Him. We 
thank God so much for helping us to improve our minds and hearts. 
We wonder that He can make everything so pleasant for us, and 
provide so mueh for our happiness. We mnst try to show our grati- 
tude to God by being kind to others and helping them all we can. 

Fifteen papils are going to graduate to-day. We all feel sorry to 
separate from each other. We cannot hope that we will meetf^ain 
on the earth, but sometime we hope that we shall meet HBaia in 
heaven. 

C. C. 

In school 7 years. Deaf from birth. 



Friendship is the attachment or affection of one person for an- 
other. Friendship is the attribute of a noble mind. 

What a great blessing it is to have many friends and no enemies. 
Wlien in affliction we have sympathy, in trouble wc are comforted, 
in danger we are defended and saved, and in sickness we are oaie- 
fViUy nursed, and all oar wants attended to. 

The rich have more friends than the poor, for the rich have wealth. 
When a man is wealthy he is sure to be surrounded by many pro- 
fessed friends, who will stand by him as long as his money lasts. 
When the money disappears and. be becomes iioor, they also dioap- 
pear, and do not remember their wealthy friends of former days. 
They are false friends. 

Every one of us needs iViends, for it is a )i;reat comfort to be en- 
circled by friends, in whom we' can trust fearlessly and without hes- 
itation. What a paradise this would be, if there was no enmity. 
Without friends we would be wretched. 

How sad is the lot of a young man who comes a stranger to a 
large city to engage in some business. He has no one to take him 
by the hand and be his friend . In his leisure hours he seeks ftieiids 
and pleasure in doubtful places of amusement. Here he is wel- 
comed by those servants of ^atan, who profess to be his friends, hut 
who lead him on from one sin to another, till he is mined body and 
soul. How thankful we should be that we have kind and loving 
friends in whom we can trust. 

I once read a story of a man who had no friends ; be committed 
some crime ; be was cost into a dork dismal cell into which the sun 
never shown. He was alone and very sad. One day he saw a rat 
in the corner of his cell eating some of his food ; the man got up 
and tried to eatch il, but it escaped into its hole. After a few days 
the rat became bolder and found out that the man did not waut to 
barm it ; they became fast friends, and ate together out of the same 
dish. One day the man found his tViend lying sick in the corner 



zedbyGoOgle 



64 junrUAi. befokt. 

preached to the people a,botit God, bat I did not anderstuid what 
he said, because' I could not hear. But I came here and began to 
where be dret eaw it He took it up and nursed it as carefully as if 
it was bifl child, but the rat died and the criminal wept over it, and 
aeked permission to bury his heat friend. This story shows that 
even wicked and depraved people possess some affection. 

Most animals possess some d^ree of affection. We have all seea 
how carefully a hen watches over her chickens ; how she gathers 
them under her winga when she thinks there is any danger. 

We should endeavor to make as many friends as we can and as 
few enemies — we should never exchange the old, faithful and well 
tried ftiend for a new one. 

W. E. D. 

In school 7 years. liOst bearing at 6. 



Culture of land is necessary in order to make it produce grain 
and vegetables for our food. It would be folly and nastefulness to 
BOW grain on ground that has not been plowed and dr^ged. And 
OS much as land needs culture, so does the body, mind and heart of 
man, A good, sound body is conducive to happiness and prosper- 
ity, as it enables a man to labor to supply hia wants. In order to 
have it, he should cultivate regular habits and right principles, 
which contribute to perfect health. And to become wise and nsenil 
members of society, the mind must be cultivated. Tiiia, in a great 
measure, devolves upon tbe parents and teachers of children and 
youth ; for, while young, tbe mind is active, and learning is mnch 
easier than at a more advanced age. For this purpose schools have 
been established throughout all civilized lands. How vastly dif- 
ferent is the condition of civilized people fVom that of savages, who 
have no kind of cultivation. They can scarcely supply themselves 
with food to keep from starvation ; but when missionaries are sent 
among them, they (the missionaries) open schools and commence 
the cultivation of mind and heart, aud teach them the art of cutti* 
vating their land, and the benefit it will be to them to labor. Grad- 
ually they become an intelligent, prosperous people, if they are so 
disposed. 

Most important of all is the culture of the heart. Seeds of evil, 
-sown by Satan are constantly springing up, and we should maintain 
a constant warfare to keep them down, and in their stead cultivate 
virtues. This also should be commenced at an early age, foi' then 
tbe heart is so tender that impressions for either good or evil nre 
easily made and are more effectual than those made in later life ; also 
faith is stronger. What Is more perfect than the faith of a little 
child? 

During tbe post seven years we have been here for the purpose of 
cultivating our minds and hearts, for which our officers and teach- 
ers have labored arduously. "Time which waits for no man," has 
brought these years to a close, and our oppoitunities here are ended. 
For the last time we will express our thanks to those who have 
labored for us, and bid them farewell. 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



THE DSAF AMD DUMB, AND TBS BUND. 65 

To Our Bonemibh Tntateea : 

For sever&l yeara past you have labored for our welfare. First 
to open a school for ue in towD, atlerwards to erect this Bne edifice, 
and yon have bo veil direuted the utTairB connected with the school, 
have taken so kind an interest in our progress, have supplied us with 
such good officers and teachers, tliat it gives us great pleasure to thank 
yon. Hoping that you will in the future continue to do the best for 
the Institution, and wishing you all the happiness and prosperity, 
we bid yon farewell. 

Our highly eateetned Superintendent and Matront : 

During the years that we have been under your care, you have 
given us innumerable canses to feel grateful to you. Although we 
can find no fitting words lo express it rill, to prove to you that we 
are not ungrateful, we publicly thank .you for your kind parental 
care, knowing full well that as long as you remain here the children 
will have true friends to supply the place of the parents from whom 
they are separated. We bid you an affectionate farewell. 

Dear Teachen: 

No one knows better than yourselves how difficult and ottea dis- 
couraging your duties are, but we all know how well and faithfully 
yon have performed them. You have not labored for pay only, bat 
for the progress of your pupils ; and we hope you will be rewarded 
by seeing thorn become good scholars and usefnl citizens. Farewell. 

FeUofa GiadiuUetr 

The time has arrived when we must part, perhaps for a long sep* 
aration, and perhaps never again to meet on earth. We must now 
go fortli to battle with the world for ourselves, and no longer be 
dependent for guidance on our friends here. Let ua strive to put to 
use the good precepts and examples which we have received from 
them, and so live that we may never bring shame to our "Alma 
Hater." Farewell. 

Dear Schoolmatet : 

We hope that you who are to return will improve your opportu- 
nities to the best of your abilities, and prepare yourselves to fight 
the battles of life when your turn cornea. The sad event which so 
recently deprived us of one of our number should warn us all to 
prepare for life in the Other world that we may live with her eter- 
nally. Now let ue all bid each other an affectionate farewell. 

Julia F. Asbj-eit. 

Jane 16th, 1875. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc^ 



L 



,.db,Googlc 



[BsBUU'iiTi DoomnKT, No. 18.] 



STATISTICS 



MINNESOTA 



FOR 1876. 



BEIHO THE 



SBYENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF STATISTICS. 



SAINT PAUL: 

SHX PioHEKB-rxm ixolpamt, 

187S. 



JigiLizedbyGoOJ^Ic 



,.db,Googlc 



EEPOET. 



Stat* of MimrasoTA, T 

OtFIOB or THB SSCBBTART OT StATI, t 

Bureau of Statibtics, f 

Saint Paal, Decembei 12th, 1875. j 

Hon, Cuthman K. Davit, Oovemor • 

YouB ExCKLLENCT : — I have the honor to transmit herewith, in 
Mcordance vith law, my report as Commissioner of Statistics for 
the year 1875. Its main parts are the agricultural and vital statis- 
tics, the balance of the report being lessened by the necessity for 
its early conclnsios owing to the change of administration at New 
Tear, when my term of office will expire. 

During my Commissionership of not quite four years, commen- 
cing March 6, 1872, five of the seven annual reports of the present 
fleries have been compiled and published, my first duty upon taking 
charge of the bureau In 1672 being to make the third annual report, 
embracing the agricultural statistics for the year 1870. The pro- 
gress since that time made in one of the principal classes of im- 
provementB — in securing early statlstica, — is partly indicated by 
the date and contents of the present report, which, while made be- 
fore the close of the year 1875, gives the final statements regard- 
ing ^riculture in 1874 and complete returns of acreages in each 
crop in the current year 1875. More accurately, the progress in 
this direction ia shon n by the fact that a comparative table, giving 
ftall returns by counties of the acreages under each of the main 
crops in 1875, together with final statements of acreages and yields 
in 1874, was published in the newspapers of the state and tele- 
graphed abroad already on August 25th, 1875. 

While in charge of the office it has been my constant endeavor to 
interest local officers in the important part of the statistical duties 
assigned to them, and with good results as regards the character 
of the returns no leas than as to the time of making them to this 
ofBcB. In addition to a large correspondence with the county audi- 
tors, I have communicated direct with the assessors (over 800 Id 



zedbyGoOglC 



4 STATI8TI0S 0EI HINlraflOTA. 

nnmber), have received letters flrom perhaps t msjoritfof them 
concerning Uie year's work and been gratified to find a yearly in. 
creasing number of officers impressed with a sense of Uie utility or 
correct statistics. The retams sre now comparatively fall and ac- 
curate, every town is returned, and with ftw exceptions a state- 
ment taken for every farm in the town. 

In reference to a third class of improvements, the extension or 
statistical inqairy to new and special subjects, only a beginning ha» 
been made, but with proper management the burean will in this re- 
spect be capable of rendering valuable future service to the state. 
The subject of tree-planting on our prairies having for some time 
claimed the attention of the Legislature and the press, statistics show- 
ing the extent and location of plantings already made were collected 
and published In the report for 1874. The ravages of graashoppers 
continuing to affect the agricultural interest in the western counties, 
separate statements on the area affected and the amount of loss bus- 
tuned were this year called for and will he found in the present re- 
port. The list of other subjects annually treated of has gradually 
increased, and the registered births and deaths for the years 1871, 
1872, 187S and 1874 have been careAilly compiled and shown under 
the various subdivisions of nativity, parent-nativity, sex, ages and 
death-caases, the first such showing under state authority in Uin- 
nesota being the vital statistics published in my first report. 

In addition to the Above, quite an amount of work has been done 
in the way of answers to iudividaal calls for statistica on specified 
subjects, the tendency being to regard the office as a sort of bureau 
of reference, with the duty to possess or to collect and give infor- 
mation on the past history or present condition of any branch of 
Minnesota afliiicB, in which inquiring parties at home or abroad may 
be interested. 

When this report is called the seventh of the present series, ref- 
erence is bad to the earlier attempts by the state to collect and 
publish statistical information. A bureau of statistics was first 
created and as a sepwate department, by a law ol February, 1860, 
and under it two reports, embracing statistics for the years 1859, 
1860 and 1861, were published by Hon. Joseph A. Wheelook, now 
editor of the St. Paul Pioneer-Press, who had been appointed Com- 
missioner. The statistical details collected at that early day were 
necessarily very incomplete and inaccurate, not excepting . the re- 
turns of the United States Census which was taken at the time, 
and only a statistieian can appreciate the difficulty then of collect- 
ing materials and of making a creditable exhibit of the state's re- 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AHHDAL BB^ET. 5 

I, condition and progress with the materials collected. Bat 
-owing partly to the absence of any previooa compilation of aacb data 
and still more to the author's ability and personal knowledge on the 
eabject-matters, these reports proved very valuable. Political com- 
plications caused the repeal of the law after the publication of the 
•econd report, and the civil and Indian wars subsequently eagrossing 
the attention of the people, Mr. Wheelock's reports long remained 
the only sources of information of a wider range on the condition 
-of oar main interests. The demand for such information caused 
the offhring, in 1861, by act of the Legislature, of prizes for es- 
says "setting forth the advantages which this state offers to im- 
-"migrants and giving usefnl information with r^aid to the state." 
The pablished essays drew largely upon Mr. W.'s work and could 
give no later statistics on the cultivated areas and yields than those 
published by him in 1861. In 1666 a clause was inserted in the 
revision of the statutes of that year providing for the annual ool- 
lectioh of agricaltural etatistics (Sec. 71, Ch. 11, Rev. Stat.) The 
county auditors were to furnish blanks to the assessors and, when 
returns were made to them, make oat and forward the same to the 
Auditor of State. Under this law, returns of acreages and products 
were made for the years 1865, 1866 and 1867, and a tabulated sum- 
mary published in the State Auditor's reports. Bat that state of- 
iicer not having the anthority or duties of a chief of a bareaa of sta- 
tistics, and the assessors' duties not being clearly defined, this at- 
tempt proved a complete failure. The Auditor's comments on the first 
retnrns pablished by him, were that " as it was nowhere made the 
" duty of the assessors to collect such information, they very gen- 
-"erally neglected it or made very imperfect returns. Stateusent 
*^ G. diowB the returns made, but owing to their imperfectness it is 
. '* worthless as a state document. It Is very essential that the true 
" productions of the soil should be known, and for that purpose 
'* the law ought to be very definite and exacting, and a strict com- 
** pliaoce of all officers required". 

The improvement thus recommended was finally made in the 
form of a new law, passed March 4, 1869, reviving the statistical 
commission, with the Assistant Secretary of State as ez-offlclo Com- 
missioner, the Hon. Pennock Pnsey, a gentleman of literary ability 
And familiar with statistics, being then Assistant Secretary of 
State. The assessors under the supervision of the county auditors 
were made the principal collectors of facts ; the registry and retnrn 
of births and deaths by the town clerks and county clerks of courts 
were provided for ; and in addition thereto the Commissioner was 



zedbyGoOt^lc 



6 sTATisTtoa or icnnriaBOTA. 

empowered " to address general or Hpeoi&I inquires, with printed 
" instnictious and blanks for answers, or otherwise at his discretioor 
" to any state, district, coanty, city or town ofQcer," and it WM made 
" the daty of such offioer to answer fhlly and promptly such general 
"or special qaestions as ma/ be addressed to them by said Com- 
*' missioner on all matters of information which can be gathered 
" fVom docnments or records in their official keeping." Mr. Pnsey 
made two interesting reports, embracing agricultural statistics fi>r 
the years 1668 and 1809, and statiatica of manufactures aad popn- 
lation compiled from the U. S. Census of 1870, a summary of wbicb 
was also embodied in a pamphlet on the state compiled by him for 
the State Board of Immigration. For the immediate success of the 
new system it would perhaps have been as well if the three prece- 
ding years' worthless returns had not been mode, the assessors hav- 
ing gradually to unlearn the habit once acquired of regarding their 
statistical work with indifference, and the people gradually to rid 
themselves of a consequent distrust of the returns. However, the 
attractive and skillful treatment of subjects in Mr. Posey's two re- 
ports at once won a reputation for the bureau which at least the ef- 
forts to secure accurate information have since done nothing to dis- 
credit. With this glance at the past history and transactions of 
the statistical office, such action on the part of the Legislatare and 
the Executive is respectfully recommended as will best serve the 
purpose of the law. 

The defects of the law now mostly felt, are : 

1.) In regard to the tiraefor making agriettlturai retuma to tki» 
office. Early in the season to give information on the past year's 
results and the current year's agriculture is the means to make the 
agricultural statistics of practical value to our owa farmers and basi- 
nesp men. This has thus far been accomplished by personal appeals 
of the Commissioner to the county auditors and by construing sec* 
tlon 2 of the act of 1870 so as to permit the Commissiimer nnder it to 
request the assessors to send him advanced copies of their town re- 
turns, for which extra blanks and stamped envelopes with printed 
address were furnished the assessors. The law does not reqnin 
agricultural returns to be made to the Commissioner before Decem- 
ber 1st, and should be amended to authorize the Commissioner to 
fix the time for the return of statements. 

i.) Jtespectivg the collection of Manufacturing and ComtMnial 
Statistiet. Information showing the condition and progress of thase 
rapidly growing interests cannot be collected without a more of- 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AmniAL BEPOBT. T 

fBcUve proviaion of law than the one now in force, nnder which it. 
haa been found Impossible to obtain the facte required by the law. 

8.) With regard to the Eegittrs of Birlha and Deaths. There is no- 
nfficient reason why the regiatry should not become complete and 
accnrate. Instead of depending for this purpose mainly upon th» 
Incentive of profit to the clerks in theformof fees, the law should be 
so unended as to secure a general compliance on the part of parents- 
and householders with the requirement to give notices to the clerks. 
It shonld be made the duty of physloians, midwives, ministers of the 
gospel and trustees and managers of cemetries to give like notices. 
To (tartber secure completeness and accoracy, the returns of the town 
olerka should not be accepted by the clerks of courts or their fees 
pud nntil the following conditions bad been complied with : a.) the 
returns should be carefblly and legibly written, so that names and 
figures might be easily read and correctly copied ; b.) the town clerks- 
should make sworu afSdavita to the effect that they had conscien- 
tionsly performed their duties ander the law to the best of their 
knowledge and ability, that original r^ietries existed in their offices. 
as required by law, and had been carefully kept, and that their re- 
turns had been oarofnUy compared with and were full and true coples- 
of ancb originals. Similar affidavits should accompany the returns- 
of the olerks of courts to the Commissioner of Statistics, and this 
officer's acceptance in proper form of the returns be required by the 
count; auditing officer before allowing the clerk's fees. In the 
titles of St. Fanl, SClnneapolla, and perhaps other places, a reduction 
of the cost of recording and returning deaths (not births) might be 
made by consolidating the two systems for obtaining the facts aa 
already suggested in a former report. A full record of deaths is 
kept in these cities by the health officer, who is paid by the city, and 
a similar record by the city clerk, who is paid by the county. In 
1871 the ooonty of Ramsey thus paid $165.00, and the county of 
Hennepin $150.00 for records of which duplicates at the same time 
were kept and paid for by the cities. The purpose of the law evi- 
dently does not require the expense of two public registries In 
the same place, and a satisfactory amendment reducing the cost- 
to taxpayers may easily be framed. Indeed, the whole system 
of registry may be simplified. It requires now a town, a county, 
and a state record of the same facts. 

4. The Legislature should provide a small contingent for the dis- 
tribution of about one thonsand copies of the Commissioner's re- 
port by m^ to newspapers, societies and individaids m other 



zedbyGoOgle 



J 



8 sTATunos or imnrEflOTA. 

■tatei and In Earope, the one thona&nd doUan now allowed at 
■alary, clerk hire and other incidentttls being too small a oompen- 
eatlon for the statistical work to enable the Commissioner to dia- 
tribate the report properly abroad- 
Very respectfally, 

Tonr ob't. serv't., 

C. F. SOLBERG, 
Asristant Seeretuy of State and Commissioner of Statiatlca. 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AGRICULTURE. 



<X»ITXNTa or OHATTSB. 



a) Tabular Sammary of onltiTatad aoreagflB and yields of pro- 
dnota in th« years 1874 and 1875. 

b) Statement showing the progress of agricnltnre in Minnesota 
tnm the first o^anization as a Territory, with a tabular live stoek 
statement for the same period. 

o) Statement showing the area of the state, the acreage snr- 
Teyed, the acreage In private hands, the acreage in farms, the 
number of farms and tilled acreage, and also an estimate of the 
extent of arable wild lands yet nnoccnpied. 

d) Statement concerning cnltirated acreages and yields of pro- 
daots in the year 1874, with tables giving totals and aver^es by 
coonties. Also tables showing by counties the totals for each 
crop of grasshopper damage in the year 1874. 

e) Preliminary sUtemente for the year 1875, with tables ehow* 
ing by conntiea the breadth allotted to each crop in that year, and 
«atimatee of total yields and grasshopper damage. 



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STATISTICS OP HOnnBSOTA. 



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8TATUTI08 OW MUnTESOTA. 



FBOOBESS OF AGRICULTURE IN TWENTT-FIVE YEARS. 



18i»- 

Firit OrganiMtion. — Organized u & Territory in 1849. Popu- 
lation, according to Territprial C«n»M previous to orgaDizatlon : — 
4,05? Boula. 

18B0- 

(United States Census Year.)— Fopalation.:~Ji,354. Caltlvated. 
area, divided among 15? forms, abont 8,000 acres. Wheat pro- 
duced: — 1,400 bushels. Com produced .- — 6,000 bashela. Oats pro- 
daced : — 16,000 bushels. Grain and flour tor food mostly imported 
fi'om other places. 



Slate Organitatton. — Became a state in the Union May 11, 1858. 
Kstimated population :— 152,000. (Territorial Censua in 1857, 
preparatory to admission showing a populaUon of 150,082.) Til- 
led area : — Not ascertained. S. B. — The number of acres in pri- 
vate hands in 1857 was about 5,500,000, bat mostly held for pur- 
poses of specalation. Of the acreage as yet under oaltlvation, 
the percentage in wheat was relatively small, and the producUon 
of breadstuffs still insufflcieat for home consumption. The great 
financial crisis of 1857 compelled the people to resort more gener- 
ally to agricnitnre, but the importation of grain and flour for food 
continued until the crops of 1858 were secured. 

1860- 

(United States Census Year.)— Population:— 173,022. mied 
area :— 345,000 acres. No. of Farms:— 18,081. Wheat pro- 
duced ;— 2,186,993 bushels. Oats produced :— 2,176,000 bushels. 
Corn produced :— 2,941,952 bushels. Total of the six principal 
grain crops (wheat, oats, corn, barley, rye, buckwheat) : — 7,564,000 
bustiela. The growth during theflrstdeoade in population and cul- 
tivated acreage thus being 8,112 per cent, of the former and 11,400 
per cent, of the latter, with a more than corresponding increase in 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AOBlOULTDItB. 19 

tgrionltoral prodoots, and ezceedins the growth of uy other 
state during the correaponding period of its exiateaoe. 



rState Census Tear.)— Fopnlation :— 250,099. 'Hlled area :— 700,' 
000. Increase sinoo I860 ; — In popalaUon, 45 per cent. ; in onlti' 
Tated acreage, 102 per cent. N. B. — The years 1860-1865 eni' 
braced the periods of the Indian war in Minnesota and the war for 
the Union, both operating as powerful checlcs upon the growth of 
^rionlinre and population. 

1870- 

(U.S. Census year.)— Population, 489,706. Tilled area, 1,619,465 
acres. No. of farms, 46,256. Whea tproduoed, 17,660,467 bashejs. 
Oats produced, 10,610,967 boahels. Corn produced, 4,519,120 bush- 
els. Total production of the six principal grain crops, 83, 765,696 
bushels. Growth during the Second Decade : — In population 267,- 
684 or 166 per cent. In No. of farms, 28,175 or 166 per cent. In 
cultivated acreage, 1,274,466 acres or 869 per cent. In production 
of wheat, 15,473,474 bushels or 707 per cent.; of oats, 8,884,969 
bushels or 383 per cent; of corn, 1,677,168 bushels or 53 per cent, j 
of the six principal grains, 26,191,695 bushels or 846 per cent. 

18IS- 

(Sute Census year.)— Population, 597,279. Tilled area, 2,816,- 
413. Ho. of forms, 60,000. Wheat produced, 31,475,000 bushels. 
Oats produced, 16,776,000 bushels. Com produced, 9,500,000 bush- 
els. Total production of principal grain crops, 57,436,600 bushels. 

Orototh since CeTimtt of 1S70, — In population, 157,573 or 36 per 
cent. In tilled area, 1,196,957 acres or 74 per cent. In No. of 
Arms, 18,744 or 29 per cent. In production of wheat, 13,814,588 
' bushals or 78 per cent. ; of oats, 6,SG4,0S8 bushels or 50 per cent. ; 
of corn, 4,980,880 bushels or 110 per cent.; of the six principal 
grains, 28,680,805 bushels or 61 per cent. 

OBOWTH IX THB LAST TKH TBAB8. 





18«. 


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iDcresM. 


lucreue Per Cent. 


PopnlatloD 

TlUMl Acres... 


3SO,0» 
700,000 


B»7,ST» 
3,SIS,41S 


M7.180 
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14 STATISTICS or lUHinSOTA. 

OBO^TH BDtCE B. S. CKNSDS OF 18£ 



FopnltUon 

No. of Farmit 

Ttllad Acres 

Wbeat, icrei 

Whut, bojhelB... 

Corn, icret 

Corn, buahelj 

Oata, KcraR 

OiiU, bashels 

t principal grains, acres. 

" ■' " basbels.. 
Valna of wheat crop. 
Talae of 6 principal grain 

cropa 



84S,00O 

115,000 
3,160,993 

119,000 

S,91 1,962 

fit,000 

3,176.000 

SOB,GO0 
7,564,000 
«l,191,84fi 



fi97,ST9 

60,000 

3,816,413 

1,764,109 

81.476,000 

S64,R8S 

9,600,000 

441,109 

16,776,000 

2,G9!,8S4 

67,486,600 

937,768,760 



436,367 

41,919 

2,471,418 

1,649,109 

38,288,007 

261,688 

6,568,048 

877,102 

18,600,000 

9,816,824 

49,872,600 

126,560,906 



92,740.950 #86.568,450 988,617.500 



247.00 
28200 
716 00 
1,484.00 
1,889.00 
235.00 
223.00 
669.00 

e».oo 

768.00 

6S9 00 

2,326.00 

1.384.U0 



The valuation of crops in 1875 i8 based upon the average prices 
in the interior of the state after the close of navigation, and the 
valnation for 1860 upon ilr. Wheetoclc's report for that year. The 
fact that the census years 1860, 1870 and 1875 were all good agri- 
oultural years renders them particularly suitable for comparisons. 
It should, however, be observed how different the percentages of 
ftcreage in wheat, oats and corn in 1860 are from the percentages 
In same crops in 1875, wheat, yielding a smaller number of ba- 
shels per acre but a lai^er money value, occupying a roach larger 
percentage of the area in 1875 than in the former year. Propor- 
tioned as in 18G0 the acreages in these three cropa alone would in 
1875 have produced more than 64,000,000 bushels of grain, bat 
nevertheless of smaller valae in our market towns than the 91} 
millions bushels of wheat and 25J millions bushels of oats and 
<orn that were produced. The statement of value of crops com- 
pletes the comparison. 

LITK STOCK n THE CBMSDB IBAB8. 





BtcBUBS PKB cam. 




1860, 


I860. 


1870. 


1876. 


1870-187B. 


I840-1B7S. 




880 
3,102 
14 
SO 
788 


16,879 
95,909 
884 
13,686 
104,479 


91,566 
807,538 
3,880 
I39,fS6 
187,186 


167.818 
407.678 
6.267 
162,807 
141,810 


71.00 
63.00 
131.00 
36.00 
8.00 








Holes end Asses. ■■ 


1,269.00 

1,193.00 

96.00 


Hoga 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AaBIODLTDBB. 



LAND STATEMENT. 
(PopnlkUon, 687,270.) 

mob orM of llu BlatP— 

Snmyod by Ui« umtod SUUa 73.71 per c«nt. or seres S7,SW,49t 

Tet to be inrrered 97.S9 per cent, or acres U,10S,2W 

• 100.00 

WboleBrea ecree Sl,70t,760 

Ho. of uieB per InbRblUot of the whole ftre«, 86.58. 

1.16 iDbebltuta to eecb 100 acres or T.S9 iDhabltants per aqoare mllo. 

InprlTate hands 48.88 per cent, or acres 18,600,000 

Not InprlTate banda 68.11 percent, or acres 31,085,401 

100.00 

Sarreyed area. _ acres 87,698,491 

Acres per Inbabltant.ortbesarreTed area. acres 62.94 

IJK Inbabittnts to etch 100 acres atinrejed. 

In Anns 60.90 per cent, or acres 8,400,000 

Not In fhnns 49.10 per cent, or acres 8,100,000 

100,00 

Lands In prlT ate hands acres 16,600,000 

InprlTate hands of the whole area. 81. 9! percent. 

Id prlrate hands per Inhabitant acres 37.68 

S.eS inbabllants to each 100 acres In private hands^ 



Tilled S8.S3 per cent, or acres 3,818,418 

NotUlted 86.48 per cent, ot acres 8,688,687 

100.00 

Infkrms acres 8,400,000 

Ro. oflhrms M.^OO 

ATengeNo.oracraslne«ch Aum acres 140.17 

In farms of the whole ares of the state 18.24 per ceot. 

Inlknnsof the sarrejed area 33.84 per cent. 

In fkrms per lahftbltSDt acres li.OS 

9.11 InhtbltanU to each 100 acres In farms. 
9.9 or not quite 10 Inhabitants to each farm. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



18 STATISTICS or MINinEBOTA. 

TOUSarea- 

In vheat. • t3.B8 per c«nt. or kons l,7ftt,ira 

Inotber crops 87.87 per cant, or «tu 1,061,80* 



Wbektinthe 7earie7S acres l,7e4,109 

Area In «U crops Id United States census yeu UTO utes 1,C19,4U 

BxcesB of wbest soreage In 1872 over aoreige in all crops 

In 1870 •' acres 114,655 

B.U per Cent, of the whole area Is tilled. 
T.48 per cent, of the snrveyed area Is tilled. 
17.06 per cent, of lands In private hands Is tilled. 
4.71 acres per Inhabitant Is tilled. 
46.94 seres of each farm ia tlUed. 

ArcMe Landa. — Of tbe now Boireyed 37J milltona acres a com- 
pantively small percentage are pine lands or irreclaimable swunps, 
tbe main portions of it being fertile prairies and timber openings 
with belts of hard wood timber of no larger extent tiian required 
for fnel and building purposes and here and there drainable over- 
flowed lands of good quality. The surveyed part west of tbe Uis- 
oissippi extending north to the Northern Pacific Railroad and inclu- 
ding the counties of Becker and Clay embraces over 24 millions of 
acres or nearly one half of the state. This ^is one uninterrupted 
mass of excellent prairies, openings and belts of bard wood tim- 
ber, watered^by numorous smaller water courses and interspersed 
with thousandB of beanti(\il lakes. Of this vast extent of country 
only one-half is as yet included in the acreage in private bands 
and less than one-third in the acreage in farms. Even at Uie pres- 
ent ratio of farms to lands in private hands there is here room 
for 45,000 new farms of the present average size on the acreage not 
yet in private hands or in any way occupied. Add to this number 
tbe increase resulting from the yearly increasing occupancy of wild 
lands in private bands as farms, from the settlement of that lai^ 
percentage of good agricultoral lands lying north of Clay uid 
Becker and of the smaller percentage of arable lands in the northeast- 
em part of the state, and tbe number of additional farms of present 
average size for which Minnesota has suiiable lands, witl aggr^ate 
100,000 to 150,000. Considering the fact that the average afze ot 
farms decreases with the Increase in density of population (tliat 
]■ to say, the number of smaller farms increases), allowing a great- 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AGKIOULTUBE. 



17 



«r nnmber of farms oo a giren are&, the above estfmate la ratber 
below tbSD above tbe namber of farms of fair average size, tbsl 
Minnesota will have before the sapply of wild agricnltnral lands is 
ezhaDsted-* 

fkrmi In At* whIbtii ilalai, Mcordlif la tb* 





n. 8.0.19W. 
WbDls Am 


u. s. c. im. 


tl.fl.C 


1870. 




PopaU'd. 


Farmi. 


PopoU'ii. 


'"""■ 


PopuU'a. 


Faral. 


Illlmoll 


S2I 


1 

ao.i7i 


U1I,U1 

si 


M3,tl0 

Silt; 
fl9;i7e 


t,S39,891 

1;S;S 

i,os*;a7« 


sa 






« 


WlicoDdn 



AGRICULTURE IN 1874. 



OOHPARATIVB SDMHAHIBa. 



Oomparative acreage table. The followiog table compares tbe 
acreage assigned to each crop in the year 1874 with the correspond- 
ing acreages of the thren last preceding years and the year 1875: 





1871. 


IBM. 


im. 


«,^ 


1876. 


W&att 


3,061 

l,6« 
1.S11 

«a,i)3i 


"iS 

le.ia 
u,a9» 


1,648,711 


1,691,830 
893,933 
2bt.29l 

4JM 
104. B7 


t.TM.1W 




^'JS 




CnlUnUdlnr 


4,3C8 

t.m 

BB,Sn 

loJ-^;? 




8.ess 


a,a» 




1.8M.Ta> 


fl.07".B03 


a^ar.JBi 


a,s«8.B0T 

a>XI.T2S 


1^16,418 





Oomparative acreage-percentage table. The percentage in each 
erop of the whole cultivated acreage of the state in the Qnder>men- 
tioned eight years is stated as follows : 
8 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



STATISTIOS OF HIKNBSOTA. 





1B«. 


imt 


ino. 


in!. 


18Ti.jl8I>.ll874. 


int. 


WhMt .. 

OftU 

ToUI p«r cant. Id siBlncTOpi 


11 

89.10 
V.V7 
I. It 


6a.i! 

OS 


ti.ae 

s'ai 

p.a 

a 

■■(I'ib 


60 7! 

o'.ac 
M.s; 
liii 
oo; 

"n'io 


01.14 

II 

n'.n 

98.00 

lias 




lo! i 
o' '. 


O.lt 

l'» 












o.ot 
t.n 

O.BS 


0.03 

si 


O.OB 










3,Ti 


Flu 

MlKalUmiont prodneU. 





■Comparative crop to&I«. The amounts rftieed of each of the va- 
'rious products in 1874 compare as follows vith the correspondiDg 
tables for three preceding years and the Commissioner's estimated 
totals of products in 1875 : 



■OaU, 



13,4SI, 
10.880, 

T,o;a.ue 



«,1£7,3SS 

m'.sjj 



2g,>38.m 
io.MT.on 

7,»0,31l 



ToUlDtgri 

•Baini, bnlGtl 

wild 
BoribDiii.nllaT 



<!(ltlvlMd h>7, tODI . . . 



■rrop.. 






.. . liittWii iMd .. 

Clorar, baibals laad ■■. 
Timothy, baibali saed -. 

SirawborrtM, qi 



HapUarrnp.iiillun 
Boaer, poand). 



Bfll.fM 
lE.OOnOOO 

1.210.000 



It will he seen that notwithstanding the general reduction of 
Average yields in 1874, as compared with 1873, there was In the 
former year an increase in the aggregate of grain crops of no less 
than 6,745,728 bushels, owing to the increased acreage in these 
products. 

Comparative graashopper-damage tablet. In addition to the oi^ 
dinary statements for each farm, the assessors in all towns visited 
by grasshoppers in the year 1674 were instmcled to obtain state- 
ments from each farmer whose crops had been iujared by these in- 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AaRioDLTtnte. 



19 



-Mct-pesta In that year, giving each farmer's own estimate of the 
nnmber of acrea injured and the amonat of loss sastained. Re- 
tnrnB were in consequence received from 264 towns in 28 coanties 
*s follows : 









H^ 

^ 






1 
i 




w 


BMkar 








, 








































L'lHpp.w..... 


6 


Id 


























































































t Lme qnl Pirl* 


a 




lU 






aw 



The whole number of acres sown in the above 28 counties in 
1874, the amounts produced on the sane, the number of acres dam- 
aged, and amount of estimated loss, are as follows : 



Product. 


'TIS" 


iSS'SfK. 


"Tiiar 


'•sisx' 




'si 

6,1S4 
t.Kl 


'if 

■■UoDi ss.a4t 
MM a.HO 


at.iw 

••s 

:i 






« 














Hi.m 




361 'j]B 





The retnrns to the Commissioner of Statistics concerning the 
year 1875 were made too early to include fbll statements of grass- 
hopper ravages during the current year ; and a commission having 
been appointed by the Governor to examine more fully into the 
wbole subject of grasshopper incursions into Minnesota, ng at- 
tempt hss been made by the Commissioner of Statistics to gather 
Inforqiatlon unofficially as to the area visited or loss sustained in 
1875. A report made by the State Grasshopper Commissioners indi- 
cates that of the 28 counties reporting losses in 1874, the crops in 11 
were not disturbed by grasshoppers in 1875, viz. : Clay, Faribault, 
Grant, Lac qui Parle, Polk, Otter Tail, Rock, Stevens, SwiR, Wil- 
kins and Yellow Medicine ; while, on tlie other hand, 8 counties re- 



zed byCoOglc 



STATISTICS OF HINNBHOTA. 



poitiDg no losses in 1871. viz. : Le Sueur, ICeeker and Todd, were 
among those iniured in 1875. The nnmber of counties in 1875 tha» 
being twenty, as follows : 





Coonljr. 


.11 


i 


Co Duty. 






Coinly. 


^11 


» 


B«ker 

Blu.^K.rth.. 

Chlppewi.".:: 

ar,:::-.; 


.i 


17 
U 


UneolD 

llMkar 

S,"S;;::; 


U 


7 
3 

I 




J 


R^lr'^.::::; 

RatiTUI* 


K 


so 


iiiii::::: 


U 



The State ComiDissiooers report losses in 1875 in the above 
connties as follows for the three principal crops : 

WHKAT. 04T9. COBM- 

AcreB daroageii 207,677 63,181 UfiBO 

BOSliela lost S,393,787 1,686,381 58S,06» 

Comparaiive averofftyield table. The average yield In the state 
per acre, of each of the products named in the under-mentioned 
ten years is stated as follows : 



Bnckwhwt... 



. .4lioa.4> 



csops IN 1874. 

Weather Statement. The season of 1674 was unfavorable to the 
proJuetion of good crops. The winter of 1873-4, while quite 
moderate in temperature, extended far into the spring season, the 
month of March being unusually cold, with a mean temperature 
lower than any March but four in sixteen years, and the only great 
snow storm of the winter occurring in that month. April was the 
coldest since 1859, and the ice slow to leave the ground. At St. 
Fanl the Blississippi opened on the 10th, the first steamer Ibrongb 



zedbyGoOgle 



AGBIOULTURE. < 21 

l4^Q Pepin arriving on the 2Sd, the latest first arrival bat one in 
«ighteen years. No snow fell and but a small amoaat of rain, 
resalting in a spring drought continued to the middle of May, and 
-especially damaging to grain on spring plowing. The latter month 
vas more favorable dnring the last half, bnt preceded a summer of 
greater warmth than any in sixteen years, with a greater amount 
of rain in June than in any mouth during the past seventeen years, 
And a degree of heat and drought in July that in most places 
greatly rednced the yield of all crops. Complaints of ntst on the 
wheat were freqnent, especially affecting the Odessa, Oran and 
Osakls varieties, of which in some localities, as for instance Blae 
Garth county, a larger area had been sown, measurably reducing 
the yield in the latter connty. Por corn, the year was compara- 
tively good until August, when a drought in the most critical period 
of the growth of this cereal, when Uie kernels were filling, serionsly 
impaired the yield on a large portion of the area. In the course 
of the summer damaging hail-storms occurred in Donglaa, (destroy- 
ing one-half of the crops in the town of Drness), in Goudhne, Le- 
Sueur, McLeod, Meeker, Otter Tail, Pope, Winona, Wright and other 
«oiuitiea. 

WHEAT m 1874. 

Acres sown 1,681,880 

Bushels produced 38,9A8,17S 

Average per acre '. 14.28 

Compared with 1873, the area sliows an Increase of 188,117 
«ores, while the number of bushels raised is 8,464,818 less, equal to 
a redaction of 2.81 bushels per acre in the average yield for tbe 
whole state. 

The following comparative table shows the conntfes prodocing 
«ach one million bushels of wheat and upwards in 1874 : 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



8TATI6TI0S OF MINNESOTA. 





,e7,. 


1B7I. 


,»u 




Baahsll. 


.V„ 


B...... 


At- 


»■■'■- |.iV. 


IhkoU 

WInani 
Wib»h> 


2.3OT.8T4 

a.ow.i»T 

I 811.609 
I,'tH,013 

l:K:SI 

11.088.840 
4*82 


i8:»i 

18.38 
18.60 
14.06 

la.M 

IS.l? 

"104 
mCor 


2,208.'«T 
»,4»».B« 

1,636.96a 


i 


i;ws.jii i»>i 


ToUlroriliMnMUa 


1.0M,44< 

13!oi7^ 
wtaait cr< 


B.B3T.S9T IB.IO 


ToUlmnnaUDDtM 


I043I4CS' 18.01 
tha lUla: 
4T.3J 








45.88 



odIj eointr bwldai 



The Aggregate and average yield of wheat in Minnesota in eight 
years is stated as follows : 



Tmn. 


AeiM Mwo. 




688,78* 
858.816 
SST,039 
1,018,744 






1870 


1871 


1.088,878 




1.287,808 
1,H8,718 




1874, («xclaslT« or gra8«> 


lioppw tcieag« and 




7leld diereon) 


1,441,418 


Avtngt yield for S veon 








p«r Bcnage end yield 




thewoD) 


1.881,880 



BukaU Wbtat 
prodnotd. 
10,014,828 
lB,S89.0ia 
16,087,621 
16,878,9(1 
18,487,800 
aa,0S8,H7E 
26,40a,48E 



14.64 
17.81 
17.70 
18.C7 
13.28 
17.40- 
17.04 

15.7* 

18.08 



Orauhopper injuries in 1874 and thttr effect on the vtheat crop. — 
The returns concerning grasshopper injuries in 1874 aflord the fol- 
lowing showing: 

For total wheat area of the 28 grasshopper counties of 1874 — 

Atani* par lera,. 



Whole No. of acres In wbeat. . 
Bubelswbeat haiTest«d 



428,780 




4,802,818 


10.04 


8,6(8,808 


6.17 



Adding lo«B to wheat harreated, . 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AantcvLivnu. 
For the injured acreage— 



Total for the 28 CODUtloa 428,7S0 4,S03,31S lO.N 

OfwIilcbnQtiDjnred ISS.SIS 8,0G3,SS0 16.11 

iDjored acreage 340,417 1,2S0,(»1 6.20 

Lou on the 2(0,417 InJared acres 2.846,803 11.01 

For the state, ezcladiag injared acreage — 

AcTM In whMt. Boih'iprf>dnc*d. ATtnf* . 

Main body of the wheat area 1,258.100 18,688,880 IB.Gff 

DuIqjDrcdiograsihoppercaDiitleB 188,318 8,082,290 16. SI 

Total tor tbe state lees injared acreage, 1,441,418 £9,668,160 16. Ti. 
For tbe state, Inclading injured acreage and loss — 

Aerea In WbMl. Boakah. ATWig*. 

nntnjand area, 1,441,418 22,686,160 IS.74 

Injnred acreage 240,417 1,280,022 

ditto, add loss, 2,846,802 

Tout for tbe state, loss added 1,681,880 £6,684,874 16.80 

Taking each of tbe gr&sahopper counties separately, the actual 
jield and estimated loM added togetJier would equal the following 
average jtelds per acre, omitting fractions of average yield: 11 
bushels per acre in Stevens ; 12 in Lyon, MoLeod ; 18 In Martin ; 
14 in Chippewa, Lincoln, Otter Tail, Sibley; -16 in Blue Earth, Fan- 
banit, Jackson, Mnrra;, RenviUe, Swift, Watonwan, Yellow Medi- 
dna; 16 in Cottonwood, Lac qui Farlo, Wilkiu; 17 in Browiy 
Noblea, Redwood; 18 In Becker, Bock; 19 in Nicollet. These 
avwages exceed the true amount of yield and loss In Bedwood and 
Benville and perhaps slightly in Brown, Nicollet and Noblee. 
In some cases farmers failed to consider tbe effects of drought and 
hail-storms but attributed all of the reduction below a normal erop- 
to grasshoppers, the resolt being over-estimates of loss fi:x)iii graas- 
boppers. For Brown and Nicollet tbe amount of over-estimate ts 
trifling, judging from yields in districts not visited by grasehoppera, 
while for Nobles tbe losses are returned as over-estimates in some oases 
and nnder-estimates in others. For Bedwood and ReuvUlc togeth- 
«r the over-estimates ma; aggregate flrom 60,000 to 80,000 bushels. 



zedbyGoOgle 



24 STATISTICS OF HINHB80TA. 

Blue Esrth with 21 towns and a total wheat-breadth of 7S,285 acres, 
retams a jiifltd of 460,189 bushels on 28,S3S acres or 1G.21 bnahela 
p«r acre for nine towns not visited by grassbopperB ; while for 15 
towns thns Tisited, return is made of 480,458 bnshels harvested and 
182,400 bushels lost on 44,B97 aorea, which, adding loss to harvest- 
ed product, woold equal only 14.76 bnshels per acre for the 15 towns, 
rather indicating an nnder-eBtimate of loss in that county. Taking 
the returns as a whole, the amonnt of over-estimate may be 
assumed to be comparatively insigniflcant, when allowance is made 
for omissions of loss-estimates from the statements. Aside 
ttom grasshoppers crops were heavier in the counties west of the 
Uinnesota tiian farther east and the low lands of the sonth- 
west better able to wiUistand the effects of the drought than Uw 
fields on the ridge-farms near the Missiasippi, hence the averi^, 
adding loss to harvested yield, was possibly qnite as good in the 
grasshopper counties aa in the b^ance of the state. The compari- 
son is as follows : 

Qasanl aTint*, 
boihtia p«r rner*. 

In grasshopper CO ontl^B, adding losB to bushels harvested, 1S.II 

Ontalde or ditto, bushels harvested 16 .C( 

In taroTot grisshopper couDtles, H 

Id grasshopper Gonnties, adding Iobb to bnsbels harvested, 16.11 

In the whole state, adding loss to basbels harvested IS. 80 

In flivor of grasshopper oovntles, ■ . ■ . 41 

OATS IN 1874. 

No. of BcreB sown S8S,t8t 

No. of bnshels produced 10,947,071 

Average yield per acre, bushels KM 

There was an increase in area, compared with 187S, of 14,740 
acres, but a decrease in average of 5. 48 bushels per acre, or 1,577,- 
464 in the total number of bnshels produced. The counties raising 
eadi one-half million bnsht-tls of oats and over, were the same as ia 
the preceding year, with the exception of Bloe Earth, which, bat 
for grasshopper ravages, would have been the fourth In point ot 
prodnctlon. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



AasiOOLTURB. 



So.er lerw to mm... 
Par cant, of total rot 
»er— 1> of Hw »t«tB. 



Par c«nt. of 
1ES,S33 



Bnahal*. Afarag*. 



Batbala. ATwaca. 



wi.no 

S31BU 
147,451 



ChaaahoiqKr-injUTy to oau in 1874. The twenty-eight counties 
retDrning grauhopper damage to oata in 1874 make the following 
•howiDg : 

Whole number of actea under oats In 1674 104,WS 

Hnmber of bnatieU oata produced 1,9S8,S9T 

ATarage yield per acre, bnshels I8.4S 

Nnmber of acres In oats damaged SS,1U 

Hnmber or boshels loss .* 1,810,7S> 

Average loas per acre of damaged acreage, boahels 99.94 

Average loas p Br acre of wliole oat-acreage of tbe 38 cooDtles.'-*- 17.41 

Comparing the injured acreage in theee oountiea with the acreage 
not iq}nred, the yield was aa follows : 



Od damaged acreage sa.lEB 

On not damaged acreage 49,997 



Okta pTolDoad, ATincajlaU 

baaball. par aera. 

400,858 6.80 

1,018,489 U.64 



Dedncling the damaged acreage and yield thereon, the aggr^ate 
And average yield of oats in the state was aa follows : 



Damaged acreage 6S,1SB 

In the atate, damaged acreage deducted 891,108 



Bubali. jlald. 

10,««7,07S 98.61 



The foregoing table shows an arerage yield of oats in the state, 
4 



byGoogle 



Na.Buh«U AT*ng*n<l« 






6,620,895 


84.54 


7,8SI,S2S 


S6.n> 


9,785,969 


8T.6S 


9,S9S.1U 


81. 1» 


10,689,484 


il.9t 


I2,6S0 788 


88.69 


I2,G44,E8S 


84.04 


10,GS7,9I4 


89.87 







Se flTATisnos OP unhesota. 

when flzclacling the injured tcrwge and tbe yield tiiereon, of 32.87 
bosbels per sere. 
The yield of oats in Minnesota for eight years is stated as follows : 



Tmh. AcrM towD. 

1887 I62,T!a 

1868 312,064 

1869 2G0,7[E 

1810 air.ill 

1S71 884,798 

187S 872,478 

1878 868,498 

1874, («iclD»lTe of gnuahopper acre- 
age and yield thereon) 831,108 

Ateragt yUtd for Hfht yean 

1874, (iDclading grusbopper acreage 

andjleldthereoD) 888,183 10,967,078 S8.81 

COBH ur 1S74. 

Tbe corn crop of Minnesota in 1874 is returned as follows: 

AcrM Bown 856,29* 

Buhhets prodnoed .' 7,S40,34> 

Average fteld per acre, bushels SS.64 

llie corn crop of the state in the nader-mentioned years was 
reported aa follows : 

Twn. Acre*. Bnibali. AranfM. 

IS6T 100,648 8,916,010 81.95 

.1868 139,909 4,849,986 87.St 

186r IS6,4SS 4,194,966 80.7S 

1870 178,439 6,660.870 81.66 

1871 £00,l!4 7,076,!6S StJ6 

1873 216,486 7,142,948 tt.9» 

1878 909,460 6,467,868 S0.8T 

1874. (cxclndlDg graeihopper acreage and 

yield thereon) 331,167 7,081,889 81.8T 

Avtrag«]/Md for eight jfean 89.76 

1874. (InclodlDg grasabopper acreage and 

yield IhereoD) 966,396 7,840,849 98.64 

Owing to a greatly Increased area, the qnantity prodnoed in 1874 
was larger tban in any former year, and notwithstanding the Angtiat 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AOBICULTUBB. 



drooght the yield pei acre od the main portion of the area shows » 
near approach to an average crop. The following table shows the 
eonnties raising each 200,000 bushels of corn and over, in 1874 : 



RpadOB .... 
HsBacplii... 
Ooodhas... 
Blnabrtb., 
Olu*tMl.... 

WahMhh,'..' 

hrltttoit!" 
I<«Siwir ... 

Blee..";.V 
WiMlDgtu. 



■croi* of tha sun. 



3J«.317 
t»9.3U 



3>.W 
32.14 



The foregoing table shows a yield per acre eqnal to that of an 
average crop on a6.87 per cent, of the breadth allotted to corn in 
1874. 

Orauhoppmr-imjury to com in 1874. The following is a anmrnary 
of the retams concerning corn in the 28 grasshopper- visited coun- 
ties of 1871 : 

Whole nnmber of ftcrea In com Id 1874 T8,8SS 

Nnmber of bQsbels prodnced 1,890,119 

Average Tleld per acre, baahels 19.08 

Ifambar of scr«a In com Injured 84,189 

Homberor baabalsloia 788,418 

Average loM per acre Of Injured acreage, biubela S).6S 

Average losa per acre of whole Gorn>aoreage ol the SB coantles... 10-18 



I the injured and uniDJared corn-acreage ii 



The respective yields o 
the same coantlea were : 

AcrM. Baikal! PcodDMe. Anrmgtpar Aerr 

Onlitlared acreage 14,189 U9,0OS 7.5a 

Oo acreage not li^ared 88,71T I,181,ITfi S9.S1 

The acreage ander oorn in the state net injnred by grosshoppersT 
and the yield of oorn on the some, la shown as follows : 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



36 STATIBTICS OF HINNBSOTA. 

Aarw tn Ooni. Butiali Prodpcad. ATcnfa'pfr A«r* 

Id th« sUte, total 2GG,S9S 7,840,aiS 18.M 

Orasshopper-lDjored S(,1S9 2S9,00S 

la tho Btete, not IqjQKd HS.ICT T.OSl^S I1.8T 

BABLET IK 1874. 

AcT«a flown S9,0t8 

Bnsb«lfl prodaced 6U,Mt 

Arenge jl«ld per acre, basbels 21.17 

The crop is less than «n average one in yEeld per acre on a great- 
ly rednced area, indeed, tbe emallest in qnantitj' in six yeare. Only 
•even counties produced eadb 85,000 basliels and upwards in lfi74, 
AS follows : 





1814. 


tSTl. 


isn. 




pSS.. 


Anr«K* 
pwAcr* 


■ess. 


p^.j'ss:. 


Bnlbril 
ProdoMd. 


AT'is; 




iMjm 

18, 
M 


11 


ET.glO 

US 


1B.M 
.W 


'IS 










w3SX' :;:::;; 
^0^^: ::::■- 


ss 










AcnatmBuUr- 




1>, 
totol l»r]^ 


21.7B 


6T.U 
W.IM 





The returns of grasshopper injury to barley are the totals of 
smaller and leaa determinable quantities than the sUttemenla of tiie 
■ame class concerning wheat, oats and com, and for this reason 
naturally less accurate than the latter. The same remark will iqtply 
to like returns for other products of minor importance. A oareM 
examination of the town reports shows the returned loss of bariaj 
to be greatly overestimated, and the figures substituted in tbe fbl- 
lowing table are believed to be a nearer approach to the qoanttty 
really lost on the damped acreage : 

Nnmbercir acres down to barley Id tho 18 conntlea fi,tU 

Number of basbels produced fll,OH 

Average per acre, bnthels • It. 74 

Namberof acres Iqjnred by graashcqipers t.MH 

Knmberof bushels loss tt.StI 

Average loss per sore of It^nred acreage 14.H 

Average loss per acre of total barlcT-acresge In the H coantles tM 



zcdbvGoogle 



Bnihrii. 


Avang*. 


818,715 


16.70 


6I8,&00 


28.GO 


ssi.iia 


2S.8S 


1,618,686 


S3.» 


I,6ST,00T 


2S.» 


1,4»»,49* 


38.8S 


ee9,4IG 


18.8» 


«68,60B 


S8.W 




a4.BS 


614,SiS 


ii.ir 



IGBIOULTDBE. 29 

' Hie yield of barley od the 2,980 acres not injured in these conn- 
ocnnties waa 58,926 bnabels, an average of 18.09 boshels per acre, 
leaving a yield of 8,114 bashels, or S.CiS baabels per acre, on the 
injared acreage. 

Excluding the grasshopper counties, the average yield of barley 
In the state was 23.27 bushels per acre. 

The following table affords a comparison with the barley crop of 
the state for seven preceding years : 



1867 11,868 

18S8 18,160 

ISO 81,696 

tSTO 64,766 

1871 84,638 

1873 JW,78« 

1878 86,601 

1874, (exclndtog grasshopper coDDttefl).->-S8, 744 

Average for etgbt 7ean 

1874, (Including srasabopper countlMj as,0S8 



Namberor acrsa sown 4,787 

Number of bnshals prodnced ■ 68,100 

Average yield per acre, baabels 19.1> 



Only 47 counties made returns concerning this cereal, threeonly, 
Anoka, Hennepin and Wright, reporting each a product of 5,000 
bnshela and over. Of the twenty-eight counties visited by grasS' 
hoppers, fourteen raised a crop of rye, the yield being 
4,490 bushels rye on 824 acres, a greater averi^e yield 
than In the remainder of the state; while twelve of these four- 
teen counties returned a loss by hoppers of 1,748 bushels 
on 127 acres, the loss and yield together averaging 19.25 bush- 
els per acre. For some towns the estimatea of loss were returned 
without acreages, and for others the estimates of acreages without 
amount of loss. The rye crop of the state for seven years is stated 
M follows : 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



82,703 


16.« 


62,100 


19.02 


7SSS1 


16.81 


78,875 


18.88 


iso.ass 


16.M 


182.780 


16.07 


98,877 


18.87 


88,100 


12.18 




16.J» 



STATISTICS OF HIHNKSOTA. 

867 1,938 

2,718 

*,428 

1870 8,BW 

8,061 

;e72 11,866 

1878 6.982 

1 4.787 

AMngt field for eight year* 

BOCKITHE^T IM 1874. 

AcKiBowD 1,861 

BnsheU prodaced 27,6U 

Avenge per acre 9.88 

Forty percent, of the above acreage was in twenty-five of the 
counties visited by grasshoppers, where, however, only one-quarter 
of a crop was obtained, the result on l,liD acres being a j'ield of 
Ji,068 bushels, and an estimated loss of 15.214 bushels. The num- 
ber of busbelt raised in the state for eight years is stated as follows : 

186T .*.. 1,10* 

1868.1 1,888 

1689 9,746 

1870 8,818 ^ 

1871 B.6B7 

1878 8,601 

1878 2,686 

1874 (exclodlDg grasshopper ^reage and jleld 

thereon — 1,719 

Awtagt fittd for alght T/aart 

1874 (Isclodlng grasshopper acreage and jleld 

thereon) / 2,861 27,69d 9.66 

. POTATORS IN 1874. 

Acres ptantei...; 28,219 

Hnmber of bushels prodaced 9,288,107 

Average 7leld per acre 80.90 

Compared with 1673 the for^;oing totals show a slight increase, 
in area 1,859 acres, and in product 86,969 bushels, while the aver- 
age is 2.41 bushels per acre below that of last year by reason of 



16,191 


18.71 


8S,i9S 


16.10 


46,0-8 


18.88 


68,868 


16.69 


84,161 


16.06 


48,869 


18.70 


29,446 


10.99 


22,640 


18.18 




14.78 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AORIODLTOBB. 81 

griMfaopper ravages. Oulside of the grasshopper counties the 
average per acre in the state is 89.17 bashola. The following com- 
parative statement shows the counties yielding each 60,000 bushels 
«nd apward in 1(174 : 





ISTi. 


isn. 


1873. 




pT*dM«d. 


a;-siv 


Baib*K 

ProdDMd. 


■S-SK. 


Bulxli 
PradnowL 


JHS. 


?Sr;a-:::-:; 


m,ua 

IMJOIJ 
MOTS 

7i'MS 

«TWT 

»,B76 

1J«I,T1» 

M 

4J 


Ki.n 

IW It 

is 


'SS 

TtLttO 

I.(irs,«i 
n, 

lotal poub 


103 W 

100.13 
IDS. to 

'Is 


in Mi 

s 

'K 

'SS 

•l.Ml 


%'S 


Islr-'-i-i; 








asa"";:-;:- 




S-;::; 

H^-: 


i 


A(mlD»at>to« 


M.U 

cTop or tb« 
uo 

WTNIXir 


l,4at,4H 1 lll.TC 
11,111) 



The above thirteen counties, raising one half ot the potato crop 
of the state in 1874, and nearly one half tn tbe two preceding 
years, show an average yield of 9».41 bushels per acre In 1871, 
96.4S in 1873, and 1S1.74 in 1872. 

Ora—hopper-ivjitry to potatoet in 1874. The returns tor the 
twenty-eight grasshopper counties of 1874 make tbe following show- 
ing: 

Knaiber of acres plflnted .* MIB 

Komber or bathels produced CMJMS 

AT«rig« jleld per acre, boshats I».U 

Hamherof aoies lujared >,TB4 

Nomber of bn&hels lotw 111,56* 

Avrrage loss per acre ol liOnred acreigs 81.00 

Average low per acre of potato acMage of grasshopper cvantles .... U.70 

Tbe yield on the iqjured and uninjured acreage in the sama 
counties may be stated separately as follows : 

Atm PluMd. BubaU Prodowd. A*«nca. 

Notlajared 5,881 4»,00S B4.8S 

iDjared S,7U 10.SS4 »M 



ligiLizedbyGoOglc 



32 BTATisnoa of hinnssota. 

The ^ield in the state in 1874, exclnaive of the iiynred acreage 
«nd yield thereon, is shown as follows : 

AerM FUoUd. Buhali Produced. ATtnge 

Id the lUte 28,219 3,2fi8,10T SO.SO 

I nj a red acreage 2,TSt 10. Est 

Id the BUteescl. of Injored acreage.. 36,48E 2,iT3,S3S 89.17 

» 

Being an averi^e yield of 89.17 bnshels potatoes per aere in the 
state, when excluding the graashopper-injared a(»:eage and yield 
thereon. 

The yield of potatoes in Minnesota for a series of years was as 
below atated : 

T*u>. Acre*. BdbIwIi. ATanc*. 

1867 17,747 1,788,058 101.81 

ISeS 24,476 2,691,636 10S.M> 

1669 20,888 1,468,428 71.44 

18T0 19,086 1,872,»IB 71.64 

1871 21,429 2,168,636 100.49 

18T9 96,061 8,079,849 117.89 

1878 26,860 2,166,186 8S.81 

1674 (ezcladlng graMhopper acreage and field 

thereon) 2^4S£ 2,312,838 89.17 

Avtragt tfMd for eight j/eari flS J> 

1874 (Incladlng grasshop^r acreage and jleld 

thereon]..... 38,219 2,388,107 8a90 

BBAm IM 1874. 

Acres planted 2,164 

Bushels produced 16,796 

Average ;leld per acre, boshela 7.88 

The average yield of beans fn the state, exolaaive of the grass- 
hopper-visited acreage and the yield on the same, was 12.24 bash* 
els per acre. The conntiea invaded by the hoppers retnmed — 

N amber or acres In beaos 1,096 

No. of bnahels produced 3,170 

Average 7leld per acre, bushels 2,89 

So. or acres damaged >,.. ),ot9 

No. ofbashelsloaa 14,971 

Average loss per acre of damaged acreage U.69 

Average Iom per acre of bean- acreage orgrassbopperconotles.... 18.66 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AQBIOOLTtlBB 88 

ProporLion of yield on injared and uninjared acreage: 

AcTM Pl(nt*d. Both. Pndac«d. Av-pncr*^ 

DBlnJared 77 1,27* 16.S5 

Injarad I,0:9 1,SH 1.68 

Yield in the state exclnsive or injured acrenge : 

Acna Plutad. Biub. prodnoid. At. fr A«r«. 

Intbe auta i,lS4 16 7U6 T.S3 

Deduct iDjarod 1,019 1,806 



Tbe sUte, exclosiveof Injured.... i,li>S 18,899 

The resnlta of beou-cnlture in Hinnesota tow eight years ; 



l3.Si 



AcTM. Bubclt. Avang*. 

1867 627 8,029 18.28 

1868 1,037 18,871 13,00 

1869 1,8!9 37,6Gt ]6.13 

1871) 1,84S 24,930 18.B8 

1871 1,606 19,668 1806 

1873 1,483 19,186 13.92 

1878 1,184 14,248 13 66 

1874 (excladlDg gTuahopper In. 

Jored acnase) 1,186 18,899 13.34 

Average yield far eight ytim 18.44 

1874 (iDcladlog grasshopper to- 

Jared acreage) 3.1S4 1S.79S 7.88 

BAT. 

CnltlVAted hay, acres 104,107 

Cnttlvat«d hay, tons prodaced ..-. 188,865 

Wild hay, tons en red.... 1,006,812 



Of the area in cullirated hay in 1874, 84,149 acres or nearly 
foiir-firtlis of the wlioie were in ten of tlio older counties, viz.: 
Dalcota, Fillmore, Goodhue, Hennepin, Houston, Oimstcd, Biee, 
Wabasha, Washington and Winona. Filly-four tUonaand five liun- 
drtd and eighty-six tons, i. e., 32.82 per cent, or nearly one-third 
of the whole crop of cultivated hay were raised in four counties, 
viz.: Fillmore, 16,684 tons; Olmsted, 12,985; Winona, 12,606, 
and Goodhne, 12,811 tons. The returns concerning this produob 
are yet in many foatancea inaccurate. The return of 23S acres in 
llattin oonnty is probably a mistake, the preliminary stalemenls 
5 



.vCoogIc 



8i STATISTICS OF MINNESOTA. 

taken in 1874 giving for lliat year bat 83 acres in cultivated hay in 
that coanty. With the proper allowance for this and other inaccu- 
racies, the loBB fh)m grasshoppers would seem to have been 1,584 
tons of cnltivated hay. The following table sliows the hay crop 
of the state for sis years : 

TMra. Cull. Brnj, Tdo>. Wfld Htr, Tmu. 

i86fl 61,901 Baa,ia 

ISTO 72,689 626,616 

1871 82,156 608,146 

18TS 108,038 748 4U 

1678 ■ 144,712 788,619 

1874 188,865 1,0M,!11 

FLAX IK 1874. 

Acres Bown I9,7« 

Baabela seed produced IW,MI 

Avertfie yield per acre. 6.61 

The culture of flax as a product occupying any considerable po^ 
Uon of the tilled area, is of recent date in Uinnesota, and this plant 
is as yet raised mainly for the seed, the fibre being generally burned 
in the fields. The establishment some years ago of linseed oil 
worlts of considerable capacity in Blue Earth county, indaced the 
assignment of a relatively large acreage to flax in the sonUiweitem 
counties, and more than 54 per cent, of the flax acreage of the state 
in 1874 were in these counties. The southwest being the favorite 
•camping gronnd of the grasshopper, flax Qelds suffered in propor- 
tion. Adding the more northern grasshopper counties, 61 per cent, 
■of the breadth assigned to flax were in the districts visited by these 
insect-pests. The returns of grasshopper injory to flax are incom- 
"plete, owing to the fact that no separate flax statements of this 
«lass were called for. Hence six counties return 2,445 acres with a 
total yield of only 1,957 bushels, and no estimate of loss. Estima- 
ting the loss on this acreage at an average of eight bushels per acre, 
■or 17,608 bushels, minus the stated yield of 1,957 bushels and ad- 
■ding the same to the injured acreage and loss returned, the state- 
taent for the grassbopper counties is as follows : 

Acres sown to flax 12,007 

BashelH seed produced 42,0DT 

Average yield per acre 3-4> 

Acres damaged f,I27 



zedbyGoOgle 



AOB1COI.TDRE. 35 

Boshelslosa 70,491 

Average loss per acre of damaged acreage S.St 

Average loss per acre of flax acreage In grasshopper conntleSo.. 5.87 

The yield of flax seed in the state, ezdudinf; the damped acre- 
age and yield thereon, was 8.92 bashels per acre. 

The acreage and qaaDtity of flax seed raised in Minnesota in the 
past seven years were : 

Tnn. AcTM. Bull. S*«d. 

18B8 Notretnrned 3,8*6 

1869 ' ■ 7,SS2 

1870 " 7,32* 

1871 " U,*2l 

1873 18,129 71,762 

1878 13,IH 100,868 

187* (exclndlDg grasshopper acreage asd 

7]ekl tliereon) 11,688 106,887 

1874 (Including grasshopper acreage aod 

Tleldthenoni 19,716 109,043 

SOBOHDH -ASD SOOAB MAPLE FBODUOTS. 

Retorns for forty-two coonties concerning sorghum culture, show 
the following results : 

Aeres In sorghom • 1,148 

OalloDS s;Tnp prodnced 69,699 

The grasshopper counties raised 22,846 gallons on 416 acres, 
reporting at the same time a loss of 5,284 gallons on 106 acres. 
Sorghum for seven years — 



TMn. 


Acr«. 


Gil. Syrup 






81,876 
81.191 
66,870 
TS,i26 
78.096 
58,236 
















' 


1878 









The products of the sugar maple in 1874 were returned with the 
preliminary statements of that year, and published by counties in 
last year's report. Tb« totals were 17,246 gallons synip and 145,< 
265 pounds sQgar, comparing as follows with six preceding years : 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



36 8TATIBTI0B OF MIHirESOTA. 

TMn. CM Syrmp. Foandi Siikv. 

UeS U,I15 250,46r 

1869 14,198 197,Ti> 

1870 17,830 281,e0» 

1871 239iS UI,9SI 

1873 17,834 195,587 

1878 17,B*1 139,»S> 

1874 17,3« l45,tSfr 



Wben late in the sixties tbo raising of hops saddenly grew to kd 
important branch of agricnlture in onr neighboring state of Wiseon- 
sin, the Commissioner of Statistics called for statements caacerniog 
this plant, hnd found the contagion to have spread to Uinnesota, 
partial returns for 1SG9 showing the comparatively considerabls 
breadth of 457 acres in bops, and a proiiuct of 264,789 pound*' 
The hop excitement, however, soon subsided, neither tiie acreage nor 
the j'ield of auy aubaequent year reached tlie above figures, and the 
crop of 1874 is the amailest of all recorded. The retarns, at least 
of acreage, are necessarily inaccurate, hop-patches being too fre- 
quently of a size and shape tliat render tbem diffisult of measure' 
ment. The returns from cwenty'flvc counties aggregate 131 acreSt 
with a yield of 53,653 pounds, comparing as follows with the fire 
precedina; years : 

Ttan. Aerta. Poandi. 

1889 4S7 364,789 

1870 811 188.803 

1871 978 S4,S43 

1873 ■... 88 114,4» 

1878 194 BT.»1 

18T4 ISl 68,e5S 

GRASS IKKD8. 

There has been a marked increase for the past two years in the 
production of timothy seed, the quantity raised in 1873 being 40,022 
bosbels against 15,228 the lost preceding year, while the returns for 
1874 eompared with 1873 show an increase of 6.241 buriiels. The 
erop of clover seed shows an increase of 4,105 bushels, or ukhv 
than 200 per cent, compared with lost year. 

Summary for six preceding years — 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



^QBICULTUBB. 6l 

tsw. )§». isTO. isri. im. ibti, 

Tlmptb]', basliela S,»79 1S,670 I6,81S 15,118 10,0n 

CIoTer, baiheb 383 U 8,669 2,688 2,3U 1,S4I 



TOBACCO n 1874. 

Tobacco is grown to 8 Binall extent in nearly every ooanty of ibe 
«tate, and the nnmber returning a yield of this product in 1874 
was filly. y\M product was 22,557 pounds, or 5,767 pounds len 
tban in 1678, the reduction being attributable mainly to the drought 
And groasbopper ravages in the west. The crop of aix preceding 
jeara was : " 

IStB. IBM. IBIt. inl. 1ST9. im. 

Found* S,998 11,389 20,578 87,060 1S,T8S 28,8H 

rsDiia IM 1874. 

Am remarked in laat year's report, the effects of the winter of 
1872-3 wero still felt in 1874 in the continued dying of trees and 
vlnea, but there is neTerthcless a liandeome increase in the nnmber 
of apple trees in bearing, and grape vines in bearing. The quan- 
tity of apples raised shows an increase of 15,775 bushels, or 77 per 
'eent., uompared with 1873. Tlie totals for 1874 are as follows: 

^pple trees growing, number. *<•.< 8,7i2,47t> 

Apple trees Id bearing, number IH,tT< 

Apples raised, bushels 8t,069 

Of the connties reporting agricnltoral products, only Carlton and 
Lake make no return of growing apple trees, hence it may be said 
that virtually every agricultural county in the state hoe made a 
beginning in apple culture. 

Of the counties reporting apple trees growing, all return also 
trees in bearing except Big Stone, Kanabec, Lac qui Parle, Lin- 
coln, LyOD, Rock, Stevens, Swift and Wadena. Kanabec is not an 
agricultural county, and the remaining seven yet too new to have 
trees in bearing to report. 

Of those reporting apple trees in bearing, only elglit of the newer 
•^cultural counties, viz. : Grant, Jackson, Uurray, Nobles, Red- 
wood, Watonwan, Wiikiii and Yellow Medicine, return no crop of 
Apples. 

The remaining forty-five counties all report a crop of apples. 



zedbyGoOglC 



38 



8TATI8TI0S OF HINNBBOTA. 



forty-two had a crop to report in 187S, thirty-nine in 1872, thirty- 
two in 1871, thirty-one in 1870, and twenty-six in 1869. 

A crop of one hundred bushels apples and upwards was reported 
from each of thirty-one counties in 1874, twenty-seven counties in 
1S7S, twenty-six in 1S72, eigbieen in 1871, and twelve counties in 
1870 and 1869. 

The n Oder-mentioned were the counties raising each not less ihaiv 
one thousand bushels of apples in 1874 : 





IST*. 


1373. 


1612. 




A^li. 


Trenln 


Biubele 
Apple.. 


a!" 


Bnihall 

ApplM. 


Tnnln 
b«ul>«. 


SSl""" 


s 

IS 

z 
s 

:S 


Is 

1,041 
3JS0 
tM6 


s:o6o 

l.OH 


is 

E.oei 


'Si 
i;S 

3130 


4^ 


Olmitml 


!■« 


EC;;;.:::: 


■ !'3 






BlnaBartb 


f13 






S.E£i 


hS 




».4M 


88.ae2 


18.481 


«.su 


8B.0W 


73.e» 



■ No nttiTDM for Bt. Pmnl. 

Returns concerning grape-culture have been made only for the 
two last years. The totals for 1874, 86,146 vines in bearing and 
114,922 pounds grapes of cultivated varieties gathered, show a good 
increase since the preceding year. 

The strawberry crop of 1874 was greatly reduced by droogbl 
throagboul the state, and by grasshoppers in the west. The re- 
return of only 177,185 quarts ts, however, owing partly to incom- 
plete statements for Winona, Olmsted, Hencepin, and a few other 
counties. Statements regarding no otiier fruits are retnmed to thia 
office. The following is a summary of the returns concerning frait» 
for six years [last : 



,:.dbv Google 



AGaiODI/TDBE. 





„™. 


aiupKs. 


flTBiTrB'Bl». 




Trees 
Growing. 


Trees In 
Beftrlng. 


Bushels 
Apples. 


Vines Id 
Bearing. 


Founds 
Grapes. 


Qaarta. 


1880... 
1870... 
1871... 
1873... 
187S... 
1874... 


B0S,877 
891.123 
1,007,274 
1,784,861 
8.882,088 
8,742,478 


19,195 
27,191 
63,222 
87,461 
84,4S4 
114,474 


0,410 
10,758 
84,027 
89.668 

30.807 
86,083 


P 

11 

e 

£6,684 
86,145 


-1 

,61,881 
' 14,032 


148,024 
176.168 
288,061 
277,718 
266,765 
177,189 



8 AND HOMBT IN 1874. 



The totals of retuma lor forty three counties are ; 



Vnmber of hires kept 7,MS 

Poo nds of bone J produced 60,10S 



The totals for five preceding years were : 



nires, naaber 6,870 0,709 13,608 ' 18,704 10,876 

Honer, poands 86,650 188,418 220,679 233,048 184,376 



Tbe returns concerning sheep on farms sheared in 1874, and the 
quantity of wool obtained, give the foliowlog totals : 



No. of sheep sheared 

Founds wool 

Average per sheep, ponnds.. 



144,901 

649 ,816 

8.7» 



The wool-clip of 1874 was 20,059 pounds larger than that of any 
former year. 

Founds of wool grown in six preceding years : 

tass 18N 1S70 isn len ma 

FoDDdswoot 433,600 882,808 881,400 8S5.282 107,045 620,8e» 

DAIRT PEODOCT6. 

Among the items of personal property retnmed in 1874 to the 
8tat« Auditor for the purposes of taxation were 191,049 "cows two 



JigiLizedbyGoOglc 



40 STATUTim OF MUmKSOTA. 

yean old ROdoier." OrtheBethentunberof 169,618wci« fttUie mom 
tlmo relnrned to lbs CommiBsionarof StetUtics ■• "milch cowbob 
ftrms." The yield of batter wad cbeoM from the wume wh retomed 
&• foUowB : 

Hllch cowl on IhriDS, Hnmber IM,6II 

Bnttar, ponodi prodaced I(t,91C*U 

CbCMC, pound] pTodneod 1,0M>,HS 

ToUIb for »lx precedEog yean : 



IM8 4,«».ooo i«e,in 

IHl «,IW,KI 9M,HI 

1870 e,aoB,8es su,ou 

WTl 7.S96,7ra 4»,MT 

"" 8,est.SM rn,an 

lars io,iw,sio i,osi,ni 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AGEICDLTDBB. 



WHEAT OBOP or KimiKaoTA : 



[ 1874 AMD 1878, Bi 







1874. 






1V7S. 






Aorn. 


Buhali. 


Avaraia. 


i,M. 


Ba.b.1.. 


Axang*. 


ToUlt 


l,«I.8ail 


V3f»,m 


14.33 


l.M8,713 


M,4«,4W 


17.01 




i 

31,910 

f.f! 

M3W) 

,£;S5 

W.3tl 

"s;s 

H,a63 

a,Hij 

"■*ia 

34,<M 

-s" 

E.IMO 

a.8M 

AS 

l.(jS 

":i 

4;JS 
B 

1«.9III 


Si 

»in.ftia 
ira.Mt 

l.SIl 

■IK 

IW.OSO 

618.9W 

fioet.mr 

8T4,TH 

£.3<nJn4 

3TB'Mt 

•sss 

40JWJ 

3.6TS 

S.S1S 

•HH 

4r>ts 
a.'w 

■g.si 

£06^13 

mm 
i.mpis 

JM006 


11 
■S;S 

18.11 
11. U 

ia 
i» 

M 

t.A* 

i!.S 

10.49 
3« 

16 n 

J:!! 

1S.« 

n.M 

14 38 

8'ar 

S3! 
I.IK 

7:»i 

7 'is 

•1 

14.44 

US 

17.« 

III 


""a',»i'' 

3t;tui 

:l 

Will 


M.I1M 

■■■»■ 

■|.478;Mi 
M»4Ji 
tin. 4 10 

611. no 

!,SW.6J« 
Wt,MI 

BilJMl 

3»,0T» 
61,Gbi 


ISM 










SSSS-.:;:::-.-.:::.:: 


UiM 




■Si? 


CtowWIiik{1u«.iUi) 




gSSE.;-.:::-.:- " 


?-ss 


















gr.:±""' ■*■"■:■■ 


6.11 














Ssja-JU;::;:::- 
L.*.v:: 


4,144 

iffi 

it^i 

H.S05 

■as 

i3.»oe 

3,730 

n/ta 
».«% 

3,611 


314,731 
4W 

i':!!S 

1,001.411 
2,43ri.A» 

iS4,a'0 


17. M 
11 tl 


SKJ'iviv;.;;.-:::; 


,'!S 










&;;-••■-■ 


'!-3 


?a;'&-.:;.;::::- 




ip;;;^;; 


.'is 
















9',4B1 

i*:o» 

1B.7II 

K.1 

40» 
80.6M 


3.9 417 
3I4!m« 

MX 143 

u:79G 
i,tH>n 








S.::.::^:-:^: 


ij-s 


Sas^.:;; 


10.31 




7S.IM 


WT797 
















WlBlW 


i->.<i« 




ii.»t 



Hvra.— Tk* eoonllM wlUi niniM 
from ffnuitaappar InJorJC'. 
n<>lhlBi for Dulni^ clljr, Htroun 



in llaani mi 



Lac, BL LanlicoaBlr. 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



42 BTATlSTIOa OF MINNEBOTA. 

OA.T CBOP OT KIMHESOTA IN 187i AMD 1878, BI CODiniBS. 





imi. 


isn. 


CoantlM. 


ACFM. 


Bn«hel., 


A««g». 


ACTM. 


Biuhali. 


4VMW 




«M,aW 


KIM? ,072 


!8.6l 


3ts,m 












10C9 
7IB 

!«,«» 

8^089 

s.iis 

s 

27.484 

•"i 

1,24S 

li 
"Is 

I0,03< 

is 

'ffi 
fffl 

fi,0ft9 

T.Hl 

1.SR3 

16,612 


23.97* 
6,097 

i9;6»6 

16.S« 
111,3T7 

>S:S! 

Sis 

lllvM 

""^^ 

u,b3a 

i«,m 
t.m 

SS.TSt 

bI160 
6€i;680 

C0i;i64 

8o;o;a 




'IS 


31, SOS 






M 

2e 

27 
37 

1 

83 
24 

■"« 
1( 
a 

3C 

3E 

If 
M 

1 

17 

311 

IE 

i 


96 

93 
00 
G2 

i7 

)3 

)1 

H 

rs 
4e 

J3 

87" 

18 

N 
U 
l» 

S 

92 

1< 

i7 

n ' 

IS 

)7 












^iP^'''-z£ 


f:f 

20M 


■"iBl'.Ssi' 


g^ 


c"\m.,',.'..'.'.'.'.\'.'.'.'. 


■■«.7i- 


















Dokou 


Vg.93S 

^fm 

12,967 
23,138 

B.1<H 
9,S28 

•■S! 

2 
4.6!» 

6W 

9,000 
8.79« 
1.183 

i^Hs" 

1 

i.ati 

l«',60l 

o.iki" 

6;»79 

16.681 
1.721 


C36.na 
susu 

112,509 
S«,Mt 
91S,S8J 
441^76 
1.0M,7» 

ns'.its 

iji;629 

1*,30J 


S:I! 














g™"*-; 


MM 














^■dU-:::;:.;::: 


S2a» 


i^sJiX-j... ;:..:; 


2I.W 




'"■1.' 

,S;S 

9i,Me 
Mini 

'Effi 

38/PlS 
3!0;767 

iffl 

WI.I91 
'"aBB',506" 

6,620 




































"iSS:::;:: -.::. 


U,S7 






/wt 


37.61 


Eedseca. 


i:" 






















vz^r. -■.■.:■- 


■3.0* 


^^ii' ■:::..;;■ ■:■■ 


22*1 










WBBhlDgion.l !'!.".,." 


«7.« 


iniHn 


38J7 
JI.7» 



,.db,Google 



AGEUCULTUBB. 49 

OOKK OBOr Of 1IIMKB80T<L IH 1874 ARD 1879, BT OOUIfTIU. 



ConnUM. 


IBH. 


..« 




A««. 


Butitli. 


Avereg*. 


ACT4B. 


Bu*b<ill. 


Avanga. 


ToUI. 


WI.W 


7,340,34» 


sn.M 


S0»,4B0 


0.417,868 


30.81 




«es 

10,653 

4.601 

1,103 

tjMO 

"4 

lo.ni 

■a 

10.813 
14.su 

i.asi 

»j«T 
1.C80 

i| 

1 

«:mo 

40 

,.| 

2,403 

i 

"J! 

11.^8 


T8.aii 
.0,.™ 

■'•S 

3M.3M 

11 

a3«;»i 

433,flOS( 
481,474 

ZiifQl 

r;w2 

39.010 

Sfi.'iDO 
100,999 

Wi 

„S 

38!ll8 
M.ltS 

aas.foo 

«:s» 

171.908 

MIT 
19.807 

•"■S 

1»,1M 

"hi 

839.327 




'« 


•IS 


11 


H::;;:;;;::;i:: 


i! 

i 

1 
i 

K 
81 
» 

6 
K 

i 

8C 
2t 

11 

3e 
sc 

31 
»7 

I 


s 

s 
s 

M 

Kl 
DO 

ea 

4J 
77 

a& 

8t 

9i 
H 
01 

S4 
60 

40 

10 

i 
i 

M 

oa 

10 

i 
11 

0! 




7>i4 
8,201 

S,32«" 

464 


""m',9S8" 
92.849 


M.77 


CitrluiD 

aSSi.;;.;.::;:; 


S:^^-;:;; - 


24.9- 








SJot.."!?:..' 


io.«e 

"■a 

4,Hlt 

« 

1 ,961 
1 .634 

'1 

2.665 
2.001 

606 

'« 

/ •«! 

10.02S 

'838 
1,438 

••s 

G.418 
2.676 

1 

8,901 

ifiVi 

8.060 

,ri 

4,U1 

m 


lealoss 
«ti,Ma 

(IB'.Mfi 

I2J60 
1.446 
10.362 

iisioii 

1,164 
6,81 J 

sslioa 

06.M1 

l| 
II 

9.017 
H.311 

sa 

2U,»94 

161.TS9 

116^663 
137 494 

B»,affl 

I.SDO 
17,460 
3W.196 

■"ioflBo" 

1S3.7M 

3 

104.1B6 
4.821 


30 61 












'AV, 


o^dlS.";"::;;:::: 


fA 


























'"'t? 


^ja** 


19, W 






Jg^"; 


11.80 






SSSr';:.::::.::: 


2S.60 




















3^ 80 


























gJS;.r::::::::::; 


Kfi 19 










wJdw*..!.;:::'."" 


"io'.w" 
ao.3i 










Wrl(h( 

IVmifAMeiM 


30.17 

28.01 



■ 111* oonutlM Uut In 1: 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



44 STAT1BTI08 OF KimrESOTl.. 

BABLET CSOr OF KIIOIBSOTA IK 1874 AKD 1873, Bt OOmRlM. 





1871. 


un. 


"""■' 


ACTM. 


BoBhaU. 


ATtnf*' 


AeiM. 


BmtMa. 


Annc» 




n,OH 


(l4,Mfi 


a. IT 


tifiti 


W.4U 








S&::::::::::::::: 


S 

»1 


l.HM 


11 

It'.tl 


M 


S 


CI. SI 








■ffi 


1<(,S(M 












fJSr.:::::::,.:. 


s 


!ffi 


II.H 
IG.W 


iu 

»9 

14S 

791 

'■g 

if 

m 

3K! 


1 

i 

"■si 
"■a 

W3 


!?.?! 




'ttT 

'•'to 

Wl 
31 
1« 

■s 
i 

.! 

•■'g 

1 

is' 

1 

'1 

M 


«3,BH 

.as 

Ti,ni 

4M 

'iS 

u 

Sl« 

"g 
■■IS 

'II 

looW 

'■'S 

lO.SH 

B,oas 

■i:i 

■ SI 

u.nu 

1T;b13 

4 


B.Dl 
10. ts 

5:S 

il 
!i 

II 
■!:S 

•1 

1«.<0 

11 

II.M 
10.40 

S3!m 

i.Tt 

aa.M 

l.BO 

s 

H.08 

u.n 

33.41 

M.ra 

■J3 




kE--:;--""-' 
as!" 


U.M 

am 
it.n 

It.M 

S;J! 
II 


f^,,. 


'S 


"■a 


i).n 




4 

WD 

S 

HI 

n 

'■» 
a 
'i 

81 

BOt 


1,004 

Ma 

i 

'■Si 

n.ta 

1,M« 

'•!S 

is.ats 

!i 

IS 

'■s: 

1;S 




••""•r 


■iS 


StceUti 

SC^i::-:-::;:: 


10. n 


SS"^-.:-- 


sa.n 


















Rles 

&:■■■■■■■■■■■ 


■Is 

SIS 










W..tilaKbui 


i'S 
















(.«> 



• Id tIaUa ar* lb* coBUtiM tbkt la 1S74 n 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AORIOULTIIBB. 45 

-«TB cxor or imniuoTA nr 1874 ahd 1878, bt commzs. 





1S71. 


1873. 




A«CM. 


Snihak. 


ATtnf. 


AarM. 


Bubda. 


ATini*. 


Town 


4,787 


C8.I00 


».» 


!,« 


•^877 


U.87 




Anoka 


1 

is 

i 

1 

' HO 

K 

) 

9) 

(8 

in 

'^■' 

1 

333 
« 

«7 

in"" 


1,1(16 
1,I7G 
=^™ 

1,M3 

» 

'Ts 


».77 
ll-U 

«!£■ 

3198 
10.3b 

II 

lOiOO 


1 
183 

3n 


1 

4 Oil 


11.40 


JiwAtrM 






m 
to 

138 


6;m« 


IB.W 

II 

aa:oo 






ftj™"" 




OoMfOfc ■ 




Ssr:;::::::::::: 




to 

709 

7M 

P7» 

i'.B»" 

»78 

■,4ai 


'IT, 

III 

■■■»;» 

7.'en 
11.30 

a 

13 83 
x.0« 
l.» 

s!go 

4.«l 
B48 
19.91 


« 

30" 

CS 

at 

eo 
»o 

• 


ii" 

♦«■ 

■is 

747 

Z 

m 




ft«^:::::::: 


19^ 

!!:S 


'SB::::'''-'-'' 


17,W 

17. «t 
1S.M 






"1 




OSI 






j-if..;;:;::;::::;; 
W3-.:;.:;;:.:;::. 
KSll:::::::;;:;: 


01 
l»7 

iw 


4.039 


H.W 
10.80 


SIS.-::::-.:;:;::::: 


m 


13.1(7 



M With umM Id UoIliMir 



tb* goiuUm Ibrt In Uri nlBtntd Iomm 



DigiLizedbyGoOglc 



46 8TATISTI08 OF BUNKE30TA. 

BOCKWHBAT CROP OF MIHKCSOTA IK 1874 AND 1878, BT COUMTIBS. 







,B7. 






1SI3. 






ACT... 


Bnihili. 


A,.™„ 


AOTM. 1 Bubal*. 


A,™. 




a,841 


1T,«3 


S.Cfi 


3.C8S 


m.4u 


10 M 








as 

•g 

.i 


i 


12. 30 

,'!:S 
IS 

iw.oo 

•I 


100 


i.iw 

IBS 




See::;; 


17 .« 








se 


■•ss 




fc.'t ::;;;:::- 






U 


144 










n 

94 

in 
sa 

T7 
W 
« 

M 

S 

u 


It 

706 
KB 

'i 










s 

lU 

11 
1 

S 
1 
1 

17 

J 

i 

i 

33 
SS 

S 

SO 
IM 

as 


l:i 

«tt 

eo 
sa 

,.! 

SO 

IS 
"2 

M 

'S 
S 

'3tt 


■!:§ 

Is 

IS. S3 

S;S 

'"ii.io" 

1 .74 

'41 
1 00 
O.H 

b's! 
.10 

:!! 
11 

■":! 

1 M 
.33 

'1 

1 .11 

■ ;g 

1 .oe 




g«gj» 


,}■!! 


SOHliU 


!S 






■OOOdbDI 


^■s 


HMiiepU 
















^.'.■.'."^■.■.■■■::- 




11 
« 

1! 

I0« 

30 
IS 


1 

3t2 

1 








fci-::;...;: 


















































10 
4« 

ts 

■i 


2» 

at 

1 

3(3 


13.« 




Baaia, 


4.40 

ll.M 

,5'S 
























1 

't37 


v.oa 

B.M 

M>« 
IS. OB 
M.80 




iS 














a 

1 

30 


SO 

u 




ig±E;;::;: 


*» 






-Wlnou. 




Ttiiov jridi^ 


"a 



NOTI.~T)l| CODDtlHWlth 

fron cruihoppfT InJorlM. 



B eoiBtlM that ]■ IS74 ratini*d Ion** 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



AOBICDLTDBE. 47 

POTATO CHOP Of MIWtESOTA fS 1874 AMD 187S, Bf COUNnES. 



IfosnUM. 


1874. 


WIS. 


ACTM. 


B<»,b.l.. 


a™.b.. 


Acr«. 


B„h,l.. 


Av.r.g.. 




a8,in 


3.581,107 


8D.eo 


fii.3M 


3,u«.iie 








^3£ 


338 
3D9 

1 

lis 

M) 

ass" 

1.IT» 

Z 

'1 

3ra 

Ki 

Mr 

101 

tH 

S 

38fi 

■s 

MS 

«• 

MS 

i 

06 
IM 

res 

1« 

M 

S 

ii 

193 


IS 

"■■|3,»i" 

85,468 
ISS^DIT 

1 

1463 
13495 

ai,sM 

• lilM 
38^ 

•:iH 

11,114 

'.S 

31.U8 

SS 

i 
i 


11 

S3, at 

■HI 

If 
II 

MwllS 

!!:£ 

SB. at 

18.91 

ii 

««!4S 

m 
11 

HI 

11 

i:g 

II 

,g:ll! 

II 
'11 


310 

no 


8i,nR 


nJ^ 






S5/JSU::::;::::: 




■ «n 

i',K» 

s 

48S 

872 

aa 

823 

81 

8,1 

■s 

4oa 

1 

1,110 

1 

130 


■■■■«;«♦■ 

8,S81 
41(03 

I,B7J 
12,169 

^^ 
g^ 

140.000 
4«,]«6 

l^ss 

780 
11,837 

.ss 

i 

Kit! 

,i 

61307 

3t;iS 

7210 
1,890 


?1S 


















«o» 
























gSS"::::::;:::- 


'S-!! 








u.w 














^sr^^ 


46.13 










JS::::::.;;:::: 


42 83 








«:* 




^.r-::::::. 


K 


pjp^v.:;:;:;:;:: 




5j*» 


90.99 






ffia,'..;:::::::::;;: 


733 

1,141 
18* 

1 


64.149 


SI 


sfc;;;rE;; 


'S'i 








4n 

lai 

«93 
H 


29,149 

1:ffi 

»,9es 

(91038 
2,939 




^:£isr 


"■S 



















» that tn 1S74 ratgrqwlla 



zedbyGoOt^lc 



48 BTATISTIG8 OF MINHBSOTA. 

BKAN CROF OT HlHtlKSOTA DI 1874 AMD 1873, BT COCHTIXS. 





mi. 


«». 




ACT-. 


Bnihaii. 


Av*nK 


&crM. 


BalMl. 


..™„. 




S.1M 


U7W 


TM 


1,11. 


HOK 










ii 

> 

30 


« 

■s 

4C3 


1 


10 


m 




S3S::::::':::::;;: 










24 


3H 




Br«.n 


UM 




w.sn 


i 

1 

i 

i 

21 

,1" 

10 

1 

w 

3 

IS 


)S 

3B 
IM 

S! 

007 

ail 

*i 
to 

i 

ns 

Si 

1 

S7 

«t 

11 
13* 

10* 




IMivm 


M.«* 








149 

8 

37 


5 
.it 

te7 


ose 

ISM 
10 .w 

4.M 

H 




RSS ■::::.::■:.:. 


ii:S 

lO.H 


as."....:::::::: 








KU;::::::::::: 


l*t 
» 

17 
« 

r 

13J 

3C 
18 
IB 

^ 11 
11 

sr 


aw 

171 

J" 

i 

at* 

ItH 

"1 

Vi 

IS 

m 

S 

ai 
15 


11 w 
}7'.M 

17: n 
i.is 
w.w 

T.W 

(.SO 

3:11 
19. GO 




A***™ 


!i!f 


K»;iV..::::: 


11 














Mttitin 


3I.N 


















































^^EE: 


47 

s 

M 

J 

IS 
16 
t5 

tt 

10 


13.S3 


4< 
1 


4M 

'»I0 

tt 


IT. 3* 


t^luarat.'.. '.".'.'■'.'..... 


^■s 












m 

■•'!! 

1 
i.i;i 


KM 

|i 

1>5 

a. a) 
ilao 












ox 


4 














{J-5 




■-•* 



« the cooallM Ikat In IS7I n 



zedbyGoOgle 



AQBIODLTDRC. 



HAT CROP OF HIHKKBOTA IN 1874 AND 1878, BT CODMTIBS. 







1S74. 






1678. 




CoaailN. 


COLtlTAVlR H*T. 


Wiu>Day. 


Cdltivatkp Hat. 


Wiu> Bat. 


ACTH. 


Tout. 


TODI. 


Aor«. 


Tani. 


TOBk 




104,107 


mfiK 


i,o«,eia 


104.630 


144,Tlt 


783.618 






SOi 


Mi 
ST 


to.3oa 

^^ 

.... 

IS ,683 

siiei 
VsJi" 

1B,M7 

ia,ssfi 

li;,fOI 

sbIssi 
11,1^1 

S;S 

«.9B7 
8;6W 
13,911 

1;i 


934 
M 

■■■'« 
.J 

"1 

9.801 
li 


S81 
M 














1 


...yl. 


••Si 

1,686 

■,S 

16.4 SO 
13,144 

■■■«;ij8'" 

9,813 
30 

J 


36.036 






■"■loiisi ' 






B.0I9 




"'»,MS" 
1 


SJS3 

me 

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iiwii 

•i 




sS;;;;;;;;::;::;n: 


Wr^ 














gSlT :; 


4.400 
K,163 








I'g 








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Sr;;;;;-;;;;:" 


3:»i3 

ao,i8T 

6863 
40,933 
8,M6 

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6,4^ 
1T.I03 
M*4 

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loirai 
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'•?^ 


^rE;;£::i; 


""ks" 


463 

4,179 






4.MS 

i9,;ie 

1S.7!» 

•IS 


31(1 
Htt 

aa 

3.207 

""as 


360 

i 

4.103 

»«" 


sEir;;:;;;;;;-;;;; 




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uV 


■■•t" 


w:4» 

4.87J 
16.316 
28.843 


Kfe:";;;;-;:;;;;; 


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14.493 


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i,eii 


19M^ 
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i.£Oa 

2,«» 


i 

4.810 


16 
1.904 


3K« 

a.9»t! 

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24>! 
4,964 


jtaSiS^.v.:: .".".".■.;■.: :■.:'. 


,,S 










BcoM....... 

SSS;- 


196 
1.446 


1.409 

,,g 

S.OM 


13,981 












ii 


^^;?;:^;i:E 


in 

T.SM 


..;£ 


70 

7,688 


IOC 
10.636 


SnSte;:;:::::::::: 


is 


1,IM 

■a 

K 
11,60* 

alsis 


••g 


1.490 


a,9e» 

3,6'il 
10,687 




wISSl. .;;:::::::::::: 


'!:!S 


'JSI 


it'iso 

61316 



Nora.— Th* oodoUm witb i 
troB (TUthopptr liO«l*a. 
7 



zedbyGoOgle 



iO STATISTIGS OF lOKiraSOTA. 

VLAX AHD HOP FBODUCTS OF WKMKBOIA IK 1874 AND 1873, BY OOUSTIIS. 





FLil. 


Hon. 


i'OBBllM. 


.S7* 


187*. 


1874. 


1873. 




Acr... 


Bothtli 


A«r«. 


Baad. 


ACTM. 


Poandi 


Acna. 


Po»od. 


TotaU 


lt,71S 


i<n,ais 


ia,ii« 


100.<^ 


ISl 


U,SSS 


1« 


»^1 






















»^i 












J" 
■.IS 

6W 


11,068 


•0.000 


















1 1 


' 


000 


9 
« 




miwi^ 


il 


g:5"" 


1 
i 


^■'JS 


.1. 


«oe 
a,4M 


S 




?s?& 








i:gl 


8 


.::3 


^ 


s 


Fraabora 

Ooodbne 




» 


n«naplii 


B< 


(si 


S 
37 


■!;S 


41 


■!:!!! 




ma 


2 
IH 


« 








1 






KmndWoW 


81 


SM 

a* 
1,11. 


» 


::;:::; 


.::::;::: 






10,012 


tlB 




& 

B 




S=:. 


i" 


li 


















^= 


S, 


IK 

in 

'«, 

H.i6« 


MO 


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• 


m 


in 

1.3« 

itt 

I 

28 


..SI 

*■'"■ 

are 

in 








u 


gJ««::::: 


11 


8,«0 


■ 


^«j 


&"r,;:;::. 




'« 


y» 






400 
» 


I 






Mi 

•i 

i,in 


am 

'« 
'•ffi 
■•a 

1.80S 


iia 


■■si 










«IM1*. 


» 


aj3o 


3 


NT 




















3H 

i^oea 












I 


rs 


* 


»,S3« 


^S?^^"- 


«e 


043 

3T» 


11 


airt 


Wlnonm 


8 


■« 


,2 


l.«M 
>,Ui 


t 40 







namM In Uallei an th* eoantlM tkat !■ 1374 ratunwi la«M« 



DigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AaBIb-ULTCSM. 



tQtaaait, snu.WBKSBT akd tobuoovfroduoh or MiHHEsatA m 1874 

AMD 1873, BT CO PWTIBS. 





,^-.... 




TOBiOOO. 


OduMm. 


inc 


1S78. 


197<. 


1873. 


1«7«. 


1813. 




M... 


OllllDIt 


Acrw. 


Bjmp. 


,..™. 


Qokfta. 


Pound* 


PooBdf 


TQUto 


1,I4« 


«.»t 


747 


B3,^ 


177,lKi 


au,7(6 


ta.MJ 


28.3*1 












3,U1 


I.1U 

ai 

' i.tce 
"wo 

"""m 


tl 

18» 
IM 




SS:::;:::...::::::: 














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!' 

I 


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3,ao« 

a.eoi 

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isi 

130 

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30 

t 


1 

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H~;iE;;:;i:. 

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1.831 

3,33i 
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rt 
a,8w 

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i,m 

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'm 

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147 

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li«61 

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4|oi( 
10.t90 
17,301 


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gjj««^ 


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it> 

s 


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Ss?;--:;::'-----' 


M 

1 

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I 

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31 

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51B 


3^ 
381 








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........ 

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MV 




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a 
a 

V 


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i 




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J 






s 


3K 

a.iM 








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310 




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4.W8 

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N la UaUei mr* th* conslti 



JigilizedbyGoOt^lc 



BTATianOS OF UIMHESOTA. 



I SIKD, BHB AMD aONIT IK^HIINBSOTA IN 1874 AND 187S, BT 
COnNTIBB. 





■™. 


1911. 


IBM. 


IB78. 


OoaBtlM. 


W 


BiuliMi. 


:s 


CloTar 
BDihtii. 


HITM. 

Ho. 


?= 


"r- 


f^ 


TotaU 


«.ws 


^^»l 


«,oaa 


1,HC 


7^1 


Mjse 


iiWioo 


1»,1» 


Adoka 






'i 




aw 

K4 

101 

■'■■«" 

S17 
t»3 

Ml 

1 


>i» 

If 

1,1M 

T40 

"4,733 

"S 
•i 

2.300 

ji 


078 
IM 






1 














J 






8- 




assr::::: 




iii" 


IW 

-i 
1 

61 
M 

1 




3» 

1 

9S3 

ue 

10 

1 
10 

i 
,1 

ISO 


'■^ 




1 

1.SS3 
MB 


171 




s"£r:::: 




1 






SSC;-:- 




!« 


QoDdbD 

i:sff:::::: 


8 




















•i 








6 


■ 


C6 


J-K 








TO 

s 

104 






ux 
















i" 


iii" 


■■■; 


1,M 




w 






SffilJi;.;::: 


'•'1 
,i 

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sit 


m 


l,t71 


SM 


"S 


££.;:■ ::;: 




"w" 


"i;«o 


iii" "■«» 




■■'• 

97 

w" 

'1 

419 










4» 


to 


191 


4,070 
"tOM 


3tl 

■■■■« 

si 

a- 

4W 








^J^Jl""- 




1" 




38 
860 

i 






10 






8&-;:::- 














30 












Ktt.:::;-- 


H 


14 




^JblnittiiiV.'.! 


.1! 


..OH 
1,0U 


' ' is " 


7» 


■S! 


94< 


fS 






TO 
74 


"iai" 

040 


""l,UB 




Wlnoan 


-s 


S3) 


S.43) 


'•* 


' 









la that Id 1874 ntarnwl IM 



cc-,:...dbv Google 



AGRlboLTDSB. 58 

Am.* OBOP or HiKNiBOrA IN 1874 axd 1878, bt oodmties. 





ini. 


1873. 


OouU«. 


-isas" 


«E!Sr,- 


.•Jffil; 


tnltftnm 


|pb«rlD|. 


izx 


T M> 


3,T«.479 


IM,4H 


3t,(iea- 


t,as2.ax 


S4.434 








ABOk* 

SSr.".:::::::;:::: 


'•IS 

1 
^87l 

S.iM 

il 

'•"^ 

I«,471 

i 

l4.3Clt 

!!,« 


3SI 


TDl 


•IS 


1,»»B 

'sis 




KSs::l'-..;:" 




I,S1 

is 

'a 

MIT 

S.SM 




K,7>1 
l.WT 
GUS 

'16 

1 
li 

43.111 

t,l)(»,6i8 
87.«B9 

•r» 

8.W6 
3),S9 

rS 

"1 
S:!!f 

»,B16 

4.MS 

,!;Ui 

"•is 


'4 

i.on 

Mil 
















^::= 


14f 


























lr.S".r.-.::::::: 


'S 


^. 












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io 


M4 


4 


S.M8 
131 


101 


. 't,m 








K£!«j.'...V,V.','.."r 
MMkar i. 

5^;;:::;:e 




OSS 

16! 

1 

1.18) 

,,JI 


48 

IS 

411 

1 


S 


■» 


iii" 




"S 


<■«! 


'■?" 


^.™' ■■■ 


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if 
.J 

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IDS 

1,97! 

3,41! 

1 


u 

1,10» 


J 


»! 




roB 




SSI:;.-. 


w 










ari 


:;!g 

17,SS? 
Si.lK 

4.471 
H.Slft 


a.iOT 

1 




«b«rbanie 

atM^i 


t» 






«■:■;.;:■;::;:;■ 










.5 


..«; 


,^ 




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1,(M 




3.SS 


'SK 
I10S7 

•■IS 


•■g 

4.M4 


M,. 










f;^ 


"a 


?»■»«*;;.::: 



nnllM wllb umm In VtaMM ■■ 



Iba eonntin that In 1S74 niBTMd H 



zedbyGoOgle 



8TATIBTI0R OF'mIKKBSOTA. 



OI7LTITATKD ORAPK TOIZS AXD THEIS PRODUCT ID HnOnBOTA III 1874 

i.AirD 1873, BT c 





187*. 


1»7». 


Coutlw. 


iTIumId 


Ponna.. 


ISI 


Paaddt. 


ToMt 


i«,iie 


Ii4,n3 


M^ 


•1^ 




&SS;;:::::::::::::::"::::::::::::-::: 


678 


1,084 


W 


n 












M 


'■S 

s 

100 

•i 

''310 
417 




Avwa 






■a 


ItakoHk 


MS 

IS 

so 

'iM" 

.,i 

63 
41 

i 

soo 

1.787 

"d 

■7 
BST 


is 

»,0M 


^p;;;.:::-.:-.:::-.;:-.::::::::::::::::: 


1;S 

HI 


H«n.pio 


S£a8 


1,S83 


"■? 












G 


wi" 




^^E^£^:^EE 


iii'' 


Si'i^iS^..- ■■■.:"■.:•.•■■■:■■■•■ 


S 


1 

SO 

■ s 

i,Eue 


64 






411 




s.eu 










4;^ 


ii;i;;:i;;;;;E;;;;;;i;;i 


,i5 


6.^ 




ija 




BIm 








4E 


''ii 

i 

VOTS" 

aoa 




BherbonirB 

SS,-i ; •■•■- 


10S 
ilf 


H-K-::;-;;:::;::;;-;;;::::::::::;:; 


'« 


w.bi,h». ■. '.....:: 

WmMe. 

Wright. 


131 
443 


■IS 

i,«> 
wii' 


917 
1,0« 



'4 ntatned lou* 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



AOBIC^TUBE. A& 

WOOL CUP OF uisiraaoTA ni 1874 asd 187S, bt oouKTua. 





IWfc 


1BT3. 


CsutlM. 


.!SS>. 


pSS.. . 


nZ-S, 


p^x 




Wt.»Ol 


M»,»8 


»1,T4S 








iSS::::::::::;::::;":::::::::: 


'■a 

8« 
1^ 


8,«6S 

87» 

'«! 

11 fit 


1,114 
478 


;f 


i 

t.TlS 


n® 














Seeee—^ 


BOS 

MU 

4011 

aoii 

ill 

5k 
IS 

4,633 

•■i 

"S 

'■& 

SB 

•i 

i:3i 
.,! 

a 

49G 

J;| 

»,8»l 


B6,'311 
ll,4C3 

1 

a.tM 

••as 

"«! 

SI.2SS 

•■» 

tl 
w. 

ie.i7o 

"if 

!:i 

1.S!( 


i?-S?.' 


^Mnor. 

GoSb?'.;;. ..■.:....::.■:.;.:;.■::. 
g^;:;:::.:::::::::;:::::;::: 


30,182 
B.8B4 

IS 
SIS 










KanatiK! 

Kinillfvfal ._ 




■IS 

•■u 

BSD 

■BS 

a 

1 

liou 

3:«M 
1 

I.3M 


"■8M 


iinl.'L;;i".; ; :'.:".'../.'.: ".'.■. i: :: i: 


»l.(»a6 
13,710 






g!r.™v;::::::::::::;::::;:;; 

Pop* 


11,1S) 

112 

l».B8ft 

4, £32 

2H 

6,lfi3 


ifcr-v-:;;;;;;;;:::;::; 

Siir"--.:;: ;:•.■.:■ 








?aj;:;;.;:;:;::;;:::;;::::::::;; 


13,15« 
MtSS 
U.QI« 
3M 
1,44& 

aliin 


Wublacton 

JffS;-.:-.:-.:::-.-.:;;::;.::::::: 


•■a 
•i 


IS.87tt 


KI<«jiWMt* 





■ tha eosDllM Uikt In m4 ratnriMd lo 



JigilizedbyGoOt^lc 



56 8TATISTI08 OF HINNE8OTJI. 

DAIRI PB0DUCI8 or KINHESOtA IM 1874 AITO J878, BT CODMTIES. 







itn. 




1873. 




ConiiM««. 


Mllcb 
Cow*. 


i t 

11 38 


mieh 
Cow*. 


»i 


P^«T^^, 




lO^lB 


16S,«M 


10,140.3111 


1,0JI*IB 








7M 


IK.418 


i 


££;;:;:::::;;;::;-::::: 






S^i 


•£S 






ss 


g;r ::::::::;.::;■■;; 

iai»i-f". 




4,7M 

'•a 

;;i 

■« 

•i 

4,473 

CM 
2413 
4,M1 


IS.TSX 

Ii 

s,s 
'Is 

m.^ 

i)l 
1U.E01 

4,460 

31 MO 

«0,40l 

449;sft< 

l»,e07 
14:47G 

'"■Hi 

JSS 

S8.B93 


!i 




i 

;i 
"& 

^f 

1 

803 

*'m8 
4.«1 
170 

ii 

4;8i« 

716 

'i 

!;| 

897 

i 

E,431 

!;S 




i< 


Si'i'r' ■■■'■■■■■■•■■■:•: 


1;i 




4:s 








'■•s 


ffi""":"::.;;:.:::.::::': 




•■s 

3>si 

'«..»« 






5Str.i-i ::::.::..■■: 


i-^ 








"^ 






"iff 








i5 






ffl 




StntUU 


a.i« 












3,7M 

lis 

*^ 


168.639 
H,3a8 

lolaoi 

«»;8o! 






]^!» 




I"""* 


.1?^ 






?^!-"":;::":-:::::: 


7T« 






WuMiigtiiDl'.'-illi'. "'/"'.'. 




I.I7| 


4;32<' 

S0O,747 
1 1.433 


'SS 








^S 


WrlghL 



tnm (ruahopixr Injsrlw. 



« (ha SOdqUm lb*t Id 1S74 n 



DigilizedbyGoOgle 



AaBtOOLTUBB. 





Mtai* ot OoutT- 


wai^v. 


OiT«- 


loSSi* 


IpjDTtd. 


LOM. 


IijBi^d. 


B»b*li 
Lou. 






M0.417 


8,M^«B 


«*.]» 














1 

"is 

1^817 
17,sr4 

f 

•IS 

AM* 


11,4W 

SS;!i! 

BtTG 

sSiii? 

IS 

es,tKK 

UT.MI 


i 

M7 

I.ll 

4,M 
H 

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!S 
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It 








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&;sv.v.v.v.v.:::::;::::: 
a?^;wii;.;.;.;v.v.v.:::::: 

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so 


j.d?.'iD":.'.::::. :;■;;:: ::::;::: 
};KX"""". :::: 


"S'SS 














1 
'■I 


5>i«S:::::.;::": ■.;;:":;::::; 

Korrij 


1R.T87 


14 


te;:"r;.:v.v:.v;,v.:::.:;:::- 


114, DM 














u 


WiM.iiw.n 


"Iffi 




YiiiowMriwn;;;.:.. ;.■.■.:::::: 


a,<M7 





OOBK. 


.ABUT. 




r.. 


Nuna of Conntr- 


InJartd. 


Bii>li*l« 


iDjsred. 


'sr 


AOrM. 
Injartd. 


B„.^ 




34,IM 


7SS,41lk 


8,301 
401 

3a 

14 

TO 

so: 

i 


ti8,«2 


W 








B3!L«."-v.;;;::;:::: 


1 

IS, 

OT 
t.014 


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44,390 


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&;a."r"::::;:;: ■;;■■::• 






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t 


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1,4S5 

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,.db,Googlc 



58 BTATiarioa OF Minnesota. 

ORiSaUOPPER DAHAOB IN 18T4— ConUDned, 





.^„„.. 


PoTi 


TO.,. 


..^ 




Acre* 
iDjtrad. 


^:' 


Acre. 
Injarad. 


Bqakali 

LOH. 


Acraa 
Ipjarwl. 


■jSf 


Total 


tu 


iB,aM 


a,7J« 


m.4» 


l,Ol» 


n.tn 






• 
M 

> 
le 

900 


es 

1 

t 


les 

it 

? 

as 

a 

s 

21 
80 
» 

S 

SOU 
M 

1 


11,«*3 

!Si 

13.1 1& 

10,J67 

a.wi 

18 3M 

1 

"IS 

'i 
,1 

l»,»i8 

Si 


i 


s 






Ootio n wood V. '. ' /.".'.'. 1 r. '. 1 ^ .' 

5iT":'.;.;.;.":::.:::::: 


9 


a 


Ij.^;lP.rt. 


ai 

9 

j| 

m 

ia 

ISO 

s 

» 

M 
IB 




^■;=-EB 


iii 
5.on 




••in 






4 

4 
IS 

a 


■i 

MS 

ii 


an 










KS;-: :::: 

SS5.™::;:.:...:;::;:::; 




Tallow Hadlclii* 











"" 


b™. 


CD1.T.71 


r»D-*T. 


FI^. 


HMDOorConDt;. 


li^nred. 


«.' 


Injiind. 


Ton* 
Loa«. 


Aeras 

Injnrad. 


Bo. B»4 
LoiU 




lot 


»,a8i 


I,W1 


a,d3t 


»,«a 


suaa 










KH 


HI 










1.047 


i'itt 






36 






?.?w«^d.-.v.:-.v;;::::-::: 






sn 


1.181 














M4 

M 

St 

3M 


t^ 




a 


at 










•i"-;;;-;vV^^^.i;; 


i 


iii 


0! 


'iJ! 






48 


■*M 


«n 


sSse-e;;;;;-;- 


ii 


11 


4 


la 


1 












Polk 

g;s?::::::-:;:;-:;:;:::' 


i 














2 














■W.Wbw»d 

WHkln 

Tallow Madlclna 






m 


w 


!;» 


ii,n* 



Dl (ivao Id lown of Lrnd. 



,.db,Google 



AOBiOUr.TDBB. 



RETURNS FOB lB7fi. 



Ttie eDUmeratiOD by the tovDship aaseseors, upon vhich the agri' 
caltar&l report is based, is made in the moDtha of May and JuDe, 
while the crops of the current year arc yet grovring, and for thi» 
reason embraces no returns of crops of the currant year, except a» 
below stated, bnt only the acreages under each of snch crops, while 
for the preceding year both yields and acreages of prodncts are 
taken. Maple sugar and syrup being spring products, are returned 
for the current year, as are also the number of apple trees growing 
and in bearing, grape vines in bearing, the number of sheep and 
amount of wool shorn, and the naraber of milch cows on fanns. 
Aside from the items just named, all yields of produoia for the cur- 
rent year 1873, as given in this report, are estimates made by the 
Commissioner of Statistics on the baaie of the returned crop-acrea' 
ges, private crop-reports, and estimates of grasshopper-injury tn 
1875, the latter nirnished by the state grasihopper commiasloners. 

The average as well as the aggregate production of most crops 
was good in 1875, notwithstanding continued grasshopper inj'iries 
in the west and a visitation during the wheat and oats harvest of ,» 
aeries of those violent rain storms which throughout the country 
canght the same crops in the harvcsUaeoaon, causing even greater 
damage in a number of other states than in Minnesota. On the 
main portion of the breadths assigned to wheat and oats, the yield 
per acre was greater in 1875 than in any preceding year 
since 1860, and the aggregate quantities harvested of these 
grains were larger than ever before raised in the state. 
Also of corn the product exceeded that of any former jear, 
but in the case of this cereal owing entirely to an unusual en- 
largement of acrea^. A bacltward spring, late frosts and grass- 
hoi^pers made the season just passed one ol the poorest on record 
for corn, the state-average per acre being the lowest in nine years. 
But every county in the state largely increased its corn-acreage in 
1875, and most of all the 28 western counties which had been vis- 
ited by grasshoppers in 1874, so that while the cultivated area of 
the whole state was increased not quite 11 per cent., the corn-acre- 
age of the 28 counties grew 63.53 per cent, in 1875, and the corn- 
acreage of the balance of the slate 33.85 per cent. The same move- 
ment was observable to a lesser degree in some of the minor crops 



zedbyGoOgle 



60 STATI8TICB OF KINMBSOTA. 

And generally wiUi better resuItB as to yields. The ordinary ratio 
of increase in the wheat breadth was consequently leasened, the 
acreage being 62.68 per cent, of the whole cnltivated area of Uie state 
In 1875, against 66.25 per cent. In 1874. Judging from past expe- 
rience) however, this change will not be permanent, the money raloe 
per acre of wheat being ordinarily greater than that of other pro- 
ducts thus far BuccessloUy raised, notwithstaDding the fact that the 
valae to our farmers of wheat is reduced by the necessity for iU 
export to distant markets, while the value of other grains is enluu- 
ced by a constant home demand that even requires the importatioB 
annually of large quantities fVom other states. 

The acreage under each crop in 1875, and estimate of ytddi 
thereon, will be found in the table on pages 10-11 of this reporb 
Other summary statements of the returns of 1875 are iucladed En 
the comparative summaries on pages 65 to 69. Compared with 1874 
the cultivated area of the state in 1875 shows an increase of ST7,906 
acres, or 10.94 per cent. It will be observed that a little more thu 
one-flfth of this augmentation, or 55,733 acres, is in the 28 conntiei 
returning losses from grasshoppers in 1874. Fully aware of tbi 
earpaSBiog excellence of their lauds, and hoping for a speedy deliv- 
erance Trom the Insect- plague, the severely -tried farmery of the 'lan- 
ded setttements have shown the pluck and endurance of true west- 
ern pioneers, and no farms have been abandoned except in a com- 
paratively few cases, whore removals, temporary or permanent, 
were compelled by extreme poverty. Indeed, the past year has wit- 
nessed quite a considerable influx of new settlers into the very heart 
of the infested regions, and there is no good reason to doubt that 
ere long these districts will be among the largely grain prodacing 
and prosperous portions of the state. The effects of the insect in- 
vasion on the dimensions of the acreage under cultivation has thos 
far been simply to diminish the ratio of annual increase, the increase 
for 1875 in the whole state being 10.94 per cent., and in the coun- 
ties not ravaged 11.80 per cent., while in the twenty-eight counties 
invaded in 1874 the increase is 8.60 per cent. The increase, posi- 
tive and comparative, in 1875 of cultivated acreages in these coon- 
ties, is shown more fully in the subjoined comparative acreage taUe 
for 1875 and 1874 : 



zedbyGoOgle 



AautaovruBB. 





... 


wn. 






Dac^aa. 


Aeraaia 


In aaeh 


S^V'JS 




3 

r 




J 

•3 

i 


5. 

if 


i.«a.»T 

•421:112 


1 
i 

BJ.879 

n,8e9 
45;a8: 

108,387 

— 709 
S90 




S;«S:?Biv.::: 


M.t» 


1.C81.BW 

Ifll.SN 
38J.I33 

_!?:»! 

tteAM 

b'.3U 
4.T87 

i,7ia 
Cms 


«B.in 

14,740 
4«,M« 

-t,m 

\m 

1.W 

3H 

—IIS 

T.IM 
4^ 


47. 97 
14 90 


-i;!5 




lO.W 


4.12 

t'.'ii 

l.M 
0.23 


1,104, IDS 

mloM 

441,101 

BtS>>D 

113,148 

~»4;S 

»8.a!r 
0.IM 

44,430 

S,I64 

4,s«e 

\% 


4.S9 


Si-.tsSffi:::: 


ii.ira 




16.10 
T.ZI 

s.b; 

W.I(I 

a.*3 

J:i!_ 

9.19 

D.M 
OM 

l.U 




Kali body or U«>r« 

Tb.!8eoi»ll«ofl8"— 


33.81 
41.99' 


IWn ba4l oru* arw 


S:S 




1.M 

0.14 


63.0* 


turn bodi ot itia ar« 

TheaSeoonllMof W*.... 


-16.88 




o.u 


Ul 

771 

3,3(4 

81( 

8,140 
1,M4 

1> 


-8.« 


■UOEWaUT. 


11.44 




13 

o.u 

0.10 

O.M 
t.M 


3,«Ba 

3,3B! 

lloia 

6.294 
VtiK 

i,9:« 

3ti,H7 

039 

BJl 


W.94 


¥f?."sS":,'5Si:::: 


219.00 
74.40 




o.w 

O.TJ 
O.M 


1.IH 

u.atM 




S?^'S;S-Si,;;: 






S;S 

O.M 

3. as 
o.ae 


l.M 
0.03 

0.0« 
0.38 

o.« 

o.u 
o.n 

o.n 


7,308! 21.89 


UatDbodTortbaarn 

Tl.aS8«>0Dil«oll674.... 


4M;109:87 




1,14« 

titM 

Wi,lW 

7, IK 
13.001 


1,610 

105»3 
90,9BE 
17,6M 

aSoc 


«U| 67.94 


onLTITiTaD HIT. 

Si«t;'jr.r,Si.:: 


-.,!! 


18.63 




4.10 
0'4T 


79« 

1,8« 

-i;74 


0.76 


Sl-.nsBl:?',!!i::: 


!-S;S 


TfeaaUt* 

■OFa IMD HIBCKLLtNTOUe 

SfK:Si:fSi::: 


o.n 
o.n 

"Toi" 


»,T16 

as,i3i 

I.BM30I 


I.15( 

- SOI 

l,»OI 


6.08 
-3.31 






SOI 
2C,I7 

m;73; 


1.30 


Si^'-Sr.,'?.!;- 


11. eo 
B.00 


Tlaitata 


lW-00 


MO,m 


100.00 


M11.41 


!D7J0«1 10.94 



N. B.— Inenaaa Id 1874 la 



a compatad witb iHII. 



zedByGoOglC 



di . STATISTICS OF HINHBSOTA. 

Detailed eatimateB or injured acreage and loss in 1875 have been 
fbrnlslied by the state graasbopper commission only Tor the thras 
leading cereals, wheat, oats and corn. Tbey are as follows : 





WbMl. 


0*U. 


Con. 




du^^d. 


BDSbeli 

lOB. 


AcrM 


Bn*h.li 
low. 


daml^. 


»!S? 


ess-::::::.. 


300 

41,3>0 

1 


3000 

■sss 

7,000 

si 

s.Doa 

441,M1 
I28,6M 


IS 

l.EOO 

'!S 

S,000 


■S 

so.a» 

s 

am 

SG.0«O 

"1!S 

1M.0MI 






IS 


SX 


91 
OM 






"« 














Jfsra ::■.::::; 
a;'.:.;::.:,.: 


a,in 


1 


Wntonvftii 








a)7,«77 ' 2.najs7 


S>.1B1 


I.GU.331 


4s.oca 


5B3.iet 



The footings of the foregoing table compare as follows with the 
Assessors' returns of losses in 1874 to the Commissioner of Statis- 
tics: 



Acres damaged. 

1874. 1S7S. 

Wheat 240,117 207,677 

Oats S3,126 eS,lEl 

Com 8i,139 4S,0SO 



1,028 
11,111 



880,681 816,878 

DecreiselQ 1B75, la wheat, acres 82,740 

iDcreaaeln 1878, Id oats and corn 12,137 

Decrease In 187S, acres 20,608 



IdT*. 



WhMt !t,SU,eD9 

Oata 1,81«.733 

Caro 738,111 



ia7t. 



San. 1D1>. 


Pt.kto. 


IncnaH. 


>,8>3 7a9 


IIM 


— tS3,01fi 


i,«s5.ai 


aw* 


-IS1,«« 


B86.0ta 


12.M 


-163,3« 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AOBICDLTURB. 63 

Sbowit^ ■ decreue in 1876 ia tbe Amount ot loss of each of the 
three grains aggregatiDg 587,882 basheis, anii a loss per acre of 
3.85 bushels leu of oats and 6.64 boBhels leas of corn, while the 
loss in wheat is 0.51 bushels more per acre ia 1875 than in 1874. 

As already showa, the field of grasshopper operations was con- 
•iderably lessened, and also to a certain degree charged, in 1875, 
the inaeota having disappeared in eleven of tbe twenty-eight coun- 
tiea of 1874, and committed depredations in 1875 in three new cosn- 
tieSt where late in the preceding year they bod appeared, depositing 
ciggs but not materially damaging crops. 

The Commisatoner of Statistics' estimates of yield of wheat, oats 
and corn in 1875 are in detail as follows ; 



Wheat— Acres sown. 


Bnsheta prodnced. 


Average. 


Halo bodr ortbe area l.tll.ieT 


»T,BiB,881 


1950 


The 80 grassbopper 






eonntlu of 137S— 






Nottnjared U5,!SS 


S,6U,770 


18.00 


lojared SOT, 677 


I,«4*,8» 
81,478,000 


(.48 


IB sUte, acreage md yield 1,764,100 


1734 


TA*a An tKa Vnr HTT tnlnrHl •CMa .. . 


S,89B,TS8 




Oats- 






Haln body of tbe area 889,S»S 


18,787,997 


40.50 








coddUc* of 1875- 






Not Injured SS.ISS 


1,8T«,2M 


KOI 


Injured 63,1BI 


e3»,41S 


10.18 


rnttieaUtfl.acreageaiidTleld 141,191 


I5,77B,C00 


86.80 


Loss on the 68 ISl lojared aorss.x. •• >• 


],U8,281 


S5.W 


Corn- 
Main body of tb« area I70,9S0 


8,578,450 


81.00 


do do iTO.esa 


8,110,060 


ZS» 


81>,6» 


8,688,500 


87.18. 


Onssboppei^lDjored U.OSO 


811,500 


18.01 








In tbe state, acreage and yield 864,688 


»,500,000 


86.00 


iMea on tba tS.OiQ lolDied scret 


688,CS0 


18.99 



Tbe estimated average yields per acre on the main portion of the 
area of other products were : barley. 37 ; rye, 18 ; buokwbeat 12 ; po> 
t*toes, 97 : beons, 1S.50. 



zedbyGoOglC 



61 8TATI8T108 OF MINNESOTA. 

The forgoing averages compare as follows with the average per 
aore la 1874, ezclusiva of the grasBhopper-injured acreages in the 
Utter year: 



WhMt 

OiU 

Com 

Btrtey 

Bfe 

Backwheat .. 
Potatoes-... 



187S. 


I87i. 


19.50 


IG.H 


40.00 


8J.87 


87.18 


81.87 


8T.00 


!3.t7 


18. 


IMS 


IS. 


18. 1> 


97. 


89.17 


ISM 


tl.M 



The foregoing eatimates of yields in 1875 give eighteen bneheli 
per acre as the general average of yield + loss of wheat in 
the twenty grasshopper counties of that year. Using the aaine 
average for each of those counties as the best available baais of a 
calculation, In the absence of specific returns, the result is as fol- 

lOWS! 



CeuUM. 


Aem 


Ka. baihaU 
■tlSbni. 


DSdDCt 

bnihsli 
loM. 




ttiii^33p« 




MJ193 

IS 

'bij 

^i 

'ill' 

»,8S7 


SI .Git 

'■S:S 

SI8.7M 
2M.S84 

S09.41» 

83,ft>2 
G10,9!0 
1)'8.M» 

aM:»i 


B.OOO 

aoolooo 

ii 

«7,33S 

Ik 

S:SS 

1,200 
1!3,G0€ 


4B,tlB 
t20.0M 
107 ,183 

ii 
lis 

103,2M 

m,sw 




















{?^r«r;:;:::;;:;::;::: 












SE^r-""r:;::';: 


ij.> 


S-;;:=;:::: 


H.» 




U.I 

s. 


Total 


»tI,Rlt 


«,3aa,»6 


»,3»3,7S7 


i.mi» 


io.n 



D,j.,.db,Googlc 



AORICULTURR. (l5 

ACKkAOK OHDES WHEAT, OATS, CORN AXD BARLET III I87S, BT 00 UNTIES. 





WhMt. 


o.». 


Cora. 


B..l.y 




No. of MTM 


s...,.^ 


No, of icrn 


No. Dl .cm. 




1.I«1,109 

'•Si 

Si;JS 

ii;wi 

M,IW1 

.lis 

S3, 18! 

lJi:386 

I.MI 

M>* 

ii|;isj 

'^ii!' 

7,«0 

n,iK> 

iS, 

119.364 

■if 

!;:S! 

MMt 

B 

..if 


«1.IC« 


W4,M8 


44.130 








,3 

lOJOI 

B.n« 

13,297 

i:o» 

22.072 

e,i30 

lfi,991 

„JS 

11.130 
1844 

1JGI 

1.429 

■"■*io',i»"" 

2,B3« 

B,G98 
Bllll 

1 

1,3 IS 

'■•r, 

4«&3 

7.(i3» 
8.00 
<.479 

4 

Btl 

"i 

».0(I0 

liii 




^■■■■rZi-Ei:^: 


!0« 






^^e;;£=;z 


S!^ 


S?Sii- ■.■.■.;■.■■:;•.■.;::;:::;:::: 


33.306 
13,0M 

lO.»08 

:l 

!S! 

1,W3 

'si 

489 
2.880 

,!S 

1,840 
13IKI 

■s 

lOH 

"■•s 

1,408 
■ ,418 
•'in 

im 








^rowWlm 


1<>9 




Kfer.-;-;;-.-.-.v.v.-.r.-.:-.;; 


430 
998 


&e--e;eee. 


Ts 






KSSi;::.:;::-":;:::::;::;: 

KmndtrobU 

USinur 


13 

88 
189 










oSSSj-.::::::::::;:::::::::::::: 


•1 






fSi:;:: ::::::::::-:";:;::::::;: 




IS:;;;;:;::;;:;;;;;;;;;:::;: 














S 


WkUd» 

;SSi:::.::;:::::::;.::-:::::::- 

Wrighl 


1U 

■■!S 



■MM Id ItoMM >r* Ikon nporlad bj th* SMW 



zedbyGoOgle 



STATISTICS OF HINHESOTA. 



AMD BUJn n ■ 



CoiatlN. 


Bf.. 


Bgckwbatl. 


PotatOM. 


— 


Ko. orAe«. 


No. of ACM 


Ncof Aera*. 


N&oTAcnL 


T«ul. 


1^ 


*m 


»^ 


t;m 


«»•»«?«:»».'.■.";;;".'."""'.';. 


trr 

10 

«■■■■ 


Ml 

■s 

• 


IN 

'■a 

'« 
a 

•« 

:| 

IF* 

M 
31 

M 

i 

ss 

i 

ni 

Kt 

M« 

tia 
m 

■■I 

N 
IM 

■I 










1S3 




S^EP=-EE 


T 






g^»«fj"* 


T 

s 
s 

f" 


N 


:?« 




S 

M 

S 

.." 
S 

!'"■ 

it 

r 
i 

1 

u 

s 
s 

i 

8 










5SSS^......:v.::;.:::;:::::.::: 


1% 


^p:::::,:,-- 


ji' 




■s 




IT 




K»S,ii:;:;;:;::;:;;:::.::::: 


w 


SJar-:::::::::::::::;:::;::: 


i 

ii" 

«■" 

i 


li 


S?-;r".-;.v.-,::;::;:::::::::: 


? 










fc^--:;;;:;;;:;;:::::::::;: 


1 

» 




an 




gr-;:;;;;;;;;;;;;;;::;;;;;;; 


s 










1 




S^SU..:::-;::::"-::::::::: 


s 


R£S^::::^^::-;:::::::::: 


M 


J* 


^^lEE-;;;;;:-" 




Y»UowliiJiyoiV..'.V.;;V."".'"' 


~..., 


1 


■f 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



AORICULTUUE. 



CMmtlM. 


8.,... 


CnltlTatwl 
H.J. 


Hopi 


Flu. 


llllckCow 


BbM^ 


Wool. 




AOTM. 


Aelt. 


Ac». 


Aerw. 


NBmb«r. 


Noicb.r. 


Poond.. 




1.SM 


llH.SfiT 


IM 


ta.83s 


17<,2S8 


•MB ,021 


•WI.9M 






•g 


IS 




1 


l.TH 
<,7BS 

a,'«7B 

1 

2i 

!;S 
i^ 
!;!S 

i 

1.1W 


i,ais 


'■a 




KSSiv;:::::::::;- 








•■IS 

St 

M 

-if 
% 

g 

i" 

1,W8 

«i« 

a; 
J 


, i 


.,«s 


».s 






^S^""- 


SB 

I 

li' 

i' 

i 

■ 

J 


1 


■■■m 


'Is 


»«.((7T 

1,818 




a'fci*:::::::.::: 

Crj»Wln( 


! 

*>■■ 

"n»" 

IT 


l,BO' 

S:!S 

10 

w 


B 
1 










E 








"■5S 
!:g) 




••JS 


■as 


LMtBlParlo 


aj( 


£<Ar«M- 


«3 
»" 

V 






4,H8 

MT 

'•a 

3i 
;|! 

'SM 

1:S 
1 

LIB 
a,o«s 

'S 

4.0M 


u,ni 

■i 


SSTui::;.:-.::::: 


•ffi 

m 

is 

!;!g 

i 

to 

4,06t 

'■S 

••s 

'« 
11 


"ISTI::::.:::;::;: 
JSasr-:-.:::-.:::: 


I 


t! 


4 


...... 


1 

Ml) 










BR;;- ■:•:■■•:■..:■■ 


ax 


w 

'■3 
.3... 


H 


a 


S:;;;:;;:::;;; 


t 

s 




giS""; ■.■::: 


"J'S? 










i: 


1,1U 

J. 




SiST' ■■■::;:::::: 


Ml 




1 

M 

ii" 


T.8H 


..... 






i«5 




wICIiJirtii;; ;::;;;:: 


"1 


:l 


m 


4,ira 


Wl«on« 


.s 


•I 


■J 


11,»M 
U.SM 



■ Ualla ira tlioiit r^poiied bj the Btot* GmabvpiMr 

MrrotB gnMhoppanla IVt. 

M tlm* of lb* as inanition. 



zedbyGoOglC 



nATisnos or hihmbsota. 



CodbUm. 


Bt^ 


Baekwlwiit. 


~1^«>^ 


BOMI. 


No-orAorai 


Ho, of Aem. 


No. or ACTM. 


No-oTAerM. 




t;iw 


■ W 


»fisa 


S»l 




ffiK::::::::-::::;;:::::;;:;;::: 


in 

%■'■■ 


Mt 

S 

IM 
W 

IT 


331 

IS 

S! 

•1 
» 

1 
^« 
% 

1 

'•fs 

w 

Si 

i 

u 

!S 
,.| 

M 

m 

s 

no 
Its 


IT 

m 


s^ef-=;e 


IB 


f 








1 

80 

■s 


m 


f 


I>»kot.....*. 

^^i::::-::::::::::::-::- 


s 

i 

t 


?,X" t. . ..... ::;;:..::: : ;:.::; 

nilmort 

SS!K::::::::::::;::::::.:::::: 

Qnnt 


U 


BOUMO 


M 




» 






i 
ii" 

li 

N 

'i 
B 

i 


>x 






31 

¥' 

i 

at 

i"' 

n 

4 

n 

4M 




iJT" ...: :;::;; ::■ 


N 


^•:::^::£E^E: 


IS 


MarrbOB 








OtMr TUI 

Polk 




&^:"-"::EE=E 


s 




J 

H 




^zS^EEz 


31 

S 








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zedbyGoOgle 



AOBICULTUKE. 



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nap. 


Flu. 


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zedbyGoOgle 



STATISTICS OF HINNESOTA. 





^»L.TB.... 


a>in TiKBi 


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zedbyGoOJi 



STATIBTI08 OF HINNESOTA. 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

BEOISTEEBD U 1874. 



Th« nambers or births snd deaths in eaeb county in 1874, w 
•hown by tbe toira clerks' registries, wero u follows : 



Biniu. Dutlu. 



Births. Death*. 



Total 

Anoka 

Becker 

BentOD 

Bine Eartb. . . 

Brown 

Carlton 

Carver 

Chippewa. . . 

Chl»a«o 

Crow Vring. . 

Dakota 

Dodge 

DoQglaa 

VaribaalC... 

Pillmore 

Freeborn.... 
Ooodboe ... . 
Hennepin ... 
Hooston ..... 

IsintI 

Jack«on 

Kandiyohi.... 

Lake 

LeBaenr 

HcLeod 

Hartlo 

Meeker 

HUleLaca... 
Horrlflon . . . . 



10 Mower 

6 Nicollet'...'. 

IT Nobles 

18 Olmsted. ■>■ 

8 Utter Tall.. 

» eioe 

SFope 

•i Banisey .... 

2 Redwood... 
16 Renville.... 

« Rice 

ORock 

11 SLLonto.... 

II Scott 

18 Sberbarne .. 

4 Sibley 

I Stearns ... 

II Steele 

5 Stevens .... 

3 Swift 

9 Todd 

■ Wabasha 

:A Waden^ 

8 Waseca 

9 Washington . 
9 Watonwan... 

9 Winona 

8 Wright 



zedbyGoOgle 



^rfir* 


'^T.:' 


4.7H 


4,669 


4,694 


9,264 


E,9S8 


e,T84 


6,786 


11. m 


6,W9 


11,080 



TITAL BIATinnOB. 71 

The totkli for the Ave yeara, dariog which the gysteaiB of regU- 
tering births and deatha has been in operation, are : 

BaclMarad 

Tmm. Blrtkt. 

UrO. 9.44T 

1S71 1S,96S 

ISn. 14,S63 

Un. I7.IM 

16T4. 1T,M9 

78,419 S7,S8I 46,G47 

Hon^ Th* unmlMr of il«U» In IBTO, u BboT* itTaa. 1* lb* nnubcr iliawi bj th* Ant 
■MI*««tBra, «nbi*elBf tb* twalTamentli Jmankr^ lit lo DM«iiilMr31it (irib«(Ut*-T«tarn 
jttx. Tb« annbor 3,BK. u (iTsn In fbrmar raporU, eovcn Ik* Diilt*d ButM oaiai jnt 
IkoBVnjat, UN, MJaa* 1, IdlO. 

OlaMM^kation of Birtlu and D«cUht.—Tbtt births of 1870, the 
deaths of 1670, and the births or deaths of an; sabaeqaent yfiar, 
as spoken of in thia report, are births and deaths that occurred in 
1870 or the sabseqnent year named. Births and deaths are regis- 
tered in the year of their occurrence, and a year's returns comprise 
the registered number of the birtiis and deattu ocourring in the 
twelve months beginning January Ist and ending December 8l8t. 
Tbe numbers of returned births and deaths for 1870, the first year 
of registration, were published in the second annual report of the 
barean by conaties without further dassiDcation. The returns for 
1671, published in the third annaal report, were classified under 
rarions heads, the births by connty, sex, twins, illegitimate and 
principal parent nativities ; the deaths l^m nineteen of the prin- 
lApai death-causes, by county, deathn^ause, sex, age and birth-place 
as bom in the United States and bom in foreign and unknown coun- 
tries. Tbe whole number of deaths was also classified by county, 
sex and age. For the tabulation of the returns for 1872 new classi- 
flcatiODs were adopted, showing in better form the parent nativities 
(rf persons born, and including, aa to deaths, a very oontplete nos- 
ol<^ similar to the arrangement of death-caasea in ose in Hassa- 
oboMtls. Tbe tabulation of the retams for 1878 and 1874 Is 
anif<mn with that for 1872. 

BIRTHS BKOtSTEBXD IM 1874. 

The toUls of the several divisions of tbe birth table for 1874 
compare as follows with those of the three last preceding years : 



zedbyGoOglC 



78 STATISTICS OP UIKNBliOTA. 

Birtha bg Sex:— 

im. un. 1812. laiL 

Hkle 9,S1( ifiK T,T5t T.OM 

FeiDKle 8,616 S,t79 T,14S C,TU 

8cz not raport«d 108 US 6E IH 

ToUlb7S«z 1T,93S 17,118 U,WS \»,9it 

Birtht by Nationality of ParenU:^ 

' m*. isn. isra. un. 

American, both 4,81(9 4,261 8,888 8,883 

American Atber ftDd foreign motber SST 619 488 tC9 

Foreign hther and American mother 1,181 t,05T 888 6TS 

German 8,9TS 8,889 8,78S S.ttl 

Norwestan 8,708 1,448 2,047 1,880 

Swedish 1,881 1,266 1,079 «21 

Irish .' 1,187 1,227 1,241 1,668 

CaDadian G90 886 606 Glfi 

Other conntrles and not reported 3,184 2,092 1,163 1,060 

Total b7 Parent-KMtvitr 17,089 17,123 14,962 18,968 

Twlna and UlegUimate birtkt: — 



Ttrlns— Hales.... 
Pemilesx 



Twin children, total 887 8S4 816 2S4 

Illegitimate— Holes 46 86 86 88 

Femalei 81 48 40 43 

lUegltlmate, total 77 St 76 81 

Among tbe twins ia included one birtli of male triplets reported 
flrom Goodhue. Also, one female cliUd reported u twin ftoa 
Douglas. The odd child ia tke oumtwr of twins is a hermaphrudite, 
reported from Hennepin. 

DEATHS BKQI8TKRBD IK 1874, 

In tbe comparative statement of the totals of the death tables, as 
below given, a numiwr of 1,116 deatba in 1873, loft wboU> anciaas- 



I 



,.db,Google 



TUAL siATisnos. 78 

Ifted in last year's report, becaaae of ansatisfaetory naming of dexth- 
causes, have been olaasified as to sez, age, nativity and parent- 
natlvlty,and added to the respective subdivisions in tbedeatb tables 
for 1878. Ttie ci£aiQcation of these 1,116 deaths in 187S is shown 
Id subjoined note. 

DeathabsSex:— 

iBH. 1813. itn. isn. 

Hale B,7W 8,208 3,8S0 S,SU 

Female 8,1S» 1,563 2,878 3,110 

TotaldeathB «,90& S,T<6 0,238 4,094 

KoTB.— OaulBcitlOD of I,llt SmUi Ib 1)13, not eUtitfltd Id riport of ISH: 
8n— Hftt*. «1 FBm«I*,4S5. 
Matinti— DDlMd StBtM, M., 171, F., IT). ForMin caniitiiM, H., lU, F., SO. Vat eItm, 

M.,36, F.,n. 
P*r*at-N>llTUr— Both parmts AmarteiB, X., lOT, F., 88. Both foriign, X., SBO, 7., SIS. 

amarlcma rathnavKOnlsnmatbaT, tL.T.r^t. ForalcD dither and Amuioai BOthM, 

H., ia,F.,U. Not sI'M. M., N, F., 79. 



af»- 

Dadn I. Undar 2. Usdar S. Undar 1. Uodar S. Tot*l Didar 1. 
Mai* 3» aa 17 19 > SH 



Dddvrlft Undartt. UndwM.Undn'aB. UadarSO. Undw 3f . 



DnderW. Dndar «. UDdar U. Undar DC Dndar N. Dndar W. 



UndarTO. UidarH. UndarSB. SOandnp. HotOlraa. Total. 



D«alh» bfi general claasijleation : — 

ISM. 1BT3, an. 

Dnmber of deaths with death-coDse reported and 
dasslfled In the general death-table nnder the sev- 
eral classes or the adopted nosoloicy S,S08 4,SS0 4,SS7 

Number of deaths with death-caoae not reported- ••■ l,40e 1,116 891 



8,909 S,7B8 8.31S 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



74 BTATISTtOS OT MIMHBaOTA. 

OeaOu by Ota$ttt of DMUk-Oautet .— 

tat. isn. . un 

J. Zjmotlc dlMiaM— >U1e 1^77 9M l,OM 

Fenude 1,017 77) S8) 

ToUl-.t S,194 I,71S 1,88« 

II. CoDfltltaUonaldlHases— U»U.. 488 401 8<s 

Fentftle 464 878 841 

Tout 902 774 70$ 

III.— Locid dlSMM— Mtle 768 707 068 

Femkle 61£ S4S 410 

Toul 1,888 I,3U >TS 

IV.— D«T«lopment«l dlUMM— Hftl« SS4 MB S48 

Female 870 Slfi >77 



ToUI... 



v.— Vlol«Qt dwttu— Hale .... 
Female. ■ 



Total.., 



Total of the flTe classes B,S08 4,SfiO 4,a87 

Add deathi with no deatb-cauH reported 1,406 1,116 8»1 

Total No. of deaths in the Tear. 6,999 5,766 5,)» 

Deaths by Nativity of pertont deceaud .*— 

1674. isn. wt. 
Uolled States— 

With death canaes raportad-Hales S,11S l,78S 1,671 

Female 1,861 1,499 1,416 

8,967 8,S61 3,067 

With death eanMSDOt reported— Hale 618 471 »6 

Female 477 877 801 

1,096 84S fil» 



JigiLizedbyGoOgle 



YTtAL STATISTiCB. 75 

Total-Hal« I.TIS 9,1M t.OM 

Female 1,SS> 1,886 1,717 

nait«d sutM, toui fi,ou ton 8,74s 



Vonign OonntrlM — 
With deftUi caoM* reported— Male . . 



1,8SS 1,260 1,108 



With deaUi eusaa not raport«d— Hil«... . 

Female.. 



Total— Hale.... 

Female.. 



Poielsn coontrlei, total 1,S» 1,468 1,2TS 

BIrth'place not reported— 

With death caOM reported— Kale 107 79 88 

Female 71 SO 64 



With death eaoae not reported— Male 

Female.. 



Total— Hale 140 114 IIS 

Female 108 88 84 

Birth-place not reported, total 148 909 210 

Total dmthf br natlTltr 6,808 s,766 s,9iS 

The natiritiea io 1871 were rep