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Full text of "Explorer"




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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/explorer1951lasa 



EXPLORER 



19 5 1 



designed and photographed by 



John Joseph Kane 
Editor-in-Chief 

Written by 

Anthony A. Alito ' 

ana 

Eugene P. McLoone 

Associate Editors 




DEDICATiaiV 

The Class of 1951 of La Salle College, rejoicing in 
the three hundredth anniversary of the birth of St. John 
Baptist De La Salle, and ever mindful of their indebted- 
ness to his sons, the Brothers of the Christian Schools, 
pray God that the influence of the Saint and his disciples 
may continue to spread and enrich the lives of countless 
numbers of boys and young men. In grateful appreciation 
and with a prayer that St. John Baptist De La Salle may 
ever plead our cause, we reverently dedicate this book to one 
who has so deservedly been named the patron of all the 
Christian Teachers of Youth. 



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Bapteme de Saint Jean-Baptiste de La Salle 



M. ChampigneuUe 



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For thirty two of the thirty three years 
that Cardinal Dougherty presided over the 
Archdiocese of Philadelphia, he served as 
honorary president of the Board of Trustees. 
His kindly guidance and sympathetic under- 



standing were largely instrumental in La Sal- 
le's progress through the years. We shall ever 
be prayerfully grateful. 

May the soul of this great Shepherd of 
Souls rest in eternal peace. 




Brother Gregorian Paul, F.S.C., B.S., M.S., 

Ph.D., LL.D. 

President 



Brother G. Lewis, F.S.C., B.A., M.A., Sc.D. 
Vice-PTesident 





Brother E. Stanislaus, F.S.C., B.A., M.A., 
Ph.D 
Dean 




Brother G. Joseph, F.S.C., B.A., M.A, 
Registrar 




Mr. Joseph J. Sprissler, B.S. 

Comptroller and Director 

of Evening Division 




Brother E. Joseph, F.S.C., B.S. in L.S. 
Librarian 



Brother E. John, F.S.C., B.A., M.A. 
Bursur 




Dr. Joseph F. McCloskey, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant to the Dean 




Mr. Charles P. Perkins, B.A., M.A. 
Registrar of Evening Division 





Rev. Charles F. Gorman, B.A., LL.D. 
Chaplain 




Brother George Thomas, F.S.C., B.A., M.S. 
Dean of Freshman 



-1 




Mr. John J. Kelly, B.A. 

Director of Public Relations 

and Placement Bureau 







<^ 4. 






Rev. Charles J. Curran, B.A., 

LL.D. 

College Historian 




Mr. Anthony M. Waltrich, B.A. 

Director of Alumni Relations and Director of 

Student Information on Military Service 



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Mr. Donald Masser 

Superintendent of 

Buildings and Grounds 




Miss Margaret M. Kiely. B.A. 
Assistant Registrar 




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BROtHER E. ABDON, F.S.C. 

Professor of German 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Ped.D., La Salle College 




BROTHER F. AZARIAS, F.S.C. 

Associate Professor of Education 
B.A., La Salle College 
M.A., La Salle College 






FRANCIS T. ALLEN 

Lecturer in Insurance 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania 





DONALD T. BARRETT 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Woodstock College 

Ph.L., St. Louis University 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 





AUSTIN J. APP 

Associate Professor of English 

B.A., St. Francis Seminary 

M.A., Catholic University of America 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 




YVON BLANCHARD 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Litt.B., St. Charles' College 

M.A., University of Montreal 

Ph.L., University of Montreal 

Ph.D., University of Montreal 





BROTHER D. AUGUSTINE, F.S.C. 

Processor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Scranton 

M.A., Catholic University of America 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



WILLIAM J. BINKOWSKI 

Instructor in History 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 





VINCENT D. BRADLEY 

Lecturer in Finance 

B.S., Villanova College 

MS. A., University of Pennsylvania 



CASIMIR CIESLA 

Instructor in Statistics 

Dr. Rer. Pol., University oj Innsbruck 




MARTIN BURKE 

Instructor in Business Law 

B.S., La Salle College 
LL.B., Temple University 



C. RICHARD CLEARY 

Assistant Professor oj Government 
B.A., St. Peter's College 
M.A., Fordham University 






JOSEPH M. CARRIO 

Instructor in Spanish 

B.A.S., University of Havana 



BROTHER E. CLEMENTIAN, F.S.C. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., La Salle College 




BROTHER F. CHRISTOPHER, F.S.C. 

Associate Professor of Biology 
B.A., Catholic University of America 
M.S., Catholic University of America 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



VINCENT COOKE 

Lecturer in Industry 

Graduate Mechanical Engineer 

Drexel Institute 



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ROBERT J. COURTNEY 

Assistant Professor of Government 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., Niagara University 



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MICHAEL DE ANGELIS 

Instructor in Accounting 

B.S., M.S., Temple University 

M.S., Temple University 




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JOSEPH E. CROWLEY 

Lecturer in Industry 

B.A., La Salle College 

LL.B., Temple University 




LAWRENCE DONDERO 

Instructor in Economics 

B.A., La Salle CoUege 

M.A., Fordham University 



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BROTHER F. CYRIL, F.S.C. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., Catholic University of America 
M.A., Ccuholic University of America 



UGO DONINI 

Associate Professor of History 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 




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KURT A. DAUWALTER 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., La Salle College 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



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FREDERICK J. DOUGHERTY 

Instructor in Sociology 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., Catholic University of America 




JOSEPH C. ECKERT, JR. 

Lecturer in Accounting 
BJS., La Salle College 




BROTHER F. FRANCIS, F.S.C. 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A., La Salle College 
M.A., La Salle College 





BROTHER M. EDWARD, F.S.C. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., La Salle College 
Litt.M., University of Pittsburgh 



BERNARD S. GOLDNER 
Associate Professor on Industry 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 



GEORGE FELLMETH 

Lecturer in Industry 

Graduate Industrial Engineer 

University of Purdue 





REVEREND CHARLES F. GORMAN 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

LL.D., Villanova College 





'^^* -^ 



JOSEPH F. FLUBACHER 

Professor of Economics 
B.A., La Salle College 
M.A., Temple University 
Ed.D., Temple University 




JULES GOULET 

Instructor in French 

Brevet Superior, Lavet 



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JOSEPH G. GRASSI 

Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A., St. Bernard's College 

H.A., Catholic University of America 



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JOHN GUISCHARD 

Assistant Professor of French 
B.A., La Salle College 
M.A., Villanova College 
Ph.D., Laval University 




CHARLES GUERIN 

Lecturer in Business Law 

B.A., La Salle College 

LL.B., University of Pejinsylvania 



MAX GUZIKOWSKI 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Catholic University of America 
M.A., Catholic University of America 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 





FRANCIS J. GUERIN, C.P.A. 

Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S., La Salle College 



PAUL M. HAFEY 
Lecturer in Government 
B.A., Amherst College 




JOHN F. GUILTINAN, C.P.A. 
Instructor in Accounting 



CHARLES A. J. HALPIN, JR. 

Assistant Professor 

B.S., La Salle College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 



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HOWARD L. HANNUM 

Instructor in English 

B.A., La Salic College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 




RICHARD T. HOAR 

Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A., St. Bonaventure's College 

M.A., St. Bonaventure's College 




lAMES W. HEALEY, C.P.A. 

Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.C.S., New York University 




ROLAND HOLROYD 

Professor of Biology 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Sc.D., La Salle College 




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JAMES J. HENRY 

Associate Professor of Finance 

B.S., Villanova College 

M.A., Villanova College 




JOSEPH F. HOSEY 

Instructor in English 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 




EDWARD P. HILL 
Lecturer in Economics 
B.A., La Salle College 





PAUL STANISLAUS HSIANG 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

and Religion 

S.T.D.. Catholic University of America 







LEO C. INGLESBY 

Lecturer in Economics 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., Rutgers University 



BROTHER D. JULIUS, F.S.C. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Catholic University of America 

M.S., Catholic University of America 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 




LARRY H. JACKSON 
Instructor in Spanish 
B.A., La Salle College 



WALTER J. KAISER 

Instructor in Accounting 

B.S., La Salle College 




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BROTHER D. JOHN, F.C.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.S., Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



JAMES F. KELEHER 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A.. Providence College 
M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 





BROTHER G. JOSEPH, F.C.S. 

Professor oj Physics 

B.A., Rock Hill College 

M.A., Rock Hill College 



CLAUDE F. KOCH 
Instructor in English 
B.S., La Salle College 




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ROBERT F. LAVELLE 

Lecturer in Business Law 

B.A., University of Scranton 

LL.B., Catholic University of America 




JOHN A. LUKACS 

Visiting Lecturer in History 

B.A., University of Budapest 

M.A., University of Budapest 

Ph.D., University of Budapest 



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BROTHER G. LEWIS, F.S.C. 

Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Sc.D., Duquesne University 



DENNIS J. McCarthy 

Instructor in History 
B.A., La Salle College 





HARRY LIEDERBACH 

Lecturer in Business Law 

B.A., La Salle College 

LL.B., University of Pennsylvania 



DANIEL J. McCAULEY 

Instructor in Business Law 

B.A., La Salle College 

LL.B., University of Pennsylvania 





BROTHER E. LOUIS, F.S.C. 

Associate Professor of Spanish 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 




LIEUT. JOHN McCLOSKEY, U.S.A.F. 

Assistant Professor in Military Science 

and Tactics 

B.S., La Salle College 






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JOSEPH F. McCLOSKEY 
Associate Professor of History 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



■#5^ 




JOSEPH MORAN 

Lecturer in Spanish 
B.A., La Salle College 



JOHN F. McGLYNN 

Instructor in English 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 



E. RUSSELL NAUGHTON 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

M.A., Catholic University of America 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 




JAMES A. MALCOLM 

Lecturer in Industry 

B.S. in E.E.. Swarthmore College 

M.S. in I.E., Columbia University 




*■*". .^ 



JOHN J. O'DONNELL, C.P.A. 
Lecturer in Accounting 
B.S., Temple University 



JOSEPH MARKMAN 

Instructor in Accounting 

B.S.. La Salle College 




BROTHER E. PATRICK, F.S.C. 

.4ssistant Professor of English 
B.A.. La Salle College 



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BROTHER G. PAUL, F.S.C. 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Catholic University of America 

M.S., Catholic University of America 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

LL.D., Villanova College 



AUGUSTINE J. RIEFFEL 
Lecturer in Business Law 

B.S., La Salle College 
LL.B., Temple University 




NICHOLAS PENSIERO 
Lecturer in Industry 
B.S., La Salle College 



JOSEPH A. RIDER 

Lecturer in Accounting 

B.A.. La Salle College 

M.A., Niagara University 




CHARLES P. PERKINS 

Lecturer in English 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., Catholic University of America 



BROTHER G. ROBERT 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Catholic University of America 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 




CAPTAIN BEVERLY PRATT, U.S.A. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 

and Tactics 

LL.B., National University 




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DANIEL .L RODDEN 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A.. La Salle College 

M.F.A., Catholic University of America 




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JOHN ROONEY 

Instructor in Psychology 

B.A., La Salle College 
M.A., Temple University 



BROTHER E. STANISLAUS, F.S.C. 

Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Catholic University of America 

M.A., Catholic University of America 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



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ROBERT ROWLAND 

Lecturer in Education 

f.S.. Bloomsburg State Teachers College 

M.A., Bucknelt University 




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RICHARD F. STROSSER 

Instructor in Philosophy 
B.A., La Salle College 




THOMAS RYAN 

Instructor in Industry 

B.S.. La Salle College 

M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 



CORNELIUS F. SULLIVAN 

Lecturer in Economics 

B.A., La Salle College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 




s**"^ .^m- 



JOHN SINGER 

Lecturer in Insurance 
B.A., St. Joseph's College 




PETER J. SWEENEY 

Instructor in Accounting 

B.S., La Salle College 

M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 





MAJOR JAMES F. UNGER, U.S.A. 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

B.S., Duquesne University 



GEORGE SWOYER 

Instructor in Marketing 
B.S., La Salle College 




BROTHER D. VINCENT, F.S.C. 

Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Catholic University of America 

M.A-., Catholic University of America 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 




BROTHER D. THOMAS, F.S.C. 

Professor of Classics 
B.A., Catholic University of America 
M.A., Catholic University of America 
Ph.D., Catholic University of America 




ANTHONY M. WALTRICH 

Lecturer in English 

B.A., La Salle College 



BROTHER G. THOMAS, F.S.C. 

Assistant Professor of Speech 

i.A., Catholic University of America 

M.S., University of Pennsylvania 




-«ia»si»^ 



WILLARD G. WALSH 

Assistant Professor of Speech and Drama 

B.S., United States Military Academy 

M.F.A., Fordham University 




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MELVIN F. WOODS 

Instructor in Finance 

B.A., St. Vincent's College 



FRANK J. WETZLER 
Instructor in German 
B.A., Villanova College 





HERBERT S. WEBER 





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Campus 





College Hall seen throug 
copic camera from Church 
niie. 

'Situated on a hill overlooking Wister Woods, 
the campus while easily reached by public trans- 
portation has the appearance of being far re- 
moved from the hurry city. 

The quadrangle, which serves as the center 
of the twenty acre campus, abounds in trees 
and shrubs. On the quadrangle, one could hard- 
ly tell that a street car runs on the other side 
of College Hall. The shade of the trees beckoned 
many students on the warm days and a few 
professors conduct classes on the quadrange dur- 
ing the humid days of Spring. 

The Faculty House and College Hall form an 
"L" that closes two sides of the quadrangle. Mc- 
Shain Hall and the Field House complete the 



h the eyes of a teles- 
Lane and Chew Ave- 

other two sides. The Shrine of the Sacred Heart 
with the memorial to La Salle men killed in past 
wars is in the center of the quadrangle. A light 
burns constantly before the statue. The Grotto 
of Our Lady of Lourdes fills in the corner be- 
tween McShain Hall and the Field House. 

Behind McShain Hall is Leonard and Benilde 
Halls. Leonard Hall, the student union building, 
was dedicated just a few weeks before we ar- 
rived on the campus. The first post-war addi- 
tion to the campus, Leonard Hall was named for 
Brother G. Leonard, who had a great interest in 
extra-curricular activities during his stay at La 
Salle. 



33 




The main entrance to College Hall and the 
College auditorium is located at Nineteenth Street. 
The plaques were dedicated by the various classes 
during their Junior Week celebrations. 



During our first year, we saw heavy trucks 
hauling materials for Benilde Hall mar the 
beauty of the campus. Benilde Hall was finished 
and opened at the start of our Sophomore 
year. Its nine classrooms helped to relieve the 
crowded conditions as La Salle reached its all- 
time peak in student enrollment. 






We learned that the increased beauty of the 
campus was the result of careful planning and 
planting by Brother F. Christopher, associate 
professor of Biology, as he gradually began re- 
storing the area around Benilde and Leonard 
Halls by the planting of trees and shrubbery. 



2S 




Students stream from the College Hall after their 
last class. 



The Twentieth Street entrance to College Hall 



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The center of the quqdmgle is dominated by 
the status of the Sacred Heart and the plaque 



which serves as a memorial tor the La Salle men 
vifho died in the service during the second World 
War. 



In appreciation of his work, Student Council 
voted to give Brother money to construct a 
grove at the end of the library when work on 
the restoration of that area begins, after the 
completion of the library. 

Equally important are the athletic fields. Mc- 
Carthy Stadium which was built for the football 
teams, no longer has college football games but 
is used by both the soccer and track teams. Be- 
hind McCarthy Stadium is a newly made dia- 
mond with bleachers where the baseball team 
plays its home games. Adjacent to the baseball 
field, is the practice field where intramural foot- 
ball is played and the varsity teams practice. 

In our junior year. Brother G. Paul, president, 
announced an expansion program to make La 
Salle better. The program calls for a Library, 



dormitories, chapel, « and field house and swim- 
ming pool. 

In our final year at La Salle, we saw the be- 
ginning of construction of the library and the 
moving of the Scholasticate, which is an affiliate 
of the College to Elkins Park, and the construc- 
tion of a new building under the west stands of 
McCarthy Stadium to house the ROTC unit on 
campus. 

At our class banquet. Brother Paul announced 
that the College had purchased the ground dia- 
gonally across from College Hall and that dor- 
matories would be constructed as soon as the 
funds were available. Thus to our every last 
day at La Salle, we saw the planning to make 
a "better not a bigger" La Salle continue. 



57 



"Fundamentally La Salle wants to better, not 
bigger." 

These words keynote the announcement by 
Brother G. Paul of a La Salle expansion program. 

Evidence is the three criteria established by the 
Christian Brothers in judging the future scope 
and size of La Salle: 

"L The timeless value of a Christian liberal 
education and its particular application to the 
moral crisis of our time. 

"2. The growing demand that the opportunity 
for higher education be further equalized and 
extended for all youth, fully qualified by educa- 
tion, character, and ability. 

"3. The capacity of the College to meet this 
demand for educational service without sacri- 
ficing the quality of instruction." 

To learn what Christian liberal education has 
meant, one might read from the 1949 Explorer: 
The majority of us entered La Salle with tech- 
nical knowledge as our dominant goal. With 
our graduation . . . we have realized the import- 




ance of the disciplines that are not correlated to 
earning power. Without a proper share of moral 
values our efforts in the professional fields 
would be for naught. We carry with us an ex- 
trinsic ability to share in the world's goods and 
an intrinsic sense of sharing our portion of the 
world's goods with others." 

The democratization of education is one of 
the most important happenings of our time and 
the source of much hope for the future. The 
"G. I. Bill of Rights" was the first long step to- 
ward education for all; let us look at how La 
Salle has met its demands. 

Before the war, the La Salle enrollment was 
430 students. The war sent the enrollment plung- 
ing, and by 1944 there were only 85 students on 
the campus. By 1945, however, the enrollment 
already was up to 300 — and the Christian Broth- 
ers faced a difficult post-war question. How big 
could La Salle get? 

It was decided to learn the answer by going 
ahead, and in 1946 the enrollment soared to 
1240 — almost three times as high as ever before. 
It rose again in 1947 to 1535, and in 1948 to 
1885. This year it is established at 1821, and a 
level seems to have been reached at least tem- 
porarily. 

During these same years. La Salle took an- 
other step in making college education available 
to all young people; an evening division was 
formed in 1946 with some 200 students enrolled. 
This evening enrollment is now 780, and indica- 
tions are that it too can grow as long as physical 
space permits. 

The La Salle of 1951, then, is a new La Salle — 
different from the College in any other year of 
its 88-year history. Its students now represent 
more than ten per cent of the number enrolled 
in Catholic colleges and universities in Penn- 
sylvania. 

The question at present is whether increased 
size means a drop in the quality of education. 
So far, we think, the answer is no. But in- 
creased sibe has meant a strain on the physical 
facilities; so much so, in fact, that La Salle's 
equipment cannot be considered adequate for 
the future. 

In 1945, La Salle could hardly have refused to 
expand. It had to help accommodate the great 
surge of young men who wanted and deserved a 
college education. Today, it faces a continued 
demand for educational opportunities for all. 
La Salle cannot answer tKis call without a physi- 
cal expansion much greater than that which added 
Leonard and Benilde Halls to the campus during 
the past four years. 

Granted there is a need for the Christian lib- 
eral education provided by La Salle, granted all 
men have a right to improve the intellects which 
mark them as men, a bigger La Salle means a 
better La Salle — better able to serve city and re- 
gion, better able to reach more young men. 

La Salle wants to be bigger — not, however, 
for the sake of being bigger, but rather in the 
hope of better achieving the very goals for which 
it w;.s founded 

The partially completed library as it appeared 
on graduation day is the first project in the Col- 
lege expansion program for a "better La Salle." 



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Bachelor of Arts 

Glee Club 4, Weber Society 4. 



EARL D. ADAMS 

4243 Vista Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Education 



Bachelor of Science 



GEORGE ROBERT ADELSBERGER 

7147 Cottage Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Accounting 



ANTHONY A. ALITO 

920 Quinton Avenue 

Trenton, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts English 

Collegian 3-4, Copy Editor 3, Associate Editor 4; Explorer, Associate Editor 4; 
Out of Towncrs 1-4, Treasurer 3, President 4. 



MICHAEL VINCENT ANGELOTTI 

2324 S. Fifteenth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Preparation for Law 

Doernenburg Society 1-3; Podium Society 2; Crew 2-3. 



iL£..».i_',iiL^ "^^^Ji^—A 




Bachelor of Science 
Student Congress 4. 



Bachelor of Science 



JOSEPH F. ARMSTRONG 

1653 N. Sixtieth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JAMES J. AUCHINLECK 

6012 Ogontz Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



LOUIS MICHAEL BACKE III 

4710 Conshohocken Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Vartity Club 3-4; Crew 2-4, 




Accounting 



Marketing 



Marketing 








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JAMES A. BAIRD 

2604 W. Twenty-third Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Preparation for Law 

Fabrician Society 1-2; Podium Society 2; Intramurals 1-4. 



CHARLES J. BAKER 

750 Landis Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Gavel 2-3-4; Glee Club 2-4, Secretary 4. 



HARRY W. BAKER 

5944 Malta Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Education 



Bachelor of Science 
Student Congress 4. 



Industrial Management 



REV. ANASTASIUS C. BANDY 

5924 Jefferson Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Philosophy 



EDMUND L. BARNES 

5842 N. Howard Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Preparation for taw 

Student Council 4; National Student Association 1-4, Recording Secretary 3 

Chairman, Regional Treasurer 4. 



JOHN BARRETT 

1019 Greenmount Road 
Haddonfield, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Society for Advancement of Management 4. 




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Bachelor of Arts 



PATRICK J. BARRY 

4314 N. Carlisle Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



English 






SALVATOR BARTUCCI 

Cedar Brook, New Jersey 



Bachelor of Science 

Society for Advancement of Management, President 4. 



ROBERT P. BASS, JR. 

525 N. Vodges Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Fabrician Society 3-4. 



JOHN R. BATEMAN 

3135 Guilford Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Intramurals 1-4. 



JOSEPH E. BAUMGARTNER, JR. 

Smith Avenue 
Mount Washington 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Industrial Management 



Bachelor of Science 
Out of Towners 1. 



Bachelor of Arts 



WILLIAM BEISSER 

R. D. #1 
Berwyn, Penna. 



Philosophy 



Marketing 



Marketing 



Education 



WADDIE LANE BELTON, JR. 

5901 Thompson Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Bridge Club 3; Chess Club 3. 



Education 



MICHAEL FRANCIS BENNETT 

2228 Martha Street 
Philadelphia, Penna, 
Bachelor of Arts 
Economics Club 2-3; International Relations Club 1-2. 



Economics 



FRANCIS BERRY 

1632 Allengrove Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



English 



SIGMOND JOHN BLASZCZYK, JR. 

3335 Cottman Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science General Business 

Collegian 3, Business Manager 3; Society for Advancement of Management 4. 



VICTOR N. BOCCELLA 

1530 S. Fifteenth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science General Business 

Accounting Association 4; Economics Club 2-3; Italian Club 4. 



ALBERT JOSEPH BOCK 

8739 Stardust Lane 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3-4. 



Accounting 



JOHN BOLTON 

1358 Jerome Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



JACK NEWLAND BOODY 

223 Penn Avenue 
Westmont, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Glee Club 3. 



HARRY W. BOSTON 

3837 N. Nineteenth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Glee Club 4; Interracial Justice Society 3-4. 









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LEE JOSEPH BOWDEN 

6550 Githens Avenue 
Merchantville, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 3-4; Intramurals 1-2-4. 



JOHN G. BOYCB 

5700 Ogontz Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Biology 



Bachelor of Arts 



Education 



GERALD T. BOYER 

6835 Ditman Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

Weber Society 3-4; Blue Si Gold 4; Harvest Dance 4; Junior Week Com- 
mittee 3. 



JOSEPH JOHN BOYER 

6835 Ditman Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3-4. 



Accounting 



VINCENT JOHN BRACCILI, JR. 

1319 Dickinson Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

Historical Society 4; Italian Club 4, Secretary 4; Intramurals 1-2. 



JOHN J. BRADFIELD 

46 Waverly Road 
Havertown, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

Historical Society 3-4; Intramurals 2-4. 



ROBERT THOMAS BRADLEY 

7208 N. Broad Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Education 





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JOHN FRANCIS BRADY, JR 

161 W. Chew Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3-4. 



JAMES J. BRESLIN 

1631 S. Fifty-fourth Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Doernenburg Society 1-2, Fabrician Society 2-4, Podium Society 2-4, Intra- 

murals 1-4. 



JAMES J. BROPHY 

7040 Limekiln Pike 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 3-4, Intramurals 1-4. 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 4. 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 4. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 



MARTIN J. BUKOWSKI 

2338 E. Susquehanna Avenue 

Philadelphia, Penna. 



LAWRENCE JOHN BUR, JR. 

3439 Tilden Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



ANDREW S. BURDZIAK 

240 Federal Street 



JOSEPH BURNS 

5666 Blakemore Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Mathematics 



Marketing 



Marketing 



Preparation for Law 



Philosophy 




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NORBERT A. BUSCH 

1253 Lansdowne Avenue 
Camden, N. J. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 2-4, Intramurals 1-4. 



JAMES P. BUSH 

1605 Minnesota Road 
Camden, New Jersey 



Biology 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



Accounting 



JESSE DENNIS CAIN 

3421 Friendship Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts English 

Student Council 2-3, Vice-President 3; Class ('50) President 2-3; Masque 1-3, 
Vice-President 2; Radio Workshop 1-3; Theater 4; Blue & Gold 1-3; Harvest 
Dance 1-3; Intramurals 1-2, 



EUGENE M. CALLAHAN 

945 Belmont Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 



Bachelor of Science 



ROBERT B. CAMERON 
33 Hillside Road 
Broomall, Penna. 



Industrial Relations 



Accounting 



FRANCIS X. CAMPBELL 

732 Cypress Street 
Yeadon, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Economics Club 1-4, Sigma Beta Kappa 2-4, Intramurals 1-4. 



Marketing 



Bachelor of Arts 
Newtonian Society 3-4. 



VINCENT J. CARITA 

411 Chestnut Street 
Camden, New Jersey 



Physics 



ARNOLD C. CARNEVALE 

367 E, Chelten Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



Accounting 



HUGH J. CARROLL 

1891-2 Lippincott Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science General Business 

Student Congress 3-4, President t; Society for Advancement of Management 4. 



JAMES P. CATTANI 

6424 Morris Park Road 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 

Intramurals 1. 



CHARLES McILVAIN CAVANAGH 

28 High Street 
Sharon Hill, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Sigma Beta Kappa 3-4. 



PATRICK JOSEPH CLANCY 

5602 Cedar Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Intramurals 3. 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 2. 



Bachelor of Arts 



JOSEPH E. COADY 

217 S. Fifty-first Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



RICHARD F. CODY 

5714 N. Beechwood Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 






English 



Marketing 



Accounting 



General Business 



English 






17 








JOSEPH COLLINS 






883 Marcella Street 






Philadelphia, Penna. 




Bachelor of Arts 




Education 


WILLIAM JOSEPH COLLINS 






4312 Comly Street 






Philadelphia, Penna. 




Bachelor of Science 




Accounting 


Accounting Association 


3-4. 

JOHN J. CONNELL, JR. 

610 E. Cheltenham Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




Bachelor of Science 




Marketing 


Intramurals 2. 


ROBERT I. CONNOR 

29 N. Thirty-sixth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




Bachelor of Science 




Marketing 


Intramurals 2. 






VINCENT JAMES CONSTANTINI 






1229 Pine Grove Street 






Bristol, Penna. 




bachelor of Science 




Accounting 


Accounting Association 


3-4. 

HUGH CONVERY 

5650 Chew Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




Bachelor of Arts 


GUST AVE C. COTE 

403 W. Fisher Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 


Chemistry 


Bachelor of Science 




Accounting 


Accounting Association 


.3-4; Explorer 4; Blue Sc Gold 4; 


Harvest Dance 4. 






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WILLIAM COYLE 

254 W. Abbottsford Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



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Bachelor of Science 



Industrial Management 




JOHN BARRY CREGAN 

3505 Chippendale Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna, 



EL WOOD G. CREWS 

836 Edgehill Road 
Ardsley, Penna. 



3achelor of Science 



Bachelor of Science 
Student Congress 4. 



ROBERT CHARLES CROSSON, JR. 

7138 Limekiln Pike 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Society for Advancement of Management 4. 



General Business 



Accounting 



General Business 



RICHARD S. CULLEN 

2113 Ritner Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Education 

Historical Society 4; National Federation of Catholic College Students 3; 

Harvest Dance 3; Intramurals 2-3. 



JOHN THOMAS CURRAN 

2429 W. Seventh-ninth Avenue 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Society for Advancement of Management 4; Varsity Club 3-4, President 4; 

Track 2-4, Captain 4; Soccer 3-4, Captain 4. 



GEORGE S. CURTIS, JR. 

315 Franklin Street 

Cape May, New Jersey 

Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Student Council, Treasurer I ; Society for Advancement of Management 4, 

Intramurals 1-3, Track 2-3. 










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CHESTER THOMAS CYZIO 

4524 Ritchie Street 
Philadelphia, Pcnna. 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 2-4; Collegian 2-3; Explorer 4; Senior Editor 4; His- 
torical Society 4; Masque 2-3; Philosophy Club 3; Podium Society 2-3; 
Blue Si Gold 4; Junior Week Committee 3. 



EDWARD ALBERT DACHOWSKI 

701 Grant Avenue 
Willow Grove, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Fabrician So( iftiy 3-4, Gavel 2-4. 



RICHARD J. DAISLEY 

3642 N. Marshall Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Economics Club 3; International Relations Club 2; 

Intramurals 1-4. 



JOHN FRANCIS L SEGAN 

2866 Aramingo Aver;ue 

Philadelphia, Per i 

Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Doernenburg Society 2-4; Fabrician Society 2 4; Intramurals 1-4. 

FRANK DONALD DeGEOR<^-' JR. 

R. D. #2 
Mount Holly, N€ 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4. 



WILLIAM O. DELANEY 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 2; Crew 2. 



Bachelor of Arts 



5027 Morris Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



ROBERT DeHENZEL 

5419 N. Palethorpe Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Marketing 



French 



10 



GENE M. DeLAURENTIS 

4129 Comly Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Explorer 4, Sports Editor 4; Fabrician Society 3; Intramurals 1-3. 



Biology 



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JAMES DAVID DELSORDO 

6027 Germantown Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Liberal Art; 



FRANCIS P. DeMARCO 

7674 Sherwood Road 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Historical Society 4; Intramurals 3. 



DONALD DAVID DeMURO 

901 Berkley Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Italian Club 4; Junior Week Committee 3; Intramurals 1-2 



JOHN F. DeSALVO 

1803 S. Tenth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Glee Club 3-4; Podium Society 1-2. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 
Italian Club 4. 





RALPH J. DcSHAN, JR 

201 S. Union Street 
Wilmington, Delaware 



FRANCIS J. DESIMONE 

336 Spring Mill Avenue 
Conshohocken, Penna. 








RICHARD A. DEVLIN 

137 New Street 
Glenside, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Historical Society 3-4; International Relations Oub 4. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH DEVLIN 

205 Runnymede Road 
Jenlcintown, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Social Science Club 3; Intramurals 1-2. 



NICHOLAS JOSEPH DiCANDILO 

2412 Chestnut Avenue 
Ardmore, Penna. 



Preparation for Law 



General Business 



Bachelor of Arts 
Chymian Society 3-4. 



DANIEL FRANCIS DiPENTINO 

3038 Agate Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 
Podium Society 1. 



JOHN JOSEPH DIXON 

7271 Walnut Lane 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Intramurals 3. 



LEO EDWARD DODD 

6917 Saybrook Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



PHILIP EDWARD DOLAN 

4622 Horrocks Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Society for Advancement of Management 4. 





Chemistry 



Education 



Accounting 



Accounting 



Industrial Relations 



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JOHN JOSEPH DOMAN 

5031 Cottage Street 
Ph'ladclphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Historical Society 3-4; Secretary 4. 




Education 




Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 1-2. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 



A. A. DONATELLl 

2211 S. Bancroft Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



ROBERT DONNELLY 

1242 W. Lehigh Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



LOUIS V. DONNINI 

314 Maple Street 
Conshohocken, Penna. 



Industrial Management 



Psychology 



Education 





EUGENE A. DONOHUE 

5373 Delfar Road 
Clifton Heights, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Historical Society 4; Italian Club 4, 



Education 



ANTHONY JOSEPH D'ORAZIO 

2239 Dickinson Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Italian Club 4; Podium Society 4; Society for Advancement of Management 4; 

Intramurals 1-2, 



RALPH C. DORVAL 

3132 Fordham Road 
Philadelphia, Penna, 
Bachelor of Arts 
Le Cercle Claudel 3-4; Theatre 3. 










CHARLES PATRICK DUGAN 

251 Lindley Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

Accounting Association 4; Economics Club 2-3; Intramurals 1-4. 




JOSEPH P. DUKE 

60 E. Hortter Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Marketing 

Social Science Club 1; Blue a; Gold 2-3; Harvest Dance 1-3; Intramurals 1-4; 
Baseball 1. 



JOSEPH PATRICK EARLEY 

420 W. Durham Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Education 

Student Council 4; Class Vice-President 4; Radio Workshop 3-4; Theatre 3-4; 

Varsity Club 4; Harvest Dance 1; Intramurals 2; Tennis 1-4. 



WILLIAM J. EARLEY 

6936 Paschall Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Mathematics 

Doernenburg Society 3; Newtonian Society 3; Mathematics 3-4. 

WALTER F. ECK, JR. 

665 E. Westmoreland Street - 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 4. 



FRANCIS A. EDGETTE 

509 Academy Avenue 
Glenolden, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts History 

Collegian 3; Historical Society 3-4; Vice-President 4; Italian Club 4; Intra- 
murals 1-4. 



JOHN W. ELLIOTT 

3128 Knorr Street 
Philadelphia 24, Pa. 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



Accounting 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Club 3-4. 



Bachelor of Science 



Bachelor of Science 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 2. 



Bachelor of Arts 



WILLIAM F. ENGLISH 

3859 North 7th Street 
Philadelphia 40, Pa. 



C. L. ERE 

5248 N. Hutchinson Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JAMES PURNELL EWELL 

220 Fitch Road 
Hatboro, Penna. 



ARTHUR F. EWING 

2924 Hale Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



RANDOLPH S. EWING, JR. 

30 Lynbrook Road 
Newport, Delaware 



Accounting 



Accounting 



Marketing 



Marketing 



FRANK D. FAIRMAN 

2537 Jasper Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Chymain Society 3-4; Newtonian Society 4. 



Economics 



Chemistry 



JOHN NICHOLAS FALZETTA 

7 Lincoln Terrace 

Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Bachelor of Arts Education 

Economics Club, Secretary 2-4; Gavel 2-4; Historical Society 4; Masque 2; 

Sigma Beta Kappa 2-4; Vice-President 3, President 4; Harvest Dance 1-2. 






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Bachelor of Arcs 
Basketball 1-4. 



Bachelor of Science 




LOUIS NICHOLAS FANELLI 

29 S. Sixcy-first Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Education 

Historical Society 3-4; International Relations Club 4; Italian Club 4; Podium 

Society 3-4. 

MATTHEW ALOYSIUS FANNING, JR. 

3250 "F" Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 



Education 



RAYMOND ANTHONY FILIPPONE 

2217 S. Twenty-fourth Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 3; Historian 4; Fabrician Society 2-4; Podium Society 3-4. 



JOSEPH FINE 

6134 Wayne Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



General Bu^ineis 



JAMES W. FINEGAN 

2160 Pennington Road 

Trenton, New Jersey 

Bachelor of Arts Education 

Collegian 3-4; Theatre 3; Varsity Club 2-4; Weber Society 4; Intramurals 1; 

Golf 1-4. 



EUGENE J. FITZGERALD 

1700 S. Twenty-ninth Street 
Philadelphia, Pex-ia. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Class President 1; Gavel 4; Philosophy Club; President 2-4. 



STEPHEN J. FITZGERALD 

412 Primes Avenue 
Folcroft, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Chymian Society 3-4; Newtonian Society 4. 



Philosophy 



Chemistry 



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EDMUND J. FITZPATRICK 

729 E. Chelten Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 



Accounting 



JAMES J. FLATLEY 

5420 Pentridge Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science General Business 

Economics Club 3; Society for Advancement of Management 4; Intramurals 1-4. 



EDWARD JAMES FLEMING 



:lor of sifSfelic 



Bache 
Intramurals 1-4. 



Bachelor of Arts 
Newtonian Society 4. 



Bachelor of Science 
Society for Ad' 



232 W. Rosemar Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JAMES FLYNN, JR. 
308 W. Louden Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Marketing 



Physics 



JAMES C. FORD 

536 S. Conestoga Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Industrial Relations 
t of Management 4; Intramurals 1-4. 



CHRIS J. FRANCOS 

6006 Spruce Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Artd 
Weber Society 4; Intramurals 1. 



JOSEPH V. FRIEL 

1025 Bartram Avenue 
Collingdale, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Chymian Society 3-4, President 4. 



Education 










FRANOS A, FUaXB 

1631 S. Ninth Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Doernenburg Society 2-4, Secretary 3, Vice-President 4; Fabrician Society 3-4, 
Glee Club 1; Intramurals 1-4. 





EDWARD J. GALLAGHER 






251 W. Berkley Street 






Philadelphia, Penna. 




Bachelor of Arts 




Education 


Economics Club 2-3; 


Historical Society 3; Intramurals 1-4. 

FRANaS P. GANNON 

1 11 W. Champlost Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 




Bachelor of Science 




Accounting 


Accounting Association 3-4; Varsity Club 2-4; Golf 1-4. 






EDWIN J. GAROA 






Llorens Torres #360 Hatorey 






Box #274, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 




Bachelor of Science 


CHARLES JOSEPH GARVEY 

62 Harvey Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 


Marketing 


Bachelor of Arts 




Education 


Swimming 1-4. 


WILLIAM JOSEPH GATZMBR 

5943 N. Fourth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




Bachelor of Science 




Accounting 


Accounting Association 3-4; Intramurals 3-4. 






JOHN GAVIGAN 






4726 Chestnut Street 






Philadelphia, Penna. 




Bachelor of Arts 


Preparation for Law 



Bachelor of Science 
Podium Society 3-4. 



Bachelor of Arts 



FREDERICK C. GEARY 

217 Center Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



NICHOLAS C. GEARY, JR. 

1656 N. Sixty-second Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Marketing 



Economics 




Bachelor of Science 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Science 



ALBERT GEORGE 

936 W. Fishers Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JOSEPH GERETY 

4744 Penn Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



CARMEN FRANCIS GIACCIO 

7103 Rising Sun Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



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Accounting 



Sociology 



Accounting 



JOHN PAUL GILLANE 

1 103 S. Fortyseventh Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Social Science Club 1-2; Intramurals 1-4. 



EDWARD L. H. GILLESPIE 

243 N. Fifty-eighth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 
Glee Club 3-4: Track 2-4. 



Education 









JOSEPH JAMES GLEASON 

7530 Fayette Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Social Science Club 2-3; Intramurals 1-3 



JOSEPH P. GRACE 

1350 Colwyn Street 
Philadelphia, Penna 



Preparation for Law 



Bachelot of Science 
Accounting Association 4. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Science 



JOSEPH A. GRANAHAN 

116 E. Durham Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JOHN E. GRANT 

1922 Maple Avenue 
Croydon, Penna. 



Ec^ 



onomics 



Industrial Manegcment 





iLlife 



LEONARD GRAZIANI 

1923 S. Broad Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 3-4; Doernenburg Society 2-3; Fabrician Society 2-4; 
Glee Club 1; Intramurals 1-4. 



ELMER A. GRUBB 

1318 E. Washington Lane 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 



Accounting 



VINCENT J. GUMINSKI 

6310 Wheeler Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Government 

Economics Club 2-3; International Relations Club 3-4; National Federation of 
Catholic College Students 3; Podium Society 2-4; Blue 3C Gold 3-4; Harvest 
Dance 3 •4. 













RICHARD TACK GUMPERT 

440 W. Queen Lane 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 

Le Cercle Claudel 3-4. 



JOHN HAGGERTY 

203 1 E. Wilmot Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 4; Baseball 1-4; Basketball 1-4. 



LEO S. HALEY 

2144 S. Broad Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Historical Society 4; Italian Club 4. 



JOHN J. HAMBROSE 

206 Morgan Avenue 
Collingswood, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Science 




Education 



Marketing 



Education 





General Business 



OSCAR EDWARD HAMILTON, JR. 

1404 S. Fifty-fourth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

Historical Society 3; Masque 2; Podium Society 2-3; Weber Society 4; Intra- 
murals 2-3. 



ALBERT S. HARRIS 

2612 S. Dewey Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



.'jnchelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



Accounting 



FRANCIS J. HART 

215 Abbottsford Road 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

dnchelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Praefectus Club 3-4; Vice-President 4; Varsity 

Club 4, Vice-President 4; Basketball Manager 2-4. 




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WILLIAM J. HARTMAN 

719 Penn Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 




Accounting 




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THOMAS QUINN HARTY 

7701 Cherokee Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

B'.chelor of Science 

Bridge Club 2-4, Secretary 3, President 4. 



Marketing 



ANTHONY F. HECK 

4263 N. Fifteenth Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Education 

Historical Society 4; Italian Club 4, Treasurer 4; Blue 61, Gold 4; Harvest 

Dance 4; Intramurals 3-4. 



THOMAS E. C. HEFFERNAN 

3026 W. Harper Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Society for Advancement of Management 4. 



Industrial Relations 



EDWARD PATRICK HERATY 

1013 S. Forty-seventh Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Intramurals 1-2. 



CHARLES C. HIBBS 

563 E. Godfrey Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 1-4. 

CHARLES HENRY HIGGINS 

1302 S. Broad Street 
Trenton, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts 
Doernenburg Society 3-4; Weber Society 4. 



Accounting 



Marketing 



Educati< 



WALTER J. HILPL 

6215 Palethorpe Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Intramurals 1-3. 



HARRY H. HILTON 

132 Mercy Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 3-4. 



Bachelor of Arts 



LAWRENCE J. HINKLE 

1074 Alcott Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



FRANCIS JOSEPH HOBAN 

4811 N. Eighth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JEROME P. HOFMANN 

5947 Bingham Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



THOMAS F. HOOK 

1035 E. Chelten Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 

Social Science Club 3; Socjety for Ad 
murals 1-4. 



Accounting 



Accounting 



Biology 



Biology 



Education 



Industrial Relations 
of Management 4; Intra- 



CHARLES M. HORAN 

5354 N. Fifteenth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Social Science Club 3; Intramurals 1-4. 




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EDWIN L. HOSKINSON, JR. 

505 Greenwood Avenue 
Jenkintown, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Collegian 3; Intramurals 1-3. 



Marketing 



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JOSEPH F. HUGHES 

8440 ArdJeigh Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Society for Advancement of Management 4; Varsity Club 3-4; Intramurals 1-4; 
Golf 3-4. 



ROBERT J. HUNTER 

4720 Chester Avenue 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Industrial Relations 

Class Treasurer 2; Econom^ics Club 1-2; Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4. 



WALTER J. HYNEK 

2369 Croyden Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Chemutiy 

Chymian Society 3-4; Newtonian Society 4. 



STEPHEN P. IMMS 

33 W. Seymour Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Society for Advancement of Management 4; Junior Week Committee 3; 

Intramurals 1-4. 



CHARLES A. INGLESBY 

6519 Paschall Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Sociology 

Economics Club 2-3; Podium Society 2-3; Social Science Club 3-4; Intra- 
murals 3. 




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SAMUEL ALFRED JONES 

158 W. Godfrey Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 




Marketing 




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JOHN JOSEPH KANE 

2522 W. Columbia Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Collegian 1-4; Photographic Editor 3-4; Explorer 1-4, Photographic Editor 2-3, 
Editor-in-chief 4; Philosophy Club 2; Photographic Society 1-4, Director 1-4; 
Society for Advancement of Management 4, PubUcity Director 4; Weber 
Society 4; Harvest Dance 4; Intramurals 4. 




Bachelor of Arts 
Newtonian Society 2-4. 



ROBERT A. KAUFFMANN 

3529 Ainslie Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 
Philosophy Club 2-4. 



Bachelor of Arts 



ROBERT JOSEPH KEATING 

4645 Horrocks Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



CHARLES JOSEPH KELLEY 

1101 N. Sixty-third Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JOHN KEMENOSH 

2351 N. Fifth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Physics 



Economics 



Philosophy 



Economics 







JOHN H. KENNEDY 

3029 Fanshawe Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Economics Club 2-3; Glee Club 1-2; Blue & Gold 
3-4; Harvest Dance 3-4. 



41? 



Bachelor of Science 



TERRENCE A. KERR 

550 W. Lindley Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



General Business 



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CHARLES FRANCIS KILEY 

304 Powell Road 
Springfield, Delaware County, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Intramurals 1-2. 

GUST AVE C. KLUBAL 

5417 N. FairhiU Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Student Congress 4. 



Accounting 



General Business 



CHARLES F. KNAPP 

2216 S. Twenty-third Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Podium Society 4; Society for Advancement of Management 4; Intramurals 1-2. 



JAMES EDWARD KNIGHT 

Box 7187 
Elkins Park, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 4. 



LEONARD C. KONOPKA 

4544 Silverwood Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Explorer 4. 



General Business 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 1-4. 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



PETER L. KUNTZ 

7848 Spring- Avenue 
Elkins Park, Penna. 



ROBERT R. KURMIN 

116 Vance Avenue 
Lavallette, New Jersey 



Accounting 



Marketing 



Accounting 



PAUL W. LANKEWICH 

810 Belmont Avenue 
Collingswood, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts 
Historical Society 4; Sigma Beta Kappa 2-3. 



C RAYMOND LARKIN 

401 Springton Manor 
Upper Darby, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Student Congress 4, Acting President 4. 



WILBERT LaVERGHETTA 

116 White Horse Pike 
Collingswood, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Glee Club 3. 



JAMES A. LEE 

535 Columbia Avenue 
Millville, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Out of Towners 4. 



Education 



Industrial Management 



Accounting 



Accounting 



JOHN P. LEE 

2137 Gilles Street 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Society for Advancement of Management 4; Junior Week Committee 3; 

Intramurals 1-2. 



GEORGE E. LEMONNIER 

1706-D Patton Drive 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3-4; Collegian 3, Copy Editor 3. 



HARRY G. LENTO 

3159 Knorr Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 3-4; Intramurals 1-4; Baseball 2. 






GENNARD C. LEONE 

1121 S. Fourth Street 
Camden, New Jersey 



Bachelor of Science 
Italian Club 4. 



General Business 




Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 2-4. 



Bachelor of Arts 



HOLLAND J. LeTOURNEAU 

115 Terrace Avenue 
Kirklyn, Penna. 



CARMEN LICCARDO 

38 Wainwright Avenue 
Trenton, New Jersey 



JAMES GEORGE LIEBNER 

5615 Musgrave Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Historical Society 4; Out of Towners 4. 



FRANCIS ALBERT LIHOLTZ 

5717 N. Woodstock Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 
Fabrician Society 3-4. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Science 



RAYMOND E. LILLY 

57 Crescent Avenue 
Woodbury, New Jersey 



FRANK R. LINDELE 

8105 Ardleigh Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Collegian 1; Society for Advancement of Management 4. 




Biology 



Education 



Education 



Biology 



Education 



General Business 








DONALD R. LINTNER 

374 Church Road 
Elldns Park, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Alpha Epsilon Delta 3-4; Fabrician Society 3-4. 



ALFRED B. LISTA 

Ronwyn Apartments 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Biology 



Bachelor of Arts 
Baseball 1; Soccer 3-4, 



Political Science 



PHILIP POHN LUCIA 

25 Fairmont Street 
Elmsford, New York 
Bachelor of Science Accounting' 

Accounting Association 3-4; Out of Towners 1-2; Intramurals 2-4. 



NICHOLAS WILLIAM LUNIG 

5902 Loretto Avenue 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Industrial Relations 

Economics Club 1-2; Sigma Beta Kappa 2-4; Society for Advancement of 
Management 4. 



Bachelor of Science 



JOHN J. LYONS 

715 E. Mermaid Lane 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Industrial Relations 



JOSEPH F. McAVEETY 

5329 Hedge Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Collegian 3-4; Varsity Club 3-4; Intramurals 1-4; 

Soccer 3-4. 



FRANCIS N. McCABB 

4600 Disston Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science General Business 

Podium Society 1-2; Society for Advancement of Management 4. 







era 



Bachelor of Science 





GALLEY 7 
JAMES J. McCABE 

553 Anchor Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Philosophy Club 4; Intramurals 1-4. 



WILLIAM J. McCAULY, JR. 

405 Ascot Road 
Oreland, Penna. 



Preparation for Law 



JAMES J. McCAUSLAND 

240 W. Somerville Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 



Industrial Management 



Accounting 



JAMES JOHN McCLOSKEY 

1307 E. Oxford Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3-4; Harvest Dance 1. 



WILLIAM E. McCOY 

2113 McKinley Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Accounting 



Bachelor of Science 



EDWARD C. McCREADY 

1365 Narragansett Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Podium Society 2; Intramurals 1-4. 



WILLIAM J. McDEVITT 

108 North York Street 
Pottstown, Pa 



Bachelor of Science 



Accounting 



Marketing 



Marketing 



Bachelor of Science 



DONALD F. McDonnell 

5909 N. Third Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



General Business 



JOSEPH FRANQS McFADDBN 

1236 S. Twenty-sixth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Newtonian Society 2-4; Intramurals 3-4. 



Physics 



FRANCIS HUGH McGEE 

2217 E. Huntingdon Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Industrial Relations 

Economics Club 2; Praefectus Club 3-4; Society for Advancement of Manage- 
ment 4; Varsity Club 4; Harvest Dance 1; Swimming 2-4. 



THOMAS JOSEPH McGINTY 

5357 Yocum Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Intramurals 1-4. 



JAMES H. McGOLDRICK 

1339 S. Fifty-fourth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



JAMES T. McGLYNN 

1527 S. Twenty-ninth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Economics Cluh 2-3; Historical Society 4. 



JOHN C. McGUIRE 

416 Jasper Street 
Camden, New Jersey 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 




Accounting 



Education 




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WILLIAM JOSEPH McHALE 

357 E. Gale Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Podium Society 3; Sigma Beta Kappa 2-4; Theatre 

3; Varsity Club 2-4; Blue and Gold 1-4; Harvest Dance 1-4; Tennis 1-4. 



Bachelor of Arts 
Historical Society 4; 
Class Secretary 3. 



EUGENE F. McHUGH 

1727 N. Fifty-seventh Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Education 
National Federation of Catholic College Students 3 ; 




English 
3 ; Class Secretary 2-3 ; 
1-4; Associate Editor 4; 



JOHN VINCENT McILMAIL 

415 E. Wildey Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

Doernenburg Society 3-4; Historical Society 4; Intramurals 1-2. 

EUGENE PETER McLOONE 

243 Sydney Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 

Student Council 2-4; Secretary 2; Vice-President 
Collegian 1-4, News Editor 3; Editor 4; Explor 

International Relations Club 2-3; National Federation of Catholic College Stu- 
dents 1-4, Regional Secretary 2; National Student Association 2-4; Sub-regional 
Chairman 4; Podium Society 1-3; Social Science Club 1-3; Executive Board 2; 
Blue and Gold 1-3; Harvest Dance 1-4; Intramurals 1-4. 

JOSEPH D. McTAGUE 

4246 Romain Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 

JOHN C. MACKLIN, JR, 

311 Battel Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Collegian 1-2; Explorer 4 
murals 1-2. 



Accounting 



Marketing 
Harvest Dance 1-2; Intra- 



JAMES D. MAGOWAN 

401 W. Duncannon Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Education 

Historical Society 4; National Federation of Catholic College Students 4; 

Spanish Club 3-4. 






JAMES L. MAHER 

5 1 7 Delancey Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 



General Business 



CHARLES FRANOS MAHONY 

2460 Seventy-sixth Avenue 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Marketing 

Explorer 4; Sigma Beta Kappa 2-4; Blue and Gold 4; Harvest Dance 3-4; 

Intramurals 2-3-4. 



LEON R. MALLEY 

308 .Wadsword Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 
Crew 4; Intramurals 4 



Bachelor of Arts 
Doernenburg Society 3. 



JOHN JOSEPH MALONE 

6111 Hegerman Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Psychology 



Education 



JOHN A. MARCHESANI 

122 White Horse Pike 
Haddon Heights, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 3-4; Fabrician Society 2-4; Podium Society 3; Intra- 
murals 3-4. 



LOUIS J. MARTIN 

62 W. Mill Road 
Pedricktown, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Radio Workshop 3-4. 



Accounting 




NICHOLAS STRATTIS MATCHICA 

6125 Lebanon Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 1. 



Marketing 




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JOHN G. MATEEZUM 

536 N. Twelfth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



MICHAEL JOSEPH MATHEWS 

220 Lemonte Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



Accounting 



Accounting 



ROBERT A. MATICS 

3601 S. Eighty-third Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



DOMENIC NICHOLAS MATTEO 

933 Watkins Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Doernenbuig Society 1-2; Glee Club 1-2; Intramurals 3. 



Psychology 



Sociology 



JOHN MATTIS 

5100 North Broad Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



chelor of Arts 



FRANK J. MAUER, JR. 

4141 Levick Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
National Student Association 1-3. 



HARRY J. MAYER, JR. 

88 Utica Avenue 
Westmont, New Jersey 



Bachelor of Arts 
Newtonian Society 4. 



English 



Preparation for Law 



Physics 



EUGENE W. MEEHAN 

2634 N. Howard Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 



Industrial Management 



THEODORE CMESTER MENDALA 

482 Eighth Street 
Clearfield, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3-4; Intramurals 1- 



JOSEPH A. MEUSER 

6025 Rising Sun Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Accounting 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 



CARL JOSEPH MEYER 

5319 N. Front Street 
Philadelphia, Penna, 



WILLIAM D. MIGNOGNA 

429 Stevens Street 
Camden, New Jersey 



Mathematics 



Liberal Arts 



Preparation for Law 



Student Council 2; Class Vice-President 2; Harvest Dance 1 



THEOBALD M. MIGNONE 

326 Kaighn Avenue 
Catnden, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts 
Italian Club 4; Social Science 3-4. 



EDWARD W. MIKUS 

3180 Emery Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 





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WILLIAM B. MITCHELL 

314 E. Twenty-second Street 
Chester, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 



Industrial Relations 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 




JOHN JOSEPH MOLNAR 

507 Levick Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Varsity Club 2-4; Intramurals 1-4. 



RICHARD I. MOLYNEAUX 

224 Wabash Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JAMES F. MONAHAN 

7202 N. Twentieth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JOHN A. MOORE 

6701 Torresdale Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Preparation For Law 



Education 



HAMILTON W. MOOREHEAD 

3695 Eveline Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Varsity Club 4; Intramurals 3-4; Soccer 4. 



ANTHONY MORESCHI 

1107 E. Rittenhouse Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Science 



Marketing 



achelor of Arts 



Preparation for Law 





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JOHN J. MORRISON 




606 N. Sixty-third Street 




Philadelphia, Penna. 


Bachelor of Science 


General Business 


Intramurals 2-4. 






FERDINAND PAUL MORRO 




748 Foss Avenue 




Drexel Hill, Penna. 


Bachelor of Science 


Accounting 


Class ? 4; Accounting Association 2-3; Barbell Society 3-4; Theatre 3; 


Blue and Gold 1 ; Harvest Dance 4. 




JAMES PETER MORRO 




748 Foss Avenue 




Drexel Hill, Penna. 


Bachelor of Arts 


Education 


Le Cercle Claudel 1-4 


Vice-President 3, President 4; Explorer 4; Podium So- 


ciety 1-4; Theatre 1-3; 


Weber Society 3. 




HENRY C. MOSER 




850 Westfield Avenue 




Elizabeth, New Jersey 


Bachelor of Arts 


Education 


Mathematics Club 3-4 


Out of Towners 2-4; Intramurals 2-4. 


JOSEPH RAYMOND MOUNTAIN 




154 Roselyn Street 




Philadelphia, Penna. 


Bachelor of Arts 


Government 


Intramurals 4. 






ROBERT F. MUIR 




3021 Fanshawe Street 




Philadelphia, Penna. 


Bachelor of Arts 


Enghsh 


Chess Club 3-4, Theat 


re 3-4. 




JAMES J. MULHERRIN 




3049 Rorer Street 




Philadelphia, Penna. 


Bachelor of Arts 


Chemistry 


Chymian Society 3-4. 















FRANCIS BERNARD MULLARKEY 

1914 S. Alden Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3-4; Vice-President 4; Intramurals 1-4. 



Accounting 



EDWARD F. MURPHY 

5830 Saul Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

Student Council 2-4, Vice-President 3; Class President 2, 4, Vice-President 
3; Explorer 4; Sigma Beta Kappa 3-4; Blue and Gold 1-4; Harvest Dance 
1-4; Intramurals 2. 



FRANCIS J. MURPHY 

1336 W. Columbia Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 



Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 4. 



FRANK P MURPHY 

6035 Jefferson Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



WILLIAM R. MYERS 

222 1-A Dune Road 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Political Science 



Education 



Biology 



SIMON T. NAGEL 

5833 N. Twenty-first Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Glee Club 3-4, Historian 4. 



Accounting 



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AUGUST NIEMEYER 

315 Edmonds Avenue 
Drexel Hill, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 



Industrial Management 



J. PHILIP NOLAN 

314 W. Sparks Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 3-4; Fabrician Society 3-4; Podium Society 3; Sigma Beta 
Kappa 2-4; Intramurals 4; Crew 2. 



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JOSEPH F. NOVELLA 

F308 Montevista Apts. 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Economics Club 2-3; Intramurals 2-4. 



Marketing 



GREGORY RICHARD O'BRIEN 

327 Ridgeway Avenue 
Glenalden, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



WILLIAM A. O'CALLAGHAN 

252 Apsley Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Barbell Society 3-4; Intramurals 1-4. 



Accounting 



General Business 



JOSEPH THOMAS OLSON 

112 Wharton Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Society for Advancement of Management 4; Intramurals 2. 



VINCENT C. PAOLETTO 

609 W. York Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Newtonian Society 3-4; Radio Club 1-4, President 3-4. 



ROGER E. PARENTEAU 

312 Hampden Street 
Chicopee, Mass. 



Bachelor of Arts 
Alpha Epsilon Delta 4. 




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Biology 




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Bachelor of Arts 
Intramurals 1; Tr 




HERBERT F. PATRICK 

323 N. Redfield Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



ALBERT LINTON PEARSON 

4526 MiUett Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 2-4; Treasurer 4; Sigma Beta Kappa 2-4. 



Education 



Biology 



ANTHONY FREDERICK PEDICONE 

2342 S. Bancroft Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Economics Club 2; Gavel 4; Glee Club 1-4, 

President 3, Vice-President 4. 



JOHN V. PENSIERO 

1241 Germantown Avenue 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Marketing 

Economics Club 2 ; Glee Club 3 ; Social Science Club 1 ; Harvest Dance 1 ; 

Intratnurals 1-4. 



HARRY N. PEPE, JR. 

2420 S. Rosewood Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 3-4; Podium Society 3; IntramuAls 1-4. 



ROBERT JOHN PETERSON 

155 Fern Avenue 
Collingswood, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts 
Economics Club 3; Podium Society 2; Weber Society 4. 



LOUIS J. PETTI, JR. 

2237 S. Hemberger Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 2-4; Podium Society 1; Intramurals 3-4. 



Biology 



Education 



Biology 





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FRANK P. PETTINELLI 

1822 S. Thirteenth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Le Cercle Claudel 3; Italian Club 4. 



NEAL P. PHILLIPS 
1333 Grange Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Education 



Bachelor of Science 
Baseball 3. 



EDWARD PIERCE, JR. 

334 N. Sixty-first Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Education 

Collegian 2; Doernenberg Society 4; Historical Society 4; Photographic 

Society 1-4. 

JOSEPH F. PITTELLI 

2538 Tasker Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Student Council Treasurer 4; Class Treasurer 4; Accounting Association 3-4; 
Explorer 4; Podium Society 4, Treasurer 4; Sigma Beta Kappa 4; Harvest 
Dance 3-4. 



ADAM F. PODLINSKI 

3415 N. Seventeenth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 
Student Congress 3. 

WILLIAM J. POUNDS 

805 Broadway 
Westville, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Arts 
Fabrician Society 2, Vice-President 2. 



JAMES POWERS 
5519 Hazel Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 



General Business 



Biology 



History 



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THOMAS POWERS 

5310 Chew Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

International Relations Club 2; National Student Association 2. 



JOHN JOSEPH PULLEKINES 

705 Independence Square 
Chester, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Chemistry 

Chymian Society 3-4; Newtonian Society 2-4. 



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GEORGE FRANCIS QUINN 

1724 N. Blair Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Weber Society 4; Harvest Dance 1. 



Education 



IGNATIUS A. QUINN 

423 W. Hortter Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Doernenburg Society 2-4; Fabrician Society 1-4; Intramurals 1-4. 




Bachelor of Science 
Soccer 4. 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 4. 



NICHOLAS JOSEPH QUITTER 

4730 C Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



JOSEPH J. RAGG 

2903 E. Elbridge Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



General Business 



Accounting 




DANIEL J. RAGONE 

1235 Dayton Street 
Camden, New Jersey 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



Accounting 



LOUIS MATTHEW RAKSZAWSKI 



Bachelor of Arts 
Newtonian Society 3-4. 



Bachelor of Science 
Swimming 1-4. 



3851 N. Gratz Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



ROBERT E. REGAN 

1115 Dyre Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Physics 



Marketing 



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JAMES FRANCIS REIDY 

5339 N. Carlisle Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Marketing 

Sigma Beta Kappa 2-4; Vice-President 4; Blue and Gold Chairman 4; Harvest 

Dance Secretary 4, Intramurals 1-4. 



LAWRENCE THOMAS REIFSTECK 



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718 Maple Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 

Intramurals 3-4. 



General Business 



EDWARD DANIEL REILLY 

5320 Walton Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3. 

HARRY T. REIN 

5041 N. Fifth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Chymian Society 3-4, Secretary 3-4. 

VINCENT A. RENZULLI 

15 Chatham Road 
Upper Darby, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Intramurals 1. 



Accounting 



Chemistry 



Preparation for Law 







Bachelor of Science 




WILLIAM ANTHONY RIES 

2842 Frankford Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Student Council President 4; Accounting Association 3-4; Explorer 4; Podium 
Society 2-4; Praefectus Club 2-4; Sigma Beta Kappa 1-4; Varsity Club 4, 
Treasurer 4; Blue and Gold 1-4; Harvest Dance 1-4, Chairman 4. 



JOSEPH DAVID RIHL 

2058 Margaret Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3-4, Treasurer 4; Intramurals 1. 



Accounting 



LEO JOSEPH ROBE 

166 Upland Road 

Manoa, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Doernenburg Society 1; Fabrician Society 1-4, President 4; Podium Society 2; 

Intramurals 1-4. 



WILLIAM S. ROBINSON 

8101 Roanoke Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



LOUIS A. ROMAN 

47 W. Willow Grove Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Class Secretary 1; Historical Society 3-4. 



WALTER S. ROSOWSKI 

4550 E. Thompson Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4; Economics Club 2. 



Industrial Relations 



Education 



Accounting 



RICHARD A. ROTHWELL 

7171 Ogontz Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 1-3. 



Marketing 




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MAURICE F. RUDDEN 

7054 Reedland Street 
Philadelphia ,Pennae 
Bachelor of Science 
Varsity Club 3-4; Intramurals 3-4; Baseball 3-4. 



General Business 



JOHN J. RUSH 

109 E. Pleasant Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
International Relations Club 1; Intramurals 2-3. 



Political Science 



JOHN ALOYSIUS RYAN 

3213 Disston Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

Historical Society 3-4, President 4; International Relations Club 4, Intra- 
murals 1 . 



ANTHONY EDWARD RYZINSKI 

2701 Snyder Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Doernenburg Society 1 ; Fabrician Society 2. 



WILLIAM ANDREW RUCK 

230 W. Sheldon Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Government 

International Relations Club 3-4; Theatre 4; Intramurals 1-4. 



JOHN JOSEPH SABIA 

223 E. Benezet Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting Association 3-4; Intramurals 1-4; Crew 1. 



Bachelor of Science 



JOHN F. SCHENKEL 

Wheatsheal Lane Sc Thompson St. 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Accounting 



Marketing 







JOSEPH A. SCHMID, III 

5864 Loretta Avenue 

Philadelphia, Pe 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Economics Club 1-4; Intramurals 2-3. 



ALBERT HARRY SCHOELLHAMMER 

Forrest Avenue 
Jenkintown, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 



LOUIS ANDREW SCHOPPET 

5620 N. Second Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4- 



Marketing 



Accounting 



FRANCIS L. SCHUCK 

209 Barlow Avenue 

Merchantville, New Jersey 

Bachelor of Science Industrial Management 

Economics Club 3; Society for Advancement of Management 4; Intramurals 2. 



JAMES F. SCULLY 

417 E. Center Street 
Mt. Carmel, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 
Cercle Claudel 3-4. 



Education 



WILLIAM C. SEIBERLICH 

120 W. Champlost Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Weber Society 4, President 4. 



JOSEPH NICHOLAS SENEK 

130 E. Wyoming Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 2. 



Education 



Accounting 



HUGH J. SHIELDS 

3949 N. Dell Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 



Industrial Management 



Society for Advancement of Management 4; Intramurals 4. 



GEORGE R. SIMMONS 

639 Hunter Street 
Gloucester City, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 3-4. 



DANIEL K. SIMPSON 

1 1 06 Haworth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 2; Masque 1; Radio Workshop 1. 



JAMES J. SINCLAIR 

4304 Norrocks Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Intramurals 1-3. 



JOSEPH F. SMITH 

5619 N. 'Uber Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science 

Vaarsity Club 2-3; Intramurals 3-4; Tennis 1-2. 



ALBERT A. SMOTER 

727 W. Roosevelt Boulevard 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 1. 



JOSEPH F. SPELLMAN 

1306 Hale Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 



Accounting 



Accounting 



Biology 



Marketing 



Marketing 




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FRANCIS X. STANTON 

3221 W. Allegheny Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts 
Economic Club 1-3; Varsity Club 2-4; Crew 2-4. 



Econo 



JOSEPH LOUIS STAUNTON 

4919 Morris Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Industrial Relations 

Student Council 3; Class Treasurer 3; International Relations Club 2; Podium 
Society 2-4; Social Science Club 2; Society for Advancement of Managenient 4; 
Varsity Club 3-4; Swimming 1-4. 



HARVEY J. STEFANOWICZ 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 3. 



Bachelor of Arts 



4249 Barnett Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



BURTON STEIN 

5740 N. Twelfth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Marketing 



Liberal Arts 







RICHARD JOHN STOUT 

1425 N. Sixty-first Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Education 

Gavel Society 1-4, President 4; Radio Workshop 2-3; Weber Society 4; Intra- 
murals 1-4. 



ROBERT O. STRAYHORN 

636 Crosby Street 
Chester, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



French 



ROBERT E. STUMPF 

417 W. Rockland Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Glee Club 2; Blue and Gold 4; Harvest Dance 4. 



General Business 







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ANTHONY J. STUMPO 

1309 Snyder Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Fabrician Society 1; Podium Society 1. 



t 



Biology 



JAMES T. SULLIVAN, JR. 

538 E. Washington Lane 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Junior Vice-President 3, President 4; Intra- 

murals 114. 



THOMAS E. SUROWICZ 

7435 Rising Sun Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



iachelor of Arts 



Sociology 



EDWARD J. SWEENEY 

1441 Stevens Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Liberal Arts 



HARRY P. SYKES 

3938 Bennington Street 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Industrial Relations 

Economics Club 2-3; Society for Advancement of Management 4, Treasurer 4; 

Intramurals 1-4. 



JAMES FRANCIS TADDEI 

140 E. Glenside Avenue 
Glenside, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 3-4; Podium Society 1-2; Intraijiurals 1-4. 



FRANCIS K. TAYLOR 

1316 S. Twenty-ninth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Chemistry 

Chymian Society 3-4; Newtonian Society 4 





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MICHAEL F. THEES 

4523 Teesdale Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



International Relations Club 4; Intramurals 1-3; Track 1-2. 



ALBERT WALTER TIBBETTS 

408 Beideman Avenue 
Camden, New Jersey 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 4. 



General Business 



Accounting 



JOHN JOSEPH TILLGER 

5223 N. Marshall Street. 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 3-4; Fabrician Society 3-4; Intramurals 1-4. 



GUY R. TOBIAS 

1722 S. Eighth Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 
Historical Society 3-4. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Education 



JOSEPH TRANOTTI 

425 Jefferson Avenue 
Bristol, Penna. 



Education 



JOHN DANIEL TURCO 

2012 Morris Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 3-4; Fabrician Society 3-4; Sigma Beta Kappa 2-4; Intra- 
murals 4. 



EDWARD J. UHLER 

245 E. Hiebee Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 



Education 



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BARTHOLOMEW JOHN VATTIERI 

521 Rising Sun Avenue 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Arts Preparation for Law 



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EDWARD J. WALL 

2442 N. Mutter Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Arts 
Historical Society 3-4. 



Education 



Bachelor of Science 



RICHARD FRANCIS WALSH 

1306 Van Kirk Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



HARRY BERNARD WATTS 

113 S. Thirty-seventh Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Bachelor of Science 
Intramurals 2, Track 1. 



Accounting 



Marketing 



ROBERT F. WEINMAN 

7358 Torresdale Avenue 

Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bachelor of Science Accounting 

Accounting Association 2-4; Sigma Beta Kappa 3-4, Treasurer 4; Varsity Club 

3-4; Crew 1-4. 



JOHN SHORT WELSH 

427 E. Mt. Airy Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science General Business 

Economics Club 2; Podium Society 1-4; Social Science Club 1-3. 



Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Associati< 



THOMAS MICHAEL WHITE 

6750 Greenway Avenue 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





Accounting 





ROBERT E. WIEBLER 

15 Linda Avenue 
White Plains, New York 
Bachelor of Arts Economics 

Collegian 3-4; Bridge Club 3-4; Explorer 4; Glee Club 1-4; Masque 2; Out of 
Towners 1-4,, Secretary 3, Vice-President 4; Blue and Gold 3; Intramurals 
1-4. 



SAMUEL M. WINNEMORE 

192 Church Road 
Merchantville, New Jersey 



Bachelor of Science 



Industrial Management 



ROBERT FREDERICK WOODLAND 

2110 Laisson Road 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Science 
Accounting Association 2. 



WILLIAM FREDERICK WRIGHT 

2106 Laisson Road 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



Accounting 



Bachelor of Science 



Accounting 



FRANOS JOSEPH WUEST 

404 Gerritt Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
Bachelor of Arts Biology 

Class President 3; Collegian 3-4; Doernenburg Society 1-3; Fabrician Society 
1-4; Glee Club 1-2; Sigma Betta Kappa 3-4; Blue and Gold 2-4; Harvest Dance 
2-4; Intramurals 1-4; Crew 1, 2, 4. 




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Class president Edward Murphy and class mod- 
erator Max Guzikowski clear the dates for Senior 
Week with William Ries, president of Student 
Council. 



Treasurer Joseph Pittelli, vice-president Joseph 
Earley, and secretary Ferd Morro discuss progress 
of ticket sales for Senior Week affairs. 



Student Council 

Plagued with many of the difficulties that mark- 
ed its earlier years, Student Council entered its 
fourth term with a determination to improve and 
to solve problems. 

Elections were held in the fall and, as in other 
elections, contestants disputed and contests were 
disputed. The annual conflict with the Collegian 
concerning the legitimacy of news-writing ensued. 
Gradually and noticeably the initial determination 
dwindled, faded, and, with the new elections of 
the Class of 1952, the remaining enthusiasts 
hoped that Council would not die. 

All in all, a few men now know better methods 
and clearer appproaches toward successful gov- 
ernment. 




Accounting Assaciatian 

Although juggling figures gave the members 
of the Accounting Association little difficulty, 
they ran into great difficulty in juggling dates to 
fit the calendar-year events. In spite of this, the 
association went on to have many dinner-rallies 
during the basketball season, stag parties, and 
guest speakers at their meetings. 

Fundamentally known for a high spirit of fel- 
lowship, the officers and older members cooper- 
ated in directing and teaching the novices the 
fundamentals of accounting practices, especially 
strengthened by field trips to accounting offices. 



The olhcers of the Accounting Association 
discuss plans for one of their many successful 
stags. They are: (seated) James Sullivan, presi- 
dent; Francis Mullarkey, vice-president; (stand- 
ing Albert George, secretary; and Joseph Rihl, 
treasurer. 





Le Cercle Clandel 

With the completion of "Le Malade Imagin- 
are", a visit to Georgian Court, and a banquet for 
its members, Le Cercle Claudel closed another 
successful campaign which saw the rise of added 
interests in the area of French culture. High 
morale, deep interest, and able leadership ranked 
this society among the elite, and made it the most 
respected model for other language societies to 
follow. Sharing a common aim, its members 
found expression in the literature and customs of 
the French nation. 



Members of Le Cercle Claudel rehearse 
for their production of " Malade Imaginaire." 
Shown in the usual order are: James Morro, 
club president who played the lead in the show; 
Robert Hafev, and William Stdlivan. 



Is 




Alyha Epsilon Delta 

La Salle's excellent premedical department 
gained national recognition last year when the 
Fabrician Society was the recipient of a chapter 
of Alpha Epsilon Delta, national premedical fra- 
ternity. 



Dr. Edward J. Cannon '46, an active alum- 
ni member of Alpha Epsilon Delta, uses a 
flashlight to feature the part of the slide he 
explains. The slides were used to illustrate his 
research paper in the field of ophthalmology. 
He delivered the paper at an open forum of 
the society. Left to right: Martin Bukowski, 
president of AED; Leonard Graziani; Rudolph 
Komada; and Robert Fisher. 



Brother F. Christopher, associate pro- 
fessor of Biology, prepares the skeleton of Fawsa 
for the comparative anatomy laboratory while 
members of Alpha Epsilon Delta look on. Fawsa 
was obtained from the Philadelphia Zoo where 
she died of old age. The additional of the 
skeleton made the laboratory one of the most 
complete in the Philadelphia area. 




AED continued to spread the name of La 
Salle by sponsoring the first annual premedical 
conference in Pennsylvania. In cooperation with 
Jefferson Hospital, this forum gave students an 
insight into the operations of medical schools and 
the methods used in selecting students for medical 
schools. 

The honor society also provided students with 
a monthly bulletin devoted to articles, reviews, 
and papers by the members. 



Raymond Fillippone and Robert Smith register 
students for the tour of Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege and Hospital during Alpha Epsilon Delta's 
first annual premedical conference. The students 
registering are: Angel Paul, Beaver College; 
Charles Wolfe. Ronald S. Romlg, Alberto Grute- 
man, and C. Douglas Ebling, Albright College. 




Historical Society 

A small group of students interested in fur- 
thering their knowledge of History gathered 
monthly in informal meetings at the residence of 
Dr. John Mc Closkey, assistant professor of His- 
tory, to hear noted historians from the Phila- 
delphia area speak. Like the science societies, 
this is a group closely aligned with the course 
work. 



Dr. Joseph McCloskey, assistant professor of 
History and Historical Society mederator, dis- 
cusses the schedule of speakers with club of- 
ficers. In the usual order; John Ryan, president; 
Francis Edgette, vice-president; John Doman, 
secretary; and Richard Devlin. 



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Brother M. Edward, associate professor of 
Chemistry and moderator of the Chymian So- 
ciety, and John Moore examine part of the 
equipment given to the Chemistry Department 
by Louis P. Dominques '49. 




National Student Association leaders discuss 
student liberties with Dr. Patrick Malin (sec- 
ond from left), president of the American Civil 
Liberties Union, after his speech to the NSA 
Pennsylvania convention. Left to right: Elmer 
Brock, NSA national vice-president; Dr. Malin; 
Ted Perry, Temple University, former NSA 
national vice-president; and Ken Kurtz, Swarth- 
more College, president of Pennsylvania NSA. 




IVational Student Association 

Losing the able leadership of Elmer Brock, 
now national vice-president of NiA, and EUwood 
Kaiser, past active member, the National Student 
Association settled down to performing routine 
tasks and to helping Student Council, instead of 
invading new fields as it had done for the past 
three years. The student loan prospered under 
"Shylock" Donatelli, and no creditors escaped. 

La Salle was well represented in regional acti- 
vities by Brother George Thomas, chairman of 
the regional advisory board; Edmund Barnes, re- 
gional treasurer; and Eugene McLeone, sub-re- 
gional chairman. In all, the campus committee 
concentrated on benefits to students through 
cooperation with Student Council. 




Collegian 




Joseph Gavin, editor of the Collegian, ex- 
plains May publishing schedule to staff members 
John DiSangro, Joseph McLean, James Ledwith, 
and John Mangan. 



Continuing the policy of last spring, the Col- 
legian published eight pages weekly. During most 
of the Fall term the combined efforts of the edi- 
tor-in-chief and staff turned out a steady flow of 
above average journalism. Then, with the change 
of editors and the loss of John Kane and his cam- 
eras, the Collegian appeared more as a four-page 
issue. Intramurals, under the editorship of Skip 
Largay '52, gained extensive coverage, and in co- 
operation with the Weber Society, a literary 
supplement was published. 

Even with the reduced number of pages and 

without a faculty censor, the editors still had to 
spend over twenty-four hours to turn out the 
Collegian. 

Bob Considine right, International News Col- 
umnist, receives the Collegian Award for Public 
Service in Journalism, from Eugene McLoone, 
retiring editor, and Brother G. Paul, president. 





James Sanzare, news editor, and Joseph Gav- 
in, editor-in-chief, prepare material for another 
Collegian Poll. The Collegian Poll reached na- 
tional prominence when it picked Truman to 
win the 1948 election. 



Editor-in-chief Eugene McLoone 

Associate Editor Anthony Alito 

Sports Editor Joseph Gavin 

Photographic Editor John J. Kane 

News Editor James Sanzare 

Feature Editor Francis Conaty 

Intramural Editor Henry Largay 

Business Manager Richard Kloos 

Circulation Managers James Ledwith 

Robert Wiebler 
News Staff: William Kieser, Joseph McLean, 
David Rosania. 

Sports Staff: John DiSangro, Charles Peoples, 
Tohn Mangan. 

Features Staff James Finegan, Rolland LeTour- 
neau, John J. Keenan, Francis Tiers. 
Art Staff: Arthur O'Neill, Edward Graham, 
Tames Larkin. 
Moderator: John J. Kelly. 



Joseph McLean, copy editor, checks to see if 
the story will fit the space provided in the make- 
up sheets. 



James Ledwith, circulation manager, prepares 
the papers for mailing to subscribers and other 
collesje newspapers. The "exchange", as the pap- 
ers from other colleges are called, serve as a 
valuable file of ideas. 



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VI 




John Di Sangro, sports editor, receives copy 
from John Zaccaria while John Mangan waits to 
ask the sports editor's advice on the story he 
is writing. 



James Sanzare, news editor, shows staff mem- 
ber Charles Day where his story will go by 
checking the make-up sheet. 



John Keenan, associate editor, gives staff mem- 
ber William Kieser some pointers on writing a 
good news story. 





La Salle's delegation to the regional meeting 
of the National Federation of Catholic College 
Students are: (seated) Frederick Enck, regional 
Interracial Justice Commission chairman; Donald 
Gates, editor of the national IJC newspaper; 
(standing) Charles Day, national IJC chairman; 
James Sanzare, senior delegate; Francis Duffy, 
junior delegate; and Felix Moletteri, alternate 
delegate. 



IVational Federation of Catholic 
College Stodents 

With the way led by two sophomores, Donald 
Gates and Charles Day, the National Federation 
of Catholic College Students spent most of its 
time in regional and national activities of inter- 
racial justice. Their efforts were climaxed when, 
at the April meeting, the national council assign- 
ed to La Salle a national Interracial Justice Com- 
mission. With the election of Fred Enclc to the 
vice-presidency, La Salle again became a power 
in the region activities. 

Bill Biesser '51, served as co-chairman of the 
regional congress. The interracial activities of 
Vern Hart and the relief drive for needy stu- 
dents occupied most of the campus tasks. 



The final regional council meeting of the 
Philadelphia National Federation of Catholic 
College Students was held in Leonard Hall. 
Fredrick Enck was elected vice-president for 
1951-1952 year at the meeting. 




k r w 



John Kane 



Anthony Alito 




John Kane, editor-in-chief, was responsible for 
taking almost every action picture in the year- 
book as well as co-ordinating the work of the 
other editors. He planned the book and watched 
it grow into the finished product. 

Eugene McLoone, associate editor, assisted 
Kane in the make-up department and in collect- 
ing copy for the annual. 

Chester Cyzio, senior section editor, puzzled 
with the activity lists of the seniors and compiled 
the completed listings for each senior. Chester 
was first editor to complete his section. 

Eugene DeLaurentis, sports editor, preserved 
the records of the athletic teams and composed 
the write-ups for that section. Due to the busy 
spring sport season, his work was only finished 
with the completion of the academic year. 

Activities Editor James Morro arranged the 
schedule of pictures for the various clubs and 
gathered the data on the club's activities for the 
past four years. 



Eugene McLoone 



Joseph Pitelli 



William Ries, faculty editor, made sure every 
faculty member had his portrait taken and that 
the degrees listed were correct. 

Associate Editor Anthony Alito read the copy 
for errors by the writers or the printer. He was 
also available to offer advice and check the ac- 
curacy of the copy. 

Joseph Pitelli, class treasurer, provided a run- 
ning record of funds available and constantly 
reminded us of the remainder we needed for 
the yearbook. Joe kept all the financial record. 

Class president Edward Murphy acted as sales 
manager and with the help of the Senior Ad- 
visory Board, he conducted two fund raising 
campaigns that insured the publication of the 
Exolorer. 



Chester Cyzio 



Edward Murphy 




Eugene DeLaurentis 



James Morro 



William Ries 




saauBf^msf -^i 




The preliminary work on appointments for 
senior portraits is completed by staff members 
imder the supervision of editor John Kane 
(standing left). Edward Murphy, yearbook sales- 
manager and class president, and Richard Del- 
vin type lists of seniors in triplicate while Eugene 



McLoone, associate editor, places the appoint- 
ment times on file cards. Edmund Barnes cuts 
one copy of the list prior to pasting them on 
fil" cards. Underclassman Arthur O'Neill ob- 
serves to learn the intri cacie s of yearbook work. 




Senior Editor Chester Cyzio complies the list- 
ings for the senior section of the book from the 
activity sheets. 



Asso'-iate Editor Anthony Alito gath- 
ers data from the Collegian for use in write-ups 
ot Che clubs and for the four-year review. 



lohn Kane, editor-in-chief, assisted by 
associate editor Eugene McLoone, checks the 
completed pages of the senior section. 

Th<> niee Club und<»r the direction of 
Father William Sailer perform at their annual 
Sprine Concert. 




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The Glee Club takes time off from one 
of the numerous rehearsals during the year for 
a group picture with the director Father Wil- 
liam Sailer. 




Out of Towners Club 

Students from as far away as Paris and Hawaii 
and as near as Trenton and Wilmington were 
brought together into a small, compact group, 
in which a feeling of loneliness was overshadowed 
by the spirit of friendship. Begun in 1947, the 
Out of Towners Club relied mainly on social 
functions for the promotion of personal friend- 
ships. The members concentrated upon stags, 
closed parties and out-of-town basketball trips. 

With a decline in enrollment and a lessening 
of the veteran group, the club's activities were 
not as varied in the past year. But the newer 
and younger members are confident of more 
successful years. 



Brother E. Stanislaus, Dean and Modera- 
tor of the Out-of- Towners, receives a token of 
aopreciation from the club prior to leaving for 
his second noviciate and a year of study at the 
motherhouse in Rome. Anthony Alito, club presi- 
dent, makes the presentation. 




A few couples pictured at one of the 
highly successful parties held by the Out-ot- 
Towners during the year. 



^* 



% 




Fraefactus Snciety 

A closed and closely-knit group consisting of 
the managers of the various teams, the Praefac- 
tus Society took time from their tasks of looking 
after the equipment to hold an annual dinner 
and install new members. The blue blazer with 
club shield is proudly worn by all the members. 
In general, the club served the purpose of giving 
the men behind the teams suitable recognition 
for their efforts. 



Francis Magee, vice-president and Francis 
Hart, president, discuss plans for the Praefactus 
Club dinner and the initiation of new members, 
with the members of the club. 



Varsity Cluh 

This organization of the letter-winners in all 
sports conducted a dance and gave a public 
showing of the films of the North Carolina State 
game. The main part of its activities were con- 
cerned with the members, for whom they held 
a few socials. 



Francis Hart (second from left), vice- 
president; John Curran, president; and William 
McHale, secretary, listen to a Varsity Club mem- 
telling his views on the club activities. 




Society For 
Advancement of Management 

With tremendous momentum and able leader- 
ship and publicity, La Salle's chapter of the So- 
ciety for the Advancement of Management went 
full steam ahead. In its four month period the 
organization drew enough members and interest 
to foretell a very successful future. The banquet, 
which was one of the most satisfying ever held 
at La Salle, brought dignity and station to the 
society and stamped the character of La Salle 
men indelibly on the minds of leading businesr- 
men. 

Under the guidance of Dr. Bernard B. Gold- 
ner, associate professor of industry, speakers in 
the industrial world were brought to the school 
and representatives of SAM were sent to the 
national convention at New York. 



r^n:^/^ 




Clarence Slocum, (right) National Execu- 
tive Director of the Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management, presents the charter for 
the La Salle chapter to Salvator Bartucci. John 
Mincer Mcllvain, chief engineer at Atlantic Re- 
fining Company and the principal speaker at 
the installation banquet, looks on. 

Harry Ijykes (s t a n d i n g), treasurer, 
checks the dues paid by the members with the 
chapter moderator. Dr. Bernard B. Goldner, pro- 
fessor of Industry, and chapter president Sal- 
vator Bartucci. 




Q± 




John Falzetta, Sigma Beta Kappa president, 
supervises a boxing match at St. John's Orphan- 
age. In keeping with its secondary aim of Catho- 
lic Action, the fraternity conducts a sports pro- 
gram at the orphanage. 



Steve Van Uuren and Alex Wojceicho- 
wies (right) of the Philadelphia Eagles, try a 
La Salle jersey on the captain of tk'- winning 
touch team at St. John's Orphanage, while John 
Falzetta, Sigma Beta Kappa president, smiles 
approvingly. The sweaters were awarded by SBK 
during the annual Christmas Party for the or- 
phans. 





Frank Hart dressed as Santa distributes 
toys to the boys at St. John's Orphanage during 
the annual Christmas Party sponsored by the 
fraternity. 



Members of the fraternity gather for 
one of their socials. Along with the stags, Sigma 
Beta Kappa also held two open dances that were 
both financial and social successes. 





Brother E. Louis, associate professor of 
Spanish, the president of the Inter-American 
Union of Catholic College Students, confer with 
the Spanish Consul Luis Villalba during his 
visit to La Salle. Mr. Joseph M. Carrio, instructor 
in Spanish, and Brother D. Augustine, profes- 
sor of Sociology, look on. 



Captain Luis Cebreiro, Commander of 
the Spanish Schoolship "Juan Sebastian Eicano," 
Ambassador and Senora Jose Felix de Lequerica 
y Erquiza, and Miss Gloria M. Altemir, Spanish 
instructor at Rosemont College, attend El Club 
Hispanol's production of "Una Extravangancia", 





IVewtonian Snciety 

Another one of those student groups that 
proved the true scholar, the Newtonian Society, 
whose members delivered papers on scientific 
topics of interest to open meetings of the society. 
However, members found time to unite with 
Chymian Society and hold a banquet at Old 
Original Bookbinders. 



Members of the Chymian Society and the 
Newtonian at their annual banquet held at Old 
Original Bookbinders. Standing: Paul Moser, 
Francis Favigan, Joseph McFadden, Edward 
Sweeney, Vincent Carita, Walter Hynek, Anth- 
ony Campese, James Mulherin, Hugh Convery, 
James Flynn, and Louis Radszawski. Seated: John 
Moore; Brother M. Edward assistant professor 
of Chemistry and moderator of the Chymian 
Society; Brother D. John, assistant professor of 
Physics and moderator of the Newtonian Society; 
Vincent Paoletto and Robert KaufFman. 




Weher Society 



Organized at the beginning of the Fall Term, 
the Herbert S. Weber Society started off strong. 
In the first few months, many interesting and 
well-attended meetings were held on current lit- 
erature topics. As the year rolled along, interest 
waned and fewer students attended the meetings 
that continued to be excellent. 



Brother Edward Patrick, assistant pro- 
fessor of English; Dr. Austin J. App. associate 
professor of English (second from right) ; and 
Mr. Claude. Kock, instructor in English; discuss 
the operations of English clubs with Dr. Steward 
Stokes, assistant professor of English at Temple 
University and moderator of Temple's English 
Club prior to his talk to an organizational meet- 
ing of the Herbert S. Weber Society. 



)r>r 




The Color Guard of the La Salle Reserve 
Officers Training Corps Unit leads the parade 
of the unit into McCarthy Stadium for formal 
inspection by a board of officers under Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Harry B. Cooper. 



Ihe entire Reserve Officers Training 
Corps Unit stands facing the reviewing stand 
during the parade which was held as part of the 
first formal inspection of the unit. 



One ot the three squads passes the re- 
viewing stand which contained Brother G. Paul, 
president, Lieutenant Colonel Harry B. Cooper, 
Major Ralph Manual, Captain Charles L. Cline, 
and 1st Lieutenant Raymond M. Cummings. The 
La Salle College High School band (background) 
provided the music. 



tatiij'<iitfi.<wi»..«> 









Francis Bonner (kneeling), who is trying 
to elope with Gloria Massey (right), hides from 
James Larkin (left), her guardian. Charles Smith, 



Larkin's clever servant greets him while Pamela 
Orsini watches during a rehearsal for the 
Theatre's production of "The Blunderer." 



Charles Smith talks with Gloria Massey 
and C. William Kieser during the production of 
''The Blunderer." 





A scene from the Theatre's production of 
the life of St. La Salle portrays the meeting of 
the Bishop with the first of St. La Salle's fol- 
lowers. The show was presented as part of the 
commemoration of tercentenary of St. La Salle's 
birth. 



The members of the Theatre as seen 
in a scene from "Hope Is A Thing With Feath- 
ers" are: (front row) John McGuigan, Felix 
Pilla, Joseph Earley, Jessie Cain; (back row) 
Carl Belber, James Calabra, James Larkin, Louis 
Abuise, and Francis Bonner. The one-act play 
was presented at Chestnut Hill College's one-act 
play night and the University of Pennsylvania 
Cultural Olympics as well as in the La Salle 
auditorium. 




General Chairman William Ries (kneeling) 
inspects a Harvest Dance publicity stunt with 
committee members Ferd Morro, Harry Reitcher, 
Leonard DeSantis, and William McHale. 




BRO. GEO. THOMAS, F.S.C., Mode 

COMMITTEES 

WILLIAM RIES. General Chairmai 
JAMES F. REIDY, Secretary 
ROCCO DONATELLI, Treasurer 



TICKET 

EDWARD F. 
ANTHONY ALITO 
EDWARD BARNES 
GEORGE BOTTO 
JERRY BOYER 
JOHN D. COGGINS 
RICHARD CULLEN 
LEONARD DE SANTIS 
THOMAS J. FEENEY 



COMMITTEE 

MURPHY, Chairman 
ANTHONY F. HECK 
JOHN KENNEDY 
WILLIAM KIESER 
JOSEPH OESTERLE 
FORTUNATO MANNO 
JOHN MALONE 
JOSEPH F. PITELLI 
PAUL QUINLAN 



PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

FERDINAND P. MORRO. Co-Chairman 
EUGENE P. MC LOONE, Co-Chairman 
GUSTAVE C. COTE WILLIAM J. METZLER 

WILLIAM C. KOHLER JAMES P. MORRO 
DAVID RUMSEY 

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 

FRANK WUEST. Chairman 
ERNEST GUNN CHARLES MAHONY 

JOHN J. KANE HARRY RECKNER 

JAMES TOWSON 

BAND COMMITTEE 

WILLIAM MC HALE, Chairman 
VINCENT GUMINSKI ANTHONY J. POI CINO 
JAMES J. MALLON ROBERT E. STUMPF 

Program Cover by James Larkin 




1-^ 




Chairman James Riedy presents his ticket to 
the perennial ticket taker Joseph Graham while 
Blue and Gold moderator Brother George Thom- 
as smiles approvingly. 



•«r^i^«^ 



#rt 






"^■' 



*^. ^^'i 



rwfe 



>-;( 




C. Raymond Larkin 

acting president of 

Evening Division Congress. 



Discussing plans for the coming Winter 
Dance, the Evening Division officers are: Hugh 
Carroll (seated), president; John Quinlan, vice- 
president; and Frank Mee, secretary. 




if* ^— 




Intramurals 



Intramural Director checks with the timers 
and scorers during the game for the Intramural 
Basketball Title. 



The growth in both the number of intramural 
sports and the number of students participating 
in the program can be measured by the Intra- 
mural Jackets awarded to league champions. 

In our freshman year, only the nine members 
of the Softball championship team owned the 
prized possession. By our senior year, while the 
jackets remained a prized possession, they were 
too numerous to ^ount. Under the direction of 
Bill Delvin and Joe Kirk, the program grew to 
include not only Softball and football but also 
badminton, bowling, and soccer. 

The past year witnessed almost complete cover- 
age of the games by the Collegian and the pick- 
ing of an all-intramural team in football. One of 
the highlights of the year was the game between 
the winners of our intramural touch league and 
St. Joseph's winners. 



The line-up in the Collegian's All-In- 
tramural football team is: on the line Bill Zwann, 
Jim Covello, and Jack Haggerty; quarterback 
Bob Conners; other backfield men Joe Walker, 



Leo Robb, and Charlie Peoples. End Haggerty 
was signed by the Philadelphia Eagles of the 
National Football League. 




Basketball 



The 1950-51 basketball season gave the fol- 
lowers of the La Salle team many thrills. The 
most notable was the appearance of the Ex- 
plorers hoopsters n their second consecutive 
National Invitational Tournament and their third 
in our four years. Next was the winning of the 
city crown and the winning of the second 
straight invitational at Atlantic City where the 
Blue and Gold turned back Idaho. 

Individually Jack George broke Larry Foust's 
records of most points and most field goals in 
one season. The new records are 455 points 
and 194 field goals. 

The squad was composed of four seniors — 
Captain Jim Phelan, Jack Haggerty, Matt Fan- 
ning, and John Gillespie, two juniors. Buddy 
Donnelly and Newt Jones, and eight sopho- 
mores — Jack George, Norm Grekin, Fred Ihele, 
Jack French, Dick Breen, Ducky O'Donnell, 
Fred Ley, and Tony Carney. 




The great number of sophomores bears witi- 
ness to the rebuilding task that faced Coach 
Ken Loeffler due to the loss not only through 
graduation but also the calling of players by the 
reserves. 



Three Explorers demonstrate the teamwork 
that sent LaSalle to the National Invitational 
Tournament for the third time in four years — 
Jack O'Donnell passes over the head of opposing 
player to teammate Newt Jones who is "in the 
clear", Jack Haggerty blocks a Loyola contestant 
from the play. 





Three Gettysburg players battle Jack French 
for possession of the ball under the Blue and 
Gold basket, result — Big John got a free throw, 
and made it. 



The season .started well as the green squad 
overcame poor shootiing in the first half to de- 
feat Millersville, 57-39. In the second game 
against Loyola, the Explorers extended the vic- 
tory string in the Feld House to twenty-six as 
they showed great promise winning 70-42. 

In the hrst road game of the season against 
Albright, the followers knew what Loeffler meant 
when he said this was a green team and anything 
could happen. A rally in the last five minutes 
pulled the game out of the fire for the Explorers, 
58-51. The Blue and Gold had trailed by a point 
most of the second half until the rally by Phel- 
an, Grekin, and George. 



AucK J^aaqeriu 



Next the Blue and Gold walked to an easy 
victory over St. Joseph's, 81-63 and made Gettys- 
burg, number twenty-seven on the home court 
in tune-ups for the first intersectional clash against 
Niagara. 



Captain Jimmy Phelan sends one towards the 
cords despite the efTotts of high jumping Johnny 
Hughes of St. Joe's. 




Norm Grekin doesn't pay any attention to the 
pleas of his "friend" from Bowling-Green as he 
maintains a firm grip on the sphere. 



V 



4 



7 - 



'^1 



La Salle created a mild sensation by routing a 
highly rated Niagara team, 82-56. Phelan limited 
Zeke Sincola to one shot before he hurt his angle 
and was sidelined. At that point, the Explorers 
lead 13-9, with all the visitors points coming on 
foul shots. From then to the final whistle it was a 
case of how high the margin was going to be. 
Coach LoefFler cleared the bench in the con- 
test and twelve of the fourteen members of the 
squad found their way into the scoring column. 
The Blue and Gold were stopped by Western 
Kentucky, 73-63, in their next game as the ac- 
curate shooting Hilltoppers set a new record for 
the highest number of points scored against a 



W^ 



Newt Jones prevents the ball from crossing 
the out of bounds line as he leaps high and pass- 
es back to teammate Grekin. 



Watt 3. 



La Salle basketball team. The Explorers staged 
two rallies that carried them within a point of 
tying but Jack Turner and Rip Gish — the pair 
had twenty field goals on fourty-two shots — al- 
ways stopped the rally with their shooting. 

The Idaho game at Atlantic City showed the 
Explorers were able to cope with a taller team. 
This game also witnessed Coach LoefFler playing 
control ball and waiving fouls to get two points 
instead of one. After building a 54-42 lead, with 
four minutes remaining, the Blue and Gold 
waived thirteen fouls and the final score read: 
La Salle, 60; Idaho, 49. 





One daring shot that J. Newton Jones failed 
to get away is shown in this pic, as Bob Wheller 
and friend from Idaho crash into the fast step- 
ping Explorer; result — still two points as Jones 
sank both free throws. 



Double teaming by Temple failed to stop Ex- 
plorer high scoring champ Jack George. 





Aohnnu K^iiteip 



The Blue and Gold, clinched a tie for the city 
crown as they turned back Temple, 82-65. Phel- 
lan did an effective job of handcuffing Bill Mlkvy 
ivho had to shoot from far out and was thus 
limited to his lowest point production of the 
season. 



Matt Fanning releases a one hander as Temple's 
Joe Gavin attempts to deflect the sphere from 
its course. 



The Explorers reached the greatest heights 
of the season as they routed the highly rated 
squads from Baldwin Wallace and Bowling Green. 
Due to excellent scouting work by last season's 
Captain Frank Comerford, the Blue and Gold 
held a 30-14 lead at the ten minute mark, as 



Dick Breen takes a rebound off the Temple 
backboard only to be fouled by Joe Gavin. 








Ken Loeffler's "give and go" technique is 
demonstrated by the Explorers above, Jack 
George above although blocked by one Owl 



player is tree to pass to three teammates all of 
whom are "free"; under the basket, Jones; at the 
foul circle, Haggerty and Donnelly. 






none of the BeeGee's plays worked against the 
tight defense. Then Loeffler called upon the re- 
serves who built the lead to 48-18 at the half. 
Returning after the half, the first team widen- 
ed the gap to 62-27. From here on in with the 
reserves playing La Salle coasted to the surpris- 
ingly easy victory. 

As the Exiporer defense reached the heights 
in the Bowling Green game, the offense did in 
the Baldwin game, with each member of the 
starting five scoring in the double figures, and 
hitting 48% of their shots. 



Jack George receives the basketball writers' 
Player of the Week Award from Matt Gukas 
for his fine play against North Carolina State. 




Jonu y^a 



The Blue and Gold decided the outcome of 
the contest mid-way through the first half when 
they scored fifteen straight points while holding 
the Yellow Jackets scoreless. From here, the Ex- 
plorers coasted to an 86-67 victory. 

The Blue and Gold offense fell off as the Loef- 
lermen lost to Duquesne, 53-43. Up to the Du- 
quesne game, the Explorers had averaged 75 
points a game. But bouncing back from their 
second defeat, the hoopsters defeated Geneva, 
87-58 and St. Joseph's, 77-64, in a battle that 
was nip and tuck during the first half. Scranton 
became the twenty-eighth consecutive victory in 
the Field House, 80-60. 

"The biggest steal since the Louisiana Pur- 
chase" was next as the team lost a highly dis- 
puted game to North Carolina State. After a 
well played first half — the Explorers lead 44-31 — 
the Wolfpack came back — many La Salle parti- 
sans claim with the help of the offic ials — to nip 
the Blue and Gold. 

The seventy-six points btoke the offense rec- 
ord against La Salle, 76-74. At one point during 
the game Loeffler threatened to take his team 
off the court. The offic ials called three techni- 
cals against La Salle including one against the 
coach. 



Newt Jones' charging-jumping tactics surprise 
a pair of George Washington players as the Ex- 
plorers ran wild again.st the Colonials. 




W'K 



Bud Donnelly twists and sends a one hander 
through the cords as the Explorers easily topped 
Lafayette at Convention Hall but had cinsider- 
able trouble in repeating the victory at Easton. 



^red ^e 




> .' 



i 



'■-s> 



Recuperating from the NC State game, La 
Salle took the measure of Loyola, but were dealt 
a stunniing upset by Bill Mlkvy and the Temple 
Owls, 59-54. The LoefFlermen were off form in 
beating Lafayette at Convention Hail. 



When surrounded by three opposing players 
just jump and shoot says Newt Jones. Helpless 
Tom Carroll, Jim Sayre, and Regis King of 
Manhattan watch the lesson in fancy shooting. 



/Va CK ^ren ck 




m' 



Bud Donnelly uses an underhand shot to sink 
one from in close. 



Norm Grekin uses a two hand overhead shot 
to make this field goal against Cincinnati. 



{I5ud tsDonneilu 





Proving his versatility Donnelly releases a one 
hander from his finger tips. Tony Trabert of Cin- 
cinnati seems to concede the goal. 



Jack George broke the "most points in a sea- 
son for a La Salle player" record when he sank 
this goal against Muhlenberg. The game was 
played at the new St. Joseph's field house. 



Journeying South again, the Blue and Gold 
split a two-game series with Miami. After the 
Explorers took the first, the Gaels evened mat- 
ters with a 77-75 overtime upset. The seventy- 
seven points established the new record for the 
most points against a La Salle basketball team. 



The never give up attitude of George is shown 
here as he wrestles a "Mule" to the floor. How- 
ever, teammate Fred lehle seems to be getting 
the worse of it. 



AacK Ly aDonnett 








2)/ J iSr. 



Teammates crowd around Matt Fanning in- 
terested in learning the latest reports about them- 
selves and also interested in saving a multitude 
of nickles. 



Previously Western Kentucky (73) and North 
Carolina State (76) had set new records. 

The Blue and Gold settled down and started 
to play consistent basketball as they took George- 
town, George Washington, and Muhlenburg in 
stride. All three games were hard fought battles 



with the Explorers using control-ball to retain 
early leads. Against Manhattan in Madison Square 
Garden, the Loefflermen proved their worth 
when after trailing by eleven points against a 
taller Jasper squad, they rallied to win 64-63. 
Everyone was happy over the victory and dream- 
ed of an NIT bid. 

The foUowmg Saturday, the Explorers suf- 
fered their sixth loss in twenty-six starts as Cin- 
cinnati edged La Salle, 62-61. Fighting an uphill 
battle against the Bearcats' early lead gained by 
means of a full court press, the Explorers ran 
out of time and scored their last point after the 
game ended. With less than fifteen seconds re- 



\o^3 



Even fellow Explorer Norm Grekin seems 
surprised at the high stepping of Newt Jones as 
he evades members of the St. Louis team and 
sets up a score. 



maining, Phelan dribbled in and was fouled as 
he sunk the basket to make the score, 62-60. 
Jimmy sank the foul but it only served to shave 
the margin of defeat. Although the roughest gam- 
es of the season, many considered it to be one of 
the best. 



Frightened St. Louis basketmen give Explorer 
ace Jack George plenty of room to shoot. 



^red oLci 



Jack Haggerty, who was considered the sixth 
man on the squad, kept the starting five hustling 
for Jack was ready to step into their places if 
they showed signs of letting-up. 

Matt Fanning and John Gillespie made the 
bench one of the strongest in the East. They 
both were useful in many games as Matt's sets 
prevented opposing teams from using the zone. 
Matt's outplaying Pee Wee Long of Bowling 
Green, who was hailed as the best small player 
in the country, makes Matt a candidate for the 
honor. John was used to spell the tall men and 
his play in the Muhlenberg game after Grekin 
had four fouls saved the day for La Salle. 




In the final game of the scheduled season, 
the Blue and Gold easily disposed of Muhlen- 
berg, 83-53, with George setting the new in- 
dividual records for one season. George in- 
jured his knee early in the game when he was 
less than four points from the record. It wasn't 
until late in the second hall, that he was able to 
return to play. 

In the National Invitation, La Salle met the 
wrong team on the wrong night. After matching 
goals with a hot St. Louis team through the 
first half, the Explorers couldn't hold the pace 
and lost, 73-6L Two nights later St. Louis had the 
same trouble as they were eliminated from the 
tournament. 

Even though all the victories were essentially 
team victories, one player shone now and another 
again. Jim Phelan, the outstanding defensive 
player, played varsity ball for three years. Al- 
though his defensive work didn't show in the 
La Salle box score, his handcuffing of opposing 
stars meant victory many times and showed in 
comparing opponents' box scores. 



The comeback had become the expected in the 
second Lafayette game. Easton sports writers 
were writing off the Blue and Gold tourney 
hopes. And well they might for the Leopard 
commanded an eight point lead, 57-49. The 
greatest comeback of the season saw Phelan 
and Haggerty team up to steal the ball and drib- 
ble to score as Lafayette tried to freeze the ball. 
With less than twenty seconds, George sank a 
goal to tie the game, 57-57. 

The Explorers showed the Leopards how to 
freeze as the Loefflermen switched to control 
ball in the extra period and went on to win, 
62-59. 




/< 





Captain Jack Curran (seated, right) gives 
instruction to senior soccer players before last 
game against Temple. Thev are: (seated) Nick 



(Quitter, and Moe Moorehead; (standing) Bill 
McDevitt, Joe Mc Aveety, and Al Lista. 



Soccer 




H: W- 



The soccermen showed signs of brilliance in 
their two wins at home but in the remaining 
games the play bordered on the mediocre, or 
else the team lacked the stamina to play a full 
game. 

Captai n John Curran who was goal tender, 
many times saved the Blue and Gold from a 
trouncing. Only in the Muhlenburg game, which 
was the best of the season, was John able to rest. 
That day, Rudy Tippenhauer's penalty shot won 
the game as Curran needed to make only two 
saves. 

The team showed great signs of promise as they 
held West Chester scoreless for most of two 
periods while the Explorers lead 1-0. However 
in the final period. La Salle tired and the Teach- 
ers poured ten goals across the net. 

Merb Sweitzer, Moe Moorehead. and 
Sam McKay wait for the ball in the Lafayette 
game La Salle won 3-2. 



La Salle, in white ierseys, and West Ches- 
ter wait for the ball. The La Salle players are: 
Rudy Tippenhauser. Herb Swietzer, and (with 
back to camera) Bill McDevitt. At this time. 
La Salle was leading 2-0. When La Salle tired 
late in the final period, West Chester poured 
over 11 goals to win 11-2. 



This same pattern followed for most of the 
losses. The Explorers were able to match the 
game in the beginning but as the game continued, 
the Blue and Gold tired. The soccermen also 
found trouble in scoring as they only scored 
eight points in the entire eight games and three 
of these were in the shut-out win over Western 
Maryland. 

Despite their poor record, the team played 
well for their new coach Joe Smith and their 
greatest drawback was lack of reserves. 



Captain John Curran, Explorer goal tend- 
er, blocks a shot at La Salle's net during the 
fourth period of the University of Delaware 
game which Delaware won 2-0. Behind Curran 
is Nelson Wilcox, Delaware. Don Vansant, Dela- 
ware, watches the play over the shoulder of Jake 
Razszorski, La Salle. 




C" 

aH^ 

^ 



c 




#-% -■ 










111 



*»d\ 







Captain Jack McKay and George Dukes 
cross the finish line together to lead the Ex- 
plorer harriers to victory over Lafayette. 



Cross - Country 

In the first three meets of the season, Man- 
hattan and St. John's triumphed over them in a 
triangular meet; Georgetown and St. Joseph's in 
dual meets. Then after taking third in aquadran- 
gular meet, the Explorers, lead by the running of 
Captain Jack McKay and George Dukes, de- 
feated West Chester, Lafayette and Lincoln. 



La i>alle runners dominate the field at 
the half mile mark of the race with Lafayette. 
Lone Leopard hairier Bob Gray, Jack McKay, 
and Don Sharp set the pace while Henry Ag- 
new, Vince Gesiske, George Dukes, and Bill 
Sullivan follow close behind. La Salle won 19-36. 









^. 



-^ 



try 





Swimming Coach Joe Kirk talks over the 
forthcoming meet against Michigan with Captain 
Bob Regan while members of the squad surround 
the pair. 



Swimming 



The swimmers were able to chalk up a seven- 
five log for the campaign despite the loss of 
Farrell Devlin due to an injured knee cap and 
Allan Rhodes to the Marines before the first 
meet. 

The Explorers took the first four teams in 
stride. In the Temple meet, Coach Joe Kirk 
juggled the line-up to keep the score down but 
the Blue and Gold won 55-20. The team also 
scored easy victories over Lafayette, 46-29; West 
Chester, 47-28; and Loyola, 46-29. 



Bob Regan after he won the 100 yard 
freestyle in the Michigan meet which the Ex- 
plorers lost. 



\ 



A^ 



Bob Fitzgerald swims to a new 100 yard 
breaststroke record during an open meet at Pitts- 
burg. Bob's record bettered the old mark of 
lil3.2 bv 9.8 seconds. 



1 he loss ot the two swimming stars showed in 
the meet against the University of Virginia as 
the Explorers captured the meet by winning the 
440 yard freestyle relay, the last race. The fol- 
lowing week against McGill University, the meet 
followed the identical pattern and again the Ex- 
plorers won on the 400 yard freestyle relay. 



Chuck Garvey, with Fitzgerald, helped 
to fill the gap caused by the graduation of 
Olympic Champion Joe Verduer. 



Joe Stauton swims his specialty, the 
backstroke. Joe gained valuable points for the 
Explorers in the close meets against McGill and 
Virginia. 



n' 









""y:-'-* 



iH'^k^ 



Pat Kennedy shouts "go" as Walt Farrell starts 
the final lap in the 100-yd. freestyle. Teammates 
shout the lap number and on the final lap "go" 
as the swimmers make the turn. 



Michigan had too many excellent swimmers 
for the Blue and Gold as only Captain Bob 
Regan and Pat Kennedy were able to take firsts 
in a meet La Salle lost 52-23. 

Rebounding the Blue and Gold beat the Uni- 
versity of Scranton, 48-28. Springfield defeated 
the Explorers on a break in the 400 yard free- 
style relay. Joe Sweeney, swimming the second 



leg, thought he had failed to touch on a turn 
and went back. The ground gained by Spring- 
field enabled them to win the race by a foot 
and the meet 41-34. 

All-American Regan was beaten for the only 
time of the season in the Seton Hall meet which 
the Explorers lost 49-26. The swimmers ended 
the season with losses to Yale and North Caro- 
lina. 



U\- 




Jack Molnar crosses the plate after a four- 
bagger in the St. John's game. The Explorers won 
the game 12-7. 



Baseball 



La Salle holds the opposing runner close 
to first. This and the throwing of All-American 
catcher Jack George prevented most opponents 
from stealing a base. 




K. 






Moe Rudden, Bill Zwann, and Paul Cur. 
cio limber up in some early practice. Curcio is^ 



attempting to bunt while Zwann is catching. 



The 1951 baseball season was the most suc- 
cessful in the history of the College as the Ex- 
plorer nine gained the co-championship of the- 
Middle Atlantic Conference. In the regular sea- 
son, the HaeflFnermen amassed a record of 
nine wins and five losses. Against MAC schools, 
the Explorers lost only to Swarthmore. 

Playing a doubleheader for the first time of 
the season in the MAC tournament, the Ex- 
plorers conquered a scrapping Lehigh nine in 
the initial encounter, 7-5, behind the pitching of 
Jimmy Covello. In the nightcap, after only a 
twenty minute rest, the Haeffnermen met Buck- 
nell, who had drawn a first round bye. Herb 
McLaughlin, pitched brilliantly in the face of de- 



Hawk catcher says: "INot this time" as 
he tags Moe Rudden. Rudden had crossed the 
plate four times previous in the 13-3 rout of St. 
Joseph's. 




Ill 



feat and by his courageous hurling spurred the 
team to rally. Herb's single drove in the tying 
run to make the count, 4-4. After eight innings, 
with the score still 4-4 the game was called due 
to darkness and Bucknell was named co-cham- 
pion with La Salle. 




The hustling spirit the team showed this sea- 
son was one of the many factors that was respons- 
ible for their success. They shook the persistent 
defeatist attitude of past years and mustered 
the feeling of confidence as the season progress- 
ed. The surge of confidence can be attributed to 
the pitching of Jimmy Covello in winning seven 
of his eight starts and the hitting of All-American 
catcher Jack George, who batted at .449 clip 
while driving in twenty-two runs. 

The outstanding performances of these two 
players plus the consistent work of Captain Moe 
Rudden at first, Moe Moorehead at second, Neal 
Phillips at short. Jack Molnar in right field, 
and "stopper" Joe Granahan on the mound when 
help was needed produced the first team cham- 
pionship in baseball. 



All-American Jack George crosses the plate 
on a wild pitch during the St. Joe's game. Cov- 
ering the plate is the Hawk pitcher. La Salle won 
20-1. 










Joe Torrence also scores in the St. 
Joseph's game which saw the record for most 
runs tied. The record was set the previous year 
against the Hawks. Jim Covello drove Torrence 
in bv doubling down the right line. 




Crew 



The anxious coxwain waits for the other mem- 
bers of the crew before shoving off for the Dart- 



mouth race. Coach Bratten with a few members 
of the crew examine the boat. Some crew mem- 
bers relieve the tension by chatting while others 
prefer to sit_alone. 



%< 




A view of the Crescent Boat Club, the 
home of the La Salle crews, seen through a tele- 



scopfc lens from the West River Drive. 




Only two losses to Florida Southern and Rut- 
gers marred the record of the Explorer crew 
which won the Dad Vail Regatta to climax the 
season's work. In their second year of participa- 
tion in the small college championship, the Blue 
and Gold were able to win despite a poor start 
because they failed to hear the starter's gun. 



Coaches Glenn Robertson and John Brat- 
ten place the sign on the newly acquired 
Crescent Boat Club which was purchased by the 
La Salle Rowing Association. 



Danile K. Kedmond '90, shows crew stroke 
Frank Stanton how he held the oar when rowing 
for Crescent Boat Club. Redmond was a member 
of Crescent's international championship eight 
of 1894. Crescent Boat Cluh, which was pur- 
chased recently by the La Salle Rowing Associa- 
tion, is headquarters for the La Stalle crews. 



Trying for the second win of the day in the 
American Henley, the crew was edged by Har- 
vard by three-fourths of a length. Harvard's 
winning time was nine-tenths of a second less 
than the Explorers' in capturing the Dad Vail 
earlier in the day but the Blue and Gold were 
noticeably tired from their morning's effort. 

After losing the first race of the season to 
Rutgers, the varsity crew swept past Washington 
and Lee, Dartmouth, Marietta, and Springfield. 
Then they lost a tune-up race for the Dad Vail 
CO Florida Southern. 

The junior varsity took their first four races 
against Rutgers, Washington and Lee, Dartmouth 
and Matietta but lost to Springfield in a regular 
race and Dartmouth in the Dad Vail. In the 
American Henley, Harvard defeated the junior 
varsity. 




The varsity crew edges out Dartmouth 
for the first win ofthe season. It was also the 
first race on the home course. 





iTT 




The varsity sweeps to victory over a strong 
Washington and Lee crew for its third straight 
victory of the season. 



La Salle, in tune-up race for the Dad 
Vail regatta which they captured, lost to Florida 
Southern over the home course. Florida: Southern 
was also entered in the Dad Vail. 




Coach Glenn Robertson (right) points out 
flaws in Frank McGuigan's rowing technique by 
use of the mirror. Other members of the crew 
are: Carter McAvoy, varsity captain Frank Stan- 
ton, and Anthony Del Borretto. 



The improved showing of the Blue and Gold 
crew is due to the work of Coaches Jack Bratten 
and Glenn Robertson and also the providing of 
a boat house by the La Salle Rowing As- 
sociation which made the scheduling of the daily 
drill easieir. 

The first crew to take a champonship in that 
sport includes: Herb Myers, bow; Bill Best, 2; 
Bill Kieser, 3; Tom Conville, 4; Tom Waters, 5; 
Charley Wynne, 6; Tom McKenney, 7; Frank 
Stanton, stroke; and Dick Threlfall^ coxswain. 

An inexperienced cross-country team with 
only two returning lettermen did very well for 
the Blue and Gold as they completed the season 
by taking third in the Middle Atlantic Conference 
championships. 

Lead by the running of Captain Jai5k McKay 
and George Dukes, the Explorers defeated West 
Chester, Lafayette, Lincoln and took third in a 
meet against St. Joseph's, Temple and Haverford. 
All these wins were bunched at the end of the 
season after the squad had found itself. Except 





La. Salle's frosh crew rowing up the river 
prior to the start of a race. 




John Curran, the first student to captain two 
sports, warms-up for the defense of La Salle's 
Middle Atlantic Conference crown. Curran cap- 
tained both the track and soccer teams. 

The track team could only garner sec- 
ond in the Middle Atlantic Conference Cham- 
pionships as they lost their crown to Lafayette. 
However, they did capture the Middle Atlantic 
Amateur Athletic Union title by defeating the 
University of Pennsylvania by seven points. 

In the first outdoor meet, the Explorers easily 
defeated Swarthmore, 83-43 and most people 
looked for the team to repeat in the MAC title 
meet as they also laced a strong Lincoln team, 
83-48. They then took the MAC mile relay title 
at the Penn Relays as well as setting three new 
school records in the meet. 

The Blue and Gold took the measure of Muhl- 
enburg and Temple in a triangular meet. In all 
these meets, the Explorers spotted the opposition 
thirty points in the field events. This proved to 
be the Explorers' downfall against a strong La- 
fayette team as the Blue and Gold lost its first 
meet, 73-53. 

Rebounding the Explorers took the measure of 
a good West Chester team, 66-60, but again weak- 
ness in the field events cost the Georgetown meet, 
74-56. 




Track 



Coach Frank Wetzler was counting on getting 
performances to equal those of the 1950 squad 
when they captured the MAC crown in the cham- 
pionships. However the team, which had had 
few injuries during the season, seemed plagued 
with them just before the MAC title meet. Joe 
Morrison, had shin splints; Charles Peoples, sore 
ham string muscles; and John Curran's leg went 
bad on the day of the race. Even without these 
injuries the Explorers would have had a hard 
time against a primed Leopard squad who knew 
they could beat the top teams in the meet for 
they had conquered them in dual meets during 
the season. 



C'\o 



W" 




'% t::f:":f 



It was a fine sunny October 13 when the Class 
of 1951 made their way to La Salle College to 
swell the enrollment to 1750. Leonard Hall had 
been dedicated the previous month and was on 
hand to serve the largest enrollment ever recorded 
at La Salle til! then. And school had hardly 
begun, than work was started on a new building — 
Benilde Hall. This building was to relieve the 
crowded conditions of College Hall and thus 
eliminate the late afternoon classes. 




Duriiig this same month of October, the an- 
nual Mass to the Holy Ghost, which traditionally 
opens the school year, was held at Holy Child 
Church. Kurt Lowe was installed as president of 
the newly formed Gamma Chapter of Sigma Beta 
Kappa. 

Most of us were introduced to college social 
life at the Harvest Dance held the first Friday in 
November, in the college Field House. The 
following year the ever increasing student body 
made the dance committee seek a larger site and 
the dance was moved off campus. In the early 
days of November, Brother Charles, professor of 
Chemistry, died. Although we knew little about 
him, we could sense from the solemn, remorseful 
note of the upper classmen that we had indeed 
lost a friend. 

Front page editorials in the Collegian constant- 
ly proclaimed the need for a student council and 
finally the Senior, Junior and Sophomore class 
chose their class officers who were to investigate 
the possibility of student government. We, lowly 
freshman, had to wait until January before we 
elected our officers. The political campaigns of 
the month made the quiet resting place that 
Leonard Hall was resemble a streetcorner earlier 
in the month where Dilworth held forth. Student 
candidates made full use of the public address 
facilities with the contending hucksters dunning 
the ears of the loungers with hourly exhortations 
on the merits of their candidates and eyecatching 
posters dominated the entrances to the Hall. It 
was in the month of November that the student 
activities began to hum. Dr. Richard Hunter of 
the National Health Foundation spoke to the 
Social Science Club; The Podium Society inaug- 
urated its very popular weekly concerts; The Ra- 
dio Workshop aired "Macbeth"; and members of 
the Masque appeared in "George Washington 
Slept Here;" and the National Federation of 
Catholic College Students sponsored a Mass at 
the Cathedral for the spiritual aid of students in 
war devastated areas. 



^l 



With the activities now rolling, the month of 
December saw the formation of the Adoration 
Society and the forming of a staff under Leo In- 
glesby to revive the yearbook. Father Charles 
Gorman was appointed Chaphn of the College; 
Mr. John J. Kelly '39, moderator of the Colleg- 
ian; and Brother Augustine, first Chairman of the 
Philadelphia Chapter of the American Sociologi- 
cal Society. 

The social events revolved around the Christ- 
mas Holidays with the Masque and Glee Club 
combining to present a variety show and the Po- 
dium Society holding a Christmas party in Leo- 
nard Hall. Ted Harris, who was known on cam- 
pus for his work with the International Relations 
Club, chaired the first convention of the Pennsyl- 
vania Region of the National Student Ahsocia- 
tion. 

Returning after the holidays, the Premeds were 
cornering everyone to get x-rayed and salesmen 
selling tickets to the Blue and Gold Ball were 
doing likewise. We finally obtained class officers 
when we elected William Mignogna, who in his 
own words admitted "he carried a lot of weight 
around" and who "wasn't going to tell us — a class 
that was almost 70% veteran — that he was a vet, 
cause he wasn't." 




Louis Ambellas and Richard Ferrick cast their 
ballots in the first election held for Student 
Council while James Barr looks on. Sitting be- 
side Barr is Anthony Gringari checking the nam- 
es of the students who voted. 




Soon after Willie's election, the Constitutional 
Committee submitted its final draft of student 
council constitutian for student ratification. The 
first term ended and during the mid-term recess 
the Alumni awarded the Signum Fidei Medal to 
Max Jordan, NCWC Correspondent. 

February was a cruel month that saw our ath- 
letic teams suffer unexpected losses. After winn- 
ing twelve straight, including topping some of 
the powerhouses of the nation, the basketball 
team bowed to Temple, 54-52; and then after con- 
quering Texas Wesleyan and Albright, to St. 
Joseph's, 70-65. The swimmers, who had been 
undefeated for two years, lost the expected meets 
to Yale, Michigan, and Ohio State and could fare 
no better than the basketball team against city ri- 
vals as they dropped a heart-breaker to University 
of Pennsylvania, 38-37. 



I'wo students getting clipped in Pete's new 
tonsorial shop in Leonard Hall. Pete moved from 
the McShain basement prior to the beginning of 
our Freshman year. 



M? 




The French club held their annual trip to New 
York City and the actors held forth with produc- 
tions of a Thomas Comber original and "Richel- 
ieu" over the airwaves and "A Game of Chess' 
in the one-act night at Chestnut Hill College. 

The speakers platform witnessed Dr. Otter- 
bein Dressier talking to the Premeds on tropical 
medicine; Mr. William McKevver, to the Accoun- 
tants on special problems of the field; and Max 
Jordan, to the Social Science Club, on the Rus- 
sian problem. 

April marked the beginning of the celebration 
of the Centenary of the Christian Brothers in 
America. The April celebration was climaxed at 
La Salle on the 26th when Brother Athanese Emile 
received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree. 
The Gavel gave a preview of future years when 
they traveled to New York and Washington and 
returned with better than .500 for the trips. Mr. 
Lee Boardman spoke on the work of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation to the Social Science 
boys. 



March saw the student body accepting the Con- 
stitutional Committee's constitution and the Col- 
lege accepting an invitation to the National In- 
vitational Tournament. Even though, the team lost 
the first game, everyone was satified with the Gar- 
den appearance. We, freshmen, were equally 
proud of our teams who only dropped one deci- 
sion. A lone defeat to Villanova frosh marred 
the record of the frosh basketball squad while 
the frosh swimmers were undefeated. 

Death again removed a Brother who was be- 
loved by all the students and this time a man that 
many a freshmen knew. Brother Pius, who was 
always willing to counsel and advise students, had 
made Leonard Hall his headquarters, and was a 
friend that many students spoke to during off- 
hours. Only three days before his death. Brother 
Pius had celebrated his fiftieth anniversity as a 
Christian Brother. 



A tew students pause to look at the partially 
completed Benilde Hall in the Spring of our 
Freshman year. The building was dedicated the 
following September at the final summer com- 
mencement. 




Utf 



Joseph Verduer examines a few of his many 
trophies. Included among the trophies is the 
President's Cup, which he won three times, and 
the Trenton Times Trophy, which he captured 
four times. 



The NFCCS held their national convention in 
Philadelphia with a La Salle student as congress 
chaiman and Student Council accepted member- 
ship in the NSA. 

The Masque's performance of "State of the 
Union" ushered in the month on May. Pre-war 
tradition was re-established with a return to Jun- 
ior Week. We topped off the year with our first 
formal at Melrose Country Club. We carried the 
"Dink" theme for the dance, giving dinks to our 
dates and also shaping the souvenir program in 
the form of a dink. We also introduced the idea 
of continuous dancing. Both Frankie Lawrence 
and Tommy Varrone played at the dance. At the 
dance it was announced that the slate headed by 
Ed Murphy had captured the class offices for 
the coming year. 




Right Reverend Monsignor Francis J. Furey, 
rector of St. Charles Seminary, and Brother G. 
Paul, president, unveil plaque bearing name of 
the new building following ceremonies during 
which Monsignor Furey blessed the edifice. 




For a year we had watched the upperclassmen, 
but as we had experimented with two bands at 
our first formal, we experimented with a social 
club in order to increase the class spirit by having 
more socials during our second year. The club 
was to insure the financial success of the ventures. 
Thus vacation ended, and we returned for the 
first year under Murphy's rule. 

Benilde Hall was dedicated on the 19th of Sep- 
tember and the nine new classrooms eased the 
crowed conditions as the student body soared over 
the two thousand mark. 

The Collegian began publication as a four-page 
weekly; Ted Harris was elected national president 
of National Student Association. The Podium So- 
ciety started the social activities early with a dance 
the first week in October. Student Council staged 
a huge "welcome home" rally for La Salle's Olym- 
pic Champion Joe Verduer. The Mayor procclaim- 
ed October 15th, Joe Verduer Day in Philadel- 
phia and the student body presented Joe a port- 
able typewriter. Joe repaid the students by smash- 
ing over thirty records that year including his 
own world record for 200 yard breaststroke which 
he bettered for the eighth time in the annuai 
National Collegiate Athletic Association meet. 




Edward Murphv, president, congratulates Wil- 
liam Metzler on his successful campaign to cap- 
ture the presidency of the Freshman Class. Metz- 
ler lead his class for four years. Murphy served 
as class officer in all but his Freshman year. 



Leonard Hall became a dark but not gloomy place 
as a television set was installed. There was a lot of 
speculation about the center staging the Theatre 
proposed to do in "The Doctor In Spite of Him- 
self." October closed with the SBK giving their 
first social of the year. 

The Collegian picked Truman to win by 5 to 
4 as the Varsity Club reorganized itself. 1 ruman 
wins the election and the Collegian receives a con- 
gratulatory telegram from the president for being 
one of the few papers to have correctly forecast- 
ed the election. John Magee and his orchestra 
play for the first off-campus Harvest Dance. J. 
A. Livingston, financial editor of the Evening Bul- 
letin, addresses the Economic Club. The other 
classes started to hold the elections that should 
have taken place in the spring. John Patrick Ryan 
is elected president of the Student Body. Ver- 
duer was elected swimming captain and Green- 
berg to head the basketball team. The Radio 
Workshop produced "The Doctor Kills a Wife." 
The Accountants held their Thanksgiving Dance, 
Basketball practice started and everyone had 
dreams of returning to the NIT. The first of 
many Soph Socials was held in Leonard Hall 
and Murphy's plan started to pay off. The Gavel 
announced a schedule of over seventy debates. 
Rehearsals began for "Romeo and Juliet." 



The Library completed the moving into the two 
additional rooms on the first floor of College Hall 
and Brother Joseph invited all to visit the new 
open stacks. The Collegian also changed again 
increasing to six pages and replacing the glossy 
stock with pulp paper. Council sold Purchase 
Cards to students. The Student Loan Fund prove 
its worth by lending a number of students money 
while they waited for the Post Office checks. 

La Salle lost an international quiz to King's 
College, London. Millersville used a zone defense 
and was a lot harder to beat than the 65-52 score 
indicates. Both the Podium and the Out-of-Town- 
ers held Christmas parties. The swimmers trounc- 
ed Penn to avenge last year's setback. 

The Blue and Gold with Buddy Williams pro- 
viding the music started things humming after the 
Christmas vacation. The basketball team lost to 
Frisco and Temple. Joe Verduer retained his 
AAU title. But the basketball team last again — 
this time to Baldwin-Wallace. 

The La Salle men proved they took the Post 
Office slogan "Through sleet, rain, etc." seriously 
when attendance dropped only 18'^r during the 
PTC strike. The Fall semester died and a valliant 
band of students set out to follow the basketball 



Congressman Hugh D. Scott, national chair- 
man of the Republican Party, talks ■with Brother 
G. Paul, president. Congressman Scott spoke on 
the college student and politics. 





Salesman Hugh Convery, Paul Sunderman. 
and manager John McCloskey wait for customers 
in the renovated bookstore. The store was re- 
modeled prior to our Junior year. 



team on its western trip. The International Rela- 
tions Club ran a trip to the United Nations. The 
Sophs ran a stag after the St. Joseph's game. 
Brother G. Paul, president, gave the keynote ad- 
dress at the Philadelphia area NFCCS congress. 
La Salle played host to NSA area convention and 
the Explorers top Holy Cross, 63-61. The canal 
between College Hall and Leonard and Benilde 
Halls is completed. The Collegian Award for 
Public Service in the field of Journalism goes to 
Ed Sullivan for his columns on Juvenile delin- 
quents. Dr. Frank McMackin from Jersey City 
speaks to the education students. Foust becomes 
the first Philadelphia player to pass 1000-point 
mark. 

March, a month of disappointments arrived. It 
opened auspiciously enough with Father Furfey's 
address to the Sociological convention and the 



a'-.nual forum on Interracial Justice. But first Man- 
hattan (after being dubbed by 30 points two weeks 
earlier) handled us very nicely in the Garden. 
North Carolina State beat us in Convention Hall, 
and all hope of a tourney ended. Then Student 
Council killed the Soph Social Club by declaring 
it unconstitutional. We went to the Cincinnati In- 
vitation Tournament and hope revived of a NIT 
bid until the host team, Cincinnati, whom we had 
thumped in the regular season, stopped us, 50-49. 
The premeds decided to change their name to 
Fabricians. Congressman Hugh D. Scott, Jr., 
chairman of the Republican Party, spoke on the 
college student and politics. We ended the season 
with a 21-7 log by topping William and Mary. The 
Soph testing program is held and each learned 
how much he didn't know. "Abraham and Isaac" 
is presT.ied by the drama classes as the first in a 

series of miracle plays. 



Hn 




April Hpp.-:_red for tl-e shortest month of our 
coliegiate career. Rerr>£ir.'Ter we had a 17-day 
vacation because the National Catholic Education- 
al convention was held in our city. The Theatre 
presented "Life With Father." The crew's new 
shells, the E. James and the G. Paul, are christ- 
ened. The swimmers ended their season with a 7-4 
record. The Student Loan Fund closed for the 
year The Sophs held a barn dnnct. Ken Loeffler 
was handed a veteran squad an 1 a tough schedule 
and ir.fited to get us into next year's NIT. 

Dr. Harry G. Scarpa '38, opened the lecturing 
in May by addressing the Fabrician Society. Frank 
Duffy brought honor to the College by being 
judged the best debator in the Benjamin Frank- 
lin Debate Tournament. Dr. John LaMonte, 
professor of Medieval History at the University 
of Pennsylvania, spoke to the Historical Society. 
Dick Adair hurled a no-hitter against Ursinus. 
Harry Butcher spoke to the Social Science Club 
on the previous November's elections and what 
they mean to the city. 

Mr. Henry announced that soccer will be added 
in the fall. The Gavel completed its campaign 
with a record of 70 ^r victories. The IRC listened 
to Walter Lippman and Senator Douglas. "La 
Farce De Maitre Pierre Pathelin" was presented 
twice. Once by the French students and later in 
English by the drama classes for the benefit of the 

Brother t. Felix works on a poster for one of 
the many campus affairs. The success of manv 
affairs depended on Brother's ability with a brush. 
The Harvest Dance was dedicated to Brother 
Felix after he had retired from teaching. 



John Quinlan, Chairman of the Evening Divi- 
sion's first dance, and Robert Shocri. Ti'-k^t '"om- 
mittee, present the first ticket to Mr. Jos.^ph Spris- 
sler.Director of the Evening Division. Frank Mee, 
Publicity Director of the dance, and Hugh J. 
Carroll, president of the Evening Division Con- 
gress, witness the ceremony. 

illiterates who didn't know what happened the first 
time. The Theatre closed a successful year by com- 
bining with the Glee Club to present "H.M.S. 
Pinafore." The Sophs beat the Brothers in a game 
of baseball by the score of 1 1-3. The Soph Cotillon 
is held on Friday, May 13. with a jinx theme. The 
souvenir progtcm ireitures a cracked mirror. The 
year ended with t". free dance in Leonard Hall as 
Murphy stepped dov/n to tLe vice-presidency for 
Frank Wuest was chosen to run the class for the 
Junior year. 

Everything around the College was brighter as 
we started our Junior year. During the summer 
months, new lights had been installed throughout 
the buildings ihat increased the candlepower of 
rhe lighting by 300^r. The Podium Society was 
off to a fast start again with a dance less than two 
weeks after we returned to class. The new lighting 
was Oiiiy one of the many summer improvements. 
The boo!;iiore in Leonard Hall had been enlarged 
and a display window installed. The Field House 
had a new floor and the "canal" was paved. Elmer 
Bro-:k- had been elected president of the Pennsyl- 



\^^> 





vania region of NSA. The soccer team defeated 
the University of Pennsylvania in the first game 
of the new sport. The Theatre planned a world 
premiere for "Ambition Should Be Made" by Mr. 
Willard Walsh, assistant professor of Speech and 
Drama. The Radio Workshop presented "She 
Stoops to Conquer." NFCCS starts a clean-up 
drive on magazines. The Social Science Club 
sponsored a voting machine demonstration. The 
Newtonians erected a telescope and John Curran 
came to the fore as a goalie on the soccer team. 
November and the annual Harvest Dance came. 
This year the affair was moved to the main ball- 
room of the Broadwood to accommodate all the 
students as Clarence Fuhrman and his orchestra 
provided the music. The dance was dedicated to 
Brother E. Felix, who had retired after teaching 
for many years at the College. Brother Felix was 
well known to all as the "man to see for a poster" 
and the success of many events in our first two 
years hinged on his brush. The Glee Club was 
reorganized with Father vX'illiam J. Sailer as 
director. Thus began the climb of the Glee Club 
to national prominence in less than a year. The 
Student Loan opened once again. The Bowling 
League was formed. The Collegian began a series 
on the attitudes of foreign students towards col- 
lege life at La Salle. 



George Hines notaries the veteran bonus 
applications for one of the several hundred stu- 
dents who obtained the forms at the bookstore. 



Mr. Norman Bell, director, introduces his 
Xavier University Choir at its concert during 
our Junior year. A capacity crowd of students 
heard the celebrated group give a one-hour per- 
formance in the College Auditorium. 



December found little out of the ordinary 
happening. The soccer team completed its first 
season with three wins, four losses and one tie. 
SBK added a Christmas party for the boys at St. 
John's Orphanage to the holiday schedule and 
the Glee Club sang carols in the vicinity of the 
College. 





Walt Kanigowski, Podium Society presi- 
dent, gives first student donation for the new 
library to Brother E. Stanislaus, Dean. The So- 
ciety raised the money on its annual dance of 
which William Felte (left~) was chairman. 



January found Mr. John Kelly searching for 
jobs for the senior class. The Evening Division 
organized their own governing body and elected 
Hugh Carroll, president of the Evening Division 
Congress. The Theatre scored with a superb pro- 
duction of "Macbeth." The Gavel travels to west- 
ern Pennsylvania and New England tournaments. 
In the ten debates, they stay above the .500 mark 
but fail to equal last year's record of .700. 

Brother E. Stanislaus, Dean, announces a new 
registration plan designed to banish registration 
lines. The plans worked and the organized con- 
fusion of past registrations vanishes as we pre- 
registered for the Spring term. Over a thousand 
attended the Blue and Gold where Howard Lanin 
and his orchestra provided continuous music. 
Phelan stopped Ranzino and tourney hopes soared. 
Virginia was beaten by the swimmers who were on 
their way to fulfill Kirk's promise of winning nine 
of the twelve meets. 

Without having to bother with registration for 
the Spring term, we received a full week of rest 
between terms. The Evening Division started the 
social activities in February with their first annual 
Winter Dance. The bookstore was swamped as 

The president of Lehigh University's 
chapter of Alpha Epsilon Delta points to the tele- 
gram from his chapter congratulating La Salle 
on being awarded a chapter, while Martin Bu- 
kowski, president-elect, of the La Salle AED 
chapter looks on. The bulletin board contains 
the congratulatory messages received from the 
chapters througout the country. 



John McCIoskey distributed and George Hines 
'51, notarized forms for the veterans bonus. The 
Collegian Award went to Morley Cassidy of the 
Evening Bulletin for his excellent reporting on 
events in Europe including a series on the Mar- 
shall Plan aid. Dr. La Salvia discussed "Rh" factor 
at a Fabrician forum. The NSA in cooperation 
with Student Council begin a leadership training 
program. 

March of 1950 was a month of happiness. The 
basketball team took the city crown. Jim Webb set 
a new high jump record in the Junior Nationals. 
Murphy was elected vice-president of Student 
Council. We edged Manhattan in the final min- 
utes, 65-60. Student Council ran an "effort day" 
for student relief. We were invited to the (NIT and 
capture our first game in the tourney by beating 
Arizona, 72-66. The Swimmers beat the Univer- 
sity of Scranton, 59-16, to close the season with 
an 11-1 log having lost only to Yale. Duquesne 
eliminated us from the NIT in a close game, 49-47. 

While we were climbing to the heights in ath- 
letics, the Theatre presented "Tidings Brought to 
Mary." Dr. Desmond O'Doherty '42, spoke on 
mental disorders to the Fabrician Society. John 




Paxton told the IRC about his escape from the 
Reds in China. The Theatre also presented "Lost 
Silk Hat" at Chestnut Hill College. Monsignor 
Julius W. Haun of St. Mary's College, Winona, 
Minnesota, gave an illustrated lecture on. the Holy 
Year. The Fabricians had Dr. Richard Kern, Dean 
of Temple University Medical School, talk about 
hospitals in Europe. A parish census was started 
by the American Catholic Sociological Society 
through the help of college students including a 
number from the La Salle. The Photographic 
Society sponsored a contest for high school in the 
metropolitan area. The Signum Fidei Medal, 
awarded annually to the person who has done the 
most for the advancement of Christian principles, 
was given to Dr. Louis Clerf, professor at Jeffer- 
son Medical College. 

However the month ended on an athletic note 
as the swimming team finished second to Yale in 
the Eastern Intercollegiate Swimming Champion- 
ships and three men — Foust, Comerford, and Phe- 
lan — are named to the All-City basketball team. 
Nevertheless, Temple beat the Bridge Club by 
1720 points. 

The students returned to the campus after the 
Easter recess to be greeted by a "new" Collegian 
which announced the beginning of an expansion 
program for the College. "Fundamentally La Salle 
wants to be better not bigger," were words of Bro- 
ther G. Paul, president, that set the keynote of 
the expansion program. For the first weeks of 



The Most Reverend J. Carroll McCormick, 
auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia, turns the first 
shovelful of earth for the new ^500,000 library. 
Brother G. Paul, president, assists in the cere- 
mony. 



April talk of the program continued as a student 
campaign that raised ^4300 for the LaSalliana 
Room of new Library got under way. In the early 
weeks of the campaign, the Collegian added its 
files to the historical material of the College to 
be kept in t;he LaSalliana Room. 

The Fabrician Society attained national prom- 
inence by being granted a chapter of the National 
Premedical Fraternity. La Salle's chapter became 
known as the Pennsylvania Delta chapter of 
Alpha Epsilon Delta. Charles Day and Donald 
Gates established a regional newsletter for the 
Interracial Justice Commission. Edward Warren 
and William Graham placed one, two in the dram- 








William Bieser, president of the Adora- 
tion Society, receives the Catholic Action Award 
as the member of the Class of 1951 who had done 
the most for Catholic Action. Francis Wuest, 
president, makes the oresentation. 



atic reading section of the Grand National For- 
ensic Tournament. J. A. Livingston, financial 
editor of the Evening Bulletin, spoke to the Eco- 
nomics Club on the difference of the economic 
structure of Great Britain and the United States. 

Both the national president, Dr. Hugh E. 
Setterfield, and the national secretary. Dr. Maurice 
L. Moore, of Alpha Epsilon Delta attend the in- 
stallation ceremonies of the new chapter on 
campus. 

As the month of May arrived, we assumed the 
leadership that was to be ours. We started Junior 
Week with a Communion Breakfast, the planting 
of the class ivy, the dedicating of the class plaque, 
and a softball tournament on Sunday. During the 
week, the other athletic events were completed. 



Eugene McHugh, secretary, unveils the 
class plaque as Father Charles F. Gorman, Chap- 
lain of the College, blesses the plaque. Stephen 
Imms looks on in the background. 




Charles Mahoney, the Class of 1951 poster 
maker, puts the finishing touches on a Junior 
Week banner. Francis Wuest, class president, as- 
sists Mahoney. 




L)r. Max Guzikowski, moderator, plants 
a plant of the class ivy bv Benilde Hall. Watching 
Dr. Guzikowski plant the ivy are: Will'am Mc- 
Hale, William Sieberlich, and Eugene McLoone. 




The Most Reverend Gerald P. O'Hara, Bishop 
of Savannah-Atlanta, receives the Signum Fidei 
Medal from O. Francis Levy, president of the 
Alumni Association. Archbishop O'Hara accepted 
the medal, which is awarded annually to the 
person who has done the most to advance Christ- 
ian principles, as "custodian until such time as 
he can hand it to the Christian Brothers of 
Rumania." 

The class night and a Monte Carlo night were also 
held. The week closed with the Junior Prom at 
the Penn-Sheraton. Boyd Raeburn and his orches- 
tra provided the music for the occasion. The Thea- 
tre closed a good season with ""Three Men on a 
Horse." The Glee Club finished on a high note 
with its formal concert in Town Hall. The Chy- 
mian Society heard John F. Thomas of the Hilton 
Drug Company speak on the uses of dyes. The 
College was awarded a Reserve Officer Training 
Corp unit. St. John Baptist de La Salle was named 
oatron of all teachers of youth. Three seniors cap- 
ture all the prizes in the Collegiate Essay Contest 
sponsored by the Purchasing Agents Association. 
The track team added to the athletic honors of 
the previous months by capturing the Middle 
Atlantics Conference Championship for the first 
team championship in College history. 



Late in September, we started our final year 
at La Salle. We lacked leaders as student elec- 
tions weren't held until late in October. We 
soon learned that Elmer Brock has been elected 
national vice-president of NSA and Edmund 
Barnes, Pennsylvania area treasurer. The re- 
quirements for the Dean's List were revised. 
The new bleachers on the baseball field topped 
the summer improvements. The Theatre planned 
another center-staged play. The Freedom Scroll 
was signed by over four hundred students dur- 
ing its one day stand. 

As the overwhelming choice of the class, 
Murphy returned to the office of president. 
Joseph Earley was elected vice-president; Ferd 
Morro, secretary; and Vincent Guminski, treasur- 
er. Hugh J. Carroll was re-elected president of 
the Evening Division Congress and C. Raymond 
Larkin, vice-president. William Ries was elected 
president of the Student Body in the first all 
college election. 

November started with Pennsylvania Week 
and Albert J. Crawford '36, County Commis- 
sioner of Delaware County, spoke on the achieve- 
ments of the state. AED held the first annual 
eastern Pennsylvania premedical conference and 
Dr. Moore, national secretary of AED, attend 
the affair. The La Salle Rowing Association was 
formed and purchased Crescent Boat Club. Dr. 
Lynn Case, professor of History at the Univers- 
ity of Pennsylvania, talked to the Historical 
Society on the fourth domension of History. 
The Radio Workshop, faced with a rebuilding 
job equaling that of the sports coaches, held 
classes in radio technique in the hopes of reach- 
ing the heights of their performances in prev- 
ious years. Harry M. Orth, principal of the 
Wilson Elementary School, addressed the group 
in elementary education. The Glee Club reached 
the pinnacle of its achievements when they sang 
over the Mutual Network. Four men — Joe Ver- 
duer. Bob Regan, Bob Fitzgerald, and William 
Dorsch — placed on the Ail-American swim- 
ming team. It was the second straight year. La 



\^' 



Salle placed, four men on the dream squad. Gu- 
minski resigned as treasurer and was succeeded 
by Joseph Pittelli. A fund raising campaign be- 
gan to decide the senior interest in an annual. 
The Evening Division held their second annual 
Dance. 

As December came. Dr. Edward J. Cannon 
'46, delivered a paper on the eye to AED 
and the Glee Club presented its Christmas con- 
cert to various groups. They journeyed to local 
high schools as well as schools as far away as 
Washington and Baltimore. They also perform- 
ed over KYW, WFIL, and WFIL-TV. During 
the holidays, excavation started for the founda- 
tion for the library and Ronale Manor in Elkins 
Park was purchased for the new Scholasticate 
and Provincalate. The new Scholasticate is an 
affiliate of the College. 

Billy Butterfield provided the music for the 
Blue and Gold which highlighted the January 
social events. John Mincer Mcllvain, chief in- 



dustrial engineer at Atlantic Refining, spoke at 
the installation banquet of the chapter of the 
Society for Advancement of Management. The 
basketball team reached the height of the sea- 
son when they easily beat Bowling Green, 85-51. 
The vacation between terms was marked with 
the presentation of the Signum Fidie Medal to 
Archbishop Gerald P. O'Hara. The Collegian 
Award went to Bob Considine, International News 
columnist. The NFCCS presented an award to 
Senator Francis Myers. Temple and Miami beat 
us and the hopes for a tournament bid dipped. 
Monsignor Haun, returned to deliver an illus- 
trated lecture on the backgrounds of English 
literature. The IJC held its annual panel during 
Interracial Week. The Gavel captured second 
in the national tournament sponsored by NFCCS. 



Brother G. Paul, president, presents the com- 
mission of Cadet Colonel to Robert Tierney as 
Major James P. Unger, professor of Military Tac- 
tics and Science, looks on. 




March witnessed Richard Stout on a panel 
at the Bulletin Forum — the second straight year, 
a La Salle student was on a panel at the Forum, 
the third national conclase of SBK was held in 
Leonard Hall. Glenn Robertson '49, was elected 
national vice-president of the fraternity. Le Cer- 
cle Claudel made its annual sojourn to New 
York City. The students edged the faculty in 
a sudden death extra period in a basketball 
game for student relief. The ROTC unit held 
its first Military Ball with Bernie'Berle provid- 
ing the music. The Gavel placed fourth in the 
Brooklyn College national forensic tournament. 
The track team defeated University of Penn- 
sylvania to take the indoor Middle Atlantic 
Amateur Athletic Union title. Stout scored again 
by capturing second place in the Virginia Na- 
tional Debate Tournament. 

April was highlighted by the presentation 
of a play on the life of St. La Salle. Le Cercle 
Claudel scored with "La Malade Imaginaire." 
The ROTC was formally inspected and its first 
parade was staged. Mr. Claude Kock, instructor 
in English, won the Catholic Press Association 
Short Story Contest. The national council of 
NFCCS awarded the national IJC commission 
to La Salle. Charles Day was appointed chair- 
man and Donald Gates, editor of the commis- 
sion's national paper. 



The Most Reverend J. Carroll McCormick, 
Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia, blesses the 
Christian Brothers' Scholasticate in EUins Park. 
Assisting in the ceremony are: Reverend Joseph 
A. Quigley, St. Charles Seminary and Reverend 
Edward M. Reilly Diocesan Superintendent of 
Schools. 



A special issue of the Collegian proclaimed Loef- 
fler's worth as the basketball team went to its 
second straight invitational. St. Louis triumph- 
ed over us, 73-61 and our NIT record for 
four years stood at one win and three losses. 
During Holy Week, the annual retreat as an 
exercise for the entire student body was re- 
established. During our first three years, crowd- 
ed conditions had necessitated substituting Days 
of Recollection for the undeclassmen. However, 
the Dean arranged a schedule for two simultan- 
eous retreats and the pre-war practice was re- 
newed. 



\^^V) 




Brother E. Stanislaus, Dean, concrratulate": 
Brother F. Christopher, associate orofessor of 
Biology, on his appointment as Acting Dean 
while Brother Stanislaus goes to Rome for his 
second noviciate and a year of study. 



As May arrived, Francis Taylor captured the 
American Institute of Chemists' Student Medal. 
The mile relay team took the MAC title. Father 
Raymond A. McGowan, director of the Social 
Action Department of the National Catholic 
Welfare Conference, was presented with an award 
for his work in promoting the encyclicals. The 
Glee Club held their annual formal Spring Con- 
cert. The Theatre presented the "Mikado". The 
baseball team tied for the MAC crown for the 
first team championship in that sport. The crew 
did likewise by capturing the Dad Vail Regatta 
in their second year of participation in the small 
college championship. The trackmen spotted pow- 
erful Lafayette almost thirty points in the field 
events and were only able to take second in 
the MAC championships. Jack George was named 
to the AU-American baseball team by the col- 
coUege coaches. And we moved into the final 
exams of our college career. 

On Thursday, June 7, the curtain closed on our 
social activities as a college student with the din- 
ner-dance in the main ballroom of the Penn- 
Sheraton. Under the chairmanship of Ferd and 
James Morro, the affair which over a hundred 
seniors and their guests attended was well enjoyed 
by all. A number of the seniors attended suite 
parties held by various groups such as the Society 
for Advancement of Management. 

The music for the evening was provided by 
Frankie Stone and his orchestra. The dinner-dance 
was the climaxing affair of Senior Week. After 
starting with a Communion Breakfast on Sunday 
on campus, the seniors journeyed to Lakeside 
Amusement Park for a class outing on Monday. 

Brother Emilian James, provincal of the Balti- 
more Province of the Christian Brothers, spoke at 
the Communion Breakfast. He told the seniors to 




remember that LSC also stood for loyalty, service 
and confidence. 

The seniors who were able to overcome the dif- 
ficulties in finding Lakeside Amusement Park en- 
joyed a day of Softball, swimming and general 
good fellowship. 

Thus the final week as a college senior passed 
and another successful year of social events under 
the capable guidance of Edward Murphy ended. 




Among the hundred couples who attended the 
dinner - dance at the Penn-Sheraton which was 
the closing affair of Senior Week are: (at the 
tab'e in the foreground) Misters Sweeney, Malone, 
Stanton, and Kenienosh and th.-ir guests. 



^.- 




Views of the couples who attended the dinner- 
dance which climaxed the events of Senior Week 
dancing in the main ballroom of the Penn-Sher- 
aton. 





i_ i 






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The head table and part of the graduands at 
the class banquet held in the College Auc^itorium 
on Monday of Graduation Week. 



Another view of the graduands at the 
Class banquet held in the CoUese Auditorium. 




LA SALLE COLLEGE 



THE EIGHTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT 




Wednesday, June 13, 1951 
5 o'clock in the afternoon 

McCarthy stadium 
la salle campus, philadelphia 






Members of the Senior Class adjust their aca- 
demic gowns and hoods in preparation for the pro- 
cession before the Bacculaureate Mass in Holy 
Child Church, Broad and Duncannon. 



On a rainy, ever threatening to riear, June 
13th — almost the direct opposite of the sunny, 
clear October 13th we started — we reached 
the end of our careers as college students. 

In the morning, we gathered in the Chapel 
of Holy Child Church to vest for the academic 
procession prior to the Baccalaureate Mass. The 
seniors, struggled, experimented, failed and tried 



again to adjust their academic attire until each 
was satisfied. Most relied on tlie judgment of 
friends in fixing the hoods and adjusting the 
cap until it was parallel to the ground. 



Monsignor Hubert J. Cartwright, rector of 
Cathedral of Sts. Peter and Paul, delivered the 
Baccalaureate sermon in which he mentioned the 
efforts of not only St. La Salle but also our lately 



deceased Cardinal, who was the honorary presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees of La Salle, to 
further the education of youth. 



iil«^ 



The academic procession proceeds up the aisle 
of Holy Child Church lead by Brother D. Thom- 
as, professor of Latin and Greek and Brother F. 
Ch'-i'^topher, professor of Biology. 



In the evening rather disappointed with the 
rain, we crowded into the cafeteria to again 
robe in our academic attire. This time, we were 
fully confident that we had dressed correctly and 
didn't need the assurances of friends. 

We heard Dr. Francis J. Braceland, head of 
the section of psychiatry at Mayo Clinic, tell 
how the College has grown and carefully listen 
to the advise the lone graduate of 1926 had to 
oflFer. 

Thus we said farewell to our College that had 
better prepared us to meet the battles on the field 
of life. We had been educated in an atmosphere 
where philosophy was not another subject but 
a way of life. June 13th was our day of honor 
nor for us alone but for all who had worked with 
us to make that day ossible. 



A few of the seniors in the procession pass from 
the chapel to the church prior to the Baccalaur- 
eate Mass. 




.iTV r- '■*.'t>' tVJi^f 




Brother George Thomas, Dean of Freshman, 
acts as marshall at the commencement exercises 
and leads the procession into the Field House. 



The graduates enter the Field House surround- 
ed by their friends and guests at the commence- 
ment execises. 




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The Bachelor of Arts men return the presi- 
rent's salute. 



Ralph Joseph De Shan, Jr., receives his degree 
from Brother G. Paul, president, while Francis 
Desimone, Nicholas Dicandilo and Daniel Di 
Pentino await their turn. 








Brother E. Stanislaus, Dean, reads names of 
the candidates for degrees as Brother G. Paul, 
president, presents degrees to Edward McCreadv. 



William McCoy is descending the steps after re- 
ceiving his degree. 



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Brother G. Paul, president, reads the citation 
prior to the conferring of an Honorary Doctor of 
Humanities on the Honorable James P. McGran- 
ery, LL.D., K.C.S.G., Judge of the U. S. District 
Court. 




The Commencement Address 

Francis J. Braceland, M.D., Sc.D, K.S.G., 
Professor of Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic 



\{nl 



W\ 




Chester 



Cyzio 




Francis 



Stanton, 




Eugene McLoone 




Francis Taylor 




J°l^n Del: 



^'sordo 




James 



Scully 



Eugene Rtzgerald 



CDmmencement Awards 



Chester Cyzio, the William T. O'Connor Award 
for the senior with the best scholastic average 
in Business Administration. 

Eugene McLoone, the John McShain Award 
for the senior who has maintained a high schol- 
astic average and is considered by the Com- 
mittee on Awards to have done most for the 
public welfare of La Salle College. The Anas- 
tasia McNichol Memorial Award in English 
Essay. 

James Finegan, the Sir James J. Ryan Award 
for the senior with the highest scholastic average. 
The William T. O'Connor Award for the senior 
athlete with the highest scholastic average. 

Francis Stanton, the William T. O'Connor 
Award for the senior with the highest scholastic 
average in Social Science. 

Francis Taylor, the William T. O'Connor 
Award for the senior with the highest scholastic 
average in Science and Mathematics. 



John Delsordo, the Rev. Charles F. Gorman 
Award to the student who would most benefit 
by doing graduate work in Sociology. 

James Scully, the Vernon Guischard Award 
for French to the student who has maintained 
the highest scholastic average in the study of the 
language and literature of France. 

Earl Adams, the William T. O'Connor Award 
for the senior with the highest scholastic average 
in language and literature. 

James Morro, the French Government Medal 
for the student who has demonstrated the highest 
proficiency in the study of French letters and 
culture. 

Eugene Fitzgerald, the Honorable Vincent J. 
Carroll Prize for the senior with the best schol- 
astic record in Philosophy. 



La Salle men have found that success awaited them after completion of study at these two 
great Catholic graduate schools: 



ST. JDHIV'S 

University 
Brooklyn, Hew York 



Graduate School of 
Arts and Sciences 



School of Law 



MAROUETTE 

University 
Milwankee, Wisconsin 



For complete information 
on graduate study write: 
Office of the Registrar 
Marquette University- 
Milwaukee 3, Wisconsin 



Distinguished Patrons 



Eugene V. Alessandroni 

Judge of Common Pleas . 

Richardson Dilworth » ^T^ 4 

City Treasurer ^^\ii'^iT — 

Mr. and Mrs. George C. Armstrong («^ 

Accounting Association fi*5T?ii 

Martin L. Burke 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Cavanagh 
Vincent Cooke 



Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Delvin 

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Duffy 

A Faculty Member 

A Friend 

William B. Haeffne. 

Francis Hanlon 

Charles Kelley 

Walter Krause 

Joseph Larkin, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Raymond Larkin 

Robert F. Lavelle 

Mr. and Mrs. Rolland LeTourneau 
Reverend Francis X. McGinty 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Pensiero 
Captain Beverly C. Pratt 
Mrs. A. C. Reagan 
Glendon Robertson, Sr. 
O. A. Schilling 
John J. Smith 

Major and Mrs. James F. Unger 
Fred Unkel 

St. James' Catholic High School for Boys 
Chester, Pa. 



no 



->y^ V VleS6ctae to 

C^ach 1 1/ [ember of the 

CiaSi of 1951 



As you stand on the threshold ot a new era in your lite, you 
face the future with the joy of anticipation. This is as it should be. 

Mingled with your hopes is the reluctance in parting with your 
acquaintances and your Alma Mater, That, too, is as it should be. 

As you take leave of the Campus you know so well, one thought 
should be uppermost in your mind. You will always be a part of La 
Salle. 

You will find it impossible to forget the hopes and aspirations 
you will have are in large measure a product of the School which 
prepared you for them. 

As an alumnus, you cancontinue your friendships and main- 
tain your interest in La Salle. You need never feel that your campus 
leave-taking was absolute and final. 

We invite you to join wholeheartedly in the future of our 
Alma Mater. 

Congratulations and — Welcome! 



THE LA SALLE COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Business Patrons 

The Campus Store 

La Salle College 
John C. Dailey Co. 

2803 E. Cambria Street 
J. C. Dailey Trucking Co. 

Westmoreland dC Delaware River 
Durkin World Travels 

50 W. Chelten Avenue 
EU 6C Ess Diner 

Olney and Ogontz Avenue 
Flannery's Square Bar 




Wayne and Roberts Avenue 
Georgia Pacific Plywood Si Lumber Co. 

Pier 179 North Wharves 
William L. Harty Real Estate Company 

1 8 W. Chelten Avenue 
Hatboro Appliance Co. 

Hatboro, Pa. 
McKeevers Beer Distributors 

3343 Conrad Street 
O'Connor Sporting Goods 

908 Arch Street 
Ontario Land Co. 

Delaware River dC Ontario Street 



Pete's Tonsorial Shop 

La Salle College 
Roslyn Sunoco Service Station 

Easton Road and Mildred Avenue 
O. B. Rotzell, Caterer 

4803 Wayne Avenue 
W. W. Smith Hauling Co. 

1826 E. Russell Avenue 
Union Paving Company 

1227 N. Broad Street 
Waters Florist 

Collingdale, Pa. 
Wheatland Tube Company 

1300 Bankers Security Building 



compliments of 

ATLAS CASKET CO., INC. 

3207 Cedar Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



THE RE. WOLF CO. 
Printers 

31 E. COLUMBIA AVENUE PHILA. 25, PA. 



EXPERIENCE HAS NO SUBSTITUTE 



20 Years of Yearbook "KNOWHOW" Is 
Yours When You Sign With 



IllHerln ^tudlod 

O F PHOTOGRAPHY 



Official Portrait Photographers to the 
1951 EXPLORER 



All Portraits Appearing In This Publication 
Have Been Placed on File in Our Studio 
And Can Be Duplicated At Any Time 



Write or Phone us for Information 
PEnnypacker 5-5777 



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Philadelphia 7, Pa. 




^^^chnou/CeaQments 



The Explorer stafF wishes to take this oppor- 
tunity to thank the many friends we have found 
in the task of publishing a college yearbook. 
Their interest and willing cooperation are sincere- 
ly appreciated and provided an endless source 
of encouragement to us. In particular we extend 
our gratitude to: 

Brother G. Paul, President, and Brother E. 
Stanislaus, Dean, whose wise counsel, experience 
and advice have been of inestimable value. 

Mr. Charles Moulder, sales manager of Merin 
Studios, under whose direction the fine portraits 
exhibited in this book were produced. 

Mr. Ollie Twist, of National Publishing Com- 
pany, under whose direction the cover was manu- 
factured and the edition bound. 

Mr. Joseph Gavin, editor of the Collegian, 
and Mr. James Sanzare, news editor, and Mr. 
John DiSangro, sport editor, for their invaluable 
aid in research, a ready sense of humor and 
constructive suggestions. 

Mr. Max Pearlman, of the F. E. Wolf Com- 
pany, printing division, under whose direction 
the book was printed. 

Mr. Donald Masser, plant superintendent, Mr. 
William Gordon, and the other maintenance per- 
sonnel who were always ready to lend a helping 
hand. 



Mr. John J. Kelly, director of public relations, 
for the use of his files and encouragement in the 
face of darkness. 

Mr. Anthony Waltrich, director of alumni re- 
lations, for a cheerful attitude and use of past 
Explorers from his files. 

To the members of the faculty, moderators and 
officers of campus organizations, and to those 
students who have cooperated with us to the nth 
degree. 

And finally the man to whom most of the 
credit for this volume belongs, our liaison with 
the administration. Brother E. Clemenfian whose 
sincerity and kindness will never be forgotten. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC CREDITS 
Page 4 — Fabian Bachrach Studios 
Administration, faculty, senior, and basketball 
portraits — Merin Studios 
Pages 160 to 169 — Merin Studios 
All other photographs — John Joseph Kane, '51 
The photographs appearing in this volume are 
the property of the above persons or organiza- 
tions and may not be reproduced without their 
permission. 











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