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Full text of "Executive Documents, Minnesota"

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EXECUTIVE DOCUMENTS 



OP THE 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, 



FOR THE YEAR 1874. 



VOL. I. 



PRINTED BY AUTHORITY. 



SAINT PAUL : 

TBR PIONEER-PBESS COMPANY. 
1875. 



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HENNEPIN CO, LAW UB. 

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EXCHANGE 

UNlVr:R?" . Or ChCAOO 

LIBRARY 

MAY 8 '36 



PAGE. 
OOVKBNOR'S ME60AGB NO. 1. 

Bbport of Sbcbbtart of State No. 2 . 

Appendix— List of Notories Pabllc 23 

List of Commissioners for the State of Minnesota 42 

List of Coonty Officers 47 

Famishing Paper for Public Printing, Schedale of Proposals ... 65 

Record of Proceedings of Board of Anditors of State Treasnry. . 70 

Schedale of votes cast at General Election, 1874 78 

Report of Auditor of State No. 8. 

Land Department 88 

Appendix 55 

Statement ** A," showing appropriations of 1878, &c 57 

Statement <* B," showing estimated expenses of the State Goy- 

ernment for 1875 62 

Statement *< C," showing condition of tax accounts with the va- 
rious counties, Nov.80, 1874 65 

Statement ** D," showing action of State Board of Equalization 66 
Statement '*E," showing real property as equalized by State Board 68 
Statement <* F/' showing personal property as equalized by the 

State Board 70 

Statement *^ G," showing taxes levied for State and local pur- 
poses, for 1875 79 

Statement <*H," showing disbursements by warrants on the 

State Treasnry, during the year ending Nov. 80, 1874 88 

Statement*' I," showing bonded indebtedness of counties, cities 

and school districts 125 

Statement << J," showing proceedings of Commissioners of in- 
vestment of School and University funds r . . . 126 

Statement ** K," showing condition of Savings Banks, organ- 
ized under laws of 1867 127 

Statement " L,*' showing condition of Banking Associations ... 180 
Statement "M," showing cash on hand for redemption of circu- 
lating notes of Qanks closed in 1861 184 

Statement '< N," showing township organizations 185 

Report of State Treasurer No. 4. 

Appendix 15 



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IV INDBX. 

PAGE. 

RsPORT OF Attornbt Obmbbal No. 5, 

Report OF Adjutant Obnbral No. 6. 

Report of Board of Trastees Soldiers' Orphans' Home 21 

Report of the Saperintendent of the Home 26 

Report of the Surgeon of the Home 29 

Report of Saperintendent of Instmction of the Home dO 

Report of State Librariak No. 7. 

Report of State Prison No. 8. 

Inspectors' Report 3 

Warden's Report 18 

Report of State Reform School No. 9. 

Report of Commissioner of Statistics No. 10. 

Agriculture 4 

Vital Statistics * 56 

Property and Taxation 82 

Lands 86 

Population 98 

Navigation 97 

Logs and lumber in 1874 108 

Railroads 105 

ITnited States internal revenue 107 

National banks in-Mlnnesota 108 

Marriages and divorces 109 

Naturalization 110 

School statistics 112 

Internal revenue coUections 114 

Report of the Hospital for the Insane No. 11. 

Report of the trustees 5 

Treasurer's report 10 

Superintendent's report ^ 17 

Appendix 24 

Report of Institute for Deaf and Dumb, and the Blind, No. 12. 

Report of directors 9 

SuperiutendenVs report 11 

Treasurer's report 28 

Report OF Railroad Commissioners No. 18. 

Summary of tables 17 

Appendix to report. 25 



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[EXSCUTXYK BOGUMXNT NO. 1.] 



ANNUAL MESSAGE 



OP 



GOVERNOR C. K. DAVIS, 



TO THE 



JaEQI^LATUI^E OF ^IJSNE^OTA. 



DELIVERED JAN. 8, 1878. 



PRINTED BY AUTHORITY. 



SAINT PAUL: 

8T. PAUL PRB8S COMPAHT. 

1875. 



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ANNUAL MESSAGE 



OF 



GOVERNOR C. K. DAVIS. 



Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives': 

The year just ended has been one of general prosperity to 
our people. The financial embarrassments which have sus- 
pended the industries of other States have affected our own 
but little. The laborers have had employment. Failures 
have been infrequent, and our merchants are in excellent 
credit. The farmers have, as a general rule, secured abund- 
ant crops. They are out of debt, and now hold unsold the 
surplus of last year. For such blessings as these, it becomes 
us lo return thanks to the Author of all blessings, not only by 
the utterance of formal phrase, but with a devout sense of 
our dependence on His mercies. 

STATE AUPITOR. 

The report of the State Auditor presents a detailed state- 
ment of the financial transactions of the State, and the pres- 
sent condition of the various funds, from which has been 
condensed the following statement of receipts and disburse- 
ments: 

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^ oovebnob's message. 

Total receipts during the flscal year ending November 29, 

1874 ♦1,831,210 BT 

Total diBbarsements 1,148,059 9^ 

Leaving a general balance of. $ 188,160 91 

The receipts came Arom the following genera sources : 

Balance in treasury December 1, 1878 9*218,898 85- 

From tax duplicates 575,164 65 

From railroad companies in lieu of taxation . ; 129,907 08^ 

From insurance companies in lieu of taxation 25,505 62 

From insurance companies in lieu of fees • 4,845 8S 

Income from permanent school ftmd 189,826 74 

Income Arom permanent university Amd 11,524 5S 

From sale of school land 68,697 02 

From Side of timber on school lands 28,428 5]( 

From sale of university lands 4,457 85 

From sale of timber on university lands 6,618 01 

From sale of internal improvement lands 122 8)^ 

From loan for erection of public buildings 20,000 00 

From all other sources 56,720 81 

The disbursements were made for the following general purposes : 

For legislative, executive and Judicial expenidtures 167,229 6S 

For support of State Normal Schools, Insane Asylum, 
Deaf, Dumb, and Blind Institute, State Prison, Beform 

School and Soldiers' Orphans 221,625 la 

For erecting, repairing and famishing public buildings .... 188,099 05 

For payment of apportionment of current school hind. . • • 194,654 10 

Expenses of State University • 80,000 00 

Payment of interest on loans 81,255 00 

Publicprintlng « 49,866 61 

Purchase of bonds for school Aind 168,757 47 

Miscellaneous expenses « 97,078 10 

Total •1,148,059 96 

Balance in treasury November 29, 1874 188,160 91 

To the credit of the following Ainds : 

Permanent school ftind 6,646 91 

Permanent university Amd 1,870 44 

Current school Aind • 12,795 62 

Current university Aind • 2,828 88 

General revenue Aind 80,416 62 

Interest Aind 40,980 6S 

Sinking fund 5,899 82 



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GOVBBKOB^S MESSAGE. 5 

< State iDBtitatlon fond 68,616 12 

Internalimprovement fand 10,768 15 

Internal improyement land fbnd 1,326 44 

Interest on railroad bonds ftind 1,797 57 

Inebriate asylnm Aind 754 80 

Total • 188,150 91 

The recognized bonded indebtedness of the State at the commencement 
'Of the year was 9460,000-^consisting of the following bonds : 

X^oan of July, 1867, for bailding State institations $ 100,000 00 

Loan of Jnly, 1868, for bailding State institntions 100,000 00 

Xoan <^f July, 1869, for bnilding State institations 50,000 00 

Iioan of 187iB, for bailding State institations 210,000 00 

Totol • 460,000 00 

To this has been added the balance of the loan of 1873, 
^20,000y making a total of recognized bonded indebtedness 
of $480,000. 

The Auditor commends the tax law which was passed by 
the last legislature, and states that a bill will be presented for 
jour consideration, containing provisions which have been 
found necessary to its efficient operation. 

THE TBEASUBT. 

The treasury has been conducted with that skill and in- 
tegrity by which the administration of the present Treasurer 
has restored confidence in that department of the State Qov- 
^rnment. Its history for the past year is summarized in the 
following: 



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GOVSBirOK^S MBSSAGE. 7 

ATTORNEY GENERAL. 

The report of the Attorney General is herewith submitted. 
The duties of that officer have been of exceptional difficulty 
and importance. 

In my last message attention was d^'rected to the failure of 
the Southern Minnesota Railroad, to report all of its gross 
earnings for the year 1867 and 1870, and the consequent 
witholding from the State of the tax thereon. This road has 
been for the past two years under the administration of a 
Beceiver, appointed by the United States Circuit Court. By 
my direction the Attorney General intervened on behalf of 
the State in that Court, asking that the amount of the gross 
earnings so unreported for these years be ascertained, and 
that the Receiver be directed to pay the tax into the Treasury 
of the State. The application was successful and the tax has 
been paid. 

I stated in my last message that the State has a claim 
against the Winona and St. Peter Railroad Company for about 
$61,498.22, for unpaid taxes which have accrued since 1865. 
This claim is based upon a decision of the Supreme Court of 
this State, holding to be unconstitutional the Act of March 4, 
1865, which, among other things provides that, instead of 
paying three per cent, upon its gross earnings, the Company 
shall pay only one per cent, for the first three years after the 
passage of that Act ; two per cent, for the next seven years, 
and three per cent, thereafter. By resolution of the Senate 
adopted Pebruray 2, 1874, the Attorney General was directed 
to take such action as will ensure the collection of these un- 
paid taxes at as early a day as practicable. A suit has been 
brought and is at issue in the District Court for the county of 
Ramsey. It will be tried as soon as reached upon the calen- 
dar of that Court. 

Certain transactions referred to in my last message, by 
which one hundred thousand acres of land formerly owned by 
the Sonthem Minnesota Railroad Company have become sub- 
ject to taxation, although the obligation has been denied, and 

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8 GOYBBKOB^S MBSSAaS. 

payment of the tax evaded, have been made the subject of 
suit by the State for the ccllection of the amount due. The 
District Court rendered judgment in favor of the State. The 
case was then transferred to the Supreme Court, where it has 
been argued and now awaits decision. 

The Attorney General has also complied with the joint 
resolution passed by the Legislature of 1874, directing him 
to bring suit against the First Division of the Saint Paul and 
Pacific Railroad Company for the purpose of vacating its 
charter on account of certain alleged abuses and usurpations. 
This suit will be argued at the present term of the District 
Court for the county of Ramsey. 

The title of the State to the grounds occupied by the State 
Prison has always been considered uncertain, owing to the 
loss of unrecorded deeds. The Attorney General has been 
able to supply these defects, and reports that the title of the 
State has been made perfect. 

At the last session of. the Legislature, a committee was 
appointed for the purpose of investigating the affairs and 
management of the office of State Auditor. This committee 
was authorized to sit during the adjournment, and was 
directed to make its final report to the Governor. This re- 
port was filed with the Governor September 4, 1874, and with 
the testimony taken by the committee is herewith transmitted. 

The substance of the conclusions td which the committee 
arrived was that the late State Auditor had received for tim- 
ber cut on State lands 177,041.13 more than he had paid to 
the State Treasurer ; that there had been such management 
in other transactions, that the State had suffered further dam- 
age in the sum of $12,518.04; that certain transactions with 
the banking firm of P. M. Myers & Co. of New York, raise 
a strong presumption that the State has an interest in them ; 
and that the conduct of the examiners of the State lands had 
been grossly corrupt. Such a showing as this, demanded the 
interposition of the courts, and I therefore requested the 
Attorney General to bring suit against the late Auditor, and 
to otherwise assert in the courts all the rights of the State 

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qoybbnob's hbssagb. ' 9 

which an examination of the report and evidence should 
bring to his attention. , 

The Attorney (Jeneral has brought suit against the late 
Auditor to recover the sum of 194,641.69. It will be speeded 
to its trial. 

The complexity of the facts, and the importance of the 
issues, persuaded the Attorney General that this is a case 
where the public interests demand the employment of assis- 
tant counsel. He accordingly, with my concurrence, secured 
the services of the Hon. Wm. Lochren. The Attorney Gen- 
eral states that a suitable appropriation will be necessary to 
meet the expenses of procuring the attendance of the many 
witnesses whom the State will be obliged to call. An appro- 
priation for that purpose, and also to properly compensate 
Mr. Lochren, is respectfully recommended. 

EDUCATION. 

The report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction is 
replete with information upon subjects connected with his 
department. He is convinced of the importance of making 
more efficient the means by which teachers who have not 
had the benefit of training by the Normal Schools, may be 
instructed in the most advanced educational methods. His 
views upon this subject are worthy of your earnest considera- 
tion. He favors the continuance of the present system 
of supervision. He maintains that the plan of district 
school management by a township board presents many 
advantages over the mixed system which now prevails, but 
it is very questionable whether the objections to this pbn, 
which have- been made valid by long acquiescence in the 
present mode of governing schools, the establishment of small 
independent districts, and the large expenditures which the 
taxpayers of those districts have made upon the assurance of 
permanency in their powers of self-government, do not over- 
weigh the inherent and abstract merits of any other scheme. 
He is opposed to an enforced uniformity of text books. He^ 

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10 GOVBRNOB^S MBSSAGB. 

attests the beneficent and increasing influence of the Normal 
Schools, and in these views I entirely concur. Much of the 
obloquy which has been expended upon these institutions has 
been excited by undue expectations that their general benefits 
ought to be more immediate. That this is not reasonable, is 
apparent from the fact that, while in the year 1874, 6,482 
teachers were employed in the common schools, the total en- 
rollment in the Normal Schools, an enrollment doubtless 
limited by their capacity, was 905. To this consideration is 
to be added that their work is one of recent beginning, and 
that sufficient time has not elapsed to enable their pupils to 
pervade the entire State with their labor. These, figures, 
however, show that these schools are rapidly advancing to a 
point where their results will be practically commensurate 
with the demand which they are intended to supply. 

The report of the State Normal Board is also herewith 
submitted. Its members have administered the business inter- 
ests of these institutions with most commendable fidelity. 
Appropriations are requested as follows: For current ex- 
penses in addition to the $5,000 permanently appropriated 
to each. 

For Normal School at Winona, - - - $7,000 
For Normal School at Mankato, - . - 6,000 
For Normal School at St. Cloud, - - - 4,000 

A special appropriation of between 11,100 and $1,200 is 
also asked for the school at Mankato for reasons which are 
stated in the report. The Board also recommends that the 
claim against the State for heating apparatus for the building 
at Winona be disposed of by the Legislature, and, if correct, 
paid without farther delay. It has existed ever since 1871. 
The grounds on which the Winona school building stands are 
uninclosed and the Board recommends a small appropriation 
in that behalf the amount of which is not stated. 

I have been deeply interested in the workings of the Insti- 
•tution for the education of the Deaf and Dumb, and of the 

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GOYEBKOB'S MBS8AGE. 11 

Blind. It gives me the greatest pleasure to bear, the testimony 
of personal observation concerning the paternal care with 
which the State has surrounded these children. The trustees 
present very forcibly the fact that the buildings for the Deaf 
and Dumb, which were designed to accommodate each fifty 
pupils are now so inadequate that there are in the boys' building 
nineteen more pupils than it was designed for, while there 
are in the girls' building, thirty-five pupils. The ietscertainable 
rate of increase demonstrates that by the end of this year 
applicants for admission must be rejected for want of room# 
The trustees ask for an appropriation of |20,000 with which 
to commence the construction of the main building. 

The report of the State Reform School is submitted for 
your consideration. It exhibits in a satisfactory manner the 
workings of this beneficent institution. The Board of Managers 
request appropriations as follows : $10,000 for salaries, wages 
of employees and keeping up repairs; $17,000 for general 
current expenses. It is proper to remark for the credit of 
the management that the estimate for expenses is $3,000 I^ss 
than it was in 1&73. 

The progress of the University during the year is exhibited • 
in the report of the Board of Regents, to which your attention 
18 respectfully solicited. . The Institution is rapidly surmount- 
ing the obstacles, which have impeded, its preliminary efforts. 

In my last message the importance of bringing the Univer- 
sity and Common Schools into intimate and direct connection 
was urged in general terms. In the performance of official 
duties, my attention has been directed to this subject in a 
practical manner as one of the members of the Board of Re- 
gents, and the result has been a more perfect conviction that 
the time has arrived for the adoption of a liberal policy io 
this matter. 

Our common school system has been so far perfected as to 
leave little to be desired except improvement in matters of 
detail. The people have built up this system. It is not the 
result of any elaborate scheme of education. It is the tangi- 
ble form in which is expressed the popular conviction that 

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12 ooyebnor's messagb. 

in the general diffusion of knowledge lies the strength of our 
free institutions, and the hope of their perpetuity. The func- 
tions of the coioimon schools have their limitations, however. 
They are elementary in their character and teachings. They 
drill and discipline the youth in essential studies and enable 
them to enter active life with that equality of power which 
equality of knowledge gives- Not the least valuable lesson 
which they teach is that vast fields of knowledge lie beyond 
them — knowledge which not only elevates and refines its 
possessor, but which it is of the first importance to the State 
that many should possess. It is the province of the Univer- 
sity to impart this knowledge. The difficulty is that there are 
no immediate relations between this institution and the com- . 
mon school. The University should begin where the highest 
grade of common school leaves off. This can be done only 
by raising tlie grade of the latter and by instruction upon 
those subjects which are necessary to the introduction of the 
pupil to the university course. 

These reflections have been caused by many complaints 
which I have received during the past year that what is 
taught in these schools does not fit the youth to partake of 
the higher advantages for which they have such ardent de- 
sires. The complainants say that there are no preparatory 
schools in the State, and they observe, with entire justice, 
that the State which affords both a university and a system of 
common schools ought to connect them and make one har- 
monious scheme of our educational interests. What is needed 
now is that this desire may be gratified. This State has 
an inexpressible interest in the complete and liberal education 
of every boy and girl who desires it. Thomas Jefferson was 
so impressed with this idea that he founded his interest in the 
University of Virginia and based his plans for its success 
almost solely upon a patriotic view of the benefits which the 
education there to be received would confer upon the Com- 
monwealth. And he was right. In modern times great 
states have grown up out of great schools. Great states 
have great universities. 

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goybrnob's mbssage. 19 

The consideration of the best means to bring the common 
sdiool into connection with the University involves questions 
of considerable practical difficulty. 

As the result of much reflection upon the subject, I am 
inclined to think that a preparatory course of study to be 
prescribed by the faculty of the University should be estab* 
lished in those schools in different parts of the State, which 
by reason of their location in leading towns and cities will 
give them in educational matters the same prominence enjoyed 
by the communities in which they are. It should be made a 
condition of this enlargement of the functions of the schools, 
that there be received into this department as many pupils as 
may apply for admission from a certain specified district up 
to such limits as will not embarrass the school in the per* 
furmance of its ordinary duties. To make this measure effi- 
cient, the salary of the preceptor who will have charge of this 
department in each school, should be paid .wholly or in part 
by the State. While this measure will involve expense, still 
it need not be large. The experiment can be tried in say six 
schools in leading cities throughout the State, thus giving to 
those living near these places facilities for preparatory instruc* 
tion which are now nowhere afforded. I am persuaded that 
the people of the communities whose schools are thus pro* 
posed to be enlarged in their ^ usefulness, will be willing to 
have those schools adapted to the performance of this impor- 
tant function. 

The University is now upon an assured foundation. A little 
fostering care is needed to cause it to take a leading position 
in the course of a very few years, and I am in favor of liberal 
subsidies to those forces of knowledge from which States 
derive their power, to the end tjiai the University shall be 
not only the rich man's privilege, but also the poor mau » 
available right. 

Better plans to effect the object proposed may be devised. 
In calling your attention to this matter I have done what 
commeDds itself to my judgment and feelings alike, and pass 
from the subject with the recommendation that by conference 

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14 GOYABNOB'd MSSSAGS. 

with those who have given it tneir attention some means be 
adopted to present in the educational scheme of oar State %q 
unbroken continuity of schools from those where the first 
elements of knowledge are transferred to infant minds to that 
one which, as its name implies, '' takes all knowledge for its 
province." 

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

The report of the Insurance Oommissioner is herewith 
transmitted. It shows with great clearness the condition of 
the companies doing business in this State. It is gratifying 
to remark the improvement which has taken place in their 
financial condition since the date of their last report. 

The Commissioner animadverts with great force and with 
entire justice upon the practice of effecting insurance by 
companies which have not entitled themselves to transact 
business in this State. The devices by which this evasion of 
the policy of the law is accomplished are thoroughly exposed 
in the report. These devices inflict injustica upon the com- 
panies which do a legitimate business with our people, and 
they defraud the State of her revenues. I recommend legis- 
lation thai will check these evasive and unlawful practices. 

The Commissioner recommends that the law by which the 
companies are taxed upon their gross earnings be so amended 
that the tax shall be laid only upon the excess of premium 
receipts over losses paid. He supports this view by a prac- 
tical illustration which adds force to this suggestion, and he 
states that his views in this respect are substantially identi- 
cal with the opinions of all commissioners and superintend- 
ents of insurance. 

ADJUTANT OENERAL. 

In 1865 this State established a Claim Department for the 
collection of military bounties, pensions and back pay, and 
devolved its administration upon the Adjutant General. The 



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GOYSKfiTOB'S MXSSAGIB. 16 

report of that ofScer shows that during the past year 114,406 
have been collected on these accounts, and that seven hundred 
and ninety-six claims are now pending and unsettled. 

STATE PBISON. 

The report of the Inspectors of the State Prison accom- 
panies this message. ' 

That the management of this institution for the past year 
has been economical, seems to be proved by the fact that 
the expense per capita is 128.28 less than it was in 1873. It 
is also a gratifying fact that you will not be required to pro- 
vide for any deficiencies, the board having confined expenses 
strictly within the appropriations, and wisely refrained from 
undertaking any improvements in cases where it was found 
that they could not be made for the money given for the 
specific purpose. 

The inspectors estimate the expenses of the Prison for the 
coming year, at $14,000 for salaries of officers and pay of 
guards, and $26,000 for current expenses. 

This report contains recommendations for an increase of 
the cell room, it appearing clearly, that before this year ex- 
pires, the present accommodations will be wholly inadequate. 
Other improvements are advised. I^am unable to state with 
precision, from the report, what sum is deemed by the inspec- 
tors necessary for these purposes. 

STATE BOABD OF HEALTH, 

The report of the State Board of Health is presented for 
your consideration. It will be seen from this paper that the 
members of the Board have been engaged in duties of a 
most commendable character. 

The Board has undertaken in systematic, original investi- 
gations of the causes directly affecting health, and of the 
diseasee and death rate of the people of this State ; and, in 
subordination to this undertaking, is giving attention to the 



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16 goysbkob's mbssagb. 

characteristics of the climate of MinneBota. It is also con- 
sidering the important question of ventilating and warming 
dwellings ; also the causes of accident from the use of kero- 
sene, and the methods df prevention, concerning which the 
report contains some valuable suggestions. Its members have 
visited the different State Institutions, and the result of their 
inspection is stated in their report. 

The restrictions of this occasion preclude further detail of 
the labors of these gentlemen. I commend their report to 
your consideration, pausing only to remark that the State ia 
most fortunate in obtaining the services ot these scientific 
men in matters of very high public importance, without more 
cost than is involved in the appropriation of $1,600; and I 
recommend its renewal at this session. 

HOSPITAL FOB THE INSANE. 

The eighth annual report of the Board of Trustees and 
Officers of the Minnesota Hospital for the Insane is herewith 
transmitted. 

The administration of this institution seems to have been 
efficient, and as economical as the nature of its functiona 
would permit. 

The trustees ask for an appropriation of $47,600, which it 
is estimated will complete the building according to the 
original plan. They also request an appropriation of $6,600 
to furnish the portion so to be completed, and $3,000 for 
cars, machinery and fixtures for all the buildings. 

The Superintendent, in his report to the Board, urges the 
importance of lighting the permanent hospital building with 
gas, basing bis request upon the ground of safety to this 
property, which in its present condition is estimated to be 
worth $452,000, exclusive of furniture and library. I do not 
understand that this expense is included in the foregoing 
estimates by the trustees. The views of the Superintendent 
are extremely judicious. The safety of this property, ten- 



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GOVKBKOk's MKS8AOB. 17 

anted as it is by persons of diseased intellect, should not be 
imperilled by the use of inflammable oil. 

The trustees recommend an appropriation of $87,500 for 
cnrrent expenses, being for an average of 421 patients during 
the year at $4 per week each. This estimate is less by fifty 
cents per week for each patient than the estimate of last year. 
The rednction is explained by the familiar fact that as the 
number increases the cost of each diminishes. 

SOLDIEBS' orphans' HOME. 

The Trustees of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home submitted 
the accompanying report showing the manner in which the 
sacred duty of the State to the children of those who died 
for the nation's life has been performed. $18,000 will be 
necessary for current expenses for this year, a reduction of 
$2fl00 from the amount required during the year just ended. 
The trustees state that, from obvious reasons, this undertaking 
of the State will be completed within four or five years, dur- 
ing which time the expenses will annually decrease. 

HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. ' 

The Historical Society is commended to your liberal con- 
sideration. It is now in the twenty-fifth year of its existence. 
It has been most successful in those important labors by 
which it has collected its library, and rescued from oblivion 
and fixed in enduring form invaluable facts pertaining to a 
generation now passing away, whose works should not be left 
for coDomemoration to those fleeting sources of information in 
whose disappearance perish utterly the memorials of the 
pioneers. 

LOOS AND LTTMBEB. 



The reports of the Survevors General of the Fivst and 
3 



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18 GOYBBNOB^S MBSSAGB. 

Second Districts present in convincing form the groat impor- 
tance of our lumber interests. 

In the First, or Stillwater District, the total amount of logs 
scaled during the season of 1874, was 189,994,466 feet. 

In the second, or Minneapolis District, the total amount of 
logs scaled for that season was 192,482,520 feet, and the 
estimated quantity of logs sawed but not scaled in that 
District is 29,984,000 feet. 

DILATOBY LEQISLATION. 

The practice of postponing most of the important work of 
general legislation until the last few days of the session ought 
to be abandoned. To say nothing of the objections to this 
. manner of doing business which inhere in the fact that under 
such circumstances the legislature is compelled to act hastily, 
lYithout full discussion, and that the success of deservinis 
measures is often craftily implicated in measures which ought 
not to succeed, the Governor is entitled to sufficient time 
to consider the bills upon which he is to act. This he has 
not under the practice which has hitherto prevailed. The 
legislative work of sixty days is poured upon him during the 
last ten days of the session. It is his duty to consider each 
measure, — a duty which cannot always be properly performed 
within such narrow limits of time. Many important acts 
necessarily remain for his consideration after the adjourn-, 
ment. In case of doubt, he is deprived of the counsel of the 
members, and when those doubts result in disapproval of the 
measure, the people are deprived of the exercise of that cor- 
rective power which the Legislature possesses where he is 
deemed to have erred as to the constitutionality or expediency 
of the bills. 

CENSUS. 

By section 23 of article 4 of the constitution of Minnesota, 
the Legislature is required to provide by law for the enume- 

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goyebnob's message. 19 

ration of the inhabitants of the State in the middle year of 
each decade. 

The object of this provision of the constitution is to ascer* 
tain the basis of legislative apportionment which is required 
to be made every five years on the basis of the United States 
census and the State census alternately. 

I may be permitted to suggest for your consideration 
whether this duty, for which all the machinery of census 
taking will be requisite, does not with propriety invite us to 
obtain at the same time, by* the same ofiScers, the leading 
industrial and vital statistics. 

The additional cost will be a trifle, while the results will 
demonstrate officially our marvelous development since the 
census of 1870 was taken, and will enable us to present in an 
authentic form to those contemplating emigration from other 
countries and States the superior inducements of our own 
State. 

It will be an easy matter to prescribe in the statute which 
you will pass on this subject the form of the schedule into 
which the desired information can be distributively stated, 
and at the same time to fix the cost of the undertaking. 

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT. 

By an act of the Legislature approved March 5th, 1868, the 
punishment for the crime of murder was spbversively changed. 
The penalty of death was abolished as a general rule of law. 
This abolition is subject, however, to the exception that, in 
cases of murder in the first degree, the jury may determine 
by their verdict that the convict shall suffer death. 

I regard the principle of this innovation as radically un- 
sound. The punishment which crime entails upon its perpe- 
trator should not be uncertain. It should be explicitly 
declared by the statutes, and not left to the caprice, to the 
mistaken sympathy, or to the fear of responsibility of the 
jurors. 

Popular prejudice, or passion, or the negative influence of 

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20 GOYEBNOB^S MESSAGE. 

an inefficient defense may consign one offender to the scaffold, 
while his equal in crime, possessing, perhaps, the means of 
commanding undeserved sympathy through his domestic rela- 
tions or his own personal qualities, or aided to this sympathy 
by a powerful defense, is sentenced to imprisonment for life, 
leaving him the abiding hope of a pardon within* a few 
years, after all interest in the case has passed away. For 
prison statistics show that the average of life sentences is by 
pardon made less than ten years. Even when there is no dis- 
parity in the presentation of the* cases there remains the con* 
sideration that the temper and modes of thought of the juries 
may be different. All this leads to uncertainty of justice. 
Several trials at the same term may exact the life of one 
offender and remand another to the prison only, when, in the 
strictest justice their positions should be reversed. 

There is another consequence of this statute which reflects 
discredit upon the administration of justice. In order to 
inflict the extreme penalty of the law, a jury must by a verdict 
so direct. The man who commits a brutal murder, who i» 
caught red-handed in the act, for whose defense no profes- 
sional ingenuity can devise a plan, either in fact or in sympa- 
thy, can, in this hopeless condition of his case, — a conditioo 
caused by its incontrovertible publicity and atrocity, plead 
guilty ; the result of this plea is, that there can be no jury, 
and consequently no verdict that he shall suffer death. 

In another case the accused may have a defense, and unfor- 
tunately be restricted in his means for presenting it, and he 
is presented by the statute with the alternative of selecting 
his own punishment by pleading guilty, or to undergo the 
dreadful risk of taking his trial before a jury, whose action 
regarding his own life he cannot foresee. 

Irrespective of these defects in this statute, and its inequit- 
able tendencies, there arises under it a question of far greater 
moment. It is for the Legislature to consider whether the 
guarantees which the law now affords to human life are suf- 
ficiently absolute ? It cannot be denied that homicidal crime 
has increased to a degree which has caused the law for its 

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' auY£liNOK'S MASSAGE. 21 

puniehmeDt to be subject to the severest popular criticism. 
It is asked of what value is a law which no person seems to 
fear? • 

Yon will doubtless consider these questions of public justice 
and public safety with a hearty disposition to make justice 
something more than a name, and safety a reality. 

SCHOOL FUND. 

I desire to present in explicit form the considerations which 
led me to advise in my last message the submission to the 
people of a constitutional amendment which will place entirely 
beyond the power of the Legislature, or any oflScer of the 
Executive Department of the Government, the school fund, 
now actually so great and which is destined to assume pro* 
portions which will surely tempt cupidity to profligacy in its 
management. 

The condition in which this fund now is, is as follows : Up 
to 1874 our Constitution was such, that by ihe express terms 
of that instrument it was made an act of embezzelment to 
deposit any of the State or school funds in banks. At the 
election in the year 1873, this portion of the Constitution was 
changed most materially, and us the organic law now is, the 
Legislature has the undoubted power to prescribe by law in 
what manner the State and school funds may be kept, trans- 
ferred and disbursed. I am not now disposed to criticise this 
Authority over the ordinary State funds. They are used in 
-current expenses nearly as fast as they come into the treasury, 
and this fact is a great protection against abuse of the power. 
But the school fund is a permanent fund to be held and invested 
in performance of the most sapred trust which can be devolved 
upon us. It has hitherto been invested in securities whose 
sufficiency is beyond question. But there is now no check 
tipon the authority of the Legislature over it. 

By enactment it may be made lawful to loan it to individu- 
als, to banks, to school districts, or to invest it in securities by 
i¥hich it ought not to be imperiled. In other States where 

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22 GOYISRNOB'S HBSSAGE. 

a similar anthority has existed, these funds have been made 
the prey to legislative rapine incited by corrupt combinations 
organized expressly and successfully for their spoliation. The 
consequence has been to disinherit the children of the patri- 
mony which wise legislation attempted to entail upon them. 

There is no reason to hope that the time may never cornier 
when this State will not repeat these warning acts of history. 
The possession of power surely brings its abuse sometime, 
and an abuse such as this which implies irretrievable ruin to 
its subject, should not be permitted to remain a possibility. 

The constitution prescribes a mode of investment of the 
proceeds resulting from the sales of the internal improvement 
lands, which place them beyond the reach of such influences. 
I most ^earnestly recommend the adoption of a similar pro- 
vision as to the school fund. 

A bill proposing an amendment in this respect to the con- 
stitution passed the House of Representatives last winter, but 
was sacrificed in the Senate by the familiar exigencies of the 
last night of the session. 

THE FRONTIEB. 

The condition of our people in several of the southwestern 
counties has been the subject of earnest endeavor for its alle- 
viation. In carrying out the measures which were adopted, 
I have had the benefit of the counsel and assistance of Gen- 
eral H. n. Sibley, whose exertions in this behalf I take this 
opportunity of most gratefully acknowledging. The railroad 
companies have acted with great liberality. You will find it 
necessary to aid these districts by liberal appropriations. A 
fuller statement of the ^tuation and of what will be needed 
is reserved for a special communication which it is my inten- 
tion to address to you very soon after the organization of th» 
Legislature has been efiected. 

INDIAN AFFAIBS. 

I have complied with the requirements of a concurrent res- 
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aOTABKOB'S MK8SAGB. 23 

elation passed by the last Legislature, by which the Governor 
was requested to make enquiry into the condition of the sev- 
eral bands of Chippewa Indians in this State, and to recom- 
mend such legislation as may be requisite or desirable for the 
aid and encouragement of these Indians in adopting the 
industries and habits of civiliamtion, with a view to their 
remaining as inhabitants, and ultimately becoming citizens of 
this State. 

The importance of this duty seemed to demand the offices 
of some person of experience with these people, cognizant 
with their views and wishes, and of the history of the rela- 
tions of the white people to them for many years. The ser- 
vices of Mr. Charles Ruffee were fortunately secured , and he 
was instructed to report to me upon the subject covered by 
the resolution, after personal inquiry and examination. He 
has performed those duties most thoroughly, as the report 
which is herewith submitted will attest. It states with abund- 
ance of detail the present condition of these people, their 
grievances, and what causes have produced those grievances. 
It indicates the remedies by contrasting the condition of the 
Indians at White Earth, who have been the subjects of real 
and intelligent attempts to bring them to the ways of civili- 
zation, with the condition of the other bands who have been 
left mercilessly to the influence of those processes by which 
their natures are remitted to a deeper degradation and bar- 
barism. I am required by the resolution to recommend leg- 
islation in the premises. I do not understand that the State 
has any power to legislate upon this subject. By judicial 
decisions which have settle^ the question upon constitutional 
foundations, the Indians are held to be domestic dependent 
nations; and to this construction apply several provisions of 
the federal constitution which prohibit the State from dealing 
with these nations at all. Minnesota cannot treat with them. 
Congress has power to " regulate commerce • • * 
with the Indian tribes." It is suggested in the report that if 
the State conld be intrusted with the management of the 
Indians many of the evils which are so apparent and seem- 

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24 gk/v:bb^o&'s JktsssAais. 

iagly 60 remediless in the present system coald be remedied* 
But the constitutional provision to which I h^ve alluded 
equally forbids the delegation of any such power by the United 
States or its assumption by the State. 

It was proposed many years ago to permit the State of 
California to assume such relations to the Indians within itB 
boundaries, but these objections were found to be insuperable. 

I have no doubt that the earnest endeavors now being made 
by the United States will in due time, result in remedying 
the m^ost obnoxious difficulties which beset this question. The 
problem is complex and unwieldly, and we must await its ' 
solution by the authority to which it has been exclusively 
committed, rendering such assistance through our representa- 
tives and senators in Ooogress as our experience and their 
wisdom may suggest. 

ST. VINCENT EXTENSION, &C. 

In 1857 the United States granted to Minnesota a most 
munificent quantity of lands to aid in the construction of rail- 
roads. This endowment was increased in 1865. The lines 
of these roads were prescribed in the act itself with prescient 
knowledge of the destiny of a country that was then almost a 
wilderness. The system thus devised, has been completed 
with two important exceptions. Those exceptions are the line 
between St. Cloud and St Vincent, and the line from Watab to 
Brainerd, in all about 365 miles. A few miles of iron have 
been laid south of Brainerd towards Watab. The road has 
been fully constructed for about ^0 miles from St. Cloud to 
Melrose, and the iron has been laid upon a segment of the 
line between towns 138 and 153, of which there is no regular 
operation. The whole line between Brainerd and Watab is 
graded and ready for superstructure. The line between Mel- 
rose and the British line is graded except about 40 miles. In 
the summer 1872 the work of construction was suddenly 
stopped, and has never been resumed. The people pf those 
portions of the State to be benefited by these roads have 

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GOYABNOB'S MSSSAGB. 25 

waited patiently for the adjaatment of th^ private difficulties 
by which the work has been frustrated. They have waited 
in vain. The disputants hold each other obstinately at bay, 
and in the meantime the prosperity of the region most direct- 
ly concerned in these roads is checked. 

It would be an irrelevant undertaking to enter here into a 
discussion of the merits of this dispute. That question is 
now taxing the ingenuity of lawyers and the wisdom of 
courts, with no hope of its immediate solution. To these 
proceedings the State is not a party ; and believing as I do, 
that it has the right at this moment, to assert its paramount 
title to these lands and to the franchises of the company which 
has failed to build the road ; and that it has, as the result of 
this right, plenary power to coerce the settlement of these 
questions, and thereby, or by other means, such coercion 
failing, to ensure the completion of the grand system of rail- 
roads inaugurated with such wisdom so many years ago, I 
earnestly urge that you take such legislative action as will 
bring about these results. 

The company now in default, has been liberally treated by 
the State. It has had several extensions of the time within 
which it was to construct the road. The last operative exten- 
sion was made by the act of March 11, 1874. I say '^operative 
extension " because the act of March 5, 1874, by which an 
extension was offered, never became effectual, for the reason 
that the company has not accepted the terms and conditions 
thereof, as it was required by the express language of the 
statute to do, within four months after the approval of the 
act The time granted by the act of 1873 expired January.l, 
1874. 

The importance of these roads cannot be overstated. 
The line from Watab to Brainerd will afford a direct connec- 
tion for the Northern Pacific road with portions of this State, 
and with railroads leading to tue seaboard, with which its 
present connections are circuitous and expensive. The exten- 
sion from St. Cloud to St. Vincent will traverse a region 

second to none in the State for its varied resources — a region 
4 

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26 goybbnob's mbssagb. 

to which immigratipn has been arrested by the repeated dis- 
appointmeDts which have been experienced concerniDg the 
coDBtruction of this road, by the withdrawal of the railroad 
lands and by doabling the price of the government lands 
within the limits of the grant. « 

Other considerations of great moment press for the ^solu- 
tion of this question. The Canadian government has taken 
direct action in furtherance of its policy to build a railroad 
to the Pacific Ocean. It is believed that were the railroad 
opened to St. Vincent it would be speedily extended to Fort 
Garry by that government^ and that the construction of a 
railroad thence westward would be commenced immediately. 
This will not be possible until Fort Garry has the railroad 
connection. The fertility and resources of tha^ imperial 
domain which stretches from Lake Winnipeg to the base of 
the Bocky Mountains, can be made powerful forces in the 
development of the commerce of our own State. 

In your legislation upon this subject you should consider 
the claims of the foreign bondholders whose money htfs 
brought these works to their present stage, in the spirit of 
fair dealing which is nowhere so becoming as in a great State 
dealing with private interests. 

But if the representatives of these interests cannot or will 
not give substantial assurances, something more tangible 
than mere promises, upon which "^e have already relied too 
often, that they will do this work without further delay, and 
comply with the legislation by which this State last winter 
endeavored to protect its own citizens, whose unrecompensed 
labor and capital are now locked up in this inchoate enter- 
prise, then it will be your duty to assert all the rights of the 
State to the lands and franchises, and turn them over to any 
agency which will give the like assurances, and which will 
accept the provisions of the act of Congress approved June 
22, 1874, which, as I am informed, have not as yet been 
accepted by the company now in default. 



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GOVXBNOB'S MB8SAGB. 27 

WATER OOMMUNICATIOK. 

The agitation of the question of cheap transportation has 
cansed many of the best minds to turn for relief to the system 
of water communication for which this country presents 
such extraordnary natural advantages. Many schemes for 
such improvements have been pressed upon the attention of 
Congress, and will doubtless soon be dealt with in a practical 
manner. The feasibility of connecting by canhl the Missis^ 
aippi or some of its tributaries with Lake Superior, has been 
the subject of considerable discussion. It is not surprising, 
in the absence of exact scientific information, that the most 
diverse views should be entertained as to its practicability* 
* The advocates of this improvement assert with entire confi- 
dence that it is feasible. The importance of such connection 
cannot be overestimated. A glance at the map demonstrates 
it. It is of the greatest interest to the State that the question, 
whether this connection is prohibited by any insurmountable 
obstacles, should be definitely settled. I recommend therefore 
that a survey be made for this purpose. I am informed by 
engineers that it need not be elaborate or expensive. If it 
is demonstrated thereby that such a canal can be constructed 
at a moderate expense, we shall then, be enabled to give 
urgent advocacy for its adoption in any general undertaking 
into which the United States may enter in this respect. 

DULUTH. 

Among the many advantages with which nature has 
endowed our State is the remarkable convergence of the 
shores of Lake Superior at its western end, forming a harbor 
of great extent and perfect safety. These advantages are 
shared by the State of Wisconsin, and it is to be greatly 
desired that each State shall enjoy them with the most perfect 
amity. The efibrts of our people to utilize their harbor facili-* 
ties, efforts which the terminus of two railroads in this State 
at that point and the existence of the most important city on 

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28 oovsBiroB's mbssaob. 

that lake have rendered imperative, were impeded in their 
inception by some embarrasements which were fairly and 
legally surmounted. 

A brief statement of facts is necessary to an understanding 
of the present condition of this important interest. 

In 1870 the city of Dulath began to excavate a ship canal 
across Minnesota Point near its base. While this work was 
in progress the United States commenced a suit in the federal 
courts to restrain the prosecution of the improvement, on the 
ground, among others, that such a canal when opened would 
tend to deflect the current of the Saint Louis river from its 
outlet and thereby injure the natural harbor. A temporary- 
injunction was obtained and the matter then became a subject 
of jiegotiation between the promoters of the improvement' 
and the prpper authorities of the United States. These nego- 
tiations resulted in an arrangement whereby the city was 
permitted to go on and construct Xh^ canal upon giving a bond 
in the penal sum of f 100,000, conditioned that the city should 
build a dyke below the canal, from Rice's Point to Minnesota 
Point. This bond was given, the dyke was built and the canal 
completed. It is two hundred and fifty feet wide, and deep 
enough to float any vessel on the lakes. Since it was con- 
tructed nearly all of .the commercial business at the western 
extremity of Lake Superior has been transacted at Duluth. 
It gives safe ingress to the Bay of Superior which is dangerous 
of access through its natural and tortuous outlet. 

Since the adjustment of the issues between the United States 
and the city, the collection district of Duluth has been estab- 
lished and Duluth made its port of entry. Appropriations 
for the improvement of its harbor have been made by Congress, 
and expended. 

The State of Wisiionsin, however, deems itself aggrieved 
by these improvements, and has therefor recently exiiibited in 
the Supreme Court of the United States its bill of complaint 
against the city of Duluth and the Northern Pacific Railroad 
Company, in which the decree of that tribunal is prayed that 



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« OOYBBNOB'S MK8SAGB. 29 

the defendants be perpetually enjoined from keeping open or 
maintaining a canal, and also required to fill it up. 

The interest of the State of Minnesota in the subject of thi» 
suit is so paramount, that I have detera)ined, at the request 
of the common council of the city of Duluth, to act under the 
authority conferred upon the Governor by joint resolution 
approved January 23, 1873/ and to take such necessary steps 
as will protect the interests of the State in the premises. 

RAILROAD I^GISLATION. 

In 1871 the Legislature enacted a statute entitled ''an act to 
regulate the carrying of freight and passengers on all railroads ' 
in the State." This law was crude in its conception, harsh 
towards the people in : some of its provisions which were 
honestly intended for their benefit, unjust to some of the 
weaker railroad companies, in that it did not consider that 
the question of rates is justly subject to considerations respect* 
ing the strength of the road to which they are applied. It 
was also from similar causes a work of invidious favoritism in 
some respects towards the strong companies, for it gave them 
under certain conditions and in regard to certain classes of 
freight a greater compensation than those companies had 
themselves prescribed. This law broke down at once under 
its own inherent imperfections, and its sole value consists in 
the fact that it was the first assertion of the right of our Leg' 
islatnre to protect the people against excessive tolls and unjust 
discriminations, and that under it these questions of right 
were submitted to the courts, whose decisions established the 
existence of those rights over the companies who were defend* 
ants. 

In 1874 another act was passed, after much deliberation 
and discussion, establishing .a Board of Railroad Commis^ 
si oners and requiring them to make a schedule of reasonable 
maximum rates for each company by August 1, 1874. It 
prohibited unjust discriminations, and prescribed equality of 
charges for equal distances. Ancillary to these general prin- 
ciples which the statute was designed to establish, it contained 

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so GOVABNOB'S MESSAGE. 

other important provisions which it is not necessary here to 
recapitulate. 

I appointed as Commissioners, Ex-Governor Wm. R. Mar- 
fihalL Gen'l A. J. Edgerton, and Hon. John J. Randall, with 
the fullest sense of my own responsibility and with the view 
of securing the services of citizens of undoubted standing, 
who would perform the duties of their office with impartiality. 
These gentlemen addressed themselves with great industry to 
the administration of this statute, and the result of their 
labors, together with such recommendations as their experi- 
ence has suggested, are presented in their report. They state 
that in the establishment of rates they proceeded solely upon 
their conviction of what would be reasonable, after consider- 
ing the views of the companies and the shippers, designing 
to effect material savings to the people, and at the same time 
Dot to oppressively reduce the revenues of the roads. They 
aimed also to do away with the evils of discriminations, which 
they consider the most important grievance of all Three- 
fourths of the carrying business of our roads consists of the 
transport ation of lumber and grain, and it is as to these that 
reductions have been mainly effected. They state that there 
has been a general and substantial compliance with the law 
on the part of the companies, and that no well-founded com- 
I^aint has been made of its violation. 

They make several special recommendations upon points 
whe^e they think amendments will be necessary. 

Statutes are generally vindicated or condemened by their 
results. This statute has resulted in the substantial abolition 
of local discriminations. The tables which accompany this 
report demonstrate that upon passenger fares, if the average 
earnings estimated by the Commissioners are correct, reduc- 
tions will in one year amount to $69,345. By the same pro- 
cess of approximation they estimate that the saving in one 
year from Aug. 1, 1874, upon the two articles of grain and 
lumber will be 1230,000. 

Upon the general question of the right of the State to pre- 
vent abuses, and to give a remedy for their commission, my 

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GOVRBNOB's MB8SAGB. 31 

own views are so well known through frequent expression, 
that it is not necessary for me to reiterate them, I regard it as 
practidhl^y settled that this right exists. This view is war- 
ranted by the decision of nearly all the courts which have 
passed upon the question, and now awaits final confirmation 
by tbe Supreme Court of the United States, whose decisions • 
upon principles which underlie this subject have placed that 
court upon a line of logical consequences, which, it would 
seem, must lead it to affirm the views of the subordinate 
tribunals. 

The right then existing, the question is merely, how shall 
it be exercised? 

That question is for the people themselves to determine 
It is not a matter of party feeling. It cannot be circum- 
scribed by party lines. It is a question of justice, in solving 
which, it is your duty, doing no wrong, to see that the people 
suffer no wrong. 

CONCLUSION. 

As I close this paper some considerations press almost 
irresistibly for expression. 

The formal and special details of legislative and executive 
duty are generally well enough and easily performed. It is 
not by the performance of such tasks that public men receive 
their acquittance, and pass from the scene of trial to the 
station of imperishable esteem. 

These acts are the almost involuntary performance of the 
functions of the body politic, and though vital, are unheeded 
while being done, and forgotten when accomplished. They 
are merely the normal incidents of the vigor and existence of 
national life. 

You will also be required to deal with questions of large 
and general significance, which will test your integrity and 
judgment alike, and to their consideration I doubt not you 
will apply the highest rules of action. There seem to be 
times in the history of all constitutional government's, when 

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32 GOVAHIirOB'S MBSSAGB. 

public confidence in public servants is abated and changed 
into distrust. The cause is almost invariably found in unwise 
or dishonest legislation. Private interests, seeking advance- 
ment by public instrumentalities, become so powerful that the 
functions of government act with them with diseased sympathy. 

The idea that there is a different rule of official action from 
that which should govern men in their private intercourse 
' becomes dominant. The reactionary influences of such ideas 
reach down and corrupt the popular mind and pervert the 
popular judgment, until overthrown by the forces of reform 
rising in insurrection against them. 

I have the fuUest confidence that no such tendencies will 
be caused by this body. You are just from the people, and 
have their latest instructions. You cannot go far wrong if 
you correctly interpret and express them. 

C. K. DAVIS. 



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EXECUTIVE DOCUMENT, No. i. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



SECRETARY OF STATE, 



TO THE 



LEGISUTURE OF MIMESOTA, 



FOB THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30th, 1874. 



TBANSHHTED TO THB LEOISIjATUBB OF THE SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL 
SESSION, 1875. 



SAINT PAUL: 

HONEEE COMPANY PRINT. 

1875. 



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State op Minnesota, ' ^ 

Office of the Secretary of State, > 

St. Paul, January 2d, 1875. ) 

His Excellency^ Guehman K. Davie : 

Governor of the State of Minnesota. 

Sir: — I have the honor herewith to transmit the annual 
report of this department to the Legislature, for the year 
ending November 30th, 1874. 

Very Respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

S. P. JENNISON, 

Secretary of State. 



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REPORT. 



To the Legislature of the State of Minnesota : 

The Annual Keport of this Department is herewith sub- 
mitted : 

CORPORATIONS. 

There have been filed and duly recorded during the past 
year ninety-eight instruments creating corporations,' or 
modifying former articles under the several statutes relating 
to corporations. The names and dates of filing thereof are 
as follows : 

When FDed. 

The Claremont Flouring Mill Company, - Jan. 17, 1874. 

Goodhue County Council Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, Jan. 21, " 

Duluth Lake Transportation Company, - Jan. 21, " 

The Minnesota State Grange of the Pa- 
trons of Husbandry, - - - Jan. 30, " 

Western Railroad Company, of Minnesota, Jan. 31, " 

Red Wing Hotel Company, - - - Jan. 30, " 

The Minnesota Mutual Benefit Building 

and Loan Association, - - - Jan. 31, " 

St. Paul Tumverein, . - . . Feb. 2, " 

The Midway Improvement Company, - Feb. 3, " 

The Butchers' Mutual Benefit Society, of 

St. Paul, Minn,, .... Feb. 4, " 



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6 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



The Oitizens Publishing Co., of Minnesota, 
Fergus Falls Fire Department Association, 
The Muskado Land Improvement Associa- 
tion, 

Minnesota Immigration Oompany, - 
Minnesota Society for the Prevention of 

Cruelty to Animals, 
Minnesota Magdalen Society, - 
Elk River Library Association, - 
The Leroy Union Grange Company, 
Red River Transportation Company, - 
The Plainview, Weaver and Minneiska 

Telegraph Company, 
The Preston and South Western Railroad 

Company, 

Firemen's Relief Association, of Minne- 
apolis, 

German Roman Catholic, St. Joseph Be- 
nevolent Society, of Wabasha, Minn., 
The Union Canadian Francaise, of Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota, . - - . 
Farmers' Monticello Mill Company, - 
Cannon City Mill Company, 
Rochester German Library Association, - 
Moorhead Manufacturing Company, 
Hubbard Harvester Company, 
Tuscan Lodge No. 77, of A. F. & A. M. 
Washington Lodge No. 1, Order Sons of 

Herman, 

The Winona Savings Bank, 
Chapman Binder Company, 
Spring Valley Grange Union, - 
Franklin Grove No. 2, of the United An- 
cient Order of Druids, - 
Minnesota Tool Company, 
Olmsted County Union of Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, 

The Ladies' Floral Club and Library Asso- 
ciation, of Austin, .... 



Feb. 4, 1874 

Feb. 6, « 

Feb. 12, « 

Feb. 14, " 

Feb. 17, " 

Feb. 18, « 

Feb.' 19, '^ 

Feb. 19, « 

Feb. 27, " 

Feb. 27, " 

Feb. 27, " 

March 5, " 

March 6, " 

Mar. 6, « 

Mar. 11, ^ 

Mar. 11, « 

Mar. 14, " 

Mar. 20, " 

Mar. 20, ** 

Mar^ 28, '^ 

Apr. 10, " 

Apr. 16, " 

Apr. 22, " 

Apr. 22, " 

Apr. 25, « 

Apr. 27, " 

Apr. 28, " 

Apr. 29, « 



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SECRETARY OF STATE. 7 

The Catholic Industrial School, of Minne- 
sota, Apr. 30, 1874 

The Granger's Warehouse Company, of 

Lake City, May 1, « 

Tube Well Company, .... May 6, « 

Kellogg Flouring Mill Company, - - May 9, •' 

Star Manufacturing Company, - - May 12, " 

Modification of Articles of Incorporation of 
the St. Paul Working Men's Building 

Society, - May 12, *^ 

The Stillwater Trout Brook Company, - May 13, " 

Stillwater Gas Light Company, - - May 13, " 

Homestead Building Society, - - May 14, ** 

Union Canadian Francaise, of Faribault, 

Minnesota, May 14, ** 

Minnesota Cranberry Association, - May 14, " 

The Nicollet Mutual Benefit Building and 

Loan Association, . - . , May 28, " 

St. Boniface Mutual Aid Society, of Hast- 
ings, Minnesota, - - . : May 30, " 

Minnesota Bed Spring Manufacturing Co., June 1, " 

Lyle Elevator Company, - - - June 5, " 

Garden Valley Agricultural and Driving 

Park Association, . - - . June 10, " 

Hastings Manufacturing Company, - June 12, " 

Minneapolis Manufacturing Company, - June 15, '* 

The Stillwater & St. Paul Railroad Com- 
pany, (Amended Articles), - - June 18, " 

The Gemuethlichkeit Society, - - - June 22, " 

The Douglas County Fair Ground Associa- 
tion, June 22, " 

The St Paul Warehouse & Elevator Com- 
pany, June, 26, " 

Farmers' Association of Freeborn 

County, July 3, " 

Tribuile Publishing Company, - - July 13, " 

Mankato Academy of Music Company, - July 24, ^^ 

Penniman Homoeopathic Hospital, of Min- 
neapolis, - - - - - July 24, " 

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8 ANNUAL REPORT. 

The Minnesota and Great Eastern Trans- 
portation Company, - - - - July 27, 1874 

Arbeiter Verein, of New Ulm, - - July 29, " 

Patron Warehouse Company, - - - July 21, " 

East Side Water Company, - - - Aug. 6, '* 

Winona Paper Barrel Company, - - Aug. 6, " 

The Swedish Lutheran Board of Educa- 
tion, Aug. 13, " 

Northwestern Manufacturing Company, - Aug. 19, " 

Hennepin County Catholic Building and 

Loan Association, - - - - Aug. 19, " 

Seymour, Sabin & Co., - . . - Aug. 20, " 

Eedwood Falls Warehouse & Elevator 

Company, Aug. 26, " 

Faribault Building & Loan Association, - Aug. 28, ^' 

Mechanics' & Workingmen's Loan & 

Building Association, of Minneapolis, Aug. 31, ^^ 

The Upper Mississippi Navigation Com- 
pany, Sept. 4, " 

Skandinaviska Sjuk Hjelp Foreningen, of 

Red Wing, Sept. 8, « 

Farmers' and Mechanics' Savings Bank, 

of Minneapolis, . . - . Sept. 10, " 

Plymouth Grange, No. 351, Patrons of 

Husbandry, Sept. 14, " 

The Union Benevolent Society, of St. Paul, 

Minnesota, Sept. 17, " 

Minnesota Wood Carbolizing and Con- 
struction Company, ... - Sept 24, '^ 

People's Building and Loan Association, Sept. 24, '^ 

The Minnetonka Mill Company, - - Oct. 3, " 

New Ulm Tumverein, (Alteration of Ar- 
ticles of Incorporation,) - - Oct. 6, " 

The Goodhue County Savings Bank, - Oct. 7, " 

West St. Paul Building & Loan Associa- 
tion, No. 1, Oct. 10, " 

The South Stillwater Lumber Company, Oct 11, '' 

American Postal Telegraph Company, - Oct 31, ** 

Mapleton Warehouse Company, - - Oct. 31, '^ 

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SECBETABT OF STATE. 



9 



StOlafsSchool, Nov. 17,1874 

Faribault Mutual Loan and Building Asso- 
ciation, Nov. 17, ^' 

The German Benevolent Society, of St. 

Peter, Minnesota, - - - - Nov. 30, " 

Co-operative Barrel Manufacturing Com- 
pany, - - - . - - - Dec. 2, " 

The Taylor's Falls Copper Mining Comr 

pany, Dec. 6, " 

The Baptist Union, of Minneapolis, - - Dec. 6, ** 

The Father Matthew Catholic Abstinence 

and Benevolent Society, - - Dec. 18, " 

Brownsville and Root River Internal Im- 
provement Company, - - - Dec. 26, '' 

Affidavits of publication were filed as follows : 



Duluth Lake Transportation Company, 
Minneapolis Mutual Benefit Building and 

Loan Association, . . - . 
Minnesota Emigration Company, 
Red Wing Hotel Company, 
The Midway Improvement Company, - 
The Plainview and Minnesota Telegraph 

Company, 

Preston and Southwestern Railroad Com- 



pany? 

Moorhead Manufacturing Company, 
Farmers' Monticello Mill Company, 
Moorhead Manufacturing Company, 
Hubbard Harvester Company, 
Red River Transportation Company, 
Spring Valley Grange Union, 
Star Manufacturing Company, 
The Tube Well Company, - 
Hubbard Harvester Company, 
St Paul Coal Company, 
Grangers' Warehouse Company, 
Homestead Building Society, 
2 



Jan. 


30, 1874. 


Feb. 


6, 


a 


Feb. 


14, 


a 


Feb. 


28, 


u 


Mar. 


5, 


u 


Mar. 


5, 


u 


Feb. 


25, 


u 


Feb. 


23, 


u 


Mar. 


11, 


u 


Mar. 


20, 


u 


Mar. 


28, 


ii 


Apr. 


7, 


u 


May 


1, 


iC 


May 


12, 


a 


May 


12, 


u 


May 


12, 


u 


May 


16, 


u 


May 


16, 


(( 


May 


26, 


(( 


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10 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Minnesota Railway Construction Company, May 27, 1874 

Cannon River Manufacturing Company, May 28, " 

Minnesota Bed Spring Manufacturing Co., June 1, '' 

Minnesota Cranberry Association, - - June 2, " 
Nicollet Mutual Benefit Building and Loan 

Association, June 6, " 

Patrons' Warehouse Company, - - July 21, ^' 

St. Paul Warehouse and Elevator Company, July 22, " 
Grangers' Warehouse Company, of Lake 

City, July 27, « 

Winona Paper Barrel Company, - - Aug. 6, " 

Northwestern Manufacturing Company, Aug. 26, " 

Faribault Building and Loan Association, Aug. 28, " 
Mechanics' and Working Men's Loan and 

Building Association, of Minneapolis, Sept. 7, " 
Redwood Falls Warehouse and Elevator 

Company, Sept. 7, " 

People's Building and Loan Association, Sept. 28, " 

Upper Mississippi Navigation Company, Oct. 7, • " 
Farmers' and Mechanics' Savings Bank, of 

Minneapolis, Oct. 9, " 

West St. Paul Building and Loan Associa- 
tion, No. 1, Oct. 10, " 

Patrons of Husbandry Warehouse Com- 
pany, of Kellogg, Minn., - - - Oct. 31, " 
American Postal Telegraph Company, Nov. 16, " 
Faribault Mutual Loan and Building Asso- 
ciation, ...-,- Nov. 24, " 
Resolution passed by St. Paul Harvester 

Works, Dec. 2, « 

The Father Matthew Catholic Total Absti- 
nence and Benevolent Society, - - Dec. 15, " 
Taylor's Falls Copper Mining Company, Dec. 25, " 
Western Railroad Company, of Minnesota, Dec. 30, ** 



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SECRBTARY OF STATE, 11 

PAPER AND STATIONERY. 

Three proposals were received in answer to the official 
advertising, for furnishing the paper necessary for the 
public priijting, and the stationery for use of the Legis- 
lature and the various departments. Both contracts were 
awarded to Averill, Russell & Carpenter, who were the 
lowest bidders, as will appear from the detailed proposals 
in the appendix. 

The prices for the paper for printing are the lowest ever 
obtained by the State, as follows: 

Book paper, 45 lbs. per ream, sample marked "A," per 
pound, 12f cents. 

Sample marked " B," per pound, 12^ cents. 

Flat papers, best quality, per pound, 24^ cents. 

The contract for stationery is believed to be at equally 
favorable rates, but to save space, the details are here 
omitted. 

The appropriation necessary for paper and stationery, for 
the current year, is estimated at $10,000. 

JOURNALS AND BILLS. 

The new provisions of law regulating the enrollment of 
bills, and the transcription of the journals, have produced 
in a considerable degree the good results expected. The 
journals of 1874 were recorded and filed quite early in the 
year. 

Although the enrolling clerks might have given more 
and better instructions to their assistants, yet a percep- 
tible improvement is apparent in their work upon the 
whole. 

BONDS OF COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Under the operation of the Act of February 28th, 1874, 
requiring the bonds of county officers to be filed in this 
office, there have been received and filed the official bonds 
of the present officers of most of the counties of the State. 

The law does not explicitly say what should be done 



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12 ANNUAL REPORT. 

with bonds already executed, filed and recorded in the 
several counties, but it seemed that the reason of the law 
required the forwarding of at least the bonds of officers 
then in service, and such bonds have been asked for from 
this office, in cases where they have not been previously 
sent. 

PUBLIC PRINTING. 

Proposals for doing the public printing were advertised 
for, according to law, but none was received for any class 
of work. Communications were sent us by the contract- 
ors for the printing for some years past, stating that they 
could not afford to undertake the work under the new law, 
because, leaving the maximum rates for composition and 
press work unremunerative, as they were before, it had re- 
duced to a proportionately low rate the prices for the 
various items of work included in binding. 

The Printing Commissioners, recognizing the possible 
justice of this statement, as regarded the second, third and 
fourth classes, did not think it well founded as to the first 
and fifth classes, because the changes by the law made almost 
no difference in the settlement for work of those classes. 
After endeavoring, without avail, to dispose of the con- 
tracts in the manner prescribed by statute, the Commis- 
sioners believed it their duty to let the printing in some 
other way, if possible to do so, without excluding competi- 
tion, and without undertaking that the State would pay 
more than the maximum rates. Accordingly, a circular 
was prepared and sent out to every book or job printing 
establishment in the State and to thirty or forty of the 
larger newspaper offices, showing the contract prices hith- 
erto paid in each class, and the maximum rates under the 
new law, and asking proposals, without regard to the max- 
imum rates, promising to make contracts with the lowest 
bidders whose proposals were not above the rates in the 
law, and to report all bids above the legal rates to the 
Legislature. 

In reply to these circulars, one proposal for the printing 
of the fifth class was received, and a contract has been 



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SEGBETAB7 OF STATIC. 1^ 

executed in accordance therewith, at the highest legal 
rates, Mr. J. K. Moore, of St. Peter, being the contractor, 
A proposal was received from Mr. D. Ramaley for the first 
class, the printing of bills and blanks for the Legislature, 
which he subsequently modified so as to agree to do that 
work according to the terms of the new law, provided he 
could use type of the size formerly authorized. Under the 
seeming necessity of the case, consent was given, and the 
printing of the first class was provided for. But the 
proposals for the remaining classes, comprising the jour- 
nals, reports, and laws, so exceeded the legal rates that no 
contract has been made for either class of work. 

If the policy is to be maintained of letting the printing 
to the lowest bidder, the maximum rates must be revised 
and increased ; or authority must be given the commis- 
sioners of printing to contract with the lowest bidder 
without regard to fixed prices, but with power to reject 
excessive or unreasonable bids. 

The prices specified in the act of 1874 were fixed by the 
Senate Committee on Printing, after an examination of the 
contract prices at which the work of the State had actually 
been done, under competition, for six years ; and they 
would afiford a contractor for either class of printing a 
larger amount than has been paid on the average for eight 
years for a like amount of similar work. This fact induced 
the belief that there would be a profit, to an office properly 
stocked, in doing the public printing at the new prices. 

But the act of 1874 required the work to be done upon 
a new size of type. This necessitated an outlay by any 
contractor, for new material, exceeding any possible profit 
accruing in the single year during which his contract 
would continue. 

Further, the Superintendent of Printing was known not 
to favor the making up of profits by indirection. 

The contractor's work would begin the first of November ; 
no payment could be made him until an appropriation 
should be made by the Legislature, which did not convene 
till January, and would hardly pass the appropriation within 
four months of the beginning of his outlay. 

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l4 ANNtJAL EEPOE*. 

Besides these certainties, there were contiRgencies eqaally 
tending to influence printers not to bid. The appropriation 
might be insuflScient, as it was two years since. The Super- 
intendent might interpret the law differently from the con- 
tractor. The construction of the Superintendent might 
itself be overruled. 

In the earlier years competition under the printing law 
was brisk. The motive of a printer in bidding was not so 
much the hope of making a profit for himself out of the 
public printing, as the determination that his competitor, 
if successful, should gain nothing but the prestige and his 
trouble. But the printing houses capable of doing the 
work no longer compete for business which does not offer 
fair compensation, and the State must resolve either to 
pay higher prices, or follow the example of California, which 
has a State printing office, to go into operation the present 
year. 

To aid the Legislature in intelligently determining the 
question of prices, I have procured the statistics of print- 
ing from almost all the so-called Northern States, and all 
the Southern States except those whose governments have 
been supposed to be bad economic examples. An exam- 
ination of these will convince one that Minnesota has 
neither had an uncommon amount of printing done, nor 
paid for it unusual prices. 

I renew the recommendation made two years ago, that 
the printing contracts be let for not less than two years. 
This appears to be the usual rule in other States. It will 
surely increase the number of bidders, and increase of com- 
petition will reduce prices. 

The prices allowed for binding should be sufficient com- 
pensation for folding, collating, stabbing and stitching, as 
well as covering and lettering. I am not sure that this was 
not the purpose of the law of 1866, re-enacted in 1868, but 
the custom has prevailed from the first of allowing charges 
for folding and stitching everything which was folded and 
stitched, whether there was a charge for binding or not. 
This should be changed by the terms of the new law. 

The use of the technical terms, token and quire, in 

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SlSCRETAltt OJ^ STATE. 16 

regard to press-work, wraps the subject in unnecessary 
mystery. The price had better be specified at so much a 
hundred impressions, in addition to a certain sum for 
making ready each form. The labor of preparing a form 
is as great for ten impressions as for a thousand, and after 
that labor is paid for, the value of press- work is exactly 
proportioned to the number of impressions taken. 

From examination of the subject, I believe the following 
prices to be fairly profitable, though not, perhaps, high 
enough to induce the liveliest competition : 

Composition^ 60 cents per 1,000 ems. 

Press-work^ 25 cents per hundred impressions; three 
times the price of a hundred impressions for making ready 
each form. 

Folding^ 8 cents per hundred sheets. 

Collating^ StahJnng^ and Stitching^ $1.00 per hundred 
copies. 

Binding^ including all work subsequent to press- work : 

In brochure covers, 8 pages, per hundred copies, f 1.50 ; 
every additional 8 pages, a sixth of a dollar additional. 

In quarter binding, 940 per hundred copies. 

In half binding, $70 per hundred copies. 

In full cloth, $55 per hundred copies. 

In full sheep, law binding, $125 per hundred copies. 

I recommend that these prices be made the maximum 
rates, and that the form of proposals be that each bid- 
der shall say for what per cent, less than the maximum 
rates he will undertake to do the work of the class covered 
by his bid. 

The appropriation for public printing by the last Legis- 
lature having proved insuflScient, the contractor justly 
claims an appropriation for the amount of the unpaid bal- 
ance. In determining the amount so due the same ques- 
tion is involved which was considered by the expert 
employed to measure the printing under the contract of 
1872, who, in the poiht in question, set aside the judgment 
of every commissioner or superintendent of printing since 
1861 and of the experts employed by them, and reversed 



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16 ANNUAL REPORT. 

the nniform construction and practice of this department. 
The question regards the binding in brochure covering, of 
messages and reports making not more than one hundred 
pages, and it turns upon the construction of the words 
'^executive documents." Are the executive documents 
for binding which in brochure covering the maximum 
pri-ce is eight cents a copy, the volumes of collected re- 
ports of executive officers and State institutions, or is each 
report contained in said volume an "executive docu- 
ment?" 

Ordinarily speaking, the documents proceeding from the 
executive officers of the State would be called executive 
documents. Did the printing law use the term in that 
ordinary sense, or in a restricted sense, applying to such 
reports only when bound together, or in an enlarged sense 
covering the reports of State institutions, also ? 

The judgment of the printing commissioners has been 
from the first, that the collective volume was not an exec- 
utive document, but a " volume of executive documents," 
and each of the volumes contained in that volume was 
singly an "executive document." 

Section 28, of the Act of March 6, 1868, seems to com- 
pel the acceptance of that construction. 

It is as follows : 

Sko. 28. At the same time the documents mentioned 
in the two preceding sections are printed in pamphlet 
form, there shall be printed on the same type, four hundred 
copies of each document named in said two preceding sec- 
tions, which shall be bound together in a volume and 
styled " executive documents." The paging of said docu- 
ments shall be consecutive. The Secretary of State shall 
make out an index of said volume of executive docu- 
ments, which he shall deliver to the printer, who shall 
print the same at the close of said volume. There shall be 
no charge for composition for printing the number of 
copies of said executive documents necessary for the vol- 
ume herein provided for, and none of them shall be 
printed otherwise than is provided in this and the two pre- 
ceding sections of this chapter. 



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SECRETARY OP STATE. 17 

Section 26, the first of '* the two preceding sections," 
provides for the printing in pamphlet form, and binding 
in brochure covers, of the separate reports ; and section 27 
makes similar provision for the Governor's message. Sec- 
tion 28 says that these documents shall be bound ''in a 
volume and styled executive documents." 

The Secretary of State is required tb make an index to 
the " volume of executive documents." 

" There shall be no charge for composition for printing 
the number of copies of said executive documents neces- 
sary for the volume herein provided for." This plainly 
recognizes the executive documents as different from, but 
" necessary for," the volume. They are the several reports . 
which are needed to make a volume of. The section con- 
tinues : " And none of them [the executive documents] 
shall be printed otherwise than is provided in this and the 
two preceding sections." 

The two preceding sections, then, according to the plain 
language of section 28, contain provisions for the printing 
of executive documents. The first of the two preceding 
• sections reads: "There shall be printed in pamphlet form 
and covered in brochure covers the following numbers of 
each of the following documents, to-wit: Auditor of State's 
report," etc., enumerating all the documents except the 
Governor's message, which is the only document the print- 
ing of which is provided for in the other of the two 
sections. 

Here, then, are the very documents about binding which 
the question is now raised. They are the "executive 
documents in brochure covers," expressly authorized and 
explicitly descrijied as such. 

It is proper to see if the same care is used in other parts 
of the law to distinguish " executive documents " from 
" the volume of executive documents." 

The law relates to the distribution of the laws and public 
documents by the Secretary of State, as well as to the 
printing of them. The provisions relating to the distri- 
bution are contained in sections 30 to 36, inclusive, 
3 



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18 AKNUAL REPOM. 

Section 30 designates {he officers who shall be entitled to 
a copy of each journal and " the volume of executive doc- 
uments;'' and next, what institutions shall receive the 
journals and ''the volume of executive documents." 

Having thus, in the first section relating to distribution, 
twice designated the " volume " as the publication to be 
distributed by the Secretary, the subsequent sections speak 
of it only as " documents," or " executive documents." 
Less strictness was evidently required in this part of the 
law, because the documents in brochure covers were all 
printed for the Legislature and distributed by them ; the 
volume being the only form in which the documents were 
for distribution by the Secretary. 

The earliest act in which these provisions were found 
was approved March 7, 1861. This was re-enacted in 1866, 
with the sections added which establish the contract 
system. In that early act of 1861, by a misplacement that 
is not unusual, a section which related to the printing, and 
which therefore belonged earlier in the act, was placed 
after the sections concerning the distribution. The sec- 
tions concerning distribution were, in the act of 1861, 
numbered 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16. The misplaced section 
concerning printing was then numbered 17. This section, 
having been written just after the immediately preceding 
sections, emplo3'^ed the words "executive documents" as 
they were used in those sections, meaning the " volume of 
executive documents." 

In revising the law for the general statutes, this 
misplaced section (17) was put where it belonged, and is 
now section 12 ; but the language of the section was not 
changed, and it still refers to the " t;{?Zt^me of executive 
documents" by the words "executive documents." 

But in all the sections of the law relating to the print- 
ing and binding, with the single exception of this 12th 
section, there is not one instance where the words "exec- 
utive documents," or "public documents," sometimes 
used, refer to the volume of documents bound together. 

Hence from 1861 to this date the words "executive doc- 
uments in brochure covers" have been understood to 

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BECI^ETART OF STATfe. 19 

mean the reports severally, and " the volume of executive 
documents" to mean the reports collectively. 

From 1861 to 1866 the separate reports were bylaw, 
bound in brochure covers, and the volume of documents 
was bound in quarter binding. By the act of February 
26, 1866, the contract system was adopted, limited by 
maximum rates. Rates were specified for binding execu- 
tive documents in brochure and in half binding; and by 
the same law the separate reports were to be bound in 
brochure and the volume in half binding. Certainly the 
words " executive documents in brochure covers" could 
not refer to a volume of documents which by the law were 
not to be in brochure covers but in half binding. 

If these separate reports are to be understood as de- 
scribed by the law as pamphlets and not executive docu- 
ments, another objection arises. No maximum rates are 
provided for binding pamphlets which exceed one hun- 
dred pages. More than half of the volumes of the third 
class are of that size. 

The strongest argument against the established con- 
struction lies in the fact that for some of the executive doc- 
uments, containing but eight or ten pages, the maximum 
of eight cents a copy for brochure covers is far more than 
the work is worth. This is true ; but it must be remem- 
bered that the law gives eight cents a copy as the maxi- 
mum price, and a maximum should be, not a fair rate for 
the least expensive work, but a remunerative price for the 
most costly. The laws and journals are limited by the 
same rate as the executive documents, and eight cents 
per copy is not excessive for the large volumes in bro- 
chure. Competition, it was thought, would, reduce the 
price upon each class to the proper sum, the legal maxi- 
mum being high enough for the dearest work. 

I have discussed this question here, in justice to the 
ofScer, now deceased. Colonel H. 0. Rogers, who was Su- 
perintendent of Public Printing when the lowest bidder 
system was adopted in 1866, and when the law was revised 
in 1868, and who established the precedent which has 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 ANNUAL REPORT. 

been constantly followed, and which I believe to be 
right. 

But although I believe the contract made in 1873, before 
the new theory was broached, was legal and binding, yet 
feeling that there was much good faith as well as much 
violent feeling in the support of the opposite view* I have 
refused to audit accounts under said contract for binding 
any executive document, which was also a pamphlet not 
exceeding 100 pages, for a greater sum than one dollar per 
hundred copies. 

Application was made to the Supreme Court, by the 
contractor, for a writ commanding the Superintendent of 
Printing to audit and approve the same at the contract 
rates. Wishing the interests of the State to be represented 
by counsel who believed my refusal to be right, I employed 
lion. M. S. Wilkinson to defend on the merits of the case. 
But the court refused to take jurisdiction of the cause. 
Mr. Wilkinson's services remain to be paid for by appro- 
priation. ♦ 

Two facts seem to me to raise an equity in favor of the 
contractor's claim, even if it be thought to have no legal 
foundation in the contract under the law. These are : 

First — ^That his proposals were made in view of a uniform 
and unquestioned construction of the law by the State's 
officers for the settlement of printing claims. 

Second — ^That while the prices for binding under his 
contract may have afforded him more than a fair profit for 
that workj the rate for composition produced as much less 
than fair compensation for that service. 

Mr. J. C- Wise, a practical printer with no extravagant 
views of prices, gave me his opinion last winter that the 
price for plain composition should be 55 or 60 cents per 
thousand ems. At the lowest price, 55 cents, Mr. Wright, 
the contractor, would have received $1,545 more 
for composition under his contracts of 1872 than he was 
in fact paid for it. It is but fair to suppose that he agreed 
to do the work at that price because he knew that, accord- 
ing to our construction of the law, it would be possible for 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECBETABT OF STATE. 21 

him to make up, on the binding, part of his deficit upon 
composition. 

PRINTING CLERK. 

The growth of the printing work and the care of the pur- 
chase, custody and distribution of the stationery, as well 
as the paper for printing, makes the employment of an ad- 
ditional clerk in this department an absolute necessity. 

I think an act should be passed authorizing the Secretary 
of State to appoint a Printing Clerk, who should be a com- 
petent practical printer, whose duty it should be to see that 
the printing is done not only in a workmanlike manner, 
but with due regard to economy; to measure every job of 
printing and endorse thereon the detailed cost; to have 
charge, under the Secretary, of the paper for printing, and 
see that the proper paper is used ; to have chargb of, and 
issue the stationery of the State. He might also be given 
the measurement of the State advertising. The cost of 
paper, stationery, printing, distributing the laws and ad- 
vertising, cannot well be less than $50,000 a year here- 
after, and the duties here mentioned would involve as 
much care and perplexity as attaches to any department 
in the State government. 

SPECIAL LAWS. 

Now that a less number of the special laws are distrib- 
uted gratuitiously than formerly, it seems likely that a 
smaller edition will answer the demand. I think one 
thousand will be suflSicient for all purposes under the 
present law. 

The four thousand copies of Booth's Township Manual, 
authorized at the last session, have been furnished and 
distributed according to law. 

The publisher of Bissell's Minnesota Statutes at Large 
filed in this office an agreement promising to furnish that 
publication for use of State, or of the counties of the State, 
for not more than ten dollars per set. The law required 
no bond, nor did it afford any hint what should be a satis- 



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22 ANNUAL BEFOBT. 

factory form of agreement. I have, therefore, expressed 
DO formal satisfaction, but there is probably no reason to 
doubt that the work will be obtainable, when wanted, at 
that price. 

Several thousand immigration pamphlets remain of 
those prepared in 1872. They might be made useful at 
this time by the preparation of a few pages of statistics of 
the last two years to accompany them. If no other 
expense for immigration may seem best, I think $400 for 
the preparation of such statistics, for advertising and 
postage, would enable this office, by the aid of the addi- 
tional clerk whose employment is necessary for other 
reasons, to put the remaining pamphlets where they will 
do the most good. Respectfully submitted, 

S. P. JENNISON, 

Secretary of State. 



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8ECRETABY OP STATE. 



23 



i^LPPEISTDIX. 



LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC 

IN COMMISSION, JANUARY 1, 1875. 



NAME. 



Aldrich, Leonard 

Atherton, Cornelias 

Allen, Willard 

Allanson, John S 

Adams, A. H 

Arnold, Geo. B 

Alley, Josephus 

Abbott. S. J 

Arnold. J. K 

Archibald, W. H 

Allen, W. P.. 

Ackennann, Julius H... 

Armstrong, Geo. H 

Arnold, W. J 

Atkins, Howard M 

Allen, Ormanzo 

Adams, Samuel E 

Averj, Silas.. 

Aiken, John 

Anthony, David 

Allen, Charles P 

Armstrong, Thomas H... 

Armstrong, J. A 

Allen, Charles...^ 

Andrews, C. S 

AUis, Frederick 

Ames, Angier 

Allen, William A 

Avery, Henry M 

Bean, James 

Brackenridge, Walter L. 

Baumhager, Herman 

Belfov,F 

Bockham, Thomas S 

Baltes, Peter J 



BESIDENCE. 



Lake Shetek, Murray county 

Wasioja, Dodge county .*. 

Spring Valley, Fillmore county 

Lake Traverse, Traverse county 

Madelia, Watonwan county 

Mantorville, Dodge county 

Howard Lake, Wright county 

Winnebaffo City, Faribault county.. 

St. Paul, Kamsey county 

Northfield, Rioe county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Carver, Carver county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Wabasha, Wabasha county 

St. Cloud, Steams county 

Austin, Mower county 

Monticello, Wright county 

Pleasant Grove, Olmsted county 

Caledonia, Houston county 

Kasson, Dodge county 

Beltrami county. 



Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

Winnebago City, Faribault county.. 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Eyota, Olmsted county, 

St. Paul, Bamsey county 

St. Paul, Bamsey county 

Winona, Winona county 

Jackson, Jackson county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Litchfield, Meeker county 

Faribault, Bice county 

Shakopee, Soott county 



DATE OF COH. 



Jan. 2, 1873 
Jan. 24, 1873 
Feb. 11, 1873 
Feb. 1,1873 
Apr. 26, 1873 
June 16, 1873 
July 23, 1873 
Aug. 25, 1873 
Aug. 28, 1873 
Aug. 29. 1873 
Dec 15, 1873 
Dec. 18, 1873 
Jan. 6,1874 
Jan. 26, 1874 
Jan. 20, 1874 
Feb. 19, 1874 
Feb. 19, 1874 
Feb. 19, 1874 
Mar. 5. 1874 
May 3,1874 
Jan 9, 1874 
Apr. 25, 1874 
Miy 1, 1874 
May 18, 1874 
June 13, 1874 
July 15, 1874 
Sept. 16, 1874 
Oct 21, 1874 
2, 1874 
10, 1873 
23, 1873 
17, 1873 
6, 1873 
1, 1873 



Nov. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



Jan. 21, 1873 



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24 



ANNUAL REPOBT. 



LIST OF NOTABIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



NAME. 



Beaapre, Phillin , 

Barlinffame, J. M..., 

Buflwell, Geo. W 

Ball,W. F 

Baker, Francis M..., 

Buell,D. L 

Bortan^, B. J 

Ball, Miner 

Bartlett, Plinej 

Butler, Henry C 

Bartleson, Charles J 

Brownell, Lewis 

Blaisdell, H. M 

Bennett, John 

Bliss, T.H 

Bailej, Samuel 

Blackstock, Wm; J... 

Bryant, James , 

Butler, S. A 

Braden, John Q. A. 
Bowen, Morell D..... 

Blacken, C. H 

Bruce, Hector , 

Briggs, Thomas R... 
Brown, Joseph R..., 

Buell, Salmon A 

Beals, James B 

Blanchard, Albert..., 
Baldwin, Dwiffht M 
Briggs, Rinaldo R... 

Bell, Charles N 

Brown, L. M , 

Brown, D. A , 

Barbaras, George 

Bosworth, C. H. 

Bryant, Charles S... 

Barker, A.P 

Baxter, George N... 

Brown, Z. E 

Bostwick, C. E 

Benton, C. H 

Butler, Nathan 

Bissell, Arthur H..., 

Bartlett,A. H 

Benedict, C. T 

Burch, Edwin K , 

Bardey, David 

Barker. Albert F... 

BuUen, John , 

Bockler, Joseph 

Burd, J. S 

Burdipk, A. M 

Budd, Charles H 

Baasen, Francis ^ 



BBSIDENCE. 



St. Cloud, Steams county 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Blue Earth City, Faribault county.. 

Detroit, Becker county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Caledonia, Houston county 

Norway, Goodhue county 

Delano, Wright county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Rochester, Olmsted couniy....! 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Waseca, Waseca county 

Fainnount, Martin county 

Waverley Mills, Wright county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Pine City, Pine county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Chatfield, Faribault county 

Litchfield, Meeker county 

Litchfield, Meeker co«nty 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Crookston, Polk county 

Howard Lake, Wright county 

Morris, Traverse county 

St. Peter, Nicolet county 

St Paul, Ramsey county „ 

New Ulm, Brown county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

Winona, Winona county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Hastings, Dakota county 

Redwing, Goodhue county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Princeton, Mille' Laos county 

Faribault, Rice county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Duluth, St. Louis county 

Austin, Mower county 

Minneapolis^ Hennepin county 

Winona, Winona county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

Rochester, Olmsted county .r 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Winona, Winona county 

Monticello, Wright county 

Elba, Winona county 

Wilson, Winona county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

New Auburn, Sibley county 

Monti vido, Chippewa county... 

Nicollet county.. 



DATE OF COM. 



Jan. 25, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 19, 
Feb. 24, 
Jan. 5, 
Mar. 13, 
Mar. 3, 
Mar. 15, 
Mar. 25, 
Mar. 22, 
Mar. 26, 
Apr. 1, 
Apr. 17. 
Apr. 1, 
Apr. 4, 
Apr. 10, 
Mar. 26, 
Apr. 18, 
May 14, 
May 14, 
May 23, 
May 26, 
June 4, 
June 4, 
May 16, 
June 3, 
July 11, 
July 20, 
Aug. 12, 
Aug. 30, 
Sept. 22, 
Apr. 10, 
Apr. 10, 
Nov. 10, 
Nov. 14, 
Nov. 17, 
Dec. 2, 
Dec. ;15. 
June 6, 
Dec. 30, 
Oct. 23. 
Dec. 31, 
Jan. 6, 
Feb. 16, 
Jan. 20, 
Jan. 22, 
Jan. 6, 
Jan. 1, 
Mar. 1, 
Feb. 2, 
Mar. 23, 
Mar. 2, 
Feb. 26, 
Mar. 3, 



1873 

1873 
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1874 
1874 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECRETARY OP STATE. 25 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



KAME. 



Baier, Wm. H .. 

Buch, Norman 

Brown, Frank G 

Brown, J. E 

Barnes, Oliver W 

Baxter, Luther L 

Brown, Parley 

Blake, Charles E 

Bull, H. C 

Barney, Sheldon F.... 

Barto, A 

Beman, Samuel S 

Brown, Charle« T 

Babcock, P. M 

Bonn i well, Henry V.. 

Brophy, John 

Bishop, James L 

Brimmer, W. D 

Bottineau, John B 

Bentlev, Alfred N 

Bangii, A. W 

Busse, H. W 

Bryant, Robert S 

Benhara, A 

Bean, Charles 

Brick, Peter 

Brower, J. V 

Barnum, A. K.. 

Bierce, C. A 

Barnes, George A 

Brosseau, Francis X.. 
Bumham, Frank J.... 

Bell, Chas. N 

Benton, C H 

Bnckman, George R.. 

Behrns, John 

Brill, H.R 

Butterdeld, M. D 

Ball, John 

Blisi*, Charles H 

Button, R. D 

Bell, Vernon 

Batchelder. G. W 

Barting, Theophil 

Brown, Wilson C 

Best, William H 

Burwell, Charles H.., 

Baldwin, 0.0 

Bell, J. E 

Bradford, Adolphus., 

Claggett, John R 

Crandall, Chas. F 

Campbell, S. L 

Campbell, £. A 

4 



BESIDEKCE. 



DATEOFCOH. 



Jordan, Scott county 

Winona, Winona county 

Detroit, Becker county 

Mapleton, Blue Earth county.... 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county., 

Chaska, Carver county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

-, Anoka county., 



Collin wood, Meeker county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Sauk Centre, Stearns county 

Winona, Winona county 

, Nicollet county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 

HutchinsQ|p, McLeod county 

Austin, IvSwer county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 

Winona, Winona county 

Le Sueur, Le Sueur county 

Carver, Carver county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

, Kanabec county 

St. Cloud, Stearns county 

St. Cloud, Stearns county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Winona, AVinona county 

Wells, Faribault county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Glyndon, Clay county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.., 

Waseca, W^aseca county 

Bremen^Wabasha county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Anoka, Anoka county 

Winona, Winona county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county., 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county., 

Faribault, Rice county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county., 

Winona, Winona county. 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county., 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin, county. 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county. 

Hastings, Dakota county 

Owatonna, Steele county , 

Wabasha, Wabasha county , 

Litchfield, Meeker county 



Mar. 14, 1874 
Mar. 13, 1874 
Mar. 15, 1874 
Mar. 12, 1874 
Mar, 24, 1874 
Mar. 21, 1874 
Mar. 24, 1874 
Mar. 26, 1874 
Mar. 20, 1874 
Feb. 14, 1874 
Apr. 4, 1874 
Apr. 13, 1874 
Apr. 15, 1874 
Apr. 17, 1874 
Apr. 29, 1874 
Apr. 9, 1874 
Mar. 24, 1874 
Mar. 25, 1874 
Mar. 16, 1874 
Apr. 10, 1874 
May 2,1874 
May 15, 1874 
May 13, 1874 
May 4,1874 
May 13, 1874 
May 14, 1874 
May 28, 1874 
Mar. 19, 1874 
June 4, 1874 
Mar. 1,1874 
July 23, 1874 
Aug. 10, 1874 
July 20, 1874 
Aug. 21, 1874 
Aug. 22, 1874 
Dec 11, 1874 
Dec. 28, 1874 
Aug. 22, 1874 
Sept. 8, 1874 
Oct. 6, 1874 
Oct. 20, 1874 
Nov. 19, 1874 
Nov. 25, 1874 
Dec. 1,1874 
Nov. 23, 1874 
Dec. 18, 1874 
Nov. 7, 1874 
Nov. 20, 1874 
Sept. 10, 1874 
Dec. 19, 1874 
Feb. 8,1873 
April 1, 1873 
Mar. 9,1873 
Mar. 23, 1873 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



26 ANNUAL REPORT. 

LIST OF N0TABIE8 PUBLIC— Continued. 



NAME. 



Clark, Charles F.... 
Chamberlain, G. C. 

Cole, Gordon E 

Cleveland, G. K 

Clark, George A.... 

Cornish, W. D 

Cornell, F. B 

Cbrser, El wood S... 

Cardozo, J. N 

Charter, T. G 

Cooley, Grove.. 



RESIDENCE. 



. Willmar, Kandiyohi connty 

Jackson, Jackson connty 

Faribault, Bice county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

St. Paul, Barasey connty , 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county . 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 

St. Paul, Bamsey county 

St. Peter, Nicollet county 

,. , _ Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 

Chandler. James O jjanesville, Waseca county 

Couch, George, Jr Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 

Colbum, N. P iPreston, Fillmore county 

Capon, Jules iWabasha, Wabasha county 

Castle, James N Stillwater, Watfiington county... 

Case, Sweet W I Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 

Comfort, O. H Stillwater, Washington county... 



Cory, Henry W, 
Cunningham, H. 

Case, B. A 

Carson, Bobert B.. 



St. Paul, Bamsey county.. 
Becker county., 



Chatfield, Fillmore county 

Detroit, Becker county 

Crain, Chas. W jWyckoff, Fillmore county 

Chambers, James Ozakis, Douglas county < 

Cook, Levi L I Minneapolis, Hennepin county., 

Cummings, Bobt. W j Minneapolis, Hennepin county. 



(k)rning, J. W. L 

Comstock, S. G 

Crowell, B. F , 

Chapman, George H 

Coon, W. L 

Cameron, George M 

Crosby, Charles W 

Carver, Oscar F 

Clerk, Merrill M 

Chowen, George W 

Chase, Sylvester B 

Chandler, James O 

Carpenter, Niles , 

Collins, H. B 

Carver, Frederick A 

Chapin, Arthur G; 

Collester.M. D. L 

Chase Benj 

Cameron, Daniel 

Cool, John M 

Castle, Henry A 

Clarke, Z. B 

Crane, Eugene B 

Comstock, Elbridge G... 
Chadbourn, Nathaniel... 

Case, Adelbert C 

Crocker, Beuben 

Coffin, William P 



St. Paul, Bamsey county.. 
Moorhead, Clay «)unty.... 
St. Paul, Bamsey county.. 
Steams county. 



Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Austin, Mower county 

Hastings, Dakota county 

Sauk Centre, Stearns county 

Garden City, Blue Earth county.. 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 
Minneapolis, H«nnepin county... 

Janesville, Waseca county 

Bushford, Fillmore county 

Alden, Freeborn county 

St. Paul, Bamsey county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 

Waseca, Waseca county, 

Wells, Faribault county 

La Crescent, Houston county 

Winona, Winona county iFeb. 28, 

St. Paul, Bamsey county < Mar. 3, 

Lac ^ui Parle, Lac qui Parle county...! Mar. 10, 

Austm, Mower county jMar. 6, 

Avr, Goodhue county 'Mar. 10, 

Blue Earth City, Faribault county jMar. 25, 

High Forest, Olmsted county 'Mar. 14, 

Bush City, Chisago county I Apr. 7, 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 'Apr. 16, 



DATE OF OOX. 



Apr. 23, 
May 20, 
June 10, 
June 20, 
July 1, 
Aug. 26, 
Sept. 23, 
Nov. 1, 
Dec. 9. 
Dec. 9, 
Feb. 14, 
Mar. 1, 
Feb. 20, 
Feb. 18, 
Mar. 13, 
Mar. 15, 
Mar. 10, 
Mar. 8, 
Mar. 6, 
Jan. 24, 
Mar. 24, 
Mar. 26, 
Apr. 1, 
Apr. 15, 
Apr. 17, 
May 16, 
June 17, 
June 27, 
Nov. 21, 
Dec. 5, 
Jan. 5, 
Jan. 20, 
Jan 21, 
Jan. 21, 
Jan. 22, 
Jan. 24, 
Jan. 29, 
Mar. 1, 
Mar. 1, 
Feb. 23, 
Feb. 16, 
Feb. 18, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 25, 
Feb. 9, 



1873 
1873 
1873 

1873 
1873 
1873 
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1874 
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1874 
1874 
1874 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECRETARY OP STATE. 
LISTS OF NOTAKIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



27 



NAMB. 



Carleton, Frank H 

Castle, IraW 

Carson, William 

Cooper, John 

CaRe, John H 

Chittenden, Edwin S 

Cash, Daniel G. 

Clarke, S. C 

Chilslrom, P. O 

Caster, G. L 

Countryman, A. D 

Cleveland, George S 

Capehart, A. R 

Colling, L. W 

Chapman, Charles A 

Crowell, Albin M 

Casey, John T 

Cheney, William 

C<x:hran, Thomas, Jr.... 

Constans, H. B 

Chapman, Truman D.... 

Chase, H. S 

Danflingbury, Peter L.., 

Daniels, M. J , 

Dickenson, D. A 

Dean, Isaac N , 

Daily, M. A 

DeKay, W. H 

Daniels, J. V 

Drew,Wm.S 

Drew, Walter 

Darling, W. C 

Dikeman, C 

Du Toit, Geo. A 

Davis, Nathan 

Dixon, A. C 

Dodge, W. O 

Davis, L. R 

Dyckson, James W.... 

Davis, Thomas M , 

Donaldson, E. N 

Davidson, J. Ham 

Davis, C. R 

Dye, Walter G 

Denton, E. W 

Denton, M. G 

Dean, William J 

Drew, M. K 

Donaldson, Joseph...... 

Dorival, N. E 

Dunlop, A. G.. 

Dashiell, John L. M.... 
Desmond, Michael J.... 
DoaglaflB,E.. 



RESIDENCE. 



St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Stillwater, Washington county 

High Forest, Olmsted county 

St. Cloud, Stearns county 

Faribault, Rice county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Duluth, St. Louis county 

St. James, Watonwan county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Minneapolis, Plennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

St. Cloud, Stearns county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Long Prairie, Todd county 

Austin, Mower county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin* county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Brown county 

Sunrise, Chisago county 

White Bear, Ramsey county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Rochester, Olmsted county.., 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Blakeley, Scott county 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Hastings, Dakota county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Winona, Winona county 

Audubon, Becker county, 

Detroit City, Becker county 

Winona, Winona county 

Carver, Carver county 

Lynd, Lyon county 

Winona, Winona county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

Lac qui Parle, Lac qui Parle county., 

Winona, Winona county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Winona, Winona county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

St. Peter, Nicollet county 

Winona, Winona county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

W^inona, Winona county 

Farmin^on, Dakota county 

Caledonia, Houston county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Rushford, Fillmore county 

White Earth, Becker county 



DATE OP COM. 



Mar. 18, 
April 6, 
Mar. Si, 
Mar. 14, 
May 20, 
June 6, 
Jan. 24, 
June 10, 
June 20, 
June 22, 
July 7, 
July 8, 
Aug. 1, 
July 23, 
Aug. 19, 
Aug. 20, 
Aug. 29, 
Sept. 4, 
Sept. 7, 
Oct. 24, 
Nov. 21, 
Dec. 8, 
Dec. 18, 
Jan. 12, 
April 1, 
Feb. 21, 
June 4, 
Julv 16, 
Jul> 1, 
July 18, 
Jan. 11, 
Jan. 22, 
Feb. 10, 
Jan. 15, 
Feb. 18, 
Mar. 22, 
May 21, 
June 7, 
Sept. 29, 
Oct. 3, 
Nov. 19, 
Aug. 2, 
Jan. 1, 
Jan. 20, 
Jan. 25, 
Jan. 21, 
Jan. 31, 
Jan. 21, 
Feb. 9, 
Feb. 13, 
Jan. 12, 
Feb. 20, 
Feb. 24, 
Feb. 5, 



1874 

1874 

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1873 

1873 

1873 

1873 

1873 

1873 

1873 

1873 

1873 

1873 

1873 

1873 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 

1874 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



28 ANNUAL REPORT. 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



KAME. 



Bow, William B.. 

Denny, H. R 

Degnon, John F 

Dickey, WmB 

Dunn, L. A 

De Flon, John F. N.., 

Dowse, Thomas , 

Dryer, George W 

Dulton, Loren 

Dnnn, Andrew C: , 

Dodge, H.M 

Dufour, P. A 

Davidson, John 

Douglas, Howard 

Dayton, Lyman C 

Donaldson, E. N 

Dibble, William S 

Doughty, J. Ed 

Erricson, Erric 

Evans, Eri P 

Eagan, Philip 

Erwin, Wm. W 

Emery, Sloan M 

Elliot, Adolphus F.... 

Eichorn, Edmund 

Eckholdt, Halftan A.. 

Evans, J., Jr 

Eaton, Samuel W 

Edwards C.F 

Emmel, Henry J 

Everett, Mahlon R.... 
Eygabroad, John J... 

Eaton, J. S 

Edgerton, A. J 

Eagan, Jas. J 

Eaton, Charles A 

Ellington, Lewis 

Eaton, Charles A 

Fuller, M. A 

Flanders, Joseph....... 

Flint, Samuel M 

Folsom, S. P 

Fulmer, Nelson B 

Flannery, George P... 

Ferrall, LF. O 

Filbert, P 

Fuller, Israel 

Farmer, Daniel B 

Fish, Daniel 

Finley, H. H 

Fowler, Andrew J.... 

Follett, Dennis 

Ford, Orville D 



BESn>£NCE. 



Davidson, A. Y Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 



DATE OF COM. 



Bear Valley, Wabasha county, 

Carver, Carver county 

Brainerd, Crow Wing county 

Zumbrota, Goodhue county 

St. James, Watonwan county 

Alexandria, Douglas county 

Duhith, St. Louis county 

St. Peter, Niccollet county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Winnebago City, Faribault county. 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Brainerd, Crow Wing county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Rushford, Fillmore county 

Kasson, Dodge county 

Lake City, Waba.*5ha county 

Beaver Fall.c, Renville county.. 

Blue Earth county 

Hastings, Dakota county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Minneapolis:, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

St. James, Watonwan county 

Melrose, Stearns county 

Le Sueur, Le Sueur county 

Winnebago City, Faribault countyu . 
Lac qui Jrarle, Lac qui Parle county... 

MantorviUe, Dodge county 

Duluth, St. Louis county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 
Blooming Prairie, Steele county 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county. ., 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 

Madelia, Watonwan county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county , 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Alexandria, Douglas county 

Faribault, Rice county , 

Chatfield, Fillmore county 

Dundas, Rice county 

St. Peter, Nicollet county , 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county. 

Delano, Wright county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Hastings, Dakota county 

Wabasha, Wabaflha county 



Apr. 7,1874 

Mar. 26, 1874 

April 1, 1874 

Apr. 27, 1874 

Feb. 24, 1874 

May 19, 1874 

May 18, 1874 

June 7, 1874 

May 4,1874 

June 17, 1874 

June 23, 1874 

June 6, 1874 

July 22, 1874 

Aug. 11, 1874 

Aug. 18, 1874 

vSept. 1,1874 

Sept. 3, 1874 

Oct. 15, 1874 

Dec. 1, 1874 

Feb. 20, 1873 

Jan. 23, 1873 

Mar. 10, 1873 

Mar. 22, 1873 

Maiv29. 1873 

Apr. 24, 1873 

May 2,1873 

Aug. 20, 1873 

Dec. 24, 1873 

Mar. 2, 1874 

Mar. 20, 1874 

Mar. 16, 1874 

April 1, 1874 

May 28, 1874 

June 1, 1874 

Aug. 25, 1874 

Aug. 9, 1874 

Oct. 8, 1874 

Nov. 16, 1874 

Oct. 8, 1874 

Feb. 20, 1873 

Apr. 3, 1873 

Mav 13, 1873 

Aug. 25, 1873 

Feb. 21, 1873 

Apr. 5, 1873 

Feb. 16, 1873 

Nov. 1,1873 

Dec. 19, 1873 

Dec. 13, 1873 

Nov. 10, 1873 

Dec. 3,1873 

Dec. 18, 1873 

Dec 30, 1873 

Jan. 1,1874 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECKBTABT OF STATE. 2d 

LIST OP NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



KAMI. 




DATE OF COM. 




St Paul. Ramsey county 


Jan. 27, 1874 


Farmer. B. F 


Spring Valley, Fillmore county 


Feb. 8. 1874 


Ti^nlcanm TViiTnii.n — «.. 


LeRov. Mower county 


Mar. 13. 1874 


Fanner. James !)...••••••. 


Sorinir Vallev. Fillmore county 


Feb. 23, 1874 


Fale8.Grenville 


St Paul, Ramsey county •• 


Mar. 11, 1874 


Frink. F. W 


Faribault, Rice county 


Mar. 12, 1874 
Mar. 30. 1874 


Fnrber S. W 


Cottage Grove, W^ashmgton county.... 
Duluth. St. Louis county 


Frewson, ThomaH B 

Fairchild, Frank 


May 1,1874 
Apr. 18, 1874 
July 16, 1874 
Aug. 16, 1874 
Oct 1, 1874 
Sept 7,1874- 
Oct 19, 1874 


St Paul, Ramsey county .« 


Freudenreich, George A. 
French P 


Alexandria, Douglas county 


Austin. Mower county ■•.. 


Furber, J. Warren 

Fridley, A. M 


Cottage Grove, Wjwhington county.... 
Becker, Sherburne county 


Flvnn, D. H 


Winona, Winona county 


Florer. William J 


Wabasha. Wabasha county 


May 18, 1874 
Feb. 13, 1873 


Oriswold, Frank C 

Groll. JoBenh 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


T,4ikelAnd, Washingt^^n county. .....t.ttt 


May 13, 1873 
Mar. 4. 1873 


Gale. Geo 


W^inona. Winona county 


Gordon. H. L.... 


St. Cloud. Steams county 


April 7, 1873 
May 27, 1873 
July 3,1873 
Aug. 1, 1873 
Jan. 6. 1873 


Georcfp, Jamo^.. 


Rochester, Olmsted county 


Greenman. J. M 


Austin, Alower county 


Gnlbrandson, Gilbert 


Albert Lea, Freeborn county 


Galusha, R.B 


St. Paul. Ramsey county 


GrLswold. H. S 


Chatfield, Fillmore county 


Feb. 22, 1873 
Mar. 17, 1873 


Gardner, CharleR H...... 


Glencoe, McLeod county 


Greene, J. P 

Gorman. Rich. L.... 


Albert Lea. Freeborn county 


Mar. 11 1873 


St. Paul. Ramsey county 


April 4, 1873 
July 24, 1873 
June 28, 1873 
Sept 10, 1873 
Sept 16, 1873 
Dec. 26, 1873 


Gaylord, S. D 


Garden City, Blue Earth county 

Nortlifield, Rice county « 


Grover, Niels T 


Gale, Frank A r. 


Winnebago City, Faribault county 

Duluth, St. Louis county 


Gulick. W.A 


Gutzwiller, Ignatz, Jr 

Graves, John T 


Bufialo, Wright county 


Windom, Cottonwood county 


Dec. 30, 1873 


Orethen. Anton 


Minneanolis. Hennenin county 


Jan. 19 1874 




St Paul. Ramsey county 


Jan. 23, 1874 


Gabrielson, Gabriel 


Newburg, Fillmore county 


Feb. 10. 1874 


Gould, O.B 


Winona, Winona county 


Feb. 10, 1874 
Mar. 18. 1874 


Criiilford. Jonas 


MinnAApolifi. TJennenin county 


Gribble. Edwin 


St Paul, Ramsey county 


May 11, 1874 
June 10, 1874 


Grovenor. Abel.... 


St Cloud, Steams county 


finttAn M-T 


Preston. Fillmore county 


Feb. 14, 1874 
Mar. 8. 1874 


Gilbert G. K 


Glencoe. McLeod county 


Granirer.' James N 


St Paul, Ramsey county 


Apr. 18, 1874 
Apr. 14, 1874 
Mar. 23 1874 


Goodnow, Charles C. 

Gale. William 


Worthington, Nobles county..... 


Winona. VVinona county 


GankilL Lucius M 


High Forest, Olmsted county 


July 17, 1874 
Jan. 13. 1874 


Grammons^ Wm. F 

Greene, Mansier W 

Gove, K.H 


Renville, Renville county 


Wells, Faribault county 


Mar. 2, 1874 


Rochester, Olmsted county 


Mar. 18, 1874 
Mar. 27. 1874 


Gaidner. C. W.. 


Blooming Prairie, Steele county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Gove. £. A...... 


May 6,1874 
May 26, 1874 
Sept 26, 1874 
Oct 6, 1874 


Greelev. Otto E 


Alinneapolis, Hennepin county.. 


Gregory, Charles P 

Uoi2d,H.B 


Stillwater, Washington county 


Austin, Mower county 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



So AKNTJAL UEPORT. 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC.-iCk>ntinued. 



KAME. 


BESIDENCE. 


DATE OP COM. 


CtjiIg. Samuel C 


Minneanolis Hennenin countv 


Mar. 2. 1874 


Gettv Dauiel 


White Bear Lake, Ramsey county 

Red W^inar Goodhue countv 


Dec. 3. 1874 


Hodgson, Ed. J 

Hebbard, D. S 


Jan. 20. 1873 


Rochester. Olmsied countv 


Feb. 1, 1873 


Hart, H. C 


Rushford, Fillmore countv 


Jan. 17, 1873 


Houlton. Wm. H 


Elk River Sherburne countv 


May 23, 1873 
Feb. 18. 1873 


Harrifl, W. H 


Caledonia. Houston countv 


Hawkins. J. N 


Austin, Mower county 

St Paul Ramsev countv 


Apr. 17, 1873 
Feb 1. 1873 


Hnirhson E E 


Homer, E. A 

Horton Hiram T.: 


Houston Houston countv 


Mar. 28, 1873 


Rochester. Olmsted countv 


Oct. 4, 1873 


Hamilton. Oeo. A......... 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 


Apr. 10, 1873 
July 21, 1873 
Apr. 11, 1873 
May 5, 1873 


Hammons, Weston 

Hotchkiss, E. A 

Hall 0. M 


Anoka, Anoka county 


Winnebago City, Faribault county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 


Harkin, Alexander 

Hawkins Oliver P 


West Newton, Nicollet county.... 


Apr. 10, 1873 
Apr. 25, 1873 
Apr. 25, 1873 
May 3, 1873 
June 4, 1873 


MinneiiDolis Henneoin countv 


Hawkins Marsh P.. 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county......... 


Huckins J. W 


Dundas. Rice countv..... 


Hahn, W. J 


Lake City, Wabasha county 


Howe, J. P 


Granger, Fillmore county 


Nov. 3, 1873 


Hoard J. 8 


Red Winer Goodhue countv 


Dec. 13, 1873 


Hubbard C. A 


Lake Citv. Wabasha countv 


Dec. 7, 1873 


Howell. S. L 


Austin, Mower countv 


Dec. 20, 1873 


Hill. Wm. B 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Dec. 30, 1873 


Had lev E D 


. _.r Itork countv 


Jan 31 1873 


Hvmes Henrv R 


Rochester, Olmsted county 


Feb. 11, 1873 


Hall. Isaac F 


Preston, Fillmore county 


Feb. 16, 1873 


Hill, Henry 

Hodcson William 


Granite Falls, Chippewa county 

Farminfirton. Dakota countv 


Feb. 17, 1873 
Mar. 20, 1873 


Howard. Jarvis 


Leech Lake, Cass countv 


Apr. 4, 1873 
May 6, 1873 
Ma> 12, 1873 
May 5,1873 
May 13, 1873 
May 20, 1873 
May 24, 1873 
May 28, 1873 
Jan 24 1873 


Huddlet^ton. T. R 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 


Heslet Hiram H 


St Paul Ramsev countv 


Hauaer, Nathaniel T., Jr 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Hertlev. W. W 


Brainerd, Crow Wing county 


Hulet, Marshal F 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Hadlev R. S 


Owatonna Steele countv.... 


Hawlev. W. B 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Hnvnpfl PjHwRrd 




Hamel, Joseph 

Howard. B. F 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


June 14, 1873 


North Branch. Chisaso countv 


July 14, 1873 
Sept. 8, 1873 
Aug. 14, 1873 
Dec. 31, 1873 


Hamnstrom, Charles 

Hu&rheB. James S 


LitchBeld, Meeker county 


Stillwater, Washington county 


Hurlbut, Walter 


Rochester, Olmsted county... 


Hayes, George A 


Rushford, Fillmore county 


Oct. 4, 1873 


Hickman A. C 


Owatonna, Steele coimty 


Oct. 17, 1873 


Hall, Hezekiah 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 


Oct. 23, 1873 


Hammond, Larnet A.... 


Le Sueur, Le Sueur county 


Nov. 17, 1873 


Hancock, Lucius A 


Red Wing, Goodhue county 


Nov. 27, 1873 


Herrick. E. W 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Dec. 26. 1873 


Hatha wav. R. D 


Pleasant Grove, Olmsted county 

Medford. Steele countv 


Feb 6. 1874 


Hazen, L* 


Feb. 28 1874 


Hinds. Henrv 


Shakopee, Scott county 


Feb. 12. 1874 


Henning, F. W 


Chaska, Carver county 


Mar. 8,1874 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECRETARY OF STATE. 31 

LIST 0$ NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



NAME. 



Hamlin, H.O 

Hoerr, JohnW 

Higbie, Delos 

Harrington, Lewis 

Hefieman, Patrick 

Howes, B. C 

Harrison, Wra. H 

House, David 

Hall,T.O 

Humaaon, W.Scott.... 

Hanson, Andrew 

Henderson, G. L 

Hill, E... 

Hunt, Sam. M 

Hoxie,N. T 

Hatch, D. P 

Hale,Wm.D 

Hicks, Henry G 

Holding, Randolph... 

Heard, LV.D 

How, Squire D 

Hibbfi, D.K. P 

Hazen, John M....« .. 
HughcH, Twiford E... 
Horton, Jam&i W. ... 

Ilechtman, John 

Howe, William M 

Hewson, Stephen 

Ilage, Siver 

Henderson, J. A 

Hainlin, Ernest 

Himes, James L 

Harkens, Rudolph 

HolgeHon, Neri 

Hopkins, Joseph B.... 

Hathom, John H 

Herbert, C.Hill 

Howe, Joseph P 

Humifltone, Henry D. 
Harrington, Chas. M., 

Hutchins, E. H 

Hodgins, Abner F 

Irwin, Robert A 

Johnson, R. W 

Jones, Wm. B 

Jones, Josiah H 

Jewett, W.P 

Johnson, C.J 

Jewett,R. H. L 

Judge, Solomon W.... 

Jewett, E.B 

Jenne88,B. F 

Johnmn, Alfred B 

Johnson, Lucien A.... 



RESCDENCB. 



Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Hutchinson, McLeod county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county...... 

Hastings, Dakota county 

Winnebago Agency, Blue Earth Co, 

Hokah, Houston county 

Kasson, Dodge county .., 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Emerald, Faribault county , 

LeRoy, Mower county 

St. Charles, Winona county 

Granger, Fillmore county , 

Yellow Medicine, Yellow Medicine Co 

Fergus Falls, Otter Tail county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, ^ennepin county 

Holding, Steams county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

Mankato, Blue Earth coun^ 

Minneapolis, Hennepin coimty^ 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Osseo, Hennepin county 

Austin, Mower county 

Oxford, Isanti county 

Brown county 

LeRoy, Mower county 

Watertown, Carver county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Long Prairie, Todd coimty 

Rushford, Fillmore county 

Morri.«ton, Rice county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

M inneapolis, Hennepin county 

Bristol, Fillmore county 

Worthington, Nobles county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Wiunebaeo City, Faribault county... 

Winona, Winona coimty .,. 

Belle Plaine, Scott county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Excelsior, Hennepin county 

Winona, Winona county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Rushfora, Fillmore county 

Faribault, Rice county 

La Moille, Winona county 

Marshall, Lyon county 

WiUmar, Kandiyohi county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Chatfield, Fillmore county , 



DATE OF COM. 



May 1,1874 
May 22, 1874 
June 27, 1874 
May 30, 1874 
June 18, 1874 
Jan. 12, 1874 
Jan. 14, 1874 
Jan. 27, 1874 
Jan. 20, 1874 
Jan. 30, 1874 
May 11, 1874 
Mar. 1, 1874 
Jan. 9, 1874 
Feb. 8,1874 
Mar. 18, 1874 
May 29, 1874 
July 12, 1874 
Feb. 6,1874 
Feb. 15, 1874 
Feb. 14, 1874 
Feb. 14, 1874 
Mar. 1, 1874 
Feb. 21, 1874 
Jan. 15, 1874 
Mar. 1,1874 
Feb. 27, 1874 
Mar. 9, 1874 
Jan. 30, 1874 
Apr. 21, 1874 
May 10, 1874 
Jan. 29, 1874 
May 2,1874 
May 16, 1874 
Apr. 17, 1874 
May 30, 1874 
Jmie22, 1874 
July 3,1874 
Jan. 9,1874 
Sept. 15, 1874 
Oct. 15,1874 
Oct. 1, 1874 
Nov. 9, 1874 
Feb. 6, 1873 
Feb. 10, 1873 
June 1, 1873 
Apr. 18, 1873 
Jan. 15, 1873 
Feb. 14, 1873 
Apr. 15, 1873 
Apr. 15, 1873 
May 21, 1873 
June 1, 1873 
July 10, 1873 
Mar. 16, 1874 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



S2 ANNUAL REPORT. 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC-fiontinued. 



NAME. 



Jones, John B 

Joss, Frederick.}.... 

Jones, £. S 

Johnson, Albert 

Joy, F. D 

James, Henry C.... 

Jonsrud, T. G 

Jerome, Charles T... 

Johnson, Peter 

Jacobson, John P... 
Johnson, Olen H.... 

Jennings, F. A 

Jaques, W. D 

Johnson, H. £ 

Jaques, John M 

Johnson, Charles J.. 

Koenig, Michael 

Kellar, Curtis B 

Kendall, Joseph B.. 
Kattenberg, Chas.... 

Knowlton, B. K 

• Keyes, John 

Koch, E. G 

Kinvon, C. J 

Kniss, P. J 

Kerr, Charles D 

Kipp, Orrin 

Keyes, A. D 

Kempe, Charles 

Kemp, S. A 

Kline, Frank J 

Kranz, N. F. W 

Knauft, Charles F... 

Kingsby, Geo. B 

Kellogg, W. L, 

Koch, William 

Kulhman, George.... 

Kells, Lucas 

Kellett, Thomas P.. 
Kelley, WilUam L.. 
Koser, William H... 

Kelliher, John 

Kniss, Geo. W 

Kuhn, Henry M 

Keen, Wm. W 

Lyon,O.H 

Lovely, John A 

Lange, A. H. E 

Ladd, Sumner 

Lovell. H. M 

Lull, A. C 

Lassen, A. C 

Layman, J. G 

Lennon, Jaa. A 



RESIDENCE. 



Chatfield, Fillmore county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Madelia, Watonwan county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Spring Valley, Fillmore county 

Kerkhoven, Swift county 

St. James, Watonwan county 

Austin, Mower county 

Austin, Mower county 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Austin, Mower county 

Point Douglas, Washington county... 

St. Peter, Nicollet county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

Byron, OlnvSted county 

Stillwater, Washington county 

Sauk Rapids, Benton county 

Winona, Winona county 

New Ulm, Brown county 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Rock county 

Ramsey county 

Henderson, Sibley county 

Faribault, Rice county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Hastings, Dakota county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Blue Earth City, Faribault county 

Spring Valley, Fillmore county 

New Ulm, Brown county •. 

New Ulm, Brown county 

Sauk Centre, Stearns county 

Zumbrotfl, Goodhue county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Shakopee, Scott .county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Luveme, Rock county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Minn^polis, Hennepin county 

Garden City, Blue Earth county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

Elysian, Le Sueur county 

St. Peter, Nicollet county 

Chatfield, Fillmore county 

Stillwater, Washington county 

Chaska, Carver counter 

Minneapolis, Hennepm county 

St Anthony, Hennepin county 



DATE OF COM. 



Jan. 24, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 14, 
Mar. 21, 
May 13, 
Jan. 7, 
Mar. 1, 
June 4, 
June 15, 
Jan. 25, 
Jan. 22, 
Jan. 30, 
Feb. 12, 
Mar. 20, 
June 25, 
Dec. 14, 
Feb. 21, 
July 24, 
Dec. 1, 
Jan. 28, 
Nov. 20, 
Oct. 28, 
Dec. 15, 
Sept. 8, 
Jan. 17, 
Feb. 20, 
Mar. 4, 
May 24, 
July 12, 
July 18, 
Sept 1, 
Dec. 16, 
Mar. 4, 
Oct 21, 
April 12 
May 15, 
Nov. 1, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 20, 
Jan. 3, 
Feb. 20, 
Apr. 17, 
April 2, 
July 24, 
Dec. 7, 
Feb. 1, 
Sept. 27, 
Mar. 28, 
May 12, 
May 6, 
May 15, 
May 19, 
June 15, 
Aug. 2, 



1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SEGBJBTABT OF STATE. 33 

LIST OP NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



NAME. 



Lewis,J.V.V 

Lee, J. A 

Leonard, Joeeph A.. 

Lawther, James 

Lawrence, James H. 

Lee,Ralza8 

Lacy, E. J 

Lamb, Gajlord , 

Leaiy, Cbarles M..... 

Lane,E. F 

Little, Moses 

Lamberton, Alfred J 

LaDuc, A 

Lowry, Thos , 

Lewis, Joseph.^ 

Lebmicke, K , 

Lamprey, Uri L 

Lamprey, Morris...... 

Lorentzen, Henry..... 

Lott,B.W 

Lewis, J. A 

LacroLz, Josepb 

Lewis, Abner , 

Letford, John S 

Lamb, C 

Lester, Kichard , 

Lowell, Chas. L 

Lewis, Geo. W 

Lucas, James B 

Lashier, H. F 

Lane, Freeman P..... 
Lamby, Charles .••••. 
Lochren, William.... 
Lincoln, Edgar B..... 

Lewis, E. F..... 

Langquth, Christian 
Lawther, Saml. D.... 
Lorentzen, Henry..... 

Lowe, Lemoine , 

Murdock, E. H 

Mainzer, Jacob 

McOure, J. C 

Merrick, Albert H... 

Mturay, W. P. , 

Montgomery, Thos.... 

McMahon, £.A 

Manson, Albert G.... 
Mendenhall, Luther, 

Milliken,C.H 

Mair, James.. 

McDuffie, Charles G. 

Moore, Wm, S 

Maloney,E 

McNair, Henry B.... 
5 



BESIDEKCE. 



Hutchinson, McLeod county 

Sleepy Eye, Brown county 

Ohnflted county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Pelican Rapids, Otter Tail county 

Lake Crystal, Blue Earth county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Beaver Falhi, Renville county 

St Peter^ Nicollet county 

MantorviUe, Dodge county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Stillwater, Washington county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

St Paul, Ramsev county 

Frontenac, Goodhue county 

iStPaul, Ramsey county 

Minnesota Falls, Yellow Medicine Co 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Winona, Winona county 

Gk)lden Grate, Brown county 

Frankford, Mower county 

Caledonia, Houston county 

Faribault, Rice county 

Faribault, Rice county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Long Prairie, Todd county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Winsted Lake, McLeod county 

St. Peter, Nicollet county % 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

Frontenac, Gfoodhue county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Stillwater, Washington county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county; 

St Paul, Kamsey county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

St Peter, Nicollet oounCy 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Duluth, St Louis county 

Kasson, Dodge county 

Lake Shetek, Murray county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Winnebago City, Faribault county..... 
St Paul, Ramsey county 



DATE OF OOM . 



Sept 6,1873 
Jan. 1,1873 
Feb. 20, 1873 
Feb. 25. 1873 
Feb. 25, 1873 
May 22, 1873 
May 23, 1873 
June 24, 1873 
July 9, 1873 
Nov. 26, 1873 
Dec. 29, 1873 
Dec. 30. 1873 
Dea 30, 1873 
Feb. 6.1874 
Feb. 8,1874 
Feb. 18, 1874 
June 24, 1874 
June 7, 1874 
Oct 10,1874 
Aug. 1,1874 
Feb. 21, 1874 
Aug. 16, 1874 
Jan. 8,1874 
Feb. 1, 1874 
Jan. 27, 1874 
Feb. 11, 1874 
Mar. 20, 1874 
Mar. 26, 1874 
April 6, 1874 
May 14, 1874 
May 29, 1874 
June 6, 1874 
July 29, 1874 
Aug. 18, 1874 
Feb. 26, 1874 
Oct 12,1874 
Oct 20,1874 
Oct. 20,1874 
Nov. 27, 1874 
Jan. 21. 1873 
Mar. 8,1873 
Mar, 14, 1873 
Apr. 13, 1873 
Apr. 8, 1873 
Apr. 25, 1873 
Oct. 6, 1872 
July 6,1873 
Aug. 10, 1873 
Sept 20, 1873 
Jan. 25, 1873 
Feb. 13, 1873 
Mar. 5,1873 
April 1, 1873 
Apr. 14, 1873 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



34 ANNUAL REPORT. 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



NAME. 



Mason, John W 

Matthews M. Erwin 

McFarlane, John G 

Miller, Luke 

Morgan, W.W 

Miller, Stephen 

Mix, Frank T 

Morrill, Geoi^ce W 

Meese, Jacob 

Murray, Daniel 

McMillan^ Putnam D.... 

Marshall, Edward R 

Milne, John O 

Merrick, A. N 

Mayer, Mathias 

McCluer, Wm. M 

Morrin, Wm 

McBride, John 

McDougall, Geo. A 

Matihew^S. T 

Miller, John 

Mott, Rodney 

Metcalf, Tracy M 

Meade, O. M 

McCormick, R. L 

McDonald, D. B 

Miller, Chaa. N 

McMullen, Robt. M 

Moyer, L. R 

Metcalf, Edward I 

Murray, Richard 

McCarger, Albert L 

Mitchell, W. H 

McAfee, Nicholas 

Merrick, 

Matthews, M. E....? 

Miner, N. H 

Martin, Nathan C 

McConncll, J. O 

McClelland, R. H 

Morisoii, George H 

McDonald, John L 

Martin, James M 

Mackenroth, F 

McKenna, Patrick... 

Morris, J. S. M 

Morgan, W. P 

MeEmery, S 

Miller, Samuel R 

Moore, John 

Mascher, Albert F 

K ichols, Browning 

Newell, Frank A 

Norton, Huaen P 



BESIDENCE. 



Fergus Falls, Otter Tall county.. 
Brown Valley, Traverse county.. 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 
Lanesboro, Fillmore county....... 

Lakeland, Washington county.... 

Windom, Cottonwood county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Anoka, Anoka county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Princeton, Mille Lacs county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 

Kenyon, Goodhue county , 

Sauk Centre, Todd county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county.. 

Shakopee, Scott county , 

Stillwater, Washington county... 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Wabasha, Wabasha county 

Winona, Winona county 

Wastedo, Goodhue county 

Faribault, Rice county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Northfield, Rice county 

Winona, Winona county 

Melrose, Stearns county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 
Montevideo, Chippewa county.... 

St. Paul, Ramsey county... 

Rushford, Fillmore county 

Willraar, Kandiyohi county 

Northfield, Rice county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Mower county.. 



New Ulm, Brown county 

Sauk Centre, Stearns county.. 

Litchfield, Meeker county 

, Stevens county.. 



Watertown, Carver county 

Leech Lake, Cass county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Delano, Wright county..... 

Shieldsville, Rice county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county... 

Lake Citv, Wabasha county jOct. 22,' 1874 

Beaver FaUs, Renville county Nov. 2, 1874 

Scamble, Otter Tail county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Lac qui Parle, Lac qui Parle county.. 

Waseca, Waseca county 

Waseca, Waseca county 



DATE OF cox. 



April 8, 1873 
May 20, 1873 
May 23, 1873 
July 20, 1873 
May 26, 1873 
July 21, 1873 
July 22, 1873 
July 22, 1873 
Apr. 17, 1873 
Oct 1, 1873 
Dec. 1, 1873 
Nov. 29, 1873 
Dec. 22, 1873 
Dec. 27, 1874 
Mar. 24, 1874 
Feb. 5, 1874 
Feb. 12, 1874 
Feb. 19, 1874 
Mar. 12, 1874 
Feb. 19, 1874 
Feb. 21, 1874 
Mar. 12, 1874 
Apr. 7, 1874 
Aug. 15, 1874 
Jan. 26, 1874 
Feb. 20, 1874 
Feb. 25, 1874 
Jan. 30, 1874 
Jan. 29, 1874 
July 29, 1874 
Feb. 2,1874 
Feb. 5,1874 
Feb. 19, 1874 
Feb. 11, 1874 
April 1, 1874 
April 7, 1874 
AprU 4, 1874 
Apr. 11, 1874 
Apr. 14, 1874 
Apr. 27, 1874 
May 4,1874 
May 12, 1874 
June 12, 1874 
June 24, 1874 
July 7, 1874 
July 15, 1874 
Sept. 29, 1874 



Nov. 14, 1874 
Dec. 24, 1874 
Jan. 1, 1873 
Mar. 16, 1873 
July 26, 1873 



Digitized by VjOOQIC ^ 



8ECKETART OF StTATE. 35 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



NAME. 


BKSIDENCE. 


NorihroD F W 


St Paul Ramsev rountv... 


Noel MP 


St. Cloud. Stearns county 


NewDort Burt C 


Rush City. ChidRfiro county 


Newhait. Judas 


New Ulm, Brown county..., 


Norton, Charles 


Sauk Centre, Stearns county 


Nelson. L. G 


Kasson. Oodfire county 


Nelson. Knnte 


Alexandria, Douglas county 


Newton, Angelo 

Norton, W.H 


Rochester, Olmsted county 


Northfield, Rice county 


Noe. John C 


Mankato. Blue Earth county 


^^elflon Jflcob 




Nonrord. Chas. E 


Stillwater, Washington county 


Newel, Stanford 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Nichols, Brown ing 

Northman. TTlric r 


Lac qui Parle, Lac qui Parle county... 

St. Cloud; Steams county 

Caledonia, Houston county 


O'Brien, James 


Otis, Chas. E 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 


Osborn, S. L 


O'FerralK LF 


Chatfield, Fillmore county 


Olivier. J. B 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 


Officer, Harvey 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 


O'Leary, Timothy 

Olds, A. J 


Hastings, Dakota county 1 


St. Charles, Winona county 


Ortman. Ernst 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 


O'Brien, I. D 


Olds, Georjre E 


Yellow Medicine, Yellow Medicine Co 


O'Gorman, Henry 

O'Brien, James F 


St. Paul. Ramsey county 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 


O'Gorman, Henry 

Pearsall, Frank W 

Palmer, E. C 


St. Paul, Ramsey county.... 


Lac qui Parle, Lac qui Parle county.. 
St. Paul. Ramsey county 


Patch, T. G 


Owatonna, Steele county 


PiUsbury, Chas. F 

Pendergast, W. W. 

Powell, M.E 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Hutchinson. McLeod county 


Redwood Falls, Redwood county 

Faribault, Rice county .« 


Perkins, C. C 


Finney, W. W 


New London, Kandiyohi county 

Red Winar. Goodhue county 


Putnam, W. H 


Payne, E 

Phillips, George M 

Palmer, W. D 


Rochester, Olmsted county 




Wabasha, Wabasha county 


Pratt, A.W 


Red Winer. Goodhue county 


PaiBons, M^m. J...* •••••. 
Puntches, Newton Q..... 
pQtnam, A. Z. 


St. Paul, Kamsey county 


Pomme de Terre, Grant county 

Minneiska, Wabasha county 


Plant. Jamai 




Pringle, W. DeW 

Pain, William 


St. Paul, Ramsey county , 


Brainerd, Crow Wing county 


Phelps, Wm.B 

Parliman, E.. 


Winona, Winona county... 


Hastings, Dakota county 


Plaisanoe, L. 


St. Paul. Ramsey county 


Pickit, Daniel 


Henderson, Sibley county„ 


Pope/Edmund M 

Ferkins, T. H 


Mankato, Blue Earth county 


Red Wing, Goodhue county 



DATE OF COM. 



Sept. 18, 1873 
June 21, 1873 
Nov. 12, 1873 
Dec. 19, 1873 
Dec. 24, 1873 
Jan. 21, 1874 
Jan. 19, 1874 
Feb. 5,1874 
Feb. 11, 1874 
Feb. 26, 1874 
AprU 4, 1874 
Apr. 13, 1874 
May 26, 1874 
Nov. 9,1874 
Nov. 12, 1874 
Nov. 15, 1873 
Aug. 19, 1873 
Jan. 16, 1873 
Feb. 15, 1873 
Nov. 27, 1873 
Dec. 1,1873 
Aug. 11, 1873 
Mar. 17, 1874 
Aug. 13, 1874 
Mar. 18, 1874 
April 1, 1874 
Aug. 16, 1874 
Sept. 10, 1874 
Aug. 16, 1874 
Feb. 27, 1873 
Mar. 6,1873 
Mar. 27, 1873 
Apr. 10, 1873 
May 10, 1873 
May 20, 1873 
July 24, 1873 
Sept. 20, 1873 
Sept. 1,1873 
Aug. 22, 1873 
Aug. 21, 1873 
Aug. 26, 1873 
Oct. 19, 1873 
Nov. 21, 1873 
Jan. 4,1873 
Apr. 9,1873 
Apr. 16, 1873 
May 6,1873 
June 20, 1873 
July 26, 1873 
Sept. 10, 1873 
Nov. 26, 1873 
Dec. 19, 1873 
Jan. 1,1874 
Jan. 13, 1874 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



36 ANNtTAt. REPORT. 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continned. 



Pitcher, Omn O 

Pelzer, Wm 

Partridge, H. A 

PierB, W. C 

Parker, James A 

Pratt, Elias 

Pringle, W. DeW 

Peterman, Jonah 

Parsons, S. D 

Passavant, Chas 

Pinney, S. B 

Pearce, L. E 

Pershall, J. R 

Parks, Chas 

Ploumen, Joseph 

Pennev, Fred. C 

Porter, E. D. B 

Putnam, Edgar P 

Pendergast, Lloyd G 

Pease, Jay 

Piper, M.W 

Pfaa, A. R.... 

Pope, John F 

Parker, Addison J 

Pierce, 8. L 

Putney, D. P 

Peterson, N. C 

Peny, Leonard B 

Puntches, Newton Q 

Praxel, Anthony A 

Parsons, Asa A 

Qnirck, John A 

Rooa, Charles 

Reynolds, Benj. G 

Rust Geo. A 

Reeve, Budd 

Robinson, Geo. R 

Rogers, E. G 

Roos, Oscar 

Reevfs, Charles McC... 

Rose, S. W 

Richardson, N 

Rutledge, Thomas.. 

Rice, Albert E 

Rice, Wm. D 

Roser, Francis M 

Rogers, C. F 

Rotjers, F. L 

Randolph, JohnS 

Rose, Robert II 

Radford, C. H 

Ross, W. M 

Randall, Benjamin H... 
Rian, O. C 



BISBIDEI7CE. 



Mankato, Blue Earth county , 

Winona, Winona county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Read's, Wabasha county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county , 

Anoka, Anoka county , 

Hastings, Dakota county , 

Lewiston, Winona county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

St. Cloud. Stearns county 

Grand Meadow, Mower county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Cannon Falls, Goodhue county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Collin worth, Meeker county 

Sleepy Eye, Brown county 

Atwater, Kandiyohi county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Plain view, Waba.sha d6unty 

Ortonville, Big Stone county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Frankford, Mower county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Pomme de Terre, Grant county.. .. 

Lamberton, Redwood county 

HeAey, Nobles county 

Dassel, Meeker county 

New Ulm, Brown county 

Winnebago City, Faribault county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Taylor's Falls, Chisago county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Morrison county 



Madelia, W^atonwan county 

Willraar, Kandiyohi county 

Watonwan county a. 



St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Winnebago Citv, Faribault county, 

Crookston, Pollc county 

St. Peter, Nicollet county 

Elizabeth, Otter Tail county 



DATB OF COM. 



Apr. 20, 
July 24, 
Jan. 5, 
Mar. 9, 
Mar. 8, 
Apr. 8, 
Mar. 12, 
June 10, 
Mav 11, 
Apr. 27, 
Jan. 23, 
Feb. 28, 



23, 
28, 
27, 
24, 
,11 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 21, 
Apr. 28, 
May 1, 
May 18, 
Jan. 24, 
June 19, 
July 1, 
July 3, 
July 6, 
July "30, 
Oct. 27, 
Oct. 26, 
Nov. 3, 
Dec. 17, 
Aug. 29, 
Jan. 1, 
Jan. 28, 
Mar. 13, 
Mar. 19, 
Jan. 20, 
May 17, 
Aug. 24, 
Aug. 1, 
Sept. 9, 
Jan. 21, 
Feb. 1, 
Jan. 27, 
Mar. 10, 
Jan. 24, 
Feb. 20, 
April 5, 
Apr. 1, 
June 8, 
May 25, 
Oct 16, 
Nov. 17, 
Dec 1, 



1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BECKBTABT OF STATE. 37 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBUC— Continued. 



NAME. 



RobertBon, Wm. G... 

Bobineon, Charles 

Bobbins, Marcus 

Ros8,C. H 

Bochebrunei Phillip de., 

Rogers, J 

Ro68,W.E.C 

Ruflsell, Benj. S 

Reis, Georee 

Reynolds, K 

RosenbuTg, J. W 

Rudolph, John C 

Ross, WilUam W 

Rexford, J. M 

Rigby, Fred^ 

Robinson, J. E 

Rittenhouse, C. E 

Resing, F. A 

Seeman, T 

Stewart, D. Grant 

Smith, O.P 

Sanford, David 

Steams, J. C 

Sheardown, J. M 

Sawyer, J. S 

Seymour, Greo. W 

Schultz, Joseph 

Streeter.T.H 

Skillman, Evander. • 

Smith, C.W 

Seeger, Paul 

Stannard, Geo. J 

Salsbury, James F.... 

Sackett, J.B 

Snyder, Simon P« 

Sniith, Peter P 

Sperry, Wesley A 

stunner, Geo.E 

Swift, Lucian, Jr 

Sherwood, Martin L 

Simmons, Jorgen 

Shawbut, Frank 

Sawyer, Geo. W 

Smith, Albee 

Shillock, Daniel G 

Sareent. U. F 

Smith, Percy B 

Sterens, George G 

Scott, W.W 

Sheffield, George. 

Sweet, Georee W 

Shandrew, CSias 

Smith, A. C 

Smithy William 



BESIDENGB. 



St Paul, Ramsey county. 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Fillmore, Fillmore county 

New Ulm, Brown county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Blue Earth City, Faribault county.. 

Duluth, St Louis county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 



Detroit Becker county 

Blue Earth City, Faribault county.. 



New Ulm, Brown county., 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Etna, Fillmore county. 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Winona, Winona county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Winona, Winona county - 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Hamilton, Fillmore county 

Alma City, Waseca county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Zumbrota, Goodhue county 

Winona, Winona county 

Chatfield, Olmsted county 

Taylor's FaJls, Chisago county 

Red Wine, Goodhue county 

Northfielo, Rice county 

Mazeppa, Wabashaw county 

Jordan, Scott county 

Mountain Lake, Cottonwood county.. 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

St Peter, Nicollet county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin coimty 

Waseca, Waseca county 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Faribault, Rice county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

New Ulm, Brown county 

Lanesboro, Fillmore county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Plainyiew, Wabasha county 

Stillwater, Washington county 

Rushford, Fillmore county , 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

StPauL Kamsey county 

Benton county 

St Paul, Ramsey county , 

Meeker county 

Le Sueur, Le Sueur county... 



DATE OF COM. 



July 12, 1873 
Jan. 9,1874 
Mar. 12, 1874 
June 15, 1874 
June 1,1874 
Aug. 5,1874 
Jan. 6, 1874 
Jan. 29, 1874 
Feb. 17, 1874 
Mar. 10, 1874 
May 20, 1874 
June 1, 1874 
June 6, 1874 
Aug. 1,1874 
Aug. 7,1874 
Nov. 7,1874 
Nov. 19, 1874 
Dec. 4, 1874 
Jan. 20, 1873 
Feb. 8, 1873 
Apr. 18, 1873 
Jan. 31, 1873 
Feb. 4,1873 
Feb. 6,1873 
Jan. 6, 1873 
Mar. 1, 1873 
Mar. 21, 1873 
Apr. 7,1873 
Apr. 20, 1873 
Oct 16, 1873 
July 3,1873 
May 1,1873 
Oct. 2, 1873 
May 22, 1873 
May 26, 1873 
May 29, 1873 
June 11, 1873 
June 10, 1873 
July 1,1873 
Aug. 6,1873 
July 20, 1873 
Sept 9, 1873 
Aug. 5, 1873 
Feb. 18, 1873 
July 7,1873 
Jan. 1, 1873 
Jan. 20, 1873 
Jan. 17, 1873 
Jan. 22, 1873 
Feb. 4,1873 
Feb. 7,1873 
Feb. 10, 1873 
Feb. 12, 1873 
Jan. 16, 1873 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



38 ANNUAL REPORT. 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continned. 



NAME. 



Sprout, J. H 

Stewart, L.M 

Soule, S. H 

Simmons, Ralph B 

Stylee, J.8 

Stacy, Edwin C 

Spicer, Marlow S 

Southworth, Eii 

Stoyell, John A 

Smallidge, Joseph W.. 

Shaver, U.B 

Shepherd, Geo.B 

Shuck, John S 

Start, Chas. M 

Sinclair, P. A 

Sleeper, C. B 

Sherwood, Chas. D 

Stowe, Martin 

Skog, Andrew L 

Shannon, Chas. E 

Secombe, David A 

Simmons, H 

Shillock, David G 

Strobeck, Chas. H 

Sanders, William H.., 

Seip, Albert N« 

Sencerbox, J. W^ 

Stewart, John 

Smith, John H 

Slocum. James, Jr 

Siegen thaler, Godfrey 

Scheflfer, Albert 

Stocker, Henry D 

Sanborn, Walter H 

Simpson, Thomas 

Smith, John T 

Soule, Martin B 

Shaw, J.C 

Sanford, Philander...., 

Seager, J. W 

Schumacher, J. J 

Searle, D. B 

Slingsby, E. T 

Stone, H. W. 

Stewart, M.S 

Sperry, Wesley 

Stanley, DaVid B 

Street, A. H 

Stevens, Edmund 

Shank, J. T 

Schmidt, Herman 

Severens. J. M^ 

Scheid, Adam 

Smith, Luther B 



BESIBJSNCS. 



DATE OF OOM. 



Blue Earth City, Faribault county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Mountain Lake, Cottonwood county... 

Golden Gate, Brown county 

Brainerd, Crow Wing county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

Beaver Falls, Renville county 

Jordan, Scott county 

Anoka, Anoka county 

Kasson, Dodge county 

Kasson, Dodge county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Worthington, Nobles county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Elk River, Sherburne county 

Brainerd, Crow Wing county 

Rushford, Fillmore county 

Brandon, Douglas county 

Beven's Creek, Carver county 

Minnesota Falls, Yellow Med. county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Fort Ridgley, Nicollet county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Litchfield, Meeker county 

Alexandria, Douglas county 

Duluth, St. Louis county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

Wabasha, Wabasha county 

Brownsville, Houston county 

Young America, Carver county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Winona, Winona county 

Heron Lake, Jackson county 

Worthington, Nobles county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

St. James, Watonwan county 

Leavenworth, Brown county 

St. Cloud, Steams county 

Stillwater, Washington county 

Montevido, Chippewa county 

Duluth, St. Louis county 

Mantorville, Dodge county^ 

Maine Prairie, Stearns county.. 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county 

Winnebago Valley, Houston county... 

Shelbyville, Blue Earth county 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Montevido, Chippewa county » 

Eaton, Faribault county 

High Forest, Olmsted county^ 



Feb. 7,1873 
Mar. 4,1873 
Mar. 8,1873 
Mar. 19, 1873 
Feb. 4,1873 
April 9, 1873 
Mar. 26, 1873 
Apr. 17, 1873 
Apr. 12, 1873 
June 12, 1873 
June 13, 1873 
Aug. 1, 1873 
Aug. 11, 1873 
Oct. 24, 1873 
Oct. 30,1873 
Nov. 7,1873 
Dec. 3,1873 
Dec 16, 1873 
Dec. 6,1873 
Dec. '22, 1873 
Jan. 10, 1874 
Jan. 20. 1874 
Jan. 13, 1874 
Jan. 11, 1874 
Jan. 27, 1874 
July 1,1874 
Feb. 5,1874 
Feb. 1,1874 
Jan. 30, 1874 
Feb. 1,1874 
Jan. 22, 1874 
Mar. 12, 1874 
July 17, 1874 
July 28, 1874 
Aug. 15, 1874 
Apr. 29, 1874 
Apr. 20, 1874 
Sept. 15, 1874 
Oct. 12, 1874 
Apr. 16, 1874 
Jan. 19, 1874 
Feb. 1,1874 
Feb. 6,1874 
Feb. 9,1874 
Feb. 14, 1874 
Feb. 13, 1874 
Feb. 11, 1874 
Mar. 5,1874 
Jan. 19, 1874 
Mar. 20, 1874 
Mar. 27, 1874 
Apr. 20, 1874 
Mar. 24, 1874 
Apr. 26, 1874 



Digitized by 



Google 



SEOBSTABT OF STATE. 39 

LIST OF NOTARIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



NAME. 



a«er, J. W 

Scanlan, Michael.. 

Strait. W. W 

Sandera, Joseph H.. 

Shanks. M.KL 

Sprague, G. M 

Sonde, B 

Sweet, Daniel E 

Saxton. T. E 

Simonton, Edward 

Stevens, S.F 

Solberg, C. F 

Squieres, George C 

Stone. E. K., Jr 

Strong, M. L 

Trenwith, Geo. F 

Thornton, Hiram 

Taylor, (Carles. 

Thomas, William 

Thornton, J. J 

Trott, Hermann... 

Thnrin, Chris 

Titus, Seymour S 

Taylor. John W 

Thayer, Samuel R 

Tu thill, CD 

ThompeoD, John M. N... 

Thornton, Frank M 

Trask, J. F 

Thompson, Andrew 

Taylor, Robert. 

Titus, Seymour S 

Thompson, Jacob F 

Thompson, Eben F 

Teachout, William 

Truesdell. J. E 

Thompson, John W 

Taylor, Oscar 

Taber, Dayid M 

Thomson, Clifford 

Tibbetts, Till 

Titus, T. H 

Thomnson, H. F 

Truesaell, Verdine 

Tavemer, John R 

Utter, William J 

Veryais, Joseph O... 

Van Dyke, T.S 

Velikanje,J.B 

Van Hoesen, F. B 

VanSlyck,L 

Van Vliet, Leonard 

VanCleye, E. M 

Van BensMllar, J. B 



BSaXBESfCE. 



St James, Watonwan county.. 

Lanesboro, Filmore county 

Jordan, Scott, county 

Wadena, Wadena county , 

Fairmount, Martin county 

Sauk Centre, Stearns county... 
Willmar, Kandiyohi county... 
Pipestone oounty., 



Good Thunder, Blue Earth county.. 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county , 

St Paul, Ramsey county , 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

St Paul, Ramsey oounty , 

Owatonna, Steele county 

Austin, Mower county , 

Anoka, Anoka oounty 

Northfield, Rice county , 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

St James, Watonwan county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Atwater, Kandiyohi county 

Shakopee, Scott county 

New Ulm, Brown county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Dodge Centre, Dodge county 

Duluth, St Louis county 

Benson, Swift county 

Le Roy, Mower county 

Wheatland, Rice county 

Winona, Winona oounty 

Sauk Centre, Stearns county 

Swan Lake, Nicollet county 

Minneapolu, Hennepin oounty 

Six Oaks, Olmsted oounty 

Owatonna^ Steele county 

Lester, Rice county 

St Cloud, Stearns county 

Redwing, Goodhue county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Redwood Falls, Redwood county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Duluth, St Louis county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Litchfield, Meeker county 

St Paul, Ramsey county 

Wabasha, Wabasha county 

New Ulm, Brown county 

Alexandria, Douglas county 

Hastings, Dakota county 

Lake (3ty, Wabasha county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county ! 

St Cloud, Stearns oounty i 



DATE OF OOM. 



Apr. 16, 1874 
June 1, 1874 
May 1, 1874 
May 20, 1874 
July 1,1874 
July 1,1874 
July 10, 1874 
July 13, 1874 
July 27, 1874 
Aug. 14, 1874 
Aug. 14, 1874 
Sept 11, 1874 
Sept 26, 1874 
Nov. 10, 1874 
Noy. 13, 1874 
Jan. 6, 1873 
Jan. 11, 1873 
May 6,1873 
June 23, 1873 
Jan. 24, 1873 
Aug. 10, 1873 
Feb. 1,1873 
Feb. 13, 1873 
Apr. 1,1873 
Oct. 23, 1873 
Dec. 25, 1873 
Jan. 12, 1874 
Jan. 26, 1874 
I Mar. 1,1874 
iFeb. 17, 1874 
I Feb. 17, 1874 
I Feb. 19, 1874 
'Feb. 18, 1874 
I Mar. 12, 1874 
Mar. 6,1874 
lApr. 1,1874 
lApr. 15, 1874 
Apr. 16, 1874 
May 19, 1874 
May 23, 1874 
July 1,1874 
Aug. 4,1874 
Aug. 24, 1874 
Noy. 25, 1874 
Dec. 9,1874 
Mar. 1,1873 
Mar. 16, 1873 
July 1,1873 
Sept 2, 1873 
Dea 5,1873 
Feb. 17, 1874 
May 2,1874 
IJan. 3,1874 
iMar. 3,1874 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



40 ANNUAL BJBPORT. 

LISTS OP NOTARIES PUBLIC.-Continued. 



NAMB. 



Van Trotha, Qaade 

Walton, W. S 

Willard,M.G^ 

Willard, Swante J 

Wilson, Charles C 

Ward, Albert L 

Ware, John 

Wilson, R. R 

Wilson, Mark 

Whitehead, James 

Walker, Thomas B 

Waldron, J. M 

Woods, Chaa.H 

Wakefield, C. N 

Ware, J. L 

Walker, Piatt B 

White, Dana 

Weed, James H 

West, J. P 

Wedge, A. G 

White, C.R 

Willson, BCarvey S 

Wiseman, George S 

Westman, Gastayos 

White, John W 

West, Lewis L 

Wilson, Charles M.« 

Wakeman, Walter 

Woodbourne, Fred^ 

Wallmark, Otto 

Walker, Edward H 

Walker, P. E.../. 

Whipple, A. O 

Woodruff William G.... 

Watson, Robert 

Webber, Benj. F 

Wilson, John N 

Wright, Edwin M 

WuSsberff, O. R 

Wells, Adelbert 

Williamson, A. W 

Wheeler, Rash B , 

White, Mordecai 

Wilcox, Alfred G 

William, James 

Whiting, Samuel, Jr.... 

Wilder, E. A 

West, Horatio D 

Williamson, Henry M. 

Wheeler, J. S 

Weed, Joseph D 

White, Mic^jali C 

Wilcox, David 

Warner, W.P- 



RBSIDENCE. 



Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Wabasha, Wabasha county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 

Rochester, Olmsted county 

Fairmount, Martin county 

Mantorville, Dodge county 

Garden City, Blue Earth county 

Winona, Winona county 

Aitkin, Cass county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Litchfield, Meeker county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Winona, Winona county 

Mantorville, Dodge county 

Taylor's Falls, Chisago county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county , 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Wells, Faribault county 

Albert Lea, Freeborn county , 

Pine Island, Goodhue county 

Madelia, Watonwan county , 

Winona, Winona county , 

Cannon River, Goodhue county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county , 

Sauk Centre, Steams county , 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Marshall, Lyon county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Chisago City, Chisago county 

St. Cloud, Steams county , 

Marine Mills, Washington county.. 

Northfield, Rice county 

Crookston, Polk county 

Redwood Falls, Redwood county.. 

New Ulm, Brown county 

Preston, Fillmore county 

Fergus Falls, Otter Tail county .... 

Alexandria, Douglas county 

Lake City, Wabasha county 

Sleepy Eye, Brown county 

Austin, Mower county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Clearwater, Wright county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Sauk Centre, Steams county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county..... 

St. Charl^ Winona county 

Sauk Rapids, Benton county 

Minneapolis, Hennepin county 

Mankato, Blue Earth county 

SL Paul, Ramsey county.. 



DATE OF COM. 



Sept. 1, 1874 
Jan. 1,1873 
Jan. 20, 1873 
Feb. 13, 1873 
Jan. 21, 1873 
Jan. 24, 1873 
Feb. 20, 1873 
Jan. 1,1873 
April 3, 1873 
Apr. 12, 1873 
Apr. 11, 1873 
May 22, 1873 
May 4,1873 
June 3, 1873 
June 28, 1873 
Aug. 10, 1873 
Sept. 1, 1873 
July 22, 1873 
Oct. 17,1873 
Nov. 6, 1873 
Dec 11, 1873 
Jan. 7, 1873 
Jan. 9,1873 
Jan. 17, 1873 
Jan. 24, 1873 
Jan. 20, 1873 
Jan. 28, 1873 
Jan 1, 1873 
Feb. 10, 1873 
Feb. 15, 1873 
Feb. 20, 1873 
Mar. 17, 1873 
Mar. 22, 1873 
Mar. 18, 1873 
Mar. 17, 1873 
Mar, 26, 1873 
Apr. 1,1873 
8, 1873 
8, 1873 
2, 1873 
8, 1873 
May 23, 1873 
Aug. 4,1873 
9, 1873 
8, 1873 
6, 1873 
1,1873 
Sept. 29, 1873 
Oct. 29, 1873 
Nov. 10, 1873 
Nov. 20, 1873 
Dec 2,1873 
Dec 26, 1873 
'Mar. 16, 1874 



Apr. 
Apr. 
May 
May 



Aug. 
Aug. 
July 
Aug. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECBETABT OF STATE. 
LIST OF NOTAEIES PUBLIC— Continued. 



41 



NAME. 


BESIDEKGE. 


DATE OF COM. 


Whitney, Joseph C 

Wilson. ThomajB. 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Feb. 8, 1874 


Winona, Winona county 

Plain view. Wabashaw countv 


Mar 3 1874 


Wilflon, H. P 


Feb. 20, 1874 
Mar. 24, 1874 
Mar. 25. 1874 


Wilson, Wm. S 


St. Paul. Ramsev countv 


Wilaon, Joseph P 


St. Cloud, Stearns county 


WUliams. Henry L 

Webb, Edward 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 


April 24 1874 
May 3,1874 
Feb. 1, 1874 


St. Paul. Ramsev countv 


Watson, David 


Redwood Falls, Redwood county 

Red Wing, Goodhue county 


Werner, Nilla 


Sept. 25, 1874 
Nov 5 1874 


Wvckeoff, J. M 


Le Roy, Mower county 

Faribault. Rice countv 


Weinmann, Joseph 

W^ells, Henry R 


May 18', 1874 
Feb. 14. 1874 


Preston. Fillmore countv 


Wheeler, Daniel Y 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


July 25, 1874 
Feb. 16, 1874 
Feb. 16 1874 


Williams, Geo. V. B 


Sauk Centre Todd countv 


Walsh, James R 


St. Paul. Ramsev countv 


Weiser, J. M 


Brownsdale, Mower county 


Apr. 18, 1874 
Sept. 2,1874 
Sept. 7,1874 
Jan. 10. 1874 


Wilde, Francis F 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 


W>lch, William 


St. Paul, Ramsey county 

Wabasha, Wabasha county 


Webb, Nathan F 


Wagner, J. Daniel 

Westhover, Herman 


Mankato, Blue Earth county 


Jan. 24, 1874 


Delivan, Faribault county 


Jan. 12, 1874 
Jan 28 1874 


Wheeler, E.O 


Austin. Mower countv 


Williams, O.M 


Winona. Winona countv 


Feb. 3,1874 
Feb. 24, 1874 
Mar 27 1874 


Webb, Charles 


Preston, Fillmore county 


Whitlock, F. J 


Belle Plain. Scott countv. 


Wilson, E. M 


MinneaTX)lis. Hennenin countv 


Mar. 2,1874 
Mar. 2,1874 
Mar. 16, 1874 
Apr. 16, 1874 
Apr. 6,1874 
May 6,1874 
June 3. 1874 


Wasgall, David P 


Winnebago City, Faribault county 

Cokato. Wrififht countv 


Warde, A. G 


Wade, Edward F 


Cedarville, Martin county 


Williams, John P 


Fersus Fails. Otter Tail countv.... 


Walsh, J. F 


LeSueur. LeSueur countv..... 


Walker, Charles 


Saqk CVntre. Steams courts.... ......... 


Wiswell, James A 


Mankato, Blue Earth county 


May 10, 1874 
July 6,1874 
Feb 1 1874 


Watson, F. E 


Wells, Faribault countv 




Redwood Falls, Redwood county 

Litchfield, Meeker county 


Wadsworth, H. L 


Aug. 3,1874 
Aug. 8,1874 
Apr. 17, 1874 
Sept. 9,1874 
Nov. 27, 1874 
June 11. 1874 


Winston, P. B^ 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county 


Wood, E.H 


f Dakota county 

St. Paul, Ramsey county 


Williams, E. T 


Wockerhagen, E. G 




Willins, Gustav 


St, Paul, Ramft^y county...,,..,, ......... 


Weed, GayC 


St, Panl, Ramsey county 


Nov. 23 1874 


Wakeman, Walter 


Marshall. Lvon countv 


Dec 1st 1874 


Young, J. W 


Dresbacfa, Winona county 


Feb. 7. 1873 


Young, Geo. B 


Minneapolis, Hennepin connty,,, .,,,,, 


June 19, 1873 
Feb. 17. 1874 


Yalp, WiH^ft"! H.. 


Winona. Winona countv 


Zapp,John 


St. Cloud, Steams county 


Dec. 14, 1874 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



42 



AITKUAL KEPOBT. 



LIST OF COMMISSIONERS 



FOB THE STATE OF MINNESOTA^ TO TARE ACKNOWLEDGMENTS, ETC., 
IN COMMISSION JAN. IST, 1875. 



RESIDENT IN ARKANSAS. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Date of Appoint- 
ment. 


Strong, Frank, 


Little Rock. 


April 15, 1872 



RESIDENT IN CALIFORNIA. 



Hoskins, Wip., 
Smith, N. Proctor, 
Scudder, Frank V., 
Thibault, F. J., 



Oakland. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 
San Francisco. 



April 17, 1874 
January 1, 1872 
October 27, 1872 
Sept. 9, 1873 



RESIDENT IN COLUMBIA. 


Plant, Jos. T. K., 


Washington. 


April 


17, 1874 


RESIDENT IN CONNECTICUT. 



Fitch, Lucius, 
Goodman, Edward, 
Gordon, David G., 
Munson Ljman E., 
Taintor, Henry E., 



New Haven. 
Hartford. 
Hartford. 
New Haven. 
Hartford. 



Feb. 18, 1873 
March 16, 1874 
April 17, 1872 
January 1, 1872 
May 9, 1873 



RESIDENT IN FLORIDA. 



Durkel, Joseph H., 



Jacksonville. 



May 2, 1862 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECKETART 0? 8TATB. 



48 



RESIDENT IN GEOBGIA. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Date of Appoint- 
ment. 


Burrows, John W.. 


Savannah. 


May 20, 1872 



RESIDENT IN ILLINOIS. 



Gould, John S., 


Chicago. 


May 26, 


1873 


Hovne, Philip A., 


Chicago. 


Feb. 28, 


1874 


King, Simeon W., 
Willard, S. S., 


Chicago. 


August 5, 


1873 


Chicago. 


January 2, 


1872 


Knobelsdorff, Charles, 


Chicago. 


June 6, 


1874 



RESIDENT IN LOUISIANA. 



Bragdon, Oren D., 
Eustis, John G., 
Graham, James, 
Ingraham, Alfred, 
Poole, Wm. L., 



New Orleans. 


April 


12, 


1872 


New Orleans. 


Nov. 


8, 


1873 


New Orleans. 


March 


25, 


1873 


New Orleans. 


July 


26, 


1874 


New Orleans. 


Nov. 


8, 


1872 



RESIDENT IN MARYLAND. 



Hill, William B., 
Latimer, W. W., 
Quantmeyer, William, 
Brock, Henry, 



Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 
Baltimore. 



January 16, 1872 

May 10, 1872 

Sept. 10, 1872 

April 3, 1874 



RESIDENT IN MASSACHUSETTS. 



Angell, Geo. T., 


Boston. 


April 


17, 


1874 


Adams, Chas. Hall, 


Boston. 


May 


20, 


1872 


Bell, James B., 


Boston. 


August 


25, 


1874 


Jennison, Samuel, 


Boston. 


Feb. 


20, 


1872 


Jones, Edward J., 


Boston. 


May 


16, 


1873 


Pratt, C. C. K., 


N. Middleborough 


April 


5, 


1873 


Sharp, Daniel, 


Boston. 


March 


6, 


1872 


Hill, Henry J., 


Worcester. 


April 


n, 


1874 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



44 



ANNUAL BBFOBT. 



BESIDENT IN NEW TOBK. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Date of 


Appoint- 






ment. 




Anderson, Armour C, 


New York. 


Dec. 


15 


1872 


Anderson, Fred. R., 


New York. 


June 


20 


1873 


Anderson, Charles W., 


New York. 


April 


17 


, 1874 


Andrews, Horace, 


•New York. 


May 


10 


1872 


Bushnell, Chas. J., 


New York. 


April 


9 


1873 


Baglej, H. A., 


New York. 


Dec. 


16 


1873 


Banks, Henry C, 


New York. 


June 


24 


1874 


Barney, Chas. T., 


New York. 


Feb. 


21 


, 1873 


Brown, Joseph T., 


New York. 


March 


9 


1872 


Brown, Geo. W., 


New York. 


Feb. 


19 


1873 


Burke, Francis P., 


New York. 


August 


26 


1872 


Clark8on,Wm. H., 


New York. 


March 


18 


1872 


Colles, Geo. W., 


New York. 


May 


20, 


1872 


DuBois, Jacob, 


New York. 


May 


8 


1874 


FoUet, George, 


New York. 


March 


11 


1872 


Goddart, Calvin, 


New York. 


Feb. 


19 


1873 


Goddard, Wm. W., 


New York. 


January 


^18 


1872 


Hillery, Jno. A., 


New York. 


May 


16 


1873 


How, L. W., 


New York. 


March 


13 


1873 


Jenkins, Augustus G., * 


New York. 


March 


9, 


1872 


Knapp, Arthur W., 


New York. 


Feb. 


9 


1873 


Kilvert, Thos., 


New York. 


March 


11 


1872 


Kent, Andrew W., 


New York. 


Nov. 


19 


1872 


Lett, Wm. F., 


New York. 


June 


27 


1872 


Lay, Sylvester, 


New York. 


April 


6 


1872 


McAdam, David, 


New York. 


Dec. 


15 


1872 


Merchant, Marvin J., 


New York. 


May 


20 


1873 


McKinlay, James M., 


New York. 


Nov. 


26 


1873 


Nones, Joseph B., 


New York. 


March 


4 


1874 


Ostrander, Alex., 


New York. 


Feb. 


23 


1874 


Osborn, Wm. E., 


Brooklyn. 


July 


17 


1874 


Robertson, Mackintosh, 


New York. 


Nov. 


29 


1873 


Crannell, Monroe, 


Albany, 


Feb. 


24 


1874 


Clifford, Thos. B., 


New York. 


May 


18 


1874 


Fairthorne, F., 


New York. 


Sept. 


7 


1874 


Goodale, S. B., 


New York. 


October 


4 


1874 


Nettleton, Charles, 


New York. 


March 


3 


1874 


Taylor, James, 


New York. 


Feb. 


25 


1874 


Smith, Chas. H., 


New York. 


March 


9 


, 1872 


Viele, Sheldon, 


Buffalo. 


June 


1 


1873 


White, Albert C, 


New York. 


October 


4 


1871 


Wines, Walter B., 


New York. 


March 


23 


1871 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SSORETABT OF g^AtB. 



4^ 



RESIDENT IN MICHIGAN. 



NAME. 


Residence. 


Date of Appoint- 
ment. 


Waterman, Wm. J., 


Detroit. 


June 16, 1874 



RESII 



PENT IN MISSOURI. 



Boas, John R., 
Greene, C. D.. Jr., 
McPherson, Wm. M. 



St. Louis. 
St. Louis. 
St. Louis. 



Dec. 19, 1872 
August 13, 1873 
March 25, 1873 



RESIDENT IN NEW JERSEY. 



Cassidy, James M., 


Camden. 


March 


4, 


1873 




RESIDENT IN OHIO. 








(^arpenter, Samuel S., 
Made, James, Jr., 


Cincinnati. 
Cleveland. 


March 
July 


20, 
26, 


1874 
1873 


RESIDENT IN PENNSYLVANIA. 



Chauncey, Charles, 
Colton, S. W., Jr., 


Philadelphia. 


January 


24, 1872 


Philadelphia. 


July 


6, 1872 


Diver, J. Paul, 


Philadelphia. 


January 


30, 1874 


Prankish, Joseph, 


Philadelphia. 


June 


16, 1873 


llindmarsh, H. E., 


Philadelphia. 


March 


23, 1872 


Hulv, Samuel B., 


Philadelphia. 


July 


12, 1872 


Janvier, F. Herbert, 


Philadelphia. 


January 


25, 1873 


Phillips, Henry, Jr., 


Philadelphia. 


Dec. 


6, 1872 


Russell, John, 


Philadelphia. 


April , 


17, 1874 


Rand, Theo. D., 


Philadelphia. 


May . 


24, 1874 


Reed, Henry, 


Philadelphia. 


August 


7, 1873 


Sayres, Edward S., 


Philadelphia. 


April 


2, 1872 


Tener. Finley J., 


Philadelphia. 


June 


10,1872 


Taylor, Samuel L., 


Philadelphia. 


March 


30, 1874 


Wheeler, J. H., 


Philadelphia. 


March 


25, 1874 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



46 



ANNtTAti tLfePOBt. 



BESIDENT IK BHODE ISLAND. 



Name. 



Addennon, J. M., 



Residence. 



Date of Appoint- 
ment. 



Providence. October 16, 1872 



BESDENT m SOUTH CABOLINA. 

f 


Cohen. Augustus E., 


Charleston. 


July 3, 


1872 


BESIDENT IN WASHINGTON. 


Callan, M. P., 


Washington,D.C. 


March 3, 


1873 


BESIDENT IN WISCONSIN. 


Ritchie, James S., 


Superior Citv. 


January 21. 


— . 
1873 


BESIDENT IN FBANCE, EUBOPE. 


Morell, E. B., 


Paris. 


Feb. 24, 


1874 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SBCBETABt OF SIAiU. 



i1 



LIST OF COUNTY OFFICERS 

nj THE SEVERAL ORGANIZED COUNTIES OP THE STATE OP MIN- 
NESOTA, FOR THE YEAR 1875. 



AITKIN COUNTY. 

G0X7NTY S£AT| AITKIN. 



Office. 



I 



Incumbent. 



Auditor^ 

Treuurer^ 

Sheriffs 

R«ffiBter of Deeds 

Juo^ of Probate 

Attorney «.. 

Surveyor 

Coroner— 

Clerk Difitrict Court... 



C. C. Knox 

D. Willard 

J. W. TibbetU.. 

D. Willard 

Solomon Clapp.. 

D. 0. Preston 

A. P. Knight 

Louis Allars 

W. H. Williams. 



Term of Office. 



Two ^^ears. 



Pour years' 



Commenoemt of Term 



March 1 
March 1. 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 



, 1875. 
1876. 
1. 1875. 
1. 1874. 
1, 1873. 
1, 1873. 
1, 1875. 
1. 1876. 
1. 1875. 



ANOKA COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, ANOKA. 



Auditor « 


0. L. Cutter...: 


Two 


years. 


March 1. 1875 


Trensurer 


C. S. Quderian 

J. C. Frost 






March 1, 1875! 


Sheriff 


January 1 187&. 


Recieter of Deeds.. 

Judge of Probate- 

Attorney 


Wm. W. Pitch 


January 1. mi. 


Hiram Thornton 


M. Q. Butterfield 


January 1. 1873 


Surveyor 


Elias Pratt 


January 1, 1»74. 


Coroner - 


P. B. Russell 


January 1. ]m. 
January 1, 1BT$. 


Clerk District Court. . 


A. C. Tilden 


Four years. 
Three veajra. 


Court Commissioner... 


Hiram Thornton 













BECKER COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, DETROIT LAKE. 



Auditor .-.....„„,*, 

TrtMttrer ,..*,*^.,**...... 

Sheriff... ^.. ...... 

^wlp|«r &( Bnds.... .. 

Jndi« «f Vwlhutr.... 

Altoniey ....... ..,.»-..... 

Sorrejor ........._**...., 

Coroner ..„„.,.. ^«....- 

Clrrk iHnriot Canrt. 
Caart €ommis#[onBt 



John Cromb.... .►.►., 

MX A, B'Jfi , , _ 

[Ths'Odare HoLton..., ,,, 

Jwhn McCI«UoJii«.... ...... 

E. Auder^n 4. .,,„....... 

J. G. McQrew„. 

A. II. Wilco*.. „...,. . 

D.J. Miillhy ,. 

P, C, Sictten. .*.*,„...„ 

A*B. M'All[at*r„ 



Two ^^ear». 



Four yean. 
Throe yeait. 



March 2. 1374. 
March 1, W4. 
January 1. 1874. 
Januibry 1, 1974, 
January ]» 1^75. 
Jafiiaaryl. 1K74. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1. IS74. 
January U \^li. 
JnnuaEyl, IST6. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



48 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



BENTON COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, SAUK RAPIDS. 



Office. 



Auditor „ 

Treaiarer 

Sheriff. - 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor^ 

Coroner ^ 

Clerk District Court.. 
Court Commissioner. 



Incumbent. 



B. H. Spencer. 

Wm. H. Fletcher 

Samuel P. Carpenter. 

John Renard 

Samuel Hall 

J. Q. A. Wood 

E. W. Griffin 

E. W. Griffin 

L. Mayo 

Justus Carpenter 



Term of Office. 



Two jean. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



Commencemt of Term 



March 1. 1875. 
March 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
•January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 



BIG STONE COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, OETONVILLE. 



Auditor 

Treasurer , 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor : , 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court. 



A. .1. r.irk'T 

A i.. .1 iL'tPCin...... 

J. w. il„rlor....... 

J.T Lift't,., 

A^i-ii^'.n F'hplpd^, 
A. ^. VfifkcT. ...... 

J, K. If.n 

Os.^ I:.,l-i. !.. . 
Auvzuiir I' ii I.-..0. . 




March 1. 1875. 
JanuaryHt 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 



BLUE EARTH COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MANKATO. 



Auditor.. 

Treasurer 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court. 
Court Commissioner. 



C'tiri*:.' inn .\r\-.Hl.i..,.. 
D. C. KVEIN? 

J^shn liinmoml., ...... 

Hiitfh J. Owen!" 

J E. Fr>rtoT ....,., 

A. R. Pfau. 

L. Z. Torrcy 

lltjrtj, S, Durkee„ 

Will mm G. Uiifkee. 
\\\ B. Tofray........ 



Two years. 


March 1. 187-S. 


•* 


March 1, 1874. 


•• 


January 1, 1871. 


" 


January 1, 1871- 


** 


January 1,1 ^.V 


'* 


January 1, 1 H75,. 




January 1. ]^T4, 




January 1. l^^T^. 


Four years. 


January 1, 1S74. 


Three years. 


January 1. 1875, 



BROWN COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, NEW ULM. 



Auditor 

Treasurer - 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court.. 
Court Commissioner. 



Ernst Q. Koch 

Nels C. Bukke 

Geo. Bickelhaupt. 
E. A. Hausraann... 

A. Westphal 

R. F. Webber 

Julius Borndt 

Dr. C. Weschcke... 

A. Blanchard 

J. Newhart 



Two years. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1. 
March 1. 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 



1875. 
1874. 
1, 1875. 
1. 1875. 
1, 1875. 
1. 1875. 
1,1875. 
1, 1875. 
1, 1875. 
1, 1872. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECB£TABT OF STATE. 



49 



CARLTON COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, THOMSON. 



Office. 


Incumbent 


Term of Office. 


Commencemt of Term 


Auditor *..- 


L. W. Greene 

C. F. Leland 


Two years. 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 2. 1874. 


Treasurer - 


March 1. 1874. 


SheriflL 


H. L. Wiard 


January 1, 1876. 


R«ff later of Deeds 

Judge of Probftte^ 


J. W. Litchfield 


January 1, 1875. 


Mark Paine 


January 1, 1874. 


Attorney 


Alex. Holm 


January 1, 1874. 


Surveyor .M 


Benj. Perkins 


January 1, 1875. 


Coroner.^ 


Wm. Lovejoy 


January 1, 1875. 


Clerk District Court. 


J. W. Litchfield 


January 1, 1875. 


Court Commissioner... 


J. C. Black 


January 1, 1875. 









CARVER COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, CHASKA. 



Auditor.. 

Treasurer - . 

Sheriff. - 

Register of Deed! 

Judffe of Pro bate w,..,.. 

Attorney 

Surveyor „ ,„.*.* 

Coroner - 

Clerk District Court.... 
Court Commissioner... 



I Leonard Streak eas„ 

Fpi^rJ. K. I>utoiL 

I Frederick ?iroi tier..* 
Cliiifk^f II. LtLMmu.., 

lErriei'r Lhuniin 

I Jobii 0. EruQptuSp*., 
Frederick Ob ode..,.., 
G. Krny en bubl, .*....- 
J. A. Sargent. 



Two years. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1, 1875. 
March 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 



CASS COUNTY. 

OOUHTY SEAT, 



Auditor 

Treasurer 

Sheriff- 

Register of Deeds.. 
Judge of Probate.... 

Surveyor 

Coroner.. 



P. E. Stauff. 

S. E. Tennis 

Uiram Sanders. 

H. S. Mooers 

B. F. Hartley.. . 
Albion Barnard. 
Albion Barnard. 




March 1, 1875. 
March 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 



CHIPPEWA COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MONTEVIDEO. 



Auditor - 


J. M. Severens 


Two ^ears. 
•• 

•• 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 2, 1874. 


Treasurer 


Die A. Janro 


March 1, 1874. 


Sheriff 


George J. Crane 


January 1, 1874. 


Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate^ 

Attorney « 

Surveyor 


A. A. Jargo» 


January 1, 1875. 


J. J. Stewart 


January 1, 1874. 


Henry Hill 


January 1, 1873. 


L. R. Moyer «. 

C. J. C. Bldred 


January 1, 1874. 


QoTOTkW 


January 1, 1875. 


aerk District Court.... 


J.D.Baker 

J. M. Severens -t---- 


January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1975. 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



50 



ANNUAL BEP0R9. 



CHISAGO COUNTY. 

COUirrY SEATy CHIBA.GO CITT. 



Office. 



Auditor 

Trefluiarer , 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate , 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner , 

Clerk District Court. 



Incambent. 



Otto Wallmark 

N.C. D.Taylor 

John Shaleen 

Andrew Wallmark.. 

Robert Currie. 

Piatt B. Walker 

Henry H. Newbury. 

Robert Currie 

Robert Currie 



Term of Office. 



Two jears, 



Four years. 



Commencemt of Term 



March 2. 1874. 
March 1, 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 



CLAY COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MOOBHSAD. 



Auditor 

Treasurer 

Sheriff 

Register of Deeds.... 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court, 



Peter Wilson 

John Thorsgaard 

J. B. Blanohard 

C. A. Nichols 

Die Jacobson 

S. Q. Comstook 

F. J. Bumham 

John Kurtz 

John Briokson 



Two j^ears. 



Four years. 



March 1. 1875. 
March 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1S75. 
January 1, 1873. 



COTTONWOOD COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, WINDOM. 



Auditor «... 


S. M. I'lpoy™,,..,. »*„... 


Two ;^ears. 

.4 
tt 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1, 1875. 


Treasurer 

Sheriff. 


C. ll.Srintb 

S. H. ^te^man. 

D. A. r..^e. _,,„ 

A. 1>. I^.'^kt^i ^. 

B . Si'hoQieraft „ 

Orrin XjU'*on.-»...M*.. .*>.... 

M. Ixwalf. „ 

J. ii. Redding. ...,„.... 


March 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 


Register of Deeds. 

Judffe of Probate 


January 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 


Attorney ~ 

Surveyor... 


January 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 


Coroner... 

Clerk District Court ... 


January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1874. 


Court Commissioner... 


J 11. Redding ., 


January 1, 1874. 



CROW WING COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, BRAINSBD. 



Auditor 


F. H. Goulet 

N. McFadden 


Two i^ears. 
•• 

•« 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 2. 1874. 


Treasurer 


March 1, 1876. 


Sheriff 

Reffifterof Deeds ,.. 

Judge of Probate 

Attomev 


A. P. McKay 

C. W. Dariing 

D.O.Preston 

Geo. W. Holland 


January 1. 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1874. 


Surveyor 


H. M Halpin 

J. C. Rosser « «.. 

W. W. Hartiey 


January 1, 1875. 
January 1 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 


Coroner 

Clerk District Court.... 


Court Commissioner ... 


H. D.FoUett.:. 


January 1. 1875. 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SEORETABT OF STATE. 



61 



DAKOTA COUNTY, 
ooxmrr seat^ HAsnNGS. 



Office. 


Incumbent. 


Term of Office. 


Commencemt of Term 


Auditor - 


Miobsel Heinen 


Two ^y ears, 

•* 

•« 
t« 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1. 18^, 
March 1. 1874 


Treasurer «. 


Wm. Harrington 


Sheriff- 


Stephen Newell 


January 1, mL 
<ranuarTl liifri^ 


Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate.^ 


N. P. W. Krana. 


T. O'Leary 


January 1, 1874» 


Attorney 


Seagrave Smith 


January 1 1 S74 


Surveyor 


cTb. Lowell 

William Felton 

Georges. Whitman 

John F. Newton 


January 1.1iT4. 
January 1, 1874, 
January 1, iair4> 
January 1, ISTS. 


Coroner - 


Clerk District Court,... 
Court Commissioner... 







DODGE COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MANTORVILLE. 



Auditor «^ 

Treasurer 

Shenfil 

Register of Deeds , 

Judge of Probate. 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner , 

Clerk District Court... 
Court Commissioner., 



J. Orinnell 

D. K. Dibble 

E.K. Whiting. .. 
Gilbert H. Higby. 
J. F. Ostrander.... 

W. A. Sperry 

R. J. Perry „... 

N. Jones , 

J. P. Brewer 

Geo. W. Slocum.. 



Two years. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1, 18:^.. 
March 1. 187i, 
January 1, H74. 
January 1, J>^T4, 
January 1, ]S74, 
January 1, 1><75» 
January 1, l-^T,^. 
January 1, IslA. 
January 1, |s74. 
January 1. H75. 



DOUGLAS COUNTY. 

C0T7NTY SEAT, ALEXANDRIA. 



Auditor 

'Treasurer 


Fred. Von Bftumbiioh — 
Heriry K. White 


Two 

Pour 
Thro 


«4«4 ft 


March 1,1871. 
March 1. I^j. 
January 1. 18T.=>. 
January 1, 1 ^7^"?. 
Januarv 1. 1^75 


Sheriff. 


N, A. Hftlson. »..*.,.... 


Rogister of Deeds 

Judge of Probate 


A. J. A til OS... „.^ .„..„„... 
Wm. McAboy., „.,,... 


Attorney.. -.. 

Surveyor 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court... 
Gonrt Commissioner... 


N. R Futmo4-,...»„. 

L. W. Rima 


January 1, 1H75. 
January 1, 1>!75. 
January 1, 187a, 
January 1. 1874, 
January 1, 1^75. 


G. Vtrja.n. .». 

J»me» Piirdon..,„„„ 

Churl ae Stihalti 









FARIBAULT COUNTY. 

00T7NTY SEAT, BLUB EARTH CITY. 



Auditor ^ -.. 

Tnarorer^-,. , ., ..... 

Sherit ..»»... 

B«ict«r of D««d«..,H.. 
Jnage of Probate.. ..^ 

Atloitiey ......«*.......... 

SorreyoT *k.,«....^ «**«. 

OofMkeT.- ^»*..T~^»,. .... 

acffc District Court.. 
GMtl OotantlMlonsiT. 



W. W. White........ 

H. B. Johnson......^...*.... 

A. B. DiiTi*. „...„„„ 

F. P. BrowD..., 

J. A. Kteilar^,. »„..„„,,*, 

J. H. BdtouL ,. 

a A, Wier. _..„„ 

A. J. RoBe^ ,..*.. 

H.J.Noftl 

J, A. Elciter^.. .. 



Two .^eara. 


March 1, 


Marobl* 


'* 


January 




January 


'* 


Jan nary 


'* 


January 


It 


Jiinanry 


It 


Jauiiary 


Four years. 


JjLDuary 


Three yeara. 


January 



1875. 
1874. 
1J874, 
1,IIH75. 

1.1874, 

I, 1.S75. 
],1874. 
1, 1873. 
h 1«73* 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



52 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



FILLMORE COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, PRESTON. 



Office. 



Auditor 

Treasurer. - 

Sheriff 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate...... 

Attorney 

Suryeyor , 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court. 



Incumbent. 



Aldis Bartlett 

W.W. Braden 

Christian Peterson. 

Lars 0. Hamne 

Henry 8. Bassett.... 

N. P. Oolbum 

John Greyor 

H.Jones 

H. A. Billings 



Term of Office. 



Two ^ears, 



Four years. 



Commencemt of Term 



March 1, 

March 1. 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 



1875. 
1874. 
1, 1875. 
1,1874. 

1. 1874. 

1. 1875. 
1. 1875. 
1. 1875. 
1, 1874. 



FREEBORN COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, ALBERT LEA. 



Auditor « , 

Treasurer 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds , 

Judge of Probate...... 

Attorney 

Surveyor , 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court. 
Court Commissioner. 



Samuel Batohelder .. 
Charles Kittleson.. .. 

T. J. Sheehan 

August Peterson 

Gilbert Gulbrandson 

A. G. Wedge 

H. C. Lacy 

N. H. Bllickson 

A. W. White 

B. W. Carter 



Two; 


rears. 


March 1 
March 1 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 


** 


January 


Four years. 


January 


Three 


years. 


January 



.1871. 
,1874. 

1. 1874. 

1, 1874. 

1. 1874. 

1. 1875. 
1, 1874. 
1, 1874. 
1, 1873. 
1. 1872. 



.GOODHUE COUNTY. 

• COUNTY SEAT, BEDWINO. 



Auditor 


S. .T. WillarJ 


Two 


^ears. 


March 1 1875. 


Treaflurertr.-.....i.r— -Tf.TT- 


L. A, llHllCO^k.^*^.^^. 




March 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1,1875, 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1,1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1,1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 


Sheriff 


Mitrrin S. Cbiindler 

ClMiHr'; Mf^ClurC..*.... 


Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate- 

Attorney 


N. \.^^'E''rncr 


JdfiTi C McCJure. 


Surveyor 


Wm, Duofortb 

B. .<. Park... *....,... 


Coroner 


Clerk District Court.... 


Hj^rii^ Johnjoti....f.^ 


Four years. 
ThroA vAA.ni. 


Court Commissioner.... 


P. W. Uoyt. 











GRANT COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, HERMAN. 



Auditor 

Treasurer 

Sheriff 

Register of Deeds.. 
Judge of Probate.. 

Surveyor 

Coroner 



R. S. Talbot 

0. W. Oleson... 
E. A. Ziebarth 

Ole Larson 

Ole Thompson.. 
John Ohlson..... 
H. P. Hanson.. 




March 2,1874. 
March 1,1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
Januaiy If 1874. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8E0BSTABT OF STATE. 



63 



HENNEPIN COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MINNEAPOLIS. 



Office. 


Incumbent. 


Term of Office. 


Commencemt of Term 


Aaditor 


Mahlon Black 


Two je&n. 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1, 1 ^T . 


TreJUfurfsr - 


W.W. Huntington 

George H. Johnson 

L."P. Plummer 


March 1. I>7i. 


Sheriff. 


January], IHTFj, 


Register of Deeds. 

Jud^e of Probate. 


January 1 1^5 


Franklin Beebe 


January 1* 18T4, 
January 1 ISiS* 


Attorney.. 


J. W. Lawrence 


Snrreyor 


G. W. Cooley 


January 1. 1BT5* 


Coroner 


P. 0. Chilstrom 

D. W. Albaugh « 

Albee Smith 


January 1, 1H75. 


Clerk District Conrt.... 
Court Commissioner... 


January]. ISTi. 
January], IHTfi. 



HOUSTON (X)UNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, CALEDONIA. 



Auditor 


B. W. Trask 


Two years. 
*« 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1, 1875. 


Treasurer. 


Elias Velo 


March 1, 1874. 


Sheriff. 


M. Hargraves 


January 1. 1875. 


Renster of Deeds 

Judge of Probate- 

Attorney 


James MoMahon.. 

J. W. Cook 


January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1874. 


James O'Brien 


January 1, 1875. 


Surveyor 


I. Thompson 


January 1, 1875. 


Coroner ...~.. 


Q. L. Gates 


January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 


Clerk District Court... 


Joseph Yassen 


Conrt Commissioner... 


W. Trask 


Janu arv 1 . 1 872. 









ISANTI COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, CAMBRIDGE. 



Auditor 


T. C. White 

Thos. H. Caine 


Two 


years. 


March 1, UTr^ 


Treasurer ~.. 




March 1, l^lh. 


Sheriff 


B. 8. Gifford 


January 1, TS75. 
January 1, 1^75, 
January 1. 137S 


Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate. 


Andrew Danielson 

A. B. Odell 


Attorney «. 


G. Clough 


January 1, 1375. 
January 1, 1375. 
January 1. 1873^. 


Surveyor 


A.Colbum 

G.F.Harvey 

G. F.Harvey 


Coroner 


Clerk District Court... 


Four VA&rfl. 


January 1, 1874. 













JACKSON COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, JACKSON. 



Auditor. 

Treasurer 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds 

Juage of Probate ..... 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Clerk District Court , 
Court Commissioner. 



William V. King. 
Henry Knudson.. 

A. C. Scrum , 

Edward Orr 

Henry Knudson.. 
William V. King. 

J. E. Palmer 

Ole A. Brown 

W. W. Hamilton. 



Two ^^ears. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 2, 1874. 
March 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January], 1876. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



KANABEC COUNTY. 

COUNTY BEAT, BRUNSWICK. 



Office. 



Auditor 

TreMurer. 

Sherifif. 

ReffiBter of Deeds. 
Jaage of Probate.. 

Surveyor 

Coroner , 



Inoumbent. 



C. W. Lenfest 

B.H.Chesley 

I. M. Hurlbert 

C. W. Lenfest 

P. M. Crosby 

Stephen E. Tallman 
Samuel Hioks 



Term of Office. 



Two Years. 



Commencemt of Term 



March 1. 1875. 
March 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 



KANDIYOHI COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, WILLMAB. 



Auditor 

Treasurer.. «. 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds — 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor. 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court,. 
Court Commissioner. 



J. A. Jacobson.. 

H. Sanderson 

Samuel Stoner.. 

A. F. Nordin 

S. Holmes 

John H. Brown. 
John Y. Hooper, 
Bdwin S. Frost.. 
J. W. Burdick... 
S. Holmes , 



Two ^^ears. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 4, 
March 1. 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 



1874. 
1874. 
1. 1874. 

1. 1874. 

1. 1875. 
1. 1874. 
1. 1874. 
1. 1873. 
1, 1872. 
1.1874. 



LAKE COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, BEAYEB BAY. 


Auditor « 


Christian Wieland 

Gustav A. Schultze. 

Henry Wieland „ 


Two jtan. 


March 2, 1874. 
March 1.1874. 
January 1.1873, 


Treasurer « 

Reffister of Deeds 


LAC QUI PARLE. 

COUNTY SEAT, ULC QUI PABLB. 



A u si itor... ►>*...*«... 4...,, 
Treiui u r er.. ^„ .,.„,-*. t.*H 

8h«rlff,. ., >.-, 

Hotfiater lyf DaedK 

Judf e of Pro bata 

Attorney,— .*.»..*..*... 

Surveyor.,..,..,. .„ 

Coroner.*....,. ., 

Cl*rk District Court.. 



F* Jpioob?on...... 

A, LAraon .. 

L. RobertatHi 

J, OoffhlELDt,*,,*.^ M.. 

P. Ltntor... 

. C. ChiimbdrUin 

EriokaQD 

J. Bttlon ....,„.. 

G, Austiu«-.,.„.« 



Two years. 



Four years. 



March 1. ]875. 
March 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1,1875. 

January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1.1874. 



LE SUEUR COUNTY. 

00X7NTY SEAT, LB SUEUB. 



Auditor,. »...*„ ..* 

Tf euuT«T. »* *.... 

Sheriff..-. .-.— 

Reffit«r of D^Adfl ^.... 
JudffB orProb«le...,.M 
A ttnrctiy..,„...t ..*...***- 
Surv ey or. . . .^.....tu. < *^ ■ — 

CorwucFn.-... ,.. 

Clerk Biirtri(!t Court.. 
Court CommiisioDer, 



John Kmseiy., 

Patrick MtiRaaey 
Mk'baeiL Grady.... 
Felix A* Bf.>ior.„. 

C. P. Smith. 

A. W. Banffi'........ 

L. It. 13nll]3 

S. B. UlJ}ph^^y.... 
Frank WKalars. 
i3. E. Eiaedord..... 



Two ;y'ears. 



Four yearn. 
Three years. 



March 1, 
March 1, 
Jantinry 
Januiiry 
JaQuary 
Jntitmry 
Janunry 
J an q dry 
January 
January 



lfi76. 
1S74. 

1. m4. 

1,1^*. 
1J874. 

1, ms, 

1, 1574. 

1. 1S74. 

1. I87i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SBCKBTABT OF STATti. 



66 



LINCOLN COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MAB8HF1ELD. 



Office. 


Incumbent. 


Term of Office. 


Commencemt of Term 


Auditor 


Charles Marsh 


Two ;fear8. 

•• 
•« 


March 1, 1876. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1875. 


Treasurer .- 


A. C. Burdick 


Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds. 

Judffe of Probate. 

Attorney..... 


&.l.WS2t:::::::::::: 


J. W. Lawton 

C. H. Qoodsell 


January 1. 1875. 


Surveyor 






Coroner «. 








Clerk District Court.... 


M. 8. Phniips 


Four years. 


January 1, 1875. 



LYON COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MAB8HALL. 



Auditt?r*^*H, ..*.««. „.. 


. 0* fJ^GreBB 


Two 
Foui 


;year8. 
yean. 


March 1, l^^Tn. 




- J. W, WiUiatus „ 

. 8, Wobsttr..... ..,„.... 


March 1, ]^7~\ 
January 1 ] "^Tli 


Ee(isl«r of Deedi 

JoHcvefProbKte 

Attorney 

Sarvey or „ . .. .„. „ . . .. .. „ 


. S. V. Groestactk.* 

E, B. JeiTBlt 

W. Wakfitoan «... 

. C.L- Van Fleet*.. 

D. M. Taytor,., ...... 


January l', 1«7,^. 
January h 1«75, 
January 1. 1375. 
January 1. 1N75, 
January 1.1875. 
January 1, 1875, 


Clerk District Court,, 


JOle Dahl....... , 







MoLEOD COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, GLENOOE. 



Auditor 

Treasurer „.... 

Sheriff. 

Reffister of Deeds 

Judffe of Probate... 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner ^ 

Clerk District Court.... 
Court Commissioner... 



Mathias Thoeny. 

C. R. Mime 

A. S. Nobles 

L. W. Lester 

T. T. Sargent. 

J. V. V. Lewis . 

J. Dean 

Daniel Nobles.... 

A. J. Snyder 

P. A. Graves 



Two ^^ears. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1, 1875. 
March 1, 1871. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1 ST5. 
January 1, 1R75. 
January 1, l^ry, 
January 1, 1^5. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1^. 



MARTIN COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, PAIBMOUNT. 



Auditor .,.- 


J. A. Armstronff .- 


Two ;7ear8. 
•• 

*• 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1. 1875. 


Treasurer 


C. H. Viesleman 


March 1. 1874. 


Sheriff. 

Renster of Deeds.. 

Judffe of Probate 

Attorney 


C. A. BuUard - 

Amasa Bowen 


January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1873. 
January 1. 1875. 


M^TT^stall!.-::::;:;::: 


Surveyor — 

Clerk District Court.... 
Court CommiflBioner... 


G. H. Dewing 

E.M.Hyatt 

Allison Fancher 

N. C. Goats ^ 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



56 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



MEEKER COUNTY. 



COUNTY SEAT, LITCHFIELD. 



Office* 


Ificambwit 


Term of Office. 


Commencemt of Term 


Auditor ,** .« - 


[iMiuIut Steretu.. ....» 


Two jreara. 

*« 
<• 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1, 1875. 


Treannrer , ....*.f> 


A, KelioD Poian., 


March 1, 1874. 


Sheriff .* .» 


N.J.MnrPh 

N. A. Viriti... ,. 


January 1, 1874, 


ReffUter of Deed* 

Judge of Probat«_ 

Attomej yy *-.*** *^fP. 


January i, 1875. 


Jolin Bltt^kfTFll 

B, A. Cnmi-bell.^ 


January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 


fin rveyo r ^ 


J* B* SEilii^liurF - * , .... 


January 1, 1875. 


Coroner. , 

Clerk Dintrjot Court.. - 


Oliver RciMiiok 

S. W* Lijjivitt.™ , 


January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1872. 


Court CommiBsioner... 


J. H. Bacon 


January 1, 1875. 









MILLE LACS COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, PRINCETON. 



Auditor... 

Treasurer 

Sheriff. „ 

Reffister of Deeds 

Juage of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner , 

Clerk District Court.., 
Court Commissioner 



J. S. Mudgett. 
S. L. Staples.... 
T. W. Dickson 
Geo. D. Loring 
A. P. Barker .. 

J. L. Cater 

L. Pratt 

F. Henry 

W. J. Biddle... 
S. Cone 



Two jirears. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1, l^Ti. 
March 1,W:l 
January 1, I-i.-. 
January 1, IsT-i. 
January 1, 1^75* 
January 1, 1>^5, 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1§74. 
January 1, liilB. 
January 1, 1H74. 



MORRISON COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, LITTLE FALLS. 



Auditor 

Treasurer , 

Sheriff. , 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 

Surreyor 

Coroner v- 

Clerk District Court 
Court Commissioner. 



J. D. LaChance~ 

Jonathan Taylor 

T. J. Hayes 

Theodore Bellefeuille. 

John Shanks 

Peter Roy 

Wm.L. Dow 

John T. Stillwell 

J.D. LaChance 

S. P. Fuller 



Two^prears. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1. 1FV5. 
March 1, If^Tl. 
January 1, 1S74 
January 1, ]'i7^. 
January 1, Ijv^. 
January 1, l^sT.^i. 
January 1, 1 S7^k 
January 1, 3S75, 
January 1, ]!474. 
January 1, 1H74. 



MOWER COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, AUSTIN. 



Auditor 

Treasurer... 

Sheriff. 

Reffister of Deeds 

Juage of Probate...... 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court. 
Court Commissioner.. 



P. T. Mclntyre.,....*.... 

I. Ingmandson. 

R. 0. Hall 

W.M. Howe 

Samuel Harter 

L. French 

G. H. Allen 

C.B. ThralL 

F. A. Elder 

John Brophy 



Two ;rears. 



Four years. 
Three yean. 



March 1, 1875. 
March 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1« 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1« 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1. 1875. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SECRfiTABT OF STATti. 



57 



MURRAY COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MURBAT. 



Office. 


laeumbonU 


Term of Office. 




Auditor ........... . . .. 


Rufita Th^iii{ij(.4».^«^,p .... 


Two years. 
Four yean. 


Marcb 1, 1875, 


Tretitiirer 


John L, Cabot..,. -..^.^ 


March 1, 1875, 


SberiiL 


Z. W. Alar?b *. 


January 1, 1^5. 


Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate.. 


J. R Cot bio 

W. W. OaJkinB......... 


January 1» 1S76. 
January 1, 1875. 


Attorney 


S. R* Harris.. ...,. ..,„.... 


January l] 1S75, 


Snrreyor — 

Coroner.- 


N. P. Shoi^ardp...... 


January 1, 1375, 
January 1, 1^73* 


Qerk Distriot Court.... 


Henry Edwards 


January 1,1^7-2- 



NICOLLET COUNTY. 

COXJNTY SEAT, ST. PETER. 



Auditor - 

Treasurer 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds.. 

Judge of Probate.. 

Attorney ^ 

Surveyor « 

Coroner - 

Clerk District Court... 
Court Commissioner., 



Zuriel S. Gault 

Frederick Fritohc 

E. J. Boys. 

A. Thorson 

John Peterson , 

G. S. Ives 

Israel Fuller 

WiUiam Klein 

Asro A. Stone 

G. S. Ires 



Two y^ears. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1, lh~^. 
March 1, 1874. 
January 1, lS74v 
January 1, 1S74. 
January 1, 1^74. 
January 1, 1875, 
January 1, 1ST4. 
January 1. 1875, 
January 1, IS72. 
January 1. 1R?>. 



NOBLES COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, WORTHINOTON. 



Auditor «..-, ^,«. 

Tr*afurBT - >■ 


WiUiam M. Bear... 

HeniT D. Haini*ton„. 

Cbarfea W.BuJUfl 

T. O-Bell .„. 

J. Crafl. 


Two jrears. 
t« 

•« 
«« 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 2, 1B74, 
March 1, 1674, 


SberiffL 

Register of Deeds — ... 
Judge of Prol*ate...„.„ 

Attorney «„. „ 

SuTTeyor-. 


January 1, 1874* 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874, 
January 1. 19i75. 


M. B, Soulo 


B.W.WoMen croft.. 

J, B. OhurobtU. 

B. N. Carrier... 

J. Cmft. 


January 1, 1874, 


Coroner „.. 

derk District CourL... 


January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874, 
January 1. 1874 









OLMSTED COUNTY. 

OOUMTY SEAT, ROCHESTER. 



^udttOT^..™ „.... 


Adolph Biermann 

J. L. Wright 


Two^rears. 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1. 1875. 
March 1, 1874. 


Register of Deeds.. 

Judge of Probate.- 


J. A. AUison „ 

L. E. Cowdery 


January 1, 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 


J. W. Fulkerson 


January 1, 1874. 


Attorney... 


Charles M. Start 


January 1. 1874. 


Surveyor 


Thomas Hunter.. 


January 1. 1874 


Coroner «. 


G. W. Nichols^ 


January 1. 1875. 


Clerk District Court... 
Court Oommisffioner.Tr. 


H. J. Hannon«. 

0. 0. Baldwin.. 


January 1, 1874. 
January 1 . 1875 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



58 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



OTTER TAIL COUNTY. 

OOUNTY SEAT, FERGUS FAX.I£. 



Office. 



Auditor , 

Treasurer. , 

Sheriflf. , 

Register of Deeds 

Jnage of Probate 

Attorney , 

Surveyor , 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court., 
Court Commissioner. 



Incumbent. 



Term of Office. 



0. Jorgens i Two years. 

Alexander Norman- : 

M. Anderson ** 

8.H. Nichols | 

W. Bearer 

D. P. Hatch i 

A. N. Pull I 

S. A. Beardsley ; 

John Schroder I Four years. 



Commenoemt ef Term 



Robert MUler... 



March 2. 1874. 
March 1. 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 
January i, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1873. 



I 



Three years. January 1, 1875. 



PINE COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, PINE CITY. 



Auditor.^.......... 

l&Basurer — .*«..„.„ 

Sheriffs ^ 

Re«QC4r of I>eedi»***. 
Jau«f! of Probate. <.,.., 
Attortiey ...,*„►.*.....«*, 
Surveyor ....„,„„„.„... 
Cafonor... „..,«.* ...„...., 
Clerk Diatdot Court. 
Court Comialwicinef . 



M. A. Brftwky Twoyeart* ' Mapoh 1* lffT5. 

D. L. WiUard.,„. ......; '^ Atarob 1. 1ST5. 

B.A. Hutchinfou " JaDuary 1,1875. 

J. P. Petorsoa «*.....».».,- 1 '' Jftouary 1. 1ST5, 

H- P. EDb!B.....M..-*^.*.*«, *' I January 1, 1873. 

J. D. Wil CO jc ^» " I JMiuarj 1, 1875- 

W,Wi]flai..„ „,,„,.„.. *■ ! JnnBaTT 1. 1BT5. 

M. A* Bra wl^iy. »„......»«' *' Janujtry K 1B75. 

D. li, WiUard .^...*^,*^ Fauryears. I Jwiuiiry ]* 1173. 

A.G. Hooi^and. — ,.„.,^,.. Thrwyeatfi. Januaiy 1, W5* 



POLK COm^TY. 

COUNTY SEAT, CROOKSTON. 



Auditor 

Treasurer... 

Sheriflf. 

Register of Deeds 

Judi^e of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner... 

Clerk District Court. 
Court Commissioner. 



Arthur Yeyernalt. \ Two years. 

John Cbristenson ' 

J. Paulson 

C. S. Spendley ' 

L. B. Pierce 

W. G. Woodruflf. 

F.W.Taylor ; 

J. Redland 



J. R. Barb.. 
T. Bradshaw.. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1. 

March 1, 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 



1875. 
1875. 
1. 1875. 
1. 1875. 
1. 1875. 
1, 1875. 
1, 1875. 

1. 1875. 
1, 1874. 

1. 1876. 



POPE COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, OLENWOOD. 



Auditor 

Treasurer 

Sheriflf. 

Reffister of Deeds.. 
Judge of Probate... 

Attorney 

Surveyor.. 



K.J. Kinney Two years. 

. Brick Henderson I 

Joseph Peacock , 

J. W.Simmons 

Norman Shook 

. J. L. Crane , 

OleRiM, Jr , 

Coroner Ole 0. Huset 

Clerk District Court.... .Tony Thorson Four years. 

Court Commissioner... , D. B. Pettijohn Three years. 



March 1, 
March 1, 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 



1875. 
1876. 

1. 1875. 

1. 1876. 
1. 1874. 
1. 1876. 

1. 1874. 

1. 1875. 

1. 1873. 

1. 1874. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BECRETABT OF STARTS. 



59 



RAMSEY COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, ST. PAUIi. 



Office. 



Incumbent. 



I Term of Office. 



Auditor. S.Lee Davis Two years. 

Treasurer- I Calvin S.Uline 

Sheriff!. JohnQrace 

Register of Deeds iTheodore Sander i *' 

Judge of Probate.. .O.Stephenson I 

Attorney C. D. O'Brien I 

Surveyor CharlesM. Boyle I ** 

Coroner iPeter Gabrielson I 

Clerk District Court.... | Albert Armstrong | Four years. 

Court Commissioner... { H. M. Dodge i Three years. 



Commencemt of Term 



March 1. Ifcr. . 
March 1, l&ri, 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1 K74, 
January 1, 1 S75. 
January 1, 1^74. 
January 1, ia7l. 
January 1, 1^74. 
January 1, J £74. 
January 1, ] B7i. 



REDWOOD COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, REDWOOD FALLS. 



Auditor 

Treasurer 

Sheriff: 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate.. 

Attorney , 

Surveyor 

Coroner - 

Clerk District Court.... 
Court Commissioner.., 



I. A. ChAtnibr 

L. F. Robinson...., 
Thof. McMillan... 

G. W.Braley 

H, D. BftldwLn ..„ 
M. E. Poirt'U 

D. U Hitchcock^., 
H.D. BaJdwm.. 



-I 



Two ;^ear8. 



Four years. 



ED. Post , Three years. 



March 4. 
March 1. 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 



187i. 
1874, 
1. I«74. 
1, 1874. 
1, 1875. 
1, 1874, 
1, 1874, 
1, )874. 

1, irt;i 

1. ]^7J. 



BENVILLE COUNTY. 

00T7KTT SEAT, BEAYEB BALLB. 



Auditor .....,«, 

Treasiu^r.. .., ,. .. . . ..« 

Sberi^ ^. „„ 

Regif ler of Deeds.,....,, 
Juigc of Probate^...-., 

Attorney ^™*... 

Sarrejror.^. «.,,.. 

CoToa*r 



Clerk District Court... 



RricEnPion,....,..........K.. Tiro tiut. 

Hans Grrmoerad.... „ 

Martin JoD?©i)..,.....,.,..., 

Wm. MflGuwan ,,....... ^ 

Geo- U, Mog^akr.... p. I 

(I. H. MciggDifir.. ,„..,.{ 

CO. JobESon .,,... I 

F. li. Sberwin. ,.. 



D.^, II nil. 



Poor yean. 



Oraxt OoffltuisBitjner,..! John M. Donnan^^, .[ Thrftey*a«i. 

I i 



Marab 1. 
M&r<3b 1, 
January 
Jn^nnary 
Jan (J dry 
January 
JanaAry 
January 
Jaauary 
January 



IS75. 
1875, 
1. 3S75* 
I, 187S. 
].ia74. 
1. 1875. 
Ih 1175. 
1. 1875. 
1. 18T4. 
1, 1874. 



RICE COUNTY. 

•OUNTY SEAT, FABIBAULT. 



Auditor 

Treasurer , 

SheriflL 

Benster of Deeds. 
Juage of Probate. 

Attorney 

Surveyor I 

Coroner.. 

Clerk District Court..., 
Court Commissioner... 



Frederick W. Prink. 

Thomas Mee 

John Grant. Jr 

John R. Parshall 

John B. Quinn...... .. 

R. A. Mott 

R. H. L. Jewett 

H. L. Coon 

Chas. A. Bailey 

W. H. Archibald 



Two .^ears. 



Pour years. 
Three years. 



March 1, 
March 1, 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 



1876. 
1874. 
1. 1874. 
1, 1874. 
1. 1874. 
1, 1874. 
1. 1874. 
1,1874. 

1. 1873. 

1. 1874. 



3igitize_d 



d by Google 



60 



ANNUAL BfePOBI!. 



BOCK COUNTY. • 

COUHTY SEAT, LUVERNE. 



Office. 


Incumbent. 


Term of Office. Oommencemtof Term 


Aoditor. ..^....«. 


Francis Howard 


Two^yeaw. | 
«t ' 

1 
1 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1, 1875. 


Treasurer. 

Sheriflf. 

Reflriflter of Deeds 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 


J. F. Shoemaker 

Eim Rice- 

Robert Herren... 


January 1, 1875. 
January 1.;1875. 
January 1, 1875. 


E. D. Hadley _ 

E. D. Hadley 


January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1875. 


Surveyor ^ 

Coroner ., 

Clerk District Court.... 
Court Commissioner ... 


P.J.Kniss 

Nels. Jacobson 

J. 0. Helgerson 

J. 0. Helgerson- 


January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 187r). 
January 1. 1875. 
January 1. 1875. 



SAINT LOUIS COUNTY. 

OOXTNTY SEAT, DIILUTH. 



Auditor 


Frank Burke 

Nehemiah Hulett. 

George Berkeiman 

Chas. R. Haines.. 


Two :^ean. 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1, 1875. 


Treasurer.......... 

Sheriff 


March 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 


Register of DeediL..:.. 
Judge of Probate 


January 1, 1875. 


E. H. Parker 


January 1, 1875. 


Attorney 


M. S. Stewart. 


Januaiy l\ 1875. 


Surveyor 

Coroner „.„ 

Clerk District Court... 


G. R. Stuntt- 

Sam'l J. Thompson 

J. R. Carey 


January li 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 


Court Commissioner ... 


B. F.Parker 


JanuaiT i\ 1875. 



SCOTT COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, SHAKOFEE. 



Auditor... 

Treasurer «.. 


Mathias Mayer -. 

John J. Ring~ 


Two jwn. 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1. 1S71. 
March 1. ir.L 


Sheriff.. 

Register of Deeds 

Judffe of Probate 


Dennis Flaherty 

Herman Baumhager 

John Daly 


January 1, Nr4, 
January 1, B74, 
January 1, 1C4. 


Attorney 


William H. Koser 


January 1, l^Tr; 


Surveyor 


William A. Fuller 


January 1, l!^74. 


Coroner 


Edward G. Hall 


January 1, 1 «74, 


Clerk District Court ... 


Thos. Haas 


January 1, 1K74. 


Court Commissioner... 


Peter Geyermann 


January 1, 1'^Ti 



SHERBURNE COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, ELK RIVER. 



Auditor.- , 

Treasurer 

Sheriff 

Register of Deeds , 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor , 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court- 
Court Commissioner . 



P. A. Sinclair Two years. 



I 

IWm.H.Houlton.. 

'B. H. Davis 

Wm. B. Mabie.. 

H. P. Burrell 

H. T. HalU 

B. F. Snow 

Cyrus Shaw 

E. A. Jellison.... 
B. F. Hurd 



•1 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1. 1875. 
March 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BECBSTABT OF STATE. 



61 



SIBLEY COUNTY. 

« COUNTY SEAT, HENDEBSON. 



Offioe. 


Incumbent. 


Term of Offioe. 


Oommenoemt of Term 


Auditor 


Christ Didra 

Henry Touns 


Two jears. 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1. 1>T . 
March 1 I'-Tl 


Sheriff 


Patrick C. Bray 


January 1. 1^5, 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1S74, 
January U iSTf). 
January 1, 1S74. 
January 1 1875 


Reffister of Deeds. 

Juoge of Probate. 

Attorney 


Wm. Carroll 


A. Zimmerman 

8. Fowler 


Snrreyor ....« ^ 

Coroner ^ 


Adam Buck 

Maurice Joyce 


Clerk District Court.... 


M. R. Wilcox 


January 1, 1S74, 
January], 1S74. 


Court CommisBioner... 


Wm. Maurer 



STEARNS COUNTY. 

COUHTY SEAT, ST. CLOUD. 



Auditor 


Barney Vosberg 


Two ^ years. 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 1, l^7 ■ 


Treasurer 




March 1 1 S74 


SheriflF. 


George Geissel 


January 1 . 1 3Ti . 


Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate. 

Attorney 


John Zapp 


January]. 1S74, 
January 1. 1S74. 
January], IflTTC 
January!, 1874* 
January J H 1374. 
January 1. 1S75. 
January!, 1874. 


L. A. Evans 


Peter Brick 


Surveyor 


M. P. Noel .....:.;::::;::.:: 


Coroner ~. 


Barney Qyerbeok 


Clerk District Court... 


E. B. Dtrong 


Court Commissioner... 


B. R. Palmer 







STEELE COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, OWATONNA. 



A editor. ..,„„. .„.. 

Treuorer. „.h.... .. . . 

Bheriff.......... ..... 

RoiitAr of Deeds 

Juavtt of Probate „ 

A ttor&fly.. *...... 

Surreyor. ..«,«..«..,.., ., 

Coroner...,, ., 

awk Diattiot Coai-L., 
Court Comiiiiaaioiier. 



L. B- Padffham .,„ 
Thoa. ThotDpsoa. 
M. J. Toh€r„...,.., 
E.A.Tylpr ,.,..,.. 
L. L. Wheelook„. 

B, e. Wheolflr ...... 

L. Ij. Bonnett*„... 

J. VV. Buroh 

M. B- Chjidwick 



Two p^ears. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1, ] kTo. 
March 1. 1^*74. 
January 1, 1874. 
January L 1S75, 
January 1, 1B75. 
January 1, 1S75. 
January ] . ] 874. 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874, 
January 1.1872, 



STEVENS COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MOSBIS. 



Auditor.. 

Treasurer. - 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate — 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner.. 

Clerk District Court . 
Court Ck>mmis8ioner. 



W. W. Griswold 

Samuel Larson 

Die A. Bakke 

R. M. Richardson. ., 

R. M. Richardson 

R. M. Richardson. 

C.J.Fisher 

Michael Galvin..' 

James T. Avery 

H.B. Wolff. 



Two ^^ears. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 2, 1874. 
March 1. 1874. 
January 1. 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1878. 
January 1, 1875. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



62 



ANNUAL BEFOBT. 



SWIFT COUNTY. 

GOUNTT SEAT, BXNBON. 



Office. 



Auditor. 

Treaflurer , 

Sheriff ~ 

Reffister of Deeds 

Jndge of Probate 

Attorney , 

Surveyor ...... 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court. 
Court Commissioner. 



Incumbent. 



K. P. Trovold 

Halver Heliresen 
A. J. Camefian.... 

0. Wenans 

J. J. McKay 

J. Hodgson 

R. G. Demer 

S. C. Haines 

J. Moore 

A. W. Lathrop... 



Term of Office. 



Two ^^ears. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



Commencemt of Term 



March 2, 

March 1, 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 

January 



1874. 
1874. 
1, 1874. 
1.1875. 

1. 1874. 
1, 1876. 
1.1874. 
1, 1876. 

1. 1875. 
1, 1874. 



TODD (X)UNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, LONG PBAIRIB. 



Auditor.......... 


H. F. Lashin 


Two ;rearf. 

Four years. 
Three yean. 


March 2. 1F7S. 


Treasurer 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate... 


Charles B. Buss - 

M. Dinkel 

John D. Jones 

H. H. Morrell 


March 1. It74. 
January 1, H74. 
January 1, 1874, 
January 1, 1S74. 


Attorney 

Surveyor 


A. M. Crowell... 

John Barnes 


January 1, 1,^5, 
January 1, 1 974* 


Coroner 


M. Nessline.. 


January 1, 1^74. 


Clerk District Court.... 


Charles Harkens 


January 1, l-"r74^ 


Court Commissioner... 


John Barnes 


January 1, l^Tt. 









WABASHA COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, WABASHA. 



Auditor 

Treasurer... 

Sheriff 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner 

Clerk District Court.... 



William H. Campbell. 

Anson Pierce , 

Sidney H. Smith 

James G. Lawrence 

A. Z. Putnam 

W.J. Hahn 

G.Maxwell 

William J. Arnold , 

Charles J. Stauff. 



Two^^ears. 



Four years. 



March 1. lS7-j. 
March 1, UlA. 
January 1, 1 ^7L 
January 1, 1^74. 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1, l^lb, 
January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 



WADENA COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, WADENA. 



Auditor 


P.A. GatcheU « 

H. W. Fuller 


Two ^^ears. 
■• 

•• 
Four yean. 


March 2. 1874. 


Treasurer .......mm... 


March 1, 1874. 




John Wheeler 

C. J. Stuart. 

C. D. Van Aemam 

P. A. GatcheU 


January 1. 1874. 


Register of Deeds 

Juoge of Probate. 

Attorney ..mm 


January 1. 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January It 1874. 


Surveyor 


S. S. Gardner 


January 1, 1874. 


Coroner 


A.wTiScel:.....;.;........: 


January 1. 1874. 


Clerk District Court... 


8. S. Gardner... 


January 1* 1874. 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



gBOBBTABT OF STATE. 



63 



WASECA COUNTY. 

OOUHTT SmiLT, WASECA, 



Office^ 



Inoumbent. 



Term of Offioe. 



Ttro ;^«ar8. 



Auditor 'Edgar OronkMte 

Treasurer^ I Warren Smith 

Sberiff. 'Seth W. Long 

Register of Deeds Hiram A. Mosher 

Judge of Probate.. U. A. Ganfield ~. 

Attorney 'Peter MoGovem 

Snrreyor jC. B. Crane « 

Coroner. 'L.D. Molntosh ,. 

Clerk District Court... I James Harden i Four years. 

Court Commissioner ... J. B. Smith « Three years. 



Commenoemt of Term 



March 1, 1875. 
March 1, 1874. 
Janaary 1, I^C-I. 
January 1, Uli. 
January 1, 1^74, 
January 1, W74. 
January 1. ls74, 
January!. l!^T4. 
January 1. J S7i. 
January 1, H74. 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

COUITTY SEAT, STUXWATSB. 



Auditor.-^-^^t^*. 


G«o. Djivis. *..„. 


Two :f&an. 

Four jfBBf*, 
Three year*. 


March 1. 1875. 




JMrroTi Shftphwrd 


March3plfi74, 


Jadi» of Probate*^ 

Attorn flif , .-.,-- ^ 


J, A. Jnhnffcm ^■.,*.„«* 

A. M. Dodd„.......™....... 


Janaar}' 1* 187^* 
JanuArr 1. 1S74. 


K. Op But La. ...... .... . 

,P«rflyH. Smith 


Jatii^ary 1^ 1S74. 


Surveyor .** 

Clerk Diiiriet OoiorrL^!] 


January K 1574. 


ij. C. Rhotlea 

HafVflV Wilson ......^.... 


Janaarr 1, IBTS, 
January 1. 1S74, 


Coatt Commi«it&&er.,. 


0. H. Comforts... 


January 1* lJi7&, 


WATONWAN COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, MADELIA. 


Auditor ~ 


Joseph FIanders-...rr--... 


Two .Ifears. 
•« 

;; 

Four years. 
Three years. 


March 2, 1^74. 


Treasurer. 


Jans'Torsen 


March 1, IwT'i. 


Sherltt ^. 

Register of Deeds 

Judge of Probate. 

Attorney 


Jamee Glispen 

W. H. Witham «.. 

Thomas Rutledge.. 

G H Overholt 


Januaryl, 1874. 
January 1.1^74. ' 
January 1, 1875. 
January }» 1^74. 


Surveyor 


January 1.1S74. 




January 1. 1974. 


Clerk Distriet GourL.. 


D. R. Bill..... 


January "1. 1S72. 


Court Commissioner... 


C. M. Pomeroy 


January 1, IST-t. 



WILKIN COUNTY. 

OOUVTT SEAT, BBEGKSNBIDOS. 



Auditor 

Treasurer 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds..... 
Judge of Probate...... 

Attorney 

Surveyor 

Coroner... ~. 

Clerk Disiriot Court. 



Chas. B. Falley 

G.Hyser 

J. R. Harris 

S.H.Colby 

.Gilbert Hoag 

J. D. Boyer. 

J.M.CampbelL 

William Rapp 

P. Hansen 



Two ;f ears. 



Four years. 



March 2, 1874. 
March 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1872. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



64 



ANNUAL BEFOBT. 



WINONA COUNTY. 

COUHTT SEAT, WINONA. 



Office. 


Incumbent 


Term of Office. 


Commencemt of Term 


Auditor 


N. B. Ufiford 

John Ball 

W. H. Dill 


Two Years. 

«• 
Four years. 


March 1. 1875. 




March 1, 1874. 
January 1,1874. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1. 1874. 


Register of Deeds. 

Judge of Prob&te «. 


H. W. Jackson 


Jacob Storey 


Attorney 


A. H. Snow 


January 1, 1876. 


Surreyor 

Coroner « , 

Clerk District Court.... 


J. B. Fellows 


January 1,187.3. 
Januaiy 1, 1874. 
January 1,1874. 


J. B. McGaughey 

Bmst A. Gerdtzen 



WRIGHT COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, BUFFALO. 



Auditor,., *..«*.. 

T rea«a ror^. .^. .p.^t . . . 

Sheriff. 

RenAter of Deedi.. 
Judfftt of Probate... 

Attorn ay *„..„» 

Surr By or„. .*..., ....... 

Coroaiir^ „.,„,....„..... 

Clerk Distrbt Court,. 



1 



Wm.Tubbs,,. , „. 

John YottOig,... 

John C- Nqj^oelL 

IgXi&U GutxwUlerj Jr.. 
H. C. MomaiiH. ........,,.-. 

J.F, DiUey 

JoaEphua Alley ..,.».,., .... 

gr. E. 0. CaiJr......... ... 
eor»e A. Hoffroaa....... 



Court Commissioiifit... JT. E. Erigri 



Two ^years. 



Four years. 
Three years. 



March 1, 
March 1. 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 



1875. 
1874. 
1. 1874. 
1, 1874. 
1, 1874. 
1. 1874. 

1. 1874. 
1,1874. 
1, 1872. 

1. 1875. 



YELLOW MEDICINE COUNTY. 

COUNTY SEAT, YELLOW MEDICINE. 



Auditor 

Treasurer 

Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds.. 

Judge of Probate 

Attorney ~ 

Surveyor ~ 

Coroner „ 

Clerk District Court- 



Henry Bordewich.. 

K. T. Hazellberg , 

B. H. Monroe , 

Ole Fobs 

M. 0. Hall 

Gorham Powers -...., 

Geo. B. Olds 

William A. Monroe , 

W. B. McRobert... 



Two years. 



Four years. 



March 1, 1875. 
March 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1,1875. 
January 1,1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1, 1875. 
January 1.1875. 
January 1,1875. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SBCBSTAKT OF 8TATB. 65 



SCHEDULE OF PROPOSALS 



Far furnishing the Paper for the Public Printing^ and for 
Stationery^ as received and opened hy the Secretary of 
StatSj September Istj 1874. 

PROPOSAL OF TITUS, HAMILTON & CO. 

PAFEB. 

Book Paper. , 

Sample marked Al per tt>. $ 17.4 

No. 1 " 14.^ 

" 01 " 13| 

CO " 13f 

« •* 3 : « 12} 

" No. 3 " 12J 

" No. 3 F « 12 

Flat Paper. 

Sample A per tt>. $ 24 

" B " 23 

" C " 25 

8TATI0NBBT. 

14 pounds legal cap per ream $3 90 

12 pounds legal cap ** 3 35 

10 pounds letter " 2 80 

12 pounds letter « 3 35 

14 pounds letter..... " 3 90 

7 pounds packet " 2 00 

No. 10 enrelopes, 60 pounds, white, marked D per M. 5 40 

No. 9 " « « II 4 9Q 

No.6Jor6" " " « 3 00 

No.6Jor6" 50 " " E " 2 60 

No. 6J or 6 « Manilla, double thick « F .' " 1 15 

No, 10 " " " " 2 85 

Nail " u u u 3 7^j 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



66 ANNUAIi REPORT. 

Desauen' writing flaid, quarts per doz. 5 50 

Arnold's " « 6 50 

Arnold's or Desaners' writing fluid, 4 oz " 90 

3J in. flat glass inks " 1 36 

Extra heavy government mucilage, quarts '^ 8 50 

5 oz. mucilage reservoirs, with brush " 3 10 

Faber's hex. lead pencils per gross 6 60 

Am. " : " 6 75 

Faber's office, round, rubber inserted *' 6 00 

Eureka pencil sharpeners perdoz. 56 

Faber's white rubber, first quality per lb. 1 00 

Faber's white rubber, second quality " 60 

OOOOJ Faber's rubber bands per gross 1 97 

0000} " " 123 

31 " " 56 

11 " " 15 

Esterbrook's No. 14 bank pen " 39 

GiUott's No. 303 pen " 90 

Faber's 2491 penholders, natural " 2 12 

Faber's2592 ' " « 2 40 

No. 2 stand bill files • perdoz. 1 10 

Heavy board clips, capsize.... " 5 95 

} inch McGills' paper fasteners per M. 2 12 

i " " 2,34 

14 inch flat rubber rulers ..perdoz. 3 30 

18 " " 6 00 

14 inch flexible « " 4 24 

2} inch fine spur green seals per doz. boxes 1 76 

" gold seals perdoz. " 3 00 

Rogers' erasers, 6 inch cocoa handle per doz. 3 60 

Swiss ruling pens, hinged, medium " 8 00 

All other supplies not enumerated herein will be furnished at 7 per cent. ad> 
vance on invoice or cost price. 



PROPOSAL OF METCALF & DIXON. 

FAFEB. 

Book Paper. ^ 

Sample marked N per lb. $ 13 

« R « 16 

" . Y « 16i 

Flat Cap, or Double Cap " 24J 

FoUo, (Faust) '. " 24} 

Folio, (MiUbury) « 22} 

Medium, (H) ^ " 27} 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SBCBBTART OF STATB. 67 

8TATI0NXBT. 

Legal Cap and Letter Paper, (Biverdale) per lb. $ 28} 

Legal Cap and Letter Paper, (YoBemite) * *^ 27 

L^Cal Cap and Letter Paper, (Live Oak) : " 30 

Packet Poet> (Riverdale) ** 33 

No. 10 Envelope*, white, 60 lb per M. 7 75 

No. 9 " " ** " 6 75 

No. 6 " " " " 4 20 

No. 6 " " 50 1b " 3 10 

No. 6 " Manilla, double thick " 125 

No. 10 " ** " " " 2 55 

No. 11 •* " " " " 3 50 

Desauers' writing fluid, quarts per doz. 5 50 

Arnold's chemical writing fluid, quarts " 6 90 

Desaaers* writing fluid, 4 oz " 1 60 

Arnold's writing fluid, 4 o« " 1 40 

3} inch flat glass inkstands '* 140 

Extra heavy gov't mucilage, quarts " 8 75 

Mucilage reservoirs, with brush, 5 oz " 3 50 

Faber's hex. lead pencils pergross 8 00 

A m« hex. lead pencils '' 6 75 

Faber's office round, rubber inserted '* 7 00 

Batchelder's pencil sharpeners per doz. 86 

Faber's rubber, white, 20 to lb ; per lb. 1 05 

Faber's ink and pencil erasers per doz. 1 10 

OOOOi Faber's or Goodyear's rubber bands pergross. 2 30 

OOOOJ ** " " " " ** 1 40 

No. 31 " " ". " ** " 70 

No. 11" " " " " " 2 00 

Esterbrook's ba^k pens, No. 14 '' 52 

GiUott's 303 pens " 1 10 

Faber's penholders, 2491, natural •* 2 00 

« " 2592, natural « 2 10 

No. 2 hand bill files 1 per doz. 1 00 

Heavy board dips, cap size '* 5 50 

Nide " •• - « 8 00 

} inch McGill's paper fasteners " 2 25 

finch « " " 1 « 2 35 

FUt 14 inch rubber rulers " 3 50 

Flat 18 inch « " « 5 00 

Flexible 14 inch rubber rulers " 4 50 

2} inch green seals per box. 1 75 

2i inch gold seals " 8 15 

Sogers' erasers, cocoa handle, 5 inch perdos. 4 50 

Swiss ruling pens, medinm, hinged ** 9 25 

Tea paper per ream. 8 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 ANNUAL BEFOBT. 

PBOPOSAL OF AVERILL. BUSSELL A CABPENTEB. 

PAPES. 

Book Paper. 

No. 1 sample A per lb. 12} 

Sample B " 12} 

Sample C " 11} 

Flat Paper. 

First quality per. lb. 24} 

Second quality " 21 

STATIOKKRT. 

First daas legal cap per ft. 26} 

Second " « 26 

First daas letter " 26} 

Second " " 26 

First daas packet post " 28} 

Second " " 27 

Envelopes, No. 10, white, 60 lb per M. 5 26 

" 9, " " 5 00 

6, " " 2 75 

" 6, 50 " 2 40 

" 6, Manilla, doublethick " 1 10 

10, " " 2 15 

11, " « 2 66 

Arnold's ink, quarts perdoz. 5 70 

" 4oz " 1 00 

Carter's ink, quarts " 6 26 

" 4oz " 1 65 

Flat glass inkstands, 3} inch " 1 35 

Garter's mudlage, quarts ** 7 75 

" 3 oz., with brush " 1 26 

Lead pencils, A. W. Faber's, hexagon per gross 6 60 

" Eagle, hexagon " 5 50 

" American, " " 4 75 

" Faber's office, rubber inserted " 6 10 

'^ Sharpeners, Batchelder's perdoz. 70 

Stationers' rubber, A. W. Faber, 1st quality per lb. 1 00 

" " 2nd " " 65 

Lik and pendl erasers, Faber's, small perdoz. 1 10 

« " mammoth « 1 75 

Bubber bands, A. W. Faber, 0000} in ..per gross 1 85 

" " OOOOJ in «< 120 

« « 31 " 55 

« « 11 « 13 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



&feCBBTABT Olf STAtti. 69 

Steel pens, festerbrook'B Bank, 14 ^pergroflB.$ 32 

« GiDott'B, 803 " 95 

Penholders, Faber's, 2491, " 1 56 * 

« 2692 « 1 76 

Bill files. No. 2, stand perdoE. 1 00 

Board dips, cap sue, cedar '< 8 00 

McGill's fasteners,} inch per M. 2 00 

} " " 2 26 

Bnbber ralers, flat, 14 inch ..per doE. 3 60 

" 18 inch *' 6 00 

" flexible, 14 inch " 4 60 

Seahs 2} inch, finespur gold " 1 25 

" " green « 76 

Billing pens, medium, hinged " 2 75 

ErasecB, steel, Rogers', 6 inch, cocoa ** 2 85 

Will supply any other stationery required during the year not enumerated 
above, at 16 per cenL above New York invoice prices. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC , 



RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS 



OF THB 



BOARD OF AUDITORS OF THE STATE TREASURY. 



State of Minnesota, \ 

Treasurer's Office, j 

St. Paul, Sept. 8, 1874. ) 

The Board of Auditors of the State Treasury met at the 
Capitol, under the provisions of the act entitled '^ An Act 
to amend Section 28 of Title 4 of Chapter 6, of the Gen- 
eral Statutes of Minnesota, relating to the duties of the 
State Treasurer and the care of the public funds," ap- 
proved March 9th, 1874. 

There were present — 

C. K. Davis, Governor. 

S. P. Jennison, Secretary of State. 

Geo. p. Wilson, Attorney General 

The Board was organized by the election of C. K. Davis 
as President, and S. P. Jennison as Secretary. 

The Board then proceeded, without previous notice to 
the Treasurer, to carefully examine and audit the accounts, 
books and vouchers of the Treasurer, and to count and as- 
certain the kinds, and description and amounts of funds 
in the Treasury. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SlSCBXrA&y OF StAT£. 



71 



The Treasurer was found charged with the following 
amounts belonging to the several funds named : 

Revenue Fund, < - - $ 40,247 82 

Interest Fund, 31,146 49 

Sinking Fund, - 506 57 

State Institutions Fund, - 115,923 16 

Permanent School Fund, - - - - 1,160 84 

General School Fund, .... 144,276 44 

Permanent University Fund, - - 1,806 08 

General University Fund, - 9,356 19 

Internal Improvement Fund, - - - 14,781 87 

Internal Improvement Land Fund, - 1,346 83 

Inebriate Asylum Fund, - - . - 678 13 

R. R Bonds Interest, . . . - 1,920 43 

Total, $363,148 43 

The public money, to the amount above named, was 
found to be deposited as follows : 

To the credit of the State Treasurer — 

With the First National Bank of St. Paul, $184,241 82 
With the Second National Bank of St. Paul, 91,055 73 
With the Merchants Nat'n'l Bank of St. Paul, 87,127 95 
With P. M. Meyers & Co., of New York, 663 02 

Cash in Treasurer's vault, - . . 69 91 

Total, $363,148 43 

The Treasurer had received advance payments 
from several counties, amounting to - 6,411 93 

And there were also remaining in his hands, to 
meet certain certificates issued by Mr. Seeger, 16 66 

Total, f6,428 69 

These sums were evidenced to the Board by certificates of 
deposit in the — 

First National Bank of St. Paul, - $1,800 00 

First National Bank of St. Paul, 200 00 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 ANNUAL BfiPOBTi 

Second National Bank of St. Paul, - - 3,702 71 
Cash, 725 88 



Total, $6,428 59 

The bonds belonging to the Permanent School Fund 
were carefully examined, as follows : 

Minnesota 7 per cents., issue of 1867, - $100,000 00 

Minnesota 7 per cents., issue of 1868, - - 100,000 00 

Minnesota 7 per cents., issue of 1869, - 50,000 00 

Minnesota 7 per cents., issue of 1873, - 215,000 00 

U. S. 6 per cents., of 1881, - - - 10,000 00 

U. S. 5-20S, 77,800 00 

U. S. 6 per cents., currency, - - - 158,000 00 

Missouri State 6 per cents., - - . . 46,000 00 



Total, $756,800 00 

The Permanent University Fund owned the following 
bonds, examined as follows : 

Minnesota 7 per cents., of 1873, - $15,000 00 

Missouri 6 per cents., . . . . 12,000 00 

U. S. 6 per cents., currency, - - 5,000 00 

Total, $32,000 00 

9 

The Treasurer held D. S. 6 per cent, currency bonds, 
amounting to $10,000.00, belonging to the Inebriate Asy- 
lum Fund. Also, $60,000.00 Missouri Consols, belonging 
to the Sinking Fund, and $2,000.00 in U. S. 6 per cent 
currency bonds, the acccumulation of the Internal Im- 
provement Land Fund. 

On motion, the Board adjourned, to meet at the call of 
the President. 

CUSHMAN K,, DAVIS, Governor, 

S. p. Jbwnison, Secretary of State, 

Secretary of the Board. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8ECBSTART OF STATE. 



73 



SCHEDULE OF VOTES 

Cast at the General E lection j November 3, 1874, upon 
propositions to change County Lines* 



Olgect of Law. 



To esUblish Cook Ck>aDt7. 
Change of line.. 



To establiah Seward Connty 



Change of line.. 



Counties. 



Lake 

Dakota. 

Ramsey 

Lac qui Parle 

Lincoln 

Yellow Medicine. 

Steams 

Todd 



For. 


Against. 


24 





1721 
4700 


1188 
53 


84"" 


176 

53 

245 


741 
220 


260 
17 



Carried. 
Carried. 

Lost 

Carried. 



SCHEDULE OF VOTES 

Cast at the General Election^ November 3, 1874, upon 
propositions to change County Seats. 



Connty, 

Houston 

Le Saenr 

Sibley.. 

Watonwan.. 

Yellow Medicine. 



For. 



1,366 

1,281 

291 

886 

385 



Against. 



1,468 

1,379 

1,043 

421 

194 



10 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



[SZlOUTIYB DOOUMSNT NO. 8.] 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF TBB 



AuDiTOE OF State 



TO THB 



LEGISLATURE OF MINNESOTA, 



VOm THX 



FISCAL TEAB ENDING NOYEMBEB 80, 1874. 



TRAHBMITTED TO THK LBQISLATURK OF THS SXYlBNTBEIfTn ANNUAL 
8B86ION, 1875. 



SAINT PATTLi 

ST. PAUL PRESS COMPANY. 

1875. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



State of Minnesota, 
Auditob's Office, 

St. Paul, Jan. 7th, 1875 



i 



Son. Oushman K. Davis^ 

Oavemor of Minnesota: 



Sib : I have the honor to submit for transmittal to the 
Legislature, the following report of the transactions of this 
department during the last fiscal year • 
Very respectfully, 
ORLEN P. WHITCOMB, 
. Auditor of State and ex-officio 

(Jommissioner of State Land Office. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



KEP O RT. 



A 8UMMABT OF THE RECEIPTS AND DISBUBSEMENTS OF THE 
• STATE TBEASUBT BURIKG THE FISCAL TEAB ENDING 

NOYBMBEB 80, 1874. 

BBOBIPTS* 

There was remaining io the Treasury, December 1, 1873, 
belonging to the following funds : 

General Revenue Fund, - $66,976 66 

State Institutions Fund-, - 50,122 95 

Interest Fund, - - 30,045 97 
Sinking Fund, ... 32,463 70 

Apportioned School Fund, - 7,822 60 

Permanent School Fund, - 5,416 46 

Current School Fund, - 10,125 29 

Permanent University Fund, - 240 08 

Current University Fund, - 1,892 22 

Internal Improvement Fund, - 8,167 61 
Internal Improvement Land Fund, 2,578 43 

Interest on Railroad Bonds, - 1 ,434 71 

Inebriate Asylum Fund, - 1,111 67 



$218,398 35 



The following sums were received during the 

year, on account of — 
State Taxes, - - $575,164 65 

Taxes on gross receipts of Rail- 

road Companies, - - 129,907 03 



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ANNUAL BBFOBT. 



Taxes on gross receipts of In- 




surance (Companies 9 


25,505 62 


Fees of Insurance Companies, - 


4,345 83 


Taxes of Telegraph Companies, 


678 20 


Interest on State Deposits, - 


9,270 29 


Labor of State Prison Convicts, 


9,684 79 


Board of United States Convicts, 


6,772 68 


Sales of State Bonds, 


20,000 OO 


Bedemption of Miss. State Bond, 


1,000 00 


Sales of School Lands, 


63,196 92 


Sales of Pine on School Lands, - 


23,428 53 


Sales of University Lands, - 


4,457 85 


Sales of Pineon University Lands, 


6,613 01 


Interest on Permanent School 




Fund, 


188,031 58 


Interest on School Land Stump- 




age accounts, 


1,295 16 


Sales of Grass on School Lands, 


500 10 


Interest on Permanent Universi- 




ty Fund, - - - 


10,555 61 


Interest on University Stumpage 




accounts, . • • 


968 92 


Sales of Internal Improvement 




Lands, ... 


122 89 


Interest on Internal Improvement 




Land Fund, 


893 12 


Inebriate Asylum Fund, 


1,875 18 


Interest on Inebriate Asy'm Fund 


600 00 


Internal Improvement Fund, 


17,413 61 


Interest on Bonus Railroad Bonds 


10,925 36 


Miscellaneous, - - • 


162 09 




ft 1 io Ota RA 







Total, .... 11,881,210 87 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



▲UDITOB OV STATE. O 

DISBUBBEMENTS. 

The following sums were paid out daring the 

year» on accoant of — 
Xiegislative Expenses, • - $69»310 45 

Extra Session of Senate, 1873, 8,659 25 

Executive Expenses, - 48,564 97 

Judicial Expenses, - - 45,694 86 

Public Printing, - . 49,866 61 

Support of State Prison, - 34,857 48 

Support of Reform School, - 30,000 00 

Support of Soldiers' Orphans, - 20,017 62 
Support of Deaf, Dumb and Blind 26,000 00 
Support of Hospital for Insane, - 84,500 00 
Support of Normal Schools, 26,250 00 

Support of State University, - 80,000 00 
State Board of Health, (two years' 

expenses,) ... 2,769 17 
Erection of Public Buildings, 188,099 05 
Interest on State Bonds, * 31,255 00 

Apportioned School Fund, - 194,654 10 

Purchase of Bonds for Invested 

Funds, - . - 168,757 47 

Appropriations from In. Im.Fund, 14,518 07 
Interest Coupons, Bonus Railroad 

Bonds, - - - 10,562 50 

Frontier Bielief, - - - 31,970 25 

Supportof Agricultural Societies, 8,000 00 
Geological Survey, - • 2,000 00 

Teachers' Institutes and Training 

Schools, . . . 2,710 73 

Support of State Hist'cal Society, 2,980 54 
Sheriffs Expeuses, - - 3,390 05 

Fuel and Lights, - • 4,166 84 

Personal Appropriations, - , 2,705 29 
Miscellaneous Appropriations, - 16,804 66 

$1,148,059 96 



Balance in Treasury, Nov. 30» 1874, $183^150 91 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



6 ANNUAL BSFOBT* 



To the crecKt of the following : 


Funds: 


General Revenue Fund, 


$30,416 S2 


State luBtitutions Fund, 


68,616 12 


Interest Fund» - . - 


40,930 63 


Sinking Fund, 


5,399 23 


Apportioned School Fund, 


5,432 74 


Permanent School Fund, - 


6.646 91 


Current School Fund, - 


7,362 88 


Permanent University Fund, 


4,370 44 


Current University Fund, 


2,328 38 


Internal Improvement Fund, 


10,768 15 


Internal Improvement Land 




Fund, - - - - 


1,326 44 


Interest on Railroad Bonds, 


1,797 57 


Inebriate Asylum Fund, 


754 80 




*10Q 1 KA A« 







WARRANTS DRAWN ON THE TREASURY. 

Amount of Auditor's Warrants outstanding 

December 1, 1873, ... $12,229 68 

Amount of Auditor's Warrants issued during 
the year, .... 1,143,833 96 



$1,156,063 64 
Amount of Auditor's Warrants redeemed 
during the year, ... -$1,148,05996 



Amount of Auditor's Warrants outstanding 
November 30, 1874, ... $8,00368 



LEOISLATiyE APFROFRIATIONS. 

Amount of Appropriations un- 

expended Dec. 1, 1873,* - $181,549 78 
Am'tof Appropriations of 1874, 1,091,001 25 

$1,272,551 0» 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUBITOB OF 8TATB. 7 

Amount of Appropriations of 
former years canceled, - 31,188 64 

Amount of Appropriations ex- 
pended during the year, 1,143,888 96 

1,174,972 60 



Amount of Appropriations unex- 
pended November 80, 1874, $97,578 48 

STATE INBEBTBDNESS. 

Amount of the recognized Bond- 
ed State Debt, Dec. 1, 1873, $460,000 00 

Amount of State Bonds issued 
during the year - - 20,000 00 



Total amount of regular State 

Debt, November 30, 1874, - $480,000 00 

Consisting of the following loans 

authorized for erection of build- 
ings for State Institutions : 
Loan of 1867, 7 per cent, bonds 

due in 1877, - . - $100,000 00 

Loan of 1868, 7 per cent, bonds 

due in 1878, - - 100,000 00 

Loan of 1869« 7 per cent, bonds 

due in 1879, - - 50,000 00 

Loan of 1873, 7 per cent, bonds 

due in 1888, - - 280,000 00 

$480,000 00 



STATEMENT OF BEVENUE FBOM TAXES. 

Amount of Taxc<) levied for State 

purposes on list of 1873, - $561,480 12 

Divided as follows : 

General Bevenue, - - $364,962 09 

Support of State Int^titutions, - 112,296 02 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8 . AKNUAL BBPOBT. 

Interest on State Debt, - 56,148 01 

Sinking Fund, - - 28,074 00 

Amount of Delinquent State Taxes 
due December 1, 1878, - $461,461 18 



$1,022,941 30 
Amount of State Taxes collected 

during the year - - $575,164 65 

Amount of Siate Taxes abated and 

canceled during the year, 23,747 38 

$598,912 03 



Am't of Delinquent State Tax, Nov, 30, 1874, $424,029 27 



STATEMENT OF BECEIFTS AND DISBURSEMENTS BY FUNDS. 
GENEBAL EBTENUE FUND. 

Beceipts. 

Amount in the Treasury, December 1, 1873, $66,976 66 

Beceiyed during the year, on account of — 
State Taxes, - - - $373,857 34 

Rent of Shops and State Prison 

Labor, - - - 

Board of United States Convicts, 
Fees from Insurance Companies, 
Interest on State Deposit, 
Sales of State Bonds , 
Sale of Stoves and Desk, 
Sales of Special Laws, 
Legislative Stationery returned, - 
Unexpended bal. of Belief Fund, 
Transfer from Interest Fund 



Total, 



9,634 79 


6,772 68 


4,345 33 


9,270 29 


20,000 00 


30 00 


46 50 


10 00 


75 59 


15,876 78 

........... -i/1^0410 ^n 




$506,395 96 


Digitized by (jOOg IC 



AUDITOB Oir STATJS. 9 

Disbursements. 

Paid out daring the year, on aooouat of— 
Legislatiye Expenses, - - $69,310 45 

Extra Session of Senate. 1873, 3,659 25 

Executive Expenses, - 48,564 97 

Judicial Expenses, - - 45,694 86 

Public Printing, - - 49,366 61 

Repairs and Furnishing Capitol, 9,249 70 

University Building, - - 61,500 00 

St.CIoud Normal School Building, 20,000 00 

Refo.rm School Building, r 5,500 00 

State Prison Building, - . 5,849 35 
Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute 

Building, - - - 9,000 00 

Hospital for Insane Building, 77,000 00 

Frontier Belief, - -^ - 31,970 25 

Agricultural Societies, - 3,000 00 
Teachers' Institutes and Training 

, Schools - - • 2,710 73 

State Historical Society, - 2,980 54 

Sheriff's Expenses, - * - 3,390 05 

State Board of Health, - 2,769 17 

Geological Survey, - - 2,000 00 

Fuel and Lights, - - 4,166 84 

Personal Appropriations, - 2,705 29 

Miscellaneous Appropriations, 15,581 28 



$475,979 34 



Balance in the Treasury November 30, 1874, $30,416 62 



STATE INStit utxONS FUND. 

Receipts. 



Amount in the Treasury, December 1, 1873, $50,122 95 
Becived during the year, on account of — 

State Taxes, - - * tJL15,032 42 

2 

DigitiEed -by Google 



10 ANNUAL BB2POBT. 

Taxes from Bailroad Companies, 129,907 03 
Taxes from Insurance Ciompanies, 25,505 62 
Taxes from Telegraph Companies, 673 20 

$271,118 27 



Total, .... $321,241 22 



DisbursemerUs. 

Paid out during the year, on account of — 
Support of State University, - $19,000 00 
Support of Winona Normal School 11,000 00 
Support of Mankato Normal 

School,- - . . 8,250 00 

Support of St. Cloud Normal 

School, . - - 7,000 00 

Support of State Reform School, - 30,000 00 
Support of State Prison, - 34,857 48 

Support of Soldiers' Orphans, - 20,017 62 
Support of Deaf, Dumb and Bli|i4, 26,000 00 
Support of Hospital for Insane, - 84,500 00 
Reimbursement of Permanent Uni- 
versity Fund, ... 12,000 00 

$252,625 10 



Balance in the Treasury November 30, 1874, $68,616 12 



STATE IKTBBBST FUND. 

Receipts. 

Amount in the Treasury December 1, 1873, $30,045 97 

Received during the year, on account of — 
State Taxes, ..... 57,516 44 

Total, . - . $87,562 41 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB DIP STATE. 11 

Disbursements. 



Paid out daring the year, on account of — 
Interest on State Loans January 1, 

1874, ... - $14,700 00 

Interest on State Loans, July 1, 

1874, - - - 16,555 00 

Transfer to General Bevenue 

Fund, .... 15,876 78 

$46,631 79 



Balance in the Treasury, November 30, 1874, $40,930 



SINKING FUND* 

Jteoeipts. 

Amount in the Treasury December 1, 1873, $32,463 70 

Beoeiyed daring the year, on account of — 
Stete Taxes, 28,758 45 



Total, .... $61,222 15 

Disbursements. 

Paid out during the year, on account of — 
Purchase of Missouri State Bonds, - - $55,822 92 



Balance in the Treasury November 30, 1874, $5«399 2» 



FBBHANENT SCHOOL FUND. 

Beceipts. 

Amount in the Treasury December 1, 1873, $5,416 4S 

Beceiyed during the year, on account of — 
Sales of Lands for former years, - $48,818 80 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



12 AIOniAL BBPOBT. 

Sales of Lands for 

1874, - . $21,612 06 

Less unpaid D'fts on 

Ck). Treasurers, - 6,533 94 15,078 12 
Sales of Pine Timber, - - 23,428 53 

Bedemption of Missouri State 

Bonds, - - - - 1,000 00 

$87,625 46 



Total, - - , - - - $93,041 91 

Di&bursemenis. 

Paid out during the year, on account of — 
Purchase of Minn. State Bonds, - $17,000 00 
Purchase of Missouri State Bonds, 69,395 00 



$86,395 00 



Balance in the Treasury November 30, 1874, $6«646 91 



OUBRENT SCHOOL FCTin>. 

Beceipts. 

\ 
Amount in the Treasury December 1, 1873, $10,125 29 

Beceiyed during the year, on account of — 
Interest on Land Ciontraots, - $120,792 50 
Interest on Minn. State Bonds, 30,505 83 
Interest on Missouri State Bonds, 9,537 95 
Interest on U. S. Bonds, - 26,568 00 

Premium on Otold Coupons - 537 30 

Interest on Stumpage accounts, 1,295 16 

Sales of Qrass on State Lands, - 500 10 

$189,826 84 

Total, .... $199,952 13 



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AUBirOB OF STATB. ' 13 

DiAursemetUs. 

Paid out during the year, on aocount of — 
March Apportionment to Counties, $49,047 00 
October Apportionment to Coun- 
ties, .... 148,217 24 
Expenses and accrued interest on 

Bonds piurchased, - - 325 01 



$192,589 25 



Balance in the Treasury, November 80, 1874, $7,362 88 

PEBHANBNT UNIYBBSITr FUND. 

BeceijpU. 

Amount in the Treasury December 1, 1873, $240 08 

Beceiyed during the year, on account of— 

Appropriation from State Institu- 
tions Fund, ... $12,000 00 

Sales of Agricultural 
College Land 1874, $4,719 85 

Less unpaid DYts on ^ 

Co. Treasurers, - 1,827 50 2,892 35 

Sales of Pine Timber on Univeisi- 
ty Lands, ... 6,613 01 

Sales of Land former years, - 1,565 00 

$23,070 36 



Total, $28,310 44 

Disbursements. 

Paid out duriug the year, on account of — 
Purchase of Minnesota State Bonds, $3,000 00 
Purchase of Missouri State Bonds, 18,940 00 

$21,940 00 



Balance in the Treasury November 80, 1874, $1,870 44 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



u 



ANNUAL BBPOBT. 



OUBBENT UmyEBSITr FUND. 



Receipts. 

Amount in the Treasury, December I, 1874, 
'Beceiyed during the year, on account ot — 

Appropriation from State Institu- 
tions Fund, - . . $19,000 00 

Interest on Land Contracts, - 

Interest on Minnesota State Bonds, 

Interest on U. S. Bonds, 

Interest on Stumpage accounts, 



Total, - 



$1,892 22 



9,596 44 




659 17 


. 


800 00 




968 92 






$30,524 53 




. 


$32,416 75 



Disbursements. 

Paid out during the year, on account of Orders 

of the Board of Begents — 

January 7, 1874, ^ - • $2,000 00 

March 18, •• • . - 3,000 00 

March 28, ' •• - - - 3,000 00 

May 4, " - - iJ,000 00 

June 1, *« - - - 3,000 00 

June 22, •• - • 3,000 00 

Oct. 16, «« . - - 3,000 00 

Oct 30, " - - 3,000 00 

Nov. 12, « - - - 4,000 00 

Nov. 16, " - - 1,000 00 
Expenses and accrued interest on 

Bonds purchased, - - 88 37 



$28,088 37 



Balance in the Treasury, November 30, 1873, $4,328 38 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB.OIP STATB. 15 

. INTEBNAL IMFBOYSMENT FUND. 

Receipts. 

Amount in the Treasury, December 1, 1878, $8,167 61 

Beceiyed during the year, on account of — 
Five per cent, on Sales of Public Lands, - 17,413 61 



Total, $25,581 22 

ZHsbursemetUa. 

Paid out during the year^ on account of — 

Boad and Bridges, Sibley County, $300 00 

Chippewa Biver Bridge, Swift 

County, . - - 500 00 

Bed Biver Bridge, Wilkin County, 2,000 00 

Hawk Creek Bridge, Benville Co., 800 00 

B oad from Duluth to Pigeon Biver, 1 ,4 13 07 

St. Francis Biver Bridge, Sher- 
burne County, 

Minnesota Biver Bridge, Minnesota 
Falls, - - - . 

Outlet East Chain Lake Bridge, 
Martin County, 

Zumbro Biver Bridge, Olmsted 
County, - - - - 

Pine Creek Bridge, Morrison Co., 

Des Moines Biver Bridge, Jackson 
County, ... 

Minnesota Biver Bridge, Swift 
County, - - - - 

State Boad, Bush City to Cam- 
bridge, Chisago County, 

State Boad, Bush City to Cam- 
bridge, Isanti County, 

St. Louis Biver Bridge, Carlton 
County, 



400 00 




800 00 




500 00 




2,000 00 




500 00 




600 00 




1,000 00 




800 00 




50 00 




1,000 00 




Digitized b 


/Google 



16 AKiniAL BBPOBT. 



Three Mile Creek Bridge, Lyon 




County, ... 


150 00 


Wing Biver Bridge and Road, Ot- 




ter Tail County, 


700 00 


Crow River Bridge, Meeker 




County, 


500 00 


Chippewa River Bridge, Pope 




County, ... 


800 00 


Beaver Creek Bridge, Renville 




County, - - - 


500 00 



$14,813 07 
Balance in the Treasury, November 30, 1874, $10,768 15 



INTERNAL IMFBOYEBIENT LAND FUND. 

Receipts. 

Amount in the Treasury, December 1, 1873, $2,578 43 

Received during the year, on account of — 
Sales of Land, 1874, $4,193 62 1 
Less unpaid Drafts on > 

County Treasurers, 4,193 62 ) 
Interest on Land Contracts, - $833 12 

Interest on United States Bonds, 60 00 

Sales of Land, 1873, - - 122 39 



$1,015 51 



Total, $3,593 94 

Didmraements. 

Paid out during the year, on account of — 
Purchase of United States Bonds, - - $2,267 50 



Balance in the Treasury, November 30, 1874, $1,326 44 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AtJDrrOB OF STATE. 17 

n^TEBEST ON J^AILROAD BONDS. 

jRecetpts. 

Amount in the Treasury December 1, 1873, $1,434 71 

Keceived duriug the year, on aocount of — 
Taxes from Faribault County, $2,802 61 

Taxes from Fillmore County, 2,578 47 

Taxes from Freeborn County, 3,533 44 

Taxes from Mower County, 2,010 84 



$10,925 36 



ToUl, - • . - $12,360 07 

Disbursements. 

Paid out during the year, on account of — 

Appropriation to Carver Co. - $62 50 
Coupons redeemed, Faribault 

Co. . - - . 3,220 00 
Coupons redeemed, Fillmore 

Co. - - " . 2,940 00 

Coupons redeemed, Freeborn Co., 2,730 00 

Coupons redeemed, Mower Co. - 1,610 00 



$10,562 50 



Balance in the Treasury November 30, 1874, $1,797 57 



INEBBIATE ASYLUM FUND. 

Receipts. 

Amount in the Treasury December 1, 1873, - $1,111 67 

Received during the year, on account of — 
Licenses issued in different coun • 

ties, • - - $1,375 18 

Intereet on U« 8. Bonds, * 600 00 



$1,975 18 



ToUl, ... - $3,086 85 

3 



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18 AirKUAL BSPOBT. 

IHsbur9emenis. 

Paid out during the year, on aooount of — 
Purchase of U. S. Bouds, ... $2,382 0^ 



Balance in the Treasury November 30, 1874, $754 80 



STATBBIBNT SHOWING THE ACCUMULATIONS AND INVEST^ 
MENT8 OF THE SEVERAL INVESTED FUNDS. 



PERMANENT SCHOOL FOND. 

Accumulations. 

Sales of Land, - - - ^ - - $2,759,556 8» 
Am'ts paid on forfeitures, right-of-way, etc., 6,746 34 

Sales of Timber, 239,41120 

Profits on sales ot bonds in 1869 and 1874, 24,412 6& 



Total, . . $3,080,127 09 

Investments. 

$ 77,S00 U. S. 5-20S at par $ 77,800 00 

10,000 U. S.68 0f 1881, at<^1.05 .' 10,500 00 

100,000 Minn. 7s of 1867, at par 100,000 00 

100,000 Minn. 7s of 1868, at par 100,000 00 

50,000 Minn. 78 of 1869, at par 50,000 00 

215,000 Minn. 78 of 1878, at par 216,000 Oa 

146,000 U. S. 6s (currency) at 99ic 143,731 25 

140,000 U. S. 6s (currency) at $1.06ic 149,460 00 

10,000 U. S. 68 (currency) at $i.06|c 10,687 60 

26.000 U. S. 68 (currency) at $1.07ic 26,875 00 

10,000 U. S. 68 (currency) at $1.09ic 10,925 00 

25,000 U. S. 68 (currency) at 91.09|c 27,281 25 

14,000 Missouri 6s at 92ic 12,985 00 

28,000 Missouri 6s at 98c 26,040 00 



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AUDITOB OF STATE. 19 

57,000 Missouri 68 at 9dic 58,295 00 

24,000 Missouri 6s at 98ic 22,500 00 

49,000 Missouri 6s at 95c ' 46,550 00 

46,000 Missouri 6s at 92ic 42,550 00 

14,000 Missouri 6s at 98c 18,720 00 

#1,189,800 #1,189,840 00 

Land contracts bearing 7 per cent., ... 1,888,640 18 

Cash in Treasury, ...... 6,646 91 



$8,080,127 09 



PERMANENT UNIVERSITY FUND. 

Accumulations, 

« 

Sales of Land, - - - $191,600 52 

Amount paid on forfeitares, - - 894 00 

Sales of pine timber, - - $59,320 29 1 
Less amount transferred to cur- > 

rent university fund, 52,707 27 ) 6,613 01 

Appropriation from State Institutions fund 
by Chapter 124, General Laws of 1874, 
lor partial re-imbursement of above 
amount transferred to current fund, 12,000 00 



$211,107 53 
Invesimenta. 

I 5,000 U. S. Bonds (carrency) 6s at 91.091c $ 5,<62 50 

15,000 Minnesota 7s of 1878, at par ^... 15,000 00 

12,000 Missonr) 6sat92ic 11,100 00 

8,000 Missoari6sat98c ; 7,840 00 

$40,000 (89,402 50 

Land contract bearing 7 per cent., - - $161,884 60 

Cash in Treasury, - - - - - - 1 870 44 

ToUl productive ftind, - ~ . - $202,607 68 

Experimental Farm, .... - 8,500 00 



6211,107 58 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

INTBRNAL IMPBOYEBOSNT LAND FUND. 

* AccumtUations. 

Sales of land, $38,972 42 

Interest on bonds, .... 60 00 



$39,032 42 
Investments. 

$2,000 U. S. bonds (currency) 68 at $L18ic., $2,267 50 
Due upon lands including $4,193 62 

Drafts on County Treasurers unpaid, - 35,438 48 

vCash in the Treasury, - - - 1,326 44 



$39,032 42 



INEBRIATE ASYLUM FUND. 

Accumulations. 

Licenses issued in various counties, - - $12,722 73 
Interest on U. S, bonds, - . - 600 00 



$13,322 73 



Investments. 

$11,000 U. S. bonds (currency), - - $12,567 98 
Cash in Treasury, - - - - 754 80 



$13,322 78 



ESTIMATED STATE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOB 
THE YEAB IS75. 

The assessed valuation of taxable property in the State 
amounts to $217,427,211, an increase over the assessment 
of last year of $105,129,086. 



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AUBITOK or STATE. 2 1 

The State tax for (he year 1874 is levied upon this 
amount and distributed as follows : 

For General Revenue, .... $329,789 89 
For support of State Institutions, - 101,473 til 

For interest on State Debt, - • - 50,736 91 

For Sinking Fund, 25,868 46 



ToUl, . - . $507,369,07 



The receipts and disbursements of ihe State Treasury 
during the ensuing year may be estimated as follows : 



FOB GEKEBAL BBYUNUE. 

Receipts. 

From current and delinquent taxes, - $373,750 00 

From State Prison labor and other sources, 25,000 00 

Transfer from Interest Fund, ... 24,130 68 

' Balance in Treasury, .... 30,41662 



4^ 


$453,297 25 


Disburaemetits. 




Legislative Expenses, - - $70,000 00 
Executive, - - - 50,780 00 
Judicial, - - - - 46,300 00 
Public Printing, - - 45,600 00 
Deficiencies, ... 22,500 00 
Unexpended Appropriations, 48,357 50 
Outstanding Auditor's Warrants, 8.003 68 
Miscellaneous Appropriations, 33,000 00 


$324,541 18 




Am't uf surplus Revenue Fund estimated. 


$128,756 07 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 

i 



22 AKKUAL BBPOBT. 

8TAT£ INSTITUTIONS FUND. 

BeceipCa. 

From Taxes, ... 

From Railroads, 

From Insurance Companies, 

From Telegraph, Express and Car. Co's, 

Balance in Treasury, 



♦115,000 00 

120.000 00 

25,000 00 

5,000 00 

- 68,616 12 

$333,616 12 



iJuburaemenis. 

For Insurance Hospital, - $87,500 00 
For State Prison, - - 40,000 00 

For Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute, 26,000 00 



For Soldier's Orphans 
For State Reform School, 
For Normal Schools, 
For State University, 



18,000 00 
27,000 00 
32,500 00 
81,000 00 



$262,000 00 



Excess Receipts over disbursements estimated, $71,616,12 



INTEREST FUND. 

Receipta. 



From Taxes, 
Balance in Treasury, 



DUbursemerUa. 

For Interest on State Debt, $83,600 00 

Transfer of January 1, 1875, 24,133 63 



$57,500 00 
40,133 63 

$97,633 63 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OP STATS. 23 



Amount necessary to meet interest 

payment, January ], 1876« 16,800 00 



74,533 63 



Excess of receipts subject to trans- 
fer January 1, 1876, estimated, • - $S3,100 00 



SINKING FUND. 




# 

Beceipis. 




From Taxes, - - . 
Interest on Invested Fund, 
Balance in Treasury, 


- $28,750 00 

8,600 00 ^ 
6,899 28 



Subject to Investment, estimated, - $87,749 28 



For detailed statement of estimated expenses, see Ap- 
pendix, statement B. 

The present Legislature is required by law to determine 
the amount of State tax for the year 1875. I estimate the 
necessary amount at $450,000. This includes the same 
amounts levied last year for general revenue, interest, and 
sinking fund, with a reduction of $50,000, or one-half of the 
ufrual amount for support of State Institutions. This 
-decrease is rendered possible by the increased receipts from 
delinquent taxes and Railroad and Insurance Companies. 

The amount of State taxes collected during the past year, 
exceed^ the collections of any tormer year by more than 
^100,000, being $13,705.32 more than the total amount of 
State tax levied for 1873. 

The receipts from railroad and insurance companies have 
also increased moie than twenty- five per cent, over last 
year, and equal in* amount more than one- half of the dis- 
bursements of the State Institutions Fund. This source of 
revenue, at the probable annual increase, will be sufficient 
within five or six years to defray all the ordinary expenses 
of the State government. The payments from the general 

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24 ANNUAL RBPOaT. 

revenue fund on account of ordinary expenses, are some- 
what in excess of the previous year, caused in part by 
increased legislative expenses, an increase of the numbei of^ 
Bailroad Commissioners, the creation of an additional ju- 
dicial district, and the deficiencies of 1873. TUe balance^ 
of $30,416.95 to the credit of this fund, will be increased 
after the first of January by the transfer of $24,133.63 from* 
the State Interest Fund, being the balance that will remain 
atter the payment of the interest due January first on the 
8tate indebtedness. Before anything can be realized fromi 
current collections of taxes for this fund, at least $100,000 
will be required to meet the ordinary legislative, judicial, 
and executive expenses, which may be provided for by the 
temporary use of money belonging to the State Institutions 
Fund, which has a balance on hand probably suflGicient to 
afford the necessary accommodation to the revenue fond, 
and at the same time meet the drafts for the monthly ex- 
penses of the different institutions until it can be reimbursed 
from collections of taxes. 

It may be found advantageous to use the large balance 
carried by the Institutions Fund in this way hereafter, as it 
is not probable that the General Revenue Fund will ever 
have an amount on hand sufficient to pay all the expenses ot 
the first quarter of the year, including as they do the large 
annual item of legislative expenses. 

In view of the probable receipts from taxes hereafter, and 
of the small amount accruing to the Sinking Fund, the an- 
nual excess of the Interest Fund collections, after this year, 
should be transferred to the Sinking Fund, to provide for 
the redemption of the bonds issued under the different State 
loans as ihey become due. 

It may be better to consolidate the two funds and invest 
for the Sinking Fund all that remains after paying the Stato^ 
interest each year. 

The accumulations of the Sinking Fund for the last two 
years were invested in bonds to the amount of $60,000» 
which, with the balance of $5,000 remaining in the Treaa- 



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AUDITOR OF STATE. 25 

ury, offset so muoh of the State debt, in effect reducing it to 
$415,000. 

The sales of school lands and collections on pine stump- 
age accounts, during the year* have increased the Perma- 
nent School Fund to over $3,000,000, making it the fourth 
fund in magnitude in the Union, the largest fund being that 
of Indiana, which aggregates over $8,500,000. The Illi- 
nois fund, which exceeds $6,250,000, ranks next, and the 
Iowa fund, exceeding $3,256,000, stands third on the list^ 
while the funds of Minnesota and Michigan are very nearly 
equal. The fund of this State will ultimately amount to* 
$10,000,000. ^ 

The annual increase of the Current School Fund which 
is derived from the income of the permanent fund only about 
equals the ratio of increase of persons in the State entitled 
to share in its distribution and it is not probable that it wil^ 
ever much exceed the present average yearly rate of about 
one dollar per scholar, as the increase of population will 
without doubt keep pace with the increase ot the fund. 

The State Constitution provides for distributing this fund 
to the different townships throughout the State, in propor- 
tion to the number of scholars in each township between 
the ages ot five and twenty^one years, while the general school 
law requires the apportionment of this mouey among the 
school districts of each county, in proportion to the number 
ol persons in the several districts between the ages of five 
and twenty-one y^ears. Under this provision, which i& 
clearly not in accordance with the constitutional require* 
ment, thousands ot persons are annually enrolled to in^ 
crease the basis of apportionment, who are not scholars or 
pupils in the schools. A strict compliance with the intent 
of the constitution would be fair and equitable, and would 
probably encourage the general patf onage and actual attend- 
ance of the public schools. 

The JPermnnent University Fund has been augmented 

$42,475.78 during the year. A suggestion in the last 

report of this department led to the passage of a law for 

the re-imbursement of this fund, for the amount of the 

4 

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^ ANNUAL BBPORT. . 

proceeds of pine stumpage previously diverted from the 
Permanent to the Current University Fund, under which 
$12»000 per year is transferred from the State Institutions 
Fund to the Permanent University Fund, which, with the 
tmnual proceeds from sales of land and pine stumpage, will 
add to it $50,000 per year. The amounts of Agricultural 
College Lands, and University Lands proper, coustituting 
the basis of this fund, are shown in the tabulated statements 
of the Land Department. The sale ot all of these lands 
and the conversion of every available resource, may ulti- 
mately increase this fund to $1,000,000. 

The Current University Fund from \f hich the expenses 
of the University are defrayed, also received an annual ap- 
propriation of $19,000 from the State Institutions Fund, 
which with the regular receipts from interest on the Perma- 
nent University Fund, will secure a sufficient income for the 
support of this institution to insure its future prosper- 
ity and assist in giving it a position above all other 
educational institutions in the State, a rank to which it is 
entitled as the supplement, and crowning glory of our public 
school system. 

The balance of $10,768.15 to the credit ot the Internal 
Improvement Fund will be reduced to $5,481. 2S by the 
payment of outstanding appropriations which are being 
claimed from time to time upon completion of the bridges 
designated in the several appropriations. This fund consists 
of '< five per centum oi the net proceeds lof sales of all pub- 
lic lands lying within the State'' which is annually paid by 
the general government for the purpose of making public 
roads and internal improvements as the legislature shall 
direct according to the provisions of the enabling act, 
which were that '< the State should not interfere with the 
primar}' disposal of the soil within the same by the United 
States, or with ^ny regulations Congress may dnd necessary 
for securing the title in said soil to bona fide purchasers 
thereof; and that no tax be imposed on lands belonging to 
the United States, and that in no case shaU non-resident 
proprietors be taxed higher than residents.** This extract, 

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AUDITOR OF STATE. 27 

though somewhat out of place in this connection, is intro- 
duced here for the purpose of showing upon what considera- 
tion we receive this liberal donation, and to call the attention 
of county boards of equalization and the especial attention 
of assessors throughout the State to the last clause, which 
if common report is true, is in many cases flagrantly 
violated* 

The right of non-residents to purchase and hold lands 
within our borders is here recognized ,by the general govern- 
ment, and protection from unequal taxation guarantied them, 
and however objectionable such investments may be to resi- 
dent owners these non*resident lands cannot be assessed any 
higher than the same quality of lands belonging to actual 
residents, without a direct violation of this fundamental 
provision of our State government, and of the provisions 
of the general tax law under which every assessor is sworn 
to value all property alike. 

Heretofore this fund has been appropriated almost exclu- 
sively for the erection of bridges principally in the frontier 
counties. 

It might be inferred from looking over the long li^t of 
these appropriations that most of the streams crossed by 
thoroughfares in the new counties have been properly bridged 
which is probably the case, excepting, perhaps, in a few 
localities* As soon as practicable this fund should be devoted 
to some object that will generally benefit the whole State. 
It might be used to good advantage by setting it apart as a 
capitol building fund, and investing it in bonds until such 
time as it may be needed for the erection of a State capitol. 
The amount that would accumulate before a new building will 
be required, together with the proceeds of the sale of the 
Public Building Lands would go far towards making up the 
amount necessary for such purpose, aud would relieve the 
whole property of the State from taxation, to an equal 
amount, for this purpose. 

The Internal Improvement Land Fund, resulting from, 
the sales of the 500,000 acres of land, donated to the Stafe 
by the general government, by act of Congress, approved 

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28 AKNUAIi RHPOKT. 

September 4, 1841, **tor purposes of internal improTement»'^ 
under the constitutional amendment which prohibits any 
disposition of it not approved by a majority vote of the 
people at a general election, becomes literally a ^9rma7i«n/ 
Jund. The first sales of land were made in 1878, and the 
first investment of the fimd in bonds was made during the 
past year. 

The interest of this fnnd will be compounded until some 
disposition is made of the whole grant. If it is allowed to 
accumulate until the lauds are all disposed of, which will 
probably be within ten years, it may possibly amount ta 
♦4,000,000 to $5,000,000. 

The fund arisins^ from taxes, levied by various towns to- 
pay interest on lands issued to aid in the construction of raiU 
roads, is designated as Interest on Railroad Bonds. It was 
established under the provisions of Chapter 19 of the General 
Laws of 1871. 

The Inebriate Asylum Fund was created by a law of 1873, 
for the foundtttion and maintainance of an Asylum for Ine- 
briates. It was only partially enforced that year. 

The last legislature amended the law with the intention of 
securing its geneaal enforcement, but its provisions have 
been almost entirely di3regai*ded. Some further legislationin 
reference to this matter is required for the purpose of mak-» 
ing the law operative throughtout the State, and to provide 
for Ihe disposition ot the fund, or for a transfer of the fund^ 
and to repeal the law under which it was established. 

THE NEW TAX LAW. 

In the last annual report of thia office, reference was 
made to the necessity and demand tor a revision of our 
lawa relating to the assessment and collections of taxes. 

Yhe consideration of the matter by the legisl iture, re« 
suited in the enactment of the new general tax law, which, 
though imperfect in some respects, — in consequence of the 
limited time for its* preparation, — in its general provittiona 
and practical operation, seems to be efficient and satisfactory. 

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Au i>rroB OF s'l ate. 29 

Such amendments as are obviously necessary, and were 
overlooked in the hasty work of last winter, and others 
which have been suggested by the partial trial to which it 
has been subjected, will be embodied in a bill and submitted 
to the present legislature for consideration, and which if 
adopted, will, it is believed, make our system o( taxation as 
complete and effective, and at the same time more lenient 
and less annoying to the tax payer, than that of any other 
State. 

In most other States the collection of taxes is a summary 
business — payment at a certain time is compulsory^ and if 
delayed, attended with vexatious and expensive proceed- 
ings. Very soon after taxes become due, demand lor pay- 
ment is made, and if not promptly met, it becomes the duty 
of the collector to make the taxes upon both real and per- 
gonal property by distraint and sale of goods and chattels. 

Our mode of collection, as compared with the compulsory 
system of other States, may be called the voluntary system. 
All taxes levied for the year become due on the first day 
of December, and may be paid at that time. Taxes upon 
personal property may run until the first day of February 
following before demand for payment can be made or collec- 
tion can be enforced, while taxes upon real property may re- 
main unpaid until the first day of June without penalty or ex- 
pense, and no demand for pay mentis ever required, thud giving 
the propeity owner ample time to make provision for his 
taxes and relieving him from the annoyance and expense 
incident to the compulsory process common in other States. 
Taxes always have been, and probably ever will be, re- 
garded as a burden, and no method of tax paying made easy 
can be devised, yet perhaps our voluntary system, as above 
•explained, more nearly approximates such a method than 
Any other in existence. Certainly the law cannot be made 
any more lenient or less stringent in its provisions without 
impairing its force and destroying the prestige it has gained 
during the brief period it has been in operation. 

When it is understood that our tax law is perfected and 
that It will be sustained by the courts, the delinquent 

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30 ANNUAL RBFOBT 

taxed of former years will be extinguished and the cur- 
reDt taxes of each year will be promptly paid. With the 
certainty of iull collections and no delinquencies to carry 
over, only the amount of tax needed to meet actual expend 
iture will be levied annually, which will reduce taxation ta 
the lowest possible limit. 

THE ABSESSMBNT OF 1874. 

In providing for the enforcement of the new tax law, 
under a strict construction of its provisions, it became 
necessary to make an innovation upon the old policy of 
levying a certain number ot mills State tax each year in ad- 
vance of the assessment of property. This wps a bad 
policy from the beginning, and it has had a pernicious in* 
fluence upon private and official action in the valuation of 
property for purposes of taxation. The fixed rate of State tax 
has been in effect a bribe to the individual tax payer, to the* 
assessor of each town, and to every county board of equali- 
zation, to induce them to return their property at a low 
estimate, thereby directly reducing the amount of their 
taxes, while it has effectually prevented the State board of 
equalization from performing their duty according to law, 
and has compelled them to allow the assessment ot property 
at one-third to one-half its value, under a law that required 
all property to be assessed at its *Hrue and full value in 
money.'* 

The continuance of this system from year to year has 
been demoralizing in the extreme. 

The torms of law in the assessment of property have 
been disregarded, oaths and affirn:ations to statements, false 
upon their face, have been taken, and the general aim and 
purpose has apparently been rather to/disregard and evade, 
than to uphold and obey the law. 

Of course all of the evils here enumerated are not to be 
directly attributed to the manner of levying a State tax, 
but it must be admitted that it has fostered and encouraged 
them ; nor is it persumed that they can be entirely correct-* 

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AUDITOR OF STATE. 31 

ed under the new policy inaugurated the past year, which fixee^ 
the aggregate amount ot State tax to be, raised, leaving the 
rate to be determined by the total aibount of the assess- 
ment. 

It can readily be seen, however, that this policy must have 
directly the opppsite tendency of the old system, and that 
it will effectually discourage and prevent many of the abusea 
that haVe heretoiore been allowed. 

As the rate ot taxation is decreased by the increase of the 
assessed valuation, the direct inducement to the owner of 
property to secure ^ low or false assessment is diminished, 
and boards of equalization are left free to bring the assessed 
valuation of all property up to the standard required by law. 
The assessment of 1874 probably more nearly approximates 
this valuation than any previous one ever made in the State.^ 

The amount of property returned for taxation by the differ* 
ent counties to the State board of equalization was $162,512,- 
497 against $112,298,1 25 the amount as equalized, of taxable 
property in the State for 1873. This amount was increased 
by the State board $54,914,714, making the total assessed 
valuation lor 1874, $217,427,211, which fixed the rale of 
State tax at two and thirty-three hundredth mills to raise 
$500,000.00, the amount levied, or as accurately shown by 
the abstract ot tax lists Appendix '' 6," $507,869.07 against 
$561,469.33 produced by the five mill tax of 1873. 

A comparison of the total amount of taxes levied in the 
State for 1874 sbtiws $4,102,835.04 — an average rate of less 
than one and nine-tenths per cent against $3,815,260.96, or 
about three and one-third per cent for the year 1873. 

With an increase of moie than $105,000,000 in the assessed 
valuation of property in the State the aggregate taxation 
has only increased $287,574.88, ot which more than $209,000 
is caused by the increase of the two mill general school tax 
and to which especial attention is directed elsewhere in thi& 
repot t. 

The advantages accruing to towns, cities and counties 
and to the whole State from such a showing, are apparent 
and can hardly be ovei estimated. 

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32 ^ ANNUAL KKPORT. 

The value of the bonds of every municipality is determ- 
ined to a great extent, by the amount of assessed taxable 
property upon which they are based, and the value of all 
classes of property is more or less affected by rates of taxa- 
tion, while the settlement and consequent improvement and 
prosperity of a community, or State, is always influenced 
thereby. 

Heretofore we have, by our false assessments, advertised 
our State to the world as impoverished and tax-burdened, 
thus diverting immigration to other localities, and discour- 
aging the investment of capital within our borders. 

We now make an exhibit of our resources which, al- 
though considerably below the real value of our property, 
approximates the total value of the taxable property of the 
State, and will have a tendency to counteract the erroneous 
impressions conveyed by our assessments of tormer years. 
The action of the State Board of Equalization in increasing 
the assessed valuation of the property of the State, as re- 
turned by the county auditors from ten to one hundred and 
fltty per cent., an average increase of thirty-three and one- 
third per cent., unavoidably caused injustice in some in- 
stances to individuals and localities. Whatever burdens 
may have been thus imposed, must be charged to the asses- 
sors, who so inexcusably disregarded the provisions of 
law in the discharge of their duties, and to the different 
county boards of equalization who failed to correct the un- 
warrantable returns of their district assessors. It became 
my duty to prescribe forms of blanks for the use of asses- 
sors and other officers under the provisions of the new tax 
law. Upon the blanks for assessors were printed extracts 
from the law relating to and particularly defining their du- 
ties, and direct and assist them in the performance thereof. 
It was presumed that the special obligations and pen- 
alities imposed upon them by the new law, when thus 
•brought to their notice, would secure a strict observance of 
its requirements, and that it would also induce property 
owners to yield a ready compliance with its demands upon 
Ihem. As the assessment proceeded, however, I became 

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AUDITOR or 8TATB. 33 

apprised that the old standard of valuation was being quite 
generally followed to the entire ignoring of the law. I then 
dressed a circular letter to the county boards of equalization 
throughout the State, urging upon them the necessity of 
correcting the work of* their assessors wherever they had 
failed in making a proper return, and notifying them that 
in case of their failure to raise the valuation of the 
property of their county to the required standard, it would 
have to l>e done by the State board. I am pieased to 
state that in a few counties the assessors performed their 
duties in strict accordance with the letter and spirit of the 
law and from these and other counties where my suggestions 
were regarded by the county boards of equalization the State 
board was furnished with data upon which to base its action ; 
and to the standard thus established by these leading counties 
the valuation of all others was raided. It is to be hoped 
that the State board ot equalization may never again be com- 
pelled to take such action, and that hereafter all who are 
concerned in the listing, or valuation of property for pur- 
poses of taxation, whether as public officers, or private 
citizens, may discharge their several obligations with a due 
regard for the requirements of law. 

THE TWO 1IIIX8 OBNBRAL SCHOOL TAX. 

This tax was originally imposed under the requirements 
of sec. 3, Art. 8 ot the State Constitution and before there 
was any income from the permanent school fund. 

During the past years it has been necessary to the support 
of our common schools and has not been subject to any 
serious objection, but under the increased valuation of the 
new assessment it becomes extremely burdensome. 

The rate should be reduced to one mill, and it would be 
more just and equitable if it were imposed as a special tax 
upon every school district instead of a general tax upon the 
property of the county. The income of the school fund is 
distributed among the school districts of the State accord- 
ing to the number of scholars in each district, which is 
6 

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34 ANNUAL BSPOBT. 

fair and reasonable, but it ie not equitable to directly tax one 
locality for the benefit of anotber, which is the result of the 
two mill general school tax as it is now imposed. If the 
law were amended so as to require the county auditor to 
levy annually a special tax of one mill upon the property of 
«ach school district in his county for the support of schools 
the constitutional requirement would be fulfilled, and exact 
justice would be done to all localities. The amendment 
should be framed so as to control the distribution of this tax 
for 1874 and previous years. 

OOUNTT, TOWN AND SCHOOL DISTRICT TAXES. 

The increased assessment also requires a re-adjustment of 
the maximum rates of taxation allowed to counties, towns 
and school districts, as the rates now prescribed admit the 
imposition of unnecessarily large amounts of taxes which 
may become unjustly burdensome. The rates permitted un- 
der the old law should be reduced at least one-half with perhaps 
a provision for the benefit of exceptional localities, allowing 
them under defined and guarded restrictions an increased 
rate. 

TAXATION OF RAILROAD LANDS. 

All railroad lands are required to be listed for taxation 
whenever they are sold, or corUracted to be aold^ and yet by 
special provision of law the taxes are not a lien upon the 
land in case of reversion to the company by forfeiture' of the 
contract. Considerable amounts of taxes are lost to the 
local and State funds each year in consequence of such forfeit- 
ures and reversion. The railroad companies should be 
required to provide for the payment of these taxes, or else 
the interest of the purchaser in the lands should be assessed 
as personal property, the same as improvements upon 
homestead lands are now assessed. School, Univer- 
sity, Internal Improvement and Agricultural College Lands 
pur<;hased of the State are in the same situation in case of 



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AUDrrOB OT STATB. 35 

forfeiture on the part of the purchaser, the taxes have to be 
canceled and consequently are lost. 

TAXATION OF TELEOSAPH, EXPRESS AND TRANSFOBTATION 

COMPANIES. 

Bills were prepared and submitted to the last Legislature 
providing for the taxation of Telegraph , and Express Com- 
panies upon the amount of their gross receipts, the same as 
thef are taxed in other States, and in the same manner as 
Bailroad, and Insurance Companies are now taxed, but 
through the active efforts of the companies, they were not 



Under existing law telegraph companies are only required 
to pay a nominal tax per mile upon the number of miles of 
line in operation within the State, while the express com- 
panies escape taxation entirely, excepting upon their per- 
sonal property in the difierent towns where their oflSces are 
located. 

The various transportation, and car companies, that do an 
extensive business in our State, escape taxation here, while ' 
they are all taxed in other States. 

The annual income of the State may be considerably in- 
creased by the proposed taxation of these corporations, and 
there is no reason for their exemption from the payment of 
taxes in Minnesota, while they are compelled to pay in our 
neighboring States ; to say nothing of the injustice to rail- 
road and insurance companies in allowing other and prob- 
ably more prosperous corporations almost entire immunity 
from taxation. 

COUNTY INDEBTEDNESS TO THE STATE BEFORM SCHOOL. 

I proposed to the last Legislature an amendment to Chap- 
ter 121, of the General Laws of 1873, relating to county 
indebtedness, for clothing, maintenance and instruction of 
inmates of the Beform School, to require the Auditor of State 
on receipt of a statement of the accounts against the several 



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36 AKHUAL BBPOBT. 

counties at the close of each year, to draw on the treasurers 
of counties so indebted for the amount due in the same 
manner as he is required to draw for other State hinds, and 
to require the commissioners of each county to make the 
necessary appropriation to meet such draft. Eighteen 
counties were indebted to the State on this account ior tiie 
year 1873t $119486.99, and during the year 1874 six counties 
have been added to the list and the indebtedness has been 
increased $14,426.48, making the total amount now due 
from twenty-four counties, $25,912.47. I am informed that 
several of the counties have voluntarily provided for the 
settlement of their accounts as recommended by me under 
date of September 25, 1874. 

What has been done voluntarily by a few counties should 
be immediately required ot them all, as they have ample 
funds to meet such demands, and the burden of carrying them 
should not be imposed upon the State as was done by the 
ill advised act of 1873. The amendment suggested last year 
received the favorable consideration of the Senate, but for 
some reason failed in the House. I would again respectfully 
recommend the enactment of the proposed amendment to 
the law. 

DEIimQUBNT TAXES. 

Chapter 2 of the General Laws of 1874, known as the 
delinquent tax law, was designed to enforce the payment of 
taxes delinquent previous to 1873; of which there was due 
the State, Dec. 2, 1873, $461,461.18. Of this amount 
$102,378.45 has been received during the year, but as no 
sales were made under the law previous to the annual 
settlement, no definite statement of its results can now be 
made. 

Probably the March settlement will show quite large re- 
ceipts of this class of taxes, from the sales in the different 
counties. The last legislature authorized the abatement of 
$10,000 of the St. Louis county State tax of 1873, for 
special reasons ; this amount with the legal abatements and 



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AUDITOB OP STATB. 37 

allowances made to other counties, make the total amount 
of abatements and cancellations of State tax dnring the 
year,. $28,887.40. 

In consequence of the increased laboi*8 of county auditors, 
under the requirements of the two tax laws, many of them 
have been unable to report the amount of abatements and 
uncollectable taxes for which their counties are entitled to 
credit ; consequently the showing of the amount of delin- 
quent taxes is unsatisfactory and incomplete. It will be 
accurately ascertained during the ensuing year. 

ooLLEonoN Of railboad and other taxes. 

The manner of paying railroad and other corporation 
taxes into the State Treasury is not in accordance with the 
system that controls most other transactions of that depart- 
ment, under which the auditor's office directs all payments 
into and all disbursements from the Treasury. To accom- 
plish this, reports of all amounts due the State should be 
made to this office, and the Treasurer should collect on the 
Auditor's draft for the amount reported or found due. 

I make this suggestion at the instance of the State Treas- 
urer. 



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38 AJSmj All BXPOBT. 



1^AJNT> DEPA-RTMENT. 



The preceding statements of receipts and disbursements 
by funds, exhibit in detail the condition of the several trust 
funds derived from sales of land. 

The following detailed statements show in a tabular form 
the result of the sales of the different classes of land through* 
out the State during the past and previous years : 



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AUDTTOB OF STATU. 



39 



Tabular Staiement shovnng the Result of the School, Land Sales 

in 1874. 



COUKTZSB. 



Anoka 

Blae Earth.. 

Brown 

Chippewa . . • 

Dakota. 

Dodge 

Donglas 

Faribault. . . . 
Fillmore ..•• 
Freeborn. . . . 
Ooodhoe . • . • 
Hennepin . . . 
Houston .... 
Jackson .... 
Kandiyohi .. 
Le Soenr.... 

McLeod 

Meeker 

Mower 

Nicollet 

Olmsted 

Otter Tall... 
Ramsey .... 
BenTille .... 

Rice 

Scott 

Sherburne. . . 

Sibley 

Steams 

Steele 

Todd 

Wabasha.... 

Waseca 

Washington. 
Watonwan .. 

Winona 

Wright 



Acres 
Sold. 



280.00 
326.40 
120.00 

16.00 

289 80 

480.00 

2,111.87 

40.00 

710.00 

1,564.72 

260.00 

766.16 

. 660.00 

177.46 

1,061.90 

489.43 

768.76 

419.76 

1,866.00 

210.00 

280.00 

1,268.37 

872.93 

820.00 

898.66 

418.60 

80 00 

432.00 

1,200.00 

692.80 

40 00 

80.00 
687.26 
140.00 

77.00 
400.00 
480.00 



Purchase 
Money. 



Principal 
Paid. 



•1,660 00 


•660 00 


1,671 20 


267 36 


600 00 


200 00 


120 00 


90 00 


1,489 00 


223 36 


2,480 00 


372 00 


11,686 72 


2,141 76 


200 00 


30 00 


4,060 00 


697 60 


8,096 10 


1,214 41 


1,632 40 


406 70 


6,628 66 


994 28 


8,400 00 


949 00 


1,214 60 


, 283 63 


6,971 60 


1,267 72 


2,197 16 


329 67 


4.767 19 


882 30 


2,438 76 


366 81 


11,000 00 


1,650 00 


1,060 00 


157 60 


1,400 00 


210 00 


7,12197 


1,348 97 


4,889 68 


1,240 68 


1,760 00 


264 00 


4,727 76 


709 16 


2,102 30 


316 35 


400 00 


60 00 


2,400 00 


718 00 


6,610 00 


1,041 60 


8,856 80 


678 52 


240 00 


188 00 


400 00 


60 00 


3,406 30 


610 94 


906 00 


266 76 


846 00 


126 90 


2,260 00 


337 60 


2,800 00 


634 00 



Principal 
Due. 



•1,010 00 
1,308 84 

400 00 

80 00 

1,265 65 

2,108 00 

9,443 97 

170 00 
8,352 60 
6,881 69 
1,226 70 
6,634 27 
2.461 00 

930 87 
6,718 78 
1,867 58 
3,874 89 
2,072 94 
9,350 00 

892 50 
1,190 00 
5,773 00 
3,649 00 
1,496 00 
4.018 69 
1,786 96 

340 00 
1,682 00 
6,668 60 
3,278 28 

102 00 

340 00 
2,896 86 

649 24 

719 10 
1,912 50 
2,166 00 



Totols 20,538.74 119.157 76 21,612 06 97,646 70 

Ayerage per acre, •5.803. 



Interest 
Paid. 



•48 00 
58 26 
16 86 
128 
6179 
86 18 

416 62 
6 78 

136 97 

274 37 
60 08 

218 67 

100 25 
37 98 

288 84 
76 40 

16142 
86 68 

376 33 
36 51 
48 65 

255 70 

148 53 
6106 

164 31 
73 16 
13 90 
66 94 

24137 

136 00 

3 67 

13 90 

118 40 
26 66 
29 86 
78 20 
0198 



4,080 20 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



40 



A^^iUAi. liBPOKT. 



Tabular Btatement shoufing the number of acres of School Lands in the 
counties where sales have teen Jield, the number of acres sold and unsold, 
and the number appraised and unappraised. 



Counties. 



Anoka 

B«nton 

Blue Earth. . . 

Brown 

Carver 

Chippewa... 

Chisago 

Cook 

Cottonwood. 

BakoU 

Dodge 

Douglas .... 
Faribault... . 
Fillmore .... 
Freeborn.. . . 

Goodhue 

Henuepio • . . 

Houston 

Jackson 

Kandiyohi... 

Lake 

Le Sueur.... 

Martin 

McLeod 

Meeker 

Mower 

Murray 

NicoUet 

Olmsted 

Otter Tall... 

Pine..f 

Samsey 

Renyille 

Rice 

8cott 

Sherburne.. . 

Sibley 

Stearns 

Steele 

St Louis.... 

Todd 

Wabasha. . . . 

Waseca 

Washington. 
Watonwan.. . 

Winona 

Wright 



No. of acres 

appraised 
and sold. 



Total. 



8,786.8^ 

1,268.62 
16,858.85 

7,896.16 

11,890.51 

805.00 

6,779.26 

834.60 

762.88 

18,530.02 

18,040.00 

2,902.88 
16,826.74 
29,150.00 
20,897.89 
20,992.90 
12,848.71 
14,129.58 

1,054.41 

6,482.88 

640.00 

15,752.26 

1,872.20 
14,529.49 
18,061.28 
24,820.00 



11,808.90 
2^,744.68 

4,050.88 
800.00 

8,998.11 

8.856.28 
16,927.19 
10,661.58 

2,628.18 
11,886.47 
11,959.19 
18,504.20 

1.760.00 
40 

6,784 46 
10,228.82 

9,845.42 

8,728.82 
18,917.21 
11,447.87 



4^0,857.43 



^a;n4^d 'No. of acres 
and unsold. «°aPP»l8ed 



11,517.05 

2,870.74 

2,199.22 

9,647.70 

860.00 

7,655 00 

7,562 57 

564.99 

4,542.58 

2,629.01 

1,400.00 

10,891.58 

9,826.66 

1,090.00 

5,535.90 

280.00 

1,619.94 

4,641.64 

12,828.11 

16,823.69 

640.00 

858.90 

14,687.16 

5,148.75 

9.817.19 

1,280.00 

2,448.84 

2,244.84 

295.87 

84,832.14 

480 00 

560.00 

16,598.85 

1,126.45 

1,459.48 

2,602.60 

7,549.15 

18,722.98 

1,529.75 



22,510.58 
612.40 
1,620.00 
2,314.13 
8,686.18 
8,188.77 

10,689.80 



271,778.99 



512.80 
10,880.00 



18,118.48 



Indefinite. 
18,16L77 



40.00 
9,086.87 



12,165.57 

7,486.06 

Indefinite. 



8,949 69 



57,821.18 



29,048.86 
Indefinite. 



24,709.97 
80.00 



9,990.20 

2,560.00 

16,895.06 



Indefinite. 
Indefinite. 



820.00 
1,485.00 
9,556.28 



1,126.68 



287,928.42 



Total No. 
of acres of 
school land 

in county. 



15,765.70 
14,514.36 
17,557.57 
17,548.86 
11,750.51 
26,078.48 
14,341.88 

Indefinite. 
28,457.28 
21,159.08 
14,480.00 
22,880.88 
26,152.40 
80,2(0.00 
25,988.79 
21,272.90 
14,468.65 
18,771.17 
25,538.09 
80,292.08 

Indefinite. 
16.106.16 
25,509.05 
19,678.24 
22,878.42 
25,600.00 
60,270 02 
14,058.24 
28,040.00 
67,481.88 

Indefinite. 
4,558.11 
44,659.60 
18,188.64 
12,120.96 
15,220.93 
21,495.62 
46,577.18 
15,038.95 

Indefinite. 

Indefinite. 
7,846.86 
12,068.82 
13,094.55 
16,916.28 
22,105.98 
28,218.85 



939,289.67 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OF STAT£. 41 

Tabular sUUemeni 8h(noing the resiUi oj the sales of School 
land each year^ the average price per acrCf and the total 
productive fund and aU sources from which it has been de- 
rived. 



Tear 


No. of acres 


FarchMe 


Average price 


■oM. 


■old. 


money. 


per acre. 


1862 


88,247.41 


>242.876 10 


$6 35 


1868 - 


- 53,220.88 


309,740 06 


5 82 


1864 


41,483.58 


287,269 27 


6 92.5 


1865 - 


- 24,241.93 


144,980 05 


5 97.8 


1866 


54,495.25 


839,761 93 


6 23.5 


1867 - 


- 34,620.62 


209,288 28 


6 04.5 


1868 


76,910.13 


464,840 61 


6 04.4 


1869 - 


- 39,877.23 


238,204 45 


5 97.8 


1870 


14,802.56 


89,696 41 


6 06 


1871 - 


- 7,495.20 


49,085 00 


6 54.9 


1872 


27,606.73 


166,081 07 


6 01.5 


1873 - 


. 22,164.12 


135,437 66 


6 11 


1874 


20,533.74 


119,157 76 


5 80.3 



455,698.88 $2,796,868 65 $6.1806 
Deduct lands for- 
feited and resold, 5,341.45 36,811 76 



450,357.43 $2,759,556 89 $6 12.9 
Am'ts paid on forfeitures right of 

way, etc., - - - $ 6,746 84 
Sales of timber, - - * 239,41120 



Total from sales of land and 

timber, .... $3,005,714 43 
Profits on sales of bonds, . 24,412 66 



Total productive fund, - $3,030,127 09 
6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



42 



AKBOJAL RBPOBT. 



Tabular Statement showing the result of the Sales of AgrieuUu' 
ral College Lands in 1874. 



Coonty. 


Acres. 


Parchase 
Money. 


Principal 
Paid. 


Principal 
Unpaid. 


Interest 
Paid. 


Faribanlt. 

Freeboni 

McLeod 


80 
1244.85 
1800 
200 
959.88 
80 
240.42 
857.07 


• 520 00 
6,224 85 
10,590 00 
1,000 00 
6,680 00 
400 60 
1,202 10 
2,062 42 


• 78 00 
088 68 

1,827 50 
150 00 

1,002 00 

60 00 

180 00 

488 72 


• 442 00 
5,290 62 
8,762 50 

850 00 
5,678 CO 

840 00 
1,022 10 
1,573 70 


• 17 59 
211 U 
842 50 


Meeker 


85 55 


Mower ..t««««<T* 


228 50 


Sibley 


18 86 


Steele 


41 86 


Wright... 


66 72 






Totals 


4962.22 


$28,678 77 


$ 4,719 85 


928,958 92 


« 957 23 



Tabular Statement showing the number of acres of Agricultural 
College Lands of the StatCy the counties where situated, the 
number of acres sold and unsold, and the number of acres op- 
praised andunappraised on the 30th of JVovember, 1874. 



Oonnties. 



No. of acres 

appraised and 

sold. 



Bine Earth... 

Brown 

Dodge 

Faribanlt . . . • 
Freeborn . . . • 
Lac qnt Parle. 

McLeod 

Meeker 

Mower 

Nicollet 

Pope 

Renville 

Sibley 

Steams 

Steele 

Waseca 

Watonwan. . . 
Wright 



Total 88,872.79 



2,597,68 
800.00 



8,838.68 
6,797.05 



5,895.60 
8,395.07 
1,759.52 
2,200.00 



600 00 
V,840.42' 



2,716.68 
1,987.14 



No. of acres 

appraised and 

unsold. 



280.00 
1,270.04 



3,854.96 
6,869.56 



8,479.77 
2,684.84 



1,960.00 



7,857.04 
V,'682.29' 



1,920.00 
4,761.17 



41,569.67 



No. of acres 
nnappraised. 



1,276.60 
'320.00" 



1,600.00 
1,921.89 
1,920.00 
9,244.27 



2,714.56 



18,996.82 



Total No. of 
acres Agr. Col. 
Land In county 



(&) 



(6) 
(&) 



2,877.68 
2,070.04 
1,276.60 
7,688.64 

18,666.61 
820.00 

13,875.87 
6.029.91 
1,759.52 
4,160.00 
1,600.00 
1.921.89 

10,377.04 
9,244.27 
3,522.71 
2,714.56 
4,636.68 
6,698.81 



94,439.28 



(a) All double minimum lands. 

(b) Part double minimum lands. 

(c) Not approved. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AXTDITOB OV STATE. 



43 



Tabular Statement thotomg tite result of the tales of Agricultural 
College land each year, and the total productive fund and all 
sources from tohich it has been derived. 



Year Bold. 

1867, 

1868, 

1869, 

1870, 

1871, 

1872, 

1873, 

1874, 



No. of acres sold. 

- 1,120.00 
7,157.15 

- 9.995.55 
3,481.27 

640.00 
4,916.48 

- 2,640.00 
4,962.22 



34,912.67 
Deduct forfeited lands resold, 1,039.88 



33,872.79 



Sales of timber, 

Amount paid on forfeitures, 

Appropriation of 1873, 

Total permanent fund. 



Fnrchase money. 

$ 5,600 00 

44,862 38 

56,529 01 

17,866 35 

3.408 OO 

•26,156 01 

14,260 00 

28.678 77 

$197,360 52 
5,760 00 

191,600 52 

- 6,613 01 

894 00 

- 12,000 OO 

$211,107 52 



Tabular Statement showing the result of the Sales of Internal 
Improvement Lands in 1874. 



ConntieB. 


Acres 
8old. 


Amt of 
8ale. 


Principal 
Paid. 


Principal 
Dne. 


Interest 
Paid. 


Douglas 

Jackson.. » 

Otter TaU 


1,887.90 

160.00 

1,877.58 


•10,289 70 

1,056 00 

11,178 26 


•1,586 05 

168 40 

1,679 16 


•8,708 65 

897 60 

9,499 10 


•884 05 

86 67 

420 86 


Totol 

Sale of 1878.... 


8,875.48 
2,159.54 


22,478 96 
14,842 41 


8,878 61 
2,197 90 


19,100 85 
12,144 61 


841 08 
514 5S 


Total 


6,085.02 


•86,816 '87 


•5,571 51 


$81,244 86 


•1,255 61 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44 



AKKUAIi BVPORT. 



Tabular Statement showing the nurnher of acres of Internal Im* 
provement Landsj the counties where situated^ the number of 
acres sdd and unsold^ and the numbw of acres appraised and 
unappraised. 



Counties. 



No. of acres 

appraised and 

sold. 



Cass 

Chippewa. 

Clay 

DoDglas .. 
Faribault. 
Grant .... 
Itasca .... 
Jackson . . 
Kandiyohi 
Lac qui Parlr 
Martin ... 
McLeod... 
Morrison. 
Otter Tall 
Polk. 



Pope 

Redwood... 
BeDYllle .... 

Sibley 

Steams .... 
Stevens ••.. 

Todd 

Watonwan. • 

Wilkin 

Yellow Med. 



No. of acres 

appraised and 

unsold. 



1,887.90 



820.00 



8,877.12 



No. of acres 
unappraised. 



8,200.00 
8,240.74 



80,725.87 



22,878.82 



26,282.23 



Total No. of 
acres Int. Imp. 
Landincoun^ 



18,880.71 



18,811.26 

9,920.00 

19,20X00 

6,871.78 

646.68 

14,068.78 

888.01 

28,261.97 

8,000.00 

4,799.90 

28,648.87 

2,240.00 

18.75941 

12,202.20 

14,954.56 

28,998.01 

58,528.45 

60,441.46 

11,520.26 

10,851.70 

5,120.00 



8,198.99 
80,400.00 
,18,797.88 



18,811.26 

9,920.00 

22,400.00 

16,950.42 

646.68 

14,068.78 

888.01 

59,807.84 

8.000.00 

4,799.90 

46,022.19 

2,240.00 

18,759.41 

41.811.55 

14,954.66 

28,998,61 

58,528.45 

69,822.17 

11,520.26 

10,851.70 

5,120.00 

9,928.81 

8,198.99 

80,400.00 

18,797.88 



Total. 



6,085.02 



108,652.87 



884,998.98 



499,681.82 



Tabular Statement ^ showing the number of acres of Swamp Lands 
patented to the Seated the number of acres certified and not 
patented^ — the number of acres conveyed and set apart by the 
State f and the number qfcteres in the odd and even sections west 
of the Mississippi Rivera so far as they have been certified or 
patented to the State : 



Patented to the State 
Deeded to Lake Superior 
and Miss. R. B. Co. 



No. Acres 
Disposed of. 



567,247.84 



No. of Acres. 
1,062.998.05 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUBITOB OT STATJC. 46 

Deeded to Southern Minn. 

R. R. Co. . . - 32,342.44 

(a) Deeded to St. Paul and 

Chicago R. R. Co. - - 177,828.52 
(6) Deeded to Daniel Rice, 

assignee (Madelia State 

Road) .... 4,563.71 

Set apart for McLeod Co. 

Agl. Col. (the «' Stevens 

Seminary"; - - • 4,684.17 

Set apart for Insane Asylum 19,816.78 

D. D. & B. Institute, - 19,812.16 

*• •* •• State Prison, - 19,831.11 

•• *• •• N'mal Schools, 44,718.16 890,844.89 



172,153.17 
Approved but not patented to State - - 79,455.13 



251,608.30 
Applicable under existing laws to the following grants t 

Acres, 

liake Sup. and Miss. R. R. - 52,641.72 
Southern Minn. R. R. - 2,603.77 

St. P. & Chicago R. R. - - 30,613.56 

Normal Schools, - - 71,035.38 

Insane Asylum, ... 31,571.29 

D. D. & B. Asylum, - - 31,571.29 

State Prison, ... - 31,571.29 



250,608.30 



(a) Two deeds conyeylng 96,779.17, were executed daring the year to 
this Co. 
(6) Deed executed Dec 81, 1873. 

BAHiBOAD LANDS. 

During the year certified lists of Congressional^lands nave 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



4(5 



ANNUAL RBPOBT. 



been filed ia this office for the benefit of Railroad Companies 
as follows, viz : 

Name of Company. No. of Acres. 

St. Paul and Pacific R. R. Co., - - - 12,584.77 

Minnesota Central R. R. Co., - - - 112.03 

Hastings and Dakota R. R. Co., - - - 144,472.07 

Lake Superior aud Mississippi R. R. Co., - 68,211.43 

St. Paul and Sioux City R. R. Co., - - 72,760 29 

Winona and St. Peter R. R. Co., . • - - 3,091.22 
St. Vincent Extension, St. P. & P. R. R. Co., 778,411.75 

Southern Minnesota R. R. Co., - . - 1,700.76 



1,081,344.32 



Since the last annual report, there have been executed by 
the Governor seven deeds conveying lands to railroad com- 
panies, ior whose benefit the State holds lands in trust. 

These deeds were verified by the certified lists of Con- 
gressional lands on file in this office, before they were sub- 
mitted to the Goveru(»r for his signature, and subsequently 
recorded in the railroad record books. The following is a 
list of the deeds : 



Date of Deed. 


Name of Company. 


Acres Conveyed. 


January 2d, 1874. 
March 26th, 1874. 
May 6th, 1874. 
May 80th, 1874. 
July 22d, 1874. 
Sept. 2l8t, 1874. 
Dec. 3d, 1874. 


Hastings A Dakota R. R. Co 

St. Paul & Pacific (main) R. R. Co- 
Minnesota Central R. R. Co 

Winona & St. Peter R. R. Co. ..... . 

Lalce Superior & Mississippi R R Co 

Winona & St. Peter R. R. Co 

St. Paul & Sioux City R. U Co 


24,958.94 

12,684.77 

950.09 

532,288.62 

68,177.43 

1,671.08 

8,619.19 

644,150.12 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITO& OV 8TAT£. 



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Digitized by VjOOQ IC — ^ 



48 ANNUAL RKPORT. 

SCHOOL LaNBB. 

A large portion of the unappraised lands of Douglas county 
were appraised the past year, also a part of the lands of 
Mille Lacs and Todd counties in which no appraisals had 
before been made. The annual sales were held during the 
autumn with about the usual result in quantity sold and a 
slight reduction in price per acre, as will be seen by reference 
to the tabular statement of sales for the current year. Duri ag 
the year 1870 selections of indemnity lands were made by 
my predecessor in office and forwarded to the Department 
of the interior, ior deficiencies in school lands by reason of 
' fractional sections and townships, pre-emptions, Sioux Half 
Breed, Winnebago, and Sioux Indian Reservations, and the 
Fort Snelling Military reservation, amounting to 105,713 
acres, under Act ot Congress approved May 20, 1826, Feb. 
26, 1857 and Feb. 26, 1859. The Hon. Jos. S. Wilson, 
then acting Commissioner of the General Land Office, while 
admitting the right of the State to the other selections refused 
to pass for approval the selections ior deficiency on account 
of the Winnebugo Rerervation on the ground that *« the lands 
were not public lands at the date of the Organic Aci^ and 
that consequently the State obtained no interest whatever 
to 16 and 36 sections therein.'* During the first year of my 
official term I endeavored to secure an adjustment of these 
selections but failed. This year the effort was renewed, and 
the matter brought to a successful issue through the favorable 
consideration and decisive action of the present Commis-* 
sioner of the General Land Office, the Hon. S. S. Burdett. 
The fcdiowing lists of lands were certified and approved to 
the State Sept. 23, 1874, comprising all of the selections 
named excepting 16,275 acres selected for defficiency from 
natural causes, viz. : 

Acres. 
Sioux Half Breed Reserve entire selections, - 17,870. 1^ 
Winnebago Indian Reserve entire selections, 12,527.86 
Sioux (Minn. River) Indian Reserve entire 

selections, .... 33,881.02 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OF STATE. 



49 



Fort SnelliDg Military Beserve entire Beleotion, 315.57 

Pre-emptions entire selections, - - 99262.37 

Natural causes partial selections, - - 15,583.60 



Total, - - . - . 89,440.55 

The State is entitled to other indemnity lands for which 
selections will be made as soon as the amount of deficiencies 
can be ascertained. 

UNIYEBSITT AND AGBIOULTUBAL COLLEGE LANDS. 

The selections lor University Lands proper are incom- 
plete as shown by the tabular statement. Measures are 
contemplated that will complete them during the ensuing 
year. The Agricultural College Lands, the proceeds of which 
enure to the University fund, have all been selected and the 
selections approved, excepting for the last 320 acres which 
it is expected will soon be adjusted. These are among the 
most valuable of the State Lands and will all be sold within 
a few years. 

INTEBNAL IMPBOVEMBIVT LANDS. 

Selections for the 500,000 acres comprising this grant 
were made by my predecessor, but a final adjustment of the 
selections was not secured until January 7, 1874, when the 
complete lists were approved and certified to the State. In 
March, however, the Governor was requested by the De- 
partment of the Interior to relinquish 9,040 acres of these 
lands, lying in Pope, Stevens and Wilkin counties, ap- 
proved to the State by the Secretary of the Interior in 1869, 
for the reason that they were within the ten mile limits of a 
prior grant to the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. If the re- 
quest had been preferred within a reasonable time after the * 
selections were made, no particular objection could have 
been urged against it, but five years ^ving elapsed since 
they were approved, and other selections having been made 
7 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



60 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

aad approved so late as the oommencement of the last year, 
at which time an excess of several hundred acres was relin- 
quished by the State and the whole matter finally adjusted, 
it appears to be, under the circumstances, an unjust and 
unreasonable demand, as it will subject the State to the ex- 
pense of making other selections that can only be made 
from lands of inferior quality, and if of the same quality, of 
very much less value, because of the locality in which it 
is possible to make such selections at this time. Lands 
of equal value might have been selected by the State if 
this request had been made within one or two years after 
Abe approval of these selections. Now they are worth from 
:$2Jk) to $5.00 per acre, while lands that can be obtained in 
Jieu of them would not be worth more than $1.25 per acre. 
The Governor has deferred action upon the matrer up to 
Jbhis time. 

• STATE SWAMP LANDS. 

I3y Act of the Legislature approved February 13th, 1865, 
the even numbered sections of Swamp lands to the amount 
of 100,000 acres each, for the Hospital for the Insane, the 
Deaf, Dumb, and Blind Institute, and the State Prison, and 
75,000 acres for each of the three Normal Schools, were re- 
quired to be set apart for the benefit of these Institutions. 
The tabular statement of these lands shows 104,178.21-100 
acres thus set apart, and 165,749.25 100 acres now subject to 
formal transfer making 269,927.46-lOU acres that have al- 
ready enured to the institutions mentioned under this grant. 
Under previous grants the Lake Superior and Missis- 
sippi Railroad Company will probably receive all of the valu- 
able swamp lands east of the Mississippi river, and the St. 
Paul and Chicago Railroad Company will be entitled to about 
450,000 acres, which will be made up from the odd num« 
' bered sections west of the Mississippi when the government 
surveys are completed in the State, and the State Institutions 
grant will be made good. In my last report I alluded to the 
claim set up by the St. Paul and Chicago Railroad Company 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OP STATE, 61 

for double the amount of land conveyed by its grant, un- 
der an ingenious construction of the peculiar phraseology 
of the law, which, if allowed, would take every acre of the 
swamp lands of any value that will ever enure to the State. 
The company also deny the right of the State to make dispo- 
sition of any part of these lands untilits entire grantis satisfied, 
and has commenced suit against the Trustees of the Hospital 
for the Insane to determine this question. 

If this case is decided in favor of the State, the claim for 
double the amount of the grant will be unimportant as it 
will be of but little value if the company is restricted to 
odd numbered sections in selecting its lands. If, how- 
ever, it is allowed to complete its selections before the 
State Institutions can make, or secure any selection under 
their grant, then the question of construction becomes a 
very important one, involving the ownership of nearly half 
a million acres of land, which if disposed of for the benefit 
of the institutions to which the grant has been made would 
ultimately produce an endowment fund, for each of the 
Normal Schools adequate to their entire support, and pro- 
duce an income for the charitable and reformatory institu- 
tions, that would, practically, defray their annual expenses 
and relieve the property of the State from an equal amount 
of taxation for their support. There is great inquiry in ref- 
erence to the purchase of these lands, and there is but little 
doubt that most of them can he disposed ot at the same 
minimum price as school and other State lands are sold. 

I would respectfully suggest that provision be made 
during the present session of the legislature for their apprai- 
sal and sale, as it is quite probable that the right of the 
State to dispose of them will be determined at an early day. 

PRESENT CONDITION OF THE SALT SPRING LANDS. 

The original grant covered 46,080 acres. Of this the 
State was unable to avail itself of 11,520 acres, that amount 
being situated outside the area surveyed by the general 
government. This fact reduced the original available grant 
to 34,560 acres. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



52 asvuaia bbpobt. 

As the United States Government was tardy in certifying 
the selected lands to the State, settlers were allowed to 
occupy and receive patents for 69752 acres. About 1,600 
acres were also previously covered by the terms of the act 
granting swamp lands to the State. The remainder, 26,435 
acres, have been certified to the State. Of this amount the 
Belle Plaine Salt Company were granted 7,648 acres, on com- 
plying with the acts ol the legislature. The rest of the 
certified lands, amounting to 18,771 acres, are now available. 
Of the uncertified portion of the original grant aggregat- 
ing 19,872 acres, the various sums lost to the State were 
as follows : 

Situated outside of the surveyed portion, - 11,520 

Patented to settlers, .... 6,752 

Previously covered by swamp land grant, - 1,600 



Total, . . - - . 19,872 

By act of the legislature, approved March 10th, 1873, 
these lands were transferred to the custody and control of 
the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota. The 
act also provides that they may be sold in such manner, or 
in such amounts, consistent with the laws of the State of 
Minnesota, as they may see fit, the proceeds being held in 
trust by them, and only disbursed in accordance with the 
law ordering a geological and natural history survey of the 
State. 

FUBLIO BUII4DING LANDS. 

These lands consist of 6,395.12 acres, granted to the 
State at the time of its aduiission into the Union, which 
have been selected and certified to the State. They are sit- 
uated iu Kandiyohi county. 

SALE OF PINE STUMPAGE ON STATE LANDS. 

No permits for cutting pine timber have been made during 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 58 

the year» and no cutting upon lands not previouBly held by 
permits, cut over or damaged by fire or windfall has been 
permitted. There are several tracts that have been thus 
damaged and some old cuttings that have more or less tim- 
ber liable to deterioration and loss by decay, upon which 
cutting has been allowed. A strict observance o^. the law 
controlling this matter would not perhaps authorize this pro- 
ceeding, but it was believed to be in accordance with the 
spirit of the law and for the protection of the important 
interests represented by this department and it is therefore 
hoped that if not entirely approved it may not be severely 
condemned. Payment of current and old stumpage accounts 
have been slow in consequence of the great depression in 
the lumber trade but nearly the average annual amount has 
been received on this account. 

All unpaid accounts are due from responsible parties and 
are generally secured, and it is probable that all claims of 
this kind will be settled during the ensuing year, most of 
them would have been canceled the past year if the large 
stocks of lumber on hand could have been disposed of at any 
reasonable price, all of them might have been forcibly col- 
lected, but such action would have caused great embarass- 
ment and still greater depression in the lumber trade without 
resulting in any benefit to the State. 

The responsible duties imposed upon the Land Commis- 
sioner in making these settlements and collections are ex- 
tremely arduous and thankless, and under existing law 
cannot be avoided. Alter the outstanding business is 
closed up, and before future sales of stumpage are made, the 
law should be amended requiring every purchaser to execute 
a boud with sufficient security to the State conditioned upon 
the payment to the State Treasurer of the amount found due 
according to the terms of his permit, and upon the return 
of the Surveyor of logs and lumber, require a draft from 
(ihe State Auditor for the amount found due for collection by 
the State Treasurer, the same as drafts are now drawn upon 
county treasurers, and giving the State the same lien upon 
the logs as at present, in addition to the bond mentioned* 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 ANNUAL BBFOBT. 

This would relieve the head of this department from all of 
the perplexing duties now imposed upon him, and secure the 
payment of all stumpage dues promptly and in the regular 
way that moat other payments are made into the State 
Treasury. 

THE SALE OF STATE LANDS. 

The constant demand for School and other State lands » 
induces me to suggest the propriety of a modification of the 
law prescribing the method of selling State lands, so as to 
afford opportunity to purchase them at any time, after the 
first or second regular sale in each county, and at the same 
time to comply with the constitutional requirement of a 
public sale. 

This might be accomplished by furnishing the county audi- 
tor with duplicate lists of lands for sale, authorizing him to 
receive and record bids, at any time, or at stated periods to 
be forwarded to this office at the end of each month, or ot 
every quarter, for approval or rejection, and if accepted cer- 
tificates to be forwarded to the county treasurer for the 
purchaser, who should be required to deposit the amount 
due on his purchase, at the time of recording his bid. This 
method would secure the usual competition at the sales, and 
would be inexpensive to the State. 

The first sale in every county after an appraisal, and per- 
haps the second one, should be held in the usual manner, 
after which the method proposed might be adopted with such 
additional provisions and safeguards as would secure a just 
administration of the law and protect the interests of the 
State. 1 have suggested thb policy, in response to the 
numerous applications received at this office for the purchase 
of these lands, and not with any desire to inaugurate an 
innovation upon the established policy of this department ; 
leaving the further consideration of this, and all other mat- 
ters treated of in this report to be determined by the judg- 
ment and wisdom of the legislature. 

ORLEN P. WHITCOMB, 

Auditor of State. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



APPENDIX. 



Containing the following statements : 

A. Showing appropriations of 1878, balances of fbnner years, amounts 
of warrants drawn, and balances remaining Not. 80, 1874. 

jB. Showing estimated expenses of the State GoTemment for 1876. 

C Showing condition of tax accounts with the various counties, 
Nov. 80, 1874. 

JD. 'Showing action of the State Board of Equalization of 1874. 

E. Showing Real Property as Equalized by the State Board. 

F* Showing Personal Property as Equalized by the State Board. 

Q, Showing taxes levied for State and local purposes for 1875. 

J7. Showing disbursements by warrants in the Stote Treasury during 
the year ending November 80, 1878. 

J. Showing bonded indebtedness of Counties, Cities and School Dis- 
tricts. 

J, Showing proceedings of Commissioners of Investment of School 
and University Amds. 

IT. Showing condition of Savings Banks organized under laws of 1867. 

It. Showing condition of Banking Associations organized \inder the 
general banking laws of the State. 

jr. Showing cash on hand for redemption of circulating notes of 
banks closed in 1861. 

N. Showing township organizations existing under provisions oi 
Chapter 10 of the General Statutes. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OF STATB. 
STATEMENT "A." 



57 



Showing the Unexpended Balances of appropriations for 1865, 
1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872 and 1873, on De- 
cember 1, 1874, the tqfal Appropriations for 1874, the amounts 
of Warrants drawn therefrom during the Fiscal Year 1874, and 
the Balances remaining unexpended on-the 30th of Jfovemher^ 
1874. 

APPROPRIATIONS OP 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 
1872 and 1873. 



Appropriations. 



Board of Anditon 

lilnnMOta Minate Men 

Chicago Bye and Bar Infirmary. 

Locating Lands 

M- Ryder 

Back Noa. Sap. Ck>iirt Reports.. 

Law Library ......••• 

Revising War Records 

ByeandBar... 

Oakland Cemetery 

Salaries of Judges 

Law Library. 

Insane Building...... 

Revising War Records 

Washington National Monnment 

Wm. Wait..... 

Bngene McNeaL 

Bed River Bridge 

LegisHtive ...^ 

Governor's salary 

SecreUry's salary 

Auditor and Land Com. salary ... 

Treasnrer^s salary.... 

Attorney Generar s salary 

Adjt. General's salary 

Bnpt. Public Instruction 

Railroad Commissioner 

Insurance Commissioner 

Insurance Commissioner (1872). 

Librarian's salary. 

Governor's Private Secretary.... 

Assmunt Sec'y of State 

Statiotlcan's salary •.....■ 

Chief Clerk of State Auditor 

Land clerk... 

Auditor's clerk 

Deputy Treasurer 

Pabllc Instruction clerk 

Attorney General's clerk 

Janitor's salary . ... ;...... 

Bnglneer and Night Watch 

Xllitary Storekeeper 

Bzecntlve Contingent 

Beeretory's Contingent 

Auditor's Contingent 

Treasurer's Contingent 

Attorney General's Contingent... 
Public Instrnctlon Contingent. ... 
AdJt. Genl's Contingent, Def. '72. 
Library Contingent 

^Canceled. 

8 



Am'ts ap- 


Warrants 




drawn 1874. 


$17.0ra 86 


$198 


100 00 




34 89 




2,465 99 

66 00 

800 00 








64 GO 


64 00 


869 


600 


46 26 
12 00 

68 60 






66 65 


237 


237 


21,000 00 

3 75 

1,000 00 


Si,000 00 




600 




16 00 
800 00 






1,147 89 


1,147 89 


260 00 


260 00 


160 00 


160 00 


208 87 


908 37 


697 88 


891 66 


83 33 


83 33 


126 00 


1>6 00 


206 38 


206 38 


2B0 00 


250 00 


166 66 


166 65 


250 00 
66 65 




66 65 


125 00 


1S6 00 


83 83 


83 33 


83 83 


83 38 


195 00 


185 00 


100 00 


100 00 


489 00 


468 00 


125 00 


126 00 


100 00 


100 00 


16 65 


16 66 


83 38 


88 38 


149 50 


149 60 


100 00 


100 00 


147 79 


147 79 


60 46 


60 46 


1 77 
64 98 




4178 


998 35 


26 20 


11167 


11157 


25 
76 13 




"76 66 



Balances 
Nov.a0,1874 



♦$17,081 

•100 

•34 

8,466 

65 

800 



12 

•12 



•3 

1,000 

5 

16 



•31)6 62 



•2SO0O 



87 00 



•1 n 
•13 85 
•903 16 



•26 
♦47 



Page of Laws. 



146 of 1866. 

178 of 1867. 

179 of 1888. 
191 of 1870. 
188 of 1876. 
199 of 1871. 
199 

33 " 
201 " 
188 " 
171 of 1872. 
1T3 •» 

m " 

164 " 
187 " 
185 

185 " 
645 Spec'l 1879. 

987 of 1878. 



839 " 

289 " 

230 " 

239 " 

239 " 

246 «* 
239 " 
239 •* 
239 •' 
242 " 
239 " 
239 " 

a» " 

889 " 

839 " 

289 " 

839 " 

239 »* 

839 '' 

240 of 1873, 

840 *• 
240 " 
840 " 
240 

210 «< 

247 " 
840 " 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 



ANKUAL BBPOBT. 
STATEMENT "A"— Continued. 



APPEOPMATiONS OF 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 
1872 and 1873. 



Appropriations. 



Salaries of JudgM 

Clerk Sapreme Coart 

ReporterSap. Coart 

Marshal Bap. Coart 

Sap . Coart Contiagent. » 

Sap. Court Reporis, vol. 19 

Law Library 

Soldiers* Orphans 

Prison Current Expense 

Prison Officers 

Insane Support 

Deaf, Dumb and Blind Baildinjc. .. 

Uniyerslty Building. 

Third Normal School BuUding.. . . 

Intereston Loans 

Sheriffs' Fund 

Selling State Lands 

Capitol Bztenaion 

Bepairs of Capitol 

Fuel and Lights 

Bzpressage and Mileage 

Dnluth Harbor 

Training Schools 

Teachers' Institutes 

Historical Society 

Bent of Arsenal.. 

Reward for Arrest Murderers Cook 

family 

Seed Wheat Certf 's (Bef. *7S!) 

Hon ument 5th Minn. Vols 

Haines' Township Org. Laws 

Co. £,8dMinn. Vols 

Bxpenses of Loan 

Transportation Ind. Prisoners 

Pennock Pusey. .,.....« 

Bast ChainlAke Bridge 

Red River Bridge 

Hawk Creek Bridge 

Minnesota Riyer Bridge 

St. Francis River Bridge 

Chippewa Riv. Bridge (Swift Co).. 

Zumbro River Bridge 

Duluth and Pigeon.River Road... 

Total 1873^ an<l prior years 

^ Canceled. 



Am*t8 ap- 
propriated. 



$7,7»1 76 
1X5 00 
60 00 
166 00 
18 99 
1,200 00 
64 40 

6^(43 86 
1,600 00 
764 01 
11,600 00 
9,000 CO 
36,000 00 
10,000 00 

20,666 67 

1,507 66 

60 

04 

134 74 

869 61 

2 69 

9,226 00 

1,133 67 

18 90 

696 77 

100 00 

2,000 00 
397 50 
500 00 

1,200 00 

226 94 

876 00 

169 40 

90 00 

600 00 
2,000 00 

800 00 
1,000 00 

400 00 

600 00 
2,000 00 
1.600 00 



$181,649 78 



Warrants 
drawn 1874. 



$7,716 37 
126 00 
60 00 



Balances 
Nov. 30, '74. 



16 73) 

1,200 00 

51 63 

3,399 29 
1,600 00 
764 01 
11,600 00 
9,000 00 
86,000 00 
10,000 00 

14,700 00 
446 76 



184 74 
719 19 



696 77 
100 00 



600 
600 00 



33 80 



169 40 
SO 00 

600 00 
2,000 00 

800 00 
1,000 00 

400 00 

600 00 
2,000 00 
1,413 07 



$183,433 13 



^$76 39 



* 166 00 
*226 



277 
« 8,144 67 



« 6,966 07 

1,06188 

♦ 60 

*04 



140 42 

•269 

9,226 00 

♦ 1,133 67 

•18 90 



•8,000 00 
392 60 



•1,200 00 

193 14 

•376 00 



•86 93 



$48,116 66 



Page of Laws* 



239 of 1878. 

239 " 

k39 *' 

240 

241 

242 

241 •* 

M6 •• 

849 " 

942 " 

243 *• 

251 " 
966 

S69 " 

241 •• 

941 " 

241 

249 •* 

941 «• 

941 

241 " 

279 •* 

76 

76 

241 " 

241 '* 



948 
259 
266 
260 
232 
247 
941 

314 Spec 1878. 

313 

331 

310 

391 

322 

326 

314 



APPROPRIATIONS OF 1874. 



Appropriations. 



Legislative 

Senate Court of Impeachm't of '73. 

Senate Stationery 

Printing Messages 

Legislative Committee on Cass Co. 



Amt's ap- 
propriated. 



$66,000 00 

4,000 00 

600 00 

767 66 

638 00 



Warrants 
drawn 1874. 



$66,000 00 

3,669 96 

476 87 

760 00 

610 30 



Balances 
Nov. 30, '74. 



$340 76 
23 63 
17 69 
27 70 



Page of Laws. 



967 of 1874. 

972 •• 

280 

976 •• 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OF STATE. 
STATEMENT «« A."— Continued. 

APPBOPBIATIONS OF 1874. 



59 



Appropriations. 



LegisUtiTe Com. on Pine Lands 
LegialatlTo Com. on tt. 4. Railroad 
Lagis. Com. on Printing (J.C. Wiaa) 
Legia. Com. on Insane (2 items). 
Leglslatlye Com. on Blevators. 

L^ttlatlTe Com. on Prison , 

GontesM Election of Loreaso Hoyt 
Contes'd Election of 01. H. Howe, 
Contes'd Election of McArthnr.... 

Goyemor^s salary , 

Secretary's salary t ..... 

Auditor's and Ld. Com. salary...., 

Treasurer's salary 

Attorney Qenerai's salary 

AdJt. Generars salary 

Snpt. Public Instraction 

Ballroad Commissioner 

Bailroad Commissioners 

Insurance Commissioner , 

Librarian's salary , 

Janitor's salary , 

Assistant Janitor 

Might Watch, Bngi'r and Fireman , 

XUitary Storekeeper 

Xeeseoger 

GoTemor's Private Secretary 

Assistant Secretary of State 

Statistican's salary.... , 

Auditor's chief clerk 

Landderk . 

Auditor's clerks , 

Deputy Treasurer , 

Public Instruction clerk , 

Attorney Qeneial's clerk 

Bzecutiye Contingent 

Sxecutiye Contingent (Postage)... 

Secretary's Contingent 

Auditor's Contingent 

Treasurer's ContlDgent. 

Att'y General's Contingent 

Public Instruction Contingent. .... 
Bailroad Commiit^ners' Contingent 

AdJt. General's Contingent 

Library Contingent... , 

Salaries of Judges , 

Clerk of Supreme Court 

Reporter of Supreme Court. .... 

Ifs^hal of Supreme Court 

Supreme Oonrt Contingent 

Supreme Court Reports, Vol. 20 
Law Library 

Printing, Advertising and Binding 
Printing and Advertising 0)ef.)... 

Printing and Binding (Def.) 

Printing Laws in Newspapers 

Printing Laws in Newspa^rs (Def.) 

Priming Paper 

Prepar&Lg and Indexing Laws. . ! .' . 

Soldiers' Orphans 

Prison Current Expenses 

Insane support. 

Deaf, Dumb and Blind support. . . . 
Reform School support 



Am't ap- 
propriated. 



$228 75 
340 70 
100 00 
138 00 
88 76 
35 00 

76 44 
300 00 

77 76 

3,000 00 
1,800 00 
2,600 00 
8,600 00 
1,600 00 
1,600 00 
2,600 00 
3,000 00 
11,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,200 00 
1,000 00 

380 00 
1,800 00 

400 00 

120 00 
1,600 00 
1,000 00 
l,0OJO0 
1,600 00 
1,200 00 
1,000 00 
1,500 00 
1.200 00 

200 00 

3,000 00 
100 00 
400 00 
600 00 
400*00 

1,000 00 
600 00 

1,000 00 
800 00 
400 00 

39,000 00 

1,600 00 

600 00 

200 00 

600 00 

1,20(100 

2,000 00 

81,900 00 
1,000 00 

10.736 23 

6,000 00 

1,677 26 

6,000 00 

200 00 

20,000 00 
38,000 00 
84,000 00 
26,000 00 
30,000 00 



WarranU 
drawn 1874. 



$223 76 
840 70 
100 00 
138 00 
38 26 
32 00 

76 44 
300 00 

77 76 

2,822 00 
1,660 00 
2,291 67 
3,208 36 

1.375 00 

1.376 00 
2,891 67 

626 00 
7,406 00 
1,833 35 
1,100 00 

916 67 

319 00 
1,602 00 
• 300 00 

120 00 
1,376 00 

916 67 

916 67 
1,875 00 
1,100 00 

770 00 
1,376 00 
1,100 00 

150 00 

2,40136 
100 00 
398 70 
452 79 
247 10 
734 75 
416 34 

1,000 00 
299 86 
896 95 

38,606 81 

1,186 00 

460 00 

112 00 

334 69 

"i;896*8i 

81,899 16 

996 29 

10,736 »3 

6,000 00 

1,677 85 

5,997 19 

200 00 

16,686 88 
32,698 47 
73,000 00 
86,000 00 
80.000 00 



Balances 
Nov. 30, '74. 



60 
300 



177 60 

150 00 

208 33 

891 65 

126 00 

126 00 

208 33 

8,876 00 

3,6^4 00 

166 66 

JOOOi) 

83 33 

61 00 

198 00 

100 00 



125 00 
83 83 
83 33 

126 00 
100 00 
230 00 
125 00 
100 00 

60 00 

696 66 



7 30 

47 21 

152 90 

266 25 

83 66 



16 
306 

6,493 19 

376 00 

160 00 

88 00 

165 41 

1,200 00 
104 19 

84 
3 71 



2 81 



3,374 72 
6,40b 53 
11,000 00 



Page of Laws* 


274 of 1874* 


274 


»* 


273 


»4 


260 


** 


260 


*• 


260 


*» 


272 


*• 


278 


4* 


272 


l» 


261 


.. 


261 


t* 


261 




261 


«• 


861 


4» 


261 


l» 


261 


»« 


261 


4« 


265 


»• 


861 


• • 


261 


t» 


261 


** 


2S8 


t» 


261 


4* 


261 


4«, 


862 


ti 


261 


• * 


261 


<» 


261 


«l 


861 


»• 


261 


»i 


261 


*» 


262 


4, 


262 


«• 


262 


*« 


257 


«» 


271 


(4 


258 


41 


868 


44 


268 


»• 


258 


*• 


858 


(• 


258 


44 


268 


4* 


258 


«• 


268 


(• 


262 


44 


862 


l» 


868 


44 


268 


<4 


268 


4< 


268 


4. 


268 


44 


273 


44 


873 


44 


260 


4* 


273 


•( 


258 


4« 


268 


44 


260 


•4 


266 


44 


866 


It 


867 of 1874. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



60 



ANNUAL BBPOBT* 



STATEMENT « A ''— Continued. 

APPROPRIATIONS OP 1874. 



AppropriftUQUs. 



Fl?it Normal School ■op. (tUnd'ff) 
FJFftl Norma) School sup. (1874)*-. 
Sewdti Nurmal Sch^ ftijp. (jt&od'gj 
Becoiid Normal Schl mip. (ISHJ^.* 
Third NortflftE Sch4 i,ijp, t&UndlBg) 
Third Normal School aap. (197HJ... 

PrlMon nulldtngft* . ,,.*,.,.,.-.,.., 

Insane Bunding 

Eer^rui School, UaalliigbtJUdlDp. 

UnlTOtiplty, HoLtlD^aad Knrnlflli'g 

TMrd Nuriuul SchqoJ, Heating, 

FLimUbloi;, M..,. .,,... ........ 

Ititertston Loao*.,., 

Frontier ReUflf Ibm*! f min} , 

FfooliBr BftUef (dlBlTws),. , 

Kelief to SeUltirB do N. P, H. R. 

Limii*.-.-" ..»....■.■*■-'* 

Hellef lo Immigranla 

SherlfTii" Fun il. .,..,.... ,*».. 

fielline^tateLiiUd*..... „ 

SelecUDg iJftlv*r*lty Lauds. - , 1 

Fii#Uod Lifihts..... ..*... 

Traltilaj; School and Inatilntei.., 

Hl*torScal Solely ^.. , . . 

AKiiflnltnrft* Societies,.,.,,. ,,.„ 
WlBonn &9t, Peter R- R, ts, Blak» 
Stfttloo'ry for Le^i^litureuni! SUU 

0(ficei'« . * * •' ' ' — 

QeoloKlcal 8nrvoy... 

Mardinen Socipty 

eutft Board of If fjulth. 1973 

fiuto Board of BeJiltb, 13T4 , 

Booth ^fl Towrti^Ulp La we 

Bepatr!! of C»pll»l - 

6o wer to Capltul. 

Flltifift Roomt for Secretary --.... 
Fiiiir.K Court and Library llooms, 

Painltaff Capitol ;'■■'■■ 

FtirnUhliig Com. Kooioi {2 lleoiB). 

Fres^colniT and Kttlftyraliiing 

euperiniendiuK Bfrpalns, '73 

t!ei4t)tig Uipltol, IKM-S*. . — *,,..,. 

VentSUtlQK bcei*V«tlre DftU* 

Etpr*!*» and Mlleiige.. ...,*.. 

Beoi of Oovemot'B HooHe. ........ 

Kenlof Araenal. 

Becker Co. Ttlal Of Cook Mnrd**., 
Trial Marderera Cock and Swede 

Fatuineft. .. - .' ^ 

Kmmlij'ohl Co. (TrUl of Cotiuy and 

BrutiiJtm w ). ...... ^ ........_..„ 

Indian Diffl<5iiitle» at W«.d«iia. .... 

Safe for Kxocutiie Office ......... 

Fl*h Commit* loners 

Revrurd for Arrest of DouahaOH. ,, 
Ilrldge Exam'ra (Oblppewa Rlvor). 

Ainoi CoflgftiToll. - - * .-..,... 

A C. Minrj...*.- 

Mark Uendiickft - 

A- r. Nelson ..... 

ChrlfltUo J& wsTiBon ........ i ,, - .„ , 

0. Y. McMai'tcra...... .. ..*,,. 

Chaa^ N ■ Hewlett. ..... 

Cb*a. njortJberg .. 

Pr. Alex.J. Stona 



Am*t8 ap- 
propriated. 



$5,000 00 
6,000 00 
6,000 00 
4,000 00 
6,000 00 
4,000 00 

10,000 00 
66,000 00 
6,500 00 
80,360 00 

10,000 00 

35,000 00 

26,000 00 

6,000 00 

8,600 00 
1,000 00 
8.000 00 
8,500 00 
2,600 00 
3,500 00 
8,000 00 
2,600 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 

8.000 00 

2,000 00 

1,600 00 

1,600 00 

1,600 00 

1,200 00 

8,000 00 

1,000 00 

1.200 00 

600 00 

600 00 

86^96 

860 00 

825 00 

1,187 00 

1,500 00 

600 00 

800 00 

626 00 

1,377 29 

760 00 

1,000 00 
887 70 
000 00 
600 00 
260 00 
46 00 

860 00 
130 00 
868 00 
600 00 
200 00 
800 00 
200 00 
100 00 
160 00 



Warrants 
drawn 1874. 



$6,000 00 
6,000 00 
6,000 00 
3,260 00 
5,000 00 
2,000 00 

6,849 86 
66,000 00 

6,500 00 
86,600 00 

10,000 00 

16,655 00 

25,000 00 

6,000 00 

1,146 00 
826 86 
2,944 30 
8,861 87 
1,281 19 
3,447 66 
2,710 73 
2,888 77 
3.000 00 
1,000 00 

1,999 49 
2,000 00 
1,600 00 
1,500 00 
1,269 17 
l,a 00 
3,000 90 
80 00 
1,200 00 
800 00 



862 96 

260 00 

286 00 

1,187 00 

1.600 00 

434 20 

733 26 

400 00 

1,877 29 

683 00 

1,000 00 
887 70 
400 00 
• 400 00 
250 00 
46 00 

250 00 
180 00 
268 00 
500 00 
160 00 
300 00 
200 00 
100 60 
ICO 00 



Balances 
Nov. 30, '74, 



$760 00 



2,000 00 
4,160 66 



2,060 00 



18,446 00 



1,366 00 

174 76 

56 70 

1,138 63 

1,818 81 

52 35 

269 37 

116 28 



2,000 00 
51 



830 83 



920 00 

sooob 



66 80 
66 74 
185 00 



887 00 



200 00 
100 00 



60 00 



Page of Laws. 



146 of 1864. 
862 of 1874. 

14 of 1869. 
262 of 1874. 

16 of 1869. 
262 of 1874. 

870 of 1874 
266 •• 
276 «• 
269 " 

866 



864 



316 



260 •• 

289 " 
864 •* 
269 " 
83 of 1868. 
860 of 1874. 

260 of 1874. 

266 of 1873. 

871 of 1874. 

274 

259 " 

266 



869 
269 
869 
860 
260 
274 
276 
261 
259 
261 
869 
276 

276 

878 
269 
873 
866 

316 
276 

859 
269 
277 
380 
281 
281 
874 
874 
376 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDTTOB 07 STATB. 

STATEMENT "A"— Continued. 

APPBOFBIATIONS FOB 1874. 



61 



Appropriations. 



W. D. Fllnn 

Dn. Mnrphy A Wharton. 

Dr. S. B Haynea 

Dr. W. W. Clark. 

A.D. Ferrit 

Owen Bgan 

Peter Harff 

Sherwood Hoagh 

John C. Shaw , 



Chippewa B bridge (Douglas Co.) 
Chippewa Riyer bridge (Pope Co.) 
Chippewa River bridge (Swift Co.) 

St. Loais River bridge 

Lac qui Parle River bridge 

Minnesota River bridge 

Fort Rldgely Creek brl dge 

BmsL Greek bridge. 

Des Mqlnes River bridge 



i 116 00 
100 00 
84 00 
60 00 
100 00 
78 30 
64 00 
84 00 
28 00 

20OOO 
800 00 
300 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
800 00 
400 00 
600 00 
600 00 
700 00 
400 00 
160 00 
900 00 
300 00 
200 00 
600 00 
800 00 
600 00 
600 
860 06 

193,689 36 
80,088 87 
86,896 00 
22,840 00 
2,267 80 
8,833 06 
66,822 92 
10,663 60 

JoUls 1874 appropriations .... $1 ,091.001 26 



Wing Rivers bridge. 

Sponk Brook and Two Rivers bdg 

Three Mile Oreek bridge 

St. Francis River bridge 

Fish Lake bridge 

Pomme de Terre River bridge... 

Crow Rive r bridge .... 

Otter Tail River bridge 

Beaver Creek bridge 

Pike Creek bridge 

Rnsh City ana Cambridge road.. 



General School 

General University , 

Permanent School , 

Permanent University 

Internal Improvement Land Fund 

Inebriate Asylum Fond 

Sinking Fnnd , 

Interest on R. R. Bonds 



Amounts 
appropriated, 



Warrants 
drawn 1874. 



Balances 
Nov.30,»74. 



116 00 
100 00 

84 oo; 

60 001 
100 001 
78 80 
64 00 
34 00 
28 00 



800 00 

'i*,oo6*o6 
"soooo 



600 00 
700 00 



160 00 



600 00 



600 00 
600 00 
860 00 

192,589 86 
30,068 37 
86,896 00 
a,940 00 
3,267 60 
3,888 05 
66,822 92 
10,662 60 



$1,010,400 88 



900 00 
"*20b*66 

'i',(i66'6o 



400 00 
600 00 



400 00 



200 00 
300 00 
800 00 



300 00 



900 00 



$80,600 43 



P.ofLaw»# 



274 of 1874. 

374 

276 " 

274 *• 

260 ♦• 

382 •* 

2n 

869 

869 *' 

394 «* 

889 ♦» 

891 •« 

401 •* 



887 
386 
384 
897 
404 
406 
893 



402 " 

400 •* 

399 •• 
398 

817 *• 

77 of 1878. 

4 of 1868. 

863 of 1874. 



808 " 
253 " 
887bp'1*74. 



DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS : 



Revenue 

Interest 


$ 647,878 90 
66,666 67 
66,823 92 
847,307 87 
86 896 00 
192,689 a 
22,840 00 
30,088 37 
18,800 00 
2,367 50 
2,332 06 
10,662 60 


SinkincFnnd 


State Institutions.. 


Permanent School 

General School 


Permanent University 

General Unlversltv 

Internal ImpH (bridge) fond 

Internal Improvement Land Fond 

Inebriate Asylum 

Interest on it. R> Bonds 






$1,272,661 03 



474,436 86 
81»265 00 
66,822 92 

821,682 06 
86,896 00 

192,689 26 
21,940 00 
30,038 37 
14,513 07 
2,267 60 
2,338 06 
10,668 60 



$1,148,833 96 $188,717 07 



$ 73,448 66 
24,411 67 



26,676 88 



900 00 



4,886 93 



Digitized by VjOOQIC ' 



62 ANKUAL BEPOBT. 



STATEMENT "B." 

Showing the Estimated Expenses of the State Government, in 
detail for the year 1875. 



LKGISLATIVS DEPARTMENT. 

Per diem of members and officers of the Legisla- 
ture, sixty days $52,000 00 

Mileage of members 5,000 00 

Statimery 3,000 00 

Newspapers and postage 8,000 00 

Miscellaneous expenses 7,000 00 



$70,000 00 



BXBCUTIVB DEPARTMENT. 

Salary of Oovemor and House Rent $8,800 00 

Salary of Secretary of State 1,800 00 

Salary of Auditor of State and Land Commisslon'r 2,600 00 

Salary of State Treasurer 8,500 00 

Salary of Attorney General 1,000 00 

Salary of Adjutant General 1,500 00 

Salary of Superintendent of Public Instruction... 2,500 00 

Salary of Railroad Commissioners and Clerk 10,200 00 

Salary of Insurance Commissioner 2,000 00 

Salary of Librarian 1,200 00 

Salary of Janitor 1,000 00 

Salary of Assistant Janitor 880 00 

Salary of Engineer and Night Watchman 1,600 00 

Salary of Arsenal Keeper. 400 00 

Salary of Governor's Private Secretary 1,600 00 

Salary of Clerks in Auditor's office 8,500 00 

Salaiy of A seilstant Secretary of State 1,000 00 

Salary of Statistician 1,000 00 

Salary of Deputy Treasurer 1,600 00 

Salary of Clerk of Supt. Public Instruction 1,200 00 

Salary of Clerk of Attorney General ..,., 200 00 

Executive Contingent 8,000 00 

Secretary's Contingent 400 00 

Auditor's Contingent 500 00 

Treasurer's Contingent 400 00 

Attorney General's Contingent „ 1,000 00 

Public Instruction Contingent 600 00 

Railroad Commissioners' Contingent 1,000 00 

Adjutant General's Contingent 800 00 

Librarian's Contingent 400 00 



$50,780 00 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUBITOB OP STATE. 63 



JUDICIAL DKPARTIfKNT. 

Salaries of Judges of Supreme Court $9,000 00 

Salaries of Judges of District and Common Pleas 

Courts 82,500 00 

Salary of the Clerk Supreme Court 1,600 00 

Salary of the Reporter of the Supreme Court.. .. 600 00 

Marshal of the Supreme Court 200 00 

Supreme Court CoDtiugeut. . .' '. 500 00 

Two hundred copies of Vol. 21, Supreme Court 

Reports 1,200 00 

Additional Law BooIls 800 00 



#46,800 00 



PX7BU0 PBIMTIKO. 

Printing Executive Documents $10,000 00 

Printing for the Legislature 2,400 00 

Printing Laws 5,000 00 

Printing Journals ^ 8,000 00 

Printing Laws in Newspapers 12,000 00 

Printing and Advertising for State Departments . . 5,000 00 

Preparing Laws and Journals 200 00 

Printing Paper. 8,000 00 



OF 8TATB UVTTITUnOMS. 



$45,600 00 



Current Expenses of Prison #40,000 00 

Support of Insane 87,500 00 

Deaf, Dumb and Blind 26,000 00 

Reform School 27,000 00 

Support of Normal Schools 82,000 00 

Support of Soldiers* Orphans 18,000 00 

State University 81,000 00 

$261,500 00 

Interest on State Loans 88,600 00 

Investments for Sinking Fund 87,750 00 

MI8GKLLAMIE0U6. 

Appraising, selling and selecting lands #2,500 00 

Conveying convicts to prison and returning fugi- 
tives from Justice 8,000 00 

County Treasurers' mileage and express charges. 500 00 

Fuel and Lights 8,000 00 

Repairs of Capitol 8,000 00 

Historical Society 2,500 00 

Geological Survey 2,000 00 

Teachers' Institutes and Training Schools 8,000 00 

Agricultural Societies 8,000 00 

Bent of Arsenal 500 00 

Sundries, (including outstanding warrants,) 10,000 00 

#88,000 00 

Claims provided for by appropriation #97,578 40 

Deflclencies 22,500 00 

#120,078 40 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



64 AimUAIi BEPOBT. 

RBCAPITXTULTION. 

Legislative ^..970,000 00 

Execative 60,780 00 

Judicial 46,800 00 

Public PrintlDg 45,600 00 

Current expenses of State Inatitutions 261,500 00 

Miscellanoous, (includlug warrants outstanding,) 88,000 00 

Interest on Loans 83,600 00 

Investments of Sinking Fund 87,750 00 

Claims provided for by appropriation 97,278 40 

Deficiencies 22,500 00 

9498,808 40 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OF STATB. 



65 



STATEMENT "C." 

Showing the total charges on account of State Taxes against the several coun- 
ties of the State during the fiscal year, ending November SO, 1874, including 
the balances due at the commencement of the year^ the credits given during 
the year, and the balances remaining delinquent at the close of the year. 



Countiee* 



Aitkin 

Anoka 

Becker 

Benton. > 

Blue Sartb 

Brown 

Carlton 

Carver 

Cass 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Clay 

Cottonwood 

Crow Wing 

DakoU. ... 

Dodge 

Donglaa 

Farloanlt 

•Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Goodhne 

Hennepin 

Honston 

Isanti 

Jackson 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Lacqai Parle 

Lake 

Le Saear 

Lyon 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker. 

MiUe Lacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 

Nicollet 

Nobles 

Olmsted 

Otter Tall 

Pile 

Polk 

Pope 

Ramsey 

Bedwood 

BenTille 

Rice 

Rock 

St. Lonis 

tJcott 

Sherbnrne 

Sibley 

Stearns 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Waseca 

Wadena 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine. 



Delinquent and 
current taxes. 



I 1,063 10 
13,815 69 

1.822 00 
7,349 02 

87,679 00 
9,409 46 
1.484 02 

13,908 17 
4,591 09 
1,242 49 

12.971 61 
4,675 76 
2,040 48 

2.823 38 
46,04f» 10 
15,783 22 

5,779 82 
12 923 40 
41,509 48 
15,546 76 
33 746 06 
66,029 17 
25,231 13 

3,695 59 

1,654 42 

2,743 88 

7,090 50 

705 02 

949 06 

14,731 86 

668 75 

14,548 80 

3,976 79 
10,246 59 

8,547 00 
12,082 55 
83 060 16 

1268 63 
17,710 76 

1,659 88 
84,260 33 

5.68^43 

12,780 91 

776 73 

4,827 66 
174 628 01 

8,290 59 

4,319 90 

24,259 01 

902 82 

20.228 59 

15,860 02 

5,725 62 

16,944 48 

25,328 98 

13,696 14 

489 57 

759 61 

6,080 27 
31,038 27 

9 662 12 

199 55 

31,684 87 

4.170 98 

3 041 00 
86.293 61 
16,851 93 

2,198 70 



$1,023,081 S2 



Total Credits, 



$ 641 10 

6,065 51 

857 87 

2.418 22 

27.790 99 

6,658 10 

927 80 

8,590 66 

8,995 63 

1,106 38 

6,896 19 

2,162 64 

417 06 

l,80i 08 

24 086 20 

10,381 83 

4,842 78 

9.358 73 

25,206 28 

8,976 24 

80,628 67 

47,377 61 

14.948 60 

1,628 86 

641 72 

1,611 89 

4.511 tl 

583 53 

562 14 

8^2 89 

340 11 

6,918 14 

8,466 95 

5,349 33 

1,546 77 

2,757 86 

16,181 38 

292 01 

9.105 69 
851 46 

22,865 01 
4,054 12 
2,256 78 
454 31 
8,809 78 

77,938 26 
8,162 19 
8,542 89 

18,014 82 
267 94 

16,546 29 

10,473 16 
2,860 65 
6,085 69 

15,407 60 

10,381 50 

4^91 

665 75 

8,787 84 

16,539 02 

7,028 31 

180 50 

20,071 48 
2.621 12 
3,014 86 

32,418 89 

8.106 27 
1341 80 



Balances Due. 



$ 428 00 

7.750 18 
964 13 

4,985 80 
9,888 01 

2.751 86 
666 28 

6,817 62 

596 46 

184 11 

7,076 48 

2,513 12 

1,623 48 

1,019 30 

28,961 90 

5,401 89 

967 04 

3,661 67 

16,803 26 

6,.'^9 58 

3,221 89 

18,651 66 

10.287 58 

2,078 84 

1,012 40 

1,232 40 

8,570 29 

171 49 

306 92 

6,318 97 

488 64 

7,685 66 

509 84 

4.897 26 

7,000 23 

9,274 69 

17,928 83 

976 59 

8,606 16 

808 48 

11^95 81 

1,629 31 

10,584 13 

322 42 

1,927 87 

96,604 75 

5,128 40 

1,777 61 

6,214 69 

684 88 

4,677 30 

4,876 86 

8.866 00 

9,908 89 

9,921 48 

2,813 61 

8 66 

108 76 

3,302 Ot 

14.494 25 

2,688 81 

70 a5 

10,712 89 

1,649 8C 

26 65 

3,874 72 

8,745 66 

856 00 



$699,062 06 ' $484,029 27 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



66 



ANNUAIi BKPOBT. 
STATEMENT "D/* 



Skowing the action of the State Board of Equalization^ at its 
sesiiion begun on the first Monday of September ^ 1874. 

Besolved, That aU shares of National Bank Stock, in this State, be as- 
sessed at par value. 

Beaolvedj That the Auditor of Blue Earth County be instructed to enter 
upon th^ Tax Lists for Blue Earth County, for the year 1874, all shares or 
National Bank Stock at par value; and that the Auditor of Ramsey 
County be instructed to enter the Capital Stock of the German American 
Bank of St. Paul, upon the Tax Lists/of said Bamsey County, for the 
year 1874, at two hundred thousand dollars. 

Besolved^ by the State Board of Equalization, That the aggregate as- 
sessed valuation of Heal and Personal Property of the several counties of 
this State, hereinafter named, as returned to this Board, be, and the same 
is hereby adopted as the true and fUli value thereof in money, with the 
changes and alterations in respect to each of said counties, and the 
several classes of property thbrein, as hereinafter particularly indicated 
and stated, viz. : 



Najosof 
couhtixs* 


Aggregate Value 
ofLands (other 

exclusive of 

structures there* 

on. 


Value of Struc- 
tures worth more 
than tlOO each on 

Real Property 

other than Town 

Lots, as noted on 

Plat Books. 


Aggregate Value 

of Town and City 

Lots including 

on. 


Total Value of al! 
Personal Proper- 
ty included in the 

thirty items as 
equalized by the 

County Board. 


Aitkin 


No change. 

60 pr. ct Increase 

50 »• 

60 " *« 

70 " 

36 " •* 

10 " " 

100 " 

10 " 

No change. 

70pr.ct increase 

80 '• 

80 »' " 

No change. 

26 pr. ct. increase 

76 *» " 

80 «* 

100 ** " 

100 " 

60 *• " 

60 *» 

20 " 

12i pe. ct. dec*se 

180 pr. ct. incr'se 

60 •* 

100 ** 

60 •* «• 

100 « «* 

100 " 

60 " 

66 " •« 

50 •♦ 

70 " 

90 •' 

120 " 

50 " 

76 " 

60 •* 

15 '• " 

30 ** *' 

100 *• 


No change. 

60 pr.ct Increase 

60 " 

50 •* *• 

70 " •« 

No change. 

100 pr.ct increase 
10 «' ** 
No change. 
70 pr. Ct. increase 
30 •* •♦ 
No change. 

100 pr.ct. Increase 

76 " 

80 " 

100 " " 

100 " 

60 " 

60 *• " 

M « «. 

12i pr. ct dec'se 
130 pr. ct incr*se 
No change. 

lOOpr.ct. lncr*se 

100 '» 

60 " 

66 '• »* 

60 '• 

70 " 

90 «• 

120 " " 

No change. 

75 pr. ct. increase 

50 " 

16 « 

30 " 

100 " »• 


50 pr.ct increase 
50 " 

60 « " 
26 " " 

10 «• 

10 " *« 

150 •• 

10 " 

No change. 

70 pr. ct. increase 

No cnange. 

SO pr. ct Increase 

No change. 

40 pr. ct. increase 

100 " 

50 " ** 

76 " " 

100 " 

40 " «« 

50 " " 

90 ** '* 

ISi *' decrease 

80 *♦ Increase 

No change. 

4. 4k 
C4 44 
U »l 
44 It 

60 pr. ct. Increase 

lOO " 

50 «* 

70 " 

90 " " 

120 " 

45 pr. ct. increase 

60 " 

16 " " 

30 " 

100 " 


No change. 

20 pr. ct. increase 

No' change. 

96 pr. ct. increase 

96 •' '• ♦ 

20 " 

No change. 

30 pr.ct incr*set 

No change. 

20 pr. ct. decrease 

No change. 


Anoka 

Becker 


Benton.. . .... 

BlneBarth 

Brown 

Carlton 


Carver 


Caes 


Chippewa 

Chicago. •• 


Clay 


Cottonwood.... 
Crow Wing. ... 
DakoU 


20 pr. ct. increase 
No change. 
10 pr. ct Incr'se** 
96 " 


Dodge 


Douglas. .... .... 


No change. 
26 pr. ct Increase 
60 " 
40 " 

26 pr. ct. incr*se» 

No change.* 

26 pr.ct increase 

No change. 

95 pr. ct increase 

No change. 

It 11 
II It 
i« t» 

60 pr. ct increase 

26 " 

20 " " 

60 •* •• 

No change, 
ti t«** 

25 pr. ct increase 
No change.* 

«4 41*' 


Farihault 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Grant. ... ■ • 


Goodhae 

Bennepin 

Uouston 

Itenti 


jHckson 

Kanabec. ..... 

Eaodlyohi 

Lake.: 

Lac qui Parle... 

Le Sueur 

Lincoln 

Lyon 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

MilleLacs 

Morrison 

Mower 


Murray •. 


Nicollet 


20 pr. ct incr'se* 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OF STATS. 
STATEMENT «'D."— Continued. 



67 



NAJOssoy 

COUHTIBB. 



oflLands (other 
than Town Lote;) 

exclusive of 
stmctures there- 
on. 



Nobles 

Olmsted .... 
Otter TaU... 

Pine 

Polk 

Pope 

Ramsey 

Redwood... 
Renville.... 

Rice 

Rock 

St. Louis.... 

Scott 

Sherborne.. 

Sibley 

Steams.... 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha . .. 
Wadena..... 

Waseca 

Washington 
Watonwan . 

WUkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine 



Aggregate Valne 
of Lands ( 



lOOpr.ct increase 
20 " *• 

M) " 

10 " •• 
No change. 
150 pr.ct. Increase 
No change. 
' pr. ct. increase 
60 »' 

100 " " 

60 " 
No change. 

70 pr. ct. increase 
150 «' •• 

100 " " 

90 " " 

60 •• ** 

60 ♦• •* 

60 " 

30 «* «• 

No change. 
106 pr.ct. increase 
60 " " 

76 " «' 

60 " " 

10 " " 

60 " " 

60 ** •* 



Valae of Strac- 
tures worth more 
than $100 each on 

Real Property 

other than Town 

Lota, as noted on 

Plat Books. 



Aggregate Value 
ot town and City 

Lots including 
Structures there- 
on. 



No change. 

ao pr. ct. increase 

No change. 

10 pr. ct. increase 

No change. 

iSOpr.ct.lncrerse 

60 " 

60 *• 

60 " 

100 *• 

50 " 

No change. 
Ik «* 

70 pr. ct. increase 

160 " 

100 " 

«0 •* 

60 " 

fO " 

60 •• 

30 •• 

No change. 

106 pr.ct.incr ease 

60 " 

76 " 

flO " 

10 •• 

60 •• 

60 " 



Total Value of all 
Personal Proper- 
ty Included in the 

thirty itemH as 
equalized by the 

County Board. 



60 pr. ct. increase 
20 '* 

23 pr.ct. decrease 
No change. 

100 pr ct. increase 

No change. 

60 pr. ct. increase 

60 " 

100 *• " 

60 " 

No change. 

70 pr. ct. increase 

100 " 

No change. 

90 pr. ct. increase 

60 " " 

60 " " 

60 " 

26 " *• 

No chance. 

106pr ct.lncrea8e 

20 " 

46 " 

No change. 

t* 4» 

60 pr. ct. increase 
60 " 



No change. 



76 pr.ct.increase* 
No change. 

ti 41 



30 pr. ct. increase 

80 ■• 

26 



change. 
20 pr. ct. increase 
26 ** " 

No change.* 

tt u 

60 pr. ct Increase 

No change.* 

26 pr. ctlncrease 

No change 

16 pr. ct. de*crs*t 

No chauge. 



* Except shares of National Bank Stock; in relation to which iee first resolution 
ftboye. 

County Auditors are directed to !place shares of National Bank Stock upon the tax 
lists in the names of the owners thereof; at par valne, without Wny reduction for any 
purpose whatever. 

t Bzcept in Winona City. 

X Bxcepting Moneys and Credits in the Town of Carver, and property assessed to 
the banking Ann of Howe, Straight A Co., of Ohatka. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 



AMMUAIi BEPOBT. 



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AUDITOB OF STATU. 



69 



























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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



70 



ANNUAL BKPOBT. 



STATBNTBNT 

Abstract qf p9nowA property, moneys and crsdits, in tht several countiee of the State of 
____^__^____ 3tQle Boards of 



Ck>naUes. 



No. of 
persons 
assessed 

excla- 
siTe of 

firms 



Aitkin 

Anoka 

Becker 

Benton 

BlaeBartb 

Brown ... 

Carlton 

Carver 

Cas(« 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Clay 

Cottonwood 

Crow Wing 

Dakota 

Dodge 

Douglas 

Faribault 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Graut 

Qoodhae... 

Hennepin 

Houston 

Iftanti 

Jackson 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Lake 

Lac qui Parle .... 

LeSueur 

Lincoln 

Lyon 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

Mille Lacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 

Nicollet 

Kobles 

Olmsted 

Otter Tail 

Piue 

Polk 

Pope 

Kamsey 

Redwood 

Renville 

Rice 

Rock 

8t. Louis 

Bcott 

Sherburne 

Sibley 

Stearns 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

WabHska 

Wadena 

•Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Tello\<r Medicine 



Totol val.of 
all personal 
prop'ty in 
the 30 items 
as equaliz- 
ed by the 
State B'rd. 



Totol. 



21 

815 

<W7 

404 

8,598 

3,598 

27 

1,936 

20 

711 

1,109 

341 

661 

178 

9,788 

1,809 

1,348 

2,037 

4,109 

2,218 

sat 

8,636 

3,911 

2,181 

768 

835 

48 

1,663 

10 

331 

1,769 

66 

5S6 

1,422 

949 

9,607 

196 

456 

9,137 

349 

1,919 

746 

3,140 

1,732 

106 

186 

901 

9,547 

676 

1,610 

2,439 

490 

260 

1,904 

5?3 

1,939 

2,785 

1,781 

177 

895 

782 

9,600 

33 

1,465 

1,638 

865 

119 

2,877 

2.135 

558 



L HORSES. 



Under three years old. Three years old and over 



No. 



1,!*37,3« 

71TJ.J0 

l:i,U7 

'iTl,<iH| 

:t^i|,4';.( 

i.v,:,:-,.;| 
Si J^>J 

4a0.6SS 
7^-3,719 

tiJ(,6a7 

9S,yU 

2 76H,909 

]. 0X1,766 

217,090 

19,790 

606,916 

4,458 

106 391 

513,529 

21.115 

150,481 

456,072 

280,^82 

623,490 

60.329 

140, no 

1,042,277 

88,«?9l 

883,928 

249,1^2 

2,351,503 

668,009 

76,198 

64,524 

283,684 

8,16S,495 
187,484 
455,768 

2,077,373 
170.789 
418.^ 
708,763 
193.5a3 
437,321 

1,186.687 

974,489 

66,99.^ 

154 605 

173,785 

1,353,401 

20.976 

aS3.3l6 

1,637,047 

275,938 

64.793 

9,736816 
520,416 
144,052 



2 

201 

27 

53 

2,106 

760 

4 

6?8 

4 

113 

150 

30 

80 

10 

1,318 

951 

287 

980 

2,180 

1,029 

61 

1,818 

992 

900 

40 

198 



Value. 



Av. 

Value 



396 



47 

618 

6 

81 

468 

377 

488 

32 

109 

1,048 

51 

952 

46 

2,036 

257 

7 

22 

292 

192 

124 

293 

1,181 

62 

3 

607 

120 

675 

1.046 

746 

24 

59 

180 

1,128 

2 

811 

387 

217 

11 

1,125 

528 

107 



*75 

6,981 

990 

1,595 

61,366 

23,147 

320 

13,728 

180 

4.738 

5,218 

762 

2,415 

310 

43.494 

98.453 

10.045 

26.567 

66,851 

30,3:M 

1,880 

69,839 

H0,957 

97,171 

1,305 

6,68b 



$.37 50 

29 75 
36 66 
80 09 

30 48 
31) 49 

80 001 

26 00 
46 00 
41 92 
34 78 
22 03| 
30 19 

81 00 
83 00 
99 91 
85 00 

27 11 
30 64 

29 87 
36 86 
32 63 
81 21 

30 18 
32 62 

28 20 



18,248 



1,642 

21,110 

147 

2,871 
19 724 
10,437 
16,157 
702 

2.987 
36,411 

1,29^ 
81,397 

1926 
76,018 

525 

865 

6,644 

8,894 

3,901 

8,832 

41,510 

2,067 

115 

23,976 

4.200 

22,124 

84,019 

24,162 

960 

1,911 

4,271 

39,162 

50 

27,998 

12,602 

6,620 

815! 

38,345, 

15,813! 

3 027 



No. 



83 60 



84 93 
34 16 

24 49 

29 26 
46 94 
27 67 

37 84 
21 93 

27 38 
34 90 

25 32 
82 97 
41 48 
87 3.3 
33 OS 
75 00 

39 81 

30 00 
46 32 

31 46 

30 14 
86 00 

33 83 

38 .S3 
89 60 

85 00 

32 77 
32 55 

31 62 

40 00 

32 40 
32 SS 
84 70 
25 00 

34 25 
89 56 
30 05 

28 &3 
34 08 

29 95 
28 29 



90,633 $68,170,088 31,584 $1,019,6961 $39 28 124.067 $9,160,794 $78 84 



14 
9T2 
165 
964 

6.814 

2,174 

9 

1,857 

18 

671 

648 

185 

696 

75 

5,465 

3.411 

916 
8.662 
8,417 
8,723 

177 
8,446 
5.855 
8,960 

283 

773 

15 

1,426 

7 

2(8 

2,249 

41 

414 
1,532 
1,221 
1.736 

168 

416 
4,216 

926 
2,607 

624 
7,650 

922 
29 
66 

665 
2,149 

637 
1414 
4,158 

467 

108 
2.210 

559 
1,897 
3,096 
2,926 

124 

273 

416 

6,867 

18 

2,521 

9,836 

898 

79 

5,380 

1,797 

406 



Value. 



Av. 
Value 



$1.105; $78 98 
64.254 65 07 
13,8101 83 69 
15,669 1 63 It 
407,4051 70 07 
176,771' 80 85 
375 41 66 
144,846 



1,775 
49.122 
42,6S5 
13,652 



78 00 
98 60 
86 03 
66 41 
78 79 



89,112| 66 66 
6,630 75 06 



860,690 
230,437 

68,705 
222 509 
654.466 
268.690 

14.915 
662,025 
418,659 
275,868 

17,219 

49,072 

1,175 

105,552 

'280 

i0,369 

169 006 

2,887 

26,246 

10,273 

81,379 

147 772 

8,651 

95 848 
814,935 

11.627 
185,81.^ 

43.944 
676,784 

69.153 
2,706 
5,665 

47,965 
179,424 

40.905 

98,876 
383.6iK) 

29,782 

8,060 

165,405 

39,130 

137,663 

9.38,514 

223,984 

8,770 

19,656 

26,050 

873,649 

1,600 

183,787 

216,159 

56,090 

7,086 

476,023 

107.191 

26 936 



66 Ou 

67 66 

76 00 
60 76 

77 74 

72 03 

84 27 

78 39 

73 18 

69 39 
60 84 

63 46 
78 33 

74 02 
40 00 

82 13 

70 70 

70 46 

68 39 

71 97 
66 GS 

85 11 

50 89 
60 92 

74 69 

51 23 

71 97 
70 49 
76 39 

75 00 
93 27 

86 83 

72 11 

83 49 

64 21 

69 92 
80 23 
63 77 
74 6.^ 
74 84 
.0 00 
72 66 
80 92 

76 68 

70 79 
72 00 
60 50 
69 00 

88 83 
72 90 
76 22 
<V2 46 

89 06 
.94 29 
59 65 
04 62 



Digitized by 



Google 



AUDITOB OV STATS. 



71 



JOnAMOla, at r^tumtd by the Townthip AMtuon, and egvaUeed by ths County and 
EqualUatUmf&r 1874. |_ 

~~ 2. CATTLE, 



Under two yean old. 


Cows 2 J 


irearB old and over. 


All other Cattle two 
and over. 


yeari old 


No. 


Value. 


Av'age 
value. 

$10 70 


No. 


Value. 
$ 840 


Av'age 
value. 

$26 26 


No. 


Value. 


Average 
value. 


si 


• "S 


32 


106 


$6,835 


$55 06 


l,07S 


7,790 


7 01 


1,924 


36,662 


1ft 92 


1,638 


30 806 


90 00 


682 


3,400 


6 89 


8:^3 


15,772 


18 94 


808 


26 664 


82 99 


441 


3.449 


7 82 


896 


16.420 


18 69 


769 


16.189 


81 06 


f-SS 


28,428 


6 81 


7,436 


182,400 


14 95 


4.511 


101,790 


88 56 


2,923 


15,675 


6 43 


3,960 


71,464 


IS 04 


1,866 


45,074 


24 16 


9 


16 


7 60 


10 


275 


27 50 


81 


1,470 


47 41 


4,fi03 


29,270 


650 


4,887 


63,581 


13 00 


9,498 


48,711 


19 00 


9 


146 


16 11 


11 


845 


22 27 


90 


980 


49 00 


827 


6,304 


762 


1,446 


26.497 


18 14 


1,462 


44,091 


30 16 


1^ 


10,071 


644 


8,300 


41,926 


18 82 


1,668 


40,662 


24 31 


954 


1,867 


6 40 


640 


10.714 


19 84 


421 


18,867 


82 93 


581 


4,214 


724 


1,088 


19,618 


18 08 


1,1'26 


89,804 


99 04 


25 


146 


684 


116 


8,915 


25 12 


37 


1026 


27 70 


3663 


23,516 


660 


6,663 


124,.'509 


18 70 


2,458 


r4.076 


22 00 


8'234 


22,669 


7 01 


4,684 


77,227 


16 48 


2,638 


62,151 


19 75 


1798 


11,246 


686 


2,534 


40,644 


16 00 


Slsoo 


69,975 


26 00 


8962 


21,476 


725 


6,161 


84,255 


16 32 


2,667 


68,219 


19 90 


68«i 


44,779 


703 


10,618 


188.169 


17 26 


6,606 


98.040 


17 81 


<?13 


31,606 


728 


6,699 


99.753 


14 85 


6,192 


98.945 


19 19 


^661 


3,944 


7 16 


601 


10.299 


17 14 


648 


16.489 


30 00 


4 947 


81,231 


630 


9,496 


143,980 


16 16 


4,969 


78.886 


16 86 


9,860 


sn,3M) 


7 18 


7,169 


152,482 


21 2ft 


3,356 


68,916 


20 58 


3,611 


19,977 


668 


6,169 


98,823 


15 96 


8,711 


43,691 


17 96 


1,266 


10,882 


820 


1.468 


26,658 


18 16 


1,890 


86,728 


26 48 


974 


6,366 


6 52 


1,584 


a4.820 


15 67 


1.862 


32,616 


26 05 


62 


442 


850 


74 


1.643 


22 20 


67 


2,796 


41 72 


2,729 


19,641 


7 19 


. 8,811 


56,606 


14 SO 


3,318 


82,195 


24 81 


15 


143 


963 


31 


477 


16 38 


21 


482 


81 04 


444 


2,940 


6 62 


698 


n,287 


16 69 


786 


21,077 


86 n 


2,726 


20,766 


7 62 


4,081 


61,584 


16 09 


2,623 


66.161 


84 84 


104 


951 


9 13 


171 


3.243 


18 96 


163 


6,776 


42 93 


689 


3,578 


6 06 


1,011 


14,915 


14 76 


1,090 


29,772 


87 81 


-2,667 


17.652 


6 61 


4.144 


69,263 


16 70 


3,016 


63,408 


81 02 


1.1H8 


8,160 


6 81 


1,868 


34,906 


18 67 


1,187 


88,678 


26 21 


2.803 


14,786 


6 42 


3,567 


63 459 


17 79 


2,934 


68,480 


28 34 


269 


1,366 


607 


436 


7,796 


17 88 


405 


6,788 


16 63 


7M 


6.772 


7 98 


1,056 


18,888 


17 36 


796 


19,631 


24 54 


3,6fi9 


29,610 


804 


6,608 


98,754 


17 94 


8,681 


58,396 


19 91 


362 


2,160 


696 


673 


9,621 


14 19 


706 


18,886 


25 97 


3698 


97,788 


7 71 


6,042 


86,848 


16 91 


9.814 


60,836 


21 43 


406 


8,938 


782 


766 


18 949 


17 69 


756 


23,590 


31 90 


4.712 


98>45 


600 


8,598 


144,149 


16 76 


4,212 


67.824 


16 10 


2.431 


16,792 


6 43 


3,447 


60,169 


17 45 


3,190 


82,976 


86 00 


10 


113 


1180 


• 32 


910 


28 40 


61 


2.265 


44 22 


3»0 


8,760 


944 


412 


10,029 


94 34 


847 


14,480 


41 73 


1,606 


9,021 


6 70 


2,127 


86,639 


12 62 


1,908 


37.068 


19 48 


4M 


4,979 


10 91 


1,816 


43,147 


93 77 


486 


12,902 


89 59 


756 


5.681 


7 81 


1.109 


20,129 


18 16 


942 


82,677 


28 96 


1,920 


16 506 


807 


3 089 


65,899 


17 90 


3,073 


76 371 


84 86 


3,687 


95.809 


700 


6,126 


119.894 


20 66 


8,932 


88,672 


2100 


492 


3.890 


786 


702 


13.169 


18 74 


639 


19,537 


30 57 


6 


200 


12 50 


90 


1,914 


2186 


10 


360 


36 00 


2,711 


16,326 


602 


4,728 


72,296 


16 88 


2,316 


67,664 


24 90 


1078 


10,780 


10 00 


1633 


32,660 


20 00 


1.262 


87,660 


80 00 


«.796 


98.052 


7 87 


8 939 


76,143 


19 88 


8,669 


60,635 


19 70 


€,225 


60,084 


8 03 


6,749 


105.7«6 


15 66 


8,728 


112,798 


80 80 


9,960 


83,669 


7 96 


6,298 


96,696 


18 01 


3.671 


71,636 


20 06 


891 


1,846 


6 75 


299 


6,098 


17 06 


868 


7.609 


28 01 


695 


6,774 


840 


942 


15,825 


16 80 


862 


24,876 


88 80 


1,062 


7.492 


705 


1,806 


19 835 


16 19 


1,400 


38.876 


84 20 


«,976 


19,936 


6 70 


6,203 


78,790 


15 14 


8.409 


28,307 


11 78 


8 


no 


18 76 


87 


645 


24 00 


87 


1,616 


43 65 


S,920 


20,764 


7 11 


4,066 


71,319 


17 63 


8 687 


64,026 


21 28 


i;476 


9,962 


6 75 


3,763 


63.101 


18 17 


1,260 


25.292 


20 07 


1.048 


7,220 


688 


1,649 


25,676 


15 69 


1,167 


89.074 


24 89 


102 


919 


900 


149 


3,864 


2190 


123 


3.841 


81 22 


3,266 


19.876 


608 


6,283 


119.397 


17 41 


3.169 


69,917 


18 96 


3,834 


91,697 


648 


4,940 


76.819 


16 46 


4,229 


97,190 


88 98 


864 


6,147 


.... 


1,865 


20,661 


16 24 


1,142 


86,868 


S3 51 


"726,039 


$873,104 


$6 93 


191,047 


$3,427,879 


I $17 94 


196,917 


$8,796,786 


$82 81 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 



A3mUAI< BHSFOBT. 













STATEMENT 


Coantles. 


3. MULES AND ASSBS, 
of all ages. 


4. SHBBP. 




No. 


Value. 


Average 
value. 


No. 


Value. 


Average 
value. 


Aitkin 








18 

1,215 

964 

438 

6,156 

i;265 


$ 26 

2,521 

629 

564 

7,710 

1,540 


$2 00* 


Anok* 

Becker 

Benton ••••••• 


fs 

10 
170 
6i 


1,675 

676 

11,540 

5.400 


$60 00 

87 60 
57 60 
65 38 

88 62 


20T 
1 !<► 
1 80- 


Blae Barth 


1 25 


Brown 

Carlton 


128 


Carver... 

CaBB 


vr 

4 
18 
87 
80 
28 


7,666 
900 
1,803 
1,910 
8,314 
1.668 


78 00 

60 00 
100 18 

61 68 
77 13 

79 38 


6,587 


8,496 


130* 


Chippewa •••• 


636 

1,883 
806 
878 


i;638 

^M7 
642 


242 


Chisago 

Clay 


1 25 

2 IL 


Cottonwood ••• 


1 6» 


Crow Wins 




Dakota. ..! :::: 

Dodge 

Doaglat 


162 
106 
66 

109 
151 
90 
6 
410 
188 
155 
14 
95 


10,089 

7,188 

8685 

6,736 

11448 

6,211 

427 

85,109 

14 036 

10 936 

823 

1,871 


66 00 
68 40 
66 80 

68 62 
76 81 

69 08 

71 11 
86 62 
74 66 

70 56 
54 78 

72 36 

51*74 


8,604 
5,127 
2,848 
6,883 
9,071 
5,048 

416 
7,556 
6.860 
5,587 
1,179 

921 

"'4,662 


7,988 

9,121 

4,484 

6,868 

18,607 

7,084 

862 

19,621) 

12,640 

7,700 

1.807 

1,192 


220^ 
177 
200* 


FariDaalt 


1 e& 


FUlniore 


1 50* 


Freeborn 


I 40 


Qrant 


203 


Goodhue 


1 07 


HenneDin • 


202 


Houston 

Isanti - 

Jaokson ... 


187 
158 
1 29^ 


Kanabec. ........ .... 




Kandiyohi 

Lake 


66 


3,415 


6.394 


137 


Lac 4q1 Parle.... .... 


8 
93 

2 
81 
26 
26 
8« 

8 
18 
87 
80 
64 
44 
277 
69 

8 

1 
31 
62 
12 
64 
114 
85 
10 
66 
32 
89 
949 
62 

6 

18 

48 

285 


6.586 

106 
1,908 
1,890 
1,802 
6,396 
60 

976 
6,672 
1171 
3.201 
8,060 
28,938 
6,666 

326 

70 

1,623 

5184 

616 
4.788 
9,976 
3,080 

750 
5,161 
1,600 
1,319 
17,967 
6,611 

346 
1817 
8,662 
17,648 


96 87 

60 06 
62 50 

61 32 
72 69 
60 07 
78 00 
40 00 
81 26 
76 64 

68 53 

69 99 

69 88 

86 41 
80 60 

108 00 

70 00 
52 35 
88 64 
6185 
74 73 

87 00 
87 57 
76 00 
78 21 
50 00 
45 60 
72 15 
92 51 
69 00 
98 60 
69 69 
76 00 


289 

M}| 

836 

8,728 

1>69 

8,H6 

88 

552 
2,259 

194 
8,049 

886 
6,858 
1,796 


457 
,.018 

594 
6,332 
3,875 
6,499 

110 
1,017 
4,516 

474 
5,003 

643 
14,88U 
2.866 


1 91 


Le Sueur...... .!.!.. 


1 60 


Lincoln 


2 71 


Lyon 


1 75 


McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 


169^ 
2 16 
1 48 


Mille Lacs 


1 25 


Morrison 


1 84 


Mower 


1 99 


Murray 

NicoUet 

No.les 

Olmsted 


2 44 
1 64 
1 67 
244 


Otter Tall 


1 50 


Pine 




Polk v.,".'.'!.*.*.' 


*124 

1,873^ 

403 

769 

1,893 

8,261 

165 

9 

4,548 

1,071 

4,445 

7.143 

3,483 

94 

417 

577 

1,388 

2,710 
8,076 

690 

82 

4,127 

5,773 

606 


800 
8,038 

903 

1.352 

2,819 

18,066 

846 
16 
13542 
1878 
5.867 
9.691 
6.668 

180 
1,001 
1,398 
8>5d 
110 
4,071 
6,671 

862 

60 

7,137 

8,786 

621 


248 


Pope 


1 61 


Ramsey ..... 


284 
1 75 


BeuTllle 

Rice 

Rock 

St. Louis 


1 66 
8 16 
209 
200^ 


Scott. 


298 


Sherburne 

Sibley .. 


1 75 
1 31 


Stearns 

Steele 


185- 
1 87 


Stevens 


1 91 


Swift 


240 


Todd 


2 11 


Wabasha 


220 


Wadena..... •*. 


250- 


Waseca 


88 
197 

49 

7 

306 

06 

13 


5,539 

13,784 

3,868 

445 

95,265 

2,643 

826 


62 44 
69 97 
68 76 

63 67 
8i 83 
46 47 
63 46 


150 


Washington 

Watonwan 


2 IT 
12& 


Wilkin 





Winona 


1 72 


Wright 

Yellow Medicine 


162 

1 00 






Toial 


4,541 


1341,844 


$75 17 


169,069 


$272,789 


$1 7h 



Digitized by Google | 



AUDITOB QV STATB. 



7» 



"P."— Contimied. 



5. HOGS. 



No. 



16 



433 

0,217 

1,887 

15 

6,486 

20 

449 

1,406 

194 

801 

78 

14,342 

2,498 

1.64T 

S,974 

11,841 

3,292 

141 

6^9 

4,r- 

9,119 
GOO 

668 

29 

1,188 

6 

188 

6,677 

84 

260 
2,684 

845 
1,696 

181 

813 
8,019 

197 
2,493 

811 

5,669 

1,918 

30 

92 

792 

804 

430 
1,424 
4999 

357 

18 

4,781 

486 

8,660 

5,561 

2,181 

98 

240 
1,223 
5,148 



Yalae. 



2,764 
8,149 

710 

70 

5.819 

5,068 

a05 



$ 104 

3,048 

7S4 

1,110 

10,101 

4,266 

61 

14,264 

67 

2,169 

4,860 

671 

991 

822 

89,441 

5,840 

3,997 

8,289 

20,109 

4,074 

607 

ai,o«7 

14,925 

14,679 

9,497 

661 

121 

3,090 

19 

1.035 

10,030 

182 

924 



Average 
Value. 



l,06t 
4,042 

480 
1,969 
9,026 

661 

6,066 

1,814 

13,739 

4,771 

161 

447 
2,054 
8,956 
1,0S9 
4,147 
17,496 
1,608 

289 
13,699 

930 
5,055 
11,927 
6,877 

486 

864 
3,278 
15,108 



5,049 
8,029 

••SI 

16,063 
10 766 
1,027 



$693 
8 69 
8 12 
256 

1 91 
982 
406 
960 
335 
484 
299 
5 41 

8 28 
4 12 

2 75 

9 H4 
900 

2 79 
171 
124 
4 31 
306 
322 
1 60 
404 
1 17 
4 17 
260 
240 
550 

1 60 
4 89 

3 70 
104 

. 127 

2 68 
2 65 

2 66 
9 98 

3 19 
943 
4 
2 46 
248 
536 

4 86 
9 62 
448 
2 46 
9 91 
860 
4 40 

13 27 
287 
1 91 

1 87 

2 18 
2 46 
622 
8 60 
2 67 
993 



6. WAGONS AKD OABBIAflSS. 



No. 



1 82 

2 56 

3 11 
62 57 

3 01 
9 12 
8 36 



153,944 $873,295 
10 



$2 42 



3 

666 

868 

220 

9,582 

1,233 

1,481 

12 

450 

543 

184 

491 

45 

2,808 

1,167 

820 

1,519 

3,358 

1,556 

161 

8,546 

3,671 

2,024 

307 

698 

8 

1,141 

8 

238 

1,431 

41 

856 

883 

683 

lOM 

120 

852 

1,634 

226 

1,873 

450 

3,116 

1,162 

27 

123 

671 

1,866 

435 

1,062 

9,111 

377 

95 

1,815 

393 

894 

2,176 

1,355 

103 

208 

433 

9,324 

13 

1,155 

1,511 

478 

89 

2,764 

1,194 



Yaloe. 



$ 115 

91,669 

7,416 

6.224 

78,698 

26,493 

148 

38.506 

625 

14788 

16,838 

6,267 



Average 
Value. 



2,005 
68,470 
80,979 
28,n4 
37,975 
97,577 
40,068 
4,686 
101,491 
192^76 
57,249 
6,755 
10,678 
820 
30,460 
105 
5,469 
20,986 
1,977 
9,436 
23,696 
14,896 
31.368 
2,572 
7,806 
30,111 
5,783 
87,198 
14,824 
116,398 
27,345 
850 
3,627 
11,808 
140,942 
9.771 
94,470 
89,940 
11,040 
0,705 
84 217 
11,820 
18,001 
50,693 
44,945 
8,291 
6,824 
10,995 
62,874 
470 
80,960 
66,096 
10,640 
2,720 
79,384 
97,681 
7,157 



65,097 $2,043,188 $31 88 



7. BKWDIO AND KNITTING 
XACHINB8. 



$88 83 
32 52 

27 80 
98 99 
98 54 

21 48 

28 60 

26 00 
69 48 
38 85 
80 94 
84 06 

28 15 
44 55 

27 60 
26 54 

29 00 
96 00 
29 06 
24 99 
29 10 

28 60 
62 54 
98 27 

29 00 

20 41 
40 00 
26 69 
19 87 

22 98 
17 63 
31 37 
26 50 
26 88 
95 87 
29 86 

21 43 
28 98 

19 62 
95 14 
.28 08 

31 83 
37 35, 
28 63| 
31 60, 
28 671 

20 671 
75 68 

22 99 

28 04 
42 60 

29 66 
60 58 
26 02 

30 00 
20 08 

25 59 
38 16 
81 96 

26 40 
95 98 

27 06 
86 16 
26 80 
88 45 

22 60 
80 56 

28 70 

23 14 
19 71 



No. 

197 
60 
44 
804 
185 
6 
249 
3 
40 
139 
40 
109 
81 
676 
377 
88 
326 
724 
254 
7 
834 
1,864 
431 
81 
45 
1 
150 
6 
18 
271 
6 
49 
285 
103 
289 
24 
78 
496 
15 
847 
116 
939 
114 
28 
18 
89 
912 
70 
107 
510 
40 
11 
328 
106 
123 
885 
468 
22 
25 
07 
638 
16 
919 
060 
74 
17 
796 
982 
80 



Valne Average 
value. y^j^^ 



$ 180 

5,846 

M18 

1,306 

20,891 

4,781 

180 

7,866 

55 

964 



905 
3,065 
2,904 
18,590 
9,917 
2,559 
6,937 
19,011 
0,721 
140 
26,261 
89,844 
13,802 

1,031 

8,157 
140 
364 
5,453 
91 
1,152 
5,910 
2,269 
7,140 
475 
1,962 
8,709 
485 
10,902 
2,806 
24,606 
9,766 
1,816 
930 
758 
80,146 
1,868 
9,219 
18,977 
1,035 
370 
9,675 
2,120 
2,388 
10,347 
14,866 
610 
484 
1,294 
14,778 
410 
6,550 
10,940 
1,860 
640 
91,080 
6,953 
725 



$40 00 
29 67 

23 05- 

29 54 
3150 
25 84 

30 83 
82 00 
18 33 

24 10 
/30 42 

2« 62 
29 95 
35 85 

27 60 
24 45 
29 00 

21 27 
96 2& 

22 01 
20 00 
3148 

28 94 
89 01 
28 64 

22 91 
5U0 

2104 

23 3a 
28 00 

20 12 
15 00 
27 44 
96 25 

21 91 
81 17 
J9 79 

26 15 
17 48- 
98 88 

27 37 
Iff 34 
26 90 
94 2$ 
47 00 
17 69 
90 00 
33 0» 
86 64 
20 73 
36 82 
26 87 
88 68 
29 65 
20 00 
19 40 

26 87 
8-i 11 

27 79 
17 39 
29 60 

28 34 
97 33 

29 85 
28 46 
26 OO 
37 66 
26 40 
24 66 
24 60 



" 15,899 $447,5991 $28 11 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



7tl 



ANKUAL BSPOBT. 



STATEMENT 



ConntioB. 



Aitkin 

Anoka 

Beckor 

Benton 

Bine Bartb. ... 

Brown ■ 

Carlton 

Carver ... 

Caae 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Clay 

Cottonwood.... 
Crow Wing... 

Dakota 

Dodge 

Dougiae 

^ftrlDanlt 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Grant 

Goodhue 

Bennepln 

Houston 

Isanti 

Jackson 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

I^ake......... 

Lac qui Parle . 

L« Sueur 

Xiincoln . 
U 



l^Leod. 



Martin. 

Heeker 

Hllle Lacs 

ICorrison 

Mower 

Murray 

Nicollet 

Nobles 

Olmsted.. 

Otter Tall 

Pine 

Polk 

Pope 

Bamsey...r 

Redwood 

Renville 

Rice 

Rock 

Bt. Louis 

Scott 

Sherburne 

Sibley 

Steams 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Wadena 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

WUkln 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine. 



8. WAT0HK8 AKD OLOOKS. 



No. 



Totol. 



U 
469 
302 

64 

1.723 

859 

12 
978 

16 
S32 
847 
192 
285 
189 



706 
622 

1,716 
603 
116 

1,( 

2,658 

1,114 

287 

218 

9 

965 

12 

164 

886 

6 

141 

714 

217 

702 

189 

256 

728 

65 

803 

^. 306 

1,617 

740 

56 

66 

357 

1,703 
179 
480 
835 
913 
180 
786 
268 
664 

1,816 
863 
82 
178 
841 
706 
80 
617 

1,164 
326 
50 

1,669 
909 
176 

88,120 



Value. '^▼•/»K« 
"* value. 



$149 
3,499 
1,729 

909 
13,764 
2,894 

263 
8,177 

892 
1,116 
4,368 
1,626 
1,795 



6,787 
2,961 
3,620 
3,397 
9,474 
3,168 

400 

16,420 

67,001 

4,227 

702 

842 

60 

3,060 

64 

696 

2,477 

67 

653 
8,448 

830 
3,832 

874 

988 
4,186 

266 

7,569 

1.961 

12,508 

2,999 

70^ 

647 

1,020 

38,500 

914 
1,898 
10,447 
1.142 
3,210 
3,160 
1,840 
1,222 
6.669 
6,770 

685 

642 

1,206 

10.174 

334 
9,506 
12,049 
2,010 

386 

28,737 

3,070 

772 



$10 64 

7 46 
6 79 

16 88 
798 

3 87 
21 91 

323 

24 60 

4 81 
604 
804 
6 30 

16 64 

8 SI 

9 90 
500 
6 46 
6 52 
522 
3 45 

10 01 
21 44 

8 79 

2 96 
400 

25 00 

3 10 
633 
424 

2 79 

9 49 

4 87 

3 42 
3 81 
646 
9 69 
3 66 
6 68 
409 
9^88 

6 ll 

7 73 
406 

12 60 

8 41 

3 89 
28 62 

6 16 
2 69 

12 51 

5 36 
84 69 

4 29 
600 
2 19 
605 

7 H4 
7 18 

2 40 
364 

14 41 

11 13 

3 99 
10 85 

6 18 
673 

14 30 
8 
488 



$326,700 $8 67 



9. KKLODSONe AXD OBOAITS. 



No. 



Value. 



22 



9 

44 
7 

11 

3 

121 

71 



126 
69 



129 

186 

78 

8 

7 



17 



1 
36 

2 

9 
29 

6 
83 

4 

8 
106 

8 
83 
82 
178 
13 

1 



8 

96 
11 

7 
99 

7 
15 
42 
16 

6 

42 
62 

6 

2 

8 
116 

3 

88 

101 

17 

1 
128 
47 

6 



2,424 



$1,197 

400 

800 

6,104 

300 



Average 
value. 



1^62 



6 

8,576 

810 

420 

275 

6,632 

8,348 

1,850 

8,052 

7,841 

8,468 



7,612 

10,960 

4,721 

40 

377 



860 
1,301 

160 

884 
1,600 

610 
1,812 

180 

176 

3,730 

80 

1,782 

1,097 

10,825 

746 
60 



302 

6,971 

628 

270 

6,936 

655 

l,l8o 

2,616 

690 

260 

8,286 

3,437 

236 

84 

aoc 

6,867 

106 

1,876 

6,185 

746 

100 

7,124 

2,227 

800 



$62 04 
67 14 
80 00 
66 68 
48 86 



66 00 



2 50 
68 68 

44 28 
86 18 
91 m 

46 65 

47 16 

48 08 
61 71 
68 86 
65 38 



68 16 

69 84 
«4 67 
18 83 
68 98 



62 86 



860 OO 
86 14 
75 00 
86 96 
51 t5 
84 90 
70 S8 
45 00 
58 82 
35 92 
26 66 
64 00 
49 86 
68 00 
67 80 
60 00 



87 76 
66 32 
48 00 
38 67 
70 00 
79 28 
79 00 

62 89 
86 87 

43 88 

63 23 

65 44 
47 00 
42 00 
25 77 

60 00 
85 00 

46 63 

61 24 

44 88 
100 00 

66 66 

47 88 
60 00 



$136,093 



$68 08 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB or STATS. 



75 



*F"— Continued. 



10. PlAVO FOBTEa. 



No. 



16 
3 
8 
66 
18 



17 

3 

1 

5 

73 

26 

8 

9 

41 

16 



87 

416 

IS 



10 
4 

2 
38 



20 
6 

74 
4 
3 



477 
6 

1 

83 

8 

26 

8 

7 

66 

42 



1 



6 
61 

1 
2 
132 
8 
1 



2,002 



Valae. 



$1,914 

260 

881 

11,788 

8,970 



646 
125 



2,710 
810 



8,821 
2.868 
210 
1,156 
4,842 
1,669 



15,414 
79,800 

1.470 



425 



1,000 

"'285' 
880 



1,6S0 
816 
176 

8,615 



8,610 

776 

10,215 

426 



74,490 

840 

lOO 

17,681 

400 

6,a»0 

8,910 

9U0 

1,176 

11,264 

6,587 



120 



10,468 



997 
9,701 
125 
460 
26,846 
206 
60 



Ayerage 
valae. 



$119 62 
88 33 
110 33 
15135 
166 00 



91 00 
125 00 



159 47 
103 88 
26i00 
186 00 
115 60 
114 50 

70 00 
128 81 
lis 09 

99 83 



181 76 
191 83 
122 60 



212 60 



90 90 



117 60 
60 00 



165 00 
78 76 
87 60 
96 18 



175 60 
129 16 
138 04 
106 25 
200 00 



156 16 
68 00 
100 00 
213 01 
188 33 
199 63 
156 40 
112 60 
163 06 
201 14 
156 84 



120 00 

iii'ei* 



176 24 
159 OS 
126 00 
225 00 
203 38 
68 83 
60 00 



ll.Hoasebold 
and Office 
Famitare. 



$166 16 



$ 640 

28,443 
12,080 
12,968 
139,089 
42.700 

1,640 
42,899 

1,760 

7,466 
86,719 
10,926 
12,684 
14,498 
87,887 
11,950 
25,938 
84,264 
101,615 
81,714 

2,957 

124,814 

472,612 

58.899 

8,019 

8,664 

1.460 

23,809 

585 

4,170 
80,966 

2,807 

3,894 
22,926 
18.768 
39,851 

4327 
12,401 
72,745 

2.727 
86,657 
17,118 
181849 
28,060 

0,416 

3.224 

18,892 

545,408 

6,129 

16.695 

150,098 

8,036 
60,979 
47,514 
10,182 
18,919 
98,478 
56,444 

2,014 

6,878 
10.025 
101,566 
786 
2ZJ84 
115,079 
12,880 

8,806 
240.948 
38,909 

4,751 



18. Axricalta- 
ralTools, 

Imprts and 
Machinery. 



$8,422,394 



$ 208 

7,877 

9.678 

2,237 

92,8H 

66,576 



51,358 

85 

82,879 

11,058 

5,713 
24,960 
289 
81,605 
46,878 
34,2*28 
65,944 
168,342 
70,887 

7,680 

196,269 

62,870 

77,688 

4,737 
17,429 

' 606 

76,161 

66 

18,136 

17,014 

1,477 
10.479 
85,666 
26,017 
63,698 
969 

7,860 
68,160 

6,194 

72092 

22,728 

147.942 

40,654 

140 

2,586 
24,568 
12,117 
19.069 
60,154 
75,660 
15.588 
158 
88,218 

5,898 
40 567 
67,068 
59.850 

5,677 
17,710 
18,347 
89,120 
176 
69,421 
48,412 
29,666 

1,940 
76,886 
18,569 
10,231 



18. Qold& 

Silver Plate 

and Plated 

Ware. 



$8,466,916 



$601 
84 
80 

2,835 
48 



26 



17 

- 82 

98 

36 

76 

1,087 

126 

249 

120 

777 

816 

46 

8,227 

18,681 

74 

28 

81 



790 

6 

70 

271 

8 

1,048 

285 

766 

479 

81 

60 

16 

15,418 



190 

1,586 

62 

660 

217 

106 

106 

691 

159 

15 

7 

146 

1,646 



76 

2,872 

87 

161 

8,856 

112 

27 



$59.226 



14. Dia- 
monds and 
Jewelry. 



$17 

19 

986 

162 



82 



110 
40 

108 
187 
724 



175 
82 

161 
45 



860 

10,660 

26 

20 



118 


10 










15*' 
85 
126 


is" 



874 



44 

46 



720 
105 
162 
416 
8 



6 
9.068 



9 
62 



1,200 
76 
80 
80 
137 
26 



4 
252 



1.886 



16 

1,072 

10 



$304^n 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



76 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



8TATBBCENT 



CotmUeB. 



Aitkin 

Alloka 

Becker 

Benton 

Blue Berth 

Brown 

Carlton 

Carver 

Cass 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Clay 

Cottonwood 

Crow Wing 

Dakota 

Dodge 

Dongias 

Faribault. 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Grant 

Goodbne, 

Hennepin 

Houston 

Isanti 

Jackson 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Lake 

Lac qui Parle 

Le Sueur 

Lincoln 

Lyon 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

MlUeLacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 

NieoUet 

Nobles 

Olmsted 

Otter Tail 

Pine 

Polk 

Pope 

Ramsey 

Bedwood 

Renville 

Rice. .9 

Rock 

St Loois 

Scott 

Sherburne 

Sibley 

Stearns 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Wadena 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Tellow Medicine. 

Total 



15.Franchises 

annuities and 

royalties. 



$76 
34 



305 



600 
100 



56 



186 
124 



175 
8,109 



16. Steam- 
boats, Sail- 
ing vessels, 
etc. 



18.000 

ao 



662 



100 



70 



1,894 
11,816 
3,181 



80 



60 



750 
"74 



162 



186 
8S0 



375 



600 



2,700 

"24 

"'260 



138 
200 



17. GkMds & 
Merchan- 
dise. 



|S,600 
66,964 
18,081 

6,729 
188,676 
86,877 

8,850 
63,948 



8,784 
61,567 
60,126 
17,887 
24,237 
159,963 

6,860 
41,500 



18. Material 
and Mann< 
ikctured 
Articles. 



19. Manufactar*s 
Tools, Imple- 
ments and 
Machinery, in- 
cluding Bngines 
and Boilers. 



$48,420 
6,826 
182 
80,870 
8,977 
8,975 
8,904 



199,2«8 

48.754 

18,358 

485,606 

1,832,976 

82,086 

12,644 

20,406 

2,600 

68,744 

600 

4,960 

21,440 



18 

7,949 

1,160 

854 

7,060 

38,466 
4,056 
3,468 
8,809 

21,815 



850 



2,548 

■'iso 



85,200 

50 

250 

1,638 



187 
4,062 



2,553, 



44,560 
"6,429 



12,781 

36,456 

8,834 

46,486 

7,300 

7,853 

167,474 

1,800 

88,152 

86,828 

266,897 

43.681 

5,966 

900 

8,500 

1,740.840 

18 565 

11,788 

818,677 

9,710 

81.180 

48,575 

4,457 

12,155 

138 419 

101,706 

7,548 

11,400 

4,687 

186,916 

2,800 

50,878 

208,661 

24,975 

12,145 

566,846 

48,864, 

11,805 



83,860 
570,510 

7,216 

1,416 
260 
100 

1,675 
600 
250 

4,044 



30 
2,086 



10,006 
530 
987 

5,246 



5,346 

966 

82,849 

16,620 

40,066 

100 

85 

61,921 

225 

84S 

47 429 

190 

860 

14,252 

2,450 



80,476 
10,129 



1,104 

667 

86,675 



5,190 

80,969 

785 

85 

81,487 

4,562 

10 



$75 
6,788 
6,910 
2,194 
81,628 
18,834 



8,204 

692 
7,101 

618 
8,824 
4,600 
7,856 
8,682 
7,825 
41 
10,647 
4,878 



10,931 

898,991 

4,688 

i,9eo 

1,885 
1,000 
1,889 



7,41 



435 

8,914 

i,877 

10,260 

590 

406 

6,771 



4,647 

1,651 

IB 921 

10.786 

11,680 

880 

694 

146,300 

465 

266 

84.271 

600 

16,475 

8,868 

4,51(W 

686 

28,280 

10.141 

70 

465 

1,485 

8,165 



1,987 
84,168 
765 
40 
12,665 
6,130 
1,880 



$9.704 $121,068 $7,531,906' $1,291,700 



$967,500 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 



77 



«« F "—Continued. 



20. Moneys of 
Banka, Bank- 
en, Brokers or 
tftock Jobbers 


21. Credits 

ofBauktt, 

Bankers,Bro- 

ker« or sitock 

Jobbers. 


22. Moneys 

other than 

Bankers, 

etc. 


28. Credits 

Bankers, 
etc. 


94. Bonds 
and Stocks. 


25. Shares of 

National Bank 

Stock. 














•^'g 


$ 696 

1:^ 


12.640 «2o'm(V 


$1,080 




8,436 
2,250 
67,818 
17,660 


8,174 

21411 

166,096 

86,062 




93 
12.461 
29,631 


626 

8,646 

819 


$i90*,066'* 


8,516 


490 

125 

42 

8,642 ^ 

281 
1.242 


21,066 

Ajdei" 

9,222 

4,828 

2,672 

1,925 

99,626 

88,826 

14,416 

84,451 

84,068 

13,460 

6424 

121,889 

166,864 

108,2M 

266 

122 

11,399" 

6;8i9 " 

24361 


46,884 

100 

8,169 

44,186 

3,046 

6,782 

5,465 

30,916 

29,906 

23,000 

18,679 

177,694 

27,190 

266 

868,980 

619,862 

78,116 

1,930 

6,086 

83*,626" 

l',i42" 

18,041 

267 

6,928 

8,190 

7,091 

28,228 

1,730 

625 

83>207 

489 

20,016 

8,224 

172,223 

16,734 

600 

400 

8,843 

36,842 

3,460 

16,541 

860,709 

7ij99 


3,714 










1,260 
176 


1,600 








680 

400 

39,670 








42,460 
11,690 


16,170 

16,310 

400 

6,096 
60,988 

1,060 


100,000 


6,302 

7,236 

19,672 

i;848 


2,078 
104 
859 
112 


,,,,.. , 




1,166 
26,176 


28,928 
17,160 


626 
483,238 


100,000 
785,280 






266 






62 




aoo" 












860 


1,000 


226 
925 






470 


8,341 
8.671 
6809 

90,924 
2,700 
1,119 

22.251 
560 

81,428 

4,012 

111,667 

13,288 

76 

1,946 

4,560 

66,712 
3940 
6.077 

69,611 
4,783 

63,161 

83,629 






58 










3,860 


8.060 


3.632 




6 

7,664 


2,878*' 

244 
8.688 
2,208 
14,146 


1,881 


8,130 
60,000 


l!l86 


100 




4,847 


76,000 


60,084 




150,000 






50,000 




100 




66 

88,810 
1,160 




108 


903 
4,891 




169.708 

6,681 

60 


1,800,000 










180,000 


496 


860 

2,000 

926 

187 

6,266 

21,776 

4,261 






16,929 


2,600 
2,^00 


100,000 


lioo 

814 


34,609 
7,406 
4,978 

48,943 

82 747 
4,148 
2,688 
8,566 

88,472 
1,460 

81,800 
143,168 
3.370 
1,060 
282,486 
7,490 
6,869 


50,000 




620 

41.662 

19.929 

1,000 

2,149 

2,196 

70,789 

5,100 

32,667 

78,026 

6,969 

150 

274,974 

11,119 

2.406 






9,628 


1,118 






62,600 














461 


600 
10,269 


23 
6,306 




19,986 


""60,696 ' 


900 


706 

21,066 

1,876 

i2;682** 






11,046 
662 


16,107 


290,000 








2,830 


2.700 


250,000 


600 












* 




$476,662 


$278,849 


$1,867,249 


$8,214,359 $554,604 ' $4,235,910 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



78 



ANKUAL BBPOBT. 



STATEMENT "F."— Continued. 



Counties. 


26. Shares of 

capital of 

Companies 

not of this 

State. 


27. Stock and 

furniture of 

Saloons and 

eating houses 

including 

BilliarcT 

tables, etc. 


28. Another 
property not 
included in 
the preceed- 
ing 27 items. 


89. Elevators, 
Warehouses 

and other 
imp'menta on 

lands, the 
title to which 

is vested in 
any R. R. Co. 


30. Imp^mento 
on lands held 
under Home- 
stead Laws 
of the United 
States. 


Aitkin 










$8,260 
8,177 

28,119 
6,896 


Anoka. 




$1,188 
990 


$2,544 


$1,666 

9,187 


Becker 


$10 


Benton 


94 

8,763 

8,886 

125 


Blue Barth 


799 
480 


7,026 
6,622 

780 

2,426 

50 

288 
1.886 
1.986 

800 
a,920 
8,6-28 

794 
1,465 

846 
4,874 

602 

60 

8,475 

21,151 

1,991 

615 

876 


10,770 


Brown 




36,094 


Carlton 




Carver • 


278 


7,608 


117 


Cass 




550 


Chippewa ••••••. . 




288 

8,342 

48,104 

240 




68,495 
9,960 


Chisfl^o 






Clay 




Cottonwood 






46,488 


Crow Wlnff. . . . 




1,316 


Dakota 


16,802 


2,624 


2,420 


Dodge 


8,700 
36 983 


Donslss. •••••••.. 




436 
1,918 
2,963 




Faribault 


41 




18.684 


Fillmore 




17,444 


Freeborn. ... • . . . 




Qrant - 






10.849 

8,394 

261.913 


Qoodhue ...•..■ 


2,781 
80^73 


188 

23,027 

IS 

660 


24,883 


Hennepin 

Houston ■ ....... . 




4,848 


Isanti 






26,814 


Jackson 




27.831 
4,874 
56 988 


KEnabeo * 






8,400 
9,000 


Kandiyohi 




1,729 


45 


Lake 




150 


Lac qui Parle .... 




10 
760 






10.518 


Le Sueur 


4,679 
1,429 
321 
918 
450 
840 






Lincoln 








Lyon*. . *■•.•••.•■ 








14.720 


McLeod 




f20 

875 
810 
206 
62 
,7,989 

3,640 

4,470 

1,898 

1,340 

850 

85 

38,001) 

166 

GOO 

9,713 

175 

2,679 


8,040 


Im 


Hartin 




29,196 
26,811 


Meeker 


GOO 


MilleLacs 




2.946 


ICorrison. 


81 




400 
2,060 

13;966 


16,992 


Hower 


1,696 

800 

111,981 

102 


6,678 
23.918 
17,806 


Murray 

Nicollet 




Nobles 

Olmsted 


iio 


68.066 


Otter Tail 


61,826 


Pine 






Polk 








14,819 


Pope 


880 
3,688 






28,690 


Ramsey 


2.984,407 

1,066 

860 

66,666 

68 

75 

1,676 

1,625 

986 

16,181 

416 


15 700 


1,300 
22,157 


Redwood 


Renville 




49,991 


Rice 






Rock 




35,852 
1.060 

w 

9,967 


St. Louis 

Scott 

Sherburne 




10,000 

1.660 

800 

818 

1,664 


Sibley 






7 27A 


Stearns 




8,906 

6,206 

175 

884 

206 

7,160 


38,476 
28 986 


Steele 


2.600 


Stevens 


1.400 
1,628 


16 086 


Swift 






81797 


Todd 






19,764 


Wabasha 


4,806 


60 


8,726 


660 


Wadena 


6.410 


Waseca 




9,826 
7.690 
1,176 

460 
8,280 
1,118 

100 


8 808 
12,946 


uiooo 


1,215 


Washington 

Watonwan....... 






46,368 


Wilkin 


1,000 
87,168 




8,100 


10,287 


Winona 


76 
2,870 


16 606 


Wright 

Yellow Medicine. 


1,160 


10.118 
14,428 








Totol 


$110,249 


$184,070 


$3,261,688 


$186,044 


$1,879,716 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 



79 



STATEMENT "G." 
Abstract of the Tax List of the several counties of the State of Minnesota 
for the year 1874. 



Counties. 



Aitkin 

Anoka 

Becker 

Benton 

Blue Earth 

Brown 

Carlton 

Carrer 

Cass 

Chippewa 

Chittago 

Clay 

Cottonwood 

Crow Wing 

Dakota 

Dodge 

Douglas 

Fartbault 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Grant , 

Goodhue 

Hennepin 

Houston 

UantL 

Jackson 

Kanubec. 

Kandiyohi 

Lake 

Lac qui Parle 

Le Sueur 

Lincoln 

Lyon , 

Mc Leod 

Martin , 

Meeker 

MUle Lacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 

Kieollet 

Nobles 

Olmsted 

Otter TttU 

Pine 

Polk 

Pope 

Ramsey 

Redwood 

Renville 

Klce 

Rock 

M. Louis , 

Scott 

iiherbume 

^»lbley , 

btearns , 

Steele 

Stevens 

swift 

Todd -/. ., 

Wabasha , 

Wadena 

Wa»eca 

WashlLg^n 

Watonwan , 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine.. 



Total $13,74M04 



No. of acres of 
Land Bxclusive 
of Town Lots. 



37,694 
171,669 

47,063 

167.295 
446,530 
301,186 

56.752 
218,755 
207,696 

37,674 
225,178 
107,883 

78,858 

15,152 
854,272 
269,677 
196,170 
88^,185 
643,645 
363,744 

60,241 
484,562 
836,185 
384,120 
146,636 

70,194 
187,408 
191,470 

79,612 

36,966 
273,966 
1,460 
156,011 
259,861 
169.783 
228,292 
188,771 
195,325 
434,421 

66.374 
207,931 

26,962 
417,346 
196,150 
238,961 

30,969 
159,487 

80,288 
166,591 
140.612 
304,792 

48,607 
196,833 
207,886 
162,373 
284,816 
561,352 
226.612 

13,341 

21,791 
210,044 
326,190 

1U,310 
266,833 
244,305 

91,176 

71,260 
386,726 
828,428 

95,020 



'^Sgreg'te value 
ot Land (other 
than town lots) 
including struc- 
tures thereon 



$ 156.611 
744,364 
241,596 
524,797 

4,811,266 

l,5f 9.293 
212,389 

1,911,268 
864,511 
177,477 

1,214,219 

461,381 

390,494 

81,887 

4,667,581 

2.846,020 
968,260 

2,721,772 

6,766.027 

2,876,986 
196,876 

6,284,142 

7,164,697 

3,26M53 
478,162 
337,410 
414,919 

1,369,034 
206,014 
I4»,lb2 

2.267,526 

4694 

668,667 

1,776,147 
787,199 

1,884,666 
660,242 
638,916 

8,966.667 
200,179 

1,846,263 
a06,761 

6,688.982 

976,984 

880,866 

95,244 

793,528 

2,444,716 
766,638 
700,146 

8,786,887 
186,11X 
941,506 

2,075,169 
660,562 

2,126,166 

3,701.422 

2,582,648 

67,687 

97,640 

767,774 

3,546,461 
46,6y0 

2,269,543 

2,818,038 
568.060 
290,350 

4,964,780 

2,086,517 
404,781 



$113,410,620 



^ggreg^te value 

Town and City 

Lots, including 

structures 

thereon. 



$ e,l«) 

661,076 

08,962 

183,274 

1,167,066 

435 647 

28,080 

180 960 

9,765 

6,289 

882,432 

86,396 

26,140 

241,291 

796 464 

385,780 

106.066 

377,078 

643,790 

176,317 

8,068 

1,406,643 

14,399,062 

625,376 

11,796 

16,670 



116,007 



7,421 
217,497 



21,499 
183,946 

21,604 
123,078 

66.814 

86,282 
661,918 
960 
496,638 
114,208 
1,077,426 
186,884 
160,428 



20,092 

21,626,787 

66,418 

24,476 

l,747,Jc06 

16,626 

1,870,978 

336,266 

48,607 

79,468 

675,671 

528,681 

12,226 

13,718 

11628 

1,181,391 

""216',899' 
2,104,488 
64,311 
77,782 
3,129,620 
197,888 
37,663 



$58,994,798 



Value of 
Personal 
Property. 



$ 18,459 

294,071 

116,049 ' 

69,648 

1,491,791 

641,410 

16,772 

461,568 

6,461 

205,853 

277,198 

142,7b 1 

168,303 

166,041 

1,278,030 

548,60^ 

302,886 

689,918 

1,684,580 

602,850 

77 304 

2,400,158 

6,088 849 

799,255 

92,370 

142,228 

16,141 

464,893 

4,453 

75,663 

839,612 

14,997 

97,976 

818,899 

187,664 

487,755 

31.bl3 

98,042 

824,982 

56,634 

697,896 

lb ,137 

2,043,262 

39d,435 

78,894 

46 963 

167,367 

7,«3,111 

130,478 

314,9.' 6 

1,847,793 

119.987 

394,683 

524,972 

l»6,t60 

858,192 

91*^,354 

863,748 

60,689 

lli>J)9<y 

104,21W 

1,101 ,fc77 

16,633 

480,368 

1,574,398 

193,449 

68,V39 

2,440,980 

8 1 6,161 



$46,021,798 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 



ANNUAL RKPOBT. 



STATEMENT 



Conniies. 



Total value. 



Aitkin 

.Anoka 

Becker 

Benton 

Bine Earth. 

Brown 

Carlton 

Carver 

Cas8 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Olay 

Cottonwood 

Crow Wing 

Dakota 

Bodge 

Donglaa 

Faribault 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Orant 

Goodhue 

Hennepin 

Houston 

Isanti 

Jackson , 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Lake 

Lac qui Parle.... 

Le Sueur 

Lincoln 

Lyon , 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

MilleLacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray , 

Nicollet , 

Nobles , 

OlmAted 

Otter Tail 

Pine 

Polk 

Pope 

Ramsey 

Redwood 

Renville 

Rice 

Rock 

6t. Louis 

Scott 

Sherburne 

Sibley 

Stearns 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Wadena 

Waseca 

Wanhington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine.. 

Total 



$179,320 

1,689,601 

411,604 

727,719 

7,470,101 

8,636,2S0 

259.141 

2,aB8,771 

879,727 

391,569 

1,878,848 

689 507 

686 987 

389,222 

6.727,015 

8,780,352 

1,375,662 

3.638,766 

8,093.347 

8.155.152 

281248 

10,040,943 

27,661,998 

4,589,784 

582,398 

486,808 

480,060 

1,939,934 

209,467 

232,186 

2,814,685 

19.591 

778,031 

2,278.492 

996,367 

3,446,488 

657 069 

768,190 

6,343,467 

257,763 

8,088,787 

501,101 

8.809,610 

1,609,253 

1,105,189 

141,207 

900,982 

32,013 614 

958,494 

1,039,679 

7,880.886 

271.725 

2,707,164 

2,936,;)96 

816.719 

2,662,826 

6,189,447 

8,974.997 

130 401 

226 754 

908,614 

5,828,719 

63,262 

9,972,810 

6,496,924 

825,840 

421.321 

10,525,280 

2,549,056 

686,716 



»917,427.211 



Total taxes as- 
sessed. 



$4,082 88 
32,709 49 
16.964 27 
18,126 05 
139,.382 18 
45,958 90 

9.514 15 
54,881 15 
14.955 28 
10,873 65 
31,822 66 
24,207 78 
15,888 27 
12 029 92 
97,491 88 
58,008 85 
36.228 96 
63,481 07 
101,205 18 
63,704 74 

5.437 88 
196 982 07 
671,076 05 
64,063 52 
16,427 64 
14,028 03 

4.874 84 
30,740 66 

8,560 95 

4,361 65 
62.094 86 
484 94 
18,257 76 
36,978 13 
14 371 80 
47,065 06 

10.165 79 
2i,42& 50 

94.166 70 
5,199 28 

67,686 54 
14,561 70 

129.589 78 
44,189 18 
31.204 61 
2 747 86 
28.402 17 

6<«,082 43 
16,967 09 
29 016 66 

114,389 41 
8,600 68 

101,382 57 
62,892 62 
16,455 29 
48,658 27 

107,787 29 

56,116 67 

4,158 20 

6,972 48 

21.008 17 

186,650 16 
1,586 34 
69,281 28 

111,616 47 
16,399 96 
10,144 94 

161.221 78 
47.504 16 
13,854 91 



$4.109 835 84 



State tezes. 



$416 26 

3.923 72 
961 85 

1.695 56 

17,405 80 

5,909 46 

6S8 88 

6,960 23 

2,049 76 

911 69 

4,866 06 

1,606 62 

1,866 83 

908 47 

15,673 96 

8,691 75 

3,909 88 

8,478 06 

18,922 91 

7,860 77 

666 19 

23 399 49 

64,196 15 

10,709 50 

1,859 31 

1,163 28 

1,002 50 

4,618 61 

468 06 

628 89 

6,667 46 

46 10 

1,819 81 

6,808 95 

2,320 04 

6.698 00 

1.533 15 

1,792 40 

19,449 16 

600 67 

T,090 50 

1,168 65 

20,526 ."^9 

3.616 39 

2,578 68 

898 86 

2,098 63 

74,591 72 

2.221 48 

9 499 31 

17,714 12 

651 08 

6,316 67 

6,841 81 

1,970 50 

5 971 88 

12.195 18 

9,960 15 

309 11 

^30 41 

9.105 42 

13,597 49 

147 61 

6,929 05 

16,188 19 

1.924 24 
983 07 

34,528 78 
6,947 67 
1.950 76 



$507.369 07 



SCHOOL 



3 Mill Tax. 



$858 46 


8,373 64 


834 68 


1,466 44 


14,940 16 


5,079 60 


604 38 


5,107 64 


783 63 


3,747 69 


1,379 00 


1,170 18 


778 12 


13,455 01 


7,160 71 


2J!>1 88 


7,280 16 


16,242 16 


6.301 61 


562 50 


20,090 81 


55,101 00 


9,179 66 


1,168 19 


996 66 


860 63 


3.878 65 


418 94 


461 89 


5,629 27 


89 68 


1,539 80 


4,557 04 


1,992 06 


4,890 97 


1,314 13 


1,686 87 


10,678 76 


615 51 


6,077 67 


1,057 01 


17,619 -/9 


8.018 38 


2.210 34 


282 05 


1.80196 


64.027 24 


1,906 80 


2,079 16 


14,761 76 


657 61 


5 414 33 


6,872 88 


1,691 44 


6.185 65 


10,878 85 


7,950 90 


261 50 


455 07 


1,807 22 


11,660 99 


1*6 46 


6.943 11 


12,998 97 


1,651 70 


842 65 


21,050 48 


5,098 07 


1,073 13 



$448,192 SI 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OP STATS. 



81 



"G^— Continued. 



TAZB8. 




COUNTY TAXBS. 




Spec*! School. 


County 
reTenno. 


Poor. 


BondB and 
interest. 


Koad and 
bridge. 


Mltcellaaeons. 




$1,798 19 
8,441 61 
8,894 95 
8,821 75 
2,841 08 
8,089 91 
2,621 41 

10.649 93 
6,158 08 
9.789 10 
9,369 84 

15,311 50 
5,8'9 97 
3.892 22 
4,963 82 
7,460 71 
7,337 97 
7,281 28 
8,121 09 

10,096 90 
2,812 43 




$1,006 88 


$460 19 




$11,367 R3 




4,768 04 


$1,841 26 


8,058 22 
1,456 44 






4,880 89 
41,667 12 






1,969 85 

8,686 86 

262 14 

9,663 77 


29,880 83 




12 999 46 




1,163 01 
11,847 27 


1,260 72 


1,018 84 


WHi'A' 




2,348 84 
89188 


9,689 17 


1,759 44 


2,871 05 


39188 


1,848 00 


7,363 85 






3,768 73 


489 62 
1,766 96 
1167 08 
2,957 67 
1,866 86 

917 24 
1,820 86 








2,349 01 
609 98 


l"946'28* 


1,170 18 

778 93 

8,962 43 




86,794 17 




20.968 16 


• 


6,708 97 








21,601 47 


2,663 26 
1,742 01 


1,820 98 




44,670 49 




28,069 03 


2,018 68 




9,186 26 




^, ,,, 


28124 


1,184 97 


48,407 95 




70,077 67 
14,686 10 


66,369 60 
99,948 98 
4,678 14 
2,983 80 
1,290 78 
9.699 22 
1,676 73 

98 94 

8,860 72 

6,063 61 

2,4«8 16 

10,197 71 

3.942 41 

7,681 90 

10,673 75 

1,983 23 

9,692 83 

8,511 72 

14,976 33 

15,099 53 

11,049 17 

1,412 07 

4,504 93 

106,869 96 

4,761 09 

10.896 79 

15,499 86 

8,767 45 

18,960 15 

13.218 79 

4,228 59 

16,876 95 

18,163 02 

11,986 47 

1,808 90 

1,692 88 

4,618 07 

28,88] 97 

682 69 

8,920 73 

7,601 69 

4,955 09 

4,81? 21 

31,576 97 

10,196 20 

3.760 85 




97,034 79 










831 24 


3,337 43 


1,168 19 
499 01 


1,760 70 
2,489 86 




2,994 85 


996 67 






7,186 48 
209 47 


970 60 

209 47 

272 76 

4,881 91 








904 64 

16,780 49 

'960 18 


115 66 


!'.*.*,"!. . .*!'.'. 


16116 


1,816 89 
12,226 80 
3,688 26 

1,789 37 
4,496 86 

37,799 40 
1,178 26 

16,094 63 
3,946 09 

61,780 86 
6,808 68 
6,242 93 








$,781 38 










497*93* 

2,446 48 

828 68 

1,636 89 








3,840*93' 


1,822 70 






..... .... 




188 89 
3,645 25 

698 61 
5,021 47 
3,018 38 


* " 






1.012 98 
1,686 66 


2.086 86 
1,057 04 






3.018 38 

1.104 04 

565 45 

900 97 


8,018 88 
,,, t^ 








141 19 




6,643 00 
6 651 15 




4,604 98 


19,184 49 




3^14 66 
6.893 74 


' 






1.039 68 
6,904 71 

'7,219 'm 

4,170 07 

2,668 82 

7,784 13 

994 04 

65 31 

454 95 

903 61 

8,744 89 




1,039 68 


2,0^9 16 


81,611 37 
8,064 59 
4,689 90 
9,073 64 
6,883 60 
8,491 64 

98,177 25 

19,867 38 

681 14 

1,878 33 

6,439 27 

47,865 13 
878 37 


5,904 71 

976 80 

21,657 80 






8.121 46 
3,083 21 











Mso'ii' 




1,041 94 
796 74 


195 01 
454 95 
908 61 

7,297 12 
190 48 

2,061 68 






0.829 62 
63 46 






17,038 66 
30.960 75 
2,916 70 
1,999 40 
52,969 64 
16,919 84 
8,300 88 


1.4B6 78 


2,878 87] 


'6*497 6i 


1,651 70 






842 66 
19,965 40 

646*86' 


1,263 96 
i,'9U72 




68728 

805 80 


1,473 44 








$898,679 14 


$687,603 34 


$109,238 95 


$184,781 86 


•82.698 66 1 $21,804 68 



11 



Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



82 



ANNUAL REPORT. 

STATEMENT "G."— Continued. 



ConntlM. 


i 

TOWN TAXES. 




Town. 


City. 


Road 
and Bridge. 


Bonds 
and Interest. 


MlsceUan'B. 


AUIrln 












Annjt^ ,,, ,,, 


$3,375 94 
8,134 61 
8,184 86 
11,198 31 
2.836 92 
986 08 
8,346 06 

705*46' * 

8,988 34 
l,62;i 46 
1,608 06 




$ 2,826 75 

707 17 

282 69 

4,418 66 

2,486 87 

726 34 

4.761 11 

388'a2' 

8,50S88 






decker 








B6Dton 


6,078 08 






Blue Earth 




$M17 93 






Carlton 






Carver 

CftM 

CblppewB 

ChlSHgO 




$3,779 80 


660 22 






Clsy • ....... 






Cottonwood 

/Vnw Wlnff 


'""wi'oe* 

1,944 71 
1,618 01 


608 48 




i'K" 


Dakota 

Dodge 


6,679 05 
8,187 42 
8,411 28 
8,8'« IS 
6,586 54 
4,699 68 


8,868 81 
7,766 86 
1,891 79 
6,186 46 
, 5,186 68 
5,0b4 93 


6,409 20 


8,388 66 


Donglas* 






Tnribault 

TtUnore 


847 89 


2,888 18 
80 00 


804 31 


Freeborn 


3.948 83 








'Goodhue 


7,711 73 
6,181 68 
4,322 00 
1,442 79 
1,679 69 


83.609 61 
197,661 60 


""aiissJ 

8.449 72 
1.936 21 
1,627 89 
661 37 
1,721 04 
1,738 56 




6,644 89 


Hennepin 








Iganti 








.Jack»on 

Kanabec 




860 76 


88 00 






Kandiyohi 

I^l^e 


8,877 85 

669 88 

897 51 

4,525 56 

60 24 . 

1,417 03 

2,761 74 

1,777 88 

4,623 72 

915 40 

1,348 00 

4.6^0 76 

793 99 

4,514 46 

9 4 26 

6,968 12 

* 8,961 69 

3.948 66 

18 30 

1,804 06 

4,888 78 

2,428 71 

8,638 35 

8,519 14 

1.146 09 

672 97 

4,308 87 

8,062 80 

7.850 68 

9.899 82 

1,170 06 

826 36 

60S 22 

2,357 04 

16,160 91 

40 14 

1,838 28 

8,748 20 

1,214 68 




242 04 


178 65 






Lac qni Parle ... 
Le Bneur 




P2 66 
8,111 70 













, , 






80 68 

4,042 88 

1,487 86 

4,060 06 

408 80 

2,194 15 

12,439 64 

54 88 

2.444 43 

490 82 

6,538 60 

2,68«J 58 

4,070 80 

"* i.ois'ss" 

4,660 01 
1,418 60 
1.028 99 
2,719 39 

127 82 
11,120 98 
6,126 60 

C38 4G 
8,459 95 
9.129 03 
4,888 16 

188 00 

306 88 
2 968 93 
2,169 04 
730 
3,786 93 
1,91H 09 

787 88 






wcTeid'."*.:::: ■ 






992 14 


Martin 


474'76" 




80 18 


Heeker 






Hill e Lacs 






Morrison 


*'*" 8,074* ob"' 






Kower 


S.029 27 


1,616 06 


Mnrray - 


Nicollet 


6,168 19 






Nobles 


248 18 


Olmsted 


8,766 03 





8,368 76 


OttArTail .... 




Pine 


465,719* ib" 




•■• ......... 


l»olk 






Pone 


98 41 


Ramsey. 

Redwoods 

Renville 

"Rice 

















11,764 86 






Rock .... 




10 19 


Bt Lonis. 


• 8,608 88 
188 41 

419*80' 

6,820 60 
468 98 


''8,n0 86 




gcott 




RhorliiirtiA . 






Sibley 






Btearns 






Steele 


600 00 


866 61 


Stevens 


14 04 


g<^tf^ 




ToAA 






Wabasha 

Wadena .... 




82 00 








42[)00 
29.079 68 


1,401 48 
4,684 14 


111 68 


Washington 

Watonwan 

'\(riikin 




858 04 








Winona 


4,480 68 
6,446 68 
1,406 93 


7,188 38 
40 60 


8,572 99 
2,318 66 
1,670 86 




1,44127 


Wright 

Yellow Medicine 














Total 


$217,749 42 


$731,024 46 


$176,946,24 


$81,204 86 


$20,808 67 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUBITOB OP STATE. 



83 



STATEMENT «H." 

Shotoing the total disbursements by toar rants on the Treasury for 
the fiscal year ending JVov. 30, 1874. 

LEGISLATIVE. 

Senators, mileage ; 91,099 90 

Senators, postage 570 00 

Senators, Htationery 576 88 

Senators, per diem 12,285 00 

Officers of the Senate, mileage 68.40 

Officers of the Senate, postage 80* 00 

Officers of the Senate, per diem 8,748 00 

Representatives, mileage 2,962 60 

Sepresentatiyes, postage and stationery 1,590 00 

Representatives, newspapers 1,988 09 

Representatives, per diem 81,685 00 

Officers of the House, mileage 10 50 

Officers of the House, postage and stationery 15 00 

Officers of the House, per diem 4,461 00 

Reporting for the Senate 800 00 

Reporting for the House 600 00 

Extra Engrossing for the Senate 200 50 

Extra Engrossing for the House 68 85 

Extra Enrolling for the Senate 170 99 

Extra Enrolling for the House 227 97 

Stationery for Clerks' Desks of the Senate 486 87 

Stationery for Clerks' Desks of the House 886 48 

Printing Messages for the Senate 750 00 

Printing Messages for the House 1,117 58 

Election Contests of the Senate 650 00 

Election Contests of the House : : 453 19 

Indexing and Transcribing Journals of the Senate 200 00 

Expense'' of Sepate Committee on Taxes 580 00 

Expenses of Senate Committee on S. M. R. R 840 70 

Expenses of Senate Committee on Elevators 108 25 

Expenses of Senate Committee on Pine Land 232 25 

Expenses of Senate Committee on Cass county 668 80 

Expenses of Senate Committee on Auditor's accounts 181 85 

ExpenseH of Senate Committee on Insane 188 00 

Expenses of Senate Committee on Prison 20 00 

Expenses of Senate Committee on Printing 100 00 

Expenses of House Committee on Accounts 280 00 

Expenses of House Committtee on Prison 12 00 

Furniture and Repairs for Senate 29 50 

Furniture and Repairs for House 72 80 

$69,810 45 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



81 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

SBNATS COURT OF nCPBACHMENT, 1878. 

Mileage Of Senators ^1,012 20 

Perdlemof Senators 670 00 

Mileage of Officers 98 40 

Fer diem of Officers 190 00 

Per diem and Expenses of Hoase Trial Commissioners 1,811 50 

Services and Expenses of Sergeant- at- Arms 225 25 

Fees of Witnesses 24 00 

Stationery 102 9a 

Printing Proceedings 76 OO 

Pay of Reporter 60 00 

^,669 26^ 
EXECUTIVE. 

BALARIBS OF OFFICERS AND CLERKfl. 

Horace Anstin, Governor $822 60 

C.K. Davis, •* 2,760 00 

S. P. Jennison, Secretary of State 1,800 00 

O. P« Wtiitcomb, Auditor and Land Commissioner 2,600 04 

E. W. Dike, Treasurer 8,600 01 

F. R. E. Cornell, Attorney General 88 8a 

Geo. P. Wilson, Attorney General 1,876 00 

MarkD. Flower, Anjntant General I,«f00 00 

H. B. Wilson, Superintendent of Public Instruction 2,600 00 

Pennock Pusey , Insurance Commissioner 88 86 

A..R. McGiU, ** " 1,916 66 

A. J. Edgerton, Railroad Commissioner 8,000 OQ 

Wm. R. Marshall, *» " 2,126 Oa 

J.J.Randall, " ** 2,126 00 

E. D. B. l^orter, Secretary to R. R. Commissioners 1,000 OO 

JohnC. Shaw, State Librarian 1,166 66 

A. Richardson, Military Storekeeper 400 00 

C. E. Chapel, Janitor ^ 1,000 05 

E. G. Wackerhagen, Assistant Janitor 129 00 

Mathew Redmond, •* *' 190 00 

George R. Morton, Engineer and Night Watchman 1,248 00 

M. Redmond, Fireman 271 60 

Wm. Cunnift*, Night Watch and Engineer 62 OO 

J. O. L. Burke, Fireman - 176 00 

George Symonds, Messenger Executive Department 120 00 

A. R. McGill, Governor's Private Secretary 600 00 

W.L. Wilson, " *♦ " 1,000 00 

C. F. Solberg, Assistant Secretary of Stote 1,000 00 

C. F. Solberg, State Statistician 1.000 00 

J. R. Lucas, Auditor's Chief Clerk 1,600 00 

W. L. Vincent, Auditor's Clerk 626 OO 

M. D. Kenyon, Land Clerk 1.200 00 

HenrvS. Hurter, Deputy Treasurer 1,600 00 

Orrin Densmore, Public Instruction Clerk 1,200 OO 

F. B. Cornell, Attorney General's Clerk 16 66 

J. F. Williams, Attorney General's Clerk 160 00 

J. R. Lucas, extra services as Clerk of Auditor 200 00 

M. D. Kenyon. extra services as Clerk of Auditor 160 00 



^1,880 7d 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OF STATE. 85 

EXECUTIVE CONTINGENT. 
1878, 

Dec. 19, Press Printing Co., Weekly Press to London Free 

West 

Jan. 2, N. W. Telegraph Co., Telegrams 

** 8, A. M. TItue, Painting Sign 

" 8, R. O. Strong, 8 Window Shades 

** • 6, Geo. R. Morton, Boxing Books 

' *' 5, E. Page Davis, Immigration Agent 

* 6, D. D. Merrill & Co., Stationery 

** 6, C. E. Chapel, Ba.sket, Towels, Pitcher 

** 5, Stees Brothers, Washstand and Looking Grass . . . • 

** 6, Charles lljortsberg, Copying 

•* 8, C. E. Chapel, Postage 

'* 12, St. Paul Ice Co., Ice 

" 21, P. O. Deptmt, Postage 

'* 80. P. O. Deptmt, Postage 

Feb. 14, P, O. Deprmat, Postage 

March 9, St. Paul Llth. and Eng. Co. , Letter heads 

** 10, St. Paul Press Co., Proof Sheets of Governor 

Davis' Message 

** 10, Sam McCulloch, Daily Pioneer 

" 10, P. A. Taylor, Stationery 

** 10, A. C. Macy, Clerk in Gov. Office 

'• . 10, James Davenport 

^* 10, C. K. Davis, Bissel's Statutes 

** 11, S. C. Williams, Daily Press 

^* 18, Campbell & Davidson, City Directory 

" 18, N. W. Telegraph Co., Telegrams 

-** 18, W. P. Jewett. Map 

*' 16, Wm. Seeger, Expenses Menonite Immigration.. . . 

" 16, D. D. Merrill&Co , Stationery 

*' 16, D. W. Ingersoli & Co., i Doz. Towels 

** 26, P. O. Department, Postage < 

•* 26, Thos. Turner, Transportation Military Stores.... 

April 2, C. E. Davis, Expenses Messenger Leach Lake 

account Indians 

" 8, N. W. Telegraph Co , Telegrams 

i* 4, A. C Macy, Clerk in Governor'ii Office 

'* 8, W. S. Combs 

** 15, C. K. Davis, Expenses Messenger to Leach Lake 

account Indians 

-•* 16, A. C. Macy, Clerk In Governor's Office •. 

-** 16, C.E Chapel, Postage Stamps 

** 20, A. W. McKinstry, Faribault Republican 

« 20, O Brown & Son, Mankato Record 

'* 21, James Davenport, Stationery 

•» 28, C. K. Davis, Stamps 

" 27, St. Paul Lith. & Eng. Co. , Envelopes 

If ay 6, A. C. Macy, Clerk in Governor's Office 

*' 2, James Davenport, Stationery ^ . • 

" 26, A. P. Connolly, Daily Dispatch 

** 27, Leader Printing Co., Lake City Leader 

June 5, A. C. Macy, Servlc<>s in Governor's Office 

•* 9, J. A. Wheelock, Postage Stamps 

" 11, C. E.. Chapel, Washing Windows and sund 

** 22, Michael Malone, Removing rubbish 

*' 28, A. C. Macy, Express charges 

" 26, Chas. E. Chapel, Water Pitcher and Tub 

«• 26, Chas. £. Chapel, Washing Towels 

-*• 26, J. A. Wheelock, Postage 



93 05 


16 69 


400 


9 80 


4 60 


40 00 


28 70 


8 86 


16 00 


8 00 


5 70 


4 66 


4 86 


22 00 


12 00 


16 00 


26 00 


12 00 


34 20 


200 00 


10 38 


10 76 


12 00 


8 00 


80 76 


4 00 


84 60 


40 76 


1 26 


12 00 


6 26 


60 00 


1 02 


100 00 


2 80 


74 40 


160 00 


12 00 


4 00 


2 00 


8 00 


10 00 


9 00 


60 00 


11 06 


9 00 


2 00 


60 00 


27 00 


8 76 


4 00 


2 25 


2 60 


6 00 


10 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



86 ANNUAL BEFOBT. 

July 1, J. A. Wbeelock, Stamped Envelopes 

'* 1, Jame8 Davenport, Stationery 

** 1, A. C. Macy, Services In Execntlve Office 

** 2, N. W. Telegraph Co., Telegrams 

** 2, W. L. Wilson, Gzp. visiting Grasshopper region.. 

'* 7, A. C. Macy, Express charges 

** 14, Cheritree & Parwell, Locks 

" 14, C. K. Davis, Trips to Minneapolis 

" 20, Daggett & Jonbert, Lltcbfield Ledger 

" 21, St. Paul Llth. and Eng. Co., Envelopes 

" 22, A. C. Macy, Express charges 

*' 28, St. Paal Lith and Eng. Co., Letter heads 

** 28, Stees Bros., Kep. Lounge 

" 27, Tribune Printing Co., Daily Tribune 

" 27, H. Jacobs, Steel pens 

" 2S, A. C. Macy, Clerk In Governor's * office 

" 28, St. Paul Evening Journal, Dally Evening Journal. 

Aug. 1, A. C. Macy, Clerk In Governor's office . *. 

" 1, N.W.Telegaaph Co., Telegrams 

** 14, A lex. F. McAlister, Anti-Monopolist 

•• 16, F. A. Taylor, Stationery 

'* 18, Chas. E. Chapel, Postage 

<• 19, H. H. Schrodder, Repairing Desk and Chairs 

<* 20, Thos. Mara, Freight on Books 

" 21, St. Paul Llth. and Eng. Co., Letter-heads 

•< 28, A. C. Macy, Brushes 

Sept. 1, A. C. Macy, Services in Governor's office 

" 1, N. W. Tel. Com Telegrams' 

" 8, Wiley Bros., Repairs in Goveruor's office 

*' 7, James Davenport, Stationery 

" 11, J. A. Wheelock, Postage 

*' 12, A. C. Macy, 1 ream Foolscap 

" 17, C. E. Davis, Sundry Expen^^es, Minneapolis, «&c., 

*• 21, J. J. Eagan, Investigating Officers of Aitkin Co., 

<* 21, A. G. Simons, InvesiigatlDg Officers of Aitkin Co. 

Oct. 1, A. C. Macy, Services in Governor's office 

*« 1, N. W. Tel. Co., Telegrams 

*' 2, St. Paul Press Co., Newspaper binding, &c 

'* 5, James Davenport, Stationery 

** 18, John Strapp, Freight on Books 

*< 14, Geo. R. Morton, Curtains, &c 

'* 14, A. C. Macy, Postage stamps 

** 24, A. C. Macy, Express charges, <&c 

" 27, John Strapp, Fielght on Books 

Nov. 2, James Davenport, 8tatlon<rry 

<* 2, A. C. Macy, Services in Governor's office 

<< 6, C. K. Davis, Traveling Expeuses 

** 6, W. L. Wilson, Traveling Expenses 

Nov. 10. A. C. Macy, postage stamps 

*' 18, A. C. Macy, fre't on goods to snff. from grasshp'rs 

*' 17, A. C. Macy, fare for delegation of Chippewas .... 

*' 18, A. C. Macy, Bill of Indians at American House-. 

** 21, Chas. Bromwich, Subscription to **Echo" 

<* 24, Chas. E. Chapel, Express charges and Sundries.. 

" 80, A. C. Macy, Postage Stamps 

" 80, A. C. Macy, Services In Governor's Office 

** 80, N. W. Tel. Co., Telegrams 

** SO, Chas. E. Chapel, Stationery and Sundries 

*' 80, A. C. Macy, Stotlonery and Sundries 

*• 80, St. Paul Llth. Eng. Co., Letter heads 



34 20 


12 60 


100 00 


' 17 76 


26 88 


1 00 


7 00 


20 60 


^ 460 
* 8000 


6 00 


8 00 


28 00 


10 00 


18 00 


80 00 


8 00 


100 00 


29 60 


2 00 


11 OO 


18 00 


11 40 


8 68 


10 00 


2 60 


100 00 


60 


10 00 


14 77 


16 00 


6 50 


21 60 


6000 


26 00 


100 00 


1 77 


4 76 


10 66 


1 86 


6 60 


16 00 


2 20 


10 62 


12 10 


•100 00 


58 10 


66 46 


12 00 


6 00 


86 00 


28 00 


2 00 


« 16 76 


9 OO 


100 00 


9 62 


14 76 


10 76 


10 00 


«2,662 14 



Dngitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOa OP BTATB. 



87 



SKCRKTARY'8 CONTINGENT. 
1878. 

Dec. 24, Times Printing Co., Dally Evening Times 

*' 81, Chas. Hjortsberg, Clerk in Secretary's Office ••• . 

1874. 
Marcli 9, James Davenport, Stationery 

'* 10, A verlU, RaHseil & Carpenter, Stationery 

** 11, S. C. Williams, Dally Press 

*' 11, P. O. Department, Postage 

'* 12, Stees Brothers, Lounge 

" 12, Chas. HJortsbcrg, Clerk in Secretary's Office 

** 18, Campbell A Davison, City Directory 

** 18, St. Paul Press Co., Record Book 

*< 18,*W. P. Jewett, Map of Minnesota 

" 17, A. P. Connolly, Daily Dispatch 

April 15, Pollock, Donaldson & Ogden, Pitcher, Goblets, &c. 

*< 20, James Davenport. Stationery 

June 9, F. A. Taylor, Stationery 

«' 11, John St. A nbin, Freight on Door to Vault 

July 11, St. Paul Lith. & Eng. Co. , Envelopes 

'* 11, St. Paul Lith. & Eng. Co., Letters and Notes 

*< 27, Mathew Redmond, Cleaning Room 

Aug. 1, Metcalf& Dixon, Stationery 

Sept. 7, C. C. Miles, Repairing Locks 

Oct. 8, J. A. Wheelock, Postage 

Nov. 25. Averill, Russell & Carpenter, Stationery 



$6 75 


48 71 


20 60 


8 08 


10 50 


78 00 


26 00 


106 89 


8 00 


24 00 


4 00 


6 00 


4 85 


5 40 


8 00 


7 76 


12 00 


14 00 


200 


21 JO 


1 50 


29 00 


6 08 



$448 16 



ACDITOR'S CONTINGENT. 



1874. 


March 7, 


t< 




u 




»l 




(C 




u 


10, 


u 


lit 


i( 


18, 


«c 


21t 


April 




(C 




«f 


11, 


« 


17, 


<« 


17, 


cc 


27, 


Hay 




<C 


22, 


June 




(( 




«< 


8, 


u 


16, 


July 


2, 


14 


2. 


t« 


8. 


<C 


7, 


« 


18, 


It 


37, 



A. P. Connolly, Dally Dispatch $9 00 

St. Paul Lith. & Eng. Co., Book of Treasury Drafts, 80 00 

P. O. Department, Postage 25 00 

St. Paul Evening Journal, Daily Journal ....... 8 00 

D. D. Merrill & Co., Stationery 9 40 

Sam McCuUoch, Daily Pioneer 12 00 

S. C.Williams, Daily Press 12 00 

Campbell & Davison, City Directory 8 00 

James Brownell Framing Map 1 40 

N. W. Telegraph Co., Telegrams 16 49 

Wm. s. Combs, Stationery 83 80 

J. A. Wheelock, Postage 25 00 

W. W. Hilton, Repairing of Clock 8 00 

W. J. McMasters, Lake City Leader 2 00 

St. Paul Lith. and Eag. Co., Envelopes 10 00 

St. Paul. Lith. and Eng. Co., Letter heads 82 00 

M. Voorsenger. Pens 8 OO 

W. A. ilotchkiss, Preston Republican 4 00 

Liberty Hall, Glencoe Register • • • • 1 50 

St. Paul Press Co., Tax Deeds 1 00 

Chas. £. Chapel, Postage 25 00 

Stees Brothers, Letter -press table 9 00 

N. W. Telegraph Co., Telegrams 1 55 

St. Paul Evening Journal, Subscription 8 00 

Metcalf & Dixon, Stationery 8 05 

Wm. S. Combs, Stationery 10 65 

M. Redmond, moving safe, &c <•• 8 75 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



bS ANNUAL BIfiPOBT. - 

Aug. 8, Clias. E. Chapeli Postage 26 00 

<* 18» M. D. Kenyon, Express charges 125 

** 21, St. Paul Lltb. and Eng. Co., Lith. Envelopes 10 00 

Sept. 1, A. P. CoDDOlly, Daily Dispatch 4 50 

'* 7, J. A. Wheelock, Postage. 1 5 00 

'* 8, Curtice & Stateler, Map 15 00 

" 10, W. S. Combs, Stationery 8 25 

Oct. 5, C. £. Chapel, Express Stamps 5 00 

« 10, C. £. Chapel, Postage Stamps -. 25 00 

** 12, American Express Co., Express charges 1 00 

•• 21, 1). D. Merrill & Co., Bill holder 8 75 

" 28, J. W. Dewey, Postal Guiile 150 

«' 29, Chas. UJortsberg, Copying 2 50 

Nov. 2, N. W. Telegraph Co., Telegrams 1 35 

« 2, James Davenport, Stationery 8 20 

*< 12, American Express Co., Express charges 1 15 

'' IS, Ed. Uoancic, Map Dakota county 5 00 

" 21, St. Paul Lith. & Eng. Co., BooJt of Trea*. Drafts, 85 00 

" 89, N. W. Tel. Co., Telegrams 2 70 

*' 80, M. D. Kenyou, Express charges 4 05 

9452 79 



treasurer's CONnNGENT. 

1878. 

Dec. 22, Robt. 8. Craig, Painting Sign f4 00 

1874. 

March 9, D. D. Merrill & Co., Ledger 15 00 

** 10, Sam McCuUoch, Daily Pioneer 12 00 

" 10, E. W. Dike, Newspaper postage and Stationery.. 80 20 

** 10, J. H. Woolsey & Co., Chandelier 26 00 

" 18, E. W. Dike, Stationery, Repairs in office, Ac 11 78 

" 18, St. Paul Press Co., Check-books and Envelopes.. 25 45 

** 17, E. W. Dike, Newspapers and Postage 20 00 

June 8, St. Paul Press Co., Stamp Check-book 48 00 

July 15, E. W. Dike, Postage, New(«p. and Sundries 14 75 

<< 81, H. Jacobs, 3 boxet> of Pens 9 00 

Sept. 7, £. W. Dike, Postage and Sundries 16 70 

Oct. 6, E. W Dike, Lounge 25 00 

'* 12, H. H. Schrceder, Book-case 14 00 

Nov. 17, S. M. Raymond, Gov't Note Detector and Glass.. 10 00 

'* 80, E. W. Dike, Postage and Ink 7 00 



$288 88 



ATTORNEY GENERAL'S CONTINaENT. 
1874. 

Jan. 10, F. R. £. Cornell, Postage, Stationery, Tele- 
grams, &c $25 20 

March 6, Geo. P. Wilson, Attending Court at Brainerd...« 116 40 

April 7, Geo. P. Wilson, Aitcndlng Court Sibley County.. 42 00 

May 4, Geo. P. Wilson, Attending Court (Sup.) 20 00 

'' -4, Geo. P. Wilson, Postage and Siatloiiery 8 00 

June 4, Geo. P. Wilson, Attendance on Court and Telegram 112 55 

July 1, Geo. P. Wilson, Attendance on Court and Postage 157 70 

*< 81, Geo. P. Wilson, Attendance on Court and Sundries 106 50 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OP STATB. 89 

Oct. 6, Geo. P. Wilson, Attendance on Court and Sundries 87 76 

« 26, Geo. P. Wilson, Attendance on Court and Sundries 106 96 

Koy. 80, Geo. P. Wilson, Attendance on Court and Sundries 81 90 



$769 96 



PUBLIC INSTRUCTION CONTINOBMT. 

1878. 

Dec. 27, H. B, Wilson, Sundry Expenses as Sup*t $46 26 

1874. 

Jan. 14, St. Paul £v. Journal, Evening Journal 50 

« 28, H. B. Wilson, Sundry Expenses as Sup't 66 82 

March 7. St. Paul Lith. and Eng. Co., Envelopes 10 00 

«« 10, H. B. Wilson, Sundry Expenses as Sup't 66 67 

" 11, S. C. Williams, Dally Press 12 00 

<« 18, W. P. Jewett, Map of Minnesota 4 00 

Hay 10, H. B. Wilson, Sundry Expenses as Sup't 72 87 

June 2, DeCoster & Clark, Bed Lounge and Fixtures .... 27 60 

«« 2, St. Paul Press Co., Binding 3 50 

July 8, H. B. Wilson, Sundry Expenses as Sup't 77 60 

Sept. 1, H. B. Wilson, Sundry Expenses as Sup't 127 70 

Kov. 80, H. B. Wilson, Sundry Expenses as Sup't 25 60 



-i- 



•627 91 



RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS' CONTINGENT 
1874. 

Macch 6, P. O. Department, Postage $45 00 

•• 19, J. F. Williams, Clerical Services 76 00 

April 6, E. D. B. Porter, Postage 10 00 

" 28, B. D. B. Porter, Postage 16 00 

•< 80, A. J. Edgerton, Expenses Inspection S. M. R.R. .. 26 41 
Hi|y 2, Wm. K. Marshall, Exp. Inspecion S. M. R. R. and 

Sioux City R. R 87 76 

** 6, Ramaiey & Cunningham, Pamphlets R. R. Laws... 88 00 

*' 6, Ramaiey & Cunningham, Binding and Sundries .... 18 70 

" 9, Wm. S. Combs, Stationery 48 60 

<' 12, J. S. Se well, Inspecting Railroads 221 40 

<* 22, J. J. Randall, Exp. Inspecting, S. M., and W. and 

St. Paul, and St. P. and S. C. R. R 67 86 

'< 27, £. D. B. Porter. Exp. examining books and ac- 
counts S. M. R. R 16 60 

Jane 6, Giesen & Co., Binding 4 76 

*' 11, A. J. Hill, Work on U. R. Commissioner's Report. 203 60 
" 18, Chas. HJortsberg, Copying Deeds, Mortgages, 

Leases, &c 66 90 

<* 18, J. J. Randall. Exp. as R. R. Commissioner in May 46 96 

« 8, J. A. Wheelock, Postage 16 00 

** 8, P. N. Cordoza, Book-case 10 00 

*< 8, Metcall& Dixon, stationery 16 60 

« 16, E. D. B. Porter, Newspapers 19 00 

Aug. 81, Wm. R. Marshall, Exp. to Dubuque convention. .. 26 00 
'* 81, Wm. R. Marshall, 6 months subscription to Inter 

Ocean 6 00 

Sept. 19, J. A. Wheelock. Postage 19 69 

^1,081 Op 
12 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



90 



ANNUAL BSPOBT. 



ADJUTANT aSinERAL'S CONTINOKNT. 

1874. 

March 9» F. A. Taylor, Stationery $ 28 50 

" 9, P. O. Deptmt, Postage 27 00 

<' 10, Sam McCulloch, Dally Pioneer 12 OO 

" 10, G. C. Smith, Transportation of Arms 9 57 

*» 11, S.C. Williams, Dally Press 13 00 

«« 18, Campbell & Davison, City Directory 8 OO 

" 14, R. O. Strong, Oil Cloth and Mats 6 01 

*« 17, A. P. Connolly, Daily Dispatch 9 00 

*' 20, St. Paol Evening Journal, Daily Joamfd 2 50 

April 1, C. B. Chapel, Postage 16 00 

«* 9, C. B. Chapel, Postage 8 10 

*< 14, Ed. A. Stevens, Gopher Mirror 2 00 

<' 25, Stone, Parker & Co. , Set Pigeon-holes 8 00 

May 28, C. E. Chapel, Postage 16 00 

June 2, F. A. Taylor, Envelopes 12 25 

July 1, MIL & St. Paul Railway, Transportion of Arms.... 6 38 

<* 2, Chas. E Chapel, Postage Stamps 15 00 

<* 8/< St. Paul Evening Journal, Daily Journal 8 00 

" 7, Chas. E. Chapel, Postage 4 00 

" 7, Ed. Brady, Telegram 120 

" 8, Pollock, Donaldson & Ogden, Pitcher and Goblet. 8 95 

" 18, F. A. Taylor, Stationery 15 00 

<< *24, Chas £. Chapel, Expenses for Flag Boom 5 62 

Aug. 12, Chicago & Mil. R. U., Transportation of Arms.... 2 22 

<« 14, Alex. F. McAUister, Anti-Monpolist 2 00 

« 18, Chas. £. Chapel, Postage 12 00 

*' 21, Henry Brledert, Saw and Hammer for Arsenal.... 8 40 

" 26, Wm. M. Dwinell, Cartage for Arsenal 2 00 

Sept 15, Mil. & St. Paul Railway, Freight on Arms 90 

*• 15, Tribune Printing ('o , Dally Tribune for August.. 1 00 

" 16, A.P.Connolly, Daily Dispatch 4 50 

«* 6, C. E. Chapel, Postage 10 00 

<< 20, St. Paul & Pacific R R., Freight on Arms 1 60 

" 20, F. A. Taylor, Stationery ....^ 19 70 

•* 28, J. W. Dewey, Postal Guide 1 50 

Nov. 4, C. E. Chapel, Postage 4 00 

" 4, W. B. Hawkins, Miu. Tribune 4 00 

« 7, C. B. Chapel, Postage Stamps 15 00 



9299 85 



LIBRARV CONTINGKNT. 



1878 
Dec. 



1874< 
Jan. 



Feb. 



18, Howe & Wood, Screw-hooks, &c.... 

28, John C. Shaw, Sere w- books. ..; 

81, P. O. Dep't, Postage Stamps 

2, James Davenport, Stationery 

8, U. S. Express Co., £xpre88 charges- 

6, Am. M. U. Ex. Co., Express charges. 
24, W. F. Bancroft, Map of Minnesota.. 
26, Press Printing Co., Binding Laws... 

8, U, S. Express Co. Express charges.. 

8, James Davenport, Stationery ......... 



• 2 88 


1 00 


10 00 


14 18 


1 50 


14 65 


4 00 


8 75 


50 


7 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOK OF 8TAT£. 91 

March 2, U. 8. Express Co., Express cliargea 

'« 11, 8. C. WUlUms, Dally Press 

" 18, Campbell <& Davidson, City Directory 

•* 18, James Davenport, Stationery 

«• 1 6, Chas. Chapel, Washing Towels and Mncilage 

*' 19, P. O: Dept., Postage stamps 

" 27, G. Sidney Smith, Dictionary 

" 30, Am. Merch. U. Ex. Co., Express charges 

April 1, U. 8. Express Co., Express charges 

« 8, Wm, Smith, Moving Books to New Room 

** 8, Thomas Ham, Moving Books to New Room 

<« 8, Henry Stebbins, Moving Books to New ROom. . . . 

«* 4, Geo. Gopsil, Moving Books to New Room 

^* 4, James Davenport, Stationery 

<« . 4, Goodkind & Manheimer, Towels 

*• 7, Gi^sen & Roosen, Bloding 

« 9, C. E. Chapel, Packing Books, &c 

*< 10, DeCoster & Clark, Desk 

<« 10, Sam McCulloch, Daily Pioneer 

" 14, A. P. Connolly, Daily Dispatch 

" 17, Thos. Jefferson, Writing Notice for Library Door, 

•* 20, James Davenport, Stationery 

«« 21, A. E. Melgren, Stencils 

May 1, St. Paul Press Co., Adv. Des<k for Sale 

<* 1, U. S. Express Co., Express Charges 

** 1, James Davenport, Gam Lables 

" 2, R. O. Sweeny, Duster 

** 6, A. Angler, Brashes 

Jane 1, James Davenport, Stationery 

** 1, U. 8. Express Co., Express Charges 

** 1, Ramaley & Canningham, Blank Book 

•• 6, C. C. Miles, Yale Keys 

'< 11, C. E. Chapel, Water Pitcher, Packing Box 

*' 12, Soale, Thomas & Co.. Subscription to Central Law 

Jonmal 

** 17, A. E. Angler, Alcohol 

«' 17, J. A. Wheelock, Postage 

'* 26, John Hnrley, Freight on Books 

*' 27, Robert Nolan, Moving Books 

'* 80, John C. Shaw, Cartage on Books 

'* 80, James Davenport, Stationery 

July 8, Chas. £. Chapel, Exp. charges and sundries 

« ^ 11, Sylvanus Brown, Examiniug and Assorting Books 

-* '11, U. S. Express Co., Express charges 

** 18, American Express Co. , Ezpressage 

** 22, Thos. Mara, Freight on Books 

** 21 y John Mangan, Freight on Books 

Aug. 4, Howe k Wood, Step-ladder, &c 

Hept« 8, U. S. Express Co. , Express charges 

** 7, James Davenport, Stationery 

*« 16. American Express Co., Exp. charges on Books. . . 

*« 28, Chas. E. Chapel, Washing Towels 

Oct. 2, U. 8. -Express Co., Express charges 

« 8, James Davenport, 12 Mem. books 

«« 6, W. W. Hilton, Repr. Clock • 



6 76 


9 00 


8 00 


27 60 


8 26 


10 00 


12 00 


26 10 


1 26 


6 00 


6 00 


6 00 


10 60 


11 65 


8 00 


46 96 


8 66 


29 OO 


9 00 


6 76 


1 00 


10 88 


76 


46 


2 00 


2 40 


60 


1 80 


6 76 


76' 


1 00 


2 60 


1 16 


8 00 


76 


6 00 


9 87 


8 00 


1 00 


« 9 80 


2 76 


6 00 


60 


67 96 


8 26 


76 


6 40 


4 76 


6 ^ 


6 66 


200 


2 00 


6 00 


6 00 


$472 61 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



92 ANNUAL BBPOBT. ' * 

JUDICIAL. 

SAULBIEB OF JUDGBS. 

€. 6. Ripley, Chief Jastice $1,500 OO 

8.J.H. McMillan, Chief Justice 1,941 C8 

S. J. K. McMillan, Associate Justice 1,058 82 

Geo. B. YoQDg, Associate Justice 1,000 00 

John M. Berry, Associate Justice 3,000 OO 

F. M. Crosby, Judge First District • 2,500 00 

W. WMkin, Judge Second District 2,500 00 

^ John Van Dyke, Judge Third District 284 78 

Wm. Mitchell, Judge Third District 2,013 87 

Lloyd Barber, Judge Third District, balance for 1872. .' '55 55 

Chas. £. Vanderburgh, Judge Fourth District 2,500 OO 

fiam'l Lord, Filth District 2,916 68 

Franklin U. Wait, Judge Sixth District. 2,083 34 

A. C. Woolfolk, Judge Sixth District : 208 38 

Sam'l McKelvy , Judge Seventh District 3, 125 00 

A. G. Chatfield, Judge Eighth District .... * 2,500 00 

M. G. Hanscome, Judge Ninth District 2,500 00 

Sherman Page, Judge Tenth District 2,500 00 

O. P. Stearns, Judge Eleyenth District \,^0S 92 

Wm. Sprigg Hall, Judge Common Pleas, Ramsey County. . . . 2,083 86 

A. H. Young, Judge Common Pleas, Hennepin County 2,500 00 

$40,277 73 



CLERK, REPORTER AND MARSHAL SUPREME COURT. 

Sherwood Hough, Clerk Supreme Court $1,250 00 

Wm. A. Spencer, Reporter Supreme Court . 500 00 

Marshall Sherman, Marshal Supreme Court 92 00 

Geo. R. Morton, Marshal Supreme Court 20 00 

$ 1,862 00 

^ SUPREME COURT REPORTS. 

1874. 

Jan. 8, Wm. A. Spencer, vol. 19 Supreme Court Reports, 91,200 00 



LAW LIBRARY. 

1874. 

X'eb. 5, John C. Shaw, Purchase of Books |i20 oo 

** 24, Soule, Thomas & Wentworth, Purchase of Books, 88 00 

April 13, Soule, Thomas & Wentworth, Purchase of Books, 49 00 

** 18, C. K. Davis, Purchase of Books 5 00 

May 25, Henry Jackson, Purchase of Books • . .*. . . 7 50 

June 27, Soule, Thomas & Wentworth, Purchase of Books, 1,067 25 

July 24, Soule, Thomas & Wentworth, Purchase of Books, 2ro 00 

" 31, W. J. Parsons, Purchase of Books 15 00 

Aug. 25, Soule, Thomas & Wentworth, Purchase of Books, 227 06 

Oct. 17, J. C. Shaw, Purchase of Books 200 00 

IJov. 30, Soule, Thomas & Wentworth 75 00 

«2,003 81 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OF BTATB. 93 

SUPRSMB COUBT OONTIMOBNT. 
1874. 

Peb. 24, T. J. Kenny & Co.. Globes for Chandeliers ^5 00 

March 11, 8. C. Williams, Dally Press .*. 6 OO 

'* 18, Campbell & Davisofi, City Directory 8 00 

April 4, Ramaley & Connf ngham, Stationery 10 48 

** 9, C. £. Chapel, Cleaning Rooms 12 80 

*« 18, C. G. Ripley, Postage and Stationery 8 78 

*' 20, James Davenport, Stationery 6 25 

May 5, (^has. £. Chapel, Postage Stamps 20 00 

June 18, Sherwood Hoagh, Copying, Postage and Sundries, 97 88 

Jaly 7, Metcalf & Dixon, Stationery 16 90 

•• 26, 8. C. Williams, Dally Press 6 00 

'< 27, U. Jacobs, 4 boxes Pens 10 00 

Aug. 8, Metcalf & Dixon. Stationery 8 80 

** 81, Sherwood Hoogh» Copying Opinions 57 88 

Sept. 1, C.E. Chapel, Postage 10 OO 

Oct. 5, James Davenport, Stationery 12 90 

'* 28, Chas. £. Chapel, Postage 5 00 

Nov. 2, James Davenport, Statiouery ' • 12 45 

** 16, Sherwood Hough, Copying 46 75 

$851 82 



PUBLIC PRINTING. 

PRINTINO LAWS IN NBW8PAPBRS (DKF. 1878.) 

1874. 

March 5, Preston Republican, Pub. Laws of 1878 $105 15 

«< 5, Rochester Fed. Union, Pab. Laws of 1878 105 16 

** 5, Big Lake Appeal, Pub. Laws of 1878 105 15 

•* 5, Red River Gazette,' Pub. Laws of 1873 105 16 

*' 5, Le Sueur Sentinel, Pub. Laws of 1878 105 15 

«* 6, Lanesboro Clarion, Pub. Laws of 1878 105 15 

'* 5, RushfordLaborReform, Pub. Laws of 1878 105 15 

«« 5, Lac qui Parle Press, Pub. Laws of 1878 * 105 15 

'* 5, Henderson Independent, Pub. Laws of 1878 106 15 

" 5, Eyota Advertiser, Pub. Laws of 1878 105 15 

«* 5, Worthlngton Advance, Pub. Laws of 1873 105 15 

*« 5, Detroit Record, Pub. Laws of 1878 105 15 

«« 5, Windom Reporter, Pub. Laws of 1878^ 105 15 

' ' 5, Fergus Falls Advocate, Pub. Laws of 1878 105 15 

** 5, Austin Register, Pub. Laws of 1878 105 15 

91,577 26 



(Other payments Pub. Laws of 1878 flrom "Printing, Binding 
and Advertising'* Fund of 1874 } 

PRINTI140 LAWS IN MEW8PAFKK8, 1874. 

March 27, Glencoe Register, Publishing laws of 1874 $97 95 

** 27, Worthlngton Advance, Publishing laws of 1874.. • 97 95 

•« 27, Madella Times, Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

<« 27, Austin Transcript, Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

'< 27, Albert Lea SUndard, Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

'« 27, Austin Register, Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



94: ANNUAL RBPORT. 

March 27, Dnlnth Herald, PabHshing laws of 1874. . - 97 96 

•* 27, Lake CJty Sentinel, Publlehlnfj Jaws of 1874 97 95 

'• 27, Duluth Tribune, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

** 27, Waseca Record, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

'' 27, Hastings Union, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

>« 27, Winona Herald, Publittbing laws of 1874 97 95 

^* 27, Albert Lea Enterprise, Publishing laws of 1874... 97 96 

'* 27, Buluth Minnesotian. Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

'* 27, Minneapolis Frle Presse, Publie^hing laws of 1874. 97 95 

'* 27, Minneapolis Budsticken, Publishing laws of 1874. 97 96 

•* 27, Minneapolis M. Mechanic, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

<* 27, Minneapolis 6 Mirror, Publishing laws of 1874. . . 97 96 

*< 27, Minueapolis F. Union, Publishing laws of 1874 ... . 97 96 

^* 27, Waseca News, Pablishlng laws of 1874 97 96 

« 27, Homer Novelty Press, Puhllshing laws of 1874 97 96 

'< 27, Windom Reporter, Pablishing laws of 1874 97 96 

'* 25, Pioneer Company, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

«< 26, St. Paul VolKSblat, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

»< 26, St. Paul Wanderer, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

*< 26, St. Paul Swedish Pioneer, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

** 25, St. Paul Dispatch, Publlj<hing laws of 1874 97 96 

'< 25, St. Paul Evening Journal, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

V 26, Northfield standard, Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

** 26, LeSueur Sentinel, Publishing laws ot 1874 97 96 

•* 26, Willmar Republican, PnbliHhing laws of 1874 97 96 

<* 26, Litchfield Ledger, Publishing lawsof 1874 97 95 

" 26, St. Cloud Times, Publishing law8 of 1874 97 96 

<< 26, Mankato Union, Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

f ' 26, Sauk Rapids Sentinel, Publishing laws of 1874 .... 97 95 

'* 26, St. Cloud Journal, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

' '« 26, Anoka Union, Publishing lawsof 1874 97 95 

^* 26, Elk River News, Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

** 26, Faribault Republican, Publishing laws of 1874.... 97 95 

" 26, Faribault Democrat. Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

** 26, Stillwater Messenger, Publishing laws of 1874. . . . 97 95 

'< 26, Wabasha Herald, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

X 26, Red WingGrange Advance. Publishing lawsof 1874, 97 95 

'* 26, Minneapolis Nord Folkeblad. Publishiug laws 1874, 97 95 

*« 26, Stillwater Gazette, Puhli.^hlng laws of 1874 97 95 

*» 26, Hen4erson Times*, Publishing laws of 1874 «7 95 

'< 26, Henderson Independent, Publishing laws of 1874. 97 95 

" 26, Mankato Beabuchter, Publishiug laws of 1874.... 97 95 

** 26, Mankato Review. Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

" 26, St. Paul Western Times, Publishing laws of 1874, 97 96 

** 26, St. Paul Staats Zeitung, Publishing laws of 1874, • 97 76 

. ** 26, St. Paul N. W. Chronicle, Publishing laws of 1874, 97 95 

" 26, Anoka Republican, Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

'< 26. Minneapolis Tribune, Publishing laws of 1874.... 97 96 

*• 26, Mankato Record, Publishing taws of 1874 97 96 

*' 26, St. Peter Tribune. Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

*< 26, Shakopee Argus, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

<* 26, Winona Republican, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

*< 26, Owatonna Jourufd, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

" 26, St. Paul Press, Publishing laws of 1874 97 96 

*' 26, St. Cloud Press, Publishing laws of 1874 97 95 

« 26, Hastings Gazette, on account. Publishing laws 1874 26 06 

$6,000.00 



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AUDITOR OP STATE. 95 

PRINTING AND ADYBRTISING (DRF. 1873). 

1874. 

March 5, B. C. Sanborn, Adv. Und sale, 1873, Watonwan.. 

•• 6, D. G. Parker, Adv. land sale, 1873, Freeborn 

«< 6, J. K. Moor#, Adv. land sale, 1878, Nicollet 

'* 5, Johnson & LarsseD, Adv. land sale, lr^7S, Hennepin, 

** 5, W. R. Co' ton. Adv. land sale, 1878, Sibley 

'* 6, Daggett & Jonbert, Adv. land sale. Meeker 

*' 5, H. M. Avery, Adv. land sale, Jackson 

" 6, A. J. Underwood, Adv. lani sale, Otter Tail 

*• 5, S. & E. C. Huntington, Adv. land sale, Cottonwo'd, 

** 5, Eagle Pt'g Co., Adv. land sale, Wright 

'* Bf Granville S. Pease, Adv. land sale, Anoka 

*' 5, James £. Child, Adv. land sale, Waseca 

** 5, Todd & Stebblns, Adv. land sale, Dakota 

<< 6, Willmar Republican, Adv land sale, Sandiyohi... 

'< 5, Wabasha Herald, Adv. land sale, Wabasha 

" 6, A. W. McKinstry, Adv. land sale. Rice 

*' 5, Goodhue Co. Republican, Adv. laud sale, Goodhue, 

<< 6, A. E. Ball, Adv. land sale, Martin 

«• 6, H. P. Robie, Adv. land sale. Pine 

** 6, Taylor's Fa1l8*s Journal, Adv. land sale, Chisago.. 

" 5, W. W. WUllams, Advertising Land Sale 1873, 
Faribault 

'* 5, Redwood Gazette, Advertising Land Sale 1873, 
Redwood 

^< 5, Joseph Gilpin, Advertising Land Sale 1873, Douglas 

-« 5, Henry Hinds, Advertising Land Sale 1878, Scott.. 

** 5, T. A. Perrine, Advertising Land Sale 1873, Wright 

*' 5, W. B. Mitchell, Advertising Land Sale 1873, 
, Steams 

'* 6, John M. Thomson, Advertising Land Sale 1873, 
Sherburne 

** By O. Brown & Son, Advertising Land Sale 1873, 
BlneEarth 

<< 5, Glencoe Register, Advertising Land Sale 1878, 
McLeod 

'« 5, J. Lnt.' Christie, Advertising Land Sale 1878, 
Houston 

** By New Ulm Post, Advertising Land Sales 1872 and 
1873. Brown 

** By Journal Printing Company, Advertising Land Sale 
of 1872, Steele 

** By Tribune Printing Company, Advertising Proposals 
for Printing 1873 

*' . 5, J. C. Terry, Advertising Proclamations relating to 
Lyon and Lincoln Counties 1873 

^* 5, Press Printing Company, Advertising Land Side — 

local notice ^. . . 

** By Press Printing Company, Notice to Lumbermen.. 

** By Press Printing Company, Advertising Land Side 
General 

*^ By Press Printing Company, Advertising Thanks- 
giving Proclamation 

** By Press Printing Company, Advertising Proclama- 
tions relating to special elections in Ramsey and 

Olmsted Counties 12 00 

-'* 5, Press Printing Company, Advertising Proclama- 
tions relating to sepecial elections in Lyon and 
Lihcoln Counties 15 00 



•12 42 


15 00 


18 15 


13 13 


13 12 


15 76 


16 75 


13 50 


13 12 


15 76 


18 00 


13 50 


15 00 


15 75 


16 00 


13 13 


18 00 


15 00 


18 00 


18 13 


15 75 


9 37 


14 40 


10 60 


15 75 


15 75 


13 24 


13 12 


15 75 


10 50 


18 75 


9 37 


42 00 


12 00 


1 75 


4 50 


84 12 


5 63 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



96 ANKUAL BBPQBT. 

March 5, Fre^s Printing Co., Adv. Proposals Building 
Capitol Extension i • - • 

" 5, Press Printing Co., Adv. Procl. for arrest Murder- 
ers McQaisten 

*< 5, Press Printing Co., Adv. Procl. for arrest Murder- 
ers McMullen 

** 6, Press Printing Co., Adv. Procl. for arrest^Murder- 
ers Edward Kreike 

** 6, Press Printing Co., Adv. Proposals for Printing 
1878 

" 5, Press Printing Co , Adv. Notice to Bidders for 
Printing 

" 5, Press Printing Co., Adv. Proposals for Paper.... 

" 5, Press Printing Co., Record Book for A<yt. Gen. 
Office 

" 6, Press Printing Co., Weekly Press to A. A. Wise- 
London 

*' 5, Leonard & BoQ|;h, Publishing Proclamation rela^ 
ting to Election of Senators. 

*' 6, Theodor Sander & Co., Publishing Proclamation 
relating murder Kreike and McMullen 

" 6, Theodor Sander & Co , Publishing Land Sale of 
1878 

*< 6, Theodor Sanders & Co., Publishing Notice to Lum- 
bermen • 

*' 6, Seward & Taylor, Publishing Notice to Lumbermen, 

<• 6, Seward & Taylor, Publishing Land Sale 

« 7, Dispatch Printing Co , Publishing Land Sale 

<< 7, A. J. Underwood, Publishing Notices of Trespass 
on State Lands 

*' 9, D. S. Hall, Publishing Land Sale of 1878 

<< 9, D. Sinclair & Co., Publishing Land Sale of 1878. . . 

<< 9, D. Sinclair & Co., Publishing Proposals for Print- 
ing 

'< 9, Pioneer Printing Co., Publishing Land Sale 1878. « 

«.« 9, Pioneer Printing Co., Publishing Notice to Lum- 
bermen, 1878 

" 9, Pioneer Printing Co., Publishing Proposals for 
Printing, 1878 

'< 10, Dispatch Printing Co., Publishing Proposals for 
Paper, 1878 

'< 14, Tribune Printing Co , Publishing Proclamation re- 
lating to Murderer McQutsten 

'< 14, Tribune Printing Co., Publishing Proposals for 
Paper 

« 14, Pribune Printing Co., Publishing Notice to Lum- 
bermen. 

<« 14, Journal Printing Co , Publishing Notice of Land 
Sale, 1878 



81 50 


568 


750 


7 50 


42 00 


76 
18 18 


28 00 


8 00 


200 


4 50 


18.87 


8 76 

4 50 

18 00 

28 60 


6 00 
16 76 
18 12 


84 12 
84 12 


4 60 


42 00 • 


11 26 


6 60 


11 26 


8 76 


15 75 



$996 29 



PRINTINO AKD Bnn>INO (DEF. 1878). 

1874. 
March 5, Norman Wright, Balance due on contract work of 

1878 $10,786 28 



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AUDITOB OF STATB. 97 

PBDITnfO, ADVKRTISmO AKI> BIN]>IHa» 1874. 

1784. 
March 9, C. T. Miller, 2,000 Maps for R. R. Com'r Report.. • $180 00 

•' 9, A. J. Reed, 700 Maps for Manual 100 00 

" 11, J. B. Chaney, on acc't 2d class Printing (76 pr. ct.) 1,500 00 
'* 11, J. B. Chaney, Printing for the Legislature, 1st 

class 2,121 98 

'< 11 , C. £. Chapel, 50 Boxes and Packing Docs 100 00 

" 12, H. P. Hall, Bill of Austin Harvest Herald, pub. 

laws, 1878 105 15 

" 18, Norman Wrfght, On account 8d, 4th and 6th classes 

Printing 6,000 00 

'* 18, St. Paul I'ress Co.. Pub. State Treasurers Annual 

Statement 260 25 

'* 18, St Paul Press Co., Pub. Proclamation relating con- 
stitutional amendment 8 75 

•* 18, St. Paul Press Co., Pub. Proposals for Wood 5 25 

" 16, Henry Hinds, Pub. Laws of 1878 105 15 

" 16, D. Sinclair & Co., Pub. Proposals for Paper, 1878. 11 25 

« 16, W. A. Hotchkifis, Adv. Land sales of 1872.8 26 25 

" 17, C. E. Chapel, Paid cartage of paper to printer. . . . 11 00 

" 18, N. W. Lith. Co., 1,000 Maps for Geological Report 80 00 

<' 18, 6. W. Walsh, Measuring flrt^t class of Printing.. . 5 00 

<' 18, Photo-Engraving Co., Plates illustrating Qeologi- 

cal Report 100 00 

<< 28, J. K. Falrcher, Adv. Land sale of 1878 15 00 

** 80, St. Paul Press Co., 400 copies original engrosed 

tax-bill 250 00 

April 1, A. A. Harwood, Adv. Land sale of 1878 12 00 

** 8, Norman Wright, On account 8d 4th and 6th class 

printing (75 per ct.) 2,000 00 

" 8, Chas. Hjortsberg, Services in Secretary's Office- 
reading proof ^ 50 00 

«* 22, 0. S. King. Adv. Land sale of 1878 (Otter Tall) ... 16 75 

** 29, J. B. Chaney, On account 2d class Printing 760 00 

•* 80, Chas. Hjortsberg, Services in Secretary's offlco— 

reading proof 50 00 

May 4, St. Paul Press Co., Adv. Notice to Insurance Com- 
panies 7 50 

*« 11, C. B. Chapel, Moving paper into Store-room 82 00 

<' 11, C, £. Chapel, Paid drayage on paper 2 60 

'* 16, Norman Wright, On account 8d, 4th, and .^th classes 

Printing 2,000 00 

*' 27, Norman Wright, On account 8d, 4th and 6th 

classes Printing 1,000 OU 

June 1, Dispatch Printing Co., Adv. Ventilation of Legis- 
lative Halls, &c 8 80 

*' 8, Pioneer Company, Adv. Ventilation of Legislative 

Halls,&c TT... 8 4ft 

«• 8, Pioneer Company, Adv. Prop, for Public Printing. 42 00 
" 8, St. Paul Press Co., Adv. Prop, for Public Printing 42 OO 
" 8, St. Paul PresA Co., Adv. Prop for Ventilating Leg- 
islative Halls 8 00 

*' 5, St. Paul Press Company, Advertising Seed- wheat 

distribution 4 50 

'< . 6, Sam. H. Nichols, Indexing House Journal 100 00 

'* 15, Tribune Printing Company, Advertising Proposals 

for Public printing 86 00 

" 18, D. Sinclair & Co., Advertising Propd^als for Pub- 
lic Printing 81 60 

13 



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98 ANNUAL RBPOBT. 

June 18, JeniUson & Perkins, Advertising Proposals for 

Pabllc PrintlDg 28 18 

<* 26, Chas. £. Chapel, 81 Boxes and Packing Books. . .. 181 00 

" 27, Norman Wright, on acconnt 8d, 4th and 5th classes 

Printing 1,200 00 

'< 27, Norman Wright, on acconnt (26 per cent.) Print- 
ing 700 copies Legls. Manual 167 68 

-*< 27, Norman Wright, on account (26 per cent.) Print- 
ing 1,000 University Reports .... . 96 78 

-'* 27, Norman Wright, on account (26 per cent. ^ Print- 
ing 8,000 Statistics 401 90 

" 27, Norman Wright, on account (26 per cent.) Print- 
ing 7,000 General Laws 788 48 

« 29, J. B. Chauey, Bal. found due on Printing for Legis- 
lature 1st class 84 66 

« 27, Bal. due on Printing Journals, 2d class 786 17 

July 16, M, Houlihan, Freight on Tp. Laws 8 28 

" 24, Norman Wright, on account (26 per cent.) 6,000 

Rept. Sap. Pub. lust 890 96 

<< 24, Norman Wrighi;, on account (26 per cent.) 2,000 

Repts. Hist. Society 96 94 

*' 24, Norman Wright, on account 2,000 R. R. Comr.... 284 66 

** 24, Norman Wright, on account 2,000 Special Laws*. 266 86 

« 24, Norman Wright, 76 per cent, on bills not yet ad- 
justed 214 68 

Sept. 9, W. J. Abernethy, Adv. Proposals for Stationery.. 28 18 

** 9, D. Sinclair & Co., Adv. Proposals for Stationery.. 26 26 

»21,899 16 



PRIKTINCf PAPER. 

March 10, Averill, Russell & Co., Paper lumlshed under 

- contract ••••.... $6,819 12 

" 26, Averill, Russell A Co., Bal. on bill of Paper- ••• .. 1 67 

April 9, Averill, Russell & Co., 14 Rms. Book Paper 176 40 

June 26, Averill, Russeil & Co., Stationery for Public print- 
ing 1,847 80 

July 29, J. P. Chaney, 262 lbs. of Flatcap for Isi and 2d 

classes printing. 68 10 

Nov. 26, Averill, Rnssell & Co., 20 Rms. Cap 98 60 

« 80, Averill, Russell & Co., Stationery for Public Print- 
ing 460 99 

$ 7,967 68 



PREPARINQ AKD INDEXmO LAWS. 
1874. 

May 1, 8. P. Jennlson, Preparing Laws for publication. .. 100 00 

July 22, S. P. Jennison, Indexing Laws 100 00 

$200 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB bF STATE. 



99 



SUPPORT OF STATE INSTITUTIONS. 

SOLDISRS' ORPHANS 

1878. 

Dec. 81, P. 0. Department, Postage t^l5 00 

1874. 

Jai>. 8, Dowlan & Doyle, Wood for Tharsten Orphans.... 8 00 

<< 16, O. B. Gould, Expenses of *' Home " for December 1,554 64 

« 21 , J. £. West, Supplies for Slatterly Orphans 25 00 

<' 21, J. £. West, Expenses at Meeein^ of Board ^ 9 60 

** 21, J.A. Stevenson & Co., Dry Goodsfor Flood Orphans 10 00 

«< 21, Mills, Chnrchill & Co., Groceries for Flood Orph's, 10 00 

*< 21, Ara Barton, Expenses at Meeting of the Board... 19 i)Q 

Febr. 5, O. B. Gould, Expenses at Meeting of the Board.. 16 00 

« 5, O. B. Gould, Expenses of '* Home " for January. . • 1,705 55 

«< 18, John St. Aubln, Wood for Thursten Orphans. .. 6 00 

*< 28, Monfort Brothers, Supplies for Flood Orphans... 10 00 

•« 27, Mills. Chnrchill & Co., Supplies for Bof st Orph's, 10 00 

Harch 9, O. B. Gould, Expenses of »* Home "for February.. 1,545 16 

" 11, Murnane & Donohue, 1 c'd Wood for Boest Orph's, 7 25 

<* 26, Tanner & Barlow, Supplies for Morreli Orphans.. 25 00 

« 26, Tanner & Barlow. Supplies for Boss Orphans 25 00 

April 11, O. B. Gould, Expenses for '" Home " for March. . . 1,687 88 

•' 28. £. L. Baker, Expenses at Meeting of Board 9 60 

" 28, Henry A. Castle, Expenses at meeting of Board... 14 20 

May 7, H G. Hicks, Expenses at meeting of Board 18 88 

<* 7, R. D. Barber, Expenses at meeting of Board 80 00 

<< 7, J^ E. West, Expenses at meeting of Board 24 10 

" 7, J. E. West, Supplies for Slatterly Orphans 25 00 

" 7, Mills, Churchill & Co., Supplies for Flood Orphans ' 10 00 

•« 7, O. B. Gould, Expenses of *»Home" for April 1,770 29 

June 2, O. B. Gould, Expenses of '* Home" for May 1,682 09 

*< 4, W. P. Hood, Supplies to Frank Brickop 28 50 

<• 4, Henry A. Castle, Expenses, trip to Winona 14 45 

" 9, F A. Taylor, Stationery 2 50 

** 9, E. L. Baker, Expenses at meeting of Board 4 80 

<* 9, Tanner & Barlow, sups, to Morreli and Boss Orpns. 50 00 
'< 22j Francis Bingham, Lease of ground for Mrs. Boest 

and Orphans 15 00 

" 28, C. F. Smith, Supplies to Bonharo Orphans 25 01 

July 2, O. B. Gould, Expenses of ''Home" for June 1,544 84 

Aug. 6, O. B. Gould, Expenses of *'Home" for July 1,595 66 

»' 7, R. D. Barber, Expenses of trip to Winona 80 00 

Sept. 4, O. B. Gould, Expenses of **Home" for August 1,554 25 

Oct. 6, 0. B. Gould, Expenses of ''Home" for September. 1,510 62 

'* 6, J. R. Gardner, For Orphans of Susan J. Toombs. . 84 20 

NoY. 5, O. B. Gould, Expenses of *<Home" for October. . . . 1,577 94 

*' 5, R. D. Barber, Expenses to Winona 84 55 

«* 5, £. L. Baker, Expenses to Winona 1140 

** 5, H. G. Hicks, Expenses to Winona 19 52 

•< 5, H. G. Hicks, Board of Geo. H. Partridge 25 71 

*' 5, Carl Gutherz, Making De'^ign for Orphan discharge 80 00 

** 19, J. R. Gardner, Supplies to Toombs Orphans 15 80 

<* 19, C. F. Smith, Supplies to Bonham Orphans 25 00 

" 19, D. W. IngersoU, Supplies to Boest Orphans 10 00 

" 19, Henry Castle, Exp. Trip to Winona, Postage, &c., 18 80 

'* 19, Pratt & Flagg, Supplies to Boest Orphans 10 00 

" 80, H. G. Hicks, Board, &c., G. H. Partridge 17 15 

" 80, 0. B. Gould, Expenses of Home, November 1,555 78 

$20,024 61 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



100 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

PRISON CTJRRBNT EXFBN8ES. 
1873. 

Dec. 16, H. A. Jackman, Expenses for December ^^1,500 (X> 

1874. 
Jan. 9, H. A. Jackman, on account Salaries of Officers for 

December 764 0% 

March 17, H. A. Jackman, CHirrent Expenses for March 2,00u OO 

April 10, H. A. Jackman, Officers' Salaries for January, 

Eebraary , March 8,078 OO 

" 29, H. A. Jackman, Current Expenses for April 2,000 OO 

<' 29, H. A. Jackman, Balance on December Bills 1878., 274 86 

May 15, H. A. Jackman, Carrent Expenses for May 2,500 OO 

June 11, H. A. Jackman, Carrcnt Expenses for June 2,000 OO 

July 8, U. A. Jackman, Current Expenses for July 2,000 00 

** 8, U. A. Jackman, Salaries of Officers April, May, 

June 8,250 IS 

Aug. 11, J. A. Reed, Current' Expenses for August.... 2,000 00 

Sept. 19, J. A. Reed, Current Expenses for September 2,000 00 

Oct. 12, J. A. Heed, Current Expenses for October 2,000 00 

** 12, J. A. Reed, Salaries of Officers for July, August 

and September 8,239 20 

KoY. 4, J. A. Reed, Current Expenses for November 2,000 00 

<' 80, J. A. Reed, Current Expenses for December 2,000 00 

«* 80, J. A. Reed, Salaries of Officer, Nov. and Dec 2,251 75 

♦34,857 4a 
SUPPORT OF IXSANB. 

1878. 

Dec. 20, First National Bank St. Peter for December. . . « . • $6,000 00 

1874. 

Feb. 6, First National Bank St. Peter for February 5,50D 00 

Mar. 10, First National Bank Si. Peter for March 7,000 OO 

April 2, First National Bank St. Peter for April 7,000 00 

May 1, First National Bank St. Peter for May 7,000 00 

June 2, First National Bank St. Peter for June 7,000 00 

July 2, First National Bank St. Peter for July 7,000 00 

Aug. 1, First National Bank St. Peter for August 7,000 00 

Sept. 1, First National Bank St. Peter for September 7,000 00 

Oct. 1, First National Bank St. Peter for October 7,000 00 

Nov. 2, First National Bank St. Peter for November 7,000 00 

•< 19, First National Bank St. Peter for November 8,000 00 

" 80 First National Bank St. Peter for December 7,000 OO 

»84,500 00 
DBAF, DUMB AND BLIND. 

1874. 

Mar. 11, H. Wilson, Treasurer, March and April 96,000 00 

April 16, H. Wilson, Treasurer, May 8,000 00 

May 6, H. Wilson, Treasurer, May 3,000 00 

June 3, H. Wilson, Treasurer, June 2,60;) OO 

July 8, H. Wilson, Treasurer, 2,600 OC 

Aug. 5, H. Wilson, Treasurer, August 2,000 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOfi OF STATE. 101 

Sept. 9, H. Wilson, Treasurer, September 2,500 00 

Ocu 9, H. Wilson, Treasurer, October 8,600 00 

Nov. 80, H. WilsDu, Treasurer, ' 1,000 00 

<|26,000 00 



RBFORIC SCHOOL SUPPORT. 

1874. 

March 9, D. A. Monfort, December, January and Febmry • . . . $7,500 00 

'< 14, D. A. Monfort, March 2,500 00 

April 11, D. A. Monfort, April 2,500 00 

May 2, D. A. Monfort, May 2,500 00 

June 1, D. A. Monfort, June 2,500 00 

July 8, D. A. Monfort, July 2,500 00 

Aug. 8, D. A. Monfort, August, 2,500 00 

Sept. 5, D A. Monfort, September 2,500 00 

Oct. 1, D. A. Monfort, October 2,500 00 

IfOY. 2, D. A. Monfort, November 2,500 00 



»80,000 00 

FIRST NORMAL SCHOOL SUPPORT. 
1«74. 

Jan. 29, Thos. Simpson, January and Februry ||2,000 00 

Feb. 19, Thos. Simpson, March 1,000 00 

April 17, Thos. Simpson, April 2,000 00 

May 6. Thos. Simpson, May and June 2,000 00 

June 1, Thos. Simpson, June 1,000 00 

Aug. 29, Thos. Simpson, August 1,000 00 

Sept. 28, Thos. Simpson, September 1,000 00 

Oct. 27, Thos. Simpson, October 1,000 00 

»11,000 00 

SaCOKD NORMAL SCHOOL SUPPORT. 

1874. 

Jan. 22, Geo. W. Austin, January $1,250 00 

May 6, Geo. W. T. Wright, Februaiy, March and April... 8,000 00 

June 2, Geo. W. T. Wright, May 1,000 00 

'« 29, Geo. W. X. Wright, June 1,400 00 

Oct. 1, Geo. W. T.Wright, September 80000 

" 80, Qeo. ^. T. Wright, October ••••. 800 00 



$8,250 00 



THIRD NORMAL SCHOOL SUPPORT. 

1874. 

Jan. 26, J. G. Smith, January and February $1,000 00 

Mar. 81, J. G. Smith, March and April 1,000 00 

April 16, J. G. Smith, May 1,000 00 

May 22, J. G.Smith, June 1,000 00 

Sept. 21, J. G. Smith, 1,000 00 

Oct. 22, J. G. Smith, 2,000 00 

$7,000 00 



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102 ANNUAL BBFOBT. 

PRISON BUILDING. 
1874. 

Aug. 8, Seymonr, Sabln & Co. , Enlar^ng Shops ||1,105 OO 

♦« 8, Seymour, Sabln & Co., Building Cistern 610 OO 

Sept. 10, Seymour, Sabin & Co., Completion of Prison 1,171 80 

Oct. 7, Seymour, Sabin & Co., Completion of Prison 2,001 75 

<* 28, Seymour, Sabin & Co., Completion of Prison 848 96 

Nov. 19, A. M. Badcliflfe, Completion of Prison 76 00- 

" 80, J. A. Reed, Bemoving Dep. Ward. House 157 86 

#6,849 85 



UXBANK BUILDING. 

1878. 

Dec. 26, Conrad Bohn, Order of Board No. 26 16,00000 

1874. 

Jan. 22, Conrad Bohn, Order of Board, No. 27 8,000 00 

Feb. 6, 1st National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 28 2,000 OO 

" 26, 1st National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 29 4,000 OO 

April 2, 1st National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Boaivl, No. 81 4,600 OO 

** 2, ConradBohn, Order of Board,No. 80 1,600 00 

May 1, Ist National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 82 2,000 00 

June 8, ConradBohn^ Order of Board, No. 86 4,000 00 

** 80, 1st National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 83 5,000 00 

July 6, 1st National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 86 6,000 00 

*< 18, 1st National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 87 8,000 OO 

Aug. 1, Ist National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 88 7,000 00 

Sept. 1, 1st National Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 89 11,000 OO 

Oct. 1, IstNational Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 40 7,600 00 

NoY. 2, IstNational Bank, St. Peter, Order of Board, No. 41 7,500 00 

•77.000 OO 



DSAV, DUMB AND BLIND BUILDING. 
1878. 

Dec. 81, H. Wilson, Treas. Building Purposes $6,000 00 

May 7, H. Wilson, Treas. Building Purpose 8,000 OO 

#9,000 00 



BXFORM SCHOOIr— HBATING BUILDING. 

1874. 

Aug. 8, D. A. Monfort, on account Heaiing 8,000 00 

•* 27, D. A. Monfort, on account Heating 2,600 00 

$5,600 00 



UNIVKHSITY BUILDING. 
1873. 

April 1, Paris Gibson, Building purposes $3,000 OO 

•' 16, Paris Gibson, Building purposes 8,000 OO 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUOITOB OF 8TATB. 



103 



May 7, Paris Gibson, BulldiDg purposes 8,000 00 

Jane 6, Paris Gibson, Bnildtng purposes 8,000 00 

July 6, Paris Gibson, Building purposes 8,000 00 

*' 8, Paris Gibson, Building purposes 8,000 00 

Aog. 4, Paris Gibson, Building purposes 8,000 00 

*' 12, Paris Gibson, Building purposes 8,000 00 

** 27, Paris Gibson, Heating and Furnishing 5,000 00 

Sept. 8, Paris Gllson, Buildiug purposes 5,000 00 

^* 12, Paris Gibson, Buildiog purposes 5,000 00 

« 21 , Paris Gibson, Heating and Furnishing 5,000 00 

Oct. 5, Paris Gibson, Heating and Furnish iug 8,000 00 

« 5, Paris Gibson, Heating and Furnishing 8,000 00 

*• 21, Paris Gibson, Heating and Furnishing 8,000 00 

Nov. 25, Paris Gibson, Heating and Furnishiog '2,000 00 

<* 25, Paris Gibson, Building purposes 1,000 00 

'« 80, Paris Gibson, Heating and Furnishing 8,000 00 

" 80, Paris Gibson, Heating and Furnishing 2,600 00 



THIRD KORMAL SCHOOL BUILDINO. 



$61,500 00 



1878. 

Jan. 26, J. G. Smith, Building purposes t^2,000 00 

April 2,J. G.Smith, Building purposes 2,000 00 

June 18, J. G. Smith, Building purposes 5,000 00 

Aug. I, J. G. Smith, Heating and Furnishing 5,000 00 

*• 1, J. G. Smith, Building; purposes 1,000 00 

'« 27, J. G. Smith, Heating and Furnishing 5,000 00 



$20,000 00 



INTBRB6T ON LOANS. 

Jan. 8, B. W. Dike, 8 Months' Interest on $10,000, Min- 
nesota Loan of 1878, in Uniyersity Fund $1 75 00 

'« 8, £ W. Dike, 1 Month's Interest on $2,000, Min- 
nesota Loan of 1878, in University Fund 11 67 

« 8, E. W. Dike, 6 Months' Interest on $400,000, Min- 
nesota Loan of '67-8-9-'78, in Permanent School. 14,000 00 

<< 8, £. W.Dike, 8 Months' Interest on $20,0u0, Minnesota 

Loan of 1878, in Permanent School 850 00 

<' 8, E. W.Dike, 1 Month's Interest on $28,000, Minnesota 

Loan of 1878, in Permanent School 168 88 

July 8, E. W. Dike, 6 Months' Interest on $448,000, Minne- 
sota Loan '67-8-9>'78, In Permanent School 15,680 00 

*« 8, £. W. Dike, 5 Months' Interest on $10,000, Minne- 
sota Loan of 1878, in Permanent School 291 67 

** 8, £. W. Dike, 8 Months' Interest on $5,000, Minnesota 

Loan of 1878, in Permanent School 87 50 

<< 8, E.W. Dike, 2 Months' Interest on $2,000, Minnesota 

Loan of 1878, in Permanent School 28 88 

*' 8, £. W. Dike, 6 Months' Interest on $12,000, Minne- 
sota Loan of 1878, in Permanent University 420 00 

'' 8, E. W. Dike, 8 Months' Interest on $3,000, Minnesoto 

Loan of 1873, in Permanent University 52 50 



$81,255 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



101 ANNUAL EEPOBT. 

FRONTIER RBUBF (SEBD GRAIN.) 

1874. 
Mar. 18, C. K. Davis, to be expended by Committee, wheat 

distribution 94,000 00 

" 19, C. K. Davis, to be expended by Committee, wheat 

distribution 2,086 92 

*< 19, C. K. Davis, to be expended by Committee, wheat 

distribution 7,056 00 

<* 24, C. K. Davis, to be expended by Committee, wheat 

distribution 2,912 00 

*< 28, C. K. Davis, to be expended by Committee, wheat 

distribution 2,240 00 

<^ 80, C. K. Davis, to be expended by Committee, wheat 

distribution 6,000 00 

May 7, C. K. Davis, to be expended by Committee, wheat 

distribution 706 08 



926,000 00 



FRONTIER RELIEF (DISTRESS.) 

1874. 

Feb. 4, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Cottonwood Co. . . f 860 00 

« 4, C. K. Davis, Relief of Destitute. Nobles Co 606 06 

'* 4, C< K. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Jackson Co 640 00 

« 4, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Murray Co 640 00 

'• 4, C. E. Davis, Re. ief of Destitute, Rock County 216 00 

** 4, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Lincoln Co 146 00 

*< 4, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Redwood Co 70 00 

<* 4, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Yellow Medicine 

County 70 00 

« 4, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Lac qui Parle Co., 86 00 

<* 4, C.E. Davis, Expenses of Agent, 6000 

" 6, P. O. Department Postage 6 02 

'< 6, C.E. DaviH, Relief of Destitute.. 2000 

" 6, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Martin Co 106 00 

<« 6, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Martin Co 140 00 

'< 6, C. E. Davis, RelKf of Destitute, Watonwan Co ... . 860 00 

« 11, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Cottonwood Co.. 200 00 

« 14, C. E. Davis, Expenses of Agent 46 65 

« 18, C. E. Davis, 24 pairs Blankets 68 40 

«' 19, C. E. Davis, Expenses of Agent 2000 

« 19, C. E« Davis, 12 pairs Shoes 24 26 

« 19, C. E. Davis, Blankets, Cloths, Flannel, &c 48 91 

«< 19, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Jackson Co 100 00 

«< 20, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Nobles Co 60 00 

*< 20, C.E. Davis, 4 pairs Blankets 14 00 

*< 26, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Rock Co 24 88 

<* 27, C. E. Davis, Blanltets, Sheetings, Prints, &c 199 94 

'* 27, C. E. Davis, Boots and Shoes 6120 

«' 27, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Rock County .... 160 00 

Mar. 2, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Martin County. . . 100 00 

« 2, C. E. Davis, Boots and Shoes 17 16 

<• 2, C. E. Davis, Clothing 26 00 

« 8, C. E. Davis, Postage Stamps 10 00 

'< 8, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Lyon Co 260 00 

« 8, C. E. Davis. Blankets, Prints, Cotton, &c 69 28 

«« 14, C. E. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Yellow Med'ne Co. 10 00 

«< 4, C. E. Davis, Expenses and pay of agent 96 60 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OP STATB. 105 

M«r. 4, C. K. Davis, Shoes ^ 28 80 

'* 5, C. K. Davis, Sheeting, Prints, &c 69 40 

*' 14, C. K. Davis, Expenses of agent 80 00 

" 26, O.K. Davis, Shoes 12 80 

<' 26, C. K. Davis, Sheetings, Prints, &c 9 65 

May 5, C. K. Davis, Relief of Destitute, Long Lake, Wat- 
onwan coanty 20 00 

May 26, C. K. Davis, Belief of Destltne, E. Chain Lake, 

MartinCounty : 15 oo 

Jane 1, W- L. WUson, Expenses trip to Cottonwood and 

other counties • 

Jnne 2, C.K. Davis, Relief of Destitute in Redwood county, 

'* 11, C.K.Davis, Relief of Destlltnte In Cottonwood Co. 

July 2, W.L. Wilson, Expn's trip to Grasshopper district, 

$5,000 00 



RBUKF TO 6BTTLBBS ON N. P. B. R. LANDS 

1874. 

Mar. 26, C.K. Davis, Belief of Settlers 500 00 

<' 26, C. K. Davis, Belief of Settlers 500 00 

April 80, W. F. Ball, Att'y Fees and Expenses Settlers on 

N. P. B. B 14500 



40 00 


» 4000 


500 


2 22 



i $1,146 00 



RXLISF OF DiMIORANTS. 

1874. 

Jane 26, C K. Davis, Prof, services of Dr. Stone in behalf 

of Immigrants $100 00 

July 1, C K. Davis, For Belief of Destitute. $50 00 

" 8, C . K. Davis, For Belief of Peter Christiansen 20 00 

<• 29, C K. Davis, For Belief of Matthew Portz 5 00 

Aug. 25, C. K. Davis, For Relief of Elizabeth Sherman.. •• 25 00 

•* 27, C. K. Davis, For relief of A. W. Taylor 25 00 

Sept. 1, C. E. Davis, For relief of Maria J. Blaisdell 10 00 

'< 7, A. L. Cripps, For relief of Destitute 25 00 

" 18, A. C. Macy, For relief of Mrs. Walker and Mrs. 

Hawkins 85 00 

** 32, Mrs. Nellie McDonald, For relief of herself and 

family 25 00 

'« 28, Henry Warfleld, For tixp, to Chicago on account 

baggage of immigrants 80 00 

Oct. 16, A. C. Macy, For relief of Mrs. Westland ........ 15 00 

<' 19, C. E. Davis, For relief of Mrs. Jones 18 00 

Nov. 7, A. C. Macy, For relief of B. Hummel 25 00 

*« 9, C. E. Davis, For relief purposes 100 00 

" 80, A. C. Macy, For Belease of baggage and other ex- 
penses 17 25 

$825 25 



14 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



106 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

8HBBurF*B ruin>. 

1878. 
Dec. 28. M. S. ChaDdler, 8 Prisoners Trom Goodhae Coaoty. . 

« 80, John DiamoDd, 1 Prisoner fkrom Bine Earth 

1874. 
Jan. U, W. H. Dill, 1 Prisoner ftom Winona 

** 7, Geo. H. Johnson, 1 Prisoner ftom Hennepin 

<« 29, J. A. Ellison, 1 Prisoner from Olmsted 

Feb. 10, Stephen Newell, 4 Prisoners trom Dakota 

Mar. 18, Geo. H. Johnson, 4 Prisoners firom Hennepin 

<* 21, Nelson J. March, 1 Prisoner fh>m Meeker 

*« 26, J. A. Ellison, 1 Prisoner trom Olmsted 

April 14, F. E. DnToii, 1 Prisoner firom Carver 

May 1, Wm. H. Dill, 8 Prisoners ftom Winona 

** 14, James Glispin, 1 Prisoner trom Watonwan » .. 

Jnne 4, John Diamond, 1 Prisoner firom Bine Earth 

'< 6, Christian Peterson, 1 Prisoner firom Fillmore 

" 10, £. J. Boys, 1 Prisoner from Nicollet 

Jane 18, Geo. H. Johnson, 5 Prisoners fh>m Hennepin (two 
trips) 

". 20, M. J. Toher, 8 Prisoners firom Steele 

' * 27, John Grace, 4 Prisoners flrom Ramsey 

Ang. 26, J. A. Johnson, 1 Prisoner fh>m Washington 

Sept. 16, Thos. McMillan, 2 Prisoners form Redwood...... 

'* 21, Geo. H. Johnson, 7 Prisoners trom Hennepin 

'* 26, Geo. Balrd, 1 Prisoner trom Mower 

Oct. 5, C. K. Davis, Keward for return of Stack 

*' 14, E. K. Whiting, 4 Prisoners from Dodge 

<* 16, J. A. Ellison, 1 Prisoner trom Olmsted 

" 22, J. C. Nugent, 1 Prisoner from Wright 

Nov. 2, Wm, Grumbly, 1 Prisoner firom Kandiyohi 

'* 6, T. J. Hayes, 1 Prisoner trom Morrison 

'< 6, John Shaleen, 1 Prisoner trom Chisago 

** 6, S. W. Walker, 1 Prisoners from Houston 

*« 17, Wm. H. Dill, 7 Prisoners firom Winona 

" 17, John Diamond, Exp. account requisition for Thomas 
and Lewis 

•* 21, Christ'n Peterson, 2 Prisoners fh>m Fillmore 

«< 80, S. H. Smith, 4 Prisoners firom Wabasha 



8BLLZNO STATE LANDS. 

1874. 
Mar. 28. H. Loomis, Exp. looking after Trespass Stevens 

and Todd Counties t^l02 60 

May 4, Robt. Miller, Hauling camp outfit Surv. and Apr. of 

School Land, Otter Tail Co., 1878 82 76 

June 8, St. Paul Press Co., Blank Record Book (D) for 

School Lands 42 60 

« 8, St. Paul Press Co., Blank Record Book for Internal 

Improvement Lands 60 00 

Aug. 21, W. P. Jewett, 48 Plats Government Surveys 82 86 

Sept. 4, W. P. Jewett, 42 Plats Government Surveys 88 76 

Oct. 12, Tribune Pub. Co., Adv. Landsale 18 88 

Nov. 5, O. L. Cutter, Attending Land Sale, Anoka Co 8 00 

** 6, John Blackwell, Attending Land Sale, Meeker Co.. 8 00 

** 6, Barney Vossberg, Attending Land Sale, Steams Co 8 00 



I 74 90 


67 00 


64 60 


926 


100 00 


66 60 


87 26 


64 00 


81 60 


80 60 


76 60 


88 26 


64 26 


99 86 


60 60 


48 75 


66 96 


28 76 


600 


125 10 


6100 


48 60 


1,000 00 


108 00 


64 06 


8160 


68 96 


92 00 


64 46 


124 80 


182 80 


218 66 


128 66 


84 60 


$8,890 06 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8 00 


8 00 


800 
8 00 


6 00 


600 


6 00 


60 00 


60 00 



AUDITOB OP STATB. 107 

Not. 5, G. A. Rnckoldt, Attending Land Sale, Wright Co . . 
•• 5, Joseph Flanders, Attending Land Sale, Watonwan 

Co 

«* 5, Fred Von Baumbach, Attending Land Sale, Douglas 

Co 

>• 6, Fred Yon Baumbach, P*d Clerk L*d Sale, Douglas Co 
•• 5, John Parker, 2 days appraising School Lands, MiUe 

Lacs Co \ 

<« 6, B. F. Whiting, 2 days appraising School Lands Mille 

Lacs Co 

*• 6, 1. S. Mudgett, 2 days appraising School Lands Aiille 

Lacs Co 

ci 5, James W. Barr, 20 days appraising School Lands 

Douglas Co 

«( 5, James W. Barr, 20 days appraising Int. Impt. Lands, 

Douglas Co 

« 6, Thorer Evenson, 20 days appraising School Lands, 

Douglas Co 60 00 

«( 5, Thorer Evenson, 20 days appraising Int. Impt. 

Lands, Douglas Co 60 00 

«< 6, Gilbert Sargent, 20 days apprai!»ing School Lands, 

Douglas Co 60 00 

«< 5, Gilbert Sargent, 20 days appraising Int. Impt. 

Lands, Douglas Co 60 00 

»« 5, Gilbert Sargent, 20 days use of team. School Lands, 

Douglas Co 60 00 

i* 5, Gilber ^argent, 20 days use of team. Int. Impt. 

Lands, Douglas Co 60 00 

•« 6, Chas. Tengwall, 5 days Surveying and Plat'g School 

Lands, Douglas Co 20 00 

«« 5, Albert Roth, 2 days axman. School L*ds, Douglas Co 4 00 

<• 5, Wm. R. Colton, Adv. Land Sale, Sibley Co 10 50 

it 6, O. Brown & Son, Adv. Land Sale, Blue Earth Co.. 10 50 

*• 5, A. A. Harwood, Adv. Land Sale, Mower Co 10 60 

« 6, Seward & Taylor, Adv. Land Sale, Washington Co. 10 50 

« 5, Renville Times, Adv. Land Sale, Renville Co 7 85 

•« 5, Sauk Center Herald, Adv. Land Sale, Todd County 10 50 

« 5, Leonard A Booth, Avd. Land Sale, Olmsted Co 10 50 

•< 5, T. A. Perrlne, Adv. Land Sale, Wright Co 7 87 

<« 5, D. G. Parker, Adv. Land Sale, Freeborn County... 7 88 

<• 5, W. B. Mitchell, Adv. Land Sale, Stearns County . • . 1050 

«< 5, Granville S. Pease, Adv. Land Sale, Anoka County. 10 50 

<« 5, A. J. Underwood, Adv. Land Sale, Otter Tall County 9 00 

•« 5, Willmar Republican, Adv. Land Sale, KandiyuhiCo.. 9 76 

«* 6, Joseph OUpin, Adv. Land Sale, Douglas County .... 7 87 

*« 5, Todd & Stebbins, Adv. Laud Sale, Dakota County. 10 50 

<« 5, A. F. Booth, Adv. Land Sale, Houston County .... 7 85 

«< 5, A. W. McKinstry, Adv. Land Sale, Rice County. . .. 10 50 

« 5, John M. Thompson. Adv Land Sale, Sherburne Co. 10 50 

«« 7, Dispatch Printing Co., Adv. Land Sale (general; ... 21 00 

'« 9, W. F. Von Deyn, 20 Plats of Government Surveys. 89 50 

** 26, John T. Halsted, Surveying Ramsey County, 1878. . 15 00 

« 85, J. A. Armstrong, Attending Land Sale, Martin 

County, and Paid on ^ook 8 80 

<« 25, M. Thoanv, Attending Land Sale, McLeod County . • 8 00 

« 25, Aldls Bartlett, Attending Land Sale, Fillmore County 8 00 

" 25, S. Batchelder, Attending Land Sale, Freeborn Co.. 8 00 

« 25, Edgar Cronkhite, Attending Land Sale, Wa-eca Co., 8 00 

•* 25, Eric Ericson, Attending Land Sale, Renville Co.. 8 00 

•< 25, 8. J. Wlllard, Attending Land Sale, Goodhue Co . . . 8 00 

«< 26, M. Mayer, Attending Land SAe Scott County 8 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



108 



ANNUAL BEPOBT. 



Nov. 



<i 


26, 


u 


25, 


•( 


26, 


«< 


26, 


ti 


25, 


it 


26, 


ii 


5, 


C( 


5, 


It 


5. 


It 


5, 


It 


5, 


tt 


5, 


it 


5, 


It 


5, 


it 


5, 


C( 


5. 


it 


5, 


it 


6, 


it 


5, 


It 


5, 


4C 


5, 


4C 


5, 


i( 


5, 


«( 


5. 


i< 


6, 


IC 


5, 


it 


5, 


it 


27, 


At 


27, 


it 


28, 


H 


28, 


(( 


28, 


i< 


80, 


i( 


80, 


« 


80, 


• < 


80, 


it 


80, 


it 


80, 


tt 


80, 


it 


30, 


it 


80, 


tt 


80, 


it 


80, 


tt 


80, 


it 


80, 



25, J. M. Beverens, Attending Land Sale, Chippewa 

Connty 8 00 

F. B. Benedict, Attending Land Sale, Winona County 8 00 
Z. S. Gault, Attending Land Sale, Nicollet County. 8 00 
£. G. Koch, Attending Land Sale, Brown Connty. .. 8 00 
Wm.y. King, Attending Land Sale, Jackson County 8 00 
R. W. Gansby, Attending Land Sale, Dodge County 8 00 
J. H. Cooper, Attending Land Sale, Houston County 8 00 
A. D. Seward, Attending Land Sale, Bine Earth- 

County 8 00 

O. W. Hartman, Attending Land Sale, Sibley Co.. 8 00 

J. Scbafer, Attending Land Sale, Hennepin Co ... • 8 00 

H. B. Spencer, Attending Land Sale, Benton Co. .. 8 00 

D. B. P. Hibbs, Attending Land Sale, Freeborn Co. 8 00 

Davidson & Bassford, Adv. Land Sale, Mower Co.. 9 00 

James £. Child, Adv. Land Sale, Waseca Co 10 60 

C. H. Slocuni, Adv. Land Sale, Faribault Co 10 60 

Daggett & Joubert, Adv. Land Sale, Meeker Co.. .. 10 50 

J. K. Moore, Adv. Land Sale, Nicollet Co 10 50 

Goodhue Co. Hep., Adv. Land Sale, Goodhue Co. . • 10 60 

Henry Hinds, Adv. Land Sale, Scott Co 8 75 

G. W. Benedict, Adv. Land Sale, Benton Co 10 50 

R. A. Pier & Son, Adv. Land Sale, Dodge Co 10 60 

D. Sinclair & Co.. Adv. Land Sale, Winona 10 50 

S. £. Huntington. Adv. Land Sale, Cottonwood Co. 7 85 

Herald Pt'g Co., Adv. Land Sale, Brown Co 10 50 

Day & Ballard, Adv. Land Sale, Martin Co 10 50 

Journal Pt'g Co., Adv. Land Sale, Steele Co 10 60 

H. P. Roble, Adv Land Sale, Pine Co 10 60 

Croffht, Johnson & Smith, Adv. Land Sale, Henne- 
pin Co 10 50 

C. S. Hamlin, Appraising State Lands, Todd Co 186 00 

S. M. Herbert, Appraising State Lands, Todd Co. 185 00 
Edw'd Phinney, Appraising State Lands, Todd Co., 

(and Postage,) 186 60 

Pioneer Co., Adv. Land ^ales, (general) 84 12 

M. Heinen, Attending Land Sale, Dakota, 1878 .... 8 00 

M. Heinen, Attending Land Sale, Dakota, 1874.... 8 00 

J, A. Wheelock, Postage 60 00 

H. M. Avery, Adv. Land sale, Jackson County .... 10 50 

W. F. von Deyn, 29 Pats. Govt. Surveys 58 76 

John Einsoy, Attending Land sale LeSneur County, 8 00 

Johnson & Larson, Adv. Land sale (general) 21 00 

£. B. Chambers, Appr. School Lands Clay County, 9 00 

£. B. Chambers, Appr. Int. Imp. Lands Clay County, 27 00 

Peter Wilson, Appr. School Lands Clay County... 9 00 

Peter Wilson, Appr. Int. Imp. Lands Clay County, 27 00 

Nels Mickelson, Appr. School Lands (^lay County, 9 00 

l^els Mickelson, Appr. Int. Imp. Lands Clay County, 27 00 

O. P. Whitcomb, Exp. attending Land sales of 1874, 189 20 

O. P. Whitcomb, Exp. collecting stnmpage account, 68 10 

<|2,861 87 



SSLSCnNQ UNIVKRSITT LANDS. 



1874. 

Mar. 14, Loren Fletcher & Co., Bill of Henry S. Back for 
selecting 6,864.74-100 acres Pine University Lands 
in Dulnth District, Act of 1870 



$686 47 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ADDITOB OT STATE. 109 

Mar. 19, J. S. Pillsbnry, Paid Reg. and Rec. Fees locating 

6,880.47- 100 Univ. Laads @ 1^ per acre 85 88 

" 19, J. S. Piliabary, Paid Reg. aud Uec. Fees locating 

8,394.64-100 acres Univ. Land @ ii per acre .... 41 19 
«* 19, J. 8. Pillsbury, Paid Henry 8. Back for selecting 

Univ. Lands 883 04 

April 6, L. Le wiston, Land Office fees for locating 6,864.24-100 

acres Univ. Lands Daluth District 85 12 

»1,281 19 

FUEL AND UOHTS. 
1878. 

Dec. 19, Chas. E. Chapel, 1 Case of Matches $9 50 

*' 22, St. Paul Water Co., Water Supply, 6 Months, to 

December 8 J, 1«78 75 00 

1874. 

Jan. 2, Saunders & Hanna, 74,050 lbs. Coal 888 7& 

** 2, Mumane & Donohue, 2 Cords Sawed Wood at 

Arsenal 20 75 

«* 5, Geo. K. Morton, Salt, &c., for use in fire clay 1 40 

*< 6, St. Paul Gas Light Co., Lights for December 66 28 

«• 8, Dowlan & Doyle, 1 Cord Wood 8 00 

Feb. 5, St. Paul Gas Light Co., Lights for January 82 60 

<• 6, Dreis & Mitsch, Oil and Alcohol 2 90 

Mch. 9, Hill, Griggs & Co., 7 Cords Wood 88 75 

' <« • 9, Saunders &Hanna, 198,080 lbs. Coal 1,058 80 

« 10, St. Paul Gas Light Compauy, Lights for February. . 166 75 

" 11, Dowlan & Doyle, 1 Cord Wood 7 25 

« 11, John Graham, U Dozen Brooms 9 00 

•< 17, Dreis & Mitsch, Oil, Alcohol, &c 2 70 

April 1, Saunders & Hanna, 70,160 lbs. Coal 420 27 

«< 8, St. Paul Gas Light Co., Lights for March 172 86 

** 7, Reynolds & Timmerman, Oil 120 

'• 10, Dowlan & Doyle, 6 Cords Tamarack 81 50 

May 1, Saunders & Hanna, 20,000 lbs. Coal 105 00 

<• 5, St. Paul Gas Light Co., Lights for April « 80 70 

June 8, St Paul Gas Light Co., Lights for May 12 85 

*• 6, Flower & Hawkins, 25 Cords Wood at $5 48 187 00 

" 15, Flower & Hawkins, 4 Cords Wood at |I5.48 for 

Arsenal 21 92 

*< 15, Flower & Hawkins, 65 Cords Wood at $5.48 856 20 

'« 80, Flower & Hawkins, 10 Cords Wood at $5.48 54 80 

July 2, Dreis & Mitsch, Alcohol and Oil for Engine Room. . 1 55 

<« 6, St. Paul Gas Light Co., Lights for June 19 90 

« 7, St. Paul Water Co., Water supply, Jan. to Dec. 81, 

. 1874 75 00 

« 24, Wm. £d wards. Sawing Wood at Arsenal 4 00 

»• 29, J. H. Woolsey&Co.. Globe, &c 1 45 

Aug. 4, St Paul Gas Light Co., Lights for July 12 25 

*• 5, J. H. Sanders, Fire-brick and Clay 28 00 

<' 20, Wm. Constans, Tiles 5 86 

<* 21, Henry Lunkenheimer, Cose of Matches 750 

'• 26, J. O. L. Burke, Laying Brick in Furnace 9 00 

<< 28, M. Redmond, Labor on Furnace 6 00 

« 28, J. H. Sanders, Fire-brick and Clay 10 50 

Sept. 1, Parker, B., Howson & Co., Furnace Frame v-.. 14 C6 

« 4, »t. Paul Gas Light Co., Lights for August i„. 12 70 

• 7, Dreis & Mitsch, Oil, Lead, &c 1 65 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



110 ANNUAL BEPOBT. 

Sept. 7, H. Lankenheimer, Candles, &c 

'* 14, Saunders & Harrison, 81,310 lbs. Coal 

*• 19, Martin Bnrkley, Work on Boiler 

" 30, Robinson & Cary, Tabe-scraper 

Oct. 5, St. Panl Gas Light Co., Lights for September.... 

" 15, Defoil & Hardy, Ice, Dec. 1, 1873, to Dec 1, 1874. 
Nov. 4, St. Paul Gas Light Co., Lights for October 

" 80, St. Paul Gas Light Co. , Lights for November 



TfiAININO SCHOOLS AND IN8TITUTB8. 

1874. 
Mar. 11, H. B. Wilson, Ttaining School at Spring Valley. . . f 400 00 
« 28, H. B. Wilson, Training Schools at Rochester, Wells 

and Monticello 1,200 00 

Sept. 8, H. B. Wilson, Training Schools at Cannon Falls 

and Waseca 800 00 

Nov. 7, H. B. Wilson, Institutes held in Scott, Stearns, 
Carver, Sibley and Le Sueur counties, including 
•27.08, advanced on Schools held in March 810 78 



158 


487 86 


2 60 


8 50 


18 85 


75 00 


82 95 


64 00 


$4,166 84 



t2,710 78 



HISTORICAL 80CISTT. 
1878. 

Dec. 81, J. F. Williams, Salary and Sundries $129 46 

1874. 

Jan. 8, Wilson & Rogers, Gas- tubing 8 60 

*» 6, John Wiley & Son, Books 98 00 

" 18, W. F. Bancroft, Map of Wisconsin 6 00 

Feb. 28, J. F. Williams, Paid for Books, Papers & Sundries, 84 65 

»< 28, John Wiley & Son, Books 8 55 

Mar. 10, G. Sidney Smith, Books 14 00 

** 10, Chas.E. Chapel, 2 Maps 5 00 

*< 10, 1st National Bank, St. Paul, Exchange on London 

for purchase of Books 298 52 

<' 10, J. F. Williams, Salary for January and February.. 250 00 
** 10, Ist National Bank, St. Paul, Exchange on London 

for purchase of Books 117 18 

" 17, Mrs. Charlotte O. Van Cleve, Services to Com- 
mittee on Publication 25 00 

« 18, W. H. Kelly, Books 8100 

" 81, S. G. Drake,Books 180 88 

" 81, John Wiley & Son, Books 16 50 

April 4, J. F. Williams, Salary and Sundries 158 48 

" 25, H. H Shroeder, Wash- stand 8 50 

<* 25, 1st National Bank, St. Paul, Sterling draft, for 

purchase of Books 277 50 ' 

May 4, J. F. Williams, Salary and Sundries 140 84 

<* 2, Am. Exp. Co., Express charges 19 00 

" 12, Wiley Brothers, Book- case 88 00 

June 1 , James Cullen, Plastering vault 19 75 

" 2, J. F. Williams, Salary and Sundries 148 92 

<< 6, St. Panl Press Co., Printing and Binding 77 08 

'* 9, David G. Francis, Books 18 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OF STATE. Ill 

Jane 9, John Wiley & Son, Books 8 15 

** 9, W. A. Leary, Jr., Books 12 90 

" 9, J. Pennington, Books 8 00 

*' 11, John 8t. Anbin, Freight on Vault door 7 76 

July 2, J. F. Williams, Salary and Sundries 185 94 

** 6, Stone and Downer, Freight, &c 25 79 

" 13, Thos. Mara, Freight, &c 18 28 

" 27, American Express Co., Books and Charges 11 50 

Aug. 8, J. F. Williams, Salary and Snndries 189 50 

** 18, U. SchroBder, Book-case 8 00 

Sept. 8, J. F. Williams, Salary and Sundries 188 70 

Oct. 8, J. F. Williams, Salary and Sundries 184 24 

Nov. 2, J. F. Williams, Salary and Sundries Itfl 20 

<' 80, J F. Williams, Salary and Sundries 189 84 

'< 80, Judson & Brack, Graining Book-case, &c 7 50 

$2,980 54 



▲OBICULTURAL SOCIETY. 
1874. 

Aug. 4, John 0. Milne, for State Society fl,00000 

Sept. 14, Anoka County Agricultural Society^ Apportion- 
ment for 1874 5715 

'* 14, Becker County Argicultusal Society, Apportionment 

for 1874 ?. 57 15 

" 14, Blue Earth County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 .' 57 15 

** 14, Brown County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 57 15 

'* 14, Carver County Argicultural Society, Apportionment 

for 1874 67 15 

** 14, Clay Coanty Agricultural Society, Apportionment 

for 1874 67 16 

** 24, Dakota County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 57 15 

** 14, Dodge County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 57 16 

*• 14, Douglao County Agricultural Socieiy, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 6716 

^' 14, Faribault County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 15 

** 14, Fillmore County Agricultural Soclaty, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 5714 

** 14, Freeborn County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 6714 

** 14, Groodhue County Agricaltural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 57 14 

** 14, Jackson County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 14 

** 14, Lac qui Parle County Agricultural Society, Appor- 
tionment for 1874 67 14 

" 14, Le Sueur County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 6714 

" 14, Martin County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 6714 

** 14, Meeker County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 14 

** 14, Nicollet County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 U 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



112 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

Sept. U, Olmsted Connty Agricnlttiral Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 U 

*' 14, Pope County Agrlcnltnral Society, Apportionment 

for 1873 67 14 

** 14, Ramsey Connty Agricnltaral Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 14 

" 14, Redwood Connty Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 6714 

<* 14, Rice County Agricultural Society, Apportionment 

for 1874 57 14 

*' 14, Rock County Agricultural Society, Apportionment 

for 1874 67 14 

*^ 14, Scott County Agricultural Society, Apportionment 

for 1874 67 14 

*' 14, Sibley County Agricultural Society, Apportionment 

for 1874 67 14 

'* 14, Steams County Agricultural .Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 14 

*< 14, Steele County Agricultural Society, Apportionment 

for 1874 67 14 

" 14, Stevens County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 14 

'* 14, Wabasha County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 14 

" 14, Wadena County Agricultural Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 14 

" 14, Washington County Agricu^^ral Society, Appor- . 

tionment for 1874 67 14 

" 14, Wright County Agricultucal Society, Apportion- 
ment for 1874 67 14 

** 14, Fillmore and Mower Agricultural Society, Appor^ 

ment for 1874....; 67 14 

# 8,000 00 

WmOKA AMD ST. PBTBR RAILROAD VS. BLAKK. 

1874. 
Mar. 16, W. P. Clough, Retoining Fee, case W. & St. P. R. 

R. vs. Blake f500 00 

Oct. 8, W. P. Clough, Fee lor services In Blake case 600 00 

f 1,000 00 



STATIONERY FOR LBOI8LATURB AMD STATE OFFICBRS. 

Nov. 80, AveriU, Russell & Co., 13 doz. Ink Wells $69 00 



OKOLOOIGAL SURVXT. 

1874. 
Aug. 18, Paris Gibson, Expenses of Survey $2,000 00 

MAODALBK BOCIBTT. 

1874. 

Mar. 11, Mrs. Frank Farwell, on account Society $200 00 

May 12, Mrs. Frank Farwell, on account Society 200 00 

J uly 11, Mrs. C. E. Parker, on account Society 1,100 00 

$1,600 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOR OF 8TATB. 113 . 

STATS BOARD OF HBiXTH. 

1874. 

Mar, 10 D. W. Hand, Expenses of Board for 1878 $1,500 00 

April 18, Chas. N. Hewett, Salary as Secretary, January, 

February and March 125 00 

Jane 6, D. W. Hand, Chemical Aparatus 66 94 

" 8, Chas. N. Uewett, Air Meter and Expenses 88 84 

Jaly 9, Chas. N. Hewett, Salary as Secretary for April, 

May and June. < 12500 

Sept. 25, D. W. Hand, Bill of Dr. Hewett for Printing 86 00 

'« 25, D. W. Hand. Bill of Dr. Urlch, attending Board at 

St Paul 60 00 

*< 25, D. W. Hand, Bill of Dr. Hand, Traveling expenses, 12 00 

" 25, D. W. Hand, Bill of Dr. Hewitt, Postage, books, &c. 78 44 

«< 25, D. W. Hand, Bill of Dr. Hill, Trayeliog Expenses, 18 85 

Oct. 2, Chas. N. Hewett, Secretary of Board, July, Aug. 

and Sept 125 00 

Nov. 80, Dr. D. W. Hand, BiU of Dr. Hewett, Special Ser- 
vices examin'g Food, Water, School-houses, <&c. 500 00 
** 80, Dr. D. W. Hand, Bill of Dr. Hand, Express chr'gs. 

Postage, &c 15 00 

« 80, Dr. D. W. Hand, Bill of A. E. Senkler, Traveling 

Expenses 85 25 

« 80, Dr. D. W. Hand, Bill of Franklin Staples, Travel- 
ing Expenses, Stationery, &c 51 85 

<• 80, Dr. D . W . Hand, Bill of N . B.. Hill, Traveling Exp., 1 50 

$2,769 17 

BOOTH'S TOWNSHIP LAWS, 1874. 

1874. 

Leonard & Booth, 4,000 copies of Booth's Town- 
ship Laws tf 91,200 00 



RBPAIR8 OF CAPITOL. 

f 
1878. 

Dec. 16, Jndson & Brack, Painting, glazing, varnishing $5S 08 

** 16, Wiley Brothers, Locks on Governor's Office 9 15 

** 16, Wiley Brothers, Standards for Steam-pipes 6 50 

" 19, Wiley Bros., lUp'rsain Treasr's Office, Counter, &c., 26 25 

*< 22, R. S. Craig, Graining & varnishing in Trea's. Office, 15 00 

" 22. A . M. Titus, Painting four office signs 16 00 

•< 22, Henry Breidert, White- wash brash, &c 800 

1874. 

Jan. 6, Moritz Walter, Repairing Valve 76 

Mar. 7, Johii Mathies, Paper, Matting, Carpeting, &c., in 

Treasurer's Office 167 15 

'* 7, John Mathies, Paper, Matting, Carpeting, Ac, in 

Auditor's Office 78 28 

'* 7, John Mathies, Matting, Oilcloth, &c., various 

offices, 26 78 

'* 7, John Matthies, on account Carpeting Con^. rooms, 15 00 

<• 10, J. H. Woolsey & Co., Valve, pipe, &c 5 98 

«' 10, John Mathies, Papering ^dj't GenTs Office 48 80 

15 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



114: ANNUAL BBPORT. 

Mar. 10, A. C. SnlUyan, Hanging Paper in Committee RoomB 50 00 

'' 10, Mrs. A. C. Baker, Pipe Fixtures, &c., Engine Room 22 09 

" 10, C. C. Miles, 11 Door Springs 1100 

'< 12, Chas.E. Chapel, Cleaning HaUs 10600 

** 12, Chas. E. Chapel, Sundry Repairs . /. 18 85 

'* 12, Stees Brothers, Table for Ins Commissioner 20 00 

" 12, Geo. R. Morton, P. O Box, Locks, &c 12 25 

** 12, Beck, Partridge & Rank, Glazing 7 20 

-** 12, John Mathies, Carpeting, &c., Ins. Commr's Office 8 80 

^* 18, Pollock, Donaldson & Ogden, 8i D. Spltoons 40 50 

-^^ 16, Judson & Brack, Painting and Graining Aij^utant 

General's Office 15 00 

"** 16, Judson & Brack, Painting and Sanding Water 

Closets 74 50 

'" 16, Judson & Brack, Miscellan.ous Painting, &c 9 55 

** 16, A. M. Titus, Painting Sign Secretary's Office 8 00 

" 16, John Mathies, Carpet Lounge. 25 00 

'< 16, Wilson & Rogers, Plumbing and Steam Fitting 

Goods 82 20 

*« 16, Henry Breldert, Locks, &c 8 60 

«* 18, A. C.Lobdell, Lightning Rods 9700 

^' 20, A. C.Lobdell, Lightning Rods 44 60 

" 20, James CuUen, Plaster Patching 500 

'*^ 21, John McCormick, Cutting Trench in Basement .... 50 00 

*' 26, F. J. Hoffman, Step Ladder 5 00 

-<* 26, John McCormick, Cutting Trench in Basement .... 140 00 

**' 26, Henry Breidert, Grind Stone and Fixtures 8 00 

"** 81, H. H. Schroeder, Repairing Chairs and Book-case 

Auditor's Office 88 75 

April 2, Parker, B , H. <& Co .P'umance Bars 960 

" 11, Chas. E. Chapel, Cleaning Halls Com. Rooms, &c.. 58 00 

«« 11, J. H. Pomroy, Chair for Clerk of Court 11 00 

« 14, R. O. Strong & Co., Carpeting Judges Room. . • • . • 78 79 

« 18, James Cullen, Plastering in Basement of New Wing 81 84 

<< 18, Wiley Brothers, Labor and Material in Basement . • 250 00 

May 5, E. W. Dike, 2 Office Chairs and Cushions 22 25 

« 6, John A. O'Brien, 40 Loads^ of Dirt on Capitol Square 20 00 

" 6, S. L. Bailey & Co , Wash-stand for Clerk of Court. 12 00 

*< 6, S. L. Bailey & Co , Book-case for Governor 45 00 

" 7, H. H. Schroeder, Repair'g Chairs, Senate and House 80 75 
<' 7, H. H. Schroeder, Repairing Furniture for Court 

Room 1150 

<< 7, Chas. E. Chapel, Paid for Dust Pall 225 

« 9, J. O. L. Burke, Repairing Boiler Wall 8 00 

« 9, Mathew Redmond, Labor on Capitol Square 22 50 

« 12, Deflel & Hardey, Hauling Rubbish firom Capitol 

Square 68 25 

<< 15, R. Marvin & Son, Spittoons, &c., forderk of Court's 

Room 5 70 

'* 16, Pleis & Ran, Repairing Wall la Basement and Extra 

Door 800 

'* 16, Wiley Brothers, Sundry Repairs 87500 

<« 19, L. B. Wait, Grass-seed 7 00 

<* 22, J. H. Woolsey ft Co , Globes, Flue Brush, &c 8 60 

'< 28, J. O. L. Burke, Labor on Vault in Auditor's Office., 75 00 

<< 27, John M. Fairfield, Lawn Mower 2000 

'< 28, W. L. Anderson, Carpeting Governor's Office 815 04 

" 29, Henry Breidert, Files 170 

June 6, J. O. L. Burke, Labor on Vault in Auditor's Office. 175 00 

** 8, Michael Laller, Planting Trees 500 

*< 10, Marshall Sherman, Water-stand and Sundries for 

Clerk of Court ' 8 65 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ATTDITOB OF STATE. 



115 



Jane 10, W. L. Anderson, Laying Carpet, &c., R, B. Com. 

Room and Upper Hall 50 75 

*< 11, C. £. Chapel, Paid Repairing Rods for Vault Doot 

Aaditor'8 Office 2 75 

<* 12, Martin Bnrkley, Rods for Auditor's Office 9 02 

" 18, C. C Miles, Lock Repairing Committee Room 2 50 

*• 18, J. H. Pomroy, Mirror, Clerk of Court's Room 8 00 

'* 15, R. 8. McCleary, Repairs of Fence.'^Cnorth side) .... 27 28 



SEWER TO CAPITOL. 



1874. 
Soy. 



28, John Cokely, Cleaning Sewer 



$8,18474 



$80 00 



SITTINO BOOMS FOR 8BCRBTART. 
1874. 

April 25, J. O. L. Burke, on acc't building Vault $75 00 

Hay 9, J. 0- L. Burke, on acc't building Vault 50 00 

** 11, J. 0. L. Burke, on acc't building Vault 400 00 

*• 11, Parker. Bailey, H. & Co., Washers on vault rods ... 1 41 

** 11, J. W. Woolsey & Co., Nuts on vault-rods 1 60 

*• 12, Nivens & Graham, 100 feet Flagging for vault 85 00 

« 26, Henry Breidert, Cupbord-locks 29 00 

June 9, Hall's Safe and Lock Co., 2 Vault-doors 400 00 

<' 12, J. O. L. Burke, on acc't of building Vault 207 99 



$1,200 00 



FITTING COURT AND LIBRARY ROOMS. 
1874. 

Har. 21, Wiley Brothers, Work on Court and Library rooms, $ 25 00 

*' 29, Wiley Brothers, Work on Court and Library rooms, 25 00 

April 4, Wiley Brothers, Work on Court and Library rooms, 275 00 

« 11, Wiley Brothers, Work on Court and Library rooms, 25 00 

** 14, R. 0, Strong, Carpeting Supreme Court Boom.... 800 14 

. " 80, Sam'l Potter, 6 Cane-seat Chairs 1000 

Hay 4, Craig & Larkin, half-doz. Cuspadores 11 50 

<• 16, Wiley Brothers, Work and Material in Court and 

Llbraiy Rooms 128 86 



$800 00 



FURMISmNO OOMMITTEB ROOMS. 



1874. 
lich. 7, John Mathles, Carpeting Committee Rooms . 
<< 11, Stees Brothers, Chairs, Tables, Desk, &c. . . 



$588 26 
824 70 

$862 96 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



116 AKNUAL RBPOBT. 

FBBSCOING AND KAUBOMIlflNa. 

1874. 
Mch. 18, Theodore Rank, Be-Arescoing Legislative HalLs and 

KalBomining Court Booms •••• $MOW 

SDPKRIKTBNDINO KBPAIB8. 

1874. 
Hch. 9, A. M. BadcliJOf, Balance Dae for Services as Super- 
intending, Architect of Capitol Extension of 1878, 
and other Bepairs 92260O 

HBATENO GAFITOL, 1871-72. 

1874. 
Peb. 24, Natlbnal Marine Bank, Claim of Atterbury, Baker 
& Co., for Additional Expenses Heating Apparatus 
1871-72 f 1,187 00 



VKNTXLATINO LBGISLATIVE TLAJLLS. 
1874. 

Aug. 4, Gustave Dressel, on account Work and Material . . $150 OO 

Sept. 14, Oustave Dressel, on account Work and Material.. 150 00 

<* 16, Wilson & Rogers, on account Work and Material. . 800 00 

Oct. 19, Wilson & Rogers, on account Work and Material . . 560 OO 

^ « 24, Bemer & Dressel, on account Work and Material . . 40 00 

$1,500 00 



KXPRBSS ASD MILBAGR. 

1874. 
March 6, American Express Co., Express Service, Nov., Dec. 

and Jan #87 50 

« 10, £. W . Dike, Paid Sundry Express charges 18 85 

<* 18, Ole A. Jargo, Mileage, Treasurer Benton Co., 

March Settlement 7 00 

<* 14, S. L. Staples, Mileage, Treasurer Mille Lacs Co., 

March Settlement 4 OO 

« 20, Hans Ounuf rud, Mileage, Treasurer BenviUe Co., 

March Settlement 8 00 

« 27, C. H. Veiselman, Mileage, Treasurer Martin Co., 

March Settlement 4 00 

April 2, E. J. Yelo, 'Mileage, Treasurer Houston Co., March 

Settlement 2 60 

« 2, L. f . Robinsen, Mileage, Treasurer Bedwood Co., 

March Settlement 900 

. '• 8, E. Bordewick, Mileage, Treasurer TeUow Medicine 

Co., March Settlement i 5 0O 

" 7, 0. A. Boe, Mileage, Treasurer Becker Co., March 

Settlement 80 

*• 7, W. M. Ross, Mileage, Treasurer Polk Co., March 

Settlement 4 40 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OF STATE. 117 

April 17, American Express Co., Sandry Express charges .... 6 05 

*< SO, Jolm ToDng, Mileage, Treasurer Wright Co., Maivh 

Settlement S 60 

*< 24, P. F. JacobsoD, Mileage, Treasurer Lac qui Parle 

Co., March Settlement 6 00 

*« 24, R. B. Johnson, Mileage, Treasurer Faribault Co., 

March Settlement 2 00 

May 5, American Express Co., Express services flrom Feb- 
ruary 1 to April 17 8166 

June 16, Ole A. Jargo, Mileage, Treasurer Chippewa Co., 

June Settlement 7 00 

'* 20, C. Redlen, Mileage, Treasurer Wright Co., Land 

Sale, 1878 2 60 

<« 24, C. Bordwick, Mileage, Treasurer Yellow Medicine 

Co., June Settlement. 1874 6 00 

« 24, L. F. Robinson, Mileage, Treasurer Redwood Co., 

June Settlement 900 

« 24, P. F. Jhcobson, Mileage, Treasurer Lac qui Parle 

Co., June Settlement 6 00 

** 26, C. H. Viesselman, Mileage, Treasurer Martin Co., 

June Settlement 4 00 

** 26, Thos. H. Caine, Mileage, Treasurer Isanti Co., June 

Settlement 8 t^O 

*• 29, Hans Gronnerud, Mileage, Treasurer Renville Co. •• 

Jane Settlement 8 00 

July 1, John Young, Mileage, Treasurer Wright Co., June 

Settlement 6 20 

** 12, J. L. Cabot, Mileage, Treasurer Murray Co., March 

and June Settlements 12 00 

•' 14, Henry Knndoon, Mileage, Treasurer Jackson Co., 

June Settlement 9 20 

*« 16, E. J. Velo, Mileage, Treasurer Houston Co., June 

Settlement 2 80 

<« 16, S. L. Staples, Mileage, Tr. Mille Lacs County, June 

Settlement 4 00 

<* 16, E. W. Dike, Sundry Express Charges. 20 66 

*' 18, C. H. Yeisselman, Mileage, Tr. Martin County, Conv 

School moneys 4 00 

«< 20, E. J. Velo, Mileage, Tr. Houston Co., Conv. School 

moneys 260 

*' 28, W. M. Ross, Mileage, Tr. Polk Co., June SeVm*nt, 4 40 
Aug. 11, A. M. Expr. Co., Express services, Apr. 17 to JnlvSl, 48 76 
«< 17, R. B. Johnson, Mileage, Tr. Faribault Co., June Set- 
tlement, 1874 •••• 200 

Oct. 16, 0. A. Schulze, Mileage, Tr. Lake Co., Feb. and June 

Settlement 20 00 

« 21, L. F. Robinson, Mileage, Tr. Redwood County, Oct. 

Settlement. 1874 9 00 

«' 29, H. A. Larson, Mileage, Tr. Lac qui Parle Co., Oct, 

Settlement, 1874 6 00 

«' 81, Henry Knudnon. Mileage, Tr. Jackson Co., Oct. 

Settlement, 1874.... 400 

17ov. 6, C. H. Yeisselman, Mileage, Tr. Martin Co., Oct. 

Settlement, 1874 4 OO 

«< 9, Am. Ex. Co., Expr. service, Aug. 1 to Oct. 81 87 60 

«' 11, T. H. Caine, Mileage, Tr. Isanti Co., Oct. Settle- 
ment, 1874 8 60 

*< 14, C. Bordwick, Mileage, Tr. Yellow Medicine Co., Oct. 

Settlement, 1874 6 00 

** 17, Ole A. Jargo, Mileage, Tr. Chippewa Co., Oct. Set- 
tlement, 1874 700 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



118 



AISTNUAL RBSFORT. 



Not. 19, Hans Gronnerud, Mileage, Tr. Renville Co., Oct. 
Settlement, 1874 

" 27, J. L. Cabot, MUeage, Tr. Mnrray Co., Oct. Settle- 
ment, 1874 

" 80, W. M. Rose, MUeage, Tr. Polk Co., Oct. Settle- 
ment, lci74 

** 80, Hans Gronnerud, Mileage, Tr. Renville Co. Land 
sale, 1874 — 

«* 80, R. B. Johnson, Mileage, Tr. Faribanlt Co., Oct. 
Settlement, 1874 

** 80, E. W. Dike, Sundry Express charges 

*< 80, R. B. Johnson. MUeage, Tr. Faribault Co. Land 
sale, 1874 



800* 

600 

4 40 

BOO 

2 00 
8 65 

200 

$484 20* 



1874, 



Mar 


10, 


C. 


April 


9, 


C. 


May 


4, 


C. 


June 


9, 


C. 


July 


14, 


C. 


Aug. 


8, 


C 


Sept. 10, C. 


Oct. 


9, 


C. 


Nov. 


9, 


C. 


« 


80, 


c. 



RBNT OF OOVKBNOB'S HOU8B. 



E. Davis, Rent of House, January and February, $ldZ 88^ 

E. Davis, Rent of House, March ^^^7 

E. Davis, Rent of House, April 66 66 

K. Davis, Rent of House, May 66 66- 

E. Davis, Rent of House, June 66 66 

E. Davis, Rent of House, July 66 66 

K. Davis, Rent of House, August 66 66 

E. Davis, Rent of House, September 66 66 

E. Davis, Rent of House, October 66 66 

E. Davis, Rent of House, November 66 66- 



f788 26> 



RENT OF ARSENAL. 

Jan. 6. L. Remmetter, Rent on acc't quar. ending Dec. 81, f 100 00- 

AprU 7, L. Remmetter, Rent for quar. ending March 81 ... • 125 00 

" 7, L. Remmetter, Rent, bal. due on quar. end'g Dec.81, 25 00 

Jnly 8, L. Remmetter, Rent for quar. ending Jane 80 125 00^ 

Oct. 6, L. Remmetter, Rent for quar. ending Sept. 20 125 00- 



1500 00- 



OO. E. 2]> MINNESOTA VOLUNTEERS. 



1878. 
Dec. 19, Hans Jensen, Military Service, 1861. 

1874. 
Jan. 15, T. D. Fouble, Military Service . . . . 
Feb. 16, A. C. Enter, Military Service 

<« 21, A. £. Alden, Military Service 



f7 60 

760 

760 

1100 

188 80 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OP BTATB. 119 

TRIAJL MURDKBSRS COOK AND 8W1BDE FAVILIE8. 

1874. 

ApTll 1€, Wm. Garcelon, Snndiy Expenses of Trial f 190 00 

*' 17, I*. D. Burger, Subsisting Military Company 106 00 

^ 81, Henry J. Larson, Boarding and Qaarding Indian 

Prisoners 108 00 

lime 18, Paul SUtten, Use Team Conv eying Troops 5 00 

<* 13, L. A. Larson, Use Teams Conveying Troops 115 00 

♦528 

FISH COHMISfilONXBS. 

1874. 

Sept. 28, I>r. D. Day, for Expenses ^250 00 

" 28, Dr. D.Day, for Expenses 15000 

♦400 00 

REVISING WAR RECORDS. 

1874. 
Feb. 18, W. D. Hawkins, Worlc on Records $6 00 



SEED WHEAT CERTIVICATBS, DEV. (1878.) 

1874. 
June 26, £. W. Dike, N. M. Porter's Cer. I^s'd Apr 20, 1872 $5 00 



inSCELLANSOUS. 

1874. 
Jan. 81, Northern Pacific B. B. Co., Transportation Indian 

Prisoners to Detroit Lake $189 40 

" 5, Snllivan & Terry, Erecting Monument to 5th Minn. 

Vol at Ft. Ridgley 500 00 

Feb. 21, J. A. Jacobson, Ezi>ense8 Eiwdiyohi County for 

trial of Coney and Bradshaw 1,000 00 

Hch. 6, J. 6. Whittemore, Pay of Exaroiner^ Chippewa 

Biver Bridge, Pope County 45 00 

*< 9, M. Baldwin, Reward for Arrest Murderers Donahue 

Brothers 25000 

** 9, J. B. Cleveland, Expenses on account Indian Diffi- 
culties at Wadena, February 1874 287 70 

** 25, Treas. Beoser Co., Exp. Trial of Indians for Muni. 

Cook Family 1,877 29 

Jane 80, A. B. Holmes, Safe for Executive Office 400 00 

July 29, John Bogers, B'd Auditors' certf. No. 2,470, 1st B'd, 1 98 

♦4,081 87 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



130 ANNUAL BSFOBT. 

INDIVIDUAL, 

1874. 

Jed. 17, Cha^. HJortsberg, Services In Aadltor's Office #20 00 

<« 17, J. F. Williams, Services in Auditor's Office 17 50 

" 80, J. B. Lucas, Secreury Board of Equalization, 1878, 100 00 

Mar. 6, A. P Nelson, Care of Insane Person, E. Putnam . . 600 00 
'< 6, A. 0. Macy, Services in Governor's Office. Dec 1 

to Jan. 9 180 00 

«' 7, Chas. HJortsberg, Serv'sfin Secretary's Office, 1878, 100 00 
<* 7, Peter Harff, Subsistence Airnished Dickinson's Co., 

1862 6400 

** 9, John C. Shaw, Affidavits in Pension and Bounty 

claims, 1878 29 00 

<< Dr. Alex. J. Stone, Prof. Services in case State vs. 

Bailev - 160 00 

*' 10. Sherwood Hough, Administering Oaths in Pension 

and Bounty Cases 84 00 

*< 10, Mark Hen<Jricks, Captain of Artillery in Indian war 

of 1862 , 268 00 

** 11, Amos Coggswell, Attorney Services, Minn. Central 

vs. L. S. Padgham 260 00 

'< 12, Dr. W. W. Clark, Medical attend, on sufferers firom 

stormof 1878 6000 

<< 18, Chas. N. Hewett, Visiting Am. Inebriate Asylums, 200 00 
" 14, Drs. Murphy & Wharton, Medical Attendance on 

suffers from storm of 1878 100 00 

<< 26, A. D. Ferris, Use of Ferry at Faxon, in Aug. 1862, 100 00 

** 28, Christian Swanson, sufferer trom storm of 1878... 60 00 

April 1, E. B, Haynes, Med. Attend, sufferers of storm 1878, 84 00 

** 9, S. Y. McMasters, Exp. as Com'r to Vienna Expo'n, 800 00 

'< <« Owen Eagan, Care of Insane person, bis son 78 29 

" 18, Pennock Pusey, Cl'k Board Pres. Electors, 1872... 20 00 
June 17, M. D. Kenyon, Making and Recording Reliquish- 

ments, &c 18 60 

July 7, Christian Swanson, Suflerer firom Storm of 1878.. 60 00 
Sept. II, W. D. Flinn, Medical attendance on sufferers fh>m 

8tormofl878 11600 

Oct. 9, Christian Swanson, Sufferer from storm of 1873. .. 60 00 

Nov. 80, J. R. Lucas, Services Sec. Br'd of Equalization, 1874 100 00 



•2,961 29 



ROADS AND BRIDQSS. 

1874. 
Jan. 6, Treasurer Swift Co., Bridge across East Branch 

ChippewaRlver $ 600 00 

Jan. 17, Treaburer Wilkin Co., Bridge across Red River at 

Breckenrldge 2,000 00 

Feb. 16, Treasurer Renville Co.. Bridge across Hawk Creek, 800 00 

Mch. 81, J. W. Hopkinson. Road flrom Duluth to Pigeon Riv. 1,418 U7 
April 28, Treas. Sherburne Co., Bridge across St. Francis 

River 400 00 

May 2, Qriswold & Shannon, Bridge acro!<s Minn. River*. 800 00 
May 9, Treasurer Martin Co., Bridge across ontlet East 

Chain Lakes 600 00 

May 14, Treas. Olmsted Co., Bridge across Zumbro River.. 2,000 00 

July 18, Treas. Morrison Co. . Bridge across Pike Creek .... 600 00 

July 27, Treas. Jackbon Co., Bridge across Des Moines Riv. 600 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUOITOK 07 STATB. 121 

Ang. 5, Treas. Swllt Co., Bridge aeioas Minnesota Rlrer. . 1»000 00 
Aof. 17, Treas. Chisago Co., State Road from Rnsh City to 

Cambrit'.ge 80000 

lag. 17, Treas Isanti Co., State Road flrom Rash City to 

Cambridge. 5000 

Bept 11, Treas. Carlton Co., Bridge across St. Lonls Rlrer. 1,000 00 

OeL 10, Treas. Lyon Co., Bridge acro6<t Three-Mile Creek . . 160 00 
Oct 18, H. L. Tlets & J. L. Kasson, Bridge across Wing 

Birer, and for road purposes 70000 

Oet 39, Treas. Meeker Co., Bridge across Crow River 500 00 

Hot. 14, Treas. Fope Co., Bridge across Chippewa River In 

Pope County 80000 

Not. 88, Treas. Renville Co., Bridge across Beaver Creek •• 500 00 

$14,518 07 

FSBUAmEHT SCHOOL. 

1874. 
Feb. 8, E. W. Dike, 10 Mln. Bonds, loan of 1878, Nos. 811, 

280 Inclusive $10,000 00 

April 1, E. W. Dlke« 5 Mln. Bonds, loan of 1878, Nos. 281, 

285 Inclusive 5,000 00 

May 1. E. W. Dike, 2 Mln. Bonds, loans of 1878, Nos. 229, 

280 2,000 00 

Ang. 20, E. W. Dike, 86Mo. 6sat92|c 88,800 00 

" 14, E. W. Dike, 10 Mo. 8s at92i|c 9,250 00 

KoT. 80, £. W. Dike, 14, Mo. Bs at 98ic 18,125 00 

" 80, E. W. Dike, 14, Mo. 88at98 18,72000 



986,895 00 



PKRMANKMT UMIVKBSrrT. 



1874. 

April 1. E. W. Dike, 8 Mln. B'ds, loan of 1878, Nos. 226, 7, 8, $8,000 00 

Aug. 20, E. W. Dike, 12 Mo. 68 at 92^0. 11,100 00 

NaT.80,£. W. Dlke,8Mo. 6sat98c 7,84000 



$21,940 00 



snncnro fund. 



1S74. 

A«g. 18, E. W. Dike, 1 Mo. 6 per cent Bond at 92 7-8c $928 75 

" 18, £. W. Dike, 11 Mo. 6 per cent. Bonds at 98c 10,280 00 

*' 18, E. W. Dike, 18, Commission on same paid Myers i 

percent 15 00 

** 18, E. W. Dice, Accrued interest on same 21 72 

•• 17, E. W. Dike, 88 Mo. 6s at 92J 85,150 00 

** 17, E. W. Dike, Com. on same paid M>ers i per cent*. 47 50 

" 17, E. W. Dike, Accrued Interest on same 68 44 

** 20,X W. Dike, 10Mo.6sat92ic 9,25000 

*< 20, E. W. Dike, i Com. on same paid Myers 12 50 

'* 20, E. W. Dike, Accrued interest 18 01 

** 20^E. W. Dike, Account Exp. charges on above. 25 OO 

" 20, American Express Co., Account Exp. charges on 

above 56 00 

$55,822 92 

16 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC ^ 



122 ANNUAL SBPOBT. 

GXNmUL SCHOOL. 

1874. 

Mar. 4, Sundry Conn ties, Apportionment of March 2d, by 

Superintendent Public lustrnctlon $ 49,047 00 

Aug. 14, £. W. Dike, i per cent. Commisston paid Myers for 

Purchase 10 Mo. 68, Permanent fUnd 12 50 

<< 14, E. W. Dike, Accrued Interest on 10 Mo. 6s bought 

for Permanent Aind 18 01 

<« 20, E. W. Dike, Accrued Interest on 86 Mo. 6s bought 

for Permanent fund 64 84 

<< 20, £. W. Dike, i per cent. Commission pail Myers for 

Purchase of same 46 00 

*< 27, Am. Expr. Co., Express Charges on 46 Mo. 68 from 

New York 63 00 

Oct. 7, Sundry Counties, Apportionment of October 5, by 

Superintendent Public Instruction 148,217 24 

|7oy. 80, E. W. Dike, I per cent. Commission paid P. M. 

Myers for Purchase 14 Mo. 6s Permanent fund, 17 60 

<' 80, E. W. Dike, Accrued Interest 10 days on $14,000 

Mo. 6s for Permanent ftind 26 66 

«* 80, E. M. Dike, i per cent. Commission paid Myers for 

Purchase 14 Mo. 69 for Permanentf and 17 60 

*< 80, S. W. Dike, 10 days Interest on purchase 14 Mo. 68 

for Peimanent fond 26 71 

" 80, E. W. Dike, Express Charges on 14 Mo. 6s ttom 

New York .|. 16 90 

« 80, E. W. Dike, Express Charges on 14 Mo. 6s from 

New York 1760 

$192,689 26 



GKNBRAL UNIVSRSITT. 

1874. 

Jan. 7, Paris Gibson, Order Board of Regents $ 2,000 00 

Aug. 20, E. W. Dike, Accrued Interest on 12 Mo. 6s bought 

for Permanent Aind 2161 

<< 20, E« W. Dike, i per cent. Commission paid P. M. 

Myers for Purchase of same 16 00 

(* 27, Am. Expr. Co., Express Charges on 12 Mo. 6s Arom 

New York 16 60 

Oct. 80, Paris Gibson, Order Boa;rd of Regents 8,000 00 

Nov. 12, Paris Gibson, Order Board of Regents 4,000 00 

<* 16, Paris Gibson, Order Board of Regents 2,000 00 

<* 80, £. W^. Dike, i per cent. Commission paid Myers for 

Purchase 8 Mo. 6s for Permanent fbnd 10 00 

<« 80, £. W. Dike, 10 days Interest on same 16 2$ 

« 80, Paris Gibson, Order Board of Regents Issued Under 

Chapter 124, Laws of 1874 19,000 00 

** 80, E. W. Dike, Express Charges on 98,000 Mo. 6s flrom 

New York 1000 

»80,088 87 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OP 8TATB. 123 

nmSKAL IMFROVXMBNT LAUD FUIVD. 

1874. ' 

Jan. 2, E. W. Dike, U. 8. 6 per cent. reg. Cur. Bonds, Nos. 

174, 175, Central Branch Union Pac. R. R. at l.lSi $2,265 00 
** 2, £. W. Dike, Commission t per cent 2 50 

$2,267 50 

INEBBIATB ASYLUM. 

1874. 

Feb. 10, E. W. Dike, U. S. 6 per cent. Currency Bond, No. 

4046, Union Pacific R. R., at 15| •1,15750 

*< 10, E. W. Dike, Acnmod Interest 228 

<* 10, E. W. Dike, Commission i per cent 1 25 

May 15, E. W. Dike, U. 8. 6 per cent. Currency Bond, No. 

2473, Central PacUlc R. R.', at 1.16} 1,167 50 

<' 15, E. W. Dlke,Accrued Interest 2 27 

<« 15, E. W. Dike, Commission t per cent. 125 

f 2,882 05 



INTXBXST ON RAILROAD BONDS. 



1878. 



Dec. 17, Geo. W. Sawyer, Coupon 11, Red Rock, July, 1878 ^70 OO 

" 18, E. W. Dike, Coupons 8-4, Red Rock, July, 1878 .... 140 00 

" 18, E. W. Dike, Coupon 24, Albert Lea, July, 1878 70 00 

" 80, E. W. Dike, Coupon 80, Winnebago City, July, 1878 70 00 

Mch. 14, E. W. Dike, Coupons 81 to 85, Winnebago Ciiy, July, 

1878 850 OO 

April 7, Treas. Town of Carver, Interest on Carver Town 

Bonds 62 50 

" 28, E. W. Dike, Coupons 86 to 88, Winnebago City, 

■July, 1878 210 00 

<* 24, E. W. Dike, Coupons 26-27, Winnebago City, July, 

1872 140 00 

June 1, E. W. Dike, Coupons 5-6, Winnebago City, July, 

1878 140 00 

July 2, E, W. Dike, Coupons 5-6, Red Rock, July, 1874.... 140 00 

July 2, E. W. Dike, Coupon 1, Grand Meadow, July, 1874. 70 00 

July 2, E. W. Dike, Coupons 1, 2, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, Red 

Rock,. July, 1874 560 00 

July 2,B. W. Dike, Coupon 9, Red Rock, July, 1874 7000 

July 2, E. W. Dike, Coupon 4, Gr. Meadow, Jaly, 1874. . . 70 00 

July 2, E. W. Dike, Conpons 1 to 14 Inclusive, 8prlng Val- 
ley, July,, 1874. 980 00. 

July 8, E. W. Dike, Coupons 15 to 25 inclusive, Spring 

Valley, July, 1874 770 OO 

July 16, E. W. Dike, Coupons 1 to 7 and 11 to 15 inclusive, 

Alden, July, 1874 840 00 

July 16, E. W. Dike, Coupons 18 to 21, 28 and 86 to 40, in- 
clusive, Albert Lea, July, 1874 70000 

July 16, E. W. Dike, Coupons 9 to 14 inclusive, Albert Lea, 

July, 1874 420 OO 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



124 



ANNUAL BBPOBT. 



Aug. 11> £. W. Dike, Coupons 1 to 6, 10 to 18, 19 to S8 and 

81to86, Win. City jQly, 1874 1,820 00 

«< 24, E. W. Dike, Coupons 24 and 25, Spring Valley, dne 

Julyl,1871 14000 

<« 24, B. W. Dike, Coupons 8, 9, 10, Alden, due July 1, 1874 210 00 

Sept. 7, £. W. Dike, Coupons 15, 16, Albert Lea, dne July I, 

1874 140 00 

" 24, E. W. Dike, Coupons 17 and 25 to 85 Ind. Albert 

Lea, due July 1, 1874 84000 

Oct. 28, E. W. Dike, Coupons 1 to 7 Incl., Albert Lea, due 

July 1. 1874 490 00 

KoY. 14, E. W. Dike, Coupon No. 11, Red R., and No. 5, Gr. 

Mead., due July 1, 1874 14000 

16, E. W. Dike, Coupons Nos. 7, 8, 10, 18, Red Rock, 

due July 1, 1874 28000 

80, E. W. Dike, Coupon No. 12, Red Rock, due July 1, 

1874 70 00 

80, E. W. Dike, Qonpon No. 8, Albert Lea, due July 1, 

1874 70 00 

80, E. W. Dike, Coupons Nos. 14, 15, Winneb. City, due 

July 1, 1874 14000 

80, E. W. Dike, Coupons Nos. 29, 87, 88, Winneb. City, 

due July 1, 1874 % 21000 

80, E. W. Dike, Coupons Nos., 25, 28, Winneb. City, 

due July 1, 1872 14000 

f 10,562 50 



Digitized by CiOOQIC 



AUDITOB Ol* 8TATB. 



126 



STATEMENT •*!." 

Showing Banded Indebtedness of CountieSf CiUee^ Towns, and School JHs^ 
triets, with rates of Interest, reported by County Auditors. 





Coonty 
Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


City 
Bonds. 


Ratoper 
cent, of 
Interest. 


Town 
Bonds. 


Ratoper 
cent of 
Interest. 


School 
District 
Bonds. 


Ratoper 
cent, of 
Interest. 


Aitkin -..T-'.. 


$6.t00 


12 














Anokft .,, 






8,860 
6;000 


IS 

18 


8,100 
2,600 
4,000 

■"lioio 


10 


Becker 


6,800 
10,000 
22,462 
8,672 
6,000 


1ft 

10 

8 to 12 

7 

10 






10 


Benton 






10 


«Blae Burth.. 
*Brown 


""iiiooo 


'iOto'ii 


....%... 




'"7 


Carlton 






















C^t 


13,000 


12 














iCklppewa ... 












Chisago 

ICottonwood*. 
ICrowWing.. 


"'V^OOO 


"vi 









••••'.•'•• 


"*6,obb 


"ii 


DAkoU 

Dodge 


61,000 


io' 


83,600 


7 


2,060 


10 


14,600 
5,260 
1,^00 


10 
12 


^Douglas 

^ribaolt.... 


6,000 


12 











12 


nllmore 










26,000 
66,000 


7 
7 


aoo 
2,000 

36>68 
'"9,000 
"8,936 

'"4;«o 



12 


*Vreebom.... 










u 


•Ooodhoe.... 






18,0S7 


10 to 12 


in 
"16 


Sm.::: 











ilMntL 

Jaekeon 


■"8,876 


"ii 










•12':::: 


^Kandiyohi.. 






■'i;oob 


"ii 


..jj..... 


Lac qnr Parle. 


2,000 
600 


is 

7 




..... ... 




La^; 










""86b 




Lincoln 

^Sneor .... 
Lyon...* 


12 


•McLeod 










1,700 

"iiioob 


12 
'"7 






Olartln 

^Meeker 

tMUleLaes. . 

Morrison 

Mower 


"'8,000 

"iiioo 


"'i 

'ioto'i2 










•Mnrray 

tNicollet... . 
Nobles 


600 

" 8,400 

10,000 

6,600 

1,T» 


18 


Olmsted. 











10 


*OtterTail. . 


7,000 


10 to is 










12 


Pine 











12 


Polk 


2,607 

7,000 

121,661 


12 
12 
7to8 












Pope 










8,400 


IS 


Bamsey 

*Redwood ... 


1,200,000 


7' 












2,000 
2600 
68,000 

""moo 

""8,806 


i? 


Renyille 


2,000 
66,000 

iKfiao 


IS 

tolO 

"J'to'io 








. 


«Rice 


6,300 


7 


4,000 


(t) 


9 to 10 


IRock 

ttt.Lonls 


"io 


tScott 

Bherbnme ... 






*"'ii2ob 


"i2 


"12""' 


tSibley 













Hteams 


81,000 


7 to 10 










19,434 


12 


^Steele 












titoTcns 


2,000 


12 










1.660 
3,767 


12 


Swift 










12 


ITodd 

Wabasha . ... 


'"veo 


is 


""iT^io 


"7to 12 








• 




28,176 
1.000 
6,366 

88,000 
6^ 

ilooo 


12 


Wadena 






12 


Wasecsa ••••«. 










3,000 


12 


IS 


•Washington . 
Ws ton Wan . . . 


34,260 


10 


68^00 


' 8to io 


10 






12 


Wilkin 

IWlnona...*.. 


4,600 


12 











12 


Wright 












' 


6,on 


(t) 


:T^.Medlcine 



























$667,987 




$1,401,827 




$lft6,800 




$801,966 





* Report partially based npon estimates, t Ko indebtedness. | Ko retnm. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



126 AKKUAL BBPOBT. 



STATEMENT **J" 

Bhowing proceedings of the Board of Oommisstonersfor the 
Investment of (he Permanent School and University 
Funds. 



A meeting of the Board was held at the office o\ the 
Auditor of State, on the fourth day of August. 1874. 
There were present of the members of the Board, Chief 
Justice S. J. R. McMillan, Governor C. K. Dayis, State 
Treasurer E. W. Dike, and Auditor O. R Whitcomb; 
absent, President of Board of Regents, J. S. Pillsbury. 

On motion, Hon, C. K. Davis was elected chairman of 
the meeting, O. P. A^'hitcomb being ex^officio secretary. 

On motion, it was unanimously resolved that the per- 
manent school and university funds subject to the control 
of this board, under the provisions of section 51, of chapter 
14, of Bissell's Statutes at Large, be invested in the bonds 
of the State of Missouri, known as ** long bonds,'' or bonds 
running from 1881 to 1891. 

The board then adjourned. 

0. E. Davis, Chairman. 

O. P. Whitcomb, Secretary. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OV BTATB. 127 



STATEMENT «K." 

Showing the condition of Savings Banks organized under the 
provisions of chaptei^ 23, General Laws of 1867, on the first 
day of December i 1874. 



SAYINGfi BANK OF 8T. PAUL. 

Lidbiliiies. 

Due depositors Dec. 1» 1878 $ 92,956 40 

Deposits recelYed, 1874 650,825 96 

$748,782 86 
Amoant paid depositors, 1874 648,784 66 

Due depositors Dec. 1, 1874 *• 99.997 70 

Capital stock paid in 18,950 00 

$118,947 70 

Assets. 

Bills receiyable 

Beal Estate 

Due from Banks and Bankers 

County and City Bonds 

Office Fixtures • 

Cash on hand * 



$88,428 64 


1,000^00 


7,978 69 


9,866 15 


8,488 91 


8,185 81 


$118,947 70 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



128 AxnruAL bspobt. 



DULUTH SAYINGS BANE. 

Lidbilities. 

Savings Deposits on December 1» 1878 $22,216 10 

Beceipts to December 1, 1874 22,382 61 

$44,548 71 

Disbursements to December 1, 1874 83,689 06 

•10,869 65 

General Deposits, December 1, 1878 f 12,059 56 

Beceipts to December 4, 1874 607,98181 

#620,041 87 

Disborsements to December 1, 1874 615,089 42 

4,951 95 

Certificates of Deposit 351 00 

Interest and Exchange 1,502 18 

Suspense Account 150 00 

Bills Payable 10,110 08 

Due to other Banks 1,311 68 

Capital Stock 25,600 00 

154,836 54 
Resources. 



Bills discounted f25,756 28 

Bonds and Mortgages, (on property worth double) 9,198,59 

County and City Bonds, orders and street certificates 3,473 08 

Beal Estate 8,598 16 

roLTniture and Fixtures (induing safe) 2,555 37 

Taxes and expenses paid 866 51 

Bevenue Stamps 80 01 

Profit and Loss 1,883 44 

DueArom other Banks 870 45 

Cash on hand 1,598 70 

(?) 954,836 54 



Digitized by Google 
I 



AIDITOB OF STATK. 129 

HENNEPIN COUNTY SAVINGS BANK. 

Liabilities. 

Amoaut Savings Deposits, December 1, 1878. .. #77,124 80 

Beceived daring year 1874 188,629 68 

Paid oat daring the year 1874 118,585 00 

a0,044 68 

•97,168 98 

Resources, 

First Mortgages on Real Estate, Dec. 1, 1874. . . f 70,696 61 

Cash on hand 26,472 82 

•97,168 98 



STILLWATER SAYINGS BANK. 

Liahilities, 

Amount on Deposit, Dec 1, 1878 #10,089 58 

Deposits recelTed to Not. 80,1874 25,875 67 

•85,965 25 

Resources. 

Amount paid Depositors to Nov. 80, 1874 •21,707 67 

Honey loane4 on Real Estate 6,498 94 

Cash on hand 7,758 64 

•85,965 25 



ST. CROIX SAYINGS BANK OB STILLWATER. 

Liabilities. • 

Balance on hand December 1, 1878 ^6,014 98 

Deposited since December 1, 1878 14,088 08 

•20,108 06 
17 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



130 ANNUAL BVFOBT. 

Resources. 

Paid Depositors since December 1, 1878 f 12,865 82 

Amoiint on hand December 1, 1874 7,787 24 



#20,108 oe 



FABHBRS' AND MECHANICS' BANK, jfiNNBAPOLIS. 
(Organized October, 1874.— No report.) 



OOODHUB COUNTY SAVINGS BANK, RBD WING. 
Organization Incomplete.— No report. 



STATEMENT "L." 



Showing the Condition of Banking Associations organized under 
the provisions of the General Banking Laws of the StatCy on 
the first Monday of October y 1874. 

« FABMEBS' AND MECHANICS' BANK OF ST. PAUL. 

Resources. 

Loans and Discounts f 99,018 86 

Overdrafts • 778 86 

Office Fixtures and Safes 1,600 00 

Due flrom Banks 7,890 49 

Loss and Expense Account. . .' 8,929 64 

Cash Items 24,584 69 



#189^146 54 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB 07 STATE. 131 

lAobilities. 

Capital Stock paid up in Cash $ 50,000 00 

Due depositors on demand 82,480 97 

Undivided Fronts 6,666 57 

f 189,146 54 



GBBMAN AMERIOAN BANK, ST. PAUL. 

Resources. 

Loans and Discoonts • ••• $870,088 96 

Dne ftom Banks and Bankers 87,119 95 

Bank Building, Furniture and Fixtures 8,690 29 

Overdrafts 5,826 95 

U. 8. and other bonds— par value 29,217 50 

Premium on bonds 987 75 

Oold, silver and foreign coin 4,084 11 

U. S. Notes, Nat. Currency and other cash items 49,860 94 

Current Expenses • 4,898 85 

Sundry Debtors 2,087 07 

$512,156 87 
Liabilities. 

Capital Stock paid in #200,300 00 

Amount due Depositors 278,402 58 

Due to Banks and Bankers 11,148 18 

ProfltandLoBS Account 18,564 62 

Bills Payable , 746 67 

Sundry Creditors 8,299 87 

$512,156 87 



CITT BANE, HINNBAPOLIS. 

Resources. 

lioansand Discounts $248,804 l^ 

Overdratts (secured) 12,815 14 

Current Expenses 2,561 98 

Taxes Paid 8,642 88 

U.S. Stamps 1,167 40 

Due from Banks 36,964 89 

Cash 85,628 02 

Personal Property 8,000 00 

$842,488 92 

Digitized by VjGOQIC 



132 AI9NUAL BHPOBT. 

Liabilities. 

Capital Stock .^ #150,000 00 

Surplus and UndlYided profits 28,928' 84 

IndivldUEl Deposits 168,666 68 

•842,488 92 



BANE OF DULUTH. 

Resources. 

Loans and Discounts • fll9,228 06 

Overdrafts 6,010 91 

Cashon Hand 2,771 72 

Due ft'om Banks 8f720 60 

Taxes paid 1,488 ^ 

Bond account • 69 00 

Bents 1,146 84 

Bevenue Stamps 164 2C 

Xxpense • ••• 6,288 OS 

Furniture and Fixtures 4,992 89 

f 149,814 26 
Liabilities. 

Capital $ 60,000 00 

Deposits 66,992 01 

Due other Banks ; 8,816 76 

Interest and Exchange • 12,884 60 

BUls Be-discounted 8,122 00 

f 149,814 2S 



LAKE CITT BANK. 

Resources. 

Loans and Discounts fll4,776 7S 

Beal Estate • 6,000 00 

Furniture and Futures 1,089 90 

Expensespaid 1,163 62 

Taxes paid 806 01 

Due from Banks 11,992 99 

Specie Account 50 78 

Cash on hand 10,181 86 

OYerdrafts 268 90 

f 145,716 81 

Digitized by Google 



AUDITOB OF STATE. 133 

lAabilUies. 

Capital • W,000 00 

Deposits • 82,409 70 

Interest M62 20 

BxchAn^e • • • •••• 1»169 83 

Discounts ..•• • • •• 6,67408 

f 146,716 81 



DAKOTA COUNTY BANK. 

Resources. 

Bills Becelyable $ 69,666 79 

Overdrafts 187 62 

Cash on hand 1M68 16 

Dueftom Banks 6,289 88 

Expenses and taxes paid 1»869 87 



lAdbilities. 



f 90,666 66 



Capital paid in #60,000 00 

Profit and Loss M66 80 

Dne Depositors 81,099 W 

•90,666 66 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



134 



ANNUAL BEPOBT. 



Of the foarteen banks having circulating notes outstanding since 1865^ 
nine have closed up business in accordance with law, and have with- 
drayra their securities ; and flye— Bank of Hastings, Bank of Stillwater, 
Minneapolis Bank, People's Bank, and the State Bank of Minnesota — 
have giyen certificates of deposit for redemption of notes on presentation. 



STATEMENT «M." 



Showing amount of cash on hand for redemption of circulating 
notes of Banks closed in 1861 by lawy the amxmnt of notes out- 
standing and the rate of redemption of the same. 





Specie. 


Notes 
Outstanding 


Bate. 


Bank of the State of Minnesota. . . . 
Bank of Bochester 


9946 70 
814 46 

. 822 72 
441 06 
847 86 
674 42 
46 00 
629 66 
269 60 


•1,851 
1,986 
1,666 

460 
1,807 
8,178 

280 
1,799 

866 


70 cts. 
16i " 
201 " 


Bank of Owatonna 


Bank of St. Paul 


Chisago Co. Bank 


19i «• 
2U " 


ICxchangf? Bank .««••••■• 


Fillmore Co. Bank 


Nicollet Co. Bank 


86 '* 


Central Bank. » . r . , 


itn « 








•8,981 86 


•18,166 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OF 8TATB. 

STATEMENT "N." 



135 



Showing Tovmship organizations existing JVbr. 30, 1874, under 
provisions of chapter 10 of the General Statutes. 



Township. 


County. 


Township. 


County. 


Aastad, ' 


Otter TaU, 


* 
Belle Plaine, 


Scott, 


Acoma, 


McLeod, 


Belle Prairie, 


Morrison, 


Acton, 


Meeker, 


Belle River, 


Douglas, 


Adams, 


Mower, 


Bell*3vue, 


Morrison, 


Adrian, 


Watonwan, 


Belmont, 


Jackson, 


Afton, 


Washington, 


Belvidere, 


Qoodhue, 


Aitkin, 


Aitkin, 


Bennington, 


Mower, 


Alba, 


Jackson, 


Benson, 


Swift, 


Albany, 


Steams, 


Benton, 


Carver, 


Alberta, 


Benton, 


Ben Wade, 


Pope, 


Albert Lea, 


Freeborn, 


Bergen, 


McLeod, 


Albin, 


Brown, 


Berlin, 


Steele, , 


Albion, 


Wright, 


Bemadotte, 


Nicollet, 


Alden, 


Freeborn, 


Bethel, 


Anoka, 


Alexandria, 


Douglas, 


Big Bend, 


Chippenta, 


Alfdborg, 


Sibley, 


Bigelow, 


Nobles, 


Alton, 


Waseca, 


Big Lake, 


Sherburne, 


Amador, 


Chisago, 


Birch Cooley, 


Renville, 


Amboy, 


Cottonwood, 


Birch Dale, 


Todd, 


Amherst, 


Fillmore, 


Black Hammer, 


Houston, 


Amo, 


Cottonwood, 


Blakeley, 


Scott, 


Ann, 


Cottonwood, 


Bloomfleld, 


Fillmore, 


Anoka, 


Anoka, 


Blooming Orove, 


Waseca, 


Antrim, 


Watonwan, 


Blooming Prairie, 


Steele, 


Appleton, 


Swift, 


Bloomington. 


Hennepin, 


Arendahl, 


Fillmore, 


Blue Earth City, 


Faribault, 


Arlington, 


Sibley, 


Blue Mounds, 


Pope, 


Ashland, 


Dodge, 


Bondin, 


Murray, 


Ashley, 


Steams, 


Boon Lake, 


Renville, 


Anrdal, 


Otter TaU, ' 


Brainerd, 


Crow Wing, 


Aurora, 


Steele, 


Branch, 


Chisago, 


Austin, 


Mower, 


BrMge water; 


Rice, 


Avon, 


Steams. 


Bristol, 


Fillmore, 






Brockway, 


Steams, 


Baldwin, 


Sherbume, 


Brookfleld, 


Renville, 


Bancroft, ^ 


Freebom, 


Brooklyn, 


Hennepin, 


Bandon, 


Renville, 


Brookville, 


Redwood, 


Barber, 


Faribault, 


Brownsville, 


Houston, 


Barsness, 


Pope, 


Brunswick, 


Kanabec, 


Bashaw, 


Brown, 


Brash Creek, 


Faribault, 


Bath, 


Freeborn, 


Buckmantown, 


Morrison, 


Baxter, 


Lac qui Parle, 


Buffalo, 


Wright, 


Baytown, 


Washington, 


Burbank, 


Kandiyohi, 


Beaoford, 


Blue Earth, 


Burlington, 


Becker, 


Beaver, 


Fillmore, 


Bumhamsville, 


Todd, 


Beaver Bay, 


Lake, 


Bums, 


Anoka, 


Beaver Creek, 


Rock, 


Burnside, 


Goodhue, 


Beaver Falls, 


RenviUe, 


BumsviUe, 


Dakota, 


Becker, 


Sherbume, 


Burastown, 


Brown^ 


Belgrade, 


Nicollet, 


Buse, 


Otter Tail, 


Belle Creek, 


Gtoodhue, 


Butterfleld, 


Watonwan, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



136 



AHKUAL RSPOBT. 
STATEMENT "N"— Continued. 



Township. 


County. 


Township. 


County. 


Butternut Valley, 


Blue Earth, 


Colfax, 


Kandiyohi, 


Byron, 


Waseca. 


CoUins, 


McLeod, 






Collinwood, 


Meeker, 


Cairo, 


RenVille, 


Columbus, 


Anoka, . 


Caledonia, 


Houston, 


Concord, 


Dodge, 


Cambria, 


Blue Earth, 


Corcoran, 


Hennepin, 


Cambridge, 


Isanti, 


Cordova, 


Le Sueur, 


Camden, 


Carver, 


Cormorant, 


Becker, 


Camp, 


Renville, 


Cornish, 


Sibley, 


Camp Lake, 


Swift, 


Corrinna, 


Wright, 


Camp Release, 


Lac qui Farle, 


Cosmos, 


Meeker, 


Canisteo, 


Dodge. 


Cottage Grove, 


Washington, 


Cannon City, 


tiice, 


Cottonwood, 


Brown, 


Cannon FaUs, 


Goodhue, 


Courtlauvi, 


Nicollet, 


Canton, 


FiUmore, 


Credit River, 


Scott, * 


Carimona, 


Fillmore, 


Crooked Creek, 


Houston, 


Carios, 


Douglas, 


Cruw Lake, 


Steams, 


Carlston, 


Freeborn, 


Crystal Lake, 


Hennepin. 


Carrolton, 


Fillmore, 


Cuba, 


Becker, 


Carson, 


Cottonwood, 


Culdrum, 


Morrison. 


Carver, 


Carver, 






Cascade, 


Olmsted, 


Dahlgren, 


Carver, 


Castle Rock, 


Dakota, 


Dale, 


Cottonwood, 


Cedar, 


Martin, 


Daue Prairie, 


Otter Tall, 


Cedar Lake, 


Scoit, 


Danielson, 


Meeker, 


Cedar Mills, 


Meeker, 


Danville, 


Blue Earth, 


Center, 


Murray, 


Darwin, 


Meeker, 


Centerville, 


Anoka, 


Dayton, 


Hennepin. 


Central Point, 


Goodhue, 


Decoria, 


Blue Earth, 


Center Creek, 


Martin, 


Deer Creek, 


Otter Tail, 


Ceresco. 


Blue Earth, 


Deerfleld, 


Steele, 


Ceno Gordo, 


Lac qui Parle, 


Delafield, 


Jackson, 


Cbamplin, 


Hennepin, 


Delevan, 
Defton, 


Faribault, 


Chanhassen, 


Carver, 


Cottonwood, 


Charlestown, 


Redwood, 


Denmark, 


Washington, 


Chaska, 


Carver, 


Derrynane, 


Le Sueur, 


(hatfield, 


Fillmore, 


Des Moiues, 


Jackson, 


Chatham, 


Wright, 


Detroit, 


Becker, 


Chengwatana, 


Pine, 


Dewald, 


Nobles, 


Cherry Grove, 


Goodhue, 


Dexter, 


Mower, 


Chester, 


Wabasha, 


Douglas, 


Dakota, 


Chippewa, 


Douglas, 


Dover, 


Olmsted, 


Chippewa Falls, 


Pope, 


Dovre, 


Kandiyohi, 


Chisago Lake, 


Chisago, 


Dresbach, 


Winona, " 


Christiana, 


Jackson, 


Dry den. 


Sibley, 


Claremont. 


Dodge, 


DulDth, 


St. I^uis, 


Clark, 


Faribault, 


Dunbar, 


Faribault. 


Clayton, 


Mower, 






Clear Lake, 


Sherburne, 


Eagan, 


Dakota, 


Clearwater, 


Wright, 


Kaglc Creek, 


Scott, 


Cleveland, 


Le Sueur, 


Eafzle Lake, 


Otter Tail. 


Clinton, 


Rock, 

Steele, 


East Chain, 


MarUn, 


Clinton Falls, 


Echo, 


Yellow Medicine, 


Clitheral, 


Otter TaU, 


Eden, 


Brown, 


Cokato, 


Wright, 


Eden Lake, 


Steams, 



I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB or STATE. 

STATEMENT «N"— Coatinoed. 



13T 



Township. 


County. 


Township. 


County. 


Eden Prairie, • 


Hennepin, 


Frankford, 


Mower, 


Edwards, 


Kandiyohi, 


Frankfort, 


Wright, 


Efflngton, 


Otter TaU, 


Franklin, 


Wright, 


Egland, 


Clay, 


Fraser, 


Martin, 


Elba, 


Winona, 


Freeborn, 


Freeborn, 


Elgin, 


Wabasha, 


Freedom, 


Waseca, 


Elizabeth, 


Otter Tail, 


Freeman, 


Freeborn, 


Elk, 


Nobles, 


Fremont, 


Winona, 


Elk River, 


Sherburne, 


French Lake, 


Wright, 


Ellington, 


Dodge, 


Friberg, 


Otter TaU. 


Ellsworth, 


Meeker, 






Elm Creek, 


Martin, 


Garden City, 


Blue Earth, 


Elmira, 


Olmsted, 


Genesee, 


Kandiyohi, 


Elmore, 


Faribault. 


Geneva, 


Freeborn, 


Elaborongh, 


Murray, 


Germantown, 


Cottonwood, 


Elysian, 


Le Sueur, 


Getty, 


Steams, 


Emerald, 


Faribault, 


Gilchrist, 


Pope, 


Emmett, 


Renville, 


Gillford, 


Wabasha, 


Empire, 


Dakota, 


GUmanton, 


Benton, 


Enterprise, 


Jackson, 


Glasgow, 


Wabasha, 


Srhard's Grove, 


Otter TaU, 


Glencoe, 


McLeod, 


Erickson, 


Renville, 


Glendale, 


Scott, 


Erin, 


Rice, 


Glendorado, 


Benton, 


Eureka, 


Dakota, 


Glenwood, 


Pope, 


Evans ville, 


Douglas, 


Glyndon, 


ciffy, 


EwiDgton, 


Jackson, 


'Goodhue, 


Goodhue, 


Excelsior, 


Hennepin, 


Gordon, 


Todd, 


Byota, 


Olmsted. 


Gorman, 


Otter TaU, 






Grafton, 


Sibley, 


Fairbanks, 


Crow Wing, 


Graham Lakes, 


Nobles, 


Fairfield, 


Swift, 


Granby, 


NicoUet, 


Fairhaven, 


Stearns, 


Grand Meadow, 


Mower, 


Falrmount, 


Martin, 


Grand Prairie, 


Nobles, 


Fairview, 


Lyon, 


Grand View, 


Lyon, 


Farming, 


Stearns, 


Granite Falls, 


Chippewa, 


Ff^mington, 


Olmsted, . 


iGrant, 


Washington, 


Faxon, 


Sibley, 


Gray Eagle, 


Todd, 


Featherstone, 


Goodhue, 


Great Bend, 


Cottonwood, 


Fergus Falls, 


Otter TaU, 


Greenbush, 


Mille Lacs, 


Fielden, . 


Watonwan, 


Greenfield, 


Wabasha, 


Fillmore, 


FUlmore, 


Green Isle, 


Sibley, 


Fish Lake, 


Chisago, 
Renville, 


Green Lake, 


Kandiyohi, 


Flora, 


Greenleaf, 


Meeker, 


Florence, 


Goodhue, 


Green Praitie, 


Morrison, 


Fond du Lac, 


St. Louis, 


Green Vale, 


Dakota, 


Forest, 


Rice, 


Greenwood, 


Hennepin, 


Forest City, 


Meeker, 


Gregory, 


Rock, 


Forest Lake, 


Washington, 


Grove, 


Steams, 


Forest Prairie, 


Meeker, 


(>rove Lake, 


Pope, 


ForestviUe, 


Fillmore, 


Grow, 


Anoka. 


Foster, 


Faribault, 






Fountain, 


FiUmore, 


Hale, 


McLeod, 


Fox Lake, 


Martin, 


Hamden, 


Becker, 


Framnas, 


Stevens, 


Ham Lake, 


Anoka, 


Franconia, 
18 


Chisago, 


Hampton, 


Dakota, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



138 



STATEMENT "N"— Continued. 



Township. 


County. 


Township. 


County. . 


Hancock, 


Carver, 


Jamestown, 


Blue Earth, 


Harmony, 


Fillmore, 


Janesvllle, 


Waseca, 


Harrison, 


Kandiyohi, 


Jay, 


Martin, 


Hart, 


Winona, 


Jefferson, 


Houston, 


Hartford, 


Todd, 


Jessenland, 


Sibley, 


Hartland, 


Freeborn, 


Jo Daviess, 


Faribault, 


Harvey, 


Meeker, 


Jordan, 


Fillmore, 


Hassan, 


Hennepin, 


Judson, 


Blue Earth. 


Havana, * 


Steele, 






Havelock, 


I'hippewa, 




Olmsted, 


Haven, 


Sherburne, 


Kanaranzi, 


Rock, 


HaverhiU, 


Olmsted, 


Kandiyohi, 


Kandiyohi, 


Hawk Creek, 


Renville, 


Kandota, 


Todd, 


Hawley, 


Clay, 


Kasota, 


Le Sueur, 


Hay Creek, 


Goodhue, 


Kelso, 


Sibley, 


Hayfleld, 
Hayward, 


Dodge, 
Freeborn. 


Kenyon, 
KetUe River, 


Goodhue, 
Pine, 


Hector, 


RenvUle, 


Kiester, 


Faribault, 


Helen, 


McLeod, 


Kilkenny, 


Le Sueur, 


Helena, 


Scott, 


Kimball, 


Jackson, 


Henderson, 


Sibley, 


Kingston, 


Meeker, 


Henryville, 


Renville, 


Kirkhoven, 


Swift, 


Herman, 


St. Louis, 


Kragero, 


Chippewa, 


Heron Lake, . 


Jackson, 


Kraln, 


Steams. 


Hersey, 


Nobles, 






High Forest, 


Olmsted, 


La Crescent, 


Houston, 


Highwater, 


Cottonwood, 


La Crosse, 


Jackson, 


Highland, 


Wabasha, 


Lac qui Parle, 


Lac qui Parle, 


HUlsdale, 


Winona, 


Lafayette, 


NlcoUet, 


Hinckley, 


Pine, 


La Grand, 


Douglas, 


Hokah, 


Houston, 


Lake, 


Wabasha, 


Holden, 


Goodhue, 


Lake Andrew, 


Kandiyohi, 


Holding, 


Steams, 


Lake Belt, 


Martin, 


Hollywood, 


Carver, 


Lake Benton, 


Lincoln, 


Holmes City, 


Douglas, 


Lake Elizabeth, 


Kandiyohi, 


Holt, 


Fillmore, 


Lake Eunice, 


Becker, f 


Holly, 


Murray, 


Lake Fremont, 


Martin, 


Home, 


Brown, 


Lake Hanska, 


Brown, 


Homer, 


Winona, 


Lake Henry, 


Steams, 


Houston, 


Houston, 


Lake Joanna, 


Pope, 


Hudson, 


Douglas, 


Lakeland, 


Washington, 
Kandiyohi, 


Hunter, 


Jackson, 


Lake Lillian, 


Huntsville, 


Polk, 


Lake Marshall, 


Lyon, 


Hutchinson, 


McLeod, 


Lake Mary, 


Douglas, 
Nicollet, 


Hyde P»rk, 


Wabasha. 


Lake Prairie, 






Lake Sarah, 


Murray, 


Ida, 


Douglas, 


Lakeside, 


Cottonwood, 


Independence, 


Hennepin, 


T<akeiown, 


Carver, 


Indian Lakes, 


Nobles, 


Lake View, 


Becker, 


Inver Grove, 


Dakota, 


LakevUle, 


Dakota, 


Iosco, 


Waseca, 


Lamberton, 


Redwood, 


Irving, 


Kandiyohi, 


Lanesburg, 


Le Sueur, 


Isanti, 


Isanti. 


Langola, 


Benton, 






Langhei, 


Pope, 


Jackson, 


Scott, 


Lansing, 


Mower, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AtTDITOB OF STATE. 
STATEMENT «N"— Continued. 



139 



Township. 


County. 


Township. 


County. 


Leaf Mountain, 


Otter TaU, 


Manannah, 


Meeker, 


LeafVaUey, 


Douglas, 


Manchester, 


Freeborn, 


Leavenworth, 


Brown, 


Mankato, 


Blue Earth, 


Lebanon, 


Dakota, 


Manomin, 


Anoka, 


Leeds, 


Murray, 


Mansfield, 


Freeborn, 


Leenthrop, 


Chippewa, 


MantorviUe, 


Dodge, 


Lemond, 


Steele, 


Manyaska, 


Martin, 


Lent, 


Chisago, 


Maple Grove, 


Hennepin, 


Leon, 


Goodhue, 


Maple Lake, 


Wrl-ht, 


LeRay, 


Bhie Earth, 


Maple Ridge, 


Isanti, 


LeRoy, 


Mower, 


Mapleton, 


Blue Farth, 


Le Sauk, . 


Steams, 


Marine, 


Washington^ 


Levan, 


Pope, 


Marion, 


Olmsted, 


Lexington, 


Le Sueur, 


Marion Lake, 


Otter Tail, 


Liberty, 


Becker, 


Marshall, 


Mower, 


Lien, 


Grant, 


Marshan, 


Dakota, 


Lime, 


Blue Earth, 


Martin, 


Rock, 


Lime Lake, 


Murray, 


Marysville, 


Wright, 


Lincoln, 


Blue Earth, 


Mayville, 


Houston, 


Linden, 


Brown, 


Maywood, 


Benton, 


Linwood, 


Anoka, 


Mazeppa, 


Wabasha, 


Lisbon, 


Yellow Medicine, 


Medford, 


Steele, 


Litchfield, 


Meeker, 


Medina, 


Hennepin, 


Little Falls, 


Morrison. 


Medo, 


Blue Earthy 


Little Rock, 


Nobles, 


Melrose, 


Stearns, 


Little Sauk, 


Todd, 


Mendota, 


Dakota, 


Livonia, 


Sherburne, 


Merlden, 


8tt:ele, 


Lodi, 


Mower, 


Merton, 


Steele, 


London, 


Freeborn, 


Middletown, 


Jackson, 


Loni; Lake. 


Watonwan, 


MiddleviUe, 


Wright, 


Long Prairie, 


Todd, 


Milford, 


Brown, 


Lorain, 


Nobles, 


MillerviUe, 


Douglas, 


Louisville, 


Scott, 


Millwood, 


Stearns, 


Lowville, 


Murray, 


Milo, 


MUle Lacs, 


Lucas, 


Lyon, 


Milton, 


Dodge, 


Lund, 


Douglas, 


iMiltona, 


Douglas, 


Lura, 


Faribault, 


jMinden, 


Benton, 


Luveme, 


Rock, 


Minneapolis, 


Hennepin, 


Luxemburg, 


Steams, 


Minneiska, 


Wabasha, 


Lyle, 


Mower, 


Mlnneola, 


Goodhue, 


Lynd, 


Lyon, 


Mlnneota, 


Jackson, 


Lynden, 


Stearns, 


Minnesota Falls, 


Yellow Medicine, 


Lynn, 


McLeod, 


Minnesota Lake, 


Faribault, 


Lyon, 


Lyon, 


Minnetonka, 


Hennepin, 


Lyra, 


BlUb Earth. 


Minnetrista, 


Hennepin, 






Moe, 


Douglas, 


McDooaldsville, 


Polk, 


Molund. 


Clay, 


McLean, 


iiamsey. 


Money Creek, 


Houston, 


McPherson, 


Blue Earth, 


Montgomery, 


Le Sueur, 


Madelia, 


Watonwan, 


Monticello, 


Wright, 


Madison, 


Lyon, 


Moose Lake, 


Carlton, 


Magnolia, 


Rock, 


Moore, 


Stevens, 


Maine, 


Otter Tail, 


Moorhead, 


Clay, 


Maine Prairie, 


Stearns, 


Morris, 


Stevens, 


Mamre, 


Kandiyohi, 


Morris town, 


Rice. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



140 



ANNUAL BBPOBT. 
STATEMENT "N"— Continued. 



Township. 




Moscow, 
MoQDt Prairie, 
Moands View, 
Mountain Lake, 
Mount Pleasant, 
Mount Vernon, 
Mulligan. 
Munson, 
Murray, 

NashviUe, 

Nelson, 

Nessel, 

l^evada, 

New Auburn, 

New Avon, 

Newburg, 

New Canada, 

New Hartford, 

New Haven, 

New London, 

Newmarket, 

Newport, 

New Hichland, 

Newry, 

New Sweden, 

New York Mills, 

Nicollet, 

Nidaros, 

Nioinger, 

Nora, 

Nordland, 

Norfolk, 

Norman, 

Normannia, 

North Branch, 

Northfleld, 

North Fork, 

North Hero, 

North Star, 

Norton, 

Norway, 

Norwegian Grove 

Norway Lake, 

Nnnda, 

Oak, 

Oakdale, 

Oak Grove, 

Oak Lake, 

Oakland, 

Oakwood, 

Odin, 

Okacheeda, 

Olney, 



Freeborn, 

Houston, 

Ramsey, 

Cottonwood, 

Wabasha, 

Winona, 

Brown, 

Stearns, 

Murray. 

Martin, 
Watonwan, 
Chisago, 
Mower, 
Sibley, 
Redwood, 
Fillmore, 
Ramsey, 
Winona, 
Olmsted, 
Kandiyohi, 
i Scott, 
Washington, 
Waseca, 
Freeborn, 
Nicollet, 
Otter Tail, 
Nicollet, 
Otter TaU, 
Dakota, 
Pope, 
Lyon, 
Renville, 
Yellow Medicine, 
Yellow Medicine, 
Isanti, 
Rice, 
Steams, 
Redwood, 
Brown, 
Winona, 
Fillmore, 
Otter Tall, 
Kandiyohi, 
Freeborn. 

Stearns, 

Washington, 

Anoka, 

Becker, 

Freeborn, 

Wabasha, 

Watonwan, 

Murray, 

Nobles, 



Township. 



Oneka, 

Oneota, 

Orange, 

Orion, 

Oronoco, 

Osakls, 

Oscar, 

Oshawa, 

Otis, 

Otlsco, 

Otsego, 

Ottawa, 

Otter TaU, 

Owatonna, 

Palmer, 

Palmyra, 

Park, 

Parker's Prairie, 

Paynes viUe, 

Pelican, 

Penn, 

Pepin, 

Petersburg, 

Pickerel Lake, 

Pierz, 

Pilot Grove, 

Pilot Mound, 

Pine City, 

Pine Island, 

Plalnview, 

Pleasant Grove, 

Pleasant Hill, 

Pleasant Mound, 

Pleasant Prairie, 

Pleasant Valley, 

Plymouth, 

Pralrieville, 

Preble, 

Prescott, 

Preston, 

Preston Lake, 

Princeton, * 

Qulncy, 

Racine* 

Ramsey, 

Randolph, 

Ransom, 

Hapidan, 

Ravenna, 

Raymond, 

Red Rock, 

Redwood Falls, 



County. 



Washington, 

St. Louis, 

Douglas, 

Olmsted, 

Olmsted, 

Douglas, 

Otter Tall, 

NicoUet, 

Yellow Medicine, 

Waseca, 

Wright, 

Le Sueur, 

Otter. Tall, 

Steele. 

Sherburne, 

RenylUe, 

Clay. 

Otter Tall, 

Steams, 

Otter Tall, 

McLeod, 

Wabasha, 

Jackson, 

Freeborn, 

Morrison, 

Faribault. 

Fillmore, 

Pine, 

Goodhue, 

Wabasha, 

Olmsted, 

Winona, 

Blue Earth, 

Martin, 

Mower, 

Hennepin, 

Brown, 

Fillmore, 

Faribault, 

Fillmore, 

BenvUle, 

Mille Lacs. 

Olmsted. 

Mower, 

Anoka, 

Dakota, 

Nobles, 

Blue Earth, 

Dakota, 

Stearns,' 

Mower, 

Redwood) 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AUDITOB OF STATS. 
STATEMENT "N"— Continned. 



14] 



Township. 


County. 


Township. 


CouQty. 


Reno, 


Pope. 


Sand Creek, 


Scott, 


Beserye, 


Ramsey, 


Sandnes, 


Yellow Medicine, 


Reynolds, 


Todd, 


Sand Prairie, 


Wabasha, 


Rice Lake, 


St. Louis, 


San Francisco, 


Carver, 


Riceland, 


Freeborn, 


Santiago, 


Sherburne, 


Richfield, 


Hennepin, 


Saratoga, 


Winona, 


Richland, 


Rice, 


Salient, 


Mower, 


Richmond, 


Winona, 


Sauk Centre, 


Steams, 


Rich Valley, 


McLeod, 


Sauk Rapids, 


Benton, 


Richwoods, 


Becker, 


Scambler. 


Otter TaU, 


Ridgely, 


Nicollet, 


Sclota, 


Dakota, 


Ripley, 


Dod?e, 


Seely, 


Faribault, 


Rlverdale, 


Watonwan, 


Selma, 


Cottonwood, 


Riverside, 


Lac qui Parle, 


Severance, 


Sibley, 


liochester. 


Olmsted, 


Seward, 


Nobles, 


Rock Creek, 


Pine, 


Shafer, 


Chisago, 


Rock Dell, 


Olmsted, 


Sharon, 


Le Sueur, 


Rockford, 


Wright, 


Shelby, 


Blue Earth, 


RockYille, 


Steams, 


Sheldon, 


Houston, 


Rolling Fork, 


Pope, 


Shell Rock, 


Freeborn, 


Rolling Qreen, 


Martin, 


Shelly, 


Folk, 


Rolllngstone, 


Winona, 


Sheridan, 


Redwood, 


Rome, 


Faribault, 


Sherman, 


Redwood, 


Roscoe, 


Goodhue, 


Shetek, 


Murray, 


Rose, 


Ramsey, 


ShleldsvUle, 


Rice, 


Rose Lake, 


Otter Tall, 


Sibley, 


Sibley, 


Rosemonnt, 


Dakoto, 


Sigel, 


Brown, 


Rosendale, 


Watonwan, 


Silver Creek, 


Wright, 


RoseviUe, 


Kandiyohi, 


Silv^r Lake, 


Martin, 


Rosewood, 


Chippewa, 


Sioux Valley, 


Jackson, 


Round Grove, 


McLeod, 


Skutidia, 


Murray, 


Round Lake, 


Jackson, 


Solum, 


Douglas, 


Rouod Prairie, 


Todd, 


Soraeraet, 


Steele, 


Rnshford, 


Fillmore, 


i:»outb Bend, 


Blue Earth, 


Rush Lake, 


Otter TaU, 


Soutb Branch, 


Watonwan, 


Rutthseba, 


Chisago, 


Sou til Brook, 


Cottonwood, 


Rust, 


Jackson, 


South Side, 


Wright, 


Rutland, 


Martin. 


Sparta. 


Chippewa, 






Speiiter Brook, 


Isanti, 


6acred Heart, 


Renville, 


Spriugdttle, 


Redwood, 


8t. Anthony, 


Hennepin, 
Steams, 


iSpriijglleld, 


Cottonwood, 


St. Augusta, 


Spring Grove, 


Houston, 


Su Charles, 


Winona, 


Spring HIU, 


Stearns, 


St. Cloud, 


Steams, 


Spriug Lake, 


Scott, 


bt. Francis, 


Anoka, 


Spring vale, 


Isanti, 


St. George, 


Benton, 


Spring Yalley, 


Fillmore, 


St. James, 


Watonwan, 


i^priot^ Water, 


Kock, 


St. John, 


Kandiyohi, 


StAHcblleia* 


Isanti, 


St. Joseph, 


Steams, 


btttuffirii, 


Isaotl, 


St. Lawrence, 


8C0tt, 


Stanton. 


Goodhue, 


St. Martin, 


Steams, 


BUrK 


Brown, 


St. Mary, 


Waseca, 


Sterling, 


Blue Earth, 


St. Ohif, 


Otter TaU, 


Stillwater, 


Washington, 


St. WendeU, 


Steams. 


Stoekholm, 


Wright, 


Salem, 


Olmsted, 


Stony ttan. 


Yellow Medlclni, 



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142 



ANNUAL BBPOBT. 
STATEMENT «N"— Continued. 



Township. 


Pounty. 


Township. 


County. 


fiammit, 


Steele, 


Watab, 


Benton, 


Summit Lake, 


Nobles, 


Waterford, 


Dakota, 


Sumner, 


Fillmore, 


Watertown, 


Carver, 


Sumter, 


McLeod, 


WaterviUe, 


Le Sueur, 


Sunrise, 


Chisago, 


Watopa, 


Wabasha, 


Sundown, 


Redwood, 


Waverly, 


Martin, 


Swan Lake, 


Meeker, 


Webster, 


Hice, 


Swan River, 


Morrison, 


Weimer, 


Jackson, 


Swede's Forest, 


Redwood, 


Welch, 


Goodhue, 


Swede Grove, 


Meeker, 


Wellington, 


Renville, 


Swenoda, 


Swirt. 


Wells, 


Rice, 






West Albany, 


Wabasha, 


I'enhassen, 


Martin, 


Westbrook, 


Cottonwood, 


Thomson District 


Carlton, 


Westeren, 


Otter Tail, 


Tordenskjold, 


Otter TaU, 


Westfleld, 


Dodge, 


Transit, 


Sibley, 


Westford, 


Martin, 


Traverse, 


Nicollet, 


West Ueron Lake 


Jackson, 


Trondl^em, 


Otter Tail, 


West Newton, 


Nicollet, 


Tumuli, 


Otter TaU, 


Westport, 


Pope, 


Tunsburg, 


Chippewa, 


West St. Paul, 


Dakota, 


Twin Lakes, 


Carlton, 


West Union, 


Todd, 


Two Rivers, 


Morrison, 


Wheatland, 


Rice, 


Tyrone, 


Le Sueur, 


Wheeling, 


Rice, 






White Bear, 


Ramsey, 


Udolpho, 


Mower, 


White Bear Lake, 


Pope, 


Union, 


Houston, 


Whitefleld, 


Kandiyohi, 


Uolon Grove, 


Meeker, 


Whitewater, 


Winona, 


U. Yel. Medicine, 


Lyon, 


WiUmar, 


Kandiyohi, 


Umess, 


Douglas, 


Willow Creek, 


Blue Earth, 


Utica, 


Winona. 


WUlow Lake, 


Redwood, 






WUmington, 


Houston, 


Vasa, 


Goodhue, 


Wilson, 


Winona, 


Vermilion, 


Dakota, 


Wilton, 


Waseca, 


Vernon, 


Dodge, 


Windom, 


Mower, 


Vernon Centre, 


Blue Earth, 


Winnebago, 


Houston, 


Verona, 


Faribault, 


Winnebago City, 


Faribault, 


Victor, 


Wright, 


Winona, 


Winona, 


Vienna, 


Rock, 


Winsted, 


McLoud, 


Viola, 


Olmsted, 


Wisconsin, 


Jackson, 


Vivian, 


Waseca. 


Wiscoy, 


Winona, 






Woodbury, 


Washington, 


Waconia, 


Carver, 


Wood Lake. 


Yellow Medicine, 


Wacoota, 


Goodhue, 


Woodland, 


Wright, 


Wadena, 


Wadena, 


WoodviUe, 


Waseca, 


Wakefield, 


Steams, 


Worthington, 


Nobles, 


Walcott, 


Rice, 


Wyoming, 


Chisago. 


Walden, 


Pope, 






Walnut Lake, 


Faribault, 


Yellow Medicine, 


Yellow Medicine, 


Waltham, 


Mower, 


York, 


Fillmore, 


Wanammgo, 


Goodhue, 


Young America, 


Carver, 


Warren, 


Winona, 


Yucatan, 


Houston. 


Warsaw, 


Goodhue, 






Washington, 


Le Sueur, 


Zion, 


Stearns, 


Washington Lake 


Sibley, 


Zumbro, 


Wabasha, 


Wasioja, 


Dodge, 


Zumbrota, 


Goodhue. 



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EXECUTIVB DOCUMENT, No. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



STATE TREASURER, 



TO THE 



LEGISUTURE OF MINNESOTA, 



FOB THE 



FISCAL YEAK ENDING NOVEMBER 80, 1874. 



TRAKSMITTZD TO THE LBGISLATUBB OF THE SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL 
8EBBI0N, 1875. 



SAINT PAUL: 

FIONBEB OOMPANT PBINT. 

1876. 

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State of Minnesota, ^ 

Treasurer's Offioe, > 

St. Paul, Dec. Ist, 1874. ) 

To Sis SxcelUncy^i C. K\ Davisj Oovernor of Minnesota : 

Sib: — ^I have the honor to transmit herewith the report 
of the transactions of this office for the fiscal year ending 
Noveml>er 30th, 1874. 

Very respectfully, 

E. W. DIKE, 

State Treasurer. 






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HEPORT. 



State of Minnesota, ^ 

Treasurer's Ofhoe, > 

St. PAtFL, Dec. I, 1874. ) 

To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives : 

Osntlemen: — In obedience to the reqairements of law, 
I have the honor to submit my annaal report of the trans- 
actions of this 6ffice for the fiscal year ending November 
30th, 1874. 

The receipts were as follows : 

For Revenue Fund, - $424,042 62 

For Interest Fund, - 67,516 44 

For Sinking Fund, - 28,758 45 

For State Institutions Fund, 271,118 27 

For Permanent School Fund, 87,625 45 

For General School Fund, 189,826 84 

For Permanent University Fund, 11,070 86 
For General University Fund, 11,524 58 
For Internal Improvement Fund, 17,418 61 
For Internal Improvement Land 

Fund, . - . . 1,015 51 

For Interest on Railroad Bonds 

Fund, .... 10.926 86 

For Inebriate Asylum Fund, 1,975 18 

Total, - - - $1,112,812 52 
Balance in Treasury, Dec. 1,1874, 218,898 85 

Total Receipts, * $1,381,210 87 $1,881,210 87 

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6 ANNUAL BEFORT. 

The disbnrsements were as follows : 

From Bevenne Fund, . - $460,602 56 
From Interest Fund, - - 46,631 78 
From Sinking Fund, - 55,822 92 

From State Institutions Fund, 252,625 10 
Prom Permanent School Fund, 86,395 00 
From General School Fund, 194,979 11 

From Permanent University Fund, 9,940 00 
From General University Fund, 11,088 37 
From Internal Improvement Fund, 14,813 07 
From Internal Improvement Land 

Fund, 2,267 50 

From interest on Railroad Bonds 

Fund, .... 10,562 50 

From Inebriate Asylum Fund, 2,332 05 

Total, - $1,148,059 96 $1,148,059 96 

Leaving balance in Treasury, December 1, 1874, belong- 
ing to the several funds, as follows : 

To Bevenue Fund, 
To Interest Fund, - 
To Sinking Fund, - 
To State Institutions Fund, 
To Permanent School Fund, 
► To General School Fund, 
To Permanent University Fund, 
To General University Fund, - 
To Internal Improvement Fund, 
To Internal Improvement Land 

Fund, - - 1,326 44 

To Interest on Railroad Bonds Fund 1,797 57 
To Inebriate Asylum Fund, - 754 80 



$ 30,416 62 


40,930 63 


5,399 23 


68,616 12 


6,646 91 


12,795 62 


1,870 44 


2,328 38 


10,768 16 



Total, - - - $183,150 91 $183,150 91 

REVENUE FUND. 

Receipts. 

From County Treasurers, see 

Statement "A," - - $373,857 34 

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STATE TBSASUBER. 7 

From misceUaneons sources, 

see Statement "B," - - 50,185 18 

Balance in Treasury Decem- 
ber 1, 1878, .... 66,976 66 

Total, .... $491,019 18 

Diahuraements. 
Paid State Auditor's warrants, - $460,602 56 

Leaving balance in Treasury, December 1, 

1874, .... $30,416 62 

There were received during the fiscal year of 1874 : 

From interest on State deposits, - - $9,270 29 

From Insurance Commissioner for fees, - 4,345 '33 

From sale of special laws of 1874, 46 50 

mTERBST FUND. 

Receipts. 

From County Treasurers, see 

Statement "A," - $57,516 44 

Balance in Treasury, December 

1, 1878, - - - 30,045 97 



Total, - $87,562 41 

Diahursements. 

Paid State Auditor's warrants, - $31,255 00 
Transferred to revenue fund, - 15,376 78 



Total, - $46,631 78 

Leaving balance in Treasury, De- 
cember 1, 1874, $40,930 63 

SINKING FUND. 

/ Receipts. 

From County Treasurers, see 

Statement "A,'' - - $28,768 46 

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8 ANNUAL KBFOBT. 

Balance in Treasury, December 1, 
1878, - - - - 82,468 70 

Total, - »61,222 16 

Dislmnemsnts. 

August 18, paid for $12,000 Mis- 
souri 6 per cent, currency 
bonds - • - $11,196 47 

August 17, paid for $38,000 Mis- 
souri 6 per cent, currency 
bonds - - - 86,266 94 

August 20, paid for $10,000 Mis- 
souri 6 per cent currency 
bonds - 9,280 61 

Paid State Auditor's warrants - 81 00 



Total $65,822 92 

Leaving balance in Treasury, 
December, 1, 1874, - $6,399 23 

The sinking fund now holds the following securities : 
Missouri 6 per cent, currency bonds, - $60,000 00 

BTAT^ INSTITUTION FUND. 

Receipts. 

From County Treasurers, see 
Statement ^*A" - - - $116,082 42 

From misceUaneous sources, 
see Statement ''B,'' - 166,086 86 

Balance in Treasury, Decem- 
ber 1, 1873, - - 60,122 96 



Total, . - - - $321,241 22 

Diahuraementa. 
Paid State Auditor's warrants, $240,626 10 

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STATE TREASURER. 9 

Transferred to permanent ani- 

versity, .... 12,000 00 

Total .... $262,625 10 



Leaving balance in Treasury, 

December 1, 1874, - - $68,616 12 

There were collected during the fiscal year of 1874 : 

From railroad companies, .... J129,907 03 
From telegraph companies, - - - 673 20 

From insurance companies, ... - 25,505 62 



PERMANBKT SCHOOL FUND. 

Beceipts. 

From County Treasurers, see 

Statement ** A," - - $63,196 92 
From miscellaneous sources, see 

Statement « B," - - - 24,428 53 
Balance in Treasury, Dec. 1st, 

1873, 5,416 46 



Total, - - - «93,041 91 $93,041 91 



Disbursements. 

February 1, paid for $10,000 
Minnesota 7 per cent. Loan 
of 1873, .... J10,000 00 

April 1, paid for $5,000 Minne- 
sota 7 per cent, loan of 1873, 5,000 00 

May 1, paid for $2,000 Minnesota 

7 per cent. Loan of 1873, - 2,000 00 

August 13, paid for $10,000 Mis- 
souri 6 per cent Currency 
Bonds, .... 9,250 00 

August 17, paid for ^6,000 
Missouri 6 per cent. Currency 
Bonds, .... 33,300 00 

November 23d, paid for $14,000 
Missouri 6 per cent. Currency 
Bonds, .... 13,125 00 

2 

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10 ANNUAL REPORT. 

November 30, paid for $14,000 
Missouri 6 per cent. Currency 
Bonds, .... 13,720 00 



Total, .... $86,395 00 $86,395 00 



Leaving balance in Treasury, 

December 1, 1874, - - $6,646 91 

The following securities are now held by the permanent 
school fund : 

Minnesota 7 per cent, bonds, loan of 1867, 

currency, .... $100,000 00 
Minnesota 7 per cent, bonds, loan of 1868, 

currency, ----- 100,000 00 
Minnesota 7 per cent, bonds, loan of 1869, 

currency, - . . . . 60,000 00 

U. S. 6s. bonds of '81, registered, gold, - 10,000 00 

U. S. 5-20 bonds, registered, gold, - - 77,800 00 

Missouri 6 per cent, bonds, currency, - 232,000 00 

Minnesota 7 per cent, bonds, loan of 1873, - 216,000 00 

U. S. 6 per cent, currency bonds, registered, 355,000 00 

GENERAL SCHOOL FUND. 

Receipts. 

From County Treasurers, see 

Statement "A" - - $120,792 60 

From miscellaneous sources, 

see Statement " B," - - 69,034 34 
Balance in Treasury, December 1, 

1873, - - . 17,947 89 



Total, - - *207,774 73 

DiabuTsements. 
Paid State Auditors warrants, - - - $194,979 11 



Leaving balance in Treasury, December 1, 

1874, 12,796 62 

Of the above balance the sum of $6,432 74 belongs to 
the apportioned school fund on outstanding warrants. 



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STATE TREAflUREB. 11 

PERMANENT UNIVERSITY FUND. 

Receipts. 

From County Treasurers, see 

Statement "A," - - - $4,467 86 

From miscellaneous sources, 

see Statement '^B" - - 6,613 01 

Transfer from State institution 

fund, - - - . - 12,000 00 

Balance in Treasury, Decem- 
ber 1, 1873, - - . 248 08 

Total, - . - . $23,310 44 

Dishureementa. 

April 1, paid for $3,000 Minne- 
sota 7 per cent, loan of 1873, $3,000 00 

August 17, paid for $12,000 
Missouri 6 per cent, currency 
bonds, - * - - - - 11,100 00 

November 30, paid for J8,000 
Missouri 6 per cent, currency 
bonds, . . - - - 7,840 00 

Total, .... $21,940 00 

Leaving balance in Treasury, 

December 1, 1874, $1,370 44 

The permanent University Fund now holds the follow- 
ing securities : 

U. S. 6 per cent currency bonds, registered, - $6,000 00 
Minnesota 7 per cent, currency bonds, loan of 

1873, - 16,000 00 

Missouri 6 per cent currency bonds, - - 20,000 00 

GENERAL UNIVBRSITY FUND. 

• Receipts. 

From Oounty Treasurers, see 

Statement '«A," - - $9,696 44 



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12 ANNUAL BEFOBT. 

From miscellaneous sources, see 

Statement " B," - - 1,928 09 

Balance in Treasury, December 1, 

1873, 1,892 22 

Total, $18,416 76 

Disbursements. 
Paid State Auditor's warrants, - - - $11,088 87 

Leaving balance in Treasury, December 1, 
1874, $ 2,828 88 

' INTERNAL IMPBOVEMSKT FUND. 

Beceipts. 

From miscellaneous sources, see 
Statement "B," - $17,418 61 ^ 

Balance in Treasury, December 
1, 1873, - 8,167 61 

Total, . . $25,681 02 

Disbursements. 
Paid State Auditor's warrants, - $14,818 07 



Leaving balance in Treasury, Dec. 1, 1874, $10,768 16 

INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT LAND FUND. 

Beceipts. 

From County Treasurers, see 

Statement ^<A," - - $966 61 

From miscellaneous sources, see 

Statement ''B," - - 60 00 

Balance in Treasury, December * 

1, 1873, . - - 2,578 48 

Total - . $3,698 94 

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STATE TKBASUBEB. IS 

Disbursements. 



January 2, paid for $2,000 IT. S. 6 per cent. 



paia 10 
r bonds, 



currency bonds, registered, - t 92,267 50 



Leaving balance in Treasury, Dec. 1, 1874, $1,326 44 

The internal improvement land fnnd now holds the fol- 
lowing securities : 

Par vahte. 

TT. S. 6 per cent, currency bonds, registered, $2,000 00 

INTEREST ON RAILROAD BONDS FUND. 

t 

Receipts. 

From County Treasurers, see 

Statement "A," - - $10,925 36 

Balance in Treasury, December 

1, 1873, 1,484 71 



Total, . - - - $12,860 07 

Disbursements. 
Paid State Auditor's warrants, - - 10,562, 60 



Leaving balance in Treasury, December 1, 

1874, $1,797 67 



INEBRIATE ASTLUM FUND. 

Receipts. 

From County Treasurer's, see 

Statement «C," - - $1,376 18 

From miscellaneous sources, see 

Statement «B," - - 600 00 

Balance in Treasury, December 

1, 1873, .... 1,111 67 

Total . - - - $3,086 86 

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14 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Disbursements. 

February 6, paid for $1,000 U. S. 

6 per cent, currency bonds 91,161 03 

May 15, paid for $1,000 U. S. 6 

per cent, currency bonds - 1,171 02 

Total, ... - $2,882 06 

Leaving balance in Treasury, December 1, 

1874, ' - $754 80 

The Inebriate Asylum fund now holds the following 
securities : 

Par value, 

U. S. 6 per cent, currency bonds, registered, - $11,000 00 

TAXES OOLLBOTBD. 

The following table shows the State collections of taxes 
from 1860 to 1874, viz : 

Tax collected in 1860 $111,918 53 

Tax collected in 1861 .... 100,186 88 

Tax collected in 1862 133,001 73 

Tax collected in 1863 . . . . 177,170 43 

Tax collected in 1864 195,418 52 

Tax collected in 1865 .... 218,963 33 

Tax collected in 1866 252,646 96 

Tax collected in 1867 ... - 286,447 32 

Tax collected in 1868 276,186 93 

Tax collected in 1869 ... - 318,556 86 

Tax collected in 1870 -.-.•- 336,460 83 

Tax collected in 1871 . . . - 410,069 66 

Tax collected in 1872 418,233 71 

Tax collected in 1873 . - . . 467,036 59 

Tax collected in 1874 575,164 65 



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48 ANNUAL REPORT. 



STATEMENT "0." 

deceived from County Treasurers for Inebriate Asylum 

Fund. 

Name of county. % ' Amount. 

Anoka $ 30 00 

Becker 40 00 

Benton 10 00 

Chippewa • 30 00 

Chisago 30 00 

Clay / 20 00 

Cottonwood 40 00 

Grant 10 00 

Houston 60 00 

Kandiyohi 20 00 

Lac qui Parle 10 00 

Le Sueur 60 00 

Meeker 120 61 

Mille Lacs 20 00 

Mower 330 00 

Murray ► 6 67 

Otter Tail 40 00 

St. Louis 20 OO 

Steele 220 00 

Stevens 38 00 

Swift 30 00 

Washington 60 00 

Wilkin ., 60 00 

Wright 60 00 

Yellow Medicine 10 00 

Total $1,375 18 



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50 ANNUAL BEPORff. 



EXPENDITURES 

From December lat^ 1873, to November 80M, 1874. 

Law library, 1871 $ 64 00 

Selling State lands, 1871 784 43 

Revising war reoordg, 1871 6 00 

Salaries of judges, 1872 65 55 

Law library. 1872 2 37 

Insane building, 1872 22,000 00 

Selling State lands, 1872 101 57 

Soldiers' orphans, 1873 3,406 14 

Insane support, 1873^ 11,500 00 

Deaf, dumb and blind support, 1873 9,000 00 

Prison current expenses, 1873 1,500 00 

Priison officers, 1873 764 01 

Interest on loans, 1873 14,700 00 

Legislative fund, 1873 1,161 39 

University buildings, 1873 32,000 00 

Third normal school buildings, 1873 10,000 00 

Governor's salary, 1873 500 00 

Secretary's do 150 00 

Auditor and Land Commissioner's salary, 1873 208 37 

Treasurer's salary, 1873 291 66 

B. R. Commissioner's salary, 1873 250 00 

Attorney General's do 83 33 

Adjutant General's do ^ 125 00 

Supt. Public Instruction do 208 33 

Insurance Commissioner's do 333 37 

Librarian's do « 66 66 

Governor's Private Sec'y's do A 125 00 

Auditor's Chief Clerk's do 125 00 

Assistant Secretary's do 83 33 

Statistician's do 83 33 

Deputy Treasurer's do 125 00 

Land Clerk's do 100 00 

Auditor's extra Clerk's do 462 00 

Attorney General's Clerk's do 16 65 

Janitor's do 83 38 

Public Instruction Clerk's do « 100 00 

Night Watch and Engine'r's do 149 50 

Military Storekeeper's do „ 100 00 

Executive contingent, 1873 153 29 

Secretary's oontintent, 1873 60 46 

Attorney Generals contingent, 1873 25 20 

Treasurer's contingent, 1873 41 73 

Public Instruction condngent, 1873 11167 

Library contingent, 1873.... 76 66 

Salaries of Judges, 1873 7,'923 70 

Supreme Court contingent, 1873 ^ 82 23 

Clerk Supreme Court salary, 1873 ,V.V.".. 600 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8TATE TBEA8UBEB, 51 

Beporter Supreme Court salary, 1873 50 00 

Law library, 1873 61 63 

Volnmea 19, Supreme Court Reports, 1873 1,200 00 

Sherirs fund, 1873 446 76 

Selliog State lands, 1873 308 00 

Fuel and lights, 1873 719 19 

Express and mileage, 1873 11 60 

Historical Society, 1873 696 77 

Agricultural sodetiee, 1873 61 29 

Seed wheat certificates, 1873 6 00 

Heating Capitol (deficiency 1871-2) 1873 1,187 00 

State Board of Health, 1873 1,600 00 

Tranfiportation of Indian prisoners, 1873 169 40 

Co. "E" 2d Minn.. Vol., 1873 ^ 33 80 

Monument 6th Minn, Vol., 1873 ^ 500 00 

Repairs of Capitol, 1873 - 384 74 

Rent of arsenal, 1873 100 00 

Pennock Pusey, 1873 20 00 

Duluth and Pigeon River bridge, 1873 ^ „ 1,413 07 

Chippewa River bridge, 1873 600 00 

Red River bridge, 1773 - 2,000 00 

Sibley county bridges, 1873 300 00 

Hawk Creek bridge, 1873 800 00 

St. Francis River bridge, 1873 400 00 

Zumbro River bridge, 1873 2,000 00 

East Chain Lake bridge, 1873 » 600 00 

Minnesota River bridge, 1873 1,000 00 

Legislative, fund, 1874 66,000 00 

Senate court of impeachment, 1874 8,669 25 

Legislative committee on Southern Minnesota R. R.,1874 340 70 

Legislative committee on Cass county, 1874 610 30 

Legislative committee on pine lands, 1874 «. 223 76 

Legislative committee on printing, (J. C. Wise) 1873 100 00 

LegisUtive committee on insane, 1874 138 00 

Legislative committee on prison, 1874 32 00 

L^islative committee on elevators, 1874 38 26 

Contested election case of L. Hoyt, 1874 76 44 

Contested election case of O. H. Howe, 1874 300 00 

Contested election case of McArthur, 1874 77 76 

Senate stationery, 1874.. 476 37 

Stationery for Legislative and State officers, 1874 1,999 49 

Printing messages, 1874 750 00 

Governor's salary, 1874 4 2,822 60 

Secretary's do 1,660 00 

Auditor and Land Commissioner's salary, 1874 2,291 67 

Treasurer's salary, 1874 ; 3,208 35 

Attorney General's salary, 1874 1,376 00 

Adjutant General's do 1,376 00 

Supt. Public Instruction salary, 1874 2,083 31 

R. R. Commissioners' do do 626 00 

R. R. Commissioners' do do ^ ~ 7,406 00 

Insurance Commissioner's do do 1,833 35 

Librarian's do do 1,100 00 

Governor's Private Sec'ys do do 1,875 00 

Assistant Secretary's do do 916 67 

Sutistician's do do 916 67 

Auditor's Chief Clerk's do do ^ 1,376 00 

Deputy Treasurer's do do ^ 1,375 00 

Land Clerk's do do ^ 1,100 00 

Auditor^s Clerk's do do ^ 770 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



52 



AliNUAL BEFOBT. 



Pnblic Instmctor'B Clerk's do do 
Attoniej Qeneral's Clerk's do do 

Janitor*s do do ...« 

Assistant Janitor's do do ^... 

I^ight Watch, Engineer and Fireman's 

salary, 1874 

Militaiy Storekeeper's salary, 1874 .*... 

Executive contuigent, 1874 

Secretary's contingent, 1874 

Auditor's contingent^ 1874 

Treasurer's contingent, 1874 ^. 

Attorney General's contingent, 1874 , 

Adjutant Qeneral's contingent, 1874 

Publiclnstniction contingent^ 1874 

B. B. (k>mmis8ioners' contingent, 1874 

Library contingent, 1874 

Salaries of Judges, 1874 

Supreme Court contingent, 1874 

Clerk Supreme Court salary, 1874 

Beporter Supreme Court salary, 1874 

Marehid Supreme Court salary, 1874 

Soldiers orphans, 1874 

Insane support, 1874 

Prison current expenses, 1874 

Deaf, dumb and blind support, 1874 

Beform School support, 1874 

University support^ 1874 

First Normal School support, 1874 .'. 

First Normal School support, 1874 

First Normal School support, 1874 

SheriflTs fund, 1874 

Prison buildings, 1874 

Insane buildings, 1874 

Printing, advertising and binding, 1874 

Printing and advertising (deficiency) 1874 

Printing and binding (deficiency) 1874 

Printing laws in newspapers, 1874 

Printing laws in newspapers, (deficiency) 1874 , 

Printing paper, 1874 

Preparmg and indexing laws, 1874 

Interest on loans, 1874 

Selling State lands, 1874 

Selling university lands, 1^874 

Fuel and lights, 1874 

Express and mileage, 1874 

Bepairs of Capitol, 1874 : 

University (reimbursement of permanent fund) 1874... 

University (heating and furnishing) 1874 

Beform school buildings (heating) 1874 

Third Normal school (heating, ramishing, &c,) 1874., 

Law Library, 1874 

Historical Society, 1874 

Agricultural Societies, 1874 , 

Fittingrooms for Secretary, 1874 

Fitting Court and Library rooms, 1874 , 

Frontier relief, (seed grain) 1874 

Frontier relief, (distress) 1874 

Belief to settlers on N. P. B. B. lands, 1874 

Belief to immigrants, 1874 

Winona & St. Peter B. B. (verBUS Blake) 1874 



1,100 00 
150 00 
916 67 
819 00 

1,602 00 
300 00 

2,504 35 
392 70 
452 79 
247 10 
734 75 
299 85 

416 34 
1,000 00 

396 95 

32,298 48 

334 59 

1,125 00 

450 00 

112 00 

16.611 48 

73 000 00 

32,593 47 

26.000 00 

30,000 00 

19,000 00 

11,000 00 

8,250 00 

7,000 00 

2,944 30 

5,849 35 

65,000 00 

21,899 16 

996 29 

10,736 23 

6,000 00 

1,577 25 

5,997 19 

200 00 

16,555 00 

1,862 35 

1,281 19 

3,447 65 

417 00 
3,000 00 

11.100 00 

26,500 00 
5,500 00 

10,000 00 
1,895 81 
2,383 87 
2,942 86 
1,200 00 
800 00 

25,000 00 

5.000 00 

1,145 00 

825 25 

1,000 00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE TREASUBER. 53 

Sewer to Capitol, 1874 80 00 

Bent of Governor's hooae, 1874 733 26 

Meaeenger's salary, 1874 .• 120 00 

Training School and Instituten, 1874 2,710 73 

Geological survey, 1874.../. - 2,000 00 

Magdaline Society, 1874 1.500 00 

State Board of Health, 1874 1,269 17 

Booth's Township Laws, 1874 1,200 00 

Furnishing Committee Booms, 1874 862 96 

Frescoing and Kalsomining, 1874 260 00 

Superintending repairs, 1874 226 00 

Ventilating Legislative Halls, 1874 1,600 00 

Bentof Arsenia, 1874 400 00 

Becker County, trial of Cook murderers, 1874 1,377 29 

Trial Cook and Swede family murderers, 1874 ^ 623 00 

Kandiyohi county, trial of Cooney and Bradshaw, 1874 1,000 00 

Indian difficulties (at Wadena) 1874 287 70 

•Safe for Executive office, 1874 400 00 

Beward for arrest of Donahue, 1874 260 00 

Fish Commissioners, 1874 400 00 

Interest on Carver county town bonds, 1874.. 62 60 

Bridge examiners (Chippewa river) 1874 46 00 

Amos Coggswell, 1874 260 00 

A. C. Mary. 1874 130 00 

Mark Hendricks, 1874 268 00 

A. P. Nelson, 1874 : 600 00 

Christian Swanson, 1874 150 00 

S. Y. McMasters, 1874 300 00 

Charles N. Hewith, 1874 200 00 

Charles Hjortsberg, 1874 ; 100 00 

Dr. Alex. J. Stone, 1874 160 00 

W. D. Flynn, 1874 115 00 

Drs. Murphv & Wharton, 1874 100 00 

Dr. E. B. Hanes, 1874 84 00 

Dr. W. W. Clark. 1874 60 00 

A. D. Ferris, 1874 100 00 

Owen Egan, 1874 : 78 29 

Peter Harf, 1874 64 00 

Sherwood Hough, 1874. 34 00 

John C. Shaw, 1874 22 00 

Chippewa Biver Bridge (Pope county) 1874 800 00 

St. Lonis Biver Bridge, 1874 , 1,000 00 

Minnesota Biver Bridge, 1874 800 00 

Des Moines Biver Bridge, 1874 600 00 

Wing Biver Bridge. 1874 700 00 

Three Mile Creek Bridge, 1874 160 00 

Crow Biver Bridflce, 1874 600 00 

Beaver Creek Bridge, 1874 600 00 

Pike Creek Bridge, 1874 600 00 

Bush City and Cambridge Boad Bridge, 1874 360 00 

Total $770,831 43 

State fund, old Legislature oertificatee | 3 68' 

Sinking fund, Missouri 6 per cent, bonds 66,822 92 

Permanent school fund, loan of 1873 17,000 00 

Permanent school fund, Missouri 6 per cent bonds 69,396 00 

Genera] school fund, apportionments 194,979 11 

Permanent university fund, loan of 1873 3,000 00 

Permanent oniyerBity fond, Missouri 6 per cent, bonds ~ 10|840 00 

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64 AKKUAL BSFOBT/ 

Oenend Dniver8it7 fund ^ 11,088 37 

Internal improyement land fund, U. 8. 6 per oent carrencj 

bonda 2,267 60 

Intereaton railroad bonds faad 10,500 00 

Inebriate Asjlum fund, U. 8. 6 per oent. carrencj bonds 2,332 05 

Total $1,148,059 96 

Beapectinllj aubmittted, 

E. W. DIKE, 

State Treaaorer. 



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[EXBCUTIVB DOCUMKNT NO. 5.] 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 



TO THE 



LEGISLATURE OF MINNESOTA, 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1874, 



TRAMSHITTED TO THE USOISLATUBE OF THE SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL 
SESSION, 1875. 



• SAINT PAITL: 

ST. PAUL PRESS COMPANY. 
1875. 



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REPORT. 



State of Minnesota^ 

Attobney General's Offige, 

St. Paul, Dec. 1, 1874. 



■•I 

His Excellency/ f O. K. Davis, Oavemorqf Minnesota: 



Sib. — ^In accordance with the duty imposed upon me by 
statute, I herewith respectfully submit a statement of the 
. actions prosecuted or defended by me on behalf of the State 
during the past year, together with a tabular statement of 
offenses reported to this office by the several County At- 
torneys, together with the cost of prosecuting, and the 
amount of fines and penalties collected. 

The tabular statement is imperfect and consequently of 
but little value, for the reason that some of the County At- 
torneys have not reported at all, and others made only 
partial returns. 

GBIMINAL ACTIONS IN THE SUPREME COURT, INCLUDING THOSE 
DECIDED DURING THE YEAR AND THOSE NOW PENDING. 

The State vs. Angus McDonald et al. ; indictment, riot ; 
certified from Goodhue Co. Demurrer to indictment sus* 
tained. 

The State vs. P. Autibies ; indicted for assault with intent 
to do great bodily harm. Appeal abandoned. 

The State vs. Michael Welch. Appeal from Washington 
county ; indicted for voting more than once at the same elec- 



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4 ANNUAL KBPOBT. 

tion and convicted. Judgment and order appealed from 
affirmed. 

The State vs. John Smith. Appeal from Blue Earth 
county; indictment, assault with intent to commit rape. 
Order denying new trial reversed and new trial awarded. 

The State vs. Otis 0. Jones. Appeal from District 
Court, .Winona county. Appeal dismissed. 

The State vs. William Beckards. Appeal from judgment 
in Court of Common Pleas, Hennepin Co. Judgment in 
Court below affirmed. 

The State vs. John Vadnais. Assault with intent to coqh 
mit rape ; appeal from judgment in District Court, Sher- 
burne county. Pending. 

The State vs. Thomas New. Indictment, larceny. Ap. 
peal from judgment in District Court, Hennepin county, and 
pending. 

The State vs. Emil Munch. Two indictments tor em- 
bezzlement; certified from District Court, Ramsey Co. 
Argued and pending. 

The State vs. H. H. Kent. Indictment, embezzlement ; 
appeal from District Court, Ramsey county, denying motion 
for new trial. Argued and pending. 

The State vs. Martin Ludwig. Appeal from District 
Court of Hennepin county. Argued and pending. 

The State vs. Charles Ehrig. Appeal from District Court, 
Hennepin county. Pending. 

The State vs. Henry L. Bliss. Appeal from judgment in 
District Court, Wright county. Pending. 

The State vs. J. Frederick Swanson. Convicted of man- 
slaughter in second degree ; error from Nicollet county. 
Pending. 

The State vs. Frederick Gummel. Convicted of assault ; 
error from Brown county. Argued and pending. 



I have by request assisted in the prosecution of Justice 
A. Wilson, indicted for manslaughter in the second degree, in 

/Google 



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ATTOBNXY GBNBBAL. 5 

Crow Wing county, who was tried at a special term in 
January last, and found not guilty. Also, in the prosecu* 
tion af Oliver Potter, who/was indicted in Mower county a 
number of years ago for the murder of Chauncy Knapp. 
He was tried at a special term of the District Court in Fill- 
more county in June last. The jury disagreed and case was 
continued. 

Also, in the prosecution of Henry Moonen, indicted in 
the District Court of Steams county, for murder in the first 
degree. Plea of self-defence. Verdict of not guilty. 

Two indictments for murder in the first degree were found 
against Patrick Sullivan by the grand jury of Clay county 
in May last. I was present by request ol the County 
Attorney to assist in the prosecution. On motion of the 
defendant's counsel, the cases were continued until a special 
term in July. In the meantime the prisoner exhibited 
symptoms of insanity. At the July term a jury was im- 
panneled and a preliminary examination had, touching the 
priBoner's competency to make a defense, and was found by 
the jury not to be competent. On the 20th of August last, 
he-was taken to the Asylum at SU Peter, where he still 
remains. 



The following civil cases, arising under the new tax law, 
are now pending in the Supreme Court : 

The State of Minnesota vs. Ihe Southern Minnesota 
SaUroad Company. This case arose in Olmsted county. 
The Court directed (jn-o forma) Judgment against the com- 
pany, but considering the case of great public importance, 
and the questions involved likely to arise frequently* upon 
application of defendant, made a brief statement of facts and 
transmitted the same to the Supreme Court. Case argued 
and now pending. 

The State vs. The Winona and St. Peter Railroad Com- 
fony. (Two cases.) Tax cases, arising in Bedwood and 
Ljon counties. Judgment in both cases against the State ; 



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6 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

but upon application of the county attorneys, a statement 
of the tacts was made in each case and transmitted to the 
Supreme Court, by the Judge of that district. Argued and 
pending. 

The State ve. D. Morrison. Taxation of lands. Certi- 
fied up ^rom Mille Lacs coiinty by the Judge of that Dis- 
trict. Pending. • 

CIVIL ACTIONS PENDING IN DISTRICT COURTS. 

The State vs. Henry Toung, et al; Sibley county. This 
case was begun by my predecessor in this office. Suit was 
brought upon the bond of Henry Young, treasurer of Sibley 
county, to recover the amount due the State from Young as 
treasurer of that county, as shown by the settlement sheets 
transmitted to the State Auditor by the auditor of Sibley 
county. Upon trial of the case, the State was unable to 
show by competent and satisfactory proof any settlements 
between the auditor and treasurer ol that county during 
the year 1873, that being the period covered by the com- 
plaint. The case was therefore discontinued, and another 
suit brought at once upon the Treasurer's bond to recover 
the amount collected and received by the defendant Young 
as Treasurer of Sibley county, for the ^ State, and not ac- 
counted for or paid over to the State authorities. In this 
suit a motion was* made to set aside and dismiss the com- 
plaint, on the ground that it did not conform to the sum- 
mons. The motion was denied by the Court, and an appeal 
taken to the Supreme Court, manifestly for delay, as there 
was no merit in the motion. 

The St. Paul & Chicago Railway Company vs. Charles 
T. Brown et al. , Trustees of the Hospital for Insane^ and 
Cushman K. Davis^ Governor. This action is now pend- 
ing in the District Court for Ramsey county, and is brought 
for the purpose of having the plaintiff adjudged to be the 
owner in fee simple of some twenty thousand acres of swamp 
land, heretofore selected and set apart for the use of the 
Hospital for the Insane by the Commissioner of the State 

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ATTOBNBT aONBSAL. * 

Land Office, under the act of the Legislature, approved 
May 13, 1865. 

2 he State of Minnesota V8. A. Gutter and T. Reardon. 
This action was brought upcn a bill of exchange drawn by 
defendant Cutter upon defendant Beardon, in favor of 
Charles Mcllrath, State Auditor. Date Nov. 19, 1870. 
Amount $500. Issue joined and pending in Ramsey County 
District Court. 

The State vs. the Winona & 8t. Peter Railroad Cgmpany. 
This action is brought by direction of the Senate of last 
winter, to recover $58,674, claimed to be due the State * 
from the company upon its gross earnings over and above 
the amount paid to the State from 1865 to 1873, inclusive. 
Issue joined, and action pending in District Court for Ram- 
sey county. 

On the 25th day of August last I obtained judgment in 
the District Court, Ramsey county, in favor of the State 
and against the Anoka Lumber Company, upon a stumpage 
note for $764.75. Execution i&sued to the Sheriff of Anoka 
county. No return. 

"On July 1, 1874, 1 obtained judgment in the same court 
against William H.' Brown and William Brockway, in favor 
of the State, upon stumpage notes for $1,443. Execution 
issued to the sheriff of Hennepin county. No return. 

On November 11, 1874, I obtained judgment in the same 
court upon stumpage notes, against Crooker Bros. & Lam- 
oreaux, and in favor of the State, for $5,364.95, and against 
Crooker Bros. & Lamoreaux and R. J. Mendenhall for 
$566.75. Executions issued to sheriff of Hennepin county. 
No return. 

Suit is now pending in the District Court, Ramsey county, 
against F. P. Clark, and in favor of the State, for $2,500, 
the value of a large number of pine trees cut by Clark 
without permit upon school lands belonging to the State, in 
the winter of 1870 and 1871. 

Pursuant to the instructions of the Legislature of last 
winter, I have brought suit in the Ramsey County District 
Court against the^ First Division of the Saint Paul and 

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8 ANNUAL BEPORT. 

Pacific Railroad Company, to have its charter declared for. 
feited and the corporation dissolved, on account of the 
abuses and usurpations set forth in the joint resolution of 
the last session. This case will be argued at this term of 
the District Court. 

The State va. Munch Bros. <& Co. This is an action upon 
a promissory note given by the defendants to the State 
Treaurer, December 1st, 1872, for three thousand eight 
hundred and niilety-six 82 100 dollars, and is now pending 
in the District Court for Ramsey Cpunty. 

The State vs. Charles McMrath. In this gase suit was 
brought in accordance with the instru^^^tions of your Excel- 
lency to recover the sum of ninety-four thousand six hundred 
and forty-one 69-100 dollars, moneys alleged to have been 
received by the defendant while Auditor of the State of 
Minnesota, and n^ver accounted for, nor paid over to the 
State. In view of the complicated character of the case, 
the amount ot money involved and the great responsibility 
attaching to the prosecution of such a case, I thought it pru- 
dei^t, in fact indispensable, that I should have an associate 
counsel, and accordingly retained the Hon. William Loch- 
ren, of Minneapolis. Inasmuch as a groat many witnesses 
will have to be subpoenaed on the part of the State, and 
costs incurred to a large^amount, I would suggest that your 
Excellency request the Legislature to make a suitable appro- 
priation to meet these expenses, as well as to liberally com- 
pensate the associate counsel. The preparation and trial of 
this case will require months of continuous labor, and hence 
the propriety of my request. 

TITLE TO TH£ STATE FBI80N GROUNDS. 

The Senate Committee on the State Prison at the last 
session of the Legislature reported the title to the State 
prison grounds to be in a very unsatisfactory condition, and 
the Senate accordingly directed me to take the necessary 
steps to perfect the title to the same. I first procured a 
complete abstract of all the pieces within the enclosure and 



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ATTOitNBT GBNSRAL. 



9 



found the apprehensions of the bommittee to be well 
founded. With the assistance and co-operation of Judge 
Butts, chairman of the Board of Inspectors, and A. M. Dodd, 
the Eegister of Deeds of Washington count jr, several deeds 
were procured, and the missing links in the chain of title 
supplied. I am quite well assured that the title to the 
grounds now occupied by the State is perfect. Legislation 
was had at the last session having in view the enlargement 
of the State prison grounds by the condemnation of a strip 
on the north and west of the present grounds, but inasmuch 
as the appropriation for that purpose was considered insuf- 
ficient, it was thought advisable not to move in the matter. 

SBTTLEBS ON LANDS CLAIMED BY THE N. P. B. B. CO, 

t 

I hereto append a communication from Mesers. Moore & 
Eerr, Attorneys of this city which explains itself: 

Eon. Oeo. P. Wilson^ Attorney General of Minnesota: 

Sib — We have the honor to report, that in conjunction 
with Messrs. Erwin & Pierce, of this city, we were, in the 
month of April, 1874, employed by His Excellency the 
Governor of Minnesota, under and pursuant to Chap. CVII 
of the general laws ot 1874, to assist yourself as Attorney 
General of the State, in determining and protecting the 
rights and property of settlers in and to lands in this State 
claimed adversely by the Northern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany under its land grant. 

We took immediate action in the premises, and procured 
from the United States Land offices at Detroit and Alex- 
andria, Minnesota, lists of all the lands claimed adversely to 
settlers by the said railroad company, date and character ot 
settlement and of contest in respect thereto, and all the 
facts appearing of record as to each tract contested. 

We also procured from the general land office, at Wash- 
ington, D. C, all the facts of record there, in respect to the 
land so claimed, including the rulings of the department. 

We then procured from the local land offices, having 
jurisdiction over the territory covered by the land-grant of 
said railroad company, maps, showing the different filings 
2 

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10 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

of the company y and the specifio tracts of land embraced in 
each. 

From these data we were enable to compute that there 
were twenty-four pre-emption claims of land upon odd num- 
bered sections, and four hundred and two claims upon even 
sections, besides one cash entry of about one thousand acres, 
which were made after the filng by said railroad company 
of a plat showing the general route of the road, but before 
said road was definitely located in the field, or the plat ot 
such location filed. 

The company denies that its grant became operative and 
that lands covered thereby were withdrawn from market, 
immediately upon the filing of the map or plat of the gen- 
eral route of the road, to-wit : August 13th, 1870. 

We, on the contrary, claim that the lands remained open 
to settlement and pre-emption, and that no rights of the 
company, under its charter, attached thereto, until the 
definite location of the road upon the ground, and the filing 
of the plat of such location, to-wit : November 21st, 1871. 

Herein lies the whole controversy. 

The Secretary of the Interior, on appeal from a ruling of 
the Commissioner of the general land office, in favor of the 
settlers, sustained the view of the railroad company, which 
resulted in the cancellation of all the entries upon odd sec 
tions, and in raising the price for all land upon even sections, 
from $1.25 to $2.50 per acre. 

The four hundred settlers upon these even sections, between 
13th Aug., 1870, and 21st Nov., 1871, representing sixty 
thousand acres of land, had paid the minimum price of $1.25 
per acre and were each entitled to his patent, but the effect 
of the ruliijg of the Secretary of the Interior, referred ro, 
was to raise the price of all this land to $2.50 per acre, 
dating back to the time when said map of the general route 
of said railroad was filed, and as a consequence these four 
hundred settlers are now required by the G-overnment to pay 
in the aggregate about eighty thousand dollars in addition to 
the bame amount already paid. 

Their contest being directly with the Interior Department 
of the Government, and not with the railroad company, they 
are remidiless in the courts, (and we would here remark that 
the bill introduced by our representatives in Congress, at 
the last session, tor the benefit of settlers along the line of 
this railroad, did not reach the case of these settlers, and 
afforded them no lelief whatever. The law in question 
simply applied to the few settlers on odd sections, whose 
remedy was already ample in the courts.) 



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ATTOBNBT GBNSBAIi. 11 

These settlers upon even sections comprise by far the largest 
class, whose rights we were employed to protect. There is 
DO tribunal in the land where these rights can be enforced, 
but we propose to furnish them a complete and adequate 
remedy, by estfiblishing, in the actions brought for settlers 
on odd sections^ a principle which the Interior, and other 
Departments of the Government, will be compelled to recog- 
nize ; namely, that the rights of a railroad company to landf 
under such a charter as that oj the Northern Pacific Company 
do notf and cannot attach to any particular tract until the 
line of the road is definitely located. 

It we secure a decision from the highest tribunal in the 
land, where these cases will doubtless go, that under this land 
grants the lands were not vnthdrawn from market, until the 
line was definitely located, the Departments of the Govern- 
ment must, of course, recognize the same principle as 
governing the entries of land' on even sections, within the 
limits oJ the same grants and the ruling which requires 
settlers on even sections, to pay the additional $1.25 per acre, 
will accordingly be abrogated. 

We have brought, in the United States Circuit Court, for 
the District of Minnesota, an action, in which the heirs of 
Edward Schreiber, deceased, non-residents, are plaintiffs, and 
the Northern Pacific Railroad Company is defendant, wherein 
is involved a cash entry ot about one thousand acres of land 
made shortly after the filing of the map of general route, 
and before there was any location of the line of the road, 
which entry was cancelled by the Interior Department, and 
a patent for the land issued to the railroad company. 

This is perhaps the best test case we have, and was com- 
menced for that purpose. It is now pending on demurrer 
to the plaintiffs bill, and will be argued at the term of said 
court, to be held this month. 

Should a decision be rendered before the meeting of the 
Legislature, we will make a supplemental report and em- 
body the same. 

We have also brought in the State Courts the following 
actions, all of which are pendins: on demurrers to the com- 
plaints, which will be argued, after the hearing in said case 
in the U. S. Circuit Court, to wit : 

In the Dist. Court of Becker County ; John O. French 
vs. N. P. R. R. Co. 

In the Dist. Court of Otter Tail County ; Frank Meyers 
vs. N. P. R. R. Co. 

In the Common Pleas Court of Ramsey County ; Nels. A. 
Hage vs. N. P. R. R. Co. 

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12 A^NUAIi BBFOBT. 

RasimuB Hage vs. same. 
Henry Henderson vs. same. 

We have endeavored, in these cases, to present all the 
phases of the contest between settlers and said company, 
that can arise. * 

Respectfully submitted, 

MooRB & Kerb. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Your ob't servant, 

Geo. p. Wilson, 

Attorney General. 



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EXECUTIVE DOCUMENT, No. 6. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



ADJUTANT GENERAL, 



STATE CLAIM AGENT, 



AND 



BOAKD OF TRUSTEES OF THE SOLDIERS' ORPHANS, 



OF THE STATE OF MINNESOTA, 



rOB THI 



FISCAL TEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 80, 1874. 



TBAHSmTTSD TO THE LEGISLATUBE OF THE SEYENTEENTH AKNTTAL 
BE88I0N, 1875. 



SAINT PAUL: 

PIONBEB COMPANY PKINT. 

1876. 



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General Headquarters, 

State of Minnesota, 
Adjutant General's Opeioe, 
St. Paul, November 30th, 1874. 

His Excellency Cuehman K. Davie^ 

Governor of the State of Minnesota. 

Sib : — Pursuant to law, I have the honor to transmit 
herewith the annual report of the Adjutant General's De- 
partment, together with a full exhibit of the transactions 
of the State Claim Agency for the year 1874. 

I am respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

MARK D. FLOWER. 

Adjutant General. 



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REPORT. 



€^overnor : 

I have the honor to submit the following report of this 
Department for the fiscal year ending November 30th, 
1874. 

There is very litle variation in the business routine of 
this office from year to year. Our records show an in- 
crease of claims from last year. 

NATIONAL GUARD. 

Owing to the determination of the Legislature to withhold 
its countenance from the movement, our militia is not as 
flourishing as it would be otherwise. A report from A. 
Richardson, Keeper of State Arsenal, will show the receipts 
and distribution of arms and munitions of war. 

SOLBIEBS MONUMBNT. 

In my last year's report I gave a description of the monu- 
ment erected at Fort Kidgely to the memory of the offi- 
cers and men who fell in battle and were buried at that 
spot 

The monument is completed and placed in position 
near said Fort according to contract. 

0RPHA58. 

• * 

The report of the Board of Trustees of Soldiers' Orphans, 
of which I am ex-officio a member, is transmitted in a sep- 



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6 ANNUAL REPORT. 

arate document and will be found of interest as setting 
forth the workings and management of that noble State 
Institution, the Soldiers' Orphan Home. 

SOLDIERS BOUNTIBS AND PENSIONS. 

For the information of many who are entitled to relief 
from the government, but do not understand the modus 
opernndi^ I append an oflScial copy of rules of the Pension 
and Bounty Bureau's at Washington, D. C, trusting that it 
may be the means of assisting many deserving soldiers, 
their widows, or heirs in obtaining their dues from the 
United States government which, for want of information, 
they might lose. 

ORieiNAL BOUNTIES. 

Bounties will be invariably paid to any soldier discharged 
for wounds received in the line of duty^ and to soldiers 
duly enlisted and mustered into the United States service 
between May 3d, 1861, and July 22d, 1861, and to no other 
soldier except those who served two years and were hon- 
orably discharged from the U. S. service. All men who 
enlisted in old organizations from October 24th, 1863, to 
April 1st, 1864, and received honorable discharges, are en- 
titled to $300 bounty ; all men who enlisted in new organ- 
izations from December 21st, 1868, to April 1st, 1864, $300 
bounty ; all veterans^ enlisting as such prior to April 1st, 
1864, are entitled to f400 bounty ; all men who enlisted 
after the 18th day of July, 1864, for one year, and who 
served full terms are entitled to $100 ; all men who en- 
listed after July 18th, 1864, for two years, and served full 
terms are entitled to $200 ; all men who enlisted after 
July 18th, 1864, for three years, and served full terms are 
entitled to 9300; all soldiers discharged by reason of 
wounds received in battle or in the line of duty, and all 
volunteers (excepting those enlisting after July 18th, 1864,) 
discharged in consequence of the close of the war, are en- 
titled to the same bounty as if they had served out their 
full terms of service ; but if discharged for disability other 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL, 7 

than wounds, as heretofore stated, they are entitled to the 
matured installment only^ but if the disability existed 
prior to enlistment, all unpaid installments and the $25 
advanced at enlistment, are forfeited. If honorably dis- 
charged for any cause other than above enumerated, within 
two years, they are entitled only to the matured install- 
ments. This only relates to the six months' .men who en- 
listed under the call of the President, in 1862, for 500,000 
men. 

There is no bounty allowable for enlistment in the Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps. All the foregoing are paid to the 
heirs of deceased soldiers in the following order, viz.: 

widow, children, father, mother, brother and sisters. 

I 

^ ADDITIONAL BOUNTY. 

The Equalization Act, passed July 28th, 1866, provides 
that all who enlisted after April 16th, 1861, for a period of 
not less than three years, served the term of their enlist- 
ment, and were honorably discharged, and who have re- 
ceived, or are entitled to receive under existing laws, $100 
bounty and no more, and all enlisted for not less than 
three years who have been honorably discharged on ac- 
count of wounds received in line of duty, and the widow, 
parents, or minor children, in the order heretofore named, 
of any soldier who died in the service, or of disease or 
wounds contracted while in the service, shall be paid an 
additional bounty of $100. 

The second section of this Act provides that men who 
enlisted for a period of not less than two years, and who 
have served two years, or been discharged on account of 
wounds, shall be paid an additional bounty of ^50, to be 
paid to the heirs in the same order as hereinbefore stated. 

PERSONS ENTITLED TO PENSION. 

The following classes are entitled to pensions : 

Ist. All soldiers. Provost Marshals, Deputy Provost Mar- 
shals, enrolling officers, commissioned and non-commis- 

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8 ANNUAL REPORT. 

sioned officers, or persons directly in the service of the 
United States who were disabled while in the j^erformance 
of duty, whether regular volunteers or militia. 

2d. All widows of such. 

3d. All minor children, (under 16 years of age,) when 
the widow is dead or re-married. 

4th. All mothers who were dependent in whole or in 
part upon such son for support, where no widow or minor 
children are living. 

5th. All fathers who were dependent upon such a son 
for support, where there is no widow, minor children or 
mother living. 

6th. All orphan brothers or sisters (under sixteen years 
of age,) who were dependent, in whole or in part, upon 
such soldier, where there is no surviving widow or chil- 
dren. 

RATES OF PENSION. 

Non-commissioned officers and privates, including all 
persons of like grades, whether in the Army, Navy, or 
Marine corps, for total disability, $8.00 per month. Past 
Midshipmen, Midshipmen, Captains' and Paymasters' 
clerks, 2d and 3d Assistant Engineers, Master Mates and 
all warrant officers $10.00 per month. Second Lieutenants 
and Enrolling officers in the army, and 1st Engineers and 
Pilots in the navy, $16.00 per month. First Lieutenants, 
deputy Provost Marshals, Regimental Quartermasters, 
Assistant Surgeons, acting assistant or contract Surgeons, 
$17.00 per month. Captains, Provost Marshals, Chaplains, 
Commissaries, and Assistant Quartermasters in the Army 
and Professors of Mathematics, Masters, Assistant Surgeons, 
Assistant Paymasters, and Chaplains in the navy, $20.00 
per month. Majors and Surgeons in the army, and Lieu- 
tenants, Surgeons, Chief Engineers, Paymasters, (respec- 
tively ranking with Lieutenants by law,) and Past Sur- 
geons in the navy, $25.00 per month. 

Lieutenant Colonels and all officers of a higher rank in 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL. 9 

the army, and Captains, Oommanders, Surgeons, Paymas- 
ters, Ohief Engineers, (and respectively ranking with Oom- 
mander by law,) and lieutenants commanding in the 
navy, $30.00 per month. 

By the Act approved March Srd, 1873, pensions previous- 
ly granted for loss of both feet, or both eyes, or both hands, 
or permanent or total disability rendering pensioner utter- 
ly helpless, or so nearly so as to require the regular per- 
sonal aid and attendance of another person, were increased 
to $31.25 per month. 

All persons who under like circumstances shall have lost 
one hand and one foot, or been totally or permanently dis- 
abled in the same, or otherwise so disabled as to be inca- 
pacitated for performing any manual labor, but not so 
much as to require personal aid and attendance, shall be 
entitled to $24.00 per month, and all persons who «hall 
have lost one hand, or one foot, or been permanently dis- 
abled in the same, or otherwise so disabled as to incapaci- 
tate them from performing manual labor, equivalent to 
the loss of a hand or foot, shall be entitled to a pension of 
$18 per month. 

Persons having lost one leg above the knee, and in con- 
sequence thereof so disabled as to prevent the use of arti- 
ficial limbs, shall be rated second class, and receive $24.00 
per month. 

Persons having lost the hearing of both ears are entitled 
to a pension of $13.00 per month. 

Any person embraced within the provisions of the fore- 
going statements having died since the 4th day of March, 
1861, or shall hereafter die by reason of wounds, injury or 
disease which, under the provisions of law, would have en- 
titled him to an invalid pension, his widow, or if there be 
no widow, or in case of her death, without payment to her^ 
of any part of the pension hereinafter mentioned, her child 
or children under sixteen years of age, shall be entitled to 
receive the same pension as the husband or father would 
have been entitled to had he been totally disabled, to com- 
mence from the death of the husband or father, to continue 
to the widow during her widowhood, and to his child or 

2 . Digitized by Google 



10 ANNUAL REPORT. 

children until they attain severally the age of sixteen years, 
and no longer, and if the widow re-marry, the child or child- 
ren shall be entitled from the date of re-marriage. 

Under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 
March 8d, 1873, any person, not regularly mustered, but 
serving temporarily with any volunteer or regular company 
or acting with the militia of any State, who volunteered for 
the time being to serve in any engagement against rebels 
or Indians, and was disabled in consequence of said service, 
shall, upon due proof in conformity with law, be placed 
upon the pension rolls, and be entitled to receive the same 
pension as though in actual service. Provided^ that no 
claim for such service shall be allowed unless prosecuted 
to a successful issue prior to the 4th day of July, 1 874. 

This is important information to residents of Minnesota 
having claims arising from or in cpnsequence of our late 
Indian wars. 

Widows of Revolutionary soldiers and sailors, and sold- 
iers and sailors of the war of 1812 and their widows, are 
entitled to pension simply by reason of the service, with- 
out conditions. 

In the prosecution of claims before any of the govern- 
mental departments, the following imperative rules must 
be observed : 

Names must in all cases be signed infull^ and care tak- 
en to affix signatures to proper places. 

, Two persons, disinterested, who can write^ must sign their 
names in full, as witnesses. 

All writing in vouchers or receipts must be with black 
ink. 

If erasures or alterations are made, the same must be not- 
ed in the margin over the signature of the attesting officer. 

In all cases, if possible, original declarations for pensions, 
bounties, arrears of pay, &c., Ac, should be attested by a 
clerk of a court of record or some officer having custody of 
his seal. 

The following statement showing the annual amount of 
money paid by our own and foreign governments for civil 
and military pensions, though not properly pertaining to 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL. 11 

this report, is of such general interest, as evidence of the 
liberality and public spirit of our people, that I venture to 
insert it in this report. 

United Stated of America^ - $39,169,314 

German Empire, .... 7,866,06iS 

Austro-Hungarian Monarchy - 14,648,710 

Denmark, 1,006,941 

Spain, 8,238,820 

France, ..... 10,900,000 

Greece, 660,060 

Russia 18,127,266 

Sweden 413,424 

Italy 1,140,000 

Turkey 2,666,592 

Great Britain 24,087,925 

Switzerland ..... 21,928 

Egypt 1,227,734 

Brazil 868,677 

The total amount of land for which warrants have been 
issued for military service up to Nov. 1873, is 74,052,811 
acres. 

The tables following give a detailed exhibit of the trans- 
actions of the Claim Bureau, from January, 1866, when es- 
tablished, to Nov. 80th, 1873. 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OF TUK 



SOLDIERS' ORPHANS, 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 



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MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 



HENRY G. HICKS, Minneapolis. 

HENRY A. CASTLE, St. Paul. 

ARA BARTON, Northfield. 

0. B. GOULD, Winona. 

MARK D. FLOWER, ex-off., St. Paul, 

J. E. WEST, St. Cloud. 

R. D. BARBER, Worthington. 

E. L. BAKER, Red Wing. 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 



To 3ts Excellency C. K. Davisj Governor of Minnesota : 

Sir : — ^The Board of Trustees of Soldiers' Orphans' in com- 
pliance with the statute, respectfully submit the following 
report of their transactions during the fiscal year ending 
November 30th, 1874. 

The work of the Board is divided into twojdepartments 
— (1) that of maintaining the Soldiers' Orphans' Home at 
Winona, and — (2) that of afibrding temporary relief in ex- 
treme cases, to children of deceased soldiers, residing in 
various parts of the State. 

The organization of the Orphans* Home being on a dif- 
ferent plan from that of other State Institutions, it may be 
well to explain it, although previous reports of this Board 
have given full statements of the matter from time to time. 
The law providing for the placing of the orphans under 
charge of the Board, in a Soldiers' Orphans' Home limited 
the expenditure for rent, food, clothing, education, medical 
attendance, etc., to four dollars per week for each child. 
In order that this restriction might be complied with it was 
evidently necessary that local benevolence should supple- 

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22 ANNUAL REPORT. 

ment the benefactions of the State. If any other Institu- 
tion of this or neighboring States has been able to complete- 
ly and comfortably support and educate its inmates on 
this allowance, even with the buildings furnished, rent free, 
the fact has not yet been reported. Accordingly the chari- 
table and patriotic citizens of Winona formed a local asso- 
ciation and through its board of directors, composed in part 
. of ladies, assumed the labor and responsibility of managing 
the Home. A large and handsome building erected by 
private enterprise, has been rented by this local board, the 
rent being guaranteed by the State to the owner, for the 
term of six years from December 1, 1872, by virtue of a 
special enactment of the Legislature. This building is sup- 
plied throughout with every convenience for the comfort 
and accommodation of its inmates. The Treasurer of the lo- 
cal board receives, from the State Board of Trustees, month- 
ly rolls giving the name, each child, the allowance of four 
dollars per week for each. This sum is expended in paying 
rents, and wages of help, buying provisions, fuel, lights, 
clothing, books, medicines and all necessary articles for the 
children, all of whom attend the model or normal depart- 
ments of the First State Normal School near which Institu- 
tion the Home is located. Their maintenance, government 
and education are conducted under the strict supervision 
of the State Board of Trustees, which meets semi-annually 
at Winona, and one member of which makes an inspection 
without notice, of the Home and School, every month. It 
is a grateful duty on the part of the State Board to acknow- 
ledge the zeal, fidelity, intelligence and care with which 
the arduous task imposed on the managers of the local board 
is performed. The moral, physical and mental require- 
ments of the Soldiers' Orphans are met with a sympathet- 
ic care, which shows that the hearts of the managers are 
enlisted in the work. Their religious training is remitted 
to the churches and Sunday schools chosen for them by 
their guardians, or their mothers if living. Their clothing 
is neat, substantial, comfortable and always presentable. 
Their food is simple but wholesome in quality and plentiful 
in quantity. In cases of sickness they have the most skill- 
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ADJUTANT GENERAL. 23 

ful medical attendants. The discipline of the Home is ad- 
mirable-^firm, yet kindly and parental ; all social refine- 
ments and graces are studiously cultivated, and the child- 
ren are credited throughout tlie community with being at 
least equal in good copduct and good manners, to the aver- 
age of the best trained families. Their education is pro- 
gressing under the most favorable auspices, the model and 
normal classes in which they ure placed aft'ording the very 
best facilities for systematic and thorough culture in all 
necessary branches, and the orphans standing above the 
average in these classes. Thus, through the kind assistance 
and under the sympathetic guidance, of the directors and 
oflScers of the local board, the matron and assistant matron 
of the Home, the surgeon of the Home, and the principal 
and teachers of the Normal School, (and we may add, 
through the co-operation of the children themselves, a ma- 
jority of whom are now old^enough to appreciate the lii^er- 
ality of the State, and to realize their obligations to make 
the most of their advantages) these wards of the nation, 
bequeathed to our care by fathers who died battling for the 
nation's life, who had otherwise through neglect and pov- 
erty been doomed in many^cases to lives of ignorance and 
vice, are being trained for careers of usefulness, and being 
developed into a refined, cultivated and virtuous manhood 
and womanhood. It is a noble w^ork : and now that the 
older inmates are being rapidly discharged, and placed in 
situations where they will be self-sustaining, the end is 
coming into view ; those who have been engaged in it from 
the commencement, begin to see the fruit of their labors ; 
and the State is beginning to reap the benefits in the in- 
creased capacity and character of these future citizens, aside 
from the satisfaction of having discharged a sacred duty, 
which will repay its expenditures a hundred fold. 

The reports of the Superintendent of the Home, the 
Surgeon of the Home, and the Principal of the First State 
Normal School, are herewith transmitted. They give in de- 
tail the workings of the institution. From the report of 
the Superintendent it will be seen that nineteen of the 
orphans have been discharged during the past year. A 

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24 . ANNUAL REPORT. 

part of these have returned to their mothers, whose 
changed circumstances have enabled them to resume their 
support. The remainder have been placed in positions 
where they have become nearly or quite self-sustaining, 
and are at the same time acquiring a knowledge of some 
useful avocation. It will also be seen that there have 
been twenty admissions. These occurred, however, mostly 
in the early part of the year, and many of them were cases 
which had applied the previous year, and were awaiting 
the completion of the building. Latterly the number of 
applications has perceptibly diminished, and it may be 
safely assumed that the turning point has been reached. 
Henceforth the number of discharges will no doubt stead- 
ily and increasingly exceed the number of admissions, 
until the final closing of the institution, four or five years 
hence. 

The other branch of the work of the Board, as permitted 
by law, that of outside relief, has been continued as in 
previous j'^ears. Great care is taken that, the recipients of 
this relief shall be worthy of it, and the disbursements are 
made under the eye of a member of the Board for articles 
of food and clothing actually furnished, and the money is 
paid only to the merchants furnishing the goods on de- 
tailed invoices, certified by the resident member and ap- 
proved by the Executive Committee. The aggregate of 
these disbursements will be found below. 

In compliance with the Act, approved March 9th, 1874, 
the Board has caused to be prepared a design for a certifi- 
cate of discharge from the Home, which is now in the en- 
graver's hands. Its cost will be small, but it will prove a 
strong incentive to good conduct on the part of the in- 
mates of the Institution, and will be treasured by them in 
after years as a valued testimonial of their good conduct, and 
serve as a constant reminder of their duty to the State. 

The only other expenditure of the Board, that of travel- 
ing expenses of its members incurred in the performance 
of their oflScial duties, is also given below. Their services 
are gratuitous, and it is believed that this expense bill is 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL. 25 

not larger than is required for an efficient discharge of the 
trust devolved upon them. 

The following exhibit shows the amount and purposes of 
the expenditures of the Board during thoi fiscal year end- 
ing November 30th, 1874. (It will also be noticed that the 
fiscal year of the Home, as embraced in the Report of the 
Superintendent, ends September 30th, 1874) : 

December, 1873, Vouchers, Orphans' Home, 

Winona .... $1,554.64 

January, 1874, .... 1,705.55 

February, 1874 .... 1,545.16 

March, 1874, - - - 1,687.83 

April, 1874, .... 1,770.29 

May, 1874, - - - - 1,682.09 

June, 1874, .... 1,544.34 

July, 1874, .... 1,595.66 

August, 1874 .... 1,554.25 

September, 1874 - - - 1,510.62 

October, 1874 .... 1,577.94 

November, 1874 - - - 1,565.78 

19,284.15 
Special aid to orphans residing with widowed 

mothers - - - * - 427.52 

For design of certificate of discharge - 30.00 

Expenses of members of the Board, attending 

meetings, and inspections of the Home 282.90 

Total . $20,024.57 

The Board estimates its necessary expenditures for the 
ensuing year at eighteen thousand dollars, (a reduction of 
two thousand dollars from last year's appropriation), and 
respectfully asks of the Legislature an appropriation for 
that amount, 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY G. HICKS, 

President, 
MARK D. FLOWER, 

Secretary. 



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26 ANNUAL REPORT. 



REPORT OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF THE HOME. 



Winona, Minn., Sept. 30lh, 1874. 

« 
To the State Board of Trustees of Soldiers' Orphans, 

Gentlemen : — At the close of another year of successful 
operation, " The Soldiers' Orphans' Home of Minnesota," 
submits its Fourth Annual Report. 

Last year we entered somewhat fully into the details of 
the "Home" and its management, which being essentially 
the same at this time need not be repeated. 

The number of children in the institution, Sept. 30th, 
1873, was eighty-five. There has since been admitted 
twenty, making a total of one hundred and five, of whom 
nineteen have been discharged, and one is absent without 
leave, the present number being eighty-five. Of this num- 
ber forty- two are boys and forty-three girls. 

A few of those now here have nearly attained the age 
limited by law for their maintenance in this institution, 
and they, together with some others who will have become 
capable of self-support, will probably leave before the 
close of the present year, so that the number in the 
"Home" will be somewhat reduced by a year from this 
date. It is hardly to be expected that as many will enter 
this year as last. 

The children are in good health, and well provided for 
in respect to all temporal, moral and educational needs. 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL. 27 

For particulars as to their health, and the sanitary condi-. 
tion of the institution, I would respectfully refer you to 
the accompanying report of Dr. J. B. McGaughey, the 
faithful and very eflScient physician of the HoDae. 

The children continue to receive instruction gratuitously, 
or substantially so, in the several departments of the First 
State Normal School, through the kindness and liberality 
of whose officers, their education has thus far so favorably 
advanced. They are now dispersed through all the de- 
partments, from highest to lowest, of that institution, and 
are making commendable progress. For particulars in 
this respect I beg to refer you to the accompanying 
report of our Superintendent of Instruction, Prof. W. F. 
Phelps, to whom, with his valuable corps of assistants, 
these little ones are greatly indebted. 

Mrs. L. D. Eempton still presides as matron, and with 
entire satisfaction, being both faithful to the welfare of the 
children, and successful in their management. Mrs. M. A. 
Glayhorn remains as assistant matron, and discharges well 
her duties in that relation. The care, control, and man- 
agement of a family of eighty -five children, of vy /ious ages, 
temperaments and conditions, so that confusion and dis- 
order do not follow, requires executive ability of a high 
order. 

The expenditures for the year, classified as nearly as 
may be, are as follows : 

Food ..... $3,204.49 

Dry goods, hats, shoes, &c., - - 2,990.55 

Employees .... 2,497.13 

Rent . . - - . 1,800.00 

Improvements and repairs - - 706.68 

Normal school - - - 602.00 

Fuel 592.31 

Sewing ... - 575.07 

Furniture - - - - 556.95 

Books, stationery, Ac, - - 394.06 

R. R. fare .... 274.85 

Boarding .... 166.05 



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28 A53rrAL eefokt. 

Drnfcn. medicines. Ac - - - 159.40 

Gas . . ^ . . 99.60 

Insarance . . . . 37.50 

Undasisified items - - - S44.06 



Total $15,500.70 

There are al»o probably about fifteen hundred dollars of 
accountB outstanding against the Home, which we are pre- 
pared to meet as fast as they are presented and audited. The 
above does not include any moneys paid through the Home 
Association for children residing with widowed mothers. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

O. B. GOULD, 

Superintendent of the Home, and Secretary of the 
Local Board. 



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ADJUTANT GENERAL. 29 

REPORT OF THE 

SURGEON OF THE HOME. 



2o the President and Board of Directors of the Soldiers^ 
Orphans^ Home^ at Winona^ Minn.: 

During the year that has jnst closed sickness has been 
almost unknown to the inmates of this institution. Within 
the period embraced in this report there has not been a 
single case of serious acute disease in the Home, and but 
little of any kind with the exception of an epidemic 
of acute opthalmia of a contagious nature which appeared 
early in November, 1873, since which time there have 
been thirty-seven cases — the large majority of which have 
recovered — the few remaining are now convalescent. 
There is every reason to believe that trouble from this 
source is no longer to be apprehended. 

During the month of March, 1874, there were a few cases 
of measles, all of which were mild in form, some requiring 
no medical attention. 

The sanitary condition of the Home has been almost un- 
exceptionable. The food provided has been abundant, 
substantial and uniformly well prepared. 

The children are well clad in every respect — by this I 
mean not only comfortably, but also neatly. 

Much attention is given to cleanliness, not only of 
clothing and persons, but of the building and its surround- 
ings. 

I am, very respectfully, 

Tour obedient servant, 

J. B. McQAUGHET, M. D. 
WnroNA, Sept. 80th, 1874. 



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80 ANNUAL REPOET. 



REPORT OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSTRUCTION. 



To the Trustees of the Soldiers^ Orphans^ Home of the 
State of Minnesota. 

Gentlemen : — ^The total enrollment of Soldiers' Orphans 
in the different departments of the Normal School for the 
year ending December 1st, 1874, has beeh as follows 

Males. Females. Total. 



First Model Class, - - - - 


14 


10 


24 


Second Model Class, - 


- 12 


18 


30 


Third Model Class, - - - - 


18 


10 


28 


Fourth and Fifth Model Classes, - 


- 9 


12 


21 



Add enrollment in Normal Department 

not included in the above,- - - 1 1 2 

Giving a total for the year in all the de- 
partments of 54 51 106 

At the present time there are eight of these wards of 
this State in the Normal Department, making special pre- 
paration for the work of teaching, with the expectation of 
engaging in that occupation. Several of the older girls 
design to leave the Home in the spring for this purpose, in 
the hope of being able to return and complete the course 
in the school at their own expense. Two of the orphans 
have graduated at the Normal School, and have taught 
schools in the country with entire success. One of them 
is now permanently employed in the public schools of 
Winona, and the other has entered upon a course of study 
at the State University. 

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ADJUTANT GENERAL. 31 

The branches pursued by the children in the different 
^ades are the same as heretofore reported, and therefore 
do not require special mention in this communication. As 
a class, they have made excellent progress in their studies, 
while their morals and manners have continued to receive 
the most assiduous attention.* The discipline has been in 
no respect relaxed, but is administered, as heretofore, with 
a firm and steady hand. The fruits of it are more and more 
manifest in the good deportment, the manly and womanly 
bearing of the children at all times. They are required to 
march in regular order to and from school daily, under the 
command of officers selected from their own number. 

The experience of the past year has served to confirm the 
conviction that under no ordinary circumstances could the 
soldiers' orphans have been more kindly or generously treat- 
ed, nor could they have been surrounded with influences 
more conducive to their physical, intellectual and "moral 
well-being. That their future lives may justify the pater- 
nal care with which their interests have been protected, 
will certainly be the ardent wish of every good citizen. 
May the kindly influences which have so long surrounded 
them prove to be seed sown on good ground, which shall, 
in the coming years, spring up and bring forth fruit a hun- 
dred-fold. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. F. PHELPS, 
Superintendent of Instruction Soldiers' 
Orphans' Home. 
State Normal School, 
Sept. 30th, 1874. 



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EXECUTIVE DOCUMENT, No. 7. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



STATE LIBRARIAN, 



TO THE 



LEGISUTURE OF MIMESOTA, 



FOB THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30th, 1874. 



TRANSMITTED TO THE LEOI8LATX7BE OF THE 8EYENTBENTH ANNUAL 
SESSION, 1875. 



SAINT PAUL: 

PIONBBR OOMPANY PRINT. 

1876. 



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State of Minnesota, State Libbart, ) 
St. Paul, November 80th, 1874. \ 

To Sis Ejocellenoy^ OusAman K. Davis^ 

Governor of Minnesota: 

Sib : — I have the honor to transmit herewith the annual 
report of this department. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN 0. SHAW, 

' State Librarian, 



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HEPOHT. 



Statb of MnmEsoTA, State Library, ) 
St. Paul, November 30th, 1874. ) 

To the Son. Senate and Souse of Bepresentatives: 

Gentlemen : — ^In compliance with the statute, I have the 
honor to submit the following report. 

On the completion of the new library room in the exten- 
•sion to the Capitol, I moved the books, &c., into it, and 
although the room is decidedly too small for a library 
which increases as rapidly as ours does, yet, so far as I can 
learn, the judges and members of the bar are well satisfied 
with the change. 

The last Legislature appropriated $2,000 for the increase 
of the library. 

In addition, $54 have been received from sale of dupli- 
•cates, under the provisions of the law. 

Most of the total amount, $2,054, thus applicable has 
been expended in the purchase of books, as follows : 



Kent's Commentaries 

DiUon on Municipal Corporations. 

Bigelow's Over-ruled Cases 

Story on Agencj 

Palej on Agency... 

Chittjon (>>ntractB 

High on Injunctions 

Onmt on Corporations 

Littleton A BlatchleT's Fire Insuranoe Digest... 



Vols, 


Dollars. 


4 


18 00 


2 


11 00 


1 


5 25 


1 


6 25 


1 


6 00 


2 


10 50 


1 


5 25 


1 


4 00 



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ANNUAL BEFOBT. 



May on Insoranoe ^ 

Schooler on Personal Property 

Story's Eqoity Jorispradence 

Broom's Legal Maxims 

Allen's Telegraph Gases 

Gases on Self Jksfeace (Horrigan A Thompson) 

Archbold's Griminal Pleadings 

Hawkins' Pleas of the Grown 

Wait's Table of Gases 

Graham and Waterman on New Trials^ 

Bishop on Marriage and Divorce 

Sedgewick on Measure of Damages 

Byles on Bills 

Broom's Gommentaries on Gommon Law» 

Langdell on Gontracts 

Langdellon Sales 

Scribner on Dower^ : 

Phillip's United States Practice ^ 

Adam's Eaoity 

Gould's Pleading 

Drake on Attachment 

Stephens on Pleading •• 

Bi^ow's Lisorance Gases, vol. 3 

High, on Extraordinary Kemedies 



ols. 


Dollan. 


1 


5 25 


1 


5 25 


2 


10 50 


1 


5 25 


1 


5 25 


1 


7 00 


2 


15 00 


2 


15 00 


1 


5 25 


3 


20 00 


2 


10 50 


1 


7 00 


1 


4 76 


1 


450 


1 


525 


1 


525 


2 


10 50 


1 


3 50 


1 


525 


1 


350 


1 


5 25 


1 


1 00 


1 


5 25 


1 


5 25 



DIGESTS. 



Abbott^s New York Digest, vols. 1 to 5 
Fishen annual Digest (English,) 1872-3, 

U. S. Digest, vol. 4. (N. S.) 

U. S. Digest, vols. 1, 2. (1st Series) 

U. a Digest, voL 8. (1st Series.) 



Vohi. 


DoUan. 


5 


32 50 


2 


15 00 


1 


5 50 


2 


10 50 


1 


5 25 



UNITED STATES REPORTS. 



Wallace's Reports, vol. 17 
Ware^B Reports, vol. 3....; 
BiMell's Reports, vol. 8 .... 
Benedict's Reports, vol. 5. 
Wallace's Reports, vol. 18, 




DoUara. 

5 25 

6 00 
6 00 
9 00 
5 75 



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STATE LIBRARIAN. 



STATE REPORTS. 



ALABAMA. 



Alabama Beports, vols. 1, 2, 4, 16, 17, 18, 22, 33... 

Smith's Conaensed Beports, vols. 1 to 5 

Alabama Beports, vols. 9, 20, 21 

Alabama Beports, vols. 34^ 35, 38, 39, 41, 42, 43.. 

Alabama Beports, yol. 14. 

Alabama Beports, vols. 3, 6, 12.., 



Vols. 


Dollars. 


8 


48 00 


6 


35 00 


3 


19 50 


7 


38 50 


1 


7 50 


3 


22 50 



ABKANSAS. 


Arkansas Beports, vols. 11, 14 


Vols. 
2 


DoUan. 
12 00 


CONNECTICUT. 


Hays' Beports. vols. 1 to 6 


Vols. 
5 

1 
2 


Dollars. 
25 00 


Connecticut Bep<?rtfl, vol. 29^. ...... ....*.. ^.r... ............ .«.•... 


4 75 


Boofs Beports, vols. 1, 2... 


15 00 


GEOBGIA. 


Georgia Beports, vol. 11 


Vols. 

1 


Dollan. 
7 50 


IOWA. 






Morris' Beports. 


Vols. 

1 


Dollan. 
500 


KENTUCKY. 


Bibbft' Renorts vol.1 


Vols. 

1 
2 


Dollars. 
4 00 


Duval's Beports, vols. 1, 2 


20 00 



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ANNUAL REPORT. 
MARYLAND. 



HarriB and Johnson's Beports, volumes 1 and 7... 
Gill and Johnson's Reports, volumes 1 to 6^ 




Dollars. 

8 00 

43 00 



MISSISSIPPL 



Walker's Reports 

Howard's Reports 

Smede and Marshall's Reports , 

Mississippi Reports, volumes 23 to 31 

Mississippi Reports, volumes 34 to 40 

Mississippi Reports, volumes 42, 43, 45, 46...... 

Freeman's Chancery 

Smede and Marshall's Chancery 

NEW YORK 



Coleman and Caines' Cases 

Caines' Cases 

Abbott's Cases of Appeals, Decisions, volumes 1, 2.. 

Sweeney's RepNorts, volumes 1, 2 .., 

Abbott's Practice Reports, volumes 1 to 19 

Wheeler's Criminal Cases, volumes 1 to 3 

Bradford's Surrogate Reports, volumes 1 to .4. 

Barbour's S. C. Reports, volumes 55 to 65 

Abbott's Practice RepDrts, (N. S.) volumes 1 to 14., 

Redfield's Surrogate Reports, volume 1 , 

Tucker's Surrogate, volume 1 

TENNESSEE. 



Vols. 

11 
7 

13 
9 

7 
4 

1 
1 



Dollars. 



265 00 




Coldwell's Reports, vols. 1 and 7 

Heiskell's Reports, vol. 2 

Yerger's Reports, vols. 1 to 10 , 

VIRGINIA. 




Dollars. 

13 00 

7 00 

70 00 



Jefferson's Reports, 1 vol 

Wythe's Reports, 1 vol .• 

Calls' Reports, 6 vols 

Washington's Reports, 2 vols 

Virginia Cases, 2 vols, in 1 

Hering & Munford's Reports, 4 vols...., 

Munford's Reports, 6 vols 

Gilmer's Reports, 1 vol 

Randolph's Reports, 6 vols , 

Leigh's Reports, 12 vols , 

Robinson's Reports, 2 vols 




Dollars. 



275 00 



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STATE LIBRARIAN. 



ENGLISH LAWS. 



€k>ke'8 Beporto, vola. 1 to 6 

Vernon's Reports, vols. 1 and 2.. 

Wine's Reports 

Tamlyn's Reports ^ 

Yelverton's Reports 

Hobart^s Reports 



English and Irish Appeal Gase., 

Privy Council 

Scotdiand Divorce 

Equity, vols. 15, 16 

Chancery Appeal, vol. 8...: 

Queen's Bencn, vol. 8 

Common Pleas, vol. 8 

Exchequer, vol. 8 



In Numbers, 

Scotch and Divorce, Appeal Cases, vol. 2, parts 1, 2, 3. 
Privy Council, vol. 4 



Modem Reports, vols. 1 to 12 

Plowdens* Reports, vols. 1 and 2 

Strange's Reports, vols. 1 and 2 

Jacob & Walker's Reports, vols. 1 and 2.. 

Davies' Reports 

Cox's Chancery Cases, vols. 1, 2 

Lloyd & Gould, 1 vol 

Drury & Warren, 4 volrf 

Drury, 1 vol , 

Jones & LaTouche, 3 vols , 

Wilson's Reports, vols. 1 to 3 

Crookes' Reports, vols. 1 to 3 

Lord Raymond's Reports, vols. 1 to 3 

Ball & Beattey's Reports, 2 vols, in one... 

Dyer's Reports, vols. 1 to 3 

English Chancery Reports, vol. 63 

Binder for Central Law Journal.. 

Binding 4 vols. Florida Reports 



Vols. 
6 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

6 
3 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Dollars. 
21 00 
12 00 
4 00 
400 
6 00 
6 00 



130 00 



32 00 

8 00 
10 00 
16 00 

3 50 
12 00 

60 00 

9 00 
20 00 
18 00 

5 00 
18 00 
5 00 
1 50 
400 



The balance of amount applicable as before mentioned, 
to the increase of Library, will be required to pay for books 
ordered but not yet received in the Library. 

One copy of Volume 19 Minnesota Reports has been 
sent to each State in the United States. 

The records of State Library will furnish full information 
upon all points concerning that department. 



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10 ANNUAL REPORT. 



BOOKS RECEIVED IN EXCHMGE. 



ALABAMA. 

Reports, vol. 47. 
Acts, 1873. 

ABKAN8A8. 

Reports, vols. 17, 20, 21. 

CALIFOBNIA. 

Surveyor's Report. 

Gal. Reports, vols. 42, 43, 44. 

Statutes Cal., 1873-74. 

Codes, 1874. 

School Laws. 

CANADA. 

Session Papers, vols. 6, 7 and 8, in 7 parts. 
Journal, Senate, 1873-74. 
Report of Progress. 

CONNECTICUT. 

Reports, vol. 39. 

CONOBB88IONAL LIBBABT. 

130 volumes Congressional Documents. 

DAKOTA. 

Laws of Dakota, 1871, '72, '73. 

DBLAWABE. 

Houston's Reports, volume 3. 

Laws, 1873. 

Code. 

GEOBOIA. 

Reports, volumes 47, 48. 

Code Laws, 1874. 

Journals, House and Senate, 1873. 

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STATE HBRARIAN. 11 

\ 

ILLINOIS. 

» 

Geological Survey, 1873. 
Reports, 59, 60, 61, 62. 
Journal, House and Senate, 1873. 
Reports to General Assembly, 7. 
Railroad Report. 
University Report. 
Agricultural Report. 

IOWA. 

Reports, volume 35. 

INDIANA. 

Senate and House Journal, Regular and Special Sessions, 1873. 

Acts, 1873. 

Reports, 41, 42, 43, 44. 

Geological Survey. 



Statutes, 1873. 
Cofer's Digest. 
Monroe's Digest. 



KENTUCKY. 



KANSAS. 



Reports, volume 10. 

LOUISIANA. 

Reports, volumes 16, 17, 23, (Annual Reports.) 

IfASSAOHUIJBTTS. 

Acts, 1873. 

Reports, 108, 109. 

Public Documents, 1871, 1872. 

IIABTLAND. 

Reports, volumes 36, 37. 

IfAINE. 

Public Documents, 1873. 
Legislative Documents, 1873. 
Laws, 1874. 

Agricultural Reports, 1872, 1873. 
Reports, volume 61. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Reports, volumes 41, 43, 44, 47, 48. 

Laws, 1874. 

Journal, House and Senate. Appendix to same. 



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J 



12 ANNUAL REPORT. 

lONMESOTA. 

Laws, 1873. ^ 

Executive Documents, 1873. ( 

• Reports, volume 19. r^ copies of each. 

Journal, Senate and House. J 

MISSOURI. 

Reports, volumes 52, 53, 54, 55. 

MICHIGAN. 

Reports, volumes 25, 26, 27. 

Laws, 1873. 

Joint Documents, 1872. 

School Report, 1872. 

Insurance Report, 1872. 

Pomological Report, 1872. 

Statistics, 1870. 

Registration, 1870. 

School Laws. 

Manual, 1873. 

Geological, 1869—1873. 

Laws, 2 volumes. 

Board of Health. 

Public Acts, 1874. 

Public Instruction, 1873. 

Constitutional Amendments, 1873. 

Board of Agriculture. 

MONTANA. 

Reports, volume 1. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Laws, 1873. 

Reports, volumes 51, 52. 
Reports of Legislature. 
Agricultural Report. 

NEW YORK. 

Senate and House Journal, 1873. 

Legislative Documents, 1873. 

New York Reports, volumes 52, 53, 54. 

Lansing s Reports, volume 7. 

Assembly Documents, 8 volumes. 

Senate Documents, 4 volumes. 

University Report. 

Hun's Reports, volume 1. 

Assembly Documents, 1873. 

Assembly Documents, 1874. 

Senate Documents, 1874, 



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STATE UBRABIAN. 13 

NEW JBBSBT. 



Laws, 1873. 

Reports, (Law) 35, 36, (Equity) 23, 24. 

Minutes of Assembhr, 1872. 

Senate and House Journal, 1872, 1873. 

Laws, 1874. 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

Reports, volumes 69, 70. 
Laws, 1866, 1867, 1873, 1874. 
Battlers Revisal. 
Laws, 1868, 1869. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Reports, 1871, 1872, 1873. 
Laws, 1874. 

Journal, Senate and House. 
Executive Documents, 1873. • 
Legislative Documents, 1874. 
Agricultural Report, volume 8 . 
Fire and Life Insurance Statistics. 
Board of Charities. 
School Reports. 
Smuirs Handbook. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Laws, 1873, 1874. 

8MITHB0NIAN INSTITUTE. 

Contribution to Knowledge, 1 volume. 
Smithsonian Collection, 3 volumes. 
Reports, 1 volume. 

TEXAS. 

Reports, volumes 34, 35, 36, 37. 
Laws, 1874. 

TENNESSEE. 

HeiskelVs Reports, volume 4. 

VERMONT. 

Reports, volume 45. 

VIRGINIA. 

Board of Public Works, 1871, 1872. 
Senate and House Journal, 1871, 1872, 1873. 
Auditor's Report, 1871, 1872, 1873. 
Code. 



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14 ANNUAL BSFOBT. 



WISCONSIN. 



Reports, volumes 5, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 32. 
Laws, 1874. 

Journal, House/ and Senate, 1874. 
Governor's Message, 1874. 



By permission of His Excellency, Governor Davis, I dis- 
posed of a desk which formerly stood in old Library, which 
could not be used in new one, for $16.00, the proceeds of 
which I have expended and hold receipts therefor. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. . 

JOHN 0. SHAW, 

State Librarian. 



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[ExflcuTivB Document No. 8.] 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OV THB 



INSPECTORS AND WARDEN 



ov 



THE STATE PRISON, 



TO THB 



LEGISLATTIBE OF MIUIJESOTA, 



FOR THB 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING NOVEMBEB 30, 1874. 



TBJOISIIITTXD TO TBB LEGIBLATUBB AT THB MCVBN T BBN TH ANNUAl* 
SBflSIOK, 1875. 



SAINT PAUL: 

flT« PAUL PRX88 OOMPANT. 
1876. 



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INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



Office Warden State PiasoN, ) 
Stillwater, December 15, 1874. > 

To jERs Ehccdlencyy O. K. Davis ^ Oovemor of Minnesota: 

We herewith submit our report of the condition of the 
State Prison for the fiscal year ending November SOth, 1874. 

The number of conyicts in the prison at the date of our 
last report was 103. 

The whole number received during the year was 93. 

Whole number discharged dunng the same period was 
68p and the whole number in prison at this date is 134. 

Average number during the year 112 65-100, being an 
increase during the year of 31. 

A corresponding increase during the coming year would 
more than fill the cells, there being now only 18 unoccu- 
pied ; hence it is imperatively necessary that more cell room 
be provided. 

The Warden's report hereto attached gives in detail the 
expenses and earnings of the prison. 

The expenses have been .... $36,880 36 
The earnings 19,261 49 



Excess of expenses over earnings, -* - $17,618 87 

Or $158 27-100 per capita. This is a reduction of the per 
capita cost of 1873 of $28.28. A still greater reduction 
18 shown by leaving out of the expense account certain 
amounts paid convicts for good time; money paid them on 

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ATSnSVAL BSPOBT. 



their discharge, and for discbaige suits ; expenses of inves* 
tigating charges against Warden, &c., which do not legiti- 
mately enter into the ordinary running expenses of the 
prison. They are as follows : 



Freedom suite, . - . . 


$1,180 00 


Repairs, .... 


830 73 


Good conduct paid coDvicts, 


707 85 


Paid dischai^ed convicts, 


580 00 


Expenses of investigation, 


194 00 


Expenses ot recapturing convicts. 


139 76 



$3,682 34 

Which, being deducted, leaves the actual net cost per 
capita for board and clothing, and medical attendance and 
officers' salaries to be $124.15. 

The law allowing convicts pay for the good time earned 
by them while in prison has a marked effect upon them. 
It tends to keep them from becoming despondent, and helps 
to preserve their self-respect. They feel that they can still 
do something to aid their iamilies or themselves, although 
shut out trom the world. And above all, it is a great aux- 
iliary to the good order and discipline of the prison. 

The last Legislature made the following appropriations 
for improvements and additions to prison, to- wit: 

For building stockade, - . • $ 1,200 

Condemnation of land, - - - - 2,000 

Enlarging shops, .... 5,000 

Building cistern, ... - 800 

Moving Deputy Warden's house, - - 500 

iron floor in cell room, • - - • 500 

Total, $10,000 

Of the above amounts only those for building cistern and 
shop and $137.85 of the amount appropriated for moving 

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INSPECTORS OF STATE PBISOK. 6 

Deputy Warden's house have been expended, leaving the 
balance in the treasury. 

The moneys expended have been laid out strictly in ac- 
cordance with the law appropriating the same, and no defi- 
ciencies are to be provided for. 

The shop nnd cistern are fully completed, including steam 
pipes for heating the shop with steam within the appropria- 
tion, including pay for the plans and specifications of the 
architect and the superintendence of the work. 

The Deputy Warden's house was removed for $137.35, 
leaving the balance, $362.65, appropriated for that purpose 
unexpended. 

No part of the amounts appropriated for the other pur- 
poses above named has been expended, for the reason that 
we found it impossible to accomplish the objects contempla* 
Ced by said appropriations with the limited amounts provi- 
ded fgr such purposes. 

We had estimates made for building an iron floor in the 
cell room, and found the amount inadequate to build it. 
The amount is sufficient to build a wood or stone floor, 
which would answer the purpose equally well, and we 
recommend that permission be giyen us to use the amount 
for such purpose. 

It is estimated that it will require $5,000 more for the 
purpose of condemning and paying for the lands necessary 
to enlarge the prison grounds to the desired capacity, hence 
nothing has been done in this direction. And the same 
may be said as to the amount for stockade. 

In this connection we call attention to the joint report of 
B. J. Chewning, chairman of the Senate committee, and 
Stephen Miller, chairman of the House Special committee 
on Prison in 1872. The committee say ** That they have 
** made a thorough examination of the prison building, and 
** after securing the surveys, plats, and estimates of a com- 
** petent engineer, have came to the following conclusions : 

** That the State has expended $123,500 in the erection 
** of a suitable and convenient building for the accommoda- 
** tioD of 158 convicts, which makes an institution altogether 

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6 annual' bdpobt. 

*< too valuable to be abandoned, inasmuch sa 52 more oell» 
*< can be erected at a small comparative expense under the 
*^ present roofs, making capacity for 210 convicts." 

The committee further say, ** We think the proposed ex* 
*^ tension of grounds will accomodate as large a number of 
** convicts as should ever be confined in any one locality, 
** and when the limit is reached, it will be wise prudence 
** and economy to locate another prison in some other por- 
<* tion ot the State. 

«• We find the grounds cramped and inadequate for the 
** successful management of the number of convicts that 
** can be cared for in the buildings already erected, and by 
*^ adding to the grounds the proposed extension, the yard 
** will then accommodate as many persons as your committee 
<< would advise confined in this or any other prison. 

** We also find the present enclosure surrounded by a 
<* rickety board fence, presenting a standing temptation for 
** continual plotting for escape, and in case of fire, it would 
'< be impossible for the officers to prevent a general escape 
** of inmates. To fail to provide for the remedy of this 
*^ evil by a substantial stone wall, we regard as criminally 
«* negligent on the part of the Legislature." ♦ ♦ ♦ 
** The estimates of Chief Engineer Sheldon for walling in the 
** grounds, including the proposed extensions of 2 and 7-100 
** acres, together with the necessary grading and sewerage, 
" is $74,439." 

We have requested drawings to be made by A. M. Bad- 
cliff, a competent architect, showing the desired improve* 
ments and extensions of the prison, as it will appear when 
finally completed, together with estimates of the cost of the 
same, which will be presented to the Legislature, and we 
earnestly request an appropriation for such purpose in ac- 
cordance with said estimates, and also to pay said architect 
for his drawings, (or permission to pay the same out of 
some other fund.) 

In the plans drawn by the architect for the addition to the 
prison provision is made for a place for the Deputy Wardea 
and his family to live inside of the yard. This is the 

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INSFE0TOB8 OP STATB PBISON. 7 

proper place for his residence, and we hope the Legislature 
will finally settle the question as to the right to have or not 
to have a house provided for him. 

A bath room is much needed. The only means of wash- 
ing the convicts is by the use of a bucket. 

The prison should be better supplied with means for 
keeping the convicts cleanly. The well in the yard has 
been condemned by the State Board of Health and by one 
prison physician. There is no water to be had from a well 
that would be free from surface drainage, hence it becomes 
an important question to supply this prime necessity. 
There is a very large flowing spring just outside the prison 
walls and within the proposed extension of the grounds 
which should be utilized for this purpose. It comes out of 
the bluffs at an elevation high enough to carry water to any 
part of the priscm buildings. A reservoir or large cistern 
should be built to catch this water and then conduct it by 
pipes to any desired point. This would furnish a never 
failing supply of pure water, and we recommend that an 
appropriation be made for this purpose. 

A hose tower is needed for drying the hose owned by the 
State. This can be built for a trifling expense, and we re< 
commend that it be done. The plans and estimates here- 
with submitted will show more fully what is desired in re- 
gard to most of the improvements suggested. It was im- 
possible for us to determine without these estimates what 
the improvements would cost, hence we have caused them 
to be made to give the Legislature a more intelligent idea 
than could otherwise be obtained. 

We would again call attention to the propriety of heating 
the cell building with steam. This should be done as a 
matter of safety against fire. The cells are surrounded 
with wooden corridors, which are likely to take fire from 
the stoves or stove-pipes. These corridors should be 
I < moved and replaced with iron ones, or alsafer means of 
hcuting provided. 

v\'e call attention to the accompanying proposition of the 
oonirtctors for heating the cell building with steam. It is 

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8 JunruAii BUPOBT. 

evident that it can be furniahed by them, with their facilitiee, 
much cheaper than the State could do it Id any other way. 

There should be a contingent fund provided for certain 
expenses, such as repairs, and for the expenses incurred.m 
the pursuit and recapture of escaped convicts. The law 
compels the pursuit of convicts who escape, but makes no 
provision for the expenses. Heretofore these expenses 
have been paid from the current expense fund. It seems 
eminently proper that there should be a separate fund to 
draw from in case of such emergency, instead of having 
them go to swell the ordinary expenses of the prison. 

It is known to your excellency that there is a great and 
growing interest in the important subject of penitentiary 
reform. That interest culminated in the International 
Prison Congress, which was held in the city of London in 
July, 1872, and in like sessions held in this country since 
that time, one in the city of Baltimore in February, 1878, 
and the last at the city of St. Louis in May, 1874. It is 
believed that the public interest concentrating upon this 
important subject, and the experiment in prison manage- 
ment and construction now in progress will crystalize within 
a few years in some system which, in respect to the protec- 
tion of society and the reformation of the prisoner, will be 
a great advance upon any present system. Other States 
make appropriations to enable one or more of their prison 
officers to attend this congress, and learn something of prison 
discipline and reform management. Minnesota has never 
but once been represented in this congress. Your board 
recommend that provision be made hereafter to send one or 
more delegates to the meetings of this congress. 

It has been the custom for many years to exchange re- 
ports with the various prisons and reformatory institutions 
of other States, but for the past two years no printed copies 
of the Warden and Inspectors' reports have been sent to 
this prison. Not even the Warden being supplied with a 
copy to file in his office, as required by law. The board, 
therefore, ordered 100 copies printed in 1873, and had them 
sent to the prison for exchange and distribution. The bill 

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mSFSCTOBS OF 8TATE PKISON. if 

for sttoh printing is $115, but hae not been paid, for the rea- 
son that there were no funds appropriated for such purpose, 
and no contingent fund out of which to pay it. The bill is 
reasonable and should be paid. 

During the season gas fixtures hare been put into the pris- 
on, with all necessary burners, to supply the prison with 
gas, the bill for the same is $269 39. JiV'e recommend an 
appropriation to pay for the same. 

We estimate the earnings of the prison for the ensuing 
year ^t the sum of $16,600. 

An appropriation of forty thousand (40.000) dollars will 
be necessary to meet the expenses for the ensuing year, to- 
wit : $14,000 for salaries of officers, and $26,000 for cur- 
lent expenses. 

In regard to the sanitary condition of the prison, and the 
spiritual welfare of the convicts, attention is invited to the 
reports of the Physician and Chaplain hereto attached. All 
of which is respectfully submitted. 

E. G. Butts, ) 

Dayid Day, > Inspectors. 

J. B. M. Gaskill, ) 



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WARDEN'S REPORT. 



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OFFICERS OF THE MINNESOTA STATE PRISON. 

DECEMBER 1, 1874. 



INSPEOrOBS, 

E. G. BUTTS, DAVID DAY, 

J. B. M. GASKILL. 

WARDEN, 

J. A. REED. 

DBPUTT WABDEN, 

W, W. WILLIAMS. 

CHAPLAIN, 

J. H. MAGOMBEB. 

PHYSICIAN, 

6. M. LAMBEBT. 

CLERK, 

FBAI^E CHASE. 

STEWARD, 

ABE HALL. 

STEWARDESS, 

MBS. A. HALL. 

GATEKEEPER, 
B. F. BURNS. 

HOSPITAL GUARD, 

ALEXANDER CHISHOLM. 

WALL GUARDS, 

WM. SMTTHSON, H. C. PIERCE, 

FRED. ROTTGER, JOHN C. GARDNER, 

ALEX. ARMSTRONG. 

SHOP GUARDS, 

C. C. BORDWELL, A. ROTTING, 

HOWARD PACKARD, R. G. BLANCHARD, 
WM. P. STICKNEY, NEIL McKAY. 

TARD GUARD, 

G. HOLCOMBE. 

NIGHT GUARDS, 

BENJAMIN CAYON, ELBRIDGE L. BRYANT. 



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REPORT. 



Warden's Office, Minnesota State Prison, > 
Stillwateb, Minn., Dec. 7th, 1874. > 

To the Board of Inspectors Minn. State Prison: 

Gentlemen : In accordance with the provision of the 
law for the government of the State Prison, £ have the 
honor to submit the annual report of the Warden for the 
fiscal year ending Nov. 30th, 1874 : 

POFCUkTION. 

The number of prisoners in confinement Dec. 1, 1873 : 

From U. S. Military Courts, males, - - 31 

•« U. S. District Courts, ** . - 4 

•« County Courts, " . • 68 



— 103 



Received during the year : 



From U. S. Military Courts, males, - 10 

•♦ IT. S. District Courts, •• . . 5 

*< County Courts, females, - - 1 

•• •* males, . - • 77 

— 93 

Total in confinement during the year, . 196 



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14 ANNUAL BBPOBT 

Number discharged during the year : 

Upon expiration of sentence, - - 4 
Upon expiration of sentence, less portion of time 

allowed by law for good conduct, • - 6 
Upon expiration of sentence, less full amount of 

time allowed by law for good conduct, - 21 
Pardoned by Governor Horace Austiu, • 5 
«* •• C. K. Davis, - • 5 
" President U. S. Grant, - 1 
«« Secretaiy of War, - - - 1 
** Commander Department of Dakota, 15 
Released upon order of Judge oi 6th Judicial Dis- 
trict tor new trial, • . - 1 

Died, 2 

Escaped, ----- 1 

— 62 

Number remaining in prison Nov. 81 st, 1874, - 184 

From U. S. Military Courts, males, - - 18 

** U. S. District Courts, «* - - 8 

*« County Courts, *• - - 107 

«« «< females, - - 1 

134 

The total number of days of confinement are classified as 
follow : 

No. of days labor for contractors, - - 26,051 

•* *• State, - - - 5,961 

" disabled, - - - . 2,722 

** ** under punishment, - - 207 

Sundays, ----- 5,816 

Holidays, .... 355 

Total, . - . . 41,112 

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WABDBN OF 8TATB PHISON. 16 

Daa&ing an average of 112.63 prisoners in oonfinement 
during the year. 

A considerable portion of the work done for the State 
was expended in grading the grounds, and other permanent 
improvements. 

The total expenditures of the Prison for the year have 
been as follows : 



For Salaries of offioers, ... 
** Subsistence, ... 

** Fuel and lights, - * - 

** Clothing and bedding, 
** Freedom suits, discharged convicts, 
*« Bepairs, .... 
" Good conduct, .... 
** Gateage, discharged convicts, 
** Medicines and Hospital stores, 
** Blank books, stationery, postage and 
printing, .... 

*' Miscellaneous, . . • 



The above division of items of expense is approximately 
correct, but not entirely so, owing to the method of keeping 
the books. It is my purpose henceforth to keep an exact 
account of the different items of expense so classified as to 
give at a glance the amount expended for each purpose. 
The item of *<good conduct '* covers the amount paid to 
convicts under the law passed at the last Legislature. It is 
not properly an item of expenditure, but is a gratuity given 
by the State for good conduct, and is deducted from the 
earnings of convict labor. 

The earnings for the year have been as follows : 

For rent of shops and grounds, - - $100 00 

For convict labor, .... 11,722 93 



$12,868 46 


18,089 75 


2,603 06 


2,403 17 


1,180 00 


830 73 


707 85 


580 00 


457 23 


322 08 


1,838 08 


$86,880 36 



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5,431 56 


1,067 91 


137 05 


179 58 


45 00 


240 75 


820 96 


15 75 


$19,261 49 


$36,880 36 


19,261 49 


$17,618 87 



16 AinnXAIi BOFOBT* 

For boarding U. S. military convicts, 
For boarding U. S. District C!ourt convicts, - 
For gate fees for the year, 
For sale of lard and soap grease, 
For sale of old Deputy Warden house, 
For board of J. Covill and others. 
For sales of barrels, wood, and miscellaneous. 
For forfeited by convicts from good conduct 
fund, - - - 



Total expenses, ... 
Total earnings, 

Excess of expenses over earnings. 



STATBMBNT SHOWING SITUATION OF EABNINOS OF PBI80N, 

Cash paid State Treasurer for rent and con- 
vict labor, .... t7,965 50 

Cash paid State Treasurer for boarding U. S. 

military convicts, ... 4,768 25 

Cash paid State Treasurer for boarding U* S. 
District Court convicts, - - SOS 81 

Due from Seymour, Sabin & Co., for rent and 

convict labor, ... - 2,149 43 

Due from U. S. for boarding military con* 

victs, 663 81 

Due from U. S. for boarding U. S. District 

Courts convicts, ... 265 10 

Cash paid for good conduct, - • 728 60 

Cash on hand and due convicts for good con* 
duct, ..... 83() 55 

Cash deposited in bank and due convicts for 
good conduct, ... 658 85 

Cash on hand, gate fees and miscellaneous, 

and carried to current expense fund, - 989 09 

$19,261 49 

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WABDICN OF STATU PBISON. 17 

X8TIHATBD BECBIPTS OF PRISON FOB 1875. 



For rent of shops and grounds, 
For convict labor, - - - 

For boarding U. S. military convicts, 
For boarding U. S. District Court convicts, 
For gate fees and miscellaneous, 



Value of personal property Dec. 1, 1874, 

Value of real estate as valued by Board of In- 
spectors Dec. 1, 1869, 
Improvements in 1870, . . . 

Improvements in 1871, ... 
Improvements in 1872, - 

Improvements in 1873, - 
Improvements in 1874, - ' - 



ASSETS OF PRISON. 



$100 00 

18,000 00 

1,200 00 

1,500 00 

800 00 



$16,600 00 


$11,364 61 


$72,251 19 


11,200 0(* 


68,484 26 


6,892 60 


40,000 00 


5,800 00 



$204,628 0& 



Beal Eestate, - - - - $204,628 05 

Personal Property, ... 11,364 61 
Due from Seymour, Sabin & Co., for rent and 

convict labor, .... 2,149 48 

Due from U. S. for boarding military convicts, 663 31 
Due from U. S. for boarding U. S. District 

Court convicts, . • «. 265 10 

Cash on band, current expense fund, - 4,694 50 



$223,765 99 



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18 



ANNUAL RBFOBT 



Current Expenses of Minnesota State Prison for fiscal year 
ending JTov. 30, 1874. 



Months. 



December . 
January . . . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . . 
September. 
October .». 
November . 



Officers' 
Salaries. 



#1,049 85 



8,078 00 



8,250 16 



8,289 20 
'2,'26i"76 



$12,868 46 #707 85 



Good 
C'nd'ct 



82 90 

62 40 

98 90 

79 70 

175 40 

114 75 

148 80 



Dlscha'd 
C'nvicta 



#40 00 
10 00 
20 00 
70 00 
70 00 
45 00 
65 00 
80 00 
60 00 
90 00 
80 00 
50 00 



Miscella- 
neous. 



#1,481 00 
2,279 80 
1,190 54 
1,189 96 
1,634 89 
8,867 05 
1,791 18 
1,881 98 

1.863 52 
1,667 11 

2.864 52 
2,118 55 



#580 00 #22,724 05 



Officers' salaries #12,868 46 

Good conduct 70786 

Discharged conylcts 580 00 

Miscellaneous 22,724 05 



Total for the year. 



.#86,880 36 



Total number of days earned by good conduct 

during tbe year, ... 

Total number of days earned by good conduct 

from March let to Nov. 30th, 
5,024 days at 45 cents per day, 

July 10. Amount due convicts tor good 
conduct for the months of 
March, April, May and June, 
and deducted from cash re 
ceiled from Seymour, Sabin 
& Co., for rent and convict 
labor, - - $947 80 

Oct. 10. Amount due convicts for good 
conduct for the months of 
July, August and September, 
and deducted from cash re- 
ceived from Seymour, Sabin 
& Co., for rent and convict 
labor, - - - 760 20 



6,796 

5,024 
$2,260 60 



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WABDSUr OF 8TATB FBIBON. 19 

Nov. 30. Amount due convicts for good 
conduct for tbe months of 
October and November, and 
to be deducted from rent and 
convict labor, payable Jan. 
10th, 1875, . 552 60 



$2,260 60 



STATEMENT SHOWING SITUATION Or GOOD CONDUCT FUND. 

Cash paid for convicts from Good Conduct Fund, $723 60 
Cash on hand and due convicts for good conduct, 330 55 
Amount due convicts for good conduct, and de- 
posited in St. Croix Valley Saving Bank, 653 85 
Amount due convicts for good conduct for the 
months ot October and November, and to 
be deducted from rent and convict labor, 
payable Jan. 10, 1875. ... 552 60 



$2,260 60 



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20 ANirUAL BEPOBT. 

Statement of cash paid from Ghod Conduct Fund. 



For Whom Paid. 



Us0b« Pftrront. 

J.R. BatM , 

LoaiBLesBlog 

S.8. West 

Bagone T. Rooney. . . , 

JohnO. Strons , 

Wm. F. Langoon 

J- R* BatM „. 

JanieA Hue. .^ *,«■,,.... 

D. Firrell. --- .. 

Jolm BiLXter . -■ . ^ . ■ . « . , 
EdwArd Jones.. . . .,.. 

Bfltiry Co&ati. ,..*.*.., 
Qttorga Dq wnle ..... ^ .. 

Jolia B«aver.^-.. ...... 

T&flor Cumbi. .,«■ ..< 

C, CrftodaU 

ObArl»« Huong ...... 

A. P. West . 

Fred. Shuttlowartli. ,. 

Joho Farrell.. 

Robt. K. Cowell — ,. 

K. fl. Wail 

Tho*^ FHigeraia.. ... 
Geo. W. Foresythe.... 
Ott<J Noabert....,, ... 

C, B, GQTti*m 

Wtn. L*ih*lL .......... 

Charles Manx 

Jolui Beurer 

i^coU M&Aiiaa.... ' . . 

Wm. Yewr. ......... 

Ed WArd Enforth ....... 

J. WeJch 

Cb;i''!tm FoWEern...... 

Inward Bcbullt.. ., ,., 

Wm. ilunen +..< 

W^m- Arms trong ,-.«•. 

ThOB. WllBOH.. , 

CUmlae Bailey 

C. Crftndall 

HoghColwell , 

JobnR. Bates 

Herbert Taylor 

B. 8. West 

John F. Bwanson 

Bdwln French 

James McClore 

James Hotton 

Bd.PitU 

George Davis 

Wm. Hicks 

Bd. Pitts 

Geo. H. Ashford 

Wm.Yeager 

C. Crandall 

J. Knott 

Henry M. Knight 

RobtB.CoweU 

Michael Horan 

Isaac Orover 

Oanaan Comets 

Wm Bird 

Jolias Fox, deceased. 
Charles Clifton 

Clinton O. Weloh 

Bnsign BUis 



Self on discharge.. 

His mother 

Self on discharge.. < 

His family 

Self on dischaige... 



His mother 

Self on discharge.. 



mother 

wife 

mother... 

famUy 

Self on discharge... 

His Bisters .'.' 

His family 

His daughter , 

Self on discharge... 



To Whom Paid. 



His family 



His daoffhter 

Self on discharge . 

His mother 

Self on discharge.. 

His mother 

Self on discharge.. 



His mother 

daughter 

' lister 

' mother 

Self on discharge.. 

His daughter 

His family 

Self on discharge.. 

His wife .*." 



mother 

uncle 

wife ... 

Self on discharge.. 

His mother 

HisfamilT 

Self on discharge. . 



His wife 

Self on discharge.. 



His mother 

Advertising his account. 
Forfeited 



Total Disbursement!, Good Conduct Fund. . 



Amount. 



9540 
50O 
6 76 
400 
600 
76 
810 
80(> 
8 10 
2 7a 
10 80 
8 10 
10 80 
900 
40O 
126 
10 80 
10 00 
10 80 
10 89 
10 80 
10 00 
10 80 
i 16 
18 00 
13 60 

12 16 
16 30 

460 
18 06 

600 
16 90 

loot 

16 90 

16 20 
8 10 

13 96 

14 40 

17 10 

17 10 
16 20 

600 
496 
820 

18 00 
10 00 

8 10 
20 96 

20 96 
640 
8 10 

18 06 
10 00 
10 80 
2160 
800 
680 

21 60 
16 20 
10 80 
21 60 
23 40 
23 40 
16 00 

600 
4 90 
640 
640 



$728 66 



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WABDBK OF STATE PBISOK. 21 

0A8H BBOEIVBD FBOM ALL BOUBOSS. 

iJash on hand Dec. let* 1873, 

Cash received on Inspector's orders current 

expenses, .... 
Cash received on Inspectors orders, salaries 

of officers, - - - 

Cash received for rent and convict labor, 
Cash received for boarding U. S. Military 

convicts, .... 

Cash received for boarding U. S. District 

Court convicts, ... 

Cash received, gate fees and miscellaneous, - 
Cash on hand Dec. 1st, 1878, wall and sewer 

fund, ..... 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid current expenses for the year, - 

Paid State Treasurer, cash received from 
Seymour, Sabin & Co., for rent and con- 
vict labor, ... 

Paid State Treasurer, cash received for board- 
ing U. S. Military convicts. 

Paid State Treasurer, cash received for board- 
ing U. S. District Court convicts, 

Paid from wall and sewer fund on Inspector's 
orders, for labor and material on sewers. 

Cash on band Dec. Ist, 1874, and due convicts 
for good conduct, .... 

Cash on handy current expense fund. 



SIATSMBNT OF 0A8H EXPENDED TROU *' FUND6 FOB OOMFLH- 
TION OF PBISON.'' 

June 15, Inspector's order on State Auditor 
favor of A. M. Badcliffe for plans, 
specifications and services, superin- 
tending erection oi workshops, - $75 00 



$5,060 46 


22,000 00 


12,368 46 
9,678 50 


4,768 25 


802 81 
922 34 


242 53 


$56,338 35 


$36,880 36 


7,965 50 


4,768 25 


802 81 


242 53 


984 40 
4,694 50 


$56,338 35 



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22 ANNUAL BEPOBT. 

Aug. 69 Inspector's order on State Auditor 
favor of Seymour, Sabin & Co., for 
labor and material as per estimate, 1,105 00 

Sept. 7, Inspector's order on State Auditor 
favor of Seymour, Sabin & Co., for 
labor and material as per estimate, - 1,171 30 

Oct. 5, Inspector's order on State Auditor 
favor of Seymour, Sabin &C!o., tor 
labor and material as per estimate, 2,001 75 

Oct. 15, Inspector's order on State Auditor 
favor of Seymour, Sabin & Co., for 
labor and material, ... 571 95 

Nov. 16, Inspector's order on State Auditor 
favor of A. M. BadclifFe for services 
superintending the erection of work 
shops, - - - - 75 OO- 



$5,000 00 

STATEMENT OF GASH EXPENDED FROM *< OISTEBN FUND.'' 
1874. 

Aug. 6, Inspector's order on State Auditor fa- 
vor Seymour, Sabin & Co. for labor and 
material as per estinuite, - - $510 OO 

Oct. 15, Inspector's order on State Auditor fa* 
vor Seymour, Sabin & Co. for labor and 
material as per estimate, - • 277 OO 

Nov. 80, Cash paid advertising for proposals, 13 00 

$800 00 

THE UNITED STATES IN AOOT. WITH STATE OF ItlNNESOTA. 

1874. Dr. 

Nov. 30, To boarding U. S. Military prisoners 

from Dec. 1, 1873, to Nov. 30, 1874, $5,431 5» 
" To boarding IT. S. District Court Pris- 
oners from Dec. 1, 1873, to Nov. 30, 
1874, - . . . 1,067 91 

$6,499 4T 

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WABDBK OF STATB PRISON. 23 

Cb. 

Feb. 19; By Cash paid State Treasurer, * $ 66 28 

April 1, By Cash paid State Treasurer, 535 46 

July 3, By Cash paid State Treasurer, - 421 11 

'« 18, By Cash paid State Treasurer, 1,554 60 

Sept. 19, By Cash paid State Treasurer, - 1,522 82 

Nov. 23, By Cash paid State Treasurer, 1,155 37 

*« By Cash paid State Treasurer, • 315 42 

Nov. 30, By Balance due for Boarding U. S. 

Military Prisoners, - • 663 31 

<* By Balance due for Boarding U. S. 

District Court Prisoners, - - 265 10 



$6,499 47 

8BTHOUB, SABIK AND 00. IN AOOT. WITH J. A. BBBD, WARDEN. 

Dr. 

Oct. 5, To Inspector's order on J. A. Reed, 
Warden, to be paid from Wall and 
Sewer Fund, - - - $49 66 

Oct. 15, To Inspector's order on J. A. Beed, 
Warden, to be paid from Wall and 
Sewer Fund, - - - 99 60 

Nov. 30, To Inspector's order on J. A Beed, 
Warden, to be paid from Wall and 
Sewer Fund, - - - 98 27 



Cb. 



$242 53 



Oct. 5, By labor and material as per bill ren- 
dered, - - - - 49 66 

Oct. 15, By labor and material as per bill ren- 
dered, - - - - 99 60 

Nov. 80, By labor and material as per bill ren- 
dered, - - - - 98 27 



$242 58 

J. A. BBSD IN AOOOUNT WITH STATE OF MINNESOTA. 

Dr. 
Nov. 30, To Inspector's order on State Audi* 
tor to be paid from Fund for Moving 
Deputy Warden's House, - - $137 85 . 

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24 



ASnXUAL BBPOBT* 
Ce. 



Nov. 30, By labor and material as per bill ren 
dered, - . - - 



187 35 



FltOM WHENOE OONVIOTS WBBE BEOEITED 8IN0B LAST 

BEPOBT. 



U. S. Military Courts, 
U. S. District Court, 


Hennepin County, 
Winona •• 


Bamsey 

Dodge 

Dakota 




Olmsted 


«c 


Steele 


<i 


Fillmore 


«< 


Goodhue 


« 


Redwood 


<< 


Washington 
Nicollet 




Blue Earth 


<« 


Chisago 
Houston 




Mower 


<< 


Watonwan 


«< 


Carver 


<* 


Meeker 


i« 


Wright 
Kandiyohi 


(< 


(1 


Morrison 


cc 



10 
5 
24 
11 
4 
4 
4 
3 
8 
3 
8 
2 



2 
2 



98 



0BIMB8 FOB WHIOH CX>NVIOIS XmOmiVSD SmOB UJT HaFOBT 
WKBE CX>irVIOTBD. 



Larceny, - _ - . 

Desertion and Larceny, 

Assault witb intent to do great bodily harm, 

Murder in first degree, 

Having possession ol counterfeit money. 

Manslaughter, second degree, 

Manslaughter, lonrth degree, 



49 
7 
6 

4 
4 



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WABDBN OF 8TATB PBISOK. 



26 



Entering with intent to steal, 
Forgery, - - - - 

Assault with intent to commit rape. 
Bobbery, . - • 

Burglary, - • - 

Assault with intent to murder. 
Rape, . - • 

Embezzlement, ... 
Illegal voting, 
Beoeiving stolen goods, 
Keeping house of ill-fame, i- 
Seduction, . * . 



2 

i 
i 



93 



AGES OF OOKYIOTQ BBOBIYBD SINOB LAST BBPOBT. 

Under 20, 15 

From 20 to 25, 86 

From 25 to 80, - - - - - 12 

From 30 to 40, 15 

From 40 to 50, - - - - - 8 

From 50 to 60, - - - - - 5 

Above 60, . - - - • - 2 

98 



XBBBfS FOB WHIOH OONVIOTS BBOETVED 8IN0B LAST BEPOBT 
WERE SENTENCED. 



6 montbs, 
1 year, - 
1 year 2 months, 
1 year 3 months, 
1 year 4 months, 

1 year 6 months, 

2 /ears, 

2 years 1 month, 
2 years 2 months, 
2 years 4 months, 
2 years 6 months, 
2 years 8 months, 
8 years, 
4 years, * 
4 years 6 months, 
4 



6 
21 
2 
8 
2 
5 

13 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
18 
6 
1 



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26 ANKUAL BBFOBT. 

5 years, ... - . 3 

7 years, - - - - - 1 

10 years, - . . . l 

Life, - . - . .4 

98 



NATIYITT OF CONVIOTS BEOEIYED 8IN0B LAST BEPOBT. 

Sweden, - - - - - - 7 

Canada, - . - • - - 7 

Ireland, - - - - - - 5 

Germany, - - - - - - 5 

Prussia, - - - - - - 4 

England, •-..•• 8 

Norway, - - - - - - 2 

Bohemia, ..... i 

New York, - - - - - - 17 

Maine, - - - - . . 6 

Pennsylvania, - - - - - 6 

Wisconsin, ..... 5 

Ohio, . . - - - - .5 

Minnesota, - - ' - - - 8 

Illinois, - - - - - - 4 

Massachusetts, - - • - - 4 

New Hampshire,' - - - - - 2 

California, - - - - - - 1 

Iowa, - - -.- - - -1 

New Jersey, . - ... 1 

Florida, - - - - - - 1 

Indiana, - - - - - - 1 

District of Columbia, - - - - • 1 

Virginia,, ...... 1 

98 

8OOIAL RELATIONS OF OONTIOTS OONFmED DEO. 1, 1874. 

Married, . - - - S4 

Single, - - - - - 110 

184 



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WARDEN OF STATE PRISON. 
EDUOATION. 



Can read and write. 
Cannot read and write, 



27 



107 
27 

134 



HABITS. 



Temperate, 
Intemperate, 



Use Tobacco, - 
Do not use Tobacco, 



101 
134 
125 

134 



OOOUPATIONS. 



Farmer, 

Baker, 

Barber, 

Blacksmith, 

Stonemason, 

Moulder, 

Bookbinder, 

Painter, 

Veterinary, 

Shoemaker, 

Artist, 

Machinist, 

Carpenter, 

Engineer, - 

Druggist, 

Merchant, - 

Clerk, 

Sailor, 

Cook, - 

Gardener, - 

Tailor, 

Forgeman, 

Accountant, 

Agent, 



15 
3 
3 
8 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



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28 



AXTNUAIi BBPOBT. 



Glassblower, 

Cooper, 

Teacher, 

Groom, 

Laborer, 



1 
I 
1 
1 

79 

184 



HUMBBB OF OONYIOTS OOimNIlD 8IH0B THE OBOANIZATION 
OF THE 8TATB. 



1858, 

1859, - - 

1860. 

1861, 

1862, 

1863, 

1864, 

1865, 

1866, 

1867, 

1868, 

1869, 

1870, 

1871, 

1872, 

1878, 

1874, 

Total, 

Of the above there has been : 

White males. 
Colored males. 
White females. 



mJHBBB OF B80AP1SS. 



1861, 
1868, 
1872, 
1874, 



5 

16 
12 
7 
8 
7 
11 
29 
86 
81 
47 
89 
60 
59 
64 
98 

526 



507 

16 

3 

526 



2 
1 
1 
1 



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WABDSN OT STATB PBISON. 



29 



NUMBER OF DBATHS. 



Shot by guard in 1861, 
Billious Colic in 1861, 
Typhoid Pneumonia in 1867^ 
Consumption in 1868, 
Pt^rnioious Fever in 1868, 
PbthisiB in 1870, 
Traumatic Tetanus in 1871 » 
Phthisis in 187 L, . - 

Pf 8Bmia in 1872, 
Paralysis in 1872, 
Chronic Intestinal Catarrh in 1874, 
Entric Feyer in 1874, 

Total* - 



12 



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30 



ANNUAL BBFOBT. 



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ASmJAL BBPOBT. 



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WARDEN OF STATE PiilSON. 



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AXTMUAL BBPOBT. 



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WABDBN OF STATE PRISON. 35 

IKYEENTOBT OF PBESONAL PROPERTT BELONGING TO MINNE- 
SOTA STATE PBISON. 

Office. 

Furniture, Bland Books and Stationery, - - $311 00 

Yard. 

Wood, Coal and Implements, - - 2,176 99 

Bake Room. 

Stove, Flour, Ac,, - - . - 92 50 

Guards* tiiUing Boom.. 

Stove, Tables, Chairs, &c., - - - 118 50 

Dining Room. 

Tables, Chairs and Stove, - - - 94 00 

Kitchen. 

Stove, Furniture and cooking utensils, - 291 00 

Store Room. 

Groceries, Provisions, &c., ... 17499 

Pantry No. I. 

Crockery, Ac., - - - - . 55 21 

Pantry No. 2. 

Crockery, Cutlery, Spices, &c., r - - 48 30 

Mess Room. 

Tinware, Stove, Kettle, Cooking Utensils aud 

Tables, - J ... 284 90 



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86 AHHUAL BBPOBT. 

OeU Boom. 

Bedsteads, Bedding, Clothing, Stores, Cell Fur- 
niture and Miscellaneous, - - 4,837 90 

Chapel. 

Organ, Stores and Chairs, - • - 248 00 

Sick Boom. 

Stove, Bed and Bedding, Chairs, <fbc. - 46 7ft 

Hospital. 

Bedsteads, Bedding, Stoves, Chairs and Hospital 

Store, - - - - - 856 88 

Clothing Boom. 

Cloth, Leather and Clothing, - - - 553 18 

8hoe Shop. 

Shoemaker's Tools, Leather, Shoe Findings, 

Stove Furniture, <fbc. - - - - 108 70 

Tailor Shop. 

Cloth, Clothing, Tailors' Tools, Sewing Machine 
and Furniture, ^ . - - . - 179 17 

Female Cfiis. 
Beds, clothing and furniture, ... 109 40 

Room No. 23. 
Carpet, stove and furniture, - - - 34 00 

Boom No. 24. 
Carpet and furniture, - - - - 40 75 



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WABDBN OF BTATB FBISOK. 37 

Boom No. 36. 
Stove, beds and bedding, furniture, eto., - 45 70 

Room No. 37. 
Beds and bedding* stoves, furniture, etc., - 127 95 

Room No. 38, 
Furniture, - - - . - 14 05 

8teward^8 Room. 
Stove and lamp, - - - . • 13 00 

Odlars. 
Pork, beef, vegetables, etc., - . . 498 25 

Laundry. 
Washing machines, stove, kettle, etc., • - 69 10 

Ouard Houses. 
Guns, ammunition, stoves, furniture, etc., - 434 50 



$11,364 61 



Having been in charge of this institution for so short a 
time it would seem inappropriate for me to make any sug- 
gestions in regard to its necessities. Your long connection 
with it enables you to thoroughly understand its wants and 
iisk lor such appropriations as you deem expedient. 

Permit me, however, to call your attention to some facta 
with which you may not be conversant. The well in the 
yard irom which water was obtained in part for cooking and 
dritiking purposes was condemned by the Prison Physician 
last August, he considering the water unfit for use, and I 
am satisfied that no good water can be obtained from wella 
aunk within the Ptison yard, on account of the locality, but 
it can be easily obtained Irom springs outside and brought 
into any part of the Prison. Our supply now is limited to 
one small spring and the cisterns. |The^ necessity for an 

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38 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

abundance of good water is so apparent that I ain sure you 
would only have to ask tor in order to obtain the necessary 
funds. 

The cooking facilities are entirely inadequate for the pur- 
poses with our increasing numbers* and I recommend that 
you ask for an appropriation sufficient to build a brick oven 
in the basement story. 

There are now but eighteen vacant cells in the Prison. 
Should the relative increase be as great this year as it was- 
last, we shall soon require more ceils. By carrying up the 
walls of the old ceil room to the height of the new part fifty- 
f wo more cells could be obtained. I deem it important that 
this be done at an early day. 

In regard to the old crazy fence that surrounds a portion 
of the yard, it is only necessary to say that it still stands- 
there* and if we have no high winds or freshets may last 
another year. 

Under the operations of the law of last winter paying 
convicts for their good time the expenses of the Prison have 
been considerably increased* but the effect of the law upon 
the prisoners is good, it impresses upon them the fact, 
that while they are being punished for their offenses the 
State has a fostering care for its unfortunates. 

I am well aware, that at the present time, when crimen 
are so frequent, that there is a strong feeling against con* 
victs, hut there is a fact in connection with this matter 
worthy of our consideration, it is this, that a large per cent, 
of those sent up here during the past year are young men, 
some mere boys, and for short terms* they have generally 
been addicted to intemperance and their education sadly 
neglected, although the most of them claim that they can 
re^ and write yet their education is extremely limited* of 
course there are exceptions* but intemperance and ignorance 
are the two primary causes that bring men to this Prison ; 
while here they are strictly temperate, and we are endeavor- 
ing to give them an education sufficient to enable them to 
do business for themselves. 

The conduct of the prisoners of late has generally beea 
good and they seem as contented and quiet as could well be 
expected of men deprived of their freedom. As to the 
moral and sanitary condition of the Prison I would refer you 
to the accompanying reports of the Chaplain and Physician, 
both of whom have been earnest and faithful in the discliarge 
of their respective duties, and to them as well as others- 
associated with me in the care and management of the Prison,. 

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WABDBN GF STATB FBISON. 39 

I tender my thanks. They have all evinoed a disposition to 
attend to their own legitimate business and that faithfully. 

To take charge and become conversant with the intricate 
affairs of an institution of this kind is a matter of no small 
responsibility, and to you gentlemenn I am under many 
obligations for your valuable suggestions and kind assistance 
so cheerfully given. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J« A. HEED, 

Warden. 



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40 AJBOrUAIi BBFOBT. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 



Stillwateb, MiNN.y Nov. 30f 1874. 
To (he Hon. Warden and Board of Inspectors: 

Gentlemen : I have the honor herewith to present my 
report of the Department] under niy charge, for the fiscal 
year ending Nov. 30»)1874. 

Before making a specific report of the sick cases and other 
matters of record, I deem it my duty to pay a passing tribute 
to the memory of my honored and lamented predecessor in 
office, the late Dr. Joel K. Reiner, who for a number of 
years filled the office of Physician of the Prison i and who, 
in his humane and skillful fulfillment of the duties pertain- 
ing thereto, won the high esteem of, not only the various 
'officers having charge thereof, but who received the grateful 
regard of the convicts who came under his care, for his ten- 
der and zealous attention to their physical ailments. No 
higher eulogy can be paid to the memory of the late Dr. 
Beiner than is contained in the fact that he fell a victim to 
his professional zeal and Christian desire to aid the suffer- 
ing and the unfortunate* Open-hearted and generous, none 
ever appealed to him in vam for the assistance that lay in 
his power to give. His memory is embalmed in the hearts 
of hundreds who knew him but to honor and love him, and 
there are thousands of citizens of this State who will gladly 
join in eulogizing the memory of this departed and most 
respected citizen and professional gentleman. 

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WABTODT OF STATB PRISON. 41 

In my endeavors to catry oat the measares best adapted 
to the preservation of the health of the occupants of the 
Prison, I desire to acknowledge the assistance which past 
and present Wardens, Mr. Jackman and Capt. Beed, and 
their deputies, respectively, Maj. Evans and Mr. Williams, 
have afforded me. I desire to especially call attention to 
the eneigetic manner in which the present Warden and his 
subordinates have sought to improve the sanitary ^condition 
of the Prison, in so much that I seriously question whethcfr 
any institution of this kind in the West, presents stronger 
evidences of a kindly regard for its inmates, their comfort, 
health and general welfare. 

To the Honorable the Board of Health for the State, I 
desire to express my acknowledgments of the success oT 
their late recommendation of the use of dry earth in 
the cells and cell buckets. As a disinfectant the earth has 
proved more satisfactory than any article previously used 
ior the same purpose. All other suggestions of the Board, 
60 far as practicable, have been carried out. 

The pursuance of the system of frequent whitewashing of 
rooms and cells, and the enforcement of personal cleanliness 
among the convicts, in which matters the Warden has neg- 
lected nothing calculated to promote health and comfort, 
and the excellent manner in which the culinary department 
has been conducted under supervision of Steward Hall 
has conduced, in a great measure, to keep the sanitary con- 
dition ot the prison within nearly the bounds of the year 
previous, notwithstanding the extensive increase in the 
number of persons confined in the cells. 

There are matters pertaining to the existing and insuffi- 
cient drainage system, the incapacity and improper location 
of the shop privies, and the inadequate water supply, that 
more properly belong to the Warden's report, which* that 
gentleman will undoubtedly refer to. 

I shall therefore conclude by making the following report 
of total cases treated during the year, and of such other 
oiatters as appear upon the physician's book of record, viz. : 
6 

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42 ASn^AJL BXPOBT. 

Total cases treatedi «... 45^ 

Average daily attendance* ... 13. 
Total Tisits from Not. 30 to Jan. 21, 1874, Dr. 

Beiner, ..... 4^ 
Total visits from Jan. 21 to March 3, 1874, Dr. 

Millard, 8& 

Total visits from March 3, 1874, to Nov. 80, 1874, 

Dr. Lambert, .... 30O 

Total, 884 

Deaths — Convict Chas. McDonald, Jan. 28, - 1 

** ** Julins Fox, Oct. 21, - - 1 

2 

Total nnmber of prescriptions, • . • 2,478 

LIST OF DISBABBS. 

Abcess, - - - - - 7 

Asthma, . • . • . 4 

Amputations, ... . - 6 

Burns, .... 1 

Bronchitis, - - - - - 7 

Colica, Biliosa, - • - ^ - 1 

Colica, Urinary, - - - - 1 

Conjunctivitis, - -* - - 8 

Pystitis, - - - - •• 8 

Cirrohsis, Hepatitis, ... 3 

Catarrh, Intestinal, - • * • I 

.Contusion, .... 1 

Con^ipation, - - - « 50 

Comeitis, .... 3 

Canker, - - - • - 3 

Catarrh, Nasalis and Bronchial, * * 18 

Cramps, - - - - - 1 

CepaWgia, . . . - l 



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WABBEK 07 STATS FBISOK. 



4a 



Cholera Morbus, 

Diarrhoda, - ^ - 

Delirium, Nervosum, - 

Dyspepsia, 

Diabetes, 

Debility, General, 

Dysentery, - 

Erysipelas, 

Enteritis, 

Endocarditis, 

Fever, Intermittent, - 

Fever, Remittent, 

Fever, Communis (Eph.), 

Felon, . - - 

Fenniculus, 

Gbstritis, 

Hepatitis, Acute, 

Hepatitis, Chronic, 

Hepatization, Lung (Chronic), 

Hemorrhoids, 

Hernia, 

Insomnia, 

Jaundice, 

Intergitium, 

Lumbago, 

Masturbation, 

Malingering, 

Neuralgia, 

Nephretis, - 

Odontalgia, 

Opthalmia, - 

Otorrhea, 

Phthisis, Pulmonary, - 

Pleurisy, 

Prolapsus, Anis, 

Palpitation, Cordis, 

Pericarditis, 

Pharyngitis, 



1 

48 
1 

18 
1 
8 
1 
i 
1 
1 
2 

17 

11 
2 



6 
2 
2 

11 

1 

11 

1 

1 

& 

6 

4 

28 

8 

10 

12 

1 

2 

7 

i 
1 

2 

1 



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44 ANNUAL 


BXPOBT 




Sheumatism, Syphilitic, 




• 


. 16 


Betentio, Urin», 




- 


-1 1 


Bbeumatism, Chronic, 


- 


- 


10 


Syphilis, Secondary, - 




- 


2 


Syphilis, Chronic, 


- 


- 


8 


Syphilis, Tertiary, 




- 


. 8 


Stricture, 


. 


- 


5 


Sprain, 




- 


. 2 


Suppressive Uarin», 


- 


- 




Scald, 




- 


• 


Spermatorrhea, Chronic, 


- 


- 


10 


Stomatitis, - 




. 




Sciotica, 


- 


- 




Tonsilitis, 




- 


- 10 


Taenia, 


- 


- 




Urticaria, 




- 




Ulcer, Syphilitic, 


- 


- 




Vertigo, - • - 




- 




Worms, 


- 


- 




Wounds, Slight, 




- 


. 31 



Total, . - - - 45» 



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Google 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Warden arid Board oj Inipectora of the 
Minnesota State Prison: 

Oentlbmen : I sake pleasure in submitting the follow* 
iug report as Chaplaia of the prison : 

My experience in this capacity has been short, having 
been appointed in August last. Since that time we have • 
held religious services in the chapel every Sabbath at nine 
o'clock A. M. I have been very much pleased with the uni- 
form good order on the part of the prisoners in passing in 
and out of the chapel, amounting almost to military preci- 
sion ; and I have been especially pleased with the close at- 
tention given to the pulpit mmistrations, and the earnest* 
ness with which they enter into the singing. As we con- 
sider the singing an important part oi the chapel service, 
we have introduced a cheap *« hymn and tune books'* so that 
all may be supplied with books who will sing. 

There seems to be but Httle opportunity, outside of the 
regular Sabbath services, to do much with the prisoners in 
the jRray of religious instruction. I would state, however, 
that I have visited them to some extent at their cells out- 
side otl working hours, and trust that in the future I shall 
be able to do so more than in the past. I enjoy the work, 
and shall try to do all in my power for the moral reform of 
the prisoners. 

I am under great obligations to Warden Reed and Depu- 
ty Warden Williams for the cordial welcome given me when 
introduced to my duties, and the hearty co-operation on 

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46 ANNUAL BBFOBT. 

their part and those of all their assistants with me in my 
worK. * * 

I wish here to express my appreciation of the determina- 
tion manifested by the Warden not only to make lyiinnesota 
State Prison meet the object for which it is designed in the 
way of penalty, but also to make it a place of moral reform 
and mental improvement. As further evidence of this he 
has recently established a class for instruction in secular 
knowledge, which meets in the chapel every Sabbath after- 
noon, that being the only opportunity, the prisoners being 
engaged during the week in the work shops. This is a suc- 
cess, and doubtless many who entered the prison unable to 
read or write will be able to do so on retiring. 

I feel like saying in conclusion that in my judgment, if 
the same interest is taken in the direction of moral and 
mental improvement on the part of the prisoners as is man- 
ifested for them, they will retire from prison life better men 
than when they entered. 

I remain, gentlemen, 

Yours very respectfully, 

J. H. MACOMBER, 
Chaplain. 

Stillwateb, Minn., Nov. 80th, 1874. 



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[EZBOUTIYE DoGUHBzrr No. 9.] 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THJB 



MINNESOTA. 



STATE REFORM SCHOOL, 



FOR THB 



FISCAL TEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1874. 



TRANfiMITTBD TO THE LBGIBLATUBB AT THB SEVENTEENTH ANNT7AI 
SESSION, 1875. 



SAINT PAUL: 

BT. PAT7L PRESS COMPANY. 

1875. 



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BOARD OF MANAGER'S. 



OFHOEBS. 

D. W. INGERSOLL, St. Paul, President. 

Chief Jdstiob, S. J. B.M0MILLAN, St. Paul, Vice Pres. 

Hon. GEOBGE L. OTIS, St. Paul. 

Hon. C. PETTITT, Minneapolis. 

F. MoCOBMICE, Secretary. 

D. A. MONFORT, Treasurer. 

J. G. RIHELDAFFEB, Superintendent. 

JAMES W. BROWN, Assistant Superintendent. 

Mbs. C. C. RIHELDAFFEB, Matron. 

WM. MOTHERSILL, Chaise of Family and Teacher. 

Mb8. HANNAH M. CHAPMAN, Teacher. 

Miss LOUISA L. SMITH, Teacher. 



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REPORT. 



To His Excellency i O. K. Davis ^ Chvemor; and to the 
Honorable Legislature of the State of Minnesota : 

The Board of Managers and the Superintendent of the 
Minnesota State Reform School, have the honor to present 
this, their Eighth Annual Report. 

We have pursued the work intrusted to our management, 
with such a measure of care and diligence as its importance, 
to the State and to the youth committed to our care, neces- 
earily demands. 

The members of the Board are called to meet, at least 
once a month lor the transaction of business ; frequently, at 
other times, to consult and advise with the Superintendent, 
on matters connected with the interest of the Institution ; 
and while for these services no pecuniary compensation is 
received, we find an ample rewpd in the assured reforma* 
tion of many of the youth who have been committed to our 
guardianship. 

DISOIFLINB. 

The discipline of the Institution has been maintained fully 
up to the standard of former years. 

It has been our constant aim to make the school a suit- 
able home for these youth ; a home in which order, indus- 
try, application to stndy, and obedience to law are incul- 
cated and required. 

The largest liberty, consistent with good morals, just 
treatment of each other, and a proper respect for superiors, 
is permitted to the inmates in their amusements. Playful- 
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4 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 

ness iB a prominent characteristic of youth, and ours are not 
stinted in their allowance of fun and frolic. There is in 
this school none of that dejected, self-deprecatory, and 
hang-dog look, too often to be seen in institutions where 
youth are confined, either for correction or in compliance 
with the behests of pity and benevolence. 

HEALTH. 

^ During nine months of the year, we were blessed with 
uninterrupted health. On the 29th of August, Typhoid 
Fever made its appeaVance in the school. Twenty -two boy» 
have had the fever, of which number three have died ; two 
died in the school, the third was removed by his mother 
and died at his home in St. Paul. Two of the eipployees- 
have had the fever, and one of the children of the Superin- 
tendents, a daughter seven years old, died of it, November 
27th. 

Dr. Chas. E. Smith and Dr. D. W. Hand, were the at* 
tendant physicians ; they were prompt and diligent in their 
care of the sick, and all that could be done by the skill of 
physicians and careful nursing, was done for the sick. 

At the request of the Superintendent, Dr. Smith has made 
a statement in writing, touching the endemic, which is here- 
with presented as a part of this report : 

St. Paul, Nov. 28, 1874. 

Bev. J. G. mhelda^er^ Superintendent State Reform 
School: 

Sir: — In compliance with your request I send you an 
account of the endemic of Typhoid Fever, which has been 
prevailing in the Reform School. 

Typhoid Fever made its appearance on Aug. 29th in a 
boy in the large boys' dormitory. He was immediately 
transferred to the Hospital building, and no new cases were 
developed until about Sept. 2()th, when several others were^ 
taken « so that in a few days there were eight new cjases m 
Hospital. 



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BBFORM BOHOOL. v 6 

Other oases developed themselves, until Oct. 8th, when 
in all there had been at that date thirteen cases. On Oct. 
^th. Dr. D. W. Hand took charge of the sick, on account of 
my absence from the city, and he reports seven new cases 
between this date and the 11th Nov. Since that time two 
new cases have developed — one a small boy, and one a 
member of your own family. The boys attacked were nearly 
equally divided between the two dormitories, so that it 
cannot be traced to any local cause in their sleeping apart- 
ments. 

In the above number of cases four have resulted fatally, 
three of the inmates, and one in your family. A careful 
survey of the buildings and surroundings, both by Dr. 
Hand and myself, the water closets, drains, wells, etc., fails 
to reveal any local cause for the disease. 

At the present time there are but two sick, among the 
inmates, one convalescing and the other still ill. 

Some of the cases were very severe, but the majority of 
them were not more so than we ordinarily meet with in the 
-city. 

Bespectfullyy 

Chas. E. Smith. 

numbeb of inmates. 

There have been received during the year 81 boys ; mak- 
ing the whole number received since the opening of the 
Institution, in January, 1868, 253. There were in the 
school December 1, 1873, 110 boys, and 10 girls; in all, 
130. The whole number in connection during the year has 
"been 157. 28 boys and 8 girls have been discharged, 3 
1)oys have escaped, and 3 have died, leaving the number 
present December, 1874, 108. 

FBOM WHAT COUNTIES BEOBIVED. 

Anoka, .--.-- 2 

Orow Wing, - - - - - - 1 

Hennepin, ------ 5 

Houston, - « - - - - 1 

Lyon, - - . - - - - 1 

Meeker, ... - . i 



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6 



AmsrUAL HBPOBT. 



Bamsey, - 
Bice, - 
Sherburne, 
Washington, 
Wabasha. - 
Winona, 



12 
2 

1 
1 
1 
S 



FOB WHAT OOMMITTED. 



Burglary, 

Incorrigibility, 

Larceny* 



1 

16 
U 



FLAOE OF BIBTH. 



Minnesota, 

Illinois, 

Indiana, 

Wisconsin, 

New York, - 

New Brunswick, 

Louisiana, 

Kentucky, 

Sweden^ 

Switzerland, 

England, 

Ireland, 



15 

1 

1 
^ 1 

» 
. 1 

1 
. 1 

1 
. 1 

2 
. 2 



NATIVITT OF PABENTS. 



Americans, 

Irish, 

Swede, 

Swiss, 

English, 

French, 

Germans, 



11 

a 

1 

1 

a 
1 

6 



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BEVOBM SCHOOL. 7 
EDUCATIONAL STATUS. 

Could not ready ..... 2 

Could read in 1st Beader, - - - - 5 

Could read in 2d Reader, - - - - 14 

Could read in 3d Header, - - - - 7 

Could read in 4th Header, ... 8 

AOB WHEN COMMITTED. 

16 years old, ..... 9 

15 years old, ..... 8 

14 years old, - . ... 8 

18 years old, - - - - - - 6 

12 years old, - - - - - 2 

11 years old, - - - - - - 4 

10 years old, - - - - - 2 

9 years old, * - - - - - 2 

SOCIAL CONDITION. 

HiO^e no father living, - - - - 11 

Orphans, - - - - - - 3 

Have step-fathers, . . • . i 

Have both parents living, - - - - 15 

Father only living, . . . . i 

SHOWING WHOLE NUMBEB SINCE THE OPENING OF THE INSTI*. 
TUTION, AND THE COUNTIES FBOM WHICH THET HAVE 
COME. 

Anoka, - - - - - 4 

Blue Earth, 10 

Brown, - - - - - 1 

Crow Wing, - - 1 

Carver, - - - - - - 8 

Dakota, ... . . g 

Faribault, 1 

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8 AJSrSTJAl4 BBPOBT. 

Fillmore, ... - - 5 

Goodhue, - . - - - - 4 

Hennepin, ----- 58 

Houston, ------ 1 

LeSueur, ----- 2 

Lyon, ...... 1 

Lac qui Parle, . . - . . 1 

Mille Lac, ------ 1 

Meeker, - - ' - - - 3 

Mower, - - - - - - 2 

Nicollet, 1 

Olmsted, ...... 2 

Bamsey, - - - - - 90 

Rice, .......9 

Steams, ------ 1 

Sherburne, ------ 1 

Washington, ----- 5 

Wabasha, ------ 6 

Winona, ------ 29 

Wright, ------ 1 

Freeborn, ----- 1 

Watonwan, - - - - - - 1 

Soldiers' Orphans, - - - - . 2 

OK WHAT OHABGBS. 

Larceny, - -•- - - -115 

Incorrigibility, ----- 120 

Arson, ------ 5 

Burglary, ----- 3 

Vagrancy, ------ 6 

Poisoning, ----- 1 

Truancy, - • - - . • - - 1 

NAnvrrr of pabents, 

American, * - - - - - 112 

German, - - - - . - 47 



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BEFOBM SCHOOL. 



Irish, 

French, 

Swedes, - 

English, 

Canadians, 

Norwegians, 

Bohemians, 

Scotch, 

Hollanders, 

Italians, 

Swiss, 

Unknown, 



48 
12 
8 
10 
4 
5 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 



EDUOATIONAL STATUS. 



Could not read, 
Coald read in First Reader, 
Could read in Second Reader, 
Could read in Third Reader, 
Could read in Fourth Reader, 
Could read in Fifth Reader, 



31 
61 
111 
41 
17 
15 



AGB WHEN OOIOIITTBD. 



16 years old, 

15 years old, 

14 years old, 

13 years old, 

12 years old, 

11 years old, 

10 years old, 

9 years old, 

8 years old, 

7 years old. 



32 
36 
38 
38 
37 
33 
20 
12 
4 



It will be seen from the foregoing statement, that the 
whole number now in the Institution is slightly less than at 
the beginning of the year. The decrease has been mainly 
2 

/Google 



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10 ANNUAL BBPOBfT. 

in the Female department. Not a single girl has been com* 
mitted during the year ; while those who had been receiyed 
during preceding years, were for the most part so far 
reformed that it was thought safe to discharge them. Those 
whose friends desired to take charge of them were sent to 
their homes, while for others suitable places were found, 
and employment provided. 

THE OIBLS DEPARTMENT. 

But a comparatively small number of girls have been 
sent to the Reform School ; only 16 in all ; but most of these 
were committed tor Larceny or worse oflfenses. The fact 
that so few girls have been committed is not to be attributed 
to the absence of proper subjects among the female juve- 
niles of the State. There are many who greatly need and 
would be benefited by the discipline and training of the 
Beiorm School, but the act, regulating commitments, is such 
as to make it almost impossible to secure the conmiitment of 
a girl upon a charge of incorrigibility ; it is only when con- 
victed of some crime that must be punished that they will 
be sent to the Beform School. 

We have had frequent applications during the past year, 
from mothers and other friends of incorrigible girls, for 
information, as to how they could secure their commitment; 
all we could do was to refer them to the law in the case ; 
but in trying to follow the steps prescribed by the law they 
found it impossible to secure the consent of the County 
Commissioners, which is required to all commitments for 
incorrigibility. 

The bad conduct of boys is more open send annoying to 
the community, and hence officials are more ready to seek 
their restraint and reformation. 

There is, however, but one feature in the law that your 
Board would respectfully suggest, may be working against 
the beneficent purpose of the State Reform School ; that 
feature which requires the counties from which the inmates 
are sent to be taxed for their support. We would galdly 

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RSFOKM BCHOOL. 11 

see every other bar against improper commitments remain. 
We deem it only necessary to lay before the Legislature the 
results of our experience in attempting the reformation of 
girls. Thirteen have gone out from the school; one is 
acting as assistant in the girls school , one is teaching a 
public school, four are at service in good families where 
they have good homes, and the remainder are with or under 
the care of their own friends. These girls were proper sub- 
jects for the school, it has been the means of saving them to 
themselves and their friends, and what it has done for them 
it could with the same agency have done for a larger number. 

DISOHABGED BOT8. 

We have i^ previous reports, called attention to the good 
effects of the training received in this Institution, as showD 
in the conduct of those who have been honorably fur* 
loughed. 

The number of discharged has been increasing each year, 
and is now greater than the' number in attendance. Since 
the discharged, now number 145, it is impossible longer to 
notice them individually in our annual reports. While we 
might select a number of cases .and present them as com* 
menditory of the good work being done, we should have to 
leave out a larger number equally worthy, we will therefore 
content ourselves with the following statement : 

We have a general knowledge of the standing and char- 
acter of the discharged ; they are to be found employed in 
stores, in shops, on farms, on railroads, in the pineries, and 
working in the mills ; some are learning trades, some attend* 
ing schools, and others are living at home, subject to their 
parents. As a class, these boys have ceased to require the 
vigilance of police officers, or to make business for the 
courts. We frequently hear from the most. trustworthy 
sources, of the good conduct of our boys, and are able to 
say again, as we have said before, «* as a class they will not 
suffer in comparison with any equal number of boys of the 
same^age, taken as they come, in any part of the State.^ 

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12 ANNUAL BBFOBT. 

HOLIDAT8. 

As in the past, the holidays have been devoted to the 
pleasure of the inmates. The Fourth of July, Christmas 
and New Year's Day, Thanksgiying, and their usual day at 
the State Fair. 

During the summer* we have devoted one half hour each 
day to military drill. The boys made rapid progress in ac- 
quiring a knowledge 6f the various ' movements, and were 
much interested in these exercises. Not being able to pro- 
euve suitable arms, we have been unable to progress in this 
undertaking as far as we might otherwise have done. But 
the drill has been good for the boys, and has aided in the 
discipline of the school. 

In August we took the whole school out for a week's en- 
<)ampment, upon a lake about seven miles from the Institu- 
tion. We took with us provisions and tents ; were well 
supplied with boats and fishing tackle ; caught all the fish 
we could eat, gave ourselves up to the enjoyment of the va- 
cation, and returned at the close oi the week feeling that no 
other one hundred boys had enjoyed that week more than 
the Beform School boys. 

STEAM HBATING. 

The last Legislature made an*appropriation ot $5,500.00 
for heating with steam the Shop building and New Family 
building. 

When the board came to receive bids for this work, it was 
discovered that there had been a very large decline in the 
price of steam pipe, and all other materials used in steam 
fitting. There was also a sharp competition between differ- 
ent firms, for the contract, hence the bids were much lower 
than had been anticipated ; so that with the addition of a few 
hundred dollars we were able to heat the Main building 
also. The furnaces of the Main building were burned out, 
and to have replaced them would have involved an expense, 
almost if not quite equal to the amount necessary to supple- 

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BEFpBM SOHOOL. 13 

ment the appropriation for steam heating. Besides it had 
always been impossible to heat the Main building with the 
furnaces. Stoves had to be used in all the rooms except the 
dormitory. Thus greatly increasing the risk from fire, and 
consuming an unnecessarily large amount of fuel. Id 
view of these facts, and also of the fact that the introduction 
of steam which lessen our expense for insurance about one- 
third, it was thought in every way better to complete the 
steam heating in all the three buildings. 

The contract for the Shop and Family building was 
awarded to J. H. Woolsey & Co., of St. Paul. The con- 
tract for heating the Main building was awarded to Wilson 
& Bodgers, of St. Paul. Both of these firms have done 
their work in a satisfactory manner, and have warranted the 
heating of the rooms up to the degree of temperature re- 
quired in the contracts. 

WOBK OF SHOPS. 

Shoe Shops. Db. 

To stock, tools and wages of foreman, - $ls411 71 

Cb. 
By cash received, r - $221 20 

By boots, shoes, and mending for 

school, - - - 866 12 

By stock on hand, - - 520 00 



$1,607 32 



By balance, - - - - - $195 61. 

Tin Shop. Db. 

To stock and wages of foreman, - - $3,606 37 

Cb. 
By cash received from sales, - $2,665 80 
By work, supplies, new furnanoe, 

&c., for the Institution, - 548 31 

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14 ANNUAL REPORT. 

By wares and stock on hand, 1436 73 



$4,350 84 



$744 57 



By balance in favor of shop* 

Tailor Shop. 



The work in the tailor shop is exclusively for the inmates. 
Under the instruction of a foreman the boys manufacture 
fill the shirts, pants, coats and caps, used in the Institution. 



Articles of Clothing Made. 



Hickory shirts, - 
Bed flannel shirts, 
Cloth coats, 
** pants, 
•• caps, 
" overalls, 



600 
450 
160 
200 
176 
400 



To this is added all the mending and a variety of other 
sewing necessary in so large a family. 



FABM AND GARDEN CROPS. 



Beans, green and dry 

Beets, - . . 

Cabbages, - 

Celery, 

Carrots, 

Cucumbers 

Currants, - 

Corn, green 80, dry 320 

Forage, 

Lettuce^ 

Melons, 

Onions, 

Oats, 



40 bushels 

55 
300 heads 
500 " 
320 bushels 

25 

3 

400 

40 tons 
800 heads 
500 

120 bushels 
350 •* 



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St 



BEFORM SOHOOL. 15 

Parsnips (io the ground) * - 50 bushels 

Peas, . - . - - 12 •* 

Potatoes, . . • . 720 " 

Pumpkins, . - - . 80 

Radishes, .... 5 

Raspberries, .... 100 quarts 

Strawberries, - - - 400 " 

Plums, ..... 18 bushels 

Squashes, - - - - 40 *• 

Tomatoes, - - - - 170 " 

Gfapes, . . - . 300 pounds 

YALUB OF BEAL AND PEBSONAL PBOPBBTT AT OBIQINAL OOST. 

First purchase of land and buildings, with new 
buildings erected on same up to Dec. 1st, 

1874, - - . . $59,800 00 

Hare property purchased, - - 7,000 00 

Furnace in building, - - - 500 00 

St^eam heating apparatus, - 6,300 00 

Furniture in GirlsVHouse, ... 1,20000 





$74,800 00 


PBBSONAI.. 




Fiye horses, - - - . - 


. $ 600 00 


Eight cows, .... 


280 00 


Wagons, harness, sleighs, bobs, plows, etc.. 


1,200 00 


Sixty-five tons of coal, ... 


747 00 


One hundred cords of dry wood. 


650 00 


Furniture, .... 


. 5,000 00 


Tin shop tools and stock, ... 


1,600 00 


Shoe shop tools and stock. 


. 500 00 


Oats, com, roots, &c., ... 


400 00 


Cloth and ready made clothing, - 


. 750 00 


Other supplies estimated, . - . 


400 00 



$12,127 00 
Total of real and personal, - - $86,927 00 



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16 ANNUAL BEPOBT. 

LIBBABT. 

There is no privilege connected with the school more 
highly prized than that of the Library. 

The books have been well taken care of, and show only 
the wear of irequent readings. We have purchased an 
addition of 249 volumes, and are happy to acknowledge a 
donation of 14 vols., by D. D. Merrill, of St. Paul. 

Macauley's History of England in 5 vols, from D. J. 
Lawrence. 

The Federal Government, The Play Fellow, and Bound 
Graphic, from Eugene Truesdell. Self Helps and Better 
Life, from a lady. One volume from Prof. J. H. Gates. 
Whole number of volumes in Library 846. 

The Board of managers would respectfully recommend to 
the present Legislature, the following appropriation for the 
current year : 

For officers' salaries, wages of employes and keep- 
ing up repairs, .... $10,000 
For general current expenses, - - 17,000 
Signed by order of the Board, 

J. G. RIHELDAFFER, 

Superintendent. 



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BSFOBM SOHOOL. 



17 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Minnesota Slate Reform School December 1, 1874. 



^ BeceipU. * 

Balance in Treasury last annual report $3,045 30 

From bills receivable 315 38 

State of Minnesota. ^ 35,500 00 

"■' "' 2,665 80 

124 40 

221 20 
336 01 



Tin Shop. 

Farm products 

>Shoe shop 

Soldiers' Orphans* Home. 



-•42,208 09 



Expenditures. 

Salaries of officers and employes $7,720 42 

House ftirnlshing ( new building, &c. ) 2,060 69 

Living 7,504 84 

Livery 42 00 

Books, stationery and printing 383 78 

Medical (medicines and medical attendance) 726 78 

Blacksmithlng 93 94 

Clothing 8,644 04 

Stock, harness and implements 1,277 16 

Tin shop 3,812 77 

Shoeshop 1,411 71 

Fuel 3,540 24 * 

Incidental expenses 261 10 

Steam heating 6,414 42 

Undertaking 54 00 

BnUding 299 99 

Improvements 798 81 

$39,916 69 

Balance in treasury. 2,261 40 

$42,208 09 



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18 ANNUAL BBPOBT. 



THE LA.A^. 



An Ad to secure proper commitmerUa to the Minnesota State 
Reform School. 

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Minnesota: 

Section 1. That whenever any iafant under the age of 
sixteen years shall have been duly convicted in any of the 
courts of this State, of any crime punishable by imprison* 
ment, except of the crime of murder, it shall be the duty 
of the magistrate before whom such conviction is had, to 
commit the said infant so convicted to the guardianship of 
the Board of Managers of the Minnesota State Reform 
School. 

Seo. 2. That no Justice of the Peace shall have power 
to commit any infant to said Reform School upon a charge 
of incorrigibility, unless such charge is proved by at least 
two disinterested witnesses, and no commitment for incorri 
gibility shall be sufficient to justify the admission of the 
said incorrigible infant into the Reform School unless such 
commitment be accompanied by the written consent of at 
least three of the County Commissioners ot the proper 
county to ^hich said infant belongs, and which is charge- 
able with the expense of clothing, maintenance and instruc-. 
tion of such infant. 

Sbo. 3. That in case any infant under the age of sixteen 
years shall have been duly convicted of any other crime, 
except that of incorrigibility, then no consent of the County 
Commissioners shall be necessary to authorize the commit- 
ment ; but in all cases of conviction before a Justice of the 
Peace, the justice shall reduce all the evidence taken by him 
to writing, and state the name, age and residence of each 
witness examined, and transmit the same forthwith to the 
chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, who shall, 
without delay, submit the same to the Judge of the District 
Court for said county, whose duty it shall be to examine the 

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BBVOBM SOHOOL. 19 

same and approve or disapprove of such conviction. If the 
conviction of the justice is approved, the minor shall forth- 
with be committed to the said Board of Managers ; if dis- 
approved, no other proceeding shall be had. 

Seo. 4. Tliat if it shall appear to the County Commis- 
sioners that the parents of any infant committed for incor- 
rigibility are able to pay the expense of clothing, mainten- 
ance and instruction of such infant, then, and in th&t case, 
the said county having paid to the State Reform School the 
charges for the clothing, maintenance and instruction of 
such infant, may recoyer the same of the parents of such 
infant. 

Sec. 5. This act shall be in force and take effect from 
and after its passage. 

Approved February 26, 1872. 



An act erUitled an act to consolidate the various acts relating 
to the Minnesota State Reform School and to amend the 
same. 

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State qf Minnesota: 

Seotiok 1. That the Minnesota State Beform School 
shall be managed and conducted on behalf of the State and 
as a State institution, by a board of four managers, three of 
whom shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of busi- 
ness. That the persons now constituting said board shall 
continue to serve as managers for the term for which they 
were respectively appointed, and on the second Monday of 
January of each and every year hereafter, the Governor of 
this State shall appoint one competent person to serve a^ 
manager in said board for four years ; and within twenty 
days after such annual appointment, the Governor shall des- 
ignate one of said managers to act as President of said board 
for the period of one year, and until his successor shall be. 
designated ; and the Governor shall duly notify said board 
of such appointment at their first regular meeting thereafter ; 
and the said managers shall always, at their first regular 
meeting after the appointment of their President, elect, by 
a plurality of votes, such other officers of the said board as 
may be deemed by them expedient; and whenever any 
vacancy shall occur in said board by death, lesigaation, or 
otherwise, the Governor shall fill the same by appointment, 

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20 ANNUAL BVPORT. 

and the appointee, shall hold only for the unexpired term of 
the person whose place he is appointed to fill. The managers 
in said board shall in all cases hold over after the expiration 
of the term tor which they shall have been respectively ap- 
pointed, until their successors respectively shall have been 
appointed and qualified. No member ot the board of man- 
agers shall receive any compensation for his services. 

Sec. 2. That the board of managers shall keep said insti- 
tution provided with suitable buildings and grounds in the 
county of Ramsey, and shall establish such regulations 
respecting the religious and moral education, training, em- 
ployment, discipline, and safe keeping ot its inhabitants as 
may be deemed expedient and proper. 

Sbo. 3. That it shall be the duty of the board of mana- 
gers to receive, to the extent of the means placed at their 
disposal, and of the accommodations afforded by the build- 
ings and grounds belonging to said school, all infants under 
their care and guardianship, and the same to keep during 
their minority, or until discharged under the rules of said 
board ; males under the age of sixteen years, and females 
under the age of fifteen years, committed to said school, in 
any of the following modes, to- wit : 

First — Infants committed by a justice ot the peace, on the 
complaint and due proof thereof, by the parent, guardian or 
next friend of said infant, that by reason of incorrigible or 
vicious conduct, such infant has rendered his or her control 
beyond the power of parent, guardian or next friend, and 
made it manifestly requisite that from regard to the morals 
and future welfare of such infant, he or she should be placed 
under the guardianship of the managers of the Minnesota 
State Reform School. 

Second — Infants committed by the authority aforesaid, 
when complaint and due proof have been made that such in- 
fant is a proper subject for the guardianship of the managers 
of the said Minnesota State* Ref6rm School, in consequence 
of vagrancy, or incorrigibly vicious conduct, and that from 
the moral depravity or other insuperable obstacle, on the 
part of the parent, guardian or next friend in whose custody 
such infant may be, such parent, guardian or next friend is 
incapable or unwilling to exercise the proper care and disci- 
pline over such incorrigible and vicious infant. 

Third — Infants who shall be taken and committed as va- 
grants, or upon any criminal charge, or duly convicted of 
any criminal offenses, such as in the judgment of the court 
before which such conviction may be had, may be deemed 

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BBFOBM SCHOOL. • 21 

proper reason for such commitment ; and the said managers 
shall have the power to place the said children committed to 
their care during their minority, at such employment, and 
cause them to be instructed in such branches of useful knowl- 
edge as may be suitable to their years and capacities ; and 
they shall have the power at their discretion to bind out the 
said children, with their consent, as apprentices, for the 
period of their minority, to such persons and at such places, 
to learn such trades and employments as, in the judgment of 
the said managers, will be most conducive to their reforma- 
tion and amendment, and will tend to the future benefit and 
advantage of such children. 

Sec. 4. That it shall be the duty of any justice of the 
peace, compitting a vagrant, or incorrigible, or vicious in- 
fant, as aforesaid, in addition to the adjudication required 
by the third section of this act, to annex to the commitment 
the names and residences of the different witnesses examin- 
ed before him, and the testimony given by them respectively, 
on which the said adjudication was founded. 

Sec. 5. It shall be the duty of the sheriff or any consta- 
ble of the respective counties, or in case of their absence, of 
. any suitable person appointed by the court for such purpose 
to convey any infant committed as aforesaid, to said school, 
and justicee of the peace and constables and sheriffs per- 
forming services under this act, shall be paid the same fees 
as are allowed for similar services in criminal cases, and the 
officer conveying any infant committed, as aforesaid, to said 
school, shall receive therefore the same compensation as is 
allowed for the conveyance of prisoners to the State prison : 
such fees and compensation to be paid out of the treasury of 
the county from which such infant was committed. 

Seo. 6. That the children received by said managers, un- 
der the conviction of any court within this State, shall be 
clothed, maintained and instructed by the said managers, at 
the public expense of the proper county from which they 
came ; and the accounts of said children shall be kept by the 
managers in an intelligible and proper manner. 

Seo. 7. That the said managers may, from time to time, 
make by-laws, ordinances, and regulations relative to the 
management, government, . instruction, discipline, employ- 
ment and disposition of the said children, while in the said 
Beform School, as they deem proper, (the same being not 
contrary to law) and may appoint such officers, agents and 
servants as they may consider necessary to transact the busi. 
ness of said school, and may designate their duties and sal- 

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22 * AurxruAL bbpobt. 

aries. And further, the said managers shall annually lay 
before the Legislature of the State,/on the first day of each 
session thereof, a report setting forth the number of children 
received into the said school, the disposition which shall 
have been made of them by instructing them or employing 
them therein, or by binding them out as apprentices ; the 
receipts and expenditures of said managers, and generally 
all such facts and particulars as may tend to exhibit the effects 
whether beneficial or otherwise, ot the said institution. 

Sec. 8. That all persons committed to the Minnesota 
State Reform School, shall be allowed in all casses of sick- 
ness spiritual advice and spiritual ministration from any rec- 
ognized clergyman ot the denomination or church to which 
said inmates may respectively belong ; such advice and min- 
istration to be given within sight of the person or persons 
having charge oi such inmates ; but if the sick person or 
persons seeking it, desire religious consolation out of hear- 
ing of any ofiicer of said institution, they, in such cases, shall 
not be debarred the right by any rule of said school. 

Sec. 9. That the grounds and buildings erected thereon, 
for the use of the said school, shall be exempt from tax- 
ation. 

Sec. 10. That no person or persons, corporation or body 
politic, shall be permitted to open, lay out, or construct any 
road or highway, either public or private, under any pre- 
tence whatever, upon or through any ground owned and 
occupied by said school, without the consent of the mana- 
gers thereof. 

Seo. 11. All acts or parts of acts heretofore passed for 
the incorporation of the said Minnesota State Reform School 
and all act amendatory thereto, not necessary to carry out 
any provisions of this act, not contained in or incorporated 
herein, and all acts inconsistent with this act, are hereby 
repealed. 

Seo. 12. This act shall take effect and be In force from 
and after its passage. 

Approved March 3, 1870. 



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BSFOBM SCHOOL. 23 

An act to amend anaotto consolidaile the various acts relating 
to the Minnesota /State Reform School^ and to amend the 
same^ approved March thirds one thousand eight hundred 
and seventy. 

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Minnesota : 

SEOnoN 1. That section four of an act entitled an act, 
entitled an act to consolidate the various acts relating to the 
Minnesota State Reform School, and to amend the same, ap- 
proved March third, one thousand eight hundred and seventy, 
be amended by adding thereto the following proviso^ to< 
wit ; That no justice of the peace shall commit any infant 
to the State Reform School under the provisions of this act 
until at least one member of the board of county commis- 
sioners of the county to be charged with the maintenance of 
such infant shall have signified, in writing, his consent to 
such commitment, and such written consent shall be attached 
to the commitment. 

Sbo. 2. This act shall take eflfect* and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

Approved March 4, 1871. 



An act for an act entitled an act to apprcpriate moneys for 
the support of the Minnesota State Reform School for the 
year A. D. one thousand eight hundred and seventy^three. 

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Minnesota: 

Section 1. That the sum of sixteen thousand dollars, or 
BO much thereof as may be necessary, be and the same is 
hereby appropriated out of any moneys in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, for the general current expenses of 
the Minnesota State Reform School for the year one thousand 
eight hundred and seventy- three. 

Seo. 2. And the further sum of ten thousand dollars, 
be and the same is hereby appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for repairs and 
other expenses appertaining to the real estate of the said 
Reform School, paying salaries of officers, teachers and em- 
ployes, furniture and addition to library. 

Seo. 3. That section six of an act to consolidate the 
various acts relating to the Minnesota State Reform School, 

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24 AUNIUL BEPOBT. 

and to amend the same, approved l^rch third, one thousand 
eight hundred and seventy, be amended to read as follows, 
viz.: 

Sec. 6. That the children received by said managers 
under the conviction of any court within this State, shall be 
clothed, maintained and instructed by the said managers, 
at the public expense of the proper county from which they 
came ; the accounts of said children shall be Icept by the 
managers in an intelligible and proper manner, and shall be 
presented to the state auditor at the end of each year, and 
the state auditor shall thereupon cause the amount due from 
each county to be entered upon the tax duplicate ot said 
counties respectively, and the same shall be collected and 
paid into the state treasury, like other state taxes. 

Sec. 4. This act shall take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

Approved March 10, 1873. 



An Act to secure Liberty of Oonsctenee and Equal Rights 
in Matters of Beligion to the Inmates of State InstitU' 
turns. 

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Minnesota: 

Section 1. That all persons committed to any state 
prison or reform school or other place of confinement in 
said state, shall be allowed spiritual advice and spiritual 
ministration from any recognized clergyman of the de- 
nomination or church to which such persons so committed 
or received may respectiV^ely belong, and have belonged 
prior to their being so committed or received into such 
state prison or reform school, or other place of confinement, 
such advice and ministration to be given within the prison 
or retorm school or other building where the inmates there- 
of are required by law to be confined or imprisoned in such 
manner as will secure to such persons the free exercise of 
his religious belief; and such religious consolation, advice 
and ministration shall be allowed separate and apart, and 
out of the presence and hearing of any person other than the 
clergyman who is ministering to such inmates. Such clergy- 
man shall have the right, at the times fixed as hereinafter 
provided, and in all cases of serious sickness, without 
regard to time, to visit either of said institutions and to 

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RBFOBM SCHOOL. 26 

see and oommuDicate freely and untrammeled, with such oC 
said inmates as belong to the church or society of which he 
is a clerfryman. 

Sbo. 2. It shall be the duty of the board of managers, 
or persons or officers having the control and management of 
said institutions* to set apart not less than one hour (and 
more if necessary) on the first day of each week, in which 
any of the clergymen in good standing ^f any church or de- 
nomination may freely minister to and impart moral and 
religious instruction to those of the said inmates or children 
who respectively belong thereto prior to their being so com- 
mitted or received therein, and to afford and grant to such 
clergyman such reasonable and proper facilities as may be 
necessary to enable them to freely and properly discharge 
their duties as ministers and spiritual advisers to the said 
inmates ; and to provide and furnish to such clergymen on 
such occasions a room or apartment whereby he may be en- 
abled to freely and properly discharge his duties as such 
clersryman ; Provided^ That the religious denomination to 
which, the parents of any child or minor so committed or re- 
ceived into either of said institutions belonged or was a 
member, shall be considered the denomination to which such 
child or minor belongs, provided all such religious ministra- 
tions shafll be given between the hours of nine o'clock 
in the forenoon and five o'clock in the afternoon, except in 
special cases, such as sickness when such ministrations may 
be given at any hour, and that the board of officers in charge 
of such institutions shall designate to each denomination 
which of the hour or hours so designated when a clergyman 
of such denomination shall <»mmence and impart such min- 
istration and instruction and the time they shall occupy, 
which time shall be in accordance with the rules of such 
• denominations, giving to each denomination an equal 
' amount of time, without partiality or unjust discrimination 
whatever. 

Seo. 3. All sectarian practices, except by said clergy- 
man as aforesaid, are hereby prohibited, and no officer of 
any state institution, or other person, shall interfere with or 
attempt to influence, control or change the religious belief 
or opinions of any of said inmates ; nor shall an}' of said 
inmates be required to attend any religious services or de- 
votions in any of said institufions against their own free will, 
if they have attained their majority and if minors shall not 
be so required contrary to the expressed directions of the 
parent or guardian or clergyman having spiritual charge of 
4 

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26 AKNUAL BBFOBT. 

^aid iDmates respectively, and in all matters appertaining 
to religion ibe rights of conscience and the free exercise 
thereoi, shall be scrupulously respected and guarded, pro- 
vided that nothing herein contained shall be construed to 
prohibit or limit such freedom of speech among the em- 
ployees or inmates of said institutions as is permitted by the 
rules and regulations thereof not in conflict with the spirit 
ot this act. 

Seo. 4. All acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this 
act, are hereby repealed. 

Sec. 5. This act shall take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

Approved March 5, A. D. 1874. 



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[RxscuTivjs Document No. 10.] 



STATISTICS 



OF 



MINNESOTA 



FOR 1874. 



BEING THE 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OP THE COMMISSIONER 
OP STATISTICS. 



SAINT PAUL: 

ST. PAUL PBSSS OOMPANT. 
1875. 



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REPORT. 



State of MmNESOTA, 
Offioe of the Seobbtabt of 
January 30th 



rA, ) 

)F State, > 
, 1875. 3 



7o his JSxcellency Ouahman K. Davis ^ Governor: 

m 

Sib : — I have the honor to transmit herewith the sixth an- 
nual report of the Assistant Secretary of State, as Commis- 
flioner of Statistics. 

C. F. SOLBERG, 
Assistant Secretary oj State. 



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STATIBTIOS OV mNKBSOTA. 



AGRICULTURE- 



The present report on agriculture embraces : 

(a) Statements concerning cultivated acreages and yields 
of products in tbe year 1873, with tables showing aggre- 
gates and averages by counties. 

(b) Preliminary statements regarding tbe breadths as- 
signed to each crop in the year 1874, with an estimate of 
aggregate yields in 1874, and acreage tables by counties. 

(c) A report on live stock in 1874, with tables showing 
the number of each class by counties. 

{d) Returns concerning the planting of forest trees on 
bur prairies under State and National enactment^ for the 
encouragement of tree planting. 

There is a steady improvement in the character of the re- 
turns. The obstacles to the collection of accurate informa- 
tion, interposed by prejudice and ignorance, are gradually 
disappearing, and no organized town with important agricul- 
ture to report is now omitted from the returns. For a state- 
ment of towns included in this report, the Commissioner 
refers to pages 238-41 of his last report, to which a num- 
ber of new towns and districts were added in the year 1874. 

The acreage in each of the several crops in the year 1873 
were as follows : 



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AGBIOULTUBIG. 



Prodaei. 



Wheat 

Oatt 

Corn 

Barley.. 

Rye 

Buckwheat 

Acres in grain crops . 

Beans 

Potatoes 

Hops 

Sorghnm. < 

Cnltiratodhay 

Flax .«• 

MisoellaneoQs products. . . 

Total In 1878 

Baported acreages in 1878 

Increase for 1878 



Acres. 


Per cent 
oftotol 
acreage. 


1,648.713 

368,493 

809,460 

86,501 

6,988 

9,686 


66.24 
16.76 
8.95 
1.68 
0.30 
0.11 

0.06 
1.18 


8,171,824 

i;]34 

26,360 

194 

747 

104,686 

12,114 

80,884 


0.06 
4.47 
0.68 
0.89 


2,337.782 
8,072,603 


99.97 


266,870 



Increase or decrease 


since 1672. 


Increase . 


.881,404 


Decrease. 


. 3,965 


tt 


7,005 


tc 


. 21,884 


<« 


. 4,363 


" • 


915 


C( 


348 


Increase. 


290 


(C 


101 


Decrease. 


112 


Increase • 


. 16,685 


Decrease. 


15 


Increase . 


. 6,988 



The following table shows the proportlbn of the cultiva- 
ted area of the state assigned to each crop in the past four 
years: 





Per cent, of caltirated 
acreage. 




Per cent, of oultiyated 
acreage. 




1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1878. 


1870. 


1871. 


1878. 


1673. 


^lieat 


61.06 
19 00 
10.69 
8.88 
0.83 
0.83 


60.79 
16.66 
11.09 
8.68 
0.46 
0.20 


61.14 
17.97 
10.44 
8.74 
0.64 
0.17 


66.24 
16.76 
8.06 
1.62 
0.80 
O.ll 


Beans 


0.11 
1.14 
0.02 
0.04 
8.15 


0.08 
1.19 
0.01 
0.07 
3.49 


0.07 
1.26 

"6.04 
4.29 
0.66 
0.71 


0.05 
1 18 


Oats. 


Potatoes 

Hops 

Sorgham 

Cnliivated hay.. 
Plax 


Oorn. ...• •... .... 




Barley 


0.08 


Bye 


4 47 


Buckwheat. 


0.62 
0.80 


Misc. products.. 


0.40 


"0.48 



The number of acres under each crop in the past four 
years were : 





1870. 


1871. 


1672. 


1878. 


oats...""'.!.*;'.*.;!i!.M 

Com 

HapIat • 


1,019,744 

317,211 

176,489 

64,766 

8940 

3818 

19,086 

1,846 

'311 

786 

62,690 


334,796 

200,184 

64.666 

8,061 

3,697 

21,429 

1,606 

273 

1,244 

02,968 


1,867,309 

872,478 

216,466 

56 786 

11,366 

8,601 

26,061 

1,482 

93 

659 

88,990 

12,129 

14,896 


1,648,713 

866,493 

209,460 

36.601 


isariejr • 

Bye 

Buckwheat 


6,968 
2666 
96,360 


3eans 


1,134 


Hops 

Borghum 

CultlTatod hay 


194 

747 

104,086 

18,114 


Misc. products 


6,704 


8,638 


20,684 


Total acres 


1,609,270 


1,808,789 


8,072,608 


2,887,782 



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6 



STATISnOS OF MINNBSOTA. 



The quantities produced of the various products in the 
year 1873 are shown as follows : 



Wheat, basheli 26,408,486 

Oata, ** 12,644,686 

Corn, ** 6,467,868 

Barley, " 669,415 

Bye, " 96,877 

Backwheat, '« 29,446 

Beam, " 14,246 

Potatoes, '* 9,196,138 

Hops, pooxids. 67,891 

Sorghimi, call., syrup 68,826 

Caltlvated hay, tons 144,712 

Wildhay. tons 788,619 

Flax, bashels seed 100,863 

Maple sogar, iK>ands 139,962 

Maple syrup, gallons 17,641 

HiTesor bees,No 10,376 



Honey, pounds ^2i'2SJ 

Tobacco, pounds *'Ss 

Timothy seed, bashels 40,W2 

Clover seed, bushels ««l»x2 

Apple trees growing. No 8,8»,0» 

Apple trees In bearing. No 84,484 

Apples, bushels 30,807 

Qrape vines in bearing, No. 5?*Si 

Grapes, pounds ^J»S 

Strawberries, quarts ?*?'I?X 

Sheep, sheared, No }S»IS 

Woof, pounds 6»,8» 

Milch cows. No ,.J%»S1 

Butter, pounds ^^'U^'^J! 

Cheese, pounds 1,031,610 



Comparing as follows with the three last preceding years \ 



Wheat, bushels.., 
Oats, " 

Corn, " . , 

Barley, " 

Kyo, " .. 

Buckwheat, '' 

Total of {grain crops 

Beans, bushels 

Potatoes, " 

Cultivated hay, tons... 
Wild hay, " ... 

Hops, pounds 

Sorghum, gaUs., syrup 
Flax, pounds, fibre.... 
Flax, bushels, seed.... 
Clover, bushels, seed . . 
Timothy, bushels, seed 

Tobacco, pounds 

Strawberries, quarts . . 
Apples, trees growing 
Apples, trees in bear*g 
ApplOH, bush, produced 
Maple sugar, pounds.. 
Maple syrup, gaUons.. 
Bees, number of hives 
Honey, pounds... . 

Wool, »• 

Butter, »» 

Cheese, " 



1870. 



16,378,941 
9,896,164 
6,660,870 
1,618,686 
73,376 
63,369 



39,673,946 

24.960 

1,379,976 

78,689 

526,616 

188,806 

66,870 

88,609 

7,824 

8,689 

16,670 

20,678 

176,163 

891.128 

27,191 

10,766 

281,602 

17,320 

9,709 

188,418 

881,400 

6,806,866 

866,048 



1871. 



18.467,300 

10,689.484 

7,076,268 

1627.007 

130,928 

64,162 



83,046,189 

19,668 

8,168,636 

89,466 

606,146 

64,243 

78,425 

286,648 

14,421 

2,688 

16,823 

87,061 

288,961 

1,007,274 

68,638 

34,997 

141,982 

29,928 

12,698 

299,679 

366,232 

7,366,768 

469,147 



1872. 



82,069,876 

18,560,788 

7,148,246 

1,495,496 

182,780 

49.869 



43,479,937 

19,156 

8,078,349 

106,028 

743,414 

114,429 

78,095 

2,903,079 

71,762 

2,848 

15,888 

48,788 

8n,716 

1,734,861 

87,461 

39,663 

196,687 

17.894 

18,704 

239,948 

497.046 

8,898,630 

778,630 



1873. 



86,402,486 

19,544,686 

6,467,368 

660,415 

96,877 

S9,446 



46,200,196 

n5[,246 

8,196,138 

144,712 

763,619 

67,891 

63,226 

1,297,647 

100,853 

1,546 

40,092 



255,766 

3,839,038 

84,434 

20,307 

189,962 

17,641 

10,876 

134.266 

529.866 

10.140,316 

1,031,610 



The number of bushels averaged per acre of the under- 
mentioned crops for a series of years is stated as follows : 





1969. 


1860. 


1866. 


1867. 

14.64 
84.64 
81.96 
96 70 


1868. 


1860. 


1870. 


1871. 


1879. 


1878. 


Wheat 


19.00 


28.06 
42.39 
86.67 
83.93 
21.66 
16.73 


14.46 
88.39 
23.39 


17.91 
36.90 
37.33 
28.60 
19.02 
16.40 
13.00 
106.90 


17.70 
87.68 
80 73 
26.85 
16.32 
16.88 
16.12 
71.44 


16.07 
31.19 
81.66 
28.48 
18.58 
16.69 
13.52 
71.94 


12.98 


17.4o' 17.04 


Oato 


81.99 38.69 


34.04 


Corn 

Barley 


26.16 


86.36 
25.20 
16.94 
16 06 
13.05 
100.49 


32.99 
96.38 
16.07 
18.70 
19.98 


30.87 
18.86 


Bye 

Buckwheat 

Beans 




13.87 
10.98 
19.66 


PoUtoes 




138 00 


m.62 


101.89 


U7.89 


88.31 



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AGBIOULTUHB. i 

The following is an epitome of the statements concerning 
each product : 

WHBAT m 1873. 

Acres sown 1,548,718 

BnshelB produced, 26,402,486 

Average yield yer acre 17.04 

881 9404 acres were added in 1873 to the breadth assigned 
to wheat, a greater enlargement than in any former year. 
Comparing product with area, the crop, like that of 1872, 
was a good average one in yield, the total quantity exceed- 
ing by 4,343,110 bushels the bountiful harvest of the latter 
year. 

The following statement shows the yield of wheat in Min- 
nesota in the years named : 

Years. Bnsliels wheat produced. Ayerage* per acre. 

1859 2,874,416 19.00 

1880 6,101,483 32.06 

1886 9,476,000 22.07 

1868 7,921,442 14.46 

1867 10,014,828 14.64 

1868 15,882,022 17.91 

1869 16,587,621 17.70 

1870 15,872,941 15.07 

1871 18,467,800 12.28 

1872 22,059,875 17.40 

1878 26,402,485 17.04 

The spring of 1873, succeeding a winter of almost un- 
exampled severity, was unusually backward, cold and disa- 
greeable, and the preparation of the soil and putting in of 
the seed were in consequence materially delayed. Bainy 
weather prevailing during the early part of the growing 
season, wheat as well as other grains failed to get a good 
start on low lands throughout the state, the damage gener- 
ally proving greater than crops were able to onflow, de- 
spite the very favorable after-conditions that finally gave 
character to the season. To this cause, even more than to 
ravages by grasshoppers, must be ascribed the small yields 
in the new counties of the southwest, while in Freeborn, 



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8 



8TATISTIC8 OF MDnDBSOTA. 



Mower. Fillmore, Dodge, Waseca, Steele, Soott, Sibley, 
Le Sueur, Wright, Meeker and Morrison the effect was to 
reduce more or less the county averages. July and August 
and, indeed, June from the 20th were months of great 
beauty and pleasantness, with a positive warmth not ex- 
ceeded in the past fifteen years and yet so generally dif- 
fused as not to become oppressive ; a fair amount of rain 
fell at quite equal intervals, and the wheat crop was rapidly 
carried forward to maturity, was harvested in good condi* 
tion and proved to be above the average in most places 
where a good stand had been obtained in the spring. 

Seven counties in 1873 returned a yield each of one mil- 
lion bushels wheat and upwards, as follows : 





18fI8. 


1872. 


CoontiM. . 


Bashels 
wheat. 


Acres. 


Average. 


Bushels. 


Acres. 


Ayersge. 


Goodhue 


2,881,161 

9,'90e|676 
1.636;069 
1,476,864 
1,443,400 
1,004,441 


134,976 
116.064 
117,415 
80,690 
86,440 
78.699 
64,990 


90.97 
90.99 
18.81 
90.39 
17.0T 
18.86 
18.26 


9311.674 
1,901.273 
1,768,998 
1988:271 
l»466,15l 
1.166,990 
696,171 




19.76 


OlmBtod 


18.01 


Fillmore 

Wabasha 

Dakota 


I7.9S 
19.71 
18.04 


Winona 

Hower 


16.17 
10.67 






Beyen counties... 
Per cent, of 


18,037,029 

totol for 
49.41 


669,003 

the sUte: 
43 19 


19.48 


10,482,468 

Per cent, of 
47.83 


678,602 

total fbr 
45.66 


18.04 
the state: 



Showing an average yield of 19.48 bushels per acre on 
43 per cent, of the total wheat area for the year. Group- 
ing the remaining 55 wheat-reporting counties according to 
average yields without reference to produced quantities, 
twelve — Carver, Dodge, Douglas, Hennepin, Houston, Kan- 
diyohi, Le Sueur, MilleLacs, Ramsey, Rice, Steele and Wash- 
ington — each yielded 17 bushels per acre and over, together 
raising 5,652,577 bushels of wheat on 308,434 acres, or an 
average yield of 18.32 bushels per acre. Added to the 
first seven, this makes 19 counties with 18,689,599 bush- 
els on 977,437 acres, being an average yield of 19.12 bush- 
els per acre on 63.12 per cent, of the total wheat area for 



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AOBIOULTUBB. 



9 



the year. A third group ot ten counties — Chisago, Clay, 
Freeborn, Grant, McLeod, Nicollet, Otter Tail, Todd, 
Waseca and Wright — averaged each between 16 and 17 
bushels per acre, together producing 2,806,864 bushels on 
172,951 acres, an average of 16.22 bushels per acre. Added 
to the above nineteen, we have 29 counties raising together 
21,496,468 bushels on 1,150,388 acres, or a general aver* 
age of 18.68 bushels per acre on a trifle less than three- 
fourths of the total wheat area of the state in 1873. 

The remaining 83 counties, yielding each from 3 to 15 
bushels per acre, produced 4,906,022 bushels wheat on 
898,325 acres, an average of 12.84 bushels per acre. Their 
area embrace most of the newer settlements, including all 
districts ravaged by grasshoppers in 1873. Where not 
caused by these insects, their greatly reduced yields were 
mainly owing to an extraordinary amount of damage from 
wet and weeds, superinduced by the* absence of drainage 
and generally of fall ploughing, damage from cattle break- 
ing into the fields, and damage from the rotting of seed in 
the ground when taken from wheat wintered in the stack. 
In some western districts on both sides of the St. Paul & 
Pacific Main Line, drought in the latter part of the season 
contributed to the reduction of crops. The counties suf« 
fering from grasshoppers in 1873 were returned as follows : 



Coiinties. 



Brown 

Cottonwood 

jMknon 

I^on 

Mnrtln 

Mamy 

Nobles... .. 
Sodwood... 
SenTillo.... 

Bock 

Wntonwna.. 



Gnsshopper towns. 



Acres. 



8,401 
8,604 

10,181 
2.2S8 

13,496 
1,979 
4,787 
2,776 
6.706 
1,676 

13,474 



Basbels. 



68,736 
36,S91 
61,68S 
15,181 
66.380 
6,642 
31,108 
16.489 
64,692 
16,866 
79.076 



499,411 



Bemainlng towns. 



Acres. 


BashelB. 


26,684 
1.176 


370,919 
24,446 






1.883 


12.883 






3,866 

20.943 

1,836 

6,688 


49,792 
68 983 



61,866 



821,681 



Averaging 5.79 bushels wheat per acre in the towns from 
2 



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10 STATISTICS OF MINNBSOTA. 

which reports coDcerning grasshoppers were received by 
the Commissioner, and 13.38 bushels per acre in the re* 
maining towns of the same counties. In addition to the 
above, a town in Faribault raising 14,381 bushels on 1,683 
acres, was reported to have been touched by the grasshop- 
pers, making an aggregate of 75,840 acres in wheat devas- 
tated by these pests. Comparing the final returns for the 
above counties with the preliminary acreage statements ta- 
ken in the spring of 1873, the former are seen to be quite 
full, those for Martin and Faribault alone excepted, the 
final reports for these two counties falling short respectively 
1,589 and 6,397 acres, attributable, perhaps, mainly to the 
omission from the returns of acreages whose crops from any 
cause were completely destroyed. 

Aside from grasshoppers, the drawbacks throughout the 
state to a good crop ot wheat were largely such as in the 
older and better cultivated districts are measureably under 
the control of farmers, while in the newer counties they be- 
come controlling for want of experience and of the means 
necessary to proper cultivation. The season, upon the 
whole, will bear comparison with that in other Northern 
states. Throughout the country the winter was equally as 
severe and the spring equally as backward as in Minnesota. 
The Hudson opened five days later at Albany than the Mis- 
sissippi at St. Paul, and while in ^Minnesota there was no 
relapse into winter after the beginning of the growing sea- 
son, heavy falls of snow occurred in New England in the 
middle ot May, and the growing crops of Kansas and Ne- 
braska were seriously damaged by violent snow storms. 
Indeed, Minnesota was the banner state in the production 
ot wheat in 1873, the yield on an equally large area exceed 
ing that of any other state. 

OATS. 



Acres sown 86S,488 

Bushels produced 12,544,596 

Average yield per acre, bushels 84.04 



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AOBIOULTUSB. 



11 



The yield of oats in 1873 was determined mainly by the 
same causes that aflfected the wheat crop. The average 
ranged above 60 bushels per acre in all but four of the 
counties producing a good or middling crop of wheat, and 
fell below this figure in 29 of the 33 counties whose yield 
of wheat was only 15 bushels or less per acre. The follow- 
ing eight counties each produced half a million bushels of 
oats and upwards » being the seven that yielded not less 
than one million bushels of wheat each, with Blue Earth 
added: 





1878. 


1872. 


Covntj. 


Bushels 
oats. 


Aores. 


Arerage. 


Bushels. 


Acres. 


Areragv* 


Qoodhno- . . « t - 1 r ^ f 


1,006,788 
974.630 
946,886 
661,681 
648,686 
686,690 
646,706 
616,068 


23,188 
28,882 
28,002 
16,601 
16,681 
16,996 
18,610 
16,090 


43.46 
40.90, 
33.74 
40.09 
38.67 
37.40 
40.09 
32.07 


987,632 
923,978 
984,791 
661,864 
601,920 
676,481 
447,493 
637,447 


27,768 
24,869 
26,667 
14,861 
16.996 
19.198 
13 492 
16,061 


84.76 
37 16 


01in»t«4 


ItUmore 

WabMha 

Winonft •>■■.••• 


88.76 
81*37 


BakoU 


86.23 


Mower 


83.16 


Knelanh 


38.49 


Bight ooimtles.. 
Per cenUge 


6,930,089 

of total for 
47.97 


164,849 

the sUte: 
42.02 


38.29 


6491,366 

Per cent. 
48.83 


160,791 

of totol for 
43.63 


84.16 
the state; 



Being 38.29 bushels per acre on 42 per cent, of the oat 
area for the year. Twenty- three other counties— Dodge, 
Douglas, Faribault, Freeborn, Grant, Hennepin, Houston, 
Kanabec, Kandiyohi, Le Sueur, McLeod, Meeker, Mille 
Lacs, Nicollet, Otter Tail, Polk, Ramsey, Rice, Sibley, 
Steele, Todd, Washington and Waseca — yielded each 30 
bushels per acre and upwards, together producing 4,590,- 
296 bushels oats on 133,794 acres, an average of 34.30 
bushels per acre. Adding the first eight, it makes 31 coun« 
ties producing 10,520,328 bushels on 288,643 acres, or an 
average of 36.44 bushels per acre on 78.33 per cent, of the 
total acreage allotted to oats in 1873. Of the remaining 
counties the oat crop of eleven was reported to have been 
reduced by grasshoppers, as follows : 



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12 



STATISTIOS OF HIN^BSOTA. 



County. 


Grasshopper towns. 


Remsining towns. 


Acres. 


BasheU. 


Acres. 


BasheU. 




1,486 
1828 

3.331 
610 
888 
730 

1,188 

i;6» 


25,837 
S2,680 
26,605 
10,667 
04,748 
8,889 
14,480 
1S,748 
16.875 
18,181 


6,866 
t28 
897 


221,801 
6926 
90,678 


f!oltonwood 


Jackson t« 


u%Tiin. *. '.' 


1,609 


86,718 


Mnrray 

Nobles 






^dwood 


794 


28,267 


jtock 


WfttonwAn *-T*- r 


1,566 


46,498 






14.079 


211,610 


11,849 


807,617 



In several towns in Renville county the crop was dam* 
aged more or less by grasshoppers, the extent of the injury 
not being stated. The acreage in oats returned for five of 
the above counties is 6,400 acres less than teported in the 
preliminary acreage statements for the same year. 

The aggregate and average yields of oats for nine years 
in Minnesota are recorded as follows : 



No. bashelA Arerage 

Years. produced. yield per acre. 

1860 2,912,867 42.89 

18«6 4,872,477 28.82 

1867 6,620,896 84.64 

1868 7,881,628 36.90 

1869 9,786,969 87.68 

1870 9,896,164 81.19 

1871 10,689,484 81 92 

1872 12,660,788 88.69 

1878 12,644,686 84.04 

GOBN. 

Acres sown 209,460 

Bushels produced 6,467,868 

Average yield per acre, bushels 80 .87 

The season was not favorable for corn. Too great an 
amount of wet in the spring, frosts before the crop had fully 
matured, and in places drought during the time for earing, 
brought the yield below the usual average for the state. 
The production of corn for ten years has been as follows : 



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AaKIOtniTUBX. 



13 



Ye»«. Acrw. 

1869 117,600 

I860 80,762 

1866 88,168 

1867 100,646 

1868 129,909 

1869 186,462 

1870 176,429 

1871 200,124 

1872 216,466 

1878 209,460 



Bashels. 

8,078,749 

8,148,677 

2,066,747 

8,216,010 

4,649,986 

4,194,966 

5,660,870 

7,076,268 

7,142,246 

6,467,868 



Averages 
26.16 
86.67 
28.82 
81.96 
87.88 
80.78 
81.66 
85.86 
82.99 
80.67 



The acreage in 1873 was reduced somewhat by injuries 
from grasshoppers, and perhaps still more by the unfavora- 
ble character ot the planting season and the use of poor 
seedy the latter rotting in the ground at a time when it was 
too late for re-planting. The under-mentioned eleven coun« 
ties each raised 200,000 bushels and upwards : 







1878. 






1872: 




County. 


Bushels. 


Acres. 


Average. 


Bushels. 


Acres. 


Average^ 


FUlmore 


648,814 
419,846 
480^ 
377,906 
865,490 
846,810 
317,670 
280,166 
289,042 
236,994 
216,014 


17,218 
13,634 
11286 
11.964 
10,682 
10,028 
10,476 
8,901 
7^ 
6,967 
7,108 


81.84 
80.75 
86.67 
31.68 
39.81 
84.68 
30.81 
31.47 
32.77 
33.92 
80.27 


648.620 
466,497 
406616 

^:^ 

468,068 
377 8M 
269,804 
290,304 
276,406 
276,208 


19,li36 
13,219 
11,861 
11,869 
10,629 
11,924 
10,698 
8,^1 
7,894 
8,178 
7:i«2 


33.62 


Houston 


86.26 


Qoodhae 

Hennepin 


34.06 
82.69 


Winona 


81.19 


Olmited 


89.80 


Dnkota 


34.63 


WabMha 


82.14 


Bloe Earth 

Rice 


39.27 
88. 81 


Lo Snenr • 


88.60 






Slayen connties 


8,786,666 


116,634 


82.30 


4,169,814 


120,831 


34.66 



The counties visited by grasshoppers make the following 
exhibit : 



County. 


Grasshopper Towns. 


Remaining Towns. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Brown..... 

Cottonwood 

Jackson • • . . ■ • ■ • 


619 

1,066 

l',018 

^60 

1.921 

408 

676 

290 

710 

l,36f 


7,890 
9,907 
12860 

23,720 

6,865 
8,172 
0,971 
12,684 


'•iS 


63 616 
12,802 


IiTon ••••.. 






Martin'.'.! .*.'.*. "'.'. 


141 


2,686 


Murray 

Nobles 








Redwood 

Rock 

Watonwan 


416 


14^ 


190 


'6;i98 




6,368 


96.814 


8,780 


98,860 



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1^ STATISTI08 OF MINNESOTA. 

The amount of damage in Benville is not stated. 

BABLET. 

Acres sown 85,501 

Bushels produced 669,415 

Average per acre 18.85 

Being less than an average crop in yield on a greatly re- 
duced area. Only seven counties returned each an aggre- 
gate of 40,000 bushels or more, towit: Olmsted, 98,153; 
Mo^er, 69,507; Fillmore, 60,981; Goodhue, 57,810; Wa- 
buBha, 53,301; Winona, 48,079, and Dodge, 44,321 bush- 
els. The highest averages on comparatively large areas 
were thosjB of Mower, 26.19; Goodhue, 26.11; Olmsted, 
23,54, and Wabasha, 21.54. 

The barley crop of the state, for the years named, has 
been as follows : 



ToAfB. Acres. 

1660 9,078 

18B7 11,862 

1B68 18,150 

18ri9 81,695 

1B70 64,766 

1871 64,558 

1873 56,785 

187B 85,501 



BTE« 

The rye crop of 1873 was returned as follows : 

Acres sown 6,988 

Bu£ihelB produced 96,877 

Average per acre 18.87 

This cereal whose area is liable to great fluctuations, is 
cultivated mainly in the Upper Mississippi counties ; the only 
counties raising 5,000 bushels and over being Anoka, 12,17 1 ; 
Hennepin, 11,557; Wright, 6,277; Sherburne, 6,170; 
Stearns, 5,828; Chisago, 5,300, and Isanti, 5,043 bushels. 
The culture of rye for seven years has resulted as follows : 



BaBbels. 


Average. 


801,589 


38.28 


816,715 


26.70 


518,500 
851,118 


28.50 


26.85 


1,518,686 


28.42 


1,627,007 


25.20 


1,495,494 


26.88 


669.415 


18.85 



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AaRIOULTUBB. 16 

Ttun. AerM. Bushelt. Average. 

I860 18,276 286,126 21.66 

1868 2,718 62,100 19.02 

1869 4,428 72,281 16.82 

1870 8,949 78,876 18 68 

1871 8,061 180,928 16.24 

1872 11,866 182,780 16.07 

1878 6,982 96,877 18.87 



BUOKWUEAT. 

The returns concerning buckwheat make the following 
showing : 

Acres sown 2,686 

Bushels prodaced 29,446 

Average per acre • 10.92 

The area was somewhat reduced by grasshoppers and the 
yield diminished by the same insects, by early frosts, and in 
places by summer di ought. Ten counties produced each 
upwards of 1,000 bushels, to- wit, Winona 2,914, Dodge 
2,450, Stearns 1,826, Olmsted 1,372, Freeborn 1,274, 
Anoka 1,192, Hennepin 1,190, Mower 1,141, Bice 1,113, 
and Blue Earth 1,086. The following table shows the 
amount of production for a number of years : 

Tean. Acres. BoBhels. Average. 

1860 8,618 66,929 16.78 

1868 1,688 26,292 16.40 

1869 2,746 46,088 16.88 

1870 S.Srs 68,869 16.69 

1871 8,697 64,162 16.06 

1872 8,601 49,869 18.70 

1878 2,686 29,446 10.92 

POTATOES. 

Acres planted 26,860 

Bushels prodaced 2,196,188 

Averageper acre 88.81 

This is an increase in area of 309 acres as compared witii 
1872. The acreage actually planted was, however, consid* 
erably larger, the preliminary acreage statements taken in 
1873 showing an area of 28,317 acres. But the potato bug. 



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10 



STATISTIOB OF MINNESOTA. 



from which comparative exemption had been enjoyed in 
1872, proved very destructive again the following year, and 
together with grasshoppers in some counties and drought in 
others caused a reduction of the area yielding a crop at all, 
as well as a marked decrease in the average yield of all 
districts affected by these drawbacks. The aggregate pro- 
duct is 876,211 bushels less than the crop returned in 1872, 
And the yield per acre 34.58 bushels below the average of 
the latter year. 

The counties raising each not less than 60,000 bushels 
of potatoes in 1873 were the following : 



Coanty. 


1878. 


1872. 


Basbela. 


Average. 


Bnbhelg. 


Average. 


HMinepin. • 

Olmeted 


140,000 
120,950 
94.128 
87,421 
86,360 
85.098 
82,677 
7S,204 
70,260 
69,038 
64,149 
62,978 
62,644 


103.00 
108.96 
100.18 
102.71 
97.88 
106.90 
91.66 
63.17 
90.99 
99.83 
87.6« 
106.91 
61.86 


in,504 
161,072 
126,810 
99,460 
164 945 
128,076 
91,621 
118,892 
97,842 
82,783 
60,201 
64,137 
78.171 


126.06 
'45.63 


Dftk4>to 


111,77 
123;06 
110.22 


Winona. 

FMImore • 


Ooodbuo..... 


1874(6 


WftbMha 


133.66 
106.58 


RiC6 


118.18 


Wright 


138.61 


Scoft 1 

gteele 


81.08 

isaoi 


Cftrrer 


87.89 






Tldrteen Ooantiea 


1,096,792 




1,428,693 





A glance at the general table giving the aggregate and 
average yield of potatoes by counties, will show the smallest 
yields to be in counties suffering from grasshoppers. 

The acreage and yield of potatoes in Minnesota for nine 
years were : 



Years. Acres. 

ISeO , 16,687 

1868 16,297 

leST... 17,747 

1868 24,475 

1869 20,838 

1670 19,085 

1871 ; 31,429 

1872 26,061 

187d 26,860 



Bashels. 


Average. 


2,808,808 


188.00 


1,581,696 


118.63 


1,788,058 


101.83 


2,592,686 


105.90 


1,488,428 


71.44 


1,872,975 


71 94 


2,158,586 


100.49 


8,072,849 


117.89 


2,196,188 


88.81 



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AGBICUIiTUBX. 17 

BBANS. 

Acres planted 1,184 

Bushels prodnced 14,246 

Average per acre, bushels 12.56 

The small patches of ground, on which beans is mainly 
cultivated, were in numerous places touched by early frosts, 
and in the southwest the crop was almost completely de- 
stroyed by grasshoppers. In Martin county a colony of 
English settlers make the culture of this leguminous plant 
a specialty and in 1873 planted from 1,200 to 1,500 acres, 
but no crop being obtained, this acreage was not returned 
by the assessors. 

The production of beans for the years named has been as 
follows : 



Yean. Actm. 

1868 1,027 

1869 1,829 

1870 1,845 

1871 1,506 

1872 1,482 

1878 1,184 



HAT, 

The hay crop of 1873 was returned as follows : 

CultlTated hay, acres 104,525 

Tons hay raised 144,712 

Average yield per acre, tons 1.88 

Wild hay, tons cnred 788,619 

The season was favorable foi grasses and the hay crop was 
an excellent one, though impaired by the winter-killing of 
clover in some portions of the state. The area in cultivated 
hay exceeds that of any former year by 15,535 acres, while 
the quantity produced is 36,684 tons larger than any crop 
previously harvested. The amount of wild hay secured is 
40,205 tons greater than last year, making an increase in 
the aggregate hay crop since 1872 of 76,889 tons. 
3 

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BuBhelB. 


Ayerage 


18,871 


18.00 


27,661 


16.12 


24,950 


18.52 


19,668 


18.05 


19,166 


12.92 


14,246 


12.56 



18 



STATISTIOS OF MINNBSOTA. 



The following comparative statemeDt shows the amount 
of production of cultivated hay in eleven counties raising 
each 5,000 tons and over: 





1878. 


1872. 


Ooonty. 


Tons. 


Acres. 


Tons. 


AcrM. 


Flllinor^fr r-1---- 


16,480 

14,969 

14,483 

18,144 

10,088 

9,812 

0^ 

7760 

7220 

6,238 

6,191 


18,921 
11,601 
11,661 
9804 
7,683 
6,768 
6,378 
?,810 
6,447 
4,166 
4,227 


11,110 
12,648 
8>86 
8,^29 
6,643 
9,664 
6,077 
6,411 
6981 
6,976 
8,897 


10,865 
10,870 


Winouft 


Olmited 

Ooodlmo • •••• 


8,699 
7.868 
6,868 
6,469 
6,169 
4029 


Wabasha 


Houston ...•••• 


Washington 

Rice 


Dakota 

Hennepin 

Bodice. 


6,627 
2,868 
3,094 






114,916 


84,246 


84,686 


70,606 



The crop of cultivated hay in 1873 in this State compares 
as follows with the four last pi*eceding years : 



Tears. Tons. 

1869 61,951 

1870 72,689 

1871 82,456 

1872 108,028 

1878 144,712 



Acres. 


Average. 


41,890 


1.56 


52,680 


1.88 


62,988 


1.82 


88,990 


1.21 


104,525 


1.88 



The following is a comparative statement of the crop of 
wild hay for the past four years : 



1870, tons of wild hay 526,616 

1871, " «* 608,146 

1872, «« " 743,414 

1873, " " 788,619 



FLAX. 

Returns from thirty-six counties show the following re- 
sults : 



Acres sown 12,114 

Bashels seed produced 100,858 

Ponnds fibre produced 1,227,547 



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AGRIOULTUBB. 19 

The returns concerning flax are still very incomplete, and 
for Blue Earth county the Commissioner has ma^e use of a 
statement from the Superintendent ot the Mankato Linseed 
Oil Works in place of the assessors' returns. The amount 
of fibre is not generally stated, the number of pounds be- 
ing frequently not known to the producer. The acreage 
and quantity of seed raised for the past five years have 
been: 



Tear. Acree. BnshelB seed. 

1868 Noi returned. 8,845 

1869 •* 7,282» 

1870 «* 7,224 

1871 " 14,421 

1872 12,129 71,752 

1878 12,114 100,858 



HOPS. 

Partial returns from twenty-seven counties give the fol- 
lowing totals : 

Acres sown 194 

Pounds hops produced • 57,291 

Comparing as follows with the totals for the four last pre- 
ceding years : 

I860. 1870. 1871. 1872. 1878. 

Acres planted....*.... 467 811 278 98 194 

Pounds produced 264,789 188,808 64,248 114,429 57,291 

SOBOHUM AND 8UGAB MAPLE PRODU0T8. 

The statements concerning sorghum make the following 
exhibit : 

Acres planted...*.. 747 

Gallons syrup produced 58,226 



The totals for five preceding years were : 



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20 STATISTIOS OF MIIKNBSOTA. 

1866. 18«9. 1870. 1871. Wt2. 

Acres 629 728 1,244 859 

Gallons B^nip prodQced .. 81,875 81,191 56,870 78,425 78,095 

Beturns for thirty-two counties regardipg maple sugar 
and syrup sum up as follows : 

Gallons synip 17,541 

Founds sagar 189,952 

The aggregates for the past five years were : 

» 1868. . 1869. 1870. 1871. 1872. 

GaUons syrap 14,105 14,196 17,820 22,928 17,894 

Founds sagar 250,467 197,742 281,602 141,982 195,587 



HONEY. 

The returns for 1873 make the following showing : 

Hives, number kept 10,876 

Honey, pounds produced • 184,266 

The table of county aggregates shows an increase in most 
of the newer counties, and a decrease in nearly all of the 
older, the reduction being attributable mainly to the sever- 
ity of the winter. The statement for four preceding years 
were as follows : 

1869. mo. 1^1. 187S. 

Hives, number kept 6,870 9,709 12,698 18,704 

Honey, pounds produced 86,650 188,418 229,679 282,948 

TOBAOOO. 

Returns for fifty-one counties give a total of 28,824 
pounds, or 14,464 pounds less than in 1872. This crop, 
which is but trifling in all counties, was destroyed by grass- 
hoppers in the southwest, and was greatly reduced through 
other agencies in Winona, Meeker and Kandiyohi, while 
the returns of several other counties show a small increase. 



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AGBIOULTUBB. 21 

The quantities produced in the last preceding five years 
were: 



1868. 1869. 1870. 1871. 1878. 

Ponods tobacco raised.. •• 5,998 11,289 20,678 87,060 42,768 



OBAS8 SEEDS. 

The returns for 1873 concerning clover seed show a re- 
duction of the crop amounting to 802 bushels, as compared 
with 1872, owing principally to the unusual severity of the 
winter of 1872-73. Of timothy seed the quantity harvested 
in 1873 was 40,022 bushels to 15,228 in 1872. The follow- 
ing statement affords a comparison with former years : 

1868. 1869. 1870. 1871. 1872. 1873. 

Timothy, bnshels 2,279 16,670 16,828 16,228 i0,022 

Clover, bnshels 282 44 6,669 2,586 2,648 1,646 

FBUITS. 

In Minnesota, as throughout the country, the extreme 
cold of the winter did immense damage to fruit trees, in 
many places killing fifty per cent, of apple trees and grape 
vines, and making the crop on bearing trees and vines gen* 
erally small and poor. The statements for 1873 show an 
apple crop of 20,307 bushels against 39,663 bushels in 1872, 
and a falling off in the number of trees in bearing of 3,017, 
while the number of trees growing has more than doubled, 
owing to new plantings. The totals for 1873 were as fol- 
lows : 

Apple trees growing 6,662,068 

Apple trees in bearing 64,464 

Bushels of apples raised 20,607 

Comparing as follows with the figures for four preceding 
years : 



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22 STATI8TI0S OF MINNBSOTA. 

Tear. Trees growing. Trees In bearing. Bnsb. apples* 

1869 806,877 19,196 9,410 

1870 391,128 27,191 10,756- 

1871 1,007,274 68,622 84,927 

1872 1,784,861 87,461 89,668^ 

The number of apple-growing counties was swelled in 
1873 by the addition of Orant, Kanabec, Lac qui Parle , 
Nobles, Polk, Bock and Wilkin. Of counties reporting 
agricultural products only Liake and Lincoln made no re- 
turn of apple trees. 

Ten counties made return of apple trees growing and na 
trees in bearing or yield of apples, to-wit : Becker, Clay, 
Kanabec, Lac qui Parle, Lyon, Nobles, Polk, Bock, Ste- 
vens and Swift. 

Nine other counties reported apple trees in bearing in 
1873 and no yield of apples, to-wit: Cottonwood, Grant, 
Jackson, Murray, Otter Tail, Bedwood, Benville, Wilkin 
and Yellow Medicine, being an addition of four, Cotton- 
wood, Orant, Wilkin and Yellow Medicine, since 1872. 

The forty-two remaining counties all reported a crop of 
apples in 1873, three of them, Chippewa, Martin and Pope, 
returning a yield for the first time. In 1871 thirty-two 
counties reported a crop of apples, thirty]counties in 1870 
and twenty-six in 1869. 

A crop of 100 bushels apples or more was reported from 
twenty-seven oounties in 1873, against twenty-six in 1872, 
eighteen in 1871 and twelve in the two previous years. 

Statements concerning grape culture having been called 
for in the blanks for 1878, reports were made by forty-seven 
oounties showing the following aggregates : 

Nnmber of grape vines in bearing 26,684^ 

Ponnds of grapes gathered 6 1 , 8S 1 

The reports concerning cultivated strawberries sum up aa 
follows : 



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AGBIOULTUHH. 23 

Qnartsof stiawbeziieffralaed 265,76ff 

Comparing as follows with the totals for four preceding 
years: 

1809. 1910. ISTl. 18TI. 

Quarts Of Strawberries ..146,034 175,158 388,961 277,716 

No statement for the city of St. Paul is included in the 
above summary of fruit culture in 1873, nor for other incor- 
porated cities forming separate assessment districts and 
having no general agriculture to report. 

WOOL. 

No. of sheep sheared 141,746 

Poandsof wool grown 529,659 

Ayerage per sheep, pounds • 8.78 

The above number of sheep embrace only sheep on farms 
returned in connection with the wool-clip, and is 7,458 less 
than the number of all sheep in the state as returned in the 
same year to the State Auditor for the purposes of taxa- 
tion. The wool-clip of 1873 was the largest yet obtained 
in the state, and compares as lollows with the statements 
for former years : 



1868. 1809. 1970. 1871. 19n. 

Pounds of wool grown . . .422,500 882,808 861,400 865,282 497,045 



DAIBT FBODUOTS. 

Of the 187,995 cows returned in 1873 to the Auditor of 
State as taxable property, 155,454 were returned to the 
Commissioner of Statistics as milch cows on farms. The 
yield of butter and cheese from these cows is stated as fol- 
lows: , 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



24 8TATIBTIC8 OF MOrHSSOTA. 

IDlch C0W8 on flurms 166,464 

Batter, poondB prodaced. • 10,140,816 

Cheese, poondB prodaced 1,081,610 

The totals for five preceding years were : 

1S68. 1880. . 1870. ISH. 1872. 

Batter, poand8 4,476,000 6,680,961 6,806,866 7,866,768 8,838,680 

Cheeee, pounds 166,182 389,848 866,048 469,147 772,680 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AOUICULTUBB. 



26 



TABLE Showing the Area, Product, and Average Yield per Acre of WHEAT 
in the several OourUies of Minnesota for the Tears 1878 and 1872. 



Coantles. 




1873. 






1872. 




Acres 
Sown. 


Bushels 
Produced. 


Average 
per Acre. 


Acres 
Sown. 


Bushels 
Produced. 


Average 
per Acre. 


Totals 


1,648.718 


26,402.486 


17.04 


1,267,309 


32,069,376 


17 40 






Anoka. 


2,296 

1,643 

966 

63,097 

34,985 


34,652 

34.587 

14,043 

817.410 

429,015 


16.04 
14.96 
14.64 
13.17 
12.86 


1,762 
613 
666 

54.306 , 
28,062 

17,694 

6,166 

2605 

31 

8,600 

81,173 

36.770 

8,895 

89,719 

101790 

41,413 

116.977 


29,328 

8297 

9183 

949,318 

490.460 

30 

352,158 

98,108 

50,249 

90 

60,508 

1.466.151 

673,818 

162.120 

599,769 

1.763,938 

689,&&6 

8.311,674 


16.78 


Becker •••>•• 


5.37 


Benton 

BlaeBarth 

Brown. .......... 


16.16 
17.48 
17.47 


Carlton 


24 00 


Carver 


19A»88 

9,662 

8504 

841 

9,680 

86,440 

42,293 

12,666 

46 793 

117,416 

60,166 

184,975 

2,402 

24,356 

49,192 

2.406 

10.181 


l,^75,6M 

G71.600 
2,a)fi,e76 

9oa,eei 

2,8:]1J61 
435,01 C 

ess.ofit 

'■^ 1 . fsr'] 


19.07 
14 00 
16.74 
16.68 

6.17 
17.07 
19.04 
17.00 
12.21 
18.81 
16.00 
20.97 
16.12 
17.86 
17.32 
14.68 

6.08 


19 90 


Chippewa 

Chisago 


18.90 
19.88 


Clay , 


2.90 


Cottonwood 

Dakota 


14.42 
18.04 


Dodge 


15.60 


DoQglas.... .■•••• 


16 22 


Faribault..^.... 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Goodhue 

Grant 


15.10 
17.28 
16.45 
19.76 


Hennepin 

Houston 

Isanti 


20,268 

47.234 

1,497 

6.687 


341,054 

738,306 

' 20,636 

60,264 


16 83 
15.68 
13.78 


Jackson ....• .... 


10.88 


Kanabec- * - 




Kandiyohi 

Lac qai Parle.... 
Lake 


28.070 
4,124 

,.^ 

16,567 

14.881 

23,439 

587 

2.119 
54.990 

1,979 
81.205 

4,787 

116,064 

14.186 

197 

13,206 

3,730 

6,630 
27,648 
87,688 

3,511 
21,118 

2.464 
22,069 
35,938 
86.718 

1.622 


504,337 

49,280 

36 

314,784 

466 

3flS.706 

l,(MH,4ll 
506 J P9 

3i,u>e 

12.43f: 536 

237,9&4 

4,73B 

70,327 
50,281 
3ll,fiiil 
710,0(56 
37,696 

550,702 
&iaj43 
17^9 


17.96 
11.94 


80,280 
1,714 


340,106 
31,431 


16.81 
18.88 


LiO Snenr. .....«• 


17.20 
10.66 

6.81 
16.73 

6.85 
15.61 
17.94 
14.32 
18.26 

3.36 
16.20 

6.49 
30.99 
16 77 
84.00 
13.48 
18.85 

9.24 
12.36 
18.84 
10.70 
15.69 
11.08 
15.61 
15.33 
18.00 
11.02 


16,068 


274,999 


18.22 


Lincoln 




Lyon 


348 

12.381 

10,717 

18,493 

374 

1,461 

88,216 

894 

' 24,565 

839 

105,544 

7,281 

16 

9,108 

3,275 

8,670 

14,449 

31,471 

993 

21,158 

.1^ 

25.785 

30.458 

870 

1 

2,986 

2,965 

62,832 

29,677 

31.062 

15,488 

110 

72,140 

18,859 

2,767 


6,690 

226,686 

119.061 

842.820 

5,681 

28,415 

595,171 

10,030 

471,543 

8.837 

1,901,273 

164,383 

296 

143,676 

60,181 

71,603 

866,897 

547,626 

13,284 

834,595 

20.605 

353,668 

425,812 

652,856 

6,789 

16 

46,666 

61,316 

1.388,271 

561,546 

540,815 

177,531 

1,870 

1466,990 

^878 

54,709 


19.66 


M!eLeod 


18.88 


Martin ... 

Meeker 

MiUeLacs 

Morrison 

Hower 


11.10 
19.06 
15.16 
19.66 
15 57 


Murray 

Nicollet 

Cobles 


11.20 
19,20 
18 96 


Olmsted 


18.01 


Otter Tail 

Polk 


32.57 
19.70 


Pope 


16 77 


Ramsey 


18.46 


Bedwood 

Renville 


19.61 
18.47 


Rice 

Rock 


17.40 
18.39 


Scott 


16.34 


Sherburne 

Sibley 


16.08 
19.23 


Stearns 

Steele 

Stevens 

St. Louis 


16.62 
18 12 
16.64 
15.00 


Swift 

Todd 


6,137 
4,092 
80,520 
84.647 
86,968 
19,062 
484 
78,599 
15.851 
5.030 


69,795 

66,501 

1.636,962 

667,797 

712,343 

143,058 

7,085 

1.448,400 

266.068 

60,072 


13.61 
16.25 
30.32 
16.09 
19.80 
7.50 
14.63 
18.36 
16.15 
11.96 


15.25 
17.81 


Wabasha 

Waseca 


19.71 
18.92 


Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 


17.39 
1146 
16.36 


Wioona. ......... 


16.17 


Wright 

Yellow Medicine 


15.90 
19.77 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



26 



STATI8TI0S OF MUnSTSBOTA. 



TABLE showing the Area, Product and Average Yield per Acre of OATS in 
the Several Counties of Minnesota, in the Tears 1878 and 1872. 



Conntles. 



ToUl 



Anoka 

Becker 

Benton 

BlneBarth 

Brown 

Carlton 

Carver 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Clay 

Cottonwood 

Dakota 

Dodge 

Donglaa 

Farlbanlt 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Ooodhne 

Grant 

Hennepin 

Honston 

Isanti 

Jackson ■ 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Lac qni Parle ... 

Lake 

LeSnear 

Lincoln 

Lyon 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

Mine Lacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Mnrray 

Nicollet 

Nobles 

Olrasted 

OtterTall 

Polk 

Pope 

Rumsey 

Redwood 

Renville 

Rice 

Rock 

Scott 

Sherbame 

Sibley 

Stearns 

Steele 

Stevens 

St. Lonls 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine 



1873. 



Acres 
sown. 



868,493 



1,44S 

611 

688 

116,090 

8361 



6,106 
1,480 
1,946 

tn 

3,066 

16,996 

10,393 

3371 

10,890 

28,002 

12,967 

23.138 

483 

0,164 

9,828 

996 

3,776 

85 

6,061 

626 

2 

4,696 

3 

637 

4,462 

4,840 

5,863 

697 

1,398 

13,610 

610 

9,090 

888 

23,882 

8,450 

162 

8,793 

2,066 

1,614 

7,626 

8,066 

1,188 

4,779 

1.168 

7,322 

16,448 

7,700 

833 



Bnshels 
Produced. 



12,644,636 



34,608 

13.480 

14.164 

616,068 

247,638 



988 
1,841 
16,601 
6,650 
8,379 
8,084 
367 
16.681 
4,731 
847 



161,867 

44,176 

66,223 

5,868 

89,656 

686,690 

349,963 

142,509 

366.564 

946,885 

441,575 

1,006,738 

16,863 

278,148 

864,968 

24.620 

47.383 

3,746 

171,629 

14,308 



148,302 
86 

10,767 
164,037 

91,466 
196,680 

21.498 

29,671 

646,706 

8,889 

800,916 

14,480 

974 639 

106,668 

6,713 

110,913 

66,269 

88,015 
192 820 
310,767 

16,875 
137,418 

27,378 

241,987 

405,310 

270,849 

7,368 



23,003 

56,490 
661,681 
258,606 
312,001 

64,559 

6,620 

648,636 

130,371 

84,646 



Average 
per Acre. 



34.04 



84.00 
26.27 
26 33 
82.07 
29.66 



1872. 



29.74 
29.84 
28. 89 
31.65 
14.37 
87.40 
33.68 
86.81 
33.63 
83.74 
34.04 
43.46 
34.98 
80.36 
87.13 
24. n 
17.07 
32.29 
33.89 
29.19 



31.66 



17.17 
36.76 
18.89 
33 59 
36.01 
23.94 
40.09 
14.57 
33.14 
16.80 
40.90 
30.88 
37.61 
99.24 
32.07 
36.10 
25.62 
34.68 
14.26 
28.76 
33.56 
88.04 
26.28 
86.17 
33.08 



24.53 
80.66 
40.00 
38.76 
37.23 
30.94 
24.70 
38.67 
27.69 
27.79 



Acres 
Sown. 



872,478 



1,236 
490 

614 

16,061 

8,086 

6 

4,567 

864 

1,717 

27 

1.166 

19,198 

10,841 

6,068 

11,988 

28,537 

11,286 

27,768 



9,001 

9,106 

988 

2,118 

94 

4,787 

214 

1 

6,991 



98 
4,740 
6,674 
5.128 

634 

1,251 

13,493 

644 

9,458 

81 

24,869 

8,347 

103 
3,983 
8,169 
1,165 
3.556 
10,159 

610 
7,200 

946 

6,735 

15.972 

8,268 

491 
31 

510 
1,888 
14,851 
6,857 
8,981 
6,364 

314 
16,996 
4,689 



Bushels 
Produced. 



12,660,738 



31,424 

8,617 

15,640 

637,447 

292,748 

240 

198,514 

31,408 

48,806 



39,667 
67t,481 
842,384 
182.897 
367.656 
934,791 
896,487 
987,632 



Average 
per Aere. 



273,068 

313,201 

24,361 

59,939 

8,670 

136,910 

7,096 



178,340 



3,8S9 
146,132 
202,046 
171,441 

16,180 

37,000 

447,488 

5.718 

877,170 

2024 

923,978 

152,350 

8,611 

138,003 

62,759 

39,639 
131,081 
366,720 

15,620 
150,124 

37,328 
238,977 
497,943 
380,006 

13,501 
1,066 

15,909 

68,990 
63i,S64 
387,122 
330,660 
164,806 
7,868 
601.920 
146,612 

26,966 



38.69 



26.62 
8.61 
80.23 
83 43 
86.48 
40. (K> 
43.56 
36.36 
38 43 



34.01 
86.28 
33.48 
86.13 
30.66 
83.76 
86.12 
84.76 



30.22 
34.89 
25.96 
28.88 
28.8T 
38.39 
83.15 



39 76 



39.68 
30.83 
33.28 
38.43 
30.78 
39.57 
88.16 
10.51 
39. 8B 
24.96 
87.16 
45.81 
86.50 
34.66 
29.06 
84 02 
36.86 
86.00 
30.62 
20.86 
28.88 
36.18 
31.17 
33.86 
37.49 
84.03 
31.19 
86.48 
35.81 
41.86 
86.81 
28.76 
25.06 
31.37 
81.26 
43.68 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AOBIOULTUBK. 



27 



TABLE showing the Area^ Product and Average Held per Acre of COJSiV 
in theseceral OounHes in Minnesota in the Tears 1878 and 1872. 



Comities. 



ToUl 

AaokA. 

Becker 

Benton 

Bine Barth 

Brown 

Carver 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Clay 

Cottonwood .... 

DakoU 

Dodge 

Boaglai 

Faribault 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Ooodhne < 

Orant 

Hennepin 

Houston 

Isanti 

Jackson 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Lac qui Parle.... 

La Sueur 

Lincoln 

Ltou , 

McLeod , 

Martin 

Meeker 

MiUe Lacs 

Morrison , 

Mower , 

Murray , 

Nicollet 

Nobles 

Olmsted 

Otter TaiL 

PoU , 

Pope 

Bamsey 

Bedwood 

BenTille , 

Bice 

Bock 

Scott 

Sherburne 

Sibley 

Steams 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wrighi 

Tellow Medicine. 



1873. 



Acres 
Sown* 



9O9«40O 



2,548 

120 

543 

7.294 

3,201 



4M 
i;290 
16 
1,486 
10,476 
8,914 

498 

4,814 

17,218 

5.767 

11,226 

28 

11.964 

18,684 

1,118 

1,018 

70 

654 

867 

T,106 

90 

460 
2,666 
9,062 
2,129 

557 

666 
4,448 

409 
3,647 

675 
10,028 

605 
26 

440 
1,579 

688 
1,428 
6,967 

710 
5«418 
9,676 
3,453 
6,149 
4^16 
18 

188 

603 
8,902 
3,612 
6.060 
1,647 
24 
10,839 
4,601 

166 



Bushels 
Produced. 



6,467,868 



81,369 

8,330 

14,460 

239,042 

71,005 

177,966 

18 861 

32,213 

239 

22,849 

817,670 

109,608 

17,024 

180,186 

648,314 

161,590 

400,445 

861 

377,905 

419,846 

96,284 

12,860 

1.446 

19,362 

7,231 

915,014 

1,756 

6,816 

96,970 

86.406 

66,584 

18,997 

19,420 

164,191 

4,430 

90,897 

5,366 

346,810 

12,421 

845 

9,017 

56,341 

17,611 

36,904 

235,994 

9,971 

161,769 

96369 

116.663 

137,494 

156,298 

376 

8,300 

17 660 

280.156 

106348 

188,754 

17,882 

440 

855,490 

164,186 

4,697 



Average 
per Acre. 



80.87 



31.93 
27.75 
26.61 
32.77 
29.18 
38.41 
28.79 
24.97 
15 93 
16.38 
3031 
28.09 
84.19 
28.93 
31.84 
28.01 
35.67 
30.39 
3L53 
80.75 
22.62 
12.14 
20 65 
28.99 
19.70 
30 97 
19.50 
14.81 
36.62 
12.80 
31.27 
34.10 
29.60 
36,89 
11,01 
26.62 
933 
84.63 
2439 
88.80 
20.40 
36.04 
27.66 
26.84 
38.92 
14.04 
29.86 
36.19 
38.78 
96.70 
84.87 
28.84 
2431 
35.08 
81.47 
80.42 
80.82 
11.62 
18.33 
3931 
86.47 
28.04 



1872. 



Acres 
Sown. 



916,466 



9380 

95 

660 

7,394 

2,971 

4,957 

432 

L084 

10 

8M 

10,983 

8,746 

716 

6,636 

19,136 

5,239 

11,851 



11.669 

13,919 

1,276 

768 

45 

736 

380 

7,162 



167 
2,918 
2,481 
3,113 

601 

849 
4372 

246 
3,988 

129 
11,924 

607 
19 

466 
3,037 

618 
1,946 
8,178 

660 
5,840 
3,791 
3317 
4,635 
4,289 
16 
96 

669 
8,061 
3,787 
6,000 
1,844 
24 
10,699 
4.666 

199 



Bushels 
Produced. 



7,142,246 



66,961 
1,956 

17,690 
290394 

98,681 
907,838 

20,748 

28,469 



15,166 
377321 
136,042 

28,744 



643,620 
172,982 
408,616 



887,464 

466,497 

23,726 

16,878 

1,210 

20,722 

9,672 

276,203 



Average 
per Acre. 



82.90 



27.88 
90.68 
26.86 
89.27 
31.62 
41.82 
48.02 
26.26 



17.82 
84.63 
36.04 
40.20 
38.14 



82.87 
84.05 



82.69 
86.28 
18.69 
20 93 
26.88 
28.15 
86.45 
38.66 



5,274 


8138 


107,687 


38.90 


68,277 


27.66 


71,169 


29.88 


14,810 


29.66 


27,376 


82.51 


128.906 


23.3i 


6,896 


24.90 


200,102 


60.17 


1,996 


10.61 


462,068 


89.86 


13,416 


26.46 


784 


38.63 


14,371 


80.90 


56,432 


18.26 


16,280 


26.66 


40,822 


82.78 


276,406 


8331 


14,385 


26.68 


191.796 


82.84 


74.091 


19.54 


139,160 


41.95 


148,114 


31.95 


151,678 


36 89 


452 


28.26 


3,434 


36.77 


21.421 


87.64 


259,804 


32.14 


122.583 


89.36 


174.627 


29.10 


53.168 


98.82 


760 


81.66 


331382 


31.19 


157,894 


34.47 


7,208 


87.64 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28 



STATISTICS OF MINNESOTA. 



TABLE 8?iQ%Ding the Area, Product and Average Yield of B ABLET in Oie 
several cauntiei in Minnesota in the years 1878 and 1872. 





1878. 


1872. 


Counties. 


Acres 
Sown. 


Bushels 
Produced. 


Average 
per Acre. 


Acrea 
Sown. 


Bushels 
Produced. 


Average 
per Acre. 


Totol 


86,601 


609«415 


18.86 


66,786 


1,486,494 


26.83 


Anoka 


38 
41 
84 

'^ 

686 
150 
895 
T 
148 
781 

1,987 
866 

1,163 

?;gj 

177 
583 

18 
322 
193 

17 


720 

617 

406 

10,684 

4,168 

14,934 

8,208 

4,459 

163 

826 

12,238 

44.821 

7,970 

18,820 

60.931 

19,508 

57,810 

1,509 

lSl738 

340 

663 

3,660 

290 


21.81 
15.04 
11.91 
9.85 
9.62 
21.80 
13.86 
16.11 
28.28 
22.02 
16.09 
28.00 
21.83 
16.82 
15.32 
18.30 
96.11 
26.94 
17.34 
23.55 
18.88 
3.06 
18.78 
17.05 


18 

36 

183 

2,772 

772 
78 
147 
3 
192 
2,135 

323 
9,216 
6,774 
1,906 
4,303 


960 
TO 

949 
64,060 
26,499 
21392 

2,685 


14.16 
9.00 
7.13 
28.10 
21.16 
27.68 
28.71 
18.96 


Becker 

Benton 

BlueKarth 

Brown .«•••• •••• 


Carver ••. 


Chippewa 

Chisago ••••••••. 


Clay ...•••.. 


Cottonwood 

Dakota 


8,686 
68,607 
76,607 
9,000 
48,715 
166,265 
51,706 
141.761 


29.38 
37.67 


Dodge 


28.75 
27 95 


Parlbanlt 


19.73 
36 88 


Freeborn 

Goodhue, 

Grant •.... 


27.14 
33.96 


Hennepin 

Houston 

Isanti 

Jackson 

Kandiyohi 

Lac qui Parle. ... 
Lake 


379 
929 

14 
444 
319 

98 

3 

379 


9,536 

24,377 

370 

4,655 

4,269 

47 
9,474 


25.16 
26.13 
19.28 
10.48 
19.48 
34.04 
15 66 


Le Sueur 

Lincoln 


209 

8 

94 

860 

378 

473 

10 

74 

,.663 

684 

89 

8,914 

842 

2 

228 

84 

82 

192 

449 

80 

85 

6 

666 

728 

880 

14 


3,004 

99 

881 

4,708 

472 

7,964 

162 

1,701 

69,507 

354 

5,489 

876 

92,158 

7,138 

59 

8,966 

1,076 

137 

8,6i0 

8,656 

1,083 

1,285 

63 

12,751 

14.920 

16.248 

840 - 


14.47 
12.37 

3.41 
18.10 

1.24 
16.83 
16.80 
22.98 
26.19 

6.29 
10.27 

7.07 
88.54 
90.87 
29.50 
17.39 
12.80 

4.28 
18.85 
19.27 
U.77 
14.52 
12.40 
19.14 
19.53 
18 59 
17.14 


34.99 




6 

371 

869 

847 

19 

72 

4.467 

45 

7,009 

268 

8 

841 

86 

162 

818 

1,117 

33 

169 

13 

947 

912 

1,180 

10 

2 

107 

34^ 

948 

1,589 

457 

7 

3,231 

268 

83 


166 
9,660 
15,686 
7,793 
266 
2,660 

194,297 

6;m» 

73 

8,526 

2,495 

2,861 

6,343 

27,038 

480 

4,036 

466 

84.610 

19,628 

86,817 

208 

60 

2,802 

1.335 

91,330 

23,660 

40.952 

10,370 

248 

89,361 

7,219 

806 


2T.B0 
26.01 
17.93 
93.45 
13.94 
36.94 
26.22 
15.84 
25.78 

3.00 
27 72 
98.15 

9.00 
25 00 
29.01 
18.82 
19.94 
24.90 
14.54 
23.88 
85.84 
35.98 
21.40 
31.90 , 
20.90 
80.00 
21.51 
25.00 
28.36 
24.83 
26.77 
29.67 
34.71 
27.6« 
26.93 
24.42 


ficLiodV.'.::*.::: 


Martin • • 


Meeker 

HllleLacs 

Morrison 

Mower 


Murray 


ivf collet 


Nobles 

OlmHted 


Otter Tall 

Polk 


Pope ••.. ........ 




Redwood 

Hfinville. ....••... 


Kjce , 


Rock 

Scott 


Bherburne 

Sibley 


Stearns ••*. 


Steele 


Stevens 


St. Louis 


Swift 

Todd 


118 

59 

2,469 

670 

503 

413 

38 

2,418 

230 

84 


2,268 

1,908 
63,301 

9,337 
10,556 

1,346 
646 

4,800 
886 


,,, 

19.23 
90.47 
21.54 
13.93 
20.98 
3.61 
17.00 
19.93 
18.69 
16.08 


Wabasha 

Waseca .....•..!. 


Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 


Winona 


Wright 

Yellow Medicine. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGRIOULTUBB. 



29 



TABLE showing the Area, Product and Average Yield of STE in the 
several Counties in Minnesota, in the Tears 1873 and 1872. 





1878. 


1872. 


CoantlM. 


Acres 
Sown. 


Bnshels 


Average 
per Acre. 


Acres 
Sown. 


Bushels 
Prodaced. 


Average 
per AcrSt 


Total 


6.982 


96,877 


13.87 


11,865 


182,780 


16.07 


Anoka 

Bedcer 


912 


12,171 


13.84 


929 

2 

82 
210 

49 

242 

2 

485 

2 

626 

21 
888 

22 
103 

43 
271 


12,079 

85 

1,167 

4130 

940 

8,271 
448 

8,943 
486 

1,498 
809 

4,489 


18.00 
17.60 


Benton 


88 

87 
20 
183 


622 
1,662 

248 
4,011 


18.73 
17.96 
12.40 
21.91 


14.23 


Bine Earth 

Brown 

Carver 

Chippewa 


10.66 
19.18 
95.26 
20.00 


Chisago 

Cottonwood 


369 


6,300 


14.86 


14.96 
19.50 


Dakota. 


172 
82 
189 
8 
18S 
20 
49 
1 
748 
138 
825 

e 

30 
68 
12 
35 
90 
SOO 
88 
1 
44 


1,646 

437 

8,669 

108 

2,418 

286 

692 

36 

11,667 

1962 

6.048 

74 

408 

728 

61 

620 

1,086 

2,801 

544 


9.66 
18.66 
18.88 
17.16 
13.28 
14.80 
12.06 
86.00 
16.46 
14.14 
16 53 
12.83 
13.60 
12.55 

6.08 
17.71 
11.60 
14.00 
16.47 


15.72 


Bodge 


21.33 


Dooslas 

Faribaalt 

FUlmore 

Freeborn 

Goodhne 

Qrant 


26.45 
22.04 
14.48 
18.81 
16.88 


Hennepin 

Honaton 

Iflantl 

Kandiyohi 

Le Bnenr 


1,373 

232 

641 

4 

96 

94 

9 

74 

148 

296 

52 


22,866 
3,883 
4,497 
70 
1,786 
1788 
140 
1,860 
1983 
6,521 
1,076 


16.64 

14.58 
8.81 
17.60 
18.08 


McLM>d 

Martin 


18.48 
15.55 


Meeker 

MiUeLacB 

Morrison 

Mower 


18.50 
13.30 
18.71 
20.69 






Nicollet.::'."..... 
Nobles 


577 


18.11 


49 


1,144 


23.28 


Olmsted. 

Otter TaU 

Pope 


58 

183 

89 

67 


747 

8,218 

^7 

840 


12.87 
17.57 
6.59 
14.78 


122 

180 

130 

184 

2 

6 

344 

662 

471 

77 

708 

67 

2 

3 

296 

65 

40 

617 

«! 

726 


1,728 
8,044 
2,988 
2,187 
40 

108 
4,169 
9,376 
6,470 
1,267 
12,202 

627 

40 

24 

5,934 

1500 

519 
10,383 

141 
2,881 
15,709 


14.12 
28.4t 
22.98 


Bamsay 

Redwood 


16.32 
20.00 


Renyille 

Bice 


9 

66 

177 

454 

27 

968 

3 


165 

701 

. 2,666 

••IS 


17.22 
12.61 
14.44 
18.69 
18.07 
6.02 
6.33 


18.00 
12.09 


Scott 

Sherburne 

Sibley 

Steams ....•• ...• 


16.98 
13.73 
16.45 
17.23 


Steele..: 


11.00 


Stevens 


90.00 


S^ift 








8.00 


Todd 


810 

61 

3 

897 


4,689 
666 

26 
3,904 


14.96 

10.88 

18.00 

9.88 


28.16 


Wabasha 

Waseca 


27.27 
12.97 


Washington 

^ITatonwan. 


16.82 
17.62 


Winona 


138 
473 


2,197 
6,277 


16.91 
13.27 


17.89 


Wright 


21.68 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



30 



STATISTICS OF MINNESOTA. 



TABLE shoMoing the Area, Product and Average Yield of BUCKWHEA'i 
in the several counties in Minnesota in the years 1878 and 1872. 







1873. 






1872. 




Coanties. 


Acres 
Sown. 


Bushels 
Produced. 


Average 
per Acre. 


Acres 
Sown. 


Bushels 
Produced. 


Average 
per Acre. 


Total 


2,686 


29,446 


10.92 


8,601 


49,369 


13.70 


AnokA 

Becker 

Benton* • *••• •*««• 


106 
98 
16 
88 
7 
16 


1,192 
477 
186 

1,086 
148 
144 


18.01 
17.03 
12.83 
11 77 
21.14 
9.00 


78 
8 

^^ 

11 

26 

4 

92 


766 
16 
148 
710 
146 
934 
86 
174 


9.81 
2.00 
18 60 


Blae Earth 

Brown >..*••••••• 


16.90 
13 97 


Carver •••■•• 


9.00 


Chippewa 


21.60 


Chisago.. 

Clay • 


82 

2 

42 

94 

192 

12 

88 

77 

96 

66 

4 

40 

47 
19 
88 
11 


830 

16 

92 

706 

2,460 

921 

638 

608 

1,274 

604 

80 

1,190 

602 

262 

198 

36 


10.81 

7.60 

0.82 

7.60 

12.76 

18.41 

7.21 

6.60 

13.41 

7.63 

80.00 

13.92 

19.80 

13.96 

6.21 

8.97 


7.90 


Cottonwood 

Pakota ^ . . . 


10 
166 
267 
30 
96 
276 
130 
196 


i60 
9,344 
3,416 

609 
1,159 
3,648 
1,869 
1,982 


16.90 
16.12 


Podge 


12 79 


DoosiaB* «•■« ••••, 


16.7$ 


Failbaalt 

Fillmore 


19.07 
18 19 


Freeborn 

Ooodhne 


14.30 
10.15 


Grant • 




Hennepin 

Houston 


127 
129 
27 
18 
4 
8 
29 


1,910 
1,919 
268 
46 
170 
186 
394 


16.08 
15.67 


Isanti 


9.65 


Jackson 


2 50 


Kandiyohi 

Lac ani Parle . . 


49.60 
28.25 


LeSneor 

Lincoln* •••• ••• 


16" 

6 
11 
22 
47 
10 
19 
92 

106 
86 
39 
76 

164 
24 
17 
46 
2 
10 
98 
21 
46 
68 
13 

102 
34 


988 
46 
24 

644 

168 
118 
342 
319 

1,141 
964 
687 
902 

1,372 

380 

930 

276 

26 

44 

1.118 

76 

463 

963 

243 

1,826 
432 


19.20 
7.50 
9.18 
94.79 
3.67 
11.80 
18.00 
14.18 
10 76 
9.96 
17.61 
2.69 
8.90 
16.83 
18.62 
6.97 
13.00 
4.40 
11.96 
8.61 
10.06 
14.17 
18.68 
17.90 
12.70 


13.58 


Lyon 


13 
36 
71 
26 

9 

16 

947 

20 

42 

9 

264 

39 

11 

26 

6 

4 
114 

8 
40 
48 

7 

82 
170 

8 

4 

13 

169 

81 

84 

8 


199 
642 
896 
804 
126 
437 
3,848 
230 
449 
666 
4,248 
634 
286 
916 

76 

28 
1,690 

46 
661 
6S6 

86 
1,415 
1,790 

26 

60 

816 

9,299 

482 

804 

38 


16.30 


McLeod 


16.05 


MarUn 

Heeker 


12.61 
11 80 


tfiUe Lacs 

Morrison 

Mower 


14.00 
29.13 
15.67 


Murray 

Nicollet. 


11.60 
10.52 


Nobles 


61.77 


Olmsted 


16.70 


Otter Tail 

Pote 


16.25 
26.90 


Ramsey* 


8.90 


Redwood 

RenviUe 

Ijlce 


15.00 
6.76 
13 iM 


T}ni«lr 


6 69 


Jill 


18. n 
12.18 
19.14 

17.96 


Steele 

Stevens 


19.62 
8 83 


Swift ....... . , 








16 00 


ipodd 


94 

68 

39 

62 

7 

1 

194 

80 

3 


486 

869 

440 

492 

30 

9 

9,914 

467 

16 


18.16 
19.77 
11.28 
7.98 
4.28 
9.00 
16.02 
16.66 
6.83 


24 28 


Wabasha 

Waseca.. 


14.46 
6.96 


Washington ..... 

Watonwan 

^lll^Q 


8.94 
4.75 


Winona . 


269 
40 


^ 8,860 
684 


14.31 


Wrtght 

Yellow Medicine 


16.86 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBIOULTUBB. 



31 



TABLE showing ihe area, product and average yield per acre of POTA- 
TOES in the several counHes of Minnesota, in the years 1878 and 1872. 



OoiUtiM. 



TotaL 



Aitkin 

Anoka 

BMk«r 

Benton 

BlneBarth ... 

Brown 

Oarlton 

Carrer 

Chlppcwm — 

Chtoago 

Clay 

Cottonwood .. 

Dakota 

Dodge... 

Donglaa 

Farttenlt 

nUmore 

Freeborn 

Ooodhne • .. . 

Oraat. 

Hennepin. ... 

HoBSton 

laanti 

Jackson 

Kanabce 

Kandljohl.... 
LaceoiPftrle. 

Lake 

LeSneor 

Lineoln 

I«yon 

KcLeod 

Martin 

Meeker.. 

Miller 

Morrison... 

Mower 

Mnrray 

VIoollet.... 

Heblee. 

Olmsted.... 
Otter TaU. 

Polk 

Pope 

Bamsey 

Badwood... 
BenTiUe.... 

Sice. 

Bock 

Bcott 

Skerbnme.. 

Sibley 

Steams .... 

Steele 

Stefens.... 
St.Lonia.... 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha... 



Waaklngton , 

Watonwan 

WUkIn 

Winona. 

Wrlgbf 

TeUowMedldne. 



1873. 



Acres. 



810 
227 
110 
788 
490 



i,ao6 

144 
9»3 
48 

040 
304 
828 
466 
873 
719 
706 
71 
1,366 
788 



20 
828 

86 

8 

876 

10 
104 
402 
318 
811 

66 
197 
626 
100 
646 
137 
1,110 



299 

441 
190 
463 
772 
132 
782 
182 
743 
1,H8 
689 
42 



70 



489 
681 
186 

27 
851 
606 

66 



Bnshels. 



2,196,]88 



81,687 
81981 
8,239 
69,361 
19,366 



68,644 

8,981 
41,902 

6,972 
12,166 
94,188 
30,988 
38,687 
86.960 
86 360 
48,274 
86,093 

6,672 
140,000 
49,166 
24,286 

9,776 

2.0S0 
17 683 

3 676 

786 

46,887 

634 

6.880 
31,066 
13,406 
82.184 

7,406 
18,664 
66,466 

3,396 
82,906 

6,189 
120.960 
66,307 

6,891 
17,070 
48,862 

6,146 
SI 860 
70.260 

6,890 
64,149 
10,837 
68,970 
78,204 
62.978 

1312 



3.607 
30,376 
82,677 
29,149 
68,603 

6,601 

8,989 
87,421 
69,038 

9,939 



Average. 



68.81 



101.73 
140.68 
74.90 
80.42 
88.80 



61.66 
02.36 

106.62 

138.88 
48.27 

100.18 
78.63 

117.64 
74.18 
97.88 
67.14 

106.90 
78.47 

103.09 
66.60 

104.01 
83.42 

101.00 
64.60 
46.68 
96.18 
62.38 
63 40 
61.84 
77.27 
42.88 

101.10 

184.66 
94.18 

106.64 
82.96 
60.04 
46.17 

108.96 

114.27 

191.64 
66.46 
96.32 
42.66 
69.00 
90.99 
46.40 
87.62 
82.09 
71 30 
68.17 

106.91 
48.14 



61.38 
02.68 
91.61 
66.30 
102.88 
86.14 
110.70 
102.71 
99.88 
68.48 



18T2. 



Acree. Bosbels. 



86,061 



10 
828 
139 
133 

1,380 
644 
14 
890 
110 
323 
84 
137 

1,130 
361 
620 
660 

1,106 
668 
896 



1,872 
786 
241 
207 
23 
291 
74 

,3§^ 



45 
436 
861 
876 

41 
166 
661 

60 
603 

63 

1,106 

440 

48 
264 
600 
204 
331 
884 

78 
743 
149 
616 
1,116 
601 

39 

28 

70 



437 
644 
148 
27 
800 
680 



8,072,849 



860 
84,894 
20,281 
16,029 

104,443 
44,056 
2,180 
78,171 
16,340 
29,287 
2,498 
14,926 

126,310 
60,367 
78,978 
66.699 

164,945 
72,812 

123,075 



171,604 

78,608 

28,747 

2,007 

2,800 

41,106 

10,766 

666 

72,766 



3,651 
60,347 
29,789 
51,181 

5,885 
22.912 
73,565 

9,614 
60,615 

4,125 
161.072 
70,172 

2,331 
36,493 
69,822 
18,487 
40,967 
97,342 
10,677 
60,901 
18,472 
60,270 
116,892 
64,137 

5,001 

2,716 

7.674 
39,402 
91,621 

4.572 
62,358 
14,872 

8,960 
96,460 
82,783 

7.006 



Average. 



117.89 



8.60 
106.17 
146.90 
120.61 

78.62 

80.94 
166.71 

67.80 
187.31 

90.48 
104.08 
106.94 
111.77 
139.49 
151.88 
101.86 
140.22 
111.60 
187.36 



185.06 
102.60 
119.26 
9.69 
121.78 
141.26 
145.47 
86.75 
99.40 



81.13 
108.84 

82.86 
186.47 
142.81 
14501 
126.65 
156.56 
100.62 

77.82 
146.63 
159.48 

48.56 
128.49 
139.64 

90.62 
123.76 
116.13 
135.60 

61.02 

90.41 

97.86 
106.68 
186.01 
180.63 



169.88 
138.66 
104.63 
127 87 
100.48 
146.29 
123.06 
138.51 
120.79 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



82 



8TATISTI0S OP HINKIBBOTA. 



TABLE Showing the area^ product and average yield per acre of BEANS 
in the eeneral Countiee in Mnneeota, in the yeare 1878 and 1872. 





187a 


1872. 


Ooimties. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Average. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Average. 


Tout 


1,134 


14,246 


12.66 


1,482 


19,156 


12.98 


Anoka 

Becker 

Benton 

BlneBartk 


46 
21 
10 
94 
8 
6 
6 

42 

1 

68 

12 

6 

8 

10 

18 

20 

94 

1 

64 

6 

18 

91 

8 

4 

e 

7 

16 

17 

10 

16 

63 

98 

19 

9 

10 

64 

14 

6 

3 

6 

6 

16 

8 

19 

10 

tl 

64 
10 
12 

9 

22 
44 
12 

9 
22 

2 
20 
89 


676 
274 
132 
892 
96 
76 
190 

"J 

89 
136 
120 

81 
380 

IS 

188 
11 

007 
92 

217 
80 

134 
69 
60 

142 
7 
14 

218 

& 

876 

624 

296 

38 

117 

103 

708 

- 182 

87 

60 

69 

21 

136 

91 

106 

113 

466 

384 

1,273 

210 

66 

17 

309 

692 

91 

139 

14 

20 

231 

1,863 

61 


12.60 
13.04 
13.20 
13.41 
12.00 
19.66 
24.00 
17.97 

9.00 
.67 
11.33 
90.00 
10.96 
83.00 
18.27 
10.17 

7.88 
11.00 
16 79 
16.88 
12 06 

3.80 
16.76 
16.50 
10.00 
90.28 
14.00 

1.14 
14.68 

9.28 
20.90 
26 00 

io;o7 

12 86 

3.16 
18 00 

642 
13.il 
13.00 
14.60 
16.66 
12.40 

490 

9:06 
11.87 

6*67 
11.30 
10.06 
96.68 
23.57 
21.00 

6.66 

8.60 
13.72 
16.72 

7.68 
16.44 

1.09 
10.00 
11.66 
16.20 

6.66 


84 
15 
16 
67 
44 
8 
6 

1 

61 
25 
19 
16 
68 
80 
32 
36 


547 

96 

900 

991 

IS 

168 
766 
3 
396 
416 
327 
299 
496 
396 
362 
889 


16.08 

6.88 

12.00 

17.38 


Brown 


12 68 


Carver 

Chippewa • 


26.87 
26.60 


Chisago 

Cottonwood 


24.36 


6 89 


Dakota 

Dodge 

Douglas 

Fartbanlt 

FlUmore 

Freeborn 

Goodhue 


16.60 
17.91 
14.81 
9.36 
13.20 
1131 
11.11 


Qrant 




Henneoln 


76 
91 
60 
16 

8 
16 
18 

8 


504 
83 
160 
187 
360 
216 


"*i2li8 


Houston 

Isanti 


10.98 
18,08 
5.53 


Jackson ....«...•>••• t... 


Kanabec*.... .rtT,. ...... 


18.76 


Kandiyohi 

Lac qui Parle>.. »tt 


19.46 
96 99 


Le Snenr 


26.87 


Lincoln .-....».» .» 




Lyon 


5 
29 
64 
30 
16 
3S 
44 

7 
16 

4 
64 
37 

7 
13 
10 
14 
13 
21 

8 

9 
57 
16 
40 
20 
26 
10 
94 
89 
13 
88 
16 

1 
10 
60 

6 


88 

448 
606 
406 
281 
867 
443 

66 
196 

18 
973 
820 

95 
214 
171 
170 
140 
966 
188 

90 
600 
298 
666 
409 

64 
238 
488 
446 
272 
800 
174 

18 

919 

1.1« 

148 


19.60 


McLeod 


20.36 


Martin 


7.89 


Meeker 


13.50 


KiUeLaca 

Monrison 


17.66 
11.12 


Mower 

Murray 

Nicollet 

Nobles 

Olmsted 

Otter Tail 

Polk 1 

Pepo 


10.06 
9.98 

18.06 
4.60 

18.01 

14.06 
8.67 

16.46 


Ramsey 

Redwood 

Renville 

Rice 

Rock 

Scott 


17.10 
1214 
10.70 
19.66 
17.95 
10.00 


Sherburne. •••• 


10.68 


Sibley. 


18.68 


Steams 

Steele 

Stevens 


16 69 
14.10 
2.07 


Swift 

Todd 


98.30 
18.60 


Wabasha 


13.98 


Waseca 

Washington. 


20.98 
7.89 


Watonwan 

Wilkin 


10.87 
18.00 


Winona 

Yellow Medicine'.' WWW 


21.90 
19J» 
94 66 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBIOUIiTUBB. 



33 



TABLE Mhowing the area and produet of SOBQHTJM and the producteof 
the SUGAR MAPLE in the several Covnties of Minnesota, in the years 
1878 and 1872. 





1873. 


1872. 


1873. 


1S72. 


Conntlos. 


SOBGHTM. 


SoBOBinc. 


SuoAB MIflb. 


SuoAa Maplb. 




Acres. 


OallB. 
Syrup. 

fi3,2M 


Acres. 


Galls. 
Syrup. 


Galls. 
Syrup. 

17,641 


Lbs. 
Sugar. 

139,968 


Galls. 
Syrup. 


Lbr. 
Sugar. 


ToibX 


747 


8&9 


78,096 


17,394 


196,687 




Aitkin 

Anoka. 

Becker 

Benton* 


.".*;'. *.'.'.' 


:::::::: 




60 

8,770 
2,084 
1,869 
6^ 
188 


27 

96 
274 

666 


i06 

660 
2,134 
1,260 


16 


4.000 
200 


979 
286 


767 


Bine Barth.... 

Brown*. .«• •«•' ..... 

Carver 

Chippewa 

Chiaago 

Clay 

PottAn wood .....■■• 


S8 

28 

30 

7 

1 
1 


1701 

1,070 

818 

22S 

50 

60 


62 
36 
15 
10 

1 


2,747 


1318 


1,886 


981 


2.616 


3 
2 
12 
2 

41 

11 

46 

8 

.y 

**" 2" 

90 

96 

16 

.... ^.. 

92 

7 

1 

9 
83 
16 


60 

860 

1,006 

102 

8,498 

3,892 

20 
169 

72 

^. 
36 

2,686 

6,924 

1,199 










Dakota. 


8 

6 

1 

27 

24 

29 

6 

40 

40 


608 

626 

40 

1,893 

2,661 

416 
4,421 

,.m 

90 


18 

80 

897 






680 


Dodge 

Donglas 

FArlnanlt 


100 
6,938 


16 
366 


1,080 

9,689 
116 




120 


6,428 


786 


6,326 


Freeborn 

Goodhue 

Hennepin 

HoQBton .....< 




339 

626 
8 
4 


680 

43,607 

300 

186 


122 
764 


125 

62,019 

130 


leantt 

Jaokson 

Kanabec 

Tjftft onl Parle. 


676 










9,370 
1,196 

64 

76 

149 
169 


98,238 
47,449 

■'8,398 

84 

1,276 


Le Suenr 


72 

60 
8 

4" 

90 

12 
2 
2 
6 
7 
2 

i" 

ifi 

P. 

12 
6 


6.»r 

1,969 

2,612 

672 

23 

6.913 

'^ 

8 
860 
669 

12 

866 

766 
866 

n% 

889 
4 
218 
280 
160 

'^n 

866 

6,946 

16 


1,601 

80 

46 

227 
318 


21,687 
*"8,840 

60 

8.618 
1.980 


llkLeod' i m *!.'.'.*.*! .* 


Martin 

Meeker 

MlUeLaca 

Morrison 

Mower.... 


Murray....: 

Nicollet 


866 

10,122 

702 

68 

460 

2,143 

1,260 


















Olmsted 

OtterTall 

Bed wood 

BenvlUe 

Bice 

Rock 

8t. Louis 

Scoti 

Sherburne 

Sibley 

Steams 


118 
87 


^•^ 


806 
262 


8,880 


"** 1,831 


"i*7;9i7 


*'■ 2,713 


"i»i440 


6 

16 
6 

22 
4 
3 
2 
2 

21 
9 
6 

44 
2 


3 
908 
809 

••IS 

129 
60 
80 
1.649 
638 
632 
4,099 
118 


646 
40 
180 
782 
12 


'*i;367 

640 

1,880 

753 

880 


ioi 

400 
320 
174 


460 

""i\m 

826 


Steele 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Washington 


1,660 


660 


7,760 


366 
80 


6,640 
1100 












86 


1,172 








VTBtWUIVKU 

Winona 


•"2,041 


260 
11,277 


""i;792 


486 


TeffowMidiciiii;;: 


12,440 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



34 



8TATI8TICS OF MINNBSOTA. 



TABLE showing the Area and Product of CULTIVATED and WILD 
SAT in tJie several Counties in Minnesota for the years 1878 and 1872. 







1878. 






1873. 




CoantiM. 


OULTIYATSD HaT. 


Wild Hat. 


CuLTivATW) Hat. 


Wiij>Hat. 


• 


Acres. 


Ton«- 


Tons. 


Acres. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Total ••••• 


104,626 


144,712 


788.619 


88,990 


106,028 


748,414 






^(^In. 








40 

144 


120 
919 




Anoka «... 

Becker 

Benton 


224 

2 

84 

2,040 

130 


381 

4 

66 

^ 3.631 

♦ 268 


9.293 
6,162 
8,441 
36,088 
24.446 


7,601 
3,876 
3,481 


28 

1.693 

60 

7 

669 

1 

1,074 


41 

2.480 

124 

18 

1,067 

1,4M 


BIneBarth 

Brown 

Cftrlton . ...... 


86 228 
91,842 


Carver •••••• 


601 

20 

i;») 

1 

6,447 

4227 

'108 

789 

18^221 

472 

9,804 


9i8 

16 

1,886 

i" 

7,226 

6,191 

176 

1,176 

16,480 

762 

18,144 


16,434 

6.396 

6,946 

2 019 

9.277 

13,764 

17,490 

14.607 

31,428 

11,326 

61867 

26.114 

4,400 

26,163 

6.768 

6,464 

12,628 

326 

22.679 

4.147 

80 

9983 

686 

4.846 

19,716 

12.720 

17,482 

1,662 

2,894 

16,837 

6,019 

29.469 

4,872 

18,816 

26,862 

3,233 

18,697 

8,726 

6,992 

18,646 

24,262 

4.964 

12,981 

7,467 

20,217 

28,625 

24,640 

1.996 


81,230 


Chippewa 

Chisago 

Clay 

Cottonwood 

Dakota 


6.714 
6,676 
1,112 
5,211 
18,806 






6,627 
3.094 
129 
8,392 
10,866 
482 
7,268 


6,981 

3.897 

193 

997 

11,119 

622 

8,429 


Bodge 


81,296 


Douglas 

Farlbanlt 

Fillmore 

Freeborn • • . 


18.362 
31.671 
10,092 
39 .062 


Goodhne 


263S 


Hennepin 


4,164 
6,991 
41 
28 
18 
124 
6 

69 
1,699 


6.288 
9,812 
70 
22 
86 
182 
8 

86 
3,820 


2,868 
6 


6.976 
9 


22,482 

8,826 


Isanti 


6,644 


Jackson 


•■as 

17,663 
8,084 


Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Lac qui Parle .... 
Lake 


49 


97 


66 

1.629 


73 
3.024 


Le Suenr 


12,044 


T 1n<>n1n 














2,674 
17,867 
15.660 


Hartln 


216 

30 

203 

7 

26 

3.267 


864 

68 

866 

16 

46 

4,108 


207 

107 

186 

3 

10 

2,803 


406 

72 

296 

6 

11 

8,316 


Meeker ,.. 

HllleLacfl 

Morrison 

Mower 


17.523 
1,578 
2,861 

18,666 
2,612 

84,196 


Nicollet 


948 


396 


208 


871 


VnhlAM... - 


1,891 
19.699 


Olmsted 


11,661 
106 


14,483 
*172 


8,699 
91 


8,926 
180 


Otter TaU 


12,032 
1,327 


Pone 


13 
1,201 

8 
4,810 


16* 

1,964 


11 

1.067 

8 

8 

4,029 


18 
1,280 

9 
5,411 


14!^ 


**'*"' 


3,086 




3>86 


Renville 


12 
7.760 


15,828 


Rice 


34,199 

3.443 

15186 


gcott 


890 
65 
196 
676 
1,446 


1.409 

67 

397 

1,186 

2,024 


639 

29 

142 

637 

1,166 


382 

906 

1,766 


Sherburne 

81bley 


6233 
20.810 


Stearns 


23.177 


Steele 


34.523 

1,427 

86 


St« liouli. 






100 


128 


Swift • • • • • 






7,261 

7,872 
4,761 


3.876 


Todd 


70 
7,683 


106 
10,628 


78 

6.868 


100 
6,643 


11.620 


Wabasha 

T^adena 


4,722 
60 


Waseca . ..*••••• 


968 

6,878 

269 


1,490 

9,006 

868 


22,982 
2,821 

10,687 

877 

4,817 

17,169 
6,315 


410 

6,169 

66 


666 

6,077 
92 


23.176 


Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 


3,866 
838 


Winona 


11,601 


14,969 

"•I 


10,870 
1,048 


12.648 
1,607 


6.128 


Wright 

Yellow Medicine. 


13.102 
36,404 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AaBIOULTUBB. 



35, 



TABLE shovoing the area and prodwOe of FLAX and HOPS in (he eeveral 
counHes of Minneeota in the years 1878 and 1872. 





Flax. 


FT.AX. 


Heps. 


Hops. 


CoontiM. 


1873. 


1872. 


1878. 


1872. 




Acres. 


Bushels 
Seed. 


Acres. 


Bushels 
Seed. 


Acres. 


Poinds. 


Acres. 


Poinds. 


fToUl 


12,114 


100,868 


12,129 


71,762 


194 


67,291 


93 


114,429 




^^oka 








K 


5 


1 


200 


Benton 

BlneBarth 


3 


"w.666 


•i^" 


"11,000 




Cftrver* ,.••••••• 


9 
3 


463 

16 

600 

2,700 


6 
,,, 


4,100 


GUbako •■• 


Dakota 

Dodge 


680 
296 

60 
856 

20 
200 
263 

64 

2 

84 


6,410 

2,786 

286 

""243 

1,337 

2,986 

684 

i 

869 

2 

824 

991 

1,112 


928 
1,600 


17,942 
7,797 


1 
8 


800 
1,207 


Donglas 


Faribattli 


1,159 

18 

980 

1,769 

4** 

146 
116 


1,721 
8 

2,261 
161 
973 

2 

1,834 
691 


1 
27 
19 
41 


2 
4,776 
60 
9,606 
6,870 
17,100 
6 






Fillmore 

Freeborn ........... 


29 


12,836 


Qoodbne 


36 


16,480 


Hennepin 

Houston 

Isanti 

Kandlyobl 


is 
3 


10,400 
13 


Le Snenr 


400 


Lyon 


1 


2 




]I^L«od 


22 
318 
116 










Hartin 




8 








30.888 


Heeker 


1 


80 

20 

814 

10 

"3,680 
6 
6 




•5 


Morrison 








Mower 

Nicollet 


440 

614 

189 

1,364 

344 


4,712 

669 
9.9« 

3.084 


1^062" 


6,978 
"iV,841 


6 




800 


Hobles 






Olmsted 


8.900 


Otter Tall 


Pope 

Bamsey 










. ... 


a 


200 






25 


Bed wood 


1 

S8 
SB 


8 
2T3 
103 










}(fee-- T r 


11 


120 


2 


700 




7,800 


Bock 


Scott 






3 


420 




4,i83 


Sherburne .• 










Sibley 




1 

1,144 

171 


8 


48 


. . . .... 








Stearns 


128 
17 










Steele 

Swift 






3 


667 





11.080 
88 


Todd 


21 
149 
76 


356 

1,668 

643 














Wabasha 


100 

404 


790 
4,077 


4 
11 


2,350 
2,106 


ii 

6 

3 


5,943 


Washington 


1200 
i;i06 


Waseca 


Watonwan 

Winona. .....* 


986 
49 


872 


68 


600 


6" 

10 


'"V,46o 

3,162 


""6*600 


Wright 


X 


20 


siwo 


Yellow Medicine... 


6 


* 40 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



36 



8TATISTI0B OF MmNESOTA. 



TABLE Showing the production of TIMOTHY and CLOVER SEED, and 
the number of HIVE OF BEES kept^ and pounds of HONEY produced 
in the several Counties in Minnesota in the years 1878 and 1872. 



» 


1873. 


1872. 


1873. 


1879. 


Coantles. 


Tlm'hy 


Clover. 


Tlm»hy 


Clover. 


Honey. 


Honey. 




Bushel 
Seed. 


Bushels 
Seed. 


Bushels 
Seed. 


Bushels 
Seed. 


No. of 
Hives. 


Lbs. 
Honey. 


No. of 
Hives. 


Lbs. 
Honey. 


Total 


40,022 


1,646 


16,228 


2,348 


10.876 


134,966 


13.704 

64 

2 

60 

866 

147 

287 

216 

3 


196,387 






Anoks 


4 

li' 

l,t64 

46 

21 

104 

7 

947 

6»683 

30 

749 

6,066 

404 

2,688 

196 

298 

8 

61 

60 

13 

161 

262 

38 

••• 








64 

278 

626 
198 

97 
126 

14 
286 
328 

12 
291 
780 
106 
263 
698 
939 
103 
1 

96 
198 
476 

46 
968 

66 

47 

198 

3 

880 

804 

4 


970 

0,126 
8,909 
1,671 
1460 

2b0 
6,470 
8627 

446 
3,360 
6,046 
9,133 
2,068 
4,668 
1,676 
1,870 

m 

1,998 
8364 
930 
3,667 
1,060 
1162 
1446 
81 
4,932 

•••v.sj 

""2.660 


1,000 


Becker .... 

Benton 

Blae Barth 


1 

2 

79 

171 

64 

174 

8 

i 


14 

648 

16 

6 

36 

3 

732 

2,496 

12 

691 

1,338 

201 

1,698 

198 

29 

3 

14 

16 

11 

87 

49 

**'V,816 


4* 

....... 

968 

""i62* 

""238" 

7 

28 

8 

ii 


'190 

680 

10,607 


Browni* ,,,.....-.. 


4,046 


Carver 

Chliago 

Cottonwood 

Dakota 


4,806 

2,818 

76 

7,420 


Dodce. • ...•••••• 


8,161 


Donglae..'. 

FarlDaolL 




iis 

848 
188 
894 
761 
601 
190 
2 

72 
254 
368 

19 
254 

60 

17 
289 


1,760 


Fillmore 


13U)66 


Freeborn 

Goodhae 

Hennepin 

Houston 


2,940 
11,480 
19.866 
10.299 


iMQtl 


i;960 

"i'ao 


Jackson 

Kandlvohif. ^ - - - . . r - 


Le Snenr ••••.•.*•• 


3,817 


McLeod 


Martin 


Meeker 

MilleLacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 


8,834 
6,064 


NlcoUet. 

Nobles 

Olmsted 


141 

9 

6 

10 

1,946 

67 

11 

97 

260 

4U0 

sr? 

1,014 

78 

1,062 


894 


12 
• i;743 


""oil' 


446 

4 

i64 


156 
16,686 


Otter TaU 

Pope 

Ramsey.. .....->-.... 


18 




9 


■ "86 


116 


1,460 


l^jniyllfe 




RIee 


90 

ii 

88 


11 

48 

256 

12 

381 

194 

71 


90 





""833* 
9 

111 


831 
393 
997 

76 
276 
211 

26 
492 
240 
164 

36 


8,060 
6,266 
8,174 
2,726 

l:SS 

1,099 
4,674 
3799 
2,110 
1,020 


628 
885 

109 
166 
870 
441 
9 
798 
386 
959 
60 


14,789 


Scott 


7,118 


Sberbame 

Sibley 

Steams 

Steele 

Todd 


9,196 
8,'544 
6,899 
11,716 
90 


Wabasba 


11,018 


Waseca •. 


9,966 


Wasbington 

Watonwan ... . 


1718 
llSGO 


Wilkin 


25 
78 
74 


.... 






Winona 

Wrtght 

YeUow Medicine... 


6,432 
816 


9,668 
68 

4 


861 


889 

644 


1,687 
19;896 


667 
636 


7,461 
11,808 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBIOULTinEUB. 



37 



TABUS Mhovfing the inroduct0f 8TBAWBEBBISB and TOBACCO in the 
several Counties of Minnesota in the years 1878 and 1872. 



CountiM. 



Total.. 



Aooka 

Backer 

Benton 

Blao Earth 

Brown 

Omrror 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Cottonwood 

BakoU 

Dodffe 

Douglas 

Vartbanlt 

nUmore 

Freeborn 

Ooodbne 

Grant. 

Hennepin 

Honeton 

Isanti 

Jackson. 

Kandiyohi 

IacqdI Parle 

LeSoenr 

Lyon 

MeLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

MtlleLacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 

NicdMst 

Nobtos.... , 

Olmeted 

Otter TaU 

Pope 

Ramsey 

Bedwood 

BenTille 

Bice 

Bock 

Bt. Louis 

Scott 

Sherburne 

Sibley 

Steama 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabaaha 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

WUkin. 

Winona 

Wright 

TeUow Medldne. 



Stkawbbbbiss. 



1873. 



QuarU. 



255,766 



2,114 



471 

8,466 

920 

508 



661 

44 

80,580 

2,604 

1,215 

8,628 

a.222 

4,010 

10,690 



87,301 

J, 604 

850 

110 

541 



6,875 



1,370 

4,168 

2,680 

S60 

195 

1,680 

80 

2,068 



11,066 

20 

430 

85,062 

70 

289 

7,517 



1,878 
1,184 

782 
8,069 
8,836 

190 



801 
3,818 

568 
6,899 

788 



49,609 

4,618 

3 



1878. 



Quarts. 



977,716 



1,990 



847 
5,868 

167 
1,818 



320 



38,489 
4,657 
798 
6,849 
1,618 
4,847 

14,864 



29,058 

2,866 

1,088 

51 

478 



6,464 



2,608 
1,936 
8,634 
188 
170 
4,925 



TOBAOOO. 



1873. 



Pounds. 



1,684 
i3',i62' 



893 
49.077 



05 
6,801 



100 

2,873 

1,421 

469 

10,041 



600 



964 
11,999 

438 
11,187 

877 



86,907 
3,298 



28,324 



958 
125 
801 
766 
331 
672 
76 
454 



1,081 
111 
383 
381 
300 
6 
478 
106 

1,884 

199 

241 

60 

2,145 



1,684 

10 

987 



660 

868 

6 

660 

86 
190 
587 
806 
356 

16 

30 
762 

10 



60 

482 

1,161 

208 



60 

760 

66 

310 

, 10 

13 

10 

4,298 

3,469 



1878. 



Pounds. 



42,788 



390 



19 
789 

1,610 
591 
198 

1,386 
172 
32 
286 
564 



146 
100 
880 



380 
360 
675 

8,894 

1,742 
380 
932 
600 

1,906 
768 

8,662 



110 

900 

2,800 

6 



50 
778 



480 



311 

1.147 

10 



973 



316 
840 



800 
772 



249 

100 

8,494 

8»187 

800 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



88 



STATJ^TIOS OF MDnsnCSOTA. 



TA^LE showing the numbw of APPLE TBES8 QBOWING, IN BEAM- 
INQ, and nunkber of butJiels of APPLES produced in the several Counties 
in Mnn€sota\n the years 1878 and 1872. 





. 


1873. 






1872. 




CoimtiM. 




No. 
Growing. 


No. 
Bearing. 


Bnshels 
Apples. 


No. 
Growing. 


No. 
Bearing. 


Bnshela 
: Apples. 


Total 


3,832.088 


84,484 


20,808 


1,734,861 


87,461 


89,668 




■ 

Anoka 


9.489 

806 

906 

39,269 

7486 

28,761 

1.687 

6,366 

168 

10,448 

38,861 

13,567 

9,646 

26.614 

64,376 

' 20,170 

43,112 

592 

2,906,668 

27;629 

8,064 

80 

8.286 

134 

31,289 

880 

85,098 

11,867 

7,831 

1,048 

1,178 

18,361 

729 

16,606 

19,961 

66,916 

^•1 

2,166 
18,651 

1,974 

4,807 

24,686 

877 

12 827 

9,067 

5,183 
17,587 
82,'698 

1,129 
799 

4.471 
66,316 
91,929 
94,073 

2,754 

'993 

61,087 

89,503 

870 


1,396 


916 


918 

^"-^ 

6,930 

8 

917 

97,862 

88,741 

6,646 
17.850 
60,086 
16,871 
49,467 


690 


139 


Seeker 


Benton 


918 

8,442 

424 

*'l6 
716 


S3 

690 

90 

769 

4 

149 


201 

81 
1,760 


28 

685 

3 

540 


Bine Earth 

Brown 


Garver 


Cbippewm 


Chisaeo 


641 

3* 

4,126 
1360 
81 
609 
6,900 
1,960 
5,768 


125 


Clay 


Cottonwood 


8 
5,583 
1,366 
9T6 
1,076 
6,061 
1184 
8,826 

13,043 

9,682 

177 

21 


'"9,094** 
248 
18 
194 
1,490 
176 
779 


"*V,942" 
%4 

8 
156 

8,130 
366 

9.068 


Dodge 


DoQglae 

Faribanlt 

Fillmore 

Freeborn* •••<••• 


Goodhne 

Grant 


Hennepin 

Honston 

Isanti 

Jackson 


2,080 

1,092 

16 


898,342 

86,970 

9,941 

978 


8,463 

4,760 

91 

8 


2,679 

4,867 

19 


Kanabec 




SandiyoU 

Lac qal Parle..... 


244 


4 


4,690 


86 


12 


Le ttneor 


1,994 


660 


6,684 
1,012 

8,660 


1,387. 


60S 


Lyon. 

McLeod 


686 

169 
608 
137 
22 

1,449 


48 
16 
42 
91 
8 
138 


481 
106 
198 
71 
17 
1,341 

968 


106 


Martin 


Heeker 


94 

23 

19 

858 


MUlelAca 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 


Kicollet 


160 


92 


liobles 


Olmsted 


4,98a 


1,222 


94,026 
9,181 


9,184 
8 


4.643 


Otter Tall 


Polk 




Pope 


90 
1,664 

67 
3,006 


2 
690 


1,062 
8,976 
1,668 
2,716 
29,490 


16 

20 

2,917 




Kamsey.... .,..«■ 


696 


Bed wood......... 


Benvllle 




6* 


Rice 


600 


1,409 


Scott 

Skerbnme. 

Sibley 


2,108 

202 

610 

1,810 

9,'297 


614 
89 
828 
139 
434 


19,837 
8,840 
4^836 

12,006 


1,696 
148 
716 
601 


666 

82 
146 
134 


Stearns 


Steele 


Stevens 


466 

109 

2,060 

28,130 

8,769 

96.861 

1,601 






Swift 






46" 

6,771 

677 

4,823 

68 


"•"*■ 


Todd 


96 
4,877 
1,084 
6,493 
168 
9 
4,944 


i" 

1,094 

162 

2,919 

19 


5 


Wabasha 

Waseca 


Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 


2,872 
8 


Winona ... 


1,702 
260 


61,096 
999 , 


*"* 14,776" 
2,996 


8,648 
948 


Wright 

Yellow Medidne. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AOaiOULTUBB. 



39 



TABLE Bhowing the nwn^ber of QBAPE VINES in hearing and the pny- 
duetion of CULTIVATED GRAPES in the eeoena countieain Minneeota 
in the year 1878. 



OonnttM. 



ToUl. 



ABOks 

Becker 

Benton 

BloeSarth ... 

Brown 

Carlton 

Cerrer 

Cam 

Oblppewa 

Chisago 

Clay 

Cottonwood... 
Crow Wing.... 

Dakota 

Dodge. 

Dooglaa 

Taribaolt 

FUlmore 

Freeborn 

Goodhne 

Grant 

Hennefrtn 

Hoaaton 

laantl 

Jackson 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Laeqni Parle.. 

Uke 

LaSaenr 

Lincoln 

Ijron 

icLeod. 

Martin 

Meeker 



S 



26,084 



56 



l,i06 
IM 



094 



88 

18 

200 



1.038 
279 
214 

1,040 
310 
174 
417 



1,963 

6,05S 

81 



18 



164 



90 
468 



I 

i 



61,381 



87 



6,989 
409 



1,196 



80 

86 

1,000 

4 



1,691 
706 
190 
1,800 
1,792 
64S 
663 



3,967 

14,384 

80 



190 



118 

237 

64 



Conntiet. 



MilleLflca 

Morrison ( 

Mower. 

Murray 

Nicollet. 

Nobles 

Olmsted ■ 

Otter Tail. 

Pine 

Polk 

Pope , 

Ramsey 

Redwood 

RenYille 

Rica** 

Rock 

St. Lonis 

Scott 

Sherburne 

Sibley , 

Steams , 

Steele 

Stevens , 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Wadena , 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan , 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine.. 



18 



400 

1,206 

10 



4 

1,396 
17 



689 



1,841 

12 

116 

422 

996 



2 
89 
623 



4,076 
908 



i 



6 
434 



69 

600 

4,608 



68 

6,626 



8,266 



6T1 
106 
686 
626 
1,065 



100 
140 
917 



161 
1,015 



6,608 
178 



Digitized by LjOOQIC • 



dO 



STATIBTI08 OV MIINKBSOTA. 



TABLE Showing the number of SHEEP SHEABED and number of 
POUNDS OF WOOL produced in the several CounUee in Minnesota, 
in the years 1878 and 1872. 



Coantiet. 



Total. 



Aitkin 

Anoka 

Becker 

Benton 

BlaeBarth 

Brown 

Carver 

Cliippewa 

Oliieago 

Clay. 

Cotton wood. •••••« 

Dakota 

Dodge 

Dooglas 

Faribault 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Ooodhne 

Grant 

Hennepin 

Hoaston 

leanti 

Jackson 

Kandiyohi 

Lac qni Parle 

LeSnenr 

Lyon 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

Mine Lacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Marray....< 

Vioollet 

Nobles 

Olmsted 

Otter TaU 

Polk 

Pope 

Bamtey 

Redwood 

RenviUe 

Bice 

Rock 

Scott. 

Sherbnrne 

Sibley 

Steams 

Steele 

Stevens 

St. LoqIs 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasba , 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine. . 



1878. 



Sheep 
Sheared. 



141.748 



1,114 

170 

478 
5,623 
1,2D7 
5,738 

466 
1,631 

149 

614 
3,249 
4,891 
1,819 
4,S70 
8,981 
4,594 
6,329 

346 
6,496 
5.718 
1,129 

701 
4508 

207 
6,365 

S56 

8.600 

1,464 

8,857 

39 

C20 
1,986 

818 
2,989 
88 
5,267 
1,326 
87 
1,578 

286 

614 
1,780 
6.946 

118 
4,469 
1.018 
8.664 
6,904 
8,876 
79 



360 
454 

1,330 
2,226 
3,110 

'692 

13 

3.100 

4.718 

314 



Pounds 
Wool. 



620,859 



3,800 
402 

1.897 
21.389 

4,652 
18 456 

1,812 

5,666 
489 

2,667 
10,561 
22,661 

6.894 
17.096 
30,182 
16394 
24,299 

1.181 
20,164 
19,609 

8,667 

2.398 

14,864 

768 

21,096 

1,684 
13.710 

4.898 

15.368 

161 

2,03a 

7,362 

1094 

11,188 

112 

19,686 

4,232 
299 

6,768 
966 

8,178 

6,163 

26.064 

402 

16,002 

8,811 
18.166 
20,468 
14.074 
304 



1,445 

2,122 

5.184 

12,875 

12.748 

1.465 

85 

13,460 

16,466 

980 



1872. 



Sheep 
Sheared. 



125,728 



6 

1.107 

66 

390 
6.868 

987 
6,470 

433 

1,494 

11 

221 
2,168 
4,672 
1,260 
8,414 
7.939 
4,754 
6,950 



4.695 

6.173 

1.062 

281 



120 

5,041 

90 

3.145 

1097 

2,672 

63 

479 

1,695 

114 

2.729 

75 

4,947 

m 

40 

1.139 

270 

506 

1,068 

6,217 

89 

4.054 

957 

3,034 

C.180 

3,061 

69 

18 

279 

810 

1.147 

2,146 

2,510 

429 

16 

2.446 

8,617 



Pounds 
Wool 



497,045 



3,661 
157 

1,694 
22,100 

4.211 
19.348 

1.294 

4,746 



1,421 
9,42t 

20.434 
4.844 

18,020 



8.306 
81,093 



17/05 

17.2U 

8.488 

844 

13.609 

866 

20.666 

314 

19.68S 

3.660 

11.667 

209 

1,815 

6.248 

705 

11.088 

6.542 

21.511 

2,802 

100 

4,826 

1,367 

2,684 

3,625 



10ft 

14108 

5.520 

1.946 

23,641 

13.208 

229 

20 

706 

1,184 

4.848 

7,162 

9,172 

1^13 

42 

11,465 

12,669 

1.089 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBICULTUBK. 



41 



TABLE showing the DAIBT PRODUCTS in the several Counties in Min- 
nesota, for the years 1873 and 1872. 



Coanties. 



ToUl.. 



Aitkin 

Anoka 

B«ck3r 

Benton 

BlneBarth 

Brown 

Carver 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Clay .. — • 

Cottonwood . .... 

DakoU 

Dodge 

Donglat 

Farlbanlt 

Fillmore 

Freeborn «i 

Ooodhne 

Grant 

Hennepin 

Houston. 

Isanti 

Jackson 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Lac qai Parle.... 

Lake 

LeSaenr 

Lincoln 

Lyon. 

McLeod 

Martin 

Keeker 

HUleLacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 

Nicollet 

Nobles 

Olmsted 

Otter Tall 

Polk 

Pope 

Ramsey 

Redwood 

Renville 

Rice 

Bock 

Scott 

Sherbnme 

Sibley 

Steams 

Steele < 

Stevens 

St. Lools 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Waseca 

Wastilngton 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine. 



1873. 



No.Cows. 



166,464 



1,461 
677 
724 

-1 ,T :^n 

4,ryT 
3 f\i'} 

7. 737 

:f.].H 
].ii4 

2,958 

670 

18 

8,274 

54 

697 
3,296 
1,498 
2,877 

263 

661 
3,699 

461 
4,478 

418 
6,961 
3,485 

828 
1,749 
1,131 

669 
2,418 
4,611 

490 
8,730 
1.117 
8,460 
6,666 
4,084 

191 



676 
1,077 
4,291 
2,869 
2,666 
1,176 
98 
4.682 
3,911 

777 



Lbs. Bntter 



10,140,816 



116,448 

84,339 

74,428 
411.061 
150,385 
209,090 

73,644 
143,500 

16.783 

62,687 
312.706 
292,628 
189,746 
255,630 
523,130 
430,348 
600,378 

33.361 
381,060 
265,253 

48,813 

70,068 

1,576 

193,286 

26,616 

975 

166,604 

4,460 

87,924 
189,163 
119,730 
181,981 

82,700 

46.153 
286,908 

31,830 
270,406 

24,618 
449,364 
169,897 

14,475 
122,967 

99.880 

67,761 
164,674 
876,290 

38,833 
168,629 

68.368 
193,640 
357,714 
364,294 

10,805 



40,947 

68,766 
366,804 
196,630 
132,812 

78.387 

4.325 

298,277 

200,757 

54,438 



Lb8.Chee8e 



1,031,510 



8,801 

716 

3.676 

21,966 

14,898 

8,961 

800 

1,908 

70 

536 

66.236 

46.806 

1,680 

4,884 

86,307 

6,400 

40,960 

1,712 

9,440 

12^0 

310 

2.827 

25 

3.486 

320 



3.380 



3,466 

56,536 

7,410 

6,800 

666" 

45,664 

640 

9,000 

190 

182,700 

2,066 

100 

2,680 

8,064 

1,461 

2,680 

151,872 

126 

8,470 

33,419 

8,190 

10,936 

146,162 



no 

940 

18.942 

12,117 

865 

1,675 

40 

22,622 

4,S65 

120 



1873. 



No. Cows 



186,691 



i;»6 

365 

648 
4,878 
2,631 
4,868 

845 

1,471 

54 

413 
4,297 
8.169 
1,724 
8,444 
8,318 
6,142 
7,189 



6,280 

4,628 

896 

836 

36 

2,503 

866 

16 

8,218 



183 
3,989 
1,295 
2,417 

213 

494 
8,866 

218 
8,399 



6,631 
1,680 

110 
1,498 
1,069 

444 
1,761 
4,897 

382 
3,412 

960 
3,022 
4.886 
3,661 

113 
46 

506 

80S 
3,624 
2,869 
8,542 

809 
93 
4,288 
8.796 , 

617 I 



Lbs. Batter 



8,838,660 



106,787 
32,446 
40.131 
394,722 
147,472 
173,481 
66,467 
73,464 



82.797 
326,611 
239,801 
128,196 
193,670 
486,998 
866,646 
546,783 



331,484 

260,840 

41,081 

44,158 

1,360 

174,686 

32,810 

1,060 

168,291 



7,166 

146,417 

116,810 

168,418 

18.010 

30,938 

227,743 

16,005 

166,207 



641000 

114,977 

5,383 

126,016 

91,369 

31,199 
104,562 
848,199 

16,027 
180332 

67,967 

166,665 

271,443 

375,024 

6,536 

870 

26,978 

63,636 
229,424 
174,801 
176,669 

70,991 

4,913 

806,486 

166,656 

86.860 



Lbs.Cheese 



772,680 



3.010 

666 

8,169 

14,660 

14,390 

3,621 

746 

849 



476 
48,746 
22,861 
1,883 
8,221 
38,629 
12,139 
38,186 



6168 

9,180 

373 

3,420 



3,695 



8,100 



4360 
60,600 
2,138 
2,367 



466 

80,696 

1,130 

7,937 

90 

161,486 

1.622 



2,260 
6,160 

966 
8,860 
69,868 

800 



38,165 

6,763 

8.369 

138,479 

760 



700 

375 

6,169 

9,020 

40 



14,004 
4,203 



Digitized by 



Google \' 



42 8TATISTI0B DIP MnTHnSSOTA. 

BBTURN8 FOB 1874. 

The number of acres in each of the various products in 
the year 1874, were reported as follows : 

Acres in Wheat In 1874 1,672,040 

Acres In Oats in 1874 890,808 

Acres in Com in 1874 258,489 

Acres in Barley in 1874 i 82,988 

Acres in Rye In 1874 4 840 

Acres in Buckwheat in 1874 2,182 

Acreage in grain crops in 1874 2,856,842 



Acres in Potatoes in 1874 29,157 

Acres in Beans in 1874 8.589 

Acres In Hops in 1874 « 226 

Acres in Sorghnm in 1874 825 

Acres in CnltlYated Hay In 1874 112,286 

Acres in Flax in 1874 20,878 

Acres in miscellaneons products In 1874 22,540 

Total of reported acreages in 1874 2,545,248 

Total of reported acreages in 1878 2,887,782 

Increase of cultivated acreage since 1878 207,461 

The tax law of 1874 requiring assessors to take their 
statements between the first Monday in May and the fourth 
Monday in June, these officers necessarily visited some 
tarms before the sowing or planting was all done, hence the 
above returns for 1874 are presumably not quite full as re- 
gards late sown or planted products. The increase in the 
acreage ot each crop is as follows : — 

Acres. 

Acreage in Wheat In 1874, increase since 1878. 128,827 

Acreage in Oats in 1874, Increase since 1878 22.816 

Acreage in Corn In 1874, increase since 1878 44,039 

Acreage in Potatoes in 1874, increase since 1878 2,797 

Acreage In Beans in 1874, increase since 1878 2,405 

Acreage in Hops in 1874, increase since 1878 82 

Acreage in Sorghnm in 1S74, Increase since 1878 78 

Acreage in Cultivated Hay in 1874, Increase since 1878 7,711 

Acreage in Flax in 1874, increase since 1 878 8,264 

Miscellaneons acreages in 1874, increase since 1878 • 1,656 

Increase in foregoing acreages since 1878 • • • • 212,624 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBIOULTUBB. 43 

Acreage i|i Barley In 1874, decrease since 1878 S,818 

Acreage in Rye in 1874, decrease since 1878 2,143 

Acreage in Bockwheat in 1874, decrease since 1878 •••••••• 608 

6,168 

Net increase in acreages since 1878..... •••.« 907,461 

CBOPS ly 1874. 

Private orop-reports tor 1874 indicate a reduction, com- 
pared with 1873, in the average yield ot nearly all products. 
As causes operating more or less throughout the state, poor 
seed and drought would seeiti to have been prominent, while 
of drawbacks more local in their effects, grasshopper-in- 
juries proved very serious in a large number of western 
counties. With occadional exceptions, wheat was low on 
old soil, and great inequalities were reported in the yield 
of oats and corn. The average of these crops may fall below 
that of last 'year on large areas in even the best cultivated 
portions of the state. The following is an estimate in ad* 
vance of official cropreturns, of the aggregate yield for the 
whole state of each of the products named : 

Bushels. 

Wheat in 1874, estimated crop 21,660,000 

Oats in 1874, estimated crop 10,696.000 

Com in 1874, estimated crop • 6,600,000 

Barley in 1874, estimated crop • 590,000 

Bye in 1874, estimated crop 80,000 

Buckwheat in 1874, estimated crop 26,000 

Total of grain crops 89,640,000 

Potatoes in 1874, estimatea crop 2,000,000 

Beans in 1874, estimated crop 16,000 

Official acreage-statements, always essential to an intelli- 
gent estimate of aggregate yields, are for the present year 
of less value than ordinarily, because of the absence of in- 
formation concerning the amount of damage by grasshoppers. 
The destruction of crops is said to have been more than 50 
per cent, in the counties of Brown, Clay, Cottonwood, Jack- 
son, Lac qui Parle, Lincoln, Lyon, Marti ^Murray, Nobles, 
Bedwood, Senville, Bock, Watonwan and Yellow Medicine ; 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44 8TATI8TIOB OF MINNB80TA. 

and a smaller percentage in the counties of Blue Earth, 
Chippewa, Faribault, Grant, Nicollet, Otter Tsil, Sibley» 
Stevens, Swift and Wilkin. 

Fruits.— The effects of the winter of 1872-S were still 
felt in 1874 in the continued dying of trees, and the returns 
for the year show a decline in apple trees growing and grape 
vines in bearing, while there is a handsome increase in the 
number of apple trees in bearing. There is an increase, 
also, in the reported number of nurseries. 

LIVE STOOK m 1874. 

The condition of stock was reported as good during the 
year, the winter being mild, though long, fodder abundant 
and n J serious less from epidemics. The only losses reported 
were from depradations of dogs on the flocks of wool-growers, 
the number of sheep killed in some towns exceeding one 
hundred. The number of each class of live stocft in the 
summer of 1874, as returned to the State Auditor for the 
purposes of taxation, is stated as follows : 

Horses under 8 years 81,6S4 

Horses 8 years old and over 124,057 

Horses, total • 165,641 

Cattle nnder 2 years 126,069 

Cows 2 years old and over • 191,047 

All other cattle 2 years old and over • 125,917 

Cattle, total 448,008 

Mnles and Asses, of all ages • 4,541 

Sheep 159,069 

Hogs 168,944 

Showing an increase for the year in all classes except 
horses under 3 years and cattle under 2 years. The follow- 
ing table affords a comparison with two preceding years : 

1872. 1873. 1874. 

Horses under 8 year. 27,466 82,515 81,584 

Horses 8 years and over , . . • 99,784 109,856 124,057 

Total 127,200 141,871 155,641 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



AGRXOULTUBIO. 



46 



Cattle Qnder 2 years 185,879 160,976 126.089 

Cows 2 years and over 198,022 187,995 191,049 

Other cattle 2 years and over 57,647 71,118 125,917 

Total 886,048 419«084 448,008 

Mules and asses, 8,569 4,005 4,541 

Sheep ^.. 184,509 149,206 159,069 

Hogs 161,786 149,896 158,944 

The gradrual increase of live stock from the beginning of 
the Territoy is shown by enumerations in the under* men- 
tioned years, the first three being U. S. Census returns : 



Years. 



1850 
1860 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1878 
1874 



Horses. 



860 
16,879 
98,011 
114,027 
127,200 
141,871 
155,641 



Cattle. 



2,102 
95,909 
810,879 
881,186 
886.048 
419,084 
448,008 



Mules and 
Asses. 



14 


80 


884 


12,595 


2,850 


182,848 


2,990 


116,498 


8,569 


184,609 


4,005 


149,206 


4,541 


159,069 



Hogs. 



788 
104,479 
184,478 
164,779 
161,786 
149,896 
158,944 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



46 



STATISTICS OF MINNESOTA. 



TABLE exhmung the Acreage under WHEAT, OATS, COBNand BAB- 
LET in the several countiea of Minnesota in the year 1874. 



CountlM. 



Total 

▲noka 

Becker 

3enton 

Blaelarth 

Brown •< 

Carver 

Chippewa 

Chlaago 

Clay 

Cottonwood...., 

PakoU 

Dodge 

DoaglaB 

Farlbaolt 

Fillmore < 

Freeborn 

Qoodhae 

Grant 

Hennepin 

Houston 

Isanti , 

Jaokson 

Kanabeo 

Kandiyohi 

Lac qal Parle.... 

Lake 

LeSneor.. 

Lincoln 

Lyon 

McLeod 

Martin < 

Meeker 

MUleLaca 

Morrison > 

Mower , 

Mnrray 

KlcoUe 

Nobles 

Olmsted 

Otter TaU 

Polk 

Pope 

Bamsey 

Itedwood 

ItenylUe 

Bice 

Bock 

Scott 

Bherbome 

Bibley 

Stearns , 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 

Winona 

Wright 

Tellow Medicine 



Wheat. 



No. of acres 



1,672,040 



2,l»4 
3,011 

i;m3 

07,684 
37,846 
18,421 
11,236 

3,966 

1,186 
10,458 
80,916 
44.960 
13.925 
46,967 
197,403 
58,579 
138,252 

3.746 
25,221 
61,639 

2,864 

10.564 

9 

89,651 

6,860 

3 

19,196 

180 

4,466 
18,004 
10,195 
25,818 
696 

9,687 
61,808 

9,571 
35,697 

7,622 

116,489 

20,011 

453 

15,148 

4,075 

9,936 
30,607 
41.048 

6,945 
29,664 



24,898 

39,094 

40,666 

9 693 

7,249 

6,329 

66,013 

37,468 

85,703 

18,079 

919 

89,522 

16,824 

0,666 



Oats. 



No. of acres 



890,808 



1,178 

690 

690 

16,768 

8,846 

4,666 

1,848 

2809 

567 

2,060 

19.545 

10,456 

8,793 

19,891 

29,766 

14 076 

24,465 

659 

9.110 

10,019 

1.080 

3.406 

112 

6,716 

652 

8 

4,768 

98 

1.158 

4,718 

4.454 

6.479 

606 

1,874 

14,178 

827 

9JBa7 

2.175 

29,779 

4,897 

268 

3,917 

9,079 

9,226 

8.807 

9,347 

1,629 

4,754 

1,179 

7,662 

16,697 

6,223 

407 

1,162 

1,918 

16,782 

7,266 

6318 

4.106 

403 

17,304 

4,766 

1.182 



Com. 



No. of acres 



968,489 



2,667 

169 

638 

10,150 

4,753 

4,744 

769 

1,112 

44 

8,241 

10,451 

4,196 

676 

10.190 

18,177 

6,905 

11,961 

166 

13,205 

14.037 

1,822 

3,046 

58 

1,016 

466 



7.216 

60 

1,478 

2,944 

6,642 

9,412 

684 

900 

6,738 

921 

3,547 

1,659 

728 
34 

480 
1,793 
9,809 
2,128 
7,474 
2,938 
6,624 
9,960 
4,091 
6,046 
4,902 
68 

338 

711 
9.441 
8,962 
6,822 
4,179 
29 
12,179 
6,998 

670 



Barley. 



No.ofmcrae 



88 
74 
69 

M7 
456 

458 

128 

162 

69 

100 

867 

1,712 

986 

959 

3,374 

1,181 

9,489 

74 

194 

676 

38 

147 



178 

96 

2 

196 

2 

99 

860 

101 

891 

10 

86 

9.299 

83 

584 

84 

3,990 

461 

6 

228 

76 

80 

907 

463 

160 

168 

4 

666 

799 

888 

86 

86 

68 

9,456 

445 

693 

88 

49 

8.368 

198 

97 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBIOUIiTUBlfi. 



47 



TABLE «aUMUng the aereage under BTE, BUCKWHEAT, POTATOES 
and BEANS in the »eo€ral oountiem of JtRnneaota in the year 1874. 





Rje. 


Bnokwbeal. 


PoUtoee. 


Beau. 


Ooonttei. 


No.,of Aorea. 


No. or Acree. 


No. of Aeret. 


No. of Aerek 


toul 


4,M0 


9,189 


90,167 


8.688 




Anoka. 

Bcek«r 


&n 


88 

97 

1 
14 

1 
90 


899 

978 

144 

908 

894 

80S 

119 

808 
00 

880 
1,117 

414 

878 

608 

096 

786 
!.<«. 

948 
882 

90 

888 

108 

8 

818 

14 
900 
484 
846 

U 

196 
800 

184 
880 
944 
1,160 
610 
88 
886 
461 
191 
666 
878 
168 
766 
157 , 
894 

53 

08 

944 

098 

618 
818 
916 

98 
968 
710 

78 


88 

18 


PWllflll ■•«• •• 


40 
71 
» 
78 


19 


mm Kwtb T 


88 


Brown 


78 


OtTTtr 

Oldppevn. 


4 
15 


oSS!!!!:...: 

Olav 


SM 


96 

8 


Dakota 

iiGdm 


6 

7S 

25 

144 

8 

88 

18 

48 

8 

068 

08 

857 

1 


96 
08 
88 

8 
88 
88 
88 
17 

4 
88 
41 
48 
40 


88 
18 
90 


S«&.:.:::.;..;i.;.:....::;: 


7 


KribMOl 

ilUmow 

nMbom •••••• •■••■•.•....•••• 

6oodha«. 


47 
14 
46 
99 


enni 


1 


Ffnmpla 


108 


Honilon ,, 


7 


tenU 

J«etton 


97 
84 
16 


Kandljolil 

LMqoiPtfle 

Lak*.. ftrrr .. 


18 


10 



6 

4 


Le BMW 

UnMin 


ii"" 


16 
11 
19 
98 
81 
15 
14 
U 
08 
60 
49 
119 
69 
44 


1 

9 


Iffon 




98 


MeLc^ 

Mnrttn. 

Meeker 

mue LMt 

MerrlMtt 

Mower 

Mormj 


48 
8 

81 
80 
187 

1 

1 

10 


98 

15 
98 
88 

15 


NlooUet 


21 


Nobles 


69 


•buted 

OUerTnU 

Polk 


90 
08 


88 
98 

4 


Jn» 

Bniuey • 

Bedviwd....... ... 


17 

40 


16 
48 
19 

8 
98 
46 
98 
68 

8 

108 

10 

8 

8 
48 
77 
98 
86 
14 


8 


B«DTllle 


4 
108 

1 

178 

881 

87 

817 

8 


90 


lloe. 

Rock 

8eott 



91 
17 
50 


fltbler 


91 


Bteemi, 


40 


flieele 

OlATfini. 


90 
18 


Bvtfl 


1 

904 

41 


4 


Tbdd 


17 


vebaehn ...^ .....t, 


160 




18 


WedilnffloB 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 


198 

1 


16 
18 
5 


Winona 


188 
461 


180 

97 


88 




7 



digitized by Google 



48 



8TATI8TIOS OF MHilNXSOTA. 



TABLS ExhiMHng the acreage under SOBGBUM, CULTIVATED MAT, 
MOPS and FLAX in the several Counties in Minnesota, in the year 
1874. 





SOBOBUX. 


OULTnrATXD 
HAT. 


HOPS. 


FLAX. 


Conntlea. 


No. of Acres. 


No. of Acres. 


No. of Acres. 


No. of Acres. 


Total 


825 


112;tt6 


226 


20,878 




j^oka 




200 
11 
56 

126 

295 

30 

1.161 






Becker 








Benton... 






2 


Bine Karth. ....»»■ 


37 
U 

16 
1 

1 

1 

15 

a 

4 


3 


4,846 
193 


Brown.. 




9 




Chippewa. • ••..• 


127 


ChUago 

Clay 

Cottonwood. 

Dakota.. 

godge 

DoQglaa ' •• 










24 

6.039 

6,966 

178 

1,090 

13,194 

648 

9,7T1 


i"" 

3 
2 


660 

839 

266 

1,706 

1.088 


FarlDiialt •. 


87 

7 
35 

4 


Fillmore 


21 

8 

97 


Freeborn 

Goodhne 

Grant 


166 

47 

1 


Hennepin...^ 

Henaton.... 


•7 
6 
9 

11 


5,989 

69 
62 
168 
6 
62 
1,702 

i" 

361 
86 

960 

11 

99 

3,440 


28 
36 

1 


96 


Isanti, 

Jackson 

Kanabec. ««f--. 


1 
187 


Kan<if yohl „ 






789 


Lac qnl Parle 

Lake 






46 


Le Snenr... ••.••..••• 


130 

i"" 

S3 
lOB 

8 






Lincoln 

Lyon 

lIcLeod 








604 


Martin 


974 


Meeker 


1.086 


Mllle Lacs 


Morrison 


19 

1 
1 

•s 

1 
1 


^ 




Mower 

Murray 


6 


9 


Nicollet 


260- 

2 

11,981 

108 

W* 

99 

4,816 

899 

89 

268 

830 

1,466 

6 



196 

7.063 

Ml 

6,784 

833 

6 

18,719 




16 


Nobles 


1.146 


Olmsted 

OtterTall 


98* •• 


46 
161 


Polk 

Pope......... 


l^" 


Ramsey. • >... ..*•.'-. 






Bedwood 


8 

4 
17 

6 
15 
2S 
18 

6 
10 




Benyllle ••...• 




946 


Rice 

Hock 


2 


76 
680 


gcott 


2 




Sherbnme 


21 


Sibley 




79 


Steams 




716 


Steele 

Steyens 


7 

i"" 

4 
11 


84 
192 


Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin 


7*'" 

1 
98 

6"*' 


170 

267 

86 

90 

216 

V»6 


Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine 


6 


8'" 


»** 

2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBIOULTUSE. 



49 



TABLE exhiMting the number of APPLE TBEE8, and of GBAPE VINES 
in bearing, 8UGAB MAPLE products, NUB8EBIE8 and CHEE8E 
FACT0BIE8 in the several Counties in Minnesota m the year 1874. 





Apple Trees. 


Grape 
Vines. 


Sogar Maple Pro- 


II 


Cheese 

Fac- 
tories. 


CoimtlM. 


No. 
Growing. 


No. 
Bearing. 


No. 
Bearing. 


Galls. 
Symp. 


Lbs. 
Sagar. 


No. 


No. 


Total 


8,880,826 


110,668 


26,678 


17,246 


146,986 


109 


67 






j^oks 


9,867 
668 

1,969 
42,010 

9,096 
25,446 

1,934 

736 

11.687 

36,680 

14,703 

10,027 

98,048 

52,644 

23,771 

48,152 

736 

2,906,694 

26,666 

8487 

9,614 

42 

10«421 

1.666 

*'"»;638 
118 
668 

87,068 
11,684 

8,067 

r,i28 

1,681 
14,687 
779 
17,876 
14,380 
46,'681 

6,817 

8,186 

13,630 

1,716 

4,792 

27,922 

1,173 

14,071 

6^96 

6,738 

18,267 

73,677, 

986 

791 

6,600 

66,'/18 

23,914 

25,678 

3,264 

1118 

41,878 


474 
4,192 

977 

3,610 

25 

1,206 


63 


95 

167 

814 

483 

7 

1,887 


801 

460 

1,844 

iizo 


1 
1 
1 
6 
2 
6 




Btekcr 




Benton 

BlMBsrth 

Brown ■ •..••••••• 


14 

1,362 

174 

979 

34 

43 


9 

4 


Carver 

OhlppewA •••• 




Chisago. ■ • ■•. 


1,4S6 
24 


466 


1 
1 


I 


Cley T»--.....,, •■■■«. 




Cottonwood. 


21 

6,068 
1,400 
846 
1,299 
6094 
1,909 
6,4^ 

8,078 
28 


81 
943 
292 
284 
f673 
326 
191 
818 




Dakota 


18 

86 

336 


200 

400 

4,680 


9 

9 


g 


I>odge 

Donglas.. .... •.!•.•. ^ 


6 


Fanoaalt 


8 
4 

1 
4 


1 


TlUmore 

Freeborn •.. 


197 


4,093 


t 
1 


Goodhue 

Qrant 


24 


640 


2 


Hennepin-- r. .. 


1,616 

4,344 

67 

67 

2 

64 


3.m 

766 
62 
29 


49.687 

150 

246 

64 

200 


16 
9 




Hooston 

Iflanti 


1 


Jackson 






Kanabec 




KAndlTohl 


8S8 


1 


1 


Lac qal Parle 

Lake 

Le Snenr* ••••• 








«.86i 


260 


'a^iso 


■"96",99i 


8 





Lincoln 




Lyon 

McLeod 

Il^rtin 














1,184 
149 
744 
200 

26 
862 

38 


61 
806 

89 

12 

8 

260 

18 
146 
328 


66 


*"• 1,861 


2 

1 
1 


2 


Meeker 


53 
103 

2«9 


48 
1,995 
i;960 


1 


MiUe Lacs 




Morrison ...... 






Mower •- « .. 


4 

4 

8 
6 


1 


Murray 

Nicollet «.. 


8 






Nobles 






Olmsted 

Otter Tail 


141 
6 


1,410 
164 


8 


Polk 






Pope 

Ramsey ••• 


178 

2,468 

131 

164 

8,616 


12 








1 






2 
1 
) 
6 
2 
9 

i 

9 
8 




Redwood 




8 




B«nyllle 






Kice.... 


669 

27 

1,496 

40 

8a 

469 
700 


1.766 


17,128 


9 


Kock 




Scott. 

Sherbame 

Sibley 

Steams 


8,033 
487 
880 

1,609 


717 

10 

160 

886 

22 


690 
60 
9,600 
691 
600 


i 

1 

8 


Steele 


6 


Sterens 

a«»llt. 




8 

70 

466 

120 
648 










Todd 

Wabaaha 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Wilkin****** 


147 
6,149 
1697 
6868 

169 

2 

8.666 

8,731 


686 


13,660 






8 

1 
1 


1 


116 
100 




8 










10 

793 










Winona 

Wright 

TeUow Medicine..... 


30 
1,608 


100 
11,669 


6 
• 9 


2 

1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



60 BTATISTIOS OF HINKXSOTA. 

TBBB PLANTING. 

In the spring of 1874 the Commissioner of Statistics caused 
a summary of all state and Congressional laws offering 
premiums for the planting of forest trees on our prairies to 
be printed on the slips upon which farm-statements of acre- 
ages and products are made, thus bringing the knowledge 
of these laws to every farmer in the state. A column was 
also added on the slips for statements showing the progress 
already made in this class of improvements, and returns 
were obtained from 345 towns in 48 counties. The totals 
are as follows : 



249 towns report acres planted 5,777, and number of trees •••• 14,180,668 

•59 towns report no acreage, but number of trees 797,496 

•37 towns report acres planted 791, bat no number of trees • • • • 



The number reported of acres planted being 6,568, and 
of trees planted, 14,908,048. Taking the average number 
of trees per acre in the 249 towns reporting both acreage 
and trees, the number of acres in the 59 towns reporting 
only trees would be 296, and the number of trees in the 37 
towns reporting only acreage, 1,941,114, making a total for 
the 345 towns of 6,864 acres wtth 16,121,667 forest trees 
planted and growing upon the same. The number of planted 
acres, however, as well as of planted trees, really covered by 
the returns, is larger, because in aS towns there were farm- 
ers who could state only the number of trees plauted» with- 
out acreage, or the acreage planted, without the number of 
trees. 

To the above should be added statements concerning tree- 
planting on the main line of the St. Paul and Pacific Bail- 
road and on the line of the St. Paul and Sioux City Bail- 
road, kindly furnished the Commissioner by Hon. Leon- 
ard B. Hodges, Supt. of tree-planting of the former road» 
and by General J. W. Bishop, General Manager of the latter. 
Mr. Hodges reports as follows : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBIOULTUBB. 51 

Estimate oj trees planted on the 8t. P. d P. Main Line: — 

In Meeker Coiinty— acres •.... 4 Trees.. •• 46,000 

In Kandiyohi •* — " 60 

Inbwift " — " U 

In Stevens ** — ** 87 

In Grant ** — •« 18 

In Wilkin *' — " 22 



866,000 

786,000 

1,000,100 

1,282,000 

82,700 



Total, acres 147 Trees 4,000,800 

The varietieB planted on the Main Line are the White Wil- 
low, Cottonwood, Box Elder, Ash, Oak, Elm, Butternut, 
Soft Maple, Sugar Maple, European Larch and Lombardy 
Poplar, 

On the St. Paul and Sioux City B. B. about 40,000 trees, 
principally Cottonwood, Box Elders and White Willows, 
mostly planted in the spring of 1874, are growing along the 
line from Madelia, Watonwan county, Minnesota, to Le 
Mars in Iowa. About one-half of the number are in Min- 
nesota. European Larches to the number of 80,000 were 
planted in the spring of 1874 but were destroyed b; grass- 
hoppers. These will be replanted in the spring of 1875. 
The company intend to grow the European Larch for B. B. 
ties and will plant 600 acres with this variety. 

Both companies transport forest and fruit trees for plant- 
ing on farms on their lines free of charge. 

As shown by a statement in the chapter on lands in this 
report, 119,277 acres were entered at the U. S. Land Offices 
in 1874 and 7,831 acres in 1873 under the Timber Culture 
Acts of Congress which provide that 25 per cent, of land so 
entered shall be planted with forest trees. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



52 



8TATI8TI0S OF MIKIUBSOTA* 



TABLE shewing acreage planted toUh FOREST TBEE8 on Prairies and 
number qf Forest Trees planted. 



'Vowub. 


Acres. 


No. of trees 


Towns. 


Acres. 


No. of tree* 


Tota.1 


6^X 


14,906,048 
















Anoka. 

GontenrUle 

QtOW* 


106 

3^ 


882 

2,900 


MonnUinLake... 

Springfield 

Westhrook 

Jkikota. 

Castle Bock 

Donglas 


8Qli 

1^ 


80,268 
16,800 
3,860 




Bseksr, , 


M6K 
2 


2,682 

9,600 
i;20C 


216)i 
7 


402,800 

1,000 
11,860 


Blchwood 




i 

2 

8 


8,706 



Lakeville 

Marshan 


31,000 
6,200 


Bki$ Earth. 


Randolph 


10 


7,000 


BMtaford 

Butternut VaUey .. 
Ceresco 


Rosemoont. 

Vermillion 

I>odg4. 


10,200 
9309 


17,900 
600 
9,426 
1,000 
2,600 

12.300 

61,460 
8.012 

38,600 
240 

68,700 


DanyUle. 


42 

72 
3 
18 
19 


76,010 


Decoria 


QardenClty 


«?;SS 


McFhenon 

Medo 


46 


Bayfield 


PleMant Mould... 
Rapldan 


Wasioia 

Westfleld 


68;64b 


Shelby 


81 
42X 


l>ouoku. 
ByansYiUe 


112 


489,M0 
260 


South Bend 

Yornon Centre 


Albin 


19SH 
2 

S^ 

2 
18H 


189 667 

44,000 

2,000 

1,270 

46,600 

61,966 

96 840 

1,011 

24.460 

800 

26.200 


FaHbault. 

Barber 

Bine Berth City... 


146^ 


W.iib 


Bnmeto wn« 


Clark ... 


109 


69,600 


Cottonwood . 


Donbar 


127.622 


Bden 


Delavan 

Ilmora 

Emerald 


84 

100 

61 

76 

21 
1483^ 

T6« 


182,*636 


Home 

LettTenworth . ... 


361,060 


MHford 


Poster 


287,000 


Mnlliean 


Joe Daviess 

Kiester 

Lnra 


84,400 


North SUr 

PralrleTills ...... 


190,800 
668,270 


Bigel 

Stark 


Pilot Grove 

Prescott 


97,900 


39,600 


810,909 




HOIQ^ 






MH 


841,236 

4,126 

8,700 

3^00 

11,600 

46,486 

10,780 

700 

1,840 

4 


Seely 


96,000 


H.v.t^r;.... 


Walnut Lake 

Winnebago City.. 

Fillmore. 
Beaver 


1,040,060 
101,000 


Kragero 

Leenthrop . . • 


21 

10 

7 

46 

10 


t 
21 


3^6,078 


Rosenvood 

Sparta 


8,000 




Bloomfleld 

Canton 




117, R. 38 


19,747 


Ut ABBeBam'tblst! 
2d '* " 


)4 


Rnshford 




Spring YaUey 

Fr€^om. 

Albert Lea 

Alden 










Cflay. 

Park 

1st AsaeeemH Dint. 


94^ 
10 


87,684 

2,000 
6,100 


76X 
6 

15 


27,747 
18,000 




18000 




10 


8,100 

28,200 
9,300 
67,600 
66,700 
11,100 

134*,96b 

9,108 


Bath 


26,060 


Cottonwood. 


Carlston 

Freeborn 


66,810 
68,260 


j^nu 


8 


London 




Carson ••.•••.•••• 


MauBfield 

Newry 


20 920 


Clinton 

Belton 


88,906 


NuEda 

Oakland 


»>» 


Germantown 

Great Bend 

Bighwater 






828 


816,946 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AOBIOULTUBX. 



68 



TABLE showing Acreage planted with F0BE8T TBEE8 on Prairies and 
number of Forest Trees planted,— Coniinued. 



Towns. 



Ihne.. ...... 

KeDfon 



Woloh 



Alb*. 



Jctdbaon, 



JMaAeld. 

]>caliolnM. 

Snterpriae.. 



LaOrow.... 
Wddletown.. 



Peieribi 



a;:; 



ttooz YaUqr 

Webner 

West Heron L«ke.. 



XdMdiyoM, 

Oolfu 

I>OTre 

KaodWobi • • ■ • • 
Lake Aadrewi .. 

Lake LUUan 

Xamre 

Norway Lake.... 

Bi. Jofm 

WUtefleld 



Lao qui JParU, 

Baxter 

Oamp Releaie- 

OerroOordo 



Lffon^ 
Canton, or Llfbon.. 

FiOniew 

QhraadTlew 

IffDd*. 



LToaa.... 
Madiwm. 



l<l»,Kaii<e41.,. 
109, " ^... 
111, ^ 40... 
112 a40 Alls IUU48 



McLaod. 




AoTM. No. of trees. 



8 

lOK 

.?« 

1 
81 



66X 

M 

IS 
40 

13K 
16 

as 

7 
SO 

82X 



4U 



113^ 



30j^ 



10 



1^ 

1 
s 

10 



4)^ 



6SX 



84X 



48,611 

23,300 

7,100 

1,600 

5,800 

846 

68,100 



160.2 

0,376 
46.640 
89,6;e0 



64,640 
17,700 
26,060 
17,460 
17,180 



24,900 



82.800 
28,600 
2,400 
46,600 
48,760 
87,760 



JfMber. 

OedarlCilU.... 

0oemoi 

Danlelion 



481,706 

260 

200 

9,600 

500 

18,881 

8,400 

7,682 

'«6,000 

29,400 



70,898 

96,118 
6,860 

18 900 
6,840 



187,708 

2,960 
11,672 
6.616 
4,000 
18,060 



8,900 
6,400 
2.000 



68,667 

8,864 

3,000 

7,610 

48,900 

89,000 

S20 



106,484 



MarUn, 

Oeder 

Centre Greek.... 

■act Chain 

klm Creek. 

Fairmoant 

Vox Lake 

Vraaeri 

Jay 

Lak4 Belt , 

LakeKremoot..., 

Hanyaika < 

NadiTUb 

Pleasant Prairie.. 
Boiling Green.... 

Rutland 

Silver Lake 



Waverly. . . 
Westford. . 



JTotosr. 

Adaais 

Austin 

Bennington 

Clayton 

Dexter 

Frankford 

Qraod Meadow. 

LeUoy , 

Lodi.. 
le.. 



Lyle 

MarshaU. 



Raeine . 
Red Rock. 
Sergeant . 
lotpho. . 
Walth^im. 
Wlodom... 



Murray. 
Blsborough .... 

Holly 

Lime Lake 

Okacheeda..... 
Soandla 



ITioolM. 

Belgrad 

Granby 

Lafoyette 

Nicollet 

New Sweden.... 

Rldgely 

West Newton... 



KoUu, 

Blgelow 

Dewald. 

Blk. 

Falnrlcw 



Acxes. 



80 
26 

10 
2SK 
269X 
19 
89 

117 

Jt^ 
200 

«S 

12 

60 

86 

40 



1,060 
10 



aoii 

19 
16 

2 

7 
11 
21 
18 
17 

1 
48^ 
94 



8643li 



4^H 

1 
10 



81 
9 

^* 

1 
MX 



BIH 



28 

18il^ 



No. of tress. 



78.000 
41.680 



46,600 

11,279 

1,000 

66,880 
14,670 
81,600 
42,791 
93,000 
172,000 
7.690 
20,000 



108,400 
6.900 
73,907 



809,817 

21,876 
87.900 
18,087 



78,088 
7,600 



87,200 
4.800 
4,600 
7,600 
26,600 
;6,400 
41,600 



5,040 
100,000 



99,600 
2.425 
11,960 



864,416 

1,800 
11,000 

2,000 
16,782 



80,682 

31,881 
11365 

1,074 
1,600 



4,8( 



100 



66,295 



1O.20S 

19,777 

02S»810 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 



BTATISTIOS OV MIKinfiSOTA. 



TABLS showing acreage planted toUh FOREST TBEE8 on Prairies^ and 
number of Forest Trees planted.— Continued. 



Towns. 



JfebiM (conMfMM4). 

Gnkham Lake 

Grand Prairie 

Hersey 

Indian Lake 

Little Bock 

OIney 

WUson 

Worthington 



OlmtUd. 

BoTer 

Byota.. 

I*arnitecton. ■ . . 

HaTerhDl 

lEalmar 

Bochester 

Viola 

Qotnoy 



Base 

Bfllington 

Nidarofl , 

Norwegian Groye. 

Pelican 

Parker*» Prairie. . 

BoBeLake 

8t. Olaf. 

Throndl^em , 

Weetem , 



Fop*. 
Chippewa Falla.... 

Grove Lake 

Leyan 

Keno 

BolHng Fork 

Westport 

White Bear Lake.. 



New Canada 



Barton 

BrookTiUe 

Charleston 

Lamberton 

NewATon 

Bedwood Falls. 

Sheridan 

Sundown 

Swede Forest... 
WlUowLake... 



Bandon 

Beayer Palls. •• 

Boon Lake 

Brookfleld 

Cairo 

Oamp 

Kmmett. 

■riokson 



Acres. 



20 
6 



Vl&X 



\^ 






68X 






5 



4K 
W 



IS^ 



41 



lae 



68 



46 

10 



No. of trees 



107,800 

44^ 

45,880 

17,860 

6.000 

6,600 

67,600 

112.08S 



Towns. 



Flora 

Hawk Creek... 

Henryyllle 

Marschner 

Palmyra 

Preston Lake.. 
Sacred Heart.. 
WeUlngton.... 



1,081,7)78 

26,000 

600 

21,700 

10,000 

4,312 

8,786 

79.760 

4,024,000 



Morristown. . 

Blchland 

WolcoU 



4,177,097 

196 

60 

90 

160 

686 

96 

100 

800 

9,300 

900 



Booifc. 
Beayer Greek.. 

Clinton 

Kanaransl..... 

Layeme , 

Magnolia , 

Martin 

Vienna •••••... 



Jackson , 



Sherburne. 

Big Lake 

Palmer 



4,666 

600 

1,166 

800 

6,160 

18 

8,990 

2,000 



19,193 
1,789 



10,183 

86.607 

3,700 

30,270 

91,700 

89,120 

80,710 

6,766 

1,060 



921,821 

4,159 
22.190 
96.700 

1.200 
68,678 
11.609 
19,960 

9,70T 



Alftborg 

ik>mish 

Grafton 

Henderson 

Kelso 

New Anbnrn... 

Severance 

Sibley.... 

Transit 



Ashley 

Brockway 

Getty.... 

Melrose 

North Fork.... 
Paynesyllle.... 
Sank Centre... 



Aurora 

Berlin 

Blooming Prairie. 

DemHeld 

Merlden 

Sonunlt 



Framnaes.. 
Moore 



Acres. 



90^ 



8 
31K 

6M 
21 
14 

1 



20 






10 
6^ 



110>^ 



9 

H 

8 
17 

4 

"46X 
5 



3X 
IM 



95 
8 
6 

S^ 
8M 
18K 



70M 
6 



JJK 



No. of trees- 



83,126 
29,011 



66,90a 

6,600 
86 600 
13.286 

1,000 



330,316 



19,900 
3,605- 



23,606 

9,806 

48,700 
86.200 

47,281 
98.908 
38,880 

2,707 



191,880 



921 

176 



14,860 

5,280 

600 

880^ 

6,000 



16,418 
9,00O> 



8,976 
61 
464 
291 
1,600 
6B 
91,887 



38,390 



21,400 



1,668 
21,600 
48,800 



91,308 

11.16^ 
81,076 



48,176> 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AQVIOUVrUSE, 



6^ 



TABLE showing aertage plataed wUh FOSE ST TBEE8 on FrairieB, and 
number ofForM IVeea planted,— Continued. 



Towns. 


Aores. 


No. of trees 


Towns. 


Acres. 


No. of trees 


/SM/t. 
AvpletoB.. 


4 


9,000 
1424 
3030 
4,706 


Adrian 


21 

er 

40K 
60 

2rK 




Benson 


19,912 
16,121 

73495 

24.940 

130,800 

9,800 


Gamp lAk» 


i" 


Antrim 


Bntterdeld. 


Jbdd. 


8 


18,210 
125 

60 
199,796 

oioo 

23,860 
2,664 
0,600 
3.200 


Long Lake 

Madelia 

Odin 

Riverdale 

Rosendale 

St. James 


Chester*. ••• 


3 

6 


Vlgln .. ...I 


Soath Branch 

Winona, 
Fremont..* 


24 


GlSSKOW 

Oskwood 


817^ 


416,318 


PIsIhtIow .•..«»••• 


160 


Zttiiit)ro«^t* •••• » • 


Hart..... 




1,000 
11200 




New Hartford 

Saratoga 

Utica.. 


2 
6 
19 




1 

1 


241,069 
300 




16,266 


Wright. 
Corinna .....•.•..• 






26 


17,616 


l«* • •• •••••• 






2 

17 
S 

u 

7 
9^ 


800 

4,000 
76975 
19,900 


46 


TPSlffMOa 


MlddleTllle 




1,070 


Byion 


Fellow JfedMne. 

Bee 

Wood Lake 




Freedom.....!!!'.!*. 

KewBlcfaluid 

Otisco 

SUMmtj 

ViTlan 

WoodTiUe 


2 


1»115 

820 
6,700 


4,600 
62,848 


YeUow Medicine.. 


a" 


M^ 


24 


70,870 




IWH 


104,028 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



66 



STATISTIOS OF MINNBSOTA« 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

BEOI8TEBED IN THE TEAB 1878. 



The number of births and deaths by counties was as fol- 
lows: 



Counties. 



Total. 



Anoka 

Becker 

Benton* ••••..< 
Bine Earth.... 

Brown 

Carlton.... ••. 

Carver 

Chippewa 

Chisago 

Crow Wing. . , 

Dakota 

Dodge 

Douglas 

Faribault 

Fillmore 

Freeborn.. .. 

Ooodhae 

Hennepin.... 
Honston..... 

Isanti 

Jackson 

Kandiyohi ... 
Lac qai Parle. 
Le Snenr. .... 

HcLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

MilleLacs... 
Morrison ••.. 
Mower 



Births. 



17,123 



148 

68 

61 

628 

886 

26 

447 

80 

164 

68 

879 

241 

280 

868 

794 

824 

781 

997 

441 

108 

92 

277 

66 

886 

221 

187 

249 

41 

78 

847 



Deaths. 



6,766 



62 

18 

17 

196 

97 

6 

107 

17 

68 

9 

180 

74 

64 

126 

298 

127 

267 

661 

160 

89 

10 

68 

19 

182 

76 

48 

87 

17 

18 

128 



Counties. 



Murray.... 
Nicollet... 

Nobles 

Olmsted... 
Otter Tail.. 

Polk 

Pope 

Ramsey.... 
Redwood... 
Renville... 

Rice 

Rock. 



St Louis.. 

Scott 

Sherbnme 

Sibley 

Steams 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Wadena 

Waseca 

Watonwan 

Washington 

Winona. 

Wright 

TeUow Medicine. 



Births. 



86 
466 

47 

460 

816 

2 

160 

2,217 

70 
198 
627 

27 
104 
291 
100 
801 
664 
218 

41 

88 
HO 
869 
6 
226 
226 
429 
622 
814 

60 



Deaths. 



11 
164 

14 
149 

60 



46 

608 
18 
66 

198 

9 

21 

118 
28 
96 

217 
94 
10 
28 
27 

162 



67 

88 

169 

289 

125 

9 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



VITAL STATISTIOS. 67 

The new counties of Aitkin, Clay, Cottonwood, Lyon 
and Wilkin make no report. Of older counties, only 
Kanabec and Lake (estimated population ot the two to^ 
gether 501 in 1873) fail to report. 

The number of births and deaths, and excess of births 
over deaths for the past four years were reported as follows : 

1870. 1871. 1872. 1878. 

Births 9,447 18,968 14,962 17,128 

Deaths 8,526 4,694 5,228 5,766 

Excess of births 5,921 9,264 9,784 11,857 

Population 489,706 552,459 

Population is given for June Ist, the figures tor 1870 being 
taken from the U. S. Census, and for 1873 from the statisti- 
cal report for that year. 



1872. 


1871 


7,754 


7,088 


7,148 


6,715 


65 


155 



Births. — ^The totals under the various heads, as given in 
the general birth table for 1878, compare with the corres- 
ponding statements for two previous years as follows : 

Births by Sex: — 

1873. 

Male 8,826 

Female 8,179 

Sex not reported • • • • 119 

TotalbySex 17,128 14,962 18,958 



Births by Nationality of Parents: — 

1878. 

American both 4,261 

American Father and foreign Mother 519 

Foreign Father and American Mother . . • • 1,067 

German 8,682 

8 



1872. 


1871. 


8,898 


8,688 


488 


409 


888 


679 


8,762 


8,621 


Digitized b;y 


Google 



68 8TATI8TI0S 67 MDOnSSOTA. 

Norwegian 2,448 S,047 1,830 

Swedish.... 1,266 1,079 821 

Irigh 1,227 1,241 1,850 

Caoadian 686 606 615 

Coontriea not reported 2,092 1,168 1,060 

Total by Parent-Nativity 17,128 14,962 18,968 

Twins and illegiiimale births:*^ 

1878. 1872. 1871. 

Twins— Males 199 160 124 

Females 186 156 180 

Twin ChUdren, total 884 816 264 

niegithnate— Males 86 86 88 

Females 48 40 48 

lUegltlmate, tolal 88 76 81 

Under the head of Twins are classed two oases of living 

triplets— one in Isanti county* sex not given, and one in 

Wright, one boy and two girls. In Wabasha one case of 

twin birth, both children still-born, occurred, sex not re- 
ported. 



Dbaths. — ^The totals under the various heads, as given in 
the general death-table for 1873, compare with the cor- 
responding figures for 1872 as follows : 

Deaths by Sex: — 

1873. 1812. 

Males 8,196 2,860 

Females 2,666 2,878 

Sex not reported 16 ..•• 

Total number of deatbs 6,768 6,228 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



TRAL 8TATI8TI0S. 69 

Deaths by general daeeijleaium: — 

1878. 19IS. 

Nvmber of deaths with death-cause reported and classi- 
fied in the General Death-Table under the several 
classes of the adopted Nosology 4,660 4,88T 

Number of deaths with death-cause not reported 1,116 891 

5,766 5,22a 

* 

Deaths hy Classes of DeaAh-Oavses : — 

1878. 1872. 

I. Zymotic diseases— Male 948 1,024 

Female 772 862 

Total 1,715 1,886 



' n. Constitutional diseases— Male 401 865 

Female 878 841 

Total 774 706 



m. Local diseases— Male 707 568 

Female 546 410* 

Total 1,258 978 



IV. Deyelopmental diseases— Male 249 24^ 

Female 815 277 

Total 564 525^ 



Y. Violent Deaths— Male 282 177 

Female 62 70* 

Total 844 247 

Total of the flye classes*. 4,650 4,887 

Add deaths with no death-cause reported 1,116 891 

Total No. of deaths in the year 5,766 6,229 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



90 STATI8TI08 OV MINNH80TA. 

Nativity of persons deceased^ whose deaih-causes loere 
teporied :'^' 

1878. 1878. 

Bom In the United States— Males 1,798 1,871 

Females 1,468 1,416 

Total born in the United States 8,861 8087 



Born in Foreign Countries— Males 711 688 

Females 649 480 

Total bom in Foreign Countries 1,860 1,106 



Birth-place not reported— Males 79 88 

Females 60 64 

Total with Birth-place not reported 189 147 

Total of Native, Foreign and NatiFltcr Not Reported 4,660 4,887 



Parent Nativity of persons deceased^ whose death-eauses were 
reported: \ 

1873. isn. 

Both American 1,186 1,819 

Both Foreign 8,818 8,148 

American Father and Foreign Mother 66 88 

Foreign Father and American Mother 98 68 

Parent-Nativity not reported 1,098 874 

Total 4,660 4,887 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1 



VITAL STATIBTICIS« 61 

Ages of perwM deceased f whose decUk^causes were reported: 



Age in yean. 



Under I 

1 under 2 

2nnder 8 

Sander 4 

4 under 5 

Total under 6... 

5 under 10 

10 under 15 

16 under 20 

sounder 26 

25 under 80 

sounder 86 

85 under 40 

40 under 46 

46 under 50 

50 under 66 

55 under 60 

60 under 65 

65 under 70 

70 under 76 

76 under 80 

80 and upwards... 
Age not Reported. 

Total 



1878, 



Males. 



209 
71 
72 
46 



1,066 

155 

91 

107 

122 

120 

84 

77 

98 

106 

78 

68 

89 

61 

68 

48 

45 

89 



2,582 



Femalea. 



507 

176 

72 

51 

89 



846 

119 

89 

107 

125 

90 

116 

108 

80 

64 

42 

48 

81 

42 

44 

82 

48 

68 



2,068 



TotaL 



1,195 

885 

143 

128 

86 



1,981 

274 

180 
214 
247 
210 
200 
180 
178 
160 
120 
HI 
120 
108 
107 
80 
88 
152 



4,650 



1872. 



Males. 



682 

216 

96 

61 

48 



952 

164 

76 

100 

117 

106 

71 

86 

98 

70 

75 

60 

75 

59 

61 

88 

88 

147 



Females. 



2,877 



426 

209 

90 

66 

54 



845 

106 

76 

105 

111 

102 

86 

85 

61 

46 

87 

46 

89 

85 

29 

27 
91 



1,960 



TotaL 



958 
467 
186 
127 
102 



1,797 

260 

153 

206 

228 

207 

157 

171 

154 

116 

112 

106 

104 

94 

90 

71 

66 



4,887 



Deaths from Phthisis Pulmonalis or Consumption. 

Annexed to this report will be found a special table of 
deaths from consumption by sex, month, nativity and age. 
The totals compare with the corresponding statements for 
1872 as follows:— 



Deaths of Consumption by Sex: — 



1876. 18T2. 

Males 285 260 

Females 277 289 

TotalbySex 562 499 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



oS 8TATIBTI0S OT MnnO»OTA. 

JDeaihs of Oansunipiion by months: — 

1878. 1872. 

Juiaary 46 41 

February 82 84 

March 60 49 

AprU 48 50 

Hay 67 42 

Jane 40 85 

July 47 80 

Augost 54 46 

Beptember • • 47 41 

October 58 58 

November 86 87 

December 80 86 

Month not reported 8 5 

Total by months 562 499 

Deaths of Consumption hy NcUiviiy: — 

1878. 1872. 

Minnesota 52 58 

Other States of the Union 270 224 

Germany • 51 51 

Norway 48 87 

Bweden ••••• 28 22 

Ireland 44 85 

Sngland 9 10 

British Am. Provinces 19 18 

Other Coontries and Nattvify not reported. • • 46 49 

Total by Nativity 562 499 

Deaths of Oonsung^tion by Age: — 

1878. 1872. 

Less than 8 yean 85 80 

From 8 to 5 years 1 21 

From 5 to 10 years 18 42 

10 years and upwards 490 79 

Age not reported 28 270 

Total by age 562 499 

When compiling the consumption table, the following 
peculiarities were noticed : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



VITAL STATIBTICSf 68 

In Chippewa county there was among reported deaths of 
ooDfiumption 1 female, 1 month 8 days old. In Crow Wing, 

I male, 2 years old. In Dakota, 1 male, 1 year old. In 
Dodge, 1 female 8 months and 1 male 78 years. In Fari- 
bault, 1 female 10 months 5 days. In Fillmore, 6 months 

II days. In Freeborn, 1 female 1 year 3 months. In 
Goodhue, 1 male 11 months; 1 male 3 months 29 days; 

I female 1 year 1 month ; and 1 male 8 months 2 days. 
In Isanti, 1 female 7 months. In Le Sueur, 1 female 1 
day old. In Meeker, 1 female 15 days. In Olmsted, 1 
male 76 years. In Benyille, 1 male 18 days. In Sher* 
burne, 1 male, 1 month 25 days. In Sibley, 1 male, 1 year 

I I months ; 1 female 4 days. In Stearns, 1 female, 1 year 
5 months ; 1 male 5 months. In Watonwan, 1 male, 1 
month 28 days. In Winona, 1 male, 8 months 28 days ; 
and 1 female 11 months. In Wright, 1 male, 1 year 6 
months. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



64 



STATISTICS OF MINNIBBOTA. 



BIBTH8. 
TMe exhibUing the sex, eondUion {<u twins or illegitimaU) and parentage of 

Jan. Ist to Dec 8M, 







Sex. 


Ciondltion. 




Twins. 


niegitimate. 


CoumUes. 


1 


\ 


^1 

la 




1 




\ 


Total 


17,128 


8,896 


8.179 


119 


199 


186 


86 


48 






Anoka 


148 
68 
61 

623 

% 
U 
>8 

879 
241 
980 
363 

7»4 

2* 
781 

187 

249 

41 

78 

11 

460 
815 

160 

70 
198 
496 

27 
104 
991 
100 

Z 

83 
110 
369 
6 
226 
429 
147 


64 

29 

31 

309 

176 

16 

288 

46 

74 

80 

226 

121 

109 

189 

419 

164 

426 

094 

206 

66 

44 

182 

83 

188 

126 

Tl 

124 

26 

89 

188 

16 

216 

22 

934 

160 

1 

88 

1,140 

43 

96 

242 

16 

62 

162 

60 

166 

337 

HI 

98 

30 

66 

184 

8 

104 

290 

69 


84 

24 

29 

806 

160 

10 

207 

31 

80 

38 

164 

190 

121 

166 

373 

170 

382 

448 

938 

49 

48 

148 

23 

198 

94 

66 

191 

16 

87 

164 

19 

216 

26 

916 

146 

1 

79 

1,077 

24 

109 

963 

11 

62 

139 

46 

186 

826 

102 

19 

44 

44 

179 

2 

118 

197 

78 




1 


8 




1 


Benton 

BloeBarth 

Brown . . 


1 
6 










19 
6 


10 
2 


4 • 


8 


Carlton 

Carrer • . ■•«••■••.••*• 




1 


2 
8 

...... 

2 
...... 

26 
2 
3 


16 


10 


1 




Cbippewa. 

ChltHUCO 

Crow Wing 

Bakou 

Dodge 

Donglas ..,,.»*•» 




2 
2 

4 
2 
4 
1 
9 
1 
8 
10 
8 
3 


4 


1 


1 

1 








4 
8 
7 
6 
6 
4 
12 
3 


1 
2 

...... 

...... 


...J.. 


Farlbaalt..... 

Fillmore 

Freeborn • •• 


1 
4 
1 


Qoodbue •••••••• ... 


S 


Hennepin --t ..♦. ....... 


1 


Houston 


1 


Isanti 

Jackson 

Kandiyohi 

Lacqtti Parle 

Le Snenr •.... 


1 








2 

"i" 

1 
1 
4 


9 

8 
7 
6 

1 
8 


6 

1 
18 

1 
1 
8 


1 


1 


1 
1 




McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

Mill* TiAAfl 


s 


9 


1 


Morrison 


2 


'"i" ' 


4 
2 






Mower 

Mnrray 

Nicollet • 






8 


3 


8 


2 


s 


IVnhlMi 




noDiee. • 

Olmsted 

Otter TaU 

Polk 

Pooe 


""%' 


• 2" 
1 


9 
1 


9 


"*i" 


•a.... 


'8 

18 

9 

8 

11 


8 
18 


•"i" 


1 


Ramsey r»^ 


8 


Bedwood 

RenviUe 

Bice 




8 






1 




Bock 

Bt.Lonis 

Scott 

Sherburne 

Sibley 

Stearns ... 

AtAAlA. .... 


••*2" 


...... 

1 
1 


1 

1 

4 

14 

4 


7 

1 
2 
4 
6 












8 


1 






9 


Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha *-, 


6 
12 


1 


1 




1 


6 
...... 

2 
8 


2 

2 
6 






Wadena .•.....• 






ll^aseca « ... 




Washington 


1 




Watonwan 

Wilkin .....••• 


1 


Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine 


629 

814 

60 


816 
176 
36 


999 

139 
24 


8 


7 
6 
9 


18 
6 


■"i" 


2 
2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



TTTAL 8TATISTI0S. 



65 



BIBTHS. 
chOdren hem in the several counHea of Minnesota during the period from 
A, D. 1878, inclusive. 



Counties. 



Total. 



Anoka... 

Becker 

Benton 

BlneBarth 

Brown 

Carlton 

Carver 

Chippewa. 

Cliieago 

Crow Wing 

DakoU 

Dodge 

Donglas 

Fartbanlt 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Qoodhne 

Hennepin 

Hottston 

Isanti 

Jackson 

Kandiyohi 

Lacqtti Parle 

LeSnenr 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

Mille Lacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 

Nicollet. 

Nobles 

Olmsted 

Otter Tail 

Polk 

Pope 

Ramsey..... 

Redwood 

RenTille 

Rice 

Rock 

8t. Louis 

Bcott 

Bherbnme 

Sibley 

Steams 

Bteele 

Steyens 

Swift 

Todd 

Wabasha 

Wadena 

Waseca 

Washington 

Watonwan 

WilklB 

Winona 

Wright 

YeUow Medicine . 



Nationality of Parents. 






4^1 



18 
93 

231 
41 
30 
86 
24 
17 
SI 
77 

116 
69 

166 

184 
76 

147 

148 
62 
S2 
19 
80 
8 

116 
77 
79 
97 
SI 
18 

120 
18 
66 
86 

20S 
40 

"26 

672 
88 
80 

164 
9 
36 
84 
44 
19 

181 
96 
16 
18 
63 

111 
1 
47 
78 
48 

'169 

106 

9 



619 



da 



1,067 



12 

3 

34 
2 
13 
31 
52 
14 
II 
46 
9B 
ft 

7 
1 
21 
IB 
3 

a 

3 

1i 

43 

1 
22 

3 
40 

104 
6 
11 
33 
3 
12 
16 
18 
& 

IG 
4 
6 
7 

44 

1 

'66 
It 
2 



8,632 



9 
180 
168 



882 
4 
13 



114 
14 
24 
66 
44 



8 

167 

'60 
24 

"*2 
604 
10 
41 
49 
2 
10 



153 

817 

34 

1 

2 

19 

106 

"67 
143 
18 

'206 
66 



8,448 



81 



3 
13 
68 
66 
68 
873 
160 



116 


SI 


97 


170 


13 




12 


46 


1 


182 




41 


79 




60 


18 


10 


4 


15 


80 




1 



80 
9 
61 

1 
68 
188 

"so 

Sb 
6 



1,266 



48 

6 

6 

8 

164 

20 
7 

61 
1 

88 
2 
5 
8 
7 



73 



1,227 



8 

887 

1 

22 



ill 



636 



11 
18 
4 
2 
1 
1 
8 
6 
IB 
2 
6 
9 
8 
4 
10 
49 
9 
8 
2 
4 
3 
5 
9 
8 
4 
9 
19 
14 

'"i 

1 
3 
8 
S 

4 
138 
4 
6 
61 

"*6 



18 

80 

18 

1 

1 

1 



2,092 



. 6 

6 

6 

88 

68 

11 

49 

1 

7 

10 

31 

88 

17 

19 

32 

84 

26 

640 

9 

6 

2 

17 

1 

89 

88 

20 

14 

4 



18 

4 

36 

6 

26 

16 



16 

6 

66 

6 
19 
43 
4 
7 
98 
28 

"i 

7 
40 

8 
U 
20 
10 

'ii 

18 
1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



66 



8TATIBTI0S OF MINNESOTA. 
DEATHS. 



Table showing the number of Deaths from each specified 

with Par enir Nativity ^ Nativity ^ 







Parent N*gtity 


* 






NitlTit;. 






0AUBI8 or DEATH. 


«1 

S 
1 

i 

94 


S 


4 
H 

7 
2 

"'4 

1 

2 

* 

1 

'ii 

1 


1 

1 

le 

16 

4 

7ft 
10 
« 

1 

4* 

14 

3 


U, 8, 


Fordpi, 


Hot 
ifT<eai 




lie 

B7 

1 

41 

77 
13» 
U 

^? 

fi 
62 
11 
107 

1 


s 

■"i 

"■4 
s 

"s 
"i 

as 


113 

3 
47 
To 
78 
10 

5S 

18 

137 

% 


F. 
15 


2 
4 


r. 


t 

4 
I 


?. 


OLAMI. STMOTIO OltlAlM. 

1. BoMtUPoz*. M •■ 

S. IfeMlM. 

4. DiphtheriA^ 

S OalofT -r •>.... ....•••-..- 


.... 


6. Croup 

T WhooDtnar Onqch. - . 


3i 

7e 
s 

21 
47 

"'a 


1 

1 
42 
ID 

"'* 
22 
S 

'"* 
4 

T 
1« 

140 

#.- 
2 

3 
24 


8 
IS 

"i 

10 

» 

1 

'I 

3 

t5« 

ft 
12 

4 

ft 

101 


1 

1 

" "i 
"ii 

.... 

1 

1 

t 
t 

1 
s 


"1 


8 Bnterio FeTer. ..• 


f 


•. BryilpelM. 




lo! PnerDeral FeTer 




is Inflaenia • 


1 


13. Dysentery 




14 DUriiKBB 




16 Oholerft Infaatam 


3 


^7, Ague .•■. ••■•.... .•....•«• 




18 Remittent FeTer. 


1 

5a 

4 
33 

*a2 




t9 Spotted Ferer 


.... 


1 


d, RheumAtlmi 


IS 
776 

I 

1 
J 

i 

14 

2 

41 
10 
IB 

lu 

HE 


2 

3 
ow 




.1. Other Zjmotlo DieeMM 


1 


Total MlMmatlo dtiotiOB 


~ 


Ordmr%. Enth^Uc 
4 Qlanderf 




Orders. JHstie, 

t. DeUrlum Tremens 

A IntMBDer&noe ....■.•• ■•■■•■ 














— 







0rd§r4 ParatiUo, 


% 

23 
9 
B 
2 

37 

fl 
340 

m 

105 


1 
19 

■"a 

920 
9 

tS4 

Its 


1 

1 

1 








1 

1 

1 


lift 

6 

S 

Ifl'-f 


11 


Order \, JHatUHc. 


1 


S. Chancer •• 


li 12 
iL... 

2 i 


I 


4. Noma (or Canker) 

A. Mortification 




Total Diathetic diseases.. 


1 

2 

1« 

10 

"iii 

£14 


31 

3 


'^ 


1, BcrofuU 

t. Tabes Mesenterica 

t. Phthisis 

4. HjdrooephalQS 


< « • • 

» 


Total OonsUtaUonal olass 


^ 


~ 


3S2 


2ii 


3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



VITAL STATISTIOS. 
DEATHS. 



67 



Deatk-catise in Minnesota in the year ending Dec. 31, 1873, 
Affe and Sex oj the persons deceased. 



Af at Deatb. 



Undor 

1 


1 


2 


8 


4 


Total 
QBdcr 


6 


10 


16 


M. 


». 


U 


F. 


K. 


». 


M. 


F. 


if. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


K. 


F. 

1 

6 

28 

9 

•••4 

16 

• .•* 


1. 

"ii 

4 

"i 


F. 

2 

1 
16 

4 


M. 


F. 


1 
S 

u 

10 
1 


e 

1 

7 


1 

1 

17 

1 


2 
8 
17 

1 


1 

8 

17 

1 


1 
2 

11 

2 


•'8 
10 
8 


1 

"*8 
1 


.... 
12 

2 


1 
8 
4 
1 


8 
16 
74 
17 

1 
40 
62 
20 

6 

'""^ 

68 

126 

1 
1 

ts 

605 

1 


11 


47 


""27 

49 

16 

7 

8 

19 
43 
112 


4 

1 

29 



"'i 

1 
16 


4 
1 
2 
1 


1 

" i 
2 


ao 


IS 

26 

8 

4 

"*i 

10 

so 
.... 

IS 
"22 

"io7 


6 
18 

4 
1 

"ii 

21 
26 

1 


7 
IS 
2 
2 

.... 

16 
27 


1 
2 
2 


6 
7 
6 


1 
6 
7 


1 
8 
8 


8 
6 
2 

1 

...J 

1 


1 
8 

1 
1 

.... 

8 


.... 


6 

4 


16 

1 


20 


16 

1 


29 


.,.. 


.... 

2 

1 


"2 
2 
3 
8 


"'2 
6 


"'2 

1 
1 


2 


94 


2 
2 
2 


8 


2 


•"i 


'"2 


•••J 




1 
"'i 

8 
2 




..... 

2 
6 




1 








.... 






... 


1 
42 


1 

16 
3 
6 


1 

13 
.... 




15 





IS 

"i 

"lOO 


1 

"so 


8 
"2 
40 


6 
"*6 




"w 


1 
.... 

I0 


6 

"24 


4 
"■4 


ao7 
1 


422 


97 


78 


48 


68 


40 


46 


•■•• 




.... 


.... 


.... 


• ••• 


.... 


.... 




.... 


.. . 


.... 


.••.• 




.... 






































.... 


.... 


1 


1 


.... 


.... 


1 




.... 




S 


1 




1 




.... 


. ••* 


.... 


SOB 

8 


207 


127 


110 


89 


40 


04 


38 


80 


24 

... 


668 

4 
1 

1 


4S8 


97 


79 

2 
.... 


48 

*"i 


68 
2 


40 


46 

s 


1 


2 

1 










2 

1 


...1 


8 


1 










































8 

""s 

_• 

14 








... 




.... 


**** 


. ••. 






... 




5 






• 










6 

5 

""28 
14 


8 

...... 

18 
12 


2 

'"4 
2 


8 
"*9 


8 

1 

""2 

1 


8 

s 
"ii 


■'17 

1 


4 


s 


1 

"8 
5 


s 
I 


1 

"*2 

1 

4 










1 


"is 

6 


1 
2 

1 


.... 

1 


"*i 


■"i 


.... 

1 


"ii 


ts 


1 


1 


2 


42 


26 


8 





4 


13 


18 


86 


27 


17 


14 


ft 


4 


4 


2 


1 


1 


2 


48 20 


8 


12 


7 


16 


18 


40* 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 STATISnOB OT MINinBSOTA. 

DEATHS.— Continued. 
3 able showing the number of Deaths from each speckled Death-cause 

Jfativity^ Jfativity^ Age and 













Age at Death. 










CAUBB8 OF DBATH. 


80 


26 


80 


86 


40 


48 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


CLAM I. ZTMOno DlflBABIfl. 

Orderl. matmaOc 

1. BmallPox 

2. MeMlM 

8. BcarUtina 


6 


1 


8 


2 


.... 


E 


.... 


.... 


2 

a... 


.... 


.... 


1 


4. Diphtheria 




£. (Quinsy 
















" 




^ Croup. ••• 






.... 


1 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 




7. WhooDiBS CoDsh 


.... 








si jtoterTcXarT.:::::::... 

9. SryBlpelas 


14 


IT 

1 
3 

• •.. 
""l 
*"*6 


8 


14 


7 


11 


6 

1 

.... 

1 
2 


7 
2 

8 

'"2 

1 


"i 


6 
1 
3 


.... 


8 


10. Pnerperml Fever. 




'"a 

.... 

1 

6 


4 
.... 
• ••• 

2 
.... 

*"i 

4 


"'i 


.... 




IS. Influenza .i 

18. Dysentery 

14. DinrrhflBs. 

15. Cholera Infkntnm 

17. Ague........ 


"'4 

* *2 


.... 
.... 


18. Remittent Fever 

tt. Spotted Fever 

90. JUieumatUm 

2L Other ZymoUc Diseases.... 


"4 


""s 


.... 


1 
7 


"'i 


■"2 


"1 


.... 
""2 


Total Miasmatic diseases. . . 
Order2. BtUhttic. 
4r Olandi^rs.... 


23 


» 


20 


89 


14 


16 


18 


28 


14 


11 


17 


n 


8. Delirium Tremens 

4. IntAmiMninMi 














1 




1 


.... 


...• 




Total Dletic diseases 


















1 


.... 


.... 


— 


Ord«r^ PwratUHe. 
















Total Zymotic, class. ....... 


"5 

1 


28 

1 
1 


20 

1 

4 


"15 


I4 

1 


"16 

8 

1 
.... 

4 

34 

"^86 


"14 

8 
3 

"lio 


1l9 

4 
4 

"io 

1 

91 


1b 

"29 

1 

93 


6 

"is 

18 


17 

2 

8 

"29 
29 


"li 


2. Dropsy and Ancemla 

8. Cancer .... 


1 

6 


4. Noma (or Canker) 

fi. If ortiflcAtlon .... 


... 




ToUl Diathetic diseases.... 
OrdMr2. Titderetdar. 

L Scrofttla 

3. Tabes Mesenteries 

8. Phthisis 

4. Hydrocephslus 


1 

1 
"io 

32 


2 

"47 

47 


6 

86 

1 


1 
"ao 


1 

"ao 

1 

31 


"7 

1 

"ii 

.... 

"if 


ToUl ConsUtntlonsl class.. 


49 


42 


■ji 


88 


89 


88 


86 


28 


24 


34 


19 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YITAL 8TATISTI08. 69 

DEATHS— Continued. 

in Minnesota in the year ending Dec. 31, 1873, toith Parent' 
Sex of the persons deceased. 



Age at Death. 


Total 


209 
66 

2 

76 

184 

286 

8S 

21 

6 

81 

163 

247 

4 

iJ 

26 
166 

itS 

1 

2 

2 

4 
1716 

94 
64 

8 
7 


60 


06 


60 


66 


70 


76 


80 and 
upwards 


Not 
glTen. 


Sexes. 


M. 


F. 


H. 


F. 


M. 

1 

■"7 

1 


F. 
"1 

• a*. 
...J 


M. 


F. 

.... 


M. 

1 
.... 

.... 

1 


F. 

a... 


M. 


F. 


M. 

1 

"2 


F. 


M. 



2 
2 

'**i 

8 

4 
2 


F. 

"i 

6 
.... 


M. 

28 
18 

180 
86 
8 
48 
71 

129 

81 

...J 

68 

96 

180 

2 

4 

70 

20 

83 

986 

1 

2 
2 

4 

2 
943 

60 

28 

2 

8 


F. 

19 
16 
89 
80 

"28 

66 

166 

18 

21 

4 

83 

67 

117 

8 

3 

78 

6 

73 

"tto 

2 
772 

44 

26 

1 

76 

6 

2 

877 

14 

"298 

878 


•••• 

•••• 
•••■ 

•••• 


"4 


.... 

1 


■"2 

1 


1 

1 

•••• 

.... 
1 
• 


* i 
.... 

6 


"2 

.... 
3 
11 


1 

"i 

7 


"i 

1 

8 
16 


8 

2 


1 
.... 


•••; 


a... 


.... 








1 
4 
2 


.... 




2 


■;;: 


"1 


1 

7 




6 


"2 

4 


.... 




.... 


.... 


8 




— ^ 


2 
8 


6 


.... 


8 
86 


22 


1 




































.... 






















1 
1 


1:11 


~ 






— 









— 


— 




— 


































10 

•9 

4 


6 

4 

1 


2 

8 


3 


Is 

6 

7 

.... 


4 

4 

2 


7 
6 


9 
2 


6 

6 
2 


6 
8 

.... 


8 

2 
8 

.... 


8 

2 


6 

1 


2 


'"2 

«... 


82 

2 
8 


.... 


.... 


.... 




.... 


, 






... 


13 


6 


4 


7 


14 


6 


7 


4 


7 


8 


6 


9 


1 


2 


2 

2 


4 

**i8 


88 

11 

886 
22 

"iii 

401 


166 

16 

3 

668 

36 

616 

774 


"ii 


""8 

1 



u 


'ft 

16 
20 


'"s 

5 
12 


■*i2 

12 
26 


*"*6 

6 
11 


"4 

1 

6 
12 


"io 


■**8 


—4 


*"8 


'"i 


... 


.... 


"la 


*lo 

14 


"1 

"li 


4 
12 




6 

7 


I 


~ 


~1 
10 


18 
17 



One male born in Bngland died at Insane Asjlnm, Nicollet Co., aged 106. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



70 



&TATIBT10& OF MINNIBSOTA* 



DEATHS.— Continued. 

TMe shovoing the number of Deaths from each specified death-catue 

JfatwUyy JfatwUyf Age and 





Parent Nativity. 


Nativity. 


CAU8B OF DBATH. 


t\ 


5I 

3 
IT 
14 

2 

"6 
127 


rather 
[other 
father 
iother 


j 

6 
16 
20 

7 

1 

8 

29 


- 


Foreign. 


Not 
given. 




""2 


.... 

6 


M. 

8 
7 
17 
8 

'"6 
106 

1 
62 

808 


F. 

8 
6 
14 
2 

1 

1 

81 


M. 

2 
17 
10 

\ 


P. 

1 
6 
6 
8 


'"i 


r. 


osjlbb xn.— local DinASBt. 

0rd4r 1. Nentoui 8y§tiin. 

1. Oephalltla 


6 
6 
18 




2. Apoplexy 

8. ParujBiB 


% 


4. InianltT 


...• 


5. Chorea. 


.... 

47 

1 

60 


.... 


0. Bpilepey 


6 
9 


1 
6 


1 
2 




g. ConYnlslone .••• 

7. Tetanias 


s 


ft. Brain dlseaaee. Ac 


64 
822 


6 
9 


' 7 
18 


97 

"we 

8 
67 

~«0 

3 
16 
8 

82 
1 
16 


63 


16 


9 

"so 


4 
9 

3 

4 

7 

"*i 
2 




Total diseaies, Nenrons System 
1. Pericarditis. 


"^ 


8. Heartdiseases 

Total diseases, Cironlatorr System. 

OnUr 8. SetpircOory OrgoM, 
S. Laryngitis... 


47 

"47 


66 

66 


1 
1 


1 


46 

46 

1 
28 

1 
80 

2 
86 


47 
47 

1 
20 

J 
67 

8 
26 


42 

42 

1 
6 

"27 

3 

86 


21 
21 

"'7 
1 

11 
2 

14 


3- 

i 


8, BroncfiiUs. 

4. Plenresy.. 


10 


88 

1 
78 

6 
60 


"*i 


2 

"'i 
'"i 


• ••• 


5. Pnenmonia 

6. Asthma 


81 

6 

37 

"114 


• 2 
1 


7. Lung diseases, Ac 


8 


Total diseases. Respiratory System. 

OnUri. biffSUve Otvant. 
h Gastritis 


168 

1 

47 

8 

1 
2 
4 
9 
1 
3 
22 

98 

1 

"*4 

4 

1 
8 


1 


9 

"'8 


69 

1 

13 
3 
9 

4 


143 

"84 
8 
2 
8 


106 

1 

82 

3 

1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
6 
8 

66 

1 

*"6 

6 

2 

1 


61 

1 

11 
1 
k 
2 
1 
9 


36 

1 

*"i 

1 
3 


3 
.... 

1 


6 


8. BnteriUs 

8. Peritonitis 


29 


8 


6. Ulceration of Intestines 

8. Hernia 


.... 


7, Dens 


.... 


11. Stomach diseases, Ac 




1 


1 

"i 
5 


8 

1 
1 
9 

42 

1 

*"i 
3 
9 

14 

1 
1 


10 

"i 

6 

68 

"i 

1 

8 

7 

12 


... 


18. Hepatitis 


I 


14. Jaandice 


"S 


1 
10 

i 
4 

1 

7 


""i 
11 

"lo 

' "i 

1 

1 
3 


8 

"*1 

1 

2 




15. liver dibeases, Ac 


1 


Total diseases J)igestiTe System. .. 

Order 8. urinary Orffont. 
1 Nenhritis 


~ 


8. Nephria 


1 
1 
1 
2 

6 

1 
1 


•••• 


4, Diabetes 


.... 


8> Calcnlns. Qrayel. Ac. > 




7. Kidney diseases, Ac 

Total diseases of Urinary System. . . 
1. Ovarian DroMT ........ ...tttr 


1 

1 


8. Diseases of Uterns, Ac 


... 


Total diseases of Generatiye Organs 

OrdM- 7. Organs qf LooomotUm, 
8. Joint diseases, Ac. 

1. Phlegmon f 


2 

4 


3 
2 

5 

6 
2 

12 


1 




8 

1 


6 


3 
8 


8 

8 

1 
1 

t 


4 

1 
4 
2 

7 


.•■• 


.... 


8. Ulcer -. .ti . .-»--«^---"«««««»f 




8. Skin diseases. Ac 


2 


~\ 


.... 


3 


2 
7 


2 
6 


.... 


Total dis. Integnmentary System... 


— 


T^tal Local Class 


866 


668* 18 


89 


297 


468 


401 


216 


128 


84 


17 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^YTTAL STATISTICS. 



71 



DEATHS.— Continued. 
in Minnesota in the year ending Dec. 31, 1873, with Parent 
Sex of the persons deceased. 



Agtat DmOIu 



VBdn 

1 




I 


8 


; 


^ 


i 


1 


Totel 


ondOT 
5 


i 


> 


10 




16 


M. 


t 
t 

"57 


M.|F. 


8 


F. 


M. 


F. 


U, 


F. 


M. 


F. 


.... 

.... 


F. 

1 

"*8 


.... 

.... 

1 


F. 


M. 
.... 


V. 






t 


i 

8 

90 

♦4} 


6 
8 

1 




% 
1 

76 


1 

.... 
18 




, 






1 


.... 




:::: 


*•.. 


"'i 








.... 




.... 


I'.V. 




' 


1 
1 
7 


8 


8 


8 


8 


2 


8 


M 


28 


IS, 12 





8 


8 


4 


2 


60 


7 


4 


8 


2 


8 


8 


104 


90 


88 


i « 


U 


8 


4 


8 


8 


4 


189 


180 


11 


8 


6 


8 


7 


8 


6 


S 


1 








' 


* 


8 


7 


6 


***ir"" 


2 


4 


'"4 


1 




.... 








.... 




.. .. 





S 

1 
18 


1 

1 
S 














8 


7 

1 
17 


6 

1 
80 


1 


"'2 


8 

1 
1 


1 
"1 


4 


1 


















It 


2 


8 


8 


.... 


1 


1 


8 


• •••• 


M 


14 
1 
9 

1 

9 


!1 


18 


6 


8 


8 


8 


1 


1 


48 


1 

14 


7 


6 


8 


2 


8 


4 


14 


6 


1 
""18 


2 


2 


.... 


8 


8 


.... 


88 


8 


4 


1 


8 


8 


1 


M 


9 


7 


8 


6 


4 


8 


84 


89 

1 
13 


10 


11 


8 


6 


6 


6 


18 

1 
1 
1 


2 


8 


1 


1 


8 


1 


.... 


• ••• 


19 

1 
1 
1 
1 
4 


8 

1 


4 


1 


8 


.... 


1 

1 


>«•• 


' 


... 


• 








.... 








■* *' 
















i 

8 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 




1 
2 


.... 


'* i 


'"i 


v.v. 


1 
1 


.... 


.... 


.... 


1 


1 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


1 


..... 


1 
1 


2 

1 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 




1 


.... 


... 


i 

1 


8 
8 




4 


1 


6 

.... 


8 


1 


" 


.... 






... 


.... 


19 


18 
■ ••* 

•••• 


8 


4 


8 


1 


6 

.... 

* 


8 

.... 

.... 


!!!! 


;;;; 


89 

i 


88 

i 


4* 

.■••• 
..... 


• ••• 


.••• 


... 




.... 


.... 


.... 






1 


1 














1 


1 




.... 




1 


... 






.... 


.... 


.... 




.... 


.... 










.... 








•••. 


• ••• 


.... 


* * 




" 




^^^ 


. .. 


.... 








.... 




.... 


.. . . 












































































% 


.::: 


1 












1 


;::: 


4 

i 












1 




.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


...... 


■*'i 


.... 




.... 


s.... 


• ••• 


* 


• .•• 




*' 








* ' 


... 


.. .. 


* 




S 


.... 


1 




' 








2 


.... 


6 




1 








1 




•• 




.... 


" 


* 




..■• 






1*1 


147 


«T 


41 


98 


18 11 


18 


14 





986 


288 8Di 


88 


14 


18 


80 18 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 



STATISTIOS OF MmNXSC^A. 



DEATHS.— Continued. 
Table shounng th^ number of Deaths from each specified Death-cause 

JVatimit/y jyativityf Jlge and 





Age at Death. 


CAU8B8 OF DBATfl. 


M 


26 


80 


35 


40 


46 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


K. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


1. CephallclB 


1 

1 


1 


1 
1 


'"2 

1 


1 
.... 










1 

"'i 

I 


•'•4 

1 
2 




2, Apoploxy 


.... 


1 


t 


2 




8. Paralysis 




4. Insanity 






3 

2 


.... 


.... 


1 


...a 




6. Chorea 

6. Epilepsy 


""2 


1 


.... 


8. ConTulslonSa***** 


.... 
.... 


',V.\ 


1 


1 
.... 


1 


.... 
"i 


2 
"*4 


1 


7. Tetanns 


.... 


"*i 


Total diseases, Nervons System 
OrderZ. OrgoMOf (Hrcu&Oion. 
1. Pericarditis T 


6 


6 


a 


4 


s 


4 


3 


6 


8 


8 


13 


2 


8« Heart diseases 


9 


6 


8 


8 


7 


16 


2 


4 


8 


6 


8 


« 






Total dls*s, Olrcnlatory System. 
Order 8. Bemiratory Organa, 

2. Laryngitis 

8. Bronchitis 

6. Pnenmonla 

6. Asthma 


9 
*"6 


6 
■"2 


8 

""2 

"*9 


3 

• ••* 

• ••. 


T 
"■3 


15 

• a*. 

2 


8 

"5 

1 


4 

• a*. 

2 
2 
2 

6 


8 

"1 
'"2 


6 

.... 
6 


8 
"*6 


6 

... . 


7. Lang diseases, Ac 


1 
7 


6 
7 


3 
14 


1 


6 

8 


4 


3 

6 

1 
2 

'"9 


4 
10 


4 

9 


1 


Total dls's, Respiratory System. 

Order 4. IHffteHve Organs, 
1 OutrUiH.. 


8 


2. Bnterltls 

8. Peritonitis 

6. Ulceration of Intestines*. .. 
6, Hernia. .. . •••••••••••• 


7 


1 


3 
1 

• • 

1 


2 


' 1 


4 
1 

X 


..•1 


6 

1 


5 


2 


"**i 


7. Hens 

11. Stomach dliieaiefi Jkc. 


.... 




.... 


13. Hepatitis.... 






.... ■ 


14. Janndice****.. ■>.••• ••■••• 




1 
2 










1 

1 


.... 
*'*2 


"*i 


1 
9 


« 


16. Liyer diseases, Ac 


8 


.... 


1 


.... 


.... 


2 








Total dls*s, Digestive System... 

Order 5. Urinary Organs, 
h Nephritis „,., 


9 


4 


6 


3 


1 


6 


2 


9 


7 

1 

"i 
2 


6 

1 

1 


6 




8. NephrU 

4. Diabetes 


.... 


.... 


.... 


1 
1 


.... 


1 
1 


• .•* 


.... 


.... 


fi Oalcnlns. Oravel Ac ..■•>■ 






.... 


7. Kidney diseaaes Ac .... 




.••• 


1 
1 


•* 


Total dls's of Urinary System.. 

Order 6. Generative Organs, 

1, Oyarlan Drooay . • . • 


.... 


1 


.... 


2. Diseases of Uterns. Ac» 








.... 


.... 


Total dis. of Oeneratlye Organs 
Order 7. Organs qf LoamujUon, 
2. Joint diseases, &c 

1. Phlegmon 

2. Ulcer........... •••••••••• 


1 
2 


1 
1 









1 


.... 


.... 


^"^ 




1 












1 


















.... 




2 

1 

8 
"21 


"31 


1 
34 


1 

1 
~87 




3. Bkin diseases. Ac... 














1 

1 

14 


.... 


Tot. dis. Integnmentary System 
Total Local Class 


~1 
38 


1 


1 







1 

39 




26 


82 


"Ta 


""is 


"w 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YITAL .STATIBTICeU 



73 



DEATHS.— Continued, 
til Minnesota in the year ending Dec. 31^ 1873, irith, Parent 
Sex qfthe persons deceased. 



Age at Death. 




.1 


•o^ 


•0 


M 


60 


66 


TO 


75 


80 and 
upwards 


Not 
given. 


by Sexes 


M. 


r. 


M. 


F. 


IC 


». 


M. 


F. 


H. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


1 


F. 

"*i 
.... 


M. 

6 
26 
27 

6 

"ii 

116 

1 
82 


F. 



14 
20 
4 
1 
2 
88 

**72 




•••• 
6 


• ••• 

s 

8 


.... 

4 
• ••• 


*"i 

•••• 

1 


• ••• 

1 

4 

• ••• 

*"i 


.... 

1 
1 

• ••• 


8 


"i 

6 


.... 

4 


.... 
S 


"i 




"*i 


*"l 

2 


14 

89 

47 



1 

14 

104 


•••• 
I 


;;r. 


:;;*. 


1 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


... 


.... 


1 

a... 


V.V. 


8 


'.V,\ 


1 

.... 


1 

"*8 
6 


'.IV. 


"i 


•••• 
s 


1 

4 


,... 


1 
164 




i 


9 


8 


5 


6 


1 
t 


4 


1 
s 


" 


8 


~ 




• 


1 


278 

8 
01 


210 

"ii 


488 

8 
162 


6 


4 


10 


8 


3 


t 


2 


s 


1 


7 


1 


•••■ 


s 


• 

• ••• 


4 


10 

"i 


8 

• •.. 



8 

1 
6 
8 
8 


S 


8 
.... 


6 


8 


2 


2 


1 


7 
.... 


1 

"i 
■**i 

2 


01 

2 
28 

1 

107 

6 

68 

207 

1 
46 

4 
4 
6 
2 
19 

16 


71 

1 
27 

2 
70 

6 
42 

148 

1 

1 
2 
2 
6 
8 
6 
20 


166 

8 
66 

3 


4 
1 


.... 


4 


4 


4 


3 


4 
1 

6 


1 
1 
8 

6 


1 
8 

1 

4 


1 


1 


..•• 


i 


8 

1 
1 

6 


17T 
18 


1 


2 

s 


3 
7 


6 


6 
U 


1 


106 


~ 


1 


~ 


• •.* 


~M6 


t 


■ "s 


S 


S 


.... 


•:;;i i 


1 




.... 


1 


.... 


1 


.... 


.... 


2 


02 

8 
6 
y 


1 


■ ••• 


1 
1 


J 
1 


1 

• ••• 

1 




.... 

.... 


.... 

t i 


.... 
.... 

"*5 


:;;; 


*"i 

«... 
1 




.... 


.... 


..a. 


.... 


"*i 




.... 


.... 


1 


4 
26 

2 
g 






*' 








1 
.... 










.... 


i 


***i 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 




s 




1 


S 


86 


8 


6 
• ••• 


6 


6 
1 


4 


s 


4 


8 


4 


•• 


4 


.... 


1 


.... 


1 


6 


09 

1 
1 
8 
8 

8 

"ii 


90 
1 

'"t 

8 

8 

4 


188 

2 


•••• 




...• 


1 

"*8 

1 

4 






' 


. .. 


** 


.... 






.... 


J 


•••• 
1 


•••• 

• ••• 

"i 

1 


• ••• 


1 


4 


.... 


.... 

1 


1 
1 
1 

8 




1 

8 




1 


*!!* 


1 

"i 


.... 


8 

8 
15 




• •.. 


"1 
• ••• 


:::: 


"S 

8 
4 




7 

4 
4 
4 


7 




























2 

7 
1 
8 


g 




.... 


*••« 


.... 


.••• 


...a 


..«• 


1 


















11 


•••• 


!III 


..•• 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


...J 


5 

7 


■ •■ 


•• • 


• ••• 


...« 


• •• 


• .. • 








1 












8 


.... 


.... 


... 


1 


— 


.... 


.... 


1 


11 
70T 


12 


28 


«■■• 








*"" 


.••• 




' •' ■« 


M 


M 


80 


11 


29 


10 


V 


14 


16 8 


7l 7 


28 


10 


646 


12B8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



74 



8TATI81*I08 OV MQjrJtnBOTA. 
DEATHS.— Continued. 



TaUe showing the number of Deaths from each specified Death-cause 

Jfattvityy Jfaiioityy Age and 





PHODtNatlTltj. 


HolMtj. 


0AUS18 OF DEATH. 


il 

88 

70 
6 

"loe 

16 
18 
7 

« 

7 
8 

10 
8 

16 

47 


l| 

48 
88 

16 

"146 
06 

66 
10 

"Jn 

SI 
16 
2 
89 

4 
10ft 

"176 

2 

2 

'"4 

8 

1 

"iM 

til 
186 
668 

271 
184 

nis 


6 

1 

1 


il 

8 
8 

6 


1 

22 

10 
6 

46 

IT 
61 
IT 


U.S. 


Vor^gn. 


Not 




M. 

66 

101 
18 

"no 

18 

4 


V. 

60 
77 
16 

"l87 
81 
24 

U 


K. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


1. Stfllborn 




t. Pi«iiiatar«Blrtti*I]if.I>«UUt7... 

A TmUMiw 


.... 
1 

40 

10 


2 

1 

"1 

H 

40 

8 


1 


.... 


Total DtreL DlMMta of Ghttdren. . 
Onl«r S. l>49a. IHtMm tf Womm. 
ft Uhlldhirlh 


4 


OrdirS. J>09a.JH».o/OidI'^opl4, 
1 Old Ace.. 


Ordm'i. J>U4at«t0/JruiriUon, 


«..• 




• - .. 


Ord^rX, AcMdmU or jr0alig0H04, 
1. fra«larM ABd Oootniloiit 


7 

.... 

1 

6 

6 

fO 

S 
18 
7 
6 

06 


6 

"i 
2 

•••• 

a. • 

66 

6 
29 

6 
2 

~96 


181 

14 
6 
1 

16 
2 

40 

4 

1 
"'0 

1 
101 

286 

282 
207 
181 
102 

1098 


102 

22 

12 

4 
30 


906 

1 
12 

) 


66 

14 
2 

1 
21 


106 

2 

4 


1 

1 


4 
1 


t. BaraiudBMldk 

4» Polwn 


0, Drowning 


S 


T 


.... 




6 6 


.... 


T. Otli«nrlM 


60 
"l5 

.... 

6 

128 

770 
226 
468 

102 
128 

1702 


8 

1 


67 
126 

8 

2 


11 
1 


6 

14 

1 


9 


Ord4r4, auiMd4 

•_ FolwMi • 




1 


t ^S^L::::::::zv:::::::::::. 


1 
8 

4 

~\ 

484 
186 
866 

146 
61 

1186 


1 
2 

"u 

604 
214 
401 
206 
84 

1460 


"8 
~18 

188 

142 
160 
216 
66 
188 

ni 


1 

2 

2 

"94 

166 
1£6 
128 
106 
2ft 

6<9 


1 
9 

"15 

22 

16 
94 
1 
16 

"79 


1 

4 

IS 

9t 
17 

« 


Ordm'$. 




Total Loeal DlMMSt. 

Total Derelopmental DlMtM. . . . i ! ! V ' 
Total Ylolont DmUm 



NoTS. For oomploto dnMiilcation of dlsoMOf mo roport for 1878L 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YTFAL 8TATIS1!I0B» 
DEATHS.— Oontinoed. 



75 



m Minnesota, in the year ending Dec, 31, 1873, with Parent 
Sex of the persons deceased. 

AgefttDMth. 



Under 1. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


Toua 

under 6. 


6 


10 


16 


X. 


P. 


K. 


F. 


P«. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


K. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




F. 


M. 


F. 


9S 


60 

74 

6 


















66 
101 
14 

171 


60 
79 
11 








4 
2 


8 
6 


1 


1 


1 


1 


.... 


.... 




IS 








* 










• •• 




•• •• 


.... 




*' 


.... 










Iff 


127 


9 


1 


1 


1 


1 


*... 


.. . 


140 






















• 




f 
































































1 

1 
1 


3 




4 
18 

1i9 




.... 


15 


6 


9 


1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


1 

1 


""l 


' •*' 




• •*• 








...• 


166 


1 






171 

1 
8 
2 
2 
3 
8 


140 

1 
10 

1 
3 
6 

4 


6 
8 


8 


1 


"*1 

4 
2 


S 

1 

1 


3 

1 
1 
1 
1 


2 


8 


.... 


4 


1 


1 


1 








*" 


6 

1 
6 


""2 


7 

1 

11 


*"i 


•••• 


S 
4 




.... 






■ 


.... 


.... 


2 


1 


1 


.... 


1 


9 


T 

• ••a 


6 

• ••■ 


1 


6 


2 


4 


4 


1 


4 


21 


24 

1 


« 


4 


29 


2 


2 


«.•• 


:::: 


• ••• 


.... 


... 


.... 


•;•• 





• ••• 


•••. 


.••• 


.::: 


;:;: 


.... 


•^ 


.... 


.... 


1 
















1 


.... 


.... 


.. •* 


.... 










* 












•«•• 






















25 

493 

29 
228 
140 

86 


97 

8 

99 

"ii 


4 

79 
12 
23 

1 
4 


82 

48 

7 

14 

"22 


2 

63 

16 
18 

2 


29 

40 
18 
90 

"*29 

107 


** 


9 

808 

V 


7 

907 
17 

14T 
U9 

7 


6 

117 

14 

67 

6 

6 


8 

110 

6 

44 

9 
8 


6 

39 

4 
22 

1 
6 


2 

49 
4 

16 
1 
» 


4 

64 

2 
11 

1 
4 


4 

88 

1 
12 

1 
4 


1 

80 

1 
14 

"*1 


4 

94 
% 
9 

'**4 


94 

668 

48 
9ti6 
171 

24 


46 
4& 
18 
2 

• 


68b' 607' 209l 


176 Tl' 


72 


78 


61 


46 


39 1,086 


846 


166 


119 


91* 89 


101 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



76 



STATISTICS OF MINNBBOTA. 



DEATHS— Continued. 
TaUe showing the number of Deaths from each specified Death-cause 

Jfalivityj JVaiivity, Age and 













Age at Death. 










OAUBES OF DEATH. 


SO 


26 


80 


86 


40 


46 




M. 


F. 


K. 


F. 


M. 


P. 


M. 


P. 


M. 


P. 


u. 


P. 


fCLAM IT. DXYELOPlI*L DI8S*S. 

L StUlborn 

d. PremfttareBirt]iAInf.Deb. 
e> Teething 


.... 


.••• 


.... 




.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.. •* 


..•. 


. •• 


Totol Derel. Dls. of 01illd*d 






























Ordsr2. J)m>a.JHs.o/ Wam^n, 
4. Childbfrth 




18 


•••• 


17 


.... 


22 


.... 


17 


.... 


7 


.... 


2 


Ordtr 8. Jho. DU. Old PsopU, 
1 OldAge 






Ord«r4. JH4MM9 0/ SutHHon 

I. Atrophy and DebiUty 

Total Developmental Class 

CLASS Y.— YIOLKIT DBATHS. 

Order 1. Aooid'tor NegUgmkoe 

1. Practnresand Contusions. 

2. Bnrna and Scalds 


9 


18 
.... 


1 
1 

4 


17 
• .*■ 


2 
2 

1 
.... 

"13 


3 

1 


-- 


1 
"18 

1 
1 


a... 
.... 

1 


2 


9 


2 


4. Poison. ..•*.... 










6. Drowning 

«. SniTocatlon 

7. Otherwise 


T 
12 


2 
*"2 


8 

'if 


1 


"*2 


*'i2 


.... 


2 

"ii 


*"i 


1 

"is 


'"% 


Total deaths from Accid*t8 
Ordm'%. Bamioids. 
1. Mnroer and Manslaughter. 

Order 4. Suicide. 
S. Poison •••.....•...•.•... 


28 


6 


24 


1 


16 

1 


3 

1 
1 


12 
9 

1 

4 


3 


16 


1 


16 


t 




















4. Hanging • 

5. Otherwise,. 

Total Suicidal deaths 

Orders. 
flndden canse. iinascerta*d 


i 


.... 


.... 

1 


.... 


'"2 


1 


"'2 


1 


*"2 
2 


•■•• 








. .. 


* 






** 


.... 




• .. 


Total Violent deaths 

-Total Zymotic Diseases 

1 Total Constitutional Diseases. 
'Total Local Diseases 


29 

S8 
S2 
38 




28 
49 
26 
18 
6 

126 


26 

20 
42 
82 

1 
26 

120 


1 

29 
81 
12 
17 

1 

"90 


18 

14 

82 

18 

S 

18 

84 


4 

16 
89 
32 
26 

4 

116 


16 

14 
88 
14 

' 16 

7T 


4 

29 
26 

2T 
18 

4 

108 


18 

16 
29 
31 

"is 


s 

11 

JM 

84 

9 

2 

80 


IS 

17 
84 
87 

"is 

106 


2 
11 


■ToUl Developmental Diseases. 
Total Violent Deaths 


4 
2 


•a>otol SpeclM Causes of Death 


"Ti 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YTTAL 8TATIBTI0S* 



77 



DEATHS.— Cootinued. 
in Minnesotay in the year ending Dec. 31, 1873, vriih Parent 
Sex of the person deceased. 



Ago ftt Death. 


Total 


„. 


M 


66 


60 


66 


70 


76 


80 and 
npwardi 


Not 
1 QlTon. 


Sexes. 


1 


M. 


P. 


K. 


F. 


X. 


P. 


X. 


P. 


X. 


P. 


X. 


P. 


X. 


P. 


X. 


F. 


X. 


P. 


































66 

101 
14 

171 

64 

14 
249 

87 
14 

6 
48 

6 

m 


60 
79 
11 

140 

90 

64 

21 
316 

4 

16 
1 
8 
5 

21 


10^ 


• ••• 


.... 


IL.^ 


_— 


.... 


.••• 


mi 


1111 


111! 


nil 


nil 


.... 


nil 


.... 


nil 


***' 


180 
811 
































6 

9 

t 
9 

"2 


9t> 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


s 


2 


3 
2 


14 

1 


14 


18 
3 


14 

1 


80 

1 
"81 

'"i 


81 
2 

"sa 


2 
2 

"i 
'"b 
"io 


12» 
36 


B 
.... 


1 


1 


S 


2 
2 

■"i 


2 


2 

.... 
.... 

"*8 


6 
.... 


16 
.... 


14 


21 
.... 


16 
.... 


664 

41 

30 

6 

66 


'"i 


••;• 


8 


"i 


"i 


■ ••• 


10 

178 


11 


1 


8 


s 


6 


.... 


10 


1 


1 


.... 


1 


.... 


1 




16 

1 

... 


4 
1 


261 

4 

9 

1 
14 


66 
S 

1 
**"2 


816 




;;;• 


1 


.... 


1 














••*• 






i 


1 


■i....| 




1 






* 


... 






"i 


2 


.... 


16 




..•. -..-| 










' 






1 


■... 


2 


.... 


1 


11 
18 


1 


.... 


.. .. 


.... 


• ••• 


.... 


.... 


1 


3 


1 


21 


6 

8 

~« 

772 
878 
646 
816 
62 


2» 

f 


10 

as 
n 

1 

12 


1 

6 

U 
20 

1 
1 


10 

11 
20 
26 
1 
10 


s 

7 
12 
20 
2 
2 


7 

15 
26 
89 
2 

7 


11 

7 
12 
29 

8 
11 


1 

3 
14 
19 

6 

1 


1 

6 
16 
27 
16 

1 


4 
IS 
14 
14 


1 

S 

16 
21 

1 


•••• 

2 

7 
8 
16 


1 

6 

1 
7 
81 

1 


1 

7 
33 

1 


"15 

36 
10 
22 
2 
19 


29 
17 
10 
9 
6 


943 
401 
707 
249 
282 


844 

171» 
774 

1258 
664 
844 


T8 42l 
Ko. of d«- 


68 

Attlft 


48 
with 


80 


81 
lA no 


61 

t. vfv 


42 

Ml... 


68 


44 


48 


88 


46 


43 


89 


68 


2588 
613 


2068 

iflrr 


4660 
1100 




c not ffivA 


n*. ••.... •...••••..••.. 


.... 




16 


Totm] 


Aon 


iber 


Of al 


IdM 


thsr 


egis 


kerod 


Inl 


873 


;::.;:::::..;::.::: 


6766 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



78 



8TATI8TIOS OF HEBrNBSOTA. 
PHTHISIS PULMONALIS. 



TMe showing the number of deaths from Phthisis or Con 
in the year ending Dec. 31, 1873, with SeXy Month 





1 


Sex. 


Month. 


OooBtiei* 


1 


1 


1 


£' 


5 


Total 


662 


266 


977 


46 


32 


00 


Ano^^ ^-,„,,,, 


8 
6 
4 

IT 
8 
9 
1 
1 
4 
1 
7 

10 
2 

10 

30 
9 

S8 

62 

13 
8 
2 
2 
1 

17 
9 
5 
9 
1 
2 
7 

14 
1 

23 
6 
2 

71 
1 
2 

17 
1 
1 

13 
6 
6 

23 
6 
1 
6 
2 
9 

re 

20 

4 

82 

11 


8 

1 


6 
4 
4 
9 
2 
2 




1 


1 


3e€k6r ..«..>•••«••. ... 






Penton 

BlaeBarth 






1 


8 
6 

7 

1 


4 
2 

1 


1 


1 


Brown ■••.... 




OarTflr* •••• • 






Oarlton 




1 


OhtDDflwa* 


1 
2 


1 






<7hisago.i*.....iT,,.... ... 


2 
1 

4 
4 


1 




CTow'W^lng. 

DakoU 

DoqcIm • 





3 
6 
2 

7 
16 

7 

9 

28 

! 

1 
2 

io" 

4 
2 

4 


i" 


2* 


.... .^.. 


Farlbaalt 

Fillmore 

Freeborn. 


3 
IS 

2 
14 
84 
10 

2 

1 


1 

2 

1 
1 
3 

1 


i" 


1 

4 


Ooodhne 


1 

4 
2 


% 


Hennepin • 


6 


Honeton 

Xianti 




Jackson. •« 




1 




Kandiyohi 

Lac a ni Parle.... ■ .. 




1 


1 

I 

3 
6 

1 

v 

9 


i' 

t 


i" 




Le Soeor 


2 


McLeod 

Kartin 


1 


Meeker 






1 


Mllle Lacs 


1 

i" 

1 






lforri*onTi.T-f -• ....t..^ 


2 
3 
6 
1 

12 
4 






Mower 




Nicollet 

Noblea 


2 


2 


Olmsted 

Otter Tail 


11 
1 
2 

42 


2 




2 

s 


Pada 








Ramsey 

Bedwood 


29 

1 
1 
9 

1 


6 

1 


8 


4 


RenviUe 


1 
8 






Rice 

Rock 




1 


2 


St. Lonis 


.... 

7 
S 

8 
10 
2 

1 

4 

1 

2 

2 
11 

3 
16 

6 








Bcott 


6 
8 
2 
13 
3 

2*' 

1 
7 
4 
9 
1 
16 
6 




1 

1 


« ... 
3 


eherbnme..... 

Sibley 


2 




Steams ■ 


2 




s 


Steele 


2 


Stevens 

Swift 






i" 


Todd 








Wabasha 


1 


1 


1 


Waseca... ••....••. ••.. 


2 


Washington 

Watonwan 


1 


1 


1 
2 


Winona 


4 
1 


a" 


8 


Wright 


1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YTTAL STATISTICS. 
PHTHISIS PULMONALIS. 



79 



sumption of the Lungs in the several Counties of Minnesota 
of heathy JfativUy and age of the persons deceased. 



Month. 



i 


1 


i 

a 


i 

47 


1 


u 


1 


1 

1 


1 


1 


43 


87 


40 


54 


47 


68 


80 


30 


8 




1 
1 


1 
1 






1 


2 

1 








1 






1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 






1 
2 

4* 








1 


1 
1 

i"" 

1 


i" 

1 

2 


2 


1 
1 


i" 

1 




1 






i" 

.. ..... 






•••' 


i'* 


i" 


i" 

1 


i" 


2" 

1 


"1 ' 


....... 


i" 


...••••.•a 


i 


1 

1 

4 


2*' 

2 
2 


i 

4 


1 
6 


2 
4 
1 
2 
5 
3 


i" 

1 

8 

10 
2 


1 
2 

4 
1 
3 
1 

i" 

1 


1 

2 

i" 

8 

i 


1 
1 


3 


S 
11 


2 

4 


4 
4 
2 





7 

1 

i" 


1 


1 






1 


2" 

1 


i" 


i" 


2" 

2 

i" 

2 






.... J.. 

2 

1 
1 

.*. 

2" 

1 
8 


2" 

1 


....•••.a* 


i" 


8' 

2 

r* 


i" 

8 


1 






i" 


i" 

...... •«• 


i" 


1 


1 
1 


.••.••..•. 


i' 

8 


i" 

i" 

10 

i" 

i" 

1 
1 

2 


i" 


i" 


.. ..J.. 

i" 

18 

i" 

i" 

i" 

• « •• ...a 

i" 


3" 


1 




......•••a 


2* 

i" 

•••• .. 

2 

1 


4 

i" 

1 

i" 

4 




i" 

i" 

.... ^ 

1 
1 


5 

i" 

1 

i" 

4 

i* 

1 

1 


4 

i" 

i" 

i" 




i" 

i" 

i" 

i" 


1 
2" 

2" 

2 

i" 

1 

i" 







1 

1 


r* 


i" 


1 

9 


., ••••• 


1 

6 

5" 


2" 




1 


8 


1 
1 

9 
S 


2 

4" 

2 


1 
1 
2 


2' 

2 


1 


2 


8 

1 


.......••a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 



STATISraCS OF MraKBSOTA. 



PHTHISIS PULMONALIS.— Contiimed. 



Table shovnitg the number of Deaths from Phthisis or Com 
in the year ending Dec. 31, 1873, with Sex, Month 









NatlTltj. 






COBBtleB. 




II 

0^ 


i 


& 


1 


Total ..-• 


62 


S70 


61 


46 


2i 






Anoka 

B6<^er 


1 


6 

t 
8 
10 

2 


i" 

1 
3 


2" 

i" 

1 




Benton 

Blue Earth.. 


1 




Brown 


2 
2 

i" 

1 


1 


Carlton 

Chippewa. 

ChiMKo. 

Crow T^inK...... •••••• 





1 


1 






% 


i 

1 






Dakota.... .'.* 


1 
1 


2 
6 
2 
6 

11 
3 
7 

29 
6 
1 
2 
1 

io" 

6 
6 
3 

1 






Dodge 

DoQglas •.... 


2 
i" 

8 
8 

4 
2 

1 




i* 




Farlbanlt.... 

Fillmore 

Freeborn . .. •••.••..••••..•■•••. 


1 

8 

1 
6 
8 

1 
1 




Goodhoe 1 

Hennepin 

Honston 

leant! 


4 

4 


5 
4 


Jackson ••••• • 






.>•> 


Kandiyoh4'^i. V** * ••••.. 








1 


Lac qai Parle .,'. !'!.l." 

LeSnenr ••••.••.■••. 


'2" 


i" 

1 


1 




licLeod 






Martin 








Meeker 

Mille Lacs 


1 


1 


2 




Morrison l.III.!.,.... 




1 






Mower 




6 
3 

u" 

2 

ii" 






Nicollet 




2 
2" 


4 

i'" 

1 

2 


4 


Nobles 

Olmsted 

OtterTall 


i ' 

1 

i" 




Pope 

Bamses* 

Bedwood 


k" 


2'* 


Renville 


1 

i" 




Rice 


12 

a" 

1 
1 
11 

6 

2" 

S 

4 
4 
11 


i" 

i" 

4 




Rock 

BULonis • 


i" 

t 
2 

6 

i" 




Scott. • 


s 

1 
•• ....... 




Bherbnme ', 

Sibley 

Stearns 


••• 


Steele.. *.'.*.l..l.!' ..••..•• 






Stevens 

Swift ••••••.••. 

Todd 


1 


..... ••. . 


1 


Wabasha 


1 
1 
1 

2 


t 
2" 






Waseca..... 

Washington 

Watonwan. ••••• 


4 ' 

1 


i" 


Winona .'....* ."..* 

Wright 


16 

6 


6 

1 


i" 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



TITAIi STATISXIOS* 

PHTHISIS PULMONALIS— Continued. 



81 



sumption of the Lungs in the several Counties of Minnesota 
of Deathy Jfaiivity ani Age of the persons deceased. 



NAttTlU. 


ic«. 


1 


1 

9 


19 


i|l 


1^ 


i^ 




^'i 




4A 


46 


85 


1 


18 


490 


88 


1 














18 

88 

18 
87 
18 

18 

18 
88 

86 

16 
10 
19 




1 


i" 

i" 




i" 

i" 

i" 

1 

s 

1 
1 

10 

i" 




••.•••••. 


i" 

9 

1 








\ 




1 


i" 

i" 

1 

i" 

1 

i" 

1 
1 

4 
8 

*i" 




1 
1 




*■•• .... 


i" 




i" 


1 


i" 


i" 


i" 

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Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



82 STATISTICS . OF MISOirBSOTA. 



PROPERTY AND TAXATION* 



The valuation of property as returned in June, 1874, 
to the Auditor of State, and equalized for the purposes of 
taxation, was as follows : — 

Nomber of acres of land, exclnsiye of Town and City lots. 18,741,404 

Aggregate yalue of the same, indndlng atmctares thereon. #U8,410,S20 
Aggregate yalae of Town and City lots, Inclading structores 

thereon 58,994,79S 

Taxable yalaation of Keal Estate .* •172,405,^18 

Value of Personal Property 46»02i,798 

Total yaluaUon of Taxable Property $817,427»211 

Showing an increase for the year of 467,581 in the num- 
ber of acres taxable as the property of individuals. As to 
the valuations, no information concerning the increase in the 
wealth of the people can be derived from a comparison with 
previous years, the assessment of 1874 having been made on 
a basis differing from that of former assessments. In the 
latter year an effort was made to do away with established 
practices and customs in assessing property that generally 
made the valuation range from one-half to one-third of the 
selling price, and instead of such results to secure a valua- 
tion that should be a near approach to the true value. Thfs 
purpose has been accomplished to the extent of nearly 
doubling the valuation in a year of scarcity of money and 
low values, the increase in the several aggregates being as 

follows : — 

Increase for 

1874. 1878. 1874. 

Aeresofland 18,741,404 18,277,828 468,681 

Yalnatlonofland, etc $118,410,620 •67,211,460 •66,199,160 

Yal'tion of town & city lots, etc. * 68,994,798 80,286.861 28,708,988 

Yalaation 6f personal property 46,021,798 24,688,240 20,488,668 

•217,427,211 •112,086,661 •106,891,660 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



PBOFBBTT Ain> TAXATION. 



83 



IncludiDg exemptions which are deducted in the above 
valuations of personal property, the aggregates of this 
class were $53,170,028 in 1874 and $32,389,402 in 1873. 
Under the head of personal property, live stock of the 
several kinds were valued as follows : — 



Horses under 8 years . . . . 
Horses 8 years and oyer. 



1874. 

At. Yalne, 

•1,019,696 982 28 
9,160,794 78 84 



1878. 
YalMtloii. AT.VahM. 

t888,210 $27 81 
6,446,109 5S 94 



Horses, total •10,180,490 



Cattle under 2 years 

Cows 2 years old and over. 
Other cattle 2 yean & oyer 



Cattle, total. 

Mnles and Asses. 

Sheep 

Hogs 



•878,104 
8,427,879 
2,796,786 

•7,097,719 



•6 98 
17 94 
22 21 



•841,844 ^76 17 
272,789 1 71 
878,295 2 42 



•7,884,819 

•1,087,508 
2,657,157 
1,717,125 

•5,461,785 
•281,111 



•6 75 
14 18 
24 14 



268,772 



•57 70 
1 81 
1 79 



The balance of the personal property list for 1874 is 
made up of the following subdivisions :— ^ 

Nnmbmr. V«liifttloii. At. ValM. 

Wagons and Carriages 65,097 t^,048,188 •SI 88 

Sewing and Knitting Machines 15,899 447,592 28 11 

Watches and aocks 88,120 826,700 8 57 

If elodeonb and Organs 2,424 186,098 52 02 

Pianofortes 2,002 882>652 166 16 



Vftliiatioii. 

Honseholdand Office Fumitare ^8,422,894 

Agricnltaral Tools, Implements and Machinery 2,465,915 

Gold and Silyer Plate and Plated Ware 59,226 

Diamonds and Jewelry • 80,577 

Franchises, Annnnities and Royalties ••• 9,704 

Steamboats, Sailing Vessels, etc ••• 121,068 

Ooodsand Merchandize •• 7,581,906 

Material and Manufactured Articles 1,291,700 

If annfkctnrers' Tools, Implements and Machinery, inclading 

Engines and BoUers • 967,500 

Money of Banks, Bankers, Brokers and Stock Jobbers 475.562 

Credits of the same • 278,842 

Honeys other than Bankers, etc. • • • 1,867,249 

Credits other than Bankers, etc • 8,224,594 

Bonds and Stocks 554,594 

Shares of National Bank Stock 4,285,910 

Shares of capital of companies not of this state - 110,249 

Stock and Furniture, Billard Tables, etc., of Saloons and 

Bating Houses *» 184,070 

Slevators and Warehouses and other improvements on lands, 

the title of which is vested in B. B. Go's 186,044 

Improvements on lands held under IT. S. Homestead Law* . • 1,879,716 

AU other personal proper^ not above speciiied 8,261,682 



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84 STATISTIOS OF, MINNESOTA. 

A change for 1874 in the classification of personal prop- 
erty forbids a comparison of the last twenty-five sub- 
divisions with those in former personal property assess- 
ments. 

On the above valuation of $217,427,211 taxes were 
levied as follows : — 

FOB STATE PUBPOSBS. 



For General Beyentie 9829,789 89 

For Sapporc of State Institatioiis 101»478 81 

For Interest on State Debt 60,786 91 

For Sinking Fond 25,868 46 

♦607.869 07 



FOB OOMMON 80HOOLS. 



2MiUTax $448,192 81 

Special Tax 898,679 14 



$1,841,7/1 96 



FOB OOUNTT PUBPOSES. 



For Connty Revenne ••••• 1687,608 84 

For the Poor 109.288 96 

For Bonds and Interest 184,721 86 

For Boads and Bridges 82,698 66 

Miscellaneous 21.804 68 



$1,086,967 47 



% 



FOB TOWN FUBPOSES. 

Town Taxes $217,749 42 

City Taxes 731,024 46 

Boadsand Bridges 176,946 24 

Bonds and Interest. 81,204 26 

Miscellaneous. « 20,808 67 

$1,177,726 96 

Taxes total $4,102,886 01 

Being an average taxation of $1.88 on every $100.00 of 
the valuation. 

Of other sources of income the following are specified is 
the State Auditor's estimate of revenue for the year 1875 : 



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PBOFEBTT ASD TAXATION. 85 

Aided to Qenerca Bevenue .-—From State Prison labor, etc . # 25,000 00 
Aided to State iMtitutione Jrwuf :— Taxes on gross receipts 

of railroads 120,000 00 

Insurance Companies' taxes • 25,000 00 

Telegraph, Express and Car Co. taxes i 5,000 00 

The State institutions are the University of the State of 
Minnesota at Minneapolis, three Normal Schools at Winona, 
Mankato and St. Cloud, the State Prison at Stillwater, the 
State Reform School at St. Paul, the Deaf, Dumb and Blind 
Asylum at Faribault, the Hospital for the Insane at St. 
Peter, and the Soldiers' Orphans' Asylum in connection 
with the Normal School at Winona. 

The common schools and the University derive an ad- 
^tiooal income from interest on invested funds, land 
coDtracts and stumpage accounts and sale of grass on state 
lands. 

The amounts annually raised by taxation for roads and 
bridges are swelled by a tribute of 5 per cent, on U. S. Land 
Office sales, paid by the U. S. government. 

There are four permanent state funds as follows : — 

The Permanent School Fundf derived from sales of lands, 
«very 16th and 86th section or one-eighteenth of the area 
of the state belonging to the common schools. Accumula- 
tions November 30th, 1874, $3,030,127.09, or more than 
the permanent school fund of any state in the Union except- 
ing three, those of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa. Will 
ultimately exceed ten millions of dollars. 

The Permanent Univereiiy JFundt derived from sales of 
Agricultural College and University lands. Accumulations 
November 80th, 1874, $211,107.53. May ultimately reach 
one million of dollars. 

Internal Improvement Land Fund» derived from sales of 
500,000 acres of land granted by Congress for purposes 
of internal improvement. Accumulations Nov. 80, 1874, 
$39,032.42. May reach four or five millions of dollars. 
A constitutional amendment prohibits any disposal of this 
fund not approved by a majority vote of the people at some 
general election. 

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86 STATISTIOS OF MINNXBOTA* 

The InebricUe Asylum Fund^ created by^ an act of the 
Legislature in 1873 for the foundation and maintenance oi 
an asylum for inebriates, and derived from special $10 
licenses to be paid by all liquor dealers in the State. Ac- 
cumulations Nov. 30, 1874, $13,322.73. 

The above permanent funds are invested in U. S. and 
Minnesota and Missouri State bonds. 

8UUe Debt. The State of Minnesota has a recognized 
debt of $480,000, consisting of four loans authorized for 
the erection of buildings for state institutions, viz. : 

Loan of 1867, 7 per cent, bonds, due in 1877 #100,00(^ 

Loan of 1868, 7 per cent, bonds, due in 1878 100,000 

Iioan of 1869, 7 per cent, bonds, due in 1879 50,000 

Loan of 1878, 7 per cent, bonds, doe in 1888 • 280,000 

Total of the loans ^iSOyOOa 

For the payment of these loans a sinking tund has been 
provided, derivable from taxes. Accumulations in sinking 
fund on November 30, 1874, $37,749.23. 



LANDS. 



Bstlmated area of the state in acres •..•• 51,701,7W^ 

Of which — 

Snrreyed by the United States to Angost 1, 1874, acres 85,868,166 

Tet to be surveyed, acres. . •• •• 15,889,604 

61,701,760 

The total area as above given includes all water surfaoe^ 
only excepting the Minnesota portion of Lake Superior. 



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LAHDS. 87 

In the surveyed acreage all lakes of 40 acres and over are 
meandered and not included. 

DISPOSAL OF THB SUBVETED AOBBAGB BY THB UNITED STATES. 

Of the surveyed area 24,378,591 acres have been absolutely 
disposed of by the United States government. The balance 
of surveyed land, 11,483,565 acres, is yet held by the U. 
S. Oeneral Land Office, a large share of it, however, subject 
to claims under existing grants to railroads and to the state. 

llie disposal made of the 24«378,591 acres is as follows : 

Given or sold to individuals :— 

GiYen to settlers tree under homestead laws .... 4,690,285 
Glyen to settlers tree under timber coltnre acts. 127,108 

Sold fbr cash, scrip and warrants 10,048,916 

Total to individuals 14,866,289 

Given to the state in aid of Schools and Improve- 
ments : — 

Common Schools, 1-18 of aU surveyed 1,994,828 

The State University 82,966 

The Agricultural College 94,489 

Capitol BoildlDgs 6,400 

Internal Improvements 500,000 

Saline 26,485 

Swamp Lands 1,062,998 

Total for state purposes 8,767,566 

Given in aid of Railroads :^ 

Bailroads incorporated under state laws 6,068,805 

Northern Pacific B. B 685,961 

Total deeded to BaUroads 5,744,766 

Total disposed of. 2^,878,591 

The following is an estimate* of the ultimate disposal of 
the 11»483,565 acres yet held by the United States : 

* In this estimate allowance has been made for the probable inability of some B. B. 
companies to secnre the tu\\ amount of their grants. The Northern Pacific B. B., incor- 
porated by act of Congress and already completed throngh this state, is certain of 
receiTing the fhll amount of its grant (2,918,400 acres in aU m Minnesota) and of other 
B. B. grants abont one million acres have already been certified by the General Land 
Ofloe m addition to lands deeded to railroads. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



88 STATISTICS OF MINlirBSOTiu 

To nllrotds iacozporated under state laws S,217,888 

To Northern Pacific Bailroad 2,282,489 



Total to railroads^ 4,460,272 

To the state as swamp lands 186,000 

To IndlTldnals by sale and nnder homestead and 

timber coltare laws • 6,898,298 

Totalacres 11,488,666 

The disposal by the United States of the total of sonreyed 
acreage thus being as follows : 





14.866,269 
6,898,298 


AerM. 


of£!l£l^. 


To indlTidoals by entry or sale 




21,764,662 


60.69 




8,767,666 
186,000 


i 




To the state in aid of schools, etc.... 


6,744,766 
4,460,272 


8,902,666 


10.88 


Ta llAllTOIIjdS >••••■■•■•••••••••••#••• 




10,196,088 
86,862,166 


28 43 






Total surveyed 


100.00 



DISPOSAL OF LANDS BT THB 8TATB AND BY RAILROAD 
OOMPANIBS. 

As above shown the original owner, the United States, 
disposes of only 21,764,552 acres of the surveyed lands to 
individual settlers, the balance being granted to the state 
and to railroads, to be sold by these grantees to settlers 
excepting only the area required for building-grounds and 
road*ways. 

The lands granted to the state are under the management 
ot the State Land Office in St. Paul. Of this class School, 
Agricultural College and Internal Improvement lands are 
now subject to purchase by settlers through that office, the 
average price being about $6 per acre on time with interest 
at 7 per cent. Of the swamp lands a minor portion have 
been set aside by the Legislature for the benefit of state 
institutions, while the major part have been granted by the 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



LANDS. 89 

Mune authority to railroads, about 775»000 acres having 
already been deeded to the Lake Superior and Miss., the 
Southern Minnesota, and the St. P. and Ch. B. B. com- 
panies. All or nearly all railroad lands, of Congressional 
and state swamp land grants both, are subject to purchase 
by settlers through the land offices of the respective railroad 
companies. Average price ot railroad lands from $2.73 per 
acre for Lake Superior and Miss., to $8 per acre for Winona 
and St. Peter lands. 

The number of acres sold to individuals by the state and 
railroad land offices to the end of the year 1874 was as 
follows : 

Acret. 

Of State School lands 450,857 

Of State AgricQltaral CoUege lands 88,872 

Of State Internal Improyement lands • 6,086 

Total of state lands 490,264 

or Ballroad lands 864,886 



Total of state and railroad lands sold to indlTidnals 1,854,850 

UNOOOTTFIED LANDS OBTAINABLB BT BBTTLEB8 IN MINNESOTA. 

The whole surveyed acreage is still unoccupied and oI> 
tainable by settlers, with the exception of the 14»866,259 
acres already given or sold to individuals by the United 
States and' the 1,354,850 acres sold by the state and rail- 
road companies. 

AOTM. 

Whole surveyed acreage 85,862,166 

Disposed of to iDdividoals by the United States. . . 14,866,259 
Disposed of to indiyidaals by the state and B. B. 

Co/s 1,854,850 

16,221,109 



Balance unoccupied and obtainable of acreage surveyed. 19,641,047 
Of which may be obtained : 

Acres. 
By purchase, or free under homestead and timber culture 

laws, from the United States 6,898,298 

By purchase from the state and Railroad Companies 12,742,754 

19,641,047 
12 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



90 



STATISTI08 OF MDOnCSOTA. 



The above unoccupied lands are ecattered through all 
sections of the stiite. A large part ot the state lands are 
found even in the more densely populated counties ; more 
than one-half of the railroad grants are located in fertile 
portions of the state, and of the surveyed lands yet obtain - 
able at the U. S. Land Offices a very ^considerable per 
oentage is arable lands of unsurpassed fertility. There is 
room on these lands for a number of new farms at least 
equal to the number (about 60,000) located on the 16 millions 
of surveyed acres now in private hands. 

.The following is a summary of lands entered or sold in 
Minnesota during the past year : 

At U. 8. Land Offices in 1874;— 





HomMtoad 
BntrlM. 


Soldiers* 


Sold for Cash, 
Scrip A Warr. 


Timber Oiiltor» 
AelBntriee. 


WorthiDffton 

NewUlm 


61,604 
24,648 
18,848 
19,666 
10,446 
24,879 
81,269 
11,616 
88,281 


6,660 


6,628 

8,812 

9,948 

1,988 

618 

86,276 

11,867 

2,486 

17,694 


49,777 

28,821 

21,69> 

8,094 

6,869 


Redwood Falls ...•••• 




A lAZflndrlA ••■••• •••• 




Detroit ••..•.• 


**44,826i' 


St. Clond • 


Litchfield 


16,627 


Taylor's Falls 

Didiith •••••••• 














Total, acres 


226,090 


60,886 


89,466 


119,277 



* Include lome pine land. 

Being a total of 484,719 acres for the nine offices. Pre- 
emptions being frequently changed to homestead and other- 
wise ultimately coming under the head of sales, are not 
included. Of this class there were 49,202 acres entered. 
The claims finally proved up aggregated 86,006 acres. 

The officers in five of the land offices make special 
mention in their statements to the Commissioner of Statis- 
tics of the character of lands in their districts, as follows : 

Worihington — ** There are about 200,000 acres unoccu- 
pied in this district, mostly rolling prairie well watered 
with creeks and rivers/' 



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I«ANDS. 91 

New Ulm — << There are aboye SOO^OOO acres of goyem 
ment land in this district, comprising some of the mosi 
desirable prairie lands in thjo state, and all lying within the 
80 mile limits of the Winona & St. Peter B. B. grant. 
These lands are well watered and for gtein or stock farms 
are unexcelled by any in Minnesota or out of it. All are 
subject to homestead, timber culture or pre-emption entriee 
— ^none to private entry. Population made up of nearly 
every nationality." 

Redwood FaXls — << Still considerable quantities of land 
subject to entry in this district, principally prairie of good 
quality and desirable for farming purposes, with a number 
of good mills in successful Operation." 

8t. CUmd — ** There is much good farming land left in 
the St. Cloud district open to actual settlement, mostly in 
Morrison, Todd, Wadena and some in Crow Wing and Cass- 
counties." 

Detroit — **The surveyed lands in this district are agri- 
cultural lands and open to homestead and pre-emption 
entry." 



Sales by the State Land Office in 1874 : 

Acres. Avtnge prieer 

School lands 30,588 $5 80 

AgricQltaral College lands 4,962 

Internal ImproTement lands. 6,085 

Total acres « 81,580 

The above sales were mostly in older counties. 



Sales by BaUroad Companies: 

The totals of sales for all years, with price per acre, up 
to July 1st, 1874, as reported to the office of the Railroad 
Commissioners, were as follows : 



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92 



STATISTIOB OT MOrNXSOTA. 



Name of OomptDy. 


No. of 
Aeroi sold. 


Ko. of acres 
eontraoUdto 
. be sold. 


ATengepriM 

per acre re- 

eelTod. 


NnrfchAvn Pftdflr .«■••••«•.>>•••• 


90,025* 

107,782 

85,840 

48,128 

62,715 

9,754 

66,379* 

154,498 




«5 46 
2 73 
7 68 
498 

6 05 


Lake Superior and Mlaalsalppl. . . 

St. Paol ft Paclflo— Main Line. .. 

«• « —Branch Line. 

fit Panl and Slonx Cltv 


80,790 
84,850 
21,654 
70,797 
8,925 


filonx nitv and St. Pai^. •••••... 


8 86 


TRTInnnA. AnA Rt. pAtAr 


8 00 


AoiithArn M^lnnAflOtA •■■•••>•■■■• 






flt. PaiiI anil flhlCAirO. *^^' , * ,,,,* 


221 
66,288 


2 86 


MlnniuiotA Centml. ••••••••• •••• 


16,500 


6 68 






TaIaI .............. t. ••...«••.• 


586,566 


278,020 ' 









* Thli Indadee both amo ut sold end eoatraoted to be sold. % 

The under-mentioned roads report to the Commissioner of 
Statistics cash and contract sales during the calendar year 
1874, (January 1 — December 31; as follows : 

Aerei. Price per Acre. 

St. Paul ft Paclflo— Main Line 24,148 #8.06 

fit. Paul ft Pacific— Branch Line 7,061 5.27 

Lake Superior ft Mississippi— For cash 807 8.98 

Lake Superior ft Mississippi— Contracted 8,082 4.86 

fit. Panl ft Slonz City 11,881 7.29 

Slonx City ft St. Paol 4,589 

The Winona & St. Peter B. B. Co. reports as sold and 
contracted to be sold from July 1, 1873, to July 1, 1874, 
13,245 acres, at an average price of $9.83 per acre ; further, 
sold and contracted to be sold from July 1 to December 31, 
1874, 8,507 acres, at an average price of $9.88 per acre. 

The Minnesota Central B. B. Co. reports cash sales for the 
twelvemonth trom July 1, 1878, to July L, 1874, of 3,709 
acres, and contract sales for the same period of 14,410 
acres ; further, cash sales from July 1 to December 1, 1874, 
of 3,898 acres, and contract sales of 3,816 acres. Average 
price per acre, $6.65. 



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POPULATION. 91J 



POPULATION 



The Legislatare will this winter provide for a census of the 
inhabitants of the state, to be taken during the coming 
summer^ hence a calculation of the population by counties 
on the basis ol the number of school children and simitar 
classes of information , would not now possess the same in- 
terest as in years farther from an actual enumeration. The 
last statements of the number of school children are for 
September, 1874 ; an estimate based on these and on the 
very careful calculation of the population in 1873, pub* 
lished in the Commissioner's report for that year, would 
make the population of the whole state, 582,747, on June 
1, 1874. This would be an increase since the U. S. Census 
of June 1, 1870, of 148,041 inhabitants and an increase since 
June 1, 1873 (over estimate for that date), of 30,283. It 
is probable, indeed, that the increase in the year ending June 
1, 1874, did not exceed the latter figure — allowing 11,000* 
for the natural increase through excess of births over deaths, 
it leaves 19,000 for increase by'immigration without count* 
ing removals from the state, and immigration was known to 
have been comparatively small, while the number of removals 
naturally incident to the movement of population was 
augmented from unusual causes, such as grasshoppers in 
the southwest and ** hard times " everywhere. Accepting, 
therefore, the above estimate as a near approach to the true 
population, it compares as follows with statements for former 
years: — 

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94 STATI8TI0B OF UnSOSTKBOTA. 

Population on Jane 1» 1850, (U.S. Census) <(77 

Popnlation on Jane 1, 1860, (U. S. Census) 172,088 

Population on June 1, 1865, (State Census) 250,099 

Population on June 1, 1870, (U. S. Census) 489,706 

Population on June 1, 1878, (calculated) 552,459 

Population on June 1, 1874, (calculated) 582,747 

Among intelligent men in our own state and abroad there 
is a demand for information concerning the elements com- 
posing our population and their relative proportions, which 
suggests the propriety of not limiting the approaching state 
census to a mere counting of the number of inhabitants, as 
was the enumeration in 1865, but to include at least all such 
statistics for which the machinery of the census may be made 
available without greatly increased cost to the state. 

In the absence of sufficiently late official information, the 
Commissioner of Statistics has frequently been called upon 
to furnish detailed population-estimates tor^use in this and 
other states, two of which may possess sufficient interest to 
warrant their reproduction here. 

At the request of the Eev. Dr. Jas. W. Strong, President 
of Carlton College, the Commissioner in the summer of 1874 
made the following calculations of the population by sex, 
age and nativity at the latest date for which materials were 
At hand : 

POPULATION JUNB 1, 1873. 
Total 552,484 

By Sex:— 

Male 294,710 

Female 257,754 

Total 552,464 

By Birth Place and Sex;— 

Ible. Fomale. TotaL 

Born In this State 81,026 79,154 160,180 

Bom In other states 100,111 90,265 190,876 

Bom in Foreign Countries 118,578 88,885 201,908 

Total 294,710 257,754 552,464 

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POFUIiATIOlir. 



95 



Foreign- Born Population by Birth Place and 8ex:— 



Mtle. 

From Scandlnaylan Conntrips • . • • 41,588 

From Great Britain and Ireland 21,622 

From DritlBh America.. 11,801 

From Germany 29,284 

From other Foreign Countries *• • • 9,888 

Total 118,578 



Female. 


TotaL 


82,841 
16,817 

9,179 
22,788 

7,260 


78,924 
88,489 
20,980 
51,972 
16,698 


88,886 


201,908 



TOTAL POPULATION BT AGBB. 



Under 21 Tears:— 

Male. Female. 

Bom in Minnesota 81,026 79,154 

Bom in other stotes 48,628 42,648 

Bom in Foreign Countries 26,768 25,728 

Total 151,417 147,525 

21 years and over: — 
N. B.— All bom in Biinnesota included in ages under 21, 

Kale. Female. 

Bominother states 56,488 47,622 

Bom in Foreign Countries 86,806 62,607 

Total 148,298 110,229 



TotaL 

160,180 

86,266 

52,496 

298,942 



Total. 
104,110 
149,412 

258,528 



FOBBIGN-BOBN POPULATION BT AGBB. 



Under 21 years:— 



From Scandlnaylan Countries 

From Great Britain and Ireland 

From British America 

From Germany 

From other Countries 

Total 26,768 

21 and over: — 

Male. 

From Scandlnaylan Countries ?i*I5i 

From Great Britain and Ireland *. . . • 16,627 

From British America * ^»017 

From Germany ^'?S 

From other Countries ' »*** 

Total •<•••••• 86,805 



Male. 


Female. 


Total 


9,802 


9,418 


19.220 


5,096 


4,899 


9,994 


2,784 


2,671 


5,456 


6,888 


6,626 


18,518 


2,199 


2,116 


4,814 



25,728 52,496 



Female. 


Total 


22,928 
11,918 

6,508 
16,118 

5,145 


54,704 
28,446 
15,625 
88,459 
12,279 



62,607 149,412 



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96 



STATISTIOS OF MIKNEBOTA. 



In the fall of 1874 the Commissioner made out the follow- 
ing table of the Scandinavian population in Minnesota and 
in the United States, including the number of persons bom 
here but haying Scandinavian parents, at the request of 
Professor Sven Oitedal, of Augsburg Theological Seminary 
at Minneapolis : 







Swedes. 


Danes. 


Total of aU 
three 


DatoofFopolAtloiu 


1 


j 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 




n 


17. S. CeniM of 1870 

Immlpated between June, 
187S; end June, 1018 


114,946 
87,098 


86,940 
6.417 


81,888 
89,066 


20,987 
7,896 


30,107 
10,669 


Mio 


2U,686 
86,728 


68,887 
15,081 


Total from ScukdinaTUa 
countries 

Their ohUdrenn, AmeHca 
bom 


117,684 


48,867 
82,884 


136,888 
106,919 


88,382 
29,041 


40,6T6 
81,669 


8.186 
8,4T8 


888,408 
266/>42 


78,084 
67,406 


Scandinavian popn]at*n, to- 
tal June l,m. 


268378 


76,861 


248^ 


60,413 


78,266 


6,666 


683,46ol 181,882 



In the above tables the proportions are, of course, taken 
from the n. S. Census of June 1, 1873, modified more or 
less by the information gleaned from birth and death returns, 
immigration statistics and the school census. Hence their 
. accuracy depends upon the preservation of nearly the same 
proportions at the end of three years after the U. S. Census. 
They are, however, apt to be approximately correct and are 
the nearest approach to the true figures in the absence of 
an actual enumeration. 



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NATiaATION. 97 



NAVIGATION. 



Port of St. Paul. 

For the following statement concerning transactions at 
the port of St. Paul during the year 1874, the Commis- 
sioner is indebted to George W. Moore, U. S. Deputy Col- 
lector of Customs : 

TBSSSLfi LIOHNSKD, 

No. Tons. 

steamboats 28 2,082.89 

B«rges 6 478.06 

Total 29 2,505.95 

GOixBonosrs at st. paul custom housb. 

Botles on imports (gold) |5,857 94 

Marine Hospital does (currency) ^ 511 68 

Steamboat Inspection (carrency) 798 57 

Official fees 96 15 

Storage 184 50 

Total •7,898 84 

Inyports through St. Paul Custom House. 

No. Packages. Foreign Yalae. 

Wines and Liquors 19 tl,088 00 

Sarthenware 79 8,762 00 

Calfskins 12 9,624 00 

Onns..... 2 598 00 

Woolcloth 1 285 00 

Ironcastings 1 48 00 

Total 114 115,840 00 

The number of steamer arrivals, of days of boating, etc., 
at St. Paul for the years named were as follows : 
13 



Digitized by 



Google 



98 



8TATISTI0S OF MINIirBSOTA. 



i 


Hi 

1*3 


Hi 


Arrival of first 
boat flrom be- 
low TAke Pe- 
pin. 




i 




IS**.... 










41 

48 
24 


231 


I84C,.-* 










834 


jSIG... 










246 


l&IT* .. 










4T 
63 
95 
104 


886 


18iS. . * > 










241 


1B49 . 










^iSB 


1B60., , 










829 


lasi,,.. 








, ,,,, ,,,. 


119 


218 


ifisa .^- 










171 


216 


]363..,. 










800 
866 
660 


838 


ISM 










298 


1865. „. 


April 9. 


Noyeinber20. 


April 17. 


November 19. 


217 


ISGC.... 


Aoril 7. 
M!arch 20. 




April IS. 
Way 1. 


November 10. 
November 14. 


86T 

}»9K 


218 


ie&7.... 


November 80. 


298 


tiGe.,.. 


March 20. 
March 85. 


December 8. 


MHr^^te'25. 


November 16. 


1,068 


886 


I8£9.... 


December 1. 


April yt). 
March 23. 


Nov ember 89. 
November 23. 


808 


an 


1660... 


March 16. 


November 23. 


776 


240 


i&ai.... 


April 2. 
March 29. 


November 26. 


AiJril b. 


November 26. 


^937 


831 


lias,... 


November 16. 


AiJrlUe. 


November 16. 


M15 


811 


1S«3.... 


March 89. 


November 24. 


Apdie. 


Piovomber24. 


748 


233 


18M,„. 


March 29. 


November 11. 


April 14. 


November 11. 


681 


211 


liAfi .. 


April 2. 


December 6. 


April 1&. 


D«c:ember 1. 


889 


231 


1906 ... 


April 12. 


December 9. 


AprlJ 1'^, 


Xoviimber23. 


777 


219 


isa7..,* 


April 16. 


December 2. 


April 21. 


Nov umber 89. 


883 


228 


196B,.., 


March 26. 


December 8. 


April 4. 


December 1. 


886 


240 


iS69.... 


April 8. 


December 4. 


April 19. 


NorQmber20. 


792 


216 


IBTO.,,. 


April 7. 
March 27. 


December 10. 


April 10. 


October 6. 


760 


840 


18T1.», 


December 6. 


April 19. 


Nu member 19. 


663 


887 


187^.... 


April 8. 


November 19. 


April 28. 


November 16. 


346 


206 


lS7a,.. 


April 8. 




April IT. 


November 18. 





209 


19:4.... 


April 28. 


Novembsr 2^ 


AprU28. 


November 16. 


218 


219 



POET OP DULUTH. 



The Collector of the Port, Hon. Henry Sdlby, reports as 
follows : — 



Arrivals. 


No. 


Tonnage. 


Men. 


American steam vessels coastwise 

American sailing vessels coastwise 

American steam vessels ftom foreign ports 
American sailing vessels flrom foreign ports 
Foreign steam vessels from foreign ports* 


184 

44 

2 

8 

55 


124,686 

15,738 

294 

149 

27,874 


8,928 

325 

20 

12 

1,807 


Total 


288 


168,241 


6,092 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



NAYIGATION. 



99 



Departures. 



American steam vessels coastwise 

American sailing vessels coastwise 

American steam vessels fh)m foreign ports 
American sailing vessels from foreign ports 
Foreign steam vessels Arom foreign ports 



Total. 



No. 



182 

45 

7 

8 

55 



292 



Tonnage. 



128,879 

15,741 

919 

148 

27,874 



168,061 



Men. 



8,882 

881 

64 

12 

1,307 



6,096 



Value. Duties. 

Valae of free goods entered #1,495 

Valne of goods with amount of duties collected 1, 148 #898 07 

Value of goods and duties remaining in warehouse.. 188,416 41,701 15 

Value of goods and duties bonded to Canada 271,782 141,019 17 

Total #407,841 #188,118 89 

First report in the year 1874 May 18th. 

First clearance in the year 1874 May 2d. 

Last report in the year 1874 Dec. 10th. 

Last clearance in the year 1874 Dec. 1st. 



Freight received by Lake at the Railroad Docks of Duluth 
» in 1874. 



May 

June 

July 

August 

September. .... 

October 

November 

Total, 1874 
•* 1878 
" 1872 
" 1871 



MDSE. 

lbs. 



1,788,925 
1,642,689 
1,768,758 
8,524,661 
4,151,642 
8,188,890 
4,826,424 



20,881,989 
12,407,428 
85,010,697 
24,190,099 



SALT, 
brls. 



8,000 
6,291 
8,884 
5,564 
8,667 
4,988 
6,710 



88,494 
26,072 
45,685 
84,792 



COAL, 
lbs. 



15,704,800 
7,864,600 
4,870,000 
8,768,000 
5,860,000 
1,872,000 



88,488,900 
60,612,000 
22,580,000 
26,946,520 



TOTAL. 

lbs. 



2,688,925 
19,284,289 
11,628,558 

9,568,861 

9,016,742 
10,525,290 

7,711,424 



70,819,089 
80,841,028 
71,201,197 
61,574,219 



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100 



BTATI8TI0B OF MIN20SaOTA« 



Receipts of Freight by Lake at the Docks of W. R. Stone Sf Co., 
Duluth, in 1874. 



May 

June 

July 

AngUBt 

September .... 

October • 

November 

Total, 1874 
" 1878 



MDSE. 
lbs. 



706,500 
1,580,000 
1,484/250 
1,633,100 
1,711,150 
1,^50,260 
y,l!7.BO0 



11,181,500 
12,924,141 



SALT. 
brlB. 



400 
1,500 
2,000 

500 
1,000 

400 

350 



6,150 

8,000 



COAL 
lbs. 



600,090 
400,000 

80,000 
150,000 

40,000 



1,270,000 



TOTAL. 

lbs. 



825,600 
2,080,000 
2,684,250 
2,188,100 
2,091,150 
2,220,260 
2,262,800 



14,296,560 
15,824,181 



Total Freight Received by Lake at the^ Port of Duluthf 
Minnesota, in 1874. 



May 

Jane 

July 

AngUBt 

September 

October 

Koyember 

Total, 1874.. 
•* 1878., 
** 1872.. 
" 1871 . . 



MDSE. 
IbB. 



2,444,425 
8,222,689 
8,248,008 
5,157,761 
5,862,792 
5,184,150 
6,448,724 



81,518,549 
25,881,604 
46,465,420 
29,489,846 



SALT. 
brlB. 



8,400 
7,791 
10,884 
6,064 
4,657 
5,888 
7,060 



44,644 
84,072 
50,915 
84,792 
I 



COAL. 
IbB. 



15,704,800 
7,964,600 
4,770,000 
8,848,000 
6,010,000 
1,412,000 



89,708,900 
60,612,000 
82,580,000 
26,946,520 



TOTAL. 
IbB. 



8,464,424 
21,264,289 
14,812,606 
11,746,961 
11,107,892 
12,745,550 

9,978,724 



84,615,649 
96,165,204 
94,269,920 
66,828,466 



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NATIOATIOK. 



101 



Shipments by Lake from the Railroad Docks^ Duluthf 
Minn.fin 1874. 



May 

Jane 

July 

Angatt 

September 

October 

KoTember 

Total, 1874 
" 1878 
•« 1872 
" 1871 



MDSS., te. 


FLOUB. 


lbs. 


brls. 


254,450 


80,107 


494,950 


48,848 


877,865 


87,412 


1,448,210 


82^«86 


1,752,510 


40,104 


2,712,741 


46,188 


980,280 


44,720 


8,066,006 


278,405 


8,606,558 


189,008 


5,170,706 


119,567 


8,585,740 


164,114 



WHEAT, 
bos. 



254,795 
800,580 
156,272 
18,891 
95,086 
124,756 
102,645 



1,552,625 

2,282,876 

780,216 

1,485,254 



TOTAL, 
lbs. 



21,568,550 
58,295,850 
17,286.585 
8,988,870 
15,475,470 
19,284,701 
16,082,980 



156,922,606 

165,849,918 

72,975,061^ 

122,528,780 



Shipments by Lake from Duluth, Minn.ffrom Private Docksy 

in 1874. 



W. B. Stone & Co. 
X. Ingalls 



Total, 1874. 
" 1878. 



LUMBER 

AMD 

MDSE. 
lbs. 



FLOUB. 
a)rls. 



81,160,000 
5,880,000 



86,490,000 
19,146,848 



TOTAL, 
lbs. 



18,800 
8,000 



21,800 
11,020 



84,020,000 
5,980,000 



40,850,000 

^ 1 ,vOU,(5vlf 



Total Shipmentt by Lake from DtUuth, Minn., from all Docks, 

in 1874. 





LUMBEB. 

AKD 

MDSE. 
lbs. 


FLOUB. 

brls. 


WHEAT, 
bns. 

• 


TOTAL. 

lbs. 


Ballroad Docks 


8,066,006 
86,490,000 


278,406 
21,800 


1,652,926 


156,922,606 
40,850,000 


Prlyate - 






Total. 1874 


44,556,006 

22,768,401 

15,621,580 

8,585,740 


800,205 
150.028 
122,557 
164,114 


1,562,925 


107.770 JUVI 


«« 1878 


2,282,876 186,710,561 

780.216 84,045,940 

1 485 254 1^3 K!i» 7flA 


" 1872 

«« 1871 






*— -»"— ^> . --^ 



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102 8TATIBTI0B OF lONNSSOTA. 



JVavigaiian an the Red River of the Jforth in 1874. 

Hon. N. W. Kittson, General Manager of the Bed River 
Transportation Co., reports as follows : 

The following steamers have been mnning on this river in 
1874 : 



JntemaHondl ••••• 115 tons. Boimdtrips 12 

Selkirk. >f 100 " « 1» 

Dakota 86 " " 1« 

Alpka 110 « «* la 

Cheyenne 80 " " 11 

SeoenBargee 650 ** « 

Total 1140 " " 65 



Dates of first and last trips. 

International. — Left Moorhead May 5; arrived at Fort 
Garry May 12th ; laid up at Grand Forks Sept. 7th. 

Selkirk. — Left Moorhead April 26 ; arrived at Fort Orsiry 
April 29th ; laid up at Grand Forks Nov. 9th. 

DoAofo.— Left Moorhead April 28tli ; arrived at Fort Garry- 
May 2d ; laid up at Grand Forks Nov. 1st. 

Alpha. — ^Left Moorhead May 7th ; arrived at Frog Point 
May 9th ; left Moorhead May 25th ; arrived at Fort Garry 
June 1st ; laid up at Grand Forks Nov. 9th. 

Cheyenne. — Left Moorhead April 30th; arrived at Fort 
Garry May 6th ; laid up at Grand Forks Nov. 6th. 

Total amount of Areight carried by B. R. Trans. Company 

during season, tons 8,918 570-9000 

Total number passengers 2,761 



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LOGS AUD LUHBSBw 103 



LOGS AND LUMBER IN 1874. 



JSRm. O. F. iSoIberg, 

Commie9ianer of Statistics of Minnesota : 

Below please find statement as per yonr request of De- 
cember 19, 1874, for the 1st District : 

ToUl amount of Logs cat In the winter of 187S-4 198,670,581 

Manofkctared Into lumber, lath, shingles and pickets 98,274,149 

Sold in rafts 65,896,872 

On hand In mill booms 27,800,000 

Baftedand unsold 12,200,000 

198,670,521 
Total yalneof St. Croix log crop for 1874 12,186,522 

Itobt E. MoEusiok, 
Sury. Oen. First Dist. Minn. 



Hon. O. F. Solberg, 

Commissioner of Statistics: 

Dbab Sm : — ^Below is Log Statement as per your request. 

Logs Scaled in Second District. 
At Minneapolis, No. feet / 185,714,940 



At Anoha, 
AtChamplin, 
At Elk RSyer, 
At Clear Water, 
At St. Cloud, 
Below the Falls, 



8,420,980 

258,670 

288,760 

910,800 

80,460 

1,807,970 



Total amount scaled 192,488,580 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



101 8TATISTI06 OF MnorBSOTA* 



Logs Sawed bui Mt Soaied. 



(■SmCATSD) 



At Anoka, No. «Mt. 90,800,000 

AtBlkRiver, '< 1,624,000 

At St. Cloud and above, No. foet 2,500,000 



Northern Padflc B. B. i^ 

West of Birer, No. feet • 4,000,000 

AtPrinceton, «< 600,000 

AtCambridge, « 500,000 29,994,000 

222,466,520 
Logs included in above scale now at Ifinneapolis and not 
mannCactared... 5,000,000 

217,466,520 



Have no data at present upon which to base an estimate 
tor cut of 1874-75. 

Q-. A. BBAOKBTTy 

Surveyor Gen. Second Dist. Minn. 
Minneapolis, Deo. 24, 1874. 



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RAILROADS. 106 



RAILROADS. 



The number of miles of railroad built each year in Minne- 
sota is stated as follows : 

Tear. Miles BaUt. Tear. MttesBoUt. 

1868 10 •*•• ldS9... 210 

1868 *« *••• W70 822ft 

1864 4»4 •••• 1871 457J 

1866 110 •••• 1872 v.. 866 

1866 105 .••• 1878 •• 4 

1867 11* •••• 1»74 40 

1868 181 

Total 1,950 

The 40 miles built in 1874 were on the now completed 
Wells & Mankato B. B. The operations of all roads for 
the year ending Jhne 30, 1874, were as follows : 

Grogs earnings from passengers r #1,624,927 08 

Gross earnings fromfreight 4,882,785 08 

Gross earnings, misceUaneoos ••••• 887,007 07 

Total of gross earnings #6,194,669 18 

Operating expenses 4,652,885 77 

Neteamings ♦1,542,888 41 

Operating expenses do not include taxes, the reported 
amount of which were $140,640.29. 

ATerage gross earnings per mUe of road #8,272 40 

Average operating expenses per mile of road • 2,457 00 

Average net earnings per mile of road 814 78 

Excess of gross earnings for 1874 over 1878 658,564 46 

Number of mUes run by passenger trains 1,064,002 

Number of miles run by flreight trains 1,747,568 

No. of tons of freight carried 1,484,918 

Of which were grain, tons 505,940 

No. of passengers carried 1,012,506 

No. of passengers carried one mUe ••• 86,907,798 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



106 STATI8TI08 OF llIira]B80TA« 

The number of miles run by pasBenger trains does not io« 
cladc the Winona & St. Peter B. B., and the I. & M. Div. 
of the St. P. & Milwaukee B. B. ; and the number of tons 
of freight carried does not include the Winona & St. Peter 
B.B. 

The comparative safety of traveling on railroads in Min* 
nesota is seen from the fact that on all roads no passenger 
was killed, and but two injured, from causes beyond their 
control during the year. The number of passengers killed 
by their own misconduct or want of caution was two on all 
roads, and number injured from the same causes two. That 
is, one passenger was killed to every 506,253 passengers 
carried and one passenger injured to every 337,502 carried; 
or one passenger killed to every 527,001 train miles run, 
and one injured to every 351,300 train miles; or one pas- 
senger killed to 18,458,899 and one injured to every 
12,302,599 miles traveled by one passenger. 



Totalstock of all roads $81,740,060 

Average amount of stock per mile of road .•••.••••• 16,767 

I 

Total ftinded debt of all R. B. Cos. operating in the state. 86,844,164 

Total onAinded debt 6,266,026 

Total debt #92,699,179 

Of which appertaining to lines in Minnesota 68,410,968 

Average debt per mUe of road in the state . • 86,189 

Average debt per mile inclading stock 62,906 



For more detailed statements see statistical reports for 
1873 and 1872. 



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XTNITBD 8TATBB XNTBBHAL BBYANUB. 107 



UNITED STATES INTERNAL REVENUE 
IN MINNESOTA. 



A table is appended to this report showing by district, 
rate of tax and articles and occupations taxed, the amount 
of collections in Minnesota in 1874 • The totals are tor the 
first U. S. collector district, embracing the southern half ot 
the state, $75,429^7, and for the second district, embracing 
the northern half, $151,986.38, making an aggregate of 
$827,855.55. The amount collected in the 8d district ha» 
suffered a reduction since 1873, owing to the repeal of the 
income tax and tax on gfts, and also to a diminution in the 
number of retail liquor dealers paying the special $85 tax. 

The collection of taxes on brewers and *< fermented 
liquors,'*which are mainly beer, discloses the fact that 89,644 
barrels of this beverage were brewed by 124 brewers in 
Minnesota in 1874. 

The amount ot collections in Minnesota and their percent- 
age of collections in all the United States and Territories in 
the under-mentioned years, were as follows : 

Oolldetions Per cent, of totel 
In MtnnMoU. Ibr the Union. 

1868 f 59,561 27 

1864 87,700 52 .0801 

1865 256,724 78 .0188 

1866 881,911 07 .1817 

1867 452,104 42 .1822 

1868 868,890 72 .2102 

1869 868,887 80 M40 

1870 467,879 15 .2792 

1871 252,582 98 .1975 

1872 248,979 48 .2159 

1878 281,404 94 

1874 227,855 55 .2800 



98,897,982 68 



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lOS BTATZBTI08 OF MIN1O10OTA. 



NATIONAL BANKS IN MINNESOTA. 



The U. S. Comptroller of Currency, Hon. Jno. J, Knox, 
famishes the following facts concerning National Banks in 
Minnesota in the year 1874. ^ 

The resources and liabilities of the whole number, 82, on 
October id, 1874, were as follows : 



jRemmrces. 



Loans and discounts |8^15,S98 79 

U.S. Bonds to secnre circnlatlon 8,754,850 00 

tJ. S. Bonds to secure deposits 580,000 00 

U. S. Bonds on hand 28,800 00 

Other stocks, bonds and mortgages.... 15^87 15 

Dae from redeeming and resenre agents 768,825 81 

Dne ttom other National banks 266,710 99 

Due Arom State banks and bankers 14o!987 71 

Bills of other National banks... 145,864 60 

Fractional cnrrency 88,598 08 

Specie 14,969 86 

Legal tender notes..... 779,889 00 

Overdrafts 188,267 47 

Beal estate, ftimiture and flztares.*«. 816,069 58 

Current expenses , 85,872 64 

iPremiams paid * 288,648 78 

Checks aiid other cash items 150,696 21 

Five per cent, redemption ftmd with U. S. Treasurer 168,927 25 

Additional, amount with U. 8. Treasurer 80,000 00 

•16,081,097 67 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MABBIAGBB AKD DIYOBOBS. 100 

lAabilUieB. 

Cipltal stock paid Ui $4,850,000 00 

Bttrplufl ftuid 746,768 80 

Undivided profits « 841,492 29 

National bank notes outstanding 8,858,921 00 

Dividends unpaid 5,828 919 

Individual deposits 6,297,881 97 

U. 8. Deposits 185,151 90 

Deposits of U. 8. disbursing officers 296,180 84 

Due to National banks 189,202 10 

Due to 8tate banks and bankers 150,085 82 

Notes and bills re-dlscounted 191,145 00 

Bills payable 20,000 00 

916,081,097 67 

In the subjoined table showing the condition of eaoh 
bank, several items not of interest to the general reader 
have been omitted. The column ** other stock, bonds and 
mortgages ** in the same table includes U. S. bonds to secure 
deposits and U. S. bonds on hand. The column *< Due 
from Banks ^ includes dues from redeeming and reserve 
agents, dues from other National banks and dues from state 
banks and bankers. The column ** Currency and Specie on 
hand," embraces bills of other National banks, fractional 
currency, specie and legal tender notes. 

The circulation per capita was 7.71 in Minnesota and 6.86 
in all western states. The ratio of circulation to wealth 
was 1.5 per cent, in Minnesota and 0.9 in all western states, 
and the ratio of circulation to capital was 76.3 per cent, in 
Minnesota and 80.8 per cent in all western states. 



MARRIAGES AND DIVORCES. 



Five counties, Lac qui Parle, Nicollet, Otter Tail, Stevens, 
and Swift, have failed to make reports of marriages and 
divorces tor 1874 and 1873. The returns for the reporting 
counties show the following totals : — 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



110 STATI8TI0S OF MUMBSOTA^ 

1874. 1878. 

Marriages ....' 4,791 4,679 

DlTorces 152 159 

The totals for five years being : — 

Marriage. DlToreas. 

1874 4,791 152 

1878 4,679 159 

1872 4,£00 189 

1871 8,941 144 

1870 8,478 128 

Total 20,984 717 ' 

The greatest proportion of divorces to marriages — and 
also of divorces to population — in 1874 was in Crow Wing 
county, viz. : Eleven marriages and six divorces. 

A table is appended to this report showing marriages and 
divorces by counties. 
I 



NATURALIZATION. 



The number of persons of each of the several foreign na- 
tionalities that have legally declared their intention to become 
citizens of the United States i are in the naturalization tables 
of this report shown under the head of ** Ist Paper ;" and 
the number of those that have become such citizens, under 
the head of << 2d Paper. ** No statements of this class for 
the year 1873 having been included in the last report, the 
numbers for 1873 and 1874 of each nationality have in the 
present report been added together, the totals of all nation- 
alities in the two years being 7,522 that legally declared 
their intention to become U. S. citizens, and 2,842 that be- 
came U. S. citizens. The following is a comparative state- 
ment for four years : 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



KATUBALIZATIOK. 



Ill 





1871. 


18T2. 


1873 ft 1874. 


Total. 




1 


1- 


1 

3 


•I 


1 

1 


1 


1 

3 


1 

SI 


BriUffh AmflrleanH ,.... 


2M) 

818 
84 
M 
188 
104 


30 

37 

4 
1 

62 
38 


186 

170 

82 

16 

178 

261 


35 

30 
4 

6 

78 
17 


260 

274 

86 

17 

266 

374 


82 

119 

7 

5 

109 

118 


666 

762 
102 
66 
617 
729 


147 


Englishmen 

g^^ ; ,,, 


179 
15 


Welshmen 

Irishmen 

British* 


11 
289 
173 


SnroDeAn British, total 


663 

1.384 
1,006 
1,287 


132 

160 
63 

164 
19 


646 

1,014 

1,059 

765 

187 


134 

160 

932 

186 

18 


96J 

977 

796 

1,766 

840 


361 

300 
400 
900 

76 


2,266 

8,876 

2.788 

3.798 

601 


617 


27 Of ^0|rlmi§ , ,,,ff,r--' 


600 


Swedes 


685 


Swedes and Norwegians* 

Danes 


1,960 
113 




8,888 

64 
19 
1,090 
189 
26 
14 
21 


386 

3 

"*i83 

88 

16 

10 

9 


3,016 

49 
60 
1,106 
139 
89 
23 
42 


686 

80 

2 
192 
24 
8 
6 
3 


8,799 

71 

9 

1,962 

948 

64 

36 

116 


1,676 

18 

2 

689 

130 

16 

19 

16 


10,662 

184 

71 

4,167 

676 

129 
73 

179 


2,648 

51 

4 


Hollanders 

Belffians 


Germans ••• 


914 


Anstrlans ■ 


187 


Frenchmen'. *. *.."'.*.'.!!!!.*..! '.'.'. '. *. 
Other conntries 


30 

27 
28 


ToUl 


6,W 


801 


6,298 


1,019 


7,682 


9,849 


18,962 


4,668 



* Conntry not specified. 



This shows a total for the four years of 18,952 persons 
who took out intention-papers and 4,662 that became U. 8. 
citizens. Of the first class, 10,652 or 56.20 per cent* of 
all were Scandinavians, 4,157 or 21.93 per cent, were Ger- 
mans, and 2,256 or 11.95 per cent. British Europeans; 
while of the 4,662 who became full citizens, 2,648 or 56.79 
per cent, were Scandinavians, 914 or 19.60 per cent, were 
Germans, and 617 or 13.23 per cent, were British Euro- 
peans. A marked feature in the naturalization table for 
1873-74, is the comparatively large number of persons in a 
number of counties that became U. S. citizens, a fact attribu- 
table mainly to the necessity of acquiring full citizenship 
for the purpose of proving up claims under the U. S. home- 
stead laws. The counties of Nicollet, Otter Tail, Stevens 
and Swift make no report. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



112 



STATI8TI08 OF MOraSSOTA. 



SCHOOL STATISTICS. 
For the school year ending iSeptember SOth, 1874, 



CX>MMON SGHOOL& 

Whole number of persons in reporting districts between 6 

and 21 years 810,194 

Increase for the year 14,129 

Increase since 1864 135,229 

Whole number of common school districts 8,266 

Increase for the year 129 

Whole number of childreh attending winter schools 99,842 

Increase for the year 7,860 

Average number attending winter schools 71 ,862 

Increase for the year 11,775 

Whole number of winter schools 2,789 

Increase for the year 181 

Whole number of children attending summer schools 81,781 

Increase for the year 1,068 

Average number attending summer schools 55,248 

Increase for the year 5,040 

Whole number of summer schools 2,718 

Increase for the year 145 

Whole number of different persons attending school 128,902 

Whole number of male teachers 1,884 

Increase for the year 195 

Whole number of female teachers 8,648 

Increase for the year 81 

Whole amount paid as teachers' wages #678,606 00 

Increase fb;r the year •• 110,668 00 

Average monthly wages of male teachers in winter term.. 41 86 

Average monthly wages of male teachers in summer term . . 4157 

Average monthly wages of female teachers in winter term. 80 52 

Average monthly wages of female teachers in summer term. 27 80 

Whole number of school houses 2,758 

Increase for the year 190 

Value of school houses #2,288,700 00 

Increase for the year #148,698 00 

Whole number of school houses buUt in 1878 • 276 



Digit^ed by VjOOQIC 



SOSOOL STATIBTI08. IIH, 

Se90wree9 in 1874.— Tuces voted by districts $889,890 00 

Receiyed firom school Aind 862,708 00 

Amount in district Treasuries, Sept. 

80, 1878 118,701 68 

Permanent School Fund, derived firom the sales of school 
lands: 

Acres sold 460,857 

Purchase money ; #8,769,666 00 

Cash receipts fiK>m stumpage, forfeitures, etc 270,671 00 

Total productiye ftind.. 98,080,127 00 

Whole number of acres (every 16th and 86th section in the 
state) belonging to permanent school ftind, less quantity 

sold, estimated 8,618,891 

Average price per acre of lands sold #6 18.06 



OXBIIB SCHOOLS. 



Three Suae Normal Schools (Teachers Training Schools) :— 

Number of enrolled pupils in Normal department in 1874 : Male, 126 

Female, 422 
Meeourees, — State appropriation and tuition in Model 
schools. 
The UnivereUy of Mnneeota ;— 

Number of students 287 

Males «. ....•> 209 

Females 78 

J^etotireet.-^rants of land by Congress, acres 82,660 

Agricultural College lands 119,862.17 

Total acres 202,412.17 

Acressold, about 88,872 

CoUegee and AcadenUee, aside from the above, No. reported, 86 

Number of Professors and tutors in these * 106 

Number of students in the same 8,764 

BetottrcM.— Tuition, and partly endowment and church contributions. 

* Biz schools no rtport of toftohen. 



16 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



114 



8TATI8TIO0 OF MIKNX80TA. 



CoUectums of U, S. Internal Revenue in Minnesota, in 1874. 



Articles and Occupations. 



Bate of Tax. 



Rectifiers (special tax) 

Dealers, retail liquor (special tax) 
Dealers, wholesale liquor (special 

tax) 

Stams for rectified spirits each . • • • 
Stamps, wholesale liquor dealers', 

each 



#200 00. 
25 00. 



Total collections on spirits • 



TOBACCO. 

cigars and cheroots of all descrip- 
tions, domestic or imported, per 
thousand 

Manufacturers of cigars ^special 
tax) 

Tobacco, chewing and smoking, 
flne-ent, cavendUh, plug or 
twist, &c., twisted by hand, &c., 
fine-cut shorts, and reAise scraps, 
clippings, cuttings, and sweep- 
ings of tobacco, domestic or im- 
ported, per lb 

Dealers In leaf tobacco, (special 
tax) 

Dealers In manuftuitured tobacco, 
(special tax) 

Peddlers of tobacco, 2d class, 
(special tax) 

Peddlers of tobacco, 8d class, 
(special tax) 

Peddlers of tobacco, 4th class, 
(special tax) 



Total collections on tobacco. 



100 Op.. 
10 cents. 



10 cents.. 



$6 00. 



$10 00. 



20 cents. 
$25 00... 
$5 00.... 
$25 00... 
$15 00... 
$10 00... 



Amount Collected. 



1st District. 2d District. 



$825 00 
20,014 01 

625 00 

74 90 

61 90 



$21,100 81 



$5,789 25 
217 50 



25 00 
8,886 78 
89 59 
12 50 
10 00 



$14,480 62 



$2,188 88 
82,907 76 

8,849 99 
494 00 

977 40 



$89,912 48 



$15,919 68 
495 85 



68 46 

45 88 

12,125 90 

164 58 

17 50 

11 67 



$28,824 4o 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UXTSBNAL RVnSNinB COLUDOTEONfiU 115 

/ 



CoUedums of U. S. Jniemal Revenue in Minnetoia, in 1874 — 

Continued. 



Articlds and Occupations. 



FBBMXZnVD LiqUOBS. 



Fennented liquors, per barrel 

Brewers, annual manufacture less 
than 500 barrels (special tax) .... 

Brewers, annual roanufkcture not 
less than 500 barrels (special tax) 

Retail dealers in malt liquors 

Wholesale dealers in malt liquors. 

Total collections on fermented li- 
quors 



$1 00. 



$50 00. 



$100 00. 
$ 20 00. 
$ 50 00. 



BANKS Ain> BAITXBBS. 



Bank dei>osit8, per month 

Bank capital, per month 

Bank deposits, savings, etc., hay- 
ing no capital stock, per six 
months 

Total collections on Banks and 
Bankers 



Total collections not otherwise 
herein proyided for 



PSNALTIBS, Bra 



Unassessed penalties 

Penalties receiyed on compromises 



Total of penalties, etc, collected . 
Total for each district 



Total for the state. 



Bate of Tax. 



1-24 of 1 pet 
l-24oflp.ct 



i of 1 p. ct. . 



Amount Collected. 



1st District. 2d District. 



$81,975 20 
1,499 99 



/ 



2,516 67 
710 01 
100 00 



$86,799 87 



1,285 14 
848 88 



$2,078 97 
$41 18 



477 77 
500 00 



$977 77 



$75,429 17 



$57,671 45 

1,888 88 

8,054 15 
595 01 
495 83 



$68,649 77 



$7,144 21 
2,479 68 



267 6$^ 



$9,891 58 
$9,152 98 

4i»5 22 



$495 22 



$151,926 88 
75,429 17 



$227,855 55 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



116 



STATISTICB OF XIIHN180TA. 



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118 



STATISnOB OV MIHinBSOTA. 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MARBIAaSS AND DIVOBOBS. 



119 



TABLE 

Showing the fitmi6«r of Mcarriagu in the yean 1874, 1878, 1872, 1871 and 
1870, and the nwmber of DivorctM granted in the eeveral counHee of Jfln- 
neeota for the pa$t Jive yeare. 



CoonUes. 




Marrlag« 


. 


1870. 


DlTorcBi Granted. 




1874. 


1873. 
4,679 


1872. 


187L 


1874. 


1673. 


IS72. 


1871. 


1870. 


Total. 


4,791 


4;W0 


8,941 


8,478 


168 


IBO 


139 


144 


la 




Anoka 

Backer 


60 

6 

179 

89 

6 

96 

2B 

30 

28 

11 

132 

98 

67 

79 

299 

109 

271 

508 

92 

87 

31 

13 

88 

"86 
19 
78 
90 
89 
8 
19 
190 

"26 
167 

• ••• 
20 

414 
20 
63 

178 
24 
34 

113 
91 
63 

137 
99 

**60 

119 

5 

80 
111 

21 

9 

218 

86 

28 


47 
29 
9 
193 
112 
6 
103 

a 

29 

10 

26 

183 

89 

69 

80 

284 

96 

947 

479 

110 

26 

84 

14 

66 

'66 
16 
66 

21 
90 
12 
18 
108 

"12 

179 

"ii 

413 
91 
68 

164 
19 
64 
71 
19 
60 

121 
70 

"81 

129 

1 

60 
96 

1 

949 
68 
90 


60 
18 
J2 

1«V 

78 

•» 

104 
90 
37 
99 
16 

197 
88 
69 
79 

916 

n 

448 

91 

7 

91 

"74 

8 

79 

8 

46 

19 

70 

6 

10 

110 

111 

6 

166 

68 

6 

27 

440 

8 

86 

118 

3 

66 

96 

22 

49 

160 

96 

1 

18 

*i6i 
* w 

96 

68 

1 

191 

70 

9 


36 

"12 
167 
66 

3 
79 
20 

41 

4 

'iii 
77 

66 

83 
232 

80 
989 

896 
97 

"90 

"63 

"66 

"47 
14 
70 
10 
20 
101 
69 

'137 

43 

8 

26 

868 
94 

'i84 

**48 
70 
19 
46 

134 
62 

"19 

'io8 
"io 

103 
19 

*20O 
68 


71 

"17 
160 
66 

"98 

6 

84 

.... 

105 

74 

68 

89 

217 

82 

214 

342 

106 

"is 
"m 

"a 

"61 
36 

87 

"76 

'i44 
16 

"a 

893 
17 

& 

"29 
68 
19 
48 
100 
79 

.... 

'i04 

"is 

'ioo 


.... 

1 

19 

3 

...^ 

■'1 
2 
6 
2 
1 
1 
8 
6 
6 
1 

14 
4 
9 

"i 

"*2 

"9 

1 

"1 
1 

4 

" i 

14 

"92 
""1 

4 
1 
1 

"9 
6 

"'6 
.... 

1 

"*6 
8 

1 


1 
.... 

6 
6 

"o 

"'9 

4 
3 
1 
1 
6 
7 

11 
6 

27 

2 

1 

.... 

8 
8 
6 

1 

"*5 

"i 

16 

"*2 
8 

"*i 

2 
.... 

1 
8 
6 

"'i 

" i 

1 

"'i 
3 

.... 


"i 

"6 
6 

"4 
.... 

6 

1 
6 

4 
1 

9 

"l8 

1 
1 

4 

"*i 
"*i 

"*6 
9 

4 

1 

"'2 

1 

"*8 

1 

"a 

"*2 

.... 

"'9 
2 

4 
•••• 

"'8 

"'6 

1 
6 

7 
8 






Ban ton ■••• 


"'is 
9 




BlnaBarth 

Brown 

Carlton 


4 
4 


0iu>Y9f , ,,, 


6 


10 


Chlppawa. 

Chlaago 

CotiAD wood ......•••• 


. ..^. 


Crow Wing 


""7 

6 

2 

...... 

3 
7 
12 
9 

""4' 

4 

""i' 

""2* 
3 

1 
...... 

""'4,' 
3 

1 

"ii" 

8 

""2' 

9 

...... 

...... 

6 
9 

'"*2* 
2 




DakoU 

Dodge 


4 

7 




3 


Farlbanlt 

Fillmore.^, 


8 


Freeborn 


B 


Qoodhne 


1 


Hennepin. 


92 


Honiton 

Isanti 

Jaekeon 

Kanabec • 

KaBdl70hl.TT'-T. 


"1' 


Lacqal Parle 

Le Sneur 




Ljon 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

MlUeLaca 

Morrison 


1 
3 


Mower 


2 


Nicollet 

Nobles 




Olmsted 


2 


Otter TaU. 

Pine 

Pope 




Ramsey. t . - 


6 


Redwood 




Btnrllle .t.. 


1 


Bie« 


7 


Bock 


3 


St. Loals 


1 


8oott 

Iherbame 

Sibley 

Steams 


...... 

4 
10 


Steele 

StcTens 

Swin 

Todd 




Wabasha 


1 


Wadena 




Waseca. 




Washington 


1 


Watonwan 




WlUrtn 

Winona. 


'"'i' 


""4' 







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INr>EX. 



AauoDLTUMi— Paab. 

ContoBtt of Repprt 4 

Acraftge In all eropi In 1873 5 

TotaU of prodncCft In 1873 • 

WhMktin 1873 T 

Oats !• 

Corn It 

Barley— R70 14 

Bnckwhoat— PoUtoes 1ft 

Boana— Hay 17 

Flax IS 

Hop*— Sorghnm— Sugar Maple Producta IS 

Honey— Tooaceo 90 

Oraaa Seed— Fralta 91 

Wool— Dairy Prodncta tS 

tUtin 1878 .: 7. : 2R-41 

AgrieuUwal Sttwrntfor 1874:— 

Acreage In each crop In 1874 41 

Yield of each crop In 1874 48 

LlTe Stock In 1874 44 

TablM--'Acriag€qf€a<lh product^ tte,t^c(nintiet, 46-40 

Tru-FlamMng:— 

Summary of retams 50 

TfM*<^7}rt9-PktnUngbif Town» 08-65 

BimTHa AMD DlATHB— 

Totals by ooantlee for 1873 66 

Blrtha— Sammary by Sex and Parent-NatlTlty 67-10 

Death!— Summary by Sex, Claiaei, NatlTity, Parent-NatiTlty, Age, and of 
Consumption « 

TabUqfBiHht^eomUUi,4te 04-66 

TcM* f^ deaih$yhun ^pte^fisd d4aih-cau9»$, €te 66-77 

Table o/dtathi from OontumpUan 78-61 

PBOPUTT AXD Tazatioh ■ 83-86 

Lahimi 86-01 

POFULATIOH 86-00 

NATiaATIOV 07 

On the Red BlTcr of the North V» 

LoatAXD LUMBXB 160 

SAILBOADa 106 

U. S. iRTXBiiAL Bbtzhux iH MnimeoTA 107 

T ab U CoUectlone of U. B. Internal Bevenne 114 

National Baxkb ov HimffMOTA 106 

^TafrXe— Showing Condition of National Banks 118 

Habbxaom Ain) DiTOBOss 100 

3\iM0— Showing Number of Marriages and DlTorces 110 

Natvrauxatiok 110 

TcMe Showing the number of persons Naturalized during the yeara 1873-4.. 116 

SOBOOL STATUTIOi ^ 119 



EBBATA. 

In population-table on page 96: ** Their chlldrenn, America bom;'* read: ** Their 
children, American bom/' 

On page 06, 8lh line from below: "from the U. S. oenaua of June 1, 1873;** read: 
** from tne U. S. census of June 1, 1870.** 

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EXECUTIVE DOCfDMENT, No. XL 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOABJ) OF TRUSTEES AM) OMCERS 



OP THE 



Minnesota Hospital for Insane, 



TO THE GOYEBNOB OF THE STATE OF MINNESOTA, 



FOB THE 



FISCAL YBAB ENDING NOV. 30, 1874. 



TBANSmTTSD TO THE LEOIBLATUBE OF THE SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL 
SESSION, 1875. 



SAINT PAUL: 

PIONSEB OOMPANT PRINT. 

1876. 

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MINNESOTA HOSPITAL FOR INSANE. 



BOARD OP TRUSTEES. 

Hov. C. T. BBOWN, St Peter, PresidenL 

HoH. H. B. STRAIT, Shakopee. 

Hov. WILLIAM SCHIMMEL, St. Peter. 

Bmv. a. H. K£BB, St. Peter, Secretary and TreMuier. 

HoH. LOBEN FLETCHEB, Minneapolia. 

HoH. JAMES £. CHILD, Waseca. 

NATHANIEL S. TEFFT, M. D., PlainviW. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

CYBUS K, BABTLETT, M. D., 

Saperintendent and PhjndaB. 
JAGOB K BOWERS, M. D., 

AasistaDt Phymoian. 
QEOBGE W. DBYEB, 

Steward. 



8UB0RDINATB OFFICERS. 

FRANCIS DUNN, 

Saperviflor Male Departmonl 
EVALINE DUNN, 

Saperrisor Female Department 
WILLIAM H. PEABCE, 

Engineer. 

WILLIAM MoFADDIN, 
Farmer. 



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REPORT OF TRUSTEES. 



EU maoeUenoy, O. K Davis, 

Qovemar of Minnesota : 

We herewith present onr Annual Report as Trustees of 
the Minnesota Hospital for Insane. 

By reference to the report of the Building Oommittee, 
you will notice what has been accomplished during the 
year towards the completion of our Hospital buildings. 
Seven years ago the foundations of this noble pile w.ere be- 
gun, and we congratulate the State, that year by year the 
work has gone on, and now only one more appropriation 
is required to finish the north section, return and hall. 
This will complete the plans adopted for the Minnesota 
Hospital for Insane, and present a frontage of more than 
800 feet, consisting of a central edifice four stories in 
height, with two sections, two returns, and a hall on the 
south of the central building, each three stories in height, 
for female patients, and the same on the north for male 
patients. In all their arrangements and appointments, we 
regard these buildings as admirably adapted for the hu- 
mane ends for which they have been erected. 

We have carefully estimated the amount necessary to 
complete these buildings, and respectfully ask an appro- 
priation therefor, namely : 

To finish north section, return and hall $47,500 00 

Tofumiah the same^ 6,000 00 

Ctaa maddnezj and fixtures for all the buildings 8,000 00 

$66,600 00 

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6 ANNUAL KEFOKT. 

For cnrrent expense appropriation, we need 987,500. 
This is for an average of 421 patients, during the year, at 
94 per week for each. This is fifty cents less per week for 
each than was required last year. Let it be remembered 
that at $4 per week, all repairs to buildings, officers^ and 
attendants' salaries, clothing, fuel, medical supplies, eta, 
are all included. This is as low as we can safely estimate. 

In the Treasurer's Report will be found the financial 
statement of receipts and expenditures. 

We refer you to the Superintendent's report for details 
of the internal workings of the institution. We think it 
not inappropriate to insert here an extract from the report 
of the November monthly visitation and examination, 
written by Dr. J. H. Stewart, of St Paul, so favorably 
known throughout the State : 

^President of the Board : 

'^I have the honor as well as the sincere pleasure to re- 
port the result of my examination and inspection of the 
Hospital for Insane. I cannot too strongly express my 
satisfaction at the condition and management of the insti- 
tution, and I congratulate you most heartily on your suc- 
cess in securing so efficient a corps of officers as at present 
represent you. 

*^An intimate knowledge both from experience and ob- 
servation of the conduct of eastern institutions of a similar 
character enables me to say, that for professional adminis- 
tration and executive ability as represented by Superin- 
tendent Bartlett, assisted by Dr. Bowers, Rev. Mr. Eerr and 
their immediate aids, the Hospital for Insane at St. Peter 
is their equal ; facts which not only redound to their ere* 
dit but are and ought to be a source of pride and gratifica- 
tion to the entire State." 

The Treasurer's report shows an unexpended balance in 
current funds. It is all import.ant at the close of the fiscal 
year Nov. 30, to have about this amount in the State Trea- 
sury to run us through the three expensive winter monthst 
as new appropriations are not available until March. 

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HOSPITAL FOB m&ANE. 7 

We commend this institution with its annual wants to 
the favorable consideration'of onr public men and to the 
generous sympathy of all. 

C. T. BROWN, 
A. H. KERR, 
WM. SOHIMMEL, 
H. B. STRAIT, 
L. FLETCHER, 
JAS. E. CHILD, 
N. S. TEFFT. 

TVustees. 



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ANNUAL REFOBT. 



REPORT OF BUILDING COMMITTEE. 



To the Board of Trustees: 

Gentlbmsn : — Since the date of our last report, Novem- 
ber 30th, 1873, the centre building and addition to the 
south wing of the hospital have been completed and occu- 
pied. The portico in front, and the connection with the 
laundry in the rear of the centre, have also been finished. 

The Legislature at its last session appropriated $40,000 
to erect the walls of the addition to the north wing, and 
prepare it for plastering and finishing another season. Af- 
ter advertising, according to law, bids were received and 
opened, and the contract awarded to Messrs. Breen & 
Young of St. Paul, they being the lowest bidders, for the 
sum of $38,950. This bid did not include foundation and 
mason work that might be necessary below nine feet of 
basement. As the foundation proved to be mostly stone 
very little extra work was required, the cost of which, 
with footings, was $852.76. 

When the appropriation was asked for your committee 
supposed the excavation for the basement would be mostly 
soil, easily removed and at small expense ; but at a depth 
of a few feet rock was found, and as it was necessary to 
prepare the cellar early as possible for the contractors to 
begin their work, the cost of this excavation was $1,443.49. 
The material removed was deposited as taken out around 
the other wings where grading was needed, and thus a 
special appropriation for that purpose avoided. Several 
thousand dollars were thus saved. It is proper to state 
that the farm hands usually employed two teams together 

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HOSPITAL FOB INSANE. 9 

with the help of patients, have assisted in this work of 
excavating and grading to the estimated amount of $1,800 
during the year. 

The walls of the new addition have been complet*ed and 
the roof finished. The windows are also put in, thus en- 
closing the building for the winter, according to contract, 
and a month in advance of the appointed time. The work 
is ready for your inspection. We feel that it will compare 
favorably with the rest of the building. 

To finish this addition and prepare it for occupancy, 
your committee recommend an appropriation of 347,500 
be asked of the next Legislature. 

An addition to our heating apparatus was required, and 
has been made, at a cost of a little more than $2,000. A 
cistern, of 3,700 gallons capacity, has also been built, to 
save water from the roof, at a cost of $1,388.85. The 
boiler and pump-bouse at the spring has been enlarged 
and repaired, and the boiler re-set, the expense of which 
was $600. These three items are classed as ^^ extraordi- 
nary," and have been paid from the current fund, because 
your committe regarded them as absolutely necessary, and 
there was no special appropriation for these purposes. 

Mr. Harry Downs was employed, as before, to superin- 
tend the work of building, and the portico in front was 
built entirely under his direction. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

0. K. BARTLETT, 
A. H. KERR, 
WM. SCHIMMEL, 
L. FLETCHER, 
0. T. BROWN, 

Building Committee. 



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10 ANNUAL BEPOBT. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Trustees Minnesota Hospital for Insane : 

Gentlbmen : Herewith yon will find a statement of re* 
ceipts and expenditures for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 

1874: 

t 

BUILDIHO ACXX>inVT. 

CSuh Balance Dec. let 1873 ^ $ 2,207 43 

Gaah State Treasary balance of appropriation of 1873 22,000 00 

Gash State Treasury 1874 66,000 00 

Gtoh brick eold ' 33 00 

$79,240 43 
To balance 8,036 45 

$87,276 88 

Completion of center building, south section, return and hall..... $36,643 08 

Sewers, flues and labor 223 81 

Liffhtning rods 139 35 

Aavertising 60 65 

Expenses of building committee and treasury salary • 396 00 

Plans and drawines 80 75 

Two porticoes on N. and 8. section ($428,71) 428 71 

Excavation of north section and return, labor teams and tools... 1,443 49 
Footings and masonry below foundation of N. section and 

return 852 75 

Erection of north section return and hall contract 38,950 00 

Carpenter work on first S. section 346 96 

Window weiffhts for same 183 75 

Central building portico 4,004 55 

Connection of central building and laundry 2,172 4ft 

Superintendent of construction 1,331 00 

Treasurer's petty account 19 60 

$87 276 8» 

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HOSPITAL FOB INSANE. 11 

Cn&BENT KZFBH8B AOOOUNT. 

BeeaptB, 

Cash balance on hand and in State Treasury Dec. 1, 1873 $24,170 44 

Gash, State Treasury, 1874 66,000 00 

Gash, Steward's receipts, via. from private patients $584 17 

Gash, sale of old steam boiler ,. 106 70 

Gash, hides, tallow, old iron, Ac 161 38 

Gash, farm stock 62 00 

Gash, farmproduce 209 68 

Gash, clothing 96 44 

Gash, stindries 18 60 

Cash refunded 22 00 

Ossh refunded by discharged patient.. 6 00 

Gash refunded by discharged patient incurred in 

collectinff a claim 45 00 

Gash refunded by over charge on flour.. 9 38 

Gash refunded by over charge on freight.. 1 50 

$1,322 80 

$91,593 24 
ExpendUurts. 

Current monthly expenses paid on certified vouchers.. 88^017 15 

By balance-.. 8,476 09 

$91,493 24 

Yon will notice under current expenditures a balance of 
$8^76.09. I was instructed, however, by the Building 
Oommittee to settle all accounts involved in building and 
minor contracts, so that^ at the close of the fiscal year, only 
$439.64 remained on hand. The amount belonging to the 
current fund and in the State Treasury, is $26,476.09, all of 
which will be needed by the first of March to meet accruing 
bills. You will find a schedule of current expenses, pre- 
pared by the Steward ; some items should be regarded as 
^^extraordinary,'' namely, boiler, cistern, and steam fittings. 
In the operation of so large an institution some such ex- 
penses will necessarily occur, unprovided for by a special 
appropriation, and can only be met from the current fund. 
I would again notice the importance of having a sufficient 
amount to the credit of the Hospital in the State Treasury 
at the end of the fiscal year, to meet the expenses of the 
costly winter months. 

KespectfuUy submitted, 

A. H. KERR, 

I^eaeurer. 



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12 ANNUAL BEFOBT. 

On this 10th day of December, 1874, the undersigned, as 
Finance Oommittee, hereby certify that we have examined 
the vouchers and accounts of the Treasurer and Steward 
of the Hospital for Insane, for the year ending with the 
month of November, 1874, and find them correct 

0. T. BROWN, 
WM. SOHIMMEL, 
L. FLETCHER. 

Finance CommiUee. 



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HOSPITAL SOB mSASE. 13 



STEWARD'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees Minnesota Hospital for Insane: 

Gentlbmbn : — Herewith is respectfully submitted a re- 
port of the Steward's department for the year ending 
November 30, 1874: 

DISBURSEMBNTS. 

For additions, alterations and repairs ^ 4,655 83 

For attendants, assistants and labor 10,728 30 

For books, stationery and printing , 212 12 

For cistern « 1,388 85 

For clothing 2,966 50 

For iann. btum. garden and grounds 4,463 48 

For fireiffnt and express charges 1,000 24 

Fuel ana heatins (including new steam boUer and connections 
and repairs to neating apparatus,) also extension of, and repairs to 

water supply pipes and fittings 18,634 27 

For furniture « 2,060 53 

For furnishing centre building 2,875 84 

For furnishing second section of south wing of permanent Hospital 

buUding 4,297 57 

For libraiy and amusements 233 74 

For lights and oil lamps 353 64 

For medicines and medical supplies , 664 54 

For miscellaneous expenses 817 35 

FoToflScers' salaries 4,200 00 

For patients' miscellaneons expenses ^ 325 60 

For provisions and household supplies 23,160 11 

For pent - 85 34 

For Steward's petty expenses 393 80 

$83,017 15 

NoTB. — ^Additions, alterations and repairs, include labor and material for 
repairs on permanent and temporary bnudincp. building addition to boiler and 
pump house at springs, fitting up closets, dimng reoms, wardrobes, Ac, in sec- 
ond section south wing. Extra work in first sections north and south win^, 
not embraced in contract. 14,000 feet oak fiooring (now on hand) enlarging 
icehouse, Ac 

"Attendants, aasistantB and labor/' indudes wages of engineer, fireman, su- 
perriaors, watchmen, cook, seamstresses and attendants. 



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14 ANNUAL BEPORT. 

" GiBteni/' for soft water, oataide of boildiog ; capacity, 37,000 gallona. See 
Boildin^ Committee Report 

" Frei(|[ht8 and express charges," inclodes transportation charges on coal, 
steam boiler, lomber, groceries, famitore^ Ac. 

Farm, barn, garden and grounds is detailed as follows : 

For hay, oats and feed $ 625 08 

For stock 629 30 

For labor 1,898 64 

For farm implements and repairs to same. - 628 00 

For harness, robes, blankets, etc., and repairs.. 89 85 

For trees, fruit and ornamental 41 00 

For seeds 143 03 

For flower pots ^ - 3 35 

For nse of horse 13 00 

For shoeing horses and oxen 77 45 

For fencing 157 82 

For making roads and grading around building.. 326 16 

For Paris green.. 16 76 

For pump 14 86 

$ 4,463 48 

^^ Fael and heating^ is detailed as follows : 

For wood (4163 cords— 18 mo's. supply). 13,372 29 

For coal (HI 7-10 tons) 1,472 60 

For horse-power Roofs safety steam boiler and setting.. 1,929 06 

For extra boiler tubes and heads -. 158 95 

For boiler scale preyentive.. 85 00 

For charcoal 46 90 

For lubrucating oil 123 53 

For furnace, fire box and setting (temporary building) 48 10 

For steam fitting and plumbing supplies, including steam pump and 

repairs 1,408 19 

For hauling coal 26 25 

For saws- 13 40 

$18,634 27 

'* Furniture," includes beds and bedding, and all kinds of household furni- 
ture required for increase of patients in parts of the hospital occupied previous 
to 1874, and to replace that worn out and destroyed. 

" MiscellaneooB expenses," includes traveling expenses of Trustees and other 
officers, fees for legal services and other items that cannot properly be others 
wise classified. 

"Patients miscellaneous expenses," includes undertakers charges and cash 
to dischaiged patients. 

Rent is for taxes on town lots and land used for hospital purposes (tempo- 
rarr buildings.) 

''Steward's petty expenses," includes postage, telegrams, and small pur> 
chases not exceeding five dollars in amount. 

The yield of farm prodace from the 140 acres (aboat) 
under cnltivation is exhibited in the following list: 



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HOBPITAL FOB IN8AMB. 15 

The yalaes afEu:6d are estimated at average market 
prices. 

Asparaffus, OSObanches 76 00 

Beans, (green) 8 bushels 10 00 

Beans, (dry) 12 bushels ^ ^ 30 00 

Beets, 725 bushels ^ 362 60 

Cabbage, 4,850 heads '. ^ 201 00 

Carrots, 136 bushels ^ 68 00 

Cauliflower, 200 heads 20 00 

Com shelled, 1680 bushels ^ 766 00 

Com stalks, 60 tons 125 00 

Cucumbers, ISObushels .' 150 00 

Cnb apples, three bushels : 6 00 

Hay, (wild) 100 tons 500 00 

Hay, (timothy and clover) 12 tons ^ 84 00 

Lettuce, 100 bushels 75 00 

Melons, 1,265 ^ 126 60 

Milk, 30,000 quarts 1,500 00 

Oyster plant, 20 bushels 20 00 

Onions, 103 bushels 128 75 

Parsnips, 130 bushels 104 00 

Parsley, 25 bunches 2 50 

Peas, (green) 47 bushels • 70 50 

Peas, (dry) 12bu8hel8 24 00 

Pie Plant, 619 bunches 61 90 

Potatoes, 1860bushels 930 00 

Pumpkins, 3,000 150 00 

Radishes, for summer use, 400 bunches 20 00 

Badishes, for winter use, 3 bunches 2 25 

8pinnach, 30 bushels.. •« 22 50 

Squash, summer, 56 bushels • 42 00 

Squash, winter, 150 15 00 

Tomatoes, 125 bushels 125 00 

Turnips, Sbushels « 3 20 

$5,901 60 

Yalne of beef slaughtered for use of house, 8,285 lbs 497 10 

Value of pork for the use of houscL 12,250 lbs 735 80 

Amount received from sale of stock, hides and tallow 280 40 

In addition to the cultivation and harvesting of crops 
and other ordinary farm labor, the patients and farm labor- 
ers under the sapervision of the farmer have performed 
2,036 days labor and farm teams 268 days labor excavating 
for north wing and cistern, making roads and grading 
around the buildings, ditching bottom-lands, hauling build- 
ing material for porch and laundry connection, clearing 
wood land, &c. 

This is exclusive of cutting and storing the ice crop 
(about 100 tons) and the drayage of supplies, fuel and 
building material, an item of considerable magnitude, of 
which no accurate account has been kept 



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16 ANNUAL REPORT. 

The farm stock consists of five horses, two yokes of oxen, 
one bull, sixteen cows, six heifers, two calves and forty 
pigs. 

The following is an inventory of hospital property of all 
descriptions on hand at this date, Nov. 30, 1874. 

Permanent Hospital Bailding, consisting of centre bmldin^. two sec- 
tions and return wing south, one section and return wing north, 
complete, second section and return wing north, in coarse of con- 
struction, Laundry, Engine house, water supply, induding Steam 
Boiler and pump and Wind Engine, drainagje, heating appar- 
atus, supply pipes for gas, steam wash machines, steam table 
and cauldrons for cooking, bath tube, cars and railway track.....$452,000 00 
Temporary Hospital buildings, consisting of one three story stone 
building, 60x32 feet with two story L 60x25 feet ; one two 
story nrame building, 36x34 feet, and heating >lPPA- 
ratus for same, one-one story frame office buildmg, one 

frame barn, 25x35 feet, and six building lots 13,350 00 

One three story frame barn 44x72 feet with jnanary attached 14x90 

feet, and straw bam and root cellar, 34x64 feet 7,000 00 

Farm 348 acres 12,400 00 

Farm stock and Implements, including buggies, cutters, harness, 

robes, blankets, ^c, 4,575 00 

Household furniture of all kinds 18,500 00 

Medicine and medical supplies, surgical instruments, &c., 600 00 

Library and cabinet, consisting of medical and miscellaneous 
boou, engravings, chromos, stereoscopes and views, masic lan- 
tern and views, stuffed birds, games, cabinet organ ana other 

musical instruments 1,300 00 

Clothing and material forclothing 1,075 OO 

Provisions and supplies consisting of groceries, vegetables, butter, 
wood, hay, oats, etc, lumber and steam fitting supplies 9,001 00 

$519,891 00 



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HOSPITAL FOB INSANE. 



17 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees : 

Gevtlemsn : — ^The following is a summary of the general 
statistics of the patients in the Hospital for the year 1874 : 



Whole number Dec. 1st, 1873, 
Number admitted during year. 
Number under treatment, - 
Number discharged, (including 

deaths, . . - . 
Number remaining in> hospital 

November 30th, 1874, 
Daily average throughout the year. 



Kecovered, 
Inrproved, 
Unimproved, 
Not Insane, 
Died, 



The patient reported as ^ not insane '' was committed on 
account of some abnormal actions, from the jail in this 
county, where he was detained on a charge of stealing 
cattle. The same day it was decided to return him to the 
county authorities, he eloped ; but he was retaken, tried 
for stealing, convicted, and is now serving out his sentence 
in prison. 
3 



Hen. 


Women. 


TotaL 


159 


144 


303 


119 


75 


194 


278 


219 


497 


70 


46 


116 


208 


173 


381 


rear, 


- 


341-188.365 


3E DISCHABGED. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


35 


20 


55 


16 


16 


32 


2 


2 


4 


1 




1 


16 


8 


24 



Digitized by 



Google 



10 AKNUAL REPORT. 






CAUSBS OF DXATH. 






Men. 


Women. 


ToUL 


Epilepsy, . . . . 2 
Marasmns, .... 6 



3 


2 
9 


Paralysis, .... 2 
Phthisis, .... 2 



1 


2 
3 


Apoplexy, . . - - i 
Oholera Morbus, • - - 1 








Scrof'ulosis, - - - 1 







Maniacal Exhaustion, - - 1 


3 




Inflammation of bowels, - 


1 





Totals, - . . - 16 8 24 

The household has been remarkably free from sickness 
throughout the year, and the number of deaths two less 
than last year, and with sixty-eight more on a daily average. 
There is not one patient to-day confined to the bed by 
acute sickness. No case of typhoid fever has been devel- 
oped in the house, and most of the deaths have been the 
result of chronic disease. 

The number recovered and improved, eighty-seven, com- 
pares favorably with previous reports and with the number 
of admissions when it is remembered that all classes are 
treated, and that no one committed by the courts has been 
rejected on account of the form of disease or mental 
condition. 

Thirty of those admitted had been previously connected 
with the hospital. Some of these had been absent six 
years, some two or more, and a few several months oifly. 
On account of the 'crowded condition of the house patients 
have been removed, occasionally, sooner than prudence 
would dictate, and this is one cause of re-admission ; but 
the necessity of accommodating all recent cases has been 
urgent — hence the removals. There are also some cases 
of recurrent mania who are well at intervals, and these can 
spend their best days at home both to their own advantage 
and that of their friends. 

All patients belonging to this State are now supported 
from the current fund, appropriated for that purpose, and 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



HOSPITAL FOR INSANE. 19 

have been since the 7th of last March, when the new law 
relating to the support of patients took effect. [See Special 
Acts of Legislature for 1874.] Since that time there has 
been only one private boarder, a man from Dakota Terri- 
tory, who has paid six dollars per week, the same as for- 
merly charged for private patients within this State. 

The appropriation last year for current expenses was 
based on the expectation that the daily average through- 
out the year would be 325. This estimate was too low as 
the daily average was 341 and a fraction. With the same 
increase for the coming year the daily average will be 421. 
As the number inorecbses the cost of support for each 
diminished', the expense of heating, lighting, and officers' 
salaries remaining about the same. Estimating the daily 
average for the coming year as above, 421, at a reduction 
from last year's estimate, in the cost of each, of fifty cents 
per week, the sum of eighty-seven thousand five hundred 
and sixty-eight dollars will be required for current funds. 
This Amount does not include any expective extraordinary 
charge, and with the usual economy of expenditure will 
probably suffice. But it will be necessary to provide some 
additional heating apparatus to meet the wants of the new 
portion of the north wing, and also for furniture for the 
same; not less than $2,000 for the former, and six 
thousand dollars for the latter purpose will be required. 

On the first of June the centre building was so far com- 
pleted that it was partly furnished and occupied, and the 
addition to the south wing has since been finished and all 
the female patients moved from the temporary building in 
town. Their old quarters were immediately occupied by 
men, thus relieving this department, partially, which has 
been for a long time overcrowded. When the addition to 
the north wing is completed, there will be apartments for 
nine distinct classes in each wing, and room for all seeking 
admission, it is hoped, for some time to come. 

The immediate and pressing wants of the hospital are, 
funds to finish the addition to the north wing, the walls of 
which are now ready for plastering, and some provision for 
lighting by gas. In regard to the first item the building 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 ANNUAL REPORT. 

committee will estimate and report upon cost. As to the- 
matter of lighting, if either of the most approved methods 
of manufacturing gas is adopted, the cost will not be less 
than $2,000 exclusive of fixtures for burning. The^ 
expense of the latter would be greater or less, of course, 
according to the selection made ; but would probably 
amount to $1,500 more at a moderate estimate. But 
the great and constant risk, by night, of accident from fire 
by the necessary use of so many movable lamps filled with 
inflammable oil, is a matter for serious consideration, and 
the danger should be obviated if possible by any reason- 
able expenditure. 

FARM. ^ 

Farming operations have been carried on as heretofore 
under the care of Mr. Wm. McFadden, and although the dry 
weather and the red-legged locusts, commonly called ^ass- 
hoppers, diminished the crops to a considerable extent, the 
results were encouraging, and the out-door exercise of the 
patients assisting in their cultivation and gathering was 
not the least item on the credit side to be considered. 
The Steward's report shows the various products and their 
value at a moderate appraisal. In addition to the regular 
farm work and care of the stock, 2,035 days work have been 
done by hospital teams and farm hands, assisted by pa- 
tients, in excavating and grading about the hospital build- 
ing and on the county road. 

While the men have been thus engaged, the women 
have not been idle; as the following list of aiticles made 
in the sewing room will show. 

Mattress ticks ..107 

Straw " 102 

Sheets 532 

Bed spreads 21 

PiUow ticks 127 

Pillowcases -....862 

Dresses U89 

Wrappers ., 115 

Drawers, pairs 130 

Chemises ^ 21S 

Kight dresses 17 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



HOSPITAL FORIUPANE. ' 21 

l^ight caps 10 

Skurts 56 

Dreases for child ^ 3 

Aprons 85 

Handkerchiefs 62 

Hats trimmed 5 

Shirts « 172 

Gents' scarfs 21' 

Grents' socks, knit, pairs « 14 

Gents' mittens, " „ 15 

Short towels 330 

Lonff " : 89 

Clothes bags ^ 14 

Cupboard covers, for sheWes 41 

Wmdow curtains ^ 15 

Holders 65 

Tablecloths 6 

Shrouds 13 



I 



2,930 



The above list shows only a fraction, of course, of the 
needle work actually performed by the inmates and the 
attendants during the year, as no account of the daily re- 
pairing is made. 

Chapel services have been held every Sabbath, with a 
few exceptions, by the several clergymen of St. Peter, for 
which we again tender grateful thanks. Since July these 
exercises, evening readings, and other entertainments 
have been conducted in the new chapel on the third floor 
of the centre building, a large and convenient hall. 

We are again under great obligations to the publishers 
of the following papers gratuitously sent to the hospital. 
We hope to see the list enlarge yearly until every county 
is represented by its local publication, as patients prefer 
to read the news from their own section of the State : 

St. Paul Daily Pioneer. 

St. Paul Daily Press. 

Minneapolis Tri- Weekly Tribune, part of year. 

Northwestern Chronicle. 

Le Sueur Sentinel. • 

Henderson Times. 

Redwood Falls Gazette. 

Mantorville Express. 

Waseca Weekly News. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



'22 ANNUAL REPORT. 

St. Peter Tribune. 
Minnesota Yolksblatt. 
Minnesota Staats Zeitung. 
Nordisk Folkeblad. 
Svenska Manitoren. 
Renville Times. 
St. Cloud Times. 

Donations from individaals are also gratefully acknowl- 
edged, as follows : 

From Rev. A. H. Kerr, Rev. Edward Livermore, Mrs» 
Henry A. Swift, Mrs. Henry Jones, «ind Mrs. Ool. £. L. 
Moore, of St. Peter, books, papers, and pamphlets 

From Mr. F. Lange, and Mr. J. K. Moore, of St. Peter, sev- 
eral pictures. , 

From Miss Grace L. White and Mr.' Fogg, of St. Paul, 
books and pictorials. 

From Mrs. L. Fletcher, several books, and Hon. L. 
Fletcher, of Minneapolis, a box of papers, books and pic- 
torials. 

From Mr. James Snyder, Thomas Downs, and Thomas 
Perry, of St. Peter, papers. 

From Miss H. L. Dryer, of Utica, New York, one fine oil 
painting. 

The members of church choirs in the city have furnished 
music on several occasions, also the St. Peter band. Mr. 
and Mrs. Asa Hutchinson, ^^ Tribe of Asa," gave lis a 
concert, and the North Carolina Minstrel Troupe, also. 
The young people of St. Peter, aided by Rotters' Band^ 
gave us an entertainment. The Hon. Freeman Talbot, of 
Cleveland, two readings ; and Miss Grace L. White, of St 
Paul, and Miss Julia Thomas, of New York, two readings 
each, all of which were highly interesting and acceptable. 

Ten dollars in cash was presented by Mr. Gtoor^e L. 
Shaw, of Davenport, Iowa. 

I am happy to report a visit, in June^ to the hospital by 
Miss D. L. Dix, the well and widely known friend of the- 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



HOSPITAL FOR INSANE. 23 

poor and unfortunate. Her suggestions and words of en- 
couragement will be long remembered. 

Aside from the regular quarterly meetings of your Board 
the Hospital has been visited monthly, and sometimes 
more, by one member, usually accompanied by some pro- 
fessional gentlemen by invitation. Those special inspectors 
have made reports in writing which are duly recorded and 
they are before you. 

There has been no change in the staiff of officers and only 
one among the subordinate officers. Mrs. H. 0. Porter, 
who had filled the position of Supervisor of the female de- 
partment for two years, with credit to herself and to the 
satisfaction of the officers, resigned to .take a position in 
another institution in this State. 

It gives me pleasure once more to report ti^e continued 
devotion of all the officers to the best interests of the hos. 
pital and the welfare of the patients. To their watchful- 
ness and that of the attendants, who have the immediate 
.and constant charge of the inmates, and who perform their 
duties with few opportunities for public approval and 
encouragement, and often under the most trying circum- 
stances, the excellent sanitary condition of the house, the 
comfort of all, and the ultimate restoration of many of the 
unfortunate persons committed here, is due. 

Once more I thank you as a Board for your unflagging 
interest in this charitable institution, for your personal 
kindness, harmonious action, and constant support in the 
responsibilities of its general superintendence. 

With gratitude to that Providence which has protected 
and favored us in the past, we look for future blessings 
and enter on the duties of a new year. 

CYRUS K. BARTLETT, 

Superintendent 
Dec. Ist, 1874. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



24 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



^^i=>i=>Ei]sr3Di:x:. 



TABLE I. 

MOVEMENT OP THE POPULATION. 



Number at b^^ning of the jear. 

Admitted donng the year 

Total present in the year 

DiBcharged, recovered 

Dispharged, improved 

Discharged, stationary 

Died 

Remaining at end of year^ 



Men. 


Women. 


159 


144 


119 


75 


278 


219 


35 


20 


16 


16 


3 


2 


16 


8 


208 


173 



Total. 



194 
497 

56. 

32 
5 

24 
318 



TABLE n. 

ADMISSIONS AND DISOHABGES FROM THE BEOINNING OF THE 

HOSPITAL. 



Admitted since opening... 

Discharged, recovered 

Dischai^ed, improved 

Discharged, unimproved.. 

Not proper subjects^ 

Died 

Remaining at end of year. 



Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


560 


448 


1,008 


167 


130 


297 


81 


76 


157 


13 


13 


26 


3 


2 


5 


88 


54 


142 


208 


173 


381 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



HOSPITAL FOR INSANE. 



26 



TABLE III. 



CIVIL CONDITION OP THOSE ADMITTED. 

I 





DUBINO THB 


rEAR. 


SINGE OPENIKG HOSPITAL. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 




76 

35 

4 



4 


20 

45 

7 

3 




96 

80 

11 

3 

4 


857 
167 

21 
4 

11 


133 

265 

44 

6 




490 


Married.. 


432 


Widowed 

DiToroed 

Unknown 


65 
10 
11 


Total.. 


119 


76 


194 


560 


448 


1,008 







TABLE IV. 

NDHBEB AT EACH AGE WHEN ADMITTED DTTRmO THE TEAR. 





AQE WHEN ADMITTED. 


AGE WHEN ATTACKED. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Under 15 :..... 


3 

3 

11 

29 

18 

16 

14 

9 

8 

3 

. 2 

3 




2 

9 

12 

12 

13 

9 

6 

9 

3 






3 
5 

20 

41 

30 

29 

• 23 

15 

17 

6 

2 

3 


6 

5 

19 

24 

12 

14 

12 

6 

4 

3 



14 


3 

9 

• 10 

11 

12 

7 

14 
4 
3 
2 




9 


15 to 20 


14 


20 to 25 

25 to 30... 


29 
35 


30 to 35 

35 to 40 

40 to 45 


24 
21 
26 


45 to 50 


10 • 


50 to 60 


7 


60 to 70 


5 


70 to 80... 





Unknown 


14 


jTotftlt.f m •■«•■•■■• 


119 


75 , 


194 


119 


75 


194 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



26 



ANNUAL REPOET. 



TABLE V. 



OOOUPATION OF TflOSI ADlfIIT£D. 



1 


DXTRmO THB 
TEAR. 


SINCE 
OPENING 
HOSPITAL. 


1 

Farmers ... • 


41 
82 

46 
13 

1 
1 

3 
2 

1 






1 





1 

3 

4 


2 
1 
1 


1 




? 



' 

2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
27 


204 


Laborers „,... 


162 


Housekeepers 

Housework 


292 
82 


PainteTs 


6 


Tailors 


4 


Carpenters , , 


17 


Seamstresses •• 


9 


Teachers 


8 




2 


Lunnbennen ...........*.»..... ^.. 


2 


Butcher 


1 


Printers 


5 


Bakers 

Cabinet MiJcers « 


3 
2 


School Children « 


6 


Trader 

Bookkeeper 


1 
1 


Students 


6 




13 


Brickmaker 


1 


Blacksmiths 


9 


Bank clerks^ 


2 


Shoemakers 


9 


Merchants 


12 


Masons , 


4 


Humewmakers ................................................ 


3 


G^ardeners 


2 


Cooks 


2 


Weaver , 


1 




1 


Confectioner 


1 


Music teachers • 


2 


TeamAer 


4 


Boiler maker 


1 


Miller 


1 


Citrar maker 


1 


Clerks '. 


2 


Hunter 


1 


Druarist 


1 


Barber 


1 


Hotel keepers 


2 


Coopers. ,.., 


1 


Tjiveiyman.,,,,. 


1 


Clei^^ymen 


1 


Stenographer •••.. 


1 


Stavemaker 


1 


No occunation 


114 






Total 


194 


1.008 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



HOSPITAL FOR mSANE. 



27 



TABLE VI. 
iTATivrrr of patients admitted. 





DURXNG THE YE^B. 


SINCE OFSNINQ HOSPITAL. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


State of New York 
Maine 


12 
3 

1 

I 

2 


1 
1 

5 



1 
1 
1 



1 

6 


11 . 
3 

1 
2 
1 
•1 


4 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 



1 
a 




23 
6 

1 
4 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
7 
2 
6 

1 
2 
2 
1 

1 
1 
5 


54 

21 
6 

11 

16 
4 
1 
6 
3 
9 
6 

16 
1 

14 
7 
4 
3 
1 

1 

10 


1 

53 

14 

1 

6 

12 

3 

2 

6 

3 

14 

12 

12 

2 

8 

10 

1 

2 



2 



6 


.107 
>35 


ConnecticQ t. . F . t . t ' . - 


6 


MaBsachnsettB 

Penn^lyania 

New HampBhire... 

Bhode Island 

Virginia 

New Jenej 


17 

28 

7 

3 

10 

6 


Yennont 

niinoia 


23 

18 


Ohio 


^27 


Iowa 


3 
22 


Tn<)iapa w. r . w. .wt .F t*».' 


17 


Garolinaa 


5 


Kentacky 


5 


Maryland 


1 


Miasoari .• 

Louisiana 


2 

1 


Minnesota, 


16 






Total native bom 
Ireland 


42 

11 

18 

16 

15 

5 

3 

1 



3 



1 

2 



3 


29 

8 
9 
11 
7 
6 
1 

4 








71 

19 
27 
26 
22 

11 
4 
1 
4 
3 

1 
2 


a 


191 

64 

80 

65 

53 

30 

15 

12 

4 

7 

8 

5 

2 

1 

23 


168 

65 

59 

57 

25 

15 

10 

20 

8 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

12 


359 . 
129 


Germany .........r.. 


139 


Noi^^ay.*!. 


122 


Sweden 


78 


Ofuiada 


45 


Knirland ............. 


25 


Prussia. 


32 


"PoWmia.. 


12 


Switzerland 


12 


I^enm^rk ......,..r.. 


9 


8«>tlan<1,. .......M 


6 


France. 


3 


Wales 


2 


Unknown 


35 






Total 


119 


76 


194 


560 


448 


1,008 



OF THB PATIENTS COMMITTBB TO THE HOSPITAL THERE ABB I 



Native Born 

Foreign Born... 



42 

77 


29 
46 


71 
123 


191 
369 


168 
280 



359 
649 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28 



ANmrAL BEFOBT. 



TABLE VII. 

SHOWme THE NUMBER OOUHITTBD BT EACH OOUNTT. 





NOW REMAINING 
PITAL. 


IN HOB- 


SINOE OFENINa HOSPITAL. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Anoka 


3 

1 
1 
6 

*"3 

i 

1 

"s 

3 

"5 

11 

4 

12 

18 
4 
3 

2 
4 
2 

*1 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 

14 
3 
2 


3 
•.. 
1 
5 
6 

"i 

"6 
2 

1 
4 
8 
2 
8 
1 
13 
4 
1 
1 
1 
8 

"3 

"2 
2 

2 

3 

... 

1 


• 6 

1 

2 

11 

6 

8 

2 
1 

14 
6 
1 
9 

19 
6 

20 
1 

31 
8 
4 
1 
3 

12 
2 

"4 
2 
4 
3 
2 
2 
3 

16 
5 
5 

"2 


3 
2 
2 

21 
8 
1 
6 
1 
3 
1 
2 
2 

24 
7 
3 

12 

27 
8 

36 

67 
12 

4 
1 
2 
17 
2 

3 
6 
6 
3 
2 
5 
31 
19 
4 
1 
3 


6 

2 
16 
14 

12 

"i 
"i 

16 

11 
4 
6 

24 
6 

26 
1 

31 
4 
4 
2 
1 

21 

"s 

1 

"i 

"i 
7 

11 

4 
"3 


9 


Becker 

Benton 


2 
4 


Blue Earth , 


36 


Brown 


22 


Carlton 


1 


"Carver 


17 


Chit>pewa 


1 


Chiaairo 


4 


Clay 


1 


Cottonwood 


3 


Crow Wing 


2 


Dakota. 


39 


I>odge 


18 


Douglas 


7 


FariBaolt 


18 


Fillmore 


61 




14 


Goodhue 


61 


Grant 


1 


Sennepin 


98 


Houflton ....w.... 


16 


Isanti 


8 


Jackson.. 


8 


KandivohL 


3 


Le Sueur 


38 


Li^^slature 


2 


Lyon ., 

McLeod 


13 


Martin 


4 


Meeker 


6 


MUleLacs 


6 




3 


Monongalia. 


3 


Mower 


12 


Nicollet 


42 


Olmsted 


30 


Otter Tail 

Pine 


8 

1 


Pope 


6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



HOSPITAL FOR INSANE. 



29 



TABLE VIL— Continued. 

SHOWING THE NUMBER COMMITTED BY EACH COUNTY. 



Redwood 

Renville 

Rice..... 

St. lioaiB ••. 

Scott 

Sherbnnie 

Sibley 

Stearns 

Stevens^ 

Steele 

Todd 

Wftbasha 

Waseca ^ 

Washington 

Watonwan 

Winona 

Wright 

Yellow Medicine... 
Dakota Territory... 



NOW REMAINING IN 'HOBP'L. 


SINGE OPENING [HC 


Men. 


Women. 


Total, 


Men. 


Women. 


20 


36 


55 


64 


72 


... 




••■ 


.«• 


2 


2 


2 


4 


3 


5 


14 


4 


18 


19 


14 


2 


2 


4 


4 


2 


5 


8 


6 


8 

1 


12 


5 


3 


8 


8 


9 


6 


3 


9 


14 


4 


1 




1 


2 


1 . 


1 


3 


4 


9 


12 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


6 


8 ] 




4 


4 


5 


8 


9 


2 


11 


21 


7 


3 


1 


4 


3 


4 


7 


10 


17 


22 


26 


5 


4 


9 


8 


8 


1 


... 


1 


1 


.■■ 


1 


... 


1 


1 


... 



136 
2 
8 

33 

6 

20 

1 

17 

18 

3 

21 

2 

14 

13 

28 

7 

48 

16 

1 

1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



30 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



TABLE VIII. 

ALLBGBD 0AUSK8 OF INSANITT. 



ni health 

Ill health from overwork and anxiety, 

Intemperanoe 

Domestic trouble 

Pecuniary difficulties 

Disappointed affection 

Epilepsy 

Masturbation 

Puerperal , 

Climacteric 

Menstrual irregularities 

Disappointed ambition 

Beli^ous excitement 

Political excitement 

Coup de soliel 

Injury to head and spine 

Fright 

Apoplexy ^ 

Exposure in army 

Exposure to severe weather 

Typhoid fever 

Death of child 

Death of wife 

Death of husband 

Excessive use of tobacco 

Loss of property 

Chief and disappointment 

Desertion by husband 

Desertion bpr wife * 

Opium habit 

Exhaustion from travel 

Consulting fortune teller 

Spiritualism 

Prolonged lactation 

Nymphomania 

M!aliciou8 disposition 

Brain fever 

Hereditary 

Severe study 

Fright from lightning 

Murder committed at his house 

Paresis 

Paralysis 

Hysteria 



Men. 





43 


60 




16 


18 




44 


2 




21 


34 




21 


2 




16 


5 




32 


26 




44 


6 







34 







10 







11 




6. 


5 




26 


17 




1 . 







13 ^ 


4 




20 


6 




5 


6 




1 







4 







5 







3 


6 


- 





9 




4 










9 




2 


1 




3 


1 




2 


5 







3 




1 










2 







1 







1 







2 







2 







2 







1 




7 


2 




4 


3 




1 










1 




1 







1 







2 


3 







3 



Women. 



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HOSPITAI. FOR INSANE. 



31 



TABLE VIII— Continued. 

I 

ALLEGSD CAUSES OF INSANITY. 



Nostalgia 

Senili^ , 

Arrested development.... 

Poverty 

Previous attacks , 

Remorse 

Simulation i 

Monc7 

No history of causation.., 

Total 



Men. 


Women. 


1 


2 


5 


6 


4 


2 


1 


1 


2 


4 


1 





1 





1 





196 


132 


660 


448 



TABLE IX. 
SHovnre the pobm of hbntal diskasb m thobe abhittkd. 





DURIHO THE YBAE. 


SINCE OFENINO H06FITAL. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Acute Mania.. 

Chronic Mania 

Monomania 

Puerperal Mania... 
Paralytic Mania... 
EpilepUc Mania... 
Perioaical Mania... 

Nymphomania 

MelancUolia 


41 
26 
2 

2 
6 
4 

27 
6 
2 


22 
21 
1 
1 

2 
8 
2 
13 
3 
2 




63 

46 
3 
1 
2 
8 

12 
2 

40 
8 
4 
4 
1 


190 1 

109 

8 



9 

28 

34 



100 

63 

• 


126 
103 

6 
17 

3 
20 
13 

7 
86 
49 
12 

6 

2 


316 

212 

13 

17 
12 
48 
47 
7 
186 


Dementia 


112 


Sinile dementia..... 

Idiocy 

Not proper saljects 


19 

14 

6 


Total 


119 


76 


194 


660 


. 448 


1.008 







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32 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



TABLE X. 

SHOWING THE NUMBER OF ATTACKS IN THOSE ADMITTED. 





DUBDf G THE YEAR. 


SINCE OPENING HOePFTAI.. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total 


Men. 


Women. 


Total 


Firet 


80 
11 
5 
3 
3 
1 
1 
16 


55 
9 
3 
2 
2 
2 

2 


136 
20 
8 
6 
5 
3 
1 
17 


346 

62 

18 

7 

4 

2 

3 

118 


316 
49 
8 
5 
3 
3 
2 
63 


661 


Second 


111 


Third • 


26 


Fourth 


12 


Fifth 


7 


Sixth 


6 


Not siibiects 


6 


Unknown 


181 






Total 


119 


75 


194 


560 


448 


1,008 



TABLE XI. 

SHOWINe mjMBER ADMITTED EACH MONTH DUBING THE TEAR. 



December., 
January .... 
February . 

March 

April 



Api 

Mil: 



June 

July 

August 

September . 

October 

November . 



Men. 


Women. 


9 . 


6 


14 


2 


5 


6 


5 


3 


10 


6 


7 


8 


13 


12 


14 


6 


12 


4 


8 


9 


9 


7 


13 


7 



Total 



14 
16 
11 
8 
16 
15 
25 
20 
16 
17 
16 



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HOBFITAL FOB INSANE. 



38 



TABLE XIL 



DUBATION OF INSANITT BEFORK ADMISSION. 





DUBIHO THB TBAB. 


BINGX OFENIVG HOfiFTTAL. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Under 1 week 

Under 1 month..... 

1 to 3 months..... 

3 to 6 months 

6 to 9 months 

9 to 12 months..... 
12 to 18 months..... 
18 to 2 years 

2 to 3 years 


11 

15 

13 

9 

12 

4 

6 

5 

5 

9 

6 

8 

1 

2 

1 

1 



1 

11 


3 

11 
6 

8 
2 
3 


1 

8 


14 

26 

19 

16 

19 

7 

9 

6 

12 

13 

11 

16 

3 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

14 


11 

101 

61 

55 

37 

15 

30 

17 

30 

80 

13 

31 

18 

6 

5 

3 

2 

3 

92 


8 

68 

60 

45 

21 

13 

17 

7 

31 

20 

19 

40 

29 

10 

9 



5 

2 

49 


14 

169 

121 

100 

58 

28 

47 

24 

61 


3 to 4 years 

4 to 6 years 


50 
32 


5 to 10 years 


71 


10 to 15 years 

15 to 20 yeats 

20 to 25 years 

25 to 30 years...... 

30 and over 


47 

16 

14 

8 

7 


Not snhjectB......... 

Unknt>wn....... 


6 
141 






Total 


119 


75 


194 


560 


448 


1,001 



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34 



ANNUAL BEFOBT. 



TABLE Xm. 



DEATHS AKD THBIB CATJ8BB. 





lyXJBXSQ THE TEAR. 


SINCE OPENING H08PITAL. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


MarasmuB ........... 


6 
2 

1 

2 
2 
1 
















1 
1 





3 

1 

2 






















1 
1 


9 
3 

3 

2 
2 
1 
















1 

T 

1 

1 


19 
10 

10 

4 
14 
4 
3 
2 
4 
2 
1 
1 



1 



1 

4 
2 


4 

1 
1 






14 
5 

7 

5 
6 

1 
1 
3 
1 
1 

5 
1 
1 

1 




1 





1 
1 


33 


Phthifiis 


15 


Exhaustion from 1 
maniatt.. ....... J 


17 


Paralysis 


9 


EoileDBv. 


19 


ADODleZY 


5 


Eiysipelas 


4 


Typhoid Fever 

Typhomania 

Flieumoiiia 


5 
5 
3 




1 


Old Age 


6 


Gangrene. .. ....t*... 


1 


AhBoesB of brain... 
Assault hj patient 
Death by drowning. 
Cancjer of Stomach 


1 
1 
1 
1 
4 


AiiRflarca ..rtr.t..... 


2 


Bright's disease 

Paresis 


1 
4 


Cholera Morbus ... 

Scrofulosis 

Exhaustion from 1 
Melancholia. .. j 
Acute enteritis 


1 
1 

1 

1 


Total 


16 


8 


24 


88 


54 


142 



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HOSPITAL TOR INSANE. 



35 



TABLE XIV. 



AGSS AT DEATH. 





DUBIKG THE YEAR. 


aiNCB OFBNINa HOBFITAIi. 


Years old. 
















Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total 


Under 15 




1 
1 

4 
3 

3 

1 
2 
1 









1 
2 
2 
1 
1 

1 





1 
• 1 
5 
5 
5 
2 
3 
1 
1 




2 

5 

10 

15 

10 

8 

9 

8 

11 

6 

2 

2 



4 
6 
7 
4 
8 
5 
3 
8 
5 
3 
1 


2 


15 to 20 


9 


20 to 25 

25 to 30 « 

30 to 35 

36 to 40 

40 to 45 

45 to 50 


16 
22 
14 
16 
14 
11 


50 to 60 


19 


60 to 70 

70 to 80 

80 to 90 


11 
5 
3 


Total 


16 


8 


24 


88 


54 


142 



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EXECUTIVE DOCUMENT, No. 12. 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DIRECTOES Md OMCERS 



OF THE 

MIMESOTA mSTITUTION 



FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE 



DEAF AND DUMB, AND THE BLIND, 



LOCATED IN FARIBAULT. 



TO THE GOVERNOR OF MINNESOTA, 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30th, 1874. 



TRANSMITTED TO THE LEOISLATUBE OF THE SEYENTEENTH jLNKUAL 
SESSION, 1875. 



SAINT PAUL: 

FIOKEEB COMPANY PRINT. 

1876. 



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ALPHABET OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

A, a Bb Cc Dd Be 



f) 







Pf Gg Hh li Jj 





fj 




Kk LI Mm Nn Oo 



H9 




Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt 

UuVt Ww Xx Yj 

Z z A 




Digitized by 



Godgr 



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BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



His Exoellenot, C. E^ DA^nS, Gotebnob of Minnesota, 

EX-OFFIGIO. 

Hon. H. B. WILSON, Superintendent of Public Instbuotion, 

EX-OFFIOIO. 

HORACE THOMPSON, of St. Paul, 1870 to 1875. 
GEORGE M. GHiMORE, of Pabibault, 1871 to 1876. 
HORACE E. BARRON, of Fabibault, 1872 to 1877. 
RODNEY A. MOTT, of Fabibault, 1873 to 1878. 
HUDSON WHiSON, of Fabibault, 1874 to 1879. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

pbesident, 
HORACE E. BARRON. 

ncE pbesident, 
GEORGE M. GILMORE. 

8EGBETABT. 

RODNEY A. MOTT. 

TBEASUBEB AND STEWABD, 

HUDSON WILSON. 



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INTELLECTUAL DEPARTMENT. 



OFFICERS AND TEACHERS. 



8UPEBINTENDENT, 

J. L. NOTES, A. M. 

TEACHRB6 OF THE DEAF AND DUHB, 

GEORGE WING. 
D. H. CARROLL, A. B. 
PENDER W. DOWNING. 
JOSEPHINE PIETROWSKL 
ISABELLA H. RANSOM. 
♦MARION WILSON. 
ANNA WING. 

TEACHEB8 OF THE BLIND, 

A. N. PRATT, A. M., Acting Pbinoipal. 

JOHN J. TUCKER. 

MARIA. E. CRANDALL. 

teacheb of INSTBUHENTAL IfUSIO, 
JOHN J. TUCKER. 

tbagbebs of rOOAL HUSIC, 

CORA SHIPMAN. 
MARIA E. CRANDALL. 
^ TMMhw of BmrlBt aIbo. 



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DOMESTIC AOT) INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENTS. 



8UPEBINTENDENT, 
J. L. NOYES. 

MATBON OF THE DEAF AKD DUMB, 

ADELINE R. HALE. 

ASSISTANT liATBON, 

SARAH M. PERRY. 

MATBON OF THE BLIND, 

LYDIA AUSTIN. 

PHYSICIAN, 

Z. B. NICHOLS, M. D. 

STEWABD, 

HUDSON WILSON. 

ASSISTANT STEWABD, 

F. C. SHELDON. 

OABDENEB, 

• OLOF PEHRSSON. 

IN OHABOE OF SHOPS, 

0. S. BLAKE, PoBEMAN OF Shob-Shop. 
D. M. EVANS, FoBEMAN op Tailob-Shop. 
JEREMIAH KELLY, Fobeman of Coopeb-Shop. 



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REPORT OF DIRECTORS. 



To Sis Excellency J C- JET. Davis^ Oavemor : 

As required by law, we present you with our twelfth 
annual report, showing the financial, industrial, education- 
al, and domestic condition of our Institution to Dec. 1st, 
inst, the close of our financial year. 

Each branch of our schools is reported to be in a most 
satisfactory condition — the officers, teachers and em- 
ployees working harmoniously for the general good of the 
Institution, and co-operating with us to carry out our gen- 
eral plan of prudence and economy. 

Since our last report we have built, completed, furnish- 
ed and occupied our new building for the Blind, the con- 
tracts for which we reported last year. At an expense of 
about twelve thousand dollars, we think, we have furnished 
the State as much pleasant and convenient room as can be 
shown for that money in the land. It is a pleasure to visit 
the Blind in their new, beautiful and quiet home, enjoying 
their music and their work free from all disturbance. 
This department, under the charge of A. N. Pratt, is do- 
ing its work well. 

We are happy to report this year, the industrial depart- 
ment in the Deaf and Dumb division well organized and 
in full operation. We have eleven boys in the cooper- 
shop, thirteen in the shoe-shop, and nine boys and four 
girls in the tailor-shop, besides thirty-two girls in the 
general sewing-room of the Institution. 

In order to make the industrial department more effec- 
tive, the Superintendent has re-organized the order of ex- 

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10 ANNUAL REPORT. 

ercises in the Institution, giving the school work one 
extended forenoon session. The afternoons are devoted to 
shop work, and the evenings to stady. This arrangement 
meets our entire approval. 

It is probably understood that the wings erected for the 
use of the Deaf and Dumb were designed to accommodate 
fifty pupils each. The boys' wing has now quite a large 
excess of that number, and yet a large proportion of 
proper subjects for our care are at home. It will take 
three years properly and economically to build and finish 
the main center of our building, and will cost one hundred 
thousand dollars. Beyond the completion of this main 
centev for the accommodation of the deaf mutes, this Board 
has never provided in their estimates. This will complete 
the plan upon which they commenced building, and it is 
expected that this will furnish necessary room for many 
years to come. 

We cannot finish this structure on our plan of three 
years building before it will be sorely needed, and before 
many will necessarily be refused admission to the In- 
stitution. 

We ask, therefore, for putting in the foundation of the 
main center, and procuring such material as may profitably 
be obtained in advance of the main work, the sum of 
twenty thousand dollars ; reminding you, however, that this 
appropriation involves two supplemental appropriations of 
forty thousand dollars each to complete the work thus 
begun. 

We feel that we have done our whole duty in disclosing 
the wants of the Institution, and we confidentially leave 
the matter to those who represent the tax-payers of the 
State. 

With gratitude that our records bear to you no tidings 
of death or misfortune, we respectfully submit this and the 
accompanying reports. On behalf of the Board of 
Directors. 

Attest: H, E. BARRON, 

R. A. MOTT, President. 

Secretary. 

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THE DEAF AND DUMB, AND THE BLEND. 11 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Director %: 

Obktlbmen : — The past year, tlie twelfth in the history of 
this Institution, has been one of more than ordinary pros- 
perity and success. Through Divine favor, health has pre- 
vailed in all our halls — the few cases of serious illness 
yielding readily to the remedial agencies employed ; the 
studiousness of the pupils; their willingness to comply 
with the demands of discipline ; their diligence and faith- 
fulness in the labor exacted of them ; the general preva- 
lence of obedience and good order ; the intellectual im- 
provement made by the various classes ; and the conscien- 
tious recognition of the claims of both good morals and 
religion, are some of the evidences of internal prosperity. 

It is a source of unfeigned pleasure and devout gratitude 
to God that another year's record is closed, and not a se- 
rious case of discipline has occurred, and not a single 
death among the pupils for now twelve years in succession^ 

While these facts indicate the internal condition and 
prosperity of the Institution, there are others which mark, 
with equal emphasis, the progress made in things physical. 

The completion, furnishing and occupancy of the new 
and separate quarters for the blind pupils ; the erection, 
completion, furnishing and manning two new shops, giving 
employment to all the deaf mute boys of suitable age and 
capacity ; the proper adjustment of the hours ol intellect- 
ual and manual labor ; the systematic employment and 
instruction of the girls in household and needle work, have 
all been re-organized and systematized within the past 

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12 ANNUAL REPORT. 

year, rendering, it is believed, the twelfth year in the his- 
tory of the Institution, one peculiarly important in the 
work it is accomplishing for the State. 

The facilities now afforded the pupils both in the intel- 
lectual and the industrial departments are much superior 
to those enjoyed by former 

GRADUATES. 

On the 16th of last June three pupils, two deaf and dumb, 
and one blind, graduated, receiving diplomas of the high- 
est grade. They had completed a full course of study in 
the Institution, and had in every respect acquitted them- 
selves honorably, both in respect to character and intellect- 
ual attainments. 

FROM THE DEAF AND DUMB DEPARTMENT, 

James M. Oosgrove, Hazelwood, Rice county. 
John Martin, Watertown, Carver county. 

FROM THE BLIND DEPARTMENT, 

Maria E. Crandall, Blue Earth, Faribault county. 

One of these is now a member of the National Deaf-Mute 
College in Washington, pursuing a liberal course of study ; 
another is at home, a comfort to his aged parents, and an 
honor to the community in which he lives, and the third is 
in the employ of this Institution, teaching in the Blind De- 
partment. 

The Institution can give no better evidence of the kind 
of work it is doing for the State than the character and in- 
telligence of its graduates. Other pupils have done well, 
but these three have excelled. They will honor their Alma 
Mater and the State that has educated them. James M. 
Cosgrove is the first representative of this Institution in 
College. Others are looking forward to collegiate honors, 
hoping thereby not only to fit themselves for usefulness in 
life, but to make it apparent that the deaf and dumb need 
only the time and a favorable opportunity to enable them 



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THE DSAF AND DUMB^ AND THE BLIND. 13 

to compete successfully with their more highly favored 
brothers and sisters. The time will soon come when the 
State can point with satisfaction and pride to those who 
have been educated here, and find in them citizens who 
have a grateful remembrance of the benefit they have re- 
ceived at her hands. 

ADMISSIONS. 

One year a^o, the south wing was opened for the first 
time for the reception of pupils. A large number re- 
sponded to the letters of admission sent out, and the build- 
ing was nearly filled. It became apparent that it would 
be impossible to receive so large an accession this year 
without increased accommodations. Moreover, it has been 
apparent for some time that it would be greatly to the ad- 
vantage both of the deaf and damb, and the blind, partic- 
ularly the latter, if they could be accommodated in sepa- 
rate buildings. 

These two facts led to the effort which has resulted in 
the erection of the new and separate quarters for the blind 
pupils. This separation having been accomplished, the 
rooms formerly occupied by the blind were thrown open 
to the deaf-mutes. In consequence of this, all applioanU 
for admission, of suitable age, have been received. Just 
who these deaf-mute applicants were, and where they are 
from, will be seen by examining the following table : 



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14 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



DEAF-MUTE PUPILS ADMITTED. 



NAME. 


AGE. 

10 
10 
10 
14 
10 
10 
12 
10 
12 
13 
12 
13 
20 
13 
18 
17 
14 
23 
11 
16 
10 


BKHIDENCE. 


Daniel S Bossard 


Eagle Lake, Blue Earth county. 
R^ Wing, Goodhue county. 
Delano, Wright county. 
Minneapolip, Hennepin county. 
Clear Water, Wright county. 
Fountain, FillmoreKx>unty. 


Axel J. Berg 

A. Edward Benz 


Wm. Henrv Gowlea 


Susan J. Dallas 

Georsre Douehertv 


Clara A. Doyle 


Victor, Wright county. 
Spencer Brook, Isanti county. 
Minneapolis, Hennepin county. 
Eau Claire, Eau Claire county, Wis. 


Anna Erickson 


Charles Erickson 


Edward Fox 


Robert Kuske 


Rush River, Sibley county. 




Waterville, Le Sueur county. 


Betsev Oskerson 


Kenyon, Goodhue county. 
Faribault, Rice county. 


Abbie M. Russell 


Marshal 0. Roberts 


North Branch Station, Chisago Co. 


Marv J. Sexton 


Janesville, Waseca county. 


Anson R. Soear 


Minneapolis, Hennepin county. 
Richland, Rice county. 


Gustav F. Wallner 


Frederick Wenholz 


Henderson, Sibley county. 


Spurgeon S. White 


Lake City, Wabasha county. . 


Frederick W. Zuelsdorf 


Henderson, Sibley county. 



RE-ADMITTED. 



NAME. 


AGE. 
20 


RESIDENCE. 


A nthnnv Si irinn 


Madelia, Watonwan county. 





Twenty-one new pupils have been admitted to the Deaf 
and Dumb Department, and one re-admitted to enable him 
to complete his course. 

Their average age is tkirteen. Of the new comers five are 
semi-mutes. This is nearly one-fourth of the whole, a larger 
proportion than ever before. As a rule about one-tenth of 
the pupils admitted are semi-mutes. 

Hennepin, Sibley, and Wright counties, each send three 
pupils ; Goodhue and Rice each two, and nine counties 
more, one each. Hence it appears that the admissions 
represent thirteen different counties, and one has been 
received from the State of Wisconsin. 



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THE DEAF AND DUMB, AND THE BLIND. 15 

There have been other applications for admission, but 
age, health, and mental condition have indicated that they 
had better wait another year. 

ATTENDANCE. 

In the Deaf and Dumb Department : 

Males present last year, 58 

Females " u ...... 28 

Total, 86 

Number not to be reckoned in this report, - 4 

Former pupils present, --..-. 82 

Number of males admitted, .... 14 

Number of females " 7 

Number of males re-admitted, - . - - 1 

Total admitted, - - - - - - 22 

Whole number of males — deaf-mutes, 69 

Whole number of females — deaf-mutes, - - - 35 

. Total, 104 

In the Blind Department : • 

Males present, as per last report, - - - - 11 

Females '' '^ " 9 

Total, - - - 20 

Number not to be reckoned in this report, - 8 

Number of former pupils present, ... 12 

Number of males admitted, 6 

Number of females admitted, 4 

Total, 32 

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16 ANNUAL REPORT. 

Total in Deaf-Mute department, . . - - 104 
Total in Blind department, 22 

' Total in both, 126 

NATIONALITY. 

The twenty-two deaf-mutes admitted represent the fol- 
lowing nations : 

Americans, 10 

Germans, 7 

Swedes, 2 

Danes, 1 

Norwegians, 1 

Irish, 1 

Total, 22 

Very nearly one-half of the new pupils admitted this year 
are Americans, while last year, out of thirty admitted, 
more than three-fourths were of foreign origin. Our records 
for eleven years indicate that a little more than one-half 
of the deaf and dumb admitted to this Institution were for- 
eign born — the Germans and the Irish being the most nu- 
merous. 

The general character and natural ability of the new pa- 
pils this term, compare very favorably with those of former 
years. This might be inferred readily from the fact that 
so many of them had their hearing for several years. 

CAUSES OF DEAFNESS. 

The causes of deafness assigned in the twenty-one n^w 
pupils admitted, are as follows : 

Congenital, - - 6 

Typhoid fever, 4 

Cold and sores in head, 3 

Scarlet fever, 2 

Brain fever, .-..-..- 2 

Ship fever, . . - 1 



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THE DEAF AND DUMB^ AND THE BLIND. 17 

Sickness, - - 1 

Scrofula and inflammation, 1 

Measles and fits, --.-.-- 1 

Cerebro Spinal Meningitis, 1 

Total, 21 

Age at which deafness occarred : 

Congenital, 5 

Under one year, - ' 5 

Over one and under two, 1 

Over two and under three, ... - - 3 

When 8 years old, - 

When 4 years old, 

When 7 years old, 

When 8 years old, 

When Hi years old, 

When 16 years old, 



Judging from the records of the last three years, dea 
ness is on the increase in Minnesota. The causes assigned 
indicate accidental rather than congenital influences. 
During the first ten years of this school not a case of deaf- 
ness from spotted fever, or cerebro spinal meningitis, ap- 
peared; but during the last two jeaxs Jive semi-mutes have 
entered the Institution, who lost hearing by that terrible 
disease. 

Similar facts, of a more startling nature even, appear 
from the records of other States. To the prevalence of 
this disease to a large extent may be ascribed the increase 
of deafness, and particularly the increase of semi-mutes in 
the State of Minnesota. 



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18 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



Blind. 



20 


(( 


- 


23 


(( 


- 


28 


u 


4 pupils 


27 


u 


4 '« 


51 


(( 


7 « 


55 


u 


- 11 « 


61 


w 


- 15 " 


60 


u 


- 17 " 


66 


(( 


- 16 « 


86 


u 


- 20 " 


104 


u 


- 22 " 



Annual attendance for twelve j'^ears : 

Deaf and Dumb. 
In 1863 - - . - 8 pupils 

« 1864 - - . 

« 1865 
** 1866 
« 1867 
" 1868 
"1869 
« 1870 
*^ 1871 
" 1872 
« 1873 
« 1874 

One year ago it was estimated that accommodations 
would be needed for one hundred deaf and dumb, and 
twenty blind, pupils. The actual demands exceed the es- 
timate in both departments. This does not result from ap- 
plications deferred, as was true two years ago, nor from any 
special effort made to increase the number of students. It 
indicates the natural increase, and the demands the Insti- 
tution must be prepared to meet annually. On another 
page of this report will be found a table giving the names 
of uneducated deaf-mutes in the State who have not at- 
tended school. By glancing at this table, it will be seen 
that there are eighteen blind, and seventy-one deaf-mute 
children in the State who have not been to school. Some 
of them are expected to enter next term, but should two- 
thirds, or even one-half of them, ask for admission, there 
would not be room to accommodate them. 

Take another view. Examine all the statistics at hand, 
make every reasonable deduction for inaccuracies, and it 
is impossible to show that we have at school over three'^ 
fourths of the children in the State who ought to be edu- 
cated. Touching this subject, would it not be well to ask 
the Legislature, this winter, to make provision for reliable 
statistics concerning the deaf and dumb, and the blind, ia 
connection with the State census of 1875 ? 



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THE DEAF AND DUMB, AND THE BLIND. 19 

This would enable the Institution to prepare tabulated 
lists of both these classes, as the Statutes require. I most 
earnestly recommend such a course. 

f 

TEACHERS AND GLASSES. 

At the present time there are seven classes in the deaf- 
mute department, averaging a little over fourteen pupils 
each. There are seven teachers, three males and four fe- 
males. Three of these, two males and one female, are semi- 
mutes, well qualified by education and experience for their 
work. One is a speaking and hearing gentleman of consid- 
erable experience, and well acquainted with the methods 
employed in teaching the deaf and dumb, both in England 
and America. One is a graduate of this Institution two 
years ago, and two are speaking and hearing ladies whose 
experience in this kind of work is limited to what they 
have seen and learned within the last three months. Hence 
it will be seen that the corps of instructors employed com- 
bines the influence, experience, and tact of intelligent men 
and women, who, from their own condition, are able to 
sympathize with the pupils, with the culture and refine- 
ment of those in both sexes who have all their senses. 

The classes, with one exception, are graded, not accord- 
ing to age, time in school, or sex, but according to intelli- 
gence. Each class contains pupils of both sexes, and hence 
derives whatever benefit arises from the co-education of 
the sexes. 

A single class is composed of semi-mutes — ability to speak 
and read from the motion of the lips is the basis of classi- 
fication here. 

The teachers, each and all, associate more or less with 
the pupils outside of school hours, and take am interest in 
them, their studies and amusements, thus giving the chil- 
dren much of the influence and enjoyment of home and the 
family circle. The beneficial effiects of these mutual social 
relations were never more happily illustrated here than at 
the present time. The teachers, the matrons and steward 
are all trying to do their best, both in and out of school. I 

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2D ANNUAL REPORT. 

commend both their work and the spirit in which they 
work. They are always ready to extend a helping hand to 
a pupil, or do anything that is for the good of the Institn- 
tion. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

About fonr. years ago a small cooper-shop was opened 
and manned, giving employment to ten deaf-mute boys. 
Up to the present time they have manufactured about 14,- 
000 flour barrels. This shop continues to be self-support- 
ing — even better than this, it yields an annual revenue of 
a hundred dollars, or more, over and above all expenses. 
This small shop, however, gives employment to only about 
one-sixth of the boys. Hence has arisen the demand for 
more shops — a demand which, happily, has been met 
during the past year. After years of patient waiting and 
planning, shops for shoemaking and tailoring have been 
opened. They are well manned ; well equipped ; presided 
over by practical men, and already, after less than a 
month's trial, give evidence of their ability to do good 
work just as soon as they have obtained the necessary ex- 
perience. 

The systematic employment and instruction of the deaf- 
mute girls in household and needlework, have been made 
much more thorough a