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Full text of "Exhibitions of first and other editions of the works of John Dryden (1631-1700), together with a few engraved portraits and two oil paintings--commemorative of the two hundredth anniversary of his death. Exhibited twenty-nine East Thirty-second Street, New-York, March 8th to 24th, 1900"

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Or 87 



INTRODUCTION 



JOHN DRYDEN, Poet Laureate and His- 
toriographer Royal to King Charles II 
and King James II, will ever hold high rank 
among the great names in Enghsh Literature. 
Few among his contemporaries possessed such 
versatilitY of intellect, and none, except Mil- 
ton, his wonderful powers of versification. Of 
wide learning and correct literary judgment, 
he also excelled as a critic, and possessed an 
excellent prose style. Many of his prefaces 
and introductions are justly admired for their 
strong, vigorous English. His example did 
much to form and settle the prose of his day 
and pave the way for Steele and Addison in 
the " Tatler " and " Spectator." Dr. Johnson 
does not hesitate to write, " What was said of 
Rome, adorned by Augustus, may be applied 
by an easy metaphor to English poetry, em- 
bellished by Dryden, * Lateritiam invenit, 



M21221 



marmoream reliquit * (he found it brick and 
he left it marble)." 

A distinguished critic of the present day, 
Mr. Edmund Gosse, in his " Modem English 
Literature," says: " Dryden's exuberant vi- 
vacity, his solidity of judgment, his extraordi- 
nary command of all the artifices of poetry, 
pointed him out as a leader of men, and should 
prepare us to find his influence the dominant 
one in all verse-writing in England for a hun- 
dred years after his death." It is to be re- 
gretted that many of his plays reflect the low 
standard of morals which unfortunately was 
introduced into England with the restoration of 
the monarchy. The fault, however, is more of 
the time than of the man, and in his old age he 
virtually admitted the justness of Jeremy Col- 
lins' attack on the immorahty and profane- 
ness of the English stage. But it is not on his 
plays that Dryden's fame as a poet rests ; it is 
rather on his achievement as a writer of satire, 
in which he so far excelled as to merit the 
distinction of being called " the greatest satirist 
of British Poetry." He is, moreover, unrivaled 
as a reasoner in verse. To quote Dr. Johnson 
once more, " Though Davies had reasoned in 
rhyme before him, it may be perhaps maintained 
that he was the first who joined argument and 
poetry." His two odes for St. CeciHa's Day, 
especially the second, " Alexander's Feast," are 

4 



among the greatest in our literature, and many 
of his lyrics and shorter occasional verses are 
justly celebrated for the beauty of their 
language and harmonious versification. 

No bibliography of John Dryden has ever 
been attempted, though considerable material 
exists in Sir Walter Scott's editions of his 
works, and still more in the excellent edition, 
in one volume, edited by Mr. W. D. Christie 
in 1870. The catalogue of the present ex- 
hibition of the works of John Dryden does 
not profess to be complete, except so far as to 
record the first editions of his works published 
during his lifetime, and, so far as was possible, 
the volumes by other authors to which he con- 
tributed. Of his original volumes of poetry, it 
is believed all will be found in the present ex- 
hibition, except the poem, " To My Lord Chan- 
cellor," 1662. This the committee has been 
unable to discover in the remarkably complete 
collections belonging to members of the Gro- 
lier Club. First editions of two of his plays 
are also missing, "Secret Love," 1668, and 
" The State of Innocence," 1676. To these 
must be added " The Secular Masque," his 
last work, contributed by him to "The Pil- 
grim," when performed for his benefit shortly 
before his death. The more important of his 
translations will be found in the exhibition, 
together with a considerable number of satires 

5 



and attacks upon him brought out in answer 
to his pohtical satires. 

It is to be regretted that Dryden lived at a 
time when good printing was almost unknown 
in England. His books are not attractive in 
appearance, which may account for the fact 
that few collectors have made much effort to 
gather together complete sets of first editions. 

As has been usual in similar exhibitions, the 
more important engraved portraits have been 
included. It is singular that, so far as known, 
no engraved portrait of Dryden was pub- 
lished during his lifetime. 

The committee is exceedingly pleased to be 
permitted to exhibit two portraits in oil — both 
attributed to the celebrated court painter, Sir 
Godfrey Kneller. They possess very great in- 
terest^ and will no doubt be an attractive 
feature in this commemoration of the two 
hundredth anniversary of the death of " Glori- 
ous John Dryden." 



I. (J^rifiinal Wiom* 



Three | Poems | Upon the Death of his 
late I Highnesse | Oliver | Lord Protec- 
tor I Of I England, Scotland, and | Ire- 
land. I Written | 

( M^ Edm. Waller, 

By < M'' Jo. Dryden, London, | 

( M^ Sprat, of Oxford. Printed by 

William Wilfon, and are to be fold in 

I Well-yard neer Little St. Bartholomew's 

I Hofpitall, 1659. 

Quarto. First edition. 

One leaf without signature; B-F 2, in fours. 

B I to C I (verso blank) are occupied by Dryden's 
" Heroique Stanzas, Confecrated to the Glorious Mem- 
ory of his moft Serene and Renowned Highnefle Oliver 
Late Lord Protector of this Common* Wealth, &c. 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Written after the Celebration of his Funerall." This, 
Dryden's third poem but his first important poetical 
production, was written upon the death of Cromwell, 
September 3, 1658. It was first published about the 
beginning of 1659, either in the present form or sepa- 
rately (see the following number). W. D. Christie, 
the editor of the best modern edition of Dryden's poeti- 
cal works (London, 1870), thinks that the separate 
edition was the later of the two. " This edition," he 
says, " was probably revised by Dryden and may be 
presumed to be later than the other, as the spelling is 
more modern. There is no difference between the two, 
except of spelling and punctuation." In 1682 the 
** Three Poems " edition of 1659 was reprinted, with- 
out variation, save that " late Usurper " was substi- 
tuted in the title for " late Highnesse," etc. This re- 
print, which was inspired by one of Dryden's political 
enemies, was followed in the same year by a reprint of 
the separate form of the " Heroique Stanzas," with this 
title : 

An I Elegy | On The | Usurper O. C. | By The | Au- 
thor I Of I Absalom and Achitophel. | Publifhed to 
fhew the Loyalty and Integrity of the Poet. | Reprinted 
in the Year MDCLXXXII. 

Another reprint of the separate form, the title again 
varying, appeared in 1687 (see No. 4). The " Three 
Poems " were also reprinted in 1689 in ** Poems on 
Affairs of State " (see No. 5). 

A I Poem I upon the | Death | of | His 
Late Highnefs, | Oliver, | Lord Protector 
of I England, Scotland, & Ireland | Writ- 
ten by Mr. Dryden, | London, | Printed 
for William Wilfon ; and are to be fold 
8 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

in I Well- Yard, near Little St. Bartholo- 
mew's I Hofpital, 1659. 

Quarto. 

A, four leaves; B, two leaves. 

See note to No. I. 

3. Three | Poems | Upon the Death of the 
Late I Usurper | Oliver Cromv^el. Writ- 
ten I 

SMr. Jo. Drydon. 
Mr. Sprat, of Oxford. London : | 
Mr. Edm. Waller. Printed by 

William Wilfon, in the Year, 1659. And 
Reprinted for R. Baldwin, 1682. 

Quarto. Unauthorized edition. 
A, three leaves ; B — D, in fours. 

See note to No. i. 

4. A I Poem I Upon the Death of the Late 
I Usurper, | Oliver Cromwel. | By the 

Author of The H d and the P r. 

I London, | Printed for S. H., and to be 
Sold by I the Bookfellers of London and 
I Weftminfter. 1687. 

Quarto. Unauthorized edition. 
A, four leaves. 

See note to No. i. 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

5. A I Collection | Of | Poems | On | Af- 
fairs of State ; | Viz. | 

Advice to a Painter. 

Hodge's Vifion. 

Britain and Raleigh. 

Statue at Stocks — M . 

Young Statefman. 

To the K . 

Noftradamus Prophecy. 

Sir Edmondbury Godfrey's Ghoft. 

On the King's Voyage to Chattam. 

Poems on OHver, by Mr. Driden, Mr. 
Sprat, and Mr. Waller. 

By I A M 1 Efq. ; and other 

Eminent Wits. | Moft Whereof never be- 
fore Printed. | London, | Printed in the 
year, MDCLXXXIX. 

Quarto. First Edition. 

A and B, four leaves each; D — F2, in fours. 

A " Second Part of the Collection of Poems on Affairs 
of State," London, 1689, with twenty-one pieces, ac- 
companies the first part in the present copy. This 

" Second Part" has new signatures and pagination 

A — D, in fours. 

6. Aftraea Redux. | A | Poem | On the 
Happy I Reftoration & Return | Of His 
Sacred Majefty | Charles the Second. | 

10 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

By John Driden. | Jam Redit & Virgo, 
Redeunt Saturnia Regna. Virgil. | Lon- 
don, I Printed by J. M. for Henry Her- 
ringman, and are to be fold at | his Shop, 
at the Blew- Anchor, in the lower Walk 
of the New- | Exchange, 1660. 

Folio. First edition. 

One leaf without signature; B — D in twos. 

" * Astraea Redux ' and the two poems which follow 
["To his sacred Majesty" and "To my Lord Chan- 
cellor'*], addressed to King Charles II. on his Corona- 
tion and to the "Lord Chancellor Clarendon on New 
Year's Day, 1662, were successively published in folio 
by Henry Herringman. Dryden's name is printed 
* Driden ' on the title pages of two of them. All these 
poems were reprinted in 1688 in quarto, with a new 
edition of 'Annus Mirabilis.'" — Christie, 

To His Sacred | Majesty, | A | Panegy- 
rick I On His | Coronation. | By John 
Dryden. | London, | Printed for Henry 
Herringman, at the Anchor on the Lower 
walk in the | New Exchange. 1661. 

Folio. First edition. 

A and B, two leaves each. 

To I My Lord | Chancellor, | Prefented 

on I New- Years-day, | By J. Driden. | 

London, | Printed for Henry Herringman 

II 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

at the I Anchor in the Lower- walk in the 
New I Exchange. 1662. 

Folio. First edition. 
A, four leaves. 

Annus Mirabilis : | The Year of | Won- 
ders, I 1666. I An Historical | Poem: | 
Containing | The Progrefs and various 
Succeffes of our Naval | War with Hol- 
land, under the Conduct of His | High- 
nefs, Prince Rupert, and His Grace the | 
Duke of Albemarl. | And defcribing | 
The Fire | Of | London. | By John Dry- 
den, Efq ; I Multum intereft res pofcat, an 
homines latius imperare velint. | Trajan. 
Imperator. ad Plin. | Urbs antiqua ruit, 
multos dominataperannos. Virg. | Lon- 
don, Printed for Henry Herringman, at 
the An- | chor in the Lower Walk of the 
New Exchange. 1667. 

Octavo. First edition. 

A, eight leaves; a, four leaves; B — F 7, in 

eights. 

From May, 1665, till the close of 1666, London 
was made desolate by the plague and the Great Fire. 
The theatres were closed, and Dryden retired to Charl- 
ton, in Wiltshire, a seat of Lord Berkshire, his father- 

12 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

in-law. There he wrote the "Annus Mirabilis" and 
the "Essay on Dramatick Poesy." 

" * Annus Mirabilis ' added considerably to Dryden's 
fame. It was the longest and most elaborate poem he 
had yet produced. In this poem he returned to the 
quatrain stanzas which he had used in his poem in 
praise of Cromwell, and to the ear of the poetry-read- 
ing public was familiarized by the *Gondibert* of 
Davenant. The Dutch War and the deeds of the Eng- 
lish navy were subjects of thrilling interest at the mo- 
ment ; his description of the Fire of London contains 
some fine poetry. . . The poem was reprinted in quarto 
in 1688, with several changes in the text, which are al- 
most all deteriorations ; and the text of 1688 was fol- 
lowed in the next reprint of the poem, in the edition 
of the * Miscellany Poems' of 1716. In subsequent 
editions other errors have been added." — Christie, 

Of I Dramatick Poefie, | An | Essay. | By 

John Dryden Efq; | Fungar vice 

cotis, acutum | Reddere quae ferrum 
valet, exors ipfa fecandi. | Horat. De 
Arte Poet. | London, | Printed for Henry 
Herringman, at the Sign of the | Anchor, 
on the Lower-walk of the New- | Ex- 
change. 1668. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — K, in fours. 

" His * Dramatic Poesy* led to a controversy with 
Dryden's brother-in-law, Sir Robert Howard. The 
subject of dispute was the comparative merit of rhyme 
and blank verse in tragedies. Howard, though he had 

13 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

written rhymed heroic plays, tartly criticised Dryden's 
doctrine in the Preface to his play of * The Duke of 
Lerma,' 1668; and Dryden sharply rejoined in * A De- 
fence of the Essay of Dramatic Poesy,' prefixed to a 
second edition of* The Indian Emperor,' [1668]. The 
quarrel . . . has probably been much exaggerated. 
There is incontrovertible proof in Dryden's letters of 
the last years of his life that he and Howard were on 
terms of intimacy and affection." — Christie. 

II. Absalom | And | Achitophel. | A | Poem. 
— Si Propius ftes | Te Capiet Magis — 
I London, | Printed for J. T. and are to 
be Sold by W. Davis in | Amen- Corner, 
1681. 

Folio. First Edition. 

Two leaves without signature, B — I, in twos. 

The success of this poetic attack on Shaftesbury was 
unprecedented, and, as Leslie Stephen has said, it is 
still the first satire in the English language for mascu- 
line insight and for vigor of expression. It was ans wered 
in a parody called " Towser the Second," said to be by 
Henry Clare, while the Duke of Buckingham retorted 
in " Poetical Reflections," Samuel Pordage in " Azaria 
and Hushai" (see No. 108), and Elkanah Settle in 
"Absalom Senior, or Achitophel Transposed." 

" The first edition was in folio, published by Jacob 
Tonson [about November 17, 1681, according to a note 
in Narcissus Luttrell's copy]. A second edition ap- 
peared before the end of December. This second edi- 
tion contained, with several minor changes, two notable 
additions, one in the description of Shaftesbury (lines 

14 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

180-191), giving him praise as a judge, and the other in 
the King's Speech (lines 957-960), expressing a desire 
that Monmouth would repent and open the way for 
pardon. Seven more editions were published during 
Shaftesbury's lifetime. ... It has been stated by 
Tonson that the poem was undertaken in 1680, at the 
request of the King." — Christie. 



12. Another copy of the same edition, in 
which a contemporary reader has added 
in manuscript, on page 7, the Hnes Dryden 
inserted in the second edition. Before 
the title-page is inserted a leaf in the same 
handwriting, containing the complimen- 
tary addresses by Lee and Duke, first 
published in the second edition of the 
poem. 

13. The Medall, | A Satyre | Against | Se- 
dition. I By the Authour of Abfalom and 
Achitophel | Per Graium populos, medi- 
aeque per Elidus Urbem | Ibat ovans; Di- 
vumque fibi pofcebat Honores. | Lon- 
don, I Printed for Jacob Tonfon at the 
Judge's Head in | Chancery - lane, near 
Fleet- ftreet. 1682. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves ; a, two leaves; B — D 2, in fours. 

15 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

" The rejection by the London grand jury, on Novem- 
ber 24, 1 68 1, of the bill of high treason presented 
against Lord Shaftesbury was celebrated by a medal, 
having on one side a portrait of Shaftesbury and on 
the other a sketch of London. Dryden's satire on it 
was published in the beginning of March, 1682, within 
four months after the first publication of 'Absalom 
and Achitophel.' A second edition appeared in 1683, 
and a third was published in 1692. Like ' Absalom 
and Achitophel,' it was published anonymously, and Dry- 
den's name did not appear on the title-page of any 
edition of either poem in his lifetime." — Christie. 

Dryden's satire called forth several answers, among 
which are "Satire to his Muse " (see No. no), and 
the "Medal of John Bayes," by Thomas Shadwell 
(see No. 109). ShadwelFs attack was answered by 
Dryden in " Mac Flecknoe." Pope used " The Medal " 
as model when he wrote his " Dunciad." 

14. Mac Flecknoe, | OrA | Satyr | Upon the 
I True — Blew — Protestant | Poet, T. S. | 
By the Author of | Absalom & Achitophel 
I London, | Printed for D. Green, 1682. 
Quarto. First edition. 
A, four leaves; B, three leaves. 

" * Mac Flecknoe ' was published in October, 1682. 
It was published anonymously, but Dryden spoke of 
the poem as his own in his * Essay on Satire,' 1692, and 
* Mac Flecknoe ' is printed at the beginning of the 
volume of Miscellanies edited by Dryden in 1684. The 
publication in this volume was the second edition of the 
poem; a third edition, a reprint of that of 1684, ap- 
peared in 1692. The first edition contained many 
misprints .... The text, as altered in 1684, is Dry- 
den's authorized text." — Christie. 

16 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

By Mac Flecknoe Dryden meant "poetical son of 
Flecknoe " — Richard Flecknoe, a dull poet, then de- 
ceased, and of use, therefore, for the purpose of satire. 
There is no evidence that Flecknoe ever offended Dry- 
den. His " Epigrams," 1670 (see No. 103), contain 
some lines addressed to Dryden of a most complimen- 
tary character. 

The I Second | Part | of | Absalom | 
and I Achitophel. | A | Poem. | — Si 
Quis tamen Haec quoque, Si Quis | Cap- 
tus Amore Leget — | London: [Printed 
for Jacob Tonfon, at the Judges Head in | 
Chancery-Lane, near Fleet-Street. 1682. 

Folio. First edition. 

One leaf without signature. B — Ki, in twos. 

There were two issues of the above work this year, 
so similar in all respects as to be easily confounded 
with each other except on a close examination. The 
easiest method of identification is on the title where the 
word " Fleet-Street " in the imprint as given above is 
printed " Fleetstreet " in the other issue; changes in 
certain letters of the text of the work, especially in the 
use of the double "V" for the "W,'' indicate that it 
was partially if not wholly reprinted. There is no evi- 
dence as to which is the earlier of the two issues. 

The larger part of this poem was written by Tate, 
Dryden contributing about two hundred lines begin- 
ning on p. ID, " Next these a Troop of buify Spirits 
prefs " and ending on p. 16, "To talk like Doeg, and 
to Write like Thee." It was published in October, 
1682, and marks the closing on Dryden's part of the 
controversy with Shadwell, Settle and others. 

3 17 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

1 6. Religio Laici | Or A | Laymans Faith. | 
A I Poem. I Written by Mr. Dryden. | 
Ornari res ipfa negat ; contenta doceri. | 
London, | Printed for Jacob Tonfon at 
the Judge's Head in | Chancery-lane, 
near Fleet-ftreet. 1682. 

Quarto. First Edition. 

One leaf, without signature; a, three leaves; 

b and (c), two leaves each, B — E2, in fours. 

"A mistake has arisen about the person to whom 
this poem was addressed. Derrick has said it was 
Richard Hampden. It was a young gentleman of the 
name of Henry Dickinson. The poem was quickly re- 
printed in 1682, and a third edition appeared in 1683; 
and the poem was not again reprinted till it appeared 
in Tonson's folio edition of Dryden's poems, 1701.'* 

Christie, 

17. The I Vindication: | Or The | Parallel | 
Of The I French Holy-League, | And 
The I Englifh League and Covenant, | 
Turned into a Seditious Libell againft the | 
King and his Royal Highness, | By | 
Thomas Hunt and the Authors of the Re- 
flections upon I the Pretended Parallel in 
the Play called | The Duke of Guise. I 
Written by Mr. Dryden. | Turno tempus 
erit magno cum, optaverit emptum | In- 

18 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

tacum Pallanta : 8i cum fpolia ifta, diemg ; | 
Oderit — | London, | Printed for Jacob 
Tonfon at the Judges Head in Chancery- 
Lane, I near Fleetftreet, MDCLXXXIIL 

Quarto. First Edition. 

Two leaves, without signature, the first blank ; 

A — H 2, in fours. 

Dryden, in co-operation with Nathaniel Lee, had writ- 
ten a play called " The Duke of Guise," which gave rise 
to the story that he had intended a parallel to the con- 
test of the court against Shaftesbury and Monmouth. 
The present work is in answer to that charge. 

Threnodia Avgustalis: A | Funeral- 
Pindarique | Poem | Sacred to the Happy- 
Memory I Of I King Charles H. | By 
John Dryden, | Servant to His late Maj- 
esty, and to the | Prefent King. | Fortu- 
nati Ambo, fi quid mea Carmina poffunt, 
I Nulla dies unquam memori vos eximet 
aevo ! | London, Printed for Jacob Tonfon, 
at the Judge's Head | in Chancery -lane, 
near Fleet-ftreet, 1685. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — D2, in fours. 

'* Charles II. died on February 6, 1685. This poem 
was published about a month later. ... A second 
edition appeared in 1685. I'here were some changes 

^9 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

of the text, which are mostly improvements. . . . The 
poem was next reprinted in the folio volume of Dry- 
den's poems, 1 701." — Christie. 



19. The I Hind | and the | Panther. | A | 
Poem, I In Three Parts. | — Antiquam 
exquirite matrem. | Et vera, inceffu, patuit 
Dea. — Virg. | London, | Printed for Ja- 
cob Tonfon, at the Judges Head in | 
Chancery Lane near Fleetftreet, 1687. 

Quarto. First Edition. 

Four leaves without signatures ; B — S, in 

fours ; T, five leaves. 

James II succeeded to the throne February 6, 1665, 
and within a year after his accession Dryden became a 
Roman Catholic. Then he wrote " The Hind and the 
Panther," a defence of his new religion in verse. It 
was published in April, 1 68 7. Charles Montagu, the 
future Earl of Halifax, and Matthew Prior, replied to 
it in a parody called "The Hind and the Panther 
Transversed." (See No. 113). 

A variation of the above issue has the last leaf re- 
printed, containing at the bottom of the recto an errata 
of a little over two Hnes and on the verso a list of 
" Books printed for Jacob Tonfon at the Judges Head 
in Chancery-Lane, near Fleet-flreet." Some copies of 
this latter issue have inserted a slip of errata occupying 
four lines, which was intended to be pasted over the 
list as originally printed. The corrections of the first 
list are included in the second. 

In both variations the leaves (with the exception of 

20 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

the last) are identical, and the errors contained in the 
first are uncorrected, although it has no errata. At least 
three editions were published during the year 1687. 

Another copy of the same edition, with- 
out the errata on the recto of the last leaf 
or the advertisement on the verso. 



Another copy of the same edition, with 
the last leaf reprinted and containing 
three lines of errata on the recto of the 
last leaf and advertisement of books for 
sale on the verso. This copy also con- 
tains a corrected slip of errata which was 
intended to be pasted over the one origi- 
nally printed. 

Britannia Rediviva: | A | Poem | On 
the I Birth | of the | Prince. | Written by 
Mr. Dryden. | Dii Patrii Indigetes, & 
Romule, Veftaque Mater, | Quae Tufcum 
Tiberim, & Romana Palatia fervas, | 
Hunc faltem everfo Puerum fuccurrere 
faeclo I Ne prohibite : fatis jampridem 
fanguine noftro | Laomedonteae luimus 
Perjuria Trojae | Virg. Georg. i. | Lon- 
don, I Printed for J. Tonfon, at the 
21 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Judges-Head in Chancery- | Lane, near 
Fleet- ftreet 1688. 

Quarto. 

A — C3, in fours. 

On the verso of the title is: "June the 19th, 1688. 
Let this be printed. Middleton." The birth of a son 
to James II on June 10, 1688, and on Trinity Sunday, 
is celebrated in this poem. 

23. Another issue of the same edition, with 
the same title, but printed in folio and 
consisting of one leaf without signature ; 
B — Ei in twos. 

Of the two editions of this poem, this 
and the one last described, there is nothing 
to distinguish which is the earlier. This, 
in foHo, and the edition published at 
*' Holy-Rood-House" described in the 
following number, seem to have escaped 
the notice of bibliographers. 

24. Another issue of the same edition, the 
title reading the same down to the im- 
print, which is as follows : " Holy- Rood- 
House, I Re-printed by Mr. P. B. Engi- 
nier. Printer to the Kng*s | Moft Excel- 

22 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

lent Majefty, for His Houlhold, Chap- 
pel I and Colledge. 1688. 

Quarto. 

A and B, two leaves each. 

On the verso of title is : "June 19, 1688. Let this 
be Printed. Middleton." 

Annus Mirabilis. | The Year of | Won- 
ders, I M. DC. LXVL I An | Hiftorical 
Poem. I Also | A Poem on the Happy 
Restoration and Return of | His Late 
Sacred Majesty | Charles the Second. | 
Likewise | A Panegyrick on His Corona- 
tion. I Together | With a Poem to My 
Lord Chancellor | Prefented on New- 
Years-Day. 1662. I By John Dryden, 
Efq; I London, Printed for Henry Her- 
ringman, and fold by | Jacob Tonfon 
at the Judges-Head in Chancery-Lane. 
1688. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves; ^*^, four leaves; ttt, two 

leaves ; B — Q 2, in fours. 

This is the first collected edition of Dryden's poems. 
His early poem on the death of Cromwell is omitted 
for reasons readily understood. It is probable that the 

23 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

four poems included in this volume were out of print 
when it was determined to reissue them in the present 
form. In order to make it a complete edition of Dry- 
den's poems, unsold copies of his other productions 
were often bound up with the present collection, such as 
"Absalom and Achitophel," 4th edition, 1682; "Thre- 
nodia Augustalis," 2d edition, 1685; "The Hind and 
the Panther," 3d edition, 1687. 

26. The I Address | Of | John Dryden, | 
Laureat | To | His Highness | The | 
Prince of Orange, | London, | Printed, 
and are to be Sold by Randal Taylor, | 
near Stationers-Hall. 1689. 

Folio. First edition. 

A and B, two leaves each. 

27. Eleonora: | A Panegyrical | Poem: | 
Dedicated to the | Memory | Of the Late 
I Countess | Of Abingdon. | Written by 
Mr. Dryden. | — Superas evadere ad 
auras, | Hoc opus, hie labor eft. Pauci, 
quos aequus amavit | Juppiter, aut ar- 
denas evexit ad aethera virtus; | Diis 
geniti potuere. Virgil ^neid. L 6. | 
London : | Printed for Jacob Tonfon, at 
the Judges Head in Chancery-| Lane, 
near Fleetftreet. 1692. | Where com- 
pleat Sets of Mr. Dryden's Works are 

24 



^ Quarto. First edition. 

t, four leaves ; A — C, in fours. 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Sold : The Plays being put | in the order 
they were Written. 



" Eleonora, Countess of Abingdon, daughter of Sir 
Henry Lee, baronet, of Ditchley, in Oxfordshire, died 
May 31, 1 691, in her thirty-third year. Her death was 
very sudden; it happened in the ball-room of her 
house. This poem was a task undertaken by Dryden 
for a handsome pecuniary reward. He says in the 
prefatory address to Lord Abingdon that he had never 
seen the lady, and was not acquainted with him. Un- 
der these circumstances, it is not strange that the poem 
wants vigor and animation ; it is, perhaps, the least 
successful of Dryden's poems." — Christie, 

Alexander's Feaft ; | Or The | Power | 
Of I Musique. | An | Ode, | In Honour 
of I St. Cecilia's Day. | By Mr. Dryden. | 
London, | Printed for Jacob Tonfon at 
the Judge's Head near the | Inner-Tem- 
ple-Gate, in Fleetflreet. 1697. 

Folio. First edition. 

One leaf without signature; B and C, two 

leaves each. 

" Very soon after the publication of the translation of 
Virgil, Dryden was requested to furnish an Ode for the 
festival of St. Cecilia of 1697. He complied with the 
request, and this great Ode was the result. He is said 
to have been paid forty pounds for it." — Christie, 

4 25 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

29. Fables | Ancient and Modern ; | Tranfla- 
ted into Verse, | From | Homer, Ovid, | 
Boccace, & Chaucer : | with | Original 
Poems. I By Mr. Dryden. | Nunc ultro 
ad Cineres ipfius & offa parentis | (Haud 
equidem fine mente, reor, fine numine 
divum) I Adfiimus. Virg. JEn. lib. 5. | 
London : | Printed for Jacob Tonfon, 
within Gray*s Inn Gate next | Gray's 
Inn Lane. MDCC. 

Folio. First edition. 

Two leaves without signature; B and C, two 
leaves each; *A — * D, in twos; one leaf 
without signature; A, four leaves; a, two 
leaves; B — L, and Aa — Mm, in fours; Aaa 
— Zzz, in fours ; Aaaa and Bbbb, four leaves 
each; Cccc, two leaves; Dddd — Nnnn, in 
fours ; Oooo, two leaves. 

" Dryden's imitations, or, as he himself calls them, 
translations of Chaucer and Boccacio, were made in 
1698 and 1699, and published in March, 1700. The 
original poems in this volume were the Epistle to his 
cousin, John Driden, * Alexander's Feast,' and the 
Epitaph on Mrs. Mary Frampton. It is known that 
the price paid to Dryden by Ton son in all for this folio 
volume was £300: two hundred and fifty guineas were 
paid at the time of the contract, March, 1699, and the 
remainder, due on the printing of a second edition, 
was paid in June, 1713, for the benefit of Dryden's 
widow, then out of her mind, to Lady Sylvius, her 
niece. Additional profit accrued to Dryden from pres- 
ents from his cousin in return for the Epistle, and from 
26 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

the Duke and Duchess of Ormond in return for the 
dedication of the volume to the former and the beauti- 
ful address to the latter prefixed to * Palamon and 
Arcite.* Dryden's tales from Chaucer and Boccacio 
have been, perhaps, the most popular of his w^ritings ; 
and there have been innumerable editions. His power 
of versification is seen in perfection in these composi- 
tions of his latest years." — Christie, 

The I Fables | Of | John Dryden, | 
Ornamented With | Engravings | From 
The Pencil Of | The Right Hon. | Lady 
Diana Beauclerc. | London. | Printed by 
T. Bensley, | For J. Edwards, N*^ ^^, 
And E. Harding, N« 98, Pall Mall. | 
MDCCXCVn. 

Folio. 

The I Works | Of | John Dryden, | Now 
First Collected | In Eighteen Volumes. | 
Illustrated | With Notes, | Historical, 
Critical, and Explanatory, | And | A Life 
Of The Author, | By | Walter Scott, 
Esq. I Vol. I. [Vols. II.-XVIII]. | Lon- 
don : I Printed For William Miller, Albe- 
marble Street, | By James Ballantyne 
and Co. Edinburgh. | 1808. 

Octavo. Edited by Sir Walter Scott. 
On Large Paper. 

27 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

32. The I Poetical Works Of | John Dryden | 
Volume I [Volumes II-IV] [motto] 
London | William Pickering | 1843. 
The I Poetical Works Of | John Dryden | 
Volume V | [motto] London | William 
Pickering | 1844. 

Duodecimo. Portrait in Volume V. 

Issued in the Aldine Edition of the British Poets. 

33. The Globe Edition | The Poetical Works | 
of I John Dryden | edited with a memoir, 
revised text, and notes | By | W. D. 
Christie, M. A. | Of Trinity College, 
Cambridge | [portrait] London: | Mac- 
millan and Co. | 1870. 

1 2 mo. 

William Dougal Christie, (1816-1874) diplomatist 
and man of letters, who gave much of his time to the 
history and literature of the Seventeenth Century, is 
now best known for his biography of Shaftesbury and 
the present edition of Dryden's poems. Though he 
excluded the plays and translations from Roman and 
Greek poets, he collected in this volume all of Dry- 
den's prologues and epilogues and his versions from 
Chaucer and Boccaccio, in addition to the poems, his- 
torical, political, controversial, and occasional. He is 
Dryden's best editor. 

38 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

The I Works | of | John Dryden | illus- 
trated I With Notes, | Historical, Critical, 
And Explanatory, | and | A Life Of The 
Author, I by | Sir Walter Scott, Bart. | 
Revised And Corrected | by | George 
Saintsbury. | Vol. i. [vols. II.-XVIII | 
Edinburgh : | Printed for William Pater- 
son, Princes Street, | By T. And A. Con- 
stable, Printers To Her Majesty. | 1882. 

Octavo. 

This revised and most carefully edited re-issue of 
Scott's edition of Dryden's works was published in 
1882-93. The copy shown is one of lOO copies on 
Large Paper. 



II. l^lan. 



The I Rival | Ladies. | a | Tragi- Com- 
edy. I As it was Acted at the Theater- | 
Royal. I Nos haec Novimus effe ni- 
hil I [device]. London, | Printed by W. 
W. for Henry Herringman, and are to | 
be Sold at his Shop in the Lower- walk in 
the New- | Exchange. 1664. 
29 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Quarto. First Edition. 

A, four leaves; a, two leaves; B — K 2, in 

fours. 

This wasDryden's second play. It was acted during 
the winter of 1663-64 and was well received. In the 
dedication Dryden defended his use of rhymed verse in 
the play. Sir Robert Howard, his brother-in-law, soon 
replied to him, and thus began the controversy that 
produced Dryden's " Essay of Dramatic Poetry." 

36. The I Indian-Queen, | A | Tragedy. | 
[motto] London, | Printed for H. Her- 
ringman, at the Blew-Anchor | in the 
Lower Walk of the New-Exchange | 
1665. 

Folio. First Edition. 

This tragedy, in the writing of which Dryden assisted 
Sir Robert Howard, is the third play in the volume en- 
titled " Four New Plays . . . Written by the Honour- 
able Sir Robert Howard," London, 1665. It occupies 
pages 137-176 and the collation is as follows : T — Z, in 
fours. " The Indian Queen " was first acted in 1664. 

37. The I Indian Emperour, | Or, | The Con- 
quest Of I Mexico I By the | Spaniards. | 
Being the Sequel of the Indian Queen. | 
By John Dryden, Efq; | Dum relego 
fcripiiffe pudet, quia plurima cerno | Me 
quoque, qui feci, judice,dignaHni. Ovid. | 

30 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

London, | Printed by J. M. for H. Her- 
ringman at the Sign of the Blew Anchor 
I in the Lower walk of the New Ex- 
change. 1667. 

Quarto. First Edition. 
A — K 3, in fours. 

" The Indian Emperor " was produced at the Theatre 
Royal in the early part of 1 665 with great success. 
Howard's '* Indian Queen " had dealt with the subject 
of Montezuma acquiring the throne of Mexico. Dry- 
den pictured in " The Indian Emperor " the conquest 
of Mexico and dethronement of Montezuma by the 
Spaniards, and the fine scenery and dresses of "The 
Indian Queen " reappeared. In the Prologue Dryden 
said: 
" The scenes are old, the habits are the same 
We wore last year, before the Spaniards came.'* 

S^ Martin Mar-all, | Or The | Feigned In- 
nocence: | A | Comedy. | As it was 
Acted at | His Highnesse the Duke of 
York's Theatre, [device] London, | Printed 
for H. Herringman, at the Sign of the 
Blew Anchor in the | Lower Walk of the 
New Exchange. 1668. 

Quarto. First edition. 

Two leaves without signature; B — K, in 

fours. 

31 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Adapted from Moliere's *' Etourdi," and owing much 
to Quinault's "Amant Indiscret," Fare's ** Francion," 
and Marmion's "Antiquary." It was first produced 
August 1 6, 1667, and seems to have been originally 
called " The Feigned Innocence ; or, Sir Martin Mar- 
all." 

39. The I Wild Gallant: | A | Comedy. | As 
if was Acted at the | Theatre- Royal, | By 
His I Majesties | Servants. | Written By 
John Dryden, Esq; | In the Savoy. | 
Printed by Tho. Newcomb, for H. Her- 
ringman, at the | Blew- Anchor, in the 
Lower- Walk of the | New Exchange. 
1669. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — K, in fours. 

This play, Dryden 's first dramatic attempt, was 
brought out in February, 1663, by the Kings Com- 
pany, who were then acting in Vere Street, Lincoln's 
Inn Fields. It had no success, though when revived 
in March, 1667, when its author was better known, it 
was very well received. In the Preface Dryden says : 
" It was the first attempt I made in Dramatique Poetry 
. . . . The Plot was not Originally my own : but 
so alter'd, by me . . . . that, whoever the Author 
was, he could not have challenged a Scene of it." The 
comedy was much altered when revived, and had a 
new Prologue and Epilogue, 

40. The I Tempest, | Or The | Enchanted 
Ifland. I A | Comedy. | As it is now 

32 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Acted at his Highnefs the Duke of 
York's I Theatre. | London, | Printed by 
J. M. for Henry Herringman at the 
Blew I Anchor in the Lower- walk of the 
New-Exchange. | MDCLXX. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — M2, in fours. 

First produced November 7, 1667. The plan of this 
alteration of Shakespeare's play appears to have been 
Sir William Davenant's, while the writing was largely 
Dryden's. From the Prologue, with its noble tribute 
to Shakespeare's genius, we take the familiar lines : 
" But Shakespeare's Magick could not copy'd be, 
Within that Circle none durft walk but he." 



Tyrannick Love, | Or The | Royal 
Martyr. | A | Tragedy. | As it is Acted 
by his Majefties Servants, at the | Theatre 
Royal. I By | John Dryden, Servant to 
his I Majesty. | Non jam prima peto 

neq ; vincere certo ; | Extremum 

rediiffe pudet. Virg. | London, | 

Printed for H. Herringman, at the Sign 
of the Blew Anchor in the | Lower Walk 
of the New Exchange. 1670. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, three leaves; a, two leaves; B — K2, in 

fours. 

S 33 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

"Tyrannic Love" was produced in the Spring of 
1669. In the Preface Dryden says it was contrived and 
written in seven weeks. 



42. An I Evening's Love, | Or The | Mock- 
Aftrologer. | Acted at the Theatre- 
Royal I By His I Majesties Servants. | 
Written By | John Dryden | Servant to 
His Majesty. | Mallem Convivis quam 
plaeuiffe Cocis. Mart. | In the Savoy, | 
Printed by T. N. for Henry Herringman, 
and are | to be fold at the Anchor in the 
Lower | Walk of the New Exchange, 
1671. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — O2, in fours. 

Founded on " Le Feint Astrologue," by the younger 
Corneille, who had imitated Calderon's " El Astrologo 
Fingido." First produced June 19, 1668. 

43. The Conqueft | of | Granada | By the 
Spaniards : | In Two Parts. | Acted at the 
Theater- Roy all. | Written by John Dry- 
den Servant | to His Majefty. | — Major 
rerum milhi nafcitur Ordo ; | Majus Opus 
moveo. Virg : iEneid : 7. | In the Savoy, | 
Printed by T. N. for Henry Herringman, 

34 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

and are to | be fold at the Anchor in the 
Lower Walk | of the New Exchange. 
1672. I Almanzor and Almahide, | Or, 
The I Conquest | of | Granada. | The Sec- 
ond Part. I As it is acted at the | Theatre- 
Royal. I Written by John Dryden Ser- 
vant I tohisMajefty. | Stimulos dedit 

aemula virtus. | Lucan. | In the Savoy, | 
Printed by T. N. for Henry Herringman, 
and are to be fold at the Anchor in the 
Lower Walk | of the New Exchange. 
1672. 

Quarto. First edition. 

*, four leaves; a and b, four leaves each; A 
and B, four leaves each; C i, followed by C 
2 and 3 apparently reprinted as c i and 2, and 
by C 4; D — I, in fours; two leaves without 
signature ; K — Y, in fours. 

This tragedy, in two parts, each part being a sep- 
arate play, was Dryden 's contribution to the King's 
Theatre in 1669 and 1670, Nell Gwyn having a promi- 
nent r61e in both plays. To " The Conquest of Gra- 
nada" he prefixed an essay on heroic plays, and an- 
nexed to the publication an essay on the dramatic poets 
of the last age, being a defence of his Epilogue to the 
Second Part. 

44. Marriage | A -la -Mode. | A | Comedy. | 
As it is Acted at the | Theatre - Royal. | 

3S 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Written by John Dryden, Servant | to His 

Majefty. | Quic quid fum ego, qua- 

mvis I Infra Lucilli censum ingeniumque, 
tamen me | Cum magnis vixiffe, invita, 
fatebitur ufque | Invidia, &fragiliquaerens 
illidere dentem | Offendet folido. | Horat. 
Serm. | London, | Printed by T. N. for 
Henry Herringman, and are to be | fold 
at the Anchor in the Lower Walk of | the 
New Exchange, 1673. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves; a, two leaves; B — M 3, in 

fours. (A 2 is misprinted B 2.) 

First played in 1672. The Prologue and Epilogue 
were printed the same year in " Covent Garden Drol- 
lery" (see No. 71). 

45. The I Assignation: | Or, | Love in a Nun- 
nery. I As it is Acted, | At the Theatre- 
Royal. I Written by John Dryden Ser- 
vant I to His Majesty. | Succeffum dea 

dira negat | Virg. | London : | 

Printed by T. N. for Henry Herringman, 
and are to be fold | at the Anchor in the 
Lower Walk of the New Exchange. 1 673. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves ; two leaves without signatures ; 

B — L 2, in fours. 

Unsuccessfully produced in 1672. 

36 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

46. Amboyna: | A | Tragedy. | As it is 
Acted I at the Theatre- Royal, | Written 
by John Dryden Servant | to His Ma- 
jefty. I — Manet alta mente repoftum. | 
London : | Printed by T. N. for Henry 
Herringman, and are to | be fold at the 
Anchor in the Lower Walk | of the New 
Exchange. 1673. 

Quarto. First Edition. 

A, four leaves; a, two leaves; B — Ki, in 

fours. 

" In 1673 Dryden produced the tragedy of * Amboyna, 
or the Cruelties of the Dutch to the English Merchants,' 
a very inferior piece, hastily written for the occasion of 
the Dutch War, and designed to gratify and inflame the 
national animosity against the Dutch. There has been 
a general mistake among Dryden's editors and biog- 
raphers of representing the Prologue and Epilogue to 
this play as principally made from a * Satire against the 
Dutch,' alleged to have been composed by Dryden in 
1662. The fact is that the alleged Satire was made up 
from the Prologue and Epilogue to this play of 1673, 
by the publisher of the * State Poems,' and first pub- 
lished by him in 1704, with the invention of its having 
been written in 1662. The style and tone of the Pro- 
logue and Epilogue are execrable." — Christie, 

. The I Mall: | Or The | Modifh Lovers. | 
A I Comedy. | Acted by His Majefties 
Servants. | Inceptis nulla Poteftas. | Lon- 
don, I Printed for William Cademan, at 

37 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

the Pope's-head in the low- | er Walk ol 
the New Exchange in the Strand. 1674. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A — K, in fours (title on A2). 

In September, 1668, a translation from the French, 
by Dryden, called " Ladies a la Mode," was produced 
at the King's Theatre, but failed the first night and was 
never repeated. Outside of Pepys's notice of its failure, 
nothing is known of this comedy ; but Edmund Gosse 
thinks it identical with "The Mall." The dedication 
of "The Mall" ("To William Whitcomb, Junior, 
Efq.") is signed "J. D." 



48. The I Miftaken Husband. | A Comedie, | 
As it is Acted by | His Majesties Ser- 
vants I At the I Theatre-Royall. | By a 

Perfon of Quality. Haec placuit 

femel [Hor.] | London, | Printed 

for J. Magnes and R. Bentley | in Ruffel- 
ftreet in Coven- Garden near | the Pi- 
azza's, Anno Domini, MDCLXXV. 

Quarto. First Edition. 

Four leaves without signature, B — K, in fours. 

Founded on the " Amphytrion " of Plautus. Dryden 
revised the version made by the "Person of Quality," 
whose name is not known, and added one scene, the 
Prologue and Epilogue. 

38 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Aureng-zebe : | A | Tragedy. | Acted at 
the I Royal-Theatre. | Written by | John 
Dryden, | Servant to his Majesty. | — 
Sed, cum fregit fubfellia verfu, | Efurit, 
intactam Paridi nifi vendat Agaven. 
Juv. I Licenfed, Roger UEstrange. | 
London, | Printed by T. N. for Henry 
Herringman, at the Anchor in | the Lower 
Walk of the New Exchange. 1676. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves ; a, two leaves ; B — M, in fours. 

"Aurengzebe," produced in 1675, was the last of 
Dryden's rhymed heroic tragedies. It has many fine 
lines. 

All For Love : | Or, The | World well 
Loft. I A I Tragedy, | As it is Acted at 
the I Theatre-Royal; | And Written in 
Imitation of Shakefpeare's Stile. | By John 
Dryden, Servant to His Majefty. | Facile 
eft verbum aliquod ardens (ut ita dicam) 
notare : idque re- | ftinctis animorum in- 
cendiis irridere. Cicero. | In the Savoy : 
I Printed by Tho. Newcomb, for Henry 
Herringman, at the Blew An- | chor in 
the Lower Walk of the New-Exchange. 
1678. 

39 



WORJCS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Quarto. First edition. 

One leaf without signature; a and b, four 
leaves each; one leaf without signature; B — L, 
in fours. 

This tragedy, on the theme of Antony and Cleopatra, 
which was brought out at the King's Theatre about the 
beginning of 1678, is universally considered the best of 
Dryden's plays. It was extremely successful on the 
stage. In it he abandoned rhyme for blank verse. 



51. Oedipus: | A | Tragedy. | As it is Acted 
at His I Royal Highnefs | The | Duke's 
Theatre. | The Authors | Mr. Dryden, 
and Mr. Lee. | Hi proprium decus & 
partum indignantur honorem | Ni teneant. 
— Virgil. I Vos exemplaria Graea, | Noc- 
turna verfate manu, verfate diurna. Horat. 
I Licensed, Jan. 3. i67f. | Roger L'Es- 
trange. | London, | Printed for R. Bent- 
ley and M. Magnes in Ruffel-ftreet | in 
Covent- Garden. 1 679. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — L, in fours. 

"CEdipus" was brought out a little after August, 
1678. Dryden wrote the first two acts ; the rest was 
chiefly written by Nathaniel Lee. Dryden briefly refers 
in the Epilogue to Sophocles, Seneca, and Corneille, 
who had treated the subject. 

40 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

52. Troilus I And | Cressida, | Or, | Truth 
Found too Late. | A | Tragedy | As it 
is Acted at the | Duke's Theatre, | To 
which is Prefixed, a Preface Containing | 
the Grounds of Criticifm in Tragedy. | 
Written by John Dryden | Servant to 
his Majefty. | Rectius, Illacum carmen 
deducis in actus, | Quam fi proferres 
ignota indictaqua primus, Hor. | London, 
Printed for Jacob Tonfon at the Judges- 
Head in Chan- | cery-Iane near Fleet- 
ftreet, and Abel Swall, at the Unicorn | 
at the Weft-end of S. Pauls, 1679. 

Quarto. First edition. 

One leaf without signature ; A, a, and b, in 

fours ; B — K 3, in fours. 

This adaptation was brought out at Dorset Gardens in 
April, 1679. Betterton, crowned with bays as the ghost 
of Shakespeare, spoke the Prologue, which is in Dry- 
den's best style. 

53. Secret-Love, | Or The | Maiden-Queen: 
I As it is Acted | By His Majesties Ser- 
vants I At The I Theater Royal. | Written 

by I John Dryden, Efq; | Vitiis 

nemo fine nafcitur; optimus ille | Qui 
minimus urgetur. Horace. | London 
6 41 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

I Printed by J. M. for Henry Herring- 
man, at the Sign | of the Anchor, on the 
lower walk of | the New-Exchange, 1679. 

Quarto. 

A — I 2, in fours. 

" Secret Love " was successfully played March 2,1667, 
Nell Gwyn,then a new actress, taking the part of Flori- 
mel, and was published in 1668. The Epilogue recited 
and published with the play was by a friend, " a person 
of honour." A short Epilogue for the comedy is in 
"Covent Garden Drollery," 1672 (see No. 71), with 
several known pieces by Dryden, and is probably his. 
For the revival of " Secret Love " in 1672 by the women, 
Dryden wrote a new Prologue and a new Epilogue, 
which were printed in " Covent Garden Drollery." 



54. The I Kind Keeper ; | Or, | Mr. Limber- 
ham : I A I Comedy : | As it was Acted 
at the I Duke's Theatre | By | His Royal 
Highneffes Servants. | Written by John 
Dryden, Servant to his Majefty. | K^v (is 
(j>dYi(](; ItuI ptCav, ojiwc szi xapTro^opYjoco. | 
'AvBoXoYia AsoTspa. | Hie nuptarum in- 
fanit amoribus ; hie meretricum : | Om- 
nes hi metuunt verfus ; odere Poetas. 
Horat. I London ; | Printed for R. Bent- 
ley, and M. Magnes, in Ruffel- | Street in 
Covent- Garden, 1680. 
42 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A — I, in fours ; two leaves without signature. 

Brought out at Dorset Gardens in 1678 and acted only 
three times. 

55. The I Spanish | Fryar | Or,| The Double 
Difcovery. | Acted at the Duke's The- 
atre. I Ut melius poffis fallere, fume to- 

gam. Ma. | Alterna revifens | 

Lufit, & in folido rurfus fortuna locevit. 
Vir. I Written by John Dryden, Servant 
to I His Majesty. | London, | Printed for 
Richard Tonfon and Jacob Tonfon, at 
Grays- 1 inn-gate, in Grays-inn-lane, and at 
the Judge's-Head,in Chancery-lane, 1681. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves ; a, one leaf; B — M 2, in fours. 

This severe attack on the Roman Catholic Order was 
probably written in 1680, and was successfully produced 
in the Spring or Summer of 1 68 1. It is one of Dry- 
den's best plays. 

56. The I Duke | Of | Guise. | A | Tragedy. 
I Acted By Their | Majefties Servants. | 
Written by Mr. Dryden, and Mr. Lee. | 
OoTCDf; 8s (pik6zi\Loi yoastc; Iv talc TToXtTsiaic 
TO ocYav jXY] yoXa^ajJLSvai, | tw a^aOw [xsiCov 
TO xaxov sXcDot. Plutarch in Agefilao. | Lon- 

43 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

don, I Printed by T. H. for R. Bentley in 
Ruffel-ftreet, near the Piazza | in Covent- 
Garden, and J. Tonfon at the Judge's 
Head in | Chancery-lane. M. DC- 
LXXXIII. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — L, in fours. 

This play of Dryden and Lee was first represented 
December 4, 1682. 

The Epilogue published with this play is the second 
one written by Dryden for it. The first was never 
regularly published, bat was circulated in the theatre 
in a broadsheet. Bell, in his edition of Dryden's 
poems, three volumes, 1854, reprinted it from a copy of 
this broadsheet. 

57. Albion I and | Albanius : | An | Opera. | 
Performed at the Queens Theatre, | in 
Dorfet Garden. | Written by Mr. Dryden. 
I Difcite juftitiam moniti, & non temnere 
Divos. Virg. | London, | Printed for Ja- 
cob Tonfon, at the Judge's Head in | 
Chancery-lane, near Fleet-ftreet. 1685. 

Folio. First edition. 

Two leaves without signature; b, two leaves, 

B — I, in twos. 

Written in celebration of the success of Charles II 
against the popular party and parliamentary opposition, 
but was not publicly acted until June 3, 1685, four 
months after James's accession. Albion is Charles 
and Albanius his brother James. 

44 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

;. Don I Sebastian, | King of Portugal: | 
A I Tragedy | Acted at the | Theatre 

Royal. I Written by Mr. Dryden. | 

Nee tarda Senectus | Debilitat vires 
animi, mutatque vigorem. Virgil. | Lon- 
don : I Printed for Jo. Hindmarfh, at the 
Golden Hall in | Cornhil. MDCXC. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A and a, four leaves each ; B — L, in fours ; 

M and N, in twos; O — S, in fours. 

One of Dryden's best dramas, but too long to be quite 
successful. It was first acted in 1690. 

59. The I State of Innocence, | And | Fall of 
Man : I An I Opera. | Written in Heroick 
Verfe; | And dedicated to Her Royal 
Highnefs | The | Duchess. | By Mr. John 

Dryden. | Utinam modo dicere 

poffem I Carmina digna Dea : Certe eft 
Dea Carmine digna. Ovid. Metam. | 
London, | Printed by J. M. for Henry 
Herringman, and are to be fold by | Abel 
Roper, near Temple-Barr, in Fleetftreet, 
1690. 

Quarto. 

A — G, in fours. 

" The State of Innocence," which Dryden wrote in 
four weeks, was first published in 1676. Though this 
adaptation of Milton's ** Paradise Lost" adds little to 

45 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Dryden's reputation, it is interesting to read his Pref- 
ace, where he describes Milton's poem as "being un- 
doubtedly one of the greatest, most noble, and sublime 
poems which either this age or nation has produced." 
"The State of Innocence" was never produced on the 
stage. 



60. Amphitryon ; | Or, | The Two Sofia's. | 
A Comedy. | As it is Acted at the | The- 
atre Royal. I Egregiam, vero laudem, & 
fpoHa ampla refertis ; | Una, dola, Divum, 
fi Faemina victa duorum eft. Virg. | Written 
by Mr. Dryden. | To which is added, | 
The Musick of the Songs. | Composed by 
Mr. Henry Purcel. | London, | Printed 
for J. Tonfon, at the Judges Head in 
Chancery-lane | near Fleet-ftreet, and M. 
Tonfon at Gray 's-Inn- Gate in | Gray's- 
Inn-Lane. 1691. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A — H, in fours; I, two leaves; four leaves 

without signatures; C and D, two leaves each. 

Also produced in 1690, later than " Don Sebastian," 
this comedy was very successful. The subject had 
been treated by Plant us and by Moliere. 

61. King Arthur: | Or, | The Britifh 
Worthy. | A Dramatick | Opera. | Per- 

46 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

formed at the Queens Theatre | By Their 
Majesties Servants. | Written by Mr. 

Dryden. | Heic alta Theatris | Fun- 

damenta locant : Scenis decora alta fu- 
turis. Virg. ^neid. i. | Purpurea in- 
texti tollunt aulaea Britanni. Georg. 3. 

10. I Tanton' placuit concurrere 

motu. ^neid. II. | Jupiter, aeterna Gen- 
teis in pace futuras ? | Et Celebrare 
Domeftica facta. Hon | London, Printed 
for Jacob Tonfon, at the Judges- Head | 
in Chancery-Lane near Fleetftreet. 1 69 1 . 

Quarto. First edition. 

Two leaves without signature ; A, four leaves ; 

one leaf without signature; B — H3, in fours. 

First written near the close of the reign of Charles 

11, and intended as a sequel to " Albion and Albanius,'* 
and for congratulation to Charles on his last political 
triumphs, "King Arthur" was greatly changed when 
finally brought out in 1691, with music by Purcell. 
The opera, as Dryden calls it, was a great success. In 
the dedication he acknowledges his indebtedness for 
the idea of" King Arthur " to George Savile, Marquis 
of Halifax. 

Cleomenes, | The | Spartan Heroe. | A 
Tragedy, | As it is Acted at the | The- 
atre Royal. I Written by Mr. Dryden. | 
To which is prefixt | The Life of Cleo- 

47 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

menes. | His Armis, ilia quoque tutus in 
aula. Juv. Sat. IV. | London, | Printed 
for Jacob Tonfon, at the Judge's-Head 
in Chancery- | Lane near Fleet- Street. 
1692. I Where Compleat Sets of Mr. Dry- 
dens Works, in Four | Volumes, are to be 
Sold. The Plays being put in the | order 
they were Written. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A and a, four leaves each ; B — K, in fours. 

First produced in May, 1692. Dryden's illness 
caused him to get young Southerne to write half of the 
last act for him. The play did not enjoy much favor. 

63. Love Triumphant; | Or, | Nature will 
Prevail. | A | Tragi- Comedy. | As it is 
Acted at the | Theatre Royal, | By Their 
Majesties Servants. | Quod optanti Divum 
promittere nemo | Auderet, volvenda 
dies, en, attulit ultro Virg. | Written by 
Mr. Dryden. | London, | Printed for 
Jacob Tonfon, at the Judges Head near | 
the Inner-Temple- Gate in Fleet-ftreet. 
1694. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves; a, two leaves; B — M2, in 

fours. 

On January 11, 1694, John Evelyn supped at Mr. 
Edward Sheldon's, " where was Mr. Dryden, the poet, 

48 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

who now intended to write no more plays, being intent 
on his translation of Virgil : he read to us his prologue 
and epilogue to his valedictory play now shortly to be 
acted." "Love Triumphant" was produced soon 
after this and was a decided failure. Dryden declared 
in the witty Prologue that he had forsaken the stage, 
and the Epilogue began with this conceit ; 

" Now, in good manners, nothing shall be said 
Against this play, because the poet's dead." 

Dryden used rhyme in this play in some of the tragic 
parts. Congreve, in whom the old poet had taken a 
kindly interest, wrote a song for the first scene of the 
fifth act. 

54. The I Comedies, | Tragedies, | and | 
Operas | Written by | John Dryden, 
Esq; I Now first Collected together, 
and I Corrected from the Originals. | In 
Two Volumes. | [The Second Volume] 
London, | Printed for Jacob Tonfon, at 
Gray's- Inn- Gate in Gray's-Inn-Lane ; | 
Thomas Bennet, at the Half-Moon; and 
Richard Wellington, at | the Lute in St. 
Paul's Church-Yard. MDCCI. 

Folio. First collected edition. 

The portrait of Dryden, by Edelinck, after Kneller, 
which was published with this edition, was also issued 
separately. 

65. The Dramatick | Works | Of | John 
Dryden, Esq; | In Six Volumes. | Lon- 

7 49 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

don : I Printed for J. Tonfon: And Sold 
by R. Knaplock, | W. Taylor, W. Hears, 
J. Browne, W. Churchill, | E. Symon, 

and J. Brotherton, MDCCXVII. The 

Dramatick Works | Of | John Dryden, 
Efq ; I Volume the Second. [Third, 
Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth] .... Lon- 
don, I Printed for Jacob Tonson at 
Shakespeare's Head | over-againft Kath- 
arine-Street in the Strand. | MDCCX- 
VII. 

Duodecimo. Portrait by Vertue in each 
volume. 

Edited by Congreve, who, in the Dedication to the 
Duke of Newcastle, thus refers to Dryden's lines in 
"The Double Dealer" (see No. 98): "In fome very 
Elegant, tho' very partial Verfes which he did me the 
Honour to write to me, he recommended it to me to be 
kind to his Remains. I was then, and have been ever 
fince moft fenfibly touched with that Expreffion: and 
the more fo, because I could not find in my felf the 
Means of fatisfying the Paffion which I felt in me, to do 
fomething anfwerable to an Injunction laid upon me in 
fo Pathetick and fo Amicable a Manner. You, my Lord, 
have furnifh'd me with Ample means of acquitting my 
felf, both of my Duty and Obligation to my departed 
Friend,'' 

66. The Dramatick | Works | Of | John 
Dryden, Efq ; | In | Six Volumes, [vols. 

SO 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

II-VI] I [head of Shakespeare] London : 
Printed for Jacob Tonson in the Strand. | 
MDCCXXXV. 

Duodecimo. Portrait by Vertue in first vol- 
ume ; the others have frontispieces by G. 
Vander Gucht. 

An uncut copy. 



III. Conttribttteu 

^7. Lachrymae Musarum : | The Tears of the 
Muses ; | Expreft in | Elegies ; | Written 
I By divers perfons of Nobility and Worth, 
I Upon the death of the most hopefull, | 
Henry Lord Haftings | Onely Sonn of the 
Right Honourable | Ferdinando Earl of 
Huntingdon | Heir-generall of the high 
born Prince | George Duke of Clarence, | 
Brother to | King Edward the fourth. ( 
Collected and fet forth by R. B. | Dignum 
laude virum Mufae vetant mori Hor. | 

SI 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

London, Printed by T. N. and are to be 
fold I by John Holden, at the blue Anchor 
in the | New Exchange. 1650. 

Octavo. 

A — C, in eights ; two leaves without signa- 
tures; D and E, eight leaves each; F, six 
leaves (F 3-8); G, three leaves. 

The elegy by Dryden on pages 88-92, is generally 
considered his first appearance in print. Among the 
other contributors to this collection of elegies to the 
memory of Lord Hastings (whose death by smallpox 
occurred July 9, 1649) were the Earl of Westmoreland, 
Lord Falkland, Sir Aston Cokain, Robert Herrick, Sir 
John Denham, Andrew Marvel, J. Bancroft, Alexander 
Brome, and Richard Brome. The latter, better known 
for his comedies, is usually thought to have been the 
editor, whose initials " R. B." are on the title. Dry- 
den's poem is characteristic of a schoolboy full of clas- 
sical erudition, and carries to an extreme the scholastic 
pedantry, discernible also, though in less degree, in 
Dryden's early political poems. The rhythm also of 
some of the lines is imperfect. The poem is reprinted 
in Vol. I. of the edition of the " Miscellany Poems " of 
1716. 

The present is the second issue of the volume. It is 
the same book as the first issue with a substituted title. 
As originally published, the title agreed with that given 
above, except in the imprint, which was as follows: 
" London, Printed by Tho. Newcomb, 1649." On the 
verso of the title were " The names of the Writers of 
these following Elegies,'^ but as they had been printed 
before the additional contributions had been sent in, 
the names of these last contributors were omitted, and 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

the list contains only twenty-seven names. The re- 
printed title has on the verso thirty-six names, and the 
editor has added a note at the foot apologizing to any 
contributor whose proper title he may have omitted. 



Another copy of the same edition and the 
identical copy formerly owned by Lucie, 
Countess of Huntingdon, the mother of 
the ill-fated Lord Hastings. On the fly- 
leaves the sorrowing mother has recorded 
her tribute to her only son in a copy of 
verses, which for pathetic personal inter- 
est far surpass the stilted and more formal 
compositions of the regular contributors. 

Sion and Parnassus, | Or | Epigrams | 
On feverall texts of the Old and | New 
Teflament, | 

To which are added, 

A Poem on the Passion, 

A Hymn on the Refurrection, 

Afcention, 

And feaft of Pentecost. 

By John Hoddesdon. | Horat de arte 
Poet. I Omne tulit punctum qui nufcuit 
utile dulci. | London, | Printed by R. 
Daniel for G. Everfden, and are to be | 

S3 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

fold at his Ihop over againft the Httle 
north I gate of S. Pauls Church. | MDCL. 

Octavo. First edition. 

^ , four leaves; A — 1 2, in eights. 

Facing the title is a portrait of the author, engraved, 
according to Bromley, by T. Cross. Beginning on the 
verso of *f[2 and extending to the verso of If 4 are 
commendatory poems by Henry Bromley (in Latin), 
R. Marsh, W. James, and John Dryden. Dryden's 
poem, " To his Friend, the Author, on his Divine Epi- 
gram," signed J. Dryden, of Trin. C, is believed to be 
his second appearance in print. 

70. Poems, I Viz. | i. A Panegyrick to the 
King. I 2. Songs and Sonnets. | 3. The 
Blind Lady, a Comedy. | 4. The Fourth 
Book of Virgil, | 5. Statius his Achil- 
leis, I with Annotations. | 6. A Pane- 
gyrick to Generall | Monck. | By the 
Honorable | S^ Robert | Howard. | Lon- 
don, I Printed for Henry Herringman, 
and are to be fold at his | fhop at the 
fign of the Anchor on the lower Walk | 
of the New Exchange. 1660. 

Octavo. First edition. 

A — B, eight leaves each; C, nine leaves; 

D — O, in eights. 

Contains a commendatory poem to Howard, signed 
"John Driden." 

54 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

71. Covent Garden | Drolery, | Or A | 
Colection, | Of all the Choice Songs, | 
Poems, I Prologues and Epilogues, 
(Sung and | Spoken at Courts and Thea- 
ters) never in | Print before. | Written 
by the refined'ft Witts of the Age. | 
And Collected by A. B. | London, | 
Printed for James Magnes, neer the 
Piazza in | Ruffel- Street, 1672. 

Octavo. First edition. 

One leaf without signature; Bi — H7, in 

eights. 

^^ A large part of the pieces in " Covent Garden Drol- 

lery" are Dryden's. He may have been also the 
author of several other pieces there, whose authorship 
is not known. For example, the fine Prologue to 
"Julius Csesar," written for a revival of the play at 
the Theatre Royal, may be his. 

72. The I Man of Mode, | Or, | S^ Fop- 
ling Flutter. I A | Comedy. | Acted at 
the Duke's Theatre. | By George Ethe- 
rege, Efq ; | Licensed, | June 3. | 1676. | 
Roger UEftrange. | London, | Printed 
by J. Macock, for Henry Herringman, at 
the Sign of | the Blew Anchor in the | 
Lower Walk of the | New Exchange, 
1676. 

SS 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — N, in fours. 

Epilogue by Dryden. This was the last play Etherege 
produced. 



73. Circe, | A | Tragedy. | As it is Acted | 
At His I Royal Highnefs the Duke of 
York's I Theatre. | By Charles D'Avenant, 
L.L.D. I Hor. Velut ^gri fomnia vava. | 
Licensed June 18,1677, Roger L*Estrange. 

I London, | Printed for Richard Tonfon 
at his Shop | under Gray's-Inn-gate 
next Gray's-Inn- | lane, MDCXXXVII. 

Quarto. First edition. 

Two leaves without signature ; B — L 2, in 

fours. 

Prologue by Dryden. 

74. The I Rival Queens, | or the death of 
I Alexander | The Great. | Acted at the 
I Theatre- Royal. | By | Their Majefties 
Servants. | By Nat. Lee, Gent. | — Na- 
tura fublimis & acer, | Nam fpirat tragicum 
fatis, 8l feliciter audet. | Horat. Epift. ad 
Aug. I London, | Printed for James 
Magnes and Richard Bentley, at the Poft- 

56 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

houfe in | Ruffel-ftreet in Covent-Garden, 
near the Piazza^s, 1677. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves ; a, two leaves ; B — D, in fours ; 

E, five leaves ; F — I, in fours. 

Complimentary poem by Dryden. 

75. Mithridates | Kingof Pontus, | A | Trag- 
edy : I Acted at the | Theatre Royal, | 
By their Majeftie*s Servants. | Written by 
Nat. Lee. | Hi motus animorum atque 
haec certamina tanta, | Pulveris exigui 

i' jactu compreffa quiefcent. | Virgil. Georg. 
1. 4. I Licenfed March 28 1678. | Roger 
L'Estrange. | London : | Printed by R. 
E. for James Magnes and Rich. Bentley. 
in Ruffel- | ftreet in Covent-Garden, 
near the Piazza's 1678. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — L, in fours. 

Epilogue by Dryden. A second Epilogue was 
written for a representation of the play in 1 68 1, and 
Scott has printed it as Dryden's, but it was probably 
done by Lee himself. 

^6, A I True Widow. | A | Comedy, | Acted 
by the Duke's Servants. | Written by | 

8 57 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Tho. Shadwell. | Odi profanum Vulgus & 
arceo. | [device] London, | Printed for 
Benjamin Tooke, at the Ship in St. Paul's 
Church- I yard. 1679. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — L, in fours. 

Prologue by Dryden. After his quarrel with Shad- 
well, Dryden gave this Prologue to Mrs. Behn, in 1690, 
for her play, " The Widow Ranter " (see No. 92). 

yj. Ovid's I Epistles, | Translated | By Sev- 
eral Hands. | Vel tibi compofita cantetur 
Epiftola voce : | Ignotam hoc aliis ille 
novavit opus. Ovid. | London, | Printed 
for Jacob Tonfon at the Sign of the | 
Judges Head in Chancery Lane, near | 
Fleet-Street. 1680. 

Octavo. First edition. 

A, eight leaves; a, four leaves; B — S, in 

eights. 

The Preface is signed by Dryden; among the other 
contributors were Tate, Flatman, Mrs. Behn, Settle, 
Lord Mulgave, Rhymer, and Otway. The translation 
gave occasion for several burlesques ; (see Nos. 105- 
107). 

78. Caefar Borgia ; | Son of | Pope Alexan- 
der I The I Sixth : | A | Tragedy | 

58 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Acted at the | Duke's Theatre | By | 
Their Royal Highneffes Servants. | Written 
by Nat. Lee. | London : | Printed by R. 
E. for R. Bentley, and M. Magnes, in 
Ruffel- I Street in Coven t- Garden, near 
the Piazza, 1680. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — K, in fours. 

Prologue by Dryden. 

79. The I Loyal | General, | A | Tragedy. | 
Acted at the | Duke's Theatre | Written | 
By N.Tate, | London, | Printed for Henry 
Bonwicke, at the Red Lion | in St. Paul's 
Church-yard, M. DC. LXXX. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves; a, two leaves; B — 12, in 

fours. 

Prologue by Dryden. 

80. The I Loyal Brother | Or the | Persian | 
Prince. | A | Tragedy | As it is Acted at 
the Theatre Royal | by their Majefties 
Servants. By Thomas Southern. | I,fuge; 
fed poteras tutior effe Domi. Mart. | 
London, | Printed for William Cademan 

59 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

at the Popes Head | in the New Exchange 
in the Strand, 1682. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — 12, in fours. 

Prologue and Epilogue by Dryden, though he does 
not sign them. This was Southerne's first play. It 
was directed against the Whigs, the Duke of York 
being the "loyal brother," while the conspirator in 
the play was Shaftesbury. According to Dr. Johnson, 
Dryden raised his customary price for a prologue or 
epilogue from two to three guineas when " The Loyal 
Brother " was brought out, saying : " Not, young 
man, out of disrespect to you, but the players have had 
my goods too cheap." This incident is responsible for 
Pope's lines ; 

" Tom, whom Heaven sent down to raise 
The price of prologues and of plays." 



81. The I Unhappy Favorite : | Or The | 
Earl of Essex. | A | Tragedy. | Acted at 
the I Theatre Royal | By Their Majeft/s 
Servants. | Written by John Bankes. | 

qui nimios optabat Honores, | Et 

nimias pofcebat Opes, numerofa parabat | 
Excelfae turris tabulata, unde altior effet | 
Cafus & impulfae praeceps immane Ruinae. 
Juven. Sat. 10. | London, | Printed for 
Richard Bentley and Mary Magnes in 
60 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Ruffel-ftreet | near the Piazza in Covent 
Garden, 1682. 

Quarto. First edition, 
A — L2, in fours. 

Prologue and Epilogue by Dryden. 

The I History | Of The | League. | 
Written in French | By Monfieur Maim- 
bourg. I Translated into English | Accord- 
ing to His Majefty's Command. | By Mr. 

Dryden. | Neque enim libertas gra- 

tior ulla eft | Quam fub Rege Pio | 

London, | Printed by M. Flefher, for 
Jacob Tonfon, at the | Judges- Head in 
Chancery-lane near Fleetftreet 1684. 

Octavo. First edition. 

A, a, and b, in eights ; c, six leaves ; B — Z, 
and Aa — Kk, in eights ; LI, four leaves ; 
Mm, two leaves; Aaa — Uuu, in eights; Xxx, 
four leaves. 

An I Essay | On | Translated Verfe. | By 
the I Earl of Roscommon. | Cape Dona 
Extrema Tuorum. | London, | Printed 
for Jacob Tonfon at the Judges Head in | 
Chancery Lane, 1684. 
61 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Quarto. First edition. 

One leaf without signature; A — D, in fours; 
between A3 and A4 are inserted two leaves 
signed (a) and (a2). 

Contains complimentary address by Dryden. Ros- 
common returned Dryden's favor with a compli- 
mentary poem on his " Religio Laici," which Dryden 
published in the " Miscellany Poems " of 1684 (see 
No. 85). 

84. Conftantine | The | Great; | A | Trag- 
edy. I Acted at the | Theatre- Royal, | 
By their Majefties Servants. | Written by 
Nat. Lee, Gent. | London, | Printed by 
H. Hills Jun. for R. Bently, in Ruffel- 
Street, Covent- 1 Garden, and J. Tonfon, 
at the Judges- Head in | Chancery- Lane 
near Fleet- ftreet. 1684. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — 1 2, in fours. 

Epilogue by Dryden. 

85. Mifcellany Poems. | Containing a New | 
Translation | Of | Virgills Ecloques, | 
Ovid's Love Elegies, | Odes of Horace, | 
And Other Authors; | With Several | 
Original Poems. | By the Mofl Eminent 
Hands. | Et Vos, O Lauri, carpam, & Te, 

62 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

proxima Myrte: | Sic pofitae quoniam 
fuaveis mifcetis oderes. | Virg. Eel. 2. | 
London, | Printed for Jacob Tonfon, at 
the Judges-head in | Chancery- Lane near 
Fleet-ftreet, 1684. 

Octavo. First edition. Edited by Dryden. 
A, four leaves; B — X, in eights; Y, four 
leaves ; A — E, in eights ; F, four leaves. 

This volume contains reprints of "Mac Flecknoe," 
"Absalom and Achitophel," and "The Medal," to- 
gether with translations from Ovid, Theocritus, and 
Virgil, complimentary addresses, and some Prologues 
and Epilogues. 

56. Sylvae : | Or, The | Second Part | Of | 
Poetical | Miscellanies. | Non de- 
ficit alter | Aureus; & fimili frondefcit 
virga Metallo. Virg. | London, | Printed 
for Jacob Tonfon, at the Judges- Head | 
in Chancery-lane near Fleetftreet, 1685. 

Octavo. First edition. 

A and a, eight leaves each; b, four leaves; 
leaf of errata; B — L, in eights; M, four 
leaves; Aa — Hh, in eights; li, seven leaves. 

This second series of the Miscellanies Contains 
translations from the " ^neid," Theocritus, and Hor- 
ace, mostly by Dryden. There is a long Preface by 
Dryden on translation. The third series, with the ad- 

63 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

ditional title of "Exam en Poeticum," appeared in 1693, 
containing translations from Ovid*s " Metamorphoses," 
the "Veni, Creator Spiritis," epitaphs, and*' Hector 
and Andromache " from the 6th Iliad. The fourth, 
called also the " Annual Miscellany," was published 
in 1694, and included Dryden's translation of the 
"Georgics," bk. iii, and his excellent poem addressed 
to Sir Godfrey Kneller. A fifth volume, by other 
writers, appeared in 1704, and a sixth in 1706. A uni- 
form edition of the Miscellanies was published in 1716 
in six volumes, and is described under the next 
number. 

"^T, The First Part [Second, Third, Fourth, 
Fifth and Sixth] of | Miscellany Poems. | 
Containing Variety of New | Transla- 
tions I Of The I Ancient Poets : | Together 
with Several Original Poems. | By the 
Moft Eminent Hands. | Publifh'd by Mr. 
Dryden. | [quotation in first three volumes] 
The Fourth Edition. | London. | Printed 
for Jacob Tonson at Shakespeare's | Head 
over-againfb Katharine- Street in | the 
Strand. MDCCXVI. 

Duodecimo. 

88. Poems | By | Mrs. Anne Killigrew. | Im- 

modicis brevis eft aetas, & rara Senectus. 

I Mart. 1. 6. Ep. 29. | These Poems are 

Licenfed to be Publiflied, | Sept. 30, 1685. 

64 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

I I Ro. L'Eftrange. | [device] London : | 

Printed for Samuel Lowndes, over againft 

; Exeter Exchange in | the Strand. 1686. 

[Quarto. First edition. 

One leaf without signature; [a]-[c] i, in fours; 
[ B — O 2, in fours. 

Contains Ode to the memory of Anne Killigrew by 
Dryden. 

Remains | of | Mr. John Oldham | In | 
Verse and Prose. | London : | Printed for 
Jo Hindmarfh, at the Golden Ball over | 
againft the Royal Exchange in Cornhil. 
1687. 

Octavo. 

A — I, in eights. 

Contains an epitaph by Dryden on the death of Old- 
ham, author of " Satires on the Jesuits," which were 
written in 1679 and published in the height of the ex- 
citement against the Roman Catholics. Oldham died 
in 1683, in his twenty-ninth year, and Dryden gives 
generous praise to his fellow satirist in the noble lines, 
beginning : 

" Farewell, too little and too lately known, 
Whom I began to think and call my own." 

The I Life | Of | St. Francis Xavier, | Of 
The I Society | Of | Jesus, | Apoftle of 
the Indies, | and of Japan. | Written in 
French by Father Domi- | nick Bohours, 

9 ^S 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

of the fame Society. | Tranflated into 
Englifli I By Mr. Dryden. | London, 
Printed for Jacob Tonson, at the Judges- 
Head I in Chancery-lane, MDCLXXX- 
VIII. 

Octavo. First edition. 

A, eight leaves; a, four leaves ; B — Z, Aa — 

Zz, and Aaa — Ccc, in eights. 

91. Paradife Loft. | A | Poem | in Twelve 
Books. I The Authour | John Milton. | 
The Fourth Edition, Adorn'd with Sculp- 
tures. I London, | Printed by Miles 
Flefher, for Jacob Tonfon, at the Judge's- 
Head in Chancery-lane near Fleet-Street. 
I MDCLXXXVIII. 

Folio. 

A, two leaves; B — Z and Aa — Yy 2, in 

fours; Zz and Aa, two leaves each. 

The title is preceded by a portrait of Milton, en- 
graved by R. White, under which are Dryden' s well- 
known lines : 

Three poets, in three distant ages born, 
Greece, Italy, and England did adorn. 
The First in loftinefs of thought SurpalPd, 
The next in Majesty; in both the Last. 
The force of Nature cou'd no further goe : 
To make a Third she joynd the former two. 
This is the first folio edition of "Paradise Lost," and 
the first to be illustrated, the work containing, in ad- 
dition to the portrait, twelve full-sized copper-plates. 

66 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

92. The I Widdow Ranter | Or, The History 
of I Bacon in Virginia. | A | Tragi-Com- 
edy, I Acted by their Majefties Servants. 
I Written by Mrs. A. Behn. | [device] 
London, Printed for James Knapton at 
the I Crown in St. PauFs Church- Yard. 
1690. 

Quarto. First Edition. 
A — H, fours. 

The Prologue, by Dryden, is the one he wrote for 
Shadwell's '*True Widow" (see No. 76). 

. A I Dialogue | Concerning | Women, | 
Being a Defence | Of the | Sex: | Writ- 
ten to Eugenia. | London, Printed for R. 
Bentley in Ruffel-Street in Covent-Gar- 
den, and J. Tonfon at the Judge's-Head 
in Chancery-Lane. 1691. 

Octavo. First edition. 

A, four leaves; B — K 3, in eights. 

Dryden contributed a Preface to this work, the most 
notable of the productions in prose of William Walsh 
(1663-1708), critic and poet, and the friend of Alex- 
ander Pope. 

94. The I Mistakes, | Or, | The Falfe Re- 
port: I A I Tragi- Comedy. | Acted by 
Their Majefties Servants. | Written by 

67 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Mr. Jof. Harris. | The Prologue Written 
by Mr. Dryden, | The Epilogue by Mr. 
Tate. I Haec fi placuiffe erint mihi praemia 
Mart. I Licenfed according to Order. | 
London, Printed for Jo. Hindmarfh at the 
Golden-Ball | over againft the Royal- Ex- 
change. 1 69 1. 

Quarto. First edition. 

Four leaves without signature ; B — L, in fours. 

Harris was the ostensible author of this dull piece, to 
which Dryden contributed a Prologue. 

95. The I Satires | Of | Decimus Junius Ju- 
venalis. | Tranflated into | EngHsh Verse. 
I By I Mr. Dryden, | And | Several 
other Eminent Hands. | Together with 
the I Satires | Of | Aulus Perfius Flac- 
cus. I Made EngHfh by Mr. Dryden. | 
With which is Prefixed a Difcourse con- 
cerning the Original and Progrefs | of 
Satire. Dedicated to the Right Honour- 
able Charles Earl of | Dorfet, &c. By 
Mr. Dryden. | Quicquid agunt homines, 
votum, timor, Ira, voluptas, | Gaudia, 
difcurfus, noftri eft farrago libelli. | Lon- 
don, I Printed for Jacob Tonfon at the 
Judge's-Head in Chancery- Lane, near | 
6S 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Fleetftreet MDCXCIII. | Where you 
may have Compleat Sets of Mr. Dryden's 
Works, in Four Volumes | in Quarto, the 
Plays being put in the order they were 
Written. 

Folio. First edition. 

Two leaves without signature; (a) — (o), in 

twos ; B — LIU and A — Z, in twos. 

Each of the satires, twenty-two in all, is preceded by 
a half-title and argument, following which are ex- 
planatory notes, by Dryden. From the half-titles to 
Juvenal we learn that five of the satires were translated 
by Dryden, one each by Charles Dryden and John 
Dryden, Jr., two by Tate, one each by Bowles, Stepney, 
Harris, Congreve, Power, and Creech, and one by an 
anonymous translator. All the satires of Persius were 
translated by Dryden. 

96. Another copy of "Juvenal,'' on Large 
Paper. 

97. Henry the Second, | King of England ; | 
With The | Death of Rofamond. | A 
Tragedy. | Acted at the Theatre- Royal, | 
By I Their Majefties Servants. | Lon- 
don : I Printed for Jacob Tonfon, at the 
Judges Head in | Chancery-lane near 
Fleet-ftreet. MDCXCHI. 

69 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — H2, in fours. 

This tragedy was written by John Bancroft, the sur- 
geon, for Mountfort, the comedian, and it was pub- 
lished as Mountfort's. The Epilogue is by Dryden. 

98. The I Double-Dealer, | A | Comedy. | 
Acted at the | Theatre Royal, | By Their 
Majefties Servants. | Written by Mr. 
Congreve. | Interdum tamen, & vocem 
Comoedia tollit. | Hor. Ar. Po. | Lon- 
don, I Printed for Jacob Tonson, at the 
Judges- Head near | the Inner-Temple- 
Gate in Fleet- ftreet. 1694. 

Quarto. First edition. 
Aa, and B — L, in fours. 

Congreve's first play, " The Old Bachelor," was very 
successful ; this, his second comedy, was first acted in 
November, 1693, and was received with indifference. 
The following year "The Double Dealer'' was pub- 
lished, and Dryden contributed a complimentary ad- 
dress, " To my Dear Friend, Mr. Congreve," in which 
he consoled and encouraged him. In conclusion he 
charged Congreve with the defence of his fame when 
he was dead. 

. . . "You, whom ev'ry Muse and Grace adorn, 
Whom I forfee to better Fortune born. 
Be kind to my Remains ; and oh defend, 
Againft Your Judgment Your departed Friend! 
Let not the Insulting Foe my Fame purfue ; 

70 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

But Ihade thofe Laurels which defcend to you : 
And take for Tribute what thefe Lines exprefs 
You merit more ; nor cou'd my Love do lefs." 

In 1 71 7 Congreve fulfilled Dryden's charge by an 
edition of his plays (see No. 65). 

^9. The I Husband | His Own | Cuckold. | 
A I Tragedy. | As it is Acted at the 
Theater in Little | Lin coins- Inn-Fields, | 
Written by Mr. John Dryden, Jun. | Et 
Pater ^neas, & Avanculas excitet Hec- 
tor. I Virg. I London, | Printed for J. 
Tonfon, at the Judge's Head in Fleet- 
ftreet, | near the Inner Temple - Gate, 
1696. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves ; * two leaves ; B — H, in fours. 

" The Husband his Own Cuckold " was written by 
Dryden's second son, John. It was produced in 1696, 
with a Prologue by Congreve and an Epilogue by Dry- 
den. It was published soon after, with a Preface by 
Dryden and a Dedication to Sir Robert Howard, the 
author's maternal uncle, who had revised and re- 
written the play. 

100. The Works | Of | Virgil : | Containing 
His Pastorals, | Georgics, | And | 
^neis. I Tranflated into Englifh Verfe ; 
By I Mr. Dryden. | Adorned v^ith a 

71 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Hundred Sculptures. | Sequiturque 
Patrem non paffibus ^quis. Virg. 
JEn.2. I London, | Printed for Jacob 
Tonson, at the Judges - Head in 
Fleetftreet, | near the Inner-Temple- 
Gate, MDCXCVn. 

Quarto. 

A, two leaves ; ^ and ^^, four leaves each ; 
opopop — ^^^^^, in twos, t, two leaves; 
tt , three leaves ; B — G, in fours ; fl , four 
leaves ; ^|f , two leaves ; H — T, in fours, 
U, two leaves; (a) — (f), in fours Aa — Zz, 
Aaa — Zzz, and Aaaa — Ffff, in fours ; Gggg, 
two leaves ; Hhhh and liii, four leaves each ; 
Kkkk, two leaves. 

Dryden's translationof Virgil was commenced near 
the end of 1693, and was finished about the end of 
1697. It was published in July, 1697, and sold so 
rapidly that the first edition was all disposed of in a 
few months, and a second, revised by Dryden, ap- 
peared in the following year. In November, 1697, 
he wrote to his sons Charles and John, who were at 
Rome, in the Pope's service : " My Virgil succeeds 
in the world beyond its desert or my reputation." 

loi. Heroick Love: | A | Tragedy. | As it 

is Acted at | the Theatre in | Little 

Lincolns- Inn- Fields. | Written by the 

Honourable | George Granville, Efq; | 

72 



WORKS OF JOHN DRYDEN. 

Rectius Iliacum Carmen deducis in 

Actus, I Hor. de Arte Poetica. | 

Quam fi proferres ignota indictaque 
primus. | London : | Printed for F. 
Saunders, in the New- Exchange in the 
Strand; | H. Playford in the Temple- 
Change, and B. Tooke at the Middle- | 
Temple-Gate, Fleetftreet, 1698. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, four leaves ; A, two leaves ; B — K, in 

fours ; two leaves without signature. 

Contains complimentary poem by Dryden. 

Beauty in Diftrefs. | A | Tragedy. | As 
it is Acted at the Theatre | in Little 
Lincolns-Inn-Fields. | By His Majefty's 
Servants. | Written by Mr. Motteaux. | 
With a Difcourfe of the | Lawfulnefs 
and Unlawfulnefs of Plays, | Lately 
Written in French by the Learned Father 
Calf - I faro. Divinity - Profeffsor at 
Paris. I Sent in a Letter to the Author | 
By a Divine of the Church of England. | 
London, | Printed for Daniel Brown, at 
the Black Swan and Bible without 
Temple - | bar ; and Rich. Parker at 
the Unicorn under the Piazza of the 

10 73 



DRYDENIANA. 

Royal I Exchange. 1698. | There is 
newly publifhed, The Ufefulnefs of the 
Stage, to the Happinefs of Mankind, | 
To Government, and to Religion. Oc- 
cafioned by a late Book, Written by 
Jeremy | Collier, M. A. By Mr. Dennis. 
Printed for Rich. Parker. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — M2, in fours. 

" Motteaux's tragedy, * Beauty in Distress *, was 
published in June, 1698, with a complimentary poem 
by Dryden prefixed. Jeremy Collier's attack on the 
immorality and profaneness of the English stage, in 
which Dryden was severely handled, had appeared 
in the preceding March. Dryden retaliates in the 
poem he wrote for Motteaux's comedy, and ex- 
cuses himself for his attacks on the clergy. In his 
Epilogue to *The Pilgrim,' written very shortly 
before his death, Dryden defended himself against 
Collier ; but it must be admitted that his self-defence 
is not complete or satisfactory." — Christie, 



IV. ©rttieniana* 



103. Epigrams | Of All Sorts, | Made at | 
Divers Times | On | Several Occasions. 
I By Richard Flecknoe. | A noftris pro- 

74 



DRYDENIANA. 

culeft omnis vefica Hbellis. Mart. | Lon- 
don: I Printed for the Author, and Will. | 
Crook, at the Green-dragon with- | out 
Temple-bar, 1670. 

Octavo. 

A, four leaves ; B — H, in eights. 

In one of his epigrams Flecknoe praises Dryden, 
*' the Muses' darHng and delight, 
Than whom none ever flew so high a height." 
Dryden, however, regarded Flecknoe as an exceedingly 
dull poet, and made use of his name in the title of 
" Mac Flecknoe,*' 1682, his satire on Shadwell (see 
No. 14). In "Mac Flecknoe" Dryden says that 
Flecknoe 
" In prose and verse was owned, beyond dispute, 
Through all the realms of nonsense, absolute." 
Flecknoe, who was an Irishman and a Roman Catholic 
priest, is supposed to have died about 1678. Little is 
known about him; his verses, which are rather unin- 
teresting, were happily chiefly printed for private cir- 
culation. 

The I Rehearsal, | As it was Acted at 
the I Theatre- Royal. | [device] London, 
Printed for Thomas Dring, at the White- 
Lyon, I next Chancery-Lane end in 
Fleet- I ftreet, 1672. 

Quarto. First edition. 

Two leaves without signature; B — H, in 

fours. 

IS 



DRYDENIANA. 

In " The Rehearsal " Buckingham caricatured Dry- 
den and ridiculed his rhymed plays. The witty Duke 
had the assistance in this famous production of Butler, 
Sprat, Clifford, and others. The poet Bayes of the 
farce was Dryden ; his dress and manners were imi- 
tated, his favorite phrases freely used, and a number 
of passages of his plays parodied. Dryden was re- 
venged in " Absalom and Achitophel," where he 
sketched Buckingham as Zimri. Buckingham replied 
in a little known and rather dull work entitled " Poet- 
ical Reflections on a late Poem, entitled Absalom and 
Achitophel, by a Person of Honour." Eighteen plays 
were burlesqued in " The Rehearsal," of which the 
following were Dryden's : " Conquest of Granada," 
"The Indian Emperor," " Marriage-d-la-Mode," 
" Secret Love," " Tyrannic Love," and " The Wild 
Gallant." 



105. The I Wits I Paraphrased: | Or, | Para- 
phrase upon Paraphrase. | In a Burlesque 
I On The | Several late Tranflations | 
Of I Ovid's Epiftles. | Juven. Sat. 10. | 
Et facilis cuivis rigidi cenfura cachinni. | 
London, | Printed for Will Cademan, at 
the Popes- Head in | the New Exchange 
in the Strand. 1680. 

Octavo. First edition. Anonymous. 
A — K, in eights. 

Burlesque rhyme was in fashion at this period, fol- 
lowing the example set by Butler in his" Hudibras," 
and a poet could hardly publish a serious work but 

76 



DRYDENIANA. 

that it was immediately parodied. The present col- 
lection of fifteen burlesque epistles was especially 
aimed at Dryden's translation of Ovid (see No. 77). 
It was followed by a burlesque upon itself, by Alex- 
ander Radcliffe, which, in a second edition, was 
enlarged. 

!io6. Ovid Traveftie, | A | Burlesque | Upon 
feveralof | Ovid's Epiftles: | By | Alex- 
ander Radcliffe, | Of Gray's-Inn, Gent. | 
London, | Printed for Jacob Tonfon, at 
the Judge's- Head in Chan- | eery-lane, 
near Fleet-Street. MDCLXXX. 

Quarto. First edition. 

*, three leaves; A — F i, in fours. 

This volume pretends to be an answer to " The 
Wits Paraphrased," but also burlesques Dryden's 
translation. 

>7. Ovid Travesflie, | A | Burlesque | 
Upon Ovid's Episftles. | The Second 
Edition, Enlarged with | Ten Epiftles 
never before printed. | By | Alexander 
Radcliffe, | of Gray's- Inn, Gent. | Lon- 
don, I Printed for Jacob Tonfon, at the 
Judge's- I Head in Chancery-Lane, near 
Fleet-ftreet. | MDCLXXXL 
Octavo. Second edition. 
A, five leaves ; B — I, in eights. 

Contains ten additional epistles, making fifteen in all. 

77 



DRYDENIANA. 

1 08. Azaria | And | Hushai, | A | Poem. | 
Quod cuique vifum eft fentiant. | Lon- 
don, I Printed for Charles Lee, | An. 
Dom. 1682. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, two leaves ; B — F3, in fours. 

A counter allegory by Samuel Pordage to "Ab- 
solom and Achitophel," and one of its several answers. 

109. The I Medal | Of | John Bayes : | A | 
Satyr | Against | Folly and Knavery. | 

Facit indignatio verfus. | [device] 

London : | Printed for Richard Janeway, 
1682. 

Quarto. First edition. 

One leaf without signature; A — D, in fours. 

A virulently personal answer by Thomas Shadwell 
to " The Medal." It so angered Dryden that he de- 
voted a new satire to Shadwell, who had once been 
his friend — "Mac Flecknoe, or a Satire on the True 
Blew Protestant Poet, T. S." (see No. 14). 

1 10. Satyr | To His | Muse. | By the Author 
of I Absalom & Achitophel. | Quo liceat 
libris non licet ire mihi | Turpiter hue 
illuc Ingeniosus eat. | London, | Printed 
for T. W. 1682. 

78 



DRYDENIANA. 

Quarto. First edition. 
B — Di, in fours. 

One of the most noted of the numerous contribu- 
tions to the controversy between Dryden and Shad- 
well. As it principally consists of abuse of Dryden, 
it could not, of course, have been written by him. It 
has been generally ascribed to John Somers, later the 
celebrated Lord Chancellor, then a young man begin- 
ning his profession ; but Christie says there is neither 
internal probability nor evidence to support the story. 
Pope has said that Somers told him he had nothing to 
do with the poem. 



Another copy of the same edition, with 
pagination somewhat irregular and with 
a different imprint, but agreeing in other 
respects. The imprint : ** London, | 
Printed for D. Green, 1682.'* 

The I Laurel, | A | Poem | On The | 
Poet-Laureat, | Nos fequimur Lauros 
Te Lauri fponte feqnuntur. | London, 
Printed for Benj. Tooke at the Ship in 
St. Paul's I Church-Yard, 1685. 

Quarto. First edition. 
A — F I, in fours. 

An attack on Dryden by Robert Gould, who pub- 
tished a volume of poems in 1689. 

79 



DRYDENIANA. 

113. The I Hind | and The | Panther | Trans- 
versed | To the Story of | The Country | 
Moufe and the City- | Moufe | Much 
Malice Mingled with a little Wit Hind 
Pan. I Nee vult Panthera domari. Quae 
Genus | London: | Printed for W. Davis, 
MDCLXXXVII. 

Quarto. First edition. 

A, three leaves ; B — E2, in fours. 

The best of the many replies to Dryden's brilliant 
poem, — Bayes, Smith's and Johnson's — of Bucking- 
ham's " Rehearsal/' reappeared in this truly witty 
performance, by Matthew Prior and Charles Mon- 
tague, the future Earl of Halifax, two young men 
destined to become distinguished in literature and 
politics. Montague was Prior's ostensible coUabator 
in this satire, but Prior was probably the more active 
partner. It was his first literary essay. 

114. A I Description | of | Mr. D n's | 

Funeral | A | Poem. | London ; | Printed 
for A. Baldwin in Warwick-lane, | 
MDCC. Price 3d. 

Folio. First edition. By Tom Brown. 
A — B, in twos. 

115. LuctusBritannici: | or the | Tears of the 
I British Mufes; | for the | Death of | 
John Dryden, Efq : | late | Poet Laureat 

80 



PORTRAITS OF DRYDEN. 

to Their Majesties, K. Charles | and K. 
James the Second, | Written By the 
most Eminent Hands in the two Famous 
Univer- | fities, and by Several Others. | 
[quotation] London | Printed for Henry 
Playford, in the Temple- Change, and 
Abel Roper, at | the Black Bay in Fleet- 
ftreet ; | and sold by John Nutt near 
Stationer's Hall. 1700. 

Folio. First edition. Portrait. 

A — P and Aa — F, in twos. 

This is one of the several volumes of poems on 
Dryden that appeared shortly after his death. As a 
tribute of poetry to his memory it is not remarkable 
but serves to show the strong and general sensation 
excited by the passing away of "Glorious John.'* 

The portrait that appears with this volume, though 
without name of painter or engraver, is undoubtedly 
after Kneller, and is from the same original as the one 
by Vander Gucht. It is quite possible that the pres- 
ent is the earliest engraved portrait of Dryden. 



V. 3^ortraitj5» 



6. Portrait of John Dryden in oil, attributed 

to Sir Godfrey Kneller. The following 

note from Leon Richeton accompanies 

the painting : 

II 81 



PORTRAITS OF DRYDEN. 

" I have carefully examined the life-sized 
painting of the portrait of John Dryden and 
have afterwards compared it with the well- 
known examples of Sir Godfrey Kneller*s 
portraits in the National Portrait Gallery and 
I am convinced that your portrait is an orig- 
inal work of this master. 

" The manner of the painting, the texture 
of the canvas and the fact that the picture is 
not signed, all lead me to this conclusion." 

117. Another portrait of Dryden, also as- 
cribed to Kneller and, as far as is known 
never engraved. 

118. Full bust, in oval, face to left. Mezzo- 
tint. G. Kneller Baron* pinx. G. White 
fecit. 

Inscription, below: Mf John Dryden. 
Sold by Thomas Bowles Printseller in 
St. Paul's Church Yard, London. 

119. Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle. 
Line. Peint par le Chevalier Kneller. 
Graue le Chevalier Edelinck C. P. R. 

Inscription, below. M^John Dryden. 

This print, which appeared in the folio edition of 
Dryden's "Plays," 1701, was probably also issued 
separately. 

82 



PORTRAITS OF DRYDEN. 

Full bust, in a rectangle, face to right. 
Line. G. Kneller eques pinxit. Geo : 
Vertue Londini Sculpsit 1730. 

Inscription, below : Nat. 1632. denat. 
iEtat. 6S. I John Dryden, | whose tune- 
ful Muse affords, | The Sweeteft Num- 
bers, and the fitteft Words | Addison. 

Praenobili D^^P Edoardo Comiti Oxo- 
niae &c. ad Archetypa Museo Harley- 
ano afservatum. Qua par est Observan- 
tia D. D. G. Vertue Sculpts 

Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle. 
Line. G. Kneller pinxit. J. Hou- 
braken, sculps. Amst. 1743. 

Inscription, in border: John Dryden. 

From the collection of the late Earl 
of Oxford. Impensis J. P. Knapton Lon- 
dini, 1743. 

Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle, 
face to right. Stipple and line. Vertue. 
Sc. 

Inscription, below : M^ John Dryden. 

This portrait first appeared in Dryden's " Dramatic 
Works," edited by Congreve, London, 171 7. 

83 



PORTRAITS OF DRYDEN. 

123. The same plate, retouched by Vertue at 
a later date. 

124. Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle, 
face to left. Line. lohn : Ryly Pinxit. 
P. A. Gunst Sculp : 

Inscription, below: M^ lohn Dryden. 
I Anno, 1683. -^tat: 52. 

Engraved by Van Gunst after Riley's painting, and 
published with the two portraits that follow in the 
edition of Dryden's version of Virgil that appeared in 
three volumes in 1709. 

125. Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle, 
face to right. Line. 

S^ G: Kneller Pinxit. M. V^^ Gucht 
Sculp. 

Inscription, below: M^ lohn Dryden. | 
Anno, 1693. iEtat: 62. 

126. Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle, 
face to right. Line. 

Inscription, below: lohn Dryden | 
Anno, 1698. iEtat: 6t, 

Sy G. Kneller Pinxit. I. de Lecuw, 
Sculp. 

127. Bust, in a rectangle, face to left. Line. 

Inscription : John Dryden. 
Engraved for the Univerfal Magazine 

84 



PORTRAITS OF DRYDEN. 

For J. Hinton at the King^s Arms in 
Newgate Street. 

128. Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle, 
face to left. Line. 

Inscription in border: John Dryden, 
Efq. 

For the London Mag. Published by 
R. Baldwin JunF at the Rose in Pater 
Noster Row, 1752. 

129. Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle, 
face to left. G. Kneller, P. J. B. Grate- 
loup Sc. 

Inscription, below : J° Dryden. 

This is the second portrait engraved by Jean-Baptiste 
de Grateloup (i 735-1 784), the French savant "who 
practised engraving simply for amusement." His pro- 
cess of engraving seems to have involved the use ot 
aquatint, mezzotint, line, and dry point, and some parts 
of the plate, it is said, were hammered. The secret 
was confided to his nephew, Dr. J. P. S. de Grateloup 
under a promise that it should never be divulged, and 
it died and was buried with him. 

130. Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle, 
face to left. Line. Sharp fc. 

Inscripton, below : John Dryden. 
Printed for John Bell near Exeter 
Exchange Strand London Jan^ 12*? 1778. 

»5 



PORTRAITS OF DRYDEN. 

131. Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle, 
face to left. Line. Cook fc. 

Inscription, below : John Dryden. 

Printed for John Bell, at the Britifh 
Library in the Strand, London, Aug. 
16. 1780. 

132. Bust, in circle, with border, in a rec- 
tangle, face to right. Line. G. Zocchi 
Invent D. B. Pyetti Sculp* 

Inscription, below: John Dryden. 
Morifon's Edition of Dryden's Virgil. 

133. Bust, in oval, with border, in a rectangle. 
Line. G. Kneller pinx. W. Sharp Sculp. 

Inscription, below : Dryden. 
Published by G. Kearsly, N? 46 Fleet 
Street. 

134. Bust, in oval, face to right. Line. From 
Houbraken. Birrell sculp. 

PubHsh'd by Harrison & C? Aug. i. 
1794. 

135. Bust, in circle, with border, in a rec- 
tangle, face to right. Line. I. Sherwin 
sculp. 

Inscription, below : Dryden. 
86 



PORTRAITS OF DRYDEN. 

136. Bust, in oval, face to right. Stipple. 
HoU, sculp. 

. Bust, in a rectangle, face to right. 
Stipple. Engraved by R. H. Cook, from 
the Print by Houbraker. 

Inscription, below : Dryden. 

Published by Mathews & Leigh, 
Aug'* I. 1808. 

38. Bust, in a rectangle, face to right. Line. 
i Drawn by T. Uwins. Engraved by E. 

Smith. 

t Inscription, below: John Dryden. | 

From an original Picture in the Collec- 
tion I of Sir Walter Scott, Bart. 

\ London, July i, 1822. Published by 

W. Walker, 5 Grays Inn Square. 

39. Bust, in a rectangle, face to right. En- 
graved by I. Jenkins, from a Painting by 
Godfrey Kneller. 

Inscription, below : John Dryden. 
London : PubHshed by Thomas Kelly, 
17, Paternoster Row, 1830. 

40. Bust, in a rectangle, face to left. 
Stipple. Engraved by C. E. Wagstaff. 

87 



PORTRAITS OF DRYDEN. 

141. Bust, in a rectangle, face to right. 
Stipple. H. Robinson sc. 

Inscription, below: Jon: Dryden. 
London, William Pickering, 1833. 

142. Bust, in rectangle, face to left. Stipple. 

Inscription, below : J. Dryden. 

143. Bust, in a rectangle, face to right. Line. 
Sir G. Kneller. J. Horsburgh. 

Inscription, below : John Dryden. 

144. Bust, face to left. Stipple. Bollinger sc. 

Inscription, below : Dryden. 
Zwickau, b. d. Gebr. Schumann. 

145. Heads of Dryden, Aetat 33, 59, and 6t ^ 
in circles, in a rectangle. Stipple. 
Hinchliff, sc. 

Inscription, below : John Dryden. 

146. Bust, in a rectangle, face to right. 
Stipple. Sir G. Kneller. H. Robinson. 

Inscription, below : John Dryden. 
London, Edward Moxon, Dover Street, 
1851. 

88 



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