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Full text of "Explorer"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/explorer1956lasa 




"Life at La Salle College" 



Beautiful La Salle! Expanding La Salle! Indeed there is a sure reason for 
her existence. The external beauty which reflects life at La Salle College is 
only a means used in attaining our ultimate end. The theme of the 1956 
EXPLORER centers around the "Imitation of Christ" by Thomas a Kempis. 
The author tells us how our end can be reached: ". . . he who would fully 
and feelingly understand the words of Christ, must study to make his whole life 
conformable to that of Christ." 



1^ 



^eJmim 



A man in a white robe, designated as the new 
chaplain to the La Salle College student body, 
began his residence here in January, 195 3. The 
tall, lanky, bespectacled Dominican is in the per- 
son of Rev. Mark Heath, O.P., a religiously-de- 
voted and humorous Bostonian. 

The arrival of Father Heath brought with it an 
abundance of religious activities. A constant flow 
of Masses, Communions, Benedictions and Confes- 
sions were continually at our disposal for our spir- 
itual betterment. Moreover, Father Heath, as a 
teacher of philosophy and full-time counselor, 
never bothered to utter a sigh about his numerous 
duties. His time was given unselfishly to the 



students. It was not unusual to see him talking 
to a group of boys while bidding the time of day 
to others, for his repertoire of names appeared un- 
limited. 

To Father Mark Heath, we, the Class of '56, 
dedicate the 1956 EXPLORER. The guidance 
and inspiration which he has shed upon us can 
ne'er be forgotten. 

We have utilized the exhortation of Thomas 
a Kempis in the "Imitation of Christ" when he 
said: "Consult with a wise and conscientious man, 
and seek rather to be instructed by one who is 
better than to follow thine own inventions." 




Under this ivy-shrouded cove pass the 
Christian Brothers on their journey to 
and from classes. The three storied 
building is the home of the Brothers at 
LaSalle College. 




"SenJ ffffii/i (J^^ /i(^/ii ana jnti /mm, 
i/iaii/^tl maif s/iine ujim ifie eafiin 




College Hall with its sturdy tower 
personifies LaSalle. The heart of the 
college, this building houses the ad- 
ministration, faculty^ classrooms, and 
laboratories. 




Members of the Class of 1956: 

It is with a sense of pleasure that I write 
this word of congratulations and encourage- 
ment to you, the members of the class of '56, 
for your capable leadership and with a sense 
of gratitude for the many worthy lessons 
you have left us. 

The leadership and inspiration of the class 
of '56 lifted many above the status of 
ordinary students extremely conservative 
about their own capacities and ever fear- 
ful to assume responsibilities. You were 
intelligent and mature enough to see signifi- 
cant relationships between academic interests 
and social activities and as a result taught 
many that studies must not remain un- 
motivated and campus activities irrespons- 
ible and uninformed. 

It is my sincere hope that you will con- 
tinue to be leaders among the worthy citi- 
zens of the city of man so that one day you 
will "live" among the privileged citizens of 
the city of God. 

Sincerely, 

Brother Daniel Bernian, F.S.C. 
(Vice-President) 



Brother E. Stanislaus, F.S.C, Ph.D. 
President 



A Message from the President: 

"... I wish to take advantage of this 
opportunity to compliment the students for 
the magnificent manner in which the activ- 
ities of the school year have been carried 
out to date. Such functions as the Har- 
vest Dance, the R.O.T.C. Ball, the Mili- 
tary Mass on the Feast of St. Barbara, the 
productions of the Masque, the religious ac- 
tivities sponsored by the Benilde Club, the 
Fine Arts exhibits — it is understandably im- 
possible to list all — have been carried 
through in a manner highly complimentary 
to the students and very satisfying to the 
faculty. This is indicative of a seriousness 
and dignity of purpose which is laudatory. 
Brother E. Stanislaus, F.S.C." 

(Excerpt from President's Christmas 
message, December, 195 5) 



Brother Daniel Bernian, F.C.S., Ph.D. 
Vice-President 





ADMINISTRATION 




Brother D. Vincent, F.S.C., Ph.D. 
Dean of Arts and Sciences 





Brother D. John, F.S.C., Ph.D. 
Dean of the College 




Brother David Cassian, F.S.C., Ph.D. 
Dean of Business 



Brother G. Paul, F.S.C, Ph.D. 
Dean of Evening Division 




Brother G. Joseph, F.S.C., M.A. 
Registrar 



Brother E. John, F.S.C., M.A. 
Bursar 



Brother E. Joseph, F.S.C., M.A. 
Librarian 



Joseph J. Sprissler, Ph.D. 
Comptroller 



James J. Henry, M.A. 
Director of Athletics 



Brother Gavin Paul, F.S.C., Ph.D. 
Director of Properties 



DEPARTMENT 




HEADS 




Rev. R. Mark Heath, O.P., Ph.D. 
Chaplain 



Edward F. Bronson, B.A. 
Director of Public Relations 



Reverend Edward J. Curr 
College Historian 



John McCloskey, B.A. 
Assistant to the President 



Brother F. Christopher, F.S.C., Ph.D. 
Director of Admissions 




William S. Gordon 
Buildings and Grounds 





Lilian Keogh, Mrs. Georgette Most, Mary Broder- 
ick, and Helen Meehan. 



Mrs. Ruth Serchak, R.N., Dispensary. 



Our truly, truly fair! The women of LaSalle! 



Mrs. Mary Gallagher and Arlene Haist. 



Molly McPhillips, Nancy Dougherty, Yvonne 
Cleland, and Ellen Bekir (seated). 





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Millie Kaluder. 



Pat McCauley, Kathy Sullivan, and Sue Liebner. 



10 




Top Row: Edwin W. Adams, M.A., Ed.D., Associate 
Professor of Education; Bro. D. Adalbert, F.S.C., B.A., 
Instructor in English; Bro. F. Adrian, F.S.C., B.A., M.O., 
Assistant Professor of Religion; Bro. E. Alban, F.S.C., 
M.A., Instructor in Mathematics; Austin J. App, M.A., 
Ph.D., Associate Professor of English; Joseph F. Arm- 
strong, M.B.A., Instructor in Accounting. 



Bottom Row: Bro. D. Augustine, F.S.C., Ph.D., Pro- 
fessor of Sociology; Bro. F. Azarias, F.S.C., M.A., Asso- 
ciate Professor of Education; John C. Bannon, B.S., 
Instructor in Marketing; Max Barth, M.A., Ph.D., In- 
structor in Chemistry; Gert Barth-Wehrenhalp, M.A., 
Ph.D., Instructor in Physics; Arthur H. Benner, B.S. in 
E.E., M.S., Ph.D., Instuctor in Physics. 



"(^f II men miufia/li^ Jesi/ie k heu/, 
iui w!iai Joes ^mwm(^e amil 
wiilimi i/ie jeafi ej ^ea?'' 




The new statue of St. John 
Baptist de LaSalle standing 
between the Library and Col- 
lege Hall is an inspiration to 
Christian teachers. 




Dr. Berger displays keen interest with 
a student's problem during a physics 
class. 

Moderator of the Sigma Beta Kappa 
Fraternity, Brother Damian appears to 
be enjoying himself at a fraternity 
^'social." 



KNOWLEDGE IS RECEIVED 



Top Row: A. V. Berger-Voesendorf, J.D., J.U.D., Visit- 
ing Professor in Economics; William J. Binko'wski, M.A., 
Assistant Professor of History; Vincent D. Bradley, 
B.A., B.S., Instructor in Finance; Victor D. Brooks, 
D.Ed., Instructor in Psychology; Franklin W. Burch, 
M.A., Instructor in History; Hatton Burke, M.A., In- 
structor in English. 



Bottom Row: Martin L. Burke, B.S., L.L.B., Instructor 
in Business Law; Joseph M. Carrio, B.A.S., Assistant 
Professor of Spanish; Casimir Ciesla D., R.E.L., P.O.L., 
Assistant Professor of Economics; C, Richard Cleary, 
M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Government; John 
A. Clement, Jr., B.A., L.L.B., Instructor in Business 
Law; Bro. E Clementian, F.S.C., M.A., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English. 




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Top Roiv: John F. Connors, M.A., Instructor in Sociol- 
ogy; Vincent Cooke, M.A., Instructor in Industry; Rob- 
ert J. Courtney, M.A., Assistant Professor of Govern- 
ment; Joseph E, Crowley, B.A., L.L.B., Instructor in 
Economics and Industry; Michael DeAngelis, M.S., 
Assistant Professor of Accounting; Domenico A. Di- 
Marco, Litt.D., Instructor in Italian. 



Bottom Roiv! Rev. John T, Dittoe, O.P., B.A., St.Ll., 
S.T.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy; Francis J. 
Donahoe, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics; Ugo Donini, 
M.A., Associate Professor of History; John M. Dronson, 
M.B.A., Instructor in Economics; Chester Dudziaz, B.S. 
in E.E., Instructor in Mathematics; Joseph C. Eckert, 
B.S., Instructor in Accounting, 



FROM THE LEARNED 



Top Kotv: Bro. M. Edward, F.S.C., Litt.M., Associate 
Professor of Chemistry; Bro. Dominic Edwin, F.S.C., 
M.A., Instructor in French; Bro. E. Felix, F.S.C., M.A., 
Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics; George G. 
Fellmeth, Grad. Engineer, Instructor in Industry; James 
W. Finegan, M.A., Instructor in English; Eugene Fitz- 
gerald, M.A., Instructor in Philosophy. 



Bottom Rotv: Herbert A. Fleck, 1st Lt. USA, B.A., 
Assistant Professor of Military Science; Joseph F. FIu- 
bacher, M.A., Ed.D., Professor of Economics; Bro. Felix 
Francis, F.S.C.; Bro. G. Francis, F.S.C., M.A., Instructor 
in English; Joseph F. Gabriel, B.A., M.A., Instructor in 
English; William F. Garrity, M.B.A., Instructor in 
Accounting. 






where did it go? Tom Murphy is waiting for a ball that 
never came as basketball coach Jim Pollard smashes it out 
of the infield during last year's Junior-Faculty Softball 
tilt. 



Senior George Harkins can't jump high enough to block 
a shot by Mr. John Rooney in the Senior-Faculty basket- 
ball game. 



I 



A TEACHER IS A FORMULATOR 



Top Row: Harry J. Gibbons, B.S., Instructor in Ac- 
counting; Bernard B. Goldner, M.A., Ph.D., Associate 
Professor of Industry; Francis E. Greene, M.B.A., 
L.L.D., Ph.D., Instructor in Economics; Francis J. 
Guerin, B.S., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting; 
John A. Guischard, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
French; Max E. Guzikowski, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy. 



Bottom Row: Paul Hafey, B.A., Instructor of Govern- 
ment; Charles A. J. Halpin, Jr., M.A., L.L.B., Assistant 
Professor of Industry; E. Francis Hanlon, B.A., In- 
structor in English; Howard L. Hannum, B.A., M.A., 
Instructor in English; John L. Harbison, M.A., Instruc- 
tor in Government; Rev. R. Mark Heath, O.P., B.A., 
B.S., S.T.L., S.T.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Re- 
ligion and Philosophy. 





mk ^'4ii Li 




Top Rou>: Rev. Thomas L. Hebert, A. A., B.A., L.L.B., 
S.T.B., S.T.L., Ph.B., Ph.L., Assistant Professor of So- 
ciology and Psychology; John F. Hemminger, SFC, 
U.S.A., Instructor in Military Science; James J. Henry, 
M.A., Profesjor of Finance; Richard T. Hoar, M.A., 
Lecturer in Philosophy; George G. Hoeberg, B.S. in 
E.E., M.S., Instructor in Mathematics; Roland Holroyd, 
B.A., M.A., Sc.D., Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 



Bottom Koiu: Robert E, Jenkinson, M.S., Instructor in 
Physics; Bro. D. John, F.S.C., M.A., M.S., Ph.D., Asso- 
ciate Professor of Physics; Bro. F. Joseph, F.S.C., M.A., 
Assistant Professor of German; Bro. G. Joseph, F.S.C., 
M.A., Professor of Physics; Bro. G. Jude, F.S.C., M.A., 
Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Latin, Greek, and the 
Classics; Bro. J. Damian, F.S.C., M.A., Ph.D., Associate 
Professor of Mathematics, 



OF CHARACTER 



Top Row: Walter J. Kaiser, B.S., C.P.A., Assistant 
Professor of Accounting; Charles Kelly, M.A., Assistant 
Professor of English; John J. Kienan, B.A., Instructor 
in English; Claude F; Koch, B.S., M.A., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English; Raymond Ksiazek, B.A., Instructor 
in Biology; Robert F. Lavelle, B.A., L.L.D., Instructor 
in Business Law. 



Bottom Row: Bro. Eliphus Lewis, F.S.C., M.A., M.E.D., 
Assistant Professor of History; Bro. E. Lewis, F.S.C., 
M.A., Instructor in Religion; Bro. G. Lewis, F.S.C., 
M.A., Sc.D., L.L.D., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics; 
Bro. E. Louis, F.S.C., M.A., Assistant Professor of 
Spanish; John Lukacs, M.A., Ph.D., Lecturer in History; 
John F. Malloy, Jr., B.S., M.A., Instructor in Sociology. 





Brother Mark, in front of his mathematics class, tells the 
about the Math major who was short-changed in a 
restaurant. 



Equally facile at cutting-a-rug as a cake, Walt Krau 
and wife show how it*s done at the Junior Prom. 




"IN ORDER TO TEACH WELL, MORE MUST BE LEARNED BY THE 



Top Row: Martin P. Marion, M.S., Instructor in Mathe- 
matics; Bro. E. Mark, F.S.C., M.A., Instructor in 
Physics; Joseph G. Markman, B.S., Instructor in Ac- 
counting; John B. Martin, Capt., U.S.A., B.A., Assistant 
Professor of Military Science; Dennis J. McCarthy, 
M.A., Assistant Professor of History; Daniel J. Mc- 
Cauley, B.A., L.L.B., Instructor in Business Law. 



Bottom Row: Joseph P. Mooney, M.A., Instructor in 
Economics; Edwin E. More, B.S. in E.E., Instructor in 
Industry; Joseph L. Moran, M.A., Instructor in English; 
Edward J. Morris, Maj., U.S.A., B.A., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Military Science; E. Russell Naughton, M.A., 
Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy; Eugene J. 
O'Donnell, B.A., Instructor in Physics. 





Top Ron: John J. O'Donnell, B.S., C.P.A., Instructor 
in Accounting; Frederick Patka, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant 
Professor of Psychology; Bro. E. Patrick, F.S.C., M.A., 
Assistant Professor of English; Bro. E. Paul, F.S.C., 
Ivl.A., Assistant Professor of Spanish; Bro. Gavin Paul, 
F.S.C., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology; 
Robert W. Pearson, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 



Bottom Ron: John S. Penny, M.A., Ph.D., Associate 
Professor of Biology; Charles P. Perkins, B.A., M.A., 
Instructor in English; Brother D. Philip, F.S.C., M.A., 
M.B.A., Instructor in Accounting; Bro. G. Raymond, 
F.S.C., M.S., Associate Professor of Chemistry; John R. 
Reynolds, SFC, U.S.A., Instructor in Military Science; 
Charles H. Rice, Maj., U.S.A., B.A., Assistant Professor 
of Military Science. 



TEACHER THAN HE HAS FORMALLY TO IMPART TO THE PUPIL." 



Top Roiv: Joseph A. Rider, M.A., Instructor in Ac- 
counting; Augustine J. Rieffel, B.S., L.L.B., Instructor 
in Business Law; William N. Ritchie, B.S., Instructor 
in Industry; Bro. G. Robert, F.S.C., M.A., Assistant 
Professor of English; Daniel J. Rodden, M.F.A., Assist- 
ant Professor of English; John J. Rooney, M.A., Assist- 
ant Professor of Psychology. 



Bottom Rou: Robert J. Rowland, B.S., M.A., Lecturer 
in Education; Thomas J. Ryan, Jr., M.B.A., Instructor 
in Accounting; Rev. William J. Sailer, M.A., S.T.B., 
Ph.D., Director of Music; Henry J. Schneider, Ph.D., 
Instructor in Chemistry; Rev. George P. Shugrue, 
O.S.F.S., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy; 
Basil W. Simmons, M, Sgt. U.S.A., Instructor in Mili- 
tary Science. 





Top Row: John C. Singer, B.A., Instructor in Insur- 
ance; Harold Staras, M.S., Ph.D., Instructor in Mathe- 
matics; Cornelius F. Sullivan, M.A., Instructor in Eco- 
nomics; Peter J. S'weeney, M.B.A., Instructor in 
Accounting; George Swoyer, M.B.A., Assistant Professor 
of Marketing; Paul K. Taylor, M.S., Ph.D., Instructor 
in Mathematics. 



Bottom Rotv: Robert D. Teasdale, B.S. in E.E., M.S., 
Ph.D., L.L.D., Instructor in Physics; Bro. D. Thomas, 
F.S.C., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Religion; Vance M. 
Trueblood, M.A., Instructor in Marketing; Stephen A. 
Ucherek, Lt. Col., U.S.A., B.A., Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics; John O. Van Hook, B.S., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Industry; Walter Van Stan, Jr., B.A,, 
Instructor in English, 







"<Jj jnm wi/i fieceive jifK^jii fieaa wm 





BBBBBI^^^BII^^^^Hf >*« 4 







In pedagogic posture Brother Edw^ard of Mary utilizes 
Visual aid to clear up a problem in Organic Chemistry. 



"EDUCATION PROVIDES A PERSON WITH 

THE MEANS OF ATTAINING MATURITY. 



1 » 



Top Row: Bro. D. Vincent, F.S.C., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 
Professor of Psychology; Anthony J. Waltrich, B.S., 
Instructor in English; Frank J. Wetzler, M.A., Assist- 
ant Professor of German. 



Bottom Row: Mclvin F. Woods, B.A., Instructor in 
Finance; Frank Wroblewski, M/Sgt., U.S.^., Instructor 
in Military Science; Walter F. Zenner, B.A.^iItkstructor 
in Sociology; Peter Zuk, M/Sgt., U.S.A., Instructor in 
Military Science. 




19 



ACTIVITIES 



''^^ jny jtafii weii; mind wnai jmu mi aimi; 
Xam laiinjuliij in J^i^ vinei^mJ, J will ie 



An inspiring lecture given by Bro. D, 
Vincent at the second annual "You 
and Marriage" series was received with 
extreme interest by the many couples. 




Father Mark Heath, 0,P., College Chaplain, presents a spiritual dissertation at an outdoor 
religious function sponsored by the Benilde Club. Such an affair typifies the productions emitted 
by campus organizations. 



^^ii: 



A^M 



S.-/ ,: 



STUDENT COUNCIL 



The Student Council, under the leadership of 
President Jack Lombard, did a masterful job in 
fulfilUng its purpose of unifying student-faculty 
efforts. The Executive Board, composed of oflS- 
cers from campus organizations, and the newly 
created Residence Hall Council, have been inval- 
uable assets to the Student Council in reahzing the 
amiable unification of the entire student body. 



Answering a plea from an alum- 
nus on duty in Korea, La Salle 
students flooded the Library 
Lounge "with . last year's jackets 
and forgotten suits. These three 
determined gentlemen made use 
of every cubic inch, trying to 
make the ROK winter a bit easier 
for a fe^w people. 




•^^^^S!lP"\^ 






Student Council prexy. Jack Lombard, received 
the letter which initiated the "Person-to-Person" 
clothing drive. Looking like a haberdasher 
checking inventory. Jack found this to* be a 
different sort of craming. Lt. Bob Schaeffer, past 
editor of the Collegian, in a subsequent letter 
expressed the appreciation of the recipients "which 
made this effort worthwhile. 






^^: 



^Ji^ 



The Student Council progressed ■without flaw due 
to the determined efforts of the elected officers of the 
organization, (1. to r.), Paul Cundy (secretary), 
Frank Blatcher (treasurer), Jack Lombard (p 
dent), and Bob Rogers (vice-president). 



22 



1 




Forming the body of the Student Council are: (seated) 
Bob Freisem, Sherman Everlof, Jack Lombard (presi- 
dent), Bro. D. Augustine (moderator), Bob Rogers, 
Pete Pino; (second row) John Capola, Dave Spratt, 
Tom Murphy, Frank Blatcher, Jim McDonald, Bob 
Ganter, Paul Cundey; (top row) Jack Gallagher, 
Anthony Pressens, Jack Hellman, Tom Cunningham, 
Jerry Cain, and Bill Kelly. 



The annual Blue and Gold Ball, sponsored by the 
Student Council, is the largest social dance of the 
year. The dance committee shown w^ith their guests 
are: (I. to r.), John Pompa, Anthony Pressens, Dave 
Imschweiler, Bob Rogers (General Chairman), Paul 
Cundey, Ed Devlin, Dave Spratt, and Jim McDonald. 




EXECUTIVE BOARD 




Laboratory scenes, such as the one show^n, "were on the 
agenda for the visitors who attended the third annual 
Open House sponsored by the Executive Board. 



The captains of the Executive Board are: (1. to r.) Jesse 
Atkins (secretary), Sherman Everlof (president), Bro, D, 
Augustine (moderator), Bob Simard (vice-president), and Joe 
O'Grady (treasurer) . 



The Executive Board was successful in its duty of creating 
cooperation between campus organizations. The annual La Salle 
College Open House visualized the Board's efforts. Members of 
the Executive Board are: (1. to r.) Frank Montague, Ed. Miller, 



Joe Di Berardino, Pete Pino, Jesse Atkins, Bill Bickley, John 
Dever, Bob Simard, Bro. D. Augustine (moderator), Sherman 
Everlof, Henry Di Vincent, Nick Dienna, John Grablewski, 
Joe Sanquilli, Tom Lynch, Harry Friel, and Joe O'Grady. 



24 





The members of the Student Congress take time out from their night session. The Congress 
consists of four officers and elected representatives from each class. The units of the organization 
are the Constitution Committee, the Policy Committee, and the Membership Committee. 



STUDENT CONGRESS 



The Student Congress of the Evening Division, 
formed in 1949, acts as the official representative 
of the student body to the faculty and adminis- 
tration. The purpose of the Congress is to culti- 
vate, promote, and manage all extra-curricular 



affairs; to promote the general welfare of the 
students and of La Salle College; and to act as 
an advisory body between the students and the 
administration. 



Officers of the Student Congress grant the flo 
Mr. Keating. Seated (1. to r.) are: Mr. Potenza 
Larkin, Mr. Adler, and Mr. Lance. 




THE COLLEGIAN 




Interest centers on Al Butrym, Collegian Editor- 
in-chief, as he maps the strategy for a forthcom- 
ing issue of the school's newspaper. 



Adhering to the tradition of changing stalffs at 
mid-term, Editor-in-chief Alexander Butrym 
(left) congratulates Junior John Gall on acquir- 
ing the editorship of the Collegian. 



An amusing bit of sports copy appears to be 
unfolding from columnist Jim Dougherty's type- 
writer by the facial expressions of the other 
Collegian staff members. 




The responsibility for the weekly appearance of 
the 195 5-5 6 Collegian fell to Alexander Butrym. 
The paper not only serves as a workshop for stu- 
dents interested in journalism but acts as a vehicle 
for disseminating information to the student body. 

Dr. J. L. Rafter and Ted Bronson, former 
columnist for the Collegian and a 195 5 graduate 
of La Salle, who is the current public relations 
man for the College, served as moderators of the 
paper over the past year. 

By-lines from Bill Bickley, Jack McDevitt, Jim 
Dougherty, Tom Devlin, and Norb Moser, to 
mention a few, added invaluable interest and zest 
to the columns of the eight page weekly. 



26 










The consistent and interesting productions of the Collegian 
■were sparked by a competent staff. Members of the school 
paper are: (seated) Jim Pennestri (Business Manager), Joe 
Kane (Associate Editor), Larry McGuire (Sports Editor), 
Alexander Butrym (Editor-in-chief), John Gall (News Editor), 



Norb Moser, and Tom Adams; (second row) Bill Bickley, Dan 
Gallagher, Nick Dienna, Dennis Welsh, Bob Jones, Dave Bessel- 
man, and Jack McDevitt; (top row) Jim Dougherty, Jack 
Breza, Dick Coulson, Bob Lydon, and John Grablewski. 



-Operation: Person 10 ^^^^^^^^ 
"!I,R"i'?"^5"'"^"^ Times-Al least 

'""'""'"""' Clothes Collections 

Commence Monday 







fym Tjles Oitr 
«l Slrol, (»,,„ 
Ctwugej Conlrnu; 



^ 






"* '•"• *^''«."<'<" ttlalsKSonftaSi 



a 







farLt Dane: Opens Social Season Friday Jigh, 





Sociology Club members and moderator Mr. John Connors (seated, third from left). 



SOCIOLOGY CLUB 



The purpose of the Sociology Club is to better 
understand the problems and causes of social dis- 
tress confronting the modern world. Field trips, 
discussions and individual case studies serve as the 
tools for the accomplishment of this worthwhile 
function. 



PI DELTA PHI 



Since the inauguration of the Alpha Psi Chap- 
ter of Pi Delta Phi was established on the campus 
in 1951, the society has flourished and grown into 
a tremendously successful organization. 

The purpose of the society is to foster a wider 
knowledge of, and a greater love for the contribu- 
tions of France to world culture. 




Fraternity Officers Bob Simard, Vincent Serfilippo, and Ronald 
Gendaszek uphold the activities of Phi Delta Phi, the French 
Honor Society. 



28 



EDUCATION SOCIETY 

The Education Society was founded on campus 
in order to promote an interest in teachers' prob- 
lems, to foster ideals of professional ethics, and 
to increase the opportunity for professional de- 
velopment through organized contacts with 
teachers currently engaged in the teaching pro- 
fession. Leading educators in the Philadelphia area 
addressed the club at monthly meetings.- 




The Circolo La Salliano members. 



CIRCOLO LA SALLIANO 



Mr. DeMarco (left), 
chats with club office 
DiBerardino. 



oderator of the Italian Club, 
Pete Pino (center) and Joe 



Members of the Education Society are: (seated) 
Nick Dienna, Harry Friel, Jack Breza; (stand- 
ing) Jiin Campbell, Joe Woll, Bob Clark, John 
Volz, John Seitz, Charlie Greenberg and Jim 
Pennestri. 



In keeping with its socio-academic aims, the 
Circolo La Salliano (better known as the Italian 
Club) conducts various social programs, and offers 
cultural opportunities to all the students at La 
Salle College interested in Italian art, music and 
literature. 





Day school members of Le Cercle 
Claudel, the French Club, moderated 
by Dr. John Guischard. 



LE CERCLE CLAUDEL 



The French Club, under the supervision of Dr. 
John Guischard, promotes an interest among the 
students of La Salle College in the people, institu- 
tions, literature, art and civilization of France. 

Fine plays, spoken entirely in French, were pre- 
sented regularly during the past few years. The 
newly initiated series of Music Appreciation Hours 



developed into the biggest "during hours activity" 
on campus. The social highlight of this year pre- 
sented by the energetic French Club was the 
"Night in Paris" dance. 

There are two divisions of Le Cercle Claudel, 
one in the day school and the other in the night 
school. 



The Evening Division members of Le 
Cercle Claudel. 



30 





History Club members shown are: (seated) John Galloway, Bob Jones, Mr. 
Ugo Donini, Jim Campbell, and Nick Dienna; (standing) Ed Gibbons, Joe 
Sanquilli, Ted Walczak, Frank Healy, John Volz, John Burke, John Tucker, 
and John Pettit. 



HISTORY CLUB 



Mr. Ugo Donini (center), History Club 
moderator, scans a documentary book 
with officers Jim Campbell (left) and 
Bob Jones. 




INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 



Officers of the International Relations 
Club are: (1. to r.) John Grablewski 
(president) , Bill Henhoeffer (vice- 
president), and John Tucker (secre- 
tary-treasurer). 



Members of the International Relations Club are: (seated) John Grablewski, 
Mr. Robert Courtney (moderator), and John Tucker; (standing) Jim Camp- 
boJU frank- HeaJy.^ Al Butrym^ -Biil Henhoeffer, John Galloway, Bob Jones, 
and Lamont Cranston. 





Gathered around Sports Edi- 
tor Nick Dienna are Jim 
Dougherty, Larry Maguire 
and Joe Kane. With scissors 
and pencil they Tvent through 
mountains of photos and sta- 
tistics to compile their sec- 
tion, a sailent feature of the 
Explorer. 



Managing the entire project 
was Joe O'Grady, as Editor- 
in-Chief. A facility for ad- 
ministrating and a stickler 
for details, Joe's stewardship 
united the staff's sundry 
ideas and reduced them to a 
comprehensive "whole. 



THE 1956 EXPLORER 



The 1956 Explorer began functioning early in 195 5 with the appoint- 
ment of Joseph O'Grady as Editor-in-Chief. Since that day, Joe has 
worked with his staff to make the Annual a success. 

The myriad problems of composition, makeup and administration 
involved in publishing a yearbook are only fully appreciated when 
confronted. The Explorer staff solved these formidable problems with 
skill and dexterity. 

Through the past months, the major proposition in the minds of the 
staff was that a yearbook should serve as a record of college life and the 
outstanding events of the year. The conclusion, a successful yearbook, 
proceeded from the efforts of such men as Joe O'Grady, Tom Murphy, 
Jack Grablewski, Nick Dienna, Jim Breen and many others. 





During a relatively inactive moment a few days 
before the deadline, stafiF members submit final 
reports. Joe O'Grady's wit failed to disturb 
the contemplative Ted Miller, typing the faculty 
section. Jim Dougherty, in the background, 
convinces Bill Bickley on a last minute change. 



Editor Tom Murphy happily agrees 
with cohort Ted Miller's handling 
of his section. Tom's able man- 
aging of the Editorial Depart- 
ment proved to be indispensable 
during the days leading to pub- 
lication. 



Bringing in the wherewithal, 
Business Manager Jack Grablewski 
relied heavily on a cooperative 
class as his staff. Recording a few 
last subscribers. Jack smilingly 
balances the books. 





Photography Editor Karl Wrightman 
made the Explorer click picture-w^ise. 
Believing a picture is worth a thousand 
words, quiet Karl made professional 
selection of material. 



Brother Clementian, F.S.C., 
Explorer moderator, in his 
unmatched tranquil com- 
posure, directed the policy of 
the yearbook staff by his 
years of experience in the 
£eld. 



Meeting the deadline with a smile is the Explorer staff: Joe Kane, Nick 
Dienna, Bill Bickley, Jack Grablewski, John Volz, Tom Murphy, Pete Pino, 
Ted Miller and Tom Noone. In the rear are Jim Dougherty, Bob Jones and 
Al Butrym. Presiding at the desk is Joe O'Grady. 





GAVEL SOCIETY 



Members of this year's Gavel group 
are, seated, Peter Walsh, Secretary; 
William Henhoeffer, President; and 
Lawrence McAllee, Treasurer. In the 
back row are Frank Truczukowski, 
James O'Halloran, Hugh Logan, Vin- 
cent Konen, Joe Murphy and Harry 
Bradley. 



PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 



The Psychology Club offers an oppor- 
tunity to consider the problems of 
psychology more extensively than do 
the required courses but -without the 
emphasis on technical aspects required 
of psychology majors. In the quad- 
rangle, Mr. Rooney, 'moderator, dis- 
cusses member-subject's reactions, Tvhile 
Bob Rogers, president, offers criticism. 




The Gavel Society exists at La Salle College for 
the general purpose of drawing together all those 
men who are interested in argumentation and de- 
bate and for the specific purpose of providing 
membership for the intercollegiate debating teams 
representing the College. The society is nationally 
prominent and has been highly successful in inter- 
collegiate matches. 





THE MASQUE 




^} "^ 





Masque members in the auditorium 
are: 1st row, Dick Cavanaugh, John 
Pompa, Joe Kane, Ed Bresnan, John 
McCrane, Hank DeLuca, Dick Coulson, 
Jules Budny, and Jack Lombard; 2nd 
row, John Carney, Ed Fernandez- 
Cierra, Ed Reading, Jerry Loesch, Ed 
Langdon, John Larkin and Cle 
Feeney; 3rd row, Tom Wynne, Joe 
Murphy, Dave Immschweiler, Joe 
Valee, Frank Montague, Jim McCrane, 
and Ed Stein. 




The Masque Officers and Board of Governors are shown in nonchalant pose. 
In the first row, left to right.'are John Pompa, Joe Kane, John Mcfrane, Ed 
Bresnan and Hank De Luca; second row, Dick Cavanaugh, Dick Coulson, 
Jules Budny, Clem Feeny, John Carney and Jack Lombard. 



Try-outs for The Caine Mutiny are presided over by Mr. Rodden with an 
insight that tells in the final result. Selections proved difficult from the large 
group that answered the call. Casting John McCrane, on Mr. Rodden's left, 
as the Captain of the Caine, assured a dramatic success. 




The La Salle College Theatre, better known as the Masque, followed 
its tradition of bringing fine entertainment to students and friends by 
presenting two Broadway hits: The Cainc Mutiny and South Pacific. 

Masque President, Jack Lombard, can proudly match the successful 
theatrical "double-header" of his tenure with any in La Salle's history. 
Compliments and praise were well deserved for Mr. Dan Rodden, 
moderator, for his direction of both shows. 



In dress rehearsal for the Caine, Clem Feeny cross-examines -witness McCrane 
before Bill McCaffrey's Board adjudicating the case. Prosecutor Hank DeLuca 
listens attentively, while defendant Dick Cavanaugh seems to give up the 
ship. 






37 




The most recent production of 
the Brothers' Dramatic Club was 
the play "Stalag 17." The show 
centers about a German prison 
camp. Brother Ronald (right) 
portrayed a German spy and 
Brother Bernardine (left rear) 
played the soldier who uncovered 
the plot. 



BROTHERS' DRAMATIC CLUB 



A dramatics club in a Brothers' Scholasticate 
serves several purposes. The chief of these is 
recreational. Productions of plays, variety shows, 
and revues provide many evenings of enjoyment 
to the whole community. While staging plays the 



Brothers gain skill in the allied arts of lighting, 
make-up, and scenery. Later they will put these 
skills to use as moderators of school dramatic 
clubs. 





Another production this year Tvas the one act play "Gold Feathers." 
Brother George Paul (left) played a happy-go-lucky naval air 
cadet, while Brother Gerard Ronald was another cadet who was 
almost ""washed out." 



Brother Francis De Sales as "Stosh" tries un- 
successfully to rid the barracks of "that crumb 
Sefton," the German spy, while Brothers Bar- 
tholomew and Karl attempt to quell the dis- 
order. 



r 



\ 



i 




The AED group is, (1. to r.) 1st row, Bro. Christopher, 
moderator; Hank DeVincent, Len Thompkins, AI 
Strohlein; 2nd row, Andrew Holo-winsky, Frank 
Sterling, Paul Schneider, Dave Torpey; 3rd ro-w, Dick 



Monihan, Bob Rogers, Joe Pappano, Joseph Koehler; 
4th row, Joe Pintimalli, Bob Romaine, Jim Thomas, 
Charles Moloney; and last row. Bill Smith, Joe Peditto 
and Ray Vivacqua, 



The AED is the Pennsylvania Delta chapter of 
the National Pre-Medical Society. The primary 
goal of the fraternity is to encourage excellence 
in pre-medical scholarship. The Chapter's activi- 
ties include meetings where subjects of interest 
are discussed and lectured on by qualified men in 
the medical profession. 



ALPHA EPSILON DELTA 



Moderator Bro. ChristopKer ■with the 
officers of this year's AED group: Hank 
DeVincent, President; Len Thompkins, 
Historian; AI Strohlein, Secretary; Joe 
Peditto, Treasurer; and Ray Vivacque, 
Vice-President. 



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R ^^ VP^^'^^v Vr ■■ 






1^' ~' fm 




FABRICAN SOCIETY 



The Fabrician Society is an organization of stu- 
dents interested in the biological sciences. Orig- 
inating on the La Salle campus in 193 3, the Society 
has grown and succeeded in forming a chapter of 
the Alpha Epsilon Delta. With aims similar to 
those of the fraternity, lectures, medical papers 
and socials are among the numerous activities 
of the biologists. 



Fabrician Society ofiScers are: (1. to r.) Joe Kohler, 
Frank Troilo, Tony Battaglia, and (seated) Sherman 
Everlof. 



Members of the Fabrician Society. 





College Glee Club members are: front row, Jim Walsh (secretary), Bill Hall (president), and 
John GuUiford (treasurer); second row, Bob Ronco, Carl Brown, Don Petrilli, Joe Egan, Henry 
Zekanis; third row. Bob Lowery, Al Alfano, George Weckerly, Bob Molczan, Ray Giove, John 
Lee, Dave Beebe; last row, Charlie Wahl, Ron Connors, John Pompa, Dan Home, Dick Corbett, 
Tom Beckett, and Bob Haley. 



COLLEGE GLEE CLUB 



BROTHERS' GLEE CLUB 



Pictured left below, is the Anselm Hall Glee Club, under the 
direction of Brother Declan Kenneth, '5 5. Besides singing at 
periodic community entertainments, the Glee Club presents a 
program of Christmas Carols each year at St. Joseph's Hospital 
and at the Jenkintown branch of Strawbridge's. Below right, 
the Kinsmen, the Brothers' orchestra for popular and semi- 



classical music. In the picture are, left to right, Brother Ed- 
mund Pius, Brother Eric Leo, Brother Damian Philip, Brother 
Denis James, Brother Declan Malachy, Brother Declan Kenneth, 
Brother Gerard Ronald, and at the piano. Brother Dominic of 
Mary, 





Chymian Society members 

CHYMIAN SOCIETY 



officers of the Chymian Society shown 
with their moderator, Dr. Earth 
(right). 



In 1949, the Chymian Society was established on 
the La Salle campus for the purpose of fostering 
a greater interest in the field of chemistry and re- 
lated subjects. The society has since become a 
chapter of the Student Affihates of the American 
Chemical Society, a national organization, and a 
member of the Philadelphia Area Student Chemi- 
cal Association, a group of the colleges in this 
area which ofFer degrees in chemistry. 



NEWTONIAN SOCIETY 



Members of the Newtonian Society. 



The Newtonian Society is an academic organi- 
zation devoted to the interests of students in the 
physical sciences. The purpose of the Society is 
to promote the study and appreciation of physics 
both academically and as a vocation among the 
students of La Salle. 

The social activities of the Newtonian Society 
are usually held in conjunction with other campus 
organizations as well as with inter-collegiate 
groups; field trips, discussions, lectures and motion 
pictures highlight the varied functions of the 
academic year. 



\ 





EVENING DIVISION SCIENCE CLUB 



Officers of the Evening Division Science Club. 



During the past year, Brother Paul, Dean of 
the Evening Division, was approached by students 
who felt that a Science Club should be inaugurated 
to supplement the various science courses offered. 
The outcome was the Evening Division Science 
Club, which attempts to integrate various class 
material by guest speakers, films and discussions. 





Accounting Association members of the Day School 



ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION 

The Accounting Association whose aim is to 
foster better relations among accounting students 
and promote greater interest in the accounting 
profession, had for its president this year Peter 
Finnegan. Other officers were Frank Trent, Gerald 
Bowers, and Joseph Antal. 

The Association in co-operation with three other 
clubs promote and present the Annual SIAM 
Dance, the focal point of the second semester. 





Members of the Accounting Association of the Evening 
Division. 



Officers of the Day School Accounting Association. 



The members of the Industrial Relations Commission 
of the Day School pose with their moderator, Mr. 
Charles E. Halpin. 




V V* V 




Day School Commission Officers: Mr. Charles Halpin, stand- 
ing (moderator), Mr. Lee Morton (treasurer), Mr. John 
Palembas (president), and Mr. Richard Nolan (secetary). 



The members of the Evening Division of the Commission 
find time between classes to have this picture taken "with 
the Commission's moderator, Mr. Halpin. 



INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS COMMISSION 



The Industrial Relations Commission was 
founded in 1954, and immediately added to the 
extra-curricular life of the business majors. The 
Commission initiated a lecture program which 
brought to the La Salle College campus many of 
the leaders in the field of management and union- 
ism. In the past year, the Evening Division stu- 
dents formed their own division of the club, thus 
enabling the entire college to profit from the 
activities of the combined and larger club. Both 
groups are under the capable direction of Mr. 
Charles Halpin, the club's moderator. 




Members of the Day School Marketing Association 



Officers of the Marketing Association are shown in 
■with Mr. George Swoyer, moderator (third from left) 



The Marketing Association, under the direct 
guidance of Mr. George Swoyer, has a two-fold 
purpose: first, to foster an interest in the field 
of Marketing; and second, to promote high ethical 
standards within the field. Their primary purpose 
is accomplished by inviting to the college well- 
known authorities to present lectures and to direct 
discussion groups; while the secondary one is ful- 
filled by presenting Catholic ethical principles in 
the light of modern economic life, proving that 
the business man can be both successful and 
ethical. 

Evening Division members of the Marketing Association. 



MARKETING 
ASSOCIATION 



The Evening School formed the Marketing As- 
sociation during the 195 3-54 school year, and 
since that time has cooperated with the Day School 
Association in the promotion of their mutual pur- 
poses. Many lecture and social affairs were arranged 
through the combined effort of the leaders of both 
groups in such a way that the members of the 
entire association were able to attend and enjoy 
these functions. 








The members of the Society for the Advancement of Management manage to 
smile for their yearbook picture even though it was taken during the week of 
semester exams. 



Gathered around Dr. Goldner are the officers of the SAM: (I. to r.) John Wall (secretary), Thomas 
D'Arcy (treasurer), George Cooper (vice-president), and Paul James (president). 



SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT 



The members of the Evening Division 
of SAM pose for their picture after 
leaving one of Dr. Goldner's interest- 
ing classes. 





ALPHA PHI OMEGA 



Members of the APO are hidden workers who 
accomphsh so much and receive so httle credit for 
many of the activities that take place on the 
campus. This small group was primarily respon- 
sible for the huge success of the "You and Marriage 
Series," which was directly sponsored by the 
NFCCS, the Freshman Formal, the Day Student's 
Retreat, and many more. The list of their activities 
is endless; and thus, the members of Alpha Phi 
Omega fulfill their primary purpose — service. This 
Fraternity, which began on the La Salle Campus 
as a petitioning group in the Fall of 1954, received 
its official charter on May 17, 195 5. In the past 
year, they have enlarged their services under the 
leadership of Milton Miller and his competent 
officers. 



APO officers Ed Miller, Herb Keilman, Tony Catalan!, Jin 
McGovern, Jack Sechler, and Joe Kelly. 



Two members of the Fraternity are supervising the elections 
of Student Council. Tom Wynne and Alex Butrym (both stand- 
ing) can testify to the faithfulness of the members of the 
Fraternity. 




Members of APO are: (1. to r.) front ro'sv, Mike Pilla, Herb 
Keilman, Milton Miller, Anthony Catalani, and Jack Sechler; 
second row, William Lee, John Gall, Paul Santella, Edward 
Garr, George Elishewski, Joe Kelly, and Mike Hayduck; top 



row, Paul Geib, Jim McGovern, John Burke, Bill Kopec, Bob 
Ganter, Frank Magnan, Mike Dybicz, John Bengough, and 
Tom Cunningham. 




tJ^vt t t, t t J , ., 



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•-*-*, '^ J .^-«-.. ^■4>_ , i. '. 



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Moderator, officers, and members of the Caisson Club. 



CAISSON CLUB 




The Senior member.s of the Caisson Club meet in one of 
the Battery Day Rooms during their visit to Fort Sill. 
The meeting was held to elect a president of the club. 
Jesse Atkins, a New Jersey man, got the nod. 



Dick Lee, singing many of his hit tunes, thrilled the 
three hundred couples at the Military Ball -with his 
performance. Mr. Lee "was appearing at Sciolla's on 
the night of the Military Ball and accepted an invita- 
tion extended by the Caisson Club. 



The Caisson Club is an organization sponsored 
by the Reserve Officer's Training Corps. Its 
purpose is threefold: to maintain a high stand- 
ard of mihtary education in school, to encour- 
age and foster the essential qualities of good 
and efficient officers, and to promote friendship 
and good fellowship among the cadets. The Club 
sponsors the Annual Military Ball and other social 
and business functions for members of the 
R.O.T.C. Membership in this Club is limited to 
outstanding students in the second year basic 
course and the advanced course. The Caisson Club 
also presents the Outstanding Class Awards to 
those members of each class who fulfill the highest 
ideals of the Military Service. 




The officers of NFCCS are: (1. to r.) Joseph 
Harris (secretary), Peter Pino (president), 
Thomas Cunningham (vice-president) and James 
McDonald (treasurer). 




NATIONAL FEDERATION 

OF CATHOLIC 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 



The National Federation of Catholic College 
Students is an organization whose purpose is to 
acquaint students with their responsibility to the 
student and post-college communities and to con- 
tribute to Catholic leadership. 

Operating through a series of National and 
Regional Commissions, NFCCS coordinates and 
directs activities in such fields as Interracial Jus- 
tice, Mariology, the Press, Family Life, Inter- 
national Relations, Confraternity of Christian 
Doctrine, Industrial Relations, Liturgy, and others. 
NFCCS is one of the groups which fulfills the 
papal definition of Cathohc Action. 




Members of the NFCCS and 
their moderator. Brother D. 
Augustine, F.S.C. 



'• ""' "=■""" '=•■"^1/ Uf. c»„„i„. 



presents 

Six Lenten Lecto 



"YOU AND MARRIAGE 

T^'s ticket admits two 

Sundays 7;30 P.M. 



PS'-sons to all lectures. 

Student Lounge 



One Dollar 



'"'• ''*'' S'-^'sy m Courtship 

Panel Discussion 
^-- *♦". Ho„. Hepp;„... , „..,, 

°'- ^""i" P- Oulndlen 
^-- '3th. Money MeH.r. 

^;- & Mrs. Dennis Clerk 
John McDermott 
^-^CH,0.CI.,-M...^,,,^,„^ 

Mary Lewis CoaHey 
^-- 27,h. Morelity « Merr;.,. 

Pa- James Cummlskey 
''■ '''■ *='"'•;-«", You. Ho„. 
P"- Edoer Schmledeler 



Last year NFCCS sponsored ike first annual "You and 
Marriage" series. The talks presented were inspiring as 
-nrell as comprehensive. 



• © 



oo 



This picture portrays a small portion 
of the young men and ■women who at- 
tended the lectures which Tvere held 
in the Library Lounge and which were 
open to all w^ho w^ished to attend. Most 
of the Catholic colleges in the Phila- 
delphia area were well represented. 




Mr. James McDonald prepares to introduce Brother Vin- 
cent, the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, w^ho 
spoke on the "Psychology of the Sexes in Courtship," 




51 




Since the picture w^as taken on a drill day, the 
Fraternity Tvas able to demonstrate the influence 
of the R.O.T.C. in its membership. This group, 
the most active on campus, has been able to do 
much for La Salle. 



SIGMA BETA KAPPA 



Just nine short years ago a national Catholic 
organization known as the Gamma Chapter of 
Sigma Beta Kappa was formed on the La Salle 
campus. Since that time the SBK has grown into 
the most popular fraternal organization among 
the student body. 

The society is devoted to the development of 
character and campus leadership on the basis of 
a strong, sense of Christian morality. 

Secondarily dedicated to the advancement of a 
sound program of Catholic Youth Welfare, the 
Fraternity accomplishes untold merit at the Saint 
John Orphanage. 





In the course of the school year, the 
SBK sponsors two major dances. The 
above is a scene from the "Thanks- 
giving Dance" which is held each year 
in order to gather funds for the 
Christmas party at Saint John's Or- 
phanage. 



Some of the Officers of the Fraternity 
sit with their moderator Brother 
Damian: (1. to r.) Edwin Stein (secre- 
tary), Frank Healy (vice-president), 
Len Tully (Orphanage Director), and 
Bill Thomas (Mardi Gras chairman). 







The primary purpose of the Sigma Beta Kappa Fra- 
ternity is to foster Cathohc Action. Gamma Chapter in 
1948 proposed that the chapter fulfill this purpose by 
rendering services to the orphans of St. John's. Since 
that time the Fraternity brothers have devoted untold 
hours of toil so that they may bring into the little lives 
some rays of joy. It is most fitting that the climax of these 
activities would be the Annual Christmas Party. There 
Santa Claus is giving the orphans some of their presents. 



During the course of the evening the orphans -were given ice 
cream and candy. Some of the orphans are shown finishing 
their ice cream. 



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K^'i 



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The members of the Benilde Club pose with their officers. 



BENILDE GLEE CLUB 



The Benilde Club seeks to aid those who believe 
they may have a vocation or who are interested 
in hearing of the formation and works of the 
various religious orders that compose the clergy 
of the Catholic Church. The activities of the club 
set a fine example for the entire student body; 
and the deep religious spirit that motivates it is 
mirrored by its membership. 





The Benilde Club Officers (left to 
right) : Ronald Gendaszek, James 
Meyer, Joseph Sanquilli, and Daniel 
Beebe. 



Jack Wall, Tom Shawdis, John Burke, Bob Ronco, and Presi- 
dent Bill Bickley represent the Praefectus Club. One of the 



smallest groups on Campus, they are undoubtedly one of the 
most active for their size. 



The Praefectus Club is an organization com- 
posed of student managers of athletic teams. Serv- 
ice for one year as an apprentice manager, main- 
tenance of a high level of scholarship and a keen 
desire to work for the good of La Salle are among 
the requirements for membership. 

The blue blazer and shield are the distinctive 
identification of the organization. 



PRAEFECTUS CLUB 



VARSITY CLUB 



The purpose of the Varsity Club is the organi- 
zation of the lettermen in a society to advance 
and improve varsity and intramural athletics, to 
stimulate student interest, and to support athletics. 

Tom McGowan presided Over this year's edition 
of the organization and was assisted by Vince 
Szymkowski, Paul Misura, and George Harkins. 



The members of the Varsity Club 
letter sweaters. 



L. 



e shown adorned in their ■well-deserved 



^* 



1*e 



C^ 



Varsity Club officers George Harkins, 
Tom McGowen (president), and Paul 
Misura passing the time of day on the 
campus Quadrangle. 




ATHLETICS 



an eveaymin^ aikna k myseij, w/iaH/i0u aii Jeint^ anJ w/iai 
m0u afii sayint^; ana atlieci my wnole inienikn U i/iis, iliai iliou 
maysi jiiease (/!4e alone, ana neime/i Jesi^e nsft see& anyM/n^ oui- 
siJe sf cMe. 

(Pna as jofi itie say/n^s sfi asin^s oj gims, juJt^e 0/ neM/n^ 
fiasniy, neUm cusy i/iyseii w/M M/n^s W csmmUkJ io i/iy cane, 
anaf Mug may // ie keu<^fi^ aleui Mai Meu s/taii ie We 0/t 
seiaom a/sh/tleJ. 




Explorer Sports: Since its founding La Salle has al'ways recognized the value 
of good clean athletic competition. The consequences of the "all work and no 
play" adage have al'ways been kept in mind as sports have supplemented the 
academic diet for Explorers through the years. The happy medium between 
athletics and studies has constantly been maintained w^ith the accent in any 
athletic contest being always on playing the game as a gentleman rather than on 
■winning at any cost. Good sportsmanship and consideration for the other man 
have alw^ays been characteristic of La Salle athletes. They have w^on their 
share of honors. 




Mr. James J. Henry Director of Athletics: The coach of any athletic team is 

the man behind the athlete. And the man behind the coach is the Athletic 
Director. At La Salle this responsible position is filled very capably by a quiet 
spoken, devoted man who is both teacher and administrator. Mr. James J. Henry, 
always one to recognize the value of improving oneself, came to La Salle from 
Villanova, and has been serving Blue and Gold sports for more than 25 years, 
the last 2 1 of these in his present position as Director of Athletics. 



57 



BASKETBALL 




Won 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Won 



BASKETBALL, 1955-56 
Won 15, Lost 10 
Millersville 88-72 Won Pennsylvania 
69-5 8 Lost Seton Hall 
96-6 3 Won Richmond 
72-70 Lost Georgeto-wn 
95-81 Lost Fordham 
93-78 



Muhlenberg 
Albright 
Niagara 
Lafayette 
Bradley 

San Francisco 79-62 
Syracuse 75-72 

St. John's 85-79 

St. Joseph's 69-56 
West Virginia 8 7-71 Won Villanova 
Syracuse 71-64 Won Dickinson 

Lost Villanova 76-73 



Won Furman 

Lost Temple 

Won Muhlenberg 

Won Scranton 

Won West Chester 



64-52 
64-63 
74-59 
67-63 
84-69 
73-65 
60-57 
81-70 
82-51 
90-78 
71-64 
98-57 



Trainer Mario Vettere proved in- 
valuable psychologically as "well 
as physically. Well-Iiked and 
aways in high spirits Mario keeps 
team morale high when opponent's 
scores tend that way. 



"None of that stuff now!" Coach Jim Pollard seems 
to be saying as assistant Frank O'Hara looks on. A 
former Ail-American at Stanford and an All-Pro 
selection -with the powerful Minneapolis Laker teams 
of recent years, the "Kangaroo Kid" guided the 
Explorers to a winning 15-10 season in his first fling 
at coaching. Jim, who o"wns a lifetime scoring aver- 
age of 13.1 as a Pro, said that he had "learned more 
basketball this season than any boy on the La Salle 
squad." A perfect gentleman at all times and very 
different in temperament from his predecessor, Jim 
is respected and admired by every player and looks 
forward to a fine season next year. 
Frank "Wacky" O'Hara, captain of the Explorers' 
1954 NCAA championship team, did an excellent job 
as coach of the frosh as well as aiding Jim with the 
varsity. 



"Can I give you a band?" asks Muhlenberg's Clint Jeffries 
(3 6) as Franny O'Malley exhibits his "classic drive." The 
Mules' Bill Smith (45) comes over to lend one too. 
Despite a 24 point performance by Franny in this, the 
Explorers' Palestra opener, the Blue and Gold dropped a 
69-5 8 decision. Later in the season, however, La Salle 
evened things up, defeating the highly-rated Mules on their 
home court, 81-70. 




Vp for this one. Bob Ames seems to be reaching for the 
ceiling of the Lincoln High gym with his right hand push 
shot against Albright's Riddell (21) as Mike DePaul (14) 
watches the action. All of the Explorers got into the act 
as they walloped the Lions, 96-63. 



"Don't shoot'. Don't shoot!" pleads 
6'7" Tom Hemans (3 0) as Charley 
Singley lays one up against the 
NIT bound Niagara five at the 
Palestra. Watching intently are 
the Purple Eagles' Worosz (31) 
and Prechtl (32). The Explorers 
fought back valiantly from a 12 
point deficit in this one but just 
missed, 72-70. 





.vf^4at»&;y 




"O.K., left handed!" says Frank Blatcher, scor- 
ing two of his fourteen points as the Explorers 
shot a sizzling 53% to down NIT entry Lafay- 
ette, 95-81, at the Palestra. 




Blow, Blotv, Blow the ball down! San Francisco's 6' 10" AU-Amerlcan 
Bill Russell (6) seems prepared to blow the ball out of bounds as soon 
as Franny O'Malley lets it go. The Explorers battled the nation's No. 1 
team to a standstill for 34 minutes before succumbing to a late USF 
rally, 79-62. 



"This is called a jump shot, Bill," instructs Fran O'Malley as he 
buckets two of the 18 points he scored against the Dons. Bill 
Russell (6), Gene Brown (15), Bob Maples (14), and Al 



Lewis (5) pay strict attention while the Dons' Presseau (18) 
ignores the situation which took place in the Holiday Festival 
at Madison Square Garden, 



\- 






;.4 ' % -L 



jU^JJ i 



'/i^€ 



^ 0t$ 




Frank Blatcher as he by-passes Vinr 



"Vm going to have a ball" she 

Cohen (41) of Syracuse. Frank collared 28 points in two games against the 
Orangemen as the Blue and Gold proved superior 7 5-72 in the Holiday 
Festival and later, 71-64, at the Palestra. 




Basket Hangers. Charley Greenberg (11), Fran 
O'Malley (4), and Wally Fredricks (9) leap for 
a rebound against St. Joseph's at the Palestra 
as the Hawks' Ray Radziszewski (18) and Kurt 
Engelburt (19) are caught flat-footed. How- 
ever, the Hawks, city champions to be, sneaked 
by 69-56 as the Explorers just couldn't get 
started. 




Dance, Ballerina, Dance! Frank Blatcher out- 
jumps 6'10" Lloyd Sharrar (24) of West Vir- 
ginia to share a rebound, flanked by the visitors' 
Vincent (15), Barnett (11), and AU-American 
"Hot Rod" Hundley (33). In one of their, best 
performances of the year the Explorers swamped 
the NCAA bound Mountaineers, 87-71, at the 
Palestra. 



61 





Squeeze Play, Al Lewis (5) is caught between 
two Pirates named Gallagher (4) and Gaines 
(9) as teammate Bob Maples (14) and another 
Buccaneer, Richie Long (23) look on. Bob and 
Al split 20 points between them but the Ex- 
plorers dropped a heartbreaker, 64-65, to Seton 
Hall, another NIT entry on the La Salle sched- 
ule, at the Palestra. 



"Oh, so that's how you do 
it!" remarks Pennsylvania's 
Earl Killian (19) as Fran 
O'Malley lays one up. Jerry 
Nensel (15) of Penn seems 
about to call it a night while 
Charlie Eltringham (18) 
takes time out from doing 
push-ups to -watch the shot. 
The Explorers waltzed past 
the Quakers, 64-52, at the 
Palestra. 



"Let go or take off your 
glasses," says Frank Blatcher 
to emphasize his point to 
Georgetown's Dale Smith 
(14). Despite their spirit of 
determination the Blue and 
Gold continued their habit 
of losing the close ones, bow- 
ing to the Hoyas in overtime, 
67-63. Other Hoyas, Ken 
Pichette (17) and Joe Mis- 
sett (23), seem unwilling to 
argue the point as soph Ed 
Givnish (19), Fran O'Malley 
(4), and Bob Maples (14) 
stand by. 





Driving Lessons. Temple's abbreviated back- 
court duo of Guy Rodgers (5) and Hal Lear 
(6) pick up a few pointers from Bob Maples 
(14) as he glides past Owl Jay Norman (15) 
to notch a field goal. The Explorers, leading by 
nine points, failed to score in the final five 
minutes, enabling the nationally ranked and 
NCAA bound Owls to back in, 60-57. 

Between Rounds. A major factor in the Ex- 
plorers' loss to Temple w^as an injury to center 
Wally Fredricks in the last few minutes of the 
game. A stray Ow^l elbow made contact w^ith 
the La Salle center's left eye, bruising it seri- 
ously enough to cause him to leave the game. 
Here a physician applies medication as Trainer 
Mario Vettere and Ted Bronson lend assistance. 



Up J up J and away. Charlie 
Singley, a 12 point per- 
former, throws up a two 
pointer as Temple's "Tink" 
Van Patton (19) leaps fruit- 
lessly behind the shot. Owl 
co-captain "Hotsy" Reinfeld 
(17) grimaces as the Cherry 
and White seem headed for 
defeat, while Guy Rodgers 
( 5 ) admires Charlie's form. 







so ^ ^ V 111 




THE 195 5-56 EXPLORERS 
Front row, left to right: Charlie Singley, senior; Frank Blatcher, senior; Alonzo Lewis, junior; 
Tom Garberina, soph.; Fran O'Malley, senior, and Charlie Greenberg, senior. Second row, left 
to right: Ed Givnish, soph.; Bob Ames, senior; Charlie Eltringham, soph.; Wally Fredricks, junior; 
Bob Maples, senior; Jack Steele, soph.; Bill McGonigal, soph.; and Coach Jim Pollard. Soph. 
Gerry Grifiin w^as not present when picture w^as taken. 



Easy Does It. Charlie Singley tosses one in as Villa- 
nova's Jack Weissman w^aves to fans. Marty Milligan 
(behind Weissman) and Jimmie Smith (24) of Villa- 
nova give futile chase w^hile La Salle's Al Lewis (5) 
and Charlie Greenberg (11) w^atch confidently. The 
, Explorers, ahead throughout, breezed to a 71-64 
decision over the not so Wildcats at the Palestra. 




Get that ball! AI Lewis battles with Villanova's Jack 
Weissman (15) for possession as Charlie Singley (10) 
comes up fast to help out. Explorer Bob Maples (14) 
and Wildcat Tom Brennan (32) express wonderment 
at the proceedings. Some poor shooting by the Ex- 
plorers late in the game permitted the victory-starved 
■Main Liners to cop a close, 76-73 verdict. 




ROBERT AMES Roxborough High School 6'3» 181 

Games EGA FG AVE. FTA FT AVE. REB PTS. AVE. 

40 114 46 .428 42 29 .697 47 121 3.2* 

FRANK BLATCHER South Philadelphia H.S. 6'2" 190 

Games FGA FG AVE. FTA FT AVE. REB PTS. AVE. 

82 887 319 .360 217 164 .658 343 802 9.8 

CHARLES GREENBERG La Salle H.S. 6'2" 175 

Games FGA FG AVE. FTA FT AVE. REB PTS. AVE. 

82 714 253 .348 145 83 .596 326 505 7.5 ' 



ROBERT MAPLES York Community H.S. 6'5" 

Games FGA FG AVE. FTA FT 

83 635 264 .416 214 117 



FRANCIS O'MALLEY St. Rose H.S. 

Games FGA FG AVE. 

86 664 255 .402 



CHARLES SINGLEY 
Games FGA 
86 990 



175 














AVE. REB 


PTS. 


AVE. 










.524 455 


645 


8.2 










6'3" 180 














FTA FT 


AVE. 


REB 


prs. 


AVE. 






309 218 


.704 


699 


728 


9.6 






West Catholic 


H.S. 


6'3" 


175 








G AVE. 


FTA 


FT 


AVE. 


REB 


PTS. 


AVE 


54 .357 


309 


206 


.6 51 


470 


934 


10.6 




SOCCER 




An Ursinus goalie clutches the ball as 
Leo Rudnisky and Bobby Rumer of the 
home team watch with much interest. 
Ursinus w^on this one, 4-2, 



Goalie Hank DeVincent kicks away an opponent's attempted go 
Hank switched to goalie this year after having played forwa 
last year. 



Soccer Scores 

La Salle Opponent 

3 Lafayette College 1 

2 Elizabethtown Colleges 
2 Muhlenberg College- •• -3 

2 Ursinus College 4 

2 Phil. Textile Inst. 

1 U. of Pennsylvania 7 

West Chester S.T.C. 4 

2 U. of Delaware 3 




Eddie Suez leads the Ex- 
plorers goalward. The scene 
of action is the soccer field 
behind McCarthy Stadium. 
The Smithmen opened their 
season w^ith a 3-1 victory 
over Lafayette. 




Coach Joe Smith instructs his charges in the finer points of soccer play. This shull session took 
place during the early part of the season before the hooters met some of the finest teams in the 
east. The soccermen finished with a 2-6 record but three of the losses were by the slim margin 
of one goal. The hooters had a fine leader in Captain Hank De Vincent. 



In an action shot taken from the Ur- 
sinus game Bobby Graham and Jack 
Smith battle for possession of the ball. 
The game was one of six played at 
La Salle's home field during the season. 




Goalie Hank DeVincent was one of the standouts on 
this year's soccer team. Hank, a senior, proved his 
versatility by playing well the different positions 
assigned him by Coach Joe Smith. 



67 



SWIMMING 



For the past two seasons, the Explorer swimming team 
has been nearly perfect. The brilHant coaching of Joe 
Kirk and a wealth of exceptional talent has led to twenty- 
two consecutive dual wins, a runner up position in the 
195 T Metropolitan Championship and the Number One 
spot in the 1956 edition. 

What makes the glory all the more shining is that Joe 
Kirk is confronted with a group comprised of sophomores 
and juniors Ernie Gash, Jim Sheehan, Frank "Buzz" 
Kohler and Terry McLaughlin and sprinkled with seniors 
Joe Hockenbrook and Paul Misura. 

The 1956 Champions of Philadelphia can look forward 
to more honor and glory in the coming years because the 
spirit and technique will improve. 




Coach Joe Kirk tries out his OTvn techniques in the Villa- 
nova pool after the Explorers tankmen had swept the 
Metropolitan Swimpiing Championships. Tom Devlin (L.) 
and Joe Hockenbrock (R.) look on. 



Back Row: Joe Kirk, Gene Sharp, Terry McLaughlin, Don DiLascio and Joe Hockenbrock. Front Row: Joe Lavin, John 

Schmidt, Cal Walters and Ernie Gash. Middle Row: Frank Misura, Paul Misura, Tom Devlin and Jim Sheehan. 

Kohler, John Campanelli, Mitch Sukalski, John. Schmidt, Joe 




( i 



^ 



) 



\ 




Sheehan, Gash and Kohler receive awards from 'Bud' Dudley o^ 
Villanova after placing one-two-three in the fifty yard freestyle in 
the Metropolitan meet. Time was 0:23:1, a new record. 





One of the better up and coming divers in the Philadelphia 
area is Mitch Sukalski shown here giving a demonstra- 
tion of his wares. Mitch placed high in the Metropolitan 
Championships. 



Ernie Gash gets a good jump in a practice joust. Gash teams 
with Sheehan, Kohler and McLaughlin as Philadelphia's most 
devastating sprint and middle distance quartet. 





The start of the 440 yard freestyle shows Willis of Pcnn, 
J. Misura of La Salle, Coggins of Penn and Lavin and 
Devlin of La Salle going to work. Lavin, Misura and 
Devlin were two-three-and four. W. Coggins won in 
5:12. 



69 




Pickin' Them Up and Layin' 
Them DoTvn: That is just 
w^hat the La Salle harriers 
are doing, as they romp 
through the park in prepara- 
tion for the year's meet ac- 
tion, ably led by the main- 
stays of the team, "The Earl 
of Eldridge" and George 
Harkins. 



CROSS-COUNTRY 



Park^vay Turn: Earl Eldridge takes a curve as 
he leads an unidentified Penn runner around the 
La Salle home X-country grind. This was one 
of the many times when the "Earl" led the field 
home in dual meets. Eldridge, fresh from the 
clutches of Uncle Sam, led the Wetzler-men to a 
three and three record in dual meets and third 
place in the MAC Championships. 




f-fv/ 




Three Points of View: 
Swoyer, dubiously surveying 
the terrain (as any good 
Marine) ; Bronson, the man 
of casual distinction, (what 
publicist isn't); Wetzler, 
with notebook in hand, the 
anxious mentor waiting for 
his boys to come home. 



Oct. 
La S; 

Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 

Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



CROSS COUNTRY SCHEDULE 

7 Quintagonal Meet between St. Joseph's, 
lie, Penn, Temple and Haverford. 
(Third place, 79 points) 

12 57 Villanova 18 

[8 44 St. Joseph's 19 

16 20 Temple 3 5 

1 27 Penn 29 

4 3 3 Westchester S.T.C 24 

8 1 8 Lafayette 3 7 

1 1 MAC Championships 

(Third place, 113 points) 



The 19 56 Explorer 
Rifle Team 
Back Row: Harrell, Fceny, 
Mcllhenny and Gruber. Mid- 
dle Row. Sinclair and Camp- 
bell. Front Row. O'Rourke, 
Fraley and Reading. 




Drawing bead on three different targets are Jack Harrell 
(standing) and Clem Feeny (left) and George Sinclair 
(right). This was taken during the St. Joseph's match 
which the Explorers took by the score of 13 37 to 1297. 



La Salle's Rifle Team, coached by Major Her- 
bert Fleck, has come out of the doldrums of the 
past seasons to provide some interesting competi- 
tion for the rest of the college marksman squads. 

The team is made up of several veterans in 
Clem Feeny, Jack Harrell, George Sinclair and 
Ed Reading. Included in the team are marksrrien 
O'Rourke, Gruber, Campbell, Fraley and Mc- 
llhenny. 



La Salle has faced top notch opponents like 
Valley Forge Mihtary Academy, Penn N.R.O.T.C, 
Villanova, Temple, Penn Military College and St. 
Joseph's. 

While rifle competition is a comparatively new 
sport at La Salle, the teams fielded seem to be 
getting better and better and that means trouble 
for the opponents. 



71 




LAST MINUTE ADVICE 
Coach Tom Curran (left) gives last 
minute instructions to one of his many 
experimental crews. (Left to right) 
Frank McCloskey, John Dever, John 
Bloxsom, Bill Fynes, Gene Marketa, 
Romeo Boyd, Bob Morro, Vince Cyzm- 
kowski, and coxs\\^ain Johnny Seitz. 



CREW 



THE PHILADELPHIA OPENER 
La Salle's varsity eight open up 
a length lead on the big eight 
from American International Col- 
lege. The Blue and Gold paddlers 
(left foreground) won this race 
with comparative ease. This may 
be the sight on May 12 when the 
Dad Vail Trophy Race will be 
held on the Schuylkill. 



■\ 



THE JUNIOR VARSITY 
From left to right Gene Marketa, Tom Noone, John Galloway, Bill Fynes, Ed Haas, Herm 
Philips, Dick Flynn, Herb Dorchsbrung and (in front) Tommy Loschiavo. 









THEY ARE GENTLEMEN AND SCULLERS! 
The 1956 Explorer Crew are: Back Row: Johnny Seitz, John Dever, Bob Morro, Romeo Boyd, 
John Bloxsom and coach Tom "Bear" Curran. Front Row: Jerry Heffernan, Jim Garvin, Vince 
Syzmkowski and Frank McCloskey. 



Tom Curran, better known as "the Bear," makes 
no bones about the fact that he wants the Dad 
Vail Trophy back in the hallowed halls of La Salle 
College. The Dad Vail Trophy is symbolic of 
national supremacy in rowing among small col- 
leges. 

Curran's crews are on the river every day, rain 
or shine, at the unearthly hour of 6:4 J A.M. and 
for a return dose at 4:00 P.M. 

As this book goes to press, the varsity eight 
has chalked up three wins in four tries. On a 
Florida junket, the Explorers whipped Florida 
Southern and Tam^pa and lost, in a stunning upset, 
to a good Rollins College eight. Later in April, 
the Blue and Gold gave American International 
a lesson in the art of rowing on the Schuylkill 
River by winning by a length and a half. 

The junior varsity eight and the Frosh eight 
have shown good form in their outings. Thus, 
after the season, "The Bear" may hibernate and 
dream of Dad Vail Trophies for many years to 
come. 



COACH TOM "BEAR" CURRAN 
"The Bear" scans the murky waters of the Schuylkill 
River. Does he see another Dad Vail Trophy? 








TRACK 



Frank Wetzler, coach of the Cross Country and Track teams, 
believes in conditioning his men to the real fine edge. It pays 
off, too. La Salle's cindermen have been M.A.C. champs in 
three of the last four years. 




The 1956 edition of the La Salle track team looks like 
a sure bet to repeat as Middle Atlantic Conference Cham- 
pions. Having won three of the last four top spots, Coach 
Frank Wetzler will field of group of seasoned veterans 
paced in the track events by Mark Harmon, Paul Mita, 
Vic Gavin and a few others. In the field Wetzler has all 
around man Tom McGowan. 

The schedule of meets sees La Salle facing such formid- 



able foes as St. Joseph's, St. John's, Villanova and West 
Chester. As a matter of course, the cindermen will partici- 
pate in three big meets where they will defend honors 
previously taken. The first is the Penn Relays at Franklin 
Field in late April and followed later by the M.A.C. 
championships in mid-May and the IC4A affair in New 
York at the end of May. We wish Frank Wetzler and the 
entire team the best of luck. 





KANGAROO, Mark Harmon, Bob Kraemer, Paul Mita, George- 
town hurdler, and Vic Gavin (L. to R.) meet their first 
obstacle in a sprint race. All Explorer men pictured above 
iorm one of the best sprint quartets in the East. All break 
records with regularity. 



My Achin' Dogs: Unidentified Explorer broad jumper returns to 
the sidelines as interested La Salle onlookers check next entry. The 
broad jump is one of Coach Wetzler's fortes. 



Jack Lynch goes over the bar. Top height has been 12' 6" to date. 




J.A.T.O.: Mark Harmon, rnnner ex- 
traordinary, turns on the fire for a 
jet assisted take off in the high jump. 








Schedule of Meets 
Saturday, April 21 

West Chester Home 

Tuesday, April 24 

Temple Home 

Friday, April 27 

Penn Relays Franklin Field 

Saturday, April 28 

Penn Relays Franklin Field 

Saturday, May 5 

Lafayette Away 

Tuesday, May 8 

St. Joseph's Home 

Friday, May 11 

M.A.C. Championship Reading 

Saturday, May 12 

M.A.C, Championship Reading 

Tuesday, May 15 

Villanova Home 

Saturday, May 19 

St. John's Home 

Friday, May 2 5 

1C4A New York 

Saturday, May 26 

1C4A New York 




THE EXPLORER MOUND STAFF 
Jim Gross, Jack Catanio, John Bengough, and Bob Rumer with Coach Frank Hoerst look 
like a menacing group as they pose for the picture. Gross, Rumer and Catanio paced La Salle 
to a 10-2 verdict over Haverford in the opening. The trio whiffed 15 men. 



BASEBALL 




SLAM BANG TRIO 
Ed Czerniakowski, Joe Toth and Ail-American Hank 
De Vincent are Coach Hoerst's big batsmen. Czernia- 
kowski and Toth are neTvcomers ■while De Vincent is 
playing his third year. 



BALLET SPLIT COMIN* UP 

Charlie McGee, now a veteran performer, show^s his wares 
during last year's Temple Game. McGee has been split- 
ting his first sack duties with pitching to help out Hoerst'. 
moundsmen. 



^ 



76 





A TRY FOR TWO! Ed Filliben gives a demonstration of his 
short stop moxie as he gets ready to fire to first. This newcomer 
can give good showings at the plate, too. 



PICTURE OF AN OWL ASLEEP! 
Charlie McGee has a Temple man on the ropes and finally 
out on a close play at first. McGee took over for gradu- 
ated Lucia and divides his chores with Jack Catanio 
at the initial sack. 



FIRST BASE OR PITCHING MOUND? 
Jack Catanio, left, and Charlie McGee, right, discuss pitching and first base duties. Jack*s 
forte is pitching while Charlie*s is on the bag. Very versatile fellows! 




POWER DRIVE 
Hank De Vincent, an All-American for the 
Explorer nine last year, exhibits his swing as 
he sends outfielders a lookin' for the ball. 






TOSSIN' ASPIRIN TABLETS? 
Bobby Rumer, pitcher for the Explorer nine tosses 
a high hard one against Drexel, Bern Stuski is the 
I catcher. 



!?'''*''''''y'*'^STT 





t 



.J , 






THE WAY THE BALL BOUNCES! 
Jerry Sheehan scores on a miscue by the Haverford catcher to help 
La Salle score opening day victory 10 to 2 on McCarthy field. 



78 



COURTNEY'S CLOUTERS CLIP CRO- 
CUSES: Eddie Griffin, Ed Higgins and Bill 
Goetz, (L. to R.) get in some practice 
swings before the match. The veteran team 
hopes to improve last year's 2-10 record. 




Reading from left to right 
are the members of the Blue 
and Gold Golf Team. Back 
Row. Coach Bob Courtney, 
Ed Griffin, Ed Higgins and 
Joe Sheeney, Front Kotv: 
Bobby Deck, Dave Besselman 
and Bill Goetz. 



-','*?^fl 




INTRAMURALS 



"Don't Crowd Please," says one of the Gold 
League gridmen as three mates go up for a pass. 
Intramural football seems to be the most popular 
of tbs non varsity sports. 



BALLET de McCARTHY FIELD is portrayed by 
members of the Intramural Blue League. The 
contestants are reaching for a long toss Tvhich 
unfortunately eludes both of them. (Ball it; 
upper right corner. ) 



"I SHOULD HAVE STOOD IN BED" seems to 
be the sentiments of Blue League passer as he 
can't find his receivers. He also finds that after 
getting past one man there's trouble sweeping 
in from the right. 



ALPHONSE-GASTON? Two Gold League de- 
fenders look on somew^hat helplessly as Ed 
Givnish, of the basketball team, pulls in a spot 
pass. Another duo tries to intercept but find 
"their feet too big." 



80 



MEMO: INTRAMURALS 

While academic work takes up the better part of a 
student's life at La Salle, intramural sports gives the boys 
a little chance to work off the excess energy. 

It would be fitting to salute Joe Kirk, coach of the 
championship swimming team, and commissioner of the 
intramural program. Too few people realize that the co- 
ordination of many teams in the fields of basketball, soft- 
ball and football is an extremely tedious job. Mr. Kirk 
has done the chore with nary a gripe. It is evidence that 
"Jolly Joe" is a master at handling men. 

One would be surprised to find that some of the games 
played on the field behind Benilde Hall and on the courts 
of the gym produce what might be termed "pretty fair 
athletes." No team is overmatched for the players them- 
selves hold stretegy meetings to cope with their opponents. 
To the players, it is serious. To Joe Kirk, it is a job. But 
it's a job that pays off in a high degree of sportsmanship. 




ONE FOR THE OUTER GARDENS: The shades of Gerhig 
can be seen in this mighty swat in an intramural Softball game. 
Batter picked up two bases on this clout. 




REQUIESCANT IN PACE 

With this page we lay to rest a great year in athletics. It 
has been difficult to choose the most thrilling of sports experi- 
ences for the past year. It would be more difficult to compress 
four years into these twenty-four pages. 

We leave behind us pages of records, many trophies, and 
certificates of profitiency in sports. Those of us who played 
now lay down the basketballs, tennis racquets, golf clubs, base- 
ball bats, oars, soccer shoes, and rifles. Those of us who 
watched lay down our scorecards, press clippings and scrap- 
books. We will never forget the shrieks of the crowd, bat 
striking ball, the sound of human body against water and 
the bullets boring into targets. 

The pages of this book, like the pages of the scorecards and 
press clippings, will turn yellow with age. The uniforms may 
lie in lockered repose. Yet our memories will carry us back 
to those good afternoons and yes, to those bad days when 
every ball took the wrong bounce. 

To the coaches, players and sport directors, the spectator 
and student, Grantland Rice had these words: "For when the 
One Great Scorer comes to write against your name. He writes 
not — that you won or lost — but how you played the game." 

. . . and Thirty 
Nick Dienna 
Sports Editor. 



Many gruelling contests have been fought for 
the intramural basketball crown in the College 
field house. Basketball has the largest response in 
participation among the students. 



81 



FEATURES 

"(/f i^sffJ lije ma&es a man wise accmm^ 
k ^&cl, mJ exjtefii in mmij ininp. " 



"Howdy, Clem!" Stage settings and viva- 
cious Thesbians claim the limelight many 
times throughout the school year. 



"Who's next, please?" The campus tonsorial parlor is always a busy thorough- 
fare when feature attractions sponsored by campus organizations are on the 
week-end program. 





E 




^JJS^i*? 




Dances, dances, and more dances provide the students of La Salle with "cool" memories of 
"real gone" times. 




When "Old Sol" breathes his warm rays on Philadelphia, picnics are in order for the student 
body. Watch out, Fairmount Park! Here comes La Salle. 



83 



Headquarters Battery steps off 
into column for the Annual In- 
spection and Review, the culmina- 
tion of months of intensive drill. 
The entire regiment, including 
Drill Team and Band, participate 
in this Review. 



The Color Guard marches smartly 
down the track, leading the Sec- 
ond Battalion on to the Parade 
Ground. 




Filing into Holy Child Church for 
the Annual Mass for the Feast of 
St. Barbara, La Salle's ROTC Unit 
displayed proficiency at drill for 
.shioners and friends. 




During the 195 5 Summer Camp, 
Brother Daniel Bernian, repre- 
senting the administration of La 
Salle College, visited Fort Sill, 
Oklahoma, on invitation of the 
United States Army. The high- 
light of his trip was the Annual 
Cadet Banquet which was held at 
the Officers' Club of Fort Sill. 



Cadets David Imsch-weiler (far 
right) and Edward Stein are 
pointing out some aspects of the 
Artillery Mission in modern -war- 
fare to Brother Daniel Bernian. 
Lieutenant Colonel Stephen 
Uchrek (left), the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics at 
La Salle College, looks on. 



Each year the Department of 
the Army sends an Inspect- 
ing Party to our campus. All 
aspects of the ROTC Pro- 
gram are carefully scrutin- 
ized by this group of Reg- 
ular Army Officers. In the 
above picture, the Cadet 
Band is performing one of 
their intricate movements, 
much to the satisfaction of 
the Inspecting Officers. 




BACK TO SCHOOL 



The cafeteria, at a quiet moment dur- 
ing Fall registration, finds many en- 
joying that good food for which La 
Salle is famous. Registration is the 
first official activity of the school year, 
one ■which everyone would rather by- 
pass because of the renowned "red- 
tape". 





On the Monday following registration, the 
students arrive on Campus for their first 
class day of the year. One of the most 
familiar sights, and the happiest in the 
minds of the students, is the class break. 
Here, the students are shown at that famous 
period of the day, still enjoying the warm 
weather and discussing tales of by-gone 
summer days. 



Back to work again and "all is quiet on the Western 
front." Most students utilize the tranquility of the 
College library for absorbing knowledge for the mid 
semester examinations. 




The annual Harvest Dance, sponsored by the Student Council^ 
■was held in the main ballroom of the Broadwood Hotel. Senior 
Ted Friel and his fiancee appear to be involved in an intricate 
movement of a jitterbug number. 





Jack Lombard, president of the Student Council, presents 
a w^ord of thanks to the hundreds M>^ho attended the 
annual Harvest Dance. 



A typical examination arrangement, the students concen- 
trate and write simultaneously for the full lengh of the 
period since time is priceless during the 





Edward Stein prepares to announce the winner of the "Queen of the 
Military Ball" contest. Ed seems to be enjoying this "difficult" task. 



MILITARY BALL 





Brother Stanislaus, the President of La Salle, 
congratulates Miss Mary Ann Haas after bestow- 
ing the Crown of Roses, the symbol of her reign. 



The Junior Cadet Officers, serving as Guidon Bearers, and 
the Color Guard stand at attention while the names of 
the Senior Officers and their dates are announced. This 
was the climax of the Military Ball. 



Vince Carson, the Philadelphia-born crooner, sings his hit 
tune, "My Possession," to the satisfaction of the Military 
students. 



88 




A variety show presented by the Class of 1956 was Insti- 
tuted in 1954 and became known as the '5 6 Follies. Co- 
directors Bob Rogers and Bill McCaffrey spent long hours 
in planning the colossal productions which have been finan- 
cially and entertainingly successful each of the three years. 
Latent talent was discovered within this year's graduating 
class and it was rendered unselfishly by all who participated 
in the shows. 





Bob Rogers and Bill McCaffrey (both 
on stage), co-directors of the third 
annual '56 Follies, iron out a musical 
arrangement with pianist Rosemary 
Peacock. 



Either Jules Budny is of giant propor- 
tion or the horn he is blowing belongs 
to a tot. Anyway the Six Nosebleeds 
appear to be ripping apart the place 
for the audience while doing a panto- 



It looks like "Miss" Dewey Clark is 
making a big hit with the boys while 
singing "Sh-Boom." 



"Charlotte" DelMarco displays the 
latest in beach wear at the '56 Follies' 
fashion show. 



Jack Bloxsom was taken by surprise in 
the shower when the sponsor adver- 
tised tub enclosures for the bathroom 
during a take-off on a teen-age tele- 
vision show. 



"I hope they don't recognize me," Joe 
Kohler is probably thinking as he 
models a colorful evening go-wn. 



To"wering Jerry Griffin seems to be out 
of his category when he dances -with 
petit Joan CuUinan in the '56 Follies. 




'56 FOLLIES 





89 



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l^' 



The Quadrangle provides the student 
rctreatants with an inspiring and 
peaceful route for spiritual reading. 
The annual three day retreat is com- 
posed of a dialogue Mass each day, 
followed by sermons, readings and 
Benedictions. 



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1^^ 



The annual Lenten Retreat is held on the first three days in Holy Week. The ^ 
students are given the opportunity to concentrate on the Passion and Death ^; 
of Christ and His Resurrection from the grave. || 

Rev. Mark Heath, O.P., College Chaplain, under whose leadership the 
Retreat is conducted, Vi'orks efficiently in planning the complex and timely 
schedule. Father Heath adds a great deal of interest to the program by acquiring 
Dominican priests from various parts of the country to officiate and lecture 
at the religious services. 

The Lenten Retreat, an inspiration to all, helps recall the words by Thomas 
a Kcmpis: "Be devout and quiet and Jesus will stay with thee." 



LENTEN RETREAT 



The stone grotto of Our Lady of 
Lourdes on the edge of the Quad- 
rangle is frequented by students dur- 
ing the retreat. The rosary is fea- 
tured at the grotto during the annual 
Holy Week 




In April, 1954, the Class of '56 initiated Sophomore 
Week at La Salle. The above picture was taken dur- 
ing the Sophomore Picnic, held on Sunday at Blue Bell 
Park. 




Major Morris, a member of the Department of Military 
Science, shows his form in the Student-Faculty Softball 
game. "Big Tom" Murphy is behind the plate. 



SOPHOMORE WEEK 



JUNIOR WEEK 



Bill McCaffery gives the Junior Week crowd a few 
good laughs. Bill has appeared in every Variety Show 
the class has presented and has been the star in many 
of them. 



The climax to Junior Week was the Junior Prom, held 
at the Philadelphia Rifle Club. The night served as a 
fitting close to" one of the most successful of Junior 
Weeks. 








Brother Damian Richard, F.S.C. Brother Daniel Lawrence, F.S.C. 



Brother Daniel Timothy, F.S.C. 




M 



-\ 




MASTER OF 



Brother David Alban, F.S.C. 



Brother David Thomas, F.S.C. 



Brother Declan Kenneth, F.S.C. 



Brother Dominic Martin, F.S.C. 




-^ •* 



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92 






Brother Emilian Victor, F.S.C. 



Brother Ephrem Justin, F.S.C. 



Brother Eric Leo, F.S.C. 



ARTS-RELIGION 




Brother Eugene Anthony, F.S.C. 



Brother Eugene Patrick, F.S.C. 



Brother Francis Bernardine, F.S.C. 



Brother Gerard Owen, F.S.C. 






93 



ROBERT C. AMES 



B.A. 

Basketball 1,2,3,4. 



DAVID L. ANDREWS 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Benilde Club 1,2; Sociology Club 3,4; Alpha Phi Omega 3,4; 
Education Society 4. 



BROTHER FREDERICK ANTHONY, F.S.C. 
B.A. Education — Physics 



BROTHER DAVID ARNOLD, F.S.C. 

Education — Physics 




Top Row: 

BROTHER FRANCIS BARTHOLOMEW, F.S.C. 
B.A. Education — English 

Out-of-T owners 1,2, 

EDMUND ALBERTS BATEMAN, JR. 
B.A. Pre-Law 

Sociology Club 2,3; Spanish Club 1,2; Glee Club 2,3; Explorer 
3,4. 



B.A. 



Biology 



ANTHONY BATTAGLIA 
Fabrician Society 2,3,4 (Vice-President). 

BROTHER DAVID BERNADINE, F.S.C. 
B.A. Education — English 

Dean's List 2,3,4; Pi Delta Phi 4; Liturgy Round Table 1,2,3. 



Bottom Ro'w: 

WILLIAM J. BICKLEY 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Baseball 2 (Assistant Manager), 3,4 (Manager) ; Basketball 
2 (Assistant Manager) , 3,4 (Manager) ; Praefectus Club 3 (Sec- 
retary-Treasurer), 4 (President); Education Society 3,4. 



JOHN R. BISHOP 



B.A. 

Economics Club 3,4. 



JOHN EDWIN BLOXSOM 
B.A. Sociology 

Sociology Club 3, 4 (President); Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; 
Varsity Club 3, 4; Crew 2,3,4 (Captain). 



B.A. 

Neivton 



J. THOMAS BOYER 

Society 4 (Treasurer) . 



Physli 



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Top Row: 



BROTHER DAMIAN BRENDAN, F.S.C. 

Education — French 



EDWARD T. BRESNAN 
B.A. Economics 

Masque 3, 4 (Vice-President). 

JOHN G. BREZA 
B.A, Education — Social Studies 

Collegian 3, 4 (Advertising Manager) ; History Club 3, 4; 
International Relations Club 3, 4; N.F.C.CS. 1,2,}, 4. 

ALEXANDER JOHN BUTRYM 
B.A. Education — English 

Collegian 1,2,} (Copy Editor}, 4 (Editor-in-Chief); Explorer 
},4 (Publicity Director}; International Relations Club },4; 
Education Society 3,4 (Treasurer). 



Bottom Row^: 

JAMES P. CAMPBELL 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Sigma Beta Kappa 1,2,3,4; Education Society 3,4; Interna- 
tional Relations Club 3,4; History Club 3,4 (Vice-President). 



BROTHER FIDELIS CELESTINE, F.S.C. 

Education — Latin 



BROTHER GILES CHRISTOPHER, F.S.C. 

Education — German 



CHARLES A. CLARK 



B.A. 

Sociology Club },4. 



Sociology 




DEWEY P. CLARK 

B.A. Spanish 

Eos LaSallanos 1 (Treasurer), 2 (Vice-President), 3 (Presi- 
dent), 4; Le Cercle Claudel },4; Masque 1. 



ROBERT G. CLARK 
B.A. Education — English 

Sigma Beta Kappa 1,2,}, 4 (President}. 



DONALD F. COPELAND 
B.A. Pre-Law 

Praefectus Club 1; Le Cercle Claudel 2,3; Gavel Society 3. 



RONALD S. GROSSMAN 
B.A. Sociology 

Mr. and Mrs. Club 3,4 (President); Sociology Club 3, 4 (Vice- 
President) . 



95 



ROBERT T. DECK 
B.A. Mathematics — Physics 

Newtonian Society 2,3; Mathematics 2,3,4 (President) ; Coif 
},4. 

HENRY GEORGE DeVINCENT 
B.A, Biology 

Class President 1; Varsity Club 2,3,4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 
2,3,4 (President); Baseball 2,3,4; Soccer 2,3,4 (Captain); 
Track 2,3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4; ROTC Band 1,2. 

JOSEPH V. DI BERARDINO 
B.A. Economics 

II Circolo LaSalliano 1,2,4 (President) ; Gavel Society 4; Eco- 
nomics Club 4. 

NICHOLAS PATRICK DIENNA 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Collegian 1,2,3,4; Explorer 3,4 (Sports Editor); History Club 
4; Circolo LaSalliano 1 (Secretary), 2, 3 (President), 4; 
N.F.C.CS. 4; Education Society 3,4. 

FRANCIS M. DONAHUE 
B.A. Chemistry 

Chymian Society 2,3,4 (Treasurer); Caisson Club 3,4. 

THOMAS FRANCIS DOONER 
B.A. 

Fabrician Society 3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 



Biology 





JAMES JOSEPH DOUGHERTY 
B.A. English 

Le Cercle Claudel 1,2; International Relations Club 3,4; Gavel 
Society 3; Collegian 2,3,4; Weber Society 2; Explorer 4. 



B.A. 

S.A.M. 3,4. 



B.A. 



JOHN JOSEPH DOUGHERTY 



LEON E. ELLERSON 



Mathematics Society 2 (Secretary), 

ANTHONY FRANCIS ESPOSITO 
B.A. 

Chymian Society 2,3,4 (Vice-President). 

ANTONIO LAWRENCE FALZARANO 
B.A. 
Chymian Society 3,4; Mr. and Mrs. Club 3,4. 

JOHN P. FARRELL 

B.A. Education — English 

Le Cercle Claudel 2,3; Education Society 3,4; Adoration So- 
ciety 4. 



Chemistry 



Chemistry 




EDUARDO FERNANDEZ-CERRA 



B.A. 

Masque 2,}, 4. 



English 



HARRY L. FRIEL, JR. 
B.A. Education — Biology 

N.F.C.C.S, 1; Education Society 3, 4 (President') ; Executive 
Board 4. 



LEO JOSEPH GEORENO 



B.A. 

Italian Club 4; Intrmaurals },4. 



JOSEPH DOMENIC GIOVANETTI 
B.A. 
Circolo LaSalliano 1,2,3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 



Biology 



JOHN GINYARD 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Education Society 2,3,4; Sociology Club 2,3; Psychology Club 2. 



MANUEL GOMEZ, JR. 
B.A. 
Basketball 1,2,3; Newtonian Society 4. 



Physics 



EDWARD K. GORAL 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Sociology Club 2; Education Society 3,4. 

JOHN T. GRABLEWSKI 
B.A. Government 

Explorer 3 ,4 (Business Manager) ; International Relations Club 
3,4 (President); History Club 3,4 (Secretary); Collegian 3,4. 

CHARLES W. GREENBERG 
B.A. Education — German 

Basketball 1,2,3,4; Varsity Club 2,3,4. 



TEOFIL GROCHOWSKI 



Languages 



DANIEL JOHN HART 
B.A. Sociology 

Sociology Club 3,4; History Club 4; N.F.C.C.S. 4. 

JAMES JOSEPH B. HATCH 
B.A, Education — English 

Baseball 1,3,4; Varsity Club 3,4; Education Society 3,4; Intra- 
murals 1,2; Sigma Beta Kappa 3,4. 




FRANCIS X. HEALY, JR. 
B.A, Economics 

S.A.M. 2; History Club 3,4; International Relations Club },4; 
Sigma Beta Kappa 2,3,4 (Vice-President) ; Economics Club 4. 



WILLIAM M. HENHOEFFER 
B.A. German 

Gavel Society 1,2,3,4 (President) ; Class Secretary 2,3; History 
Club 3 (Secretary) , 4; International Relations Club 3, 4 
(Vice-President); Collegian 4; N.F.C.C.S. 3,4; Masque 1. 



ANDREW W. HOLOWINSKY 
B.A. Biology 

Glee Club 2; Alpha Epsilon Delta 4; Fabrician Society 3,4. 



ZENON JACURA 
B.A. 
Glee Club 1,2; Chymian Society 1,2,3,4. 



Chemistry 




Top Row: 

JOHN P. JANUS 
B.A. Education — Biology 

N.T.C.C.S. 1; Education Society 3,4 (Secretary). 



Bottom Row: 



BROTHER FIDELIS LEO, F.S.C. 

Education — French 



ROBERT F. JONES 
B.A. History 

International Relations Club 2,3,4; History Club 2,3,4 (Presi- 
dent); Explorer 3,4; Collegian 3,4. 

JOSEPH V. KOEHLER 
B.A. Biology 

Fabrician Society 1,2,3,4 (Treasurer); Alpha Epsilon Delta 3,4; 
Sigma Beta Kappa 2,3,4. 

WILLIAM L. KOPEC 
B.A. Pre-Law 

Sigma Beta Kappa 2,3,4; Crew 2; Accounting Club 4; Alpha 
Phi Omega 4. 



WILLIAM ZANE LOGUE 



JOHN JAMES LOMBARD, JR. 
B.A, Pre-Law 

Industrial Relations Commission 1,2,3,4; Gavel Society 3,4; 
Masque 2,3 (Secretary), 4; Student Council 3,4 (President); 
N.F.C.CS. 1,2,3,4; Student-Faculty Committee. 



MICHAEL J. LONGO 
B.A. Physics 

Newtonian Society 2,3,4 (President) ; Dean's List 2,3,4. 



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Top Row: Bottom Row: 

THOMAS J. LYNCH ROBERT N. McNALLY 

B.A. Psychology B.A. Chemistry 

Psychology Club 3,4 (Vice-President) ; Collegian },4; Intra- Chymian Society 1,2,} (Secretary), 4 (President) ; Executive 



■murals 3,4; Executive Board. 



Board },4. 



JOHN T. McCRANE 
B.A. 

Masque 1,2,3,4 (President). 



English 



JOSEPH DONALD McNAMARA 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Sociology Club 2,3; Education Association 3,4; N.F.C.C.S. 
2,3,4; International Relations Club 3,4; Intramurals 1,4. 



GERALD WILLIAM McENTEE 



FRANCIS McTAGUE 



Economics B.A. 



Physics 



FRANCIS E. McGUIGAN 
B.A. 
Psychology Club 2,3,4; Collegian 2,3. 



THOMAS O. MAHONEY 
Psychology B.A. 

Economics Club 3,4. 




JOSEPH L. MELLON 



B.A. 

Sociology Club 4. 



Sociology 



ROBERT S. MAPLES 
B.A. Chemistry — Educatii 

Basketball 1,2,3,4; Varsity Club 2,3,4; Tennis 3,4. 



JOHN MARELLA 



Spanish — Education 



BROTHER GABRIEL MARK, F.S.C. 
B.A. Education — Physics 

Liturgy Round Table 1,2,3, 



99 



BROTHER FIDELIS OF MARY, F.S.C. 
B.A. Education — Mathematics 

Dean's List 1,2,3,4. 

CHARLES ANTHONY MELLON 
B.A. Biology 

Sigma Beta Kappa 1, 2 (Secretary), 3 (Secretary), 4 (Presi- 
dent); Fabrician Society 1,2,3,4; Student Council 1; Mr. and 
Mrs. Club 4. 

MILTON E. MILLER, JR. 
B.A. Education — Sociology 

Alpha Phi Omega 3 (Secretary) , 4 (President) ; Sociology 
Club 2, 3 (Secretary), 4; Executive Board 4; Education So- 
ciety 3 ,4. 

THEODORE H. MILLER, JR. 
B.A. Education — Spanish 

Spanish Club 1,2,3,4; Caisson Club 3,4; Explorer 3,4 (Faculty 
Editor); Education Society 3,4. 

PAUL MISURA 
B.A. Education — Biology 

CHARLES JOSEPH MOLONEY 
B.A. Biology 
Sigma Beta Kappa 1,2,3,4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 2,3,4; Fabri- 
cian Society 1,2,3,4; Intramurals 1,2,4; Class Treasurer li 





FRANCIS J. MONTAGUE 
B.A, Economics 

Sociology Club 1 (Treasurer); Masque 2 (Vice-President), 3 
(Board of Governors), 4; Economics Club 3,4 (President) ; 
Executive Board 3,4 (President) . 

JOSEPH LAWRENCE MURPHY 
B.A. Psychology 

Psychology Club 4; N.F.C.CS. 4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

THOMAS J. MURPHY 
B.A. Government 

Class Vice-President 2,3,4; Student Council 2,3,4; Caisson 
Club 4; Explorer 4 (Associate Editor); Intramurals 1,2,3,4; 
Masque 1 . 

JAMES J. NORMAN 
B.A. English 

FRANK ANTHONY NOTARO 
B.A. Pre-Law 

Sociology Club 2,3,4; Le Cercle Claudel 1,2,3,4; Italian Club 
1,2,3,4; History Club 1,2,3. 

EDWARD M. O'DONNELL 
B.A, Education — Social Studies 

Interracial Justice Commission 3 ,4 (Chairman) ; Benilde Club 
3,4; Education Society 4; N.F.C.CS. 3,4. 




JOSEPH P. O'GRADY 
B.A. Education — History 

S.B.K. 1,2,3,4; Caisson Club 2,3,4; Explorer 3,4 (Editor-in- 
Chief); Education Society 3,4 (Vice-President) ; Collegian 3,4; 
Executive Board 3,4 (Treasurer) ; Dean*s List 2,3,4. 

JOSEPH JOHN PEDITTO 
B.A. Biology 

Class Vice-President 1; ROTC Band 1,2; Fabrician Society 
2,3,4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 3,4; Caisson Club 3,4; S.B.K. 
1,2,3,4. 

JAMES JOSEPH PENNESTRI 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Collegian I (Circulation Manager), 2,3,4 (Business Manager); 
Education Society 3,4; Italian Club 2; History Club 4. 



Sociology 



JOHN C. PERNA 
B.A. 
Sociology Club 3; N.f.C.CS. 1,2,3,4. 

ARMAND PAUL PETRILLO 
B.A. Biology 

Fabrician Society 1,2,3,4; Mr. and Mrs. Club 3,4. 

JOHN JOSEPH PETTIT, JR. 
B.A. Government 

International Relations Club 3,4; History Club 3,4; Track 2. 



BROTHER DAMIAN PHILLIP, F.S.C. 
B.A. Education — English 



JOSEPH T. PINTIMALLI 
B.A. Biology 

Fabrician Society 1,2,3,4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 2,3,4. 



BROTHER EDMUND PIUS, F.S.C. 
B.A. Education — German 

Dean's List 1,2,3,4. 

JOSEPH ALOYSIUS QUIRUS 
B.A. English 

Intramurals 2,3,4. 

LOUIS PAUL REIFF 
B.A. Chemistry 

Chymian Society 2,3,4. 



MICHAEL S. RIVIELLO 
B.A. 

Fabrician Society 1,2,3,4. 



Biology 




BROTHER FIDELIAN ROBERT, F.S.C. 

Education — English 



BROTHER FREDERICK ROBERT, F.S.C. 

Education — Social Studies 



ROBERT M. ROGERS 
B.A, Psychology 

Class President 2,},4; Student Council 2,3,4 (Vice-President) ; 
Masque 2 (Treasurer), J, 4; Varsity Club 2,3,4; Psychology 
Club 1,2,},4 (President); Alpha Epsilon Delta 2,3,4. 



ROBERT LOUIS ROMAINE 
B.A. Chemistry 

Class Treasurer 2; Vabrician Society 4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 3,4. 




Top Row: Bottom Row: 

PAUL JOSEPH SCHNEIDER 
B.A. Biology B.A. 

Fabrician Society 2,3,4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 2,3,4; Dean's 
List 2,3,4. 



B.A. 
Crew 3,4. 



JOHN A. SEITZ g^ 

Education — English 



THOMAS J. SIMONE 



Education — Biology 



ADAM SMITH 



JOHN HUGH SONGSTER 



English 



VINCENT J. SERFILIPPO 
B.A. French B.A. 

Circolo La Salliano 2,3,4; Pi Delta Phi 3,4 (Vice-President). ROTC Band 1; Benilde Club 4; Collegian 1,3,4; Explorer 

3,4 (Senior Editor); History Club 3,4. 

ROBERT W. SIMARD 
B.A. Biology 

Collegian 2; Le Cercle Claudel 2 (Vice-President) , 3 (Presi- 
dent), 4; Pi Delta Phi 2,3 (Vice-President), 4 (President); B.A. 
Executive Board 3,4 (Vice-President) ; Fabrician Society 3,4. Masque 3,4; Education Society 3,4. 



JOHN J. STAUB 



Education — English 



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Top Row: EDWARD J. STEIN, JR. 

B.A. Pre-Law 

Caisson Club } ,4 (Vice-President); Italian Club 1; Explorer 
3,4. 

FRANCIS HENRY STERLING 
B.A, Biology 

Fabrician Society 1,2,3 (Secretary) , 4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 
2,3,4. 

ALFRED C. STROHLEIN 
B.A. Biology 

Benilde Club 1,2; ROTC Band 1,2; Alpha Epsilon Delta 2,3,4 
(Secretary") . 



JAMES A. THOMAS, JR. 



Biology 



fabrician Society 1,2,3 (Vice-President), 4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 
2,3,4; Praefectus Club 3,4; Varsity Club 2,3,4; Soccer 2; 
ROTC Band 1,2. 



LEONARD JOSEPH THOMPKINS 
B.A. 
Fabrician Society 1,2,3,4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 2,3,4. 

DAVID J. TORPEY, JR. 



Biology 



Biology 



Alpha Epsilon Delta 3,4; Fabrician Society 2,3,4; Mr. and M 
Club 3,4; Marketing Association 1. 



PAUL FRANCIS STROHM 
B.A. Chemistry 

Cbymian Society 2,3,4. 



FRANCIS X. TROILO 
B.A. 

Fabrician Society 2,3,4 (Secretary). 



Biology 




JOHN J. TUCKER 
B.A. Government 

International Relations Club 2,3,4 (Secretary-Treasurer) ; His- 
tory Club 2,3,4; S.B.K. 2,3,4. 



RAYMOND JOHN VIVACQUA 
B.A. Biology 

Fabrician Society 1,2,3,4; Alpha Epsilon Delta 3,4 (Vice- 
President) . 



EUGENE R. VOEGTLIN 
B.A. 

Chymian Society 1,2,3,4. 



Chemistry 



JOHN C. VOLZ 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Los La Sallanos 1,2 (Treasurer) ; Education Society 3,4; Italian 
Club 1; Explorer 4; History Club 4. 



103 



THADDEUS ROMAN WALCZAK 
B.A. Education — Social Studies 

Spanish Club I; N.F.C.C.S. 2,3,4; History Club 4. 



B.A. 



Biology 



PAUL A. WALKER 
S.B.K. 2,3,4; Fabrician Society 2,3,4. 

RICHARD JOSEPH WALSH, JR. 
B.A. Biology 

S.B.K. 2,3,4; Intramurals 1,4; fabrician Society 3,4; Crew 2; 
Varsity Club 2,3,4. 

MATTHEW H. WATTS 
B.A. Biology 

Caisson Club 3,4; Fabrician Society 3,4; Masque 1. 

JOSEPH W. WEILAND 
B.A. Biology 

Benilde Club 1,2,3,4; S.B.K. 2,3,4; Fabrician Society 3,4; 
Intramurals 3,4, 

EDWARD FRANCIS WALSH 
B.A. Pre-Law 

Glee Club 1; Crew 1,2. 





BROTHER ELRICK WILLIAM, F.S.C. 
B.A. Education — English 

Dean's List 1,2,3,4; Explorer 4. 



JAMES ANTHONY WILSON 
B.A. Biology 

Caisson Club 3,4; Fabrician Society 3,4; ROTC Rifle Team 2; 
Intramurals 2,3,4. 



JOSEPH A. WOLL 
B.A. Education — English 

Spanish Club 1,2; Education Society 3,4; ROTC Band 1,2; 
Mr. and Mrs. Club 3,4. 



KARL B. WRIGHTMAN 
B.A. Chemistry 

Explorer 3,4; Collegian 3,4 (Photography Editor). 



ANTHONY JOSEPH WYDAN 
B.A. Biology 

Fabrician Society 3,4; Caisson Club 3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4, 





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PETER PAUL ADAMONIS 
B.S, Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Commission 2,3 (Vice-President^ , 4; Cross- 
country 1,2; Intramurah 1,3. 



JESSE EDWARD ATKINS 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 2,3,4; Accounting Association 1,2; Cais- 
son Club 3,4 (President) ; Executive Committee 4 (Secretary). 



FRANK BLATCHER 
B.S. Marketing 

Student Council 2,3,4 (Treasurer) ; Class Officer 2,3,4 (Treas- 
urer); Basketball 2,3,4; Varsity Club 2,3,4; Marketing Asso- 
ciation 2,3,4. 



B^. 



FRANCIS JOSEPH BOYLE 




Top Kow: 

JAMES HEFNER BREEN 
B.S. Marketing 

Caisson Club 3,4 (Secretary) ; Explorer 3,4 (Activities Editor); 
Marketing Association 2,3,4; Intramurah 1,2. 



JAMES A. BROWNE 



B.S. 

Marketing Association 2,3,4. 



Marketin; 



JULLAN J. BUDNY 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Crew 1,2; SAM 2,3,4; Masque 3,4; Caisson Club 3,4; Varsity 
Club 3,4. 

JOHN NELDINE BURGOYNE 
B.S. Marketing 

Sociology Club 1; Marketing Association 2,3,4 (Treasurer); 
Intramurah 1,2,3,4. 



WILLIAM F. CALLAHAN 
B.S. 

Baseball 2,3,4; Intramurah 1,2,3,4. 



Marketing 



GEORGE F. COOPER 
B.S. Industrial Management 

SAM 2,3,4 (Secretary); Gavel Society 2,3,4; History Club 3; 
Industrial Relations Commission 3. 

BERNARD JAMES COSTELLO 
B.S. Accounting 

Collegian 1,2,3; Accounting Association 1,2,3,4; History Club 
1,2,3. 

THOMAS PATRICK DARCY 
B.S, Industrial Management 

Collegian 3,4; SAM 2,3,4; Industrial Relations Commission 
2,3,4; Dean's List 1,2,3,4. 



Business 

^Jmm/sMm 



106 





Clt^ 



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1956 



Top Row: 

CORNELIUS J. DEEGAN 
B.S. Accounting 

Accounting Association 2,3,4; Sociology Club 1; Jntramurah 
1,2. 

RAYMOND JOSEPH DERBYSHIRE 
B.S. General Business 

N.F.C.C.S. 3,4; Marketing Association 3. 

JOHN OWEN DEVLIN 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Spanish Club 2,}, 4 (Vice-President) ; Marketing Association 4. 

ANTHONY DI PRIMIO 
B.S. Accounting 

Italian Club 2,3,4 (Treasurer') . 



Bottom Row: WILLIAM PHILIP DOLAN 
B.S, Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Commission 3,4; History Club 3,4; Inter- 
national Relations Club 3,4. 

HARRY J. DOUGHERTY 
B.S. Marketing 

Baseball 2,3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4; Marketing Association 
2,3,4. 

PETER J. DWYER 

B.S. Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Commission 3,4. 

WINSTON DAVID ENGLE 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 2,3,4; ROTC Sand 1,2; Intramurals 1,2; 
Los LaSallanos 1,2. 




) t i._ -^ I 




PETER JOSEPH FINNEGAN 
B.S. Accounting 

Accounting Association 2,3,4 (President) . 



PAUL MARTIN FITZMAURICE 
B.S. Accounting 

Accounting Association 2,3,4. 



ROBERT D. FREISEM 
B.S. Accounting 

Residence Halls Council 2,3,4 (President) ; Student Council 4; 
Accounting Association 4; Intramurals 1. 



RICHARD A. FUNCHION 
B.S. Marketing 

Intramurals 1,2,3,4; Marketing Association 2,3,4 (Secretary). 



107 



DANIEL W. GALLAGHER 
B,S. Accounting 

Accounting Association 2,2,3,4; Sociology Club 1; Collegian 
2,3,4. 

DONALD JOSEPH GALLAGHER 
B.S, Accounting 

Accounting Association 4; Cross-Country 1,2,4; Track 1,},4. 

THOMAS R. GALLAGHER 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 2,3,4; Varsity Club 2,3,4; Track 1,2,3,4. 

JOSEPH THOMAS GARVEY 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 2,3,4; Spanish Club 2; Jntramurals 
1,2,3,4. 

PAUL JOSEPH GEIB 
B.S. Marketing 

Alpha Phi Omega 3,4; Marketing Association 2,3,4; Intra- 
murals 2. 



WILLIAM GERSCHANICK 



Accounting 





WILLLAM GILMORE GOETZ 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 2,3,4; International Relations Club 3,4; 
Glee Club 2,3; Benilde Club 3. 

FRANCIS J. GOLDEN 
B.S. Accounting 

Marketing Association 3 ; Accounting Association 4. 

JAMES AUGUSTINE GROSS 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Caisson Club 3,4; Baseball 3,4. 

GEORGE JOSEPH HARKINS, JR. 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Cross-Country 1,2,3,4 (Captain); Track 1,2,3,4; Varsity Club 
2,3,4 (Secretary) ; Jntramurals 1,2,3,4. 



CHARLES JOSEPH HEISER 
B.S. 
Baseball 2,3,4; Intramucals 1,2,3,4. 



Marketing 



JOSEPH LEE HOKENBROCK 
B.S, General Business 

Swimming 1,2,3,4; Varsity Club 2,3,4; N.F.C.C.S. 2,3,4. 




RAYMOND GEORGE HUML, JR. 
B.S. Marketing 

Glee Club 1,2; Marketing Association 3,4. 

DAVID R. IMSCHWEILER 
B.S, Finance 

Caisson Club },4; Masque 3,4; Marketing Association 2,3,4. 

PAUL EDWARDS JAMES 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Accounting Association 1; SAM 1,2,3,4 (President) ; Industrial 
Relations Commission 4. 

THOMAS OWEN JONES 
B.S. Marketing 

Glee Club 1,2; Sociology Club 1; Marketing Association 2,3,4. 



B.S. 



General Business 



DAVID P. KANE 

N.F.C.C.S. 4; Out-of-Towners I. 

JOSEPH A. KANE 
B.S. Accounting 

Collegian 1,2,3 (News Editor), 4 (Associate Editor); Explorer 
4; Masque 2 (Secretary), 3,4 (Treasurer); Benilde Club 
1,2,3,4; Accounting Association 2,3 (Secretary), 4. 



FRANK J. KELLY 
B.S» Accounting 

Accounting Association 1,2,3,4; Caisson Club 3,4; Intramurals 2. 



THOMAS A. KENNEDY 
B.S. Marketing 

Benilde Club 2; Marketing Association 2,3,4. 

JOHN J. KILTY 
B.S, Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Commission 3,4; Psychology Club 2; Glee 
Club 2. 



B.S. 



WILLLAM A. KLEIN 
Marketing Association 1,2,3,4. 

BART LaKUAGLLA 
B.S. 

Tennis 2,3, 

ROBERT J. LAWLER 
B.S. 

Marketing Association 2,3,4. 



Marketing 



Accounting 



Marketing 




STEPHEN K. LEVY 1,53^ 

B.S, Accounting > 

Accounting Association 2,3,4; Intramurals }. 



JOSEPH FRANCIS LYNCH, JR. 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 2,3,4; Benilde Club I; Glee Club 1. 



JAMES JOSEPH McCARTAN 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 2,3,4; N.F.C.C.S. 2,3,4; Los LaSall- 
anos 1,2. 



JOHN F. McCAULEY 



B.S. 

Accounting Association 3,4, 



Accounting 




Top Row: 
B.S. 



Bottom Row: 
THOMAS McGOWEN FRANK THOMAS MARZOLLA 

Education — General Business B.S. Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Commission 3,4; Italian Club 4; Intra- 
murals 2,3, 



JAMES J. McGRATH 
B.S. 
Accounting Association 3,4. 



Accounting 



B.S. 
SAM 3,4. 



STEPHEN McLOUGHLIN 

Industrial Management 



LAWRENCE L. MAGUIRE 



E. PAUL MITA, JR. 
B.S. Business Management 

Sociology Club 1; Varsity Club 2,3,4; SAM 3,4 (Vice-Presi- 
dent); Track 1,2,3,4 (Captain), 

JOSEPH M. MORE 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Commission 3,4. 

GEORGE J. MORRIS 



B.S. Accounting B.S. Industrial Relations 

Accounting Association 4; Collegian 2,3,4 (Sports Editor); Caisson Club 3,4; Industrial Relations Commission 3,4; Ex- 

Explorer 4. plorer 4; Dean's List 2,3,4; Swimming Team 1,2. 




Business 
j^JmimsMm 







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Top Row: 

STANLEY LEE MORTON 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Commission 3,4 (Treasurer) ; Intramurals 
1,2. 

RICHARD J. NOLAN 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Commission } ,4 (Secretary') , 



Bottom Row: 

DONALD ORESTE OLIMPO 
B.S. General Business 

Caisson Club 4; Explorer 4; Intramurals },4; N.F.C.C.S. 4. 

CHARLES JOHN OLIVER 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 2,3,4; Industrial Relations Commission 
},4. 



THOMAS A. NOONE 
B.S. Marketing 

Caisson Club 2,},4 (Treasurer) ; Varsity Club 3,4; Crew 2,3,4; 
Intramurals 2,3,4; Explorer 4. 



JOHN J. PALEMBAS, JR. 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Commission 2,3 (Secretary), 4 (President) ; 
SAM, 4. 



JAMES W. NUSS 
B.S. Accounting 

Accounting Association 4; Varsity Club 3,4; Cross-Country 
1,3,4; Track 2,3. 



THOMAS ANTHONY PELAIA 
B.S. Marketing 

Sociology Club 1; Benilde Club 1,2,3; Marketing Association 
3,4; Italian Club 4; N.F.C.C.S. 1,2,3; Out -of -T owners 1,2. 




MARTIN GERALD PENDERGAST 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Masque 2,3,4; SAM 2,3,4; Marketing Association 4. 



JOSEPH M. PENROSE 



B.S. 

Accounting Association 2,3,4. 



Accounting 



PETER ANTHONY PINO 
B.S. General Business 

N.F.C.C.S. 2,3,4 (President); Benilde Club 3,4; Circolo La 
Salliano 2,3,4 (Secretary) ; Student Council 3,4; Class Officer 
3,4 (Secretary). 



JOHN R. POMPA 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Glee Club 2,3,4; Masque 1,2,3,4; Caisson Club 4; SAM 3,4. 



Ill 



ANTHONY R. C. PONTARELLI 
B.S. Accounting 

Italian Club 1,2. 

ROBERT JOSEPH PTAK 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Varsity Club 2,},4; Out -of -T owners 1; Track 1,2,3,4. 

JOSEPH FRANCIS RAPONE 
B.S. Accounting 

Italian Club 1,2,4; Accounting Association 2,3,4; Jntramurals 
1,2,3,4. 

LON J. ROHACH 
B.S. General Business 

N.F.C.C.S. 3,4. 

ROBERT DOMINIC RONCO 
B.S. Accounting 

Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Masque 3,4; Accounting Association 2,3,4; 
Praefectus Club 3,4 (Vice-President); N.F.C.C.S. 2,3,4. 

JOHN L. SCHMIDT 
B.S. Accounting 

Swimming 1,2,3,4; Varsity Club 3/f; Accounting Association 4; 
Caisson Club 4. 





JOHN L. SECHLER 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 2,3,4; Alpha Phi Omega 3,4; ROTC 
Band 1. 

chArles a. SINGLEY 

B.S. Marketing 

Basketball 2,3,4; Baseball 3; Marketing Association 2,3,4; 
Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 

E. RODNEY SMYRK 
B.S. Marketing 

Intramurals 1,2; Marketing Association 2,3 (Vice-President) , 
4 (President); Executive Board 4; Out-of-T owners 1, 

WILLIAM FREDERICK SOMMERS 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Sigma Beta Kappa 2,3,4; Industrial Relations Commission 2,3,4 
(Vice-President ) , 

HAROLD JOSEPH STINSON 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Marketing Association 3,4; Industrial Relations Commission 
3,4. 



ISADOR P. STRITTMATER 



B.S. 

Marketing Association 3,4. 



General Business 



^dlM 




JOSEPH W. SUCHINSKY 
B.S. General Busin 

ROTC Band 1,2; SAM },4; Golf 4; N.F.C.C.S. 3,4; Masque 
2,3. 



JOHN P. THOMPSON 

Accounting Association 3,4; Intramurals 2,3,4. 

JOSEPH J. TOTH 
B.S. 
Marketing Association 3,4; Varsity Club 2,3,4. 

FRANK J. TRENT 
B.S. 
Accounting Association 2,3,4 (Vice-President). 

THOMAS H. TREVELINO 
B.S. 

Accounting Association 1,2,3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3,4. 



B.S. 



Accounting 



Marketing 



Accounting 



Accounting 



JOHN F. X. TREVI 
B.S. Industrial Management 

SAM 4; Industrial Relations Commission 4; Marketing Associa- 
tion 4; Glee Club 2. 



B.S. 

SAM 2,3,4. 



JAMES B. WEBER 

Industrial Management 



DONALD C. WHITE 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association 1,2,3,4; ROTC Band 1,2. W^' 



LEONARD J. WODARCZYK 
B.S. Accounting 

Accounting Association 2,3,4; Intramurals 1,2,3. 



THOMAS L. WYNNE 
B.S. Accounting 

ROTC Band 1,2,4; Caisson Club 3,4; Accounting Association 
2,4; Masque 3,4. 



HENRY A. ZEKANIS 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Intramurals 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Caisson Club 3,4. 




CHARLES E. ADLER 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

French Club '52, '53, '54 (Vice-President), '55; Accounting 
Association '52; Industrial Relations Commission '54, '5 5, '56; 
Student Congress '52, '5}, '54, '55, '56 (Vice-President); 
Policy Committee Chairman '54, '55, '56; Dean's List. 

THOMAS ALEXANDER M ^ \. 

B.S. Industrial Management 

SAM '56. 



ANTHONY S. ARCARI 



General Business 



JOHN JOSEPH AUCHINLECK 

Industrial Relations 




Top Row: Bottom Row: 

GEORGE J. BAKER FRANCIS J. X. BERCKMAN 

Certificate of Proficiency Production Management B.S. 



Accounting 



JOHN J. BARRETT 



Accounting Ji.S. 



JOHN R. BEST 



Industrial Management 



JOHN J. BASQUILL, JR. 
B.S. Accounting -o c 

Accounting Association '54; SAM '55, '56. 



JOHN S. BLAIR 

Production Management 



JAMES A. BECHTEL 



B.S. 

Accounting Association '54. 



Accounting B.S. 

SAM '54. 



WILLLAM J. BOGLE 

Industrial Management 



s> 



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114 





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488 



Top Row: 
B.S. 



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Bottom Row: 
WILLIAM J. BRADY WILLIAM J. BURNS, JR. 

Industrial Management B.S. Accounting 

Accounting Association '54, '55; Dean's List '51, '52. 



JOHN A. BRENNAN 



WILLLA.M P. BRENNAN 



Accounting 



Marketing g c 



FRANCIS T. CAIN 

Production Management 



RAYMOND P. CANTON 

Production Management 



PAUL F. BUEHLER 

Industrial Management B.S. 



THOMAS M. CLEARY 



Accounting 




RAYMOND COMBER 
Certificate of Proficiency Industrial Relations 



FRANCIS G. CONNELLY 



Accounting 



THOMAS F. CONNOLLY 

Industrial Management 



FRANCIS P. COSGROVE 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Student Congress '54; Industrial Relations Commission '5 5, '56 
(Treasurer^ , 



115 



B.S, 



GEORGE W. DARLINGTON 



DAVID J. DEL MOORE 



JOSEPH G. DI LELLO 



Accounting 



Accounting 



EDWARD G. DOUGHERTY 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Student Congress '56, 



THOMAS J. DURKIN 
B.S. Chemistry 

Science Club '56, 




JOHN K. ENDO 



Accounting 










N 
* V 




JOHN H. ENGEL 



JOHN J. ERVIN 



J. F. ETTNER 

Deceased December 27, 195 5 



EDWARD P. FAICHTYGER 



Physics 



Accounting 



Accounting 



SALVATORE MICHAEL FANELLI 
Certificate of Proficiency Industrial Management 

Student Congress '53; SAM '54. 



JOSEPH F. FARNAN 

Production Management 




FRANK R. FIGHERA 
B.S. Marketing 

Student Congress '53; Marketing Association '52, '53, '54, '55, 
'56 (Treasurer). 



LEONARD WARREN GARDO 

Production Management 



MARTIN GELMAN 



Chemistry 



MARTIN GLICKMAN 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Student Congress '52. 



ANTHONY J. GLOD 



JOSEPH M. GOLDING 
B.S. Accounting 

French Club '52, '5J; Accounting Association '5 6. 



ALAN E. GOORLAND 



ROBERT EDWARD GRAY 



Marketing 



Marketing 



Student Congress '55j Marketing Association '54, '55 (Secre- '!\\ 

tary), '56 (President). 



JOHN JAMES HALEY 
B.S. Accounting 

Student Congress '53, '54; Accounting Association '53, '54, 
»55, '56 (President). 



JOHN S. HARKINS 
B.S. 

WILLLAM T. HATZELL 
B.S. 
Accounting Association '53, '54, '55, '56. 

VENARD A. HAUBERT 
B.S. 



Accounting 



Accounting Bf" 



Accounting 




HERBERT M. HELMUS 



Accounting 



CHRISTOPHER W. lANACONE 
B.S. Industrial Management 



B.S. 



JOSEPH F. JIMENEZ 



Accounting Association '55, '56. 



Accounting 



EDWARD B. JOHNSON 

Business Administration 




Top Row: Bottom Row: 

WILLIAM R. JOHNSON JOHN T. KIJAUSKAS 

B-S. Industrial Relations ^•^• 

Student Congress '55, '56. 



Accounting 



PAUL A. KALAL 



STEPHEN F. KOENIG 



Production Management 



Accounting 



FRANCIS J. KELLY 



Accounting • ■ 



LOUIS F. KURZEKNABE 

Industrial Management 



JOHN F. KERSTAN 



Accounting B.S. 



WALTER J. LACY 

Production Management 



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Top Row: 

EDWARD P. LARKIN 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Student Congress '51, '52, '53, '54, '5 5 (Vice-President), 
'56 (President}; Activities Advisor '52, '53, '54; SAM '52, 
'55, '54. 

ANTHONY H. LE ROY 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association '51, '52, '55, '54 (Secretary), '55, 
'56; Student Congress '51, '52, '54, '55; N.F.C.C.S. '56. 



Bottom Row: 
B.S. 



JOHN M. McDEVITT, JR. 



JOHN P. McGUIGAN 

Production Management 



B.S. 



FRANCIS X. McBRIDE 

Industrial Management 



JAMES E. McKENNA 



WILLIAM McCONAGHY 
B.S. Industrial Management 

Explorer '56 (Evening Division Editor); Student Congress '50, 
'51, '52; SAM '55 (Vice-President), '55, '56; Industrial Rela- 
tions Commission '56. 



B.S. 



JAMES J. McKENNA 



Industrial Relations 




RUSSELL B. McLaughlin 

B.S. Industrial Management 

Student Congress '51, '52; Industrial Management Society '55. 



JAMES J. McNULTY 

Industrial Management 



ANDREW J. McQUADE 



Accounting 



DAVID A. MADDEN 
B.S. Industrial Relations 

Industrial Relations Society '5 5 (Vice-President) , '5 6 (Presi- 
dent); French Club '53, '54; Student Congress '54, '55, '56; 
Baseball, '50. 



119 



JOSEPH N. MALONE 

Industrial Management 



WILLIAM F. MAIER 



Accounting 



GEORGE J. MARKEY 
B.S. Marketing 

Marketing Association '52, '53, '54, '55, '56; Student Congress 
'56. 



JOHN A. MONASTRA 



Accounting 



THOMAS J. MULLIGAN 
B.S. Industrial Management 

SAM '55, '56. 



THOMAS P. MURRAY 
B.S. Accounting 

Accounting Association '53, '54, '55, '56 (Secretary). 



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CHARLES VINCENT MURRIN 
B.S. Industrial Management 

SAM '56. 



FRANCIS X. NOLAN 
^^ B.S. Accounting 

Soccer '53; French Club '53, '54 (Treasurer). 



JAMES C. O'BRIEN 



General Business 



GEORGE H. RAUSENBERGER 



OWEN E. REGAN 



Industrial Relations 



JOSEPH J. REILLY 

Production Management 













ROBERT E. RICE 




B.S. 
SAM 


'56. 




CHARLES 


Industrial 
EDWARD RIES 


Management 


B.S. 






JAMES D 


Production 
. RITZHEIMEN 


Management 


B.S. 
Accounting 


Association '53, 


'54, '55, '56. 


Accounting 


B.S. 






JOHN 


P. ROARTY 


Chemistry 








ROBERT RAYMOND ROWE 




B.S. 










Chemistry 


B.S. 

SAM 


'55, ' 


56. 


RAYMOND J. SCHAEPER 

Industrial Management 



GEORGE H. SCHRADER 
B.S. 

Accounting Association '5}, '54, '55, '56. 



Accounting 



WILLIAM SELTZER 
B.S. Finance 

Marketing Association '52, '53; Student Congress '53, '54. 



BENEDICT J. SEMBELLO 

Industrial Relations 



RICHARD S. SHIMMIN 



Industrial Relations 



GEORGE A. SINE 
Certificate of Proficiency Marketing 

Student Congress '56; Marketing Association '56 (Publicity 
Director^ , 



JOSEPH H. SODER 



Accounting 




CHARLES J. STROEDECKE 

Production Management 



JOSEPH J. TAGG 
B.S. Accounting 

Student Congress '54, '55; Accounting Association '53, '54, 
'5 5; President Senior Class '5 6. 



STEPHEN TASHJIAN 



General Business 



ALBERT F. TERRY 

Industrial Management 




Top Row: 
B.S. 



CECIL W. TOON 



Industrial Relations B.S. 



GEORGE J. WAGNER, JR. 

Industrial Management 



FRANK J. TURBETT 

Industrial Management 



BERNARD G. WALKER 



JOHN P. VAN BUREN 

Industrial Management 



STANLEY E. WEINSTEIN 



Accounting 



CHARLES H. WAGNER 
B.S. Marketing 

Student Congress '54, '55; Senior Class Representative '5 5, '5 6 
Marketing Association '53, '55, '56. B.S. 



EDWARD A. YEHLE 



Chemistry 



OvenitKi 



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122 





The ROTC band, directed by Joseph Colantonio, struts in unison to the beat of the dr 
they pass in review at the annual Founder's Day exercises on May 15, 1956. 



FOUNDERS' DAY 



Founder's Day, recently instituted, is a day in 
honor of the school's patron saint, St. John Bap- 
tist de La Salle. The day is full of joy and color. 
The entire ROTC display full strength in front 
of the Administration and prominent guests; and 
the year's graduating class, in cap and gown, walk 
in procession to the auditorium where academic 



honors are awarded and many eloquent speeches 
made. 

A High Mass, commemorating the death of St. 
John Baptist de La Salle, is said at Holy Child 
church. Later in the day dinner is served to the 
future graduates and guests. 



The Glee Club adds sparkle to the Founder's Day pro- 
gram by their pleasant harmonizing. Here they are 
being conducted by Father Sailer, Glee Club director. 



The administration of La Salle College pays honor to 
the school's founder, St. John Baptist de La Salle, by 
dressing in their eminent regalia and praising La Salle 
College's patron saint. 






Administration officials and members of the 
Faculty enter Holy Child church in an orderly 
fashion to attend the Mass in honor of St. John 
Baptist de La Salle held on Founder's Day. 



Graduates were provided with a delectable 
dinner served in the College field house. The 
long table is occupied by Faculty members and 
guests at the Founder's Day event. 



Faculty members and honored guests 
occupy the Auditorium stage during 
Founder's Day exercises. The ROTC 
band provided intermission entertain- 
ment. Part of the graduating class are 
shown in the foreground. 



SENIOR WEEK 



Miss Cleland, the Vice-Pres- 
ident's secretary, takes a 
hard s-wing, but just couldn't 
hit the little round thing. 
This all took place during 
the course of the Senior 




Manny Gomez enjoys one of the home-made sand"wiches his date furnished; 
or was it HIS date? Manny, as usual, seems to be surrounded by young ladies. 



Ted Friel lets loose -svith a quick pass after being blocked 
by Mr. Swoyer during the Senior-Faculty game. The 
Faculty, with the aid of that Old Pro, Jim Pollard, put 
the mark on the Seniors to the tune of 42 to 3 5. 



Never let it be said that Jim Breen, (The Greatest Lover) , 
even permitted a moment for fun to pass without some act. 
This time "Birdie" was dressed in a night cap and robe, 
bouncing a ping-pong ball. This was just a rank at the 
"Old Profs," prior to the Senior-Faculty game. 



a III 



Wf^. 



iilHv. 



II Hi M' 





GRADUATION 



Awards of Achievement, one given to a deserving 
classman and another to an energetic campus employee, 
are presented eafch year by th^ Class of '56. Here 
Walt Kraus, of the cafeteria staff, receives the award 
at last year's Junior Prom. 





Moderator and officers of this year's graduating 
class are: (L. to R.) Bro. D. Vincent, F.S.C, 
Bob Rogers (president), Tom Murphy (vice- 
president), Pete Pino (secretary), and Frank 
Blatcher (treasurer) . 



Our years at La Salle College have been joyous as well as learned ones. May we forever appreciate 
all that has been done for us; and may we be granted a fruitful life, one in which w^e can proudly 
display the results of a Christian education.