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1 998 

L O 



La Salle University 

1 900 West Olney Avenue 

Philadelphia, PA 1914M199 



R 



Contents 







Dedication 
4 

A Day In The Life of 

La Salle 

6 

Academics 
32 

The Class of 1998 
78 

Remembering La Salle 
128 A 

Student Life 
130 

Athletics 
174 

Patrons & Ads 
218 

Closing 
240 



CONTENTS 




Edward J. Sheehy, F.S.C., Ph.D. '68 



4 EXPLORER 




9 9 8 




EXPLORER 




Aristotle once wrote that, "Before an individual 
embarks on his journey, one must retain all that he 
has learned." This statement poignantly captures the 
meaning behind an individual that is truly the hallmark 
of the Lasallian mission: Brother Edward Sheehy, 
F.S.C.. Many of us are familiar with the spirit and 
enthusiasm that is constantly portrayed by a Christian 
Brother who presents history instructions, acts as a 
moderator for both football and basketball, serves as 
Corporate Vice-President of the University, and who 
ends every answering machine message with "Beat 
Army." His instructions are the quintessence of 
what a higher education really means to a college 
student. Beyond his yelling "nicknames" after a 
student attempts to respond to his convoluted queries 
and his "off the wall" teaching style. Brother Ed is a 
mentor and parental figure for all La Salle students. 
Therefore, on behalf of the entire La Salle student 
body, we dedicate this yearbook to this well-deserv- 
ing scholar and gentleman. 

Brother Ed arrived at 20th and Olney in 1988 with 
the intention of putting his Bachelor of Arts from 
La Salle University, and his Master of Philosophy 
and doctorate from George Washington University to 
service in the History Department. Brother Ed's 
passion for U.S. Naval History is apparent through- 
out his office and in his admiration for his father, a 
Naval Officer. David Luby, a senior secondary 
education/social studies major, states that "Brother 
even provides the non-history majors with the all- 
inspiring La Salle experience." 

Seana McKendry, a senior secondary education/ 
social studies major, states "that Brother externally 



appears to be a solid rock, but internally is a com- 
passionate friend who taught me to accept myself 
and my feelings." To many. Brother is that "rock" 
sipping tea in the Food Court attentively listening to 
the daily conundrums of his students. Alex 
Schugsta, a senior secondary education/social 
studies major, confirms Brother's compassion by 
describing him as "a father away from home." 

Brother Ed inspires his students to support the 
basketball and football teams fully. He is a visible 
mark cheering the teams on to victory. As a 
moderator. Brother frequently attends the practices 
of both teams even when he is not required to be 
there, inspiring them to do their best in the face of 
opposition. 

This moderator and mentor has made one lasting 
mark in my life as well as the entire La Salle com- 
munity with his "younger and older aduU" philoso- 
phy, which has caused many students to initially 
raise their brow in opposition. However, this 
philosophy, which reassures us that "we are all 
younger adults inspiring to be older adults," supports 
the meaning behind a liberal arts education and 
confirms St. John Baptist de La Salle's mission for 
this University. We walk tall because of his com- 
passion and love for our education. 

In recognition of his service to the La Salle 
University community, the staff of the Explorer 
proudly dedicates this book to Brother Edward J. 
Sheehy, F.S.C. As we enter the next stage of our 
lives, we should allow Brother Ed's influence to 
instill the confidence and support needed for even 
greater achievements. !; 

Michael Oscar '98 



DEDICATION 




The sun rises above the Connelly Library and the Hayman parking lot ' 
to signal the start of another day at La Salle University. ■; 



EXPLORER 



A Day In The Life of La Salle 




FIrom sunrise to sunset, it's a place that never sleeps. 
In any 24-hour period, there is always something 
happening on La Salle's campus. Whether it's the 
nightly security patrol, a student taking an early morning 
jog before classes, or a St. Katherine's student furiously 
finishing a 10-page paper at 4 a.m., there is always some- 
body doing something. And this year, there was a lot that 
went on. Hayman was converted into a 3,500 seat bas- 
ketball arena, graduate students had classes in the brand 
new Bucks County Center, and the football team played 
in McCarthy Stadium for the first time in 56 years. To 
start off the 1998 Explorer, we invite you to travel with 
us through a typical day in the life of La Salle. $ 



Section Editor: 

Andy Gwiazda '98 



A DAY IN THE UFE OF LA SALLE 




Making waves in the Schuylkill with 

MEN'S & WOMEN'S Crew 

6:00a.m. By Lauren Roots '01 



"Beep. beep. beep. " 
We all know the annoy- 
ing sound of an alarm 
clock, but imagine 
hearing it everyday at 
4:30 in the morning. It 
is often tempting to hit 
the snooze button and 
crawl back under the 
covers. At 4:30 a.m. the 
City of Philadelphia is 
still covered in the dark 
blanket of night. What 
normal La Salle student 
would be awake at this 
hour? Well, it's not just 
one student but a 
number of dedicated 
people who make up the 
La Salle crew team. 
Yes, these are the 
people who are awake, 
and they are getting 
ready to hit the Schuylkill 
River. 

Getting up at 4:30 in 
the morning is not an 
easy thing to do, but then 
again neither is crew. 
Many mornings and 
afternoons are spent 
running, exercising, and 
rowing along scenic 
Kelly Drive. Much of it 
is hard work, but each of 
the members is devoted 
to the sport and all do 
their best to reach their 
goals for the season. 
The team can often be 
seen running up and 
down 20th Street or the 
bleachers of McCarthy 
Stadium. They are truly 



one of the hardest 
working athletic teams at 
La Salle University, for it 
takes a strong, dedicated 
group to not only 
wake up early in the 
morning but also to 
work hard. As 
varsity member 
Meghann Haugh 
said, "Crew is one of 
the best things I 
have become 
involved in at La 
Salle; I have made 
so many great ^ 

friends I couldn't 
imagine life without it." 

The men's and 
women's teams are 
returning for another fall 
season, a time primarily 
to prepare for upcoming 
spring competitions. It is 
also a rebuilding time for 
both teams after losing 
many key members due 
to graduation. Both 
teams are looking 
forward to getting out on 
the water and the varsity 
women's team is looking 
to defend their silver 
medal which they won at 
the Dad Vail Regatta 
last year. With the 
promise of spring ahead, 
the members of the 
crew teams have been 
putting forth their best 
efforts hoping that they 
will go beyond the 
success they had last 
year. 



Their success, of 
course, is made possible 
not only by the team, but 
also by the leadership of 



"Crew is one of 
the best things I 
have become 
involved in at La 
Salle" 

- Meghann Haugh '99 



the coaches. With the 
help and dedication of 
head coaches Gerry 
Quinlan and Matthew 



The men's team works hard to get their boat moving along 
the Schuylkill. Both the men's and women's teams are on 

the river by 6 a.m. 



Kelly, the men's and 
women's varsity teams 
are ready to show 
everyone what they can 
do. The novice 
coaches, Stuart 
Chase, Steve Kelly, 
and James Stack, 
have been really 
patient to help new- 
comers learn and 
become familiar with 
crew and the basic 
techniques. Stuart 
Chase notes, "Every 
^ member should be 
proud that they are 
on this team because 
now they are the ones 
people come to watch." 
So as the new season 



begins, the men's and 
women's crew teams 
are ready to do what it 
takes to be number one. 
Whether by running, 
rowing, or exercising, 
they work their hardest 
to achieve their goals. 
This year they are 
backed by a great 
coaching staff and team 
captains Sean Bevan 
and Kerrie Myers — 
working together as a 
team is helping them 
reach for the gold this 
year. 

Maybe getting up at 
4:30 a.m. is what makes 
them such a successful 
team. 5' 



EXPLORER 




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Elsewhere On Campus . 




6:18 a.m. 
A desolate campus greets the rising sun behind 
Olney Hall. 





6:32 a.m. 

This squirrel, one of the few animals awake at this 
le, begins his daily quest for nuts. 



This men's crew team member (top) ponders the meaning of life while sitting in his 
boat on the Schuylkill. He also wonders why someone just took his picture. 

Boat House Row (above) provides the perfect backdrop for the men's crew team to 
practice their stuff. 




6:56 a.m. 
latent on arriving promptly for class, this student 
Is the operator hourly to verify the time. 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLE 



Construction managers Nason & Cullcn (right) were 

responsible for interpreting the architectural drawings by 

Ewing Cole Cherry Brott. 

This view (below) shows the first tloor lobby lu-ea and 
gabled mezzanine level during construction. 





With the addition of a lobby and concession area, the parking lot side of Hayman will be 
much more attractive than the original design (above). 

Work progresses on the brick pillars of Hayman Center (right). Construction 
crews were on sight every day as early as 6 a.m. 



,„,tTTr17f 



10 



EXPLORER 




Brick by brick, transforming Hayman Hall into 

Hayman Center 

8:00a.m. ByAprUWHi.e '99 



After years of explor- 
ing, the men's basketball 
team has finally found a 
home. 

The newly expanded 
Hayman Center, com- 
pleted in January of 
1998, brought basketball 
to La Salle's campus for 
the first time since 1983. 

In addition to hosting 
basketball games, the 
center now provides 
3,500 to 4,000 seats for 
campus events such as 
concerts and convoca- 
tion. "It will be wonder- 
ful to have a place 
where the entire 
La Salle community can 
come together," Brother 
President Joseph Burke 
said when the project 
was announced in the 
fall of 1996. 



The effort to expand 
and renovate the 26- 
year-old Hayman Hall 
has been in progress for 
several years. The 
building was unable to 
accommodate many 
campus events with a 
seating capacity of only 
750 to 1,000. In the fall 
of 1996, the University's 
Board of Trustees 
approved a $5 .5 million 
dollar plan for the on- 
campus arena. The 
project received substan- 
tial support from alumni 
through fundraising 
efforts. Construction 
began in May of 1997 
and continued into the 
school year. 

Improvements to the 
building included a new 
lobby on the campus side 



of Hayman Hall, a 
3,000-square-foot 
concession area on a 
mezzanine level, and a 
30,000-square-foot 
multipurpose arena 
created by the removal 
of the suspended track 
and the demolition of the 
concrete wall formerly 
dividing the basketball 
courts. The arena now 
provides three refinished 
basketball courts for 
intramural sports which 
can be reconfigured for 
seating for 3,400 during 
basketball games and 
seating for more than 
3,800 for convocation. 
The arena also includes 
a camera booth for 
televised games. 

The building also 
received a new exterior 



rrf' 




look. Architects Ewing 
Cole Cherry Brott 
designed a brick and 
glass facade with gabled 
roofs reminiscent of the 
style and colors of the 
Connelly Library. 
"We've all known for 
years that from a visual 
standpoint, Hayman Hall 
has been a less than 
attractive building. Now 
there is a refreshing 
attractiveness to the 
external aspect of 
campus that I think is 
truly enjoyable for 
people to see," Burke 
said. 

"This project makes 
the campus much more 
appealing and attractive 
to prospective students 
when they can see a 
sense of energy and 



vitality, and I think it has 
a very positive effect on 
our current students 
because it is visible 
evidence that the 
University is responding 
to student satisfaction," 
Vice President for 
Enrollment Services 
Raymond Ricci said. 

In the process of 
renovation and expan- 
sion, Hayman Hall, 
named after H. Blake 
Hayman, a 1941 
La Salle College gradu- 
ate, became Hayman 
Center. 

"We've entered a new 
era in which we'll 
encompass academic 
and student life activities 
as well as athletics," said 
Associate Athletic 
Director Tom Meier. °? 




A construction worker (above) checks out the renova- 
tions being made on the court level of Hayman Center. 

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLE 



11 



^"^ The Road Less Traveled 

A senior reflects on 4 years of commuter life 



10:00 a.m. 

"Two roach diverged 
in a wood and I . . . 
took the one less 
traveled by. " 

This line by Robert 
Frost encompasses the 
true meaning of being a 
commuter to 20th and 
Olney for the last four 
years. Even though our 
numbers are subsiding to 
the rising resident 
population, we are 
representatives of a 
unique class of students 
who bring to instruction 
a different perspective 
towards higher educa- 
tion. Our perspective 
envisions the total 
college experience: one 
that centers on the 
practical as well as the 
theoretical image of 



highereducation. 
Although we enjoy the 
same educational 
pursuits as our resident 
counterparts; however, 
we augment the class- 
room instructions with 
our practical encounters 
along the road less 
traveled. 

Perhaps, Antonio 
Vivaldi's Four Seasons 
will serve as a frame- 
work for those of us 
who traveled down the 
other road. The start of 
September divides the 
student body into two 
factions: residents and 
commuters. And as the 
fall semester develops 
into a haggard beast of 
papers and exams, we 
may begin to rethink our 




decision to take the less 
traveled road, thinking of 
how residents have easy 
access to buildings and 
parties. Only the 
steadfast among us 
remain with our torches 
held high and our 
carburetors frozen. 

The familiar holiday 
lyric "I'll be home for 
Christmas" holds dear to 
the hearts of all La Salle 
students. As the resi- 
dents deal with the 
relentless traffic blocking 
them from their loved 
ones and the never- 
ending lines at the 
airport, they may wonder 
how we commuters deal 
with the headaches of 
traveling on a daily basis. 
For us, the holidays are 



filled with less travel and 
more shopping along the 
streets of Center City. 

The start of the 
second semester quickly 
leaves students wander- 
ing back to the rudiments 
of their mundane scho- 
lastic routines. Finally, 
the boredom of higher 
education is lifted with 
the potpourri of spring. 

Springtime allows for 
the renaissance of life as 
everyone escapes the 
confines of books and 
embraces the warmth of 
the sun and the coolness 
of the morning dew. For 
residents, this means 
relaxing on the main 
quad or playing a game 
of Softball in the dorms. 
For us, as commuters. 



By Michael Oscar '98 

we equally embrace the 
moment, but are hin- 
dered from joining the 
game by the guardian 
turnstiles at every 
residence hall entrance. 
But just as quickly as it 
began, the game is over, 
and the year comes to a 
screeching stop for both 
residents and commuters 
alike. 

Even though this road 
is exceedingly less 
traveled, we are still a 
dominant force in the 
education at La Salle 
University. Because of 
our perspective and 
many contributions to 
student life at La Salle, 
we, too, as Frost writes, 
have "made all the 
difference." w 



The WiUiamson Commuter Lounge (above) is the perfect 
place to do some work or to catch some Z's. 

The TV in the commuter lounge (right) is great for 
watching Opray, Geraldo, or in this case. Gene Siskel. 




12 



EXPLORER 




Elsewhere On Campus 



These students (top) wonder where the six ball will go next. Wu-Tang's double 
album is coming soon. 

This teddy bear (above) gets to watch people pass by and secretly makes fun of 
them. With a larger freshman class, commuters had to contend with crowded parking 
lots. 




10:07 a.m. 
Jen Merritt wonders how she got on an e-mail list 
for the Don Knotts Fan Club. 




10:23 a.m. 

The horde of students exiting OIney indicates that 
it's the middle of the 10-minute break between class. 




10:54 a.m. 
These three students take a minute to catch up on 
things outside North Dorms. 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLE 



13 



it's not me, I tell you. Frank the Gnome draws The Men 
of D-7.' It's not me!" says Jason Adamo. (right) 

As the dinner rush drags on. (below) lines get longer as 
students anxiously await their chicken & pasta. 




EXPLORER 



Introducing . . . 

The Blue & Gold Dining Commons 

It's not North Dining anymore! 

12 :UUp.in. jgy Joanne McTamney '01 




On Olney Avenue, 
across from Hayman 
Center, and just a short 
walk from the residence 
halls, is the Blue and 
Gold Dining Commons. 
This building, still lovingly 
called "North Dining" by 
many of the upperclass- 
men, was renamed at 
the start of this school 
yeai" as part of a contest 
that was held to finally 
give the building an 
official name. After 
reviewing all of the 
entries, Owen 
Shanahan's was chosen, 
and "North Dining" was 
christened "The Blue 
and Gold Dining Com- 
mons." Regardless of 
whether or not one has 
adopted the new name, 
there is no denying that 



the building plays an 
important part in the 
day-to-day life of La 
Salle. Just look at a 
typical Tuesday for 
example. 

You are sitting in 
your eleven thirty 
class. Suddenly, 
your stomach starts 
to growl, reminding 
you of the breakfast 
that you missed this 
morning. You 
glance at the clock; 
there's still one 
minute left. How — 
are you ever going to 
make it? Finally, the 
sound of a ringing bell 
frees you from your 
class — it's universal free 
period. You start 
walking to the Commons 
and upon entering, see 



the ever-so-familiar lines 
of other students anx- 
iously waiting to get their 
lunch. On your way to 
find a table, you pass the 

"La Salle's Food 
Services is one of 
the best in the 
area." 

- Glenn Jones 

Manager, Blue & Gold 

Dining Commons 

same door that you pass 
every afternoon, and 
read the sign that you've 
read at least a hundred 
times before: "Food 
Service Personnel 
Only." This time, you 




think to yourself, "1 
wonder what goes on in 
there?" 

What goes on behind 
the closed doors of the 

Commons? The 
^ answer: more than 
one might think. 
The Blue and Gold 
Dining Commons 
employs approxi- 
mately forty full- and 
part-time workers, 
not including the 
student staff who 
work the day and 
^ evening shifts. The 
first staff members 
arrive at six o'clock to 
begin their day. They 
spend that time before 
the Commons opens to 
prepare the food and 
dining area for those 
students who manage to 
wake up in time for 
breakfast at 7:30 in the 
morning. After break- 
fast ends at 10:30, the 
workers then have a half 
an hour to prepare for 
the arrival of the lunch 
crowd at 1 1 a.m. 

Any worker at the 
Commons will say that 
the day's work never 
seems to end. There is 
always food to be 
prepared and cooked. 
Dishes, trays, and 
silverware all need to be 
washed. Sodas, juices, 
and ice constantly need 
to be refilled. The day 
continues like this until 
quarter after seven 
when the last students 
have finished their 
meals. After this, the 



task of cleaning begins. 
Often, workers will stay 
until nine o'clock wa.sh- 
ingdishes, cleaning 
every counter, and 
mopping the floor to 
ensure that standards of 
appearance and cleanli- 
ness have been met. 

One of the principal 
people behind the 
operations at the Blue 
and Gold Dining Com- 
mons is the sharply 
dressed campus 
heartthrob, Glenn Jones, 
who has been working at 
the dining hall for fifteen 
years. During that time 
he has worked his way 
through the ranks from 
bus boy to afternoon 
manager. Jones is 
responsible for oversee- 
ing the daily routine, 
planning special events 
such as Bookbinder's 
Night, and making sure 
that everything is running 
smoothly. However, the 
part of the job that is 
dear to his heart is 
dealing with the students 
by acting as the voice of 
the "Napkin Board." He 
devotes much of his time 
to accommodating the 
needs of all of the 
students at the Univer- 
sity. 

"1 feel that La Salle 
University ' s Food 
Services is one of the 
best in the area," Jones 
said. "If you try the 
food services at other 
area colleges, you" 11 find 
the food here is quite 
good." V 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLE 



15 




P\ A CADEMic Life at La Salle 

Preparing students for the next stage of their hfe 

By Michelle Dillin '99 



2:00 p.m. 

The past few years 
have brought loads of 
excitement to La Salle's 
campus. This year alone 
brought two new sports 
teams: football and 
women's lacrosse. The 
new Hayman Center 
provided an excellent 
arena for athletics. 
Community-minded 
activities tlourished both 
on and off-campus, and 
more activities were 
planned for students. 
Enrollment has in- 
creased, and La Salle is 
gaining a new reputation 
for itself. People are 
flocking to La Salle for 
the excitement of the 
campus on a Saturday 
afternoon at game time, 
right? Although some 
students may debate the 
issue, the primary reason 
we come to La Salle is 
for an education. 

Based on our interests 
and goals, we choose a 
major, and maybe a 
minor, and take courses 
that relate to that topic. 
The trick is to fit about 
forty classes into eight 
semesters of about 
fourteen weeks each 
with eight periods a day, 
while at the same time 
making sure we don't 
schedule a class in 
Wister right after a class 
in the Communication 
Center. It's not easy to 



make that walk in just 
ten minutes! 

Carrying, on average, 
fifteen credit hours per 
semester, we face the 
task of adapting to the 
teaching styles of 
various faculty members 
and the responsibility of 
leaving La Salle pre- 
pared for the next stage 
of our lives — whether 
that be graduate school 
or the "real world." This 
means taking advantage 
of internships and 
cooperative education 
opportunities, as well as 
fulfilling all the require- 
ments of the University 
and of our major. Part 
of this preparation 
includes going to class, 
suffering through group 
projects, and more than 
likely, living on less-than- 
adequate sleep. Trips to 
the computer lab and 
library also factor into 
the academic mix. 

There are, of course, 
some advantages to this 
hecfic academic life. If 
we didn't go to classes, 
we certainly wouldn't be 
prepared to enter the 
competitive markets for 
jobs and graduate 
schools. Count all the 
people you know from 
your department that you 
wouldn't have met if it 
were not for that foun- 
dation class you had to 



16 



With goggles, a microscope, and some strange blue 

fluid (top), this student is ready to perform her 

biology experiments. 

These students (right) prove that work can be done 
anywhere. In this case, it's the hallway of Olney Hall. 

EXPLORER 



take in your first semes- 
ter at La Salle. In 
addition, reladvely small 
classes make it easy to 
work with professors 
one-on-one and to gain 
valuable knowledge from 
their experiences. 

All of this hard work 
results in entrance into 
the "real world," com- 
plete with responsibilities 
and bills, or the continua- 
tion of studies in gradu- 
ate or medical school. 
Now you know why 
your parents urged you 
to "enjoy it while you 
can!" The knowledge 
and experience we gain 
through our academic 
pursuits at La Salle are a 
vital part of the entire 
collegiate experience, s; 





Elsewhere On Campus 



rhis student (top) is amused by a sarcastic remark by one of his professors. Over the 
;ourse of four years, many students come to know their professors quite well. 

Dr. Chip Desnoyers (above) takes the teaching of history to new heights. 




^P 2:03 p.m. 

Shannon McEnroe and Kelly Tierney stop to chat in 
! Food Court during lunch. 




2 : 15p.m. 

If Food Court chow doesn't satisfy, you can always 
try the Chinese Truck on Olney Ave. 




2:55 p . iTi . 
April White and Mike Oscar take time out for tea 
and muffins after class in the Food Court. 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLK 



17 



A sea of faces filled the stands (far right) at La Salle's 
home opener against the Fairfield Stags. 

Two Explorers (right) tackle an opposing team's player. 
La Salle finished their season with only one win at home. 

One of the best ways to get to know your fellow team 
members (below) is to hug in mid air. 




A La Salle football coach (above) tells the team what they 
should do in the next play. 

The University's first football team in 56 years (right), 
a rather formidable bunch, makes their way onto the field. 



18 



EXPLORER 




I ^\ After 56 years, La Salle tackles 

Division I-AA Football 

3:00 p.m. 




For fifty-six years, the 
roar of football fans and 
the excitement of 
halftime has been absent 
from McCarthy Stadium. 
This year, however, 
brought the much 
anticipated return of 
football to La Salle's 
campus. The first game 
brought many historic 
events: the Explorer's 
first play, first down, first 
reception, first touch- 
down, and first field goal 
since 1941. Formany, 
the 1997-98 football 
season was a rebirth of 
this great American 
sport. 




The La Salle Explorer 
football team did much 
for the school spirit of 
the University this year. 
Rather than just sit 
around the Food Court 
all day, football gave us 
something to do on 
Saturday afternoons. It 
served as a major event 
for Parent's Weekend, 
and also brought the 
return of Homecoming 
with its game against 
Central Connecticut. 

On Friday afternoons, 
one could hear profes- 
sors wishing the best of 
luck to the football 
players in class, and on 
Monday mornings there 
was sure to be a recap 
of Saturday's game 
before class started. On 
a Friday afternoon, one 
could almost feel the 
excitement in the air as 
the grounds crew 
prepared the field for the 



By Jenn Brewer '99 

game the following 
afternoon — there was 
definitely a buzz around 
campus. 

Although the football 
team did not have a 
winning season this year, 
it helped to revive school 
spirit, which remained 
throughout the year. 
Not only did it help rally 
the student body around 
their team and their 
school, it also attracted 
more students to 
La Salle, as evidenced 
by this year's increased 
freshmen enrollment. 

With their first season 
behind them, the team 
moves on to prepare for 
next season, with more 
blocking, sacs, touch- 
downs, and of course, 
tailgating, yet one thing 
remains: the spirit of the 
blue and gold that united 
students, friends, faculty, 
and alumni. # 




The Explorers (above) do battle with the Stags of Fairfield 
during La Salle's fu-st football game since 1941 . 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLE 



19 




La Salle 56 

A new home provides better broadcasting experience 



4: 00 p.m. 

Not many schools can 
boast that they have a 
creative outlet for their 
students which reaches 
over 300.000 homes 
each day, but La Salle 
can. And for Communi- 
cation majors, it could 
mean the difference 
between getting a 
successful job and 
wearing a cardboard hat 
at Harold's Hamburger 
Hut. 

Since its inception in 
1991. La Salle 56. the 
University's educational 
cable station, has 
provided students with a 
very unique opportunity: 
the chance to gain 
hands-on production 
experience before 
entering the "real 
world." And for Liberal 
Arts majors, anything 
that will help one get a 
better job is well worth 
the time and effort. 

"If you want to work 
in sales or public rela- 
tions at a television 
station, it's much easier 
to get a job." said senior 
Communication major 
Laura Galbraith. "But 
finding a job as an on-air 
talent is ten times as 
hard." 

That's why she, and 
others like her, have 
taken advantage of the 
station's resources 
nearly every week to 



By Andv Gwiazda '96 



produce and host their 
own shows, operate a 
camera or teleprompter. 
and edit stories to be 
aired during the broad- 
cast. 

Over the years, 
however, the station has 
been in constant limbo, 
changing departments 
several times. But the 
1997-98 school year 
marked a rebirth for the 
station, as it found a 
new, permanent home at 
the Communication 
Center on South Cam- 
pus. Now that the 
station has been com- 
bined with the high-tech 
equipment at the Com- 
munication Center, 
students have a more 
powerful outlet with 
which to let their cre- 
ative energies flow. 

"Since the station is 
now right here in the 
Communication Center, 
we have access to all of 
the department's equip- 
ment, including cameras 
and editing systems," 
said Station Manager 
and former La Salle grad 
Tonya Ellis. "Students 
can use the studio for 
shoots and it's easier to 
target students and get 
them involved on crews 
when you're doing 
productions in the same 
building where they have 
class." 



Kathy Reynolds (top) monitors the audio board for a 

taping of the "Blue & Gold Scoreboard" with 

Laura Galbraith. 

Camera crews in the TV studio (right) prepare for a taping 
of an Education Department Forum program. 



"La Salle 56 allows 
you to gain experience 
throughout college, 
whether you want to be 
on-air or work behind 
the scenes," said 
Galbraith. "And now 
with a full-time station 
manager, programs are 
getting done and going 
on-air in a matter of 
days." 

"One of the greatest 
benefits of the station is 
that it allows students to 
work on programs in 
freshman year. There is 
no waiting line at 
La Salle to use equip- 
ment like there might be 
at larger schools," said 
Ellis. 

And for Communica- 
tion majors, that is the 
key benefit, w 





20 



EXPLORER 




a Salle 56 Station Manager Tonya Ellis (top) acts as floor manager for a taping of 
le "Blue and Gold Scoreboard," a show which highlights La Salle sporting events. 

he control room (center) is filled with activity at show time. Communication 
rofessor Sid MacLeod keeps his eyes on the wall of monitors that are before him. 

ick Marmarou (bottom) puts a microphone on one of the panelists of the Education 
epaitment's Forum program. 



4:43 p.m. 
The Union Patio is the perfect spot for Emily 
Suvock and Erin Morris to discuss class work. 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLE 



21 



Someone must be having a birthday, (far right) as these 
students have come to the store to tlnd that perfect card. 

Besides offering textbooks, (right) the store also 
offers a wide selection of reference books. 




22 



EXPLORER 




The Campus Store 

Meeting the needs of students for 50 years 



When students sud- 
denly realize that they've 
run out of pens or 
notebooks, or that they 
forgot to get Uncle Bob 
a birthday present, or 
they just want to pur- 
chase that new La Salle 
sweatshirt to wear at the 
football game, the 
Campus Store can solve 
all of these 
dilemmas, and it has 
been doing so for 50 
years. 

In 1947, the first site 
for a bookstore was 
established in Leonard 
Hall, which was located 
between Benilde and 
McShain Halls. Since 
then, the bookstore has 
moved to what is now 
"Backstage," to the 




room that currently 
serves as the Commuter 
Lounge, and finally to its 
current home in Wister 
Hall in March of 1989. 

However, even this 
location has a unique 
history with remnants of 
its past serving as 
reminders. The floor 
was once that of a 
gymnasium, and the 
bookshelves that now 
hold textbooks were 
previously those of the 
reference section when 
the facility was used as 
the library annex and 
study area. 

The role of the Cam- 
pus Store has evolved 
over the years from 
solely a provider of 
textbooks to that of a 
pseudo-department store 
selling many other 
commodities such as 
supplies, novelty gifts, 
posters, music, greeting 
cards, La Salle apparel, 
and other such items. 

"I definitely rely on the 
campus store when I 
need a gift for 
someone's birthday 
because sometimes it's 
difficult to get off 
campus and do your 
shopping," said sopho- 
more Andrea Quinn. 
"It's nice to be able to 
surprise someone with a 
present when he or she 
is not expecting it." 

"When I think of the 
bookstore, I picture Gold 
Cards paying for La 
Salle paraphernalia that 



By Kim Kes.sler '00 

will be worn by students, 
their families, and those 
with an affinity for blue 
and gold," said sopho- 
more Lydia Steiber. 

During the bookstore's 
early development, 
students utilized the 
facility solely to obtain 
their textbooks during 
those first two weeks of 
the academic year. 
Now, the store has 
become an integral 
aspect in the lives of 
many students. 

With the addition of 
the L-Stop, students 
frequent the store on a 
regular basis throughout 
the entire school year. 
The L-Stop was de- 
signed to offer a mini- 
mart selection with 
extended hours. Snacks, 
sodas, juice, TV dinners, 
film, medication, and 
health and beauty aids 
can all be obtained there 
and even paid for with 
the convenient use of 
one's Gold Card. Those 
who live in townhouses 
or apartments have the 
ability to prepare their 
own meals and so the L- 
Stop makes this feasible. 

"By necessity, we are 
indispensable to students 
for their text books. 
However, we here at the 
store would like students 
to choose to make us an 
important part of their 
lives on campus for their 
other needs." said 
Campus Store Manager 
Mike Lyons, w 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLE 




Roommates, laundry, and independence! It's all a part of life for 

Resident Students 



Remember that day, 
way back in freshman 
year when you moved in. 
met your new roommate, 
learned how to pack 
everything that you ever 
owned into a couple of 
milk crates, and waved 
goodbye to your family, 
thinking how great it was 
to finally be on your 
own? Free at last! Of 
course, you then realized 
that you had no idea how 
to do laundry, but that 
was all right because 
you were independent 
now. 

For more than half of 
La Salle's students, 
resident life is an integral 
part of the college 
experience. This year 
alone, an overwhelming 
number of students who 
enrolled at La Salle 
wanted to live on 
campus, as evidenced by 
the overcrowding and 
the placement of much 
of the freshmen class 
into triples. 

Some freshmen, 
however, did not seem to 
mind being stuck in a 
dorm room with two 
other people. Heather 
DiBianco said, "We just 
had to compromise a 
lot." She and her 
roommates, Tracy 
Daniels and Genelle 
Walters, got along quite 
well, though they "didn't 
have much space." But 
they agreed that it was 
definitely worth sacrific- 



ing space to live on 
campus. 

Different people have 
different expectations of 
resident life at college. 
However, most people 
agree that part of _ 
their decision to live 
on campus was a 
desire to live on their 
own, to meet more 
people, and to have 
the full college 
experience. 

Being a resident 
does include a 
certain freedom that 
is very appealing to 
most students. No one 
questions where you are 
going, what you are 
eating, or how often you 
are going to class. 
However, it also involves 
learning to cope with 
various situations that 
many students did not 
foresee as they waved 
goodbye to their families 
and thought, "I wonder 
where the first party is?" 

For many students, 
sharing a room was a 
foreign concept. Others 
didn't realize how much 
it was going to irritate 
them when their room- 
mate was up until 3 a.m. 
And, although most 
students were convinced 
that it would never 
happen to them, home- 
sickness was contagious. 

But these are all 
learning experiences that 
most students feel 
comprise an extremely 



important component of 
their overall college 
experience. Sophomore 
Laurie Stewart said, "I 
don't think college is 
college without resident 

"I think you learn 
more from living 
with people than 
you do from 
class." 

- Laurie Stewart '00 



life. I think you learn 
more from living with 
people than you do from 
class." 

Where else can you 
learn how to live and get 
along with people that 



you may have otherwise 
avoided? Where else 
can you learn to assert 
yourself, because it is 
your living space, while 
at the same time remain- 
^ ing tactful enough to 
keep a friend who 
will be one for life? 
Where else can you 
knock on a door at 
four o'clock in the 
morning and know 
that someone will be 
there to give advice? 
And where else can 
you learn to be 
^ receptive to that 
knock on the door at 4 
o'clock in the morning 
because you realize that 
sometimes another 
person in need is more 
important than sleep or 
even homework? 



By Christine Gray '00 

"Living on campus has 
helped me to be more 
responsible in everything 
that I do. I have learned 
how to budget my time 
and accept responsibility 
without relying on my 
parents to make me 
follow through," said 
sophomore Eileen 
Golden. 

Though there is 
nothing better than going 
home to Mom's cooking 
and to get that laundry 
washed which has been 
piling up over the past 
month, most residents 
agree that learning how 
to live and deal with 
different people, and to 
take responsibility for 
themselves, is an essen- 
tial part of one's educa- 
tion, w 



From Tom Cruise to Mickey Mouse, part of the fun of 
living in a dorm is that you can decorate anyway you like. 



24 



EXPLORER 





Elsewhere On Campus 




6:10 p.m. 

This student stops to gel a drink at the Campus 
Store before heading back to his dorm. 







6:33 p.m. 

These ladies discuss class material in the library's 
informal study lounge. 




[Students hurry out of North Dorms (top) on their way to class. This year, La Salle 
lad so many residents that many freshman had to live in triples. 

Erin Morris, (above) while trying to figure out her biology work for the next day, 
isecretly longs to be far away from La Salle on a Caribbean Island. 



6:49 p.m. 

The Food Court empties out after the crowd leaves 
night class. 



m 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLE 



25 



Dr. Joseph Ugras (far right) instructs M.B.A. students at 

Bucks County. The center opened in the fall of 1997 and 

offers eight graduate programs in Newtown, PA. 

This graduate student (right) does an Internet search in 
one of the new computer labs. 




26 



EXPLORER 



Introducing La Salle's other half in 




Bucks County 



The commitment, 
philosophy, and mission 
of Lasaliian institutions 
has always been to 
educate. In the process 
of growth and expansion 
of several different 
aspects of La Salle 
University's campus, 
ranging from the expan- 
sion of Hayman Hall and 
the improvements to the 
Communication Center, 
the University still 
continues to maintain 
that goal. In the fall of 
1997, La Salle 
University's Bucks 
County Center, located 
in Newtown, Pennsylva- 
nia, opened its doors for 
the first time, providing a 
vast selection of educa- 
tional programs. These 




programs would educate 
those in Bucks County, 
Eastern Montgomery 
County, New Jersey, 
and Northeast Philadel- 
phia. The Center will 
ultimately be part of the 
new Silver Lake Execu- 
tive Campus. 

In continuing its 
tradition of zeal for both 
God and teaching. La 
Salle University built the 
Bucks County Center in 
order to offer various 
Master's degree pro- 
grams in several aca- 
demic areas: Business 
Administration, for the 
potential business leader; 
Bilingual and Bicultural 
Studies, for those who 
work with Spanish- 
speaking individuals; 
Computer Information 
Science, for students 
looking to expand their 
knowledge of the PC 
and different aspects of 
the Internet; Education, 
to help bring about an 
emphasis on an under- 
standing of the student 
as an individual, rather 
than an emphasis on 
subject matter; Clinical- 
Counseling Psychology, 
for emphasis on mar- 
riage, family, addiction, 
psychology, and pastoral 
counseling; Nursing, for 
the health care practitio- 
ner looking toward a 
future as a clinician or 
administrator; Profes- 
sional Communication, 
for professionals wishing 
to further their communi- 
cation skills; and Theo- 



By Dennis Miguel '01 

logical Studies, Pastoral 
Ministry, and Liturgical 
Praxis, for all Christians 
wanting to take on the 
theological challenges of 
today. Other programs 
which are being consid- 
ered for the future are a 
combination M.S.N./ 
M.B.A., Executive 
MBA, Family Nurse 
Practitioner M.S.N. 
track, and Certificate 
programs. 

Bucks County is 
equipped with computer, 
nursing, and psychologi- 
cal assessment labs, 
class and seminar rooms, 
and executive training 
and professional devel- 
opment facilities. In 
addition, the Center 
houses a Resource 
Center containing 
computer workstations 
and library materials. 

La Salle University's 
commitment to excel- 
lence in teaching, its 
concern for the values of 
the individual student, 
and its pursuit of the 
truth along with the 
development of skills in a 
person to reach his or 
her potential all reflect 
the philosophy of 
Lasaliian institutions aU 
over the world. There- 
fore, it is no surprise that 
La Salle would continue 
expanding. The 
University's mission to 
educate has remained its 
priority. It is a priority 
that is fulfilled in 
La Salle's new Bucks 
County Center. S 



A DAY IN THE UFE OF LA SALLE 



27 



eP\ Center City Philadelphia 

9:00 p.m. 



A night in La Salle's largest classroom 

Bv Kimherlv O'Brien '01 



The La Salle eommu- 
nity provides a plethora 
of activities that both 
stimulate the mind and 
enhance the social 
aspect of the "college 
experience." But every 
now and then students 
just want to break out, 
see what's out there, 
and just get away from it 
all. With Center City 
Philadelphia only a 
stone's throw away, La 
Salle students have the 
best of both worlds. 

For night life, look no 
further than Delaware 
Avenue, home to some 
of the most cutting-edge 
clubs on the east coast. 
Many clubs host 18-24 
nights and college nights 
where there is reduced 
cover when you show 
your student ID. Want 
some ideas of places you 
could try? Check out 
Egypt, Maui, the 8th 
Floor, Shampoo, and 
Baha Beach Club. 
These are great places 
to meet a college crowd 
from all over the tri-state 
region looking for a good 
time. 

For shopping, there is 
the Gallery at 8th & 
Market, the shops on 
Chestnut Street, South 
Street, and Liberty One. 
These stores can 
accommodate all of your 



shopping needs whether 
it be replacing the shirt 
your roommate acciden- 
tally ruined or purchasing 
that much needed futon 
for the guests that drop 
by unexpectedly. These 
are also great places to 
just sit back and take in 
the people, places, and 
sites. Whatever your 
motive may be, these 
shops are the answer to 
your prayers. 

Looking for a dining 
experience that will 
surpass the Blue and 
Gold Dining Commons? 
How about T.G.I. 
Fridays, Ruth Chris' 
Steakhouse, The Pan- 
orama Room, The 
Charthouse, or Pizzeria 
Uno, just to name a few. 
The aromas of cheese 
steaks and ethnic cuisine 
mix with the sharp night 
air which fill the streets 
of Center City. 

As for cultural diver- 
sity and enrichment, 
there is no place more 
appropriate than Center 
City. The Philadelphia 
Museum of Art houses 
some of the largest art 
collections in the coun- 
try. From Baroque to 
Van Gogh, you can 
experience art in all its 
forms. At the Franklin 
Institute, you can explore 
the complex and diverse 



world we live in with all 
its beauty and surprises. 
On a more historical 
note, you may want to 
visit Independence Hall 
and the Liberty Bell to 
see for yourself the very 
place where our destiny 
as a country was 
determined. 

Center City is ideal for 
just getting away from 
the constant bustle of 
campus life. You can 
take a walk down Kelly 
Drive and take in the 
beauty of this famous 
tree-lined drive or bring 
a good book and a warm 
blanket and sit by 
Boathouse Row on a 
chilly day as evening 
approaches. In the 
midst of the glass and 
steel skyscrapers, 
Philadelphia has plenty 
of natural beauty just 
waiting to be explored. 

Center City is the 
place that has it all — 
from shopping to dining, 
from museums to 
clubs — it' s all right here, 
only six miles away. So 
the next time you're 
sitting in your dorm room 
thinking, "I'm soooo 
bored!" check out the 
sites and sounds of the 
City of Brotherly Love, 
and maybe you'll change 
your attitude. 5' 



28 



These La Salle students (top) have just come out of Downey's in Center City. 
Philadelphia has a variety of restaurants, shops, and pubs that are perfect 

places to spend a weekend nighi. 

Among some of the many specialty shops you'll find on South Street (right) 

are Foot Locker and Tower Records. 

EXPLORER 




Elsewhere On Campus 




I A walk along South Street (top) yields an assortment of interesting shops and 
icateries. Just imagine all the scrunchies you could buy with only a few bucks. 

Philly has one of the most beautiful skylines in the country (above)-and what better 
place to see it than the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 



9:55 p.m. 
Collegian editors work late and rejoice that they 
I can work side-by-side. 



A DAY IN THE UFE OF LA SALLE 



29 



La Salle Overnight 








A bottle of detergent 

(above right) indicates that 

someone is still awake 

doing the tons of laundry 

that have piled up during 

the week. 

The lights are still on 

(above), but nobody's 

home in Wister Hall after 

everyone has left to go 

home after night class. 




Michelle Dillin (above) walks back to her townhouse after 
working late in the Grimoire office. 

The setting sun (right) of a late summer afternoon signals 
the end of another day at La Salle University. 



30 



EXPLORER 





Masque members (left) go through rehearsals for Pippin 
in the Dan Rodden Theatre. Once rehearsals are over, set 
construction will start and continue through the night. 

Using skills he learned playing with Legos as a child, 
Joe D'Orazio (below) buids molecular structures for a 
biology class. 




"il 






^5B^ 


il 






^ 





Therese Leonard (above) works late to finish her math 
homework for the next day and wonders why there is a 
photographer in her townhouse. 

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LA SALLE 3 1 




The spirit of St. John Baptist de La Salle plays an important role in both the academic and 
spiritual life of every student, as evidenced in the name of the University chapel. 



32 



EXPLORER 



Academics 




During La Salle College's earliest days, its faculty con- 
sisted of approximately five Christian Brothers. Since 
then, the faculty has grown and changed considerably. 
Yet, 135 years after the school's establishment, there remains 
something distinctive about its professors — a commitment to the 
ideals of St. John Baptist de La Salle. Recognizing that teachers 
have a responsibility to "touch hearts" as well as to nurture minds, 
De La Salle emphasized providing caring, personalized attention 
to students. In keeping with his vision, the faculty at 
La Salle University today strive to create an atmosphere "where 
mind speaks to mind and heart to heart and where teaching and 
learning are experienced among friends." Despite their many com- 
mitments, these professors generously give of their time, energy, 
and selves to help their students, proving daily that, at 
La Salle, teaching truly does come first, v 



Section Editor: 

Lori Molinari "97 



ACADEMICS 



33 




DMINISTRATION 




JOSEPH F. BURKE, F.S.C., Ph.D. 

President 




ALICE L. 


RICHARD 


BARBARA C. 


GREGORY O. 


ZANE ROBINSON 


ELIZABETH 


HOERSCH, Ph.D. 

Executive Assistant to 
the President 


NIGRO,Ph.D. 

Provost 


MILLARD, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of 
Arts & Sciences 


BRUCE, M.B.A. 

Dean, School of 

Business 
Administration 


WOLF, Ph.D., 
R.N.,F.A.A.N. 

Dean, School of 
Nursing 


HEENAN, M.Ed 

Director of 
Continuing Studies 



34 



EXPLORER 







NANCY A. BREWER, M.S. 

Dealt of Students 



CHARLES F. 
ECHELMEIER, F.S.C., M.A. 

Director of Campus Ministry 

ROSEMARY A. BARBERA, 
M.A., M.S.S. 

Director of the Center for 
Community Learning 

PETER J. FILICETTI, Ph.D. 

Director of the Counseling Center 

RONALD C. DIMENT, 
M.Ed. 

Director of Resident Life 

LAURA K. McKENNA, 

M.S.N., C.R.N.P. 

Director of Student Health Services 

KATHLEEN SCHRADER, 
M.B.A. 

Director of Student Life 



FRED J. FOLEY, JR., Ph.D. 

Vice-President for 
Development 

CHARLES E. GRESH, 
F.S.C., M.Litt. 

Director of Development 

ANDREW H. JAFFEE, B.S. 

Director of the Annual Fund 

GEORGE J. DOTSEY, M.A. 

Director of Alumni 

LOUIS A. LAMORTE, Jr., 
M.S.Ed. 

Director of Career Planning 

EDWARD A. TURZANSKI, 
M.A. 

Director of Government Affairs 

ANDREW J. BARTLEY, 
F.S.C., M.A. 

Director of Community Affairs 



RAYMOND A. RICCL Ed.M. 

Vice-President for 
Enrollment Services 

WENDY J. McLaughlin, 

M.A. 

Director of Financial Aid 

DOMINIC J. GALANTE, 
B.S. 

Registrar 

RAYMOND E. ULMER. 
M.A. 

Director of Public Relations 

STEPHEN W. THORPE, 
Ph.D. 

Director of Institutional Research 




DAVID C. FLEMING, M.B.A. 

Vice-President for 
Business Affairs 

ROSE LEE PAULINE, M.A. 

Assistant Vice-President for 

Business Affairs & 
Affirmative Action Officer 

PAUL V. McNABB, M.B.A. 

Comptroller 

JAMES E. COOPER, B.B.A. 

Director of Accounting & Budgets 

MARINA A. GRACE, M.B.A. 

Bursar 

HUBERT A. THOMAS. B.S. 

Director of Physical Facilities 

SUSAN ROHANNA, B.S. 

Director of Human Resources 

NANCY LEE MOORE, B.S. 

Director of Purchasing 

ROBERT J. LEVINS 

Director of Security & Safety 

STEPHEN C. GREB. M.Ed. 

Director of Food Services 

LINDA FERRANTE 

Director of Duplication & 
Mail Services 

MICHAEL D. LYONS. B.S. 

Manager of the Campus Store 



ACADEMICS 



^^ 




CCOUNTING 



New Curriculum Helps Students 
Embark on Successful Careers 



The Accounting 
Department has recently 
made key curriculum 
changes that will better 
prepare students for 
accounting careers and 
professional licensure 
upon graduation. These 
efforts, in combination 
with others such as the 
development of corpo- 
rate partnerships, allow 
the department and its 
students to maintain their 
competitive edge in the 
dynamic world of 
business. In reassessing 
its curriculum, the 
department placed 
particular emphasis upon 
what course of study 
would prove most 
beneficial to students 
once they embark on 
their professional 



careers after graduation. 

Recognizing the 150- 
Hour Requirement for 
CPA Licensure, the 
department revised its 
curriculum to make it 
easier for La Salle 
accounting students to 
fulfill this requirement. 
First, the total number of 
credits necessary to earn 
a Bachelor's Degree in 
accounting has been 
increased to 129. This 
number includes the 
additional requirement of 
two electives (six 
credits) and one credit 
hour for the Freshman 
Year Experience. 
Additionally, the Univer- 
sity Curriculum Corrmiit- 
tee ruled to change the 
two Intermediate 
Accounting classes 



(Accounting 201 and 
202) to four-credit hour 
courses. Finally, a 
subcommittee of the 
department developed a 
proposal that affords 
students the opportunity 
to complete the 150 
credit hours required for 
licensure on a part-time 
basis within one calendar 
year after graduation. 

The Accounting 
Department has also 
taken many other 
measures to maximize 
the learning opportunities 
for its students. For 
example, it has sought to 
establish and maintain 
corporate partnerships. 
These efforts have been 
aided by the fact that 
many department faculty 
members have been 



professionally involved 
with the participating 
corporations. Addition- 
ally, faculty members 
often coordinate field 
trips to such places as 
the Philadelphia Stock 
Exchange, Coopers & 
Lybrand, and Johnson & 
Johnson. The depart- 
ment also seeks to 
expand its network of 
relationships with the 
professional business 
community through 
activities such as lun- 
cheon meetings with top 
corporate executives and 
the annual Accounting 
Department Golf Outing, 
which in its second year 
included a large number 
of business and account- 
ing professionals. 
The Accounting 



By Sara Ch lappa '98 

Department's commit- 
ment to the education 
and professional devel- 
opment of its students 
has recently been 
recognized by many in 
the field. The depart- 
ment was invited to join 
the Federation of 
Schools of Accountancy 
(FSA), an association of 
167 accredited colleges, 
universities, private 
businesses, and non- 
profit organizations that 
promotes graduate level 
education in accounting. 
Moreover, last spring 
two teams from La Salle . 
were among the five 
teams selected as 
finalists in the PICPA's 
statewide competition 
called "The Business 
Plan Challenge." H 



PAUL BRAZINA, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor 

GERALD FITZGERALD, F.S.C., 
M.A., M.B.A. 

Assistant Professor 

BRUCE LEAUBY, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 



ALVINO MASSIMINI, M.B.A. 

Assistant Professor 



JOHN REARDON, Ph.D. 

Chair and Associate Professor 



36 EXPLORER 





Department of 

/\CC(;UNTING 



Chair ; 

John Reardon, Ph.D. 

Professor : 

Scott Stickel, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

Susan Borkowski, Ph.D. 

Dennis Kennedy, Ph.D. 

Bruce Leauby, Ph.D. 

Joseph Ugras, Ph.D. 

Mary Jeanne Welsh, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

Paul Brazina, Ph.D. 

Gerald Fitzgerald, F.S.C., M.A., M.B.A. 

Alvino Massimini, M.B.A. 

Anne Walsh, Ph.D. 

John Zook, M.B.A. 



SCOTT STICKEL, Ph.D. 
Professor 



JOSEPH UGRAS, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 



MARY JEANNE WELSH. Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



JOHN ZOOK, M.B.A. 

Assistant Professor 



ACADEMICS 



37 




lOLOGY 

Department Maintains High 
Standards in Teaching and Research 



The Biology Depart- 
ment at La Salle Univer- 
sity has long had a 
strong reputation for 
academic excellence. 

The key to the Biology 
Department's quality 
undeniably resides in the 
knowledge and dedica- 
tion of its professors. 
The faculty holds a 
common belief in 
preser\'ing a vital feature 
of undergraduate-level 
education which is sadly 
absent from many other 
institutions: student- 
professor contact. 

For the 1997-98 school 
year, the department was 
again headed by Dr. 
Annette O'Connor. 
Moreover, lab assistant 
Steve Ranjo joined the 
staff in the fall. In 



addition to preparing 
and maintaining the 
many lab materials, he 
directed the student 
workers on the biology 
floor. 

Recently, many 
biology professors have 
been actively engaged in 
research and other 
projects outside of the 
classroom. Dr. Gerald 
Ballough, for example, 
has spent his past few 
summers as a research 
associate and principal 
investigator in the 
neurotoxicology divi- 
sion of the U. S. Army 
Medical Research 
Institute of Chemical 
Defense. He has also 
conducted related 
experiments on the effects 
of certain chemicals and 



Department of 

Biology 



Chair : 

Annette O'Connor, Ph.D. 

Professor : 

Thomas McPhillips, F.S.C., Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

Norbert F. Belzer, Ph.D. 

Ann Mickle, Ph.D. 

Geri Seitchik, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

Gerald P. Ballough, Ph.D. 
Robert Shurina, Ph.D. 



enzymes on the brain and 
its tissues. 

This year, many 
members of the depart- 
ment also continued their 
involvement with the 
Institute for the Ad- 
vancement of Math and 
Science Teaching 
(lAMST), which Brother 
Thomas McPhillips was 
instrumental in organiz- 
ing three years ago. For 
example. Dr. Robert 
Shurina taught the 
Institute-sponsored 
Integrated Math and 
Science class, which 
provides education 
majors with a "hands-on" 
approach to science that 
focuses more on general 
scientific principles than 
on specific theories and 
methods. 



In addition, some 
biology majors have 
also been engaged in 
personal research 
projects over the last 
year. Recently, senior 
David Dinan received a 
research grant from the 
lAMST, while junior 
biology majors Agnes 
Gaweska and Mike 
Jaworski spent last 
summer in Maryland 
performing research on 
the effects of various 
toxins on DNA and 
brain tissue. 

Such research has 
been augmented by the 
recent addition of a 
scanning electron 
microscope (SEM) to 
the biology floor. 
Purchased before the 
beginning of the fall 



By Steffan Schiilz '99 

semester, the micro- 
scope operates by 
shooting and capturing a 
beam of electrons that is 
directed at the object 
being viewed. This 
powerful instrument 
allows the user to obtain 
a crisp, 3-D image of the 
surface of many objects 
found within the average 
cell. The new SEM 
provides a magnification 
significantly greater than 
that of the common light 
microscope usually seen 
in laboratories. The 
department hopes that 
this instrument will 
provide more faculty 
members and students 
with the means to 
engage in new research 
projects on La Salle's 
campus. * 



38 EXPLORER 





ANN MICKLE. Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



ANNETTE O'CONNOR. Ph.D. 
Chair and Associate 
Professor 



ROBERT SHURINA, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



ACADEMICS 




HEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY 



SPOTLIGHTING: 

Paul A. 



Originally from Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, Dr. Paul Hintz 
joined La Salle's Department of 
Chemistry & Biochemistry in 
1994. He earned his 
Bachelor's Degree in chemistry 
at Beloit College in Wisconsin 
and then attended State Univer- 
sity of New York (SUNY) at 
Stony Brook for his doctorate in 
physical chemistry. Next, Hintz 
spent about two years as a 
"post doc" at the University of 
Nevada at Reno. After that, he 
applied for a teaching position 
at La Salle. 

Hintz admits that the skills of 
a chemist and those of an 
educator are very different. In 
fact, prior to his arrival at 
La Salle, the only teaching he 
had done was in a General 
Chemistry Lab in graduate 
school. However, Hintz 
remarks that he is "learning 
about how to teach everyday." 
He knows how important it is to 
adapt what he does to his 
particular audience. 

At La Salle. Hintz teaches 
General Chemistry Laboratory, 
Nurse's Chemistry, Consumer 
Chemistry, Quantitative Analy- 
sis, and Instrumental Analysis. 
In the fall of 1995, he also 
taught a special topics course 
on Chemical Dynamics that 
investigated gas phase reactions 
and how to measure the energy 
of the bonds breaking and 
forming. Of all his courses, 
Hintz likes teaching Nurse's 
Chemistry and Quantitative 



By Stephanie Hamilton '98 

Analysis the best. He finds 
teaching Nurse's Chemistry 
especially enjoyable since the 
nursing students show such 
enthusiasm. Hintz also enjoys 
teaching Quantitative Analysis 
because that class brings all of 
the chemistry majors together 
for the first time. Quantitative 
Analysis is also the first class in 
which chemistry majors must 
write a "real" laboratory report. 

Hintz states that Consumer 
Chemistry is his most challeng- 
ing course to teach, since it is 
geared primarily toward non- 
science majors. He explains 
that these students have often 
had very bad experiences with 
chemistry prior to taking his 
class, and, because they are 
often trying to fulfill a require- 
ment, they may not want to be 
there. Consequently, he 
attempts to make chemistry 
interesting by taking the stu- 
dents to the lab. There they 
can learn about chemistry in a 
more "hands-on" fashion by 
performing experiments. Hintz 
wants his students to recognize 
that "chemistry is everywhere 
they look." He hopes that they 
ultimately become less afraid of 
chemistry, understand it, and 
see it as a part of life. 

Hintz remarks that the most 
rewarding thing about teaching 
is seeing people learn. He 
enjoys watching students sit 
down to a problem, understand 
it, and say, "That's how it 
works." a 



Department of 



Chair : 

Nancy L. Jones, Ph.D. 

Professors : 

David J. Cichowicz, Ph.D. 
Thomas S.Straub, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

William A. Price, Ph.D. 
George M. Shalhoub, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor : 

PaulA. Hintz, Ph.D. 




40 



EXPLORER 





NANCY L. JONES. Ph.D. 
Chair and Associate 
Professor 



WILLIAM A. PRICE. Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

GEORGE M. SHALHOUB, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

THOMAS S. STRAUB. Ph.D. 
Professor 



ACADEMICS 




OMMUNICATION 



SPOTLIGHTING: 



M. 



JUamton^ Jr li * JlJ , 



What do hundreds of commu- 
nication majors, the entire 
Masque theater group, and 
several committees across the 
campus have in common? 
They all have worked with Dr. 
Marianne Dainton, an Assistant 
Professor in the Communication 
Department. Communication 
majors will recognize her as the 
one whose office door is 
always open, regardless of 
whether their visit falls within 
office hours. Dainton comes to 
the campus each day to help 
her students learn and to 
contribute to the La Salle 
community. 

Although raised in East 
Brunswick, New Jersey, 
Dainton was actually bom in 
Darby, Pennsylvania, and calls 
the Philadelphia area "home" 
because her family still lives 
here. She attended Villanova 
University as an undergraduate 
majoring in communication and 
then obtained both her Master's 
Degree and doctorate from 
Ohio State University, where 
she concentrated on marriage 
and interpersonal communica- 
tion. 

Dainton taught at Ohio State 
for four years before moving to 
the Genesio branch of the State 
University of New York, where 
she remained for two years. 
Then, in the fall of 1996, 



By Michelle Dillin '99 

Dainton started teaching at 
La Salle, where she has since 
taught multiple sections of three 
courses: Rhetoric and Commu- 
nication Theory, Advanced 
Theory and Research, and Sex 
Roles. 

Although this schedule keeps 
her busy, she has also im- 
mersed herself in the La Salle 
community, participating in the 
Student Affairs Committee and 
the International Week Planning 
Committee. Dainton also 
serves as the moderator for the 
Masque, where she lends her 
enthusiasm, support, and advice 
to La Salle's theater produc- 
tions. 

In the little free time she 
allots herself, Dainton renovates 
her Upper Dublin home with 
her husband, Scott, who is an 
engineer. She enjoys garden- 
ing, watching films, and reading 
fiction, especially murder 
mysteries. 

If Dainton had to describe the 
La Salle community in one 
word, it would be "personal." 
She appreciates the fact that it 
is relatively easy to get to know 
people well. When asked to 
identify the best way to improve 
one's communication skills, 
she replied: "More communica- 
tion is not always better. Too 
often, people overlook the 
importance of silence and 
privacy." 




42 



EXPLORER 




Department of 

Communication 

Chair : 

Gerard Molyneaux, F.S.C., Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

Richard J. Goedkoop, Ph.D. 
Lynne A. Texter, Ph.D. 
William D. Wine, M.S. 

Assistant Professors : 

Marianne Dainton, Ph.D. 

William E.Hall, Ph.D. 

Holly C.Kruse, Ph.D. 

Sidney J. MacLeod, Jr., M.F.A. 

Michael Smith, Ph.D. 

Lecturer: 

Scott McHugh 



MARIANNE DAINTON, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



1 ■ -~ J^s^rWi RICHARD J. GOEDKOOP, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

^ f 

-- ' WILLIAM E. HALL, Ph.D. 

Jm \ ' Assistant Professor 



rs 



HOLLY C. KRUSE, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor 

SIDNEY J. MacLeod, Jr., M.FA. 
Assistant Professor 

GERARD MOLYNEAUX, F.S.C., 

Ph.D. 

Chair and Professor 



MICHAEL SMITH, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 

LYNNE A. TEXTER, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

WILLIAM D. WINE. M.S. 
Associate Professor 



ACADEMICS 



43 



J- 



Economics 

-^ New ECI Major Will Provide 



World of Opportunities 



Economics and 
International Studies 
(ECI) is one of 
La Salle's newest 
majors. Combining such 
disciplines as economics, 
business, and foreign 
language and culture, 
ECI allows students to 
gain a well-rounded 
education. ECI majors 
will be more versatile in 
the work force because 
their background will 
include the theories and 
practicality of econom- 
ics, along with a more in- 
depth global knowledge. 

Sophomore ECI major 
Marc Santugini-Repiquet 
comments that the ECI 
major was part of the 
reason he chose to 
attend La Salle. Since 
his ultimate goal is to 



work in the foreign 
service, he recognized 
the opportunities that the 
ECI major had to offer 
him. Santugini-Repiquet 
explains that ECI "is a 
new major that is not 
offered at most universi- 
ties. It is very original." 

The ECI major is, 
indeed, unique. It 
consists of nine econom- 
ics classes, eight classes 
that include math, 
history, and internation- 
ally focused electives, 
and a three-course 
sequence in a foreign 
language. These 
requirements allow 
students to receive a 
strong background in 
economics, while at the 
same time gaining 
exposure to other fields 



that will increase their 
understanding of the 
world around them. 

The foreign language 
requirement, in particu- 
lar, enables students to 
learn more about another 
society through a 
comprehensive under- 
standing, not only of its 
culture, but of its spoken 
word. 

The foreign language 
requirement is also 
important because of the 
seminar class, which is 
taken senior year. This 
course is the culmination 
of the major, and it 
allows students to prove 
their proficiency in their 
chosen language. In 
order to fulfill the 
requirements for the 
seminar class, students 



must submit abstracts of 
their research papers, or 
present their papers 
orally, in a non-native 
language. These 
presentations ensure that 
students have a demon- 
strated ability in a 
language other than 
English. 

ECI also offers 
internships to its stu- 
dents. Once the stu- 
dents have fulfilled the 
basic economic founda- 
tion courses and have 
earned sophomore 
standing, they are eligible 
to apply for internships 
and co-ops that will give 
them first-hand experi- 
ence in the fields in 
which they are inter- 
ested. 

Having a background 



By Christine Gray '00 

in International Studies is 
particularly advanta- 
geous because the world 
has become more 
internationally focused. 
An understanding of 
foreign governments, 
economies, policies, and 
languages will provide 
ECI majors with many 
job opportunities. Ca- 
reers in the U.S. govern- 
ment, such as embassy 
positions, the Foreign 
Service, the State 
Department, or the 
Peace Corps, will be 
among those available to 
them. The Economics 
and International Studies 
major can thus benefit 
any student who is 
interested in pursuing 
some form of interna- 
tional career. S 



JOSEPH R CAIRO, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 

JOHN A. DUFFY, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

DAVID L. GEORGE, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 



RICHARD T GERUSON, Ph.D. 
Chair and Associate Professor 



JOHN S. GRADY, M.A. 
Associate Professor 



44 



EXPLORER 





Department of 

Economics 



Chair ; 

Richard T. Geruson, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

John A. Duffy, Ph.D. 

David L. George, Ph.D. 

John S. Grady, M.A. 

Richard E. Mshomba, Ph.D. 

Elizabeth Paulin, Ph.D. 

H. David Robison, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

Joseph P. Cairo, M.A. 
Mark J. Ratkus, Ph.D. 



RICHARD E. MSHOMBA. Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



ELIZABETH PAULIN. Ph.D. 



jjf^yi Associate Professor 



MARK J. RATKUS. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



H. DAVID ROBISON. Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



ACADEMICS 45 



H 



? DUCATION 



>' V 



^ Learning through Teaching 



Student Teachers Gain Practical Experience in the Classroom 



Students majoring in 
elementary or secondary 
education study for three 
years in preparation for 
their senior year student 
teaching experience. 
Called the "Professional 
Year," student teaching 
provides seniors with the 
opportunity to gain 
hands-on experience in 
either the elementary or 
secondary classroom. 

Students majoring in 
elementary/special 
education (ESE) spend 
one semester of their 
senior year teaching in 
elementary classrooms. 
During the other semes- 
ter, they teach in special 
education classrooms, 
servicing mildly, moder- 
ately, or severely 
mentally and/orphysi- 



cally handicapped 
children. During both 
experiences, these 
students are under the 
guidance of experienced 
teachers and a La Salle 
supervisor. These 
teaching experiences 
take place in either a 
public or private school 
in Philadelphia or the 
surrounding suburbs. 
Dr. Marilyn Lambert 
and Dr. Sharon Schoen, 
the co-directors of the 
ESE program, work 
together to ensure that 
this "Professional Year" 
is a positive experience 
for all concerned. 

These ESE student 
teachers are encouraged 
to use both traditional 
and innovative strategies, 
techniques, and ap- 



proaches in their class- 
rooms. They can thus 
put theory into practice 
in realistic environments. 
Concerning her semester 
of student teaching in a 
special education 
classroom, Elizabeth 
Hargrave remarked, 
"Although this has been 
a challenging semester, I 
am excited that I have 
been able to incorporate 
what I have learned . . . 
The experiences I have 
had this semester are 
ones that cannot be 
simulated in a university 
classroom, but must be 
experienced first hand." 

Students majoring in 
secondary education 
spend the spring semes- 
ter teaching in either a 
public or private middle 



school or high school in 
Philadelphia or the 
surrounding suburbs. 
Brother Jim Butler 
assists these students 
with their placements. 
Also under the guidance 
of experienced teachers 
and a La Salle supervi- 
sor, these student 
teachers instruct in their 
areas of specialization 
(English, foreign lan- 
guages, history, math, or 
science). Like the ESE 
majors, they have the 
opportunity to utilize the 
strategies and theories 
they have learned. 
Secondary education/ 
history major Mary 
DeMasi commented, 
"Student teaching is 
definitely challenging and 
demanding, but I know 



By Jennifer Schmitt '98 

that this semester is 
preparing me for when I 
have a full-time teaching 
position after graduation. 
Although the first year 
of teaching is always an 
adjustment, I feel 
prepared for the transi- 
tion because of the 
training that we have 
received through the 
Education Department." 

During this "Profes- 
sional Year," prospec- 
tive teachers are treated 
as professionals and 
encouraged in their 
creative ideas and their 
eagerness to teach. i 

Well prepared by the j 
Education Department, 
these student teachers | 
enter the field as re- 
spected and informed j 
educators. 



ARTHUR BANGS, F.S.C., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

MARYANNE R. BEDNAR, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

GARY K. CLABAUGH, Ed.D. 

Professor 

LAWRENCE J. COLHOCKER, 

F.S.C., Ed.D. 

Assistant Professor 



PRESTON D. FEDEN, Ed.D. 
Associate Professor 

CAROLE FREEMAN, Ph.D. 

Chair and Associate Professor 

MARILYN A. LAMBERT, Ed.D. 
Associate Professor 




46 EXPLORER 




Department of 

EliUCATHiN 



Chair: 

Carole Freeman, Ph.D. 

Professor: 

Gary K. Clabaugh, Ed.D. 

Associate Professors: 

Arthur Bangs, F.S.C., Ph.D. 

Maryanne R. Bednar, Ph.D. 

Preston D. Feden, Ed.D. 

Marilyn A. Lambert, Ed.D. 

Francis Ryan, Ed.D. 

Sharon F. Schoen, Ed.D. 

John J. Sweeder, Ed.D. 

Robert M. Vogel, Ed.D. 

Assistant Professors: 

Lawrence J. Colhocker, F.S.C., Ed.D. 

Sally Sentner, D.Ed. 

Debra Yost, Ph.D. 



FRANCIS RYAN, Ed.D. 

Associate Professor 

SHARON F. SCHOEN, Ed.D. 

Associate Professor 

SALLY SENTNER, D.Ed. 

Assistant Professor 



JOHN J. SWEEDER, Ed.D. 
Associate Professor 



ROBERT M. VOGEL, Ed.D. 

Associate Professor 

DEBRA YOST, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor 



ACADEMICS 



47 



-^ 



English 



SPOTLIGHTING: 

Justin \^ 



Justin Cronin, La Salle's 
Writer-in-Residence for the 
past six years, was born in 
Boston, Massachusetts, and 
grew up in New York. 

After receiving an A.B. in 
English and American literature 
from Harvard University in 
1984, Cronin spent some time 
traveling in Europe and teaching 
high school English in Honolulu 
and Los Angeles. In 1987, he 
enrolled in the graduate creative 
writing program at the Univer- 
sity of Iowa, and he earned his 
Master of Fine Arts Degree 
two years later. By 1989 he 
had already published two 
novellas — Bones and A Short 
Histoiy of the Long Ball 
(which won the National 
Novella Award). 

Before coming to La Salle, 
Cronin also worked as a 
columnist and editorial page 
editor, a graduate creative 
writing instructor, and a 
freelance writer for Reader's 
Digest and other publications. 

Since joining the English 
Department faculty in 1992, he 
has been a great asset to 
La Salle. In addition to teach- 
ing creative writing and prose 
fiction courses, Cronin has 
developed a unique "Living 
Writers" series and course that 
brings accomplished novelists to 
campus for readings and class 
discussions. In the fall, Cronin 
brought five rising young 
writers to campus for this 
course: Elizabeth McCracken, 
Marcie Hershman, Jonathan 
Franzen, Tom Drury, and Chris 



, M.F.A. 



By Chris Lilienthal '98 

Bojhalian. 

Cronin has also contributed to 
the extra-curricular life of 
La Salle University. He has 
developed and assisted with the 
coordination of Coffeehouse — 
a semi-regular function in 
Backstage that provides 
students with an opportunity to 
share prose or poetry, perform 
musical numbers, act out short 
routines, and enjoy some free 
coffee. Cronin has also acted 
as moderator for the Grimoire 
and served on the Judicial 
Board. 

In addition to teaching at 
La Salle, Cronin has done some 
freelance writing, contributed to 
several travel books, and served 
as fiction editor for the Wid- 
ener Review. He has also 
continued to pursue his own 
fiction and poetry writing. His 
"What This Is Between Us" — 
a short story that appeared in 
the Greensboro Review — was 
selected for honorable mention 
in the Pushcart Prize Anthol- 
ogy. He has also contributed 
fiction to the magazine section 
of The Philadelphia Inquirer, 
and he has a new book forth- 
coming — a collection of novel- 
las and short stories called 
Adrift in the Heavens. 

When not teaching or writing, 
Cronin enjoys running, biking, 
and fly-fishing. However, most 
of his free time these days is 
spent with his wife Leslie and 
their beautiful one-and-a-half 
year old daughter Iris, who, he 
says, "is the center of [his] 
universe." ii 



Department of 

English 



Chair: 

Patricia B. Haberstroh, Ph.D. 

Professors: 

James A. Butler, Ph.D. 

Kevin J. Harty, Ph.D. 

Linda E. Merians, Ph.D. 

Barbara C. Millard, Ph.D. 

Emery C. Mollenhauer, F.S.C., Ph.D. 

JohnJ.Seydow,Ph.D. 

MargotSoven,Ph.D. 

Associate Professors: 

Gabriel A. Pagan, F.S.C., Ph.D. 

Vincent Kling, Ph.D. 

Stephen P. Smith, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors: 

Marjorie S. Allen, Ph.D. 

Phyllis Betz, Ph.D. 

Dolores Lehr, Ph.D. 

Maribel W. Molyneaux, Ph.D. 

Catherine J. Robert, Ph.D. 

Michael D. Torrey, Ph.D. 

Writer-in-Residence: 

Justin Cronin, M.F.A. 

Director. Sheekey Writing Center: 

Mary C. Robertson, Ph.D. 



48 



EXPLORER 





MARJORIE S. ALLEN, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 

JAMES A. BUTLER. Ph.D. 
Professor 

JUSTIN CRONIN, M.F.A. 
Assistant Professor 

GABRIEL A. FAGAN. F.S.C.. 

Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

PATRICIA B. HABERSTROH, 
Ph.D. 

Chair and Professor 

KEVIN J. HARTY. Ph.D. 
Professor 

VINCENT KLING. Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

DOLORES LEHR, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



ACADEMICS 



49 




LINDA E. MERIANS, Ph.D. 
Professor 

BARBARA C. MILLARD, Ph.D. 

Professor 

EMERY C. MOLLENHAUER. 

F.S.C., Ph.D. 

Professor 

MARIBEL W. MOLYNEAUX, 
Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor 

JOHN J. SEYDOW, Ph.D. 

Professor 

STEPHEN P. SMITH, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

MARGOT SOVEN, Ph.D. 
Professor 

MICHAEL D. TORREY, Ph.D. |r 

Assistant Professor 




50 



EXPLORER 



[^ INE ARTS 



SPOTLIGHTING: 

Daorina J 



Sabrina DeTurk, the 
newest member of La Salle's 
Fine Arts Department, has truly 
eclectic tastes. A specialist in 
the Italian Renaissance, 
DeTurk' s academic interests 
run the full gamut from the very 
traditional to the highly innova- 
tive. In addition to teaching 
such standard courses as 
Introduction to the Visual Arts 
and Baroque and Rococo Art, 
DeTurk has also introduced 
some cutting-edge special 
topics courses into the 
department's curriculum. 
Building upon her interest in 
feminist approaches to art and 
art history, she offered a course 
called Women in Art this 
spring. Also in the spring 
semester, her course Electronic 
Visual Communication exam- 
ined the cultural function of 
digital images on the World 
Wide Web and other multime- 
dia environments. In this 
course, DeTurk also challenged 
her students to create their own 
visually effective presentations 
by utilizing such software as 
Adobe PageMill and Photoshop 
and Microsoft FrontPage. 
Originally from Maine, 
DeTurk first became interested 
in the history of art after taking 
an advanced placement course 
in high school. She then 
majored in that discipline at 
Wellesley College, where she 
received her Bachelor of Arts 
Degree in 1992. Continuing on 
to Bryn Mawr College, DeTurk 
earned her Master's Degree in 
1996. Currently, she is writing 



Vk, M.A. 

By Lori Molinari '97 

her doctoral dissertation, which 
deals primarily with works by 
Titian and Tintoretto. 

Professor DeTurk came to 
La Salle in the fall of 1997. 
Though she has only been here 
a few months, she says that so 
far she has found the entire 
La Salle community "unbeliev- 
ably nice." Citing La Salle's 
Art Museum as a "great 
resource," DeTurk adds that 
she particularly likes teaching in 
a school that has its own 
collection. She explains that 
she often takes her classes to 
this gallery to examine the 
works there exhibited and that 
she especially appreciates its 
casual, small setting, which is 
very conducive to learning and 
discussion. 

Not one for narrow special- 
ization, DeTurk explains that 
she enjoys teaching because 
she likes to introduce students, 
many of whom have little 
background in art history, to a 
broad range of periods and 
styles. Noting the small number 
of fine arts majors and minors, 
DeTurk also expresses the 
hope of getting more students to 
take advantage of La Salle's 
fine arts program. 

When not teaching or study- 
ing, DeTurk often volunteers at 
the Institute for Contemporary 
Art in Philadelphia. She 
explains that she finds giving 
tours there "quite fun" since the 
works there displayed are so 
different from the Renaissance 
works which she otherwise 
studies. S 



Department of 

Fine arts 



Chair: 

Charles White, Ph.D. 

Professor: 

George Diehl, Ph.D. 



Instructor: 

Sabrina DeTurk, M. A. 





CHARLES 
WHITE, Ph.D. 
Chair and 
Associate 
Professor 

GEORGE 
DIEHL, Ph.D. 

Professor 



ACADEMICS 51 



T^ INANCE 



^^JSl 



Keeping Up with Changing Times 

Updated Curriculum Prepares Students for the Business World 



Recently, the School 
of Business Administra- 
tion has focused on 
examining, updating, and 
tightening its curriculum. 
In concert with these 
efforts, the Finance 
Department has care- 
fully reassessed its own 
curriculum and made 
some changes that will 
better prepare students 
to enter the business 
world after graduation. 

The department 
believes that these 
changes are necessary 
to keep up with the 
changing nature of the 
world of business. 



Today, few companies 
are one-service firms; 
rather, they offer many 
services to their clients. 
Consequently , compa- 
nies seek graduates who 
possess broad-based 
knowledge and certain 
core competencies that 
will enable them to adapt 
to the particular de- 
mands of the jobs for 
which they are hired. 
The purpose of the 
Finance Department's 
curricular changes is to 
ensure that graduating 
finance majors have 
mastered these core 
competencies. 



Department of 

Finance 



Chair : 
Walter J. Schubert, Ph.D. 

Professor : 
Lester Barenbaum, Ph.D. 



Associate Professors : 

Joshua Buch, Ph.D. 

James M. Kelly, Ph.D. 

Kenneth L. Rhoda, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

Janet M. Ambrose, Ph.D. 

Kathleen S. McNichol, M.B.A., 

C.P.C.U. 



The curriculum 
changes include modifi- 
cations in the Profes- 
sional Studies require- 
ments, changes in course 
content, and the elimina- 
tion of some courses. 
Because of the global 
nature of business 
markets. International 
Finance is no longer an 
elective, but rather a 
requirement for finance 
majors. The department 
has also broadened the 
course on pension 
planning to include all 
employee benefits, and it 
has eliminated other 
courses, such as the one 



on speculative markets. 

Recognizing that 
companies today are 
looking for experience 
and leadership, the 
Finance Department has 
also placed increased 
emphasis on co-ops and 
internships. The faculty 
devotes much time to 
announcing opportunities 
offered by regional firms 
to its qualified students. 
Furthermore, two 
finance clubs. Gamma 
Iota Sigma and the 
Investment Club, have 
afforded students 
increased opportunities 
to become involved and 



By Sara Ch lappa '98 

to learn more about key 
financial issues. 

The Finance Depart- 
ment seeks to prepare 
students academically, 
professionally, and 
personally for careers 
beyond college. Its 
recent curriculum 
changes will provide 
students with the oppor- 
tunity to develop neces- 
sary core competencies, 
while internship opportu- 
nities and co-curricular 
organizations will allow 
them to gain valuable 
experience and leader- 
ship skills prior to 
entering the workforce.* 



52 EXPLORER 





JOSHUA BUCH, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 



JAMES M. KELLY. Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 



KATHLEEN S. McNICHOL, M.B.A., C.P.C.U. 
Assistant Professor 



KENNETH L. RHODA, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



ACADEMICS 



"VT" 



~^ 



H 



QREIGN LANGUAGES & LITERATURES 

BUSCA Program Facilitates 
Learning for Bilingual Students 



The BUSCA (Bilingual 
Undergraduate Studies 
for Collegiate Advance- 
ment) Program began in 
the fall of 1993 with 
thirteen students. Oper- 
ating through the School 
of Arts and Sciences, this 
Associate Degree 
program especially 
designed for the Latino 
community enables 
students "to continue the 
cognitive learning 
process in their first 
language while master- 
ing English language 
skills." 

In the BUSCA Pro- 
gram, Latino students 
must take classes which 
will fulfill the require- 
ments for an Associate's 
Degree; however, many 
of these courses are 



offered in Spanish. 
Thus, BUSCA students 
can complete the core 
curriculum in the com- 
fort of their native 
language, while they 
develop greater profi- 
ciency in the English 
language. The director 
of the program. Dr. 
James Devine, states that 
this program promotes a 
climate in which the 
Latino student can both 
learn content material 
and master the English 
language. Ms. Janet 
Nieves, secretary for the 
program, works side by 
side with Devine to 
insure that this purpose is 
fulfilled. 

From the outset, 
students interested in the 
program receive careful 



attention and orientation. 
They must complete the 
evening division's 
application, undergo an 
interview with the 
BUSCA staff, and take 
both an entrance exam in 
their native Spanish 
tongue and an English 
proficiency test. A 
participating student is 
required to complete 
sixty credit hours. If he 
or she is enrolled full- 
time, a program partici- 
pant can complete these 
requirements in five 
semesters, or two and 
one-half years. In 
addition to the required 
courses in the core 
curriculum, such as those 
in literature, history, 
philosophy, religion, 
science, fine arts, and 



computer science, 
students take several 
writing classes in both 
Spanish and English. 
They also have a few 
electives, which they can 
fulfill with their choice 
of mainstream English 
courses. 

Approximately sixty 
students are currently 
enrolled in the program. 
These students do not 
view their first language 
as a hindrance to receiv- 
ing an education, but 
rather work "to perfect 
their first language, to 
develop their English 
competencies, and to 
leam and adapt to 
American culture," states 
Devine. 

The BUSCA Program 
also helps prepare 



By Jennifer Schmitt '98 

students for future 
careers by offering non- 
credit workshops that 
hone computer, office 
assistant, and interper- 
sonal skills in the 
English-speaking 
workplace. Rooted in 
the Lasallian tradition, 
the BUSCA Program 
also has a required 
service component for 
the enrolled students. 

The BUSCA Program 
is believed to be the fu^st 
of its kind in the Phila- 
delphia area. In June of 
1996, the first five 
graduates of the program 
received their 
Associate's Degrees, and j 
four of those five stu- 
dents are now pursuing 
their Bachelor's Degrees 
at La Salle. 




54 EXPLORER 




Department of 

Foreign languages & 
'literatures 

Chair : 

Bernhardt G. Blumenthal, Ph.D. 

Professors : 

George A. Perfecky, Ph.D. 
Leo D. Rudnytzky, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

Nicholas Angerosa, Ph.D. 

Rita S. Mall, Ph.D. 
Glenn A. Morocco, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor : 

Barbara G. Trovato, Ph.D. 






x.> 



NICHOLAS ANGEROSA, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

BERNHARDT G. BLUMENTHAL, 

Ph.D. 

Chair and Professor 

RITA S. MALL, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

GLENN A. MOROCCO, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



GEORGE A. PERFECKY, Ph.D. 

Professor 

LEO D. RUDNYTZKY, Ph.D. 
Professor 

BARBARA G. TROVATO. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



ACADEMICS 



55 




^ EOLOGY & PHYSICS 



spotlighting: 

Uavia JL/Cd 



SmitW Pk.D, 



Though now residing in 
Hatfield. Pennsylvania, Dr. 
David Smith grew up near 
Rochester, New York. After 
taking his Bachelor of Science 
Degree in geological engineer- 
ing from Princeton in 1982, he 
studied geology at Stanford, 
earning his doctorate in 1989. 

In addition to teaching at 
Stanford, Colorado College, and 
Kent State, Smith worked as a 
consultant geologist responsible 
for seismic hazard assessment 
prior to coming to La Salle. In 
this capacity, which required 
him to estimate the potential 
frequency and magnitude of 
earthquakes. Smith applied his 
expertise to such projects as 
ensuring the earthquake safety 
of a nuclear power plant and 
determining the best site for a 
new reservoir. 

Smith joined La Salle's 
Geology Department six years 
ago. He teaches such subjects 
as petrology, mineralogy, 
crystallography, and structural 
geology. Of these subjects. 
Smith says that he is especially 
interested in structural geology, 
which examines how the crust 
of the earth deforms and 
changes. Smith had studied 
structural geology while in 
California, and he continues to 
conduct some research in this 
field in the local area. 

Smith also serves as the 
Director of Academic Opera- 
tions for the Institute for the 
Advancement of Math and 
Science Teaching (LAMST), 
which provic. , research 



By Lori Moliiiari '97 

funding for students and 
coordinates various programs 
aimed at improving science 
education. Smith's involvement 
with the lAMST has contrib- 
uted to his deep interest in how 
students learn science and how 
best to improve the teaching of 
science. 

Considering the high priority 
he places on teaching, Dr. 
Smith' s enthusiastic involve- 
ment with the lAMST is 
understandable. He says he 
believes teaching is "really 
important," adding that he finds 
the earth to be "an incredible 
thing" and that he wishes to get 
his students as excited about it 
as he is. He also admits that 
teaching science can be very 
challenging, especially when he 
must guide his students through 
very complex, abstract material 
that requires much prior 
knowledge of mathematics and 
physics. Undaunted, Smith 
strives to be the most effective 
teacher for each individual 
student. He is determined to 
show his students that science, 
though very hard work, is also 
fascinating and "great fun." 

Smith also has many varied 
interests to occupy his time 
when not teaching or research- 
ing. He enjoys such outdoor 
activities as gardening and 
mineral collecting. Indoors, he 
can often be found cooking, 
working with model railroads, 
and even brewing his own beer. 
He is also an active member of 
his synagogue. Am Haskalah, in 
Allentown. ii 



Department of 

■EOLOGY & PHY! 



Chair : 

Henry A. Bart, Ph.D. 

Professors : 

Alice L. Hoersch, Ph.D. 
Stephen A. Longo, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

David Lee Smith, Ph.D. 
Bertram Strieb, M.S. 



56 



EXPLORER 





STEPHEN A. LONGO. Ph.D. 
Professor 



DAVID LEE SMITH. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



BERTRAM STRIEB, M.S. 

Assistant Professor 



ACADEMICS 57 



ISTORY 



y ^ 



> ^ 



spotlighting: 

L^liarles JUesnoyers^ JrJIiollJ. 



A native of Plainfield, New 
Jersey, Dr. Charles Desnoyers 
graduated from Villanova 
University in 1975 with a 
degree in sociology. A few 
years later, he enrolled in 
Villanova' s graduate program in 
European history, taking his 
Master of Arts Degree in 1979. 

At Villanova, Desnoyers 
focused primarily on 19th 
century British imperialism. 
However, in studying such 
Sino-British conflicts as the 
Opium Wars of the early 1840s, 
he realized that his true inter- 
ests lay in Chinese history. 
After taking a few years off, 
during which time he began 
learning the Chinese language, 
Desnoyers entered Temple 
University's Ph.D. program, 
where he earned his doctorate 
in 1988. Today, Desnoyers is 
primarily interested in modem 
Chinese diplomatic and cultural 
history. Most of his current 
research revolves around Sino- 
American relations and Chinese 
perceptions of the West. 

Desnoyers came to La Salle 
in the fall of 1989. In keeping 
with his diverse academic 
background, he teaches "a little 
bit of everything." For fresh- 
men, he teaches Global History 
and the history component of 
the Honors "triple" course in 
Western Civilization. For 
upperclassmen, he regularly 
teaches Asia, Africa, and 
America: 1920-Present, and he 
occasionally also offers survey 
courses in Chinese and Japa- 
nese history. 



By Lori Molinari '97 

Having taught at other 
regional universities, Desnoyers 
says he feels especially at home 
at La Salle. In addition to 
finding greatercollegiality 
among faculty members here, 
he appreciates the opportunity 
La Salle affords for faculty/ 
student interaction. He ex- 
plains, "People do care about 
you. It is a place where you 
get to form relationships with 
faculty and students that you 
might not . . . be able to form at 
a much bigger place." 

He also believes that at 
La Salle a real attempt is made 
"to have an all-encompassing 
student body," by bringing 
together students of greatly 
varied academic backgrounds 
and skill levels. He suggests 
that there is something special 
about a school that holds such a 
powerful appeal for so many 
different types of students. 

When not teaching, Dr. 
Desnoyers remains very active. 
He is on the Board of Directors 
for the AIDS Information 
Network, which funds various 
AIDS prevention programs and 
maintains a significant library 
and database in Philadelphia. 
He also enjoys doing construc- 
tion projects around his house. 
Long interested in solar energy, 
he has even tried to solarize his 
home. He says he likes to 
broaden his historical horizons 
too, explaining that, though his 
continued reading of historical 
literature is partially for profes- 
sional development, "some of it 
is just for sheer fun." ii 



Department of 

History 



Chair : 

Theopolis Fair, Ph.D. 

Professors : 

Joseph P. O'Grady, Ph.D. 

John Rossi, Ph.D. 

George B. Stow, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

Charles Desnoyers, Ph.D. 
Edward J. Sheehy, F.S.C., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor; 

Stuart Leibiger, Ph.D. 



-ns-;.- 



\ 



I 







58 



EXPLORER 




JOHN ROSSI, Ph.D. 
Professor 

EDWARD J. SHEEHY. F.S.C., 
Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

GEORGE B. STOW, Ph.D. 
Professor 



ACADEMICS 59 




ANAGEMENT 



Management Department Provides Many 
Curricular and Co-Curricular Learning Opportunities 

By Cory Christian '00 

options for MIS majors. 
Another co-curricular 
organization for manage- 
ment majors is the 
Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Manage- 
ment (SAM). Com- 
prised primarily, though 
not exclusively, of 
organizational manage- 
ment majors, this society 
also sponsors corporate 
speakers to increase 
students' awareness of 
career possibilities and to 
help them make valuable 
contacts. The society 
thus provides organiza- 
tional management 
students with opportuni- 
ties to interact with local 
businesspeople who are 
concerned with the 
management of human 



The Management 
Department offers its 
students the opportunity 
to choose between two 
distinct, though related, 
sub-fields in pursuing 
their course of studies. 
Depending on his or her 
strengths, interests, and 
ultimate professional 
goals, a management 
major can choose to 
focus on either manage- 
ment information sys- 
tems or organizational 
management. The 
program in management 
information systems, or 
MIS, teaches students to 
design and implement 
cost-effective computer 
systems that will help 
employees work more 
efficiently. The curricu- 
lum in organizational 



management, on the other 
hand, emphasizes the 
"human" side of business 
by training majors to 
manage human resources 
in such a way as to 
maximize both profitability 
and employee satisfaction. 

Many management 
students also participate in 
various co-curricular 
organizations designed to 
supplement the education 
they acquire in the class- 
room. One such organiza- 
tion is the AITP (Associa- 
tion for Information 
Technology Profession- 
als). Moderated by MIS 
professor Dr. Q. B. 
Chung, this club teaches 
its members more about 
networking and computer 
systems. 

Dr. Chung established 



La Salle's AITP 
chapter four years ago. 
However, La Salle's 
club is really part of a 
nation-wide organiza- 
tion with chapters in 
Philadelphia, Mont- 
gomery County, and 
South Jersey, to name 
just a few. Because of 
their proximity, the 
AITP chapters from 
other regional schools, 
such as Delaware 
Valley College and 
Widener University, 
can join with La Salle's 
to maximize the 
learning and network- 
ing opportunities for all 
concerned. 

This year, the AITP 
also sponsored many 
informative programs 
and activities for its 



members. On Thursday, 
October 16, 1997, the 
club went on a field trip 
to Prudential Insurance 
in Horsham to observe 
that company's MIS 
department first hand. 
Since the Prudential has 
three high-tech data 
centers, this trip proved 
very educational. 

Many MIS majors are 
also members of the 
Data Processing Man- 
agement Association, or 
DPMA This national 
society of information 
systems professionals 
also provides student 
members with the 
opportunity to interact 
with those already 
established in the field 
and to explore the many 
career development 



Q. CHUNG, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor 

MARIANNE S. GAUSS, 
M.B.A. 

Assistant Professor 

PRAFULLA JOGLEKAR, 

Ph.D. 

Professor 

STEVEN MEISEL, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

LYNN MILLER, Ph.D. 
Professor 

JACK M. RAPPAPORT, 

M.S. 

Assistant Professor 

JOSEPH SELTZER, Ph.D. 

Professor 



60 EXPLORER 




MtANA'C;. 




Department of 



ENT 



Chair : 

Madjid Tavana, Ph.D. 

Professors : 

PrafullaJoglekar, Ph.D. 

Lynn Miller, Ph.D. 

Joseph Seltzer, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

Steven Meisel, Ph.D. 

James Smither, Ph.D. 

William Van Buskirk, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

Q. Chung, Ph.D. 

Marianne S. Gauss, M.B.A. 

Jack M. Rappaport, M.S. 

Kathryn Szabat, Ph.D. 



JAMES SMITHER, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



KATHRYN SZABAT, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



MADJID TAVANA. Ph.D. 
Chair and Associate Professor 



tv 


..^^ 


WILLIAM VAN BUSKIRK. 




5=2-' ■ ^ 


Ph.D. 


.*# 


@l. 


.Associate Professor 


^a';''^ 


M- 




Uife 


£ 


ACADEMICS 



61 



]\/[r ARRETING 

spotlighting: 

David JoiieS;> Ph»D» 



Dr. David Jones started out 
as an undergraduate psychology 
major at the University of North 
CaroHna at Chapel Hill. How- 
ever, he quickly found himself 
intrigued by marketing as well. 
Going on to do all of his post- 
graduate work at Virginia Tech, 
he earned a Master of Science 
in experimental and clinical 
psychology, a Master of 
Business Administration, and, 
finally, a Ph.D. in marketing. 

For some, this shift from 
psychology to marketing may 
seem unusual, but this "atypi- 
cal" educational background, as 
Jones calls it, actually makes 
sense. "There is a lot of 
overlap between the two 
[areas] since marketing is 
actually applied psychology," 
says Jones, adding, "Marketing 
absolutely fascinates me — it 
isn't just the selling of Coca- 
Cola; it's the process of helping 
people better meet their needs 
and solve problems." 

Jones' background in market- 
ing is quite extensive, particu- 
larly in the wine industry, having 
worked with wineries, whole- 
salers, and retail stores. Since 
achieving his Ph.D., Jones has 
specialized his consulting in the 
area of market and promotional 
strategy. He has worked for 
and/or consulted with such 
firms as IBM, Resorts Casino, 
and Bell Atlantic. 

As both a teaching assistant 
and student while in graduate 
school, Jones made a key 
connection between teaching 
and learning that he tnes to 



By Andy Gwiazcia '98 

convey to his students. He 
recalls, "I learned much more 
about marketing by doing it, 
rather than studying it." Jones 
continues, "As customers, 
students are exposed to market- 
ing everyday, and so I always 
try to teach by example. Part 
of my goal is to make marketing 
come alive for my students." 

Coming to La Salle after 
spending many years in the 
wine industry, Jones immedi- 
ately noticed a difference. He 
explains, "I've been at several 
schools in my career, both as a 
teacher and as a student, and 
La Salle really does care about 
its students — it's a nice thing, 
and it's different." 

In addition to teaching in the 
Marketing Department, Jones 
does marketing work for the 
University and performs pro 
bono work for a variety of 
other institutions. He is cur- 
rently investigating how, 
through marketing, doctors and 
hospitals can encourage 
patients to seek the medical 
help they need before it is too 
late. 

In addition to his various 
professional employments, the 
responsibilities of a parent keep 
Jones very busy. However, in 
the little spare time he has, 
Jones also enjoys cooking and 
gardening. In particular, he 
grows his own hot peppers for 
use in the spicy Tex-Mex 
dishes he creates. His other 
cooking interests include an 
eclectic blend of Oriental and 
French cuisine. 




62 



EXPLORER 




Department of 

Marjketing 



Chair: 

James Talaga, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors: 

Andrew Bean, Ph.D. 
Sharon Javie, Ph.D. 
David Jones, Ph.D. 



ANDREW BEAN, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



SHARON JAVIE. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



DAVID JONES. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



JAMES TALAGA. Ph.D. 
Chair and Assistant Professor 



ACADEMICS 



63 




ATH & COMPUTER SCIENCE 



SPOTLIGHTING: 



^ervasio ivamirez 

B\ Andx Gwiazda '98 and Mike Rocco'99 



As the newest professor in 
La Salle's Math & Computer 
Science Department, Gervasio 
Ramirez brings to the classroom 
a wealth of knowledge from a 
variety of academic areas, 
making him a truly multi- 
disciplinary person. 

Ramirez received his under- 
graduate degree in geography 
from Rutgers University, in 
New Brunswick, New Jersey, 
where he specialized in cartog- 
raphy. He then worked for 
McGraw-Hill Publishing 
Company for three years, 
during which time he acquired 
extensive knowledge and 
interest in desktop pubhshing. 
Several years after graduating 
from Rutgers, Ramirez began 
teaching bilingual computer 
literacy courses in La Salle's 
Continuing Studies Program. 
Then, in 1994, he joined the 
faculty of La Salle's newly 
created BUSCA Program, a 
part-time Associate Degree 
program for Spanish-speaking 
students. This teaching experi- 
ence led him to enroll in 
La Salle's Graduate Education 
Program, which, he says, 
allowed him "great personal and 
professional growth." 

While pursuing his Master's 
Degree in education, Ramirez 
served as La Salle's Web 
Master and worked as a 
member of the Information 
Technology training team, 
assisting faculty and administra- 
tors by improving their com- 
puter skills. During the past 



two years, Ramirez was also 
responsible forcurricular 
changes to several CSC 151 
sections, due in part to his 
graduate work in education. 

In his first year of full-time 
teaching at La Salle, Ramirez 
has shown that he is a true 
renaissance man. In the spring 
semester, he taught one course 
in each of three different 
disciplines: computer science, 
education, and English. In fact, 
the English course, Web 
Editing, was new this year and 
was designed by Ramirez 
himself. Going into the semes- 
ter, Ramirez said that "the 
semester will give me an 
opportunity to meet a variety of 
students and expand on my 
interests and to share those 
with my students." 

Outside of his full-time 
teaching position, Ramirez 
enjoys spending time with his 
wife and young daughter. One 
of his hobbies is creating 
stained glass, and he has 
enrolled in a course to learn 
more about this unique art. 

Having been at La Salle for 
five years, Ramirez says that he 
could not be happier with his 
current position, adding "I like 
the one-on-one student relation- 
ship at La Salle as I feel I am 
able to make a difference in the 
students' learning." 

Gervasio Ramirez will 
hopefully be able to share his 
broad talents with the faculty 
and students of La Salle for 
many years to come. !f 



Department of 



TH & C 



Chair : 

Linda J. Elliott, M.A., M.S. 

Professors : 

Stephen A. Longo, Ph.D. 

Carl P. McCarty, Ph.D. 

Marijke Wijsmuller, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

Stephen F. Andrilli, Ph.D. 

Richard A. DiDio, Ph.D. 

Charles E. Hofmann III, Ph.D. 

Raymond P. Kirsch, Ph.D. 

Margaret M. McManus, Ph.D. 

JohnC. O'Neill, Ph.D. 

Jane F. Turk, Ph.D. 
Samuel J. Wiley, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

Gary E. Michalek, Ph.D. 
Gervasio Ramirez 



STEPHEN R 

ANDRILLI, 

Ph.D. 

Associate 
Professor 



RICHARD A. 
DiDIO, Ph.D. 

Associate 
Professor 



64 



EXPLORER 






LINDA J, ELLIOTT, M.A., M.S. 
Chair and Assistant Professor 

CHARLES E. HOFMANN III, 
Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 



RAYMOND P. KIRSCH, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

STEPHEN A. LONGO, Ph.D. 
Professor 

CARL p Mccarty, Ph.D. 

Professor 

MARGARET M. McMANUS. Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

GARY E. MICHALEK. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 

JOHN C. O'NEILL, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 



JANE F. TURK, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

MARIJKE WUSMULLER. Ph.D. 
Professor 

SAMUEL J. WILEY. Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 



ACADEMICS 



65 



^r 




URSING 



La Sailers Nursing Center: 
Neighbors Helping Neighbors 



The Neighborhood 
Nursing Center project 
was established in 1991 
as a means of supple- 
menting the theoretical 
aspect of nursing classes 
with hands-on experi- 
ence. Nursing students 
are able to fulfill their 
clinical portion of the 
Community Health 
Experience through the 
Neighborhood Nursing 
Center. 

A coalition of nurse 
practitioners, registered 
nurses, mental health 
and substance abuse 
counselors, and La Salle 
faculty and students 
provides health care for 
the surrounding commu- 
nity that it otherwise 
might not receive. The 
ground floor of the 



La Salle Apartments at 
Chew and Wister 
Streets, the YWCA 
located at 5820 
Germantown Avenue, 
and the newest addi- 
tion — Hill Creek Hous- 
ing Complex in 
Crescentville — serve as 
the base sites from 
which the community 
health outreach extends 
into the surrounding 
area. 

"The Nursing Center 
offers a wealth of 
opportunities for students 
in areas of healthcare 
that are not traditionally 
offered in the hospital 
setting. A network is 
established within the 
community, and students 
are involved in solving 
pertinent issues of health 



care," states Kris 
Warner, Assistant 
Professor and Educa- 
tional Liaison for the 
Center. 

La Salle's Nursing 
Center has sponsored 
community health fairs, 
bike-safety programs for 
children, dating programs 
for teenagers, and blood- 
pressure and cholesterol 
screening for senior 
citizens. It has also 
continued to provide 
pregnancy tests, 
immunizations, and flu 
vaccinations to members 
of the local community. 
This year, the senior 
nursing students also 
conducted parenting 
classes for day care 
workers. In these 
classes, the day care 



workers received vital 
information on disease 
prevention which they 
could later impart to 
parents. 

Rooted in the ideals of 
community involvement 
and personalized atten- 
tion to patients, the 
Neighborhood Nursing 
Center simultaneously 
provides a professional 
and compassionate 
source of health care for 
residents of the 
surrounding community 
and a first-hand learning 
opportunity for 
La Salle's nursing 
students. For example, 
student nurses can 
provide vaccinations that 
many children in the 
community need to enter 
school. They also have 



By Kim Kessler '99 

the opportunity to play 
an integral role in 
screening and detection, 
injury prevention, early- 
intervention, and 
rehabilitation among the 
adult population. This 
unique community 
atmosphere of the center 
allows the students to 
turn their knowledge into 
actual skills. 

The Neighborhood 
Nursing Center thus 
establishes a reciprocal 
relationship between the 
students and the commu- 
nity. On the one hand, 
La Salle's nursing 
students provide health 
care service for their 
patients; in return, 
however, they experi- 
ence professional and 
emotional growth. 



PATRICIA BECKER. Ed.D., 

M.S.N., R.N. 
Assistant Professor 

JANICE BEITZ, Ph.D., R.N., C. S., 
C.N.O.R., C.E.TN. 

Assistant Professor 

JOAN FRIZZELL. Ph.D.. R.N.. C.C.R.N. 
Assistant Professor 

EILEEN GIARDINO, Ph.D., R.N., C.R.N.P. 
Associate Professor 

MARY BETH HAAS. M.S.N.. R.N.. 

C.R.N.P, I.B.C.L.C. 

Assistant Professor 

CAROL ANN HANNA, 

M.S.N.,R.N. 

Assistant Professor 

MARJORIE HEINZER, Ph.D., R.N., C.S.. C.R.N.P 

Assistant Professor 




66 EXPLORER 




School of 

Nursing 



Dean: 

Zane Robinson Wolf, Ph.D., R.N., F. A.A.N. 

Assistant Dean: 

Mary Dorr, M.S. N., R.N. 

Associate Professors: 



Eileen Giardino, Ph.D., R.N.,C.R.N.P. 
Kay Kinsey, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N. 

Assistant Professors: 

Patricia Becker, Ed.D., M.S.N., R.N. 

Janice Beitz, Ph.D., R.N., C.S., C.N.O.R., C.E.T.N. 

JannaDieckmann,M.S.N.,R.N. 

Joan P. Frizzell, Ph.D, R.N., C.C.R.N. 

Mary Beth Haas, M.S.N., R.N., 

C.R.N.P.,I.B.C.L.C. 

Carol Ann Hanna, M.S.N., R.N. 

Marjorie Heinzer, Ph.D., R.N., C.S., C.R.N.P. 

Susan M. O'Brien, Ed.D., M.S.N., R.N. 

Joanne Farley Serembus, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N. 

Kristine Warner, M.S.N., M.P.H., R.N. 

Nancy Youngblood, Ph.D., R.N., C.R.N.P. 

Patti Zuzelo, M.S.N., R.N. 



KAY KINSEY. Ph.D., R.N., 

F.A.A.N. 
Associate Professor 



SUSAN M. O'BRIEN, Ed.D., 
M.S.N.. R.N. 
Assistant Professor 



ZANE ROBINSON WOLR 
Ph.D.. R.N., EA.A.N. 
Dean and Professor 



NANCY YOUNGBLOOD. 
Ph.D., R.N., C.R.N.P. 

Assistant Professor 



ACADEMICS 



67 



Philosophy 



J V 



Diplomat-in-Residence Program 
Addresses International Issues 



The Diplomat-in- 
Residence Program was 
established in 1994 under 
the leadership of philoso- 
phy professor Dr. 
Cornelia A. Tsakiridou, 
who remains the 
program's coordinator. 
It is designed to bring 
Foreign Service officers 
and representatives from 
the United States and 
other countries to La 
Salle to address interna- 
tional concerns. These 
representatives include 
ambassadors, dignitaries, 
diplomats, and other 
governmental officials as 
well as scholars who are 
at the forefront of their 
fields of expertise. Since 
it began, the program 
has grown considerably; 
whereas its first confer- 



ence lasted only two 
days and consisted of 
three speakers, the 1997 
conference lasted three 
days and had fifteen 
speakers. 

Every year, the 
Diplomat-in-Residence 
Committee selects as the 
primary focus of the 
next conference some 
major topic that is 
currently in the news. 
Past conferences have 
focused on many topical 
issues. For example, the 
1995 conference, 
"La Salle Celebrates 50 
years of the UN," 
centered on the inner 
happenings of the United 
Nations, since 1995 was 
the fiftieth anniversary 
of that body. Similarly, 
the 1 996 program 



Department of 

Philosophy 



Chair ; 

Michael J. Kerlin, Ph.D. 

Professor : 

William Sullivan, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

ArleenB.Dallery,Ph.D. 
Frederick Van Fleteren, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

Marc Moreau, Ph.D. 

Cornelia Tsakiridou, Ph.D. 

Joseph Volpe, Ph.D. 



focused on "Diplomacy 
and Human Rights in the 
Midstof Ethnic Vio- 
lence," because at that 
time there were major 
conflicts occurring in 
Bosnia and the former 
Yugoslavia. The 1997 
conference explored the 
relations between "Islam 
and the West" because 
of the ongoing conflicts 
in the Middle East. 
By interviewing 
faculty and students who 
either have an interest in 
the designated area or 
have traveled to that 
area, the Diplomat-in- 
Residence Committee 
then determines what 
specific issues relating to 
this general topic should 
be discussed. After the 
issues are determined. 



students research these 
issues, establish contact 
people, and obtain 
contact telephone 
numbers to reach the 
ambassadors. Dr. 
Tsakiridou thus relies on 
the assistance of many 
individuals. Each year 
she hopes to involve as 
many people as possible 
and to organize the best 
possible conference. 

Tsakiridou sends out 
official letters of invita- 
tion in the fall about five 
months before the actual 
event. Usually she 
invites both a country's 
ambassador in Washing- 
ton and its ambassador 
to the United Nations in 
the hope of getting at 
least one of them to 
attend. The ambassa- 



By Jenn Brewer '99 
dors, as the highest- 
ranking officials of their 
countries in the United 
States, sometimes 
cannot attend. If they 
are unable to do so, they 
usually try to send 
someone else from the 
embassy in their place. 

The Diplomat-in- 
Residence Program is a 
good experience for La 
Salle students because it 
involves them in what is 
going on beyond the 
campus in the interna- 
tional community. By 
providing them with the 
opportunity to meet other' 
countries' officials and 
to talk with them face- 
to-face, it gives students 
a better understanding of 
and appreciation for 
world affairs. 



68 EXPLORER 






ARLEEN B. DALLERY, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

MICHAEL J. KERLIN, Ph.D. 
Chair and Professor 



MARC MOREAU, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor 



WILLIAM SULLIVAN, Ph.D. 
Professor 

CORNELIA TSAKIRIDOU, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 

FREDERICK VAN FLETEREN. Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



ACADEMICS 69 



J ^ 



3 OLITICAL SCIENCE 



spotlighting: 

Jhyawara A<, 1 



A member of the Political 
Science Department for eleven 
years, Mr. Edward Turzanski 
has served the University in a 
number of academic and 
administrative capacities. 
Turzanski graduated magna 
cum laiide from La Salle in 
1981 with a Bachelor of Arts in 
Political Science and Russian. 
He then held several positions 
in the federal government, 
specializing in Soviet/European 
politics and intelligence issues. 

In 1984, Turzanski joined La 
Salle as the Assistant, and later 
Associate, Director of Alumni. 
Intending to return to govern- 
ment service, he was asked by 
former President Brother 
Patrick Ellis to become Director 
of Government Affairs. 

In this position, Turzanski is 
afforded a unique opportunity to 
work with government officials 
on a host of political matters 
that will affect the University. 
He explains, "I represent the 
University's interests in legisla- 
tive, governmental, and political 
matters ... on all levels of 
government." 

In the spring of 1987, Dr. 
Robert Courtney, then chairman 
of the Political Science Depart- 
ment, asked Turzanski to teach 
a course. He has lectured in 
the Political Science Depart- 
ment ever since, usually 
offering special topics courses 
based upon his experience in 
the federal government. 

Some of the courses he has 
taught include The Global 
Village, Governments of East 
and Central Europe, Western 



By Michael Boyle '98 

European Politics, Soviet 
Politics under Gorbachev, 
Congress, The Presidency, and 
The Process and Policy of 
Intelligence. 

These academic duties 
complement his duties as 
Director of Government Af- 
fairs. He explains that, in 
approaching government 
officials, "I don't just have a 
situation in the abstract. I 
approach them with real stu- 
dents and real situations. 
Politicians and government 
officials react more directly and 
honestly in these situations." 
He further observes, "Because 
I teach, I am viewed by govern- 
ment officials differently than 
the hired political guns who 
come to call on them. As a 
teacher, I am viewed as having 
a unique intellectual and moral 
perspective on politics." 

Calling his job a "serendipitous 
blend of administrative and 
academic work," he explains, 
"My administrative work lends a 
certain credential of the real 
world to my academic pursuits, 
and my academic interest adds 
both an intellectual and moral 
weight to my representative 
work in Washington, Harrisburg, 
and City Hall." 

Turzanski, who has moder- 
ated the Student Political 
Association for eight years, says 
his favorite thing about teaching 
at La Salle is the frequent 
contact he has with students 
both in and out of class. He 
adds, "there is also a certain 
privilege in being able to play a 
role in someone's future." 



70 



EXPLORER 





Department of 

Political science 



Chair : 

Samuel J. Wiley, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

Mary Ellen Balchunis-Harris, Ph.D. 

Joseph V. Brogan, Ph.D. 

Kenneth L. Hill, M. A. 



MARY ELLEN BALCHUNIS- 
HARRIS. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



JOSEPH V. BROGAN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor 



KENNETH L. HILL, M.A. 
Assistant Professor 



^ SAMUEL J. WILEY. Ph.D. 

Chair 



ACADEMICS 



TD SYCHOLOGY 



> V 



Professors are Excellent Researchers 
And Teachers at All Academic Levels 



The Psychology 
Department currently 
consists of seven skillful 
full-time professors. 

Dr. David Falcone has 
been the Psychology 
Department chairman 
since 1986. He teaches 
mostly upper level 
courses and conducts 
many student-involved 
research experiments 
which concern such 
varied topics as the 
psychological implica- 
tions of the chaos theory 
and the training of 
cyber-pigeons in neural 
network modeling. The 
talented Falcone has also 
recently released a CD, 
■"Secrets of Sherwood," 
and he has performed in 
several local clubs and 
coffeehouses. 



Often praised by 
students for her dedica- 
tion. Dr. Faye Pritchard 
is committed above all to 
teaching. Though her 
expertise lies in experi- 
mental psychology, 
which is generally 
considered one of the 
most difficult subjects to 
teach, Pritchard has 
been the experimental 
psychology professor for 
over fifteen years. 

Dr. David Oden is 
internationally known for 
his work in primate 
cognition. His experi- 
ments involve teaching 
chimpanzees a substitute 
language. He is also 
studying cognition as it 
relates to learning, in 
order to discover why 
some students learn 



more efficiently than 
others. An enthusiastic 
scientist, Oden believes 
inconstantly involving 
students in research, as 
opposed to merely 
teaching them results. 

Dr. Joe Kovatch is the 
department's specialist 
in aging. Though he 
enjoys teaching courses 
in this area, he is espe- 
cially fond of teaching 
introductory level 
classes. His students 
remark, "Dr. Kovatch is 
an excellent teacher 
because he cares about 
his students. He readily 
gives extra help and 
makes class interesting 
by telling jokes and 
relating theories to 
everyday life." 

Dr. Jack Smith 



teaches developmental 
psychology and counsel- 
ing courses. For many 
years, he was involved in 
pastoral counseling, and 
he now teaches in the 
clinical counseling 
graduate program. An 
excellent and dedicated 
professor at both the 
undergraduate and 
graduate levels. Smith 
has had to learn to 
balance many diverse 
commitments. He is just 
as likely to be found in 
Good Shepherd as he is 
inHolroydHall. 

Dr. Margaret Watson, 
who came to La Salle 
five years ago, is an 
industrial and organiza- 
tional psychologist who 
primarily teaches 
statistics courses. 



By Amy Van Vessitin '00 

Warm and supportive, 
Watson is known 
throughout the depart- 
ment as a person who 
always has time for her 
students. Yet, she is 
also involved in many 
campus activities and 
committees. According 
to Falcone, she "embod- 
ies what a person and a 
teacher should be." 

Dr. John Hall, a 
clinical psychologist who 
joined the department 
last year, teaches mostly 
introductory classes, 
including abnormal 
psychology. The faculty 
advisor of the Alpha Chi 
Rho fraternity, he is 
described by his students 
as "enthusiastic and 
adept at getting students 
involved." ^ 



"^^ rr\/M^\si 






72 



EXPLORER 




rrtSfe V 




Department of 

PSYCHOL'OGT 



Chair ; 

David J. Falcone, Ph.D. 

Professor : 

John J. Rooney, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

Peter J. Filicetti, Ph.D. 

Joseph D. Kovatch, Ph.D. 

David L.Oden, Ph.D. 

John Alexander Smith, Ed.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

John Hall, Ph.D. 
Joan Faye Pritchard, Ph.D. 
Margaret D. Watson, Ph.D. 



DAVID J. FALCONE. Ph.D. 
Chair and Associate Professor 

JOSEPH D. KOVATCH, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 

DAVID L. ODEN, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

JOAN FAYE PRITCHARD. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



JOHN J. ROONEY, Ph.D. 
Professor 

JOHN ALEXANDER SMITH, Ed.D. 
Associate Professor 

MARGARET D. WATSON, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor 



ACADEMICS 



73 




ELIGION 



^ 



SPOTLIGHTING: 

Josepli Jrk 



F.SaC. PL]D< 



"[He is] an exem- 
plary teacher who 
shows a great inter- 
est in all the stu- 
dents he has en- 
countered." 

Dr. Geffrey B. Kelly 
Chair, Religion Department 



According to Religion Depart- 
ment Chairman Dr. Geffrey 
Kelly, Brother Joseph Keenan is 
"an exemplary teacher who 
shows a 

great inter- ■^^^^^~~^^~ 
est in all the 
students he 
has encoun- 
t e r e d . " 
Brother 
Keenan, a 
professor of 
religion and 
a distin- 
guished 
member of 
the La Salle 

community. ^_^^^^^^^^ 
can usually 

be found in the Japanese Tea 
House, located on the west side 
of campus, adjacent to the Peale 
Estate, where his work centers 
on exploring the rich history and 
significance of the Japanese Tea 
Ceremony. 

His colleague Dr. Joseph 
Devlin states, "Brother Joseph 
has begun nationally renowned 
work in attempting to uncover 
connections between the ancient 



MIGUEL A. 

CAMPOS, 

F.S.C., S.T.D. 

Associate 

Professor 

JOSEPH W. 

DEVLIN, Th.M., 

M.A., J.C.D. 

Assistant 
Professor 



By Drew Sharkey '00 

Tea Ceremony and the Last Sup- 
per." For example, by bringing 
people together around a table, 
both the Tea Ceremony and the 
Last Supper 



emphasize the 
concept of 
unity. 

La Salle 
students have 
the unique op- 
portunity to 
explore the 
results of 
Brother 
Keenan' s re- 
search first- 
hand by tak- 
^^^^^^_^_ ing his "Japa- 
nese Tea Cer- 
emony" class. In fact, this 
course, like so many others of- 
fered by Brother Keenan such as 
The Sacraments, fills up almost 
immediately at pre-registration 
time. This fact illustrates the high 
degree of respect students have 
for Brother Joseph Keenan. As 
one former student notes, "You 
realize after a course with 
Brother Joe that you have ex- 
panded your knowledge." 




Department of 

Religion 



Chair ; 

Geffrey B. Kelly, S.T.D. , LL.D. 

Professors : 

William H. Grosnick, Ph.D. 
Gail Ramshaw, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors : 

Miguel A. Campos, F.S.C., S.T.D. 
Joseph Keenan, F.S.C., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors : 

Joseph W. Devlin, Th.M., M.A., J.C.D. 
Jacqueline Pastis, Ph.D. 

Instructor: 

Joseph Dougherty, F.S.C., M.A. 



74 



EXPLORER 





WILLIAM H. GROSNICK, Ph.D. 
Professor 

JOSEPH KEENAN, RS.C, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



GEFFREY B. KELLY, S.T.D., LL.D. 
Chair and Professor 



GAIL RAMSHAW. Ph.D. 
Professor 



ACADEMICS 




OCIOLOGY, SOCIAL WORK, & 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



Criminal Justice Association Takes Learning 
Beyond the Classroom 



Bv Patrick Sheridan '00 



The Criminal Justice 
Department strives to 
bring the real world into 
the classroom, and 
sometimes the classroom 
into the real world, for its 
students. To increase 
their learning opportuni- 
ties, the department has 
the Criminal Justice 
Association. This year, 
the association was 
coordinated by Stephanie 
Parkinson, Mark Manzo, 
and John Wisham and 
advised by Dr. Otten. 

Together, these 
hardworking individuals 
arranged "Police Ride 
Alongs" in which a 



student got to ride 
shotgun (no pun in- 
tended) with patrolling 
peace keepers to 
witness firsthand the job 
of a police officer. They 
also brought in speakers 
who discussed various 
jobs in executive security 
and scouted for interns 
among the students. In 
addition, the Criminal 
Justice Association 
sponsored an extremely 
successful alumni night 
which enabled criminal 
justice students to meet 
and get to know people 
in the field. In addition 
to being valuable con- 



tacts, these Criminal 
Justice Department 
alumni offered career 
advice and shared their 
own experiences work- 
ing in the field with 
current students. Over 
the year, the association 
planned trips to the 
Criminal Justice Center 
and to some local 
prisons. This year, as in 
previous ones, the 
Criminal Justice Asso- 
ciation did an excellent 
job of preparing students 
for a future in criminal 
justice while giving them 
the skills necessary to 
land the job they want, ii 




76 EXPLORER 





Department of 

Sociology, social work, 
& criminal justice 

Chair; 

Finn Hornum, M.A. 

Professor: 

John F. Connors, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors: 

Francis Tri Van Nguyen, F.S.C., Ph.D. 
Laura A. Otten, Ph.D. 
Judith C. Stull, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors: 

Janine M. Mariscotti, M.S.W. 
Sybil E. Montgomery, Ph.D. 



FINN HORNUM, M.A. 
Chair and Assistant Professor 



JANINE M. MARISCOTTI, M.S.W. 
Assistant Professor 



LAURA A. OTTEN. Ph.D. 
Associate Professor 



^ JUDITH C. STULL. Ph.D. 
^ Associate Professor 



^. 



ACADEMICS 77 




Late night trips to the computer lab, twenty-five page papers, final exams, all-night study sessions, and weekend parties 
are all distant memories for these students as they celebrate the conclusion of the best years of their lives. 



78 EXPLORER 



The Class Of 1998 




The following pages contain the faces of La Salle's 
1998 graduates. Their smiles and serious 
expressions conceal a variety of memories. Some 
might be thinking about what life will be like once they 
leave La Salle. Others might be reminiscing about 
meeting their roommate or commuting to La Salle for 
the first time. They might chuckle to themselves as they 
think about Freshman Orientation, twenty-five page 
papers, and all night study sessions. Before they even 
realized it, they were at La Salle for their last semester. 
Excited? Scared? Who knows when or if they would 
see their friends, teachers, and others at La Salle who 
touched their lives? More importantly, where would they 
ever encounter so many talented, dedicated individuals 
in one place again? ^ 



Section Editor: 

Stephanie Hamilton '98 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



79 



The President's Message 
to the Class of 1998 




Brother Joseph Burke, F.S.C., Ph.D. 
President 



You are receiving this 
yearbook around the time of 
graduation in May, 1998. If 
you are hke many of us, you 
probably looked at the pic- 
tures, but text like this mes- 
sage may have been by- 
passed for the moment. 
Indeed, it may well be in the 
next millennium before you 
get around to it. And that's 
all right because the mes- 
sage will still be timely. 

As the years pass, the 
value of your La Salle edu- 
cation will become increas- 
ingly evident to you. Per- 
haps most immediately, you 
will see the value of the 
various skills and knowl- 
edge you acquired. But 
your education has also been 
about values — religious and 
human. Not all of these 
values have come your way 
in the classroom; learning 
values takes place in dorm 
rooms, the Food Court, the 
chapel, the playing field, 
and even strolling through 
Belfield. Think back now. 



too, on the relationships you 
formed during your time at 
La Salle. The faculty, the 
staff, your peers, and all the 
laughing, anxiety, and even 
problems that helped you 
mature. 

La Salle's greatest wealth 
will always be in our alumni 
and alumnae. And although, 
hopefully, you will be finan- 
cially generous to the Uni- 
versity throughout your 
lifetime, there is much more. 
People will look at you as an 
ambassador of La Salle. 
Your successes will be our 
successes, your contribu- 
tions to humankind will 
reflect positively on us. The 
only thing that I can say 
without hesitation about 
those who will follow me in 
this position is that they will 
all welcome you back to La 
Salle. My hope is that La 
Salle will always be part of 
your life. My hope is that 
you will also see La Salle as 
a home to which you can 
always return, i' 

Brother Joe Burke, 
President 



80 



EXPLORER 





Rebeka L. Adamitis 




David S. Adams Bridget Elizabeth Aguado Danielle Rose Aldi 




Irene Aleynikov 



Mary Alford 



Evelyn Alicea-Cruz 



Karen Alston 



Peter Steven Acchione: Criminal Justice/Sociology, Cherry Hill, 
NJ, Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Ann M. Acka'a: Nursing, Sicklerviile, NJ 

Allison S. Adair: Nursing, Jenkintown, PA, Student Nurse Organi- 
zation 

Rebeka L. Adamitis: English/Education, Dickson City, PA, 
Neiginborliood Tutoring, Writing Fellows 

Jason L. Adamo: Psychology, Morrisville, PA, Grimoire, Masque, 
Explorer, Collegian 

David S. Adams: Political Science, Boyertown, PA, Pi Kappa Phi, 

Karate 



Bridget Elizabeth Aguado:. Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student 
Nurse Organization 

Danielle Rose Aldi: Business Managennent, Burnt Hills, NY. 
Society for the Advancement of Management. Health Care 
Administration Society., Lacrosse Captain 

Irene Aleynikov: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization 

Mary Alford: Nursing, Norristown, PA 

Evelyn Alicea-Cruz: Business Administration, Philadelphia. PA 

Karen Alston: Nursing, Levittown, PA 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



Nicole Ambrosini: Elementary/Special Education, Huntingdon 
Valley, PA 

Meghan Andros: Chemistry, Brigantine, NJ, Softball, Flag 
Football, Honors Program 

Denise Anoia: Public Administration, Philadelphia, PA, Judicial 
Board. Academic Enrichment Tutor 

Laura Elizabeth Apostolik: Elementary/Special Education, 
Verona, NJ 

Theresa Argondezzi: Communication, Norristown, PA, Honors 
Program, La Salle 56, Collegian 

Christine Armento: Biology, Philadelphia, PA, Gamma Phi Beta. 
Alpha Epsilon Delta 



Mark Armstrong: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Sabrina Arroyo: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Chi Upsilon 
Sigma, OLAS 

Mary Baldwin-Hagan: Sociology, Philadelphia, PA 

Angela M, Balsamo: English, Allentown, PA 

Patricia Banaszek: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization 

Tricia Barcliff: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Alpha Theta Alpha 
Treasurer 



I 




Mary Baldwin-Hagan 
82 EXPLORER 



January Bartle: English, Newtown, PA, AIDS ALIVE, Intramural 
Sports 

John L. Bauman: History, Wayne, PA, Phi Alpha Thelst Honors 

Program, Collegian S-"' 

Matirisa C. Baumann: Marketing, Allenhurst, NJ, Resident* 
Student Association 

Michelle Beaumont: Communication, Blue Bell, PA, Intramural 

'Soccer^ 

^ -' 

Sara Becker: Bkjiogy, Philadelphia, PA, AED Treasurer, FAB 
Biology Club, Mentoring Program 

Alex Bedenko: Accounting, Kharkoz, Ukraine 



Johanna M. Bender: Business, Philadelphia, PA 

Timothy J. Benson: Accounting/Finance, Washington Township, 
NJ, Honors Program, Beta Alpha, Gamma lota Sigma, 
Investgient Club 

Tobie 3. Bethea: Criminal Justice, Philadelpihia, PA 

Sean Bevan: English, Carmel, NY,' Athletic Relations Council, 
Faculty Scholar Athlete Honor Roll, Varsity Crew Captain 

Charles W. Biehn: Sociology/Criminal Justice, Bensalem, PA 
Alpha Chi Rho 

Suzanne Billings: Finance, New Milford, CT, Alpha Theta Alpha 




January Bartle 



John L. Bauman 



Maurisa C. Baumann Michelle Beaumont 




Tobie J. Bethea 



Sean Bevan 



Charles W. Biehn 



Suzanne Billings 



THE CLASS OF 1998 83 




WA^ 



Michael J. Boyle 



Patrick H. Brady 



Shannon M. Brady 



Marline T. Branch 






Jennifer Brank 



Daniel B. Brennan 



Jim Brighters 



Patricia Brodsky 



Shannon Blackburn: Finance, Wyndmoor, PA, Investment Clubf 
Gamma lota Sigma 

David Bognar: Secondary Education/Social Studies, Philadel- 
phia, PA 

David M. Bonora: Computer Science, Giiilford, CT 

Michael A. Bove: Finance, Dow'ningtown, PA, Tau Kappa Epsi- 
'len, Investment Club 

Micliael J. Boyle: Political Science/English, Philadelphia, PA, 
Honors Board President, Collegian Managing Editor, Gavel 
Society President, LaSPAM Co-editor 

Patrick H. Brady: Accounting, Morrisville, PA, Men's Varsity 
Crew, Honors Program .,- '' 



Shannon M. Brady: Psycfiology, Philadelphia, PA 

Marline T. Branch: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 

•i •>; 

Jennifer Brank: Communication/English, Wilmington, DE, Delta 
Phi Epsilon, Writing Fellow, Judicial Board, Diplomat in Residence 
Prografn 

Daniel B. Bi^ennan:*inance, Philadelphia, PA, De'/fa Sigma Pi 

Jim Brighters: Ccpmunication, Warminster, PA, Resident 
Student Association, P re-Law Society 

Patricia Brodsky: Nur^g, Org,and, PA 



>f 



EXPLORER 





Susan Brodsky 



Kathleen R. Brown 



Kathryn J. Brown 



Sharon M. Brown 



«^%. 




Theresa M. Burke 



Rita Burns 



Patricia Butler 



E. Lamar Caison 



3usan Brodsky: Elementary/Special Education, North Wales, " 
r'A, Alpha Theta Alpha, Campus Tutoring 

<athleen R. Brown: Elementary/Special Education, Springfield, 
^A, Trac((, Cross Country 

<a1|iryn J. Brown: Elementary/Special Education, Southampton, 
^A, Student Admissions Representative 

Sharon M. Brown: Computer Science, Philadelphia, PA, /Waf/)/ 
Dornpt^er Science Board, ACM 

Dolfeen M. Brunp: Math/Computer Science, Norristown, PA, 
'^ield Hockey, Track and Field 

John K. Bruno: Finance/Marketing, Philadelphia, PA 



NaTOaEggwahmBllldck: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, 
African American Student League 

Maija Blue Burd: Psychology, Phillipsburg, NJ 

Theresa M. Burke: English, Glenside, FA, A^ha Sigma Tau, 
Intramural Sports, Lambda lota Tau ~' ' 

Rita Burns: Communication, Brigantine, NJ *"* C 

Patricia Butler: M^^rketing, Benwyn, PA, Gamma Phi Beta, 
Intramural Sports 

E. Lamar Caison: Criminal Justice, Philadelphia, PA 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



85 



Hoong Yang Chang: Management Information Systems/Market-|| 
ing, Malaysia, Cross Cultural Association, IFPA " 

Katharine Chapman: Managerpent Information Systems, 
Stratford, NJ 

Sara J.Chiappa: Accounting, Doylestown, PA, Homeless Com- 
mittee Co-Coordinator, Masque Producer, La Salle Singers Sec, 
Explorer Ads Editor, Lector, Beta Alpha, Honors Program, Project 
Appalachia, Branch Out, Orientation Leader 

Edward Chiosso: Accounting, Maple Shade, NJ, Sigma Phi 
Lambda, Resident Student Association 

Marc Ciambrello: Biology, Bristol, PA, Varsity Diving, Club Earth, 
AIDS Outreach, FAB Biology Club 



Nicole C. Cantiello: Marketing, Royersford, PA 

Peter Carr: Political Science, Philadelphia, PA, Phi Alpha Delta 
P re-Law Fraternity, College Republicans, LaSPAM, Gavel Society. 
Branch Out 

Gail V. Carter:,t!Jursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse Organi- 
zation 

Marialena Caruso: Education/English, Philadelphia, PA 

Christopher Cavallaro: Biology, Philadelphia, PA, Intramural 
Sports 

Nicholas S. Cavallaro: Accounting, Lindenwold, NJ 

John F. Ceccola: Management Information Systems/Marketing, 
Philadelphia, PA, DJ Supervisor, Italian Club Vice-President, AIDS 
Outreach J* i^ 




Nicole C. Cantiello 



Peter Carr 



Gail V. Carter 



Marialena Caruso 




Katherine Chapman 
86 EXPLORER 



Sara J. Chiappa 



Edward Chiosso 



Marc Ciambrello 



Marc Cianfrani: Psychology, Deptford, NJ, Outdoor and Indoor 
Track, Cross Country, L.O.C.K. 

Justin M. Cifra: Marketing, Bradford, MA, Business Honor 
Society, Healtli Care Administration Society Soccer, 
LE.A.D.E.R.S. 

Amy Elizabeth Clark: Accounting, Marmora, NJ, Beta Alpha Psi, 
Accounting Association, Business Honor Society 

'l^is jClark: Communication, King of Prussia, PA, Branch Out 
Ccf^oordinator, Pastorious l\/lentoring, Student Government, 
intramural Soccer, F. O. C. U. S. 

John R. Claudius: Finance, Oreland, PA, Sigma Phi Lambda, 
Investment Club 

Cathleen M. Cleary: Communication, Abington, PA 



Michelle Colbert: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA 

Alison Cole: Marketing, Southampton, PA, Health Care Adminis- 
tration Society President 

■» 
Andrea Colella: Finance, Philadelphia, PA, Beta Gamma Sigma, 
Business Honor Society, Investment Club, Italian Club, Intramural 
Soccer 

Allison M. Coleman: Marketing, Churchville, PA 

Edward W. Colter: Education/History, Philadelphia, PA, Tennis 

Brian C. Convery: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA, Intramural Sports 




Marc Cianfrani 



Justin M. Cifra 



Amy Elizabetli Clarl< 



Lewis Clark 




b^^ 



Andrea Colella 



Allison M. Coleman 



Edward W. Colfer 



Brian C. Convery 
THE CLASS OF 1998 87 




Randy Cutillo 



Nicholas D'Addezio 



Joseph D'Aiuto 



Tara Daily 



Erin Eileen Cook: Elementary/Special Education, Trenton, NJ 
Resident Assistant, Weel<ofHope * 

Angel Cooper: Biology, Fort Washington, PA, Women's Crew, 
l-ionors Program 

Renee Cooper: Accounting, Philadelphia PA, Institute of Man- 
agement Accountants, Acounting Associdtion,J[ASL, Beta 
Gamma Sigma 

beffnif^ L. Cox: English, Tinton Falls, NJ, Alplia Sigma Tau 

IVIichael P. Creedon, Jr.: Political Science/History, Maple Glen, 
PA, Sigma Phi Lambda President, Student Government Associa- 
tion' '*„ 

Kerri A.Crowne: Finance, Norristown, PA, Tracl<, Field Hocl<ey 



Anthony R. Cugini: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

J. Pam Curl: Nursing, Browns Mills, NJ, Sigma Theta Tau 

Randjj^ Cutiflo: Marketing, Levittown, PA, Ice Hockey 

NichoiSis D'Addezio: Marketing, Downingtolivn, PA 

Joseph D'Aiuto: Psychology, Perkasie, PA, Pi Kap^k Phi, 
Intraneural Football 

Tara Daily: Psychology Philadelphia, PA, Gamma Phi Beta 



EXPLORER 




Cassandra Davila 



Stephen DeCesare 



Gregory DeFelice 



Sue Delemitas 




Jessica DeLeon 



Michael T. Delp 



Anthony J. DeMarzio 



Mary DeMasi 



Scott M. Dandy: Accounting, Collegeville, PA ' ^^ 

Ernestine Daniel; Business Administration, Philadelphia, PA 

Maureen Daniels: Communication, Philadelphia, PA, Delta Phi 
^psilon, Collegian 

Vlaria C. Dattilo: Elementary/Special Education, Philadelphia, PA 

Sassandra Davila: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA 

3Jepfien DeCesare: Finance, Cinnaminson, NJ, Volleyball, 
Intramural Sports, FAB Biology Club 






Gregory DeFelifee: Biology, Havertown, PA, AED Secretary, FAB 
Biology Club Secretary and Treasurer, Honors Program - 

Sue Delemitas: Accounting, Upper Darby, PA ^ 

Jessica DeLeon: Accounting, Philadelphia, EAj, Academic 
Discovery Program Peer Advisor 

**% • #»^'- 
Michael T. Delp: Accounting, Holland, PA '*''''■ 

Anthony J. DeMa^o: Management Information Systems, 
Philadelphia, PA, Sigma Phi Epsilort Academic Discovery Pro- 
gram Peer Advisor 

Mary DeMasi: Secondary Education/History, Philadelphia, PA, 
L.O.C.K., Branch Out, Open House ^ 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



89 



Marino Demonte: Finance, Philadelphia, PA, Investment Club Dafnl Dimopoulos: English/Education, Philadelphia, PA 



G'merice Dennis: Finance, Philadelphia, PA, Gamma lota 
Epsilon, Risk Management Organization, Investment Club 

Rosetta'M. Dennis: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Sigma Theta Tau 

Christine A. Detwiler: Elementary/Special Education, 
Horsham, PA, Alpha Theta Alpha, Campus Mentoring, Homeless 
Committee 

IVIidiietre Dias: Criminal Justice, Stamford, CT, Alpha Theta Alpha 

David DIMenna: Biology, Washington Township, NJ 



David Dinan: Biology, Quakertown, PA, AED, lAMST, Resident 
Assistant 

Julie dDoherty: Education/Math, Philadelphia, PA, AME, Math/ 
Computer Science Club, G.A.E.L.S. Vice President ■^ 

Therese M. Donahue: Computer Science, Philadelphia, PA, 
Alpha Sigma kqmbda 

William Donahue: Nursing, Glenside, PA, Student Nurse Organi- 
zation 

Thomas Donnelly: Englifeh/Education, Philadelphia, PA 



% 




Marino Demonte 



G'merice Dennis 



Rosetta M. Dennis 



Christine A. Detwiler 




Julie C. Doherty 
90 EXPLORER 



Therese M. Donahue 



William Donahue 



Thomas Donnelly 



Dina L. Dormer: Chemistry/Biochemistry, Springfield, PA, Swim? 
ming, Chymian Society Secretary, Athletic Relations Committee 

Arkadiusz Dorozala: Political Science, Langhorne, PA 

Michael Downey: Elementary/Special Education, Philadelphia, 
PA, Student Government Association, Education Society, Sigma 
Phi Lambda 



Francis Duffy: Accounting, Mercerville,NJ, Tau Kappa Epsilon, 
Student Government Association 

Angela Duncan: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA, Gamma Phi Beta 

Whiladlean Dunlap: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA 

Robert S. Duszak: Economics, Huntingdon Valley, PA, FIJI 



Jeffrey S. Downing: Marketing, Toms River, NJ, Phi Kappa Theta Ilia M. Echevarria: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
' Organization 

Jp^ Marie Downs: Biology, Levittown, PA, AED Vice President, 
FAB Biology Club, Senior Representative of the Biology Board 



Jessica Edelhauser: Psychology/ Elementary/Special Education, 
Summit, NJ, Gamma Phi Beta, Intramural Sports 



Carol B. Drummond: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 




Whliadean Dunlap 



Robert S. Duszak 



Ilia M. Echevarria Jessica Edelhauser 

THE CLASS OF 1998 91 




Frances Grace Entrada Thomas Esack Jennie L Evankow Andrew J. Fanelli 




Carrie Rebecca Fanning 



Jason M. Farrell 



Nicole K. Fazio 



Danielle K. Fenyus 



Joan Agozzino Edwards: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA 



Jer1ftii§ L. Evankow: Communication, Lyme, CT 



Andrew J. Fanelli: Finance,' Holland, PA 
Philip Emma: English, Washington Township, NJ, Pi Kappa Phi Carrie Rebecca Fanning: P^ghology, Nonwalk, CT 



Christine Eisler: Criminal Justice, Philadelphia, PA 

Philip Emma: English, Washington Township, NJ, F 

President and Secretary, Italian Club, Intramural Football, Basket- 



ball, and Softball 

Susanna M. Eng: History, Philadelphia, PA 

France? Grace Entrada: Nursing, Livingston, NJ, 
Ch&erleading, Student Nurse Organization 



,Jason1UI. Farrell: Accounting/Finance, Morffsville, PA, Befa 

Alpha, Student Life Office, Collegian ^' *z:^ ,^, 

Nicolg K. Faaip: Biology, Warrington, PA, AED,'FAB Biology Clutil 



' Danielle K. Fenyus: Nursing, Phoenixvllle, PA, Softball, Intramu- 

rai Football, Athletic Relations Committee, Student Nurse Organi- 
Thomas Esack: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA, Intramural Football, 'Nation "''^ ,. 

Soccer, Softball, Basketball, and Volleyball, G.A.E.L.S., Branch * ■ . , - • 

Out 



92 



EXPLORER 




Heather Mary Fleming 



Brian Flickinger 



Robert Foreaker 



Kirk A. Frederick 




Jerrod M. Freund 



Raymond Friedman 



Domenic N. Frontino 



Maria A. Gabrys 



jusan Marie Feshuk: Biology/Health Care Administration, 
Jensalem, PA, Health Care Administration Society Secretary, 
ntramural Volleyball, Student Body Organization Representative 

'Caren L. Fisher: Elementary/Special Education, Delran, NJ 

ile^issa Eileen Fitzgerald: Political Science, Norwalk, CT, 
3amma Phi Beta 

)iana Flecha: Elementary/Special Education, Reading, PA 

ie^lr Mary Fleming: Marketing/Finance, Philadelphia, PA, 
\lpha Sigma Tau 

Irian Flickinger: Accounting/Management Information Systems, 
llonsville, IN, Basketball 



Robert Foreakeii": Accounting, "Philadelphia, PA 

Kirk A. Frederick: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA yi 

Jerrod M. Freund: Accounting/Finance, Wichita, KS, Varsity 
Swimming, Beta Alpha, Gamma lota Sigma 

Raymond Friedman: Marketing, Safety Harbor, FL, Track and 

Field ^^; 

Domenic N. Fron|ino: Criminal Justice, Philadelphia, PA 
Maria A. Gabrys: Education, Lawndale, PA 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



93 



Christina Gagliana: Elementary/Special Education, ^IH 

Southampton, PA ''^^ 

Colleen M. Gain: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Campus 
Ministry, Accounting Association, Alplia Beta 

Laura Christine Galbraith: Communication, Lake Orion, Ml, 
La Salle 56 Scoreboard Producer, Explorer Broadcasting Club 
Production Manager 

'Fit2-Gerald Gallagher: English/Education, Philadelphia, PA, 
Coffeehouse 

Mark Gallagher: Marketing, Columbus, NJ, Alpha Chi Rho 

Gregory Gambescia: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Wrestling, 
Resident Assistant, Student Nurse Organization, Stifden't Coordi- 
nator 



■Alicia Marie Gardner: Art History, Upper Darby, PA, French Club 

President 

Michael J. Gatti: Communicatiqn, Philadelphia, PA, Jazz and Pep 
Bands Vice-President, WEXP, La Salle 56 

Deborah S. Gaughan: Economics/International Studies, 
Southampton, PA, German Club, Student Economics Association, 
Intramural Sports, Phi Sigma lota, Best Buddies 

David M. Gershar^ck: Criminal Justice, Hatboro, PA 

Anna Maria Gialias: Psychology, Alpha, NJ, FosterTutor/Mentor, 
PsiChi 

Erica Lynn Giehl: Finance, Bordentown, NJ, Dance Team, Alpha 
t Sigma Tau, Investment Club 




Christina Gagliana 



Colleen M. Gain 



Laura Christine Galbraith Fitz-Gerald Gallagher 




Deborah t Gaughan 
94 EXPLORER 



Michael A. Gizzi: Finance, Philadelphia' PA, Basketball ^^, 

Gary Goldenberg: Biology, Philadelphia, PA, AED 

Paul Goldhammer: Communication/English, Dover, DE, Masque, 
La Salle 56, Project Appalachia 

* ■*■ 

Miriam Gonzalez-Perez: Education/English, Philadelphia, PA 

Natasha A. Gordon: Accounting, Allentown, PA, Accounting 
Association 

Arlene E. Grace: Humanities, Philadelphia, PA, Dean's List 

F. Daniel Green: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Govern- 
ment Association Vice-President of Business Affairs, Intramural 
Sports, Activities Funding Board 



Elizabeth Ann Griffin: Marketing, Neptune, NJ, Resident Student 
Association, Club Earth, Business Honor Society, Dean's List 

Maria T. Grispino: Accounting, Jamison, PA, Pre-Law Society, 
Accounting Association, L.O.C.K., Big Brothers/Big Sisters 

Matthew Philip Guarno: Nursing, Yardley, PA, Crew, Explorer 
Mascot. Student Nurse Organization Secretary, OrienJ^tion 
Leader '< 

Kelly A. Guerin: B|plogy, Philadelphia, PA 

Kevin Michael Guinnessey: Finance, Colts Neck, NJ, Rugby, 
FIJI 




Maria T. Grispino Matthew Philip Guarno 



Kelly A. Guerin Kevin Michael Guinnessey 

THE CLASS OF 1998 95 




Steven Haluszka 



Stephanie A. Hamilton 



Scott Hammond 



Erin Kate Hannigan 





Maureen O'Connor Hanson Elizabeth A. Hargrave 



Sharon D. Harris 



Troy Harry 



Andy Gwiazda: Communication, Philadelphia, PA, Explorer 
Editor-in-Chief, La Salle 56, Collegian, Branch Out, La Salle 56 
Advisory Board, Honors Program 

Sheri L. Habingreither: Nursing, Burlington, NJ, Student Nurse 
Organization, L.O.C.K., Soup Kitchen 

Kerry E. Haeser: Elementary/Special EdQcatign#>^Brigantine, NJ 

Kathryn J. Haldeman: Communication, Columbia, PA, French 
Vlub Vige-President 

Steven Haluszka: History, Bound Brook, PA, Sigma Phi Lambda, 
WEXP, OutreacftSi^an B. Kelly Benefit 

Stephanie A. Hamilton: Chemistry/Blochemistry/English, 
Jamison, PA, Explorer Senior Section Editor, La Salle Sihgers VP, 
Homeless Committee, Chymian Society VP and Treasurer, 
Eucharistic Ministe,. Branch Out, Honors Program 



Scott Hammond: Psychology/English, Bethesda, MD, Soccer, 
Rugby, Pi Kappa Phi 

Erin Kate Hannigan: Biology, ^bington, MA, Women's Varsity , 
Crew, Alpha Sigma Tau, Varsity Soccer, G.A.E.L.S., Mentor 
Program 

Maureen O'Connor Hanson: Communicatidn, Willto^n, NJ, 

Intramural Soccer, Grimoire - "'*'' 

Elizabeth A. Hargrave: Elementary/Special Education, Vestal, 
NY, Delta Phi Epsilon, Jazz and Pep Bands 

Sharon D. Harris: Criminal Justice, Philadelphia, PA 

Troy Harry: Political Science, Gaithersburg, IVID, L.O.C.K, 
Mentor Program, Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track 



96 



EXPLORER 




ilizabeth Marion Haverty 




Sarah Haynes 



Alison E. Heider 




Shantay D. Henderson 





Jill Lynn Hengstler 



Polly Hess 



Erin HIivia 



Nghia Trong Hoang 




Justin J. Hoffmann 



Heather L. Hopkins 



Kenneth Howard 



Eileen Dolores Huggett 



lizabeth Marion Haverty: Elementary/Special Education, 
olmdel, NJ, Gamma Phi Beta 

arah Haynes: Math/Education, New Palestine, IN, Women's 
asketball, Athletics Relations Council, Education Society 

Ijfon E. Heider: Biology, Nutley, NJ, Women's Varsity 
wimming 

liantay D. Henderson: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA 

in^nn Hengstler: Elementary/Special Education, ^w %' 
Miadelphia, PA 

,ollV Hess: Nursing, Pennsauken, NJ 



Erirt HIivia: Communication, Drums, PA 

Nghia Trong Hoang: Biochemistry/Chemistry, Allentown, PA, 
Chymian Society, A/ASIA, AED^ 

Justin J. Hoffmann: Management Infonnation Systems, Philadel- 
phia, PA, Beta Gamma Sigma, Association for Information Tech- 
nology Professionals 

Heather L. Hopltins: Management Information Systems, Brigan- 
tine, NJ , Associatipn for Information Technology Professionals 
President, Resident Student Association 

Kenneth Howard: Communic^on, Pennsauken, NJ, Collegian 

Eileen Dolores Huggett: Biology, Philadelphia, PA 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



97 



Teresa M. Huggett: Biology, Philadelphia, PA, G.A.E.LS., FAB 
Biology Club 

Lauren K. Huminski: Biology, Cinnaminson, NJ, Soccer, AED 

David Infante: Marketing, Barnegat, NJ, Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
Crew, Intramural Sports 

Jennifer Ingram: Political Science, Atlantic City, NJ, Women's 
■Varsity Crew, Student Political Association 

Carlo T. loannucci: Biology, Philadelphia, PA, Intramural Football 

Jeffrey Jaworski: English/Education, Cherry Hill, NJ 



Samuel Sylvain Jean: Management Information Systems, 
Philadelphia, PA, Masque, La Salle Choir, Association for Informa' 
tion Technology Professionals, ADP Leadership Council 

Maurcia S. Jenkins: Nursing, Atlantic City, NJ, Student Nurse 
Organization, Chi Eta Phi Nursing Sorority 

Gaye G. Johns: Social Work, Philadelphia, PA 

Elizabeth A. Johnson: English, Warminster, PA 

Janice T. Johnson: Business Management, Philadelphia, PA 

Andrew J. Johnston: Finance, Philadelphia, PA, Rugby, 

Investment Club 




Gaye G. Johns 



Elizabeth A. Johnson 



Janice T. Johnson 



Andrew J. Johnston 



98 



EXPLORER 



Kimberly A. Johnston: Marketing/French, Severna Park, MD, 
Gamma Phi Beta 

Christie H. Jones: Elementary/Special Education, Pasadena, 
MD, Women's Varsity Swimming 

IWfrle Jones: {sAursing, Jamaica, Wl 

IVIichael E. Jordan: Psychology, Laurel, MD, Alptia Chi Rtio, 
Collegian, WEXP 

Paltfice M. Juliani: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 

Amy Kaltneckar: Spcial Work, Jamison, PA, Alpha Theta Alpha 



Allison Kane: Elementary/Special Education, Philadelphia, PA 

Kevin X. Kane: Finance, Richboro, PA, Investment Club, Intramu- 
ral Sports 

Jerry Kearns: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization 

Brad Kelly: Political Science, Glenside, PA 

Brian M. Kennedyj Computer Science, Runnemede, NJ , Sigma 
Phi Lambda 

Kathleen M. Kershaw: .gsycholpgy, Philadelphia, PA, Italian Club, 
Intramural Softball ' 




Jerry Kearns 



Brad Kelly 



Brian M. Kennedy 



Kathleen M. Kershaw 
THE CLASS OF 1998 99 




Heather Kritch 



Kimberly Anne Kuchler 



Carl J. Kunz, Jr. 



Jessica F. Lake 



Michael Kimmel: Communication/English, Orwigsburg, PA, 
Sigma Phi Lambda, Interfraternity and Sorority Council 

Lileya Alexandra Klecor: Russian, North Brunswick, NJ, 
Ul<ranian Club 

Ste^anie M. Koch: Marketing, Dresiner, PA, Alpha Theta Alpha 

Linda Kochensky: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Robert F. Kolb: Finance, Horsham, PA, Investment Club 

Stacy M. Korbel: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization 



Kirsten M. Kraas: Marketing, Sioux Falls, SD, Tracl<, Athletics 
Relations Committee, Resident Student Association, German Club 

Stephen Krasowski: Comnnun|cation, Philadelphia, PA 

Heather Kritch: Criminal Justice/Sociology, Manasquan, NJ, 
Women's Crew 

Kimberly Anne Kuchler: Chemistry/Biochemistry, Holland, PA, 
Chymian Society, Lacrosse 

Carl J. Kunz, Jr.: English, Warminster, PA 

Jessica F. Lake: Nursing, Mount Laurel, NJ, Student Nurse 
Organization 



100 



EXPLORER 




Colleen M. Ledger 



Jimmy Lee 



Tanya Marie Lijewski 



Chris Lilienthal 



Diana Landa: Chemistry/Biochemistry, Cherry Hill, NJ, Chymian 
Society, AED 

Phil Lanz: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Men's Varsity Crew 

Timothy M. LaPira: Public Administration, Willow Grove, PA, 
S/gjpa Phi Lambda, Judicial Board 

Janine M. LaF>ointe: Psychology, Metuchen, NJ, Psi Chi, Psy- 
chology Club, Foster Tutor-Mentor, AIDS ALIVE, Intramural 
iall 



Joseph LaSorsa: Finance, Fort Washington, PA, Investment 
Club, Tau Kappa Epsilon 

Vincent J. A. Latronica III: Finance, Hopewell Junction, NY, 
Rugby, Investment Club 



Michael J. Lear: Accounting, Warrington, PA, Ice Hockey, Beta 
Alpha, Accounting Associatbn 

Dawn LeCato: Communication^ Manassas, VA 

Colleen M. Ledger: Accounting, Norristown, PA, Gamma Phi 
Beta, tnterfraternity and Sorority Council, "Ac^unting Association 

Jimmy Lee: Management Information Systems, Philadelphia, PA 
A/ASIA, ADP, Association for Information Technology 
Professionals 

Tanya Marie Lijewski: Accounting, Phoenix, MD, Gamma Phi 

Beta 

Chrrs Lilienthal: English, Hatboro, PA, Collegian, Masque, 
Project Appalachia 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



101 



The Glory Days To 




102 EXPLORER 



Cherish Before Graduation 





f! 



THE CLASS OF 1998 103 



Jeremy B. Lista: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization 

Tara Marie Loghing: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, Alpha Sigma 
Tau 

William Love: Finance, Philadelphia, PA 

Brett W. Lovelidge: Computer Science, Hummelstown, PA, 

Baseball. Phi Kappa Theta 

» -■ 

DaVid H. Luby, Jr.: Education/History, Hatboro, PA, Sports 
Information, Historical Society, Open House 

Julte Anne Luby: Management/Marketing, Hatboro, PA, Track 
and Field 



Teresa Lucas: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Linda L. Lutz: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Alpha Sigma 
Lambda, Beta Alpha 

Kathyl.ynch: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 

Robyn Magliacano: Psychology, East Hanover, HJ.-^p/'a Sigma 

Tau - Z**^: 

Christopher J. MMliozzo: CotnmunJcation, Hamilton Square, 
NJ, Phi Gamma Delta, La Salle 56, WEXP 

Francis A. Maguire: Accounting^ Philadelphia, PA 





^^d 




Jeremy B. Lista 



Tara Marie Loghing 



William Love 



Brett W. Lovelidge 





Linda L. Lutz 



Iv^el 



Kathy Lynch 



Robyn Magliacano 



Christopher J. Magliozzo Francis A. Maguire 



104 



EXPLORER 



Courtney Makowski: Biology, Yardley PA 



Andrew P. Marvef: Political Science, Brookhaven, PA 



Patrice Malkowski: Elementary/Special Education, Philadelphia, Colleen MatkowskI: Management, Philadelphia, PA 
PA, Gamma Phi Beta 

Michelle Matrisciano: Education/English, Churchville, PA, 
MarkA.Manzo: Criminal Justice/Sociology Philadelphia, PA, Academic Discovery Program 

Criminal Justice Association 

Kirsten May: Elementary/Special Education, Erie, PA 
Steven E. Marino: Psychology Philadelphia, PA, Karate, CSC, 
■ CriminalJustice Association, AIDS Outreach James Michael McAnany: Political Science, Philadelphia, PA 

Deriise Markmann: Biology Huntingdon Valley PA, AED, FAB William C. McBride: Biology Warrington, PA, AED 
Biology Club, Best Buddies, Writing Fellow, Honors Program 

Shelden Martin: Biology Lititz, PA, Honors Program, AED, FAB 
Biology Club, Wrestling, Intramural Football 




Courtney Makowski 



Patrice IVlalkowski 



IVlark A. IVlanzo 









Steven E. Marino 




James Michael McAnany 



J 



> 



Colleen Matkowski 




William C. McBride 
THE CLASS OF 1998 105 




Maureen McCool 



Christopher McCoy Geraldine Craige McDonnell Jimmy T. McDonough 






Andrea L. McGinley 



Denise M. McGinley 



Sylvia B. McGraw 



Lawrence C. McGuffin, Jr. 



Robert R. McCarthy: Accounting, Southampton, PA 

Catherine A. McCauley: Biology, Philadelphia, PA 

Karen Michele McCloskey: Nursing, Westmont, NJ, Student 
Nurse Organization 

Heather A. McClung: Biology, Downingtown, PA, Soccer, 
Lacrosse. AED, FAB Biology Club, Best Buddies 

Maureen McCool: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Christopher McCoy: Education/History, Philadelphia, PA, 
Basketball Manager, Intramural Sports, G.A.E.LS. 



Geraldine Craige McDonnell: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 
Jimmy T. McDonough: Public Administration, Reading, PA 
Andrea L. McGinley: Communication, Philadelphia, PA 
Denise M. McGinley: Nursing, Bordentown, NJ 
Sylvia B. McGraw: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 
Lawrence C. McGuffin, Jr.: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 



106 



EXPLORER 




Seana M. McKendry 

m 



Brendan S. McLaughlin Shawn P. McLinden Bemadette McMenamin 







Michael E. McMonagle 



Tierney McNulty 



Amy McTlghe 



Alex Merdiuszew 




Seana M. McKendry: Secondary Education/History, Vernon, CT 

Brendan S. McLaughlin: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Shawn P. McLinden: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Bernadette McMenamin: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 

Michael E. McMonagle: Communication, Erdenheim, PA, 
Jazz and Pep Bands, Film Club, WEXP 

Tierney McNulty: English, Philadelphia, PA, Community Service. 
Masque, Study Abroad, FOCUS, SAR 



Amy McTlghe: Political Science, Philadelphia, PA, Alpha Sigma 
Tau Recording Secretary, College Democrats 

Alex Merdiuszew: i\/larl<eting, Philadelphia, PA 

Heather C. Middleton: English, Trenton, NJ, Grimoire. English 
Board, Honors Board 

Jaime Marfe Millard: Criminal Justice, Sewell, NJ 

Arlene A. Miller: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Joanna Mironko: Accounting, Bielsk Podlaski, Poland 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



107 



Maureen Mohan: Nursing, Oceanport, NJ, Student Nurse Organi- 
zation 

Mary Frances Moleski: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization, SNAP Health Service Committee 

Michelle Krista Montano: Political Science, Philadelphia, PA, 
Intramural Softball, College Democrats, La SPAM, SPA 

Vincent D. Monzo: Economics, Blackwood, NJ, Student Eco- 

^nomic Association, Omicron Delta Epsilon 

Maureen Mooney: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Jillfl. Morrisroe: Marketing, Jeffersonville, PA, Alptia Sigma Tau, 
Student Government Association, Community Service 



Gerald M. Moseley, Jr.: Accounting, Barrington, NJ, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon 

Anthony L. Moss: Communication, Baltimore, MD, WEXP 
Collegian 

Shannan Gentina Ellobree Mumford: Criminal Justice/Sociol- 
ogy, Philadelphia, PA 

Dionne M. Murray: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA 






Kerrie Ann Myers: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization, Athletic Relations Committee, Intramural Flag 
Football and Basketball 



Frank D. Nardone: History, Philadelphia, PA, Varsity Crew 

3> 




Maureen Mohan 



Mary Frances Moleski Michelle Krista Montano 



Vincent D. Monzo 






Maureen Mooney 



Jill N. Morrisroe 



Gerald M. Moseley, Jr. 



Anthony L. Moss 




/ 




Shannan Gentina Ellobree ivlumford 
108 EXPLORER 




Dionne M. Murray 



Kerrie Ann Myers 



Frank D. Nardone 



Joseph N. Natoli: Biology, Erial, NJ, Phi Kappa Theta, AED * 

Richard R. Nepomuceno: Nursing, Jenkintown, PA, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon, Student Nurse Organization, Intramural Sports, A/ASIA 

Thomas Nguyen: ManagemeHt, Philadelphia, PA 

% ■■■■*/ >i ', 

Sadie Nickelson: Spanish, Meadowbrook, PA, Delta Phi Epsilon, 

Writing Fellows, Mascot, Phi Sigma Iota 

^Lawrepce F. Nicoletti: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Beta Alpha, 
BetS Gamma Sigma 

Ann Marie Nieclosik: Chemistry, Atco, NJ, Chymian Society, 
Student Admissions Representative, Club Earth 



Colleen Marie Nixon: Management Information Systems, Brigan- 
tine, NJ, Resident Student Association, Association for Informa- 
tion Technology Professionals 

Brian Nolfi: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA 

Andrew F. Noonan: Chemistry, Warminster, PA, Phi Kappa Theta 
Secretary 

Anita Novak^Nursing, Pottstown, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization ^ 

Joceiyn O'Brien: Communication, Clarks Summit, PA, Gamma 
Phi Beta, Spring Fling C^mittee 

Lauren O'Brien: English/Communication, Langhorne, PA 




Andrew F. Noonan 



Anita Novak 



Joceiyn O'Brien Lauren O'Brien 

THE CLASS OF 1998 109 




Nazli Onaran 



Tina Onorato 



Michael T. Oscar 



Catherine Elizabeth Paczkowsk 



Kerry R. O'Connor: Communication, Somerrille, MA, Varsity 
Crew, Resident Assistant, WEXP 

Stephanie O'Neill: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA 

Andrew B. O'Rahilly: PsychoTbgy, Lawrenceville, NJ 

Alicia M. O'Rourke: Psychology, Levitto^n, PA 

Edmundo Ocalagan: Computer Science, Wilmingtor^J^^^j^ 

Marffyn N. Ochoa: Political Science, English, Waynesboro, PA 

Donald Oliver: ^Criminal Justice, Hulmeville, PA 



Heather J. Olson: Biology/English, Reading, PA, La Salle 
Singers President, Jazz and Pep Bands, AED, FAB Biology Club, 
Explorer, Honors Program 

Nazli Onaran: Computer Science, Ankara, Turkey, Tennis Team 

Tina Onorato: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, ^3ent Nurse Organi- 
zation '"*:■,* A.». 

Michael T. Oscar: Education/History, Philadelphia, PA, Gavel 
Society, Explorer, Judicial Board, Student Political Association, 
LaSPAM, Education Society, Historical Society, Campus Ministry, 
Branch Out 

Catherine Elizabeth Paczkowski: Social Work, Taberhadd, NJ, 
Neighborhood Tutoring, Resident Assistant 



110 



EXPLORER 




Kristen M. Palumbo George K. Papantonis 



Robert J. Pariser 



Stephanie Parkinson 




Hemant Patel 



Frederick A. Paul, Jr. 



Kathleen E. Pazdalski 



Michelle Pearson 



Juliana Padilla: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Gamma Phi Beta 

Angela Pale: Elementary/Special Education, Bensalem, PA, 
Diving Team Captain 

Amanda Joan Paiko: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization 

Dawn Marie Palmer: Psychology, Levittown, PA, Varsity Softball 

Kristen M. Palumbo: Psychology, Mount Laurel, NJ 

George K. Papantonis: Accounting/Management Infornnation 
Systems, Philadelphia, PA 



Robert J. Pariser: Political Science, Carlisle, PA, Sigma Piii 
Epsilon Vice President 

Stephanie Parkinson: CriminaJ Justice, Philadelphia, PA, 
Community Service, Criminal Justice Association Co-Coordinator, 
Resident Assistant, Peer Educator 

Hemant Patel: Biology, Philadelphia, PA 

Frederick A. Paul, Jr.: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Kathleen E. Pazdalski: Criminal Justice, Audubon, PA, Criminal 
Justice Association 

Michelle Pearson: Biology, Phoenixville, PA 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



111 



Christopher M. Pekula: Accounting, Tumersville, NJ, Pi Kappa- 
Phi, Intramural Football, Softball 

Michael Pelham: Accounting, Huntingdon Valley, PA, FIJI 

Timothy R. Pell: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, Psi Chi, Phi 
Sigma lota, Intramural Tennis, Foster Tutoring 

Domenico Pellecchia: Finance, Philadelphia, PA, Business 
Honor Society. Beta Gamma Sigma, Italian Club, Investment 
Club, Intramural Soccer 

Danielle Marie Penko: Secondary Education/English, New 
Britain, PA, Alpha Theta Alpha 

Stephen J. Pflugfelder: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, La Salle 
Singers, Grimoire, Psi Chi, Explorer, Honors Program 



Christopher Picollo: Accounting, Marlton, NJ, Business Honor 
Society 

Laurence J. Pimble: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student Nurse 
Organization 

Stacee Thomas Prather: Finance, Philadelphia, PA 

Michelle A. Priestley: Communication/English, Silver Spring, 
MD, Delta Phi Epsilon, Men's Crew, L.O.C.K., Campus Ministry, 
La Salle 56 

Petro Prystatskyi: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 

Christina Puntel: Elementary/Special Educatjon, Philadelphia, 
PA, Masque, Grimoire Co-Editor, Project Appalachia, Chile 
Sen/ice Project, Wrestling -^ 






tffe^l 



Christopher M. Pekula 



Michael Pelham 



Timothy R. Pell 



Domenico Pellecchia 








hJ2t 



Danielle Marie Penko 



Stephen J. Pflugfelder Christopher Picollo 



Laurence J. Pimble 




Stacee Thoma_ ather 
112 EXPLORER 



Michelle A. Priestley 




Petro Prystatskyi 



Christina Puntel 



Nella G. Pupo: Finance, Philadelphia, PA, Branch Out, Orienta- 
tion Leader, Investment Club 

Anthony J. Purcell, Jr.: Political Science, Conestoga, PA, 
Masque, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Student Political Association, College 
Republicans 

Corey Purcell: Connmunication, Reading, PA, Men's Crew, 
WEXP HUB, Intramural Basketball 

•Donald M. Quinn: Finance, Philadelphia, PA, Baseball 

Thomas E. Quinn: Communication/English, Churchville, PA 

Joann Quintana: Communication, Philadelphia, PA, La Salle 56 



Rosa M. Ramos: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Beta Gamma 
Sigma, Accounting Association, Tutor 

Erin T. Regan: Communication, Philadelphia, PA, AIDS ALIVE 
President. Homeless Committee, Intramural Basketball Captain, 
Intramural Soccer 

Heather Regulski: Education, Philadelphia, PA 

Philip J. Rellly: Elementary/Special Education, Philadelphia. PA 

Kathleen Reynolds: Communication, Horseheads, NY, Varsity 
Softball, Varsity Soccer, La Salle 56, WEXP Judicial Board. 
Resident Student Association. L.E.A. D. E. R. S. , Intramural Sports 

Dan Rhoads: Criminal Justice, Pennington, NJ, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon 




Heather Regulski 



Philip J. Reilly 



Kathleen Reynolds Dan Rhoads 

THE CLASS OF 1998 113 




Caroline R. Robertson 



Migdalia Rodriguez 



Robert T. Roll 



Joseph A. Romig 




Edwin M. Rosario 



Karlene Rose 



Shannon L. Ruddy 



Jennifer Sadaka 



Timothy F. Riley: Accounting, Glenside, PA, Accounting Associa- 
tion, Honors Program 

Robert P. Rittler: Accounting, Bristol, PA 

Rachel L. Ritz: Economics/International Studies, Drums, PA, 
Cross Country, Track and Field, Student Economics Association, 
Athletic Relations Committee 

■Lucita Rivera: Elementary/Special Education, Philadelphia, PA, 
lean's List 

Caroline R. Robertson: Spanish, Silver Spring, MD, Women's 
Crew, Resident Assistant, Jazz Band, Sigma Phi lota 

Migdalia Rodriguez: Sociology, Philadelphia, PA 



Robert T. Roll: Marketing, Bethlehem, PA, WEXP Manager 

Joseph A. Romig: Secondary Education/Biology, Seven Springs, 
NC, Alpha Chi Rho, Intramural Sports, Resident Student 
Association 

Edwin M. Rosario: Spanish, Rio Piedras; Pti%rto Rico 

Karlene Rose: Computer Science,. Philadelphia, PA f 

Shannon L. Ruddy: Environmental Science, Coatesville, PA, 
Geology Club 

Jennifer Sadaka: Commuhication/Marketing, Newark, NJ, 

Gamma Phi Beta ■ " 



114 



EXPLORER 






Maria Angelica C. Saladino 






Jamie M. Sanko Christopher IVl. Santarsiero Madeline I. Santiago 





James J. Scollon 



Elaine Sein 



Michael Sexton 



Owen P. Shanahan 



Maria Angelica C. Saladino: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Student 
Nurse Organization, La Salle Neighborhood Nursing Center, 
Intramural Volleyball, Tennis, National Service Sorority 

Jamie M. Sanko: History, Blakely, PA, Sigma Phi Epsilon, History 
Club, Varsity Golf, Intramural Sports 

%■ 
Christopher M. Santarsiero: Communication/English, 
Naugatuchc, CT, Student Body President 

Madeline I. Santiago: English, Philadelphia, PA 

Matthew J. Santillo: Accounting, Williamstown, NJ, Sigma Phi 
Lambda 

Jennifer A. Schmitt: Secondary Education/Spanish, Philadel- 
phia, PA, Homeless Committee Co-Coordinator, La Salle Singers, 
Chile Service Project, Explorer Section Editor, Euchahstic Minister, 
Branch Out, Honors Program 



Robert Schnepp: Biology, Maple Glen, PA, Jazz and Pep Bands, 
Philadelphia Futures Tutor, AED, FAB Biology Club 

Alexander Schugsta: Secondary Education/History, Oreland, PA, 
Intramural Sports. Phi Alpha Theta 

James J. Scollon: Finance, Feasterville, PA 

Elaine Sein: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 

Michael Sexton: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Dean's List 

Owen P. Shanahan: Communication, Holyol<e, MA 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



115 



Michelle Shegda: Marketing, Fairless Hills, PA, Women's Soccer, 
Intramural Basketball. STAR Program 

Steven Silvestro: Computer Science, Philadelphia, PA 

Heather L. Simpson: Elementary/Special Education, Warminster, 
PA, Gamma Phi Beta, Intramural Football, Volleyball, and Soccer 

Nakia J. Sims: History/Secondary Education, Philadelphia, PA, 
Historical Honor Society. Education Honor Society, Campus 
"Ministry Volunteer 

Thomas J. Sinclair: Biology, Broomall, PA 

Troy Sisum: Political Science, Venice, PL, La SPAM, Editor-in- 
Chief. Student Political Association President, College ' 
Republicans 



Lisa M. Slawinski: English, Philadelphia, PA 

Meghan A. Slowey: Psychology, Point Pleasant, NJ 

Mary Ann Smallberger: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Amanda Carol Smith: English, Wynnewo^dn^X, Delta Phi 
Epsilon, Interfraternity and Sorority Council, Lambda Iota Tau 

Farrah V. Smith: Management information Systems, Philadel- 
phia, PA ^ 

Pearl E. Smith: Sociology, Philadelphia, PA 



^ 




Michelle Shegda 



Steven Silvestro 



Heather L. Simpson 



Nakia J. Sims 





^^^^MM^ 



Thomas J. Sinclair 



Troy Sisum 



/ 



i. 






Mary Ann Smallberger Amanda Carol Smith 

116 EXPLORER 



Farrah V. Smith 



Pearl E. Smith 



Sean M. Smitheman: Accounting, Colwyh, PA 
Marie J. Smolenski: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 



Justine C. Staab: Social Work, Philadelphia, PA 
Yvette L. Starling: Social Work, Philadelphia, PA 



Jessica Soto: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, French Club, AIDS Michael E. Stech: Management, Audubon, NJ 
Outreach, AIDS ALIVE 

I ^ Allison Steever: English, Sinking Spring, PA, /^/pte T/7efa/\/p/7a 

Theresa Spinner: Marketing, Wood-Ridgfe, NJ, /Sulpha Sigma Tau Corresponding Secretary 

>. ,■• '«' %» 

.. «„-.'.- ■■ 'a-., 

£dwardH. Spotts III: Marketing, Berlin, NJ Barbara Steltzs Computer Science, Levittown, PA, Masque 

k .-- 

Patrifciy A. Spraggins: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, Psi Chi, Rubyann Stewart: Business Administration, Sewell, NJ 
l^ational Honor Society of Psychology 




Sean M. Smitheman 



Marie J. Smolenski 



Jessica Soto 



Michael E. Stech 



Allison Steever 



Barbara Steltz 



Theresa Spinner 




Rubyann Stewart 
THE CLASS OF 1998 117 




Alyson Lorraine Stone 



Catherine A. Sullivan 



Christopher Sullivan 



Maureen A. Sullivan 



uA m.M 

Raymond F. Szafran, Jr. Scott M. Szewczak 




Michele Tagye 



Linh Tao 





Andrew Michael Tavani 



Mary Taylor 



Bill S. Teixeira 




Christine A. Temple 



Alyson Lorraine Stone: Finance, Yorktown Heights, NY, Alpha 
Sigma Tau President, Homecoming Committee 

Catherine A. Sullivan: Secondary Education/Mathematics, 
Philadelphia, PA 

Christopher Sullivan: Communication, Princeton Junction, NJ, 
Men's Soccer, Sigma Phi Lambda 

Maureen A. Sullivan: Political Science, Philadelphia, PA, Student 
^otitical Association, College Democrats, Community Service 
Corps 

Raymond F. Szafran, Jr.: Accounting/Finance, Philadelphia, PA, 
Varsity Wrestling, Accounting Honor Society, Pre-Law Society 

Scott M. Szewczak: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA, Soccer 



Michele Tagye: Marketing, Delran, NJ, Resident Student Asso- 
ciation, Senior Senator, GAM Representative 

Linh Tao: Finance, Lancaster, ^A, Alpha Sigma Tau, Investment 
Club, Resident Student Association 

Andrew Michael Tavani: Communication, DoVlestown, PA, Pi 

Kappa Phi, WEXP . ,, 

Mary Taylor! -Nursing, Roxborough, PA, Student Nurse Organiza- 
tion Officer 

Bill S. Teixeira: Business Management, Portugal, Society for the 
Advancement of Management, Soccer, Golf 

Christine A. Temple: Psychology, Fairfax, VA 



118 



EXPLORER 




Natalie M. Toomey 



John A. Torrente 



Amy Christine Tosto 



Andrew R. Trella 



Jaime C. Tepedino: Elementary/Special Education, Ventnor, NJ 

Nicolle A. Tepedino: Nursing, Ventnor, NJ, Student Nurse 
Organization, SNAP Healtti Service Committee 

Nadine Thies: Accounting, Waterford, NJ 

%, 
Geraidine Thomas: Elementary/Special Education, 
Philadeipiiia, PA 
^» 
^If^ela^D. Thomes: Psychology, Pawling, NY 

Audrey Thompson: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA 

Joseph J. Thompson: Criminal Justice/Philosophy, Philadelphia, 
PA, Rugby, Tau Kappa Epsilon 



Jennifer Lynn Thurston: English, Philadelphia, PA, African 
American Student League, fracl< and Field 

Natalie M. Toomey: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Beta Alptia, 
Accounting Association, Alpha Sigma Tau, Intramural Softball and 
Football 

John A.Torrente: Criminal Justice/Sociology, Southampton, PA, 
Student Government Association, College Republicans 

Amy Christine Tofto: Elementary/Special Education, 
Hammonton, NJ, damma Phi Beta 

Andrew R. Trella: Chemistry/Biochemistry, Allentown, PA, 
Chymian Society President, Honors Program, Intramural Spoils, 
"Channel 17 Fan of the Year" 



THE CLASS OF 1' 



119 



Amy Trinh: Biology, Cheltenham, PA B 

Juan Carlos Trujillo: Finance, Langhorne, PA, Pi Kappa Phi, 
Gamma lota Sigma, Investment Club 

Mary Elizabeth Tuinstra: Elementary/Special Education, Cran- 
berry Township, PA 

Nicole R. Vacca: IVIarketing, Stamford, CT, Alpha Theta Alpha 

Wendy Vandenburg: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, Gamma 
Sigifia Sigma 

Gwynne E. Vandiver: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Gamma Phi 
Beta, Student Nurse Organization, Campus Ministry 



Russell D. Vaughan: Computer Science, Philadelphia, PA 

Michele Lee Venture: Accounting, Garwood, NJ, Founding Sister 
of Chi Upsilon Sigma, Beta Alph^ 

David L. Viloria: Communication, Philadelphia, PA, Student 
Government Association, Intramural Sports, CSC 

Marc C. Vincelette: Criminal Justice, Pittsfieid, MA** 

Jason Viola: Finance, Philadelphia, PA 

Vito S. Viscomi: Biology, Manalapan, NJ, Indoor and Outdoor 
Track and Field, L.O.C.K. 




Amy Trinh 



Juan Carlos Trujillo Mary Elizabeth Tuinstra 



Nicole R. Vacca 




David L. Viloria 
120 EXPLORER 



Marc C. Vincelette 



\h mM 



Jason Viola 



Vito S. Viscomi 



Kristin Vivian: Marketing/Finance, Delran, NJ, Gamma Phi Beta, 
Investment Club 

Renee Lynn Vogel: Elementary/Special Education, Beachwood, 
NJ, Gamma Phi Beta, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field, 
Orientation Leader, Spring Fling Committee 

Francis P. Voight: Communication, Philadelphia, PA, Jazz and 
Pep Bands, La Salle 56 

•John J.Walsh: Sociology, Hatfield, PA 

Kathleen Ward: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, Intramural Soft- 
ball. Accounting Association 

Patricia A. Ward: Management, Peterson, NJ 



Linda M. Warner: Elementary/Special Education, Warrington, PA, 
Alpha Theta Alpha, Student Government Association, Campus 
Mentoring, Honors Program 

Brian J. Warriner: Communication, Washington's Crossing, PA, 
Intramural Sports, Resident Student Association 

Jennifer L. Weakland: Elementary/Special Education, 
Mechanicsburg, PA, Resident Student Association, L.O.C.K., 
Council for Exceptional Children. AEP Tutor, Intramural Volleyball 
and Basketball 

Amy Weaver: Elementary/Special Education, Pottstown, PA, 
Alpha Sigma Tau, Chile Service Project 

Jill Marie Weber: Biology, Yardley, PA, Women's Soccer.C.A.R.E. 

Sarah Weiss: Elementary/Special Education, Libertyville, IL, 
Women's Basketball 




Jennifer L. Weakland 



Amy Weaver 



ill Marie Weber 



Sarah Weiss 

THE CLASS OF 1998 121 




Kelli L. West 



Diana L. Weston 



Richard J. Wesztergom Elaine Wideman-Vaughn 




Joan Graham Wilder 



Christine Wilderman 



Delia M. Williams 



Maxine L Williams 



Kathleen Welsh: Criminal Justice, Philadelphia, PA 

Maureen Welsh: Marketing, Philadelphia, PA 

Cathy Werner: Nursing, Littlestown, PA, Gamma Phi Beta 

Jeannine N. Wejscott: Management Information SysternC^ 
Philadelphia, PA 

Kelli L. West: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA 

^ .-■ 

Diarig L. Weston: History, Martins Creek, PA, Judicial Board, 

Gamma Phi Beta, Phi Alpha Theta 



Richard J. Wesztergom: Accounting, Philadelphia, PA, 
Accounting Association 

Elaine Wideman-Vaughn: Psychology, Philadelphia, PA 

Joan 6raham Wilder: English, Philadelphia, PA 

Christine Wilderman: Elementary/Special Education, Levittown, 
PA, Varsity Softball, Intramural Football, Resident Student Asso- 
ciation, Educational Society 

Delia M. Williams: Accounting/Management Information Sys- 
tems, Medford, NJ, Accounting Association, Association for 
Information Technology Professionals, Lacrosse 

Maxine L. Williams: English, Philadelphia, PA 



122 



EXPLORER 




Terez K. Wood 



Maryanne Wooden 



Monica Woytus 




Stephen L. Zyble 



Brian Garbacz 



MoHIca Woytus: Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, Women's Tennis 
Captain, Student Nurse Organization Officer, Intramural Sports, 
La Salle Neighborhood Nursing Center 

Inna Yermosh: French, Philadelphia, PA, Phi Sigma lota, 
La Salle University Archives Translator, French Club 

Jaci Young: Nursing, Medford, NJ, Cheerleading 

Stephen L. Zyble: Political Science, Philadelphia, PA, Men's 
Varsity Crew 

Brian Garbacz: Criminal Justice, Conshohocken, PA, Men's 
Varsity Crew 



John J. Wisham: Criminal Justice, Laurel Springs, NJ, Criminal^ 
Justice Association, Backstage Programming Activities Committee 

Edward Woehlcke: Secondary Education/Mathematics, Philadel- 
phia, PA, Varsity Soccer, Intramural Sports, G.A.E.L.S. 

Ka^leen M. Wolfe: Finance, Ambler, PA, Women's Basketball 

Terez K. Wood: Criminal Justice, Philadelphia, PA 

11/la'ryanne Wooden: English, Philadelphia, PA 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



123 



1998 Graduates Not Pictured 



Joseph M. Alfonsi 
Myrna I. Alicea 
Rukiah Alwan 
Megan E. Anderson 
Celina Angua 
Sheila D. Avent 
Jesse B. Bagans 
Genell D. Ball-Smith 
Kevin A. Ballisty 
Brigid A. Benner 
John A. Bodden 
James A. Bradley 
Patrick J. Bree 
Matthew T. Brescia 
Michael L. Bronisz 
Jesse F. Brookreson 
Michelle A. Budenz 
Tatyana Burd 
Vanessa C. Burk 
Thomas W. Butcher 
Joseph M. Cappello 
Nicholas J. Caramenico 
Luke B. Cavanagh 
Kerry H. Clark 
Stephanie C. Coddens 
Cesidio V. Colasante 
Rochelle Coles 
Sean P. Connell 
Nicole H. Contosta 
Cora Dandridge 
Jeanette Danvers 
Roman D. Danyliw 
Eric C. Davies 
Robin C. Davis 
Michael P. Day 
Frank A. DeFalco 
Katherine R. DeStefano 
Eric D. DeVine 
Michelle DeVito 
Anne Marie Devlin 
Kelly A. Devlin 
Francis M. DiPaolo 
Michael M. Dickman 
Shirley A. DuBoyd 
Stephen F. Duncheskie 
Denise M. Dwyer 
Marianne Farley 
James B. Ferry 
William C. Fleck 



Linda Ford 
Damon R. Forte 
Pamela L. Foster 
Maryann R. Frazier 
Thomas E. Friel 
Steven C. Fromal 
Melody A. Fuksman 
Diana G. Gagliardi 
Gina M. Gasper 
Kevin M. Gillespie 
Carolyn T. Gimpel 
Catherine E. Giordano 
Aristotelis Giouzelis 
Anderson Gonzalez 
Francis D. Green 
Steven J. Greenberg 
Michael L. Gregan 
Johanna L. Grochowalski 
Vicki L. Gross 
Timothy A. Grugan 
Cynthia N. Hallman 
John R. Haybum 
Christopher M. Heckler 
Matthew P. Heil 
Andrea F. Henion 
Charles F. Holman 
Christopher P. House 
Amie C. Howell 
Joseph M. Huber 
Richard L. Irving 
John F. Jeter 
Carrie A. Jewett 
Robert J. Kayris 
Jenine M. Kee 
Kenneth L. Keim 
Thomas P. Kelly 
Patricia E. Kennedy 
Dolores F. Kingston 
Douglas H. Kirk 
Theresa M. Kitzmiller 
Steven C. Kleinschmidt 
Kevin J. Koch 
Inga Kogan 
Thomas M. Lannen 
Patrick E. Larr 
John P. Lawler 
Christine M. Lebisky 
Ellen Lemashov 
Robert A. Lobis 



David A. Long 
John D. Lottier 
Michael J. Lutz 
Polly Luu 
Nghiem S. Ma 
Joseph V. Macalindong 
Tamara E. Malachi 
Thomas F Markward 
Barney F. Martin 
Alese M. Matera 
Chrystal R. Mattox 
Michael S. McDonough 
Charles F. McGivem 
Brian P. McGuire 
Dwayne McKelvey 
Shannon L. McKeown 
Kevin C. McNamara 
Donna M. McNeill 
Christopher B. Mediano 
Thomas J. Meehan 
Ella M. Mickus 
Valerie L. Montoya 
Ena N. Morimoto 
Douglas K. Morrison 
Daniel J. Morrissy 
Thomas A. Mulligan 
Michelle Murrill 
Timothy J. Nash 
David A. Nazari 
Jeanne R. Noe 
Joseph P. O'Donnell 
Stephen J. Palladinetti 
Laurie M. Parks 
Frank J. Patrick 
Suzanne R. Patton 
Stephanie C. Payne 
Chad E. Pierce 
Betty Jo Povilaitis 
Andrew J. Quinn III 
John J. Quinn 
David Z. Red 
Daniel E. Rhoton 
April Rider 

Tami N. Riebel-Gramm 
Kathryn A. Riley 
Christopher A. Roat 
Ernestine R. Rooker 
Tony J. Rose 
Jonathan J. Rotella 



Brian M. Satterfield 
Stella C. Scott 
Syreeta L. Scott 
Thomas J. Shaw 
Daniel J. Shields 
Shawn J. Smith 
Kelly L. Speck 
Daniel C. Stout 
Erin J. Strickler 
Carla M. Stroman 
Kathryn J. Stuckart 
Natahe S. Stusyk 
Kathleen E. Suchecki 
Jessica L. Svoboda 
James P. Tardi 
John E. Teague 
Kimberly A. Thomas 
Cory L. Touchton 
Arcangelo Travaglini 
Thao P. Trinh 
Max Tritz 
Robert J. Truitt 
Taihra M. Tucker 
James J. Vacca 
Vania S. Vangore 
Jovelyn L. Vilar 
Myrina L. Vy 
Nykia D. Walker 
Donald J. Walsh 
Timothy R. Walton 
Kevin Wegner 
Luchiana Wesley 
Tracey M. Williams 
Laura J. Winchester 
Michael J. Wisniewski 



124 EXPLORER 



1997-1998 HIGHLIGHTS 



"^ 



'urrent Events 

Timothy McVeigh received the death 

sentence for the Oklahoma City 

bombing. 

The President added Buddy the dog 

to his family. 

Despite being found guilty of the death 

of a baby, Louise Woodward, a British 

nanny, was freed by a judge. 

On October 27, 1997, the Dow Jones 

plunged 554.26 points in response to 

an unstable Asian market. 

In California, the Hale-Bopp comet 

caused 39 Heaven's Gate cult members 

to commit mass suicide. 

Iraq's Saddam Hussein confronted the 

UN again. 

After 156 years of British colonial rule. 

Hong Kong sovereignty reverted to 

China. 



Entertainment 

► The Titanic received acclaim both on 
Broadway and at the box office. 
Seinfeld returned to NBC for its ninth 
and final season. 

In a much publicized episode on ABC, 
Ellen DeGeneres's character Ellen 
came out on national television. 
The Rolling Stones returned to the 
road for their Bridges to Babylon tour. 
After popular vote, the Miss America 
pageant allowed contestants to wear 
either one or two piece bathing suits for 
the first time. 



Sports 



During their heavyweight fight, Mike 

Tyson bit Evander Holyfield's ear. 

The Florida Marlins won the World 

Series. 

At 21 years old, Eldrick (Tiger) Woods 

became the youngest golfer to win the 

Masters. 

The 1998 Winter Olympics were held 

in Nagano, Japan. 



Health and Science 

^ The first set of septuplets in the world 
to survive after birth were bom in 
Carlisle, Iowa, to Bobbi and Kenny 
McCaughey. 

*► NASA's Mars Pathfinder explored the 
Red Planet. 

^ The effects of El Nino were felt along 
the Pacific Coasts. 

^ Scientists in Scotland cloned a sheep 
named Dolly. 



Those We Said Goodbye To: 

^ Sonny Bono 

^ Princess Diana 

^ John Denver 

^ Michael Kennedy 

'^ Jimmy Stewart 

^ Mother Teresa 

^ Gianni Versace 



THE CLASS OF 1998 



125 




126 EXPLORER 




LA SALLE LTNIVERSITY 1 27 




128 EXPLORER 




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collegian 




Volume XLIII 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1972 



No. 1 




Havman Hall, the college's new $4 million athletic facilities building, has Opened this semester. 
This view is looking north-west from 20th Street. Photo by Wi; 

$4 Million Hayman Hall Opens; 
Schedule of Activities Released 



by Bill Terry 

Remember when all freshmen at La Salle 
were required to tal<e ROTC. Remember 
when meat on a Friday was considered ta- 
boo. Rememberwhen Jim Harding comman- 
deered the Explorer basketball team. Re- 
memberwhen Tom Dempsey was Editor-in- 
Chief of the Collegian. Such memories. We 
can now add venerable Wister Gym, that 
poor man's version of a basketball court, to 
this list of things that are no more. For 
Hayman Hall, the athletic building of the fu- 
ture, is now open and ready for use. 

No longer will the swim team be forced to 
practice in the Germantown YMCA. No 
longer will a basketball player lose his dribble 
to a "dead" spot on the court. No longer 
will there be a line waitingto shoot 'em up at 
a basket with a bent rim. Hayman Hall, dedi- 
cated to the wife and parents of H. Blake 
Hayman, M.D., LLD., class of 1941 and cur- 
rently on La Salle's Board of Trustees, pro- 
vides the college with athletic facilities never 
before seen at this school. 

Costing over four million dollars to build. 



Hayman Hall is a four level construction. The 
bottom, or locker room level, consists of two 
singles squash courts and a doubles court. 
Handball and paddleball can also be played 
on these courts. If fast-paced action is your 
bag, try these games. A limited quantity of 
squash rackets and handball sets are being 
sold for seven and four dollars, respectively, 
at the equipment counter on this level. 
Men's and women's lockers, showers, and 
lavatories, the trainer's room, doctor's of- 
fice, and sauna room are other items of in- 
terest on this lower level. 

The Joseph Kirk IVlemorial natatorium is 
located on the next floor, the foyer and pool 
level. There are separate swimming and div- 
ing areas, a place for underwater observa- 
tion, and 1700 seats for swim meets. The 
Explorer swim team will hold their meets here 
and the three day Middle Atlantic Confer- 
ence Championships will take place here in 
March. There is ample room for press and 
television coverage in this real first class 
area. 

Directly above is the mezzanine level 
where the athletic offices are located. Ath- 
letic Director John Conboy, Building Direc- 

REMEMBERING LA SALLE 

128 A 



tor Joe O'Donnell, and the coaches of the 
various sports all have their offices on this 
floor. The next level contains three regula- 
tion-size basketball courts, which can ac- 
commodate six intramural games at one time. 
The varsity will practice here and the fresh- 
men will play here to 500 spectators. Also 
on this floor is an area for exercise and weight 
training. 

On top of the basketball level is a one- 
twelfth mile indoor practice and exercise 
track, making it possible for the track team 
to practice running inside during the winter 
Facilities are also available for fencing, wres- 
tling, and gymnastics throughout the build- 
ing. 

All it takes to make use of this modern 
recreation center is a validated ID Card. A 
guest, registered a day previous, will be ad- 
mitted. Lockers and towels can be pur- 
chased for 25 cents at the equipment 
counter A special rate of fifteen dollars a 
semester can be obtained. 

More information on the building can be 
found in the La Salle Handbook or the 
Hayman Hall Information booklet. 



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Today, if we want to purchase a text- 
book, stationery supplies, or La Salle 
paraphernalia, we simply walk into the 
Campus Store on the first floor of 
Wister Hall. But in 1947, we would 
have walked into Leonard Hall — 
Leonard Hall? 

Named for Bro. Gervald Leonard, 
F.S.C., Leonard Hall was an officers' 
club from WWH, which was acquired 
from the U.S. Government by La Salle 
College. It was disassembled at its lo- 
cation in Camp Patrick Henry, loaded 
on a truck, and reassembled on La Salle 
property immediately behind McShain 
Hall in 1947. Originally a wooden struc- 
ture, the College had it bricked over to 
match the surrounding buildings. The 
Collegian of March 7, 1956 reported 
that Leonard Hall contained "a student 
lounge with the barber shop and cam- 
pus store in the rear," thus making 
Leonard, a building long since gone, the 
first site of a campus store. 

Text continues on 128G 




The interior of the Leonard Hall store (above). Leonard also contained a 

student lounge and cafeteria. 

This photo (right), indicates that a "textbook store" was located under the 
east stands of McCarthy Stadium where the mailroom is today. 



REMEMBERING LA SALLE 
128B 



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La Salle University's roots go back to the time of the Civil War — 1 863 to be exact — thus making La Salle over 1 30 years old. Quite 
often, our narrow frame of reference causes us to forget that an institution such as La Salle was here before we ever arrived and will 
continue to exist long after we leave. The grounds we walk and the buildings we inhabit didn't always look the way they do today. In 
some cases, the change between then and now is drastic, and other times it is hardly noticeable. These changes only become apparent 
through an examination of the "before" and the "after" in order to see the differences that passing decades bring. 




Since the founding of La Salle, the school has had four locations, with the present site at the comer of 20th and Olney being the fourth location. The 
upper photo shows how sparse the main quad looked in the 1930s just a few years after the campus was moved for the fourth and final time. What 
were once tiny shrubs are now lowering trees. Note the bleachers which are set up in the upper photo for Commencement exercises. 



REMEMBERING LA SALLE 

128C 



The thought of expanding the campus across 20th Street, not to mention such buildings as Ohiey or St. Katharine's, were mere dreams in 1963 when 
this aerial photo was taken (below ). Note the street, (Cottage Lane) di\ iding the Peale Estate and the main parking lot. Compare this photo with the 
bottom aerial shot tVom 1994 to see the many changes around campus. 




REMEMBERING LA SALLE 
128D 




The time is circa 1 930s and the location is the ground floor of College Hall (above left). What is now office and meeting space for the School of 
Business Administration (above right) was once a locker area where students could store jackets and books for the day while on campus. The doors 
in the background lead out to Olney Avenue. 




REMEMBERING LA SALLE 
128E 



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Today, the Blue & Gold Diiuiig Comuuiiis is used us u luic-night study lounge, but in the 1960s, students used the Union Ballroom as a place lo get 
school work done or attempt to relax in hard plastic chairs (above left). The art deco lights are gone, replaced by the more modern ionized type, and 
the ballroom now serves as a place for dances, award banquets, and convocations with a stage at the west end (above right). 




When completed in the fall of 1959, the Union, built of "radial design," originally ended with the theatre at its south end 
(left). Decades later, this side of the building is now hidden by the addition of the Union Annex, (above) built to increase 
meeting and assembly space. The door in the lower center of the old photo was raised to match the height of the first floor 
of the annex. 



REMEMBERING LA SALLE 

128F 




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When the Student Union opened in the 
fall of 1959, the store was moved to a lo- 
cation on the first floor of the Union. It is 
here that the modern store took shape, of- 
fering a wide variety of items, including La 
Salle apparel, magazines, and yes, even 
cigarettes. In the October 7, 1959 issue of 
the Collegian, Union Director John Veen 
stated that "for the size of our campus, the 
new Campus Store compares in size and 
.set-up with the best in the country." For 
years, however, textbooks were sold un- 
der the east stands of McCarthy Stadium 
because of the store's limited space. 

With the store's move to the Union, 
Leonard Hall was converted to classrooms 
and office space, and was later demolished 
in 1977 due, in part, to termite damage. 

In the 1980s, with the addition of the 
Union Annex, the Campus Store was 
moved to what is now the Williamson Com- 
muter Lounge. Finally in 1989, the store 
was moved for the fourth and final time to 
the first floor of Wister Hall, an area pre- 
viously occupied by the gymnasium and, 
later, the library annex. It is this location 
which we are familiar with today; it is here 
where we can pick up that last minute gift 
or that textbook which should have been 
bought back in September. 



The first modem Campus Store was located on the first floor of the Union 
(top). Note the black and white flooring used throughout the building. 



The Williamson Commuter Lounge (left ) in the Student Union was home 
to the store in the 1980s. 



In April 1989. Brother President PatrickEUis, F.S.C. (above), cuts the 
ribbon on the new Campus Store in Wister Hall. 



REMEMBERING LA SALLE 
128G 



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In August of 1 970, work 
progresses on the diving 
wells of La Salle College's 
$4 million dollar athletic fa- 
cility (right). The view is 
looking southwest towards 
where the St. Miguel 
Townhouses now stand. At 
the time, Hayman Hall was 
considered "the athletic fa- 
cility of the future." 

From the air (lower right), 
we get a glimpse of what 
Hayman looked like under 
construction. The steel 
beams for the third floor 
basketball arena are in place 
and work continues on the 
courts themselves. Note the 
amount of parking that was 
available all around the 
building. 

Workers from the James 
J. Clearkin Company (lower 
left) use wood forms to al- 
low the concrete to set in 
place for the entrance on the 
south (parking lot) side of 
the building. The architects 
for the project were Carroll, 
Grisdale, and VanAlen, the 
same firm who designed 
Olney Hall the year before. 



Section Editor: 

Andy Gwiazda '98 

Special thanks to Brother 
Joseph Grabenstein, 
F.S.C., of the La Salle Uni- 
versity Archives for his as- 
sistance in researching 
and preparing the photo- 
graphs for this section; 
and to Kathy Bagnell of 
Public Relations for the 
photograph of the Union 
Ballroom. $ 




REMEMBERING LA SALLE 
128H 




LA SALLE UNIVERSITY 1 29 




During Homeless Awareness Week, Carolyn Bonner, Loren McCloskey, Jen DeBisschop, and 
Steph Rozak spend 24 hours on the main quad to experience the plight of a homeless person. 



130 EXPLORER 



Student Life 




La Salle has a university culture rich in history and 
background. Superior teaching is one reason 
why the value of a Christian Brothers education 
is immeasurable. But would any of this history matter 
if La Salle was a school without students? They are 
what make this school such an incredible institution. 
Their activities are as diverse as they are. Some partici- 
pate in the arts through the Masque, the Jazz Band, and 
La Salle Singers. Others are drawn to literary aspira- 
tions through the Explorer, Collegian, and Grimoire. 
Many others continue the Greek traditions and join so- 
rorities and fraternities. If there is an interest, there is a 
group or organization; and when there is a club, there is 
student life, i' 



Section Editors: 

Tracy Mann '00 
Joy Morris '00 

Greek Life Coordinator: 

Amy VanVessem '00 



STUDENT LIFE 



131 



A/Asia: 



(Front Row Left lo Right) 

Marilyn Ochoa, Kristine Bayot. 

Joli Laxarino. Ngluia Hoang. 

Sylvia Ramos. Nikki Santos 

(Back Row Left to Right) Itona 

Onove. Shigerie Imamura. 

Nobuko Ueki. Alex Zaidan 





Army 
R.O.T.C.: 

( Front Row Left to Right) 
Tisha Bridge. Jackie 
Synnamon, Nikki Santos, 
Tammy Stavenski (Back Row 
Left to Right) Major Keith 
Cianfrani. Paul Normoyle. Jim 
Bigg, Nick McDermoU, Nick 
lorio, Sean Hopkins, Ed 
Gotiangco, Captain 
Todd Berry 



Business 

Honor 

Society: 

(Front Row Left to Right) 
JeffChrin. Maria Whitman, 
Broderick Jones (Back Row 
Left to Right) Chris Picollo, 
Katie Wood. Susan Young. 
Melissa Hodge, Deanna 
Monroe. Tara Nicolo 




132 



EXPLORER 




Campus 
Crusade for 
Christ: 

(Front Row Lefl lo Right) 
Melissa Hindenlang. Rachel 
Williams, Natalie Karelis. 
Allison Collucio (Back Row 
Lefl to Right) Juha Costello, 
Paul Hartsuss 



CJV.R.E 



(Front Row Left to Right) 

Stacy Gerhardt, Kim Kessler, 

Annemarie Gregoiy. Allison 

James, Jenna Long. Stacy 

Harris, Erin McGuigan, 

Colleen Smith (Back Row 

Left to Right) Coleen 

Keenan, Mike Davis, Kelly 

Tierney, Brick Hyde, Pam 

Markert, Stephanie Rozak, 

Eric Augenstein, Dan Merz, 

Pat Sheridan, Bob Delp. Julie 

Rose, Christine Gray, 

Patrice Kruszewski 




College 
Democrats: 

Left to Right) Dr. Mary 
Ellen Balchunis-Harris. 
Melissa Volin. Michael Burke 



STUDENT LIFE 



133 



Council for 

Exceptional 

Children: 

(From Row Left to Right) 

Julie Jurkiewicz. Crystyna 

Fedorijczuk, Christine 

McDonald, Lauren Patterson, 

Shannon Brown, Moira 

Downey, Laura Direnzo 

(Back Row Left to Right) 

Pam Markert, Casidy Dailey, 

Paul Gimbel, Megan Bullard, 

Kelly Roche, Kate Doerins 





Cross 

Cultural 

Association: 

(Front) Annie Hounsoukou, 
Aya Hirano (Back Row Left 
to Right) Richie Fumey, 
Bernard Okite, Cristina 
Andrade, Bojan Bares, 
Kevin O'Neill 



French 
Club: 



(Front Row Left to Right) 

Jennifer Vicoli, Alicia 

Gardener, Jessica Soto, David 

Greer (Back Row Left to 

Right) Barbara Mulholland, 

Julia- Anne Jurkiewicz, Inna 

Yermosh, Kate Haldeman, 

Heather Fenwick, 

Nicholas Simard 




134 



EXPLORER 




(Front Row Left to Right) 
Julie Dougiierty, Erin Reagan, 
Jenna Long. Kate Doering. 
KaraSchieler, Kim O'Brien 
(Back Row Left to Right) 
Melissa Smyth, Chris 
Clayton, Alex Schugsta, Tom 
Essac, Dan Morrissy, 
John McNamara 



Gospel 
Choir: 



(Front Row Left to Right) 

Jocelyn Dandridge, Joli 

Lavarino, Anne Blackson, 

Nicole Boyd, Oriel Dennis 

(BackRow Left to Right) 

Broderick Jones, Lesette 

Wright, Reth Phoeuk, Burton 

Sternthal, Takiyah Myatt, 

Charlise Cole, Angela 

Anderson, Ebony Ingram, 

Will Hennigan, Chris Collins, 

DaenaOritz 





Health Care 

Administration 

Society: 

(Front Row Left to Right) Alison 
Cole. Susan Feshuk (Back Row 
Left to Right) Justin Ciffra. 
Dan Morrissy 



STUDENT LIFE 



135 



Institute of 
Management 
Accountants: 

(Left to Right) Chris Piccolo. Jeff 

Chiin. Dr. Borkowski. 

Fred Manning 




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p 



Investment 
Club: 



(Front Row Left to Right) 
Nella Puppo. Shannnon 
Blackburn. Christian Saffici 
(Back Row Left to Right) Dr. 
Rhoda, Vic Roth, Donald 
Jones, Nick Simard, Sean 
McDevitt, Jill Evanko, Emily 
Mendel. Kim Rosers 



Jazz and 
Pep Band: 



(Front Row Left to Right) 

Frank Voight, Paul Bourke, 

D.J. Deeney, Joe D'Orazio. 

April White, Joe Longo, 

Allison Slabek, Nick Voight, 

Mike Gatti (Back Row Left to 

Right) Bonnie Errico. Jennifer 

Merritt, Stacy Harris, Mike 

McGonigle 




136 



EXPLORER 




Karate Club: 

(Left to Right) Rob Scheibel. 
Brian Selzer, Sensei John 
Duniel, Jason Kubert 



La Salle 

Committee 

for the 

Homeless: 

(Front Row Left to Right) 

Robert Scott, Marianne 

Bellesorte, Loren McCloskey, 

Colleen Smith (Back Row 

Left to Right) Stephanie 

Hamilton, Ken Gavin. Katie 

Riordan, Katie Wilson, 

Sara Chiappa 





La Salle 
Singers: 

(Front Row Left to Right) 
Jennifer Schmitt. Stephanie 
Hamilton. Patti Noe. 
Annemarie Gregory. Stacy 
Harris. Jen DeBisschop. 
Andrea Quinn (Back Row 
Left to Right) Julie Rose. 
Lydia Stieber. Dennis Miguel. 
Amy VanVessem. Eric 
Augenstein. Stephen 
Pflugfelder. Erica Law son. 
Becky Thimm. Heather 
Olson. Erin Morris. Allison 
James. Reth Phoeuk 



STUDENT LIFE 



137 



L.O.C.K.: 



(Kneeling) Stephanie 

Parkinson, Michelle Priesllex 

(Back Row Left to Right i 

Nicole Gagnon. Vanessa 

Unger. Sharon Badolato, Sue 

Strittmatter, Laura 

Stillabower. Pamela Markert. 

Alexine Judge, Elise Wagner, 

Jenn Hess, Sharon Wilson, 

Jane Meera Huh 





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(Left to Right) Daniel 
Rodriguez, Maria Angelica 
Colon, Daena Ortiz-ToiTes, 
TamikaTubens, 
Melissa Martinez, Roberto 
King-Sandoral 



Rugby Club: 



(Front Row Left to Right) 

Vincent Latronica, Pat 

Murphy, Frank Moffa. Jon 

McFarland, Tamer Ahmed. 

Dave McClafferty, Seth Cyall 

(Back Row Left to Right) Jim 

Cute, Zack Zondlo, Andrew 

Johnston, Scott Hammond, 

Mike Borda, Dan Kateusz, 

Rich Godshall, Chuck Dalin, 

Chris Rendina 




138 



EXPLORER 




Sigma Theta 
Tau: 



fFront Row Left to Right) 
Majorie Hein/er Ph.D. RN: 
Zane Wolf Ph.D. RN, FAAN; 
Sandra Davis Ed.D, RN 
(Back Row Left to Right) . 
Janice Beitz Ph.D. RN: 
Joanne Serembus M.SN, RN, 
CCRN; Patti Zuzelo MSN, 
RN; Mary Dorr MSN, RN 



Student 

Economic 

Association: 



(Front Row Left to Right) 

Chrissie Medori, Dr. Richard 

Mshomba, Joanna Pietrus, 

Debbie Gaughan (Back Row 

Left to Right) James 

Pietraffita, Marc Santugini, 

John Sadlow ski Allan 

Medwick, Jrn I av\ son 





Students' 

Government 

Association: 

(Front Row Left to Right) 
Karen Heistand. Dave Viloria. 
Chris Santarsiero. Mar}' 
Burke. Trey Ulrich. Christine 
Gray. Megan Bamett. Julie 
Creedon ( Middle Row Left to 
Right) Abby Laurich. Kristy 
Quinn, Michelle Berhstein. 
Joanna Pietrus. Jackie Daino 
(Back Row Left to Right ) Matt 
Kane. Pat Scanlon. Ann 
Walker. Rich Godshall. Victor 
Nieves 



STUDENT LIFE 



139 



Technical 

Theater 

Association: 

(Front Row Left to Right) 

Hilarie Hastings-Mahon, 

Reggie Gauss, Stacy Harris. 

Bonnie Clawson, Christine 

Grugan. Eric Weidner (Back 

Row Left to Right) Maria 

Whitman, Amy Reynolds, 

Justin Tormey, Matt Chiappa, 

Tom Grasso, Pat Doran, 

Christina Sgroi, Erin Kenny, 

John Kozempel 





University 
Peers: 



(Left to Right) Rochelle 
Serenci, LeSette Wright, 
Drew Sharkey, Jason Leahy, 
Cindy Hennessy (kneeUng), 
Stefanie Harakal, Arianna 
Pescatore, Lili McNally, 
Angela Purcell, Bill Doyle 



WEXP 
Radio: 



(Front Row Left to Right) 

Nick Bondella, Rob Barone, 

Rose Frasciella, Tracy Mann 

(Back Row Left to Right) 

Mike Jordan, Mike Ruzzi, 

Ben Kerr, Kevin Burkitt, 

Christian Belko, Amy 

VanVessem, Joy Morris. 

Jesse Cute, Michele Dolson 




140 



EXPLORER 




STUDENT LIFE 141 



Commuiiity Service 

Proving La Salle is More Than Just Academics 



By Tracy Mann '00 
Attending classes, writing 
papers, and cramming for the 
next day's exam is not the 
entire focus of La Salle 
students. Some students 
devote many hours to projects 
and activities that will never 
be graded, but are high 
priorities in their lives. To 
these students, community 
service is an important aspect 
of their life, and the La Salle 
community encourages and 
assists with service projects 
of many different kinds. 

The Center for Con;munity 
Learning is directed by 
Rosemary Barbera, who 
devotes much of her time to 
the curricular aspects of 
community service. Faculty 
involvement is an important 
part of her position because 



she works closely with them to 
encourage community service 
as a part of student's learning 
experiences. She also works 
with these students and with 
F.O.C.U.S., an advisory board 
devoted to dealing with 
community service issues. 

Heather Kilmer, Assistant 
Director for the Center for 
Community Learning, sees 
many of these dedicated 
students everyday. Kilmer 
works closely with the 
Neighborhood Tutoring 
program, La Salle's largest 
community service program, 
which brings approximately 
120 students from the sur- 
rounding area to work on 
improving literacy and 
mathematical skills. This 
program is only one of many, 
including Pastorius 



Mentoring, AIDS Outreach, 
L.O.C.K., Amnesty Interna- 
tional, and Habitat for 
Humanity. All La Salle 
community service programs 
are run by student coordina- 
tors who manage the day-to- 
day aspects of the projects 
with assistance from Kilmer 
and Barbera when necessary. 

Another strong program 
that La Salle's Center for 
Community Learning encour- 
ages is the alternative break 
options. During the winter 
break, students went to Chile 
to work in a Santiago 
shanty town. Over spring 
break, however, students 
could choose between either 
venturing to the West Vir- 
ginia-Kentucky Appalachian 
region with Project Appala- 
chia to help construct houses 



or taking part in Week of Hope. 
Those participating in Week of 
Hope, the "urban plunge," 
spent the week teaching 
children in Portland, Oregon. 
Shannon Hennrich, a junior 
education major, coordinated the 
week in Portland, her home- 
town. Extremely active in La 
Salle's community service 
program, Hennrich spent many 
hours devoted to helping other 
people and stresses the idea of a 
personal responsibility that she 
believes each person has to his 
or her own community. "You 
get more out of the service than 
what you put into it. The effect 
that one can have to improve 
the quality of life for another 
human being is immeasurable," 
Hennrich commented. * 




Janine LaPointe and Erin Reagan represent La Salle University at the 1997 
President's Summit for America's Future. 

Cleaning up the community is an important focus of La Salle's Center for 

Community Learning. 




142 



EXPLORER 



These La Salle studenls assist neighborhood children as 
they decorate hags to hold their Halkjween candy. 

As a part of the Chile Service Project, Nick Susi helps a 
young friend paint a mural. 




Facepainting is the highlight of Branch Out Day for many 



Dan Rhoton and Pat Doran share their day with children 
during the Chile Service Project. 



STUDENT LIFE 143 



Homecoming 1997 

The Tradition of Football Returns 



By Tracy Maim '00 

Duringthefallof 1997, La 
Salle faculty and staff, 
students, and alumni brought 
back a tradition that had been 
dormant for decades. On 
Saturday, October 25, La 
Salle played its first Home- 
coming game in 56 years, but 
not only did football return, 
but a resurgence of the spirit 
and enthusiasm that sur- 
rounds Homecoming. 

To lead up to the football 
game on Saturday, the 
Student Government planned 
many exciting events for the 
La Salle community to 
participate in. SGA sponsored 
a drive-in movie, "Rudy," at 
St. Katherine's quad. Painted 
faces, pumpkins and cos- 
tumes were seen Thursday 
at the LOCK (La Salle 
Organization Caring for Kids) 



haunted house, which brought 
neighborhood kids onto La 
Salle's campus to celebrate 
Halloween. The day also 
included enthusiastic trick or 
treating in the townhouses. 
To energize the students for 
Saturday's game, Friday was 
the tug-of-war competition 
and the Pep Rally, which 
went on despite inclement 
weather. 

The Banner-Making 
Contest sponsored by IFSC 
( Inter Fraternity-Sorority 
Council) was held on Friday. 
It was a good chance for 
each organization or group to 
display support for their team. 
Banners were waving outside 
the Union building and Wister 
Hall for the entire campus to 
see. 

On Saturday morning, RSA 
(Resident Student Associa- 



tion) hosted Carnifall on the 
Main Quad before the game. 
Carnifall included many 
action games, such as the 
joust and various eating 
competitions, and was 
successful despite the fear of 
rain. 

The La Salle Singers 
opened the football game 
with a spirited version of the 
National Anthem. Although 
the football game was not a 
win for La Salle, the players 
performed well for a team in 
its beginning stages. La Salle 
scored 14 points while 
Central Connecticut State 
posted a 55-point win. The 
team, however, had the 
support of the audience of 
over 3,500 homecoming 
spectators. 

The current students of La 
Salle were not the only ones 



to demonstrate school spirit. 
The Alumni Association 
hosted the Hall of Athletes 
dinner on Friday night. 
Various alumni receptions 
preceded and followed the 
game, and many also enjoyed 
the other spirit week activi- 
ties. 

Although it took 56 years. 
La Salle brought back 
football with a Homecoming 
that was rich in spirit and 
enthusiasm. The return of 
Homecoming will be remem- 
bered not for the football 
game loss, but for the out- 
pouring of school spirit and 
the birth of a new, although 
familiar, tradition. Home- 
coming, a tradition to con- 
tinue, brought students, staff, 
faculty, and alumni together 
to celebrate La Salle.^S 



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The La Salle Singers take part in the Homecoming festivites by singing the 

National Anthem before the game. 

This Mummer 2ets the crowd excited at one of the Homecoming activities. 




144 



EXPLORER 



Despite the chilly weather, the dance team shows their spirit at the 
Homecoming game by cheering on the players from the sideline. 

Both cLirrenl and former La Salic students turn out lo show support for 
the football learn 




Members of the football team anticipate playing in the first 
Homecoming game in 56 years at La Salle. 



STUDENT LIFE 145 



Branch Out Day 1997 

La Salle Students Work MMrith the Community 



By Chrisrine Gray '00 

Close to 1 ,000 students 
waking up voluntarily at eight 
o'clock on a Saturday morn- 
ing to do work — who would 
ever believe that? 

But on Saturday, October 4, 
1997. this event actually 
happened. Over 900 La Salle 
students dragged themselves 
out of a comfortable slumber 
to participate in the Second 
Annual Branch Out Day. 

Branch Out Day is a day 
dedicated to community 
service on which students 
venture out into the surround- 
ing community to offer their 
services in a variety of ways. 
This year. La Salle students 
worked at over 30 sites 
participating in activities such 
as cleaning up parks, visiting 
the elderly, feeding the 
homeless, and taking graffiti 
off city walls. And while 
many were out in the commu- 
nity, some stayed behind to 
help host a carnival for 



neighborhood children. 

Students signed up to 
participate in Branch Out 
through various organiza- 
tions, such as clubs, teams, 
sororities, fraternities, the 
honors program, and FYE 
classes. Countless organiza- 
tions formed teams that 
students could join. 

Branch Out clearly was a 
terrific success. With so many 
students participating, it was 
one of the best-attended 
functions on La Salle's 
campus this school year. Not 
only did the community 
benefit, but the students 
themselves received the 
satisfaction of having sacri- 
ficed their time and effort to 
help others. 

Sophomore Joe D'Orazio, 
who aided in the clean up of 
nearby Martin Luther King 
High School, commented, "It 
was nice to see La Salle do 
something good for the 
community." This was 



D"Orazio"s first experience 
participating in community 
service through La Salle. He 
also added, "It was an 
amazing experience to see the 
entire school all come 
together in order to help the 
community." 

Other students responded 
differently. Sophomore 
Laurie Stewart, who visited 
the elderly for Branch Out 
Day said, "At first I was 
nervous that I would have 
nothing to say, but that wasn't 
the case at all." 

Stewart feared that the 
elderly people would think 
that the students were only 
there because of their one-day 
obligation. However, she 
added, "I can't believe that 
anyone would do this simply 
because of a requirement. I 
am embarrassed that it took 
Branch Out to open my eyes 
to such an experience, but 
now that it has, I am grateful 
for it." 



Stewart and others who 
visited the elderly at the 
Branch Out site, now go back 
on a regular basis for visits. 
They have formed a relation- 
ship with the people and, as a 
result, are continuing with 
their Branch Out service on a 
weekly basis. Stewart com- 
mented, "We always have a 
great time. The people are so 
much fun, especially now that 
we know them better." 

Branch Out was not all 
hard work, though. The day 
was kicked off with free 
bagels and pretzels and was 
followed by a free lunch of 
hoagies, chips, and sodas. 
Students were able to return 
to campus and enjoy a good 
lunch. Most students could be 
found discussing the good 
time that they had at Branch 
Out and what a great experi- 
ence it was to help the 
community, ii 




Karate Club Members volunteer to help with neighborhood children on Branch Out Day. 

These students enjoying each other's company share their Branch Out Day adventures. ;' ^^1/ ■ iji„ .'■ ' 
146 EXPLORER 



Branch Oul Day staff 
member Nancy Haig 
gives last minute 
instructions to these 
dedicated students about 
to leave for their site. 

Joy Morris, Nicole 
Granville, Marc 
Ciambrello, Samantha 
Schraeder, Jennifer 
Ernest. Carmella laria, 
Mike Davis and Kim 
Stancavage relax before 
a day of volunteering. 




Christina Kozen schmoozes with Branch Out Day Coordinator Lew Clark 
during registration. 

"Pinatas are fun !" scream all the kids involved in the Branch Out Carnival. 

STLTDENTLIFE 147 



Political Awareness Month 

Senator Santoriun Visits La Salle 




SGA President Chris Santarsiero greets an enthusiastic Santorum. 

Archivist Brother Joe Grabenstein meets Santorum while student 
intern Tony Purcell looks on. 



148 EXPLORER 



United Slates Senator Rick Santorum speaks to La Salle students about the 
importance of political awareness. 

Santorum takes time to speak with students oncon-one. 




Dr. Mary Ellen Balchunis of the Political Science Department speaks with the 
senator and staff member Brandon Domiod}'. 

President Brother Joseph Burke welcomes Santorum to La Salle. 



STUDENT LIFE 149 



Jazz and Pep Band 

Bringing Music to Campus 



The La Salle 

Jazz Band's 

Director, Mr. 

Ciccimaro, 

motivates and 

instructs the 

band members 

during practice. 




The trombone players practice an especially hard piece that needs to be perfect 

for an upcoming perfonnance. 



150 EXPLORER 



Bucky T. G. Lang watches from the back as Kevin 
Badolato, Mike Dooner and Jen Merril play a piece on 
their saxophones 

Jazz Band member Frank Voight impresses everyone 
with his saxophone playing skills. 






On the keyboard, Paul Bourke performs for Allison Slabek, who watches on impressed by 
his talents. 



STUDENT LIFE 151 



AIDS A.L.I.V.E. 

AIDS Awvareness At La Salle Is Vital Education 



By Tracy Mann '00 

La Salle University has 
many organizations that are 
trying to raise the awareness 
of students about social 
issues, but many have not had 
the success as AIDS 
A.L.I.V.E. AIDS A.L.I.V.E. 
or AIDS Awareness at La 
Salle Is Vital Education, 
during 1997 was coordinated 
by Erin Reagan and Janine 
LaPointe. Holding meetings 
each week gave them the 
chance to plan many success- 
ful events to try and reach the 
community of La Salle 
students. 

In the spring of 1997 for 
example, they sponsored a 



hugely successful benefit 
concert to raise money for St. 
Mary's Family Hospice and 
increase AIDS awareness 
among La Salle students. The 
show featured local band Trip 
66, which performed a show 
for approximately 300 
students, raising over $800. 
The members of AIDS 
A.L.I.V.E., appropriately 
dressed entirely in black, 
followed the show with a 
candlelight vigil to increase 
the consciousness of students 
about children suffering from 
the disease. 

Another important project 
AIDS A.L.I.V.E. participated 
in was the annual Philadelphia 



AIDS Walk. Working with 
the community service group, 
AIDS Outreach, they re- 
cruited La Salle students to 
walk the 12 kilometer walk in 
support of the AIDS Fund. 
La Salle students raised 
approximately $ 1 200 in 
support of the fund by 
receiving pledge support for 
walking. 

December 1 marked World 
AIDS day, and coordinating 
functions for the week was 
one of AIDS A.L.I.V.E.'s 
most important projects. On 
Monday they sponsored a 
portion of The Names Project 
Quilt, which was on display in 
the lobby of the Union 



building. At the same time, 
members read names of people 
who have died from AIDS. 
Tuesday brought a speaker to 
La Salle to talk about the way 
AIDS has affected his life. The 
week ended with a candlelight 
vigil which included music and a 
prayer service. 

In April of 1997, Reagan and 
LaPointe attended The 
President's Summit for 
America's Future as represen- 
tatives of La Salle's extensive 
community service program. It 
was an opportunity to represent! 
AIDS A.L.I.V.E., which is 
proving that it is possible to 
bring together La Salle students 
for education and helping 
others. * 




152 



AIDS A.L.I.V.E.: (Front Row Left to Right) Erin Reagan, Loren McCloskey, Kate Doering, Jen Bryant (Back Row Left to Right) Gabe Vizza, Janin 

LaPointe, Amy VanVessem, Myriah Hilbert, Michelle Dolson, Scott Hammoni 



EXPLORER 



The Grimoire 

Literary Magic 



By Amy VanVesseni '00 

For the past 28 years. La 
Salle's student activities have 
included a creative outlet for 
the university ' s budding 
writers and artists. The 
Grimoire, a student-run 
literary magazine, led by a 
small group of editors and 
faculty advisor Justin Cronin, 
was started in 1970 by a 
group of freshman students. 

The Grimoire, whose 
name literally means "magic 
book," has changed its 
appearance over the years. 
When the Grimoire first 
began, it was the size and 
texture of a magazine, but it 
has lately come to resemble a 



small novel. However, 
although the outside has 
altered, the inside contents 
have remained the same. 

The Grimoire 's submis- 
sions are compiled into three 
categories: poetry, prose and 
artwork. Submissions are 
looked at or read and voted 
upon by the Grimoire staff 
and editors. Those works 
deemed to be of the highest 
quality are published in the 
biannual issue of the maga- 
zine. Although the Grimoire 
is always flooded with 
submissions, editor Heather 
Middleton admits that she 
hopes for an increased 
number in the future, espe- 



cially in the subjects of art 
and nonfiction prose. 
Middleton said, "There are so 
few outlets for people who 
write; so few artsy things. I 
wish more of La Salle's 
talented students would take 
advantage of this opportu- 
nity." 

In the past, the Grimoire 
has collaborated with the 
coffeehouse for one night a 
year. The Grimoire Coffee- 
house recognized the 
Grimoire staff and editors 
and gave writers the opportu- 
nity to read their published 
creations aloud in front of an 
audience. This activity was 
not done last year, but the 



event might soon begin again. 
It is possible that the 
Grimoire coffeehouse might 
become the unveiling of each 
new issue. 

La Salle's Grimoire has 
been very successful during 
its existing years. It has given 
a coundess number of 
students an outlet to express 
their creativity and an oppor- 
tunity to have their talents 
published. The "magic book" 
is an incredible asset to this 
campus; it allows each 
contributor's "magic" to be 
shared with the entire student 
population. 




The Grimoire Staff: (Left to Right) Jill Linden, Ray Bossert, Michelle Dillin, Stephen Pilugfelder, Susan Chemesky, Heather Middleton 



STUDENT LIFE 153 



The 

Informing La Salle Each Week 



By Christine Gray VO 

Each week, early Wednes- 
day afternoon, students could 
be seen heading towards the 
Union to pick up the new 
issue of the campus newspa- 
per, the Collegian. 

The 20-plus page newspa- 
per did not simply appear 
there out of thin air from 
week to week. It was the 
not-too-often seen Collegian 
staff, editors and reporters, 
whose combined effort made 
it possible for students to 
enjoy a weekly newspaper. 

Each week, the editors 
retired to the dungeon-like 
basement of the Union to a 
room, whose decor consisted 
of old newspapers laminated 
on the floor, to produce an 
informative and fun newspa- 
per for the campus. 



On Tuesday nights, the 
editors got little or no sleep, 
as they were up most of the 
night putting together 
Wednesday's paper. That is 
not to say that they did not 
have fun, however. They 
could get pretty crazy when 
they were down there for a 
long time, and they usually 
helped pass the time by 
playing music and cracking 
jokes at each other, which 
occasionally showed up in the 
Personals Section of the 
paper. 

The advisor for the paper is 
communication professor and 
well-known Channel 29 
movie critic Bill Wine. 
However, the Collegian is 
put together entirely by the 
students. Each section of the 
newspaper has its own editor. 



The Editor-in-Chief of the 
entire paper this year was Ian 
Berry. The editorial staff was 
comprised mostly of juniors 
and seniors with Mike Boyle 
as Managing Editor, April 
White as News Editor, 
Michael Pelusi as Entertain- 
ment Editor, John Gonzalez 
as Sports Editor, Chris 
Lilienthal as Cake Editor, and 
Becky Thimm as Photogra- 
phy Editor. Two underclass- 
men also worked themselves 
into the editorial ranks this 
past year, sophomores 
Andrea Quinn and Kim 
Kessler who teamed up as 
editors of the Features 
Section. However, all these 
editors would have been lost 
without Head Copy Editor 
John Elberson and his staff 
reading over their sections 



and correcting typos and 
errors in grammar. 

In addition to the editorial 
staff, there were over 25 
students who covered stories 
every two to three weeks and 
others who had weekly 
columns; Chris Lilienthal with 
his "From Nowhere" and 
John Kozempel's "This Isn't 
Cinemax" were often 
favorites, and no one could 
forget the ever-popular Men 
of D7 comic on the Cake 
Page. 

The Collegian provided an 
invaluable service to the 
campus this year. The editors 
and the staff worked very 
hard to produce such a paper 
every week that gave 
students information regard- 
ing campus events, news, and 
controversy.'' 




The Collegian 
Row Left to 



Staff: (Front Row Left to Right) Ray Bossert. Michael Pelusi, John Elberson (Back 
Right) John Gonzalez. April White, Mike Boyle, Chris Lilienthal, Andrea Quinn, Ian 

Berry. Kim Kessler 

The copy editors read over text every Tuesday night to insure there 
are no mistakes the following day. 




154 



EXPLORER 



Entertainment Editor Micliael Pelusi carefully lays out his section, 
making sure everything fits correctly. 








1 


1 ^ 


"^^ 




The office of the Collegian is a 
hectic place on Tuesday nights. 

Editor-in-Chief Ian Berry 
diligently finishes his article in 
order to meet the deadline. 



STUDENT LIFE 155 



The Masque 

Adding a Little Drama 



By Carey Reed '00 

This fall the Masque, along 
with a new executive board 
and faculty advisor, presented 
the colorful musical Pippin. 
The new e-board consisted of 
Tony Purcell (Producer), A. 
Raymond Bossert III (Vice 
President of Publicity), Amy 
Reynolds (Vice President of 
Technical Affairs), and Rose 
Brownell (Vice President of 
Personnel). All of the new 
members did an excellent job 
in handling some of the 
"kinks" of presenting this 
show. The new faculty 
advisor was Marianne 
Dainton, who deserves 
applause for sustaining her 
energy and enthusiasm 
throughout the production. 

Returning to La Salle, 
Colleen Durkin Lapowsky, 



who also directed last year's 
"Lend Me a Tenor," both 
directed and choreographed 
Pippin. With immense help 
from vocal director. Brother 
Charles Echelmeier, a vibrant 
and exciting interpretation of 
Pippin was created. Pippin is 
the story of King 
Charlemagne's son. Pippin, 
and his quest to find his true 
identity. 

La Salle's interpretation of 
this musical was set on a 
medieval golf course, paral- 
leling the development and 
growth of Pippin's life. The 
cast was lead by Pat Doran 
(Leading Player), Bonnie 
Clawson (Fastrada), Regina 
Gauss (Berthe), Gaddiel 
Gonzalez (Pippin), Peter 
Greco (Lewis), Tony Purcell 
(Charlemagne), and Maria 



Whitman (Catherine). Alto- 
gether the cast did a wonder- 
ful job presenting this satiri- 
cal play in a colorful and 
entertaining way. The techni- 
cal crew also deserves 
applause for creating the 
well-lit set. 

This year the Masque 
performed three shows: two 
musicals, and a dramatic 
comedy. In February it 
performed Lysistrata, a 
dramatic comedy by 
Aristophones about the 
Peloponnesian War and an 
attempt by Greek women to 
end it peacefully by practic- 
ing total abstinence. In April, 
the Masque finished the year 
with The Fantasticks, a 
musical about feuding 
fathers, forbidden love, and 
an abduction, w 





1 he Masque: (Front Row Left to Righl) Maria Whitman, Joe Jones, Stacy Harris, Regina Gauss. 
Carey Reed, Bonnie Clawson, Christine Grugan, Chris Fieri, Marianne Dainton (Back Row Left to 
Right) Damian Tremblay, Hilarie Hastings-Mahon, Christina Sgroi, Raymond Bossert, Jen Brewer, 
Matt Chiappa. Patrice Kruszewski, Justin Tormey. Jen DeBisschop, Tom Grasso. Amy Reynolds, 

Jason Adamo. Erin Kenny. Eric Weidner. John Kozempel 

The pompous Chariemagne (Tony Purcell) and coniving wife Fastrada (Bonnie Clawson) are 

engaged in an intense marital discussion. 



156 



EXPLORER 



The show begins with an excited Pippin cast singing "Magic to Do." 

The demonic cast, led by the Leading Player (Pat Doranj, begins to set Pippin 
up for his death in the play's "Grand Finale." 




4 / 



Charlemagne (center), his son Lewis (right), and Pippin are engaged in 
serious prayer for the upcoming war with the Visigoths. 




"Dinner is served!" Berthe (Regina Gauss) pops up from Catherine's 
(Maria Whitman) dining table. 

STUDENT LIFE 157 



The Explorer 

"A Year in the Life of La Salle" 



By Joy Morris '00 

Once again the staff of the 
La Salle Explorer worked 
hard in order to produce a 
book that sutTiciently cap- 
tured the memories of the 
past school year.Dr. Dolores 
Lehr returned for her second 
year as advisor and many 
previous staff members filled 
new positions. The major 
change with the book was a 
switch to a new publisher. 
Taylor Publishing Company 
was chosen after much 
research and consultation 
among the staff over the 
summer. The transition to 
working with a new company 
was rather smooth, thanks to 
the assistance of Taylor 



publishing representative 
Emmy Katchel. 

The Explorer staff was 
headed this year by senior 
Andy Gwiazda. Andy's job 
as Editor-in-Chief was not 
limited only to overseeing the 
other Section Editors. He also 
had the responsibility of the 
Color Section, which this 
year illustrated "A Day in the 
Life of La Salle." However, 
Andy did not have to tackle 
the task of producing the 
1998 Explorer alone. Each 
section editor worked with 
his or her own staff to 
assemble the individual parts 
of the book. Junior Becky 
Thimm, a former staff writer, 
took over the position as 




Student Life Editors Joy Morris and Tracy Mann get help from 

Greek Life Coordinator Amy VanVessem (center) in choosing 

the Greek Organization pictures. 

Photography Editor Becky Thimm crops a series of photos for 

the Color Section. 



Photography Editor for the 
1998 publication; and Lori 
Molinari returned to the 
Explorer staff this year as 
Associate/ Academics Editor. 
Also returning to the Ex- 
plorer staff were sophomores 
Joy Morris and Tracy Mann, 
who were coeditors of the 
Student Life Section. The 
Athletic Section was taken 
over by two sophomores, 
who wrote for last year's 
book, Jen DeBisschop and 
Steph Rozak. The Senior 
Section was headed by 
Stephanie Hamilton and 
Jennifer Schmitt who, along 
with Sara Chiappa and 
Heather Olson, the Patrons/ 
Ads Editors, have been part 



.> 'yj 



of the Explorer staff for three 
years. 

However, the editorial staff 
were not the only ones who 
contributed to the 1998 
Explorer. Many writers 
composed articles that 
featured some of the events 
of the past year. Others, like 
John Elberson, contributed 
with marketing and distribu- 
tion. Whatever the contribu- 
tion, it took many talented 
people in order to success- 
fully produce the book. This 
past school year saw many 
interesting events, and the 
staff of the Explorer did their 
best to capture all of those 
memories. '^. 





ri 



158 



EXPLORER 



Andy Gwiazda, Edilor-in Chid', discusses luiancial matters with Mike 
Boyle. 





Patrons/ Ads Editor Sara Chiappa puts the 
finishes touches on the Ads before they are 
shipped to the publisher. 

The 1 998 Explorer Staff: (Front Row Left to 
Right) Amy VanVessem, Stephanie Hamilton. 
Heather Olson (Back Row Left to Right) Tracy 
Mann, Joy Morris, Andy Gwiazda. Mike Boyle, 
Sara Chiappa (Not pictured) Jen DeBisschop. 
Michelle Dillin. John Elberson. Lori Molinari. 
Steph Rozak. Jen Schmitt. Becky Thimm 



STUDENT LIFE 



159 



Home Aivay From Home 




160 EXPLORER 



Phi Gamma Delta 




Phi Gamma Delta: 

(Front Row Left to 

Right) Don Smith. 

Brett Robison, Mike 

Bull. Dave Fisher. 

Jason Hill. John 

Calarco, John 

Giansanti. John Lesko, 

Bob Tmitt. Mike 

Houser (Back Row Left 

to Right) Frank Patrick, 

Pat Garrily. Bob 

Duszak, Dean Nasto. 

Mike Sidebotham, Tim 

Maloney, Jeny Smith. 

Matt Gallagher. Pat 

Moynihan. Ed 

Bransfield. Rich Gillin, 

Robert Hammer, Don 

Touhey. Joe Stock. 

Corey Oulletle, Joe 

Bostick 



Phi Kappa Theta 



Phi Kappa Theta: 

(Front Row Left to 

Right) Ryan McNeill. 

Brian Pressler. Matt 

Delrossi, Darren Atlee, 

Joe DiLauro. Larry 

Ricciardi (Back Row 

Left to Right) Ben 

Powers, Anthony 

Zappile. John Lottie r. 

Scott Gorrell, Jim 

Gallo. Alan Damiani. 

Ryan Flannery , Tony 

Romero. John 

Gonzalez. Dave 

Stanoch. Joe Natoli. 

DanO"Brien 



K 





162 



EXPLORER 



Pi Kappa Phi 



Pi Kappa Phi:(Front 
Row Left to Right) Phil 
Emma, Davin Lee, 
DamianD' Antonio, 
Andrew Johnston. J.B. 
Palaganis, Tim Hyland, 
John Reynolds, Tom 
Gaydos, Bob Wltoko 
(Back Row Left to 
Right) T.J. Anghelone, 
Chris Pekula, Greg 
Jacovini. Reggie Stiller, 
Rob Cleaver, Andrew 
Tavani, Sean Gushing, 
Rich Ricciardi, John 
Mahoney, Ian Morris, 
Joe Canataro, Gabe 
Vizza, Trevor Conlin, 
Garrett Hogan, Rehan 
Chaudhry, Drew Elder 



n 

K 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 




Sigma Phi Epsilon: 
(Front Row Left to 
Right) Jim Kelly. 
Broderick Jones. Bojan 
Baros. Jim Vahey. 
Chris Sofranko. John 
Ross. Joe Longo, Kris 
Matullo (2nd Row Left 
to Right) RobPariser, 
D.J. Deeney. Victor 
Nieves. Joe Jones. 
Adam Bruccoleri. John 
Sitko. Brady Hicks 
(Back Row Left to 
Right) Father James 
Kruc. Tom Zdanowski, 
Rob Hillman. Tony 
Purcell. Scott Blades. 
Steve Palladinetti. Peter 
Acchione. Dave 
Infante. Jamie Sanko. 
Joe Woyciechaw ski, 
Rob Kins 



STUDENT LIFE 



163 



Sigma Phi Lambda 




E 
A 



Alpha Sigma Tau: (Front 

Row Left to Right) 

Alyson Stone. Erin 

McVan. Juha Mazzei, 

Tania DiGerolamo. 

Stephanie Pinto, Robyn 

Maghcano, Jenn 

Lukosius, Theresa Burke, 

Jen Cox (2nd Row Left to 

Right ) Kelly 0"Brien, Lisa 

Donnelly, Linh Tao, 

Heather Ridgeway. Jen 

Wixted, Jill Morrisroe, 

Kim Dale, Jill Aquilino, 

Jeannine Massimini, 

Amanda Coll, Melissa 

Palaganas, Alicia 

O" Rourke, Tara Loghing 

(Back Row Left to Right) 

Natalie Toomey, Amy 

McTighe. Jackie Barrett, 

Eileen Scanlon, Erin 

Hannigan. Leen Khalifa, 

Kathi Chapman. Desiree 

Raffio. 

Heather Flemming, 

Jamie Bendina 



Alpha Sigma Tau 



A 
T 



Sigma Phi Lambda: 

(Front Row Left to 

Right) Tim LaPira, Eric 

Bryce. Roger Hoyle 

(2nd Row Left to Right) 

Bill Conway, Sam 

Spoto. Larry Baccari, 

Greg Rotz, Nick 

Marmarou. Brian 

Kennedy, Gaddiel 

Gonzalez (Back Row 

Left to Right) Chris 

Sullivan. Matt Sontillo, 

Mike Creedon, John 

Claudius. Ed Chiosso, 

Mike Kimmel. Sean 

Lonergan. Kevin 

McNamara, Steve 

Haluzka, Dennis Harris, 

Chris Wert, Ken Kiem, 

Dr. Geffrey Kelly, 

Tim Browne 




164 



EXPLORER 



Alpha Theta Alpha 



Alpha Theta Alpha: 
(Front Row Left to 
Right) Donna Cubbage, 
Susan Duff, Renee 
Snyder, Maryann 
Vatrella, Brianna 
Matteis, Andrea 
McGinney, Michelle 
Buckelew, Vanessa 
Nguyen (2nd Row Left 
to Right) Colleen 
Gallagher, Gina Casper, 
LeighAnne Murphy, 
Gina Tasker, Suzy 
Kubinsky, Maria 
McDermott, Jeanne 
Schueller, Shannon 
Koren (Back Row Left 
to Right) Megan 
Dempsey , Danielle 
Penko, Nikki Vacca, 
Michelle Dias, Denise 
Kiystopa, Krista Quinn 



A 
T 
A 




Delta Phi Epsilon 




Delta Phi Epsilon: (Front 
Row Left to Right) Janet 
Chudzik. Chrystyne 
Fedorijczuk. Michelle 
Priestly. Rose Kozak, 
Jessica English, Asha 
Engledow, Cristina 
Andrade. Cheyenne 
Kopchak, Annmarie 
Terelle(2ndRowLeftto 
Right) JenBrank. Kim 
Johns. Danielle 
Thomasco. Sadie 
Nickelson.Eve 
DeAngelo. Kristen 
Walder. Suzanne Boyle. 
Angela Dodds (Back 
Row Left to Right) 
Teresa Wierzbicki. Karen 
Sax. Maureen Daniels. 
Kass Schurtz. Alison 
McGowan. Missy Mini, 
Karen Carraccio. Mary 
Burke. Regina D" Amato, 
Stacy Brooks. Viviana 
De la Torre 



STUDENT LIFE 



165 



Gamma Phi Beta 




r 

B 



Gamma Phi Beta: (From 

Row Left to Right) Sarah 

Owens, Melissa Fitzgerald, 

Erica Neiman, Shawn 

Costello. Jane Huh, Tanya 

Lijewski, Karen Swierzy, 

Tracy Wagner, Mary Beth 

Davis (2nd Row LeI'l lo 

Right) Adriene Buschmeir, 

Kim Johnston, Vicky 

West, Jenn Smith, 

Katherine Brister, Mary 

Ellen Lomumo, Ginny 

Paone, Debbie Thomson, 

Tara Daily, Angie Duncan 

(Back Row Left to Right) 

Patti Butler, Lindsay 

Releford, Kelley Dalton, 

Meaghan Mullins, 

Michelle Henik, Jessikah ', 

Yencha, Tammy Cobaugh, 

Kelley Dimerling, 

Roseanne Propato, Heidi 

Lawrence 



Gamma Sigma Sigma 



Gamma Sigma Sigma: 

(Front Row Left to Right) 

Melissa Sloden, Wendy 

Vandenburg, Colleen 

Sherry, Liz Dowling, 

Melissa Vietro, Amanda 

Conway, Tisha Bridge, 

Sofia Metexas, Elizabeth 

Karolewski (2nd Row Left 

to Right) Meg Patterson, 

Mary Duffy, Kristen Lis, 

Natalie Kueppens, Kristine 

Bonczek, Jennifer 

Billingslea, Carla Morello, 

Erin Smyth, Rosemary 

Gruber, Mindy Mooney, 

Erin McDermott, Jamie 

Schaadt, Michelle 

Bernstein (Back Row Left 

to Right) Colette Cirano, 

Christine Davis, Erin 

Boyce, Shannon O'Neill, 

Ann Walker, Tara Nicolo, 

Kait Daly, Lauren 

Robinson, Kellie Keegan, 

Cheldin Barlatt, Megan 

Devine 



r 




166 



EXPLORER 




STUDENT LIFE 167 




EXPLORER 




STUDENT LIFE 




?' 



170 EXPLORER 




STUDENT LIFE 171 




172 EXPLORER 




STUDENT LIFE 173 




The field hockey team, Hke all La Salle sports, exemplifies teamwork, dedication, and 
recognition, as when they celebrate the team with a congratulatory handshake. 



174 EXPLORER 



I 



ATHLETICS 




While attending college, one comes to realize that 
the full experience is not all about academics. 
College is about identifying oneself with oth- 
ers, working toward a common goal, and about teamwork. 
This is what the members of the sports teams at La Salle 
show us everyday as they work hard together to achieve 
goals not only as students, but as sports players and team 
members. This section is a tribute to those in athletics 
who demonstrate these characteristics through their hard 
work and dedication. They prove to us that hard work 
pays off both on and off the field; that college isn't just 
about classes, but also about hard work, determination, 
teamwork, and achieving goals. # 



Section Editors: 

Jen DeBisschop '00 
Steph Rozak '00 



ATHLETICS 



175 



With pride, persistence and power the 
Mew's Soccer Team... 



For the men's soccer 
team, the 1997 sea- 
son was one that was 
set in the land of 
mythical cosmology. 



By their conviction, they 
were warriors. By their 
determination, they were 
heroes. And as it was for 
this men's soccer team this 
season, when both convic- 
tion and determination 
neatly 
coa- ^^-^^— ^^—i 

lesced, 

the 

resuh 

was that 

La Salle 

placed 

second 

in the ^^^^^^^__ 

Atlantic 

10. But their solid finish in 

the A- 10 Tournament 

wasn't what the team was 

all about. 

For the men's soccer 
team, the 1997 season was 
one that was set in the land 
of mythical cosmology. It 
was the season that said 
farewell to perhaps the 
best soccer player La Salle 
has ever seen, Cesidio 
Colasante, whose #5 
jersey was retired for his 
achievements. Over his 
four years at La Salle, 
Colasante, rewrote just 
about every record in La 



By Mark Schugsta '00 

Salle's books, including the 
record for most career 
goals, points, and assists. 
Also, Colasante earned 
himself Atlantic 10 Player 
of the Year honors twice 
(1996-97) and was recog- 
nized in his 
"~^~^^^^ senior year 
as a third 
team Ail- 
American. 
It was a 
season that 
saw senior 
Justin Cifra 
_____^_^ net an 

unsuspect- 
ing hat trick, making 
everyone believe in the 
power of the underdog. It 
was also a season of 
fulfillment for two of La 
Salle's most dependable 
plow horses, seniors Ed 
Woehlcke and Dan Stout, 
whose efforts helped bring 
the Explorers to the A- 1 
championship game. 
Finally, it was a season of 
growth for budding stars 
like Andre Spangler, 
Shawn Jefremow, and Don 
Tuohey, on whose shoul- 
ders rest a tradition of 
excellence. ?' 




176 



EXPLORER 



oster 



11 Blesi, B.J. Carolan, John Cavellieri, Justin Cifra, Cesidio Colasante, Dan Devery. 
ive Edwards, Gerry Greenleaf, Rob Hoffman, Shawn Jefremow, Shawn Lafferty, 
indy Miloszewski, Adrian Nkodo, David Rajakovich, Andre Spangler, Dan Stout, 
iris Sullivan, Scott Szewczak, Steve Tarrant, Don Tuohey, Graham Walker, Tim 
alton, Ed Woehlcke, Peter Zaleszak, Nick Zegestowsky 




Senior Sideline 



Justin Cifra 



Cesidio Colasante 



Dan Stout 



Chris Sullivan 



Scott Szewczflk 



Tim Walton 



Jm Ed Woehlcke 



ATHLETICS 177 



Fancy footwork awd crafty strategy 
help the Women's Soccer Team... 



What do the words 
strength, hard work, and 
satisfaction mean? To the 
members of the La Salle 
women's soccer team they 
spell out the word soccer. 
Throughout the season, the 
meaning of these words 
was clearly defined by the 
players. 



La Salle's 
1 997 season 
welcomed 
to the team 
13 talented 
freshmen. 
Among the 
freshmen 
who made a ^^^^^^ 
major 

impact were Blair Hontz, 
Dana Gavaghan, and 
Tracey Spinelli along with 
goalie Erin Lenox. Along 
with the contribution of the 
twelve returning players, 
the power of the women's 
team was evident. Sopho- 
more Jackie Daino and 
juniors Christen Gough and 
Staca Urie made a differ- 
ence for the 1 997 season 
as did three seniors who 
will be missed next year: 
Laura Winchester, 
Michelle Shegda, and 
Lauren Huminski. Hope- 
fully, next year the team 
will pick up players who 



The players felt like a 
team, and they knew 
that they could face 
any opponent, no 
matter what the 
outcome. 



By Krista Parson '01 

can fill the spikes of these 
three. 

La Salle's women's 
soccer team, coached by 
Craig Dorman with 
assistance from Tiffany 
Carr and Molly O'Connell, 
had a rough season. 
Starting practice in mid- 
August of 
1997, they 
won their 
first game 
against 
Rider (2- 
1 ) and the 
next two 
against 
^____^^_ Lafayette 
(2-1) and 
Drexel (4-0). However, 
they then began to lose 
some of their momentum 
and finished the season 5- 
1 1 -0, ranking tenth among 
twelve in the Atlantic 10. 
The most exciting game 
was probably that against 
Fordham where La Salle 
won in overtime (2-1). 
That win made all the 
players feel like a team 
and let them know that 
they could face any 
opponent, no matter what 
the outcome. Next season, 
the team hopes to carry 
over this motivation and 
become more successful. % 




n 



*j. 




178 



EXPLORER 




Senior Sideline 



Lauren Huminski 




Michelle Shegda 



^ 



7 



Laura Winchester 



Roster: 

Michelle Bauer 
Jennifer Curran 
Jackie Daino 
Danielle Dotsey 
Dana Gavaghan 
Christen Gough 
Blair Hontz 
Lauren Huminski 
Erin Lenox 
Kristen Lenox 
Katie McDonald 
Jennifer Myers 
Krista Parson 



Rachel Quinlan 
ErinQuinn 
Holly Regan 
Caity Ryan 
Alicia Santelli 
Michelle Shegda 
Meghan Sheridan 
Tracey Spinelli 
Staca Urie 
Kristin Washburn 
Kristin Will 
Laura Winchester 



ATHLETICS 



179 



Writ) their speed and agilHy the 
Mew's Cross Country Team is... 

(ii(s)m(ii um 



It was a successful 
season for the men, 
who enjoyed their 
best season in years. 



In a season that was 
defined by surprises, the 
Men's Cross Country team 
was led by the stunning 
performance of fifth year 
senior Marc Cianfrani. 
Cianfrani, a first-time cross 
country 

runner, 

helped 
pace the 
Explorers 
while 

earning the 
award for 

A-10 

Newcomer 
of the Year. 

It was a successful 
season for the men, who 
enjoyed their best season 
in years. The Explorers 
surprised everyone but 
themselves as they finished 
second overall in the A-10. 
Sophomore Kevin Myles 
starred with Cianfrani all 
season long, but the team 
was a close knit group who 
emphasized running 
together in their races. 
The men were anchored 
by sophomore Greg 
Blaszko, junior Joe 
DiGiacomo and fifth year 
senior Tom Sabol. 

The Explorers can 
expect to do well again 
next season although they 



By John Elberson '99 

will lose some valuable 
contributors. Along with 
Sabol and Cianfrani, Tom 
Shaw and Ray Friedman 
are graduating and will be 
missed. 
However, the men can 
expect to be 

in the hunt 

for an A-10 
title next 
season 
because of 
their return- 
ing person- 
^^^^^^_ nel. They 
will retain 
Myles, Blaszko, and 
DiGiacomo and expect a 
contribution from freshman 
Mark Beauchamp. 

Plus, they will have one 
of the best coaches in the 
A-10 as Charles Torpey 
returns for his sixth year at 
La Salle. Torpey came to 
La Salle after an enor- 
mously successful career 
at the University of 
Maryland as cross country 
coach and is driven to 
succeed here as is shown 
in his remark, "We did very 
well this season. But it 
isn't quite where we want 
to be; second was nice but 
being the best in our 
conference is still the 
goal." w 




180 



EXPLORER 




Roster: 

Marc Beauparlant, Brian Bell, Greg Blaszko, Nicholas Cavallaro, Marc Cianfrani, 
Chris Cummins, Joseph DiGiacomo, Colin Dooley, Michael Fox, Raymond Friedman, 
James Fulginiti, P.J.Gallagher, Michael Hendricks, Michael James, Omar Knight, Brian 
Kordeck, Scott Levell, David Moshiashuipi, Kevin Myles, Sean O'Brien, Nick Pagano, 
Seann Pelkey, Philip Reilly, Mike Robinson, Tom Sabol, Tom Shaw, Kyle Trocolla 



Senior Sideline 



fS 



% iQ » 






^ 



Nicholas Cavallaro 



Marc Cianfrani 



Raymond Friedman 



Scott Levell 



Philip Reilly 




Tom Sabol 



Tom Shaw 



ATHLETICS 181 



Witb their endurawce and stamina, 

the Women's Cross Country 

Team is... 



This was a difficult 
season for the Women's 
Cross Country team. 
Their season was almost 
doomed at the start when 
three of their top runners 
red-shirted. The women 
struggled for much of the 
season as 
seniors 
Johanna 
Grochowalski, 
Brigid 

Benner, and 
Katie 
Brown sat 
out. 

The 

Explorers ^^^^^^^ 
did uncover 

several jewels in freshmen 
Megan Jordan, Jen Jellig, 
and Karen Reber. These 
young runners had to 
undergo a trial by fire as 
they made the adjustment 
to college competition. At 
times, they experienced a 
great deal of difficulty but 
responded resiliently. 

It took time for the 
women to mesh as they 
finished seventh in the 
Atlantic 10. Although the 
season was a painful one, 
the team's growth will be 
evident next season 
because they have gained 
experience. 

The women are poised 



The team's growth 
will be evident next 
season because they 
have gained experi- 
ence. They are 
poised to do well 
next season. 



By John Elberson '99 

to do well for next season. 
This is because they will 
get their red-shirted 
runners back, bring three 
talented sophomores back 
into the fold, and retain 
talented juniors Katie 
McCormick and Elena 
Gomez. 
Gomez and 
McCormick 
anchored 
the team in 
1997 but 
look 

forward to 
a strong 
campaign in 
their senior 
seasons 
next year. 

It is not only possible but 
likely that this team will 
rebound nicely and be a 
favorite in their conference 
next season. 

In any event. Coach 
Charles Torpey com- 
mended this year's squad 
for their drive and unity. 
"This team went a long 
way in a short time," 
Torpey commented. 
"When the season opened, 
the team seemed to lack 
an identity. Through the 
course of the season, they 
came together nicely and 
worked together until the 
end." % 



182 



EXPLORER 




Brigid Benner, Katie Brown, Maura Calahan, Lori Carroll, Megan Carroll, Renee 
Zarroll, Kelly Cassidy, Erin Doogan, Maureen Dougherty, Elena Gomez, Johanna 
arochowalski, Kathy Heabel, Roxanne Hughes, Jennifer Jellig, Megan Jordan, Kathr>'n 
VIcCormick, Lauren Newcomb, Toniann Razi, Karen Reber, Rachel Ritz, Megan 
rhomas 




Senior Sideline 



Brigid Benner 



Kafie Brown 



Johanna 
Grochowalski 



Rachel Ritz 




ATHLETICS 



183 



High energy and a powerful swing 

empower the Mew's Tennis Team 

to reign as... 



s:<m^ m fu 






Perhaps La Salle's best 
kept secret, the men's 
tennis team proved in the 
fall of 1997 that dedication 
and perseverance can 
conquer all odds. 

After 
losing two ^^^— ^— 
of their first 
three 
matches, 
the Explor- 
ers rallied 
to win the 
remaining 
five 
matches of 

the season, '^^^^"^~" 
finishing 

with an impressive record 
of 5-2. That record 
includes a perfect 4-0 at 
home. Led by head coach 
Pat Shanahan and an- 
chored by senior Ed Golfer 
and junior Drew Elder, the 
Explorers overcame a 
rough start with a thor- 
oughly dominating second 
half that saw the team gain 
victories over city rivals St. 
Joe's and Drexel. 

The underlying reason 



The men's tennis 
team proved in the 
fall of 1997 that 
dedication and 
perseverance can 
conquer all odds. 



By M Ah en '00 

for the tennis team's 
success may have been 
the spectacular efforts of 
its supporting cast. Sopho- 
mores Rehan Chaudhry, 
Bob Wlotko, Andy 

Pessano and 
^^—^^~' freshman 
Jordan Biel 
all played 
pivotal roles 
in the team's 
winning 
season. 

With the 
fall session in 

the books, all 

eyes focus on 
the spring of 1998. The 
Explorers confidently 
envision success in the 
second half of their 
season. They are hoping 
that their success in the fall 
carries over to help them 
realize their ultimate goal 
of an Atlanfic Ten champi- 
onship. With effort and 
dedication such as theirs, 
success is a very realistic 
dream. 




184 



EXPLOPYR 



'////// ft 



Senior Sideline 




ATHLETICS 185 



The Women's Tennis Team's 
sportsmanship and skill 
allow them to prevail... 






?. 



Through the combi- 
nation of new talent, 
depth, and hard 
work, the fall sea- 
son yielded fantas- 
tic results. 



A tough schedule packed 
with Atlantic Ten teams 
would seem formidable to 
La Salle's young women's 
tennis team. But through 
the combination of new 
talent, 
depth, and 
hard work, 
the fall 
season 
yielded 
fantastic 
results, with 
a 6-9 

overall team 
record. 

The influx of four 
freshmen added strength 
and depth to the singles 
and doubles lineups. 
Camille Khan and Lindsay 
Belcher were strong 
additions to the singles 
Uneup. Colleen 
Prendergast and Debbie 
Blissick played consistent 
doubles in the #2 and #3 
positions, stepping into 
singles whenever neces- 
sary. 

The upperclassmen team 
members provided experi- 
ence and strength. Co- 
Captains Monica Woytus 
and Nazli Onaran offered 
excellent contributions on 
the court. Onaran contrib- 
uted as a high powered 
singles player, while 
Woytus put her talent to 



By Jill Evanko '00 

play in the doubles lineup. 
Juniors Carrie Brennan, 
who had continued success 
playing singles, and Suzy 
Kubinski, who was a 
versatile doubles player, 
also pro- 



vided 
leadership 
to the team. 
Steph Bono, 
and Jill 
Evanko, the 
team's 
sophomores, 
^^^^^^^ played 

tough at 
both singles and doubles 
positions. 

The team had winning 
performances against 
Atlantic 10 foe St. 
Bonaventure, as well as 
local schools such as Rider, 
West Chester, and Coppin 
State. Even the losses 
were competitive, showing 
that the team's 6 a.m. 
practices paid off. 

And with a spring 
tournament schedule, La 
Salle will move up in the 
seedings for the Atlantic 
10 tournament. Coach 
Harold Conway's goal of a 
.500 season was almost 
realized, and the spring 
holds innumerable possibili- 
ties for this talented group 
who continue to serve up 
winners. ^ 



186 



EXPLORER 




Senior Sideline 





Roster: 

Lindsay Belcher 
Deborah Lee Blissick 
Stephanie Bono 
CaroUne Brennan 
Jill Evanko 

Camille Watasha Khan 
Suzy Kubinski 
Nazli Onaran 
Colleen Prendergast 
Monica Woytus 



ATHLETICS 



187 



Accuracy ahd aim make the 
ftolf Team shoot... 

^M^ mu^ urn 



The La Salle University 
golf team, although largely 
unrecognized, does exist 
and is alive and well. La 
Salle does not have enough 
funds for a very large 
program, but does manage 
to keep 

about seven 

or so 

players on 
the roster 
each year, 
several of 
whom 
receive 
partial 
athletic 

scholar- ""^^^"^^ 

ships. The 

season itself is split into 
two parts, one in early fall 
and the other in early 
spring. The tournaments 
that the team competes in 
are usually referred to as 
invitationals because the 
participants (usually 
between 10 and 18 teams) 
are invited to these tourna- 
ments. As the team 
members will attest to, the 
invitations they receive to 
these tournaments are not 
because they shoot 
outstanding numbers every 
time out, but they have a 
reputation as a respectful 



The La Salle Uni- 
versity golf team, 
although largely 
unrecognized, does 
exist and is alive 
and well. 



^ 



By Eric Till '99 

group of competitive 
golfers led by a supportive 
coach. 

This year's team, 
coached by Joe Boyle, 
included Jesse Brookreson, 
Jay Krasly, Eric Till, Ben 
Henry, 

Charlie 

Chisholm, 
Dave 
Tallarida, 
and Bryan 
Trimbiski. 
Finding 
new 

courses and 
practice 
^-^'^~~~ facilities, 

Brookreson, 
the team captain, and 
Boyle worked together to 
restructure practices and 
meetings for the spring 
season. Juniors Krasly 
and Till were consistently 
counted on to post solid 
scores. Sophomores 
Henry, Chisholm, Tallarida, 
and Trimbiski, contributed 
by taking turns traveling to 
the invitationals. This 
squad of players puts 
effort into every round, yet 
manages to keep the game 
in perspective and have 
fun at every event. * 




188 



EXPLORER 




Roster: 




Jesse Brookreson 
Charles Chisholm 
Ben Henry 
Jason Krasley 
David Tallarida 
EricTiU 
Bryan Trimbisky 




ATHLETICS U 



Shihihg individuals ahd solid team 

work make the 

Field Hockey Team a... 



?. 



^^ 



^ 



wiiiim 



The La Salle University 
field hockey team this year 
was one that grew stron- 
ger as the season went on. 

With ten new members 
including 
freshman 
midfielder 
Kelly 
Saxman, 
who was 
named 
Atlantic- 10 
Rookie of 
the Year, 
the team 
struggled 
at times 

but 

succeeded 

in making the Atlantic 10 
tournament for the second 
year in a row. Highlights 
for the Explorers included 
a tough road win at 
Monmouth University, 
defeating for the second 
year cross-town rival St. 
Joseph's University. Also 



"This season the 
team benefited from 
a great combination 
of young talent and 
experienced older 
players. Next sea- 
son, we should be 
even stronger." 
-Coach Broderick 



By Tim Browne '00 

there was a huge win 
against Rhode Island amid 
a torrential downpour that 
clinched a post-season 
birth for the team. 

While the 
team's final 
record of 7 
wins and 13 
losses may 
not seem 
great, the 
team knows 
it is building 
for next 
year. Many 
starters will 
be returning 
— ^^^^^— to a team 

that is young 
overall. Head Coach Joan 
Broderick commented, 
"This season the team 
benefited from a great 
combination of young 
talent and experienced 
older players. Next season, 
we should be even 
stronger." 




190 



EXPLORER 




Senior Sideline 



Colleen Bniiir 




^■^ 



Cheldin Barlatt, Lindsay Block, Colleen Bruno, Amanda Conway. Kerri Crowne, Alishia 
Faller, Lauren Ferracco, Jeannie Fitzgerald. Julie Hope. Holly Kosmalski. Michele Molesk}'. 
Megann Perry, Kelly Saxman, Eileen Scanlon, Annette Sciamanna, Natalie Sibley, Carleena 
Smith, Megan Smith, Kara Souder 



ATHLETICS 191 



A traditioh continues as the Football 
Team... 

rfmm 



The team displayed 
a chemistry that will 
help them to build 
on this season and 
will help them im- 
prove next year. 



It had been over fifty 
years since a La Salle 
team took to the gridiron. 
No one expected the 
success of this football 
team to be measured by 
wins and 

losses. ——^^—^ 

With two 
national 
titles 
under his 
belt, 
coach 
Bill 

Manlove 
was ^^.^^^_^.^ 

hired to 

build a program from the 
ground up. The goal of 
this team was not to 
capture a national title, but 
to work towards respect- 
ability and to build a solid 
foundation for years to 
come. 

With a team that is 
considered young in every 
aspect of the word, the 
Explorers played tirelessly 
week in and week out. 
Sometimes the scoreboard 
did not always tell the true 
tale of the game. While 



By Bob Delp '00 

the Explorers only won 
the game against St. 
Peter's this season, they 
played every game with 
determination, and as the 
season progressed they 
continued to 



improve. 

They made 

fewer 

mistakes on 

both sides of 

the ball as the 

weeks 

passed. 

They showed 
__^_^ that indeed 

they were a 
disciplined team. 

With a team that 
consisted of only a few 
marquee players, such as 
Ralph Sacca, Terrence 
Zaahir, and freshman 
quarterback Mike 
Bramowski, the team 
displayed a chemistry that 
will help them to build on 
this season and will help 
them improve next year. 
This team should be very 
happy with themselves for 
what they accomplished. 
Everyone at La Salle is. 




192 



EXPLORER 



■^=^:5r;^ 



Roster: 



fz * ^"M emn ' ^^ 



Micah Abdullah, Juslin Beyer, Brian Boss. Mike Bramowski, Michael 
Chiliberli, Anthony Chirchirillo, Anthony Ciccotia, Doran Coley, Tim 
Connelly, Drew Costello, Tony D'Aniico. Joe DeFelice. Bill DeVuono. Rocky 
DeVuono. Mike Dickman, Greg English. Mike Fedele, Chris Gallagher, 
Anthony Gatt, Paul Gimbel, Vince Grego, Frank Grosso. Luke Haggerty, 
David Hand. Jonathan Henry, Rick Hicks, Shawn Hopkins, Joe Huber, Joe 
lannetta, D.J. Jones, Mike Kane, Ken Keim, Neil Kelleher. Chris Kinka, Jim 
Kirschner, Ed Klusman, Chuck Knowles, Kevin Kots, .Stephen Lindsay, Joe 
Lombo, Joe Mallee, Eric Martinson, Tim McGlone, Brad McGovern, Tom 
McKenna, Tim McNichol, Brian McShane, Chris Michalak, Ed Morris, Pal 
Murray, Mike O'Conncll, Kerry O'Connor, John O'Donohue. Chad Pierce, 
Mark Pitta, Rich Rekos, John Reynolds, Josh Roniig, Vinnie Rosselli. John 
Ruddy, Ralph Sacca, Rob Sautter, Pat Scanlon. Anthony Schullz. Danny 
Smyth, Pete Turchi, Jeremy Uhrich, Hector Vincenty, Kevin Whitney, Mike 
Wolski, Mike Wotlinski, Terrence Zaahir, Michael Zeccardi. Scott Zettle 




The Cheerleadihg and Pahce Teams, 
full of spirit ahd energy, make us... 



Because they 
both entertained 
and involved the 
fans, the spirited 
cheerleading and 
dance teams were 
greatly appreci- 
ated this year. 



This year the 
cheerleading team's 
season was greatly 
extended. 

The fall 

season 
which 
used to be 
a time of 
training for 
the 

upcoming 
basketball 
season 
was 
instead 

spent ^____^___ 

cheering 

on the resurrected Ex- 
plorer football team. To 
rouse fans' cheers was a 
relatively young group. 
The team consisted of 
senior Jennifer Sadaka, 
sophomore captains Karen 
Heistand, Donna Mscisz, 
and Melissa Stover, and 
twelve freshmen. With so 
many new members, the 
season was both one of 
trial and error containing 
much potential. Carl Smith 
returned once again to 
coach the team; however. 



By Karen Heistand '00 

this year his job was made 
easier due to the help he 
received from Assistant 

Coach Juan 

Liceaga. 

The 
dance team, 
without a 
coach this 
year, took 
the fans by 
storm. Led 
by junior 
Jeannie 
Schueller 
and senior 
_________ Erica Giehl, 

the team 
showed great improvement 
over recent years. Sport- 
ing their new uniforms, and 
performing new choreog- 
raphy, the girls definitely 
had something to show off. 
They left lasting impres- 
sions on Explorer fans 
after every one of their 
performances. 

Because they both 
entertained and involved 
the fans, the spirited 
cheerleading and dance 
teams were greatly 
appreciated this year. (' 



194 



EXPLORER 





iCheerleading Roster: 

Chris Cabbot, Christina Daley, Liz DiTomasso, Christina Fuller, Karen Gaedke, 
Gaddiel Gonzalez, Lisa Hauenstein, Karen Heistand, Devin Hudgens, Donna Mscisz, 
Jennifer Ross, Jennifer Sadaka, Kristina Sineni, Melissa Stover, Vicky West 

Dance Team Roster: 

Heather DiBianco, Laura Fenton, Erica Giehl, Melissa Palaganas, Rikki Quin-James, 
Cindy Schmidt, Jeanne Schueller, Jess Virus, Danielle Voight 




Py supporting each other's efforts 

and learning from experiences, the 

Men's Pasketball Team... 



um €mm 



The Explorers 
entered the 1997- 
1998 season and 
stormed their way 
toward improve- 
ment and history. 



With two years of 
conference experience 
under their belts, the 
Explorers entered the 
1997-1998 season and 
stormed 

their way 

toward 
improve- 
ment and 
history. 

On 
January 
27 at 
Virginia 
Tech, La ^-^-^-^-^^ 
SaUe 

Head Coach Speedy 
Morris made another entry 
into the record books. With 
his team's 72-68 victory 
over the Hokies, Morris 
picked up his 200th career 
win. Morris, who is a 
member of the Pennsylva- 
nia Sports Hall of Fame, 
has the most wins in La 
Salle basketball history. 

Morris wasn't the only 
Explorer to make a lasting 
impact during the season, 
though. Senior captain Mike 
Gizzi, who was one of the 
Explorers most improved 
players over the last 
several seasons, reached 
the 1000-point milestone 
during the Arizona State 
tournament. In a game 
against the Sun Devils, 
Gizzi hit a three-pointer 



By John Gonzalez '99 

from the top of the key 
with 15:08 left in game to 
reach the plateau. The 6-5 
guard was just the 38th 
player in La Salle's 

basketball 
history to 
become a 
member of 
the 1000- 
point club. 

Also 
making an 
impact on the 
court was 
^-^^— standout 

sophomore 
Donnie Carr. After leading 
the A- 10 in scoring and 
gaining Rookie of the Year 
honors as a freshman. Can- 
was once again one of the 
most dangerous guards in 
the conference. 

While Carr and Gizzi 
were busy leading the 
team, newcomers like 
freshman Victor Thomas 
and transfer junior K'Zell 
Wesson were making an 
impact of their own. 
Thomas, a 6-7 forward, 
was widely regarded as 
one of the premier fresh- 
men in the league, while 
Wesson, who grabbed 
rebound after rebound with 
his massive 6-7, 254 lb. 
frame, made an immediate 
impacton the A-10. % 




196 



EXPLORER 




Senior Sideline 




</ 



Roster: 

Garrett Bragg 
Donnie Can- 
Sid Catlett 
Brian Flickinger 
Mike Gizzi 
James Jordan 
Olof Landgren 
Shawn Smith 
Victor Thomas 
K'Zell Wesson 



Brian I- li':kiii'.'cr 




Mike Gizzi 



Olof Landgren 



Shawn Smith 



ATHLETICS 197 



Fresh taleht and seasoned experience 

provide the Women's 

Pasketball Team with... 



The bench counts down 
the play clock. The team 
members cheer each other 
on. Large smiles cross the 
faces of the women full of 
team spirit. This is the 
spirit of the 1997-1998 
Lady 



Not only have they 
been successful but 
also distinctive both 
on and off the 
court. 



Explorers 
basketball 
team. 
Such spirit 
along with 
great skill 
has led 
them to ^^_^^____ 

their 

success. Although they 
are a very young team, 
they have worked together 
once again to make a 
name for themselves in the 
Atlantic- 10 Conference. 
These Lady Explorers 
rank among Atlantic- 10 
leaders in categories such 
as free-throw percentage, 
three-point field goals per 
game, and three-point field 
goal percentage. With 
individual league leaders in 
senior Katie Wolfe and 
freshman Jen Zenszer, as 
well as starters Sarah 
Haynes, Sarah Weiss, 
Carrie Jewett, Mandy 
Dubbs, Marjorie Rhoads, 
and Shannon McDade, this 
Explorer Basketball team 



By Jen DeBisschop '00 

began the season bound 
for success. Success is 
just what they found. 

Not only have they been 
successful but also distinc- 
tive both on and off the 
court. The Lady Explorers 

had the 
^— ^^-— distinction 

and honor of 
playing the 
first home 
game at 
newly 
renovated 
^_^^^__ Hayman 

Center. 
They also hold the distinc- 
tion of having ten scholar 
athletes out of the 
thirteen women roster. 
Five, in fact, were on the 
academically superior 
Lady Explorers 1 996- 1 997 
team who scored first 
among the nation's 300 
Division I teams for 
cumulative GPA. 

This Lady Explorer 
Basketball Team has class, 
sportsmanship, skills, 
friendship, and spirit that 
have led them full force 
into a very successful 
season. They have what it 
takes to have serious fun 
and achieve success at 
work and play on and off 
the court. V 



198 



EXPLORER 





Senior Sideline 



Sarah Hayiies 



Sarah Weiss 



Katie Wolfe 




Roster: 

Mandy Dubbs 
Dana Gavaghan 
Sarah Haynes 
Melissa Hindenlang 
Carrie Jewett 
Shannon McDade 
Laura Newhard 
Marjorie Rhoads 
Mary Tuinstra 
JillWeakland 
Sarah Weiss 
Katie Wolfe 
Jennifer Zenszer 



ATHLETICS 



199 



The Swim Team's control and grace 
Ih the water leaves... 




Stockpiled with talent 
this year, the swim 
team enjoyed a great 
deal of success 
throughout the sea- 
son. 



With hands charging 
forth through the water 
and with feet aflutter, the 
swim team stormed the 
ramparts of their 1997-98 
season 
with a 
brimming 
confi- 
dence, 
spawned 
by suc- 
cesses of 
seasons 
past. ^^^^^^^ 

Stockpiled 

with talent this year, the 
swim team, along with 
their eminent Head Coach 
John Lyons standing pool- 
side, enjoyed a great deal 
of success throughout the 
season, including a second- 
place finish in the Rhode 
Island Invitadonal and a 
first-place finish in the 
seven-team Philadelphia 
Invitational. 

Among those swimmers 
whose talent superseded 
mediocrity included senior 
Dina Dormer. Akeady 
holding numerous pool 
records at La Salle, 
Dormer helped engineer 
the women's team to 



By Mark Schugsta '00 

victory countless dmes 
with her performances in 
the 200 yd. butterfly and in 
the 500 and 100 yd. 
freestyle. Also pacing the 
women's 
team to 
victory were 
Trisha 
Swanson, 
Kristi 
Forcier, 
Alison 
Heider, 
-^^^^^^ Dawn 

Leonard, 
and diver Kim Steck. 

The men's team, whose 
wall-to-wall talent this year 
was a harrowing sight for 
opponents, relished in 
success provided by the 
youthful and the experi- 
enced swimmers alike. 
Seasoned swimmers such 
as senior Steve 
Duncheskie and junior 
Jamie Morrow collabo- 
rated with youthful swim- 
mers, such as Mitch 
Zackowski, Chris Hefty, 
Tom Yaegel, Jason 
Streefkerk, and diver 
Adam Vance to help 
prolong a tradition of 
supremacy in the pool. % 



200 EXPLORER 




Senior Sideline 



JJintt Dornirr 



Alison Heider 




ATHLETICS 201 



Bryan Baiocchi 

Marc Ciambrello 

Michael Davis 

Stephen Duncheskie 

Keith Fencl 

Matthew Forcier 

Jerrod Freund 

John Friel 

Shawn Friel 

Pat Gallagher 

Christopher Hefty 

Derek Kay 

Michael McGinnis 



Roster: 

Dan Morrissy 

Jason Morrow 

Dennis O'Donnell 

James Piatt 

Nathan Reese 

Jarrett Roke 

David Schalleur 

Jason Streefkerk 

Daniel Swierk 

Adam Vance 

Tom Yaegal 

Matthew Yaglenski 

Mitchell Zackowski 




202 EXPLORER 



Roster: 




ATHLETICS 



With youth awd vigor, the 
Volleyball Team... 



By Theresa Argondezzi '98 



The 1997 Women's 
Volleyball season provided 
fans with more exciting 
matches and competitive 
play than the team's record 
may indicate. After 
finishing the 1996 season 
with an 
overall 
record of 
2-30, the 
team was 
determined 
to earn the 
respect of 
the Atlan- 
tic- 10 
Confer- 
ence by 
putting - 

together a 
successful season. 

The Explorers were a 
relatively young team this 
year, led by junior co- 
captains Missy McCulty 
and Missy Ortwein. Hard 
work in the off-season 
combined with a roster full 
of talented athletes helped 
La Salle start off its season 
with a string of impressive 
victories. Big wins over 
teams like Morgan State, 
Columbia, and Lehigh 
highlighted the Explorer's 



Hard work in the 
off-season com- 
bined with a roster 
full of talented ath- 
letes helped La Salle 
start off its season 
with a string of 
impressive victories. 



non-conference schedule, 
and they entered A- 10 
conference play with a 7-1 
record. 

Even though the team 
showed tremendous 
improvement and chal- 
lenged 
several of 
their A- 10 
opponents, 
the Explor- 
ers did not 
see as much 
success in 
their confer- 
ence. 
Individual 
perfor- 
^^^^^^~ mances by 

McCulty, 
who led the team in kills, 
and sophomore Melissa 
Hodge, who finished the 
season with more blocks 
than any other Explorer, 
gave the team strength and 
leadership. With exciting 
matches against power- 
houses like George Wash- 
ington and Xavier, La Salle 
finished its season with an 
overall record of 1 1-22, a 
vast improvement over the 
1996 season. (' 




204 



EXPLORER 



■ 


■ 




m 


^ 


■^ 4k 


J^fl 







/ ^' •>^ /'V^' ^^' ^ 






Roster: 

Trina Allen 
Kelly Daniel 
Kristen Darby 
Melissa Hodge 
Autumn Krauss 
Missy McCulty 
Keri Metzger 
Missy Ortwein 
Lori Beth Ryan 
Kolbe Scilley 
Kelly Tiemey 
Julianna Vorholy 



ATHLETICS 205 



Iw racihg shells, the Mew's 
Crew Team is.... 

um 



While it is a club team in 
the fall, men's crew is a 
Division 1, Atlantic 10 
sport in the spring. With 
both a fall and spring 
season, the crew team can 
be found training six days a 
week from 

September ^^^^^^^ 
to May. 
Much of 
that time is 
spent on the 
Schuylkill 
River 
despite cold 

tempera- ^^^^^^^ 

tures and 
icy waters. 

Despite the prolonged 
absence of a head coach, 
dedicated athletes formed 
two boats this year, a 
"varsity lightweight 8" and 
a "novice 8." The classifi- 
cation of lightweight is 
given to a men's boat with 
athletes under 1591bs. In 
addition to being predomi- 
nantly lightweight, the team 
is also young. Composed 
of mostly sophomores and 
freshmen, there is leeway 
for strengthening and 



Despite the pro- 
longed absence of 
a head coach, 
dedicated athletes 
formed two boats. 



By Sara Chiappa '98 

growth in the future. 

Fall season competitions 
included the Frostbite 
Regatta and Head of the 
Schuylkill, and spring races 
included the La Salle 
Invitational, Kerr Cup, and 

Bergen 
^^^■^^^— Cup. After 
months of 
hard 

training, the 
spring 
season 
culminated 
with the 

Dad Vail 

Regatta in 
Philadelphia. This annual 
regatta is not only well 
known locally, but also 
world wide due to the 
world class reputation of 
the Schuylkill River for 
crew races. Proximity to 
the Schuylkill has its 
advantages and disadvan- 
tages though. Training for 
the Dad Vails required 
these committed athletes to 
give up Spring Break and 
stay at La Salle for two 
practices a day. 




206 



EXPLORER 




Id the early morwiHg hours, the 

Wowew's Crew Team 

gracefully glides... 



t 






La Salle Women's 
Crew Team can be 
found working 
relentlessly in hopes 
of achieving gold. 



Whether it is in the 
darkened hours of the 
early morning or during the 
dusky hours of the evening, 
the La Salle Women's 
Crew team can be found 
working relentlessly in 
hopes of achieving gold. 

The 
women's ^^^^^~~"~ 
Varsity 
team 
hoped to 
find gold 
under the 
leadership 

of new _^^^_^^^__ 
Head 

Coach Gerry Quinlan. 
Quinlan, an alumnus of 
Notre Dame, was the head 
coach of the Women's 
Crew Team at Northwest- 
ern University of Ilhnois. 

The Varsity squad for 
the 1997- 1998 rowing 
season looked to the new 
season with hopes of 
surpassing the successes 
of the previous one. One 
indication of the strength of 
this year's team was the 
strong finish at the Head of 
the Charles Regatta, the 
most prestigious of all fall 
races in the sport of 
rowing. 



By Jessica Riccio '00 

It looked as though the 
loss of a few key rowers 
to injury and other commit- 
ments may have hampered 
the spring season; how- 
ever, the team was quite 
successful. 
The Novice Crew of 
spring 1 997 

turned out an 

impressive 
season, with 
a gold-place 
finish at the 
Mid-Atlantic 
Collegiate 
^^^^^^ Crew 

Champion- 
ships in Virginia. This 
eight-women team, under 
first-year Coach Stuart 
Chase, also made their 
way to a semi-final finish 
at the Dad Vails missing 
finals by .04 seconds. 

Chase, a former cox- 
swain for the University of 
Pittsburgh, is back with the 
Novice team this year. His 
team this season was one 
of the largest La Salle has 
seen in years. Success 
also played into the cards 
of the Novice Crew of 
1998. § 



ATHLETICS 



207 



The Mew's Track Team's speed awd 
strength keep them... 



With a strong unity and 
diverse talent, the men of 
the track and field team 
have once again competed 
strongly against their 
Atlantic- 1 Conference 
opponents. 
Coach 



With a strong 
unity and diverse 
talent, the men of 
the track and 
field team have 
once again com- 
peted strongly. 



Charles 
Torpey had 
many high 
hopes for 
his close- 
knit track 
and field 
team, a 
team with 
surprising ^^^^^^ 

promise and 
a legitimate chance to 
claim the A- 10 title this 
season. Anchored by the 
efforts of senior Ed Morris 
and fifth year seniors Marc 
Cianfrani and Brian 
Gallagher, these Explorers 
proved they had what was 
necessary to win and win 
big. 
One problem the team 



By Brady Hicks '00 

faced, however, was the 
lack of field competitors. 
Coach Torpey stressed the 
importance of gaining a 
strong field component, an 
aspect the Explorers will 
be looking to 
build upon in 
the future. 
Yet the 
young strong 
sprinters, 
middle 
distance 
division and 
the men's 
ability to 
■^^^^^— compete as a 

powerful 
team unit helped them to 
surpass their opponents. 
They did so while improv- 
ing their own individual 
strengths as well. 

With a small positive 
core group of athletes, the 
men's track and field team 
has once again aimed for 
and achieved success, v 



\ 




208 



EXPLORER 




Brian Bell, Greg Blaszko, Nicholas Cavallaro, Marc Cianfrani. Chris 
Cummins, Justin Cupples, Joseph DiGiacomo. CoHn Dooley. Michael Fox, 
Raymond Friedman, James Fulginiti. Brian Gallagher. P.J. Gallagher. Michael 
Hendricks, Joe lannette, Michael James. Thomas Lannen. Scon Levell. John 
Lewis, Philip Magee, Edward Morris. Kevin Myles. Sean 0"Brien. John O" 
Donnell, Nick Pagano, Seann Pelkey, Philip Reilly. Michael Robmson. 
Thomas Sabol, Jeff Simpkins, Kyle Trocolla 



Py practicing and perfecting, the 
Women's Track Team... 




For the women's track 
team at La Salle, 1998 
proved to be the year of 
the perfect combination. 
The leadership, dedication, 
and enthusiasm of the 
experienced athletes, along 
with the fresh new talent 
of the influx of 14 fresh- 
men runners ^— ^^^— ^ 
have made 
La Salle a 
team of 
champion 
level perfor- 
mance. 

Head 
Coach 
Charles 
Torpey has 

used his expertise to mold 
his senior athletes into 
feared individuals in the 
Atlantic 10 Conference. 
Assistant Coaches Joyce 
Jellig and Eric Mobley 
have helped by recruiting 
an outstanding group of 
young athletes. 

Opening up the season 
with a bang, fifth year 
senior superstar Terry 
Carroll won the 1000 
meter run at Princeton 
with a time of 2:58. Other 
outstanding performances 
of the meet were turned in 
by freshmen Kelly Cassidy 
and Meg Jordan, who 
finished third and fourth, 
respectively, in the mile. 
The Lady Explorers moved 



Their unique combi- 
nation of youthful 
talent with experience 
provides them with 
the perfect ingredients 
to become champi- 
ons. 



By Megan Thomas '00 

on to strut their stuff at the 
University of Delaware 
Invitational, with the 
exceptional races of 
seniors Carroll and 
Johanna Grochowalski in 
the mile. Veteran Katie 
Brown joined the other 
overachieving seniors by 
placing 
sixth in the 
3000 

meter run 
at Dela- 
ware. 

Senior 
Rachel 
Ritz, an 

^ excellent 

leader on 
the team, led by example 
when she stunned the 
competition at the 
Princeton Invitational with 
a meet record time of 
2: 16:4 in the highly com- 
petitive 800-meter run. 
Junior Elena Gomez, 
coming off an injury, 
finished third in the 3000 
meter run. 

The daily dedicadon and 
hard work of these women 
athletes have been accu- 
mulating strength and 
notoriety for the team. 
Their unique combination 
of youthful talent with 
experience provides them 
with the perfect ingredients 
to become champions. 




210 



EXPLORER 



^^^H^^^ 
K^i 


P^^^l^^^^^n 



Senior Sideline 



KirsUiii Krcias 





Roster: 

Brigid Benner 
Katie Brown 
Kelly Ann Bums 
Maura Calahan 
Lori Carroll 
Megan Carroll 
Renee Carroll 
Terry Carroll 
Kelly Cassidy 
Erin Doogan 
Maureen Dougherty 
Elena Gomez 
Johanna Grochowalski 
Kathy Heabel 
Roxanne Hushes 



Jennifer Jelhg 
Tomeka Jones 
Megan Jordan 
Kirsten Kraas 
Kathryn McCormick 
Lauren Newcomb 
Lisa Precourt 
Toniann Razi 
Karen Reber 
Melinda Rega 
Andrea Riccardo 
Rachel Ritz 
Megan Thomas 
Heather Tjrell 
Renee Vosel 



ATHLETICS 



211 



Practice awd cohccwtratiow allow the 
baseball Team to keep ah... 



J 



iBt^(L(L 



The Explorers will 
rely heavily on 
offense this spring. 



Change. 

The Explorer baseball 
team became quite familiar 
with that word change as 
it headed into the 1998 
season. Big changes 
occurred with the team, 
especially at the top. 

Larry 
Conti, an 
ex-La 
SaUe 
baseball 
player, 

came back ^^^~~^~~ 
to campus 

from the Community 
College of Philadelphia to 
take over head coaching 
duties. Helping Conti out 
were Steve Bongard and 
John Polillio (one of the 
aces from last year's 
pitching staff). Conti 
inherited a team that 
finished 19-27 (8- 12) last 
season and has suffered a 
few key losses. 

Brian Schaller, the 
team's leading hitter and 
GTE Academic All- 
American, was lost to 
graduation. Pitcher Will 
Fleck did not return for his 
senior campaign after 
being drafted in the off- 
season by the Atlanta 
Braves. Thus, Conti had 
to focus on the squad's 



By Kevin Ibach '00 

youth this season, with 
underclassmen represent- 
ing over half of the roster. 

The Explorers planned to 
rely heavily on offense this 
spring, hoping to mimic the 
.345 team batting average 
it posted in the fall season. 
The pitching 



staff, under 
Polillo's 
guidance, 
was counted 
on to keep 
^^^^^^~ the team in 
ball games 
throughout the season. 
The start of the season 
began with the squad's 
annual trip to Florida. 

Following the spring trip, 
the baseball team returned 
home to embark on 
another voyage through a 
competitive Adantic 10 
conference. The team 
spent much of the early 
part of last season in first 
place in the A- 10 West. 
However, perennial 
powerhouse Virginia Tech 
was one of the many 
roadblocks the Explorers 
faced towards the end of 
that season. Yet, Conti 
and company prepared this 
year's team to face the 
tough conference 
competition, v 




212 



EXPLORER 




Senior Sideline 




iJnni'fJtir. 



fidrrv Lopateii 




o 



Brian Mills 



WM 


mm 





Hal Mitchell 




^ 



Don Quinn 



Roster: 

Mike Bell 
Bill Burke 
Paul Burke 
Mike Cavallaro 
Damian Derico 
Kevin Dorsey 
Mark Duffy 
Joe Eliasen 
Ron England 
Mike Ferrialo 
Joe Fiorelli 
Toby Fisher 
Mike Fuchs 
Ted Grandstaff 
Kevin Ibach 



Barry Lopoten 
Kevin Manero 
Jim McGovem 
Brian Mills 
Hal Mitchell 
Jordan Nicgorski 
Jon Palumbo 
Don Quinn 
Alex Roberti 
Ralph Sacca 
Tim Slater 
Ryan Sylvander 
Jim White 
Kevin Wittmever 



ATHLETICS 



213 



With depth of play and overall 

talent the Softball Team 

proves that... 




mm miMm 



For the last three years, 
the Softball team has 
placed in the top four in the 
A- 10 championships. In 
1998, the team has high 
hopes of keeping that 
record alive due to a very 
sohd field 

defense and a ^^^^^_ 
large pitching 



staff. Lead 
by Head 
Coach Ray 
Perri, Assis- 
tant Coach 
Rich Gross 

and CO- ^^^^^_ 

captains Vicki 
Gross and Danielle Fenyus, 
the women's team has an 
excellent chance for 
success. 

With five returning 
seniors, the softball team 
has much experience in 
this year's line-up. There 
also is a solid base of 
sophomores and freshmen 
who will remain to keep 
Softball's tradition alive at 
La Salle. Their solid 
defense is supported by a 
hitting staff with an 
abundance of base hitters 
who focus on consistency 
and not power. Seniors 
Chris Wilderman and Vicki 
Gross are the team's best 
power hitters. Freshman 
Julie Reiss appears to be 
following in their lead. 
During this season's A- 10 



With time and 
experience, this 
year's softball 
team will continue 
their tradition of 
excellence. 



By Steph Rozak '00 

competition, she will be 
able to display her consis- 
tency and ability. By 
maintaining a decent 
offense to complement the 
defense, the softball team 
remains a strong contender 

in the A- 10 
^^^^_ champion- 
ships. 

While they 
have many 
pluses in their 
line-up this 
season, there 
are still some 

kinks which 

need to be 
worked on. Due to the 
work on the Hayman 
Center, the team has been 
displaced during practices 
on a regular basis. This 
displacement has forced 
them to split up during 
practice, hindering the 
sense of team identity. 
Also, the lack of ample 
practice time has hurt the 
team's fitness level. They 
are a fast team, but their 
speed needs development. 
Practice time and experi- 
ence during season play 
will help with this flaw. 
These difficulties cannot 
subtract from the overall 
quahty of the team. With 
time and experience, this 
year's softball team will 
continue their tradition of 
excellence. % 




lU 



EXPLORER 







Senior Sideline 



Meghan Aiidms 



Danielle l-en\iis 



Vicki Gross 



Dawn Palmer 



Chris Wildenjiflfi 



Meghan Andros 
Jackie Bernard 
TaliaBilella 
Megan Clifford 
Sarah Dougherty 
Danielle Fenyus 
Vicki Gross 
Kate Guzzo 
Jennifer Hoemer 
Debbie Klawiter 
Kelly Lyons 



Janice McGint}' 
Mehssa McVey 
Bemadette Murphy 
Dawn Palmer 
Julie Reiss 
Marlene Rorke 
Kelly Saxman 
Natahe Striano 
Jennifer Teffenhart 
Chris Wilderman 



ATHLETICS 215 






amRwrntm 






.^k*' 



'V- 



216 EXPLORER 



We Love Our Seniors 




roB 



218 EXPLORER 







PATRONS/ADS 219 




The La Salle University 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Offers Sincere 

Best Wishes and 

Congratulations 

to the 

Class of 1998 

And Welcomes You to the 

Alumni Association 



The 1997-1998 Alumni Board of Directors 

OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT - Nicholas J. Lisi, Esq., '62 

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT - Charles J. Quattrone, 73 

VICE PRESIDENT - James J. McDonald, '58 

SECRETARY - Leslie L Brando, '80 

TREASURER - Gerard J. Binder, '73 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Joseph H. Cloron, '61* 

Maria Tucker Cusick, '83* 

Leo D. Eisenstein, '55 

Kenneth &. Hoger, '58 

Elizabeth R. Lochner, '87 

past alumni Association Presidents 



Marianne Salmon Gauss, '75* 

Teresa Hooten Kozempel, DO., '74 

William W, Matthews III, Esq., '90 

Christine Kloster Meko, Esq., '90 

George 5. Poull, Jr., '67 



220 



EXPLORER 



The La Salle University 



Alumni Office Staff 



Congratulate the Class of 1998 



Or\ Your Graduation, 



And Welcome You 



to YOUR 




Alumni Association 

La Salle University Alumni Association 

In recognition of having earned a degree as conferred by the President of La Salle University 



The Class of 1998 

is welconned into the Alumni Association of La Salle University. 



Nicholas J. Lisi, Esq. '62 
President, Alumni Association 



Brother Joseph F. Burke, FSC, Ph.D. '68 
President, La Salle University 



George J. Dotsey '69 
Alumni Director 




FOR MORE INFROMATION ABOUT THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION CALL 
(215) 951-1535 OR 1-888 4 ALUM LU OR EMAIL ALUMNI@LASALLE.EDU 



PATRONS/ADS 221 




%' » ' 



V 



r 



HEATHER, 



Wishing all your tomorrows 

are filled with the pride and 

happiness you bring to us 

today and always... 



CONGRATULATIONS! 



Love, Dad, Mom & Shawn 





V 



V 



* 




122 EXPLORER 



Good Luck to the Class of 1998 

J. MICHAEL WHITAKER, MD 

Class of 1972 
Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine 




and 



GREGORY G. GALLANT, MD 

Orthopaedics, Sports Medicine, & Hand Surgery 

103 Progress Drive 

Suite 300 

Doylestown, PA 18901 

Phone: (215)345-5840 

Fax: (215)345-4478 



J- 



THS LA SALLE SINGERS 

WANT TO THANK THE 

sENions Fon their 

DEDICATION AND YEARS Of SERVICE 



CONGRATULATIONS AND GOOD LUCK TO 

HEATHER OLSON, PRESIDENT 

STEPHANIE HAMILTON, VICE PRESIDENT 

STEPHEN PFLUGfELDER, TREASURER / 

SARA CHIAPPA, SECRETARY 

JENNIFER SCHMITT 



PATRONS/ADS 223 



CONGRATULATIONS, 
ANDY GWIAZDA 



No words can describe the warm 
memories, the pride, and the gratitude 
that come from having a son Hke you to 
love. May God grant you the best of 
health, happiness, and success in your 
future in communication. 

What will La Salle do without you, 
"Mr. G"? 

Mom, Dad, 

Uncle Frank, Aunt Helen, Aunt 

Dolores, and the rest of the family who 

are too numerous to mention 



"The soul of a child 
is the loveliest flower 
that grows in the garden of God. 
Its climb is from weakness 
to knowledge and power, 
to the sky from the clay to 
the clod. 

To beauty and sweetness 
it grows under care, 
neglected, 'tis ragged and wild. 
'Tis a plant that is tender, 
but wondrously rare, 
the sweet wistful soul of a child." 
-Anonymous 



A TRIBUTE TO MY GRANDSON 

You know where you're going 

You have a good clue 

Just follow your dreams 

And make them come true 

You have character and wisdom 

to help you along 

Keep a smile on your face and 

always be strong 

Make sure you enjoy the career 

you seek, or else your future can 

become rather bleak 

You have been given much love 

along the way 

So give some back a little each day 

I toast you. Bob Foreaker, in every 

endeavor. 

God's love follow you now and forever. 

OCEANS AND OCEANS, 
LOVE, 

NAN 




ROBERT M. FOREAKER 

LA SALLE UNIVERSITY 
CLASS OF 1998 

YOUR ENTIRE FAMILY 
SALUTES YOU. WE ARE 
ALL VERY PROUD OF YOU 

CONGRATULATIONS ! 

WE ALL LOVE YOU BOBBY! !!! ! 



A TRIBUTE TO MY SON 
MY PRIDE! 
MY JOY! 
MY LIFE! 

I will always be the wind beneath your wings 

I will stand behind you, and always help guide 

you as you set out to discover what life brings 

You have grown into a wonderful young man 

I am so proud of you, you will do well, in 

whatever you plan. 

Oh! Where has the time gone, since those 

little boy days? 

I looked away for a moment, and here we are, 

your Graduation Day. 

It is time now to wish you the best in all you try 

And as you walk away, on your own, I'll try not 

to cry. 

Always remember how much you are loved, my son 

You have fdled my life with pride and joy, from the 

time you were just a little boy. 

I salute and honor you today! 

I congratulate your accomplishment, 

YOUR COLLEGE GRADUATION DAY! 

OCEANS AND OCEANS OF LOVE, 
MOM 



224 



EXPLORER 



College Hie is tough indeed 

But we knew that you'd succeed. 

Liz, we're proud 'cause 
You did your best. 

Now come home and really rest. 





Love, Mom and Dad 



)ear Theresa, 

Intelligence, diligence, thoughtfulness, kindness, beauty 
internal and external) and a great sense of humor are just a few |^ .- 
)f the many attributes which you have utilized to the fullest. 

Congratulations on your many wonderful achievements at La Salle! We are 
ertain you will be extremely successful in all of your future endeavors. 

Our wish for you is that your life continues to be full of love, happiness, 
ontentment, health, good friends, and a loving family. Our pride and love for you 
now no bounds!! 




Much love always. 
Nana, Papa, Mom, Dad 
Anne, Jim, and Joe 



PATRONS/ADS 



225 




The Masque of La Salle 

thanks all our Seniors for 
their years of service. 



Congratulations, Seniors! We'll miss you! 

1997-1998 Executive Board 

Tony Purcell and Sara Chiappa— Producers 

Amy Reynolds— Vice-President of Technical Affairs 

Jenn Brewer— Vice-President of Business Affairs 

A. Raymond Bossert- Vice-President of Publicity 

Rose Brownell— Vice-President of Personnel 

Cood Bye and Good Luck 
to the Class of 1 998! 

I must also say good bye to La Salle in order 

to spend more time with my family. My 

fondest memories will always be of my 

relationships with all of you. 

Laura K. McKenna, MSN, CRNP 

La Salle University 

Director of Student Health 

1986-1998 

226 EXPLORER 



La Salle University s 

Students Government Association 

Congratulates Class of '98 

Graduating Seniors! 

Chris Santarslero 

David Viioria 

John Torrente 

Miclieile Tagye 

Fran Duffy 
Kevin Caiiaghan 

Good Luck and Best Wishes! 




Congratulations / 
Class of 1998 

From the staff of the 
Collegian 



(Please feel free to spill your guts 

about all the scandal and corruption 

you've hid for all these years.) 



PATRONS/ADS 227 



Sara Chiappa 



Mom & Dad 

Peter, Ruth, and Christopher 

Denis and Julie 

Elizabeth 

and 
Matthew 





1^ Stude^Ac(fe 0{f(fCcc 
& 



Edward Chiosso 
Michael Creedon 

Jason Farrell 
Steven Haluszka 
Michael Kimmel 

Robert Pariser 

Michelle Venture 

and 

Renee Vogel 




228 



EXPLORE. 



lo Our JUauffMer.*'? 



Oappinesso .deep down witlkin* 
uiereJiity* « witli eacii sunrise » 
Ouccess. 4 .in eacn iacet ol your file. 
Vvlose iriends. 
JL/ove mat never ends. 



A Ibrignt today. . . witn mucli to Ibe tnanktul 
A pat]a...tliat leads to iDeautilul tomorrows. 



And appreciation. . .oi all tne wonderiul tilings about you. 



'ith love anc 



M-oni;. JUad;. Jerry;, and ^kjstei 




Dear Cileya, 

from the moment you 
were born, our life has 
had a special meaning. 
'We watched our little 
girl grow into a 
beautiful, responsible 
young lady. 
The years have gone 
by so very quickly. 117e hardly turned 
around and you're graduating from college. 
A new door of life is about to open for 
you. As you journey through the path of life, 
may you always walk in the warm sunshine 
of God's love and wisdom. 

'We wish you the very best. 
'With much love, 
^ama and Tato 



TO TIM PELL: 

WAY TO GO TIM! 

WE COULD'NT BE 

PROUDER. 

MAY YOLR FUTURE BE 

SUNNY AND BRIGHT. 

LOVE, 
MOM & DAD 




PATRONS/ADS 



229 








^ o (N ex ^al- u \ o. Y'\or. 5- 
^hc\f;P/3^ I ( jz /.cue 






s 



't^ 








V \^ 



h 






CONGRATULATIONS 
JASON FARRELL 



WE ARE PROUD OF YOU. 
YOU ARE THE FUTURE 
AND ALL IT HOLDS. 
MAY YOUR LIFE BE FILLED 
WITH 

LOVE, 

SUCCESS, AND 

HAPPINESS 



LOVE, 
MOM AND DAD 







Tell me an 


d 1 forget. 


Sh 


ow me and 1 


will remember. 


\nvo\ 


ve me and 1 


will understand. 




Ch 


nese Proverb 



The Center for Community learning 

would like to congratul^te all 

those grac?uating seniors 

who have become involved and are 

helping to change the world. 

we wish you the best! 



230 



EXPLORER 




CONGRATULATIONS JASON 

MAKE IT SO! 

Love Mom, Dad, 

Christopher & Max 



Congratulations Jieather 

Middleton & yriendsl 

Cove TDad 



JULIE DOHERTY 

WE'RE AS PROUD 

AS CAN BE!! 

LOVE AND KISSES 

MOM, DAD, TRICIA, 

DEANA, JOE, 

EDY MARIE, AND 

SPORTI 



"^^iP 



Congratulations to 
Vincent Monzo! 

You weathered the storm. 

Now, enjoy the rainbow! 

Best wishes in law school. 



With all our love and pride, 

Mommy, Daddy, Rosemarie, Ralph, and 

Soupenya 



Pi Kappa Phi 

Congratulations, Chris! 

We're proud 

OF you! 

Love, Mom, Dad, 

Dan, Nick, 

Tim, 8c Joe 




Mv Son. 

Remember when you would say, "1 
can't do this" "1 don't under standi" 
Congratulations for a job well done 
frankie'V. 

Your Troud 

Mom & Dad 



M iycheXey Vevxturo-, 

TKiy uyyour aney moment iv\/Vwvie/. 
hJot only are/ we^ ceiehrccting^ ycywr 
huthda^ today. We/ are^ c^Uo- 
celehratVng^your (M:hle^ewie^\ty ivx/ lt/e< 
\0e/ are/ aW k>- proud/ ofyow: 



Love/ alwayy, 
Vad/, Howu, £r Kelly 




Congnatulations, Lindail 

We aue so pnoud of 

youV. 

We tofsh you much Looe, 

Happfness and Success 

in youn futurzeV. 

Looe, 
Dad, Mom, Rob, 8t Launa 




PATRONSA\DS 



231 



The 1 998 Explorer staff 

would like to ttiank 

Mike Durinzi and 

Carl Wolf Studio, 

the official photographers 
for the 1 998 yearbook for 
their dedicated service. 

For portrait package information, 
contact Carl Wolf Studio at 

401 Elmwood Avenue 
P.O. Box 1037 

Sharon Hill, PA 19079-0737 
610-522-1338 



232 EXPLORER 



The staff of the 1998 Exp/c^rer 

thanks 

Emmy Rachel 
and the entire staff at 

Taylor Tublishlng Company 

for all of their assistance in 
producing this yearbook. 

M^ay this partnership continue 
for many more years to come! 



PATRONS/ADS 233 



The Resident Life Office 

would like to congratulate the 1998 

graduates on our staff 

Resident Assistants 

Cathy Paczkowski 

Greg Gambescia 

Valerie Montoya 

David Dinan 

Stephanie Parkinson 

Christine Temple 

Graduate Assistant Area Coodinator 

Carolyn Bonner 

Resident Educator 

Le Sette Wright 

Thank you so much for your service to 

our residents. Good Luck and 

Godspeed on your journey! 



Congratulations 
to the Class of 1998 




from the 
Campus Store 



The Student Nurse Orgahization would like to thahk 
the officers for their enthusiastic service. 

Bridget Aguado 

Gregory Gambescia 

Mary Taylor 

Monica Woytus 
Matthew ^uarno 

CohgratulatioHS and &ood Luck 
In the future. 



Congratulations to the Class of '98 

Especially to my Former Students 

and 

Those on the Explorer Staff 

(Andy, Heccther, Jen, Sanz, cuid Stephcuiie) 




Best Wishes for Success and Happiness to Alii 
Dr. Dolores Lehr 



Congratufations to tfic (Jlqss oJ 1998 



oTTicn to tfic cfcmcnts 

fj3e Jrec, ancf Jarc tfiou wcfff 

offte oJempest 



-~ Jrom tfic Office ojtfic i^can oj^ts ancf Sciences 



Congratulations 

to our graduating English majors 

for a degree well earned. 




The English Department faculty wishes 
you well on your journey. 









^'^-^^ 


0^ triency^^^. 




^"^ 

^ 




\ 








OC 











o- 







,5' 


®-, 




«o 


■t3 




risS^ 



My housemates. 

Thank you for the rvonderful years of friendship, fun. 

support d memories. You have made college all 1 could 

have asked for. 

Sara 



234 



EXPLORER 




Congratufations 

to our 
^TN(ursing Qraduaics 

^rom the 
^acu[t^ and Qt off 
of the Qchoof of ^^rsing 



PATRONS 

CONGRATULATIONS STEPHANIE, LOVE MOM, DAD, JENN, & WES 

CONGRATULATIONS, HEATHER & GOOD LUCK IN DENTAL SCHOOL. LOVE, MOM & DAD 

CONGRATULATIONS, TROY, ON A JOB "WELL DONE"! ! I-LOVE, MOM & DAD 

TONY MOSS, WE LOVE YOU-MOM AND DAD 

MONICA WOYTUS-WE LOVE YOU AND ARE PROUD OF YOU--MOM & DAD 

STEFANIE- WISHING YOU MUCH SUCCESS AND HAPPINESS IN ALL YOUR ENDEAVORS! LOVE. MOM & 

DAD 

CONGRATULATIONS-MR. & MRS. WILLIAM HEIDER 

GOD BLESS, TOM QUINN, JR., WE ARE PROUD AND WE LOVE YOU! MOM, DAD, MIKE, MAURA, EILEEN, 

MATT 
ALICIA, CONGRATULATIONS, WE'RE SO PROUD, LUCK AND LOVE, MOM & DAD 

ALICL\, ALWAYS REMEMBER LOVE MOM 

CONGRATULATIONS-MR. & MRS. TULLIO lOANNUCCI 

BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1998 FROM THE STAFF OF THE COUNSELING CENTER 

CONGRATULATIONS TIERNEY MCNULTY AND THANKS FOR THE HARD WORK AND CHATS - SUSAN, AEP 

CONGRATULATIONS SEAN BEVAN AND THANKS FOR THE COMPUTER GLITCHES - SUSAN. AEP 

BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF '98 - FRANCINE LOTTIER 

CONGRATULATIONS FROM SUSAN BORKOWSKI 

CONGRATULATIONS FROM DAVID J. CICHOWICZ, PH.D. patrONS/ADS 235 




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Congratulations to the Class of 1998! Horizon 
House, a non-profit provider of services to the poor 
and disabled since 1 952, welcomes applications for 

employment from LaSalle University graduates. 



Telephone 324-3800 



ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 



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OFFICE HOURS: 
BY APPOINTMENT 



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PHILADELPHIA, PA 1 9141 



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THE JEFFERSON BUILDING 

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PHILADELPHIA, PA 19107 

FAX 215-923-5951 
TEL. 215-238-1099 BEEPER 215^19-1723 



8lUs 

Coffee Company 

Eugene A. Kestenbaun 

PRESIDENT/CEO 



Linda Pastor 

Employment Specialist 



PCCA 



Community 
Revitalization 
Consultants 



^yE)''^ Woods Services 



LaVarue M. Jones 

Executive Director 



PA 19137 



Langhorne, Pennsylvania 19047 
215/750-4247 Fax 215/750-4591 



Philadelphia Council For 

Community Advancement 

100 North 17th Street 

Suite 700 
Philadelphia, PA19103 

TEL. (215)567-7803 
FAX (215) 963-9941 



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Visit our web site at: www.erac.com 



I Enterprise 



236 



EXPLORER 



Congratulations 



LaSalle University 
Graduates 

from 

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For information on exciting career 
opportunities with Comcast 
Cellular, call our Job Hotline at 
1-800-655-9388 or visit us at http:// 
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C®j COIVICAST' 

Cellular Communications, Inc. 



The Wax Shop 

226 E. Lancaster Ave. 

Wayne, PA 1987 

687-8858 



HKCMG 



Hege Kramer Connell Murfhy & Goldkamp, P.C. 
Certified Public Accountants 

Harry W. Kramer 

Director 



North Point Office Center 
200 Gibraltar Road, Suite 315 
Horsham, PA 19044-2380 



Phone (215) 672-6404 
Fax (215) 672-6775 



I THE -J-" I (215)624-7575 



t>ai 



HOME 



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8301 ROOSEVELT BOULEVARD-PHILADELPHIA, PA 19152 



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Director of Marketing & Public Relations 
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1500 Lansdowne Avenue 

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RESTORATIONS 
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Manufacturers of 

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P.O. Box 445 
436 Stump Roaid 
Montgonneryville, PA 18936 
(215) 362-5100 Fax (215) 362-1022 

Over 1 Years of Service to Industry 



Compliments 
of 

UNIVERSITY 
PUBLISHING 

For All Your 
Publishing Needs 



Please 
Patronize 

Our 
Advertisers 



PATRONS/ADS 



237 



■K) 



(215)728-0847 
FAX (215) 725-3076 



Golden & Cowden 

Plumbing & Heating, Inc. 

1037 Stanwood Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19111 



FRANCIS X. GOLDEN, JR. 



A nurse 

is a rare 
combination 

...a scientist, 

in command of a 
complex body of knowledge, 
and an artist, 

whose work touches 
the human soul. 



On behalf of the 
Nursing Service 
Organization, 
we wish the 
Class of 1998 
good luck as they 
enter a new world 
of opportunities. 



Albert Einstein 
Healthcare Network 



[i<i!BgSi!l 



Genius in hcalthci 



ALBERT EINSTEIN 
MEDICAL CENTER 



MOSSREHAB WILLOWCREST 



BELMONT 
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH 



CERMANTOWN HOSPITAL AND 
COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES 



EXPLORER 



interested in addrtloHai 
copies of tliis yearboolc? 



Send requests for book purchases to 

La Salle University Explorer 

i^ox 6S9 

1900 W. OIney Avenue 

Philadelphia, FA 19I4M199 

or call: 

(ZW 95\'\m 




Colophon 



Volume 54 of the Explorer was printed by Taylor Publishing 
Company. Initial preparation and cover design were done at 
Taylor's main plant in Dallas, Texas, and final assembly was 
completed at Taylor's Chester County, Pennsylvania, plant. A 
total of 800 copies of this book were printed and available for 
distribution in May of 1998. The 1998 Explorer consists of 240 
pages of 100# enamel paper, including 32 pages printed in four- 
process color. The book is smyth-sewn with head and foot bands 
and the cover is Lexotone with Handtool Grain in Blue 452. 

The cover illustration of College Hall Tower and the illustration 
on page 240 were drawn by Jason Adamo '98. The cover 
drawing was set in Gold Foil. Endsheets are Rainbow Blue 
Parchment with an embossed die stamp of the University shield. 
The font for the cover, spine, and all divider pages was 
Copperplate Gothic Bold. All body copy was set in 1 1 -point Times 
New Roman and all captions were set in 10-point Times New 
Roman. 

Headline font for A Day in the Life of La Salle was Arial and 
sub-headlines were in Times New Roman. Dropped caps for the 
Academics Section were set in Casque Open Face, while story 
headlines were in Century Schoolbook. The names and activity 
information of graduating seniors was set in Arial. 

The Remembering La Salle section was printed as an 8-page 
gatefold, tipped in to the center of the book and printed on Tan 
Parchment. Banner font was Formal Script while all body copy 
and captions were Times New Roman. The article on page 128 A 
was reprinted from the September 20, 1972 issue of the 
Collegian. In order to duplicate the look of the 1972 paper, 
Lucida Sans was used for the Collegian banner and News Gothic 



was used for the story text. 

Headline font for Student Life was Subway. Primary headlines 
for Athletics were in Standout and secondary headlines were in 
Markerfelt Thin. Fonts for the Patrons/ Ads Section included 
Symbol. Century Gothic, Times New Roman. Bazooka, Jester, 
Bookman Old Style, Chaucer, Heather, Librarian, Garrett. Lucida 
Handwriting, Century Schoolbook, Copperplate Gothic Bold, 
Sherwood, and Markerfelt Thin. 

Spot colors used for A Day in the Life of La Salle were Super 
Blue 1 1 and Gold 80. Clocks were created in Adobe Illustrator 7.0 
and Adobe Photoshop 4.0. All La Salle University logos and 
shields were used courtesy of the Information Technology 
Department. 

All senior portraits in this book were taken by Carl Wolf Studio, 
Sharon Hill, Pennsylvania. Other color and black-and-white 
photographs were taken by Carl Wolf Studio photographers and 
members of the yearbook staff. 

All layouts for the 1998 Explorer were designed in Adobe 
PageMaker 6.0. Wherever possible, a version of the Associated 
Press Stylebook was consulted to maintain uniformit}' in the 
presentation of the printed word. 

The 1998 Explorer is an official publication of La Salle 
University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and reproduction of any 
portion of this book, either whole or in part, is prohibited without 
the written consent of the staff or the organization's faculty and/or 
Student Life advisors. 

Inquiries about this edition of the Explorer should be directed to 
the staff at La Salle University. Box 685. 1900 West Olney 
Avenue. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. 19141-1199. 



PATRONS/ADS 



239 



A Note From The Editor 



It has been said that if you try to please 
evei^'one, no one will be happy. It is my 
hope that if we pleased anyone this year, it 
is you, the members of the Class of 1998. 
for after all, this is your book, your year to 
celebrate, your year to remember for the rest 
of your life. 

We tried some new things this year; the 
■"Senior Sideline," A Day in the Life of La 
Salle, and e.xpanded coverage in both the 
Academics Section and Renieinbering La 
Salle. But all of this v\ould not have been 
possible without the work of the entire staff 
listed below; an editor couldn't have asked 
for a better staff than this. You all made the 
editing of this book easier than you could 
ever imagine. Two people to whom I am 
especially grateful are Lori Molinari and Joy 
Morris. While pursuing post-graduate work 
here at La Salle, Lori willingly gave of her 
time to edit the Academics Section and 
assist with copy editing, writing, and just 
about anything else. In addition to editing 
Student Life again, Joy worked over the 
summer to help get the book up and running 
with our new publisher. It's been much fun 
and I'm proud to have worked with both of 



CAN ^ 

D -7 . , 




you for two great years. 

I am also indebted to our 
publishing rep, Emmy Kachel, who 
always made time for us and brought 
experience, enthusiasm, and fresh 
ideas to the book. This was our first 
year with Emmy and Taylor 
Publishing, and I hope that it is a 
partnership which will continue for 



many more years. Thanks, Emmy, for your 
support and guidance. 

1 would also like to thank Louise Voluntad 
and Francine Lottier; two people to whom I 
am indebted for all of their help with 
photocopying, faxing, mailing, post-card 
making, money-collecting, and the list goes 
on. Our organization would not have run as 
smoothly as it did if it weren't for everything 
that both of you did for us. 

Thanks also to Kathy Schrader for all of he: 
support and assistance, and I thank our 
advisor, Dr. Dolores Lehr, for her patience an 
understanding in working with us to produce 
the book we wanted, while staying 
professional throughout the process. What 
would we have done without you. Dr. Lehr? 

I thank Laurie Shirley and Tim Esposito foi 
getting me involved in all of this, and I thank 
Dwight Homan for just being Dwight. 

And finally, I owe much thanks to the 
people of La Salle for giving us enough stuff 
to fill these 240 pages. 

Thanks for keeping life at the University 
lively, interesting, and fun.<' 

Andy Gwiazd 
February 199 



1 998 Explorer 
Editorial Staff: 

Editor-in-Chief: 

Andy "Mr. G." Gwiazda '9 

Associate Editors: 

Lori Molinari '97 
Joy Morris '00 

Photography Editor: 

Becky Thimm '99 

Business Manager: 

Michelle Dillin "99 

Academics Editor: 

Lori Molinari "97 

Class of 1998 Editor: 

Stephanie Hamilton '98 

Student Life Editors: 

Tracy Mann "00 
Joy Morris "00 

Athletics Editors: 

Jen DeBisschop "00 
Steph Rozak "00 



Greek Life Coordinator: 

Amy VanVessem '00 

Patrons/Ads Editor: 

Sara Chiappa '98 

Distribution Manager: 

John Elberson '99 

Editorial Staff Assistant: 

Heather Olson '98 

Captain: 

Bob McCormick '99 

Advisors: 

Dwight Homan 
Dr. Dolores Lehr, Ph.D. 

Cover Artist: 

Jason Adamo '98 

Writing Staff: 

Al Alven "00 

Theresa Argondezzi "98 

Mike Boyle '98 

Jenn Brewer '99 

Tim Browne '00 

Cory Christian '00 



Bob Delp '00 

Jill Evanko '00 

John Gonzalez '99 

Christine Gray '00 

Karen Heistand '00 

Brady Hicks '00 

Kevin Ibach '00 

Kim Kessler '00 

Chris Lilienthal '98 

Joanne McTamney '01 

Dennis Miguel '01 

Kimberly O'Brien '01 

Michael Oscar '98 

Krista Parson '01 

Carey Reed '00 

Jessica Riccio '00 

Lauren Roats '01 

Mike Rocco '99 

Jennifer Schmitt '98 

Steffan Schultz '99 

Drew Sharkey '00 

Patrick Sheridan '00 

Mark Shugsta '00 

Megan Thomas '00 

Eric Till '99 

April White '99 



Special Thanks To: 

Eric Augenstein '00 

Kathy Bagnell 

Bro. Joe Burke, F.S.C. 

1997-98 Co//e^/fl/i Staff 

Mike Durinzi & the entire 
staff at Carl Wolf Studio 

Asha Engledow '00 

Bro. Joe Grabenstein, F.S.C. 

Emmy Kachel & 
Taylor Publishing Company 

Dwight Homan 

Francine Lottier 

Kathy Schrader 

Louise Voluntad 

This yearbook has been 

brought to you by the letters 

G, P, D, and by 

the number 7. 

© 1998 La Salle University 



240 



EXPLO-