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Full text of "Exhibition of "fakes" and reproductions"

EXHIBITIOiN 



OF 



"FAKES" 



AND 



REPRODUCTIONS 



PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

MEMORIAL HALL, FAIRMOUNT PARK 

PHILADELPHIA 

1916 




E « 



U < 



EXHIBITION 



OF 



a 



FAKES" 



AND 



REPRODUCTIONS 




Agesilaus, the Lacedaemonian king, on being 
invited to hear a man who mimicked the nightingale 
to great perfection, declined by saying, " I have 
heard the nightingale herself." Plutarch's Agesilaus. 



PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

MEMORIAL HALL, FAIRMOUNT PARK 

PHILADELPHIA 

1916 



PREFACE 




IK COUNTERFEIT INC OF ART 
objects is not a recent practice. The 
Chinese have for centuries imitated and 
reproduced their own famed fabrics of 
earlier times, and have placed upon them 
the same characters or marks which distinguished the 
originals. Tn Europe the forging of bric-a-brac can 
be traced back for a century or more. Wherever 
collectors of rare and beautiful art works sprang up, 
skilled copyists began to turn their talents to profit- 
able account. As early as the year 1815, one Bettignie, 
an accomplished potter of Saint-Amand-les-Eaux, in 
France, commenced the imitation of the beautiful soft 
paste porcelain of the Sevres factory, and examples of 
his work which are still extant are among the most 
perfect reproductions of that ware which have ever 
appeared. When Lady Charlotte Schreiber, the noted 
china collector, visited St. Amand in 1877 she found 
a Bettignie still in possession of the works. He was 
then reproducing Worcester porcelain and the pate 
tendre of Sevres, in white, which wares were bought 
by dealers in Paris, to be there painted and duly sold 
as old. 

About the middle of the nineteenth century 
wealthy Americans, traveling abroad, commenced to 
gather together representative examples of pottery 
and porcelain from the celebrated factories of Europe 
and brought back with them extensive and valuable 
collections of these w^ares. But among these treasures 
were numerous pieces of questionable character which 
have since proved to be spurious. No collector of that 
period appears to have entirely escaped the wiles of 



the forgers, who were even then plying their trade, 
with little chance of detection. Most of these collec- 
tions have since been sold or have passed into the 
possession of public museums, and some of them, under 
expert inspection, have been gradually reduced by 
the elimination of fraudulent specimens. In certain 
museums, however, these collections are still exhib- 
ited intact, no attempt having been made, for reasons 
of policy, to withdraw the obviously fraudulent pieces. 

After the Centennial Exhibition, which was held 
in Philadelphia in 1876, the number of art collectors 
increased rapidly. As certain classes of objects became 
popular, their modern counterparts appeared in in- 
creasing numbers, but some time elapsed before col- 
lectors began to discriminate between the genuine and 
false. Collections formed about that time frequently 
contain many rare and priceless things, but among 
them will usually be found a large proportion of 
worthless reproductions. As authentic objects became 
scarcer, the modern mock wares became more plenti- 
ful, and within the past twenty years the latter have 
outnumbered the former a thousand to one. 

The porcelain of the Sevres factory, both soft and 
hard paste, has been imitated more extensively than 
any other ware of modern times. To such an extent 
has the manufacture of counterfeit Sevres pieces in- 
creased that a French newspaper recently stated, 
probably without exaggeration, that the sale of sham 
porcelain attributed to this factory nets the counter- 
feiters 16,000,000 francs every year, yielding retail 
dealers in Europe and America the enormous sum of 
48,000,000 francs, or $9,600,000. It is, therefore, not a 
matter for surprise that almost every American tourist 
who has returned from abroad has brought home with 
him some of these worthless fabrications. 

A prominent house in Paris manufactures repro- 
ductions of almost every known ceramic ware. These 

4 



include copies of examples from the Louvre, Cluny, 
Sevres, Rouen, Nevers, South Kensington, Bethnall 
Green, Wallace and Dresden Museums, and from pri- 
vate collections. Among the wares reproduced are 
early soft paste porcelains of St. ("loud, Mennecy, 
Chantilly, Vincennes, Sevres and Tournay. Among 
the hard paste imitations are those of Oipo di Monte, 
Meissen and other famous factories, and the porcelains 
of China and Japan; among the English soft paste 
reproductions are those of Chelsea, Derby, Worcester, 
Bow and Lowestoft. Included in the imitations of 
faience are Persian and Hispano-Moresque pottery; 
tin enameled wares of Delft and the various French 
factories; Italian maiolica; enamels on metal, imitat- 
ing those of Limoges, Battersea, China and other well- 
known wares produced from the twelfth to the eight- 
eenth century. 

Some of these reproductions have deceived the 
best experts. As stated in Lady Charlotte Schreiber's 
Journals, this noted collector, as long ago as 1878, 
bought in Madrid some lovely vases. A friend after- 
wards expressed a doubt as to their genuineness, and 
when she and her husband arrived in Paris they took 
the cover of one of the vases to the manufacturer, "who 
owned himself the maker of it. So those vases," she 
writes, ''have proved themselves all wrong and cannot 
go into the collection. I fear we shall lose heavily on 
them, but they are so pretty that I regret them more 
for their beauty than for the money's worth. This has 
been rather a costly lesson." 

Next to the porcelain of Sevres, that of Capo di 
Monte has been most extensively counterfeited, and 
in this country fraudulent examples of the Italian ware 
are probably as abundant as those of the national 
manufactory of France. They are found in almost 
every antique shop and bric-a-brac store in our larger 
cities ; they are offered for sale in our prominent 

5 



jewelry establishments and figure extensively among 
the wares sold by well-known auction houses. Many 

of them are elaborately modeled and artistically col- 
ored and entirely suitable for decorative purposes, but 
they are not what they are represented to be. true 
examples of the noted products of the old Capo di 
Monte works, and are consequently unworthy ^i a 
place in any public or private collection. 

The forgers have turned their attention to all of 
the decorative as well as the fine arts. — erlass, enamels, 
metal work, ivories, furniture, textiles. There is per- 
haps no public or private collection of any importance 
in this country which does not contain some spurious 
objects, and we know of no European museum which 
is entirely free from forgeries. 

The present exhibition of "Fakes and Reproduc- 
tions" is necessarily confined to the industrial arts, 
and, on account of the limited space at command, to 
objects of comparatively small size. The collection 
consists of examples of counterfeits and reproductions 
which have been acquired by the Museum from time 
to time, in connection with the work of the Bureau 
of Identification, and through gift or bequest, aug- 
mented by specimens which have been lent by dealers, 
collectors and other museums, to whom they came as 
the price of experience. The purpose of the exhibition 
is the education and protection of collectors and the 
general public, so far as may be. against the wiles of 
the forgers, by exhibiting side by side, for comparison 
and study, genuine antiques and their modern coun- 
terparts. 

The genuine pieces, which are shown for compar- 
ison with the fakes and reproductions, are indicated 
by black cards with gold lettering. 

Edwin AtLee Barber 



CATALOGUE 



PORCELAIN 



CHINESE 

1. PLATES (6) — Modern imitation of Chinese por- 

celain of the 18th century. Made in Paris, 
France. 

Note the creamy color of the paste and the 
crudely drawn decoration. 

2. PLATE— Chinese, Ch'ien-lung period (1736-1795). 

A GENUINE piece with the same decorative 
design as the preceding. 

Note the bluish tint of the paste and the fine- 
ness of the drawing, when compared with the 
modern copies. 

3. PLATE — Modern imitation of Chinese porcelain 

of the 18th century. Peony and cock pattern. 
Made in Paris, 18th century. 

Note the creamy tint of the paste. 

4. PLATES (Pair) — Modern imitation of Chinese 

porcelain of the 18th century. Peony pattern. 
Made in Paris. 

Note the muddy and patchy appearance of the 
decoration and irregular bluish tint of the glaze, 
produced artificially to imitate the old Chinese. 

5. PLATE — Modern imitation of Chinese porcelain 

of the 18th century. Peony and cock pattern. 
Made in Paris. 

Note the muddy and irregular appearance of 
the colors and the roughness of the execution. 



6. GINGER JARS (Pair)— Modern imitations of old 

Chinese porcelain of the 17th century (K'ang- 
hsi period). Made in Budapest, Hungary. 

Note the pronounced greenish tint of the 
glaze, the poor quality of the colors and the 
crudeness of the decoration. 

7. TEAPOT — Modern imitation of the famille rose, 

of China, of the 18th century. Probably made in 
Paris. 

Note the irregular and poor quality of the 
rose ground, which has flaked off in spots. 

8. COVERED JAR — Modern imitation of a baluster- 

shaped jar of Chinese porcelain of the 18th cen- 
tury, with rose ground and reserved medallion 
painted with the cock and peony pattern. Made 
in Paris. 

Note the muddy and thick appearance of the 
enamel colors and the artificially tinted white 
ground. 

9. VASE — Modern imitation of Chinese porcelain of 

the 18th century. Probably made in Paris. 

Note the muddy and irregular appearance of 
the yellow ground and the poor quality of the 
iridescent lustre of the raised leaves. While this 
is evidently intended to imitate Chinese ware, it 
is different in modeling, coloring and lustre from 
anything which has come out of China. 

10. TEAPOT — Modern imitation of Chinese porcelain 

of the 18th century. Made in Paris. 

Note the crudeness of the modeling and the 
decoration and the irregular streaked bluish tint 
of the glaze. 

11. CUP AND SAUCER— Modern imitation of Chi- 

nese porcelain of the 18th century (Ch'ien-lung). 
Made in Paris. 

Note the muddy and smeary appearance of the 
enamel colors and the irregular bluish tint of the 
glaze. 



12. PLATE- Modern imitation of Chinese porcelain 

of tliu 18th century. Made in Paris. 

Note the crude finish of the edges and muddy 
appearance of the enamel colors and the streaky 
appearance of the bluish glaze. 

13. CREAM JUG — Modern imitation of Chinese por- 

celain of the 18th century. Made in Paris. 

Note the uneven tinting of the rose ground and 
the crudeness of the modeling. 

14. PLATE — Modern imitation of Chinese porcelain 

of the 18th century. Made in Paris. 

Note the pronounced muddy appearance of the 
enamel colors and the streaky, bluish tinted 
glaze. 

15. VASES (Pair) — Modern imitation of old Chinese 

porcelain. Made in Paris. 

Note the crudeness of the decoration and the 
irregular bluish tint of the glaze. 

16. COVERED JARS (Set of Three) — Baluster 

shape. Modern imitation of old Chinese porce- 
lain. Made in Paris. 

Note the crude modeling of the lion finials and 
the coarse drawing and coloring of the decora- 
tion. 

17. CUP AND SAUCER— Modern imitation of Chi- 

nese porcelain of the Ch'ien-lung period (late 
18th century). Peony and cock pattern. Made 
in Paris. 

Note the muddy appearance of some of the 
colors and the artificially tinted glaze, intended 
to imitate the natural bluish tint of genuine 
Chinese porcelain. 

18. CUP AND SAUCER— Cafe-au-lait glaze. Genu- 

ine ware made in China in the 18th century, but 
decorated later in Europe by wheel-cut designs 
of birds and flowers. Hence not entirely genu- 
ine. 



19. PUNCH BOWL- A genuine example of Chinese 

porcelain decorated with underglaze blue de- 
signs, of the 18th century, but redecorated in 
Europe by painting undecorated parts with oil 

colors over the glaze, a process known as "clob- 
bering." This superficial decoration can readily 
be scraped off. 

20. VASE — Relief floral decoration on white glaze. 

Modern imitation of old Chinese ware. 

21. \ ASE — Lemon vellow crackled gflaze. Modern 

imitation of old Chinese porcelain. 

22. VASE — Baluster shape, purple glaze. Modern 

imitation of old Chinese porcelain. 

23. VASE — Pink souffle glaze. Modern imitation of 

old Chinese porcelain. 

24. SAUCER — Circular medallions with figure and 

floral paintings reserved in coral red ground. 
Modern French imitation of old Chinese porce- 
lain. 

25. VASE — Mustard yellow glaze. Modern imitation 

of old Chinese porcelain. 

26. PLATE (Deep) — Cock and peony pattern in en- 

amel colors, surrounded by rose ground, with 
reserved medallions on marly containing land- 
scapes in colors. A GENUINE example of the 
Ch'ien-lnng period, shown for comparison. 

Note the accuracy of the painting and the 
beauty and richness of the colors. 

27. PLAQUE — Cock and peony pattern in enamel 

colors. White slip design around marly. A 
GENUINE example of the Chia-ching period, 
shown for comparison. 

28. PLATE — Cock and peony pattern in enamel col- 

ors. Border, "Octagon and Square" diaper, with 
three irregular medallions containing flower and 

10 



fruit designs. A GENUINE example of the 
Ch'ien-lung period from which the preceding was 
a »pied. 

29. CUP AND SAUCER Cock and peony design in 

enamel colors, of the Ch'ien-lung period. GEN- 
UINE pieces, shown for comparison 

30. BOWL- Reticulated porcelain, decorated with 

flowers in enamel colors. Made by Morice 
Fischer at Herend, Hungary, in imitation of 
Chinese porcelain of the 18th century. 

31. CUP AND SAUCER— Same. 

32. il< >T WATER JUG— Decorated in enamel colors 

in Chinese style. Handle and finial in form of 
mandarin. Made by same. 

33. PLATE — Decorated with chain of fifteen links. 

each containing the name of a state. A modern 
reproduction of the Chinese porcelain set pre- 
sented to Martha Washington by Capt. Jacob 
van Braam, several pieces of which are in the 
National Museum, Washington. Painted on 
modern Limoges porcelain. 

34. VEGETABLE DISH— Same. 

Lent by Mrs. Emma 13. Hodsre. 

J o 



CAPO DI MONTE 

35. TANKARD — Modeled decoration in high relief, 
representing warriors in battle, with hinged lid 
surmounted by a plumed helmet, and handle in 
form of a griffin. Modern imitation of hard paste 
Capo di Monte porcelain of the 18th century. 
Forged mark of the Meissen factory. Probably 
made in Paris. 

Note the crudeness of the colors and decora- 
tions. 

ii 



36. TANKARD— With repousse metal lid. Nude 

figures of boys in high relief around sides. Mod- 
ern imitation of hard paste Capo di Monte por- 
celain of the 18th century. Probably made by 
Ginori, of Doccia, Italy. 

Note the whiteness of the glaze and the crude- 
ness of the painting. 

37. VASE — Urn-shaped, with horn-shaped handles, 

and cover surmounted by a modeled boy. Clas- 
sical pastoral figure scene in relief extending 
around the entire circumference. Modern imi- 
tation of hard paste Capo di Monte porcelain of 
the 18th century. Made by Ginori, of Doccia, 
Italy. 

Note the want of sharpness of the reliefs and 
the whiteness of the glaze. This piece is marked 
with a crowned capital letter N in blue, whereas 
the genuine hard paste Capo di Monte of this 
character was seldom, if ever, marked. 

38. VASE — A companion to the preceding. 

39. VASE — Large ewer-shaped vase with figure deco- 

ration modeled in high relief. Handles in form 
of a grotesque dolphin surmounted by a woman's 
head. Modern imitation of hard paste Capo di 
Monte porcelain of the 18th century. Made by 
Ginori, of Doccia, Italy. 

Note the gaudy colorings and the whiteness of 
the glaze. It is marked with a crowned N in 
blue, showing its spurious character. 

40. VASE — A companion to the preceding but with 

different figure decoration. These elaborate and 
effective pieces are good examples of the so-called 
Capo di Monte porcelain which has been manu- 
factured so extensively in Italy for almost one 
hundred years and brought in such abundance 
into this country. 

12 




39, 4°. Pair of Porcelain Ewers 
Modern Imitations of Old Capo di Monte 

41. DISH — Oval form, handles representing mer- 

maids. Relief and painted decorations on sol- 
idly gilded ground. A modern imitation of Capo 
di Monte porcelain of the 18th century. 

42. PLATE — Figure decoration in relief around marly. 

Cupids painted in centre. A modern imitation of 
Capo di Monte porcelain, bearing the mark of the 
Meissen factory. 

13 




43. CHOCOLATE POT — Figure scenes in relief; on 
one side the "Judgment of Paris," on the reverse 
a classical scene. This is a GENUINE example 
of Capo di Monte of the 18th century, which is 
exhibited here for the purpose of comparison. 
Not marked. 

Note the sharpness of the reliefs, the fineness 
of the coloring, particularly the stippling of the 
flesh tints, the slender and gracefully modeled 
figures, and the beautiful finish. 

44. SEAU, or ICE BOWL — Figure decoration in high 
relief, representing Apollo and Daphne, with 
handles in form of hooded dolphin. This is a 
GENUINE example of Capo di Monte porcelain 
of the 18th century, and a particularly choice 
piece of this style of ware. Not marked. 

Note the pronounced grayish or bluish tint of 
the paste and glaze, the excellence of the model- 
ing and the carefully executed coloring. 

45. CUP AND SAUCER— Figure decoration in relief, 
representing on one side of the cup the "Tri- 
umph of Bacchus" and on the other Ceres in her 
chariot. These are GENUINE pieces of Capo 
di Monte hard paste of the 18th century, and 

came from the celebrated collection of Rev. T. 
Staniforth, who secured them at the noted sale 
of the Bernal collection in 1855. 

Note the grayish tone of the glaze, the sharp- 
ness of the modeling and the fineness of the col- 
oring. These pieces are not marked, as genuine 
Capo di Monte porcelain of this style was rarely, 
if ever, marked, while the reproductions are 
almost invariably marked. 

46. CUP AND SAUCER— Decorated with figure and 

floral design in relief. A modern reproduction. 
This cannot be classed with forgeries, since it 
bears the mark of the Meissen factory, the 

14 



o7->7* 



crossed swords in blue, bul it is an attempl to 
reproduce the Capo di Monte suit-. 

Note tlie poor modeling, the lack of sharpness 

in the reliefs and the crude coloring. 

47. TILE or PLAQUE — Modern imitation of Capo di 

Monte hard paste porcelain of the 1 Si h century. 
Biblical figure scene (St. Christopher) in high 
relief. While the modeling of this example is 
better than the average of such imitations, in the 
boldness of the reliefs, the coloring is crude and 
garish and the stippling of the flesh tints is coarse 
in texture, while the porcelain is much whiter 
than the genuine old Capo di Monte ware. 

Probably made at Doccia, Italy, late 19th cen- 
tury. 

48. BENITIER, or HOLY WATER CUP— Modern 

imitation of Capo di Monte hard paste porcelain 
of the 18th century. The modeled figure design 
in the centre represents the Holy Family. The 
coloring of the reliefs, including the rococo 
frame, is muddy and imperfect, while the attempt 
at gilding has proved a failure. 

Made at Doccia, Italy, late 19th century. 

49. BONBON BOX— With gilded metal mounts. 

Modern imitation of Capo di Monte hard paste 
porcelain of the 18th century, with classical 
figure scenes in relief. The mark on the base 
is a crowned N in blue, which stamps it as a 
forgery. M'ade at Doccia, Italy, late 19th cen- 
tury. 

Note the crudely modeled reliefs, the extreme 
carelessness of the painting and the intense 
whiteness of the glaze, all of which are features 
not found in genuine Capo di Monte ware. 



15 



SEVRES 

50. SCENT BOTTLE — Soft paste porcelain known as 

fritted porcelain or pate tendre. Turquoise blue 
ground with reserved white medallions contain- 
ing portrait of Marie Antoinette, cupids, tro- 
phies and monogram, surrounded by rococo gold 
frames. Date marked on base, 1779. A beauti- 
fully executed specimen but a dangerous forgery. 
Important decorations of this character were 
never painted at the Sevres factory on insignifi- 
cant pieces of this kind. 

51. CUP AND SAUCER— Hard paste porcelain dec- 

orated with figure scene in colors, in a rectangu- 
lar gold framed medallion, with imitation pearl 
settings, surrounded by dark blue ground. Sau- 
cer decorated with imitation pearls and rubies. 
Marked with a double L date mark of 1771. 
Modern imitation of early soft paste Sevres. 
Jewel decoration was not attempted at that fac- 
tory until 1778. A forgery throughout, paste, 
decoration and mark. 

52. CUP AND SAUCER— Soft paste porcelain with 

beautifully painted heads of French court 
beauties, Dubarry, Victoire and de Fontanges, 
surrounded by jeweled frames representing tur- 
quoise, with imitation pearls, rubies and emer- 
alds on dark blue ground. On base the factory 
mark of 1753. A modern French imitation of 
the celebrated jeweled porcelain of the Sevres 
factory which was not produced until 1778, 
twenty-five years later than the date indicated 
by the mark. 

53. TEA SET — Teapot, sugar bowl, creamer, two cups 

and saucers and tray. Light blue ground with 
reserved white medallions decorated in colors 
with cupids and flowers and monogram of Louis 
Philippe in gold surrounded by gold rococo 
frames. On base, the forged factory and deco- 

16 



rator's marks of 1840 and 1X44. Modern repro- 
ductions. Made in Paris. Forged throughout, 
paste, decoration and marks. 

54. TEA SET — Teapot, sugar bowl, cream jug, two 

cups and saucers and square tray. Decorated 
with portrait medallions of Louis' XVI and 
French court beauties, surrounded by rococo 
gold frames on light blue ground. On bottom, 
forged double L mark of Sevres soft paste por- 
celain of the 18th century. Made in Paris. 

55. VASE — Tall slender form, dark blue ground with 

gold decoration consisting of elaborate mono- 
grams composed of the double L surmounted by 
a crown. Ormolu mounts, including base and 
finial. Modern forgery of Sevres porcelain of 
the early 19th century, with forged factory mark 
of 1837 (overglaze instead of underglaze). Dec- 
orator's mark of 1844 and mark of the Chateau 
des Tuileries. Forged throughout. 

56. DISHES (2) — Circular form, large size. Decora- 

tion in colors, two cupids holding a floral wreath 
enclosing the monogram of Louis Philippe sur- 
rounded by gold circles. Broad outside band of 
light blue. A piece of Sevres hard paste, dated 
1846, the decoration having been painted at a 
later date outside of the factory. 

57. CUP AND SAUCER— Dark blue ground with 

gilded decoration and forged double L mark in 
gold. [Modern imitation of early Sevres soft 
paste. 

58. VASES (Pair) — Baluster shape, dark blue ground 

with broad central band painted with landscape 
and figure scenes. Bold decoration of rococo 
design and groups of trophies. Modern imita- 
tion of early soft paste Sevres, marked with the 
double L cipher used on Sevres porcelain in 1763. 
Made in Paris, late 19th century. Forgery 
throughout, paste, decoration and mark. 

17 




56. Hard Porcelain Dish 

Modern Imitation of Sevres Porcelain 

Louis Philippe Period 

59. CUPS AND SAUCERS (2)— Light blue ground 

enclosing figure scenes and flowers in colors sur- 
rounded by rococo frames in gold. Hard paste 
porcelain made at Sevres between 1870 and 1876, 
with genuine date marks cut through, indicating 
that they left the factory in a white condition 
and were decorated later outside. 

60. CUP AND SAUCER— Bleu Agate ground with 

gold decoration. Pieces of Sevres hard paste 
porcelain with incised mark of 1841. Gilded later 
in Paris, hence not entirely genuine. 

18 



61. SMALL VASES ( Pair)— Decorated with gold and 

small floral medallions in colors. Gilded handles 
in form of human heads. Examples made at 
Sevres in 1844 but decorated and gilded in Paris 
at a later date. 

62. PLATE — With scalloped margin. Decorated with 

the letter N crowned in gold. On hack, factory 
mark of 1860 scratched through. Also forged 
Napoleon mark of 1868. Made at the Sevres 

factor\- hut decorated later outside. 

63. CUP AND SAUCER— Dark blue mottled ground 

with gold tracery decoration. Pieces made at 
Sevres in 1817 but gilded later in Paris. 

64. C\J\> AND SAUCER— Chrome green ground and 

gold decoration. Pieces made at Sevres in 1818 
but gilded later in Paris. 

65. COMPOTE- — Figure and floral decoration in col- 

ors, surrounded by gold rococo frames on light 
blue ground. Sevres porcelain with date mark 
1868 cut through, showing that it was made at 
Sevres but decorated later outside. 

66. CUP AND SAUCER— Painted with portrait of 

Marie Antoinette surrounded by gold rococo 
frame, on light blue ground. Modern imitation 
of old Sevres porcelain. Forged throughout. 

67. COMPOTE — Decorated with cupids and floral 

designs in colors with monogram of Louis Phil- 
ippe in gold, surrounded by pink ground. Mod- 
ern imitation of old Sevres porcelain. Forged 
throughout. 

68. PLATE — Decorated with figures of boys in colors 

on white ground with dark blue marly embel- 
lished with gold tracery. Date mark of 1861 
cut through, indicating that the piece was made 
at Sevres in that year and later decorated out- 
side. 

i9 



69. PLATES (3) — Decorated with cupids bearing 

floral wreaths in colors enclosing monogram of 
Louis Philippe in gold. Margins with light blue 
ground work with vine-leaf decoration in gold. 
On base, Sevres date mark of 1874 cut through, 
showing that the ware itself was made at the 
Sevres factory in that year but the decoration 
was done later outside. 

70. PLATE — Decorated with figure scene in colors. 

Gold tracery around border. On back, counter- 
feit Sevres marks of 1846. Forged throughout, 
paste, decoration and marks. 

71. PLATE — Decorated with painting of woman. 

Modern imitation of old Sevres porcelain. 
Forged Sevres marks of 1843 and 1844. Coun- 
terfeit throughout. 

Lent by Mr. Albert H. Pitkin. 

72. PLATE — Decorated with head of Michel de Mon- 

taigne. Modern imitation of Sevres porcelain. 
Forged mark of 1814-1824. 

73. PLATE — Decorated with classical head in cameo 

style. Modern imitation of old Sevres porcelain. 

74. PLATE — Decorated with "Vue du Chateau de 

Brinde-." Modern imitation of old Sevres por- 
celain. Forged Sevres mark. 

75. PLATE — Subject of decoration. Chinese fishing 

scene. Gold and silver tracery on marly. A 

GENUINE example of Sevres porcelain of 1841. 

Note the delicacy and beauty of the decoration. 

76. PLATE — "View in Isle of Cracatori.'' A GEN- 

UINE example of Sevres porcelain of 1820. 

Note the fine painting and the excellence of 
the colors and gilding. 

20 



OTHER FACTORIES 

77. PLATE — Decorated with floral (lesions and bear- 

ing on the back the mark of the Nyon factory, 
Switzerland — a fish painted in blue over the 
glaze. This mark, which if original would be 
under the glaze, has been painted over the im- 
pressed mark of a modern maker. r \ ne back has 
been filed to imitate wear. Probably made in 
Paris. 

78. PLATE — Modern imitation of old Dresden porce- 

lain with floral decoration painted in colors and 
border design in raised white slip. On back, 
forged Meissen mark. Probably made in Dres- 
den. 

79. PLATE — Basket-work design in relief with sprays 

of flowers painted in enamel colors. Openwork 
border. Modern German imitation of old Meis- 
sen porcelain. 

80. PLATE — Floral decoration in colors. Elaborate 

openwork border decoration. On back, forged 
Meissen mark. Modern German imitation of old 
Meissen porcelain. 

81. PLATE — Decorated with bold floral design in col- 

ors. Raised pattern around marly. Modern copy 
of an old Meissen pattern but very curiously 
bearing the forged date mark of Sevres porce- 
lain of 1765. 

82. PLATTERS (4) — Landscapes painted in colors in 

the centre. Openwork border with gold decora- 
tion. Forged mark of Amstel (Holland) factory. 
Probably modern Dutch. 

83. SAUCER — Monogram of George Washington in 

gold in centre, surmounted by a floral wreath in 
colors. Border design of festoons of leaves 
in brown and bronze. Modern French porcelain. 

21 



84. SAUCER — Decorated with gold design on purple 

ground. A genuine marked example of old 
Vienna porcelain but decorated outside of the 
factory. 

85. LAYER — Side medallions imitating Wedgwood 

jasper. A genuine marked example of old 
Vienna porcelain but decorated outside of the 
factory. 

86. PLATE — Decorated with sprays of flowers. Forged 

Xiderviller mark. Modern French forgery 
throughout. 

87. CANDLESTICKS (Pair )— Rococo design with 

floral decoration in colors. Mark of the Herend 
(Austria) factory. Modern imitation of Meissen 
porcelain. Made by Morice Fischer. mid-19th 
century. 

Since these pieces bear the mark of the Herend 
factory, where imitations of all celebrated wares 
were made, they can hardly be placed in the cate- 
gory of fakes but come under the head rather of 
imitations. 

88. CUP AND SAUCER — Decorated with painted 

figure subjects ("Orpheus und Euridike"). False 
mark of the Vienna factory painted over the 
glaze instead of under. Impressed mark of the 
Gotha factory. 

The marks show that the ware itself was pro- 
duced at Gotha, but decorated elsewhere, and 
marked with a forged Vienna mark. 

89. COVERED CUP AND SAUCER — Decorated 

with figure medallions in colors, and gold bor- 
ders. The saucer was made at Meissen, Ger- 
many, the cup at some other Continental factory. 
On the latter is a forged Copenhagen mark. The 
decoration, which was done outside of either fac- 
tory, is modern. A very curious combination of 
ancient and modern work and of different places. 

2.2 



90. CUP AND SAUCER Genuine Meissen paste, as 
shown by the crossed swords mark scratched 
throuerh. Decoration done elsewhere. 



l 6 



91. CUPS AND SAUCERS (2) — Decorated with 

floral designs in colors and raised pattern in 
white slip. Modern imitation of Meissen porce- 
lain by Samson, of Paris. 

92. COVERED CUP— In form of a rose. Forged 

Vienna mark. Modern imitation of Vienna hard 
paste porcelain. 

93. MUSTARD CUP— In form of a lemon on a leaf. 

Forged mark of the Berlin factory. Modern imi- 
tation of old Berlin porcelain. 

94. FOUNTAIN — Figures of Venus, Juno and Jupi- 

ter. Base and pillars decorated with miniature 
Chinese figure scenes in colors and gold. Forged 
mark of the Meissen factory. Modern imitation 
of Meissen porcelain of the mid-18th century. 

95. KNIVES AND FORKS (12)— Porcelain handles 

painted with figure scenes. Modern imitations 
of old Meissen. 

Note the poor quality of the painting and the 
modern steel blades and prongs. Probably made 
in Dresden, Germany. 

96. SUGAR BOWL AND CREAMER— Modern imi- 

tation of Japanese porcelain, but bearing a forged 
mark of the Meissen factory. 

97. SAUCER — Bearing a false mark of the Strasbourg 

(France) factory. Modern imitation. 

98. PLATE — Decorated with birds in colors. Modern 

imitation of old Meissen porcelain, with the AR 
mark. 

99. VASE — Cupids and flowers in full relief. Modern 

imitation of old Meissen porcelain. 

23 



100. CLOCK — Cupids and flowers in relief. Modern 

imitation of old Meissen porcelain, by Thieme, 
of Dresden. 

101. PERFUME VASE — Modern imitation of old 

Tournay (France) soft paste porcelain, with 
landscapes painted amund centre. 



FIGURES 

102. FIGURE — Winged girl with basket of fruit. 

Modern imitation of old German ware. 

Note the coarse modeling and the poor qual- 
ity of the colors. 

103. SCENT BOTTLE — Modeled in the form of a 

monk carrying a goose in one hand, a basket of 
eggs on one arm, and a sheaf of wheat on his 
back in which is concealed a girl. The base 
bears the mark of the Meissen factory. Mod- 
ern German. 

104. FIGURE — Boy with flute. Modern imitation of 

old Hoechst porcelain. German. 

105. FIGURE — Cavalier. Modern imitation of an old 

Hoechst porcelain design. 

106. FIGURE — Child with garden tools. Modern 

imitation of old German porcelain. 

107. VINAIGRETTES (Pair)— Figures of infants in 

swaddling clothes. Modern imitations of old 
Meissen porcelain. 

108. VINAIGRETTE— Figure of infant in swaddling 

clothes. Similar to preceding but of larger 
size. 

109. OX — Hard paste porcelain with forged Meissen 

mark. Modern imitation. Probably made in 
Paris. 

24 



110. BEAR — Soft paste porcelain. Forged Niderviller 

mark of about 1792. Modern imitation of old 

French porcelain. 

111. MAN— With hat in hand. Hard paste porcelain. 

Modern imitation of Meissen ware. Probably 
made in Paris. 

112. MAN — seated, with hurdy-gurdy. I lard paste 

porcelain. Forged Meissen mark. Probably 
made in Paris. 

113. MAN— With cello on back. Mark of the Hoechst 

factory. Modern imitation of old German pot- 
tery. 

114. MAN — In uniform of a guild. Modern imitation 

of old Meissen hard paste porcelain. 

115. MAN — Similar to preceding but in different atti- 

tude. 

116. DOG — In recumbent attitude. Modern imitation 

of old Meissen hard paste porcelain. 

117. MAN AND DOG— Modern imitation of old Chel- 

sea porcelain. 

Lent by Mrs. Emma B. Hodge. 

118. GARDENER— A GENUINE example of Chel- 

sea-Derby porcelain of about 1780. Shown for 
comparison. 

Note rich, creamy tone of the glaze as com- 
pared to preceding. 

118A. BUST OF LOUIS XVI— Modern imitation of 
old Meissen porcelain. Made in Paris. 
Lent by Miss Sarah Cooper Hewitt. 

118B. BUST OF MARIE ANTOINETTE— Compan- 
ion to preceding. 

Lent by Miss Sarah Cooper Hewitt. 

25 



ENGLISH LOWESTOFT AND "ORIENTAL 
LOWESTOFT" 

119. TEA POT — -Decorated with transfer-printed 

landscapes in underglaze blue. Soft paste por- 
celain, made at Lowestoft, England, late 18th 
century, in imitation of Worcester porcelain. 
A GENUINE example shown for comparison 
with Chinese so-called ''Lowestoft." 

120. CREAMER — Decorated in dark blue, painted 

beneath the glaze. Made at Lowestoft, Eng- 
land, late 18th century, in imitation of early 
Worcestershire porcelain. A GENUINE ex- 
ample. 

121. TEA POT— Decorated in red and blue. Made at 

Lowestoft, England, late 18th century, in imita- 
tion of an old Worcester pattern. A GENUINE 
example. 

122. CREAMER — Decorated in colors with figure 

scenes. Made at Lowestoft, England, late 18th 
century, in imitation of Chinese porcelain. A 
GENUINE example. 

123. CUP — Decorated in red, blue and green. Made 

at Lowestoft, England, late 18th century, in 
imitation of Chinese porcelain. A GENUINE 
example. 

124. BOWL — Decorated in colors with bird and 

flowers. Made at Lowestoft, England, late 18th 
century, in imitation of Chinese porcelain. A 
GENUINE example. 

125. SAUCE BOAT — Soft paste porcelain decorated 

in underglaze blue. A GENUINE example of 
English Lowestoft of the late 18th century. 

Note greenish tint of glaze and dust specks 
in the glaze. 

Lent by Mr. Albert H. Pitkin. 

26 



126. CUP Decorated with transfer-printed landscape 

in underglaze blue. Made at Lowestoft, Eng- 
land, late 18th century, in imitation of Worces- 
ter porcelain. A GENUINE example. 

127. SAUCE BOAT- Decorated with transfer-printed 

landscape in underglaze blue. Made at Lowes- 
toft. England, late 18th century, in imitation of 

Worcoter porcelain. A GENUINE example. 

128. CUP— Decorated with figure subject in colors in 

Chinese style. Made at Lowestoft, England, 
late 18th century. A GENUINE example. 

129. CREAMER— Decorated with floral design in col- 

ors, in Chinese style. Made at Lowestoft, Eng- 
land, late 18th century. A GENUINE example. 
Note the duck's-egg tint of the glaze. 

130. PUNCH BOWL— Hard paste porcelain made 

and decorated in China, late 18th century. A 
GENUINE example, improperly called Lowes- 
toft, shown for comparison with true Lowestoft. 

131. CREAMER— Helmet shape. Same. 

132. SUGAR BOWL— Crossed handles. Same. 

133. TEA POT— Crossed handle. Same. 

134. VEGETABLE DISH WITH COVER — Deco- 

rated with Tomb of Washington. Same. 

135. HOT WATER JUG WITH COVER— Same. 

136. PLATE — Heraldic design. Same. 

137. DISH — Blue edge with gold stars. Same. 

138. SUGAR BOWL — American eagle in brown and 

gold. Modern imitation of so-called Chinese 
Lowestoft. Probably made in Paris. 

139. CUP AND SAUCER— Same. 

27 



140. MUG — Modern imitation of Chinese so-called 

Lowestoft, of the late 18th century. Made in 
Paris. 

Note the streaky blue tinting of the glaze. 

141. MUG — Figure scenes painted in enamel colors. 

GENUINE so-called Chinese Lowestoft, 18th 
century. Shown for comparison with real Eng- 
lish Lowestoft soft paste. 



HENRI II. FAIENCE 

142. BIBERON — Copy of Henri Deux ware, or Fai- 

ence d'Oiron, of the 16th century. Made by 
Minton's, Stoke-upon-Trent, England, in 1875, 
from the original in the South Kensington 
Museum. Done by C. Toft. 

143. CANDLESTICK— Copy of Henri Deux ware, or 

Faience d'Oiron, of the 16th century. Same 
series. 

144. SALT CELLAR — Copy of a Henri Deux piece 

of the 16th century. Same series. 



PALISSY WARE 

145. WALL PANEL — Rectangular form. Modern 

imitation of 16th century ware made by Ber- 
nard Palissy. By Victor Barbizet, Paris, 1876. 

146. WALL PANEL— Oval form. Modern imitation 

of 16th century ware made by Bernard Palissy. 
By Victor Barbizet, Paris, 1876. 

147. DISH — Fishes and reptiles modeled in relief. 

Modern imitation of Palissy ware (rustiqites 
iiguliiics) by Victor Barbizet, Paris, France. 

28 



148. DISH — Circular form. Fishes, shells, reptiles 

and leaves in relief. Imitation of Palissy ware. 
Modern Portuguese. 

149. DISH — Deeorated with lobster, fishes and shells 

in full relief. Modern Portuguese imitation of 
Palissy ware of the 16th century. 

150. DISH — Circular form. Similar to preceding but 

larger. Modern imitation of Palissy ware. 
Made at Rorstrand, Sweden. 

151. DISH — Oval form. Figure design, "Henry IV 

and His Family." School of Palissy. Proba- 
bly by Guillaume Dupre, France, about 1600. 

This is an interesting example made by one 
of Palissy's early imitators. 

152. DISH — Oval form. Figure decoration. "The Bap- 

tism of Christ." School of Palissy. Probably 
by Guillaume Dupre, France, about 1600. 

These two dishes were probably produced 
within thirty or forty years of Palissy's time, 
and by most collectors would be classed with 
Palissy ware. We know of no example in this 
country which with certainty can be attributed 
to Palissy himself. 

153. DISH- — Oval form. Subject, "The Baptism of 

Christ." Palissy school, probably seventeenth 
century. 

154. DISH— Oval form. Subject, "Abraham and the 

Angels." A companion to the preceding. 

154A. DISH — Hexagonal form, with masks and other 
ornaments in relief. Made in imitation of 
Palissy ware by Avisseau the vounger, of Tours, 
France, in 1889. 

Lent by Mr. Edward Page Mitchell. 

154B. DISH — Oval form, with lizard, lobster, frogs, 
shells and leaves in relief. An imitation of 
Palissv ware by Avisseau the vounger, Tours, 
France, 1889. 

Lent by Mr. Edward Page Mitchell. 

29 



GREAMWARE 

155. PITCHER — Printed design in red, caricaturing 
Napolean and John Bull, entitled "The Gov- 
ernor Stoped in His Career." On reverse, in- 
scription, "Success to the Volunteers," sur- 
rounded by grape-vine and grapes. A modern 
copy of an old Liverpool design. 

Note the form of the pitcher, whose lip rises 
above the top in a curved line instead of being 
a continuation of it. 




156, 155. Creamware Jugs 

Lafayette and Napoleon 

Modern Forgeries ; Made in London 



156. PITCHER — With transfer-printed design in 
black. On one side, bust of Benjamin Frank- 
lin wearing fur cap. On reverse, bust of La 
Fayette, "The Nation's Guest," in commemora- 
tion of his visit to the United States in 1824. 
On front, American eagle with inscription, 
"Republicans are not always Ungrateful," and 
the name of the supposed makers, Ricd. Hall & 
Son. Modern imitation of a Staffordshire de- 
sign of 1824. 

30 



NoU* the fine crackle of the glassy glaze, the 
name "Fayette" over the bust and' the weak- 
ness (it the black printing. 

157. PITCHER — Same design as preceding but with 

bust of Washington in place of that of Franklin. 
Note the coarse crackling of the glaze, into 
which black pigment has been rubbea. 

158. PITCHER Same as preceding but of somewhat 

smaller size and more creamy paste. 




[59, 162, 188. Creamware Jug, Bowl and Plaque 
With busts of Lafayette, Franklin and Washington 

Modern Forgeries, London 



159. PITCHERS (Pair.)— Staffordshire form. Same 

decoration as preceding. 

Note the coarse crackling of the glaze, the 
crudeness of the engraving and the heavy ap- 
pearance of the ware. 

160. PITCHERS (Pair) — Same as preceding but of 

smaller size. 

161. PITCHER — Same as preceding but slightly 

larger. 

162. BOWL — Decorated with black printed busts of 

Washington, Franklin and La Fayette. ( )n the 

3* 



interior, a heraldic design labeled "The Ship- 
wright's Arms." Modern imitation of an old 
Liverpool bowl. 

Note the heavy, clumsy appearance of the 
ware, the coarse crackling, into which black 
pigment has been rubbed, and the pronounced 
pinkish tint of the ware. 

163. PITCHERS (Pair) — Head of Judy. Modern 

imitation of Staffordshire creamware. 

Note the thickness and heaviness of the ware, 
the tinselly brightness of the gilding and crude- 
ness of the finish. 

164. LOVING CUP— With two handles. In front, 

inscription, "Peter Bates, 1802," painted in 
brown and black. Blue borders. Modeled frog 
inside. Modern imitation of an old Stafford- 
shire cup. 

Note the coarse crackling of the artificially 
stained glaze and the thickness and clumsiness 
of the ware. 

165. PLATE (Dinner) — Transfer-printed design in 

blue, "Dr. Syntax drawing after Nature/' A 
modern imitation of a Staffordshire design 
made by James Clews about 1820. Made by a 
well-known maker in London, England. 

Note the weak, grayish tone of the blue color, 
the weight of the ware, which is about one-half 
greater than the old, and the artificial crack- 
ling of the glaze, which on the back has been 
darkened by rubbing in coloring matter. 

166. PLATE (Dinner) — Companion to preceding but 

different design — "Doctor Syntax bound to a 
tree by Highwaymen." 

Note the scratching produced by sandpaper, 
in imitation of knife marks. 

167. PLATE (Soup) — Transfer-printed design in blue, 

"Doctor Syntax mistakes a Gentleman's House 

32 



for an Inn." A modern imitation of a Stafford- 
shire design produced by Janus Clews about 

1820. Made in America. 

Note- the pronounced creamy tint of the white 
as compared to the genuine ware, which is of 
bluish tone. The glaze and color being fairly 
good, but of a more reddish tone of blue, this 
is a more dangerous counterfeit than the Eng- 
lish copies, as the impressed mark of (lews has 
been reproduced. 

168. PLATE (Tea) — Transfer-printed design in blue, 

"Doctor Syntax and Dairy Maid.'' This i^ a 
GENUINE example, made by James Clews, of 
Cobridge, Staffordshire, about 1820. Border 
design same as preceding. 

Note the bluish tint of the white glaze and 
the fine quality of the engraving. Shown for 
comparison. 

169. PLATE — Transfer-print in dark blue. View of 

"Gilpin's Mills on the Brandywine Creek." 
Modern imitation of an old design by Enoch 
Wood & Sons, of Burslem, England. Forged 
mark of Wood. Made in America. 

170. PLATE- — Transfer-print in dark blue. Supposed 

to represent Franklin's Birthplaee. Modern 
imitation of an old Staffordshire design. 
Forged mark of Wood. Made in America. 

171. PLATE — Transfer-print in dark blue. Subject, 

"A View near Philadelphia.'' Modern imitation 
of an old Staffordshire design. Made in Amer- 
ica. 

172. PLATE — Transfer-print in dark blue. Subject, 

"Near Fishkill." Modern imitation of an old 
Staffordshire design. Made in America. 

173. PLATE — Transfer-print in dark blue. Subject, 

"Erie Canal Eulogy." Modern imitation of an 
old Staffordshire design. Made in America. 

33 



174. PLATE — Transfer-print in dark blue. Subject, 

"Baltimore and Ohio Rail Road" (on the level). 
Modern imitation of an old Staffordshire de- 
sign. Forged mark of Enoch Wood & Sons. 
Made in America. 

(The above described five plates are much heavier 
in weight and yellower in paste than the genuine old 
ones.) 

175. PLATE — Transfer-print in dark blue. Subject, 

"The Baltimore and Ohio Rail Road." A 
GENUINE example made by Enoch Wood & 
Sons, Burslem, England, about 1830. Shown 
for comparison. 

Note the clearness of the print. 

176. PITCHER— Transfer-print in black. Bust of 

Benjamin Franklin. On reverse, eulogy of 
Franklin. A GENUINE example of Liverpool 
(England) creamware of about 1788. Shown 
for comparison. 

Note the fineness of the engraving. 

177. TOBY — Man seated, holding a jug of beer. Mod- 

ern English imitation of an old form. 

178. TOBY — Man seated, holding jug of beer and pipe. 

A GENUINE old Staffordshire example of 
about 1830. Shown for comparison. 

179. BUSTS (Pair) — Intended to represent Washing- 

ton. Modern imitations of old Staffordshire 
figures. 

Note the brilliancy of the coloring and the 
crudeness of modeling. 

180. FIGURE— Benjamin Franklin, labeled "Wash- 

ington." Modern Staffordshire reproduction of 
an old design. 



L S J 



181. FIGURE — Same, but varying in detail. 

182. FIGURE — Same, but different coloring. 



34 




' ' .V UT l' l 






,/rVer Bates* 






179, 164. Creamware Bust of Washington and Peter 

Bates Loving Cup 

Modern Forgeries ; Made in London 



183. PICKLE DISHES (Pair)— In form of leaf. Dec- 

orated with blue transfer-print. Willow pat- 
tern. Modern imitation of old Staffordshire 
china. 

Note the coarse crackling and the heaviness 
and clumsiness of the ware. 

184. CREAM PITCHER— In form of Toby. Modern 

design intended to simulate an old one. 

Note extreme crudeness of the coloring and 
modeling. 

185. CREAM PITCHER — In form of grotesque 

human head covered with tin enamel and 
painted in blue. Modern imitation of Dutch 
Delft of the 18th century. 
Note. — Nos. 179-185 were made by a manufactu- 
rer in London, England. 

186 PLATE (Dinner) — Transfer-printed design in 
blue, "Doctor Syntax disputing his Bill." This 
is a GENUINE example, made by James 

35 



Clews, of Cobridge, Staffordshire, about 1820. 
The beautiful border design is unusual. 

Note the intense blue of the decoration, the 
lightness of the ware in weight, the bluish tint 
of the white and the fineness of the engraving. 
Although nearly a hundred years old, the ware 
shows no crackling. This beautiful example 
is shown for comparison. 

187. BOWL — Black transfer-printed portraits of 

Washington and Franklin (fur cap). A GEN- 
UINE example of Liverpool (England) cream- 
ware of about 1788. 

Note the thinness of the ware, the excellence 
of the engraving and the greenish tint of the 
glaze. Shown for comparison. 

188. WALL PLAQUE— Oval form, decorated with 

black transfer-printed portrait of Washington. 
The same portrait that appears in the pitchers. 
Note the coarseness of crackling, the clumsi- 
ness of the ware, and pale, weak print. 

189. WALL PLAQUE— Oval form, decorated with 

black transfer-printed portrait of "Dr. Frank- 
lin." A GENUINE example of Liverpool 
(England) creamware of about 1788. 

Note the fineness of the engraving. Shown 
for comparison. 

190. PITCHER — Decorated with red transfer-printed 

portraits of Commodores Perry and Bainbridge. 
A GENUINE example of Staffordshire cream- 
ware of about 1814. Shown for comparison. 

LUSTRE 

191. BOWL — Copper lustre. A modern imitation of 

old lustre. English. 

192. PITCHER — Copper lustre with yellow bands. 

A GENUINE piece of the early 19th century. 
English. For comparison. 

36 



GLASS GLAZED POTTERY 

193. TILE — In form of an eight-pointed star. Deco- 

rated with painting of an animal in brown. The 

tile itself is old but has been cut into form and 
decorated with oil paint. Some of the decora- 
tion lias been removed to show the original 
surface. Intended to imitate the Persian tiles 
of the 13th century with brownish lustre. 

194. TILE (Fragments) — Blue and lustre decoration. 

\ eramin. Persia, 13th century. GENUINE 
example, shown for comparison. 

195. SALT CELLARS ( Pair)— Turquoise blue glaze. 

Modern Persian imitation of old pieces. 



TIN ENAMELED POTTERY 

196. PLATE — Decorated with bird design in green in 

the enamel. A GENUINE example of Mous- 
tiers stanniferous faience of the 18th century. 

197. PLATE — A modern imitation of the same design. 

Probably made in France. 

Note the black outlines of the decoration, 
which are painted orer the enamel instead of in 
it. The painting appears dry and dull, while 
in the original it is glossy. By comparing the 
two plates, the crudeness of the painting of the 
copy will be apparent. 

198. PLATE — Painted in bright colors in the enamel; 

Cornucopia design (faience a la come). A GEN- 
UINE example of stanniferous faience of the 
18th century. Made at Rouen, France. 

199. PLATE — Modern imitation of a Rouen (France) 

design, known as the Cornucopia pattern, of the 
18th century. Made at Gien, France, in 1875. 
Note the transparent lead glaze. Genuine 
Rouen ware of this character was coated with 
opaque tin enamel. 

37 



200. PLAQUE— Modem imitation of a Rouen piece 

of the 18th century. In centre a heraldic (le- 
sion. Border in lambrequins style. Made at 
Giens, France, in 1875. Glazed with lead 
instead of tin. 

201. PLATE — Blue decoration, heraldic design in 

centre, "Brodcric" border pattern. Made at 
( Hen, France, 1876. Modern imitation of a 
Rouen design of the 18th century. 

Note the lead glaze, instead of tin, which 
was used on the old faience. 

202. PLATE — Blue decoration. Made at (lien, France, 

1876, in imitation of an old Rouen design. 

203. GROUP — Pug" dog and two puppies in yellow- 

enamel. Modern imitation of old Holland Delft 
ware. 

204. PLATTER — Openwork border, decorated in col- 

ors to imitate an old piece of tin-enameled pot- 
tery. On the back is a false mark of Hannong, 
who was connected with the old factory. A 
careful examination of the decoration shows 
that the central heraldic design has been 
printed in outline and filled in with colors — a 
process never employed at the old factory. It 
is a modern imitation of old Strasbourg faience. 

205. PLATES (2) — Italian scene painted in central 

medallion, blue and gold border. Tin glaze. 
Modern imitation of Naples porcelain of the 
18th century. 

206. PLATTER— Same. 

207. COVERED DISH— Same. 

208. PLATE — Decorated with a cursive N in centre, 

composed of tiny flowers. Tin glaze. Same 
ware as preceding. 

38 



MAIOLICA 



ITALIAN 

209. PLATEAU -- Modern imitation of Caffagiolo 

maiolica dish of the 17th century, with heraldic 
design in centre surrounded by grotesque fig- 
ures. Made in Italy. 

210. TAZZA — In the centre, crowned figure of the 

Virgin. Modern imitation of Faenza maiolica 
of the 17th century. Italian. 

211. PLATE — Modern imitation of Gubbio lustred 

maiolica. Forged date (1526) and mark of 
Maestro Giorgio. Italian. 

212. PLATE — Decorated with central caricature sur- 

rounded by grotesque figures in brown and 
green. Modern imitation of Caffagiolo maiol- 
ica. Italian. 

213. PLATE — Central design of Cupid surrounded by 

grotesque figures. Modern imitation of Caffagi- 
olo maiolica of the 17th century. 

214. PLATE — Central design of Cupid warming his 

hands over a brazier, surrounded by arabesque 
with grotesque figures, interspersed with four 
medallions containing- figures painted in blue. 
The painted decoration is lustred. Modern imi- 
tation of old Italian maiolica. The edges and 
base have been chipped to imitate wearing of 
the glaze and filed to simulate age marks. In- 
stead of being covered with tin enamel, as is 
genuine maiolica, it is glazed with lead. 

215. PLATE — Figure subject, "Finding of Moses," 

painted in colors ( istoriato style). Modern 
Italian copy of an Urbino plate of 1523. 

216. PLATE — Landscape rudely painted in purple 

lustre on a golden lustre ground. Modern imi- 
tation of old Gubbio lustre maiolica. Italian. 

39 



217. TAZZA— In centre, figure of Cupid carrying a 
ball. Surrounding central medallion, diapered 
patterns divided into four sections. Modern 
imitation of old Faenza maiolica. Italian. 



HISPANO-MORESQUE 

218. PLAQUE, or DISH— Sunken cavetto with large 

conical boss, surrounded by four rosettes in 
blue, in centre. Conventional floral design in 
relief around marly. Ground work of ara- 
besques in violet and copper lustre. Diameter. 
19 J/? inches. 

This is one of the best modern imitations of 
Hispano-Moresque ware of the 16th century 
we have seen, the lustre being particularly good 
for modern ware. 

219. PLAQUE, or DISH— Central design of a wolf 

surrounded with bands of wheel and leaf pat- 
terns. The marly is ornamented with embossed 
godroons running diagonally. The entire deco- 
ration is in remarkably brilliant lustre of yel- 
lowish brown, changing when viewed from dif- 
ferent angles to a beautiful golden, rose, lilac, 
blue and madreperla with touches of green. 
Diameter. 18 inches. A GENUINE example of 
Hispano-Moresque ware of the 16th century. 
Exhibited for purposes of comparison. 

220. DISH — Lion in blue surrounded by copper lustre 

leaf diapering. Modern imitation of a Hispano- 
Moresque piece of the 15th century, in the Mu- 
seum at Madrid. 

Note the poor quality of the lustre, (dazed 
with lead instead of tin. 

221. TEA POT— Tall hexagonal form. Panels deco- 

rated in relief in the style of the old cuenca tiles 
of Seville, covered with glass glaze. Flat wing- 
shaped handle. Modern Spanish imitation. 

40 



MEXICAN 

222. COVERED JAR— Decorated in dec]) blue, with 

cherubs' heads and foliage. A modern revival 
of the old Mexican maiolica, by Senor Enrique 
L. Ventosa, of Puebla, Mexico. His produc- 
tions arc neither reproductions of the old ware 
nor intended to deceive, but represent a new 
development of the art after the old methods. 

223. PLAQUE — Decorated in deep blue with double- 

headed eagle of the Austrian Dynasty. An 
adaptation of an early design. By Senor En- 
rique L. Ventosa. Modern Mexican. 

224. PLATE — Decorated in dark blue, yellow and 

green. After a design on an old Mexican mai- 
olica tile (see original, shown under No. 229). 
By Senor Enrique L. Ventosa. Modern Mex- 
ican. 

225. PLATE- — Similar to preceding but decorated with 

a bull (see original, shown under No. 228). 

226. PLATE — Double-headed Austrian eagle in dark 

blue. By Senor Enrique L. Ventosa. Modern 
Mexican. 

227. PLATE — Dragon painted in dark blue. By 

Senor Enrique L. Ventosa. Modern Mexican. 

228. TILE — Decorated with figure of a bull in poly- 

chrome. An ORIGINAL example of Mexican 
maiolica, from an old church in Puebla, Mexico ; 
dating from about 1750. Shown here for com- 
parison with No. 225 above. 

229. TILE — Companion to preceding with painting of a 

bird in polychrome. Made at Puebla, Mexico, 
about 1750. Shown here for comparison with 
No. 224 above. 

4i 



230. BOWLr -Decorated with foliated pattern in dark 

blue. A GENUINE piece, made under Spanish 
influence at Puebla, Mexico, about 1750. Shown 
for comparison. 

231. CORNER TILE--Decorated with head of cherub 

in hlue in white medallion reserved in a hlue 
enameled ground. A GENUINE example made 
at Puebla, Mexico, about 1750. Showing one of 
the designs of which Senor Ventosa's work is an 
adaptation. 



SALT GLAZED STONEWARE 

232. GREYBEARD JUG— Brown stoneware dated 
1687. Modern imitation of Frechen salt glazed 
stoneware of the 17th century. Made at Cologne, 
( rermany. 

23?>. GREYBEARD JUG — Salt glazed stoneware dated 
1850. Made by Jacob Aver Sonne, Koln, in imi- 
tation of Frechen stoneware of the 17th century. 

234. CANNETTE — Modern imitation of the white 

stoneware made at Siegburg, Germany, in the 
late 16th century ; modern pewter lid. 

235. CAXXETTE — White stoneware, made at Sieg- 

burg in the late 16th century. A GENUINE 
example, shown for the purpose of comparison. 

236. SMALL MUG — Brown glazed stoneware. Mod- 

ern imitation of stoneware of the 17th century, 
made at Kreussen, Bavaria, having a modern 
pewter lid. Made in Germany, late 19th century. 

237. GREYBEARD. OR BELLARMIXE— Mottled 

brown glaze. Made at Frechen, Germany, 17th 
century. A GENUINE piece, for comparison. 

238. JUG — Tiger-skin glaze. A GEXU1XE piece of 

the 17th century, from Frechen, ( lermany. 
Lent by Mr. Albert H. Pitkin. 

42 




Siegburg White Stoneware 

234. The First, A Modern Imitation 

235. The Second, A Genuine Piece of the 

Sixteenth Century 

239. DRUG JAR — Brown stoneware, relief decorations. 

A genuine piece of Kretissen ware of the early 
18th century, but superficially painted to imitate 
the Kreussen enameled stoneware of the 17th 
century. 

240. DRUG JARS (2)— Same ware and period. GEN- 

UINE examples throughout. Shown for com- 
parison. 



43 



CLASSICAL POTTERY 

241. OINOCH( )E — Handle in form of a female figure. 

Modern Copenhagen imitation of an antique 
design. 

242. ASKOS — Modern imitation of a red-figured vase 

of ancient Greece. 

243. LAMP' — Decorated with five-branched candlestick 

in relief. Modern imitation of an old Roman 
form. 

244. LAMP — Decorated with seven-branched candle- 

stick. A GENUINE example of the Christian 
era, from Jerusalem, shown for comparison. 

245. LAMP — Design, two warriors in relief, righting. 

Most of this lamp has been restored, very little 
of the original remains. 

246. LAMP — Roman, early Christian era, shown for 

comparison. 

247. STATL^ETTE — Modern imitation of an old Tan- 

agra figurine. 

Note the clumsy modeling. 

248. FIGURINE ( Tanagra ) — A GENUINE example 

of the 4th century B. C, shown for comparison. 

249. STATUETTE — Original antique body, head mod- 

ern. 

250. STATUETTE — Figure of Eros. Modern imita- 

tion of old Roman pottery. 

251. STATUETTE — Subject, Eros and Psvche. Greek, 

400-200 B. C. A GENUINE example, shown for 
comparison. 

252. FIGURE — Woman carrying child. The head, en- 

tirely too small for the body, is modern. The 
figure is ancient Roman. 

253. ASKOS — Relief design copied from the Borghese 

marble krater in the Louvre. A modern adapta- 
tion of an old design. 

44 



254. RHYTON— In form of a satyr's head. Modem 

imitation of a red figured vase of 500 1' !( I B. I . 
The black glaze can be readily scraped off with 
a knife or washed off with strong alcohol, which 
is impossible in original vases of this character. 
In addition, the red figures of the originals are 
surrounded by a heavy black line of glaze which 
i- not so with the reproductions. 

255. RH^ T< )\ — In form of cow's head. ( hi neck red- 

figured decoration. Eros seated. A GENUINE 
example, from Apulia, Italy, 300-250 B. C. 
Shown for comparison. 

256. VASE (Kalpis) — Modern imitation of a Greco- 

Roman black-figured vase: subject, "Death of 
Patroclus." Made by P. [psen, Copenhagen. 
Denmark, 1876. 

2?7. \ ASE I Amphora ) — Modern imitation of a Greco- 
Roman red-figured vase. Made by same. 

258. AMPHORA (Nolan)— Red-figured style. Subject, 

Athena and Warrior. A fine GENUINE ex- 
ample of the period of 500-470 B. C. Shown for 
comparison. 

259. LEKANE — Modern imitation of red-figured style. 

Made bv Ipsen, Copenhagen. 1876. 

260. LEKYTHOI (2) — Modern imitations of Greek 

black-figured vases of about the 4th century B. C. 

261. LE PASTE — Modern imitation of a red-figured 

bow 1 of ancient Greece. 

262. PELIKE — Modern imitation of a red-figured Greek 

vase of about 400 B. C. 

263. LAMP — In form of a grotesque head. Modern 

imitation of an old Roman design. 

264. LAMP — Fish shape. Modern imitation of an early 

Roman design. 

45 



WEDGWOOD 

265. BUCKLE — Modern imitation of old Wedgwood 

jasper. Female figure modeled in white wax, 
mounted on blue paper, under glass. 

266. BUTT( )N — Figures of mounted knights in white 

relief on blue ground. Imitation of old Wedg- 
wood jasper. Probably from the Sevres factory. 

267. B( )WL — Modern imitation of Wedgwood jasper. 

Border design in white relief on dark green 
ground. 

Xote the poor quality of the reliefs. Probably 
modern English. 

268. PLAQUE — Rectangular form, with modeled figure 
scene in high relief ("The Judgment of Paris''). 

Figures in white against light blue ground. In 
imitation of Wedgwood jasper. A modern repro- 
duction from an old mold at the Sevres factory. 
Note the muddy and irregular color of the blue. 

269. LARGE PLAQUE— Oval form, with man's pro- 

file in relief. Modern imitation of Wedgwood's 
basaltes ware of the late 18th century. 

270. MEDALLION— Profile of Cardinal Mazarin, in 

relief. A GENUINE example of basaltes, 
marked "Wedgwood & Bentley." Made about 
1768. Shown for comparison. 

271. WAFER TRAY— Light blue "solid" jasper with 

applied white reliefs of the Dancing Hours. A 
GENUINE example, made by Josiah Wedgwood, 
Etrufia, England, about 1780. Shown for com- 
parison. 



46 



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POTTERY 

272. TEAPOT — Red stoneware, applied relief decora- 

tions. Made in Delft, Holland, about 1675, by 
Ary de Milde, in imitation of the Chinese red 
boccaro ware of the same period. A GENUINE 
example, with original mark, — a running fox and 
the name of the maker. 

273. TEAPOT — Red ware. A modern imitation of the 

preceding, with copied mark. The genuine piece 
and reproduction are shown together. 

274. TUMBLER, or CUP— Red clay, sgraffito decora- 

tion, tulip design, inscription and date 1793. A 
modern imitation of an old Pennsylvania-Ger- 
man piece. Made by the Moravian Pottery, 
Doylestown, Pa. 

275. CUP — Red clay, white slip coating, sgraffito leaf 

design. Pennsylvania-German ware of about 
1830. A GENUINE example, shown for com- 
parison. 

276. CREAMER — In form of a cow. Brown glazed 

pottery. A modern imitation of an old English 
design. This specimen is nearly double the 
usual size. 

277. CREAMERS (2)— In form of cows. Brown 

glazed, buff pottery. Modern imitations of an 
old form. Made in Philadelphia, late 19th cen- 
tury. 

Note the plain brown glaze, which also occurs 
beneath the base. 

278. CREAMERS (2)— In form of cows. Mottled 

brown and yellow glaze (so-called Flint Enam- 
eled Ware). GENUINE examples, shown for 
comparison. Made at Bennington, Vt., about 
1850-1856. 

Note the brilliancy of the glaze, and the deli- 
cacy of the mottling, which is continued under- 
neath the base. 

4 8 



279. TOBY JUGS (3)- Brown and black glazes. 

Modern imitations of an old English form. 
Made in Philadelphia, late 19th century. 

Note the ball-shaped hollow in the base. By 
tin's peculiarity these modern pieces may he 
known. 

280. TOBY JUGS (2) -- Twelve-sided. GENUINE 

examples of brown glazed ware made at the old 
Jersey City Pottery about 1840. Marked. 
Shown for comparison. 

281. TOBY [UG— Mottled brown and yellow pottery. 

A GENUINE example, made by W. W. P. Ben- 
ton, Perth Amboy, N. J., about 1860. Shown 
for comparison. 

282. TOBY JUG — Streaked glaze — brown, yellow and 

green. A GENUINE piece of old American 
ware dating- from about 1850. Shown for com- 
parison. 

283. TOBY JUG — Brown glazed ware. Grape-vine 

handle. A GENUINE old example of about 
1840, probably English. The base is flat. Com- 
pare with No. 279. 



MEXICAN POTTERY 

284. VASE — Black pottery, decorated with grotesque 
masks and heads in relief, and incised designs. 
A modern imitation of ancient Aztec pottery. 
Made at San [nan Teotihuacan, Mexico. 

Black ware of this eharaeter was never made 
by the early Mexicans, but is now produced in 
great abundance for sale to tourists. 



285. VASE — Black pottery, with grotesque human 

He1 

49 



figure and mask reliefs. Mexico. 



286. PITCHER VASE — Black pottery, with gro- 

tesque figure reliefs and serpent handles. 
Mexico. 

287. GROUP — Black pottery. Turtle surmounted by 

a coiled serpent. Mexico. 

288. IMAGE— Black pottery. Seated figure. 

288A. IMAGE— Black Pottery. Modeled in low relief. 

288B. GROTESQUE FIGURINE — Reddish clay, 
whistle. 

289. CIRCULAR PLATE ( Calendar?)— Black clay. 

Found near Lake Chapala, Guatemala. 

290. MASK — White marble carving. Mexico. 

The eight pieces numbered 285-290 are lent by the 

Smithsonian Institution. 

291. COVERED VASE— Decorated with grotesque 

heads in relief and bands of incised ornament, 
the cover being modeled in the form of a human 
figure. 

Lent by Prof. William H. Holmes, who as 
long ago as 1883 called attention to the spurious 
character of this class of Mexican pottery, in 
his article "On some Spurious Mexican Antiqui- 
ties and their Relation to Ancient Art," and who 
quotes the following from Desire Charnay's 
Lcs Anciennes failles du noveau Monde: "The 
fabrication of these pieces goes back as far as 
1820 or 1826. This grand hoax was conceived 
in Tlateloco Street, and the fortunate inventor 
must have made his fortune thereby, to judge 
from the immense number of vases dispersed 
by him. Most of the museums are infested by 
them, to say nothing of private collections." 



5o 



MISCELLANEOUS 

292. MUG — Modern imitation of the "Terra Sigillata" 
or "Ancient Buccaros" of scented earth, which 
were a mania in Europe during the 17th cen- 
tury. The name was derived from the stamp 
or seal with which they were marked. No gen- 
nine examples are known to have survived. 



GLASS 

293. PASSGLAS, or MEASURING GLASS— Deco- 

rated in enamel colors with inscription and date 
1748, horizontal rings separating the glass in 
vertical sections to grade the amount of liquor 
to be drunk. Modern imitation of a German 
drinking glass of the middle of the 18th century. 

294. BEAKER — Decorated with heraldic designs in 

enamel colors, inscription signed Paulus Puch- 
ner Hurst, Meister zu Dresden, and date 1587. 
A modern reproduction of a German drinking 
glass of the 16th century. 

295. PASSGLAS — Decorated with figure design in 

enamel colors. Inscription and date 1662. A 
GENUINE example made in Germany in the 
17th century. Exhibited for comparison. 

296. PASSGLAS — Decorated with coats of arms 

of three trade guilds in enamel colors, with 
inscription and date 1745. A GENUINE ex- 
ample made in Germany in the 18th century. 

297. TUMBLER— Decorations engraved in gold-foil 
/o placed between two thicknesses of glass, called 

Zwischenglas (doubled glass) or Zwischengold- 
glaser. Ruby glass base. A GENUINE ex- 
ample made in Bohemia. Mid-18th century. 

298. GOBLET— Modern Venetian imitation of Zwisch- 
*z „ , ensdas of the 18th century. 




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299. BOWL — Modern Venetian imitation of early 

"Christian glass," from the original in the 
library of the Vatican; from the Catacombs in 
Rome. 

300. WILLKOMM-BECHER— Decoration in enamel 

colors, arms of the Butchers' Guild. A GEN- 
UINE old example of greenish glass dated 
1676. Shown for comparison. 

301. PASSGLAS — Decorated with a representation of 

a playing card, in enamel colors. Modern imita- 
tion of a German drinking glass of the 17th 
century. 

302. PASSGLAS — Decorated with representation of a 

playing card, in enamel colors. Modern imita- 
tion of a German drinking glass of the 17th 
century. 

303. BOTTLE — Hexagonal form, surmounted by a 

funnel-shaped neck. The glass is old but the 
figure decoration has more recently been super- 
ficially painted in white and covered with varnish. 
Swedish. 

304. VASE — Globular body with funnel-shaped neck. 

Three loop handles. The decoration, in enamel 
colors and gold, is in Moorish style. The inte- 
rior has been coated with silver paint. Modern 
Spanish imitation of an old piece of the 15th 
century. 

305. ROSE WATER SPRINKLER— Globular form 

with bell-shaped base, two upright spouts and 
large ring handle. Decorated with vertical bands 
of white enamel hatching. Modern Spanish imi- 
tation of Barcelona glass of Venetian style, 18th 
century. 

306. POCAL — Drinking glass on tall, bulbous stem. 

Engraved decoration of Venus and Cupid. Mod- 
ern German imitation of an 18th century glass. 

53 




302. Passglas. Modern Imitation 

309. WlLLKOMM-HUMPEN 

Genuine Piece, dated, 1647 



307. GOBLET — Wine-glass form. Decoration with 

German inscription. Modern German imitation 
of an old design. 

308. WILLKOMM-HUMPEX. OR ADLER-HUM- 

PEX — Decoration in enamel colors, double- 
headed eagle of the Holy Roman Empire with 

54 



outspread wings on the feathers of which are 
painted the arms of fifty-six electors and mem- 
bers of the empire. Date 1616. A modern imi- 
tation of an old German design. 

309. WILLKOMM-HUMPEN— A GENUINE old ex- 

ample bearing the date 1647. 

Compare with the preceding, in order to see 
the difference between the quality of the glass 

and the decoration. 

310. STAINED GLASS PANEL, LEADED— Her- 

aldic designs, etc., in various colors of stained and 
painted glass. Modern imitation of Swiss house- 
hold glass of the 16th century. 

311. STAINED CLASS PANEL, LEADED— Fig- 

ure subject in stained and painted glass of various 
colors, with date 1550. Modern imitation of 
Swiss household glass of the 16th century. 

312. CURTAIN KNOB— Rosette of opalescent, pressed 

glass. Long white metal stem. Modern Amer- 
ican imitation of a mid-nineteenth century design. 
These reproductions are sold extensively. 



IVORIES 

313. CARVED IVORY FIGURE OF CHARLE- 

MAGNE — Modern imitation of German ivory of 
the 15th century. 

314. CARVED IVORY GROUP OF TWO FEMALE 

FIGURES ("The Visitation") — Modern imita- 
tion of Italian carved ivory of the 13th century. 

315. CARVED IVORY GROUP ("Elevation in the 

Parvis" ) — Modern imitation of Italian carved 
ivory of the 15th century. 

316. CARVED IVORY GROUP ("The Conversion") 

— Modern imitation of Italian carved ivory of 
the 13th century. 

55 




3I5j 3 x 3j 3 l 7- Ivories 

Modern Imitations of Old Examples 

317. CARVED IVORY GROUP < "The Coronation") 
— Modern imitation of Italian carved ivory of the 
16th century. 

In all of the above described pieces, note the 
crudeness of the carving and the black lines which 
have been artificially produced in the grain of the 
ivorv by staining, to imitate great age. 



318. GROUP— Madonna and Child. 
ample, Spanish, 17th century 
parison. 

56 



A GENUINE ex- 
Shown for com- 



319. GROUP — Four figures of men and boys. Modem 

imitation of old Japanese ivory. 

320. GROUP — Five figures. Modern imitation of old 

Japanese ivory. 

Note the crude carving and coloring of these 

two examples of modern art. 

321. GROUP— Monkeys and serpent. A GENUINE 

Japanese carving. Shown for comparison. 

322. NETSUKE— Man and boy in boat. Same. 

323. NETSUKE— Group. Same. 



METALWORK 



PEWTER 

324. WAFER TRAY— Relief medallions of Scriptural 

scenes. Modern reproduction of a German de- 
sign in the British Museum dated 1619. 

325. DISH — Head of a Bishop in relief in centre, in- 

scribed, "Sanct Leodigari 1647." Modern repro- 
duction of a design of the 17th century. 

Note the scratching of the surface, produced 
by the use of sandpaper, to simulate age marks. 

326. PEWTER FLAGONS (6)— With hinged lids, and 

inscribed names and dates ranging from 1783 to 
1806. Modern reproductions of old German 
forms. 

327. PEWTER TANKARD— Hinged lid, and incised 

decoration. On the lid the date 1793. A mod- 
ern imitation of an old German form, made of 
spun pewter, and battered to imitate hard usage. 

57 




326. Pewter Flagons 

With Eighteenth Century Dates 

Modern Reproductions 



SILVER 

328. PORRINGER — A modern imitation of an old 

piece, with forged mark of Samuel Vernon, a 
silversmith of Newport, R. I. (1683-1737). 

329. PORRINGER— A GENUINE example, made by 

Benjamin Burt, a silversmith of Boston, Mass. 
(1729-1804). Shown for comparison. 

330. CAN — A genuine old piece with recent forged 

mark of John Burt, who was a silversmith in 
Boston between 1691 and 1745. The mark is 
in two places, on the outside of upper rim and 
on base. 

58 



331. TABLE SPOON An old example, made aboul 
1820, with recent forged mark of Revere. Paul 
Revere, the Boston silversmith, was in business 
From aboul 1735 to 1818. 



332. TABLE SPOON Marked Revere. An exceed 
ingly crude imitation of an old design. 
Lent hv Mr. Georcre C. Gebelein. 



333. TABLE SPOONS (2)— Coffin-shaped handles. 

Marked Revere. The spoons themselves are 

probably old, but as the mark varies from the 
well-known Revere marks, these pieces are open 
to suspicion. 

334. TABLE SPOON— "Rat tail" pattern of the mid- 

dle of the 18th century. Marked I. E. (proba- 
bly intended for Joseph Edwards, of Boston). 
A modern fake. 

Lent by Mr. George C. Gebelein. 



ENAMELS ON METAL 

335. ETUI, or BODKIN CASE— Dark blue lozenge 

pattern on white ground with gold lines. Mod- 
ern French imitation of old enamel. 

Note the new appearance of the enamel and 
the metal mounts. 

336. SALT CELLAR — Enamel on metal. Modern 

French imitation of an old Limoges enamel. 

337. SALT CELLARS (Pair) — Imitations of old 

painted enamels on metal. Modern French. 

338. MATCH BOXES (2)— Imitations of old painted 

enamels on metal. Modern French. 

339. SNUFF BOX — Gilded metal with painted enamel 

lid. Modern French imitation of an old design. 

340. SNUFF BOX— In form of a walnut. Modern 

German imitation of an old design. 

59 



341. SNUFF BOXES (5)— In form of birds. Modern 

German imitations of old enamels. 

342. SNUFF BOXES (2)— In the form of pug dogs. 

Modern German imitations of old enamels. 

343. BONBON BOX— In the form of a turbaned ne- 

gro's head. Modern German imitation of an 
old enamel. 

344. BONBON BOX— In form of a dog's head. Mod- 

ern German imitation of an old design. 

345. BONBON BOX— In form of an apple. Modern 

German imitation of an old design. 

346. SCENT VIALS (4)— Imitations of old painted 

enamels on metal. Modern German. 

347. ETUIS, or BODKIN CASES (9)— Modern Ger- 

man imitations of old enamels on metal. Vari- 
ety of shapes, colors and decorative designs. 

348. ETUI, or BODKIN CASE — White medallions 

containing painted figure scenes, surrounded by 
rococo frames in raised gold, in light blue 
ground. A modern imitation of old Battersea 
(England) enamel. 

349. SCENT VIAL — Figure scenes painted in medal- 

lions surrounded by rococo gold frames, in deep 
blue ground. A modern imitation of old Bat- 
tersea. 

Note the crudeness of the painting and the 
poor quality of the gilding. 

350. BONBON BOX — Medallions on sides and lid 

painted with birds and flowers in colors. A 
GENUINE example of Battersea enamel of the 
18th century. 

Note the fineness of the painting and the 
brilliancy of the enamel. 

6o 



351. BONBON BOX Another of similar form and 

period with turquoise ground. A GENUINE 
example. 

352. ETUI, or BODKIN CASE— Landscapes painted 

in colors in medallions, surrounded by rococo 
frames in gold, in a pink ground. A GENU- 
[NE example of Battersea enamel of the 18th 
century. 




354. Modern Imitation of Champ- 

leve Enamel 

Reliquary of the Thirteenth Century 

French 



353. ETUI, or BODKIN CASE — Of similar form. 

Medallions surrounded by dark blue ground. 
A GENUINE example of old Battersea enamel. 

354. RELIQUARY— Figures of Christ and His Apos- 

tles in enamel on copper. Modern French imi- 
tation of Champleve enamel of the 13th century. 

61 



355. PLATE — Enamel on metal. Subject, "David 

Triumphant." Modern imitation of Limoges 
enamel of the 17th century. 

356. PLAQUE — Enamel, on metal. Subject, "Magda- 

lene." A GENUINE example of Limoges en- 
amel of the 17th century, by Laudin. Shown 
for comparison. 

357. ETUI, or BODKIN HOLDER — GENUINE 

Battersea enamel of the 18th century. Land- 
scapes in white medallions surrounded by dark 
blue ground. Shown for comparison. 

358. BONBON BOX— GENUINE Battersea enamel 

of the 18th century. Figure scene in colors on 
white ground, surrounded by green enamel. 
Shown for comparison. 

359. PLAQUE— Enamel on metal. Subject, "Magda- 

lene." A GENUINE example of Limoges en- 
amel of the 17th century, by Laudin. Shown 
for comparison. 

360. CUP AND SAUCER — Modern imitations of 

Limoges enamel of the 17th century. 

BRASS AND BRONZE 

361. BRASS VASES (Pair)— Handles in the form of 

modeled boys ; engraved decoration. Modern 
imitations of European brass work of the 17th 
century. 

362. BRASS SPECTACLE BOX— Engraved decora- 

tion, with representation of calendar months 
with dates 1497 and 1582. Modern imitation of 
an old German design in brass. 

363. BOTTLES (Pair)— Ruby glass, encased in metal 

with openwork and engraved design — grotesque 
figures and masks. Modern Italian imitation of 
17th century work. 

62 



364. BUST (Diana) ( icnnine solid bronze, with 

brown oxidation. 

365. BUST (Diana) A zinc imitation of the pre- 

ceding", first plated with copper, tlicn with 
silver, to represent a silver piece. 

366. FIGURE (Elephant)- A modern Japanese fake, 

made of white metal, oxidized or painted to 
represent bronze. 

367. FIGURE (Tiger) — Solid bronze, GENUINE 

piece, showing natural color before oxidizing. 

368. FIGURE (Horse) — Solid bronze, GENUINE 

piece, with green oxidation. 

The above described five pieces are lent by Mr. C. 
J. Kling, to show the difference between genuine and 
imitation bronze. 



CAST IRON 

369. STOVE PLATE— Design in relief, "The Temp- 

tation of Joseph." A GENUINE example of 
Pennsylvania- German workmanship, dated 
1749. 

370. STOVE PLATE — A modern reproduction of pre- 

ceding. 

371. STOVE PLATE— Design in relief, "Samson and 

Delilah." A GENUINE example, Eastern 
Pennsylvania, dated 1756. 

372. STOVE PLATE— Subject, "Cain and Abel." A 

modern reproduction of an old design dated 
1741. 



63 



Printed 

At the Sign of the Ivy Leaf in Sansom Street 

Philadelphia