(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Fairy tales from the far North"



I^ni^l^.^l."^ LIBRARY THE BRANCH LIBRARIES 



'^ 3 3333 08103 5020 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/fairytalesfromfaOOasbj 



'Fairy Tales from the 
Far North i 

by 

P. C. Asbjornsen 

Translated from the Norwegian by 
H. L. Braekstad 




'. "■VV'ith Ninety-Five Illustrations by 
E. WERENsfc'lOLD, T. KITTRL^EN and O. SINDING 

' ' '' /AUTHORISEV'.'tD'rnON 



LONDON 
DAVID NUj:^E?=a=5ac^2 7i, STRAND 




r'riiitcd by I'.ai.lantvnk, Hanson <S-^ Co. 
At the Ballantyne Press 



PROPERTY OF THE 
CITY OF MEW YORK 



TRANSLATOR'S NOTE 

Slowly but surely the name of Asbjornsen has been gaining 
ground in popularity as one of the most fascinating and delightful 
writers of Fairy Tales, not only among the young folks in this 
country, but also among adult readers and students of Folk Lore. 
Asbjornsen was first introduced to the English public through the 
late Sir George Dasent's translations, published in 1858 and 1874. 
In 1 88 1 appeared my translation of a selection of his Norske 
Folkc-Evcntyr (Norwegian Folk and Fairy Tales), and his Hiildrc- 
Evcntyr (Tales and Legends about the wood-fairy and other 
supernatural beings), with the original illustrations, which a 
number of Norwegian artists, all friends and admirers of the 
genial author, had for some time been preparing for the first 
illustrated edition of his Tales. The English edition was 
published under the title of ** Round the Yule Log," and met 
with a most favourable reception both in this country and in 
America. 

A second volume, containing a further selection of his most 
popular Tales, with illustrations by the well-known Norwegian 
artists, E. Weienskiold, T. Kiitelsen and O. Sinding was in course 

THS; K'liW VOPK P'^'^LIG LIBRARY 
CIRr'lJLATiON DEi^ART^'IEMT 



vi Translator's Note 

of publication when, in 1885, death overtook the author, and 
Norway lost one of her most celebrated sons. But the arrange- 
ments for the publication of this new volume of the illustrated 
edition were so far advanced, that the final part was able to 
appear about two years after Asbjornsen's death. It is these 
illustrations which appear in the pages of the present English 
edition of the new selection of his Tales. With regard to the 
translation, I have in this, as in my former volume, ** Round the 
Yule Log," attempted to retain as far as possible the racy, 
colloquial flavour of the original. 

H. L. B. 

London, Sepicmher, 1S97. 



~M^^*IM- 



CONTENTS 



The Ram and the Pig icJio icent into the Woods to live by Themselves . i 

The Golden Bird 8 

The Fox as Herdsboy 20 

Ashiepattle, who ate with the Troll for a IVager ..... 22 

The Quern at the Bottom of the Sea 27 

Little Biitterkin , . 34 

The Contrary -minded WonuDi 39 

The Woodpecker 45 

The Man's Daughter and the Womaji's Daughter 47 

The Hare who had been Married . 58 

The Squire's Bride 61 

All Women are alike . . . . 6g 

One's own Children are always the Prettiest ...... 77 

Old Father Bruin in the Wolf pit 79 

The Doll in the Grass 82 

The Hen who went to Dovrefjeld to save the World .... 87 

Squire Peter gi 

Bird Dauntless ........... too 

The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse 116 

Soria Maria's Castle 122 

Well Done, III Paid 138 

Ashiepattle and his Goodly Crew 142 

Gudbrand on the Hill-side 155 

The Twelve Wild Ducks 162 



VI 11 



Contents 



The Bear and the Fox : 

1. Slip Pine-Root, Grip Fox-Foot . 

2. The Bear and the Fox make a Wager . 

3. The Bear and the Fox go into Partnership . 

4. Reynard wants to taste Horseflesh 
The Cock who fell into the Brewing Vat . 
The Cock and the Fox ....•• 
The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain . , 
The World's Reward , . . . • . 

The Companion 

Nanny who wouldn't go Home to Supper 

The Lad with the Beer Keg ..... 

Little Fred and his Fiddle ..... 

The Storehouse Key in the Distaff .... 

The Lad who went wooing the Daughter of old Mother Corner 

The Princess whom nobody could silence .... 

Farmer Wcatherbeard 



Page 

174 
175 
176 
180 
182 
189 
192 
220 
226 
246 
253 
259 
269 
272 
283 
289 




WHO Went • 

INTO THE^</6bDS 
TO;" LIVE 

BY THEMSELVES ^^NllrV^.'^j 

There wa^ .opfle'. uppn a time .a ,;',>• .',j|5^ 
ram, who was,' "Beint^' fattferied.u^/';'* '-''*' 
for killing. He ,' tidcl, therefore/ « 
plenty to eat, and hd s&on • be- 
came round and fat with all the ^, i , j j 
good things he got. One da}- -n^ \x ■^^ „„ 

the dairy-maid came, and gave s^C^Yi" />— Mil/} 

him some more food. ^"X^mV /. M, Wi 

" You must eat, ram," she 



2 TuK Ram axd the Pig 

said; "you'll not be long here now, for to-morrow we are going to 
kill you." 

** There's an old saying, that no one should sneer at old 
women's advice, and that advice and physic can be had for every- 
thing except death," thought the ram to himself; ** but perhaps 
I might manage to escape it this time." 

And so he went on eating till he was full, and when he was 
quite satisfied he ran his horns against the door, burst it open, 
and set off to the neighbouring farm. There he made straight for 
the pig-sty, to look for a pig with whom he had struck up an 
acquaintance on the common, since when they had always been 
good friends and got on wxll together. 

" Good day, and thanks for 3^our kindness last time we met," 
said the ram to the pig. 

" Good day, and thanks to you," said the pig. 

" Do you know why they make you so comfortable, and why 
they feed you and look after you so well ? " said the ram. 

" No," said the pig. 

" There are many mouths to fejed pn this ftirm, you must know," 
said the ram ; " they are going. to'.klJh]you and.-feat'you." 

"Are they?" said the .pig'.:'*'/«W^ir, "m'uelj -good may it do 
them ! " _• '-' ' ".■•.•'*■;■• 

" If you are of the same mind as I, we will g'o'into the woods 
and build a liouse and* liye' by ourselves ; there "is nofhing like 
having a home of your QW.T7',*.ypu know," said the ram.,, ■ 

Yes, the pig was 'quite, \villing. "It's ni.ce'.j:p be in fine 
company," said he, and off -thi^y 'started. 

When they had got a bif'cxv.the Way iheV.m'fct'-a'goose. 

" Good day, my good people,. l^nd thanks for yoiir kindness last 
time we met," said the goose. "Wher.e .are you off to ? " 

"Good day, and thanks to you," said the ram. "We had it 
altogether too comfortable at our place, so we are off to the woods 
to live by ourselves. In your own house you are your own 
master, you know," said he. 

"Well, I'm very comfortable where I am," said the goose; 



The Ram and tiik Pig 3 

"but wbv shouldn't I join you ? Good company makes the day 
sliorter," said she. 

" But neither hut nor house can be built b}^ gabbling and 
quacking," said the pig. " What do you think you can do?" 

" Good counsel and skill may do as much as a giant's will/' 
said the goose. " I can pluck moss and stuff it into the crevices, 
so that the house will be warm and comfortable." 

Well, she might come with them, thought the pig, for he liked 
the place to be warm and cosy. 

When they had gone a bit on the way — the goose was not 
getting along very fast — they met a hare, who came scampering 
out of the wood. 

"Good day, my good people, and thanks for your kindness the 
last time we met," said the hare. " How far are you going to-day ? " 
said he. 

" Good day, and thanks to you," said the ram ; " we had it alto- 
gether too comfortable at our place, so we are off to the woods to 
build a house and live by ourselves. When you have tried both 
East and West, yon'll find tfta,t ,9.' home of your own is after all 
the best," said he' % K'^ » vv"/-'' - 

" Well, I. haw,'Of "Course, SL'hojht'mi every bush," said the hare ; 
"but I hav,e ofti^'ii'said to myself in. the wmter, that if 1 lived till 
the summer I wduld build a house, .so I have a good mind to go 
with you and build one after all," sai'd/hfe.' * 

"Welt, if-*ftie worst comes to the°wDrst, we might take you 
with us toTrtglUen the dogs a way, "~ sal (} the pig, "for you couldn't 
help us to 13ui]d>,^ttie' bouse, I should" ^'a}^J' 

"There is.'°li\vVays.,solfii'ethjn^f6f Willing hands to do in this 
world," said the'ljaVfe,, "I haVe-^teeth to gnaw pegs with, and I 
have paws to knock th'em" into "the walls, so I'll do very well for a 
carpenter ; for * good tools make good work,' as the man said, 
when he skinned his mare with an auger," said the hare. 

Well, he might come with them and help to build the house ; 
there could be no harm in that. 

When they had got a bit further on the way, they met a cock. 



4 The Ram wd the Pig 

" Good day, my good people, and thanks for your kindness 
last time we met," said the cock; "where are you all going to- 
day ? " he said. 

" Good day and thanks to you," said the ram ; " we had it 
altogether too comfortable at our place, so we are off to the woods 
to build a house and live b}- ourselves. ' For unless at home you 
bake, 3'ou'll lose both fuel and cake,' " said he. 

"Well, I am comfortable enough, where I am," said the cock, 
" but it's better to have your own roost than to sit on a stranger's 
perch and crow ; and that cock is best off who has a home of his 
own," said he. " If I could join such fine company as yours, I too 
would like to go to the woods and build a house." 

" Well, flapping and crowing is all very well for noise, but it 
won't cut joists," said the pig. " You can't help us to build a 
house," he said. 

" It is not well to live in a house where there is neither dog 
nor cock," said the cock ; " I am early to rise and early to crow." 

" Yes, * early to rise, makes one weajth}' and wise,' so let him 
come with us ! " said the pig. He.Ws always the heaviest sleeper. 
" Sleep is a big thief, and st6a.\s'. half 'one's life''','h.e' ?aid. 

So they all set off to th'e""vV0,6(;ls 'and built' 'th,e.*'fiause. The pig 
felled the trees and the .ram dragged them hortie',;,''ihe, hare was 
the carpenter, and gnawed pegs and hammered 'them "jnto walls 
and roof; the goose pluck'cd fnoss and stuffed it into the crevices 
between the logs; the cdck.'crew and took care th^t-'vhey did not 
oversleep themselves in. tbtj'-'mornings, and when, the .house was 
ready and the roof covered. w.iK.^ birch-bark ajid fiiatcbed with turf, 
they could at least live by '"lix^yhseW'ts', a.nd._ thp'^^Avere all both 
happy and contented. '.'•.; .,•'.' 

" It's pleasant to travel both EaSb and 'West, but home is, after 
all, the best," said the ram. 

But a bit further into the wood two wolves had their lair, and 
when they saw that a new house had been built hard by they 
wanted to know what sort of folks they had got for neighbours. 
For they thought, " a good neiglibour is better than a brother in a 



The Ram and the Pig 7 

foreign land, and it is better to live among good neiglibours than 
to be known far and wide." 

So one of them made it his business to call there and ask for a 
light for his pipe. The moment he came inside the door the ram 
rushed at him, and gave him such a butt with his horns that the 
wolf fell on his head into the hearth; the pig snapped and bit, the 
goose nipped and pecked, the cock flew up on a rafter and began 
to crow and cackle, and the hare became so frightened that he 
scampered and jumped about, both high and low, and knocked and 
scrambled about from one corner of the room to the other. 

At last the wolf managed to get out of the house. 

** Well, to know one's neighbours is to add to one's wisdom," 
said the wolf, who was waiting outside ; " I suppose you had a 
grand reception, since you stayed so long. But what about the 
light ? I don't see either pipe or smoke," said he. 

*' Yes, that was a nice light I got, and a nice lot of people they 
were," said he who had been inside. " Such treatment I never 
met with before, but ' as you make your bed so you must lie,' 
and 'an unexpected guest must put up with what he gets,'" said 
the wolf *' No sooner had I got inside the door, than the shoe- 
maker threw his last at me, and I fell on my head in the middle 
of the forge ; there sat two smiths, blowing bellows and pinching 
and snipping bils of flesh off me with red-hot tongs and pincers; 
the hunter rushed about the room looking for his gun, but as luck 
would have it, he couldn't find it. And up on the rafters sat 
some one beating his arms about and shouting : * Let's hook him ! 
let's hook him ! Sling him up ! sling him up ! ' and if he had only 
got hold of me I should never have got out alive." 



THE GOLDEN BIRD 




There was once upon a 

time a king who had a 

garden ; in that garden there was an 

apple-tree, and on that apple-tree there 

grew a golden apple every year ; but 

when the time came to pluck the apple, it 

was gone, and no one knew who took it or 

what became of it ; but gone it was. 

The king had three sons, and one day he 
told them that he who could bring him the 
apple, or get hold of the thief, should have the 
kingdom after him, no matter whether he was 
the eldest, the second or the younger son. 

The eldest set out first and sat down under the tree to keep 
watch for the thief. Soon after dark a golden bird came flying 



The Golden Bird 9 

and the light from it was so strong and dazzling, that it could be 
seen a long way off. When the prince saw the bird and the 
dazzling light, he became so frightened, that he dared not stay 
any longer, but rushed indoors as fast as he could. 

Next morning the apple was gone ; the prince had then, how- 
ever, recovered his courage and began to get ready for his journey 
and wanted to set off to find the bird. The king fitted him out in 
grand style and spared neither money nor fine raiment. When 
the prince had gone a bit on the way he became hungry, opened 
his scrip and sat down to his breakfast by the road side. A fox 
then came out of the wood and sat down and looked at him. 

" Do give me a little to eat," said the fox. 

" I'll give you some powder and shot," said the prince ; " my 
food I shall want myself; nobody can tell how far and how long I 
may have to travel," said he. 

"Just so," said the fox, and so he went back into the wood 
again. 

When the prince had finished his meal and rested awhile he 
set out on his way again. After a long time he came to a big city, 
and in that city there was an inn, where there was always joy and 
never any sorrow ; he thought that would be a nice place to stop 
at, and so he remained. And there was such dancing and drinking 
and joy and merry-making, that he forgot the bird and his father 
and his journey and the whole kingdom. 

Away he was and away he stopped. 

The next year the second prince was to watch for the thief in 
the garden ; he also sat down under the tree when the apple began 
to ripen. But one night, all of a sudden, the golden bird came 
flying, shining like the sun ; the prince became so afraid that he 
took to his heels and ran indoors as fast as he could. 

In the morning the apple was gone, but the prince had then 
recovered his courage and wanted to set out and find the bird. 
He began to get ready and the king fitted him out in grand style 
and spared neither money nor fine raiment. But the same thing 
happened to hmi as to his brother ; when he had got a bit on the 



lo The Golden Bird 

way he became hungry, opened his scrip and sat down to his 
breakfast by the roadside. A fox then came out from the pine 
wood and sat down and looked at him. 

" Do give me a httle to eat," said the fox. 

" I'll give you some powder and shot," said the prince ; " my 
food I shall want myself; nobody can tell how far and how long I 
may have to travel," said he. 

*' Just so," said the fox, and so he went back into the wood 
again. 

When the prince had finished his meal and rested awhile, he 
set out on his way again. After a long time he came to the 
same city and the same inn, where there was always joy and 
never any sorrow ; and there he also thought it would be nice 
to stop, and the first he met was his brother, and so he remained. 
The brother had been leading a gay and reckless life and had 
scarcely any clothes left on his back ; but now he began afresh, 
and there was such dancing and drinking and joy and merriment 
tliat the second prince also forgot the bird and his father and 
his journey and the whole kingdom. Away he was and away he 
stopped. 

When the time came for tlie apple to ripen again the youngest 
prince was to go into the garden and watch for the thief. He 
took a companion with him who was to help him up into the tree, 
and he also took with him a keg of beer and a pack of cards to 
pass away the time with so that he should not fall asleep. All 
of a sudden they saw a bright light, as if from the sun ; every 
feather of the bird could be seen long before it came to the tree. 
The prince climbed up into the tree and at the same time the 
golden bird swooped down and took the apple ; the prince tried to 
seize the bird, but he only caught a feather out of its tail. 

So he went to the king's bedroom, and as he came in with the 
feather, it became as light as day. 

He also wanted to try if he could find his Ijrothers and catch 
the bird, for he had been so near to it that he had got a feather 
from its tail and would know it again anywhere, he said. 



The Golden Bikd ii 

Well, the king went and pondered long whether he should let 
him go, for he thought the youngest would not fare any better than 
the two eldest, who ought to have more knowledge of the world, 
and he was afraid he should lose him also. But the prince begged 
so earnestly that at last he got permission to go. 

He then began to get ready and the king fitted him out in 
grand style, both with clothes and money, and so he set off. 

When he had travelled for some time he became hungry and 
took his scrip and sat down to have his breakfast, but just as he 
was in the midst of it, a fox came out of the wood and sat down 
close by his side and looked at him. 

" Do give me a little to eat," said the fox. 

"I shall want the food myself," said the prince, "for I cannot 
tell how far I shall have to travel, but I have enough to give you a 
little." 

W^hen the fox had got the piece of meat he asked the prince 
where he was going. 

Yes, that he would tell him. 

" If you will listen to me, I will help you, and you will have 
good luck," said the fox. 

The prince promised he would, and so they set off together. 
They travelled a while till they came to the same city and the 
same inn, where there was always joy, but no sorrow. 

'*I must keep outside here; the dogs are rather a nuisance," 
said the fox, and so he told the prince where his brothers were 
to be found and what they were doing; "and if 3-ou go in there 
you will not get any further either," said he. 

The prince promised he would not go in there, and gave 
him his hand on it, and so each went his way. But when the 
prince came to the inn and heard the noise and merriment 
going on he felt he must go in ; there was no help for it, 
and when he met his brothers there was such rejoicing that 
he forgot both the fox and the journey and the bird, and his 
father. But when he had been there a while the fox came — 
he had ventured into the city after all — and opened the door a 



12 The Golden Bird 

little and made a sign to the prince, saying that now they must be 
ofif. So the prince bethought himself, and they went their way. 

When they had travelled a while they saw a big mountain far 
away. The fox said : 

"Three hundred miles at the back of that mountain there is 
a gilded linden-tree with golden leaves, and in that tree sits the 
golden bird from which you took the feather." 

Thither they travelled together. When the prince was going 
to catch the bird the fox gave him some bright feathers which he 
was to wave in his hands, and so attract the bird, which would 
then fly down and sit on his hand. 

But the fox said he must not touch the linden-tree, for inside 
it was a big troll, who owned it, and if the prince only touched 
the smallest twig the troll would come out and kill him on the 
spot. 

No, he would not touch it, said the prince ; but when he 
had got the bird on his hand, he thought he must have a 
twig of the tree ; there was no help for it, it was so bright 
and beautiful. So he took a tiny little sprig, but the satne 
moment the troll came out. 

"Who is that stealing my tree and my bird?" roared the 
troll, and he was so angry that he spurted sparks of fire. 

"Thieves believe that all men steal," said the prince; "but 
only those get hanged who do not steal properly," said he. 

The troll said that made no difference, and was going to kill 
him, but the prince begged him to spare his life. 

"Well," said the troll, " if you can bring me back the horse 
which my nearest neighbour has taken from me, you will get off 
with your life." 

" Where shall I find it, then ? " said the prince. 

" Oh, he lives three hundred miles at the back of that big blue 
mountain against the horizon yondei"," said the troll. 

The prince promised he would do his best. But when he came 
back to the fox he found him in rather a bad temper. 

" Now you have got yourself into trouble," said the fox ; " if 



The Golden Bird 13 

you had listened to me we could have been on our way home by 
this," said he. 

So they had to make a fresh start, for the prince had pledged 
his word, and his life depended on his finding the horse. 

At last they got there, but as the prince was going to take the 
horse the fox said : 

"When 3^ou come into the stable you will find all sorts of 
bridles hanging on the wall, both of gold and silver ; you must 
not touch them, for then the troll will come and kill you right 
away ; you must take the ugliest and shabbiest you see." 

Yes, the prince promised he would ; but when he came into 
the stable he thought it was quite unreasonable not to take a fine 
bridle, for there were plenty of them, and so he took the brightest 
he could find. It was as bright as gold, but just then the troll 
came and was so angry that sparks flew from him. 

" Who is that stealing my horse and my bridle ? " he 
shrieked. 

"Thieves believe that all men steal," said the prince; "but 
only those get hanged who do not steal properly," said he. 

" Well, that makes no difference. I'll kill you on the spot," 
shouted the troll. 

But the prince begged him to spare his life. 

"Well," said the troll, "if you can bring me back the fair 
damsel which my nearest neighbour has taken from me I will spare 
you." 

"Whereabouts does he live, then ?" asked the prince. 

" Oh, he lives three hundred miles at the back of that big blue 
mountain against the horizon yonder," said the troll. 

The prince promised he would fetch the damsel, and was 
allowed to go, and so he escaped with his life. 

But when he came out you may imagine how angry the fox 
was. 

" Now you've got yourself into trouble again," said he ; " if you 
had listened to me we could have been on our way home long ago. 
I almost think I will not go with you any further." 



14 The Golden Bird 

But the prince begged and prayed and promised he would 
never do anything else but what the fox told him, if he would 
only remain with him. At last the fox gave in, and they 
became firm friends again ; so they set off once more and came at 
last to where the fair damsel was. 

" Well," said the fox, " I have your promise, but I dare not let 
you in to the troll, after all ; this time I must go myself." So he 
went in, and after a while he came out with the damsel, and so 
they went back the same way they had come. 

When they got to the troll, who had the horse, they took both 
the horse and the brightest bridle ; and when they got to the troll, 
who had the linden tree and the bird, they took both the tree and 
the bird and started off with them. 

When they had got a bit on the way, they came to a field of 
rye, and the fox then said : 

" 1 hear a thundering noise ; 3'ou had better go on ahead ; I 
will remain here a while," he said. He then plaited himself a 
gown of rye-straw, in which he looked like a preacher. All at 
once the three trolls came rushing along, hoping to overtake the 
prince. 

" Have you seen any one passing here with a fair damsel, a 
horse with a golden bridle, a golden bird, and a gilded linden- 
tree ? " they shouted to the fox, as he stood there preaching. 

" Well, Fve heard from my grandmother's grandmother, that 
something of the kind passed this way, but that was in the good 
old times, when my grandmother's grandmother baked halfpenny 
cakes and gave back the halfpenny." 

Then all the trolls burst out laughing : " Ha, ha, ha ! " they 
laughed and held on to one another. 

" If we have slept so long, we may as well turn our noses home- 
wards, and go to sleep again," tl.ey said, and so they went back 
the way they came. 

The fox then set off after the prince, but when they came to 
the city, where the inn and his brothers were, he said : 

" I dare not go through the town on account of the dogs ; I must 




"HA, HA, ha!" the trolls LAUGHED, AND HELD ON TO ONE ANOTHEK 



The Goldex Bird 17 

go my own way just above here, but you must take good care your 
brothers do not get hold of you." 

But when the prince came into the city, he thought it would 
be too bad if he did not look in upon his brothers and have a word 
with them, and so he tarried there for a while. 

When the brothers saw him, they came out and took both the 
damsel, and the horse, and the bird, and the linden-tree, and every- 
thing from him, and they put him in a barrel, and threw him into 
the sea ; and so they set off home to the king's palace, with the 
damsel, and the horse, and the bird, and the linden-tree, and every- 
thing. But the damsel would not speak, and she became pale and 
wretched to look upon ; the horse got so thin and miserable that 
it could hardly hang together ; the bird became silent and shone 
no more, and the linden-tree withered. 

In the meantime the fox was sneaking about outside the 
city, where the inn and the merriment were, and was waiting 
for the prince and the damsel, and wondered why they did not 
return. 

He went hither and thither, waiting and watching for them, 
and at last he came down to the shore, and when he saw the 
barrel, which was lying out at sea drifting, he shouted : "Why are 
you drifting about there, you empty barrel ? " 
" Oh, it is I," said the prince in the barrel. 

The fox them swam out to sea as fast as he could, got hold of 
the barrel, and towed it to land ; then he began to gnaw the hoops, 
and when he had got some off the barrel, he said to the prince : 
" Stamp and kick." 

The prince stamped and kicked till all the staves flew about, 
and out he jumped from the barrel. 

So they went together to the king's palace, and when they got 
there the damsel regained her beauty and began to talk, the horse 
became so fat and sleek that every hair glistened ; the light shone 
from the bird and it began to sing; the linden-tree began to blossom 
and its leaves to sparkle, and the damsel said, " He is the one who 
has saved us." 

B 



i8 The Golden Bird 

They planted the Hnden-tree in the garden, and the youngest 
prince was to marry the princess, for such the damsel really was ; 
but the two eldest brothers were put each in a spiked barrel and 
rolled down a high mountain. 

Then they began to prepare for the wedding, but the fox first 




THE TWO ELDEST BROIHERS WERE PUT EACH INf A SPII-CED BARREL 
AND ROLLED DOWN A MOUNTAIN 



asked the prince to put him on the block and cut his head oflf, and 
although the prince both prayed and cried, there was no help for 
it ; he would have to do it. But as he cut the head off, the fox 



The Golden Bird 



19 



turned into a handsome prince, and he was the brother of the 
princess, whom they had rescued from the troll. 

So the wedding came off and everything was so grand and 
splendid, that the news of the festivities reached all the way 
here. 




THE FOX AS HERDSBOY 



There was once upon a time a woman, who went out to look for 
a herdsboy, and so she met a bear. 

" Where are you going ? " said the bear. 

"Oh, I'm looking for a herdsboy," answered the woman. 

" Won't you take me ? " asked the bear. 

" Well, if you only knew how to call the flock," said the 
wife. " Ho-y ! " shouted the bear. 

" No, I won't have you ! " said the woman, when she heard 
this, and went on her way. 

When she had gone on a while, she met a wolf. 

" Where are you going ? " said the wolf. 

" I am looking for a herdsboy," said the woman. 

" Won't you take mc ? " said the wolf. 



The Fox as Herdsboy 



21 



"Well, if you only knew how to call the flock," said the 
woman. " U-g-h ! " howled the wolf. 

"No, 1 won't have you," said the woman. 

When she had gone a bit further, she met a fox. 

"Where are you going?" said the fox. 

" Oh, I'm looking for a herdsboy," said the woman. 

" Won't you take me ? " asked the fox. 

" Well, if you only knew how to call the flock," said the woman. 

" Dil-dal-holom ! " called the fox in a thin, squeaky voice, 

" Yes, I'll take you for a herdsboy," said the woman ; and so she 
put the fox to look after her flocks. On the first day he ate up all 
the goats belonging to the woman ; the second day he finished all 
her sheep, and the third day he ate all the cows. When he came 
home in the evening, the woman asked what he had done with all 
the flocks. 

*' The skulls are in the brook and the bones in the wood," 
said the fox. 

The woman was busy churning, but she thought she might as 
well go and look for her flocks. While she was away, the fox 
slipped into the churn and ate all the cream. When the woman 
came back and saw this, she became so angry, that she took a 
small clot of cream, which was left, and threw it after the fox, 
splashing the end of his tail with it, and that's the reason why 
the fox has a white tip to his tail 1 




ASHIEPATTLE* WHO ATE WITH 
THE TROLL FOR A WAGER 

There was once upon a time a peasant who had three sons. He 
was badly off, and old and feeble, and the sons would not do any 
work. 

To the farm belonged a large pine forest, and the father 
wanted his sons to cut timber in it, and try to get some of his 
debts paid off. At last he got them to listen to him, and the 
eldest one was to go out first and fell trees. When he got into 
the forest and began felling an old bearded pine, a great big troll 
came up to him. 

" If you cut down my trees, I'll kill you ! " said the troll. 

When the lad heard this, he threw down the axe and set off 
home as fast as he could. He got there quite out of breath, and 
told what had happened to him, but the father said he was chicken- 
hearted ; the trolls had never frightened him from felling trees 
when he was young, he said. 

The next day the second son was to go, and the same thing 
happened to him. He had no sooner struck some blows at the 
pine than the troll came and said : 

" If you cut down my trees, I'll kill you ! " 

The lad hardly dared to look at him ; he threw down the axe 
and took to his heels, just like his brother, only rather quicker. 

* The favourite hero of most Norwegian fairy tales is called Askcladcn, a sort 
of male Cinderella, and is always the youngest son of the family. 




"IF YOU DON'T BE QUIET," SHOUTED THE LAD TO THE TROLL, " i'LL SQUEEZE VOU 
JUST AS I SQUEEZE THE WATER OUT OF THIS STONE " 



ASHIEPATTLE WHO AtK WITH THE TkOLL 25 

When he came home the fatlier became angry, and said that 
the trolls had never frightened him when he was young. 

On the third day Ashiepattle wanted to set out. 

" You indeed ! " said the two eldest ; " you'll never be able to 
do anything, you who have never been outside the door ! " 

Ashiepattle did not answer, but only asked for plenty of food 
to take with him. His mother had nothing ready, and so she put 
on the pot and made a cheese for him, which he placed in his 
scrip, and then set out from home. When he had been felling 
trees awhile, the troll came to him and said : 

" If you cut down my trees, I'll kill you ! " 

But the lad was not slow ; he ran into the forest for the cheese 
and squeezed it, so that the whey spurted from it. 

" If you don't be quiet," he shouted to the troll, " I'll squeeze 
you just as I squeeze the water out of this white stone." 

"Oh dear, oh dear! do spare me!" said the troll, "and I'll 
help you." 

Well, on that condition the lad would spare him, and as the 
troll was clever at felling trees, they cut them down by the dozen 
during the day. Towards evening the troll said : 

" You had better come home with me; it is nearer than to 
your place." 

Well, the boy went home with him, and when they got there 
the troll was to light the fire on the hearth, while the boy fetched 
the water for the porridge. But the two iron buckets that were 
there were so big and heavy he was not even able to move them. 
So the boy said : 

" It is hardly worth while to take these thimbles with me ; I'll 
go and fetch the whole well." 

"Oh dear, no! " said the troll, " I cannot lose my well; you 
make the fire, and I'll fetch the water." 

When he came back with the water, they boiled a great big 
cauldron of porridge. 

" If it's all the same to you," said the lad, " I'll lay a wager I'll 
eat more than you." 



26 ASHIEPATTLE WHO AtE WITH THE TROLL 

" All right/' said the troll, for he thought he could easily 
manage that ; but the boy took his scrip without the troll seeing 
it, and tied it in front of him, and managed to put more porridge 
in the scrip than he ate himself. When the scrip was full he took 
his knife and cut a slit in it. 

The troll looked at him, but didn't say anything. When they 
had been eating a good while the troll put away his spoon, and 
said : 

" I can't eat any more." 

"You must eat," answered the lad. "I'm scarcely half-way 
through. Do as I did, and cut a hole in your stomach, and then 
you can eat as much as you like." 

'* But I suppose it hurts one dreadfully ? " asked the troll. 

'* Oh, nothing worth talking about," answered the lad. 

So the troll did as the lad told him, and as you will easily 
understand, that was the end of him. But the lad took all the 
silver and gold which was in the mountain, and went home. With 
that he would be able to pay off something of his father's debt. 



THE QUERN AT THE BOTTOM 
OF THE SEA 




Once upon a time in the old, old days 
there were two brothers, one of whom 
was rich and the other poor. When 
Christmas Eve came the poor brother 
had not a morsel in the house, neither 
of meat nor bread ; and so he went to 
his rich brother, and asked for a trifle 
for Christmas, in heaven's name. It 
was not the first time the brother had 
helped him, but he was always very 
close-fisted, and was not particularly 
;lad to see him this time. 

" If you'll do what I tell you, you 
shall have a whole ham," he said. The 



28 The Querx at the Bottom of the Sea 

poor brother promised he would, and was very grateful into the 
bargain. 

"There it is, and now go to the devil ! " said the rich brother, 
and threw the ham across to him. 

" Well, what I have promised I must keep," said the other one. 
He took the ham, and set out. He walked and walked the whole 
da}', and as it was getting dark he came to a place where the 
lights were shining brightly. "This is most likely the place," 
thought the man with the ham. 

In the wood-shed stood an old man with a long white beard, 
cutting firewood for Christmas. 

" Good evening," said he with the ham. 

" Good evening to you," said the man. " Where are you 
going so late ? " 

" I am going to the devil — that is to say, if I am on the right 
way," answered the poor man. 

"Yes, you are quite right ; this is his place," said the old man. 
" When you get in, they will all want to buy your ham, for ham 
is scarce food here ; but you must not sell it unless you get the 
hand-quern, which stands just behind ihe door. When you come 
out again, I'll teach you how to use it. You will find it useful 
in many ways." 

The man with the ham thanked him for all the information, 
and knocked at the door. 

When he got in, it happened just as the old man had said. All 
the imps, both big and small, flocked around him like ants in a 
field, and the one outbid the other for the ham. 

" Well," said the man, " my good woman and I were to have 
it for Christmas Eve, but since you want it so badly I will let you 
have it. But if I am going to part with it, I want that hand-quern 
which stands behind the door." 

The devil did not like to part with it, and higgled and 
haggled with the man, but he stuck to what he had said, and in 
the end the devil had to part with the quern. 

When the man came out, he asked the old wood-cutter how 



The Quern at the Bottom ok the Sea 29 

he was to use the quern, and when he had learned this, he thanked 
the old man and set out homewards as quickly as he could ; but 
after all he did not get home till the clock struck twelve on Christ- 
mas Eve. 

" Where in all the world have you been ? " said his wife. 
" Here have I been sitting, hour after hour, waiting and watching 
for you, and have not had as much as two chips to lay under the 
porridge pot." 

" Well, I couldn't get back before ;" said the man. " I have had 
a good many things to look after, and I've had a long way to walk 
as well ; but now I'll show you something," said he and put the quern 
on the table. He asked it first to grind candles, then a cloth, and 
then food and beer, and everything else that was good for Christmas 
cheer ; and as he spoke the quern brought them forth. The woman 
crossed herself time after time and wanted to know where her 
husband had got the quern from ; but this he would not tell her. 

" It does not matter where I got it from ; you see the quern is 
good and the mill stream is not likely to freeze," said the man. So he 
ground food and drink and all good things during Christmas; and the 
third day he invited his friends, as he wanted to give them a feast. 
When the rich brother saw all that was in the house, he became 
both angry and furious, for he begrudged his brother everything. 

" On Christmas Eve he was so needy that he came to me 
and asked for a trifle in heaven's name ; and now he gives a 
feast, as if he were both a count and a king," said the brother. 
"Where did you get all your riches from?" he said to his brother. 

" From just behind the door," he answered, for he did not care 
to tell his brother much about it. But later in the evening, when 
he had drank a little freely, he could no longer resist, but brought 
out the quern. 

" There you see that which has brought me all my riches," he 
said, and so he let the quern grind first one thing and then another. 

When the brother saw this, he was determined to have the 
quern at all cost, and at last it was settled he should have it, but 
three hundred dollars was to be the price of it. The brother was, 



30 Thp: Otekx at the Bottom of the Sea 

however, to keep it till the harvest began ; " for if I keep it so 
long, 1 can grind out food for many years to come," he thought. 

During that time you may be sure the quern did not rust, and 
when the harvest began the rich brother got it ; but the other had 
taken great care not to show him how to use it. 

It was evening when the rich brother got the quern home, and 
in the morning he asked his wife to go out and help the ha}'- 
makers ; he would get the breakfast ready himself to-day, he said. 

When it was near breakfast time he put the quern on the 
breakfast table. 

"Grind herrings and broth, and do it quickly and well," said 
the man, and the quern began to bring forth herrings and broth, 
and filled first all the dishes and tubs, and afterwards began flood- 
ing the whole kitchen. 

The man fiddled and fumbled and tried to stop the quern, but 
however much he twisted and fingered it, the quern went on 
grinding, and in a little while the broth reached so high that the 
man was very near drowning. He then pulled open the parlour 
door, but it was not long before the quern had filled the parlour 
also, and it was just in the very nick of time that the man put his 
hand down into the broth and got hold of the latch, and when he 
had got the door open, he was soon out of the parlour, you may be 
sure. He rushed out, and the herrings and the broth came pouring 
out after him, like a stream, down the fields and meadows. 

The wife, who was out haymaking, now thought it took too 
long a time to get the breakfast ready. 

"If my husband doesn't call us soon, we must go home whether 
or no : I don't suppose he knows much about making broth, so I 
must go and help him," said the wife to the haymakers. 

They began walking homewards, but when they had got a bit 
up the hill they met the stream of broth with the herrings tossing 
about in it and the man himiself running in front of it ail. 

" I wish all of you had a hundred stomachs each ! " shouted 
the man ; " but take care you don't get drowned." And he rushed 
past them as if the Evil One was at his heels, down to where his 




(« < 



5 < 



The Quekm at the Bottom ok the Sea 33 

brother lived. He asked him for heaven's sake to take back the 
quern, and that at once ; " If it goes on grinding another hour the 
whole parish will perish in broth and herrings," he said. But the 
brother would not take it back on any account before his brother 
had paid him three hundred dollars more, and this he had to do. 
The poor brother now had plenty of money, and before long he 
bought a farm much grander than the one on which his rich 
brother lived, and with the quern he ground so much gold that he 
covered the farmstead with gold plates and, as it lay close to the 
shore, it glittered and shone far out at sea. All those who sailed 
past wanted to call and visit the rich man in the golden house, and 
everybody wanted to see the wonderful quern, for its fame had 
spread both far and wide, and there was no one who had not 
heard it spoken of. 

After a long while there came a skipper who wanted to see the 
quern ; he asked if it could grind salt. Yes, that it could, said he who 
owned it ; and when the skipper heard this he wanted the quern 
by hook or by crook, cost what it might, for if he had it he thought 
he need not sail far away across dangerous seas for cargoes of salt. 

At first the man did not want to part with it, but the skipper 
both begged and prayed, and at last he sold it and got many, 
many thousand dollars for it. 

As soon as the skipper had got the quern on his back he did 
not stop long, for he was afraid the man would change his mind, 
and as for asking how to use it he had no time to do that ; he made 
for his ship as quickly as he could, and when he had got out to sea 
a bit he had the quern brought up on deck. 

" Grind salt, and that both quickly and well," said the skipper, 
and the quern began to grind out salt so that it spurted to all sides. 

When the skipper had got the ship filled he wanted to stop the 
quern, but however much he tried and whatever he did the quern 
went on grinding, and the mound of salt grew higher and higher, 
and at last the ship sank. 

There at the bottom of the sea stands the quern grinding till 
this very day, and that is the reason why the sea is salt. 

c 




LITTLE BUTTERKIN 



Once upon a time there was a woman who was sitting baking. 
She had a Httle boy who was so fat and plump and who was so 
fond of good food that she called him Butterkin. She also had a 
dog called Goldtooth. 

One day, all of a sudden, the dog began to bark. 

" Run out, Butterkin ! " said the woman, " and see what 
Goldtooth is barking at." 

So the boy ran out and came back, saying : 

" Oh, mother, mother ! There's a great big troll-wife coming 
here, with her head under her arm and a bag on her back." 



Little Butterkin 35 

" Run under the table and hide yourself," said his mother. 

The big troll-wite then came in. 

** Good da}' I " she said. 

" Good day to you ! " said Buttcrkin's mother. 

" Is Butterkin at home to-day ? " asked the troll-wife. 

" No, he is in the forest with his father, after the ptarmigan," 
answered the woman. 

" That's a pity," said the troll : " for I have such a nice little 
silver knife I wanted to give him." 

" Peep, peep, here I am," said Butterkin under the tabic, and 
crept out, 

" I am so old and stiff in my back," said the troll, "3'ou must 
get into the bag and find it yourself." 

No sooner was Butterkin in the bag than the troll threw it across 
her back and walked off with him. When they had gone a bit on 
the w^ay the troll got tired and asked : 

" How far have I to go before I can lie down and sleep ? " 

"About a mile," answered Butterkin. The troll then put 
down the bag by the roadside and went in among the bushes by 
herself and lay down to sleep. In the meantime Butterkin took 
the opportunit}', pulled out his knife, cut a hole in the bag and 
jumped out ; he then put a big root of a fir-tree in his place 
and ran home to his mother. When the troll-wife reached 
home and saw what she had in the bag she flew into a great 
rage. 

The next day the woman sat baking again. All at once the 
dog began to bark. 

" Run out, Butterkin," said she, " and see what Goldtooth is 
barking at." 

" Oh, mother, mother ! It's that terrible old troll ! " said 
Butterkin. " Here she is again, with her head under her arm and 
a big bag on her back." 

" Run under the table and hide yourself," said his mother. 

"Good-day!" said the troll-wife. "Is Butterkin at home 
to-day ? " 



36 Little Butterkix 

" No, indeed he is not," said his mother ; " he is out in the 
forest with his father, after the ptarmigan." 

" That's a pity ! " said the troll ; " for I have such a nice little 
silver fork I wanted to give him." 

" Peep, peep ! Here I am ! " said Butterkin, and crept out. 

" I am so stiff in my back," said the troll, " you must get into 
the bag and find it yourself." 

No sooner was Butterkin in the bag than the troll threw it 
across her back and walked off with him. When they had gone 
a good bit on the way the troll got tired and asked : 

" How far have I to go before I can lie down and sleep ? " 

*' About two miles," answered Butterkin. The troll then put 
down the bag by the roadside and went into the wood and lay 
down to sleep. While the troll-wife took her nap, Butterkin cut 
a hole in the bag, and when he had got out he put a big stone in 
his place. As soon as the troll-wife reached home she lighted a 
great fire in the hearth and put on a large cauldron in which to 
boil Butterkin, but when she took the bag to empty Butterkin into 
the cauldron, the stone fell out, and knocked a hole in the bottom 
of the cauldron, so the water rushed out and put out the fire. The 
troll then became very angry and said : 

" Let him make himself ever so heavy, I'll be even with him 

yet." 

The third time it happened just as before ; Goldtooth began to 
bark and so the mother said to Butterkin : 

" Run out, Butterkin, and see what Goldtooth is barking 
at." 

Butterkin then ran out and came back saying : 

" Oh, mother, mother ! It's that troll again, with her head 
under her arm and a bag on her back." 

" Run under the table and hide yourself," said the mother. 

" Good day ! " said the troll, as she came in through the door. 
" Is Butterkin home to-day ? " 

"No, indeed he is not," said his mother; "he is in the forest 
with his father, after the ptarmigan." 



Little Butterkin 37 

" That's a pity ! ' said the troll-wife, "fori have such a nice 
little silver spoon I wanted to give him." 

" Peep, peep ! Here 1 am ! " said Butterkin and crept out from 
under the table. 

" I am so stiff in my back," said the troll, "you must get into 
the bag and find it yourself." 

No sooner had Butterkin got into the bag than the troll threw 
it across her back and walked away with it. 

This time the troll-wife did not lie down and sleep, but went 
straight home with Butterkin in the bag. It was a Sunday when 
they got home, and so the troll said to her daughter : 

"Now you must take Butterkin and kill him and make broth of 
him, till I come back again, for I am going to church, and shall ask 
some friends for dinner." 

When she was gone, the daughter went to take Butterkin to 
kill him, but she did not quite know how to set about it. 

" Wait a bit ! I'll show you how to do it ! " said Butterkin ; 
"just put your head on the block and see how it's done." 

She did so, poor silly thing, and Butterkin took the axe and 
cut off her head, just as if it had been that of a chicken ; he then 
put the head in the bed and the body in the cauldron, and made 
broth of the daughter, and when he had done this he climbed up 
on the rcof, just over the door, taking with him the fir-root and 
the stone, and put the first over the door and the other across the 
top of the chimne3\ 

When the people came home from church and saw the head in 
the bed, they thought that the daughter had lain down and was 
asleep, so they thought they would taste the broth. 

" This Butterkin-broth tastes nice! " said the troll-wife. 

"This daughter-broth tastes nice!" said Butterkin, but they 
took no heed. 

The troll-wife then took the spoon to taste the broth. 

" This Butterkin-broth tastes nice," she said. 

*'This daughter-broth tastes nice," said Butterkin down the 
chimney. 



38 Little Butterkin 

They then began to wonder who it could be, and went out to 
see. But when they came outside the door, Butterkin threw the 
fir-root and stone at their heads and killed them all on the spot. 
He then took all the gold and silver that was in the house, and 
you may imagine how rich he became ; and so he went home to 
liis mother. 



THE CONTRARY WOMAN 

There was once upon a time a man who had a wife, and she was 
so contrary and cross-grained that it was not an easy thing at all 
to get on with her. The husband fared worst of all ; whatever he 
was for, she was always against. 

So it happened one Sunday in summer that the man and the 
woman went out to see how the crops looked. 

When they came to a corn-field on the other side of the river 
the man said : 

" It's ready for reaping ; to-morrow we must begin." 

" Yes, to-morrow we can begin and clip it," said the 
WDnian. 

" What is it you say ? Are we going to clip it ? Are we 
supposed not to reap corn any longer ? " said the man. 

" No, it must be clipped," said the woman. 

"There is nothing so dangerous as a little knowledge," said 
the man ; " one would think you had lost what little sense you had I 
Have you ever seen anybody clipping corn ? " said he. 



40 The Contrary Woman 

" Little I know, and less I want to know," said the woman ; 
*'but this I do know, that the corn shall be clipped and not 
reaped." There was no use talking any more about that; clipped 
it should be. 

So they walked on wrangling and quarrelling, till they came to 
the bridge across the river, close to a deep pool. 

"There's an old saying," said the man, " that good tools make 
good work ; 1 fancy that'll be a queer harvest which is cut with a 
pair of shears," said he. "Shall we not settle to reap the corn, 
after all ? " 

"No, no! it must be clipped, clipped, clipped ! " shouted the 
woman jumping up and clipping her fingers under the man's 
nose. 

In her passion she forgot to look where she was going, and 
all at once she stumbled over one of the beams on the bridge and 
fell into the river. 

" Old habits are hard to change," thought the man, " but it 
would be a wonder if I, for once, got my way." 

He waded out into the pool and got hold of her by the hair, 
till her head was just out of the water. 

" Shall we reap the corn then ? " he said. 

" Clip, clip, clip ! " screamed the woman. 

" I'll teach you to clip," thought the man, and ducked her 
under the water. But that wasn't of much use ; " they must clip 
it," she said, as he brought her to the surface again. 

" I do believe the woman is crazy," said the man to himself; 
"many are mad and don't know it, and many have sense 
and don't use it ; but I must try once more, anyhow," said 
he. But no sooner had he ducked her under again than she 
held her hand above the water and began to clip with her 
fingers, like a pair of shears. Then the man got furious and 
kept her under so long that her hand all of a sudden fell under 
water, and the woman became so heavy that he had to let go 
his hold. 




^' NO, NO ! IT MUST BE CLIPPED, CLIPPED, CLIPPED ! " SHOUTED THE 
WOMAN, CLIPPING HER FINGERS UNDER THE MAN'S NOSE 



The Coxtrary Woman 



43 



" If you want to drag me down into the pool with you, you 
may He there, you wretch!" said the man. And so the woman 
was drowned. 

But after a while he thought it wasn't right that she should lie 
there and not be buried in Christian soil, so he went along the 
river and searched and dragged for her; but for all his searching 




SHE HELD HIR HAND ABOVE THE WATER AND BEGAN TO CLIP WITH HER 
FINGERS, LIKE A PAIR OF SHEARS 



and all his dragging he could not find her. He took the people on 
the farm and others in the neighbourhood with him, and they 
began dragging the river all the way down ; but for all the search- 
ing they could not find the woman. 

" Well," said the man, " this is not much use ! This woman 
was a sort b}^ herself; while she was alive she was altogether a 
contrary one, and it is not likely she'll be different now," he said, 



44 



The Coxtkary Woman 



^' we must search up the river for her, and try above the fall ; 
perhaps she has floated upwards." 

So they went up the river and searched and dragged for her 
above the fall, and there, sure enough, she lay. That shows what 
a contrary woman she was I 




THE WOODPECKER 




.V 



In those days when the saints used to wander 
about on earth, St. Peter once came to a woman 
who was sitting baking oatcakes. Her name 
was Gertrude, and she had a red cap on her 
head. 

As St. Peter had been walking a long dis- 
tance and was hungry, he asked her for a bit of 

her cake. Yes, he might have some, and she took a tiny lump of 

dough and began to roll it out ; but it became so big that it filled 

the whole of the board. No, that cake was too big, he shouldn't 

have that one. 

She then took a still smaller lump of dough, but when she had 

rolled it out and put it on the slab to bake, that one also became 

too big. He shouldn't have that one either. 

The third time she took a still smaller lump, a tiny little one ; 

but this time also the cake became too big. 



46 The Woodpecker 

" I have nothing to give you," said the woman ; "you may as 
well go without your bit, for all the cakes are too big." 

Then St. Peter became angry and said : " Because you be- 
grudge me such a trifle 3'ou shall be punished, and you shall 
become a bird and seek your food between the bark and the wood 
and have nothing to drink except when it rains." 

He had no sooner said the last word than she became a wood- 
pecker and flew from the hearth up the chimney. To this day 
3'ou can see her flying about with her red cap on and her body all 
over black from the chimney. She is always tapping and pecking 
at the trees for food, and piping when it is going to rain, for she is 
always thirsty and is then waiting for water. 



THE MAN'S DAUGHTER AND THE 
WOMAN'S DAUGHTER 

Once upon a time there were a man and a woman who got married ; 
they had each a daughter. The woman's daughter was lazy and 
idle and would never do any work, and the man's daughter was 
active and willing, but for all that, she could never please the step- 
mother, and both the woman and her daughter would have liked 
to get rid of her. 

One day they were sitting by the well spinning ; the woman's 
daughter had flax to spin, but the man's daughter had nothing else 
but bristles. 

" You are always so clever and smart," said the woman's 
daughter, " but still I'm not afraid to try and see who can spin the 
most." 

They agreed, that the one whose thread first broke, should be 
put into the well. 

All at once the man's daughter's thread broke, so she was put 
into the well. But when she came to the bottom she found she 
was not hurt ; and far and wide around she saw nothing but a 
beautiful green meadow. 

She walked for some time in the meadow, till she came to a 
hedge which she had to climb over. 

" Do not step heavily on me," said the hedge, " and I'll help you 



4^ The Man's Daughter and the Woman's Daughter 

another time." She made herself as h'ght as a feather and stepped 
over so carefully that she scarcely touched it. 

So she went on a bit farther, till she came to a brindled cow, 
which had a milk pail on her horns ; it was a fine large cow, and 
her udder was round and full of milk. 

" Please do milk me," said the cow, " for I am so full of milk ; 
drink as much as you like and pour the rest over my hoofs, and I'll 
help you some other time." 

The man's daughter did as the cow had asked her ; the moment 
she took hold of the teats the milk squirted into the pail, then she 
drank as much as she could and the rest she poured over the cow's 
hoofs, and the pail she hung on the horns again. 

When she had gone a bit further she met a large ram, which 
had such long thick wool that it trailed along the ground, and on 
one of his horns hung a large pair of shears. 

" Please do shear me," said the ram, *' for here I have to go 
about panting with all this wool, and it is so warm I am almost 
stifled. Take as much wool as you like and twist the rest round 
my neck, and I'll help you another time." 

She was quite willing, and the ram lay down in her lap ; he was 
so quiet and she sheared him so neatly, that she did not make a 
single scratch in his skin. She then took as much as she wanted 
of the wool, and the rest she twisted round the ram's neck. 

A little further on she came to an apple-tree, which was so 
laden with apples that all the branches were bent to the ground. 
Close to the trunk stood a small pole. 

"Please do pluck some of my apples," said the tree, "so that 
my branches can straighten themselves, for it is quite painful to 
stand so crooked, but be sure and strike mc gently and lightly, so 
that 3'ou do not injure me. Eat as many as you like and place the 
rest around my root, and I'll help you some other time." 

So she plucked all she could reach, and then she took the pole 
and carefully knocked down all the other apples ; she ate till she 
was satisfied, and the rest she placed neatly round the root. 

Then she walked on a long, long way, till she came to a large 




SHE WENT IN TO THE TKOI.I.-WIKE AND ASKED IF THEY WANTED 
A SERVING MAID 



The Max's Daughter and the Woman's Daughter 51 

farm, where a troll-wife and her daughter lived. She went in and 
asked if they wanted a serving maid. 

"Oh, it's no use," said the troll-wife, "we have tried many, 
but none of them were good for anything." But she begged so 
hard, that at last they took her into service ; and the troll-wife 
gave her a sieve and told her to fetch some water in it. She 
thought it was rather unreasonable that they should ask her to 
fetch water in a sieve, but she went all the same, and when she 
came to the well the little birds were singing : 

" Rub in clay ! 
Put in hay ! 
Rub in clay ! 
Put in hay ! " 

She did so and was then able to carry the water in the sieve 
easily enough, but when she came home with the water and the 
troll-wife saw the sieve, she said : 

" You have not done that by yourself." 

The troll-wife then told her to go into the cow-house and clean 
it out and then milk the cows ; but when she came there she found 
that the shovel was so big and heavy she could not use it, she 
could not even lift it. She did not know what to do, but the birds 
sang to her that she should take the handle of the besom and 
throw a little out with it and then all the rest would follow. 

She did this and no sooner had she done it than the cow- 
house was as clean as if it had been cleaned and swept. She had 
next to milk the cows, but they were so restless and kicked and 
plunged so that she could not get any milking done at all. Then 
she heard the birds singing outside : 

" A little squirt ! 
A little sip! 
To little birds 1" 

She squirted a little milk out to the birds and then all the cows 
stood still and let her milk them ; they neither kicked nor plunged, 
they did not even lift a leg. 



52 The Man's Daughter and the Woman's Daughter 

When the troll-wife saw her coming in with the milk she 
said : 

" You have not done this by yourself. Now you must take 
this black wool and wash it white." 

The girl did not know how she should get this done, for she 
had never seen any one who could wash black wool white. But 
she said nothing, she took the wool and went to the well with it. 
The little birds sang to her that she should take the wool and put 
it in the big bucket that was standing near the well, and it would 
become white. 

" Oh dear, oh dear ! " said the troll-wife, when the girl came in 
with the wool. ** It's no use keeping 3^ou, you can do everything; 
you will worry the life out of me in the end, it is better you should 
go your way." 

The troll-wife then brought out three caskets, a red, a green, 
and a blue one, and the girl might take whichever she liked, and 
that was to be her wages. She did not know which one to take, 
but the little birds sang : 

" Take not the green ! 
Take not the red ! 
But take the blue ! 
On which we've put 
Three httle crosses ! " 

She then took the blue one, as the birds had told her. 

" A curse upon you," said the troll-wife, "you will be sure to 
suffer for this." 

When the man's daughter was going the troll-wife threw a 
red-hot iron bar after her, but the girl ran behind the door and 
hid herself, so the bar missed her, for the little birds had told her 
what to do. 

She set off as quickly as she could ; but when she came to the 
apple tree she heard a rumbling noise behind her on the road ; it 
was the troll-wife and her daughter, who were after her. The 
girl got so frightened she did not know what to do with herself, 

" Come here to me," said the apple-tree, " and I'll help you. 



The Man's Dai'giitek axd the Woman's Daughter 53 

Hide 3'ourself under my branches, for if they get hold of you, 
they will take the casket from you and tear you to pieces." The 
girl did so, and just then up came the troll-wife and her daughter. 

" Have you seen any girl go past here ? " said the troll-wife. 

" Oh, yes," said the tree, " one ran past awhile ago ; but she 
is now so far away you'll never overtake her." 

The troll-wife then turned about and set off home. 

The girl walked on a bit ; but when she came to the ram, she 
heard the rumbling nois-e again on the road, and she became so 
frightened and terrified, that she did not know what to do with 
herself; for she knew it was the troll-wife who had changed her 
mind. 

''Come here and I'll help you," said the ram. " Hide yourself 
under my wool and they won't see you ; or else they'll take the 
casket from you and tear you to pieces." 

All at once the troll-wife came rushing up. 

" Have you seen a girl go past here ? " she asked the ram. 

" Oh, yes," said the ram, " I saw one a while ago, but she ran 
so fast that you will never overtake her." So the troll-wife turned 
round and went home. 

When the girl had got as far as the cow, she heard the 
rumbling noise again on the road. 

"Come here," said the cow, "and I'll help you; hide yourself 
under my udder, or else the troll-wife will take the casket from 
you, and tear you to pieces." Before long she came. 

" Have you seen any girl go past here?" said the troll-wife to 
the cow. 

" Yes, I saw one a while ago, but she is far away now, for she 
was running so fast that 3'ou will never overtake her," said the 
cow. The troll-wife then turned round and went home again. 

When the girl had got a long long bit on the way and was not 
far from the hedge, she heard the noise again on the road ; she 
became terribly frightened, for she knew it was the troll-wife who 
had come back again. 

"Come here and I'll help you," said the hedge, "creep in 



54 The Max's Daughter and the Woman's Daughter 

among my twigs, and the}' won't see you ; or else they will take 
the casket from you and tear you to pieces." She made haste to 
hide herself among the twigs of the hedge. 

" Have you seen any girl go past here ? " said the troll-wife to 
the hedge. 

" No, I have not seen any girl/' said the hedge, and it became 
so angry you could hear it crackle. Then it made itself so big, it 
was no use trying to get over it. There was no help for it ; the 
troll-wife had to turn round and go home af 'X\. 

When the man's daughter got home both the woman and her 
daughter were still more spiteful than they had been before ; for 
now she was still more beautiful, and so grand, that it was a 
pleasure to look at her. She was not allowed to slop with them, 
but they sent her to the pig-sty, where she was to live. She 
then began to wash and clean out the place, and then she opened 
her casket to see what she had got for wages ; when she opened 
it she found there was so much gold and silver, and so many 
beautiful things in it, that both the walls and roof were covered, 
and the pig-sty became more magnificent than the finest palace. 

When the step-mother and the daughter saw this they were 
quite beside themselves, and began to ask her what sort of service 
she had been in. 

" Oh," she said, " 3'ou can easily guess since I have had such 
wages. Such a mistress to work for, and such people 3'ou will 
not easily find ! " 

The woman's daughter then wanted to set out and go into 
service, so that she also might get such a golden casket. 

They then sat down to spin again ; but this time the woman's 
daughter was to spin bristles, and the man's daughter flax, and 
the one who first broke the thread would be put into the well. 

Before long the woman's daughter broke her thread, as 3-ou 
may guess, and so they threw her into the well. 

Everything happened as before ; she fell to the bottom, but 
did not hurt herself, and then she came to a beautiful green 
meadow. When she had walked a bit she came to the heds:e. 



The Man's Uaughti-:r and the Woman's Daughter 55 

" Do not step heavily on nic, and I will help you another time," 
said the hedge. 

" Oh, what do I care about a lot of twigs," she said, and trod 
heavil}^ on the hedge, so that it groaned. 

In a little while she came to the cow, wliich wanted milking 
again. 

** Please do milk me," said the cow, "and I will help 3'ou 
another time ; drink as much as you like, and pour the rest over 
my hoofs." 

This she did ; she milked the cow, and drank as long as she 
was able, till there was nothing left to pour over the hoofs. She 
then threw the pail down the hill and went her way. When she 
had gone a bit further she came to the ram, which was going 
about trailing his wool along the ground. 

" Do shear me, and I'll help you another time," said the ram ; 
" take as much of the wool as you like, but twist the rest around 
my neck." She did this, but sheared the ram so roughly that she 
made big gashes in his skin ; and then she took all the wool away 
with her. 

In a little while she came to the apple-tree, which was quite 
bent down under the weight of its apples. 

** Please do pluck my apples, so that my branches can straighten 
themselves, for it is painful to stand so crooked," said the apple- 
tree, " but be careful not to injure me ; eat as many as you like, 
but place the rest at my root, and I'll help you another time." 

She plucked some of the nearest, and those she could not 
reach she knocked down with the pole ; but she did not care hov/ 
she did it. She tore down large branches, and ate till she was 
unable to eat any more ; and then she threw the rest under the 
tree. 

When she had walked a little way she came to the farm, where 
the troll-wife lived, and asked to be taken into service. The troll- 
wife said she would not have any servant girl, for either they 
were good for nothing or else they were far too clever, and cheated 
her of what she had. The woman's daughter did not give in, but 



56 The Max's Daughter and the Woman's Daughter 

said she must have a place ; and then the troll-wife said she would 

take her, if she was good for anything. 

The first thing she got to do was to fetch water in the sieve. 

She went to the well and poured water into the sieve, but as fast 

as slie poured it in it ran out. The birds then sang : 

" Rub in clay ! 
Put in hay ! 
Rub in clay ! 
Put in hay ! " 

But she didn't take any notice of what the bird's sang ; she 
threw the clay at them, so that they flew away, and she had to go 
back with an empty sieve, and got scolded by the troll-wife. She 
was then to clean out the cow-house and milk the cows, but she 
thought she was too good for that. She went into the cow-house, 
however ; and when she got there she found she could not use the 
shovel ; it was so big. The birds said the same to her as to the 
man's daughter — that she should take the besom and sweep out 
the litter, and all the rest would follow ; but she took the besom 
and threw it at the birds. When she was going to milk the 
cows they were so restless that they kicked and plunged, and 
every time she had got a little in the pail they kicked it over. 
The birds sang : 

" A little squirt ! 
A little sip ! 
For little birds ! " 

But she struck and beat the cows, flung and threw everything 
she could get hold of at the birds, and carried on in a way that 
was never heard of. She had not, of course, cleaned the cow- 
house or milked the cows, so when she came in she got both blows 
and scolding from the troll-wife. She was then to wash the 
black wool white, but she did not fare any better with that. 
The tro1l-wife thought this was too bad, and so she brought out 
three caskets — one red, one green, and one blue — and told her 
she had no use for her, as she was fit for nothing ; but she 
should have a casket all the same for her wages, and could 
choose which she liked best. Then the birds sang : 



The Max's Daughter and the Woman's Daughter 57 

" Take not the green! 
Take not the red ! 
But take the blue! 
Which we have put 
Three crosses on ! " 

She did not take any notice of what the birds sang, but took 
the red one, which was the gaudiest. So she set out on her 
way home, and got there without any trouble, for there was no 
one in pursuit of her. 

When she got home the mother was greatly rejoiced to see 
her, and they went at once into the parlour and placed the 
casket there, for the}^ thought there was nothing but gold and 
silver in it, and they believed that both the walls and the roof 
would be covered with gold. But as soon as they opened the 
casket there swarmed out of it vipers and toads, and when the 
daughter opened her mouth it was just the same ; vipers and 
toads and all sorts of vermin fell out, till at last it was impos- 
sible to live in the same house with her. And that was all she 
s:ot for servins: the troll-wife ! 




THE HARE WHO HAD BEEN 
MARRIED 



Once upon a time a hare was running and frisking about in a 
cornfield. 

"Hurray! hurrah! hurra}'!" he shouted, as he jumped and 
skipped along. 

All of a sudden he turned a somersault, and found himself 
standing on his hind legs in a new-sown cornfield. 

Just then a fox came slinking by. 

" Good day, good day to ^-ou ! " said the hare. " I feci so jolly 
to-day, for I have been married, you must know ! " 

" That's a good thing for you," said the fox. 

" Oh, I don't know so much about that," said the hare, " for 
she was rather a cross-grained creature, and she turned out a 
regular scold of a wife, she did." 

"That was a bad thing for you," said the fox. 

" Oh, it wasn't so bad," said the hare, " for I got a lot of money 
with her, and she had a house of her own besides." 

"That was a very good thing indeed," said the fox. 

" Oh, I don't know so much about that," said the hare, " for 
the house got burnt down, and everything we had along with it." 

"That was really too bad," said the fox. 

"Oh, not so very bad after all," said the hare, "for that cross- 
grained wife of mine was burnt as well," 



I 




J /^ 




THE SOUIRE'S BRIDE 



Once upon a time there was a rich squire who owned a large 
farm, and had plenty of silver at the bottom of his chest and 
money in the bank besides ; but he felt there was something 
wanting, for he was a widower. 

One day the daughter of a neighbouring farmer was working 
for him in the hay field. The squire saw her and liked her very 
much, and as she was the child of poor parents he thought, if 
he only hinted that he wanted her, she would be ready to marry 
him at once. 

So he told her he had been thinking of getting married again. 



62 The Squire's Bride 

"Ay! one may think of many things," said the girl, laughing 
slyly. In her opinion the old fellow ought to be thinking of 
something that behoved him better than getting married. 

" Well, you see, I thought that you should be my wife ! " 

" No, thank you all the same," said she, " that's not at all 
likely." 

The squire was not accustomed to be gainsaid, and the more 
she refused him the more determined he was to get her. 

But as he made no progress in her favour, he sent for her 
father and told him that if he could arrange the matter with his 
daughter he would forgive him the money he had lent him, and 
he would also give him the piece of land which lay close to his 
meadow into the bargain. 

"Yes, you may be sure I'll bring my daughter to her senses," 
said the father. " She is only a child, and she doesn't know 
what's best for her." But all his coaxing and talking did not 
help matters. She would not have the squire, she said, if he 
sat buried in gold up to his ears. 

The squire waited day after day, but at last he became so 
angry and impatient that he told the father, if he expected him to 
stand by his promise, he would have to put his foot down and 
settle the matter now, for he would not wait any longer. 

The man knew no other way out of it, but to let the squire get 
everything ready for the wedding ; and when the parson and the 
wedding guests had arrived the squire should send for the girl as if 
she were wanted for some work on the farm. When she arrived 
she would have to be married right away, so that she would have 
no time to think it over. 

The squire thought this was well and good and so he began 
brewing and baking and getting ready for the wedding in grand 
style. When the guests had arrived the squire called one of his 
farm lads and told him to run down to his neighbour and ask him 
to send him what he had promised. 

"But if you arc not back in a twinkling," he said shaking his 
fist at him. " I'll " 



The Squire's Bride 63 

lie did not say more, for the lad ran otT as if he had been 
shot at. 

" My master has sent me to ask for that you promised him," 
said the lad, when he got to the neighbour, *' but there is no time 
to be lost, for he is terribly busy to-day." 




THE BOY RODE HOME ON THE BAY MARE AT FULL GALLOP 



" Yes, yes ! Run down into the meadow and take her with you. 
There she goes ! " answered the neighbour. 

The lad ran off and when he came to the meadow he found 
the daughter there raking the ha}'. 

" I am to fetch what your father has promised ray master," said 
the lad. 



64 The Squire's Bride 

"Ah, ha ! " thought she. " Is that what they are up to ? " 
" Ah, indeed ! " she said. " I suppose it's that Httle bay mare 




SOME PULLED AT THE HEAD AND THE FORE LEGS OF THE MAKE AND 
OTHERS PUSHED BEHIND 



of ours. You had better go and take her. She stands there tethered 
on the other side of the pease-field," said the girl. 



The Squire's Bride 65 

The boy jumped on the back of the bay mare and rode home at 
full gallop. 

" Have you got her with you ? " asked the squire. 

" She is down at the door," said the lad. 

" Take her up to the room my mother had," said the 
squire. 

*' But, master, how can that be managed ? " said the lad, 

"You must just do as I tell you," said the squire. " If you 
cannot manage her alone you must get the men to help you," for 
he thought the girl might turn obstreperous. 

When the lad saw his master's face he knew it would be no 
use to gainsay him. So he went and got all the farm-tenants who 
were there to help him. Some pulled at the head and the fore legs 
of the mare and others pushed from behind, and at last they got 
her up the stairs and into the room. There lay all the wedding 
finery ready. 

" Now, that's done, master ! " said the lad ; ** but it was a 
terrible job. It was the worst I have ever had here on the 
farm." 

" Never mind, you shall not have done it for nothing," said 
his master. ** Now send the women up to dress her." 

" But I say, master I " said the lad. 

" None of your talk ! " said the squire. " Tell them they must 
dress her and mind and not forget either wreath or crown." 

The lad ran into the kitchen. 

** Look here, lasses," he said ; " you must go upstairs and 
dress up the bay mare as bride. I expect the master wants to 
give the guests a laugh." 

The women dressed the bay mare in everything that was there, 
and then the lad went and told his master that now she was ready 
dressed, with wreath and crown and all. 

"Very well, bring her down!" said the squire. "I will 
receive her m3^self at the door," said he. 

There was a terrible clatter on the stairs ; for that bride, you 
know, had no silken shoes on. 



-66 The Squire's Bride 

When the door was opened and the squire's bride entered the 
parlour you can imagine there was a good deal of tittering and 
grinning. 

And as for the squire you may be sure he had had enough of 
that bride, and they say he never went courting again. 



I 



ALL WOMEN ARE ALIKE 

Once upon a time a man and a woman were going to sow, but they 
had no seed-corn and no money to buy any with either. They 
had only one cow and this the man was to go to town with and sell 
to get money for the seed-corn. 

But when the time came the wife would not let the man go, for 
she was afraid he would spend the money on drink. So she set 
off herself with the cow and took with her a hen as well. 

Close to the town she met a butcher. 

" Are you going to sell that cow, mother ? " he asked. 

" Yes, that I am," she said. 

" How much do you want for it then ? " 

" I suppose I must have a shilling for the cow, but the hen you 
can have for two pounds," she said. 

" Well," said the butcher, " I haven't any use for the hen, and 
you can easily get rid of that when you get to the town, but I'll 
give you a shilling for the cow." 

She sold the cow and got her shilling, but nobody in the town 
would give two pounds for a tough, old hen. So she went back to 
the butcher and said : 

" I can't get rid of this hen, father. You'll have to take that 
as well since you took the cow." 



70 All Womex akl Alike 

" We'll soon settle that," said the butcher, and asked her to sit 
down. He gave her something to eat and so much brandy to 
drink that she became tipsy and lost her wits. While she slept it 
oft" the butcher dipped her into a barrel of tar and then put her in 
a heap of feathers. 

When she woke up she found that she was feathered all over 
and she began to wonder : " Is it me ? or is it not me ? It must be 
a strange bird ! But what shall I do to find out whether it is me, 
or whether it is'nt me ? Now I know — if the calves will lick me 
and the dog doesn't bark at me, when I get home, then it is me." 

The dog no sooner saw such a monster than it began barking 
with all its might as if there were thieves and vagabonds about 
the place. 

*' No, surely, it cannot be me," she said. 

When she came to the cowhouse the calves would not lick her, 
because they smelt the tar. 

" No, it cannot be me ; it must be a strange bird," she said ; and 
then she climbed up on top of the storehouse and began to flap 
with her arms as if she had wings and wanted to fly. When the 
man saw this he came out with his rifle and took aim at her. 

" Don't shoot, don't shoot," cried his wife ; " it is me." 

"Is it you?" said the man. "Then don't stand there like a 
goat, but come down and tell me what you have been about." 

She climbed down again, but found she had not a single penny 
left, for the shilling she got from the butcher she had lost while 
she was tipsy. 

When the man heard this he said : " You are more mad than 
ever you were," and he became so angry that he said he would 
go away from everything and never come back if he did not find 
three women who were just as mad. 

He set out and when he had got a bit on the way he saw a 
woman running in and out of a newly-built hut with an empty 
sieve. Every time she ran in she threw her apron over the sieve, 
as if she had something it, and then she turned it over on the 
floor. 




■^ .xV'i.W'vJAW^VW. 



FIGURE ON THE ROOF HE CAME OUT 



WHEN THE MAN SAW THE STRANGE 

WITH HIS RIFLE AND TOOK AIM AT IT 



All Women are Alike 73 

" What are you doing that for, mother ? " asked he. 

" Oh, 1 only want to carry in a Httle sun," she answered ; " but 
I don't know how it is — when I am outside I have the sun in the 
sieve, but when I get inside I have lost it. When I was in my old 
hut I had plenty of sun, although I never carried in any. If any 
one could get me some sun I'd willingly give him three hundred 
dollars." 

" Have you an axe ? " said the man, " and I'll soon get you 
some sun." 

He got an axe and cut out the openings for the windows which 
the carpenters had forgotten to do. The sun shone into the room 
at once and he got his three hundred dollars. 

" That was one of them 1 " thought the man, and set out again. 

In a while he came to a house where there was a terrible 
screaming and shouting going on. He went in and saw a woman, 
who was beating her husband on the head with a bat ; and over 
his head she had pulled a shirt in which there was no hole for the 
neck. 

** Do you want to kill your husband, mother ? " he asked. 

" No," she said, " I only want to make a hole for the neck in 
his shirt." 

The man moaned and groaned and said : "Oh dear, oh dearl 
I pity those who have to try on new shirts. If any one could 
teach my wife how to make the hole for the neck in a different way, 
I'd willingly give him three hundred dollars." 

" I'll soon do that," said the man; "only let me have a pair of 
scissors." 

He got a pair and cut the hole, and then he took his money 
and went his way. 

" That was the second of them 1 " he said to himself. 

After a lon^ while he came to a farm, where he thought he 
would rest awhile, so he went in. 

"Where do you come from ? " asked the woman. 

" I come from Ringerige," * answered the man. 
* A district in the south of Norway. 



74 All Women are Alike 

" Oh dear, oh dear ! are you from Himmerige ? * Then you 
must know Peter, my second husband, poor soul ! " said the 
woman. She had been married three times; the first and the 
last husbands were bad men, so she thought that the second, who 
had been a good husband, was the only one likely to go to heaven. 

" Yes, I know him well," said the man. 

" How is it with him there ? " asked the woman. 

" Oh, things are rather bad with him," said the man. " He 
knocks about from place to place, and has neither food nor clothes 
to his back, and as for money " 

" Goodness gracious ! " cried the woman," there's no need that 
he should go about in such a plight — he that left so much behind 
him. Here is a large loft full of clothes, which belonged to him, as 
well as a big chest of money. If you'll take it all with you you 
shall have the horse and trap to take it in ; and he can keep both 
horse and trap, so that he can drive about from place to place ; for 
he has no need to walk, I'm sure." 

The man got a whole cartload of clothes and a chest full of 
bright silver dollars, and as much food and drink as he wanted. 
When he had finished he got into the trap and drove off. 

" That's the third of them ! " he said to himself. 

But the woman's third husband was over in a field ploughing,, 
and when he saw a stranger driving off with the horse and trap, 
he went home and asked his wife who it was who drove away with 
the horse 

"Oh," she said, "that was a man from heaven; he said that 
Peter, ni}^ second, poor dear soul, is so badly off" that he walks 
about there from place to place, and has neither clothes nor money; 
so I sent him all his old clothes, which have been hanging here 
ever since, and the old money chest with the silver dollars." 

The man understood at once what all this meant, and saddled 
a horse and set off at full gallop. 

* " Himmerige," the Norwegian word for " heaven." The similarity between 
the two words " Himmerige " and " Ringerige " will easily explain the mistake 
made by the woman. 



All Women are Alike 75 

Before long he was close behind the man in the trap ; who 
when he discovered he was pursued, drove the horse and trap 
into a thick part of the wood, pulled a handful of hair out of the 
horse's tail, and sprang up a hill, where he tied the horse's hair to 
a birch-tree, and lay down on his back under it, gaping and staring 
up into the clouds. 

" Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear ! " he said, as if talking to himself, 
when the woman's third husband came riding up ; ** well, I've 
never seen anything so wonderful ! I've never seen the like 
of it!" 

The husband stopped and looked at him for a while and 
wondered if the man was crazy, or what he was up to. At last 
he asked him : 

" What are you staring at ? " 

"Well, I never saw the like ! " exclaimed the man. " I've just 
seen some one driving straight into heaven, horse and all ! There, 
you see part of the horse's tail hanging on the birch tree, and up 
among the clouds you can see the horse." 

The husband looked up at the clouds and then at him and said: 

" I don't see anything but the horse-hair on the birch-tree." 

" No, of course you can't see it, where you stand," said the 
man, " but come and lie down here and look straight up ; you 
must not take your eyes away from the clouds." 

While the husband lay staring into the sky till the water ran 
from his eyes, the man jumped on the horse and set oft', both with 
that and the horse and trap. 

When the husband heard the rumbling noise on the road, he 
jumped up, but was so bewildered because the man had gone off 
with his horses that he did not think of setting after him till it was 
too late. He did not feel very proud, as you can imagine, when he 
came home to his wife, and when she asked him what he had done 
with the horse he said : 

" Oh, I told the man he could take that with him as well to 
Peter, for I did not think it was right that he should jolt about 
in a trap up there ; now he can sell the trap and buy a carriage." 



76 All Women are Alike 

" Oh, thank you for that ! never did I think you were such a 
kind husband," said the woman. 

When the man who had got the six hundred dollars and the 
cartload of clothes and money, came home, he saw that all the 
fields were ploughed and sown. The first thing he asked his wife 
was, where she had got the seed-corn from. 

"Oh," said she, "I have always heard, that he who sows 
something gets something. So I sowed the salt which the carrier 
left here the other day, and if we only get rain soon, I think it 
will grow up nicely." 

" Mad you are, and mad you'll be as long as you live," said the 
man; "but it doesn't much matter, for the others are no better 
than you." 



ONE'S OWN CHILDREN ARE ALWAYS 
THE PRETTIEST 




^\CK^ 



Once upon a time a 
man went out shoot- 
ing in a forest, and 
there he met a wood- 
cock. 

" Pray, don't shoot 
my children," said 
the woodcock. 

" What are your 
children Hke?" asked 
the man. 

" Mine are the 
prettiest children in 
the forest," answered 
the woodcock. 



78 One's owx Childrex are always the Prettiest 

" I suppose I mustn't shoot them then," said the man. 

When he came back he carried in his hand a whole string of 
3'oung woodcocks which he had shot. 

" Oh dear, oh dear ! Why, you have shot my children after 
all ! " said the woodcock. 

"Are these yours?" said the man. "Why, I shot the 
ugliest I could find." 

" Yes, yes," answered the woodcock ; " but don't you know 
that every one thinks one's own children the prettiest ? " 




OLD FATHER BRUIN IN THE 
WOLF-PIT 



There was once upon a time a man who lived far away in the 
wood. He had many sheep and goats, but he could never keep 
the wolf away from them. 

" I'll be even with you yet, Master Gre3degs," he said at last, 
and began to dig a pit for the wolf. When he had dug it deep 
enough he placed a pole in the middle of the pit and on the top of 
the pole he fixed a board, and on the board he put a little dog. 
He then placed some twigs and branches across the pit, and on 
top of all he sprinkled some snow, so that the wolf should not see 
there was a trap underneath. When the night came the little dog 
got tired of being there. 

" Bow-wow-wow ! " it barked at the moon. 

A fox just then came slinking along, and thought here was a 
fine chance. He made a spring and fell plump into the pit. 

As the night wore on the little dog became so weary and 
hungry that it began to whine and bark. 



8o Old Father Bruin in the Wolf-Pit 

" Bow-wow-wow," it barked. 

All at once a wolf came slouching along. He thought here is 
a fat little morsel, and sprang plump into the pit. 

Early in the grey morning the North wind began to blow and 
it became so cold that the little dog shivered and trembled, and 
was so weary and hungry. 

" Bow- wow- wow- wow," it went on barking all the time. 

A bear then came trudging along, and thought here was a nice 
tit-bit early in the morning ; so he stepped out on the branches 
and fell plump into the pit. 

As the morning wore on there came an old beggarwoman who 
was tramping about from place to place with a bag on her back. 
When she saw the little dog standing there barking she thought 
she would go and see if any animals had been caught in the trap 
during the night. She went down on her knees and peered into 
the pit. 

" So you have been caught, Master Reynard, have you ? " she 
said to the fox, for she saw him first ; " serve you right, you old 
hen-thief. And you are there too, are you. Master Greylegs ? " said 
she to the wolf. " Well, you have killed goats and sheep enough in 
your time, and now you'll suffer for it and get what you deserve. 
Hulloa, Father Bruin, are you in this nice little parlour too, you 
old horse-thief ? We will cut you up and flay you, we will, and 
your skull we will nail up on the cow-house," shouted the woman 
excitedly, and shook her fists at the bear ; but just then her 
bag slipped forward over her head, and the woman tumbled 
plump into the pit. There they sat staring at one another, all 
four of them, each in their corner — the fox in one, the wolf 
in the other, the bear in the third, and the old woman in the 
fourth. 

When it became full daylight Reynard began to shake himself 
and whisk about, for he thought he might as well try to get out ; 
but the old woman said : 

" Can't you sit quiet, you old roost-robber, and not go frisking 
and trailing about in this way ? Look at old Father Bruin ; he 



Old Fathek Rri:ix i\ the Wolf-Pit 8i 

sits as quiet as a parson in his study;" for she thouglit she liad 
better make friends with the bear. 

Then came the man who had set the trap for the wolf. First 
of all he dragged up the old woman, and then he killed all the 
animals ; he spared neither old Father Bruin, nor Greylegs, nor 
Reynard, the hen-thief. The man thought he had made a good 
haul that night. 



THE DOLL IN THE GRASS 

O.NXE upon a time there was a king who had twelve sons. When 
they were grown up he told them they must go out into the 
world and find themselves wives, who must all be able to spin 
and weave and make a shirt in one day, else he would not have 
them for daughters-in-law. He gave each of his sons a horse 
and a new suit of armour, and so they set out in the world to 
look for wives. 

When they had travelled a bit on the way they said they 
would not take Ashiepattle with them, for he was good for 
nothing. Ashiepattle must stop behind ; there was no help for 
it. lie did not know what he should do or which way he should 
turn ; he became so sad that he got off the horse and sat down on 
the grass and began to cry. 

When he had sat awhile, one of the tussocks among the grass 
began to move, and out of it came a small white figure ; as it came 
nearer, Ashiepattle saw that it was a beautiful little girl, but she 
was so tiny, so very, very tiny. 

She went up to him and asked him if he would come below 
and pay a visit to the doll in the grass. 

Yes, that he would ; and so he did. W^hen he came down 
below, the doll in the grass was sitting in a chair dressed very 
finely and looking still more beautiful. She asked Ashiepattle 
where he was going and what was his errand. 




A SMAI.l. WHITE IIGUKE CAME OUT OK OSV. Ol' THE TLSSOCKS A.\:oNG THE CKAiS 



The Doll ix tiiic Grass 85 

He told her they were twelve brothers, and that the king had 
given them each a horse and a suit of armour, and told them to go 
out in the world and find themselves wives, but that they must all 
be able to spin and weave and make a shirt in a day. 

" If you can do that and will become my wife, I will not travel 
any further," said Ashiepattle to the doll in the grass. 

Yes, that she would, and she set to work at once to get the 
shirt spun, woven and made ; but it was so tiny, so very, very 
tiny, no bigger than — so ! 

Ashiepattle then returned home, taking the shirt with him ; 
but when he brought it out, he felt very shy because it was so 
small. But the king said he could have her for all that, and you 
can imagine how happy and joyful Ashiepattle became. 

The road did not seem long to him, as he set out to fetch his 
little sweetheart. When he came to the doll in the grass, he 
wanted her to sit with him on his horse, but no, that she wouldn't ; 
she said she would sit and drive in a silver spoon, and she had two 
small white horses which would draw her. So they set out, he 
on his horse and she in the silver spoon ; and the horses which 
drew her were two small white mice. 

Ashiepattle always kept to one side of the road, for he was so 
afraid he should ride over her ; she was so very, very tiny. 

When they had travelled a bit on the way, they came to a large 
lake ; there Ashiepattle's horse took fright and shied over to the 
other side of the road, and upset the spoon, so that the doll in the 
grass fell into the water. Ashiepattle became very sad, for he did 
" not know how he should get her out again ; but after a while a 
merman brought her up. But now she had become just as big as 
any other grown up being and was much more beautiful than she 
was before. So he placed her in front of him on the horse and 
rode home. 

When Ashiepattle got there, all his brothers had also returned, 
each with a sweetheart ; but they were so ugly and ill-favoured 
and bad-tempered, that they had come to blows with their sweet- 
hearts on their way home. On their heads they had hats which 



86 



The Doll in the Grass 



were painted with tar and soot, and this had run from their hats 
down their faces, so that they were still uglier and more ill- 
favoured to behold. 

When the brothers saw Ashiepattle's sweetheart, they all 
became envious of him, but the king was 
so pleased with Ashiepattle and his , 

sweetheart, that he drove all the others 
away, and so Ashiepattle was married 
to the doll in the grass ; and afterwards 
they lived happy and comfortable for a 
long, long while; and if they are not 
dead, they must be still alive. 



'x'.a\ K 



^ If III 














mmB 




THE HEN WHO WENT TO DOVRE- 
FJELD TO SAVE THE WORLD 




There was once upon a time 
a hen, which flew up in an 
oak-tree and perched there for 
the night. Before long she 
dreamt, that if she did not go 
to Dovrefjeld, the world would 
come to an end. All of a 
sudden she jumped down and 
set out on the road. 

When she had gone a bit 
she met a cock. 

" Good-day, Cocky Locky 1 ' 
said the hen. 



88 The Hex which went to Dovrefjeld 

"Good-day, Henn}' Penny! where are you going so early?" 
said the ccck. 

" Oh, I am going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan't come 
to an end," said the hen. 

" Who told you that, Henny Penny ?" said the cock. 

" I sat in the oak and dreamt it last night," said the hen. 

" I'll go with you," said the cock. So they went a long wa}-, 
till they met a duck. 

" Good-day, Ducky Lucky ! " said the cock. 

"Good-day, Cocky Locky ! where are you going so early?" 
said the duck. 

" I am going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan't come to 
an end," said the cock. 

" Who told you that, Cocky Locky? " 

" Henny Penn}' ! " said the cock. 

" Who told you that, Henny Penny ? " said the duck. 

" I sat in the oak and dreamt it last night," said the hen. 

" I'll go with you ! " said the duck. So they set off and walked 
a bit, till they met a gander. 

" Good-day, Gandy Pandy ! " said the duck. 

"Good-day, Ducky Lucky!" said the gander. " Wliere are 
you going so early ? " 

" I am going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan't come to 
an end," said the duck. 

" Who told you that. Ducky Lucky ? " said the gander. 

" Cocky Locky ! " 

"Who told you that, Cocky Locky? " 

" Henny Penny ! " 

" How do you know that, Henny Penny ? " said the gander. 

" I sat in the oak and dreamt it last night, Gandy Pandy," 
said the hen. 

" I'll go with you!" said the gander. When they had gone 
on a bit, they met a fo.x. 

" Good-da}-, Foxy Woxy ! " said the gander. 

" Good-day, Gandy Pandy ! " 



The Hex which went to Dovkefjeld 89. 

** Where are you going, Foxy Woxy ? " 

" Where are you going, Gandy Pandy ? " 

" I'm going to Dovrefjeld, so that the world shan't come to an 
end," said the gander. 

''Who told you that, Gandy Pandy ?" said the fox. 

" Ducky Lucky ! " 

" Who told you that. Ducky Lucky ? " 

"Cocky Locky!" 

" Who told you that, Cocky Locky ? " 

" Henny Penny ! " 

" How do you know that, Henny Penny?" 

" I sat in the oak and dreamt last night that if we don't 
go to Dovrefjeld the world will come to an end," said the 
hen. 

"Oh, nonsense!" said the fox, "the world won't come to an 
end if you don't get there. No, come home with me to my den ;. 
that's much better, for there it is cosy and comfortable." 

So they followed the fox home to his den, and when they came 
there, the fox put so much wood on the fire that they all became 
sleepy ; the duck and the gander settled in a corner, but the cock 
and the hen perched on a pole. As soon as the gander and the 
duck were asleep the fox seized the gander and put it on the fire 
and roasted it. The hen thought she smelt something burning^ 
she jumped up to a higher perch and said half asleep : 

" Faugh ! How it stinks here ! " 

"Oh, nonsense," said the fox, "it is only the smoke coming 
down the chinniey ; go to sleep and shut your mouth." So the 
hen went to sleep. No sooner had the fox eaten the gander than 
he seized the duck ; he took it and put it on the fire and roasted 
it and then set about to eat it. The hen then woke up again and 
flew up to a still higher perch. 

" Faugh ! How it stinks here," she said, and when she opened 
her eyes and saw that the fox had eaten both the gander and the 
duck, she flew up to the highest perch and settled there and 
looked up through the chimney. 



go The Hex which went to Dovrefjeld 

*' Just look at all the fine geese flying over there ! " she said to 
the fox. 

Reynard ran out, thinking to find another fat roast. In the 
meantime the hen woke up the cock and told him what had 
happened to Gand^' Pandy and Ducky Lucky. 

So Cocky Locky and Henny Penny flew up through the 
chimne}-, and if they hadn't got to Dovrefjeld the world would 
surely have come to an end 1 



SOUIRE PETER 




i\Jsi:( 



There was once upon a 
time a poor couple who 
had nothing in the world 
but three sons. What 
the two eldest were called 
I don't know, but the 
youngest was called 
Peter. 

When the parents 
died the children were 
to have all they left 
behind ; but there was 
nothing but a porridge 
pot, a gridiron and a 
cat. The eldest, who 
was to have the best, 
took the pot. 

" Every time I lend the 
pot I shall get the scrap- 
ings," he said. 

The second took the 
gridiron. 



92 Squirk I-'kter 

"For when I lend it I shall gel ;i bit to taste," said he. 

But there was no choice for the youngest; if he wanted any- 
thing he would have to take the cat. 

" If I lend the cat to any one I shall get nothing for it," he 
said ; "if the cat gets a little milk she'll want it herself, but I'll take 
her with me any how; it's a pity she should be left behind to pine."^ 
So the brothers set out into the world to try their fortune, and 
each went his own way. When the youngest had gone awhile 
the cat said : 

" You'll not be sorry you didn't leave me behind. I'll now ga 
into the forest and fetch some fine animal which you must take to 
the king's palace you see yonder, and say to the king you have 
come with a small present for him. When he asks who it is from 
you must sa}' it is from Squire Peter." 

Peter had not long to wait before the cat came back with a 
reindeer from the forest; she had jumped upon its head and when 
she had settled herself between its horns she said : "If you don't 
go straight to the king's palace I shall scratch your eyes out." 
The reindeer dared not do otherwise. 

When Peter came to the palace he went into the kitchen with 
the reindeer and said : 

" I have come with a small present for tlic king, which I hope 
he will accept." 

The king came out into the kitchen and when he saw the fine 
big reindeer he was much pleased. 

"But, dear friend! who is it that sends mc such a fine 
present ? " said the king. 

" Oh, it's Squire Peter ! " said the lad. 

" Squire Peter ! " said the king. " Ah, let mc see, where is it 
he lives ?" for he thought it was a shame he should not know 
such a worthy man. 

But the lad would not tell him. He dared not for his master, 
he said. 

So the king gave Peter some money and asked him to give 
his master his greetings and many thanks for the present. 



Squire Peter 95 

The next day the cat went into the forest again and jumped up 
on the head of a stag, settled herself between its eyes and com- 
pelled it to go to the palace. Peter again went into the kitchen 
with it and said he came with a small present for the king if he 
would accept it. The king was still more pleased with the stag 
than with the reindeer, and asked again who it was that had sent 
him such a fine present. 

" Oh, it's Squire Peter," said the lad ; but when the king 
wanted to know where Squire Peter lived he got the same answer 
as the day before. This time he gave Peter still more money. 

The third day the cat brought an elk. When Peter came into 
the kitchen at the palace, he said that he had a small present for 
the king if he would accept it. The king came out at once into 
the kitchen, and when he saw the fine, big elk he became so 
pleased he did not know which leg to stand upon. That time 
he gave Peter much niore money ; it mus't have been a hundred 
dollars. 

The king was now most anxious to know where Squire Peter 
lived and began questioning him backwards and forwards, but the 
lad said he dared not tell him, for his master had given him strict 
orders not to disclose it. 

" Well, ask Squire Peter to pay me a visit then," said the 
king. 

Yes, he would do that, said the lad, but when he came out 
of the palace and met the cat, Peter said : 

" You have got me into a fine scrape ; the king now says I 
must visit him and I have nothing but the rags I walk in." 

" Oh, don't trouble about that," said the cat. " In three days 
you shall have coach and horses, and fine clothes with gold 
trimmings and hangings, and then you can surely visit the king. 
But whatever you see at the palace you must say you have grander 
and finer things at home ; you must not forget that." 

No, "he would be sure to remember, said Peter. 

When the three days were over the cat came with the coach 
and horses and clothes and everything that Peter wanted ; all was 



()6 Squire Peter 

so grand that no one had seen anything like it before. So Peter 
set out for the palace and the cat ran alongside him. 

'Die king received him well, but whatever he offered him and 
wliatcver he showed him Peter said it was all very well, but he 
had everything finer and grander at home. The king was not 
over pleased at this ; but Peter went on just the same and at last 
the king became so angry that he could no longer contain himself. 

" I'll go home with you," said the king, " and see if it is true 
that you have everything so much grander and finer; but if you 
have not told the truth it will be the worse for you. I'll say no 
more ! " 

" Vou have got me into a fine scrape this time," said Peter to 
the cat ; *' the king now wants to go home with me, but it will not 
be an easy thing to find my home." 

" Oh, don't trouble about that," said the cat, " I will run on in 
front, and you need only follow me." 

So the}' set off. Peter followed the cat, who ran on in front, 
and then came the king with all his suite. When they had driven 
a good bit on the way, they came to a large flock of fine sheep ; 
tUc wool was so long it almost reached to the ground. 

" If you will say that the sheep belong to Squire Peter when 
the king asks, you shall have this sjlver spoon," said the cat to the 
herdsboy. She had taken the spoon with her from the palace. 
Yes, he would willingly do that, said the herdsboy. 

When the king came by, he said : 

" I've never seen such a fine fiock of sheep ! To whom do 
they belong, my little boy ? " 

"Oh, they belong J:o Squire Peter," said the boy. 

In a little while they came to a great big herd of fine brindled 
cows ; they were so fat that their hides glistened. 

"If you will say the cattle belong to Squire Peter when the 
king asks, you shall have this silver ladle," said the cat to the 
cow-girl. The silver ladle she had also taken with her from the 
palace. 

" Yes, that I will," said the girl. When the king came up, he 



Squire Peter 



97 



was quite surprised at the fine big cattle, for such a herd he 
thought he had never seen before ; and so he asked the girl to 
whom those brindled cows belonged. 

"Oh, they are Squire Peter's ! " said the girl. 

So they travelled on again, and then they came to a great big 
drove of horses. They were the finest one could see, big and 
sleek, and six of each colour, both brown and red, and cream- 
coloured. 

" If you will say those horses belong to Squire Peter when 
the king asks, I'll give you this silver goblet," said the cat to 
the boy. The goblet she had also taken from the palace. 




THEY THEN CAME TO A GREAT BIG DROVE OF HORSES 



"Yes, that I will," said the boy. When the king came by, 
he became quite dazed at the fine drove of horses, for he had 
never seen the like of such horses, he said. He then asked 
the boy to whom those brown, red, and cream-coloured horses 
belonged. 

*' Oh, they are Squire Peter's ! " said the boy. 

When they had trav^glj^d_ a -long, long way, they came to a 
castle. First there?:^^^ ^h'tfew%\t®N?rass, then one of silver, 




^8 Sqi'ike Peter 

and then one of gold. The castle itself was of silver, and 
glistened so brightly that it made one's eyes smart, for the sun 
was shining full upon it when they arrived. 

They entered, and the cat told Peter to say he lived there. 
Inside the castle was still more splendid than outside ; every- 
thing was of gold, both chairs. and tables and benches. When 
the king had been round and seen it all from top to bottom, 
he became quite confounded. 

" Yes, Squire Peter is much grander than I ; there is no use 
denying that," he said ; and then he wanted to return home. 
But Peter asked him to stop and sup with him, which the king 
agreed to ; but he was cross and peevish the whole time. While 
they sat at table the troll, who owned the castle, came and 
knocked at the gate. 

"Who eats my food and drinks my mead in there ?" he cried. 
As soon as the cat heard him, she ran to the gate. 

" Wait a little, and I'll tell you how the farmer gets his winter 
rye," said the cat. " First he ploughs his field, and then he 
manures it, and then he ploughs it again " ; and so the cat went 
on till the sun rose. 

"Just look behind at that beautiful damsel!" said the cat 
to the troll. The troll then turned round, and when he saw the 
sun he burst. 

"All this is now yours," said the cat to Squire Peter. "And 
now you must cut my head off; it is the only thing I ask for all I 
have done for you." 

"No," said Squire Peter, "that I will not do." 

" You must," said the cat, " or Pll scratch your eyes 
out." 

Squire Peter was then obliged to do it, although he was very 
loath. He cut the cat's head off, and the same moment she became 
the most beautiful princess any one could set eyes on, and Squire 
Peter fell in love with her then and there, 

"All this splendour has formerly been mine," said the princess, 
" but the troll got me into his power and turned me into a cat, and 



Squire Peter 99 

ever since I have been at your parents'. You must now do as 
3'ou like about making me your queen, for 3'ou are king over the 
whole realm," said the princess. 

Squire Peter was, of course, only too glad to make her his 
queen. So the wedding took place, and the feasting lasted for 
eight days. And as I did not stay any longer with the squire and 
his queen I cannot tell you any more about them. 



"^ 






BIRD DAUNTLESS 



Once upon a time there was a 
king who had twelve daughters, 
and he loved them so much that 
he never allowed them out of his sight ; but every day after 
dnmcr, while the king slept, the princesses went out for a walk. 
Once, when the king was having his afternoon nap, the princesses 
went out as usual ; but they never returned. 

The whole country mourned, but the king was the one who 
sorrowed most. Messengers were sent out to search for them, 
both in his own and in foreign countries ; proclamations were 



BiKD Dauntless ioi 

read out in all the churches, and the bells were rung all over 
the country. But they had disappeared and left no trace behind, 
so the people at last guessed that they had been spirited away 
into the mountains. 

It did not take long before this was known far and wide, in 
town and country ; 3'ea, even in the very depth of the country 
and in foreign lands. And so the report reached the ears of a 
king in a far awa}' country, who had twelve sons. 

When they heard about the twelve princesses, they asked for 
leave to set out and find them. The king did not much like 
them to go ; he was afraid he should never see them again. But 
they went on their knees before him, and prayed so long that the 
king at last gave his consent. 

He fitted out a ship for them and gave them a knight called 
Redbeard as steersman, for he was a good seaman. They sailed 
about for a very long time and visited all the countries they came 
near, and asked and searched for the princesses, but they got no 
tidings whatever. 

But a few more days and they would have been gone seven 
years. Then one day there blew such a gale and the weather 
was so bad that they believed they would never reach land raiy 
more. While the stormy weather lasted they were all obliged to 
work, so they got no rest. On the third day the wind went down 
and there came a calm. 

Now they were all so tired after the hard work and rough 
weather that they fell asleep at once, but the 3-oungest prince felt 
uneasy and could get no sleep. 

While he paced backwards and forwards on deck the ship 
neared a small island, and on the shore was a little dog running 
about, barking and whining at the ship, just as if it wanted to be 
taken on board. The prince walked up and down on the deck, 
whistling and calling the dog, but the little creature only barked 
and whined the more. 

The prince thought it was a great pity to leave it there to 
starve ; he fancied it must have belonged to a ship which had 



102 BlKH Daintless 

been wrecked during the storm, but he did not think he could 
lielp it either, for he thought he would not be able to put the boat 
out without help, and all the crew slept so soundly he would not 
awake them for the sake of a dog. 

But the weather was bright and calm, so he said to himself: 
" I had better go ashore and save the dog," and tried to lower 
the boat and found it was easily managed. 

He rowed ashore and went up to the dog, but every time he 
tried to seize it the dog ran away from him, and this went on 
until before he knew a word about it he found himself in a large 
gilded castle. There the dog changed into a beautiful princess, and 
on the bench sat a man so big and ugly that the prince became quite 
terrified. 

"You need not be frightened," said the man, but the prince 
l)ccame still more frightened when he heard his voice; "for I 
know very well what you want ; you are the twelve princes 
who are looking for the twelve princesses that were lost. I know 
where they are ; they are in my master's castle ; there they sit 
on golden stools, each scratching a head, for he has twelve of 
them. Now you have been sailing about for seven years, but 
you will have to sail for seven more years before you find them. 
You might as well stay here," he said, " and wed my daughter ; 
but first of all you must kill my master, for he is very hard 
on us. We are tired of him, and when he is dead I shall be 
king in his place. Try first if you can lift this sword," said the 
troll. 

The prince took hold of an old rusty sword which hung on the 
wall, but he could scarcely stir it. 

"Well then, you will have to take a drink from this bottle," 
said the troll. 

When he had taken one sip he was just able to move the 
sword, and when he had taken another he could lift it, and when 
he had taken still another he could flourish the sword as easily as 
a rolling-pin. 

" Wlien you return on board," said the troll, "you must hide 



BiKD Dauntless 103 

the sword well in your berth, so that Knight Redbeard does not 
see it ; he would not be able to use it, of course, but he hates you, 
and will try to take your life." 

** Three days before the seven years are up," he said further, 
" all that has happened now will happen again ; you will have bad 
and stormy weather, and when it is over 3-ou will all become 
sleepy ; then you must take the sword and go ashore. You will 
then come to a castle where there are all sorts of sentinels — wolves, 
bears, and lions ; but you must not be afraid of them, for they will 
all fall down before 3'our feet. When you get into the castle you 
will see the troll-king sitting in a gorgeous chamber, magnificently 
dressed ; he has twelve heads, and the princesses will be sitting 
on their golden stools, each of them scratching one of his heads. 
This kind of work, you know, they don't like, so you must make 
haste and cut off one head after the other ; if the troll wakes up 
and sees you he will swallow you alive." 

The prince went on board with the sword, and he remembered 
well what he had been told. All on board were still asleep, and 
he hid the sword in his berth, so that Knight Redbeard and the 
other could not see it. It then began to blow again, so the prince 
called the others and said he thought it would not do to sleep any 
longer since they had such a fair wind. Nobody guessed he had 
been away from the ship. 

Now when the seven years all but three days had passed it 
happened just as the troll had said. There came bad and stormy 
weather which lasted for three da^'s, and when it was over they 
all became sleepy after their hard work and lay down ; but the 
youngest prince rowed ashore and the sentinels fell down before 
him, and so he came to the castle. When he entered the 
chamber the king-troll sat and slept just as the other troll had 
foretold, and the twelve princesses sat on their stools, each 
scratching one of his heads. The prince made signs to the 
princesses to move awa}^, but they pointed at the troll and 
motioned to the prince to go. 

lie continued to make signs to them, and then the}' under- 



104 Bird Dauntless 

stood that he wanted to save them. They moved quietly away, 
one after the other, and immediately he cut off the heads of the 
troll-king, till the blood flowed like a great brook. 

When the troll was killed, the prince rowed out to the ship 
again and hid the sword ; he thought he had done his share, and 
as he could not get the body away by himself, he thought the 
others ought to help him a little. He therefore called them, 
and said it was a shame they should be lying asleep while he 
had been finding the princesses and had saved them from the 
troll-king. 

The others laughed at him and said that, no doubt, he had 
been sleeping as well, if not better, than they, and had dreamt that 
he was such a clever fellow. If any one had saved the princesses, 
it was far more likely to be one of them. 

But the youngest prince told them how it had all happened, 
and when they went ashore with him and saw the brook of blood, 
the castle, the troll, the twelve heads and the princesses, they saw 
he had told the truth ; and so they helped him to throw the heads 
and the bod}' into the sea. 

They were now all quite happy, but none more so than the 
princesses, who after this, had no longer to sit all day and scratch 
the troll-king's heads. They took with them of all the gold and 
silver and valuable things which were there, as much as they could 
carry ; and so they went on board, both the princes and the 
princesses. 

When they had got a good way out to sea, che princesses said 
that in their joy they had forgotten their golden crowns; they lay 
in a chest, and they would so much like to take them with them. 
As none of the others offered to go for them, the youngest prince 
said : 

" I have ventured as much before, so now I may as well fetch 
the crowns, if you will let down the sails and wait till I come 
back again." 

Yes, that they would ; but when he had got so far away that 
they could not see anything more of him, Knight Redbeard, who 




THEN SUDDENLY SOMETHING CAME FLOPPING DOWN BY THE SIDE OK 
THE prince's BED 



Bird Dauntless 107 

himself wanted to be foremost and have the youngest princess, 
said that it was of no use to he and wait for liim, for they must 
surely know he would never come back. 

They knew, he said, that the king had given him, Knight Red- 
beard, power and authority to do just as he thought right ; and 
they could say that he had saved the princesses, and if any one 
dared to say otherwise he should lose his life. 

The princes therefore dared not do anything else but what 
Knight Redbeard told them, and so they set sail. 

In the meantime, the youngest prince rowed ashore and 
went into the castle, found the chest, in which were the golden 
crowns, and tugged and dragged till he got it down to the boat ; 
but when he came to the place where he expected to find the 
ship, it was gone. As he could not see it in any direction, 
he soon guessed what had happened, and there was therefore 
nothing else for him to do but to turn round and row to land 
again. 

He was, of course, afraid to be alone the whole night in 
the castle, but there was no other shelter, so he took courage, 
locked all the doors and gates, and lay himself down in a room 
where there was a ready made bed. But he felt afraid, and 
became still more so, when, after he had been in bed awhile, the 
walls and roof began to creak and groan as if the whole casde 
was falling to pieces. Then, all of a sudden, something, which 
sounded like a load of hay, came flopping down by the side of his 
bed, and all became quiet again ; but he heard a voice, which told 
him not to be afraid, and said : 

" I am bird Dauntless, 
All that I do is faultless ; 
Be not afraid of me, 
For I will help you o'er the sea ! " 

'* The first thing you must do in the morning, when you 
awake, is to go to the storehouse and fetch four barrels of 



io8 BiKD Dauntless 

rvc for mc ; I must have that for breakfast, otherwise I can do 
nothing." 

Wlien the prince awoke in the morning, he saw an enormous 
bird with a feather at the back of its neck as thick as a small 
pine-tree. The prince went to the storehouse for the four barrels 
of rye, and when the bird had eaten it, he told the prince to hang 
the chest with the golden crowns on one side of his neck and 
to take as much gold and silver as would balance it and hang it 
on the other ; then he asked the prince to get on his back and 
to hold on to the big feather on his neck. Off they started, 
whisking through the air at such a speed that it did not take 
long before they overtook the ship. The prince wanted to 
go on board and fetch the sword, because he was alVaid some- 
body might see it, for the troll had told him it must not be 
seen by anybody ; but bird Dauntless said they could not trouble 
about it now. 

" Knight Redbeard is not likely to see it," said the bird ; " but if 
3-ou go on board he will try and take your life, as he wants to have 
the youngest princess ; but you may rest easy about her for she 
puts a naked sword by her side every night, when she goes to 
bed." 

After some time they reached the island, where the troll, whom 
the prince had first met, lived. There the prince was so well 
received that there was no end of festivities. The troll did not 
know how to treat him well enough, for he had killed his master 
and made him the king ; he would gladly give him his daughter 
and half of his kingdom. But the prince had taken such a fancy 
to the youngest princess, that he could not rest and wanted every 
moment to set out again. 

The troll asked him to take a rest and remain with him for a 
time, and told him the princesses had seven years to sail yet 
before they would get home. He also told him the same about the 
princess as bird Dauntless had done. 

" Vou can rest easy about her ; she places a naked sword by 




WHEN HE SAW THE SHU' RIGHT I\ FRONT OF HIM, HE LIFTED THE CLUB 



Bird Dauntless hi 

licr side in bed. If you don't believe me," said the troll, "you 
can go on board, when the ship passes here, and see for 
yourself, and fetch the sword. I must have that back in any 
case." 

When the ship came sailing past the weather had been 
bad again, and when the prince went on board he found everybody 
asleep, the princesses each with a prince by her side ; but the 
youngest lay alone with a naked sword beside her, and on the 
floor, in front of the bed, lay Knight Redbeard. 

The prince found his sword and went ashore, without any one 
having discovered he had been on board ; but still he was uneasy 
and wanted to be off, and when at last the seven 3'ears were nearly 
over, all but about three weeks, the troll said : 

*' Now you had better get ready to sail, since you will not remain 
with us. I will lend you my iron-boat, which goes of itself, if onl}^ 
you say ' Boat, sail on.' In the boat 3'ou will find an iron club, 
and that club you must lift, when you see the ship right in front of 
you ; they will then have such a gale of wind, they will not think 
of looking for 3'ou. When you come alongside the ship, you must 
lift the club again, and they will then have such a hurricane, that 
they will have something else to do than be spying after you ; when 
3-ou have passed them, you must lift the club for the third time, 
taking care always to la}^ it down carefully, otherwise you will 
get such weather that both you and they will perish. When you 
reach land you need not trouble yourself about the boat ; you need 
only give it a push, turn it round and say, * Boat, go home the same 
way you came.' " 

When the prince started he had much gold and silver and lots 
of fine things, and clothes and linen, which the troll-princess had 
made for him during his long stay there, so he was much richer 
than any of his brothers. 

He had no sooner sat himself down in the boat and said : 
" Boat, sail on," than the boat set off, and when he saw the ship 
right in front of him he lifted the club ; they then got such a gale 



112 BiKD Dauntless 

of wind that they could not look his way. When he got alongside 
the ship he lifted the iron club again, and the weather became so 
bad and stormy that the white foam splashed up on all sides, and 
the waves washed over the deci<, so that the people on board had 
something else to do than be spying after him ; and when he was 
passing them he lifted the club for the third time, and then they 
had so much to look after that they had no time to find out who he 
could be. He reached land long before the ship, and when he 
had taken all his things out of the boat he shoved it out again, 
turned it round and said : " Boat, go home the same way you 
came 1 " and off the boat started. 

He disguised himself as a sailor, and went to an old woman 
who lived in a wretched hut hard by ; he told her he was a poor 
sailor and belonged to a big ship, which had been wrecked, and 
that he was the only one who had been saved. He then asked 
her if she would give him shelter for himself and the things he 
had saved. 

*' Bless me ! " said the woman, " I don't think I can give any one 
lodgings ; you see how it is here, I have nothing to lie upon 
myself, still less anything for others to lie upon." 

The sailor said that did not matter; if he could only get a roof 
over his head he did not mind how he lay. She could not deny 
him that, if he would take things as he found them ; so in the 
eve ling he brought his things to the hut. 

No sooner were they in, than the woman, who was very fond 
of some new gossip to run about with, began to ask him who he 
was, where he came from, where he had been, where he was 
going, what he had with him, on what errand he was travelling, 
and if he had heard anything about the twelve princesses, who 
had disappeared so many years ago, and about many other things 
which she wanted to know and talk about. 

But he said he felt poorl}', and his head ached so much after 
the terrible weather, he could not give an account of anything ; 
she would have to leave him in peace for some days, till 



Bird Dauntless irj 

he had taken a rest after all the work he had had to do ; then she 
should know everything, and more besides. 

The following day the old woman began again to question him, 
but the sailor had still such pains in his head he could not give an 
account of anything. But all at once he dropped a hint that perhaps 
he knew something about the princesses after all. The old woman 
ran at once with what she had heard to all the gossips in the 
neighbourhood, and one after the other came running and asking 
for news of the princesses, if he had seen them, if they were soon 
coming home, if they were on the way, and more of that kind. 
But he still complained that his head ached, so he could not answer 
them ; but he could tell them this much, that if they had not been 
drowned in the storm they would arrive in a fortnight's time, or 
perhaps before ; but he could not tell for certain if they were alive. 
He had seen them, but they might easily have gone to the bottom 
since then. 

One of the old women ran to the palace with this news, and 
said there was a sailor in the hut of a certain old woman, that he 
had seen the princesses, and that they might be expected in a 
fortnight's time, or perhaps in a week. 

When the king heard this he sent a messenger to fetch the 
sailor that he might come and tell the news himself. 

** I am not in a fit state to go," said the sailor, " for I have no 
clothes good enough in wdiich to appear before the King." But 
the King's messenger said he must come ; the King would and 
must speak with him, no matter how he was dressed, for no 
one had as yet been able to tell the King anything about the 
princesses. 

"Yes, I can," said the sailor. "But I cannot tell if they are 
still alive. When I saw them the weather was so bad that we were 
wrecked ; but if they are still alive they will be here in a fort- 
night's time, or perhaps before." 

When the King heard this he almost went out of his mind 
with joy ; and as the time when the sailor had said they would 



114 



Bird Dauntless 



return drew near, the King proceeded to the shore in great pomp 
to meet them. 

There was great joy all over the country when the ship arrived 
with the princesses, the princes and Knight Redbeard ; but no 
one was more glad than the old King, who now had got his 
daughters back again. The eleven elder princesses were very 
happy and merry, but the youngest, who was to have Knight 
Redbeard, was always weeping and sorrowful. 

The King did not like this, and asked her why she was not 
merry and happy like her sisters ; there was no reason why she 
should be so sad, now that she had escaped from the troll and was 
going to marry such a brave man as Knight Redbeard. But she 
dared not say anything, for Knight Redbeard had vowed he would 
take the life of any one who told how all had happened. One day 
when the princesses were busy making fine clothes for the 
weddings, a person dressed like a sailor, with a pack on his back, 
came into the palace, and asked if they would buy some pretty 
things from him for their wedding; he had many rare and costly 
articles both in gold and silver. Yes, they would look at his 
wares. Then they glanced at him and thought they recognised both 
him and many of the things he had. 

" You, who have so many fine things," said the youngest 
princess, " must surely have many things which are still finer, 
and which would suit us still better." 

" That may be," said the pedlar ; but her sisters told her to be 
quiet, and reminded her what Knight Redbeard had threatened 
them with. 

Some time afterwards the princesses were sitting one day by 
the window, when the youngest prince came by with the chest 
containing the golden crowns on his back. 

When he came into the great hall of the palace he opened the 
chest for the princesses, and they all recognised their crowns. 
The youngest then said : 

" I think it is only right that the one who saved us should 
have the reward he deserves. It is not Knight Redbeard, but he 



Bird Dauntless 115 

who has brought us our crowns — that has saved us." And then 
the prince threw off his sailor attire and stood before them more 
finely dressed than all the other princes, and the old King then 
ordered that Knight Redbeard should be put to death. 

Now there was great joy in the palace. Each prince took his 
bride, and they kept such a wedding that it was heard of and 
talked about throughout twelve kkigdoms. 




THE TOWN MOUSE AND THE 
COUNTRY MOUSE 




■'■^ '^ Once upon a time a town mouse met a country 
mouse on the outskirts of a wood. The country 
mouse was sitting under a hazel thicket pluck- 
ing nuts. 

" Busy harvesting, I see," said the town 
mouse. " Who would think of our meeting in this out-of-the-way 
part of the world ? " 

" Just so," said the country mouse. 

" You are gathering nuts for your winter store ? " said the 
town mouse. 

" I am obliged to do so if we intend having anything to live 
upon during the winter," said the country mouse. 

"The husk is big and the nut full this year, enough to satisfy 
any hungry body," said the town mouse. 

" Yes, you are right there," said the country mouse ; and then 
she related how well she lived and how comfortable she was at 
home. 



The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse 117 

The town mouse maintained that she was the better off, but 
the country mouse said that nowhere could one be so well off as 
in the woods and hills. The town mouse, however, declared she 
was best off; and as they could not agree on this point the}' 
promised to visit one another at Christmas, then they could see 
for themselves which was really the most comfortable. 

The first visit was to be paid by the town mouse. 

Now, although the country mouse had moved down from the 
mountains for the winter, the road was long and tiring and one 
had to travel up hill and down dale ; the snow lay thick and deep, 
so the town mouse found it hard work to get on and she became 
both tired and hungry before she reached the end of her journey. 

How nice it will be to get some food, she thought. 

The country mouse had scraped together the best she had. 
There were nut kernels, polypoly and other sorts of roots, and 
many other good things which grow in woods and fields. She 
kept it all in a hole far under the ground, so the frost could not 
reach it, and close by was a running spring," open all the winter, 
so she could drink as much water as she liked. There was an 
abundance of all she had, and they ate both well and heartily ; but 
the town mouse thought it was very poor fare indeed. 

" One can, of course, keep body and soul together on this," 
said she ; " but I don't think much of it. Now you must be good 
enough to visit me and taste what we have." 

Yes, that she would, and before long she set out. The town 
mouse had gathered together all the scraps from the Christmas 
fare which the woman of the house had dropped on the floor 
during the holidays — bits of cheese, butter and tallow ends, cake- 
crumbs, pastry and many other good things. In the dish under 
the ale-tap she had drink enough ; in fact, the place was full of all 
kinds of dainties. 

They ate and fared well ; the country mouse seemed never to 
have had enough ; she had never tasted such delicacies. But then 
she became thirsty, for she found the food both strong and rich, 
and now she wanted something to drink. 



ii8 The Town Mouse and the Couxtky Mouse 

" We haven't far to go for the beer we shall drink," said the 
town mouse, and jumped upon the edge of the dish and drank till 
she was no longer thirsty ; she did not drink too much, for she 
knew the Christmas beer was strong. The country mouse, how- 
ever, thought the beer a splendid drink ; she had never tasted 
anything but water, so she took one sip after another, but as she 
could not stand strong drink she became tipsy before she left the 
dish. 

The drink got into her head and down into her toes and she 
began running and jumping about from one beer barrel to the 
other, and to dance and tumble about on the shelves amongst the 
cups and mugs ; she squeaked and screeched as if she were both 
drunk and mad. About her being drunk there was very little 
doubt. 

" You must not carry on as if you had just come from the 
backwoods and make such a row and noise," said the town mouse ; 
** the master of the house is a bailiff and he is very strict indeed," 
she added. 

The country mouse said she didn't care either for bailiffs or 
beggars. But the cat sat at the top of the cellar steps, lying in 
wait, and heard all the chatter and noise. When the woman of 
the house went down to draw some beer and lifted the trap door 
the cat slipped by into the cellar and struck its claws into the 
country mouse. Then there was quite another sort of dance. 

The town mouse slid back into her hole and sat in safety looking 
on, while the country mouse suddenly became sober when she 
felt the claws of the cat in her back. 

" Oh, my dear bailiff, oh, dearest bailiff, be merciful and spare 
my life and I will tell you a fairy tale," she said. 

" Well, go on," said the cat. 

"Once upon a time there were two little mice," said the 
country mouse, squeaking slowly and pitifully, for she wanted to 
make the story last as long as she could. 

"Then they were not lonely," said the cat dryly and curtly. 

"And they had a steak which they were going to fry." 




< z 

Q Q 

7. 

< 4 



< s 



The Town Mot'se axd the Country Mouse 



121 



" Then they could not starve," said the cat. 

"And they put it out on the roof to cool," said the country 
mouse. 

" Then they did not burn themselves," said the cat. 

" But there came a fox and a crow and ate it all up," said the 
country mouse. 

" Then I'll eat 3'ou," said the cat. But just at that moment the 
woman shut the trap door with a slam, which so startled the cat 
that she let go her hold of the mouse. One bound, and the country 
mouse found herself in the hole with the town mouse. 

From there a passage led out into the snow, and you may be 
sure the country mouse did not wait long before she set out 
homewards. 

"And this is what you call living well and being best off," she 
said to the town mouse. " Heaven preserve me from having such 
a fine place and such a master I Why, I only just got away with 
my hfc ! " 





SORIA MARIA'S CASTLE 



There was once upon a time a couple who had a son, and his 
name was Halvor. Since he was quite a small boy he never 
cared to do any work ; he would only sit in the hearth and rake 
together the ashes. The parents had many times apprenticed 



SoRiA Maria's Castle 123 

him to learn some trade, but Halvor never stopped long anywhere; 
— when he had been at a place for some days he always ran off 
home again, sat himself down in the hearth, and began digging iu 
the ashes. 

But one day a skipper came to the house and asked Halvor if 
had a mind to go to sea with him and visit foreign countries. 
Yes, Halvor had a mind for that, and this time he was not long in 
getting read3\ 

How long they sailed I do not know, but after some time a 
storm overtook them and when it was over and the sea became 
calm they did not know where they were ; they had drifted to a 
foreign coast which was quite unknown to them. 

As there was no wind at all they had to remain there and 
Halvor asked the skipper for permission to go ashore and look 
about a bit, for he would rather do that than lie and sleep. 

'' Do you think you are fit to show yourself? " said the skipper. 
** Why you have no other clothes but the rags you have on your 
back." But Halvor would not give in, and at last he got 
permission ; but he must come back on board when it began to- 
blow. 

He started off and found the country most beautiful ; all 
around he saw large plains v/ith cornfields and meadows, but he 
did not see any people. Soon it began to blow, but Halvor did 
not think he had seen enough yet, so he thought he would go on 
a little further and see if he could find any people. 

In a while he came to a big road, which was so even one could 
roll an egg along it. Halvor followed the road, and towards even- 
ing he saw a great castle far away all lighted up. 

As he had been walking all day almost without any food, he 
was very hungry ; but the nearer he came to the castle the more 
afraid he felt. 

In the castle the fires were still burning in the hearths. 
Halvor went into the kitchen, which was the most splendid he had 
ever seen ; there were pots and pans both of gold and silver, but 
no people. When Halvor had stood there awhile and no one 



124 SoKiA Maria's Castle 

came, he went to a door and opened it and inside sat a princess at 
her spinning wheel. 

"Oh dear! Oh dear!" she cried, "how dare any Christian 
person come here ! You had better go awa}', if you don't want 
the troll to swallow you alive, for here lives a troll with three 
heads." 

" It would be all one to me, even if he had four," said the lad. 
" I should much like to see him ! I am not going away, for I have 
done nothing wrong ; you must give me something to eat as I am 
terribly hungr}'." 

When Halvor had finished his meal, the princess told him he 
had better try if he could swing the sword which hung on the 
wall. No, he could not even lift it. 

*' You had better take a drink from that bottle, which hangs by 
the side of it," said the princess, " for the troll does so, when he is 
going to use the sword." 

Ilalvor took a drink, and immediately he was able to swing 
the sword as if it had been nothing. Now, thought ne, the troll 
might come any time. All at once they heard tlie troll coming, 
and Halvor hid behind the door. 

" Ugh ! I smell Christian blood here," said the troll, putting 
one head in through the door. 

" You'll soon find that is so," said Halvor, and cut off all his 
heads. The princess was so glad at being saved that she both 
sang and danced. Then she began to think about her sisters and 
said : 

" I wish my sisters were saved also." 

"Where are they?" asked Halvor; and so she told him one 
was shut up by a troll in a castle fifty miles away, and the other 
was shut up in a castle another fifty miles away. 

" First you must help me to get this carcase away," said she. 
Ilalvor was so strong he swept everything before him, and cleared 
all away in no time ; he then ate and enjoyed himself for the rest 
of tlie day. 

Ne.xt morning he set out at daybreak, and so eager was he to 




WHEN THE TROLL WITH THE THREE HEADS CAME INTO THE ROOM, IIALVOR TOOK 
THE SWORD AND CUT OFF ALL THE HEADS 



SoRiA Maria's Castle 127 

reach the caslle, tliat he ran the whole day. When at last he saw 
it he became frightened again ; it was more gorgeous even than 
the first one, but here also he could see no one. He went into the 
kitchen and straight on into the room without stopping. 

" Oh, dear ! how dare any Christian person come here ! " cried 
the princess. " I don't know how long I have been here, but 
during all that time I have not seen a Christian. You had better 
go away, for here lives a troll who has six heads." 

" No, I won't go," said Halvor, "even if he had twelve." 

" He will swallow you alive," said the princess. But it was of 
no use, Halvor would not go ; he was not afraid of the troll, but 
he wanted meat and drink, for he was hungry after the journey. 
He got as much as he wanted and then the princess again begged 
him to go. 

" No," said Halvor, " I won't go, for I have done nothing wrong 
and I have nothing to be afraid of." 

"That makes no difference," said the princess, "for he will 
take you, whether or no ; but since you will not go, try if you can 
swing this sword, which the troll uses when he goes to war." 

He could not swing the sword, so the princess told him to 
take a drink from the bottle which hung by the side. When he had 
done so, he found himself able to swing the sword. All of a 
sudden the troll came home ; he was so fat and big he had to go 
sideways to get through the door. When he had got one of his 
heads inside he cried : 

" Ugh ! what a smell of Christian blood ! " but at the same 
moment Halvor cut off one head and then all the others. 

The princess was very glad, but she soon began to think of 
her sisters and wish that they also were saved. Halvor thought 
that could be done, and wanted to set off at once ; but first he had 
to help the princess to get rid of the body of the troll, and next 
morning he set out. 

It was a long way to the castle, and he walked and ran as fast 
as he could to get there in good time. Towards evening he came 
in sight of the castle, and found it even more splendid than the 



128 SoRiA jNIakia's Castle 

others. He was not the least afraid this time, but went straight 
through the kitchen and into the room. There sat the princess, 
who was so prett}' that no words can tclL She said just the same 
as the other princesses, that no Christian person had been there 
since she came, and asked him to go away, or else the troll would 
swallow him alive. This troll had nine heads, she said. 

" Well, even if he has twice nine and still another nine I shall 
not go," said Halvor, going up to the fire. 

The princess entreated him to go, so that the troll should not 
eat him ; but Halvor said : " Let him come when he likes ;" then 
she gave him the sword and asked him to take a sip from the 
bottle, so that he could use the sword. 

All of a sudden the troll came in with a great noise. He was 
still fatter and bigger than the other two, and he had also to go 
sideways to get through the door. 

" Ugh ! what a smell of Christian blood !" he said ; but at the 
same moment Halvor cut off his first head and then all the others; 
but the last one was very tough and gave Halvor more work than 
anything he had yet had to do, although he felt so very strong. 

All the princesses were now together at this castle, and they 
w^ere happier than they had ever been in all their lives. They were 
very fond of Halvor and he of them. He could choose the one he 
liked best of them to wed, but the youngest was most fond of him 
of all three. He, however, went about looking so sad, and he was 
so sullen and quiet, that the princesses asked him what he w^as 
longing for and whether he did not like staying with them. Yes, 
that he liked well enough, for they had plenty to live on and he 
was very comfortable ; but he longed so much for home, his 
parents were still alive, and he had a great mind to see them again. 
That could easily be arranged, they said : 

" You can go there and back without any danger, if 3'ou follow 
our advice." Yes, he would do everything they told him. Then 
they dressed him up till he looked as fine as a prince, and they 
put a magic ring on his finger, so that he had only to wish himself 
anywhere and his wish would be fulfilled ; but they said he must 



SoRiA ^Maria's Castle 129 

not lose the ring or mention their names, for then there would be 
an end to all their happiness and he would never sec them any 
more. 

" I wish I were home," said Halvor, and as he wished so it 
happened. He stood outside his parents' house in less than 
no time. It was just in the dusk of the evening, and when his 
parents saw what a fine and noble stranger was coming they lost 
their wits, and began to how and curtsy. Halvor asked if he 
could stop there and get lodgings for the night. 

No, that he couldn't. " Our place is not good enough," they 
said ; " we have nothing here that would do for so grand a tra- 
veller." He had better go up to the farm, which was not far away ; 
he could see the chimne3'-pots from where they stood, and there 
he would find plenty of everything. Halvor did not like that at 
all ; he wanted to remain where he was, but the parents stuck 
to what they had said, that lie should go up to the farm, for there 
he could get both meat and drink, while they had not even a 
chair to offer him. 

" No," said Halvor, " I won't go there till the morning ; let me 
remain here to-night ; I can sit in the hearth." They could not 
refuse him that, so Halvor sat down in the hearth and began 
digging in the ashes, just as he had done when he was at home 
and idled away his time. 

They spoke about a good many things, and told Halvor one 
thing and another till at last he asked them if they ever had had 
any children. Yes, they had a boy whose name was Halvor, but 
they did not know whereabouts he was wandering, or whether he 
was alive or dead. 

" Could I be he ? " said Halvor. 

** No, not likely," said the woman ; " Halvor was such a lazy, 
idle boy, he would never do anything, and he was so ragged his 
rags would hardly keep together; he could never become as grand 
as you." 

In a little while the woman went over to the chimney to rake 
the fire, and just then the light from the ashes shone upon Halvor 



130 SoRiA Maria's Castle 

the same as when he used to sit at home raking in the ashes, and 
then the woman knew him again. 

" Of course it is you, Halvor ! " she said, and the old couple 
became so glad they did not know what to do. He had then to 
tell them all that had happened to him, and his mother was so 
proud of him that she wanted to take him up with her to the farm 
and show him off to the girls, who had always put on such airs. 
She went first and Halv'orcame after. When she got up there she 
told the people Halvor had come home again, and they should soon 
see what a fine fellow he w^as ; he looked like a prince, she said. 

"Oh, indeed!" said the girls, turning up their noses; "we 
expect he is the same ragged fellow as ever." Just at that 
moment Halv'or came in, and so startled the girls, who were busy 
dressing themselves, that they took to their heels with nothing on 
but their petticoats. 

When they came in again the}^ were so shy they hardly dared 
to look at Halvor, to whom they had formerly always been so 
proud and short-spoken. 

" Well, you have always thought yourselves so fine and hand- 
some that there were none like you, but you should just see the 
eldest of the princesses I have saved," said Halvor; "by her side 
you would look like scullery-maids, and the second sister is still 
prettier ; but the youngest, who is my sweetheart, is prettier than 
both the sun and the moon. I wish they were here, and then you 
would see," said Halvor. 

He had no sooner spoken the words than the princesses stood 
there. This vexed him ver}^ much, for now he remembered his 
promise to them. Much rejoicing now began on the farm in 
honour of the princesses, but they did not care to remain there. 

" We want to visit your parents," they said to Halvor, " and 
then we ii travel about and look around us." He said he would 
go with them, and soon they came to a large lake some distance 
from the farm. Close to the lake was a green hillside, where the 
princesses wanted to rest a while, for they thought it would be so 
nice to sit there and look out over the water. 



'^ 




t < 






- ^ 

K O 

►J o 

C5 vJ 



< < 



SoRiA Maria's Castle 133 

They sat down, and after a while the youngest princess said 
to Halvor : "Won't you lie down and rest your head in my lap?" 
Yes, he would do so, and before long he fell asleep. Then she 
took the ring from his finger and put another in its place, and said 
to her sisters : 

" Take hold of me as I take hold of you. I wish we were back 
in Soria Maria's castle." 

When Halvor awoke he soon guessed he had lost the prin- 
cesses and began to cry and lament, and was so disconsolate no 
one could get a word out of him. Though his parents begged and 
prayed him to stop with them he would not, but bid them farewell, 
and said he was not ever likel^'to see them again, for if he did not 
find the princesses life would not be worth living. He had three 
hundred dollars left which he put in his pocket, and then set 
out. 

When he had got a bit on the way he met a man with ahorse 
which he wanted to buy, so he began bargaining. 

"Well, I have not exactly been thinking of selling it," said the 

man, " but if we can come to some agreement, well " Halvor 

asked how much he wanted for it. 

" I did not pay much for it, and it isn't worth much," said the 
man ; " it is a good horse to ride on, but no good as a cart- 
horse. In any case he could manage to get along with your scrip- 
bag and you as well, if you will walk a bit now and then." 

At last they agreed about the price, and Halvor put his bag on 
the horse, and sometimes walked and sometimes rode, till towards 
evening he came to a green field, and there stood a great tree, 
under which he sat down. He let the horse loose, and then 
opened his bag and had some food, but did not lie down to 
sleep. 

At daylight he set out, for he had no peace of mind till he was 
on his way again ; so he rode and walked by turns all day through 
a large forest with many beautiful green openings gleaming here 
and there among the trees. He did not know where he was, nor 
in which direction he was going ; he only gave himself time to 



134 SoRTA Maria's Castle 

rest when he came to one of the green spots ; he then foddered 
the horse and had some food himself. 

On he walked and on he rode, and it seemed as if there never 
would be an end to the forest. But towards evening on the 
second day he saw a light shining between the trees. " I hope 
the folks are not gone to bed, so that I can warm myself and get 
something to eat," said Halvor to himself. When he came nearer 
he found only a poor little hut, and through the window he saw an 
old couple. They were very old and grey, and the woman had 
such a long nose that she could use it to rake the ashes together 
with when she sat by the fire. 

"Good evening, good evening," said the woman. " But what 
business can 3'ou have here, I wonder ? No Christian people 
have been this way for over a hundred years." 

Halvor told her he was going to Soria Maria's castle, and 
asked her if she knew the way. 

" No," said the old woman, " I don't know, but the moon will 
be out soon, and I'll ask her; she is sure to know, for she shines 
over every place." 

As soon as the moon appeared bright and clear above the tree- 
tops, the woman went out. 

"You moon ! you moon ! " she shouted, "can you tell me the 
way to Soria Maria's castle ? " 

" No," said the moon, " I cannot, for when I passed that way 
a cloud stood before me." 

"Wait a while yet," said the woman to Halvor, "the west 
wind will be here directly ; he is sure to know, for he whistles 
and blows in every corner. Dear, dear, you have a horse, I see," 
continued the old woman, as she came into the room. " Let the 
poor creature into the meadow ; don't let it remain here at the 
door to starve. Will you exchange it with me for something ? " 
said she. " We have a pair of old boots here, and when you have 
them on you can take twenty miles at every step. You can have 
them instead of the horse, and then you can get sooner to Soria 
Maria's castie." 



SoKiA Makia's Castle 



JD 



Halvor agreed at once, and the woman took such a fancy to 
the horse she was ready to dance for joy, " For now I can ride to 
church hke other people," she said. 

Halvor became impatient to start, but the woman said there 
was no hurry. 




TIIF. OLD VVOM.\N WENT OUT TO ASK THE MOO.N THE WAY TO 
SORIA MARIA'S CASTLE 



" Lie down on the bench and take a nap, for we have no bed," 
said she, " and I will look out for the west wind when he comes." 

All of a sudden the west wind came rushing along, making the 
walls creak and groan. The woman ran out. 



136 SoKiA Maria's Castle 

" You west wind ! you west wind ! can you tell me the way to 
Soria Maria's castle ? There is somebody here who wants to go 
that way." 

" Yes, I know it well," said the west wind. " I am just going 
there to dry clothes for a wedding which is to be. If he is quick 
on his legs he can come with me." 

Halvor just then came out, 

"You will have to make haste if you want company," said the 
west wind ; and away they went far over hills and dales and seas, 
while Halvor had as much as he could do to keep up. 

" I haven't time to go with you any further," said the w^est 
wind, " for I have to tear up a pine forest first before I go to 
the bleaching ground to dry the clothes ; but if you keep along 
the ridge of the mountain you will come to some lasses who 
are washing clothes, and then you have not far to go to Soria 
Maria's castle." 

Before long Halvor came to the lasses who were busy washing 
clothes. They asked if he had seen anything of the west wind. 

" He was coming here to dry clothes for the wedding," said 
they. 

"Yes," said Halvor, "he has onl}' gone to tear up a pine 
forest ; it will not be long before he is here." And then he 
asked them the way to Soria Maria's castle. 

They put him in the way, and when he came to the castle he 
found quite a crowd of horses and people there. But Halvor was 
so ragged and dirty from having followed the west wind through 
bush and bog that he kept out of sight, and would not go to the 
castle till the last da}', when they were going to have a grand 
dinner. And when the time came, as was the custom, for drinking 
the health of the bride, and the servant was filling every one's 
cup — that of the bride and bridegroom, the knights' and 3'comen's 
— he came at length to Halvor. 

He drank the toast, and let the ring which the princess had 
put on his finger at the lake fall into the cup. He then asked the 
servant to carry the cup to the bride, with his compliments. 



SoRiA Makia's Castle 137 

The princess at once got up from the table. 

"Who has most right to wed one of us," she said ; "he who 
saved us or he who sits here as bridegroom ? " 

All thought there could be but one opinion about that ; so 
when Halvor heard it, he was not long in getting off his rags and 
in dressing himself as a bridegroom. 

" Yes, he is the right one ! " cried the youngest princess wlien 
she saw him ; and so she threw the other one over, and was 
married to Halvor. 




p#^;^.^v/;fi^^ 



WELL DONE. ILL PAID 



Onxe upon a time there was a man who was going to the forest 
for firewood. On his way he met a bear. 

" Give me your horse, or I will kill all your sheep next 
summer ! " said the bear. 

"Oh dear! oh dear!" said the man, "there is not a chip of 
wood in the house. You must let me drive home a cartload of 



Well Done, III Paid 139 

wood, or we shall be frozen to death ; but I will come back with 
the horse to-morrow for you." 

Well, that would do; but it was understood that if he did not 
reuirn he would lose all his sheep during the summer, 'The man 
loaded his sledge with wood, and drove homewards ; but he was 
not very pleased with the arrangement he had made, you can 
hiiagine. On the way he met a fox. 

" Why do you look so sad ? " asked the fox. 

" Oh, I met a bear up yonder," said the man, " and I had to 
promise that at this time to-morrow he should have my horse. 
If he does not get it, he said he would tear all my sheep to 
pieces next summer." 

"Oh, nothing worse than that ? " said the fox. " If you will 
give me your fattest ram I will soon get you out of your 
difficulty." 

The man promised this, and said he would be sure to keep 
his word. 

" When 3'ou come to the bear to-morrow with the horse," said 
the fox, " I will be up in the mountain, and will shout out to you. 
When the bear asks who it is, you must say it is Peter, the hunts- 
man, who is the finest shot in the world. Afterwards you must 
use your own wits." 

The next day the man set out, and when he met the bear 
some one up in the mountain began shouting. 

" Whst ! what's that ? " said the bear. 

" Oh, that's Peter, the huntsman. He is the finest shot in the 
world," said the man. " I know him by his voice." 

** Have you seen any bear about here, Erik ? " came from the 
wood. 

" Say no ! " said the bear. 

" No, I have not seen any bear," said Erik. 

" What's that standing by your sledge then ? " came from the 
w^ood. 

" Say it is the root of an old tree," whispered t>ic bear. 

"Oh, it's only the root of an old tree," said Erik. 



140 Well Doxe, III Paid 

" Such roots we generally load our sledges with," came from 
the wood ; " if you are not able to do so, I will come and help 
you." 

" Say you can do it yourself, and put me on the sledge." 

" No, thanks, I can manage by myself," said the man, and 
rolled the bear on to the sledge. 

" Such roots we generally tie down," came from the wood ; 
" do you want any help ? " 

"Say you can do it yourself, and tie me down," said the 
bear. 

" No, thanks, I can do it," said Erik, and began tying down the 
bear with all the ropes he had, till the bear could not move a paw. 

" Such roots we generally strike an axe into, when we have 
tied it down," come from the wood, "for then one can steer the 
sledge better down the big hills." 

" Pretend to strike the axe into me," whispered the bear. 

But the man took the axe and split the skull of the bear, who 
was killed on the spot. So Erik and the fox became good friends 
and got on well together, but when they came to the farm, the 
fox said : 

" I should like to go in with you, but I don't like your dogs. I 
will wait here till you come with the ram. But remember to pick 
me out one that is very fat." 

Yes, the man would do so, and thanked the fox besides for his 
help. When he had put the horse into the stable he went across 
to the sheep-pen. 

" Where arc you going? " asked his wife. 

" Oh, I am only going over to the sheep-pen to fetch a fat ram 
for that good fox who saved our horse," said the man, "as I have 
promised him one." 

" Why on earth give that thief of a fox any ram ? " said the 
woman. " We have got the horse quite safe and the bear besides, 
and the fox has stolen more geese from us than the ram is worth ; 
or, if he hasn't already taken them, he is sure to do so sometime. 
No, take the most savage pair of those dogs of yours and let loose 



Well Doxe, III Paid 



Ui 



on him, then perhaps we'll get rid of that thieving old rascal," 
said the woman. 

The man thought this was sensible advice and took two of his 
savage red dogs, put them in a bag and set out with them. 

" Have you got the ram ? " said the fox. 

"Yes, com.e and fetch it," said the man, undoing the string 
round the bag and setting the dogs at the fox. 

" Ugh ! " said the fox bounding away, " the old saying, ' Well 
done, ill paid ' is only too true ; and now I find it is also true that 
one's relations are one's worst enemies," said he, as he saw the 
red dogs at his heels. 











ASHIEPATTLE AND HIS GOODLY 
CREW 

Once upon a time there was a king, and this king had heard about 
a ship which went just as fast by land as by water ; and as he 
wished to have one like it, he promised any one who could build 
one for him, his daughter and half the kingdom. And this was 
given out at every church all over the countr3\ There were many 
who tried, as you can imagine ; for they thought it would be a nice 
thing to have half the kingdom, and the princess wouldn't be a bad 
thing into the bargain. But they all fared badly. 

Now there were three brothers, who lived far away on the 
borders of a forest ; the eldest was called Peter, the second Paul, 
and the youngest Espen Ashiepattle, because he always sat in the 
hearth, raking and digging in the ashes. 



ASHIEPATTLE AND HIS GOODLY CREW 14-5 

It SO happened that Ashiepattle was at church on the Sunday 
when the proclamation about the ship, which the king wanted, 
was read. When he came home and told his family, Peter the 
eldest asked his mother to get some food ready for him, for now 
he was going away to try if he could build the ship and win the 
princess and half the kmgdom. When the bag was ready he set 
out. On the way he met an old man who was very crooked and 
decrepit. 

"Where are you going? " said the man. 

** I'm going into the forest to make a trough for my father. He 
doesn't like to eat at table in our company," said Peter. 

"Trough it shall be ! " said the man. " What have you got in 
that bag of yours ? " he added. 

" Dung," said Peter. 

" Dung it shall be," said the man. Peter then went into the 
forest and began to cut and chop away at the trees and work 
away as hard as he could, but in spite of all his cutting and 
chopping he could only turn out troughs. Towards dinner time 
he wanted something to eat and opened his bag. But there was 
not a crumb of food in it. As he had nothing to live upon and as 
he did not turn out an3^thing but troughs, he became tired of the 
work, took his axe and bag on his shoulder and went home to his 
mother. 

Paul then wanted to set out to try his luck at building the ship 
and winning the princess and half the kingdom. He asked his 
mother for provisions, and when the bag was ready he threw it 
over his shoulder and went on his way to the forest. On the road 
he met the old man, who was very crooked and decrepit. 

" Where are you going? " said the man. 

"Oh, I am going into the forest to make a trough for our 
sucking pig," said Paul. 

" Pig-trough it shall be," said the man. " What have you got 
in that bag of yours ? " added the man. 

"Dung," said Paul. 

" Dung it shall be," said the man. 



144 ASHIEPATTLE AND HiS GOODLY CREW 

Paul then began felling trees and working away as hard as he 
could, but no matter how he cut and how he worked he could only 
turn out pig-troughs. He did not give in, however, but worked 
away till far into the afternoon before he thought of taking any 
food ; then all at once he became hungry and opened his bag, but 
not a crumb could he find. Paul became so angr}' he turned the 
bag inside out and struck it against the stump of a tree ; then he 
took his axe, went out of the forest and set off homewards. 

As soon as Paul returned, Ashiepattle wanted to set out and 
asked his mother for a bag of food. 

** Perhaps I can manage to build the ship and win the princess 
and half the kingdom," said he. 

''Well, I never heard the like," said his mother. " Are 3'ou 
likely to win the princess, you, who never do anything but root 
and dig in i\ie ashes ? No, you shan't have any bag with food ! " 

Ashiepattle did not give in, however, but he pra3'ed and begged 
till he got leave to go. He did not get any food, not he ; but he 
stole a couple of oatmeal cakes and some flat beer and set out. 

When he had walked awhile he met the same old man, who 
was so crooked and tattered and decrepit. 

" Where are you going ? " said the man. 

" Oh, I was going into the forest to try if it were possible to 
build a ship which can go as fast by land as by water," said 
Ashiepattle, " for the king has given out that any one who can 
build such a ship shall have the princess and half the kingdom." 

" What have you got in that bag of yours ? " said the man. 

" Not much worth talking about ; there ought to be a little 
food in it," answered Ashiepattle. 

" If you'll give me a little of it PU help 3'ou," said the man. 

" With all my heart," said Ashiepattle, " but there is nothing 
but some oatmeal cakes and a drop of flat beer." 

It didn't matter what it was, the man said ; if he only got 
some of it he would be sure to help Ashiepattle. 

When they cam.e up to an old oak in the wood the man said 
to the lad, "Now you must cut off a chip and then put it back 



!%^^SSESiSj8H«^<^H«e»5S»^^»^^MS«SS?J8SSWsi*!'^««*iiS^^ 




THE SHIP WHICH WENT JUST A5 FAST BY LAND AS BY WATER 



ASHIEPATTLE AND HiS GOODLY CREW I47 

again in exactly the same place, and when you have done that you 
can lie down and go to sleep." Ashiepattle did as he was told and 
then lay down to sleep, and in his sleep he thought he heard some- 
body cutting and hammering and sawing and carpentering, but he 
could not wake up till the man called him ; then the ship stood 
quite finished by the side of the oak, 

" Now you must go on board and everyone you meet you must 
take with you," said the man. Espen Ashiepattle thanked 
him for the ship, said he would do so, and then sailed away. 

When he had sailed some distance, he came to a long, thin 
tramp, who was lying near some rocks, eating stones. 

" What sort of a fellow are you, that you lie there eating 
stones ? " asked Ashiepattle. The tramp said he was so fond of 
meat he could never get enough, therefore he was obliged to eat 
stones. And then he asked if he might go with him in the ship. 

"If you want to go with us, you must make haste and get 
on board," said Ashiepattle. 

Yes, that he would, but he must take with him some large 
stones for food. 

When they had sailed some distance, they met one who was 
lying on the side of a sunny hill, sucking at a bung. 

"Who are you," said Ashiepattle, "and what is the good 
of lying there sucking that bung ? " 

" Oh, when one hasn't got the barrel, one must be satisfied with 
the bung," said the man. " I'm always so thirsty, I can never get 
enough beer and wine." And then he asked for leave to go with him 
in the ship. 

"If you want to go with me you must make haste and get 
on board," said Ashiepattle. 

Yes, that he would. And so he went on board and took the bung 
with him to allay his thirst. 

When they had sailed awhile again, they met one who was 
lying with his ear to the ground, listening. 

" Who are you, and what is the good of lying there on the 
ground listening ? " said Ashiepattle. 



148 ASHIEPATTLE AND HiS GOODLY CREW 

" I'm listening to the grass, for I have such good ears that I 
can hear the grass growing," said the man. And then he asked for 
leave to go with him in the ship. Ashiepattle could not say nay 
to that, so he said : 

" If you want to go with me, you must make haste and get on 
board." 

Yes, that the man would. And he also went on board. 

When the}' had sailed some distance, they came to one who was 
standing taking aim with a gun. 

" Who are you, and what is the good of standing there aiming 
like that ? " asked Ashiepattle. 

So the man said : 

" I have such good eyes that I can hit anything, right to the 
end of the world." And then he asked for leave to go with him 
in the ship. 

" If you want to go with me, you must make haste and get on 
board," said Ashiepattle. 

Yes, that he would. And he went on board. 

When they had sailed some distance again, they came to one 
who was hopping and limping about on one leg, and on the other 
he had seven ton weights. 

" Who are you," said Ashiepattle, " and what is the good 
of hopping and limping about on one leg with seven ton weights 
on the other ? " 

" I am so light," said the man, " that if I walked on both my 
legs I should get to the end of the world in less than five minutes." 
And then he asked for leave to go with him in the ship. 

" If you want to go with us, you must make haste and get on 
board," said Ashiepattle. 

Yes, that he would. And so he joined Ashiepattle and his 
crew on the ship. 

When they had sailed on some distance, they met one who 
was standing holding his hand to his mouth. 

" Who are you ? " said Ashiepattle, "and what is the good of 
standing there, holding your mouth like that ? " 




TO THK END OF TJIE WORLD IN LESS THAN FIVE MINUTES 



ASHIEPATTLE AND HiS GOODLY CrEW 151 

"Oh, I have seven summers and fifteen winters in my body," 
said the man ; ** so I think I ought to keep my mouth shut, for if 
they get out all at the same time they would finish off the world 
altogether." And then he asked for leave to go with him in the ship. 

" If you want to go with us, you must make haste and get on 
board," said Ashiepattle. 

Yes, that he would, and then he joined the others on the ship. 

When they had sailed a long time, they came to the king's 
palace. 

Ashiepattle went straight in to the king and said the ship 
stood ready in the courtyard outside ; and now he wanted the 
princess, as the king had promised. 

The king did not like this very much, for Ashiepattle did not cut 
a very fine figure ; he was black and sooty, and the king did not care 
to give his daughter to such a tramp, so he told Ashiepattle that he 
would have to wait a little. 

" But you can have her all the same, if by this time to-morrow 
you can empty my storehouse of three hundred barrels of meat," 
said the king. 

"I suppose I must try," said Ashiepattle ;" but perhaps you 
don't mind my taking one of my crew with me ? " 

" Yes, you can do that, and take all six if you like," said the 
king, for he was quite sure that even if Ashiepattle took six 
hundred with him, it would be impossible. So Ashiepattle took 
with him the one who ate stones and always hungered after 
meat. 

When they came next morning and opened the storehouse, 
they found he had eaten all the meat, except six small legs 
of mutton, one for each of his companions. Ashiepattle then went 
to the king and said the storehouse was empty, and he supposed 
he could now have the princess. 

The king went into the storehouse, and, sure enough, it was 
quite empty; but Ashiepattle was still black and sooty and the 
king thought it was really too bad that such a tramp should have 
his daughter. So he said he had a cellar full of beer and old wine. 



152 ASHIEPATTLE AND HiS GOODLY CrEW 

three hundred barrels of each kind, which he would have him 
drink first. 

" I don't mind your having my daughter if you can drink them 
up by this time to-morrow," said the king. 

" I suppose I must try," said Ashiepattle, " but perhaps you 
don't mind my taking one of my crew with me ? " 

"Yes, you may do that," said the king, for he was quite sure 
there was too much beer and wine even for all seven of them. 
Ashiepattle took with him the one who was always sucking the 
bung, and was always thirsty ; and the king then shut them down 
in the cellar. 

There the thirsty one drank barrel after barrel, as long as there 
was any left, but in the last barrel he left a couple of pints to 
each of his companions. 

In the morning the cellar was opened and Ashiepattle went at 
once to the king and said he had finished the beer and wine, and now 
he supposed he could have the princess as the king had promised. 

"Well, I must first go down to the cellar and see," said 
the king, for he could not believe it ; but when he got there 
he found nothing but empty barrels. 

But Ashiepattle was both black and sooty, and the king thought 
it wouldn't do for him to have such a son-in-law. So he said, 
that if Ashiepattle could get water from the end of the world in 
ten minutes for the princess's tea, he could have both her and half 
the kingdom ; for he thought that task would be quite impossible. 

" I suppose I must try," said Ashiepattle, and sent for the one 
of his crew who limped about on one leg, and had seven ton 
weights on the other, and told him he must take off the weights 
and use his legs as quickly as he could, for he must have water 
from the end of the world for the princess's tea in ten minutes. 

So he took off the weights, got a bucket and set off, and 
the next moment he was out of sight. But they waited and 
waited and still he did not return. At last it wanted but three 
minutes to the time, and the king became as pleased as if he had 
won a big wager. Then Ashiepattle called the one who could hear 



ASHIEPATTLE AND HiS GOODLY CREW 153 

the grass grow and told him to Hsten and find out what had become 
of their companion. 

** He has fallen asleep at the well," said he who could hear the 
grass grow ; " I can hear him snoring, and a troll is scratching his 
head." Ashiepattle then called the one who could shoot to the end 
of the world, and told him to send a bullet into the troll ; he did so 
and hit the troll right in the eye. The troll gave such a yell that he 
woke the man who had come to fetch the water for the tea, and when 
he returned to the palace there was still one minute left out of the ten. 

Ashiepattle went straight to the king and said : *' Here is the 
water"; and now he supposed he could have the princess, for surely 
the king would not make any more fuss about it now. But the king 
thought that Ashiepattle was just as black and sooty as ever, and 
did not like to have him for a son-in-law ; so he said he had three 
hundred fathoms of wood with which he was going to dry corn in 
the bakehouse, and he wouldn't mind Ashiepattle having his 
daughter if he would first sit in the bakehouse and burn all the 
wood ; he should then have the princess, and that without fail. 
" I suppose I must try," said Ashiepattle ; "but perhaps you don't 
mind my taking one of my crew with me ? " 

" Oh no, you can take all six," said the king, for he thought it 
would be warm enough for all of them. 

Ashiepattle took with him the one who had fifteen winters and 
seven summers in his body, and in the evening he went across to 
the bakehouse ; but the king had piled up so much wood on the 
iire that you might almost have melted iron in the room. They 
could not get out of it, for no sooner were they inside than the 
king fastened the bolt and put a couple of padlocks on the door 
besides. Ashiepattle then said to his companion : 

"You had better let out six or seven winters, so that we may 
get something like summer weather here." 

They were then just able to exist, but during the night it got 
cold again and Ashiepattle then told the man to let out a couple of 
summers, and so they slept far into the next day. But when 
they heard the king outside, Ashiepattle said : 



154 ASHIEPATTLE AND HiS GOODLY CREW 

" You must let out a couple more winters, but you must manage 
it so that the last winter you let out strikes the king right in the 
face." 

He did so, and when the king opened the door, expecting to 
find Ashiepattle and his companion burnt to cinders, he saw them 
huddling together and shivering with cold till their teeth chattered. 
The same instant Ashiepattle's companion with the fifteen winters 
in his body let loose the last one right in the king's face, which 
swelled up into a big chilblain. 

"Can I have the princess now?" asked Ashiepattle. 

"Yes, take her and keep her and the kingdom into the bargain," 
said the king, who dared not refuse any longer. And so the 
wedding took place and they feasted and made merry and fired off 
guns and powder. 

While the people were running about searching for wadding for 
their guns, they took me instead, gave me some porridge in a 
bottle and some milk in a basket, and fired me right across here,, 
so that I could tell you how it all happened. 



\::^^ 




GUDBRAND ON 
THE HILL-SIDE 




There was once upon a time a 
man whose name was Gudbrand. 
He had a farm which lay far 
away up on the side of a hill, and 
therefore they called him Gud- 
brand on the hill-side. 

He and his wife lived so 
happily together, and agreed so 
well, that whatever the man did 
the wife thought it so well done 
that no one could do it better. 
No matter what he did, she 
thought it was always the right 
thing. 
They lived on their own farm, and had a hundred dollars at 

the bottom of their chest and two cows in their cowshed. One 

day the woman said to Gudbrand : 

" I think we ouerht to go to town with one of the cows and sell 



156 GUDBRAND ON THE HiLL-SlDE 

it, so that we may have some ready money by us. We are pretty 
well off, and ought to have a few shillings in our pocket like other 
people ; the hundred dollars in the chest we mustn't touch, but I 
can't see what we want with more than one cow, and it will be 
much better for us, as I shall have only one to look after instead 
of the two I have now to mind and feed." 

Yes, Gudbrand thought, that was well and sensibly spoken. He 
took the cow at once and went to town to sell it ; but when he got 
there no one would buy the cow. 

"Ah, well I" thought Gudbrand, "I may as well take the cow 
home again. I know I have both stall and food for it, and the way 
home is no longer than it was here." So he strolled homewards 
again with the cow. 

When he had got a bit on the way he met a man who had a 
horse to sell, and Gudbrand thought it was better to have a horse 
than a cow, and so he changed the cow for the horse. 

When he had gone a bit further he met a man who was driving 
a fat pig before him, and then he thought it would be better 
to have a fat pig than a horse, and so he changed with the 
man. 

He now went a bit further, and then he met a man with a goat, 
and so he thought it was surely better to have a goat than a pig, 
and changed with the man who had the goat. 

Then he went a long way, till he met a man who had a sheep ; 
he changed with him, for he thought it was always better to have 
a sheep than a goat. 

When he had got a bit further he met a man with a goose, and 
so he changed the sheep for the goose. And when he had gone a 
long, long way he met a man with a cock ; he changed the goose 
with him, for he thought this wise : " It is surely better to have a 
cock than a goose." 

He walked on till late in the day, when he began to feel hungry. 
So he sold the cock for sixpence and bought some food for himself; 
" for it is always better to keep body and soul together than to 
have a cock," thought Gudbrand. 



GUDBRAND ON THE HiLL-SIDE 157 

He then set off again homewards till he came to his neighbour's 
farm and there he went in. 

" How did you get on in town ? " asked the people. 

"Oh, only so-so," said the man, " I can't boast of my luck, 
nor can I grumble at it either." And then he told them how it had 
gone with him from first to last. 

" Well, you'll have a fine reception when you get home to your 
wife," said the man. " Heaven help you ! I should not like to be 
in your place." 

"I think I might have fared much worse," said Gudbrand; " but 
whether I have fared well or ill, I have such a kind wife that she 
never says anything, no matter what I do." 

" Aye, so you say ; but you won't get me to believe it," said 
the neighbour. 

" Shall we have a wager on it ? " said Gudbrand. " I have a 
hundred dollars in my chest at home ; will you lay the same ? " 

So they made the wager and Gudbrand remained there till the 
evening, when it began to get dark, and then they went together to 
the farm. 

The neighbour was to remain outside the door and listen, 
while Gudbrand went in to his wife. 

" Good evening ! " said Gudbrand when he came in. 

" Good evening ! " said the wife. " Heaven be praised 3'ou 
are back again." 

" Yes, here I am ! " said the man. And then the wife asked him 
how he had got on in town. 

" Oh, so-so," answered Gudbrand ; " not much to brag of. 
When I came to town no one would buy the cow, so I changed it 
for a horse." 

"Oh, I'm so glad of that," said the woman ; "we are pretty 
well off and we ought to drive to church like other people, and 
when we can afford to keep a horse I don't see wh}' we should 
not have one. Run out, children, and put the horse in the stable." 
"Well, I haven't got the horse after all," said Gudbrand; " for 
when I had got a bit on the way I changed it for a pig." 



158 GUDBRAND OX THE HiLL-SIDE 

" Dear me ! " cried the woman, " that's the very thing I should 
have done myself. I'm so glad of that, for now we can have some 
bacon in the house and something to offer people when they come 
to see us. What do we want with a horse ? People would only 
say we had become so grand that we could no longer walk to 
church. Run out, children, and let the pig in." 

" But I haven't got the pig either," said Gudbrand, " for when 
I had got a bit further on the road I changed it into a milch 
goat." 

'• Dear ! dear ! how well you manage everything ! " cried the 
wife. " When I really come to think of it, what do I want with the 
pig ? People would only say, ' over yonder they eat up every- 
thing they have.' No, now I have a goat I can have both milk 
and cheese and keep the goat into the bargain. Let in the goat, 
children." 

" But I haven't got the goat either," said Gudbrand ; ** when I 
got a bit on the way I changed the goat and got a fine sheep 
for it." 

" Well ! " shouted the woman, " you do everything just as I 
should wish it — ^^just as if I had been there myself. What do we 
want with a goat ? I should have to climb up hill and down dale 
to get it home at night. No, when I have a sheep I can have wool 
and clothes in the house, and food as well. Run out, children, and 
let in the sheep." 

" But I haven't got the sheep any longer," said Gudbrand, 
*' for when I had got a bit on the way I changed it for a goose." 

"Well, thank you for that!" said the woman; "and many 
thanks too ! What do I want with a sheep ? I have neither 
wheel nor spindle, and I do not care either to toil and drudge 
making clothes ; we can buy clothes now as before. Now I can 
have goose-fat, which I have so long been wishing for, and some 
feathers to stuff that little pillow of mine. Run, children, and let 
in the goose." 

" Well, I haven't got the goose either," said Gudbrand. " When 
I had got a bit further on the way I changed it for a cock." 




"HAVE I WON THE HUNDRED DOLLARS NOW?" ASKED GUDBRAND 



GUDBRAND ON THE HiLL-SIDE l6l 

" Well, I don't know how you can think of it all ! " cried the 
woman. " It's just as if I had done it all myself. — A cock ! Why, 
it's just the same as if you'd bought an eight-day clock, for every 
morning the cock will crow at four, so we can be up in good time. 
What do we want with a goose ? I can't make goose-fat and I 
can easily fill my pillow with some soft grass. Run, children, and 
let in the cock." 

" But I haven't got a cock either," said Gudbrand, " for when 
I had got a bit further I became so terribly hungry I had to sell 
the cock for sixpence and get some food to keep body and soul 
together." 

" Heaven be praised you did that ! " cried the woman. " What- 
ever you do, you always do the very thing I could have wished. 
Besides, what did we want with the cock ? We are our own 
masters and can lie as long as we like in the mornings. Heaven 
be praised ! As long as I have got you back again, who manage 
everything so well, I shall neither want cock, nor goose, nor pig, 
nor cows." 

Gudbrand then opened the door. *' Have I won the hundred 
dollars now ? " he asked. And the neighbour was obliged to confess 
that he had. 



THE TWELVE WILD DUCKS 




There was once upon a time a queen 
who was out driving one winter after a fresh 
fall of snow. When she had been driving some 
time her nose began to bleed and she got out of 
the sledge. While she was standing by the fence looking at the 
red blood on the white snow she began thinking that she had 
twelve sons, but no daughters ; so she said to herself: " If I had 
a daughter as white as snow and as red as blood I should not care 
what became of my sons." The words were scarcely out of her 
mouth when a witch came up to her. 

" You shall have a daughter," said she, " and she shall be as 
white as snow and as red as blood. Your sons shall then be 



The Twelve Wild Ducks 163 

mine, but you can keep them with you until the child is 
christened," 

When the time came the queen had a daughter, and she 
was as white as snow and as red as blood, just as the witch 
had promised, and they therefore called her Snow-white-and- 
rosy-red. 

There was great joy in the king's palace and the queen was 
happy beyond description, but when she remembered what she 
had promised the witch she ordered a silversmith to make twelve 
silver spoons, one for each prince ; she also let him make one 
more, which she gave to Snow-white-and-rosy-red. As soon as 
the princess was christened the princes were changed into twelve 
wild ducks which flew away and no more was seen of them. 
Away they were and away they remained. 

The princess grew up tall and fair, but she was often strange 
and sad and no one knew what ailed her. One evening 
the queen also felt very sad, for she was no doubt troubled 
whenever she thought of her sons, so she said to Snow-white-and- 
rosy-red : 

" Why are you so sad, my daughter ? If there is anything you 
want you shall have it." 

" Oh, I think it is so lonely here," said the princess. "Every 
one has brothers and sisters, but I am all alone and have none. 
It is that which makes me so sad." 

"You have had some brothers, my daughter," said the queen. 
** I had twelve sons, who were your brothers, but I gave them all 
away to get you," she said, and then she told her the whole 
story. 

When the princess heard this she had no peace. She must 
and would set out to find her brothers. The queen cried and 
wept, but it was of no avail, for the princess thought she was the 
cause of it all, and at last she left the palace and set out on her 
search. 

She walked and walked so far out in the wide world that no 
one would believe such a frail maiden could walk so far. 



164 The Twelve Wild Ducks 

One day when she had been walking a long, long while in a 
great, big forest she became tired and sat down on a tussock and 
there she fell asleep. She dreamt she went further into the 
forest and came to a small log hut and there she found her 
brothers. Just then she awoke and straight in front of her she 
saw a path in the greensward leading further into the forest. 
She followed this, and after a long while she came to just such a 
little log hut as she had dreamt about. 

When she got inside she found no one there, but there were 
twelve beds, and twelve stools, and twelve spoons, and twelve 
of everything that was in the place. When she saw this she 
became so glad, she had not felt so glad for many years ; 
for she knew at once that her brothers lived there and that 
it was they who owned the beds, the stools, and the spoons. 
She began to make the fire and the beds, and to sweep out 
the room, and cook the food, and to tidy everything as best 
she could. 

After she had done the cooking she had some food herself, but 
she forgot to take her spoon from the table. She then crept under 
the youngest brother's bed and lay down there. 

No sooner had she done this than she heard a whizzing sound 
in the air and all the twelve wild ducks came flying in, but as soon 
as the}' had passed the threshold they at once became princes 
again. 

** How nice and warm it is here 1 " they said. " Heaven bless 
the one who has made our fire and cooked such good food for us." 
And so they each took their silver spoon and sat down to eat. 
But when each had taken his own there was still one left lying 
on the table and it was so like the others that they could not 
tell the difference. They then looked at one another in great 
wonder. 

" It is our sister's spoon," they said, "and if the spoon is here, 
she cannot be far away herself." 

" If it is our sister's spoon and we find her here, she ought to 
be killed ; for she is the cause of all our sufferings," said the eldest 



The Twelve Wild Ducks 165 

of tl33 princes, and this the sister heard as she lay under the 
bed. 

" No," said the youngest," it would be a shame to kill her for 
it ; she cannot be blamed that we suffer. If any one is the cause 
of it, it is our own mother." They then began to search for her, 
high and low, and at last they searched under all the beds, and 
when they came to that of the youngest prince they found her and 
dragged her out. 

The eldest prince again said she ought to be killed, but she 
cried and prayed so pitifully for herself : 

"Oh, pray do not kill me," she said ; "I have been wandering 
about for many years searching for you. If I could save you, I 
would willingly give my life ! " 

" If you'll set us free, you shall live ; for if you will, you can," 
said they. 

" Only tell me how it can be done, and I'll do it, whatever it 
may be," said the princess. 

"You must gather cotton-grass," said the princes, "and this 
you must card and spin and weave ; when you have done that, 
you must cut out and make twelve caps, twelve shirts, and twelve 
handkerchiefs with the cloth, one for each of us ; and while you 
do that, you must neither speak, nor laugh, nor weep. If you can 
do all that, we are saved." 

" But where shall I get the cotton-grass for so many handker- 
chiefs and caps and shirts ? " said their sister. 

" That we will show you," said the princes ; and so they took 
her with them to a great, big moor, which was covered with cotton- 
grass, waving in the wind and glistening in the sun, so that it 
shone like snow a long way off 

The princess had never seen so much before. She set to work 
at once to pluck and gather the best, as fast as she could, and in 
the evening when she came home, she began carding and spinning 
yarn from the down of the cotton-grass. 

Thus all went well for a long time. She gathered the grass 
and carded it, and in the meantime she looked after the house for 



i66 The Twelve Wild Ducks 

her brothers. She cooked their food and made their beds for 
them. In the evening they came flying home as wild ducks, and at 
night they were princes ; but in the morning they flew away 
again, and were wild ducks the whole of the day. 

But then it happened while she was on the moor gathering 
cotton-grass one day — and if I don't make a mistake it was the 
last time she had to go there — that a young king, who governed 
that country, was out shooting and came riding across the moor. 
When he saw her, he stopped and wondered who the beautiful 
maiden could be who was wandering about gathering cotton-grass. 
He asked her, but got no answer, and he then asked her again 
and wondered still more who she could be. 

He took such a fancy to her that he wanted to take her home 
with him to the palace and marry her. He told his servants to 
take her and place her next him on his horse. 

The princess wrung her hands, and made signs to them, point- 
ing to the bags in which she had all her work ; and when the king 
understood that she wanted these with her, he told his servants to 
take the bags with them. 

When the princess saw this, she became contented, for the 
king was both good and handsome, and he was as kind and gentle 
to her as a child to a doll. 

When they came home to the palace, and the old queen, who 
was the king's stepmother, saw Snow-white-and-rosy-red, she 
became so angry and jealous because she was so beautiful, that 
she said to the king : 

" Can't you see that this woman whom you have taken with 
you and want to marry is a witch ; she neither speaks, nor laughs, 
nor weeps." 

The king did not listen to what she said, but married Snow- 
white-and-rosy-red, and they lived in great joy and splendour • 
but for all that she did not forget she had to make the shirts and 
caps for her brothers. 

Before the year was over the young queen had a little prince, 
and this made the old queen still more angry and jealous. In the 



^i^^V Tit- ^ { 



1^^^ 




SHE WAS ON THE MOOR GATHERING COTTON-GKASS 



The Twelve Wild Ducks 169 

night she stole into the room where the queen slept, took the child 
and threw it into the snake-pit ; she then cut the young queen's 
finger and smeared the blood on her mouth and went to the 
king. 

"Come and see," she said, "whom you have taken for your 
queen , she has eaten her own child ! " 

The king then became so distressed that he nearly wept, and 
said : 

" I suppose it must be true, since I have seen it with my own 
eyes, but surely she will not do it again. This time I will spare 
her life." 

Before the next year was out she had another son, and the same 
thing happened again. The king's stepmother became still more 
jealous and angry ; she stole into the queen's bedroom while she 
slept, took her child and threw it into the snake pit, cut the queen's 
finger, smeared the blood round her mouth, and then told the king 
that she had eaten this child also. 

You can hardly imagine how distressed the king became, and 
then he said : 

" I suppose it must be true, since I have seen it with my own 
eyes ; but surely she will not do it again, and I'll spare her life this 
time also." 

Before the following year was over the queen had a daughter, 
whom the old queen also took and threw into the snake-pit. 
While the young queen slept she cut her finger and smeared the 
blood around her mouth, and then went to the king and said : 

" Now come and see if it isn't true what I have said, that 
she is a witch ; for now she has eaten her third child 
also." 

The king's sorrow was so great there was no end to it. He 
could not spare her life any longer, but was obliged to give orders 
that she should be burnt alive. 

When the pile was lighted, and she was about to be placed on 
it, she made signs to the people to take twelve boards and place 
them round the pile. On these she laid all the handkerchiefs, and 



lyo The Twelve Wild Ducks 

caps, and shirts for her brothers ; but the left sleeve was wanting 
in the youngest brother's shirt, for she had not been able to get it 
ready. No sooner was this done, than they heard a whiz and a 
whirr in the air, and the twelve wild ducks came flying across 
from the forest. Each one took his clothes in his bill and 
flew off. 

" You can see now," said the wicked queen to the king, " she 
is really a witch ; make haste and burn her before the pile is 
burnt out." 

"Oh," said the king, "we have plenty of wood ; the forest is 
close at hand. I want to wait a bit, for I should like to see what 
the end of all this will be." 

Just then the twelve princes came riding along the road, all as 
handsome and well-made as one could wish to see ; but the 
youngest prince had a duck's wing instead of a left arm. 

" What does all this mean ? " asked the princes. 

" My queen is to be burnt because she is a witch, and has 
eaten her own children ; " answered the king. 

" She has not eaten her children," said the prince. " Speak 
sister I Now that you have saved us, save yourself! " 

Then Snow-white-and-rosy-red spoke and told them how all 
had happened, that every time a child was born the old queen, 
the king's stepmother, had stolen into her room in the night, 
taken the child from her, and cut her finger, and smeared the 
blood around her mouth. 

The princes then took the king and led him to the snake-pit. 
There lay the three children playing with snakes and toads, and 
finer children you could not see anywhere. The king took them 
with him, and carried them to his stepmother, and asked her what 
punishment she thought ought to be given to any one who could 
be wicked enough to betray an innocent queen and three innocent 
children. 

" He ought to be tied between twelve wild horses, and torn to 
pieces," said the old queen. 

" You have pronounced your own doom, and now you will 




THERE LAY THE THREE CHILDREN PLAYING WITH SNAKES AND TOADS 



The Twelve Wild Ducks 173 

have to submit to it," said the king. And so the wicked old queen 
was tied between twelve wild horses and torn to pieces. 

But Snow-white-and-rosy-red took the king and her children 
and the twelve princes to her parents, and told them all that had 
happened. There was now great joy and gladness over the whole 
kingdom, because the princess was saved, and because she had 
also set free her twelve brothers. 







THE BEAR AND THE FOX 



I. SLIP PINE-ROOT, GRIP FOX-FOOT 



Once upon a time there was a bear, who sat on a sunny hill-side 
taking a nap. Just then a fox came slinking by and saw him. 

"Aha! Have I caught you napping, grandfather? See if I 
don't play you a trick this time 1 " said Reynard to himself. 

He then found three wood-mice and laid them on a stump of a 
tree just under the bear's nose. 

" Boo 1 Bruin ! Peter the hunter is just behind that stump 1 " 
shouted the fox right into the bear's ear, and then took to his 
heels and made off into the wood. 

The bear woke at once, and when he saw the three mice he 
became so angry that he lifted his paw and was just going to 
strike them, for he thought it was they who had shouted in his ear. 



The Bear and the Fox 175 

But just then he saw Reynard's tail between the bushes, and he 
set off at such a speed that the branches crackled under him, 
and Bruin was soon so close upon Reynard that he caught him 
by the right hind leg just as he was running into a hole under a 
pine-tree. 

Reynard was now in a fix ; but he was not to be outwitted, and 
he cried : 

" Slip pine-root, grip fox-foot," and so the bear let go his hold ; 
but the fox laughed far down in the hole, and said : 

" I sold you that time, also, grandfather ! " 

" Out of sight is not out of mind ! " said the bear, who was in 
a fine fury. * 



2. THE BEAR AND THE FOX MAKE A WAGER 

The other morning, when Bruin came trudging across the moor 
with a fat pig, Master Reynard was lying on a stone by the moor- 
side. 

" Good day, grandfather 1 " said the fox. " What nice thing 
have you got there ? " 

** Pork," said the bear. 

" I have got something tasty as well," said the fox. 

" What's that ? " said the bear. 

" It's the biggest bees' nest I ever found," said Reynard. 

" Ah, indeed," said the bear grinning, and his mouth began to 
water ; he thought a little honey would be so nice. " Shall we 
change victuals ? " he said. 

" No, I won't do that," said Reynard. But they made a wager 
about naming three kinds of trees. If the fox could say them 
quicker than the bear, he was to have one bite at the pig ; but if 
the bear could say them quicker, he was to have one suck at the 
bees' nest. The bear thought he would be able to suck all the 
honey up at one gulp. 



176 The Bear and the Fox 

" Well," said the fox, " that's all well and good, but if I win 
3'ou must promise to tear off the bristles where I want to have a 
bite," he said. 

"Well I suppose I must, since you are too lazy yourself ;" 
said the bear. 

Then they began to name the trees : 

" Spruce, fir, pine," growled the bear. His voice was very gruff. 
But all these were only different names of one kind of tree. 

"Ash, aspen, oak," screeched the fox, so that the forest 
resounded. He had thus won the bet, and so he jumped down, 
took the heart out of the pig at one bite and tried to run off. But 
the bear was angry, because he had taken the best bit of the whole 
pig, and seized hold of him by his tail and held him fast. 

"Just wait a bit," said the bear, who was furious. 

" Never mind, grandfather ; if you'll let me go, you shall have 
a taste of my honey," said the fox. 

When the bear heard this, he let go his hold and the fox 
jumped up on the stone after the honey. 

"Over this nest," said Reynard, "I'll put a leaf, and in the 
leaf there is a hole, through which you can suck the honey." He 
then put the nest right up under the bear's nose, pulled away the 
leaf, jumped on to the stone, and began grinning and laughing ; for 
there was neither honey nor honeycomb in the nest. It was a 
wasps' nest, as big as a man's head, full of wasps, and out they 
swarmed and stung the bear in his eyes and ears and on his mouth 
and snout. He had so much to do with scratching them off him, 
that he had no time to think of Reynard. 

Ever since the bear has been afraid of wasps. 



3. THE BEAR AND THE FOX GO INTO PARTNERSHIP 

Omce the fox and the bear made up their minds to have a field in 
common. They found a small clearing far away in the forest, 
where they sowed rye the first year. 



^2^ 




M 



The Bear and the Fox 



179 



"Now we must share and share ahke," said Reynard ; "if you 
will have the roots, I will have the tops," he said. 

Yes, Bruin was quite willing ; but when they had thrashed the 
crop, the fox got all the corn, while the bear got nothing but the 
roots and tares. 

Bruin didn't like this, but the fox said it was only as they had 
agreed. 

" This year I am the gainer," said the fox ; " another year it will 
be your turn ; you can then have the tops and I will be satisfied 
with the roots." 

Next spring the fox asked the bear if he didn't think turnips 
would be the right thing for that year. 

"Yes, that's better food than corn," said the bear ; and the fox 
thought the same. 

When the autumn came the fox took the turnips, but the bear 
onl}'' got the tops. 

The bear then became so angry that he parted company then 
and there with Reynard. 




-^v ^^^^:^V^ 



i8o The Bear and the Fox 



4. REYNARD WANTS TO TASTE HORSEFLESH 

OxE day the bear was 13'ing eating a horse, which he had killed. 
Reynard was about again and came slinking along, his mouih 
watering for a tasty bit of the horse-flesh. 

He sneaked in and out and round about till he came up 
behind the bear, when he made a spring to the other side of the 
carcase, snatching a piece as he jumped across. 

The bear was not slow either ; he made a dash after Reynard 
and caught the tip of his red tail in his paw. Since that time the 
fox has always had a white tip to his tail. 

"Wait a bit, Reynard, and come here," said the bear, "and I'll 
teach you how to catch horses." 

Yes, Reynard was quite willing to learn that, but he didn't 
trust himself too near the bear. 

"When you see a horse lying asleep in a sunny place," said 
the bear, "3'ou must tie yourself fast with the hair of his tail to 
3'our brush, and then fasten your teeth in his thigh," he said. 

Before long the fox found a horse lying asleep on a sunny hill- 
side ; and so he did as the bear had told him ; he knotted and tied 
himself well to the horse with the hair of the tail and then fastened 
his teeth into his thigh. 

Up jumped the horse and began to kick and gallop, so that 
Reynard was dashed against stock and stone, and was so bruised 
and battered, that he nearly lost his senses. 

Ail at once a hare rushed by. " Where are you oft' to in such 
a hurry, Reynard ? " said the hare. 

" Fni having a ride, Bunny 1 " said the fox. 

The hare sat up on his hind legs and laughed till the sides of 



The Bear a\d the Fox 



i8r 



his mouth spht right up to his ears, at the thought of Reynard 
having such a grand ride ; but since then the fox has never 
thought of catching horses again. 

That time it was Bruin who for once had the better of Re3'nard ; 
otherwise they say the bear is as simple-minded as the trolls. 





THE COCK WHO FELL INTO THE 
BREWING-VAT 



OxcE upon a time there was a cock and a hen, who were out in a 
field scratching and scraping and pecking. 

All at once the hen found a barleycorn, and the cock found a 
bur of hops, and so they made up their minds they would make 
some malt and brew beer for Christmas. 

" I plucked the barley and I malted the corn and brewed the 
beer, and the beer is good," cackled the hen. 

" Is the wort strong enough ? " said the cock, and flew up to 
the edge of the vat to taste it ; but when he stooped down to take a 
sip, he began flapping with his wings and fell on his head into the 
vat and was drowned. 



The Cock who Fell into the Brewing Vat 183 

When the hen saw this, she was quite beside herself; she 
flew on to the hearth and began to scream and cry : 

" Got, got, got, drowned ! got, got, got, drowned ! " and th.is 
she went on crying all the time and would not stop. 

" What is the matter with you. Mother Tup, since you are 
crying and grieving so ? " asked the hand-quern. 

*' Oh, Father Tup has fallen into the brewing-vat and got 
crowned and there he lies dead ! " said the hen ; " that's the reason 
I cry and grieve." 

"Well, if I can't do any thing else, I will grind and groan," 
said the hand-quern, and began grinding as fast as it could. 

When the stool heard this, it said : 

" What's the matter with you, quern, since you groan and 
grind so fast? " 

"Oh, Father Tup has fallen into the brewing-vat and got 
drowned ; Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth, crying and griev- 
ing ; therefore I grind and groan," said the hand-quern. 

" Well, if I can't do anything else I shall creak," said the stool, 
and began creaking and cracking. 

This the door heard, so it said : 

•'What's the matter with you? Why are you creaking, 
stool ? " 

" Oh, Father Tup has fallen into the brewing-vat and got 
drowned ; Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and griev- 
ing, and the hand-quern is grinding and groaning ; therefore I 
creak and crack and crackle," said the stool. 

*' Well, if I can't do anything else, I'll bang and slam and 
whine and whistle," said the door, and began opening and shutting 
and slamming and banging till it went through one's bones and 
marrow to hear it. 

This the dust-bin heard. 

" Why are you slamming and banging like that, door ? " said 

the bin. 

•' Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned ; 



104 The Cock who Fell i\to the Brewing Vat 

Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving ; the 
hand-quern is grinding and groaning ; the stool is crealving and 
cracking; therefore I keep slamming and banging," said the 
<]oor. 

" Well, if I can't do anything else, I'll fume and smoke," said 
llic dust-bin, and began fuming and smoking, and sending the dust 
up in clouds all over the room. 

This the hay-rake saw, as it stood peeping in through the 
window. 

"Why are you raising the dust like that, dust-bin?" asked 
the rake. 

" Oh, Father Tup fell into the brevv^ing-vat and got drownec ; 
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving, the hand- 
quern is grinding and groaning, the stool is creaking and crack- 
ing; the door is slamming and banging; therefore I keep fuming 
and smoking," said the dust-bin. 

" Well, if I can't do anything else, Fll rake and rend," said the 
rake, and began rending and raking. 

This the aspen-tree saw, as it looked on. 

"Why do 3-ou rend and rake like that, rake?" said the 
tree. 

" Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned ; 
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving; the 
hand-quern is grinding and groaning ; the stool is creaking and 
cracking ; the door is slamming and banging ; the dust-bin is fuming 
and smoking ; therefore I keep rending and raking," said the 
rake. 

" Well, if I can't do anything else," said the aspen, " I will 
quiver and quake." 

This the birds noticed. " Why do you quiver and quake like 
that ? " said the birds to the tree. 

"Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned; 
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving ; the 
hand-quern is grinding and groaning; the stool is creaking and 










THE MAN BEGAN I'ULLING THE BESOM TO PIECES, AND HIS WIFE TOOK ONE 

LADLEFUL OF PORRIDGE AFTER ANOTHER AND DAUBED IT ALL 

OVER THE PLACE 



The Cock who Fell into the Brewing Vat 187 

cracking; the door is slamming and banging; the dust-bin is fuming 
and smoking ; the rake is rending and raking ; therefore I quiver 
and quake," said the aspen. 

*' Well, if we can't do anything else we will pluck off our 
feathers," said the birds, and began pecking and plucking till 
the feathers flew about the farm like snow. 

The farmer stood looking on, and when he saw the feathers 
flying about he asked the birds : 

"Why are you plucking otf your feathers like that, birds ? " 

" Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned ; 
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving ; the 
hand-quern is grinding and groaning ; the stool is creaking and 
cracking ; the door is slamming and banging ; the dust-bin is 
fuming and smoking ; the rake is rending and raking ; the aspen 
is quivering and quaking : therefore we keep pecking and pluck- 
ing," said the birds. 

** Well, if I can't do anything else I will pull the besoms 
to pieces," said the farmer, and began tugging and pulling the 
besoms to pieces, so that the twigs flew about, both east and 
west. 

His wife was boiling the porridge for supper when she saw 
this. 

" Why are you pulling the besoms to pieces, husband ? " said 
she. 

" Oh, Father Tup fell into the brewing-vat and got drowned ; 
Mother Tup is sitting on the hearth crying and grieving ; the 
hand-quern is grinding and groaning ; the stool is creaking and 
creaking ; the door is slamming and banging ; the dust-bin is 
fuming and smoking; the rake is rending and raking; the aspen 
is quivering and quaking; the birds are pecking and plucking off 
their feathers : therefore I am pulling the besom to pieces," said 
the man. 

" Well, then, I'll daub the walls all over with porridge," she 
said. And she set about it there and then, and took one ladleful 



i88 The Cock who Fell into the Brewing Vat 

after another and smeared the porridge all over the walls, so that 
no one could see what they were made of. 

Then they kept the burial feast of the cock who fell into the 
brewing-vat. And if 3-ou don't believe it, you had better go there 
and taste both the beer and the porridge. 







'"""^f&'^.f,.'', - 




THE COCK 

AND 
THE FOX 



There was once a cock who 
stood on a dunghill, crowing and flapping 
his wings. 

A fox just then came strolling by. 

" Good-day," said the fox ; " that's 
a very fine crow, but can you stand on 
one leg and crow with your eyes shut, 
as your father did? " 



190 The Cock and the Fox 

" I can easily do that," said the cock, and stood on one 
leg and crowed. But he only shut one eye, and then he 
strutted about flapping his wings as if he h.ad done something 
grand. 

" That was very nice," said the fox ; " almost as nice as when 
the parson chants in church ; but can you stand on one leg and 
crow with both your eyes shut at ^he same time? I scarcely 
think you can," said Reynard. " No ; that father of yours, he was 
really wonderful." 

" Oh, I can do that as well," said the cock, and began to crow 
standing on one leg and closing both his eyes, when all of a 
sudden the fox made a dash at him, caught him by the neck, and 
slung him across his back, and before he had finished his crow 
Reynard had set off with him for the forest as quickly as he 
could. 

When they got under an old pine-tree Reynard threw the 
cock down, put his paw on his breast, and was going to help himself 
to a tasty bit. 

" You are not so pious as your father, Reynard," said the 
cock; "he always crossed himself and said grace before his 
meals." 

Reynard thought he ought to show a little piety, so he let go 
his hold and was just going to say grace when up flew the cock 
and settled in the tree above. 

" I'll be even with you yet," said the fox to himself and went 
off. He soon returned with a couple of chippings which the 
woodcutters had left behind. 

The cock kept peeping and peering to see what it could 
be. 

" What have you got there ? " he said. 

" Oh, some letters I have got from the Pope in Rome," said 
the fox. " Won't you help me to read them, for I am getting rather 
shortsighted myself?" 

" I would with pleasure, but I dare not just now," said the 



The Cock and the Fox 



191 



cock ; " there is a man coming along with a gun ; I see him from 
behind the tree — I see him ! " 

When the fox heard the cock prating about a man with a gun 
he took to his heels as fast as he could. 

That time it was the cock who outwitted Reynard. 




/y ) 




THE THREE PRINCESSES IN THE 
BLUE MOUNTAIN 

TiiFRE were once upon a time a king and queen who had no 
children, and they took it so much to heart that they hardly ever 
had a happy moment. One day the king stood in the portico and 
looked out over the big meadows and all that was his. But he felt 
he could have no enjoyment out of it all, since he did not know 



The Three Princesses ix the Blue INlorxTAix 193 

what would become of it after his time. As he slood there ponder- 
ing, an old beggar woman came up to him and asked him for a trifle 
in heaven's name. She greeted him and curtsied, and asked what 
ailed the king, since he looked so sad. 

" You can't do anything to help me, my good woman," said the 
king; "it's no use telling you." 




" I am not so sure about that," said the beggar woman. " \'cry 
little is wanted when luck is in the way. The king is thinking 
that he has no heir to his crown and kingdom, but he need not 
mourn on that account," she said. " The queen shall have three 
daughters, but great care must be taken that they do not come 
out under the open heavens before they are all fifteen years old ; 
otherwise a snowdrift will come and carry them away." 

N 



194 'iHi'^ Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 

Wlien the time came the queen had a beautiful baby girl ; the 
3'ear after she had another, and the third 3'ear she also had a girl. 




The king and queen were glad beyond all measure ; but 
although the king was very happy, he did not forget to set a 
watch at the palace door, so that the princesses should not get out. 










As they grew up they became both fair and beautiful, and alt 
went well with them in every way. Their only sorrow was that 
they were not allowed to go out and play like other children. 
For all they begged and prayed their parents, and for all they 
besought the sentinel, it was of no avail ; go out they must not 
before they were fifteen years old, all of them. 

So one day, not long before the fifteenth birthda}^ of the 
youngest princess, the king and the queen were out driving, and 
the princesses were standing at the window and looking out. The 



The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 195 

sun was shining, and ever^-thing looked so green and beautiful that 
the}' felt the}' must go out, happen what might. So they begged 
and entreated and urged the sentinel, all three of them, that he 
should let them down into the garden. " He could see for himself 
how warm and pleasant it was ; no snow}' weather could come on 
such a day." Well, he didn't think it looked much like it either, 
and if they must go they had better go, the soldier said ; but it 
must only be for a minute, and he himself would go with them 
and look after them. 

When they got down into the garden they ran up and 
down, and filled their laps with flowers and green leaves, the 
prettiest they could find. At last they could manage no more, 
but just as they were going indoors they caught sight of a large 
rose at the other end of the garden. It was many times prettier 
than any they had gathered, so they must have that also. But 
just as they bent down to take the rose a big dense snowdrift 
came and carried them away. 

There was great mourning over the whole country, and the 
king made known from all the churches that any one who could 
save the princesses should have half the kingdom and his golden 
crown and whichever princess he liked to choose. 

You can well understand there were plenty who wanted to 
gain half the kingdom, and a princess into the bargain ; so there 
were people of both high and low degree who set out for all 
parts of the country. But there was no one who could find the 
princesses, or even get any tidings of them. 

When all the grand and rich people in the country had had 
their turn, a captain and a lieutenant came to the palace, and 
wanted to try their luck. The king fitted them out both with 
silver and gold, and wished them success on their journey. 

Then came a soldier, who lived with his mother in a little 
cottage some way from the palace. He had dreamt one night that 
he also was trying to find the princesses. When the morning 
came he still remembered what he had dreamt, and told his mother 
about it. 



190 The Three Pkinxesses in the Blue Mountain 

•' Some witchery must have got hold of you," said the woman, 
" but you must dream the same thing three nights running, else 
there is nothing in it." And the next two nights the same thing 
happened ; he had the same dream, and he felt he must go. So 
he washed himself and put on his uniform, and went into the 
kitchen at the palace. It was the day after the captain and the 
lieutenant had set out. 

" You had better go home again," said the king, " the prin- 
cesses are beyond 3'our reach, I should say ; and besides I have 



''^'^^;0^M ^^9^^m'<£.^^y/ 




THE SOLDIER S MOTHER LIVED IX A LITTLE COTTAGE. 



spent so much money on outfits that I have nothing left to-day. 
You had better come back another time." 

"If I go, I must go to-day," said the soldier. "Money I do 
not want ; I only need a drop in my flask and some food in my 
wallet," he said; "but it must be a good walletful — as much 
meat and bacon as I can carry." 

Yes, that he might have if that was all he wanted. 

So he set off, and he had not gone many miles before he over- 
took the captain and the lieutenant. 

"Where are you going? " asked the captain, when he saw the 
man in uniform. 







•j.'^^A'''^ 



THE PRINCESSES BEGGED AND KNTKICATEO THE SENTINEL TO LE 



The Three Prixxesses in the Blue IMouxtaix 199 

"I am going to try if I can find the princesses," answered tiie 
soldier. 

" So are we," said the captain, " and since your errand is the 
same you may keep company with us, for if we don't find them, 
you are not Hkely to find them either, my lad," said he. 

When they had gone awhile the soldier left the high road, and 
took a path into the forest. 

" Where are you going? " said the captain; "it is best to follow 
the high road." 

" That may be," said the soldier, "but this is my way." 

He kept to the path, and when the others saw this they turned 
round and followed him. Away they went further and further, 
far across big moors and along narrow valleys. 

At last it became lighter, and when they had got out of the 
forest altogether they came to a long bridge, which they had to 
cross. But on that bridge a bear stood on guard. He rose on 
his hind legs and came towards them, as if he wanted to eat 
them. 

" What shall we do now?" said the captain. 

" They say that the bear is fond of meat," said the soldier, and 
then he threw a fore quarter to him, and so they got past. But 
when they reached the other end of the bridge, they saw a lion 
which came roaring towards them with open jaws as if he wanted 
to swallow them. 

" I think we had better turn to right-about, we shall never be 
able to get past him alive," said the captain. 

" Oh, I don't think he is so very dangerous," said the soldier; 
" I have heard that lions are very fond of bacon, and I have half a 
pig in my wallet : " and then he threw a ham to the lion, who began 
eating and gnawing, and thus they got past him also. 

In the evening they came to a fine big house. Each room was more 
gorgeous than the other ; all was glitter and splendour wherever 
they looked ; but that did not satisfy their hunger. The captain 
and the lieutenant w^ent round rattling their mone}', and wanted to 
buy some food ; but the}^ saw no people nor could they find 



200 The Three Pkixcesses ix the Blue Moixtaix 

a crumb of anything in the house, so the soldier offered them some 
food from his wallet, which they were not too proud to accept, nor 
did they want any pressing. They lielped themselves of what he 
had as if they had never lasted food before. 

The next day the captain said they would have to go out 
shooting and try to get something to live upon. Close to the 
house was a large forest where there were plenty of hares and 
birds. The lieutenant was to remain at home and cook the re- 
mainder of the food in the soldier's wallet. In the meantime the 




IN THE EVENING THEY CAME TO A BIG FINE HOUSE 

captain and the soldier shot so much game that they were hardly 
able to carry it home. When they came to the door they found 
the lieutenant in such a terrible plight that he was scarcely able to 
open the door to them. 

"What is the matter with you?" said the captain. The 
lieutenant then told them that as soon as they were gone, a tiny, 
little man with a long beard, who went on crutches, came in and 
asked so plaintively for a penny ; but no sooner had he got 
it than he let it fall on the floor, and for all he raked and scraped 
with his crutch he was not able to get hold of it, so stiff and stark 
was he. 

" I pitied the poor, old body," said the lieutenant, " and so I bent 
down to pick up the penn}', but then he was neither stiff nor stark 
any longer. He began to belabour me with his crutches till very 
soon I. was unable to move a limb." 

" You ought to be ashamed of yourself ! you, one of the king's 



Tiiii TiiNKK Princesses in the Blue Mocxtain' 201 

officers, to let an old cripple give you a thrashing, and tlien tell 
people of it into the bargain ! " said the captain. " Pshaw ! to- 
morrow I'll stop at home and then you'll hear another story." 

The next day the lieutenant and the soldier went out shooting 
and the captain remained at home to do the cooking and look after 
the house. But if he fared no worse, he certainly fared no better 
than the lieutenant. In a little while the old man came in and 
asked for a penn3^ He let it fall as soon as he got it ; gone 
it was and could not be found. So he asked the captain to help 
him to find it, and the captain, without giving a thought, bent 
down to look for it. But no sooner was he on his knees than the 
cripple began belabouring him with his crutches, and every time 
the captain tried to rise, he got a blow which sent him reeling. 
When the others came home in the evening, he still lay on 
the same spot and could neither see nor speak. 

The third day the soldier was to remain at home, while the other 
two went out shooting. The captain said he must take care of 
himself, " For the old fellow will soon put an end to you, my lad," 
said he. 

"Oh, there can't be much life in one if such an old crook can 
take it," said the soldier. 

They were no sooner outside the door, than the old man 
came in and asked for a penny again. 

" Money I have never owned," said the soldier, " but food I'll 
give you, as soon as it is ready," said he, " but if we are to get it 
cooked, you must go and cut the wood." 

"That I can't," said the old man. 

" If you can't, you must learn," said the soldier. " I will soon 
show you. Come along with me down to the wood-shed." There 
he dragged out a heavy log and cut a cleft in it, and drove 
in a wedge till the cleft deepened. 

" Now you must lie down and look right along the cleft, and 
you'll soon learn how to cut wood," said the soldier. " In the mean- 
time ni show you how to use the axe." 

The old man was not sufficiently cunning and did as he was 



202 The Three Prinxesses in the Blue Mountain 

told ; he lay down and looked steadily along the log. When the 
soldier saw that the old man's beard had got well into the cleft, he 
struck out the wedge ; the cleft closed and the old man was caught 
by the beard. The soldier began to beat him with the axe handle, 
and then swung the axe round his head, and vowed that he would 
split his skull if he did not tell him, there and then, where the 
princesses were. 

"Spare my life, spare my life, and I'll tell you!" said the 
old man. ** To the east of the house there is a big mound ; on top 
of the mound you must dig out a square piece of turf, and then you 
will see a big stone slab. Under that there is a deep hole through 
which you must let yourself down, and you'll then come to another 
world where you will find the princesses. But the way is long and 
dark and it goes both through fire and water." 

When the soldier got to know this, he released the old man, 
who was not long in making off. 

When the captain and lieutenant came home they were sur- 
prised to find the soldier alive. He told them what had happened 
from first to last, where the princesses were and how they should 
find them. The}' became as pleased as if they had already found 
them, and when they had had some food, they took with them a 
basket and as much rope as they could find, and all three set off to 
the mound. There they first dug out the turf just as the old man 
had told them, and underneath they found a big stone slab, which it 
took all their strength to turn over. They then began to measure 
how deep it was ; they joined on ropes both two and three times, 
but they were no nearer the bottom the last time than the first. 
At last they had to join all the ropes they had, both the coarse and 
fine, and then they found it reached the bottom. 

The captain w^as, of course, the first who wanted to descend ; 
** But when I tug at che rope you must make haste to drag me up 
again," he said. He found the way both dark and unpleasant, but 
he thought he would go on as long as it became no worse. But 
all at once he felt ice cold water spouting about his cars ; he became 
frightened to death and began tugging at the rope. 



The Tiikee Princesses in the Blue Motntain 205 

The lieutenant was the next to try, but it fared no better with 
him. No sooner had he got through the flood of water than 
he saw a blazing fire yawning beneath him, wliich so frightened 
him that he also turned back. 

The soldier then got into the bucket, and down he went 
through fire and water, right on till he came to the bottom, where 
it was so pitch dark that he could not see his hand before 
him. He dared not let go the basket, but went round in a circle, 
feeling and fumbling about him. At last he discovered a gleam 
of light far, far away like the dawn of day, and he went on in that 
direction. 

When he had gone a bit it began to grow light around him, 
and before long he saw a golden sun rising in the sky and every- 
thing around him became as bright and beautiful as if in a fairy 
world. 

First he came to some cattle, which were so fat that their hides 
glistened a long way off, and when he had got past them he came 
to a fine, big palace. He walked through many rooms without 
meeting anybody. At last he heard the hum of a spinning wheel, 
and when he entered the room he found the eldest princess sitting 
there spinning copper yarn; the room and everything in it was 
of brightly polished copper. 

" Oh dear, oh dear ! what are Christian people doing here ? " 
said the princess. " Heaven preserve you ! what do you want ? " 

" I want to set you free and get you out of the mountain," said 
the soldier. 

'* Pray do not stay. If the troll comes home he will put an end 
to you at once ; he has three heads," said she. 

" I do not care if he has four," said the soldier. " I am here, 
and here I shall remain." 

" Well, if you will be so headstrong, I must see if I can help 
you," said the princess. 

She then told him to creep behind the big brewing-vat which 
stood in the front hall ; meanwhile she would receive the troll and 
scratch his heads till he went to sleep. 



2o6 The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 

**And when I go out and call the hens you must make haste 
and come in," she said. ** But you must first try if you can swing 
the sword which is lying on the table." No, it was too heavy, he 
could not even move it. He had then to take a strengthening 
draught from the horn, which hung behind the door ; after that he 
was just able to stir it, so he took another draught and then he 
could lift it. At last he took a right, big draught and he could 
swing the sword as easily as anything. 

All at once the troll came home ; he walked so heavily that 
the palace shook. 

" Ugh, ugh ! I smell Christian flesh and blood in my house," 
said he. 

"Yes," answered the princess, "a raven flew past here just 
now and in his beak he had a human bone, which he dropped down 
the chimney ; I threw it out and swept and cleaned up after it, but 
I suppose it still smells." 

" So it does," said the troll. 

" But come and lie down and I'll scratch 3^our heads," said the 
princess ; " the smell will be gone by the time you wake." 

The troll was quite willing, and before long he fell asleep and 
began snoring. When she saw he was sleeping soundly she 
placed some stools and cushions under his heads and went to call 
the hens. The soldier then stole into the room with the sword 
and with one blow cut all the three heads off the troll. 

The princess was as pleased as a fiddler, and went with the 
soldier to her sisters, so that he could also set them free. First of 
all they went across a courtyard and then through many long 
rooms till they came to a big door. 

"Here you must enter; here she is," said the princess. 
When he opened the door he found himself in a large hall, where 
everything was of pure silver ; there sat the second sister at a 
silver spinning-wheel. 

"Oh, dear; oh, dear I" she said. "What do you want 
here ? " 

" I want to set you free from the troll," said the soldier. 



The Thkee Princesses in the Blue Mountain ^07 

"Pray do not stay, but go," said the princess. " If he finds 
you here he will take your life on the spot." 

•' That would be awkward— that is if I don't take his first," said 
the soldier. 

"Well, since you will stay," she said; "you will have to 
creep behind the big brewing-vat in the front hall. But you 
must make haste and come as soon as you hear me calling the 
hens." 

First of all he had to try if he was able to swing the troll's 
sword, which lay on the table ; it was much larger and heavier 
than the first one ; he was hardly able to move it. He then took 
three draughts from the horn and he could then lift it, and when 
he had taken three more he could handle it as if it were a rolling- 
pin. 

Shortly afterwards he heard a heavy, rumbling noise that was 
quite terrible, and directly afterwards a troll with six heads 
came in. 

"Ugh, ugh !" he said as soon as he got his noses inside the 
door. " I smell Christian blood and bone in my house." 

" Yes, just think ! A raven came flying past here with a thigh- 
bone, which he dropped down the chimney," said the princess. 
" I threw it out, but the raven brought it back again. At last I got 
rid of it and made haste to clean the room, but I suppose the smell 
is not quite gone," she said. 

" No, I can smell it well," said the troll ; but he was tired and put 
his heads in the princess's lap and she went on scratching them till 
the}' all fell a-snoring. Then she called the hens, and the soldier 
came and cut off all the six heads as if they were set on cabbage 
stalks. 

She was no less glad than her eldest sister, as you may 
imagine, and danced and sang ; but in the midst of their jc}' they 
remembered their youngest sister. They went with the soldier 
across a large courtyard and after walking through many, many 
rooms he came to the hall of gold, where the third sister was. 

She sat at a golden spinning-wheel spinning gold yarn, and 



2o8 The Three Prinxesses ix the Blue Mouxtaix 

the room from ceiling to floor glistened and glittered till it hurt 
one's eyes. 

" Heaven preserve both you and me, what do you want here ? " 
said the princess. "Go, go, else the troll will kill us both." 

"Just as well two as one," answered the soldier. The princess 
cried and wept ; but it was all of no use, he must and would 
remain. Since there was no help for it he would have to try if he 
could use the troll's sword on the table in the front hall. But he 
was only just able to move it ; it was still larger and heavier than 
the other two swords. 

He then had to take the horn down from the wall and take three 
draughts from it, but was only just able to stir the sword. When 
he had taken three more draughts he could lift it, and when he had 
taken another three he swung it as easily as if it had been a 
feather. 

The princess then settled with the soldier to do the same as 
her sisters had done. As soon as the troll was well asleep she 
would call the hens, and he must then make haste and come in and 
put an end to the troll. 

All of a sudden they heard such at hundering, rambling noise, 
as if the walls and roof were tumbling in. 

" Ugh ! Ugh ! I smell Christian blood and bone in my 
house," said the troll sniffing with all his nine noses. 

"Yes, you never saw the like ! Just now a raven flew past 
here and dropped a human bone down the chiminey. I threw it 
out, but the raven brought it back and this went on for some 
time," said the princess ; but she got it buried at last, she said, 
and she had both swept and cleaned the place, but she supposed 
it still smelt. 

" Yes, I can smell it well," said the troll. 

"Come here and lie down in my lap and I will scratch your 
heads," said the princess. " The smell will be all gone when you 
awake." 

He did so, and when he was snoring at his best she put stools 
and cushions under the heads so that she could get away to call the 



The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 209 

hens. The soldier then came in in his stockinged feet and struclc 
at the troll, so that eight of the heads fell off at one blow. But 
the sword was too short and did not reach far enough ; the ninth 
head woke up and began to roar. 

" Ugh ! Ugh ! I smell a Christian." 

" Yes, here he is," answered the soldier, and before the troll 
could get up and seize hold of him the soldier struck him another 
blow and the last head rolled along the floor. 

You can well imagine how glad the princesses became now 
that they no longer had to sit and scratch the trolls' heads ; they 
did not know how they could do enough for him who had saved 
them. The youngest princess took off her gold ring and knotted it in 
his hair. They then took with them as much gold and silver as 
they thought they could carry and set off on their way home. 

As soon as they tugged at the rope the captain and the 
lieutenant pulled up the princesses, the one after the other. But 
when they were safely up the soldier thought it was foolish of 
him not to have gone up before the princesses, for he had not very 
much belief in his comrades. He thought he would first try them, 
so he put a heavy lump of gold in the basket and got out of the 
way. When the basket was half-way up they cut the rope and 
the lump of gold fell to the bottom with such a crash that the 
pieces flew about his ears. 

" Now we are rid of him," they said, and threatened the 
princesses with their life if they did not say that it was they who 
had saved them from the trolls. They were forced to agree to 
this, much against their will, and especially the youngest princess ; 
but life was precious, and so the two who were strongest had their 
way. 

When the captain and lieutenant got home with the princesses 
you may be sure there were great rejoicings at the palace. The 
king was so glad he didn't know which leg to stand on ; he brought 
out his best wine from his cupboard and wished the two officers 
welcome. If they had never been honoured before they were 
honoured now in full measure, and no mistake. They walked and 

o 



210 The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 

strutted about the whole of the day, as if they were the cocks of 
the walk, since they were now going to have the king for father- 
in-law. For it was understood they should each have whichever 
of the princesses they liked and half the kingdom between them. 
They both wanted the youngest princess, but for all they prayed 
and threatened her it was of no use ; she would not hear or listen 
to either. 

They then asked the king if they might have twelve men to 
watch over her ; she was so sad and melancholy since she had 
been in the mountain that they were afraid she might do some- 
thing to herself. 

Yes, that they might have, and the king himself told the watch 
they must look well after her and follow her wherever she went 
and stood. 

They then began to prepare for the wedding of the two eldest 
sisters ; it should be such a wedding as never was heard or 
spoken of before, and there was no end to the brewing and 
the baking and the slaughtering. 

In the meantime the soldier walked aiid strolled about down 
in the other world. He thought it was hard that he should see 
neither people nor daylight any more ; but he would have to do 
something, he thought, and so for many days he went about 
from room to room and opened all the drawers and cupboards 
and searched about on the shelves and looked at all the fine things 
that were there. At last he came to a drawer in a table, in 
which there lay a golden key ; he tried this key to all the locks 
he could find, but there was none it fitted till he came to a little 
cupboard over the bed, and in that he found an old rusty whistle. 
" I wonder if there is any sound in it," he thought, and put it to 
his mouth. No sooner had he whistled than he heard a 
whizzing and a whirring from all quarters, and such a large 
flock of birds swept down, that they blackened all the field in 
-which they settled. 

"What does our master want to-day ? " they asked. 

If he were their master, the soldier said, he would like to know 



The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 211 

if they could tell him how to get up to the earth again. No, none 
of them knew anything about that ; " But our mother has not yet 
arrived," they said ; " if she can't help you, no one can." 

So he whistled once more, and shortly heard something 
flapping its wings far away, and then it began to blow so hard 
that he was carried away between the houses like a wisp of hay 
across the courtyard, and if he had not caught hold of the fence 
he would no doubt have been blown away altogether. 

A big eagle — bigger than you can imagine — then swooped 
down in front of him. 

" You come rather sharply," said the soldier. 

" As you whistle so I come," answered the eagle. So he asked 
her if she knew any means by which he could get away from the 
world in which they were. 

"You can't get away from here unless you can fly," said the 
eagle, *' but if you will slaughter twelve oxen for me, so that I can 
have a really good meal, I will try and help you. Have you got 
a knife ? " 

" No, but I have a sword," he said. When the eagle had 
swallowed the twelve oxen she asked the soldier to kill one more 
for victuals on the journey. " Every time I gape you must be 
quick and fling a piece into my mouth," she said, " else I shall 
not be able to carry you up to earth." 

He did as she asked him and hung two large bags of meat 
round her neck and seated himself among her feathers. The 
eagle then began to flap her wings and off they went through the 
air like the wind. It was as much as the soldier could do to hold 
on, and it was with the greatest difficulty he managed to throw 
the pieces of flesh into the eagle's mouth every time she 
opened it. 

At last the day began to dawn, and the eagle was then almost 
exhausted and began flapping with her wings, but the soldier was 
prepared and seized the last hind quarter and flung it to her. 
Then she gained strength and brought him up to earth. When 
she had sat and rested a while at the top of a large pine-tree she 



212 The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 

set off with him again at such a pace that flashes of Hghtning 
were seen both by sea and land wherever they went. 

Close to the palace the soldier got off and the eagle flew home 
again, but first she told him that if he at any time should want 
her he need only blow the whistle and she would be there at 
once. 

In the meantime everything was ready at the palace, and the 
time approached when the captain and lieutenant were to be 
married with the two eldest princesses, who, however, were not 
much happier than their youngest sister ; scarcely a day passed 
without weeping and mourning, and the nearer the wedding-day 
approached the more sorrowful did they become. 

At last the king asked what was the matter with them ; he 
thought it was very strange that they were not merry and happy 
now that they were saved and had been set free and were going 
to be married. They had to give some answer, and so the 
eldest sister said they never would be happy any more unless 
they could get such checkers as they had played with in the blue 
mountain. 

That, thought the king, could be easily managed, and so he 
sent word to all the best and cleverest goldsmiths in the country 
that they should make these checkers for the princesses. For all 
they tried there was no one who could make them. At last all 
the goldsmiths had been to the palace except one, and he was an 
old, infirm man who had not done any work for many years 
except odd jobs, by which he was just able to keep himself 
alive. To him the soldier went and asked to be apprenticed. 
The old man was so glad to get him, for he had not had an 
apprentice for many a day, that he brought out a flask from his 
chest and sat down to drink with the soldier. Before long the 
drink got into his head, and when the soldier saw this he 
persuaded him to go up to the palace and tell the king that he 
would undertake to make the checkers for the princesses. 

He was ready to do that on the spot ; he had made finer and 
grander things in his day, he said. When the king heard there 




^ ."^."VV 



THE OLD GOLDSMITH WENT TO THE PALACE AND TOLD THE KING HE WOULD 
UNDERTAKE TO MAKE THE CHECKERS FOR THE PRINCESSES 



The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 215 

was some one outside who could make the checkers he was not 
long in coming out. 

" Is it true what you say, that you can make such checkers as 
my daughters want ? " he asked. 

" Yes, it is no lie," said the goldsmith ; that he would answer 
for. 

" That's well ! " said the king. " Here is the gold to make 
them with ; but if you do not succeed you will lose your life, since 
you have come and offered yourself, and they must be finished in 
three days." 

The next morning when the goldsmith had slept off the effects 
of the drink, he was not quite so confident about the job. He 
wailed and wept and blew up his apprentice, who had got him 
into such a scrape while he was drunk. The best thing would be 
to make short work of himself at once, he said, for there could be 
no hope for his life ; when the best and grandest goldsmiths could 
not make such checkers, was it likely that he could do it ? 

** Don't fret on that account," said the soldier, " but let me 
have the gold and I'll get the checkers ready in time ; but I m.ust 
have a room to myself to work in," he said. This he got, and 
thanks into the bargain. 

The time wore on, and the soldier did nothing but lounge 
about, and the goldsmith began to grumble, because he would not 
begin with the work. 

" Don't worry yourself about it," said the soldier, " there is 
plenty of time ! If you are not satisfied with what I have promised 
you had better make them yourself." The same thing went on 
both that day and the next ; and when the smith heard neither 
hammer nor file from the soldier's room the whole of the last day, 
he quite gave himself up for lost ; it was now no use to think any 
longer about saving his life, he thought. 

But when the night came on the soldier opened the window 
and blew his whistle. The eagle then came and asked what he 
wanted. 

" Those gold checkers, which the princesses had in the blue 



2i6 The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 

mountain," said the soldier ; " but you'll want something to eat 
first, I suppose ? I have two ox carcases lying ready for you in 
"the hay-loft yonder ; you had better finish them," he said. When 
the eagle had done she did not tarry, and long before the sun rose 
she wav. back again with the checkers. The soldier then put them 
under his bed and lay down to sleep. 

Early next morning the goldsmith came and knocked at his 
•door. 

" What are you after now again ?" asked the soldier. "You 
rush about enough in the day, goodness knows ! If one can- 
not have peace when one is in bed, whoever would be an 
apprentice here ? " said he. 

Neither praying nor begging helped that time ; the goldsmith 
must and would come in, and at last he was let in. 

And then you may be sure, there was soon an end to his 
wailing. 

But still more glad than the goldsmith were the princesses, 
when he came up to the palace with the checkers, and gladdest of 
all was the youngest princess. 

" Have you made them yourself? " she asked. 
" No, if I must speak the truth, it is not I," he said, " but my 
apprentice, who has made them." 

** I should like to see that apprentice," said the princess. In 
fact all three wanted to see him, and if he valued his life, he 
would have to come. 

He was not afraid, either of women-folk or grand-folk, said the 
soldier, and if it could be any amusement to them to look at his 
rags, they should soon have that pleasure. 

The youngest princess recognised him at once ; she pushed 
the soldiers aside and ran up to him, gave him her hand, and said : 
" Good day, and many thanks for all you have done for us. 
It is he who freed us from the trolls in the mountain," she said 
to the king. " He is the one I will have 1 " and then she pulled 
off his cap and showed them the ring she had tied in his hair. 
It soon came out how the captain and lieutenant had behaved, 




< 



The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain 



219' 



and so they had to pay the penalty of their treachery with their 
lives, and that was the end of their grandeur. But the soldier got 
the golden crown and half the kingdom, and married the youngest 
princess. 

At the wedding they drank and feasted both well and long ;. 
for feast they all could, even if they could not find the princesses, 
and if they have not yet done feasting and drinking they must be 
at it still. 




'VxW 



THE WORLD'S REWARD 

There was once a man who went into the wood to cut trees for 
hurdles. But he did not find any which were as long and straight 
as he wanted them to be, till he got to a rocky place, where he 
heard groans and moans, as of some one in the pangs of death. 
So he went to see who it was that wanted help. He found that 
the groans came from under a big slab among the boulders. It 
was so heavy that it would take many men to lift it. But the man 
went into the wood and cut down a tree, which he used as a lever 
to lift the slab with. From under it there crawled a dragon, who 
then wanted to eat the man. But the man said he had saved the 
dragon's life, and it was base ingratitude to want to eat him. 

" May be ! " said the dragon. " But you can easily understand 
that I am hungry, having lain here a hundred years and tasted no 
food ; besides, that is the reward one gets in the world." 

The man begged and prayed for his life, and so they agreed 
that the first being they met should decide between them. If he 
was of a different opinion to the dragon the man should not lose 
his life, but if he thought the same as the dragon, the dragon 
should eat the man. 

The first they met was an old dog, who was walking along the 
road under the hillside. They spoke to him and asked him to be 
their judge. 



The World's Reward 221 

"Goodness only knows ! I have served my master faithfully 
since I was a pup," said the dog ; " I have watched many a night 
and many a time while he has been sound asleep, and I have 
saved the house and chattels from fire and thieves more than once ; 
but now, when I can neither see nor hear any longer, he wants to 
shoot me ; so I ran away, and I knock about from place to place, 
sniffing and begging my way till one day I shall die of hunger. 
No, that is the reward one gets in this world," said the dog. 

" Then I'll eat you ! " said the dragon, and was going to 
swallow the man ; but the man spoke so well for himself, and 
begged so hard for his life, that the dragon agreed that the next 
being they met should decide between them ; and if he said the 
same as the dragon and the dog, the dragon should eat him, and 
have a good meal of human flesh, but if not, the man should get 
off with his life. 

An old horse then came dragging himself along the road just 
under the hillside. They spoke to him, and asked him to judge 
between them. Yes, that he would. 

" Well, I have served my master as long as I was able to draw 
and carry," said the horse. " I have slaved and worked for him 
till the sweat streamed from every hair, and I have worked faith- 
fully till I have become stiff and stark, and worn-out with work 
and age ; now I am fit for nothing, and am not worth my keep, 
and so I am to have a bullet, says my master. No, that is the 
reward one gets in this world," said the horse. 

" Then I'll eat you ! " said the dragon, and opened its jaws wide 
to swallow the man. He again begged and prayed hard for his 
life, but the dragon said he wanted a mouthful of human flesh 
and was so hungry that he could not wait any longer. 

'• Look, there is some one coming, just as if he were sent to be 
our judge," said the man, as Reynard came slinking towards them 
between the boulders. " Good things come in threes," said the man ; 
" let us ask him also, and if he judges like the others, you shall 
eat me on the spot." 

" Very well," said the dragon. He had also heard that all good 



222 The World's Reward 

things came in threes, and so he would agree to that. The man 
spoke to the fox as he had done to the others. 

" Yes, yes," said the fox ; but he took the man aside. 

" What will you give me, if I free you from the dragon ? " he 
whispered in the man's ear. 

" You shall come home with me and be lord and master over 
my fowls and geese every Thursday night," said the man. 

"This is a case which can only be settled on the spot itself, 
my dear dragon," said the fox. " I cannot get into my head how 
such a large and mighty animal as yourself could find room under 
that slab" 

" Well, I was lying up here sunning myself," said the dragon, 
*' when an avalanche came down the mountain and turned the slab 
over me." 

"That is very possible," said Reynard; "but I cannot under- 
stand it, nor will I believe it, till I see it," said he. 

So the man said they had better try it, and the dragon slipped 
into the hole again, and just at that moment the man pulled away 
the lever, and the slab shut down the dragon again with a 
bang. 

"You may now lie there till doomsday," said the fox, "since 
you had no pity on the man who saved you." The dragon yelled 
and groaned and prayed for himself, but the other two went their 
way. 

The next Thursday evening the fox set out for the farm to help 
himself from the hen-roost, and hid himself behind a heap of poles, 
which were standing there. When the girl went to give the fowls 
their food, Reynard sneaked in, so that she did not notice him ; 
and no sooner was she gone than he killed enough for eight days, 
and ate till he could not move. When the girl came back in the 
morning, the fox lay sleeping and snoring in the morning sunshine, 
with all his four legs stretched out ; he was as sleek and round as 
a big sausage. 

The girl ran to fetch her mistress, and she and all the others 
■came back with sticks and poles, and began thrashing Reynard till 




THIS IS A CASE WHICH CAN ONLY BE SETTLED ON THE SPOT ITSELF, 
MY DEAR DRAGON," SAID THE FOX 



The World's Reward 



22 = 



they almost killed him ; but at last when they thought they had 
done for him, Reynard found a hole in the floor, through which he 
slipped out and set off limping towards the wood. 

" Oh dear, oh dear ! " said Reynard ; " but I suppose that is the 
reward one gets in this world ! " 




^" -r^%>,'^^ ^, 



THE COMPANION 

There was once upon a time a peasant lad, who dreamt he was 
going to marry a princess far away in a strange country, and she 
was as red and white as milk and blood, and so rich that there 
was no end to her riches. When he awoke, he thought she still 
stood alive before him, and she was so sweet and beautiful that he 
felt he could not exist if he did not get her ; so he sold what he 
had and set out in the world to find her. 

He went far and further than far, and in the winter he came to 
a country where all the high roads were straight and had no turn- 
ings. When he had walked straight on for a quarter of a year, he 
came to a town, and outside the church door there lay a large 
block of ice in which stood a dead body ; and all the people who 
were on their way to church spat on it as they passed it. The 
lad wondered at this, and when the parson came out of the church, 
he asked him what it all meant. 

"He was a great evil-doer," said the parson, "and was 
punished for his ungodliness, and has been set up there to be 
mocked and scoffed at." 

" What did he do ? " asked the lad. 

"When he was alive, he was a vintner," said the parson, 
"and he mixed his wine with water." The lad did not think this 
a very wicked deed ; " and when he has paid for it with his life," 




WHEN THE PARSON CAME OUT OF THE CHURCH, THE LAD 
ASKED HIM WHAT IT ALL MEANT 



The Companion 229 

said he, " they might as well let him lie in Christian ground and 
leave him in peace after death." But the parson said that could 
not be permitted on any account, for they would have to get 
people to break him out of the ice ; and money would be wanted 
to buy burial ground from the church, the grave-digger would 
want payment for the grave, the owner of the church for the bells, 
the clerk for the singing, and the parson for casting earth on the 
coffin. 

" Do you think there is anybody who will pay all this for an 
executed sinner ? " he asked. 

"Yes," said the lad. If he could only get him underground, 
he would pay all the funeral expenses out of the little he 
had. 

The parson was still unwilling to bury him ; but when the lad 
came with two men, and asked him in their presence to perform 
the ceremony, he answered that he dared not refuse. So they 
broke the vintner out of his block of ice and put him in Christian 
ground ; they tolled the bells, and sang over him, and the parson 
cast the earth upon the coffin, and they drank of the funeral ale 
till they both cried and laughed. When the lad had paid all the 
expenses he had not many pennies left in his pocket. 

He set out on the road again. But he had not gone far, before 
a man came after him and asked him if he did not think it was 
lonely to be travelling by himself. 

No, the lad did not find it lonely for he had always something 
to think about, he said. 

The man then asked if he did not want a servant. 

" No," said the lad, " I am accustomed to be my own servant, 
and therefore I do not want any ; but if I wanted one ever so 
much, I could not afford to have one, for I have no money to pay 
for his food or wages." 

" You want a servant ; that I know better than you," said the 
man, "and you will want one you can rely upon in life and death. 
If you will not have me as your servant you can take me as a 
companion. I promise you, that you will find me useful and it 



230 The Companion 

shall not cost you a penn}-. I'll pay my own way, and food and 
clothing you need not trouble about." 

Well, on those terms he would willingly have him for a com- 
panion, and after that they travelled together, the man mostly 
going on in front and showing him the way. When they had 
travelled a long way over hills and dales through many countries 
they came to a mountain that lay across the road. 

There the companion knocked and asked them to open. The 
rock opened for them, and when they came far into the mountain a 
troll woman came and offered them a stool. 

" Won't you take a seat ? You must be tired," she said. 

"Take a seat 3'ourself," said the man. So she had to sit 
down ; but when she had done so, she stuck fast to the stool, for it 
was such that it did not let go anything that came near it. In 
the meantime they walked about inside the mountain and the 
companion looked around him till he saw a sword which hung 
over the door. 

He wanted this very much, and if he could have it he promised 
the troll woman that he would let her loose. 

" No," she cried, " ask me for anything else ! You can have 
everything but that, for it is my Three-Sister-Sword ! " There 
were three sisters who owned it together. 

" Well, then you must sit there till the end of the world," said 
the man ; but when she heard this she said that he could have it 
if he would set her free. So he took the sword and went away 
with it, but he left her sitting on the stool all the same. 

When they had gone far across some bare mountains and 
broad hills, they came to another mountain that lay across the 
road. There the companion knocked and asked them to open. It 
happened as before ; the rock opened for them and when they got 
far into the mountain there came a troll woman with a stool and 
asked them to sit down ; they might be tired, she said. 

" Sit down yourself," said the companion ; and she fared just as 
her sister had fared. When she sat down on the stool, she stuck 
fast to it. In the meantime the lad and the companion walked 



The Comi'axiox 231 

about inside the mountain and the companion opened all the cup- 
boards and drawers till he found what he searched for. It was a 
ball of gold yarn. He wanted this very much, and he promised 
the troll woman that if she would give it him he would let her 
loose. She said he could have all she possessed, but she would 
not part with that for it was her Three-Sister-Ball. But when she 
heard that she would have to sit there till the day of judgment if 
he did not get it, she said he might take it after all if only he 
would set her free. The companion took the ball, but he let her 
sit where she was. 

So they went for many days over hills and through forests, till 
they came to a mountain that lay across the road. The same 
thing happened as before ; the companion knocked, the rock 
opened, and inside the mountain a troll woman came with a 
stool and asked them to sit down, for they might be tired. 

But the companion said, "Sit down yourself! " and there she 
sat. They had not gone through many rooms before the com- 
panion saw an old hat, which hung on a peg behind the door. 
He wanted that very much, but the troll woman did not want 
to part with it, for it was her Three-Sister-Hat, and if she gave 
it away she would be most unhappy. But when she heard that 
she would have to sit there till the end of the world if he did 
not get it, she said he might take it if he only let her loose. 
No sooner had the companion got the hat than he told her to 
remain sitting where she was, just like her sisters. 

After a long time they came to a fjord. Then the companion 
took the ball of gold yarn, and threw it so hard against the 
mountain on the other side of the fjord that it came back to 
him again ; and when he had thrown it across a few times it 
became a bridge. They went across the fjord on this bridge, 
and when they got to the other side the man asked the lad to 
wind up the yarn again as fast as he could. " For if we do not 
wind it up quickly the troll women will be upon us and tear us 
to pieces." The lad wound up the yarn as quickly as he could, 
and just as he got to the end the troll women came rushing along. 



232 The Companion 

They dashed into the water so that the foam surged round them, 
and tried to snatch the end ; but they could not manage to get 
hold of it, and so they were drowned in the fjord. 

When they had walked on for some days, the companion said : 

"We shall soon come to the castle where the princess lives 
about whom you dreamt, and when we get there you must go 
in and tell the king your dream, and whom it is you seek." 

When they got there the lad did so, and he was well received 
by the king. He got a room for himself and one for his com- 
panion, and when the time for dinner came he was invited to the 
king's own table. When he saw the princess he recognised her at 
once, and saw that she was the one about whom he had dreamt, 
and whom he should have. He told her his errand, and she 
answered she liked him and would willingly have him, but first he 
must go through three trials. So when they had dined she gave 
him a pair of gold scissors, and said : 

" The first trial is that you take these and keep them, and give 
me them back to-morrow at dinner-time. It is not a difficult trial, 
I should think," she said, with a grin, " but if you cannot do that 
you will lose your life. That is the law here, and you will be 
broken on the wheel and your head stuck on a stake, just like the 
suitors whose skulls you see outside the windows," for there hung 
human skulls round about the palace, like crows on the fences in 
the autumn. 

** There's not much difficulty in that," thought the lad. But 
the princess was so merry and boisterous and romped so much 
with him that he forgot both the scissors and himself; and while 
they were in the midst of the romping she stole the scissors from 
him without his knowing it. When he got up to his room in the 
evening and told his companion what had happened, and what the 
princess had said about the scissors which she gave him to keep, 
the companion said : 

"Of course, you have the scissors she gave you ? " 

He felt in all his pockets, but there were no scissors, and the 
lad became greatly troubled when he found they were gone. 




5 O 



^ a 



The Companion 235 

" Well, well, you must be patient, and I'll try and get them 
back for you," said the companion. He then went down to the 
stable, where there was a big, fat goat which belonged to the 
princess, and which could fly many times more quickly through 
the air than it could run over the ground. 

Then he took the Three-Sister-Sword, and gave the goat a blow- 
between the horns with it, and said : 

" When does the princess ride to her sweetheart to-night ?" 

The goat bleated and said he dared not tell, but when he got 
another blow he said the princess would be there at eleven 
o'clock. The companion put on the Three-Sister-Hat and became 
invisible, and then waited till she came. The princess took some 
salve which she had in a big horn, and rubbed the goat with 
it, and said : 

"Through air, through air, over roofs and spires, over land, 
over water, over hills, over dales, to my sweetheart, who awaits 
me in the mountain to-night ! " 

Just as the goat set off the companion jumped up behind, and 
away they went like the wind through the air. They were not 
long on the way. All of a sudden they came to a mountain ; 
there she knocked, and in they rushed to the troll, who was her 
sweetheart. 

" Another suitor has arrived and wants to marry me, my dear. 
He is young and handsome, but I will have none other than 
you," she said, making up to the troll. " So I put him on trial, 
and here are the scissors he was to look after. Now you must 
take care of them," she said. Then the}' laughed heartily, as 
if they already had the lad on wheel and stake. 

" Yes, I shall mind them and look after them, and I shall 
sleep in the arms of my bride when the raven is picking the 
bones of the lad," said the troll. 

Then he placed the scissors in an iron chest with three locks 
to it; but just as he dropped the scissors into the chest, the com- 
panion took them. No one could see him, for he had on the 
Three-Sister-Hat ; and the troll thus locked the chest on nothing. 



236 The Companion 

The keys he hid in the hole of one of his back teeth, in which he 
had the toothache. It would be a difficult job to find them there, 
he thought. 

Soon after midnight the princess set out for the palace again. 
The companion sat behind her on the goat, and they were not 
long in getting home. 

Next day the lad was asked to dinner at the king's table, but 
the princess gave herself such mincing airs, and was so stuck up 
and proud, she would scarcely look at the lad. When they had 
dined she put on her Sunday expression, and said with a simper : 

" I suppose you have the scissors I gave you to keep yester- 
day?" 

" Yes, I have ! Here they are ! " said the lad, taking them out 
and banging them on the table, so that it bounded from the 
floor. 

The princess could not have been more angry had he struck 
her in the face with them ; but, notwithstanding this, she made 
herself pleasant and gentle, and said : 

" Since you have looked after the scissors so well, it will not 
be difficult for you to keep my ball of gold yarn. You can give it 
me back to-morrow at dinner-time ; but if you haven't got it you 
will lose your life. That is the law here." 

" There's not much difficulty about that," thought the lad, and 
took the ball and put it in his pocket. But she began again to 
romp and play with him, so that he forgot both himself and the 
ball ; and when they were in the midst of the romping, she stole 
it from him and let him go. 

When he got up to his room and told all they had said and 
done, the companion said : 

" Of course you have the ball she gave you ? " 

" Yes, that I have," said the lad and felt in his pocket ; but no, 
he had no ball, and he became so troubled again that he did not 
know what to do with himself. 

" Well, be patient ! I must try and get it for you," said the 
companion. He then took the sword and the hat and set off" to a 



The Compaxiox 237 

smith and got a hundredweight of iron welded on to the sword. 
When he came to the stable he gave the goat such a blow between 
the horns that it staggered, and then he asked it when the princess 
would ride to her sweetheart that night. 

"At twelve o'clock," bleated the goat. 

The companion put on the Three-Sister-Hat again and waited. 




THEN THEY LAUGHED HEARTILY, AS IF THEY ALREADY 
HAD THE LAD ON THE STAKE 

till she came rushing in with the horn and rubbed the goat with 
the salve. She then said the same as the first time. 

"Through air, through air, over roofs and spires, over land, 
over water, over hills, over dales, to my sweetheart, who awaits 
me in the mountain to-night." 

Just as they set oft the companion jumped up behind on the 
goat and away they went like the wind through the air. 

As soon as they came to the troll mountain she knocked 



-238 The Companion 

three times and in they rushed to the troll, who was her sweet- 
heart. 

"Wherever did you put the scissors I gave you yesterday, my 
dear ? " said the princess ; " my suitor had got them back and gave 
them to me again." 

"That can't be possible," said the troll, for he had locked the 
■chest with three locks and hidden the keys in the hole in his back 
tooth. But when they unlocked the chest they saw the troll had 
no scissors there. The princess then told him she had given the 
suitor her ball of gold yarn. 

" Here it is," she said, " for I took it from him again without 
his knowing it. But what had we better think of since he can do 
such tricks ? " 

The troll did not quite know, but when they had thought it 
over a bit they decided to make a big fire and burn the ball ; they 
would then be sure he would not get it. Just as she threw the 
ball into the fire the companion stood ready and caught it. Neither 
of them saw it, for he had the Three-Sister-Hat on. When the 
princess had been with the troll awhile and the day began to 
dawn she set off to the palace again ; the companion sat behind 
her on the goat and they got home both quickly and well. 

When the lad was asked to dinner the companion gave him 
the ball. The princess was still more stuck up and proud than on 
the day before, and when they had finished she pouted and said : 

" I suppose I may have back my ball which I gave you to keep 
yesterday ? " 

"Yes," said the lad, "that you may. Here it is!" and he 
threw it down with such force that the table gave a jump and the 
king leapt into the air. 

The princess turned as white as a ghost, but she soon recovered 
herself and said that was well done ; and now there was only 
one little trial left. 

" If you are so clever that you can bring me to-morrow at 
dinner-time what I am now thinking about you shall have me and 
keep me," she said. 



The Companion 259 

The lad felt as if he had been condemned to death, for he 
thought it was impossible to know what she was thinking about 
and still more impossible to get it. When he came to his room 
he was so excited he could not keep still. The companion said if 
he would be quiet he would find a way out of the difficulty as he 
had done before, and at last the lad was pacified and lay down to 
sleep. 

In the meantime the companion rushed off to the smith and 
had two hundredweight of iron welded to the sword ; when that 
was done he went to the stable and struck the goat between the 
horns with it so that it staggered from wall to wall. 

"When is the princess going to her sweetheart to-night?" 
said he. 

" At one o'clock," bleated the goat. 

When the time came the companion stood in the stable with 
the Three-Sister-Hat on, and when the princess had rubbed the 
goat with the salve and uttered the same words as before that they 
should fly to her sweetheart, who was waiting for her in the 
mountain, she set off through the air and wind with the companion 
again behind her. But this time he was not so gentle with the 
princess, for every now and then he thumped her so that he almost 
maimed her. When they came to the mountain she knocked at 
the gate, which opened and they rushed in to her sweetheart. 

When she got there she began to moan and groan and said she 
did not know if the weather could have been so bad, but both she 
and the goat had been beaten by some one and she was sure she must 
be black and blue all over, so badly had she fared on the way. She 
then told him how her suitor had given her back the ball also, but 
neither she nor the troll could make out how it had happened. 

" But do you know what I have thought of now ? " she said. 

No, that the troll could not tell. 

"Well, I have told him to bring me by dinner-time to-morrow 
that which I was thinking of — and that was your head ! Do you 
think he can get that, my dear ? " said the princess, and began 
fondling the troll. 



240 The Companion 

** I don't think he can," said the troll ; that he would take 
his oath on ; so he laughed and roared worse than a bogie ; and 
both the troll and the princess thought the lad was more likely to 
adorn the wheel and stake, with the ravens to peck his eyes out, 
than to get hold of the troll's head. 

When it got towards morning she began to get ready to set 
out for the palace ; but she was afraid, she said. She thought 
there was some one after her and she dared not go home alone ; 
the troll must go with her. Yes, he would, so he brought out his 
goat, for he had one just like the princess's and he rubbed it well 
between the horns with the salve. When he had seated himself 
the companion got up behind him and off they went through the 
air to the palace ; but on the way the companion struck the troll 
and the goat time after time, and gave them blow after blow with 
his sword, till at last they sank lower and lower and at last they 
nearly sank into the ocean across which they were passing. 
When the troll saw that things were going so badly he hastened 
on to the palace with the princess, but stopped to see that she got 
in well and safely. But just as she shut the door behind her the 
companion cut off the troll's head and ran up to the lad's room 
with it. 

" Here is that which the princess thought of," said he. 

The lad was, as you can imagine, in high spirits, and when 
he was asked down to dinner next day and they had finished 
eating, the princess became as blithe as a lark. 

" I suppose you have that which I thought of," said she. 

" Indeed, I have," said the lad, and pulled out the head from 
under the tail of his coat and struck the table with it, so that the 
table and everything on it fell over. 

The princess became as pale as a corpse, but she could not 
deny that that was what she had thought of, and now he might 
have her for his wife as she had promised. 

The wedding was then kept and there was great rejoicing over 
the whole kingdom. The companion took the lad aside and told 
him that he must shut his eyes and pretend to sleep on the 



The Companion 241 

wedding night, but if he valued his Hfe, and would obey him, 
he must not have a wink of sleep before he had rid the princess of 
the troll-skin, with which she was covered. He would have to 
flog it off her with a rod made of nine new birch besoms and strip 
her of it in three tubs of milk. First he was to scrub her in a tub 
of last year's whey, then he was to rub her in sour milk, and then 
rinse her in a tub of new milk. The besoms lay under the bed, and 
the tubs he had placed in the corner, so everything was ready for 
him. 

Yes, the lad promised that he would obey him, and do what he 
had said. When they went to bed in the evening the lad pre- 
tended to sleep. The princess raised herself on her elbow and 
tickled him under the nose to see if he slept, but the lad seemed 
to sleep soundly. She then pulled him by his hair and beard, but 
he slept like a log, as she thought. Then she dragged out from 
under her pillow a large butcher's knife, and was going to cut his 
head off, when the lad sprang up, struck the knife out of her 
hand, and seized hold of her by the hair. He flogged her with 
the birch rods till they were worn out and there was not a twig 
left of them. When this was done, he threw her into the tub 
of whey, and then he saw what sort of a creature she was. 
She was as black as a raven all over her body, but when he 
had scrubbed her in the whey and rubbed her with the sour milk, 
and rinsed her in the new milk, the troll-skin was gone and she 
was as gentle and beautiful as she had never been before. 

The next day the companion said they must set off home. 
The lad was quite willing and the princess also, for her dowry had 
been ready a long time. During the night the companion had 
brought all the gold and silver and valuables, which had belonged 
to the troll in the mountain, to the palace ; and when they were 
ready to set out the next day, they found the courtyard so full of 
things they could hardly move. That dowry was worth more 
than the king's realm, and they could not tell how they were 
to take it with them. But the companion knew a way out of 
every difficulty ; there were six goats belonging to the troll, which 

Q 



2.12 



The Companion 



could all fly through the air ; and these they loaded so heavily 
with gold and silver, that they had to walk along the ground, 
as they were unable to rise in the air and fly, and what the goats 
could not carry they had to leave behind at the palace. 

So they travelled far, and further than far, till the goats at last 
became so tired and worn out that they were unable to go 
any further. The lad and the princess did not know what to do, 
but when the companion saw they could not get on, he took 
the whole dowry on his back and the goats on the top, and carried 
them all till there was only a mile left to the lad's home. Then 
the companion said, " Now I must leave you, I cannot remain with 
you any longer." But the lad would not part with him ; he would 
not lose him for little or much. So he went with them another half 
mile, but further he could not go, and when the lad begged and 
prayed him to stop with him, or at least be present at the home- 
coming at his father's, the companion said no, that he could not. 
The lad then asked him what he owed him for all his help and 
assistance. If it was to be anything, it must be the half of every- 
thing he got during the next five years, said the companion. 

Yes, that he should have. 

When he was gone the lad left all his riches behind him 
and went home empty handed. 

They then had such a home-coming festival, that it was heard 
and spoken of over seven kingdoms, and when it was at an end, 
the winter had set in ; and then the}^ began to cart home all the 
gold and silver, both with the goats and the twelve horses which 
his father had. 

In five years the companion came back for his share. The man 
had then everything divided into two equal parts. 

" But there is one thing which you have not divided," said the 
companion. 

"What is that?" said the man. "I thought I had divided 
everything." 

"You have a child," said the companion; "you must divide 
that also in two." 




NOW THEY MUST PART FOR EVER," SAID THE COMPANION 



The Companion 



M5 



Yes, that was true enough. So he took the sword ; but just as 
he Hfted it to cleave the child in two, the companion seized 
the point of the sword from behind, so that he could not strike. 

"Are you not glad that I stopped you from striking that 
blow ? " he said. 

"Yes, I have never been so glad," said the man. 

" Well, I was just as glad when you lifted me out of the block 
of ice. Keep everything you have ! I do not want anything, for I 
am a floating spirit." He was the vintner who had stood in the 
block of ice outside the church door, and whom all had spat upon ; 
and he had been his companion and helped him because he had 
given all he had to provide him peace and get him buried in 
Christian soil. He had been allowed to follow him for a year, and 
that was over when they parted the last time. But he had been 
allowed to see him again, and now they must part for ever, for he 
heard the bells of heaven ringing for him. 






/ ^^. 







NANNY 

WHO WOULDN'T GO 

HOME TO SUPPER 

There was once upon a time a 
woman who had a son and a 
goat. The son was called Espen 
and the goat they called Nanny. 
But they were not good friends, 
and did not get on together, for 
the goat was perverse and way- 
ward, as goats will be, and she 
would never go home at the right 
time for her supper. So it hap- 
pened one evening that Espen 
went out to fetch her home, and 
when he had been looking for her 

a while he saw Nanny high, high up on a crag : 

" My dear Nanny, you must not stay any longer up there ; 

you must come home now, it is just supper time. I am so hungry 

and want my supper." 



Nanny who wouldn't go Home to Supper 247 

" No, I shan't," said Nanny, " not before I have finished the 
grass on this tussock, and that tussock— and this and that 
tussock." 

" Then I'll go and tell mother," said the lad. 

" That you may, and then I shall be left to eat in peace," said 
Nanny. 

So Espen went and told his mother. 

" Go to the fox and ask him to bite Nanny," said his mother. 

The lad went to the fox. "My dear fox, bite Nanny, for 
Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry, and I want my 
supper," said Espen. 

" No, I don't want to spoil my snout on pig's bristles and 
goat's beard," said the fox. 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

" Well, go to the wolf," said his mother. 

The lad went to the wolf: "My dear wolf, tear the fox, for 
the fox won't bite Nanny, and Nanny won't come home in time. I 
am so hungry, and I want my supper." 

" No," said the wolf, " I won't wear out my paws and teeth on 
a skinny fox." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

"Well, go to the bear and ask him to slay the wolf," said the 
mother. 

The lad went to the bear. " My dear bear, slay the wolf, for 
the wolf won't tear the fox, and the fox won't bite Nann}^, and 
Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry and want 
my supper." 

"No, that I won't," said the bear; "I don't want to wear out 
my claws for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

" Well, go to the Finn and ask him to shoot the bear." 

The lad went to the Finn. " My dear Finn, shoot the bear, 
for the bear won't slay the wolf, the wolf won't tear the fox, 
the fox won't bite Nanny, and Nanny won't come home in time. I 
am so hungry and want my supper." 



248 Nanny who wouldn't go Home to Supper 

" No, I will not," said the Finn ; " I am not going to shoot away 
my bullets for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

" Well go to the fir," said his mother, " and ask it to crush 
the Finn." 

The lad went to the fir-tree : " My dear fir, crush the Finn, 
for the Finn won't shoot the bear, the bear won't slay the wolf, 
the wolf won't tear the fox, the fox won't bite Nanny, and 
Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry and want my 
supper." 

" No, I will not," said the fir, " I am not going to break my 
boughs for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

" Well, go to the fire," said his mother, " and ask it to burn 
the fir." 

The lad went to the fire : " My dear fire, burn the fir, for the 
fir won't crush the Finn, the Finn won't shoot the bear, the bear 
won't slay the wolf, the wolf won't tear the fox, the fox won't bite 
Nanny, and Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry and 
want my supper." 

"No, I will not," said the fire, " I am not going to burn myself 
out for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

" Well, go to the water, and ask it to quench the fire," she 
said. 

The lad went to the water. " My dear water, quench the fire, 
for the fire won't burn the fir, the fir won't crush the Finn, the 
Finn won't shoot the bear, the bear won't slay the wolf, the wolf 
won't tear the fox, the fox won't bite Nanny, and Nanny won't 
come home in time. I am so hungry and want my supper." 

" No, I will not," said the water, " I am not going to waste my- 
self for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

"Well, go to the ox," said she, "and ask him to drink up the 
water." 



Nanny who wouldn't go Home to Supper 249 

The lad went to the ox : " My dear ox, drink up the water, 
for the water won't quench the fire, the fire won't burn the fir, the 
fir won't crush the Finn, the Finn won't shoot the bear, the bear 
won't slay the wolf, the wolf won't tear the fox, the fox won't bite 
Nanny, and Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry and 
want my supper." 

" No, I will not," said the ox. " I'm not going to burst myself 
for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

" Well, go to the yoke," said she, " and ask it to throttle the 
ox." 

The lad went to the yoke. " My dear yoke, throttle the ox, 
for the ox won't drink the water, the water won't quench the fire, 
the fire won't burn the fir, the fir won't crush the Finn, the Finn 
won't shoot the bear, the bear won't slay the wolf, the wolf won't 
tear the fox, the fox won't bite Nanny, and Nanny won't come 
home in time. I am so hungry and want my supper." 

" No, I will not," said the yoke. " I'm not going to break 
myself in two for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

" Well, go to the axe," said she, " and tell it to split the 
yoke." 

The lad went to the axe. " My dear axe, split the yoke, for 
the yoke won't throttle the ox, the ox won't drink the water, the 
water won't quench the fire, the fire won't burn the fir, the fir 
won't crush the Finn, the Finn won't shoot the bear, the bear 
won't slay the wolf, the wolf won't tear the fox, the fox won't bite 
Nanny, and Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry 
and want my supper." 

" No, I will not," said the axe. " I am not going to blunt my 
edge for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

" Well, go to the smith," said she, " and ask him to hammer 
the axe." 

The lad went to the smith. " My dear smith ! hammer the 



250 Nanny who wouldn't go Home to Supper 

axe, for the axe won't split the yoke, the yoke won't throttle the 
ox, the ox won't drink the water, the water won't quench the fire, 
the fire won't burn the fir, the fir won't crush the Finn, the Finn 
won't shoot the bear, the bear won't slay the wolf, the wolf won't 
tear the fox, the fox won't bite Nanny, and Nanny won't come 
home in time. I am so hungry and want my supper." 

"No, I will not," said the smith. "I'll not burn my coals and 
wear out my sledge-hammers for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 

"Well, go to the rope," said she, "and ask it to hang the 
smith." 

The lad went to the rope. " My dear rope, hang the smith, 
for the smith won't hammer the axe, the axe won't split the yoke, 
the yoke won't throttle the ox, the ox won't drink the water, the 
water won't quench the fire, the fire won't burn the fir, the fir won't 
crush the Finn, the Finn won't shoot the bear, the bear won't slay 
the wolf, the wolf won't tear the fox, the fox won't bite Nanny, 
and Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry and want 
my supper." 

" No, I will not," said the rope. " I'm not going to break in 
two for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother, 

" Well, go to the mouse," said she, "and ask her to gnaw the 
rope." 

The lad went to the mouse. " My dear mouse, gnaw the 
rope, for the rope won't hang the smith, the smith won't hammer 
the axe, the axe won't split the yoke, the yoke won't throttle the 
ox, the ox won't drink the water, the water won't quench the fire, 
the fire won't burn the fir, the fir won't crush the Finn, the Finn 
won't shoot the bear, the bear won't slay the wolf, the wolf won't 
tear the fox, the fox won't bite Nanny, and Nanny won't come home 
in time. I am so hungry and want my supper." 

" No, I will not," said the mouse. " I'm not going to wear out 
my teeth for that." 

So the lad went and told his mother. 



Nanny who wouldn't go Home to Supper 251 

" Well, go to the cat," said she, " and ask her to catch the 
mouse." 

The lad went to the cat. " My dear cat, catch the mouse, for 
the mouse won't gnaw the rope, the rope won't hang the smith, the 
smith won't hammer the axe, the axe won't split the yoke, the 




yoke won't throttle the ox, the ox won't drink the water, the 
water won't quench the fire, the fire won't burn the fir, the fir 
won't crush the Finn, the Finn won't shoot the bear, the bear 
won't slay the wolf, the wolf won't tear the fox, the fox won't bite 
Nanny, and Nanny won't come home in time. I am so hungry 
and want my supper." 



252 Nanny who wouldn't go Home to Supper 

" Yes, but give me a drop of milk for my kittens, and then " 

said the cat. 

Yes, that she should have. So the cat caught the mouse, and 
the mouse gnawed the rope, and the rope hanged the smith, and 
the smith hammered the axe, and the axe split the yoke, and the 
yoke throttled the ox, and the ox drank the vi^ater, and the water 
quenched the fire, and the fire burned the fir, and the fir crushed 
the Finn, and the Finn shot the bear, and the bear slew the wolf, 
and the wolf tore the fox, and the fox bit Nanny, and Nanny took 
to her heels, scampered home, and ran against the barn wall and 
broke one of her legs. 

"M — a — h — a — h!" bleated the goat. There she lay, and if 
she isn't dead she is still limping about on three legs. But Espen 
said it served her right, because she would not come home in time 
for supper that day. 



THE LAD WITH THE BEER KEG 

Once upon a time there was a lad who had served a long time 
with a man north of Dovrefjeld. This man was a master at 
brewing beer, and it was so wonderfully good that the like of it was 
not to be found anywhere. When the lad was going to leave and 
the man was to pay him the wages he had earned he would not 
have anything but a keg of the Christmas beer. That he got and 
off he went with it, and he carried it both far and long. But the 
longer he carried the keg the heavier it got, and so he began to 
look round to see if any one were coming with whom he could 
drink, so that the beer might get less and the keg lighter. 

After a long time he met an old man with a long beard. 

" Good day ! " said the man. 

" Good day ! " said the lad. 

" Where are you going ? " said the man. 

" I'm looking for some one to drink with me, so that I can get 
my keg lightened," said the lad. 

" Can't you drink with me just as well as with any one else ? " 
said the man. " I have travelled far and wide, so I am both tired 
and thirsty," 

" Well, why not ? " said the lad. " But where do you come 
from, and who are you ? " said he. 



254 The Lad with the Beer Keg 

" I am the Lord and I come from heaven," said the man. 

" I will not drink with you," said the lad, " for you make such 
a difference between people in this world, and divide everything 
so unjustly, that some become rich and some poor. No, I will 
not drink with you," said he, and trudged off again with his 
keg. 

When he had gone a bit on the way the keg again became so 
heavy that he could not carry it any longer unless some one came 
to drink with him and lessen the beer in the keg. He then met 
an ugly, bony man, who came rushing along. 

** Good day ! " said the man. 

" Good day ! " said the lad. 

** Where are you going ? " said the man. 

" Oh, I'm looking for some one to drink with me, so that I can 
lighten my keg," said the boy. 

" Can't you drink just as well with me as with any one else ? " 
said the man. " I have travelled far and wide and a drop of beer 
will do an old body good," said he. 

" Yes, why not ? " said the lad ; " but who are you and where do 
you come from ? " he asked. 

** 1 ? Oh, I am well known. I am the Devil, and I come from 
hell," said the man. 

" No," said the lad, " 3'ou only torture and plague people, and 
whenever there is a misfortune they always say it is your fault. No, 
I will not drink with you," said the lad. So he went far and further 
than far with his beer keg, till he felt it growing so heavy he 
could not carry it any further. He began to look round again if 
some one were not coming with whom he could drink and so lighten 
his keg. 

After a long time there came a man who was so thin and 
shrivelled it was a wonder his bones could hang together. 

*' Good day ! " said the man. 

** Good day ! " said the lad. 

** Where are you going ? " said the man, 

*' I'm looking to see if I can find some one to drink with me," said 



The Lad with the Beer Keg 255 

the lad, " so as to lighten my keg a little ; it is getting so heavy to 
carry," said he. 

" Can't you just as well drink with me as with any one else ? " 
said the man. 

" Yes ; why not ? " said the lad ; "but who are you ? " 

" They call me Death," said the man. 

" I will drink with you," said the lad, and he put down the 







^ .>.0«W»-S"^\A, 



"THEY CALL ME DEATH, SAID THE MAN 



keg and began to pour out the beer into a bowl. " You are a 
trustworthy man, for you treat all alike, both rich and poor." 

So he drank his health, and Death thought it was a splendid 
drink ; and as the lad did not begrudge him, they drank in 
turn, so the beer got less and the keg lighter. At last Death 
said : 



256 The Lad with the Beer Keg 

" I have never known drink vv^hich tasted better and did me 
so much good as the beer you have given me. I feel as if I 
had been born anew. I don't know what good I can do you 
in return." When he had bethought himself a while he said 
that the keg should never get empty, no matter how much they 
drank of it ; and the beer that was in it should become a healing 
draught, so that the lad should cure the sick better than any 
doctor. Death also said that when the lad came into a sick 
room he would always be there and show himself to him, and 
it should be a sure sign to him that when Death sat at the 
foot of the bed he would be able to cure the sick with a 
draught from the keg, but if he sat at the head there was no 
help or cure for the sick person. 

The lad soon became renowned, and was sent for far and 
wide, and he helped many to health again for whom there had 
been no hope. 

When he came into a room and saw Death beside the sick 
he foretold either life or death, and he was always right in his 
prediction. He became a rich and mighty man, and one day he 
was fetched to a princess far away in another land. She was 
so dangerously ill that the doctors thought they could do no 
more for her, so they promised him anything he might wish for 
if he only saved her life. 

When he came into the princess's room he found Death sitting 
at the head of the bed, but he sat dozing and nodding, and while 
he sat thus the princess felt better. 

" This is a case of life or death," said the doctor, " and there 
is no hope, if I see rightly," he said ; but they told him he must 
save her if it should cost even the whole kingdom. He then 
looked at Death, and while he was sitting dozing he made a 
sign to the servants that they should make haste and turn the 
bed. So Death was left sitting at the foot of it, and as soon as 
that was done he gave the princess the healing draught, and she 
was saved. 

" Now you've cheated me," said Death, " and we are quits." 



The Lad with the Beer Keg 



-57 



" I was obliged to do it if I were to win tlie kingdom," said the 
doctor. 

"That will not help you much," said Death; "your time is 
up, and now you belong to me." 

" Let that be as it may," said the doctor ; " but I suppose 




"^OW VOU'VE CHEATED ME," SAID DEATH 



you'll first give me leave to read the Lord's Prayer to the end," 
said he. 

Yes, that he would ; but the doctor took great care not to 
read the Lord's Prayer. He read everything else, but the Lord's 



258 The Lad with the Beer Keg 

Prayer never crossed his lips. At last he thought he had 
cheated Death for good ; but when Death thought this had gone 
on too long, he went to the doctor's room one night and hung up 
a large tablet opposite his bed with the Lord's Prayer on it. 

When the doctor awoke he began reading it, and did not 
bethink himself of what he was doing till he came to '* Amen." 
But then it was too late. 



LITTLE FRED AND HIS FIDDLE 



Once upon a time there was a cottager who had an onl}' son, and 
this lad was rather weak and ahvays ailing, so he was not able to 
go out to work. His name was Fred, but being rather small for 
his age he was generally called Little Fred. At home there 
wasn't much to bite or to munch either, so his father went about 
the parish to get a place for him as a cow-boy or an errand- 
boy. 

But nobody wanted a lad until he came to the bailiff of the 
parish ; he would take him as he had just turned away his 
errand-bo}', and there was no one who cared to go to him, 
because every one said he was a stingy old miser. " Something 
is better than nothing," thought the father ; in any case he would 
get his food, for that was all he was going to have from the 
bailiff. There wasn't a word said about clothes or wages. 

But when the lad had been there three years he wanted to 
leave, and so the bailiff paid him his wages for the time he had 
been with him. He was to have a penny a year. " It couldn't 
very well be less," said the bailiff, so he paid the lad three pennies 
altogether. Little Fred, however, thought it was a lot of money, 
because he had never owned so much before ; but he asked if he 
wasn't going to have some more, for all that. 



26o Little Fred and His Fiddle 

" You have got more than you ought to have," said the 
baihflF. 

" Shan't I have anything for clothes, then ? " said Little Fred. 
"Those I had on when I came here are now all in rags, and I 
haven't had any new ones from you. I have only rags and 
tatters flapping and dangling about me," said he. 

" When you have got what we agreed upon, and the three 
pennies besides, I have nothing more to do with you," said the 
bailiff. But he might go out into the kitchen and get a little food 
in his knapsack, and then he started off along the road to town to 
buy clothes. He was both merry and glad, because he had never 
seen a penny before, and he couldn't help feeling in his pocket 
now and then to see if they were all three there. 

So when he had gone far, and further than far, he came to a 
narrow valley with high mountains on all sides ; so he didn't 
know which way to get on, and he began to wonder what there 
could be on the other side of the mountains and how he should 
get over them. But get over them he must, and so he started. 
He wasn't very strong, and had to rest now and then, and he 
would then count over his money to see how much he had. 

When he got to the top of the mountain he found there was 
nothing but a great big moor. There he sat down, and was just 
going to see if he had his pennies all right when a beggar came 
up to him before he knew a thing about it; but the beggar was so 
tall and big that the lad began to scream when he really saw what 
a big and long fellow he was. 

" Don't you be afraid of me," said the beggar ; " I shan't hurt 
you. I only beg for a penny in heaven's name." 

" God help me," said the lad ; " I have only three pennies, and 
I was just going to town to buy some clothes with them." 

"It is worse with me than with you," said the beggar; "I 
haven't got a penny, and I am still more ragged than you." 

"Well, I suppose you must have it, then," said the lad. 

When he had walked on a bit he became tired and sat down 
to lake another rest. When he looked up there was a beggar 




5>t.*.xW^V 



nON'T YOU BE AFRAID OF ME," SAID THE DEGGAR 



LiTTLK Fki-:u a\d His Fiddle 263 

again, but this one was much bigger and ugher than the first, and 
when the lad saw how big and ugly he was he began to scream. 

" Don't be afraid of me ; I shan't hurt you. I only beg for a 
penny in heaven's name," said the beggar. 

" Well, God help me ! " said the lad, " as true as I am here, I 
have only got two pennies, and I was just going to town to buy 
some clothes with them. If only I had met you sooner, I " 

" It is worse with me than with you," said the beggar. " I 
haven't got a penny, and I have a much bigger body and less 
clothes." 

" Well, I suppose you must have it then ! " said the lad. 

When he got a bit further he became tired, and sat down to 
rest ; but he had no sooner sat down than another beggar came to 
him ; and he was so tall and big and ugly, that when the lad was 
going to look up at him he had to look up to the sky, and then he 
could really see what a very big, ugly, ragged fellow he was. And 
the lad began screaming and shouting. 

"Don't you be afraid of me, my lad;" said the beggar ;" I 
shan't hurt you, for I am only a poor beggar, who begs a penny in 
heaven's name." 

"Well, God help me!" said the lad, "as true as I am here, I 
have only one penny left, and I was just going to town to buy 
some clothes with it. If I had only met you sooner, I " 

" Well, I haven't got a penny and I have a bigger body and less 
clothes, so it is worse with me than with you," said the beggar. 

"Well, I suppose you must have the penny, then," said Little 
Fred. There was no help for it ; now they had all had one each 
and he had none. 

" Now since you have such a good heart, and have given away 
all you had," said the beggar, " I will give you a wish for each 
penny." It was the same beggar who had got all the three 
pennies ; he had only changed each time, so that the lad should 
not know him again. 

" I have always been wishing to hear the fiddle playing, and see 
people so merry and happy that they had to dance," said the lad ; 



264 Little Fred and His Fiddle 

"so if I may wish what I Hke I wish I had such a fiddle as would 
make everything that is aUve dance to its tune." 

**That you may have/' said the beggar; "but it is a poor 
wish. You must wish something better for the other pennies." 

" I have always been fond of hunting and shooting," said 
Little Fred ; *' so if I may wish what I like, I wish I had a gun 
that would hit everything I aim at, if it were ever so far off." 

"That you may have," said the beggar ; " but it is a poor wish. 
You must wish something better for the last penny." 

"I have always liked to be in company with kind and good 
people," said Little Fred ; " so if I may wish what I like, I wish 
that no one can refuse me the first thing I ask." 

" That wasn't such a bad wish," said the beggar, and strolled 
off among the hills till the lad couldn't see him any more. So the 
lad lay down to sleep, and the next day he came down from the 
mountains with his fiddle and his gun. 

First he went to the storekeeper and asked for clothes, and at 
one farm he asked for a horse, and at another for a sledge, and at 
one place he asked for a fur coat, and no one could say " No " to 
him ; even the most stingy people had to give him what he asked 
for. At last he travelled through the parish like a fine gentleman 
with his horse and sledge. When he had gone some distance he 
met the bailiff he had served. 

"Good-day, master!" said Little Fred, as he stopped and 
took off his cap. 

" Good-day ! " said the bailiff; " have I been your master ? " 

" Yes, don't you recollect that I served three years with you 
for three pennies ? " said Little Fred. 

" Dear me 1 " said the bailiff, " how you have got on ! How is 
it you have become such a grand fellow ? " 

" Ah, you think so, do you ? " said the youngster. 

" And you seem to be so merry that you must have a fiddle 
with you as well," said the bailiff. 

" Yes, I alwa3's liked to see people dance," said the lad, " but 
the finest thing I have is this gun of mine. It hits everything I 



Little Fred and His P'iddle 265 

aim at, if it is ever so far off. Do you see that magpie in the fir- 
tree yonder ? What will you wager I don't hit it from where we 
are now standing ? " 

The bailiff would willingly have staked both his horse and 
farm and a hundred dollars besides, that he couldn't hit it. But 
as it was he would stake all the money he had in his pocket, and 
wouldn't mind fetching the magpie when it fell down, because he 
never believed it was possible a gun could reach so far. Off went 
the gun and down fell the magpie right in the middle of a lot of 
brambles. The bailiff ran right in among the brambles after the 
magpie, picked it up and showed it to the lad. But just at that 
moment Little Fred took his fiddle out and began playing, and the 
bailiff began to dance, and danced away while the thorns were 
tearing his clothes ; but the lad went on playing and the bailiff 
danced and cried and begged for himself till the rags flew about 
him and till he had scarcely a thread to his back. 

"Well now, I think you are almost as ragged as I was when I 
left your service," said the lad, " so now you may go." But first 
the bailiff had to pay the wager he had lost, that the bo}' couldn't 
hit the magpie. 

When the lad came to town, he went into an inn, and began 
playing, and all who came there had to dance. And he lived on 
merrily and well, for he had no cares, since no one could say 
" No" to him when hft asked for anything. 

But just as they were in the middle of the fun the watchman 
came to take the lad up before the magistrate, for the bailiff had 
complained about him and charged him with having waylaid and 
robbed him and nearly taken hi.=; life ; and now the lad was going 
to be hanged — there was no help for it. 

But Little Fred had the means of getting out of all trouble, and 
that was the fiddle. He began to play on it, and then you should 
have seen how the watchmen danced away, till they fell down and 
gasped for breath. 

So they sent soldiers and the guard, but it fared no better with 
them than the watchmen. When Little Fred took out his fiddle, 



266 Little Fred and His Fiddle 

they had to dance as long as he was able to play on it, but they 
were done for long before he was tired. At last they came 
unawares upon him and took him while he was asleep at night, and 
when he was brought up he was sentenced to be hanged at once, 
and away they all went to the gallows. There was such a crowd 
of people to see this wonderful lad, and the bailiff was there too ; 
he was so pleased, because he was to get amends both for his 
money and his skin and see the lad hanged into the bargain ; but it 
took a long time before they came to the gallows, because Little 
Fred was always weak on his legs, and now he made himself still 
worse. He had brought with him his fiddle and his gun, as they 
could not get him to part with them, and when he came to the 
gallows and was going to mount the ladder, he halted and rested 
himself on each step. When he got to the top of the ladder he 
sat down and asked, if they would not grant him one thing ; he 
had such a wish to play a tune — just a little bit of a tune — on his 
fiddle before he was hanged. "Well," they said, "it were 
both sin and shame to deny him that ; " for you see they could not 
say "No" to what he asked for. But the bailiff asked in heaven's 
name that they would not let him touch a string, or else there 
would not be much left of any of them. If the lad was to play 
the bailiff wanted to be tied up to a birch tree that stood there. 
But Little Fred was not long about getting out his fiddle and play- 
ing on it, and then all that were there began dancing, both those 
that went on two legs and those that went on four, both the 
deacon and the parson, the judge and the sheriff, men and women, 
dogs and swine ; they danced and screamed the one louder than 
the other. Some danced till they dropped down dead, some 
danced till they fell down in fits. All had a terrible time of it, but 
worst of all the poor bailiff who was tied up to the birch-tree, and 
was dancing away till he scraped great bits of skin off his back. 
There was no one who tliought of doing anything to Little Fred 
after that, and they let him go with his gun and his fiddle where 
he liked. He lived happy all his days,'for there was no one who 
could say " No " to the first thing he asked for. 




EVERY ONE THAT WAS THERE BEGAN DANCING; THEY DANCED AND 
SCREAMED THE ONE I.OUDER THAN THE OTHER 







THE STOREHOUSE KEY IN THE 
DISTAFF 



There was once a rich farmer's son who went out to woo. He 
had heard of a lass who was fair and gentle, and who was both 
clever in the house and good at cooking. 



270 The Storehouse Key in the Distaff 

Thither he went, for it was just such a wife he wanted. The 
people on the farm knew, of course, on what errand he came, so 
they asked him to take a seat near to them, and they talked and 
chatted with him, as the custom is, and besides offered him a 
drink and asked him to stop to dinner. They went in and out of 
the room, so the lad had time to look about him, and over in a 
corner he saw a spinning wheel with the distaft' full of flax. 

"Whose spinning wheel is that ? " asked the lad. 




*' Oh, that's our daughter's," said the woman of the house. 

"There's a deal of flax on it," said the lad; "I suppose she 
takes more than a day to spin that," said he. 

" No, not at all," said the woman ; " she does it easily in one 
day and perhaps less than that." 

That was more than he had ever heard of any one being able to 
spin in such a short time. 



The Storehouse Key ix the Distaff 271 

When they were going to carry in the dinner they all went 
out of the room, and he was left alone. He then saw an old key 
lying in the window, and this he took and stowed well away 
among the flax on the distaff. So they ate and drank and got 
on well together, and when the lad thought he had been there 
long enough, he said good-bye, and went his way. They asked 
him to come soon again, which he promised, but he did not speak 
of the matter he had at heart, although he liked the lass very 
well. 

Some time after he came again to the farm, and they received 
him still better than the first time. But just as they were chatting 
at their best, the farmer's wife said : 

" Last tim.e you were here something very remarkable 
happened ; our storehouse key disappeared all at once, and we 
have never been able to find it since." 

The lad went over to the spinning wheel, which stood in the 
corner with just as much flax on it as when last he was there. 
He put his hand in among the flax, and said : 

" Here is the key ! much cannot be made by the spinning, 
when the spinning day lasts from Michaelmas to Easter ! " 

So he said good-bye, and did not speak of the matter he had 
at heart that time either. 




THE LAD WHO WENT WOOING 
THE DAUGHTER OF OLD 
MOTHER CORNER 

OxcE upon a time there was a woman who had a son, 
and he was so lazy and happy-go-lucky he would never 
do anything that was useful. His mind was only bent on 
singing and dancing ; and this he did all day long, and 
even far into the night. The longer this went on the 
harder it became for his mother ; the lad grew bigger 
and bigger, and he wanted no end of food, and of 
clothes he wanted more and more as he grew up ; and 
they did not last long, I can assure you, for he danced 
and ran about both in the woods and the fields. 

At last the mother thought things 

were getting too bad, so she told the 

lad one day he must begin and go to 

work and make himself useful, else 

there was nothingbut star- 

^ji,^ /, vation left for them both. 

But the lad had no mind 

for that; he said he would 




J^ll^ 



The Lad who wkxt wooing 273 

rather go and woo the daughter of old Mother Corner, for if he got 
her he could live happy and contented all his days, and sing and 
dance, and never trouble himself about work. When the mother 
heard this she thought that was not a bad thing after all ; he might 
try in any case, and so she dressed up the lad as best she could, 
that he might look a little tidy when he came to old Mother Corner, 
and then he set out on his way. 

When he came out of the house the sun was shining warm 
and bright ; but it had rained during the night, so the ground 
was soft, and the moors were filled with puddles. The lad took 
the shortest way across the moors to old Mother Corner, and ran 
and sang as he always did, but just as he was running and jump- 
ing along he came to a bridge of logs, across a marshy bit of the 
path, and from this bridge he was going to make a jump across a 
puddle on to a tussock, so as not to dirty his boots, but just as he 
put his foot on the tussock — plump ! down he went and did not 
stop till he found himself in a nasty, dark hole. At first he could 
not see anything, but when he had been there awhile he caught a 
glimpse of a rat, widdling-waddling about with a bunch of keys on 
her tail. 

** Are you there, my dear ? " said the rat. " I am so glad you 
have come to see me. I have been waiting a long time for you. I 
expect you have come to woo me, and that you are in a great 
hurry ; but you must be patient awhile yet, for I must have a big 
dowry, and I am not ready for the wedding, but I'll do my best so 
that it can come off soon." 

When she had said this, she brought out some egg-shells with 
all kinds of dainties, such as rats eat, and put before him, and 
said: "You must make yourself at home and have something to 
eat ; you must be both tired and hungry." 

But the lad did not much fancy such food. " I wish I were 
well out of this and above ground again," he thought ; but he said 
nothing. 

" I suppose you want to be oft' home," said the rat. " I know 
you are longing for the wedding, so I'll make all the haste I can. 



274 The Lad who wext wooixg 

You must take with you this Hnen thread, and when 3'ou get up 

above ground you must not look back, but go straight home ; and 

on the road you must not say anything but ' Short in front and 

long behind,' " and so she put into his hand a linen thread. 

" Heaven be praised ! " said the lad when he got above ground ; 

" I shall never go down there again." But he had the thread in 

his hand, and he ran and sang as usual. But although he did not 

think any more about the rat-hole, the tune had got into his head, 

and he sang : 

" Short in front and long behind ! 
Short in front and long behind ! " 

When he got home to the door he turned round, and there lay 
many, many hundreds of yards of the whitest linen, so fine that 
the cleverest weavers could not weave it finer. 

" Mother, mother ! come out, come out ! " he shouted and 
cried. 

The woman came running out and asked what was the matter. 
When she saw the linen, which reached as far as she could see 
and a bit farther, she would not believe her own eyes until the lad 
had told her how it had happened ; and when she had heard it all 
and felt the linen with her fingers she became so glad that she too 
began to dance and sing. 

She then took the linen and cut it up, and made shirts both 
for the son and herself. The rest she went to the town with and 
sold, and got money for. Now they both lived happy and com- 
fortable for awhile. But when it all came to an end the woman 
had no more food in the house, and so she said to her son that 
now he must really begin and go to work and make himself 
useful, else there was nothing left but starvation for both of them, 

But the lad had a greater mind to go to old Mother Corner's 
and woo her daughter. Well, the woman thought that was a 
good thing, for he was now better dressed and did not look so bad 
after all. So she dressed and tidied him the best she could, 
and he brought out his new shoes and polished them until they 



The Lad who went wooing 275 

were so bright that he could see himself in them. After that 
he set out, and it all happened as before. 

When he came outside the sun shone so warm and bright, 
but it had rained during the night and the ground was soft and 
muddy, and the moors were filled with puddles. 

The lad took the shortest way across the moors to old Mother 
Corner, and ran and sang as he always did. He went by a 
different path this time ; but just as he was running and jumping 
along he came to the bridge of logs across the marshy bit of 
the path, and from this bridge he was going to jump across a 
puddle on to a tussock, so as not to dirty his boots. But just 
as he put his foot on the tussock — plump ! down he went, and 
did not stop till he found himself in a nasty, dark hole. At first 
he saw nothing, but when he had been there awhile he caught 
sight of a rat, who widdled-waddled about with a bunch of keys 
on her tail. 

" Are you there, my dear ? " said the rat. "Welcome again ! 
It was kind of you to come and see me so soon. I know you are 
quite impatient, but you must really wait awhile ; for there is 
something still wanting for my dowr}'. But when you come again 
next time everything shall be read}'." 

When she had said this, she brought out many kinds of dainty 
bits in egg-shells, such as rats like to eat ; but the lad thought 
they looked like leavings, and he said he had no appetite. " I 
only wish I were well out of this," he thought, but he said 
nothing. 

After a while the rat said : 

** I suppose you want to be off home again ! I'll hurry on 
with the wedding as quickly as I can, but this time you must 
take this woollen yarn with you, and when you get above ground 
you must not look back, but go straight home ; and on the way 
you must not say anything but ' Short in front and long behind.' " 
And then she gave the woollen yarn into his hand. 

" Heaven be praised that I am out of it!" said the lad to him- 
self; " I shall never go there again." And so he sang and leapt 



276 The Lad who went wooing 

as usual. He did not think any more about the rat-hole, but the 
tune had got into his head, and he went on singing : 

" Short in front and long behind ! 
Short in front and long behind ! " 

And this he kept up all the way home. When he got outside the 
door he happened to look round, and there lay the finest cloth, 
many hundreds of yards long, nearly a mile in all, and so fine 
that the smartest man in town did not have finer cloth in his 
coat. 

" Mother, mother ! come out, come out ! " cried the lad. 

The woman came to the door, held up her hands in astonish- 
ment, and nearly fainted with joy when she saw all the beautiful 
cloth. He then had to tell her how he had got it, and how it had 
happened from first to last. 

They were then well off, as you may imagine. The boy got fine 
new clothes and the woman went to town and sold the cloth, piece 
by piece, and got a lot of money. So she smartened up the house 
and became so grand in her old days that she might have been a 
great dame. They were both happy and comfortable, but at last 
that money also came to an end, and one day when the womian had no 
more food in the house, she said to her son that he would now 
really have to go to work to make himself useful, else it would 
come to starvation with both of them. 

But the lad thought it would be better to go to old Mother 
Corner's and woo her daughter. The woman thought the same, 
for the lad had now fine, new clothes and looked so well that she 
thought it quite impossible such a fine lad should get " no." 

So she dressed him and tidied him as well as she could and 
he brought out his new boots and polished them till he could see 
himself in them, and after that he set out. 

This time he did not take the shortest cut but went a long 
way round, for he did not want to get down to the rat any more, 
he was so tired of all the widdling-waddling and the eternal talk 
about the wedding. The weather and the roads were just the 



li.urL 










O Q 

O to 



The Lad who went woorxo 279 

same as on the first and second occasion. The sun shone and 
the water ghstened in the puddles and the lad ran and sang, as he 
always did ; but as he was running and jumping along he found 
himself all at once on the same bridge on the moor again. From 
this he jumped across a puddle on to a tussock so as not to soil 
his boots — plump ! and down the lad went and he did not stop till 
he found himself in the same nasty, dark hole again. At first he 
was glad, for he did not see anything, but when he had been 
there awhile he caught a glimpse of the ugly rat — the nasty thing 
— with a bunch of keys on her tail. 

" Good-day, my dear 1 " said the rat ; " welcome again ! I see 
you cannot live long without me ! I'm glad of that ! But every- 
thing is now ready for the wedding and we will set out for 
church at once." 

We'll see about that, thought the lad, but he said nothing. The 
rat then gave a squeak and a swarm of rats and mice came rushing 
in from all corners, and six big rats came harnessed to a frying- 
pan ; two mice got up behind as footmen and two sat in front 
driving. Some of them got into the pan, while the rat with the 
bunch of keys took her place in the middle of them. She then 
said to the lad : 

" The road is a little narrow here, so you had better walk by 
the side of the carriage, my dear, till the road becomes wider, and 
then 3'ou can sit up beside me." 

"How grand we want to be !" thought the lad. " I only wish I 
was well out of this, and I would run away from the whole crew," 
he thought ; but he said nothing. He followed as best he could. 
Sometimes he had to creep and sometimes he had to stoop, for the 
passage was often very low and narrow ; but when it became 
broader he went on in front and looked around to see how he 
could best manage to give them the slip. 

All at once he heaM a clear and beautiful voice behind him : 

" Now the road is good ! Come, my dear, and get into tlie 
carriage ! " 

The lad turned quickly round and nearly lost his wits, for 



28o The Lad who wext wooixg 

there stood the most splendid carriage with six white horses ; 
and in the carriage sat a maiden as fair and beautiful as the sun, 
and around her sat other damsels as handsome and bright as the 
stars. It was a princess and her playmates who had been 
enchanted. But now they were freed, because he had gone down 
to them and never gainsaid them in anything. 

" Come now," said the princess, and the lad then stepped into 
the carriage and drove to church with her. On their way from 
church the princess said : 

"We will now drive to my place f.rst and then we will send 
for your mother." 

"That was all ver}' well," thought the lad; he said nothing 
this time either, but he thought it would be better to go home to 
his mother than down in the nasty rat-hole. But all at once they 
came to a grand castle, where they drove in ; and that was their 
home. A splendid carriage with six horses was then sent to fetch 
the lad's mother, and when it came back the wedding festivities 
began. They lasted fourteen days, and perhaps they are still 
going on. If we make haste we may also be in time to drink with 
the bridegroom and to dance with the bride. 



THE PRINCESS WHOM NOBODY 
COULD SILENCE 

There was once upon a time a king, and he had a daughter 
who would always have the last word ; she was so perverse and 
contrary in her speech that no one could silence her. So the king 
therefore promised that he who could outwit her should have the 
princess in marriage and half the kingdom besides. There were 
plenty of those who wanted to try, I can assure 3'ou ; for it isn't 
every day that a princess and half a kingdom are to be had. 

The gate to the palace hardly ever stood still. The suitors 
came in swarms and flocks from east and west, both riding and 
walking. But there was no one who could silence the princess. 
At last the king announced that those who tried and did not 
succeed should be branded on both ears with a large iron ; he 
would not have all this running about the palace for nothing. 

So there were three brothers who had also heard about the 
princess, and as they were rather badly off at home, they thought 
they would try their luck and see if they could win the princess 
and half the kingdom. They were good friends and so the}- 
agreed to set out together. 

When they had got a bit on the way, Ashiepattle found a dead 
magpie. 

*' I have found something! I have found something I" cried he. 

" What have you found ? " asked the brothers. 



2S4 The Prinxess whom Nobody could Silence 

" I have found a dead magpie," said he. 

" Faugh ! throw it away ; what can you do with that ? " said 
the other two, who always beheved they were the wisest. 

" Oh, I've nothing else to do. I can easily carry it," said 
A.'»hiepattle. 

When they had gone on a bit further Ashiepattle found an old 
willow-twig, which he picked up. 

" I have found something ! I have found something ! " he cried. 

" What have 3'ou found now ? " said the brothers. 

" I have found a willow-twig," said hie. 

" Pooh ! what are you going to do with that ? Throw it away." 
said the two. 

" I have nothing else to do, I can easily carry it with me," said 
Ashiepattle. 

When they had gone still further he found a broken saucer, 
which he also picked up. 

" Here lads, I have found something ! I have found something!" 
said he. 

*' Well, what have you found now ? " asked the brothers. 

"A broken saucer," said he. 

" Pshaw ! Is it worth while dragging that along with you too ? 
Throw it away ! " said the brothers. 

'* Oh, I've nothing else to do, I can easily carry it with me," 
said Ashiepattle. 

When they had gone a little bit further he found a crooked 
goat-horn and soon after he found the fellow to it. 

"I have found something! I have found som.cthing, lads!" 
said he. 

" What have 3'ou found now ? " said the others. 

" Two goat-horns," answered Ashiepattle. 

" Ugh ! Throw them away ! What are you going to do with 
them ? " said they. 

" Oh, I have nothing else to do. I can easily carry them 
with me," said Ashiepattle. 

In a little while he found a wedije. 



The Prixxess whom Nobody could Shjcn-ce 2S5 

" I say, lads, I have found something ! I have found some- 
thing !" he cried. 

"You are everlastingly finding something! What have you 
found now ? " asked the two eldest. 

" I have found a wedge," he answered. 

"Oh, throw it away ! What are you going to do with it?" 
said they. 

"Oh, I have nothing else to do. I can easily carry it with me," 
said Ashiepattle. 

As he went across the king's fields, which had been freshly 
manured, he stooped down and took up an old boot-sole. 

" Hullo, lads ! I have found something, I have found some- 
thing 1" said he. 

" Heaven grant you may find a little sense before you 
get to the palace I " said the two. " What is it you have found 
now ? " 

"An old boot-sole," said he. 
" Is that anything worth picking up ? Throw it away ! What 
are 3'ou going to do with it ? " said the brothers. 

"Oh, I have nothing else to do. I can easily carry it with 
me, and — who knows ? — it may help me to win the princess and 
half the kingdom," said Ashiepattle. 

" Yes, you look a likely one, don't you ? " said the other tv/o. 
So they went in to the princess, the eldest first. 

" Good day ! " said he. 

"Good day to you ! " answered she, with a shrug. 

"It's terribly hot here," said he. 

" It's hotter in the fire," said the princess. The branding iron 
was lying waiting in the fire. 

When he saw this he was struck speechless, and so it was 
all over with him. 

The second brother fared no better. 

" Good day ! " said he. 

"Good day to you," said she, with a wriggle. 

" It's terribly hot here ! " said he. 



286 The Princess whom Nobody could Sh.exxe 

" It's hotter in the fire," said she. With that he lost both 
speech and wits, and so the iron had to be brought out. 

Then came Ashiepattle's turn. 

" Good day 1 " said he. 

" Good day to you ! " said she, with a shrug and a wriggle. 

" It is very nice and warm here ! " said Ashiepattle. 

" It's warmer in the fire," she answered. She was in no better 
humour now she saw the third suitor. 

"Then there's a chance for me to roast my magpie on it," 
said he, bringing it out. 

" I'm afraid it will sputter," said the princess. 

" No fear of that ! I'll tie this willow-twig round it," said the 
lad. 

" You can't tie it tight enough," said she. 

"Then I'll drive in a wedge," said the lad, and brought out the 
wedge. 

"The fat will be running off it," said the princess. 

"Then I'll hold this under it," said the lad, and showed her 
the broken saucer. 

"You are so crooked in j-our speech," said the princess. 

"No, I am not crooked," answered the lad; "but this is 
crooked ; " and he brought out one of the goat-horns. 

** Well, I've never seen the like ! " cried the princess. 

" Here you see the like," said he, and brought out the other 
horn. 

" It seems you have come here to wear out my soul ! " she 
said. 

" No, I have not come here to wear out your soul, for I have 
one here which is already worn-out," answered the lad, and 
brought out the old boot-sole. 

The princess was so dumbfounded at this, that she was com- 
pletely silenced. 

" Now you are mine ! " said Ashiepattle, and so he got her and 
half the kingdom into the bargain. 




< = 



o - 









w c 



FARMER WEATHERBEARD 



There were once upon a time a man and a woman, who had an 
only son, and he was called Hans. The woman thought that he 
ought to go out and look for work, and told her husband to go 
with him. " You must find him such a good place, that he can 
become master of all masters," she said, and so she put some food 
and a roll of tobacco in a bag for them. 

Well, they went to many masters, but all replied that they 
might make the lad as clever as they were themselves, but they 
could not make him cleverer. When the man came home to his 
wife with this answer, she said : " Well, I don't care what you do 
with him, but this I tell you, that you will have to make him 
master over all masters." So she put some food and a roll of 
tobacco in a bag, and the man and the son had to set out again. 

When they had gone a bit on the way, they came out upon 
the ice, where they met a man who was driving a black horse. 

" Where are you going ? " said he. 

" I'm going to get m^^ son apprenticed to some one who can 
teach him well ; for my wife comes of such good people, that she 
wants him to become master of all masters." 

"That's lucky," said the man who was driving; "I am the 

T 



290 Farmer Weatherbeard 

ver5 man for that, and I am just looking for such an apprentice. 
Get up behind," he said to the boy, and off they went through 
the air. 

"Wait a bit!" shouted the lad's father. "I ought to know 
what's your name and where you live ? " said he. 

" Oh, I'm at home both North and South and East and West, 
and I am called Farmer Weatherbeard," said the master. " In a 
year you can come back again, and I will tell you if he's good for 
anything." And off they went, and were lost to sight. 

When the year was out, the man came to hear about his son. 
"You can't finish him in a year, you know," said the master. 
"As yet he has only found his legs, so to speak." They then 
agreed that Farmer Weatherbeard should keep him another year, 
and teach him everything, and then the man was to come back 
for him. When the year was over they met again at the same 
place. 

" Have you finished with him now ? " asked the father. 

" Yes, he's my master now, but you will never see him again," 
said Farmer Weatherbeard ; and before the man knew what had 
become of them, they were gone, both the farmer and the lad. 

When the man came home, the woman asked if the son was 
not with him, or what had become of him. 

" Oh, goodness knows what became of him," said the man ; 
" h<e went off through the air." And so he told her what had 
happened. When the woman heard that her husband did not 
know where her son was, she sent him off again. 

" You must find the lad, even if you have to go to Old Nick 
for him 1 " said she, and gave him a bag of food and a roll of 
tobacco. 

" When he had got a bit on the way, he came to a large 
forest, and it took him the whole of the day to get through it ; and 
as it grew dark he saw a bright light and went towards it. After 
a long while he came to a little cottage under a cliff, and outside it 
a woman was standing, drawing water from the well with her 
nose, it was so long. 







THE WOMAN WAS RAKING THE FIRE WITH HER NOSE, IT WAS SO LONG 



Farmer Weatherbeard 293 

"Good evening, mother ! " 

" Good evening to you," said the woman ; " no one has called 
me mother for a hundred years." 

" Can I get lodgings here to-night ? " said the man. 

" No," said the woman. But then the man brought out the roll 
of tobacco, dried a little of it and made some snuff, which he gave 
the woman. She was so glad that she began to dance, and then 
she said that he might stop the night. 

All at once he asked after Farmer Weatherbeard. She knew 
nothing about him, she said, but she ruled over all four-footed 
animals, and perhaps some of them might know soniething about 
him. She then called them together with a whistle, and questioned 
them, but there was not one who knew anything about Farmer 
Weatherbeard. 

" Well, we are three sisters," said the woman ; " perhaps one of 
the other two knows where he is. I'll lend you my carriage so 
that you can get there to-night, but it is three hundred miles to the 
nearest of them." 

The man set out and got there in the evening. When he 
arrived, there also was a woman standing drawing water from the 
well with her nose. 

" Good evening, mother ! " said the man. 

" Good evening to you," said the woman ; " no one has called 
me mother for a hundred years," said she. 

" Can I get lodgings here to-night ? " said the man. 

" No," said the woman. 

But then the man brought out the roll of tobacco, dried a 
little of it and made some snuff, which he gave the woman on 
the back of her hand. She was so pleased at this that she 
began to dance, and then she said he might stop there the 
night. 

All at once he asked about Farmer Weatherbeard. She did not 
know anything about him, but she ruled over all the fishes, she 
said, and perhaps some of them might know something about him. 
She then called them together with a whistle she had, and ques- 



2Q4 FARr^IER Weatherbeard 

tioned them all, but there was not one who knew anything about 
Farmer Weatherbeard. 

" Well, I have another sister ; perhaps she may know something 
about him ; she lives six hundred miles from here, but you can have 
my carriage and get there before night sets in." 

The man set out and got there in the evening, and found 
a woman raking the fire with her nose, it was so long. 

" Good evening, mother 1 " 

" Good evening to you," said the woman; "no one has called 
me mother for a hundred years." 

" Can I get lodgings here to-night ? " said the man. 

" No," said the woman. 

But then the man brought out the tobacco roll again and 
began to make some snuff. He gave the woman so much that 
it covered the whole of the back of her hand. She was so pleased 
at this that she began to dance, and then she said he might stop 
the night. 

All at once he asked about Farmer Weatherbeard. She did not 
know anything about him, she said ; but she ruled over all the birds 
and called them all together with her whistle. When she had 
questioned them all, she missed the eagle, but in a little while he 
came ; and when she asked him, he said he had come straight 
from Farmer Weatherbeard. The woman then told him that he 
must show the man the way there. But first the eagle wanted 
something to eat, and next he wanted to rest till the following day, 
for he was so tired after the long way he had come, that he could 
scarcely rise from the ground. 

When the eagle had finished his meal and taken a rest, the 
woman plucked a feather from his tail and put the man in its 
place, and away flew the eagle with him ; but they did not get to 
Farmer Weatherbeard before midnight. When they arrived there, 
the eagle said : 

"There are bones and carcases lying about outside the door, 
but you must not mind them. All the people in the house sleep so 
soundly that they are hard to wake ; you must go straight to the 



Fakmek Weatherbeard 297 

table drawer and take three bits of bread out of it, and if you hear 
some one snoring you must pull three feathers out of his head ; 
that won't wake him up." 

The man did as he was told, and when he had got the bits of 
bread, he pulled out first one feather. 

" Oh ! " cried Farmer Weatherbeard. 

Then the man pulled out one more and Farmer Weatherbeard 
shouted " Oh " again ; but when he pulled out the third one. 
Farmer Weatherbeard shrieked so loudly that tiie man thought 
both the walls and the roof would have burst asunder, but the farmer 
went on sleeping just the same. The eagle then told the man what 
he was to do next ; so he went to the door of the cow-house, and 
there he stumbled against a big stone, which he took with him, 
and under the stone lay three chips of wood, which he also took 
with him. He then knocked at the door of the cow-house and it 
opened at once. He dropped the three bits of bread, and a hare 
came running out and ate them. He then caught the hare and 
took it with him. 

The eagle asked him to pluck three feathers out of his tail and 
place the hare, the stone, the chips of wood and himself instead, 
and he would then fly home with them. When the eagle had 
flown a long, long away, he settled down on a stone. 

" Do you see anything ? " said he. 

" Yes, I see a flock of crows flying towards us," said the man. 

" We had better get on a bit then," said the eagle, and on he 
flew. In a while he asked again : 

" Do you see anything now ? " 

"Yes, the crows are close upon us again," said the man. 

" Drop the three feathers you plucked from his head," said the 
eagle. 

The man did so, and the moment he dropped them the feathers 
became a flock of ravens, which chased the crows home again. 
The eagle then flew l^ar av/ay with the man. At last it settled 
down on a stone to rest. 

" Do you see anything 




298 Farmer Weatherbeard 

"I'm not sure," said the man, "but I think I see something 
coming far away." 

" We had better get on a bit then," said the eagle. 

" Do you see anything now ? " he said in a while. 

"Yes, now he is close upon us," said the man. 

" You must drop the chips which you took from under the 
stone near the cow-house door," said the eagle. 

The man did so, and the same moment he dropped them 
there grew up a great, thick forest ; so Farmer Weatherbeard had 
to go home for axes to cut his way through. 

The eagle then flew on again a long way, till he became 
tired and settled down in a fir-tree. 

" Do you see anything ? " said he. 

"Well, I'm not sure about it," said the man, "but I think I 
catch a glimpse of something far away." 

" We had better get on a bit then," said the eagle ; and so he 
flew on again. 

" Do you see anything now ? " he said in a while. 

" Yes, now he is close upon us." 

"You must drop the stone you took from the cow-house door," 
said the eagle. 

The man did so, and it became a big, lofty mountain, which 
Farmer Weatherbeard had to break his way through. But when 
he had got half-way through the mountain he broke one of his 
legs, so that he had to go home and get it healed. 

In the meantime the eagle flew home with the man and the 
hare, and when they got there the man went to the churchyard 
and put some consecrated soil on the hare, and it changed into 
Hans, his own son. 

When the time came round for the fair, the lad turned 
himself into a cream-coloured horse, and asked his father to take 
him with him to the fair. 

"If some one comes up to you and wants to buy me, you must 
say you want a hundred dollars for me ; but you must not forget 
to take off the halter, otherwise I shall never be able to get away 




"YOU MUST DROP THE STONE YOU TOOK I'KOM THIi COU-HOUSIi 
DOOR," SAID THE EAtiLli 



Farmer Weatherbeard 301 

from Farmer Weatherbeard ; for it is he who will come and want 
to buy me," said the lad. 

And so it turned out. A horse-dealer came up and wanted 
to buy the horse, and the man got his hundred dollars for it. But 
when the bargain was made, and Hans's father had got the money, 
the horse-dealer wanted to keep the halter also. 

"No, there was nothing about that in our agreement," said 
the man. '* You cannot have the halter, for I have more horses 
to bring to town." 

So they went each his way. But they had not got far 
before Hans resumed his own shape, and when the man came 
home he found the son sitting by the stove. 

The second day he turned himself into a brown horse, and 
told his father to take him with him to the fair. 

"If some one comes up to you and wants to buy me, you 
must say you want two hundred dollars for me ; for he will pay 
you that and give you a drink besides ; but whatever you drink 
or whatever you do, you must not forget to take the halter off 
me, else you will not see me again," said Hans. 

It turned out just as before. The man got two hundred 
dollars for the horse, and a drink into the bargain ; and when 
they parted, it was as much as the man could do to remember 
to take off the halter. But they had not got far on the road 
before the lad resumed his own shape, and when the man came 
home Hans was already sitting by the stove. 

The third day the same thing happened again. The lad turned 
himself into a big, black horse and told his father that some one 
would come up to him and offer him three hundred dollars and 
treat him freely to drink ; but whatever he did or however much 
he drank he must not forget to take off the halter, otherwise he 
would never get away from Farmer Weatherbeard in his life. 

No, he would not forget that, said the man. When he 
came to the fair he got the three hundred dollars, but Farmer 
Weatherbeard treated him to so much drink that he forgot to take 
off the halter and Farmer Weatherbeard set off with the horse. 



302 Farmer Weatherbeard 

When he had got a bit on the way he went into a place to get 
some more drink, and so he put a barrel of red hot nails under the 
horse's nose and a trough of oats under his tail, hung the halter 
across a hurdle and went in to the innkeeper. The horse stood 
there stamping and kicking and snorting and scenting the air. A 
girl then came by, who took pity on him. 

" Poor creature ! What sort of a master have you got, who 
can treat you in this way ? " said she, and pushed the halter off 
the hurdle so that the horse could turn round and eat the oats. 

" I am his master ! " shouted Farmer Weatherbeard, who came 
rushing out through the door. But the horse had already shaken 
off the halter and thrown himself into the horse pond, where he 
changed himself into a little fish. 

Farmer Weatherbeard rushed after him and changed himself 
into a big pike. Hans then turned himself into a pigeon and 
Farmer Weatherbeard changed into a hawk and set off after the 
pigeon. At that moment a princess was standing at a window in 
the palace and watched this struggle. 

" If you knew as much as I do you would come in through the 
window to me," said the princess to the pigeon. 

The pigeon flew in through the window and then changed into 
Hans, who told her what had happened. 

"Change yourself into a gold ring and put yourself on my 
finger," said she. 

" No, that is no use," said Hans, " for Farmer Weatherbeard 
will then make the king ill ; and there is no one who can make 
him well till Farmer Weatherbeard comes to cure him, and he will 
ask for the gold ring as payment." 

" I will say it is my mother's and that I will not part with it 
for anything," said the princess. 

So Hans changed himself into a gold ring and placed himself 
on the princess's finger and there Farmer Weatherbeard could not 
get hold of him. 

But it happened just as the lad had said. The king became ill 
and there was no doctor who could cure him till Farmer Weather- 



Farmer Weatherbeard 303 

beard came, and he wanted the ring on the princess's fmgcr for 
his fee. 

The king then sent to the princess for the ring, but she would 
not part with it, she said, for it had been left her by her mother. 
When the king heard this he became angry and said he would 
have the ring, no matter who had left it her. 

" Well, it is no use getting angry," said the princess, " for I 
cannot get it off my finger. If you want the ring you must take 
the finger as well." 

" I will help you and I shall soon get the ring off," said Farmer 
Weatherbeard. 

" No, thank you ! I will try myself," said the princess and 
went to the hearth and put some ashes on it. The ring then 
slipped off and was lost in the ashes. 

Farmer Weatherbeard then turned himself into a cock, which 
scratched and rooted about in the hearth after the ring so that the 
ashes flew about their ears. But Hans changed into a fox and 
bit the cock's head off, a nd if the_ evil one was in Farmer Weather- 
beard, it was now 




Printed by Ballantynk Hanson &^ Co. 
London &= Edinburgh. 



'A 



MR. DAVID NUTT'S LIST OF 

GIFT-BOOKS FOR CHILDREN OF ALL 

AGES, for the most fart fully illustrated by leading 
artists in black and white, sumptuously printed on 
specially made paper, bound in attractive and original 
covers, and sold at the lowest price consistent with 
equitable remuneration to authors and artists, and 
beauty and durability of get up. 




CONTENTS. 

FAIRY TALES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE. 

WORKS BY HIS HONOUR JUDGE E. A. PARRY. 

WORKS BY AIRS. RADFORD. 

WORKS ILLUSTRATED BY MISS WINIFRED SMITH. 

WORKS BY MRS. LEIGHTON, ASBJORNSEN, ETC. 

All works in the present list may be had post free from the 
Publisher at the annexed prices, and are kept on sale by the leading 
booksellers of the United Kingdom. 

I 



*^The Ideal Gift-Books of the Season/^ 
FAIRY TALES OF THE 

BRITISH EMPIRE. 

Collected and Edited by JOSEPH JACOBS. 
Illustrated by J. D. BATTEN. 



M 



R. JACOBS' FAIRY TALES, which have been appear- 
ing since 1890, have won immediate and widespread 
acceptance. The choice of matter, the simphcity and 
suitable character of the language of the text, the beauty, humour, 
and charm of Mr. Batten's Illustrations, and the large and 
legible type, have commended the series alike to children and to 
lovers of art; whilst the prefaces and elaborate notes, parallels, 
and references added by the Editor, have made them indispens- 
able to the increasingly large portion of the public interested in 
the history and archaeology of popular fiction. 

"Fairy Tales of the British Empire" are to be had in two 
forms, at 3s. 6d. and at 6s. a volume. 

In so far as Tales and Illustrations are concerned, the 3s. 6d. 
Edition will be the same as the original 6s. one. But the Editor's 
Prefaces, Notes, Parallels, and References are omitted. 

A full list of the Series, a specimen of Mr. Batten's beautiful 
Illustrations, and a very small selection from the numberless kindly 
notices which the Press has bestowed upon the Series, will be 
found on the following pages. 

2 



Fairy Tales of the British Empire. 

English Fairy Tales. Complete Edition, xvi., 255 pages, 9 
full-page Plates, and numerous Illustrations in the text. 
Designed Cloth Cover, Uncut or Cilt Edges. 6s. 

The same. Children's Edition, viii., 227 pages, 7 full- 
page Plates, and numerous Illustrations in text. Cloth, Cut. 
3s. 6d. 

More English Fairy Tales. Complete Edition, xvi., 243 pages. 
8 full-page, and numerous Illustrations in text. Designed 
Cloth Cover, Uncut or Gilt Edges. 6s. 

The same. Children's Edition, viii., 214 pages, 7 full- 
page Plates, and numerous Illustrations in text. Cloth, Cut. 
3S. 6d. 

Celtic Fairy Tales. Complete Edition, xvi., 274 pages, 8 full- 
page Plates, numerous Illustrations in text. Designed Cloth 
Cover, Uncut or Gilt Edges. 6s. 

The same. Children's Edition, viii., 236 pages, 7 full-page 
Plates and numerous Illustrations in text. Cloth, Cut. 3s. 6d. 

More Celtic Fairy Tales. Complete Edition, xvi., 234 pages, 
8 full-page Plates, numerous Illustrations in text. Designed 
Cloth Cover, Uncut or Gilt Edges. 6s. 

The same. Children's Edition, viii., 217 pages, 7 full- 
page Plates, and numerous Illustrations in text. Cloth, Cut. 
SS' 6d. 
Indian Fairy Tales. Complete Edition, xvi., 255 pages, 9 full- 
page Plates, and numerous Illustrations in text. Designed 
Cloth Cover, Uncut or Gilt Edges. 6s. 
JVo Children's Edition of the ^^ Indian Fairy Tales" 
will be issued for the present. 

N.B. — A few copies of the Japanese Vellum Issues, printed in 
large 8vo, with double state of the plates, are still to be had of 
Indian, More Celtic, and More English Fairy Tales. Prices may 
be learnt on application to the Publisher. The special issues of 
Enghsh and Cehic Fairy Tales, entirely out of print, command a 
heavy premium. 

3 




Specimen of Mr. Batten's full-page Illustrations to " Fairy Tales 

of the British Empire." 

4 



Some ipress IRoticcs 

OF 

JACOBS' AND BATTEN'S FAIRY TALES. 



English Fairy Tales. 

Daily Graphic. — •• As a collection of fairy tales to delight children of all 
ages, ranks second to none." Globe.—" A delight alike to the young people 
and their elders." £:«^/a«^.— " A most delightful volume of fairy tales." 
Dailv Neivs.—"A more desirable child's book ... has not been seen for 
many a day." Athenaum.—" From first to last, almost without exception, 
these stories are delightful." E. S. Hartland.— " The most delightful 
book of fairy tales, taking form and contents together, ever presented to 
children.'' Miss Thackeray.—" This delightful book." Review of Reviews. 
— " Nothing could be more fascinating." 

Celtic Fairy Tales. 

Scotsman. — " One of the best books of stories ever put together." Free- 
man's Jouynal.—" An admirable selection." y^mJ.—" Delightful stories, 
exquisite illustrations by John D. Batten, and learned notes." Daily 
Telegraph.—" A stock of delightful little narratives." Daily Chronicle.—" A 
charming volume skilfully illustrated." Pall Mall Budget.— "A perfectly 
lovely book. And oh! the wonderful pictures inside." Liverpool Daily 
Post. — " The best fairy book of the present season." Oban Times. — " Many 
a mother will bless Mr. Jacobs, and many a door will be open to him from 
Land's End to John o' Groat's." 

More English Fairy Tales. 

Atheuaiim. — "Will become more popular with children than its prede- 
cessor." Notes and Queries. — "Delightful and in every respect worthy of 
its predecessor." Glasgoiu Herald. — " A more delightful collection of fairy 
tales could hardly be wished for." Glasgoio Evening News. — "The new 
volume of ' English Fairy Tales ' is worthy of the one that went before, 
and this is really saying a great deal." 

More Celtic Fairy Tales. 

Daily Chronicle. — "A bright exemplar of almost all a fairy-tale book 
should be." Saturday Revieiv.— "'De\\g\\t.{vi.\ for reading and profitable for 
comparison." Notes and Queries. — "A delightful companion into a land of 
enchantment." Irish Daily Independent. — " Full of bold and beautiful illus- 
trations." North British Daily Mail. — "The stories are admirable, and 
nothing could be better in their way than the designs." News of the World. 
■ — " Air. Batten has a real genius for depicting fairy folk." 

Indian Fairy Tales. 

Dublin Daily Express. — " Unique and charming anthology." Daily News. 

"Good for the schoolroom and the study." Star. — " Illustrated with a 

charming freshness of fancy." Gloucester Journal. — "A book which is some- 
thing more than a valuable addition to folk-lore ; a book for the student as 
well as for the child." Scotsman. — "Likely to prove a perfect success." 
Literary World. — "Admirably grouped, and very enjoyable." 



WORKS BY HIS HONOUR 
JUDGE EDWARD ABBOTT PARRY. 

Illustrated by ARCHIE MACGREGOR. 

THE issue of Katawavipits : its T>-eatment and Cure, in the 
Christmas Season of 1895, revealed a writer for children 
who, in originality, spontaneity, and fulness of humour 
as well as in sympathy with and knowledge of childhood, may be 
compared, and not to his disadvantage, with Lewis Carroll. And, 
as is the case with " Alice in Wonderland," an illustrator was 
found whose sympathy with his author and capacity for rendering 
his conceptions have won immediate and widespread recognition, 
A specimen of the illustrations and a small selection from the press 
notices will be found overleaf. 

KATAWAMPVS: its Treatment and Cure. Second Edition. 
96 pages. Cloth. 3s. 6d. 

BUTTER'SCOTIA, or, a Cheap Trip to Fairy Land. 180 pages. 
Map of Butter-Scotia, many Full-page Plates and Illustrations 
in the Text. Bound in specially designed Cloth Cover. 6s. 

KATAWAMPUS KANTICLES. Music by Sir J. F. Bridge, 
Mus. Uoc, Organist of Westminster Abbey. Words by His 
Honour Judge E. A. Parry. Illustrated Cover, representing 
Kapellmeister Krab, by Archie Macgregor. Royal 8vo, 
Is. 

For Christmas 1897. 

THE FIRST BOOK OF KRAB. Christmas Stories for 
Children of all Ages. 132 pages, with many Full-page Plates 
and Illustrations in the Text. Bound in specially designed 
Cloth Cover. 3s. 6d. 

6 



KATAWAMPUS: Its Treatment and Cure. 

By His Honour Judge E. A. PARRY. 

Illustrated by ARCHIE MACGREGOR. 
Second Edition, Cloth, 3s. 6d. 



the 



lprc33 IRotices. 

"One of the very best books of the season." — The World. 

"A very deUghtful and original book." — Review 0/ Reviews. 

"The book is one of rare drollery, and the verses and pictures 
are capital of their kind." — Saturday Review. 

"We strongly advise both parents and children tu read 
book." — Guardian. 

" A truly delightful little book. . . . "—Pall Ma/l Gazette. 

"A tale full of jinks and merriment." — Daily Chronicle. 

" The brightest, wittiest, and most logical fairy-tale we have 
read for a long time." — Westminster Gazette. 

"Its fun is of the sort that children revel in and 'grown-ups' 
also relish, so spontaneous and irresistible is it." 

Manchester Guardian. 

"A delightful extravaganza of the 'Wonderland' type, l)ut by 
no means a slavish imitation." — Glasgoiv Herald. 

"Since 'Alice in Wonderland' there has not been a book more 
calculated to become a favourite in the nursery. ' — Baby. 




THE BOOK OF WONDER VOYAGES. 

Edited with Introduction and Notes by JOSEPH JACOBS. 

Illustrated by J. D. BATTEN. 

Square demy 8vo, sumptuously printed in large clear type on 
specially manufactured paper, at the Ballantyne Press. With 
Photogravure Frontispiece, and many Full-page Illustrations 
and Designs in the Text. Specially designed Cloth Cover, 6s. 

Co7itents. — The Argonauts — The Voyage of Maelduin — The 
Journeyings of Hasan of Bassorah to the Islands of Wak-Wak — 
How Thorkill went to the Under World and Eric the Far- 
Travelled to Paradise. 

This, the latest of the volumes in which Mr. Jacobs and Mr. 
Batten have collaiborated with such admirable results, will be 
welcomed as heartily as its predecessors by the children of the 
English-speaking tvorld. A specimen of Mr. Batten s illustration 
is appended. 




fVORKS ILLUSTRATED BT MISS in NI FRED 
SMITH^ Silver and Gold Medallist, South Kensington, 
JVinner of the Princess of J Vales' Prize, etc. etc. 



CHILDREN'S SINGING GAMES, with the Tunes 

to which they are Sung. Collected and Edited by Alice 
Bertha Gomme. Pictured in Black and White by Winifred 
Smith. Two Series, each 3s. 6d. 



Charming albums in small oblong 
4to, printed on antique paper and 
bound in specially designed cloth 
cover, and serving equally for the nur- 
sery, the schoolroom, and the drawing- 
room. Mrs. Ciomme, the first living 
authority on English games, has care- 
fully chosen the finest and most inter- 
esting of the old traditional singing 
games, has provided accurate text and 
music, has given precise directions for 
playing, and added notes pointing out 
the historical interests of these survivals 
of old world practices. The humour, 
spirit, and grace of Miss Winifred 
Smith's drawings may be sufficiently 
gauged from the annexed specimens 
and from the following press notices. 




Some iprcss IWoticcs of "CbilC>rcirj 
Situiiiui (3amc5." 

Baby.—'-K delightful gift for little boys 
and girls. . . . Cannot fail to become quickly 
popular." 

Journal of Education.—" Most charmingly 
illustrated." 

Saturday Review.— '• A truly fascinating 
book. ... It is hopeless to make a choice 
which is best. The traditional rhymes and 
music, so quaintly and prettily illustrated, 
with moreover so much humour and go in 
all the designs, are charming." 

Scotsman.— "The pictures must please any- 
body who can appreciate delicate humour." 

/ioo/twa;;. — " The designs are witty, pretty. 
and effective." 

Sylvia's Journal.— "The illustrations are 
charming." 




NURSERY SONGS AND RHYMES OF ENGLAND. 

Pictured in Black and White by Winifred Smith. Small 
4to. Printed on hand-made paper. In specially designed 
cloth cover, 3s. 6d. 



Some ipress IRotices of ''IRurscrg Songs aiiD IRbgmcs." 

Literary World. — "Delightfully illustrated." 

Atheiiaum. — "Very cleverly drawn and humorous designs." 

Manchester Guardian. — " All the designs are very apt and suited to the 
comprehension of a child." 

Scotsman. — " The designs are full of grace and fun, and give the book an 
artistic value not common in nursery literature." 

Globe. — " The drawings are distinctly amusing and sure to delight 
children." 

Star. — " Really a beautiful book. . . . Winifred Smith has revelled into 
old rhymes, and young and old alike will in their turn revel in the results 
of her artistic revelry." 

Pall Mall Gazette. — "No book of nursery rhymes has charmed us so 
much." 

Magazine of Art. — " Quite a good book of its kind." 

Woman. — "Miss Smith's drawings are now celebrated and are indeed 
very beautiful, decorative, and full of naive humour." 

10 



WORKS BT MRS. ERNEST RJDFORD. 

SONGS FOR SOMEBODY. Verses by Dollie 

Radford. Pictures by Gertrude Bradley. Square 
crown 8vo. Six plates printed in colour by Edmund 
Evans, and 36 designs in monochrome. Coloured cover 
by Louis Davis. 3s. 6d. 

GOOD NIGHT. Verses by Dollie Radford. 

Designs by Louis Davis. Forty pages entirely designed by 
the artist and pulled on the finest and the thickest cartridge 
paper. Boards and canvas back with label, 2s. 6d. 
Some ipress IKlotices. 

Daily Chronicle. — " As far as we know no one else sings quite like Mrs. 
Radford ; hers is a bird's note — thin, high, with a sweet thrill in it, and the 
thrill is a home thrill, a nest thrill." 

Commonivealth . — " We have read with pure enjoyment Mrs. Radford's 
slight but charming cycle of rhymes." 

Star. — "A tender spirit of motherhood inspires Mrs. Radford's simple 
little songs." 

Review of Reviews. — "Very charming poems for children not unworthy 
even to be mentioned in the same breath with Stevenson's ' Child's Garden 
of Verses.' " 

Athenceum.- — " ' Good Night' is one of the daintiest little books we have 
seen for years. The verses are graceful and pretty, and the illustrations 
excellent. It will please both young and old." 

Literary World. — " Charming little songs of childhood." 

Neiv Age. — "Mrs. Radford is closely in touch with a child's mind, and 
her ideal child is a nice, soft, loving little creature whom we all want to 
caress in our arms." 

Artist. — " Since Blake died never has a book been produced which can 
so truly be described as a labour of love to the artist as ' Good Night.' " 



MEDI/EVAL LEGENDS. Being a Gift-Book to 

the Children of England, of Five Old-World Tales from 
France and Germany. Demy 8vo. Designed cloth cover, 
3$. 6d. 

Contents. — The Mysterious History of Melusina — The Story of 

_^sop — The Rhyme of the Seven Swabians — The Sweet and 

Touching Tale of Fleur and Blanchefleur — The Wanderings of 

Duke Ernest. 

Some iPress IHotices. 

Saturday Review. — " A capital selection of famous legends." 
Times. — " There can be no question as to the value of this gift." 
Morning Post. — " Full of romantic incident, of perilous adventure by land 
and sea." 
Guardian. — " This delightful volume. . . . In all respects admirable. " 
World. — "An elegant and tasteful volume." 

II \ 



THE HAPPY PRINCE, and other Tales. By OsCAR 

Wilde, i i 6 pages, small 4to. Beautifully printed in old- 
faced type, on cream-laid paper, with wide margins. Bound 
in Japanese vellum cover, printed in red and black. With 
three full-page Plates by Walter Crane, and eleven 
Vignettes by Jacomb Hood. Second Edition. 3s. 6d. 

Some press IRotices. 

Christian Leader.— "BeautiM exceedingly; charmingly devised— exqui- 
sitely told." 

Universal Reviev — " Heartily recommended." 

AtJienaum.—" Mr. Wilde possesses the gift of writing fairy tales in a rare 
degree." 

Dublin Evening Mail. — " A beautiful book in every sense." 

Glasgow Herald.—" It is difficult to speak too highly of these tales." 



For Christmas 1897. 

FAIRY TALES FROM THE FAR NORTH. By 

p. C. A.SBJORNSEN. Translated by H. L. Br^kstad, With 
94 Illustrations by E. Werenskiold, T. Kittelsen, and H. 
SiNDiNG. Small 4to (" Wonder Voyages " size), beautifully 
printed at the Ballantyne Press on specially manufactured 
paper. Cloth, designed Cover, 6s. 

*^* The raciest and quaintest of stories, the most spirited 
afid humorous of ilIustratio>is. 

THE GIANT CRAB, and other Tales from Old India. 

Retold by W. H. D. Rouse. Profusely Illustrated by W. 
Robinson. Square crown 8vo, beautifully printed at the 
Ballantyne Press on special paper. Designed cloth cover. 
3s. 6d. 

*^* Adaptation for English children of Tales from the Oldest 
Story Book ifi the world, the Jatakas, or Birth-stories of 
Buddha.