(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Exposé of the Communist Party of western Pennsylvania based upon testimony of Matthew Cvetic, undercover agent. Hearings"

rF 




t 



Given By 
17. S. SJTPT n 



3^ 



EXPOSE OF THE COMMUNIST PARTY OF. 
WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA— PART 2 (]] V 

BASED UPON TESTIMONY OF MATTHEW CVETIC 

(Undercover Agent) 



HEARINGS 



BEFORE THE 



pMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



EIGHTY-FIRST CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



APPENDIX 
INDEX 

MARCH 24, AND 25, 1950 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
63178 O WASHINGTON : 1950 



e>j>' 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMF 

SEP 19 1950 




COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Repbesentatives 

JOHN S. WOOD, Georgia, Chairman 
FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania RICHARD M. NIXON, California 

BURR P. HARRISON, Vireinia FRANCIS CASE, South Dakota 

JOHN McSWEENEY, Ohio HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois 

MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel 
Louis J. Russell, Senior Investigator 
John W. Carrington, Clerk of Committee 
Benjamin Mandel, Director of Research 
II 



CONTENTS 



March 24, 1950: Page 

Testimony of Matthew Cvetic , . ^ . . 2365 

March 25, 1950: 

Testimony of — 

Harrv A. Sherman 2369 

Matthew Cvetic 2372 

APPENDIX 

List of exhibits 2376 

Photographic reproductions of certain exhibits. 

Index I-XI 

III 



EXPOSE OF THE COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN 
PENNSYLVANIA— PART II, BASED UPON TESTIMONY 
OF MATTHEW CVETIC (UNDERCOVER AGENT) 



FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1950 

United States House of Representatives, 

Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington^ D. G . 

The committee met, pursuant to call, at 4 p. m. in room 226, Old 
House Office Building, Hon. Francis E. Walter presiding until arrival 
of Hon. John S. Wood (chairman). 

Committee members present: Representatives John S. Wood (ar- 
riving as noted), Francis E. Walter, Francis Case, Harold H. Velde, 
and Bernard W. Kearney (arriving as noted). 

Staff members present : Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel ; William 
Jackson Jones, investigator; John W. Carrington, clerk; and A. S. 
Poore, editor. 

Mr. Walter. Are you ready to proceed? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Cvetic, will you raise your right hand. You swear 
the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. CvETic. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MATTHEW CVETIC 

(The first portion of testimony of Matthew Cvetic on March 24, 
1950, concerns communism in Cambria County, Pa., and is printed 
under title, "Expose of the Communist Party of Western Pennsyl- 
vania," page 1345. 

Mr. Wood. General Kearney. 

Mr. Kearney. Mr. Cvetic, you have been on the stand now several 
days. Does this complete your testimony? Have you anything else 
to testify to regarding Communist activities? 

Mr. Cvetic. Mr. Kearney, I can't say "Yes" or "No" to that. Any 
time this committee would like to query me on any phase, I will be 
available. 

Mr. Kearney. I am referring particularly to your own file you 
brought here. 

Mr. Cvetic. I think so. This is a case where I was asked if I knew 
anything else about Cambria County. While there are many things 
in the files we probably could talk about or testify to, the investigators 
have gone over the files and we took out what we thought were the most 
important phases. 

2365 



2366 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr. Kearney. What I am getting at is whether or not every bit of 
evidence that you brought with you to this committee that is material 
to this investigation has been testified to by youi*self as a witness? 

Mr, CvETic. Mr. Kearney, I brought one file with me to this com- 
mittee which, since it has not been used in evidence, I asked that it be 
returned to me, but it has not been returned to me. It has been missing 
since I came down here. 

Mr. Kearney. There is a file that is missing? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. 

Mr, Kearney. Will you tell the committtee what that file was? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. It was a file which was contained in the docu- 
ments of the American Slav Congress, and it was a file of letters, corre- 
spondence, and contributions from Congressmen, Senators, and other 
political leaders to the American Slav Congress. 

Mr. Walter. Was that before the American Slav Congress was 
taken over by the Communists? 

Mr. Cvetic. I will say this, the file dated back to 1944 up to the 
present time. 

Mr. Walter. When did the Communists take over the American 
Slav Congress ? 

Mr. Cvetic. At the 1944 convention. We were instrumental in elect- 
ing George Pirinsky executive secretary, and were instrumental in 
getting party members in most of the key ]X)sitions in the American 
Slav Congress. 

Mr. Walter. Before that date the American Slav Congress was not 
Communist-dominated ? 

Mr. Cvetic. No. I think the first expose of the American Slav 
Congress came through this committee and through the Pittsburgh 
Press. I believe up until that time we were able to carry on the 
Communist Party line without the majority of the citizens being the 
Aviser. Wlien this committee held hearings and the Pittsburgh Press 
started attacking the American Slav Congress as Communist-domi- 
nated, people dropped out, 

Mr, Kearney. That file you refer to was brought to committee 
meetings by yourself? 

Mr. Cvetic. It was subpenaed and committee investigators brought 
it down here from Pittsburgh. 

Mr. Kearney. You saw the files at the time they were brought here ? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. 

Mr. Kearney. Was that file among them? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. It was headed "Congressmen and Senators' File" 
and also included correspondence from other political leaders. 

Mr. Kearney. Was it a large file? 

Mr. Cvetic. Quite a large file. 

Mr. Kearney. And that file cannot be found ? 

Mr. Cvetic. I have asked for it several times and asked that it be 
returned to me. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is the file we spoke about today in my con- 
ference with you? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And I believe shortly before you testified on March 
6 you went over all the documents that were brought here with Mr. 
Appell, and that document was not there at that time? 

Mr. Cvetic. That is right. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2367 

Mr. Kearney. Are any other documents missing ? 

Mr. CvETic. Not to the best of my knowledge. 

Mr. Kearney. Are any of your other files missing'^ 

Mr. C^^:TIC. Not to the best of my knowledge. 

Mr. Kearney. This so-called congressional file — is that what you 
called it? 

Mr. CvETic. Congressmen and Senators. I put the title on myself. 
That is the only one missing to my knowledge. 

Mr. Case. Is the title on the folder ? 

Mr. CvETic. Yes; and the title was in my own handwriting. 

Mr. Case. Was that included in the couple of suitcases you put on 
the table at the conclusion of your testimony one day? 

Mr. CvETic. Yes. 

Mr. Case. And after that day when the papers were scattered on the 
table, did you see it after that time? 

Mr. CvETic. Yes. I didn't pay too much attention to it. I didn't 
expect to use it in testimony here, but it was part of the whole group. 
When I was asked to remove the documents, I packed everything 
together. 

Mr. Case. That is, you packed everything together to bring it down 
here ? 

Mr. CvETic. Yes. 

Mr. Case. You didn't pack it together after you turned it over to 
the committee ? 

Mr. CvETic. No. 

Mr. Case. But you definitely did see this file after it was brought 
down here ? 

Mr. Cvetic, Yes. 

Mr. Walter. That wasn't the file that contained the names of 
clergymen, was it ? 

Mr. Cvetic. No. That was a separate file. 

Mr. Taat^nner. How long after you presented it here did you see 
it? 

Mr. Cvetic. I would say not over a week, when the papers were 
sitting over here on the table. 

Mr. Case. When did vou ask for it and find yourself unable to get 
it? 

Mr. Cvetic. AVhen we started going over the material I missed the 
file for the first time. I didn't say anything then, but later I asked 
about it and everybody said they had not seen such a file. Then I 
said I felt .sure I brought it here, and if they were not going to use 
the file, I would like that particular file returned to me. 

Mr. Velde. Will you tell the committee where you secured the file 
and a little more in detail what was in it? 

Mr. Cvf:tic. Yes. This file was a file which was kept by the Ameri- 
can Slav Congress of correspondence both from and to — I will use the 
term political leaders, since there were not only Congressmen and 
Senators in the file. Actually, there was even a photostated letter 
from the President of the United States in it. 

Mr. Velde. Any judges? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes ; and local State senators also. 

Mr. Case. You say the file contained a photostat of a letter from the 
President of the United States ? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. 



2368 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr. Case, The present President of the United States ? 

Mr. CvETic. From Franklin D. Roosevelt, in which he paid tribute 
to the American Slavs for their contribution to the war effort. 

Mr. Case. And that was prior to 1945? 

Mr. CvETic. I think so. He paid tribute to the American Slavs for 
their contribution to the war eirort. 

Mr, Wood. By and large the American Slavic people were loyal 
and did make a valuable contribution to the war effort. 

Mr. CvETic. That is right. They worked hard and bought bonds. 

Mr. Kearney. I don't think there is any question about that. 

Mr. Case. I think the testimony is that the American Slav Congress 
was encouraged as a means of developing the patriotism of the 
American Slavic people during the war, and subsequent-to that it was 
taken over by the Communists. 

Mr. Velde. Do you remember when the American Slav Congress 
was declared subversive by the Attorney General ? 

Mr. Wood. We can get that information. 

Mr. CvETic. The reason I remember the file quite well is that one of 
the last things I did before packing the file, I had six or seven photo- 
static copies of the letter from the President, and since I felt we only 
needed one, I destroyed the others. 

Mr. Case. W^hen you refer to the President you mean Mr. Roosevelt ? 

Mr. CvETic. Yes. I packed it with the other things. 

Mr. Tavenner. Attorney (xeneral Tom Clark, in letters to the 
Loyalty Review Board released June 1, 1948, and September 21, 1948, 
cited the American Slav Congress as subversive and Communist. 

Mr. Kearney. That was in 1948? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Velde. Were any of the letters in that file dated after that time ? 

Mr. CvETic. Yes ; some of them were. Without the file I could not 
testify as to which ones were, and I am not placing a question of 
loyalty on anyone, but I know some were later. 

Mr. Kearney. I would suggest a recess be taken in order that we 
may pursue this a little further. Maybe over the week end the file 
might come to light. 

Mr. Wood. I think that is a good suggestion, and the committee 
will stand in recess until 10 : 30 Monday morning. 

Before you go, I understand a copy of the President's letter is 
available. 

Mr. Tavenner. We may have it available from another source. We 
are looking for it at the present time. 

Mr. CvETic. Mr. Chairman, do you want me to be available Monday 
morning? I would like to return to Pittsburgh this evening and make 
myself available at the request of the committee. 

Mr. Wood. Would it suit you better to come Tuesday ? 

Mr. CvETic. I would Tike to rest a couple days. 

Mr. Kearney. Mr. Chairman, with reference to Tuesday 

(Conference between Mr. Wood and Mr. Kearney off the record.) 

Mr. Wood. The committee will stand in recess until Wednesday at 
10 : 30. 

(Thereupon, a recess was taken until Wednesday, March 29, 1950, at 
10:30a.m.)' 



' After flOHe of day's heariiiR, a decision was made bv the committee to reconvene on 
the following day, July 25, 1950. 



EXPOSE OF THE COMMUNIST PAETY OF WESTERN 
PENNSYLVANIA— PART II, BASED UPON TESTIMONY 
OF MATTHEW CVETIC (UNDERCOVER AGENT) 



SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1950 

United States House of Representatives, 

Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington^ B\ G . 

The committee met, pursuant to call, at 1 : 50 p. m. in room 226, 
Old House Office Building, Hon. John S. Wood (chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present : Representatives John S. Wood, Burr 
P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, Francis Case, Harold H. Velde, 
and Bernard W. Kearney. 

Staff membei-s present : Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel ; Louis J. 
Russell, senior investigator ; Donald T. Appell, Charles McKillips and 
William Jackson Jones, investigators; John W. Carrington, clerk; 
and A. S. Poore, editor. 

Mr. Wood. The committee will be in order, and let the record dis- 
close that there is a quorum present, consisting of Messrs. Harrison, 
Moulder, Case, Velde, Kearney, and AVood. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Sherman, will you come forward. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Sherman, will you please be sworn. Do you 
solemnly swear the evidence you give this committee shall be the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God t 

Mr. Sherman. I do. 

Mr. Wood. Have a seat. 

TESTIMONY OF HARRY A. SHERMAN 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state your full name, please? 

Mr. Sherman. Harry A. Sherman. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your occupation? 

Mr. Sherman. Attorney at law, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Sherman, were you here at the committee hear- 
ing room of this committee on February 18, 1950, when Mr. Matthew 
Cvetic appeared and was questioned by investigators of this com- 
mittee ? 

Mr. Sherman. The first day that Cvetic appeared, if that was 
February 18, on a Saturday morning, I was here with him at the 
opening of that investigation. There were three members of your 
staff of investigators present and the stenographer, Cvetic, Cvetic's 
son, and myself. 

Mr. Moulder. But the committee was not in session, nor was any 
member of the committee present ? 

2369 



2370 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr. Sherman. No; there was no member of the committee present, 
that is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. A question has arisen regardino; a file of papers 
relating to Members of the House and of the United States Senate 
which at one time was a part of the files of the American Slav 
(Congress. 

Mr. Wood. And other persons. 

Mr. Tavenner. And letters or papers relating to other prominent 
persons or public officials were also in that file. Do you have any 
knowledge of that file, and, if so, will you please state what you know 
about it from the very beginning? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes. As a matter of fact, in examining the volumi- 
nous papers that came into my possession in Pittsburgh with reference 
to the American Slav Congress, Civil Rights Congress, the Progressive 
Party, and other organizations, we found correspondence files and we 
also found meaningless papers. In order to reduce it to papers of 
testamentary value as exhibits in relation to Matt Cvetic's testimony 
before this committee, I discarded many of the files. 

That particular correspondence file had little, if any, probative value 
on the subject of communism. However, in order to take any political 
significance away from Matt Cvetic's authoritative testimony on the 
subject of communism in Pittsburgh, I personally deleted some of the 
correspondence file and put it in a manila letter-sized file, and at the 
top w^as written "Congressmen and Senators," although just as you 
have indicated in your question, it was not confined to Congressmen 
and Senators. There were some State officials and Congressmen and 
other persons in public life whose answers to correspondence that had 
been sent to them had been correlated in this single file so as to keep 
it away from the documents of the American Slav Congress so that 
in testifying there would be no possibility of confusion or political 
slurs on anybody. 

Mr. Wood. Will you please, for the purpose of the record, indicate 
why these matters came to your attention ? 

Mr. Sherman. Oh, yes. 

Mr. Wood. What is your relative position ? 

Mr. Sherman. I am Matt Cvetic's attorney, but I am also attorney 
for Americans Battling Communism, the organization to which Matt 
originally came for advice as to how to make public his knowledge, 
and in my capacity as attorney for Americans Battling Communism, 
as well as his personal attorney, as I became after my introduction to 
Mr. Cvetic, I reviewed the data he was going to use as the basis of his 
testimony, and in that way I came in possession of these papei-s and 
files. 

I might say it took many hours of reading and going through a lot 
of other papers to reduce it to what finally came into the committee's 
possession, or into Cvetic's possession for the purpose of testifying. 

Mr. Tavi':nnkr. What did you do with that file of papers? 

Mr. Sherman. That particular file, at the time that Matt was ready 
to leave Pittsburgh 

Mr. Wood. When you say "Matt" you mean Matthew Cvetic? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes. He was instructed by me, and followed my 
advice very carefully in order not to let the Connnunist organization 
or any friends have knowledge he was coming before this committee 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2371 

or pving up his room in the hotel. He kept everything in place so 
that in case he had visitors they would not know he was leaving. The 
instructions were that 1 hour before he left for the train, which was 
one block from the hotel, he was to call me, and I would take the 
bundles out of his room and he was to take his personal belongings, 
and we would go to the train. 

We followed that procedure. I packed the brief case. The sheaf 
of notes he was to use in his testimony, as to what the vast body of his 
testimony was to be, was reduced to voluminous notes which we had 
reviewed in private as attorney and client, and he made those notes 
separate and retyped them and got them ready for presentation. 
These notes consisted of papers an inch deep, of notes and other pa- 
pers. I put the file underneath these notes and put it in his brief 
case. 

Mr. Case. What file do you mean ? 

Mr. Sherman. The file I have been referring to, containing cor- 
respondence from and copies of letters to these public officials. 

I put that in Matt's brief case and he took it with him on the train. 

The next day, when he appeared here, Mr. Wheeler was sitting 
opposite me at the table, and Mr. Owens was questioning the witness 
at the time. 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Chairman, I don't like to interrupt, but could 
we expedite matters by bringing the file to the desk here? 

Mr. Sherman. That is exactly where I am. Just before opening the 
testimony, Mr. Cvetic pulled the entire batch of papers out of his brief 
case, and this file we referred to was at the bottom of the papers. I 
saw that. He testified from the top of this pile. 

Mr. Wood. What do you mean by testifying? There was no com- 
mittee meeting, just the investigators were there? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes; but the stenographer took notes on what he 
was going to testify to. He related his knowledge to the stenographer 
o!i questions from the investigators, and I noticed that file was still 
with his papers. At that time I asked Mr. Wheeler, who was not doing 
any questioning, I noticed the headings of the various subject matters 
that were still back in my files 

Mr. Tavenner. That is, back in your files in Pittsburgh? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes; and I slipped a note to Mr. Wheeler asking: 

Do yon think the eonimittee would be Interested in files of the American Slav 
Congress, Civil Rights Congress, Progressive Party, radio sustaining program 
files, canceled checks, and so forth? 

Mr. Wheeler called me out of the room and we talked about it, and 
I told him I, as a lawyer, believed that materials would be definitely 
admissible with the witness on the stand and tying it in with the Com- 
munist Party. He talked it over with Courtney Owens in a recess, and 
they prepared a subpena and arranged to meet me the next day, Sun- 
day in Pittsburgh. 

I met Mr. Wheeler and Jackson Jones at the airport in Pittsburgh 
the next day, Sunday, and took them to my office, where we went over 
all the material I had previously reviewed. We put all that in two suit- 
cases, and it filled the two suitcases. Then I took them back to the 
airport. In fact, they canceled one reservation because it took so long 
to go over the material; and I made a com])lete list of what they had, 
and this file was not among the papers at any time. 



2372 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr. Tavenner. So that this file was never among the papers pro- 
duced in response to the subpena duces tecum ? 

Mr. Sherman. Never; never. I reviewed that with Mr. Cvetic this 
morning, and I explained it to him, because I had been the one who 
had turned those papers over to the committee ; he wasn't even in Pitts- 
burgh ; and I packed the suitcases. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that file at any time turned over to any member 
of the staff of this committee ? 

Mr. Sherman. No, it wasn't ; but there is one thing I noticed, and I 
perhaps should have called his attention to it. In a noon recess T 
noticed Matt left his papers in the room here. No member of the com- 
mittee had yet been in the room here, and he left his papers loosely 
while we went to lunch. 

Mr. Wood. Have you seen that file since that time? 

Mr. Sherman. That was the only time I was in the committee room 
in connection with this testimony, and I haven't seen Matt's papers 
since that time. 

Mr. Moulder. Did you see him pick up the folder, or the alleged 
missing file, and put it in his brief case? 

Mr. Sherman. No. That file was on top of his brief case on a chair 
when we went to lunch. In fact, he was going to lean it up against 
the wall, and somebody suggested he put it on a chair. 

Mr. Moulder. When you came back from lunch, was it still there? 

Mr. Sherman. I paid no further attention to it. I took a plane back 
early in the afternoon, and he was still testifying. Actually, he never 
turned any papers over. He thought I had turned it over with the 
other papers, and apparently he was not aware himself that the file 
had not been there with all our other records. 

Mr. Case. The last time you saw this file in question was when it 
was with his notes on his brief case when he went out to lunch ? 

Mr. Sherman. Yes ; on a chair in this room. We came back and the 
files were still there, but what was there, I didn't observe. It didn't 
occur to me anything was missing, and I don't know that anything 
was missing at that time. 

Mr. Wood. Any further questions? 
(No response.) 

Mr. Wood. We certainly thank you veiy much for giving us this 
information, and hope it didn't cause you too much personal incon- 
venience to come down here. 

Mr. Sherman. In view of what this committee is doing for the 
country, any inconvenience would be very little to contribute to its 
efforts, believe me. 

Mr. Wood. Thank you. 

The committee will stand at recess subject to call. 

Just a moment, gentlemen. The committee will reconvene and call 
Mr. Cvetic. 

Mr. Cvetic, you have already been sworn before this committee. 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes; I have. 

TESTIMONY OF MATTHEW CVETIC 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Cvetic, you have heard the testimony of Mr. 
Sherman here to the effect that this file was placed in your brief case 
before you left Pittsburgh ? 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2373 

Mr. CvETic. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And was not among the papers which the com- 
mittee subpenaed? 

Mr. CvETic. Yes. I would say this, that I do know the papers did 
reach here. I could have been mistaken when I testified they came 
down with the other papers, but I know I did have them here and with 
me; but I could have been mistaken when I testified they came down 
with the others, because when I left Pittsburgh I was just one step 
ahead. At 5 o'clock I heard my name on the radio, and Harry packed 
my brief case, and I had it here. 

iVs Mr. Sherman testified, I just would lay my brief case with the 
papers around, and actually didn't miss the file for a week or so, be- 
cause I didn't pay any attention to it because I felt I was not going 
to use it in the testimony anyway. 

Mr. Case. Wlien was the last time you remember seeing the file '( 

Mr. CveVic. Probably 5 or 6 days after I came here. 

Mr. Wood. Do you mean that you saw it after the day that you 
talked to investigators here in Mr. Sherman's presence, or was that the 
last time you recall seeing it ? 

Mr. CvETic. That may have been the last time I saw it, but I do 
remember having the file here with me. 

Mr. Case. Do you remember having seen it the first day you testified 
here? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. 

Mr. Case. And you remember it was with material in your brief 
case ? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. I remember now I brought some papers with me, 
and the only mistake I made in testifying, I was under the impression 
all the papers were considered, whether I brought them or they were 
subpenaed. 

Mr. Case. Mr. Sherman did pack the brief case for you the day you 
left Pittsburgh ? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. We were pretty concerned about these papers be- 
cause of the nature of them. 

Mr. Kearney. You did testify positively yesterday, did you not, 
that the last time you saw that particular folder was the day that 
you first testified before the investigators here? 

Mr. CvEiTC. I testified that it seemed to me I may have seen it 5 or 6 
days later, but when I say this, I couldn't even be sure of that, because 1 
didn't pay any attention to the file missing until 2 or H weeks, then I 
asked Mr. Russell, told him I had lost this hie 

Mr. Kearney. Mr. Chairman, what I am getting at, if I understood 
the response of the witness to my question yesterday, the last time he 
saw it was the day he first appeared here, and when he came back 
from lunch if had disappeared. 

Mr. Cvetjc. I would say with absolute sureness that the last time 
I have positive knowledge of seeing it was the first day I talked to the 
investigators. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether or not you at any time gave 
that report to any investigator of this committee ? 

Mr. CvTiTic. Not to the best of my know ledge. I know it was never 
officially offered in evidence or anything like that. 

Mr. Wood. Did you consider that particular file was material to 
the testimony you were giving? 



2374 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr. CvETic. No. I thought it was not material. That is the reason 
1 didn't even consider offering it. 

Mr. Moulder. In order to keep the testimony in sequence, you heard 
Mr. Sherman's testimony about leaving your files and papers on your 
brief case when you left to go to lunch. Is it probable, or in your 
opinion was the file you missed in that stack? 
Mr. CvETic. Very probable. 

Mr. Moulder. When you returned you resumed your conversation 
with the investigators? 
Mr. CvETic. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. And when you left after completing the giving of 
your answers to the questions of the investigator, did you pack all of 
your papers up and put them in the brief case that you were carrying? 
Mr. Cvetic. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. And then you left the committee hearing^room with 
the brief case ? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes. By that time I was so engrossed with my testi- 
mony I didn't pay much attention to what I had. 
Mr. Moulder. But you did pack up all your papers? 
Mr. Cvetic. Yes ; to the best of my knowledge. 
Mr. Moulder. And then you left the committee room ? 
Mr. Cvetic. Yes, 

Mr. Moulder. After that, at any time have you ever lost a brief 
case ? 

Mr. Cvetic. I did several weeks after that. 
Mr. Moulder. You lost a brief case ? 
Mr. Cvetic. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. With papei-s in it ? 
Mr. Cvetic. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. And of course you don't know what was in the brief 
case? 

Mr. Cvetic. I know what was in the brief case. This particular 
file, I missed it before leaving here. I spoke to Mr. Russell and told 
him I had lost this particular file, and he told me he would search and 
try to find it. So I do know I lost the file before I left here and 
before I lost the brief case. 

Mr. Case. Do you know you lost that particular folder prior to 
having lost your brief case? 

Mr. Cvetic. Yes; I do know that, because I had spoken to Mr. 
Kussell about it, and the committee did cooperate in trying to find 
the file, if I had lost it here. 

Mr. Case. But since your first appearance before the committee you 
have lost a brief case ? 
Mr. Cvetic. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. With voluminous files in it? 
Mr. Cvetic. Papers; not files, just papers. 

Mr. Kearney. Did you miss any other files besides this file or 
folder you referred to yesterday ? 

Mr. Cvetic. No. This was the only one I missed. After I got my 
bearings I started missing the file, because while I knew it was not 
])ertinent to this particular investigation, there were letters in it I 
thought I wanted to keep in my own possession, and I was worried 
about losing them, that is all, and I tried to find them. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2375 

Mr. Wood. In order to clarify the record I want to ask you this 
l)ointed, categorical question : Since the day that you appeared here in 
this room with the investigators at a time when the committee was not 
in session, at which time you have testified you remember having this 
particular folder and leaving it here when you went to lunch, have you 
any independent knowledge now that you have ever seen that file since 
that day? 

Mr. CvETic. I can't testify that 1 absolutely did, no. 

Mr. Wood. Any further questions, gentlemen ? 

(No response.) 

Mr. Wood. Thank you, Mr. Cvetic. 

The committee stands adjourned subject to call. 

(Thereupon, an adjournment was taken as above noted.) 



APPENDIX 



The exhibits listed below were introduced into the record during the 
testimony of Matthew Cvetic on March 13 and 14, 1950. 

In the course of the testimony, the witness was interrogated regard- 
ing individuals mentioned in various exhibits who were known to him 
to be members of the Communist Party. Many individuals whose 
names were mentioned in these same exhibits were not known to be 
members of the Communist Party or affiliated therewith. 

Where this situation exists, the exhibit is not printed as a part of 
this appendix but is retained in the files of the committee. There are 
other exhibits considered too lengthy to justify printing in this report, 
and for this reason they likewise are being retained in the committee 
files. ^ 

1. For a Lasting Peace, For a People's Democracy! (Copy retained in c-oui- 
niittee files, see p. 1269. ) 

For a Lasting Peace, For a People's Democracy ! originally published at Bel- 
grade and now published at Bucharest, Rumania, is the official weekly organ 
of the information bureau of the Communist and Workers Parties. The infor- 
mation bureau of the Communist and Workers Parties, also known as the 
Cominform, is the lineal successor of the (^ommunist International, which was 
allegedly dissolved according to a public announcement on May 22, 194.3, during 
World War II when Russia was our ally. The Cominform was established secretly 
in September 1947, in Poland. After the defection of Marshal Tito, of Yugoslavia, 
the headquarters of the Cominform were changed from Belgrade to Bucharest. 

For a Lasting Peace, For a People's Democracy! is a successor to the Inter- 
national Press Correspondence published by the Communist International. Both 
organs, sold at Communist headquarters and book shops, have been required 
reading for all American Communists in order to keep party members fully 
abreast of the current international Communist line. 

2. Labor Youth League document entitled "Draft Principles." (See pp. 1277 
and 2386-2388.) 

3. Labor Youth League document entitled "Program of Action of the Kom- 
somol." (See pp. 1277 and 2389-2395.) 

4. Labor Youth League document entitled "Building the Labor Youth League, 
a Guide for Club Membership Directors." (See pp. 1278 and 2396-2402.) 

5. Labor Youth League, receipt showing the sale of stamps to the United 
Ellectrical, Radio, and Machine Workers of America, Local 623, 401 Federal 
Street, Pittsburgh 12, Pa., dated February 24, 1950. (Retained in committee 
flies, see p. 1278.) 

6. Labor Youth I^eague, throw-away announcing membership meeting, district 
conference of Labor Youth League of western Pennsylvania, signed by I^illy Lewis 
aa organization secretary. ( See pp. 1279 and 2403.) 

7. Labor Youth League, speech made by Lilly I.^wis at membership meeting, 
district conference of Labor Youth League of western Pennsylvania. (See pp. 
1279 and 2404-2409.) 

8. Labor Youth League, minutes of meeting held on Februarv 12, 19.'>0. (See 
pp. 1279 and 2410-2412.) 

9. I-abor Youth League, first issue of Challenge, oflScial publication of Labor 
Youth League, dated March 19.50. (See pp. 1280 and 2412-2413.) 

10. Labor Youth League, membership breakdown of Labor Youth League as of 
December .5, 1949, prepared by the national organizing conference of the Labor 
Youth League, 799 Broadway, New York 3, N. V. (See pp. 1281 and 2414.) 

11. Labor Youth League, undated statement showing membership figures. 
(See pp. 1282 and 2415.) 

2376 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2377 

12. Labor Youth League document prepared by the national organizing con- 
ference of the Labor Youth League as of December 5, 1949, which is a financial 
statement of its $50,000 organizing fund drive. (See pp. 1283 and 2416.) 

13. Labor Youth League, letter dated February 4, 1950, relating to Negro His- 
tory Week celebration during the week of February 12, 1950. (See pp. 1283 and 
2417-2418.) 

14. Labor Youth League, mimeographed outline entitled "How to Run a Model 
Meeting Around Negro History Week." (See pp. 1284 and 2420-2424.) 

15. Labor Youth League, memorandum entitled "Struggle for the Rights of 
the Negro People." ( See pp. 1285 and 2425-2430. ) 

16. Labor Youth League, memorandum dated February 6, 1950, from the na- 
tional office of the Labor Youth League to all State labor youth league organiza- 
tions on books and pamphlets. ( See pp. 1285 and 2431.) 

17. Labor Youth League, Manifesto and Resolution of the Second Congress of 
the World Federation oi Democratic Youth, Budapest, Hungary, September 2-8, 
1949. ( See pp. 1285 and 2432-2438. ) 

18. Labor Youth League, ballots siwnsored by the Western Pennsylvania 
Youth Committee for Peace for the selection of a delegate to the Second Congress 
of the World Federation of Democratic Youth, which show the contestants for 
selection of delegate. ( See pp. 1286 and 2439. ) 

19. Labor Youth League, checkbook on the Peoples First National Bank & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., account No. 1771, of Harold Orzick. (Retained in 
committee files. See p. 1287. ) 

20. Labor Youth League, brown stenographic notebook contained in files of 
Labor Youth League. (Retained in committee files. See pp. 1288-1289.) 

21. Labor Youth League, green stenographic notebook contained in files of 
Labor Youth League. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1289.) 

22. Labor Youth League, list of names and addresses of members in western 
Pennsylvania. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1289.) 

23. Labor Youth League, mimeographed form reflecting that Helen Kompus, 
510 North Negley Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., offered accommodations for one New 
York Labor Youth League member who was sent to Pittsburgh during the miners' 
strike. ( See pp. 1290 and 2440. ) 

24-1. Labor Youth League, subscription blank and receipt for Challenge. (See 
p. 2441.) 

24-2. Communist Party of western Pennsylvania, ticket for event, commemora- 
tion Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, Friday, February 17, 1950, 8 p. m., 
at A. Leo Weil School, speaker, Pettis Perry. (See p. 2441.) 

24-3. Labor Youth League, membership card showing blanks for payment rec- 
ord of dues with attachment of stickers to indicate payment. (See pp. 2442- 
2443.) 

24-4. Jefferson School of Social Science, undated leaflet, Youth Night — Tues- 
day. (Faces p. 2444.) 

24-5. Labor Youth League of Pittsburgh, western Pennsylvania, undated leaf- 
let announcing a membership meeting of the district conference of Labor Youth 
League of Pittsburgh, western Pennsylvania, on Sunday, February 12, noon 
till 5 p. m., at 943 Liberty Avenue. ( Faces p. 2444. ) 

24-6. Labor Youth Leagi;e, memo dated February 6, 1950, to all State Labor 
Youth League organizations from the national office, regarding list of books and 
pamphlets in connection with Negro History Week. (Faces p. 2444.) 

24-7. Masses and Mainstream, November 1948. (Retained in committee files.) 
24-8. New Century Publishers, Marxist Pamphlets, No. 3, United Front Against 
Fascism, by George Dimitroff, sixth edition, 1937. (Retained in committee files.) 
24-9. Political Affairs, August 1948. (Retained in committee files.) 
24-10. Political Affairs, December 1948. (Retained in committee files.) 
24-11. Labor Youth League, leaflet, A Message to Every Charter Member, let- 
ter inside, January 11, 1950. (Retained in committee files.) 

24-12. National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, leaflet. 
Let's Epd Jim Crow Now, November 1949. (Retained in committee files.) 
24-13. Political Affairs, January 1949. (Retained in committee files.) 
24-14. Political Affairs, July 1949. (Retained in committee files.) 
24-15. Political Affairs, August 1948. (Retained in committee files.) 
24-16. Young Progressives of America, leaflet. Now — Right Now. (Retained 
in committee files.) 

25. Civil Rights Congress, letter, dated April 24, 1948, containing names of 
l»ublicity committee members. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1291.) 

26. Civil Rights Congress, telegram sent to Senator Alexander Wiley, chair- 
m'an. Senate Judiciary Committee, dated May 28, 1948, from Pittsburgh Civil 

63178 O — 50 — pt. 2 2 



2378 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Rights Congress, signed by Thomas Quinn, chairman, and Miriam B. Schultz, 
acting secretary. (See pp. 1292 and 2444.) 

27. Civil Rights Congress, petition, dated May 28, 1948, containing about 50 
signatures, sent to Senator Alexander Wiley, chairman. Senate Judiciary Com- 
mittee. (See pp. 1292 and 2445.) 

28. Civil Rights Congress, four petitions against the passage of the Mundt- 
Ni-\on bill which were circulated by the Civil Rights Congress in Pittsburgh. 
(See pp. 1293 and 2446-2449.) 

29. Civil Rights Congress, notice of telegram campaign in behalf of the 12 
indicted Communist leaders sent to Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress by Civil 
Rights Congress, room 1613, 205 East Forty-second Street, New York 17, N. Y. 
(Retained in committee files. See pp. 1295 and 1296.) 

30. Civil Rights Congress, press release from national office dated November 4, 
1948. ( See pp. 1296 and 2450-2452. ) 

31. Civil Rights Congress, reproduction of newspaper clipping containing list 
of signers from ranks of labor organizations urging dismissal of conspiracy 
indictment of the 12 Communist leaders. (See pp. 1296 and facing p. 2452.) 

32. Civil Rights Congress, document entitled "Tentative Slate of Officers for 
Nominations Committee." (See pp. 1296 and 2453.) 

33. Civil Rights Congress, copy of letter addressed to William Albertson, secre- 
tary of the (.'omnuinist Party of western Pennsylvania, dated September 25, 

1948. ( See pp. 1297 and 2454. ) 

34. Civil Rights Congress document entitled "Expenses on Meeting" showing 
expense and contributions in regard to meeting on May 27, 1948. (Retained in 
committee files. See p. 1298.) 

35. Civil Rights Congress, form letter dated September 20, 1948, over the 
signatures of Thomas Quinn, chairman, and Theresa Turner, executive secretary, 
Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress, sent as appeal for defense funds for the 12 
indicted Communist leaders. (See pp. 1299 and 2455.) 

36. Civil Rights Congress, form letter dated September 28, 1948, over the 
signatures of Thomas Quinn, chairman, and Theresa Turner, executive secre- 
tary, Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress. ( See pp. 1300 and 2456. ) 

37. Civil Rights Congress, set of resolutions adopted at Civil Rights Congress 
conference held on October 16, 1948. ( See pp. 1301 and 2457-2462.) 

38. Civil Rights Congress, document entitled "Suggestions for Speakers — 
Preparation for Civil Rights Conference — October 16, 1948." (See pp. 1301 and 
2463-2470.) 

39. Civil Right Congress, statement entitled "The First Line of Defense" ap- 
pearing in the Worker, Sunday, August 29. 1948, issue, sixtnsored by W. E. B. 
Du Bois, New York City: Roscoe C. Dunjee, Oklahoma City; Charles P. How- 
ard, Des Moines; and Paul Robeson, New York City. (Retained in committee 
files. See p. 1302. ) 

40. Civil Rights Congress, letter dated November 23, 1948, signed, William L. 
Patterson. (See pp. 1303 and 2471.) 

41. Civil Rights Congress, list of contributions mailed in after conference of 
Octol>er 16, 1948. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1303.) 

42. Civil Rights Congress, letter from Charles A. Doyle, trade-union director, 
Civil Rights Congress, 205 East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y., addressed 
to Theresa Turner, Post Office box 44, Pittsburgh, Pa., dated December 21. 1948. 
(See pp. 1304 and 2472.) 

43. Civil Rights Congress, copies of reports on money collected for defense 
fund for the 12 Communist leaders. (Retained in committee files. See pp. 1304 
and 1305. ) 

44. Civil Rights Congress, report dated January 12, 1949, by William L. Pat- 
terson, national executive secretary. Civil Rights Congress. (See pp. 1308 and 
2473.) 

45. Civil Rights Congress, minutes of an executive meeting held on April 20, 

1949. (Retained in committee files. See pp. 1308 and 1309. ) 

46. Civil Rights Congress, document entitled "Emergency Legislative Bulle- 
tin." (See PI >. 1309 and 2474-2475.) 

47. Civil Rights Congress, telegram signed "Cadden" dated at New York, 
June 9, 1948, addressed to Miriam Schultz, 1527 Alabama Avenue, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. (Retained in committee files. See pp. 1309 and 1310.) 

48. Civil Rights Congress, form letter dated January 15, 1948, issued by Civil 
Rights Congress of western Pennsylvania relative to showing of film Native 
Land. (Retained in committee flies. See p. 1310.) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2379 

49. Civil Rights Congress, list of persons who were to furnish transportation 
to a meeting featuring Mrs. Paul Robeson on October 28, 1940. (Retained in 
committee files. See p. 1310.) 

50. Civil Rights Congress, form letter for the holding of a meeting on Septem- 
ber 27, on the back of which is a partial list of sponsors. (Retained in com- 
mittee files. See p. 1311.) 

51. Civil Rights Congress, copy of a letter signed "Daughter DoUie Allen, secre- 
tary, Elks Rest," dated January 29, 1949, .showing list of local sponsoring com- 
mittee on margin. ( See pp. 1312 and 2476. ) 

52-1. Civil Rights Congress, leaflet. It's Time To Call a Halt. (See p. 2477.) 

52-2. Civil Rights Congress of New Jersey, flyer. Defend Your Civil Liber- 
ties. (Seep. 2478.) 

52-3. Mimeographed hand bill. Attend Open Hearing on Civil Liberties, Thurs- 
day, May 27, 1948, 8 : 15 in the evening. ( See p. 2479. ) 

52-4. Civil Rights Congress, letter, September 11, 1948, to Leon Goldsmith. 
(See p. 2480.) 

52-5. Gus Hall Defense Committee, Civil Rights Congress of Ohio, freedom 
bond, $5. (See p. 2481.) 

52--6. Civil Rights Congress, organizational committee. Draft Proposals for 
Plan of Work. (See pp. 2482-2483.) 

52-7. Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress, letter (mimeographed), dated Sep- 
tember 14, 1918, signed, Thomas Quinn, chairman. (See p. 2484.) 

52-8. Civil Rights Congress, financial audit made by Bernard Ades, certified 
public accountant, dated November 5, 1948. (See pp. 2485-2489.) 

52-9. Civil Rights Congress of western Pennsylvania, carbon copy of letter 
dated November 20, 1948, to William L. Patterson, CRC. (See p. 2490.) 

52-10. Civil Rights Congress, leaflet for legislative conference, January 17 
and 18, 1949, Washington, D. C. (Pp. 1 and 4 onlv reproduced for record. See 
pp. 2491 and 2492.) 

52-11. Civil Rights Congress of western Pennsylvania, emergency legislative 
bulletin, Senate Hearings Start on Mundt-Ferguson-Nixon Bill (S. 1194), dated 
May 3, 1949. (P. 1 reproduced for record. See p. 2493.) 

52-12. Civil Rights Congress, fl'yer, Welcome to Oakland, Paul Robeson, issued 
by East Bay Civil Rights Congress, Oakland, Calif. ( See p. 2494.) 

52-13. Civil Rights Congress, fllyer, Killed by a Cop Because He Was a Negro. 
(See p. 2495.) 

52-14. Civil Rights Congress, flyer. President Truman Talks About Civil 
Rights — But, issued by East Bay Civil Rights Congress, Oakland, Calif. (See 
p. 2496. ) 

52-15. American Committee for the Protection of Foreign Born, call and pro- 
gram, fifteenth anniversary national conference. Congress Hotel, Chicago, 111., 
Saturday and Sunday, December 11 and 12. 1948. (Pp. 1 and 5, onlv, reproduced. 
See pp. 2497 and 2498. 

52-16. Civil Rights Congress, letter to all chapter leaders, signed Leon Gold- 
smith, national director, dated September 30, 1948, on letterhead. (See p. 2499.) 

52-17. Civil Rights Congress of Ohio, flyer. Freedom Pledge, mimeographed. 
(See p. 2500.) 

52-18. Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress, mimeographed letter dated September 
20, 1948, addressed "Dear Friends," signed by Thomas Quinn, chairman, and 
Theresa Turner, executive secretary. (See p. 2501.) 

52-19. Congress of American Women, mimeographed memorandum, signed 
Stella B. Allen, executive secretary. (See pp. 2502-2505.) 

52-20. Civil Rights Congress, Los Angeles, Calif., mimeographed letter ad- 
dressed "Dear Friends," signed Anne Shore, executive secretary, dated October 
26, 1948. (See p. 2506.) 

52-21. Civil Rights Congress of Ohio, card announcing speech of Gerhart 
Eisler, Sunday, November 7 (no year given). (See p. 2507.) 

52-22. Civil Rights Congress of Ohio, flyer announcing speech of Gerhart Eisler 
on Sunday, November 7 ( no year given ) . ( See p. 2508. ) 

52-23. Civil Rights Congress, handbill announcing Wisconsin Civil Rights 
Congress rally at which Gilbert Green and Harold Christoffel are listed as 
speakers on Friday, October 8 ( no year given) . ( See p. 2509.) 

52-24. Harold Christoffel Defense Committee, leaflet on the case of Harold 
Christoffel and an appeal for funds. (See pp. 2510-2513.) 

52-25. Civil Rights Congress, letterhead, October 13, 1948; mimeographed 
form letter signed, William Haber. (See p. 2514.) 



2380 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

52-26. Massachusetts Chapter, Civil Rights Congress, letterhead, October 28, 
1948 ; mimeographed form letter signed by Majes Marino, field organizer. United 
Electrical Workers, CIO, and Paul R. Emerson, I^cal 218, United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, AFL. (See p. 2515.) 

52-27. Civil Rights Congress, 187 North La Salle Street, Chicago 1, 111., flyer, 
soliciting members and also funds for defense of the 12 indicted Communists. 
(See pp. 2516 and 2517.) 

52-28. East Bay Civil Rights Congress, Oakland, Calif., handbill defending 
the 12 indicted Communists. (See p. 2518.) 

52-29. Student division of the Civil Rights Congress, Los Angeles, handbill in 
defense of the indicted 12 Communists and "L. A. 14." (See p. 2519.) 

52-30. Civil Rights Congress, handbill headlined "The Case of 12 Americans 
on Trial Defending Your Freedom." ( See pp. 2520 and 2521.) 

52-31. Civil Rights Congress, New York City, handbill "The Trial of the 12 
Apostles." (Seep. 2522.) 

52-32. New York Civil Rights Congress, handbill "12 Men Face Trial Today- • 
Why?" (Seep. 2523.) 

52-33. Civil Rights Congress, letterhead dated March 8, 1949 ; letter addressed 
to Miss Theresa Turner, Civil Rights Congress, Pittsburgh, Pa., signed by William 
L. Patterson. Bill in the amount of $6.10 for one copy of brief on Trenton case, 
sent by Civil Rights Congress to Miss Theresa Turner, Civil Rights Congress, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. (See pp. 2524 and 2525.) 

52-34. Leaflet advertising the film Native Land to be performed on Thursday, 
February 12, at Carnegie Lecture Hall, Pittsburgh, with handwritten notes written 
on reverse side. ( See pp. 2526 and 2527. ) 

52-35. Civil Rights Congress, letterhead dated September 13, 1948; letter 
addressed to Miss Theresa Turner, Pittsburgh, Pa., signed by William L. Patter- 
son. (See pp. 2528-2530.) 

52-36. Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress, mimeographed list of "Money Col- 
lected for Defense Fund and Other from October 16 to January 31." (See pp. 
2531 and 2532.) 

52-37. Civil Rights Congress, Pittsburgh Chapter, letterhead ; mimeographed 
letter dated January 15, 1948, signed by Thomas Quinn, chairman and Mrs. 
Jack Sartisky, committee chairman. (See p. 2533.) 

52-38, Civil Rights Congress, letter dated May 4, 1948, to Miss Miriam Schultz, 
1527 Alabama Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., and signed William Lawrence. (See p. 
2534.) 

52-39. Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress, carbon copy of letter dated May 15. 
1948, addressed to Ferdinand Smith, secretary, National Maritime Union. (See 
p. 2535.) 

52-40. National Non-Partisan Delegation to Washington, Wednesday, June 2, 
for passage of civil rights legislation, mimeographed list of sponsors. (See p. 
2536.) 

52-41. Civil Rights Congress, mimeographed "Memorandum on Organization 
of CRC Chapters." ( See pp. 2537 and 2538. ) 

52-42. Civil Rights Congress, mimeographed letter dated October 14, 1948, 
addressed to "All Chapters" and signed by William L. Patterson. (See p. 2539.) 

52-43. Civil Rights Congress, form letter dated October 29, 1948, .signed by 
William L. Patterson, national executive secretary, enclosing open letter to 
President Truman. (See pp. 2540-2542.) 

52-44. Civil Rights Congress, certificate of $12 contribution to defense of 
indicted leaders of Communist Party. ( See p. 2543. ) 

52-45. Civil Rights Congress, letter dated November 10, 1948, signed by Len 
Goldsmith, national director. (See p. 2544.) 

52-46. Civil Rights Congress, letter dat^d October 22, 1948, addressed to 
Theresa Turner, Pittsburgh, Pa., signed by William L. Patterson, national execu- 
tive secretary. (See pp. 2545 and 2546.) 

52-47. Civil Rights Congress, letter dated November 22, 1948, addressed to 
Mi.ss Theresa Turner, Pittsburgh, Pa., signed by William L. Patterson, national 
executive secretary. (See p. 2547.) 

52-48. Civil Rights Congress, mimeographed form letter dated October 8, 1948, 
signed by William L. Patterson, national executive secretary. (See p. 2548.) 

52-49. Civil Rights Congress, letter dated September 21, 1948, addressed to 
There.sa Turner, Pittsburgh CRC, signed by Felix Kusman. (See p. 2549.) 

53. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, letter dated June 14, 1948. addre.s.sed 
"Dear George," and signed "Gerald Schalflander, executive director." (See 
pp. 1317 and 255(^2551.) 

54. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, memorandum dated Noven)ber 23, 1949, 
from Zalmon H. Garfield, State director. (See pp. 1317 and 2552.) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2381 

55. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, piiotograph taken at swimming party 
held at Highland Park, Pittsburgh, which was organized by the Young Pro- 
gressives. (Retained in committee iiles. Seep. 1318.) 

56. Progressive Partv of Pennsylvania, four petitions. (Retained in com- 
mittee files. See pp. 1318 and 1319. ) 

57. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, list entitled "Progressive Party Ticket 
Sellers." ( Retained in committee files. See pp. 1319 and 1320. ) 

58. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, 10 sheets containing record of ticket 
sales. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1320.) 

59. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, mailing list as of May 3, 1949. (One 
page reproduced, see p. 2553. Rest of exhibit retained in committee files. See pp. 
1320 and 1321.) 

60. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, letter dated May 12, 1948, with typed 
signee, George S. Wuchinich. ( See pp. 1321 and 2554-2556.) 

61. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, minutes of meeting held on November 
29, 1949. ( See pp. 1322, 2557, and 2558. ) 

62. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, list entitled "Participants in the Meet- 
ing, Veterans Committee of Western Pennsylvania Against Mundt-Nixon Bill." 
(Retained in committee files. See pp. 1322 and 1323.) 

63-1. Letter to Mr. Wuchinich, dated May 28, 1948, signed Henry A. Wallace. 
(See p. 2559.) 

63-2. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, letter to Mr. George S. Wuchinich, 
executive secretary, American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, 1005 
Berger Building, Pittsburgh 19, Pa., from the Frederick Clinton Co., Inc., 
Advertising, 545 Fifth Avenue, New York 17, regarding arrangements for radio 
advertising time for Progressive Party, dated September 27, 1948, signed by 
Sydney Rubin, radio director. ( See p. 2560. ) 

63-3. Progressive Party of Penn.sylvania, typed list, undated, entitled "Returns 
From Slav Contribution Lists," two pages. (Retained in committee flies. See 
p. 1323.) 

63-4. Progressive Party of Penn.sylvania, carbon copy of "Minutes of Executive 
Committee Meeting — June 5, 1948," of "Progressive Party of Pennsylvania. 6 
South Fourth Street, Harrisburg." (Retained in committee files. See p. 1323.) 

63-5. Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, carbon copy of memo to Donald 
Henderson, Abraham Caesar, John (Jillespie, Joseph Ruccio, Tom Fitzpatrick, 
and George Wuchinich from the Progressive Party of Pennsylvania, 6 South 
Fourth Street, Harrisburg, Pa., from J. W. Gitt, chairman, undated. (Retained 
in committee files. See p. 1323.) 

64. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, file marked "Clergy 
and Professionals Committee." (Retaii\ed in committee files. See p. 1323.) 

()5. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, document entitled "Sum- 
mary Raffle Distribution." (Retained in committee files. See pp. 1325 and 1326.) 

66. American Slav Congress of Westein Pennsylvania, list of persons who had 
tickets for a garden party held by American Slav Congress. (Retained in com- 
mittee files. Seep. 1327.) 

67. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, marked for identification 
only. (Retained in committee files. See pp. 1328 and 1329.) 

68. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, list of names headed 
"Pittsburgh Delegates." (Retained in committee files. See pp. 1329 and 1330.) 

69. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, list headed "Delegates, 
contributors, and officers of organizations to whom invitations have been sent to 
form an American Slav Congress Committee of Turtle Creek Valley." (Marked 
for identification only ; retained in committee files. See p. 1331.) 

70. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, list of names appearing 
on stationery of Croatian Central Council, Pittsburgh, Pa. (See pp. 1332 and 
2561.) 

71. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, statement of names of 
persons elected to western Pennsylvania committee at quarterly meeting. May 25, 

1947, of American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania. (See pp. 1332 and 
2.562.) 

72. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, document entitled "List 
of City Committee." (See pp. 1333 and 2563.) 

73. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, credentials for tenth 
anniversary conference held at F'ort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa., Sunday, Jime 13, 

1948. (See pp. 1333 and 2564-2577.) 

74. American Slav Congress of Western Penn.sylvania, list of ticket sellers for 
a raffle in February 1949. (Retained in committee files. See pp. 1334 and 1335.) 

75. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, partial records on raffle 
held in February 1949. (See pp. 1335 and 2578.) 



2382 COMlklUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

76. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, list headed, "District 
Committee Western Pennsylvania, National Council of Americans of Croatian 
Descent," dated October 4, 1947. ( See pp. 1335 and 2579.) 

77. Ainerican Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, record of raffle books 
for which Mary Matlesko was responsible in connection with raffle in February 
1949. ( Retained in committee files. See pp. 1335 and 1336. ) 

78. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, mimeographed list 
entitled "Newly Elected Officers, American Slav Congress Western Pennsylvania 
Conference, Sunday, June 13, 1948, Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa." (See 
pp. 1336 and 2579-2582.) 

79. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania, checkbook on Potter Title 
S'. Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., covering the period from November 19, 1947, to 
May 13, 1948, inclusive, in account with American Slav Congress of Western 
Pennsylvania. (Retained in committee files. See pp. 1337 and 1338. ) 

79-1. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co. ) , No. 6, in the amount of $764.05, dated December 8, 1947, payable to the 
Council on African Affairs, signed "Matthew Cvetic, vice president and Anne 
L^sny, treasurer." (See p. 2583.) 

79-2. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co.) No. 7, in the amount of $350.00, dated December 8, 1947, payable 
to W. Colston Leigh, Inc., signed "Matthew Cvetic, vice president and Anne I-iesny, 
treasurer." (See p. 2584.) 

80-3. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 16, dated August 1, 1944, in the amount of $100, 
payable to Michael Hanusiak, signed "Michael Sulovsky, treasurer," counter- 
signed "Milo D. Mamula." (See p. 2585.) 

80-4. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 21, dated March 13, 1948, in the amount of $250, 
payable to Stefan Kozakevich, signed "Matthew Cvetic, vice president, Anne 
Lesny, treasurer." (See p. 2586.) 

80-5. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. ) No. 22, dated March 13, 1948, in the amount of $75, 
payable to Leo Krzycki, signed "Matthew Cvetic, vice president, Anne Lesny, 
treasurer." (See p. 2587.) 

80-12. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check ( Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 154, dated November 10, 1944, in the amount of 
$32.45, payable to Pauline R. Jacobs, signed "Michael Sulovsky, treasurer," 
countersigned "John Sobczak." (See p. 2588.) 

80-14. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 157, dated November 18, 1944, in the amount of 
$18.55, payable to Anton Cipcic, signed "Michael Sulov.sky, treasurer," counter- 
signed "John Sobczak." (See p. 2589.) 

80-15. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 159, dated November 17, 1944, in the amount 
of $28.50, payable to Nena Hichenko, signed "Michael Sulovsky, treasurer," coun- 
tersigned "John Sobczak." (See p. 2590.) 

80-16. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 160, dated November 25, 1944, in the amount 
of $28.50, payable to Nena Hichenko, signed "Michael Sulovsky, treasurer," coun- 
tersigned "John Sobczak." (See p. 2591.) 

80-17. American Slav Congriess of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 206, dated April 12, 1946, in the amount of 
$55, payable to Daisy Lolich, signed "Michael Sulovsky," countersigned "John 
Sobczak." (See p. 2592.) 

80-19. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 222, dated December 30, 1946. in the amount of 
$69.85. payable to Narodne Noviny. signed "Michael Sulovsky." (See p. 2593.) 

80-20. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 234, in the amount of $285.13. dated February 
25, 1947, payable to Matthew Cvetic, signed "Michael Sulovsky." (See p. 2594.) 

80-21. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 2.38, in the amount of $33, dated March 4, 1947, 
l)a.vable to Barbara Witkovich, signed "Anne Lesny. treasurer." (See p. 2595.) 

80-23. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsvlvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 248, in the amount of $25, dated March 4, 1947, 
payable to Klenore Seidenberg, signed "Anne Lesny, treasurer." (See p. 2596.) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2383 

80-24. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh. Pa.) No. 251, in the amount of $40, dated March 10, 1947, 
payable to Michael Thatch, signed "Anne Lesny, treasurer." (See p. 2597.) 

80-25. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 252, in the amount of $23.03, dated March 10, 
1947, payable to Elenore Seidenberg, signed "Anne Lesny, treas." ( See p. 2598.) 

80-26. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 264, in the amount of $30.52, dated March 27, 
1947, payable to Rose M. Gerkovich, signed "Anne Lesny, treas." (See p. 2599.) 

80-29. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check ( Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pitt.sburgh, Pa.) No. 806. in the amount of $30.52, dated May 27, 1947, 
payable to Elenore Seidenberg, signed "Anne Lesny, treas." (See p. 2600.) 

80-30. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 400, in the amount of $7.50, dated September 19, 
1947, payable to Esther Bliss, signed "Anne Lesny, treas." (See p. 2601.) 

80-31. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 420, in the amount of $21.22, dated October 17, 
1947, payable to Elenore II. Seidenberg, signed "Anne Lesny, treas." (See p. 
2602.) 

80-32. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 423, in the amount of $90.78, dated October 17, 
1947, payable to William S. Gailmor, signed "Anne Lesney, treas." (See p. 2603.) 

80-33. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 441, in the amount of $777.40, dated November 8, 

1947, payable to Progressive Citizens of America, signed "Anne Lesny, treas." 
( See p. 2604. ) 

80-34. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 450, in the amount of $247.97, dated November 
24, 1947, payable to Progressive Citizens of America, signed "Anne Lesny, treas." 
( See p. 2605. ) 

80-35. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check ( Potter Title & 
Trust Co., Pittsburgh. Pa.) No. 475, in the amount of $174.80, dated December 
22, 1947, payable to American Slav Congress of Western Penna., signed "Anne 
Lesny, treas." (See p. 2606.) 

80-37. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 495, in the amount of $100, dated January 
24, 1948, payable to Joseph Myerson, treasurer, Pennsylvania Progressive Com- 
mittee for Wallace, signed "Anne Lesny, treasurer." (See p. 2607.) 

80-38. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 497, in tlie amount of $10, dated January 24, 

1948, payable to Morning Freiheit. signed "Anne Lesny, treasurer." ( See p. 
2608.) 

80-39. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 529, in the amount of $44.50, dated March 2, 
1&48, payable to Florence Mandell, signed "Anne Lesny, treasurer." ( See p. 
2609.) 

80-40. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. ) No. 564, in the amount of $6, dated April 15, 1948, 
payable to New Republic, signed "Anne Lesny, treasurer." (See p. 2610.) 

80-41. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 631, in the amount of $17.50, dated June 22, 
1948, payable to Albert E. Kahn, signed "Matthew Cvetlc, treasurer." (See p. 
2611.) 

80-42. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 632, in the amount of $20, dated June 24, 1948, 
payable to Paul Matanic, signed "Matthew. Cvetic, treasurer." (See p. 2612.) 

80-43. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 634, in the amount of $27.82, dated June 2.5, 
194S, payable to Vera Brook, signed "Matthew Oetic, treasurer." (See p. 2613.) 

80-44. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 657, in the amount of $12.24, date<^i July 28, 
1948, payable to Bess Steinberg, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treasurer." (See n. 
2614. ) 

80-45. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 664, in the amount of $1.41, dated July 31 
1948, payable to Milo D. Mamula, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treasurer." ( See n 
2615.) 



2384 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

80-46. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 654, In the amount of $67, dated July 19, 1948, 
payable to George S. Wuchlnich, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treasurer." (See 
p. 2616.) 

80-47. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Tltllo 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 667, in the amount of $2.40, dated August 3, 
1948, payable to USSR Information Bulletin, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treasurer." 
(Seep. 2817.) 

80-48. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 727, In the amount of $25, dated November 9. 
1948, payable to Milo D. Mamula, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treasurer." (See 
p. 2618.) 

80-49. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 678, in the amount of $2, dated August 23, 

1948, payable to Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy, signed "Matthew 
Cvetic, treasurer." (See p. 2619.) 

80-50. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 743, in the amount of $40.42, dated December 
14, 1948, payable to Helen Migallch, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treasurer." (See 
p. 2620.) 

80-51. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 773, in the amount of $25, dated January 29, 

1949, payable to Milo D. Mamula, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treasurer." (See 
p. 2621.) 

80-52. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 775, in the amount of $5, dated January 31, 
1949, payable to Johannes Steel World Reports, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treas- 
urer." (Seep. 2622.) 

80-53. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 817, in the amount of $20, dated February 16, 
1949, payable to Michael Hanusiak, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treasurer." (See 
p. 2623.) 

80-54. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check (Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 819, in the amount of $500, dated February 16, 
1949, payable to Philip Vukelich, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treasurer." (See 

2624.) 

80-55. American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania check ( Potter Title 
& Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.) No. 824, in the amount of $2.40, dated February 
17, 1949, payable to USSR Information Bulletin, signed "Matthew Cvetic, treas- 
urer." (Seep. 2625.) 

80-62. Slav Congress of America check (First National Bank at Pittsburgh) 
No. 16, dated March 16, 1942. in tlie amount of $100, payable to Anthony Minerich, 
signed by Stephen Zeman, Jr., secretary, Vinko Vuk, treasurer, countersigned 
Blair F. Gunther, president. (See p. 2626.) 

80-6(3. Slav Congress of America clieck (First National Bank at Pittsburgh) 
No. 47, dated May 2, 1942, in the amount of $19, payable to Steve Dedler, signed 
by Stephen Zeman, Jr.. secretary, Vinko Vuk, treasurer, countersigned Blair F. 
Guntlier, president. (See p. 2627.) 

80-07. American Slav Congress (p. 1 of this exhibit), printed petition form to 
send George S. Wuchlnich (photo) as delegate to American Continental Congress 
for World Peace in Mexico City, Mexico, September 5-10, 1949. (See p. 2628.) 

(P. 2 of exhibit), form letter from American Slav Congress of Western Penn- 
sylvania, dated August 4, 1949, signed by Josepli Rudiak, chairman, addressed 
"Dear Friends," regarding petition described above. (Retained in committee 
files. ) 

(P. 3 of exhibit), envelopes from 1005 Berger Building, Pittsburgh, Pa., (Re- 
tained in committee files.) 

(P. 4 of exhibit), business reply envelope addressed to American Slav Congress 
of Western Pennsylvania, 1(K)5 Berger Building, Pittsburgh, I'a. (Retained in 
committee files.) 

80-^8. Slav Congress of America letter dated December 22, 1941, to Vinko Vuk, 
treasurer, from Stephen Zeman, Jr., executive secretary. (See p. 2629.) • 

80-69. Letter, "Dear Matt," dated Friday night, September 15, from Georgr. 
(See p. 2630.) 

80-70. American Slav Congress, mimeographed list headed "15>42-Disburse- 
ments"; "Disbursements of the American Slav Congress — 1941." (Retained in 
committee files.) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2385 

80-71. American Slav Congress, mimeographed list dated June 20, 1942, "Those 
Whom Helped to Finance the American Slav Congress through the Pittsburgh, 
Pa., Office." (Retained in committee flies.) 

80-72. Letter dated June .3. 1944, from Julius J. Strba. attorney and counselor 
at law, 1301 Berger Building, Pittsburgh, Pa., addressed to Mr. Michael Sulovsky, 
care of the National News, 518 Court Place, Pittsburgh, Pa., regarding accounting 
of Strba's stewardship as treasurer of the Western Pennsylvania Conference of 
the American Slav Congress. (See p. 2631.) 

81. Congress of American Women membership list. (Retained in committee 
files.) 



2386 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 2 (Pagel) 

DRA?T ?RII!CI?LSS 

(The Later Youth League) worts for a peaceful, secure, and happy life for 
every yovm^ jsraerican — uorker, student, veteran, farmer. 

It eduoRtes ycuth in a spirit of devotion to the vorking people. It tasea 
i^B pw-givsm vn tha proposition that the needs and desires of the j'outh are bound 
up insepera'bl/ nith the immediate and fundamental interests of the vorking class. 
J\, is-'Cgriaes tb^ vrorklrig class as the source of progress in the modern V70rld, 
13 t\w ilt^fennt^r of the democratic traditions of our country, as the force 
cni''"o:.e of e.sguring lasting peace. Therefore, it stimulates interest in, and 
sv'irl;' ol. Ifcrxism. and educates youth in the principles of Scientific Socialism — 
th:-. 'bifccfE-ilight and historic goal of the working class. 

fThi Lahor Youth League) at all times promotes the cooperation and \uiity of 
Aneij.oan youth, Negro and white, to improve their daily lives and advance their 
diiPoratic aspirations. It organizes young people irrespective of sex, color, 
national origin, or religious belief. It strives to enrich their lives, build 
their characters, train them for leadership — promoting both study and action, 
providing culturad., soc^al^ and sport activities. 

(The Labor Yputh League) standi against the big business tycoons whose 

sj'-stem exists bj/; V;ar and human miseiy. It opposes Uiall Street's preparations 

1 1 
for a third Tvorld w6r. tit ojiposes reaction's drive to fascism. It opposes all 

efforts to militarize iifaerica'S' young people and to poison their minds. It 
combats every form of chauvinism, war raongering, vdiite supremacy, religious 
bigotry, anti-Semitism, labor-baiting, and anti-Coramuiiism. 

(The Labor Youth League) strives for friendship bet\;een the U.S.A. and the 
U.3.3.H. as the cornerstone of lasting peace. It also biiilds fellowship and 
solidarity with the democratic youth of all nations, united in tlieir determina- 
tion for peacft, and in their hatred for imperialism and colonial oppression. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENISTSYLVANIA 2387 

CvETio Exhibit 2 (Page 2) 

[The Iiabor Youth League) calls on youth to defend, support, and liuild the 
trade tiniona. It calls for a vigorour defense of the economic rights and interests 
of norking youth, threatened tj mounting unemployment and developing economic 
crisis. It opposes every kind of special exploitation of young workers, whether 
tlirough wage discrimination, speed-up, or child lahor. 

(The Lator Youth League) works for the forging of unbreakable solidarity 
jetveen Uegro and white youth, in the conviction that this unity is indispensable 
co the fight for peace and to every struggle and advance of America's working 
people. It combats every aspect of tl\e national oppression of the Megro people, 
and fights for the full eqxiality of Negro youth in every phase of iimerican life. 

(nie Labor Youth League) strives for the democratization and expansion of 
education, opposing the concerted efforts of reaction fvirther to limit educa- 
tional opportunity and corrupt its content. It works for the health and recrea- 
tion needs of young Americans. 

(The Labor Youth League ) defends the Constitution and Bill of Bights against 
every enemy of democracy. It rallies young people to defend and extend the 
democratic gains achieved in the rich history of our countr:/, throu^ the glorious 
struggles of iimerica's common people. It inspires youth to love o\ir country. (The 
Labor Youth League ) instills young people xiith faith in the ijnerica vjhich can and 
will become a land of free and equal people, a land of Socialism. It creates 
confidence in a future free of man's exploitation of man~a future v.ithout wars, 
./ithout want, without racial and national oppression. (The Labor Youth League) 
believes that through the conviction and unity of the overwhelming majority of 
its workers and common people, .jnerica will become a country which offers its 
youth limitless opportunity for creative work, education, and happiness. 

In all of its endeavors, (The Labor Youth League) holds high the tradition 
of young iimerioans of past generations \A\o were never found wanting in time of 
Tiais. It honors the heroes and heroines who are the symbols of youth's service 



I 



2388 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 2 (Page 3) 
to the cause of progress and to the people: Nathan Hale and 
Crispus Attucks of the War of Independence: the young rebel slave 
Gabriel and the sons of John Brown; Hariy Simms, Joe York, James 
Ashford, and Dave Doran, Young communists who gave their lives 
organizing ypuiig workers and fighting fascism in the forefront of 
the great democratic youth movement of the '30 's; Dorie Miller, 
Colin Kelly, Meyer Levin, Herman Boettcher and eveiy young 
American whose blood was joined with that of the young heroes of 
other nations in the anti-Axis war. 

This, our heritage, is our inspiration, (The Labor Youth 
League) procjiaims its confidence that young Americans of today 
will not be found wanting in humanity's cause of peace and freedom. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PE'NNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 3 ( Page 1 ) 



2389 



D 




o 



THAT BECAME THE 



PROGPxAMc FACTION 



OF THE 



r^ 



^y 



an article by. N.NIKOLAYEV 



CthE address 07 J. V. 
8 T A, L I H TO THE Bth 
COHGRESS OF THE 
YOUNG C Ivi M U K I S T 
tEAGUE OF THE SOVIET 
UNION. 



Issued tyi 

E DUCAT I Oil DEPARTIEIIT 
N.Y. aRGiU-nZDIG COUilTTEE 
for a U3CK YOUTH LEAGUE 
799 Broad; /ay, K.Y» 3, N«Y# 



2390 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 3 (Page 2) 

Is ky IMe ttw tonat praaa darotad safoh «9«M V> «• tttUk *aetT«rMry of 
J.T. tt«lla*a «ddrM« %e thi 8th CengrMi o/ w» iMAitt Y«MBC OeMNnitt U»ei« of the 

•OTi«* VBiOD» 

ToC^tter «1^ Vlndlmlr L«bla» Stalin took part in fo«)dte( «to UmmboI. 
D«««lapiag Md oonor«tlilnc Ualn's iinoMv^ <A the «R)Mf 9it «M OiMimil <t Touth 
Uague. frUlla elaborated the IMologloal aaft orgeLnlxAVfeoiatk QHOaipUa of the 
KoaaaMol. Ha gare a elear deflBltlon dC His tcainbol, «f M« »Im» «Od m1« in the 
Soriat atata aa one of the prl&eipal "levers" of the dlcftatortnip o^ tha proletar- 
iat, aa the aid of th« fitflaltoTlk ftirty in the ediaaatlcn of ail liana of yoMg people 
aad ehlldraa in thd aplrit <tf Cannunlam. 

Aloa« With l0Qia*a speaoh at the 9rd Congress of the Toong CeaBOdist Laapia of 
tha Soviet thion, Stalin's address to the 8th Congress of the Leapia baeana a pro- 
graa of aation fair the tonacmol and pre-datermined its future deTelopaant and 
aetlTity. 

siiniQ Of ta era coigass 

Tha 8th Congress of the YCUIT was held Ifeiy 5-lS, 1928. That was on the ere of 
a period faaous in the history of the USSSj the period of the Stalin FiTe-Yaar Plans, 
in whieh th« OSSR, thanks to the inflexible will of the Party and the unparalleled 
heroiaa of the SoTiet people, took the great atrldes that tranaforaod it froB a 
haekaard ap^rian oountry into a leading iadaatrial power. 

Qoderlyiag the irork of the 8th Congreas of the loasoaol ware the decisions of 
the 16th Party Coagresa (Deoember 1927). whioh laid down the dirootlTes for the 
drawing up of the first Fire Year Plan. They oalled for an acceleration of tha paoe 
of tha oountry' s industrialication and for the fullest dsTelopment of colleotiTiia- 
tion in agrioulture. 

Ouidod b/ tha direetivas of tha Party, the 8%h Congress disousaad the quastiona 
relating to the direct participation of the youth in the dOTelopment of the national 
eooaony. Tha Congress drew up a oonorete program of work for the KomaoBol to aid 
in tha realisation of the Pirat Pire-Year Plan. 

It adopted a nwfcber of iin&ortaBft deolsiona oCt ttie education of young workera 
and paaaants, and on the training of oadraa. It t>e«ame imperative for all lentaaol 
organiaationa to intensify thair poliileal, oaltwral and edaaational aotlTitiea 
among the youth, to conduct a resolute struggle against alien-olass inflnenoas, 
against the surTivals of tho past. At the 8th Congress, the KonaoOol was prasestod 
the Order of the Red Banner in reoognition of its aonbat serricas an the fronts of 
the Civil H&r. 

Stalin carefully followed the proceedings of the Congreaa and gaided its work. 
At the concluding session, Stalin addressed the delegates. The leader of the Soviet 
people gave a profound analysis of the specific situation prevailing in that period, 
and defined the tasks of the Bolshevik Party and of tha K^oaol in light of that 
situation. 

Ihat ware tha apooifie faatnrea of the situation then, and the nature of tha 
taakst 



^ COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2391 

CvETic Exhibit 3 (Page 3) 
- 2 - 

COMPIACENCY — DANGER TO SOCIA.USM 

By dint of its stubborn struggle against foreign military intervention and the 
Whiteguard counter-revolution, the Soviet Union won the right and the condition for 
peaceful construction. The fact that the Soviet people for several years had been 
engaged in constructive labor was an immenBe achievement. 

But peaceful conditions had given rise to feelings of security and complacency 
among a certain ssction of the Soviet people, loading functionaries included. 
The lattor imagined that since the Soviut people had succeeded in defeating the 
combined forces of 14 imperialist states in the Civil War, their advance towards 
Socialism would proceed automatically and smoothly, without any complications, with-- 
out the resistance of tho class enemy to the policy of tho Party, Complacency 
furnished a fertile soil for the theory of "spontaneity," a theory most harmful to 
the cause of Socialism. 

Stalin gave a profound and striking analysis of the harm and danger emanating 
from these sentiments. "Such sentiments," he said, "obscure tho vision of the 
working class, prevent it from divining its enemies, lull its vigilance with boast- 
ful speeches about the weakness of our enemies, and weaken its fighting prepared- 
ness." Stalin warned against the harm of the self -consoling notion that the fact 
that millions of advanced Soviet people ure unitjd in the Party, tho Komsomol and 
in the trade unions, is alone sufficient to socuro final victory over the enemios. 

"History shows," emphasized Stalin, ""that the biggest armies perished as a 
result of conceit, as a result of over-estimation of their own strength, under- 
estimation of the strength of the enemies; because they lapsed into slumber, lost 
their fighting preparedness and at tho critical moment were caught unaware. Tho big- 
gest party may be caut^ht unawares, tho biggest party may perish, if it fails to take 
into account the lessons of history, if it fails to forgo day by day the fighting 
preparedness of its class." 

CONSTANT VIGILANCE NECESSARY 

Stalin cited examples from the Civil War, when numerically small detachments 
defeated the large, but unorganised military formations of the White Guards and 
foreign interventionists. Stalin further shov/ed that the class enemies in our 
country were not yet completely dostroyod, that they still existed; moreover, that 
they not merely existed, but vtoro growing and attempting to act against the Soviet 
Government. 

This was evident from the difficulties attending the grain purchasing campaign 
in the autumn and winter of 1927-1928, when the kulaks tried to sabotage tte policy 
of the Soviets in an effort to starvu the working class and stifle Socialist in- 
dustry. Convincing proof that tho class enemy had intensified his activities were 
furnished by certain developments in the field of domestic and foreign policy. 

At tho very moment v/hen the Komsomol Congress was in session^ all the USSR 
oontral newspapers published the indictment of the counter-rovolutionary organiza- 
tion of engineers and tochnicians in tho coal mining industry (Shakhty District of 
tho Donbas), Encouraged by tho support of the avowed enemies of the people, the 
Bukharinites, the kulaks tried to starve the working class and undermine the in- 
dustry of the USSR. Acting on the instructions of imperialist states and former 
Russian mine owners, the Shakhty oonsplrators organized sabotage in the Socialist in- 
dustry in an effort to prepare the ground for the restoration of the past. 



2392 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 3 (Page 4) 

- 3 - 

The difficulties attending the grain purchasing campaign, together with the 
"Shakhty Case," stirred up all the Soviet organizations. It provided an added re- 
minder that the class oncmios v;oro still alive and active, and that it was nocessa-y 
to mobilize against them the forcos of the working clans, its vigilance and revolu- 
tionary ardour. Pointing to all these facts, Stuliu stressed that the task of 
increased vigilance must not be rogardod as a temporary, transient task. Day by day 
it is necessary, declared tho leader of the Party, to "raise the preparedness of 
t he working class against its class enemies." 

The immense inportance of this task was fully borne out by subsequent develop- 
ments. Acceleration of tho country's industrialization and collectivization of 
agriculture brought about a sharp intensification in tho class struggle. The liqui- 
dation of the kulaks as a class, on tho basis of the solid collectivization of 
agriculture, was accomplished by bitter clashes with the enemy. 

K0MS0M3L AIDS PARTY'S VICTORIOUS EFFORTS 

During the period of the severe class battle, the Komsomol did not stay aside 
from tho struggle. Responding to the appeal of the Party, it extended the political 
education of the youth, and sent hundreds of thousands of its best members to the 
decisive sectors of the class battle and labor front. Tho Komsomol members, the 
youth everywhere, were among the builders of the largest factories and cities, the 
organisers of the collective farms and tractor drivers, the coal hewers in the mines, 
And they were among the representatives authorised by the Party to expropriate 
the kulaks. 

The Party emerged victorious from these battles. It achieved the complete 
liquidation of all tho exploiting classes in the USSR, primarily because it was un- 
swervingly guided by Stalin's directives on the necessity of vigilance, of system- 
atic efforts to strengthen the fighting preparedness of tho working class. That is 
why, unlike tho people in other countries, the Soviet people wore not caught un- 
prepared by the sudden attack of Hitler Germany. 

Their successes in the Patriotic War, in the salvation of many peoples of the 
world from fascist slavery, and the loading role of the USSR in tho democratic 
camp, do not give tho Soviet people the right to relax, to rest on their laurels. 
Tho necessity to aocolorato the pecoeful building of Communism, the fi^t for peace 
and the exposure of tho instigators of a now war — all these prompt the Soviet 
people — connnunists and Komsomol members in tho first plaoo — to strengthen tho 
might of the Socialist stato, to bo vigilant. 

BUREAUCRACY, "A BITIER EMEMY." 

The second task formulated by Stalin at tho 8th Concress was tho fight against 
bureaucracy, tho need for tho utmost development of criticism and self-criticism, 
and the organisation of control from below. 

Stalin showed that burcauomoy is a bitter enemy, a great handicap in the 
advanooment towards Socialism. Moreover, it was no longer a question of the old 
tsarist officials but of new bureaucrats who, while pf>.ying lip service to the 
Soviet system, wore pursuing illegitimate practices; of a bureaucracy which some- 
timoo, as Stalin said, "exists in all our organisations j in tho Party, as well as 
In the Komsomol, in tho trade unions and in tho economic organisations." A bureau- 
crat of this. typo is the most dangerous bureaucrat because he disguises his bureau- 
cracy by membership in the Party, by membership in the Komsomol. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2393 

CvETic Exhibit 3 (Page 5) 



In order to do away with these negative faots, to strike a blow at bureaucracy, 
it was necessary, said Stalin, "to rouse the fury of the Party rank-and-file againt,. 
the corrupt elements and chock them out," 

Strict enforcoment of democracy in the Komsomol, the organisation of control 
from below, the utmost development of criticism and self-criticism are the measures 
necessary for fighting against bureaucratic ossification in the Komsomol. 

SIGNIFICANCE OF CONTROL BY Ai© CRITICISM OF RANK-AND-FILE 

Stalin dv/elt at length on the significance of control on the part of the rank- 
and-file, on the significance of criticism from below. Stalin criticized the 
erroneous notion that only executives possess ojcporience in construction, and that 
the plain Soviet people lack experience in governing the state. Stalin advised 
listening to the people, taking into account thoir remarks and consulting rank-and- 
file citizens. 

"Day by day," said Stalin, "the millions of rank-and-file workers, who are 
building our industry, are accaiiulating tremendous experience in construction. 
Mass criticism from the ranks and control by the rank-and-file are necessary to us, 
incidentally, in order that this exporienoo of millions of people should not be 
wasted, and that it should bo taken into account and umbodiod into practice," 

In the contemporary interaational labor movement of today, the abnormal situa- 
tion in the Communist Party of Yugoslavia is a case in point. Forgotfulness of 
criticism and self-criticism, the aloofness of the leaders from the masses, their 
contempt for the experience of the masses, and the lack of oontrol by the rank-and- 
file of the Party over the activities of the leadership, explain the departure from 
the principles of democracy in the Communist Party of Yugoslavia, the persecution 
of sincere democrats, and degeneration of the Tito clique into a gang of assassins 
and traitors. 



KOtSOtCL OROAMIZ.ES YOUTH IN STRUGGLE 

Following the directives of Stalin, the YCLSU hr.s done much to assist the Party 
in its struggle against bureaucracy, in furthering criticism and self-criticism, in 
the organisation of oontrol from below. 

The Komsomol formed numerous groups and detachments of its best members, known 
as "light cavalry," which helped the Party to expose bureaucratic practices and to 
conduct a ruthless fight against red tape in the state institutions, against in- 
attentiveness tov/ards people. . Fulfilling the directives of the Party, the Komsomol 
organisations brou^t to light shortcomings in the work of offices, factories and 
individuals and recommended to the corresponding authoritios measures for the 
elimination of these shortcomings. By concrete practical examples, the Kcmsomol 
taught the youth to approach their work in the light of the interests of the state, 
and mobiliiod them against the buroauoratlo officials. 

TRAINING TORKING-CUSS INTELLIGENTSIA 

I 
Of equal importance for the work of the YCLSU is and will be the third task 
formulated by Stalin at the 8th Congress; that of taking an aotivo part in the 
training of oadres for the Socialist national economy and culture, of assisting 
the youth in acquiring knowledge. 

.63178 0— 50— pt. 2- 



2394 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 3 (Page 6) 

- 5 - 

Twenty voars ago. this ^a a particularly burning problem in the land of the 
Soviets, which was Just beginning the complete reconstruction of national economy. 
The task before the Soviet poople was that of con^leting the country's induatrial- 
iiation and developing large-aoale collective farming. This made the problem of 
skilled labor for industry and agriculture extremely urgent. But the number of 
skilled specialists available at that time was very insignificant, especially in 
the villages. 

In order to advance matters, it was neoossory to aooelerate the training of 
those cadres taken from tho midst of the workers and peaaants, from the midst of 
the people, to educate specialists who would be supremely devoted to the Soviet 
system, to the cause of Socialism. 

In general, said Stalin, there was no lack of people eager to build and direct 
construction in the USSR. But there were extremely few people really capable of 
building and directing construction, and versed in this matter, Stalin levelled 
sharp criticism against thoso who praised the lack of culture and baoknardnets, who 
boasted of this backwardness. Stalin scoffed at those with no faith in the Soviet 
people and who were persistently studying and mastering the aoienoes, at thoae who 
regard such men and women as being "aliens" to and "deserters" from the maaaes, 
from th<e workers, 

"I believe," declared Stalin, "that not until we root out this barbarism and 
savagery will we advance a single step forward. The working class oannot beooma 
the real master of the country if it does not auoceed in educating its own intelli- 
gsnttia, if It do«s not master science and learn to direot oconoay on the b«sis of 
science." 

"STORM THE FORIRESa CALLED SCIENCE" 

In the Civil War years the enemy positions were frequently taken by courage, by 
oMlau^t, by surprise "cavalry charge." Ihis is impossible under conditions of 
peaoeful construction. Under such conditions theso methods oould merely cause harm. 
Courage and daring were necessary at that time as well, but they had to be aupple- 
mented by the ability to build and manage. Only thus was it possible to defeat the 
enemy iii the economic field, in industry, in agriorulture, in trade, 

"In ojrdor to build," said Stalin, "it is necessary to possess knowledge, to 
master science. And in order to gain knowledge, it is necessary to study. To study 
stubbornly, patiently. To learn from all, from enemies and from friends, but es- 
pecially from the enemies. To study with clenched teeth, without fear that the 
enemies will ridicule us, will laugh at our ignorance, our backwardness," 

Stalin urged the Komsomol members and the Soviet youth to take the fortress 
called science, with all its numerous brunches of knowledge, noting that the Soviet 
youth has the adoquato strength for it. "This fortress must be token by the youth, 
if it wants to become the builder of the new life, if it wants to become a real 
aucoessor to the old guard." 

In order to ensure the sucoossful solution of the problem of Socialiat develop* 

mont, to overtake and surpass the leading capitalist countries, it was not enough 
to train Communist cadros in general with superficial knowledge of many things. 
Tho country required Soviet specialists in different branches of administration and 
science, "Diletantism and a smattering knowledge of all things," emphasiied Stalin, 
"are fettors to us at present. What we need at present are Bolshevik specialists 
in metals, textiles, fuel, chemistry, agriculture." 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2395 

CvETic Exhibit 3 (Page 7) 

- 6 - 

Stalin concluded his address with an appeal to the youth to organise an 
expedition into science. "To master science, to for ge new cadres of P olshevik 
specia lists IN ALL branches of knowledge, to study, st udy and study tr. - u-ie £oat 
persistent manner - this is the task toduy. An expedition of the rovolutinnary 
youth into science is what wo need. 

YOUTH RESPOND TO STALIN'S DIRECTIVES 

The course mapped out by the Soviet leader determined all the activities of the 
Komsomol in the struggle for the realisation of the Five Year Plan. 

Stalin's appeal found a most enthusiastic response among the youth. As in the 
Initial years of the Soviet period, the Komsomol launched an energetic campaign for 
the extension of the chain of workers' colleges, and particularly of the evening 
schools. In 1928, the workers' colleges recorded a graduation total of 49,400, and 
in 1930 this number rose to 224,000, There was a rapid increase in the number of 
schools which owe their existence to tho initiative of the Komsomol — factory 
training schools, schools for young peasants, technical high schools and institutes, 
with a corresponding increase in tho number of students. 

As a result of the tremendous work carried out by the Bolshevik Party in the 
training of specialists, the USSR has educated a new intelligentsia in tho working 
class and the peasantry, an intelligentsia which is faithfully serving the people 
and energetically cooperating in the building of the Communist society. Tremendous 
credit for the education of this Soviet intelligentsia is duo to the Komsomol. 

STALIN'S ADDRESS GUIDES KDMSOtPL TODAY 

Many changes have taken place in the Soviet country in the 20 odd years that 
have elapsed since Stalin addressed the 8th Congress. Then the country was just 
embarking upon the great historical transformation. Today tho Soviet people are 
reaping tho fruits of these gigantic transformations. Then Socialist society was 
merely a dream to the Soviet young men and women who worked on tho construction of 
cities and factories. Today Socialism has become tho reality for Soviet young men 
and women. 

The Komsomol has increased its membership several fold and consolidated its 
ranks since then; its tasks have also changed. But the directives laid down by 
Joseph Stalin at the 8th Congress remain in force today; under different conditions 
and with different methods the Komsomol is fighting for the realisation of these 
directives. Thoy disclose the very essence of tho work of the Lenin Young Communist 
League of the Soviet Union, of its effort to educate the youth in the spirit of 
Communism. 



2396 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 4 (Page 1) 



uLLain 



ike 











A GUIDE FOR 

CLUB AAEfviBERSHIP DIRECTORS. 



Issued byi leUBERSUIP DEFARTUENT 

NEW YORK STATE ORGANIZING COMM. 
for a LABOR YOUTH LEAGUE 



799 Broadv/ay 

IJev/ York 3, Kev; York 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



2397 



CvKTic Exhibit 4 (Page 2) 



=1% SIGN THEM UP! 




A Labor Youth Leacue club oarrylng on en active 
struggle for the economic and social needs of youth 
is .ii^oins to attract young people to its meetings and 
socials* 

Our club membership director must be on heuid to 
aelze a recruiting appeal, to personally approach the 
nei7 people and talk to them about the League and get 
tham to fill out a membership card together v/ith pay- 
ment of an initiation fee» 

Let's not nako tte old mistaJce. We have had 
people cone dovm consistently to our affairs and 
never sign up» Tlhen finally asked why they haven't 
joined, the standard answer v;as, "Kobody ever asked 
me to»" 



HOW DO WE INTEGRATE NEW MEMBERS 

Nov/ that the initial step has been tal:en, it is up to us, the older members 
of L.Y.L., and particularly the membership director to see that our new members 
are not 'lost in the shuffle', but are properly integrated. 

It's a good feeling for all of the club members when a new buddy is recruited 
into your club, and it's oven better when this vfarmth end friendship is expressed 
to our new recruits. Introductions and possibly some kind of initiation ceremony 
is a good first step to socially integrating new people. 

Our club membership director must malce it a point to establish personal con- 
tact v;ith nev/ members and really get to knai7 them. It*s also important to know 
v;hat industries, trade unions and other mass organizations they belong to in order 
to establish nhat role they can play in their union, industry, etc., in helping to 
work for peace and for the fulfillment of youth needs. 

An important second step to integrating new members is to develop the "This 
is my organization", feeling. This can be realized v;hen the person begins to share 
the responsibility for his or her club. Each person should have some special res- 
ponsibility, regardless of hov7 large or small it is, in order that he or she may 
sake their special contribution to their club. 

POLITICAL INTEGRATION 

AJLthough youth join our organization, thoy have been, and still are subject 
to the barrage of red-baiting, v/hite chauvinism and v/ar mongering which comes 
forth every day in the press, radio, movies, etc. Carrying on a serious idsor.ogi- 
ool oampaign is an absolute necessity - — "Ho\7 do I fit in?" — our membership 
director may ask. 



2398 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 4 (Page 3) 

Here, it is the responsibility of the membership director to Trork together 
vdth the educational director to guorantee attendance at nen members classes, and 
tl.at literature is forthcoming* 

One of the best v/ays to assure further political (and social) integration, 
is through the "Buddy Systen»" This simply means that the club membership is 
broken do\;n into groups \;ith a t;roup leader in charge of each one. The members of 
each group ore responsible for contacting each other for meetings and mobiliza- 
tions and all other such activity* 

Sometimes a club nay choose to break their groups dovm according to commit- 
tees. That ueans that perhaps the nev/spoper committee beccsnes one group, the dra- 
matic committee another, and so ono 'tVhen this system is functioning properly it 
is possible to have group competition in membership drives, fund drives, sale of 
publications, etc., and it moires for greater spirit in our club life. 

MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR-A POLITICAL LEADER 

The membership director must be a political spearhead pushing the entire 
exec and membership into developing a real recruiting consciousness. Vfhat speci- 
fically does this moan? 

It means that the membership director checl: on every phase of club life to 
determine v;hothcr it is geared to building the Labor Youth League. 

For instance, in the sale of literature, the moiiibership director must guaran- 
tee that the literature is being brought into all the youthoentors the club is 
concentratin~ on. 

In relation to social and cultural v/ork, 
again the membership director inust be conscious 
of the membership aspect of this v;ork» "Tfliat 
typo of social-cultural progran must be deve- 
loped in our particular community to bring 
youth into our club?" 

These are just a fovf examples, there are many others' 

There are many other aspects to this most important role in membership xiork- 
such as. . • 

ESTABLISHMENT OF MASS CONTACTS 

This m:-ans; 

4. Making contact vlth other youth organizations in the community; church 
groups, Kogro youth orjunizations, Jewish youth groups, social clubs, etc. 

B. Developing politioal tics v/ith those groups on certain issues such as 
fighting jim crov;, signing anti-discrimination petitions, fighting for a govern- 
ment program for jobs for youn^^ workers, the struggle for housing, etc. 

C. Guarantee club participation in neighborhood youth council. , Here again, 
this is not the task of the membership director alone, but he or she must partici- 
pate in the special role of building L.Y.L. 

-2- 




I 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2399 

CvKTic Exhibit 4 ( Page 4 ) 

POLITICAL RECORD OF WHAT WE ARE DOING 

Our organization must know the answer to suoh questions osi 

1« Axe we Tfinninf, the youtht 

2» Are v;e carrying on a real struggle for ITegro rights? 

3* Are we playing a role among youth in the trade union movement? 

4e Are v;e carrying on the kind of social, cultural and political acti- 
vity that will bring young people into our organization? 

5» Are vre an active force in the shops, schools, and community? 

Generally the ansvrer to these questions will be reflected in the number of 
recruits we get and integrate. The only v;ay our national organization can judge 
is by having access to these fijures. These figures xrill reflect either certain 
vrcaknesse^ or bad trends vAiich vre have to correct, or they vdll reflect that we 
ore v/orking in the proper manner. This is one of the iraportant reasons membership 
stations must be nadoo Wo must ho.ve a record of v;hat is happening, and therefore, 
this is on ixoportwit political responsibility for every club membership director, 

CONCENTRATION WORK 

In the struggle against fascism and for action on youth needs, the Labor 
Youth L3o.guc pays special attention to the winning of ilegro youth. 

The membership directors must help guarantee that this concentration policy 
is novcr lost sight of. Vfork in the important llegro communities (in the first 
plaoo, Harlem) must receive special attention, support, forces, etc. of all clubs. 

The recruitment of Negro youth and the building of llegro-white unity must 
toko place on the basis of struggle for llogro rights in the predominantly v;hite 
communities. Wliite chauvinism must be fought on a consistent day-to-day basis. 
Young people in predominantly v;hite communities must be v;on for action on every 
front in tlio fight against jim crow — economic, social, political, cultural, etoo 

The League will gror; and flourish in activity. Every club must be active in the 
fight for jobs for Ilcgro youth, for an end to discrimination in education, housings 

"■ INDUSTRIAL CONCENTRATION 

Here again, the membership director must single out any factories or other 
industries in the corar.umity and plan to assure special enphasis be paid to them. 

It pccjis reaching the young v;orkcrs In the so places vdth our literature, 
invitations to parties and meetings. It also means fighting discrimination in 
these places and v/hore there happens to bo a strike to]:ing place, to assure ful- 
lest support is given to the strikers. 

In the shop clubs, activity must be geared to the v/orkors in the shop. 

It is through these methods that ive will build the Lobar Youth League in 
industry. 

* 3 > 



2400 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic ExHiHiT 4 (Page 5) 



RFCRl JiTiNC TIPS 



Of course the key to -building a larso L.YrL, lios mainly in hovr to carry cut 
our program of fighting for the solution to the needs of young people. Nevertheless, 
there arc certain pointers v;o can l:cop in mind v/hich may be of aid V^ bringing 
vouth to our or -onizr.tion* 



One o;^ the first steps to recruiting is to make 
recruiting appeals at meetings, sooials, open air 
meetings, ctc# 



Build up a contact list of people v;ho may have 
oomo around oo one or tv/o affairs but v/erc not con- 
vinced to join at the time. 









1 W, I 



■^A 






fi 



The development of social-cultural 
prosrom to meet the needs of young people 
v/ill really bo a recruiting aid» 



Got a baseball team? No, then orga- 
nize one. If the ansvrer is yes, then how 
about challenging tlie toons in the neigh- 
borhood. 



• • * • • 



Special recruiting parties — adm5.3" 
sion free to those v/ho bring in nev; rocru^.ts 
and to the nev; members* 



Getting out IcafletsT Yos« • tllavo you saved a little space on the bottom 
of each leaflet for that little box telling v;herc and v/hen the club meets? 



Got a club ncv/spo.pcr? If so, haiv about opproaohing youth in the community to 
submit articles of intorost about tho community, to the nov/spaper» 



Knov/ those youth contors you've boon visiting veith leaflets and ^ppers* Bo 
surprised ho\7 ma.ny of those youth vd.ll join L.Y.L. if c^proMhedj 



Had a treasure hunt lately; the treasure 
being all the nov/ recruits* The whole ;^caic 
gets together before a meeting and then proceeds 
to go visiting friends and contacts to recruit 
them and bring them back to tho meeting* 



4 > 




COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2401 

CvETic Exhibit 4 (Page 6) 

Approached the workers in your shop^ school, etoat 



What about the contacts you made on the picket line in Ihe f icht against dis - 
orimination* Have they been e^proaohedT 



Remeciber those youth petitions (petitions signed by young people dealing \Tith 
youth needs) B Cor.tacted thorn lately? 



Nev; members of the olub have many friends who are not as yet L»Y«L'ers« Have 
these people been approached to contact their friendsl 



Had any forums latelyt It is an excellent r.iethod of reaching people — that 
is, if the Forum has been publicized* 



Are LtYtLt signs decorating the neighborhood stores telling v/here and when 
L«Y»L« meets and v/hat kind of organization L.Y.L» ist 



Got L.Y.L. leaflets pasted up all over the community? 



Has a real recruiting consoiousness been developed aj.iong all club memberst 
Does each person carry recruiting cards v;ith them at all timest 



^ip^iCr^kJEP.«,mP QUOTA 

etition Goinc? ^^ (^ '\ ''■'■''' f] / '('' '^ 
ing coivjnunity g^-^/ '^.r^y^flX '«^>i- 



Got inter-club oompe 
the club in the neighboriiif, -.»^,.u.n*».j.u^ f^y^jA 'J Vi^/^c, 
ing to throv; a party for your club beoaJ45_S^^.^?^.^>i-ir"^' 
you v/on that rocruiting challenge? 



Made plans to give a record albuin. or f^ 
literature to the club's ace recruiter? 




Got any sisters or brothers? It v/ould really bo thoughtful and they v^ill cer- 
tainly be grateful to you if you'll share your organization with them. Bring them 
dovm to the next meeting or social taking plaoe» 



2402 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 4 (Page 7) 

Written an L.Y.L, song lately? It's a v;onderful method of publioising our 
organization and building club spirit. 



Has each club member taken on a recruiting quota to be filled v^ithin a sped" 
fied length of time? Eapeoially during recruiting drives, this should be a must* 

These ore just a few pointers on recruiting* Ho doubt each club v/ill develop 
many othrr methods of reaching and v/inning America's youth* Young people want peace;, 
socurit;', ond democracy.-) Once they learn of Li.Y')Lp, they v/ill join with us to \fork 
for these things* We in LsYvLe have to help bring our organization to them* This is 
the big job. Let's go to iti 

BUILD TIE UBOR YOUTH lEAGUES 



# # # # ;^ # 



uopv/o/l6 

- 6 - 



I 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 6 

MEMBERSHIP MEETING 
DISTRICT CONFERENCE 
OF LABOR YOUTH LEAGUE OF 

PGH.-WfSTf/VW M. 



2403 



SUNDAY FEBRUARY 12 943 LIBERTY AVENUE 

12 NOON TIL 'i-OOPAA 



IT IS EXTRElffiLY IMPORTANT THAT EVERY LYL MEMBER ATTEND THIS MEETING. 
LET'S ALL ATTEND AND BE ON TIME. WE START AT 12 SHABP AND YOU DON'T 
WANT TO MSS ANYTHING. . . . ^_>' j J' „ ^ 

ORG. SECRETARY 




Sponsored by the Labor Youth League of Western Pennsylvania, an organ- 
ization that fights for the needs of young men and women.,, that stands 
with the working class for progress.. .that looks to a happy future in an 
'\merica of Socialism, 



2404 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PEiNNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 7 (Page 1) 

February 12, 1950 

Last July, 20 young people were brought together In Pittsburgh and after a very 
antlmated discussion ^enstltuted thenselves as the Laber Youth Lea :ue of Western 
Pennsylvania. They elected an Organizing Committee charged with the responsibility 
of leading the work to build the LYL to a membership ef over 129 by the end ef the 
year and establishing functioning clubs in the Hill, South Side •«# 'teKeesport^ 
It was also decided that the building ef the LYL would be carried through on the basis 
of developing campaigns anonj the young people on the issues of Peace, Jobs and the 
Struggle against Negro diecrimination. 

New - 7 raenths later we have gotten together again to evaluate the results ef 
our work and to chart our course if for the immediate future. 



'Zji'¥-> 



nd NtMb yeuth lee 



What can the Working olass e.T\i\Jm yeuth look forward to in 1950 in (lestern I*. ? 
The outlook is certainly a diS'^al one. L'nem p 1 eyment is increasing. Mny plants like 

Testlnghouse have already reached the 8 year seniority mark in lay-effs. '^his means 
the laying off of aainly yeungxwaunxpaa^la workers, veterans, young wemen and 
espeoially Nagro workers. There are very few new ^obe available. The steel planta 
recently have been working at almost capacity without taking en additional workers. 
This means increased speed-up together with lay-offs to come, All Klectrioal plants 
have laideff many warkers. Thexaaakax numbers on relttf and Unemployment Insurance 
roles in "^nnaylvania acoorling te the Campensat-on Fund office are constantly increas- 
ing. The young minora, united with all members ef the tavA union^MaaHMit are among 
th(? most nilitant members ef the nion, aha are V|kr fighting taday te defend and 
improve their conditions and ta defend the union against tne united attack ef the coal 
and steel aperaters, big uslness and the Government. Many af these young miners whan 
they returned from the war ^ot married, bought cars and furniture en the installment 
Dlan and scTie even bou.ht the old company houses from the coal companies. Today when 
this striking miner gees for reflef he is told that he must dispose of all his property 
before any relief can be granted. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PEiNNSYLVANIA 2405 

CvETic Exhibit 7 (Page 2) 

2 

It is not only a ^^s^al econonic future tha* the young irorlter look» forward te. 
He is -instantly being ■.•r<5 arei idea logically to serve as cannon dodder in the 
next war *>ii^h is r-irldly bping pr^j'sred by the iTerican "a italiet olasa. 
■"hi* tak^s ii<?ny fons euci as the various spy scares, ■jilitary •nrn taking over a» 
Yeslden'U/of colleges, a 'jronag'jnda line that job* can li be created only through 
increiaei roij-tion of allitary Bena* , increeaed induce^ienta to j^in the -silitary serv- 
ices. 'ars'O'nt in tiiia is the increased jro;>agania that war ia inevitable and that 
we better b" re? ly for it, - ' 

(■"tern "^ . is *ell kno«n 3s ore of the nor hern a eiS in «nioh ;. ,--o-li ac-i-ainatlon 
is at =, high 'oin'.. 'here S'-e r?.ctically ne nixed recr«»a ■ iona 1 oen'-ers. All settle- 
•aent houses ar" 8tri:*.ly «:it» or r.'og'-». In a few * ich are o^en to both ^>.;rG and 
white youth und o-.ilriren, thf activities It- in '.h'-i in t'-" -^ain ar" ke -t a-'iera*.e. The 
Megro reirea ional facilities =.3 fe^ •:?? .'erf ar? sre not on oar wi'. i the others ,ani aro 
lon'inwd in the "g^ttoos '' ^ut diaor i -lins tion takes leoe not cnly in social, recrea- 
tional \nd - Itursl relatiorBhi;is. I' is so especially where lobs are concerned, ""he 
Up-grading of «• youn^ IJegro wcksr is very ael 'o^ ■ea-'d oT, A nu-aber of our own Negr» 
•jiA'nbers 'isv? no« been ure-n oyed for -ore t ^n a year. Tf a ^ob is o ffersd the-n 
so"et' ea it 1^ th;-t of a ; orter or a janitor, never a 8<?Tii-8killed sr skilled job, and 
very aeldon If e.-er even sri unskilled job in s plant. 

■"his is the oiitleok ;or tae you*.h in 1950; ut this outlook can be clansed. Peace 
can b» guaranteed, job: can bo won and Ne-ro diseri-n'nfction can be eattjip back li(Pthe 
youth can be or.^nl^ed to fi ht for '.heir -^eedSiSS well as wen for the generil croijress- 
ive struggle for '^ acf^, BPcurity and the oxtfntion o: de-nocratie rl;,ht8. 

The youth in our ares >• rsidv •? fi-ht., In ao'. 'hey are fl..;hting. The youn^^r 
miners i-.o-i'Tlae a lar^e ir' oftlieVftTrf and file strike -noveient In th" Doal fields. 
They a'e th«) ones who in the Tiftin are aannlng the roving o'icket lines and are d#nductlng 

the other strike activities. ,, ""he young steel workers were 'he nest active in the 
recent 5 T»?ek ■steel strike. '■ Nuierous young workers are in tnc leale-sni. oi i« - ^g.. v 
„v a,....,« -vhe UI as oan be seen es-^ciaUy in all the ?eetin ■*>ouse plant, and in the 



2406 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 7 (Page 3) 
5 

'Jen-ir-jl -lei'ric 1-snt in Trio. The -Trtci-aiy sjsces-'.il -*.• j •> =1 th? ;'l-hl'nd 

^ 'V ^, .1 '. - ■ ■ • ■ ' ' ■:.— *- -. = '. ::■. ■ -er- i-! :;l:o :n ^riic ;• : -r ->f fi^is. ''ha 

oar'icl' •; : ■- 1' ''!'. :.' ■}"■■ 'i-i -X -I'-C'i'^r cj- -^i-r, in 'he :;-<.:;° Tae-tn^ton 

aiblliza •ion, in the local fKrtisivsttKK ".otivities srounJ t.he Vorld ?e eration of 

Oe^ocnt'.c "-.:' f^s'v 1, ».r! rcr the coring "•oloni"! "'-uth ■)!•,• i"? 'ons Mat ion. All of 

-•Vigge .r^ o-ly ■'o-e of ■.'-'> niicsMons tha' th'? youth (6f^ reeiy 'o .l-ht. 

»hat the yoiith.need to help guarantee vio+ory, beeliea the supr;ort and part ici -nation 
of 'h': gen^rjl -.Togressiv -noveT-nt ia their struggles, I'? unity aaong the-.aelvea , unity with 
the ,;eneril --orfressive -ove -nnt .'ind a 9tron,^ LYL ithich can ^ive I'^'idershlp in tr.eaa 
9t.r i-^les 3r.d ifhic'T can educate the young Korkers in the process of these struggles as to the 
rel<j» ■ ona:^!' of their f i ,ht to the general "rogreaaive Btruegls and the necessity for the 
eventual aoHRliat re-organi-a tion of society. 

During the oaat 7 sont • our l."L le-ncersiip wss increised by 100^ fro-a the osgtxct 

is 
ori'5inHl 20 at the or/,-.nizing conference t» ■'*% Thia/exactly l/J the objective set by 

the lonfer^nee. •.isr" iuportant - is the f'sc*. tiat only appro^i*^- '.ely 1/2 of the ^J> 

•tie-Tibdra are 0!--:iriitei into » club on the -'ill, shi^h -Avb functions •poratieally , and the 

re-n irJor can be consi:ered 5s 7te-n era at large ein"e they are- not organized -ss yet into 

clubs . 



"hat are so-ne of t e reasons for this: 

1, After a short a oert in sctl^/ity during the »u>!mer our leaders'iip 
develo ed in or-ranizatlonal a.n ' 'nte-nal ^ptvoaoh wr-i n would h«ive been correct if C9i;plod 
with ar 8 :-ro ch J^v. dev9lo",ing sc'lvity around certain issuee. It is si.^nifioant thit 
our shor' -'erioi o: noninsl grovth * - ;.k -1 .-■s d-,:r r,^ tlie rii^Kl.nd -j - fl;.t .ihd tne 'iFS( aot- 
Iv'tles. •Jo-iie t'"-^ fsH i.-.i winter Alt' ;n:;* i" • 1 '.,v ro .^ctlity am^ tie •ijor M:-stlona of 
'Vace, 'obn, '''e^ro diaorininatlon etc., ■■r'ol of B».':^na'ion aet in. 

2. -Ithoijjjr, 9-.-e ■■••'■.^~.''.nT."l jc*ivity was coniuctfld s-jr^h &"• a lead- 

srshl- 0I..39 or th-- h-^ory ^ n-1 "nc'ic- c." urvi'-n, so^e speci 1 3ctivi*tG3 a-j-ninst 

trotskvisa, and c 't'sin ■>'.■ cr wi dlscvs? iona , 'his '^duc»tion w^s -ionduotfd nainly in a 
■ vacuen, h-5 lif not cor 1 ctel i- con'imctlon with any apeclfio -lass 0i3?ai.;na. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2407 

CvETic Exhibit 7 (Page 4) 

4 
5. ■"here was no plained aonaiatant pro^ren of ^-iucat ionil , 9o:ial ?,nd ! 

cultural ic'l-ities for t-<-- ne-rber"! i; and of such 3 nature whirh Ksuli ftttrsc yo. "g 
wcrkers *.o 'he LY! . 

4. ""her" wss no ronslat'int lesdera-iL. glv^n *o the application of the 

orr^ni^ing conf'srenco deeisions as to the concentration in Hast Pitts rgh or any of 

th-it 
t!ie i'^si-ions -v'. ^e t thM corfarnoe. 

5. 'bove all - our a-i:ro4c!- waa narrow, general, secterian, without a 
real orientstion to the nin/ying of the workirj; clasa sni Kegro yout^. 

It la very significant t'-st ««■ .io not 'lave anong our -aeii-ers-^i j as yet i sir, :1» -Iner, 
a sin-l" 9teel«orker sni only one or 2 electrical workers. I'hla ^e-.ns t .et our leadar- 
ahi- h's •■ot '8 ;'■=■■'. auccse'ied in deTelo;ing thr- I'niteJ ?ront sj^j-roach to the working 
-I'si^ •.■■>\f'i. 'C. ft in ' atern ^. cannot fulfil its resL-onsibllitles unless it is 
based :Ti larlly ■'■ ^r.'_ • hese a'ictions of tlie ^'O^-ulatlon. 

'?ha» 'herefore nust be our objectives for 19^0. 

1. •^he b-:iliin.^ of an l^L of 150 ^le-nbers ca-ing ijainly fron 
electrical, steel, lining and I'e^'-o youth. 

2. To establish functioning LYL clubs •& the !:in, in T. ?gh. on 
•ne South ~ide ani in :-n' -fining area to be selected in consultation with the experienced 

loc^l --:r •■. !-••■ Ie.!-?r6. 'ith.r. '-is '-ere -,u5l '.e the objective of the 4ill '^lub 

' t5-! ::■ 1? . . / r -4-!- orS 

by 'he >n-' o - tr. ■ ••';'• r. 
5. To achlev? ." ci ro-ila • lor. tjfxtkB of 'ne ;<e7s LYL tJUblicatlon 
Challenge. mH h- tnf end cf the y«" r '< iHsiilJ n >i>nl of 250 sube^^C^ ^'--'^^-^-'-s / 

Hri-» oa'i 'hes ■ r>fc<-c*iv"S -■■ 3; ^^ liahed'' ''': y c-n ; jc oi,.ll3hed onlv If se 
succ-ed *o unite ojng workers 'md other yo ng :eo'le in action to eohieve a coTiion 
•nin:'U-, T'^-sotive. In the -ooess of such -ov^rrnta n can build, as a result of ntw 
cont-.cta , both 'he LYT. anl the challenge. 




2408 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 7 (Page 5) 

5 

What are so-ne i«Bi;e» ani •leve-n-nts that »houid be conaidered by ui. 

1. Support 'o the proa'^nt ilner» strike. In the .ona of helping 
tlu t» organize rlief oo-^ algns and o*. -pr types ef activity «hi;h will help to »in 
nen— ninlng youth in support of the miners. Thi» will help u» e«tabli»h n»w iontxact - net 
only with youth in the city and county but alee with iiany young 'n inert. «any y^ung -nlner* 
no* k-now of the exietance of VHu ae a result ef the naes dietri ution o. the LYL leaflet 
in tie nine fields laat wefkond. Here I want '-j pay special tribute to the JS LYL Tieubers 
who oa"!? *.o I'tabtr h froa f.>w ''ork "iuring the laet 2 « eka and hav ^ Jono such a marvolous 
job in bri- ing the Daily prkT • nd the L^L l^aflr*! to approjci-nately 6000 •niner»4'«V ^A'^** 
' "^heir activity alene has resvilt-ed so far in some 50 su'ra to the torlcer. 

2. fe -auet no k in th? Ur c ion of achievin<JP in a very shor'. ooried 
•f tine 9 broal confe ence of youth and youth organizations for Peace, especially around 
the central lueations of agree-nent *o outlaw the Xxsxx A and the H-BOTtbs.and jeb* threugb 
production for peao- Instead ef for nar. 

% K -aOYe-ii-'nt can be developed in certain areas for the e«ployment of 
Neg'o /outh in certain illy-white establiehiients. 

't. ^any other Issues o«n be t ought of but I suggest that these k J 
be ♦he nost la oi-tant ones for the lo-nent. 

I wouH like to raise 5 -nore ■ eints which 1 hink are vital to the future growth of 
L'^L. It ii ny MMM« opinion tha' unless these 5 things are done we cannot get very far. 
TViey a-o th"- following: 

1. I is a fact t af. our weaberehip today is iaolitet 
fron youth at« which is not sy-npatht** to the Cora- nist or at least the progressive 
Tiove-wnt. Xth 7ith such li-nit'^d contact we cannot grow, ''"o succeed in devolopiri_ the 
'.Viited front of youth it be.-cies necessary to consider in an organized way, for •sany sf eur 
T Ttbers on the hiu for examrle; taw to bocone active Ahe Kegre church or other organisations 1 
for our ne-nbers in "cKees Port - le^ us say te t-»'C8'w active in the Teung "e-neoratsi 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2409 

CvETic Exhibit 7 (Page 6) 

f»r ©ur •ne-t\>T» in klnixl^sxtttxx 3^. Hlll.bec«ne active in the Hahitaln and oth«r 'ewlsh 
T«uth •Pganl7.Btion«; for our student* to beoose active in tie exltting oa-apu* organization*. 

2. If wo •:;cek stcu*, -•itstiigxc •inning '.ho «teel ini Tuning youth, and 
t» s oertain sjct nt the elect'-ieal youth , then nn -nust lay heavy ODphaal* on paying 
attention le the youth actlvitlei and organization* •hich already szi*t in the SationRl 
group fl<>ld such a» C.f.U . - I.f.O. - S.K.P.J., ?loTak Societie* .beth left and right 
«iag. 

5. It i« uy i^raonal feeling that one of our greatest weaknesses sas the 
las^ of a collective leaders'-ip and the lack of planned work. This oonferenoe therefore 
BUst guarantee as s result of its discussion today that we ••tabllah practical sbjeetives 
whl-,h are -sseihle for aocoa. llshnent ibiTthe election of a lo^dership whim can work 
togp'-her as "^ t«a-B. 

I rnysi^lf Who has pon3;s no' oarrll throu :- all ly responoi'rilitlos , neror-he-leas 
feel slth full o-ni'idonce that if »•> 3ll p-jll tcget '.er ani give e'ery»hlng that we have 
that these oi lective* or any others set by this -neeting will be achie-ed. 



63178 O— 50 — pt. 2- 



2410 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 8 (Page 1) 

Minutes of The Conference of Leadership of the ^abor Youth League 

Feb. 12, 1950 Meeting opened at 12:80PM by Sonny — 

Attendence: the areas of the Hill, South Side, Uokeesport, were represented 

with a total of 17 people including 1 — ^National LYL and 1 — fraternal 

ddldgddd represent ive — Connnunist Barty 

Jerry was elected Chairman and. Bemie Secy, for the meeting. 

Lil gave the main report on the atatus of the LYL and outlined a perpeetive 

for the coming period, based on the fight around Peace, Jobs and Negro Discrl ^ 

mination. The report stressed the need of bringing into the LYL, Young 

steel workers, coal workers, and electrical workers in the coming period. 

ybjectives for 1950 — 150 members— clubs in Hill East Pittsburgh, South Side, 

and Mining area, the Hill club — 75 members * 

Campaigns 

Full support to the Miners 

Broad conference of youth on Peace and the Outlawing of the A-Bomb and the 

H. -Bomb 

aaac Employment of Negro Youth 

After the Report a General Discus ion ensued. 

Some of the Highpoints of the Discussion were : 

*he fight for peace—— the Coal miners ^National group work VTork among the 

unemployment youth — Struggle againg iThite Ch uvinism Stmggle to get *<xway 

for 
from the issolation of youth and contact with non Communist south 

Remarks of Julie of Nat. Off LYL 

Report is a guide to action of the .Vestem Pa. area. K ey task is the moving 
of the progressive youth and at the f;ame time hundreds of other youth. in 
the struggle for Peace and to stop the war drive of American imperlialism. 
The need tb strength the ties of LYL to the other organized and unorganized 
youth. Job Is to develop^ movements to move people on the basis of a minimum 
program, the Unitef^ front approach. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2411 

CvETic Exhibit S (Page 2) 



222 



Example: lie fight for peace: 

MinlnRun, grpunds: Organize those section of youth who donot want 

war and H*Bomb des<truction. 

In each area go to a least 1 organization and speak to the on 

the question of Peace and the H-Bomb, . . .the writing of letters, forums, 

-><- -I 

^kiX postcards, socials, etc. 

Educational role of the LYL in regard to its members on the following subjects 

Role of the Soviet Union 

Exposure of aims of American Imperialism 

Chauvinism — ^atlonal — .Thite 
War is not inevitable 
League must he out of its shell and get in contact with the other youth of 
the area. 

Proposal: Sending a letter on the ./oik; of the New York LYL in the mine fields. 



1tiSft*6Ht plan in relation tk Frateral relation to JCX3ix Communist Party 

OmrgAggth Changing the composition to V/orking class youth and to developr 

a concentration policy to insure the bringing into LYL working class Youth. 

rxxKxxxxxzxxx 

Working out a program for action on the Youth Bill of Rights and the unemploy _ 

ment issue aaiztez around the slogan of 52-35, 
♦**♦♦♦»** End of Julie's remarks . 



Discussion of the LYL publication Challenge 

Challenge will come out twice a month, first issue ^arch 1st on the question 

of unemployment. Sub are ^1.00 year, S?' issue 

Proposals for v;, P LYL 50 subs 2o subs fraternal org, — Bundle order 

115 

Proposals aeqepted 



Proposals : Tfcat the LYL go on record to support the coal r.iners and fo into 
action in support of them. Adopted 

Each club tmrt^T dicuss end decidehow, when and where to get 



2412 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibits (Page 3) 

333333 
into aotlon. 
Organizing •ommlttee discuss the plans for a 8Can Dance for the Mine s 

Adopted 

****♦ 

Motion to adopt Sister Lll's report. kBbb and that said report be sent 
St the members of the LYL. Motion adopted 

Next the meeting conslsdered a statement on '^'onny the Chairmen of 

the 7festem Pa. LYL In regard to his leadership and the question 

of removal from leadership because of White Chauvinism. 

The statement was submitted by the Organizing ^ommlttee of th LTL 

and was a result of a series ol meeting of the Irg, Gomm. in which Sonny 

sat in on the discussions^*^ t*^ /?'^ Jf a^'>^ f*.-v«^— ?i-« — , 

The meeting discussed the statement on a very high level, '^e key to 
the discussion was —How can the LTL| its membership and especially th* 
white youth rid Its self of the poisoB of White Chauvinism* Xveryone aggved 
with the statement and Sonny in the discussion agreed with the statement, 
gav^Texamples of his attitude'^kA- has started to grapple with the whole 
question of "hite chauvinism, so as to be able to play a role In the LTL^/^^v^ 
Eve^ne agreed that the statement should be sent to the membership v 
and that the discussion in the conference be brought back to the clubs > 

The conference went on reoorc to adopt the Statement and send it to the 
membership. 

The conference next l.lected*^ a collective leedershi|i for the Organizing 

Committee. The following were elected 

Chairman: Jerry 
A.dm. Sec: Lll 



Other member elected to 'Committee 



Herb W 

Ed Nixon 

Ruth G. Bemle 



Respeotttil) yours 







a, § 



<U H ^ 

>-' 5 o > 

5 S .s 



C .S -fi P « .5 



M 2 X W -S « p 
j: Q < H ■£ c 
^ g § >2 I -g -S 

"m S «^ H S o 

O : J3 3 J3 O 






o « g 



-_^ ^ oji ajji 



- P « -S iU . 



Jl 



•^ *" 'o o « 
O •= j2 ^ 

-o TJ .g ■£ •- 



t)< 



.^ 'fc; Ji £= 'S o S" T3 



§^ " g 

2 ^ c i 

a.-s — «) 



-^ 2 c c 
Z i3 CO c 



C BC c 
" ° to 

^ 6t)J3 



^3 






S -b 2 

I cu rt ir2 c 



bO 



aj •S Oi aj 0) ■£ 



1 g 0! ^ C CO 

. O (U > C [L, o 

; S J O O "j ii 

•£ aj W j; S 



S^« 9 



« S y S "" 




COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2413 

CvETic Exhibit (Page 7) 



JJwM SDoJiA-- 



PUSH BACK HORIZONS 

CHANGE THE WORLD 

TRANSFORM PEOPLE 

THE COMMUNIST MANIFESTO, 

by Karl Maftc and Frederick Engels $.10 

SOCIALISM, UTOPIAN AND SCIENTIFIC. 

by Frederick Engels .10 

THE YOUNG GENERATION, by V. I. Lenin .15 

TASKS OF THE YOUTH, by Joseph Sfalin IS 

DIALECTICAL AND HISTORICAL MATERIALISM. 

by Joseph Stalin 20 

LITERATURE OF THE GRAVEYARD. 

by Roger Garaudy .25 

TOWARD SINGING TOMORROWS, by Gabriel Peri .15 

SCIENCE AND RELIGION, by Marcel Cachin .15 

INTELLECTUALS IN THE FIGHT FOR PEACE. 

by Howard Fast .15 

THE NEGRO PEOPLE AND THE SOVIET UNION, 

by Paul Robeson .02 

THE CITIZEN WRITER, by Albert Maltz .25 

NOTES FROM THE GALLOWS, by Julius Fuchik 65 

Order Ihem in Your Club or Local Bookshop 

NEW CENTURY PUBLISHERS 

832 Broadway. New York 3, N. Y. 



2414 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvFTic Exhibit 10 

4LJI0Mi.L CRC-AiTIZING C0ITT3ENCE 
lAUCK YOUTH ICi^GUi: 
799 Droadv/ay 
ilev/ York 3, 1I» Y. 



I K s M B E n s :i I p 



(Jls of Deoember 5, 1949} 

STATE GlgLCYCD COLITG C 

California, Alajneda Co. 21 7 

California, Los i<n^olea 151 96 

Caliiornia, San Franoisoo — •- 

Connecticut 37 17 

Illinois 123 60 

Indiana -* ~" 

Massaohusetta 44 22 

Ilichi-en 88 24 

llev; Jersey 64 15 

Now York 847 396 

Ohio 79 20 

Pennsylvania, Eastern — — 

Pennsylvania, Vfestern 20 9 

Texas 4 10 

ViTashint^ton, D» C, 35 16 

Minnesota -» •• 



U1^1IPL0Y".D 
19 
159 



25 
53 

32 
42 

60 

561 

72 

12 

4 
7 



IIIC-H 
SCHOOL TOT^ 



19 

61 

5 

20 

3 

5 

14 

210 

16 

2 






66 

467 

86 

84 

256 

10 

101 

159 

153 

2014 

187 

143 

49 

18 

58 



3660 



ilotei Three chartered clubs have been formed since last report, makins 
a total of 153* 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 11 

".■AIIONA.L OnOiJilZING COin^R^lICE 
lilBul YOUTH IE;>.GUE 
799 Broad;vay 
Ne\v York 3^ N« Y» 



2415 





1 
1 
» 

STiJK^ 


n E II B E R S 


H I P 


• 
> 
1 


HIGH 
SCHOOL 

23 






EiJLareD 

32 


colu:ge 

50 


UIEIIPLOYED 
30 


TOTAJL, 


California, 


Alameda C*ty# 


135 


California, 


Los ikn~ele3 


177 


105 


174 


75 


531 


ikCalifornia, 


San Francisco 


26 


-- 


25 


1 


8 


Coanoctiaut 




37 


18 


25 


5 


8? 


Illinois 




137 


67 


62 


20 


2q: 


Indiana 




- 


- 


- 


- 


lb 


Massochusett 


s 


/.Q 


25 


34 


5 


110 


Michigan 




116 


25 


58 


9 


210 


llinnesota 




29 


2 


19 


3 


53 


New Jersey 




87 


17 


80 


16 


200 


••Mew York 




1219 


733 


828 


3f8 


3515 


Ohio 




111 


24 


120 


21 


276 


Pennsylvania, Eajstern 


71 


54 


37 


12 


174 


Pennsylvania 


V/e stern 


20 


9 


12 


2 


43 


Texas 




5 


13 


4 


~ 


22 


Utah 




5 


2 


2 


— 


9 


Washington ( 


state) 


11 


1 


24 


10 


«6 


Washington, 


D, C« 


36 


16 


7 


— 


59 


Wisconsin 




16 


3 


7 


2 


28 
5879 



• San Francisco ■• 46 included in State total not included in breakdoim, 
♦• Nev; York - 357 included in State Total not included in breakdown. 



2416 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 12 

ltt.TI01'.i.L CirtG.JII2.IITG COllFERGHCi: 

U^(n. youTi: ru^cuz 

799 Broadv;ay 
New York 3, H. Y, 



I I 

I nkTiasiJL V 50,000 aio^jiizusc Fuiro hrive i 
I I 

(status aa of Deoenber 5, 1949) 







QUOTA to 


Total raised 


Total sent 


STATS 


6,000 


H.O, 


to date 
i 1,416.15 


to N.O. 


California, Lo« Angelea 


2,400 


567.26 


Connecticut 


2,000 


800 


308*00 


15.00 


Miohlgan 


3,000 


^,200 


1,211,00 


350.00 


Uinnesota 


1,000 


400 


79.60 


31.84 


New Jeraey 


2,500 


1,000 


683.25 


273.30 


New York 


30,000 


10,000 


30,000.00 


10,000,00 


Ohio 


3,000 


1,200 


429.00 


120.00 


Fennaylvania, Eastern 


4,000 


1,600 





300,00 


Pennsylvania, Western 


800 


200 





62,22 


v;ashinston, D. C. 











15,95 


California^ iklaaeda 














California, Sen Franoisoo 











— ^ 


Illinois 


*>••« 


MM 


>.— 


- , rii 



0U,7Sf,67 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PEiNNSYLVANIA 2417 

CvETic Exhibit 13 (Page 1 ) 
National Organizing Conference for a 

LABOR YOUTH LEAGUE 



7W BROADWAY, NEW YORK 3. N. Y. OR.gor. 3-55OT 

February 4, 1950 
TO ALL STATE L.Y.L. OROANIZATIOMS 

CELEBBATE ABD HONOR THE HISTORY AMD STRUGGLES 
OF THE NEGRO PEOPLE DURING THE HiEEK OF FEBRUARY 12TH> 



The week of February 12th has been proclaimed nationally as NEGRO 
HISTORY *EEK. This celebration was begun 26 years ago by THE ASSOC UTION FOR 
THE STUDY OF NEGRO LIFE AND HISTORY, led by the Negro scholar. Dr. Carter G. 
Woodson. The month of February was chosen in tribute of the birthdays of 
Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Such an event is called in the faee 
of the vicious distortions and omissions by the big'-business press and text- 
books of the contributions and struggles of the Negro people to the building 
of America. 

School children, from kindergarten to college, are systematically 
taught that the Negro people contributed nothing to American history. To cite 
one crass example — the 1948 edition of Henry Steele Conunager's DOCUMENTS OF 
AMERICAN HISTORY , which contains over 1,200 pages and one million words, 
DOteS NOT CONTAIN A SDJGLE yOBD SPOKEN OK PENNED BY AN AMERICAN NEGRO'. The 
anti-Negro text-books' te'aoh that slavery was "good" and that the Negro people 
"seldom rebelled against itj" that the Negro slaves did "nothing" tofward their 
emancipation; that the reconstruction period was "an infamous period" in 
American history; that Negroes are "simpletons.. ,childlike*«.lasy«««shlft« 
less"..* and all generally "inferiorl" 

Today these iriiite-suprenaoist ideas are being propagated by Vail 
Street and its bourbon stooges at an alarming rate. As >tall Street increases 
its cold war and policy for world enslavement, at the same time it seeks to 
beat back the demands of the Negro people for freedea — and attempts to drive 
into complete oblivion the heroic history of the Negro people. 

The Negro people's history runs through the main stream of America, 
It is a history of perpetual struggle — and always the particular demands of 
the Negro people form the crux of the basic needs of all working people. 
Little wonder that "history," as written by the ruling class, which has grown 
fat on Negro oppression and super-exploitation, has distorted and omitted 
this history. 

The celebration of Negro History Iheek today takes plaee at a time 
when the Negro people, and particularly Negro youth, are uniting with their 
allies to militantly check the growing wave of discrimination, police brutality 
and lynch-law. The recent historic civil rights demonstration in Itoahlngton — 



2418 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 18 (Page 2) 



2 - 



the participation of Nogro youth, united v/ith other young people, attests to 
this fact. This unity is being built and carried forward today to counter 
further bi-partisan betrayal. To know and understand Negro history is to be- 
come armed in these struggles, and the fight for the liberation of working 
people generally. 

Because our Labor Youth League bases itself on the solid ground of 
Scientific Socialist education, we have the opportunity to learn and understand 
the real national character of the oppression of the Negro people — that of an 
oppressed nation. Armed with this theory our League will be able to lend vital 
strength to the national aspirations of the Negro youth movement for liberation 
from imperialist oppression. Itorxist study will give us the real meaning of 
Nogro history as it related to the struggles of the working class generally. 
History has proven that the alliance of Negro and v;hite workin;; people is an 
inseparable factor for the progress and freedom from oppression of both. 

The celebration of Negro History \\eek, 1950, must find our League 
solidly helping to forge the growing militancy and unity moveiaonts of the Negro 
youth to win peace, jobs and freedom. Because American youth are being daily 
indoctrinated with V. all Street's program of white supremacy and national- 
chauvinist aggression, it becomes the special task of our youth to also be in 
the forefront of the struggles against the white-supromacist text-books and 
newspapers that serve as ruling-class ideologioul props for anti-Negro violence 
and super-exploitation. 

The celebration of Negro History Tieek is of international signifi- 
cance. In struggling for the full rights of the Negro people, the lying 
demagogy and hypocritical "democratic" preteneione of white American imperial- 
ism is exposed to the oppressed peoples of Latin America, Africa and Asia, 
Colonial youth throughout the v;orld look to American youth to play a major role 
in the struggle against American imperialism. They are seeing more and more 
that every advance for the Negro liberation movement weakens the aims of V»all 
Street for world dc»iination tlirough imperialist war and fascism. 

At the same time more and more American youth, Negro and white, are 
gaining inspiration from the growing struggles of the colonial youth against 
imperialist oppression, first among these being the great victories of the new 
Chinese Republic, with Chinese youth and students in the forefront, in breaking 
the chains of imperialist enslavement. Furthermore, the heroic youth of the 
mighty Socialist Soviet Union give millions of young people 6veryv;here a 
lasting beacon light in all struggles against national oppression and imperial- 
ist aggression. 

Through its celebration of Negro History Y.eck our League will intensify 
its unremitting fight against the poisonous ideology of v/hite chauvinism and 
will step up all its struggles against all forms of Negro oppression. 

ML WILLIAMSON 

National Administrative Secretary 

uopwa-16 Labor Youth League 



I 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2419 

CvETic Exhibit 14 (Page 1) 

HOT TO RUN £ MODEL MEETING ARODID NEGRO HISTORY HEEX. 
(Brief Outline) 

1. After a Tew general opening remarks setting the theme, start with a 

recording or singing of the NEGRO NATIONAL ANTHEM. This record 
can be bought from record shops (especially in Negro conmunity). 

2. Someone tell the story of Nat Turner's Revolt (you'll find it on 

pages 48-52 in Aptheker's NEGRO SLAVE REVOLTS IN THE UNITED 
STaTES), and then a reading of a poem sung by Negro slaves about 
him. For fear, his name is concealed and then introduced in a 
play on words in the last sentence of each paragraph. (The accent 
is a Scot- Irish one current in Southampton, Vq,), 

You mought be rich as cream 

And drive coach and four team 

But you can't keep the Ttorld from moverin' around 

And not turn her back from the gaining ground. 

You mought be Caroll from Carrol Iton 

Arrive here night afo' Lawd make creation 

But you can't keep the Viorld from moverin' around 

And not turn her back from the gaining ground. 

You mought be reader and writer too 

And wiser' n Solomon the Jew 

But you can't keep the V<orld from moverin' around 

And not turn her back from the gaining ground. 

Your name mought be Caesar sure 

And you got cannon can shoot a mile or more 

But you can't keep the Tiiorld from moverin' around 

And not turn her back from the gaining ground. 

You can't never tell what yo' work ox gonna do 
Cause you never know who you mought be talkin' to 
You oan't keep the livorld from moverin' around 
And NAT TURNER back from the gaining ground. 

3. Read national statement written by Mel Villiamson, National Adminis- 

trative Secretary, to membership of all League clubs. This statement 
briefly explains the special significance of Negro History T»eek in 
this period. 

(continued on next page) 



2420 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic ExHiniT 14 (Page 2) 

MODEL MEETING AROUND NEGRO HISTORY VIIEK - page 2 



4, A SPEECH < An outside speaker who has special knowledge or played 

a part in a struggle for civil rights, or an LYL member who pre- 
pares a careful, simple speech of maybe'~Fwenty minutes lengthi 

1. Vihat is Negro History V.eekT 

2. \^hy do we have a SPECIAL celebration of it? 

3. How History is Tied to the Present. 

4. Present Problems of Negro People. 

5. Why Struggle is National in Character. 

6. V.hy Important to Struggle of All. 

7. Battles to be T.aged -- against white chauvinism — 

for equal rights. 

6. A QUIZ I Set up two teams to compete -- the final winner to get a 
book or pamphlet recommended for Negro History IPieek. (Enclosed 
is a list of questions and answers as samples -- to make more 
carefully, extract facts and word as questions from books and 
pamphlets on list). 

6. PLAN AN ACTIONj Survey of conditions in your area. Jobs available? 
Jimorow laws in your town? Interest other community groups in 
the issue. Maybe a small meeting at first -- then a conference 
or larger meeting — the whole community to send a delegation to 
an official, or discrimination-diseased store or playground. 
Maybe they neod a walking delegation like a picket line or a 
mass visit of Negroes and T.-hites as "customers" or any dramatic 
move that would put the finger of accusation and struggle forward. 



Nov/, the above is a sample — take of it what you will — but think of 
other things t 

Chorus. 

Clippings exhibit around the room. 

Readings of other than poetry — short stories. 

Good literature display on subject. 

Personal accounts of experiences related (such as job 

experience, FEPC struggle in Viashington). 
Movie -- if you can get a good one. See it before you 

show it, as often poor. 
Story of Peekskill record. 
Paul Robeson album. 
T.rite a skit — March of Time style - there's someone in 

your club who can - on life of Frederick Douglass, or 

incident in a slave revolt - or a thousand other 

possibilities. 



uopwa-16 



I 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2421 

CvETic Exhibit 14 (Page 3) 

QUIZ FOR NEGRO HISTORY 1VEEK 

Q. I.hat were some of the major contributions to civilization of the peoples 
of Africa? 

A. 1. Smelting of iron 4. Gold and silver mining 

2. Glass industries 5. Cotton weaving 

3, Patterns of music and art And countless other "firsts" 

Q. How many million people is it estimated Africa lost in the slave trade? 

A. It is estimated that for every one who survived, five died in Africa or on 
the voyage across. 

Q. V.hat clause in the Declaration of Independence was stricken out because of 
the slave trade? 

A. A clause denouncing George III for supporting and spreading the slave trade. 
Georgia and South Carolina's slaveholders requested this be striolcen out. 

Q. Name some of the most famed slave revolt leaders. 

A. Denmark Vesey, Nat Turner, Gabriel Prosser. 

Q. T.ho was the first martyr of the American Revolution? 

A. Crispus Attucks, a Negro seaman who had escaped from slavery, died in the 
Boston Massacre under British guns. 

Q. Y.ho fired the shot that killed the major leading the British in the Battle of 
Bunker Hill? 

A. Peter Salem, Negro ex-slave, 

Q. >hat was the underground railroad? 

A. A means of smuggling slaves by night from house to house into freedom in Canada. 

Q. V.ho said, "Labor cannot emancipate itself in the white skin where in the 
black it is branded?" 

A. Karl Marx in Capital, Volxime I. 

Q. Iiho was known as the Black Moses, and why? 

A, Harriet Tubman, Negro woman leader, who helped organize thousands of escapes 
of slaves from the South. 

Q. How many Negroes fought on the Union side in the Civil liar? 

A. Some 200,000. 

Q. In the Reconstruction Period, how many Negroes went to t.ashington as senators 
and representatives? 

A. More than 40. 

(continued on next page ) 



2422 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 14 (Page 4) 

QUIZ FOR NEGRO HISTORY \\EEK - page 2 

Q. Vhat was the nature of the laws passed in Southern states during the 
Reconstruction Period? 

A. Universal free public school education, universal franchise, and greater 
rights for workers. 

Q. How was the democratic Reconstruction Period ended? 

A4 By a compromise and betrayal arranged between the Northern capitalists and 
the Southern landlords and the violence of the KKK. 

Q. H.ho said, "No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellowman without 
at last finding the other end of it fastened about his own neokT 

A. Frederick Douglass, Negro abolitionist leader. 

Q. Vihat is the population of Negro Amerioans In the United StatesT 

A. Fifteen million (15,000,000). 

Q. Vhat is the poll tax? 

A. The poll tax is a payment required before one can vote, now operating in 
certain Southern states, 

Q. How does the poll tax affect Negro and white voters in the South? 

A. In 1942, six million Southern whites v.'ere disfranchised, as compared with 
four million Negroes. 

Q, Approximately how many lynohings have taken place in the South since 1882? 

A. More than 5,000. 

Q. How many members of lynch mobs have been punished? 

A, Not a one. 

Q, Vihat major battle in the struggle for Negro rights in the early 30' s 
mobilized the entire world? 

A. The fight to free the Scottsboro Nine of a false charge of rape. 

Q. Vhat political party nominated a Negro for vice-president in the 30' s? 

A. The Communist Party nominated James *. Ford on its 1932 ticket, with 
Tiilliam Z. Foster as presidential candidate. 

Q* T.hat constitution makes it a crime to favor any inequality against any people? 

A. The Constitution of the U.S.S.R, 

(concluded on next page) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2423 

CvETic Exhibit 14 (Page5) 

QUIZ FOR NEGRO HISTORY V.EEK - page 3 

Q. Are there any Negroes in the top C.I.O. Executive Board? 

A. No, Ever since the removal of Ferdinand Smith from the National Maritime 
Union no Negro sits on the top C.I.O. Executive Board, 

Q, lihat strange sight can be seen in the Southern Organizing Drive's headquarters 
of the C,I,0, in Tennessee? 

A, Jimcrow signs labeled "Colored" and "li.hite". 

Q, lihat tTTO congressmen have -vvaged a dauntless battle for a Fair Employment 
Practices Coramissiont 

A, Vito Maroantonio and Adam Clayton Pov.-ell, 

Q. Viho said, "if there is no struggle there is no progress. Those who profess 
to favor freedom and yet deprecate agitation are men who want crops without 
plowing up the ground." 

A. Frederick Douglass. 



uop*-a-16 



2424 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 14 (Page 6) 
g E G E HISTORY 1 E S K 

SUGQESTEP BIBLIOGRAPHy 

BOqCS AVAIUBLE FOR UAGPE MEMBERS ----- 08DEE KOK FEOM YOUR COUHTT 

THE NEGRO PEOPLE AND THE SOVIET UNION, by Paul Robeson 

This pamphlet is Paul Robeson's speech at a banquet on the 
occasion of the celebration of the 32nd Anniversary of the USSR. 

mSSES k MAINSTREAM, February 1950 - SPECIAL IJEGRO HISTORY V>EEK ISSUE. 

NEGRO CULTUREt Heritage and T^eapon, a weapon in the struggle against 
white chauvinism. The February MASSES 4 MAINSTREAM will help 
give us a greater understanding of the role of Negro culture 
in the struggle against white chauvinism* 

ARTICLES by Apthekev, Brown, Hunton and others. 

DEFENSE OF NEGRO RIGHTS, by Benjamin J. Davis. 

The testimony of Benjamin J. Davis, member of the National Board of 
the Communist Party of the United States, given at Foley Square, in 
which he outlined for the Jury the events in his lifetime that led 
him to Communism. He also tells in great detail the position of 
the Communist Party's leadership in the fight for Negro rights. 

EYE IKITNESSj PEEKSKILL, U.S.A., August 27, September 4, 1959. 

You remember it, don't youT *ere you a member of the Labor Youth 
League in its fight against fascism at Peekskill, New York? 

For further bibliography, see back cover of January 1950 POLITICAL AFFAIRS. 



uopwavl6 



COMMUNIST PART^ OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2425 

CvETic Exhibit 15 (Pagel) 

HSHOVASJXJH: S'TWQOli lOH THB SISBTS OF THE KES50 PB OPLJ 

TO AU DISTHICTS 

Sear Comrades: — 

In the past tvo years our Party hae undertaken and supported, 'both on a local and 
national scale, many important Issues confronting the Negro people. Some of these 
local struggles have been very successful, especially around the joh fight, eivll 
rights, and against nany cases of police hrutallty. However, It must be noted that 
too often the struggle for Regro rights has been sporadic and has not been prosedut- 
ed in a sustained and determined nsnner. Thus nany campaigns have been initiated 
hut not follovred through either on a local, district or national scale. Many issues 
have been raised, fo'oght for a vhlle, and dropped, while numerous Important needs 
of the Negro people were not tackled at all, This is true of mny instances of 
police brutality, violations of civil rights, the Ingram case, and especially the 
fight for Jobs, vrhlch remains a central Issue. 

The lUth National Convention focused the attention of our Party on the intensified 
brutal oppression of the Negro people — the increased lynchings, grov/th of Ku Klux 
Elanism, the murderous police violence, intiffiidatlon and terror, the drive on the 
living standards of the Negro people as the growth of unemployment eliminates large 
numhers of Negro workers from Industry. The fierce offensive of American reaction 
against the Negro people demands that our Party, and the progressive forces In the 
labor and people's movement, overcome vlth the utmost speed the existing weaknesses 
v;hlch hinder the unfolding of the most oonslstent and determined struggle to protect 
the Negro people from lynch and police violence, against Jim Crow segregation and 
discrimination, and in the first place for Jobs and against the increased lay.offe. 
Our Party and the left progressive forces in the trade unions must display the 
greatest initiative and sensitivity around the accumulated grievances of the Negro 
workers, and nake the struggle for Negro rights an Inseparable part of the fight on 
all fronts. 

From this standpoint we want to place before the Party a number of central problems 
which now require the Immediate attention of the leaderships in every state, as well 
as the attention of every Party organlmtion, Includli^ all our shop, industrial and 
community clubs. It is hoped that these questions will be Immediately reviewed in 
each state, and a program of action projected which will assure the organization of 
a persistent organlced struggle around these Issues. 

1. THE Fi&ar roa jobs, aqainst discrimihation, against lAY-oros; 

The most crucial problem confronting the Negro people Is the problem of Johs. At 
all times a serious problem, even during the period when large numhers of Negro 
workers were drawn into industry, the question of Job now looms to the fore as the 
#1 problem with the growth of mass unemployment. 

The Negro workers have always been the last to he hired and first to be fired. This 
is a general pattern of American imperialist oppression of the Negro people. But 
today, we are "itnessing a situation v/here Negro workers (who were drawn Into ind- 
ustry during the war) are now being eliminated from one factory after another. The 
lay-offs are striking the Negro workers with the heaviest hlous. Just a few ex- 
amples chosen at random Illustrates this. Reports from New York indicated that SOji 
of all unemployed are Negro workers, in Omaha, one out of every four unemployed is 
a Negro worker; in Toledo, Chicago, etc., 50/^ of the unemployed are Negroes and 
from Detroit the report is that 71/» on relief rolls are Negro workers. There is no 
douht that a review of the situation in all areas will show a similar state. Thus, 
not only are Negro workers denied Jobs in many shops and industries, hut the present 
lay-offs have resulted In a disproportionate lay-off of Negro worksrs, threatening 

63178 O — 50— pt. 2 5 



2426 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CVETicExHiniTl.") (Page 2) 
- 2 - 
to eliminate them from most industries. 

The struggle for Johs for Negro Morkers must today, therefore, become the primary 
concern of all Communists and left-progressive forces in order to protect the joh 
rights of ITegro vorkers, to maintain the unity of Ne'^o and v;hite, to prevent Big 
Business reaction from splitting the v;orking class, to prevent the full brunt of 
the developing economic crisis from being placed on the shoulders of the workers, 
Begro and I'rhite. 

In this connection the follbwlng concrete points should be considered: 

a) Preventing the disproportionate lay-offs of Negro workers; It is necessary for 
the white vorkers to recognize that it is the Negro workers v;ho because of low sen- 
iority are the first to feel the effects of the present mass lay-offs, and that 
without an effective struggle on their part the Negro viorkers v;ill be systenatical- 
ly excluded from shops and industries where they are employed today. This question 
must be faced squarely in each factory, on a concrete basis, with the objective of 
welding the unity of Negro and I'hite to nftintain the job status of Negro vorkers in 
these shops. 

b) All re..hiring must include a certain proportion of Negro v/orkers; An examination 
shows that where lay-offs have taken place the Negro workers are not re-hired i-fhen 
workers are called baok. Here it is necessary to guarantee tbat the most determined 
fight is v«ged against each attempt on the part of corporations to thus exclude Negro 
workers from their right to their jobs. 

c) yight for a program of expanded unemployment insurance; The existing unemploy- 
ment MnefTts~airegeaTed~tTaTtarvation diet with the present high cost of living. 
Therefore the fight for higher unenployment benefits, for an extended period of time 
(beyond the present 26 v/eeks) is a fight that is of prime concern for all vrorkers. 
White workers, however, must show the utmost vigilance to protect the Negro 'forkers' 
right to unemployment benefits. Recent examples indicate that Negro vrorkers are 
forced to accept the most menial jobs v;hen reporting for uneinployment benefits, or 
are compelled to wait endless weeks before receiving unemployment checks. It la 
necessary to alert the trade unions to this situation and to organize union commit- 
ees to protect in the first place the Negro workers before unemployment insurance 
offices, to fight for supplemental relief for }arge families, for expanded unemploy- 
ment Insurance, etc, 

d) l^ht for upgrading, etc. ; The fight for upgrading, training and promotion of 
Negro workers is an issue in practically every factory throughout the country. The 
fact remains tbat the trade union movement, even the left progressive forces, have 
not conducted a systematic day to day fight for upgrading. Experience shows , however, 
that vrhere this fight has been taken up, successes can be recorded. Thus, for in- 
stance, in Detroit, in the Packard Plant, where a campaign was developed around this 
issue, it resulted in the upgradizig of some 700 Negro vorkers, many of them Negro 
women. In Akron, in one of the rubber plants where the campaign of upgrading of 
Negro workers was launched, white and Negro workers were united in this fight in 
BBny departments of the shop, finally forcing the company to adopt a policy of up- 
grading. It is necessary for the vhite v;orkers to give leadership in such struggles 
and to initiate the establishment of rank and file committees (in unions where the 
leadership Is lax in this struggle) of both Negro and <-'hite vrorkers, around the day 
to day problems of hiring, upgrading, promotion of Negro '.rorkers. 

e) right for Jobs of Negro workers in plants that have not hired Negro workers 
until now. In every city without exception there are factories tbat are "lily-white" 
— factories which have persistently refused to hire Negro vorkers, or v/ho because 
of lay-offs have systematically eliminated all Negro v/orkers. It Is necessary that 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2427 

CvETic Exhibit 15 (Page 3) 

- 3 - 

the fight for iota In such factories becomes the concern of the Left progressive 
forces. On a clty-wlde tiasls — calling for Jot conferences, oass rallies and 
demonstrations, mass delegations to City Councils and State legislatures, etc. to 
compel the hiring of Kegro workers. 

Here we must note dangerous theories that have arisen that "now Is not the time to 
fight for Jobs because lay-offs are taking place." This Is being raised by the 
same people who but a short time ago stated that you cannot fight for Jobs for 
Negro workers because the white workers have not been won for this dentind. This 
th»6ry would postpone the whole fight for Jobs for Negroes until doomsday, and must 
be rejected as dangerous to the labor and progressive movement. This theory threat- 
ens to forfeit the confidence of the Negro workers In the organized trade union 
movement. 

Another theory that has grown up is that v/e must first fight for an TEPC law Instead 
of the day-to-day fight on the Job for Negro rights. This reduces the fight to a 
purely legislative struggle, vrhich may take several years to win, and which even 
after it is won, does not automatically result in eliminating Job discrimination. 
There are several states with ?SPC laws — New Tork, Connecticut, Massachusetts, 
etc. In none of these states has Jim Crowism and discrimination In employment been 
eliminated, not to mention the absence of upgrading in all the shops. This theory 
niust likewise bo rejected as one that attempts to sidestep the day to day struggle 
for the rights of the Negro people which ronalns one of the most fundamental ways to 
develop and strengthen Negro and white unity. 

* • * • 

2. THE FIQHT TOR J.S.P.O. ; The struggle to enact TFSPO laws in every state and 
nationally remains an important phase of the fight for Negro rights. In developing 
an effective fight for such a law, a demand must be included to guarantee that an 
TSPC law is passed with power to subpoena; for an TSPC with powers to enforce its 
decisions. Vlthout these conditions any ISpd law is meaningless as is proven in e:c- 
isting laws in the states previously mentioned, and in bills introduced into a num- 
ber of present state legislatures that do not include these provisions. In the pro- 
cess of the fight for I3F0 it is Imperative that all progressive forces also demand 
of city, state and federal governments! 

a) No appropriations of public money to companies, contractors, corporations, con- 
cerns or associations that discriminate against people because of race, color, re- 
ligion, national origin, political affiliations or beliefs. 

b) No loans of public money to such concerns. 

c) No subsidies or grants to concerns that discriminate as indicated above. 

d) No government contracts to concerns that so discriminate. 

This type of a fighting program will sharpen up the whole fight for JEPC, This 
fight should be developed as part of the general fight against Job discrimination 
and as a concrete phase of the legislative fight for the passage of ISPC, 

• • * * 

3. THE nam ARotmp the ihoram case, TamroN six, and against police tiolenob 

a) The fight for the freedom of Mrs. Ingram and her tv/o children, a fight which 
has now lasted for 13 months, and which In its first stages succeeded in staying 
their execution, is one that demands the most concerted struggle involving the 
broadest sections of the working class and the people. A feeling exists among 
progressive forces, including some Communists, that in view of the fact that the 
legal end of the ease is in the hands ot the NAACF, that therefore the mass moveb. 



2428 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PEOSrNSYLVANIA 

CvETic ExiriBiT If) (Page 4) 

- 1* - 

ment must also te dependent upon the Initiative and leadership provided by this 
organization. This is a false concept and must tie quickly corrected. V/e are of 
the opinion that a nass campaign in every community around this case must be devel- 
oped. We feel that this case can and must be won. But it cannot be v;on in the 
courtroom; only the nass nrotest, involving labor and all progressive forces, Negro 
and white, can wrest their freedom from the Bourbon lynchers of Georgia, 

The American people tove not forgotten the fact that in 1935 vrhen the progressive 
forces were much weaker, far more isolated, a mass movement of the people forced 
the same state of Georgia to open the prison gates and free Angelo flerndon. This 
can be repeated today. It cannot be argued that the fight tvas won then because of 
the Roosevelt administration. Progressive forces then were quite critical of the 
Roosevelt administration, the N.R.A, and its Blue 2agle, as well as other features 
of the Roosevelt program. The freedom of Herndon vias secured as a result of a 
struggle that assumed national and international scope. 

The Party itself, through its clubs, should immediately undertake to bring the 
truth of the Ingram case before the people, to the organizations and unions in 
every area and city. Brery effort should be exerted to bring about unity in the 
localities for the freedom of the Ingram family to include KAACP local branches, 
progressive forces on a city-wide scale, the Elks and other people's organizations, 
together with trade unions, fraternal groups, civic and consumers groups, city or 
local organizations of the Progressive Party, etc. Of special importance is to 
bring the information on this case to the people through speakers, to organizations, 
leaflets, mass meetings, radio talks, etc. to release floods of resolutions, tele- 
grams, letters of protest to President Truman demanding immediate intervention to 
free the Ingram family. 

While the legal end of the case is in the hands of the KAACP, the mass campaign at 
present is in no one's hands. This must be recognized. It is therefore necessary 
to initiate and encourage the broadest oeiss actions around this case on a united 
front basis. The basis for this unity exists and can be realised if the left- 
progressive forces develop proper united front tactics aimed to bring into motion 
the many existing Kegro organizations, the trade unions and progressive organiza- 
tions. At the same time the left progressive forces must push forward their inde- 
pendent program as a means of helping to stimulate actions of broader forces and 
contributing to the crystallization of united front actions in every locality. 

b) The JVame-up of the Trenton "6" — Six innocent men have been sentenced to die 
in Trenton, New Jersey on the trumped-up charge of murder of Uilliam Horner, Trent- 
on second-hand furniture dealer. This case is another Scottsboro which must arouse 
the same indignation and protest of the millions which succeeded in the thirties to 
wrest the Scottsboro boys from the electric chair. 

The CRC is now handling three of these cases and has unfolded a nass campaign to 
free the Trenton Six. V/e urge that every effort be made to assist in this movement. 
The important thing, however, is to bring the story of the Trenton Six to every 
church group, union and fraternal organization urging them to Join the fight to 
dencind from Governor Sriscoll of New Jersey the immediate freedom of the Innocent 
Trenton Six. The CRC has issued important material on this case vhich should be 
widely distributed. Local commltteea to Pree the Trenton Six should be developed 
who will conduct sustained activity in their behalf. 

It is possible in many communities to develop organized activity Jointly around the 
Trenton Six and the Ingram family, 

c) right a^inst police brutality; While in a number of cities soma stnigglei have 
developed against acts of police brutality which have mounted the number of killings 
of Negro workers, nevertheless, it is neeassary to call to the attention of the dls. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2429 

CvETic Exhibit 15 (Page 5) 



triets the fact that In most Instances a zbss movement around such cases of police 
hrutallty have not been organized and developed. There Is an inadequate understand 
ibg In aany places that these acts of police violence are hecomlng the modern form 
of lynching, vrlth local governments now assuming this role, and that such violence 
is not confined to the South alone. Yet in area after area, where these acts of 
violence take place, the development of actions is left to a cluh In a particular 
area, no matter how weak the club may be, or the Party organization in the area. 
What is even more serious, is that in the main the struggle against such cases is 
too often left to the Negro comrades to fight, 

Ve want to ra-emptAsize here what has been pointed out on previous occasions. Such 
cases of police violence should not be left to a club or section. It is necessary 

to involve in such struggles particularly the organizations in the vfhlte community 

and to unfold a city-wide or state-vide movement in the defense of Negro rights 
around Issues of this sort. If this was done in every district, the whole movement 
of the Negro people would be on a much higher level, V/e call upon all districts to 
give this type of attention to this question, 

• » • « 
3. TH5 STRggGLE AflAIlTST WHIT3 Ca.irymiSM; It Is iniposslble to develop a sustained 
stmggle in defense of the rights of the Ver.ro people without the simultaneous org- 
anization of a sustained Ideological and political struggle against v/hlte chauvinism, 
the poisonous ideolo<»y of v;hlte supromaoy. The reactionary course of American im- 
perialism at home and abroad has brought with It a frenzied wave of war hysteria and 
national chauvinism. This has inevitably crrrled with it a tremendous Increase in 
white chauvinism, vrhlch penetrates the rads of the working class, exerting its pres- 
sure also within the ranks of our ovm Party, 

The failure to recognize the paralyzing effects of vhlte chauvinism, and to conduct 
a relentless uncompromising struggle against it wherever it rears its >igly head, 
stands as the chief obstacle to the development of a determined mass movement for 
Negro rights on all levels and in the labor and people's movement. The struggle 
against white chauvinism, in its vicious crass, as well ae subtle forms, must be in- 
itiated and developed by the Party leadership on all levels, and led especially by 
our white Oommunists. Only in this manner can the struggle against vrhlte-chauv inlet 
practices and ideology be raised to the level vfhere its evil effects can be complete!;, 
rooted out from the ranks of the Party, 

It is of prime importance that every district vfithout exception review its work in 
the fight for Negro rights and particularly hov; it has conducted a concrete ideolog- 
ical and political struggle against white chauvinism as Incompatible with our Party, 
In this connection, we must finally and for all time overcome the situation where 
white chauvinist acts and tendencies are recorded, but not fought with every instru- 
ment at our disposal. Including organizational measures in concrete Instances of 
white chauvinism. To guarantee that the entire Party is mobilized In this struggle, 
every district shall or^nize, on the basis of an examination of their own situation, 
discussions in all Party committees, clubs and organizations, on the struggle for 
Negro rights and the elimination of all tendencies of white ohauvinism. 

In focusing attention on these key questions, we do not in any vjay want to ffllnimlze 
the need and possibility of developing struggles around other concrete problems fac- 
ing the Negro people in the shops or the communities. Nor do we intend here to di- 
vert attention from the possibility and necessity of actively winning the Negro 
people for the struggle for peace, for the defense of the 12 and other burning issues 
confronting the labor and people's movenent. 



2430 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 15 (Page 6) 



In addition ve vAnt to stress that as a part of your plan of action must come the 
systematic improvement in the building of our Party among the Ne^ro people, partic- 
ularly in the concentration shops end industries. Within the present Foster Party 
Building Campaign, a specific plan for recruiting Negro workers, men and women, as 
veil as youth should be outlined. 

CoinWidely yours, 

Benjamin J. Ifa.vi8, Ctslrman 
Pettis Perry, Secretary 

K^TICmL KSORO COMMISSIOH 



uopvA.l6 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2431 

CVETIC P^XHIIUT 16 



February 6, 1950 



t: E IJ 
TO I ^L STaTE LtiBOR YOUTH 1£aGUE OKJiiNIZttTIONS 
FROMi NATION.J. OFFICE 



In looking over the material that was sent out on Negro History Tkeek, 
it oame to our attention that a short-out was taken on the bibliography. 
Some very important and basio v.orks of interest to all League members 
were included under the heading "see back cover of the January, 1950 
Political Affairs". 

\,e f'eel that it is very important that these books and pamphlets be 
mentioned specifically, so that they can be -ftidely publicized during 
Negro History Veek for all year round reading and studying. Therefore 
we hope that this memo, which lists the books and pamphlets referred to, 
will be considered as a part of the material on Negro History \ieek. 
Please see that this memo gets to each club. 

The list includes the followingi -- 

Nr.GkO LIBEIuJION 
by Harry Haywood 

M/wRXISIJ! AND THF. NaTICHAL QUESTION 
by Joseph Stalin 

TO BE FKEE 

by Herbert itptheker 

ESSaYS in THE HISTORY OF THE «iiEldCiJI NEGRO 
by Herbert ^ptheker 

RECONSTRUCTION I THE BATTLE FOR DD;OCRaCY 
by James S. Allen 

THE NEGRO PEOPLE IN AI-IERICA THE P^TH OF NEGRO LIBERATION 

by Herbert Aptheker by Benjamin J. Davis 

NEGRO SLftVE REVOLTS IN THE U.S.i 1526-1660 THE STORY OF THE TRQ.'TON SIX 

by Herbert aptheker by Elwood Dean 

THE KEGRO IN THE AilfilCAN REVOLUTION FREDERICK uOUGL^SSi SELECTICHS 

by Herbert aptheker Edited by Philip Foner 

THE FEGRO IN THE aBOLITIOJIST MOVElir.NT HARRIET TUBl»kN 

by Herbert Aptheker by Earl Conrad 

THE NEGRO IN THE CIVIL YuJl THaDDEUS STEVENS 

by Herbert Aptheker by Elizabeth Lawson 



THE NaTION/.L STAFF 
uopwVl9 LABOR YOUTH LEaGUE 



2432 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 17 (Pagel) 












iki^ 



ow Kdmm OF 




'ATIC Youm 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2433 

CvETic Exhibit 17 (Page 2) 

ALL OUR FORCES IN THE FIGHT 
FOR PEACE, AGAINST WAR 

(ittNIFESTO OF THE II CONGRESS OF THE TORU) FEDERATION 

OF DEiDCRATIC YOUTH) 
BUDAPEST Sept. 2-8, 1949 

Young men and women of all countries, our Congress appeals to you in the name 
of 60 million young people. 

This Congress has clearly sho-vm that tens of millions of young people, 
organized in a strong internatiouul movement, are determined to fight relentlessly 
in order to win, with all the democratic forces, the bcttle for peace. 

At the World Festival of Youth and Students, ten thousand delegates in the 
name of countless numbers of young people of all races and beliefs, solemnly 
pledged "TO WAGE UNTIL VICTORY THIS SACRED STRUGGLE FOR PEACE AND HAPPINESS." 

In order to safeguard thoir sordid interests and maintain their domination 
or^er the people, the big capitalists, led by the imperialists of the United States, 
are ready to sacrifice millions of young lives. They threaten peace-loving peoples 
with mass destruction and the atomic bomb. 

These war preparations have been intensifiod by the imperialists during these 
last months. 

The Ifershall Plan, the Atlantic Pact, the establishment of strategic bases, 
the increase in armaments expenditures and of the intensive militarization of the 
youth are part of the diverse plans of tho aggression directed against the Soviet 
Union and ajainst tho countries of tho People's Domocraoies, and against all the 
flreodom- loving pooplos. 

Everything possiblo is dono to try and crush tho invincible national liberation 
movement of the peoples opprossod by colonialism. 

The fascist oxecutionors of Greece and Spain are receiving an ever-increasing 
support from Anglo-Amorican reaction in order to acoon^lish veritable crimes 
against humanity. 

In all of the countries under imperialist domination, and including the 
United States, democratic liberties are trampled under foot and repression is 
unleashed against the workers whose situation bocomos ever hardor and more difficult. 

But against those criminal actions, hundreds of millions of men and wcmen have 
arisen, united, and are waging a successful fight for peaoe against the war-mongers 
and their agents. 



2434 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 17 (Page 3) 



The forces of peace and democracy are continually gromng in the world, as 
showed by the repercussions of the World Congress of tho Defenders of Peace, as 
well as by tho nagnificent victories of the Chinoso people. The place of the 
young generation is in this imnonso and Invincible amy of the Partisans of 
Peace, which is headed by the Soviet Union whoso contribution to the victory over 
fascism was decisive. 

In vain, the war-mongers try to divide tho youth in order to roaliB© their 
sinister projects. Our closer unity will strengthen our forces. With this force, 
joined to that of ■i.ll the peoples, wo will bo able to win victory over tho enemies 
of our future. 

Young defenders of Peace, Unite'. 

Young workers and peasants, young soldiers, young employees and students, 
unite 1 

Youth of all countries, v/ithout distinction of race or creed, unitel Let us 
unite to defend the peace victoriously! 

LET US ENSUHE A TRIUI^PHAL SUCCESS TO TIffi IITTERKaTIuHAL CELEBRATION OF 
OCTOBER 2nd, during which tho peace-loving puoplos, with unaninous will, will 
say NO to warl 

Let ur, unite to assure our national independence and to support ever more 
actively the just fi,',ht of our youug brothers of Spain, of Greece and of the 
colonial and dependent countries'. 

Lot us unite to impose the just demands of the young workers in the fight 
agrii:ist their ejcploitorst 

In this battle for peace wliich is a battle for lif j, the youth will be able 
to act with courage and confidence. 

Under the banner of the World Federation of Democratic Youth, viith your 
brothers and sisters of all countries, we call upon you to fight for justice and 
freedom, for your future, for peace. 

YOUTH OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE! 

FORY/ARD FOR USTING PEACE! 

TOR DEMDCRACYl 

FOR THE iUTICNAL INDEPENDENCE OF ALL PEOPLES! 

TOR A BETTER FUTURE! 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2435 

CvETic Exhibit 17 (Page 4) 



RESOLUTION 



Adopted at Second Con/^ress 
on the Work of the World Federation of Doraooratic Youth 
since the first Congress and on the Ta-ks of the Fodera- 
tion in the struggle for pcaco, Democrucy, the National 
Independence of the Peoples and a bettur Future for Youth, 

Budapest Sept. 2-8, 1949 

After having discussod the report of the Executive Coranittee presented by 
Guy de Boy."^son, th, II Youth Congruss unaniniouaiy eridoTsed the work of the World 
Federation of Domocratic Youth and its leadership, for the unity of youth in the 
struggle of p'-aoe, democracy, the national independence of the peoples and a 
better fut-orc. 

The four years which hnv, passed since its formation have shovm that the 
principles, the aims, th t'.;:, •;. end t\v practical work of the Federation, are 
profoundly just, that thjy corr.spond to the- vital interests of millions of young 
pooplo, and that the youth ol' the world so'js in thd Fuderation its true organizer, 
defender and friend. 

The sure proof of the Federation's success li-^s in tho indisputable fact that 
during its existence it has doubled its moiribcrship, uniting today more than 
60,000,000 young men and women from ;:ioro than 70 countries. The remarkable suc- 
cess of the 'iVorld Festival of Youth and Students in Budapest, which preceded the 
Congress, is another demonstration of thj growing influence of tho Federation. 
All of those successes have been achieved as a result of the untiring struggle of 
tho Fodcrotion for a lusting peace and democracy, and because of its vigorous 
struggle in the defence of the rights and interests of youth. 

The activities of tho WORLD FEDERATION OF DE?©CRATIC YOUTH in the period 
between the first and the second congress horc have developed in a world situation 
oharactcriied by the steady grov/th of the forces of peace and democracy v;hich are 
fighting for peace in the whole world agiiinst all maiiifostutions of aggression, 
against the threat of a new war and for friendship among all peoples on the basis 
of equal rights and respect for their national sovoroignty. 

Tho Anglo-American a.^ressive circles,, tho map;natos of Wall Street and tho 
City, in order to dominate tho world and preserve their privileges, are carrying 
through a policy designed to destroy friendship among tho peoples and to unleash 
a new war. 

The policy of tho ocoiionic and political enslavoinont of tho peoples, carried 
out by the imperialists with the aid ol' the so-called Marshall and Clayton Plans, 
the North Atlt.ntic Pact and similar blocs and alliances, is an expression of the 
aj^ressive intentions of the An^-lo-Am^rioan instigr.tors of a now war. 

Faced with tho monaco of a now war, prepared by tho Anglo-American war-mongor- 
ing circles, the forces of peaco and democracy are grov.'ing ever stronger. The 
peoples of the whole world do not v;ant v.ar. Tho democratic forces fighting against 
tho wnr-mongers are innumerable. Their camp is hoaded by tho great Soviet Union. 
It includes the people's domoerucies and tho hundreds of millions of ordinary 
people in all countries who do not v/unt war, who hate war, and who long for peace 
and friendship among the pooplos. 



2436 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 17 (Page 5) 



The forces of peaoo are enormous and are oapcble of stopping the sinister 

plans of the war-mongars. The V/orld Con.^ress of the Defenders of Poace, held in 
April of this yoar, onco more exposed all those who aro pur^uinp a policy of 
ag(;rossion and of unleashing a new war; it won millions of now l'i/yi'':ors for peace.- 

In the name of 60 million young men and women, the II Congress of the WFDY 
approves the decisions of the World Congress of the Defenders of Peace and oalls 
on all the youth organiiations to take an active part in the realization of- these 
resolutions and in the cstablishmont and work of national committee, city com- 
mittoos, factory corimittces, villcigc committees and other assemblies of the 
Defenders of Peace, 

The Cen-ress greets and endorses the proposal of tho World Fedoration of Trado 
Unions to declare October 2nd as the International Day for tho Defence of Peaco, 
and Culls upon all the democratic youth to play an active part in the preparation 
and celebrations of this day. 

In tho name of millions of young men and women, the Congress solemnly declares 
that the domocratic youth is firmly dotcniiined to fight for a lasting peace 
throup^out the world, for friendship :imou3st the peoples against all manifestations 
of aggression and the menace of a new war. 

The II Congress of the WFDY notes with profou:id satisfaction the powerful 
upsurge of the national liberation movomont of the colonial and dependent countries 
and the ancwer of the peoplo of thise countries to the imperialists und their 
agents who are trying by every means to maintain their domination over the colonial 
peoples. 

The Congress particularly notes the great victories of the Chinese Peoplo and 
salutes tho heroic Chinese youth solflessly fighting for the freedom and indepen- 
dence of Spain and Greece, 

These struggles for the national indopondonoo of tho peoples against fascism 
and colonialism are an intogro.l part of thu general stru-^glo for peaco and 
democracy. 

The reactionary circles in their fear of tho growing strength of tho domocratio 
youth movement are conductin^^^ a policy of persecution of tho domocratio youth 
organizations and thiir leaders. In the U,S,a.j in India, in Spain, Greece, South 
Korea, in tho Westorn Zones of Gormo.ny, the Latin-American countries, in Africa 
and the Near East, the peoples are persecuted for their struggle against hostility 
between the peoples and for their participation in tho defence of peace and 
domocracy. 

The II ConiT;rcss of the WFDY vigorously protests this sinister imperialist 
policy of suppressing the proTOssivo movement and denying the rights of youth. 

Th', World Youth Congress notes that the situation of tho working youth in 
capitalist countries has sharply v/orsoned during the-oO last years. Tho absence of 
the most elementary political and oconoiiiic ri;hts, tne grovrth in ';nor.\jloyment, 
tho rise in prices, tho fall in wages, tho Iv.ck of vocations, '.lio inpet s ibility 
of receivin • an education, child labor, the insecurity of the future — these are 
the characteristics of capitalism today. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2437 

CvETic Exhibit 17 (Page 6) 

- 3 - 

The policy of enslavement of other countries and the preparation for a new 
world war pursued by the U.S. imperialists are the direct cause of the rise in 
unemployment and of the worsening conditions for the working youth. 

Colossal military expenditures are placing a hoavy burden upon the youth and 
aggravate the already difficult situation of working youth. The imperialists are 
trying to put the burden of tho approaching economic crisis on the shoulders of 
the youth and tho workers. 

The Federation and the national organizations of tho democratic youth must 
struggle more actively so that the unemployed have work, for the right to work, 
for equal pay for equal work, for the abolition of child labor, and for opportun- 
ities for young people to receive education and professional training. 

The Congress of the WTOY fully supports the struggle conducted by the young 
workers of France, Italy, Great Britain and other Marshallired countries against 
the offensive directed against their living standards and for the satisfaction of 
thoir demands. 

The struggle of the young workers for their immediate demands weakens the war- 
mongers and is an integral part of the great struggle for peaoo and democracy. 

The Congress recommends that the leading bodies of the WFDY and of the youth 
organizations strengthen their cooperation with the World Federation of Trado Unions 
and its national organitations , with n. view to a more vigorous struggle for tho 
political and economic rights of youth. 

The necessary condition for tho accomplishment of these tasks is unity in the 
ranks of the democratic youth. To this end, tho Federation must continue to expose 
tho enemies of this unity, who in seeking to divide the youth, follow the directions 
of the war-mongers. 

The II Congress strongly condemns the splitting activities of the leaders of 
the so-called International Union of Young Socialists who are tho agonts of the 
enemies of democracy in the youth movement. The reactionary leaders of the 
Catholic youth organii&tions and the leaders of the provisional committoo of the 
so-oallcd World Assembly of Youth, play the same role in the youth movement as tho 
right wing loaders in the socialist yuuth organitations. They all fulfill their 
sinister task with the aim of destroying the unity of the youth, one of the most 
important means in the struggle of the democratic youth for peace, for their rip^ts 
and a better future. 

The II World Youth Congress calls upon young men and women to strengthen their 
ranks in the struggle for peace and democracy, to reinforce their cooperation with 
tho WTOY and to rally their ranks. 

The Federation is open to all young men and women regardless of race, sex, or 
religious belief, to all youth organiftitions, to all those who sincerely want to 
struggle with the progrossivo forces for peace and democracy. 

The Congress stresses the great importance of the annual celebrations of the 
Federation and especially World Youth Day, (November 10th), World Youth Week, 
The Day of Struggle ugainst Colonialism (February 21st), the Day of Solidarity 
with the Spanish Youth (April 14th). The Congress calls on the member organira- 
tions to utilise thcso celebrations to assemble millions of youth. 



2438 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 17 (Page 7) 



The Congress calls on the leading bodies of the Federation to popularlce 
energetically the aims and tasks and the practical activities of the Federation. 
For this it is necessary to ensure the monthly publication of World Youth in four 
languages and to organiee the largo scale distribution of this magarine among 
the youth. This magaiine and other publications of the WFDY must point the way 
towards the cooperation and amity of the democratic youth and unveil all the 
iiifinoeuvers of the enemies of peace and democracy. They must mobilite the youth 
in the struggle for a lasting peace. 

The Federation must fi,?ht against the war-mongering propaganda of the 
imperialists and their efforts to deraoraliro, to provoke hatred bot-woen the 
peoples. It must assist in the education of young people in the spirit of 
democracy with all tha means at its disposal. 

Democratic youth are filled with an unshakeable confidenoo in their tomorrows, 
in a radiant future. 

This future belongs to the forces of democracy. To gain victory we must 
dedicate ourselves completely to the struggle for peace and friendship among the 
peoples. 

Youth unitel 

Forward for lasting peace, democracy, 
the national independence of peoples 
and a bettor future'. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2439 

CvKTic Exhibit 18 (Page 1) 



m 909 




PICK YOUR YOUTH FIGHTER FOR PEACE 




Choose your delegate 
by number. 

No. 1 PEGGY RUSSINKO 
No. 2 ANN PERPICH 
No. 3 JEAN VIDMAR 



\^ 



N«. 1 



N0.1X 



No. 3 



Vote for the young person you want to represent you in Budapest, Hungary at the WORLD 
FEDERATION OF DEMOCRATIC YOUTH PEACE CONFERENCE — August 1949. 

The W.F.D.Y. is an international organization of youth united in their determination to work 
for peace, liberty, democracy, independence and equality, everywhere in the world. 




TOTAL $- -/^ --— 

WESTERN PENNA YOUTH COMMITTEE FOR PEACE 



2440 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 23 



J^ 



H0D3IKG VOBILIZATIOH ■> '•'^GKEND FEBRUWY 26 and 29 - FOR irB<T TOW tTL 
W3RK IH lilNIlta 



WttE ^\tL^^ ^fCv^^v.^^.^.^^■^^^ 



ADDRESS 



I CAV ROUSE 



S E I PEOPLE - F Q'AI J m i g Knt Jo^fLy'-^ , 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



2441 



Name 


RECEIPT 


Address 




By... 








£ 
o 



c 
O 



u 
m 

a. 



0) 

o 
'5 
> 



z 



< 

o 



• - -»- 
^ o 

CO ^ 

-o E 



u ^ 5 

E 
< 

c 

3 
O 






c o 



O 



N 



_o _^ O "O 



<D 1- • 

-1= o E 

■*-'-*- if. 
n ^ <0 

^ u o 
en Cm- 

c^:^ o 
1;; o 'o 

•4: _c < 



10 



O c 



o. 

■ Q. 

■ <0 

c -c 
(D 

E -^ 
o o 
^ -*- 



_0 O 



0) 



U 



"D >■ 



X <D O 





CO 






^ 










< 






•ff 




i: 


." 




^J 






^ 




a< 


~ 




G 






> 




£ 


f 




P 






">. 




c 


i 




C 

c 


s' 








4< 





1 


u 


Q.' 
CO 

1 





a! 


>- 


C 


> 


e:; 


c 


1 







J2 






y 


S 


Pi 


0) 




cx 


a. 




V, 


1 




3 

^ 







CO 


H 
H 
UJ 

CL 




i 


1 


Z 

c 



w 


"0 






J" 






z 


!2 


< 


> 


a 


V 






< 

X 


V 




< 




v. 






< 






T 




X 


." 




0£ 






C 






f 




< 






w 




< 



63178 O — 50 — pt. 2 6 



2442 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic Exhibit 24-3 (Parts 1-3) 















] 




is 

-> — 


•n — 




o — 




1 












M 














^ -"'"V 




22: 










i-H r^ 




in o 




>" o 






u. — 


< - 




o^ 




>< -P 
■'1 ^ 














ct 














t— t "— ' 














^ o 


Of e 


-g 




^2 
02: 




^:^ 


< o 

-> — 


-S 


-> — 










d ? 




£ -D 


o 
o 




r^ 






'^ <^ 




c o ■ 


c 




1 






a — 






u 

s 

f 
















«/> 


c 




M 








111 




a 




:q-^ 






> £ 


5 








r.i ^ 






OS 

2 " 


tn 








l^ -p 








m 
O 


M 

1. >■ 






M ^^ — 
















o 




1 -^ 

>• 






o - 

















D 
O 




I 

CV 



o 


fH 


3 


t— 1 

31 --> 


O) 


^-^ H 


fD 


X -P 


O 


'-^ ^ 



O Q, 
Eh 



> 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2443 

CvETic Exhibit 24-3 (Parts 4-5) 



-» I 

• o -^ 

^ !2 cv 



a — ^ 

X -P 

• o ^ 
>- lo OP. 

• "- (— I ^-^ 

> 



E 



^< 







"^S^ii « oi „9-SS!;-^'"'5 I 



s<- T o « c" c *--**^^ w-S "•■= S* S ? E"^'".i o>c""3'*"2't "Jo 

^ til, JS O ^ Q.^ m " i/I S ? O — ~ O S = -^ S~ « «" . 

-^o^ : -yi rnSl5 CLtl-O-X-r- : « § o £ " " ill:*: 



♦ 



£o-5»o = Et;S.t:SS£ 



"0 * « 4- o M ^ o~ E o oS: « «.S o > = <: o— o E 






2444 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 26 



SSJi4TE fiTiaS ei. 
ivASajLiJ'lTOK, D. ■. 



J.«. 'i.» .».<»&i... .i. ... i .'EIDAY inrSKIMS SliSI^T Ci«ITSa .\i& ii-JH 

cwv ri .;' :^ ■■": '-:: : '.siuea TO 




SI « 



<n 



VO 



> > 

zz 
<< 



ui Z 



lU UJ 

O QJ 






> i 

z j 

uj ! 

> i 
< s 






Z 
(A;:; 



0) 



ly^ 



tf) 



Uj 

CD 



O 

Lu 

Lu 
Lu 



Lu 



u 



Cj 



a: 

I- O 
O 



CD 



K 



a 6-1 

M S3 

pq S 




£ » M 

>? & s 

1-1 (a <? 

P t-« CO 

M er^ CO 

ct: M 

e-1 hJ E 




N .H e 



• O. a 

M p i' O 

a> u a tn 

^ O S rH 

■H a> 

O H 

(0 

•H 0) CJ c 

W X 0) 3 

+J ►J •-» 
o 

»> C rH « 

faO O r-t X 



I, 



A .H <U L. .!>4 



+> X) J5 ^ ^ 



O t5 3 a C 



■p 

3 CO 


S gi 




jo 


^ tD 01 


o 






•g 


Og 


I. o 




(U 


c ^ 




• 




a o 


<D U 




n 


0) ^ o 


d 


xa 




2?. 


+> 


4^ 




0) 


^ T) O 


.H 


3 




e -p 


C .M 




X 


d XI 


b, 






Eh d 


W 3 


.rt o 




+i 


fS (u 


ID 


o 




$ ^ 


10 o 


O 






d 1. u 


+> 








C A 




+J 


o x: 


i 


x; 




u >> 


ii 


o 




5 


n -p 


o 

d 




St 


W (P 




+> 


(U 


iD 


1 


■^:g 


x: 


J«l M 






x: o +> 


x: 




1 


+> la 


b r 




+> 


4J «- OJ 


+> 


o 




Q 


d 


o 




c 


-H 




■p 




« >. 


X (d 


,: t>D 




a 


*i U ^ 


4h 




tD 


e * 


*> 


C 




+j 


d d 


o 


VI 


a 




■P 


U 'H 




t. 


x; .1) x: 




-p 




2 


^ a 


•H -O 




o 


+> >. o 


•p 


s*. 


^ 




0) si 


w d 




ex 




;< 


bO 


o 




■H +j 


d (B 




e 


o ^ x: 


d 








>. 


JO J= 




■H 


V} r-* ^ 


D. 


o 


r-H 




<1> c 








d 




B 


O 




+> o 


X) 0) 




&> 




d 


XI 


■m 




i:;3 


c x: 




>> I. o 




Q 






a +> 




(U 


-(OS 


(0 




<U 




(3 






> 


<-(<«« 


d 


w 


x: 






+> I. 


• 




d 6 




• H 


+> 




x: +> 


c » 






o J4 


■O 


X 






-p +> 


d T) 


w 


•H 


■rt 0) M 


i> 


-p 






cS 


t § 


L. 




<« (» -H 


u 




a) 




Ih 


•H 


*J 


•H ,j x: 


a> 


+> 


T3 




O k, 


O 


d 




O +J 


X) 


d 


3 




> 3 


O-T) 


t« 




0) >, 


.H 


x: 






O O 


•g^ 


1^ 


V 


C I. V 




4J 


o 






j; 




M O d 


G 




C 




hfl o 


3 




x 


V x: 


o 


<D 


•H 




.s^ 


t"S 


rH 


+> 


•o « +J 


o 


<U 






d 




(J -M 




a 


V 




M <U 


V a 




r-t 


C W (U 


Ii) 








o E 


> -^ 


■H 


«> 


O CXI 




•H 




^ 8 




■P 


V 


H O O 




w 






Si P 


•H 


t^ 


+j >H x: 




d 








B »< 






ti bO 




<u 






c *> 


o a> 


o 




0) V ID 






x: 




H -H 


CO j; 


Bl, 


,- 


6 a it 


js 


a, 


E-> 





«3 I. 




M (1) 




-^ J« 


« a 


m lu 


O <U 


^ js 


t, r-l 


< -P 




S' 


S "* 




Eh CO 


O XI 


(U 




fe^i 


* m 


6H "^ 


o 




E-i >> 

^ XI 


- X3 



H s 

^M 



te^ 



a. >» «» >, 









i4 >» w >. 



B^ 



o 






oi=>o|i:£ 






id - 



- -ia I •£' 



S = S£< Mi- 
ssal c'^ic^ 






■ ■■ evj 



"> E S? 



iu •= 




. : raSn- . 

|".||a|||S3 
• I|>|3i55«" 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2445 

CvETic Exhibit 27 



1^ 'a, im^ 

CHAIHHAH SSHATB JUDICIAKT CCMKITTiS 

ssKATB arncs bii^. 

umiTymiLM biu. cias-iiiHss .amekican demxrahc pRi^ipua its 






J} J -J? - /;r 



Mrs. XL.; L. j..:ic". :M lu ,. 



+ 



-K 



+ 



4- 



.K". 



i*<09i^'^) 



POTU.IS fjrAR-rsrj .li. ■-• N 

lOHK J. CAR TEE ?-■''. •*• ■■ -I 

■ . .j.v.-rr:: - ^ is 



2446 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 28 (Page 1) 



\'; 



IT'S CALim THE "SUBVERSIVE CCNTROL ACT OF 1948"..,. BUT IT IS ITSEIF 
SUBVHlor/£l 

IfiPg; HE Sa52, IF YOU 

WANT AN FBPC Uv/. . , .V.CRK FOR ABOLITION OF POLT- TAX... . .;'OlK K>R kii HJD TO 

lOTCHING AHD lilJCH UV.'.. ..ViDRK FOR HIOHER V4VGBS AI-ID BETTER iDRKBC. CONDITIONS 

XRK AGAir«T SBGanJATICN OF AWKICAN OITIZEiC OPPOSE U.S. BETRATAL OF IHE JFif- 

ISH PEOPLE IN THE UHITED NATIONS or any on<5 «f a nmaber r>f Uiirjta .YOU CAK 

3E DESIGNATED AS "C»tKUNIST», UDSE YOOB CITIZ£>SHIP, FINED, AMD SBiT TO JAILl 

IMPOSSIBLE? KOT IF JOHN E. RAMDl, JOHN McDOWELL, KARL KUNDT, and others 
fcave ttieir wa^'l 

W«, the undgrsigned, believing in the democratic traditions and practioas 
<sf our country, do reject any bill which treuld accomplish tha destructior. of tii© 
Bill of Rif.tits and the overthrow of Ai-erican deiiccratic ^.ovenv-ent. ..'e reject 
HR 5S52 as a measure which would establish fasaism In the United States. 

iVe v.ish to support with our contributions below the fi^ht w-'doh the 
Pittsburjjh Civil Rights Congress is oakins a^airiSt this police-state xaeasure. 



Z,_ XA- .. 






AODEsai ^ ''xrrrRii-.LT i'; 

■'■ ■■ I 




"^ 'VjMj 



.urn to: ThLMnaa Qoii-u-., dairoarv, 5-1.9 f.'abash Bidi. litt^ur^h ^u, Ha. 
• ilection List I tiata of raj;-son 

Address 






COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2447 

CvETic Exhibit 28 (Page 2) 



rr»S CALIH) THE "SUBVSRSrVE CONTROL ACT OF 19Afl"....BUT IT IS ITSEIF 
SUBVHISIVEI 

UKDER HE 5852, IF YOU 

^mSI AN FEPC 1AVJ,...(VDRK FOR ABOLITION OF PDLT- TAX I-OIK FOR AN END TO 

LTNCHING AND LIHCH UkV. . ..ViORK FOR HIGH51 ViAGES mU BETTER iORKmi CONDITIONS 

7JDRK AGAINST SBGRBGATICN OF AFRICAN CITIZENS OPPOSE U.S. BETRAYAL OF THE JEV- 

ISH PEOPLE IN THE UNITED NATIONS or any one nf a nuober of tUintS '^OU CAN 

BE DESIGNATED AS "COUiUNIST", ID3E YOUR CITIZE^BHIP, FINED, AND SSNT TO JAILl 

mPOSSIBI£? NOT IF JOHN E. RANKIN, JOHN k'cDOWELL, KARL MUNDT, aszi others 
have tbeir wayl 

oOo — — 

We, the undersigned, believir^ in the democratic traditions end practices 
'•r -nir country, do reject any bill which would accomplish the destruction of the 
'••ill of Ri^,hts and the ovrerthrow of Aiaerican der.ocratic t;.ovemi-ent. ..'e reject 
iR 585* as a measure v.-hich would establish fasoism in the United States. 

IVe wish t() support with our contributions below the f i/^ht wiiich the 
Pittsburgh Civil Rit,hts Congress is cakins a^aiist this police-state zaeasure. 

NALS ADDRESS ' __ iCOMTMEUTlClN 

QTo^f^y <^'- W-i '^ ^' • e . ^'^-~ 
2cr€' ..f2nrd-ilti'.' -. . !/' r- 

-^'"^^n fTf f^ y^-^tt^ »4^ !._-.-'.- 




■ ! ! 



Return to: Thomas Qumr., Cimirraan, 549 »»abash Bic^.. Pittsburgh 22, Pa. o 
:ollection List #_£0__ Ka5.e of Person Cii'culatine ^^ -Uci^tc^ '/■Si^t, fti^Q 



2448 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic Exhibit 28 (Page 3) 

IT'S CALIS) THE "SUBVERSIVE COITROL ACT OF 1948" ... .BUT IT IS ITSEIF 
SUB VERS WEI 

UNPgl HR 5852. I F YOU 

WWT AN FEPC IAW....VX)RK POR ABOLITION OF R3U TAX V9CRK POH AN END TO 

LYNCHING AND LYNCH lAW....»yDRK FDR HIGHHR VftGES AND BETTHR i'ORKIKG CONDITIONS,.,.. 

»RK AGAINST SEDREGATICK OF AJffiRiaS CITIZENS OPKSE U.S. BETRAYAL OF IHE JF^f- 

ISH PEOPLE IN THE UNITJC NATIONS or any one if ft nuaier of thinta YOU CAN 

3E DESIGNATED AS "COyaJNIOT", LOSE YOUR CITIZENSHIP, FINH), AND SQJT TO JAILI 

IMPOSSIBLE? NOT IF JOHN E. RANKIN, JOHN McDOWELL, KAPX ISUNDT, ani others 
have their wayl 



-oOo 



W«, the undersigned, believirg in the democratic traditions and practices 
of -jur country, do reject any bill which would accomplish the deatructicn of the 
Bill of Rights and the overthrow of American democratic <iovemr„ent. ..e reject 
HR 5852 as a measure which vrould establish fasoiam in the United States. 

We wish to support with our contributions below the fi^ht wiiich the 
rittsbia-th Civil Rights Congress is oiaicirjg against this police-state measure. 

CONTRIBUTION 

^^ V ^- hCV 




*^V»r-*-»-»-, , _ »,-r 






-I 



jturn to: Thomas Qoinr, Chairraan, 549 siabaah Bld£. Pittsbtirfeh 2Z, Pa. 
Jollaction List # ^ t.'b N«kie of Person Cii'culatin^ . ^^ir- • >^^^ 



r^ 






COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 28 (Page 4) 



2449 



IT'S aLLBD THE "SUBVERSIVE CONTKOL ACT OF 1948".. ..BUT IT IS ITSEIF 
;UBVHISIVEI 

UKDSR HR 58$2. I F YOU 

WANT AM PBPC-U #'.... VJDRK FOR ABOLITION OF R3U - ^AX WIK FOR AN EKD TO 

DfNCHING AND IXKCH UW..,.AORK FOR HIGHER '(AGES AND BETTER .DHKBSG CONDITIONS 

WRK AGAINST SBGRSaATION OF AKBHICAN CITIZENS OPPOSE U.S. BETRAYAL OF THE JE.V- 

ISH PEOPLE IN THE UNITH3 NATIONS or any one (tf a nutter of Uiixits YOU CAN 

BE DESIGNATED AS "COiMUNIST", LOSE YOUR CITIZENSHIP, FINED, AfiD SENT TO JAIU 

IMPOSSIBUE? NOT IF JOHN E. RAMIN, JOHN UoDOSWELL, KAPi i5UNDT, a«l nthers 
have their «ia/( 

oOo 



W«, the xmderalgnsd, b«ll«virg in tUe democratic traditions and practicss 
of Tur country, do rejaot any bill vrtiich would accomplish the destruction of the 
=Uil of Rif,ht6 and the overthrow of Aaerican democratic oOverrir_ent. .ie reject 
'.{R 5SiZ as a measure which would eatabllsh fassism in the United States. 

We wiab to support with our contributions below the fi^ht which the 
PittsbuTjih Civil Rights Cont,ress is making aj^ainst this police-state aeasure. 



MAi-^ 



^(^ 



ADDRESS 



'CONTRIBUTION 







^.^. 



-.f^i. 



'^i. IaT .*v. jf**;' 



'^^^4'^ 






/'! 



...jhl^.^^' h^kulS^eu^ _.A1^- ''sdJ^-< J.JU..J.. - ^ /2., 



^-. 



.. {. 



iiurxi to: Thomaa Quinn, Chairaan, 549 Wabash Bldj,. Pittsburi,h 22, Pa. 

llaction List #/^?7 Kik^a of Person Cii'oalatins , .... 



Address 



2450 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 30 ( Page 1 ) 

SVom: Kevin Mullen 

Public Relations Director 

Civil Eights Congress FOR rivttlEDIATE RILEASB 

205 East 42nd Street 

New York 17, N.Y. 

Ta. NO. MU 4^6640 

Prominent women in scientific, labor and ediicational 
circles have signed a petition to President Truman and U.S. 
Attorney General Tom Clark urging dismissal of alleged "conspiracy* 
indictments against ten leaders of the Communist Party, the Civil 
Bights Congress announced today. 

Among the several hundred well known women yAio signed 

the petition thus far are Dr. Maud (COERECT) Slye, famous cancer 

specialist of Chicago; Mrs. Mazie O'Connell, recent Seattle, Waslv- 

ington. Progressive Party Congressional candidate and wife of 

former Congressman Jerry O'Connell; Mrs. Jean Schudakoff, president 

of a United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers, CIO, local in 

Seattle; Rheua Pearce, President of Congress of American Women; 

Ray Lev, noted concert pianist and scores of others. 

In their petition to President Truman, these well known 

women declare that "civil liberties must not be the property of a 

few, but an indivisible privilege for all Mericans of all political 

opinions, ii 

The ten Communist leaders are scheduled to go on trial 

before Judge Medina in Federal Court in New York on November 15. 

— 30 — 

uopwa 16-47 
11/4/48 



2-S-2 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2451 

CvETic Exhibit 30 (Page 2) 

JtaoDg other well known women leaders who have signed are: 

Mro. Margery Pogue—Nat tonal Association for the Advance- 
ment of Colored People- 
San Frand aco, California 

Miss Elinor Kahj>-Independent Progressive Party-Saa Fran- 
cisco, California 

Dr. Ruth Nethercut-San Francisco, California 

Helen Wortis-Congress of .American Women 

Leona Carpenter-Progressive Party of Washington 

Lorraine Best ej>-Seat tie, Washington Pension ISiion 

Uarjorie H. Rabbit-Women for Wallace of Seattle, Wash. 

Dorothy N. Hayes-Executive Bd of United Office & Profess- 
ional Workers, Local #34, Chicago 

Dorothy Bushnell Cole, —Chicago Progressive Party Congress- 
ional candidate 

Elizabeth H. Keller-Financial Secretary of Ifaited Electrical 
Workers lijlon, Chicago Local #1119 

Sylvia B. Levinsoiy-National Women's League of Chicago, 111. 

Helen Lotoshynsks^Ukrainian-.toer. Fraternal Society of Chicago 

Tillle Carl^-Exeoutive Secretary-Committee for the Protection 

of the Foreign Born, Chicago, 111. 
Alice Ton il&« Secretary of Midwest Lithuanian Women's Coimcil 

Oeraldl.ne Washington-Vice- President of the Harriet Tubman Cliib 

of Chicago, 111. 
Elizabeth Wroton-Political Action Director of Food, Tobacco 

and Agricultural Uhion, Chicago Local #194 
Pauline Zigh Reed-Progressive Party Candidate, 111. Sec. of 

State 
MTs. Violet Robbitt-Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Comm. of Chicago 

Mrs. Isabel CanvReporter, Illinois Standard 

Mrs. Rose Ritman-Instltute Women's Council of Chicago 

Esther Feinglasa- United Club of Chicago, President 

Theresa G. Ehrlicb- Secretary of Civil Rights Comm. of National 

Lawyers Guild, Chicago. 
Mrs. l&bel ConracUSecretary of Washington Pension Union 

Nora McCoji^President, Aid for Dependent Children 

Hazel John son- Secretary, Congress of American Women of Seattle 



2452 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 30 (Page 3) 

3-3-3 

Veil Imown women leader slgaers continued: 

Iftnnle Thompeoi^-SxeeutWe Board Member of Tashington State a 

CIO Coxmcll 
Corlnne I'isher-Fresident of Northern Washington IWA Atuclliarjr 

Louise L. Beachwar^Vomen < 8 International League of Philadelphia 

Helen Laughll»-Local #155, I&iited Electrical, Badio and Uacbtne 

Worker 8 of Philadelphia 
Eutb Toun&-ttaited Electrical, Badio and Machine Dbrkers 

Balois Uoorbead« Hotel and dub Employees, Local 144 

Edythe Lutzker-CSiild Care Parents Association 

Bertha MoOoiraiwformer head of the National Maritime l&ilon 

Auxiliary 
Nina ETans-Bomestic Workers Iftilon 

Mildred McAdor:/s-IInited Barlem (Tenants and Consimiers Organization 

Adele Adam»>lbited Harlem Tenants and Consumers Organization. 

— a>«> 

uopuB 16-47 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2453 

CvETic Exhibit 32 



(lr^^uu. fL, 



TENTATIVE SLATE OF OFFICERS FOR MOWINATIONS COW'lTTEE 

Chairman: Thomas Quinn 7\ 

Vicc-Chaikman: Rev. C.E. McFacoen ^ 

F,..«.,.L Sfe.ST..r: - I^MT. \^,C,Cf?>V\«fc>^' ' 



CORI»ESP0NDIN AND RECORDINC 

Secretary: Margaret Russinnko 




Executive Secretary: Theresa Tur 

PcncERtHip C-(airvan; 
NANCE .Chairman: v 
Publicity Chairman: Bernice Hecker 

CHAIRMAN Legal Committee: Atty. Hyvan Schlessincer 



''^AMRAicN Director: "irf^J^y 



NER )^ 

X 



RECCMMrrNo that iommittee be authorized to increase its' numbers, and also to 

ADO AOOITIONAL COMMITTEES AS NEEDED. 



2454 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 33 

SCPTCMBCR 25, 1948 



Mr. .Villi am Albertson 

sccretary, communist party or western pennsylvania 

6ake«ill Building 

Room 426 

PiTTSBURCH, Pa. 

Dear Mr. Albertson: 

The PiTTSBURCH CiVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS IS HOLDING A CiVIL R I GHT8 

Conference in the Fort Pitt Hotel on Saturday afternoon, October 

16, for which I HAVE ENCLOSED A CALL. 

The PURPOSE of the Confffence »ill be to make plans to undertake 
A Mass Membership Caupaicn ano a Defense Fund Campaign. 

Since the Civil Rights Congress nationally has undertaken the 

DEFEASE OF THE TWELVE COMMUNIST PapTY LEADERS - THIS *ILL BE AN 
IMPORTANT PART OF OUR CONFERENCE PROGRAM. 

The Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress wmtKt'9 to extend to you, 
a leader of the communist party, an invitation to speak at our 
Conference on the case concerning the twelve indicted Communist 
Party leaders. 

We wish to bring to the public of Pittsburgh and area, the facts 
concerning this case. 

May we hear from you in the near future that you have accepted 

THIt invitation. 

Thank you, and - 



Best wishes, 



Exec. Secy. 
FITTStJURGH CIVIL fJIGHTS CONGRCSS 



Enc. I 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2455 

CvETic Exhibit 35 

PITT3BURGH CIVIL HIGHTo C0NGRU33 

P.O. Box 44 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

September 20, 1948 

Dear Friends: 

Today a little raore than three auid one haZJ" years after the end of a war against 
Fascism, the enemies of the people are stirring up a natiomd-de campaign of hysteria 
that has for its purpose the destruction of our civil liberties. 

The Taft-Hartley lav/ is used against the labor unions; the Un-American Committee 
brings before it thoae who differ vri.th its distorted views; the Immigration and 
Naturalization Bureau attacks the foreign bor.n; violence against the Negro people 
continues unabated; Progressive Party Gandid£.t.e, Henry A. I'aliace is the victim of 
organized violence and hoodlism; locdl Progressive Party leaders are arrested and 
are thrown into jail; and national liiaders of the Communist Party are arrested and 
are to be brought to a so-called trial two weeks before the National election. 

Recognizing its responsibility to expand the fight against these attacks, the Civil 
Rights Congress is calling a Corif'-;ren;e on Civil Rights for Saturday afternoon, 
October 16th at the Fort Fitt Hotel. In addition it is raising a "DiiFx^Noii FUND" 
of i»2,500 in Western Pennsylvania.! Ycur organization is invited to participate in 
this fight and we are therefore enclosing a "Call" to the Conference and a collec- 
tion list. 

We urge yo\ir organization to elect rep.-.. .mentation to thj.s conference. Those who 
are not elected delegates are invited to attend as individuals. V^e further appeal 
to your organization to either vote a contribution to the "Di)FliNSiL FUNT" or to use 
the enclosed collection list to ..ake a collection f rom your members and friends and 
contribute it to the fight. Bring your contribution to the conference or mail it 
to P.O. Box 44, Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 

Sincerely, 

y^^i^oe^i^^ vC/A^*^^^^' •Secretary 

Partial List of Sponsors '" 

Steve Mirokovich, Dist. Secy. Croition Benevolent Societies 
Nicholas Biltich, Dist. Secy. Serbian-Anericcn Federation 
Michael Hanusiak, Dist, Secy, Ukranian-Am^rican Fratcranl Union 
Matt Cvetic, Member Exec, Board, Slovenian-Anerican National Council 

-doe Rudiak, President American Slav Congress of "./estern Penna. 

'George Wuchinich, Lxec, Secy. Amorican Slav Congress of Hejtern Penna. 
Anna Devunich, Secy. Federation Croati on-American Women 
Frank Tady, Secy. Pittsburgh Chapter - Croation-/jnerican Council 
Paul Kluvo, Pres. Polonia Society 
Joseph Novak, Dist. Secy. Slovak '.lorkers Society 

(Organizations Listed For Purposes of Identification Only) 



2456 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 36 

PITTSBURGH CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

P.O. Box 44 

PlTTSBURSH, Pennsylvania 

September 28,1848 

Dear Friend: 

Today a little more than three and one half years after the end of a war acainst 
Fascism, the Civil Liberties of the American people are in crave peril. 

The Un-American (Thomas-Rankin) Committee no* presumes to set the standards for 
Americanism, Manufacturing widely felt scares and hysteria, it drags before it 
people from every field of american life who differ with their distorted views, 

But there is no word or act from Attorney General Clark or the FBI that stays the 
VIOLENCE against the Negro people of our land. 

The working people find themselves and their unions harresseo at every turn. The 
Taft-Hartley Law releases violent police attacks against picket lines. 

The right of minority political parties freely to function and bring their views to 
the people is attacked* Local Progressive Party leaders are arrested and thrown 
into jail. 

Think a minute tl These exact same methods of attack that brought Fascism to power 
WERE used in Germany I Are any of us immune to these attacks? 

RSCOGNIZING its RESPONSIBILITY TO SOLIDIFY THE SPfRIT OF RESISTANCE, AND TO EXPAND 
THE FIGHT AGAINST THESE ATTACKS, THE C|V|L RIGHTS CONGRESS IS CALLING A CONFERENCE 

ON Civil Rights for Saturday afternoon, October 16th, at the Fort Pitt Hotel, In 
ADDITION THE Civil Rights Congress is raising a "OEFEUSc FUND" of $2,500 IN Western 
Pennsylvania, Your organization is invited to participate in this fight, therefore 

WE ARE enclosing A "CALL". 

We urge your organization to elect representation to this Conference, Those who 
are not elected delegates are invited to attend as individuals. we further appeal 
to you or your organization to vote a contribution to the "defense fund". we again 
urge you to join with us in this conference for working out a program upon which 
we can march forward to becoming the civil rights defense organization for the 
people of this area, 

Sincerely, 

Thomas Quinn - Chairman 

Theresa Turner - Executive Secretary 

Partial List of Sponsors 

Joe Rudiak - President American Slav Congress of Western Penna, 

George Wuchinich - Exe^tive Secretary, American Slav Congress of Western Penna, 

Rev, CE, McFaooen - Bethany Baptist Church 

Rev, W,C, Crenshaw - Carter's Chapel - CME 

Alex Wright - Vice Chairman - Progressive Party 

Nick Lazari - Bus, Agent Local 237 Hotel & Restaurant Employees Alliance 

Stanley Loney - President District 6 UE-CIO 

Organizations listed for purposes of identification only 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2457 

CvETic Exhibit 87 ( Page 1 ) 
DRAFT COPY 

RESOLUTION: TO BUILD THE PITTSBURGH CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

W<EREAS Thc Civil Rkhts Coscvesr is a National Orcanization for Americans who 
I 
BCLievc free:o.j, C;v:'- libi-rties, the Bill or Richts :s wor-h ncKTiNi 

for; COVPOCE'j or \.orA^ Ci'-'OTrRS with individual MEMBE^SKIP- Ac^r|i.!«-ED 

National nc uo^.al Jf-U iJ.voMS, Church, Veteran, Necro, Jewish ano 
Civil Orc^nuat .on3: , 

i>N<) iWiERZAS^ Civil Rthts Congress MitaPEPS are people from all walks of l:fe — 
■■■HA'/r.xs, 'or.:;K.t. :£.A--G'is. sc:iNTisTS, wr!Ters, /irtistSj ministers, 

iWA'.u CI ■ I or »;EN!, 

AMD WMEl"'S 'i.' r''"")S^".< '" t:-.~ -• ' . R'Shts Congress i' a procam kor protectino 

>ND ■■ i EW:<'; A/E=;C''.'3 r.fvOCRATIC RifiH: BASrl- U^ON THE FINEST TRAOIT.ON^ 

,,«■ o, -^ V 9 ■ o:' •' 
NOW TUf rrcQ:^- ^^ ;.,■> r"[OOo." Tr.'. C .vii. RIGHTS Co^'-pr -- -^rz-o .. AS follows: 



"We BEuiE/i: .N AM r^if^Mr the Coms'itution p^ th?. ,.• rTED 'S'atf.s, we fight for the 

EXTENS:0'J C- T-<£ H'^S'S, 0'.' AS AK TSr.n •.NCEP Tt't C ONr". ; Tl.'' '■< , T 1 ALL AMERICANS 

recardlesb or racs, religion or pol 1' : c xl lel'!"^! wc. s'.amo with the united states 
Supreme Court when it said: 'If there ;s /n^ fixed star n ojr constellation, it 

IS THAT NO official, HIGH OR PETTY, CAN PRtSCRIBE WHAT SHALL BE ORTHODOX IN 
POLITICS, nationalism, religion, OR OTHER MaVTERS OF OPINION OR FORCE CITIZENS TO 

CONFESS er word or act their faith therein,' 



VIC DO FURTHER RESOLVE that we will go from this Conferenoc to build the Civil 
Rights Congress in the Pittsburgh area into a strong peoples' civil 
rights defense organization, through adoption at this conferencc or 

PLANS for a mass MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN. 

Copies to be sent to Presiocnt Truman, Attorncv General Tomc Clark and to all 

OTHER public OFFICIALS CONCERNED. ALSO TO ALL ORGANIZATIONS AND THE PUBLIB PRESS. 



Passed at thi Fobt Pitt HoTCLt Obvobcr 16, 1948, 

BV OELCGATCS TO A PlTTSBURQH CiVIL RIGHTS CONFERCNtC, 

HELD BV THE Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress. 



Thomas Quinn - Confcrcncc Chaikman 
63178 — 50 — pt. 2 — 7 ^CGv Rusinko - CoNrenENce Secretarv 



2458 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 37 (Page 2) 



DRAFT COPY 



ON SUPPORT TO THE CO.-*(ilTTEE AGAINST DISCRIMINATION 
ON SUPPORT TO THE DEFENSE OF NATHAN ALBERT 



WHEREAS our OF THE STRUGGLE OF THE YOUNC PROGRESSIVES OF PiTTSBUBGH 
TO BREAK DOWN DISCRIMINATION AT THE HIGHLAND PARK PUBLIC SWIMMING POOL LAST 
SUMMER, HhS DEVELOPED A MOVEMENT INCLUDING BROAD FORCES OF THE PEOPLE OF 

Pittsburgh, who have joined togetkeh to work for a mun i c i pal FEPC ordinance, 
as well as for a state-wioe law; 

AND *HEREAS this movement for an FEPC, especially in our own community 
in the City of Pittsburgh, is an affirmation of the bssic civil rights of all 
citizens and can be won through a united movement of the people; 

AND VhHEREAS among those at the Highland Park Swimming Pool interested 
IN establishing the right of all citizens to its use, one Nathan Albert was 

ARRESTED ON A TRUMPED-UP CHARGE OF INCITING TO RIOT; 

NOW THEREFORE we do vote our support to the Pittsburgh Committee Against 

D'SCRIMINATION AND WE DO URGE ALL ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS HERE ASSEMBLED, 
T'> GIVE THEIR FULL SUPPORT AND HELP TO THIS COMMITTEE TO THE END THAT ITS WORK 
SHALL BE SUCCESSFULLY CARRIED THROUGH; 

AND VC DO FURTHER RFSOLVE that the defense of Nathan Albert will receive 

OUR FULL SUPPORT AND A|», BOTH IN THE BATTER TO BRING THE CASE TO PUBLIC ATTEN- 
TION, AND IN THE MATTER OF CONTRIBUTING TO THE COSTS OF H I S DEFENSE. 

16, l<)48 

Passed at Fort Pitt Hotel, October, 
Pittsburgh Civil Rights Conference. 

Thomas Quinn - Conference Chairman 

Peggy Rusinko - Conference Secretary 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2459 

CvETic ExHiHiT 37 (Page 3) 

DRAFT COPY 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESC T-EDGE: "I WON'T LIVE WITH JIM CROW" 

For to'^ long, America has sufpered under thc. shame or white supremacy. 

For too L0N6, the racists, the Klansmen, the bisots, the Oixiecrats, in and out 
OP OUR Congressional halls, have ridden roughshod over our national honor and 

OVER THE KUMAN DIGNITY OP THC NECRO PEOPLE. 

It IS TIME TO WIPE THE SCOURGE OP JiM CROW PROM THE PACE OP AMERICA I 

|t IS TIME POR WHITE Americans, who believe in the principles upon which our 

NATION was founded, TO ACCEPT THEIR RESPONSIBILITY TO END THE EVIL OP JiM CROW 

«.-;ich plagues our land. 

20 million of us) united in the oetlcrm i n av i on that we will no longer live with 
Jim Crow, can end this scource porever. 

20 MILLION OF us, refusing to use facilities "for WHITE only", refusing to abide 

BY shameful segregation laws, rules and customs, WILL BRING A NEW BREATH OP 

freedom to America 

WE THEREFORE ADoPT THE FXLOWING CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS FLEDGE, FOR ourselves, and 

«ILL BRING IT TO A,.L ORGAN I ZAT I O'l S TO WHICH WE BELONG: 

PLEDGE 

As a white American, with an abiding faith in our 
Constitution and a democratic hatred for practices which 
degrade and humiliate men because op race, religion, 

nationality or COLOR, I REFUSE TO LIVE ANY LONGER WITH 

the shame op our nation — white supremacy. 

Its evils have plagued our fair land too long, They 
have defiled all decent ways op living por decent americans. 
They have sapped our people's moral strength and, in the 

EYES of the rest OF THE WORLD, HAVE TURNED THE TORCH QP 
liberty INTO A SYMBOL OP RACIST ARROGANCE. 

I KNOW THAT OUR COUNTRY CANNOT SURVIVE AND FLOURISH 
AS A FREE LAND AND REMAIN A LAND OF JiM CROW. 

Therefore, in the spirit of Thomas Jefferson, who 
SWORC "eternal hostility against every form of tyranny 

OVER the mind of MAN," 



I PLEDGE 



I PLEDGE 



t PLEDGE 



eternal hostility against discrimination, 
segregation and prejudice. 



to refuse to abide by laws, rules, or 
customs that degrade my fellow americans 
through discrimination, segregation or 
Jim Crow. 



no peace with those who support these 
alien and abhorrent evils. instead, i 
shall work daily to abolish hatred of 
man by man and to create a respect for 
human rights and the dignity op all men» 

Copies to be sent to all organizations and to the public press. 

PsssEo at Fort Pitt Hotel, October 16, 1946, Civil Rights Conference. 

Thomas Quinn - Conference Chairman 
Peggy Rusinko - Conference Secretary 



2460 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PEiIOTSYLVANTA 

CvETic Exhibit 37 (Page 4) 
ORAFT COPY 

RESOLUTIONt ON FEDERAL POLICE FftOTECTlOM TO MCRiCAN IIE6R0E8 VOTlM IN THE 80UTM 
Millions or Nccko Americans in the powa non-poll tax southern states ano in the 

SEVEN poll tax ST^TES WILL cE^K ''O £XE'?CISE THEIR RISHTS AS CITIZENS BY DEMANDIN6 
TO VOTE IN THE COt/'NS ■uF b .Di.H" i M i.Lfc;TI0N8| 

In both CASES THEY H'LL F Ai'L Mca VIOLcNCE, LVHCHINO ANO POLICE TERROR !P THCY 
AT'EM.-T -0 EXERCISE THIS E'-EME'/TAL AMERICAN RIGHTI 

AMOJA'hF^LAS '■■'RESiriHT Truman ka? au:hor;tv to use the police power or the Federal 

60VES"Mt'''' '•0 PROtfC" ^■f'.St Ci'dZENG .n EXERCISING THEIR INALIcTHASLE RIOHT TO 
VO-,E ..N lif^EMPtS 2 - 

iL^It=.i£f!2fi .'!£_£ii£!!:i[l ■'"''*■'■ "'"'"* ^P.TEREN'JE on '■ V .. R CHT8 KEUO AT PlTTSOUROH 

th;s ;6Ti, o„Y >,f Ci--.c?f:.!, ;9-'V£, anc FEP<;t- ;;?n?inc th'".3\.\'3'- or ctizens in the 

PlTTSbL'-'CM AfZA, ••}•*')•..,-, THl'P OP'^AN . ZATION'S ANO Ai ! •. " ' V DUALS; CALL UPON 

Presiient pjf/As >•(■ ''J ;,se hi-! a'"'k;i».;tv as oh;-- .CAiJ-T'-r .'p i');r;'"Tiho the 

PEOERAL POLICE PO*fR TO P^C'-.t' iJrCRC C:Ti"ENr VVROJSHo. lHr: SnUT!! [v THEIR 
RI8HT TO VOTE, 



Copies to tc sent to President Truwan^ Attomcy General Tom Clark and to all 

OTHER PUDLIO OPPieiALS CONCERNED. ALSO TO ALL ORSANIZATIONS AND THE PUBLIC MCVB* 



Passed at the Fort Pitt Hotel, October I|, 1948, 

Bv delbsatbs to the Pittsburoh Civil Riohts Conpercnm, 

HELD BV the PiTTBBURSN CtVIL RlOMTS CONSRSAS. 



Thomas Qhinn • Conpsrbnoc Chairman 
pcssv rvsinko - conperencc scorctarv 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2461 

CvETic Exhibit 37 (Page 5) 

WAFT COPY 

RESOLUTION: ON THE OEFENSE OF TME 12 COMWWISTS 

Our country and our people would valk blindly towards destruction were 
wc to FORcer in this moment or our history the bitter lessons or Hitlerite Germany, 
The burning of the Reichstac came early in 1933, at the outset or the public 
CAREERS or Hitler, Goerins and their cartel backers, Stinnes, Schact, Thyssen and 
those gentlemen or Krupps and the Farben Industrie. 

The Reichstag Fire was blamed on the Communists, but all the world came 
to know later, that Goerinq and Hitler had encineered it in order to outlaw the 
German Communist Party, and then quickly to choke off the trade union movement, to 
stifle religious expression, wipe out the Jewish people by mass murder, to enslave 
whole peoples including the German people, and finally, under tke slogans of the 
ant I -Com intern Pact, to inflict the uveasurable torture and slaughter or 40 to 50 
millions or human beings in the holocajs'' of World '*'4R li 

We dare not Aa*:N, in i948, cffcr up our kat;om and our people, nor the 
peoples of the world in atomic destruction, for the dubious luxury of an American 
VERSION or THE Reichstag fire, engineered this time by the American counterparts 
or those infamous German cartellists. 

Yet the indictment or the twelve Communist leaders - William Z. Foster, 
national chairman or the Communist Party - Eugene Oenn;s, its general secretary > 
Jack Stachel, national educational director - John Williamson, national labor 
secretary - Benjiman J. Davis, City Councilman or New York City - Henry Winston, 
national organizational secretary - Irving Potash, trade union leader - John Gates, 
EDITOR or the daily V/ORKER - Gil Green, chairman or the Party in Illinois - 
Carl Winter, chairman or the Party in Michigan - Gus Hall, chairman or the Party 
IN Ohio - and Robert Thompson, chairman or tre Party in New York, - whose trial 
began in New York yesterday, cannot bc characterized as anything else. It is an 
attempt «v bo-calleo "legal" means, to outlaw the communist party in the united 
States. We have learned at terrible cost that in every country in the world where 
THIS has aecN carried through, there has followed, just as in Germany, the complete 
annihilation of the peoples' rights, in their persons and in their organizations; 
AND instead the rule of fascist terror, enslavement, murder and war. 

This is the impelling reason why the defense of these !2 Communists it 

THE JOB OF EVERY AMERICAN WHO TREASURES FREEDOM, REGARDLESS Or H 1 8 OWN POLITICAL 
BELIErt - AND Wt AGREE WITH THE STATEMENT Or HENRY A. WALLACE IN WHICH HE SAID - 
"DEriNSC OF CIVIL RIGHTS OF COMMUNISTS IS THE FIRST LINE IN THE DEFENSE OF THE 



2462 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 37 (Page 6) 

Draft Copy 

Resolution) on the oefensc of the 12 Communists - (coNTiNUto) 

LIBERTIES OF A DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE," (uNQUOTe) - ANO THIS IS WHY WE BRINC IT TO ALL 

Americans of all polit'cal persuasions - 

But there are other reasons. 

The Communist Party :s now and has been for 29 years, * lecau party in 
THIS country. We observe that the Supreme Court of the U.S. has ruled in the 
famous Schneioermann case in which Wendell Willkie appeared in behalf of the 
Communist defendant, that the Communist Party "desired to achieve its purposes by 

peace- UL AMD democratic MEANS,,...." 

The indictment agains' its leaders is sased not upon any charge of 

COMMlSSrON of acts 0- rrSCE ANn VIOLENCE ~ THt LANGCAGE OF T.'.c 'NOlCrMtNT CHARGES 
"teaching", "advocacy", CF yARX'?Mj HERE AGAIN WE VlJCT NOTE THAT LAST APRIL 
ATTOPNtY GFNCPAL T-iM CLARX H!W;S£LF I'l A PUBL;? ST/.-'eHENT TO CONGRESS; SAID THAT 
NO EVIPEUCE EXISTS ■'0 Ji.'STt'^V '^PC ?•£ rJT 1 KG THE CCM.\«,'N ET PARTY OR ITS LEADERS 
EITHER FOR AOVOCAT'NG FORCIBLE OVSF .I'nOW OF ' KE GOV'JRV'<ilJT OR FOR SERVING AS 
FOREIGN AGENTS, .7 TH£ AMERICAN PE3PLE WERE NQt -, C I.E ;- ?r SL'CH A CARICATURE OF 

American constitutional law, " 'caching", ''th ink:ng", "/.cvr.cATif.'G" doctrines 

ONPLEASING TO A REP. HOWARD SmI'H OK VIRGINIA, OR A JOHN E. RaNKIN, CF MISSISSIPPI 
WOULD BECOM: CRIM^So 

WE THEREFORE CONDEf*! the ndiCTMENT of the '2 Communist leaders as an 

immediate and basic threat to our LiBERV'ES, AND OIMUND 'HAT ATTORNEY GENERAL TOM 

Clark drop the prosecutions in these cases. We support the Civil Rights Congress 

WHICH has undertaken THE LEGAL DEFENSE* 

\«E DO NOT SEPARATE this fight from the ficht against Jim Crow, against 
anti-Semitism, for world peace, for the right to strike, to oppose Taft-Hartley, 

We accept the responsibility of raising $ in Western Pennsylvania 
AS part of the national CRC defense fund in these cases, 

WE RESOLVE to bring the message of this resolution to thousands of 

CITIZENS IN Western Pennsylvania, through the public press and radio, and through 

our various organizations, and by all means at our command, so that they may be 

ROUSED to the struggle for their political and civil freedoms which are endangered 

BY these indictments and trials. 

Copies to be sent to President Truman, Attorney General Tom Clark and to all other 
public officials concerned. Also to all organizations and the public press. 

Passed at the Fort Pitt Hotel, October 16, 1948, by delegates to the Pittsburgh 
Civil Rights Conference, held by the Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress, 

Thomas Wuinn - Conference Chairman 
Peggy Rusinko - Conference Secretary 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2463 

CvETic Exhibit 38 (Page 1) 

SUJajJoTIOKb FOR SH^iW.IluS 

r.--^?Ar^riCN FOR CIVIL ILISHTS OOMFL-.l-NCE - OCT:) :U. 16, 194 



•oico Significant dates and events In recent history 

A. Feb. 1. 1933 - Ficsident von HindenberT of Jermany, ti-so "lesser evil' 
wham "^niddle-of-the-roiia." and "Sacialists" had united 
to elect, naiLCS Auslf Kiiitr as Chancellor of jei-iany. 
general elections to be holi- Uai'di 5th, s. littls ove;' 
a Eonth Ip.te.*". 



;.7, 19!^? 



1. 9:30 p.m. "The Rsiohstv.g ij on fi-'ij!" A shockc-d 
populace pours into the streets of Bei'lin. 
Elections are six days off. Kazi P-iity ci'inot 
hoye to win a majority of the votes. 

2. (Joering, first to arrive at scene a fe-' minutes 
after fire is reported: "This is a Gommuniat 
outrage!" 

3. Hitler, ai' living a lew ujinubes jLai,ex , i.o nea 
voi. fapou ana uO ^oou^cxc: Tut Coiiuuyjai.SwS 
must be destroyed. .Ve must protect Jeraaay from 
the CoKinunists!'* 

4. That night Hitler proceadeJ with hia "protection". 
ilass arrests bejan of Coiurministd, trade unionists, 
progressives. Confusion, fright, hysteria struck 
the aorsian people. Ilev/spapers and radios carried 
on a frenzied din against the Communist menace". 



G. Uarch 6. 1933 HK 



D. Ua" 2. 1933 



Six days later, a terrified, hysterical and divided 
German people j;ave the elections to Hitler. 



Two months later, ier:ian trade unions occupied by 
Nazi storm troopers. Trade union ar;;ani2 tions smashed. 
Their funds, hundreds of millions of msrks, anabse i 
fron the dues of the /orkers, taien ovsr by the Nazi 
i-a'-ty I^bor Tront, heade ! by Dr. ?vObert Ley. Honey of 
the v/orkers use'l to organize Labor Front of Kazi Party. 



D. 3y July, 19 33 



All political parties destroyed; illo^lized — excejt onV 
the i-arty of ti4iBnOeri:ian 3ig business, the trusts -ini 
cartels, the p^rty of lu-np;.s, Stinnes, Sch'-cht, the 
le "I lers of Farbenlndustrie, Hitler et al, the \'azi I'a.ty 

By thi- date also, their planned program of annihila- 
tion and e;:teriiin'jt ion of all minorities llnon-Aryan") 



2464 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 38 (Page 2) 









-._, traja-awi 



.vl-n i 



-V- 




COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2465 

CvETic Exhibit 38 (Page 3) 



t .>■■. : in; ! -;. nt j ; 



J.a.l^cJ"'^ ''*', 



^•ci.. i - ; »j , 



'.fi V U ir .^n .-^i' 



'•■' ///yV/ 



2466 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 38 (Page 4) 



.. -■ .^- ■- - . 




^> 












^ 












■ ^• '-- . ' f 


by 


'•;i. 














'•'-• 


■■- 


■ -"■ 




, ., 




- . ' - - ■ ' - - 






.t.t. :.„.;. 




.: . - 












4i;r..- . ^ . 


,. - ^. ■,.•• 






.11 


/" to fas-.iffi;.. . 






ijstolClsaaam-isrJJBlia 


^ ■ ^'-x' '^- 


:.. *: 


.. ..■ 


■.. , 


•- , ■-■■•-'■ 


.,, , -^... - . 


.'• 


■, ] i^.- ^ 1 ■ • ' 
















Vj ■- :^ '. ;.. :- - 












. *. )f :.iri,.- 




Xi.-.v-. ■ t - 


-3 














3t^.;' i-\ V-.i^ - : 










. ; ■ . . 




:. -■: 


......n..-; 


^ ; * f ■ i i ■ ■ 










. 






if 


•." .'lit 


... 


... 


jl^ :. . :j1_ ". . 








C. ..-c . 




."re- J 


-. 




. a:';.r.a •-.. 


tion, 


ths att -:. 1 in 


:i - v. 




rt. , 


-:t-. 


• 








1. Inc. 






,-. 


: .. :, f 


Ir-.u./ty, u. -^n 


t..^ 


-e^. .. .„., I, In 


the iout;-., 


,..,: 








i e3 . 




.i-^j^lVw.. ;.?■ c;.ii 


;dji;:^ j.-: 


— 













COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2467 

CvETic Exhibit 38 (Page 5) 



r^ 









jr.„-ji: 



'.■r-a4-w"i.-.i' i^I'i. w>^ j-,vu..''.in/ -^ut • '.ttee tita sett the ; + :.;"U'.'^ 



«:'■ ■ i'l-'-'ti* 









2468 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 38 ( Page 6 ) 

1. Ott Hegro rl>;-t6 

a. civil rights aiii le^al defeaee in at^ecific oasfE 
b.i.rnajor cacipalgne : 

1» 4- southpra st' tee witL no poll-tax (coaceatration on thoa 
to oeLifaid Trur.ari tcteinistr' tlon furnish -federal police 
• "..'er to protect voters in Nova-ter 



S. £; :-Llli n i i-'.n-itur^e fr-^m hite A ertcars "i .111 not 1-ve 
••I'itih Jim Crow" (pledge cards; , buttons, etc. 



., On rights oi l..bor 

vs. Taft Hwtley 

le.^s.! defense victims picket lines, etc. 



3. Teratcvd.ion politicaj. minorities 
R. cocwuni sts 
h. rr o-retstive f-rty 



Jfete Albert case and ililaad awiiir.iiiig pool victory. 






^ 

^ 



.1 



r 



^ 



-H* 



>^ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2469 

CvETic Exhibit 38 (Page 7) 

(Draft zopf r>f 1 aflat t* be printed) 




M BLL /^niencf^ni 



rrT. OR HAVE YOU EViE B£QJ GUILTI OF: 

■tHJ-xwantlng peace and protesting the danger of being pished into ■ 
atomic war by the brass hats? 

*-;«-Being angered at President Truoan's lip-service to the rights 
of the Negro people while a national KlJONVOKATION of the terror- 
istic arri violesnt KKK at Stone Mountain, Georgia is permitted? 

■»«*Pro testing the rising cost of bread, milk, oleo, diapers, rent? 

♦^Higp^ijjjijjg out agalart the scandalous lack of housing for veteraas 
and others? 

AND DO TOU THINK SOUND AMERICANI31 MEANS DEFENDING TO TOE DEATH THE RIGHT 
OF A PERSON TO EXPRESS KIS OPINION FREELY, EVEN THOUGH YOU OPPOSE THAT 
OPIMION? 

*«''*If your answer is yes to these questions, then your democ ratio rights 
as an American citizen are threatenedl 

^«*Recently leaders of the Gonmunist Party of the United Stf.tes were 
arrested. ...Next it might be you because your answer is yes to these ques- 
tions.,., or because you're a unionist who opposes the Taft-Hartley Law.... 
or a Negro who iBsists on full citizenship for his people.. oor a scientist 
who resents brass hat lAvasion of his free inquiry,. ..or the writer who 

would write truthfully of his times or a voter wto believes in a new 

party 

*-*f*Communists are now being persecuted oecause their beliefs are un- 
popular with the Administration and the SOt'i Congress .. You may be next 
because ycur beliefs may be unpopular. History shows that the pattern of 
emerging fascism starts first with the Conmonists, then the trade unionists, 
Jews, Negroes, Catholics. Remember Ger.nany, Italy, .Spainl 



NOW IS THE TDS 10 STAND UP,.. .AND BE 3DUNTI<Di 

^HHHHiviirite tJ Pres. Truman aid Attorney Gen-> Tom Clark urging them to telt tlie 
indictments and a;'rests of Gonmunist Partj^ j.eaders. 

if-fHHHiWrite to yoin- Congressman 3id Senators a" th9 Special Session of Ocngress 
to pasd legislation fbr ctringait price control, low cost housi;ig., anti- 
poll tax a«i anti-lynch legislation, and prevent passage of the Mundt-^lixon 
Bill In any form, Eiscuss these questicm at your organization, union- 

fraternal group and pass resolutions. 

«HHt*RusK FUNDS TO THE CIVIL REMTS (DKGRESS, P.O. BOX 1*1^ PITTSBIEGH 30, PA. 



2470 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit H8 (Page 8) 



C. p. Statement 
On Frame-up 

The follotving statement teas authorixed by Wil- 
liam Z. Foster, national chairman of the Communist 
Party, and Eugene Dennis, its general secretary, a 
few minutes before they were arrested on warrants 
iasud in connection with indictments handed down 
by a federal grand jury in New York Cityt 

"Only a few months ago, Attorney General Tom 
Clark was forced to admit to the House Un-American 
Committee that he had not one scintilla of evidence 
that any Communist was guilty of espionage, forca 
and violence, or service to any foreign power. 

"National and world events, as well as the history 
of the blue ribbon jury said to have returned the 
indictments, leave no doubt as to the identity of the 
real criminals and the nature of their crime. 

"The American people can now see to whait 
desperate provocations Truman is driven in an effort 
to win the election, by hook or crook. As the New 
York Sun flatly stated, the reported indictment of 
the Communists is neatly timed to embarrass th« 
new people's party now holding its founding con- 
vention in Philadelphia. Terrified of the growing 
support for the Wallace-Taylor ticket, the Demo- 
cratic high command is seeking to brand the new 
party aa "criminal" because among the opponents 
of Wall Street's two old parties and their candidates 
are the Communists, who also join with all other 
progressives in supporting the new people's anti- 
war party. 



"THIS AMERICAN VERSION of the Reichstag 
Are is the domestic counterpart of the criminal bi- 
partisan attempts to turn the war in Berlin from cold 
to hot. It will be used for this purpose in the special 
session of Congress, as well as to further advance 
the session's partisan purposes by trying to blitz 
through the Mundt-Ferguson bill. 

"It is for these sinister objectives that the 
President nobody wanted as a candidate seeks to 
use as a scapegoat the Communist Party — the most 
consistent fighter against the bi-partisan war- 
mongers and fascists. The Communist Party, its 
leaders and members serve and have always served 
(Continued on Page 11) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2471 

CvETic Exhibit 40 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



OEORCe MARSHAll WILUAM L PAnERSON 

Chairman, Board of Dirootort Nafionol Exoeutiv« S«c')r 



DR. HABRY F. WARD 

NofI Honorary Chorrmon 

NofI Vic« Chairman 
GEORGE F. ADDES 
HUGH BRYSON 
CHARLES COLLINS 
DASHIELL HAMMEH 
REV. CHARLES A HILL 
HON. STANLEY NOWAK 
HON. JERRY J. O-CONNELl 
lEE PRESSMAN 
PAUL ROBESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 



LEN GOLDSMITH 




RAYMOND C. INGERSOLl 


Halionol Director 




Nal 


ional Treai 


iurer 


Novemb' 


er 


23, 


191+8 










/'■ 




Theresa Turner 
F.O. Box 1+4 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dear Theresa: 

Enclosed is your official receipt $57b.OO 
which amount has been credited to your state quota on 
the Defense Fuhd. 

You know of course that the trials are set 
to begin January 17, 191+9 and we will need tens of 
Thousands of dollars for the legal and all other 
expenses involved in the trials. 

V.'e are sure you are doing everything possible 
to raise funds on the campaign and that we can t ount 
on you to send another check soon. 

Sincerely, 

'A'llliam L. Patterson 
TiXFrbs 
uopwa 16-1+7 



2472 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 42 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

205 EAST 42nd STREET. NEW YORK 17. N. Y. • MURRAY Hill 4-6640 



OtOHOE MAMMAll WIIUAM L rATnUOH UN OOIDSMITM 

dHritmon. toord ml Oiractwi N«N*iwl htyHn 1«> N«li.ii«l Olrtltr 



(AYMONO C. INOERSOU 
N«f/oMl TrMlvrar 



DC HAMT f. WAW 



N<f I Vk* CMrmmli 
OlOKE r. AOOtS 
HUOH (ItYSON 
CHARLES COlllNS 
MSHIEll HAMMin 
■EV. CHARLES A. HILL 
HON. STANLEY NOWAK 
HON. JERRY J. O-CONNELL 
Lit PRESSMAN 
PAUL RORESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 
AUiRET WILLIAMS 



Daombar 21, 1948 



Mis* Th«r«M Tvmar 
?. 0. Box 44 
Plttt^ui:^. P*. 

Scar 1b«r«a»: 

I will ba la ?ltt«burch Jaa«U7 
4, S, 6 A 7th, laatMtA of th« dajra Z arrancad 

to ba thara whaa I aaw jou laat, 

till /oa plaaso taka thia 19 vlth 
Bill aad Stava aad plaa aoaa aotlTltlaa for ao 
duarlnc thoaa four teja. 



Qi9:ra 
ttopaa lk47 




COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 44 



2473 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HIU 4-6640 



C€0«GI MA«SHAll 

ClxiiVniiin. e««rd ^ Oft 



WIU.I*« t f*TIC»SON 



lEN OOlDSMirH 
Nah«n*) DJr«<to/ 



RAYMOND C lNGE»SOll 



Dl nutl f WAIO 

N<,ll Hono/o., Clio.rmon 

No' I Vh;« Cfioirmort 
GEOiet f. ADDtS 
HUON IRTSOM 
CHAKUS COUINS 
OASMItU HAMMITT 
REV CHAU.es a Hill 
HON STANLEY NOWAK 

HON Knr 1. ocONNtu 

lEE fWSSMAN 
PAUl «OIIS0N 
MlltANOA MITH 



-DDAu. oatfms 



Dear It-tMsdi 



JametT 13. 1949 



KgEMPMH 



9k« CatC and the procreeeire p<«aB^«*tt«se Is yr>w 
•tata havt raised to date the »« of >i-4^-a. ^ V^ " of a (joota 

Because of thl* failure to seet the quota la your 

■tata, a* in other state*, enly^'..^__^ has heen collected 

to dkte of the $^0,000. we have i>eA cttift.*^paiihg for>— VHIOR 

IS mt mimcuK uses. 

««th the trtels OD, the aeed for futds is «b iaatedlate 
BecessUy* le w*ll sot ho able to preciire the daJly court record*, 
nor Baintaln an adequate staff ef coopetsnt laiqrer»-'ve ^U. tie 
usable to 'issue a nunher of pieces ef aaterlal ready for the pre*** 
nor place a series of nevapifier advert) saumta that are also troadjr 
for the press. Ifo oaanot jfl.mi for asgr reaeeaable use of the radio* 
nor ■atntoJn any adequate opemt'on of a OBa^eAgo—XT VI DOH^T (JM 

ruB)s nassDii'm.r, 

Rush fusds today. Oat on the telepbese aad call aU. 
procresslve frtacds aod all posslhle orgost^ satlos** Seed out 
misegeacy irire*, letters, etc* 

Organise eateTEenay eoisalttee* to go out and via&t 
every possible source, and ':ike.tever you collect, don't delAy oa« 
day. sesd it In at once* 



xnpm 16-1^ 



»Bc«raly yowr*, /O,^ 

vtLKiui L. vAvrssaas 

Ifettonal dsentlre Secretary 



^S. nease d>o« th^ s letter to the re*pon*ihle leaders of the 
procTesslve orcac^sationa Is your city or atcte. 




2474 COMMTJNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENT^SYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 4(5 (Page 1) 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS OF \VESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
1005 Bercer Building 
Pittsburgh, 19, Pa, 
May 3, 1949 

EMERGENCY LEGISLATIVE BULLETIN 



SENATE HE'RINGS START ON l,.UNOT-FERGUSON-NI XON BILL (S.II94) 

The Senate Judiciary Sub-Committee opened hearings on the f.toNOT- 
Ferguson Bill where Senator Ferguson is scheduled to speak in favor of "^h": 
BILL. This bill is similar to the ^iUNDT-NlxoN Bill(Police State Bill) of 
the 80th Congress which was defeated in the Senate only by mass public 
protest. 

It is imperative that there be vigorous opposition on a mass BAS!S 
TO THIS MEASURE FOR IF IT PASSES IT WILL RESULT IN OUTLAWING MINORITY 
political PARTIES, VIHTUALLY ALL PROGRESSIVE ORGANIZATIONS, DESTROY THE LABOr? 

movement, and seriously limit academic freedom and the freedom to reliqio'j^ 
bel'ef. Free speech, free thought, and the use of free press shall be 
CENSBREO, The Bill of Rights will be undermined and destroyed by this Bill, 

ACTION PROGRAM 

1. Get as many outst.nding community leaders and representatives of 
organizations in your community to wire Senator Pat ^lcCARREN, Shairman-, 
Senate Judiciary Committee, Washington, D.C. , for time to be heard in 

opposition to the ^lUNDT-FERGUSON BiLL (S, I 1 94- ) 

2. Get as many organizations ano individuals in your locality to wire 

OR WRITE to your SENATOR, URGING HIM TO APPEAR BEFORE THE JUDICIARY SUB- 
committee in opposition to this bill, 

3. Start raising the issue before organizations and try «o obtain 
rcsolutl'ons in opposition to tm s bill, copies ow which should be sent to 
Senator McCarren, your own Senator, and to the National Civil Rights Congress. 

Tift IS PRECIOUS'— ACTION IS NEEDED NOW 



The Monot-Fergu son-Nix on Bill is called an effort to "gag the millions 
of Americans who demand an end to the cold war and the defeat of the war- 
breeding NOBTTH ATLANTIC PACT, 

The provisions of the bill constitute a legislative blueprint for 
FASCISM. This bill must and will be defeated as was thc Mundt-Nixdn Bill 
of the 80th Congress by a mass protest of the people who refuse to be 
lcgislateo into fascism. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2475 

CvETic Exhibit 46 (Page 2) 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS OF .VESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
1005 BERGER B'it:_n!MG 

PITTSBJRG'J, 19, Pa. 

IM13EDI *TE hCTION PROGRAM 



i, TELEGRAM TO SE^A"^Cr^ C ''^i Mi ,Y„ CHAIRrv.AM 

For.E:c'i re:i.-<ticn3 ■:c4ii.iTTEE 

WA.'iHif.CTON, D.C. 



PUBLIC RALLV, '-/SSl.EY CEK'TER, PITTSS'.IPGM IwaY ^LTH— DEIviAND PUBLIC 

hearings on north atlantic war pact. ive call 0»j -qu to vote against 

war appropriations. 

civil rights concpess of >ive stern 
pennsylvami; 

2. sake copy of telegram sen5 to: 

I. SENATOR jnxrH MmRTIN 2. SENATOR FRANCIS t.lYFRS 

SENA'F OFFICE BUILDING SENATI C"<-"ICE BL'IL'ilNR 

WASH-MGTON, O.D. WaSHHjGTON, OX. 



#. TELEGRAM TO SENATOR EASTLAND, CHAIR\iAN 

SENATE JUDICIARY COf. \i!"'TcE 

SENATE BUILDING--V.ASHINGTON, D.C. 

PUBIC RALLY OF PERSONS DEMAND YOU TO OVERRULE SUB-COL*-i|TTEE 

OF TAKING UNCONSTITUTIONAL PRIVILEGE OF DEMANDING EACH TESTIFYING JITNEGS 

TO INDENT I FY THEIR POLITICAL AFFLIATION. 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS OF 
V€STERN PENNSYLVANIA. 



^. TELEGRAM TO SENATOR PaT iuCCARREN, CHAlR^lAN 
SENATE JUDICIARY COKAnlTTEE 
.VASHINGTON, D.C. 

PUBLIC RALLY OF PERSONS, ;€SLEY CENTER, PITTSBURGH, 

DEMAND TU.E TO BE HEARD IN OPPOSITION TO ANTI -DENiOCRhTIC, UNCONSTITUTIONAL 
MUNDT -FERGUSON-NIXON BILL. 



2476 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENT^f^SYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 51 

ILK8 SX8T 
2315 K^irli* Av«. 
Fgb. , 19 fa. 

jBa-'itry 29, 1943 



/ 



LOCAL SPONSORINO 
GOUUITTIS 

MR. SASL SAUS 

MRS. UABELL CASTER 

MR. ALEXAdlDFP. WRiaHV V\ 

MRS. DOLLID ALLEN 

MR. JOSIPH ROBINSON 

MR. J. W. HICKS 

MRS. IDA WAIHZ 

UR. PIDRZ WILLIAMS 

MR. W. C. WILSON 

MR. CHARLZS KERNS 



< 



• •• 



Doar friend: 

In our demodracy civil lihertiat, han long 
bean cl?9riahed aa one of the oaslc rights of the 
people. All three political parties as well aa 
iinlonB: churches. ai>d fraternal groups were 
ubited on this issue during the 1948 election 
campaigi\. As you can see by the names on the 
enclds'^d call to a Legislative Assembly and 
Rally to be held in Washington D.C. , Tebruaxy 
11 and 12, we are still united and want to do 
something about it. We have set a goal cf 300 
delegates for Western Pennsylvania. We ask 
you to Join this delegation if possible. If 
not, we urge you to have your organisation 
or church elect delegates. 

Till out the form at the bottoo of the 
call and mail to Mrs. Dollie Allen, Slka 
Rest. 2315 Wyiie Ave, Pgh. . 19, Pa. Tor 
further Information call SC 6283. 

It is very important that the above party 
be notified in order to see that arrangements 
for transportation and housing can be taken 
care of. There will be chartered buses to anc 
from Washington. Tor information pertaining 
to transportation call Mr. W. C. Wilson, UU 0553 



Sincerely yours « 



Daughter Dollie Allen 
Sacretary. Xlks Rest 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2477 



CvETic Exhibit 52-1 (Page 1) 



\iiis^ 



'SSn^f^ 



m^^ 



^'fei 



'sr 



'^> 



spy 



^ 






MUNDT 
BILL 



'fe. 



^^.Vut^ 



JOSePHiOH\ 
JAILCO 






TO CALL A HALT/ 



2478 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENTs^SYLVANIA 

CVETIC EXHIRIT r»2-2 



DEFEND 



SIGN THE GIANT POSTCARD TO STOP THIS I 



th« 




and tha 




OF 





IT'S TIME TO CALL A HALT! 



Trade unionists are blacklisted and threatened 
with jail I Tall-Hanley committees roam the 
country holding inquisitions. 

Pamell Thomas' un-American hatchet men 
hack away at the Constitutional rights of every 
decent American. 

Five Denver citizens are imprisoned and bail 
denied. Their crime? Refusal to surrender their 
rights as Americans under the Constitulion. 

TweWe leaders oi the Ceitununisi Party an 
indicted — not ior DOING anything wrong, btil 
iei what they are ALLEGED to be THINRINa 

In New Jersey the KKK bums crosses in 
Glendola, Midvale and Boonton. Police brutality 
hits the Elizabeth, Camden and Trenton Negro 
communities. Six postal employees in Flainfield 
are victims of Truman's "loyalty" inquisition. 
The Homer case frameup in Trenton sets six 
Negro youths on the death march to the electric 
chair. 



This is the pattern oi American iascism. Create 
a "red" hysteria. Outlaw the Communists. Attack 
minority groups. Then go after all other groups 
who believe in Democracy — one by one. Hitler 
did it in Germany. Mussolini did it in Italy. 
Franco did il in Spain. WALL STREET WANTS 
TO DO IT IN AMERICA! 

irS TIME TO CALL A HALT! The American 
people can stop them if we unite to fight back! 
Communist and non-Communisl, Negro and 
white, Jew and Gentile, Proleslanl and Catholic, 
worker, farmer and professional — it's our Hght — 
all of us. We can stop them. Now is the time to 
fight backl 

Sign the Civil Rights Congress' Giant Postcard. 

Defend the Constitulion. Demand that the 
government drop the indictments of the twelve 
Communist leaders. The fight against their 
irameup is the fight of all of us to defend our 
ireedom. 

If it can happen to them il can happen to you! 



DEFEND YOUR CIVIL LIBERTIES! 



Gvil Bights Congrew of New Jersey, 502 High Sueet, Newark, N. J. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2479 

CvKTic Exhibit r>2-3 
ATTEND 

O PEN HEAJIING ON CIVIL RIGHTS 

T HURSDAY EVENING, l.M 27, 1943, 8; 15 O'CLOCK 

- at - 

W'F SLEL CENTER ArlE ZION CHURCH 
2701 CENTER AVE. PITTSBURGH 



VOiTNESSE S; 

r l/ira. Li^ Hunt, (lirs. In^-^rau's /nother) x 

/ Mae,istrate Joseph H. Rainey, of Philadelphia ^ 

) Ferdinani Snith, Secretary of Ni^U, of New York 

/ ard other withesses 

On the lundl Bill (HR ^&52) : Thoi^as Quinn, Chairman CRQ 



— ADI^HSSION FREE — 
(Proceeds to be shared with ivelfare fund Ine^raa childrei 

AUSPICES: PITTSBURGH CIVIL RIOiTS CONGRESS 

Partial List fH Sponsors; 

Rev* A. B- Barnes, Rev.'W. vi. V/in^ield, 

Rev* R, Vf. Tvd^^s, Dr^ J, C- Hairston, 

Rev. C, E. McFadden, Dr. E. P. Tunie, 

Rev. \'u C- Crenshaw, Rev, J. D. Foy 

Rev, L» G, McLeod, Rev. S. D. Rudder, 

Rev* S* L- Spear. 



2480 COMMtJNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENTM'SYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52—4 

"e^. i,a ber 11, 1 48 

ie^ Uolda < th 
C If -,.j is C <.i.,r« s 
iij,. iujt ilind St. 
New lor/c V, ;«.Y. 

Dear l«ai 

\jree\,x..-^ai - I.ia is wiy first ,efi4,er to th« Hacional offia*, and it von't bo a le^i ,;:ty 
o..e. Z a.u in t.ie t-roo<?3s oi' beao. ,.■.1;^, aqua.;i:;8d •dth G.I.G, Tii.tt if an entirely :;sw 
field for .le. It is a ver^ aeri ^js i iynrua'it .^->b, ' Frni, vhai I have iasmed iib. it -'le 
b»o<.^rci.c!d of C.i ,C. in Pit->«burt !, !'•- see.is, t.!iere l% a rloh so ;roe ^jf ^.60x^-6 to 
ifork ^vj T.ii, 

So* 3 ■■ ^e i ^ rv,a /l \,:.-' ., ,8« 

I. C')<.S&reno9 - 

1, Oa '^ i i- i. 8 C;; i' orfliiae .il] b« i.eld on Da .via, , Ool-ober la, from 

i -_ r. . I X 1. u L ; ..' a ouil v;n ..■> dn , -'ne.i ■. fly t; o e lYcra the 

2. '> « are ox^jeotirisj you to oi: e in, 

S, At > .r eetl;i/;, ailer I a,, i o ;:• — , -e ,«d 'luV.e n .i6.^...<.y ■ l^TiSSi-n nn 
,.;.!•;■. i , ^-<r .■'•■'■ i^ 1 .i «t X ^ a -.if ;■» :;t'.-i^ Bs/ :h>^t , J i i-r \ ssd t..e i 

P.- OS^n. -i' '~ <-„v«j ■ , : •■ ,..■, _; PI V U) !■- ,'i. V ,P; said I 

. ,v ■' i.i ._' .; i., .edi ivf. .■.■'. ■ ■ 30!,, nd !:is gl.,. ,,, ».->.u.d c;e end 

• ', ., a-giiSi-je i ' . , ., ., i. ,s u/ai ' a quasv-on, i.^: i, ,e , ^.v.es, 
ji 'ji .:!■ . ■':, . e ar, r. .1 e ..•'. :!e a.i':>3 ...o .•^"^ 1.j''£80;i, itur. i.e 
asva KerL.ebii .^anaei, ii .ot - -.i>;iie'.iie eJao - ,. ;-e: ■jru.ji/ jg ro. e t^d 
:; ;0 ijj of iJfi., -cv.i, , t. '^ . i. , *^ -Kj^dd !>e '. .^ .:••«'. bia n_-,", a ai-e 0'...i'Liii„ 
oil . c.u for '...:«. [>•> »3 '-are ; . scii.el^,. .■^.:o_, u . ut, i '^u ••■ t i nve 
a i;..T.e, ii '^t v.s.i ^o aaxl on q -i« i.ia'i,ter - oaii aria i Sou>i.i at 
FX - Soy2. 

II. to t-i , . a V-' -^.-iors I 

r ,-.,-.» ,.e ii«i; u^i the ffui., ia,;; offioert to s rve in^il 

; 6 ", ; ,. ;; .-. , r- . ...1 i.^.c, we will fil^ut ^-tr:ii0..iant of 'ioorai 

C-,i r JiiU X; o <is alnr. ?,0. Box 44, Pit ab ir Ji 30, "Pa. 

Vioe-Chalr lar. « lev. Ci, lyari' •» jjJOS Blao adore ttve. Pitts'^jur.ih Jl, Ph. 

Flr--"e'jie ,,Rry Sa >1 .-.iuert KiOS For.«ird Ave, Pit-abarji 17, PR. 

f ..e ■-'^©re ary T R!.: ■■ T r-iT ?,0, Box -4 Pitlsb<i-,h 30, Ffe. 

C );-? - > 

4 : .^ "Si, . • , ,. F.p' 1 o I'""/ Sli Tt St. Anbrid^e, Br. 

i'iiia;;« >;■.;■■.■■•, .; j i ,,o f. . B' :■ ', riw t. n- '.■ " J, tti, 

3o£t 1 J. .es. 






COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 52-5 



2481 







o 

in 




JLNnOlAIV 



AlID 



ssanciav 



3KVN 



2482 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENN^SYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-6 (Page 1) 

DRAFT PROPOSALS FOR PLAN OF WORK 



The organizational Committee for this Civil Richts Conference presents to this 
BODY the following draft proposals for a plan of *ork for the coming immediate 
period. Please consider them carefully. We want your suggestions, additions, 
ideas, before final adoption, 

PLAN OF WORK ON TWO KEY ISSUES; 

I. MASS MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN 

II. DEFENSE FUND CAMPAIGN 

I. PROPOSALS FOR A MASS K€MBERSH I P CAMPAIGN 
(i.) CONCERNING ORGANIZATIONS: 

A. Invite all organizations, church, raternal, trade union, 

CIVIC, ETC., TO become AFFILIATED MEMBERS OF THE CiVIL RIGHTS 

Congress. To designate a certain sum as a yearly dues payment 
for tmese organizations. 

B. Each individual delegate will report back to their organization 

AND INVITE their ORGANIZATION TO AFFILIATE TO C ,R .C . 

c. That one member from each affiliated or«an izatson will become 

A MEMBER OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF C .R .C . 

(2.) CONCERNING INDIVIDUAL RECRUITING 

A. Set an objective of the following figures for recruiting into 
C.R.C. FROM the following areas by the first of the year. 

Pittsburgh £00 

McKEE SPORT 50 

Johnstown 50 

East Pittsburgh 50 

Allegheny Valley 100 

Beaver Valley 50 

B. People from the Pittsburgh C.R,C. Chapter will be available to 

ANY of these areas, IP SO DESIRED, TO HELP WHENEVER THESE AREAS 
organize a MEETING TO SET UP A CHAPTER Of C.R.C, 

The Movie "The Investigators" a witty tem-minute short exposes 
THE current labor-haters - provides many laughs for its satire 

goes deep and truly exposes the witch-hunters - IT HAS A CLEVER 
script and MUSCIAL score -, may be available IN THE COMING 
month and WOULD BE AN EXCELLENT MOVIE TO SHOW AT SUCH A MEETING. 

(3.) CONCERNING EDUCATION 

During the course of our recruiting and activity in the following 

MONTHS we will MAKE AVAILABLE TO ALL PEOPLE THE FOLLOWING C.R.C. 
EDUCATIONAL MATERIAL. 

A. A MONTHLY BULLITEN TO ALL MEMBERS - ON LOCAL AND NATIONAL 
ACTIVITY. 

B. Distribution of leaflets on Civil Rights issues. 
c. National phamplets and Literature 

A membership campaign cannot be successful without CONDUCTING ACTIVITY TO BRING 



h 



THE PROGRAM OF C.R.C. TO THE PUBLIC. THEREFORE WE CANNOT SEPERATE THE MEMBERSHI 

11 



DRIVE FROM THE FOLLOWING PROPOSALS ON THE DEFENSE FUND CAMPAING - (onPagc 2} I 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2483 

CvKTic Exhibit 52-6 (Page 2) 

PAGE 2 

1 1 . PROPOSALS FOR. A DEFENSE FUND CAMPA IGN 

IWiCDIATE OBJECTIVE: TO RAISE $2500, AS THE QUOTA FOR THE PITTSBURGH 
CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS WITHEN ONE MONTH 

1, CHfeCK ON ALL COLLECTION PETITIONS, CALL IN ALL PETITIONS THAT ARE 
FILLED. 

2. Can we have 25 volunteers from this body - to act as 25 minute men - 

TO SELL 25 bond BOOKS FOR THE DEFENSE OF THE (2 INDICTED COMMUNIST 

LEADERS. Books iNCUUte bonds ranging, from 50{f to 5 dollars. 

3. Can *E get individuals today to take "Cs^.C. Defense Fund Cans" to 
PUT in their organizations meeting halls. Cans to be filled in 
TWO weeks. 

4, The organizational committee is offering the following 2 proposals, 
under proposal a, with the idea that this body will consider and 
and approve the one most suitable for and immediate undertaking. 

PART ONE OF PROPOSAL 4 

The "Curtaineers" a Pittsburgh Dramatic croup will be presenting 
"The Cradle will rock" during the BEGiNNiftc of 1949. 

The "Curtaineers" playhouse seats 625 people. 

A. We can sell tickets for this play, under the auspices of C.R.C. 
at 60^ A ticket. If over 200 tickets are solo, we can have 50jL 

OF THE total sale. 



b. We can buy out the "Curtaineers" playhouse for one night at the 
flat rate of $ and set our own ticket price, on this 

proposition, if we sell 625 tickets, we would have A BIGGER 
INCOME, THAN SELLING TICKETS ON THE ABOVE PERCENTAGE BASIS. 

PART VHP OF PROPOSAL A 

Make IMMEDIATE PLANS TO UNDERTAKE A 3 DAY RUMMAGE SALE. 

A. Gather donated articles, clothin, furniture, books, other 

ITEMS, FROM INDIVIDUALS 

B. Investigate the possibility of a storefront - free of 
charge for such a sale. 

This PROPOSAL involves none or very little expense. 



THE FINAL PROIOSAL ON THE: 

MASS f;EMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN aND 
DEFENSE FUND CAMPAIGN 

THAT A COMf^lTTEE BE SET UP HERE TODAY TO GUIDE THE WORK OF THE DEFENSE FUND 
CAMPAIGN - AND AT THE SAkC TIHC GUARENTEE THE SIGNING UP OF t\€MBERS INTO C.R.C. 



Sincerely submitted by the organizational committee for the approval of this 
Civil Rights Conference. 

Thomas Quinn Sual Albert 

Peggy Russinnko Bern ice Hecker 

Mitt Cvetic Marion Aoler 

Miriam Schultz Theresa Turner 



2484 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-7 

PITTSBURGH CP/.'^L RIGHTS CONGRESS 

?;0. Box 44 

Pittsburgh; Pennsylvanir 

September 14, 1948 



Hoar Friend: 

Enolosed is a "Call" for a "Civil Rights Conforenoe" to be held on Saturday after- 
noon - October 16 - starting at 1 P.M. in the Assembly Roan of the Fort Pitt Hotel. 

Today a little more than three and one half years Caftor the end of a war against 
Fascism, the Civil liberties of the Ameriosm people are in grave peril. 

The Un-Amerioan (Thomas-Rankin) Committee nov presu;nes to set the standards for 
A.-icrioanismo Manufacturing widely felt sTirrs and hysteria, it drags before it 
people from evury field of ^jnerioan life who differ with their distorted views. 

But there is no word or aot from Attorney General Clark or the FBI that stays the 
violence against the Negro |.eople of our land. 

The w orking people find thonselves and their unions harressed at ovory turn. 
The Taft-Hartley low releases violent police attacks against picket lines. 

The right of minority political parties freely to function tind bring their views 
to the people, is attacked in many places. 

But the spirit of resistance to such attacks is alive in Western Pennsylvania, It 
finds wxpression in the active protest against the T'ift-Hartley Lawj it came to 
the fore in helping to boat book the police-stato Mundt-Nixon Bill, It found 
expression most recently in the successful battering down of Jim Crow practices 
at the Highland swimming pool. 

The Civil Rights Congress of Pittsburgh fools that oir Conference at this time ia 
vitally necessary to solidfy this rosistn nee to stop the breeding of prejudice 
and hysteria and attacks against civil liberties, 

Vfe invite delegates, observers and visitors to join with us in this Conference in 
working out a program upon which wo can march forward to becoming the Civil Rights 
defense organization of the people of this urea, ^ 



Sincerely, 

Thomas Quinn 
Chairman 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2485 

CvETic Exhibit 52-8 (Page 1) 

BIRRHRD ADES 
Certified Public Accountant 
505 Fifth Avenue 
Kew York 17 N. Y. 

November 5, 1948 

Civil Rigths Congress 
205 East 42 Street 
New York 17 H. Y. 

Dear Sirs, 

We have examined the books and records of the Civil Rights Congress for the six 
months ended Sejtember 30, 1948 as requested and are s\ibmitting our conclusions 
in the comments belov; and in the following statements attached: 

Page 1 Statement of Financial Condition — September 30, 1948 

2 Statement of Income and Expense - For the six months ended Sept 30, 1948 

3 Analysis of Meeting and Affairsand Appeals and Campaigns 
For the six months ended September 30, 1948 

4 Details of Expense 

For the six months Ended Sejtember 30, 1948 

C0it>1ENTS 

Operations for the six months ended September 30, 1948 resulted in a deficit of 
$11,273 increasing your Financial Deficit to $32,960. Included anng liabilities 
is $639 due to the Prisoners' Relief Fund as detailed on Page 1. 

An analysis of the "Defense of the Twelve" and Mundt Bill" campaign expenses in 
summary form is as follows: 

FOR 6 I'OS, ECTED S5PT1.MB2R 30. 1948 

TOTAL 
EXZFi^lS;.S .A~V'G . PRIFTING OTHER 

DEFENSE OF THE 12 $10,348 $ 4,075 $5,743 $ 530 

i^HTNDT BILL 8.065 6,657 554 854 

TOTALS $ 18,413 $ 10. 732 $6,297 .p 1.384 

Cash on Bank and on Hand was verified. Other Assets and Liabilies were 
ascertained from your records. 

This report has been prepared on a basis consistent vith prior reports and is for 
your information and guidance. 

Bernard Ades 

Signed 



Certified Public Accountant 



uopwa 16-47 



2486 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-8 (Page 2) 

Page 1 
CIVIL RIGHT? CONGRESS 

STATSI'iEMT OF t^INAICCIAL CONDITION CVETIC EXHIBTT 

September 30, 1948 (page 2) 

ASSETS 

Cash in Bank and on Hand 5 2,929.88 

Prepaid Expenses: 

Bazaar ^430.72 

10/14 Dinner 120.00 550.72 

Loans Receivable: 

Congress of American '"omen .... 750.00 

'Oillie Hilton Committee .... 300,00 1,050.00 

Security Deposits 485.00 

Exchanges 30.00 

N.Y. State Unemp. Ins. Credit Receivable . 9.95 

TOTAL ASSKTS § 5,055.55 



LIABILITIES 

Accounts Payable 321,512.43 

Loans Payable: 

Educational and Fighting Fund . . .57,500.00 

C. P. U.S. A 5,000.00 

George Marshall 1,500.00 

Amalgamated Bank 1.500.00 15,500.00 

©ue to Prisoners' Relief Fund 638.79 

Payroll Taxes Payable 358.39 

Exchanges 6.00 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $ 38.015.61 

FINANCIAL DEFICIT 3 32.960.06 

PRISONERS' RELI'^F FliND : 

Balance, 4/1/48 i 1,302.02 

Add : Income frtfln Contributions $ 16.75 

Less : Disbursements 679.98 663.23 

Balance, 9/30/48 3 638.79 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2487 

CvETic Exhibit r)2-8 (Page 3) 

Page 2 

CIVIL flIGHTS CC!IGil£SS 

STATEiiEJT 0? IKCO..1E AlID EXPENSE » 

For the Six laonths Ended S ept ember 30. 19 49 



INCOME 

Incom^ from States 

ContriDutions . . . . . , . $ 5.258.00 

Membership Fees . ..,.,. 506,35 

Literature r . 124.49 

Total Income fl»05». States $5,919.34 

General Contri outions, . > , ■ 8,463.55 

Meetings and At'fsirs (iJetl (j--ei;e. 3, Part A) .... 7,519.89 

^peals and Campa'-gns (Nerj (page 3, Part B) . . . . 14,490.82 
Washington Civil Rights Delegation (Ket) 476.23 

TOTAL IKCOittE $36,869.83 



expens.es 

Salaries and Expenses (P.4, Part A). $18,159.82 

Administration Expenses (Page 4, 

Part B) . 9,335.52 

Organization Expenses (P.4, Part C) 5,511.03 

Legal Expenses (Pa.je 4, Part D) . . . 15,106,30 

TOTAL EXPENSES $ 48,142.67 

TOTAL OPERATIIJG EEEICIT $11,272.84 



2488 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENN-gYlrVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-8 (Page 4) 



Page 3 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

ANALYSIS OF MEETIliGS AlID AiFIARS AIID APFE/iS AIJD a»MPAI(3IS 
•For the Six alonths En dsA September 30. 1948 



NET NET 

INCO1.1E EXParSE INCOivlE EXPQISE 



A - MEETINGS AND AFFAIRS 



Robeson Dinner $10,948.44 $ 3.710.08 $ 7,233.36 

4/10 - Conference. . . . 275.00 225,00 $ 50.00 

Manhattan Center Meeting 173.03 - 173.08 

Boet Ride 160.00 51.32 108.68 

Eisler Forum 113,37 - 113.37 

Webster Hall - 71.90 71.90 

Miscellaneous 16.30 10.00 8.30 



NET mCOi&S. APPEALS AND CAiiPAIGNS $14,490.82 



TOTALS $11,688.19 $ 4,168.-30 $ 7,641.79 $ 121.90 

NET INCOME .vlEETINGS At:D JoVAiRS $7,519.89 



B - APPEALS ACT C/kvlPAIGNS 

Tag Days $ 5,646.50 $ 835.07 $ 5,613.43 

Eisler 1,013.00 1,805.43 $ 792.43 

McGee 85.00 233.90 145.90 

Un-Jimerican Committee. , 177.10 25.00 152.10 

Ingram 286.95 - 285.95 

Josephson 314.14 99.30 214.84 

Mundt Bill 8,390.10 8,065.0? 325.03 

Anti-Lynch 588.11 - 588.11 

Summer Camps 7,306.77 243.49 7,063.28 

Defense of the Twelve. . 11,786.45 10,346.10 1,440.35 

Jim-Crow Campaign. . . . 52.00 671.39 619.39 

Miscellaneous 614.60 450.15 164.45 



TOTALS $37,262.72 $22,771.90 $16,048.54 $1,557.72 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2489 

CvETic Exhibit 52-8 (Page 5) 

BERNAED .(lDKS 
Page 4 
CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

DETAILS OF EXPENSE 
For the Six Months Ended September 30. 1948 

A- SALARIES AND EXPENSES 

Of f ^ce^3 $10, 297, 39 

Office Staff 6,254,25 

Legal Staff (R. Powe) 270,00 

Officers Expense , 767,00 

Payroll Taxes 601.18 

TOTAL 3.«LARrES AND EXP2IISSS. , $ 18. 199. 82 

B- AmiIT I STR'lTION EXP-]NSES 

Rent and Light 1, 700, 94 

Telephone and Telegraph 3, 387. 63 

Office Supplies , 838,15 

Office Services 634.50 

Audi ting Fees 275.00 

Postage 1, 125.42 

Stationery and Printing 636,79 

Interest and Bank Oiarges 91,04 

Messengers 193*95 

Limches and Fares 167,97 

Fart^ tions 164.00 

Mi scellaneous 119.13 

TC)T.4L ADMIHISTR4TI0N EXPENSES $9.335.5g 

&■ 0RGANIZ.^TI0N EXPENSES 

Travel and Services $2,617.17 

Printing 1, 776,52 

Mai ling and Mimeo 484, 28 

Film 250,00 

Postage 99, 34 

Mi scellaneous 283.72 

T0T.AL ORG.MIIZ-^TION EXPENSES.. $5.511.03 

I>- LEG.AL EXPENSES 

Josephson $5,040,80 

Eisler 7,101,25 

McGee 907, 50 

Chri stof el 400,00 

General 1. 656.75 

TOT.W:, LEG,(SL EXPENSES $15.106.30 



uopwa 16-47 

63178 O — 50— pt. 2 9 



2490 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-9 
NevKwacR 20, 1948 



William L. Pattkrson 
Civil Rismts CoNonKSt 
205 East 42nd Strcct 
New York 17, N.Y. 

Dkar Billi 

Eholoseo ^liasc riNO ONC CHICK roR $ 500 (rivK HUNORKO dollars) 

AND ONC MONEY OROSR FOR - 76 (SKVENTY SIX DOLLARS) 

$ 

576 For OirsNSE Fund 



J. As soon as Rev. Crenshaw sets straishtened out a s new Financial Secy. 

WE WILL SEND A CHECK FOR WHAT WE STILL MASC ON HASO rOR THE DEFENSE 

Fund. 

2. Also, minsy is sraoually sesinnins to com; in from outlyins sections 

AND from FBOFLE WHO HAVE BOHD BOOKS, WILL ALSO SEND THAT. 

3. Can we have a record of what you have already received direct from 
Western Pa. and Pittsbursh. From time to time we are hearing that 
certain sums have seen mailed in directly. 

4. Will you flease mail some information on Income Tax, and how it is 
handled. is it handled for all chrfters sy the national office, etc. 

5* We still have the sis proslem of not HAviNo A memsershif Secy. We 
have some money for you for new members, which will follow when we sit 
our memsershif books straiohtened out here. 

6. Please add to your National mailins list the follswins feofle^ 



Pessy Rubs inks 
Matt Cvetio 
Rev. Crenshaw 
Rev. C.E. McFaooan 
Rev. Samuel Sfear 



ilOOS Bercer Bui loins 
1005 BcROER Build ins 
2336 Bedford Ave. 
1003 BlackaooWe Ave. 
1447 Sandusky St. 



Pittsbursh, Pa. 

Pittsburoh, Pa. 

Pittsbursh, 19, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, 21 , Pa. 

Pittsbursh, 12, Pa. 



Best wishes. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2491 



CvETic Exhibit 52-10 (Page 1) 



FREEDOM CRUSADE 




NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS 

LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE 

JANUARY 17 AND 18, 1949 • WASHINGTON, D. C. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS • 205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 

George Marahall, Cliolrnuin, Board .•/ DirerUirt • Wm. L. Patlenon, Nat'l Exee. Sec'j • Len Coliliinith, Nat'l Dir. 



2492 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic Exhibit 52-10 (Page 4) 

UNITED IN THE OFFENSIVE FOR FREEDOM... 

TT E, llie undersigned, urge your participation by sending delegates or observers, by coming yourself to join in 
tiie battle to protect the Constitution of the United States. 



FRANKLIN P ADAMS 
Weitport. Conn. 
FRED P BARNES 

Pmblit Scbooli 
Peori.. Iltinoit 
DR EDWARD K BARSKY 

Joimi AmiI-m,,,,! «,).,« C 
Ntw York City 
DR BERNARD BAUM 

tJmittriity ol lou't 
low. Ciiy. low. 



HUGH BRYSON. Prii. 

MsrimI Cooki & Slet^'trii, CIO 
S.n Fr.ociico, C.lif. 
PROC LESLIE H BUCKLER 

Umivrruly ol firiiiiK L«. itiool 
CnarloiiMviltr. Virginia 
HENRIETTA BUCKMASTER 
New York Cicy 

PROF EDWIN BERRY BURGUM 
New York City 
DR. JAMES J BURNS 



K.I.I 



ireib CotUge 

. Mic 



PROF. EDWIN G BURROWS 
CuiirriDy ol Commeil.tu 

Slorri, Connecticut 

REV FRANCIS C CAPOZZI 
Epitcop^ Churtb 

Wind G.p. Pennsylvi 



Yellow Springt. Ohio 



PROF, HENRY WADSWORTH 
LONGFELLOW DANA 



HON BENJAMIN J DAVIS 



PROF JOHN J. DeBOER 



JAMES DURKIN. Prttidnt 



SUSAN D USSEAU 
A. L.A 
» Yotk City 



JOHN HOWARD LAWSON 
S.n Betnulino. Cali' 
KENNETH LESLIE 

Thf ProUiltfmt 
New Yotk City 



PAUL ROBESON 



MAUD RUSSELL 

Comtn. For A Demoerstie 
Fsr Emiltrn Policy 



PROF HENRY PRATT FA RCHILD 


OLIVtR S. LOUD 


New York City 


Neu York llmvtri.lj 




Progreiiive Pnrly ol Ohio 


HARRY SACHER 


New Yotk City 




Yellow Springs. Ohio 
ROBERT MORSS LOVETT 


New Yotk City 


HOWARD FAST 




MARGARET SCHLAUCH 


New Yotk City 




Chicago. Illinois 


New Yotk City 
FREDERICK L SCHUMAN 


A A FISHER, jet. Treu. 




REV WM A LUCAS 


V'Mhimgtom SiMe CIO Coitmcii 


Caspet. Wyoming 


W Ji.^n, (/.,.„,,(, 


Se.ttle. Wuhindon 




NORMAN MAILER 


Williunstown. Mass. 


ISABELLE GONZALES 




New York City 


DR HOWARD SELSAM. D.r. 


Amigoi dt X('»il»Et 




ALBERT MALTZ 


leSertom School ol SocinJ Science 


AllMquetqiie. New Mexico 




Hollywood. Clif 


New Yotk City 


RABBI ROBERT E GOLDBERG 


PROF JOHN M MARSALKA 


WALLACE M SHORT. F^.loi- 


New H.ven. Conn. 




Yel, ( /.iieriur 


VmoniU nnd Pnblic Forum 


UTA HAGEN 




New Haven. Connecticut 


Sioux City. Iowa 


New Yotk City 




FRANCES K MARTIN 


PROF EDWIN S. SMITH 


DASHIELLHAMMETT 




Mt Pleasant. Michigan 


Putney School 


New Yotk City 




LOUIS F MCCABE. V ice PreiUenl 


Putney. Vermont 


JOHN HARMON 




Nelion^ Ltuyer, GnUd 


MIRANDA SMITH 


(f.ite^ Sn,.U BM„nti,mtM 




Philulelphi.. Pennsylvania 
ELMER McfLAIN 


Winston Salem. North Carolina 


New York City 




REV. ARTHUR M. STEVENSON 


REV J H HARTLEY 




Lima. Ohio 


Pteihylerien Church 


Wilmington. Det.w.te 




CAREY MCWILLIAMS 


GteeflCUtle. Pennsylv.ni. 


DONALD HENDERSON. P 




Los Angeles. Caiil 
DMITRI MITROPOLOUS 


ELLA P STEWARD. Preiident 


Food. Tobscco. Agrit. & 




NntiomnI Alloc, ol Colored 


Allied Vkri. CIO 




Minneapolis. Minnesota 


Women. Inc. 


PhiUdelphi.. Pennsylv.ni. 




JUDGE STANLEY MOFFATT 


WashiO£toiu D C 

PROF Dirk f struik 


REV CHARLES A HILL 




Los Angeles. Califotnia 


DetfOit. Michig.n 




HON STANLEY NOWAK 


Meiiechuiellt Inilitnle ol 


IRA HIRSCHMAN 




Detroit. Michigan 


Technology 


Bd. ol Higher Educsliow 




ERWIN PANOPKY 


Belmont. M.S. 


New York City. 




Ptinceion. New Jersey 


EDGAR H STURTEVANT 


CHARLES P HOWARD. Co 


Cheirmen 


HON JERRY O CONNELL 


Ungniilic Society ol Americn 


Progreiiiit Perty 




Seattle. Wa.hinglon 


Yale Graduare School. Ct>ao. 


I>e» Moinei. Iowa 




FATHER CLARENCE P.'RKER 


PROF R J THOMAS 


REV KENNETH DEP HUGHES 


Chicago. Illinois 


►-.rgi.i. Sint, College 


St- Bvlhotomeii'i Church 




MAX PERIOW. Jet Tre.i 


PETERSBURG. Virginia 


Cambtidge. Massachusetts 




L'.ite^ Fnrmilure Xforgeii. CIO 


WM F THORNTON 


LANGSTON HUGHES 




New York City 


Sntionel Techmcnl Atiocintion 


New Yotk City 




ALBERT PEZZATTI. E.tleni Dir. 


Chicago. Illinois 


W A HUNTON 




Imll Mine. Mill Ii 


SAUL C WALDBAUM 


Council on Alritnn A0Mrt 




Smeller It'kri. CIO 


Philadelphia. Penn.. 
DR. GENE WELTFISH 


New York City 




Bridgeport. Conneciicur 

DR SEYMOUR M PITCHER 


J F JURICH. Prriidnl 




CoMgreir ol Amencnn Women 


Inll Fiihrrm^ & Allied Wkri. CIO 


SleSe Vniteriity ol town 


New York Ciry 


Seaitle, Washington 




Iowa City. Iowa 


MRS LULU WHITE. Sec. 


ALBERT KAHN 




GEORGE PIRINSKY. PreiidenI 


N.A.A.C.P. 


}eii'iih People'i Freternel Order 


Americen Stec Comgreti 


Houston. Tex.a 


New York City 




New York City 


ANITA WHITNEY 


ROCKWELL KENT 




REV G T PRATT 


CRC ol Celilomcn 


Aoiable Fotks. New York 




Dalton. Geofgia 


S.n Fr.nci>co. Cli( 


PROF E R KOLCHIN 




LEE PRESSMAN 


DOXEY WILKERSON 


Coliimhie ('...eriitr 




New Yotk City 


New York City 


New York City 




BENJAMIN RAIMEY 


NATHAN WITT 


DR 1 M KOLTHOFF 




Houston. Texas 


New Yotk City 


Vniteriily ol Minneiold 




MRS HERMAN RICH 


F W WENT 


Minneapolis. Minncsot. 




Atlanta. Georgia 


CeJilornin Intlitnte ol Technology 


RINGLARDNER. JR. 




HOLLAND ROBERTS 


P.sadeoa. Califotnia 


Hollywood. ClJif. 




Celilomi. Uhor School 


BISHOP R R.WRIGHT. JR. 






San Francisco, Calif. 


Wilberforce. Ohio 



s luted for ,demific 



CREDEi\TIAL BLAx\K 



!\ame of Organization 

Address City 

Name of Delegate (or Observer) 

Address City 

!\ame of Delegate (or Observer) _ 

Address City 

Enclosed is S for fees of delegates (at $2.00 per person). 

^j_ Mail to CIVIL RIGIIT.S CONGRESS, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

■•'"'■ {.IasI aditiiiimal delegates or observers on another sheet) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2493 

CvETic Exhibit 52-11 (Page 1) 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS OF \CSTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
1005 Berger Building 
Pittsburgh, 19, Pa, 
May 3, 1949 

E^ERGENCY LEGISLATIVE BULLETIN 

SENATE HE RINGS START ON ^.UNDT-FERGUSON-^j! XQN BILL (S.I 194) 

The Senate Judiciary Sub-Committee opened hearings on the Mundt- 
Fergusom Biul where Senator Ferguson is scheduled to speak in favor or thc 
BILL. This bill is similar to the Kiunot-Nixon Bill(Police State Bill) or 
the 80th Congress which was defeated in the Senate only by mass public 
protest. 

It is imperative that there be vigorous opposition on a mass basis 
to this measure for if it passes it will result in outlawing minority 

political parties, VrHTUALLY ALL PROGRESSIVE ORGANIZATIONS, DESTROY THE LAR?"? 
movement, and SERIOUSLY LIMIT ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND THE FREEDOM TO RELHIO'JS 
BELIEF. Free speech, free thought, and the use OF FREE PRESS SHALL BE 

CEN80RE0. The Bill of Rights will be undermined and destroyed by this Bill. 
ACTION PROGRAM 

1. Get as many outst-noinc community leaders and representatives of 
organizations in your community to wire Senator Pat »(1cCarren, Shairman-, 
Senate Judiciary Committee, Washington, D.C. , for time to be heard in 
OPPOSITION to the Kiunot-Fercoson Bill (S. 1194) 

2. Get as many organizations and inoiviooals in your locality to wire 
OR write to your senator, urging him to appear before the Judiciary Sub- 
Committee IN opposition to this bill. 

3. Start raising the issue before organizations and try vo obtain 
resolutions in opposition to TH^s BILL, copies ow which should be sent to 
Senator McCarren, your own Senator, and to the National Civil Rights ConcresSj 

Tlf€ IS PRECIOUS*— ACTION IS NEEDED NOW 



The Mundt-Ferguson-Nixon Bill is called an effort to "gag the millions 
of Americans who demand an end to the cold war and the defeat of the war- 
breeding NOIfTH ATLANTIC PACT, 

The provisions of the bill constitute a legislative blueprint for 
fascism. This bill must and will be defeated as was the Munot-Nixon Bill 
or THE 80th Congrebs by a mass protest or the people who refuse to be 
LEO I slated into fascism. 



2494 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENN-SYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-12 

^MM. t€iES€N 



CVETIC EXHIBIT $2-12 



NATIONAL VIC-;*CHAIRIIAN 

Civil U--idit:Gonaro^ss 



Paul Tcobeson, the r^reat A '.:!:.'.c: ;' l3auor, a fighter for freedom for 
al-l people, is here in 0;- J., nd to lift his pov/erful voice in defense 
of 'iiley King. 

V/iley r.i.ng. , . .Ho-'e is a man who has lived an exemplary life; is a 
leader in his church; active in enhancing the vfelfare of the com- 
munity in which he lives. 

After nerving S2 months of a sentence that vras imposed upon him at 
a HJ.ssissipi trial that vreis a nxDckeryof justice, Wilay King was 
paroled by authorities then in charge, upon payment of a stipulated 
sum of money. 

Vxu' the mounting attacks on minority groups, it was suddenly dis- 
covered that the parole of ^/;'?.ey K'.-^- "l.s not a legitimate one. 
Instead of punishing those who tricked \/ilcy King into paying such 
a ransom, the state of H;lssissippi has requested the State of C.li- 
fomia to arrest V/ilcv King and send hm back to a" IIass -".ssippi 
prison and Ilj.nsissippi brand of justice. 

Governor V7arren can refuse to perform this inhuman act. 

Paul Roooson is here to join the people in their demand that Governor 
Varren refuse to extradite ^.Viley King. 

The attacks on minority opinion as well as ninority groups are 
mounting 3T;/iftly, 

In Washington, twelve leaders of the Comnunist Party have been 
indicted by a Federal G; and Jury on charges of a conspiracy to 
advocate the overthrow of the governraent of the United States by 
force and violence. 

According to rulings of the Supreme Court in similar cases, the 
charges are unfounded, and have been repudiated by the Supreme Court. 

The indictments are brought -out at this time when the American people 
are demanding price control, lov/ cost housing, and a real civil 
rights program. Thr. indictments are brought out v/hen the war hyste- 
ria is at its peak, on the eve of one of the most important elections 
in the history of our country. 

The forces behind the persecttion of 'TilGy King are the same forces 
behind the persecution of American Co nunists. 

VmiTE OR V;iK3 GOVERNOR WARREN AND DEIIAND THAT \aU:Y KING BE SET FREE I 
V/RITE OR VIRS PRESIDENT TRra'AN TrAT THE HTDICTED AIIEP.ICAN CO.'3'UNISTS 
BE SET FREE I 

Issued by EAST BAY Cl^m RIGITS CONGRESS 
160-A Gv. nd Ave .ue 
L;-oor donated 0' i.l£nd 12, California. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



2495 



CvETic Exhibit 52-13 




A € 
4 MEGROI 



Tm FACTS t 

William Ullton, his brother Joseph and a. friend, on the night of July I4th, dropped 
Into a nearhy bar In Williamsburg for a glass of beer. The bartender seemed to 
think he -was not in Haw York but in Mississippi for ho ordered them to "drink up 
and get the h— 1 outl" When they protested suoh treatment, the bartender lunged 
at them Tilth an loe crusher • 

The police appeared on the soene and the men, knowing well the hostility of New 
York police toward Negro people, fled to the safety of their homes. William Mil- 
ton went around the corner. He reached his doorstep. As he opened the door, to 
his house, he fell to the floor with a bullet in his back from the gun of Patrol- 
man Kilcommons. Wounded and helpless, V.'illiam Milton could easily have been ar- 
rested, if arrest were necessary . But instead, Kilcommons fired t»o more bullets 
into his chest. William Milton died. 

THE MILTON CASE IS ANOTHER LINK IN THE CHAIN OF POLICE BRUTALITY IN NEW YORK CITY 
DIRECTED AGAINST OUR NEGRO CITIZENS: 

. A man is lynched—lynched because the murderer still 'wears a 
police uniform and still walks IJeiv York City streets, armed 
and ready to kill again. 

. A young woman is left a widow. 

. A 13-year old child is fatherless— his father killed in cold 
blood before his eyes. 

THE CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS IS CONDUCTITO THE DEFENSE. WELL KNaVN LABOR LAWYERS 

ARE HANDLING THE LEGAL FART OF THE CASE. BUT CIVIL RIGHTS CASES ABE KOT TJOH _I1I m 

COURTROOM ALONE. PEOPLE MUST SPEAK OUT TO GUARANTEE THAT JUSTICE IS DONEl 



DEMAND 



from the Mayor that: 

• The two patrolmen involved in the killing bo suspended 
from the police force and brought to justice as common 
murderers • 

• The widow be indemnified by the city. 

. The frame-up charges against Joseph Milton and William 
Hughes be dropped. 

. THE MAYOR DISCHARGE HIS DUTY TO PROTECT THE NEGRO PEOPLE 
AGAINST POLICE BRUTALITY. 



The Civil Righto Congress 
uopwa 16-47 



205 East 42nd Street, N.Y. 17, N.Y. 



2496 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENN^SY1,VAN1A 

CvETic Exhibit r)2-14 



PRES. TRumfln — 
-T-QiiKS mom (2iyiii 



E 



A/loved faster tfan Hitler on loyalty oaths! 

(j/sGS the Taft-Hartley /\ct against labor] 

/Refuses to end jinn-crow m army! 

/nvotes anti-labor Smith /\ct to persecute 
communists 1 



HflTflBOLIT IT, 






M/^^ -p2UMf)A/'<mr77^ 



Issued by! 
East .Day G:'-v:H J'Af'i':- ro'i^vess 
IbO-A Graxicl Av.^..;w P.oo:: ?'•■■: 
Oakland Gi 2-3663 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2497 

CvETic Exhibit 52-15 (Page 1) 



L^att and [ r 



roaram 



Fifteenth Anniversary National Conference 

Ameriean Committee for Protection of Foreign Born 



CONGRESS HOTEL CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Saturday and Sunday, December 11 and 12, 1948 



2498 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENT^SYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-15 (Page 5) 

SPONSORS 

(Partial List) 



Dr. Edith Abbott 

Louis Adaraic 

Prof. Thomas Addis 

Joyce Borden Balokovic 

Charlotte A. Bass 

Hon. Ebner Benson 

Rev. Arthur N. Bily 

Edwin Bjorkman 

Alice Stone Blackwell 

Rev. James A. Blaisdell 

Millen Brand 

Prof. Emily C. Brown 

Prof. Anton J. Carlson 

Edward Chodorov 

Dr. Abraham Cronbach 

Prof. John J. DeBoer 

Hugh DeLacey 

Rev. Dr. David de Sola Pool 

James A. Dombrowski 

Prof. Harl R. Douglass 

Dr. W. E. B. DuBois 

Prof. Leslie C. Dunn 

Dr. Leo Eloesser 

Prof. Kasimir Fajans 

Prof. Ernst Feise 

Dr. Guido Ferrando 

Frederick V. Field 

Rev. V. Gachinovic 



Dr. Rudolph Ganz 

Dr. Christian Gauss 

Prof. Albert Guerard 

Uta Hagen 

Douglas Hall 

Dashiell Hammett 

George Hansen 

Prof. Marion Hathway 

Donald Henderson 

Charles H. Houston 

Garson Kanin 

Prof. Louis C. Karpinski 

Carol King 

Prof. Emil Lengyel 

Ray Lev 

Hon. Robert Morss Lovett 

Prof. Albert Howe Lybyer 

Louis F. McCabe 

Dr. Waynt McMillen 

Prof. Curtis MacDougall 

Dr. Thomas Mann 

Hon. Vito Marcantonio 

Prof. Kirtley F. Mather 

Prof. F. O. Mathiessen 

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays 

Dr. Alexander Meiklejohn 

Yehudi Menuhin 

Rt. Rev. Arthur W. Moulton 

George B. Muiphy, Jr. 



Dr. John S. Nollen 

Paul Palazzi 

Rt. Rev. Edward L. Parsons 

Harriet Ida Pickens 

Samson Raphaebon 

Prof. Walter Rautenstrauch 

Anton Refregier 

Boardman Robinson 

Earl Robinson 

Hon. Adolph J. Sabath 

Dr. Bela Schick 
William Jay Schieffelin 

Budd Schulberg 

Prof. Frederick L. Schuman 

Prof. Vida D. Scudder 

Bishop Charles C. Selecman 

Joseph P. Selly 

Dr. Laila Skinner 

Edwin S. Smith 

Vilhjalmur Stefansson 

Prof. Bemhard J. Stem 

Arthur Szyk 

Prof. Ellen B. Talbot 

Alva W. Taylor 

Hon. Edward P. Totten 

Prof. Oswald Veblen 

Dr. Harry F. Ward 

Max Weber 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2499 

CvKTic Exhibit 52-16 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



GEORGE MARSHALL 
Chairman. Boaid af Dir< 



WILLIAM L. PATTERSON 



LEN GOLDSMITH 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



RAYMOND C. INGERSOLL 
National Tr^atu/cr 



DR. HARRY f. WARD 
Nat'i Honorary Chairman 

Nat'l Vice Chairmen 
GEORGE F ADDES 
MARY MclEOD BETHUNE 
HUGH BRYSON 
CHARLES COLLINS 
DASHIELL HAMMEn 
REV CHARLES A, HILL 
HON STANLEY NOWAK 
HON JERRY J O'CONNELL 
LEE PRESSMAN 
PAUL ROBESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 
AUBREY WILLIAMS 



TO ALL CHAPTIH LKASSaS 



Septenber 30, 1948 



Sear Itiends: 



Under separate cover, we are sending you 



^ 



Statements which are self explanatorjr and which list on the hack 
a nuBber of the 1100 Trade Union officials, in over 50 different 
International Unions of the A. T. of L. , C. I. 0. and Independent 
Unions that have Initiated the Statement through the Civil Rights 
Congress. 

It is significant that such a large number of Trade 
Union officials launched this Statement on behalf of the twelve 
indicted Comniunlst Party leaders. It has received widespread 
publicity in the press and Is Indicative of the broad response 
we can get for our objective of 250,000 signatures, nationally, 
of rank and file trade unionists, between now and October 30th. 

To Insure the success of this vitally Important project, 
this is what should be done without delay, to get YOUR QUOTA 
of Seoo signatures: 

1) Call a meeting or get in touch with individual 
Trade Union contacts in your territory and plan the following! 

(a) Mass meetings, Shop Gate meetings. 
Shop Stewards meetings, etc., to 
push the drive locally. 

(b) Use Radio, Loud Speakers, etc., where 
practicable. 

(c) Set (iuotas for all Unions and Industries 
in your area. 

2) Plan weekly systematic check wp on the work. 

3) Inform us Ii>iM£I)IAT£LY of the Quotas you have set 
In each Industry or Union and your plans for completing sase. 

4) Return Petitions promptly to CHC, 205 East 42nd St., 
Room 1613, New York 17, N. Y. Petitions must be in our office, 
not later than October 30th, for our use during the trial of the 
twelve. 



/ju^'^cS^eia.^:!^^ 



LG:rs Len Goldsmith 

uopwa 16-47 

P.S. For your information, we are enclosing one petition. 



2500 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-17 




IF YOU PLEDGE THIS 



I AM AN AMBRICAN ... A PRBE AMBRICAH . . 
PRKB TO SPBAK, . . WITHOUT FBAR, PRBB TO 
WORSHIP OCD IN MY (TON WAY, PRBB TO STAHD 
POR WHAT I THINK RIGHT, PRBB TO OPPOSB WHAT 
I BBtlBVB WRONG, PRBB TO CH003B TH03B WHO OOVBRM 
MY CCTJNTRY, THIS HKlITAOB OP PRBBDOM I FUaDOB TO 
UPHOLD FOR KYSKI*" AND ALL MAMCIND. 




m^^!^jim'^^fm tSif^s^;^^>i 




THEN YOU WILL JOIN THE FlgiT AGAINST 

The cold blooded murder, on Jane tth, 1948, of Leon Mosely, a 15 year old Negro 
boy, who without eny cause, was brutally beaten with gun butts, then shot In the 
back by two Detroit pollsemen under the "Go and get 'om" orders of the rabid 
anti-Semitic, anti-Negro Detroit Coonisaioner of Police, Harry Toy, 

The Loyalty Order of Harry Truman where 2 mm ion ga v e i 'iment employees are not 
free to speak without fear.. or oppose what they bellTe wrong, but Htb in con- 
stant fear of loss of Jobs by secret spying of the FBI and the Loyalty Board. 

The brutal beating of Univis strikers in Dayton, Ohio where men and wcoen fight- 
ing for decent wages and defending their Union were clubbed by Dayton police, 
and tear-gassed at bayonet point by National QuArdonen used as official strike- 
breakers by Thomas J. Herbert, Goremor of Ohio. 

The Taft-Hartley Law, product of Robert A, Taft and a wall street corporation- 
CMitrolled bi-partisan Gmigress, to smash the trade unions by injunction, enw 
lHoyer Intervention and red-hysteria loyslty purges of its militant leaders. 

The Ingram case, where on Feb. 13th an all-White Jury of Ellayllle, Qa. senten- 
. ced to death a Negro mother, Rosa Lee Ingram, and her two eons, for defending 
themselves against an attack by a White farmer anwd with a rifle. 

The witch hunt by Attorney General Ton Clark in an effort to deport more than 
50 legally resident non-citizens because of their labor aetirlties or political 
k opinions - In Ohio the late Alex Ballnt who was regional dir. of the CIO Mine, 
'Mill tt aaelter Workers, his brother David Ballnt, Koncho Dlmitrof of Loraln,0., 
and Leon Callow of Nlles, 0., a steel worker with 8 American bom children. 

The indictment of Ois Hall and 11 other leaders of the Coamunist Party in an 
I effort to iUegallze the CoosminlBt Party as the first step in imposing "Thought- 
Control" and to pave the way to force a " new Itindt Bill" upon the Anerican 
people. 



MAKE THE FREEDOM 



PLEDGE 



LIVE « I » I 



by Joining the Civil Rights Congress of Ohio, and becoming a "minute-man" 
in defense of our civil rights. 

For information, membership cards and literature write or phone t 
THE CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS OF OHIO 
Room 211, 830 Vincent Ave,, Cleveland, lA, Ohio - MAln 3594 



x»opw»-*T-«nlaeo 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYIiVANTA 2501 

CvETic Exhibit 52-18 

PITToBURGH CIVIL RIGHTJ CONGRtJiS 

PJ), Box 44 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

September 20, 1948 

Dear Friends: 

Today a little more than three and one half years after the end of a war against 
Fascism, the enemies of the people are stirring up a nationwide campaign of hysteria 
that has for its purpose the destruction of our civil liberties. 

The Taft-Hartley lav/ is used against the labor unions; the Un-American Committee 
brings before it those who differ with its distorted views; the Immigration and 
Naturalization Bureau attacks the foreign born; violence against the Negro people 
continues unabated; IVogressive Party Candidate, Henry A. Vfallace is the victim of 
organized violence and hoodlism; local Progressive Party leaders are arrested and 
are thrown into jail; and national leaders of the Communist Party are arrested and 
are to be brought to a so-called trial two weeks before the National election. 

Recognizing its responsibility to expand the fight against these attacks, the Civil 
Rights Congress is calling a Conforen;e on Civil Rights for Saturday afternoon, 
October 16th at the Fcrt Pitt Hotel. In addition it is raising a "D£Fi.Moli FUlffi" 
of $2,500 in Western Pennsylvania. Your organization is invited to participate in 
this fight and we are therefore onclosing a "Call" to the Conference and a collec- 
tion list. 

We urge your organization to elect rep i-'.^entation to this conference. Those who 
are not elected delegates are invited to attend as individuals. We further appeal 
to your organization to either vote a coniribution to the "DilFliNoii FUND" or to use 
the enclosed collection list to ,.iake a collection f rom your mcanbers and friends and 
contribute it to the fight. Bring your contribution to the conference or mail it 
to P.O. Box 44, Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 

Sincerely, 
.' -rCa-»*;.r*^ L^' "MX ohalroan 

y^-e^U.*.^ JCo^^x.^ Exec. Secretary 
Partial List of Sponsors 

Steve Mirokovich, Dist. Secy. Creation Benevolent Societies 

Nicholas E".ltich, Dlst. Secy. Serbian-American Federation 

Michael Hanusiak, Dist. Secy. Ukranlan-Amcrican Frateranl Union 

Matt Cvetic, Member Exec, Board, Slovenian-American National Council 

Joe Rudiak, President American Slav Congress of Western Penna. 

George Wuchinich, Exec. Secy, Amorican Slav Congress of Heatern Penna. 

Anna Devunich, Secy. Federation Croation-American Women 

Frank Tady, Secy. Pittsburgh Chapter - Croation-/jnerican Council 

Paul Kluvo, Pres, Polonia Society 

Joseph Novak, Dist, Secy. Slovak Workers Society 

(Organizationa Listed For Purposes of Identification Only) 



2502 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENTSTSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-19 (Page 1) 

coraRESs or akericait vokbt 

2 ERBt 23 Street 
Hew York 10, UY. 



KSSS ABZ SOMI 07 THS 7ACTS. 



In reply to the nountlng attacks on civil rights, the CO'^GiaCS 07 AMERICA5 
vrOMET has called a rally Monday evening, October 25, at 8 o'eloelc. In the 
Orand Ballroom of Manhattan Center. Jointly soonsorlng the rally, lAlch 
has received the wide endorsenent of trnde Unions and other ovganizatlons, 
are Women for Wallace, Civil Rl^ts Congress! Emma Latarus Division, JP70, 
and the CAV. 

Below are listed some of the violations of civil li'bertles, which are dally 
on the Increase. 

DeT>ortatlon8 i 

First attacks were a^^lnst the foreign horn. There are S4 aoeh 
cases already, and It is antlcl'oated that the figure will grow 
to at least 150. Many forelgn-hom, with labor and political 
action records, have been suamarlly picked up and held for de- 
Tjortntlon. Several of these T>eople were prevented from obtain- 
ing citizenship paper* during their naay years of residence In 
this covmtry. 

Some of the women against whom action has been taken ar«; 

Claudia Jonee— Breoutlve Beeretaty of the Voaen't 

Commission, Communist Party. She has 
tried to get cltlcenshlp. 

Beatrice Siskind- has been in the U.S. for many y«ars« 

She tried to get cltiienshlp. Bas on* 
child. 

Dora Lipschits— • 7orty years in the labor a«v«i«it. 

Mrs. Benjamin Saltsman— A Oold Star mother, with another 
son who served this country during 
the last war. 

TTn-Aaerleaa Committee t 

The members of the Joint Anti-7a8ci8t Refugee Comittee face ia- 
mediate Jail sentences because they refused to turn over their 
membershli> and donor lists to the Thomas Committee on un-AmerlcaB 
Activities. 71ve of these Board members are women! 

Ruth Lelder— attorney and mother of two children. 

Marjorie Chodorov— housewife; mother of two children. 

Helen Bryan— Executive Secretary of the Joint Antl- 
7a8clst Refugee Committee, rormerly 
with the 7VCA and the American Triends 
Service Committee. 

Imestlae Oonsales — widowed when her husband was the 
first American to die in Madrid, during 
the Spanish War. 

Charlotte Stem— Xducational Director, local 6, Hotel 
and Club Employees; has one child. 

ProCTeselve Party Attao^s t 

Casos of outrageous attacks against cainpalgners for Henry Vallaoe have 
recently come to ll^t: 

In Augusta, Georgia, four women and one man were beaten bruteilly 
and driven out of town. 

In Pittsburg, two young actresses, TTta Ragen and Mary Veloh, dared 
to exercise their rights of free speech and assembly, where they were 
r.ppjp.rlng with the touring comrjany ot *A Street Car Hamed Desire.* 
VI jy accepted an Invltntion to amioar at a UK sponsored rally for 
Henry Wallaoe. The reaction was imaedlate. The next 

(more) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYDVANIA 2503 

CvKTic Exhibit 52-19 (Page 2) 

Page 2 

day, drama critics of two local newsis-opts launched an attack on them. 
They urged tiurchasers of advance tic'Tets to etorm the 'bo^c-offlce and de- 
mand their money bacic. They nuhllclzed the name of the hotel, teletihone 
and room num'ber in which the actresses were stnying, which left them onen 
to haraasnent at all hours. 

Academic Freedon Attacks : 

In academic circles it is dangerous to exercise the right to stieak ae a 
free citizen. These -oeo-ole no longer nractise their tjrofession 'because 
they spoke outj 

Dr. Oeorge ?arker, teacher of T^lble and Philoso-ohy at Evansville 
College, Indiana, was asked to resign tv;o days after he had nresided 
at a rally stionsored hy the local County Citizens for ''/allace Com- 
mittee. 

Professor James ''?arfoot, feo-nles Progressive Party candidate for 
Governor of Georgia, was forced from his assistant -orofessorship at 
the University of Georgia before he accepted the nomination. 

Eleanor R. Cushane was charged with ur-Anerican activities by the 
princi-oal of the Buffalo Wigh School in which she taught because she 
read the newsTiaper "PK". After a six-month controversy, she has 
recently been reinstated by a Supreme Court decision. 

Professor Luther E. MacPair, Dean of lyndon (Vt.) State Teachers 
College, resigned his cost because his sutjport of Wallace drew 
editorial criticism from several Vermont newstiapers. 

Richard G. Morgan, Curator of Archeology, Ohio State Museum, was 
dismissed after twelve years service because of a new employment 
policy oofttaining a "g^allt by association" clause. His wife run? 
a book store which sells books dealing with the -oroblems of racial 
minorities. The attacks on him were the result of this "association." 
Other Ohio State University -orofossors and students have been warned 
not to work for the Progressive Party. 

Professor T.B. Akeley, of Olivet College (Mich.), was dismissed 
after twelve years, while he was away on vacation because his 
"opinions are ultra-liberal". 

Professor Lyman Bradley was sustiended from T'YU because he is in 
contempt of Congress in the Joint Anti-Fasclst Refugee Committee 
action. 

In the State of Washington, the Cp_nwell Committee, local prototype 
of the Thomas Comnittee, has brought dismissal charges against six 
University of Washington nrofessors. 

Taft-Hartley Law Victims ; 

The Taft-Hartley Law has bren used to attack trade unions. The House 
Labor sub-Committee has launched smear camnaigns against: 

United Public Workers, particularly the Teachers Union. Under 
attack are Rose Russell, Ella Eatner, Bella Dodd and Samuel Wallach. 

Department Store Workers: Marcella Loring, Anna Blank, Sadka Brown, 
Roberta Felson. 

Local 65, Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Workers: Esther 
letz. 

Fur Workers; Irving Potash. 

United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers; Ruth Young, James 
Matles and Julius Eraspak. 

Prljfe Br utality and Hoodlumlsm ; 

UiiTii'^c-rtary bi-utnlity on the part of police and unchecked hoodlumlsm cases 
h.ii ;.;- 1.h>j increase. 

W-lliaa Hilton: Hegro, murdered without cause as he was entering 
his liomc, .'. fter he fled from an unprovoked scuffle with the police. 

(more) 



2504 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENISTSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-19 (Page 3) 

Page 3 

Roljert Thonmeon: Hew Tork Stnto Chflrmnn of the Comnuniet Party, 
Rttftclced find BtAbbcd V = 'biinch of hoodlums nenr hie home In Queens. 
This cp.se has not been referred to In nny news-ofitier, other thpn the 
"Dally Worker", since tho original report of the nttnck. A con- 
splrficy of newsrjPTjer silence has kODt the facts from reaching the 
public. 

Twelve Communists Indicted ; 

On the unfounded chnrge that they "advocate force and violence to overthrow 
the Government", twelve Communist leaders have been Indicted and face ten- 
year Jail sentences. This attack has been denounced by the ITatlonal Lawyers' 
Oulld, the American Civil Liberties Union, Washington State CIO <ind other 
orgpnlzatlons. These Indictments have been made under the Smith Act In 
s-plte of the fact that on February 5, 1948, Attorney General Clark told the 
House Committee on un-American Activities that he could not build a case 
against Communists under the Smith Act. 

The Indicted twelve are; 

William Z. Foster Gil Green 

Eui^ene Dennis Gus Hall 

John Gates Henry Winston 

Jack Stachel Robert Thomnson 

Irving Potash Benjamin Davis 

John Williamson Carl Winter 

Denver Story ; 

On September 20, Nancy Wertheimor and Jane Rogers answered a subpoena and 
came before the Grand Jury which was investigating Communist Party Activities 
In Denver, Colorado. They refused to answer questions about Communist Party 
membership and were cited for contcm-ot. neither woman was allowed to go home; 
both were summarily Jailed. Jane Rogern left three children at home that day. 
On the following day both women and another defendant, Irving Blau, apneared 
before a U.S. District Judge and wore convicted of contempt. The women were 
sentenced to four months in Jail, Blau to six months. The Judge denied ball 
pending appeal of his decision to a higher court. The three prisoners have 
already served three weeks of their sentence. They may easily serve out the 
entire sentmice before their appeal reaches the courts. 

The Hollywood Ten ; 

One of the first attacks on American civil ri^ts wa« directed at the Holly- 
wood motion nicture studios. Ten leading writers and directors were cited 
for contempt by the House Committee on un-American Activities because they 
refused to state whether or not they belonged to the Communist Party. Stand- 
ing on their oonstitutlonnl rights that their Dolltical beliefs and affilia- 
tions were their own -orivate affair, these ten men were held In contempt but 
•oermitted to post ball. The first aT)-oeal to the courts, by John Howard 
LawBon, is now a-Tproachlng a hearing. The outcome of this case will have 
tremendous effects on the other cases to be heard. 

The Hollywood Ten are; 

Alvf>h Bessie Albert Haiti 

Herbei^ Blberman Samuel Ornltz 

Lester Cole Adrian Scott 

Edward Draytryk Dalton Trumbo 

Ring Lardner, Jr. John H«ward Laws on 

Character Assassination ; 

Louise Brnnston is a New Yorker of means. She has used her money, not for 
"yachts and Jewels" but in the interests of neace and democracy. Questioned 
b/ the House Committee on un-American Activities, she has had no charge pre- 
ferred against her. In spite of this, she has been eroosed to newsppper and 
ra.-.lo attack designed to discredit her and link her to the atomic spy investl- 
g-'tnns. 

i.-jf n n Cage ; 

R •: A Lee Ingram and her two sons are in a Georgia prison, serving life 
sci.toncos because they defended themselves against attack by John E. Stratford, 
a •••i.te sharecrormer neighbor. According to S. Hawkins Dykes, a IocpI white 
a»to -ney atmolntod by the ooiirt to defend the haTjless mother and her two 
yov:.g sons; "The evidence showed clearly that John E. Stratford, the white 

(more) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYIvVANlA 2505 

CvETic Exhibit 52-19 (Page 4) 

Page 4 

fnrmer whon the Incrr^nn were pcouEod of mrdBring, pee'-ulted the nothar vlfeh 
a rifle rnd died froa n blov on the head when the Ingran 'boys came to her 
defense." 

gerhnrdt Elsler! 

Ilaler received his exit permit to leave this country in July, 1945, to eall 
In October. Two days before he was to spil his exit Tjermit was revoked and 
he was subtjoened by the House Coranlttee on un-American Activities. Two dpys 
before the date of the henrlns he wns arrested Vi& brought to Washington -under 
the -oretext thpt he was trying to leave the country. During the hearing he 
protested igainst the refusal to allow him to make a statement »nd was cited 
for conten-ot, plven a sentence of a year in Jail p-nd a *1000 fine. Another In- 
dictntnt for -oerjury was brought against hin in August, 1947, when he was 
sentenced to from one to three years in prison. Even the trial Judge broii^t 
out the fact that the '>overnnont was nrosecuting Kisler for alleged false state- 
ments on his exit -ccrnit when it was clear thpt the Government had waived ail 
requirements for the exit -nernit in his case because they were anxious for hlm 
to leave the country. 

Despite the fact that Eisler was released in ^20,000 bpll after spending ten 
weeks in a Federal Jail, he was rearrested in February. 1948, and sent to 
Bills Islpnd under the -oretext that denortatlon -nroceedings were to be started. 
The real reason, according to Tom Clark, was to -Drevent hin from touring the 
country and 8T)€aklng in his own behalf. It was only after a six-day hunger 
strike that he was released. DetJortBtlon -nroceedings are still pending. 

leon Josctihson : 

Jose-Thson was the first nerson who was Jailed for contempt against the Fouse 
Connittee on un-Arocrlcpn Activities. He is a !Tew Jersey attorney, active In 
the anti-fascist underground in O-ermpjiy dtiring the war. He is serving a one- 
year sentence In the Hllnn, (Mich.) Federal -Drison. 

It Could Rave Been Your Fooe i 

One of the latest and most outrageous attacks on civil rights occurred In 
Washington, B.C., on October 3: 

Twenty -oolicenen entered the -orlvate home of Julius Kanlan, where 
an inter-racial riarty was going on. On the pretext that a "shooting* 
had been reDorted, they searched the house without a warrant and 
arrested and detained the •oarty-goers for five hours. 

This Is, by no means, the entire story. It is only a small samule of what 

is going on in the United States today. Fascism is not a reality yet 

but Its shadow Is across the land. 

COlTtJRESS OF AMERICAII W0KCE3T 

Stella B. Allen 

Executive Secretary 
10/13/49 
U0T)wa 16 

63178 O— 50— pt. 2—10 



2506 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-20 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 
307 So, Hill St, Lo3 Anpolos 13 MAdlson 6-5121 

Deer Friends; 

Ten men tjid women ere in jell "until they talk" — sentenced 
ty Federcl Judge Petrson Hull after they hcd defended their Constitutional 
rights to refuse to incriitincte themselves end their rights to free 
essorslEtion rnd conscience by refusing to answer questions of t Gr&nd 
Jury, the purpose of i hose investigations ere up until now, unknovrn by 
my one. 

The i.ords "Conmunist" ejvd "Communistic" have been the 
keynote of this '..hole clleged investigation end the questions csked the 
ten v.itnesses clearly indicate thct this is another attempt like the 
Kundt Eill, etc., to outlcT. the Communist Purty end all organizations 
v.hich dare to disagree ■'.Tith the status quo, 

Wu are oertfia tliot r.ll organi,zations will recognize the 
danger to all democratic thought end action in the legal trickery used 
to incarcerate citizens for an indefinite period, for no crime, since 
this Grand Jury inquisition can continue for some time. Je urge the 
follo;7in^ imniedioto action by your organization. 

1. Send resolution (sample enclosed) to Attomey-Genercl Clerk, 
President Truman and U.S. Attorney James Carter, Federal Bldg. 
Los ijigeles, copy to us. 

2. Contribute for the defense of the victims. Money is needed for 
families of those in jail, for educctionel material, legal ex- 
penses, etc. 

3- 'iVe are making en appeal for the grtnting of bail. (Bail was 
grr.nted in simile r cases in Denver today.) Help us to have 
r Bcil Fund ^vcilcble for immediate relerse of these people. 

4. Cell us to Si^nd f. specker to your next meeting, kany wives end 
husbcr.ds of those in j"il are avcilaole to speak. 

For further information, contact this office. 

Sincerjly, ., 

yjuie Shore 
Executive Director. 

uopvm 9 cio 
10/26-48 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-21 

DON'T WAIT... TILL IT'S TOO LATE .. 
Defeat Fascism NOW ! 



Hear 
GERHART EISLER 
German Anti - Fascist 

SUNDAY, NOV. 7th - 3:00 p.m. 
Public Aiaditorium Ball Room 



2507 




Adrrc 



The finp 


















for the ir« 


.. 
















guarantee 


tu..- 




. - ^ I 












The Civil 


Rights 


Con 


gress 


Ol 








meeting - 


and 


to 


join 


wi th 


us 


m 


thi 


s 



2508 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-22 

BONt WAIT... TILL ITS TOO ZAT^/ 



DEFEAT FASCISM 
ATO^// 



CVETK EXHIBIT 52-22 



• HEAP^ 



GERMAN ANTI-FASCIST 

SUN. NOV.?:- 5:00 P/^ 
DAU ROOM- public AilP. 

ADMISSION 40( ( Tax Included ) 




TOM CLARK, you jail «nd indict the leaders and •ttempt to iUegalixe the 
Communist Party .... WHERE IS YOUR EVIDENCE ? ? ? 

With lies, police spies and old vive* tales you persecute and siuear leaders 
of labor and the Negro people .... IHEBE IS YOUR EVIDENCE ? ? ? 

¥ou hound and attempt to deport leaders of the foreign born - You smear as 
subversive the many organisations that fight for the democratic rights of the 
people - WHERE IS YOUR EVIDE^CE ? ? ? 

The blood of lynched Negroes and murdered trade unionists is open evidence 
of the activities of the lynchers and the Ku Klux Klan .... WHY DONT YOU 
INVESTIGATE THEM ? ? ? 

WE CHARGE - and we will bring evidence to show that a sinister plot is 
underway to steal away the demociatic rights of the Americsn people 

WE CHARGE - and will bring evidence to show that Wall Street and fascist 
minded men in our government are out to scrap our Bill of Rights and our 
Con stitution. 

We will show that these men, who now lead the Republican and Democratic 
parties by the nose, are now tryirg to lead us into another war, into eeo-_ 
nomic chaoa and to bring the American people under the iron heel of thought 
control and fascisoi. 

The finest tradition of our Asarican History is the fight for the freedom 
of sll the people, AN INFORMED PUBLIC is the best guarantee that our democratic 
institutions shall prevail. The Civil Rights Congress of Ohio invites you to 
attend our meeting and to join with us in this fight. ■^^ 



COMMTJNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2509 

CVETIC EXHIRIT 52-28 

RALLY FOR CIVIL RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY 

YOUR RIGHTS ARE AT STAKE... 
******** 

HEAR • • • 

GILBERT GREEN 

of CMcago — One of the 12 national Communist Leaders framed under the Smith Act. 

Harold Christof f el 

former 248 leader, Victim of Allis-Chalmers witch-hunt. 

Friday, Oct. 8, 8 P. M. 

O. K. U. y. HALL 

1218 West North Avenue 

It is later than we think! The drive is on for war and a police state in America! 

12 national Communist leaders are indicted for what Tom Clark, Attorney 
General, SAYS they think, NOT for anything they did, and their trial is being rushed 
to keep them from presenting their case to the American people. This is the way it 
happened in Germany and Italy. First the "Reds" . . . next, the unions, liberals. 
Catholics, Negroes, and Jewish people! That is the logic of events. 

On the one hand Nazis are coddled. Use Koch, Buchenwald murderess, who made 
lampshades from the skins of concentration camp victims, had her sentence cut from 
life to 4 years by U. S. Army heads in Germany. On the other hand, anti-Nazis, anti- 
fascists, progressives and labor people are persecuted. Hoodlumism and violence are 
encouraged by this "red" hysteria. 

IF THESE 12 ARE FRAMED-UP AND JAILED FOR POLITICAL BE- 
UEFS ALL DEMOCRACY-LOVING AMERICANS ARE IN DANGER! 
THE U. S. CONSTITUTION WILL BE SWEPT ASIDE! 

SPEAK OUT IN YOUR OWN DEFENSE! Write or wire Atty. Gen. Tom 
Clark, Washington, D. C. demanding that the indictments in "The Case of 
the 12" be dropped! 

ATTEND THIS RALLY AND BRING YOUR FRIENDS! 

A new musical short which takes off on labor haters and witch hunters 
"The Investigators" will be shown. 

ADMISSION: 50c (42c plus 8c tax) 



Auspices: Wisconsin Civil Rights Congress, 5088 Plankinton Building, Milwaukee 3, 
Wisconsin — Phon« BRoadway 2-2493. 53 ^^ ' 



2510 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit r>2-24 (Page 1) 



& 



^ecaude 

THEY COULDN'T BUY HIM 
OR BREAK HIM 

tkeu want to jail h 



im 



CVETIC EXHIBIT 52-2U 
(page 1) 




J4i 



i5 cntne: 

HE FOUGHT RELENTLESSLY AND WITHOUT 
COMPROMISE TO BETTER THE LOT OF HIS 
FELLOW WORKERS 



THE CASE OF 



HAROLD CHRISTOFFEL 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



2511 



CvETic Exhibit 52-24 (Page 2) 



_yv Jkom m the ^lesk 



4 



anaaemen 



f 



t" 




"My firm was retained by the International Union, UAW-CIO 
and I have undertaken to defend Harold phrittoffel became c 
my conclusion, after investigation, that he Is innocent. 

"Chris is being victimized by the same witch hunt that has caused 
scores of federal workers to be dismissed without cause, hearinii 
or appeal; led to threatened deportation of labor leaders; sUn- 
dered and destroyed the articulate artist, worker and professional. 

"Why, really, did the government proceed against Chris? The 
reason the government proceeded againat Chris was becai-se he 
was an able and honest trade union leader who was a thorn in 
the flesh of a labor-baiting, union-busting management. This 
management was always trying to smear Chris in tn effort to de- 
stroy him. They had a public relations counsel on hand, not only 
at the hearings before the House Committee on Education and 
Labor, but also at Chris' trial. He was always there with slick 
releases for the press. 

"Chris was guided by a single-mindedness of purpose which to me, as an on-looker, makes sense. The 
main theme running through Chris' philosophy is that workers must hang together' or they will 'hang sep- 
arately.' The way he explained it was that this management would try to divide workers on one basis of 
another, either on the basis of young against old, of male against female, of white aqainst black, of Jew 
against Gentile, of communist against anti-communist. His philosophy was that to fall for any of these 
divisive tactics of management was to play into management's hands. His philosophy was that all workers, 
reqardless of race, creed, colbr, nationality or political affiliation, must stick together. It vras enough for 
him to know that a person was a worker in the plant wherr he worked and belonged to his union. That was 
all that Chris needed to know. The idea made sense to him. 

"If one did not understand the idea of the brotherhood of man, one could learn about it from Chris 
and his fellow workers. It is because Chris has such a deep devotion to the labor movement and was so 
able in his fight against management that, in my opinion, he found himself under indictment and trial for 
perjury." 



/ 

O. JOHN ROGGE 



CVETIC EXHIBIT 52-2U 
(page 2) 



— O. JOHN R06&E 
(Former Assistant Attorney General) 



THE CASE: 

Why They Want to "Get" Christoffel 



Harold Christoffel, Wisconsin labor leader, has 
been sentenced from two to six years in prison for 
perjury growing out of his denial '.hat he was a Com- 
munist, while being cross-examined by the House 
Committee on Education and Labor — the Hartley Com- 
mittee. Christoffel and two other leaders of the 
Allis Chalmers Workers Union, Local 248. UAW-CIO. 
in the eleventh month of the strike, hod asked for an 
opportunity to appear before the Hartley Committee 
to reoly to a barrage of anti-union and red-baiting 
attacks made before the committee by officials of the 
Allis Chalmers Manufacturing Company. 

All of the Company's "testimony" was unsworn. 
Three days before Chrlstoffe' testified, the House 



passed a resolution authoriiing Chairman Hartley to 
administer oaths. The stage having been set. Christof- 
fel was forced to submit to an abusive "third-degree. " 
The anti-union, pro-fascist. Clare Hoffman of Michi- 
gan quizzed him from a list of questions prepared by 
Allis Chalmers Co. officials, saying "I want to ask 
you a few questions that may seem unnecessary, but 
just for the sake of the record, and they are very 
short and you can answer them very quickly." 

It was this series of questions that formed the 
basis of the frame-up which led to the conviction of 
Christoffel. Tfie Allis Chalmers Co.. working with the 
Hartley Committee, set the stage to entrap a labor 
leader and railroad him to jail. 



2512 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic Exhibit 52-24 (Page 3) 



THE TRIAL: 



JUSTICE? 



When the trial opened the defense discovered that 
the FBI had investigated the entire jury panel. De- 
fense attorney Rogge asked that a new jury panel 
be selected from the group investigated by the FBI. 
The defense asled for a copy of the FBI report so 
they could use it as the prosecution had. The judge 
also denied this request. 

The witnesses against Christoffel were a regular 
rogues' gallery of renegades, criminals and fascists — 
people who hated Christoffel for his union activities. 
The central point of the prosecufion was that Chris- 
toffel lied when he said he was not a member of the 
Cpmmunuist Party. Vet, not one witness could say 
that Christoffel is or was a Communist. The only 
"evidence " the prosecution presented was to get a 
Louis Budenz to say that he heard Christoffel use the 
phrase "as a communist" at one time in 1938. This 
was false and purely a fabrication. When Budenz 
previously testified before the Hartley Committee and 
the Grand Jury, he said nothing about such a state- 
ment. Obviously the prosecution having no evi- 
der>ce against Christoffel, brought forth fabrications. 



THEORy OF ASSOCIATION 



Through the other witnesses, the prosecution pro- 
ceeded to convict Christoffel by association. They 
pointed out that Christoffel was president of Local 
248 and president of the Milwaukee CIO CcHjncil, 
and that these union organizations made donations to 
other organizations which were called "communist 
front organization:! ' without any supporting evidence. 
Accordingly, argues the prosecut'on, Christoffel is a 
communist. The cncmici of labor and democracy set 
a dangcroui precedent in the Ckriftoffcl caic, in 
labeling a man red, because he was active In the 
union which supported another organization whicK 
iomeone cl>c claimi ii connected with eommunitti. 

Probably the greatest injustice In the Christoffel 
case was the judge's refusal to let defense attorney 
Rogge read to the jury Chrisloffel's testimony before 
the Hartley Committee. The prosecution itself intro- 
duced this testimony as evidence in the case and even 
read a few pages to the jury. When the defense 
wanted to read ALL of Christoffel's testimony to the 
|ury so that it could get a clear and complete picture 
of this testimony on which Christoffel was being tried 
for perjury, the judge refused. Why? Christoffel's 
testimony before the Hartley Committee explained 
how the Allls Chalmers Co. tried to break the strike 
and smear the officers with red-baiting. Whenever 
witnesses were asked about some matter dealing with 
the Allis Chalmers Co.'s relations witth the union, the 
judge ruled out the question. 



The gross injustice of this case can also be seen 
in the Court's refusal to hold the trial in Milwaukee 
where all of Christoffel's witnesses live. The defense 
then asked that depositions (sworn statements) be 
taken in Milwaukee and read to the jury in Wash- 
ington, to save the expense of bringing the .vitnesses 
to Washington. This was denied. Christoffel had 
planned on having about 300 men and women testify 
on his behalf either in court or by depositions. When 
this was denied, he asked the government to pay for 
the expense of bringing 49 witnesses to Washington 
as the government had paid for the witnesses against 
him. The judge waited until prosecution had com- 
pleted its case before he refused to bring Christoffel's 
witnesses to Washingfon. Then at the last minute 
Christoffel had to borrow money so he could bring tlie 
six witnesses that were finally put on the stand on his 
behalf. These six men pointed out that Christdffel 
was a militant trade-unionist who refused to divide 
his union by red-baiting. They were not permitted to 
bring out that the Allit Chalmers Co. called Christof- 
fel a communist because he could not be bought, 
intimidated or forced to sell out the Allii Chalmeri 
workers. The witnesses made such a deep impression 
on the jury that it was put over five hours before it 
brought in a guilty verdict. Had the defense been 
able to tell the whole Allis Chalmers story and had it 
been able to bring in all of the 300 witnesses, that 
verdict would have been "not guilty." 

The redbaiting hysteria that big business working 
with the press has built up, has made it impoitible 
to get justice in a case where communism is an issue 
just as was the case in Nazi Germany as Hitler seized 
power. The justice department, obedient to the de- 
mands of Wall Street, wants to silence all progressives. 
It wants to "get " the communists and non-communittt 
alike. Anyone who refuses to go along with the anti- 
communist hyiterie of reaction ii labeled, pcctccutcd 
and prosecuted. 



'GET' CHRISTOFFEL 



They especially want to "get " men like Christoffel 
who says "In order to savt our unions and the progres- 
sive movement, we must destroy the reactionary weapon 
of red-baiting. We non-communists must stand together 
with the communists, for red-baiting will destroy all 
we hold dear. We trade unionists and progressives 
fight against Negro-discrimination, anti-Semitism, dis- 
crimination against the forelgn-bo'n, and all other 
forms of division by working with minority groups. 
When we work with people of another race, creed, 
color, national origin or political beliefs, we do not 
embrace their culture, religion or beliefs. Let us have 
the courage to fight against the reactionary weapon 
of red-baiting together with the communist before 
this mad hysteria destroys us all." 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-24 (Page 4) 



feet 

HAROLD 
CHRISTOFFEL 

Harold Christoffel, Chris to his fellow work- 
ers, was born on Au3ust 22, 1912, »in Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. He has lived all of his 
life in that city. He lives there now with his 
wife, Ann, and two children, Tommy, age 6 
and Nancy, age 3. He was the eighth of 
nine children of Swiss parentage. 

In April, 1929, Chris began his apprentice- 
ship as an electrician with the Allis Chalmers 
Mfg. Company. He was 17 years old at that 
time and going to vocational school to study 
electrical engineering. In 1933 as an appren- 
tice, he became active in trade union work 
and organized the Allis-Chalmers apprentices 
for a wage raise. At the time, he headed the 
Milwaukee Apprentice Association. 

In 1934, the Allis Chalmers workers organ- 
ized on a craft basis in the AFL and Chris- 
toffel became the financial secretary on the 
AFL electrical workers union. In 1936, the 
craft unions amalgamated into an AFL Fed- 
eral Union with Christoffel as its president. 
This Federal Union offilra+ed with the CIO, 
and became Local 248 UAW. At the age of 
25. Christoffel was elected president of Local 
248. He remained as president until 1944, 
when he was slated to go into the army. As 
a token of its respect and esteem, the union 
made him its honorary president. He entered 
our armed forces in February, 1945, and served 
in the Phillipines and Japan. Twice during 



2513 




Christoffel's presidency in 1939 and 1941, the 
Allis Chalmers workers were forced to strike 
in order to maintain and advance their labor 
contract. Both times in the face of over- 
whelming odds Christoffel lead the workers to 
victory. 

When Christoffel was discharged from the 
army, in October 1946, a strike, which in- 
volved seven of the Company's plants, was 
in progress. He again gave leadership to 
the workers and as « result was discharged by 
the Company during the strike, even though 
Federal law provides that he could not be 
discharged as a striker or as a veteran. He 
had worked for Allis Chalmers over half of 
his life, almost 18 years at 34 years of age. 



^o appeal tne K^nristohel cade, 

WE APPEAL FOR FUNDS! 



Will you be the next vietim? If Christoffel goes to jail, a new legal pattern will have been 
formed to frame labor leaders. Funds are urgently needed to carry this case to the District 
of Columbia Appeals Court. 

Send your contributions to HAROLD CHRISTOFFEL DEFENSE COMMITTEE. ROBERT 
BUSE. CHAIR MAN. 108 W. WELLS ST.. ROOM 522. MILWAUKEE 3. WISCONSIN. 



Enclosed is 
and to cany on 

NAME 


the 


fight 


to 


for the defense 
keep America free. 


of Harold Christoffel 


ADDRESS 





2514 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-25 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

ROOM 811, 830 VINCENT AVENUE • CLEVELAND 14, OHIO • MAIN 3594 



GeORGE MARSHALL WILLIAM L. PATTERSON 

Chiiimtn, Board ol Dincton NtUontI Entylltm Smc'y 



LEN GOLDSMITH 
Ntllmntl Dinctor 



RAYMOND C. INGERSOLl 
NBilonal Tttaiurmr 



DR. HARRY F. WARD 

Nmt'l Honorary Ch»irm»n 

Ntt'l Vic, Ch.irmfi 
GEORGE F. ADDES 
MARY MatOO BETHUNE 
HUGH BRYSON 
CHARLES COLLINS 
DASHIELL HAMMEn 
REV. CHARLES A. HILL 
HON. STANLEY NOWAK 
HON. JERRY J. O'CONNELL 
LEE PRESSMAN 
PAUL ROBESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 
AUBREY WILLIAMS 

WILLIAM HABER 

OAio ExacudVe S«cr«lery 



October 13, 1948 



Dear Sirs and Brothers i 



I am writing you at this time to request an 
opportunity for a representative cf the Civil Rights 
Congress of Ohio to speak at your next membership 
meeting. 

At no time in the history cf our nation have the 
trade unions and the working men and women of the United 
States faced so sharp an attack against their rights-- 
the Taft-Hartley law being used to smash the xinions, the 
increased use of police brutality and hired thugs to 
terrorize lonion leaders and their membership, the tremen- 
dous red-baiting and union-baiting campaigns. 

Mot recently the effat to indict 12 leaders of the 
Communist Party (in Ohio, Gus Hall, chairman of the 
Ohio Communist Party) is being used as a pre-election 
tactic to deflect the attention of the people from the 
major lssues--the rising cost of living, the move 
towards thought-control over all of the American people, 
so that civic and labor leaders would be prevented from 
bringing the truth to the people and so challenge the 
Un-American Committee and the Wall Street war prpgram. 

In order to clarify the issues, in order to de- 
velop a campaign wherein working men and women can 
fight back and defend their rights, we would welcome an 
opportunity to appear at your next meeting. 

We would appreciate your early reply. 

Sincerely yours. 



uj^juu^i\idi>^ 



H/g 



William Haber 



CVETIC EXHIBIT 52-2$ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2515 

CvETic Exhibit 52-26 
MASSACHl SirrrS en APTIJ! 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

■2 PARK SQUARE. BOSTON 16. MASS. • IJbertv 2-:>;i04 

"■^*- 

October 28th, 194fl 
Dear Brother or Sister: 

The Indictment of 12 national leaders of the Comounlet Party Is a matter 
of vital concern to every trade union leader and memlDer, Ihese Indictments 
constitute one of the gravest threats to the American tradition of civil liter- 
ties, and, as such, threaten the foundations of free trade unionism. 

Having failed to pass the Mindt-Nlxon Bill, whose purpose was to outlaw 
the Communist Party, reactionaries are now attempting to accomplish the same 
end throu^ the indictments. The very men who are responsi'ble for the anti- 
la 'bor referenda in Massachusetts are also the ones who favor the Indictment 
of the Communists. 

This is not a matter of agreeing or disagreeing with the program of the 
Communist Party, The issue is sioqply this: if 'tis 'business elements can suc- 
ceed in outlawing a minority political party, they can then proceed against 
al] tri'.rte anions which defend the interests of their members. I hat is exactly 
whe. t M.tlur f.'d. That is precisely what happened in every country in the world 
whjrfe t he Ccmfflunist Party vjas outlawed . This is a plain fact which can he 
vferified in the history hooks. 

Representative Howard Smith was the author of the Smith Act, under which 
the indictments have teen made. This is the same Hepresentative Smith who 
co-authored the anti-lahor Smith-Connally Bill, who voted against V/PA, OPA, 
the V/age Hour law, the anti-Poll Tax Bill, a hill to outlaw lahor spying, and 
the National lahor Relations Act. Professor Zacharriah Chaffee, Jr^, of 
Harvard law Sohool, says Tjhis nhout the Smith Act: "Ihis statute contains 
the most dramatic restrictions on freedom of speech ever enacted in the 
Uilted States during peace..." 

We are convinced that the only way the indictment against the Communista 
will be smashed is for an aroused labor movement to recognise that its ovs 
interests are at stake and to make itself heard on this matter. The Labor 
Committee of the CIyII Rights Congress would therefore like an opportunity 
to present the facts of these indictments to your membership. If possible, 
one of our representatives will call on you in the near future, l&y we hear 
from you soon? 

Fraternally 

lie ~ 

James Iferino Paul R. Bnerson 

Field Organizer local 216 

United Bleetrical Workers, CIO United Brotherhood of Carpenters 

and Joiners of America, AFL 

(Organizations for identification only) 






2516 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-27 (Page 1) 

L, CIVIL RIGHTS Con,,,. 

ISFIGHTIOGfOR 



CVETIC EXHIBIT 52-27 
(page 1) 



TEE. DEFENSE OF TEE 12 INDICTED C0MMJWI3TS . 

Referring to theae indictments Henry A. Wallace said that the important 
thing foi- democratic Americana la to "defend with all their energy the 
rights of others to speak freely, no matter how much they may disagree 

with the points of view of those they defend Defense of civil ri:ht3 

of Communists is the first line in the defense of the liberties of o 
democratic people." 

For this defense the Civil Bights Committee must raise $250,000.00. 

TIffi ABOLITION OF JIM-CROW, WHITE SUPREI4ACY, RELIGIOUS AND POLITICAL PEBSECUTION . 

DEFEA T OF THE PROPOSED "LO YALTY ORDER" FOR CHICAGO CITY EMPLOYEES . 

IF YOU BELIEVE IN THIS PROGRAM- JOIN TODAY 

□Please send me more j 1 Enclosed is my conti'ibu- j I I wish to Join 
information ' tion of $ to help — ' the CRC and enclose 

about CRC the defense fund. $1.00 membership fee. 

Name Address City 



RAIL 'IBE ABOVE TO: CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS, 18? North LaSalle Street, Chicago. 
ANdover i-2551 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 52-27 (Page 2) 



2517 



12 



This is the number • 
This number 

MEANS YOU! 



12 — 

12 — 

12 — 

12 — 

12 — 

12 — 



AND IT MEANS YOUR FRIENDS - AND YOUR ORGANIZATION 
AND IT MEANS MILLIONS LIKE US EVERYWHERE! 



You'll b* ttiorn of TOUR OWN KIOHTS If It li docldtd that 
our cotintry'i llll of llghtt dooa not ipply to 12 



Union Ltkor wl 11 b« Injanctlonod Into • (trilglit-Jtckot and Taft> 
Htrtliytd to z»ro If yoi don't attnd up for |2 



Mar* Mogroot will bo (hot In tlio South for dtrlng to voto • 
• ore lynchlngt . aoro J la Crow - UNLESS TOU stand up for 12 



Labor loadara will ba houndod and Jallad (tJia boataa' poli- 
tic! ani art at It now) If you don't STMD UP fOK 12 



Faar will Ineraato aanyfold. You'll dara not aay • 'I'a for 
fraadoa of atproaalon* ■ unlaaa yoa STMD UP FOR 12 



It will b« callad traitorous to say 'aore housing* - 

'lowar prioaa* - 'ainerlty rights* -*hlgher oagas* - I f 12 go 



What you say about what you see, hear, read and think 
will ba reglaentcd by fasci st-alndad un-taerlcans, un- 
less 12 QO FItEU 

This is why ]2 means you! 

MD MOW HE TELL YOU: These 12 are Coaaunlst leaders. They 
are to ba tried In federel court because they thought and 
said things tbay believe In. Don't you also denand that 
RIOHTT. You want a free taerlca? 

UD WE ALSO SAY' Don't be shortsighted. Don't be narrow- 
alnded. Don't allow RED SCARE and SPY SCARE shots in the 
head to confuse you. Reaeaiber the good old saying: "Don't 
BITE OFF YOUR NOSE TO SPITE YOUR FACE.* 



WELL, DON'T BITE OFF YOUR CIVIL RIGHTS 
TO SPITE THE COMMUNISTSI 



NDWY A. WALLACE (and he Is not a CoMuniat) aays: "Defense of the civil righte 
of the CoMunists is the f I rat line in defenae of the libertlea of a deameratie 
people. V\» history of Seraany, Italy, Japan, Franco Spain, should teach us that 
the sappraeslon of the Coaauniste Is but the first step In an aasault on the dem- 
ocratic righta of all. 



HAVE YCXJ SFO^N LP? Your laDor union or other organization? Have you sent a protest to Tern Clarli, Attorney Ger«ral, 
Washington, D. C, dermnding the charges against the 12 be dropped. 1,100 trade union leaders, 400 leaders of the 
Negro people, many educators, shop iKrkers, church people, etc., have denanded this. And you should at once contact 
the CIVIL RIGHTS CXMJiESS, 187 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, (ANdover 3 2551) and say "I want to becone a Civil Rights 
Giardian, I nent to join you. I «ent to help organize a pwerful civil rights movetnent, establish a civil rights 
connittee in my shop, my union, my lodge, my neighborhood. I want to solicit funds to help defend and uphold the 
civil r ights of all." 




Issued 6y CIVIL HlOnS OOfiCHESS 187 North lo SoUe Street. Chicag,. 1, Illinoi 



2518 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-28 

TWELVE LEADERS OF THE COMMUNIST 

PARTY have been indicted by a Federal Grand Jury on charges of a 
conspiracy to advocate the overthrow of the government of the United States 
by force and violence. The law under vtiich they are indicted rras passed 
in 19U0; the events cited in the indictment are alleged to have tiiken place 
in June, 19U5. 

The fact that the indictments are brought out at this time, --hen 
the -ar hysteria is at its peak, on the eve of a special session of Congress, 
and just prior to the fall election canpaign, indicates that this action is 
a political and not a ci-iminal prosecution, and is intended to turn atten- 
tion from the urjjent problans before the Araerican people. 

This action represents in fact the 'new face' of the Mundt Bill, 
vv'hich vras defeated by an aroused public opinion. Like the llundt Bill, it 
v.'ould outla-'.T the Communist Party. The indictments strike a blou at the 
civil rights of all Americans and endanger the democratic liberties of any 
group or individual rho differs from the current poiicies of the gcwernment 
on one or another issue, 

")ith regard to the Communist Party, the Supreme Com^ ruled in 
the Schneiderman case tVet the Ccmmunist Party presents no threat or 
danger of overthrov.lng the fovernrent by force and violence. This in it- 
self shows that the indictments are based on political considerations, 

Te believe that the heritage of free and open political organiza- 
tion, fought for by generations of Ar.ier:.cars and guaranteed in the Bill of 
Rights, is being violated, and that this action, like the Mundt Bill, bears 
an ominous resemblance to the events '.vhich led to fascism in Germany. 

Ve therefore protest the Administration's deserting the most 
fundamental liberties secured by the Constitution viiich they are sirorn to 
uphold. 

Issued by: EAST BAY CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 
160-A Grand Avaiue 
O7Vil^-u/90 Oakland 12, California 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVAIHA 2519 

CvETic Exhibit 52-29 




This is an historic day for all Americans, for today marks 
the 157th ^.iiniversary of the Bill of Rif^hts, Our people have 
long enjojod the fundamental freedoms guaranteed them by this 
great document. BUT TODAY THE BILL OF RIGHTS IS BEING 3CRAPPEDI 

The First Amendment reads: 

"Congress shall make no law lespecting an establishment 
of religion, or prohibitingthe free exercise thereof, or 
abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right 
of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the 
government for a redress of grelvences." 

In plain and unequivocal language the Bill of Rights guarantees 
to all citizens freedom from political persecution, freedom to pursue 
one's political beliefs regardless of whether they happen to conform 
to those held by government officials and the administration in of- 
fice at the time. 

This fundamental right is now being flagrantly violate*. In 
New York, 12 members of the National Committee of the Communist 
Perty wiJl be brought to trial by the administration on January 15. 
Here i Ji Los Angeles, at this very moment, fourteen prominent Los 
Angeles Coraavnlsts and progressives face possible jail terms for 
refusing to turn stool pigeon. 'What crimes do the government pro- 
K'^c ;t :ire allege these people have conmitted? The administration 
mi'- So :•(. bones about it. THESB PEOPLE ARE BEING PERSECUTED FOR 
DIGAGRRtlNG vriTH THE POLITICAL VIEWS OF THOSE NOV/ IN OFFICE I Absurd 
Absurd? ~but truei 

FELLOW STUDENTS n ACT NOW BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE J 






Write your Congressman-elect and demand that he 
exert all possible efforts to force Truman to halt 
the persecution of the N, Y. 12 and L, A, 141 

V/rlte U, S, District Attorney James M, Carter (Federal 
Building, Los Angeles) and protest the persecution 
of the L. A. 141 

Contribute any amount possible to the Los Angeles 

Civil Rights Ball Fund, 307 S. Hill St., Los 'jigeles 131 




ISSUED BY STUDENT DIVISION OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 
307 So, Hill stretjt, Los Angeles 13 MA, 6-5121 



2520 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-30 (Page 1) 



If there i> ajiy fixed Itar in our Conititutional cc 
no official high or petty, can preicribe what ahall be 
nationalikm, religion, or other matters of opinion, 
confeti by word or set their faith therein. 



• tell 



in. It i. thai 
■thodox in politics, 
force citizens to 



The Supreme Court of the United States 

June 14, 1943 — Justice Jackson 



The Case 
of 12 Americans on Trial 
Defending Your Freedom 



It'S an old AMERICAN CUSTOM. 

You have a right to your opinions. 

Nobody can tell you what you have to think. 

Nevertheless, today — at this very moment — 12 
men in New York face prison. 

Their crime? 



They dare to hold an idea. 

For this, they stand accused. 

But it is not 12 men who are on trial. 

Everybody — now or in the future — • who dis- 
agrees with the Rankin-Thomas un-Americati 
committee ... or the big newspapers ... or 
the big corporations ... is on trial. 



Congres 


• thmn 


make 


ta^ 


law respecting an establishment 


of religion. ' 


1 or prohibitin 


g the free ox 


erci 


se thereof; or abridging the freedo 


m of speech ' 


or of the press; or 


the 


igh 


t at the people peaceably to asser 


nble and to | 


petition the 


Covert 


iment 


for 


a redress of grievances. 

BILL OF RIGHTS 












First Amendment to the Constitution ^ 






^^ 


^S 


of the United States. 





o 



who accuses fhe Twelve Indicted Communiisfs? 



(I) Tom Clsu'k, the genial gentleman from Texas, 
who is not yet convinced the Ku Klux Klan 
can be prosecuted by the Justice Department. 
A man who repeatedly has told the Negro 
people he cannot act against the murderers 
of Isaih Nixon, tjr Robert Mallard, two Ne- 
groes murdered in Georgia, when they at- 
tempted to vote for the president of the 



United States in 1948. Can this man In- 
trusted with drawing or recommending in- 
dictments against anyone? 

Yes, the same Tom Clark, who allowed Use 
Koch, the Nazi who murdered people using 
their skin for lampshades to go free. Can he 
ht' trustpd In nieto out justice? No. 1^ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYDVANIA 



2521 



CvETic Exhibit 52-30 ( Page 2 ) 



Who accuses fhe Twelve Indicfed Communisfs? 

Continued from rront i>agt 



(II) Who are the jurors of Southern District of 
New York those drawing the indictments 
against the twelve leaders of the Communist 
Party? 

A haodpicked discriminatory jury representing a 
smalt section of the population. The barrel from 
which names are picked for jury service excludes 
trade uniouiste, laborers, Negroes and Jewish peo- 
ple. Who then serves on these juries? The idle rich 
who will not be of the disposition to give labor and 
the common people a fair trial. Is our American 
heritage of freedom for all in practise, or blatant 
discrimination? 

It is discrimination, but Judge John Knox, 
Chief Justice of the Southern District, New York 
Courts, says, "I am told that the selection of jurors 
should be a democratic process and that persons 
who serve in (New York) are hand-picked. If this 
be a valid tmlictment of my conduct I cannot do 
otherwise than admit my guilt. Nevertheless, un- 



less restrained by an authority that I cannot re- 
sist, jurors in my district will continue to be hand- 
picked." 

The system of handpicked juries under Federal 
Judge John C. Knox of New York was attacked on 
the Senate floor January 24th by Sen. William 
Langer (R-ND), who said: 

"I read in the newspapers of yesterday and 
several days previously of what was transpiring in 
a so-called court of justice. I conceived it my simple 
duty to bring to the attention of this body . . . the 
fact that . . . the lawyers who are appearing for 
the Communists have a right, first of all, to show 
that the jurors are not impartial because they are 
not picked from the community at large, but on 
the contrary are, perhaps, as they are alleged to 
be . . . composed of persons who will not give the 
defendants a fair trial because of their . . . eco- 
nomic conditions or because of their views on pub- 
lic matters." 



What to do NOW! Before it's too late . . . 

1. Write or wire Chief Justice John Knox, Southern District, Federal Courthouse, New York, 
N. Y. asking that he declare the indicting jury an illegal jury. 

2. Write to President Harry S. Truman, White House, Washington, D.C., and to Attorney General 
Tom Clark, Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. TeH them to dismiss the indictments 
against the Communist leaders. 

3. Fight for the Bill of Rights. Urge your organization to pass a resolution and to send similar 
letters to President Truman and Attorney General Clark. 

4. Urge your Congressman to work for a dismissal of thifse un-American indictments. 



Join Civil Rights Congress Today! r"::^ ^^ 



The Civil Righti CongreM, S2 We>t Wathinglon. 
Tel. AN 3-5M2. 



63178 O— 50— pt. 2- 



-11 



2522 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-31 





Nothing in the sham that now passes for democracy is more childishly 
foolish than legislation in the U. S. A,, nor so conclusive as to the failure 
of its schools to teach history. 

In America today the number of citizens who have read the Communist 
Manifesto, books of Marx and Engels or of the Hammonds and Upton 
Sinclair and have been converted to communism by them hasn't been 
counted ; but it can hardly be less than one percent of the population of 
upwards of 1 30,000,000. 



Illiterate as the world still is, we estimate its Marxists at a million and 
a quarter. To suppress communism, the American government has 
arrested 12 persons and charged them with advocating the overthrow of 
the government by force and violence, which is exactly what Washing- 
ton and Jefferson did, thereby creating the United States of America. 

The founder of Christianity was a Communist with 1 1 faithful Apostles, 

chief of whom struck a man and his wife dead for keeping back their 

money from a common pool instead of sharing it. But American legis- 
lators, ostensibly Christians, don't read the Bible, much less Karl Marx. 
They would charge Saint Peter with sedition as well as murder if he 
were not beyond their reach. 





/ refrain from comment. The situat/on \ peaks for itself. 



(Editors Note Thr Hammimds Shaw rckrrtd lo are J L and Batbar, 
Mve research w*»rk in British Labiir histiiry ) 



i>f ihe indicted lejders of the O 



mmunlsi Part> has been undertaken by the Civil Rights Congress. Fo 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 
305 East 42nd Street, New York City 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYL'VANTA 2523 

CvETic Exhibit 52-32 

12 Men Face Trial Today 

-wmY> 

Read the Facts! Judge for Yourself! 

Twelve men — Americans — fathers, husbands, trade unionists, veterans, face trial today 
in an unprecedented case in our country's history. 

These twelve men are charged with daring to think, teach, talk Socialism . . . 
They are accused of "dangerous thoughts" . . . 

They are charged with the crime of belonging to a legal American political 
Party — the Communist Party. 

While the newspapers and the radios blast forth their lies of "overthrow, force and 
violence," the ACTUAL TRUTH is that the indictments do not mention one single 
overt act or any charge of attempt to overthrow the Government. 

Instead these men are accused of having formed an organization (the Communist 
Party) for the alleged purpose of "conspiring" to teach Marxist doctrine and of 
belonging to this organization. 

THIS IS A POLITICAL TRIAL in direct violation of the American Constitution 
and the Bill of Rights. These men are being prosecuted for their social and 
political views. 

What Does This Trial Mean to You? 

If these men are convicted . . . YOU are in danger 

It does not matter whether you are a Communist or not . . . whether you agree or disagree with tno 
Communists. The facts are plain. If these men are convicted, any American who believes and fights for 
progress is no longer safe. 

PROOF? Look back to the days of Hitler and Mussolini. It is an old, old story. Bar the Communists . . . 
and the trade unionists, the progressives, the intellectuals, the Negroes, the Jews and the Catholics go next. 
Have no doubts. If the twelve Communists are found guilty today; tomorrow it may well be "dangerous" 
to believe and work for decent wages, adequate housing, a country free from racial and religious prejudice, 
a world free from war. 

IT IS UP TO YOU. MR. & MRS. AMERICA 

YOU— AND YOU ALONE— ARE THE JUDGE AND THE JURY 

DEFEND YOUR CONSTITUTION AND THE BILL OF RIGHTS 

STAND UP FOR DEMOCRACY 

DEFEND YOUR CIVIL RIGHTS TOMORROW BY DEFENDING THE TWELVE TODAY 

WRITE ATTORNEY-GENERAL TOM CLARK, WASHINGTON, D. C. DEMANDING THAT THE CASE 
AGAINST THE 12 COMMUNISTS BE DROPPED IMMEDIATELY. 

For more information and material on the indictments write to: 
NEW YORK CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS— 23 West 26th St., New York 10. N. Y. TeL: ORegon 9-1657 



2524 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-33 (Page 1) 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



GEORGE MARSHAll WIlllAM I. PATTERSON 

Chairman, Board of Diracfon National Cxocuiivo Sac'jr 



lEN GOLDSMITH 
National Director 



RAYMOND C. INGERSOIL 
National Troosurer 



DR. HARRY F. WARD 

Nal'l Honorary Chatrnian 



March 8, 1949 



Naf/ Vi» Ckolrmeii 
GEORGE F. ADDES 
HUGH BRYSON 
CHARLES COlirNS 
DASHIEll HAMMETT 
REV. CHARLES A. HILL 
HON. STANLEY NOWAK 
HON. JERRY J. O'CONNELL 
LEE PRESSMAN 
PAUL ROBESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 



M1b8 Theresa Turner 
P. 0. Box 44 

Civil Rights CoTigress 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dear Friend: 

Under separate cover, we are sending you a 
copy of the brief that has been filed by 0, John Eogge 
on the Trenton Case. 

Tou will note from the enclosed bill that the 
price per copy is $5.10, which is the actual cost. We 
are certain that you will find the brief useful as an 
authoritative summary of the facts in the case. 

ri^erf?ally your a. 





uopwa 16-47 
end. 



William L. Patterson 




-JS-' 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2525 

CvETic ExHiHiT 52-33 (Page 2) 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

205 East 42 Street New York 17, N. Y. 

y.-a 4-6640 



Date: March 8, 1949 



MISS TE£B£SA. TUESEE 
CIVIL ai&HTS COUOiiESS 
P. 0. BOX 44 
PITTSBUaOH, PA. 



OHB (1) COPY 0? BHISI" OK TaENTON CASii *6.10 



Please remit 
uopwa 16-47 



2526 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-34 (Page 1) 



/}-^^(Cl^& CONGRESS WROTE THE SCRIPT-- 
^ '"■"^~^ J he 75 th aof the 80th 

hpAUL STRAND PHOTOGRAPHED iT 

VJhat J-icliywccd. woaldnt g've for such fdmnq 
a ROBESON SINGS -- NARRATES 
Love that Uo(ce 




THE FILM FOR YOUR FUTURE -3 



">^, 




PREMIER PERFORMANCE IN PirTSBUEGH 

7:30 P.M. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, AT CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL 

LINCOLN WOULD HAVE LOVED IT. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2527 

CvETic Exhibit r»2-84 (Page 2) 

X ^^ ™ 1^+^ ■■ ^ Vr "^ "^I? ' 







(^ ^^W^A. «- '-^fi-^aj.-.t.,..,^ ^ X/l^ /'Uf^^^^ 







^v*«,,i-»>-v aJ- Ox.-!-*.*/^ ; Ttru. (j-^.^ a.^c 



_ ^lt>^» Mi\^ 






cli-«i4 i--^xJ^r 



^■^ 



>^ 



2528 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic Exhibit f»2-35 (Page 1) 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



GEORGE MARSHALL 
Chai/man, toa/d of Otrecfert 



WILLIAM I. PAnERSON 
National f lecuiivt Sec'y 



LEN GOLDSMITH 
Nationai DUtttor 



RAYMOND C. INGERSOLL 
National Troaiiutr 



DR HARRY F WARD 
Nat'l Honorary Chaifman 

Nal'l Vice Chairmen 
GEORGE f. ADDES 
MARY McLEOD BETHUNE 
HUGH BRY50N 
CHARLES COLLINS 
DASHIELL HAMMEn 
REV CHARLES A. HILL 
HON STANLEY NOWAK 
HON JERRY J O'CONNELL 
LEE PRESSMAN 
PAUL ROBESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 
AUBREY WILLIAMS 



8«pt. 13, 1948 



Ml«a Th*r«aa Tnraar 
P.O. Box 44 
Pittsburgh 30, Pa. 

Vm^T Thar eta: 

Ton will pardon a/ uaa of yoxur flrat nana aa anch aa 
aarly aad rathar dlstaat latrodaetlaa, but I faal fron tha 
tona •t jreur lattar that wa will hara a long aad fruitful 
acqualntaaea aad ao I drop aaj fomalltjr at tha baglaalag. 

Lan la aa tour. Ha ahould be back hara aoaatlaa aarly 
aaongh la Oetebar to kaap tha Plttabur^ angagaaaat. If ha 
doaa not arrlTa la tlna, I can subatltata for hla If you ao 
daalra. la hit abtanea, I ahall Xrj to ataora tha appaaraaea 
of oaa of tha aaaaa tou hara aaBtlenad. Baa Sarla oaa aow 
laara tha Stata to hla praaaaea la not lapeaalbla. 

I laokad OTer the Hat of teatatlra offleara. It saaat 
fairly broad, fhat, of eauraa, la the prlaa obJaetlTa. Toa 
apaak of *a rloh seuree of paopla to work with.* Xhat la 
tma awarywhara aad the tapplag af that rich rala of paapla 
will glTa as tha capital wa aaad aad auat haTa. 

Tha CHC imat becoaa a bulwark of cItII rights la Aaarlca 
~ tha aala bulwark. It oaa raaeh soureaa wa narer draaaad of 
tapplag before. Tha aoral aaaalbllltlas of daoeat Aaerlcaaa 
are being dally outraged by tha violation of eonatltatlaaal 
liberties aad daaoeratle rl^^ta that la of dally eecuraaca aad 
la particularly grlaTOua where Hagre Aaarleans are coneamad. 

We hare to take full adTaatage of thla awakealag to ahow 
Aaarleaaa aad, aspaelally white Aaerlcaaa, that ^aX^ Street 
baa bean gradually aapplag away their aoral strength aad staalaa 
and thus preparing thea for tha debacle that fall on aoa-Jawlah 
^araaay whl^, haTlag accepted aatl-Saaltlaa, could not raslat 
Hitler's ancroaohaant upoa Its awn rights. Vha accaptaaea af 
any phaaa of white superiority Ideology aust Inerltably lead 
to the aaae raaulta hara la tha USX. It followa than that tha 
dafaaaa of Hagro rlgbta, or let aa put It this way: tha of- 
faaalra agalnat thoae who deny Vegraea equality before the 
law aad atharwlaa la a flrat llaa of dafaaaa af elrll rights. 

To tha dagraa to which tha aoral sanalbllltlas of white 
Aaarlea have already beaa blxated Is the degree of aegragatlaa 
aad Jlacrow to tbleh legraea are being subjected la aay particular 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2529 



CvETic Exhibit 52-35 (Page 2) 
Miss Therasa Tum«r -2- 



eounulty without whits Aasrlcans rsssntlo^ It. And the rs«l 
fact Is that nowhsrs do Nsgross szlst In oar eouatrjr sars 
through sufferancs. Nowhsrs haiTS thsy rlgjhts a whlts man Is 
hound to respsct. 

Hsrs you gllopss ths reasons why ths July 19th Philadelphia 
Conference tried to orientate the CBC on a lon^- range prosnus: 
the fight for Negro rights, the fight for the clrll rights of 
the trade unions and trade unionists, the fl^t for the rl^ta 
of Binorlty parties and the fl^t against the estahllshaent 
In our country of quasi-legal Inquisitional bodies like the 
Thomas Comlttee. These proride a continuous program of action. 

Constantly fluting along this progran, we fit the eavpalgns 
which arise from some act of official or semi-official terrorism 
Into the main stream, strengthening it, and at the same time 
glTlng greater Titality to the Indlrldoal ease. 

With this long range perspective, we go to those people, 
Baptists, Uethodlsts, Kplscopallans and others, who drafted 
resolutions ag^'.lnst the Uundt Bill and show them patiently and 
carefully how those resolutions, to he effeetlve, must be 
supplsaented through participation in the broader struggles. 
Labor, of course. Is the main source of our strength. 

All this shows why I gave an appreciative eye to your 
list of tentatire officers. Strike out boldly. So not fear 
to talk to anyone. Go directly to some of the editors to 
explain any specific case that rereals a most flagrant viola- 
tion of civil rl^ts. Of course, you will select such editors 
and publishers as have shown a slight degree of decency. 

There is a dentist. Dr. Hobert Patterson (white). In 
Turtle Creek. He may assist you in some ways. Appeal to hlm. 
Use my name If necessary, and please send me his address. I 
shall write him. 

Be particularly alert to challenge police brutality. It 
will be used with greater frequency as the struggles for bread, 
as the looming crisis sharpens. Negroes will be its principle 
victims. 

Don't take too many eases. Don't, in other words, over- 
load yourself. Remember, winning victories inspires everybody, 
especially you who Inad. 

Watch the Negro press; the Pittsburgh Courier is a potent 
factor in Negro life. Try to sway it somewhat. The politleal 
appeal won't work. It is committed to reaction. Bat here too, 
the degradation of Negro life through constant persecution and 



2530 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Ex HiBiT r)2-3o ( Page 3 ) 
Kiss Tber«8a Pamer -3- 

▼lolence Is, for you, an entry io bod* of these people. 

You are In an extremely Important area. Terror is a dally 
visitor there against steel men, miners, Hegroes, forelgn-'bom. 
What magnificent chances you have to build, and rapidly too. 
Go to It. 

Remem'ber the National Office. It cannot erlst without 
eupt>ort of the districts. If there are prominent people In 
your locality you believe we can bring into the struggle, but 
that you can't influence - send their names in. 

Lastly, the defense of the 12 Communist leaders Is the first 
line of all civil rights struggles. A great victory was won 
by the lawyers In getting travel ri^ts. Show others what this 
means. Good luck - which means work hard - for that is the only 
road to "good luck" for us. 

Sincerely , u 

J •'^^■•' 

WILlIiM L. PATTEBSON 
Nat'l feecutlve Secretary 

WliP:Jn 
uepwa 16-48 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENISTSYLVANIA 2531 
CvETic Exhibit 52-36 (Page 1) 

PITTSBURGH - CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

MONEY COLLECTED FOR DEFENSE FUND AND OTHER FROJ OCTOBER 16 to JWIIIftRY 31 

DEFENSE FUND BOND BOOKS: 

Joe R $ 11.00 

Matt 15.00 

Rose V, - MoKoesrooks.... 10.00 

Clndrioh - Cokeburgh, Fa « 40.00 

Fink - Houston, Fa..... 41.00 

Mike G. - UoKeesport, Pbl 32^00 

M.S. - no reooipt given 76.00 

COLLECTION LISTS i 

Es telle Borgins.... 3.25 

Novak - South Side 5.00 

Nath... 7,10 

Louis Felitoh - no rooeipt given. 10.00 

ORGANIZATIONS t 

Communist Party - Vfostorn Ba 500.00 

JPFO - Max ?0.00 

JPFO - Lodge 463 10.00 

BTO - Branch 4265, MoKoosport Fa 10.00 

Federation Creation Amorioan V/omon - LloKoesrooka, Pa 10.00 

Croation Coun«il Amorioan Croation Dosoent - MoKoosport Pa 5.00 

SNPJ - Johnstown, Pa , 3.00 

Sloveno National Benefit Society - no reooipt given 5.00 

Croation Fraternal Union - no reoeipt givon 5.00 

Russian National Mutual Aid Sooittty " no rooeipt given. 25.00 

Association of Lithuanian Vforkors - no rooeipt given,.., 8.00 

PERSONEL * FRIENDS FOR DEFENSE FUNOt 

Rose Veroek - no reoeipt given 5*00 

Besale Chosky - no reooipt given...*... «. 5.00 

Stove Straka 6,00 

Anonymous 2*00 

M. Collina 5.00 

COLIECTIONSi 

Conferonoa, Ootobor 16, 194B, 41.80 

GUB Hall, C.R.C. mooting, _.-..abor, 1948 48.00 

For "Freodom Crusade" Dologatos at '..R.C. membership mooting, January.. 11.00 

W^EIVED THROUGH MAIL TCftVARD CONFERENCE EXPENSES! 

VHO - Lodge 4022, Blawnox, Pa 2,00 

Committee of United Lodges, Brownsville, Ba 10.00 

Ladies Auxilliary - UEHiiM,'iA-C 10, East Pittsburgh, Fa 5.00 

Croation Amorioan Vfomona Club, Farroll, Fa. 10,00 

$ 

TOTAL 1037.15 



2532 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-36 (Page 2) 
EXPENSES FRCM OCTOBER TO JANWJIY SI 

Moiling cijiporiBoa from Ootobor 1948 to January 31, 1949i 

ortvolopos 
paper 
' ' stonoila 

tolophono 
atanpa 

, $ 35. le 

William Rxttoraon traveling oxponsoa for C,R,C. oonforonoo 50.00 

Paid Printer for Conforonoo Calls 44.00 

Paid to C.R.C. dologatos to "Froodcm Crusado" 25.00 

Paid to Ft. Pitt Hotol for mooting room ranks: 

Conforonoo, Ootobor, 16... 15.00 

Gus Hall Prosa Conforonoo. 7.00 

C.R.C. mooting, Daoombor, . 5,00 

Paid for mooting room at Baptist Contor from Ootobor to January... 6.50 

Paid for Post Offioo Box til Maroh 31... » 6.00 

Paid for Gus Hall Radio Broadoastat VfflOD, Homostoad 34,00 

ITOPA, Now Kensington 18.00 

DEFENSE FUNT MONEY MAILEP "^0 NHV YORK, CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 607.00 

TOTAL PAID OUT $ 652.68 



TOTAL C0L1£CTED 9 1037,15 

TOTAL PAH OUT 852.66 

BALANCE m ON H*iNJ> .$ 184.47 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2533 

CvETic Exhibit 52-87 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 

PITTSBURGH CWAPTER 

1302 PARK BLDC. 



January 15,191*8 

Dear Member and Friends: 

GOOD NEWS! The Pittsburgh Civil Rights Congress Is bringing here 
for Its first Pittsburgh showing the vldely acclaimed full-length 
motion picture NATIVE LAND . There will also be short talks by Rev- 
erend McFadden, Baptist Church and Charles Newell, International 
Representative of the United Electrical Radio & Machine Workers 
Union. 

Fittingly, this program by the Pittsburgh Civil Righto Congress 
will take place on Lincoln's Birthday, Thursday evening, February 
12,191*8 at the Carnegie Lecture Hall. 

NATIVE LAND , with Its songs and narration by Paul Robeson, its 
memorable photograph by Paul Strand and music by Marc Blitzeteln, 
is a ciiltural treat of itself. But in addition to that every tic- 
ket you sell will be building another support for the protection of 
civil rights whtfth is a major Job for responsible Americans today. 

Let's all together, fill the Lecture Hall (60O seats) on Lincoln's 
Birthday. We can do this If each of us sells a minimvun of ten tick- 
ets. Tickets are available now. Please fill in and return the blank 
below as soon as possible, so that tickets may be in your hands and 
ready for sale at the earliest possible moment. 

^^^-^ Fraternally yours, , 

Thomas Quinn, Chalrmn CRC 



3. J^ck Sartj 



^'^i/'U; 



Mrs. J^ck Sartisky, Committee Chrmn. 
CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS OF PGH. 



Date 



Mrs. Jack Sartisky, Committee Chairman 
208 Wlnebiddle Ave., 
Pittsburgh 2k, Pa. 

Enclosed please find a money order for tickets at .65 each . 

I will be responsible for tickets at 65^ each for NATIVE ZAND 

to be shown on Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12,19^8 at Carnegie Lecture 
Hall, Scheneley Park. (All unsold tickets and money must be returned 
before Feb. 8,1948). 

Phone No. Name 

Address 



2534 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic Exhibit 52-88 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42ND ST., NEW YORK 17. N. Y. 



MURRAY Hill 4-6640 



DR. mm F. WARD 
Honorary Cliaiinian 

CEORS[ URSHAll 
Cbalmi ot tti Btari 

UtVUIWD C. DICERSOU 
Tninnr 

JOSEN CABDEII 
Eiieatlii Dinctir 

HUrON KAIFIUN 
PiUic lilatiois Dinctir 

UMUa ROSENNEIK 

tOUBSlI 

(EORCE F. ADDES 
MRV MtlEOD BETHUNE 
DASHIEIL HAMMEn 
REV. CHARLES A. Mil 
SIAMLEV NOWAK 
PAUl ROBESON 
VINCENT SHEEAN 
Viu Ckiimi 



May 4th, 1948 



Miss Miriam Schultz 
1527 Alataaa Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dear Miriam: 

I have already Informed you In a wire that 
we have secured Terdlnand Smith for your public hearing on civil 
rights for the 27th of this month. Incidentally, Ferdinand Smith 
Is the treasurer of the N. M. TJ. and he should be advertised as 
such, and not merely "of the National Maritime Union". 

Now Miriam, In looking over your first release 
dated April 30th, I notice thit your witnesses are Mrs. Amy Hunt,, 
Justice Josenh Ralney and Ferdinand Smith. I trust that your 
witnesses will not be limited to representatives o''" the Negro 
oeoole and Negro organizations. I am sure th<<t isn't so. However, 
I thought I would drop you a note Just to make certain. 

Joe Cadden Is on the road and will be lo 
Chicago on Thursday, May 6th. He will communicate with you and 
will Inform you when he will be In Pittsburgh. As soon as he 
gets back to New York I will try to come In for a few days. 



Sincerely, 




William Lawrence 



WL:SS 
uot)wa 16-47 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2535 

CvETic Exhibit 52-39 

U8T AUbMA Are. Plttsbuisk 16, Pa. 
M«7 15. IMf . 

rardiauid Bnitli, SMrctary, 
NaiioniO. »ritla« Qilmi, 
S46 WMt ITth 3t-. 
Rev Tork City, N.T. 

Dvar Brother tailiii 

Qielosed it ehoek la th* tun of ^45 to eorer rouaci trip 
fli^t R«w Tork to Pittsburgh and return for oar Opon Hearing oa Ciril 
Rights. Tbis is in eaee you may witii to tlji howersr yoar appe iranss at 
oar ■aatiag vLll aean so muoh to as and to the sap, ort of e Ivil rights 
of the people in oar area, that if the weather appears at all uaoertuia 
*• do hope jau will hare also aade advaoce arrangeaeats to enable jau 
to get her by train. 

oar neetin; will be held Thursday evening, May Z7, 194B at 
8:15 at the Beeley Center AXE Zioa Chureh, 2701 Ceotor Ave. laaediately 
before thit *e hope to arrai^e dinner nod a press oonferenoe* The 
prograa at the Open Hearing is planned to deal with three aspects of the 
fight for eiril rights: (1) the Ingraa Case; (2) freedoa of noTeaest, 
assaably, ^isech and aetion, on vhieh «e look to yoa to do a Job, for 
about a half-hoar( and (3) the real neaaia; of the Huadt Bill (BR 5852) 
«hiA we h re iavited Magistrate Joseph U. Rainey to deal with, for 
•bout n half -hoar. 

Ve look fonard with genuiae plaasore tj aeeting you personally, 
and to hare you with us. Onr neetlag has to date reeeired the endorse- 
■eat here of nany outstanding Benbers of the olergy, som eirio and trade 
•aloa organisations, partieularly DB sad the Allied Stone Prodoets-CIO. 

Will yoa wire oa how aai when you will be eoaiag so that we oay 
arrange to aeet yout 

Fraternally yours, 

PITTSBUnSB 0X7IL RZaHTS ConRBSS 

letiag Beeretary 

rUOHT SCHEDUI£: (All tlaea eastern standard tlaa) 

WA - Leares New Tork (12 nooa arriree Pittsburgh 2i34 p.a. 

(12:45 p.a. arrires Pittsburgh 3i90 p.a. 

TRAIN SCRDULB: 

Penna. R. R. • learea H.T. T a.a. arrives Pittsburgh 4 p. a. 



2536 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-40 







Initial Sponton: 
PAUL ROBESON 
OR. W. E. t. DU BOIS 
REVEREND JOHN H. JOHNSON 
ROSCOE DUNJEE 
MRS. ESTELLE MASSEY OSBORNE 



NATIONAL NON-PARTISAN DELEGATION TO WASHINGTON 
FOR PASSAGE OF CIVIL RIGHTS LEGISLATION 

^ 57 West 125th Street, New York 27. N. Y. 

SAcr«mento 2-8807 

NEGRO R I G_H_TS NOW J 




JOIN THE NATIONAL NON-PARTISAN MASS DELEGATION 
TO WASHINGTON, D.C. 
WEDNESDAY. JUNE SECOND 



JOIN In a mighty, united demonstration of the demand of the Negro 
People and other progressive Americans that Congress and the Adminis- 
tration ACT NOW and pass ANTI-POLL TAX, ANTI- LYNCHING, and F.E.P.C. 
legislation before Congress adjourns .' 

L»% ui to *• the Hatlon** Capitol not %/ the tcorei, ntt ly^ the boadredi eTCt, 
Vat by the XHOUSABie ob Jane aadi 

Oalttatei trva all over the country vill ••■•nkle to ffaablnctoa. D.C. at 11 A..II. 
at th« THUOBT ATJUUS BiRIST GOma 
foiBOBt Avaoue keittoan P and ^ Stroeta, l«ff. 

▲ apaoial train rrom Sew Xoric «111 l«a?e Pennsylvania Statlm at 7 A«M. (SA.t.} 
Ob June Sod. Sousd trip fare— on the epeciiJ train only»>l« $B.OD . 
Contact local apenaore (tee below) for information regarding tranaportation •rreB4»» 
menta from other citlea. 



SIOH UP TOCAT TO 00 TO WiSBViOKIS JUNI! 2ndl 

And In the meantima flood CocitreeB and the White Home with thouaande of lettera, 
resolutiona and telegrema demanding that our OoTemnent 0£XAT NO LONOSR IN PASSINO 
CIVIL aiaETS M5ASUBI9, INVOKE CLOTUBS TO STOP riLIBUSTISINa IT NiCSSAKT, and 

aiVX U unxlOH NSOBO AiO&ICABS THSIR OONSTITUTIONAL tLlSSni 



CO-SfONSOBS or TBS DSLBaAlIQH 
tiro* Charlotte A. Baas, Los Angelea 
louia B. Bumhea, Blnnln<ham, Ala. 
Joseph Cedden, Nen Toric 
J :r.n T. Clark, St. Louia 
£^. Oliver C« Coz, Tuakegee Inst< 
Pi.:,1afflin J. Davia,Jr«, New York 
If^-^i^ Uarehell Davii, Cbic^o 
L < 7.S.B. DoBoii, New Tork 
Tv-nooe IXinJoe, Oklehoma City 
r>\ A. Gerald Edwards, Brooklyn 
A.'aiB. Prgelon, Philadelphia 
rf".-.. Daisy Oeorge, New Tork 
->vV'y areene, Ja<;^aon, Miss. 
(<>■ v;i. Ouinler, New Tork 
'k.i-., Thomad Harten, Brooklyn 
4< aid Henderson, Philadelphia 
^ ., Chea. S. Hill. Detroit 
it^^t Ada B. Jaokeun, Brooklyn 
i.~:^ E. Beecher Jackson, Newark 
■'<.>-^:r P. Jackson, Va« State Ooiilege 
K.v. ,i,H« Jernacin, Sashictton, D.C. 
F.>. "' , John U. Johnson, New Terk 
T«X!xao &. Jones, Brooklyn 
9^-c itett Lochard, Chloace 
ft»c.?ge Itorehall, New Tork 



(^Mcepemlts partial list only) 
John 0* Uarshall, Savannah, Oa* 
I>arld.n Marahall, Mac9n, Sa« 
Dr. Benjanln S. Mays, Atlanta, Oa* 
James ale Leish, New Terk 
Urs. Sstelle Maaaey Osborne, New Terk 
William L. Patterson, Chici^o 
Utrtin Poypor, Weabinsten, D.C. 
Joseph R« Balney, Philadelphia 
flllard B. Bansem, Indianapolis 
Dr« Ira De A. Beid, Atlanta, Ga. 
Thomas Bicherdson, Waahlnfton, B.C. 
Paul Eobeson, New York 
Louis £• Soinders, Jersey City 
Marcel Scherer, New Tork 
Mra. Andrew H, Simkins, Columbia, 8.C. 
C. Le Bren Simaons, Detroit 
Dr. R.A. Simmens, Boston 
Ferdinand C. Smith, New Terk 
Uiss UorEcda Smith, 7in«ten-SalaD, B.C. 
Mrs. Uary Churdi Terrell, Waahin<tonJ)C 
Sneet ^Qxompson, Newark 
Baymend R. Tillman, New Orleans 
Xdweard Tolan, Detroit 
ilrs. Oeldie I. Aatson, Philadelphia 
Nelaos U, Willis, Chicago 
Coleman Tounf, Detroit 



SSI IS THS thtK TO DJiMAND ACTION PBOM THS UAJOB PARTUS ON CIVIL RIOBTS. 

jMS C SOQND IS THS DATE SET fOB A PO'itSTUL AND DBAMATIC fTfySffl'M' OT IHAt 
D£;«AND. 

PAfiS THE aQpB tiffiSqt i^D SEE mAT TOUB OHaANIZATIOK, TRADE UNION, OB CHUSdl 
lertliii REPRESENTED IB TEE OSLSaATION TO WASHINOTON. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2537 

CvETic Exhibit 52^1 (Page 1 ) 



MEMORANDUM ON OBGiHIZATION 
OF CfiC CHAPTERS 



Many communities throughout the country have groups and organizations 
particularly interested in the question of civil rights. In a great many cases 
there are local civil rights issues and cases that are not being foughtout or 
tackled properly for lack of organization. Many national civil rights issues 
are not being raised locally because of lack of organization. V/here there are 
indivaials willing to take the initiative, the following is a rough outline of 
one of the procedures that may be used for organizing Civil Rights Congress 
Chapters: 

1. Organize a samll meeting of the citizens mjst interested in the question of 
civil liberties, peoole from trade unions, churches. Progressive Party, 
campuses, veteran organizetions. Communist Party, lenguage groups, I.W.O.,etc. 

a. Elect or appoint a temporary chairman and secretpry-treas. 

b. Decide whether the Chapter should be on e county, area, 
city, or other, bpsis. 

c. Adopt a ouota for membership recruitment for the next month 
or two month period. 

d. Set up a small orppnizing committee *o vrork with the acting 
officers. 

e. Discuss CHC program and policy, and its relation to the 
local situation and hov the national program can be imple- 
mented in your city. 

f . Set a date for a large open meeting vrith each person respon- 
sible for bringing at least one nevt person to this meeting. 

2. Acting officers and organizing committee should meet within ? few days after 
the initial meeting and: 

a. Determine which of the local civil libbrtles Issues wotkld be 
of most interest to the community and therefore most con- 
ducive to the growth of CRC. Plan a campaign of pctlvjities 
around this issue. Don't take on too many fights et once. 

b. Plan a mailing and individual contact campaign to local 
organizations informing them of the now CRC organization, 
the kind of campaigns and program of activity planned, re- 
questing cooperation, funds andoffering assistance in cases 
of civil rights violations. 

c. One person of the group should ba assigned to publicity work 
and the i ssuance of press releases on the meetings and acti- 
vities. (Copies of the releases must be sent to the national 
orf ice. ) 

(more) 
63178 O — 50 — pt. 2 



2538 COMMTJNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit .■»2-41 (Page 2) 

ffiMOEANDUM ON OHGAinZATION -2- 

d. Draw up a leaflet announcing the open meeting, its speakers and 
tOT)iCB, and make Tslans for comnlete distribution of the leaflet 
through mass organizations, on street corners, °tc. <i mailingB. 

e. Study national office material ^nd worksheets to determine hovr 
your chanter can -ofrtlcipate in the national campaigns. The 
national office will sugrest a quota of the national fund drive 
for your chapter 'basc>d on the stpte quota, size of chapter and 
area. 

f . Set up your liooks and records, follovring the finaneial instruc- 
tion sheet closely. 

3. At your large, general meeting, held in a centrally located hall! 

a. distribute application cards, litprature. 

b. Elect permanent officers. 

c. Offer specific objectives and activities on local and national 
campaigns, v;ith a ■uew to involving as many of the people present 
as possible. 

d. Set e date for the next membership meeting viilh a call for each 
cerson present to recruit a given number of members by the next 
meeting. 

e. Take a collection for the defense fund arive. 

4. At all times, keep the national office informed of developments. Under 
separate cover we have sent yoi: 

a. samples of literature available. 

b. Form on which to order materials. 

c. Financial instruction sheets and material. 

d. A supply of application cards. 

e. General information on CRC, program, policy and camnaigns. 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 
205 Sast 42nd Street 
New York City - 1948 

uopwa 
16-47 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2539 

CvETic Exhibit 52-42 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



GEORGE MARSHAll WItllAM I. PAnERSON 

Chairman, Board oi Dirtlort Notional f«ec«fiv« S«c> 



lEN GOIDSMIIH 
Nalionol OrVecfor 



RATMOND C. JNGERSOLL 
Notional Jrtoturtr 



OR. HARRY F WARD 
No(7 Honofory Cdo/ 



Oct. 14. 1948 



NafI Vico Cliairmon 
GEORGE F. ADOES 
HUGH BRYSON 
CHARLES COLLINS 
OASHIELL HAMMFTT 
REV. CHARLES A, HILL 
HON. STANLEY NOWAK 
HON. JERRY J. O'CONNEll 
LEE PRESSMAN 
PAUL ROBESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 
AUBREY WILLIAMS 



TO ALL CHAPTERS — 

Dear Brothers and Sisters: 

Snclosed Is a resume of the Eisler case, the 
persecution of Oeriiart Elsler is one of the nosi scandalous 
Tlelatlons of our heritage of asjrlum for the oppressed 
of Surope. 

The case of this great anti-fascist has been 
permitted to reoaio dormant. It must be revived. 

Mr. Elsler is ao eloquent sveaker. He has an 
iotlmate MIowledge and grasp of the European situation 
in general and the tteroan situation in particular. He 
saw and erperienced the destruction of civil rights and 
constitutional guarantees in Oensany. He knows, through 
his experiences, what the destruction of the democratic 
rights of Communists and their Party means and is himself 
a living proof that defense of the rights of Communists 
is ths first line of defense of the civil liberties of 
all categories of people within the country. 

He is available for bookings in any and every 
section of the country. He would be effective among all 
groups and particularly among German and other language 
gi-oups. 

The National Office euggtsts you thoroughly 
axplore the use of Mr. Eisler's great talent in your 
vJnter forum, lecture and meetings. 

Tou should also seek his use by any and all 
progressive organizations. 

Enclosed is also a statement on the recent 
I>anver case. 

Fraternally, 



uopwa 16-47 



WILLIAM L. PATTERSON ^ 

Nat'l Executive Secretary 



2540 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-43 (Page 1) 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



GEOIIGE MARSHAU WIUIAM I. PATTIRSON LEN GOLDSMITH 

Cfioirinon, Board o( Dirtcton Nii«on<i( tMKulhn Uc'y NoHonql Oir«<<or 



RAYMOND C. INGEKSOU 
Nofionof Trtoivnr 



DIt. HAItY f. WAW 
NofI Honorary Chairman 

Nafl Vleo Ctiofrmon 

GEORGE F. ADDES 

HUGH BDYSON 

CHARLES COLLINS 

DASHIELL HAMMEn 
REV. CHARLES A. HILL 
HON STANLEIf NOWAK 
HON. JERRY J. O'CONNEU 
LEE PRESSMAN 
PAUL ROBESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 



Oct. 29. 194a 



Sear Friend: 

We sincerely hope that you will find It 
possl'ble to sign this letter, the original of which 
will tie sent to the President of the United States. 
It has already been signed hy a number of prominent 
Individuals who are In no way associated with 
Oerhart Xlsler. They are, howerer, Aoerlcans who 
are deeply alaroed at the trend of events In America 
where women with Infant children as In Denver are 
thrown In Jail with utter disregard for "due process 
of law". 

We are extremely hopeful that you will add 
your name to the list of prominent Americans who 
through this channel are reglsterlTig their protest. 



Tours very truly, 






WLP:jn 
uopwa 16-47 



WILLIJIM L. PATTS31S0N 
Nat'l Ixecutlve Secretaiy 



P.S. Please return signed letter to this 



WLP 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2541 



CvETic Exhibit 52-43 (Page 2) 

Date 



Hon, Harry A. Truman 
President of the United States 
White House 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. President: 

As American citizens, unchallenged - as yet - by the Bankln- Thomas 
Committee and therefrre in the eyes even of the most exacting critics eligible 
to speak out, we address this open letter to ycu Mr, President, 

We are perplexed and therefore in the circumfltance deeply con- 
cerned. It is the status of "our" prisoner of war or political prisoner, 
Serhart Eisler, that disturhs us. 

We are writing, Mr, President, directly to you, the Chief Executive 
of the Government, concerning the present status of this man, 

Gerhart Eisler came to the United States through no fault of his 
own. That he remained has teen our fault - not his - for he has remained 
as a political prisoner. 

Landed on our shores before the war by virtue cf a transit visa, 
Gerhart Eisler repeatedly asked to be sent to Msxico, the place he had 
chosen for refuge from Hitler. This request was as repeatedly denied. 
During the war years no charges wore made against this man. His conduct 
was In every respect consistent with his nagnificnnt anti-fascist European 
record. We shall not recapitualate the facts. They are a matter of court 
record and as such are readily available. Now we refuse to permit him to 
return to his fatherland although an exit permit was once granted him, ho had 
purchased his ticket and was ready to sail. 

Gerhart Eisler was hailed before the Un-American Activities Com- 
mittee; alleged by it to be ccntemj,tucus cf its dignity and procedure, and 
court proceedings brought against him. He has, on numerous occasions, been 
called an International spy but the record offers no proof. Was he arrested 
as we believe, solely to prevent his return to Germany? 

The record shows that Eisler was brought before Justice Holtzoff 
on a motion to dismiss the indictment against him. It shows that Justice 
Holtzoff, while legal adviser to the F.B.I,, had participated in F.B.I, in- 
vestigations of aliens and Communists, including an invostigaticn of Eisler 
and that the Justice >Bd a personal hatred of Communists as shown by his 
sponsoring of anti-Communist legislation, 

Gerhart Eisler' s case was tried in every metropolitan paper in the 
land. None of these charges, made against him, wore proven in any court of 
law. But the press has convicted him, villifled him, and tried to make his 
name an anathema. 

Those who have testified against him are almost exclusively men 
and women who openly proclaimed that they were spies, agents, provocateurs, 
or renegades from Communism. 



2542 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERJST PETTOTSYLVANTA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-43 (Page 3) 

-8- 

Thrcugh two years of persecution, thla man has steadfastly made 
tut one request: SEND ME HOMEl 

Yet, he is held a political prisoner in the land, the democratic 
practices of which once were the envy of all mankind. 

We ask you, Mr. President: Why? There is in our question no im- 
plied acceptance of Gerhart Eisler' s political or philosophical views. There 
Is implied, however, this query: Whither American justiceT 

Viewed in the light of numerous other events, this case tecomea 
the more perplexing. The Department of Justice is at this very moment beginning 
deportation proceedings against a number of men and women whom it alleges are 
"undesirable aliens". Most of them have rocts in this country. Some have 
been here many years. But Oerhart Eisler, whoso record is that of a European 
anti-fascist fighter, a man who fcught Hitler in Germany and the minions of 
Hitler and Mussolini In Spain, a man whose roots are in Europe, is hold here 
against his will althou^ it is alleged he too is a dangerous and undesirable 
alien. Are there then some so-called undesirable all*na we dare not send 
home? But where is the consistency or legal basis for cur arbitrary course? 

The facts, Mr, President, smack more Of persecution than due 
process of law. The olemonte of perseoutloii revealed by an objective examin- 
ation of the record are alien to our traditions of democracy. They present a 
dangerous alarming picture. That is what has Impelled the writing of this, 
an open letter to you. 

European and South American critics of American democracy have 
found in the Eisler case much helpful ammunition. In fact, what has passed 
for due process of law in this case has caused an every growing number of 
loyal Americans seriously to ponder the course of American Justice at this hour. 

Since the war, ox-kings, fleeing from an angry and outraged 
people, have found refuge here. So too have other noted friends of Hitler 
fascism. They remain in peace. They seemingly have found a congenial 
atmosphere. No effort Is made to hamper or hinder their goings or their 
comings. But this anti-fascist can't go back to the land from which some 
of these fascists have fled'. 

There are elements of persecution here, Mr, President, that are 
incomprehensible to us. We are asking you to intervene and to take those 
steps which in some small measure will clear our name of the opprobrium attach- 
ed to it through this case. 

We are requesting that you direct the proper agency to place 
Gerhart lisler aboard ship and that he bo permitted to go to that section of 
Germany for which he expresses a preference. 

Wo believe that no other course of procedure to be Justified 
by the facte. 

We are asking, Mr. President, that you act at once, taking 
auch Btorps as aro naodod in tho promisoB. 

Yours very truly, 
uopwa 16-47 elgnature 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLrVANIA 2543 

CvETic Exhibit 52-44 



^% -. % >. '-#^;. '^^J ll:i # ... M 




2544 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENIVSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-45 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



GEORGE MARSHALL WILLIAM L PAnERSON 

Choirman, toord of Oiracfors Notional Ex«cwffV« Soc'y 



LEN GOLOSMITH 
NotiomI Dtroctor 



RATMONO C. INOERSOU 
Nattooal Tromtynr 



DR. HAIRY F. WARD 

Sot'l Honorary Chairman 



tvtm}Mr U, 194t 



Norl VIra Clmlrimill 
GEORGE F. ADDES 
HUGH IRYSON 
CHARUS COLLINS 
OASHIELl HAMMrn 
REV. CHARLES A. HILL 
HON. STANLEY NOWAK 
HON. JERRY 1. O'CONNELl 
lit PRESSMAN 
PAUL ROtESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 
AUtREY WILLIAM 



9«ur Theraaa, 

EABOU) CRISfOlTIL, • lm4«r of tha 0.A.W.. CIO. 
•IM h«t >«M • TletlB of a taft-Sartlay fraa»-«p. la 
■•klaf « t«tir of tha eetattrj for tha porpoaa of ■obtllalac 
•upport bahlad hla eaaa aad ralalnc fao4i for tha appaala 
that ara aow paadloc in tha eonrta. 

X kaew that tdu ara ovarleaAad with ho th oaaaa 
»Bd aastlsta. Bowarar, thla oaaa la of particular 
ivpertavoa for tha laher aovaaaat. Wa ara aot aaMvc jov 
to arriac* apaelal ■astlaga for kla, h«t to attovpt to 
tohadalo hla Into a« m^mj trada oaloo aoAtloca and wtaa 
onfaiAaatloa aaotlaca aa poaslhla dnrlac hla atajr la 
70«r eltXi 



It vlll alao ha na 



hla. 



tTf to proTldo booalnf for 



Mr. Orlatoffol vlll ho la ?lttahur^ 

ea Roveaber 23, 24 (Tuasday and Wednasday). 

Will ren plaaaa ehaok laaadlataly with tha eiw 
gaalaatloat la your araa, aad advlao aa hjr ratnra aall ao 
to irttat aaetiac* ho vlll ha ahlo to addraaa. 

lo vlll alao lacluda la hla apoakloc aacacaaaata 

aa appo<il for aopport for O.t.C. aad Ita varloua oaaoa, aad 
for aaahorahlp In O.B.O. 

Toura vary truly, 

ua ooLsnm 

■atioaal M raster 
taiah 
oopva 1&-4T 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



2545 



CvETic Exhibit 52-46 ( Page 1 ) 



CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



GEOIIGE MAHSHAll WIUIAM I PAHEItSON 

Chairman. Board of Dirteton Notiortol Exccvthr* Stc> 



ICN GOLDSMITH 
Ndhsnof Dirtda 



RAYMOND C. INGEKSOll 
Nafienof Traoturvr 



DR. HARtr F WARD 

Nof'f Honorary Chairman 

Nal'l Vic* Chairman 
GEORGE F. ADDES 
HUGH BRYSON 
CHARLES COLLINS 
DASHIELL HAMMETT 
REV. CHARLES A. HILL 
HON. STANLEY NOWAK 
HON. JERRY 1. O'CONNELl 
LEE PRESSMAN 
PAUL ROBESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 
-atrKHaMMMMMa 



Oct. 22. 1948 



Theresa Turner 
FUtsburgh CP.C 
^.0. Box 44 
Pittsburgh, Pa, 

Dear Theresa; 

Just a few ccrxTctr '^i our coufersnce. Tlrst, let me 
express the great pleasure which I experienced in being In 
Pittsburgh again and having the opportunity to discuss with 
old friends the new situation. 

I believe the conference Isld a base from which to 
broaden our organlzati on^to advance the pc''ltlcal understanding 
0*" the people and of this drive arslnst our constitutional 
rights and to ir,ove some forces Into action around the csinnal^B 
which were outlined. 



It W39 obvious to all that organizationally the con- 
ference was narrow. What breadth it had CJUr.e In the laain from 
tregroes which at once shows the tremendous potentialities that 
exist in this snhere o' our work. Of the many visitors who 
were there and, their number almost eaualed th'^t of the delegates, 
some way must be found to follow their reactions and to get 
what results we can fron them organizationally and eriucatlon!iT.ly . 

Perhaps there are a number of rea<>ons for the narrow- 
ness. One would be the Insufficient preoaratlon, but I am 
afraid th=it the main reason Is the tendency which clings to 
us of wor'-ing within certain circleiand failing to coura?eou8ly 
and agresslvely cove out into new fields. 

There were no white ministers there, yet I am sure 
thnt there Is more than one white minister who can be won to 
this fight of which eo large a content lies in the realm of 
morals. 



T^°re were a few trade unionists; nor were those who 
were there prepared to speak. 

The press was not represented - neither white nor Uegro 
- only our dear friends to the far left. Nor was there any 
prepar.<ition for getting out a release. 

Undoubtedly, more work in steel and mining would have 
gotten some representatives there. 



2546 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-46 (Page 2) 



I mention the nress togethfr witl^ our organizational 
weakneaseg for every effort must be made by us to brf^ak through, 
even into thfi church press. 

The financial end was weak, too, with alr.ost 90^ of the 
finances coning from one source. 

^^owever, despite these weaknesses an educational job 
was done, I believe, and this touched upon organization, finances 
and education. We pre satisfied here thnt you will follow up 
for there are tremendous ccssibilities. 

You must be on the alert for grand jury lnvestIgatlon=! 
thTe along the lines of Denver for this is the r)attern now 
being followed. W,e must be prepared for a picket line, to send 
letters of nrotest to the attorney who is handling the matter, 
and to Ton Clark's office. 

The President's failure to speak out en civil rights 
reports in the Sout^ can be used by us to still further educate 
ITegroes. 

The Suprer.e Court decision BiPp.inst the Wallace party in 
Illinois must be used to show the peoile how the Re^iblican and 
Democratic Parties are conniving together to keep r)rogressive 
and independent forces off the ballot. 

The IILR3 ruling on the question of pf^aceful mass ticket- 
ing while not finalized is extremely vicious and can be used to 
stir the trade unions to the menace of the drive agsinst civil 
liberties. 

You will tighten your executive comnittee, and work 
with it to clarify your program - not taking too many cases, 
but concentrattgupoD those which can arouse major support. The 
case of the 12 will, of course, be your galvanizing center. 
We will be in constant contact with you. I shall be following 
very closely all of your activities. Give my regards to everyone. 

Sincerely^ 
^^-^^ 

WILLIAt: li, PATT'^SOM 
Nat'l Executive Secretary 

WLP:.1n 

uopwa 16-47 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYIyVANlA 2547 

CvETic Exhibit 52-47 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



GEORGE MARSHALL 

CfioiVmon, Boord of Dfr 



WILLIAM L PAHERSON lEN GOLDSMITH 

Nofionol fxecufitra Ste'f Nalionot Oireclo 



RAYMOND C. INGERSOll 
National Traaiurar 



DR HARRY F. WARD 

ttafi Honarary Chairman 



November 2?, 1948 



NaU Vice Cfioirnail 
GEORGE F. ADDES 
HUGH BRYSON 
CHARLES COLLINS 
DASHIELL HAAAMETT 
REV. CHARLES A. HILL 
HON. STANLEY NOWAK 
HON. JERRY 1. OCONNELL 
LEE PRESS««AN 
PAUL ROBESON 
MIRANDA SMITH 



kiss Theresa Turner, 
P. 0. Box 44, 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 

Dear Theresa, 

Tour letter was an extremely heartening ooe. 
All of the request' you have niAde will be Immediately com- 
piled with, and we shall see that those Individuals whose 
najnes you hsve submitted will receive copies of our 
naterlal. 

I am honing that you wll'' take stews to have 
a Western Pennsylvanln delegation in Washington, 1 shall 
write to you vpry shortly with regard to certain organiza- 
tional stens which I feel are vital to the future of our 
organization. We must consolidate organliatlonally those 
forceg which we have been able In this last period to In- 
fluence In one or another way. 

We must create a merbershlp base which will 
bring a constnnt flow of funds for the organization; otheru 
wise we face a very gr^ve danger of collapee. 

The financial situation Is bad, to say the 
least, and your positive activities In this respect are, 
I assure you, very helpful. 



Sincerely ."ours, , 



WILL-liU L. PATTERSON 
Nat'l Executive Secretary 



WLP:nb 



2548 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 52-48 

CIVIL RIOHTS CCVGRISS 

205 Sast 42i>d Street 

New Topk 17, N.T. 

• Oct. 8, 1948 



Dear Friends: 

If one of the trade unionists listed in the enclosed 
is In your district, he should be visited and a real public 
relations job done with reference to tiie political importance 
of civil rights work and the necessity for organizational 
action. 

This does not mean that they will aflillate to the 
CRC. However, if someoOB la assigned in the union for civil 
rights work on a serious basis, through that person the 
possibilities of reaching down to the rank and file can be 
explored. 

It is vitally necessary to develotD a political under^ 
standing of the menance of fascism to the trade unions. In 
this, of course, the trials of the 12 is a very important 
factor. The experiences of the Hollywood Ten trials must 
also be used. This work with the trade unions is of vital 
importance, so much so that we are seriously thinking of 
putting on a force especially to develop it. 



Sincerely yours, 

WILLIA}'; L. PATTERSON '^ 
Wat'l Executive Secretary 



»LP:Jn 
viopwa 16-47 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2549 

CvETic Exhibit 52^9 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONGRESS 



205 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



MURRAY HILL 4-6640 



GEORGE MARSHALL 
Chairman, Stard qI OuKtori 



WILLIAM L. PAHERSON 
National fxecutivc Stt'y 



LEN GOLDSMITH 
Halionai Director 



RAYMOND C. INGERSOLL 
National Treaiurer 



DR HARRY F WARD 
Nai't Honorary Chairman 

Nat'l Vice Chairmen 
GEORGE F ADOES 
MARY McLEOD lETHUNE 
HUGH 8RYS0N 
CHARLES COLLINS 
DASHIELL HAMMEn 
REV. CHARLES A. HILL 
HON STANLEY NOWAK 
HON JERRY J, O'CONNELL 
LEE PRESSMAN 
PAUL R08ES0N 
MIRANDA SMITH 
AUBREY WILLIAMS 



September 21, 1948 



Theresa Turner 
Pittsburgh CRC 
P. 0. Box 44 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dear Theresa: 

As Len Ooldsnith is out west at the present 
time, your letter of Septeinber 11th to him, asking for 
B New York speaker to participate at your Conference, 
October 16th, was turned over to oe, 

Paul Robeson will be in the Ke^t Indies at 
that time, Kenneth Spencer will be in Hollywood, and 
Ben DRvis will be unable to leave New York, as the trial 
of the twelve Conmunist leaders rill start October 15th. 
However, Mrs. Ada B. Jaci:son, an outstanding fighter for 
the rights of the Negro people, has accepted the engage- 
ment. Mrs. Jackson is running for Congress from Kings 
County, Now York, on the Progressive Party ticket. 

Please send me sll the detsils regarding the 
Conference, such as; when must Mrs. Jackson be in 
Pittsburgh, does she hpve to stay overnight, will someone 
meet her at the train, etc. 

A package of fund books that shouli h«ve been 
sent to you, were mailed to Tom Quinn by mistake. His 
address is: District 6, U.S. R.M.V..A. , Wabash Pldg. , 
Pittsburgh, Pa. I bulievo you can utilise them for your 
Chapter. 



possible. 



Please let me hear from ynu as soon as 



Sincerely, 



i/J/yL^ PcC^-l^L^-tU^y.^ 



Fnlix Kusmaa 



i!K:rs 
uopea lfi«47 



2550 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic Exhibit 58 (Page 1) 



(\ 



Progressive Party Of Pennsylvania 



y 



CHAIRMAN: 

J. W. Gift. Publisher 

York Gaiet+9 and Daily. Yort, Pa. 
SECRETARY; 

Thorn*! Fltipatrlck 



CIO, 






TREASURER: 

Re. J. puinton Jackion 

Paitof, Mt, Zion Bdptiit Chorch 

Phliddaiphia. Pd. 
VICE CHAIRMEN; 



of 



STATE COMMIHEE HEADQUARTERS 

xxx3«c£ii[:)e{&a b South 4th St. 

Harriiburg, Pa —Phone fr-1703 

G«rdld M. Schafldndsr. Eiacutiv* Director 



June 14, 15 



Dear Oeoige, 



ion Harhawar. PiHiburgh 
or ot Social Sclancai. U 

PitUbufflh 
Hendarion. Philadelphia 



y NichcldS Laiarli. Pittsburgh 

Employ«ai Alliar>ce, AFL. 
Stanley Lonay, Sharon 



Che 


lirman. Eaiiarn Penniylvania P.C.A. 




Pratl. Philadalphla 


Rag 


i;onal Diractor, Eaitarn Panrtsyl- 




ia, Prograiiive Party 


''ntl 


irnallonal Rapreientative, Unllad 


Ela< 


:trical. Radio and Machlna Work- 




of America, CIO 








retary, C'anlral Tradai and Labor 




,ncil. AFL 




all SchaHar, Bathlaharr, 




ef Shop Steward, Local 2600. United 


Stai 


sl-o.kar* of America. CIO 




d Schaflandar. Conyngham 


fon 


mer Ed -PAC Director. Panntylvanla 



Nbw Kcnilngton 



SUv Cor.qr.li 
John Tumb.Uy, Phtladetphia 

B.olh.rhood ol Hollxy C 
Dorothy Wolfl, Philadelphia 



. / Aleiandar WrigM. PIHiburgh 
V Inlarnallonal Rapresantallva. Urfltad 
Ston* and Alllad Producli Worhan. 

ycio 
Gaorqa Wuchlnlch, PIHtburah 



Your shipment of COM\.ON Slil^SE went out to you over 
the week end. -'e have recently had some discussion in 
the State executive Committee as to how many copies 
of C01kii..0iii diillSii can be distributed in the state. 

'.'e are sending you 1,000 copies and we knov thnt, not 
only v;ill you have no difficulty distributing them but vill 
actually need more, if we are really doing the organ- 
izational job that must be done to carry Pittsburgh 
for ./'illace and the Trogressive Party. Our only chance 
of winning in this election is to undo the 'vork: of the 
controlled press and radio. The ne\.s nnd editorials 
in COI.iI.;Oi-I QiilJoE are not printed in any other newspaper. 

It is my sincere hope - and Mr. Gitt's - that you will 
use GOlwi.iON oiiKJE organizationally; that it will not 
be just another piece of literature to dispose of somehow. 
It it our state newspaper - one of the few state news- 
papers in the country, incidentally - carrying news 
of all Pennsylvania, to give you and the Progressive 
Party workers in your area, as well as the many new 
contacts who will see it for the first time, some idea 
of the broadness and strength of the Vallace movement 
in Pennsylvania. 

Don't just mail out COl.iiON SENSE to a list of people that 
vr.': -now are already for i/allace. It must get into the 
shops and neighborhoods. Call in the folks you can 
count on to work. Give them each a supply - as many 
as they think they can handle. Sit down and talk to 
them and make sure that they will pfit every single copy 
into the hands of somebody not already convinced to vote 
for Wallace and Taylor, -'e must reach the confused and 
the undecided. 

Ut. Gltt tells me that Louis ^d 'mic , Pulitzer Prize 
author, is trying to persuade him to put out such a 
newspaper nationally to further the Progressive Party 
cause. Such a newspaper would cost some five or ten 
dollars a year in subscription fees. COtJ.;ON SENSE 
is free I Let's make it the best possible weapon. 
It will come to you twice a month and each time you 
receive it, your concentration for the next few days 
should be to see that every single copy reaches some- 
one who is not yet convinced about . Wallace. 



trn Panntylvt 
Lavllan. Counial 
Idanllflcatlon only 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2551 

CvETic Exhibit 53 (Page 2) 

- 2 - 



If there are other thin^^s you would liice to see in COI.il..OK o-]NoE, 
if you can suggest improvements, please write us about them I 
It's your paper I Send us news stories with names of officers, 
workers, special coinnittees, stories about your set-backs and 
successes, oend us pictures - particularly action pictures of 
soriBone distributing leaflets,' getting signatures or canvassing. 
Help us to make the paper just what you want - a paper that '-'ill tell 
the story of /allace and the Progressive Party bo thousands 
of new contacts every week. 

Use it to organize your County, your Congressional District, your 
..'ard - for '.mllaqe I 



rraternally yours. 



/ h ' ^ 

Gerald ochaf lender, / 

Executive Director 



uopwa-127 



2552 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 54 

(V 

Progressive Party of Pennsylvania 

1 2 1 S Walnut Street, Philadelphia 7 , Penna., Klngsley S-37 1 3 

JOSIAH W. GITT, State Chairman 
ZALMON H. GARFIELD, State Director 

Nov. ?3, I9U9 

To: Profressiv* Party State Leadership 

Frou; Zalinon H. Garfl eli?. Str.tc Director. 

Subject: Special enlarged session stpte leadership. 

1. Tfe ha;ve Just conpleted a most ImrortHnt series of election campelf 
in the state. Some gains have been nace. kany valuable lessons 
have been learned. We have begun to lay the ground work for the 
critical campaign in 1950. 

2. A special enlarged setjslon of the state lendership is called for 
Sunday Deceuber 11, 1949 at 2:30 P.M. at the Harrieburger Hotel, 
Harridburg, Peniia. , Pr.rlor-J?. 

3. This meeting vill; 

£F. Evaluate results of the 1949 ca:-.paif-in. 

b. Establish basic policy for the 1950 cahipalgn, 

0. Establish plans for ste.te-v/ldii ccnsoliaaticn and re- 
organization of forces. 

d. Create concrete iTogra!.. for ir.ii.ieo late action on such 
questions as registration and a ctate-wide conference 
on najor Isaues, 

4. We all know that the composition of the 82nd Congress to be el- 
ected in 1950 is f unJai.ientally the modt inportant sln/<J.e factor 
for the future pence of the vorld anr). the execution of a domestic 
pro5,raii in the interests of the peopAe on the vital fronts of 
housini;. Jobs, civil ri^Jits and labor's ri.^iits. We can and must 
increase the Profiressive voice in thts Coni";rcss. 

5. For this special session of the State Lerdershlo Cor.imittee be sure 
to be in attendance yourself and see to it that representative, 
active and e'''ake Profsresslves in your area cor.ie with you. Foe] v -l" 
to brin^; all those individuals who can benefit froiii or add to this 
vitally ii.ipoi'tant meetin£j. 

Don't forget tine, place and date, 
Tlrae: 2:30 P.M. 

Place: Harrlsburc;er Hotel, Hrrrisburg, Fa., Prrlor-D 
Date: Sunday December 11, 1949. 



■uopwa 2/ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 59 (Page 1 ) 

PROGRESSiuE PHRTV OF PEnnsviunniR 

WESTERN REGION 
111 NINTH STREET - PITTSBURGH 22. PA. 



2553 



aCYMOUR 



DO YOU WANT 

yy ALL ACE'S/ 

autoa rapn 




May 3 1949. 



Dear friend, 



We ask you to have twelve of your friends - neit^hboi's, 
shopmates, union brothere, church derr.bers or lodf;e bro- 
thers and sisters to sign the enclosed list of -welcome. 

It vdll be presented to Ilr, Uallace and his distinguiiied 
British guest on the stage at our People's Festival to be 
held on May 21st, Schenley High School, Pittsburgh. 

Every list vdth 12 names, shovdng a total collection of 
%25 or more shall be signed across the face by Mr. V.'allace. 
The list will be returned to you, to be kept as a souvenir 
in your lodge, union or club - or to be kept by the circu- 
lator, if ho or she wishes. 

At meetings this second and third Sunday circulate the list 
at lodge meotin.-;E, do it in the shop, mine or store, church 
or iinion hall - vjherever you are. 

We send you only one collection list, Ifr, 'Wallace vdll sign 
it to gre.it 12 Americans, or thoir organizations, good and 
true, who are signir:g and givinj for peace. 

Please see that the list is r-^tuiTied by May 20th at the lat- 
est, ao that \ic may have Mr, i.'allace sign it in time. 



With best wishes and 



Cordially yours, . ,-' 

iorge 5, Ifuchinich, 
Festival Chair:M.n, 



/George S, \h 



uopwa-CIO 
63178 0- 



-50— pt. 2- 



-13 



2554 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 60 (Pagel) 

tttgr 12, I9i8. 



Rrr* Zide fiiMrlea, 
Natloml Connltte* For T/allaoe, 
120 1/2 i»i«hlaeton ATezua. «Mt, 
ChArl*stam, W« Va« 

Dear friend, 

The felloviag la «n envavratlon of espeases for IndlTldtmla 
who hk-ve spout owmIiIi— *i'tw Ittoe In the niidaixklla DlTlaloD 
of Wast Virginia to'^HHpNVPvn the petition alguiiigi 



1. lllla.^'''Suula, 23S3 Oarecn Street, Plttabwgh 8 Ai. 



kprll 24, 25 

Hotol**..... 2 deye, 
^age* $7,60 per d»y 

Hear 1, 2 

Uot«l.....,«,2 dayi. 
nagoa ^7,50 per day 



Ifeiy 8, 9, 10 

Ho hotel blU 

Khgea $7,60 - S days 

Bw fluro- rotBd trip I^-^Nfaeellag 



■axiwrt Walter, S128 Cordell Plaeo, 
Pittaborgh 10, At. 



May 8, 8 

Boa faro* ••• 

IMtgee, 2 diqr* $7«60 



14.78 
16.00 



J3.60 
16.00 



22JS0 
8.80 

67.06 



S.SO 

16.00 

18.80 



1006 Bergeri^mne, Pittabwgh 19 Pit 

itey 1, 2, 

Hotel Bill 6*60 

Welrtfln, IT* Va., nainer of 

Bxeoutl've Co^nmlttoo... .hotel and f>fcro 10.00 



116.60 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2555 

CvETic Exhibit 60 (Page 2) 



Siia 1)111 of esqwflMfi ia a siniaua •ad w ttiiggtari titKtr 

■•pn«t« olieeki be nade out for Mioh indiridtBl tiiM* 

th»«« mr* T«ltnit««r« uad not orgnnisAtlflDal rmpr—t^ttrt. 

Brother Jo* Budlak U triat^ing this letter with him end 
we ho()o yo« wlU be able to realt sinee the people oaa* 
eeraed woul4 appreciate paroaptiWBe* 

7e eoDsider It a groat prtvUoge to hav« partlalp«te4 ia 
homing our eiater state and It Is with a great deal of 
pride that we eajogr the rletery of 30,000 el ^mttr oe of 
wbieh 723 toae from the PaxBaadle DirUlea* 

Ulth best wiahss. 

Sijwerely and flratenml2gr« 



oeoreo s. WoahlBlak 
ttopaa 10 • 1 • 



2556 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic P^xHiBiT 60 (Page 3) 




WLOA— .1550 on D 

EVERY SUNDAY 

AT 1 15 P M 




iiiEiiiciv m\ {'mwm 



/»/ iltst^rn I', 






««»- <^ P«1>rtaiy 16, 1948 ♦ 



In mill, mine or home 
A40NTHLV 
NEWSPAPER 



D<»r friead, 

The ETieoutl-w Cowmlttea of th« Amerloan SIbt 
Congress of Ifestern PennsylvRnla ■srill hold its nert 
msetlns this Thursday evenlTig ot 8i00 PK » 19 Fefcrtsary 
in Parlor "H" - fort Pitt Hotot. 



T?e will discuss t 

1» Concert Rally 
Hall. 



12 Marohi at Ccmegle Uvait 



r 



2, PropoBOd plonlo and date for this S-aoKer, 

5, 0«od a33d iTelfare 

We ar© vtry lon-y to r\moun«!o that tho nnther of 
Slgter 3olovoy dl?d thio mo?iiij\g. The funeral will he 
on Vfedn<-s<fciy at 2 PK, fron tho funeral home of MoCernott's 
on Chartlers Aveni^, MbKccsHocIcSj ?a» 

It is also with mxsh regret that ire amiounoo the 
death of :Sr. Go«rgo Birkl;Jioio's wife. The funoral will 
take place tomorrcur from their horae 432 Island Averma, 
JteKeoapooks, Pa, 

Brother Sandalc Is ettlll 111 at tWs Soufeh Side 

Hospital and he invites all his friends to eorae to 
visit hin. He is nuoh hotter and will weloono hearing 
from all of you» 

Ploaso nAke osrkaln to ottend thia IhuTBday night'e 
sweting « we hair* ttuih to do to wilae the Rally a h'ugo 
saocisst Besides Brotti'^r KrzTtJd., we hope to ha-wi 
a very promin.'snb nat-?.cnal sporikjr. ^ ' 

-->iCt'<-. /^rax- /'i^ ,-*--> -V \ Frr.termlly yoi»ra, 

uopn. 1j o i .. Q-v-.i-;: S. '.'u-.hJnii!-, Froo Sooy 



r 



L 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2557 

CvETic Exhibit 61 ( Page 1) 

PROGRiiSSIVii T.,jaY Oj:' FEUuJYLV.mIa 

.rfjibTLRN i-oiGION 
x20 Nir.th Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GRiiAT^R PITToBURGH ARiiA 
L"j;.>DiiR5UIF tiii^TIivG 

Cliarles M. Kerns, Jr.,- County Chairman 

Noveaber 29, 194-9 

23 in attendance. 

Meeting called to order at 8:30 P.I'.i, 
The follovdng a:,renda was proposed; 

1. Recommendation fron the Adninstrative Committee 
for Regional Director. 

2. Le-al fight against transit fare increase. 

3. -financial and political perspective. 

4. Good and vi/elfare. 

Agenda unanimously accepted by the body. 

1. Regional Director. Recomiiendations of the Adninstrative 
Comiiittee presented by Zalmon H, Garfield as follows; 

Because he has become the leading mass fif^ure of the 
Pro.'^ressive Party in this area, because he is a lead- 
ing trade unionist nnd it is important that ^'e establish 
a closer relationship with the tnde union movement, 
because he has vast organizational experience, and be- 
cause in bringing Alexander /ri,j^ht into leadership of 
the Progressive Party we are pointing up our own program 
for civil rights and utilizing one of our potentials, 
which in the past \.'e have by no means done. Therefore 
the Adminstrative Committee highly recommends Alexander 
./right for Regional Director of the Progressive Party 
in the .Western Region of Pennsylvania. 
This recommendation was unanimously approved by the 
bodji. 

2. Suit against the Pittsburgh Railways Company. Report by 
iilex Jright as follows; 

The lo\ifer court has already ruled in the city's suit 
against the Pgh. Railways Co. that the fare increase 
was unfair. The Supreme court of Penna. has refused 
to hear the case. Nonetheless the Railways Co. has 
raised the fares on all public transit without the 
issuance of any kind of rebate receipts pending the 
final court decision. As a result of this action a 
group of three Pittsburgh citizens have entered suit 
against the Trustees of the Railways Co. The plaintiffs 
are Lrs Bessie Diggs, Nicholas Lazaris and Alexander 
1,/right . The role of the Progressive Party is to create 
mass activity around this case. The body was asl^ed for 
suggestions. These were made from the floor; Petitions 
against the fare increase and in support of the court 
fight to be circulated, an attempt should be made to 
enlist full Progressive Party support and also the 
support of the trade unions, leaflets should be distribu- 
ted at strategic points calling people to a mass protest 
meeting for the formin,':; of a real citizen's committee. 



2558 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 61 (Page 2) 

Greater Pittsburgh >irea Leadership i.eeting--page 2. 

In accord with the sug;^estions fron the floor the follow 
ing action \ias plunned; that a committee composed of 
Morris S h indler . William Gordon and the Regional 
J-'irector"\;ork out the concrete plans for further action 
that Monday, December 5 is set for mobilization for 
the distribution of leaflets and that the ward and 
area leaders aa;<e commitments as to the number of 
people each can provide for thi;-! action. Mobilizat- 
ions at 12:30 and 5 P.M. Committments made as follows; 
llth vvd-6, 3rd wd-6, Homestead-$, Allen Thomas -5, 
Ambridse-4, Mrs. Ormay-1, Mile Mamula-b, 4-tn wd-b,and 
Duquesne-3- 
3. JJ'inancial and political perspective-Charles Kerns. 
j?\ind-raising Ccur.paign for the month of December bailt 
around a series of social events. Party Committee re- 
ported the followin;; et/ents; New Years eve Cabaret Party, 
admission \ull be $?.30 per couple and ^1.50 per single. 
Food will be free. There will be a program of music and 
songs featuring Bob Claiborne. Door prizes, noisemakers, 
favors and decoration will all add to the festivity of the 
evening. Invitations and announcements will be distributed 
as soon as a suitable spot is found for this affair. 
The Swissvale-\/ii;tinsburg club will have a party on Dec. 10 
at 1711 Iviiriam Street. The Hill wards will sponsor an 
appearance of Bob Claiborne on Dec. 30. 

National Fund Raising campaign for the month of January. 
Western Region quota is set at $3,000. 
Ward, area and group quotas: 

3rd-,j80, 4th-^223, 5th-*280, 7-8th-$100, 
9-19th-:#73, llth-$350,12-13th-|90, 14th-$730, 
15th-;|73, l6-17th-$200, l8th-$b0, 19th-$123, 
20th-$30, 21-25th-$150, Ambridge-$300, Swissvale- 
./ilkinsburg-$200, LcKeesport-$80, Duquesne-.;^30, 
Patton Township-#73, Penn Township-$73, './estnoreland 
County-^130, lYashington County-*130, Nationality 
Groups-s?l,000. 
These quotas were accepted by those wards and areas present, 
koney is to be raised by parties, membershi ps , contributions, 
etc. Twenty percent of all money raised "'ill be sent to the 
National office. Ten percent of the remainder \iill be re- 
turned to the ward or area from '.vhich collected. Balance 
is left in the regional office. All money collected should 
be turned in to this office for proper division. 
Political perspective was . pointed up by the follovdn.'s; activity 
State ComTiittao Looting in Harrisburg, Dec. 11, Guinier- Rcjge 
meetii.g in Fitteburgh, Jan. 14, National Convention in Chicago 
in ■''cbrurry and the ::itate Conference of all Progressive forces 
early in uoriih. 

Drive for dcntifcr^^ldps and registrations to start immediately 
viiith goal Cl" l.CCC set for Nei; Ytsars Eve when a prize \.o'.]l 
be avardeJ to ths vvrrd \;ith the highest number of registrants 
reported. Thr-i '■vpi-sli goal is 3,000 regiytBired Progi-escives 
by Ivlay. /iaancc v;oi:iittee asked that efch ward pick a rep- 
resentative to the .^'innnce CocLmittee nnd send such nnmes in- 
to office vi/itiij.ii week, ^-'iscussion from body on these reports 
Qootas accepted by Isad'-rs. ueeting adjourned at 10:43 P.M. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2559 

CvETic Exhibit 63-1 

HENRY A. WALLACE 



39 PARK AVENUE 
NEW YORK 16. N. Y. 



Uay 28, 1948 



Dear Mr* ^chinich: 

I eim taking the liberty of sending you a copy of an open let- 
ter which I have addressed to Premier Stalin, outlining the basic 
principles and practical steps which I believe make possible a 
general settlement of outstanding differences between ourselves 
and the Russians. 

The bod^ of this letter was written before the publication of 
the recent exchange of notes between Ambassador Smith and Foreign 
Minister Molotov. That exchange, which seemed to open the door to 
direct negotiations between the two nations, gave new hope to the 
peace-loving peoples of the world for an end to the cold war. 

It would be tragic if this hope were betrayed and a conference 
between the United States and the Soviet Union foreclosed by the 
Administration's flat rejection of the Russian offer to negotiate. 

I am therefore addressing you and other men of peace who are 
leaders of American thought euid molders of public opinion to ask 
that you urge the President, the Secretary of State and the Congress 
to act in good faith upon Ambassador Smith's statement that "the 
door is always wide open" to Soviet-American discussions by accept- 
ing the Molotov proposal for a conference to settle outstanding 
differences. Only if that proposal is accepted, and our repre- 
sentatives sit down with the Russians to arrive at a peaceful un- 
derstanding, can America regain the moral leadership in world af- 
fairs that alone can make peace possible. 

As I said in my open letter to Premier Stalin "There is no 
misunderstanding or difficulty between the U.S.A. and the USSR 
which can be settled by force or fear and there is no difference 
which cannot be settled by peaceful, hopeful negotiation." If you 
believe, with me, in the truth of this statement, let me urge you 
to speak out now for an early, open and fully reported meeting 
between representatives of the two great powers for the settlement 
of our differences by negotiation and agreement. 



Enclosure 



Sincerely yours. 



2560 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 63-2 

THE FREUERICK-CLINTON CO., INCcSA^^^g^^ 545 Hfii, Ave„u., New v.rk n 



TELEPHONE MURRAY HILL 2-7433 



September 27, 1948 



Mr, George S. Wuchinlch 

Exeoutive Secretary 

American Slav Songreas of Western Penna, 

1005 Berger Building 

Pittsburg 19, Penna, 

Dear Mr. Wuoliinioh: 

&A the radio advertising agency for the Progressive Party, 
Ed Frisbie has turned over your recent letter to us for 
reply. 

It seems, however, that we are not too clear on exactly 
what you desire. As you know, we arrange to purchase radio 
time for all state and local groups of the Progressive 
Party for the 15- and 5-ininute transcriptions (supplied 
to you free) at 10^ plus ZOfo discounts. 

Evidently, you use Station WLOA, Broaddock, covering the 
Pittsburgh area as well, for your programs. Five 15-oinute 
periods on WLOA at |40.00 each is $200,00, and the costs 
to you would be s 

gross cost f200,00 

less 10^ 20.00 

$180.00 
less ZOf, 54.00 

net to you $126.00 

If you also wished to purchase the 8 S^ninute periods, costs 
on V^iOA for these would be: 

gross cost $160,00 
less 10^ 16.00 
$144.60 
less 30^ 43.20 
net to you $160.80 

If this meets with your approval, please send us your check 
immediately, made out to this agency, after viiich we shall 
contract for time through Station V/lOA's New York representa- 
tive, and forv/ard the facte and records to you. Incidentally, 
on all additional time you may wish to buy in your section, 
we can offer you the same 10/? discount if you wish. 

Very cordially. 



very 



Sydney Rubin 
SB«bl Radio Director 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2561 



CvETic Exhibit 70 



.'LANOV 
Honorary Pi-esident 




^entrol Council 



^/c 



JOYCE BORDEN-BALOKOVIC 
Honorary President 




'of Croft 

PtTTSBfrRGH, PENNSYLVANIA 



S. Kapelac, Box 86, Kather, Pa. 

J. Snolcich 600 - 12th St. , New Brighton, Pa 

Pontarlo, 713 - 13th St., Ambridge, Fa. 

fftCK I^^K.pC'J III? 

I. HTioniiTli, liSS- Louisiana Ave,, Farrell, Pa. 




KATHERINE RADOCAJ 



V I. Vrcek, 341 Helen St., HcKees Rocks, Pa. 

M. Marinkovlch, 466 - 5th St., Donora, ?a. 
lair ton. Fa. 



TRUSTEES: 

DRAGICA BLASKOVIC V* 

MARY BARON y^ ^ ^ 'i^b Tad o vloh , Box 450, 

JENNIE KRASICH 

ANNA LAKATosH ^ g, Tq dy , _____ 1916 Ea s t St., N.S.Pittsburgh, Fa. 

FRANCES OBRADOVICH 




'Mrs. Ana Turkovloh, 1706 Jackson St., Aliquippa, Fa. 
V Milena Sincich, I^D#1, New Middle town, 0. ( /le/ax^'x-w /k ) 
^M. Radman, Box 322, Ookeburg, Pa. 

J C. Marsich, 1053 Schoonmaker Avenue, A7«y<iTe/v Pa 
i k. Tomac, 1003 Monroe Ave., Port Vue, I'cKeesport, Fa, 

J. K. Baron, 306 Marshall St., Benwood, .V.VA. --^ 
^ U. Mlinario, 321, Beach St. , E. Pittsburgh, Fa. ^ 
■^ L. Horvatin, 715, Washington Ave., Monaoa, Fa. _^ 
^ J. Abramovich, 34 Cakland St. , Etna, Pa. _^— 



' 



>Sfex-u< CMX. aJ2.4~a "h? 



v:^tri<;?^ . ^^^ ^^^ ^:ji^^ <• ^ ^ 



CVETIC EXHIBrr 70 




V— ^^ 



^^./v^ 



2562 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 71 

WSSTERN POnJA. COUMITTEB 

Kleoted •t Quarterly Me.tlng, Vimy 26th, 1947 at Vaytmir Hot»l, 



SKRBIANS 

Daisy iartl, *"' 
Uilo iiannalt, > 
Oaorge nuohinioh* > 

SLOVAK 

Mrs* Mary Bigoa« 
Paul Hodoa, ^a^ 
Lad is lav Sobol, vm 
Prank Bury. 

HgW KENSINOTClW 
Dr* H* W. Truitt, 
Adam Karaioa, 
John Bakloh, 
Ulka StanoTieh. 



f 



-~J, 






""■^rt"** 



Mlk« Kumar, 
Jllnka Trlller, 
Paul Klun, 
Oaorga Wltkovloh, 
Agnaa Dolane** 

MCKKESFORT 

Coataot Ura. Brlatle* 



CROATIAHS 
Arthur Bartl, "T 
Frank Kanalloh, — **" 
Frank Tady. _ . 

S.S. RUSSIAS 
John Komlakl, 
Anna L«any* 

COAKEBURg ft BEHTLEYYILLE 
Ned RaaofTioh, 
Joe Lanlok, 



Ulke Rodman • 

C07KRDALB 
Mr. Kuioan, 
Anton Cipoio. 

BROWtlSYim 
BTa JandakoTio, \ 

John Jandrakovlo, Sr., 
John Kamanovloh, 
Peter Ivanao* 

AMBRIDOS 
Walter Prualk 



CVETTC EXHIBIT 71 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2563 



CvETic Exhibit 72 



Llat 
Frank Plrric 
5 52 laland Ave. 
McKeeg Pocks, Pa, 

Vaso Roknich 

502 Is la nd Ave, ->^ 

llcKees Rocks, Pa, ^> 

Zare Werlenlch v. 
705 Woodward Ave. >y^ 
McKeea Rocks, Pa, > 

Rose Vrchek 
^1 Helen St, 
HcKees Hooks, Pa, 

Jack Martinlch 
341 Helen St, 
UcKees Rocks, Pa, 

Sciha Osmenovich 
341 Helen St, 
NoKees Hocks, Pa, 

Mane Susnjar 

I9I6 ^ast S t. V 

N.S. Pgh,, Pa, \. 

Nikola Baltich 
I9I6 jiast St, "X. 
N.S. Pgh,. Pa, ^Vi 

Arthur nd Dale y Bartl 
1208 Hailage St, 
H,S. Pgh,, Pa, 

Frank Tadey 
I9I6 East St, -^ 
N,S, Pgh,. Pa. 

Nnolt 

164|yW^ti 

Pitt\l)uJ\gh 



city committee 

Frank Kamallch 

II9 Fountain St. 

J* .3. P^.. Pa. 



John Yanca 
^953 Plum V.ay 
Pittsburgh 1, Pa, 



^^ 



^ 



V 



Joseph ili jaaki f 
Eusselwood St, 



^ 

^ 



Jack ilarkovich 
339 Helen St, 

McKees Hocks, Pa, 

Matt Cvetic 

1005 Berger Bldg, 

Pi-tsburg:. 19, Pa, 

Ivick iladasan 
4745 Butler St. 
Pittsburgh 1, Pa, 

^ir, iiiatt Vrklan 
372 iilckee 51, 
Bltts burgh , Pa, 



Louis Filitich 
3832 Penn Av6, 
Pittsburgh, Pa, 

Keglna Bakowski 
19c 8 Jane St, 
Pittsburgh, Pa, 



Mick tUlanovich 
3038 Arlington Ave. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. < 

Mr. and ulrs, A. Opara 
I02I Oglethorpe St. 
Pittsburgh 1, Pa, 







^ja Milanoyich 

St 



Stevo Radioh 

I6I4 Branchport S t, 

K,S, Pgh,, Pa, 




Mike ilisetich 
2921 Preble Ave, 
N,S, Pgh,, Pa, 

Joe Vrban 

5243 Keystone St.'* 

Pittsburg, Pa. 



George & Zlata Kra njcic 
*-) K.D. 7, Bellevue 
' Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 



Leo Fis her 
lnl6 -^st St, 
U.S. Pgh., Pa. 

Paul Radas 
1721-g- Colwell S 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Marko leriich 
808 Second Awe. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



lira and Mrs. S. Devunich 
5^ 221 Columbia Ive. 

West View, Pgh., 29, Pa, 

At, anj uirs, J, Uigal ic 
5427 Camelia St, 
Pittsburgh 1, fa. 



Philip Vukelich 
344 1 Forbes St. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sara Gaich 
11 3 . Lackock St, 
H.S, Pgh,, Pa. ' 




X 






^ 




Sam Korica 

278 Fre-;port St, 

Blawnox, Pa, 

George Uiadok 



CVETIC EXHIBIT 72 



*\ I9I1 -ast St. 
' II.S. - ■ 



Pgh., Pa. 



2564 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page 1) 

Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western Pennsylvania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 

Name of Organization ^.,/3.^f~*~J^'.rr-^^r%-^l — -^ / ^t,^<,^CCn<»r%..,*^. i^^i'fe*-"-,^. rrn. 

Address of Organization J^^t,**-'^— *-^_-- -/V<v-^^=<^^-^/-'^^-i 



/^^_-«^A. 



Postoffice 

^ Number of 

National Extraction ^■urfr--^r<^-vr*-^*-i_^ Members _ 

We will be represented by ' delegates 

Name _.„ •^-'r:_--<^^_<'- ^'.,<_=i-»^^-:iv — Name ^^- 



Postoffice ,_!^_.-*fva-^_— li^f^*^-"r^--/o- Postoffice 

Name Name — 

Address ■■---' Address _ 

Postoffica Postoffice 



Name - -- Name _— 

Address r Address _ 

Postoffice Postoffice 



REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers - $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio program and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checits and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OY WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2565 

CvETic F]xHiBiT 73 (Page 2) 



MORNING SESSION (10:30 to 12:30) 

English Room, Fori Pill Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa 



AFTERNOON SESSION (2 to 6) 

English Room, Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa 



EVENING MASS RALLY _ 8 P. M. — North Side Carnegie Library Hall 

Nationally Known Speakers and Musical Program. 

No Admission Charge 

Listen Every Sunday to WLOA — 1550 KC — "KEEP AMERICA FREE" — 1:15 P. M. for more 

information and announcements. 



2566 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic ExitiBiT 73 (Page 3) 

Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western Pennsylvania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 

Name of Organization ^h^l^TZ^At' jdu^^-^n^' ^' /^C^' f"^^^ "^ "^ ^. 
Address of Organization /S_^^^ E^iOLaX cy'^U^ .^idi^-^ 

Postoffice 

National Extraction 

We will be represented by - C^^rnt^ delegates 

Name 9^1aJ^ ^•^.£^^ Name 

Address /^AJIft:^,A6«^^^«*«^ <i^^»»<^- Address ^ 
Postoffice ^^ ./J^^-.CJ-^ ^, Postoffice 

Name Name — 

Address Address - 

Postoffice Postoffice 

Name -- Name — 

Address - Address - 

Postoffice - ^ Postoffice 



M-^jJ^ ^.U^-.y>- (Pa-^-- 

_^ J Numbet^ 

^Jl^miTi.!er»-^ Members /-/-T- 



REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radi6 program and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2567 

CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page 5) 



Credentials 



lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western PennsylTania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 



/"l^M^^^^I 




^/^Kf 



Name of Organization LocaL^Chaptax. -•£. ths Croatian CounclL. 

Address of Organization 1-9*6^ B»0hiO-Str-» 



Postoffice H,&. pi4t9blffgh,PaT 

National Extraction Cpoatlan M^bgrs" 78 Individual, 8 organiz^^^ 

We will be represented by ft delegates 

Name JLixton Slnrarlch^ Name _ John StrlzlclL \/__ 

Address _ 1331 Spring "ardon ^ Address - it J.9J.6. Easi.Str.- 

Postoffice H.S.JPlttSbHTgh^P^, Postoffice JI^S^-P«hiL_124.-Pa. 

Name Paul ftadas X --- Name __ Jo««Eh Vpban 

Address 1721 1/2 ColwoU Address 52jt3_ _K<»y_S,tone 

Postoffice P11;tsburgh«Pn. Postoffice PA**?)"*?.^**^*.?"? 

Name Pfter Stotlch r^- - ^^^^ - -?^ls_4«y:_.: _,i. . 

Address 231»f EfBt Str,^ . Address -19l6 EajiVStr, ^ 

Postoffice ?_«_S.__Pf.h._12j Pa. Postoffice _ J^5,__Pgh*_1.24__PA. 



-^- 



REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio program and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

23 



2568 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page?) 

Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western PennsylTania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 

SjiRBIAN AMJiRICAN Fh-D^RhTION IWO. T'ATIO^'AL CCMITTEE 
Name of Organization 

1916 iiAST ST. UTTSbURGH 13, FA. 
Address of Organization — 

Postoffice 

SERBIAN Number of / / r) 'z In W. Penna . 
National Extraction ^^"^A^il- - ^— Members _/, -^t^ J? 

We will be represented by -_ delegates 

Najne NICHOLAS BALTICH .__ Name ^ .. --.-. 

"1^16 " East StV 
Address Address 



Postoffice _?lJt.3bur^_.lg_»__Pa,t Postoffice 

Name Name 

Address Address 

Postoffice Postoffice 

Name Name 

Address Address 

Postoffice Postoffice 

REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio program and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money orders and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

«^^ 23 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2569 

CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page 9) 



/W^ cr^ 



irx> 



fr/s 



y<p 



Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western Pennsylvania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 



Nams of Organization Pietrict Six, United_Electrlcal, Radio and Machine Workers of _Ajnerica, 
Address of Organization _549 Vfabash Building, 

Postoffice Pitteiurgh^ 22^ia, 

Number of 
National Extraction "~~ Members _"_"* 



We will be represented by - 1 delegates 

Name Thomas Quinn Name 

Address 201Be«ch Street Address 

Postoffice Ea_8t_Pittsbur£h, J^, Postoffice 

Name _ - _- Name 

Address , _ „ Address __ 

Postoffic3 Postoffice 

Name - - - Name 

Address .__._ Address _- 

Postoffice Postoffice 



REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers - $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio program and monthly nevi^spaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

6.3178 0— 50— pt. 2-^14 <=^^ 23 



2570 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page 11) 



«4^? -^ y^Vy/ 



Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western PennsylTania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Sunday, June 13, 1948 



<2^ 



Name of Organization 

Address of Organization '^ A-^ -If- 

Postoffice 



r.^-c^ 




^.21. (2. ..2L^w^i^.^> 



^aj-.- 



National Extraction 
^ We will be represented^ by 
Name 



J^ostotfi 
6^*•*-'''^iame 



delegates 

M Name -. 
Address _ 
Postoffice 







Number of 
Members 



ame 
Address 
Postoffice 



Name 

Address _ 
Postoffice 



REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio p rogram and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

-=^gE*> 23 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2571 

CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page 13) 




Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western Pennsylvania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 

Nama of Organization <^-ufr-£^<i- .<''9X-VW-£,<i^kv -^^iLt^J-i-^i^ 

Address of Organization ^/^^^/J-y^ <^^^/ /LC:,^.A^ .. 

Postoffice i.!?^Xi...0<UiJjC^^^c1i.P^^l.^,J'Pl_ .^Rc 

n r . Number of U ^ _ 
National Extraction .^^^JiSiAttM-^tx^ Members .5 A ■ 




V^V// 



We will be represented by y. delegates 

liame /yy^^.£^. UL^AMk,^ Name --yi-^^xA^.- l}/LiA../(...<<^ 

Address /_Y^^ ^l^*iffefcviU- -^S-..* Address JQ^..^.AA^.._,^£^ 

Postoffice Jhy^/lA'Ai\i^X^:Ci--i'x.^)^ik^^,, Postoffice <^'^^'^UJ,*J^!t^——P—'^y^-^- 

Name .-.^^y^^JJjA^ h <^U^ ^ Name ^^k^l^^Ck^.^jl'^M^'^ 

Address J.%- UJ JWsXfuJ^- O^^-JL- Address -i-C-^J-^i^JL.^t...^.^...^. 

Postoffice VK''^<^>AU.:W'^t-j^Vi '. Postoffice ^..^^^.^.'^k l?-f^-t -/ 

Name /h^AiW__-.^^^mrXrl Name ^}:^LdyiU*r^^>^AC^^---'^f<iU.^ 

Address 1 ^T^ Jl^.<?S^XkuJ\^ CX^^fA Address -:^^P7-^/?-A^^^H^- _.^^^__'___ 



Postoffics J'Viy/yiJ^-'L^Uu^-s^^JLL y^^L-_- Postoffice t^A£^\\UlCLc<J.^--^^i?J. 

REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio program and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

«^^ 23 



2572 .COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page 15) 



Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western Pennsylvania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 






Sunday, June 13, 1948 

O / , 7 ' -^ ^ )' 

.<^^;^r<^?/t^_...„ __._ 1_. 

/^^/_^_./?_____.L.. --.-^_.-'^.<^Z:-„_/^ 

National Extraction -•^^^'r'-^^l'i^^^ (^c^ (^..^ L 

«=? delegates 



Name of Organization 
Address of Organization 
Postoffice 




f'^^^C 



/^^ 



r!r- 



Name - 
Address 
^•"^tdj^cV" 



_^_ l^'O^ 



Name 

Address - 
Postoffice 

Name 

Address - 
Postoffice 

Name --- 
Address - 
Postoffice 



,■ ^'-^ \^ REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
A /^f'. For visitors and observers $1. 

. ' ', ci ' ;< CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
' i/ ■>■ i our radio program and monthly newspaper. 

'■'■'■'•■ ; i;'.;-^-^' ■ -^ ■' Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

a'me'rICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

-^^■■^ 23 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYlrVANIA 2573 

CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page 17) 

Credentials^ 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western FennsylTaiiia 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 

Name of Organization /Ti/7 '=/?/"' /I ^ U^O^l^M J t^Oqfii^S I (ft A^tl . -^ lo^^ 

Address of Organization .^-^i?" V\ > i^\ Q /o' ^ ' ' 

Postoifice 

National Extraction 



/ ^ -, J ' -. Number of O y-> 
Lr KQolfiQil/l . — Members AQ^ 



We will be represented by *;t"- delegates 

Name .Kl'.^.K ^.Qjd Lcj/J : j_ Name .- 

Address JlL-i/ I^AOi^__ A ^t^^ _...__ Address _ 
Postoffice /y^AAtJ^JlJ?/^} f (oi , Postoffice 



Name ^ Name 

Address Address - 

Postoffics Postoffice 

Name ■ Name 

Address ^ — -— Address _ 

Postoffice Postoffice 



REGISTRATION; For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio program and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

23 



2574 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page 19) 



Credentials (^^j H ^ 



10th ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western Pennsylvania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 



yd^^^py-e.'^'tjL^ _ Ji^^M^^f^^i^vui. KiA-^^t,^^^L^Js^<r'!.,c^. ^^f^^ 



Name of Organization 

Address of Organization . -t'ti^i^^'-^-'V'/^a.^^.^ 

Postoffice :rtSn,>^!r'?^*?^*^r&^_. 



Number of 
National Extraction - - Members - 

We will be represented by J - delegates 

Name .^^^.^^^i^V-^-t^--. t-.-^^Jte^i^^i-^., Name 

Address _ _i^2^/J'-/_—^!»i:^>^^?^2i>»^_^ifeL- Address _ 

Postoffice Postoffice 

Name Name _ — 

Address -- Address - 

Postoffic? Postoffice 

Name Name _ — 

Address Address _ 

Postoffice Postoffice 



REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio program and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

"^^^ 23 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2575 

CvKTic Exhibit 73 (Page 21) 

Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western Pennsylvania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 

Name of Organization .^ ^/^ ^i^6^^-i* ^^_ .i^^-:^^-^^,^-*'' ^ / <^ A ^ y^^.y^.. 
Address of OjiaaQization y^_ _)!^ _ -'-^^<^/.i?_--/' •-^JUi^V 



Name >;y^.-^C-<g^ -^^^<^^>/ L-^^^f-^.^'-rrt^'^ Name 

Address - /Z,A- J<^C-^^^fe^d<:^^tT<y»:'^t3- Address _ 

Postoffice C^^^'~'^'y^C-^:T^l^;t'^JVV--\^ Postoffice 

Name -^- Name — 

Address Address _ 

Postoffice Postoffice 

Name Name — 

Address Address - 

Postoffice Postoffice 



REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio program and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

23 



2576 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic p]xHimT 73 (Page 23) 

Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western Pennsylvania 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sunday, June 13, 1948 



^^^e /._^_ -M^ ^.^.U. 

Address of Organization ^ L^'j^' (^.. . L^-f^r^- - ^??€t^ ....^^fc. 
Postoffice ..^.^jZ^^A^.-.J-.t^^'f-:. 



Name of Organization 

/ 



Number of 
National Extraction Members 

We will be represented by ~ delegates 

Name ^^J^^^^^.^.-^^^rt^-u^T---^^ Name ^. "^^^^.^^..^ 

Address _ ^-_=?./-^l?^^^^r?::-^'^>^^.#<^ Address ^° l/ 

Postoffice 



-^ 2, / «:;::,^{^c^,*-*:.-t-C'~v_«-^t*-<X- Address T^ "^ yCr. T-'-r^-rV^ f^^- 

_^^^i-re^ i<^-:^^--^ ^^l'-^ Postoffice J^ ^jJ^---^-^--- 



Name 

Address 

Postoffic 



^^iMaJI/iAfy^^^--^ . Name ./i^^ .^^'^r^^ '?^^- 

ill^ 4^ <^l<^^iAl^i^?Z__ Address Z„^.^^.__X^/- 



.5^s:Si_fa?_.L__ Postoffice'i-^?^-^::^;^;::^; 

i:^HJ^ ^^7U^^^-^^^^^- Name 

Address .3 _^ -^ 2-.__(^:^^u^^^, /^^^^ Address 

Postoffice ^.^'^-J^.L.M^..' Postoffice 



Name 



REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 

For visitors and observers $1. v 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio program and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

23 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 73 (Page 25) 

Credentials 

lOth ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE 
1938 — 1948 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
of Western Pennsylvaiiia 

Fort Pitt Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
f ' Sunday, June 1 J, 1948 

^ '-/^ /-^ ^ ' /.: ' 

Nams of Organization _ -_:f^^-^'r?-^' '" '^ " ■^(-■''r^^--^ 

Address of Organization ^vi-T— "rl__yi„_^x?^Cr___ v__y 

Postoffice -/^Je'uerircrrrti-^Trfe'^iJ^xli^ 

/ - Number of -? 

National Extraction .^<^^^^^i^<^^-^hJ^ ^ Members .-?*!<_ 

We will be represented by ??i delegates 

Name U^^^.-^i'rr}^^(<l<z-^ry'^^^^ Name 



2577 





Name .^^f'f-^^^ 

Address 

Postoffice 



/_/ Name 

^ Address - 
<-^ Postoffice 

_=^^i''^Name 



L>'^^-^^_'-r>i:,-^et<Lii<.^/_'^ Postoffice 



REGISTRATION: For regularly accredited delegates the fee is $2. 
For visitors and observers $1. 

CONTRIBUTIONS: Please vote a contribution to help carry on 
our radio p rogram and monthly newspaper. 

Make all checks and money orders payable to the: 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mail checks, money ord ers and credentials to: 
1005 BERGER BUILDING PITTSBURGH (19) PA. 

a^^^> 23 



2578 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 75 



TELEVISION RECORD OF BOOKS 



NAME__ 
ORGANIZATION 



7^// ^^<^^^>v^ 



^-^ 



ADDRES S ilJ hi 7<^ SjrC-C^^ 



CITY ^^-i//4y^//^. PHONE A^^'^-. 

(10) TICKETS AT 500 TO EACH BOOk) 

BOOKS RECEIVED /^ DATE /^ '^ ^ / ~ ^/u 

BOOKS RETURNED DATE 



BOOKS PAID FOR ©$5.00 Each 



AMOUNT MONEY 









'^'t^l^Hi^:-^-^ '^ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2579 

CvETic Exhibit 76 

Girls c 

:.iike stencils on these in special block: 



DISTRICT C0I.n.3:TTEE V/ESTERl! FErKSYLVAi:iA 

I:ATI01IAL CCUI.CIL of AI/UiEICAirS OF CROAT IW: DESCEitf 



4 October 1947, 



Joseph Vrat&rich 
John Ccleta 
John Jandrokovich 
liirtin Zovacioh 
Jovo r;adTij':ovich 
Mke Vranes 
Tony Opara 
Joe Cavka 
iretar Velioh 
Caspar Ijuzich 
- i.3.to Vrkljan 

"^"atjepan Devtmich 

ff »i'inbon Cipcich 
.wJ^ l-'ramk Kainal&oh 

* Joseph Jzap« 
x-ctar Chulig 
Adam lAraica 
"liirtin lilinarioh 
Ivan IvPoell, 
Joseph Vrfctarich 

•*^ Josip Lligalioh 

^ FHAilK Tadej 

t.o-thur BAETL 
Ivan Bronich 
STEVL 'JIHOMAS 



315 - 3rd St licK.ce sport Lodge 25 KBZ 

Box 545 Harmarville, Pa, 

1107 ..'ater Street :; Brownsville, ha,. Lodge 7/^07 HBZ 

FO Box 672 Traiford, Ps., 

F B ox 124, LE.rge, Fa, 248 iiBZ 

6451 Trrnkstown Ave Fittsbijrgh Jfti 

1021 Oglethorpe xive Fittfeburgh Lodge 4258 HBZ 

624 Fenn Ave Mlflland Pa Lodge 4358 HBX 

371 jjorothy ^ive J-lmstovm Fa 4373 HBZ 
RD =jfl, lij.rion Jr.ill, ;:ew Brighton Fc. 484 HBZ 
372 ;.lcKce Place, rittsbiorgh -,fl HBZ 

221 Oolimbia Avo rittsburgh 29 Fa -fl HBZ 
RD tT^, Libra.ry, i-r., ^/ti22 E3Z 

119 Fo\antain Zt 1 ittsb\irgh 12 Fa (Local COUNCIL) 

R ,fl, Box 381, BrookCield, 0. -,^126 HBZ 
1010 i^tmlap ;-.t--eet Ilonessen Fa ;r4264 HBZ 
Box 173 Parnassus, J"?-, tt^SO HBZ 

321 Beech St uast i-ittsburgh te. irl41 HBZ 
4400 - 3rd bt Versailles Boro lucKeesport Pa 7?146 HBZ 
315 - 3rd St .'Civeesport, Pa, ,f25 HBZ 

5427 Camelia bt Pittsburgh Pa 
1916 East ot RlTi'.-;3UF;GH 12 ra 
1916 East St Pittsburgh 12 •!■?. 

RD fl. Library Pa 
Box 242 CokebTorg, Pa, 



2580 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic ExHiiiiT 78 (Page 1) 

NEVi/LY ELECTED OFFICERS 

^JiffiRIC-JJ SL.iV CONGRESS WESTERN P^ 

CONFERENCE 

SUNDAY, JUNE 13, 1948 

FORT PITT HOTEL 

PITTSBURGH PA 



PRESIDENT: Joseph Rudiak of Butler and Pittsburgh, Pa 

For CIO Rrilrord Workers Internatl Rep 

VICE PRES; Paul Mritrnio of Jimbridge, Pa, 

Ex-GI, law student rt University of Pgh 

SECRSTJJY; George S. Wuchinioh of Pittsburgh, 
Former ^aTuy Cnptrin, DSO 

TRSi^URER; Mrtthew Cvetic of Pittsburgh, 

Former Secretnry imericrn Committee for 
Yugoslpv Relief 



BO^D OF DIRECTORS 



CRO/.TIivNS 



SMBL*NS 



SLOVENES 



UKRJLLNLuNS 



I-OLES 



rus3I^;ns 



CiJ^rATHO 

russl.\ns 



SLOV.JJS 



Philip Vukelich, 3441 Forbes St, Pittsburgh 
Helen Mignlich, 5427 Crmelia St, Pittsburgh 
Frrnk Borich, 632 Bc.kewell Bldg, Pittsburgh 
Leo Fisher, 1915 East Street, Pittsburgh 
^jina Devunich, 221 Columbia j^ve. West View 
^JTthur Brrtl, 1916 East Street , littsburgh 
(ex-officio) ^iJiton Minerich, 

1916 East Street , Pittsburgh 

Mrry Kluko, 1521 Oak Street, East Pittsburgh 
Milo D. Mrmula, 2341 Ccrson St., Pittsburgh (3) 
Chrrles Vuich, 1916 East Street, littsburgh 
Nicholas Brltich, 1916 East St., littsburgh 

Mrtthew Cvetic, 1005 Berger Bldg, Pittsburgh 

Anthony Zornik, Herminie, ia. 

Frank Stefancich, 241-57th Street littsburgh 

Mrry irasnikar. Box 216, Harwick, Pa. 

John Vidmar, 7 Oberlin ^ve. West View - " 

Michael Hrnusiak, 509 Noblestown Rd, Carnegie 
j;jina Slobodjian, RD #1, Box 357, Conemaugh, 

Johnstown la 

irul Kluvo, 3246 Brinton St., littsburgh 
Jean Bakowski, 1908 JaneStreet, Pittsburgh (3) 
'iauline iliska, 183 Wellington Ave, Washington 
Walter Kurowski, 921 Summit Ave, Monessen 
John Krta, 1523 Merchant St., Jlmbridge, ia. 

Pete Bolsen, 1307 Columbia Avenue, littsburgh 
Steve Merges, 1166 New Hrmpshire Dr, littsburgh 



Rev. Stephen Varzaly, 146 - 3rd St, Rankin, i>. 
John M^tlesko, 431j Main St Conemaugh, Johnstown 
John Bodrog, 401 - 5th Ave , Rnnkln, Ir. 

Joe Lanik, Box 616, Bentleyville, ia 
Mary Bigos, 1303 Donniston ^^ve, littsburgh 
Celvin Brook, 1916 East Street, littsburgh 
Martha Hubscher, 1254 Shrdycrest Dr, i ittsburgh 
John Zuskar, 1916 Bast Street, littsburgh, Ir. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2581 

CvETic Exhibit 78 (Page 2) 
-S- 



JCECUTIVE REGIONS COMMITTEE 0? 

WESTERN 1ENNSYLV.^IA 
(To be composed of Board and the 
follovdng regional representr tive) 
Marked with asterisk*) 

1. MCKEES.ORT.R-JIKIN, CL>JRTON, EE.J)DOCK iJlEA COMMITTES 

* ^nes S. Bodrog, 401 Fifth St., Rankin, Secy- 
Joseph Ivocovlch, 605 .ijrcher St, McKeesport, Ires 
John Basach, Box 138, L'^rge, la. Vice Ires 

Mike Godlch, 711 Union St, McKeesport, Treas 

2. FAYETTE COUNTY, BROWNSVILLE /J© UNIONTOWN 

* Steve Strcka, 1327 Water St, Brovrasville, la Secy 
Joseph ^. Velicevich, 32 Brooke St, Uniontovm, la 
Steve Kucak, Sr. , Box 361, West Brownsville, la. 
Eva Jf-ndrakovic , 1107 Water St, Brownsville, 1 r, . 

(Only secretnry was elected - a meeting of June 
27, will elect other officers) 

3. C^ONSBURG, MCDON.-LD, BSNTLEYVILLE , GOKEBURG COML.'ITTES 

* Steve irich, 729 Giffin Ave, Crnonsburg, iresident 
Mrtt Mr.rkovich, RD #3, Box 70, McDonald, Vice Ires 
Carolyn Cindrich, Box 41, Cokeburg, ia , Secretrry 
Joe Lrnik, Box 616, Bentleyville , ia , Trer surer 

4. LIBRJIY, COVSRDJJ: COMMITTEE 

* John Kuzmnn, Box 492, Coverdnle, la, Vice iresident 
.onton Cipcic, RD #1, Library, ia iresident 
iaul Rolich, RD 1, Librrry, ia Trer.surer 

Vld Kuzman, Box 492, Coverdale, ia Secretrry 

5. WHEELING, WEST VIRGINL* COMMITTEE 

* Genne Crockcrd, 610 S. Front, St., Wheeling Secy 
Louis Goreno, Boydsville, Bridgeport, Ohio 
Mrrtln Kross, Boydsville, Bridgeport, Ohio 
Louis Susterstich, Boydsville, Bridgeport, Ohio 

(Only secretary elected - "-t picnic of July 18, 
other officers will be chosen) 



f^^ 



F^jmEIi, lENNSYLVJLNI.. COMMITTEE 

_^_ * Mbry Viconovlc, 760 New Castle ^ve, Shrron Treas 
^ j ii ■• Rose Knozevich, 720 Lee Avenue, Farrell, In Str:cy 

Frrnk Berkovich, 1101 Broadway, Farrell, Vice Ires 
Milan lurich, 1118 Mrryland Ave, Farrell, Iresident 



7. BEi.VER V.XLEY COMMITTKB 

* John Kr.tr., 1523 Merchrnt St, ^jnbridge - Vice ires 
John Russinko, 1007 Short St, jjnbridge- President 
Mrs. Violet Roncevic, RD#1, Box 666 Freedom, ?ecy 
Mrs* Helen Luksich, Midland, Ph, Treasurer 

8. JOHNSTOWN TA COiaiTTES 

♦ Mollie Smir, Tire Hill, Pa. ., Secretary 
Tony Dolenoe, Hjj jp2, Johnstown, la. President 
jjithony Okmac, 702 Forest ^ve, Johnstown, Vice Ires 
Tony Likovich, Tire Hill, pa. Treasurer 



2582 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 78 (Page 3) 
-3- 

9. E;^T riTTSBURGH TURTLE GREEK VALLEY COMiaTTEE 

* Vince Kemenovich, 245 "venue F, littsburgh 21 
Michnel V. Blagovich, Box 142, Turtle Creek Pres 
George Spanovich, 245 jlve F, littsburgh 21 Vice Fres 
Mary Vuich, 1326 Wilmerding ^ve, East licKeesport 

Secretery 
Nick Cvotnic, 107 lark Way, East littsburgh Treas, 

10. ALLEGHENY V.LLEY COIMITTEE 

* Harry Truitt, Jr, 937 Fourth Jive Now Kensington Secy 
Frenk Malkovich, 459 - 12th St, New Kensington Ires 
Mary Sumrek, 1916 East St^ littsburgh Vice Ires 
John Zurakowski, 1601 Woodmont St, jjriwld Treas 

11. DONOR^ ilND MONONGivHEI-. ViJ-LEY COMKITTES 

♦ John Chatlok, 618 Fifth St, Donora, la 

Other officers to be elected at *»ugust picnic. 

12. CITY COMLIITTEE 

♦ Daisy Bertl, 1208 Hnslage ^.venue, littsburgh la. 
Jean Bakowski, 1908 Jane St, Pittsburgh- ires. 

(Temporary officers - permanent ones to be elected 
in July - following Gcrden lerty of July 17) 

i^ * t * * *Q* :tc * * * )|i 



I 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 79-1 



2583 



6 

z 



f^'i- 



;t • • • 
^ • • # 

f • • « 

• * 

• • « « 






6' 




2584 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CVETIC EXHIIUT 79-2 




COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYL«VAN1A 



2585 



CvETic Exhibit 80-3 



1 . ■-«.. 




! • ■■ 


cc 






< 


1 


1 


-J 




! fO 


-J 




"i J. 


o 




J CO 


a 




'\ ^ 


s 






,■ M 


, 






Mm Q 


I 
1 






\ a 


! 
! 


\ 


^ ,1 


o 


( 


t 


v\ ^ ; 


M 


' 






E-f 






"! 


W 






i ■*; 


> 








o ^ 






1 


V 






\ 


i' 
1 


• 


.! 

• i. 


i 


;■ t 


i 
1 

1 


:'■■ • 




i 
t 


, 




" . •. 


• 




»• 




• • • • 


• •• • 

• 
• • •• 


• • 

• • 
• • 


.•• 1^.^ 




• 




• S ^^ 1 


a.* • . • 


• •• 

• 


■ • • *^ w^ 


• •• 

• . • CD ... 


• •• 

• 


•••J ^ , 


1 • =3 

1 CD • 
1 , • • CO • ••■ 


• 




1 • • (_••■• 

{ • • • • - v^** 

; 


• • 
• 


■ 




n! 






'N 


k. 


r — 


V 


O 


f- 


1ft, , 


1 ^ 




in 10 


D 

a: 
o 


c: 




i ° 


( 




1 !~ 




-3N 


CL 




i 


"yrrymp^- 


'^T^ 


_ __ ._ __ 








2586 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-4 




• 


• 






1 


• 


• 


• • •• 

• • • 


• \ 


-^ 


I • • 


• 
• 


• 
• 


• 


6 






• 


i 


GO 






• •• . 

• 


. i 


&-1 
M 








u. 



CQ 








o: 


M 








UI 



s 











O 








Ul 










I 


fxl 








h 


> 











O 








1 






COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-^ 



2587 




2588 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-12 



H 
I 

O 

CO 

o 

M 

6 






o 



0) 





m 




q: 




< 


lO 


_j 


-^ 


J 


• 


o 




Q 



T^ 



=^ 



O 



c- 



• •• 

• • • • 

• • • • 






•lii •• 

cc < 
o z 

z z 

iij 
UCL 



> 

< 
J 

0) 



UJ 

H 

III 
< 



Z 

< 

u 



G I • I 






i 

X • i ; 

m ^ 

H CO 



z 
< 



••f** it 

o .i^ 



•• 


• «> 


It: 


• B'i* 




-P 


€ 




*i 


>: 


•H 


4^ 


rH 


Sh 


^ 


•H 



Dh 



I a 

h UJ 

Q 










><».* 

^ 

>* 



5; 






N* 
t^^ 









is: 



10 



o 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2589 

CvETic Exhibit 80-14 



'"k 



O) 



{I 



i# 



• • 



(/I 

ry 

< 
_J 

o 
o 



< 

z 

2 

hi 

a. 

z 

oc 

UJ 
H 
(ft 

Ui 

$ 

u. 


(f) 
(n 
UJ 
q: 
o 

2 



o 

> 

< 
_J 
tn 

z 
< 

u 

cc 

us 

< 






V. 












CO 



^^» 



2590 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic Exhibit 80-15 









m 


o: 


"^H 


C^ 


< 






0) 


^a^ 
^ 




,— « 




Q 





tx^. 






Z 


\ 


m 


t 



t 

O 
CO 



O 
H 

> 
r3 



< 






• • • • 

m 

z 





•••tr 

•D 



• ••• 






• • 



> 

if) 

z 

< 
u 

a: 
< 



z. 
z 

cn 








■?' 



•••••I 



1 



! .C 



• A • • # n 



^ 



• •• 






T tr. 

Q 

h cr 

< 



Y 



\ 






>J^ 






(£) 






1^ 



CO 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-16 



2591 



CD 



o 
z 



T 

O 

CO 

M 

(3 







q: 


N*« 




< 


"^ 




J 




o 


_j 


0) 


If) 







CO 


Q 


«i 


03 






4^ 




S 






,£J 












« 


i 




a) 






?=* 







• ♦-< 
• • ^» 




< 

z 

2 
LU 
Q. 

Z 
Ui 



in 
(/) 

UJ 

q: 
O 

z 

u 



1 




i 
1 


0) 


i 

i 


z 




< 


CO 


u 


^c^ 


q: 


o 


5^ 



; 



5:' 



§ 















2592 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-17 



CD 

CD 



o 

z 



t 

CO 

e 

o 

M 

> 
o 






H 

LiJ 

> 
> 



Z 
< 

o 
ui 



05 





If) 




cc 




< 




J 


c. 


J 


• 


O 


u-j 


Q 


lO 





4^^ 



i» • 



m • 

o fi 
• > z 



hi* • 

.5 "^ 



• • • • 



< 

z 

z 

Ul 
QL 

z 
q: 

UJ 
H 
(/) 
III 

^ 

U. 

O 

en 
in 

u 
a: 

o 

z 



u 







SLAV 


••i 




RICAN 


4- •••• 


• 
• 


•1- 



• • 


«!••• 


• 


f 


• 


-* 


1* 





• •• 

• •! 

• •! 

• !•• 
I 



! ^ 



O 



r 


c 


u. 


t^ 


uO 


•H 


I q: 


1 


h UJ 


Jr . 


oQ 




h a 


r 


>o 




< 




d 









iS^ 



V 






10 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-19 



2593 



CM 
CM 
CVJ 



O 

z 



0) 



a: 
< 

O 
Q 



¥¥ 



On 

t 

O 
oo 

M 

S 

><? 

o 

M 

> 



< 

a. 

•• -j- 
# ^^ 



!• 



< 
Z 
Z 

UJ 
0. 

z 

a; 

Ui 

h 

UJ 









• •••• 



« 



I a: 

h Hi 

oS 



^-^"P^ 



J 



< 

a. 







\ 



\^: 



5 4^ 












(0 



^!S 






0) 







X 



2594 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-20 



, \ 




^* 


is 


>* 


"^ 


s» 


■ •»> 


?N 




$- 


-^'" 


5; 


^ 


^'^ 


^ ' 


* w 


■»H 


^^ 




> 


<::; 


'ft 


% 


"Ni 


"v^ 


s V^ 


.'^ 


Lk 


■-^ 



CD 



00 



COMMTINIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-21 



2595 






o 
z 



(/) 

O 
Z 


u 

> 

< 

(/) 

z 

< 
y 

a: 
iii 

< 



/ 



< 
z 
z 

LiJ 

a. 

z 

or 

UJ 
H 
(/) 
liJ 



o 



:n 



% 



I'' 



if) 
< 

n 



< 



a; 



< 
Z 
2 

U 

a. 
z 

111 
$ 

u. 


{/> 
(/) 
u 

EC 
O 

z 



u 

> 

< 

J 
(/) 

z 

< 

• ♦ w 
• • •• 5 

• < 



,^ 



• • • • 



a*. 



•••••• 



•••• 

« ^ 

* • 









CD 



til ^ 

X X 

qO 

>, 
< 

a. 



ih 









-^ 



^ 






■r'^ 



^ 



/ 



2596 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-23 



oo 






a: 


^^ 


?^ 




< 


CM 






-J 




01 













Q 











z 




i^ 



o 

CO 

9 

X 
X 

O 

M 

> 






4 ' 

•- 

-r 

• ••a 



•• ••• e 




• 


•5? 


• • 
• 


• • •• 

• 

• 



5* 


^^* 5 


•* • ,A •• 


4-» 


• 


• • 






• mif} • 

uJ • 


• 


• • 
• 


• 
• • 


I- 




a: < 








-O 


t * 4 


z 








N^ 




z z 








>s. 


<^ ', 


liJ 








*i> 


3 ^ 


UQ. 




\ 




,?^ 


.^ : 


> z 








'.^ 




< IT 

-J UJ 












m H 








.^ -^^ 




(n 








^ 




Z UJ 

< > 




[[_ 






iD ; 


Id 










00 < 


:^ 




h tiJ 








< 




h cr 
< 








- 




Q. 






? ■ J 


■^^ ■ 


-'■ 











COMMTJNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-24 



2597 




2598 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-25 



CM 

CM 



O 



if) 

< 



lA 

I 

O 
CO 

EH 

M 
fC 
!— ! 

X 

o 

> 
o 



• • 






• • 



\ 



v\^ 



Y • • 






• .cr: < 

• « z : 

hi 

U 0. 




> 

< 
-J 



z 



Z UJ 
< 



\- ^U 






X q: 

h- UJ 

Q 

H- q: 



O 



.^ 



^/? 



(0 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-26 



2599 



CD 
CM 







CJ 

o 

•o 

M 

Si 



o 

M 

> 
CD 



• • • • 



• • • 



• 


» 


• 


• 


m 


• _ 


m 


• 


UJ 




•cs 


<f 


• efz 


• <^ 


»:» 


<_ 


^ 





Lii 


ua. 


> 


Z 


< 


q: 


_j 


LlI 


if) 


h 




cn 


z 


UJ 


< 


^ 


tr 


Ll 


UJ 





2 




< 








< 
o 

Q 



i^ 



2i *** 



• • • • • • 



z 

y 

Q. 

2 

lu 
h 
I/! 

$ 

u. 


(fl 

o 

z 


u 

> 

< 

(/.. 

z 
< 

u 

a: 

hi 

< 






• • •• 



•••••• 



,v 



• •• 

• • • 



"X 





Ix. 


ill 





r 


(Y 


i„ 


Ly 





Q 


h 


cr 


> 


c 


< 




Cl 









^ 



N,^ 






'A 












(0 



2600 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-29 



O 



OS 
Ci 

CO 

E-t 

ri 

H 



••• 

• • 

• •• • 

ill, • 
iii 



0J 






o 



'^s 




•••• * .•• 

• ••• ?.,.•• • 

• ••• 

• *\' 

• • • •\: • 



• • • 

• • • 

• •• 



•••••• 



• • 



•>€ 



< 
J 



• • • • V VI • • I 



\ 



Z UJ 

< :^ 

u > 

UJ c 

< 






u. 
H UJ 

< 



/ 




>^ 




7«4 



^ 









N^N 









|S 



^^ 






(f) 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-30 



2601 







A f^i 


o 


^ < 


••^ 


\. 




0) 


'• 


■^N 


• z 


¥•' 




V 


o 




, CA 




> < 

o 




; CO 




1 E-i' 


'> 






^ 


'. ffi 


y 


i ^ 


): 


> o 




• M 




' =-< 




M 




: 5 


< 






CL 






%. 






i3 • 

r5 ••• 








• • 






A • • « 


r- ♦ 




• • • • 


r% • ., »t 




if) 


ft • • 
* • 










• • • 

• • 

• •• 




z z 


*. •-> 




Oui 


:-:^^ 


• • • •• 


* • > t \ 


: > z 


•• ^V 


< q: 


• ^^ 


; ~J uj 




if) H 


^iX^x 


: en 


-■--J 


; z Lii 




< > 


Ll 


• a: t 


ui.O 


: lii 


I cc 


' 2 
: < 


qQ 




>o 




< 




_.^.^ ..^. ^, 




^ >/ 




/ 


/ 














->^- 

N 



"•'X-pf ] 

I 



/ 



2602 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-31 









in 






i> 


(r 


CD 


\ 




< 


«N! 


'K 




_j 


^!!t< 






^ 




O 


\ 









>r 


Q 





V 






z 


\ 


m 





? 

O 
CO 




< 
Q- 



T 



w 



J/ J ' 



\ 



/ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETio Exhibit 80-32 



2603 






CM 

? 

O 

CO 





o 

M 
O 






< 


z 

< 






_ 


a 


u 








ir 


UJ 
< 








." ■ « 




V* 


•^ 




« * 




"K, 






• ••• 

• 








TjJ* • • 


• 


• • 


5^ 


-^* 


* • « • 


• • « 




? 


K < 




■^ » «,• 


** Srf> 


""v 


• 




'*««(> 


N» 


~*1P — -• 


• «•« 


• 


> 




^ z 




• • 


^/f 


'It 


w* 


< • •• 




V 


^ 


<^a. 




• 
• • 


'- 


.**^ 
--r^ 


> ^« 


• •• 

• • 


• 


* 


^»- 


< fi 




• 


"■^ 






• 

• ••• 

• • 


• •• 
• • • 






• « 4A» 


• * 




(1 'i- 




Z Lu 


•••4» 


• • * 


r-^ 


'« 


u > 


• 






«• 


^ li^ 






:< 




ui 






^ 
f*' 






u X 












>- '- 



1-^ 



-\ 



2604 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-33 







^ 









(D 



O 



\ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETTic Exhibit 80-34 



2605 



O 

Li 



z 
• • • 



?}••.. 



••, 



10 



q: 
< 

-J 

o 



••, 



• • 



• • 



^ 


•••• 


• 


^ 


• • 


• • 


i 

CO 




• 


M 




< 
a 


X 




X 


U 




o 


O 




q: 


en 




D 


ca 




CD 


> 




if) 

h 




en 
if) 


CL 




UJ 






a: < 






O 2 






z z 






liJ 






U£L 






> z 






< q: 






J UJ 






(/) H 






cn 






Z UJ 






< > 






q: !i 






UJ 






2 






< 





• • 



UJ 





I 


a 


h 


lij 


o 


D 


'^ 




h 


q: 


> 





< 




CL 





< 

z 
z 

Ui 
Q. 

z 

UJ 

• I- 

► 'f, 

in 

L. 


(fj 

ui 
IT 

O 

z 


u 



< 









^* 


•^ < 


^ 


C 1 


Ni 


'^ J 


W 


"^"^ .3 


»N 




r 


^'^ I 


:> : 


^*^ 


^ i 


"* -w 


"^ 


's^ 




*V 


"^ : 


^/f 


'/* ! 


V 


^^ 


li: 


,^ 


^ J 


'^■N. 


^ ; 


^ ^ 




^-ma"^ 




N** 




«» 




^ 




jS^ 




r^ 


iC' ; 


^N^ 


-• < 


\ 




^ 


CO « 


m 




^ 




<: 




f* 




^^ 




-X 









2606 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-35 






I 

O 

CO 

E-* 
M 

><^ 

CI 



Ci3 
O 



• • • • 

o: < 
•CB Z 

• z*z 

U 0- 

> z 

< q: 

J LiJ 

=«!;; 

Z UJ 

< > 

u > 

u 
< 



01 



9}. > 



;/) 



/^ 



•a 



! 4 



<^ 



A 1 



<^ 



• • • 



• • • • 

• • • • 

• • •• 



• • 






• ••• 

• • i •'• • 



f 



u. 


(/) 
en 
u 
q: 
o 
z 


u 

> 

< 
J 

z 
< 

u 

5 

Ui 

< 



• • 






h lU 

< 

a 



>^ 




Ka' 





















iD 






COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



2607 



CvETic Exhibit 80-37 






o 



0) 



in 
q: 
< 

5 






c^ 




? 




1 

o 




CO 


1 


Fh 


«;\ 


M 




fi 




td 




M 


< 


r •% 




M 


I 




o 


> 


i>- 


O 


-— . 




— j 




• ••. 




• • , 




• • 




• •• 



• • 






Q^ < ... , •••••: 



Qlij 



. •• 



.. • 



• •• 






>*1K 

< q: 

• ftj Ld 

• (/?H- 

• • •(# 
Z LtJ 

< ^ 
U > 

S 
< 






: : : 



< 
z 

2 

yj 

Q. 
Z 

q: 

h 
Ui 




'. V 



2^• < 






k" 

""v 









CO 



si 



2608 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-38 





i> 


r> 








> 


:^ / 






0) 





CO 

7 







> 


1 

o 

CO 


z 


^ 


</) 






"i 









o 

Eta 



• • • 

• • • ♦ 

• • • • 




♦••5 • 1 S 






••••15 



•••••♦ 

A • 



•#•••• 



• • •Q * 




< 
z 

z 

bl 
0. 

Z 

q: 

Ui 

I- 



0) 

(n 
u 
q: 
O 
z 


u 

> 
< 

{ft 

2 
< 

y 
i 

< 






^r'^ 









CO 






COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-39 



2609 




/»>>•■ 



2610 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-40 




/U 






— ^'/%0^ 






ID 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-41 



2611 



CO ' '^ 



if) 

< 

-J 

o 

Q 



O 

z 



0) 



t/)- 



o ^ 







1 






(/) 








r-J, 






!/) 


% 












LiJ 


\ 


f-» 




.^1 








^ 


i 




4 


\ 




z 




> 


CO 


• •• 








u 


jr> 


E-i 
M 


1 • • 
• •• 








> 

< 

-J 

U1 


S 


w 


• 




•• 




z 


Y 


. a 


• ••• 

• 
• •• 


• • • 
• ••• 




< 


^ 


o 


• 








q: 


V 


M 






p 




Lu 




► E-< 


• 


• • 


•••'• 




2 




CxJ 


9 


' • 


• 


- 


< 




> 


• • • 


< 




S 






, O 




a.....: 




^ 




*••(/) 


• • • 

• • • 

• •• 

• • 


z 


• 


,0 






••oz 


3 

if) 

h 

t 

a. 


• • 

• V* 


1 

> 


1 




zz • 

OUJ»»» 

> z 


■^ -. 


/ 


1$ 




< 


01 








'S^ 


?^ 


f 

0) 














z 


w 








^ 




< 


§ 






N 














f^ 


<Nv 


»^ ' 


' '„ 










lii 


0- 




U- 




^"v 










ajO 




k 




< 






X or 
h lij 

OQ 

< 
a 









"ZL 



/?' 



2612 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-42 



CM 

CO 
CD 



o 



CD ^ 



o 



t 

CO 

Eh 
M 

a 



o 

M 
E-« 

> 



ui • • • 






(DZ 

Z 2 • 

oia • 

Zlil 

<^ 

y 

LUO 

:e 

< 









y 



tn 
cr 

< 

-J 

o 



• •• i 

• • • 

• • » 

• o • • * 

• I? • 

• CQ • 
•if) • 

h • 

• ••• 



• •• 



• • 









• •• • 



• • 



• • 




< 
z 

z 

u 
a. 

z 

IT 
LlI 
t- 

y> 

u 

$ 

h. 


if) 
en 

cc 

i3 

z 

o 
u 
> 

< 
_J 
(/> 

z 
< 
u 

< 






^ 






V 















>N. 



J.N3aiS3Ud 




'y^^nLM^^ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



2613 



CvETic Exhibit 80-43 



-f 

O 

CO 

M 



M 

> 

o 



CO 





z 



IV 



^ 



• • 



• • 



tn •, 
hi . 
K< 

> z 

< q: 

-* LU 
(I) H 

ZUi 
LjO 



< 



a 






a: 
< 

-J 
o 

Q 



• •• 

• • • 

• • • 

• ••• 

• ••• 

■ • 

:a.' : 

•i •< 
o.:. 

q: • ) 



. r 



••• 



• • • 

• • • 
•••• 

• A * 

\ N • 

•••••• 



• • • 

• • • 



t . 



I 









I q: 

h [Li 

oS 

h a: 
< 

Q. 



^ 
^ 



'•^ 



5$ 



^ 



/^ 



/^- 



O^-p^^ 



yy 



iPf' 



2614 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-44 








z 



5|o 

— ;K1 
001^ 



U 



0> 



if) 



if) 

< 

-J 
o 

Q 



-4 

o 

CO 

M 



o 

n 

> 
o 



•V 



^^ • 

(r< 

• ®^ 

z z 

<JCL 
>^ 

<ir 
• J 111 

y 

< 






s- 



«.,•- 












••• 



••• 



•••• 



*:•••• 

" A 









u. 
I q: 

h Ui 
qQ 

h a: 
< 

Q. 



< 

Z 

z 

UJ 

z 
yj 
cn 

U! 

u. 
o 
tn 

(/3 
Id 

o 
z 
o 
u 

> 

0) 

z 
< 
o 
q: 

UJ 

S 
< 



fvi' 















XN3aiS3dd 



aaissidd 




COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-45 



2615 





^\q 




in 


«ril 


co!"^ 




< 
-J 


,•• c^ 




N r 


-J 


CD 




\ 







" 




Q 




\ 


^ 




0) 






6 








z 









i' 

O 

n 

'X 
X 

w 

c> 
M 
E-< 
W 

> 

o 



iM 

q:< 

!£^* 
zz 

> 2« 

< q: 

<• 

y 

(Y Ik. 
< 



• •• 



• #•• 



H ••••♦• 

- • V • • 

• • •• 



< 
z 
z 

tiJ 
a. 

z 

q: 

UJ 

f- 

$ 

li. 

O 

(/5 

(;) 
ui 
tr 
o 
z 
o 
u 

> 

< 

_i 
(/) 

z 

< 
y 

S 
iij 

< 



• • 



• • ' • • • J 

• • • • •• 

• •• 

• > 

• •• 



I a. 

\~ UJ 

< 

Q. 



5 \' 






•5 



-^ 



5 Mt 



iS: ^^ 



^ 

^ 



i.N3aiS3Ud 



2616 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-46 




COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-47 



2617 





£> 


to 

CO 


o 


^ / 


< 








-« 


i-. 




9 









G) 


V) 






z 
















r,-» 






1 

o 

CO 













DC 

O 
M 

W 
> 



c 



I q: 

< 

Q. 



z 

< 

y 

cc 

• » • ^ 

v..f 

• • ^ Q- '^ 

(B • • • 'fiF* **!••* ^ 

en n:» • ^ 

iJi«.«« .^••' ••*••• >> 
K < *w^ • V 

6a!* • lb If. :J ir, 

en ,:^ i:: 

o> ^ 

bo ^ . '^ 

^ K 



% 



^ 






-- -"t 



5$ 



XN3aiS3!dd 



/ 



2618 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-48 





5o 




i> 




< 







Q 



o 



0) 



i^ 






CO 

t 

M 






en 
•fjj •. 

oz 
zz 
ow 

J w 
z w 

yj O 
< 



• •• 

• • • 

• • • 



; • 
•••• 

•••• 

• ••• 

Q„ • 
•••••• 

• X • 

• f • 



•••••• 

; * * 



IJU 

I cr 

h UJ 

Q 

>.o 
< 



5" 



f^ 






^^^r^^ ^v<.^ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



2619 



CvETic Exhibit 80-49 



I 



CO 







col'* 



o\ 



CO 
M 

B 



C3 
M 

> 



• • • 



I/) • 

K < 

O Z 

z z 
Ou] 

QCL 

> :? 
< cs 

-J UJ 
Z tiJ 

uiO 

< 



• • • 



• • 



• • • 



0) 



cv 



H 

-P 
CO 



?c 



< 

CL 



o 

M 

2 






]•• •• fe 

O • o 
Qt • • • • •-' 

—\* •'; 

QQ 2 

CQ • • • • Ai. 

f— • •■1 

a.... ^ 



• •• '-3 



It. 
h- UJ 

OQ 



>- 

< 







CO 

< 
o 

Q 



< 
z 

z 

a 

z 

q: 

I- 
(/) 

ui 

$ 

li. 
O 
tn 

y 

a: 

z 

o 
u 

> 

< 

-J 

(/) 

z 

< 
y 
5 

UJ 

< 

• 5^ 






s 





















lN3a!S3Hd 



2620 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-50 




XNaaisaad 



y^^ 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-51 



2621 



I 






O 

z 



ao 

M 

31 



C5 
M 






a 



o 

o 






(/I 

cr 
< 

o 

Q 





> 


o • 


^» •. 


m 


iiJ . • 


%^ 


z^. 


lii 


J9t 


•>3» 


<a: 


-J Lii 


CDt 


0) 


Z Ll' 




q^Ll 


iijO 



en 

> 
a: 

■a 

• • • 

< . 

.^^* •■ 

• •; 1 • • • 

• •CO., 

: «^ : 



• • • 



•••••• 

> 

• > • 



13 



-J 






< 



X oc 
Q 

< 



XNHaisayd 



V' 



/ 






\-. 



i 

^ 












S3 






'a'v 



/. 



/■ 



J ! 



2622 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-52 





^lo 






Ift 


CO ^ 




< 


L^ 






-J 


11"^ 




o 









• 


Q 



o 



0) 



en 



< 






< C/) 

iD • • • # ~i 

^•: g 

CO ♦ ?? 
en 



• •• 






I.: 






XNaaissdd 



• • 
• ! • • 

rl« • 

• 
' ' ■' • 

• « • 

• • • 

• » • • 



I cc 
< 



^ X 



< 




z 


. l< 


z 

LU 


-. \ 


a. 


X..' 


z 


;__ 


QL 




LU 


V 


LU 


\3 


^ 




li. 







"» 




i 


(/5 


V 







V 


z 


V 




u 


4 


> 


-i 


< 


^». 


_i 


■^^ 



I 






^/f 



^ 

^ 






5v" 
^5 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-53 



2623 






O 

z 






G) 





If) 






q: 






< 


< 




-J 


z 
z 


o 


o 


a 


o 


* 




« 


[ 'j 


z 


o 




a 


d': 




S, 






Li- 


yj 





X q: 


h 


lij 





D 


h 


a 


> 





< 




a 























< 

^ 






XNaatssiJci 



2624 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

OvETic Exhibit 80-54 



cn 



U3 



CO 



o 

o 

I 



o 



O 



I 



O 

CD -^ 

M. SB 

I- o o 

ui ui — 

S< X H 

O O 3 

— 03 
QC "- 

W CC 

O h- 

X z 

w — • o 

N < O 

- 3 

fie UJ 0) 



CD 
CD 

OZ o 

O'Ui e-. 

< CK y 



• •• 



u 







if) 






o 




q: 




i' 


1^ 


o 

o 


< 



< 
z 

z 

a. 


< 




* 

o 


Q 


z 






o 




Ui 





a 



en 



vO 



CD 

U. 



< 

O 

m 
m 



X 

o 

-J 

1x1 

3 
> 



Ua. 



* 
« 

cc 
o 



3 
X 

; > *^ 



••• 



X QC 



Id* 
(J 



• • I 

* • ' 

« 



5^'* 
"V 






: hi'* ^ 

• S • • 

< 
,• •a. • 






• •• 






;^' 



i.Ni3QIS3ad 






• • • • 

• • • 






COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-55 



2625 





^lO 




If) 


•^ 


CO '^ 




< 


CM 






-J 


oo 


0) 


5 


> 

L Q 
i 











z 










o> 




• 




^ 








o» 




» 


lA 


b- 






o 


«M» 




* 


V 




♦ 


oo 


Ce 








< 




• 


e-* 


3 






M 


oe 




• 



e 
S 

o 

M 

> 
o 



(/)J 

o» 

Oiii 

• 
> z 
< cr 

a: t 






• • • 



• • 






CD , 



UJ 
03 



* 



• ••• 






• • 






— <c 



LU V-' 


Li. 


"ST" 






ujO 


-*, 


1 q: 




h UJ 




oo 




h cr 


V 


>-0 


"> 


< 




0. 


iNaaisBbd 




















^ 
.^ 



^^ 






2626 COMMXJNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-62 




COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2627 

CvETic Exhibit 80-66 



O 
CO 

Cti 
M 

!x! 

[iq 

O 
M 

EH 

> 
o 



d 



^1 



en 



rl.- • 



• • 



z 
< 
m 

• • • 

^«* • • 






. J 





2628 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



CvETic Exhibit 80-67 



FROM WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA TO MEXICO CITY 



We proudly send our delegate, Captain George S. Wuchinich, 
native son of Pittsburgh, to represent us at the 

American Continental Congress For World Peace 

Mexico City. Mexico 
SEPTEMBER 5 — 10. 1949 



Our signatures below and the contributions we make to send him 
on his way, is to show our faith in the peoples of North and South 
America who are assembling at this great Congress to unify the 
Americas and make it a stronghold for democracy and peace, 
instead fascism and war. 

Our delegate carries with him the voice and aspirations for peace 
of thousands of coal miners, steel and electrical workers of West- 
ern Pennsylvania, the workshop of the world. 




CAPT. GEORGE S. WUCHINICH DSC 
World War II Veteran — Paratrooper. 
Only Itvinsr veteran who served with 
both Yugoslav and Chinese Liberati( 



Armies 1943-45. 

TWELVE GOOD AND TRUE AMERICANS FOR LASTING WORLD PEACE 




CONTRIBUTION 



X j^/x 



^^^ 




^'-^ 



\ ^ / ^/Z '. <;</'/^.^7r^^ 




TIME IS SHORT DO IT NOW! 
Send your Check or Money Order with this list to 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
1005 Berger Building, Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 
CvETic Exhibit 80-68 



2629 



BULGARIANS — CARPATHO-RUSSIANS — CROATS — CZECHS — MACEDONIANS — POLES — RUSSIANS 
SERBS — SLOVAKS — SLOVENES — UKRAINIANS 



SLAV CONGRESS of AMERICA 



President 

JOHN D BUTKOVICH, President 

Croatian Fraternal Union 

Executive Secretary 

STEPHEN ZEMAN. Jr. PresidenI 



IflNKO VUK, Tr. 



Founded DecembeT 3. 1938 



PITTSBURGH, PA. 

December 22,1941 



Rev. PETER MOLCHANT 



PETER HATTCA. President 
United Rutslan Orthodox Brot! 

Prof. PITRIM SOnOKIN 
FRANCES TESNT. President 
Association Polish Women 
m. Rev A SYSKI 
Orchard Lake, Wisconsin 



OMER A. MALISKY 



Bro.Vinko Vuk, Treasurer 
3441 Forbes St., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dear brother Vuk: 

As I am going to Chicago for 
' the Slav Congress meeting and using my own 
funds, and elLIso I was at Cleveland, Ohio 
to a meeting and paying my own e^enaesz, 
I would. apprlciate it if you would make me 
out a Check for these expanaesx so when 1 
come back from Chicago i would have some 
money. 



rhoodTo Chicago, 111., and return 
To Cleveland, Ohio, 
Telegram to St.Louia,l[o. 
Telegram to Cleveland, Ohio 



#35,00 

10.00 

,83 

,50 



Post Cards for Calling meetings,. 
To tal 



46.33 
.75 



947.08 



Trusting that you will make the Check 
for these expansesx I am. 



JUDGE NICHOLAS S GRONKOWSKI 
JOHN ZEMAN. President 
Slovak Gymnastic Union Sokol 
METROPOLITAN DENJAMIN 
Prof. KAREL HUJKR. D. Sc. 
PAUL M DZWOWCHTK. President 
Russian Orthodox Catholic Society 
Congressman LESINSKI 
Congressman DINXIEL 
T. DONLEY PRINCE. 
Former U. S. Ambassador to Yugoslavia 
ANDREW KALPASCH.SIKOFF. Preside 
Slavonic Committee for Democracy. Inc. 
8TOYAN CHRISTO^TB 



Fraternal 




Stephen Zeman,Jr 



tire Secretaiy 



U 



/'L/*-'<J'Vi,-t^<_ 



'y^Y'^ 






2630 COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

CvETic Exhibit 80-69 

Friday Night - Sept 15 



Dear Matt, 

Here are the bills for what I paid out today: 

e Rms Mimed paper $ 3.50 

Stenciu ink 1.25 ( addressograph) 

Stencil Ink 1,75 (mimeo machine) 

correction fluid .50 

I Rm Miice Pa^er 1.75 

$ 8.70 
In addition 7.00 

$15,70 

I HOPE you'll be able TO RE-IMBURSE IC - PAL FROM 

Sunday's workb Everything is set - nice and cleaw - two go into 

EACH ENVELOPE - THE COLUMN, AND THE QuAKER's REPORT WHICH THEY 
GAVE ME PERMISSION TO USE. 

Good luck and I tried to all I can to help you and 
Elekore, 



COMMUNIST PARTY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 2631 

CvETic Exhibit 80-72 

JULIUS J. STRBA 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law 

vtmirm m s »mBmmm.auf 

PITrSBUROH. PA. 
telephone ATLANTIC «9>M 52A.7 

1301 Berger Building 



June 3, 1944 



Mr. Michael Sulovsky 
c/o The National News 
518 Court Place 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dear Sir:- 

I am sending you herewith an accounting of my 
stewardship as treasurer of the W. Pa. Conference of the •f^nerican 
Slav Congress from the time I assumed office until your election. 

In all, I collected $.105.00 and gave Tony |21.00 
for postage, leaving a balance of $84.00 which I am turning over 
to you. 

I am also sending you several booster or supporter 
cards covering donations by individuals. 

I also enclose herewith a copy of the report of 
the financial committee. 

I have tried to contact John Sobcsak in order to 
get some money from him which he collected. I have not been able 
to reach him so I wrote him a letter and asked him to send the 
money to you. Herewith is the bill from the Fort Pitt Hotel. Will 
you see that it is paid. 

Yours for victory, 



r^^^^.^v./^'.'^ 



INDEX 



This, index reflects names mentioned in both Expose of the Communist Party 
of Western Pennsylvania and this volume, which is part 2. 

Page 

Abelson, Evelyn 1251, 1290, 1307, 1340 

Adamic, Louis 1212-1214 

Adams, May 1342 

Ades, Bernard 2379 

Ahel, Matt 1334 

Albert, Dorothy 1291, 1292,1310 

Albert, Nathan 1292, 1293,1304 

Alberts, Nate 1246, 1307-1309, 1311 

Albertson, Peter 1290 

Albertson, William (Bill) 1236, 1243, 1249, 1253, 1257, 1261, 1262, 

1271-1273, 1288, 1290, 1293, 1297, 1301, 1308, 1304, 1306, 1347, 2378 

Allen, Dollie 2379 

Allen, James S 1285 

Allen, Stella B 2379 

American Association for Reconstruction in Yugoslavia 1216 

American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born 1209, 

1218, 1219, 1225, 1227-1229, 1233, 1234, 2379 

American Committee for Yugoslav Relief.. 1196, 1216, 1225, 1269 

American Continental Congress for World Peace in Mexico City, Mexico 2384 

American Federation of Labor 1328 

American Fraternal Union 1204 

American Progressive Printing Co 1240 

American Slav Congress 1196, 

1200, 1204, 1205, 1208-1210, 1213, 1214, 1216, 1218, 1219, 1221-1224, 
1238, 1252, 1254, 1265-1267, 1271, 1272, 1293, 1295, 1296, 1300, 1301, 
1304-1306, 1317, 1323, 1325-1330, 1332, 1334, 1336-1338, 1350, 2366, 
2368, 2370, 2371. 

American Slav Congress Committee of Turtle Creek Valley 2381 

American Slav Congress, Third, Souvenir Journal 1222 

American Slav Congress of Western Pennsylvania 2382-2384 

American Slav Congress, Western Pennsylvania Conference of the 2385 

American Slav Printing Co 1333 

American Soviet Friendship Council 1341 

American Youth for Democracy 1252 

American Yugoslav Defense Committee 1228 

American Yugoslav Progressive Association, "Sloga" 1334 

Americans Battling Communism 2370 

Amter, Israel 1219, 1232 

Amtorg 1216 

Anomi, Pauline (see also Pauline Grant; Mrs. Dave Grant) 1292 

Aptheker, Herbert 1285 

Arshan, Ben 1292 

Attorney General Tom Clark 2368 

Babln, Toma (Tom) 1210-1213 

Bacich, Leo 1210, 1212, 1216, 1219, 1222 

Bakewell Building, Pittsburgh 1218 

Bakowski, Jean (Regina) (see also Jean Rudiak ; Mi'S. Joseph Rudiak)-- 1293 

1336 

Baldwin 1238 

Baldwin, Beany 1237 

Balokovich, Zlatko 1212 

Baltich, Nicholas. (Nick) 1220, 

1229, 1239, 1299, 1319, 1327, 1331, 1333, 1334, 1336 

Barron, Dr 1291 

Bartl, Arthur 1220, 1237, 1266, 1311, 1323, 1326, 1327, 1331, 1333, 1335, 1336 

I 
6317* O— 50— pt. 2 18 



U INDEX 

Page 

Bartl, Daisy Lolich {see also Daisy Lolich) 1237, 1239, 1333, 1340 

Bashista, James 1341 

Batory (steamship) 1209, 1223 

Begler, Frances Dewey (Mrs. Jack Begler) 1292, 1320, 1340 

Begler, Jack 1220, 1289, 1292, 1320 

Benjoies (Benjoya), Louise 1293 

Benton, Jerome (Jerry) 1341 

iethlehem Steel 1252, 1350 

Bliss, Esther 1290, 1292, 1307, 1311, 1318, 2383 

Blitzstein, Marc 1310 

Borich, Frank 1220, 1228, 1239, 1247, 1319, 1326, 1331, 1336 

Borich, Mary 1229 

Bortz, Bobby 1250 

Bortz, Ida 1289, 1320 

Bortz, Lou 1289, 1311 

Bostjancich, John 1206 

Brkjacic, George 1341 

Bronich, John (Ivan) 1269,1332,1335 

Brook, Calvin (sec also Calvin Bruck) 1209, 

1218, 1220, 1265, 1266, 1311, 1326, 1327, 1331, 1337 

Brook, Vera (Mrs. Calvin Brook) 1326,1334,1340,2383 

Brotherhood Week 1283 

Browder, Earl 1258-1260, 1264 

Bruck, Calvin (see also Calvin Brook) 1209 

Buban, George 1222 

Buncich, Zarko 1209, 1222 

Bureau of Standards 1302 

Cadden 1309,2378 

Caesar, Abraham 2381 

Careathers, Ben 1226, 1253, 1292 

Carnegie Steel Co 1202, 1245 

Cetinski, Martin 1200 

Challenge 1280, 2376, 2377 

Chandler, Charlotte 1341 

Chepurnykh, Zot L 1188 

Christoffel, Harold 1316, 2379 

Chuplis. Joe 1293, 1334 

Cindrich, Carolyn (Mrs. John Cindrich) 1305 

Cindrich, John 1305 

Cipcic, Anthony (Anton; Tony) 1204, 1319, 1331, 1333,13:^5, 1337, 2382 

Civil Rights Congress 1225, 1231, 1253, 1271, 1272, 1291, 1293-1295, 

1297, 1298, 1300-1304, 1306-1313, 1315, 1316, 1329, 1339, 2370, 2371, 

2377-2380. 

Civil Rights Congress, East Bay 2379, 2380 

(;ivil Rights Congress, Los Angeles, Calif 2379, 2380 

Civil Rights Congress. Massachusetts chapter 2380 

Civil Rights Congress, New York City 2380 

Civil Rights Congress of Ohio 2379 

Civil Rights Congress, Pittsburgh 2378, 2380 

Civil Rights Congress Rally, Wisconsin 2379 

Cogan, Judy (sec also Judy Kogan) 1341 

Columbia Bank Building 1217, 1218 

Cominform , 1268, 2376 

Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy 2384 

Committee of United Lodges 1334 

Communist International 1260, 2376 

Conuuuiiist Language Press 1218 

Communist Party 1266, 2380 

Communist Party. Crucible Club 1252 

Communist Party, East End Club, Pittsburgh 1199 

Communist Party. Hotel and Restaurant Workers cell, Pittsburgh.— 1249, 1290 

Communist Party, Lawrenceville Club 1199, 1202, 1203, 1237, 1252 

Communist Party, Nationality Commission 1218, 1219 

Communist Party, North Side Club, Pittsburgh 1199, 1201, 1203, 1252 

Communist Party, South Side Club 1341 

Communist Party, Tom Paine Professional Branch 1199, 1202 



INDEX m 

Page 

Communist Party, UE cell 1245 

Communist Party, U. S. A 1205, 1206, 1215 

Communist Party, U. S. A., Bulgarian section 1340 

Communist Party, western Pennsylvania 2377 

Communist Party, western Pennsylvania, political commission 1322 

Communist Political Association 1196 

Condon 1302 

Congress of American Women 1339, 2379, 2385 

Congress of Industrial Organizations 1328 

Congress of Industrial Organizations, executive board 1284 

Conrad, Earl 1285 

Cooper, Rachel 1342 

Council on African Affairs 1337, 2382 

Crenshaw, W. C 1296, 1313 

Croatian Central Council 1332, 2381 

Croatian club 1252 

Croatian commission 1266 

Croatian council 1225, 1238 

Croatian council. North Side, Pittsburgh 1334 

Croatian fraternal union 1198, 1208, 1211, 1269 

Croatian Fraternal Union, Lodge Xo. 1 1334 

Croatian Fraternal Union, Lodge 626 1334 

Croatian press 1237 

Crucible Steel Co 1203, 1241, 1243, 1244, 1311, 1351 

Cush, Pat 1226 

Cvetic, Matthew 1195-1352, 2365- 

2376, 2382-2384 

Daily Worker 1217, 1226, 1243, 1302 

Davis, Benjamin J 1285 

Dean, Elwood 1285 

Dedier, Steve. (See also Steve Dedijer) 2384 

Dedijer, Steve, {see also Steve Dedier) 1198, 1199 

Demosky, Joseph 1298 

Devunich, Anna 1220, 1239, 1299, 1311, 1332, 1333, 1336, 134(- 

Devunich, Steve 1220, 1331, 1333-1335 

Diebel, Mr 1241 

Dietze, George 1217, 1218, 1276, 1287, 1288 

Dobrovolni Obdor 1245 

Dolsen, Jim 1201, 1242, 1258, 1347, 1350, 1351 

Doyle, Charles A 1304, 2378 

Dragila, Pero 1211, 1215, 1216 

Drake, Betty 1341 

Drenovac, Nikola 1331 

Du Bois, W. E. B 1302, 2378 

Duclos, Jacques 1259, 1260 

Dudash, Mike 1266. 1327, 1331 

Dunjee, Roscoe C 1302, 2378 

Duquesne University 1349 

Ei.sler, Gerhart 1228, 1349, 1350, 2379 

Elks Rest 1312, 2379 

Emerson. Paul R 2380 

Etna Furniture Co 1196 

Farraday, Dorothy 1341 

Fast, Howard 1280 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 1228, 

1229, 1250, 12,59, 1263, 1269-1271, 1273, 1302, 1316, 1349 

Federal Communications Commission 1267 

Ficher, Mr 1238 

Filetich, Louis ^'_~___ 1202, 1327, 1331 

Filewich, Mike 1203, 1244, 1245 

Filner, Joseph 1326 

Filner, Sarah ^ 13O7. 1326 

Fink, Anna (see also Anne Natchie: Mrs. Carl Fink) 1311 

Fink, Carl I304, 1305, 1319 

First National Bank at Pittsburgh 2384 

Fisher, Charley 1309 



rv INDEX 

Page 

Fisher, Leo 1209-1211 

1214, 1216, 1218, 1220, 1240. 1247, 1253, 1311, 1331, 1333, 1334, 1336 

Fitzpatrick, Thomas J. (Tom) 1226, 

1227, 1246, 1247, 1295, 1309, 1311, 1317, 1328, 2381 

Flynn, Elizabeth Gurley 1198,1348 

Foner, Philip 1285 

For a Lasting Peace, For a People's Democracy 2376 

Fco-cl. James W 1284 

Foster, William Z 1234,1235,1302,1340 

Fotich 1215 

Franks, Abe 1198 

Franks, Nancy (Mrs. Abe Franks) 1198 

Frederick Clinton Co., Inc 2381 

Gabish, Leun - 1299 

Gabrish, Anthony 1298 

Gachinovich, Milena (Mrs. Vioslav Gachinovich) 1331,1340 

Gachinovich, Vioslav 1324, 1325, 1331 

Gaeth, Arthur 1326 

Gailmor, William S 2383 

Gainor, Dolly (Mrs. Pete Karpa) 1198-1200, 1259 

Garfield, Zalmon H 1317,1318,1322,2380 

Gariidy, Roger 1280 

Gdynia-American Lines 1266 

Gebert, Boleslaw 1209, 1222 

General Electric 1253 

Gerkovich, Rose M 2383 

Gerlach, Tony 1209, 1341 

Gerlach, Tony, Sr 1211 

Gillespie, John .,__ 2381 

Glickman, Herbert 1289, 1334 

Godfrey, Joe 1258, 1259, 1346 

Godich, Marko 1311 

Godich, Nick 1334 

Golden, Hamp 1202, 1237,1249 

Golden, Mary (Mrs. Hamp Grolden) 1341 

Goldich, Mike 1305, 1331, 1337 

Goldman, Ruth 1202 

Goldsmith, Len 2380 

Goldsmith, Leon 2379 

Goldworth, Ruth 1279,1280,1289,1290, 1307 

Gordon, William (Bill) 1243,1253,1267,1273,1322,1348 

Grant, Dave 1234, 1235, 1238, 1244, 1246, 1253, 1258 

Grant, Pauline (Pauline Anomi ; Mrs. Dave Grant) 1292 

Green, Abner 1209, 1219, 1228, 1229 

Green, Gilbert 2379 

Griffin, Pearl 1235, 1236, 1302 

Grushka, Jerry 1279, 1289, 1311, 1318 

Gunther, Blair F 2384 

Gus Hall Defense Committee 2379 

Haber, William' 2379 

Hagan Chemical Corp., Pittsburgh 1198 

Hall. Gus 1206 

Hanusiak, Michael 1209, 1218. 1220, 

1226, 1229, 1266, 1299, 1319, 1327, 1331, 1334, 1336, 2382, 2384 

Harajevich, Joseph 1327 

Hardin, R. J 1346,1347,1350 

Harold Christoffel Defense Committee 2379 

Harrison, Martin 1202, 1302 

Hart, Carolyn 1341 

Haywood. Harry 1285 

Hecker. Bernice 1291, 1297 

Heinz Co. plant 1202,1203,1237,1249 

Heiston, William L 1328 

Henderson, Donald 2381 

Hichenko, Nena 2382 

Hodos, Paul 1333 



INDEX V 

Page 

Homestead Steel 124"., 1319 

Hoover, J. Edgar 1273 

Horowitz, Rebecca (Becky) 1288, 1292 

Horwitz, Sidney 1197, 1198. 1221, 1349 

Hotel and Kestaurant Employees Alliance, Local 237 1300, 1317 

Hotel and Restaurant Workers' Union of Pittsburgh.. 1201, 1236, 1252, 1326, 1328 

House Resolution 5852 1293 

Howard, Charles P 1302,2378 

Hubscher, Eric Walter 1342 

Hubscher, Martha (Martha Novak ; Mrs. Eric Walter Hubscher) 1288, 

1311, 1326, 1337, 1342 

Hudson, Andrea (Mrs. Roy Hudson) 1257, 1258 

Hudson, Roy 1220, 1223, 1241, 

1257, 1259, 1265, 1266, 1270, 1293, 1294, 1295, 1306, 1307, 1346, 1347 

Immigration Department 1302 

International Press Correspondence 2376 

International Workers' Order 1205, 

1209, 1217, 1218, 1225, 1229, 1230, 1232, 1319, 1342, 1347 

International Workers' Order, Jewish section 1319 

International Workers' Order, Lodge 4308 1334 

International Workers' Order, Polonia Society, Lodge 3677 1334 

International Workers' Order, Servian American Federation 1334 

Jacobs, Pauline, (see also Pauline Roth) 1197,2382 

Jefferson School of Social Science 2377 

Jenca, John 1202 

Jenkins, Max 1220, 1319 

Jewish People's Fraternal Order 1304 

Johannes Steel World Reports 2384 

Johnson, Arnold 1206. 1208, 1209. 1219, 1222, 1239 

Jones, Bobby 1250 

Jones & Laughlin plant 1241, 1245, 1252 

Jones. William Jackson 1276, 2371 

Josephson, Leon 1316 

Justice Department 1196 

Justiz, Harry 1210, 1212, 1216, 1219, 1222 

Kahn. Albert E 2888 

Kamalich, Frank 1335 

Kane, George 1248, 1249 

Karpa, Pete 1199, 1200. 1291 

Karpa. Mrs. Pete (see also Dolly Gainor) 1199 

Kasu.stchik, Daniel 1209, 1219, 1222 

Kearns, Charles M., Jr 1312, 1322. 1323 

Keep America Free (radio program) 1265 

Kelich, Nick 1326 

Kish, Elmer 1245, 1248, 1319, 1328 

Kish, Gabe 1249 

Kish, Ruth 1289 

Kluko, Mary 1307, 1332, 1336 

Kluvo, Paul 1220, 1266, 1299, 1311, 1327, 1331, 1336 

Knezevich, Pete 1342 

Knezevich, Rose 1326, 1337 

Kogan, Judy (see also Judy Cogan) 1341 

Kogan, Lee 1198, 1199 

Koropus, Bill 1326, 1334 

Kompus, Helen 1249, 1290, 2377 

Komsomol (International Youth Organizations) 1278 

Kosich, Drago 1220 

Kowalski, John 1331, 1333 

Kozakevich, Stefan___^ 2382 

KQV (radio station) 1265 

Krall, Steve 1222 

Krasich, Martin 1198, 1327, 1331 

Krzycki, Leo 1222, 2382 

Kurowski, Walter 1320, 1326, 1328, 1336 

Kusman, Felix 2380 

Labor Press Committee 1225,1226,1231 



VI INDEX 

Page 

Labor Youth League 1249-1251, 

1253, 1267, 1275-1285, 1287-1290, 1315, 2376, 2377 

Labor Youth League, New York 2377 

Labor Youth Leapue, National Organizing Conference 1281-1283 

Labor Youth League, New York Organizing Committee for a 1278 

Labor Youth League of Pittsburgh 2377 

Labor Youth League of Western Pennsylvania 2376 

Landv, Avron (Al) 1205-1209, 1218, 1219, 1222 

Lang (Lange), Eddie 1202,1320 

Language Press 1217, 1219, 1220, 1225, 1239, 1240, 1286 

Lawrence, William 2380 

Lawson, Elizabeth 1285 

Lazaris, Nicholas (Nick) 1236,1249,1288,1300,1309,1311,1317,1322,1328 

Leigh, W. Colston, Inc 1338, 2382 

Lend, Jack 1206 

I^povich, Matthew 1331 

Lepovich, Tony 1319, 1326, 1335 

Lesny, Anne 2382, 2383 

I^wis, Ida M 1290 

Lewis, John L 1248 

Lewis, Lillian B. (Lilly) 1278,1279,1290,1320,2376 

Lipkind, Ann (Anne) 1198,1310,1335 

Lolich, Daisy (see also Daisy Lolich Bartl) 1211, 1212, 1216, 1331, 2382 

Loney, Stanley (Stan) , 1311,1317,1326 

Lovett, Mark P _' 1201, 1292,1307 

Loyen, Steven (N. S. ; Steve) 1269,1330 

Ludovy Dennik (changed to Ludovy Novine) 1240 

Ludovy Novine (formerly Ludovy Dennik) 1240 

Ludovy Noviny 1209 

Macek, Vladko 1215 

Malkovich, Frank 1298, 1337 

Maltz, Albert 1281 

Mamula, Mike 1294, 1319 

Mamula, Milo 1220, 

1231, 1235, 1236, 1244, 1253, 1271, 1272, 1308. 1311, 1321, 1322, 1331, 

1333, 1336, 2382, 2383, 2384. 

Mandell, Mac 1342 

Mandell, Florence (Mrs. Mac Mandell) 1342,2383 

Mankin, Agnes (Mrs. Joe Mankin) 1289,1342 

Mankin, Joe 1201, 1236, 1249, 1253, 1289, 1320, 1326, 1342 

Margetich, Peter 1270 

Marino, Majes 2380 

Markovich, Anne (Mrs. Mirko Markovich) , 1342 

Markovich, Mirko 1199, 1342 

Marshall 1316 

Martinek, Joseph 1222 

Martonovich, Rudy 1342 

glasses and Mainstream 2377 

Massola, Mark 1298 

Matanic, Eilene (Mrs. Paul Matanic) 1342 

Matanic, Paul 1.311, 1323, 2383 

Matelesko, John (see also John Matles) 1331, 1336, 1346, 1350 

Matelesko, Mary (Mrs. John Matelsko ; Mrs. .Tohn Matles) _ 1319,1335,1346,2382 

Matles, John (see also John Matelesko) 1331,1336,1346,1350 

Matles, Mary (see also Mary Matelesko) 1319,1335,1346 

Matles, Eben (see also Eben Matlis) 1290,1323 

Matles, Maxine (Mrs. Eben Matles) 1290 

Matlis, Eben (see also Eben Matles) 1318 

Matta, Mr 1265, 1266 

Matta, Bill 1267 

Matta, E. R 1266 

Matta, George C 1266 

Matta, William G 1266 

Mazur, Rose 1293 

Mazzei, Joe 1202 

McFadden, C. E 1296 

Merges, Steve 1.331, 1336 



INDEX vn 

Page 

Mesarosh, Steve {see also Steve Nelson) l26o 

Mirtdleton, John 1230, 1342 

Migalich, Helen__ 1321, 1336, 2384 

Migalieh, Joseph 1202, 1331, 1335 

Milgrom, Sam 1209, 1219, 1230. 1.349 

Milkovich, Mike 1347 

Mlnerich, Anthony (Tony) 1209, 

1212, 121G. 1218, 1220. 1311, 1324, 1325, 1331, 1336, 2384 

Mirkovich, Steve 1220, 1229, 1299, 1330 

Modic, Frank 1342 

Morning Freiheit 2383 

Morrison, Paul H 1198,1304 

Mugford, Walter 1288, 1307 

Muir, Virginia 1342 

Mullen, Kevin 1296 

Mundt-Ferguson-Nixon bill ( S. 1194) 1309 

Mundt-Nixon bill 1292, 1293, 1309, 1323 

Murin, Steve 1258 

Murray, Philip 1257 

Mutz, Ludwig 1342 

Muzil, Charles 1222 

Myerson, Joseph 2383 

Naprej (iiewspai^er) 1205 

Narodni Glasnik 1209, 1240, 1269, 1270 

Narodny Noviny 1240, 2382 

Natchie, Anne (see also Anne Fink: Mrs. Carl Fink) 1319 

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People 2377 

National Committee on Atomic Information 1317 

National Council of Americans of Croatian Descent 1225, 1239, 1335,2382 

National Maritime Union 2380 

National Negro Commission 1285 

National Non-Partisan Delegation to Washington 2380 

Nationality Commission of Western Pennsylvania 1220 

Native Land ('Um) 1310 

Negro History Week 1283 

Nelson, Steve {see also Steve Mesarosh) 1207, 

1208. 1210, 1211, 1213, 1216-1220, 1222-1224, 1229, 1230, 1234, 1235, 
1239, 1242, 1243, 1246, 1247, 1251, 1253-1257, 1263, 1265, 1266, 1293- 
1295, 1297, 1299, 1301. 1304. 1306. 1307. 1316, 1340, 1341, 1,346, 1347, 
1351. 

New Century Publishers 2377 

New Republic 2383 

Newell, Ciiarles (Charley) 1248,1309 

Nichols, (Jeorge 1238, 1249, 1323 

Nixon, Edwin F. (Ed; Eddie) 1251, 1279, 1280, 1287, 1289, 1290 

Novak, Andy 1197, 1198 

Novak, Martha ( see also Martha Hubscher ; Mrs. Eric Walter Hubscher ) 1288, 

1326 1337 

Nuss, Antoinette (Toni) ' 1326 

Nusser, Herbert 1328 

OflSce and Professional Workers of America 1202 

Onda, Andy 1231, 1242, 1243, 1253, 1257, 1297 

Onda, Mrs. Andy (see o/so Theresa Turner) 1231, 1297 

Orzick, Harold "Sonny" 1249, 1250, 1253, 1277, 1279, 1287, 2377 

Owens, Courtney 2371 

Paich, Steve 1248, 1320, 1337 

Pascowski, Zygmund 1203, 1244 

The Path of Negro Liberation 1285 

Patterson, William L. ( Bill ) 1303, 1308, 1309, 1313, 1316, 2378. 2379, 2380 

Pauk, Frank 1327 

Pennsylvania Progressive Committee for Vv allace 2383 

Peoples First National Bank & Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa 2377 

Perpich, Ann 1286, 1289 

Perry, Pettis 2377 

Peters, J 1349 



VIII INDEX 

Page 

Pintar, Anna 1330 

Pirinsky, George 1209 

1210, 1218, 1219, 1222, 1223, 1228, 1342, 1350, 2366 

Pirinsky, Mary Prirthoff (Mrs. George Pirinsky) 1218,1325 

Pittsburgh Courier 1318 

Pittsburgh Press 2366 

Political Affairs- 1217, 1285, 2377 

Potter Title & Trust Co., Pittsburgh, Pa 2382, 2383, 2384 

Pradelli, Pete 1293 

Previel, Donald 1326,1334 

Progressive Citizens of America 2383 

Progressive Party 1225, 1234, 1237, 1238, 1253, 1272, 1280, 1293, 1300, 

1302, 1306, 1312, 1316, 1317, 1318, 1320, 1323, 2370, 2371 

Progressive Party of Penns.vlvania 2380, 2381 

Quinn, Thomas (Tom) 1231, 1246, 1247. 1248, 1292, 1295, 1296, 

1299, 1300, 1309, 1311, 1319, 1326, 1334, 2378, 2379, 2380 

Radus, Paul 1327, 13.33, 1334 

Kasovich, Ned ^ 1319, 1333 

Reed, Georgia (Mrs. Sam Reed) 1340 

Reed, Sam 1246, 1253 

Robeson, Paul 1281, 1302, 1310, 1337, 1338, 2378, 2379 

Robeson, Mrs. Paul 1310,1311,2379 

Robinson, Alma (Mrs. Joseph "Sonny" Robinson) 1292,1,340 

Robinson, Joseph "Sonny" 1203, 1244, 1245, 1292, 1311, 1312 

RodniGlasnik 1209 

Roosevelt, Franklin D 2368 

Jlosner, Steve 1246, 1319, 1326 

Roth, Alice 1246, 1320 

Roth, Esther 1202, 1318, 1342 

Roth, Pauline {See also Pauline Ja(^obs) 1197,1218 

Roth, Ricky 1342 

Rubin, Sydney 2381 

Ruccio, Joseph 2381 

Rudiak, Joseph (Joe) 1220,1224, 

1225, 1293-, 1299, 1300, 1305, 1311, 1322, 1327, 1336, 2384 

Rudiak, Mrs Joseph (see also Jean Bakowski) 1293, 1336 

Rusin, .John 1220 

Russell, Louis J 2373,2374 

Russinko, Peggy (Margaret) 1286,1289,1297,1308 

Sacter, Eleanor 1202, 1243, 1244, 1258, 1340 

Salis, Bernie (See also Bernie Silas) 1315 

Salopek, Tony 1245, 1328 

Sardoch, Arminia 1332 

Sartisky, Jack 1237, 1238, 1246, 12.52, 1295, 1319, 1323 

Sartisky, Sunny (Sonya Sartisky; Mrs. Jack Sartisky) 1310,2380 

Saunders, Mike 1218, 1244 

Saunders, Mrs. Mike (see also Helen Vrabel) 1218 

Schalflander, Gerald 2380 

Schlessinger, Hyman 1231, 1244, 1247, 1288, 1291, 1297, 1311 

Schmidt, Viola I 1288, 1307 

Schultz, Lawrence 1313 

Schultz, Mrs. Lawrence 1340 

Schultz, Miriam 1231, 1292, 

1293, 1294, 1297, 1301, 1305, 1310, 1311, 1320, 2378, 2380 

Scott, I. W., Co 1196 

Seideiiberg, Elenore 2383 

Senate Judiciary Committee 1291 

Serbian Council 1239 

Serbian National PVderation 1334 

Serbian National Federati<m Convention 1212 

Serbian Vidovdan Congress 1239 

Serb Vidovdan Council 1225 

Seymour, Virginia 1238, 1317 

Sharpiikoff, Victor 1209, 1.327, 1.349 

Sherman. Harry A 2369^2373 

Shiiidler, Maurice 1320, 1322 



INDEX IX 

Page 

Shore, Anne 2379 

Shore, Barbara (Mrs. Jack Shore) 1198,1342 

Shore, Jack 1342 

Shunirak, Mary 1330 

Silas, Bernie {see also Bernie Sails) 1279 

Skertich, Pete 1202, 1334 

Skvarich, Anton 1327, 1334 

Skvarich, Anthony 1321 

Sloan, Dorothy (see also Dorothy Slome) 1197,1202,1349 

Slobodna Rec 1198, 1209, 1240 

Slome, Dorothy (see also Dorothy Sloan) 1197 

Slome, Pauline 1292 

Slovene Communist Party 1206 

Slovenian American National Council (Slovenska Narodna Podporna 

Jednota Lodges; SNPJ) 1204,12(^,1212 

Slovenian Councils 1238 

Slovenian Mutual Benefit Society 1204 

Slovenska Narodna Podporna Jednota Lodges (SNPJ: Slovenian Ameri- 
can National Council) 1204 

Smith, Ferdinand 1284, 2380 

Sobczak, John 2382 

Sobol, Ladislov 1331, 1333 

Solobodjian, Ann 1347 

Stabor, Alex 1245, 1292, 1319 

Stalin, J. V 1277 

Stanovich, Mike 1248, 1311, 1333 

State, County, and Municipality Professional Workers of America, Local 

196 1221 

Steelworkers Committee for Wallace 1311 

Steinberg, Alex 1243, 1288, 1289, 1307, 1323 

Steinberg, Bessie Murin 1243,1257,1258,1318,2383 

Steinberg. M. Y 1198,1229,1231,1235,1320 

Straka, Steve 1248, 1305, 1334, 1337 

Strand, Paul 1310 

Strauss, Abe 1220 

Strha, Julius J 2385 

Strlzich, Ivan (John) 1311, 1319,1334 

Strobel, Jack 1197, 1202, 1311 

Sulovsky, Michael 2382, 2385 

Sumrak, Margaret 1311 

Sumrak. Mark 1270 

Sumrak, Mary (Mrs. Mark Sumrak) 1220,1270,1319,1332,1340 

Susnjar, Mane 1209, 1218, 1220, 1229, 1239, 1327, 1331,1333 

Suto, Steve 1328 

Svec, Anton 1342 

Tadej, Frank {see also Frank Tadey ; Frank Tadv ; Frank Tradej) 1330, 

1333, 1334 

Tadey, Frank {see also Frank Tadej ; Fi-ank Tady ; Frank Tradej) 1311 

Tady, Frank {see also Frank Tadej; Frank Tadey; Frank Tradej) 1299, 

1330, 1332, 1333 

Tamblini's Restaurant 1266, 1293 

Thatch. Michael 2383 

Thomas, Allen 1288, 1322 

Tito, Marshal 2376 

Tkach, Michael 1209,1222 

Tradej, Frank {see also Frank Tadej; Frank Tadey; Frank Tady) 1220 

Trafford 1311 

Traven, Anne 1212,1214 

Turner, Leo 1249 

Turner, Theresa {see also Mrs. Andv Onda) 1231,1296,1297,1299,1301, 

1304, 1326, 2378, 2379, 2380 

U. S. S. R. Information Bulletin 2384 

Ukrainian Hall 1217 

Ukrainian program 1266 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, AFL, 

Local 218 2380 



X ESTDEX 

Page 

United Committee of South Slavic Americans 1212, 1214, 1216, 1225, 1269 

[^nited Electrical Radio and Machine Workers of America 1199, 1226, 1227, 

1284, 1287, 1245, 1246, 1248, 1252, 12SS. 1291, 1294, 1295, 1810 

1817, 1819, 1826, 1328, 1.884. 1.841, 2.880. 

UE, District 6 1226,1298,1.800.1328 

UB, Local 601 1246,1298 

TE, Local 628 1278 

UB trade unions 1329 

United Mine Workers 1248.1267,1328.1848 

United OflBce and Professional Workers of America 1198 

United States Employment Service, Pittsburgh 1221,1349 

United States Steel Co 1241 

United Steel Workers of America. Local 1256 1828 

United Stone and Allied I'roducts Workers, CIO 1.317 

Universit.v of Pittsburgh 1290 

Urbancich, Frank 1206 

Valinsky. Ray 13.85 

Vercek. Rose 1805 

Vidmar. Jean 1286, 1.811, 1.827, 1884 

Vidmar, John 1201, 12.86, 1248, 1278, 1811, 1336 

Vovdanoff, Smeale 1222 

Vrahel, Helen (see aUo Mrs. Mike Saunders) 1218,1229 

Vrban, Joseph (Joe) 1.811,1.827,1.3.80,1.8.88,1834 

Vucich, Louis 1334 

Vuick, Charles 1220, 1289, 1820, 1.826, 1.8.84, 13.86 

Vuk, Vinko 2384 

Vuckcevich, Agnes (Mrs. Pete Vukcevich) 1218 

Vukcevich. Peter (Pete) 1209.1210.1212 

Vukelich. Philip (Filii)) 1213,2384 

Vukovich. Matthew 1.821 

WLOA (radio station) 126.5,1266,1826.1327 

Wardman Insurance Agency, E. J., Pitt.sburgh 1196 

Walker, Herbert 1279, 1280, 1289, 1318, 1321 

Wallace 12.88 

Walace, Henry A 2381 

Wallace. Marian 1291 

Washington. Chester ^ 1291 

Wassell, .lohn 1.842 

Wasseli, Mary (Mrs. John Wassell) 1.342 

Weil, A. Leon, School 1311,2.877 

Weiss. Max 1200. 1204. 1208, 1220, 1.824, 1346 

Werlinich Zare 1.821. 18.80. 1888 

Western Pennsylvania Nationalitv Connni.s.sion 1220 

Westinghouse 1 1246.12.58 

Wheeler. William A 2371 

White, Wilbur _' 1342 

Wiley, Senator Alexander 1291,1292,2377,2378 

Williams, Ruth 1288 

Winston, Henry 1242 

Witkovich. Barbara 2382 

Witkovich. George 1204-1206 

Wolfe, .Joseph 1342 

Worker. The 2378 

Workers Party 2.876 

World Federation of Democratic Youth 2377 

World Federation of Democratic Youth. Budapest Conference of the 1286 

Wright. Alexander (Alex) 12.86, 12.53. 1300, 1.307, 1311, 1312, 1317, 1.820, 1322 

Wright. Theodore 1328 

Wuchinich, George S 1220. 

1228, 1224, 12.8.5-1288, 1244. 1245, 1247, 1258, 1265, 1266, 1271, 1299. 

1800. 1308. 1311. 1317. 1.821-1823, 1.827, 1833, 1888, 2.881. 2883. 2384 

Yardish 1211, 1216 

Yergan. Max 1.338 

Young. Charles^ 1,342 

Young. Ruth (Mrs. Charles Young) 1342 



INDEX XI 

Page 

Young Coiiininnist League, Soviet Union 1277 

Young Men's ('hristian Association 1265, 1266 

Young Progressives 1318 

Younji Progressives of America 2377 

Young Piogressives of Pennsylvania 1290 

Y'ugoshiv Home, New York 1210 

Zeman, Stejihen, Jr 2384 

Zore, Slavko 1211, 1212, 1214-1216 

Zuskar, John 1220, 1229. 1311, 1326, 1337 

o