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Full text of "The Falcon"

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Dedication 




Mrs. M. M. Harris 



Realizing the foundation of our inspiration, the sacri- 
fices, the purpose of our accomplishment, We, the Class of 
1954, Humbly Dedicate Ourselves and the 1954 Falcon to 
You; You the Foundation of our inspiration; You the 
Sacrificer; You the Purpose of our accomplishments; 
You the Parents of the Class of 1954; for without You, 
we know our accomplishments would have been a struggle 
without hope, our paths distorted, our inspiration nought. 
WE Dedicate with our undying love and affection and 
thanks. 

To you, Mrs. M. M. Harris, the recipient of our dedi- 
cation, we appreciate the giving of yourself in service, 
motherly love, guidance, and for being that link of miles 
between our Parents at home and us here. 



To the Class of 1954, I can say that 1 have climbed 
the ladder along with you, for your first year at St. Agus- 
tine's was also my first year. I felt that your problems 
were my responsibility. Each member seemed like my 
own son or daughter. 

So, it is with great appreciation that I, parent of one 
member, yet, mother of all the class receive this book— 
The 1954 Falcon for the parents of the Llass ot iyt>4. 

Mrs. M. M. Harris 



© 







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orewon 




J. Bernard White 
Editor 



FOR hundreds of years man has tried to keep parts of the past with him; his en- 
deavors, his achievements, his gay and happy days, his mistakes and many of his 
life's wealth; by drawing pictures — as the cave man did, writing histories and epics, 
singing tales and folklores. All this to preserve what he once knew. We, like them, 
have struggled to keep with us those moments here at St. Augustine's, which are 
long past, with us. For out of this past we learned, we understood, we decided, 
and we received inspiration to search for greater Horizons. To make our lives 
happier, we present to you the Falcon; with our unlost memories, faces and names 
that would be forgotten, and our cherished days around the Angle of St. Augustine's. 
So 



Content 



AS you turn through the pages and watch the Falcon fly protectingly over our 
memories, page by page you may be reminded of 1. The Campus; 2. The Adminis- 
tration; 3. The Classes; 4, Organizations; 5. Honor Societies; 6. Greek Organi- 
zations: 7. The Activities: 8. Athletics; 9. Candid Camera. 



E 
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Wi 







The Blue and the White 

Alma Mater Song 



(1) 

The dark hue of the violet 
The snow white lily's bloom 
Are emblems of the virtues rare 
That seal all failure's doom; 
That give us courage ever 
To dare to do the right; 
For Alma Mater dear they stand, 
All hail the Blue and White. 



(2) 

All through the days we spend at school 

Midst scenes we hold so dear 

Where friendships made are ne'er forgot 

Where always there's good cheer; 

While for enchanting knowledge 

Or charming laurels bright 

We strive our best, we ne'er forget 

Tis for the Blue and White. 



(3) 

Where'er relentless duty calls 

O'er life's tempest'ous seas 

We'll go and loyally we'll bide 

What weal or woe decrees; 

Yes, loyal to the colors 

That stand for "Right is Might." 

Our country's flag, the Stars and Stripes 

And ours, the Blue and White 



(4) 

O sing a song of love and praise 

From loyal hearts and pure, 

For her our Alma Mater dear 

And for her ideals true; 

For the eighty-seven years she's triumphed, 

As upward in her flight 

She's climbed to be a beacon light — 

Her banner Blue and White. 



Words and Music by Wm. Augustine Perry 

Class 1902 

Composed for 50th Anniversary 







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DR. HAROLD LEONARD TRIGG 

President 

B.A., Morgan State College 

M.A., Syracuse University 

Ed.D., Morgan State College 












THE REVEREND SAMUEL D. RUDDER 

Chaplain 

B.S., City College, New York 

S.T.B., General Theological Seminary 



1 




College Chapel 




New Benson Library 




DR. JAMES A. BOYER 

Dean of Instruction 

B.A., Morehouse College 

M.A., Atlanta University 

Ed.D., University of Michigan 



REGINALD L. LYNCH 

Assistant Dean 

B.A., Howard University 

M.A., Pennsylvania State College 




Administration 



Clarence W. Wade, B.S., M.S. 
Dean of Men 

Irene L. Dickens, B.A. 
Dean of Women 

David C. Virco, B.S., M.A. 
Registrar 



Mable Bowden Wright, B.S. 
Secretary to President 

Lawrence W. High, B.A., M.A. 
Business Manager 

Bernice B. Taylor, B.S. 
Superintendent of Building and Grounds 



Ruth A. Robinson, B.S., 
Assistant Librarian 



M.S. 



Muriel B. Walker, B.S., M.A. 
Librarian 

Ruth Boyer Walker, B.A. 
Assistant Registrar 



Leona R. Barnes, B.A. 
Matron 

Seleah B. Clark, B.S. 
Matron 

Margaret A. Glascoe, A.B. 
Supervisor of Laundry 



Esther D. Parker 
Secretary 



Not pictured: 

Lemuel T. Delaney, M.D. 
College Physician 

Dorothy M. Hyman 
Cashier 

James H. Boykin 
Public Relations 

JOSIE COPELAND DOUGLASS, B.S. 
Secretary to Dean 

Harry W. Johnson, B.S. 
Director of Subsistence 

Mary E. Phillips 
Matron 





Faculty 



James A. Boyer, 
B.A., M.A., Ed.D. 
English 

William H. Delaney, 

B.A., M.A. 

English 

Pauline G. Staggers, 

B.A., M.A. 

English 



Margaret B. Bucc, B.A. 
Greek 

Ernestine B. Saunders, 

B.A., M.A. 

French and German 

Reginald L. Lynch, 
B.A., M.A. 

French 



Arthur E. Teele, 
A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Education 

James F. Wise, B.A., M.A. 
Art 

Geraldine L. Trigg, B.S. 
Art 



James H. Boykin, B.A., M.A. 
Political Science 

Gordon L. West, B.S., MA. 
Education 

Hazel W. Rice, B.S., M.A. 

Elementary Education 



David C. Virgo, B.S., M.A. 
English 

Pinky Mae Malone 
B.A., M.A. 
Psychology 

John F. Staggers, Jr. 
B.A., M.A. 

Sociology 



Wilson B. Inboruen, B.S. 
Physics and Mathematics 

Clarence W. R. Wade, 

B.S., M.S. 

Chemistry 

John H. Dauchtrey, 
B.S., M.S. 
Chemistry 



Richard E. Ball, 
B.S., M.B.A. 
Business 

Joseph Jones, Jr., B.S., M.S. 
Biology 

Wilbert W. Johnson, 

B.S., M.S. 

Biology 



Roy D. Moore, B.S., M.S. 
Health and Physical 
Education 

Elizabeth A. Young, 
B.A., M.Ed. 
Physical Education 

Georce R. Walker, Jr., 
B.S., M.S. 
Physical Education 



Fred J. Carnace, B.A., LL.B. 
Business 

Carolyn M. Smith, 
B.S., Ed.M. 
Sociology 

Jacqueline C. Flowers, B.S. 
Business 



Romaine S. Lambert, Mus. B. 
Vocal Music 




IVot Pictured: 

Marcus H. Boulware, 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Speech Correction, English 

Celia E. Davidson, 
B.Mus., M.M. 

Music 



Julia B. Delaney, B.A., M.A. 
Speech, English 

Richard H. Loeppert 
B.S.,' Ph.D. 

Chemistry 



Richard B. Matthews, 

B.A., M.S. 

Mathematics and Physics 

Samuel D. Rudder, 
B.S., S.T.B. 

Religious Education and 
Philosophy 



Rosa Lee Williams, 
B.A., M.A. 

History 



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Clyde E. Beatty 
President 



Senior Class Officers 




I.ROY Ml'RRELL 
'ice-President 



Virginia Shields 
Treasurer 



Mary P. Harris 
Secretary 




George Robinson 
Business Manager 



Miss Senior Class 





Mazelle Price 



Most Beautiful 



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Most Handsome 





Most Talkative 



Most Athletic 



Most Athletic and 
Best Dressed 



Best Dressed 





Most Popular 



Most Popular 




Most Energetic 



Most Talkative 





Most Likely to Succeed 



Most Likely to Succeed 





Most Dignified 



Most Studious 





Most Friendliest 



Most Poetic 






Neatest 



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Most Intellectual 



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Most Intellectual 




Most Business Like and 
Most Friendliest 



Most Business Like 




Most Dramatic 





Most Studious and 
Quietest 



Quietest 



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Most Musical 



Most Musical 




Most Artistic 




■; ■!■' 



Class History 



The Memories of September 17, 1950 will never be forgotten by us; for it was on this day that we experienced 
the start of a new life, entering college, which was another step leading to our future goal and we continued from 
that day to progress each year, until we have finally by hard studying, reached the highest peak in this step, which 
is the completion of a four year college career. 

This being 1954, four years have elapsed since we first came here seeking knowledge to help us reach our future 
goals successfully by preparing ourselves to live in a changing world; today, we the class of '54 feel that it will be 
quite interesting to turn the clock of time back to September 17, 1950 to see what really took place from that time 
up to the present. 

When we entered here September, 1950 as Freshmen, there were 158 of us. We not having had the exeprience 
of knowing what a Freshman went through his first week in school, stood in fear of the upperclassmen and the initia- 
tion that they would carry us through. Some of us could not see how we were going through a week of it, but it was 
interesting at the end to find that it really was not as hard as we thought it was going to be and if we had laughed 
instead of cried, we would have seen that it was all a matter of fun: for afterwards we found that we could not have 
found any schoolmates any better than those annoying upperclassmen we met our first week here. 

Some of us found it quite hard to get adjusted to a new life, but as time passed and everybody got down to hard 
studying, we, the Freshmen class at that time forgot about being in a different environment and became a member 
of the big family in every way at St. Augustine's. 

One of the first things that we did that was of importance that year was to organize the class. Mr. Merritt was 
given the opportunity of being our adviser and the officers of the class were: President, Howard Quander; Vice- 
President, Lloyd Parham; Secretary, Lillian Jacobs. Each of the officers did his duty; thus, helping to make that 
year a successful one. Many things of interest happened that year and we were the first class to experience them. 

It was our Freshman year that for the first time in the History of St. Augustine's the Freshman girls' dormitory 
was burned to the extent that they were unable to remain living in it. This created a lot of excitement and the girls 
had to adjust themselves to new living conditions. It was during this year also that some of the boys were allowed 
to go over into the Greek organization for the first time in the history of St. Augustine's, because of the fear of being 
drafted into the Army before they reached their Sophomore year. 

It was during 1950 that through the mighty efforts of the "Falcons" St. Augustine's defeated Shaw for the first 
time in almost two decades and this event should certainly go down in the history of our class, for it was during our 
time here that this event took place. 

On a whole, our freshman year was an enjoyable one and a successful one. Many of us were fortunate enough 
to make the Dean's list; though many of our abilities would not allow us to make the Dean's list we advanced in 
other areas. Along with hard studying, many of us joined in the extra-curricular activities and also the social ac- 
tivities of the school, thus making our first year a happy and unforgettable one. 

After getting adjusted to a college life, the spring was here before we realized it and it was time for us to depart 
for a period of three months. 

After three months of vacationing and rest from studying, we returned to St. Augustine's as sophomores and 
feeling that we really owned the campus, having the privilege to initiate the freshman as we had been the year befoie. 
Some of our classmates fell by the wayside during those three summer months that we' were out of school. Yes, we 
were sorry to lose them but nevertheless did not let that interfere with our getting off to a good start for that year 
because most of us returned ready for the hardships and hard studying that faced us for that year. We realized that 
the road to success never runs smoothly, so we faced our hardships with a smile, and said to ourselves that we would 
continue to climb though sometimes we may feel like turning back. In spite of the hard studying and hardships that 
faced us our sophomore year, we did not forget the events that make history for St. Augustine's and our class. 

It was our Sophomore year that the Penick Hall of Science was dedicated and classes began there. We had quite 
a few members of the class to go into Greek organizations. As Homecoming came around, Odessa Ingram was our 
attendant to the Homecoming Queen. The class was well represented when the Honor Roll appeared. So you see 
we tried not to be a one-sided class but a well-rounded one, enjoying the extra-curricular activities and social side of 
college life along with hard studying. We accomplished much that year and departed for the summer with high hopes 
of returning the next. 



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"He who knows not and knows that he knows not is a junior." Yes, that is what we were when we returned in 
September 1952. 

Though we lost many members of the class that summer we were happy to have such transfer students as Gladys 
Daves, Marion V. Solomon and others to become a part of our class. We had made great progress in the past two 
years and had come back with the intention to continue our junior year. 

On our return, we were greeted by many new faculty members, who through the year did their best in helping 
us in all of our undertakings. Our class officers were, President — Mary Harris, Secretary — Ernestine High and under 
their leadership, we did well. During this year some of our classmates, Lloyd Parham and George Robinson became 
members of Alpha Kappa Mu, an honor society and then at the President's Assembly such members as Lil- 
lian Jacobs, Lloyd Parham, and Carrie Flemmings received certificates from the President of the college for the noble 
accomplishments they had made that year and since the day we arrived. Some of these same persons, Parham, Jacobs 
and others received awards on the commencement day of that year. Although many of us did not make history for the 
class that way, we did so otherwise. We had such athletes as Jerimiah Butts, Bobby Offutt, Carl. Edge and others. 
Besides being represented in the field of athletics we had such persons as Gladys Daves and Theodore Fagan represent- 
ing us in the field of Music. 

It was this year that the basketball team for the first time won second place in the C. I. A. A. tournament and 
had the best player of the year. We were proud to have Moxley, a member of our class on the team. 

What we did that year determined whether our greatest desire, becoming a senior, would be fulfilled at the end 
of that school year. Knowing this, many of us burned the midnight oil many nights and suffered the hardships that 
came along with the pleasures, and at the end of the year believe it or not we were seniors. 

The first thing that disturbed us, emotionally, our senior year when we returned, was the learning of the loss 
of one of the faithful members of the Staff of Saint Augustine's, Mrs. Hall. Although we grieved her loss, we did 
not let it stop us from starting the year off with hopes of making it the most noted and progressive year of our 
college career. 

As officers of the class, we chose, President- -Clyde Beatty, Secretary — Mary Harris and Virginia Shields as 
Treasurer with Mr. W. Johnson — adviser. Under their leadership we were able to see that we were about to reap 
the fruits of labor here for four long years. 

From our class, Lloyd Parham, George Robinson. Lillian Jacobs, Cecelia Hall, Mary Harris and Carl Smith were 
selected to appear in Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. 

This year was our busiest year and we had very little time for play. There was the publishing of the yearbook 
of which Joe B. White was editor and that required quite a lot of work. There was the fitting of caps and gowns, 
and above all, the upkeep of our scholarship, so that at the end of the last semester, when "Pomp and Circumstance" 
starts to play, all would be able to march down the aisle to the front of the Auditorium to take our seat as one of the 
outgoing seniors of '54. 

Now, as we the class of '54 stand at the peak of our college career, we realize how much our President, teachers 
and other advisers have meant to us and what ever success we may gain will be due to their sincerity and patient 
instruction. 

As we — with tears in our eyes and sorrow in our hearts — turn to leave this, our "Alma Mater" taking the ideals 
we have gotten from here with us, we realize that what has been instilled in us here can never die but will live 
eternally and may the guiding light of success direct each of our feet into the path that leads to the future careers that 
each of us have planned. 

May we also realize from the experience we have had here during our four years, that the road to success never 
runs smoothly; so we must face our hardships with a smile and not turn back for all our days can not be sunny, 
some must be dark and dreary. 

To the president, teachers, advisers and all others affiliated with St. Augustine's College, you can be sure that 
no matter where we are: at work, in the service, or furthering our education elsewhere, we will never forget St. Augus- 
tine's, "Alma Mater." 

With happiness as well as sorrow we bid you "Adieu." 

Class of '54, 
Lillian Jacobs. 



Words to the Class Song of *54 

Past college days we will regret, 

While toil and strain we may forget 

Past College years already gone, 

To our sorrow we're alone 

Our dearer Saint Augustine's we'll always recall, 

Our life, our dreams can not fall, 

For your dear guiding hand 

Our College dreams all gone. 

While toil and strain we may forget 

Past college days we will regret 

To our sorrow we're alone 

Our Class of Fifty-Four. 



Joe Bernard White 



Class P 



ass roem 

SAINT AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 
OUR MOTHER OF MANY TEACHINGS 

Dear Saint Augustine's we hate to leave you 
It Breaks our hearts and we want you to know 
You've done your best, so leave the rest to us my dear 
And we'll follow through the coming years. 

So long dear school we wish you happiness and fame 
To reach the top should always be our aims 
We'll keep our smiles each day where ever we may go 
Then we'll be proving Saint Augustine's teachings 
Don't you know. 

Alroy Murrell, '54 



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Dorothy Lee Alston 
"Bunch" 
"Forward ever; backward never." 
Elementary Education. 








Mattie Bailey 

"Matt" 

'To thine ownself be true.' 

English 



Clyde E. Beatty, Jr. 

"Governor" 

"All that I am or hope to be, 1 
owe to my angel Mother." 

Pre-Theology — English 




Dramatic Club, Big Sister's Club. 



Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Pan- 
Hellenic Council, Student Coun- 
cil, Canterbury Club, Brotherhood 
of St. Andrew, Layrcader and 
Acolyte. 



Mary Virginia Boyd 

"Ginger" 

"Give to the world the best that 



you have and the best 
come back to you" 

Elementary Education 



will 




Big Sister's Club. 



Reginald Brooks 

"To thine ownselj be true.' 
Social Science 



Glinzerine Buie 

"Jackie" 

"A wise old owl sat on an oak. 
The more he saw, the less he 

spoke. 
The less he spoke, the more he 

heard. 
Why aren't we like this wise old 

bird?" 




Social. Science Club. 



Science 
Big Sister's Club, Dramatic Club. 



Jeremiah Butts 

"Rocky" 

"He who sets a spark to another, 
must glow himself." 

Natural Science 



James Chadwick 

"Cool Papa" 

"Curb your heights of elation and 
also your depths of despond- 
ency. Just live on an even 
keel." 

Health — Physical Education 



Esther Lockley Clarke 

"Puddin' " 

'Beautiful on the mountains are 
the feet of those that bringeth 
good tidings." 

Business Education 




Alpha Phi 
Track Team. 



Alpha Fraternity, 



Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Var- 
sity Football, Baseball, Varsity 
Basketball. 



Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Big 
Sister's Club, Student Council 
Representative. 



Frances Clarke 



Business Education 




Big Sister's Club, Dramatic Club. 



Orie P. Clarke 

"0 P" 

"Many people have the right aim 
in life but never pull the 
trigger." 

Elementary Education 



Inez Colvin 
"To thine ownselj be true 
Biology — Natural Science 




Big Sister's Club. 



Big Sister's Club, Dramatics Club, 
Pyramid Club. 



Marjorie Cox 

"Little Bit" 

"It is only the ignorant who 
despise Education." 

Business Education 



Gwendolyn Delois Crandal 

"Lois" 

"We know what we are but know 
not what we may be." 

Health— Physical Education 




Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Big 
Sister's Club, Falcon Staff, Usher 
Guild. 



Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Big 
Sister's Club, P. E. Major Club. 



Gladys Marie Daves 

"G. D." 

"Patience is a remedy for every 
sorrow." 

Music 




Choral Club, Choir, Canterbury 
Club, Falcon Staff, Big Sister's 
Club. 



Mary Wiggins Dawson 

"Wigg" 

"Great things be ahead jor those 
who seek toward a definite 
goal with faith." 

Health — Physical Education 




Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Cur- 
riculum Council, Athletic Coun- 
cil. 



Theodore Facan 

"Teddy" 

Business 

"Once to every man and nation- 
comes the moment to decide; 
In the strife of truth with 
Falsehood for the good or evil 
side." 




Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Fal- 
con Staff, Canterbury Clurv 
Chapel Choir. 



Carrie Mae Fleming 

"Flem" 

'Knowledge is a treasure, but 
practice is the key to it." 

Health — Physical Education 



Big Sister's Club, P. E. Club. 



Joseph W. Grant 

"Tip-Light" 

"A man's own manners and char- 
acter is what becomes him." 

Elementary Education — Social 
Studies 




Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew, 
Ushers Guild, Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil. 



Mary Allene Gray 

"Sauge" 

'Where there's a will there's a 
way." 

Natural Sciences 




Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Big 
Sister's Club, Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil, Falcon Staff, Dramatic Club. 



Cecelia Hall 

"Ciel" 

"Good habits are the soul's 
muscles; the more you use 
them, the stronger they grow." 

Social Sciences 




Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, 
Sigma Rho Sigma, Social Science 
Club, Falcon Staff, Big Sister's 
Club, Who's Who in American 
Universities and Colleges. 



Mary Placyd Harris 

"Heavy" 

"11 jaut des raisons pour purler, 
mais i! n'en jaut point pour 
se taire." 

French — English 

Who's Who in American Univer- 
sities and Colleges, Curriculum 




Council, Student Representative, 
Phi Kappa Alpha, Dramatic Club, 
Big Sister's Club, Falcon Staff, 
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. 



Ernestine High 

"Ernie" 
Social Science 



Dorothy L. Holden 

"Dot" 

History — English 
'Too much and too little educa- 
tion hinder the mind." 




Charm Club, Big Sister's Club, 
Ushers and Wardens Guild, Alter 
Guild, Social Science Club, Can- 
terbury Club, Ivy Leaf Club, 
Dormitory Parliamentarian. 



Sigma Gamma Rho 
Social Science Club. 



Sorority, 



<■■<■ 



Lenora Marie Holman 

"// at first you don't succeed, 
try, try again." 

French — Sociology 



Ronald N. Holmf.s 

"Sug" 

"Roiving; not drifting.' 

Natural Sciences 



Herbert Alford Hoover 

"Shotgun" 

"It's just a matter oi time." 

Business Education 




Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. Phi 
Kappa Alpha, Student Leaders, 
Social Science Club, Pan-Hellenic 
Council, Choir, Choral Club, 
Altar Guild, Canterbury Club, 
Big Sister's Club. 



Beta Kappa Chi, Alpha Kappa 
Mu, Falcon Staff, Curriculum 
Council, Brotherhood of St. An- 
drew, Personnel Committee, 
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. 



Football Team, Student Leaders, 
Athletic Committee, Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity. 



Gladys M. Hopkins 

To thine ownselj be true." 

Social Science 




Big Sister's Club, Social Science 
Club. 



Lillian Jacobs 

"Lil" 

"A man's own character is the 
arbiter of his fortune." 

English and French 




Dramatic Club, Big Sister'sj Col- 
lege Student Representative, Phi 
Kappa Alpha, Who's Who, Fal- 
con Staff. 



Nathornia Elizabeth Johnson 

"Dot" 

"Always remember that knowl- 
edge come but wisdom ling- 
ers." 

Elementary Education 




Big Sister's Club. 



Mamie I. Joy.ner 

"Did nothing in particular, but 
did it very well." 

Business Education 



Ernest Lambert 

"Lamb" 
'Yield not to temptation." 



Eleanor Clarice LeFlore 

"Speech is silver; silence is gold.' 

Business Education 




Cheerleader. 



Curriculum Council, Canterbury 
Club, Big Sister's Club, Alpha 
Kappa Alpha Sorority. 



Bernice Lofti.n 
"Bee" 

" Th . e D n ° r , t ° success w labeled- 
PUSH'." 

Business 




Big Sister's 
Counsel. 



Club, Curriculum 



'The 

Results 



Edgar E. Lowry 

"Skip" 

world is looking 
-not — Excuses.'' 

Commerce 



for- 




Brotherhood of St. Andrew Fal- 
con Staff, Kappa Alpha Psi 
fraternity. 



Lenora McEachin 

"Mack" 
"Give to the world the best that 
you have and the best will 
come back to you." 

Physical- Education 




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Rose Marie McNeil 

"Miss Mac" 

'The road to success never runs 
smoothly, so jace your hard- 
ships with a smile." 

Business Education 




Big Sister's Club, Dramatic Club. 



Lillie Mae Mercer 

"Cousin Lillie" 

"/ have fought a good fight: I 
have finished my course: I 
have kept the faith." 

Elementary Education 




Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Big Sis- 
ter's Club. 



Warren D. Moxley 

"Kentucky" 

"Together we stand; divided we 
fall." 

Pre-Med. 




Lettermen's Club, Pan-Hellenic 
Council, Pen Staff, Falcon Staff, 
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. 



Swannie Monroe 

"Kate" 

"Into ourselves, our future lies' 

Elementary Education 




Canterbury Club. 



William H. Moore 

"Bill Moore" 

'Fools walk in where angels jear 
to tread." 

Social Studies — Business 
Administration 



Alroy Murrell 

"Kilroy" 

"All that I am and all that I hope 
to be, I owe it to my Dear 
Mother — the one that is so 
dear to me." 

Business Education 




Social Science Club, Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity. 






Campus Calendar Staff, Canter- 
bury Club, Phi Beta Sigma Fra- 
ternity. 



Fannie S. Murrei.l 

"Seek and you shall find." 

Health— Physical Education 



Laura Adams Newell 

"To thine ownselj be true.' 

Natural Science 




Big Sister's Club, Charm Club, 
Pan-Hellenic Council, Zeta Phi 
Beta Sorority. 



Big Sister's Club, Sigma Camma 
Rho Sorority. 



Bobby Ray Offutt 

"Mr. B" 

"// you see good in me, that's my 
mother's contribution to all 
that is good. 
If you can't, then I've failed the 
one who loves me most." 

Physical Education and Sociology 




Varsity: Football, Boxing, Track, 
Wrestling, Athletic Council. 



Lloyd V. Parham 

"Frenchie" 

"Careful planning, time, unrelent- 
ing effort, and an insatiable 
urge culminates in success." 

Sociology — History 




Social Science Club, Student 
Council, Alpha Kappa Mu, Sigma 
Rho Sigma, Who's If ho Among 
Students in American Universities 
and Colleges, Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity. 



Patricia Ann Perky 

"Pat" 

"Honesty is the best policy." 

Elementary Education 



Mazelle Price 

"Mae" 

'Be useful where thou livest." 

Elementary Education 




Big Sister's Club. 



Big Sister's Club, Pan-Hellenic 
Council, Sigma Gamma Rho 
Sorority. 



George Robinson 

"Roberto" 

"Give so much time to the im- 
provement of yourself that you 
have no time to criticize 
others." 

Business 





Social Committee, Curriculum 
Council, Alpha Kappa Mu, Who's 
Who. 



Marlene Lynch Sanders 

"And soon, too soon, we part with 
pain. 
To sail o'er silent seas again." 

Biology — General Science 




Dramatic Club, Student Council. 



Doris N. Sherrod 

"Dot" 

"There's so much good in the 
worst of us, and so much bad 
in the best of us, that it 
doesn't behoove any of us to 
talk about the rest of us." 

Business Education 





Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Big 
Sister's Club, Social Committee. 



Virginia G. Shields 

"Jinks" 

To thine ownself be true." 

Elementary Education 





Big Sister's Club, Dramatic Club, 
Curriculum Council, Delta Sigma 
Theta Sorority. 



Marion Vardelle Solomon 

•Work is the key to Success." 

Elementary Education 




Big Sisters Club, Safety Warden. 



Freddie C. Thompson 

'NEVER criticize— UNLESS you. 
have something better to 
offer." 

Elementary Education 




Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Big 
Sister's Club, Social Committee, 
Cheering Squad. 



Gloria Aramenta Thorpe 

"Glo" 

"Say tut revoir, but not good-bye. 
Though past is dead, love can- 
not die." 



Shirley Tunstall 

"To thine ownself be true." 

Business Education 




Social Science 
Social Science Club. 



Lela Mae Treaser Walker 
"Hips" 

'When wealth is lost, nothing is 

lost. 
When health is lost, something 

is lost. 
When character is lost, all is 

lost!" 

Health— Physical Education 




P. E. Club. 



Addie White 

"Mickey" 

"Nothing great was ever accom- 
plished without hard work." 

Health — Physical Education 




Zeta Phi Beta Sorority. 



Joe Bernard White 

"Little Tex" 

"The man who never makes mis- 
takes is the man who never 
does anything." 




Natural Science — Pre-Theology 
Student Council, Brotherhood of 
St. Andrew, Canterbury Club, Pen 
Staff, Dramatic Club, Falcon 
Staff Editor, Kappa Alpha Psi 
Fraternity. 



Stanley White 




IZ 



Richard D. Williams 

"Tex" 

"/ came. I saw. I conquered.' 

History — Social Science 



Betty Florence Byru 

"BB" 

"To thine ownselj be true." 

Social Science 



McCluey Hewett 

"Rum Som'em Hewett" 

"To do my best in all my En- 
deavors, 
For those who love me, for 
society and for myself." 

Business Education 

Social Science 




Brotherhood of St. Andrew, Var- 
sity Club, Baseball, Track. 



Lawam Commander, Jr. 

"Duke" 

"Opportunity is like an old car, 
it is always knocking." 

Elizabeth City, North Carolina 



Beulah Saunders Harper 

"Plum" 

"Life holds no higher pleasure 
than that of surmounting diffi- 
culties." 

Business Education 




Social Club 



Last Will and Testament of the Class of 54 



We, the Senior Class of 1954 of St. Augustine's College, being indisputably of sound mind and memory and about 
to pass from the great institution of learning where we have studied and learned, played and had fun, make, publish 
and declare this to be our last will and testament, and do hereby proclaim all former wills invalid. 

Realizing the finality of this, we do hereby declare the following: 

Item I 
To the community at large, we bequeath the influence we have been for the honorable and better things of life; 
the interest in music, in dramatics, in charitable drives; all these have contributed to the development of the cultural 
spirit, and in all we have taken part and done our share. 

Item II 
To our beloved parents, in appreciation of their faithful endeavor to secure an excellent college education for 
us, we give our immortal love, deepest regret, and enduring reverence. 

Item III 

To our class adviser, Mr. W. W. Johnson, we lesve our brightest smiles, and heartiest cheers, plus our hopes that 
he will be graciously rewarded for his work. 

Item IV 
To our beloved Alma Mater, we leave our treasured memories, loyalty, and ardent affections. 

Item V 
To our esteemed and understanding President, Dr. H. L. Trigg, we bequeath our best wishes for more success in 
the coming years, for the betterment and prosperity of our dear school. 

Item VI 

To our Deans and Counselors, we leave our regrets for the many headaches we have caused them and our appre- 
ciation for the helpful guidance they have given us. We sincerely thank you for your great share in our success. 

Item VII 
To the faculty (long life to every member), we bequeath our high grades, studiousness, and in general our genius. 

Item VIII 
To the Junior Class, as our rightful and worthy successors, we bequeath our richest treasures — our Senior dignity, 
our excellent wit, our superlative brilliancy, our charming manners, our splendid grades and our triumphant exit — 
rare treasures they are! Our valuables — capacity for fun, ability to giggle, our good times, our friendship, and our 
loyalty. Count them among the richest of legacies you receive. 

Item IX 

To the exhuberant and vivacious Sophomores, we bestow the power to resist the many temptations that will con- 
front them before graduation. 

Item X 

To the Freshman (those little innocent creatures), we leave the ability to uphold the motto of our Institution — 
"The Truth Shall Make You Free." 

Item XI 
The following valuable personal .bequests, freely and fully given, should be treasured as a continual reminder of 



the abundant and overwhelming generosity of the class and the individuals thereof. We trust these responsibilities will 
be assumed promptly and bring important results: 

Earl Carter leaves to James Cameron his ability to covness. 

To Azella Foster, Fannie Murrell bequeaths her slimer up and punch like Johnny Bratton. 

To Susie Moore, Inez Calvin wills her dignity. 

The lovely smile of Eleanor LeFlore is left to Greta Cooke and her model height to Doris Gibson. 

Joseph W. Grant bequeaths his deepest love and undying affections to Helen McLamb, that it may shine through- 
out her entire years. To Parker he leaves his ability to be cool, calm, and collected. 

Edgar Lowry wills his coolness and ability to get along with people to Robert Vance. 

Ronald Holmes wills his ability to stay out of trouble to Arthur Taplett and Sam Brown and his yacancy in 
B. K. X. to Ulysses Madison. 

To Arlene Moore, Gloria Thorpe bequeaths her ability to keep a calm voice at all times — especially when in class. 

To Nellie Johnson, Lela M. Walker wills her air of dignity. 

Glinzerine Buie wills her ability to think scientifically to Hazel Sampson. 

The chapel seat of Swannie Monroe is left to Mrs. Mary A. Harry, in hopes that she will use it with the same rev- 
erence as did the former owner. 

Richard D. Williams turns over to Ulysses Madison his ability to sleep through 8 o'clock classes and receive no 
credit for it. 

Clyde E. Beatty, Jr., bequeaths to Wilson McDowell his position as President of the Senior Class. 

Warren D. Moxley leaves his ability to be in the wrong place at the right time to all of his home boys. 

To Vance and Battle, Jeremiah "Rocky" Butts hereby leaves his "girl." 

To Clarence "Long Distance" Burks, Mamie Joyner leaves her ardent and everlasting friendship and to a certain 
junior "girl friend" the ability to play "cool" and stop roving around on other's private priperty. 

James Chadwick's "K-town" brogue chatter goes to Sidney Smith and he also leaves his ability to croon to his 
roommate, Eugene Stevenson. 

Herbert Alford Hoover bequeaths to James Allen his ability to adjust himself to a new environment. 

The talking ability of Virginia Shields goes to Genora Lassiter with the compliments of the giver. 

Marjorie Cox leaves behind her the following valuables: (1) To Azella Foster goes her ability to write letters so 
she will be able to receive one every two weeks instead of every ten weeks, and (2) To Doris Burney is left her seat in 
chapel. 

Dorothy Holden wills to Nellie Johnson her place in Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority in hopes that she will cherish 
the honor. 

Through the departure of Lillie Mae Mercer, Malissa Green inherits her height and Fannie James her love for 
Elementary Education. 

Mary Gray bequeaths to Matilda Moore her place in Tuttle Building and to Mildred Baines her height. 

Gwendolyn Crandol wills to Mildred Baines her love for Health and Physical Education and to Doris Green her 
love for Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority and hopes that she will be able to take her place. 

The ability to become an Elementary School teacher to Alice Massey in hopes that she will be successful in it 
through the years to come is a gift from Nathornia Elizabeth Johnson. 



Carrie Mae Flemings bequeaths to Vanilla Anderson her love for Health and Physical Education and hopes that 
she finds the subjects as fascinating as she. 

Mary Virginia Boyd wishes to bequeath to Florence McDaniel her perfect Chapel Attendance. 

Marlene L. Sanders wills to Charles Irving Cameron her parking place for his future car. 

In pondering over a suitable gift to leave behind her, she comes upon an idea. MARY PLACYD HARRIS leaves 
(avec ses compliments) this rare treasure in hopes that it will be cherished as well as used wisely. She bequeaths to the 
students remaining at St. Augustine's her initiative — the ability to occupy their minds with their classes and work on the 
campus thus allowing no evil thoughts to enter in; keeping in mind at all times the slogan, "AN IDLE MIND IS THE 

DEVIL'S WORKSHOP"; and above all casts aside all thoughts of love ... (at least until the Senior year.) 

Bernice Loftin wills to Nellie Johnson her place in room 18 of the Tuttle Building. 

Ernest Lambert wills his army experience to Leroy Harrison. 

Alroy Murrell bequeaths to Thelma Bowens his everlasting love, and to William Hennessee his ability to compre- 
hend Shorthand. 

Lloyd V. Parham bequeaths to Willie Battle his ability to be on time for his classes. 

To all his friends, Joe Bernard White leaves health and prosperity. To Owen Duncan and Eugene Shrumpert he 
leaves one of his girl friends and may the one who buys the biggest "orange drink" win; to Lockhart and John Thomas 
another girl friend, and to Oxley another one, and to all you lonely hearts and amateurs, he leaves the rest. 

Marion Verdell Solomon wills her love for St. Augustine's College to Gladys Towns. 

Mary Wiggins Dawson bequeaths to the "Auroras" her faith and courage to win what is justly theirs. 

The ability not to talk too much, a gift to Alene Moore with the compliments of Cecilia Hall. 

Rose Marie McNeil bequeaths to Marjorie Forte the ability to type 50 words per minute. 

Sarah Virgo receives a place in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges as a gift from 
Lillian Jacobs. 

Lenora McEachin wills to Maureen Aderson her ability to keep cool. 

Mazelle Price's love for St. Augustine's College goes to Matilda Moore and Barbara Woods. 

To Ilene Moore, Lenora Holman bequeaths her place in Student Leaders, and to Winifred Blanks, her place in 
Phi Kappa Alpha. 

ANY BROKEN PENS, stubs of pencils, cast-off notebooks, old term papers, lecture notes, mounds of gum we were 
compelled to stick out of sight to avoid faculty detection, and other mementoes, we bestow freely to the finder. 

Having signed and sealed this, our last will and testament of the said class on this eleventh day of January, in the 
year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-four, we hereby appoint as sole Administrator of this will, the 
President of our Class, Mr. Clyde Beatty, to be administered to its final degree. 

SIGNED HERETO: 

Mary Placyd Harris, Testator. 



// 



A Peck Into the Mind of a Dreamer" 



It is said that every rose has its thorn, and every joy its under-current of sorrow; 
certain it is that the graduating class of 1954 finds the pleasure of achievement 
dimmed by the severing of school and class friendships. 

All of us have had dreams. It is after graduation that we begin to realize these 
dreams. We must remember that in order to give reality to the fulfillment of our 
dreams we must be honest with ourselves, loyal to those we meet, and steadfast in 
our ideals. 

A certain Senior Girl was sitting in the Library. It was January 11, 1954, and 
the air was cool and moist. Mary Placyd Harris was trying to prepare for her 
coming finals, but her mind refused to be confined to the immediate' task. It 
wandered back over the happy adventures now soon to end forever; it wandered 
out over the more strenuous life now so soon to begin. She reminisced and planned, 
and out of the reminiscing and planning, a definite project took form — "A MAKE- 
BELIEVE DREAM." So engulfed was she in ecstasy that she fell asleep dreaming 
of the future. 

Nothing shows the power of dreams more clearly than the fact that they cause 
one to surrender things — the reality of which no one doubts — money, comforts, 
reputation, life itself. The illustration of this fact is revealed. She recorded as she 
dreamed — each style and epic characterizing her classmates as stars ten years from 
date. 

Dreaming can be wonderful, then all of a sudden one is thrown back into the 
world of consciousness where the worries of the present hurl him back to reality. 

The date is Monday, January 11, 1964. I am the wife of Mr. J. L. Hooker now 
and am on my way to Paris, France by plane to complete my work for a Ph.D. in 
Romance Languages. As I travel, my eyes focus on the clouds outside the window 
and — Behold! Stars are all about me. Luminous stars revealing the destinies and 
future fortunes in store for the Graduates of 1954. What have we here? A star 
of bright and glorious beauty — a star that foretells a future of brilliancy and 
honor. Whose name shines behind this luminous star? — Ronald N. Holmes is a 
Bio-chemist and has discovered a cure for cancer. Through this marvelous dis- 
covery, Ronald has become rich and retired with his wife and two lovely children. 
How lucky he is to be able to retire at such an early age. Two stars, no, three, 
are legal stenographers in the Law Offices of Attorney Richard D. Williams, 707 
McBrennon Boulevard, Tyler Texas. They are, Esther Clarke, Bernice Loftin. and 
Rose Marie McNeil. 

Other stars — Virginia Shields, Nathornia Johnson, Mazelle Price, Lillie Mercer, 
Swannie Monroe, Patricia Ann Perry, and Mary V. Boyd are all instructors at the 
J. W. Grant Elementary School, which was recently founded by Joseph Grant in 
Richmond, Virginia. Mr. Grant, I might add, is also the Principal of this ultra- 
modern school. Shining brightly by itself is another tiny star — Marjorie Cox is 
Mr. Grant's Private Secretary. 

Two new stars appear. The names so deeply etched in their luminous glow are 
those of Glinzerine Buie, who has just taken Mr. W. W. Johnson's place as Head 
of the Biological Science Department at St. Augustine's College, and Mary Wiggins 
Dawson, who teaches Health and Physical Education at the same Institution. 
Incidentally Mrs. Dawson's all-girl Basketball team has a record of being undefeated. 



A star of unusual brilliancy tells us that Lenora Holman has become an all-around 
well-educated person. She is well versed in politics, news of the entertainment 
world, and in practically every phase of the intellect. 

Stars! Stars! Stars! How they glow! What wonderful future fortunes they 
foretell! Dr. and Mrs. Richard Ewing are residing in California. Mrs R. Lwing 
is the former Lillian Jacobs, member of the graduating class of 54. She is Head 
of the English Department at the University of California. 

The valet of Mr. Joe Bernard White has been raking reporters out of the door. 
There are rumors that J. B. White is a polygamic. When questioned of his activi- 
ties Mr White merely says that he is proud of his work in the Parish and has a 
great interest in his turkey farm. Mr. White never comments as to whether or 
not he has several wives. 

A new High School has opened in Springfield, Illinois with William H Moore 
as Principal. Mr. Moore has hired the following as his Staff: James Chad wick, 
Dorothy Holden, Mary Gray, Delois Crandall, Carrie Fleming, Lenora McEachin, 
Lela Mae T. Walker, Gloria Thorpe, Addie White, Earl Carter, Eleanor LeFlore, 
Alroy Murrell, and Inez Calvin. Private Secretary for the Principal is Mamie 
Joyner. 

Another great star is recognized— Edgar Lowry has become a well-established 
certified Public Accountant, who has become a multi-millionaire, known to the 
public as a philanthropist. There are rumors that he is about to wed his campus 
sweetheart, Gladys Daves, who plans to open her Music Studio soon. 

Fannie Murrell is making a name for herself as an expert Physical Therapist 
in Canada. 

Lloyd Parham is a psychiatric Social Worker at Bellevue Hospital in New York. 
Marlene L. Sanders, Ph.D., is Head of the Biology Department at the University 
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Herbert A. Hoover is Head of the Business Depart- 
ment there. 

Cecelia Hall has done a number of constructive things in the fields of Religious 
Education and Social Work. 

Jeremiah Butts has been locked in his den for days apparently trying to discover 
some undiscovered discovery. 

Warren D. Moxley has replaced the Al Capps of yesterday with his millions of 
thrilling comic strips. 

All the class follows Dr. Trigg's suggestion to stage a reunion after Clyde Beatty 
has been ordained into the Priesthood. 

The stars gradually lost their brilliancy. They slowly disappeared. Then they 
were gone and once again the sky was darkened. 

Stunned by the ecstasy of her dream with the stars, Mary Harris awoke with this 
realization, "Great dreams I have had— they not only remake the dreamer, they 
transform the world" and part with this advice: 

We face a world in which great achievements have been built upon great dreams. 
Therefore, classmates, entertain great dreams; let them be the promise of richer 
personalities and a happier world. We can do great things if we greet life armed 
for battles with realiu. lured by the stars that are dreams. 

Mary Placyd Harris, '54. 



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The Rev. Mr. Rudder would keep his eyes opened all the time? 

Elenore LeFlore got a poodle hair style? 

Ronald Holmes didn't impress people with his pleasing personality? 

Warren Moxley gained one-half pound? 

Marjorie Cox learned to talk loud? 

Mr. Harry Johnson couldn't serve beans and franks? 

Mrs. Lambert lost her music notebook? 

Gladys Hopkins and Wilson's friendship was crushed? 

Jeremiah Butts stopped playing around and got serious? 

Carl Smith couldn't go to the movie once a week? 

Betty Byrd went to her classes? 

Lenora McEachin didn't impress people with her talking? 

Esther Clarke and Rose Marie McNeil weren't seen together? 

Orie Clarke didn't use comical expressions? 

Lillian Jacobs lost her smile? 

Inez Calvin was seen wearing bobby sox? 

Miss Parker had an English accent? 

Laura Adams Newell wasn't in Mr. West's education classes? 

Mary Boyd changed her hair style? 

Dorothy Holden wasn't seen in the library? 

Miss Hyman couldn't add? 

Lawarn Commander wasn't seen with an armful of books? 

Reginald Brooks stopped filibustering? 

William Moore was seen driving a 1954 car? 

Mr. Staggers couldn't direct a play? 

Joseph Grant suddenly stopped tipping? 

Gladys and "Skip" weren't seen together? 

Gloria Thorpe and Lela Walker would lose their dignity? 



Joe B. White wasn't seen in a hurry? 

Lenora Holman suddenly was on time for something? 

Mr. Wade was married? 

Someone stole Bobby Offutt's Pastel color shoes? 

Marlene Sanders featured a glamorous hair style? 

Mary Harris weighed "113" pounds? 

Mrs. Dickens wrote a check for $500.00? 

Lloyd Parham stopped "playing the field?" 

Stanley White lost his coolness? 

George Robinson lost his accent? 

Mamie Joyner wasn't seen with "Long Distance?" 

Clyde Beatty lost his broad smile? 

Richard Williams lost his playboy ability? 

Virginia Shields didn't have a boy friend on campus? 

Mrs. Delany wasn't concerned with the students? 

Theodore Fagan stopped being a "playboy?" 

Cecelia Hall lost her knowledge? 

Mrs. Flowers stopped being so frank with students? 

Alroy Murrell was seen playing football on the campus? 

Earl Carter couldn't meet with the boys? 

Nathonnia Johnson married a Raleigh boy? 

Fannie Murrell wasn't sarcastic? 

Mr. High couldn't be important? 

Mazelle Price wasn't friendly? 

Dorothy Alston moved nearer to the campus? 

Gwendolyn Crandel would talk plain? 

Bernice Loftin and Lillie Mercer became noisy and comical? 

Mr. Inborden stopped smoking his pipe? 

Glinzerine Buie would have majored in French? 

James Chadwick couldn't ride in William Moore's car? 

Marian Solomon couldn't play cards? 



COLLEGE HYMN 



(1) 
God of every nation, 
Every race and creed; 
Lord of every creature, 
Every budding seed; 
Friend of every right and 
Foe of every wrong; 
Father, Son, Great Spirit, 
Listen to our song. 

We acknowledge, worship 
Love and e'er adore Thee, 
Father, Son, Great Spirit, 
Holy Trinity. 

(2) 

All good things of Thee 
come 

Through Thine agencies, 

Christian lives, the Church, friends, 

Service, Charities, 

Blessing all Thy children 

Through eternity. 

St. Augustine's College 

Thus has come from Thee. 

So with thankful hearts, we 
Worship and adore Thee, 
Father, Son, Great Spirit, 
Holy Trinity. 

(3) 
For Thy missionaries, 
Laboring early here, 
Building firmly for our 
Alma Mater dear; 
For their self-denials, 
Joys and Sorrows blest, 
We give praise as now in 
Paradise they rest. 



So, with thankful hearts we 
Worship and adore Thee, 
Father, Son, Great Spirit, 
Holy Trinity. 

(4) 
For those friends and Churchmen, 
Living everywhere, 
Giving of our means to 
Build our College rare, 
For all those in service, 
Using every power 
That we may enjoy this 
Blessed, happy hour: 

We give thanks to Thee, we 
Worship and adore Thee, 
Father, Son, Great Spirit, 
Holy Trinity. 

(5) 
Ye Alumni loyal 
Who have passed and gone, 
Of your Christian lives this 
Day for us was born. 
Grant, God, that we may 
Live as worthily, 
Passing onward greater 
Opportunity. 

So, with thankful hearts, we 
Worship and adore Thee, 
Father, Son, Great Spirit, 

Holy Trinity. Amen. 

# tt # # » 

Words and Music by 

William Augustine Perry 

St. Augustine's 1902 



Senior Directory 



i \A* m * !»■„-„ Route 1, Box 158, Middlesex, North Carolina 

9 AlJTn Doroth'v" Roule 2 > Box 226 ' Roanoke Ra P' ds - Nor,h Carolina 

\ R-iW Mattie R 312 East Barr Street, Lancaster, South Carolina 

A. Bailey, «arae« 4 D T , or HomeSi Wilmington. North Carolina 

e p e n • *' i Ml';™ ..13601 Turner Avenue, Robbins, Illinois 

fi R dMnV "/.""".Route 1, Box 157, Washington, North Carolina 

7 Rrooks ReeinaTd" ---- - HO Popular Street, Clarksburg, W. Virginia 

B R. flSn Route 1, Box 129, Linden, North Carolina 

9 Bu ts Jeremiah "-- - 825 W. Lyman Ave., Winter Park, Florida 

in r 'rFaT 1333 N. W. 64th Street, Miami, Florida 

11 Thadwirk Iame~s""c" 303 North Orion Street, Kinston, North Carolina 

9 ri/rtT FatW —Post Office Box 188, Clayton, North Carolina 

it Clarke' Or e Pauline" 1_ 3621 Grand Avenue, Miami 33, Florida 

M rllvin Tne7 ....General Delivery, Linden, North Carolina 

15 Commander" Lawarn I.'III.-.^OO Homington Road, Elizabeth City, North Carolina 

6' Cox Marior'ie Post Office Box 533, Farmville, North Carolina 

17 DawsrXry"w"rg"gin"s""""""-"-".". 805 S. Grace Street, Rocky Mount, North Carolina 

IS FW Theodore B 1232 Tinton Avenue, Bronx 56, New York 

9 Flemin J Carde "- 2649 Norfolk Avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina 

5n Trxnt Wnh "" 1719 Front Street, Georgetown, South' Carolina 

91 r f v Route 1, Box 5, Scranton, North Carolina 

22: ^'C;X::::::::::~"".:::.--- ..—736 Walnut Street, Camden, New Jersey 

91 Harris Marv P Harris Farm, General Delivery, Raleigh, N. Carolina 

24! HXErne S Le:-".".":."."."-"-"-"-"-"-"-"-":: 10n Hunter Street, Elizabeth City, North Carolina 

25 Holden, Dorothy L 828 Cotton Place, Ralegh North Carolina 

26. Holman, Lenora 3244 Fish i Avenue New r York New York 

27. Holmes, Ronald 184 First Street, Clarksburg, W Virginia 

9R Hoover Herbert - - 6 North Tarboro, Raleigh, North Carolina 

29 hSsWw Route 5, No. 337, Greenville, North Carolina 

30. Bs Lim^:".".:".:-.---.".:::::"--:: r-i--.. 12 i 5 - 30th R s v . N r& ort * N r vs ' i Va - 

31. Joyner, Mamie I 614 Chamberhn Street Raleigh North Carolina 

32. LeFlore. Eleanor C 1504 Chatague Avenue, Mobile Alabama 

33. Loftin, Bernice r^S^ ^X^Tl' w v * 

34 Lowry Edgar 105 Ben Street, Clarksburg, W. Virginia 

35! McEachin, Lenora General Delivery Laurinburg, North Caro Una 

36. McNeil, Rose Marie ~P. O. Box 131 Clayton, North Carolina 

37. Mercer, Lillie Mae 304 W. Cotton St., Farmville North Carolina 

38. Moore, William H 13629 S. Homan Avenue, Robb.ns Illinois 

39. Morrison, Annie Doris 535 North Street, Fayetteville, North Carolina 

40. Moxley, Warren D 303 Chestnut Street, Bowling G.een. Ky. 

41 Murrell Alroy. . - - - 614 West 4th St., Washington, North Carolina 

42 Murrell' Fannie S — 614 West 4th Street, Washington, North Carolina 

43! Oflfutt, Bobby Ray 324 N. Washington Avenue Dancill, Illinois 

44. Parham, Lloyd V 96 Reid Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 

45 Poole Simon P . - 829 Cotton Place, Raleigh, North Carolina 

46 Price' Mazelle ' "" - - R- F- D. No. 2, Box 282, Siler City, North Carolina 

47: Robinson, George 1530 South 10% Street Springfield Illinois 

48. Sanders, Marlene L 1107 S. Bloodworth St Raleigh, North Carolina 

49. Sherrod, Doris N 1413 Short Street, Greenville, North Caro ina 

50. Shields, Virginia -Banco, North Carolina 

51. Smith, Carl William 1310 Oakwood Avenue, Raleigh North Carolina 

52. Solomon, Marion 514 E. Bridge Street, Smithfield, North Carolina 

53. Thompson. Freddie 1801 Edwin St. No. 107, Charlotte, North Caro ina 

54 Thorpe Gloria. - - 1603 E. Edenton St., Raleigh, North Carolina 

55' Tunstal'l Shirley 925 E. Jones Street, Raleigh, North Carolina 

56 Walker Lela __. - - 1701 Oakwood Avenue,. Raleigh, North Carolina 

57: White, Joe Bernard/ 707 West Line Street. Tyler, Texas 

58 White Stanley E P- O. Box 707, Kinston, North Carolina 

5^ Williams, Richard D 327 North Bevely Street, Tyler Texas 

60. Clark, Frances R- F. D. 4, Char pttesv.lle Virginia 

61. Crandol, Gwendolyn Route 5, Box 307, Greenvil e, North Caro ina 

62 Byrd Betty F . - - Route 1, Box 7, Woodsdale, North Carolina 

63 Dave's Gladys - 416 Burn Street, New Bern, North Carolina 

64 Harper Beulah " 1209 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, North Carolina 

65: Hewett! McCluey Box 91, Southport, North Carolina 



EFIRD'S 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

of 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

A GOOD PLACE TO SHOP 

IN PERSON 

BY PHONE 

BY MAIL 

BEST WISHES 


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BEST BY TASTE -TEST 


Compliments of 

HUDSON-BELK 


SHOP AT 
COLLEGE PARK GROCERY 

Your Best Buy in 
MEATS : GROCERIES 

Marvin Thorpe, Proprietor 
402 Hill Street Phone 3-4794 


JEFFREYS 

FOOD STORE 

and 

SEAFOOD MARKET 

WHERE YOUR FOOD DOLLAR 
BUYS MORE 

On Tarboro and New Bern Avenue 


Compliments of 

Mother and Daughter Stores, Inc. 

Insurance Building 
Raleigh, North Carolina 


YOUR OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 

SHERARD STUDIO 

125 E. Hargett Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Remember We Always Have Your Negative 
on File for Future Orders. 


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Member T. D. S. • 

TELEPHONE 7438 
Raleigh, North Carolina ! 

Flowers at Reasonable Prices 
to All Students 




After Exercise 
Refresh Yourself 




Compliments of 
LEWIS SPORTING GOODS CO. 



114 West Hargett Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



STUDENTS' 
ACCIDENT EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT COVERAGE 

$1,000 BLANKET COVERAGE 
COVERS MEDICAL, SURGICAL, NURSING AND HOSPITAL EXPENSES 

BOYS' FEE— $7.50 GIRLS' FEE— $4.50 



CHAMBLEE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Box 566 Telephone 2-0367 



CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF '54 

from 

DANVILLE, ILLINOIS 



DORIS BARBER SHOP 

SPRITZ 

HAROLDS CIGAR STORE 

ANKER FLORIST 



ROYALETTES NO. 2 

PASTIME CLUB 

MR. AND MRS. H. C. ANDERSONS 

MR. RALPH FARIS 



PATRONS 



Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fleishmann 

Mr. Marcus Strum 

Mrs. Janey Britton 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Nixon 

Mr. and Mrs. Finis Jackson 

Mrs. Mammie Griffin 

Miss Nellie White 

Miss Henrietta White 

The Rev. and Mrs. John D. Epps 

Chaplain (IstLt.) and Mrs. Richard Horsley 

Dr. and Mrs. James A. Boyer 

Mrs. Amanda Garris 

Mrs. Janet Tarchena 

Mrs. Alice Dawson 

Mrs. T. M. Stokes 

Mrs. E. A. Young 

Mrs. Romaine S. Lambert 

Mr. Morton Banks 

Mrs. Hattie Crandol 

Mrs. Nicy Crandol 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Crandol 

Mr. and Mrs. Boston Tetterton 

Rev. and Mrs. J. B. Crandol 
Mr. L. E. Spencer 

Mr. and Mrs. Erskine Nunn 

Mrs. Ethel Lowry 

Mrs. Dorothy Richardson 

Mr. John A. Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Gray 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert McCullough 

Mr. George Boyd 

Mr. and Mrs. Jobe Boyd 

Mr. and Mrs. George Gray, Jr. 

Mrs. Ludie Gray 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Price 

Mr. Ray Hancock 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Boykins 

Mr. Hoven Marsh 

Mr. Matthew Brown 

Mrs. Clyde Brown 

Mrs. Johnnie Murry 

Mr. J. B. House 

Mr. Warren Roach 

Miss Hattie Peterson 



Mrs. David Crawford 

Mr. James O. Tonner 

Mr. Doyl Smith 

Mr. Parker Bey 

Fran Harris 

Mary Roberson 

Mr. George D. Hene 

H. C. L. Jackson 

Mary E. Robertson 

Mr. Jesse W. Mead 

Jean McBride 

Mildred Young 

Mr. John R. Reed 

Julia Welfur 

Sadie Evans Morton 

Mr. John Burell 

Ruth P. Brown 

Freda Stipling 

Laura R. Reed 

Mr. Tutter Wills 

Mr. W. M. Rice 

Mr. W. C. Heppner 

Mr. James Burell 

Mr. Andrew J. Offutt 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace H. Offutt 

Mrs. R. L. Woodson 

Miss Nannie Hargrove 

Mr. Mases Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Shields 

Mr. Benjamin Shields 

Miss Marjorie Shields 

Mr. and Mrs. Bridy Brown 

Miss Rebecca Foster 

Mr. R. L. Johnson 

Dr. L. T. Delany 

Miss Mary Phillips 

Mrs. Ruth B. Walker 

Mrs. Nan H. Smith 

Miss Eloise Mitchell 

Rev. Odell Harris 

Mr. Henry Niles, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Issac E. Powell 

Mrs. Fannie Field 

Cpl. Earl Joyner 



Mr. and Mrs. Grover O. Holloman 

Miss Julia Shields 

Mrs. Pearl Mercer 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Weaver 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Williams 

Mrs. A. Hamlin 

Mrs. Louise J. Vann 

Pvt. George Clarke 

Mrs. Sallie Clarke 

Dr. D. P. Lane 

Mrs. Minnie Jones 

Mrs. Hattie Fields 

Mrs. William Kennedy 

Mrs. Cherry B. Harris 

Mr. Harry Fields 

Mr. David Mercer 

Mrs. Bessie Perdue 

Mrs. Louise P. Grier 

Mrs. Naomi P. Wren 

Mrs. Carrie B. Carrington 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Loftin 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Loftin 

Mr. and Mrs. Forrest Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Davis 

Cpl. Leamon Loftin 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reebals 

Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Tufft 

Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Kisser 

Mr. and Mrs. Elvey Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Ivey 



Mr. and Mrs. Willie Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Dement Weaver 

Mr. Jethro Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Long 

Mr. Ted Stone 

Mrs. Richard Murrel 

Miss Catherine Alston 

Mr. William Sanders 

Mr. Robert Boylan 

Mrs. Doris Williams 

Miss Ruby Thorpe 

Mr. A. B. Hartely 

Mrs. Maggie Peoples 

Mr. Hallie O. Thorpe 

Miss Mary Hill 

Mr. Lawrence W. High 

Miss Esther D. Parker 

Mrs. Ernestine B. Saunders 

Mrs. Irene L. Dickens 

Mrs. Viola B. Saunders 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. West 

Mrs. Catherine Burks 

Mrs. Kattie L. White 

Mr. and Mrs. Burnell Gaither 

Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Muller 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Kay 

Mr. and Mrs. John Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. Archie Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Worthy McClain 

Mr. Joseph Moody 



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