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Full text of "Fabulae Aesopi selectae or, Select fables of Aesop : with an English translation, more literal than any yet extant, designed for the readier instruction of beginners in the Latin tongue"

288. "TABLES. Select Fables of JEsop, with an English Trans- 

-T lation more Literal than any yet extant. By H. Clarke. 

First Boston Edition. i2mo, muslin. Bost. 1787 




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O R, 

Seleft FABLES of ^SOP 5 

WITH 

An Englijh TRANSLATION, 

More LITERAL than any yet extant, 

Defigned for the Readier INSTRUCTION 
of BEGINNERS in the Latin 'Tongue. 

By H. CLARKE, 

TEACHER of the LATIN LANGUAGE. 



The FIRST BOSTON EDITION," from a Copy of the latelt 
Edition printed in LONDON. 



BOSTON: 

Printed by SAMUEL HALL, in State-Street. 
1787, 



t 




PREFACE. 



WHOEVER hath duly confidered the great 
Difficulty there is in our firfl encountering 
with the Idioms of the Latin Tongue, the Variety of 
Englijh Words, which will fometimes anfwer to one 
Latin one, with the many Miftakes which Boys rnuft 
naturally be liable to, who cannot immediately form 
any tolerable Judgment of the Thing which They 
are engaged in j muft furely, in fome Meafure, be 
brought to acknowledge, that the having Things ex- 
plained and cleared up to thejr Underftandings, as 
They go along, is the bed and only Means of mak- 
ing Them eager and defirous to learn. And here, 
perhaps, It may be fomewhat of a real Help to throw 
the Language into a yet more eafy Light, and to de- 
fcend a little lower, than Others have hitherto fub- 
mitted Themfelves tqj^For I will not refufe to 
own, that I am apprehenfive, the Fear of too great a 
Baldnefs in the Tranflation hath deterred even Thofe, 
who have carried this Affair farther than was at firft 
imagined it could ever have gone, from rendering ic 
fo plain, that Children might ftill the more readily 

come 



2 PREFACE. 

come into the Knowledge of the Conftruftion, and 
form a better and quicker Idea of the different Parts 
of Speech. 

Things relating to InftrucYion cannot well be made 
too eafy j but to write in the Terms of a Pedant, or 
in fuch a Lownefs, or Poverty of ExprefTion^ as 
dwindleth almoft into Nonfenfe, is a Hardfhip too 
great to be fubmitted to by any Man of Spirit. But 
alas ! Freedom of Stile is one Thing, and literal Tranf- 
lation another ; and the bed Way to commence an 
Acquaintance with any Language,is firft to read a great 
deal of a verbal Tranflation. When fingle Words 
have been apprehended rightly, a Number of them 
may be readily put together, the remembering that 
fuch a Word is Latin-- for fuch a Thing affording 
Learners the greateft Pleafure and Incitement to- 
wards the making a Progrefs more confiderable j 
whereas, by attempting the Conftrufbion of Phrafes 
too foon, they become loft, and bewildered in a Maze. 

It hath been thought proper therefore to make the 
Englijh Words here to anfwer to the Latin, as gram- 
matically as pofiible - 3 and, where more expreffive 
Ones might often have been made Ufe of, Thofe, 
which are moft ufually met with, have been judged 
the moft convenient j the varying the Phrafe too 

much 



PREFACE. 3 

much at firft tending rather to confound, than graft 
any Thing in the Memory. 

* A new Edition ofJSfop, with the Latin and Eng- 
UJh each in their diftinft Columns, had been long 
ago wifhed for ; but, as Mr. Locke had before fuf- 
fered an Interlineary Verfion of it to be printed with 
his Name in the Title Page, it is highly probable, 
Nobody would venture to undertake fuch a Thing ; 
altho' You are told in the Preface, that the Defign 
was to help Thofe, who had not the Opportunity or 
Leifure to learn the Latin Language by Grammar ; 
which, confequently, did not lead Him to have the 
EngHJh made with the greateft grammatical Striflnefs 
to the Latin, and left Room for fomething to be at- 
tempted, which might bejafforded at an eafier Rate, 
and what might better anfwer the Purpofes of a Com- 
mon School-Book. 

Upon the whole, You have here a Collection of 
the greateft Part of the Fables done in an eafier Man- 
ner, than any yet extant -, and the farther You enter 
into the Book, You will find fuch little Liberties* tak- 
en in the Exfrcffton, as may naturally fuit with tender 
Capacities, whilfl the Judgment ripens by Degrees. 

Befides, the Advantage of the Roman and Italick 

Characters 
* Vide PREFACE to CLARKE'S CORDERY. ** 



4 PREFACE. 

Characters being alternately ufed for the better In- 
ftruflion of Young Beginners, this Tranjlation is "Con- 
trived to anfwer Line for Line throughout ; and Care 
hath been generally taken to avoi^i the Breaks of 
Words fo frequent in Things of this feature, that it is 
next to an Impoflibility now to miftake. 



SELECTS 




""""> V , 
/ y** 77 

/ ' f r ?^y''f i/ *' ' *">"-' > / - - - j 

V -- ^i f 



SELECTS 
F AEU L M JESOP I. 

SELECT 

; 

FABLES of MS OP. 



<** 



FABLE I. 

Zk GALLO. 0/theCocK. 

GAllus, </ vertit A Cock, ivhiljl he turns up 

Vtercorarium, offendit J.JL a Dunghill, finds 

Gemmam, inquiens, ^a/J a Jewel, faying, /^y 

reperio /?^m tam nitidam ? do I find a Thing fo bright ? 

Si Gemmarius reperiiTet ^Vfc; If a Jeweller had found 'J/ta% 

Nihil ejfet Isetius Nothing would be more joyful 

/-'<?, ut Qui fciret Man /T,?, as Who would know 

Prettum : ' (,hmlem eft the Price : Indeed // is 

n\dli Ufui Mihi, nee ceftimo of no Ufe to Me, <?> do I efleem it 

Jlfagni ; jmo cquidem at a great Rate ; nay indeed 

mallem Granum Hor- I had rather have a Grain of Bar- 

dei omnibus Gemtms. ley than all Jewels. 

MORALE, The MORAL. 

Intellige^r Gemmarfly^r- Underftand ly the Jewel 

tf.m & Sapicntiam ; per Gal- Art and JVifdom ; by /^<? Co^, 

'Wg Honn'.n-rm jlolidum & a Man j'oclijh and 



a SELECT FABLES OF 



voluptarlum ; nee Stulti 
amant liberates Artcs, cum 
nefciant Ufum earum ; 
nee Voluptarius, quippe 
Voluptas_/o/a placeat Ei. 



voluptuous ; neither Foolt 
love liberal Arts, ivhen 
they know not the UJe of them ; 
nor a voluptuous Man, lecaufc 
Plcafure alone pleafcs him. 



FAB 

& UMBRA. 

CAnis tranans fluvium, 
uehebat Carnem Ricfu ; 
Sole fplendente, Umbra 
Carnis lucebat in Aquis : 
Quarn I lie widens, & a vide 
captans, perdidit Quod erat 
in Faucibus : Itaq; fertuifus 
Jadura & Ref fc? 
Sgei, frimum ftupuit ; de- 
inde recipiens Minimum fie 
elatravit : Mifer ! Modus 
deerat fus Cupiditati : 
Erat fatis fuferguf, 

iii defjpuffis, Jam,^ 

per tuam Stultitiam, eft 
minus Nihilo Tibi. 

Mo s. 

Sit -Modus tuae 

, Cupiditati, ne arriltta$ 
erta ro incertis. 



L E II. 

0/"the DOG <Wthe SHADOW. 

A "Dog Swimming over a River, 
carried Flefh /n ^/'j Chaps ; 
the Sun Jhining, the Shadow 
o/"/^ J^/2//& (hone *'n the Waters ; 
which he feeing, and greedily 
catching at, /o/? what wa^ 
in his Jaws : Therefore Jlruck 
with the Lofclgftof th^hinga/^ 
his Hope, atJtytKc wfi'amazed ; 
afterwards taEThg Courage thui 
/)< barked out : Wretch ! Modern- ' 
tlon was wanting to thy Defire : 
There ivas enough, and too tnuchj 
unlefs thou hadft been mad. Now, 
thro 1 thy Folly, there 13 
left than Nothing for Thee. 

MOR. 

Let there be Moderation to thy 
Defire, left thou lofc 

certain things for uncertain. 



FAB 

De LUPO & GRUE. 

DU M Lupus vorat 
Ovem, forte Of a 
haefere in GuU, ambit, 
uat Of em. Nemo opitu'atnr ; 
Omnes diSitant, cum tvlijfi 
Premium futt Voracitatis : 
Ttimfi'tn multii Blandltits 
piti- 



L E III. 

Of the WOLF and the CRANE. 

WHilft a Wolf devonreth 
a Sheep ,by chance theBonet 
ftuck in his Throat ; He goes about, 
aflvs Help t Nobody ajfijls ; 
All fay, that he ^5 ^or 
the Reward of his Greedinefs : 
At length, with many Flatteries 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 

inducit 



pluribufq; Prompt 
Gruem, ut, 
Collo Infer to in Gulam, 
eximeret Os infixum. 
Verum illufit Ei pctcnti 
Preemium, inquicns, Inepta, 
abi, non habss fat, quod 
vivis ? Deles tuam V'ttam 
Mihi ; ft vellem, poteram 
pnemordere tuum Collum. 



and more Promifes, He draws in 
the Crane, that her very long 
Neck being thru/I into his Throat, 
She wouldpulloat/^fjifoffe fixed in, 
./?/ He played upon /fcr afking 
a Reward, faying, Fool* 
go away, hajl thou not enough, that 
thou livefl ? Ty5o o-wejl thy Z.//? 
to Me ; if I would, / was all: 
to bite off thy Neck. 





MOR. 




MOR. 


Quod 


fads 


ingrato, 


What thou doejl for the ungrateful 


peril. 






* erijbeth ' 



FAB 

JD<? RUSTICO y 

COLUBRO. 

RUfticus tulit Dorhum 
Colubrum repertum in 
"Kive t profe encftum Frig ore ; 
adjicit dd Focum : 

Coluber recipient Vim, 
Virufqne, deinde non fercns 
Flamrnam, infecit omne Tu~ 
gurium Sibilando. Ruflicus 
corripiens Sudem accurrit, 
& expoftulat -fnjuriam 
cum Eo Verbis Verberibufq; 
Num referrcl has 

Gr alias ? Num eriperet 
Vitatn ////', Qui dedtrat 
Vitam Illi ? 

MOR. 

Interdum jit, 
o^f/r Tibi, 

Tu profueris ; & // 
antur male de TV, dc 
Tu meritusfis bene, 



ut 



L E IV. 

0/"the COUNTRYMAN /ro^ 
the SNAKE, 

A Countryman \lrougbt Home 
a Snake found ia 
the Snow, almojl dead with Cold ; 
He lays him to the Fire ; 
The Snake recovering Strength , 
and Poifon, then not bearing 
the Flame, filed all the Co/S 
tagevrhh Hiffing. The Countryman 
fnatching a Stake runs up^ 
and expoftulates the Injury 
with ///. in Words and JBto-wst 
Whether he would return thefc 
Thanh ? Whether He wottldtake 
Life from Iiim t Who had given 
Life to Him ? 

MOR. 

Sometimes it happens, that 
they are hurtful to Thee, ivhom. 
Thou hajl profited ; and They de- 
ferve ill of 77j^ of Whom 
Thou /**/? deferred well. 

fl F A fe L E 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE V. 



De APRO y ASINO. 

DUM insrs Afmus ir ri- 
del at Aprum, Ille 
jndignans frendebat. Jgna- 
viflime, fueras quidem 
merlins Malura ; fed etiamfi 
fuzris dignus Pand, tamen 
Ego fum indignus, qui puni- 
am Te. Ride tutus ; nam 
es tutus ob Inert'iam. 

Mot. 

Dem us Operam, ut 
cum audiamus, au/ patiamur 
indigna Nobis, ne dicamus, 
autfaciatnus indigna Nolls. 
Nam mali & perditi ple- 
rurnq; gaudent, fi ^L"// 1 
/>/affi bonorurtt rejiftat 
iis ; pendent Magni, 
.Sj haberi dignos 

Ultione. Imitemur Equo?, 
& raagnas Be/lias, Qjui 
pratercunt oblatrantts 

Canlculoi cum Contemptu. 



Of the BOAR c<^the Ass. 



W 



(d at the Boar, He 
fretting gnq/bed his teeth. Moft 
flothful Wretch, then haft indeed 
deferred Evil ; but although thoit 
baft been worthy of Punljlmenty yet 
/ am unfit, who may pit- 
n'sjh Thee. Laugh fecure, for 
thou artfafe for thy Sluggl/Jonefs. 

MOR. 

Let us give an Endeavour, that 
'when we hear, or endure 
Things unworthy of ns, We do not fay, 
or do Things unworthy of Us. 
For bad and //? Men gene- 
rally rejoice , if Any 

one of the good " re/rjt 
them ; they value It at a great Rate, 
that they are accounted worthy 
of Revenge. Z/f/ us imitate Horfes, 
and great Beajls, who 
/#/) ^y barking 

Curs with Contempt. 



F A L E VI. 



Zk AQUILA & 

CORSICULA. 

AQuila r.aSa Cochle- 
am, non qulvlt erucre 
Vi, out Arte. 
Cornicula accede ns dat 
Condlivian, fvadet fubvolare, 
t/ 1 c fublimi praecipitare 
Coohleam in 5a.va ,* nam 
fc fore, / Cochlea 
Jrangalur. Cornicula 

Humi, . ut 

P.rxdolctur Cafum : 

Aquila 



0/~the EAGLE and 
the JACKDAW. 

AN Eagle having got a Coc- 
kle, was not able to get out \ 
the Fl/b by Force, or Art. 
The Jackdaw coming up gives 
Counlel, perfuades her to fly up, 
and from on high to throw down 
the Cockle upon the Sfoiies ; for that 
fa it would be that the Cockle 
would be broken. The Jackdaw 
flays on the Ground, th-.t 
(he may watch the Full . 
The Eagle 



SELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. 



Aquila pracipitat ; 

Telia frangilur ; Pifcis 
fubripitur a Cornicula ; 
elufa Aquila dolet. 

MoV. 

Noli baler e Fid em 
Omnibus & fac 

infpicias Gonfdium, quod 
accept ris ab Aliis ; 

nam Multi confulti ncn 
confulunt J-jis Con- 
s,/^Sibi. 



The Eagle throws it down ; 
The Shell is broken ; The Fifk 
Is f natched atvtiy by the Jackdaw / 
the deluded Eagle grieves. 

Mo a. 

Be not willing to have Faitk 
in all Mcn t and do 
you look into the Counfel, which 
you have received from others ; 
for Many being confulted do not 
counfcl for their Cori- 
fultors, but for Themfelves. 



FAB 

De CORVO 5* 

VULFECULA. 

COrvus naclus Prsedara, 
Jlrepltat in Ramis s 
Vulpecula viJet Eum ge- 

jllentem t accurrit : F"ulpes, 
inquit, impertit Corvum 

plurima Salute. Stepenumero 
audiveram, Farnam efie 

Mendacem t jam experior Re 
ipfa : Nam, ut forte prx- 
lereo hac, fufpicifns Te in 
Arbere, advo/o, culpans 
Famam : Num Fama eft, Te 
tffe nigriorem Pice, 3* video 
te candidiorem Nive. Sane in 
meo jfudicio vincis Cygnttt* 
& w formofior alba 
Hedera. Quod fi, / ex- 
cellas -/ Plumis, Va & 
*Voce t equidem dicerem te 
Rfginam omnium Av'mm. 
Corvus illeclus hac AJfen- 
tiuncula, apparat ad 
canendum. i^ero Cafeus 
excidit e Rojlro ; Quo 
ccrrepto Vulpecula, 

tol/it 



L E VII. 

0/"the CROW and 
the Fox. 

A Crow having got a Prey, 
makes aNoifrintheBranches : 
the Fox y^ Him re- 
joicing, runs up : The Fox, 
fays her, compliments the Crow 
w/V/6 wry wzwrA Health. Very often 
luul ( I heard, /^ Faw^ was 
J^tar, now IJind it in the Faft 
/(^ .' For, as by Chance 
^y this way, feeing You 
the Tree, 1 fly to you, blaming 
Fame : For toe Report is, that you 
are blacker than Pitch, <?</ I fee 
you whiter than Snow. Truly in 
my judgment 
and are fairer Man 
Ivy. But if, flj you e- 
cel in Feathers, you do fo a!(.> 
in Voice, truly / Jlioitld call yau 
//'? j^/w of all A'/v/f. 
The Crow allured by this Fiat- 
tery, prepares 

fing. But the Cheefe 

fell from /6/V Beak ; Which. 
foV/f fnatcbed by the Fox, 



6 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 

toUit Cachinnurn : Turn he fets up a Laughter : Then 

demum Corvus, Pudore at lad the Crow, Shame 

juaffo Ja&urse Ret, being Joined to the Lofs of the Thing t 

dolet. gricvelh. 

MOR. MOR. 

Nonnulli funt tarn avidi Some are fo g rf( dy 

Laudis, ut ament AJfen- of Praife, that they love a Flat- 

tatorem cum fuo Probro & terer with their own Difgrace and 

Damno. JHomundones hiijus Damage. Men of this 

Modi funt Pr<ed<( Parafito. Kind are a Prey to the Parafite. 

Quod li vitajjes Jaftan- But if you had avoided Boaft- 

tiam, facile vitaveris ing, eajily would you have avoided 

peftiferum Genus Affen- the peftilent Race of Flatter- 

tatorutn. Si Tu velis ejfe ers. If Thou art willing to be 

Thrafo, Gnatho nufqtiam a Thrafo, a Gnaths never 

deerit Tibi. will be wanting to Thee. 

FABLE VIII. 

DfCAKE &? ASIKO. 0/"the DOG and the Ass. 

DUM Canit blandiretur "YlfTHilfl the Dog fawned on 

Hero & Fan-jlit t VV b'uMafler and the Family t 

Herus ff Familia demulcent the Mafter a</ the Family Jiroke 

Cai.em. jf/kStf t videns the Dog. The Afi y feeing 

id, gemit altifftme ; Nam that, groans moft deeply ; for 

eepit pig erc Sor- he began to be weary of his Con- 

tis : Putat iaique com pa- dition : He thinks it unjuflly or- 

ratum, Canem efle ^ra- dered, that the Dog fhould be ac- 

tum cunCtis, pafcique ceptablt to all, and be fed 

herili ItLnfd, & fiom ins Matter's Table, and 

confequl Hoc Otto thai he fhould gel This by IJlenef: 
Ludoque : f'S^fe cono and Piay : that Himftlf on the 

tra portare Clitcllas, contrary carried the Dorfcrs, 

tiR Flagello, ejfe tuas beaten with the Whip, was 

nunquaaa otiofum, & tamen : tfiever idle t and y*t 

odioi'um funSit. Si hsc .odious to all. If thffe things 

fisnt Btanditlls, ftatuit "are done by Pa-tunings, he refolvcf 

J'eSari cam Artem, qux jtt to follow that Art> which it 

tarn iit.lts.'* Igitur quo- to profitable. Therefore on a cer- 

diim Tcmpore tentaturus tain. Time about to try 

Rem, procurrit obviam the Thing, He runs in the Way 

vpdcuati Zksnnm, to his Maflet: returning 
Tub- 



SELECT FABLES OF^SOP. 7 

fubfilit, pulfat Uri- leaps on Him, Jiriles him with 

gulis. Hero exclamaiite, his Hoofs. The Majler crying out, 

aervi accurrere & the Servants ran to him, and 

ineptus Afellus, qui credidlt the filly dfs, who thought 



Se urbanum, vapulat. 

MOR. 
Omncsnon p^ffimus omnia; 



Himfelf courtly, is beaten. 

MOR. 
We all cannot do all things ; 



flic omna decent 
Quifquc facial, 
tentet id, quod pot eft. 



oinnes. r.or do all things become all Men. 

quifque Let every one do, let every one 

try that, wjiich he is able. 



FAB 

De LEONE 5* quibufdam 
aliis. 

LE O pepigerat cum 
Ove quibufdamque 
aliis, Venationem fore 
communcm. Venantur, 

C'ervus c apitur : fingulis 
incipientibus tollere Jingulas 
Partes, vt convcnerat, 
Leo irrugiit, inquiens, una 
Pars eft mea, quia funi 
dlgniifimus ; altera item 
efl mea, quia przftantif- 
finvJS Viribus ; porro 
vsndico tertiam, quia fu- 
daverim p f us in capiendo 
Cervo ; dcnique, nifi con- 
eefferitu quartam, ejl aftum 
de Amicitia. Socii 

audientes hoc, difcedunt 
vacui $3* taciti, ncn auii 
mutire contra Leoaem, 

MOR. 

Fides femper fuit ttzra : 
apnd Aot Seculum ^? rarior; 
apud potentes ejl, & 
femper fuit, rar'ifjima. Q^o- 
circa # fatius vivere cum 
Parr. Nam, j^u/ vivit 
fi'i poteniiore, fx$e habet 



L E IX. 

Of the LION and fome 
Benjis. 

TH E Lion (W agreed with 
/A^ 5/'ff/> and fome 
others., that the Huntingjftow/J ^ 
common. They bunt, 

a Stag M taken : all 
beginning to take /AV Jingle 
Parts, as had been agreed, 
Lion roared, faying, one 
is mine, becaufe / am 
the moil worthy ; another alfo 
is mine, becaufe I am mod ex- 
cellent in Strength ; moreover 
/ claim a third, btfavft I have 
fweated more in taking 
the Stag ; lajlly, unlefs jow noiil 
grant the fourth, /ifr? it an end 
o/" Frieudfhip. His Companions 
hearing this, depart 

empty and filent, */ having dared 
to mutter again ft the Lion. 

MOR. 

Faith always has been ?v7r* 
in this Age // is rarer ; 
awing the Powerful it is, and 
tf/iyayj has been,moji rare. Where- 
fore it is better to live with 
d Equal. For, /rV w/^o liveth 
w;VA one. more powerful, c/i^ hath 
a Nc- 



8 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 

nectj/e concederc de fuo a NeceJJity to depart jrom hii 
Jure. Right. 



FAB 

De LEONE &f MURE. 

LE O A^iw jEftu 
Curfuque quiefcebatyl/i 
Umbra, yw/w viridi Gr#- 
TWZ/W ; Grege Murium per- 
currente f/w/ Ttrgunj, ex- 
perreSus, comprehendit 

Unum ex il/is. Captivus 
ftipphcat, clamitat, Se efle 
indignant, cui Z,eo 

irafcatur. Ille t reputans 
fore Nihil Laudis 

in A 7 ^ tantillae Eeflia, 
dimittit Captivum. Non </KI 
poftea, Z,fo, dum currit 
per Saltum, inctdit in 
Plagas : Rugit % fed non 
potejl cxire. JT/j audit 
Leonem miferabilicer rugi- 
entem, agnofcit Vocem, 
repit in Cuniculos, qu<erit 
Nodos, quos invenit, 
corroditque ; Leo- evadit 
e Plasis. 

MOR. 

Hsec Fabula fuadet C/*- 
tiientiam potentibus ; Etenim 
lit human* Res yn/ in- 
ftabiles, Potentes ipft 
Inter dum egent O/^ humil- 
limorum ; y^/ar^ prudens 
/^/r, etfi potcft, timet 
tiocere vcl i'/7/ Ho mini ; _/</ 
Qui non timet nocerc 
aiteri, defipit valJe. 
Quid //a ? Quia, eijl jam 
fretus Potentia, metuit 
Ncmioem, forfan, poithac 
erif, 



LEX. 

0/~the LION fl</ the MOUSE. 

TH E Lion tired with Heat 
and running, re (led under 
the Shade, upon the green Grafs ; 
a Company c/" Mice run- 
ning over /j Back, having a- 
rofe t He takes 

One of /. The Captive 
begs, cries, //>/ ^<? was 
unworthy, whom the Lion fhould 
be angry with. He, thinking 
there would be Nothing of Praife 
in the Death of fo little a Bcajl, 
difmifTea the Captive, Not long 
after, the Lion, whilft He runs 
thro' the Fareji, falls int 
the Toils : Hz roars, but can- 
not get out. The Moufe hears 
the Lion miferably roar- 
ing, knows the Voice, 
creeps into the Holes, feels 
the Knots, 'which He finds, 
and gnaws ; the Liou escapes 
out of the Toils. 

MOR. 

This Fable recommends Cle- 
mency to the powerful ; For 
as human Things are un- 
ftable, the Powerful themfclvcs 
fometimet want the Help of the 
lowed ; wherefore a prudent 
Man, altho' he is able, fcareth 
to hurt even a mean Man ; but 
He that dots not fear to hurt 
another, plays the Fool very much. 
Why/o ? Becaufe, altho* now /;.?- 
ving relied on his Power, he fear elk 
Nobody, per haps ^ hereafter 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



fflf t ut indiguerit 

vel Gratia vilium Homun- 
cionum, vel meluerit Iram. 



it ivlll be, that he may have wanted 
cither the Favour of mean Men, 
or have feared their Anger. 



FAB 

De <pgroto MILVO. 

MIlvus decumbebat 

Le&o jam ferme 
moriens, orat Matrtm ire 
precatum Deos. Mater 
refpondet, Nihil Opis fpe- 
randum Illi a, Diis, 
quorum facra tcties viola- 
viflet/w/V Rapinis. 

MOR. 

Decet not venerari 
Deos ; nam ////' juvant^/Vr, 
& adverfantur impios. Ne- 
gledi in Felicitate, non cx- 
audiunt Mi fend. Quare^r 
memor eorum in fecundis 
rebus, u/ vocati _/// 
prsefentes in adverfis rebus. 



L E XL 

Of thejtck KITE. 

TH E Kite lay 

in Bed now almott 
dying, tegs his Mother to go 
to pray to the Gods. The Mother 
anfwers, No Help <was to be 
hoped by him from the Gods, 
vuhofe facred Things fo often he 
had violated by his Rapines. 

MOR. 

It becometh us to worfhip 
the Gods ; for they help the pious, 
and with/land the impious. Ne 
glecled in Felicity, they do not 
hear i Mifery. Wherefore be 
mindful of them in profperout 
things, that being called they may be 
prefe'ot in adverfe things. 



FABLE XII. 



De RANIS tf earum Rege. 

GENS Ranarum, cum 
(^/ libera, fupplicabat 
Jovem, Rtgsm da- 

ri jiW. Jupiter rldebat 
Vota Ranarum. Illse 

/fl/w^ inftabant itcrum, 
atque iterutn, donee perpel- 
lerent ipfum. /// dejecit 
Trabem ; ea .MbAv qu aflat 
Fluvium ingenti Fragore. 
Ranae terrlta filent ; 
oenerantur Regem ; oc- 
rsdunt propius fsdetentim ; 
tao- 



0/"the FROGS and their 

TH E Nation of Frogs, when 
// was free, bcfoughi 
Jupiter, ybr a King to be gi- 
ven to them. Jupiter laughed at 
the Wiflies of the Frogs. They 
neverthelefs prefled him again, 
and again, until f^y drove 
him to it. //# threw down 
a Log ; that Mafs fhakes 
the River with a great A 7 "^. 
The Frogs ajfrighled are filent ; 
they reverence their King ; they 
come nearer Step by Sf?p ; 
at 



io SELECT FABLES OF ^SSOP. 

tandem, Metu abje&o, 
infultant, & defultant ; 
iners Rex eft Lufui & 
Contemptui. Rurfum lacef- 
funt Jovem ; or ant Regem 
dan fibi, qui fit 

Jlrenuus ; qtiibus Jupiter dat 
Ciconiam. Is perflrenue 

perambularis Paludem, 

vorat qii'tcqtiid Ran a rum 
Jit obviam. Jgilur 

Raoae frujira queftas fue- 
runt de Saevitia hujus. 
Jupiter non audit, nam 
.'ur k ho die : 

Etenim Vefperi Ciconia 
eiinte Cubitum, cgrejjix ex 
Antris murmurant 

rauco Ululatii ; fed 

canunt fur do. Nam Ju- 
piter vuit, ut quae depre- 
cate funt clementem 

'// iuclementcm. 



MCR. 

Solet evenire 
vt Ranis, gut, 

li halet Rcgero/ct7i> man- 
fuetiorem, damnat cum Ig- 
aaviie & Insrtitt, & o//a/, 
aliquand>> Virum dari 

^i/ .- Contra, Ji quan- 
do /?a<?a {/? flrenuum 
Rf*em, damuat S<fvitiam 
hujug, 3* laudat Clsmcn- 
/;../.*/ prioris ; Jive quod 

f-.tnper pceraret nos praelen- 
tiuir, Jive quod ejl verum 
D':flu>n t nora f^? potiora 



at length, /<Var being thrown away, 
/&ry /^fl/> upon, and /M/ o^J A/m ; 
the fluggifh Azwy i their Sport and, 
Ccnternpt. Again they pro- . 
vcke Jupiter; they pray for a King 
to be given to them, who may be 
valiant ; to whom Jupiter gives 
f/&<? Stork. He i><?ry nimbly 
ftalkiug through /ta Marjh 
devours whatever of the Frogs 
fo/nfj in the way. Therefore 
the Frogs in vain have com- 
plained of the Cruelty o/" /&/;. 
Jupiter does not hear, for 
they complain even //6w /)flp : 
For /' //6if Evening the Stork 
^i/V^ to Reft, having tome out of 
//>> Cavet they murmur 
<a;;//& a hoarfe Croaking ; but 
they firig to one deaf. For Ju- 
piter wills, /Aj/ they who peti- 
tioned againjl a merciful Kingj 
now ^fij/- au unmerciful. 

MOR. 

It is wont to happen to the com- 
mon People, at to the Frogs, who, 
if they have a King a little mild- 
er, condemn him o/" /d/?- 
n^/} and Sluggijlnefs, and W//S 
at fometime_/bra Man to be given 
/o them / On the contrary, if at 
any time //$<?y havs got an ad\ive 
King, they condemn /ta Cruelty 
of him, <W/ praife /Z'f C/<r- 
mency of the former; either becaufe 
it always repents us of the pre- 
fent, or becaufe ;'/ is a true 
Saying, that new things are better 
than o!d< 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF iESOP. 11 



FAB 

J^e COLUMBIS y MILVO. 

COlurabz ollm gef- 
fcre Bsitum cum Mil- 
voi quctn ut expug- 
narent, delegerunt fibi 
Accipitrem Rcgem. Ills fac- 
tua Rcx t agit Hoftem, non 
Regem : rapit ac laniat 
non fegnius, ac Milvus. Pec- 
nitet Columbas Incap- 
ti, putantes, fuiffe 

fatius fati Bellum Mil- 
vi, quatn Tyrannidem 
Accipitris. 

MOR. 

Pigeat Neminsm fuas 
Condi tlon'is iiimium. Ut 
Horatius ait, Nihil eft bea- 
tum ab omni Parts. 
Equidem non optarem mu- 
tare me am Sorttm, modo fit 
toleralilis. Mulli, cum qnie- 
fiverint novam Sortem, 
rurfus optaverunt 'jctercm. 
Sumus fere omnrs ita vario 
Ingenio, ut ' fanitedt 

Nofract noflri. 



L E XIIL 

Of the PIGEONS andthe KITE. 

THE Pigeons formerly car- 
ried on a War with the 
Kite, whom that they might fub- 
due, they chafe to themfclves 
the Hatok King. /fe being 
made King, afts /Atf Enetny, not 
/Ae AVn^ : he tears and butchers 
no flower, than the Kite. // re- 
penis the Pigeons of their Under- 
takihg, thinking, that it had been 
better to endure the War cf 
the Kite, than the Tyranny 
of the Hawk. 

MOR. 

Let it repent no Man of hi 
Condition too much. As 

Horace fay ft Nothing is hap- 
py from every Part. 
Tr&ly / would not wi/b to 
change my Lot, provided it be 
tolerable. Many, w/jfn they have 
fought a neia Stat? 

again have wifhed for the old. 
We are almojl all of Jo various 
a Temper, that it refenteth 
Us ourfelvcs of our f elves. 



FAB 

De FURE 5* CANE. 

CANIS refpondit Furi 
porrigenti Pancm * 
fileat, A'owi tuas 

Infidias, das Panem, 
quo dffinam latrare, /<*/ 
odi /i/.v/n Muous ; quippe fi 
.*, tulero Panem, tu 
rypsrtab'n cunfta 

-; .;.-, : 

MOR. 



L E XIV. 

0/"the THIEF <:</ the Doc. 

THE Dog anf-wered the Thief 
holding out Bread //>a 
he would be filent, / /<?> thy 
Treacheries, thou gireft Bread, 
that / wy r/^ to bark, but 
I hate //j; Gift ; for if 
/ (hall take f& ^rr^ thou 
wilt carry a!l the Things 
cut of thefc Hotifct. 
C ' 



12 SELECT FABLES OF jESOP. 



MOR. 
Cavfa 



parvi 



MOR. 
Take heed, /or //',? Sake of a fmall 



Cave, 

Commodi, amittas magnum. Profit, thou lofcft not a great one. 

Cave, habeas Fidem Take heed, that thou bajl not Faith 
in every Man ; for there arc 
ivbo not c/z/7 fay &W- 
/>', but rf^> do &W- 
ly, with Deceit. 



furvts Homini ; nam funt 
^w non tanfttm dicunt be- 
tiigne, fed & faciunt bz- 
tiigne, Dolo. 



De LUPO 



FAB 

SUCULA. 



SUCULA fartunebat ; 
Lupus pdlicetury Se 
/or/? Ciutodem Fatus. 
Secula fefpondit, Se won 
fftr^ Obfcquio faipi ; 
ii : 7//<r velit haberi 
pius, j*r cupiat facers id, 
yzW eft gratuni) abeat 
longiits : Etenira ojfidum 
J,upi cviijlare non Pricfcn- 
tid, fed Abfentid. 

MOR. 

Omnia no y^n/ creden- 
da Omnibus* Multi poUlcen- 
ittr fuam Of tram, non Amore 
tin', y>^ fui ; <?n 
quserentes /aww Commo" 
fuum. 



L E XV. 

Cf the WOLF and the Sow. 

TH E Sow row/6/ /// ; 
the Wolf promrfer, that he 
would te the Keeper o/ />?><? Tottng. 
TheSowanfwerfd, That {he did not 
tvtnt the Service o/" //v /^o^" ; 
if He is willing to be accounted 
aiFe&ionatc, //"hedefires/ot/o that, 
'which is grateful, let him go 

farther off ; For that the Offics 
of the \Vo\tconJifted not J.-z^/V Prr- 

/wff, but Aljentc. 

MOR. 

All things are nst to be trufl- 
ed to all Men. Many pro- 
m'tfe their Service, not out of Love 
of you, 3/ of themfelves ; not 
feeking thir.i Advan- 

tage, but their own. 



FABLE XVI. 



De Partu Montium. 

OLim erat Rumor, 
quod Monies parturi- 
rent. Homines accurrunt, 
circum fid tint, cxpeflantes 
n Morftri) non 
Jme 



Of the Bringing fortli 
of the Mountains. 

FOrmerly there was a Rumour, 
that the Mountains >would 
bring forth. The Men run thitler, 
Hand round about, expecting 
fomething of a Monger, not 
tti 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 13 



fine Pavore. Tandem 
Monies fartvriunt. Mus 
txitf turn Omnes ridebant. 

MOR. 

Jaclatores, cum profi- 
tentur c5" oftentant magna, 
vix faciunt parva. Qya- 
prnpter ifti Thrafones funt 
Jure Materia - Joci ^ fe 
Scommatum. FtxcFabulaitem M 
vetat inanes Timores. Nam forbids 
plerumque Timor Periculi commonly 



yottkoat Fear. Jit length the. 
Mountains bring forth. A Moufc 
comes out) then ^//laughed. 

MOR. 

Braggers, w they pro- 
fefs </ boaft .S^c* things, 
fcaroe /a little things. W*- 
/v tlinfe Thrafos are 
the Matter o/ ^f/? and 
Thij /"rt/'/i? alfo 
vain .>rtr.r. For 
the Fear o/" Danger 



Scos. 



e ft gravior 
ipfo ; imo 


Periculo 
/'</, quod 


is more grievous 
it f elf ; nay 


than the 

that, 


Danger 
\vhich 


metuimus, eft 


ftps ridi- 


we fea 


!/', IS 


i c/?^' 


ridi- 


culum. 




culous. 









FABLE XVII. 



JDff LEPORIBUS 5* 
RANIS. 

SYlva mugitiits infolito 
Turbine, trepidi 

Lepores occipiunt rapine fu- 
gere. Cum Palus oljljleret 
fugientibus, Jletere anxii, 
comprehenji Periculis 

utrmqiie. QjJodqae ejjet 
Incitamentum tnajoris 

Timotis, indent Ranas 
mergi in Palude, Tune 
unut ex Leporibas pruden- 
tior c difertior caierit 
inquit, Quid inaniter time- 
mus ? EH Opus Animo 
quidem ; Eft Nobis Agilitas 
Carports, fed Animus dee ft. 
Hoc Periculum Tttrbinis 
noti eft Ju^'iendum* fed con- 



Of the HARES anal 
the FROGS. 



ufual lyijirlwindy the trem- 
bling Hares begin hnflily to fly 
away. When a Fe n Jloppe d then 
flying, they Jlood anxious, 
encompciffed vith Dangers 
on both f.des* And -v/hat was 
an Incitement of greater 
Fear, they perceive the Frogs 
to be plunged in the Fen. Then 
one of ths Hares more pru- 
dent and more eloquent than the reji 
faid, What vainly at iuc 
fear ? There is Need of Courage 
indeed : There is to us Agility 
of Body, but Courage is wanting. 
This Danger of the Whirlwind 
is not to be jled from t but con* 
temned. 

MOP. a 



H SELECT FABLES OF 

Mo*. MOR. 

Eft Opus Animo in 
omni Re. Virtus jacet 
fine Confidents. Nam Con- 
Jidentia eft Dux & 
Virtutis. 



There is Need of Courage ta 
every Thing. Virtue lies dead 
without Confidence. For Da~ 
ringnefs is the Leafier and Queen 
of Virtue, 



FABLE XVIII. 



De HJEDO & LUPO. 

CApRA, cum effet 
iiura paftura, concludit 
jHredum Doml, monens 
ape r ire Nemini, dum ipfa 
iCfdeat. Lupus, >ui 

audiverat id procul, poft 
Difceflum Matrix, 

pulfat Fores, capiiffat 
Voce, jubcns refludi. 
Kasdus pretfentiens 

I)olum inquit, Non aperio ; 
nam etfi Vox capriflat, 
tamen equidem video Lvpum 
per Rirtas. 

MOR. 

Filii, dbedtte Parentibus, 
nam eft utile ; & decet 
Juveneoi aufcultare 

geni. 



Of the Kip a</ the WOLF. 

THE GOAT, when fhe was 
about to go tq feed, Jhuts tip 
the Kid at Home, warning her 
to open to Nobody, till fhe 
return. The Wolf, /Wo 
had heard that afar off, <a/?rr 
the Departure of the Mother, 
knocks at the Doors, a&s the Goat 
in Voice, ordering them tobeopenecl. 
The Kid perceiving 

the Cheat fays, I do not open ; 
for altho* the Voice a8s the Goat, 
yet indeed I fee a Wclf 
thro* ^ Chinks. 

MOR. 

Children, ofcy your Parents, 
/or it is prof table ; and it becometh 
a Young Man to hearken 
to an Old Man. 



? A B L 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 15 
FABLE XIX. 



Tie RUSTICO b" 
* ANGUE. 

QUIDAM Raflicfu 
nutriverat Anguem ; 
aliquando iratus petit 
Sefltam Securi. llle evadit, 
tton fine Vulnere. Poftea 
Ritftictts deveniens in 
Paupertatcm ratut eft id 
Infortuftii accidere Sill 
propter Injurlam Anguis. 
Igitar fupplicat, vt re- 
deat. /// ait, Se ignof- 
cere, fed nolle redire ; 
peque fore fecurum cum 
Ruftico, cum fit 

tanta Securis Dtxni ; 
Dolorem vu/neris 

defiifle, tamen Memoriam 
fupereffc. 

MOR. 

Eft <vix tutum habere 
Pidem i, (^ui femel folvit 
F'tdem. Condonare Injuriam, 
id fane eft Mifericordig ; 
fed caver c fibi, 

tJ 1 dccet, fcf eft Pru- 
Jtntix. 



Ofihe COUNTRYMAN and 
the SNAKE. 

A CERT A IN Countryman 

had nourifhed a Snake ; 
on a time being angry He ilrikes 
the Beajl with an Ax. He efcapes, 
not without a Wound. Afterwards 
the Countryman coming into 
Poverty thought that 

Misfortune happened to him 
for the Injury of the Snake. 
Therefore he entreats, that He 
would return. He fays, that he for- 
gave, but was unwilling to return ; 
nor could he be fecure with 
the Countryman, 'when there is 
fo great an Ax at Home ; 
that the Pain of the Wound 
was worn away, yet the Memory 
remained. 

MOR. * 

It is ykzra fafe to have 
Faith in Him, Who once has broke 
Faith. To forgive an Injury^ 
that indeed is A&* Per/ of Mercy ; 
but /o te^ /W of One's fclf, 
o/ becomcth, and is //r /*ar/ of 
Prudence. 



FABLE XX. 



s VutPECULA 
ClCONlA. 



O/ the Fox and 
the STORK. 



"VTUlpecula vocavit 



it nnHE Fox called 

Ciconiam a</Ccenam. JL the Stork to Supper. 

Effundit Opfonium in She pours out the Vidluals upon 

Mcnfqrn, Qod', cum ^ the Table, which, when V was 

liquidum, liquid^ 



i6 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



liqiiidum, Ciconia tentante 
Rojiro fruftra, Vulpecula 
Ifngit. glufa Avis ablt, 
pudetquc, figetqu: 

Jnjuriaj. Pojl plufculnm 
Dierum redit, iavitat 
Vulpeculam. Vitreim Vas 
erat fitum plenum Opfonii ; 
quod Vas, ciim efict 
arfJi Guttims, llcuit 
Vulpecnlffi cidere, Bcefurire, 
tion guftare. Ciconia facile 
cxhaufit Rojiro. 

MOR. 

Rifus merctur jRifum ; 
jfocut Jo cum ; Dolus 
Dolura ; & Fiaus Frau- 
dtm. 



liquid, the Stork endeavoaring 
iv'tth her Sill in vain, the Fox 
1 i c k s u p . The deluded B i rdgoe s a. way , 
and is afnamed, and> vexed 
at the Injury, sifter forr.c 
Days fhe returns, invites 
the Fox. A Glafs Veffcl 
was placed full of Victuals ; 
which Vtflel, when it was 
o/"a narrow Neck, it was lawful 
for the Fox to fee, and iunger, 
not /o /rt/ftr. The Stork enjily 
drtw it out ctJ/A >$ 



MOR. 

Laughter d?f ernes Laughter ; 
a J^/? a Jeft ; a 7V/V* 
a Trick ; and Deceit -k- 
celt. 



FABLE XXI. 



DC Luro y piclo 

Cafite. ^ 

J UPUS wr/i/ f & 
|. ,j miratur human um 
Caput repertura in Officina 
Sculptoris, fentiens habere 
nihil Senfus, inquit, 
pulchrum Caput, eft in 
Te mu/tum Artis, fed 



MOR. 

Externa Pulcbritudo, fi in- 
adfit, e/l grata ; fin 
carendum eit allerutrd, 
pradtat carere externa, 
uam interna : uam ilia 
ne hac interdum incurrit 
Odium, ut Slcl'dus fit eo 
cdio- 



I 



0/the WOLF and the painted 
Head. 



THE Wolf/arj ^on/, and 
admires a human 
Head found in the Shop 
<?/"<2 Carver, perceiving it to havs 
nothing of Senfe, he fays, O 
fair Head, there is irt 
Thee much of Art, wf 
Nothing of Senfe. 

MOR. 

Oat ward Beauty, if /^ //:- 
war J be prefcnt,tVpleafing ; lutif 
we muft want either ; 

it is better to want the outward, 
/rt/r the inward ; for that 
without this fometimes- incurs 
Hatrtdt that a /W/ is ^jr/i wwA 
the 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. r 



odiofior, 
formofior. 



quo 



the more odions, by how much 
the more handforae. 



FABLE XXII. 



De GRACULO. 

GRACULUs orr.avit 
Se Plants 

Pavonis ; deinde vifus 
pulchelluf Sibi contulit 
i>e ad Genus Pavo- 
mtm t fuo Gcnere faftidito. 
//// tandem inttlligentes 
Fraudem, nudalant Itoli- 
tlam Avem Coloribus, 
& affccerunt cum Plagis. 

MOR. 

Hsec Falula notat eot t qul 
gerunt fe fitblimiiis, quatn 
ejl sequnm ; qul vivunt cum 
iis, qui funt C3 5 ditiores, 
& magls nobiles ; quarc fape 
fiunt inopes t & funt 
Ludibrio. 



0/"the JACKDAW. 

TH E JACKDAW adorned 
Himfelf with the Feathers 
of the Peacock ; then feeming 
pretty to Himftlf he betook 
Himfelf to the Race of the Pea- 
cocli) his own Race being defpifed. 
They at length under/landing 
the Cheat, Jlripped the fool- 
ifh Bird of his Colours, 
and belaboured him with blows. 

MOR. 

This Fable denotes thofe, who 
carry themfelves more loftily, than 
is frf ; who live w/V/ 
thofe, w^o are both more rich, 
aJ more noble ; wherefore often 
they become poor, and tf'"f 
for a Laughing-flock. 



FABLE XXIII. 



De RANA 8? BOTE. 

RAna cupida a:qiiandi 
Bovem diftentabat fe. 
Filius bortabatur Matrem 
dcjiflere Caepto, 

inquiensy Ranam ejje nihil 
(id Bovem. Ilia intumuit 
faitndiim, Natus c/amitat t 



0/"the FROG and the OK. 

A Frog dcfirous of equalling 
an OK ftretched / 
The Son advifed the Mother 
to c?e/i/l from the Undertaking, 
faying^ that a Frog was nothing 
to an Ox. 5.6i- Avcliscl 

a fcconrt time, Tiic f>oa ff/Vj cv/, 
Met- 



IS SELECT FABLES OF JESOI*. 

Mater, licet crepes, nun- 
guam vinces Bovem. Autem, 
cum intumuiflet tertium t 
erepuit. 

Mo*. 

Qmfque habet fuarn 
Dstem. Hie excel/it Forma, 
Ille Viribus. Hie pallet 
Cpibus, Ille Amicis. De- 
cet Unumquemy; eflc con- 
tentum fuo. Ille valet 
Carper e, Tu Ingenio : 
O^uucirca Quifque confulat 
Semet t nee inv'tdeat Supe- 
riori, QjiQa eft tntferum ; 
rec o^/f/ certare, 

Stultitle, 



Mother, ^//^o* you burft, <?- 
wr will you exceed the Ox. But* 
><rn (he had fvvelled a /i/rJ tim:, 
flic burft. 

MOR. 

Every one Lai his 
Gj//. This Man excels in Beauty, 
T&zf in Strength. This is powerful 
in Richest That /a Friends. It 
becometh Every one to be ccn- 
/f/ with his own. He is ftrong 
/a ody, Thou in Wit : 
Wherefore 1st Every one confiilt 
Hir:felf* nor envy a Supe- 
rior, Which is a mlferable thing ; 
nor it^/2 to contend, 
Which is /A* Par/ of Folly. 



FABLE XXIV. 

Z)tf JE.QUO tf LEONE. Q/"the R6RSE and the LION. 

LEO ivn// ad comedendum 
Equum ; autem care'ns 
Viribus prte Sene3a, coepit 
meditari Artem : profit etur 
Se Medicum : moratur 
Equum Ambage V:rlorum. 
Hie cfponit Dolum Dolo ; 
fingit, Se nuper pvpiigiffs 
Pedem in fpinofo Loco; 
orat, ut Medicus 

iufpiciens educat 

Sentem. Leo parct. At 
EquuSj quanta VI potn- 
it, impiagit Calcetn Leoni, 
& fontir.no conjicit Se 
in PeJa. Leo vix 

ta:ivlcm r:Jieas ad ^Sr. 



THE LION <: omrf^ to fflf 
the Horfe ; tut wanting 
Strength thro' old dgt, he began, 
to meditate an Art : /T<? profejfts 
Himfelf a Phyftcian : He ftays 
the Horfe with a Circuit of Word:. 
He o//>a/ Deceit /o Z>'/ . 
He feigns, that he lately bad prick- 
ed his Foot /a a thorny Place ; 
He prays, that the Phyfician 
looking into it would draw out 
the Thorn. The Lion obeys. But 
thz fforfe, with how great Force he 
co\i[d,Jlrilef his Heel ?//>oa A&f Lie*:, 
and immediately betakes Himfelf 
to /;// /fw/j. The Lion /WT- 
at length returning to Himfe{f\ 
for 



SELECT FABLES OF ^SOP. 19 



ham fuerat prope 

txanimatus I&u, in quit y 
fero Pretium ob Stultitiam, 
& is merito effugit ; 
naro uttus eft JDolurn 
Do/o. 

MOR, 

Simulatio ejl digna Od/i?, 
& capienda Simulatione. 
Apsrtus Ho ft is tion eft ti- 
inendus ; fed qui Jimulat 
Benevolentiam, rww fit Ho- 
Jlis, is qnidem eft timendus, & 
5^ digniffimus (Wi'0. 



for />e /;<3^/ fcf aim oft. 
dead with the Blow, fays, 
I bear a Reward for my Folly* 
and ^ defervedly hat fed away ; 
for A<? ^JJ revenged Deceit 
iy//<6 Deceit. 

Moft. 

Diftimulation M worthy of Hatred", 
and /o ^e /a/'<rn with DiffiqaulaUon. 
An open Enemy is not to be fear- 
ed ; but he who pretends 
Benevolence, token he is an Ene- 
my, he indeed is to le feared t and 
if mod worthy of Hatred. 



FABLE XXV. 



De 



AVIEUS fcf Qjiadru 
pedibus. 



ERAT Pugna Avibiis 
cum Qiiadrtipedibus. 
Erat utrinque Spes, 
utrinque Metus, untrinque 
Periculum : autem Vefyer- 
tilio relinquens Socios, de- 
ficit ad Hoftcs. A<ves 
vincunt, Aquild ' Duce 
f3* Aufpice ; *uero darn- 
uant Transfugam Vefper- 
tilionem, vti nunquam 
redeat ad Aves, utl nunquam 
volet Luce. Hsc /2 
Caufa Vefpertilioni) ut 
o Wf/, nifi Nctfu. 



MOR. 



Qjii renuit 
Adverfitatis 



efle Particep: 
& Fcriculi 



BIRDS and the four-foot- 
ed Beads. 



THere was aBattteto theBirds 
, lu'tth the four-footed Beads. 
There was on both fides Hope 9 
on both fides Fear, on both fides 
Danger : but the 

Bat leaving his Companions, re- 
volts to the Enemies. The Birds 
overcome, the Eagle being Captain 
and Leader ; lut they con- 
demn the Runaway Batj 
that he never 

return to f/& Birds, that ^ iwwr 
fly in */k Light. This ir 
a Reafon for the Bat, that 
^tf/fy not, vinlefs in the Night. 

MOR. 

He that refufes to be Partaker 
of Adverfuy an^ Danger 



20 SELECT FABLES OF JESOV. 



expers 
& Salutis. 



Sociis, er'it 

Profperitatis, 



with his Companions, Jhall be 
deftitute of their Profperity, 
and Safety. 



FABLE XXVI. 



De SYLVA & Ru3- 

TICO. 

QU O Tempore erat 
Sermo etiaoi Arlo- 
ribus, Rufticus venit 
in Sylvan, rogat, ut 
liceat tollere Capu- 

lura adfuam Securim. Sylva 
annuit. Rufticus, 

Securi aptata, ccrpit fuc- 
cidere Arbor es. Turn, fcy* 
quidem fero pcenituit 
Sylvam fuse Facilitatis, 
doluit (JJe Seipfam 

Caufam fiii Exlt'ti. 

Moi. 

Vide, de Quo merearis 
bene : fuere multi, >ui 
abufi funt Benejlclo accepto 
in Pcrnicicm Autoris. 



0/"the WOOD and the COUN- 
TRYMAN. 

AT what Time there was 
a Speech even /o 
Trees, a Countryman r/7/r 
into the Wood, afks, //ta/ 
it may be lawful to take a Han- 
dle to his Ax. The Wood 
confents. The Countryman, 
/ta yfx being fitted, began to 
cut down ^<r Trees. Then, <MK/ 
indeed /oo late it repented 
^<? Woorf of her Eafinefs, 
it grieved her to be Herfclf 
the Caufs of her own Deflruftion. 

MOR. 

See, of whom ihou mayejl deferve- 
well : there have been many, Who 
have abufed a Benefit received 
to the Deftiuftion of the Author. 



FABLE XXVII. 

De LUPO 5* VutPE. 0/"the WOLF and the Fox. 



effet 



LUPUS, cum 
fat"ts Prredre, dfgebat in 



Vulpecula accedit, 
fcifcitatur Caufam Otii. 
Lupus fen fit, /fo 

Mor- 
bum 



Infidias, fimiilat 



THE WOLF, when there wa 
enough of Prey, //W</ in 
Idlenels. The Fox foww /o ii'm, 
demands the Caufe of his Idlenefs. 
The Wolf perceived, there were 
Treadxries, pretends a Bif- 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 11 



bum eje Caufam, oral 
Vulpeculam ire precatum 
Deos. Ilia Jo/ens, Dolnra 
nan fuccedere, adit Pa/lorem, 
monet, Latebras 

Lupi fotere, & Ho- 
*flem fecurum poj/e opprimi 
inopinato. Pallor adori- 
tur Lupum, madat. Vul- 
pes potitur Antro s* Pneda ; 
fed breve fuit Gaudium 
fui fceleris illi ; nam paulo 
pod idem Pad or cafit 
ipfam. 

MeR. 

Invidia cftfaa'a Res, ff 
interdum perniciofa quoque 
Author i ipfi. 



eafe to be the Caufe, prays 
the Fox to go to pray the, 
Gods. She grieving, that the Trick 
did not fucceed, goes to the Shepherd, 
advifes him, that the Den 
of the Wolf lay open, and the Ene- 
my bting fecure could be deftroyed 
unawari's. The Shepherd rifes 
upon the Wolf, flays him. The 
Fox obtains the Den and\\\e. Prey ; 
but fliort was the Joy 
of her Villainy to her ; for a little 
after /A? fame Shtpherd taiet 
her. 

Mo*. 

Envy is _/o/ Thing, and 
fo me times pernicious alfo 

fo the Author himfelf. 



FABLE XXVIII. 



De VIPERA :f LIMA. 

VIpera ojendens Limam 
in Fabrica captt 
rodere : Lima fuhrifit, in- 
quifnsi Inepta, Quid agis * 
Tu contriveris tuot 
Denies antequam atteras 
Me, Qu& foleo prasmorderc 
Duritiem >Eris. 

MOR. 

Vide etlam atq; etlam 
Qu^icum habeas Rem ; 
Si acuas Denies 

in fortiorem, rion nccu- 
cris il!i t fed tilt* 



Of the VIPER and the FILE. 

A VIPER finding a File 
in a Smith's Shop, fo^aft 
to gnaw it: The File fmiled,yi7y- 
/'-, Fool, What doll thoti do ? 
Thou wilt have worn out thy 
Teeth before thou wcarefl out 
Hfe, who OCT <wont to gna\v off 
/j&f Hardnefs of Brafs. 

MOR. 

See again and <fa/ 
with whom tkou haft an AtFair ; 
if thou whetteft Mj TVrfA 
againil ajlronger Man t thou wilt 
not have hurt /m t but thy f elf. 

FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE XXIX. 



De CERVO. 

CErvus, confpicatus fe iy 
perfpicuo Fonle, pro- 
bat procera & ramofa 
Cornua, fed damnat Exili- 
tatem Tibiarum : forte 
dutn contemplatur, dum ju- 
dicat, Venator interveuit : 
Cervus fogit* Canes infec- 
tantur fugientem ; fed cum 
tntraviffet denfam Syfoam, 
Cornua erant implicita 
JRamis. Turn demum 
laudabat Tilias, & damna- 
lat Cornua, <$utz feccre, 
r,t cffet Przda Canibus. 

MOR. 

Petimus fugienda, 

fngimus petenda ; Q^as 
cfficiunt placent. S^te con^ 
ferunt dlfplicent. Cupimus 
JBeatitudiiiem, priufquam 

intelligatnus, ubi Jit : Ouae- 
rimu3 ExceUentiam Opum, 
5" Celfitudinem Honorum ; 
opinaranr Beatltudinem 11- 
tam in his, in quibus ejl 
tarn mult urn JLaboris, y 
Doloris. 



0/the STAG. 

A Stag, having o&f/df himfelf <a 
a clear Fountain, ap- 
proves A/J lofty and branched, 
Horns, / condemns the Small- 
nefs of his Legs. By Chance , 
vvhilft Af 7oo/j, whilft ^ judges, 
the Huntfman /o^J ^y ; the 
Stagjlies away. The Dogs pur- 
foe him flying ; tut when 
^ Aa^ entered a thick Wood % 
his Horns <ztw entangled 
' /^ Boughs. Then o/ 7^/2 
he praifed his Legs, and condemn- 
ed his Horns, which made, 
that he was at Pr^y to the Dogs. 

MOR. 

We defire Things to bejhunned, 
we fly Things to be de fired ; what 
hurt pleafe. What pro- 
fit difpleafe. We defire 
Happinefs, before that 
we under/land, where // is ; We 
feek the Excellency of Riches, 
and the Loftinefs of Honours ; 
we think Happinefs pla- 
ced in thefe, in which there is 
fo mi/ft& of Labour, and 
Pain. 



FABLE XXX. 

De LUPIS # AGNIS. O/" the WOLVES 0</ the LAMBS. 



ALiquando fuit Fcedus 
inter Lupos & \J between the Wolves 
Agnos, >uibus eft the Lambs, to ivhom there is 
Difcordia 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 23 

Difcordia Natura. Obfi- a Difcord by Nature. Hofta- 
dilus datis utrinqtte, ges being given on both Sides, 

Lupi dedere fuos Catulos, the Wolves gave their Whelps, 
Oves Cohortem Canuon. the Sheep their Troop of Dogs. 
Qvibus quietis 5" pafcen- The Sheep being quiet and feed- 
ing, the little Wolves by the De- 
fire of their Dams fend forth 
Howlings : Then the Wol<oes 
rufhing on them cry out, 

Fidem, Fzdufque that their Faith, and League 

folutum, laniantque Oves was broken, and butcher the Sheep 
1 itute of their Guard of Dogs. 



tibus, Lupuli Defide- 
rio Matrum edunt 

Ululatw : Turn Lupi 
irruentes clamitant, 



iejlitutas Prsefidio Canum. 
MOR. 

Eft Infcitia, fi in Feed ere 
tradas tua Prafulia 

Hofti ; nam qui full 
Hollis, for/an nondum 
defivit cfle Hojiis ; & for- 
tajfis ceperit Caufam, cur 
acloriatur te nudatum tuo 
Prajidio. 



MOR. 



It 



is Folly, if in a League 
//tatf delivere/t thy Guards 
to an Enemy ;/pr he who Aaj ta^n 
an Enemy, perhaps not yet 
/rflj ceafed to be a Enemy ; and ^r- 
^a^j will take Occajion, why 
^ may rife upon \.\\zejlript of thy 
Guard. 



FABLE XXXI. 

De MEMBRIS & VEKTRE. 0/"the MEMBERS one/the BKLLY. 

FOrmerly the Feet and Hands 
acculed the Belly, 

that the Gains of them 
were devoured by him being idle. 
They command, or let him labour, 
or not think to be maintained. He 
intreats once and again ; 
yet the Hands deny Suflc- 
nance ; the Belly being exhaufted 
with Want, when all //ta Limbs 
began /<? yi/7 ; then a/ lajl 
the Hands wf willing to be o^- 
<?j, but that too late ; ybr 
the Belly 



OLim P^J & Manus 
incufabant Ventrem^ 
quod Lucra ipforum 
vorarcntur ab o otiofo. 
Jubent, aut laboret, 

aut we //i?/ ali. ///? 
fupplicaty^mf/ atq; iterum ; 
tamen Manus negant 4H- 
tnenfum ; Ventre exhaujlo 
Inedia, vbi otnnes Artus 
coepere deficere ; turn tandem, 
Manus -voluerunt efle offici- 
j r f f verura id fero ; nam 
Venter 



24 SELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. 



Venter debilis Defuctudine 
renuit Cibum. Ita cunH 
drtus, dura incident Ven- 
tri, per cunt cura pereunte 
Vent re. 

MOR. 

Societas Mcmlrorum 

non differt ab Humana Socie- 
tate. Mtmbrum eget Mcm- 
bro, dmicus Amico ; quare 
utamur tnutuis Officiis, 
mutuls Operibus ; nam ncq; 
Dna6* t ncquc Dignitates 
tucutur Hominem falls. 
Unicum & fummum Pras- 
Cdium eft Amicitia 

Complurium. 



the Belly weak by Difufc 
rrfufed Meat. Thus all 

the Limbs, whilft they envy the Bel- 
ly, perift with the pert/ling 
Belly. 

MOR. 

The Society cf the Members 
does not differ from human Socle- 
ety. A Member -wants a Mem- 
ber, a Friend a Friend ; wherefort 
let us ufe mutual Offices^ 
mutual Works ; /or neither 
Riches t nor Dignities 

defend a Man enough. 
The only and chief Safe, 
guard w the Ftiendfhip 
of Many. 



FABLE XXXII. 

De SIMIA ef VUIPECULA. O/ the APE aW the Fox. 



ejje 



SImia orat Vulpecuhm,- 
ut daret Parlem 
Caudae fibi ad tegendas 
Nates ; nam efTct Om- 
ri Illi, 
Ufui & 
Ilia refpondet, 
itnnis, & 
Humum 
//a Cauda, 
tes &VR/ tegi. 

MOR. 

Snnt, ^ui egetit ; funt, 
quibus fapereft ; tamen 
id eft Moris Nulli Divi- 
tum, \it ^f/ Egenos 
jTuperflud Re. 



foiet 
Illi. 

Nihil 

ir.alle 
verri 
Na- 



THE Ape /rjv the Fox, 
/^a/ /he would give Par/ 
of her Tail to Her to cover 
her Buttocks ; /or that was a Bur- 
den to Her, Which would be 
an Ufe and Honour to Her. 
5/v anfwers, /Aaf /'/ was Nothing 
too much, and thatjhe had rather 
Ma/ /&r Ground fbould be brufhed 
with her Tail, than that th* But- 
tocks of the dfre be covered. 

MOR. 

There are, w^o want ; there are, 
to whom /^r<? is overmuch ; yet 
Ma/ is of a Cujlom to no One of the 
Rich, that <? blefs the Need,y 
<zy;/A bis fitperfiuous Stare. 

FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF^ESOP. 25 



FABLE XXXIII. 

De Vulpecula fc? MuPc'a. 0/the Fox and the Weafcl. 

VUlpecula tennis longa 
Inediu forte repfit 
per angujlam Rimatn in 
Cameram Fntmenti, in qua 
ciimfuit probe pajla t dcinde 
Venter diftentus impedit 
tentantem egrcdi rurfits. 
Mujlela procul contemplata 
ludtantcm, tandem monet, 
Ji ctipiat exire t 

redeat ad Cavum niacra, 
quo intraverat macra. 



MOR. 

Videas complures lastos 
aique alacrcs in Mediocri- 
tate, "jacuot Cyris, expertos 
Molefliis Animl. Sin 

Illi fuerlnt fa&l divites, 
videbis eos incedere mcEftos ; 
nunquam porrigere Fron- 
tem, plenos Curls t obrutos 
Molefiiii Animi. 



THE ToxJIender by long 
Want by chance crept 
through a narrow Chink into 
a Heap of Corn, in which 
when Jhe <was well fed, then 
her Belly being ftretched hindered 
her trying to go out again. 
A Weajel afar off having feen her 
ftriving, at length advifes, 
if flic defires to go out, 
ftie would return to the Hole lean, 
at which /he had entered lean. 

MOR. 

You may fee many merry 
and chearful in Mediocri- 
ty, void of Cares, free 
from Troubles of Mind. But if 
They fhall be made rich, 
you Jhall fee them go fad ; 
never to fmooth their Fore- 
head, full of Cares, overwhelmed 
with Troubles of Mind. 



FABLE XXXIV. 

De EQJJO y CERVO. 0/the HORSE and the STAG. 



ECnius gcrelat Bellilm 
cum Cervo ; tandem 
pulfus e Pa feu is 

imploralat humanam Qpem. 
Rcdit cum Homine, dcfccn- 
dit in Camjunn, videos 
snfea jam fit Viftor ; 
fed 



TH E Horfe rarr</ on War 
w/V^ the Stag ; a/ length 
being driven out of the Paftures 
/fc implored human Help. 
He returns with a Man, /rV <fr 
fcenas into //>f Field, he conquered 
befcr; now becomes Conqueror ; 



26 SELECT FABLES OF JESO$. 

fed tamciT Hojle vifto, but yet the Enemy being conquered s 
&f miffo fub Jugum, ejl and fent under the Yoke, // 
ipfe necefiary. that the Vi&or himfelf 
Fert ferve //^ Man. He bears 
/>- //;<; Horfeman on his Back, /^ ri- 
die in his Mouth. 



necefle, ut Viftor 
ferviat Homini. 
E quit em Darfo, 
num Ore. 

MOR. 

Multi dimicant contva 
Paupertatem ; qua vicld 
per Indu/lriam & Fortunam, 
Libertas Visions faspe 
intent ; quippe Domini & 
ViSores Paupertatis incipi- 
ent fervire Divitiis ; an- 
guntur Flagr'ts Avari- 
tiae, cohibentur 

Fraenis Parcimoni<t ; 

nee tenent Mod urn que- 
rendi, nee audent uti 
Rebus partis, jujlo fup- 
plicio quidem Avaritiae. 



MOR. 

Many fgkt againd 

Poverty ; which being overcome 
by Indujlry and Fortune, 
the Liberty o/~ /A<? ^7ff<?r often 
perifbeth ; for /^ Lords and 
Conquerors of Poverty ta- 
^/n to ferve Riches; they are tor- 
mented W//A M* Whips of Ava- 
rice, /Ai?y are rejlrained 
\vith the Bridles o/" Parjimony ; 
nor </o ftay >&o/^ a Mean of get- 
ting, nor </a /Ary ^izr^ to ufe 
the Things got, a jujl Punifh-^ 
men I indeed of Cqjretoufnefs. 



FABLE XXXV. 



D^Duobus Addefcentilus. 

DU O Adohfcenies 

fimulant, fefe emptu- 
ros Carnem apud Coquum : 
Coquo agents alias Res, 
Alter arripit Carnem e 
Caniftro, dat Socio, 
ut occultet fub 

Vefte. Coquus, ut 

uidit Part em Carnis 
fubrcptam Jlbi t ccepit infi- 
mulare utrumq; Furti. Q^ii 
aljluhrat, pcjerat per 
Jovem, fe liabere Nihil ; 



0/Tvvo ToungMek* 

W O young Men 

pretend, that they would 
buy Flejh at a Cook's : 
The Cook doing other Things, 
One fnaickes Flcfh ca/ of 
aBaflcetj^rzw ;'/ to hisCompanion, 
that -he may hide it under 
his Garment. Tta C"oo^, as foon as 
he faw Part of the Flejk 
ftolen from him, began to ac- 
caft each of Theft. He that 
had taken it away, f wears by 
Jove, that he had Nothing j 
but 



SELECT FABLfiS OF ^ESOP. 



veto is, qui haluit, pejerat 
iJentidetn, fc abjixlif- 
fc Nihil. ^ Ad Q^ios 
Coquui inquit, quidem nunc 
Fur later., fed is, ptr 
quern juraviflis, infpexit, 
is fcit. 

MOR. 

Cum peccavimus, Homines 
non fciunt id Jlatim ; at 
Deus videt omnia, qui y^/ff 
fupcr Calosy & intuttur 
A by fibs. 



but ^f, xvho &z</ it, fwearg 
again and again, that he had taken 
away Nothing. To whom 
the Cock fays, indeed now 
the Thief lies hid, but he, j- 
whom you have f wore, looked on 
he knows. 

MOR. 

When sue have Jinne'd, Men 
do not Inoiv ft prcjently ; but 
Gad fees a// things, who ^//r/c 
upon /ta Heavens, and /co/ff //> 
the Deeps. 



ABLE XXXVI. 



&f LANIO* 



CUM Ca.w abftuliffet 
Carnetn Lanio in 
Macello, continuo conje- 
cit fefs in Ptd:s quantum 
fotuit. Lanias ptrculfus 
Jadluri Rei, primilm 
tacuit, deinde recipient 
Animum, fie acclamavit 
frocttft O fu^acifiime, 
curre tutus, licet tibi 
currert impune : nam nunc 
tutus ob Cclcritatcm, 
autem polthac sbftrva- 
beris cautius. 

MOR, 

Hacc Fabula fignificat, 
fltrofqut Homines turn 
dcmum Jicri cautiorcs, 
cum accepsrint Damnttpt. 



Of the Dccar.Jilic BUTCHER. 

WHen t&eDoghad taken away 
Flc/b from the Butcher in 
the Shambles, immediately he be- 
took himfelf to hit Heels as much as 
if could. The Butcher JlrucJ. 
with the Lofs oftbtThing, atfirft 
^//f/ /' Peace, afterwards taking 
Courage, /Aa* he cried to him 
a/cr cifi O mod thieving Cur> 
run fafe, iV M lawful for thte 
/<? r unpunifticdly ; far noT* 
Moa art fafe ^br thy Svviftnefsj 
but hereafter than Jbalt be objer*- 
ved more cautioufly. 

MOR, 

This Falle fjgnifies, 

that mojl Men then 

at length become more cautious* 

ra they hate received Damage. 

F A B L E, 



28 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



FABLE XXXVII. 



De AGNO cS* LUPO. 

LUpus cccurnt Agno 
comitanti Cap rum, 
rogitat, cur Metre reli&a, 
potlus fequatur olldum 
Hircum, fuadetque, ut rede- 
at ad Ubera Mat r is 
tit/lent a Lae, fperans, 
fore ifa, ut la- 

ii'tet abdutflum ; vero ilic 
i/zya/V, O Ltipe, Mater 
commifit me a/V. 

Kuic fumma Cura fervan- 
di efl </J/<3 y obfcquar Pa- 
rz//' potius ywanz tibi, (7^' 
poftulas feducere me j/?w 
Diftis, tf mox J//?dT- 
/frf fubdudlum. 

MOR. 



Noli />a&rr Fidera 
Omnibus ; nam J^fu///, dum 
videntur velle prodejje 
Aliis, interim confulunt 
Sib't. 



Of the LAMB an^/ the WOLF.. 

TH E Wolf meets the Lamb 
accompanying the Goat, 
be qfes, why ^/j Mother being left, 
&r ra/^r follows a Jllnling 
Goat, and advifes, that he would 
return to the Dugt of his Mother 
Jlretched with Milk, hoping, 
that it would be/?, that A* way 
butcher him drawn away ; but he 
fays, O //^ my Mother 
hath committed me /<? him, 
To him //><r ^/V/" Care of keep- 
ing is given ; I fhall obey a Pa- 
rent rather than thee, iuha 
required to f educe me with thofe 
Sayings, and bjr and by /o tear 
me in pieces drawn away. 

MOR. 

Be unwilling to have Faith 
in all Men ; for Many, whilft 
they feem to be willing to profit 
Others, in the mean time confult 
for Themfelves. 



FABLE XXXVIII. 

De Agricola & Filiis. 0/the Hulbandman and his Sons. 



AGricola kabtbat com- 
plures Fi/ios, lique 
fuJre difcordts infer 

Se, guos Pater 

elabor ans t rah ere ad mu- 
tuura Ar,iorem % Fafciculo 
a/- 



A 



Hufbandman lad ma- 
ny Sons, and they 
awf difagreeing among 

themfflves, whom the Father 
labouring to draw to mu- 
tual Love, a little Faggot 
be- 



SELECT FABLES OF ^SOP. 29 

being fut t commands them Jingle 
to break it bound about 
with a fhort Cord : Their weak 
Touth endeavoureth in vain ; 
The Father loofes it, and gives 
to each a Twig, tuhich 
when with his Strength every one 
eafily broke ; He Ja\th t O 
Children, thus Nobody will be able 
to conquer You agreeing ; buc 
if ye fhall be willing to rags 
with mutual Wounds, and 
/o drive on inteftine War, 
ye Hiall be at length for a Prey 
to your Enemies. 

MOR. 

This Fable teaches, that f mall 
Things increafe by Concord, 
great Things fall away by D if cord. 



tppoftto, jubet 
effringere circumdatum 

brevi FunlcuJo : Imbecilla 
JEtatula conatur frvjlra : 
Pater folvity redditque 

Jingulis Virgiilam, quant 
cum fro fuis Piribus quifque 

facile frangeret ; Inqult, O 
Filioli, fie Nemo poterit 
vine ere Vos Concordes ; fed 

Jl volueritis fevire 

mutuis Vulncribusy atque 
ttg it are inteitinum Bellurr., 
eritis tandem Pisedx 
Hojlibus. 

MOR. 

Hsec Falula docet, parvas 
Res crefcere Concordia, 
wagnas dilabi Difcordid. 



FABLE XXXIX. 



De CARBONARIO s* 
FULLONS. 

CArbonarius invitabat 
Fullonem, ut habita- 
ret fecum in eadem Domo. 
Fullo inquit, mi Homo, 
ijlud noa eft mihi, *el 
Cordiy vel utile ; 

nam vereor magnopere, ne t 
Quae eluam, Tu 

redclas tarn e 
Car bo eft. 



quara 



MOR. 

Monemur 
Apologo atnlulare 



0/"the COLLIER a/it/ 
the FULLER. 

r T" l 'HE ^ Collier invited 
JL. the Fuller, //?>a/ he would 
dwell with him in the fame Houfc. 
The Fuller faith, my Man, 
that is not to me, either 
to nty Hcart t or profitable ; 
for / fear greatly, lejl 
what Things / ivajl clean, Thou 
mayjl make as blacky as 
a Coal is. 



MOR. 

hoc We are admonifhed 
cum Apologue to 



this 
with 



jo SELECT FABLES OF 



inculpatis ; monemur 

devitarc Consortium fcele- 
r at or urn Hqminum, velut 
certam Pejlem j nam iwf- 
que cvadit tails, quales //' 
iunt, quibbfcum verfatur. 



the iintlamed } we arc admonifhcd 
to avoid the Company of wick' 
ed Men, at 

a certain Plague ; for every 
one cometh out fuck, as they 
are, with whom he is conveifant. 



FABLE XL, 



DC AUCUPE 3" 
PAUUMBO. 

AUceps -vldet Palum- 
bum/irof/nidulantem 
in altiffima Arbore ; adpro- 
ptrat ; denique njpjitur 
{njidias ; forte premit 
Anguern Calcibus ; hie 
mordct. Ille exanimatus im- 
provifo Mala, inquit, mife- 
rum Me ! dum infidior 
dhfrit Ipfe di/perto. 

MQR. 

Hxc Fatula fignificat, 
JEot nonnunquam cipcum- 
veniri fuis Artibui t Q^i 
met/it Mlur mala. 



0/"the FOWLER aflT 
the RiNG-Dovt. 

TH E Fowler/^ the Ring- 
Dove afar -off 'making aNeli 
in a very high Tree ; he haftens 
to him ; foal/y he contrives 
Snares ; by Chance he prefles 
a Snake with l/ts Heels ; he 
bites him. He terrified at the fud- 
den vil t fays, wretch- 
ed Me ! ivbllft I lay Snarej 
y^r ayctker, I myfelf pertfh. 



This jy/tf fignifies, /^a| 
^<?y fometimes are circumvent- 
ed with their own Arts^ who 
meditate evil Things. 



FABLE XLT. 



AGRICOLA < 
CAMBUS. 

Gricola, 
hyemaflet 
multcs Dies, 
tandem, laborare 



etspit 



0/"the HUSBANDMAN anct 
the DOGS. 

TH E Hnfbandman, whtn 
he had wintered in 
th Country many Days, 



Penuria at length to labour with the Want 

4 



Rcrum, inter- 
fecit Ovcs, deinde & 
Caff Has, poflremo guoque 



SELECT FABLES OF &SOP. jt 

of necejfary Things, he kill- 
ed hit Sheep, afterwards alfo 
his Goats, la illy alfo 

jnaftat JSovet, ut hahat be flays bis Oxen, that he may have 
quo Jujlentet Corpufculum, wherewith he may fuftain his Bndy, 
fene cxhauftum Inedid. almofl exhaufted with Want. 
Canes >oidentes id conftituunt The Dogs feeing that refolve 
qiixrere Saltern Fiiga ; to feek Safety by Flight ; 
ettnim Sefe non viSuros for that they /hould not live 
diutius, qvando Herus non longer, ivhen their Matter has not 
pefercit Bobus quidem, /pared hi Oxen ind <?./, 
Quorum Opera utebatur in whofe Labour he ufed in 
facienilo ruflico Opere.. doing Aw Country-Work. 



MQR. 



MOR, 



Si vis tfie fahus t If thou art 'willing to be fafe t 

dccede ab eo eito, quem withdraw from him foon, whom 

vit/es redac^um ad eas thou feeji reduced to thofe 

rfngujlias, ut confumat Strait's^ that A^ confumes 

Inllrumenta necejfaria fuis the luftruments necejfary for his 



Operibus, quo fuppleatur 
prsfcnii Inedit. 



*) whereby 
for the prcfent 



befupplied 



FABLE XLII. 



JDe VULPE (5* LEONE. 



VUtpECULA, 
non folcbat videre 
Immanitatem JLeonit, con- 
templata W Animal femtl 
atque iterum trepidabat, 3* 
fugitabat. Cum jam ^r//o 
Leo oltdiftt fefc oiw- 
<Jz, Vulpes non metuit 
Quicquam, fed confidenter 
4^', & faltital ilium. 



O^the Fox and the LIOK. 

TH E Fox, w^s 

wai not wont to fee 
the Fiercenefs of the Lion t having 
viewed that Beaft once 
and fl^a/rt trembled, <7</ 
fled. When now a f/W Time 
the Lion A<aaf offered himfclf in hit 
Way, the Fox feared not 
any Thing, but confidently 
him. 



MOR. 



SELECT FABLES OFJESOP. 

MOR. MOR. 



Confuetudo facit Nos .Cuftora males Ut 

ntnes audaciores, vel all bolder, even 

apud Eos, Q^os vix antea among Thofe, Whom fcarce before 

eti/i fuimus afpicere. ""* l*/mf-A*+*J *r l/\^L- ,,r>/%,. 



<we have dared to look upon, 



FABLE XLIII. 



ZfcVulpe fcf Aqulla 

PROLES 
excurrcbat foras ; 

coraprehernfa a Aquila /V.i- 
plorat Fidctn Mains. Ilia 
Mccurrit t rogat j4quilam, ut 
ftimittai Captivam 

Prolem. Aqiiila Kc5a 
frxdzm fulvolat ad Pullos. 
V'llpes, /"a cor- 

rcpta, q ua j* eff^t 

fbfumf>tura Munitionem 

fntenth, Cum jam 

afcendiffet sfrkorem, 

inqiiit, nune lucre 1'e t 
tuofque, Ji potes. Aqui- 
la trepidans, dum mctuit 
Jncendlum t inqnit,/>ar Mihi, 
rcddara quicyuld habeo 
luum. 

MOR. 

Intellige per Aquilam 
fotentes, atq; audaccs j per 
Pulpcm pauperculos, Quos 
Divites ftipenumero opprt- 



Of the Fox and the Eagle. 

THE Young of the Fox 
ran abroad ; 

caught by the Eagle foe im- 
plores the Help of her Dam. She 
raw i//, aiks the Eagle, that 
yj* would difmifs her Captive 
Toiing. The Eagle having got 
her Prey^/Vj aiy<3y to /& Toung. 
The Fox, a Firebrand being 
fnatched up, #/ / fhe was 
about to J<j!rey her Fortrefs 
with Fire, When now 
fhc hr.d gotten upon the Tree, 
fays, now defend 
and thine, j/"Thou canft. 
gle trembling, whilfl fhe fears 



Inter dum probe uklfcuntur 
Injuriam accrptam. 



I will 



Fire t fays, fpare Me, 
ill reftore ivhatfoeicr I have 



MOR. 

Underfland iy the Eagle 
the potent, and bold ; by 
/itf /ox the Poor, Whom 
the Rich oftentimes op- 
prefs 3y Force. But the Hurt 
fometimes foundly revenge 

the Injury received. 

FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 33 
FABLE XLIV. 



De Agricola & 
Ciconia. 

GRuibus Anftnlufque 
depafcentibus Sala, 
Rullicus prtetcndit 

Laqueum. GVz/Capiurit(ir, 
jlnferes capiuntur, tf 
Ciconia capitur. Ilia fup- 
plicat, clamitans, Sefe inno- 
centem, & efle nee Gruem, 
nee Anfcrem, fed optimam 
omnium Avium, qu'ippe QUOE 
femper confueverit infervire 
Parent! fedulo, & a/ere 
Etim coTifeSum Senio. 
Slgricola inquit, probe 
fcio omnla hac ; verum 
poltquam cepimus Te cum 
nocentibus, morieris quoqus 
cum Eis. 

MOR. 

Qui committit Crimen, 
f Is, $>ui adjungit Se 
Socium Sceleratis, 

pledluntur fan 

I'ocna. 



Oflhc. Hu&andman and 
the Stork. 

THE Cranes and the Gecfe 
feeding on the Corn, 
the Countryman fed 

a Gin. The Cranes are taken, 
the Geefe are taken, and 
the Stork is talen. She en- 
treats, crying, that She was inno- 
cent, and was neither a Crane, 
nor a Goofe, but the beft 
of all Birds, as Who 
always ufed /o yJri> her 
Father diligently, and /o nourijh 
Him WH ea/ with old Age. 
The Hujlandman fays, ivell 
know I a// thefe Things ; but 
fince Wtf have taken Thee p// 
/* offending, thou fhalt die o^i 
with Them. 

MOR. 

He that committeth a Crime, 
*W He, Who joins Himftjf 
a Companion /o /A* Wtcled t 
are puniflied itv'/A 
Paniihment. 



FABLE XLV. 



De OPILIONE 
AGRICOLJS. 



PUER pafcebat Oves 
editiore Pratulo, o/y; 
clamitans terqut, quaterqtie 
per 



Of the SHEPHERD and 
the COUNTRYMEN. 

A Boy fed his Sheep 
f/c a higher Ground, anJ 
crying 1 Inth thrice,, and four tiroes 



34 SELECT FABLES OF 



fer Jocum, Lupum adeffe, 
txcitbat Agricolas undi- 
gue : I Hi illuji 

frepitis, a'um non fubvtniunt 
imploranti jftixitium, Ovcs 

Jiunt Praeda Lupo. 

Mo*. 

Si Quifpiam confuevefft 
mentiri t Fides ftoh kabebitur 
facile Ei, cum occeft* 
rit narrarc verum. 



in Jcft, that the Wolf was there* 
hs raifeft the Countrymen 
on all Sides : They being deluded 
too often, >wbiljl they do not come 
to him imploring Help, the Sheep 
become a Prey /<? the Wolf. 

MOR. 

If oy One ha been ufcd 
#o He, Faith will not be had 
eafily in Him, when hsfoall hav: 
begun to tell the Truth. 



FABLE XLVI. 



jbe Aqoila s" Corvo. 

AQJJ I L A Avolat 
cditiflima Rvpe, 
in Ttrgum Agni. Corvuj 
videos /</gcftit, veluti Simia, 
imitari Aquilam, dimittit 
Se in Veil us Arietis ; 
climifTus impeditur ; impe- 
ditus comprthenditur ; 

coroprehenfus projicitur 

Putiis. 



0/the Eagle <m</the Crow. 



THE EAGLE fie 
from a very high Rock t 
on the Bad of a Lamb. The Crow 
feeing that rcjoiceth, as an Ape, 
to imitate the Eagle, He drops 
Himfelf upon the Fleece of a Ram ; 
dropt down He is entangled ; en- 
tangled he is taien ; 
taken he ii throw A 
to the Boys* 

MoR. 

Qmfque eftimet Se Let every One efleem Himfelf 

fud, non Virtutc ly his own, rot by the Virtue 

Aliorum. Tentet Id, Quod of Others. Attempt That, Which 

poffiiiyiK?/?. thou mayft be able to do. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF ^SOP, 35 
FABLE XLVIL 



De invido GANE & 
BOVE. 

CANIS decunlelat 
Praefepi plena Foeni ; 
Bos venit, at comedat ; 
Ille furrigens Sefe prohibet : 
os inquit, Dit perdanc 
Te cum \fthac tua Jnvidid t 
QJJI yefceris Fano, 
tiecjinis Me iw/. 

MOR. 

Plcrique funt eb Ingenlo, 
tit invideant Ea 

y//V, Qua; y/ ft till i i7/a; 
Sibi. 



0/"the envious Doo and 
the Ox. 

THE DOG lay down 
in a Rack full of Hay ; 
The Ox cometh, that He may eat ; 
He raifing Himfelf hinders Hitri 
72* Ox fays, AToy /^ Go^/ deftroy 
72 with /Arf/ thy Envy) 
Who neither art fed wVA ^ys 
nor fufferejl Me /o ^e/^^. 

MOR. 

Marty ar* of that Temper, 
that /^ envy thofe Things 
*o Others, Which are of no #/* 
to Themfelves. 



flrepltai 
Ovicul'ae : 



FABLE XLVIIL 

De Cornicula 5" Ove. Of the Jackdaw and the Sheep* 

TH E Jackdaw makes a No'ife 
on the Back of the Sheep i 
The Sheep fays,//"thou made a Noife 
thus to a Dog, thou ivotilc/eji beaf 
the Damage. But the Jackdaw 
faith, I know Whom I may infult, 
treullefome to the mild, friendly 
to the cruel. 

MOR. 



COrnicula 
in Dorfo 

Ovis inquit, Si obftrcpercs 
Jtc Cani, ferret 

Infortunium. At Cornicula 
tnquit, fcio Quibus infulttm, 
molejta placidis, arnica 
faevis. 

MOR. 



Mali tnfvltant innocent! Evil Men infuh the innocent 
Cff miti ; fed Nemo irritat and mild ; but no One irritates 
feroce* & malignos. the fierce and mifchievous. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



FABLE XLIX. 



De Pavone f? 
Lufcinia. 

PA V O queritur a pud 
Junonem, Conjtigem & 
Sororem Jovis, Lufcini- 
am cantillare fuaviter, Se 
irrideri ab Omnibus ob 
raucam Ravim. Cui 

Juno inquit, Lufcinia longe 
fuperat in Cantu, Tu Plu- 
mis ; Quifque habet Suam 
Dotem ' a Diis. Decet 
Unumquemq; effe contcn-' 
iumjua Sorte. 

MOR. 

Sumamus Ea t Quae 
Deus largitur, grata Animo, 
usque quctramus majora. 



Of the Peacock and 
the Nightingale. 

THE Peacock complains to 
Juno, the Wife and 
Sifter of Jupiter, that the Nightin- 
gale fung fweetly, that He 
was laughed at by All for 
his hoarfe Squalling. To whom 
Juno fays, The Nightingale by far 
excels in Singing, Thou in Fea- 
thers ; Every One ha 8 bis 
Gift /row the Gods. It becometh 
Every One to be content 
with his own Lot. 

MOR. 

Let us take thoft Things, Which 
God bcftows, with a grateful Mind, 
nor let us feek greater Things, 



FABLE L. 



De fenicula Mu STELA & 

MURIBUS. 

MUsTELA careas 

Viribus prt Senio 
non valebat infequi Mures 
jam ita t ut folebat ; coepit 
meditari Dolum ; abfcondit 
Se in Colliculp Farine t 
fie fperans fore, 

ut venetur citra Laborem. 
Mures accurrunt, 3* dum 
fupiunt en" tare Farinam, 
O nines devorantur ad Unum 
k 



0/"the old WE A .TEL and 
the MICE. 

THE WEASEL wanting 
Strength thro' old Age, 
was not alle to purfue the Mice 
now fo, us He was wont; He began 
to meditate a Trick ; He hides 
Himfelf in a Heap of Meal, 
thus hoping that it would be, 
that he may hunt without Labour. 
The Mice run to it, and whild 
they deftre to eat the Meal, 
They all are devoured to One 
by the Wcafel. 

MOR. 



SELECT FABLES OF &SOP. 37 

MOR. MOR. 



Ubi Qulfquam fuerit de- 
Jlttutus Viribus, eft Opus 
Ingenio. Lyfander Laceda- 
monius folcbat dieere fub- 
inde, quo leonina P tills 
non perveniret, Viilpinam 
ejje affumendamf 



When any One fliall be de- 
Jlitute of Strength, there is Need 
of Wit. JLyfander the Lacede- 
monian ufed to fay oft- 
en, where the Lion's Skin 



would not reach, 
was to be taken. 



that the Fox' 



FABLE LI. 



De LEONE & RAHA. 

LE O, cum audiret 
Ranam loquacem 

magni, putans effe 

aliquod magnum Animal, 
vertit Se retro, et Jlans 
parum, videt Ranam 
exeuntem e Stagno ; Q^am 
flatlm indignabundus con~ 
culcavfc Pedibus, inquiens, 
non movebis amplius 
ullum Animal clamorc, ut 
perfpictat Te. 

MOR. 

Fabula fign\ficat t qxiod 
epud verbofos Nihil 

Linguam. 



0/the LION and the FROG. 

TH E Lion, <whtn he heard 
the Frog talking 
at a great Rate, thinking it to be 
fome great Beaft, 

turned Himfclf baclt t and /landing 
a little, He fees the Frog 
going out of the Pool ; which, 
prefenlly enraged He trod un- 
der with his Feet, faying, 
Thou Thalt not move any more 
any jfnimal with thy Noife, that 
He may look at Thee. 

MOR. 

The Fable fignifies, that 
among noify Men Nothing 
is found except a Tongue. 



FABLE LII. 

De FORMICA fc? COLUMBA. 0/the PISMIRE and the DOTE, 



FOrmica Jitiens venit 
ad Fonteno, ut 
bibcret ; forte incidit 



E Pifmire thirjling came 
JL to a Fountain, that 
{he might drink ; by chance fhc fell 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



in Puteum. Columba 

fuperfidens Arlorem im- 
xninentcm Fonti, cum 
confpiceret Formicam obrui 
Aquis, frangit 

Ramulum ex Arbore, 
Quern dejicit Jine Mora 
in Fontem. Formica 
confcendens Hunc fervatur. 
duceps venit, / capiat 
Columbam ; Formica per- 
cipiens Id, mordet unutn 
fx Pedibus 
Columba avolat. 



*/ a Well. r^f 
fitting upon a Tree hanging 
over tke fountain, when 
foe faw the Pifmire overwhelmed 
in the Waters, r<ra&r 
a little Branch /row the Tree, 
Which (he throws without Delay 
into the Fountain. 7/fe Pifmire 
getting upon This is faved. 
The Fowler comes,Ma/he maytake 
fta Z)0w ; the Ant perceiv- 
ing That, tow one 
of the Feet q/ fta Fowler j 
the Dovejlies away. 



MOR. , MOR. 

Fabula J*gnificat, cum The Fable Jtgnif.es, whet* 

Brula funt grata in Bcneft- Brutes are grateful to Benefac- 

cos, eo magis li /Crj, by fo much the more They 

efle, $>ui funt Par- ought to be> /f#0 are Parfa- 

Rationis. kers of Reafon. 



F A 

Z><? Pavone & Pici 



Se 



Qui 

^/ 



GENS Avium cum 
vagaretur libere, o/>/a- 
itz/ Regem dari Sibi. 
Pa-yo putabat 

imprimis dignum, 
eligeretur, cjuia 
formofiffimus. ^foc accep- 
fo m Regtm, jP/Va inquif, 
O Rex, fi, TV imperante, 
jlquila cceperit infequi 
Nos perftrenue, Ut /o/fJ?, 
quo Modo abi- 

ges ///aw / .quo 
fervabis Nos ? 



L E LIII. 

Of the Peacock and the Magpie. 

TH E Nation of Birds, when 
M<?j wandered freely, wl/bed 
for a King to be given to Them. 
The Peacock thought Himfelf 
chiefly worthy, Who 

Jhould be chofen, becaufe He was 
the mod beautiful. He being re- 
ceived for King, the Magpie fays, 
King, if, Tou governing, 
the Eagle fhoulvl begin to purfue 
Us Jlrenuoufly, as Jbe is wont t 
by what Method will you drive a- 
way Her ? by what Means 
will you prefervc Us ? 

MOK. 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 39 

MOR. MOR. 

In Principe Forma non eft In a Prince Beauty Is not 

tarn fpehanda, quam fo much to be regarded^ as 

Fortitudo Corporis fc? Pru- Strength of Body and Pru- 

dentia. dence. 



F A 3 L E LIV. 



De 



MEDICO. 



M 



grotum ; tandem Ille 
moritur ; turn Medicus inqui t 
ad Cognates, Hie peribat 
fntemperantid. 

MOR. 



Of Ac SICK MAN and 
the PHYSICIAN. 

Phyfician hadin cure a Sick 
Man ; at length He 
died ; then the Phyjician faid 
to the Kinfmen, This Man perifhed 
by Intemperance* 

MOR. 



A 



Nifi $>nis reliquerit Unlefs Any One fhall have left 

Eibacitatem & Libidinem Drunkenncfs and Luji 

mature, aut nunquatn timely, either He never 

perveniet ad Seae3ateat t aut tuill -arrive to old Age t or 

eft habiturus perbrevem is to have a very Jbort 

Seneclutem. old Age. 



FABLE LV. 



De LEONE 3* aliie. 

LE O, dfinusy & 
Vulpes eunt venatum ; 
ampla Venatio capitur ; 
capta eft ju/fo partiri : 
Jlfino ponente Singulis fin- 
gulas Paries, Leo irrugi- 
ebat t rapit Afmum, ac lani- 
at. Poftea </a/ id 
Negotii Vulpeculse, / >ue 
aflutior, 



Of the LION and other Beads. 

THE LION, the 4fs, and 
the Fox ge /0 hunt ; 
an ample Py is taken ; 
taken is commanded to be parted : 
The Afs putting to each their fin- 
gle Partt, the Lion roar- 
ed, he fcized'*i Afs t and butchert 
him. Afterwards he gives that 
Bufmefs to the Fox, /F/Jo 
more cunning, 



40 SELECT FABLES OF MSOP. 



aftutior, cam longc 

9ptima Parte propofita, rcfer- 
vaviflet i>ix minimam, 
Leo rogat, a Quo fie 
doda ? Cui Ilia inquit, 
Calamitas Afini docuit 
Me. 

MOR. 

Ille eft Felix, Qitm aliena 
Pericula faciunt cautum. 



more cunning, 'when by far 
the beji Part being propofc d, fhe had 
referred fcarcc a very fmall one, 
the Lion afks, by Whom fa 
taught ? To Whom She fays, 
the Calamity of the Afs has taught 
Me. 

MOR. 

He is Happy, Whom othcrt 
Dangers make cautious. 



FABLE LVI. 

De H^EDO fe 1 LUPO. Of the KID and the WOLF. 



HjEdns profpecians e 
Feneflrd autkbat 



A KID looking out of 
<r Window dared 



lacejjere Lupu-m pratereun- to frovokt a Wolf p a Jfi n S 

tern Convitiis ; Cui by with Revilings ; to Whom 

Lupus ait, Scelefte, 7 the Wolf fays, Wretch, Thou 

non couvitiaris Mibi t fed doft not revile Me r but 



always 



MOR. MOR. 

Tempus 5* Locus femptr Time and Place 
addunt dudaciam Homini. add Boldnefs to a Man. 



FABLE LVII. 

De Leone Es 5 Capra., [ 0/the Lion an/the Goat. 



LE O forte confpica- 
tU3 Capram ambulan- 
tera tditd Rupe vionet, 
Ut dtfcendat ia viricle 
Pratum : Capra inquit, For- 
taje facerem, Ji Tu abcf- 
fes ) Qu'i non fuades 
Mihi 



THE LION by chants having 
feen a Goat walk- 
ing on a high Rock advifes, 
tfaljke would defcend into the green 
Pafture : The Goat fays, Per- 
haps I fhould do it if You was 
away; Wfo do not perfuade 
Me 



SELECT FABLES OF &SOP. 



Mihi iftud, tit Ego capiam Me to that, that I may take 

uliara Voluptatem inde ; fed any Pleafure thtnce ; but 

ut 7 habeas, Qnod that T^oa mayft have, #7>af 

famelicus vor. being hungry Thou mayjl devour. 

MOR. MOR.' 

Ne habeas/Yc&CT omnibus} Do not have Faith in all 5 

am Quidam non confulunt for Some do not confute 

Tibi,y*r/ Sibi. for You, but for themfclves. 



FABLE LVIII. 



De VULTURE aliifque 
AVIBUS. 

VUltur adfimulat, Se 
celeb rare annuum 
Natalem ; invitat Av't- 
culas ad Ccenam ; fere 
omnes veniunt ; accipit 
venientes magno Plaufu 
Favoribufque : Vultur 

lanlat acceptas. 

MOR. 

Omnes non font Araici, 
Qui dicunt blande, ant 
fimulant t Se facers benig- 
ne. 



0/"the VULTURE and other 
BIRDS. 

THE Vulture feigns, that He 
would celebrate his annual 
Birth-Day ; He invites the little 
Birds to Supper ; almoft 
all come ; He receives 
them coming with great Applaufc 
and Favours : The Vulture 
butchers them received. 

MOR.' 

Al! are not Friends* 
Who fpcak foirly, or 

pretend, that They will do kind- 



FABLE LIX. 



De ANSEJUBUS 
GRUIEUS. 



ANfertrs 
fim ill 
odei 



pajcelanfur 

Gruibus 

Gruca 

confpicat* 



Of the GEES B an*/ 
the CRANES. 

THE Geefe w^r* fed 
at the fame time fiV>6theCrancs 



in the fame Field. 



The Cranet 
having fee* 



42 SELECT FABLES OF 



confpicate Rufticos, 

leves avolant ; sfnferes 
capiuntur, <$>ui impediti 
Oner'e Corporis, non pott- 
rant fubvolare. 

MOR. 

Urbc expugnata ab Ho- 
Jlibus t . In ops facile fubd li- 
cit Se ; at Dives captus 
fervit. In Bella Divitis: funt 
mag is Oner i quam Ufui. 



having feen the Countrymen, 
being light fly away ; The Geefe 
arc taken, Who hindered 
with Burden of Body, luefe 
not able to fly away. 

MOR. 

A City being befieged by Ene- 
mies, the poor Man eafily with- 
draws Himfelf ; but the Rich taken 
ferves. In War Riches are 
more for a Burden than an Ufe. 



FABLE LX. 

De Anu ff Ancillis. Of the old Woman c.Whcr Maids, 



Q Used am Anus habebat 
Domi complures 
j/1nci/las, quas quotidie 
excitabat ad Opus ad Can- 
turn Galli, Quern habebat 
Domi, antequam lucefce- 
ret. Ancills tandem 

commotf Tasdio 

quatidiani Ncgotii obtrun- 
cant Gallum, fperantes jam, 
Ilk necato, Sefe dormitu- 
ras vfque ad Meridiem ; fed 
base Sfcs decepit Eas ; nam 
ffera, ut refcivit t 

Gallum interemptum, dein- 
ceps jubet Eas furgtrc 
intempelta Node. 

MOR. 

Non Pauci, dum Jludent 
cvitare Malum t incidunt in 
gravius. 



A Certain old Woman had 
at Home many 

Maids, whom daily 

(he rouzed to Work at the Crow- 
ing of a Coct, which Jht had 
at Home, before that it was 
light. The Maids at length 
moved with the Wearifomnefs 
of their daily BuOnefs be- 
head the Cock, hoping now, 
He being killed, that They fliould 
fleep even to Mid-day ; but 
this Hope deceived Them ; for 
the Mijlrefs, as foon as jhs knetu t 
that the Cock was killed, thence- 
forwards commands Them to rift 
at Mid -night. 

Mo*. 

Not a few, whilft they Jludy 
to avoid an Evil, fall into 
a heavier. 

FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF MSOP. 
FABLE LXI. 



43 



Dt ASINO S3 EQUO. Of the Ass and the HORSE. 



A Sinus pvtabat Equutn 
beaturh, quod effet 
pinguis, 5* degeret in Otio ; 
verb dicebat Se infelicem, 
quod effet maclkntus, & 
Jlrigofus, & quotidie exer- 
cerctur #3 immiti /fe'o in 
ferendis Oneribus. Hand 
raulto pofl conelamant ad 
Arma ; turn Equus non re- 
pulit Fraenum Ore, 

Equitetn Dorfo, nee 
Telum Corpore. AJinus, 
Hoc iii/a, agebat magnas 
Gratias Diis, quod non fe- 
c'lffent Se Equum, fed 
^IJlnum- 

MOR. 

Sunt Miferi, Qiios 
Vulgus judicat bcatos ; & 
non Pauci funt ^fa/;', Q^ii 
putant Se miferrimos. 
Sutor crepidarius dictt 
Regem felicem, non con- 
Jiderans in quanta* Res 2? 
Solicitudines dijlrahiiur t 
dum interim Ipfc cantillat 
cum o/// Paupcrtatc. 



THE Afs thought the Horfe 
happy, becaufe he ivas 
fat and lived in Idlenefs ; 
but he called Himfslf uahappy, 
becaufe He Was lean, and 
raw-boned, afld daily was exer- 
cifed by an unmerciful Majler in 
bearing Burdens. j?VW 

much 0/ter they cry to 
Arms ; then the Horfe //row wai 
bach the Bridle y"ro/n />/j Mouth, 
the Horfeman j/rom Back, nor 
the Dart from his Body. 
This f ^^71, gave 
Thanks to the Gods, that they had 
not made him a Horfe t but 

MOR. 

They are miferable, Whom 
the Vulgar judges happy ; and 
not a feiv are happy, Who 
think Themfelves mojt miferable. 
The Cobler calls 

the King happy, not conjider- 
ing into ^o-zy ^raz/ Affairs arf 
Troubles /'e is Jra<zvn t 
whilfl in the mean time He Jtngs 
with bit left Poverty. 



FABLE 



44 SELECT FABLES OF 



FABLE LXII. 

De LKONB y TAURO. Ofihc LION and the BULL. 



TAurus fugiens Leo- 
nem incldit in Hlrcum ; 
Is mln'itabatur Cornu & 
caperata Fronte : Ad Quern 
Taurus plenut Ira inquit, 
Tua Front con trad a in 
Rugas r.on tsrntat Me ; 
fed metuo immanem 

Leonem, Qui nifi hareret 
roe Tergo jam /> 
efle o ita parvam Rem 
pugnare cum Tauro. 

MOR. 

Calamitas ncn ^f? addenda 
calamitous. Eft JI///}r 

fat, J^; e& feme! mifer. 



THE Bull /J//TJ the Li- 
on fell upon toe Goal ; 
He threatened with his Horn 0</ 
wrinkled Brow : To /Wow; 
the Bull full of Anger /m/, 
Thy Brow c/oiitradltd into 
Wrinkles does not affright Me ; 
but 1 fear a vajl 

Lion, Who unlefs /&* /f^ 
to my Back, now youjkould know 
that it is nof fo #//& a Thing 
to f. git with a Bull. 

MOR. 

Calamity w not to be added 
/o the calamitous. He is miferable 
enough, Who is c miferable. 



FABLE LXIII. 



De TESTITUDINE 3* 
AQUILA. 

a repiandt 

occupaverat Teflitud'uiem ; 
fi Quis tolleret Earn in 
Calum, pollicetur Baccas 
rubri Marls. Aquila 

fujlulit Earn ; pofcit Ptae- 
mium ; y foditam non ha- 
bentem Unguibus. Ita, 

Telludo, )u<t concupivit 
ifidfre-A.fi.ra, reliquit Vitam 
in Aftris. 



Of the TORTOISE and 
the EAGLE. 

WEarinefs of creeping 
had feized the Tortoife ; 
{(any One would lift up Her into 
Heaven, She promifes the Pearls 
of the red Sea. The Eagle 
took vp Her ; demands the Re- 
ward ; and pierces Her not hav- 
ing it with her Talons. Thus, 
the Tortoife, Which defired 
to fee the Stars, left her Life 
in the Stars. " 



MOR. 



SELECT FABLES OF jESOP. 4 



MOR. 

- Sis contentus tua Sorte. 
Fuere NonnuUi, Qni, 
Jl manfiflent hurniTes, 
fuifient tuti ; fafti fublimes, 
inciderunt in Pericula. 



MOR. 

Be conttnted with thy Lot. 
There have been Some, Who, 
if they had remained low, 
would have bcenfafe; becomtkigh, 
have fallen into Dangers. 



FAB 


L E LXIV. 


De CANCRO Cs* ejas 
MATRE. 


Of the CRAB and his 
MOTHER. 


MAter menet Cancrum 
retrogradum, nt 
eat antrorfum. Filius 
refpondet, Mater, I pr<e, 
fequar. 


THE Mother advtfes the Crab 
going backwards, that 
He would go forwards. The Son 
anfwers, Mother, go vou before, 
I will follow. 


MOR. 
Reprehenderis Nullum 
Vitii, cujus Ipfe 
queas reprehendi. 


MOR. 
You fliould reprehend no One 
of a Vice, of which You Yourfelf 
may lit reprehended. 



FABLE LXV. 



De SOLE f? AQUI- 

LONE. 

SOL G? Aquilo 
certant, Uter fit 
fortior. Eft conventtim 
ab Illis experiri Fires in 
Fiat or em ; ut ferat 

Palmam, <>>ul excuflcrit 
Manticam. Boreas aggre- 
ditur Viatorem horrifono 
Nimbo ; at I Lie non dejiftit 
duplicare AmiEium gradi- 
endo. 



Of the SUN and the NORTH - 
WIND. 

THE Sun fcf the North- Wind 
Jlrive, Whether it 
the ftronger. // is agreed 
by Them to try tktir Strength upon 
a Traveller ; that He bear 
the Palm, Who (hall havefhaken off 
his Cloak. Boreas fets up* 
on the Traveller with a rattling 
Cloud ; but He does not dejijl 
to double his Cloak in going 
on. 



4 6 SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 



rndo. Sol experitur fuas 
Fires, Nimboque paulatim 
cvj&o, emit tit 

Radios. Viator incipit 
aftuare, fudare, anhelare : 
Tandem nequient progredi 
rejidet fub frondofo Nemore. 
Ita Vidoria contigit Soli. 

MOR. 

Id f<epe obtinctur Man- 
fuetudine, Quod non poteft 
extorqueri Vi. 



on. The Sun tries his 

Strength, and the Storm little by little 
being overcome, fends forth 
his .beams. The Traveller begins 
to grow hot, to fweat, to pant : 
At length not being able to go on 
He fits do'wn under afhady Grove. 
Thus the Vidory/*// to tht Sun. 

MOR. 

That often is obtained by Gen- 
tlenefs, which it not able 
to~be extorted by Force. 



FABLE 

De ASINO. 



A Sinus venit in Sylvan, 
offend it Exuvias Le- 
oni, Quibtis indutus 

venit in Pafcua t terri- 
lat C5* fugat Greges 
& Armenia. Venit, Qui 
perdiderat, qua: r it at funm 
jijinum. Afinus, Hero vifo, 
occur r it) imo incur' 

rtt fuo Rugitu. At 
Herat Auricuiis prehenfis, 
Qua extabant, inquit, 
Mi Afelle, poju falle- 
re ^//oj, Ego probe novi 7"f. 

Moa. 

J&efimiiks Te ^, Q^od 
non et ; non dofium, cum 
^/w indodus ; non jades 
Te divltem & nobilem, cum 
jfa pauper Ss 5 ignobilis ; 
etenlm, vero camperto, 
rideber-'s. 



LXVI. 

O/" the Ass. 



THE Afs ro7i into the Wood, 
finds //><? i'/'/'n of a Li- 
on, wi//6 Which bting clad 
He comes into the Pajlures, af- 
frights flnJputs to Flight theFlocks 
and Herds. He comes, WAo 
had loft him, /<?^j his 



runs to him, nay runj upon 
Him with his Braying. But 
//.xr Majler his Ears ' ^f/r/, 
Which ^/?oo^/ oz</, fays, 
Afj Afs, /^OM wflj'y^ be able to de- 
ceive Others, I full ive/l kaovfTbte, 

MOR. 

. Do notffign Thyfelf to be, What 
thou art not ; not learned, when 
/iott a/-/ unlearned ; do not boaji 
Thyftlf rick and noble, whvn 
T^oa ar/ poor aJ ignoble ; 
fsr, the Truth ^'j found, 
thou wilt be laughed at. 

FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF MSOP. 47 
FABLE LXVII. 



De raordaci CANE. 



DOmJ 
Can't fubinde mordentt 
Homines, at Quifq; ^caveret 
Sibi. Canis, rat us 

Id Decus trlbutum fuss 
Vlrtuti, defpicit fuos Popu- 
lares. Aliqius jam grav'ir 
JEtate fcr'Auctoritate accedit 
ad hunc Canem, monens 
Earn, ne crret ; nam 
inquit, Ida Nola eft data 
Tibi in Dedecus, non in 
Decus. 

MOR. 

Glorlofus inter dtim 

ducit Id Laudi &'/', 
Quod ejl Vituperio Ipft. 



Of the biting DOG. 

THE Matter tied a little Bell 
to the Dog often biting 
Men,/tffevery onejhou/d take heed 
to Himfelf. The Dog, thinking 
That an Ornament given to his 
Virtue, defpifcs his Neigh- 
bours. One now grave 
with Age and Authority comes 
to this Dog, adv'ifing 
Him, that he err not ; for 
fays he, That little Bell is given 
to Thee for a Dtfgrace, not for 
a Grace. 

MOR. 

The Vain -glorious J 'onetimes 
takes That for aPraife /o Himfelf ^ 
Which it for a Difgrace to Him. 



FABLE LXVIII. 



De CAMELO. 

C Am till 8 defpicuns Se 
gwrf&atur, -Tauros ire 
infignes geminis Cornibus ; 
Se inermem ejfe objeftnra 
c/fteris Animalibus ; oral 
Jovem dinars Cornua Sibi .' 
Jupiter ridet Stultitiam 
Cam el't , nee mo do ncgat 
Votum Cameli, verum & 
decurtat Auriculas Bejlix. 



Of the CAMEL. 

THE Camel defpiftng Hirafelf 
comflaineJ,t\\nt theBulls went 
remarkable ivitk two Horns ; 
that Pie without Arms w^jexpofed 
to the other Animals ; He prays 
Jupiter to give Horns to Him : 
Jupiter laughs at the Folly 
of the Came/, nor only denies 
the Wi/b of the Camel, but alfo 
crops the Ears of the Beaji. 



MOR, 



48 SELECT FABLES OF 



MOR. MOR. 

Quifque fit ccnfenlut Let every One be contented 

fua Fortuna : Etenina with his own Fortune : For 

Mult't fecuti meliorem, Many having followed a better, 

incurre're pejorem. have run into a <worfe. 



FABLE LXIX. 



De duobus AMICIS fcf 
UREO. 

DUO Amici faciunt 
Iter ; Urfus occur- 
rit in hlner: ; U nus fcanJenr 
Arborern evitat Periculum ; 
filter, cum non rjet 
Spes Fug<e, procidens 
/imulat Se morluum, Urfus 
accedlt t & olfacit An res Cif 
Os- Homine continente 
Spirit um & Mot urn, Urfus, 
)ui parcit Mortals t credens 
Eum efle morluum, abibat. 
Poftea Socio percontante 
quidnam BeJIla di'xiffet Illi 
accumbenti in Aurem, ait, 
MonnifTe Hoc, ne un- 
quam facerem Iter 

cum Amicis i/lius Modi. 

MOR. 

Adrerfa: Res & Pertcula 
defignant verum Amicum. 



Of the two FRIENDS and 
the BEAR. 

TWO Friends make 

a Journey ; a Bear meets 
them in the Road ; One climbing up 
a Tree Jbuns the Danger ; 
The other, when there 'was not 
Hope of Flight, falling down 
feigns Himfelf Dead. The Bear 
cemes, and fmells to his Ears and 
Mouth. The Man holding in 
Breath and Motion, The Bear, 
Which fpares the Dead, believing 
that He was dead, went away. 
4ft er wards the Companion ajking 
what the Bcajl had fa id to Him 
lying down in his Ear, He fays, 
that He had advifed This, that 
I fliould not ever make a Journey 
with Friends of this Kind. 

MOR. 

Adverfe Things and Dangers 
(How the true Friend. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. 49 
FABLE LXX. 

Tie Ruftico ff Fortuna. Of the Countryman and Fortune. 

THE Countryman, when 
He ploughed, found 
Treafure in the Furrows. For- 
tune feeing, that Nothing ofHonodr 
was bad to Her, thus fpake 
with H erf elf : Treafure being found, 
the Fool is not grateful ; but 
tbzl felf-famc Treafure being lojl, 
He will folicit Me firft 
of all with Vowa and 
Clamours. 

MOR. 

A B e n e fi t being received, \ e t u s be 
grateful to Him deferving well of 
Us ; For Ingratitude 

is 'worthy to be deprived even 
of the Benefit, Which lately 
it may have received. 



RU s T i c u s , c urn 

araret, offendebat 

Thefaurum in Sulcis. For- 
tuna videns, Nihil Honoris 
kaberi Sibi, it a locuta eft 
Secum : Thefauro reperto, 
Stolidus non ejl gratus ; at 
co ipfo Thefauro amiffb, 
follicitabit Me primam 
omnium Votis if 

Clamoribus. 

MOR. 

Beneficio accepto, fimus 
grati Merenti bene de 
Nobis ; Etenim Ingratitudo 
eft digna privari etlam 
Beneficio, >uod modo 
acceperit. 



FABLE LXXI. 

3" GROE. Of the Peacock and the Crane. 



PAVO fcf Grus 
ctenant una : Pavo 
ja&at Se, oftentat Caudam : 
Grus fatetnr Pavonem 
ejje formofiflimis Pennii ; 
tamcn Se penetrare Nubet 
animofo Volatu t dum Pa- 
vo vix fupervolat Tcfta. 



THE Peacock and the Crane 
fup together : "The Peacock 
boafts Hlmfelfi (hows his Tail : 
The Crane confeffes the Peacock 
/o be of mod beautiful Feathers ; 
yet Ma/ /fc pierced the Clouds 
with a bold Flight, whilft the Pea- 
cock fcarce ^w owr the Houfes. 



MOR. 



SELECT FABLES OF ySOP. 



MOR. 

Nemo contempferlt Al- 

terum : tfl cuique fua 

Dos ; eft cuique fua 

Vittus : Qui caret tua 

Virtute,ybr/a/j habcat Earn, 
Q'ia Tu careas. 



MOR. 

No mznjhouldha've defplfed Ano- 
ther : there is to every one his oiun 
Portion ; thereis to every onebiso<wn 
Virtue : He <who wanteth thy 
Virtue, perhaps may have That 
Which thou mayft want. 



FABLE LXXII, 



D: QPERCU & 
ARUNDINE. 

QUercus effraSa va- 
lid i ore Noto, 
praxipitatur in Flumen, &?, 
dutn jluitat, forte haret 
fuis Ramis in Arundine ; 
miratur, Arundlnem ftare 
ir.columem in tanto Turbine. 
H<tc refpondet, Se c/Te 
tut am fua FlexilUltate ; 
Se cedere Noto, 
Bore* ; omni Flaiui ; 
nee ^tf Mirum, quod 
Q_uercus exclderlt^ Q^ize 
concupivit noo cedere t fed 
rejiftere. 

MOR. 

Ne r^)?aj Potentiori, 
y>^/ vincas .//Z/RC cedendo, 
C^ fere ado. 



O/" the OAK and 
the REED. 

THE Oak Iting broken by the 
ftronger South Wind, 
is thrown into the River, #m/, 
whilft She flows, by Chance J?/Vr 
by her Bought upon a Reed ; 
file wonders, A&a/ a Reed Hood 
/o/c in fo great a Whirlwind. 
.SA<r anfwers, that She was 
ya/Jr by her Flexibility ; 
that She yielded to Notus, 
/o Boreas; to every Blajl ; 
nor wflj /'/ a Wonder, /Aa/ 
the Oak JLould fall, Who 
dffired not /o >'V'</> but 
to rejlft. 

MOR. 

Do not re/tftOne more powerful, 
^/ overcome Him by yielding, 
0n</ bearing. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF-ffiSOP. 



FABLE LXXIII. 



De LEONE ? 
VENATOP.E. 

LE O litigat cum 
Venatore; prasfert fuam 
Foftitudinerii Fortitudihi 
Homiriis. Pojl longa jfur~ 
gia Venator ducit Leonem 
a^Maufoleum, in Quo Leo 
erat fculptus deponens 
Caput in Gremium Viri. 
Per a rregat Id effe fails 
Indicii ; nam ait, Homines 
fculpere Quod vcllent ; 
quod fi Leones forent Arti- 
fices, Virum jam Jri 
fculptum fub Pedibus 
Lconis. 

MOR. 

Qmfque, quoad poted, 
Cff dicit, ff facit Id y Q^od 
putat prodefle fux 

Caufse y Parti. 



O/" the LION CBt/ 
the HUNTER. 

TH E Lion contends with 
the Hunter ; He prefers bis 
Strength to (lie Strength 
of Man. After long Dlf- 
futes the Hunter leads the Lion 
/o a Tomb, on Which a Lion 
xvas carved laying down 
A/T Head on Mi? Z,o^ of a Man. 
The Beajl denies /Aa/ to be enough 
Proof; for he fays, that Men 
carved What they would ; 
but if Lions were Arti~ 
fleers i that the Man o < zt> would be 
carved under M* /Vrf 
of the Lion. 

MOR. 

Every One, as much a.rhc is able, 
both fays, and docs 7a/, Which 
he thinks to be profitable to his 
Caufe as</ Party. 



FABLE LXXIV. 

fie PUERO Sf FUR'E. O/" the EOY </ the THIEF. 



P'lTer fedebat ftens apud 
Puteum ; Fur rogat 
Caufam dendi ; Puer dicit, 
Fune rupto, Urnam 

Aurt incidiffe Jit Aquas. 
Horfto exult Se> injilit 
in Puteum, quserit. Vafe 
non invtnto, confcendit, 
atq; 



A Boy Jut weeping at 
a Well ; A Tbiif afks 
theCaufeof his weeping;/,k?.Z?0y fays, 
//f /?5/^ being broke, that an Urn 
of Gold had fallen into the Waters. 
The Man undrejfes Himfelf, leaps 
into/A* 0W/, feeks for it. TheVe/el 
not &/ fnmd) He comes up, 
*n^ 

H 



52 SELECT FABLES OF /ESOP. 

atq; ibi nee invenit Pus- and there neither does He find the 

rum, nee fuam Tunicam : Boy, nor his own Coat : 

>nippe Puer, Tunica fub- For the Boy, the Coat being taken 

lata, fugerat. away, bad Jled. 

MOR. MOR. 

Interdum faHuntur, Sometimes they are deceived, 

Qni fclent fallere. Who are wont to deceive. 



FABLE LXXV. 

De RCSTICO 5" Of the COUNTRYMAN and 

JUVENCO. , the STEER. 

RUSTICUS Jflfc&rf A COUNTRYMAN bad 

Jnvencum imp alien- ji~\. a Steer impa- 

tem omnis Vinculi & Jug* : tient of every Chain and 7~s>Jk ; 

Homo ajlutulus refecat The Man a little cunning cuts off 

Cornua Beftise ; nam the Horns of the Bead ; for 

petebat Cornibas ; turn he ftruck with his Horns ; then 

jungit non Currui, fed He joins him not /o /* C<?/7, but 

Aratro, ~ ne pulfaret /o/^P/oy^Ajthathefliouldnot ftrikt 

Herurn Calcibus, ut his Majler with his Heels, as 

folebat. Iffe tenet Stivam, Hewaswont. He holds tbePlough, 

gaudens, e ffi c \ff e rejoicing, that He bad ejfe8ed 

Induftria, ' ut jam font by Induftry, that now he Jhould be 

tutus & a Cornibus, 5c a3 fafe ^o//6 from Horns, and /TOOT 

Ungulis. 5^ Quid evenit? Hoofs. 5w/ What happened ? 

Taurus fubinde refiftens The Bullock frequently refilling 

argendo Arenam applet -by fcattering the Sand Jills 

s &? Caput Rujli- the Mouth ai/ Head oftke-C&un- 

i a. tryman with It. 



Jpa 
Os 



MOA, MOR. 

Nonnulli y/ fie in- Some a/r fo 

tra5a biles, ut nequeant traflable, that 77' ^y 

tra&ari u// Arte, out be managed fy oy Art, or 

Confilio, Counfcl. 

FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JEBOP. 
FABLE LXXVI. 



Di SATYRO & VIA.- 

TORE. 

SAtyrus, <%ui olim erat 
habitus Deus Nemo- 
rum, ntiferatus Vfatorem 
obrutvm Nive, atq; cnec- 
ttim Algore, ducit in 
fuum Antrum ; fovet 
Igne. At, dum fpirat 
in Manus, percontatur 
Caufam ; Qui refpondens 
inqultj nt calefiant. Po- 
ftea, cum accumberenr, 
Viator fufflat in Pultem, 
Quod interrogatus cur fa- 
ce ret, ir.quit, ut frigefcat. 
Turn continuo Satyrus 
ejiciens Viatorem iaquit, 
Nolo, at I lie fit in 
meo Antro, Cut fit tarn 
diverfum Os. 

MOR. 



Of the SATYR and the TRA- 
VELLER. 

A Satyr, Who formerly was 
accounted a God of the 
Woods, having pitied a Traveller 
covered with Snow, and almofl 
dead ttritA Cold, leads Him into 
his Cave ; cherifhes Him 
withaFire. Bat, ivhilji He breathes 
into his Hands, He enquires 
the Caufe ; Who anfwering 
fays, that they may be warm. Af- 
terwards, when they laid down, 
theTraveller\)\Q\vs into hisPorridge, 
Which being afked why He 
old, He f aid, that // may grow cool. 
Then immediately the Satyr 
cafling out the Traveller fays, 
I am not willing, that He be in 
my Cave, Who has /o 
different a Mouth. 

MOR. 



JLvitz 6i/inguem Homtnem, Avoid a double-tongued Man, 
/ eft Proteus in Sermone. . Who is a Proteus in Difcourfe. 



FABLE LXXVII. 

Z)<; TAURO 3* MURE. O/" the BULL aW the MOUSE. 



H E Moufe bad lit 
the Foot of the Bull, fly- 
/n/o his 



MU S mamorderat 

Pcdcm Tauri, fu- 

gtens in fuum Antrum. ng /no s o^r. 

l^aurus v/^ra/ Cornua, The Bull Irandi/hes his Horns, 
qmtrit Hoftem, viJet nuf- fec-l:s his Enemy, y?rj A/'w 
quam. ^f/w irridet an ; where. TheMoufe laughs at / 
inquit 



fays 



54 SELECT FABLES OF MSOP. 



inquit, quia es robujlus, 
ac vaftus, idcirco non con- 
tempferis Qne.mvis ; nunc 
eximius Mas laefit Te, & 
quidem gratis. 



Nemo 
Flocci. 



Mo*. 
pendat 



Hoftem 



fays He, lecaufe thou art robuft, 
and big, therefore you Jbould not 
have dcfpifed any One ; now 
a little Moufe has hurt T/:ft, and 
indeed gratis. 

MOR. 

Let no Man rate his Enemy 
at a Lock of Wool. 



FABLE LXXVIII. 



De RVSTICO fc7 
HERCULE. 

CURRUS Rujll- 
ci haerct in profundo 
Luto- Mox fupinus 

implorat Deum Herculem ; 
} r ox in ton at e Coelo, 
Inepte, fiagella tucs Equos, 
tS 1 Ipfc annitere Rot is, 
atq; turn Hercules vocatus 
aderit. 

MOR. 

Otiofa Vota profunt Ktl ; 
Qua: fane Deus non audit. 
Ipfe juva Teiffum, turn 
Deus juvabit Te. 



Of the COUNTRYMAN and 
HERCULES. 

THE Waggon of a Country- 
man (licks in a deep 
Clay. By and by laying along 
He implores the God Hercuks ; 
a Voice thunders out of Heaven, 
Fool, whip thy Horfes, 
and Thyfelf try at the Wheels, 
and then Hercules being called 
will be prefent. 

MOR. 

Idle Vows profit Nothing \ 
Which indeed God does not hear. 
Thyfelf help Thyfelf, then 
Ccid will help Thee. 



FABLE LXXIX. 

D* Cicada & Formica. 0/"theGrafhopper<zfl</thcPifmire. 

CUM Cicada cantet "T IT 7 HEN the Grajiopper Cngs 
per ^ftatem, Formica V V in the Summer, the Ant 
exercet /uam Meflem, tra- exercifes her Harvefi, draw- 
hens in* 



SELECT FABLES OF &SOP. 5$ 



tens Grana in Antrum, 
ghjts reponit in Hyemcra. 
Brumd fseviente, fame/tea 
Cicada venlt ad Formicam, 
& mendlcat Viftum. Formica 
renuit, diciitans, Sefe labora- 
vift, dura Ilia cantabat. 

MOR. 

Qjji fft fegnis in Juventa, 
tgebit in Senefla ; 5? Qui 
non farcii, mox mendicablt. 



ing the Grains into a 
Which She lays up again/I Winter. 
The Winter raging, the famifted 
Grafliopper comes to /A^ ^w/, 
and begs Visuals. TA^ -fn/ 

jthat She bad labour? 

fung. 

MOR. 

Who it flothful in Youth, 
/ball want in Age ; and Who 
<sWA not J "pare ; by and \xyJbaU beg. 



FABLE LXXX. 



De CANE 5" LEONE. 

CANIS jocans occurrit 
Leant, quid Tu ex- 
hauftus Inedld percurris 
Sylvcu & De-via ? fpeda 
/fir pinguem, 5* nitidum, 
atque confequor H<c, non 
Labore, fed CW0. Turn 
Leo inquit, Tu quidem 
babes tuas JEpulas, fed 
Stolide, babes etiam Vincula ; 
Efto Tu Servus, Qui poles 
fervire ; Ego guides, fum 
//5rr, ncc voh fervire. 

MOR. 

Leo refpondit pulchre : 
Etenim Libertas eft potior 
smnilw Rebus. 



0/"the DOG and the LION, 

AD O G joking meets 
a Lion, why dojl Thou eK- 
hautled w/VA Want run thro* 
//JK ^c??i/j and By-places ? fee 
.$/( fat, and fleck, 

and I obtain thefe Things, not 
by Labour, but 5y Idlenefs. Then 
/A Z,/on fays, 7^0 indeed 
Aa/? thy Dainties^ but 

/oe/ t Thou haft alfo Chains ; 
Be Thou a Slave, /'f^o art able 
(9 ferve ; I indeed, am 
^/rff, nor am / willing to fcrve. 

MOR. 

The Lion anfivered beautifully : 
For Liberty it better 
than all Things. 



FABLE 



<6 SELECT FABLES OF /ESOP. 
FABLE LXXXI. 

Of the FISHES. 



FLuvialis Pifiis eft cor- 
rfptus per Vim Flu- 
mints in Mare, ubi ciFerens 
fuam Nobilitatem, pendcbat 
omne marinum Gemis vili. 
Phoca non tulit Hoc, fid 
ait, Tune fore Indicium 
Nobilitctis, fi caftus porte- 
tur ad Forum cum Phoca ; 
Se iri emptum a Nobiltlus, 
autem Ilium a Plebe. 

MOR. 

Multt funt fie capti 
Libidine G/ori<e, ut Ipfi 
jadent Se. Scd /><7j 
fiii Ons non datur 
Homini Laud!, at excipi- 
tur cum Rifu Audito- 



A River Fl/b is 
</OTt'n by theF'jrce of the Ri- 
ver into the Sea, where extolling 
bis Nobility, He valued 
all the Sea Race at a low Rate. 
The Seal bore not This, but 
faid, Then would be a Proof 
of Nobility, if taken He fhould be 
carried to Market 'with a Seal ; 
that He fhoiild be bought byNobks, 
but //<? by the common People. 

MOR. 

"Many are fo taltn 

with the Luft of Glory, that 7"/j<rj' 
boaft Themfehfs. But //6<f Praj/i 
of his own Mouth is not given 
to a Man for a Praife, &// is receiv- 
ed with the Laughter <?/" the Hear- 



FABLE LXXXII. 

De Pardo f Vulpecula. O/" the Leopard and the Fox. 



PArdus, Cut eft 

pi Sum Tergum, cater is 
Feris, etiam Leonibus de- 
fpeftis ab Eo, intumefcebat. 
Vulpfcula accedit ad Hunc, 
fuadet non fuperbire, 
dicens quidfm, ///;' efle 
fpeciofam Pellem, *vero Sibi 
effe fpeciofam Meniem. 



THE Leopard, Who has 
a paintfd Back, the other 
Beafts, even the Lions being de- 
fpifed by Him, was puffed up. 
The Fox comes to Him, 
perfuades Him not to be proud, 
faying indeed, that He had 
a jim Skin, but He 
lad a fine Mind. 



MOR. 



SELECT FABLEST OF 1ESOP. 57 



MOR. 

Eft Difcrimen & Or do 
Bonorum : JSona 

Corporis prxjlant Bonis 
Fortune ; fed Bona Animi 
funt prseferenda His. 



MOR. 

There is a Difference and Order 
of good Things : The Goods 
of the Body excel the Goods 
of Fortune; but theGoods oftheMin-d 
are to be preferred to Thefe. 



FABLE LXXXIII. 



De VULPE Of FELE. 

CUM Vulpet in Collo- 
qu'tO) Q^od ///*' erat 
cum Fele, jaffartt t Sibi 
effe varias Tcchnas, adeo 
at haberet vel Ptram 
refer tarn Dolis : Autem 
Fells refpondit, Sibi ej/e 
duntaxat unicam Artem, Cut 
fideret, Ji efTet 

^?//WDifcriminis. Inter con - 
fabulandum repente 

Tumultus Canum accurren- 
tium audltur ; Ibi Felis 
fubfilit in altifllmam 
Arborem ; interim Vulpes 
cinda Canibus capitur. 

MOR. 

Fabula innuit, nonnun- 
quam unicum ConfiUum, 
mo Jo fit verum, & efficax, 
cfle praftabilius quaru plures 
Dolos, S3 5 frivoja Con/ilia. 



Of the Fox and the CAT. 

WHEN the Fox in a Dlf- 
courft, Which He had 
with the Cat, loajled, that lie 
bad various Shifts, fo 
that He had even a Budget 
full of Tricks : But 

the Cat anfzvered, That She o<-/ 
only 07Z Art, to which 
She trufted, if there was 
ony Thing of Danger. In the Dif- 
courfe fuddenly 

the Noife o/" /^ Dogs run- 
ning heard: Then /^ C"a/ 
leaps rV//o a very high 
Tree ; in the mean time the Fox 
furrounded by the Dogs is taken. 

MOR. 

The Fable intimates, that fome- 
times one Defign, 

yi that it be true, and effefiual, 
is &-/ter than more 

Tricks^ and frivolous Dejtgns. 



FABLE 



58 SELECT FABLES OF 

FABLE LXXXIV. 



De RFOE & SIMIIS. 

QUid am JEgyptius Res 
ibjlituit aliquot Simias, 
ut ptrdif cerent A & ion cm 
faltandi. Nam< a/ nullum 
Animal acccdit propius ad 
Figuram Hominis, z/a nee 
altud imitator humanos 
A&us a&/ nielius, dut li- 
bentius. Itaque protinus 
edoda Artem faltandi , 
cafe runt fa It are, induttt 
purpureis yeflimentist ac 
pcrfonata ; & Spdlaculum 
jam placebat longo Tcmpore 
in mirum Modum ; </o<?c 
Q^iifpiam e Spedtatorihus 
facetus abjecit Nuces in Me- 
dlum, Quas babebat 

clauculum in Loctilis. lit 
ftatim Simi<e, fimul atque 
vidffint Nu e e s , oblitte 
Choreae, ca-ferui/t efle /^, 
Q^uod fuerant antea^ ac 
rcpente e Saltatricibus rc- 
dierunt in Simias ; & 
Perlonis & Vejlibus dilace- 
ratis, pugnabant inter Se 
pro Nucibusi non y?/7^ 
tiiaximo J?// Sptftato- 
rum. 



0/"the KING and the APES. 



A 



Certain Egyptian 
appointed fome 



King 



MOR. 



Haec 
Crnamenta 
non mutare 
jFfominis. 



that they fljould learn the Action 
of Dancing. For, as no 
Animal coincth nearer to 
the Figure of a Man, Jo neither 
any other imitates human 
Adt ions either better, or more 
willingly. Therefore prefently 
being taught the Art of Dancing, 
They began to dance, clothed 
in pdrple Vfjlmenla % and 
majked ; and //;< .S^f 
now pleafed for a long 7V/nr 
after a wonderful Manner ; till 
One of the Spc&ators 
facetious threw Nuts into /^* .M/*/- 
dlf, Which /,* /W 

privately in his Pockets. 7!/&#i 
prefently the Apes, as foon ai 
They fa'iv the Nut3, having forgot 
the Dance, fo^an to be That, 
Which /A^y ^rt^/ ^ before, and 
foddenly from Dancers re- 
turned into Apes ; and 
their Mafks and Clothes being 
torn, they fought among Themfelvet 
for the Nuts, not without 
the greateftZ/rtw^Ater of the Spefta- 
tors. 

MOR. 

admonet, This Falle admoniflieth, 
Fortunae that the Ornaments of Fortune 
Ingenium do not change the Difpofition 
of a Man. 

FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 59 
FABLE LXXXV. 



De ASIKO ff VJATO- 

RIBUS. 

DU O Quidam, cum 
forte invenirent 

Afinum in Sjlva, cceperunt 
tontendere inter Se, 

Uter Eorum abduceret 
EumQomum, nil fuum ; nam 
vidcbatur pariter objeftus 
Utriq; a Fortund. In- 
terim, Illls altercantibus 
invicem, Afirms alduxit 
Se, ac Neuter potltus eft 
Eo. 

. ' MOR. 

Quidam excldunt a pr<z- 
ftntibus Com mod is, Quibus 
nefciunt uti ob 

Infcitiam. 



Of the Ass and the TRAVEL- 
LERS. 

TW O certain Men, when 
by chance they found 
an Afs in a Wood, began 
to contend between Thentfehes t 
Whether of them {hould lead 
Him Home, as his own ; for 
he feemed equally offered 
to Either by Fortune. In the mean 
time, 'They wrangling 

by Turns, the Afs withdrew 
Himfelf, and Neither obtained 
Him. 

MOR. 

Some fall from pre- 
f:nt Advantages, Which 

they know not how to ufe thro* 
Ignorance. 



FABLE LXXXVI. 

De CORVO & LUPIS. Of the CROW and the WOCVES. 



CORVUS comitafur 
Lupos per ardua 
Juga Montium ; pvjlu- 
lat Partem Prede Si- 
bi, qula fecutus efliet, 5* 
non deftituiffet Eos ullo 
Tempore, Deinde ejl re- 
pulfus a Lupis, qula 
non minus voraret Exta 
Luporum, fi occlderentur, 
quam x/a cseterorum 
Animallum. 

I 



THE CROW accompanies 
the Wolves Mro* the high 
'fops of the Mountains ; He de- 
mands aPart of the Prey for Him- 
felf, becaufe he had followed, #</ 
had not forfook Them at any 
Time. Then he is re- 
pulfed ly the Wolves, becaufe 
no \tkwould he devour the Entrails 
o/"/A<r Wolves, \Stheyfaould be Jlatn y 
than /ta Entrails of other 
Animals. 

MOR. 



60 SELECT FABLES OF j<ESOP. 



Mo. 



MOR. 



Non Quid agamus ejl Not What We may do is 
fempcr infpiciendum ; fd always to be looked into ; but 
quo Animo ,/tmus, cum of What Mind We be, wheti 



-Animo 
agamus 



FABLE LXXXVII. 



JD<f MURE nato in 
Cifla. 

MU S not us in ;y?^ 
duxerat yfrf omnem 
yitam ibi, pajlus Nucibus, 
>ue folcbant firvari in 
a. Autem, dum ludens 
c;r:a Oras Cijla 

cifcidifiet, c57" qusereret 
Af centum i reperit Epulas 
iactifiime pnratas t Q^uas 
fii/n ccepiffet gitftare, 
jr. quit, Quam fl olid us fui 
liaftenus, ^w/ credebam 
effe Nihil /' toto 
Orbc melius mca C'tjluld ? 
Ecce ! yd*. vefcor fuavi- 
wlbus Cibis /fo / 

MOR. 

Hasc Fabula indicat, Pa- 
triam non diligendam it a, 
a/ non adcamus ea Loca t 
ubi cimus efle 



<?/ th MOUSE born in the 
Chcft. 

AMoufe born in 
had led attntfl all 
Z//<r there, fed with Nuts, 
were wont to be kept in 
//. But, -whilft playing 
about the Edges of the 'Chtjl 
He fell down, and tried at 
getting up, He found Dainties 
moft fuTnptuoiifly/n>/>flm/, Which 
iftan He had began /o fa/?r, 
He faid, How foolifh have I leen 
hitherto, Who believed 

ibere was nothing in the whole 
World tetter than my Chejl ? 
Behold ! how I am fed witb/weet- 
er Meats here ! 

MOR. 

This Fable fhows, that a Coun- 
try is not to be beloved fo, 
that We may not go to thofePlacet, 
where We may be able to be more 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF /ESOP. 6r 
FABLE LXXXVIII. 

De Rusrtco impel r ante. Of the COUNTRYMAN obtaining, 
ut Triticum nafceretur that Wheat fhould grow 
abfque Ariftis. ivitfout Beards. 



QUidam Rujlkus ira- 
petraverat a Cerere, 
ui JL riticum nafceretur abfq; 
Artftis, ne l&deret 

Man us Metentium & 
Triturantium ; Quod, cum 
inarnit, eft . depajtum a 
minutis Avibus : "Turn R li- 
ft ic us in quit, Qua HI digne 
patior ! Qui Caufa 

par<v<e commoditatis per.didi 
ctJam maxima Emolumen- 
ta. 

MOR. 

Fabula incaf t parva 
Incommoda penlanda 

natori Utilitate. 



A Certain Countryman had ob- 
tained from Ceres, 
that Wheat Jhould g row without 
Beards, that ic might not hurt 
the Hands of the Reapers and 
Threfhers ; Which, when 
it grew ripe, <was e.it up by 
the [mall Birds : Then the Coun- 
tryman faid, How worthily 
I fuffer! Who for the Sake- 
of a fmall Commodity have lojl 
even the greatejl Advanta- 
ges. 

MOR. 

The Fable /Lows, that fmall 
Difadvantages are to be weighed 
with a greater Profit. 



FABLE LXXXIX. 



De ACCIVITRE infequente 

CoLUMBAM. 

CU M Accipiter infe- 
queretur Columbam 
pneciptti folatn, ingref- 
lus quandam Villam eft 
captus a Ruftico, Quern 
obfecrabat blonde, ut 
dimitteret Se ; nam, 

dixit, nan Itfi Te. 
GUI Ruib'cus refpon- 
dit, nee Hxc Iseferat Te. 



Of the HAWK purfuing 
the PIGEON. 

WHEN the Hawk pur- 
fued the Pigeon 

with a fpeedy Flight, having en- 
tered a certain Village He was 
taken by a Countryman, Whom 
He befought fairly, that 
He would difmifs Him ; for, 
faid He, / have not hurt Thee. 
To whom the Countryman an- 
fwered, nor had She hurt Tlee. 

MOR. 



02 



SELECT FABLES OF ALSOP. 

MOR. MOR. 



Eos 



Fabula inJuaf, 
puviri merito, >u: CODED 
tur lecdere innocents. > 



The Fable Jbo-ws, that They 
are puni/hed deftrvedly, Who en- 
deavour to hurt the Innocent. 



FABLE XC. 



De RUST i CO tranji- 
turo Arnfiem. 

RUfticus tranjituruf 

Torrentem, )ui forte 
excreverat Imbribus, 

quxrebat Vadum^ & cum 
tentaviflet earn Partem 
Fluminis, Qua; videbatur 
quittior, jf placidior, 
rcperit Earn altiorem, quam 
fuerat opinatus ; rurfus 
adinvenit breviorem, & 
tuliorem Part era ; ibi Flu- 
vius iltcurrelat majori 
St refit u A q u a i u m 
inquit Secum, 
tutius poffumus 
noftram Vitam in 



Aquis, cuam 
Jilmtibus. 



Turn 
Quara 
credere 
elamo/is 



quiet is & 



MOR. 

Admonemur hac 

Fabula, ut extimefcamus 
Homines verbofos, ff mi- 
naces, minus quam quiftof. 



Of the COUNTRYMAN about to 
pafs over a RIVER. 

A Countryman alcut to pafs over 
J[\. a Torrent, Which by Chance 
had increafed by the Showers, 
fought a Shallow, and ivhen 
He had tried that Part 
of the River, Which feemed 
more quiet, and fmooth, 
he found It deeper, than 
He had thought ; again 
He came to a JJ}allo>wer, and 
fafer Part ; there the Ri- 
ver ran down with a greater 
Noife of Waters : Then 
He faid with Himfr'f, How 
more faftly are we able to trujl 
Our Life in /^ clamorous 
Waters, than in /^ quiet an4 
Jilent, 

Mox. 

We are admoniflied ^y /-&w 
Fable, that We fhould fear 
Jl/n verbofe, and threat- 
ning, lefs than the quiet. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 63 
FABLE XCI. 

De COLUMBA y PICA. Of the PIGEON and the MAGPIE. 



COlumba interrogate a TH H E Pigeon bein 

Pica, Quid induccret J_ the Pie, What could induce 

Earn, ut nidincaret femper Her, that She built always 

in eodem Loco, cum ejus in the fame Place, when Her 

Pulli fcmpcr furriperentur Toung always were ^ taken 

inde, refpondit, Simpli- from thence, anfivered, Simpli- 

citas. city. 

MOR. MOR. 

Hxc Fabnla indicat, bouos This Fable fiiows, that good 

Viros f<rfc decipi facile. Men often arc deceived eofily. 



FABLE XCII. 



Be ASIKO C5 5 VITULO-. 

A Sinus & Vit\ilus, cum 
pafcerentur in eodern 
Prato, prssfentiebant ho- 
Jlilem Exerciuim adventare 
Sonit'i Campans. Turn 
Vitulus inquit, Sodalis, 
fugiamus hinc, ne Holies 
abducant Nos Captivos ; 
Cui Afinus refpondit, 
Fuge Tu, Quern Holies 
confueverunt occidere, ff 
efle : Nihil inter ejl Afini, 
Cui ubique e a clem 

Conditio ferendi Oneris 
ejl propofita. 



MOR. 

Hxc F alula 
fiervos, ne 



admonet 

formident 

mag- 



Of the Ass and theCAi.F. 



TH E Afs am/the Calf, 
they were fed in the fame 
Pajlurfy perceived an n^- 
wj-'s' Army to approach 
by the iSound of a Bell. Then 
the Caff faid, Companion, 
let us Jly hence, left the Enemies 
If ad away Us Captives ; 
To whom /i<f Afs agiwered, 
Fly Thou, Whom the Enemies 
have been ufed to flay, ar.cl 
to eat : // is no Inter ejl of the Afs, 
to Whom every where the fame. 
Condition of bearing a Burden 
is offered. 

MOR. 

This Fable warns 

Servants, that they may not fear 

greatly 



64 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



m.ignopere mutare Dominos, 
modb futuri non fint 
Jeter lores priori bus. 



greatly to change their Lords, 
provided that the future be not 
ivorfe than the former. 



FABLE XCIII. 



f)e VULPE 9* MULIERI- 
BUS edcntilus GaHinas, 

V'Ulpes tran/lens jnxta 
quondam Villam, 
ecnfp'xit cateram Mulierum 
cornedentcm alto Silentio 
plurinas Gallinas opipare 
affatas : dd Qnas converfa 
inquit, >ui Claraorcs C5* 
Latratus Canum efient 
contra Me, Ji Ego facerem 
Quod Vos facitis ? Cut 
qusedam Anus rrfpondens 
inquit t Nos (.omedtmus Quas 
font Nollra, vero Tufuraris 
alien*. 

MOR. 

Quod eft me vim non aiti- 
net ad Te. Ne furore ; 
efto contentut tuis Rebus- 



Of the Fox W the WO- 
MEN eating the Hens, 

AF O X pajjlng near 
a certain Village, 
Jaw a Heap o/" Women 
eating / deep Silence 
very many Hens daintily 
roarted : To Whom being turned 
He fa id, What Clarrr u,s and 
Barkings of Dogs would be 
agawjl Me, // I did 
What Tou do ? To ivhom 
a certain old Woman anfwering 
/aid, We eat What 

are Ours, ^u/ Thou Jleahjl 
other Men's Things. 

MOR, 

What is mine </7^j o/ le- 
long to 77>. Do not Jieal ; 
be cont:nt with Uiine own Things. 



FABLE XCIV. 



De pinguibus CAPOKIBUS 
ff macro. 



QUixJam Vir nutricave- 
rat complures Capones 



in eodem Ornithobofcio ; Qui in 
cm ties funt efedi pingues all 
prfter 



Of the fat CAPONS 
and the lean one. 

A Certain Man had brought 
up very many Capons 
the fame Coop ; Who 
were made fat 

except 



SELECT FABLES OF MSOP. 65 



pr<fter Unum, Quern Fratres 
irridebant,ut macilentum. Do- 
minus accepturus nobiles 
Hofpites lauto 5* fumptuofo 
Convivlo, imperat Coquo, 
tit inleriwat, & coqttat ex 
His, Q^uos invenerlt 

pinguiores. Pingues audi- 
cntcs Hoc afflidlabant &efe> 
diccntes, ft Nos fuffimus 
macilenti ! 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula eft conjifta 
in Solamen Pauperum, 
quorum Vita ejl tutior, Quam 
Vita Divitum. 



except One, Which his Brethren 
laughed at, as /fan. The 
Mailer about to receive noblp 
Guefts in 3 neat flH</ fumptuoua 
Banquet, commands thg Cook, 
that He fhould kill and foo/f out of 
Thefe, which /f<; Jbould find 
the fatter. 7"At fat hear- 
ing T/J/X afflided Themfelves, 
faying, */ We had been 
lean ! 

MOR. 

This Fable was invented 
for //;<? Comfort of the Poor, 
tvhofe Life fafer, /an 
the Life o/ /^ -RwA. 



FABLE XCV. 



De CYGNO canente in 

Mortt, reprehenfo 

Ciconia. 

CYgnus moriens inter- 
rogabatur a Ciconia, 
cur in Morte, Q^uam cetera 
Animalia adeo exhorrent, 
emitteret Sonos multo 
fuaviores, quam in omni 
Vita \ cum potius deberet 
efle moeflvs. Cui Q^nux 
Jnquit, >uia non crucia- 
lor araplius Card quaeren- 

di cm. 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula adraonet, 
ne fornidemut Mortem ; 
>ud omaes Miferi* prs- 
f^ntis Vit* praeciduntor. 



Of the SWAN finging rn 

Death, reprehended 

by the Stork. 

TH E Swan dying was afk- 
ed by the Stork, 
e/y in Death, Which other 
Animals fo fear, 

He fent forth Sounds much 
fvveeter, than In all 

his Life ; when rather He ought 
to be fad. To whom the Sivan 
faid, Beeattfs I fhall not be tor- 
mented longer with the Care of 
feeking Meat. 

MOR. 

This Fable admonifhes, 
that We da not fear Death ; 
ries of the prc- 



by Which *\\thcMi[eri f 
fent Life arc cut off. 



FABLE 



66 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE XCVI. 



De TRABE fc? BOBVS 
trakentlbus Earn. 

ULmea Trats conque- 
icbatur de Bobirs, 
dicens, O Ingraft^ Ego a/wi 
Vs mulio Tern pore melt 
FiuiuHbus; vero Vos trahitls 
Me ueflram Nutricem />?/ 
Saxa 5" Luta. f 

Bovcs ; Noftra Siifpiria & 
Gemilus tsf Stimulus, 
Quo pnngimur, pof- 
funt docere Tet quod in- 
vit'i trahimus Te. 



Of the BEAM and the OXEN 
drawing It. 

AN Elm Beam complain- 
ed of the Oxen, 
faying, O ungrateful, I />GD fed 
You a /of Time with my 
Leaves ; but You draw 
Me j-owr Nourifher tiro* 
Stones fl^ Dirt. To Whom 
the Oxen ; Owr Sighs and 
Groans and the Goad 
with which We arc pricked, are 
able to teach Thee, that n- 
We draw 7*&r. 



MOR. 

Hasc Fabula docet Nos, 
ne excandcfcamus in 
Eos, Qui laedunt Nos, non 
Jud Sponte. 



Moa. 

This Fable teaches Us, 
that we fliould not be hot againjl 
Them, Who hurt Ut t not 
cf their own Accord. 



FABLE XCVII. 



De Angnilla congucrente, 
quod infejlaretur magis, 
quam Scrpcns. 



Of the 

that / 



ANguilla tnterrogalat 
Serpentem, cur, cum 
ejfent fimiles; atq; cognati, 
Homines tamen infequerentur 
Sc potlus quam I I lam : 
Cui Serpent inquit, quid 
raro Ixdunt Me impu- 
ne. 



Eel 



complaining, 
infejlcd more 



/^a the Serpent. 

TH E Eel ajked 

the Serpent, why, feeing that 
They were alike, and Kinsfolk, 
Men yet purfued 

Him ra//j*r than //>r .- 
To whom the Serpent faid, Iccaufe 
feldom do They hurt Me vnpunijk- 
ed. 



MOR. 



SELECT FABLES OF^ESOP. 67 



MOR. 

Haec Fabula indicat, Eos 
folerc ladi minus, 

g)ui ulcifcunttir. 



MOR. 

This Fable fhows, that They 
are wont to be hurt lefsy 
Who revenge. 



FABLE XGVIII. 



De ASINO, SIMIA, y 
TALPA. 

A Si no conquerente, quod 
carer ft Corrtibus j vero 
Simia, quod Cauda deejjet 
Sibi ; Talpa inquit, Ta- 
cete, cum videos Me ^ 
cap cum culls. 

MOR. 

Hsec Fabula pertinet ad 
Eos, J^/ non funt contend 
fua " ^or/f ; C^tit, 

fi conjiderarent Infortunia 
Aliorum, tolerarcnt fua 
acquiore Ammo. 



Of the Ass, the APE, and 
the MOLE. 

TH E Afs complaining, that 
He wanted Horns ; but 
the Ape, that a Tail ivas wanting 
to Him ; The Mole fa id, Hold your 
Peace, when you fee Me /o & 
deprived of Eyes. 

MOR. 

This .for/ pertains to 
Them, Who are not content 
with their own Condition ; Who, 
if They conjidered the Misfortunes 
of Others, would bear their own 
with a mote patient Mind. 



FABLE XCIX. 



De NAUTIS impJorantibus 
Auxilium San8orum. 

QUidam Nauta depre- 
henfus in Mari fubita 
& atra Tempeftate, cattris 
ejus Sociis implorantibus 
Stuxitium diverforum 

Sanfforum, inquit, Nefc'it'ts 
Quod petit'u ; Etenim, 
antequam ifti Sanfti confe- 
rant 



Of the MARINERS imploring 
the Help of the Saints, 

A Certain Mariner overta- 
ken at Sea with a fudden 
and dark Tempeft, the reft. 
of his Companions imploring 
the Help of different 

Saints, faid, Ye know not 
What ye afi ; For, 

before that thofe Saints can be- 
take 

K 



68 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



rant Se ad Deum pro nojlra 
Liberalise, obrtie- 

mur hie imminent! Procella. 
Confugiti igitur ad Eum, 
Qui Abfque Admimculo 
Jllterius poterit liber are 
Nos a tantis Malts. Igi- 
tur, Auxtlio Omnipotentis 
Del inrocato, illito 

Procella ceffavit. 

Mo*. 

Ne cpnfugito ad imbe- 
cilliores, ubi Auxiliuni 
Intentions potcft haberi. 



take Them/elves to God for cur 
Deliverance, We Jhail I; ovtr- 
'whelmed in this imminent Storm. 
Fly therefore to Him, 
Who without the Help 
of Another (halt be able to deliver 
Us from fo great Evils. There- 
fore, the Help of Almighty 
Cod being invoked, prejcntiy 
the Storm ceafed* 

Mo*. 

Do not fly to the weak- 
.cr, where the Help 

of a more powerful may be had. 



FABLE C. 



J}e Pifcibus defilientibus e 
Sartagim In Pruntrs. 

PIfces ac/Ar vivi royjtf- 
^d^ar in Sartagine fer- 
vent! 0/ro .' Unus Quorum 
inquit, Fratres, Fugiamus 
nine, ne pereamua. 

Turn Omnet pariter exiiren- 
tes e Sartagine deciderunt 
in ardentes Prunes. Igitur 
affsdi majore Dolors dam- 
nabant Con/ilium, Quod 
ceferantf dicentes, Quan- 
ta atrociori Moris nuoc 
perimut ! 



MOR. 

II xc Fabula admonct Nos, 
ut vitemus proefentia 



cula it a, 
gravfara. 



Peri- 

incidaTmts in 



O/ the Fiftes /M/M^ out of 
the Frying- Pan into the Coals* 

Fifties jf/ alive <zy<rr^ ^o<f- 
tt/in aFrying- Pan with fcald- 
ing 0*7.- One o/ /^6/fA 
faid, Brethren^ Let us fly 
/;, that we may not perifh. 
Then Ail in like Manner leap- 
ing out of the Frying- Pan fell 
j/^on the burning Coals. Therefore 
afftSed with greater Pain They 
condemned the Counfcl, Which 
They had taken, faying, By kfw 
much a more cruel Death no\v 
do IV e feri/Jj ! 

MOR. 

This Fable admonifhes Ui, 
that We avoid the prefent Dan- 
gers fo, that we do not fall into 
mtre gtitsiiut. 

FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF 

FABLE CI. 



2)e Quadrupedibus ineun- 0/"the Four-footed Beafts enter- 
tibus Societalem cum ing into an Alliance with 
Pifcibus adverfus Aves. the Fifties againjl the Birds. 

QUadrupedes, cum 

Bellum effet iftdidlum 
Sibi ab Avibus, ineunt 
Fcedus cum Pifcibus, 
ut tuerentur Se eo- 
rum Auxilio a Furore 
Awium. Autena, cum ex- 
pedtarent optata Auxilia, 
Pifces negant, Se poffe 
accedere ad Se per 



Hxc Fdbula admonet Not, 
nc faciamus Eos So- 
eio Nobis, Qui, <rOT fit 



Opus, non 
Nobis. 



pount 



THc Four-footed Beafts, 
War was proclaimed again ft 
Them by the Birds, enter into 
a League with tJjc Ftfoes, 
that /A<y would defend Them tu'ftb 
their Help from the Fury 
o//Af Birds. But, w/^fn They ex- 
peded the Jejired Succours, 
the Fi/hes deny, that They are able 
to corns to them by Land. 

MOR. 

This J^ji/e advifes 7j, 
that We do not make T^wn Com- 
panions /o Us, Who, when there is 
Need, are jiat able /o be frefent 
to Us. 



FABLE CII. 



De VIRO, Qui acfej/it ad 
Cardinalem nuper creatum 
Gratia gratulandi. 

QUJdam Vir admodum 
facetus, audiens fuum 
Amicum adfumptum ad Dig- 
nitatem Cardinalatus, 
accejjit ad Eum Gratia gra- 
tulandi : Qni tumidus 
Hoaore, diflmulans 
agnofcere "vetercm Amicum, 
inter rogabat, Quifnam tffet. 
Cui 



Of a MAN, Who went to 
a Cardinal lately created for 
the Sake of congratulating Him, 

A Certain Man very 
facetious, hearing that hit 
Friend was preferred to the Dig- 
nity of the Cardinalfhip, 
went to Him for the Sake of con- 
gratulating Him : Who puffed up 
with the Honour, diflcmbling 
to know his old Friend, 
afled, Who He was.' 

To 



7Q SELECT FABLES OF 



Cui il/e inquit, ut erat 
prcmptus ad Jocos, Mife- 
refco Tui & C&terorum, Qui 
tervetiiunt ad Honor es hujus 
Modi. ; etenim, quampri- 
mum ell is afTecuti Dignita- 
tes hujus Modi, ita amittitis 
Vifum, Auditumq; & c<r- 
ieros Senfus, ut non am- 
plius dignofcatis priftinos 
Amicos. 

MOR. 

Kaec Fabula notat Eos, 
Qui fublati in ahum de- 
fpiciant veteres Amicitias. 



To Whom He fald, as He was 
r^ffl^ at Jtjis* I pi- 
ty Thee and O'^rr, Who 
arrive to Honours of this 
Kind; for, j ,/oon 

cj Ye have obtained Digni- 
ties of this Kind, fo dto ^</ /o/> 
Sight, fln^/ Hearing, and /if o.- 
/A(fr Senfes, Mo/ no long- 
er do ye diftinguifh old 
Friends. 

MOR. 

This Fable denotes T&ofr, 
Who raifed up on >&//& de- 
fpife ancient FrienduSips. 



FABLE CIII. 

De Aquila ff Pica. 0/"the Eagle and the Magpie. 



Pica interrogabat Aqui- 
lam, ut acciperet 
Ss inter fuos Familiares & 
Domefticos ; qvand.o me- 
reretur Id, cum Puhhritu- 
dine Corporic, turn Volu- 
bilitate Lingva ad peragen- 
da Mandata. Cut 

Aquila r e fp o n d i t , facer cm 
Hoc, ni vererer, ne 
cfferres cunfla 

tua Loquacitatc, Quas 
^af intra fwfam Tegulam. 



TH E Magpie <7/&v/the Ea- 
gle, that She would receive 
/fcr among her FamiliarvS and 
Domeiticks ; feeing that She de- 
ferved That, both Ly Beau- 
ty of Body, and Volu- 
bility of Tongue to *///- 
patch Commands. To whom 
the Eagle anfwered, I fhould do 
This, unlefs I feared, left Thou 
fhould (I bear abroad all Thir.g{ 
by thy Talkativenefs, Which 
nay be done within my Roof. 



MOR. MOR. 

Hsec Falula mon*t, Tin- This JaW<r advifes, /^/ tall- 

guaces & garrulos Homines atlve and prating Meq 

no habendos Domi. flrf <?/ /Q be had at Home. 

FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE CIV. 



De Turdo ineunte Amici- 
tiam cum Hirundine. 

TUrd us gloriabatur, 

Se contraxiffe 

Amicitiam cum Hirundine ; 
Cut Mater inquif, . Fili, 
Suiltus, Ji credas, 
Te pofle coniji-vere cum 
Ea, cum Uterq; Veftrum 
foleat appetere divcrfa Lo- 
ca ; etenim Tu tklc3arit 
frigidis Locis, Ilia tepidis. 



MOR. 

Monemur 

Jaciamus 



kac Fabula, 

tft Jaciamus Eos Arnicas 
Nob is, Quorum Vita dif- 
fcntit a nojira. 



(?/"the Thrnfli entering into Friend- 
fhip 'with the Swallow. 



THE Thrufli 
that He bad contra fled 
a Friendflu'p -with the Swallow ; 
To 'whom the Mother faid, Son, 
Thou art a Fool, if Thou believe 
that Thou att able to live with 
Her, feeing that Each of you 
is wont to defire different Pla- 
ces ; for Thou art delighted 
with cold Places, She lt>j/A warm, 

MOR. 

We are advifed <5y this Fable, 
//W WIf </o not make Them Friend; 
to Us, JVhofc Life <//*. 
fcreth from owrj-. 



FABLE CV ; 



quod am Divite & 



O/" a certain Rick Man and 
his Servant, 



ERat quidam Dives 
habens Scrvum /ar^/t 
Ingenii, Q^ern folebat 
mitTcupare Regem Stuliorum : 
IWe y<?/(? irritatus A/j 
Verbis Jlatuit referre par 
Hero ; etenim femcl con- 
Ufrfus in Herum inquit, 
Utinam effem Rex 

Stultorum ; etenim nullum 
Jmperium in toto Orbe 
Tcrrarum ej/et Jatius 
men ; 



THere was a certain rich Man 
having a Servant of a flow 
Wit, Whom He vfed 

to call the King of Fools : 
He often irritated at thefe 
Words refolded to return the likt 
to his Mailer ; for once turn- 
ed upon hit Majier he faid, 
I wifh / was the King 
of Fools ; for no 

Empire in the whole G/0tf 
of .Lands mould be wider 



72 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 

tneo ; & Tit quoque fub- than nine ; and Thou alfo would/I 
ejjes meo Imperlo. be under my Empire. 

MOR. MOR. 

Fabula indicat, Stultum The Fable /bows, that a Fool 
fxpe loqui opportune. tften fpeaks pertinently. 



FABLE CVI. 



Be Urbanis CANIBUS in- 
fequeti$>uj Villaticum. 

COmplures vrbani Canes 
infequebantur queudam 
vlllaticum praecipiti Curfu ; 
QJJOS I lie diu Jugit ; 
ncc aufus fft repugnare : 
At ubi converfus ad JKos 
infequentes fub/litit, & Ipfe 
quoque caplt oRendere 
JDzntes, Omnts pariter 
fubftltenint, nee Aliquis 
Urlanorum audcbat appro- 
ptnquare I11J. Tune Impe- 
rator Exercitus, >ui forte 
aderat ibl, converfut ad fuos 
Milites, inquit, Commilito- 
res, Hoc Speftaculum ad- 
monet Nos, ne fugiamus, 
cum videamus prtfentiora 
Pericula imtnintre Nobis 
fugifntilus, quam repug- 
nantibus. 



Of the City Docs purfu* 
ing the Village One. 

MANY City Dogs 
purfued a certain 
Village one with a haily Courfe ; 
Whom He a long while jfeJ from ; 
nor dared to refill : 

2?/ when turned to Them 
purfuing jfiTf flopped, and //if 
alfo ^ao to fliow 

his Teeth, They All equally 
flopped, nor any One 
of the City ones dared to ap- 
proach Him. Then the General 
of an Army, Who by Chance 
was there, turned to h'n 
Soldiers, faiJ, Fellow-Sol- 
diers, This Sight ad- 
monif]:es Us, that we do not fly, 
when We fee more prefent 
Dangers to threaten Us 
than r * 



jr. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE CVIL 



De 



TESTUDJNE 
RANI?. 



r-pESTUDO confpicata 
JL Ranas, Qu* pafceban- 
tur in codem Stagno, adco 
leves, agilefque, ut facile 
projilirent quolibet, 5* 
faltarent longij/imc, accufa- 
bat Naturam, quod procre- 
tiffet Sc tarditm Animal, 3" 
impeditum max i mo One- 
re, ut neque poflet 
movers Se facile, & ajfidue 
premertur magna Mols. 
At, ubi' yidit Ranas fi- 
eri F.fcam Anguillarum, 
& obnoxias vel kvi/ftmo 
Idlui, aliquantulum recrea- 
ta dicebat, Quanto f/l 
melius ftrre Onus, Quo 
fum munita ad omnes Iftus, 
quam fubire tot Difcrimina 
Mortis ? 

MOR. 

Hxc Fabula indicat, 
ne fcramus *gre 

Dona Natura, Quae fepe 
funt majori Commodo Nobis, 
quam Nos valeamus intti- 



O/ the TORTOISE OB^ 
the FROGS. 

TH E Tortoife having fecn 
the Frogs, Which were 
fed in the fame Poo/, fo 
light, and nimble, /^df eafily 
'They leaped any where, afi^/ 
jumped very far, accu- 
fed Nature, that She had 
made Her a flow Animal, and 
hindered with the greateft Bur- 
den, that neither was She able 
to mow Herfelf eafily, and daily 
was preflcd 9"l a great Weight. 
But, when She favv the Frogs be- 
come the- Food of the Eels, 
and obnoxious even /o the light ejl 
Blow, a little comfort- 
ed Jhe faid, By how much is it 
better to bear a Burden, by Which 
I am fortified to all Blows, 
than to undergo fo many Dangers 
of Death ? 

MOR. 

This Fable /hows. 

that ivefhouldnot bear di [contentedly 
the Gifts of Nature, Which o/^r, 
are rt greater Advantage to [7s t 
than We ma be able /a wider- 



Jland. 



FABLE 



74 SELECT FABLES OF 
FABLE CVIII. 



De GLIIUBUS volentibut 
eruere >uercum. 

GLires defllnaverant 

eruere Qitertum, glan- 
diferam Arborem, Dentf- 
bus ; quo habe- 

rent Cibvm paratiorem, ne 
cogerentur toties 

afcendcre Js* dtfcendtre 
Gratia Viftus. StJ 

Quidam ex His, Qtti longe 
anteibat cseteros JEtate, & 
Experientid Re rum, ab- 
jitrruit Eos, dlcer,s, Si nunc 
interfieimus nojlram Nu- 
tricem, Quit praebebit Ali- 
menta Nobis, ac Noftris 
Annis futur'u ? 

MOR. 

Hasc Fabula monet, pru- 
Jentem Virum debere intucrt 
r.on modo prafcntla, verum 
longe profpicere futura. 



Of the DORMICE ivilli 
to over-turn the Oak. 

TH E Dormice had 
to over- turn the Oak, an 
Acorrr-bearing Tree, with their 
Teeth ; that they 

mighc have Food readier, that 
They might not be forced fo often 
to afcend and defcend 
for the Sake of Food. But 
One of Thefe, Who by far 
excelled the reft in Age t and 
Experience of Things, deter- 
red Them, faying, If now 
We deftroy Our Nou- 
riflier, Who will afford Nou- 
rl/hments to Us, and Ourt 
for future Te&rt ? 

MOR. 

This Fable advifes, that a pru- 
dent Mau ought to look into 
not only prefent Things, but 
afar of to forefee the future . 



FABLE CIX. 

De CANE & HERO. Of the DOG and the MASTER. 



Q 



Uidam habens Canem, 
quo diligeretur 

7//o~magis, femper pafcebat 
Eum fuis Manlbus, & 
folvelat ligatum ; auiem ju- 
bebat ligari & verberari 
a. ServO) ut Beneficia 
vidcrcntur 



A Certain Man having a Dog, 
fAfl/ He ftiould be beloved 
^y /f/m more, alwayt fed 
/rVm with his own Hands t and 
/oo/f^/ Him bound ; a/ or- 
dered Him to be bound and beat 
by a Servant, that /* Benefits 
fhould 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 75 



fhould feem to le conferred upon 
Him by Himfelf, but the ill 
Turns by the Servant. But 
the Dog bearing unkindly, that He 
daily was bound, and beat, 
Jled away ; and, when He was 
blamed by the Mafter, as un- 
grateful, and unmindful of fo great 
Benefits, Who bad Jled 
from Him) by Whom He had been 
always beloved, and fed, 
but never bound, and 
beaten, He anfwcred, / //>/'/// 
That done by 77**, Which 
a Servant doth by thy Command. 



viderentur effe collata in 
Ilium a Se, awtem Male- 
fa<5la a Servo. Autem 
Cants ferens #gre, Se 
ajjidue ligari, & verbeiari, 
aufugit ; &, cum increpa- 
retur a Domino, ut ingra- 
tus, *f immemor tantorum 
Beneficiorum, Qui fugijfct 
a .SV, a $>uo fuifjtt 
femper dileftus, f? paftus, 
autem nunquam ligatus, & 
verberatus, refpondit, Pw/o 
Id Fadum a TV, Q^iod 
Servusjacit tuo 



Fabula" hufieat, Eos 

kabendo's Malefa&ores, 
Qui fuere Caufa Maleficio- 
rum. 


MOR. 
The Fable /bows, that Thofe 
are to be accounted Evil Doers, 
Who have been the Caufe of evil 
Deeds. 


FAB 


L E CX. 


De AVIBUS timentibus 
Scarabseos. 


0/"the BIRDS fearing 
the Beetles. 



M Agnus Timor incef- 
ferat Aves, ne 
Scarabaet occiderent Eas 
Bal'tftd, a Qiillius audive- 
rant magnam Vim P/7- 
rm ftiiflc fabric at am in 
Stei'qitilinio fammo Labore. 
Turn P^r inqtiit, AW/'- 
/^ expavefcere ; eten'im 
quomodo potuerunt jacere 
Pi/as volantcs per Ae'ra ?n 
Nos, CKWJ vix trahant 
Eas ^r Terram magno 
Molimine ? 

L 



A Great Fear had fti'z- 
ed the Birds, left 
the Beetles fhould kill Them 
w/V/& a Crofs-Botu, by ^/&om They 
had heard a great Power of Bul- 
lets had been forged on 
a Dunghill with, very great Labour. 
Then //&<? Sparrow fa id, ^ o/ w/7- 
//^ to fear ; for 

how y^<3// /^j ^ able to caft 
Bullets flying thro* the Air M/OK 
Us, ivhen fcarce they can dratu 
Them on the Ground with great 
Labour ? 



76 SELECT FABLES OF 1ESO?. 

MOR. MOR. 

"HxcFaluIa zdmouctNos, This Fable admonifiies Ut, 

re cxtimefcamus Opes that We fear not the Rlchet 

Hoftium, Quibus videmus of Enemies, to Whom We fee that 

Ingenlum deeffe. Wit is wanting. 



FABLE CXI. 



JDe URSO & APIBUS. 

URSUS ifftu ab Ape 
eft percitus tanfa 
Ira, ut difcerperet toia 
Alvearia Unguilus, in 
Quibus Apes mellif.ca'ucrant. 
Tune univerfe Apes, cum 
viderent fvas Domos 
dirui, Cibaria 

auferrt, Filios necari, 
fubito Impttu invadentes 
Urfum, pene r.ecavere 
Aculeis ; $>ui vix 

elapfus ex Manibus 

Eorum, dictbat Secum, 
Quanta erat melius tolerare 
Acultum unius Apis t quam 
concitare tot Hoftet in 
Me mea Iracundia ? 

MOR. MOR. 

Haec Tabula indicat fj/e This Fable (hows /* /0 ^ 

longe mf///)j fuftincre /a- far &??/ to fuflain the In- 

juriam Unius, quam, dura jury of One, /^a, whilft 

volumus punire Unum, We are <wWing to punifh One, 

compararc mvltos Inimlcos. to g many Enemies. 



0/the BEAR an^/ the BEES. 

A BEAR being Jlung by a Bee 
was ftirred tuith fo great 
Anger, that He tore all 
the Hives with his Paws, in 
Which the Bees ta*/ ma*/<? Honey. 
Then a// the Bees, <whcn 
they faw A&'r Houfe* 
overturned, their Maintenances 
/a^n away, their Young iilleJ, 
with a {udden 0/^f attacking 
/^ ^r, almoft killed Him 
with their Stings ; Who fcarcc 
having Jlipt out of /<? Hands 
of Them, /W with Himfelf, 
By how much was /V better to bear 
ff i'/y/jy of one ee, than 
/o raife up fo many Enemies againft 
Me by my 



TABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF &SOP. 
FABLE CXII. 



77 



2)i MILTTE & duobus 
Ec^uis. 

Miles halem optimum 
Equum, emit /ilium 
nequicquam parent Illi Bo- 
nit ate , Quern nutrielat 
multo diligentiuj ', quarn 
friorem. Turn Pojlerior ait 
Jic priori, Cur 

Dominus curat Me impen- 
Jius, quam Te ; cum 
Jim comparandus Tibi 
neque Pulchritudine, neq; 
Robore, neque Velocitate ? 
Cui -Hie inquit, H<sc eft 
Natura "Hominum, ut fint 
femper benigniores in novos 
Hofpltes. 

MOR. 

Hsec Fabula indicat 
Ament'iam Hominum, >ui 
folent anteponere nova 
veteribtis, etiamfi Jint 
deteriora. 



Of the SOLDIER and the t\vo 
HORSES. 

A Soldier having a very good 
Horfe, bought Another 
not at all equal to Him in Goocf- 
nefs, Whom He nourt/hed 
much more diligently, than 
the former. Then the Latter faid 
thus to the former, Why 
does my-Maftcr mind Me more di- 
ligently, than Thee ; feeing that 
/ am to be compared to Thee 
neither in Beauty, nor 
Strength, nor Swiftnefs ? 

To Whom He faid, This is 
the Nature of Men, that they are 
always more kind to new 
Cue/Is. 



This 



MOR. 
Fable 



fliows 

of Men, Who 
are wont /o prefer new Things 
fo o/n/, altho* they are 
worfe. 



FABLE CXIII. 

' De Aucupe Cff Fringilla. 0/"the Fowler a</ the Chaffinch. 



AUCEPS tetenderat 

Rctia Volucribus, & 
tffuderat largam Efcam 
Illis / Area ; /amw 
non capiebat Aves pafcen- 
tcs j quia vidcbantur pauc<e 
Sibi ; 



THE Fowler had Jlr etched out 
his Nets to the Birds, and 
a</ poured out much Food 
to Them in a void Place ; yet 
He did not take the Birds feed- 
ing ; bscaufe they feemed /V<zy 
to Him ; 



78 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



Sibi ; Quibus pa ft is, 
ac a volant ibus, Alia 
adyeniunt pnjlum ; .Qas 
quoq; ntglejcit capere propter 
Paucitatem. Hoc Or dine 
fervato per totum J)iem, 
acAiiis advcnientibus, All'is 
abeuntibus, lilo femper ex- 
peEiante rr.ajorem Predam, 
tandem capit acivefpe- 
rafcere : Tune Auctps, 
Spe amifia caplcndi mul- 
tas, cum jam effet Tempns 
guie/andf, attrahens fiui 
Rctia, cspit tantiim ut.am 
Fringillam, qua infclix Avis 
reroanferat in Area. 



to Him ; Which being fed, 
and flying away, Others 
come to feed; Which 
aifo He neglected to take for 
their Fetvnefs. This Ot\.er 
being kept thro 1 the whole Day, 
and Others coming, Gihtrs 
going away, fie always ex- 
peBltig a greater Prey t 
at length // began to grow 
Evening : Then the Fowler, 
the Hope being loll of taking ma- 
ny, when now it was Time ' 
of rejling, drawing yp his 
Nets, took only one 

Chaffinch, fvluci unhappy Bird 
had remained in the void Place. 



MOR. .MoR. 

Hoec Fabula indicat, Eos This Fable (hows, that they 

faspe i)ix pofle eapere often fcarce are able /o to^ 

pauca, hii volunt a few Things, Wh? are \villing 

comprehendere omnia. to take all Things. 



FABLE CXIV. 



De SUE 6f CANE. 

SUS irr'uhlat odori- 
fcquum Canem t Qui 
aJulal'dtur Domino Mur- 
mure ?<. Cauda, a ^/o 
f uerat inftmSus ad oucnpa- 
roriam Artem mu'iis 

Verberibm & Vcllicatrcnil-us 
Annum: Cui Canis' inquit, 
In fane, nefcis 

Qnse fnm confecutus ex 
ill is Verberibus ; ctenirn per 
Jta vefcor fuaviftma 
Caroc 



Of the SWINE and the DOG. 

THE SwiSc laughed at the 
Scent-following Dog, Who 
flattered the Mafter w;VA a Mur- 
mur and A/'J Tot/i by Wham 
He had been injlrucled for thefo-w~ 
ling Art wf wfl)' 

Stripes and Plucks of the 
Ears : To w/om the Dog /a/W, 
Mad Wretch, T"^ knoweji not 
What / Z'a'Uf obtained from 
thofe Siripes ; for y 

I am fed iv : ,th the woftfweet 
Flefh 



SELECT FABLES OF &SOP. 

Partridges 



Came Perdicum 

Cotttrnicum. 



& Flefli cf 
Quails. 



79 

and 



Hfcc 

ne feramus ini- 

quo Animo Verier a Prat- 
ceptorum, Qua confue- 
verunt effe Caufa mu/torvm 
bonorum. 



MOR. 



This Fable admoniflie* Us, 
that We fhould not bear <witb an 
impatient Mind the Stripts of Ma- 
fters, Which have 

ufcd to le the Caufe of many 
good Things. 



FABLE CXV. 



De 



TRABE increpante Pi- 
griiiara Bourn. 



TRabs, Que veheba- 
tur Curru, increpabat 
Boves, ut Itntulos, dicens, 
Pigri, curritt, nam portatis 
le<vc Onus : Ctii 

Boves refponderunt, Irri- 
des Nos ? Ignoras, 

(ju Pee n a manet Te. 
Nos deponemus hoc Onus 
cito : autem turn Tu coge- 
ris fultinere, quoad rum- 
paris. Trabs indoluit, 
nee aufa eft amplias la- 
rejjere Boves Conviciis, 

MOR. 

Hasc Fabula mo net 
Quemlibet, ne infultet 
Calami tatibus Aliorum, 

cum Ipfe poj/it ftibjici 
majorilus. 



Of ihe BEAM blaming the Slow- 
nefs of the Oxen. 

THE Beam, which was car- 
ried in a Waggon, blamed 
the Oxen, as Jloju, faying, 
Tejloiu Wretches, run, for ye carry 
a light Burden ; To whom 
the Oxen anfwereJ, Doll Thou 
laugh at Us ? Then knoweft not, 
what Punifiiment waits Thee. 
We (hsll lay down this Burden 
quickly : but then Thou /halt It 
forced to bear, until thou maycft 
be broken. The Beam grieved. 
nor dared longer to pro- 
voke the Oxen with Revilings. 

MOR. 

This Fable advifeth 

any One, that He in full not 
the Calamities of Others, 
whin He Himfclf may be fubjeft 
to greater. 



FABLE 



8o SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE CXVI. 



De CARDUELE 3* 

PUERO. 

CArduclis interrogata a 
Puero, a Quo fue- 
rat haliita fuis Deliciis, 
& nutrita fuavibus Cibis, 
cur egreffa Cavea 

0//<r/ regredi, inqutt, 
Ut />^m pa fee re meo 
Arbitratu, non tuo. 

Mo*. 



Of the LINNET arf 
the BOY. 

THE Linnet being qfled by 
the Boy, by tf'Aorc She had 
been held in his Delights, 
and nouri/hed with fweet Meats, 
why having gone out of the Cage 
Sita <zu< un-willing to return, ya// 
That /may ^ aWf to feed at my 
Pleafure, not at thine. 



If OK. 

This Fallc fhows, 



Haec Falula indicat, Li 

lertaiem Vitse antepor.endam berty of Life 
cunSis Deliciu. before all De/igbts. 



preferred 



FABLE CXVII. 

Scurra 5* Epifcopo. Of the Jefter an^/ the Bifiiop. 



SCurra accedens ad quen- 
dam Epifcopum, divitem 
quidem, fed avarum, Ca- 
lendis Januarii, petebat au- 
reum Nvmtfma Nomine 
Strent ; Antiftcs 

tiixit, Homfnetn infanirt, 
.Qui crederet, tantam Pecu- 
niam dari S:bi in 
Strenam. Turn Scurra 
ccepit efflagitare argenteum 
Nummum ; fed, cum I lie 
eficertt. Hoc vii/eri nimium 
JiW, orabat, at trade- 
ret 5/3; asreurn Quadran* 
tern : Sed cum non poffct 



AJeftcr coming to r- 
/am Bifhop, /vVi 

indeed, ^w/ covetous, on the Ca- 
lends of January, afked a Gol- 
den Piece of Money in the Name 
ofaNew-rear'sGift: The Prelate 
faid t that the Man was mad, 
Who believed, that fo much ^l/o- 
,^y would be given Him for 
a New-Tear* sGift. Then the Jejle? 
began /o ajk fome Silver 
Money ; but, w/>d> He 
yiu/, that This ftemed too much 
/o Htm, He entreated, /a/ He 
would give Him a brafs Far- 
thing But wim he was not able 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 81 



txtorquere Hunc ab Epifco- 
po, inqutt, reverende Pater , 
imperti Me tua Benediflione 
pro Sir end : Tune 

Epifcopus inquit, Fill, flt&e 
tua Genua, ut benedicam Tibi. 
At Scurra inquit, Ego nolo 
tuam tarn vi/ein Bcnedi&i- 
onera ; etenim ii valeret 
sereum Nummum, profe&6 
nunquam concederes Earn 
Mihi. 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula eft confeda 
contra eos Epifcopos 5* 
Sacerdotes, Qua ejlimant 
Opes 5" Divitias //ra 
quam Sacra, & Myjleria 
Ecclefis. 



/o wring This _/rowz the Bi- 
(hop, A* yJV/, reverend Father^ 
reward Me with your Bleffing 
for d New- Tear's Gift : Then 
the fit/hop faid, 5o, bend 
thy Knees, that / may blefs Thee. 
But the Jefler faid, / will not 
have thy fo cheap Blef- 
fing ; Jfr if /'/ availed 
a brafs Farthing, truly 
t;<?r wouldft Thou grant /f 
to Me. 

MOR. 

This Fable is made 
againft thofe Bifhops and 
Priefts, Who efleem 

Wealth and Riches more 
than the facred Rites, and Myjleries 
of the Church. 



FABLE CXVIII. 



De Upupa honorata in- 
digne. 

FEre omnes Aves invi- 
tat* ad Nuptias Aqui- 
las ferebant indigne, Upupam 
prxferri cateris, quia 
fjjet infiguis Corona, & 
ornata Terficoloribus 

Pennis ; cum femper cflet 
folita volitare inter Stercora 
fc? Sordes. 

MOR. 

Fabula ^rguit 



Of the Puet honoured un- 
worthily. 

ALmoft <z//the Birds ^//TJ- ;w- 
Wto /^ Wedding of the Ea- 
gle ^ore ;V unworthily, Ma/ //&* Part 
was preferred to the reft, becaufe 
Jhe was fine with a Crown, and 
adorned with various coloured 
Feathers ; when always She was 
to neille OWCB? the Mud 
Filth. 

MOR. 
reproves 



This 

Eorum, ^t// in ho- ly of Them, /fofo in honour- 
norandit Homimbus fotius ing Men rather 



SELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. 



fbleant obfervare Nitorcm 
Vcflium, & Prtftantiam 
Formae, quam Virtutes 
fcf Mores. 



arc wont to mind the Splendour 

ef Cloaths, and Excellency 

of Beauty, than Virtues 
and Morals. 



FABLE CXIX. 



De SACERDOTE fc? 
PYRIS. 

QUidam gulofus Sacerdos 
proficlfcent extra Patri- 
<im ad Nuptias, ad >uas 
fucrat invitatus, reperit 
jtceroum Pyrorum in 
Itincre, Quorum attigit 
tie Unum quidem ; quin po- 
tius habcns Ea Ludibrio, 
confperfit Urina ; etenlm 
indiguabatnr, Ciboi hujuf- 
modi offer ri in It in ere, 
Qui accej/ebat ad lautas 
Epulas. Sed cum offendlffet 
in Itinere quendam 

Tor rent em it a auSum 
Imbribus, ut non pof- 
fet tr an/ire Eum fine 
Pcriculo Vit<e, conftitin't 
redire Domum ; Autem re- 
vert rnt jcjunnsy// opprefTus 
tantd Fame, ut nifi 
cotnediflct ilia Pyra, >u<e 
confpcrfcrat Urina, ciim 
non invtniret Aliud, 
fuiffet extinftus Fame. 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula admonet, 

Nihil efle contemnendum, 

ciim JV/^iV fit tarn vile lf 

ab- 



the PRIEST 
the PEARS. 



and 



A Certain greedy Pried 
going out of his Coun- 
try to a Wedding, to #7>zV 
He had been invited, found 
a Heap of Peats in 
the Road, of Which He touched 
not One indeed ; but ra- 
M<rr having 77v/n in Derifion, 
He fprinkled them with Urfne ; for 
He rcfented, /^a/ Meats of this 
K.indjlou/d le offered in the Journey, 
Who waj .gw'nf to fumptuous 
Dainties, ^w/ when He had found 
in //6<? Way a certain 
Break fo increafed 

with the Showers, //><7/ He was 
not able /o pafs over It without 
Danger of Life, He refolved 
to return Home : But - 
turning fading He 'was opprefled 
with fo great Hunger, that unlefs 
He had eat thofe Pears, Which 
He had fprinklcd witl>l7ritu t wbcn 
He could not find any Thing elfe, 
He had leen dead mitt Hunger. 

MOR. 

This 'Fable advifc?, 

that Nothing is to be defpifed, 

feeing that Nothing i*fo vile anaf 

ab- 



SELECT FABLES OF MSOP. 



abje&um, Quod non 
aliquando efle Ufui. 



abjcft, Which 
fometime be of Ufi. 



may 



FABLE CXX. 



Ds Porco 



Equo. 



Of the Hog and the Horfe. 



POrcus confpiciens Equum 
Belldtoris, Qiii ta/a- 


THE HogleboMng the Horfe 
of a fflarriour, Who arm- 


phradus prodibat ad Pug- 


ed went in Bat- 


nam, inquit, Stulte, Qo 


tle, [aid, Fool, Whither 


properas ? etenlm fortaffe 


doil Thou haften ? /or perhaps 


morieris in Pugnd. 


TJ6o wilt die in /<> Fight. 


Cui Equus refpondlt, 


To whom /^e ^cr/f anfvvered, 


Cullellus adimct ^//aw Tibi, 


A Knife will take Z$ from Thee, 


impinguato inter Lutum & 


fattened amortgll Mud and. 


Sordes, cum S s J)' er ' ts 


Filth, when 7"/6oz/ ySf/// /6ai;^ done 


Nihil dignura Laude ; vero 


Nothing worthy of Praife ; but 


Gloria comitabitur /wflw 


Glory fhall accompany my 


Mortem. 


Death. 


MOR. 


MOR. 


Ha:c Faoula innnit, efje 


This Fable hints, that it is 


honeftius occumbere^ Rebus 


more honeft to die, Things 


geftis praeclare, guanf 


being carried famoufly, than 


protrahere Vltam adtana 


to protrafl a Life fpent 


turpiter. 


bafely, 



FABLE CXXI. 

tie Coriario emcnte Pellem Of the Tanner buying the Skin 
Urji nondum capti a of a Bear not yet taken by 
Venatore. the Huntjman. 

COriarius acceJens ad r T^ H E Tanner coming to 

fanatortm emit Pel/em JL the Hunter bought the Skin 

Urfi ab Eo, & protulit of a Bear of Him, <W proffered 

Pscuniam pi o ". Ille dixit t Money QI //, He fatd* 

Sibi that 

M 



8 4 SELECT FABLES OF 



Sibi ncn effe Pellem Urfi 
in Prafentia / cseterum po- 

Jlridi: profe&urum 

vfnatam, &, Urfo interfec- 
to, polticetur, Se daturum 
Pellem Illius El. Coriari- 
us profeSus in Sylvan, 
afcendit ahiffimam 

Aiborem, ut Jnde profptce- 
ret Certamen Urfi 

& Venatorlf. Venator 
intrepldus profe&us ad 
Arftrura, vbi Urfus /atelmt, 
Canibus immiflis, compulit 
Ilium exirc, ^w, Iftu 
Penatorit e'vitato, pro- 

Jiravit Eum Humi. Tune 
Senator fciens, hanc Feram 
non fevire in Cadavera, fuo 
Anhelitu retento, fimulabat 
5^ mortuum. Urfus olfa- 
cicns, cum dcprehcnderet 
Ilium, nee fpirantem Nafo, 
nee Ore, abfcejjit. Coria- 
rius, cum perfpiceret Feram 
abefle, ac ad e fie 

Nihil amplius Psrtculi t 
deducens Se ex 

Arlorti & accedtns ad Ve- 
natorem^ Qui audebat non- 
dum/urgere, tnonebat I/tum, 
ut fvrgeret : deinde 
interrogavit, Quid Urfus 
cfTet locutus Ei ad Aurem. 
Cui Venator inquit, Mo- 
nuit Me, ne vellem 
deinceps venders Pellem 
Ur/i, nJH priut cepe- 
rim Eum. 



that He had not the Skin of a Biar 
at prtfent ; but the Day 
after He fhould go 

to hunt, and, the Bear being kill- 
ed, He promifes, that He would givs 
the SL'm of k /o #H. The Tan- 
ner having gone into /<^ Wood, 
afcends a w;y high 

Tree, //W thence ^i? might i>e- 
hold the Engagement cf the Bear 
and ftk Hunter. The Hunter 
unajfrigkted having gone / 
the Cave, where the Bear /aj A/V, 
the Dogs being fent in, forced 
Him to go out, Who t the Blow 
of the Hunter being avoided, 
beat Him on the Ground. Then 
the Hunter knowing,/^/ this Bead 
did not rage on CarcafTes, his 
Breath being held, feigned 
Himfelf dead. The Bear fmell- 
ing, when he held 

Him t neither breathing at the Nofe, 
nor Mouth, went away. The Tan- 
ner, when He perceived the Beajl 
to be gone, and that there was 
Nothing more o/" Danger, 
letting down Himfelf out of 
/e Tree, and OT;- to /* Hun- 
ter, Who ^arr// not 
yet to arife, advifed Him, 
that He fbould arife : then 
He ajkedy What //^ Bear 
had fpoke /<? ^'m in his Ear. 
To whom the Hunter faid, /? 
warnedMc,tbat Ifiouldnot be will- 
ing hereafter to fell the Skin 
of a Bear, unlefs I frjl (hall have 
taken /T/m. 



MOR. 



SELECT FABLES OF ^KSOP. 



MOR. 

Hxc Fabula iadicat, in- 
ctrta non habea- 

da pro certis. 



MOR. 

This Falle fhows, thfit uncer- 
tain Things are not to be account- 
ed for certain. 



FABLE CXXII. 

ita >' Milite. Of the Hermit and the Soldier. 



A Certain Hermit, a Man 
o/ mo/? ^ Life, 
ad'ctfed a Soldier, /^a/ fe- 
culrar Warfare being left, W^/V/> 
Few exercife without Of- 
fence of God, and Hazard 
of Life, at length, be would give 
Hirafclf to Quiet of Body, and 
would confult for Safety of Soul. 
To Whom the Soldieryij/W, Father, 
/ quill do what Ton advife ; for 
it is true, tkat at this Tims 
Soldiers neither dare to afk 
Pay, o///jo' it be fmail t 
nor to plunder. 

MOR. 

This Fable (hows, 

^<# Many renounce Vices^ 
becaufe They are not able to ex- 
ercife Them longer. 



QUidam Eremita, Vir 
fancTi/fima Vitae, 

bortalatur Militem, / fe- 
culari Militia relida, Quam 
Pauci exerccnt abfque Of- 
fenfa Dei, s* Difcrimine 
^irV, tandem traderet 
Se j^//Vrt" Corport&, sf 
confuleret Salutl Animre. 
Car Miles inquit, Pater, 
faciam quod wanes ; nam 
*/? verum, yworf hoc Temper e 
Milites neque audent exigcre 
Stipendia, licet fint cxigua t 
neque pradari. 



MOR. 

Fabula indicat, 
renunciare fit Us t 



Hsec 
Multos 

quia ///*' non poffunt 
ercere Ilia amplius. 



FABLE 



86 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE CXXIII. 



De Viro & Uxorc 



QUid am Fir, fua Uxorc 
defun&a, Quam valde 
dilexerat, duxit Aheram, & 
Ipfam Viduam ; Qu<e afli- 
diie oljiciebat Ei V'trtule: & 
fort'ia Facinora prioris Ma- 
riti : Cut, ut r/>r- 
fet Par, Ipfe quoqut refe- 
rebat probatiffimos Mores, 
fe 9 infigrrem Pud'icitlam de- 
funclx Uxoris. Autem quo- 
dam Die, i>a/a fuo 
Fire, dedit Partem Capo- 
nis, Quern coxerat 
Ccenam Utrifq; Pauperi 
petenti Eleemofynam, dicetis, 
Do Hoc Tibi ro Anima 
w prioris Viri ; Qpod 
Marititf audiens, Paupere 
accerfito ab Eo, dedit 
reliquum Caponis li't, 
dicens, Et Ego quoque do 
Hoc Tibi pro Anima met 
defun6tas Uxoris. Sic ////', 
dum dlter ctipit nocere 
Alteri, tandem non habu- 
crunt S>uod coenarent. 

MOR. 

Knee Falida monet, non 
effe pugnandum contra Eos 
hii pofTunt oindicare 
Se o//W. 



Of the Man and Wife 
married. 

^ Certain jffdn, his Wife 
beingdcad,^AoH/2^vcry much 
had loved, married dnotler t and 
# f r a Widow ; Who dai- 
ly oljeSed to Him /^ Virtuet and 
-valiant Deeds c/"^r former Huf- 
band : To Wham, that ^ ^ 
return- the Like, He o^o relat- 
ed / ^ approved Morals, 
and remarkable Modejly of his 
dead Wife. But on a cer- 
tain Day, f//; angry 'with her 
Hnfoand, She gave /\ir/ of a Ca- 
pon, Which fhe had cooked for 
the Supper of Each < to a poor Man 
nfklng an Alms, foying t 
I give y/^/V to Thee _/br the Soul 
c//" my former Hujland ; W r hich 
/.-' Hujland heaving , the poor Alan 
being called ^y Him, gave 
//j/? r/Jj of the Capon /o ^/'w, 
faying, -^^ I alfo give 
TAw to Thee for the Soul c/" my 
departed Wife. Thus r%, 
\vhilft One defires to hurt 
the other, at length had 
not What They might fup on. 

MOR. 

This Fable advifcfi, that it is 
net to be fought agatnjl Thofe 
Who are able to revenge 
Themfelves very well. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. S~ 
FABLE CXXIV. 

De LEONE &? MURE. Of the LION and the MOUSE, 



LE O, captus Laqueo la 
Sylva, cum vidcret 
Se ita ir ret it urn, nt 
r.on. pojjet explicare 

S? inde, ragavit Murem, 
ut, Laqueo abrofo 

ab Eo, liberarct Eum, 
promittens, Se non futurum 
immemorem tanti Benefic'ii ; 
Qjjod cum Mus ffctffet 
prompte, rogavit Leonem, 
vf traderet FHiatn 

Sibi in Uxorem : Leo 
non abnuit, ut faceret 
Rent gratam fuc BencfaAorf. 
intern nova nupta veniena 
ad Virum, cum non 
videret Eum, Cafu prejfit 
Ilium fuo Pede, fe* contri- 
vit. 

Moa. 

Hsec Falula indicat, Ma- 
trimonia & cetera Confor- 
tia improbanda, Q^^e 
ctntrahunlur ab Imbaribus. 



THE Liovjaten in a Snare / 
the Wood, Wjfn He faw 
Himfclf fo entangled, that 
7/<? ct</j ' 0f o3/^ to extricate 
Himftif thence, afked \.\\e Moufe, 
/^a/, the Snare being gnawed 
by /^/m, He would free Him t 
promifing, tint He would not be 
unmindful of fo great a Benefit ; 
Which <wlen the Moufe had done 
readily, Hi a/ked the Lion, 
that He would give bis Daughter 
to Him to Wife : The Lion 
refufed not, that He might do 
a Thing grateful to his Benefactor. 
But the new married Lady coming 
to the Hufband, -when She did not 
fee Him, by Chance prfffcd, 
Him with Her Foot, and trod 
him to Pieces. 



MOR. 



This 



Fable (hows, that Mar- 
riages and other Fellow - 
(hips are to le. condemned, Which 
are contraQed by Unequals. 



FABLE CXXV. 

De ULMO & SILERE. Of the ELM and the OSIER. 



ULmu 
Flu 



Lmus, nata in Ripd 
uminis, irridel^t 
Siler proximum Sibi, 
Ut {Jebile & infirrjnum, 
quod 



THE Elm, born on the Bank 
of a River, laughed at 



the 



Oder 
weak 



next to Him, 
and infirm, 
becavfe 



SELECT FABLES OF 



quod fle&eretur J omnem 
vel leviffimutn Impetum 
Undarum ; autem extolle- 
bat juam Firmitatetn S3 5 
Robur magntficis Verbis ; 
guod Jnconcuffa pertulerat 
affiduos Impetus Amnis 
multos A n n os, Autem 
Ulmus tandem perfrafta 
maxima Violent ia Unda- 
rum, trahebatur ab 

Aquis : Cut Siler 

ridcns, Jnquit, Vicina, Cur 
deferis Me ? Ub't nunc 
eft tua Fortitude ? 

MOR. 

Fabula Indicat Eos effe 
fapientiores, >ul ccdunt 
potentioribus, quam *j>ul 
volentes rejiftere fuperau- 
tur turpitcr. 



becaufe it would be bent at every 
even the lighted Force 
of the Waters ; but She extol- 
led her own Stcadinefs and 
StrengthTOz/A magnificent Words ; 
becanfe unfhook Jhe. had bore 
the daily Attach of the River 
many Years. But 

the Elm at laft being broken 
by the very great Violence of the 
Waters, was drawn along by 
the Waters : To 'which the Ofier 
laughing, faid, Neighbour, Why 
doft tiou forfake Me ? Where now 
is thy Fortitude ? 

MOR. 

The Fable./fouY/^ Thofe to be 
more wife, /Wo yield 
to the more powerful, \hzn They Who 
.willing to rejift are over- 
come bafcly. 



FABLE CXXVI. 



JDe Cera appetente 
Duritiem. 

CEra ingemifcelat, Se effe 
moflem, & procreatam 
penetrabilem cuicunquc le- 
viflimo /5;. Autem widens 
Lateres faclos ex Luio, 
molliores multo, Se perve- 
nifle in tantam Duritiem 
Calore Ignis, ui per- 
durarent m/ra Secula, jecit 
Se / Ignem, ut confeque- 
retur eandem Duritiem ; fed 
ftatim liquefaffa in Igne 
fft confumpta. 



Of 



the Wax dejlring 
Haidnefs. 



THE Wax grieved, \h*t It was 
foft t and ma</ 

penetrable to every the lighted 
Blow. But 

the Bricks madt of 
fofter ^y much, that they 
ram^ to fo great Hardnefs 
by the Heat of the Fire, that They 
laftcd many Ages, // f*/? 
itfelf into the Fire, /ta/ it might 
obtain the fame Hardnefs ; but 
prcfe ntly being melted in the Fire 
it was confumed. MOR. 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 89 

MOR. MOR. 



Hcec Fabula aditionet, 
ne appetarxut, Quod 

ejl denegatum Nob'ts a Na- 
turd. 



This Fable advifes, 

that nut dejire not, What 

is denied Us . by Na- 
ture. 



FABLE CXXVII. 



Agricola affeSante Of the 

Milltiam, 
&f Mercaturam. 



Hufbandman 

Warfare, 
and Merchandife. 



offering 



QUidtmdgricola fcrebat 
<sgre, SeaJJidue volvere 
Terr am, nee fervenire ad 
magnas Divitias fuis per- 
p etuis Labor thus ; cum vt- 
deret nonnullos Milites, Qui 
ita auxerant Rem 

Bello, ut incederent bene 
induti, 5" nutriti lautis 
Epulis agercnt beat am 
Vitam. Igitur fuis Ovibus 
venditis cum Capris ac 
JBobus, emit Equos & 
Arma, & profeSus eft in 
Militiam ; Ubi, cum effet 
pugnatum male a fuo /w- 
peratore, non folum perdidit 
J^w<? habebat, y^i/ etiam 
recef'it multa Vulncra. 
C^uare, Militia dam- 
nata, Jlaluit . exercere 
Mercaturam, ut in Qua 
cxiftimabat efie mnjus 
Lucrum, 5* minorem 
JLaborem. Igitur Pradiis 
venditis, cura impleviflet 
Navim ' Mercibus, capcrat 
navigare ; fed, cum effet 
in 



A Certain Hujbandman bore it 
i//, that He daily ftirred up 
the Earth, nor arrived to 
great Riches by hit per- 
petual Labours ; when /fe 
faiu fome Soldiers, Who 
/o had increafed /7/j ^?a/^ 
in the War, that They .went well 
clothed, and fed with fumpiuous 
Dainties led a happy 
Life. Therefore his Sheep 
being fold with the Goats and 
0., He bought Horfes and 
Arms, and iwn/ into 
/(? ^far ; Where, when it was 
fought unfuccefsfully by his Gi?- 
neral, He not on/v loft 
What Things He had, a/ alfo 
received many Wounds, 

Wherefore, War being' con- 
demned, He refolded to exercife 
Merchandife, as in what 
He thought- there was greater 
Gain, <2^ lefa 

Labour. Therefore his Farms 
being fold, when He had filled 
a Ship with Wares, /rV had begun 
to fail ; but, when /& cwv 



S o SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



;n Ahv, magna Tempejiate iu the Deep, a great Tempejl 
coorta, Na-uis fubmeifa eil, having arofe, the Ship was funk, 



Ipft cum caeteris, 



H 



erant :n i 
ad Unuru. 



Oniiizs peiicre were in 
tu One. 



It, 



the 



reft, 

perifhed 



MOR. MOR. 

Haec Fabula admonet, This Fable advifes, 

Qucmhbet debere cffe con- that every One ought to be con- 

tentum fud Sortc, cum tent with his cwn Lot, whtn 

fa parata ubique. Mifery is ready every where. 



FABLE CXXVIII. 



De ASINO (ff SCURRA. Of the Ass an</ the JESTEI. 



A Sin us ferens indigne, 
quendam Scurratn 

honorari & atniciri pulchris 
Vtflibiu, quia edebat magnos 
5ooj Ventris, acajjit ad 
MagiftratuS) petens f vel- 
Isnt honorare Se minus, 
guam Scurram ; Et cum 
Magljlratus admirantes 

interrcgarent, cur dutxret Se 
it a. dignum ffonore, inquit, 
Quia err.itto majorts Crepi- 
tus Ventris, quam Scurra, & 
e-js abfque Factors. 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula arguit Eos t 
Qiii profiindant fuas Pau- 
n,vf in leviffimis Rebus. 



THE Afs Itarlng it unkindly, 
that a certain Jtfter 
was honoured atkl dot bed in fair 
Garments, becaufc He made great 
Sounds of Belly, wf/ to 
the Magijlrates, dcliring that they 
would not honour Him lefs, 
than the Jefter ; Jtnd when 
the Maijlral?s admiring 

ajked, why He thought Himfelf 
fo worthy of Honour, He faid, 
Becaufe I fend out greater Noi- 
ksoj Belly, than ^ J^r, and 
thofe without Stink. 



MOR. 

This Fable reproves 
Who lay out their 
R/a in the lightejl Things. 



Thofe, 



FABLE 



SfcLECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 



FABLE CXXIX. 



jftt Amhe tdcejjente fuutn 
Fontem Conviciis. 

QUidam Amnis lacef- 
fcbat fitum Fo tern 
Conviciis, ut ir.ertcm, quod 
Jtaret immobilis, nee haberet 
alias Pifces, autem com- 
mendabat Se plurimum, 
quod crearet optimos Pifces, 
9" ferperet per Valles 
blando Murmure. 

Fans indignatus in Amnem, 
velut ingratum, reprejjlt 
Undas. Tune Amnis, /r/- 
t>atus Si Pifcilus & 
dulci Sono, evanuit. 

MdR. 

Haec Fabula notat Eos, 

Q_ui arrogant bona, 

>u<s agiint, Silt, 

(5* non attribuunt Deo, 

a *uo t ceu a largo 

Fonte, noftra Bona pro- 
cedunt. 



Of the River provoking his 
Spring with Reproaches. 

A Certain River pro* 
voked Aw Spring 
wlthReproacheS) &*Jl u gS l fi>i becaufe 
j^/e JlooJ immoveable, nor had 
y Fifh, but com- 

mended Hlmfelf very much, 
lecanfe he bred /ta ^^/? Fifhcs, 
an^/ 'cfept thro* the Vallies 
w//A a pleafant Murmur. 
The Spring angry at the River, 
<?.? ungrateful, kept back 
the Waters. Then the River, de- 
prived both of the Fi/hes and 
the fweet Sound, vani/hed away. 

MOR. 

This /W^ marketh Thofc, 
Who ar*ogate the good Things, 
W^iVA They do, to Themfelves, 
and do not attribute Them toGod t 
from Whom, as /row a large 
Fountain, cur ^doi Things -^iriS- 
cced. 



FABLE CXXX. 



tnaligno ^ 
Dtmtine. 



Of the wicked JJ/an and 



QUidam malignus Vir, 
<rw perpetravifTet 



A Certain wicked Man, 

_ <zy^f He had committed 

p/urima Scelcra, to" fzpius many Wicked nefles, and often 

taptus, & eonclufus Carcere, ^'j laken t and /&w/ in Prifon, 

was detained very 

N 



clofel 



92 SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 



pervigili Ctiftodia, imflo- 
rabat Auxilium Damor.is, 
Qui fftpewanero a fruit ////', 
& liberavit Eum e multis 
Periculis. Tandem Dtmon 
apparuit Ei iterum depre- 
kenfot & imploranti folitum 
Auxilium, habens magnam 
Fafcem Calcecrum pertufo- 
rum fuper Humcros, dicens, 
Amice, tion poffum effe 
Auxilio Tibi amplius ; 
etenira peragravi tot 
Loca pro liberando Te, 
ut contriverim omnes ho 
Ca/ceos, & <?/wf nulla P^- 
cunia fupcrcft Mihi, Qu^a 
valeam compararc olios ; 
qua re per ills* 

MOR, 

Hxc Fabula admonet, 
ne cxiftime-mus noflra 
Peccata fore fcropcr impu- 
nlta. 



with a watchful Guard, im- 
plored the Help of the Devil, 
Who oftentimes was la'nh Him t 
and freed Him out of many 
Dangers. At length the Devil 
appeared to Him again ta- 
ken , and imp/or ing the ufual 
Help, having a great 

Bundle of Shoes worn 
out vfon his Shoulders, faying* 
Friend, / am not able to be 
a Help to Thee longer ; 
for I have travelled thro* fo many 
Places for freeing Thee, 
that I have worn out all thefe 
Shoes, and moreover no Mo- 
ney remains to Me, with Which 
/ may be able to get others / 
wherefore thou fault ptri/&. 

MOR. 

This Fable advifes, 

that <we faould not think our 
Sins will be always unpunifo- 
ed. 



FABLE CXXXI. 



De Avibus volentilus 
cligere plures Reges. 

AVes cor.fultabant de 
eligendis pluribus 

Regibus, cum Aquila fola 
nan ~ pojfet regere tantos 
Greges Volucmm^ & fe- 
ci/ent fatls Voto, nifi 
deftitiffent a Conjilio 

Mouitu Cornicis, Q[uae, 
(um Caufa interrogabatur, 
cur 



the Birds i^ "Mining 
to choofe mor* Kings. 

E Birds cenfulted about 
X choefing more 

^Tm^j, feeing that /^ Eagle alone 
cyflj o/ fli/^ to rule fo great 
Flocks of Birds, and T^j a/ 
done enough to their Wifo, unlefs 
They had defijled from the Counfel 
by the Advice of the Crow, Who, 

the Caufc was afted, 
why 



SELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. 93 

cur non duceret plures wlty She did not think mere 

Regej e'igendos, inquit, Kings tvere to be chofen, faid, 

quia mult't Sacci impler.tur becaufe many Bags are Jilttd 

difficilius, quam unus. more difficultly, than one. 

MOR. MOR. 

Hxc Fabula docet e/e This Fable teaches it to be 

longe melius gubernari ab by far better to be governed by 

Uno, quam a taultu Prin- One, than by many Prin- 

cipibas. ces. 



FABLE CXXXII. 



De Mulicre, 
Se velle 
fuo ^itVo. 



<j>ua dicebat, 
mori fro 



Q Used am Matrona, ad- 
m o d u m pudlca & 
amar.tljjtma Viri, ferebat 
aegre, Maritum detine- 
ri ad-verfa Valetudinc : la- 
mcntabatur, ingemifcebat, 
5*, ut te/laretur fuutn 
jfmoran in Virnm^ rogabat 
Mortem, ut, ^ efltt tr^- 
/wra Maritum 5/^/, 

potius vellet occidere Se, 
quam Ilium. Inter &fff 
Verba, wrV Mortem veni- 
entem horribili Afpcclu> 
Timore Cujus preter- 
rita, & jam pcenitens fui 
J-'otl, inquit, Ego non fum, 
Quern petis ; jacet in 
L,e8o, QjJ_em venlfti 

occiiura. 



the Woman, Who faid, 
that She waj willing to die for 
her Hujband. 



Mat 



A Certain Matron, ve- 
ry chajle and 
mojl loving of her Hufband, lore it 
ill, that the Hujband was kept 
down by bad Health : She la- 
mented, She grieved, 
and, that She might tejlify Her 
Love to her Hit/band, She a/Iced 
Death, that, if He was 
f natch her Hufband /row 
He rather would kill 
than ,#/tfz. Among 
Words, She beholds Death com- 
ing with a horrible slfpefl, 
with the Fear c/" Whom being af- 
frighted, andnow repenting of Her 
Vow, She faid, / am not He, 
Whom Thou feekeft ; He lies in 
the Bed, Whom thou comtjl 
about to kill. 



thefe 



MOR. 



94 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP, 



MOR. 

Haec Fabula indicat, Ke- 
nem eflc adeo amantem 



simici, Qui non 
efle bent bibi, 
teri. 



MOR. 

This Fable (hows, that nt 
One is fo loving 



malit of a Friend, Who had not rather 
Al- ic was ivell to Him, /tan Ano- 
ther. 



FABLE CXXXIII. 



Dt Adolefccnte canentc in Cf the * young Man Jmging at 
Funcre Matris. tie Funeral of his Mother. 



QUidam Vir profeque- 
batur defunffam 

Uxorem, Qut tffcrt ba- 
tur ad Sepulchrum 
Lachrymis & FUtibus ; veto 
ftus Filius canebat, Q<ii, 
cum Incrcparetur a Pa- 
trc, ut amens, Qui can- 
tarec in Funere Mntris, 
cum deberet eflc majlus, & 
una Secum, inquit, 
Pater, Ji conduxiili 
Sacerdotety ut canerent, cur 
irajcerti Mihi concintnti 
gratis ? Cut Pater 
inquit, Tuum Officium, & 
Sacerdotum non ell idem. 

MOR. 

Hsec Fabula Indicat, 
Qmnia non efle decora Om- 
nibus. 



A Certain Afan follow- 
ed )&/j ^a</ 
Wife, 0tt was 
borne /o the Grave 
^/V^ Tears and Weepings ; but 
^/J Son /? Who, 
a;^n he was blamed by the Fa- 
ther, as mad, //''/iff could 
fing at the Burial o/a Mother, 
when /& oz/fA/ to be faa, and 
/o cw^ together tu'itb Him, faid, 
Afy Father, if You have hired 
Prit/ls, that /|?y m;^A/ ^w^, why 
are you angry with Me Jinging 
gratis ? 7"o -a'Aom the Father 
faid, Thy O^t and 
that of the Priefls is not the fame. 



MOR. 



This 
// 
Men. 



fliows, that 
are not decent for AH 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 95 
FABLE CXXXIV. 



De relotypo Vtro, Q^ui dede- 
rat Uxorem cuftodiendain. 

ZElotypus Vlr dederat 
Uxorem, Oil am com- 
pererat vivere fat-urn pudi- 
ce, cuidam Amico, Cut 
fideret plurimum, cuflodi- 
endam, pollicitus ingentem 
Pecuniam, fi obfervaret Earn 
ita diligenter, ut nullo 
Modo violaret conjuga- 
iem Copulam. At Ille, ubi 
xpertu& effct hane 

Cuftodiam nlmis difficilern 
aliquot Dies, fcf comperifltt 
fuum Ingenium vinci Vei- 
futiS Mullens t accedeus ad 
Maritum, dixit , Se 

nolle g ere re hanc tarn 
duram Provinciatn amplius ; 
quandoquidem ne Argus 
auidemy Qjii Jttit tot us 
cculatuf, poIFet cujlodire Jm- 
pudicarn Mitlierem : Ad- 
didit preterecii fi^neccfle, 
St malle dtferre 

Saccum plenum Pulicibus in 
Pratum quotidie integro 
AnnO) &, Sacco foluto, 
fafcere Eos inter Kcrbai, 
$5* Vefpcre rec/u- 

cere omnes Domtim, quam 
fervare impudicam Mttlie- 
rcm uno Die. 

MOR. 

Hasc Fabula indicat, nuUot 

Cuftodes tjjs lU diligentcs, 

Qui 



Of the jealous Man t Who had 
glvm his Wife to be guarded. 

A Jealous Man had given 
his Wife, Whom He bad 

found to live but a little chafte- 
ly, to a certain Friend, to Whotit 
He could trufl very muck, to be 
guarded, having promifed much 
Money, if He could obferve Her 

fo diligently, that by no 
Method She might violate the con* 

jngal Tie. But He, when 
He had experienced tbit 
Charge too difficult 

fome Days, and had found 
his Wit to be overcome by theCun 
ning of the Woman, going to 
the Hnfband, faid, that He 
was unwilling to bear this fo 
hard a Province longer ; 
feeing that not Argu* 
indeed, Who was all 

eyed, could be able to keep an un- 
chafte Woman : He add- 
ed moreover, if it <was neceflary, 
that He had rather carry down 
a Sack full of Fleas into 
a Meadow </a:'/y for a whole 
Tear, and, the Sack being loofed, 
/o feed Them among the Grafs, 
and in the Evening /</ bring them 
back all Home, than 

/o /?<rf/> an unchafle Wo' 
man one Z)s. 



This 
Guards 



MOR. 

Fable fliowg, 
are fo 



that no 

diligent, 

Who 



9 6 S-ELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. 

Qui valiant cuftodire Who can be able to keep 
impudicat Mulicres. vnchajie Women. 



FABLE CXXXV. 



Be Viro recufantc Cly- 
ftcres. 

QUidam fir, Germanus 
^- Natione, ad m od u m Jives, 
zgrotabat ; ad curand'im 
Quern plures Medici 
acccfferunt, (etemm Mufcae 
convolant catervatim ad 
Mel) Unas Quorum dicelat 
inter Cater a, efie 

Opus Clyfteribus, ft vcl- 
let convalefcere ; Quod 
cum Vir audirtt, in fact us 
Medicina hujufmodi, per- 
cilus Furore, jubet 

Medicos ejic'i 

Domo, dicens t Eos 

effe infamos, Quit cum 
Caput doltret, vellent 
mcderi Podicem- 



Of the Man refining Cly- 
flcrs. 

A Certain Man, a German 
by Nation, very rich, 
was fick ; to cure 

Whom many Phyjicians 

came, (for the Flies 

Jly in Heaps to 

the Honey) Or.: of Whom fald, 
among otherTbings, that there was 
Need of Clyftcrs, if He was 
willing to grotu well ; Which 
when the Man heard, ur.ufed 
to a Medicine of this Kind, mo- 
ved with Anger, He command: 
the Phyficians to be e#ft out 
of the Houfe, faying, that They 
were mad, Who, when 
the Head grieved, tuert willing 
to cure the reech. 



MOR. 

Hsec Falula indicat, 
Gmnia, qua m vis falutaria, 
vidcri fs" afpera Of obfu- 
tura infuetis & inexper- 
tif. 



MOR. 

This Fable (hows, 

that all Things, alt ho* healthful, 
feem both rough and hurt- 
ful to the unaccvftomed and inex~ 
perienced. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF MSOP. 97 
FABLE CXXXVI. 



De Afino tegrotante, & 
Lupis vifitantibus Eum. 

A Sinus agrotabat, & 
Fama exiverat, Eum 
moriturum cito ; Igitur, 
cum Lupi venffitit ad 
vijendum Eum, ff peterent 
a Filio, guomoffo ejus Pater 
valcret, Ille rtfpondit per 
Rimulam Ojlii, melius, 
an am vellttis. 

MOR. 
Hacc Fabula Indicat, 



Of the Afs being Jtck, and 
the Wolvts vifiting Him* 

TH E Afs -was fid, and 
Fame had gone out, that He 
would die quickly ; Therefore, 
when the Wolves had come to 
fee Him, and afked 

of the Son, how hia Father 
did, He anfwered thro* 
the Chink of the Door, better, 
than Ye would have Him. 

MOR. 



This Fable fhowd, 

rbear 
Others with 

Moleftia, hios tamen cupi- Trouble, Whom yet They de* 
unt interire celeriter. fire to perifh quietly. 



quod Multi fngunt ferre that Many feign to 

of 



FABLE CXXXVII. 



De Nuce, Slj 
Mature. 



Q 



Uaedam Mutter inter- 



tem Viam fccus, C^ijse im- 
petebatur Saxis a Populo 
prastereunte, quare eflet 
it a amens, ut quo r*^- 
retur pluribus ff majoribus 
Verberibust eo procrearei 
plures 3" praeftantiores 
Frufius ? Cui nywj/, 
Efne immemnr Proverbii 
die en - 



Of the Nut-tree, the 4fs, and 
the Woman. 



A Certain Woman a/k- 
*^^ ed a Nut-tree, grow, 
ing^y fAr^sy-5u/fWhich waslea- 
ten with Stones ^y the People 
pafling by, w/^y It was 
fo mad, /^/ by how much // was 
beaten with more and greater 
Stripes, by fo much /'/ yielded 
more and better 

Fruits ? To whom it faid t 
A.U thou unmindful of the Proverbs 



$8 SELECT FABLES OF JESO?. 



Jicsntlt ita, Nux, Afinus, faying thus," 4 Nut-tree t an Af, 
Mulier, // ligati W a Woman, <7rr bound 
#*<: tria Jy a like Law. 73^ three 
do Nothing rightly, if 
ceafe. 



ccflant. 



Lege. 

Nil reSe t fi Verbera 



Mo*. 



MOR. 

Haec /*/* indfcat, This Fable ffiow. 

Homines faepe /0/<?rf con- /<z/ JI/i often are wont to 
fodere Se propriig wound Themjelvts with their own 

Darts. 



FABLE CXXXVIII. 



De Afino, non invcnierite 
Fintm Laborum. 

A Sinus angelcitur plurf- 
* mum hyberno tcmporc, 
quod afficerctur nimio 
Frigore, & haberet durum 
Viclum Pakarum ; quare 
optabat vernam Tern per iem t 
& teneras Herb as. Sed 
cum Ver adveniflet, &? 
cogeretur a Domino, 
Qui crat Figulus, defcrre 
drgillam in Aream, & 
Lignum ad Fornacem, & 
inds Latcres & Tegulas ad 
di?erfa Loca ; pertsefus 
Vent) in Quo tolcrabat 
tot Labores, fperabat 
^Eftatem, ut Dominiis 
\mpeditus Mcffc 

fateretur Enm quiefcere ; Scd 
tune quoque, cum compel- 
leretur ferre MefTes in 
A ream, & inde Triticum 
Domum, nee cflet Locus 
Qui- 



Of the Afs, not finding 
an End of his Labours. 

THE Afs tuas grieved very 
much in winter Time, 
that He was affe&ed with too much 
Cold, and had hard 

Meat of Chaff"; wherefore 
He defircd the Spring Seafon t 
and th'e tender Grafs. But 
when Spring came, o*/ 
He was compelled ly the Matter, 
/Wo was a Potter, to carry 
Clay into Ak Tan/, and 
Wood to //if Furnace , and 
thence Bricks an</ Tilci /o 
diverfe P/flf ; tired 

of the Spring, in Which He bore 
yb many Labours, /^ hoped for 
Summer, /^a/ the Mafter 
being hindered by the Harveft 
would fuffer Him fo r^ / But 
then alfo, W>fn He was com- 
pelled to bear the Corn into 
the Barn, and thence the Wheat 
Home, nor was there S^a 
for 



SELECT FABLES OF ^SOP. 99 

Qnieti Sibt ; fait em fperabat 
Aqtumnum fore Finem 
Laborum : Sed, cum ne 
tune quoque cerneret Finem 
Malorum, cum quotidif 
Vinum, Poma, & Lignum 
eflent portanda, rurfus 
efflagitabat Niyem fc? 

Glaciem Hyemis, ut tune 
faltem aliqua Requies con- 
cederetur Sibi a tantis 
Laborious. 

MOR. 

Hsec Fabula indicat, 
ejje nulla Tempora prsefen- 
Quac non funt fub- 



jefta 



ls Laboribus. 



for Reft, for Him ; at lea ft He 
that Autumn -would be the End 
o/*/&;V Labours : But, -a>en not 
/^fl alfo He perceived an End 
of Evlhy feeing that .daily 
Wine, Apples t and 7^boJ 
were to be carried, again 
He longed for the Snow and 
Ice of Winter, that //JOT 
at lead fame keft m/^/J/ be 
granted to Him /row fo great 
Labours. 

MOR. 

This Fable fhows,' 

/^fl/ M^r r^ no Times of the pre- 
fent Life, Which are not fub- 
jeft /o perpetual Labours. 



FABLE CXXXIX. 



M 



ANY Mice, 

ing in the Hollow 
a ' Wall, efpied 

Cat, Who /<7y oa 
boarded Floor, with her Head 



t)e Mure, Qui volebat Of the Moufe, Who was willing 
contrabere Amicitiam cum to contract a Friendfhip 'with 
Fele. the Cat. 

GOmpIures Mures, com- 
morantes in Cavo 
Parietis, contemplabantur 
Felem, Qtjje incumbebat in 
Tabulate, Capite 

dcmtjffa, & /''/?' Vnltn. 
Tnc Unas ex lis /'nyu/V, Hoc 
JJniniat videtur admodum 
benignum, Cff mite ; 
ttenim prasfert quandam 
SantTimomam ipfo Fultu ; 
volb alloqui Tpfam, 

fe 1 n eft ere ind'iffolulilem 
Amicitiam cum Ea ; ^?/<* 
cum dix'tffety & acccjpf. 



Then One c/ them [aid, 
Animal feems i;<fry 

kind and mild ; 

/or She fhows a certain 
San8ity in Her very Countenance ; 
I am willing to fpeak to Her, 
and to knit /i indffifublc 
Friendmip TO/'/^Her; Which Things 
when He had f aid, and &?</ <a/)- 
prcached 

o 



ioo SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 

/ft propius, erat captus, proachcd nearer, He was taken, 

& dilaceratus a Feie. and torn to Pieces by the Cat. 

Tune Cseteri, v'ukntes Hoc, Then the Rdl, feting This, 

aicbant Secum, profcfio /aid with Themftlves, truly 

non eft addendum temere It is not to be trufttd rafhly 

Vvltiti. to the Countenance. 

MOR. MOR. 

Haec_ Faltita ionuit, This Fable hints, 

Jionatus hon c(Te ludicutidoi llat Men are not /o & judged 

c I^u/iti, fed .v Opetibus ; by i/jeCounUnance, but ij Works ; 

riw atrocrs Z,v/z farpe Jeiing that fierce Wolves often 

dditcfcant fub ot/W Pcile. / y?-:W under a S/;fc]>'s Skin. 



FABLE CXL. 



Z)^ Afino, ^z/i fervicbat 
ingfato Hero. 

A Sinus, ^ul ferviveiat 
ingraio Htro multos 
Annos inoffenfo Pcde, 
yj-wf/, lit Jit i dum ^ 
preffus gravl Sarcina, & 
incedcret falebrofd Via, 
recidebat fub Otic re. Turn 
impiacabius Do minus <rom- 
pellebat Euro furgere mull is 



J^erletibut. 



nuncupans 



)gnai)um & pigrum Animal. 
^/ mifcr s4Jinus dicebat 
Secum, inter /i<ft Verbera, 
Infelix Ego, J^K/ fortittis fum 
tarn ingratum Herum ! Nam 
quamvis ferviverim Ei multo 
Tcmpore fine QJfenfd, tamen 
ion compenfat hoc onw 
Deliftum m> tot priflinit 
Beneficiis. 



Of the Afs, Wko fcrved 
c ungrateful Mafter. 

THE Afs, ff^ohad ferved 
0/7 ungrateful Mafter many 
Years wi/A an ir.offenfive Foot, 
cnce, as it happens, whilfl //f <a/^J 
prefled with a heavy Load, ar.d 
went in an uneven Way, 
fell under the Burden. Then 
the implacable Mafter com~ 
pe! led Him to rife with many 
Blows, calling Him 

on idle and dull Animal. 
But the miferable 4fs faid 
io//A Himfclf) among thefe Stripes, 
Unhappy I, WAo have got 
yo ungrateful a Majler ! For 
altho* I have fcrved ///m a long 
Time without Offence, yet 
He dots not tLtigh this one 
Fault ///.o mj fo many 
Benefits. 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 101 

MOR. MOR. 

Hzc Fabula confifta eft This Fable was feigned 

sn Eos, S>ui immemores againjl Thofc, Who unmindful 

Benefciorum collatorum of Benefits conferred 

Sibit profequuntur etlam on Themfelves , profccute. focn 

minimam 0/enfam fui Be- the lead Offence of their e~ 

nefafloris in Se atroci nefacior on Him with a cruel 

Pxna. Punsjkmtnt. 



FABLE CXLI. 



De Lupo, fitadcnte Hif- 
trici, ut deponeret 
fun Tela. 

LUpus efuriens in ten - 
derat Minimum in Hij- 
tricem, Q^iam (amen ;;on au- 
debat invaiien, qviii erat 
munita unJique Sag'ULis. 
Autem Ajlutid excogitata 
ptrdtndi Earn, ceeplt fua- 
dcre ////', ne porta- 
ret tantum Onus Teloritm 
Tergo Temfore Pacis, 
quandoq-j'idcm Sagitcarii non 
bortartiit Alicj'.iid, nijl cum 
"Temfui Prxlii iri/laret ; 
Cui Hijlrlx inquit, 

Eft credendum fempsr efTe 
TTempus pvxliandi adverfus 
Lupum. 



MOR. 

Haze Falula 
fapientem Virum 
fempcr , ejfi 
adverfus Fraudes 
rum t & HcjYtuK. 



innuit, 

oportere 

m u n i t u m 

Inimico- 



0/"the Wnlf, perfuading the Por- 
cupine,/^ She would lay down 
kcr Darls. 

TH E Wolf /junserinjr had 
bent bis Mind \\pon the Por- 
cupine, Which nevertbeleft He dar- 
ed not to attack, becaufe She <was 
fortified every inhere with Daits>. 
But a cunning being thought on 
of dejlroying Her, He began to per- 
fuade Her, that She would not 
carry fa great a Burden of Darts 
on her Back in a Time of Peace, 
feeing that the Archers did not 
carry any Thing, unlefs when 
the Time of Battle approached : 
To whom tike Porcupine faid, 
// is to be believed always to be 
a Time of fighting- asain/i 
a Wolf. 

MOR. 

This Fable hints, 

that a wife Man ought 
always to be fortified 
aga'iiift Deceits of Ene- 
mies t and Foes. 

FABLE 



102 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP-. 
FABLE CXLII.' 



De MURE libcrantc 
MILVUM. 

MU S, confpicatus 

Milvum implicitum 
Laqueo Aucup'ts, mifertus eft 
jfvis, quamvis Intm'icx Sibi ; 
Vinculifque abrofis 

Dentibus, fecit Viam 
Sibi evolandi. Mil v us, 
immemor tanti Beneficil, 
ubi vldlt Se folutum, 
corripiens Murem fufpican- 
tem Nil tale, lacerqint 
Unguibus, & Roftro. 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula indicat, 
malignos Viros folere repen- 
dere Gr -alias hujus Modi 
fills Belief aftorlbus. 



Of the MOUSE freeing 
the KITE. 

THE Moufe, having cjpted 
the Kite entangled 

in the Snare of the Fowler, pitied 
the Bird, ahho' an Enemy to Her ; 
and the Bands being gnawed 
with her Teeth t She made a Way 
for Her offying out. The Kite, 
unmindful of fo great Benefoy 
when He faiv Himfelf loofed t 
feizing the Moufe fufpeft- 
ing no fuch Thing, tore Her 
with her Claws, and Bill. 

MOR. 

This Fable fliows, 

that wicked Men are wont to re- 
pay Thanks of this Kind 
to their BenefaSors. 



FABLE CXLIII. 

De Cochlea petente a Ja<oe t Of the Snail dejr'mg of Jupiter % 
ut poffet ferre that She might be able to bear 

foam Domura Secum. Her Houfe with Her. 



CU M Jupiter, ab Ex- 
ordio Mundi, 

dargiretur fingulis Anima- 
libus Munera, Qu<t peti- 
iffcnt, Cochlea petiit 
,33 Eo, tit poffet 
circumferre fuam Domum. 
Interrogata a Jove, ywar^ 
expofceret tale Munus ab 
Eo, 



WHEN Jupiter, from the Be- 
ginning of the World, 
bejlowed on all Ani- 

mals the Gifts, Which They 
had defired, fta Snail defircd 
of. Him, ^fl/ She might be able 
to bear about her Houfe. 
Being afked by Jupiter, why 
She demanded fuch a Gift /r/w 
Him, 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 103 

Eo, Quod futurum erat Him, Which would bye 

grave, ' & molejlum illi, heavy, and troublefome to He.r^ 

inquit, malo ferre tarn She faid, I had rather bear fo 

grave Onus perptfuo, quam heavy a Burden perpetually, than 

now pofle vitare malum fco/ to be able to avoid a bad 

Picinum, cum -W&W libuerit. Neighbour t when /lilt. 



MOR. 

Haec Fabula 
Vicinitatetn 
fugiendam omni 
mo do. 



indicat, This 



MOR, 
Fable 



fhows, 



Malorum t/xit tb& Neighbourhood^ bad MR 
Incorn- is to be avoided with every Dif~ 
advantage. 



FABLE CXLIV. 



Z)t Herinaceo ejiciente 
Vipcram Hojpitem. 

HErinaceus., pr<efentiens 
Hyemem adveniare, 
rogavit Viper am, ut eonce* 
dcret Locum Sibi in fua 
Cavern a adverfus Vim 
Frigoris ; Quod cum Ilia 
fectffet, Herinaceus, pervol- 
ucns Se hue atque illuc, 
pungebat Viperam Acu- 
mine Spinarum, & torqitebat 
vehement er ; Ilia videns Se 
male trafiatam quando 
fnfcepit Herinaceum Hofpi- 
tio, orabat Eum blandis 
Verbid, ut exiret, 

cum Locus effet nimis 
anguflus duobus. Cui 

Herinaceus inquit, Ex- 
eat, Qui nequit manerc 
hie ; quare Vipera fen- 



efTe 



Locum 
Sibi 



Of the Hedge -Hog cajling out 
the Viper her Hojl. 

THE Hdge- Hog, perceiving 
the Winter to approach, 
alked the Viper, that She would 
grant a Place to Him in her 
Cavern againjl the Extremity 
of the Cold ; Which when She 
had done, the Hedge- Hog, roll- 
ing Himfelf hither and t hither t 
pricked the Viper with the Sharp, 
ncfs of his Darts, and tormented Her 
vehemently ; She feeing Herfilj 
ill treated ivher< 

She took the Hedge-Hog Gueft- 
wife, entreated Him with fair 
Words, that He would go out, 
feeing that the Place was too 
narrow for both. To whom 
the Hedge- Hog yi/W, Let Him 
go out, Who cannot abide 
here ; wherefore the Viper per* 
ceiving, there was not a Place 
for 



104 SELECT FABLES OF 



Sibi tit, ctffit iltine 
ex Hofpitio. 

MOR. 

Hsec Falula indicat, Eos 
non efle admittendos in Con- 
fortium, Q^i poffunt ejicere 
Nos. 



for Her there, departed thence 
out of her Lodging. 

Mo*. 

This Fable ftiows, that 'They 
are not to be admitted into Pel' 
loiuflj'ip, Who are. able to caft out 
Us. 



FABLE CXLV. 



quodam 

Poetd. 



QUJdam Avnciia acce- 
dens o/ Poetam, ca/uj 
Agros coiebat, cum o^n- 



interrogabat Eum, quo 
Pa8o poffct v'tvere \\.z fofas ? 
Cui ///f inquil, Tanturr. 
coepi ^ folus, 
adveniiU /&<r, 

MOR. 



Hasc Fabula 
erudites Viros, 
nue Jlipantur 



fndicat, 

conti- 

Turba 



z & C/" a certain Hujbandman and 



A Certain Hvjlandman com- 
ing fo a Puct, -K/Ac/r 
Fields He ploughed, when ^? had 
found Him a/en; among his Books^ 
afkcd ^;m, by what 

Means He was able to live fo alene? 
To whom //V faid, / <?/:/) 
began to be alone, Jwcs 
You came hither. 

MOR. 

This Fable fliovrs, 

Mfl/ learned Men, /^o conti- 
nually a thronged with a Crowd 



dod'iffitnorum Virorutn, o/" /^ moft learned 

tune tfle y^/oj, cum juerint then are alone, vhen /, 
inter illiteratos Homines. amongft illiterate Fellows. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE CXLVI. 



105 



De Lupo, 
Ovis, 
Gregcm. 



induto Ptlle 
i devorabat 



LUpus, inctutus Pelle 
Ovis, immifcuit Se 
Grtgi Ovium, & 

quotidie occidebat Aliquam 
ex is : Q^tod cum Pa- 
ftor animad'utrtiffet, fufpen- 
dit Ilium in alt't/Jinid 
Arborc. Autem caeteria 
Pafloribns interrogantibus, 
cur fufpendiflct Ovcm, 
aiebat, Quiffem Pellis ejl 
Ovis, ut videtis ; avtem 
Opera erant Lupi. 

MOR. 

Haec Falula indi'cat, 
Homines non efTe judican- 
dis ex Habittt, ltd ex 
Operibus ; quoniam Muhi 
faciunt Lupina Opera fub 
ls Ovium. 



0/the Wolf, clotted with the Skin 
of the Sheep, Who devoured 
the Flock. 

A Wolf, */// with the Skin 
of a Sheep, mixed Himfelf 
with a Flock of Sheep, and 
////y flew fame One 

of TAfTO . Which when the Shep- 
herd had olferved, He hang- 
ed Him on a very hi^h 
Tree. But the o-hcr 

Shepherds a fk i n g, 

why He had hung /&? Sheep, 
He faid, / B </// the Skin is 
a Sheep's, j you fee ; but 
the Works were a Wolf's. 



MOR. 



This 



but 



fhow, 
judg- 



Fable 

// ATf are not 
ed by #a3/V, 
Works ; becaufe Many 

efo Wolves' Works under 
the Clothings of Sheep. 



FABLE CXLVII. 

Dt CANE occidente OVES O/* the DOG killing the SHEE? 
yb/ Domini. of his Mafter. 



Uidam Paflor dederat 
fuas Ovt-s Cant culto- 
diendas, pafcens Ilium 
optimis CiKs. At Ille f<epc 
occidebat aliquant Ovem ; 
cum Pajlor animad- 
vrrtiffct, 



A Certain Shepherd had given.. 
/$ Sheep /o his Dog to be 
kept, feeding Him 

wfV:> /^<r 3^ Meats. But He o/te 
killed fame one Sheep ; 
Which when the. Shepherd had ob- 



106 SELECT FABLES OF 



vertiflVt, capiens Canero, 
volebdt occidcre Eum. 
Cui Canis inquit, iQnare 
cupis perdert Me ? 

Sum unus ex tuis domffticis ; 
potius interfice Lupum, Qui 
Continue infld'tattlr tuo 
Ovili. I mo, inqitit Pa- 
ftor, Put'j Te magls dignlim 
fiTorte,c(yi\n\I*upum: Etcnitn 
Jlle proficetur Se mem 
Hoftem pal am ; wrS Tu,fbl> 
Specie Amicitis, quotidie 
imfn'muis meum Grtgem. 

MOR. 

Hzc Falula fndi'cat, Eos 
effc punlendot tange tnagls % 
Qui Ifdunt Nos yi/3 Specie 
jlmlcit'ue, quam ^/ pro- 
fitcntur Se notlros Immlcoi 
palam. 



fervcd, taking the Do)j $ 
He iuat tutUing to kill Him. 
To \vhom /^ Dr^ faid, Wbtrefoti 
dofl Thou defire to dejlroy Me ? 
/ am one c/" thy Domeft'tcs ; 
rather /^ the Wolf, Wh 9 
continually lays 'wait for your 
Sheepfold. Nay, /jjj the Shep- 
herd, / think You more worthy 
of Death, than ike Wolf : For 
//if profefles Himfelf my 
Enemy openly ; litt Thou, undef- 
the Show of Friendfiipy daily 
dimitilfkeft my Flock. 

Mo*. 

This /aJfe (hows, //&/ T% 
are to be punijhsd by far wor^, 
Who hurt Us t/</irr a Pretence 
Friend/hip, than 77*^ /^o pro- 
efs TLemf el-vet our Enemies 
openly. 



P/ 
fef 



FABLE CXLVIII. 



ARIETE pugnante cum 
TAURO. 



Rat 



idam Aries 



Eat quam 
</tr Oves, ^f 
habebat /am firmum Caput 
& Cornueit ut ^a/ra & 
facile fuperaret cttero; 
Arittes ; jwart cum inveniret 
nulhim Ar'tetem amplius, 
Qui anderet objijlere Sibi 
occurfavtiy elatus 

crebris Vitloriis, anfus eft 
provocare Taurum ad Pug- 
nam ; fed primo Congreffii, 



Of th 



the BULL. 



THERE was a certain Ram 
among the Sheep, Who 
had fo firm a Head 
and Horns, that prejently and 
eajily He overcame /Af other 
Rams ; wherefore when Atf found 
iro jRjw more, 

/P$o dared to with/land Him 
running againft Him, puffed up 
with frequent Victories, he dared 
to provoke a Bull to Bat' 
tie i but at the frjl Ofet, 
-n 



SELECT FABLES OF 7ESOP. 107 



cam arietaviflet in 

Front era Tauri, eft reper- 
cufius tarn atroci Iftu, 
ut fere moriens, diceret 
haec, Stultus Ego ! 



quid cgi 



? Cur aufus fura 



lace/fere tarn potentem Ad- 
verfarium, CK/' Natura 
creavit Me imparem ? 

MOR. 

Haec Fabu/a Indicat, won 
^j ccrtandum cum poten- 
tioribus. 



when He had butted again/I 
the foiehead of the Bull, He was 
ftruck back with fo cruel a 2?/c*y, 
that almofl dying, He faid 
thtfe words, Fool that I am ! 
what have I done ? Why dared I 
to provoke fo powerful an Ad- 
verfary, to Whom Nature 
hath created Me unequal ? 

MOR. 

This Fable (hows, */&/?/ /V 
M of to be drove w;VA the more 
powerful. 



F A B L- E CXLIX. 



De Aquila rapiente Filios 
Cuniculi. 

AQUILA, nidulata in 
altiffima Arbore, ra- 
puerat Filios Cuniculi, 
Qm pafcebatur non longe 
illinc, in Praedam fuorum 
Pullorum ; Quam Cuni- 
culus orabat blandis Verb'u, 
ut dignaretttr reftituerc 
fuos Filios Sibi ; At Ilia, 
arbitrans Eum effe pu/illum 
& terreflre Animal, 

dilacerabat Eos ffkgin&nt, 
Quos apponebat fiiis PW///J 
eptilandos m Confpeftu 
Matris : Tune Canicular, 
commotus Morte fuorum 
Filiorum, haud permifit 
hanc Injuriam abire fmp.u- 
nitara ; ctenim efFodit 
radicitus, !%u<e 
fofti- 



0/"thc Eagle friatchlng the Young 
of the Coney. 



THe TLzg 
a very high Tree, hadfnatch- 
ed away the Young of the Coney, 
Who was fed not far 
from thence, for the Prey c/" her 
Young ; When the Co- 
ney befought with fair Words, 
that .S/ji? would vouchfafe to reftore 
for Young fo Her ; But Sfo, 
fuppofing Him to be a /?///? 
and earthly Animal, 

tore Them with her Talons, 
Which She put to her To-ang 
to eat in the Sighc 
of the Dam : Then the Coney, 
moved at the Death of her 
Toung, permitted not 

this Injury to go unpunifh- 
ed ; for She dug up 
the Tree by the Roots, Which 
fuftain- 



io3 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



fuftincbat N'ulurn, Qux 
procidens Icvi Impulfu 
Ve n t o r u m , dtjtcit 

Pull os Aqulle adhuc implu- 
wes in Humunt y Q^ij 
dspafti a /V/ir pras- 
*Buerunt Solatium Doloris 
Cuniculo. 

MOR. 

Hasc F alula iddicat Ne- 
minem frctum fua Potentii 
deaere defpicerc in;bedl!iores t 
cum aliquando infirmiores 
ulcifcantur lujurias potsn- 
tiorum. 



f attained /^ A'^7. whicfc 
/J//JHJ with a light JWj/I 
of the Winds, threw do<wn 
the Young 0/"/ta Eagle, as ytt wn- 
Jledg^d l upon /^; Ground, Who 
&ij? w/ // by /if /#7A/ ^^ra/?j- af- 
fordtd Comfort of Grief 



MOR. 

This Fable (hows, that n 

Man relying on his Power 

ought to defpife the Weaker^ 

feeing \h*\. fomctimes the Weaker 

rs-oeng: the Injuries of the mors 
powerful. 



FABLE CL. 



De Lupo, Plfce Fluvii, 

qffeSante Regnum 

Marls. 

ERAT Lupus, in quo- 
dam Amne, >ui ex- 
cedebat cecterot Pi fees 
fjufdtm Fluminis in Pul- 
chritudine, Magn'ttudine, ac 
Roborc ; tinde Omnes admi- 
rabantur, tf afficiebant 
Eum raaximo Honors ; 
quare elatus Superbia 
capit appetere majorem 
Principal urn. Jgitur Am- 
nc relifio, in Quo regna- 
verat multos Annos, ingref- 
fut eft Mare, ut vendi- 
caret Rcgnum Ejus Si- 
ft ; fed offendcns Delphi- 
num mirte Magnitudinis, 



0/"the Pike, a Fiji of the River. 

affeSing the Dominion 

of the Sea. 

THERE was a Pile, in a cer- 
tain River, Who ex- 
ceeded the other Fifties 
of the fame River in Fair- 
nefs, Greatnefs, and 

Strength ; whence All admir- 
ed, and affe&ed 
Him with the greateft Honour ; 
wherefore puffed up with Pride 
He began to defire greater 
Command. Therefore the Ri- 
ver le'mg /eft, in Which He had 
reigned many Years, He entered 
into the Sea, that he might chal- 
lenge the Dominion of It to Him- 
felf ; but finding a Dol- 
phin of a ivonderful Greatnefs, 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 109 



>ui rcgnabat in Illo, eft 
it a inftSatut ab I Ho, ut au- 
fugiens vix ingrederetur 
Odium Amn'iS) nnde 
aufus ejl exire non amfliiis. 

MOR. 

Ha;c Fabuta admonct Nos t 
ut contenti nollris Rebus, 
ne appetamus, ^/< funt 
longe tsajora nc/?w Viribus. 



J^o reigned m It, //: -UMJ 
fo purfuzd by .#/, that jlyi*g 
a-Wtiy fcarce could He enter into 
the Mouth of the River, whence 
He durjl to go out no more. 

MOR. 

This Falie admonifhes Us, 
that content with our own Things, 
We do not defire, What are 
ly far greater f&m our Strength. 



FABLE CLI. 



De OVE con-vitiantc 
PaRori. 

OVis eonvitlabatur Pa- 
ftori, quod non con- 
tentus Lafte, ^i/<j<y mul- 
gebat ab Ea i fuum Ufum, 
& 7/j/w! Fiiiojum, 

infvper denudaret Illam 
Vellere. Tune Paftor 

iratus trahebat ejus Filium 
ad Mortem. Ovis inqnit, 
Qtid pejtis poles facere 
Mihi ? Pa (tor inquit, ut 
cccidam Te, 5* projiciam 
devorandam JL/upis Cff 
Canibns. 0-u/j filuit, 

formidatit ad hue major a 
Mala. 

MOR. 

Hcec Fabula indtcat, 
Homines non dcfaere excan- 
defcere in Deum, ii pcrniittat 
DivJtias 5* Filios ntiferri 
Ipfis ; rww poflit 

viferre ctiam majora Sup- 
plicia 



0/"the SHEEP railing on 
the Shepherd. 

A Sheep railed on a Shep- 
herd, /rt/ not C'ir - 
tent with t}i'..- Milk, IVlleb He 
milked /rew Her /or his own Ufr, 
and //6<f t//^ of his Children, 
moreover He ft ripped Htr 
of the Fleece. T^un the Shepherd 
angry dragged her Young- one 
to Death. The Sheep fays, 
What worfe are You able to do 
to Me ? The Shepherd f.iys, that 
Iinay&i!/Tl\ee,and throw Thee out 
to bt devoured by the Wolvts and 
Dogs. The Sheep held her Peace, 
fearing yet greater 

Evas. 

MOR. 

This /aJ& (hows, 

fta/ Afc?/j ought not /<? grow 
tuarm againft Gctf, \$ He pennitteth 
Riches and Children to be talcn 
from Them ; when He is able 
to bring even greater Punifh- 
ments 



no SELECT FABLES OF JEBOP. 



plicia Ipjis 8c vlventilus jnents upon Them both 
& mortals. and dead. 



FABLE GUI. 



De Auriga &? Rota 
Currfis Jlridente. 

AUriga interrogabat 

Currum, quare 

Rota, >U(e erat deterior, 
ftrideret, cum cseteri non 
facer ent idem ? Cut 

Currus inquit, JEgroti 
femper confuevcrunt effe 
morofi ff queruli. 



Of the Waggoner and the Wheel 
of the Waggon creaking. 

TH E Waggoner aflted 
the Waggon, wherefore 
the Wheel, Which was worfe, 
creaked, when the reft did 
not do the fame ? To whom 
the Waggon faitl, The Sick 
always have ufcd /0 be 
morofe and complaining. 



MOR. MOR. 

HxcFat>u/aindicat,MaIa This Fable fhows, that Evils 

femper folcre impellere always are wont to drive 

Homines ad Querimoniam. Men to Complaint. 



FABLE CLIII. 



De Viro wienie experiri 
Amicos. 

QUidam V'tr admodum 
dives 6c liberalis^ 
habebat magnam Copiam 
jfmicorvm, Quos fape invi- 
tabat nd Co^nam ; W Quern 
accedelant libentiflirne. 

dulem volens experiri, an 
effent ^/?/ Sibi 

in Laboribus 55" Pericnlis, 
fonvocavit Eos omnes, di- 
cens. Inimicos effe cbortos 
Sibi, 



O/" the Man willing to tty 
his Friends. 



A Certain Man very 
r/V/6 and liberal, 

had a ^ratf Abundance 
of Friends, Whom often He in- 
vited to Supper ; to Whom 
They went raolt willingly. 
JBitt willing to try, whether 
They would be faithful to Him 
in Labours and Dangers, 
He called together Them all, fay- 
ing, that Enemies were rifen up 
againft Him> 



SELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. in 



Sibi, Quos ftatmt 

occldere ; quare, Armis cor- 
reptis, treat Secum, 
ut ulcifcerentur Injurias 
lllatas Sibi. Turn Oranes 
caperunt excufare Se, 
prater Duos. Igitur, ceterls 
repudiates, habuit tantum 
Illos Duos in Nuniero 
Amicorum. 

MOR. 

Hsec Fabula indicat, ad- 
iierfam Fortunam ejje 
optimum Experimentum 

Amicitiae. 



againft Him, Whom He refolvcd 
to kill ; wherefore, Arms being 
taken up, theyfhouldgo with Him, 
that They might revenge the Injuries 
offered to Him. Then All 
began to excufe ThemJ 'elves , 
except Two. Therefore, the re/1 
being rejected, He held only 
Thofe Two in the Number 
of Friends. 

MOR. 

This Fable fiiows, that ad- 
verff Fortune is 

the beft Experiment 

of Friendfhip. 



FABLE CLIV. 



De Vulpe laudante Camera 
Leporis Cani. 

CUM Vulpes fugeretur 
a Cane, & jamjam 
effet capienda, nee 

cognofcerat ullam aliam 
Vtarn evadendi, inquit, O 
Canis, quid cupis perde- 
re Me, cujtis Caro non po- 
teft effe ulli Ufui Tibi I 
cape potius ilium Leporem ; 
(etenim Lepus aderat prope) 
cujus carnem Mortales dicunt 
tffe fuaviffimam. Igitur 
Cam's, motus Confilio 
VulpiSy Vulpe omiffd, 
infectitus ^Leporem ; Qjjem 
tamen non potuit capere ob 
ejus incredibilem Veloc'i- 
tutem. Poft paucos Dies 
Lepus 



Of the Fox praiftng the Flcfli 
of the Hare to the Dog. 

"y^HEN 'the Fox was put to flight 
by the Dog, and juft now 
was to be catched, Jtor 
knew any other 

Way of efcaping, He fald> O 
Dog, why dojl Thou defire to de- 
ftroy Me, whofe Flejb can- 
not be of any Ufe to Thee ? 
take rather that Hare ; 
(for the Hare *was nigh) 
whofe Fie Hi Men fay 

is mod iwect. Therefore 
the Dog, moved with the Counfel 
o/" fta Fcx, the Fox being let alone , 
purfued the Hare ; Which, 
yet He could not take for 
her incredible Swrift- 

ntft. After a few Days 
the Hart 



in SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



Lepus conveniens Pulpem 
accufabat Earn vehemeri- 
ter, (ctenlm audirat ejus 
Vcrba) quod demonllraflet 
Se Cani. Cut 

Vulpes inquit, Lepus, quid 
accufas Me, cum lavidavi 
Tc tantopere ? Quid 
diceres, fi c'ttvperafftm 
Tc > 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula indicat, 
Homines machinari Perni- 
clem Aliis fub Specie 
Laudatlonis. 



ty (f or 
Wor 



the Hare meeting the Fox 
accufed Her vehement- 

had heard her 
rds) becaufe She had fhown 
Him to the Dog. To whom 
the Fox faid, O Hare, ivhy 
do You accuft Me, when / have 
praifed Thee fo greatly ? What 
ivculd Toufay, if / bad difgraced 
You ? 

MOR. 

This /o^/V (hows, 

A&d/ ^/i* contrive Dtjlruc- 
tion for Others z/n^r the Pretence 
of Commendation. 



FABLE CLV. 

De Lepore petente Callidi- Of the Hare a/king Crafti- 
tatem, & Vulpc Celeri- nefs, and the Fox Swift- 
neft from J-u-tr. 



THE Hart and the Fox leg- 
ged of Jupiter ; This, 
Ma/ He would join Siviftnefs 
to her Craftinrfs ; That, that 
He would join Craftineft to his 
S-wtftnefs : To Whom Jupiter 
thus anfwered; We have bellowed 
G//>/ to all /'/' Crea- 
tures, from /i? Beginning 
of the World, ctrt o/" our mojl ll- 
leral Bofom ; but to have given 
All to One would have been the In- 
jury of Others. 



LEpus s? Vulpes /</#- 
^n/ a Jove ; Hasc, 
/ adjungerrt Ctttnfatem 
fuz Calliditati ; I lie, / 
adjungeret QalKditatem fuse 
Celeritati : Q^iibus Jupiter 
ita refpondit ; Klargiti fumus 
Munera fingulis dn'w.anti- 
&us, ab Origine 

Mundi, r noftro nbtralffi- 
mo Sinn ; y^^/ dtdiflTc 
OmK/'<z Uri fuffit lu- 
juria Aliorum. 



MOR. MOR. 

HJCC Fabula indicat, This Fable (hows, 

efTe larglttim fua that Gad has given hit 

Muncra Gifts 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 113 



Munera ita sequali Lance % 
ut Quifgue dcbcat ejje con- 
tentus fua SGI te. 



Gifts 4t>rf y equal a Balance^ 
that Every One ought to be con- 
tent with bit own Lot. 



FABLE CLVI. 



Z)g Equo ineutto, fed 
veloci, & cxteris irri- 
dentibus Eum. 

COmplures Equi fuerant 
addufli ad Circenfes 
Ludos, ornati pulcherri- 
mis Phaleris, prajter Unum, 
Qtiem cttteri irridebant, ut 
incultum, &f ineptum ad 
tale Certamen ; nee cpina- 
bantur, futurum unquam 
Vi6lorem. Sed ubi Tempus 
currendi advenit, &, Sig- 
no Tuboe data, 

cunc\i exfiliere e Carcere, 
turn demum innotuit, quanta 
Hie paulo ante irrifus fu- 
pcraret ceteros Velocitate ; 
etenim, omnibus aliit relic- 
tis pnjl Se longo intervallo, 
affccutus tjl Palmam. 

MOR. 



Of the Horfe 
fivift, and / 
ing /ffm. 



but 
mock- 



MANY Horfet were 
brought to the Circenjian 
Games, adorned with moft beauti- 
ful Trappings, except One y 
Whom the reft laughed at, as 
ugly, and urxfit for 

fuch an Engagement; nor 
think, that He would be 
Viftor. But when 
of running approached, z<c\&,the Sig- 
nal of the Trumpet being given t 
all leaped from the Goa/ t 
lhenat/ii/2 it appeared,^ hoiu much 
This a little before derided ex- 
celled the reft ia Swiftnefs ; 
for, all the others being 
left behind Him at a long Diftance* 
He gained the Viftory. 

MOR. 

f, Homines The Fable Jignijiesy that Men 
non judicandos ex Habitu, are not to be judged by Habit t 
fed w Virtntc. but by Virtue. 



FABLE 



114 SELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. 



FABLE CLVII. 

De Ruftico adm'iffo ad Of the Countryman admitted to 
Jurifconfultum per Focem the Lawyer by the Voice, 
Hxdl. of the Kid. 



h'dam Rujiicui, im- 
plicitus gravi Lite, 
accfjfit ad quendam Jurif- 
confultum, ut, Eo Patrono, 
explicaret S:. At 

I He impeditus aliis Nego- 
tiij jubet renunciari, 
Se nunc tton pnffe vaca- 
re Illi s qua re 

abiret rediturus 

alias. RulHcus, 

>ui fidebat El plurimura, 
ut veteri ? fido dmico, 
nunquam admittebatur. 

Tandem deferent Hasdum 
adbuc ladtantem, Iff 
pingucm, Secum, ftabat ante 
Fores Jurifperiti, & 

vellicans Haedum, coegit 
Ilium balare. Janitor, 

>ui folebat admittere Eos, 
Qui portarent Dona, ex 
Pracepto Heri, 

Voce Hsedi audit a, 

illico aperient Januam, 
jubct Homincm Intro'lre. 
Tune Rufticus, conver- 
fus ad Haedum, inqvif, Mi 
Hfdule, ago Gratias Tibi, 
)tue eifecifti has Fores tarn 
faciles Mibi. 

MOR. 

Fabula indicat, nullas 

JRes cfTc tarn duras tf diffi- 

cilcs, 



A 



Certain Countryman, en- 
tangled / a heavy Suit, 
'a/fnf to a certain Law- 
yer, //ta/, He being Patron, 
He might unfold Him/elf. But 
/fo hindered wi//6 o/^tr Af- 
fairs orders Him to be told, 
that He now <w^j not able to be at 
Leifure for Him ; wherefore 
He Jhould go away to return 
another Time. The Countryman, 
Wbo trufted to Him very much, 
as an old and faithful Friend t 
never was admitted. 

At length bringing a Kid 
a,s yst fucking, and 

fat, nviib Him, He flood before 
the Doors o/" /A? Lawyer, and 
plucking the Kid, forced 
Him /o /(*<2/. The Porter, 
W/&0 was wont /o <//// Thofe, 
Wbo brought Gifts, by 
the Command of his Mafter, 
the Voice of the Kid being heard, 
prefently opening the Gate, 
orders the Man /a enter. 
Then fta Countryman, having 
turned to the Kid, /0/</, My 
little Kid, I give Thanks to Thee, 
W^o haft made thef: Doors fo 
cafy to me. 



MOR. 

The Fable flows, 
Things arc yb hard o 



that no 

</ diffi- 

cult, 



SELECT FABLES OF ^SOP. 115 

cilcs, Quas Munera non cult, Which Gifts do not 
afctiunt. open. 



FABLE CLVIII. 



De Sene deficient e 

Saxis jfuvencm 

diripientem Poma Sibi. 

QUidam Sencx drabat 
Juvenem diripientem 
Poma Sibi blandis Verbis, 
ut defcenderet ex 

Arbore, nee vcllet auferre 
fuas Res; fed cum funde- 
rct Verba incaffum, jfuvene 
contemnente ejus jEtatem 
&? Verba, inquit, Audio, 
effe aliquam Vlrtutem non 
tantum in Verbis^ verum 
e tlam \ n Her bis ; igitur cccpit 
vellere Gramen, & jacere in 
Ilium ; Quod 'Juvenls 
confpicatus rldebat vehe- 
raenter, y arbitrabatur 
Senem delirare, >ui cre- 
deret, Se pofTe depel- 
lere Eum ex Arbore. Tune 
Scnex, cupiens experiri 
Omnia, inquit, Quando Verba 
^ Tierbse vaAf/ Nil 
adverfus llaptorem mearum 
Rerum, agam Eum 

Lapidibus, in >uibus quoq; 
r//Van/ efie Vlrtutem ; & 
jaclens Lapides, Quibus 
implcverat Gremiuzn, cocgit 
Ilium dcfcendere, ^ abiie. 



Of the old Man driving down 
with Stones the young Man 
flealing Apples from Him. 

A Certain old Man befought 
a young Man flealing 
Apples from Him withfairWords, 
that He would defcend out of 
the Tree, nor would take away 
his Things ; but when He poured 
out Words in vain, the\young Man 
defpifing his Age 

and Words, He fata*, I hear, 
that there is fome Virtue not 
only in Words, but 

alfo in Herls ; therefore He began 
to pull theGrafs, and to throw it at 
Him ; Which the young Man 
having feen laughed vehe- 
mently, and thought. 
the old Man to doat, Who be- 
lieved, that He was able to drive 
down Him out of the Tree. T^ra 
the old Man, dejiring to try 
a// Things, fa id, wtan Words 
aizfl? Herbs o>flr7 Nothing 
again/} the Stealer c/" roy 
Things, / will drive Him 
with Stones, in Which alfo 
They fay that there is Virtu: ; and 
throwing Stones, <a///A which 
He had filled A/V ///>, he forced 
///'w to defcend, <7/7</ to go away. 

MOR. 



n6 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



MOR, 




MOR. 






Hnrc Fabvla indicat, 


This Fable 


fhows. 


Omni a 


tentanda 


that all Things are 


to be 


tried 


Sapienti, 


prinfquam 


by a wife Man, 


before 


that 


confugiat ad 


Auxlltutn 


He jlceth to 


the 


Help 


Armorura. 




of Arms. 







FABLE CLIX. 

De Lufcinia pollicente Of the Nightingale promt/ing 
Accipitri Cantum pro to the Hawk a Song for 
fud Vita. her Life. 



LUfcinia comprehenfa 
a famelico Accipitre, 
cum intelligcret, .5V 

fore devorandam Jib Eo % 
rogabat Eum blandu, vt 
dimittcrrt Se, polli- 
cita, Sefe relaturam 

tngentem Merccdem pro 
tanto Beneficio. Autem cum 
Accipiter rogaret, Quid 
Gratia poflet referre 

Sibi ; inquit, Demulcebo 
tuas Aures du!cilusCant'\bu3. 
Accipiter refpondit, Malo, 
demulceas meum Ventrem ; 
poffum vivcre f:ae tms 
Cantibus, fed non fine 
C'tlo. 



MOR. 

Fabula docet, uti- This Fable teacheth, that pro- 

Ha anteponenda Jitable Things are to be preferred 

jucvndis. to phafant. 



THE Nightingale being caught 
by a hungry Hawk, 
ii'hen She underftood that She 
fhould be devoured by Him, 
afked Him fairly, that 
He would difmifs Her, having 
promifed, that She would return 
a vaft Reward for 

fo great a Benefit. But tuhen 
the Hawk ajkea* What 
Favour She was able to return 
to Him ; She faid, I will foften 
thy Ears with J<weet Songs. 
The Hawk anfwered, / had rather , 
thou ftiotildeft foften my Belly ; 
/ am able to live without thy 
Songs, but ncf without 
Meat. 

MOR. 



F A B L F 



SELECT FABLES OF 

FABLE CLX. 



117 



De Leone eligente Porcum 
Socium Sibi. 

LE O, cum vcllet 
adfcifcere Socios Sibi, 
& multa Animalia optarcnt 
adjungtrc Sefe Illi. fc? 
expofcerent Id Votis & 
Prccibus, czteris fpretis, 
volult in ire 

Societatem folura cum Porco. 
Autem rogatus Caufam, 
refpondit, >uia hoc Ani- 
mal eft adeo tidum, ut nun- 
quam relinqueret fuos Arnicas 
& Socios in r///o, quanturavis 
niagno, Difcriminc. 



MOR. 

Haec Falula 
Amicltiam Eorum 
dam, Oui Tempore 
referunt 



fitatis 



docet, 

appeten 
Adver- 
Pedera 



a praeftando Auxilio. 



Of the Lion cboojtng the Hog 
a Companion for Hunfelf. 

THE LION, >wben He would 
get Companions to Him f elf, 
and man\' Animals tu'iflxcl 
to join Tbtrnfcl-vcs to Him, and 
required It with 4 Vovvs ami 
Prayers, the others being defpifcd, 
He w as willing to enter into 
Society only ivilh the Hog. 
But being afked the Caufe, 
He anfwerc-d, Btcaitfi this Ani- 
mal is TO faithful, that He ne- 
ver tur/iihl tca-ve his Friends 
and Companions in 'cy,. altho' 
great) Danger. 

MOR. 

This ^a3/<? teaches, 

that the Friendfhip of thofe is to It 
dejtred. Who in the Time of Ad- 
vcrfity </9 o/ /r^w ^a^ a Foot 
yVom affording Aff.ftance. 



FABLE CLXI. 



De Ciiiice petente Cibum & 
Hofpitium ab Ape. 

CUM Culcx hyberno 
Tempore conjicerct, Se 
periturum Frigore & 
Fame, acceffit ad Alvearia 
Apum petens Cibum B 5 
Hofpitium ab Eis ; ^a.? 
fi fi'lffct confecutut ab /J 
pro- 



O/" the Gnat a/king Meat 
Lodging of the Bee. 



WHen ^^ Gna^ in theWlnler 
Time conjcfturtd, that He 
fliould perifh tuitb Cold and 
Hunger, He went to the Hives 
of the Bees ajiing Meat and 
Lodging from Them ; Which 
if Ht Jhould obtain from Them 
He pro- 



uS SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



promittebat, Se edofturura 
J^ilios Eorum Artem 

Muficae. Tune qusedam 
Apis refpondit, At Ego 
mallem, quod met Liberi 
edifcant incam Artem, Q^uae 
potent eximere Eos a 
Pertculo Famis if Frigoris. 



He promifed, that He would teach 
the Children of Them the Art 
of Mufick. Then a certain 
Bee anfwered, But I 

had rather, that w_y Children 
Jbould learn my ^//-/, Which 
'will be able to exempt Them from 
/^ Danger of Hunger on*/ Cold. 



MOR. 

Hsec Fabula admonet This 
nos, ut erudiamus noftros Us, that 
Liberos his Artibus, 
valent vindicare Eos 
Inopia. 



MOR. 

admonifhes 
itiflrufl our 

Children in thofe yfr/j, Which 
are able /o defend Them yrowj 
Want. 



FABLE CLXII. 



De Afino Tuliclne, & 
Lepore Tabellario. 

LEO, Rex Quadrupe- 
durn, fugnaturus 

adverfus Volucres, inflruebat 
fuas Acies : Autem inter- 
rogatus ab Urfo, Quid Iner- 
tia AJini, ant Timidi- 
tas Leporis conferret Vidto- 
liam i, C*uos ccrnebat 
adefle ibi inter Cfttrot, 
refpondit, Afmus, 

Clangore fu<e Tubs, 
concitabit Milites ad 

Pugnam ; vero JLepus fan- 
<?etur Officio Tabeliarii 
ob Celeritatem Pedura. 

MOR. 

Fabula Jtgnificat, Ncmi- 
yjni eJTi adeo eontempttbikm, 

CMli 



Of the Afs //je Trumpeter, and 
//6f /Tari? the Letter-Carrier. 

THE L,ion,/ta.S r ;'n i 2'ofthefour- 
footed Beaftsj about to fight 
sgainfl the Birds, difpoied 
his Troops : But being afk- 
ed by the Bear, How the Slug- 
giflinefs of the Afs, or the Fearful- 
nefs of the Hare would bringV\ta- 
ry to Him, Whom He fatu 
to be prefent there among the reft, 
He anfwertd, The Afs, 
with the Sound of his Trumpet, 
ivi/l roufe the Soldiers to 
the Fight ; but the Hare will per- 
form the Office of a Letter-Bearer 
thro' the Svuiftnefs of his Feet. 

MOR. 

The Fable fignifies, that no 

One is fo contemptible, 

Who 



SELECT FABLES OF jESOP. 119 

Qm non poffit prodefle Nobis Who cannot be profitable to Us 
in allqua Re. iafome Thing. 



FABLE CLXIII. 



De Accipitribus Inimicit 
inter Se, Quos 

Colwnbe compofuerunt. 

ACcipitres laimici inter 
5tf decertabant quotiJ'te, 
& occupati fuis Invidiis 
minime inftjlabant alias 
Aves. Columbas dolentes, 
IjCgatis tnffis, compofuere 
oj .- Sed ////, ubi /KH/ 
effefti Am'tcl inter ^, 
non definebant vexare & 
occiJere casteras imbecilliores 
Aves, y maxime Cotumbas. 
Turn CoUimbx dicebant, 
Quanta trat Difcordia 
Accipitrum melior Nobis, 
^w^ffz Concordia. 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula admonet, 
Odia malorum Civium 
inter ^ potiue altn- 
da t quam extinguetula, tit, 
dum certant inisr 

Se, permlttant bonos 
fires vivere quiete. 



Of the Hawks Enemies 
among Themfelves t Whom 
the D;i'fs reconciled. 

THE Hawks Enemies among 
Themfel'ves contended daily t 
and bitfed with their own Enmities 
they very little infejled the other 
Birds. The Doves grieving^ 
Ambafladors be tag fent, reconciled 
Them : But They, wher. They were 
made Friends among Themfehes^ 
did not leave off to -vex and 
kill the' other weaker 

Birds, and moftly the 
Then the Doves 

By hoiu much was the 
of the Hawks Letter 
than their Agreement. 

MOR. 

This Fable admonilhes, 
that the Hatreds of bad Citizen: 
among Themfelves rather are to be 
nourijked than extingui/bcd, that, 
ivbiljl They contend among 
Themfelves, They may permit good 
Men to live quietly* 



Doves. 
(aid, 

Difcord 
to Us, 



FABLE 



120 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE CLX1V. 



Da Senc wienie 
re Mortem. 



differ- 



QUidam Senex rogabat 
^-- Mortem, Q^ae advenerat 
crept ura Eum e 

Vita, ut deferrety 

dum conderet fuum 

Tcjiamentum, & prgpararet 
caetcra neceffana ad 

tantum Iter. Cj 

Mors inquit, Cur monitus 
toties fl Me now prapardjli 
Tc ? -EV, cum ///< dice ret, 
<?KO</ nunquam viderat Earn 
Liniea, inquit, C'wm quoti- 
die rapicbam non wzo^o tuos 
JEquales, Quorum JVw//i 
fere j am reftant, verum 
etiam jfwucnes, Pueros, cf 
Infantes, nonne admombam 
Te iua Mortalitatis ? Cum 
fentitbas tuos Oculos 
tabffcere, tuum Audit urn 
miriui, & tuos cfftercs 
Scnfus dejicere indies, nonne 
dicebam Tibi, Me tjje 
propinquam ? & negas, 
Te ^ admonitum ? 
yr/ar/f non eft Jffircndum 
ulterius. 

MOR. 

HJEC Fabula. indicat, quod 
debemus vi-vere, quafi^/>wy5;r 
cernamus Jllsrtem adeffe. 



0/the old Man being willing to 
defer Death. 

A Certain old Man afked 
Death, Wiio came 

to fnatch Him out of 
Life, that #<? would defer it, 
till ft nW<; his 

Willy and prepared 

the other necejjary Things for 
_/o ^rraf a Journey. To whom 
Death faid, Why warmd fo 
often y Me A<7^ /0a no/ prepared 
Thyfelf? Md, when ft faid, 
that He never Aa</ feen Him 
fo/o/v, He faid, When dai- 
ly / fnatched away not o/y thy 
Equals, of Which 2Vc<r 
almoft wow remain, but 
alfo Toung Men, Boys, and 
Infants, did not I admonijb 
Thee of thy Mortality ? When 
Thou perceivedft thine Eyes 
/0 ^row //TOT, thy Hearing 
to be leflened, and thy C//VT 
Senfcs /o decay daily, did I not 
fay to Thee, that I was 
near ? and ^/? Thou deny, 
that Thou /&<?/? been admonifhed ? 
wherefore it is not /o fo deferred 
longer. 

MOR. 

This Fable fliows, that 
We ought to //w as if always 
We faw Death to be prefer.t. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE CLXV. 



121 



D Avaro Viro alloquente 
Sacculum Nummi. 

QUidam a-varus Vir 
moriturus, & relic- 
turus ingentem Acervum 
Aureorum male partum, 
intcrrogabat Sacculum 

Nummorum, Quern jvjjtt 
affcrri Sibi, Q^ibus 

ejjet allaturus Voluptatem ? 
Cui Sacculus inquit, Tuis 
Haeredibus, >ui profun- 
dent Nammos quasiitos a 
Tc tanto Sudore, in 
Scortis Cs" Conviviis ; 3* 
Dsemonibus, Qui manci- 
pabunt tuam Animam 
tfternis Suppliciis. 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula indicat ej/e 
ftultiffimum labor are 

in Eis, Q^ias ftnt 
allatura Gaudium Aliis, 
aulem Tormenta Nobls. 



Of the covetous Man fpeaking to 
the Bag of Money. 

A Certain covetous Man 
about to die, and about to 
leave a vaft Heap 

of golden Pieces /// gotten, 
ajked a Bag 

of Monies , which be commanded 
to be brought to Him, to whom 
He <was about to bear Pleafure ? 
To Whom the Bag faid, To thine 
Heirs, Who will 

fpend the Monies gotten by 
Thee with fo great Sweat, upon 
Whores and Feafts ; and 
to the Devils, Who will tor- 
ment thy Soul 
with eternal Punifhments. 

MOR. 

This Fable (hows it to be 
a mod foolifh Thing to labour 
in thofe Things, Which may be 
about to bear Joy to Others, 
but Torments to Us. 



FABLE 



122 SEL-ECT FABLES OF 



F A B L E CLXVI. 



De Vulpe &? Capro. 

VUlpes y Caper fiti- 
bundi defcenderiint in 
<juendam Puteum ; in Quo 
cum perlibiffent, Vulpes 
ait Capro circumfpicienti 
Reditutn, Caper, elto bono 
Animo, namq; excogitavi, 
quo paflo nterquc Jinius 
reduces. Siquidem Tu 
friges Te refitim, prior ibus 
Pedibus admotis ad 

Parietcm, 9" reclinabis 
tua Cornua, Mcnto addnfto 
ad Ptcl:us, Ego tranfiliens 
per tua Terga & Cornua, 
& evadens extra Ptittitm, 
educam Te ifthinc 

pojlea, Cujtis Conjilio 

Capro kabente Fidem, atq; 
obtemperante, ut Ilia jubc* 
bat, Ipfa profiliit e Puteo, 
*c deinde geftiebat pre 
Gaudio in Margine Putei, 
& ex-ultabat, habens Nihil 
Curac de Hirco. Caterum, 
cum incufaretur ab Hirco, 
lit fdtfraga, refpondit, 
.Enimvero, Hirce, ft eflet 
Tibi tan turn Senfus in 
J\Iente quantum ejl 

Setarum in Mento, r.on tle- 
fcendtffes in Puteum, 

priufquam habul/fes cxp'.o- 
ratum dc Redifu, 



Of the Fox and the He-Goat. 

A FOX andzGoz\.ldng thir- 
Jly defcended into 
a certain Well ; in Which 
when They had well drank, the Fox 
fays to the Goat looting about for 
a Return, Goat, be o/" good 
Cheer, for I have thought 
by 'what Means \Ve both wy ^* 
brought back. If truly Thou 
v/7.' /// ly/rrhyfelf^rfl/Vjthy fore- 
Feet being fet to 

the Wall, and wilt lean forward 
/Ay Horns, /Aj Chin being drawn 
to thy Breaft, / leaping 
over thy Sack and Horns, 
and efcaping out of /Ae /JV/ 
will bring out TA<v thence 
afterwards. To whofe Counfcl 
the Goat having Faith, oJ 
obeying, flj She com- 
manded ', She leaped out of /A* #W/, 
and then jumped for 

Joy upon the Brink o/" / Well, 
and rejoiced, having na 
Care of the Goat. /?/, 

when She tvas accufed by the Goat, 
as a League- Breaker, She anfwercd , 
Indeed Goat, // there had been 
/ 77'^ as much of Senfe in 
thy Mind as //v/v w 
of Hairs on thy Chin, thou wculdjl 
not have defcended into the Well, 
before that thou hadjl examin- 
ed about a Return. 



MOR. 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



Mo*. 

Haec Fabula innuit, 
pritdentem Virum delere 
explorarc Finem, antequam 
venlet ad peragendam Rem. 



MOR. 

This Fable hints, 

that a prudent Man ought 
to examine the End, before that 
He tomes to do the Thing. f 



FABLE CLXVII. 



De Gallis cf Pcrdice. Of the Cocks an</ the Partridge. 



CU M Shtidam haberet 
GW/wJDomi, mercatus ejl 
Perdicem, 5" dedit am 
in Societatem Gallorum 
alendam, & faginandam 
Una tarn Zis. Galli 

g'i/7"* P ro &" mordebant 
' abigebant Earn. Autem 
Perdix affliclabatur apud 
Se, exi/limaas talia 

inferri Sibi a Gallis, 
quod fuum Genus efiet 
alienum ab Illorum Genere. 
^i?ro ubi won multo />o/2 
afpcxit ///oj pugnantes 
inter Se, ef mutuo 
percutientcs, recreata a 
Mcerore tff Triftitia, inquit, 
Equidem pofl Hasc non af- 
flifiabor amplius, widens Eos 
dimicantct etiam inter Se. 



MOR, 

Hzc Falula 
prudentes Viros 



nnuit, 
ferre 

Contumeliq* illatas <a Alie- 
nigenis, J^MOJ vident K<> 
abftinere a5 Injuria 
uomffticorun, 



w 



HEN a certain Man had 
Cocls9X.llom*,fy bought 

a Partridge, a^/ gave ^' 
into the Company of the Cocks 
to be fed, and fattened 
together with Them. The Cocks 
every one for liimfelf bit 
and drore asvay .//. But 
the Partridge was afflicted <with 
Herfeif, thinking that fuch things 
were offered to Her by the Cocks, 
becaufe her AtW was 

different from Mf/r Kind. 
j8?// v/hen o/ much after 
She faw TAfnj fighting 
amongjl Thcmfelves, and mutually 
Jlriking t recovered from 

Grief and Sadnefs, She faid, 
Truly after thcfe Things I /hall 
not be afflicted more, feeing Them 
fighting even amongjl Themfelves. 

Mop.. 

This Frtifc hints, 

that prudent Men cw^f to bear 
the Contumelies offered by Fo- 
reigners, Whom They fee not 
to abftairi from the Injury 
of their own Countrymen. 



R 



FABLE 



!2 4 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



F A B L^E CLXVIII. 



Dt JACTATORE. 

QUidam V":r pcrcgrina- 
tus aliquandiu, cum 
i'nijjet reverfus Domum 
Uerum, cum jaftabundus 
przdtcaret tnu/ta aiia gejla 
a Se viriliter in diverfis Re- 
gionibus, turn vero Id max'i- 
mt, quod Rhodi fuperaf- 
fet Omnes faliendo : Rho- 
illos, Qui ad fuer ant, efle 
Teftei ejufdem Ret : 
UP, us E or urn, 

Qui aderant, refpondens illi 
inquit, O ffcmo, fi IJlud eft 
vertim. Quod ioqucris, Qjjid 
0/wj eft Ti3 Teftibus? 
Ecce Rhodium ! Ecce hie 
Certamen faliendi ! 

MOR. 

Hasc Falula indicat, 
quod, ubi vera Teftiinonia 
adfunt, eft n/'A/V Opus 
Pcrbis. 



Of the BOASTER. 

A Certain Man having travel- 
led a long while, when 
He was returned Home 
again, loth boafting 

told many other Things carried on 
by Him manfully in divers Re- 
gions, and truly That efpeci- 
ally, that at Rhodes He had ex- 
celled All in leaping \ that tkeRho- 
dians, Who had teen prefent, were 
IVitncJjes of the fame Thing : 
One of Them, 

Who ivere prefcnt, anfwering him 
fait/, O Man, if 7^<7/ is 
true, Which you fpsak, What 
Need is there /o 7"ou of Witneffes ? 
Behold a Rhodian ! Btkeld here 
<? Trnz/ of leaping. 

MOR. 

This Fable fliows, 

that, where /r^ Teflimonies 

are prefent, there is no Need 
of Words. 



FABLE 


CLX1X. 


De Viro tent ante 


Of the Man tempting 


Apollinem. 


Apollo. 



Q 



Uidam facinorcfus Vir 
contulit Se Delfhos 
tentaturus dpoltinem, & 



Pafierculum /i 
Pallio. .<2flB tenebat fuo 
Pugno, 



A Certain wicked Mar. 
betook Himfclf to Delpho: 
about to tempt Apollo, and 
having a Sparrow under 
his Cloak, Which He held in hh 
Fift, 



SELECT FABLES OF ^SOP. 125 



Ptigno, 5* accedens ad 
Tripodas, interrogabat Eum 
dicens i Quod habeo in med 
Dextra, vivitne, an ejl 
mortuum ? Prolaturus Paf- 
ferculum vivum, fi Ills re- 
fpondifiet, mortuum : rurfus 
prolaturus mortuum, ft 
refpondiflet, vivum ; etenim 
occidiffct Eum Jlatim 
fub Pallia clam, privfqitam 
proferret. At Deus, 
intelligent fnbdolam Calli- 
ditatem Hominis, dixil, 
O ConfuJtor, facito Utrum 
mavis facer e ; 

ctenira ejl penes Te ; 3* 
proferto Jive vivum, Jive 
mortuum, Quod habes in 
tuis Manil/us. 

MOR. 

Haec F alula inn lift, M'- 
hil latcre, neque fallerc 
divinam Men tern. 



Fift, and going to 

the Trevet, He afied Him 
faying. What / have in my 
Right Hand, livetb it, or is it 
dead? About to pluck forth theSpar- 
row alive t if He had an- 
fwered, dead : again 

a If out to pluck it forth dead, if 
He had anfwertd, alive ; for 
He would have killed It prefently 
under the Cloak privily, lefort that 
He plucked it out. But tlie God, 
undemanding the deceitful Craf- 
tinefs of the Man, ///, 
O Confulter, do Thou Whether 
Thou art more willing to do ; 
for ;'/ is in the Power of T/>ce ; ana 
pluck out either alive, or 
dead, What Thou haft in 
thy /AWj. 

MOR. 

This FaWe hints, //R/ai No- 
thing lies hid from, nor deceives 
the divine Mind. 



FABLE CLXX. 

De Pifcatore Of Snaaride. Of the Fifherman an</ the Sprat. 



/~\Uu3am Pifcator, Retibus 
^^^ dimi/Jis in Mare, 
extulit pufillam Smaridem, 
^^ He obfecrabat Pifcato- 
rem ; Noli capere Me tarn 
pufillam in pmfentid ; fine 
Me abire f crcfcere 
ut poftea psiiaris 

Me ^if adulta cum tnajori 
Commodo. Cut PiJ'ca- 
cor 



A Certain Ft/herman, his Nets 
&?/// /<;/ i/own into the Sec, 
brought out a fmall Sprat, 
Which thus befuught the Fifher- 
man; Be not 'willing to take Me fo 
little at prefent ; fuffcr 
Tkf^ to go away, and to grow, 
that afterwards Thou mavjl obtain 
Me fo grow a up with greater 
Advantage* To whom the Fifh- 
erman 



126 SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 



ter inquit, Fero Ego ejfem erman faid, But I ftould be 

amens, Ji omitterem mad, if I fhould omit 

Lucrum licet exiguum, Qjiod a Gain altho' fmall, Which 

habeo inter meas Maims, I have between my Hands, 

Spc futuri Boni for the Hope of a future Good 

yuamvls magni. a/fko' great. 

MOR. MOR. 

HxcFabu/a indicat Eum This Fable fiiov/s Him 

efle Jlolidum, Qui fropter to be fooll/b, Who for 

Sjpcm niajoris Commodi Hope of a greater Advantage 

non ampleSitur Rem $5* does not embrace a Thing both 

praefcntem ff ccrtam, licet prefent and certain, although 

pnrvam. fmall. 



FABLE CLXXI. 



jDe Equo y Afino. 



Vtr habebat 
Equu;n & Afinum ; 
autem dum faciunt Iter, 
Afinus inquit Eqno, Si 
vis, Me efle falvum, 
leva /f/tf Parte met Oneris : 
Equo non obfequente Jllius 
J^criis, Afnuis eadetis Tub 
Onifr^ tnoritur. Twt Do- 
minus jfumenterum imponit 
Equo oranes Sarcinas, 
Q^uas S/Jinuf portabat, W 
fimul Corium, Quod 
exuerat a roor/wo 

Afino : ^ao Onere 

Equui deprefius 5* gemens 
ijat/, Vae -/T//7j; infclicifii- 
mo 'Jumtntorum / Q^iid 
//fl/ cvenit mifero 

Mihi ! A^OT recufans 
farttn:, nuns ^cr/o totum 



O/ the Horfe / the Afs. 

A Certain A/an had 

a /Tflr/f and an Afs ; 
but whiljl they make a Journey, 
the Afs y<2)'j to the Horfe, If 
You are willing, that I be //"?, 
lighten Tiff of a Part of my Burden : 
The Horfe not obeying His 
Words, the Afs falling under 
//k Burden dies. T^ the Ma- 
fter </" /Af ^a^j puts on 
the Horfe all the Packs, 
Which the Afs carried, and 
at the fame Time the Hide, Which 
He kadjlripped off from the dead 
Afs : With which Burden 
the Horfe depreffcd and groaning 
faid, Woe to Me moft un- 
happy of Beajls ! What 
an Evil has happened to <wretched 
Me ! For refilling 

a Partf now / carry the whole 



Onus, Si 
Corium. 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 127 

infufer Illius Burden^ and moreover his 



Illius Burden> 
Hide. 



MOR. 



Hsec Fabula innult, 



This 



MOR. 
Fable 



hint?, 



majores debere effe Parti- that the greater ought to be Par- 
cipes in minoribus Lubori- takers in the lefler La- 



btts, ut 

incolumes. 



Ut, 



77; 



Cnt 



boars 
fofi- 



that Both may be 



FABLE CLXXII. 



De TUBICISE. 

QUidam Tubicen, inter- 
ceptus ab Hoftibus in 
Militia, proclamabat ad Eos t 
(3iii circamjijlebant, O Viri % 
Nolite Deciders Me innocuum 
8c infonlem ; etenim nun- 
quam occidi Ullum ; quippe 
habev Nihil aliud, quam 
hanc Tnbanft. Ad Quem 
Illi refponderunt vicij/im 
cum Clamore ; Veto "Tu 
trticidabcria magis hoc 
*Pf * quod rim 

Tu Ipfe nequeas 

Jimicare, potes im/ellere 
Csteros aJ Certamen. 

MOR. 

HSEC Fabula innuit, 
y^ peccant prater csteros, 
-Q^ii perfuadent malis ff 
improbis Principibus ad 
agendum inique. 



O/" the. TRUMPETER. 

A Certain Tramfeler, ta- 
ken 3y the Enemies in 
the War, trW oaf to Them, 
Who y?oo</ about, O A/^n, 
Be not willing to kill Me harntlefs 
and innocent ; for n<r- 

r#r have 1 killed any On? ; for 
/ have Nothing elfe, than. 
this Trumpet. To- Whom. 

They a n f we red in Turn 
with a Noife ; But Thou 
/halt be flain rather on this 
/an<? Account ; becaufe when 
"Thou Thyfelf can'ft not 
j%/, Thou art able to drive 
the Reft /o the Engagement. 

MOR. 

This Fable hint*, 

that They fin beyond Others, 
Who perfuade bad and 
wicked Princes to 

a3 wnjudly. 



FABLE 



123 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 
FABLE CLXXIII. 



De Vaticinatore. 

Vdticinator fedens in 
Foro fertnocinabatur ; 
Cui Shtidam denunciat, 
Ejus Fores effe effraclas, 
3* Omnia direpta, 

Quae fuifftnt in Domo. 
Vaticinator, generis & 
proper ans Curfu, recipiebat 
Se Domum : Quern 

>uidam iutuens cur- 
rentem, inquit, T\), >ui 
promittis, Te divinaturum 
aliena Negotia, certe Ipfe 
non divina/li tua. 

MOR. 

Hasc Falitla fpciSat ad 
Eos, Qui non rede ad- 
nHniltraiites yL^/ Res, 
conantur providcre & 
confulere sJi'.cnis, QjJse 
non pertinent ad oj-. 



Of the Fortune-teller. 

A Fortune -teller fitting in 
the Market difcourfed ; 
To whom <}* declares, 
Ma/ bis Doors were broke open, 
and all Things taken atuay t 
Which had been in the Houfe. 
The Fortune-teller, Jtglnng and 
hafting in his Pace, betook 
Himfelf .fiW .- Whom 

a certain Man perceiving run- 
ning, ("aid, Thou, /Pfo 
promifelt, that Thou wilt divine 
cr/jfrj' Affairs, furely Thyfclf 
bajl not divined thine own. 

MOR. 

This Fable looks to 
Them, Who, not rightly ad- 
minillering *A'r oiun Affairs, 
endeavour to forefee and 
co nf u it 'for other Men's t \Vhich 
do not belong to Them. 



FABLE CLXXIV. 



De Puero & Matre. 



QUidam /"ufr in Schold 
furaius Libellum, 

attulit yi/<f Matri ; a 
Qua non caftigatus, quo- 
tidie furabatur magis atque 
rnagis ; Autem ProgreJJu 
Temporis ccepit furari 
majcra. Tandem depre- 
henfus 



0/"the Boy and his Mother. 

A Certain Boy in School 
having ftolen a little Book, 
brought it to his Mother ; by 
Whom not being chaftifed, dai- 
ly He ftolc more and 
more ; But in Progrefs 
of Time He began to fleat 
greater Things. At laft being ap- 
prehended 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 129 



henfus a Magiftratu, diice- 
batur ad Supplicium. Fero 
Mat re fequente, ac vocij'e- 
rante, Ille rogavit, ut llce- 
r:t Sibi loqui paulifper cum 
Ea ad Aurem. Illo per- 
mi flb, 3* Matie proper ante, 
& admovente Aurem W Os 
Filii, evdlfit Slitrifulam 
Matrts fuis Dentibus. 
Cum Mater, & cseteri, 
>ui adftabant, increparent 
Eum, non modo ut Furem, 
fed etiam, ut impinm in 
fuam Parentem, inquit, H<ec 
fuit Caufa tnei Exitii ; 
etenim Ji caftigaffet Me ob 
Libtllum, Q^iem furatus fum 
prius, fecijftm Nil ultefius ; 
mine due or ad Supplicium. 



prebended by tbeMagi/irate, He was 
led /o Punifhmcnt. But 
the Mother following, and crying, 
He a/bed, that ;'/ m/f/fo ^ /a-a;- 
_// for Him /o j^ea^ a little ivitk 
Her r her Ear. He being per- 
mitted, an</ the Mother haftening, 
and moving her Ear to tht Mouth 
of the Son, He tore off the Ear 
of his Mother ivith his Teeth. 
IV hen the Mother and the Others, 
Who flood about, blamed 
Him, not only oj a Thief, 
but alfo, aj impious to 
his Parent, He faid, Sta 
was the Caufe of my Dejlrufiion ; 
for //She had chaftifed Me for 
f/k /////tf 5oo^, Whifh / /<?/; 
fir ft, / had done Nothing further ; 
now / am led to Punijhment. 



Hxc 

quod 



MOR. MOR. 

Fabula indicat, This Fable 



/hows, 



non coercentur that They Who are not rejirained 



inter Inltia peccandi, 
evadunt ad majorq Flagitia. 



at the Beginnings of intino r , 
go on to greater Crimes. 



FABLE CLXXV. 

De Hircis &f Capellis. 0/thcHeGoats0n</theSheGoats, 



CU M Capellm obtmu- 
iflent Barbam a Jove, 
Hirci caperunt offendi, 
qula Mulieres haberent 
parem Honorem cum Eis. 
Jupiter inquit, Sinite Illas 
frui vana Gloria, 3* 
ufurparc Ornatum veftra: 



WWEKtheSkeGoats had ob- 
tained aBeardfvom Jupiter, 
the He-Goats^anto be offended, 
becaufe the Females /5a</ 
equal Honour with !TA<fw. 
Jupiter yi/V, Suffer ye Them 
to enjoy /^ vain Glory, and 
to ufurp the Ornament of your 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



Dignitat'is, dum non equent Dignity, whilft They do not equal 
veftram Vtrtutem. your Virtue. 

MOR. 

This Fable teaches j"hee t 
that thou mafjlbear Thofe to ufurp 
_ thy Ornament , Who arc 

inferiores Tibi in yirtute. inferiors to Thee in Virtue. 



MOR. 

Hasc Fabula cdocet 7V, 
ut feras Illos ufurpare 
tuum Ornatum, Qui funt 



FABLE CLXXVI. 



De Filio cujufdam Senis 
Sif Leone. 



.Uidam &zcr habebat 

unicum Filium gcr.t- 

jpiritus, 



Q 

rg^ Spiritus, $5f Amatorem 
'venaticorum Canum. Viderat 
Hunc per Quictem trucidart 
a Leone. Igitur terrifus, 
ne _/or/^ aliquando Eventus 
fequeretur hoc Somnium, 
extruxit quandam polit-if]:- 
mam, & amcnifjimam 
Domni ; inducens Filium 
Z//WT, affiduus Cujlos ade- 
rat ////. Depinxerat 

Domo omne Genus Ani- 
malium ad Deledlationern 
Filu, cum Quibus etiam 
Leonem. Adolefcens in- 
fpiciens H^c, contrahebat 
Moleftiam Eo magi 3. 
Autem quod am Tempore, 
adftans prcpius Leoni, 
inquit t O truculent i/Jima 
Fera, affervor in hac 
Domo proptcr inane 
Somnium met Patris : Quid 
faciam Tibi ? Et it a di- 
cens, 



0/"thc Son of a certain old Man 
and a Lion. 



A 



Certain elderly Man 
an only Son o/" a 



had 



rous Spirit, and a Lover 
of bunting Dogs. He tad fee* 
Him in a Dream to be hilled 
by a Lion. Therefore afraid, 
left by Chance fornetime an Evert 
fhould follow this Dream, 
He built a certain very 
fine, and mojl pleafant 

Ho life ; bringing his Son 
thither, a daily Guardian was pre- 
fent to Him. He had painted 
in the Houfe every Kind of Ani- 
mal? for the Delight 
of his Son,, with U r h':ch alfo 
a jL/cn. The Youth /oo>- 
f'/?f OK thefe Things, contraSed 
Trouble by fo much the more. 
But on a certain TVw, 
ftanding nearer to the Lion, 
flfe /rt/V, O moft cruel 
wild Bead, / am hj>t up in this 
Honfe for a vain 

Dream of my Father : What 
(hall I do /a Thee ? And > fay- 
ing, 



SELECT FABLES OF ^SOP. 131 



cent, incujjit Manum 
Parieti, volens truer e 

Oculum Leonis, & offende- 
bat in Clavo> Qtii latebat 
illic, qua Percuffione 
Manus emarcuit, & Sanies 
fuccrevit, & Febris fubfc- 
cuta eft, 3" brcvi Tempore 
raortmis eft. Ita Leo 
occ'idlt Adolcfcentem, Artt 
Patris jvvante Nihil. 

MOR. 

HJCC Fabitla indicat, 
Neminctn poffe dcvitarc 
$ht<g funt Ventura. 



ing, He Jlrucli his Hand 
on the lall t willing to pluck out 
the Eye of the Lion, and Us hit 
it on a Nail, Which lai hid 
there, with which Blow 
the 'Hand rankled, and the Matter 
grew undtr, and a Fever fol- 
lowed, and in a (hurt Time 
He died. Thus the Lioa 
killed the Youth, the Art 
of the Father availing Nothing. 

MOR. 

This Fable fliows, 

that no Man is able to avoid 

thofe Things Which arc to come. 



FABLE CLXXVII. 



De Vulpe * Rubo. 

VUlpes, cum afcende- 
ret quondam Sepem, 
ut vitaret Periculum 
gtuod yjdebat imminere Sibi, 
comprehendit Rubum 

Manibus, atquc perfodit 
Volam Senti- 

tus ; Sc cum foret 
faucia graviter, inquit, ge- 
raens, Rule, Citm confuge- 
rim ad Te, lit juve- 
ris Me, Tu nocuifli 
Mihi. Cut Rubus ait t 
Vul^pes, errdjiiy Qjuae 
pittajll capere Me pa- 
ri Dolo quo confuevi- 
Jli capere cetera. 



Of the Fox and the Bramble, 

THE Fox, when She got up 
upon a certain Hedge, 
that She might avoid a Danger 
Which She faw to hang over Her, 
catched hold of a Bramble 
with her Hands, and pricked 
the Hollow of her Hand with the 
Thorns ; and when She was 
wounded grievoufly, /he faid, groan- 
ing, to the Bramble, When I have 
fled to Thee, that Thou mightejl 
have helped Me, Thou haft hurt 
Me.. To whom the Bramble fays, 
O Fox, Thou haft erred. Who 
hajl thought to take Me with the 
like Deceit with which Thou hajl 
tifed to take other Things. 

MOR, 



SELECT FABLES OF &SOP. 



MOR. 

Fabula ftgnificat t quod 
fjl ft u It u m implorarc 

Auxilium ah Illis, Quibus 
eit datum a Naturti potius 
obifft, quam prodcjft. 



MOR. 

The Fable fignijit;, that 
it is a foolifh Thing to implore 
Help from Them, to IVbom 
it is given by Nature rather 
to hurt, than to profit. 



FABLE CLXXVIII. 



Z)<f Vulpe 5" CrOcodilo. 0/"the Fox aK<i the Crocodile. 



VUlpes tf Crocodilus 
contendebant de 

Nobilitate. Cum Crococli- 
,'vs adduce ret Malta pro 
.SV, & /</c?rt/- 
/w^ra Mod urn </<; 

Splendore fuorum Proge- 
nitorum ; Vldpti fubridsus, 
alt Ei, Hens, Amice, 
r^ quidem Tu non dix- 
eris f/Gf, apparet 

dare ex /> Corio, quid jam 
inultis Annis f u 'fii de- 
nudatus Splendore tiwrum 
Progenitor urn. 

MOR. 

Fabula fignificat, quod 
/? ipfa potif/imuTH rcfellit 
r,t>u/ncei Homines. 



THE Fox and the Crocodile 
contended concerning 

their Nobility. When /f Cnwro- 
dlle brought many Things for 
Himfelf, and foo^^ Himfelf 
beyond Meafure concerning 

the Splendoun o/ 7^V Ance- 
ftors ; ^ .Fax fmiling, 
yi/V to Him, So Ho, Friend, 
although indeed Thou hadft not 
"have faid Th'u, it appears 
clearly by thy Skin, /Aa/ now 
fflony Years Thou kafl bten de- 
prived of ike Splendour of thy 
Ancejlors, 



MCR. 

The Fable 
? Thing iifelf 
'? Men. 



that 
refutes 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JBSOP, 



FABLE CLXXIX. 

De Vulpe &? Venatoribus. Of the Fox and the Hunters. 

VUlpes, effugiens Ve- 
natores, ac jam defeja 
currendo per Viam, 

Cafu reperit Lignatorcm, 
Quern rogat, ut abfcondat 
Se in quoquo Loco. Ille 
cflendit Te&orium ; Vulpes 
ingrediens Id t abfcondit St 
in qvodam Angnlo. Vena- 
tores adveniunt, rogant 
JLignatorcm, Jt videret 
Vulpem. Lignalor negat 
Verb^s quidem, Se vi- 
diflfe ; verb oRendit 

Locum Manu, til/i 

Vulpes latebat ; vero Vena- 
tores, Re nofi percep- 
ta, Jlatim abetint. 

Vulpes t ut profpidt 

Illos alitffe t cgrcdi- 

cns TeSorio t rccedit tacite. 
Lignator criminatur 

Vulpem, quod, cum fecerit 
Eutn fa/vum, ageret Nihil 
Gratiarum Sibi. Tune 

Vulpes, convertens Se, ait 
tacite ////, Heus, 4mice t 
fi haluiffes Opera 

Manuum, & Mores fimiles 
tuts Verbis, perfolwrem 
intritas Gratias Tibi. 

MOR. 

Fabula fignijlcat, quod 
nequam Homo, etjl polli- 
cetur bona, tamen pra- 
Jlat mala &? improba. 



THE Tcox.Jtyingfromtht Hun - 
ters, 7zr/ now tired 
with running rt/ow^- the Way, 
by Chance found a Wood- Cutter , 
Whom A'if <7/,r, that //^ m^ 1 />.'V/tf 
Himfelf in any Place. He 
flowed the Cottage;, 7""Ae jFo.v 
entering //, hides Himfelf 
in a certain Corner. 7"^^ ^i/- 
/fTj coir.e up, /ry.c 

the Wood- Cutter, if He fa'w 
the Fox. The Wood-Cutter denies 
in Words indeed, that He had 
fccn Him ; Ivt He fliowed 
thfi Piace with his Hand, Wv/: 
the Fox /i?v ;V ; but /Af //a- 
/^rj-, the Thing not being per- 
ceived, immediately go away. 
The Fox, as foon as // perceiv; 
I'licnri /o ^^ ^ ?/?f away, comniP" 
out of /.^ Cottage, rellres/t/tnt/j. 
The Wood-Cutter accufe^ 
the Fox, //>/, when //^ liMvnade 
Hi in y/f He gave n 
Thanks to Him. 7"7;rr, 

the Fox, turning Himfelf, favs 
foftly to Him, Hark ye, Frienri, 
if thou would]] have had the AV 
of thy Hands, and thy Morals likf. 
/o /-6y Words, / would pav 
the deferved Thanh to thee. 

MOR. 

The Fable fignifies, that 
a wicked Man, aliho' He pro- 
mifes good Things, yet //e />.;- 
farmetk bad <jr/ wicked Things. 

FAB L E 



i34 SELECT FABLES OF &SOP. 
FABLE CLXXX. 



De Cane vocato ad 
Canam. 

Uidam Fir, cum pa- 
t opiparam Ca- 
nam, voeavit qucndam 
Amicum Domum ; Ejus 
Canis quoque invitavit 
Canem dlterius ad Ca- 
nam. Canis ingrejfus, 

cum vidertt tantas Dopes 
apparatas, latut, ait Secum, 
Sane txplelo Me ita hodie, 
qnod non indigebo comedere 
eras. fVro Cpquus 

tor l~p' dent, tacitus cefit per 
Caudam, atque rotans 
terque quaterquc, projecit 
Ilium per Feneftram. Ille 
attonitus affurgens Jfumo, 
dum yi/^/V clamans, cfteri 
Canes accurrunt Ei, atque 
rogant, quam opipare cte- 
naverit : At Ille languens 
ait, Ita cxplcvi Me 
Pc/w & Dapibus, quod 



Viam. 






MOR. 



Of the Dog invited to 
Supper. 

A Certain Man, when /& 
had prepared z dainty Sup- 
per, invited a certain 
Friend Home ; His 
Dog alfo invited 
the Dog cf 'the other Man to Sup- 
per. The Dog having entered, 
when .//<? yiew fo great Dainties 
prepared joyful, fays with Himfelf, 
Truly //to///// Myfelf >To-Day, 
that I {hall not want to eat 
To-morrow. But the Cook 
feeing Him, filent foo> Him by 
/* 7a//, and whirling Him 
both three and four Times, threw 
Him thro' //k Window. He 
amazed rifing up from the Ground, 
whilll He Jlies crying, the other 
Dogs run up to Him, and 
afk, how daintily He had fup- 
ped : But He languifhing 
fays, So have I filed Myfelf 
with Drink and Dainties, that, 
wA#i I came out, / faw not 
the Way. 

MOR. 



Fabula Jignificat, mul- The Fable Jignifies, that many 
ta cadere inter Cal'icem Things /a// between the Cup 
Sc Labra. and the Lips. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 
FABLE CLXXXI. 



135 



De Aquila & Homine. 

CUM quidam Homo 
cepiffet Aquilam, 

Pennis Alarum 

avuljis Ei, dimijlt 

Earn morart inter Gallinas. 
Peinde Quidam, merca- 
tus, munlt Alas 

Pennis : turn Aquila 
volans capit Leporem, Csf 
fert Ilium fuo BenefaBor'i. 
Q^uam Rem Vulpes con/pi- 
dens, ait Homini, No- 
li habere hanc Aquilam 
Hofpitio, tie venetur 
Te, aeque ac Leporem. 
Turn Homo item emlfit 
Pennas Aquihe. 

MOR. 

Haec Fabula fignificat, quod 
Benefaftores quiJem funt 
remunerandi, vero improbi 
omnino vitandi. 



Of the Eagle and the Man. 

WHEN a certain Man 
had taken an Eagle, 
the Feathers of the Wings 
being plucked from Her, He difmi/fed 
Her to dwell among the Hens. 
Afterwards a certain Man, having 
purchafcd Her,ybr///?fj her Wings 
with Feathers : then the Eagle 
flying takes a Hare, and 
bears Him to her Benefaftor* 
Which Thing a Fox perceiv- 
ing, He fays/o the Man, Be un- 
willing to have this Eagle 
in Entertainment, left She hunt 
Thee, as well as the Hare. 
Then the Man alfo plucked off 
the Feathers from the Eagle. 



MOR. 



that 



This Fable fignifies, 
Benefa&ors indeed are 

to be requited, but the Wicked 
altogether to be avoided. 



FABLE CLXXXII. 

De Agricola. Of the Hufbandman. 



QUidam Homo, exiftens 
Agricola^ cum cog- 
nofceret adeffe Finem 

Vitas Sibi, & cuperet Filios 
fieri pcritos in Cultu 
sfgrortim, vocavit Eos, atq; 
iyt//V, Filii, Ego decedo e 
Vita ; 



A Certain Man, being 
a Hujbandman^ when He 
knew that there was an End 
of Life to Him, and defired his Sons 
fo tarome fkilful in the Tilling 
Lands, called 7^, and 
O Sons, / depart out of 
Life ; 



136 SELECT FABLES OF 



Vita ; cmnia mea Bona funt 
con/ita in Vined. I ill, pofl 
Obitum Patris, putantes 
refer ire hunc Thefaurum in 
Vinsd, Ligonibus, Marris, 
ac Bidentibus fumptis, fun- 
ditus effodiunt V'msam, & 
non inveniunt Thefaurum ; 
vero, cum Vinea full probe 
effojfa, produxit longe plures 
Frudus foli to, atq; fecit 
Illoj divitcs. 

MOR. 

Hsc Fabula figniiicat, 
quod affidnus Labor paiic 
Thefaurum, 



Life } all uiy Goods are 
placed in the Vineyard. They, after 
the Death of the Father, thinking 
to find this Treafnre in 
the Vineyard, Spades, Mattocks, 
and Prongs being taken, entire- 
ty dig up the Vineyard, and 
do not find the Trcafure ; 
but, when the Vine ivas well 
dug u pt it produced />j far more 
Fruits than ufual, ant/ made 
rich. 



MOR. 

This FaLIe fignifies, 

that daily Labour bringeth furtli 
Treofurt. 



FABLE CLXXXIII. 



De quod am Pifcatere. 

QUidarn Pifcator inex- 
pert us pifcandi) Reti 
ac i'ibiis ajfumptti, accedit 
juxta Littus Marts, atq; 
fuperexi/lens quodam Saxo 
cospit imprimis tubicinate, 
fntans, Se capturum ej/e 
Pifcesfaci/e Cantu ; veriim 
cum ccnfeqverttur mil I urn 
EJfefium Cantu, Tibiit 
depofitis, dimifit 

Rete in Marc, ac cepit 
ferplures Pifces ; fed cum 
extraheret Pifces e Reti, 
atgue perfpiceret Eos fal- 
tantes, ait non injahe, O 
improba Animalia, cum tu- 
bicinarem, noluiflis faltare ; 



Of a certain Fl/berman. 

A Certain Fijberman un/lvil- 
ful of Fifiing, his Net 
<?nr/ Pipes being taken, goes 
nfflr the Shore of the Sea, and 
Jlanding up on a certain Rock 
He began a/ jfr/? to pipe, 
thinking, that He ftould take 
Fifties M/F/y with a Tune ; but 
when He obtained no 

^# with a Tune, /& P/>J 
being laid down, He 1st down 
the Net into the Sea, and took 
wry may Fifties ; but when 
/fc </rfw the Fifties out of the Net, 
and perceived Them dan- 
cing, He fays, not unwittilj, O 
wicked Animals, w^/ I pip- 
ed, Te were unwilling to dance ; 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 137 



nunc quia cejfo tubicinare, now becaufc / ceafe to pipe, 
faltatis continue. Te dance continually. 



MoST. 

Ha!C Fabula docet, 
Omnia fi unt 
fiunt fuo Tempon. 



MOR. 

This Fable fliows, that 
All Things are done we/!, Which 
are done in their own Seafon. 



FABLE CLXXXIV. 



De quibufdam Pifcatoribus. 

PIfcatore profeB't 

pifcatum, fcf defeffi 
pifcando diu, pneterea 
opprefli Fame & Mcerore, 
quod ceptffent Nihil, 

turn decernant abire, 
eccc, quidam Pifcis fugiens 
Aliam infequentem Se fallat 
in Naviculam. Pikatores 
admodam Iseti comprehendunt 
Ilium, ac vend unt in 
Urbc grandi Pretio. 

MOR. 

Hacc Fabula indicat, 
quod Fortuna exhibet Id 
frequentius, Quod Art noil 

poteft ' 



Of certain Fijlermen. 

FIrtiermen having gone 
to fifh, fl</ tired 
with Jl/hing a long while, befidcs 
oppreffcd tuith Hunger and Grief, 
becaufe They had taken Nothing, 
when They refolve to go a-way, 
behold, a certain Fifh jflying 
another purfuing Him leaps 
into the Boat. The Fifhertnea 
very joyful take 

Him, and fell Him " 
the City at a great Price. 

MOR. 

This Fable fliowg, 

/af Fortune offers That 
very frequently, Which Art is not 
able /0 efed. 



FABLE 



138 SELECT FABLES OF 



FABLE CLXXXV. 



De Inope 5" infirmo. 

QUidam Pauper $ cum 
agrotaret, vovit 

Z)w, quod, Ji liberare- 
tur ab co Morle, immo- 
laret centum Boves. 

>uod Dii volentes experiri, 
facile reddunt Sanitatem Illi. 
Igitur liber a Motbo, 
cum non haberet Boves, 
quia erat pauper, colle- 
git Ofla centum 

Bourn, fc? deponens 
yi//<?r Altare, inquit, Ecce, 
nwnc pevfplvo Votum, Quod 
*OT>/ Vobis. -D audi- 
entes Hoc alfiftunt El in 
Somniis, atq; inguiunf, per- 
gito orf Littus Marts ; 
etenim ill reperies cen- 
tum Talenta Auri fcmoto 
Loco. Ille expergefaSus, 
memor Somnii, dum 
pergit ad IAttus t incidit 
in Latrones, >ui fpoliant 
5" vcrberant Eum. 

MOR. 

Hasc Fabula Indicat, 
go</ Mendaces accipiant 
Pracmia Mcndaciorum. 



Of the poor and infirm Man. 

A Certain poor Man, when 
/fe waj fick vowed 
to the Gods, that, if He fhonld be 
freed from that Difeafe, He 
would facrifice a hundred Oxen. 
Which the Gods ivitting to try, 
ffl/7/p reftore Health to Him. 
"therefore free /row the Difeafe, 
wtan he had not flk Oxfn, 
becaufe Atf <zyaj poor, He ga- 
thered the Bones ef a hundred 
Oxen, and putting them down 
upon the Altar, He faid, Behold, 
now I pay the F'otv, Which 
I vowed to YcO. The Gods hear- 
ing This (land before him in. 
Dreams, and .A?* Go 
to the Shore of the Sea ; 
for there Thou (halt find a hun- 
dred Talents of Gold in a fecret 
Place. He having arofe, 
mindful o/" f/k Dream, whild 
He goes on to the Shore, falls 
Thieves, Who rob 
beat Him. 



MOR. 



This 
A^f Liars 

the Rewards of Lies, 



(hows, 

receive 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 139 
FABLE CLXXXVL 



De Pifcatoribus. 

QUIDAM Pifcatoret 
trahebant Rete Mari ; 
Quod cum fentirent efle 
grave, laetabantur magno- 
pere, putantes fuiffe multos 
Pifces ; fed, ut traxif- 
fent Rete in Terr am, 
cum perfpiciunt paucos Pifces 
quidem, vero ingens Saxum 
inefTe Red, fiunt trifles. 
Qmdam ex Illis, jam 
grandis JEtate, inquit ptu- 
denter Sociis, Eftote 

quietia Animu ; quippe 
Maflitia eft Soror Laetitiz ; 
etenim oportet Nos pro- , 
fpicere futures Cafus, y 
ut >uis ferat illos 
levitii, perfuadere Sibi 
fic eventuros. 

MOR. 

Hec Fabula Jignificat, 
quod >ui rezninifcitur 
kuman<e Sort is, ajficititr 
tninirae in adverfis. 



Of the Fifhcrmen. 

CERTAIN Ffieraen 

\^s drtw their Net out of the Sea; 
Which when they perceived to be 
heavy, They rejoiced great- 
ly, thinking that there were many 
Pi/lies ; but, as foon as They had 
dragged the Net unto the Lana f r 
when They perceive few Fijhes 
indeed, but a vaft Stone 
to be in the Net, They become fad. 
A certain One of Them, now 
great by -Age, fays pru- 
dently to his Companions, Be Te 
of quiet Minds ; for 

Sorrow is the Sifter of Gladnefs ; 
for it behoYeth Us to fore- 
fee future Mifchances, and 
that any Man may bear Them. 
more lightly, to perfuade Himfelf 
that They will come to pais. 

MOR. 

This Fable fignifies, 

that He who remembereth 
human Lot, is 
the Icaft in adverfe Things. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 



FABLE CLXXXVII. 



Cat a mut,ita 



QUaedam Caia, tapta 
dmcrc cujuftam 

J'petio/t Adoltfcentis, oravit 
Veoerem, ut mutaret 
JSam in Fczminam. Venus 
ntlferta I Hi us tnvtavlt liam 
:n Formam Famint ; Qiiam, 
cum effet va/a'e forinofa, 
j4mator adduxit Domurh. 
Sed ciim fedcrent Jimul in 
Cu&icu/o, Venus volens 
cxperiti, Jt, Facie mutatq, 
inutaflet : y Mores, 
coii/iltult Mure in in Medi- 
um ; >uam cum Ilia 
profpesit, oblita Formas ff 
Amoris, fcrfecuia eft 
Murem, vi cape- 

ret ; fuper qua Re Venus 
indignata, defiuo mutavit 
Eara in prioretn Formam 
Cata;. 

MOR. 

Fabula Jignificaf t quod 

Homo t licet //#/ 

Pcrfonam, tamsn retinet 
' 'dm Mores. 



She-Cat being ckang 
a Woman. 



A Certain Caf, ' tsken 
with the Love of a certain 
leaittiful Young Man, be fought 
Vtnus, that She would change 
Her into a Woman. Venus 
having pitxd Her changed Her 
into the Shape of a Woman ; Whom, 
when. She was very beatitiful, 
the LoTcr led Home. 

But ivhen They fat together in 
the Chamber , Venus willing 
to tiy, i/~, the Face &/n? changed^ 
She had changed fl^o her Morale, 
plated a Moufe ;" the Mid- 
dle ; Which when She 
faw, having forgot her Shape <?</ 
Love, iSA* pitrfued 

the Moufe, f&rf She might take 
Her ; upon which Thing Venus 
being ongry t again changed 
Her into the former Shape 
of a Cat. 

MOR. 

The Fable Jtgntfiet t that 
a Man, altho* He may change 
his Perfon, yet rctaicf 
thtfame Manners. 



F A B L F 



SELECT FABLES OF ^ESOP. 141 
FABLE CLXXXVIII. 



De duobus Inlmicis. 

DUO Qu'idam habentes 
Inimicit'ias inter Sc 
navigabaut una in Navi. 
Et ciim Alter non paieretur 
Aherum flare in eodein 
.Loco, Units ftdit in Puppi, 
Alter in Prord. Autcm, 
Tempeftate ortd, cum 
Navis eflVt in Periculo, Qrti- 
fedebat in Prom rog.it G\.\- 
bernatorem Navis, Quz 
Pjrs Navis fcret fubmnfa 
prliis ; & cum Gubernator 
dixifftt Pup pirn, I lie ait, 
Mors nunc non eft adto 
mole/la Mihi, ft perfpicio 
meum Inimiciun mori prius. 

MOR. 

Hxc Fabufa redargult 
Inimicitias Hominutn ; tu,n 
Inimicus fgfius digit 
perJere Seipfum, vt per- 
dat Inimlcum. 



Of the two Enemies. 

TWO certain Men having 
Enmities between 'Themjflves 
failed together in a Ship. 
And when the One would not fujf'er 
the Other to Jland in /)6c fame 
Place, On? fat a/ the Head, 
the Other at the Stern. But 
a Temped having arofe, when 
/,!ie .S^i was ,tw Danger, //^ ^v^ 
i"iU a/ the Prow fl/>f.r the Gover- 
nor o/' //!? Ship, What 
Ptir/ of the Ship would be funk 
^/fr/r ; aitd ii-/v the Pilo^ 
had faid the Ster-it, /^ fai-d, 
Death now /j n^/ 
trcublefome to Me, // I perceive 
my Enemy to diejirft. 

MOR. 

This Fall: reprovrt 

the Enmities of Men ; <wLcn 
one Enemy very often chpof-.-s 
to dejlroy Himfelf, that He may 
dedroy his Enemy. 



FABLE CLXXXJX. 

De C^ne 3" Fabro. Of the Dog and the Smith. 



QUidam Faler habebat \ Certain Smith 

Canem, Qni, dum /\_ a Dog, Which, 

Jpfc cudebat Fernim, He Jlruck the 

dormiebat continue) ; v-ero Jlept continually ; 

cum manducabat) Canfs when He eat, the 



had 

ivhil/1 
Iron, 
but 
Dog 



fiatim afTurgebat, cf fine immediately rofe up, and without 



Mo- 



De, 



142 SELECT FABLES .OF ^ESOP. 



Mora corrodcbat Qua 
crane dejeSa fub Men/a, 
ceu 0/a, & Alia 
hujufmodi. >uam Rem 
Faber anlraadverteris, ait 
"4d Canetn, Heus, Mifer, 
nefcio Qyid faciam ; 
Qui, dum cudo Ferrum, 
dormts continue, 5* 

tencris Segnitie ; rurfus 
cum movco Denies, ftatim 
furgis, & applaudis Mini 
Cauda. 

MOR. 

Fabula Jignificat, quod 
Socerdes & Somnolent! t Qiii 
uivunt ex Lqloribus aliorum, 
/WH* coercendi grav't 
Cenfura. 



Delay gnawed ^io/^ things which 
were thrown down under *< T^/<f, 
as Bones, and c/^r Things 
of this Kind. flOWcA Thing 
/>6f 5m//A minding, /^ 7^^ 
to //^<? )(?, So Ho, Wretch, 
I know not WAa/ I fhall do ; 
Who, whilft /^r/^ the Iron, 
Jleepejl continually, and 

art poflefled with Sloth ; again 
when I move my Teeth, prefently 
Thou rife ft, and fatterejl Me 
with thy Tail. 

MOR. 

The Fable f'gnifies, that 
//&e Slothful and Drowfy, Who 
AW out of /^ Labours of Others, 
or* to be retrained cf/'/A <? 
Cenfurc. 



FABLE CXC. 



De qua dam Mula- 

QUsdam ^f/^r, cffefta 
pinguis nimio Hordeo, 
lafciviebat nimia Pingue- 
dine, 'rnquiens Secum, 

Equus fuit meus Pater, ^w/ 
erat celerr'imus Curfu, y 
Ego fum fimilis Ei per 
Omnia. Parum poft con- 
ti^it, quod oportuit Mulam 
currere quantum potuit ; 
fed cum ce//avit Curfu, 
inquit, Heu ! Miferam Me, 
putabam Me cfle 5o- 



0/"a certain 



A Certain Aftf/f, being made 
fat with too much Barley, 
wantoned with too much Fat- 
nefs, faying with Herfelf, 
A Horfe was my Father, Who 
was fwiftefl in the Race, an^ 
I OT like Him in 
// Things. A little a/ter It hap- 
pened, that It behoved M Mule 
to run aj mur/ as She could j 
^w/when She ceafed from Running, 
S/j* /W, Alas ! wretched Me, 
7f%o thought Myfelflo be /^ Qf- 
ffring of the Horfe ! 2?w/ now 



SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 143 

memlni Patrem f u ffi / remember that my Father nuas 

Afinum. an Afs. 

MOR. MOR. 

Fabula fignificat, quod The Fable Jignifies, that 

Stu/ti non agnofcunt Se- Fools do not know Them- 

ipfos in profperis ; fed in felves \nprofperous Things ; but is 

adverfis perfape recognof- adverfe Things very often They 

.cunt/ww Errores. again know their Errors. 



FABLE CXCI. 



De Medico S3" 
Mortuo. 

QUid am Med\cus> Qui 
cur aver at ^grotum, 
Shit paulo pq/l moriebatur, 
aiebat Illis, ^i efferebant 
Funut, Si tfte Vir abflinu- 
iffet Vino, & fuiflet uftis 
Clyjltribus, non ftiiffet 
mortuus. Q^nidam ex His, 
>ui aderant, ait Medi- 
co hand infacete, Heus, 
Medice, ifia Coniilia 
fucrunt dicenda, cum qui- 
bant prodeffe, non nanr, cum 
aalent Nil. 

MOR. 

Fabula fignificat) quod 
ttW Confiliunj no prodt-Jl, 
dare /^/ eo Temper e eft yW 
deludcrc Amicurn. 



Of the Phyfician and 
the dead Man. 

A Certain Pbyfklan, Who 
^a*/ looked after a fick Man, 
^Wo a little after died, 
_/Ji/W to Them, Who bore /e 
Funeral, If *a Man /^a<7 abjlain- 
ed from Wine, anJ had ufed 
Clyjlers, He would not have been 
dead, A certain One of Thefe, 
Who were prefent,y}>.f to the Phy- 
fician not unwittily, So Ho t 
Phyfician, thofe Counfels 

were to be told, when They were 
able to profit, not now, when 
They avail Nothing. 

MOR. 

The Fable ftgnificst that 
when Counfel dues not profit, 
to give If at that Time is truly 
to play upon a Friend. 



FABLE 



144 SELECT FABLES OF 
FABLE CXCII. 



De Cane & Liipo. 

CUM Cants dormiret ante 
Aulam, J.upus fuper- 
veniens Jlaiim ccpit Eu<n, 
& cum vcllct cccUere 
Eum, Cants orabar, 
ne occideret Cum, inquiens, 
lit us, mi Lupe, nunc noli 
occtder e Me ; tiam, ut vides, 
fum tennis, g^acilis, & 
xnacilentus ; fed meus Ph- 
rus eft fa&urus Nuptias, 
ubi, fi expeSnlii parum, 
Ego manducans opipare, atq; 
fflus pingliior, fro uti- 
lior 7/&. Lupus 

kalens Fidem /f;/ Verbis 
diaiijit Canem. Foft 

paucos D'MS Lupus acccrlcns, 
cura repeiit Canem dbmixi- 
tin Dotni, Jlans ante 
Aulam, rogat Canem, ut 
fraflaret Piomifia 

^f. Cam's inyuit, Hens, 
Lupe, fi cep'iffes Me ante 
Aulam, ncn expttia- 



MOR. 

Kzc Falrula indicat, 
quod Sapiens, cum femel 
vitavtrit Pericutum, con- 
tinue raw/ infutwo. 



Of the Dog W the Wolf. 

WHEN the Do* flept A?/0;v 
the Hall, iktWo/f coming 
upon Him, prefehtly took ^/CT ; 
and <zt'fn He was willing /o Jlay 
Him, /Zv Z)cj befought Him, 
that he 'would n ot kill Him, Joy ing t 
So Ho, my Wolf, noiu be unwilling 
to till Me } for, as you fee r 
I ana fear, lean, . aJ 
flender ; K* my ATa- 
^r is about to make a Wedding, 
when, Jf jo -y>j7/' -wait a little, 
/ 1 eating daintily, and 

^/n^ become fatter, (ball be more 
advantageous to Thee. The Wolf 
having Faith . in /</ Words 
difm'iffed the Dog. -^/i*r 
a few Days the Wolf coming, 
when ./& found the Dog Jltep- 
ing at Home, jlanding before 
/Z* //a//, aflis //'^ Dog, tha,t 
would perform his Promifes 
The Dog /ay j, Hark ye, 
Wolf, {{Thou hailjl taken Me before 
the Hall, Thou ii'ou/ef/i not haiv 
e Wedding in -vain. 



MOR. 

This FabLt fhows, 

that Itift Man, when ow^ir 
He hath avoided a Danger, con- 
tinually takes Care for //* future. 



FABLE 



SELECT FABLES OF 

FABLE CXCIII. 



De Cane b j Gallo. 

CAnis y Callus Socii 
faciebant fier ; autem 
Vefperi fuperveniente, 

Callus dormiebac inter Ra- 
mos Arloris ; at Cants ad 
Radicem. Cum Callus, "it 
fl^/c/tf, cantabat No8u, 
Vulpcs .audivit Eum, accur- 
rit, Sf. Jlans inferius rogabat, 
Ut defeenderet ad ^f, 
quod cuptrct compltdli 
Animal adeo commendabilf 
Cantu ; auttm, cum /r 
dixifTet, w/ priue excttaret 
Janicorem dormentem ad 
Radicem, ut defcende- 
ret, ciim ///? aperuifiet ; 
///o quaerente, w/ vocartt 
Ipfum t Canis projiliens 
dilaceravit F~ulpem. 

MOR. 

Fabula Jigni/teai, pru- 
dentes Homines roittere /nx- 



Se, 



potentiores quam 
jj foriioiea 



Of the Dog a</ the Cock. 

A Dog and a Cock Companion! 
made a Journey ; but 
Evening coming on, 

f/><? Cock flept among the Bran- 
ches <?/" a 7"r^ ; but the Dug at 
/A* Root'. When the COCK .?v 
.fr ;V ivont, crowc<i / //'. 
a Fox heard Him, runs i^ 
him, and Jianding below ajked, 
that ^iff would come du<uun to Him, 
becaufc He dejired to embrace 
fla Animal fo commendable 
for Song ; a/, ;when /^ 
had faid, that firfl ^ jlould wake 
the Porter Jleeping at 
/^ ^?oo/, that J7<? wi/j^/ foaj? 
down, when ^? had opened ; 
#,? alkcd, /Aaf He would call 
.//zw, the Dog leaping out 
tore /# Fox. 

MOR. 

The Fable fignifies t that pru- 
dent JW> fend Ene- 
rr.iss more powerful /Aan 
Themfelves, to the more brave 
^y Craft. 



FABLE 



146 SELECT FABLES OF 
FABLE CXCIV. 



De Ranis. 

DUJERanx pafcebantur 
is Palude ; attfem 
^Eftate Palude ficca- 
ta, quxrelant aliara ; ctterum 
invenerunt profundum 

Puteum ; Quo vifo, Altera 
dixit Altcri, Heus Tu, 
defcentfamus in hunc 
Puteum ; Ilia refpondens ait, 
Si Aqua amer it hie, 
quomodo afcendemus ? 



#/" the Frogs. 

TWO Frogs were fed 
in a Mairti ; but 
in Summer /ta Marjb being dried 
up, They fought another J but 
They found a deep 

Well ; Which being feen, One 
faid fo the Other, So ho ?~0 t 
let us defccnd f'n/o this 
Well ; the Other anfivering fays, 
//" the Water Jhould dry up here, 
io-a; fhall we get up ? 







MoR 


MOR. 


Fabula 


declarat, 


quod 


The 


Fable 


declares. 


that 


//* 


Res 


funt 


agend 


a: ;- 


Things 


are 


to 


be 


done 


tn- 


confederate. 






coiifiderately. 



FABLE CXCV. 



De Leone & Urfo. 

LEO fc? Urfus, 
cepiflent magnum 

^iinanlum, pagtwbant de o, 
& vulnerati graviter 
feipfis jacebant defatigati. 
^a^j,videns Eos proftratos, 
5f Hinnulum jacehtem in 
Media, rapuit //ar, & /a- 
j/fis/. I Hi videbant, fed 
jaw non potuerant furgere t 
dicebant, Heu ! mife*os 
Not, quia laboravimus 
Vulpf. ' 



Cf the Lion cW the Bear. 

THE Lion and the Bear,-a6m 
They had taken a great 
Fawn, fought about Him, 
and wounded grievoufly by 
one another they lay do-urn tired. 
A Fox, feeing Them laid down, 
and the Fawn /y/nj in 
the Middle, fnatched Him, and ran 
away. They fa'w Him, but 
becaufe They could not rife, 
They faid, Alas ! wretched 
Us, becaufe We have laboured 
for the Fox. 



MOR, 



SELECT FABLES OF #!SOP. 14? 



MOR. 

Fabula ftgnificat, 
tlitm Alii laborant, 
potiuntur Prxda. 



MOR. 

quod The Fable fs n lfi is * tliac 
Alii whilft Some labour, Others 
enjoy the Prey. 



FABLE CXCVI. 



De C, 



CAffita, capta Laqueo, 
dicebat ploraxs, Hei ! 
Mihi mifera & infelici, 
non furripui Aurum neque 
Slrgcntam cujufquatn ; 

autem Granum Tritici fuit 
Caufa meae Mortis. 

MOR. 

Fabula tendlt in Eos, 
Qui fobeunt magtium Peri- 
culum ob inutile Lucrum. 



Of the LARK. 

THE Lark, taken in a Snare, 
yi/ lamenting* Alas ! 
to Me miferable and unhappy , 
I have not taken away fta Go/J nor 
?ta Silver of any One ; 
^af a Grain <?/ Wheat has been 
/ Caufe of my Death. 



MOR. 

The Fable toH/r to 
Who undergo great 
^fr for unprofitable Gain. 



.Dan- 



FABLE CXCVII. 

De Leone confeffo Senio. 0/"the Lion 'worn out with Age. 

WHcntkeLion was grown old, 
nor could get his Liv- 
ing, He contrived a Way, 
how ProviRonsJbouIJnot lie wanting 
to Him. Therefore having entered 
the Den, lying down, He feign- 
ed Himfclf vehemently to be fick. 
The living Creatures, thinking Him 
verily to be Jick, went 
to Him for the 5a^of vifiting Him; 
Whom the Lion taking can 
up J* n sfy' When 

now 

u 



CUM Leo fenuiffet, 
nee poflet qvsrere Vic- 
tum } machinabatur Viam, 
qui Alimenta hand deeffent 
Sibi. Igitur ingreffus 
Speluncam, jacens, Jimula- 
bat Se vehementer segrotare. 
Animalia^ putantia Se 
vere <egrotare, accedebant 
ad Eum Gratia vifitandi ; 
Qyie Leo capiens mandu- 
cabat ftngvlaiim. Cam 
jam 



148 SELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. 



jam occidiflet multa Ani- 
malia, Vulpes, Arte Lecms 
cognita, accedens ad Adi- 
tum Speluocaci ftans exte- 
nts, regal Leonem quomodo 
valcret. Leo refpondens 
blandl Ei alt, Filia 
Futyes, cur nan ingrederit 
Intro ad Me ? fu/pts aitnon 
illepide, Quoniam, mi 
Ifere t cerno equidem perplu- 
ra Vejligia Animalium tn- 
grrdientiunij fed nulla Ve- 
ftigia Eorum egredientium. 



nciu He had killed md.'jy A pi- 
rn als, The Fox, the Art of the Lion 
being known, coming to .>< En- 
trance of the Cwe,J}anding with- 
out, <7,#.r the Lion how 
He did. 7"/6<; jL/on anfwering 
fairly to Him y^/W, Daughter 
Fox, why ///? 716 OM not enter 
in fo Me ? 7*^ AA- faid no/ 
unwlttily, Becaufe, my 

Majler, I perceive indeed 'v 'ery ma- 
ny Footjleps of Animals f/:^r- 
/"/; /, but no Foot- 
fleps o/" 7/5fm coming out. 



MOR. MOR. 

Fabula Jignificat, quod The Fable Ji n >fi 

prudcns Horiio, >ui pro- a prudent Man, /W 

videt immincntia Pericula, fees imminent 

facile devitat Ilia. eaftly avoids Them. 



><7 fore- 
Dangers, 



FABLE CXCVIII. 



De Leone ^ Tauro. 

LEO fsquens ingentem 
Taurum per InJiJias, 
cum accejjit prope, vocavit 
Eum ad Coenam, inquiens, 
Amice, occidl Ovem, 
canabit Mecurn lodie, ft 
placet Tibi. Pojiquam 
difcubuiffent, Taurus 

confpicicns plures Lebetcs, 
<5? Obeli fcos faratos, & 
adeffi nullam Ovfm Illi, 
volutt dccederc ; Quern 
Leo pfrfpiciens jam abeitn- 
1cm t rogavit, cur abiret. 
Taartu rtfpondit, 



0/"thc Lion end the Bull. 

ALTON following a great 
^w// by Treachery, 

\vhen //<? famr nrar, invited 
Him /0 Supper, faying* 
Friend, / have killed a Sheep, 
You /ball f up with Me To- Day, if 
// pleafes You. y& yoo a-f 
They had fat down, the Bull 
feeing iway Cauldrons, 

and Spits ready y and 

fa/ /^r<f wjj no S'/fw/ for Him, 
waf willing to depart ; Wham 
the Liunferceiving novt going away t 
afked Him, w-^y He would go. 
The Bull aufwercd, Tru>, 
I do 



SELECT FABLES OF 1ZSOP. 14$ 



non abeo de Nihilo, 
cum videam Injlrumenta 
pa rat a non ad coquendum 
Ovcm, fed Taurum. 



I do not go away for Nothing, 
when I fee Injlntments 
prepared not to drrfs 
a Sheep, but a Bull. 



MOR. 

Fabula fi^nificat, 
Art a improborum 
latent prudeutes. 


quod 

non 


MOR. 

The Fable fignlfies, 
the Arts of the Wicked 
lie hid from the prudent. 


that 

da not 



FABLE CXCIX. 



De JEgroto fcf Me- 
dico. 

7}7GER, rogatus a 
**-' Medico de fud 
Salute, rffpondit, Se 
fuddjfe violcnter ; Medi- 
cus ait, Id fuifle bonum ; 
rogatus ab eodem Medico 
fecundo, quomodo invenie- 
bat Se, ./Egrotus intuit, 
Se fui//e comprenfum ve- 
hcmtnti Frigore : Msdlcus 
quoque ait t Id fore ad 
Salutem. Interrogatus 

tcrtio ab eodem, quomodo 
rcperiebat Se, JEgrotus 
inquity Se non potvijje 
iligerere fine magna Dijji- 
cultate. Medicus ait rurfus, 
Id fulfle optimum ad 
Salntem ; deinde, cvm 
Oiiidaro Domejlicorum 

interrogaret JEgrotum, 

quomodo valeret, ait life, 
tit Medicus ait, funt 
Mihi multa &. optima Signa 
ad 



Of the Sick Man and the Phy- 

fician. 

THE Sick Man leing afied by 
the Phyftcian about his 
Health, anftoered, That he 
had fiucated violently ; the Phy- 
fie'ian fays, that That was good \ 
aflced by the fame Pbjfician 
a fecond time, how He found 
Himfelf, the fick Man faid, 
that He it) as. fo'zcd -with a vehe- 
ment Coldnefs ; The Phyftcian 
alfo fays, that That was for 
his ' Health. Aflted 

a third time by /&? fame, liow 
imfelf, flfe /^ ^/? 
that He ivas not all? 
to digeft without great Diffi' 
culty. The Phyficianyi/)^ again, 
/Aa/ T/fa/ was the bejl for 
A/V Health ; afterwards, when 
fome One of his Dome/licks 
aflced the ftck Man, 

how ^ didj fays //<?, 
as /^ff Phyftcian fays, //1/rr^ /?r^ 
to Me many and ^ ^ Signs 



150 SELECT FABLES OF JESOP. 

ad Salutem, (amen difpc- for Health, yet I 
reo illls SJgnis. rifh by thofe Signs. 



pc- 



MOR. MOR. 

Falula indicat, dffenta- The Fable /how, that Flatter- 

res efle culpandos. trs art to be blamed. 



FABLE CC. 

Be quodam LICNATORE. Of a certain WOOD-CUTTER. 



DUM quidam Ligna- 
tor fcindebat Lignum 
juxta Flumen, dicatum Deo 
' Merc ur'io, Securis Cafu 
decidit in Flumen. Igitur 
affe&us tna'fo Mcerore, 
conjidebat getnens juxta 
Ripam F/umints. Mer- 
curius, motus Mifericordia, 
apparuit Lignario, & 
rogavit Caufam fui Fletus ; 
>uam fimul ac didicit, 
afferent aurearn Securim, 
rogavit, utrum eflet 

Ilia, Quam perdiderat. At 
Pauper negavit efle 

fiiam. Secundo Mercurius 
detulit alteram, argenieani ; 
Quam, cum Pauper 

ntgaret quoque ejfe fuam, 
pojlremo Mercurius detullt 
ligneam ; cum Pau- 
per ajjent'iret, Illam ejfe 
fuam, Mercurius, cognofcens 
Ilium efle Hominem verum 
df juftum, dedit Omnes Sibi 
Dono. Igitur Ligna- 
rius, accedens ad Socios, 
declarat Quid acciderat 



WHILST a certain Wood- 
Cutter cleaved Wood 
near a River, dedicated to the God 
Mercury, his Ax by chance 
fell into the River. Therefore 
afFeded -with much Grief, 
fie fat down fighing near 
the Bank of the River. Mer- 
cury, moved with Pity, 
appeared to the Wood-Cutter, and 
flj&r/the Caufc of his Weeping ; 
Which as foon as He learnt, 
bringing to him a golden Ax t 
He afked, Whether It was 
That, Which be had loft. But 
the poor Man denied that it was 
his. A fecond Time Mercury 
brought another, a Jilver One ; 
Which, tulen the poor Man 
denied alfo to be his, 
at laH Mercury reached 
the wooden One ; when the Poor 
Man agreed, that That was 
his, Mercury, knowing 

Him to be a Man true 
ajrfjuft, ^avf Them All /<? Him 
for a Gift. Therefore the Wood- 
Cutter, coming to A/V Companions^ 
declares /f&tf had happened 
to Him. 



SELECT FABLES OF ^SOP. i$t 



Sibi* Unus e Sociis 
vo/ens experiri Id, cum 
acce/ji/fet ad F/utsen, dtjecit 
Securim in Aquam^ deinde 
confedit flens in Ripa ; 
Caufam Cnjus F lei us cunt 
Mercurtus audiviffct, ajfe- 
rens auream Sfcurim, rogavit, 
Illane eflet, Quam 

perdiderat : Quam, cum 
ajfereret effc fuarn, Mer- 
curius, ejus Irapudenlia cog- 
nit a, nee tradidit Ei 
auream, nee fuam. 

MOR. 

Fabula fignificai, quod 
quanta Deus ty? propi- 
tior Probis, exiftit M/<> 
j^/or Improbis. 



/'? /('/m. One o/~ his Companions 
willing to try //, when 
/^ir came to /ta Rruer, threw 
bis Ax into */><; Watcr> then 
#< y/7< weeping on the Bank ; 
the Coa/fofWhofe Weeping when 
Mtrcary had heard, bring- 
ing a golden y^.v, He afked, 
7^/Arr r/^/ was It, /TAwA 
He had loft : Which, when 
/^ afferted to be /for own, Mer- 
cury, his Impudence being 
known, neither delivered to Him 
the golden One., nor his own, 

MOR. 

The Fflble jlgnifia^ tiiat 
by hotv much God w jtnorc propi- 
tious to the Honejl, He is the mare 
injcjluous to the Wicked. 



FABLE CCI. 



Medico, Qui 
Infanos. 



ciuabat 



P Lures cottaquclanlur de 
fuperfivd Cura Ecrum, 
Qui alunt Cartes, ad Aucu- 
pium. Quidam ex lis 
inquit, Stultus Mediolani 
rifit /f'oj refte, C'ww 
Pabula pofctretur, inquit, 
Fuit Medic us, Ci-vis Medio- 
lani, >ui fufcipiebat 
fanare infanos, delates ad Se 
intra cerium Tempos : 
autsm Curatio erat hujus 
Modi ; habebat Domi 
Aream, $5* in ed Lacunam 
f&tidx 



Of the Phyfician, Who cured 
tie Mad. 



MANY tetf/ of 

the fuperfluousCart of Them, 
Who feed -Dogs for Fowl- 
ing. A certain Man o/" Them 
fays, The Fool o/" Med'tolanum 
kughed at Thefe rightly. When 
the Story was demanded. He faid, 
There <was a Phyfician, a Citizen 
of Mediolanum, Who undertook 
to cure the Mad, brought to Hint 
within a certain Time : 
tut the Cure was of this 
Manner ; He had at Hnmc 
a Court, and in i/ a Pon-.l 



152 SELECT FABLES OF 



fetlde Aqi:je, in Qua 
ligavit Eos nudos ad 
Paiurr., Alios ;ifq; ad Genua, 
Aiios vfque ad Vent r em t 
Nonnullos profunJius, fe- 
cuiidiino Gradum Infaniae ; 
ac tamdiu macerabat Eos 
jlqud, quoad viderentur 
fani Mente. Quidam 

eft aJlaius inter Cdieros, 
Quem fofu'it in Equant 
uique ^ Femur, hti coc- 
pit rejipifcere poft quindecim 
Dies, 5* rogare yimrn Me- 
dicum, vt rcduceretur 
em Aqua ; Ille exemit 
fiominem a Crucialtt, tarn en 
ca Conditioae, ne egrede- 
retur Aream. Cum 

paruiffet aliquot Dicbus, 
pcrmifit, vt perambula- 
rct Mam Domnm ; at 
ut nan egrtderetur exterio- 
rem Tanuam ; (Sociis, 
Qui erant multi, rellfiis in 
Aqua ;) paruit Manda- 
te Medici di/igen- 
ter ; vero JIans fuper Li- 
men quouam Temfore ; (nam 
non audelat egredi,) vldit 
Juvenem vsnisr.tcm in Equo 
cum duobus Canibus, b 5 
Accipitre ; motus Novi- 
tate Rei ; (etcnim non tene- 
bat Memoria 
Quf viderat 
ante Infaniam ; cum 
jfuvcnis accefliflet, Ille 
inquit, Ifevs, TH, oro, re- 
fponde Mini paucis : Quid 
ejl Hoc, >UQ vehe- 
fit ? Intuit, eft Equus. 
Turn 



tif Jlinking Water, in. Which 
He bound Them naked to 
a Stake, Some up to the Knees, 
Others up to the Belly, 
fome more deeply, accord- 
ing t-j the Degree of Madnefs ; 
and fo long He jlarved Them 
in the Water, till They feemed 
found in Mind. A certain Man 
was brought among the Reft* 
Whom He p-ut into the Water 
up to the Thigh ; Who be- 
gan to repent after fifteen 
Days, and to alk his Phy- 
fkian, that He might be brought 
cut of the Water ; He took out 
/i6^ jlfian from the Torment, yet 
on that Condition, that He Jhould 
not go out of the Court. When 
He had obeyed fome Days, 
He permitted, that He might 
walk over the 'whole Hotife ; lut 
that hejlouldnet go out of the out- 
ward -Gate ; (his Companions, 
Who were many, being left in 
fr Water ;) He obeyed //6<r COOT- 
mandi of the Phyfician diligent' 
ly ; but flanding upon /ta Thre/h- 
cld on a certain TiW ; (for 
/^ did net dare to go out,) ffefavf 
a Young Man coming on Horff 
with /wo Dog?, a</ 

a Hawk ; moved with the No- 
velty c/"/f Thing; [forfffduf not 
retain in Memory 

A&* T/&OT^/ 7f*/rA He had feen 
before his Madnefs ;} \vhen 
/i6f Toung Man came near, //ir 
fa id, So ho, You, / /rsj, an- 
fwcr Me in a few Things : What 
is This, en Which Thou art car- 
ried ? &7y/ /&, It is a Horff. 
Then 



SELECT FABLES OF 1ESOP. 



'53 



Tum de'wceps, Q^id voca- 
tur Hoc, Quod geftas 
Manu, St. in qua Re 
uteri's ? fife refpondit, 
eft Accipitcr, &? aptus 
Captui Perdicum. 

Tum In fan us petit, & 
Hi, C^ui comitantur Te, 
Qui i'unt, 5* Quid 
profunt Tibi ? J?;V, 

Sunt Canes, & 0/>/i Au- 
cupio, ad invettigandum 
Jives. Autem hoe Aves, 
Caufd capiendi Quas 
paras tot Res, 

cujus Pretii funt, fi con~ 
feras Capturam totius 
Ann! in tinum ? KOT re- 
fpondiflet parvum, nefcio 
quid, & quod non ex- 
cederet fex Aureos, Infanus 
rogat, Quanam fit Impenfa 
Equi, Canum, & 

Acctpitris ? afHrmavit 7re- 
penfam Eorum ejfe quotan- 
nis quinqitaginta Aureos. 
Tum admiratus Slultitiam 
Juvenis, inquit, oro, 
alt bine ocyus, antequam 
Medicus rcdeat Domum ; 
nam ft Hie compererit Te, 
conjiciet Te IB fuam 
Lacunam, veluti infani/Ji- 
mum Omnium, to" collo- 
cabit Te in ^ja ufque ad 
Mentucn. 

MOR. 

Hzc Fabula oftendit, 
multas Infanias effe quotidie 
inobftrv&u* 



Then afterwards, What is call' 
ed This, Whuh thou beared 
on thine Hand, and in what TTwtf 
doft thou ufe it ? He anfwered, 
it it a Hawk, and fit 
for the catching of Partridges. 
then the Madman ajks, and 
TAefe, That accompany Thee, 
/irAaf are they, an^/ What 
do they profit to Thee ? He fays, 
They are Dogs, and ./fr for Fowl- 
ing, to trace 
ftfe Birds. But ft&^fc Birds, 
/or the Saka of catching /^"A/VA 
You prepare fo many Things, 
of what Price are They, if Ton 
put together the Catching of a whole 
Year into one ? When%\ had an* 
fvvered a little, I know not 
what, and </W it could not ex 
ceed ^w Guineas, the Madman 
afks, /fAa/ may be the Expence 
of the Horfe, of the Dogs, and 
oftheHawk? He affirmed theEx- 
pence of Them /o ^ year- 
ty ^/"<y Guineas. 
TA^o having admired /A* ^"o/^ 
of the Young Mzn,fayshe, I pray, 
jfo hence quickly, before that 
the Phyftcian return Home ; 
for // He Jhould Jind Thee, 
/rV tuill throw Thee //<? his 
Pond, as /A* wo^ 
wff^ of all Men, and He will 
place Thee in //fc Water up /o 
the Chin. 

MOR. 

This Fable fliows. 

many MadnefTes to be daily 

anci/Jrrw*^. 

FABLE 



154 SELECT FABLES OF 



FABLE CCII. 



JDf obflinata Muliere, $>u<e 
vocavit Virum pedicirlofum. 

QUffidarn Mulier, fupra 
Modum- contraria yi- 
ro, ua ut vellet fffe fupe- 
rior, femel in gravi Alter- 
catione cum Eo vocavit 
Eum pedicuiofum. Ille, ut 
retra&uret iUud Verbum, 
contun&bat Uxoretn, ex Jens 
Illaru Pugtris & Calcibus. 
Quo magis caedebatur, 
eo plus vocavit Illunar 
pedicutofum. Vir tandem 
laffus verier ando lllam> 
ut fuperaret Pertina- 
ciam Uxoris, dimifit 

in Flumen per Funero, 
dicens, ., Se fuffocaturum 
Earn, ft non abftineret 
fa/i'iaj Verbis. Ilia per- 
ilabat n/>6<Vo minus cottti- 
tiuare Jllud ferbutn, quam- 
vis fixa ufqae ad Mentum 
in Aqua. 7am Vir 
demerfit Earn in Flumen, 
it a ut non pojjlt loqui 
amplius, tentans Ji pofiet 
attertere Earn a Pertinaciu 
Timor e Mortis. At Ilia, 
Facultate loquendi ademp- 
td, exprimebat Digitis, 
Quod nequibat Ore : 
Nam, Manibus ereclis fupra 
Caput, Unguibus utriufqite 
Poll ic is conjuncJis, dcdit 
quod Opprobrium fotuit 
Viro, Mo Geftu. 
MOR. 

Haec Fabula indicat, quod 
Quidani retinebunt fuamPerti- 
naciam etiam Pericuh Mortis. 
F I 



Of the obftin,ate Woman, Who 
called her Hujbqnd loufy. 

A Certain Woman, above 
meafure cont-nry to her Huf- 
band, fo that (he would be upper - 
molt, once in a heavy Quar- 
rel wit A Hirrt called 
Him loufy. He, that 
She might ret raft that Word, 
bruifed his Wife, e eating 
Her /VA AM Fifii and J7^//. 
By how mucht/jeincrefht was beaten 
^y_/o macA the morey<? ra//f</Him. 
/oa/r. The Man at length 
tired w/V>6 beating Her, 
//j<?/ He might overcome the Ob- 
Jlinacy of his Wife, let her down 
into a River by a Rope, 
f a y tn g> t^ 3 * He would fuffocatc 
Her, r/" She would not abftaia 
from fuch Words. She per- 
fifted in nothing the lefs to conti- 
nue that Word* al- 
tho' jSjc^J up to the Chin 
* the Water. Then the Man 
pJunged Her t/a the River, 
fo that iS^f rouW o# fpeak 
more, trying if He could 
avert Her _/fW her Obftinacy 
by the Fear of Death. But She, 
*A* Faculy of fpcaking ^/n^- /a^f 
away, expreflfed with her Fingers, 



For, her Hands being raifed above 
her Head, the Nails of each 
Thumb being joined, She gave 
what Reproach She could 
to her Hufband, by that Gefture. 

MOR. 

This Fable mows, that 
Some will retain their Obfti- 
nacy even at the Hazard of Death. 
N I S. 



Quid*. 
naciam e tiara JL