(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The family Christian almanac for the United States, for the year of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ ... : calculated for Boston, New York, Baltimore, and Charleston"

This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at http : //books . google . com/| 



:,ai 



0ffi!«f?Wff'IF 



WJ- 



rn^Mfkc 



^t^^fL^ 






7^± 



C 



The family Christian almanac for 
the United States, for the year ... 



David Young, American Tract Society 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



^ 



TIDE.TABI4E. 

CHIEVLT FROM THl TABLX IN B0WDITCH»8 NATIOATOR. 

The Calendar pages exhibit the time of high^water at New York, Elizabethtown Point, 
and New London. 

To find the time of high-water at any of the following places, add to or subtract from 
the time of high- water at New York, as follows : (A signifies that the annexed quantity of 
time is to be added, S subtracted) — ^For 

Georgetown Bar S 1 54 Passsmsqnoddy Rirer-AS 96 

Gouldsboioagh A 9 6 Penobscot Hirer A 1 51 

GaUfoid Al 30 Philadelphia A5 

HaUfaXjN.S. S 1 34 " 

Hartford S 



Amelia Haibor S 34 

Ann, Capo A 2 36 

Annapolis A2 6 

Anticosti Island, west I . g 5 24 

St. Augustine S 1 94 

Block&land— S 1 17 

Boston A9 36 

CansOjCape S 24 

Charles, Cape S 1 9 

Charleston Bar S 1 39 

Cod, Cape A2 36 

Delaware RiTer, ent. AC 6 

Fairfield A2 

Pear, Cape 8 54 

FlorHaKeys SO 4 

Gay Head S 1 17 

George's Hirer -Al 51 



540 

Hatteras, Cape AO 6 

Henlopen, Cape SO 9 

Henry, Cape S 1 14 

Kenneoec - Al 54 

Lookout, Cape AO 6 

Machias A2 6 

Marblehead A 2 30 

May, Cape SO 9 

Mount Desert A 2 6 

New Bedford S 1 17 

Newburyport A 9 21 

New Haven Al 22 

Norwich Landing- - — - - - A 45 



Plymouth A 2 36 

Portland Al 61 

Port Royal Ulsjid S 39 

Portsmouth A 2 *21 

Quebec, Canada'- 8 5 

Rhodelsland 8 2 9 

Roman, Cape 8 9 54 

Sable, Cape 8 54 

Salem A2 36 

Sandy Hook, N.J. S 2 17 

Saybrook AO 15 

St. John's, N. F. 8 2 64 

St. Simon's Bar 8 1 94 

Sunbury AO 96 

Townsend Al 61 



EQUATION OF TIME. 

Almanacs often contain the expressions, ^^sunfcut," and *^ swn slowJ*^ They refer to 
the difference of time as shown by the sun, and as shown by a good clock or watch. Time 
as marked by Reformer is called " apparent f"*^ and as marked by the latter , " mean tUneJ*^ 
A good sundial will always tell ^former ; a toateh or cloeki the latter. The calcula- 
tions of most almanacs are given in mean 01 clock time. 

DIFFERENT KINDS OF FIREWOOD. 



Lbs. in m cord. 
1 Shellbark Hickory 4,469 



2 Pignut, Hickory or ) 



common Walnut ] ' "^j^^ 

3 White Oak 3,821 

4 Scrub Oak 3,337 

6 Red Oak 3,254 



Lbs. in a eord. 

12 White Elm r--2,50a 

13 Spanish Oak 2,449 

14 Buttonwood 2,391 

15 Pitch Pine 1,904 

16 White Pine 1,968 

17 Lombard^ Poplar 1,774 



Lbs. in m cord. 

6 White Beech 3,236 

7 Apple-tree 3,115 

8 Black Birch 3,115 

9 Black Oak 3,102 

10 Yellow Oak 2,919 

11 Maple 2,668 

It is estimated that a cord of wood contains when green 1,443 lbs. of water. So that a 

farmer who brings into market a cord of green wood, has no less load for his team than an- 
other who should put on the top of his cord of dry white oak, three quarters of a cord of 
seasoned pine, or one hogshead and two barrels of water. 

MEMORANDA FOR 1851. 

Jan. 1, Cireimwision ; 5, 2d S. aft. Christmas ; 6, Epiphany ; 12, 1st S. aft. Epiph. ; 19, 9d S. 
aft. Epiph. ; 95, Conr. of St. Paul ; 26, 3d S. aft. Epiph., FxB. 2, 4th S. aft. Epiph. ; 9, 5th 8. aft. 
Epiph.; 16, Septuagesima; 23, Sexagesima; 94, St. Matthias. Mabch 2, Q^uinquagesima ; 6, 
Ash-Wednesday; 9, 1st 8. in Lent ; 16, 2d S. In Lent; 23, 3d 8. in Lent; 30, 4th 8. in Lent. 
April 6, 5th 8. in Lent ; 13, 6th S. in Lent ; 18, Good-Friday ; 20, Easter-Sunday ; 95, St. Mark ; 
27, 1st 8. aft. Easter ; Mat 1, Sts. Philip and James ; 4, 9d 8. aft. Easter ; 11, 3d 8. aft. Easter ; 
18, 4th S. aft. Easter ; 25, 6th 8. aft. Easter ; 29, Ascension-day. Juirx 1, 8.' aft Ascension ; 8, 
Whit-Sunday ; 11, St. Barnabas ; 15, Trinity-Sanday ; 22, 1st 8. aft. Trin. ; 24, St. John the Bap- 
tist ; 29, 2d 8. aft. Trin., St. Peter. July 6, 3d S. aft. Trin. ; 13, ^th 8. aft. Trin. ; 20, 6th 8. aft. 
Trin. ; 27, 6th 8. aft. Trin. Auo. 3, 7th S. aft. Trin. ; 10, 8th 8. aft. Trin. ; 17, 9th S. aft. Trin. ; 
24, St. Bartholomew, 10th S. aft. Trin. ; 31, 11th S. aft. Trin. Sept. 7, 12th 8. aft. Trin. ; 14, 13th 
S. aft. Trin. ; 21, St. Matthew, 14th S. aft. Trin. ; 28, 15th 8. aft. Trin. Oct. 5, 16th 8. aft. Trin. ; I 
12, 17th S. aft. Trin. ; 18, St. Luke ; 1% 18th 8. aft. Trin. ; 26, 19th S. aft. Trin. ; 28, Sts. Simon 
and Jude. Nov. 1, AU-Saints ; 2, 20th 8. aft. Trin. ; 9, 21st 8. aft. Trin. ; 16, 22d S. aft. Trin. ; 
23, 23d 8. aft. Trin. ; 30, St. Andrew, Advent-Sunday. Dec. 7, 2d 8. in Adrent ; 14, 3d 8. in 
Adrent ; 21, St. Thomas, 4th 8. in Adrent ; 25, Christmas ; 20, St. Stephen ; 27, St. John ; 28, In- 
nocents, 1st S. aft. Christmas. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE 

ILLUSTRATED 

TAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMAMC 

FOR 

THE UNITED STATES, 



rHEOLOGICAL LIBRARI O T 1 \ r^Cl ' i C- cc"^ 

DAMBRIDGE. MAsi 1 , ^^^ ' >^^ ^ 

BEING THE THIRD AFTER BISSEXTILE, AND UNTIL JULY 4th, THE 75th 
YEAR OP THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE UNITED STATES. 

CALCULATED FOR 

BOSTON, NEW TORI, BALTIMORE, AND CHARLESTON, 

\ AND 

FOUR PARALLELS OF LATITUDE. 
ADAPTED FOR USE THROUOHOUT THE COUNTRY. 

WITH 

VALUABLE STATISTICAL INFORMATION CHIEFLY FROM ORIGINAL SOURCES 
ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS, IN EQUAL OR CLOCK TIME, 

BY DAVID YOUNa. 

HANOV3BB NBOB:, NBW JBBSBT. 

BoaTOir, Lat 43* 21' N. ; Long. 71" 4' W. 
Niw ToEK, Lat. 40*» 42' 40" ; Long. 74" 1' 
Baltihou, Lat 39*' 17'; Long. 76<' 38'. 
CHAuanoii, Lat 2af* 47' ; Long. 79*' 67' 



PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY. 

NEW YORK: 160 NASSAU-STREET; BOSTON: 28 CORNHILLj 
AND BY BOOKSELLERS AND TRADERS. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



17 This wo^ has been chiefly prepared by the Rer. TRTON EDWARDS, D. D., of New London, Conn., who, 
with great labor and care, has drawn the more important statiatlcal tables from ori^nal sources. 



ECTilPSES IN THE YEAR 1851. 

There will be two Eclipses of the Sun, and two of the Moon, this year. 

I. January 17, Moon eclipsed at the time of Full Moon, in the morning in the IJnit^ States, 
except the eastern part of Maine, where it will be afternoon. Inyisible here, but will be seen 
in the opposite regions of the globe. Magnitude, 5.58 digits on the Moon's n<»ihem limb. 

II. February 1, Sun eclipsed at the time of New Moon in the m(Mming, but will be in th^ 
evening of Jan. 31, in the states and territories west oi the Mississippi river. Invisible in 
America. The Sun may be seen more or less eclipsed on the southern limb at AustraUa, tho 
Cape of G-ood Hope, and the southern part oi Madagascar ; and on the northern limb, at New 
Zealand. This Eclipse will be central and annular on the meridian in longitude 96^ 2^ east 
from Grreenwich, and latitude 58° 23' south. 

HI. July 12, evening, and July 13, morning. Moon eclipsed ; viidble. 



Principal Cities. Beginning. 



Middle. 



Principal Cities. Beginning. 



End. 



Eastport 

Boston 

New York---. 
Philadelphia- • 

Baltimore 

Washington - ■ 

Richmond 

Rochester 

Raleigh- 

Charleston ) 
Pittsburgh) * 
Cleveland 



22 m. 
6 m. 
54 m. 
49 m. 
43 m. 
42 m. 
40 m. 
39 m. 
35 m. 



13 30 m. 
13 24 m. 



2 53 m. 
2 37 m, 
2 25 m. 
2 20 m. 
2 14 m. 
2 13 m. 
2 11m. 
2 10 m. 
2 6m. 

2 Im. 

1 55 m. 



13 4 
13 4 
13 3 
13 3 
13 3 
13 3 
13 3 
13 3 
13 3 

13 3: 

13 3 1 



Detroit -- 

MiUedgeville - 

Lexington 

Cincinnati --• 
Indianapolis - - 
Nashville----- 

Chicago 

Mobile 

St. Louis 

New Orleans- ■ 

Austin 

San Francisco 



12 11 
12 11 
12 11 
12 11 
12 11 
12 9 



18 m. 
17 m. 
13 m. 
12 m. 

6 m. 

3 m. 
59 ev. 
57 ev. 
52 ev. 
50 ev, 

19 ev. 
43 ev. 



149 m. 
1 48 m. 
1 44 m. 
1 43 
1 37 m. 
1 34 m. 
I 30 m. 
1 28 m. 
1 23 m. 
1 21m. 
50 m. 
11 14 ev. 



B. B. 

13 3 20 
13 3 19 
13 3 15 
13 3 14 
13 3 8 
13 3 5 
13 3 1 
13 2 59 
13 2 54 
13 2 52 
13 2 21 
13 45 



Magnitude, 8.47 digits on the Moon's southern limb. 

rV. July 28, morning. Sun eclipsed ; visible more or less throughout the United States, 
with the exception of the southern part of Florida : on the Sun's northern limb. 



CITIES 

n the order of 

Latitude. 



Eastport 

Montpelier--- 

Concord 

Rochester 

Milwaukie - - - 

Buffido 

Albany 

Detroit 

Boston 

Providence - - - 

Chicago 

, Iowa City 

New Haven - - 
New York --- 
Httsburgh-- 
Fhiladelphia - 



8 35 
8 38 
8 7 

7 21 

8 1 
8 26 

7 41 

8 40 
8 37 
7 18 

7 

8 27 
8 21 

7 51 

8 15 



10 1 
931 
032 

8 14 

8 54 
920 
833 
934 

9 29 

8 10 
751 

9 18 
12 
842 
9 4 



1 54 
1 60 
1 46 
1 44 
1 44 
1 44 
146 
142 
1 45 
141 
141 
1 39 
1 39 
1 38 
1 38 
1 35 



4.46 
4.00 
4.53 
5.23 
4.47 
4.02 
4.66 
3.79 
3.52 
4.81 
5.07 
3.54 
3.42 
3.79 
3.32 



CITIES 

in the order ot 

Latitude. 



Indianapolis- •• 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati 

Washington -■ 

St. Louis 

Lexington — 

Richmond 

Nashville 

Raleigh 

Little Rock - - 
MiUedgeville ■ 

Charleston 

Mobile 

Austin 

New Orleans - 
St. Augustine 



6 37 

7 23 

6 45 

7 21 
6 21 

6 46 

7 20 

6 36 

7 16 
6 10 

6 56 

7 16 
6 36 

5 49 

6 28 

7 3 



u 



OH 



7 24 

8 7 

7 30 

8 5 
7 6 

7 29 

8 1 
7 16 
7 52 

6 49 

7 28 
7 42 
7 2 
6 21 

6 53 

7 22 



H. U. 

8 14 
853 
8 18 
8 51 
754 
8 16 
845 

7 59 
832 
731 

8 2 
8 10 
731 
6 55 
721 
743 



1 37 
1 30 
1 33 
1 30 
1 33 
1 30 
1 25 
123 
1 16 
1 21 
1 6 
54 

55 

1 6 
53 
40 



4.^ 
3.12 
3.69 
3.01 
4.03 
3.39 
2.57 
2.95 
2.10 
3.02 
1.6o 
1.05 
1.24 
2.20 
1.00 
0.67 



At Astoria, in Oregon, this Eclipse will be chiefly visible. The Sun will rise there at 4 h. 
40 m. with 7.01 digits eclipsed, and at 4 h. 58 m. it will be 9.18 digits eclipsed. The Eclipse 
will end at 5h. 49m. At San Francisco, the Sun wiU rise at 5h. 2m. with an Eclipse of 
6.65 digits diminishing, which will end at 5 L 43 m. This ^olipiajEiUbe more or less visi- 
ble throughout Europe, and in the aorthem part of AjnetfT It yi^ ^^dev^tiA^d. total on the 
meridian in longitude 2SP 43> west from Greemw^ and'latitude 69° 54' n< 



CHAR 

0©Sun; ])Moan; ^Mercury; $ yinius 
urn; ^ Henchel. 



0TEirS7 /g9o 

lus; ^Earthi ^Mah; 7^ Jupitf 



1>Sat- 



THB FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALICANAO. 8 

RISING AND SETTING OF PLANETS AND STARS. 

The reader should understand that these ait not materiaUy affected by the longitudt of 
a place : «id alio that when the hour is less than 6, it is in the morning ; and when greater 
than 6, it is in the erening- 



fan. 14 
" 24 
Peb. 5 
" 12 
" 20 
" 28 
Mar. 4 
" 11 
" 19 
" 27 
April 9 
'^ 2* 
May 3 
« 14 
" 2« 
Jane 4 
" 14 
" 25 



Yenas rises - - 

<( « _ 

Saturn sets •• 
Venus rises - - 
•iter rises - 



Jupit 



Venus rises - 



4 41 

423 
10 90 
4 13 
9 49 
9 15 
8 58 
4 14 
4 12 
4 8 
3 56 
3 43 
3 32 
3 19 
3 4 
2 58 
2 51 
2 49 



Wash- Charleii 
iDSton. ton. 



43t 

4 15 
10 18 
4 5 
9 46 
9 12 
8-55 
4 6 
4 5 
4 2 
354 
3 41 
3 32 
3 21 
3 9 
3 4 
259 
2 59 



4 22 
4 3 
10 15 
3 52 
9 41 
9 8 
850 
3 M 
3 54 
353 
348 
3 30 
333 
3 25 
3 16 
3 14 
3 12 
3 14 



July 


6 


Venus rises 




16 


it {{ 


(( 


18 


Jupiter sets 


Aug. 


2 




7 


Saturn rises ■-■ 


(( 


8 


Jupiter sets --- 


u 


22 


Sersn Stars rise 



Sept. 5 
" 18 
" 25 

Oct. 6 
" 14 
" 25 

Not. 6 
" 14 
" 27 

Deo. 6 
«* 18 



M&rs rises- 



352 
3 3 

10 58 
10 3 

10 25 
9 41 
9 58 
9 3 

8 11 
744 

11 2 
10 50 
10 32 
10 9 

951 

9 17 
848 
8 1 



ii^oa. 



3 3 
3 14 
11 
10 5 
10 30 
943 

10 9 
9 14 
823 
755 

11 12 
11 
10 42 
10 19 
10 D 

9 96 
8 57 
8 10 



3 19 
331 
11 3 
10 H 
10 37 
9 47 

10 97 
9 32 
840 

8 13 

11 99 
11 17 
10 58 
10 34 
10 15 

940 

9 11 
8 25 



PHENOMENA OF THE PI4ANETS FOR 1851. 

Jah. 4, ^ Stat ; 5, $ stat D ^; 6, 5's gr. elong. ; 12, D 02/, 5 stat ; 16, .0© 
20, enters s:; ; 22,inf.<505. Fbb. 2, ^stat; 7,2Xitat; 15, ^'sgr. elong*; Ml, 
enters ^ ; 25, $'s gr. elong. March 20, enters T^ Aran. 1, rap. 6 5 ; % ^H© 
14, 60^; 20, XD enters y, <50^; 28, 5'sgr. elong. Mat 9, 5«tat; 20, iaMj*" 
21, enters n • Junb 1, 5 «*»*• *. 10, 11 stat ; 15, 5'« gr. elong. ; 21, enters SjT *•»*» 
5,D02/; 15, sup. c5 5 ; 23, enters a ; 00^, D 0^ ; 28, eclipsed, yii;, An*. 
10, ^ stat ; 17, 1> stat ; 23, enters W ; 26, ^'s gr. elong. S«rr. 8, 5 stat ; 22, inf. 
505; 23,0 enters «£a; 30, sup. c5 $, 5J stationary. Oct. 7, 5's gr. elong. ; 23, D0<y, 
enters tTi; 24, ^01^;26,<9 0^; 27, <50K. Nov. 7, sup. <5 5 ; 22, enters / . 
Dsc. 16, ^ stat ; 20, ^'s gr. elong. ; 22, enters V3 ; 27, 5 stat ; 31, T> stationary. 

SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 

T Aries; ^ Taurus; n G^emini; S Cancer; g\. I^; ^ Virgo; eaiLAra; fllScor- 
)io; /Sagittarius; V3 Capricorn; ^^ Aquarius; }£ Pisces. 

ASPECTS AND NODES. 

6 ■ Conjunction ; ^ Sextile, 60 degrees ; D Quartile, 90 degrees ; A Trine, 120 degrees ; 
iTc. Quincunx, 150 degrees; S Opposition, 180 degrees ; Q Ascending Node ; X5 l^end- 
DgKode. 

CHRONOI4OOICAL CYCLES. 

Dominical Letter, E ; Q-olden Number, or Lunar Cycle, 9 ; Epact, 28 ; Solar Cycle, 12 ; 
loman Indiction, 9 ; Julian Period, 6564. 

NOTES TO THE READER. 

The Calendar page in this Almanac is adapted for use in erery part of the United States. 
!t is based on the fact, that in the same Latitude^ that is., on a line running due east and 
eest, the Sun and Moon rise and set at the same moment by the eloek or almanae^ not 
>nly throughout the United States, but around the world — ^the yariations being so small as to 
)e of no importance for ordinary purposes. Thus, if on any day the Sun rises at Boston at 5 
ninutes past 6, it rises at 5 minutes past 6 on the same line of latitude westward throughout 
;he states of Massachusetts, New York, Michigan, Iowa, and Oregon. 

Hence, a Calendar adapted to Boston for New England, is equally adapted, as to the rising 
uid setting of the Sun and Moon, for use in Northern New York and Michigan ; a Calendar 
Cor Kew York city is adapted for use in the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois ; 



Digitized byLjOOQlC 



4 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

a Calendar for Baltimore is adapted for Yirginia, Xentacky, and Missouri ; and a Calend 
for Charleston will answer for North Carolina, Tennessee, Geoi^a, Alabama, and Louisian 
Wherever the reader is, look for the state at the top of the Calendar pag^e, and underneath a 
the rising and setting of the Sun and Moon sufficiently accurate for all practical purposes 
The changesyfulls^ aitd quarters of the Moon^ however, are governed by another pri 
ciple, and are essentially the same for all places on the same Longitude ; that is, on » 
line extending due north and south. Thus, the Moon's phases for Charleston, suit Fiti 
burgh, etc. Any phasis takes place at the same instant of absolute time ; but the local tin 
is earlier at the westward, and later at the eastward, at the rate of four minutes for em 
degree of Longitude; or at the rate of one minute for every 12 miles 273 rods in the lat 
tude of Boston ; 13 miles 60 rods in the latitude of New York city ; 13 miles 143 rods in tl 
latitude of Baltimore ; and 14 miles 199 rods in the latitude of Charleston. 



TABLE OF THB SOLAR SYSTEM. 



Mean di- 
ameter in 
Eog. miles. 



The Sun -- 
Mercury- -- 

Venus 

The Earth 
The Moon - 

Mars 

Vesta 

Iris 

Hebe 

Flora 

Astraea 

Juno 

Ceres 

Pallas* -.- 
Jupiter- '-- 

Saturn 

Uranus 

Neptune- -- 



883,246 
3,224 
7,687 
7,912 
2,180 
4,189 
238 
unknown 



1,425 
160 
110 
89,170 
79,042 
35,112 
35,000 



Bferni distance 
frum tlie Sun. 



Time or rotation 
round their axes. 



Time of reTotntion round 
the Sua. 



25 14 

1 




27 

1 



8 
5 
23 21 



22 
56 4 
43 12 
37 22 



9 55 27 
10 29 17 
unknown 



87 

224 

365 

365 

686 

1,325 

1,327 

1,375 

1,460 

1,512 

1,593 

1,684 

1,686 

4,332 

10,759 

30,686 

60,128 



23 15 

16 49 

6 9 

6 9 

23 30 

11 38 



nearly. - 







18 37 


19 




nearly. - 




0.11 


1 36 


28 




17 38 


24 




7 19 


12 




14 27 


10 


o.(i 


1 51 


11 


o.« 


19 41 


32 


«•" 


3 20 


02 


0.(^ 






* A ninth asteroid named Metis, and also 
since the beginning of 1848, between Mars and 
yet unknown, they have not been added to the 



tenth not yet named, have been discover 
Jupiter ; but as the sizes, distances, etc., i 
table. 



EQUINOXES AND SOI^STICES FOR 1831. 



EQUINOXES AND SOLSTICES. 



Washington. 



Cincinnati. San Frai 



Vernal Equinox, March ■ 

Summer Solstice June- - • 

Autumnal Ecjuinox -Sept. - - - 
Winter Solstice Dec. - - - 



21 4 55 mo. 

22 1 41 mo. 

23 3 51 ev. 
22 9 29 mo. 



21 11 mo. 
21 8 57 ev. 
23 11 7 mo. 
4 45 mo. 



20 11 47 ev. 

21 8 33 ev. 
23 10 43 mo. 

22 4 21 mo. 



20 11 17 ev. 

21 6 3ev. 
23 10 13 mo. 

22 3 51 mo. 



B. ■. a. 

20 8 47 8! 

21 5 33 el 
23 7 43fl 

22 1 21d 



When it is noon at London, it is 6 h.' 52 m. in the morning at Washington ; and when 
is noon at Washington, it is 5 h. 8 m. in the eyening at London. 

APOGEE AND PERIGEE OF THE SUN, 

The Sun is in Miie.sj 

Perigee December 31, 1850, distance from the Earth, 98,582,(1 

Apogee July 1,1851, " " " 96,Tn,ffl 

Perigee January 2,1852, "• " " 93,575,« 

The perigee does not occur in 1851, but occurs twice in 1852. 

liEAP-YEAR. 

Every year is leap-year the number of which can be diyided by 4, and not by 100; 
which can be divided by 400. ' 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



istMONTfi. 



JANUARY, ISftl. 



31 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon 

First Quarter • - 

Full Moon 

Third Quarter • • • - 



6 mo. 
11 37 mo. 
11 58 mo. 

3 33 mo. 



NSW TORIL 



5 48 mo. 
11 25 mo. 
11 46 mo. 

3 21 mo. 







m. u. 




537 


mo. 


11 14 


mo. 


11 35 


mo. 


3 10 


mo. 



CHARLES'N. 


r 


5 24 mo. 
11 1 mo. 
11 22 mo. 

2 57 mo. 


ii 

; 9 

17 
25 



er. 3 .% 
7 25 
10 23 
12 37 



3j ^"5 



a, - K - 
SJ * S 6 

< ::o -J 



X 
o 






z O ^ K 



t^i>ooo>cioo^ 2oo»-toieoo<o«ot-xo>oo»-i ►•HCico»«««ot- 



SCO i-i c 






-;<0©0t-000a>0^ cO»-tCieO'«3«0.2«OI>0>0»-i 2o»hC»ICO'<'»00<0 



■' oo«c to >o o uo <o o t o o »o o >o o « c to •CO wo^ 5^'L!r^ t o lo to to to to to ' 

• lo o to o o 50 <» CO ;d «5 to to to to to to Tj« -^T ■n' -v cc cc Ci Ci — • «-" o o 5- <r. a' 
■ »o to t.t 



as Sm 
o >« „• 

h .,g H 

« w5o 

a c - 



i| 






'2^5 = 



■^^ § ^ 



w ■^Ttrf'^TyTtTy'^Ty'^TyT }' ^ ■^ ■<» t^ to o vo t o to to to to to »o to to to tf to 



it^t^t^t-t^t-t»r-t-t^t^t^i^t-t^t^t-t^t^t^t^r-i^t^i-t't^i^t-r-t- 



•^W^JOitTSd 



^Hpi;egBJ^H^Hb:(gBaH^i3fecgWSH^Hfa.««aH^Hfi: 



•qiuowjojtTBd 



t-. wco^tooi^aoo ^; WW ;2»0 2C:2S2B?;?J?5?;^^^1 ?,?,???: 



*= « > ;J 

» S " Q 
HOC 



^l 






riS5 .-"§§5885;:$^ e^5$8£5^^ jS^^t:?'^^ £S52^?5?:85c;^5^' 

j«0"««0<0t^000>O»-t §Oi-«0IC0Ot0.2<0C»00O'-i cOtHCIW^tOOCO 



M Tf^ry'^'^r^^r^TyTy^Tyry'^'^^ ' ^ .' l^ .y^.V^ t p tO to to to to to t.T to t p to 

«S5S5S5S5^S5S5S5S5^(N<^»c^c5c5^c5c5c56{6JolBw•--•'^i^^'^i^'-' 









j«o"Sto«or-oocio«-i §orHCi'^to<o.2<©t'000'-H Soi-Hwco^tocoto 



M-^^T»-^^^ryT»"<t-»»-<»-*j«^-<»-*»-^-^-<»-^rl"n"^tO»0*0>C>0«PtOtOt'? 






•g 'loop «tung 






H^aAS^JoiT^al ^g^^'H^S^Hfot^HSH^HF^igMaH^H^c^BJ^H^HF^ 



mnowjoiCt^al ^'^c>:>^>^<gt-oog^g^!^^^^2l:^S28c^^gS^c^^Fig.?'^. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILT CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



2d MONTH. 



FEBRVARir, 18^1. 



dH BATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon • • • • 
First Quarter • 
Full Moon . - • 
Third Quarter • 



1 18 mo. 
4 12 mo. 
10 44 ev. 

4 54 ev. 



NEW YORK, 



1\ 6 mo. 
4 mo. 
10 32 ev. 
4 42 ev. 



55 mo. 

3 49 mo. 
10 21 ev. 

4 31 ev. 




Siril 0» MKRID 



13 53 

14 31 

14 18 

13 20 



iii 



lis 






jOOOOOSOOO^h 2oO'-<C0"«1««0CDt^000S0>O»-i ►Oi-iC0Tt»O® 



- ^^S^^^^ g^^S5^?5a «§8g§^^ s^°° 






a ^ 



■ oio»oooooo>o>o>(t)>o>o«^ooo>C'>o»<:>«oo»<:>«o>o»o«o«-'t 



H ^^^^^QD^COCOQDQDCOCDCDCOCOCOCOCOQDCOCOQDCOCOQOCOCO 



i i 8 



ii 



m oS 



J "S «0 t^ 00 0> O |-H |o^<NC0Tj<»0.g 



i-f^jtoco . '-' "O tr t- "^ £3 o* jrj 



i-Ht-I C 






OOSOO^^««:)^CO<M^OO§t5g§JOCOC^J.g^^CO^«;5JOgg 



'V^ALJO^^d 



^BSH^H£«gMaR^^P^^»aH^g£(8MaH^E3ft 



•tf^UOI^ JO ltd 



»-i(Nco-^o«Dt^ooo>o^wco^o»r^ooo>OjHW«^v^«t^a 






w 5 o 



OiO>OOt-lt-t I O 1-1 i-H Ol TI< O «D t^ 00 0> O O 1-I ► 1-1 r-l d Tj» O CO t^ 



H 



^^^^^5S^ g^^^^g^ g85^55^S g55^S5S^5^55 

I "S «o i> 00 o> o rH 2oi-icjco"^o.2<C)t^ooo^ §oi-<oieo'^'^o 



II 



« I 



.„oi^joasoot^«:>r.co(NrHo^^«5;^c55Hg^^co^^^^Q5' 

it«t^t«t^t«t«t«t«r«t«t^r««0<0<0<0C0OCDC0«DC0CDC0C0C0C0C0 



g SI 



8 >5 






SoOr-tTHOICTCO'^'^Ot'OOOSOr-i ► f-i »H C* CO "* Tj< O t^ 00 OS O 

_C ^f-tv »^ 



II 



I "S <0 t^ 00 OS © t-4 2oi-H(NC0Tl«O.2«0t>00Oi-i 2 O 1-1 d CO rf '«»< o 

' g 1-1^ C «" ^■^ » 






il 






•g -pap tjtmg 



) t^ CO «0 «0 O O »0 O "1* tJ" "^f CO CO CO (N <N W iH ^ O O O OS « OS 00 00 t^ 



.^OKP^^CI ^0»C0^OOt^CD0SO^ldC0;g;iO<Dt:;00g^g;g^g3^V$^^g^ 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 



3d MOVTH. 



mCARCH, 1891. 



31 DAYS. 



MDON9 PHASES. 



New Moon 

First Quarter • • • 

Full Moon 

O'hird Quarter- 



BOSTON. NEW TORE. BALTIMO'E. CHiJtLES'ir. SUN oa MERID. 



8 31 er. 
5 ley. 
8 35 mo. 
8 42 mo. 



8 19 ev. 
4 49 ev. 
8 23 mo. 
8 30 mo. 



8 8eT. 
4 38 ev. 
8 12 mo. 
8 19 mo. 



7 55 ev. 
4 25 ev. 

7 59 mo. 

8 6 mo. 



12 37 
10 48 
0' 8 35 
6 9 






1.-, 



^s 



J t*t»00000>0>OOiH 2o»H0l'*O»t»00000iOO»-« ► rH Ol CO «o «o <o t^ 



J «:> "S «o t* 00 o> o iH 2oiHcieo'«»"i*io.at*ooo4 0i-! § o t-i c* co co •« 



.^<Pt^QP®®OT-iC*C0C0'H'O«>©t^00000&Oi-ii-t<MC0C0TtO«0«0t^00 
■ O O »0 to •« O iH »p.« t-l tH 1-1 rH »p.« 1-1 t-l *H tH 1-t 

rf V^OK:>>Q>0V5<D<0^^t0<0t0t0<0t0t0t0t0g>CDCD<0<0g0t0t0t0t0^tD 









jsgooot-QDogooot- 

J «0 "S «0 t* 00 OS O r-t |o»-«C«C0'<*IO»0.|t*00O^ I O *-• W (N CO "^ •^l' « »o 






«g 






Tiwji^jox^a 



(SH;^H^d£(gH:^S^d£<gH:«^^H£<;SH:^S^g5£^H:« 



jiHaojttjoX'Bd 



»-iO»CO"^«0«Ot*000>0»-^CTCO'^»0«Ot^00040jH 



^s^g^Si^^^S;;^^^?^ 



O ft. w « 



h "> >" as 
ft o"^ » 



IS 



IS- 



^ii 



»a8 



00000>0JOOi-ii-i 2oiHClC0«C«0t^000>0>OiHiH tl »H Ol CO "^ CO t* t* 00 

t-l i-H 1-1 rH B ;^ i-HiH iH 0) 



«o»<ot*ooo>©*-« 2o»HO«co'*«o«o.Bt*oooi-i 2o«-ic«oico"^i»"^i»«:>o 

m 1-1 rH B C tH rH B 



IQ >Q O Va 0>OOlf5»QO<0<D<0<0^<0<0<0<0<0<0<0<0<0<OtOtO<0<0<C<0 



CO(0«^<0«COtO<0«CDCDCO(OQDCO<OCOCO<OCO<0<OOOIOOOIOOtO 



6- 

85 "So 



§1^ 



fH«-H io©^^C«C«C0"^O«D00O>O^-< tiOrHCTCTC0"T|«O«0t*0>OOi-l 



si-< B 



.S§85?585g^ g^^§5o8S$2S «^SS^S gSS^IS^;::^^^ 

CO ■§ « t* 00 0> O 1-1 §©*-tC«C0r*«»OiO.2t*00O^ 2 O 'H C* Ol CO '*'*»0«:i 






«-l 



^^^g^g^^^^gg^^O^^O 00 CO ^ CO ^ 

coco^<o<o<o<o<ococo<ocococococococo<oqpqptocootf5o>Q*oo*o»o 



g -pop tjirag 



t*t*«C0C0»O»O'^Tf'a*C0C00l0l0l^i-lOO(n5zioOi-«i-<<N<N0IC0C0Tj' 



•V«»iii jolted ^MaH^H£lgB?^H^H^(gHaH^Ht£^MaH^HfalgH!^ 



innowjo^Kil ^<^«^^'^^^°°*^S:=!ag3i3S^SSSc383gi^^ggS^%^^g5 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAICILY CHEISTIAN ALICANAC. 



4th MONTH. 



APRIIi, 1851. 



30 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon 

Pirst Quarter • • 
Full Moon • • • • 
Third Quarter - ■ 





BOSTON. 


». 

1 

9 
15 
23 


1 49 ey. 

2 18 mo. 
5 51- ev. 
2 14 mo. 



NIW YORK. 



■. M. 

1 37 ev. 

2 6 mo. 
5 39 ev. 
2 2 mo. 



BALTIM'RB. 



1 2a ev. 
1 55 mo. 
5 28 ev. 
1 51 mo. 



CHARLES'N. 



1 13 ev. 
1 42 mo. 
5 15 ev. 
1 38 mo. 



SUN •■ MERID. 



4 1 

1 40 
morning. 
11 57 54 



1^2 
g " -fa 

g 



i, 



M 






J ©i>ooo>o 



i-H § o '-' w c* c*3 "*"* •St' 00 o> <=>'-' § o rH r-t (N CO eo n» '^j« 



r-lTH C 









2^ s 



u 



II 



« .Sc5g3S?§ £^g5:2<^^g3s$ 5^^;ss§s e^^'^^s^^^^ 









•v»j^joi»a 



^^g£^ws5^g£c«ws^^g;j;^wsE3^S£(^»;^E3^ 



•^?«oi^ JO i«a 



i-H(NC0Tj«O«0l>000>O-<0IC0Tj«»O<0l>000iOj-H 



8oJ83?5^^^55?5S^ 



id S s 

III 






II 



J Vf'OOOOTH 2oi-i WCOCOTf Tf.SSt^OOOSOtH SotHCJOICO 

■ OB T-4 ,-1 B C th ^-1 q 



C0tJ«ti«»O 



II 



■ 50^tO(0^to^^to<o<OtO?OtOtOCOCO^CO^<0<0<0?0^tOCO?OtO CO 






^*5 






«58 e^i§S5g^2Sg55S^°°^65^§i^S?g5^S§Jo^°°S585:^^S5 

y tH 2o©i-Ii-t0IC0C0'^«0t-0>OOi-I ►i-l^(MC0C0'^Ot^000»OO^ 



y"Sl>000>0-^ C O '-' C*» CO CO Tf -^ .2 t^ 00 O »H 2oOTHO»CICOCOrfTi«U 



M ^COOCDCOCO<0<DCOO<0<DCOCOCO<OCD<D<0^000<0^^^ tO CO CO 



•K 'P^P "tWis 



OTj''^OO«0«0fl0t't'l>00000>0>0»OOO»H»H,-l(N0»C»C0C0C0"^rf"^J< 



•^••Ay.Joi*a 5^e£(gwSES^gfi;igMS^^gpi;^MS^^g£d8Ba5^ 



'muoyi JO l»a[ 



i-lCIC0'*>O<0t'000»O»H(MC0'^O«0t^000»OjH 



8c5SS5^c5SSJ58SSg 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CH&ISTIAN ALICANAO. 



5th MONTH. 



MAT, 1851. 



31 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon 

First Quarter • 
Full Moon • • • 
Third Quarter- 
New Moon 



BOSTON. 



4 18 mo. 
8 dOmo. 

3 21 mo. 
8 21 ev. 

4 3ev. 



NEW YORK, 



4 6 mo. 
8 38 mo. 
3 ^mo. 
8 9 ev. 
3 51 ev. 



BALTIMO'E. 



3 55 mo. 
8 27 mo. 

2 56 mo. 
7 58ev. 

3 40ev. 



CHARLES'N. 



■. a. 

3 42 mo. 
8 14 mo. 

2 45 mo. 
7 45 ev. 

3 27 ev. 



SUN OB MERID. 



11 56 59 

11 56 16 
11 56 8 
11 56 36 



11 



§1 



j»>OOOSOSOOr-H SoWCOTf IC»<0t'00000>OO.-l !>: tH 01 CO Tf «:» to «) l> oc 



J "2 00 OS O -t ,-1 2o-»C4C«C0Tj<Tf .aoOOiOTHTH § O 1-1 ,-l(N O CO CO ■* "2 »> 



^0<D<DCOCO^OCOCD(0<D<0(OCD(0<0<OCO<OCDCO<OCO<0<OCC(0<OCOCDt^ 






^3 



,-"SoOOiO^ gO'HTHCIOICO'^ 



-^.aaosorH SootHthwojcoco-^ "Soo 












'^wj^joAvd 



&&£^l!^S^S&£n^A^&&£Vi)l^A^HA£^)^H^&&£ 



mnoji^piva 



»H OJ CO "^ «0 <0 b- 00 OS O-^ CM CO Tf O «0 t* 00 OS O ;3 



8c5?5^^^SSJ^^^?5 



« ►" » e" 

m 



iiOOOSOOtHTH SotHCO'^OCOE^QOOSOSO^'-i ► »H Cl CO -^ «0 <0 Ir- t* 00 OS 



j'SoOOSO^ |o^tHC»C«CO'^'«J«.|oOOSO^ |ooi-i»Hoi(Neocoii<"|oo 



H 









Si 



at •* S « 

hi 5 



Ml 



j^ 2oiH,-i<MO»co'^«Dt^ooosoTH ►o»Hoio»co"^o«ot*ooosoo»H I 



j-2oOO>0»H §OTH^C«(NC0'»l«rj«.2 00 0SOTH 2 O O tH ,-1 <M (M CO CO •»1« "2 00 






^1 






U -TO*? 'tW^S 






31-AlJoH g£^HaH^H>S»gM«H^H>^«8M!^H^H£tgH!:^H^fi^«g 



tpuowjoi^al ^<Nco ^o^t-ooo>o;:!aS:^:SS^g3a85^aS?^^SS§MS^^^5 

1* 



Digitized 



by Google 



10 



THE FAICILT CHEISTIAK ALMAKAG. 



0th MOITTH. 



JUN£, 1851. 



30 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter • » • 

FuU Moon 

Third Quarter • • • 
New Moon 



1 44cT. 

2 Oer. 
1 51 er. 
1 41 mo. 



1 32 er. 
1 48 ey. 
1 39 er. 
1 29 mo. 



BALTIMORE. 



1 21 er. 
1 37 er. 
1 28 ey. 
1 18 mo. 



1 8eY. 
1 24 ey. 
1 15 ev. 
1 5 mo. 



SUN OB MSRID 



11 57 27 
11 58 50 
ev. 28 
2 11 



as 



a 



ii 



jOOOSOOtH SOi-IC0^«O«0«0»^000>0SOtH»h ► tH OI CO tj« o «o <o t* 00 






OOOOOSO^^ SoOi-t r-* Oi Ol CO -^ "S O! 



j.i-l<-iOIOlCOeOTfn»00«0«0«Ot*t^t^OOOOC»0>OiO>0>0»00©0 



rf -^ '^ji -^ji Tj* "^ •«* -^ •«* "^ -^ -^ "^ "^ Tj* Tj"^ "^ -^ -^ "^ -^ "^t -^ rr -^ -^"j^^ -^ '«* 



Oi S M 

SiiS 



u 



riSS^JQi eSIS^I^'JoS^ .S^SS^SS^ S-??'^?^"?^^^' .Ig 

jo»o»hth 2e>o«-«c«c»coco.5ooo»«Ot5^ §oo'Hi-hoic«coti«"Soc 









'4 






•v»M.jo^«a 



;i^)^&^&^£^)^A^&^S;^)^A^&ASn)!^^^&&Svi^ 



mUOW JO l-Bd 



i-ic«coTj<«o«ot^oo«d»H(NeoTj««<5«ot-oooiOjj 



g5c3S5S5^^SS585S^ 



S ^ M 

Si:- 

III 



II 



4 



o>oi-i»H |o'Hci'^iotor«t*ooo>o©'H ► o ^ c» co -^t o «o t^ t^ oo os 



5:;S^^ e^"=*^"^**5§ ^85S^^S^ gS^g^S-^^SSg .8t 

oio^rH 2o'H.-ic<cicoco.HoooioO'H»H SoO'Ht-«c«c»coco "Soo 









5a J; 

« S a 

~ o 8 

5^ 8 
S5^ 



OOTHCJOiCO-^^Ot^OOOJOOi-H ►.-lfHC«C0C0-*«0«Dt'000>OO»-H £ 



832°° 53 e85'"iS^?5*^J3 gSSSi'^SS^ gSg^-^^^SsS^;^ .*=^» 

osoi-i^ 2o»H^o»ojcoco.2oooioO'H^ 2 o o '-• i-i th cj co co » os 



1-1 r^ 1-1 B 



ll 









•N 'P^ 'i^nS 









Digitized by L^OOQIC 



THE FAICILY CHRISTIAN ALICANAC. 



11 



7th MONTH. 



JUIiTt 1851. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Qjukrter • 
Full Moon •-• 
Third Quarter- 
New Moon 



6 24 ev. 
2 30 mo. 
5 55 mo. 
9 56 mo. 



6 12 ey. 
2 18 mo. 
5 43 mo. 
9 44 mo. 



6 lev. 
2 7 mo. 
5 32 mo. 
9 33 mo. 



5 48cy. 
1 54 mo. 
5 19 mo. 
9 20 mo. 



SUN OS MERID. 



325 

4 49 

5 46 

6 11 



its 






-^:25gs? e^!§g^^5?^s 5g5'=»?5'^s5§«='§§ e'°gg5'^'='g§ .«^5?g? 

jOJOOr-t 2oOTHC}C«C0'«f .SQOOSOSOOtHi-^ flOO^OlCOCO "Sooooos 



'^t^t^t^b«b«t^t^t^t^b«b«t^t^t^t^t^b«t^t^t^t^t-^r-b«b»t^t-^f~tOCO<0 






ai > 

M S M 

tin 



u 



jO>OtH.-i 2oO'HtH(NCO"^.2000SOJOO'HtH 2oOi-t'HCi»CO"io00005 






•^"^Tf"^ 



3[09j^J0 X«(I 



5^Sfi;igwa5^S£cgsa5^Spi;cgsa£^S£cgHs5^g 



•xnuoj^joXTd 



i-t(NCOTj<0<OI>00050»HCieOrj<0<Ol-0005pjH 



^^1S5S^?§S58SS§5?5 



^5« 



|6a 



50th 2or-tc}eoTj<»o«ot'000>o>o^TH >; O iH cj co ti« »o «o t* oo o o> o 



5§S5^^ 6^??;::J^^°°S ^^SSi;^^^ 



OSOtHtH 2oOTH.-l<MC0C0.a000»0>OO'-lTH0l 2 O .-I r-t Ol CO "S 00 OS OS 

tH t-H T-l B M rHi->rHTHi-H B 2 






s;S3S§sSo!;;Si3S$S9i^^^^?^^^$$^«i»s;s;;^;sss8§ 






OTHi-Hdco-^osot^ooosotH ►orHdoieocoTfosot-ooosor-t 2oo 

^-ItH tt> t-itH B 



o>o»-<th 2oorH.H(Ncoeo,2ooo50soorHTHTH 2oi-i,-ici»co"Sooosos 



tH t-It-I B 



^C3 1-lT-lT-i gC 
tH 1-1 1-1 tH »-H B 






SSS^coco^^cow^wcoc^eocowT^'^TfTfTf^'^^rf^TfSoo 



H -pap f^ung 






^«K»^joX*a| ^^gtJ£;<gHag^g£^H;^^^g£^Ha^^g£^H!:^^^fi 



tpuoKJo^^al -'c^^^'^^^°p^S::!£3^^iS^^°SS^S^g3S^^^^§^8$^8g5 



Digitized 



by Google 



12 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



8th MONTH. 



AUOUST, 1851. 



31 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter' 

Full Moon 

Third Quarter 
New Moon - - 



23 mo. 

4 59 ey. 
8 14 ey. 

5 36 ey. 



11 mo. 

4 47 ey. 
8 2ey. 

5 24 ev. 



BALTIMORE. 



12 Oey. 

4 36 ey. 
7 51 ey. 

5 13 ev. 



CHARLES'N. 


SUN 


R. ■. 


B. 


11 47 ey. 

4 23 ey. 
7 38ev. 

5 Oev. 


1 

9 

17 

125 



6 3 

5 16i 

353 

1 



2^• 

m 
m 

J2S 



" 1— I t-H C 1-1 1-H T-l r-l a» 



ClTj»O<0t-t-000JO0 



»H 01 CO -^ .§ t^ 00 00 05 OS O O «-! tH 2 O iH C» CO » 

M i-lTH»-t»H C H 



ri S2li3 i*^*^" 



"5 t^ooooosci 

H "I 



H to<otoQ5t050^50to^ 50 CO CO CO COCO ^COCOCOCOCOCO^COCOCOCOtO<0® 









joo-^th 2o»H^oico.2»>wooo>osoO'H,-i 2othc»co "it^oooooj© 



'^t^t-'t-^r*t^b't^t-^i>t^t^cococococo<ococococococococo<ocococo<oto 



^^^C»COTfOCOt^QOO>0;^OJC5CO;2;OCOt2;OOag-;g^gJ^^«5®t;j^ 



3[99j^J0l«(I 



£<g«a5^Sp^<gwsH^Sfi;(gwsH^Hfi(gHSH^HPE:^B 



q;uoi\[joi«(i 



iHdCO-^OCOt^QOOlOi-iOJCOTfW^COt^OOOlOj^ 



w p» ^ c5 ^ c5 ^ ^ c5 S coco 






(4 S«^, 
o e< >. 

Il5 






;-|l 



iSE2"'"*2SSSSB55'-S*5S8§l8S?i!'='SS2B5SSS 



ij ^ So — cjm-* 



W3 (O t^ 00 00 a* O O -H t-H ^O.^C4C4IA«Dt^a000 0»O«- 



J 00^^ 2ot-4THCICO,at-OOOOOSO»OOi-^tH 2oiHOICO"Sl>0000005 

■ 1— I T-l rH 1-1 C ti tH tH -H 1-1 C eO . 



"t^t^t-'t^t-'t^t-'b't^t^t^t^t^COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCP. 






P5 



.cO'-^ooo>r-tocor-o»"«t^t^3!t*^o&'-'coo»cogQOJOcooot^ ei'rlSfi 
J 1-1 (N CO Tf o CO t^ 00 05 o th th ti ih 1-1 (n 01 CO CO Tf »o CO 00 OS o ih ih Soi-ic* 

■ fH »H 1— 1 4> tH tH 1— I C _ 



jOOtHi-i §O»HfHC<C0.2t^000D0S0S0SOO»H 2o»HC9CO "St^OOOOOJOS 

* iHi-lrHiH S fc; 1-I t-l 1-I C « 



d t^b»t-^t^t-'b«t^t-'t^t^t-'b't^t^t^cOCOCOCOCO<0<OCOCO<OCOCO<OCOCO« 






a "lo^p 't^s 



_,aOt^t-b-b-«0«0«C>»<^»0«'^»'^'^'^"^C*3WCOOIOIOIiH»Hi-tOOOO»0»OJQO 



^joXua| 






Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



13 



9fh MONTH. 



SEPTEMBER, 1851. 



30 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter • 
Full Moon . . • 
Third Quarter • 
New Moon 



9 9 mo. 
9 mo. 
8 45 mo. 
1 28 mo. 



NEW YORK. 



8 57 mo. 
8 48 mo. 
8 33 mo. 
1 16 mo. 



BALTIM'RE. 


CHARLES'N. 

8 33 mo. 
8 24 mo. 
8 9 mo. 
52 mo. ' 


SUN OH MERID 


a. m. 

8 46 mo. 
8 37 mo. 
8 22 mo. 
1 5 mo. 


». 
1 

9 
17 
25 


morning. 
11 57 18 
11 54 30 
11 51 43 



^ < -^ ^ 

" «^. s 

a: «a 



_, o 



orH(N-^«o«ot>t^ooooo5Cioo^-^ >o»coo«o;ot^ooo>oso^ 



gr-t O Tp '^ CO M 1-H TI" T-H rf t-i O CO ?J £ (^f Oi CO rj* • CO rH »0 CO 1-t 
I §O^'-iC^C0Tj<.2t^|>0000OOO'-4 2oTHCJC0"i«0l>t^000>O 

S ^^, i-Ht-l C CO rH 



1^ 



« c5 w 

a to to 



"Vl* rjt "^ Tj* 
tOOtOO<DtO<D<DC>gDCO<DCOCO<OCO<OOlOOiOIO>OtOU^iOOiO 






C0C0C0C0C0^^^'^T:<'^-^«^'^^'rf'rfTt'^'^O«0OO»0»0»0O 



02 >* 

o >• S - 



««2^^ cOwC}C0t3<.^ 



t'l^OOOOOSCSO'-^ 2orH(NCO««Dt*t-OOOSO> 






«Ol^o5«CO^C»5rtCOCOCOCO-«t^rJ«"^^'^"^Tfrt^Tj<8oOO«00 
li »0 O O O O O O «^ O O O O O O O O O tfO o o »o o o o o o o o «o o 



'yi99 j^plva 



SH^gpi:c^ss&2^igE^c^ssE2^i5p^c^«aE3^S;i:cgss^H 



•qiuoj^ JO Avd 



i-lCIC0Tj«»0;0t^00OO'-i(MC0Tj<O?0l^0005p«-i 



ao3^S5^^^5^85§J^ 



o 0- >: , 

tf hi M 

.< M M . 



-• cOt-<0JC0>OC0t*00000iOOO'^-^ >O^C0'«t(©t^b-000>OOTH 2 



fa 



« 0* O g '"J'.CO OJOJCsigrHCO CO Cti-H g T-iC0«c6 tJ-tH "^ 



jO^-^ gOr-tCICO"^ 



t^ 00 00 oi C5 o '-^ gOt-i cMco ■©» t* t-00O>Oi 



"<0<DtO<OtOgOCOtOCDCOCDCD<DgDtOCOgOO<gtOOOOO>OOiO«00»0 



■»0»00»00>0000«0>0»0>00»000 00>0»000»00»00«00 



S OS I 






|j Ol CO ri'O <0000>OwtH >Oi-ii-i(M(>JCOCOtJ««OI>0»00^ 2otH,-l(N 



»2^^ g?SS^S5?5 g2gS"8)S?i2='2§ g-^^SJ JS^^iSJg^ 

jO^i-h cOi-i<NC0'«J«.2 t^t'OOOOOOOSO'-^^ C rH (N CO « «D t* t* 00 00 Oi 



«JS 









•K-lo»P«««nS 



tS^So:2:g5g^gg3®^;2:5?s5'^^2i32^'=*^g^"=*s^;::^88c3^ 

00t't't^«0«0«0»0O»0"^"^C0C0C0(M(M'-<'-ti-(O}2!qcQOO»-«r-tTH(M<N 



■JIWiA.J0X«a| >^g^gt^^BS^^iSfacgH!^H^HP^(^MgH^gfa«gW!S<H 



[mU0HJoX«a| ^<NCO^>Q<Ot^OOO>0;HC<CO;g;^S^gSSSoig^§^^cS^S^8g^^ 



Digitized by'LjOOglC . 



14 



THE FAICILT CHRISTIAN ALICAKAC. 



10th MONTH. 



OCTOBER, 1851. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter 
Full Moon •• 
Third Quarter 
New Moon- -• 
First Quarter 



BOSTON. 



9 46 ev. 

1 49 mo. 
7 29 ev. 

10 26 mo. 

2 34 ev. 



NEW TORK, 



9 34 er. 

1 37 mo. 
7 17 ev. 

10 14 mo. 

2 22 ev. 



BALTIMORE. 



9 23eT. 

1 26 mo. 
7 6ev. 

10 3 mo. 

2 11 ev. 



CHARLSS'N. 



9 10 ev. 
1 13 mo. 
6 53 ev. 
9 50 mo. 
1 58 ev. 



SUN»a MERID. 



11 49 44 

11 47 22 
11 45 28 
11 44 13 



CO *'B 






■ O O UO O IC ITS tfT >c o >o o o o o o o ^-'S »^ ^•'^ o >o o *o *ft) >o 'O '■'t) >o »o *o vt 



■ Ut O O to O «0 O r-t tH tH r-t rH rH i-H r-l ^ »-^ ^ 



3525 



. OrH Soi-HtNco-^.iS^osot^t^ooososo 2orHOicO'^'S«>«ot^oocso^ 



■ O v-t O Ut) o >o o o o o o o o o o o o >-'t ^'^ o ^-'t »o >-'^ ^ti '^ *o *^ *^ *o *o "^t 



si 



IJOOtCCDCOCOCDOCDCOCO^COCO^CDCOCOCOCO<OCOCOCOCOCOCDCOCO<OCO 



•SfALJolra ^gficgWSH^S^^WI^H^HfetgWSH^H^^HSS^g^ 



•vuowjox^al ^'^^^^*^-°°^S^2i22::22^S28558^S5^^SS58SS^55 



o *« >• o 

III 



II 



4 



« wt»0'-<cc»?5wie%^« ft '•T '-< "v CO o» ''t t-H -^ •'a' w 1-H o '«t <M -^ gS 

J 00 "-HCO-VOO t^OOOOOiOSOO'-i i-H U 1-t (N Tj* O <0 t- 00 00 OS O '-H ,-1 go 



. O»HeO»-tWC0"^,2«0«0t^t^0005C5O«-ic'-^C^*C^'' 



^COCOt^OO Oi^r-^ 



«lC>r?Ow^0^t■cru?u'^l■'t'U'Ttr^ooc>f^»Q>o^O^OO>r^to^r:)O^Q^o^o■T^^■^■^ 






55 . 

S2S£ 



u 



il 



si 






^5555 eS^:32$32J g^g§"l?=:JS^^?? s^S^S .'-^S^S^'^ 






««0l>t-Q0000»O^ |»H0»C0Tfcu«0«Ot*00Oi^r-t 









|oc*3eocO"^'*o»«ototo«ot^t'OOQOOOosa«oo^^^o»CMCjeocoeO'^ 






Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



15 



11th MONTH. 



NOTEHIBER, 1851. 



30 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Full Moon . . . 
Third Quarter • 
Ne-w Moon • • - • 
First Quarter • 



6 37 ev. 
4 38 mo. 
9 22 ev. 
10 43 mo. 



6 25 ev. 
4 26 mo. 
9 10 ev. 
10 31 mo. 



6 14 ev. 
4 15 mo. 
8 59 ev. 
10 20 mo. 



CHARLCS'N. 

6 1 ev. 
4 2 mo. 
8 46 ev. 
10 7 mo. 



SUN OH MKRID. 



11 43 44 
11 43 59 
11 45 7 
11 47 9 



§^. 



5 2 
> 2 <? 



o 5 H 5 



" —I -^ 4> »^ ,-r -H g 



Bj §Ot-ic^cotj«tj«,2o«oi^oooso^ c o -^ cm co<Tf « o <o i^ 00 OS o jh I 






^ ^c^oi oic^cic<toi oic^oiCinn conned nnnnn^ TfT^ 
'«o<oco«oco<o<o«ooco^<o<o«o?o<o?o«o?o«oto«o«oto<oco?oco cow 



H M O 



gO'-«(Ncor:«»o.2o<ot^t^ooo5'^ SorHoico-^ "iotot^ooosoo^ 



II 



I rf^-n'Tj*-^ -t T>"<y rf T>*ry Tf -» tJ» -f 'rt"^«yrJ«-^'q<rJ«TyTT"^Ty-<»-^T»-^ 






"3|a»j^J0 X^d 



<gwsE2^S£cgW!^H^i5^c^B;^E2^E5fi:c«saH^SpScgH 



•HJUOW JO it!(I 



i-iOICOTj'OCDt-.00050t-i(MCOTfO«Ol>0005 0i-i 



S^?Jc5^c5^5mc5^co 



2^5 2 



6 5 



»-• CM CO »0 <0 l> r^ 00 00 Ci Ci O O T-H >.HOICOOCO t^t-OOOOOt-H flOO 



gOi-iCMC0rJ«O.2O«0«0 



l>OOOSO §0-^CMC5tJ« "iocot^t^ooojoi-t 



i»o»oo>oo§5^^Ti<Tf^ 






' cocortcocowco^^Tj* 

I fQ fQ f0 (0 (Q f0 (0 ^ (Q (Q tQ 



»C«Ol^00Q^O»C2"^»Qt^QC<5OTHCMC0'^«> 






i •^«o«>oooso 






^i-iCMCO-^OCOOOO» 



OOi-H §OtH^<NCOCO 



i *0 -^ CO O* 1-1 y 






CMOCO^ ^CMOgpCMO OOCO»QCM»-! 



gO«0<0t'000>Oi-" 



w ■<»r»TyTj«-^Ti«r>«TyTi«TfT» 



§^§8?o§^^^^?5^S?o3^gSS85S55iM 



' CO W CO w ^ ^ 
i <OCOCOCO<0«D 



<0 CO CO CO CO 



cococococococococo 



O^CM'^'OCOl-OOOJt-i 

t* t— t^ t* t* t* t^ t^ l^ t- 



•g ^09p f ^ung 






COCOCOt^t' 



:5KS^5S8§S5m:5J 

t^t»000000000>0>0> 



BSSS^C<CM^C< 



•3|»»^J0X«(I 



igBa^^efecgHa5^Hfe«gwaH^gfi:,^wsH^Sfi:.^B 



•H»w>w JO ^*a 



^CM CONOCO r^ 00 0>O^CI CO ;g; 0^tgQDgg^ gHg |gj^g3^g;g^^g 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



16 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



12th MONTH. 



BECEIflBER, 1851. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Full Moon 

Third Quarter- 

New Moon 

First Quarter • 



10 43 mo. 

42 ev. 
10 50 mo. 

8 31 mo. 



NEW YORK. 



10 31 mo. 

30 ev. 
10 38 mo. 

8 19 mo. 



10 20 mo. 

19 ev. 
10 27 mo. 

8 8 mo. 



CHARLES'N. 



10 7 mo. 

6 ev. 
10 14 mo. 

7 55 mo. 



SUN OH MERLD. 



11 49 12 

11 52 31 
11 56 18 
ev. 17 



.05»0 05«0'-iCOCO'-iClCOCO'^«0>0«-iCOCOO«OCJCOCOOOOOOSt-OQ -JOt- 
riO'-lCO'<3«0»0«Ot>'fc^OOOiC10T-i >t-<(NC0T}*O«OI>0000CJOOrH goo 



2^52 
^22 



■ C T-1 ^ C w 



_2 i£ T-i^ C m 

. C» OJ 0» 0» Ol O) 0» OJ OJ OJ CO CO CO CO '5' -f "l" O O «P «P l^ 1> 00 00 Ci <5 



OOOOCiO^ |o 



Ci p5 O t-t i-H (M 



0D0005aiOOi-»TH0J(NC0C0Tj<'^"^'>« 



si 






X E o o Tf Tf n* -^ _ 

. 2oth(ncO'^»o.2»o«oi>ooo^ So^ojco-^q 

■ fcj ^ rHj-l q . 



5o«ot^ooo50rH 2o 

- rHrH e 



■ cocococOcocococococococococococococococococococOTrTi<TrTr^'<!j' ^: 



iCOrrO«Ot^OOOi050'-^C->CO'<t"*0«0«Ol^000005CSOC3«--i'-^'--tC^CNCJ<?} 



■7[9QJ^}OlTia 



^A^&^l^^S^&^^^^^^S^S^i^^^S^^^^S^ 



•muoyijoAva 



t-i(MC0'^OC0l>0005O.-<0JC0'^»OC0l--00OO'-jC) 



o*^Sjc5(Mc5wSJcj^^co 



.os»QOi«Oi-(coco«-i050co'tooi-tcoocotoe)cocooDa)0 

«Tl*tf5 t-H T-i v5 CO ^ Tj< (N -ri* Ol T-* t-i ^ C^ CO -^a* rj» CO o» t3<C0 
-■r-tW'«fO«0«0t>000D0iOO'-t >«-fO}CO'<t»0«>l:^000>OSOr-t»-^ C 

_[^ T-l T-( rH 0) i-Ht-I rH b 






«»?:: eORPE: 



II 



■ COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCO 



^t^ 00 00^.01 CO CO^O^J^jOO^CJOj. J. g^C^g^^^^U^U^Og^Og^ 



2 23 






.>««OC^000>0»O»H»-t !>r-trH(NC0rJ«»0«0t>000SOrH 2oOT-t(NC»eO"^'^ 



. -1 T— 1 WJ WJ Wrf 



5518 «^^^^55'^ i^'^^^'^^ -^U^?^^^^ E^ 



rf S 



SorHOJCO-^O.SOtOt-OOOSi-i 2o»H0JC0>OO«O«0f'0005OiF-( 



'::^s 



^^ p^ 



.«0«D;0«0«000 0»r500ir5iQ«OOCO«>t-l>QQOOC505QO'--iTHC^COrTiV5 






g -pop ■jtms 









Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 17 



- IB Bibuatcu ui luts Geai>r<3 ux a squiirc, uu an oiiluicijuc /o 

feet above tide-water ; and consists of a central edifice and two wings, the entire 
length being 352 feet, and the depth of the wings 121 feet. On the east front, 
there is a splendid portico of 22 columns, 38 feet high ; and on the west front, a 
portico of 10 columns. The height of the building, to the top of the dome, is 120 
feet; and under the dome, is the rotunda, 95 feet in diameter, and of the same 
height, adorned with sculpture and paintings of a national character. On the 
east front, in niches, are colossal figures, in marble, of Peace and War, and a fine 
marble statue of Columbus at the entrance. The colossal statue of Washington, 
by Greenough, stands in the east park, in a neat temple erected for the purpose. 
Within the building, are the hall of the House of Representatives, the Senate 
chamber,"i;he library of Congress, the court-room of the Supreme court, and some 
70 rooms for the accommodation of conunittees, etc., etc. Around the capitol, are 
22 acres of park, highly ornamented with trees, shrubbery, fountains, etc. 



Anger. — ^Anger is like rain, which breaks itself upon that on which it falls. 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



18 THE FAMILT CHEISTIAN ALMAKAC 

Welit must I do to bs Saysd ? — Ton mnst believe on Christ as the only and 
aU-8ufficient SaTionr. Do yon ask what it is to belieye on him? It is to have 
such confidence in him, as to receive all that he has said as true, and to treat it 
as true^ to act «p<m it as true. In other words, yon must seek salvation as the 
gospel directs, by repenting, by believing, by obeying. By repenting — by breaking 
oK, at once, firom all sin, whether outward or secret, in thte heart or in the life, 
because it is offensive to God, and ruinous to yourself; for this is repentance. By 
believing — ^by giving yourself and all that you have to Christ, trusting to him, and 
to him only, for all that you need for time and eternity; for this is faith. By 
obeying — by engag^g sincerely, and uniformly, in whatever you know to be duty, 
for the sake of glorifying God, and doing good ; for this is obedience. This you 
must be willing to do— this you must begin at once — this you must continue for 
ever^ taking God's word as your rule of action, in dependence on God's Spirit for 
streng^ and in reliance on God's gppace for acceptance and final salvation. Bo 
this, and though your sins are as scarlet, they shall be white as snow ; though 
they are red like crimson, they shall be as wool. Come thus unto Christ, and he 
will in no wise cast you out. Guilty and polluted though you may be, his blood 
shall cleanse you from all sin. 

Repentance^ is to leave Fhitk, is to trust in Christ, 

The sins I did before ; Relying on his grace ; 

And show that I do truly grieTe, Resting on him as all our hope, 

By doing so no more. Our strength and righteousness. 

Dr.. Chalmers to the Impenitent. — You may delay the work of repentance, 
and think the future far off — but it will come ; your last call from heaven far off— 
but it will come ; your last unavailing effort to repent far off — but it will come ; 
the death-struggle, the shroud, the funeral far off— but it will come ; the day of 
judgment, the day of reckoning far off — but it will come ; the sentence, *' Depart 
from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire I" far off — but it will come ; eternal ban- 
ishment from the presence of the Lord, weeping, wailing, and gnashing of teeth 
far off — but it will comel 



The Bible its own Evidence.— When Dr. Duff read to the intelligent Hindoo 
youth for the first time the precept of the Saviour, " I say unto you, Love your 
enemies ; bless them that curse you ;" one of them could not restrain himself from 
speaking out his feelings : " 0, how beautiful !" For days and weeks he could 
not cease repeating, " * Love your enemies; bless them that curse you.'* How beau- 
tiful ! Surely this must be the truth." 

Children and Parents. — "Let all children remember," says Dr. D wight, "if 
ever they are weary of laboring for their parents, that Christ labored for his ; if 
impatient of their commands, that Christ cheerfully obeyed ; if reluctant to pro- 
vide for their parents, that Christ forgot himself and provided for his mother amid 
the agonies of the crucifixion. The affectionate language of this divine example 
to every child is, * Go thou and do likewise.' " 

Children of the Pious. — ^In a town in Massachusetts, the children above a 
certain age being divided into three classes, it was found that of those whose 
parents were both pious, two thirds had professed religion ; of those, only one oi 
whose parents was pious, one third ; and of those, neither of whose parents were 
i)ious, only one tenth, and several of these became pious when away from h<»ne. 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



THE FAICILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 19 



BeniimeniB mat \,at}y couia nob joui lu 
any one mode of worship. Mr. Samuel Adams arose, and after saying he was 
no bigot, and could hear a prayer from any gentleman of piety and virtue who was 
a friend to his country, moved that Rev. Mr. Duch^ — an Episcopal clergyman, 
who, he said, he understood deserved that character — be invited to read prayers 
before Congress the next morning. The motion was passed ; and the next morn- 
ing Mr. Duch^ appeared, and after reading several prayers in the established form, 
then read the collect for the 7th of September, which was the thirty-fifth psalm. 
This was the next morning after the startling news had come of the cannonade of 
Boston J and says John Adams, " I never saw a greater effect upon an audience : 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



2a 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



it seemed as if heaven had ordained that psalm to be read on that morning" 
"After this," he continues, "Mr. Duch^, unexpectedly to every body, struck out 
into an extemporaneous prayer, which filled the bosom of every man present I 
never heard a better prayer, or one so well pronounced. Dr. Cooper himself never 
prayed with such fervor, ardor, earnestness, and pathos, and in language so elo- 
quent and sublime, for America, for the Congress, for the province of Massachu- 
setts bay, and especially for Boston. It had an excellent effect upon every body 
here ;" and many, he tells us, were melted to tears. [See letter of John Adams 
to his wife, Sept. 16, 1774.] 



REFLECTION. 
The Past— where is it ? It has fled. 

The Future ? It may never come. 
Onr friends departed ? With the dead. 

Ourselves ? Fast hastening to the tomb. 
What are earth's joys ? The dews of mom. 

Its honors ? Ocean's wreathing foam. 
Where's peace ? In trials meekly borne. 

And joy ? In heaven, the Christian's home. 



THE ALTAR AT HOME. 
I remember, I remember 

The very comer where 
My father every moming knelt, 

And every eve, in prayer : 
I remember where the circle stood 

That joined the holy lay ; 
I remember how, in solemn mood. 

We all kneeled down to pray. 



Early Eeligiqus Instruction. — Thelwall thought it very unfair to influence 
a child's mind by inculcating any opinions before it should come to years of dis- 
cretion, and be able to choose for itself. ^' I showed him my garden," says Cole- 
ridge, ^^ and told him it was my botanical garden. ' How so,' said he, ' it is cov- 
ered with weeds.' * 0,' I replied, * that is because it has not yet come to its age 
of discretion and choice. The weeds, you see, have taken the liberty to grow, and 
I thought it imfair in me to prejudice the soil towards roses and strawberries.' " 

The celebrated Dr. Dwight thus speaks of the importance of early religions 
training : " The great truths of religion should be taught so early, that the xx^ad 
should never remember when it began to learn, or when it was without this kno^r- 
ledge. Whenever it turns a retrospective view upon the preceding periods of its 
existence, these truths should always seem to have been in its possession ; to have 
the character of innate principles ; to have been inwoven in its nature, and to con- 
stitute a part of all its current thinking." 



Self-government. — ^Do all in your power to teach your children self-govern- 
ment. If a child is passionate, teach him, by gentle and patient means, to curb 
his temper. If he is greedy, cultivate liberality in him. If he is seliish, promote 
generosity. If he is sulky, charm him out of it, by encouraging frank good-humor. 
If he is indolent, accustom him to exertion, and train him so as to perform even 
onerous duties with alacrity. If pride comes in to make his obedience reluctant, 
subdue him, either by counsel or discipline. In short, give your children the habit 
of overcoming their besetting sins. * 

How to Teach Children. — ^If you find an error in the child's mind, follow 
it up till he is rid of it. If a word is spelled wrong, be sure that the class is right 
before it is dismissed. Eepeat, and fix attention on the exact error, till it can 
never be committed again. One clear and distinct idea is worth a world of misty 
ones. Time is of no consequence in comparison with the object. Give the child 
possession of one clear, distinct truth, and it becomes to him a centre of light. 
In all your teaching — no matter what time it takes — ^never leave your pupU till 
you know he has in his mind your exact thought. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 21 



on the 50th anniversary of the battle, June 17, 1825 j and that foundation havinjj 
been found insufficient, the corner-stone of the present structure was laid in March, 
1827. The monument was completed July 23, 1842. Its form is that of an obe- 
lisk, 30 feet square at the base, and 16 feet 4^ inches at the top. It is built of 
hewn granite, and is 221 feet high. The interior is hollow and circular, having a 
diameter of 10 feet *? inches at the bottom, and 6 feet 4 inches at the top, and is 
ascended by 294 steps. At the top is an elliptical chamber, 17 feet high and 11 
feet in diameter, with four windows, affording a most beautiful view of Boston, its 
harbor, and the surrounding country. 

A Contrast. — Good-nature, like a bee, collects honey from every herb. Ill- 
nature, like a spider, sucks poison from the sweetest flower. 

9* 



Digitized 



by Google 



22 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

What is it to Believe on Christ ? — ^It is, to believe that he is the only 
Saviour ; that *' there is no salvation in any other ; no other name under heAveo, 
given among men, whereby we must be saved.'' Acts 4:12. 

It is, to fttl your need of him ; that you are guilty, and need forgiveness ; sin- 
ful, and need to be made holy; under condemnation, and need to be pardoned j 
lost, and need to be saved. 

It is, to believe that he is able and wiUing to save you, and to save you now. 
He is able; "almighty" — "able to save to the uttermost them that come unto 
God by him," Heb. 7:25: willing; "not willing that any should perish, but 
that all should come to repentance," 2 Peter, 3:9: ready to save you noio; for 
"notr is the accepted time, and now the day of salvation." 2 Cor. 6 : 2. 

It is, to cast yourself cU once, and without reserve, on his mercy, trusting in him 
alone for salvation, renouncing self-righteousness and self-dependence, all idea of 
meriting salvation by any thing you can do, and relying on what Christ has done; 
to give yourself up to him, just as you are, to be accepted, forgiven, purified, direct- 
ed, and saved j to take him for your prophet to teach, your priest to atone, your 
long to rule over and in you, and your example, to be imitated in all your feelings, 
purposes, and conduct. Do this, and you will be a believer in Christ ; and he shall 
be your refuge, your portion, your Saviour, all your salvation, and all your desire. 
Prostrate I'll lie before his throne, I can but perish if I go, 

And there my guilt confess ; I am resolved to try ; 

I'U tell him I'm a wretch undone, For if I stay away, I know 

Without his sovereign grace. / must for ever die 

I Am . — God doth not say, / am their light, their guide, their strength, their tower, 
but only I am. He sets, as it were, his hand to a blank, that his people may 
write under it what they please that is good for them. As if he should say. Are 
they weak ? I am strength. Are they poor ? I am riches. Ajre they in trouble ? 
I am comfort. Are they sick 7 I am health. Are they dying ? I am life. Have 
they nothing? I am all things. I am wisdom and power. I am justice and 
mercy. / am grace and goodness. I am glory, beauty, holiness, enainency, 
supereminency, perfection, all-sufficiency, eternity! Jehovah, lam. Whatsoever 
is amiable in itself^ or desirable unto them, that I am. Whatsoever is pure and 
holy — ^whatsoever is great or pleasant — whatsoever is good or needful to make 
men happy, that I am. Bishop Bereridgo. 

The Family. — " Faithful attention to family religion harmonizes with our 
belief in God^s covenant. If the blessings of God's grace descend in the line of 
Christian families, it must be by suitable means. If God says, I will be a God 
to thee and thy seed, he implies a condition. " I know him, that he will conunand 
his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord, 
to do justice and judgment, that the Lord may bring upon Abraham that which 
he hatii spoken of him." 

Diligent in Business, Fervent in Spirit. — I resolve to neglect nothing to 
secure my eternal peace, more than if I had been certified that I should die within 
the day ; nor to mind any thing which my secular duties demand of me, less than 
if I had been insured I should live fifty years more. McCheyne. 

Old and Youno. — "A young beginner in Christianity may say what he will 
do, but an old Christian will say what Christ will do." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 33 

Bad Books. — ^Books are oompany ; and the company of bad books is as dan- 
gerous as the company of bad boys or bad men. Goldsmith, who was a novel- 
writer of some note, writing to his brother about the education of a nephew, says, 
^''^dbove all tkingSy never let your nephew touch a novel or a romance" An opinion 
given in such a manner must have been an honest opinion. And as he knew 
the character of novels, and the influence they would exert on the yoimg, his 
opinion ought to have weight. 

UNKINDNESS. AN EPITAPH. 

Since life's best joys consist in peace and ease, Would yon know what religion h« had ? 

And though but few can serve, yet all may please, Be his character thus understood : 

O let th' ungentle spirit learn from hence, A dissenter from all that is bad, 

A. small unkindness is a great offence. A eonsenter to all that is good. 

A GOOD Exchange. — I shall never forget, says the bishop of Norwich, visit- 
ing the cottage of a man who had been all his life a drunkard, and which was an 
abode of misery and wretchedness. He became a teetotaler, and in six months 
afterwards I foimd his abode the scene of comfort and domestic happiness. This 
man, with tears in his eyes, placing his hand on a quarto family Bible, said, 
''This is the first thing that I purchased with the money saved by giving up 
drunkenness ; it was an alien to my house before, but it has been my daily com- 
fort and companion ever since." 

Science and Religion. — As knowledge advances, science ceases to scoflf at 
religion j and religion ceases to frown on science. The hour of mockery by the 
one, and of reproof by the other, is passing away. Henceforth, they will dwell 
together in unity and good- will. They will mutually illustrate the wisdom, power, 
and grace of God. Science will adorn and enrich religion ; and religion will en- 
noble and sanctify science. 

Good Books. — The value of a good book is not often appreciated. - Saints are 
built up in their faith by good reading, and an impenitent person is never more 
disposed to read than when he begins to take an interest in the salvation of his 
soul. It is important, therefore, for every family to keep on hand a supply of 
useful religious books. Eeligious books have a great deal to do with the destiny 
of families. 



Leisure Hours. — It was a beautiful observation of the late William Hazlit, 
that " there is room enough in human life to crowd almost every art and science in 
it. If we pass *iu) day without a line ' — visit no place without the company of a 
book — we may with ease fill libraries, or empty them of their contents. The more 
we do, the more we can do ; the more busy we are, the more leisure we have." 

Early Teaching. — Scratch the green rind of a sapling, or wantonly twist it 
in the soil, and a scarred or crooked oak will tell of the act for centuries to come. 
How forcibly does this figure teach the necessity of giving right tendencies to the 
minds and hearts of the young ! 



Children. — The real object of education is to give children resources that 
will endure as long as life endures ; habits that time will ameliorate, not destroy ; 
occupations that will render sickness tolerable, solitude pleasant, age venerable, 
life more dignified and useful, and death less terrible. Rev. Sydney Smith. 



Digitized 



by Google 



24 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Habits. — There are habits, not only of drinking, swearing, and lying, and of 
some other things which are commonly acknowledged to be habits, but of every 
modification of action, speech, and thought. Man is a bundle of habits. There 
are habits of industry, attention, vigilance, advertency ; of a prompt obedience to 
the judgment occurring, or of yielding to the first impulse of passion; of extending 
our views to the future, or of resting upon the present j of apprehending, method- 
izing, reasoning ; of indolence, dilatoriness ; of vanity, self-conceit, melancholy, 
partiality ; of fretfulness, suspicion, captiousness, censoriousness ; of pride, ambi- 
tion, covetousness ; of overreaching, intriguing, projecting : in a word, there is not 
a quality or function, either of body or mind, which does not feel the influence of 
this great law of animated nature. Paley. 

TRUE WISDOM. NEVER GIVE UP. 

True wisdom looks upward, amd places her treasure Never give up / for the wisest is boldest, 

Where the withering light of decay is ne'er known ; Knowing that ProYidence mingles the cup ; 
Then finds it at last by the river of pleasure, And of all maxims the best, as the o] lest, 

Thftt ceaselesiily flows from Immauuel's throne. Li the true watchword, never give up ! 



Steadiness of Pur/ose. — In whatever you engage, pursue it with a steadi- 
ness of purpose, as though you were determined to succeed. A vacillating mind 
never accomplished any thing worth naming. There is nothing like a fixed, steady 
aim. It dignifies your nature and insures your success. Who have done the most 
for mankind ? Who have secured the rarest honors ? Who have raised themselves 
from poverty to riches ? Those who were steady to their purpose. The man who 
is one thing to-day, and another to-morrow — who diives an idea pell-mell this 
week, while it drives him the next — is always in trouble, and does just nothing 
from one year's end to the other. Look, and adinife the man of steady purpose. 
He moves noiselessly along, and yet, what wonders he accomplishes. He rises, 
gradually we grant, but surely. The heavens are not too high for him, neither 
are the JBtars beyond his reach. How worthy of imitation ! 



How TO Preserve Health. — Medicine will never remedy bad habits. It is 
utterly futile to think of living in gluttony, intemperance, and every excess, and 
keeping the body in health by medicine. Indulgence of the appetite, and indis- 
criminate dosing and drugging, have ruined the health and destroyed the life of 
more persons than famine, sword, and pestilence. If you will take advice, become 
regular in your habits, eat and drink wholesome things, sleep on mattresses, and 
retire and rise very regularly. Make a free use of water to purify the skin, and 
when sick, take counsel of the best physician you know, and foUow nature. 



A WELL-SPENT I) AY. — Evcry day is a little life ; and our whole life is but a 
day repeated. And hence it is, that old Jacob numbers his life by days, and 
Moses desires to be taught this point of holy arithmetic, 'Ho number not his ytan^ 
but his daySy and these so as to apply his heart luito wisdom." Those, therefore, 
that dare lose a dSjy, are dangerously prodigal ; and those that dare misspend it, 
deiperatt. 

True and False Pleasure. — -''All pleasure," says John Foster, "must be 
bought at the expense of pain ; the difierence between false pleasure and true is 
just this ; for the trt^e^ the price is paid before you enjoy itj for the/oZse, after" 
wards.'*'' 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 26 



scaffolding for constructing a larger bridge, intended for the pasnage of railroad 
care. The towers for the large bridge will be of solid masonry, each 80 feet high. 
Each of the cables is 1,160 feet long, and composed of 72 strong. No. 10 iron 
wires, closely wrapped round with small wire three times boiled in linseed oil, 
which anneals it, and prevents injury from rust or exposure to the weather. 
The cables, after passing over the piers on the banks, are fast anchored in solid 
masonry fifty feet back of them. T^e suspenders^ which form the sides, are com- 
posed of eight wires each, and are four and a half feet apart. The bridge itself 
is 200 feet above the water, and is a wonder alike of enterprise and art. 



Digitized 



by Google 



26 THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 

The Bible. — ^We have never seen a more truthful remark upon "the book of 
all books" than the following : " The Bible," says Rome, " is dangerous." But 
dangerous for whom ? It is dangerous for infidelity, which it confounds ; danger- 
ous for sins, which it curses ; dangerous for Satan, whom it dethrones ; dangerous 
to false religions, which it unmasks ; dangerous to every church which dares to 
conceal it from the people, and whose criminal impostures or fatal illusions it 
brings to light. 

"SEAB-CH THE SCRIPTURES." 

Glance not with careless eye Search deeply, prayerfully ; 

The sacred pages o'er ; There is no promise given 

Nor lightly lay the volume by, To those who will not strive t'obtain 

To thinlE of it no more. Admission into heaven. 

Ungrateful ! — ^pause and thiuk, Sure 'tis our highest end 

Nor madly throw aside Eternal life to gain : 

The passport to eternal life — " Search,'* then, " the Scriptures ;" they ahme 

The sure and only guide. The words of life contain. 

Be not content to hear They point our wandering feet 

What others say ; but go, To Christ, the living way ! 

Like the Bereans, daiily search read, believe, repent, obey— 

" Whether these things are &o." Thus reign in endless day. 



Christianity not of Human Origin. — There are in the English language 
few sentences which contain more thought than the following ; 

" To me, when I look at this religion, taking its point of departure from, the 
earliest period in the history of the race ; when I see it analogous to nature ; when 
I see it comprising all that natural religion teaches, and introducing a new system 
in entire harmony with it, but which could not have been deduced from it j when 
I see it commending itself to the conscience of man, containing a perfect code of 
morals, meeting all his moral wants, and embosoming the only true principles of 
economical and political science ; when I see in it the best possible system of ex- 
citement and restraint for all the faculties ; when I see how simple it is in its prin- 
ciple, and yet in how many thousand ways it mingles in with human affairs, and 
modifies them for good, so that it is adapted to become universal j when I see it 
giving an account of the termination of all things, worthy of God and consintent 
with reason : to me, when I look at all these things, it no more seems possible that 
the system of Christianity should have been originated or sustained by man, than 
it does that the ocean should have been made by him." Preg. Hopkins. 

A GRAND Discovert. — A man, says Cecil, may find much amusement in the 
Bible ; variety of prudential instruction ; abundance of sublimity and poetry ; but 
if he stops there, he stops short of his great end, for '^ the testimony of Jesus is 
the spirit of prophecy." The grand secret in the study of the Scriptures is to dis- 
cover Jesus Christ therein, " the Way, the Truth, and the Life." 

God's Work. — In all his dispensations, God is at work for our good. In pros- 
perity, he tries our gratitude; in mediocrity, our contentment; in misfortune, our 
submission; in seasons of darkness, our faith; imder temptation, our steadfast- 
ness ; and at all times, our obedience and trust in him. 

The Conclusion op the Whole Matter. — The sum and substance of the 
preparation needed for a coming eternity is, that yon believe what the Bible tells 
^^n, and do what the Bible bids you. Ohalnun m Romans. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC 27 



Bion of knowledge. The trust was accepted by th6 United States goyemment, and 
an act passed, August 10, 1846, organizing " The Smithsonian InstittUion for the 
Increctse and Diffusion of Knowledge among Men." The endowment consists of 
the original sum, $515,169, received Sept. 1, 1838, which is to remain for ever as 
a permanent fund. The interest of this amount to 1846, when by act of Congress 
the funds were placed in the hands of the Board of Regents, was $242,129 ; which 
sum, with all accruing future interest, is to be expended in the building, and the 
current expenses of the Institution. The entire income is to be divided into two 
equal parts, one of which is to be devoted to the increase and diffusion of know- 
ledge by means of original research and publications*, and the other, to the gradual 
formation of a library, a museum, and a gallery of art. The programme of orgaii- 



Digitized 



by Google 



28 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

ization, and details of intended operations, may be found in the reports of tiie 
secretary, Prof. Henry; especially in his plan presented to the Biegents, and 
adopted by them December 13, 1847. 

Sunday-Schools. — ^Bishop Beveridge has truly and strikingly said, "Who 
knows but the salvation of ten thousand immortal souls may depend on the edu- 
cation of a single child." Connect with this Ihe remark of a living bishop of the 
church of England, that ^^Sunday-schools have saved the manufacturing districts," 
and also the fact mentioned by Dr. Bowring, that "out of 1,065 convicts sent for 
crime to the penal colonies, only fourteen had ever been in the Sabbath-school,'' 
and what an argument do we have for the importance of these institutions, both 
for time and eternity 

CUILDREM IM HEAVEN. 

Who are they whose little feet, "All our earthly journey past, 

Facing life's dark journey through, Every tear and pain gone by, 

Now have reached that heavenly seat Here through Jesus met at last, 

They have ever kept in view ? At the portals of the sky." 

" I from Greenland's frozen land," Each the welcome " Come " awaits, 

" I from hidia's sultry plain," Conquerors over death smd sin ; 

" I from Afric's barren sand," Lift your heads, ye golden gates, 

*^ I firom Islands of the main ;" Let the little travellers in. 

Anticipations of Heaven. — ^Let your hope enter within the veil, in the full 
and delightful anticipation of your speedy admission. And is this the only grace 
which should enter it ? No. Let love enter within the veil, and say, " Whom have 
I in heaven but thee?" and let faith enter it, and say, **I shall see the goodness 
of the Lord in the land of the living ;" let patience enter, and behold the good 
resting from their sorrows ; let gratitude enter, and take up its song and its harp ; 
let humility enter, and see how all its honors are devoted to Jesus ; let charity 
enter, and mark how, amidst all the varieties in character, origin, and glory, 
among its inhabitants, there is but one heart j let desire enter, and say, when 
shall I come and appear before God ? and let joy enter, and drink of its rivers of 
pleasure. 

Incidental Spiritual Insteuction. — The art of weaving spiritual instruc- 
tion easily and naturally into^^jthe daily occurrences of life, is of incalculable 
value. Its acquisition is worth your most earnest, prayerful, and constant eflforts. 
It was the remark of one of the sons of the venerated Dr. Scott, that the know- 
ledge which he had foimd turn to most account in life, appeared to have been 
gathered up gradually and imperceptibly, from the conversation that passed, from 
day to day, in the family. 

Humility. — In the school of Christ, the first lesson of all, is self-denial and 
humility ; yea, it is written above the door, as the rule of entry ^ or admission : 
" Learn of me, for I am meek and lowly of heart." And out of all question, that 
is truly the humblest heart that has the most of Christ in it. Leighton. 

A FEARFUL Principle concerning Habits. — There is one feature in the 
law of habit so important, and uniformly sure in its operation, as to call for the 
notice and remembrance of all. It is this : our power of passive sensation is 
weakened by the repetition of impressions, just as certainly as our active propen- 
sities are strengthened by the repetition of actions. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 29 



penexraiea me wuob oi jveniucKy. xroin x/d» w) i//o, 
he 8i)€nt in exploring the wilderness. In 1773 he com- 
menced his removal to Kentucky, with his own and five other families ; and 
though assailed by the Indians, and for a time driven back, yet in 1775 he built 
a fort and established himself where Boonesborough now stands. In 1777 he 
sustained two sieges from the Indians, and in the next year, was surprised and 
takei^ prisoner by them, while hunting with his men. After a time he escaped, 
and reached his home in safety, after having gone 160 miles through the wilder- 
ness in four days. After a life of fearless adventure, and great courage and en- 
terprise, he died, in 1822, at the age of 85. An interesting account of his life 
may be found in Sparks' American Biography. 



Digitized 



by Google 



30 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Safxtt in Wealth. — ^We onj^t not to foibid people to be diligent uid fimgaL 
We must exhort all ChristianB to gain all they can, and save all they can ; that 
is, in effect, to grow rich. What way, then, can we take, that our money may 
not sink us to the nethermost hell ? There is one way, and there is no other under 
heaven. If those who " gain all they can," and " save all they can," will like- 
wise " give all they cafiy" then the more they gain, the more they will grow in 
grace, and the more treasure they will lay up in heaven. Wetley. 

TRIFLES. 
** Think naught a trifle, though it imall appear ; 
Sands make the mountain, momenti make the year, 
And trifles life. Your care to trifles give, 
Else you may die ere you have learned to liTe." 

Stated Gifts proportioned to Income. — ^Three valuable works on System- 
atic Benevolence, recently published, unite in regarding the divine injunction, 
" Upon the first day of the week, let every one of you lay by him in store as God 
hath prospered him," as the principle which, varied in its details according to 
circiunstances, every man may adopt with benefit to himself and the interests of 
the Redeemer's kingdom. The great mistake of multitudes has been in determin- 
ing first to accumulate wealth, and then give largely for the spread of the gospel; 
whereas, even if wealth is realized, the very getting and possession of it hardens 
the heart. But by determining beforehand the proportion wevill statedly devote 
to God of all the income we shall receive, we feel t^at we are earning for him; 
we pray for his blessing ; we watch his providences towards us ; and giving sta- 
tedly as we receive, the heart is kept open and warm ; we are spiritually blessed 
in our own souls, are prospered so far as God pleases, and use for his glory, as 
his stewards, what he gives us. Many believe they have found advantage in 
adopting this system as contained in the following 
pledge, or covenant. 

Believing that system in alms-giving is needed by the church ; that it accords 
with the teachings of Scripture, tends to growth in grace, and is pleasing to God; 
I engage that I wiU, either in writing or otherwise, determine on some proportion 
or percentage of the income God in his providence shall give me, which I will, on 
the first day of every week or month, or at such other stated periods as I shall 
designate, sacredly set apart as a fund for charity, either in money or othej^ mate- 
rials, or by entering it on a benevolent account, to be disbursed by me from time 
to time, according as the various objects of benevolence shall seem to require. 



Habitual Kindness. — Life is made up, not of great sacrifices or duties, but of 
little things, in which smiles and kindnesses, and small obligations, given habit- 
ually, are what win and preserve the heart, and secure comfort. Sir H. Davy. 

Presxtmption. — ^A religious professor, of Antinomian sentiments, boasting to 
Eowland Hill that he had not felt a doubt of his safety for many years, wad 
answered by Mr. Hill, " Then, sir, give me leave to doubt for you." 

Sleep. — " Sleep," says Sir Thomas Brown, " is so like death, that I dare not 
commit myself to it, without first committing myself to God in prayer." 

Sin and Sufferino. — Sin has brought many a believer into suffering, and 
suffering has kept many a believer from sinning. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILT GHKISTIAN ALMANAC. 91 

A. GOOD S.I7LE. — ^Two persons, I believe a husband and a wife, being very 
much at variance, referred their quarrel to Mr. Howels. Each accused the other, 
and both declared themselves to be without blame. Mr. Howels heard them 
very patiently, and then said, "My judgment is this: Let the innocent forgive 
iiie guilty." MwnoirtofHoweU. 

A GOOD RULE. 
" 'Tis well to walk with a cheerful heaxt Since life is a thorny and diffioult path, 

Wherever our fortunes call, Where toil it the portion of man, 

With a friendly glance and an open hand, We all should endearor, while passing along, 

And a gentle word for all. To make it as smooth as we can." 



Lesson foe the Obstinate. — Joseph Bradford was for some years the trav- 
elling companion of Mr. Wesley, for whom he would have sacrificed health and 
even life, but to whom his will would never bend, except in meekness. "Joseph," 
said Mr. Wesley one day to him, "take these letters to the post." "I will take 
them," said Bradford, "after the preaching, sir." W. "Take them now, Joseph." 
B. " I wish to hear you preach, sir ; and there will be sufficient time for the post 
after service." W. "I insist upon your going now, Joseph." B. "I will not go 
at present." W. "You wont?" B. "No, sir." W. "Then you and I must 
part." B. "Very good, sir." 

The good men slept over it. Wesley confessed to himself that he was wrong. 
He did more, he confessed to his Maker that he had been hasty and erred. He 
met Mr. Bradford shortly after four o'clock in the morning, and accosting him, 
said, " Joseph, have you considered what I said — ^that we must part?" B. "Yes, 
sir." W. "And must we part?" B. "Please yourself; sir." W. "Will you 
ask my pardon, Joseph?" B. "No, sir." W. "You wont?" B. "No, sir." 
W. " Then I will ask yours, Joseph." Wesley did so. He confessed his error. 
Poor Joseph was instantly melted, smitten as by the rod of Moses, when forth 
gushed the tears, like the water from the rock. Higher than ever from that day 
stood Wesley in the estimation and afiection of the good Joseph Bradford. 

Patience. — If I were asked what single qualification was necessary for one 
who has the care of children, I should say patience — ^patience with their tem- 
pers, patience with their understandings, patience with their progress. It is not 
brilliant parts or great acquirements which are necessary for teachers, but patience 
to go over first principles again and again ; steadily to add a little every day : 
never to be irritated by wilful or accidental hinderance. 

The Power of Reflection. — The most extraordinary thing in connection 
with gin palaces, says a London paper, notwithstanding the profusion of every 
known and unknown ornament, is the absence of mirrors. This may be account- 
ed for by the fact that publicans are well aware that, if a drunkard could only see 
himself, he would immediately turn away in horror from the glass. 

Human Reason- — "Polished steel," says John Foster, "will not shine in the 
dark. No more can reason, however refined or cultivated, shine efficaciously, but 
as it reflects the light of divine truth shed from heaven." 

Christ our Hope and Example. We cannot build too confidently on the 
merits of Christ, as our only hope ; nor can we think too much of the mind that 
was in Christ, as our great example. 



Digitized 



by Google 



32 THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 

How DID YOU GET YOUR Wealth ? — A number of years ago, several young 
Scotchmen came in company to the United States, and landed at New York. On 
the following day, which was the Sabbath, it was proposed to go out and see the 
city and its environs. All assented except one. He had been charged by his 
father, on leaving home, not to break the Sabbath. He would not disobey him. 
In a few years, he was possessor of a large estate, and his companions were in 

the drunkard's grave. He was visited by a Mr. C , who asked him, " How 

did you accumulate your wealth?'* He answered, "5y strictly observing the Sab- 
bath^ sir:^ 



DAYS OF MY YOUTH. 
Paya of my youth, ye have glided away ; Cheeks of my youth, bathed in tears have ye been ; 

Hairs of my youth, ye are frosted and gray ; Thoughts of my youth, ye have led me astray ; 
Eyes of my youth, your keen sight is no more ; Strength of my youth, why lament your decay ? 
Cheeks of my youth, ye aje furrowed all o'er ; 

Strength of my youth, all your vigor is gone ; Days of my age, ye will shortly be past ; 
Thoughts of my youth, your gay visions are flowu. Fains of my age, yet awhile can ye last ; 

/ Joys of my age, in true wisdom delight ; 

Days of my youth, I wish not your recall ; Eyes of my age, be religion your light ; 

Hairs of my youth, I'm content ye should fall ; Thoughts of my age, dread ye not the cold sod ; 
Eyes of my youth, ye much evil have seen ; Hopes of my age, be ye fixed on your God. 

The Church and School-house. — While Gen. Jackson was President, and 
Gen. Cass Secretary of War, they visited a portion of New England together. In 
riding over that highly cultivated country. Gen. Jackson was much pleased with 
the appearance of the people, and expressed his gratification to his companion. 
" What fine, manly countenances these men carry !" exclaimed the President. 
" How robust and vigorous they are j and what a spirit of enterprise and perse- 
verance they manifest ! Why, with an army of such men, I would undertake to 
face the world." *' Do you know the cause of the^ characteristics that you prize 
so highly?" rejoined the veteran Secretary. "What is it?" asked the old h^o. 
" Do you see the steeple of that meeting-house yonder on the hill ?" '* Yes," 
replied the President. "And that low school-house near it?" "I see them 
both," said Gen. Jackson. " Well," answered Gen. Cass, himself a native of the 
Granite State, "here is where New England men are made." 

A WoED IN Season. — A lady who had lost a beloved child, was so oppressed 
with grief that she even secluded herself from the society of her own family, shut 
up in her chamber j but was at length prevailed on by her husband to come down 
stairs and take a walk in the garden. While there, she stooped to pluck a flower j 
but her husband appeared as though he would hinder her. She plaintively saidl, 
"What, deny me a flower?" He replied, "You have denied God your flower." 
It is said the lady suitably felt the gentle reproof^ and had reason to say, "A 
word spoken in season, how good it is." 

Good Reasoning. — " If you are not afraid of God, I am, afraid of you," said 
a merchant, as he passed a counting-room on the Sabbath and saw it open. The 
next day he refused to sell his produce to the Sabbath-breaker on any credit what- 
ever. He acted wisely. In three months the Sabbath-breaker was a bankrupt. 

Unbelief. — ^No .man is an unbeliever, but because he will be so ; and every 
man is not an unbeliever, because the grace of God conquers some, changes their 
wills, and binds them to Christ. Chamockc 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 33 



1 

^^'^ ^ \ upon the haunts of the whale, and captured them in 

the greatest abundance. Li 1680 the Dutch whale-fishery employed about 260 
ships, and 14,000 sailors ; but after the wars of the eighteenth and nineteenth 
centuries, it had so declined, that in 1828 only one whale-ship sailed from all 
Holland. The English whale-fishery was at first very unsuccessful ; and though, 
through a large bounty bestowed by the government, it so increased, that in 1815 
it employed 164 ships and 6,600 men, yet on the repeal of this bounty, it fell off 
in 1829, to 89 ships, and about 3,400 men. The whale-fishery was early begun 
by the colonists of New England ; and has been carried on with greater vigor 
and success from the United States, than from any other country. From 1771 to 



Digitized 



by Google 



34 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



1775, Massachusetts had annually about 300 vessels, of about 28,000 tons bur- 
den, engaged m it ; and though twice interrupted by war, yet the business steadily 
increased, until, in January, 1849, the whaling-fleet of New England consisted of 580 
ships and barks, 21 brigs, and 13 schooners, with a tonnage of 195,598 tons — nearly 
one tenth of the tonnage of the United States — about equally divided between the 
sperm and the right-whale fishery. The engraving gives a view of a right whale, 
about to be harpooned ; while in the distance is another, lashed to the ship for "cut- 
ting in," and still another, which the sailors, having killed, are towing towards it 

GOD ON THE OCEAN. 



We "were crowded in the cabin. 

Not a soul did dare to sleep ; 
It was midnight on the waters, 

And a storm was on the deep. 
*Tis a fearful thing in winter, 

To be shattered in the blast, 
And to hear the rattling trumpet 

Thunder, " Cut away the mast !" 
So we shuddered there in silence, 

For the stoutest held his breath, 
While the hungry sea was roaring, 

And the breakers talked with Death. 



As we sadly sat in darkness. 

Each one busy at his prayers, 
" We are lost !" the captain shouted, 

As he staggered down the stain. ' 
But his little daughter whispered, 

As she took his icy hand, 
" Is not God upon the ocean, 

Just the same as on the land ?'* 
Then we kissed the little maiden, 

And we spoke in better cheer, 
And we anchored safe in harbor. 

When the mom was shining clear. 



A STEiKiNG Anecdote. — A caviller once asked Dr. Nettleton, "How camel 
by my Mricked heart?" "That," he replied, "is a question which does not con- 
cern you so much as another, namely, how you shall get rid of it. You have a 
wicked heart, which renders you entirely unfit for the kingdom of God ; and you 
must have a new heart, or you cannot be saved ; and the question which now 
most deeply concerns you is. How shall you obtain it?" "But," says the man, 
"I wish you to tell me how I came by my wicked heart." "I shall not," replied 
Dr. Nettleton, " do that at present ; for if I could do it to your entire satisfaction, 
it would not in the least help you towards obtaining a new heart. The great 
thing for which I am solicitous is, that you should become a new creature, and be 
prepared for heaven." As the man manifested no disposition to hear any thing 
on that subject, but still pressed the question how he came by his wicked heart, 
Dr. Nettleton told him that his condition resembled that of a man who is drown- 
ing, while his friends are attempting to save his life. As he rises to the surface 
of the water, he exclaims, " How came I here ?" " That question," says one of 
his friends, "does not concern you now. Take hold of this rope." "But how 
came I here ?" he asks again. " I shall not stop to answer that question now," 
replies his friend. " Then I'll drown," says the infatuated man, and spuming all 
profiered aid, sinks to the bottom. 

A Quaker's Reproof. — Some time since, a sailor on one of the wharves was 
swearing most boisterously, when one of the society of Friends passing along, 
accosted him very pleasantly, and said, " Swear away, friend, swear away, till 
thee gets all that bad stuff out of thee ; for thee can never go to heaven with that 
bad stuff in thy heart." The sailor, with a look of astonishment and shame, 
bowed to the honest Quaker, and retired. 

Two Blessings. — " It's a great blessing to possess what one wishes," said 
some one to an ancient philosopher, who replied, '^ It's a greater blessing still, not 
to desire what one does not possess." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 35 



Indians and white hunters, for their flesh and skins, which latter are known as 
buffalo robes. The cut represents a bison on the point of being speared by an 
Apach€ Indian. 

A Romanist rkadinq the Bible. — "A Roman-catholic, of plain good-sense, 
obtained a Bible, which he used to read to his wife for an hour every evening. 
At the end of a week he said to his wife, ' If this is true, we are all wrong.' The 
next week he said to her, * If this is true, we are lost.' The third week he said, 
* If this is true, we may be saved.' And he resolved to seek salvation through a 
crucified Redeemer, and not by the priest." 



Digitized 



by Google 



36 THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 

The Sabbath in Scotland. — Many anecdotes are related illustrative of the 
veneration with which the Sabbath is regarded in Scotland, one of which narrates 
that a geologist, while in the country, and having his pocket-hammer with him, 
took it out and was chipping the rock on the way-side for examination. TTia 
proceedings did not escape the quick eye and ready tongue of an old Scotch woman. 
"What are you doing there, man?" "Don't you see? I'm breaking a stone." 
" Y'are doing mair than that : y'are breaking the Sabbath." 



THE WORLD. HOPE EVER. 

The world is seldom what it seems : The night is mother of the day, 

To man, who dimly sees, The winter of the spring, 

Realities appear as dreams, And ever upon old decay 

And dreams realities. The greenest mosses cling. 

The Christian's years, though slow their flight, Behind the cloud the starlight lurks. 

When he is called away, Through showers the sunbeams fall j 

Seem but the watches of a night. For God, who loveth all his works, 

And death the dawn of day. Has left his hope with all. 

Influence of a Smile. — It is related in the life of the celebrated mathema- 
tician William Hutton, that a respectable looking Country-woman called upon 
him one day, anxious to speak with him. She told him with aji air of secrecy, 
that her husband behaved unkindly to her, and sought other company, frequently 
passing his evenings from home, which made her feel extremely unhappy ; and 
knowing Mr. Hutton to be a wise man, she thought he might be able to tell her 
how she should manage to cure her husband. The case was a conunon one, and 
he thought he could prescribe for it without losing his reputation as a conjurer. 
•'The remedy is a simple one," said he, "but I have never known it to £wl. 
jllways treat your husband toith a smile. ^^ The woman expressed her thanks, 
dropped a courtesy, and went away. A few months afterwards she waited on 
Mr. Hutton with a couple of fine fowls, which she begged him to accept. She 
told him, while a tear of joy and gratitude glistened in her eye, that she had fol- 
lowed his advice, and her husband was cured. He no longer sought the company 
of others, but treated her with constant love and kindness. 

The Mother of Swartz. — The mother of Christian Frederick Swartz, on her 
dying bed, informed her husband and her pastor, that she had dedicated her son 
to the Lord, and obtained a promise from them that the infant should be trained 
in the remembrance of this sacred destination, and if he should, in due time, ex- . 
press a desire to be educated for the ministry, they would cherish and promote it 
to the uttermost of their power. Swartz became the missionary apostle to India, 
and died when about seventy-three years old, having been instrumental, as is sup- 
posed, of the conversion of thousands of souls. 

A GOOD Definition. — "What is grace?" inquired the Moderator of a South- 
em presbytery, of a colored candidate for licensure, who had been for nearly forty 
years a slave. " Grace," he sententiously replied — " Grace : that is what I call 
something for nothing.'*^ 

Human Philosophy. — Philosophy, says Cecil, is a proud, sullen detector of 
the poverty and misery of man. It may turn him from the world with a proud, 
sturdy contempt j but it cannot come forward, and say, " Here are rest, ^aoe, 
peace, strength, consolation." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAK ALMANAC. 



37 



A GOOD Rbference. — A stranger entering a Methodist prayer-meeting, 
made some remarks, in the course of which, he said, '*If you don't believe I've 
got religion, go and ask my wife. She'll tell you." The expression came out 
so bluntly as almost to cause an explosion of laughter. But is it not a good ref- 
erence ? Many a man's estimates of his own religion might be proved all vanity 
by just asking his wife, and getting an honest answer from her. How does his 
religion make him act at home ? is the pungent inquiry — that is the grand test. 
See to it, reader, that this reference may be to your credit. 



THE DYING CHRISTIAN. 
A holy calm was on his brow, 

And peaceful -was his breath, 
And o'er his pallid features stole 

The trace of coming death. 
We asked, "Art ready to depart?" 

He smiled with joy divine, 
And spoke the language of his soul, 

" My Master's time is mine /" 



ANGRY WORDS. 
Poison-drops of care and sorrow, 
Bitter poison-drops are they, 
"Weaving for the coming morrow 

Sad memorials of to-day. 
Angry words ! — 0, let them never 

From the tongue unbridled slip ; 
May the heart's best impulse ever 
^ Check them ere they soil the lip. 



Manlike and Godlike. — A gentleman who had filled many high stations in 
public life, with the greatest honor to himself and advantage to the nation, once 
went to Sir Eardley Wilmot in great anger at a real injury that he had received 
from a petson high in the political world, which he was considering how to resent 
in the most effectual manner. After relating the particulars to Sir Eardley, he 
asked if he did not think it would be manly to resent it. " Yes," said Sir Eard- 
ley, " it would doubtless be manly to resent it, but it would be godlike to forget 
it." This, the gentleman declared, had such an instantaneous effect upon him, 
that he came away quite another man, and in temper entirely altered from that ' 
in which he went. 



Deacon Hunt. — ^He was naturally a high-tempered man, and used to beat his 
oxen over their heads, as all his neighbors did. It was observed that when he 
became a Christian, his cattle were remarkably docile. A friend inquired into the 
secret. " Why," said the deacon, "formerly, when my oxen were a little contrary, 
I flew into a passion, and beat them unmercifully. This made the matter worse. 
Now, when they do not behave well, I go behind the load, sit down, and sing Old 
Hundred. I don't know how it is, but the psalm-tune has a surprising effect upon 
my oxen." 

Anecdote of Buntan. — The following anecdote was recently related by a 
Baptist minister of Biistol, England, at a meeting for the promotion of Christian 
Union : " A certain minister had once remarked, in the hearing of John Bunyan, 
that * baptism was Christ's livery.' * Baptism Christ's livery ?' said John ; ' do 
you not know that Christ has appointed his own litery ? * By this shall all men 
know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another.' " — ^John 13 : 35. 

A Bishop's Wish. — A gentleman was complaining to a pious prelate, that a 
certain clergyman in his neighborhood was gone mad, for that he did nothing but 
preach and pray. "I wish, then," said the good bishop, "he would bite some of 
my clergy." 

In Christ, and with Christ. — To be in Christ is heaven below, and to be 
with Christ is heaven above. 



Digitized 



by Google 



38 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Politeness at Home. — Always speak with the utmost politeness and defer- 
ence to your parents and friends. Some children are polite and civil everyi«rhere 
else, except at home ; but there they are coarse and rude enough. Nothing^ sits 
BO gracefully upon children, and nothing makes them so lovely, as habitual re- 
spect and dutiful deportment towards their parents and superiors. It makes the 
plainest face beautiful, and gives to every common action a nameless but peculiar 
charm. 



HYMN FOR A CHILD. 

My little eye can never reach But though he is so great and vise, 

Beyond the distant star, And I but weaik and poor, 

But God my Father's eye can stretch His kind compassion never dies, 

A thousand times as far. His promise Ib secure. 

And more than that, through endless space And every morning, yrhen the son 

His mighty power is kno-vm ; Shall bid my slumber cease, 

No mortal can, nor angels trace I'U bow the knee before his throne, 

The wonders of his throne. And ask his saving grace. 

Never Frighten Children.— A schoolmistress, for some trifling fault, most 
foolishly put a child in a dark cellar for an hour. The child was terrified, and cried 
bitterly } and on returning to her parents, burst into tears and begged that she might 
not be put into the cellar. The parents thought this very singular, and assured 
her they had no thought of doing it ; but it was difficult to pacify her, and i^hen 
put to bed she passed a restless night. On the following day she had a fever, dur- 
ing which she frequently exclaimed, "Do not put me in the cellar!" The fourth 
day after, she was taken to a physician in a high fever with delirium, frequently 
muttering, " Pray don't put me in the cellar." When the physician inquired the 
reason, he learned the punishment to which she had been subjected, and ordered 
what was likely to relieve her ; but she died in a week after this unfeeling conduct. 
In another case, a child being frightened by a school-fellow, suffered violentljr from. 
headache, and afterwards became permanently deaf; and still another, who had 
been shut up in a dark cellar for some trifling ofience, became nervous, and mel- 
ancholy, and at last an idiot for life. 

The Exception. — A gentleman boasted that he had drank two, three, or four 
bottles of wine every day for fifty years, and that he was as hale and hearty as 
ever.. "Pray," remarked a bystander, "where are your boon companions?" 
"Ah," he quickly replied, "that's another affair. If the truth may be told, I 
have buried three entire generations of them I" 

True Breeding. — Lord Chatham, who was almost ,^s remarkable for his 
manners as for his eloquence and public spirit, has defined good-breeding to be, 
" Benevolence in trifles, or the preference of others to ourselves in the little daily 
occurrences of life." 



Sin's, Dilemma.— ^" If I commit this, I must either repent, or not. Jf I do 
repent, it will cost me more grief and anguish than- the sensual pleasure can be 
worth. If I never repent, it will be the death and damnation of my soul." 

A Man of Prater. — Dr. Payson was eminently a man of prayer. It -was 
once said of him, " He does not need to go to the throne of grace, for he is altoayt 
there.'''' He read the Bible, studied, planned, wrote, and pronoimced his sermons 
in prayer. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 39 

PuusATORT.^-An Italiftn noble b^ing at church one day, and finding a priest 
I who begged for the souls in purgatory, gave him a piece of gold. "Ah, my lord," 
B&id the good father, " you have now delivered a soul." The count threw upon 
the plate another piece. " Here is another soul delivered," said the priest. '* Are 
you ]>ositive of it ?" inquired the count. " Yes, my lord," replied the priest ; " I 
m. certain they are now in heaven." " Then," said the count, " I'll take back 
my money, for it signifies nothing to you now ; seeing that the souls have already 
got to he«ven, there can be no danger of their returning to purgatory." 

DEATH. 

When IshaUdie, is all nnknovn, When IshaU die— I know it not, 
Except to thine omniscient mind ; Nor where my ashes shall be laid ; 

And lest with life my hopes be gone. Only be it my happy lot 

May I from thee such fayor find, With saints reliered to leare the dead : 

That I may always be prepared Small care to me the place affords — 

For death, and for thy great award. The earth thronghont is all the Lord's. 

How I shall dUy to ask were Tadn ; Bat when in death I shall recline, 
Death does his work in raried forms : Then let my soul asoend to thee : 

To some with agonies of pain, Through Christ's redemption I am thine, 
And some sink peaceful in his arms. By faith his glories now I see. 

Just as t?tou wilty if, when 'tis past, 'Twill all be well ! I little prize 

My soul be found with thee at last. Whertf how^ or token this body dies. 

Never Satisfied. — A laundress, who was employed in the family of a gen- 
tleman of wealth, said to him with a sigh, ^^ Only think, sir, how little money 
would make me happy !" " How little, madam ?" says the gentleman. " 0, dear 
sir, one hundred dollars would make me perfectly happy." " If that is all, you 
shall have it," and he immediately gave it to her. She looked at it with joy and 
thankfulness, but before the giver was out of hearing, exclaimed, ''/ toUh I had 
taid two himdredy 



" Untversalism leads to Infidelity," says the editor of a Boston infidel 
newspaper. He adds, " I am aware that this assertion is often denied by Uni- 
versalist priests, but still I believe it is perfectly correct, as a general rule. In 
my own case it has proved so, and likewise in the case of nearly every infidel 
with whom I am acquainted." 

One Day before Death. — Rabbi Eliezer said, " Turn to God one day before 
death." His disciples said, " How can a man know the day of his death ?" He 
answered, "Therefore turn to God to-day j for perhaps you may die to-morrow." 

A Sceptic's Creed. — A sceptical young man one day conversing with the 
celebrated Dr. Parr, observed, that he would believe nothing which he could not 
understand. " Then, young man, your creed will be the shortest of any man's I 
know." 



A Singular but Forcible Comparison. — ^Men are frequently like tea — the 
real strength and goodness are not properly drawn out until they have been a 
short time in hot water. 



Mirth and Wit. — ^Mirth should be the embroidery of the conversation, not 
the web j and wit the ornament of the mind, not the furniture. 

Sin and its Punishment. — If no sin were punished here, no providence would 
be believed; if every sin were punished here, no judgment would be expected. 



Digitized 



by Google 



40 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMAHAC. 

Meditation. — As fire will not warm us unless we tarry at it, and as a b«e 
cannot suck the honey from a flower unless she abide upon it, no more can any 
child of God receive support and consolation from the promises, unless he seriously 
and solemnly ponder and meditate on them. Calamf. 

DEATH TO THE RIGHTEOUS. DEPENDENCE ON GOD. 

It matters little at what hour of day Oft have I seen the day, 

The righteous faills asleep. Death pannot come When with a single word — 

To him untimely, who is fit to die. God helping me to say, 

The less of this cold world, the more of heaven ; My trust is in the Lord — 

The briefer life, the earlier inunortality. My soul has quelled a thousand foes, 

Fearless of all that could opposo. 



Wealth. — It is a beautiful remark of Lord Bacon, "Seek not proud wealth; 
but such as thou may est get justly, use soberly, distribute cheerfully, and leave 
contentedly." And says the late William Wirt — a name that will long be illus- 
trious in American history — " Excessive wealth is neither glory nor happiness. 
The cold and sordid wretch who thinks only of himself — ^who draws his head 
within his shell, and never puts it out but for the purpose of lucre and ostenta- 
tion — ^who looks upon his fellow-creatures, not only without sympathy, but with 
arrogance and insolence, as if they were made to be his vassals, and he to be 
their lord ; as if they were made for no other purpose than to pamper his avarice, 
or to contribute to his aggrandizement — such a man may be rich, but trust me, he 
never can be happy, nor virtuous, nor great. There is in a fortune a golden 
mean, which is the appropriate region of virtue and intelligence. Be content 
with that ; and if the horn of jplenty overflow, let its droppings fall upon your 
fellow-men — let them fall like the droppings of honey in the wilderness, to cheer 
the faint and weary pilgrim." 

Swearing. — A pious man once being in company where was a gentleman who 
frequently used the words, devil, deuce, etc., and at last took the name of God in 
vain, said, " Stop, sir ! I said nothing while you only used freedom with the name 
of your master, but I insist upon it you shall use no such freedom with the 
name of mine." 



Profanity Rebuked. — ^Howard the philanthropist was seen significantly to 
button up his coat in the neighborhood of a shoe-shop where he heard coarse 
profanity. "I always do this," he remarked, "when I hear swearing. One who 
can take God's name in vain, can steal, or do any thing ebe bad." 

Example the loudest Preaching. — A young man stated, that at one period 
of his life he had been nearly betrayed into the principles of infidelity; ** But," he 
added, " there was one argument in favor of Christianity which I could never 
refute — ^the consistent conduct of my own father !" 

True Position of Science. — ^It was an admirable reply of a converted astron- 
omer, who, when interrogated concerning his comparative estimate of religion and 
the science he had formerly idolized, answered, "I am now bound for heaven, and 
I take the stars in my way." 

Birth and Death. — Those bom once only, die twice — they die a temporal, 
and they die an eternal death. But those who are born twice, die only once ; for 
over them the second death hath no power. jay. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 41 

Eeligion. — If it be the characteristic of a worldly man, says Chalmers, that 
he desecrates what is holy, it should be the part of a Christian man to consecrate 
what is secular, and to recognize a present and a presiding divinity in all things. 

i'm not too youno. 

Vxa not too young for God to see, If some one great and good is near, 

He knows my name and nature too ; It makes us careful what we do ; 

And all day long he looks at me. And how much more we ought to fear 

And sees my actions through and through. The Lord who sees us through and through. 

He listens to the words I say. Thus when inclined to do amiss, 

' He knows the thoughts I have within ; However pleasant it may be, 

And whether I'm at work or play, I'll always try to think of this. 

He's sure to see it if I sin. I'm not too young for God to see. 



What hath God Wrought? — It is nearly half a century since the commence- 
ment of the modem missionary effort. And now there are in the world about two 
thousand missionaries; seven thousand five hundred assistants; four thousand 
churches ; two hundred and fifty thousand converts ; three thousand missionary 
schools, two hundred and fifty thousand children and adults belonging to them ; 
two hundred dialects into which the Bible is translated; thirty-two millions of 
Bibles scattered over the earth in languages spoken by six hundred millions. 



A Contrast. — In the year 1272, the wages of a laboring man were less than 
four cents per day, while the price of a Bible at the same period was about one 
hundred and eighty dollars. A common laborer, in those days, must toil on indus- 
triously for thirteen long years, if he would possess a copy of the word of God. 
Now the earnings of half a day will pay the cost of a beautifully printed copy of 
the Bible. What a contrast I 



What might be Expected. — It is stated on good authority, that in the town 

of B , in Massachusetts, there have been, since its incorporation, thirty-eight 

tavern-keepers habitually selling ardent spirits. And of these, three died of 
delirium tremens, seven became intemperate, one died in the poor-house, eighteen 
lost all their property, seventeen did not improve in their pecuniary condition by 
the business, three only acquired property; four were cursed with intemperate 
wives, and twenty-five sons and four daughters became intemperate. 

F&ESH Ajr« — ^Every breath we draw, wer take into the lungs from 1^ to 2 
pints of air; so that it requires about 2j gallons of pure air a minute, or 60 
hogsheads every 24 hours, properly to supply the lungs. How important, then, 
to health, to have houses well ventilated, and not to sleep in small, close rooms ! 

Condensed Teuth. — ^Mr. John B. Gough recently made this forcible declara- 
tion, that " every moderate drinker could abandon the intoxicating cup, if he 
toould — every inebriate would, if he couldy 



Tracts. — At the fiftieth anniversary of the London Tract Society, it was 
stated that it had issued five hundred millions of publications in one hundred and 
ten different languages. 

Law and Physic. — ^Use law and physic only in cases of necessity ; they that 
use them otherwise, abuse themselves into^weak bodies and light purses : they are 
good remedies, bad recreations, and if habitually resorted to, ruinous. 



Digitized 



by Google 



42 



THE FAMlLr CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



RESIDENCE. 



Ill 



fl 



14, 1799 
4, 1896 
4, 1828 

9B, 1836 
4, 1831 

33, 1848 
8, 1845 






George Washington - - 

John Adams 

Thomas Jefferson 

James Madison 

James Monroe 

John Q,ainc7 Adams • 

Andrew Jackson 

Martin Van Boren - - - 
William H. Harrison - 

John Trier 

James K.Polk 

Zachary Taylor 



Virginia 

MaMachusetts- 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Mamaohiuetts- 

Tennessee 

New York 

Ohio 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Louisiana 



1732 
1735 
1743 
1751 
1758 
1767 
1767 
1782 
1773 
1790 
1795 
1784 



1789 
1797 
1801 
1809 
1817 
1825 
1829 
1837 
1841 
1841 
1845 
1849 



Deo. 
July 
July 
Jane 
July 
Feb. 
June 



April 4, 1841 



June 
1 July 



15, 1849 
9, 1850 



OOVBRNICXNT OF THE DNITBD STATES. 

ZACHARY TAYLOR Louisiana President 

MILLARD FILLMORE New York Vice-President 

JOHN M. CLAYTON Delaware Secretary of State 

WILLIAM M. MEREDITH- - - PennsylTania- - - Secretary of the Tieasory 

GEORGE W. CRAWFORD- -Georgia Secretary of War 

WILLIAM B. PRESTON Virginia Secretary of the Navy - -'- 

THOMAS EWING Ohio Secretary of Home Department- 

JACOB COLLAMER Vermont Postmaster-General 

REVERDY JOHNSON Maryland Attorney-General 



Salary $25,000 

" 5,000 

" 6,000 

" 6,000 

" 6,000 

" 6,000 

»» 6,000 

" 6,000 

" 4,000 

CoNORsss. — The Senate is composed of two members elected by the legislature of each 
state for the term of six years. Of course the number of Senators is now sixty. The Vice- 
President of the United States is President of the Senate. 



The House of Representatives is composed of representatiyes from each state, in the 
ratio of one to every 70,680 of the population. The present number of members is two hun- 
dred and thirty-one. The compensation of the members is $8, and that of the Speaker $16 
per day during the session, and $8 for every twenty miles' travel in going and retaming. 

SiTPREMB Court. — Chief Justice, Roger B. Taney of Maryland, salary $5,000. The As- 
sociate Justices Mre, John McLean, Ohio ; James M. Wayne, G-eorgia ; John McKinley, Ken- 
tucky ; John Catron, Tennessee ; Peter V. Daniel, Virginia ; Samuel Nelson, New York ; Levi 
Woodbury, New Hampshire ; Robert C. Grrier, Pennsylvania : salary $4,500. The Supreme 
Court is held in Washington, and has but one session annually, commencing in December. 

CmcuiT Courts. — The United States are divided into nine judicial circuits, in each of 
which a Circuit Court is held semi-annually, by a Justice of the Supreme Court, and the 
District Judge of the state or district in which tiie court sits. 

District Courts. — The United States are also divided into forty-three districts, in which 
District Courts are held by thirty-five judges. 

IitTERCouRSE WITH FoREioN Nations. — The pay of Envoys Extraordinary and Ministers 
Plenipotentiary, is $9,000 per annum as salary, in addition to $9,000 as outfit The pay of 
Charges d' Afii^ires is $4,500 per annum ; of Secretaries of Legation, $2,000 ; of Mimsters 
resident, $6,000. The United States are represented by Ministers Plenipotentiary at the 
courts of G-reat Britain, France, Spain, Mexico, Brazil, G-ermany, and Chili ; and by Charges 
d' Affaires at the courts of most of the other foreign powers with which this country is con- 
nected by commercial intercourse. 

The Mint. The Mint is located at Philadelphia, and has branches in Louisiana, Geor- 
gia, and North Carolina. Coinage in 1849, in gold, silver, and copper, $11,164,695 ; depos- 
ites of gold for coinage from California, $6,147,519, and from other mines in the United 
States, $285,653: total coinage from 1793 to the close of 1849, $162,182,409. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 43 

MISCSLLANSOUa ITSMB. 

Imports into the United States, for the year ending June 30, 1849, exolnnye of specie- -$147,857,437 

Bxports from the United States, for the same period 145,755,820 

Of which, 'were products of the United States 132,066,965 

Of which, were agricultural prodncU 111,000,000 

Of which, -wen raw cotton 66,000,000 

Of our exports, were sent to England 69,161,992 

Exports of bread-stuffs 11,289,562 

Acres of PubHc Lands 1,585,000,000 

" " " sold and located in 1847 2,761,185 

" " " " " 1848 4,176,513 

" " " " " first nine months of 1849 3,383,766 

Estimated annual value of products of the United States 3,200,000,000 

£.ETE?nrE AND Expenditures of Government, for the year ending Jime 30, 1849. 

RECEIPTS. EXPENDITURES. 

From Customs $28,346,738 Cash $46,798,667 

Public Lands - 1,688,959 Treasury Notes funded 10,898,342 

Miscellaneous sources 1,088,649 

Treasury Notes and Loans 28,588,750 

In Treasury, July 1.1848 153,534 



Total receipts $59,816,630 



Total $57,697,009 



Estimated receipts for year ending June 30, 1850, $37,823,464 ; expenditures, $43,651,585. 
Public debt, Dec. 1, 1849, $64,704,693. 

Cost of our Armt. — ^In the last sixty-fire years, it is estimated, on the authority of offi- 
cial docmnents, that our military establishments have subjected us to an expense of at least 
$750,000,000 1 

Cost of the Mexican War. — The cost of the Mexican War, including the sum paid to 
Mexico, and the bounty lands due to the soldiers, will not fall short of $98,000,000 ! 

Post-Office statistics for the tear ending June 30, 1849. — Number of Post-offices, 
16,747; extent of 4,943 diflferent mail-routes, 167,703 miles; annual transportation, 
42,547,069 miles ; gross receipts for the year, $4,905,176 ; expenditures, $4,479,049 ; num- 
ber of letters charged with postage, 62,000,000 ; dead letters returned and opened, 2,100,000 ; 
money found therein, $32,669 ; number of communications received at the department, 
370,000, or more than 1,000 per day. 

Poot-Qffice DC G-REAT BRITAIN The gross receipts of the British Post-office for the 

3rear ending January 5, 1849, was $10,962,390 ; expenditures, $6,934,265 ; net revenue after 
deducting charges other than management, $3,702,145. The number of letters delivered in 
a single week in January was, 6,641,796 ; and for a single week in February, 6,849,196 ; the 
average of which — ^not allowing for the steady increase — ^would give 350,765,792 letters de- 
livered in the year. Besides this, the British Post-office issued within the year, no less than 
4,203,727 money orders — or receipts for money paid at one office, and to be repaid at another — 
covering an amount of $40,756,475. So much for cheap postage ! 



Militia, Armt, and Navt. — The number of Militia in the United States in 1850, was 
1,914,101. Regular Army, conmiissioned officers, 882 ; non-commissioned officers and pri- 
vates, 9,438: total, 10,320. Navy, captains, 68 ; conMnanders, 97 ; lieutenants, 327 ; surgeons 
and assistants, 149 ; midshipmen, 438 ; ships of the line and frigates, 25 ; other vessels, 51 ; 
total number of guns, 2,048. 

Other Navies. — The British Navy has at present, 1850, flag officers, 151 ; captains, 648; 
lieutenants, 2,446 ; ships of the line and frigates, 57 ; other vessels, 181. The French Navy, 
ships of the line and frigates, 52 ; other vessels, 121. The Russian Navy is next to that of 
France ; that of Austria ranks next ; and those of Turkey and Denmark follow. The navy 
of Spain, once the most formidable on the ocean, is now reduced to 55 vessels, of which only 
two are ships of the line. 



Digitized 



by Google 



44 THE FAMILY CHEISXIAN ALMANAC. 

LiGHTHOTTSEs. — In July, 1849, the lighthouse establishment of the United States num- 
bered 288 hghthouses, and 32 floating-lights ; of which 61 were on the northern lakes and 
the river St. Lawrence. The British establishment numbers 44 lighthouse stations, exhib- 
iting 65 lights, and 8 floating-lights. The expense of the British establishment, for the four 
years ending December 31, 1845, was $1,903,828 ; the expense of the American, for the four 
years ending June 30, 1846, was $1,656,316. 

Magnetic Telbobaph. — On the Ist of January, 1850, there were in the United States, 
about 12,000 miles of the Magnetic Telegraph, working on Morse's sjrstem ; and it is esti- 
mated about 10,000 miles, working according to the various other patents. In 1838, the 
American Institute reported as a wonderful thing, that Morse could telegraph the words 
^'■steamboat (Jaroline burnt ^^^ ifi six minutes I Now a thousand such words viay be 
telegraphed in about ttoo minutes ! 

Beitibh Mint. — ^Coinage for the year ending December 31, 1847, in gold, $25,792,200 ; in 
silver, $628,650 ; in copper, $24,800 : total coinage from 1837 to 1847, inclusive, $191,377,430. 



Savinos-Banks in Great Britain. — The number of Savings-banks in GS-reat Britain, on 
the 20th of November, 1848, was 584 ; number of depositors, 1,054,663 ; total amount de- 
posited, $140,230,695. 

The Tea-Tradb. — The tea-plant was known in China as early as A. D. 350 ; but^its 
general introduction does not date earlier than about A. D. 800. In 1669, the East India 
Company imported into England 143 lbs. ; in 1678, 4,713 lbs. ; in 1700, the import was 
60,000 lbs. ; in 1721, 1,000,000 lbs. ; in 1840, 31,717,000 lbs. From July 1, 1848, to July 1, 
1849, there were exported from China, into the United States, in 37 vessels, 18,672,000 lbs. ; 
Great' Britain, in 86 vessels, 47,242,700 lbs. ; all the rest of Europe, 8 vessels, only 97,000 lbs. 

Ths Cotton-Tradb. — In 1790, America did not export a single pound of cotton. In 
1846, out of 467,856,274 lbs. imported into Great Britain, 401,949,393 came from the United 
States. The total amount exported from the United States in 1830, was 1,218,183 bales; 
in 1849, 5,718,209 bales. The amount consumed in domestic manufactures, in 1830, was 
182,142 bales, and in 1849, 628,039 bales. 

The Spindles of the "World — The following is an English estimate of the number of 
spindles in the world, in 1849. 



Spindles. 

Great Britain 17,500,000 

France 4,300,000 

United States 2,500,000 

Austria 1,500,000 



Spindles. 

ZoUe-Verein 815,000 

Russia 706,000 

Switzerland 650,000 

Belgium 420,000 



Spain 300,000 

Italy - 300,000 



Giving a total of 28,985,000 



Coal. — The bituminous coal area of the United States, is 133,132 square miles, or l-17tli 
part; British America, 18,000 sq. miles, or l-45th part; Great Britain, 8,139 sq. miles, or 
l-14th part; Spain, 3,408 sq. miles, or l-52d part; France, 1,719 sq. miles, or l-118th part; 
Belgium, 518 sq. miles, or l-122d part. The area of the Pennsylvania anthracite coal for- 
mations, is put down at 437 sq. miles, from which, in the last 30 years, 25,669,917 tons have 
been sent to market. In 1849, there were sent 3,232,493 tons, producing to the country the 
value of nearly $13,000,000, which is more than twice the amount of all the gold brought 
from California within tjie year. 

'Newspapers and Periodicals — One hundred and fifty years ago, there was not a single 
daily newspaper in England ; and it is not two hundred years since the first idea of a regular 
newspaper was conceived in that island to rouse the people to resist the Spanish Armada. Now, 
in the United Kingdom, there are 547 newspapers. In the year ending January 5, 1849, 
90,928,408 newspaper stamps were issued in the kingdom, of which 76,180,832 were in Eng- 
land alone. After full and careful examination, it is estimated that the aggregate yearly 
issuQ of nevrspapers, magazines, and reviews, from the city of New York alone, in the year 1819, 
Tas 72,710,257, of which between nine and ten millions were religious periodicals. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY GHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 



45 



BiBLKs A2n> Tkstahkicts. — The British and Foreign Bihie Society issned, in 1849, 1,124,067 
copies of the Scriptures. The -whole number of Tolumes issued by the Society is 29,989,904, 
in 138 different languages. 

CALrpoRNiA Flbbt. — From January, 1849, to January, 1850, the whole number of clear- 
from the different ports of the United States for California, .were 698. 



Smioration. — In 1848, the total number of emigrants from G-reat Britain, was 248,089, 
of whom 176,883 were from England, 11,505 from Scotland, and 59,701 from Ireland. The 
number of foreign emigrants arriving in New York in 1849, was 234,271 ; and in Boston, 
34,873. It is estimated that the whole number arriving in tiie (Jnited States during 1849, 
was at least 325,000. 

Patjpxrism. — According to official returns, the number of paupers receiving aid, July 1, 
1848, in England and Wales, were, in workhouses, 97,128, and out of doors, 763,266. The 
number of paupers in Massachusetts in 1849, was 24,892, of whom 10,253 were foreigners 
More than nine-tenths of the whole number were made so by 'intemperance ! 

Gas-Woeis. — The number of gas-works in Enghmd and Wales, is 775 ; capital employ- 
ed, $52,500,000 ; average profit, 5 per cent. 

Tobacco awd Intoxicatino Bbinbs.— In the year ending January 5, 1849, 27,305,134 
lbs. of tobacco were imported into England, for home consumption. In the same time 
10,798,248 gallons of wines and distilled spirits were imported for the same use, in addition 
to the vast amount manufactured at home. 



Watbbworks. — ^London is supplied with water for drinking and culinary purposes, by 
eight different waterworks, which it was estimated in 1845, delivered 45,000,000 of gallons 
every twenty-four hours. The Croton Waterworks of New York are capable of discharg- 
ing 60,000,000 of gallons every twenty-four hours. 

Libsabibs. — ^From a report made to the British House of Commons, printed in 1849, it 
appears that the principal libraries of the capital cities of Europe, are 



FouDcled. Vols. 

Paris, National* 1505 ---824,000 

Munich, Royal* 1550-...600,000 

Petersburgh, Imperial --- 446,000 

Ix>ndon, British Museum* 1753 435,000 

Copenhagen, Royal* 1550 ---412,000 

Berlin, Royal* 1650- - -410,000 

Vienna, Imperial* 1440- ---313,000 

Dresden, Royal 1566 ----300,000 

Madrid, National* 1712- - -200,000 

Wolfenbuttel, Ducal 1604 - - - -200,000 

Stuttgard, Royal 1765- —187,000 

Paris, Arsenal 1781 --- -180,000 

Milan, Brera* 1797 ---170,000 Total 5,130,500 

The libraries marked *, are entitled by law to a copy of every book published within the 
states to which they belong. 

The chief University libraries are as follows : 



Fonnded. Vola. 

Paris, St. Genevieve 1624 150,000 

Dannatadt, Grand Ducal 1760 150,000 

Florence, Magliabecchian,* 1714 150,000 

Naples, Royal* 1765- ---150,000 

Brussels, Royal* 1839 ---133,500 

Rome, Casanate 1700 120,000 

Hague, Royal* 100,000 

Paris, Mazarine 1661 100,000 

Rome, Vatican 465 100,000 

Parma, Ducal* 1760 ---100,000 



Fonnded. Vols. 



Gottingen 1736 

Breslau 1811 

Oxford, Bodleian -1597 

Tubingen 1562 

Munich -- 

Heidelbnrg 1708 

Cambridge 1484 



--380,000 
-250,000 
-220,000 
1-200,000 
-200,000 
-200,000 
-166,724 



Fonnd«d. Vols. 

Bologna 1600-150,000 

Prague 1777-130,000 

Vienna 1777-115,000 

Leipsic 1544- -112,000 

Copenhagen 1730- -110,000 

Turin 1436-110,000 

Louvain 1639- -105,000 



Founded. Vols. 

Dublin 1601-104,000 

Upsal 1621-100,000 

Erlangen 1743- -100,000 

Edinburgh 1582- 00,854 



Giving a total of 2,823,578 

The principal public libraries of G-reat Britain, 35 in number, contain about 1,771,493 
volumes. In Frai)ce, there are 107, in Austria 48, in Prussia 44, in the rest of Europe 51 
public libraries that are freely open to all ; in Oreat Britain, only 1. In the capital cities 



Digitized 



by Google 



46 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

of Europe, 31 that are open, anjd in London, none. The number of public libraries in the 
United States, as reported to the Smithsonian Institute in 1849, was 182 ; of which 43 had 
over 10,000 volimies each ; 9 over 20,000 each ; and only 2 over 50,000. The number of 
volumes in all, was 1,294,000. The library of Congress, which is select and valuable, has 
about 45,000 volumes. 



CoLLBGBs AKD PROFESSIONAL ScHooLs IN THB Unitbd Statbs IN 1849. — ^Nimiber of Col- 
leges, 121 ; instructors, 931. Theological Seminaries, 43 ; instructors, 122. Law Schools, 
12 ; instructors, 23. Medical Schools, 35 ; instructors, 230. 

Univbrsities, CoLLsaEs, XTC, IN G-RBAT Brttain, IN 1849. — ^In England, besides the 
University of Oxford, which has 24 colleges, (each having it? head, or rector,) and 35 profes- 
sors, and the University of Cambridge, which has 17 colleges, (each having its head,) and 24 
professors, there are 9 colleges, having in their various departments 160 professors. In Scot- 
land, there are 4 universities, including 7 colleges, and having 110 professors, lecturers, etc. 
In Ireland, there is Dublin University, having 25 professors ; the College of St. Patrick at 
Maynooth, with 13 professors ; and a collegiate institution at Belfast, having 10 academical, 
and 7 medical professors. The endowments of the University of Oxford are about $600,000, 
and those of the University of Cambridge about $550,000 per annimi. And in addition to 
this, the colleges of Oxford have within their patronage 463 livings, the annual value of which 
is $690,000 ; and the colleges of Cambridge 313 livings, valued at $469,500 per annum. On 
the Ist January, 1849, the number of attendants on the books of the various colleges of Ox- 
ford, was 5,890 ; members of the convocation, 3,190. On the books of the colleges of Cam- 
bridge, 6,906 ; members of the convocation, 3,786. 

Principal Eblioiovs Denominations in the United Statbs in 1850, according to the 
latest reports. 

Nftine*. Churches. Miniates. Mem's. 



Namas. Churches. MmistV Mem's. 

Congregational, (Evang'l) 1,971 --1,687- -197,196 

Reformed Dutch* 282-- 299-- 33,960 

German Reformed 261-- S73-- 09,750 

Protestant Episcopal 1,192- -1,497- - 67,5S0 

Lutheran 1,604-- 663- -163,000 

United Brethren 1,800- - 503- - 67,000 

Evangelical As8oo.,(Ger.)- 190-- 300- - 17,000 

Unitarian* - »45. — 

Roman-cathoUc* 1,073 - -1,081 1,233,350 

Christian Connection 1,500- -1,500- -325,000 

ChurchofGod 125-- 83-10,000 

Mennonites 400-- 240-- 60,000 

Universalists* 1,042-- 684 

xs.;<.»^. I Evangelical, about 100,000 

^^^^^ (Hicksite., " SaloOO 



Methodist Episcopal* 3,873- -645,667 

" South* 1,578- -491,786 

" Protestant*--- 798-- 771 -- 62,305 
Baptists, Regular* 8,406- -5,142- -686,807 

« Anti-Mission*- --2,035-. 907-- 67,845 

" Freewill* 1,252-1,082-- 56,452 

« CampbeUite* ---1,898-- 848- -118,618 

« Minorsects 316-- 358-- 27,700 

TV«w-«o«« f 0- S. 2,512-1,860 -192,033 

Presbyterian* ^^ g i,651-i;551 -155,000 

Associate Presbyterian - - - - 214- - 120- - 18,800 

Associate Reformed 332-- 219-- 26,340 

Reformed Presbyterian 47-- 29-- 6,300 

Presbyterian, Cumberland- 480- 350-60,000 

" others 490- 310- 44,000 

The statistics of the denominations marked *, are from the reports of 1849 ; the others 
from the latest reports that could be obtained. 

A Lamp that will burn Twelve Months. — Take a stick of phosphorus, and put it into 
a large dry phial, not corked, and it will aflford a light sufficient to discern any object in a 
room when held near it The phial should be kept in a cool place, where there is no great 
current of air, and it will continue its limiinous appearance for more than twelve months. 

Dressing Wounds. — ^Nine times out of ten, a wound will heal quicker if done tip in its 
own blood, than any other way. As for a bum, whatever will entirely exclude the air the 
quickest, is best Cotton will do this ; so will oiled silk, if stuck down at the edge by any 
kind of sticking-salve. Put nothing on a bum to heal it Nature will soon do that when 
the air is excluded, and the pain will almost immediately cease. 

Preservative against Moths A small piece of paper or linen just moistened with tur- 
pentine, and put into the wardrobe or drawers for a single day, two or three times a year, is 
a sufficient preservative against moths. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 47 

ANNIVERSARIES AND OFFICERS OF CHARITABLE SOCIETIES, ETC. 

BOSTON.^American Board of Commissionbrs for Foreign Missions, 2d Tues. in Sept. ; 
ReT. Rufus Anderson, D. D., Rev. Selah B. Treat, Rev. Swan L. Pomroy, D. D., See's ; Henry Hill, 
E gq. , Treas. , Miss. House, 33 Pemberton-sqnare. American Baptist Miss'rt Union, 3d Thurs. in 
May ; Rev. Solomon Peck, D. D., Rev. Edward Bright, See's, 33 Somerset-st. Amsr. Education 
SocEBTT, in May; Rev. Samnel H. Riddel, Seo. ; S. T. Farwell, Treas., 15 Comhill. American 
Tract Soczbtt at Boston, last Wed. in May ; Rer. Seth Bliss, Seo., 88 Comhill. Prison Disci- 
PL.INB SociBTT, Rev. L. Bwight, Seo. ; Chas. H. Mills, Treas., 39 MUk-st. Massachusetts Home 
MisaioNABT Societt, Rev. J. S. Clark, Seo., 28 Cornhill. 

NE"W YORK.— American Bible Society, Sd Thurs. in May ; Rot. John C. Brigham, D. D., Rev. 
Joseph Holdich, D. D., See's ; J. Hyde, Esq. , Gen. Agdnt and Assist. Treas., 115 Nassau-st. Ameri- 
can Am> Foreign Bible Society, Wm. H. WyokofT, Esq., Cor. Seo. ; James R. Stone, Gen. Ag't, 
350 Broome-st. American Tract Society, Wed. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. Wm. A. Hallock, - 
Rev. O. Eastman, Rev. R. S. Cook, Cor. Seo's. ; 0. R. Kingsbury, Assist. Seo. and Treas., 150 Nassau- 
st. American Home Missionary Society, Wed. preoed. 2d Thiirs. in May ; Rev. Milton Badger, 
D. D., and Rev. Chas. Hall, D. D., Seo's ; H. W. Ripley, Assist. Treas., 150 Nassau-st. American 
Baptist Home Mission Society, Rev. Benj. M. Hill, Cor. See., 354 Broome-st. Board of For- 
EiaN Missions of Presbyterian Church, Hon. Walter Lowrie, Cor. Seo. ; Chas. D. Drake, Esq., 
Treas., 23 Centre-st. American and Foreign Christian Union, Tues. preced. 9d Thurs. in May j 
Rev. Robert Baird, D. I)., and Rev. H. Norton, Cor. Seo's ; Edward Vernon, Agent, 150 Nassau-st. 
American Seamen's Friend Society, Mond. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. John Spaulding and 
Rev. Harmon Loomis, See's, 82 Wall-st. American Temperance Union, Rev. John Marsh, Cor. 
Sec., 149 Nassau-st. Prot. Episcopal Church— Domestic Mission Committee, Rev. Chas. J. Hal- 
sey, Sec. and Gen. Agent, 2 Park-place ; Foreign Mission Committee, Rev. P. P. Irving, Sec, 2 Park- 
place. Methodist — ^Book Concern, Rev. Geo. Lane and Rev. Levi Scott, Agents, 200 Mulberry 
and 138 Nassau sts. ; Missionary Society, C. Pitman, Cor. Sec., Geo. Lane, Treas., 200 Mulberry-st. ; 
Suxtday-School Union, Rev. D. P. Kidder, Cor. Sec, 200 Mulberry-st. Reformed Dutch — ^Domes- 
tic Mission, Thos. C. Doremus, Treas., 39 Nassau-st. ; Foreign Mission, Charles L. Little, Treas. 
Central American Education Society, Wm. A. Booth, Treas. American Missionary Asso- 
ciation, Rev. Geo. Whipple, Cor. Sec ; Lewis Tappan, Treas., 61 John-st. American and For- 
eign Anti-Slavery Society, W. E. Whiting, Treas. ; Lewis Tappan, Cor. Sec, 61 John-st. N. 
York and Amer. Sunday-School Union, J. C. Meeks, Agent, 147 Nassau-st., and 38 Park-row. 

lY-School Union, Tues. after 3d Thurs. in May ; F. W. 
Fo] ». Sec, 146 Chesnut-st. General Assembly's Boards, 

at t— Domestic Missions, Rev. Wm. A. McDowell, D. D., 

Co; Van Rensselaer, D. D., Cor. Sec; Board of Publica- 

tioi JO. ; Rev. W. M. Engles, D. D., Editor ; Joseph P. En- 

gle ation Society, 118 Arch-st. ; Rev. Thos. S. Malcolm, 

Co: gent. Philadelphia Tract Society, A. Flint, Agent, 

18 ciETY, 4th Thurs. in May ; Rev. James R. Eckard, Sec. 

Ph Ted. in May ; Rev. Robert Adair, Sec, 142 Chesnut-st. 

ON Society, 3d Tues. in Jan. ; Rev. Wm. McLain, Sec 
al Convention in Maine, Tues. before fourth Wed. in 
In IPSHIRB, 4th Tues. in Aug. General Convention in 

Vi isociATioN, Massachusetts, 4th Tues. in June. Evan- 

esucAL Consociation, Rhode Island, 2d Tues. in Jime. General Association, Connecticut, 
3d Tues. in June. General Association, New York, Thurs. before last Sabbath in Aug. Gen- 
eral Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church, Ist Wed. in October. General As- 
sembly Presbyterian Church, 3d Thurs. in May. General Conference Methodist E pisco- 
PAL Cbitrch, every 4th year from 1840. General Synod Reformed Dutch Church, on the 1st 
Wed. in June. 

YEARLY MEETINGS OF FRIENDS.— New England Yearly Meeting, held at Newport, 
Rhode Island, begins second day after second sixth day in sixth month. State of New York 
Yearly Meeting, New York City, second day after fourth first day in fifth month. Philadelphia 
Yearly Meetino, third second day in fourth month. Baltimore Yearly Meeting, last second 
day in tenth month. Virginia Yearly Meeting, third seventh day in fifth month, at Cedar Creek 
in 1839 ; at Somerton in 1840 ; and so alternately at these places. Carolina Yearly Meeting 
is held at New Garden, Guilford county, second day after fint first day in eleventh month. Ohio 
Yearly Meetino, Mount Pleasant, second day after first first day in ninth month. Indiana 
YxASLT MxiTiNG, Whitewater, on fifth day preceding first first day in tenth month. 



Digitized 



by Google 



48 THE FAMIXY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

BOOKS FOR THE FAMILY. 

PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY. 

These works are not exceeded in high evangelical character, spiritual power, and pnc 
tical worth, by any similar collection in any language. They have been carefully selected 
for the great body of intelligent readers throughout the country, and the most ^tvatchfol par- 
ent may supply 1ii«ni to his family or to others, not only with safety to their best wnd et^oal 
interest, but with hope of the richest spiritual blessings. They are neatly and legiblj 
printed, and many of them illustrated with elegant engravings. 

STANDARD VOLUMES.— D'Aubign6*8 History of the Reformation, four volnmes ; Baxter^ 
Saints' Rest, 12mo, in large type, also do. 18mo. ; Banyan's Pilgrim's Progress, 12mo, in laige tjpe, 
and 18mo., both editions neatly illustrated ; Memoir of James Milnor, D. D. ; Twelve ▼olumas <rf 
Tracts, new series, 500 pages each, with new engravings ; Mason's Spiritual Treasury ; Fla^el's 
Fountain of Life, Method of Grace, and Knocking at the Door; Bishop Hall's Scripture History; 
Bishop Hopkins on the Ten Commandments ; President Edwards' Thoughts on Bevivals ; Venn's 
Complete Duty of Man ; Owen on Forgiveness, or Psalm 130 ; Baxter's Reformed Pastor ; Gregory's 
Evidences of Christianity ; Paley's Natural Theology and Hora Paulina ; Dr. Spring's Bible not of 
Man ; Nelson's Cause and Cure of Infidelity ; Sacred Songs for Family and Social Worship ; Elegant 
Narratives, Select Tracts illustrated ; Willison's AflSicted Man's Companion ; Doddridge's Rise and 
Progress ; Edwatfc' History of Redemption ; Volume on Infidelity ] Pike's Persuasives to Early Piety, 
and Guide to Young Disciples ; Universalism not of God ; Dibble's Thoughts on Missions, etc 

ELEGANT PRACTICAL WORKS.— Wilberforoe's Practical View ; Hannah More's Practical 
Piety ; James' Anxious Inquirer ; Elijah the Tishbite ; Nevins' Practical Thoughts ; Melvill's Bible 
Thoughts ; Harris' Mammon ; Gumey's Love to God ; Foster's Appeal to the Young ; Abbott^ 
Young Christian, and Mother and Child at Home ; James' Young Man from Home, etc. 

CHRISTIAN MEMOIRS.— Mrs. Isabella Graham ; Mrs. Sarah L. H. Smith ; Rev. C. Buchan- 
an, LL.D. ; Rev. John Newton ; Rev. Henry Martyn ; Rev. David Brainerd ; Rev. Edward Payson, 
D. D. ; Harriet L. Winslow ; James Brainerd Taylor ; Harlan Page ; Normand Smith ; Richard 
Baxter; Archbishop Leighton ; Matthew Henry ; Rev. Samuel Pearce ; Rev. Samuel KUpin, etc 

OTHER SPIRITUAL WORKS.— Edwards on the Affections ; Baxter's Call ; AHeine's Alarm ; 
Flavel's Touchstone, and Keeping the Heart ; Helffenstein's Self-Deception ; Sherman's Guide to 
Acquaintance with God ; Pike's ReUgion and Eternal Life ; Baxter's Dying Thoughts ; Matthew 
Henry on Meekness ; Andrew Fuller's Backslider ; Scndder's Redeemer's Last Command, etc. 

MISCELLANEOUS WORKS.— Dr. Edwards' Sabbath Manual, Parts 1, 2, 3, and 4, and Tem- 
perance Manual ; Rogue's Evidences; Keith's Evidence of Prophecy ; Morison's Counsels to Young 
Men ; The Reformation in Europe ; Nevins' Thoughts on Popery ; Spirit of Popery, 12 engravings ; 
The Colporteur and Roman Catholic; Mason on Self-Knowledge ; Anecdotes for the Family ; Three 
premium treatises on Systematic Beneficence ; Hymns for Social Worehip, etc. 

POCKET MANUALS.— Bogatzky's Golden Treasury; Clarke's Scripture Promises; Book of 
Psalms and Proverbs ; Commandments Explained ; Bean and Venn's Advice to a Married Couple ; 
Cecil and Flavel's Gift for Mourners ; Daily Food for Christians ; Heavenly Manna ; Dew-Drops, etc. 

BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG, many of them Beautifully Illustrated with Engrav- 
INOS — Gallaudet's Scripture Biography, and Youth's Book of Natural Theology ; Peep of Day ; Line 
upon Line; Precept upon Precept ; Anzonetta R. Peters ; The Night of Toil ; Legh Richm<md's 
Letters and Counsels ; Advice to a Young Christian ; Charles H. Porter ; Missionary's Daughter; 
Porteus' Evidences; Scudder's Tales about the Heathen; Nathan W. Dickerman; Grace Harriet; 
Charles L. Winslow; Withered Branch Revived ; Peet's Scripture Lessons ; ChUd's Book of BiWe 
Stories; Children V the Bible; AmosAnnfield; Child's Hymn-Book ; Scripture Animals ; Great 
Truths in Simple Words ; Clementine Cuvier ; Pictorial Tract Primer ; Watts' Divine Songs, etc. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES.— In German, 40 vols., various sizes, including Barth's Church His- 
tory • Life of M. Boos ; Christ Knocking at the Door ; also, volumes and packets of Books for Chil- 
dren' recently pubUshed. In French, twelve volumes. In Spanish, D'Aubignd's History of the 
Reformation, Vol. I. ; Sabbath Manual, etc. Iw Italian, D'Aubignd's History of the Refwrnation, 
Vol 1, etc. In WEL8H,~Pilgrim's Progress; Barter's Saints' Rest, and Call; Anxious Inquirer; 
History of Redemption, etc. In Danish, Doddridge's Rise and Progress; Baxter's Sainte' Rest, 

ALSO, ppwards of 1,000 Tracts and Children's Tracts, separate, bound, or tn jwctet*, adapted for 
convenient sale by merohants and tiadere, many of them with beautiful ingravings— m English, 
German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, ItaHan, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, and Welsh. 

\n* It is the design of the Society to issue aU its publioations in good type, for the poor as well 
as the rich ; and to seU them, as nearly as may be, at cost, that the Society may neither sustain loss 
nor make a profit by all its sales. 



Digitized 



by Google 












g^ 



iilii'5«2j||i^ii||if|, 
►» -1 ►< 1 ►» ^ 












HI 



o» Scjat a^ ' ^^joj^j^joi«j^ 



f} 



iigiiiis§igsi§§§s^ig§i§§gi^^§; 



iMiriiiiWiWisi¥iiW?i¥ils¥i§ 



g§i§i§si§gi§i§§§3 



mm^iu 







lui 









iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil'iii 



Eatim«t«d 
population ii 



«4 10 a» en Oft >ik -4 o» js 5 



"lg¥§iBag§sg ial¥ii¥§aFr§|g ail 

I? l¥¥s¥¥ill?¥§¥sils¥§§¥aN g¥i 



Total debt hi 



■!f-r 






"§ 



ilgl 



IS 

§§ 



§ 









Amount or 
School Fund. 



38 






C9 M-^ 

¥¥§§ 



S2S 



§§§§ 



II 
1§ 



fil 



AnnuKl expen- 
diture for Com 
mon Schools, f 



ill 



is 






3? 



28 

►©•a 



Highest num 
her of child 'n at 



iromber of 
•choolable chil- 
dren-t 



Digitized 



by Google 



msp 



JjBQaIa batbs of intbbbst. 

The legal rate it 8 per cent, in Georgia, Alal>anu^ Miuinippi, Lomuana, and Florida. 
7 per cent, in Ne-w York, South Carolina, Michigan, Wisconsin, and lomu In all the othw 
it ii 6 per cent. 

TABI4B OF SIMPIiB INTBBBST AT SIX PBB CBNT. 



PrincipaL One Mo'th One Tear. 



Principal One Month. One Tear. 



PribcipaL One Month. On* trnm. 



Cents 10 

« 60 

Dolls. 1 

" 2 

" 3 

" 4 

-" 5 



». 0. 




Dolls. 



Dolls. 40 

" 60 

" 60 

« 70 

« 80 

« 90 

" 100 



2 40 • 

3 Ot 

3 « # 

4 9B # 

6 « ill 



The interest of anj sum in dollars for 6 days, is the same sum in mills : riz. of $100, 100 
or 10 cents ; of $6,600, 6,600 mills, or $6 ^, eto. Money at compound interest will doubl* 
I in 11 years 10 moaths and 22 days. 



m 



A TAIiUABLE TABIiB. 

The foUowing talo^le table was first published in Mr. Ruffin's Faimei^s Register : 
A box 24 by 16 inches square, and 22 deep, contains a barrel, or 10,752 cubic inches. 



24 « 16 

16 " 16 8-10 « 

18 « 112-10 '* 

8 " 84-10 « 

8 " 8 " 

7 « 4 « 

4 u 4 u 



11 

8 « 

8 " 

8 " 

4 2-10 " 

4 8-10 " 

4 2-10 « 



half barrel, or 5,376 

bushel, or 2,150 4-10 " 

halfbnshel, or 1,075 < 

peck, or 537 6-10 * 

half peck, or 268 8-10 * 
half gallon, or 141 4-10' 
quart, or 67 2-10 



These measures come within a small fraction of a cubic inch of being perfectly aeeiuate; ms 
near, indeed, as say measures of capacity have ever yet been made for common use. The difBiwlty 
of making them with absolute exactness has nerer yet been overcome. 



THE CHBISTIAN AliMANAC, AND OTHEB PUBIilCATIONS 

Of the AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, may be had at 150 Nassau-street, New York, or R«t. 
Skth Bliss, Secretary, 28 Comhill, Boston ; Gilbert Richmond, Froyidenoe ; Charles Hosockk, 
Hartford; Willum Stbbbins, New Haven ; E. H. Pease, 82 State-street, Albany ; R. Wassov, 
186 River-stieet, Troy; L. Daivtorth & Co., 230 Main-street, Buffido; William H. Flint, 18 
North-Fifth-Street, Philadelphia; Rer. S. Gxtiteau, 2 Franklin Buildings, Baltimore ; D.W.Ha»« 
RisoN, Chalmers-street, Charleston ; H. Packard, 50 Camp-street, New Orleans; W. H. Bulklxt^j 
Fourth-street, Louisville ; Sbbly Wood, Agent, Walnut-steeet, near Fourth, Cincinnati ; Rer. O. 
Pbabodt, Agent, St. Louis ; A. McFarrem, 137 Jefferson-ayenue, Detroit ; and of other bodcsellns 
and traders. 

(D** The ALMANAC is fiimished at a low price to those who order it by the 100 or 1,000. 

The Board of the American Tract Sooiety embraces members of foiirteen evangelical denomina- 
tions, united to diffuse the knowledge of Christ and him erueified by its publications, associated witk 
personal Christian effort, at home and abroad. About 350 colporteurs are now laboring in the most 
destitute parts of the country. A donation of $20 constitutes a Life Member ; $30 a Life Direetor. 
The usual salary of a colporteur is $150, besides other expenses and books granted. WtLUAX A. 
Hallock, 0. Eastman, and R. S. Cook, Corresponding Secretaries, O. R. Kinosburt, Assistant 
Treasurer, 150 Nassau-street, New York. Sbth Bliss, Secretary, 28 Comhill, Bostcxu 



FOBM OF A BBIIUEST. 

I bequeath to my Executors the sum of - Dollars, in (ru«(, to pay ovw tiio 

In after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasuar I 

of the Society, formed in in the year eighteen hundred and 

to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said Society, and under its dix«eti(ai. 



®i^ 




Digitized 



f ■*« Mriiii 



by Google 



.- .m • m m im»m 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



THK 

ILLUSTRATED 

FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 

FOB 

THE UNITED STATES, 

FOE 

THE YEAR OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOUR JESUS CHRIST 



1852, 



BEING BISSEXTILE, AND UNTIL JULY 4TH. THE 76TH YEAR OF THE INDEPENI)- 
ENCE OF THE UNITED STATES. 

CALCULATED FOR 

BOSTON, NEW YORK, BALTIMORE, AND CHARLESTON, 

FOUR PARALLELS OF LATITUDE. 
ADAPTED FOR USE THROUaHOUT THE COUNTRY. 



VALUABLE STATISTICAL INFORMATION CHTEFLY FROM ORIGINAL SOURCES. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS, IN EQUAL OB CLOCK TIME, 

BY DAVID TOUNO. 

HANOTBB WBCK, N li W JHRSBT 

BOSTON, L«L 43«' 21' N. ; Long. 71« 4' W. 
NEW YORK, Lat. ^(y-W' 40" ; Long. 74* »'. 
BALTIMORE, Lat 39" 17' ; Long. 76*' 38'. 
CHARLESTON, Let 32* 47' ; Long. 79' 67'. 



PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY. 

NEW YORK: 150 NASSAU-STREET j BOSTON: 28 CORNHILL: 
AND BT BOOKSELLERS AND TRADERS. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



19* This work has been chiefly prepwrwl by the Rer. TRTON EDWARDS, D. D., of New London, Conn., who 
with (reat bbor and care, has drawn the more important statiatical table* firom original aourcea. 

ECIilPSES IN THB TEAR 1853 

There will be six Eclipses, three of the Sun, and three of the Moon, this year. 
I. January 6th and 7th, Moon eclipsed ; visible and total. 



CITIES in the order 
of Longitude. 



Beginning. 



Beginning of tot«l 
darkness. 



End or total 
darkneM. 



End 
or the Eclipee. 



Bastport 

Boston 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Baltimore 

Washington 

Richmond 

Raleigh 

Charleston 

St. Augustine-- - 
Milledgeville - - - 

Lexington 

Cincinnati 

Nashville 

Mobile 

St. Louis 

New Orleans 

Austin 

San Francisco - - 
Astoria 



11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

6 11 

6 11 

6 10 

6 10 

6 10 

6 10 

6 10 

6 10 

6 10 

6 10 

6 9 

6 8 

6 8 



53 ov. 
37 ev. 
25 ev. 

20 ev. 
14 ev. 
13 ev. 
11 w. 

6 ev. 
1 ev. 

55 ev. 
48 ev. 
44 ev. 
43 ev. 
34 ev. 
28 ev. 
23 ev. 

21 ev. 
50 ev. 
13 ev. 

7 ev. 



6 11 

6 11 

6 11 

6 11 

6 11 

11 

6 11 

11 

6 10 

6 9 

6 9 



53 mo. 
37 mo. 
2-3 mo. 

20 mo. 
14 mo. 
13 mo. 
11 mo. 

6 mo. 
1 mo. 

55 ev. 
48 ev. 
44 ev. 
43 ev. 
34 ev. 
28 ev. 
23 ev. 

21 ev. 
50 ev. 
13 ev. 

7 ev. 



6 11 
6 10 
6 9 



42 mo. 
26 mo. 
14 mo. 

9 mo. 

3 mo. 

2 mo 

mo. 
55 mo. 
50 mo. 
44 mo. 
37 mo. 
33 mo. 
32 mo. 
23 mo. 
17 mo. 
12 mo. 
10 mo. 
39 ev. 

2 ev. 
50 ev. 



6 10 
10 



31 mo. 
15 mo. 
3 mo. 

58 mo. 
52 mo. 
51 mo. 
49 mo. 

44 mo. 
39 mo. 
33 mo. 
26 mo. 
22 mo. 
21 mo. 
12 mo. 

6 mo. 
1 mo. 

59 mo. 
28 mo. 
51 ev. 

45 ev. 



6 11 
6 11 



31 ma 
15 mo 
3 mo. 

58 mo. 
52 mo. 
51 mo. 
49 mo. 

44 mo. 
39 mo. 
33 mo. 
26 mo. 
22 mo. 
21 mo. 
12 mo. 

6 mo. 
1 mo 

59 mo. 
28 mo 
51 ev. 

45 ev. 



Depth of immersion in the earth's shadow, !20 digits from the southern side. 

II. January 21, Sun eclipsed at the time of New Moon in the morning, (20th in ihe evening, 
west of the Rocky mountains ;) invisible. Visible about the South Pole of the earth. 

III. June 17, Sun eclipsed at the time of New Moon in the morning, (evening in the eastern 
part of New England ;) invisible. Visible in the southern part of South America. 

IV. July 1, Moon eclipsed at the time of Full Moon in the morning; invisible. 

V. December 10, Sun eclipsed at the time of New Moon in the evening ; invisible. It 
will be visible throughout the greater part of Asia; and will be central and total on the 
meridian in longitude 127^ IS' east from Grreenwich, and latitude 37° 28* north. 

VI. December 26, Sabbath morning. Moon eclipsed on the southern limb ; visible and 
partly visible in the United States. 



CITIES. 


Begin- 
ning. 


Middle. 


Moon 
Sets. 


l^i- 


CITIES. 


Begin- 
ning. 


Middle. 


Moon 
Seta. 


Msgni- 
tude. 


Eastport 


■. M. 

7 5 
6 49 
6 37 
6 32 
6 26 
6 25 
6 23 
6 18 
6 13 
6 7 
6 


H. ■. 


■. ■. 
7 38 
7 29i 
7 24 
7 22 
7 20 
7 19 
7 15 
7 10 
7 2 

6 54 

7 3 


Digits. 

447 

5.31 

5.96 

6.24 

6.53 

6.58 

6.40 

6.40 

6.15 

5.96 

7.23 


Lexington 

Cincinnati 

Indianapolis - - - 

Nashville 

MobUe 

St. Louis 

New Orleans- -- 

San Francisco - 
Astoria 


a. ■. 
5 56 
5 55 
5 49 
5 46 
5 40 
5 35 
5 33 
5 2 

3 25 
3 19 


■. K. 

6 31i 

4 48i 


H. M. 

7 17 
7 20 
7 23 
7 12 

6 58 

7 20 
6 56 
6 58 
End. 
6 24 
6 18 


Dig's. 

8.03 
8U9 


New York 

Philadelphia- --- 

Baltimore 

Washington 

Richmond 

Raleigh 

Charleston 

St. Augustine - • - 
Milledgeville. --- 


8.07 
8.10 
7.9G 
7.77 
8.05 
7.17 



Magnitude at the middle of the eclipse, 8.12 digits. 



CHARACTERS. 

00 Sun; ])Moon; ^ Mercury; $ Venu^; © Earth; ^ Mars; 24. Jupiter; ^ Sat- 
urn; ^ Herschel. 

SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 

T Aries; ^ Taurus; n Gemini; 35 Cancer; St^Lcoj n)J >Vu^ ;#^'Jlby%^ tH. Scor- 
pio ; X Sagittarius ; V3 Capricorn ; S5J Aquarius '/^ Fiscw^ 



<fy. rro 



'<^> 



i^ MAYZ3 /^f» 

DigilL-Mlj;>i..OQgle 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 3 

RISING AND SETTING OF PLANETS AND STARS. 

These are not materially affected by the lo7igitude of a place. When the hour is less 
than 6, it is in the morning ; when greater than 6, it is in the evening. 



DATE. 


PLANET. 


Boston. 


WMh- 


Charles 
ton. 


DATE. 

18M 


PLANET. [ 


Borton. 


.ncton. 


lor 


1863 




H. ■. 


.. u. 


■. ■. 




a. H. 


a. K. 


■- «. 


Jan. 12 


Venus sets 


653 


7 


7 12 


July 6 


Marssetx 


to 31 


10 2H 


10 23 


" 23 


ct u 


721 


726 


735 


" 13 


" " . . 


10 12 


10 10 


10 6 


" 27 


Jupiter rises - - 


1 52 


1 45 


1 38 


Aug. 4 


Venus riKOs - - - 


33S 


344 


354 


Feb. 5 


Venus sets 


754 


756 


8 


" 17 


« " 


2 41 


248 


2 J9 


« 17 


" " 


833 


822 


8 22 


" 19 


SeTen Stars rise 


10 6 


10 lb 


10 ^ 


Mar. 10 


«* " 


9 15 


9 10 


9 2 


Sept. 1 




9 15 


9 27 


9 44 


" 23 


Mars sets 


332 


320 


3 2 


" 11 


. (( tt 


836 


8 47 


9 5 


« 27 


Venus sets 


954 


946 


9 32 


" 25 


Venus rises- - - 


1 59 


2 6 


2 16 


April 1 
'^ 13 


tt « 


10 6 


956 


9 41 


Oct. 2 


" " . 


2 9 


2 10 


2 19 


u « 


10 31 


10 19 


10 1 


" 14 


'* '• . . . 


2 19 


223 


2 30 


" 22 


ci i; 


10 47 


10 34 


10 14 


»• 25 


'• "... 


236 


239 


243 


May 4 


Mars sets 


1 25 


1 16 


1 1 


Nov. b 


*• " .... 


3 1 


3 2 


3 2 


" 14 


44 tl 


57 


49 


36 


" 19 


" " 


3 24 


322 


3 19 


" 28 


Venus sets 


10 51 


10 40 


10 21 


" 26 


" " 


339 


335 


3 31 


June 2 


Jupiter sets • - - 


3 14 


3 21 


331 


Dec. 4 


Sirius rises 


8 42 


835 


8 21 


" 5 


Venus sets 


10 37 


10 26 


10 9 


' 15 


Venus rises 


422 


4 15 


4 5 


" 30 


It « 


9 8 


9 


8 47 


" 31 


Saturn sets 


250 


244 


2.35 



ENA OF THE PLANETS FOR 18312. 

Jan. 6, inf. d § ; 9, ^ stat. ; 17, 5 stat ; 18, D0 ^ ; 20, ent r: ; 

21, DG ; 29, §'s gr. elong. Feb. 11, D 02^; 19, ent. ^. March 4, 
^ stat ; sup. (505^ ; 20, enters T- April 9, 5 's gr. elong. ; 19. 
enters a 015P; 27, 60 ^; 28, D0 ^; 29,inf. <5 5- Mat8,5©2X; 
11, 9'8 i stat ; 20, enters n ; 27, ^'s gr. elong. Junk 21, enters fB ; 
28, $ sta Jttlt 2, in apogee ; 10, 2^ stat ; 21, inf. 60$; 22, enters 

a; 31, 6, D02^; 7,§'sgr.elong.;9. D0^; 11, $stat; 13, IJl stat ; 

21, 5 stat. ; 22, ent H^ ; 30, ^ stat Sept. 4, inf. 6 9 ; 12, ^ stat ; 20, ^'s gr. elong. ; 

22, enters eiis; 30, $ 's gr. elong. Oct. 18, sup. 6 5 ". 23, enters tit; 29, § 01*1. 
Nov. 6, 8(z>^\ 21, enters / ; 25, 6Q>U- Dkc. 2, 5f 's gr. elong. ; 10, ^ stat ; 20, 
inf. 6 5; 21, enters V3 ; 30, in perigee; ^ stat 

ASPECTS AND NODES. 

6 Conjunction; >|c Sextile, 60 degrees; D Quartile, 90 degrees; A Trine, 120 degrees; Vc. 
Quincunx, 150 degrees ; S Opposition, 180 degrees ; Q Ascending Node ; X3 Descending Node. 

CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 

Dominical Letters, D and C ; G-olden Number, or Lunar Cycle, 10 ; Epact, 9 ; Solar Cy- 
cle, 13 ; Roman Indiction, 10 ; Julian Period, 6565. 

NOTES TO THE READER. 

The Calendar page in this Almanac is adapted for use in erery part of the United States. 
It is based on the fact, that in the same Latitude, that is, on a line running due east and 
west, the Sun and Moon rise and set at the same moment by the dock or almaiiac, not 
only throughout the United States, but around the world — the variations being so small as to 
be of no importance for ordinary purposes. Thus, if on any day the Sun rises at Boston at 5 
minutes past 6, it rises at 5 minutes past 6 on the same line of latitude westward throughout 
the states of Massachusetts, New York, Michigan, Iowa, and the territory of Oregon. 

Hence, a Calendar adapted to Boston for New England, is equally adapted, as to the rising 
and setting of the Sun and Moon, for use in Northern New York and Michigan ; a Calendar 
for New York city is adapted for use in the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois ; 
a Calendar for Baltimore is adapted for Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri ; and a Calendar 
for Charleston will answer for North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, »nd Louisiana. 
Wherever the reader is, look for the state at the top of the Calendar page, and underneath are 
the rising and setting of the Sun and Moon suMciently Accurate for all practical purposes. 

The changes, fulls, a^id qtuirters of the Moon, however, are governed by another prin- 
ciple, and are essentially the same for all places on the same Longitude ; that is, en any 



Digitized 



by Google 



4 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

line extending due north and south. Thus, the Moon's phases for Charleston, suit Pitts> 
burgh, etc. Any phasis takes place at the same instant of absolute time ; but the local time 
is earlier at the westward, and later at Uie eastward, at the rate oifour minutes for each 
degree of Loitgitude; or at the rate of o7ie minute for every 12 miles 273 rods in the lati- 
tude of Boston ; 13 miles 60 rods in the latitude of New York city ; 13 miles 143 rods in the 
latitude of Baltimore ; and 14 miles 199 rods in the latitude of Charleston. 

EQUATION OF TIIIIE. 

Almanacs often contain the expressions, " sun faet^"^ and " sun slow.^^ They refer to 
the difference of time as shown by the sun, and as shown by a good clock or watch. Time 
as marked by Hie former is called ^^ apparent" and as marked by the latter^ " "mean time." 
A good sundial will always tell i^e former ; a watch or cloeky the latter. The calcula- 
tions of most almanacs are givei. in m,ean or clock time. 

TABI^E OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM. 



Menn di- 
ameter in 
Eng. miles. 



Mean distance 
from the Sun. 



Time of rotation 
round their axes. 



Time of revolution round 
tbeSuh. 



Ugfatand 
heat, earth 
being 1. 



The Sun -- 
Mercury — 

Venus 

The Earth 
The Moon - 

Mars 

Vesta 

Iris 

Hebe 

Flora 

Astraa 

Juno 

Ceres • 

PaUas 

Jupiter 

Saturn 

Uranus 

Neptune* - 



883,240 
3,2524 

7,087 
7,912 
2,180 
4,189 
238 
unknown 



1,425 
180 
110 
89,170 
79,042 
35,112 
35,000 



37,000,000 
68,000,000 
95,000,000 
95,000,000 
144,000,OOQ 
224,340,600 
226,000,000 
230,000,000 
240,000,000 
»46,0OO,O0O 
253,598,700 
263,236,450 
265,000,000 
490,000,000 
900,000,000 
1,800,000,000 
2,850,000,000 



25 14 
1 





8 

5 28 

21 22 

23 56 4 

7 43 12 

37 22 



9 55 27 
10 29 17 
unknown 



87 

224 

365 

365 

686 

1,325 

1,327 

1,375 

1,469 

1,512 

1,593 

1,684 

1,686 

4,332 

10,759 

30,680 

60,128 



23 15 

16 49 

6 9 

6 9 

23 30 

11 33 



6.67 

1.91 

1. 

1. 

0.43 



22 41 



nearly. 

18 37 
nearly. - 

1 36 
17 38 

7 19 
14 27 

1 51 

19 41 
3 20 



19 



0.16 



0.037 
0.011 

Qsm 

O.OOl 



* Since Ihe above table was first prepared. Jive new asteroids have been discovered, making in 
all thirteen. They have not been added to the table, because their diameters, mean dlstanoei*, etc., 
are not as yet accurately known. All the thirteen have been discovered within the last half cen- 
tury. Four of the thirteen were discovered in Great Britain, four in Italy, and five in Germany, 
by seven observers only ; M. Hind of London, and Professor Gasparis of Naples, having discovered 
thru each ; Dr. Olbers of Bremen, andHencke of Drieser, two each ; and Piazziof Palermo, Harding 
of Lilienthal, and Graham of Markree, Ireland, one each. As a correct list of the names, etc., of all 
these asteroids cannot as yet be found in any work on astronomy, the following table is subjoined. 



Name. Date of Discovery. Disoov. b/. 

8. Flora October 18, 1847, - -Hind. 

9. Metis April 25, 1848, - - Graham. 

10. Hyglia April 12, 1849, -Gasparis. 

11. Parthenope . -May 13, 1860, - - «* 

12. Clio Septem. 13, 1850, - -Hind. 

13. Egeria Novem. 2, 1850,- -Gasparis. 



Name. Date of Discovery. DiscoT. by. 

f. Ceres January 1, 1801,--Piazzi. 

2. Pallas March 28, 1802, - -Olbers. 

3. Juno Septem. 1, 1804,- -Harding. 

J. Vesta March 29, 1807, - -Olbers. 

5. AstrsBa Deoem. 8, 1845,--Hencke. 

6 Hebe July 1,1847,-- « 

7. Iris August 13, 1847,--Hind. 

A third ring around the planet Saturn has been discovered from the observatory at Cambridge 
within the year. Its eighth satellite was discovered there about two years since. 

APOGEE AND PERIGEE OF THE SUN. 

In 1852, the Sun will be in 
Perigee January 2, ) ( 93,575,000 ) 

Apogee July 2, S distant from the Earth < 96,768,000 } miles. 

Perigee December 30, ) ( 93,573,000 ) 

LEAP-YEAR. 

Every year is leap-year the number of which can be divided by 4, and not by 100 ; or 
which can be divided by 400. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



1st MOlfTH. 



JANUARY, 1§59. 



31 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Full Moon • • • • 
Third Quarter- • 

New Moon 

Fir»k Quarter - • 



1 25 mo. 
8 34 ev. 

2 43 mo. 
5 50 mo. 



1 13 mo. 
8 22 ev. 

2 31 mo. 
5 38 mo. 



BALTIMRE 


■■ ■. 


— 


1 2 


mo. 


8 11 


ev. 


2 20 


mo. 


527 


mo. 



CHARLES'N. 


SUN 


a. ■. 

49 mo. 
7 58 ev. 
2 7 mo. 
5 14 mo. 


o. 

1 

9 
17 
25 



ev. 3 43 
7 17 
10 18 
12 35 



o 5 ® fi 
«2^ = 



^l 



o 



■ i-H .-I tH « i-li-H»-H C 



J »H C* CO -«* lO .2 O «0 00 O^O »H §O^0»C0"^O«0®«t^000iO^ §o^w 



^co^^o«>i>t^Qooo;^c2co;2:;2:^SJ:;22Soi^c5^c5SoJ85§i8 



■ t-t-t-t-t^t^t-t^t^t^t^t^t-t^t^t^t-t^t-t-t^t't^t-t-t-t^t-OOtO 






II 



ll 









l\99Jii )0 i»Q 



gfj;cgfia5^g£,gfiaE5^gfi;cgfiaES^E3£cgqaES^g£^ 



mw)Wjoi«a 



•HOICO-^O^Or-OOOiOi-KMCOT^OtOt-OOOQi-i 



Sc5?l85^c5^S58^^w 



a 






,: (N "* O to «0 t^ 00 OS Oi O »H > O i-t « Tl« «0 «0 l> 00 00 OS O O ^ rH 2 O tH tH (N 



j'^oieo"^»o.a«o<ot*ooo«-t §OrHoieo«o«o«o'2«c^ooojO'H SoT-itN 

" >M i-n-l C « 1— 1 1-1 P 



11 






0.» 









II 



J «0 t* 00 OS OS O '-t t^ O ri d CO CO -n* O t^ 00 OS O rH 1-1 2 O i-l »-i OJ W CO -^ "^ «o 
■ THi-Hq» i-(i-i— ^b 



ri»Hc>»cO"^io.so«ot^oooTH 2o»Hoi"Tj«iocot^'»«ot»oooso»H 2o»H(N 

■ *H 1-1 1-t fa W tHi-I C 






•g loap 9^uns 






^-Mijoi^a 



g£,gfia5^i5£^fis5^g£cgfi):^^^g£cgfia5^S£(g 



inaoNP^^CI 



1 ' — " 



Digitized by 



L^oogle 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAH ALMANAC. 



2d MOHTfi. 



FEBBITABT, 1859. 



29 DATS. 



MOON^ PHASES. i 

I 

' • I 

Full Moon 5 

Third Quarter . • ' 12 

New Moon 1191 

First Quarter [ 28 1 



B0ST05. 'XEW TORK.t BALTUtHK. 



2 9eT. 

5 19 mo. 
8 10 ev. 
47 mo. 



1 57 er. 
5 7 mo. 
7 ^ er. 
35 mo. 



1 46 CT. 
4 56 mo. 
7 47 er. 
24 mo. 



1 33 er. 
4 43 mo. 
7 34 eT. 
11 mo. 



SUNo* MXRID. 



O 13 52 
14 30 
O 14 19 
13 24 



O so o 



5-5 

x2a 



^ I 



I ct-^i^co t^t^oooiOO'H > i-H c< CO lo «o t^ r* 00 00 A a» o o «--i Soo 



ii 









■J tc 









« Si 

|sl| 



1^ 



I5 









" PS 






•^••^joiwd 



fta5^Sdt:^fis^^gpi:c2fts5^gfJ;^ft;^5^S£^ft 



•Hioow JO ^*a 



»-«0»CO"*0«Ot-000»Ot-»(NCO-*»0»l^OOO>0^ 



Sc58§5S^SSjSS 




§ 5 



§1 



COW'S tOt^OOOOOiO — ^ ^-^OJCO-V^Ot^OOOOOSOSOO^rH 2o^^ 









is** 

H - O 8 



si 



•g 'lOftp tjUng 



<0 00«O^t-i > -^ CI C» CO -n* O «0 t- 0» O '-• »H cOO<^«-iOOlCO'^Tt 












O t-.«O«O«O«O»-t»^»OTj<Tf""^C0C0C0WW C»'^ i-ti-<OOO>0»O>0000(»t' 



•^-ifl^joiiea fiaH^H£cgfiaH^SfJ;«gfiaH^S»i:«gfia5^e5£,gfi 



M^uoW jo^^ I 



^<NC0'^J»«CtOt-000»O-^C»C0-T*«»OC0t-00O»C>.-l 



823^MM^S 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



3d MONTH. 



MARCH, 1§52. 



31 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Full Moon . • - 
Third Quarter 
New Moon • • • 
First Quarter - 



46 mo. 

3 45 er. 

1 59 ev. 

4 6 ev. 



NEW YORK 


a. m. 




34 


mo. 


3 33 


ev. 


1 47 


ev. 


3 H 


ev. 



23 mo. 
3 22 ev. 

1 36 ev. 
3 43 ev. 



CHARLES'N. 

■. a. 

10 mo. 
3 9ey. 

1 23 ev. 
3 30 ev. 



SUN o» MERIS 



12 29 
10 36 
822 
5 56 



fc. . • 5 

% at D 



"< 5 ,•• S 



n 



D000>O»0SOOt-i cOi-lOl 

T-l rH ^H C 



■ it r-t r-t B W 






O y~t (NCI eO'V«0«0«OI>00000»00^<NCOPO'^»0>0«Ot^t^OO 












i^ p- 
■ H M e 



l{ COtJ« 



S8^ 3iS5tgS3^^ g^^^^22S§S5$ . 






t^ooo>oso»H 2o»HC»co 






tQ<©tQ5Q50<OtQ50<OtOtO 









i»«Ai JO ^«a 



SH^H£c3oa^^Hfi:(gOSH^H£(^©SH^g£cg©»H^ 



qiuoivjoitea 



^(N«^OOl^OOO»0^5«CO;20^J^OOO»g5Hg^gJ^W5^j^g5g5gjH 



■Els 



' ^OOO^tH Soi-tdc 



u 



,jCO"Tj«TI«O.S<&t^O»Oi-t § O 1-1 W CO -T** "^ o « "S 



t-000>Ot-iCI Soi-ioco 

1-li-H »-H B 






QOOOrH 



<NCO"<*Oa>t^OOO»Oj-i5N 

i-lrHi-lr-li-H,-lTHi-IWCMOf 



"COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCO CO CO CO CO 



O0t)l>»O 
t—t 

CO CO coco 



cococov^v^v^v^oooo 



^ B 

•< 5 . 

ptf 1^ <S ^ 






jOt^oooso^H ► .-« »H (N CO CO Ti« w r* 00 



'"^S5g^8'='SSS^^Sc55j 

00»H 2oOTHrH,-lOIOICOTj<IO«0 
,-1 rHrH B 



3S2S 



o35 



f «« 



ijCO'^OO.StOt-OiOjH SOrHOICO-^ 



OOCO V 



l^00O>O*H SOrHCIOICO 

r-lTH B 



8 



■ lOOtOtOOQiOOOOCOCOCOCOCOCO 



ooo»o^ 

C O CO CO CO 



cocococo^tocococococo 



ij rococo CO coco CO CO coco COCOCO coco CO 



O00l>«O 
CO CO CO CO 



cococo«o»ooo«oo»o«o 



•g 'loop tjOng 



Ol^COCOCOW»O»O'^-^C0C0C0OICIrHTH 



'-'Oori^O©THi-iOIOIOICOCO"«3"^ 



HWM.JoX«a 



!:^g^g£(goi:gH^E5fa(goaH^g£^oaH^g£«goi3^H^ 



i{iaoiivjoX«(X 



^(NCO^«<Dt^OOO»O^JC»CO;20<Ot;»»g553g5g5^^^^^^gj 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



4th MONTH. 



APRIIi, 185d. 



30 DATS. 



MOON*8 PHASES. 



Full Moon ••• 
Third Quarter- 
New Moon • •, • 
First Quarter • 



9 40 mo. 
4 15 mo. 
7 1 mo. 
3 19 mo. 



9 28 mo. 
4 3 mo. 
6 49 mo. 
3 7 mo. 



BALTIMORE. 



9 17 mo. 
3 52 mo. 
6 38 mo. 
2 56 mo. 



CHARLES'N. 



9 4 mo. 
3 39 mo. 
6 25 mo. 
2 43 mo. 



SUN •■ msn). 



■.«.■. 
3 47 
1 27 

morning. 

11 S7 47 



K < -f •* 

S »33 

^ -4,3 



II 



j'^otOb-tsooooo'H > .H 01 <Tj< lo <o « t* t^ 00 o> OS o o '-• e^i-ioico 



^ "^ Tf O .g t^ OS O »;^ |OrHOIOICOCO'*'*0 "St^OOOSO^ | O »-i .-i Ol CO 






ii»oo»o«oo»oo»o«oo»oo«o«o»<^»oo»oo»o«o«oo«^»o»o«o«f:>»oo 



jTj-TfO.SOOOSOr-^ 2oi-tC«(NC0T»'"<*'-t>O 2^•ooo>OTH 2o»-iO»(MCO 



'^(0C0<OCO(0C0C0C0<0C0<O(0C0C0C0tOC0C0C0<0<0C0C0<0 ?0 ?0 CO ^ ^ V 






• v»M. JO ^*a 



g£«g©aH^E5£(gOSH^H£«^OSH^g£<^©S5^gfJ; 



•v«ow JO ^^a 



»-iWC0^O«0t*000SOrH(MC0"^>0«0t>.00 0S©»-H 



Sc5^c5Slc5S55S^^ 



2 £ > 

s5s5 
|e5 



^8 



jw^tot^ooooosorHTH ►^oico«o;ot^t^oo(X)o»oorH^ eOi-ioieo'* 

rH -^ ^H fl> »-^ T-< rH »-^ B 



j-^TfO.fiOOOSOi-t 2o^C»WC0'*'^'«g*W^ ^t^000»O»-H § O «-< c* OJ 

■ C^ i-H 1-H K as r-l rH C 



H 



ri tOOtOtOtOOOtOtOtOOtOtO «0 COCO5O CO ^ <0 CO CO <0 CO <0 CO CO ^ CO CO 






65 

M iJ r 4 

gSss 



jOOOSOrHi-l ►.HOIdCO'^OCOOOOSOO-^rH 2 O rH ,-1 W <N C^ "* «0 CO t^ 
■ ^^ 1—1 'HflJ 1— I t— I 1— < 1— t S 



II 



j-^-^o.SooosorH 2o'-<oieocoTj«"Tj«'^io"S^-oooso*H 2o^c*o»co 

■ *. 1-1 rH ft m 1-1 rH C 



ricocococococococococococococococococococococococococococococo 






t^'^ji-ir^oo 



"K 'TOOP •t«o8 



}^ifttf5>flcocot-t*t-ooQOOoosososooiHiHi-io<gc<cogco^^'^^' 



.,MMJox»al g£eggaH^Hfa(goaH^H£(goaH^gfat8oaH^g£ 



•n,«ow joi^al -^^^^'^'^^«><^S;3a^;aiSS^gSg$c3ag^a^SS^asg§ 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



6tli IWIOITTH. 



MAT, 1852. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASX8. 



Full Moon ••• 
Third Quarter 
New Moon ••• 
First Quarter • 



5 39 ey. 

6 39 er. 
10 31 ev. 
10 54 mo. 



i) 27 ev. 

6 27 CT. 
10 19 er. 
10 42 mo. 



BALTIM'RS 



5 16 er. 

6 16 ew. 
10 8ev. 
10 31 mo. 



CHARLSS'N. 

a. M. 

5 3 ey. 

6 3ey. 
9 55ey. 

10 18 mo. 



SUN o> MIRID. 



11 56 54 
11 56 13 
11 56 9 
11 56 41 



■^55 
1 -S5 



2 s 



u 



■ ,-11-1 » ,-1 T-l ,-1 B 






coo» 
coco 



"COtOtOtOCOCO^CDCDCOCOCOCOCOtOCOCO^COCOCOCOCOCOttCOCOCDCOt^r^ 






M S M 

o >• g «• 



II 



II 



il 



315883 ^^S^S5 e-^^'^^S^^^j^^J^^JJo^ g*^^S3J8^2S?i 

^eO'^.aOOOSO,-! §00»HOICIO»COCO"<*"2t*000>OTH goO,^,-i(N(MC0 

■ In f-li-l C 2 r-l rH B 



■ tOtO;D;DtO;D;DtO<Ob«t^t^t^t^t^t'»t^t^I>t^t'»t>b't>t-^t^t^r^ l^ t^ t^ 



«0»0«0^'^'^'^'^T*«'^'^T*«'^T*t-><J«'^-Tj«'^^'^^TI«'^'^-><J«'^'«*^'^'^Tj< 



v»Av.jo^»a 



Sf;^^A^S^S9)^^^S^S9)^^^&^£9)^^^&^S9^ 



H»uoj«joi»a 



r-<CMC0"^»CH0l-'W0»O»HCie0"^V0<0t^»0»O^ 



8c^g5S^^^^S588^$c^ 



la « • 
alfc 3 -* 



II 



H 



«0 «0 t^ 00 OS O O rH >^(M W-^OO t^t*000»0>00,^ § O O »H CO "Tj« o to 



58S5 5*^88585 gS-^J^^JSSSS^S^^^^:;:^ gSSS^IS^K 

CO-^.aoOOSO^ cOTH,-iOIOIC«COCO'^»t^OOO>OrH §00»HtHC»C>» 



9 ^ ,-t e 

r-lrH C 



rH ,-1 q 






«oSo»SoS5«o»oS-*^T»'^'^^"^"«*^"^coeococococococortrtco 



i i • 



2 ^ s 

§5^ 



0»0>0»H > »H r-< C» CO "**« O to t- 00 0» O O 1^ <N a O tH ,-1 C» CO CO "^ «0 t* 00 OS 
r-*y-* V rM T-t ,-• t-I B 



11 



^3 ^S^l^f? g^'^^S^^^g^^S .S;Sg?^^ gSS^«^i855 

CO-V.aOOOSO^ Soi-trHOKNCOCOCO"* »l>000»O»H SoOrHrMdOICO 

C ^-M-l B IS <-< rH B 






!8;S5i558^^^§^S?^:5J^^^S^2?^^J???§????3^8S^85 



N lo^p tjons 






^»>iiJ0X»Q| c8g»i^g^g£^0aH^gfa(g0i^H^H£cg0ag^gp^«g0!^ 



Imuowjoi^ttl --c^^^'^^^°°'^S:^a^;a;3S£:5S8g383gia^»KS^gg?5 



1* 



Digitized 



by Google 



10 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



6th MONTH. 



JUNE, 1852. 



30 I>ATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Full Moon ••• 
Third Quarter- 
New Moo^ • • • 
First Quarter • 



1 42 mo. 
10 31 mo. 
3 ey. 
4 3ev. 



NEW^ORK. 



1 30 mo. 

10 19 mo. 

11 51 mo. 
3 51 ev. 



BALTUfHE 



1 19 mo. 

10 8 mo. 

11 40 mo. 
3 40 ev. 



1 6 mo. 

9 55 mo. 

11 27 mo. 

3 27 ey. 



SUN OM MERID 



1 



■ - H. ■- 

11 57 ai 

11 58 58 

CT. 38 

2 21 



^ Sis 



oo 



i«0t^t^Q00>OO^ bi t-i CI CO "^ O «0 «0 t' 00 00 OS o o r-< So»-«c«co«o® 



i.aOOOSO^'H 2 O O iH 1-1 C» « CO Tj* » 00 0> 05 O T-i rH §^*-4 ,-iC)COCO 



j'-HOIO*COCO'^"n«0«0«0«0«OI>l>l>OOOOOOOaOiO>0>OiOOOOOOC 



i;S.^;S;S?E£3S?S?Sg?S?S5£S5?S§gSS§S3S;SiS;3iSiS!gJS2§S^f^ 



e o s 



II 



•^.20»OOt-i 2oOTH,-ir-iC»(MC0C0 «OOOJOO'-<i-< fiOO-^OICTCO 

fc. ,H tH rH C IS rH rH^^ tH B 



'cocowwwcococococ'ic'bcocococococococ^cocowcoco n CO CO CO CO n 



'T{99J^]0Ava 



5^gfi;«goj^^^^Fi;cgo)^^^gFi;rgoi^H^efi:^©s5^ 



•J^UOJfi jO iTQ I 



•H0IC0'^Ot0^.00O>O'-<CMC0'«*U0t0t^000>p»H 



BS&^^'S^BiS^n 



S ■* 2 

•|35 



II 



ri l^0000O>O»H^ > 1-1 CM CO "^ eO «0 t- 1- 00 OS OS O ^ »-< §OrHO«CO"^«Ot 



^OJOOggU^ ^00 5;5CO^jH^^OJ<D ^^g5COC5J;jg g§J8§S^585 
aoSOOtH §OO*-tr-ii-H(M0IC0C0 "SoOOSOOiH^ C00i-<OIOICO 



i.aosootH § 



^rH^,-l B 






'COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOWCOWCjCOCOWOjCj^WWCOCOCOCOCOCO CO CO CO CD 



i i • 
« j: s w 

« 



iO— ith ►thoioicO'^»<5«oi>ooosoO'^ 2oorHOioicO"^w^<ot^afto 

' i-Hi-lr-l q> r-l rHi-H B .- 



u 



j'^.aWOr-iTH 2©Oi-Hr-l,-H0IC»C0C0"S000»OOr-l0» 2oor-»oi~c«co 
». y-4 rH t— I B n 1— I T-t «— 1 1— < B 



II 



'NciwcocococoMcowwcococ5c5cocococo<ww 



I ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ '<J' ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ '^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^' ''^ ^ '^ ^' ^ ^ ^ ''I' ^ ^ '^ 



•K •!»•? "twie 






•nwiijoi«a 5^Hfe^o;:^H^H^tgoaH^Hfi:cgos5^ES£ig©a5^ 



muoi^ JO £^a I 



,-HC«C0'*«0«0r-000»O»HC*C0-T*««0t0t^000»Qj-J 



8c3?5S5S;^SS58Sg 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THEFAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



11 



7th MONTH. 



JUIiT, 1§53. 



31 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Full Moon . . . 
Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 
First Quarter • 
Full Moon 



BOSTON. NEW YORK. BALTIMllE CHARLES'N.i, SUN o« MERIDJ 



10 44 mo. 
3 22 mo. 

11 31 ev. 

8 18 ey. 

9 28 ev. 



10 32 mo. 
3 10 mo. 

11 19 ev. 

8 6 ev. 

9 16 ey. 



10 21 mo. 
2 59 mo. 

11 8ey. 
7 55 ey. 
9 5 ev. 



10 8 mo. ' 1 
2 46 mo. • 9 
10 55 ey. |! 17 

7 42 ey. 25 

8 52 ev. ' 



3 33 

4 54 

550 

6 12 



?3 --sa 

« 2 : 5 



j<0t-0005OO»H^ > rH d CO -^ O «0 t^ t^ 00 OS OS O rH So^OICOTflOtOt^ 



^OOgO0S0S0S0S0S00000000lr't^«0«0OOTj<'«J«e0C0(M(Mr-iOjj-jgg;jj. 






ST.| = 

PS M M O 
M € 






I? 






a 51 



31 ^^SJ'*^^^;^ g2^:2^^;: .«^^'='^"^ g^!$S5'^;^ g^ 

J .?iooo500i-<— t^ coo^fieico ©ooooosoor-i,-! SoorHOieo.soo 

■ >» 1-1 rH 1-1 i-H tH C aa rH i-H rH <-> C I- 



>i858585S85S5S;S5^^g§^^^S?3S5g3o;oJ822^$;S^;S2S^: 



• t't^t^t^t^t^t-t^t^t^i^t^t^t^t^t^t^t^t^t-t^t't-t^t^ t^t^ t^ t^ t^ t^ 






v»M.jo^«a 






Hi«oi^joi«a 



i-i<NC0'^«O<0l'00O>O'-i(Me0'^»0<0t^000»Or^ 



Sc5w83^c$c§S5c5S«w 



-iiitl 



as 



il 



M 



■ rH »-H tH q> 1—1 <-< ^^ B 



i 8^^'^??'^g;S g2:?2^g5'^ ^^5?^'^^'^?? g'^:??^^'^ g^ 

j.aooosooi-n-ii-i 2oo»H^c»co "Sooooosoo^rH 2oo^(Mco.ao 

■ C rH i-< 1-1 ^ tH C 10 1-lr-l 1-1^ B C 



si 









1 ? • 






^-J 



jOi^ > 1-t 1^ d CO CO -Tjt O « t^ 00 OS O -< »H 2 O ft 1^ d CO "^ «0 ;0 t* 00 OS O 1-" 

■i-lrHOJ i-(i-li-tC 1— li-l 



» gS?^s^^^s g^:;i'^^S'=' .;2:igc5«^'^^ i-'^t:'^^ g° 

ri .a 00 OS O O i-^ i-^ '-< cOO»Hr-lO>CO ■gOOOOOSOO^'-" cOOrMdCO.aO 



■ SSB^coSa^jco^^w^coco^^^^^^^^^^^^^^oooo 



•>I -l^p t.OTlg 



^—JA JO ^»a 






g£^oa5^E5£«^oSH^H£«g©SH^iS£«^oa5^efi:(g 



iDaoi^joXTQ 



^CM co^o«o t^ 00 oso^Hdco ;2o«t:; 00 obg5 55 g^gj^wjjg 5535^^55 



Digitized by L^OOQIC 



12 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 



8th MONTH. 



AUOUST, 1853. 



31 I>ATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 
First Quarter • 
Full Moon • • • 



8 43 ev. 

9 14 mo. 
1 18 mo. 

10 22 mo. 



8 31 ev. 

9 2 mo. 
1 6 mo. 

10 10 mo. 



BALTIH'RE. 



8 20 er. 

8 51 mo. 
55 mo. 

9 59 mo. 



CHARLXS'N. 



8 7eT. 

8 38 mo. 
42 mo. 

9 46 mo. 



SUN oa IfERID 



5 59 

5 9 
3 43 

1 45 



« 2 .-5 



U 



W 00 0S0>OO»Hi-l tZ r-i d CO »0 <0 «0 t- 00 0> 0» O tH T-l SorHCO-^O^O t-0000| 

■ rHrHi-Hi-H « r-t i~l r-l C ' 



■ rH T-l r-l i-H B « i~l »-H i-< C h* 



■i (oco co<o CO tototototDgogototo<o<o<oo<otototototp<o<o<ogo<o<o«o 






si-** 



II 



J 00 0»0>0SOOr-irH 2ot-4tHOICO ©J>000J0>OO»-i eO'-<OICO"Tj«.2t^t- 

■ r-i 1-H T-H ^H ft to r-l »-H T-H C hi 



■ t^ t- t^t^t^t^t^t^t-^t^<ototo<otototo<o<o<ootototo<o<o<o<o<oo<o 



jj^HOICO-^OtOt-OOOJOJO-^CN 






^••ALJo^^a 



©j^fi^g£<2os^^gf£:,go«5^S£^©aH^gfi:cg©SH 



11 now JO ^»a 



rHCMCO-ttOSDl^OOOJOr-^OICO 



S^:£5S2;2:^Si^S^Ss5g3§5^^^S^85S^5D 






II 



ooojoor-* 2oor-ioiTfo<or-.ooo>os 

T-H i-< tH ft 



OOOSOSOSOO^^ 2oOT-i(MCO®OOOOOSO>OOt-l §OOr-i(M-^.«2t^t- 

r-it-t r-t ^^ C CO tH rH i-H C C 



COOIi-iOOaOOtOO'^COt-lO® 



^tO?0^tO^?OtOt050tOtO*OCO CD tO 5D CO 



QpCftO»-<CMC0'^»O<0JC^000JO 






H 



1§ • 

at M ,= 4 






"§5 



8 






ti^^OJOJCOCO'^OCOt^OSOOi-l § O »H 1-1 Ol CO CO rt 
q> i-H »-l tH C 



•^ CO 









4 OO'-li-l c 
T-l i-H »-l tH S3 



C3 C3 T-l cjs; 



t^tOO-'TCO^OOit-COOCOC^ 
r-l tH tH tH 1-1 iH tH 



C^ CO <OCO to CO CO CO CO CO 






t*00O^(MC0'«fOC0t- 
»-1i-li-li-l*Hi-«i^i-l 



co^5_co 



^ CO CO CO CO 



^ 'lOftp StUng 



3je9ALJ0^^a 



mU0p^J0XlB(I 



,-HrHi— t»-<i— tr-<— ^i— It— I'^rHi-HrH 



"Tj«C0COC0(MOI(M'-t'-t'-" 



ooo 






©S^5^H£^©!^H^Hfi:^OSH^H^^O;:^H^H£cgoaH 



^<N CONOCO t^OOOO^C^ CO ;2;O2j^Q0»g55gjg5g;^^g^g5^gjH 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



13 



Hh. MOKTH. 



SEPTEMBER, 1§59. 



30 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASK8. 



Last Quarter* • 
Nevr lloon •-• 
First Quarter • 
Full Moon • • • 



1 50 cv. 
5 54 ev. 
8 33 mo. 
1 41 mo. 



NEW TORK. 



1 38 ey. 
5 42 er. 
8 21 mo. 
1 29 mo. 



1 27 ey. 

5 31 ev. 
8 10 mo. 
1 18 mo. 



CHARUES'N. 



1 14 ey. 

5 18 ev. 
7 57 mo. 
1 5 mo. 



SUN oa lUERU) 



11 59 40 
11 57 2 
11 54 14 
11 51 27 



pi 

* 2 fS 



*l 



II 



y o» o» o o 1-1 »-i ►»Heo'^»o«ot^t-ooojo©'-< ioTHC»-^o<ot*t*oooo 



j00000>0>OtH»h SoT-tW-^fSt-^-OOOOOJOTH §Or-iOICO'«i<.5»«>C^ 
■ 1-1 tH i-« B w i-H tH P h4 












H 



jOOOOO>0>0©.-i SorH<NCO"Sl^t»OOOOOSO»H»H SorHCO'*.5«0«OI> 

■ tH <-H tH C M 1-1 1-1 1-1 B ^« 






iio*o»o»o»p«o*o»ooo*ooo»oo»o*o*o*oo»oo»o»o»o«o«o*o*o»o 



•V»AV.Jo^«(I 



^&A£Qlsi&^&^&9>^^^^&S^^A^&^£9l^H^& 



•qiuow JO X»a 



^OlCO^O«.l^OOO»0;HCICO;2;0*Ot;002855g3S5^a^S5SSg? 



Ui 



ill 






iOOooa>a>oo»-« 2o«-«oieo«t^t*ooooo»oo^ 2o»Hcico.««o®t* 

• i-« i-rr-i B M tH t-i 1-1 B K 



H 



li <0»<0<0^<0<OtO<0<0<0<0<D<0©©<0©<000»0»00*0»000»0>0 



■ o*ooo*o«oooooo*o»oooo»o«o*o*oo«ooo»o*o*o»oo»o 



2 2!^ 






g 1-1 1-« 01 01 CO CO -V O t* 00 <» O tH »H |othOIOICO'**0<0000»0»-J^ ►© 



— ooi^ 2oiHOico5i^t^ooooo>a>o»H gor^dco.a**'^'^ 

tH 1-1 rH B W 1-1 tH B E^ 



■ <0«0 <0<0 CO tO<0<0<0<D<D<0<&<0<DtOtO<0<0*0*00'Q*0*0'0*0*0*0*0 



«io»o»oo«o»oo«o»o*ooo»o»ooo*o*o*o«o«o«o»o*o*ooo»o»oo 



•N*WP«««»8 



t 



>OOl*t^»»»*0«0«0'^"^COCOCOOIOICI»HTHOOJz;oQOTHf-«iHOIOICO 



•a|»»iiJO^»a 



»gtS(j8o!i^H^|gfa«goaH»g£tgoaH^g£(goaH^g 



^noH JO l«a 



^«C0^O»t-00 0»O;HC2C0;2;O»5:;002g53g5g5^^Jg55g5^g 



Digitized 



by Google 



14 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



15 



llth MONTH. 



NOTEIVEBER, 1§52. 



30 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Third Quarter- 
New Moon ••• 
First Quarter • 
Full Moon ..• 



7 57 ev. 

11 57 mo. 

9 43 mo. 

1 57 ev. 



NEW TORK. 



7 45 ey. 

11 45 mo. 

9 31 mo. 

1 45 ev. 



BALTIM'RE 



7 34 ev. 

11 34 mo. 

9 20 mo. 

1 34 ev. 



7 21 ev. 

11 21 mo. 

9 7 mo. 

1 21 ev. 



SUN •■ MERID. 



11 43 42 
11 44 2 
11 45 17 
11 47 23 



5 ^ . 

S "^ 3 5 

Vs. f t» 

2 -^ Si 



^OSOO^ ► .-I W T3« «0 «Ofct^ t^ 00 OS O O t-i 2 O tH CO -V O ;0 «0 t^ t^ 00 00 05 



^OOOSOtH 2o»HC«COO'ifO«OI>000>0^ gOt-i0IC0"^«O.2»^«0t^00 



jt^C^«0»0Tj«C00J0JrHOO 



g§8B8S5^£5S§?§JS;§;S;S;S55SSS§Sg 



■ cocococo^cococo^cococococococococotocococococococococo coco 



at >• 

g s£ 



u 









■ C0C0C0C0C0C0C0t0<0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C050C0C0<0C0C0t*t"t- 



•v»iA.jo^«a 



)^^^Sp^cgoj^5^gji;^oa5^gfe(goaH^S£<go;:^^ 



•i)iaoK JO Ira 



•H<NC0'«»W<0t*000»O^C»C0T»'OC0t*00«O;-5 



SoS85?5^^3§S^85R^ 






gl5 



-:Oi-l^ >tH WTjOCOt-OOOOOSOrHrH 2 O tH d "^ O «0 t- l^ 00 00 04 o» o 



iooo>Oi-t 2o»Hoico»o ■Sw5<ot*ooo»o»H 2or-ioicoTj«o.S»o® cot* 

' r-t 1-1 B S 1-H tH C C 






"COCD^tOOfOCO^COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOfOCOCOCOCOCOCOt^t^t^t^t^t^bo 



h SB ^-5 

to 



j»HCSI0IC0"^Ot*000>Ot-i»H 2orH(M0IC0'*i<«OI>000>OO'^»H blOi-i 
■ 1-1 tH .-^ C 1-1 .-I t-l 1.H o 



-^:s;^s g«>8^8«^ .^«£5§5S^^ g^gsjgg^ ^^^^^ 



jOOOOOO 2orM(NC0O 



» O CO t* 00 0> O »-« 20i-tOICO"Tj«0.2«OCOCOt- 
3 1-HiH C ^ 






• n CO w?5^^^^^'<J' 

riCDCOCOCOCDCOCOCOCOCO 



CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 



DOi-HOJCOTi'COt'OOOSOrH 

cocot^i^t-i^t^t^i^t^e*b-t^ 



•g ^O^p StTOIg 



0"n"«g««o«o«Ocococot^t^ 



t^ t^ 00 00 00 00 O) 






'^-JAio^'Hl\ ;^g^g£<gga^^g£^oag^g^S(goag^g£(goaH 



•ynowjo^^ttl -^g^"^'^^^«^'^S::3g3S:2SS$;SSgg$5^g^8a^SSsS^^ 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



16 THE FAMILT CHEISTIAK ALMANAC. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 17 



Trial op John Huss. — This celebrated reformer was bom near Pragfue, in 
Bohemia, about the year 1376. He was early distinguished for his piety and 
talents ; in 1400, was chosen confessor to the queen ; and in 1408, rector of the 
university. Becoming acquainted with the writings of Wickliffe, he adopted their 
vievrs, and took a decided stand against the errors and abuses of the Romish 
church. His boldness and zeal as a reformer roused the malice and rage of the 
RomanlstB, by whom he was brought to trial before the council of Constance, and 
at last burnt at the stake, on the 6th of July, 1415. 

Thb Judgment. — ^Never forget the judgment-day. Keep it always in view. 
Frame every action in reference to its unchanging decisions. 



Digitized 



by Google 



18 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Religion at Home. — "Let them, learn first," says Paul, "to show piety at 
home." Religion begins in the family. One of the holiest sanctuaries on earth 
is home. The family altar is more venerable than any altar in the cathedral. The 
education of the soul for eternity begins by the fireside. The principle of love, 
which is to be carried through the imiverse, is first unfolded in the family. 



A WEEK S WORK. 



Sunday— church doors enter in, 
Rest from toil, repent of sin ; 
Strive a heavenly rest to win. 
MoNDAT — to your calling go ; 
Serve the Loid ; love friend and foe ; 
To the tempter, answer, No. 
TuESDAT — do what good you can ; 
Live in peace with God and man ; 
Remember, life is but a span. 
"Wednesday — give away and earn ; 
Teach some truth, some good thing learn. 
Joyfully good for ill return. 



Thxtrsday — ^build your house upon. 
Christ, the mighty Comer -stone : 
Whom God helps, his work is done. 
Fkiday — ^for the truth be strong^ 
Own your fault, if in the wrong ; 
Put a bridle on your tongue. 
Satitrday— thank God and sing ; 
Tribute to his treasury bring ; 
Be prepared for Terror's king. 
Thus — ^your hopes on Jesus cast — 
Thus let all your weeks be past ; 
And you shall be saved at last. 



Christ*s Teachino on Universal Salvation. — On one occasion during our 
Saviour's ministry the question was put to him, "Lord, are there few that be 
saved ?" If Christ had been preaching the final salvation of all men, it is strange 
that such a question should have been proposed to him. Yet he manifested no sur- 
prise at it. He did not reprove or correct the inquirer for having dishonored the 
goodness of God by the supposition that any would be finally lost. He did not refer 
him to his past teachings to learn that all would be saved. Nor did Christ then 
advance the doctrine of universal salvation. Never had he a better opportunity. 
The question was directly to that point, Are there few that be saved ? What did 
he answer ? Did he say, all men shall be saved ? Did he even say, many — ^the 
great majority of mankind — shall be saved? Did he say, a just and benevolent 
God will never punish any after this life ? His answer was, " Strive to enter in at 
the strait gate " — that is, agonize to enter heaven by an incessant warfare with 
sin — "for many, I say unto you, will seek to enter in, and shall not be able." 
Whoever may preach universal salvation, and upon whatever authority, certain it 
is that Christ preached no such doctrine. 

Protestantism not Declining. — Do any tell you that evangelical Protes- 
tantism is on the decline ? How strange their error ! Every school that tells the 
story of Luther and the Reformation — every unmuzzled press — every tract that 
speaks of Christ's blood as the only atonement for and c^ncelment of sin — every 
sermon that proclaims him God and man, the one and the sufficient, and the only 
Mediator — every Protestant Bible sent on its glad errand, is a new triumph of that 
gospel, the seed and seal and warrant of yet other and future triumphs — ^is a new 
protest of a living Protestantism against the presumptuous edict that calls her 
dead, in the murderous hope of burying her alive ! Rev. Dr. Williams. 

Grace and Glory. — Grace and glory differ not so much in kind, as in degree. 
The more grace here, the more glory hereafter ; the higher in grace, the higher in 
glory. Grace differs nothing from glory but in name : grace is glory in the bud, 
and glory is grace at the full *, glory is nothing but the perfection of holiness ; 
grace is glory in the seed, and glory is grace in the flower j grace is glory militant, 
and glory is grace triumphant. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 19 



BCTuciure oi DricK, wixa a oarrea iron gaie, 
throiigh which are seen two sarcophagi of white marble, containing the remains 
of Washington and his wife. ^ Every American should visit this plac6 j and at the 
tomb of Washington resolve to cherish the hallowed spirit of him whose ashes 
rest within it. 



A Maxim of Washinoton. — ^^ Labor to keep alive in your breast that little 
spark of celestial fire, conscience ^^^ was one of a series of maxims which Washing- 
ton framed or copied for his own use when a boy. His rigid adherence to princi- 
ple, hie steadfast discharge of duty, his utter abandonment of self, his imreserved 
devotion to whatever interests were committed to his care, attest the vigilance 
with which he obeyed that maxim. He kept alive that spark. He made it shine 
before men. He kindled it into a flame which Illumined his whole life. No 



Digitized 



by Google 



20 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

occasion was so momentous, no circumstances so minute, as to absolve him from 
following its guiding ray. The marginal explanation in his account-book, in re- 
gard to the expenses of his wife's annual visit to the camp during the revolution- 
ary war, with his passing allusion to the ** self-denial " which the exigencies of 
his country had cost him, furnishes a charming illustration of his habitual exact- 
ness. The fact that every barrel of flour which bore the brand of " George Wash- 
ington, Mount Yemon," was exempted from the otherwise uniform inspectiiyi in 
the West India ports — that name being regarded as an ample guanuity of the 
quality and quantity of any article to which it was affixed — supplies a not less 
striking proof that his exactness was evetywhere understood. 

PBATEK. THE CHRISTIAN LIFE. 

Ere th« moming'f biuiy xay Liv whiU you live, th« epicure would say, 

Call yon to yoor woik away, And leize the pleasures of the present day : 

Ere ^e silent erening dose Liv whiU you Hv^ the Christian preacher cries, 

Your wearied eye in sweec repose, And giTe to God eacdi moment as it flies : 

To lift your heart and Toiee in prayer Lord, in my Tiew, let both united be ; 

Be your first and latest oare. • I lire to pleasure, while I lire to thee. 

Live for Something. — Thousands of men breathe, move, and live — ^pass off 
the stage of life, and are heard of no more. Why? None were blessed by them; 
none could point to them as the means of their redemption ; not a line they wrote, 
not a word they spoke, could be recalled, and so they perished : their light went 
out in darkness, and they were not remembered more than insects of yesterday. 
Will you thus live and die, man immortal ? Live for something. Do good, 
and leave behind you a monument of virtue, that the storms of time can never 
destroy. Write your name by kindness, love, and mercy, on the hearts of thou- 
sands you come in contact with year by year, and you will never be forgotten. 
No j your name, your deeds, will be as legible on the hearts you leave behind, as 
the stars on the brow of the evening. Good deeds will shine as brightly on the 
earth, as the stars of heaven. Br. Chalmen. 

Parental Advice. — ^The following advice was imparted to the late ex-Presi- 
dent Adams, by his mother, in 1778, in a letter to him while he was in Europe : 
^ Great learning and superior abilities, should you ever possess them, will be of 
little value and of small estimation, unless virtue, honor, integrity, and truth, are 
cherished by you. Adhere to the rules and principles early instilled into your mind, 
and remember that you are responsible to your God. Deea as you are to me, I 
would much rather prefer that you would find a grave in the ocean which yon 
have crossed, than to see you an immoral, graceless child." 

The Ebward of Diligence. — " Seest thou a man diligent in his business ?" 
says Solomon ; " he shall stand before kings." We have a striking illustration of 
this aphorism in the life of Dr. Franklin, who, quoting the sentence himself adds, 
*■'• This is true : I have stood in the presence of five kings, and once had the honor 
of dining with one." All in consequence of his having been " diligent in business " 
from his earliest years. What a lesson is this for our youth, and for us all ! 

Bad Thoughts. — Bad thoughts are worse enemies than lions and tigers ; for 
we can keep out of the way of wild beasts, but bad thoughts win their way every- 
where. The cup that is full will hold no more; keep your hearts full of good 
thoughts, that bad thoughts may fijid no room to eater. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMAKAO. 21 



"Reading the Bible to the People. — In the early part of the Eeformation 
in England, the Bible was placed in churches, commonly chained to the desk, for 
the use of the common people ; and many frequently assembled in the churches 
to hear it from those who could read. The cut represents a group of listeners 
gathered about one who is reading to them from the book of God." 

The Bible. — It is the light of my understanding, the joy of my heart, the 
fulness of my hope, the clarifier of my affections, the mirror of my thoughts, the 
consoler of my sorrows, the guide of my soul through this gloomy labyrinth of 
time, the telescope sent from heaven to reveal to the eye of man the amazing 
glories of the far distant world. Every promise in it invites me to heaven-^every 
precept commands, every exhortation urges thither — every warning alarms against 
the danger of its eternal loss. 

Mirth and Cheerfulness. — ^' Mirth is like a flash of lightning, that breaks 
through a gloom of clouds, and glitters for a moment. Cheerfulness keeps up a 
daylight in the mind, filling it with a steady and perpetual serenity.'' AddiMn. 

2* 



Digitized 



by Google 



22 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Trac Fajolt Axtak. — " Family prayer," says Cecil, " may be made a vast 
engine of power to the whole domestic circle. It says there is a Grod, and inspires 
a reverence for his character. It proclaims a life to come, and points to the spirit 
land. It fixes the idea of responsibility in the mind, while it difiiises sympathy 
through the soul. It furnishes a judicious parent with an opportunity of glancing 
at faults, where direct admonition might be inexpedient. It greatlgr conduces to 
the maintenance of family government and order, while its spiritual advantages 
are invaluable." 



A SWARM OP BEES WORTH HIVIHG. 

B p«ti«nt, B pnytrfol, B humble, B mild, B cheerfal, B grateful, B hopeful, B fixxn, 

B wiae as a Solon, B meek as a child; B peaceful, benoTolent, irilliiig to leani ; 

B studious, B thoughtful, B loTing, B kind, B courageous, B gentle, B liberal, B just, 

B sura you make matter subsenrient to mind. B aspiring, B humble, bscausk thou art dust ; 

B cautious, B prudent, B trustful, B true, B penitent, circumspect, sound in the faith, 

B courteous to all men, B friendly with few. B active, deroted, B faithful till death ; 

B temperate in argument, pleasure, and wine, B hcmest, B holy, transparent, and pure, 

B canfnl of o(mdact, of money, of time. B dependent, B Christlike, and you 'U B secure. 

Did Hs Bik for Mb ? — ^A little child sat quietly upon its mother's lap. Its 
soft blue eyes were looking earnestly into the face which was beaming with love 
and tenderness for the cherished darling. The mother's lips were busy with a 
story. The tones of the voice were low and serious, for the tale was one of min- 
gled sadness and joy. Sometimes they scarcely rose above a whisper, but the 
listening babe caught every sound. The crimson deepened on its little cheek, as 
the story went on increasing in interest. Tears gathered in its earnest eyes, and 
a low sob broke the stilbiess as its mother concluded. A moment and the ruby 
lips parted, and in tones made tremulous by eagerness, the child inquired, *^Did 
he die for me, mamma ?" "Yes, my child, for you." " May I love him always, 
mamma, and dearly too?" "Yes, my darling; it was to win your love that he 
leffc his bright and beautiful home." "And he will love me, mamma, I know he 
will. He died for me. When may I see him in his other home ?" " When your 
spirit leaves this world, my darling." " My spirit," murmured the child. " Yes, 
your spirit, that part of you which thinks and knows and loves. If you lov& him 
here, you will go to live with him in heaven." "And I may love him. here. 
How glad you have made me, deaf mamma." And the mother bowed her head 
and prayed silently and earnestly that her babe might love the Saviour. 

Indulgence of Children. — Those are mistaken who imagine that indulgence 
is the way to make children happy, and that restraint will only ten4 to damp the 
volatile spirits of childhood, or destroy the natural energy of character incidental 
to the youthful mind. No family, perhaps, is so truly and substantially happy, 
no home so peaceful and delightful, as that in which the children are under mild 
and gentle discipline, accustomed to submit themselves to those who have the rule 
over them, to be kindly afiectioned one to another, with brotherly love, and to live 
under the habitual recollection that God knows and observes every action. 



Little Kindnesses. — Small acts of kindness, how pleasant and desirable 
do they make life. Every dark object is made light by them, and every tea* of 
sorrow is brushed away. When the heart is sad and despondency sits at the 
entrance of the soul, a trifling kindness drives despair away, and makes the path 
cheerful and pleasant. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 23 



ihe Indians. During the days of the Indian warfare against the early colonists, 
such scenes were not uncommon. 



Suffering.—'* There is a great want about all Christians who have not suf- 
fered. Some flowers must be broken or bruised before they emit any fragrance. 
All the wounds of Christ sent out sweetness — all the sorrows of Christians do 
the same. Commend to me an afflicted brother, a bruised reed— one like the Son 
of man. To me there is something sacred and sweet in all suffering ; it is so 
much akin to the Man of sorrows.*' ^ 



Bb Kind to tour Mother. — "What would I give," said Charles Lamb, "to 
call my mother back to earth for one day, to ask her pardon upon my knees, for 
all those acts by which I gave her gentle spirit pain." 



Digitized 



by Google 



24 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



A God— A Moment — ^An Eternity. — ^How sad it is that an eternity, solemn 
and ever near us, should impress us so slightly as it does, and be so much forgot- 
ten 1 A Christian traveller tells us that he saw the following religious admoni- 
tion on the subject of eternity printed on a folio sheet, and hanging in a public 
room of an inn in Savoy ; and it was placed, he understood, in every house in the 
parish : *' Understand well the force of the words — a God, a moment, an eternity : 
a God who sees thee, a moment which flies from thee, an eternity which awaits 
thee ; a God whom you serve so ill, a moment of which you so little profit, an 
eternity which yo\( hazard so rashly." 



TO-DAT AND TO-MORROW. 
Don't teU m« of to-morrow ; 

But m&y I haT« grace to Mty, 
That when a good deed 's to be done, 

I will do that deed to-day. 
Don't tell me of to-morrow ; 

There 's enough to do to-day, 
That will nerer be aooompliahed 

If we throw the houie away. 
Don't tell me of to-morrow — 

If we look upon the paat, 
0, how much we have left to do 

That cannot be done at last ! 



child's evening prater. 
'Tis time to go to bed, 

And close my weary eyes ; 
But first I'll thank, for daily broad, 

My Father in the. skies. 
I fear that I this day 

Hare not obeyed my God ; 
Blest Saviour, pardon me, I pray. 

And wash me in thy blood. 
I now am very young ; 

But as I older grow, 
I hope to praise thee with my tongue, 

And more of thee to know. 



The Lioht of Nature. — The celebrated Mr. Hume wrote an essay on the 
sufficiency of the light of nature ^ and the no less celebrated Robertson wrote on 
the necessity of revelation, and the insufficiency of the light of nature. Hume 
came one evening to visit Robertson, and the evening was spent in conversing 
on this subject. The friends of both were present ; and it is said that Robertson 
reasoned with unaccustomed clearness and power. Whether Hume was convinced 
by his reasonings, or not, we cannot tell ; but at any rate he did not acknowledge 
his convictions. Hume was very much of a gentleman ] and as he was about to 
deparfc, bowed politely to those in the room, while, as he retired through the door, 
Robertson took the light to show him the way. Hume was still facing the door : 
" 0, sir," said he to Robertson, ^^ I find the light of nature always sufficient ;" and 
he continued, ^' Pray donH trouble yourself^ sir," and so he bowed on. The street 
door was open ; and presently, as he bowed along in the entry, he stumbled OYet 
something concealed, and pitched down stairs into the street. Robertson ran after 
him with a light ; and as he held it over him, whispered, ''*' You had better have 
a littler light from above, friend Hume." And raising him up, he bade him good- 
night, and returned to his friends. 

A Brahmin's Confession. — ^A wealthy Brahmin in Benares, India, not long 
since committed his son to the care of a missionary, remarking, *^ I feel convinced, 
sir, after reading your holy shasters, that they contain the true religion. I have 
not the power to come up to the purity of their precepts. But here is my son j 
take him as your child j feed him at your table ; and bring him up as a Christian." 
At the same time he made over to the missionary the sum of five thousand dol- 
lars, to defray the expenses of his son's education. 

Presumption. — A religious professor of Antinomian sentiments boasting to 
Rowland Hill that he had not felt a doubt of his safety for many yedors, was an- 
■wered by Mr. Hill, " Then, sir, give me leave to doubt for you." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILT CHRISTIAN ALMAKAO. 25 



OcKAN Steamers. — The four splendid vessels of the New York and Liverpool 
United States Mail line of steamers are of the same size, 3,000 tons each ; leng^ 
290 feet, hreadth of beam 46 feet, depth of hold 32 feet. They are the kirgest 
steam-vessels, except the iron steamer Great Britain, and perform their trips of 
3,000 miles in about 11^ days, or 260 miles per day. The cost of each is about 
$650,000, of which about $275,000 is for the engine alone. The engines are of 
great power, having 95-inch cylinders, and wrought iron wheels 35 feet in diam- 
eter. Their spacious cabins are fitted up in a style of elegance not surpassed. 

The first steamship that ever crossed the Atlantic sailed from Savannah for 
Liverpool, on the 26th of May, 1819, and made the voyage in twenty-two days. 
She was telegraphed at Liverpool as "a ship onfire^^^ and a revenue cutter was 
despatched to her relief^ when the officers and crew of the latter were struck with 
astonishment at not being able to overtake a vessel under bare poUe. At Liverpool, 
and afterwards at Copenhagen, Stockholm, and St. Petersburg, whither she went, 
she was visited by crowds of wondering people j and at the latter place a service 
of plate was presented to her officers. 

ANGRY WORDS. 
Angry -wrorda are lightly spoken Hearts inspired by -warmest feeling, 

In a rash and thoughtless hour ; Ne'er before by anger stirred, 

Brightest links of life are broken Oft are rent past hunoan feeling, 

By their deep insidious power ; By a single angry word. 

True Knowledge. — The excellent John Newton, on being asked his opinion 
on some topic, replied, " When I was young, I was sure of many things ; there 
are only two things of which I am sure now : one is, that I am a miserable sin- 
ner, and the other, that Jesus Christ is an all-sufficient Saviour." He is well 
taught who gets these two lessons by heart. 

Domestic Economy. — "Men talk in raptures," says Witherspoon, "of youth 
and beauty, wit and sprightliness ; but after seven years' union, not one of them 
is to be compared to good family management, which is seen at every meal, and 
felt every hour in the husband's purse." 



Digitized 



by Google 



26 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Thx Intidbl Confxtted. — ^A pious mother who was in the habit of catechiz- 
ing her children on Sabbath eyening, had gathered them about her in the nursery 
for that purpose, when an infidel physician who was in attendance upon her sick 
husband, entered the room and seated himself by the bedside. He heard her 
little children repeat answer after answer to the questions in the catechism, and 
at length interrupted her with the inquiry, " Madam, why do you teach your 
children such stuff ?^' Fixing lier tearful eyes on him, she said, "Sir, that it 
may preserre them from scepticism, save them, and nourish their souls when I am 
dead." He left the room trembling before the power of her faith. 

PLEASURE. PHILANTHROPT. 

With e&ntion tute the nreet Ciicean cnp ; Are we the subjects of the great First Causa ? 

He that dips oft, at last will drink it up. Then let as act obedient to his laws : 

Habits are soon assumed, but when we striTS Ours is the task to dry the falling tear, 

To strip them off, 'tis being flayed alire. And whisper sounds of mercy to the ear ; 

Called to the temple of impure delight, To comfort the distressed, relieve the poor, 

He that abstains, and he alone, does right. Nor turn the fainting beggar ftoxa the door. 

If a wish wander that way, caU it home j So shall we fill the circle Heaven assigned. 

He cannot long be safe irtiose wishes roam. And act as fellow-men to all mankind. 

Eepentahce Pays no Debts. — ^A lady being visited with a violent disorder, 
was under the necessity of calling medical assistance. Her physician was very 
latitudinarian in his notions, and endeavored to persuade his patient to adopt his 
creed as well as take his medicine. He insisted with much dogmatism that re- 
pentance and reformation were all that either God or man could justly demand, 
and denied the fact or necessity of an atonement by the sufferings of the Son of 
God. The lady had not so learned Christ ; she adopted his prescriptions, but re- 
jected his creed. On her recovery she invited the doctor to tea, and requested 
him to make out his bill. The tea-table being removed, she observed, '*My long 
illness has occasioned you many journeys, and I suppose you have procured my 
medicines at considerable expense." The doctor replied that '^ good drugs were 
expensive.'' Upon this she observed, ^' I am extremely sorry that I have put you 
to so much trouble and expense, and also promise that on any future illness I will 
never trouble you again. So you see I both repent and reform, and that is all you 
require." The doctor shrugged his shoulders, and remarked, *' That will not do fbt 
me /" ** The words of the wise are as goads." 

The best Recommendation. — A youth seeking employment went to one of 
our large cities, and on inquiring at a certain counting-room if they wished a 
clerk, was told that they did not. On mentioning the recommendations he had, 
one of which was from a highly respectable citizen, the merchant desired to see 
them. In turning over his carpet bag to ^d his letters, a book rolled out on the 
floor. *'What book is that?" said the merchant. "It is the Bible, sir," was 
the reply. " And what are you going to do with that book in New York ?" The 
lad looked seriously into the merchant's face, and replied, ^^ I promised my mother I 
would read it every day, and I thall do it,^^ and burst into tears. The merchant 
immediately engaged his services, and in due time he became a partner in the 
firm, one of the most respectable in the city. 

OuE Enemies WiTHiN.-^-Beyond all doubt, the worst of our enemies are those 
we carry about with us, in our own hearts. Adam fell in Paradise, Lucifer in 
heaven, while Lot continued righteous among the inhabitants of Sodom. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 27 



The Britannia Tubular Bridge. — This wonder of modem engineering, form- 
ing a part of the railroad firom Chester to Holyhead, is thrown over the Menai 
straits, which separate Caernarvon from the island of Anglesey. It is 100 feet 
above high-water level, and formed of long, hollow, rectangular tubes— one for up, 
and the other for down trains — composed of wrought iron boiler-plates riveted 
together, and resting on huge and massive towers of masonry. Of these tubes or 
galleries — eight in number, four for each line — the four shortest are each 230 feet, 
and the four longest each 472 feet in length. The middle and largest pier or tower, 
is 62 feet by 52 at the base, and rises majestically to a height of 230 feet. The 
workmen engaged upon this bridge, with their wives and families, were equal in 
number to the population of a moderately sized town, and had the usual provis- 
ions for large communities, of a clergyman, schoolmaster, surgeon, etc. The 
entire cost of the stupendous structure, was abOut $3,500,000. 

Work if You would Rise. — Richard Burke being found in reverie shortly 
after an extraordinary display of powers in Parliament by his brother Edmund 
Burke, and questioned by a friend as to the cause, replied, " I have been wonder- 
ing how Ned has contrived to monopolize all the talents of the family ; but then 
again, I remember, when we were at play he was always at work." The force 
of this anecdote is increased by the fact, that Richard Burke was considered not 
inferior, in natural talents, to his brother. Yet the one rose to greatness, while 
the other died comparatively obscure. DonH trust to your genius, young men, 
if you would rise, but work ! work ! 

The Gospel as an Element of PRoaRsss. — The sons of Chinese peasants 
could read and write when the princes of England were ignorant of both. China 
has since made no advance ] while England has reached a height of civilization 
that no one at that time could have formed any idea of. England has had the 
gospel, China has been without it. This accounts for their relative change of 
position. 



Digitized 



by Google 



28 THE FAMILY CHUISTIAK ALMANAC. 

Thb Teve Idba of Stewardship. — A lady, in writing to the treasurer of one 
of our benevolent societies, says, '^ I have set apart one hundred dollars, which has 
fallen to me by the death of a much-loved brother, as sacred to holy purposes. 
It could readily have been used in purchasing articles for myself and children, but 
I and they can better do with an inferior wardrobe, than perishing souls can do 
without the Bible, and without teachers." ~ 

FAITH. HOPE. 

Faith kas an eye no tears can dim, Standing on the rock of faith, 

A heart no {riefs can stir ; Trusting -what the Savioar saith, 

She bears the cross, and looks to Him Looking on the things above, 

Who bore it first for her. Hope is filled with joy and loTie. 

LOVE. 
Mortals, if ye would display 

Charity sincere and true, 
While his due to man ye pay, 

Keep your Iotb to God in view. 

The Sense of Sik Impressing the Need of Christ. — An Indian, having 
experienced a change of heart, was asked by a white man to describe how it was 
done. He replied he could not tell, but if the inquirer would go with him to the 
spot where the work was effected, he would ikow him. They went. The Indian, 
after going some distance into the woods, stopped, gathered a quantity of leaves, 
and made a circle of them. He then put a worm in the middle of it, and set it 
on fire. The worm feeling the heat, ran to one side, and then to another — it was 
on fire. After thus going from side to side in unavailing efforts to escape, he re- 
turned to the centre of the circle, and stretched himself out, apparently in despair, 
to die. At that moment the Indian caught the reptile in his hand. *' There," 
said he, *^ that was the way God did to me. I found myself a sinner ; I felt nay 
self in danger ; I saw the angry eye of God flashing upon me. I tried to escape 
on one side — ^but I met fire I I ran to the other — ^it was on fire I At last, in 
hopelessness, I gave up to die. Then Jesus Christ took my soul right up." 

Faith. — " Faith," says Jeremy Taylor, " is a certain image of eternity. All 
things are present to it. Things past and things to come are all so before the 
eyes of faith, that he in whose eye that candle is enkindled, beholds heaven as 
present, and sees how blessed a thing it is to die in God's favor, and to be chimed 
to the grave with the music of a good conscience. Faitii converses with the 
angels, and antedates the hymns of glory : every man that hath this grace, is as 
certain that there are glories for him, if he perseveres in duty, as if he had heard 
and sung the blessed thanksgiving song for the blessed sentence of doomsday." 

Educate ! Educate ! — The whole number of persons convicted of crimes in 
the state of New York, from 1840 to 1848, inclusive, was 27,949. Of these, 1,183 
were returned as having received a common education ; 441 as having a tolerably 
good education, and 128 only as well educated. Of the remaining 26,225, about 
half were able merely to read and write ; the residue were destitute of any edu- 
cation whatever. 



SxoNiFxcAHT Fact. — Although the Jesuits have been engaged in the work of mis- 
sions among the heathen more than two hundred years, not an instance is on record 
where they have sought to accomplish their work by translating the Scriptures into 
the language of the people. Popery has no greater enemy than the Bible. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



29 



'Am 






mm 



' r'f'' 



■.«,i4 



pf 






The "Crystal, or Glass Palace," prepared for 
the "World's Fair," or gpreat industrial exhibition of 
1851, is 1,848 feet long, by 456 in width. The height 
of the three roofs is 64, 44, and 24 feet ; and that of 
the transept, 108 feet. The ground floor occupies 
752,832 superficial or square feet ; and the galleries, 
102,528 feet, making, in all, an exhibiting surface 
of some 21 acres, with a length of tables of about 
eight miles. There are 3,500 cast and wrought iron 
columns, varying from 14^ to 20 feet in length; 
2,224 cast-iron girders, and 1,128 supporters for the 
galleries. The glass necessary to cover this immense 
building, is 900,000 square feet ; the length of sash- 
bars is 205 miles j and there are 34 miles of gutters 
to carry off" rain-water to the hollow colunms, through 
which it passes into drains or sewers under ground. 
The total cost of the building is estimated at about 
$800,000. 

Contributions op Missions to Science. — An 
Intelligent and able writer, speaking of the scientific 
discoveries of Protestant missionaries, says, "The 
researches of men whose primary object was the proc- 
lamation of the gospel to the benighted nations, 
have proved that the Niger, like all other sensible 
rivers, flows into the ocean ] that the Chinese lan- 
guage, though unique, is extremely simple in its con- 
struction, and can be mastered by Europeans ; that 
religious toleration is a possibility even in Turkey ; 
that the supposed omnipotence of Hindoo caste can 
be displaced by social parity ; and that the walls of 
bigotry and prejudice which have been reared to 
heaven against the entrance of Occidental commerce 
and civilization, will fall to the ground like those of 
Jericho, before the advancing hosts sent out to the 
East by British and American philanthropists." 

Universal Equality. — " There is but one way 
of securing universal equality to man — and that is, 
to regard every honest employment as honorable, 
and then for every man to learn in whatsoever state 
he may be, therewith to be content, and to fulfil with 
strict fidelity the duties of his station, and to make 
every condition a post of honor." 

Be a Man in Your Principles. — Cherish a love 
for justice, truth, self-conlarol, benevol^ice. Swerve 
not firom the right for any present advantage. In 
all circumstances ahow thyself a man in unflinching 
rectitude. 



Digitized 



by Google 



30 THE FAMILT CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Hoe's Eight-Cylindee Power-Press. — This immense printing machine is 
33 feet long, 14 feet 8 inches high, and 6 feet wide. It has one large central 
cylinder on which the type is secured, and eight smaller cylinders arranged around 
it, at convenient distances. Eight persons supply the eight small cylinders with 
the sheets, and at each revolution of the large cylinder eight impressions are g^ven 
off, the sheets being delivered in neat order by the machine itself. The limit to 
the speed is in the ability of the eight persons to supply the sheets. At the rate 
of 2,500 sheets to each, the press would give off the unparalleled number of 
20,000 printed impressions per hour. The press is used exclusively for news- 
papers, or similar printing. 

Beautiful and True. — The late eminent Judge Sir Allan Park once said at 
a public meeting in London, ^^ We live in the midst of blessings till we are utterly 
insensible to their greatness, and of the source from whence they flow. We speak 
of our civilization, our arts, our freedom, our laws, and forget entirely how large 
a share is due to Christianity^ Blot Christianity out of the page of man's history, 
and what would his laws have been^-what his civilization ? Christianity is mixed 
up with our very being and our daily life; there is not a familiar object aroimd us 
which does not wear a different aspect because the light of Christian love is on it — 
not a law which does not owe its truth and gentleness to Christianity — ^not a cus- 
tom which cannot be traced, in all its holy, healthful parts, to the gospel." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 31 

IcEBEBGS, OR IcE MOUNTAINS, as the woid signifies, are formed at sea by the 
accumulation of ice and snow, and sometimes seem to be vast glaciers, which have 
been piled up on shore, till they have broken and fallen into the ocean by their 0¥m 



XI- tu- 



rn 
I 
it 
t< 

a 
u 
n 
t] 



What is God ? — In an early meeting of one of the committees of the West- 
minster Assembly, the subject of deliberation was to frame an answer to the 
question, ^^ What is God?" Each man felt the imapproachable sublimity of the 
divine idea suggested by these words ; but who could venture to give it expression 
in human language ! All shrunk from the too sacred task in awe-struck, reveren- 
tial fear. At length it was resolved, as an expression of the committee's deep 
humility, that the youngest member should first make the attempt. He con- 
sented; but begged that the brethren first unite with him in prayer for divine 
enlightenment. Then in slow, solemn accents he thus began his prayer : "0 God, 
thou art a spirit, infinite, eternal, and unchangeable in thy being, wisdom, power, 
holiness, justice, goodness, and truth.'' When he ceased, the first sentence of his 
prayer was immediately written down and adopted, as the most perfect answer 
that could be conceived j as, indeed, in a very sacred sense, God's own answer, 
descriptive of himself. This individual, it is supposed, was George Gillespie. 

Christianity. — ^If ever Christianity, says Eobert Hall, appears in its jwwer, 
it is when it erects its trophies upon the tomb ] when it takes up its votaries 
where the world leaves them, and fills the breast with immortal hope in dying 
moments. 



Digitized 



by Google 



32 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Evil Company. — The following beautiful allegory- is translated from the Ger- 
man. Sophronius, a wise teacher, would not suffer even his grown up sons and 
daughters to associate with those whose conduct was not pure and upright. 
"Dear father," said the gentle Eulalia to him one day, when he forbade her in 
company with her brother, to visit the volatile Lucinda — "dear father, you must 
think us very childish if you imagine that we should be exposed to danger hj it." 
The father took in silence a dead coal from the hearth, and reached it to his 
daughter. " It will not burii you, my child ; take it." Eulalia did so, and behold, 
her beautiful white hand was soiled and blackened, and, as it chanced, her white 
dress also. " We cannot be too careful in handling coals," said Eulalia, in vex- 
ation. "Yes, truly," said the father, "you see, my child, that coals, even if they 
do not bum, blacken j so it is with the company of the vicious." 

MORAL COSMETICS. 

Ye who wotild have your features florid, Seek not in Mammon's worship pleasnn, 
Lithe limbs, bright eyes, unwrinkled forehead, But find your richest, dearest treasure, 

From age's devastation horrid, In God, his word, his work, not leisure : 

Adopt this plan — The mind, not sense, 

'TwiU make, in climate cold or torrid, Is the sole scale by which to measnie 

A hale old man. Your opulence. 

Avoid in youth luxurious diet, This is the solace, this the science, 

Restrain the passions' lawless riot ; Life's purest, sweetest, best appliance, 

Devoted to domestic quiet, That disappoints not man's reliance, 

Be wisely gay ; Whate'er his state ; 

So shall ye, spite of age's fiat, But challenges, with cailm defiance, 

Resist decay. Time, fortune, Cate. 

A Mother's Prayers. — Forty years ago, on the mountains of western Mas- 
sachusetts, a mother with eight children, five of them under the age of fourteen, 
was left to trust in the widow's God and the Father of the fatherless. She called 
them around her regularly, and led them in family worship; and often at the 
dead of night her low voice was calling on her heavenly Father to have mercy 
upon them. Before the youngest had reached the age of twenty-one, all except 
one son had hope in Christ. That son early in life left the family to learn a 
trade; but on becoming of age, he found himself amid the outpouring of the 
Spirit ; the sound of his mother's voice at midnight, when he slept in the chamber 
with her, reached his heart. He, too, found peace in Christ, and has long been a 
pillar in the church, and superintendent of the Sabbath-school in a new settlement. 
The mother still lives in peace and quiet, waiting till her change come ; her chil- 
dren are supposed to be all yet living, handing down her influence to the third gen- 
eration, and willing to aid their mother ; but she has a competence of this world's 
goods. Such is the history of a praying widow and her childr^i for forty years. 



Property. — Property left to a child may soon be lost ; but the inheritance of 
virtue — a good name, an unblemished reputation — ^will abide for ever. If those 
who are toiling for wealth to leave their children, would but take half the pains 
to secure for them virtuous habits, how much more serviceable would they be. 
The largest property may be wrested from a child, but virtue will stand by him 
to the last. 



Comfortable. — '"It is comfortable," says Philip Henry, "to reflect upon an 
affliction borne patiently, an enemy forgiven heartily, and a Sabbath sanctified 
uprightly." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 33 



Making Maple Sugar. — The sugar-maple is a beautiful tree, reaching the 
height of seventy or eighty feet, the body straight, for a long distance free from 
limbs, and three or four feet in diameter at the base. It grows in colder climates, 
between latitude 42 and 48, and on the Alleghanies to their southern termination, 
extending westward beyond lake Superior. The wood is nearly equal to hickory 
for fuel, and is used for building, for ships, and various manufactures. When 
tapped as the winter gives place to spring, a tree, in a few weeks, will produce 
five or six pailful s of sap, which is sweet and pleasant as a drink, and when 
boiled down will make about half as many pounds of sugar. The manufacturer, 
selecting a spot central among his trees, erects a temporary sl^elter, suspends his 
kettles over a smart fire, and at the close of a day or two will have fifty or a 
hundred pounds of sugar, which is equal to the common West Lidia sugar, and 
when refined equals the finest in flavor and in beauty. When the sap has been 
boiled to a syrup and is turning to molasses, then to candy, and then graining 
into sugar, its flavor is delightful, especially when the candy is cooled on the 
snow. On this occasion the manufacturer expects his wife, children, and friends, 
if near, to enjoy the scene. The person in the engraving is represented as blowing 
the candy or wax, to ascertain how far the boiling has advanced. 

Prater. — "I acknowledge no master of requests in heaven,'^ says Bishop Hall, 

"but one, and that is Christ, the only Mediator. I cannot be so happy as not to 

need him ] nor so miserable that he will contemn me. Good prayers never came 

weeping home. I am sure I shall either receive what I ask, or what I should ask." 

Not what vre urishy but what we wont, 

Let mercy stiU supply ; 
The good we ask not, Father, grant — 
The ill we ask, deny. 

A Sententious Saying op Br. Withe rspoon. — ^Not to hit a mark, is to miss 
it : almost to be persuaded to be a Christian, is to remain an impenitent sinner ; 
almost to enter the gate of heaven, is to sink down to hell. 



Digitized 



by Google 



34 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Punctuality. — A committee of e]|(ht gentlemen had been appointed to meet 
at twelve o'clock. Seven of them were punctual j but the eighth came bustling 
in with apologies for being a quarter of an hour behind the time. ^^ The time," 
said he, *^ passed away without my being aware of it. I had no idea of it being 
BO late.'' A Quaker present said, ^' Friend, I am not sure that we should admit 
thy apology. It were a matter of regret that thou should' pt have wasted thine 
own quarter of an hour, but there are seven besides thyself whose time thou hast 
also consumed, amounting in the whole to two hours, and one eighth of it only 
was thine oum property ^ 

THE COURSE OF LIFE — Translated firom the Spanish. 



Oh, let the ■onl its slumber break, 
Arouse its senses and awake, 

^To see how soon 
Life with its glories glides away, 
And the stem footstep of decay 
Comes stealing on : 

How pleasure, like the passing wind, 
Blows by, and leares us naught behind 

But grief at last ; 
How still our present happiness 
Seems, to the wayward fancy, less 

Tham what is past. 
Our liTes like hasting streams must be, 
That into one engulfing sea 

Are doomed to fall — 
The sea of Death, whose wares roU on, 
0*er king and kingdom, crown and throne. 

And swallow aU. 



Alike the river's lordly tide. 
Alike the humble streamlets glide 

To that sad wave ; 
Death levels poverty and pride. 
And rich and poor sleep side by side 

Within the grave. 

Our birth is but the staning-place, 
Life is the running of the race, 

And death the goal; 
There all our steps at last are brought. 
That pa& alone, of all unsought, 

Is found of all. 

To thee, God, my thoughts arise ; 
Thou great, eternal, good, and wise. 

To thee I cry : 
Gird me &e race of life to run ; 
And give me then the victors crown, 

With thee on high. 



A B»oTAL Lesson on Humanity. — Queen Caroline, wife of George 11., being 
informed that her eldest daughter, afterwards Princess of Orange, was accustomed, 
at going to rest, to employ one of the ladies of the court in reading aloud to her 
till she should drop asleep, and that on one occasion the princess suffered the lady, 
who was indisposed, to continue the fatiguing duty until she fell down in a swoon, 
determined to inculcate on her daughter a lesson of humanity. The next night, 
the queen, when in bed, sent for the princess, and commanded her to read aloud. 
After some time her royal highness began to be tired of standing, and paused, in 
hopes of receiving an order to be seated. " Proceed," said her majesty. In a 
short time a second pause seemed to plead for rest. *^ Eead on," said the queen 
again. The princess again stopped, and again received an order to proceed, till 
at length, faint and breathless, she was forced to complain. Then said this ex- 
cellent parent, "If you thus feel the pain of this exercise for one evening Only, 
what must your attendants feel who do it every night ? Hence, learn, my daugh- 
ter, never to indulge your own ease, while you suffer your attendants to endure 
unnecessary fatigue." 

How TO Know a Fool. — ^A fool, says the Arab proverb, may be known by 
six things : anger without cause, speech without profit, change without motive, 
inquiry without object, putting trust in a stranger, and not knowing his friends 
from his foes. 

Promptness and Enekgt. — " Cromwell did not wait to strike until the iron 
was hot, but made it hot by striking. ^^ 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMAKAG. 36 



View op San Frai^cisco. — All are familiar with the iinparalleled rapidity 
with which this city has sprung into heing on the Pacific coast. The hay on 
which it is situated furnishes one of the most safe and commodious harhors in the 
world ] the Sacramento river connects it with the interior j and the gold region 
has attracted to it adventurers from every quarter of the glohe. Its population is 
probahly 30,000 or 40,000, comprising men of all nations, languages, and religions j 
yet already churches are organized, a healthful moral influence exerted, and we 
hope the providence of God will make the sudden settlement of the Pacific coast 
the means of more rapidly spreading the gospel throughout the world. The en- 
graving is copied by permission from a fine print, published by N. Currier, 150 
Nassau-street, New York. 

Sleep. — "Sleep," says Sir Thomas Brown, "is so like death, that I dare not 
commit myself to it, without first conmiitting myself to God in prayer." In a 
hymn that he composed on the subject, are the following lines : 

*' Sleep is a death : make me try, And thus assured, behold I lie 

By sleeping, what it is to die ; Securely, or to waike or die. 

And as at last I lay my head These are my drowsy days ; in vain 

Upon my grave, as no-w my bed, I now do wake to sleep again. 

Where'er I rest, great God, let me come that hour, when I shall never 

Awake again, at last, with thee. Know sleep again, but wake for ever." 

A Word to Mothers. — ^In the evening, when your children have prayed for 
pardon and peace, endeavor to infuse the spirit of that beautiful expression of the 
Psalmist, " I will both lay me down in peace and sleep j for thou, Lord, only 
makest me to dwell in safety." At no thne is the influence of a mother more 
valuable, than when her children are retiring to rest. 

Volcanoes. — There are now about 303 burning volcanoes in the world, of 
which 194 are on islands, and 109 on continents. 



Digitized 



by Google 



36 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Thb Home of Taste. — ^How easy it is to be neat — ^to be clean. How easy 
to arrange the rooms with the most gracefiil propriety. How easy it is to invest 
our houses with the truest elegance. Elegance resides not with the upholsterer 
or the draper ; it is not put up with the hangings and curtains ; it is not in the 
mosaics, the carpetings, the rosewood, the mahogany, the candelabra, or the mar- 
ble ornaments ; it exists in the spirit presiding over the apartments of the dwelling. 
Contentment must always be most graceful; it sheds serenity over the scene of 
its abode : it transforms a waste into a garden. The home lighted by these inti- 
mations of a nobler and brighter life, may be wanting in much which the discon- 
tented desire ; but to its inhabitants it will be a palace, far outvying the oriental 
in brilliancy and glory. 



Hms a neighbor injured yon T 

Don't fret- 
Yon "will yet come off the best ; 
He's the most to answer for, 
Nerer mind it, let it rest : 

Don't fret. 
Has a horrid lie been told ? 

Don't fret; 
It will mn itself to death ; 
If yon let it quite alone, 
It will die for want of breath : 

Don't fret. 



*DON T FRET. 



Are yonr enemies at work ? 
Don't fret— 
They can't injure you a whit ; 

If they find yon lieed them not, 
They will soon be glad to quit : 

Don't fret. 
Is adrersity your lot ? 

Don't fi«t— 
Fortune's wheel keeps turning roond, 

Every spoke will reach the top, 
Which, like you, is going down : 
Don't fret. 



Education. — "He that has found a way," says Locke, "to keep a child's 
spirit easy, active, and free, and yet at the same time to restrain him from many 
things he has a mind to, and to draw him to things that are uneasy to him — he, 
I say, who knows how to reconcile these seeming contradictions, has, in my opin- 
ion, got the true secret of education." 

Worth Heeding. — ^If men gave three times as much attention as they now 
do to ventilation, ablution, and exercise in the open air, and only one third as 
much to eating, furnishing, and late hours, the number of doctors, dentists, and 
apothecaries, and the amount of neuralgia, dyspepsy, gout, fever, and consump- 
tion, would be changed in a corresponding ratio. Mankind would rapidly present 
the aspect, not only of a far healthier and thriftier, but a far more beautiful and 
more virtuous race. 



A Lawyer's Opinion of Law. — A learned judge being once asked how he 
would act if a man owed him ten pounds and refused to pay him, replied, 
"Rather than bring an action, with its costs and uncertainty, I would give him 
a receipt in full of all demands — ^yea, and I would send him, moreover, five pounds 
to cover all possible costs." 

An Old Saying Amended. — " You are rather late this morning, William,'* 
said good Mr. Risewiththesun to a laggard apprentice who came at a late hour. 
"Yes, sir J but * better late than never' is an old saying," replied William. ^*^ Bet- 
ter never late^^^ said the master, "is an axiom of far more worth, though it may 
not be so old." 



A Happy Thought. — ^It is difficult to conceive any thing more beautiful than 
the reply given by one in afiUction, when he was asked how he bore it so well. 
" It lightens the stroke," said he, " to draw near to Him who handles the rod." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



37 



Peace in Believing. — ''I am now most thoroughly of the opinion," says Dr. 
ChalmerB, '^ and it is an opinion foimded on experience, that on the system of * Do 
this and live,' no peace, and even no true and worthy obedience, can ever be 
attained. It is * Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved.' 
When this belief enters the heart, joy and confidence enter along with it. The 
righteousness which we try to work out for ourselves eludes our impotent grasp, 
and never cwi a soul arriv^ at true or permanent rest in pursuit of this object. 
The righteousness which, by faith, we put on, secures our acceptance with God 
and our interest in his promises, and gives us a part in those sanctifying influ- 
ences, by which we are enabled to do, with aid £rom on high, what we never can 
do without it. We look to God in a new light j we see him as a reconciled 
Father ; that love to him which terror scares away, reenters the heart, and with 
a new principle, and a new power, we become new creatures in, Jesus Christ." 

THE TEST OF DEATH. 



The glories of our birth and state 

Are shadows, not substantial things : 
There is no armor against fate, 
Death lays his icy hand on kings ; 
Sceptre and crown 
Must tumble down, 
And in &e dust be equal made 
With the poor crooked scythe and spade. 

Some men with swords may reap the field, 
And plant fresh laurels where they kill ; 

But their strong nerves at last must yield. 
They tame but one another still. 



Early or late 

They stoop to fate, 
And must give up their murmuring brea&, 
When they, pale captiyes, creep to death. 

The garlands wither on your brow ; 

Then boast no more your mighty deeds : 
Upon death's purple altar now 
See where the victor-victim bleeds ; 
All heads must come 
To the cold tomb : 
Only the actions of the just 
Smell sweet and blossom in the dust. 



The Universalist Silenced. — A few years since, a Universalist in one of 
the western states, .who did not pretend to be a moral man, met a mhiister of the 
gospel, and commenced addressing him, in the presence of a large number of peo- 
ple, on his favorite doctrine, saying a great deal about what Christ had done for 
all mankind. The minister heard him through, and then said, " Friend, if you 
are a reasonable man, I will convince you from your own words that Jesus Christ 
never did any thing for you. Now, what do you say Christ came into the world 
for?" " To save us firom our sins." "Well, he certainly has not done that for 
you, since you are committing sin every day." "He saves us firom the punish- 
ment of sin." " But you have just told me that you receive the punishment of 
your sins every day, as you go along j and he certainly has not saved you from 
hell, for you said, but a moment ago, that there is no such thing as hell !" The 
Universalist was glad to retreat in silence. 

Justification by Faith. — Sir James Mackintosh says in his journal, " The 
Calvinistic people of Scotland, of Switzerland, of Holland, and of New England, 
have been more morai than the same classes among other nations. Those who 
preached faith, or in other words, a pure mind, have always produced more pop- 
ular virtue than those who preached good works, or the mere regulation of out- 
ward acts." 



The Bible, the Chukch, the School, and the Newspaper. — A Bible and 
a good newspaper in every house, a good school in every district, and an evan- 
gelical church in every neighborhood, and all appreciated as they should* be, are 
the sure support of virtue, morality, civil liberty, and pure religion. 



Digitizes by VjOOQIC 



38 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Malay's Test of Honesty — worth trying. — A Ne"vr England sea-captain 
who visited "India beyond the Ganges," was boarded by a Malay merchant, a 
man of considerable propeity, and asked if he had any tracts he could part with. 
The American, at a loss how to account for such a singular request from such a 
man, inquired, "What do you want of tracts ? you cannot read a word of them." 
" True, but I have a use for them, nevertheless. Whenever one of your country- 
men, or an Englishman, calls on me to trade, I put a tract in his way and w^atch 
him. If he reads it soberly and with interest, I infer that he will not cheat me : 
if he throws it aside with contempt, or a profane oath, I have no more to do with 
him : I cannot trust him." 



• THE CARRIER-BIRD. 



The bird let loose in eastern skies, 

When hast'ning fondly home, 
Ne'er stoops to earth her wings, nor flies 

Where idle warblers roam. 
But high she shoots through air and light, 

Above all low delay, 
Where nothing earthly bounds her flight, 

Nor shadow dims her way. 



So grant me, God, from every care 

And stain of passion free, 
Aloft, through virtue's purer air, 

To hold my course to thee. 
No sin to cloud, no lure to stay 

My soul, as home she springs — 
Thy sunshine on her joyful way. 

Thy freedom on her wings. 



Ejaculatory Prayer requires not the sanctuary, the more retired circles, 
nor the closet, although in either, it may, and ought to be offered j but by the 
way-side, in the thronged streets, amid the cares of commerce and of trade, or 
in the social enjoyments of life, it is not only appropriate, but seems the only 
resort for keeping up close communion between the soul and heaven. A single 
wish of the inmost spirit, a groan uttered, an unspoken sentence, a yearning of 
the heart directed to the throne above, may reach the ear of Him who never fails 
to guard his tried and tempted one ; and bring the blessing down just at the mo- 
ment when it is most needed. Under the sudden invasion of anger, envy, pride, 
lust, covetousness, revenge, despondency, let the heart go right up in an instant 
to your great Leader, and there shall come the needed help. 

Thane God for Your Reason. — An individual, as he was passing along^ the 
streets of London, was accosted by a stranger with the question, " Did you ever thank 
God for the use of your reason ?" " No," was the reply, " I never thought of doing 
it." "Well, do it quickly," rejoined the stranger, "for I have lost mine." For 
years after reading the account of the above occurrence, we have no recollection 
of ever kneeling in prayer without rendering distinct and express thanks to the 
Father of mercies for the continued possession of this inestimable blessing. 



Moral Evil. — I remember once being in company with the excellent Mr. 
Newton, when a forward young man asked him, " Pray, sir, what do you think 
of the entrance of moral evil ?" " Sir, I never think about it," he said j "I know 
notiiing about it. I know there is a remedy for it ; and there, sir, all my know- 
ledge begins, and all my knowledge ends." 

Adversity. — Adversity exasperates fools, dejects cowards, draws out the fac- 
ulties of the wise and industrious, puts the modest to the necessity of trying their 
skill, awes the opulent, and makes the idle industrious. 

Politeness. — Somebody says that politeness is like an air-cushion: there 
may be nothing in it, but it eases our jolts wonderfully. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 39 

Which is the Happiest Season ? — At a festal party of old and young, the 
question was asked, "Which season of life is the moat happy?" After being 
freely discussed by the guests, it was referred for answer to the host, upon whom 
^Mras the burden of fourscore years. He asked if they had noticed a grove of trees 
before the dwelling, and said, " When the spring comes, and in the soft air the 
buds are breaking on the trees, and they are covered with blossoms, I think. How 
beautifid is Spring ! And when the summer comes, and covers the trees with its 
heavy foliage, and singing birds are among the branches, I think. How beautiful 
ia Summer ! When autumn loads them with golden fruit, and their leaves bear 
the gorgeous tint of frost, I think, How beautiful is Autumn ! And when it is sere 
winter, and there is neither foliage nor fruit, then I look up through the leafless 
branches, as I never could until now, and see the stars shine." 

THE LITTLE CHILD's MORNING HYMN. 

The morning bright, All through the day, 

With rosy light, I humbly pray, 

Has vaked me from my slee]) ; Be thou my guard and guide ; 

Father, I own My sms forgive. 

Thy love alone And let me live, 

Thy little one doth keep. Blest Jesus, near thy side. 

Take no Thought for the Morrow. — " If the most anxious and unhappy 
men of the world," says Dr. Chalmers, "were examined as to the ground of their 
disquietude, it would be found, in nine himdred and ninety-nine cases out of the 
one thousand, that the provision of this day was not the ground of it. They carry 
forward their imaginations to a distant futurity, and fill it up with the spectres 
of melancholy and despair. What a world of unhappiness would be saved, if 
* the things ' of the day, its duties, employments, and services, were to occupy 
all our hearts ; and as to to-morrow, how delightful to think that we have the 
sure warrant of God for believing, that by committing its issue in quietness to 
him, when the future day comes the provision of that day will come along with 
it. What I would like to press upon all who are beset with anxietie? about the 
future days they are to live in this world is, that daily bread is one of the objects 
it is agreeable to the will of God that we should ask, for it is the very petition 
which the Son of God taught his disciples. We have a full warrant, then, for 
believing that we shall get it, and according to the faith of our prayer so will it 
be done unto us/' 



The Way to Dispose of Anger. — It is said of the Rev. Mr. Clarke of Ches- 
ham, when .one observed to him that "there was a good deal in a person's natu- 
ral disposition," he made this answer : "I am naturally as irritable as any; but 
when I find anger, or passion, or any other evil temper arise in my mind, imme- 
diately I go to my Redeemer, and, confessing my sins, I give myself up to be man- 
aged by him. This is the way I have taken to get the mastery of my passions." 

Self-reliance. — Were we to ask a hundred men, who from small beginnings 
have attained a condition of respectability and affluence, to what, under Gf>d, 
they imputed their success in life, the general answer would be, " It was from 
!>eing early compelled to think for and depend on ourselves." 

The Entrance op Sin. — Most sins begin at the eyes / by them, commonly, 
Satan creeps into the heart : that man can never be in safety that hath not cove- 
nanted with his eyes. 



Digitized 



by Google 



40 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Habit. — "I trust ev«ry Idling, under God," says Lord Brougham, "to habit, 
upon which, in all ages, the lawgiver, as welL as the schoohnaster, has mainly 
placed his reliance ; habit which makes every thing easy, and casts all difficulties 
upon the deviation from, the wonted course. Make sobriety a habit, and intem- 
perance will be hateful and hard ; make prudence a habit, and reckless profligacy 
will be as contrary to the nature of the child grown an adult, as the most atro- 
ciour crimes are to any of your lordships. Give a child the habit of sacredly regard- 
ing the truth — of carefully respecting the property of others — of scrupulously 
abstaining from all acts of improvidence which can involve him in distress, and he 
will just as likely think of rushing into the element in which he cannot breathe, 
as of lying, or cheating, or stealing.'' 

RESOLUTION. PLEASURE. 

The wise and active conquer difficulties Pleasure, like quicksilTer, is bright and coy ; 

By daring to attempt them. Sloth and folly We strive to grasp it with our utmost skill ; 
Shiver and sink at sights of toil and hazard, Still it eludes us, and it glitters still : 

And make the impossibility they fear. If seized at last, compute your mighty gains; 

What is it but rank poison in your veins? 

Enjoyment of Life. — Two wealthy gentlemen were lately conversing in 
regard to the period when they had best enjoyed themselves. " I will tell you," 
says one, " when I most enjoyed life. Soon after I was twenty-one, I worked for 

Mr. , laying stone wall, at ttoenty cents per ddyV " Well," replied the other, 

"that does not differ much from my experience. When I was twenty, I hired 
myself out at seven dollars per month. I have never enjoyed myself better since." 
The experience of these two individuals teaches, first, that one's happiness does 
not depend on the amount of his gains or the station he occupies; second, that 
very small beginnings with industry and prudence may secure wealth. 

Insanity from Novel-Reading. — A physician in Massachusetts says, "I 
have seen a young lady with her table loaded with volumes of fictitious trash, 
poring, day after day and night after night, over highly wrought scenes and skilfully 
portrayed pictures of romance, until her cheeks grew pale, her eyes became wild 
and restless, and her mind wandered and was lost — the light of intelligence passed 
behind a cloud and her soul was for ever benighted. She was insane, incurably 
insane, from reading novels." 

Simplicity. — "How admirable," says Racine, "is the simplicity of the 
Evangelists. They never speak injuriously of the enemies of Jesus Christ, of lus 
judges, nor of his executioners. They report the facts without a single reflection. 
They comment neither on their Master's mildness when he was smitten, nor on 
his constancy in the hour of ignominious death, which they thus describe, * And 
they crucified Jesus.' " 

Death of Children. — Those who have lost an infant are never, as it were, 
without an infant child. The other children grow up to manhood and woman- 
h(K)d, and suffer all the changes of mortality j but this one alone is rendered an 
immortal child ; for death has arrested it with kindly harshness, and blessed it 
into an eternal image of youth and innocence. 

Doing Good with Property. — By doing good with his money, a man as it 
were stamps the image of God upon it, and makes it pass current for the mer- 
chandise ^of heaven. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 41 

ORiom OF Popish Errors. — Roman-catholics often talk of the antiquity of 
their religion, but the followmg dates of the origin of their peculiar doctrines and 
practices will show them to be too modem for a scriptural Christian to receive : 

Canonization of Saints- --'• A. D. 903 

Baptism of Balls " 1000 

Transubstantiation " 1000 

Clerical Celibacy " 1015 

Indulgences " 1190 

Dispensations " 1200 

The Inquisition " 1204 

Confeswon " 1215 

Elevation of the Host " 1222 



Holy Water A. D. 120 

Penance " 157 

Monkery " 328 

LatinMass " 394 

Extreme Unction " 658 

Puiigatory " 693 

Invocation of Vir. Mary and of Saints " 694 

Papal Usurpation " 607 

Kia«in£the Pope's toe " 709 

ImageWorship *^ 715 



Jehovah and Baal — A Historical Curiosity. — In 1788, a clergyman, who 
was vicar of a parish in Shrewsbury, England, ordered the removal of a picture 
of the crucifixion which had long been suspended in his church, and which he 
believed was regarded by some as an object of worship. On the day following its 
removal, the Roman-catholic priest issued the following lampoon, which was 
circulated over the whole town : 

" The parson's the man, 
Let him say -what he can, 
Will for gain leave his God in the lurch : 
Could Tscariot do ijaore, 
Had it beenln his power, 
Than to turn his Lord out of the church ?" 
It may easily be supposed, that on one part of the community this would have 
its effect ; but the worthy vicar soon gave evidence that he possessed wit as well 
as his neighbor, for he immediately replied, 

" The Lord I adore But since you bemoan 

Is mighty in power, This God of your own. 

The only one living and true ; Cheer up, my disconsolatw brother ; 

But that Lord of yours, Though it seems very odd, 

That 7 turned out of doors. Still, if this be your god, 

Had about as much knowledge as you. Mr. Burley* can make you another." 

* A celebrated painter in Starewabnry. 

The Gayety of the Wicked. — The affected gayety of a wicked njan is like 
the flowery surface of mount .£tna, beneath which materials are gathering for 
an eruption that will one day reduce all its beauties to ruin and desolation. 

Br. Pranklin, in sununing up the domestic evils of drunkenness, says, 
" Houses without windows, gardens without fences, fields without tillage, bams 
without roofs, children without clothing, principles, morals, or manners." 

Sabbath-Breakers cannot be Trusted. — A distinguished merchant, a great 
judge of character, once said, " When I see one of my apprentices or clerks riding 
out on the Sabbath, on Monday I dismiss him. Such a one cannot be trusted.'' 

JEFFERSON'S TEN PRACTICAL RULES OF LIFE. 

1. Never put off till to-morrow what can be done to-day. 

2. Never trouble others to do what you can do yourself. 

3. Never spend your money before you have it. 

4. Never buy what yon do not want because it is cheap. 

5. Pride costs as much as hunger, thirst, and cold. 

6. We never repent of eating too little. 

7. Nothing is troublesome that we do willingly. 

8. How much pain those evils cost us that never happen. 

9. Take things by their smooth handle. 

10. When angry alvnjt count ten before yon speak. 



Digitized 



by Google _ 



42 



THB FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



RESIDENCE. 



!l 



1^ 
5-3 



George Washington - - 

John Adams 

Thomas Jefferson 

, James Madison 

James Monroe 

John Qnincy Adams - 

Andrew Jackson 

Martii> Van Buren — 
William H. Harrison - 

John Tyler 

James K.Polk 

Zachary Taylor 

Millard Fillmore 



Virginia 

Massachusetts - 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Mauachusetts- 

Tennessee 

New York ---- 

Ohio 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Louisiana 

New York-- -- 



1732 
1735 
1743 
1751 
1758 
1767 
1767 
1782 
1773 
1790 
1795 
1784 
1800 



1789 
1797 
1801 
1809 
1817 
1825 
1829 
1837 
1841 
1841 
1845 
1849 
1850 



Deo. 14, 1790 
July 4, 1896 
July 4, 1826 
June 28, 1836 
July 4, 1831 
Feb. 23, 1848 
June 8, 1845 



AprU 4, 1841 



June 15, 1849 
July 9, 1850 



GrovBRNMENT OF THB United States. — The sixteenth Fresidentisl term of four 
began on the 4th oC March, 1849, and will expire on the 3d of March, 1853. 

MILLARD FILLMORE New York President Salary $ 

- Vice-President " 

DANIEL WEBSTER Massachusetts -- Secretary of State " 

THOMAS CORWIN Ohio Secretary of the Treasury " 

CHARLES M. CONRAD Louisiana Secretary of War " 

WILLIAM A. GRAHAM North Carolina - Secretary of the Nary " 

A. H. H. STEWART Virginia Secretary of Home Department - " 

.NATHAN K. HALL New York Postmaster-General " 

JOHN J. CRITTENDEN Kentucky Attorney-General " 



yean 

25,000 
5,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
4,000 



Congress. — The Senate ii composed of two members elected by the legrislature of each 
state for the term of six years. Of course the number of Senators is now sixty-two. The 
Vice-President of the United States is President of the Senate. In his absence, a President 
pro tempore is chosen by the Senate. 

The House of Representatives is composed of representatives from each state, in the 
ratio of one to every 70,680 of the population. The present number of members is two hun- 
dred and thirty-two. And there are two delegates, one from Oregon, and one from Minesota, 
who have a right to speak, but not to vote. The compensation of the members is $8, and 
that of the Speaker $16 per day during the session, and $8 for every twenty miles' travel 
in going and returning. 

Supreme Court. — Chief Justice, Roger B. Taney of Maryland, salary $5,000. Associate 
Justices, John McLean, Ohio ; James M. Wayne, G-eorgia ; John McKinley, Kentucky ; John 
Catron, Tennessee ; Peter V. Daniel, Virginia ; Samuel Nelson, New York ; Levi Woodbury, 
New Hampshire ; Robert C. Grrier, Pennsylvania : salary $4,500. This Court is held in Wash- 
ington, and has but one session annually, conmiencing on liie first Monday in December. 

Circuit Courts — The United States are divided into nhie judicial circuits, in each of 
which a Circuit Court is held semi-annually, by a Justice of the Supreme Court, and the 
District Judge of the state or district in which ^e court sits. 

District Courts. — The United States are also divided into forty-three districts, in which 
District Courts are held by thirty-five judges. 

Intercourse with Foreign Nations. — The pay of Envo3r8 Extraordinary and Miniiten 
Plenipotentiary, is $9,000 per annum as salary, in addition to $9,000 as outfit. The pay of 
Charges d'Afiaires is $4,500 per annum ; of Secretaries of Legation, $2,000 ; of Ministers 
Resident, $6,000. The United States are represented by Ministers Plenipotentiary at the 
courts of G-reat Britain, France, Russia, Prussia, Spain, Mexico, Brazil, Grermany, and Chili; 
and by Charges d' Affaires at the courts of most of the other forei^^ powers witJi which this 
country is connected by commercial intercourse. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMAHAC. 43 

Thx MnfT. — The Mint is located at Philadelphia, and has hranches in Louisiana, G^eor- 
fp&, and North Carolina. Coinage in 1850, at Philadelphia, of gold, $27,756,445 ; of silyer, 
S4O9,600, and of copper, $40,435; total gold depositee $33,150,000, of which $31,500,000 
'waji from California. Coinage at New Orleans, of gold, $3,619,000, and of silver, $1,456,500 ; 
deposits of gdid, $4,647,314, and of silver, $1,305,413. 

RsvxNiTS Aim ExpsNDiTirRBs OF GovxRNMKNT, for the year ending June 30, 1850. 



BBCBIPTS. 

From Customs $39,668,686 

PubUc Lands 6,859,894 

Misoellaneous sources 1,847,218 

Treasury Notes and Loans 4,045,950 

In Treasury, July 1,1849 2,184,964 



Total $49,606,713 



SXPSNDITUKSS. 

Cash $39,355,268 

Treasury Notes fnnded 3,646,900 



Total $43,002,168 



Estimated receipts for year ending June 30, 1851, $54,312,594 ; expenditures, $53,853,507. 
On the 30th November, 1850, the public debt was $64,228,228. The average annual expen- 
ses of the government, exclusive of trust funds, the Pott-office department, and the public 
debt, including the collection of the revenue, has been as follows : the average expenses of 
the three years ending June 30, 1845, was $25,410,180 ; the average of the three years end- 
ing June 30, 1848, was $45,729,888, and the average of the three years ending June 30, 1851, 
(taking the estimates of appropriations for the year 1851,) $41,207,251. 

Brftish Eevsnue and ExPBNDiTimE, FOR THE TSAR SNDiNO Jaiwart 5, 1850. — Re- 
ceipts, $264,758,740; Expenditures, $254,268,110. 

Post-Office statistics for the year ending June 30, 1850. — Number of Post-offices, 
18,417 ; extent of 5,590 mail-routes, 178,672 miles ; annual transportation, 46,541,423 miles ; 
gross receipts, $5,552,971 ; expenditures, $5,212,953 ; new Post-offices opened, 1,979. 

Post-Office in G-rsat Britain The gross receipts of the British Post-office for the 

year ending January 5, 1850, were $11,065,745 ; cost of management, $6,536,440 ; net reve- 
nue, deducting charges other than msmagement, $4,203,935. The number of letters sent 
was between 3 and 4,000,000 ! and the number of money orders issued, was 4,248,891 ; thus 
transmitting for the convenience of the people, $40,763,215. When will the people of the 
United States require their representatives in Congress to give them postage as cheap as in 
Grreat Britain ? 



Maaketic Telegraph...— On the 1st of March, 1851, it is estimated that there were in 
the United States about 15,000 miles of the Magnetic Telegraph, worked according to 
Morse's system ; and about 11,000 miles, worked chiefly on the systems of House and Bain. 

Railroads. — ^According to a careful estimate, it is supposed that there will be in the 
United States, on the 1st of January, 1852, about 10,618 miles of railroads in actual opera- 
tion, having cost some $350,000,000. And according to an estimate of Dr. Lardner's, the 
length of railways throughout ijie world must have been, in January, 1851, about 26,000 
miles ; costing, in all, the enormous sum of $2,000,000,000 ! 

Lighthouses. — In July, 1850, the lighthouse establishment of the United States num- 
bered 315 lights in lighthouses, and 40 floating-lights, attended in all by 346 keepers, exhib- 
iting over 3,000 lamps, and supported at an annual expense of $141,1^. 

Census of the United States. — In 1790, the Union consisted of seventeen states, with 
a population of 4,929,827, and 451,424 square miles of land, or nine persons to a square mile. 
Ia 1820, there were twenty states, with a population of 5.305,040, uid an area of 572,024 
square miles, or eight persons to a square mile. In 1810, there were twenty-four states, 
-with a population of 7,239,414, and an area of 782,544 square miles, or nine persons to a 
square mile. In 1829, there were twenty-seven states, with a population of 8,738,191, and 
an area of 849,314 square miles, or ten persons to a square mile. In 1830, there were twenty- 
seven states, with a population of 12,866,020, and an area of 949,314 square miles, or thir- 
teen persons to a square mile. In 1840, there were twenty-nine states, witii a population 



Digitized 



by Google 



44 THE FAMILr CHEISTIAK ALMANAC. 

of 17,068,666, and an area of 1,173,344 square miles, or fourteen persons to a square mile. 
We hare now thirty-one states, containing a population (by estimate) of 21,687,000, and an 
area of 1,913,125 square miles, or twelve persons to the square mile. 

Adtancb or PowxR to thx Wbst. — Dr. Patterson of the Philadelphia Ifint, has pub- 
lished some useful tables, which show the centre of representative population in the United 
States at each census, from 1790 to 1840, inclusive. By these tables, it appears that the 
centre of representative population in 1790, was 46 miles north and 22 east of Washington, 
in Baltimore county, Muyland. In 1800, the centre was 64 miles north and 30 west of 
Washington, in Adams county, Pennsylvania. In 1820, it uvas 47 miles north and 71 west 
of Washington, in Morgan county, Virginia. In 1830, it was 43 miles north and 108 west 
of Washington, in Marion county, Virginia. By these calculations, the accuracy of which 
we see no reason to question, the representative power, in its rapid and accelerated move- 
ment westward, has for fifty years kept nearly the same parallel of latitude. In that time it 
has moved 10 miles south, and 182 miles westward. The advance westward was as follows : 



From 1820 to 1830 37 mUas. 

3^ to 1840 52 " 



From 1790 to 1800 13 miles. 

" 1800 to 1810 39 

« 1810 to 1820 41 

The calculation is that the census of 1850 now being taken, will show the centre of rep- 
resentative population in the state of Ohio. 

Exports and Imports »or the trar ending June 30, 1850. — Of Imports : 



Cottons $19,896,164 

Silks 17,079,619 

Woollens 15,966,784 

Iron and Steel 23,100,607 

Salt 1,237,186 

Silk and Worsted 1,653,809 

Flax and Linens 8,095,022 

Sugars 7,555,145 

Coffee 11,215,076 



Teas - $4,588,373 

Guano 91,948 

Coal 378,817 

Spirits 3,166,841 

Total $173,306,010 

Gold Bullion and Specie 10,857.962 

Silver Bullion and Specie 2,852^136 



Total $187,018,108 

Domestic Exports: Agricultural, $115,902,263 ; of all other kinds, $21,044,649. Total, 
$136,946,912; leaving against the United States the enormous balance of $50,169,196 ! 

MiLrriA, Armt, and Navt. — The enrolled Militia of the United States, numbers 2,006,068 
men, or an average of over 60,000 to each state. Pennsylvania has the largest number, 
276,070, and Delaware the smallest, 9,229. The Regular Army, as at present established 
by law, should be 12,326, officers and privates, though from desertions, sickness, eto., the 
effective force is supposed to be less than 9,000 men in all. The Navy consists of 7 shipx 
of the line, 12 frigates, 27 sloops, brigs, and schooners, 14 steam frigates and steamers, and 
5 store-ships. The total number of officers and men of all descriptions, 8,415. 

British Army and Navt — On the 1st January, 1851, the Army of Q-reat Britain con- 
sisted of 114,451 men, of whom 52,402 are stationed in Great Britain and Ireland, 27,030 
in the East Indies, and 35,019 in the colonies. Her Navy consists of 339 sailing, and 161 
steam vessels, besides 47 steam-packets, which may be used for warlike purposes. 

Cost of thr Mrxican War — Mr. Corwin, Secretary of the Treasury, estimates the total 
cost of the Mexican war, direct and indirect, at the enormous sum of nearly $300,000,000 ! 
What a sum to be swallowed up in blood ! 

Coal-Tradr The amount of coal sent to market from the Pennsylvania anthracite 

regions in 1850, was 3,127,083 tons. 

Thr First Cobocxrcial Nation. — The London Correspondent of the New York Herald, 
states that the commercial tonnage of England is 3,130,000 tons. If so, the United States 
will stand as the first commercial nation in the world, as her tonnage on the 30th of June, 
1850, was as follows: registered tonnage in foreign trade, 1,585,711 tons; vessels in coast- 
ing trade, 1,797,824 tons; fishing vessels, 151,918; in whale fishery, 146,016 tons. Total 
3,681,469 tons. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILT CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 46 

Cai^utorii lA Flbbt The whole number of clearances from the United States for Califor- 
nia, in the year 1850, was 565, of which 181 were from New York, and 170 from Boston. 

Our IivLAND "Waters. — The aggregate valuation of the lake trade of the United States, 
for the year 1848, (imports and exports,) amounted to the large sum of $186,484,905, or more 
by $40,000,000, than the whole foreign export trade of the country. The aggregate tonnage 
employed on the lakes of the United States, is equal to 203,041 tons, of which 167,137 tons 
are American, and 35,904 tons BHtish. 

Kmioration ^According to official statements, the emigration to the United States in 

1850, was 315,333, which is an increase of 15,723 over that of the preceding year. 

GOMPARATIVB DbMOCRACT OF EnGLAIO), FrAKCK, AND VBS UnITBD StaTBB. — 

CouBtiy. Population. No. Yotas. 

England 17,000,000---630,721---1 in 26 

"Wales 830,000--- 37,924 --1 in 23 

Scotland 2,800,000--- 72,720- - -lin 38 

Ireland 8,000,000--- 98,006-1 in 81 



Yoteeto 
Popula'n. 

Prance 34,000,000- - - 250,000- -1 in 137 

United States- -20.000,000- - 2.750,000- - -1 in 7 



Stbamboat BuiLniNo. — The annual report on commerce and navigation, gives the fol- 
lowing aggregate of the nimiber of steamboats built in tlie United States since 1824 — twenty- 
five y«irs, in periods of five years each : 



From 1824 to 1829 194 

1829 to 1834 304 

1834 to 1839 504 



From 1839 to 1844 522 

" 1844 to 1849 960 



Total 2,492 

Two-thirds of these were built in the west, one-sixth of them in Ohio. 

Factoribs in Gtreat Britain. — According to official returns, there were in G-reat Brit- 
ain in 1850, of all kinds of factories, 4,330, containing 26,638,716 spindles, and 298,916 power- 
looms. The moving power employed was 107,113 in steam, and 26,104 in water. The 
total number of children under 13 years of age employed in factories, who attend school, was 
19,400 boys, and 15,722 girls. The total number of males employed, between 13 and 18, 
was 67,894 ; that of females above 13, was 329,577 ; and that of males above 18, was 157,866. 
The total number of persons of both sexes employed in factories, was 596,082. 

Cotton Manutactttrbs in thb Unitbd States. — It is estimated that the annual pro- 
duct of all the cott<m mills in the United States, is 250,000,000 yards, and the consumption 
of cotton at 600,000 bales ; 100,000 bales of which are consumed south of the Potomac and 
in the Western states. The value of this amount oi cotton when manufactured, is suppos- 
ed to be upwards of sixty-seven iqillions. 

Progress or Manufactxtreb — The increase of manufacturing industry in G-reat Britain 
in sixty years, is shown by the following table of the raw materials used in tliat kingdom : 



In 179a In 1849. 

Wool 3,245,352 lbs. 76,756,183 lbs. 

Silk 1,253,445" 6,881,861" 

Hemp 592,306 " 1,061,273" 



In 1790. In 1849. 

Flax 257,222 lbs. 1,806,786 Iba. 

Cotton 30,574,374 « 758,841,650 « 



British Woollen Mantttactures. — The declared value of British Woollen Manufac- 
tures exported from the United Kingdom in 1849, according to parliamentary returns, was 
je7,342,723, or over $36,000,000. The quantity of wool, foreign and colonial, imported in 
the same period, was 75,113,347 lbs., of which 12,234,415 lbs. were reexported. There were 
also imported 1,655,300 lbs. of Alpacca and Lama wool, of which 126,082 lbs. were reexported ; 
and 2,530,039 lbs. of goat's wool or Mohair, of which 130,145 lbs. were reexported. 

The Slavb-Tradb — ^Official returns made to the Foreign office in London, show that 
from the year 1840, to the year 1848, inclusive, 594 vessels containing 37,824 slaves, were 
captured by the British squadron, and 556 of them condemned. It has been estimated by 
the English statician McQueen, that the loss sustained by slave-traders in consequence of 
the captures or presence of African cruisers, from the year 1800 to 1847, was j£30,240,000. 



Digitized 



by Google 



46 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Imfoetatioit of WnrxB. — ^According to the report of the Secretary of the Treasiuy, it 
appears that of Madeira wine there were imported in 1850, 303,125 gaUons ; and in 1849, 
193,971 gallons ; while in no previous year since 1843, did the quantity exceed 117,000 gal- 
lons, and in 1844, it was only 16,000 gallons. The quantity of Sherry wine imported in 
1850, was 212,092 gallons ; in 1849, it was 215,935 ; and in no previous year since 1843, 
did it exceed 77,000 gallons. 



Banks iif th« Unttbd Statxs — '. 
ers' Magazine, showing the condition 

NaBka. Circulation. 8p«cie. 
Maine ... ■32- |2,300,000- • $424,000- f 
N. H. .-.-22- -1,700,000.-- 150,000 - -I 
Maw. - - -102- - -9,600,000- - - 645,000 -H 
Boston . - 30- . -6,000.000. .2,100,000 - -2 
Vermont 27- - -2,300,'00O- - - 120,000- . -1 
R.l8land 38 .1,100,000— 130,000 --J 
Pn)Tidence23- - -1,400,000. . - 130,000. . -I 
Conn.- -.-41- -6,200,000--- 880,000-21 
N. York 152 -18,000,000- - . 880,000- -2( 
N.Y. city-28- - -6,400,000-10,740,000- -2 
N. Jersey -25-. -2,900,000--- 690,000 -.-i 
Pennsyl'a 58- - -7,000,000- -2,500,000- i 
PhUadel'alS- - -4,130,000- -4,000,000- -H 

Wisconsin 1 • 

Texas 1 

Maryland 12- - -1,210,000- - - 400,000- - - 
Baltim'e -12- - -2,068,000- -2,127,000- - -: 



-The following table is compiled from the Boston Bank- 
of and total number of Banks in the United States : 

~ ' ' No.Bka. Circulation. Speci*. CapitnL 

TL-.-l 200,000 

M. -1 100,000 

... .35- - -7,000,000. - -2,300,000- -- -9,913,100 
C. -19- -.-3,600,000- -1,600,000- ---3,650,000 
:j.- -14. .. .6,090,000- -2,200,000- - 11,431,183 
>.- -17 -- -1,000,000- - -1,600,000- -- -5,329,213 
0-67- -10,366,000- - -2,750,000- - - -7,425,171 
... .14. .. .3,300,800- - -1,280,000- - -2,082,910 

I... 23-... 6,680,000- -2,680,000 9,180,000 

m. -21- - - -4,000,000- - -1,500,000- - - -7,165,197 

C. -4 900,000---- 300,000- ---1,182,300 

. ---9 900,600--- 250,000-. -.1,440,000 

ISC- -6- ---2,600,000- -1,900,000 1,258,751 

>h. --6 650,000---- 116,000- ---1,150,000 

lis'a-S- . - -4.200,000- - -7,300,000- - -13,267,120 

,. - .-2 200,000 

al 863 $120,505,400 $51,446,000 $230,897,500 



SAvnfos-BAitKs IN Gtrxat Britain. — The number of Savings-banks in Great Britain, on 
the 20th of November, 1849, was 588 ; number of depositors, 1,065,031 ; total amount de- 
posited, $148,037,615. 

IxsANK FxBsoKs IN England AND Walss. — The total number of insane persons in Eng- 
Und and Wales, on the 1st January, 1849, was 14,560, of which 6,852 were males, and 7,708 
females ; and of the whole number, 10,801 were paupers. 

NxwsPAPXB Statistics. — United States — It is estimated that in the United States 
there are about 250 daily papers published, and about 2,500 tri- weeklies, semi-weeklies, and 
weeklies ; and that the aggregate number of copies of newspapers annually distributed through 
the United States, is the enormous figure of 412,880,000. Great Britain ^In Crreat Brit- 
ain there are about 600 papers published. In London, 160 ; in the provincial towns of Eng- 
land, 232 ; in Scotland and Ireland, 211. Russia — The number of newspapers and peri- 
odicals now published in Russia, is 154 ; of which 64 are published in St. Petersburg, 12 at 
Moscow, 5 at Odessa, 22 in the province of the Baltic, and 50 in the rest of the empire. 
Of those 154 publications, 108 are in the Russian language, 29 in the G-erman, 8 in the 
French, 5 in the Polish, 3 in the Latin, and 1 in the Italian. Belgium. — The number of 
periodicals — daily, weekly, and monthly — now published in the kingdom of Belgium, is 180. 
Prussia — From a statistical report of the periodical press in Prussia, it appears that, up 
to June of last year, there existed within the Prussian monarchy, 809 periodical publications 
of different kinds, political and non-political. Of newspapers, tiiere were 159 conservative 
and governmental, 201 oppositional, and 167 neutral, undecided, and wavering. There were 
282 scientific, technical, and literary periodicals. Of the above number, 93 were published 
in Prussia, 21 in Posen, 82 in Brandenburgh, 77 in Berlin, 55 in Pomerania, 131 in Silesia, 
114 in the province of Saxony, 67 in Westphalia, 159 in the Rhine provinces. From the 
above we obtain the following results : United States, 2,750 ; Oreat Britain, 603 ; Russia, 
154 ; Belgium, 180 ; Prussia, 809 ; total, 4,496. In the United States, supposing the pres- 
ent population to be 25,000,000, our estimate gives 16^ newspapers a year for every man, 
woman, or child. In the British empire proper, a newspaper is published for every 12,000 
of the inhabitants. In Belgium, one to every 25,000 inhabitants. In Russia, about three 
newspapers to each 1,000,000. In Prussia, one to every 20,186. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 47 

ANNIVERSARIES AND OFFICERS OF CHARITABLE SOCIETIES, ETC. 

BOSTON.— Amsbicak Board for Forbion Missions, 2d Tnes. in Sept. ; Rer. Rufos Andsnon, 
D. D., Rer. Selah B. Treat, Rer. Swan L. Pomroy, D: D., Seo'i ; Henry Hill, Esq., Treas., Miss. 
Hoase, 33 Femberton-iquare. ; A. Merwln, Agent in New York, 150 Naasan-st. AMXRiCAif Bap- 
TWT Miss^RT Uniow, 3d Thurs. in May ; Rer. Solomon Peck, D. D., Rer. Edward Bright, Set^s, 33 
Someraet-flt. Amrrican Edtcatioic Society, in May ; Rer. Increase M. Tarbox, Beo. ; S. T. 
Farvrell, Treas., 15 Cornhill. American Tract Soc. at Boston, last Wed. in May ; Rer. Seth 
Bliss, Seo., 28 Cornhill. Prison Disciplinx Soc., Rev. L. Dwight, Sec. ; Chas.^. Mills, Treas., 
39 Milk-st. Massachusetts Hoius Missionary Soc., Rev. J. S. Clark, Sec, 28 C<Hnhill. Mass. 
S^BVATH-ScHOOL SociSTT, RsY. Asa BuUard, Sec, 13 Cornhill. 

NEW YORK.— American Bible Soc., 2d Thurs. in May ; Rer. John C. Brigham, D. D., Rev. Jo- 
seph Holdioh, D. D., See's ; J. Hyde, Esq., Gen. Agent and Assist. Treas., 115Nas8au-8t. American 
AXD Foreign Bible Socett, Rer. S. S. Cutting, Cor. Sec, U. D. Ward, Dep. Agt., 350 Broome-st. 
AicBRiCAN Bible Union, Wm. H. Wyckoff, Esq , Cor. Sec, 90 Chamhers-st. American Tract 
Soc., Wed. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rer. Wm. A. Hallock, Rev. 0. Eastman, Rer. R. S. Cook, Cor. 
Sec^s ; O. R. Kingsbury, Assist. Sec and Treas., 150Nassan-st. American Home Missionary Soc., 
Wed. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. Milten Badger, D. D., Rev. Chas. Hall, D. D., Rer. David 
B. Coe, See's ; H. W. Ripley, Assist. Treas., 150 Nassau-st. Amer. Baptist Home Mission Soc., 
Rev. Benj. M. Hill, Cor. Sec., 354 Broome-st. Board or Foreign Missions of Pres. Church, 
Hon. Walter Lowrie, Rer. John C. Lowrie, Cor. See's; Wm. Rankin, Jr., Treas., 23 Centre-st. 
American and Foreign Christlin Union, Tues. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rst. Robert Baird, 
D. D., Rer. E. R. Fairohild, D. D., Cor. See's, Edward Vernon, Gen. Agent and Assist. Tr., 150 
Nassau-st. Amer. Seamen's Friend Soc., Mond. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rey. John Spaulding, 
Rat. Harmon Loomis, See's, 82 Wall-st. Amer. Temperance Union, Roy. John Marsh, Cor. Sec, 
149Nassan-st. Prot. Epis. Chitrch Missions— Domestic Committee, Rer.W. T. Webbe, Loo. Sec. 
Foreign Committee, "Her. J. W. Cooke, Sec. and Gen. Agent, 2 Park-place. Methodist — ^Book 
Concern, Rer. Geo. Lane and ReT. Leyi Scott, Agents, 200 Mulberry and 138 Nassau sts. ; Mission- 
ary Soc, Rev. J. P. Durbin, Cor. Sec, Geo. Lane, Treas., 200 Mnlberry-st. ; Sunday-School Union 
R«T. D. P. Kidder, Cor. Sec, 200Mulberry-st. Reformed Dutch— Domestic Mission, John S. Bus- 
sing, Treas., 32 Cliff-st. ; Foreign Mission, Charles L. Little, Treas. Central American Edu- 
cation Soc., Wm. A. Booth, Treas. Society for Coll. and Theol. Ed. at West, Rsy. Theron 
Baldwin, Sec, M. Wilbur, Treas., 41 Liberty-st. Amer. Missionary Assoc., Rev. Geo. Whip- 
ple, Cor. Sec. ; Lewis Tappan, Treas., 48 6eekman-st. Amer. and For. Anti-Slavery Soc., L. 
Tappan, Cor. Sec, 48 6eekman-st. New York Colonization Soc., Rev. J. B. Pinney, Cor. Sec, 
Brick Ch. Chapel. Am. Soc. for Jews, Roy. E . R. McGregor, Cor. Sec, Brick Ch. Chapel. New- 
York AND Amer. Sunday-School Union, J. C. Meeks, Agent, 147 Nassau-st., and 38 Park^row. 

PHILADELPHIA.— American Sunday-School Union, Tues. after 3d Thurs. in May ; F. W. 
Porter, Cor. Sec. ; F. A. Packard, Esq., Rec Sec, 146 Chesnut-st. General Assemrly's Boards, 
at the Publication Rooms, 265 Chesnut-st — ^Domestic Missions, Rot. C. C. Jones, D. D., Cor. Seo ; 
Board of Education, Rev. C. Van Rensselaer, D. D., Cor. Sec ; Board of Publication, Rot. Joseph 
Leybum, D. D., Cor. Sec ; ReT. W. M. Engles, D. D., Editor ; Joseph P. Engles, Agent. Amer- 
ican Baptist Publication Society, 31 North-Sixth-st. ; Rer. Thos. T. Malcom, Sec, Roy. J. N. 
Brown, Ed. Secj Rot. Benjamin R. Loxley, Gen. Agent. Philadelphia Tract Society, Wm. 
C. Chambers, Agt., South-sixth-!>t., near Market. Phtla. Education Soc., 4th Thurs. in May ; 
Rer. James R. Eckard, Sec'y. Psuladblphia Home Missionary Society,* 4th Wed. in May ; 
ReT. Robert Adair, Sec, 142 Chesnut-st. 

WASHINGTON.— Amer. Colonization Society, 3d Tues. in Jan. ; Rot. Wm. McLain, Seo. 

MINISTERS' MEETINGS.— General Convention in Mains, Tues. before fourth Wed. in 
June. General Association, New Hampshire, 4th Tues. in Aug. General Convention in 
Vermont, 3d Tues. in June. General Association, Massachusetts, 4th Tues. in June. Evan- 
gelical Consociation, Rhode Island, 2d Tues. in June. General Association, Connecticut, 
3d Tues. in June. General Association, New York, Thurs. before last Sabbath in Aug. Gen- 
eral Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Chxtrch, 1st Wed. in October. General As- 
sembly Presbyterian Ch., 3d Thurs. in May. General Conference Methodist Epis. Ch., 
every 4th year from 1840. General Synod Reformed Dutch Ch., on the 1st Wed. in June. 

YEARLY MEETINGS OF FRIENDS.— New England Yearly Meeting, held at Newport, 
Rhode Island, begins second day after second sixth day dt sixth mouth. State of New York 
Yearly MSeting, New York City, second day after fourth first day in fifth month. Philadelphia 
Yearly Meeting, third second day in fourth month. Baltimore Yearly Meeting, last second 
day in tenth month. Virginia Yearly Meeting, third seventh day in fifth month, at Cedar Creek 
in 1839 ; at Somerton in 1840 ; and so alternately at these places. Carolina Yearly Meeting 
is held at New Garden, Guilford county, second day after first first day in eloTenth month. Ohio 
Yearly Meeting, Mount Pleasant, second day after first first day in ninth month. Indiana 
Yearly MsxTiNfl, Whitewater, on fifth day preeeding first first day in tenth month. 



Digitized 



by Google 



43 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

STANDARD BOOKS FOR THE FAMILY. 

PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY. 

THE RELIGIOUS (OR PASTOR'S) LIBRARY, 24 vols. 12 mo., price $10, containing 
10,831 pages, vrith a number of handsome steel portraits, viz. : FlavePs Fountain of Life, Method 
of Grace, and Christ Knocking at the Door ; Baxter's Saints' Rest, and Reformed Pastor ; The Riches 
of fiunyan ; Owen on Forgireness of Sin, or PSalinl30 ; Bishop Hall's Scripture Historj ; Bishop Hop- 
kins on the Ten Commandments ; Venn's Complete Duty of Man ; President Edwards' on ReviTals ; 
Willison's Afflicted Man's Companion and Grosvenor's Mourner ; Paley's Natural Theology and 
Hora Paulina ; Olinthus Gregory's Letters on Infidelity ; Nelson on Infidelity ; Dr. Spring's BiUe 
not of Man ; Memoir of Dr. Milnor ; Memoir of Snmmei^eld ; Memoir of Mrs. Isabella Graham ; 
Memoir of Mn. Sarah L. H. Smith ; D'Aubign^'s History of the Reformation, four volumes. 

THE YOUTH'S LIBRARY, 70 vols. 18 mo., price ^10, containL-^g 9,630 pages in fine paper, 
printing, and binding, with 255 highly finished frontispieces and engravings, viz. i F*^wp?A More's 
Cheap Repository Tracts, 8 vols, with 52 illustrations ; Peep of Day ; Line upon Line^; Precept upon 
Preeept ; The Night of Toil ; Fletcher's Lectures to Children, 2 vols. ; Child's Book on the Sabbath; 
Abbott's Child at Home ; Gallaudet's Youth's Book of Natural Theology ; Charlotte Elizabeth's Per- 
sonal Recollections ; Memoir of Anzonetta R. Peters ; Missionary's Daughter ; Legh Richmond's 
Letters and Counsels ; Memoir of Caroline E . Smelt ; Advice to a Young Christian ; Young Man 
from Home ; Memoir of Charles H. Porter ; Scudder's Tales about the Heathen ; Dairyman's Daugh> 
ter, etc. ; Gallaudet's History of Jonah, and Child's Book on Repentance ; Trees, Fruits, and Flowers 
of the Bible ; Memoir of Henry Obookiah ; Conversion of Jessie Little ; Scripture Alphabet of Ani- 
mals ; Memoir of Nathan W. Dickerman ; Spoiled Child, etc. ; Wilberforce Richmond ; YUlage in 
the Mountains, etc ; Memoir of Mary Lothrop ; Little Henry, etc. ; The Widow's Son, etc. ; Let- 
ters to Little Children ; Eliza Cunningham, etc. ; Memoir of John M. Mead ; Memoir of Charles 
L. .Winslowj Great Truths; Pastor's Daughter; Shepherd of Salisbury Plain, etc. ; Peet's Scrip- 
ture Lessons ; Putnam and the Wolf, etc. ; Walker's Faith Explained, and Repentance Explained ; 
Elizabeth Bales ; Grace Harriet ; Mary of Toulouse, etc. ; Adopted Daughter ; Memoir of Eliza 
Astor Rumpflf ; Clementine Cuvier ; Parley the Porter, etc. ; George Lovell, etc. ; Gallaudet's Li£B 
of Josiah ; Weaver's Daughter, etc. ; Lazarus Raised from the Dead ; The Bible True ; Foster's 
App<Bal to the Young ; Emily Maria ; Withered Branch Revived ; Children Invited to Chnst ; Chil- 
dren of the Bible ; Pious Children ; RoUs Plumbe. 

THE EVANGELICAL FAMILY LIBRARY, 15 vols. 18 mo., price $5 50, with frontispieces 
and engravings, viz. : 1. Doddridge's Rise and Progress; 2. Wilberiforce's Practical View, and Fla- 
vel's Touchstone ; 3. Edwards on the Affections, and AUeine's Alarm ; 4. Bunyan's Pilgrim's Pro- 
gress ; 5. Baxter's Saints' Rest ; 6. Baxter's Call, Dying Thoughts, and Life ; 7. Memoir of David 
Brainerd, and Flavel on Keeping the Heart ; 8. Memoir of Henry Martyn ; 9. Edwards' History of 
Redemption; 10. Pike's Persuasives to Early Piety; 11. Pike's Guide for Young Disciples ; 12. Me- 
moir of Rev. Dr. Payson ; 13. Nevins' Practical Thoughts, and Thoughts on Popery ; 14. Evidences 
of Christianity, by Jenyns, Leslie, Lyttelton, 'and others ; 15. Memoir of James Brainerd Taylor. 

VOLVMSS BOUND TO 2CATCH THE FAMILY LIBRARY. 21 VOLS. PRICE $7 50. 

16. Memoir of Rev. Dr. Buchanan ; 17. Elijah the Tishbite ; 18. Memoir of Mrs. H. L. Wins- 
low; 19. Reformation in Europe; 20. Practical Piety ; 21. Anecdotes for the Family Circle ; 22. 
Spirit of Popery, and Colporteur and Roman Catholic ; 23. Christian Contemplated, and Fuller's 
Backslider ; 24. Systematic Beneficence, and Life of Swartz ; 25. Melvill's Bible Thoughts, and 
Life of Leighton ; 26. Sabbath Manual, Temperance Manual, aifd Beecher on Intemperance ; 27. 
Mammon, and Self-Knowledge ; 28. Life of Pearce, Scudder's Last Command, and Appeal to Moth- 
ers ; 29. Eternal Life, and Anxious Inquirer ; 30. Universalism not of God, and Keith on Prophecy; 
31. Bogue's Essay, and Counsels to Young Men ; 32. Life of Newton, and Mother at Home ; SO. 
Gumey's Love to God, and Sherman's Guide ; 34. Harlan Page, Rev. S. Kilpin, and Nonnand 
Smith ; 35. Thoughts on Missions, and Hannah Hobbie ; 36. Matthew Henry, Meekness, and Self- 
Deception. 

A SET OF THE SOCIETY'S PUBLICATIONS. The above 130 volumes, with twelve vol- 
umes of the series of Traets, new edition, illustrated, Gallaudet's Scripture Biography, the volames 
of Children's Books and Pocket Manuals, and other volumes of various sizes, form a set of the So- 
ciety's publications in nearly 200 volumes, sold at $50. 

IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES.— In German, more than 50 volumes, including those for the 
young, many of them with engravings. Also volumes in French, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Dan- 
ish, and Welsh. 

ALSO, upwards of 1,000 Tracts and Children's Tracts, separate, bound, or in packets, adapted for 
convenient sale by merchants and traders, many of them with beautiful engravings — ^in English, 
German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Itailian, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, and Welsh. 

IC7* It is the design of the Society to issue aU its publications in good type, for the poor as well 
as the rich ; and to sell them, as nearly as may be, at cost, that the Society may neither sustain loss 
nor make a profit by all its sales. 



Digitized 



by Google 



EQUINOXES AND SQI^STICES FOR 1852. 




EQUINOXES AND SOLSTICES. 


London. 


Boston. 


Waahington. 


Cincini^ti. 


San Fnncicco. 


Vernal Equinox March - - - 

Snmmei SoUtice June 

Antmniial Equinox Sept. 

IVinter SoUtice Dec. 


!>.■.■. 

20 10 42 m. 

21 7 29 m. 

22 9 41 e. 
21 3l3e. 


9. m. u. 

20 5 58 mo. 

21 2 45 mo. 

22 4 57 ev. 
21 to 29 mo. 


D. ■. 11. 

20 5 34 mo. 

21 2 21 mo. 
•>2 4 33 er. 
21 10 5 mo. 


B. a. 11. 
M 5 4mo. 

21 1 51 mo. 

22 4 3ey. 
21 9 35 mo. 


D. a. 11. 
20 2 34 m. 

20 11 il e. 
22 1 33 e. 

21 7 5 m. 



When it is noon at London, it is 6 h. 52 m. in the morning at Washington ; and when it 
! is noon at Washington, it is 5 h. 8 m. in the evening at London. 

THE NEW STYLE 

Was adopted in Catholic countries by order of Pope Gregory XIIL, in 1582 — the 5th of 
October was called the 15th, omitting ten days. Protestant Britain adopted this rule 1752, j 
calling 'he 3d of September the 14th, omitting eleven nominal days. Russia adheres to tlie 
old style, the difference from the new being now twelve days. Up to 1752, the year was 
held to begin in England with the 25th of March ; 1751 did so, but 17^ began January 1, 
by act of Parliament, agreeably to the Gregorian or Roman-catholic Calendar, which is 
the true time, with only an error of one day in about 3,000 years. 



MEMORANDA FOU 1893. 

Jan. 1, Cinramcision ; 4, ad S. aft. Christmas; 6, Epiphany ; 11, 1st S. aft. Epiph. ; 18, ad S. 
aft. Epiph.; 25, 3d S. aft. Epiph; Oonv. of St. Paul. Feb. 1, 4th S. aft. Epiph.; 8, Septnagesi- 
ma; 15, Sexagesima; 22, Quinquagesima ; 24, St. Matthias; 25, Ash- Wednesday ; 29, 1st S. in 
Lent. March 7, Si 8. in Lent ; 14, 3d S. in Lent ; 21, 4th S. in I.ent ; 28, 5th S. in Lent. April 

4, 6th 8. in Lent ; 9, Good-Friday ; 11, Easter-Sunday ; 18, 1st S. aft. Easter ; 25, St. Mark ; 2d S. 
aft. Easter. Mat 1, SU. Philip and James ; 2, 3d S. aft. Easter ; 9, 4th S. aft. Easter ; 16, 5th S. 
aft. Easter ; 20, Ascension-day ; 23, S. aft. Ascension ; 30, Whit-Sunday. Juns 6, Trinity-Sun- 
day ; 11, St. Barnabas ; 13, 1st 8. aft. Trin. ; 20, ad S. aft. Trin. ; 24, St. John the Baptist ; 27, 3d 

5. aft. Trin. ; 29, St. Peter. July 4, 4th 8. aft. Trin. ; 11, 5th S. aft. Trin. ; 18, 6th S. aft. Trin. ; 
S5, 7th 8. aft. Trin. Auo. 1, 8th 8. aft. Trin. ; 8, 9th S. aft. Trin. ; 15, 10th S. aft. Trin. ; 22, 11th 
8. aft. Trin. ; 24, St. BartholonTew ; 29, 12th S. aft. Trin. Sept. 5, 13th S. aft. Trin. ; 12, 14th 8. 
aft. Trin. ; 19, 15th 8. aft. Trin. ; 21, St. Matthew ; 26, 16th 8. aft. Trin. Oct. 3, 17th 8. aft. Trin. ; 
10, 18th 8. aft. Trin. ; 17, 19th 8. aft. Trin. ; 18, St. Luke ; 24, aoth 8. aft. Trin. ; 28, Sts. Simon 
and Jude ; 31, 2l8t 8. aft. Trin. Nov. 1, AU-Sainte ; 7, 22d S. aft. Trin. ; 14, 23d 8. aft. Trin. ; 21, 
24th 8. aft. Trin. ; 28, Advent-Sunday ; 30, St. Andrew. Dec. 5, ad S. in Advent ; 12, .3d 8. in 
Advent; 19, 4th 8. in Advent; 21, St. Thomas; 25, Christmas; 26, 1st S. aft. Christmas, St. Ste- 
phen ; 27, St. John ; 28, Innocents. 

TIDE-TABLE. 

CHIEFLT FROM THE TABLE IN BOWDITCH'S IfAVlGATOR. 

The Calendar pages exhibit the time of high-water at New York, Elizabethtown Point, 
and New London. 

To find the time of high-water at any of the following places, add to or subtract from 
the time of high-water at New York, as follows : (A signifies that the annexed quantity of 
time is to be added, S subtracted) — For 



Amelia Harbor 8 

Ann, Cape Aa 36 

Annapolis A 2 6 

Anticosti Island, west I . g 5 34 

end ) 

St. Augustine 8 1 34 

Blockfsland 8 1 17 

Boston A2 36 

Canso, Cape 8 ai 

Chaile»,Cape 8 1 9 

Charleston Bar 8 1 39 

Cod, Cape A2 36 

Delaware River, ent. A 6 

Fairfield A 2 

Fear, Cape -8 54 

Florida Keys 8 4 

Gay Head 8 1 17 

George's River Al 51 



Georgetown Bar 8 1 54 

Gouldsborough A 2 6 

Guilford Al 30 

Halifax, N. 8. 8 1 24 

Hartford 8 5 40 

Hatteras, Cape AO 6 

Henlopen, Cape 8 9 

Henry. Cape S 1 14 

Kennebec Al 54 

Lookout, Cape AO 6 

Machias A2 6 

Matblehead A 2 30 

May, Cape SO 9 

Mount Desert A 2 6 

New Bedford 8 1 17 

Newburyport A 2 21 

New Haven Al 22 

Norwich Landing AO 45 



Passamaquoddy River-- -A 2 36 

Penobscot River A 1 51 

PhUadelphia A5 

Plymouth A 2 36 

Portland Al 51 

Port Royallsland 8 39 

Portsmouth A 2 21 

Quebec, Canada SO 5 

Rhode Island 8 2 9 

Roman, Cape ----8 9 54 

Sable, Cape 8 54 

Salem A2 36 

Sandy Hook, N.J. 8 2 17 

Saybrook AO 15 

St. John's. N. F. S 2 54 

St. Simon's Bar 8 1 24 

Sunbury AO 36 

Townsend Al 61 



Digitized 



by Google 



RATES OF POSTAGE. 

Lbttkrs, not exc«eding half an ounce, and within 3,000 miles, 3 oenti prepaid, 5 cents mA] 
prepaid ; and the same for erery additional half ounce or firaction thereof. Over 3,000 noiles, donhtoi 
these rates. Foreign letters, from any post-offioe in the United States, wholly or in part by sea,! 
nnder 2,500 miles, 10 cents ; over 2,500 m les, 20 cents ; but no change is made in existing postal 
arrangements with foreign countries. Drop-letters one oent ; advertising one cent. 

Wekklt Newspapers not over 3 ounces, sent from the office of publication to subseribeTS 
within the county, free ; out of the county, and within 60 miles, 5 oents a quarter; orer 50, and 
less than 300 miles, 10 cents a quarter ; orer 300, and less than 1,000 miles, 15 cents ; over 1,000, 
and less than 2,000, 20 oents ; oyer 2,000, and less than 4,000, 25 cents ; over 4,000 miles, 30 cents. 
Monthly Newspapers, one-fourth those rates ; semi-monthly, one-half those rates ; semi-weekly, 
double those rates ; tri- weekly, treble those rates ; and oftener &an tri-weekly, five times those rates. 
Newspapers less than 300 square inches, one-fourth the above rates. 

All other Newspapers, Circulars not sealed, Handbills, Engravings, Pamphlets, 
Periodicals, Magazines, and other printed matt^, (except periodicals as below,) including books 
and parcels not exceeding 32 oonoes, for every onnoe or firaction of an ounce under 500 miles, one 
___ oent; over 500, and less than 1,500, two cents; over 1,500, and less than 2,500, three cents; over 
tj] '2.500, and less than 3,500, four cents ; over 3,500, five cents— -to be paid in adumee. If by over- 
r|^ »ight unpaid, double those rates to be charged. 

On Periodicals, published quarterly or oftener, subscribers to pay half the above rates quar- 
terly in advance. The publishers of newspapers, and of periodicals not over 16 ounces, may inter- j 
change one copy free, and enclose bills to subscribers. 

Postage to Canada and the other British Provinces. Letters through to any office in 
Cs-nada, ten cents per half ounce, prepaid or not at option. Newspapers and all printed matter thft 
usual rates, prepaid to the line. Editors of newspapers exchange free. 

Other foreign Postage, from ant point in the United States. To England, Scotland, 
and Ireland, by British or American steamers, 24 cents a single rate, or half ounce, prepaid or not : 
newspapers (wrapped in a narrow slip, with both ends' open,) 2 cents prepaid. To Bremen, by 
the Bremen line, our inland and the sea postage is 20 cents, to which from 2 to 12 cents is added fat 
other points in Germany, and the whole may be prepaid or not. To Havre by Havre line 20 oents 
prepaid. Newspapers to Bremen or Havre, 2 cents prepaid. To other points on the continent <rf 
Europe, etc., if sent through England, by British steamer 5 cents nwst be prepaid, by American 
steamer 21 prepaid. To most countries of the world, postage can be prepaid at any office in tiie 
United States, varying from 20 to 87 cents a rate of half ounce, there being a deduction for ooun- 
tries where the rate is one fourth of an ounce, if less than that weight. Newspapers prepaid may 
be sent to most foreign countries, postage generally 4 cents. 



THE CHRISTIAN ALMANAC, 

AND 

OTHER PUBLICATIONS OF THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, 

May be had at 150 Nassau-street, New York, or Rev. N. P. Kemp, 28 Comhill, Bostoii ; WiLLiAili 
CoGGESHALL, Providence ; Charles Hosmbr, Hartford * J. B. Peck, New Haven ; E. H. Psass,] 
82 State-street, Albany; R. "Wasson, 9 and 10 Cannon-place, Troy; L. Danforth & Co., ! " 
Main-street, Buffalo; W. C. Chambers, South-Sixth-street, near Market-street, Philadelphia; 
Rev. S. Gotteau, 2 Franklin Buildings, Baltimore ; D. W. Harrison, Chahners-streot, Charlestcm 
H. Packard, 114 St. Charles-street, New Orleans ; W. H. Bulkley, Fourth-street, Louisville ; 
Seelt Wood, Agent, Walnut-street, near Fourth, Cincinnati ; Rev. C. Peabodt, Agent, 73 Market' 
street, St. Louis ; A. McFarren, 137 Jefferson-avenue, Detroit ; and of other booksellers and traders. 

DC?* The ALMANAC is furnished at a low price to those who order it by the 100 or 1,000. 

The Board of the American Tract Society embraces members of fourteen evangelical deuomuia- 
tions, united to diffuse the knowledge of Christ and him crucified by its publications, associated with 
personal Christian effort, at home and abroad. About 400 colporteurs are now laboring in the noMtt 
destitute parts of the country. A donation of $20 constitutes a Life Member ; $50 a Life Direotw. 
The usual salary of a colporteur is $150, besides other expenses and books granted. William A, 
Hallock, 0. Eastman, and R. S. Cook, Corresponding Secretaries, 0. R. Kingsbury, A ssi s tant 
Treasurer, 150 Nassau-street, New York. Seth Bliss, Secretary, 28 Comhill, Boston. 



FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my Executors the sum of Dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer 

of the Society, formed in in the year eighteen hundred and 

~ to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



Digitized 



by Google 



I«« ■« • ■■ 




t;*i itri w- 1' 

J^^i- -^^^^-^M'^ ^^^'^hfJ 
WtoSi ^*^r^P^'- i;^'^^^^^^/ 









Ll^^<^r^/^:i.;.C^r<b^fj^^^^ 



^ '-"i^' /- 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



® i 

§ I 
" I 



Manufacttiiles nv thx United States. — The entire capital invested in the rariotu 
manufactures in the United States, on the 1st of June, 1850 — not including any establish- 
ment producing less than the annual value of $500 — amounted, in roimd numbers, to 
$530,000,000 ; value of raw material, $550,000,000 ; amount paid for labor, $240,000,000 ; 
value of manufactured articles, $1,020,300,000; number of persons employed, 1,050,000. 

Iron llAKiTFACTxmEs. — In the various manufactures of wrought and pig iron, and casting% 
in the United States, according to the census returns of 1850, Sie total capital invested wa» 
$49,258,206 ; tons of ore used, 1,589,159 ; tons of iron, 608,460 ; value of raw material, fueL 
etc., $27,049,743; number of hands employed, 57,284 ; total value of products, $54,604,006. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



i 



THE 

ILLUSTRATED 

FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 

FOR 

THE UNITED STATES, 

_ FOR 

THE YEAR OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOUR JESUS CHRIST 



1853, 



BEING THE PIBST AFTER BISSEXTILE, AND UNTIL JULY 4TH, THE 77TH YEAR 
OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE UNITED STATES. 

CALCULATED FOR 

BOSTON, NEW TORE, BALTIMORE, AND CHARLESTON, 

AND 

FOUR PARALLELS OF LATITUDE. 
ADAPTED FOR USE THROUaHOUT THE COUNTRY. 



VAIiUABLE STATISTICAL INFORMATION CHIEFLY FROM ORIGINAL SOURCES 
CALCULATIONS IN EQUAL, OR CLOCK TIME. 

BY DAVID YOUNG, 

V2B NUOK, NEW JSBSBT. 

ON, Lat 4a» 21' N. ; Long. 71" 4' W. 
^ YORK, Lat 40" 42' 40"; Long. 74" 1'. 
TIMORE, Lat SQ" 17' ; Long. 76® 38'. 
RLKSTON, Lat. 32' 47' j Long. 79" 67'. 



PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY. 

NEW YORK : 150 NASSAU-STREET ; BOSTON : 28 CORNHILL ; 
AND Br BOOKSELLERS AND TRADERS. 




Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



tr Tbii woffc baa been chiadj p r epred bj th« Rev. TRTON CDWARDS, D. D., of New London, Conn., who 
witli s^^eat labor and care, has drawn many of tlie statiatical tables from orisinal sources. 



ECLIPSES IN THE TEAR 1853. 

There irill be two Eclipses of the Sun, and one Eclipse of the Moon, this year. 
I. There will be an Eclipse of the Son on Monday, June 6th, at the time of New Moon 
in the afternoon ; inrisible in all the northern portion of the United States. It will be risible 
on the Sun^s southern limb at the Ibllowing cities : 



SOUTH WEST- 
ERN C1TI£S. 



Little Rock-- - 
Tuscaloosa - - - 
MmedgeYiUe - 
Vicksburgh--- 

Jackson 

Port Gibson -- 
Natchez 



Begin 



■. ■. 

2 45 

3 8 
3 43 
2 40 
2 45 
2 33 
2 32 



3 9 
3 34 
3 57 
3 17 
3 21 
3 16 
3 16 



■. M. fl 

3 32 

4 
4 11 

3 53 
3 56 
3 57 



47 
52 

28 

1 13 
1 11 
1 24 



3 57 1 1 25 



fasni- 
tuJe. 



Di'its. 
0.1J6 
0.50 
0.15 
0.97 
0.93 
1.16 
1.26 



SOUTH-WEST- 
ERN CITIES. 



'Mobile 

iTallahassee --- 

I Austin 

I New Orleans -- 
, St. Augustine- - 

jHavana 

jMexico 



Begin- 
ning. 



H. M. 

2 49 

3 12 

1 44 

2 33 

3 29 
3 3 
1 1 



1^ 

5 ^ 



3 33 
3 52 

2 42 

3 23 

4 7 
4 6 
2 38 



4 14 
4 29 

3 36 

4 10 

4 43 

5 4 
4 2 



1 25 
1 17 
1 52 
1 37 

1 14 

2 1 

3 1 



Hafni- 
tnde. 



1.17 
2.14 
1.82 
1.20 
3.34 
5.96 



The northern limit of -visibility in this Eclipse, is a line leaving the Pacific coast about 
1^ miles south-east from San Francisco, and passing near Santa Fe, and thence east, bend- 
ing south to the Atlantic Ocean; leaving Little Rock and Milledgeville on the right hand in 
the region of visibility, and Huntsville, Augusta, and Charleston on the left, where the 
Eclipse will not be seen. The Eclipse will be central and annular on the meridian in 
longitude 119^ 54' west from Greenvrich, and latitude 0° 38' north. 

II. There will be an Eclipse on the Moon's northern limb on the 20th and 21st of June ; 
visible. Duration, 1 h. 36 m. Magnitude, 2.45 digits. 



CITIES. 



Boston 

Concord 

NewHaven ■ 
New York--- 
Philadelphia 
Baltimore -- 
Washington - 
Richmond - - 

Rochester 

Raleigh 

Charleston- •• 

Angusta 

Detroit 

Milledgeville 



Beginning. 



21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
20 11 
20 11 
20 11 
20 11 
11 



29 m. 
27 m. 
21m. 
17 m. 
12 m. 

6 m. 

5 m. 

3m. 

2 m. 
58e. 
53e. 
45 e. 
41 e. 
40 e. 



Middle. 



1 17 m. 
1 15 m. 
1 9m. 
1 5m. 
1 Om. 
54 m. 
53m. 
51m. 
50m. 
46 m. 
41m. 
33m. 
29m. 
28m 



CITIES. 



2 5 Cincinnati--- 
2 3||Frankfort.--- 
1 57 jlndinapolis - - 
1 53JNashvUle---- 

1 48 Chicago 

1 42 St. Louis ---- 
1 41 1, New Orleans- 



1 39' 
1 38| 
1 34 
1 29 
1 21 
1 17 
1 16 



Galena 

Natchez 

Little Rock- 

Anstin 

Mexico 

San Francisco 
Astoria 



Beginning. 



11 35 e. 
11 34 e. 
11 29e. 
11 26 e. 
11 22e. 
11 15 e. 
11 13 e. 
11 12 e. 
11 7e. 
11 4e. 
10 42 e. 
10 37 e. 

9 5e. 

8 59 e. 



20 12 
20 11 
20 11 
20 11 
20 11 
20 9 
20 9 



23 m. 
22 m, 
17 m. 
14 m 
10 m. 

3 m. 

Im. 

Oe. 
55 e. 

52 e. 
30 e. 
25 e. 

53 e.. 
47 e, 



I 11 
I 10 
1 5 
1 2 
58 
O 51 
49 
43 
43 
O 40 
13 
13 
10 41 
10 35 



III. There will be an Eclipse of the Sun on the 30th of November, at the time of New- 
Moon ; invisible in North America, excepting that a small Eclipse may be seen on the 
Sun's southern limb, along the peninsula and gulf of California and the isthmus of Darien. 
tt will be more or less visible in all parts of South America as far as about 46"^ of south 
latitude. It will be central and total on the meridian in longitude 110*^ 18^ west from 
Greenwich, and latitude ll'^ 20^ south. 

CHARACTERS. 

©0 Sun ; ]) Moon ; ^ Mercury ; $ Venus ; © Earth ; ^ Mars ; 11 Jupiter , ^ Sat- 
urn; ^ Herschel. 

SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 

T Aries; ^ Taurus; n Gemini; ^ Cancer; £l Leo; nj^ Virgo; :^ Libra; tTl Scor- 
pio ; / Sagittarius ; V3 Capricorn ; 7:z Aquarius ; ^ Pisces. 

CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 

Dominical Letter, B ; Golden Number, or Lunar Cycle, 11 ; Epact, 20 ; Solar Cycle, X4 ; 
Roman Indiction, 11 ; Julian Period, 6566. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



RISING AND SETTING OF PliANETS AND STARS. 

It should be observed that these are not materially affected by the longilude of a place. 
When the hour is less tliau 6, it is in the morning ; when greater than 6, it is in the evening. 



DATE. 


PLANET. 


Boston. 


Wash- 
ington. 


Charlra- 
ton. 


DATE. 


PLANET. 


Boston. 


Wash- 
ington. 


Cha's- 
ton. 


1853 




a. 11. 


H. H. 


H. M. 


1853 




a. 11. 


■. M. 


■. ■. 


Jan. 14 


Eegulus rises - • 


7 32 


7 38 


7 47 


July 13 


Venus sets 


8 36 


8 27 


8 12 


" 27 


Jupiter rises - - - 


4 2 


3 52 


3 36 


« 2-^ 


" " 


8 27 


8 20 


8 10 


Feb. 8 


u <t 


3 24 


3 14 


2 58 


Aug. 9 


« (( 


8 14 


8 10 


8 4 


" 17 


« tc 


255 


245 


2 29 


« 19 


Seven Stars rise 


10 8 


10 19 


10 37 


" 28 


" " .... 


2 19 


2 8 


1 52 


" 20 


Venus sets 


759 


7 58 


755 


>Ur. 8 


Saturn sets 


10 37 


10 30 


10 20 


Sept. 1 


Seven Stars rise 


9 17 


9 28 


945 


'* 11 


Jupiter rises - - - 


1 41 


1 30 


1 14 


" 16 


(( t( 


8 18 


8 29 


8 46 


« 21 


Saturn sets 


9 52 


9 46 


9a5 


" 28 


(( IC 


730 


7 42 


7 59 


April o 


Antares rises - - 


10 54 


10 41 


10 22 


Oct. 1 


Jupiter sets --- 


9 1 


9 11 


927 


•i 18 


« u 


10 14 


10 2 


9 42 


" 15 


8 14 


8 25 


8 41 


" 29 


Cl (( 


9 31 


9 19 


8 59 


" 26 


U It 


739 


7 49 


8 6 


May 4 


Jupiter rises - - - 


10 7 


956 


9 40 


Nov. 12 


Venus sets 


7 11 


723 


743 


" 9 


9 45 


935 


9 19 


" 21 




725 


736 


765 


H 14 


(( cc 


9 23 


9 13 


8 57 


« 28 


« cc 


7 37 


7 48 


8 6 


June 14 


Refulus sets - - 


11 18 


11 12 


11 3 


Dec. 7 


Mars rises 


10 57 


11 1 


11 


" 30 


10 15 


10 9 


10 


" 13 


" " 


10 44 


10 48 


10 55 


Joly 8 


Venus sets 


836 


8 26 


8 11 


" 20 


u u 


10 27 ! 10 31 


10 37 



TABLE OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM. 



S t 
I ^ 



^ ^ 6 



i § ' s 



6S 



When 
discoTered. 



By whom 
discovered. 



Where 
discoYerad. 



The Sun - — 

Mercury 

Venus 

The Earth -- 

Mars 

Flora 

Clio 

Vesta 

Iris 

. Metis 

New Planet - 

Hebe 

Parthenope - 

Irene 

£geria 

Astnea 

Juno 

Ceres 

Pallas 

Hygeia 

Jupiter 

Saturn 

Uranus 

Neptune 



3,224 
7,687 
7,912 
4,189 



89,170 
79,042 
35,112 
35,000 



37,000,000 
68,000,000 
95,000,000 
142,000,000 
209,160,265 
221,813,220 
224,302,695 
226,159,280 
226,632,665 
227,946,800 
230,449,670 
232,829,135 
242,468,785 
243,206,650 
244,818,565 
253,728,615 
262,964,845 
263,421,510 
299,255,700 
485,000,000 
890,000,000 
1,800,000,000 
3,600,000,000 



,387098 
723331 
,000000 
,523692 
.201687 
.334876 
.361031 
.380624 
,385607 
,399440 
,425786 
,450833 
,552303 
560070 
.577047 
.670837 
768051 
772858 
150060 
202776 
.538786 
182390 
.036800 



87 

224 

365 

686 

1,193 

1,303 

1,325 

1,341 

1,345 

1,357 

1,379 

1,401 

1,518 

1,492 

1,511 

1,594 

1,682 

1,686 

2,042 

4,332 

10,759 

30,686 

60,128 



Oct. 18, 

Sept. 13, 
March 29, 

Aug. 13, 

April 25, 

July 29, 

July 1, 

May 13, 

May - 



Nov. 
Dec. 



Sept. 1, 
Jan. 1, 
March 28, 
April 12, 



1847 
1850 
1807 
1847 
1848 
1851 
1847 
1850 
1850 
1850 
1845 
1804 
1801 
1802 
1849 



ffind- 



Olbers--- 

Hind 

Graham - 
Gausparis- 
Hencke - - 
Gasparis- 

Hind 

Gasparis-' 
Hencke - - 
Harding - 
Piazzi — 
Olbers--- 
Gasparis- 



London. 

Bremen. 

London. 

Markree. 

Naples. 

Driessen. 

Naples. 

London. 

Naples. 

Driessen. 

LilienthaL 

Palermo. 

Bremen. 

Naples. 



March 13, 
Sept. 23, 



1781 Herschel- 
1846 GaUe---- 



Slough. 
Berlin. 



PHENOMENA OF THE PliANETS FOR 185». 

Jan. 10, 5 's gr. elong. ; 12, ^ stat., IJC gtat. ; 19, enters ^; 2i,nOW\ 26, 6 G ^ \ 
31, D ^ . Feb. 18, enters >£ ; 26, sup. 60^. March 13, D 02/ ; 20, enters 
T; 23, 5'8 gr. elong. ; 31, 5 stat. April 10, inf. 6 g; U stat. ; 19, enters ^ ; 23, ^ 
•tat; 28, 60)^- Mat 8,5'sgr. elong.; 11,60 ^; 13, sup. (50 9; 20, enters n. 
JuKK 6, eclipsed ; 10, § 02X ; 13, sup. d $ ; 21, enters ^ ; ]) eclipsed. July 3, 
in apogee; 21, ^'s gr. elong.; 22, enters SI- Auo. 3, 5 stat.; 4, D0^; 11, U 
stot ; 17, inf. 60$; ^^.^ stat. ; 23, © enters "J ; 24, D ^; 26, ^ stat. Sept. 3, 
5'8gr. elong.; 8, D 02/ ; 13, >>stat. ; 22,0 enters bCs ; 29, sup. 60 5. Oct. 23, enters 
fTi. Nov.2,50TJC; 3,,6 $2/; 15, ^'sgr. elong.; 20, 6^0^; 22, ©enters/; 24,5 
•tat ; 26, D <J . Dec. 4, inf. 60^; 14, ^ stat. ; 18, 9 's gr. elong. ; 21, enters V3 ; 
ai,5'«gr. elong.; 27, 602/. 



Digitized 



by Google 



4 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

ASPECTS AND NODES. 

c5 Conjunction; 5|cSextile, 60 degrees; D. Quartile, 90 degrees; A Trine, 120 degrees; Vc. 
Quincunx, 150 degrees ; S Opposition, 180 degrees ; ^ Ascending Node ; ^ Descending Node. 

EQUINOXES AND SOIiSTICES FOR 1853. 



EQUINOXES AND SOLSTICES. London. 



Vernal Equinox March -- 

Summer Solstice June 

Autumnal Equinox -Sept. 

Winter Solstioe Dec. 



20 4 25 e. 

21 1 23 e. 
23 3 36 m, 
21 9 12 e. 



20 11 41 mo. 

21 8 39 mo. 

22 10 52 ev. 
21 4 28eY. 



Wasbington. Cincinnati. San 



20 11 17 mo. 

21 8 15 mo. 

22 10 28 ev. 
21 4 4 ev. 



20 10 47 mo. 

21 7 45 mo. 

22 9 58 ev. 
21 3 34 ev. 



20 8 17 m. 

21 5 15 m. 

22 7 28 e. 
21 1 4 e. 



lish 



When it is noon at London, it is 6h. 52m. in the morning at Washington; and when it 
is noon at Washington, it is 5 h. 8 m. in the evening at London. 

APOGEE AND PERIGEE OF THE SUN. 

The Sun is in 
Perigee December 30, 1852 ) 

Apogee July 3, ia53 } distant from the Earth 

Perigee January 1, 1854 ) 

Venus ( $ ) will b« morning star until May 13, then evening star until Feb. 28, 1854. 

NOTES TO THE READER. 

^e Calendar page in tliis Almanac is adapted for use in every part of the United States. 
It is based on the fact that in the same Latitude, that is, on a line runniiig due east and 
west, the Sun atid Moon rise and set at the same moment by the clock or almanac, not 
only throughout the United States, but around the world — the variations being so small as to 
be of no importance for ordinary purposes. Thus, if on any day the Sun rises at Boston at 5 
minutes past 6, it rises at 5 minutes past 6 on the same line of latitude westward throughout 
tbe states of Massachusetts, New York, Michigan, Iowa, and the territory of Oregon. 

Hence, a Calendar adapted to Boston for New England, is equally adapted, as to the rising 
and setting of the Sun and Moon, for use in Northern New York and Michigan ; a Calendar 
for New York city is adapted for use in the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois; 
a Calendar for Baltimore is adapted for Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri ; and a Calendar 
for Charleston will answer for North Carolina, Tennessee, G-eorgia, Alabama, and Louisiana. 
Wherever the reader is, look for the state at the top of the Calendar page, and underneath are 
the rising and setting of the Sun and Moon sufficiently accurate for all practical purposes. 

The changes, fulls, and qtcarters of the Moon, however, are governed by another prin- 
ciple, and are essentially the same for all places on the same Longitude ; that is, on any 
line extending due north and south. Thus, the Moon's phases for Charleston, suit Pitts- 
burgh, etc. Any phasis takes place at the same instant of absolute time ; but the local time 
is earlier at the westward, and later at the eastward, at the rate oi four minutes for each 
degree of Longitiide; or at the rate of o7ie m,i7iute for every 12 miles 273 rods in the lati- 
tude of Boston, 13 miles 60 rods in the latitude of New York city, 13 miles 143 rods in the 
latitude of Baltimore, and 14 miles 199 rods in the latitude of Charleston. 



EQUATION OF TIME. 

Almanaps often contain the expressions, " *7«w /<a;5f ," and ^^ sun slow^ They refer to 
the difference of time as shown by the sun, and as shcvin by a good clock or watch. Time 
as marked by tiie former is called '■'' apparent,^^ and as marked by the latter, ^^msaitt time." 
A good sundial will always tell the former ; a watch or clocJ^ the latter. The calcula- 
tions of most almanacs are given in mean or clock time. 

PREDICTIONS OF THE WEATHER. 

Inflxjekce op the Moon. — The late Dr. Olbers, the distinguished astronomer of Grermany 
who discovered the planets Pallas and Vesta, says, as the result of careful meteorologi" 
cal observatio^ts for fifty years in different countries, "I believe I have demonstrated that 
the influence of the moon upon the weather is so small that it is totally lost amid the great 
variety of other forces and causes which change the state of our atmosphere ;* and that " its 
pretended influence on men, animals, or plants, is all of it due to illusi<m and prejudice." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMTLY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



l«t MONTH. 



JANUARY,- 18^^ 



31 DAYS. 



MOONS PHASES. 



Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 
Piisfc Quarter • 
Full Moon • • • • 



5 10 ev. 
11 9 mo. 
45 mo. 
59 mo. 



NEW YORK 


a. M. 




4 58 


ev. 


10 57 


mo. 


33 


mo. 


47 


mo. 



BALTIMRE 



4 47 ev. 

10 46 mo. 

22 mo. 

36 mo. 



CHARLESN 



4 34 ev. 
10 33 mo. 
9 mo. 
23 mo. 



ev. 4 4 
7 37 
10 35 
12 45 



ii. 

o .a :3 : 



^8 



siS 



J 00 «0 O W CO t' 



2^a«^^S28^SJ^^ e^^^^22^°S^i§^^:555^:5 



83 eS5S§^8^^ .g^E^^g^^o; giss^^s^s?^ -"^^sjsg^ e 

i-H g to !"•'"' 13 S rH t-l B 






OOOO»0«0«0«0«0«0»0OOOO»0-^'^Tj«C0C0C00|0jTHr-iOO0&Q0Qb 



Ms- 



'I 



2 bSSS-*GS .^3SS?Jc3 gSSSaSS'- i'^S.'^V.'si^ E 

t-l Soi-KM-^Oif) »<OC^OOO>Oi-> cOrH<MC0Tj«l0<0.aO«0000JO»H 2 

i-» B ^ M i-l iH B *t T-l tH B 



»0®c>Ono»0'-^fNg3j^»Q«Otrg2gO»HOlTl<0«Ot^OOO»THC»eOrf»Ot-00 






Hae^joi-Ba 



tg«!^5^g£e2«^^^g^cg«!^5^SpScgH»E3^efi;tgH)^ 



q;nowjoI«(i 



i-iC^O'^0<Ol-000>0^(NCO'^«0«OI>000>053 



Sc5^c3^c5^SiSSBco 






n 



J > ,H (M CO Tj< lO «0 t^ 00 <33 OS O rH 2oOrHOJCOrJ*lO«Ot^OOOOO>OOTH >0 

■« TH.-IB 1-ll-ll-l«^ 



«22 g8§^g?"c5?3 .S«^25JoJ gSSS^^^;:: g^8'=^S8?5 g 

a^ 2oTH(M'«*«»0<0«Ot^OO<»0^ 2oTH(MC0"VW5«0.gO«0000>Oi-( 2 

"rH B W 1-H 1-H B fc< 1-I.-I B 






jt^t^t-t-t:-t:-t->t:<-«oco«o»iQioiQT*'^cocoe^i-i^pOiO>oot^«ooTj*co 



sa 



si 



^oo«o(Nco«55505^^c.o§og^c>i^^t^coo>oou5Qo.ro^c>i;55H,.. 

jCO'^O^t-OOOiO'-i §OOTH0»C0C0"^O«0t>.000iOi-tTH >f-H,-<(MCOC 

■ «-t *-l B »-HtHj-H » 



i^ g85:S5S::J^^ .;^^;::^.85J gc5c55Jc3g3c5^ g^^55°°aSS 

jji-i I o »*< oi Tf o <o "i »o t^ 00 o>'"o th 2oi-to}coTj«»o<o.2»o«ot^o>o»H 






-^?5 §5 §?S?^^§?§??5?3?58B^^85SS5S5^^^^83g3 558222^ 



g -jOBp s.trag 






•3i»3AVP^«a 



•tpuoj^joX-Sd 



§eoj 



^c»«^o«i>ooo»o^jwco;2::25SJ:;S2S8c325?5S5^S^8^^co 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



;!2d MONTH. F£BRUARir, 1§53. 28DAYS.|| 


1 

! MOON'S PHASES. 


BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


BALTIMRE 


CHARLES'N 


SUN o> MERID. 


' Third Quarter- • • • 

New Moon 

First Quarter 

Full Moon 


o 

1 

8 
15 
23 


a. H. 

1 17 mo. 
50 mo. 

10 28 ev. 

2 40ev. 


1 5 mo. 
38 mo. 

10 16 ev. 

2 28ev. 


54 mo. 
27 mo. 
10 5 ev. 
2 17 ev. 


■. M. 

41 mo. 
14 mo. 
9 52 ev. 
2 4 ev. 


o. 

I 

9 
17 
25 


13 58 
14 33 
14 17 
13 16 1 


1 l< < 


* 5 


^ >»-H(NC3»« Wt^00000>OO-H^ 2oO-^C0Tj<i0«)l>0D0Da»OO 

" a> ^ ^ ^ rH B .-1 »-, 


II 


ii?;^^55?5g^ 22S<^«S.^ £^!$5:^^22^ ^^**S^^' 

J O^WeO-^tO ««Ot^OOO>OOi-i cO'-'C^C»5'^OW.2t>00OO — 


II 




ll 


■ C0C0tO(CtOCOtOCOtOtO«OCO<0tOtOtO<0(OC0(O<O<Ot0tOC0CD«0CO 


CALENDAR FOR 
Baltimore} Yir. 

«INIA. KCHTCCKV. 
AMn MlBSOUBI. 


s It: 


gj Oi-iC0ts.«0«0 ?«Ot-00O>Oj-H |o^0»CMC0tj.O<0.|«000O»Ot;h 


II 


■ Wt O O O O «T o o o o o o « o o o «o o o o o o o v^ o o o «o 


IJ 




•Jiw^joi^a 


5^H£a1Ms5^Spi:alMj^H^gri:(^«SH^gfi:.^Ms 


•qiuowjoiiral '"'=^«^''^«^o°<=^S;::2i^:2;i2:S^°2Sg55?i?5S^SS5§^ | 


!.P5 

i a: ^ S " 


n 




u 


B Ot-iCO-^OtO ©lOt^OOOSOTH lo-^dMT-WOCO.atOOOOS O »- 


II 


■ O WT lO O O «? O O O O « O O O «ti O O tC O CS O «C O O O U-D C-J IC 


'^1 





Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



1* 

Digitized by CnOOQ IC 



THE FAKILT CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



\- 



4tk MONTH. 



APRIJLt 1853. 



30 Djirs. 



Mnt|] 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon • • • 
First Quarter • 

Fall Moon 

Third Quarter- 



7 13 mo. 
1 er. 
10 28 mo. 
2 7 mo. 



7 1 mo. 
11 49 mo. 
10 16 mo. 

1 55 mo 



BALTIM'RE 



6 50 mo. 
11 38 mo. 
10 5 mo. 

1 44 mo. 



CHARLES'N 



6 37 mo. 

11 25 mo. 

9 52 mo. 

1 31 mo. 



SUN OB Mnt|l>. 



3 5-2 
1 32 

morning. 

11 57 49 



m 



M 

»> 



S St 

11 



II 



• ►-Hcoototot^ooooosoioO'-ir-t 2 o «-< CO "«*• o «o t- r* uo OS o> o 1-1 > 



J ^0IC0"V*O«0 ®t^OOO»Of-^ |o.-i.-<c«coco'*'«*«,aooo»o^ 1®'" 






P ► s - 



II 



II 



ri « Ol CO Tj» Tt «0 «0 • t^ 00 Oi O »-* 2o«-<CIO»COCOtj»'^.2QOOJO^ cO*-i 









•Ji»»iA.j«^«a 



£^Mj^5^g£^M;^5^gfS^«SH^gfi;cg«a5^S£.^ 



•q^uowjoi«a 



"kg 2 



pi th (N rf to r^ t^ 00 0» OS O O T-« »H 2 O O i-t 0» "«*• »0 «0 t^ 00 00 OS O O *-• >—' 



M 

II 



y(N(NC0'*Tj««OO«t^00O»Ot-i 2o^C»C»COCO'^'n«.aOQOSO gooi-i 



H (0(0cotOCOCO<OCOC&<OCO<O<OCOCOtO<OCD(O<OO^<OCO(OCOCOCOtOtD 



li 






5 o . 

hn 






j"^iOt-0>00^(N §Oi-t»-<OI(NCOC 

■ 1-H t-i 1-H r-l C 



>o»r^ocot* 



^CoSh55^C?S 









(NCOCO-^-^OiOgt^QOOS 



oti 2o 

1-1 1-1 c 



1-1 0» (M CO CO -«»"*. 2 00 OS ^ 2o^.-« 



::£*= 



11 






H ;00<OCOCOCDOCO<OCO^ 



CO ^ w ^ 
to to to to 



OSOOtOOCO-^OOOt^VS-^COi-i ooo 



'N P'P 't^^S 



o-^oio>o«o<o(ot^c^aoooooososos 






ooo^T-^-HO>(^»<^»cococO'^J'■^T^ 



•vM JO x,a| dStgMa^^g£^«aH^gtg(g«a5^H^(g«aH^H£^ 



H?uopiJoX«(ll 



t-«0»C0'^»0«0t^000SO»-«<NC0'*«5«0t'.000S<2i-< 



;:^g3£3:a:2S^°SS8ag^g^a^^S58$^g 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE Family christian almanac. 



Digitized 



by Google 



10 



THE FAMILY G4IR1ST1AN ALMANAC. 



6th MONTH. 



JUNE, 1853. 



30 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon • • • 
First Quarter • 
Full Moon ••• 
Third Quarter- 



BOSTON. NEW YORK. BALTIM'RE CHARLES'N SUN ov BIERID. 



3 19 er. 

10 43 mo. 

1 27 mo. 

1 52 mo. 



3 7ev. 

10 31 mo. 

1 15 mo. 

1 40 mo. 



2 56 er. 

10 20 mo. 

1 4 mo. 

1 29 mo. 



2 43 ev. 

10 7 mo. 

51 mo. 

1 16 mo. 



11 57 31 

11 58 55 

ev. 34 

2 17 






so ■ 



98 (2 



si 









-irH»H(MC0C0'^"^OO<0«O«>»>t*l>0000000J0J0>0>0Ja> o o o o o o 

■ rH f-< tH »-H tH t-« 






p Si 



H 



9 ^ 



riOioiweoco«QOOJOOrHTH 2oo»^»^wcoeo.2o>oor-i^ cOOr-< 

■ 09 T-t»-(rH»HB «.,T-li-(.-li— its 



*$S2SBc5^?lc5c5^^c$c5^^^S5S5S^SSS^S^S?525SS 






''{••Aijo^'a 



^g£,gB8;^5^S£^B8;^S^S£^B8!g5^S£^fiQa5^fi 



•^uowjoi^a 



f-i(MC0TfO«0t-000iOTHCJe0rJ'O<Ot^<»05O»H0» 



wc5Sc5^c5wS5w^w 









jO»(MOJeoco»QO<»oorH,-H 2oo^»H(M(Mco.2aft00^rH Sooth 









S 



* COrtMrtMCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOC'JCOCO CO CO 



i« 






*: 



11 






si 



jt-ooosot-^TH 2oorH^CTeO'^'^«oi>ooo>o^TH ►TH(MeoTj<i*o«o 

■ T-l ,-ItH C . tH t-41-1 O) 



j0I(N(NC0C0"S000>OO»HtH 2oO»H»-HOIOIC0.2 0JQOrH,-i 2ooo 



" (N<Noicocow6icococococ6cowcoc'5eococowww 



'K *I®®P ■*'"^S 






♦y.jV^joA^q| ^S^^9^1^^^&^S9^)^^^&^^nM^^S&S9^XS^S 



♦muoKjox^al '-'^'=^^'^^^°p^^S:i{S3^;a^^$:;gSS8o;g^g3^^$Si8$^S 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 

1 



12 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



8th MONTH. 



AUGUST, 1§53. 



31 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon • • • 
First Quarter • 

Full Moon 

Third Quarter- 



7 22 ey. 
10 55 ev. 

6 11 ev. 
10 54 mo. 



7 10 er, 
10 43 CT. 

5 59 ey. 
10 42 mo. 



6 59 er. 
10 32 ev. 

5 48ev. 
10 31 mo 



CHARLKS'N. 



6 46 ev. 
10 19 ev. 

5 35 ev. 
10 18 mo. 



SUN ov BfERID. 



5 59 

5 12 

3 46 

1 48 



o ji :! :! 

?5 S ■ 2 



g=' 



II 



^^OCO^Ht^ 



»«i <D <D l^ 00 00 0> O O »-H goOi^CO-^O^Ot-OOOftOftOO-- ► O i-i CO tJ< to 



>0 »-i g 
■I »-•»-• C 



^-4^-4tH » 



<ioico "5t-aoooo>060rH^ 2orHoieo.ai>ooooo>o>oo»HTH 2o«-<c« 



55S:S;^S5§ 53 J5S5^^^^5?g:;!5g§?8?;5?5^§3g§ 53^35 S5S^ 









»-HOico"it^ooooo>osoo»-H 2orH<Meo.at>ooooo>oso>oorH 2o»-<ei 

M T-l T-l T-l C h. i-( 1—1 rH C 






oo«c«oow:>o«ooov5oio«cio»o«oo«c««>oo»o«too»o»ow5«o»c> 



•aiwjjA.Joi»a 



SH^Hd£;<g«s5^gp^(««s^^g£«^«s5^e£«g««H^ 



il5uoivjoX»(i 



-<0IW"*O«0l^000iOr-i0JC0-*O«0l^Q0aftOi-i 



Sc383SiS^SSS5S^§§?5 



■ 1-1 »-( ^ C ,-(,-, r_, »-( 0) 



■ to 1-1 ^ rH C C ^^ 1-1 »-^ g 



«^^^^ O O O O O »0 O '* '^S" T*"*}* Tf '^ ^ CO CO CO w « 



Mb- 
1-8 I 



jOftOO^-^ cOO^(M(MCO'^-n««Ct^OOOJO»H ►»-HrHC»<NC0'^-^«Ot^00O> 



,i^<NCO"ioOOOO»OSOJOO»^ |oO»-tC0.2 t^00 00 0»0>0iOO»H 2o»-<»-i 









I CO »o o» CO CO i-H "«t O"4t-icococi CO ""^ "^ CO 1-H Tj* r-i*-H cor-^eo 

0t*t^lSt-;0<0«0<0»0«0«CTf<Q'^C0C0C0C0(NC9(N»H»HOOO0>aa0»0000 



1,1 Xosp ■.ung 



a[M^loX»a 



^(NCr>^O<0t^00 0>O^C^C0;g;*3^t^00q>ggHg^g^^^^^g^*gggM 



njuoj^joXsa 

■p 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



13 



9tk MONTH. 



SEPTEMBER, 1853. 



30 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon 

First Quarter • • 

Full Moon 

Third Quarter- • 



6 58 mo. 

4 14 mo. 

5 28 mo. 
5 49 mo. 



NEW TO|LK. 



6 46 mo. 

4 2 mo. 

5 16 mo. 
5 37 mo. 



CHARLES'N 



6 35 mo. 
3 51 mo. 
5 5 mo. 
5 26 mo. 



6 22 mo. 

3 38 mo. 

4 52 mo. 

5 13 mo. 



SUN o« MERID. 



morning. 
11 57 7 
11 54 19 
11 51 31 



T ^ Si 



D3 " 



H 



II 



■ cot«K«ooAO>ooi-H SorHeo-^otot-ooooojOioo^ ►oo»eo»o«o 



ij coTf «r»r»ooo>o>OrH Soi-tdco-^.st-t^ooooosaftOjH 2o»He«co 



ri»f^ooooo»o>o«^oo ov^ «oo»o»o>oooo>ooo«^»ft>oo«oo 






i|y 



1^ 

S0S 



111 



3| 



£1 
l| 






so*-" B 

T-lt-H B 









T|Wj^ JO ltd 



g£(gflQ;^^^^£cg«<<^^g(£:<gflQ»S^g£^«;<^^£i£ 



•ipuowjoXwa 



^<MW^O<Or^OOO>0;HOJCO;2:0^t:;QOO>g55g5g5^V5«55g5gg 



1-3 

|a<5 



J r»ooooo»ooi-tTH 2 o »^ (N -^ o to r» 00 o>-o> o o 1-t «-• ► .-t rn eo -^ <d r- 

■ ,.^ ,-1 ,-1 ,-1 B tH 1 -t rHrH q? 



II 



jco^"ir*t*ooooo>oo«-i 2rHeicO'«t.si>t^t^ooooo»oO'-H 2o»-ico 

■ 2 tH rH t-l B >- T-l T-i 1— I B 






■ <0^<OCO<0»»tO<P<D<P<0<0<D<0<OtO<0<0 000*ft*QO*0*^^^'^*^ 



ll 



•^ O O O O O O O O O «ft »«> »0 O O O O O O O O O O »0 »0 O O IO o «oo 






II 



ll 






J co-^ ■2t^r»ooooo>oo^ 2ocieO'^,2t^r»t^ooooosog»H Soi-km 

■ n th th .-I B fc< T-tv-JT^a 



ri «0«OCO»CO<D«0«0<0<0«D«0«0«0«D«D«OCO«0«0 o* oo*rt> o O O O OJO 



U pap f.ung 



O 00 t* t* t* «0 «0 ''^ »0 O -^ Tj« Tl««0 CO Ol 0» 0» rH rH O O ^ QQ O O «^ '^ (M Ol <M 



•^Mjoitral S£,giqi^5^g£5fiQa^^M5^«j^H^gfi:,g««H^g^ 



•muoKjoi^al ^c^g^^'«>^«>«><^S::i£StS;S^^^SS$^ag3g^a^^^S?a^§^ 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



14 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



lOth MONTH. 



OCTOBER, 185: 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



New Moon • • • 
First Quarter • 
Full Moon •.. 
Third Quarter 



5 34ey. 
10 42 mo. 
7 47 ev. 
36 mo. 



NKW YORK. 



■. m. 

5 22 ev. 
10 30 mo. 

7 35 ev. 

24 mo. 



5 11 ev. 
10 19 mo. 
7 24 ev. 
13 mo. 



CHARLESTON. 



4 58 ev. 
10 6 mo. 

7 11 ev. 
12 Oev. 



SUN •■ MERID. 



11 49 33 
11 47 13 
11 45 21 
11 44 8 



^:i 



M 



• <or»r»ooo>oso.-H go^-HCO-^otot^r^ooooojOiooi-t ;^ i-t co -^ «o «o » 









II 



^•^"StOtOt^OOOOOJO |ot-l(MCOTf .gO«0«r*00000SO^ |o«-iCOTf« 



■ 000<OCDtO<0<0<0<OtO<0<OCD<0<OtOtO<0<0<OCD<OCOCDtO<DtO(0<0(0 



v'-M. JO ^»a 



SlBi^S^S£S9^^^^^AS9^^^^S^S9^1^H^S^S9^)i^ 



iHUOKjoXvd 



»^Cle0'^O«0t^000>O»-H0}C0Tj«O«>t>X0>O;-; 



S;:S2^;2:^S^S2Sc5 83 85^^^S5 85^^53 



t*00 00 0>0 0»^ cO«^OI'*0«Ot^OOOOO>0»00'-^'-« >»-H0l"^O<0t*t^ 



•^"S«o<or»ooooo>o 2o.-t<MC0'^.aO«0«0t^00000SO^ SOt-hW^O 



'S6 



S^6" 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO-^f'^'^ 



O O <0 CD <0 CO CD (D CD CD CD COCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCD CO CO CD CD 




O^rH 2 O 1-H-l (M CO Tf O t^ 00 0> O tH r-l > 

»-<>-lfH C fl T • - 



o»HrHC»oieo"^ot-ooo60o 



S^gJSS}-"^ 



'S 



coco t^ 00 00 



ojorH 2i-toieO'«*.2ocD 



P 



CO t- l> GO 0> O -H §0^<N'*0 



OOP ojo o o o oooooooooo oooooooo-^^ 



ooo>So 



j.0QOt-i0JC0'^OC0l>0>Oi-'(MC0'^C0l>00 
■ OCOCDCOCDCDCOCDCDCOCDtOCDCDCOCDCDCO 



5Sg5?5^^S5^85B 



CO CO CO 



•g 'xoap t^irag 



ocoeo'^'*t'^oococDCDi>t^r»ooooo»osos 



i-<0>^t^O»^C0C 
rHCOTtO 



■t:<»-«^0 

OOO'^r-it-iOIOKNCO 



^JSI2 

CO CO -ft 



V9Ji\JO^»a 



^«aH^gdt:cg«s5^g£^B8;^E2^g£(5«!^5^gfr;cg«s 



— = — -- — ~j- 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



15 



lldi MONTH. 



NTOTEMBER, 1§53. 



30 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



BOSTON. NEW YORK. BALTIM'RE- CHARLES'N. SUN ob MERID. 



New Moon - • • 
First Quarter • 

Full Moon 

Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 



3 55 mo. 
7 28 ey. 

1 16 ev. 
5 51 ev. 

2 29 er. 



3 43 mo. 
7 16 ev. 

1 4ev. 
5 39 ev. 

2 17 ev. 



3 32 mo. 
7 5ev. 
53 ev. 
5 28 ev. 
2 6 ev. 



3 19 mo. 
6 52 ev. 

40 ev. 
5 15 ev. 

1 53 ev. 



11 43 42 
11 44 1 
11 45 12 
11 47 17 



I 



JU 

I ill 

^ § * * 



si ■ 



u 



a i 

5-S 



jt^ooooofto^ §o»HoiTj«o««or»r^oooooio>Oi-tr-i ► (m co -^ »o «© «o 

■ r-lrH C t-l^-^^-^ » 












£"1 = 

2 fli • •< 



J ■§ <0 <0 t* 00 0> rH 2o»-iO|COt1«»0.2«0«0«OI>000>0^ SorHd'^tO » 

" «8 rH C ».. iH rH B u 



»55JgIg;SS35?SS^^^5i^^^S?^qjg^g^?8?8^fo^^^^ 






•3lMiiiJ0X»a 



5^i3£^«!^5^S£eg«a^^S£ig«a5^g£5«aES^ 



•tn"owjo^»a 



»H(MC0'*O«0t-000>O^0Je0'*O«0t*00<»OrH 



Sc5^c5^c$wS5^S^ 



-ii. 



"III 



jOOO>0»0»H 2otH(MeOO<D«Ot-OOOOOJOSOOTH t^OrHCOrtOtOt^t* 



is 






»Jg;Sg?C38^^^5§^^^^:5^^^?8JoSo^^^^^???i??^^ 















II 

CO ^ 






■4iH >O*-irH0IC0C0'^<0t'000iOO 



i "S »o «© t^ 00 o> o 2o.H<Neo'«s<io.s 

' 08 rH B U. 






n^S^^^^^^^^:^^^^^^'^^P^?^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



j5g3l^Q0<»rH0Je0"*O!>000>OjH 



•g pep tjung 









.,»a-y^joit,a|- g^gtJS^tf!^g^gfj^^MaH^H£eg«!^g^Hfi:^«aH^ 



'iffuowjoXtrql ^<^c^^'^^^«><=^S::3$^^^^S^SS8g?g^g$^^^S^8$^^ 



Digitized byLnQOQlC 



16 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



12tii MONTH. ]>£C£ilIJS£R9 18^3. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'8 PI^ES. BOSTON. NEW YORK. BALTIMIIE. CHARLES'N. SUN ob MERID. 



First Quarter • 

Full Moon 

Third Quftr'^er- 
New M .on • • • 



7 26 mo. 

8 50 mo. 
8 39 mo. 
1 22 mo. 



7 14 mo. 

8 38 mo. 
8 27 mo. 
1 10 mo. 



7 3 mo. 

8 27 mo. 
8 16 mo. 
59 mo. 



6 50 mo. 
8 14 mo. 
8 3 mo. 
46 mo. 



11 49 23 
11 52 45 
11 56 33 
ev. 32 




j^- 00 o> o '-^ rH cowco-^o^ocot^t^ooojaoo— • ^ir-ioieoTj«io«ot*oo 

■ t-(i-l rH B ,^,_,,_H 4) 






Hcoco(0<Dcocotocotococoto<otoco<oco;ot«t«t»totor«r«r«K«t^t<*i>-e^ 



-85S^iS^;:5 6^2S!5SS2 gg§^S5S5^§J?3 g^^S2?35: .^ 



"OQCOCOCOCOCOrocOCOCOCO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO WCOCO^^^^^Tf^^ 






T[te^joX«a 



gfi;cg«s^^fi£cg«;^^^gf£^«!s{5^g£^^«a^^Sfi(g 



tpnowjoXwd 



»H(MC0'<*«O«0t^Q00JOi-"0»C0'*O<0t^000Jp»-i 



8c5?3S5^^^5^8S?5?3 



1-3 
1^^ 



jOOO>Oi-< cOOrHCO-^OCO t-t-00Q0O>OO^»^ bl T-H d CO T|< »0 <0 l^ 00 0» 

■ tHtHC r-t 1-i T~t 1-t Qi 



II 



"COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO COCOCOCOCOCOCOTOCO ^ ^ 



•2* 

Ah 

« .. 5 e 



trS 



b4 



9 g?52^"55S^Sglc5^^^55?5^^SlgggS5^^§?9:5^B g 

^ gO^HC^COCO-^^Ot^OOOJOOTH,^ ► rH ,^ W <M CO -^ »0 «0 t* 00 0» O 1-1 I 



:2^S5:5J§'^ g$2S55S5^E585 gSSS^SS^g i^i^^^^^ .^ 

O<Dt^000»^ gOi-<(MC0T(*O«0.2O«0l>00 0>Ot-i I O i-i CO -^ o <D "i to 



t0C0<0«piQiQU^»QOU5W^iQ««0«0«0t:-t-t^QQgQ0i0>Qi-lr-iC?C0C0^O 

^ TJ< ^i^ ^ Tf ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ TI* ^ '^ ^ tI* ^^^j* ^ ^ ^ Tf ^ Tj* ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^* ^ 






•g 'toap ■jUng 






r^99j/^}o Ivd 



g£^«s5^g£<gfiQs5^^£«^««5^efa^««H^gfi:.g 



ti;«oKjox»a 



^(NCO^O«)r^OOO>OrHOJCO;20«t:;00 0>g55^g5^U5^j5g5ggjH 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 17 



Every one is familiar with the Daguerreotype, in which not only likenesses 
of persons, but images of all kinds of objects are transferred from the lens of the 
camera obscura, and permanently fixed on metallic plates. Though it is said to 
have been the joint invention of M. Daguerre and M. Niepce, yet common con- 
sent seems to have given it the name of the former. The engraving gives the 
appearance of the man whose name is thus associated with one of the most in- 
teresting discoveries of the age. It was copied from a daguerreotype of M. Da- 
guerre, taken in France by Messrs. Meade. 

Wonders of the Heavens. — Sir John Herschel, in an "Essay on the Power 
of the Telescope to penetrate into Space" — a quality distinct from the magnifying 
power — says, there are stars so infinitely remote as to be situated at the distance 
of twelve millions of millions of millions of miles from our earth ; so that light, 
which travels with a velocity of twelve millions of miles in a minute, would 
require two millions of years for its transit from those distant orbs to our own j 
while the astronomer who should record the aspect or mutations of such a star, 
would be relating, not its history at the present day, but that which took place 
two millions of years gone by^ 

Infidelity Confounded. — ^When Thomas Paine resided in New Jersey, he 

was one day passing the residence of Dr. S , who was sitting at his door. 

Paine stopped, and after some general observations, said, "Mr. S , what a 

pity it is that a man has not some comprehensive and perfect rule for the govern- 
ment of his life." The doctor replied, "Mr. Paine, there is such a rule." 
" What is it ?" the infidel inquired. " Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all 
thy heart, and thy neighbor as thyself," was the prompt reply. " Oh," said Paine, 
abashed and confounded, "that 's in your Bible," and immediately turned away. 



Digitized 



by Google 



18 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Christiait Joy. — Let me remember, that the highest joy to the Christian 
almost always comes through suffering. No flower can bloom in paradise, which 
is not transplanted from Gethsemane. No one can taste of the fruit of the tree 
of life, that has not tasted of the fruits of the tree of Calvary. The crown is 
after the cross. 



"thy will be done." 

Searcher of hearts, from mine erase Giver of all— for every good 

All thoughts thai should not be ; Through the Redeemer came — 

And in its deep recesses trace For shelter, raiment, and for food, 

My gratitude to thee ! I thank thee in his name. 

Hearer of prayer, guide aright Father, and Son, and Holy Ghost, 

Each word and deed of mine ; Thou glorious Three in One, 

Life's battle teach me how to fight, Thou knowest best what I need most, 

And be the victory thine. And let thy will be done. 

Christ our Example. — How convincing, how animating is our Saviour's 
example ! How loudly, how i)ersuasively, does his conduct preach ! Would you 
learn submission to parental authority? See him, notwithstanding his exalted 
character, cheerfully subjecting himself to the will of his parents, and laboring 
with them as a mechanic for almost thirty years. Would you learn contentment 
with a poor and low condition ? See him destitute of a place where to lay his 
head. Would you learn active beneficence ? See him going about doing good. 
Would you learn to be fervent and constant in devotional exercises ? See him 
rising for prayer before the dawn of day. Would you leam in what manner to 
treat your brethren ? See him washing his disciples' feet. Would you learn filial 
piety ? See him forgetting his sufferings, while in the agonies of death, to pro- 
vide another son for his desolate mother. Would you leam in what manner to 
-pray for relief under afliictions ? See him in the garden. Would you leam how 
to bear insults and injuries ? See him on the cross. In short, there is no Chris- 
tian grace or virtue, which it was proper for a perfectly innocent being to possess, 
which is not beautifully exemplified in his life ; and there is scarce any situation, 
however perplexing, in which the Christian who is at a loss to know how he 
ought to act, may not derive sufiicient instmction from the example of his divine 
Master. Payson. 

Trust in God. — There is a beautiful butterfly. Look at it, and let them of 
little faith look at it. Some mothers grow grey with thinking what will become 
of their children in this hard and wicked world. One might wonder how the 
butterfly could live in tempestuous nights, in whirlwinds and in storms j but I 
have noticed it secure and dry under a broad leaf^ while rivers have been flooded 
and tall trees uprooted. 

Fitness for Heaven. — Let us not delude ourselves. They who are not made 
saints in the state of grace, shall never be saints in glory. The stones which are 
appointed for that glorious temple above are hewn and polished, and prepared Tor 
it here, as the stones were vnrought and prepared in the mountains for building 
the temple at Jerusalem. Leighton. 

Eternal Peace and Present Duty. — ^Neglect nothing, says McCheyne, to 
secure your eternal peace, more than if you had been certified that you should die 
within the day; nor mind any thing that your secular obligations and duties 
demand of you, less than if you had been insured to live fifty years more. 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 19 



A Christian Family exposed to Wild Beasts in the Arena. — Histo- 
rians usually reckon ten general persecutions of the early Christians, by the 
Roman emperors j extending from the first, under Nero, A. D. 31, to the tenth, 
under Diocletian, A. D. 303. In the last, it is said that 17,000 Christians 
were slain in a single month, and that during the ten years of its continuance 
144,000 were pvit to death by violence in Egypt alone, while 700,000 died through 
the su£ferings of banishment and the fatigues of the public works, to which they 
were condemned. The engraving represents a Christian family in the amphitheatre, 
where they have been thrown to be devoured by hungry wild beasts, for the 
amusement of the heathen populace. 



Digitized 



by Google 



20 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Worldly PROFKSSors.-=-Too many persons seem to use their religion as a 
diver does his bell, to venture down into the depths of worldliness with safety, 
and there grope for pearls, with just so much of heaven's air as will keep them 
from suffocating, and no more ; and some, alas, as at times is the case with the 
diver, are suffocated in the experiment. 



MAN BY NATURE, BY GRACE. 



BT NATURE. 
*' Bead in trespasses and sin," 
"Vile," "pdlluted," and "unclean;" 
"Naked," "miserable," "blind," 
"Darkened" in his "heart" and "mind," 
" Satan's slave," a "child of wrath," 

Wandering, " helpless," from the path, 
" Without hope," and " without God," 
" Without strength " to seek the road ; 
" Knowing nothing," " hating life," 
" Speaking evil," " sowing strife ;" 
" In the way that leads to death," 

His best hope " a puflf of breath ;" 
" Of the world," he hath no rest, 

Peace a stranger to his breast ; 
" Hating God," who " knows him not," 
*' God is not in all his thought ;" 

A " despiser " of the word ; 

One who " will not " seek the Lord ; 

But " rtout-hearted," void of faith. 

And "condemned" to endless death. 

BY GRACE. 
" Quickened" by the voice of God ; 
" Cleansed" by his atoning blood, 
" Clothed," and " blessed ;" light is given ; 

Darkness from his spirit driven : 

See, " the Son has made him free," 

And he " walks at liberty." 

He is aji " adopted son," 

Dwelt in by the Holy One ! 

He ha« found the pathway "strait," 
" Leading to the heavenly gate." 



AND IN GLORY. 
He is " strong in Christ the Lord," 
And he loves his holy word. 
Now he knows the " better part," 
God has given a fleshly heart. 
He will " follow after peace," 
Own the " Lord is righteousness." 
He is "holy," "true," and "just ;" 
" In the Lord he puts his trust ;" 
Living, lives a life of faith ; 
Dying, triumphs over death ! 

IN GLORY. 

" Life eternal" shall be his ; 

He shall " see Him as he is ;" 

He shall "know as he is known ;" 

He shall love the Lord alone ; 

All his sorrows shall be o'er ; 

Sin shall never grieve him more. 
" Faith shall then be lost in sight ;" 

God shall be his glorious light ; 

He shall see Him " face to face,'* 

Who hais saved him by his grace. 
" Like '^ his Saviour, he shall b« 

Sharer in his majesty. 

He shall " enter into rest ;" 

He shall mingle with the blest ; 

He shall ca^t his purchzised crown 

At the Saviour's footstool down. 
" Filled and sitisfied " with joy, 

Nought shall burden, fade, or cloy ; 

Death Shall ne'er his bliss dissever ; 

He shall be " with Christ " for ever. 



Do WE KNOW HOW TO Pray ? — The Rev. Dr. Hamilton of Leeds, while sol- 
enmly enforcing on the church its duty in reference to the conversion of the world, 
asks the following significant questions : '^ And has not the church almost to 
learn what is the power of prayer ? "What conception have we of believing prayer, 
which opens heaven? What of pef severing prayer, which causes us to stand 
continually upon the watchtower in the daytime, and which sets us in our ward 
whole nights ? "What of importtmate prayer, which storms heaven with its * vio- 
lence and force V "What of united prayer, * gathering us together to ask help of 
the Lord ?* "What of consistent prayer, which regards no iniquity in our hearts ? 
"What of practical prayer, which fulfils itself? Let but such prayer be under- 
stood, let our spirit but ^ break with such longing,' and the expectations of our 
bosoms shall not be delayed. ' And it shall come to pass, that before they call, 
I will answer ; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear.' " 

Faithful in Every I^hino. — A Christian, says John Newton, should never 
plead spirituality for being an idler or a sloven. If he be but a shoeblack, he 
should be the best in the parish. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 21 



President's -House. — The President's House at Washington is an elegant, 
edifice of freestone, painted white, so as to have at a little distance the appear- 
ance of white marble. It stands near the centre of a park of 20 acres, and at 
an elevation of 44 feet above the Potomac, of which there is a fine view from its 
southern front. The building is 170 feet long and 86 feet deep. The northern 
front is ornamented with a fine Ionic portico with lofty columns, while the south- 
em front opens upon the extensive garden attached to the building. The interior 
is well constructed; but has been said to be furnished in a style more becoming a 
public hotel, than the mansion occupied by the President of the United States. 

What is Happiness ?— Every thinking man will look round him, when he 
reflects on his situation in this world, and will ask. What will meet my case ? 
What is it that I want? "What will satisfy me ? I look at the rich, and I see 
Ahab, in the midst of all his riches, sick at heart for a garden of herbs. I see 
Dives, after all his wealth, lifting up his eyes in hell, and begging for a drop of 
water to cool the rage of his sufferings. I see the rich fool summoned away at 
the very moment when he was exulting in his hoards. If I look at the wise, I 
see Solomon with all his wisdom, acting like a fool j and I know, that if I pos- 
sessed all his wisdom, were I left to myself I should act as he did. I see Ahitho- 
phel, with all his policy, hanging himself for vexation. If I turn to men of 
pleasure, I see that the very sum of all pleasure is, that it is Satan's bed, into 
which he casts his slaves. I see Esau selling his birthright for a mess of pottage. 
If I think of HONOR, take a walk in Westminster Abbey — ^there is an end of all 
inquiry. There I walk among the mighty dead ! Therie is the winding up of 
human glory! And what remains of the greatest naen of my country? A 
boasting epitaph ! None of these things can sq-tisfy n\e. J must meet death — 
I must meet judgment — I must meet Qodrr:^ must meet eternity I Q©cil. 

First and Last TnouoHTs.-rrln matters of oonsoience. first thoughts are best j 
in matters of prudence, last thoughts ivre best. 

2* * ^^-^ • 



Digitized 



by Google 



22 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Raw from Heaven. — A little girl in Yorkshire, England, living in a neigh- 
borhood where water was scarce, saved as much rain-water as she could, and sold 
it to the washerwomen at a cent a bucket ; and by this means obtained nearly five 
dollars for the Church Missionary Society. When she brought her contribution to the 
secretary, she did not wish her name attached to it ; but he told her that it must be 
recorded as coming from some one. *' Call it, then," said she, "rain from heaven." 

GOD PROVIDETH FOR THE MORROW. By Bishop Heber. 



Lo, the lilies of the field, 
Hovr their leaves instruction yield ! 
Hark to nature's lesson given 
By the blessed birds of h6aven ! 
Every bush and tufted tr«e 
Warbles sweet philosophy. 
Mortal, fly from doubt and sorrow ; 
God provideth for the morro^. 

Say, with richer crimson glows 
The kingly mantle than the rose ? 
Say, have kings more wholesome fare 
Than we poor citizens of air ? 



Bams nor hoarded grain have we, 
Yet we carol merrily. 
Mortal, fly from doubt and sorrow ; 
GoA provideth for the morrow. 

One there lives, whose guardian eye 
Guides our humble destiny ; 
One there lives, who. Lord of all, 
Keeps our feathers lest they fall : 
Pass we blithely, then, the time. 
Fearless of the snare and lime, 
Free from doubt and faithless sorrow ; 
God provideth for the morrow. 



That one Word. — " I never can forget that word which was once whispered 
to me in an inquiry-meeting. A young Christian friend who was yearning for 
my salvation, came up to me as I sat in my pew, and simply whimpered * Eter- 
nity' in niy ear, with great solemnity and tenderness, and then left me. That 
word made me think, and I found no peace till I came to the cross." 

The sainted McCheyne was once riding by a quarry, and stopped to look in at 
the engine-house. The firemaxi had just opened the door to feed the furnace with 
fresh fuel, when McCheyne, pointing to the bright, hot flame, said mildly to the 
man, " Does that fire remind you of anj^hing ?" The man could not get rid of 
the solemn question. To him it Was an effectual arrow of conviction. It led 
him to the house of God, and will lead him, we trust, to heaven. 

A single remark of the Rev. Charles Simeon, on the blessings which had 
resulted from the labors of Dr. Carey in India, first arrested the attention of 
Henry Martyn to the cause of missions. His mind began to stir under the new 
thought, and a perusal of the life of Brainerd fixed him in his resolution to give 
himself to the missionary work among the heathen. 

Harlan Page once went through his Sabbath-school to get the spiritual census 
of the school. Coming to one of the teachers he said, " Shall I put you down as 
having a hope in Christ?" The teacher replied, "No." "Then," said he very 
tenderly, "I will put you down as having no hope." He closed his little book 
and left him. That was enough. God gave that young man's soul no rest till 
he found hope through the cross. 

Fellow-disciple, have you never yet spoken one word to an impenitent friend 
about the most momentous of all questions ? Then I fear you will find no one 
in heaven whom you were the means, under God, of sending there. Though you 
may reach the "many mansions," I fear your crown will glitter with no splendors. 
It will be a starless crown. 

A TENDER Conscience. — A tender conscience is an inestimable blessing : that 
is, a conscience not only quick to discern what is evil, but instantly to shun it, 
as the eyelid closes its* If against a mote. T. Adams. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 23 



WAl 

ind( 
beei 

gag 
grei 

critical period, Washington, far from being discouraged, resolved upon a bold 
stroke which should encourage his own troops, and strike terror into the forces of 
the enemy. From his camp on the west side of the Delaware, he crossed the 
river at midnight, December 25, 1776, with some 5,000 or 6,000 men, attacked 
the British army on the Jersey side, took about 1,000 prisoners, and a large quan- 
tity of arms and ammunition, and returned in safety to his own camp again. 
The engraving is designed to represent him in the act of crossing the river to lead 
his troops to the attack. 



The Christian in the World. — A Christian in the world, says John New- 
ton, is like a man transacting his affairs in the rain. He will not suddenly leave 
his business because it rains, but the moment that business is done, he is off : as is 
said in the Acts of the Apostles, " Being let go, they went to their ovm company." 

Liberty. — Liberty is the bliss of heaven and the freedom of earth, and it 
will yet be the destiny of man. 



Digitized 



by Google 



24 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Th^ Bible. — The American colonists brought with them, from the olc 
world, a fiill portion of all the riches of the past, in science, in art, in morals, 
religion, and literature. The Bible came with them. And it is not to be doubted, 
that to the free and umversal use of the Bible in that age, men were much 
indebted for right views of civil liberty. The Bible is a book of faith and a book 
of doctrine; but it is also a book which teaches man his individuak responsibility, 
his own dignity and equality with his fellow>men. Bnnker-Hill Address. 

THE BIBLE. 

Millions of pilgrims throng earth's roads, Is there a guide to sho-vr that path ? 

Bearing their baubles or their loads The Bible. He alone, who hath 

Down to eternal night ; The Bible, need not stray ; 

One humble path that never bends. Yet he who hath, and will not give 

Narrow, and rough, and steep, ascends That heavenlyguide to all who live, 

From darkness into light. Himself shall lose the way. 

Imagery of Scripture. — ^How majestic is the imagery of Scripture, when it 
presents to us our Maker and God as feeding all the orders of his animate 
creation, and ministering continually what they as constantly need, for the sus- 
tentation of the life which he has bestowed upon them. '* The eyes of all wait 
upon thee, and thou givest them their meat in due season; thou openest thy 
hand and satisfiest the desire of every living thing.'' " He giveth to the beast 
his food, and to the young ravens which cry." The sea-gull, winnowing the salt 
and wintry air along our coasts ; the petrel, twittering in the storm over the far 
blue waves of mid-ocean ; and all the tribes that cleave the air, or traverse the 
deep paths of the seas, or rove our earth, look up to his daily vigilance and bounty, 
under the pressure of their daily necessities. To him the roaring of the beast, 
and the chirping of the bird, and the buzzing of the insect, are but one vast sym- 
phony of supplication from the host which he feeds. To his capacious gamers 
their successive generations have resorted, and yet those stores are not spent ; 
neither has the heavenly Provider failed in his resources, nor have the expectant 
pensioners been left to famish. Dr. Williams. 

Piety. — When we speak of piety, says Br. Spring, we mean something more 
than a name. By piety, we mean the religion of principle, in distinction from 
the religion of impulse; a spiritual region, in distinction from a religion of 
forms ; a religion of which the Spirit of God, and not the wisdom, or the will of 
man, is the author ; a self-denying, and not a self-indulgent religion ; a religion 
that has a heavenward, and not an earthly tendency ; a practical religion in oppo- 
sition to the abstractions of theory ; and a religion that is so full of Christ, that he 
is at the basis of all its duties and hopes, its centre, its living head, and its glory. 

Not Plainer. — When R.ev. Thomas Scott, the celebrated commentator on 
the Bible, had published an edition of Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress with exposi- 
tory notes, he benevolently presented a copy to one of his poor parishioners. 
Meeting him soon after, Mr. Scott inquired whether he had read it. The reply 
was, " Yes, sir." ** Do you think you understand it ?" " yea, sir," was the . 
answer ; " and I hope before long that I shall be able to understand the notes»^^ 

Curiosity in Children. — Children should always be heard, and fairly and 
kindly answered, when they ask aijber any^thing they would know and desire to 
be informed about. . Curiosity should be as carefriliy cherished in children as other 
appetites suppressed. 



Digitized 



by Google 



TU£ FAltlLY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 26 



Travelling in the East. — Some of the modes of trayelling^ in the East may 
here be seen. The palanquin is usually borne, as in the picture, by four men, 
while others follow, as seen on the left, to exchange places with them every six 
or seven miles. And if travelling is continued in the night, a torch-bearer has 
to be taken to frighten the wild beasts by the glare of the flame. In the march 
of an army, the leaders generally travel on horseback, vrhUe elephants are used 
chiefly to carry the burdens. 

How Often shall I Prat ? — As often as the language of prayer is in my 
heart ; as often as I see my need of help ; as often as I feel the power of temp- 
tation ; as often as I am made sensible of any spiritual declension, or feel the 
aggression of a worldly, earthly spirit. 

Self-interest. — ^He who makes an idol of his. interest, will often make a 
martyr of his integrity. 



Digitized 



by Google 



26 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAK ALMANAC. 



Chmstianitt. — There is no true domestic happiness where Christianity is not 
the law of the family j there is no security against perfidy and the breach of the 
social compact, where the gospel, in its restraimng power, is not felt j there is no 
political freedom, that is worthy of the name, where the law of the land is not 
coincident with the law of the Bible, the law of Christ. 



THE CHRISTIAN WARFARE. 



Soldier, go — ^but not to claim 

Mouldering si>oils of earthbom treasure ; 
Not to build a vaunting name, 

Not to dwell in tents of pleasure. 
Dream not that the way is smooth, 

Hope not that the thorns are roses ; 
Turn no wistful eye of youth 

Where the sunny beam reposes : 
Thou hast sterner work to do, 
Hosts to cut thy passage through ; 
Close behind thee gulfs are burning — 
Forward ! there is no returning. 

Soldier, rest — ^but not for thee 
Spreads the world her downy pillow : 

On the rock thy couch must be. 
While around thee chafes the billow : 

Thine must be a watchful sleep. 
Wearier than another's waking ; 



Such a charge as thou dost keep, 
Brooks no moment of forsaking. 
Sleep as on the battle-field, 
Girded — grasping sword and shield : 
Foes thou canst not name or number, 
Steal upon thy broken slumber. 

Soldier, rise — ^the war is done ; 

Lo, the hosts of hell are flying : 
*T was thy Lord the battle won ; 

Jesus vanquished them by dying. 
Pass the stream, before thee lies 

All the conquered land of glory : 
Hark ! what songs of rapture rise, 

These proclaim, the victor's story. 
Soldier, lay thy weapons down, 
Quit the sword, and take the crown : 
Triumph ! all thy foes are banished ; 
Death is slain, and earth is vanished ! 



The Prayers of Children. — The practice, I believe, is imiversal, among all 
parents who feel it to be their duty to bring up their children in the " nurture and 
admonition of the Lord,'' to begin as early as possible to lead them to unite in 
the prayers which are made with them, and also to pray for themselves. This is 
regarded as an essential element of their religious training ; while an abundant 
experience shows what a mighty influence it has upon their future religious devel- 
opment and character. The recollection of the times and circumstances when 
the pious mother prayed with her little one, and taught him how to offer up his 
own prayer, and of the morning and evening devotions of the family circle where 
he heard the voice of a venerated father supplicating the throne of grace, clings 
to his memory through all the changing scenes of life, and often, in the wayward- 
ness or recklessness of youth, and the irreligious worldly-mindedness of manhood, 
rouses his conscience to give its faithful admonitions, and produces the most salu- 
tary and hopeful impressions upon his heart. How many it has rescued from 
ruin I How many it has been the means, under divine grace, of turning from the 
broad way of destruction into the path of life ! Rev. T. H. Gallaudet. 

God ever Near. — ^Remember, that God is as near to our mouth when we 
speak, as that man is who leans his ear to our whispers ; he is as near to our actions 
when we act in secret, as they are whom we admit into our confederacy ; he is as 
near to our thoughts when we purpose, will, or design any thing, as is our own 
soul that conceives them. Dean Young. 

Grow in Grace. — Get a step towards heaven — a little further from sin, and 
a little nearer to God— day by day. Endeavor to master some evil temper, and 
break loose from some worldly tie, every day. T. Adams. 

Reading and Thinkino. — ^You may glean knowledge by reading, but you 
must separate the chaff from the wheat by thinking. 



Digitized 



by Google 



th£ family christian almanac. 27 



Baxter Sentenced by Jeffries. — The celebrated Richard Baxter was 
brought to trial merely for publishing a paraphrase of the New Testament, be- 
fore the infamous Judge Jeffries, May 30, 1685. An eye-witness of the scene 
says, " When I saw the meek man stand before the flaming eyes and fierce looks 
of this bigot, I thought of Paul before Nero. The barbarous usage he received 
drew plenty of tears from mine eyes, as well as from others of the auditors and 
spectators." " He," Jeflries, " drove on furiously, like Hannibal over the Alps, 
with fire and vinegar, pouring all contempt and scorn upon Baxter, as if he had 
been a link-boy or a knave." He called Baxter an " old blockhead," an " un- 
thankful villain," " a conceited, stubborn, fanatical dog," etc. And when Bax- 
ter attempted to speak, Jeffries reviled him, saying, '^ Richard, Richard, dost thou 
think we '11 hear thee poison the court ? Richard, thou art an old fellow, an old 
knave ; thou hast written books enough to load a cart, every one as full of sedi- 
tion, I might say treason, as an egg is full of meat." ^' Come, what do you say for 
yourself^ you old knave ? . Come, speak up ! What doth he say ? I*m not afraid 
of you, for all the snivelling calves you have got about you," alluding to some 
friends of 3&xter who stood by him in tears. And after much more similar 
abuse, mingled with gross profaneness, this monster in human shape, of whom 
history declares, that "his track was marked with blood and murder," sentenced 
the man of God to a fine of 500 marks, and to lie in prison till it was paid *, and 
would have had him whipped through the city, but that the other judges would 
not consent. Jeffries himself died a miserable di^th in 1689. 

Tni Real Christian. — ^No man is so happy as a real Christian; none so 
rational, so virtuous, so amiable. How little vanity does he feel, though he be- 
lieves himself united to God. How far is he from abjectness, though he ranks 
himself with the worms of the earth ! Pascal. 



Digitized 



by Google 



S8 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Impressions on the Young. — Impressions are made on children, as on rocks, 
by the constant dropping of little influences. What can one drop do ? You scaitsely 
see it fall ; and presently it rolls away or is evaporated : you cannot, even with a 
microscope, measure the little indentation it has made. Yet it is the constant 
repetition of this trifling agency which furrows, and at length hollows out the 
very granite. 

SELF-EXAMINATION. fPOR THE YOUNG.] 



Did I this mom devoutly pray 

F<»- God's assistanco through the day ? 

And did I read his sacred word 

To make my life therewith accord ? 

Did I for any purpose try 

To hide the truth or tell a lie ? 

Was I obedient^ humble, mild — 

To prove myself a Christian child ? 

Did I my thoughts with prudence guide, 

Checking ill-humor, anger, pride ?, 

Did I my lips firom aught refrain 



That might my fellow-creatures pain ♦ 
Did I with cheerful patience bear 
The little ills we all must share ? 
To all my duties through this day 
Did I a due attention pay ? 
And did I, when the day was o'er, 
God's watchful care again implore ? 
Saviour, thy grace divine impart, 
To feed my soul and cleanse my heart, 
And make me meet for heaven above, 
To join thy saints in praise and love. 



Guarding against Vulgar Language. — There is as much connection between 
the words and thoughts, as there is between the thoughts and words ] the latter 
are not only the expressions of the former, but they have the power to react upon 
tile soul, and leave the stain of their corruption there. A young man who allows 
himself to use one profane or vulgar word, has not only shown that there is a foul 
spot on his mind, but by the utterance of that word he extends that spot and 
inflames it, till, by indulgence, it will soon pollute and ruin the whole soul. Be 
careful of your words, as well as your thoughts. If you can control the tongue, 
that no improper words are pronounced by it, you will soon be able also to con- 
trol the mind and save that from corruption. You extinguish the fire by smoth- 
ering it, or by preventing bad thoughts bursting out in language. Never utter a 
word anywhere which you would be ashamed to speak in the presence of the 
most refined female, or the most religious man. 

Evil Company. — " I have often wondered," says Jeremy Taylor, " how the 
fishes can retain their fresh state, and yet live in salt waters, since eveiyTthing 
partakes the nature of the place where it abides, and of that which is around it. 
So it is with evil company; for, besides that it blemishes our reputation, and 
makes us thought evil though we be good, it also inclmes us insensibly to ill, and 
works in us, if not an approbation, yet a less dislike of those sins to which our 
eyes and ears are thus continually inured. For this reason, by the grace of God, 
I will ever shun it. I may have a bad acquaintance ; but I will never have a 
wicked companion." 

A Prating Closet for Children. — I have read of a father who selected for 
each of his children a place of retirement, where, unmolested, they might daily 
read the Scriptures, and pour out their hearts before God. The place was pointed 
out, and each child solemnly and earnestly enjoined to occupy it. The efiect was 
such as might be expected. Tl^ were all distingpiished for piety. One of them, 
at least, became an eminent minister of the gospel. Parental Training. 

Censure. — All censure of another is oblique praise of self. It is done in 
order to show how much one can spare. It has all the invidiousness of self-praise, 
and all the reproach of falsehood. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. ' 29 



Latakd's Discoveries at Nineveh. — Layard's wonderful discoveries among 
the ruins of ancient Nineveh, are familiar to many readers. Remains of palaces, 
and colossal sculptures of the most remarkable character, have been disinterred 
from the mounds of earth and rubbish which had concealed them for more than 
twenty-five hundred years. A large number of these sculptured stones have 
been brought to England and deposited in the British Museum. One of the most 
remarkable of these is the colossal winged bull, represented above. The features 
of the face, the cap on the head, and the arrangement of the hair and beard are 
Persian ; the wings extend over the back. The figure is supposed to represent one 
of the Assyrian deities, as the attributes of intelligence, strength, and swiftness, are 
typified by the head of a man, the body of the bull, and the wings of the eagle. 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



30 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

The Family. — The family is the nurseiy of the future church j and every 
parent is to his children what his pastor is to him. They are placed under his 
care, to be trained up " in the way they should go j" to be brought up " in the nur- 
ture and admonition of the Lord.'' Hence, every family should become '^ a house 
of prayer," a nursery of piety, a vestibule of the church, a preparatory depart- 
ment in which the infant mind is trained for a place in Zion. And every 
parent should be a priest over his family, a shepherd, spiritual guide, teacher, and 
protector of the infant inmiortals intrusted to him. It is thus the duty of every 
parent to consecrate his children to God, and instruct them in his ways. 

SPEAK NOT HARSHLY. 

Speak not harshly— much of care Dwelleth every heart within ; 

Every hnman heart mnst bear ; In its closel]Mcovered cells, 

Enough of shadows darkly lie Many a wayward passion dwells. 

Veiled within the sunniest eye. By the many hours misspent, 

By thy childhood's gushing tears, By the gifts to errors lent. 

By thy griefs of after-years ; By the wrong thou didst hot shun. 

By the anguish thou dost know, By the good thou hast not done. 

Add not to another's woe. With a lenient spirit scan 

Speak not harshly — much of sin, The weakness of thy fellow-man. 



Woman's Sphere. — The true place of a cultivated woman is at the head of 
an enlightened home, dispensing its courtesies and charities, performing its daily 
labors and its higher duties, training up her children from the earliest dawn of 
life, and doing the last offices of kindness and devotion to the sick and the dying. 
Women peculiarly endowed, may find their happiness in other spheres. The 
future wife and mother may find healthful and useful occupation for a time as a 
teacher. But as a general thing, it is only in the diversified experience of a 
Christian home, that a cultivated woman can find exercise for all her faculties 
and all her affections. Any remedy for the wrongs of woman which does not 
look to this as the main thing, must fall short of its proper end. 

Social Intercourse. — We should make it a principle to extend the hand of 
fellowship to every man who discharges faithfully his duties, and maintains good 
order; who manifests a deep interest in the welfare of general society; whose 
deportment is upright and whose mind is intelligent, without stopping to ascer- 
tain whether he swings a hammer or draws a thread. There is nothing so dis- 
tant from all natural claim as the reluctant and backward sympathy, the forced 
smile, the checked conversation, the hesitating compliance the well-off are too 
apt to manifest to those a little down, with whom, in comparison of intellect and 
principles of virtue, they frequently sink into insignificance. Wehster. 

Domestic Happiness. — Six things, says Hamilton, are requisite to create a 
"happy home." Integrity must be the architect, and tidiness the upholsterer. 
It must be warmed by affection, lighted up with cheerfulness j and industry must 
be the ventilator, renewing the atmosphere and bringing in fresh salubrity day by 
day ; while over all, as a protecting canopy and glory, nothing will suffice except 
the blessing of God. 

Self-control. — Let not any one say, says Locke, that he cannot govern 
his passions, nor hinder them from breaking out and' carrying him to action ; for 
what he can do before a prince or a great man, he can do alone, or in the pres- 
ence of God, if he will. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 31 



e 
akin, with its thick, warm hair, attbrds material for his tent, his bedding, and his 
clothing. The bones and antlers, or horns, are worked into implements for do- 
mestic use, for fishing and hunting, and the tendons are split into threads for 
various purposes. The speed of the Greenlander on his sledge is said to rival 
that of the locomotive on our railroads. 



Keep Troubles out of Sight. — Southey says in one of his letters, "I have 
told you of the Spaniard who always put on spectacles when he was about to eat 
cherries, that they might look bigger and more tempting. In like maimer, I make 
the most of my enjoyments ; and though I do not cast my cares away, I pack 
them in as little compass as possible, and carry them as conveniently as I can for 
myself, and never let them aimoy others." 

A PRECIOUS Gem beautifully Set. — A young minister lately said, when 
near dea^h, " Formerly, death appeared to me like a wide river, but now it has 
dwindled to a little rill ; and "my comforts, which were as the rill, have become 
the broad and deep stream.'' 

If you want to understand a tubject, talk with a man whose business it is ; if 
you want to understand the man, talk about something else. 



Digitized 



by Google 



32 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Education without Religion. — To prevent evil, we hear it said, cultivate 
and strengthen the higher faculties of man. Now, Christianity is the one ap- 
pointed means of doing this. To attempt doing it without Christianity, is repeat- 
ing the sin of Adam, who sought a knowledge of things on grounds other than 
the will of God ; hut with this aggravation, that it is done after the melancholy 
experience of six thousand years has shown how ruinous was its nature. 

THE TRUE RULE. ACT WELL YOUR PART. 

" My son, be this thy simple plan : In brief, acquit thee boldly ; play the man ; 

Fear God, and love thy fellow-man ; Look not on pleasures as they come, but go ; 

Forget not, in temptation's hour. Defer liot the leaist virtue. Life's poor span 

That sin lends sorrow double power. Maike not an ell, by trifling in thy woe. 

With hand and brow and bosom clear. If thou do ill, the joy fades, not the pains : 

Fear God, and know no other fear." If well, the pain doth fade, the joy remains. 



Losses by Religion. — Near London there dwelt an old couple. In early 
life they had been poor ; but the husband became a Christian, and God blessed 
their industry, and they were living in a comfortable retirement, when one day a 
stranger called on them to ask their subscription to a charity, The old laJy had 
less religion than her husband, and still hankered after some of the sabbath- 
earnings and easy shillings which Thomas had forfeited from regard to the law 
of God. So, when the visitor asked their contributions, she interposed and said, 
"Why, sir, we have lost a deal by religion since we first began; my husband 
knows that very well. Have we not, Thomas ?" After a solemn pause, Thomas 
answered, "Yes, Mary, we have. Before f got religion, Mary, I had an old 
slouched hat, a tattered coat, and mended shoes and stockings ; but I have lost 
them long ago. And, Mary, you know that, poor as I was, I had a habit of get- 
ting drunk and quarrelling with you ; and that, you know, I have lost. And then 
I had a burdened conscience and a wicked heart, and ten thousand guilty fears ; 
but all are lost, completely lost, and, like a millstone, cast into the deepest sea. 
And, Mary, you have been a loser too, though not so great a loser as myself. 
Before we got religion, Mary, you had a washing-tray, in which you washed for 
hire ; but since then you have lost your washing-tray. And you had a gown and 
bonnet much the worse for wear; but you have lost them long ago. And you 
had many an aching heart concerning me at times ; but these you happily have 
lost. And I could even wish that you had lost as much as I have lost ; for what 
we lose for religion will be an everlasting gain." The inventory of losses by 
religion runs thus : A bad character, a guilty conscience, a troublesome temper, 
sundry evil habits, and a set of wicked companions. The inventory of blessings 
gained by religion includes all that is worth having in time and eternity. 

Reform. — Man's constant prescription for the elevation of man, is to alter hia 
circumstances ; God's grand prescription for the improvement of man is to change 
his heart. Man's plan is to give the patient a new bed ; God's divine plan is to 
give the patient health. Man goes to the circumference, and tries by civilizing 
to get inward, and ultimately to christianize ; God's plan is to begin at the centre, 
christianize the heart, and then civilize the whole circumference of the social sys- 
tem. Man's plan is to give us something that we htye not ; God's plan is to 
make us something that we are not. Rev. Dr. humming. 

Thb desponding Christian, says Leighton, turns to his Saviour as surely u 
the needle to its pole ; even though, like the needle, he turns trembling. 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 33 



In the " Family Christian Almanac " for 1851, was a view of the Capitol 
at Washmgton as originally built. The above is designed to represent it as it 
will appear when the additions, commenced in 1851, shall have been completed. 
These additions will consist of two wings at the ends of the building, with which 
they will be connected by corridors or piazzas 44 feet long and 50 feet wide.- 
The wings will each be 143 feet by 238, exclusive of porticos and steps; and 
the entire length of the building when completed will be 751 feet, and the area it 
covers 153,112 square feet, or over 3^ acres. Around the capitol are 22 acres of 
park, highly ornamented with trees, shrubbery, fountains, etc. 

Liberty, Law, and Religion. — All society, by its changes, seems gradually 
preparing, in the providence of God, for the universal prevalence of liberty, law, 
and religion. The free intercourse of nations, the railways, the telegraphs, the 
lines of steam-packets, the post-office intercommunications, the exchange of litera- 
ture, the decline of bigotry and ignorance, the multiplication of missionaries, the 
spread of the Bible, the very arts and commerce of society, all are preparing for 
communion on a wider field of fellowship than ever before was occupied by man. 
The tide is irresistible — the opposition is as nothing; but still it is useful as a 
lesson in our course, for the obstacles it presents are the deep-rooted prejudices of 
the old world — prejudices to which society will ever have a tendency to recur. 



Patience in doing Good. — When we remember that the missionaries labored 
five years in Orissa, fifteen in Greenland, sixteen in Tahiti, and seventeen in New 
Zealand, before they saw any of the heathen converted to Jesus, and then gath- 
ered a rich harvest of precious souls, we need not, and indeed must not, despond. 
"Behold," says James, "the husbandman waiieth for the precious fruit of the 
earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain. 
Be ye also patient ;^^ for "in due season we shall reap, if we faint not." 

Example. — One watch set right will do to try many by ; but, on the other 
hand, one that goes wrong may be the means of misleading a whole neighbor- 
hood; and the same may be said of the example we individually set to those 
around us. 



Digitized 



by Google 



34 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



How TO DO Good. — Dr. Johnson wisely said, " He who waits to do a great 
deal of good at once, will never do any thing." Life is made up of little things. 
It is but once in an age that occasion is offered for doing a great deed. True 
greatness consists in being great in little things. How are railroads built ? By 
one shovelful of dirt after another ; a single one at a time. Thus drops make the 
ocean. Hence, we should be willing to do a little good at a time, and never *' wait 
to do a great deal of good at once." If we would do much good in the world, 
wo must be willing to do good in little things and little acts, one after another — 
speaking a word here, giving a tract there, and setting a good example all the 
time y we must do the first good thing we can, and then the next, and the next, 
and 80 keep on doing good. This is the way to accomplish any thing. Thus only 
shall we do all the good in our power. 



THE GOOD 

We all might do good . ' 

When we often do ill, 
There is always the way, 

If we hare but the will ; 
Though it be but a word 

Kindly breathed or suppressed, 
It may guard off some pain, 

Or give peace to some breast. 

We all might do good 
In a thousand small waya^ 

In forbearing to flatter, 
Yet yielding due praise — 



MIGHT DO. 

In spuming ill humor, 

Reproving wtong done, 
And treating but kindly 
Each heart we have won. 

We all might do good, 

Whether lowly or great, 
For the deed is not gauged 

By the purse or estate : 
If it be but a cup 

Of cold water that *s given. 
Like " the widow's two mites,*' 

It is something for/teaven. 



Atheism. — ^What can be more foolish, says Jeremy Taylor, than to think that 
all this rare fabric of heaven and earth could come by chance, when all the skill of 
art is not able to make an oyster ? To see rare effects, and no cause ; a motion, 
without a mover; a circle, without a centre; a tirtie, without an eternity; a 
second, without a first ; are things so against philosophy and natural reason, that 
he must be a beast in his-understanding who does not assent to them. The thing 
formed says that nothing formed it ; that that which is made is, and that which 
made it U not. This folly is infinite. 

Accounted for. — A great many men and women in the world, says a shrewd 
observer of human nature, who are blessed with a surplus stock of wealth, are 
for ever miserable. This fact is often a source of wonder, as well to the persons 
themselves as to their acquaintances. But the whole thing is plain, when looked 
at through the medium of the Proverbs of Solomon, where is recorded this won- 
derful and truthful passage : '' He that giveth to the poor shall not lack ; but he 
that hideth his eyes shall have many a curse." 



A Wise Saying of a Wise Man. — It is mentioned in Roberts' Life of Hannah 
More, that in 1783, she sat next to Dr. Johnson, at a dinner-party at the Bishop 
of Chester's. She says, *' I urged him to take a little wine." He replied, " I 
can't drink a little, child ; therefore I never touch it. Abstinence is as easy to 
me as temperance would be difficult." 

Christian Graces are like perfumes ; the more they are pressed, the sweeter 
they smell ; like stars, that shine bright-est in the dark ; like trees, the more they 
are shaken, the deeper root they take, and the more fruit they bear. Rev. John Mason. 



Digitized by L^OOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 35 



Thb Golden Island. — The site of the scene here represented was a favorite 
resort of the Cliinese ennperor Kien-lung. It is situated at the junction of the 
grand Imperial canal and the great Yang-tse Keang river. The island " rises 
majestically above the broad flood of the Keang, which here presents a contin- 
ued scene of animation, from the arrival and departure of junks, boats, and other 
vessels trading with the flourishing city of Qua-tchow." " The delicate pagoda, a 
feature for ages identified with Chinese landscape,'' is a prominent and splendid 
object. 

Works of Fiction: — Constant familiarity, even with such works of fiction as 
are not exceptionable in themselves, says Hannah More, relaxes the mind, which 
needs hardening; dissolves the heart, which wants fortifying; stirs the imagi- 
nation, which wants quieting ; irritates the passions, which want calming ; and, 
above all, disinclines and disqualifies for active virtues and for spiritual exercises. 
Though all these books may not be wicked, yet the habitual indulgence in such 
reading is a silent mining mischief. Though there is no act, and no moment, 
in which any open assault on the mind is made, yet the constant habit performs 
the work of a mental atrophy, it produces all the symptoms of decay ; and the 
danger is not less for being more graiiual, and therefore less suspected. 

A WISE Conclusion. — "The conclusion at which I have arrived, after years of 
observation and experience,'' said the late John McDonough of New Orleans, "is, 
that without temperance there is no health ; without virtue, no order ; without 
religion, no happiness ; and that the sum of our being is, to live wisely, soberly, 
and righteously." 

Humility. — The casting down of our spirits in true humility, is but like 
throwing a ball on the ground, which makes it rebound the higher towards 
heaven. 



Digitized 



by Google 



36 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

The Evil of a Bad Temper. — A bad temper ia a great curse to its possessor, 
and its influence is most deadly wherever it is found. It is a kind of martyrdom 
to be obliged to live with one of a complaining temper. To hear a constant round 
of complaint and murmuring, to have every pleasant thought scared away by 
this evil spirit, is^in truth a sore trial. It is like the sting of the scorpion, or a 
perpetual nettle, destroying your peace, and rendering life a burdep. 



REDEMPTION. MEMORY. 

Redemption is tHe science and the song The up-hill path of human life, 

Of all eternity. Archangels, day Strown u it is -with cares and grief, 

And night, into its glories look. The saints Affords, to retrospective glance. 

And elders round the throne, old to the years A thousand joys as we adrance. 

Of heaven, examine it perpetually ; Sorrows that many a tear-drop drew. 

And every hour get clearer, ampler views Seem blessings in the distant view ; 

Of right and wrong ; see virtue's beauty more ; And pleased we see them, as they fade, 

See vice more utterly depraved and vile ; Settled and softened into shade ; 

And this, Mrith a more perfect hatred hate ; As setting sun on mountain sides 

That, daily love with a more perfect love. Lights up the trees, the' bushes hides. 

The Lost Bank-note. — Mr. A was an irreligious man, nearly sixty 

years of age. He had long neglected the house of God, and indulged in the use 
of profane language. One day he lost a bank-note in his bam. He sought for 
it several times, but did not find it. At length he said to himself^ " That note 
is in the bam, and / will search for it till I find lY." Accordingly he went 
to the barn, and carefully moved straw and hay hour after hour, till he found 
the note. He had said, two months before, that he knew that his soul was 
not right with God, and he intended to live a better life and seek salvation. 
His anxi<»ty increased. A few weeks after he had lost the note he sat by the 
fire musing on the state of his soul, when he turned to his wife and asked, 
"What must one do to become a Christian?" "You must seek for it," she 
replied, " as you sought for the bank-note." She said no more. It was " a word 
fitly spoken." He tried to follow the direction, and hopes that, through the grace 
and mercy of Christ, he has found the "pearl of great price," and rejoices in the 
hope and the glory of God. 

Resolutions formed under Angry Feelings. — ^Never do anything that can 
denote an angry mind ; for although every body is bom with a certain degree of 
passion, and from untoward circumstances will sometimes feel its operation, and 
be what they call " out of humor," yet a sensible man or woman will never allow 
it to be discovered. Check and restrain it : never make any determination until 
you find it has entirely subsided j and always avoid saying any^thing that you 
would afterwards wish unsaid. Collingwood. 

Meekness. — ^How difficult it is to be of a meek and forgiving spirit, when 
despitefully used. To love an enemy, and forgive an evil speaker, is a higher 
attainment than is commonly believed. It is easy to talk of Christian forbear- 
ance among neighbors, but to practise it ourselves requires the grace of a Chris- 
tian indeed. 



Repentance. — Tme repentance consists in the heart being broken ybr sin and 
broken from sin. Some often repent, yet never reform j they resemble a man 
travelling in a dangerous path, who frequently starts and stops, but never turns 
back. Thornton. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



37 



The right Idea of Prater. — ^A little boy once heard a clergyman preach 
from the text, " Verily, verily, I say unto you, whatsoerer ye shall ask the Father 
in my name, he will give it you." After reading the text he stopped a minute, 
and asked his hearers to consider what it was they should like most, and then to 
ask for it in Jesus^ name, trusting to his promise that it would be given to them. 
At the end of the service the little boy asked his aunt if she had asked for any. 
thing. Then she asked him what he had asked God to g^ve him, and he said, 
"I thought first of one thing I should like, and then another; but I did not 
know which would be best to ask, and so I said, ^ Father, thy will be done.^ " 

ADVERTISEMENT OF A LOST DAY. Bj Mra. L. H. Sijourney. 



Lost! lost! lost! 

A gem of countless price, 
Cut from the living rock, 

And grayed in Paradise. 
Set round -with three times eight 

Lai^e diamonds, clear and bright, 
And each with sixtf smaller ones, 

All changeful as the light. 

Lost — ^where the thoughtless throng 

In fashion^s mazes vrind, 
Where trilleth folly's song, 

Leaving a sting behind : 
Yet to my hand 't was given, 

A golden harp to buy, 
Such as the white-robed choir attune 

To deathless minstrelsy. 



Lost ! lost ! lost ! 

I feel all search is vain ; 
That gem of countless cost 

Can ne'er be mine again : 
1 offer no reward, 

Fox till these heart-strings sever, 
I know that J&eaven-intrusted gift 

Is reft away for ever. 

But when the sea and land 

Like burning scroll have fled, 
ril see it in His hand 

Who judgeth quick and dead ; 
And when of scathe and loss 

That man can ne'er repair, 
The dreM inquiry meets my soul, 

What shall it answer there ? 



The Influence of the Bible on Communities. — The Bible, for more than 
a thousand years, has gone hand in hand with civilization, science, and law. It 
has never been behind the age ; nay, it has always gone before it, like the pillar 
of fire before Israel in the wilderness. Its great principles of order, submission, 
and freedom, have been the stability of states. Its presence among them has 
been a saving ark, a refuge, and a rest. How far, even beyond the present time, 
gleams the light of that wondrous book, which describes and promises true 
freedom and fraternity, that divine and universal brotherhood of which the 
nations only dream. In a word, the Christian revelation is the true salt of the 
earth, the vital force of communities and states. It alone regenerates. There 
never was found, in any age of the world, says Lord Bacon, either religion or 
law ijiat did so highly exalt the public good as the Bible. 



A River from a Small Rill. — A Welsh clergyman asked a little girl for the 
text of his last sermon. The child gave no answer — she only wept. He ascer- 
tained that she had no Bible Ik which to look for the text. And this led him to 
inquire whether her parents and neighbors had a Bible ; and this led to a meeting 
in London of a few devoted Christians, to devise means to supply the poor in 
Wales with the Bible, the grand result of which was the formation of the British 
and Foreign Bible Society, which has already distributed more than 15,000,000 
copies of the Bible, i-v \ ' 

PiETT AND Mental Growth. — ^An hour of solitude passed in sincere and earnest 
primer, or the conflict with and the conquest over a single passion or ^^ subtle bosom 
sin," will teach us more of thought, will more effectually awaken the faculty and 
form the habit of reflection, than a year's study in the schools without them. 



Digitized 



by Google J 



38 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

The Christian Sabbath. — The ChristiMi Sabbath, that "pearl of days," 
sanctified as it was in the creation, in the giving of the law, and in redemption, 
founded as well in the necessities of nature as of faith, is a blessed privilege and 
a sacred duty, a gracious gift and a means of grace, a heavenly rest in this 
earthly unrest, a pre-festival and a foretaste of the eternal Sabbath of the church 
triumphant in heaven. 

SUNDAY MORNING. 
Dear is the hallo-vred morn to me, Oft -when the world, with iron hand, 

When Tillage bells awake the day, Has bonnd me in its six days' chain. 

And by their sacred minstrelsy, This bursts them like the strong man's hand, 

Call me from earthly cares aWay. And lets my spirit loose again. 



A Worldly Spirit. — If a man's conduct, says President Edwards, shows that 
he thinks more of treasure on earth than of treasure in heaven ; and if^ when he 
has got the world, or some part of it, he hugs it close, and appears exceedingly 
reluctant to let even a little of it go for pious and charitable uses, though God 
promises him a thousand-fold more in heaven for it, he gives not the least evidence 
of his being weaned from the world, or that he prefers heavenly things to the 
things of the world. Judging by his practice, there is sad reason to believe that 
his profession is vain. 

Man's Ways and God's Ways. — A man, says Jeremy Taylor, is circum- 
scribed in all his ways by the providence of God, just as he is in a ship ; for 
although the man may walk freely upon the decks, or pass up and down in the 
little continent, yet he must be carried whither the ship bears him. A man hath 
nothing free but his will, and that indeed is guided by laws and reason j but 
although by this he walks freely, yet the divine providence is the ship, and God is 
the pilot, and the contingencies of the world are sometimes like the fierce winds, 
which carry the whole event of things whither God pleases. 

The Greatest Blessing. — I have known 'wrhat the enjoyment and advan- 
tages of this life are, and what the more refined pleasures which learning and 
intellectual power can give. I now, on the eve of my departure, declare, that 
health is a great blessing ; competence, attained by industry, is a great blessing ; 
and a great blessing it is to have kind, faithful, and loving friends and relatives ; 
but that the greatest of all blessings, as it is the most ennobling of all privileges, 
is to be indeed a Christian. Coleridge. 

A Hint sometimes Needed. — Almost any one can be courteous in a neigh- 
bor's house. If anyi^hing goes wrong, or is out of time, or is disagreeable there, 
it is made the best of, not the worst ; even efforts are made to excuse it, and to 
show it is not felt j it is attributable to accident, not to design ; and this is not 
only easy, but natural, in the house of a friend. I will not, therefore, believe 
that what is so natural in the house of another, is impossible at home ; but main- 
tain, without fear, that all the courtesies of social life may be upheld in domestic 
society. A husband as willing to be pleased at home and as anxious to please 
as in a neighbor's house, and a wife as intent on making things comfortable every 
day to her family as on set days to her guests, could not fail to make their own 
home happy. 

True Religion shows its influence in every part of our conduct; it is ISke 
the sap of a living tree, which penetrates the most distant boughs. 



Digitized 



byL^oogle 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 39 

Inordinate Expenditure is the cause of a great share of the crime and con- 
sequent misery which devastate the world. The clerk who spends more than he 
earns, is fast qualifying himself for a gambler and a thief; the trader or me- 
chanic who overruns his income, is very certain to become in time a trickster and 
a cheat. Wherever you see a man spending faster than he earns, there look out 
for villany to be developed, though it be the furthest thing from his present thought. 

REST IN HEAVEN. 

" If ever life should seem But 0, if thomless flowers 

To thee a tedious way, Throughout thy pathway bloom, 

And gladness cease to beam And gaily fleet the hours, 

Upon its clouded day ; Unstained by earthly glo<Hn ; 

If, like the weary dore, Still, let not every thought 

O'er shoreless oceaui driven, To this poor world be given ; 

Raise thou thine eye above, Nor always be forgot. 
There 's rest for thee in heaven. Thy better rest in heaven." 

The Nails in the Post. — There was once a farmer who had a son named 
John, a boy very apt to be thoughtless, and careless as to doing what he was 
told to do. One day his father said to him, " John, you are so careless and for- 
getful, that every time you do wrong, I shall drive a nail into this post, to remind 
you how often you are naughty; and every time you do right, I will draw one 
out." His father did as he said he would, and every day he had one, and some- 
times a great many nails to drive in, but very seldom one to draw out. At last 
John saw that the post was quite covered with nails, and he began to be ashamed 
of having so many faults ; so he resolved to be a better boy, and the next day 
he was so good and industrious that several nails came out ; the day after, it was 
the same thing, and so on for a long time, till at length it came to the last nail. 
His father then called him, and said, " Look, John, here is the very last nail, and 
now I am going to draw this ; are you not glad ?" John looked at the post, and 
then, instead of expressing his joy, as his father expected, he burst into tears. 
"Why," said his father, "what 's the matter? I should think you would be 
delighted; the nails are all gone." "Yes," sobbed John, "the nails are gone, 
but the scars are there yet." 

Spirituality. — Be not contented with a little religion, with a little know- 
ledge, a little hope, a little activity, a little holiness. Be not satisfied with any. 
thing short of deep, devoted, active spirituality, and decided and eminent holi- 
ness. Make not half-hearted and decent but doubtful Christians your pattern for 
imitation ; but set your mark and standard high, and steadily and prayerfully 
endeavor to regulate your conduct by it. 

The Spoken and the Unspoken Thought. — I beg you, says Kossuth, to take 
to heart one maxim, which for myself I have ever observed, and ever shall : it 
is, never to say more than is necessary. The unspoken word never does harm ; 
but what is once uttered cannot be recalled, and no man can foresee its conse- 
quences. 

Rules of Health. — Live moderately, exercise freely, bathe daily, rise early, • 
dress lightly^ take things coolly, avoid the blues, eschew wine, shun doctors and 
drugs, lawyers and lawsuits, marry a good wife, and endeavor to make her happy. 

An Arcbitkctural Conceit. — The column is an emblem of faith, it springs 
from earth to heaven ; the arch symboUzes mercy, it descends from heaven to earth. 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



40 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

MORNING LIGHT. •,7, 



|s ^ j4 B. c r JiJ r Jf??^HrJUrF5 



1. The morning light is breaking, The dukness dis - appears, The sons of earth are 

\Ut.TBBBLE. 




2. Rich dews of grace come o'er us In mauiy a gentle shower, And brighter scenes be- 



^ 



m 



P"~y~-g- 



m 



■4 — • — # 



4 * 4 4 i - 




waking To pen - i - ten - tial tears : Each breeze that sweeps the ocean Brings tidings from a- 



* 



^^^^^^ 



:^=i: 



fore ns Are opening er - ery hour ; Each cry to heav - en go • ing A - bimdant answers 



Fg^ag^^eg^ S f^^^ 



n-r^^f^f=^tfrr-^^r^ 



-H 



far. Of na-tions in com - mo - • tion, Pre -pared for Zi--on's war. 



#jJ4tfefe^i^H^ 



r 



brings, And heaven - ly gales are blow - ing, With peace np - - on their wings. 



^^^^ ^f ^F ^^WfTff^ 



T 
Blest river of salvation, 

Pursue thy onward way ; 
Flow thou to every nation, 

Nor in thy richness stay : 
Stay not, till all the lowly 

Triumphant reach their home ; 
Stay not, till all the holy 

Proclaim, " The Lord has come." 
From " Songs orZioa," recently pablished by tbe Society. 



See heathen nations bending 

Before the God we love, 
And thousand hearts ascending 

In gratitude above ; 
"While sinners now confessing, 

The gospel call obey. 
And seek the Saviour's blessing— 

A nation in a day. 



The following beautiful lines are given in the Rev. Legh Richmond's "Young 
Cottager," as taken from a monument, and committed to memory by the youth- 
ful subject of that work : 
It must be so— K>ur father Adam's fall HaU, glorious Gospel, heavenly light, whereoy 

And disobedience brought this lot on all : We live with comfort, and with comfort die ; 

All die in him ; but hopeless should we be, And vie-vi^ beyond this gloomy scene — the tomb, 
Blest Revelation, were it not for thee. A life of endless happiness to eome. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



41 



PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 



10 

11 

12 

13 



George W^hington - - 

John Adams 

Thomas Jefierson 

James Madison 

James Monroe 

John Ctuincy Adams - 

Andrew Jackson 

Martin Van Bnren — 
"William H. Harrison - 

John Tyler 

James K.Polk 

Zachary Taylor 

Millard Fillmore 



Virginia 

Massachusetts - 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Virginia 

Massachusetts - 

Tennessee 

New York ---- 

Ohio -- 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Louisiana 

New York-- -- 



1732 
1735 
1743 
1751 
1758 
1767 
1767 
1782 
1773 
1790 
1795 
1784 
1800 






1789 
1797 
1801 
1809 
1817 
1825 
1829 
1837 
1841 
1841 
1845 
1849 
1850 



Dec. 14, 1799 
July 4, 1826 
July 4, 1826 
June 28, 1830 
July 4, 1831 
Feb. 23, 1848 
June 8, 1845 



April 4, 1841 



June 15, 1849 
July 9, 1850 



n 

n 



G-ovERNMENT OF THE United States. — The sixteenth Presidential term of four years 
began on the 4th of March, 1849, and will expire on the 3d of March, 1853. 

MILLARD FILLMORE New York President Salary $25,000 

"Vacant Vice-President " 5,000 

DANIEL WEBSTER Massachusetts -- Secretary of State " 6,000 

THOMAS CORWIN Ohio Secretary of the Treasury " 6,000 

CHARLES M. CONRAD Louisiana Secretary of War " 6,000 

WILLIAM A. GRAHAM North Carolina - Secretary of the Navy " 6,000 

A. H. H. STEWART Virginia Secretary of the Interior " 6,000 

NATHAN K. HALL New York Postmaster- General " 6,000 

JOHN J. CRITTENDEN Kentucky Attorney-General « 4,000 

Congress. — The Senate is composed of two members elected by the legislature of each 
state for the term of six years. Of course the number of Senators is now sixty-two. The . 
Vice-President of the United States is President of the Senate. In his absence, a President 
jfro tempore is chosen by the Senate. 

The House of Representatives is composed of representatives from each state, in the 
ratio of one to every 70,680 of the population. The present number of members is two hun- 
dred and thirty-four ; and there are four delegates, one each from Oregon, Minnesota, Utah, 
and New Mexico, who have a right to speak, but not to vote. The compensation of the 
members is $8, and that of the Speaker $16 per day during the session, and $8 for every 
twenty miles' travel in going and returning. 



Supreme Court. — Chief Justice, Roger B. Taney of Maryland, sS'lary $5,000. Associate 
Justices, John McLean, Ohio ; James M. Wayne, Greorgia ; John McKinley, Kentucky ; John 
Catron, Tennessee ; Peter V. Daniel, Virginia ; Samuel Nelson, New York ; Benjamin R. 
Curtis, Mass. ; Robert C. Grier, Pennsylvania: salary $4,500. This Court is held in Wash- 
ington, and has but one session annually, commencing on the first Monday in December. 

Circuit Courts. — The United States are divided into 7nne judicial circuits, in each of 
which a Circuit Court is held semi-annually, by a Justice of the Supreme Court, and the 
District Judge of the state or district in which the court sits. 



District Courts The United States are also divided into forty-six districts, in which 

District Courts are held by thirty-seven judges. 

Intercourse with Foreign Nations. — The pay of Envoys Extraordinary and Ministers 
Plenipotentiary, is $9,000 per annum as salary, in addition to $9,000 as outfit. The pay of 
Charges d'Afifaires is $4,500 per annum ; of Secretaries of Legation, $2,000 ; of Minister^ 
Resident, $6,000. The United States are represented by Ministers Plenipotentiary at the 
courts of G-reat Britain, France, Russia, Prussia, Spain, Mexico, Brazil, and Chili ; and by 
Charges d^Affaires at the courts of most of the other foreign powers with which this coimtry 
is connected by commercial intercourse. 



Digitized 



by Google 



42 THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Rkvknue an© Expknditukes of Government, for the year ending June 30, 1851. 

RECEIPTS. I EXPENDITURES. 

Customs $49,942,032 Civil List $29,901,013 



PubUo Lands 2,370,947 



Total $.52,312,979 



Anny 9,060,263 

Nary ----► 9,044,597 

Total $48,005,67d 



Estimated reqeipts for the year ending June 30, 1852, $51,800,000, which, with probable 
unappropriated balance in liie treasury, will give as the probable available means for that 
year, $63,258,743. Estimated expenditures for the same year, $43,892,299. 

Exports and Imports for the year ending June 30, 1851. 



EXPORTS. 

Domestic products $178,546,55.5 

Foreign goods reexported 9,738,695 

Specie 29,231,880 



Total $217,517,130 



IMPORTS. 

Foreign products $210,758,094 

Specie 4,967,901 



Total $215,725,995 

British Hevenue and Expenditure for the year ending January 5, 1851. — ^Receipts, 
$264,054,400 ; Expenditures, $251,159,370. 

IJjnTED States Mint and Branches.— Total coinage for 1851, and sources whence gold 
was received for 4 years. 

coinage in 1851. I WHENCE GOLD RECEIVED. 

Gold. Silver. TotaL California. Other source*. Total 

Philadelphia $52,143,446 $446,797 *$52,689,878 1848 $45,301 $351,374 $896,675 

New Orleans- 9,795,000 327,600 10,122,600 ' 1849 6,151,360 927,784 7,079,144 

Charlotte---. 324,454 324,454' 1850 36,273,097 665,217 36,938,314 

Dahlonega-. 351,592 351,592 1851 55,938,232 602,380 56,540,612 

$62,614,492 $774^ $^,488,524 1 Total -- $98,407,990. $3,046,755 $101,454,745 
Whole number of pieces coined, 28,701,958. The expense of coinage at Philadelphia is 42-100 
per cent. ; at,New Orleans, 1 and 8-100 per cent. ; at Charlotte, 3 and 55-100 per cent. ; and 
at Dahlonega, 3 and 13-100 per cent. 

* Including $99,636 in copper. 

Post-Office Statistics for the year ending June 30, 1851. — Number of Post-oflSces, 
19,796 ; extent of 6,170 post-routes, 196,290 miles ; annual transportation, 53,272,252 miles ; 
gross receipts, excluding foreign postages, $6,727,866 ; expenditures, $6,024,566 ; letter post> 
age, $5,369,243 ; newspaper and pamphlet postage, $1,035,131 ; new Post-offices, 1,698. 

Post-Office in G-reat Britain. — The gross receipts of the British Post-office for the 
year ending January 5, 1851, was $11,323,420; cost of management, $7,303,925; net 
revenue, $4,019,490. The estimated total number of letters in 1850, was 347,069,071 ; 
number of money orders, 4,439,713, and the amount of them, $42,472,490. 

Magnetic Telegraph According to the Mechanics' Magazine for February, 1852, there 

are already in the United States and Canada, more than 12,000 miles of wire, involving a 
capital of more than $3,000,000. To work these lines, costs annually 720 tons of zinc 
worth $57,600, more tiian a million pounds of nitric acid worth $117,800, and $27,000 
worth of mercury, besides a considerable value in sulphuric acid, etc. 

Railroads The number of Railroads in operation in the United States, on the 1st of 

January, 1852, was 263, measuring 11,565 miles in length, and constructed at an estimated 
cost of over $350,000,000. The number of Railroads in course of construction was 74, 
measuring 11,228 miles. Total number of Railroads 337, and total number of miles in 
operation, and in course of construction, 22,893. 

Railroads in G-reat Britain — The total length of Railroads open and in use in Great 
Britain, on the 1st of January, 1851, was 6,621 miles ; authorized and in course of construc- 
tion, 5,382 miles ; giving a total of 12,003 miles. Total number of persons employed on 
Railroads, open and unopen, 118,859. Number of passengers conveyed on railroads in th^ 
half-year ending December 30, 1850, 41,087,919. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 43 



•c 



g 



pi: S 



Digitized 



by Google 



g 

a" 

M 

f 



6 

i 



41 



THE FAMILr CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Prookksi and Propobtion of the Popuultion in Psriods of Ten Years. 



CENSUS. 


POPULATION. 


PROPORTION. 


INCREASE. 




WhitM. 


Free Colored 


SUrefc 


Toul 


Whites 


Fr. CoL 


SlaTee. 


Nombers. 


Perct. 


1790 


3,172,464 
4,304,489 
5,862,004 
7,866,569 
10,537,378 
14,189,895 
19.630,738 


59,466 
108,395 
188,446 
233,524 
319,599 
386,245 
428,661 


697,897 
893,057 
1,191,364 
1,538,098 
2,009,043 
2,487,213 
3,198,324 


3,929,827 
5,305,941 
7,239.814 
9,638;i61 
12,866,020 
17,069,453 
23,257,723 


80.73 
81.12 
80.97 
81.55 
81.90 
83.16 
84.50 


1.51 
2.04 
2.57 
2.46 
2.48 
2.26 
1.84 


17.76 
16.84 
16.46 
15.99 
15.62 
14.58 
13.66 






1800 

1810 

1820-^.. 

1830 

1840 

1850 


1,376,114 
1,933,873 
2,398,377 
3,227,829 
4,203,433 
6,188,270 


35.01 
36.45 
33.12 
33.48 
32.67 
30.25 



Progress of the Unitbd States. — The following figures present, in a small space, an 
impressive picture of the progress of our country in the last half century : 



Population. 

5,305,925 

8,000,000 

12,866,920 

17,063,353 

24,000,000 



Pout-offices. 

903 

3,459 

8,450 

13,733 

19,796 



Post routes. Expend's or Post-office. Rerenae. 



20,817 miles $213,994 

52,089 916,515 

115,176 1,932,708 

149,732 5,674,752 

196,290 6,024,566 



Tear. Area, sq. miles. 

1800 739,000 

1817 1,869.000 

1830 1,929,000 

1842 2,370,000 

1851 3,220,000 

G-ROUPING OF THE StaTES. •q.'roilM. 

New England States 63,226 ' 

Middle States, including Maryland, Delawaxe, and Ohio 151,760 

Coast planting States, including South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, 

Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana 286,077 

Central slave States, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, 

Missouri, and Arkansais 308,210 

North-western States, Indiana, Michigan , Illinois,'Wisconsin, and Iowa 250,000 



$280,804 
1,002,973 
1,850,583 
4,546,849 
6,727,866 



Population. 
2,727,597 
8,653,713 



Inhabit's 

to sq. m. 

43.07 

57.02 



3,537,089 12.36 



5,168,000 
2,735,000 

Relative Progress of different Classes of Population. — Increase per cent. 



16.75 
10.92 



1800 1810 1S30 1830 1840 



1810 

37.6 



1830 1830 1840 1860 

28.58 31.44 23.4 26.23 



1790 1800 1810 1820 1830 1840 1790 

Classes. to to to to to to Classes. to 
1800 1810 1830 1830 1840 1850 1800 

Whites 35.7 36.2 34.19 33.95 34.7 38.28 Total colored 32.2 

Free colored- --82.2 72.2 25.25 36.85 20.9 10.09 

Slaves -27.9 33.4 29.01 30.61 23.8 28.58 

The time of taking the census was changed in 1830, from August 1 to June 1. Allowing for 
these two months, the increase in ten years ending 1830, would have heen 34.36 per cent. 



^uUtLT} ^-^^ 36.45 33.12 33.48 32.6 36.25 



I860. 

19,638,019 

428,637 

3.184,262 

3,612,899 

23,246,301 



Absolute increase 


loc perct. 


in sixty years. 


in 60 years. 


-16,457,555 


527.97 


369,171 


617.44 


2,486,365 


350.13 


2,855,536 


377.00 


19,316,444 


491.52 



Increase in Sixty Years._ i790t 

Whites 3,172,464 

Free colored 59,466 

Slaves 697,897 

Total free colored and slaves 757,363 

Total population 3,929,827 

Sixty years since, the proportion between the whites and blacks, bond and free, was 4.2 to 1. 
In 1850, it was 5.26 to 1, and the ratio in favor of the white race is increasing. Had the 
blacks increased as fast as the whites during these sixty years, their number on the 1st of 
June would have been 4,657,239 ; so that in comparison with the whites, they have lost in 
this period, 1,035,340. This disparity is much more than accoimted for by European cmi- 
gration to the United States. 

Area and Population. — Taking the 31 States together, their area is 1,485,870 square 
miles, and the average number of their inhabitants is 15.48 to the square mile. The total 
area of the United States is 3,221,595 square miles, and the average density of population 
is 7.219 to the square mile. In the last ten years, no less than 1,166,432 square miles have 
been added to the area of the United States, not including the great lakes upon our north- 
ern borders, or the bays that indent our Atlantic and Pacific coasts. The total area of Eu- 
rope is 3,807,195 square miles. 

The Whale Fishery. — The number of vessels employed in the Whale Fishery at the 
^ commencement of 1852, was 558 ships and barks, 27 brigs, and 35 schooners. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



45 



Housxs AND PopmjLTioic OF GrRSAT Britaiit, ftccording to the census of March 31, 1851. 





HOUSES. 


POPULATION. 




Inhabited. 


Uoioliabited. 


Building. 


Persons. 


MaW 


Female* 


England and Wales 


3,280,961 

366,650 

21,826 

1,047,735 


152,898 

11,956 

1,077 

65,159 


26,534 
2,378 

202 
2,113 


17,922,768 

2,870,784 

142,916 

3,176,727 


8,762,588 

1,363,622 

66,511 

3,339,067 


9,160,180 

1,507,162 

76,405 

6,515,794 


Islands in the British seas • - • 


ireianu - 


•Jq^ 


4,717,172 


231,090 


31,227 


24,113,195 


13,531,788 


17,259,541 





Licrease of population in England, Wales, and islands, since the census of 1841, 12 per 
cent. ; increase in Scotland, 10 per cent ; decrease in Ireland, 20 per cent. 

Thi Aoricultural Productions op thk United States. — By the Census report, we 
learn that the following are the agricultural productions of the United States : Acres of land 
improved, 112,042,000; value of farming utensils, $151,820,273; live stock, $552,705,238; 
wheat, 104,799,230 bushels ; Indian com, 591,586,053 bushels ; tobacco, 199,532,494 lbs. ; 
ginned cotton, 2,474,214 bales, 400 lbs. each; wool, 52,422,797 lbs.; wine, 141,295 gal- 
lons ; butter, 312,202,286 lbs. ; cheese, 103,184,585 lbs. ; hay, 13,605,384 tons ; hemp, dew- 
rotted, 62,1^ tons; hemp, water-rotted, 13,059 tons; flax-seed, 567,749 bushels; maple 
sugar, 32,759,263 IIjs. ; cane sugar, 318,467 hhds. ; home-made manufactures, $27,525,545. 

Health of the United States. — The statistics of mortality for the census year, repre- 
sent the number of deaths occurring within the year, at 320,194 ; the ratios being as 1 to 
72.6 of the living population, or as 10 to each 726 of the population. The rate of mortality 
in this statemeift seems so much less than that of any portion of Europe, that it must at 
present be received with some degree of allowance. 

Kewspapers and Periodicals. — ^According to the census returns, the whole number of 
newspapers and periodicals in the United States, on the 1st June, 1850, amounted to 2,800. 
Of these, 2,496 were fully returned, 234 had all the facts excepting the circulation given, and 
72 are estimated for California, the Territories, and for those that may have been omitted 
by the Assistant Marshal. From calculations made on the statistics returned, and estimated 
circulations where they have been omitted, it appears that the aggregate circulation of those 
2,800 papers and periodicals is about 5,000,000, and that the entire number of copies printed 
annually in the United States amounts to 422,600,000. The following table will show the 
number, daily, weekly, monthly, and other issues, with the aggregate circulation of each class. 

No. of copies 
printed ann'ly. 



No. Circulation. , 



DaiUes 


- 350 


750,000 


235,000,000 


Tri-weeklies - - - 


- 150 


75,000 


11,3:00,000 


Semi-weeklies - 


- 125 


80,000 


8,320,000 


WeekUes 


- 2,000 


2,875,000 


149,500,000 



No. 
Semi-monthlies • 50 

Monthlies 100 

Q,uarterUe8 25 

Total 2^ 



Circulation. ^°: "^ «>P»» 
pnnted ann'ly 

300,000 7,200,000 

900,000 10,800,000 

20,000 80,000 



5,000,000 422,600,000 

424 papers are issued in the New England States, 876 in the Middle States, 716 in the 
Southern States, and 784 in the "Western States. Average circulation of papers in the 
United States, 1,785. There is one publication for every 74^^ ^^^^ inhabitants in the 
United States and Territories. 



Indian Census. — ^According to the census returns, the entire number of Indians, inhab- 
iting all parts of our country, amounts to about 418,000. Of this number, 30,000 is the esti- 
mated number of those inhabiting the unexplored territories ; 24,100 are the Indians of 
Texas ; 92,130 belong to the tribes living in New Mexico ; 32,231 are in California ; 22,733 
are in Oregon ; 11,500 in Utah. Many of the New Mexican Indians are civilized, and have 
fixed habitations and towns. 



The Coal-Trade. — The extent and growth of the Anthracite coal-trade may be seen 
in the following table. 

Tenr. No. Tona. [Year. No. Tona. I Tear. No. Ton*. 

1820 365 1840 865,414 1850 3,356,899 

1830 174,734 1845 2,023,052 1 1851 4,383,730 



Digitized 



by Google 



46 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



LiBBAKiss IX THs UxiTKD Statss From the Census returns. 



rVmUC LTBBABISS. PUB. 8CH. LIBR's. 

Ko. Yohiinea. No. Toloinea. 

Maine 48 51,815 4 740 

New Hampshire 27 20,487 

Vermont 21 9,917 13 9,100 

Ma«sachu5etta-. 78 199,322 700 85,443 

Rhode Island ■ • 18 8,165 10 5,064 

Connecticut 43 44,273 1 300 

New York 355 168,239 9,482 1,136,584 

New J.rser - - 26 26,571 6 2,180 

Pennsylrania •• 111 149,476 29 8,131 

Delaware 3 10,350 

Maryland 10 44,850 22 5,467 

Virginia 23 43,105 2 1,460 

North Carolina - 7 45,252 

South Carolina - 9 63,b75 1 250 

Georgia 8 12,500 11 .1,800 

Florida 1 1,000 1 200 



PUBLIC LIBBABIXS. PUB. 8CH. LIBB's. 
No. YolQines. Na Yolomes. 

Alabama 5 2,048 

Mississippi--- 6 11,264 
7 12,800 



Louisiana 

Texas 

Ohio 56 

Indiana 53 

Illinois 32 

Missouri 10 



Arkansas 

KentucV ■• - - - 
Tennessee --- 

Mighigan 

Iowa 

"Wisconsin --- 



1 
36 
13 

248 

1 
7 



54,858 
46,429 
32,419 
21,950 
52 
33,316 

6,866 
59,819 

1,600 
10,240 



30 
102 
1 
2 
3 
1 

16 
4 

1 
2 
124 
4 
33 



1,000 
3,050 
10,000 

330 
1,595 

200 
2,350 
6,200 



1,100 

5,100 

31,382 

160 

2,163 



Total- - - 1,262 1 ,212,858 10,605 1,321^9 
This list does not include priyate, college, church, or private school libraries. 



Vessels Built in the United States — ^In 1851, there were built in the United States, 
211 ships, 65 brigs, 532 schooners, 326 sloops and canal-boats, "with a total of 298,202 ton- 
nage. The steam tonnage of the United States had increased within the year, 57,760 tons ; 
making the whole amount 583,607 tons. 



Steam Vessels of the United States. — From official reports to Congress, it appears 
that in 1851, the steam marine of the United States, internal and external, was as follows: 
inland steam marine. 

Steamers. 

Northern frontier 164 

Ohio basin 348 

Mississippi river 353 

Total 765 204,613 17,607 5,860,850 

On the Atlantic coast, there were 58 ocean steamers, 369 ordinary steamboats, 67 propellers, 
and 80 ferry-boats, having an aggregate tonnage of 177,514 tons. And on the Pacific coast, 
there were 37 ocean, and 13 ordinary steamers, having a tonnage of 34,986 tons. These 
several vessels were manned by about 11,770 officers and crew, and carried for the year 
ending July 1, 1851, 33,:U2,846 passengers, as follows : 



Tonnage. 


Crew. 


Passengers. 


69,165 


2,855 


1,513,300 


67.101 


8,338 


3,464,867 


97,967 


6,414 


882,593 



Long Island Sound 302,397 

Hudson river 995,100 

Philadelphia and New York 840,000 



Potomac and James rivers, and Chesa- 1 ,,^^,^ 

peakebay - } *22,100 

Gulf of Mexico 169,209 

Pacific coast 79,207 



Steam Vessels in Gtreat Britain — According to official reports, the entire steam 
marine of Great Britain amounted, in 1851, to 1,185 steamers, with a total tonnage of 
177,312 tons. 

Religious Denomtxations in the United States — ^According to the estimates of Eev. 
Dr. Baird, the statistics of the principal evangelical denominations of the United States, in 
1851, were as follows, not including about 9,000 " local preachers" of the Methodist W>dy. 



Cong's. 


Members. 


1,550 


73,000 


1,971 


197,196 


13,455 


948,867 


6,672 


490,259 



1,250,000 
333,000 



Denomination. Ministers. Cong's. 

Methodist body 6,000 30,000 

German churches - ■ - 1,827 5,356 

Friends or Q^uakers 300 

Total 23,614 58,304 3,292,322 

preachers, 10,896 churches, 784,028 members. The Presbyterian bo^j 



Denomination. Ministers. 

Prot. Epis. Churches 1,504 
Congregational body 1,687 

Baptist body* 8,018 

Presbyterian body* - 4,578 

* Tlie Baptirt Almanac for 1863 has 7, 
includes the Reformed Dutch church. 

Colleges ant> Professional Schools in 1851 — Number of Colleges, 122; Theological 
Seminaries, 44 ; I^aw Schools, 17 ; Medical Sehools, 37. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 47 

ANNIVERSARIES AND OFFICERS OF CHARITABLE SOCIETIES, ETC. 

BOSTON. — American Board for Foreign Missions, 2d Tues. in Sept. ; Rev. Rafos Anderson, . 
D.D., Rer. Selah B. Treat, Rev. Swan L. Pomroy, D.D., See's; Henry Hill, Esq., Treas., Miss. 
House, 33 Pemberton-square. ; A. Merwin, Agent in New York, 150 Nassau-st. American Bap- 
tist Miss'ry Union, 3d Thurs. in May ; Rev. Solomon Peck, D. D., Rev. Edward Bright, See's, 33 
Somerset-st. American Education Society, in May; Rev. Increatse M. Tarbox, Sec.; S. T. 
Farwell, Treas., 15 Comhill. American Tract Soc. at Boston, last Wed. in May; Rev. Seth 
Bliss, Sec, 28 Comhill. Prison Discipline Soc., Rev. L. Dwight, Sec. ; Chas. H. Mills, Treas., 
39 Milk-st. Mass. Home Missionary Soc, Rev. J. S. Clark, Sec, 28 Comhill. Mass. Sabbath- 
School Soc., Rev. A. Bullard, Sec, 13 Comhill. Amer. S. S. Union, H. Hoyt, Agent, 9 Comhill. 

NEW YORK.— American Bible Soc, 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. John C. Brigham, D. D., Rev. Jo- 
seph Holdich, D. D., See's ; J. Hyde, Esq., Gen. Agent and Assist. Treas., 115 Nassau-st. American 
AND Foreign Bible Soc, Rev. R. Babcock, D. D., Cor. Sec, U. D. Ward, Dep. Agt., 10 Park-place. 
American Bible Union, Wm. H. WyckofF, Esq , Cor. Sec, 90 Chambers-st. American Tract 
Soc. , Wed. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. Wm. A. Hallock, Rev. 0. Eastman, Rev. R. S. Cook, Cor. 
See's ; O. R. Kingsbury, Assist. Sec. and Treats., 150 Nassau-st. American Home Missionary Soc, 
Wed. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. Milton Badger, D. D., Rev. Chas. Hall, D. D., Rev. David 

B. Coe, Sec's ; H. W. Ripley, Assist. Treas., 150 Nassau-st. Ambr. Baptist Home Mission Soc, 
Rev. Benj. M. Hill, Cor. Sec, 354 Broome-st. Board of Foreign Missions of Pres. Church, 
Hon. Walter Lowrie, Rev. John C. Lowrie, Cor. Sec's; Wm. Rankin, Jr., Treas., 23 Centre-st. 
American and Foreign Christlan Union, Tues. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. Robert Baird, 
D. D., Rev. E. R. Fairchild, D. D., Cor. Sec's, Edward Vernon. Gen. Agent and Assistant Tr., 17 
Beekman-st. Amer. Seamen's Friend Soc, Mond. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. J. Spaulding, 
Rev. H. Loomis, Sec's, 80 Wall-st. Amer. Temperance Union, 2d Thurs. in May, evening ; Rev. 
J. Marsh, Cor. Sec, 149 Nassau-st. Prot. Epis. Church Missions — Domestic Committee, Rev. W. 
T. Webbe, Loc Sec ; Foreign Committee, Rev J. W. Cooke, Sec. and Gen. Agent, 19 Warren-st. 
Methodist — ^Book Concern, Rev. T. Caxlton and Rev. Z. Phillips, Agents, 200 Mulberry and 138 
Nassau sts. ; Missionary Soc, Rev. J. P. Durbin, Cor. Sec, Geo. Lane, Treas., 200 Mulberry-st. ; 
Sunday-School Union, Rev. D. P. Kidder, Cor. Sec, 200 Mulberry-st. Reformed Dutch — ^Domestic 
Mission, J. S: Bussing, Treas., 32 Cllff-st. ; Foreign Mission, C. L. Little, Treas. Central Amer- 
ican Education Soc, Wm. A. Booth, Treas. Society for Coll. and Theol. Ed. at West, Rev. 
T. Baldwin, Sec, M. Wilbur, Treas., 41 Liberty-st. » Amer. Missionary Assoc, Rev. Geo. Whip- 
ple, Cor. Sec ; Lewis Tappan, Treas., 48 Beekman-st. Amer. and For. Anti-Slavery Soc, L. 
Tappan, Cor. Sec, 48 Beekman-st. Colonization Soc of State of New York, J. B. Pinney, 
Cor. Sec, Brick Ch. Chapel. American Soc. M. C. Jews, Rev. E. R. McGregor, Cor. Sec, Brick 
Church Chapel. Nev York, and American Sunday-School Union, J. C. Meeks, Agent, 147 
Nassau-st., and 38 Park-row. 

PHILADELPHIA.— American Sunday-School Union, Tues. after 3d Thurs. in May; F. W. 
Porter, Cor. Sec ; F. A. Packard, Esq., Rec Sec, 146 Chesnut-st. General Assembly's Boards, 
at the Publication Rooms, 265 Chesnut-st. — Domestic Missions, Rev. C. C. Jones, D. D., Cor. Sec ; 
Board of Education, Rev. C. Van Rensselaer, D. D., Cor. Sec ; Board of Publication, Ilev. Joseph 
Leybum, D. D., Cor. Sec. ; Rev. W. M. Engles, D. D., Editor ; Joseph P. Engles, Agent. Amer- 
ican Baptist Publication Society, 31 North-Sixth-st. ; Rev. Thos. T. Malcom, Sec, Rev. J. N. 
Brown, Ed. Sec, Rev. Benjamin R. Loxley, Gen. Agent. Philadelphia Tract Society, Wm. 

C. Chambers, Agt., South-sixth-st., near Market. Phila. Education Soc, 4th Thurs. in May; 
Rev. James R. Eckaxd, Sec'y. Philadelphia Home Missionary Society, 4th Wed. in May ; 
Kev. Robert Adair, Secj 142 Chesnut-st. 

WASHINGTON. — Amer. Colonization Society, 3d Tues. in Jan. ; Rev. Wm. McLain, See. 

MINISTERS' MEETINGS.— General Convention in Maine, Tues. before fourth Wed. in 
June. General Assoclition, New Hampshire, 4th Tues. in Aug. General Convention in 
Vermont, 3d Tues. in June. General Assocla-Tion, Massachusetts, 4th Tues. in June. Evan- 
gelical Consociation, Rhode Island, 2d Tues. in June. General Association, Connecticut, 
3d Tues. in June. General Association, New York, Thurs. before last Sabbath in Aug. Gen- 
eral Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1st Wed. in October. General As- 
sembly Presbyterian Ch., 3d Thurs. in May. General Conference Methodist Epis. Ch., 
every 4th year from 1840. General Synod Reformed Dutch Ch., on the 1st Wed. in June. 

YEARLY MEETINGS OF FRIENDS.— New England Yearly Meetlng, held at Newport, 
Rhode Island, begins Second day after second Sixth day in Sixth month. New York Yearly 
Meeting, New York City, Sixth day after fourth First day in Fifth month. Philadelphia Year- 
ly Meeting, third Second day in Fourth month. Baltimore Yearly Meeting, last Second 
day but one in Tenth month. North Carolina Yearly Meeting is held at New Garden, 
Guilford county. Second day after first First day in Eleventh month. Ohio Yearly Meeting, 
Mount Pleasant, Second day after first First day in Ninth month. Indiana Yearly Meeting, 
Whitewater, on Fifth day preceding first First day in Tenth month. 



Digitized 



by Google 



48 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



FAMILY READING. 

Every family should have a carefully chosen library, with suitable books for young and old. 
Immoral tales and books of piracy and murder should be excluded. Works of history, poetry, and 
science, should have a place, and certainly a good selection of standard books of practical theology. 
To meet this and kindred wants, the following libraries^and single works h8.ve been 
PUBUSHED BT THE AMEKICAN TRACT SOCIETY. 

THE RELIGIOUS (OR PASTOR'S) LIBRARY, 24 vols. 12 mo., price $10, containing 
10,831 pages, with steel portraits, embracing practical and experimental works, of Flavel, Baxter, 
Owen, Bunyan, Hopkins, Edwards, Venn, and Willison ; works on the evidences of Christianity 
by Paley, Gregory, and Spring ; the inemoirs of Milnor, Summerfield, Mrs. Graham, and Mrs. 
South, and D'Aubign^'s History of the Reformation. 

THE YOUTH'S LIBRARY, 70 vols. 18 mo., price $10, containing 9,630 pages, elegantly 
printed, with 255 highly finished engravings, embracing Hannah More's Cheap Repository in 
eight volumes, the "Peep of Day" series, and as rich a collection of juvenile books as exists in 
the same compass. 

THE EVANGELICAL FAMILY LIBRARY, 15 vols. 18mo., price $5 50, embracing a choice 
selection of the most spiritual authors. It has been a blessing to thousands of families. A con- 
tinuation of this library in uniform binding, in 21 vols., price $7 50, will be sought by those who 
have the first 15 volumes. 

THE SET OF ENGLISH PUBLICATIONS, nearly 200 volumes, is sold for $50. 

TRACTS AND CHILDREN'S TRACTS, singly, bound, or in packets, for convenient sale 
by merchants and traders, many of them beautifully illustrated — in English, German, French, 
Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, and Welsh. 

PUBLICATIONS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES in rich variety, including more than 50 vol- 
umes in German. • 

THE FAMILY TESTAMENT WITH NOTES, Instructions, and Maps, wiU be welcomed 
as a brief and comprehensive conmient for use in family worship, in the Sabbath-school, and iu 
the closet. Price 60 cents. 

THE AMERICAN MESSENGER, a monthly newspaper issued by the Society, is the most 
widely circulated journal, secular or religious, in the world. It goes to 200,000 families. Single 
subscribers, 25 cents a year ; six copies for $1 ; twenty copies for $3 ; forty copies for $5. 

THE M ESSENGER IN GERMAN, (Amerikanischer Botschafter,) is edited with much ability, 
and should be put into the hands of every German family. Circulation 25,000 monthly. Same terms. 

" THE CHILD'S PAPER '? is a beautiful little newspaper for the young, with fine paper, 
elegant engravings, and valuable reading matter. Its circulation is nearly as large as that of the 
Messenger. Terms, ten copies to one address, in advance, $1 ; sixty copies. $5 ; one hundred 
copies, $8. 

All the publications of the Society are selected with scrupulous care ; they are replete with 
soul-saving truth ; are printed on good paper in clear type, and at such prices that the Society 
may neither sustain loss nor make a profit by its sales. The conscientious parent may feel secure 
in placing them in the hands of his child ; and whoever would learn the way of salvation through 
Christ and the influences of the Spirit, will find in these works the plain, practical instructions 
presented in the unerring standard of the word of God. 

FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my Executors the sum of Dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

in after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer 

of the Society, formed in in the year eighteen hundred and 

to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



TABIiE OF SIMPIiE INTEREST AT SIX PER CENT. 



Principal 


One Mo'th 


One Year. 


Principal 


One Month. 


One Year. 


Principal 


One Montlu 


One Year. 




». 0. M. 


B. 0. u. 




S. 0. M. 


D. 0. M. 




1>. 0. M. 


D. O. M. 


Cents 10 





6 


DoUs. 6 


3 


36 


Dolls. 40 


20 


2 40 


" 50 


2 


3 


" 7 


3 5 


42 


" 50 


25 


3 00 


Dolls. 1 


5 


6 


« 8 


4 


.48 


" 60 


30 


3 60 


" 2 


10 


12 


" 9 


4 5 


54 


« 70 


35 


4 20 


" 3 


15 


18 


« 10 


5 


60 


" 80 


40 


4 80 


it 4 


2 


24 


« 21 


10 


1 20 


" 00 


45 


5 40 


" 5 


3 5 


30 


" 30 


15 


1 80 


" 100 


50 


6 00 



The interest of any sum in dollars for 6 days, is the same sum in mills : viz. of $100, 100 mills, 
or 10 cents ; of $6,600, 6,600 mills, or $6 60, etc. Money at compound interest will double itself 
in 11 years, 10 months, and 22 days. 



Digitized 



by Google 



-nmui 9pvui 



iiiiiigi3iiisiifii§igiis|g§§gg§|§ 



SI 



•JO sponod 



:)0«io)'Xbh 



^oepanod 



Sisi igilS ii 



ill^ 



SSI 






ef 



IIIIPIMIIISII SlillllfllElillliFi * 

I II I e I S II 8 g'- 1 2 8 S " S 2'8 * " fiS I If 1 2 35 1 ""^ " 






^ f-<©l coo CO Of Ol»^^ 



•jovpunod 

♦4»nua 



iiisiiiggS§gg|iSi|28SS|§S|$g5§2g|g|: 



^ tH »-l 



■JO 



issiSsi 






sponod loo^ 






T^cfo'cfefef^ 



■JO spnnod 



- i is" S^ 8*83" - S" 



•oiooireip 
-ni JO sidqsna 






T-lrHWOI r-it^<X)<3>9ir- 



sss-sas'^^ 



g«3'Nr-«2^»^ 



nvan-^ 
JO oiaiiima 



58 00 c5 



IllslfllillSllslIflliliifllflii 



CSrHVi ^ ^ei*-4i-l 



rief ■'sJ" V^fo'cTef i-T"^ 



llgi§giS§i§liili§§S§ii[ 



r- <•£) — ^ 3 



ifDoja 
BAji JO anpA 






50«^C9 »-l 






•^aaiqavta 
pau Biuacu 
-aidmi Sill 
-uiJBj JO aniiiA 



Cfofoi 






■paAOJdun 
pirei JO vajbv 






i-refi-Tao' ef oui^fo ^cfr^ « «o oTi-Twa »o ©f »h 




•|||3 

oPh 2 § « 

•s ^ § SI 



Digitized 



by Google 



°£fH^ 



liEGAIi RATES, OF INTEREST. 

The legal rate is 8 per cent, in Alabama, Ml^is^pji, Louisiana, and Florida. It is 7 per cent- 




n New York, South Caj jlina, Georgia, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa. In adl the other states, 
t is 6 per cent. *"' -**:^ " ^ 

^.i 

MEmORANDA FOR 1853. 

Jan. 1, CircuihcUi* ; 2, 2d S. aft. Christmas ; 6, Epiphany ; 9, -Ist S. aft. Epiph. ; 16, 2d S. 
ft. Epiph. p 23, Septuaigesima ; 25, Conv. of St. Paul ; 30, Sexagesima. Feb. 6, Quinquagesima ; 
, Ash-Wednesday ; 13, 1st S. in Lent ; 20, 2d S. in Lent ; 24, St. Matthias ; 27, 3d S. in Lent. 
Iarch 6, 4th S. in Lent ; 13, 5th S. in Lent ; 20, 6th S. in Lent ; 25, Good-Friday ; 27, Easter 
iunday. April 3, 1st S. aft. Easter; 10, 2d S. aft. Easter ; 17, 3d S. aft. Easter; 24, 4th 8. aft. 
master ; 25, St. Mark. May 1, 5th S. aft. Eaister ; Sts. Philip ajid James ; 5, Ascensior^-day ; 8, S. j 
ft. Ascension ; 15, Whit-Sunday ; 22, Trinity-Sunday ; 29, 1st S. aft. Trin. JrotB 5, 2d S. ait. 
'rin. ; 11, St. Barnabas; 12, 3d &. aft. Trin. ; 19, 4th S. aft. Trin. ; 24, St. John the^ Baptist; 26, 
th S. aft. Trin. ; 29, St. Peter. July 3, 6th S. aft. T/in. ; 10, 7th S. aft. Trin. ; 17, 8th 8. aft. | 
:..... ; 24, 9th S. aft. Trin. ; 25, S. Jajpaes ; 31, 10th' S. aft. Trin. Aug. 7, 11th S. aft. iMn. ; 14, 
2th S. aft. Trin ; 21, 13th S. aft. Trin. ; 24, St. Bartholomew; 28, 14th S. aft. Trin. Sept. 4, 15th 
!. aft. Trin. ; 11, 16th S. aft. Trin. ; 18, 17th S. aft. Trin. ; 21, St. Matthew ; 25, 18th 8. aft. Trin. 
)CT. 2, 19th S. aft. Trin. ; 9, 20th S. aft. Trin. ; 16, 21st S. aft. Trin. ; 18, St. Luke ; 23, 22d S. I 
ft. Trin. ; 28, Sts. Simon and Jude ; 30, 23d S. aft. Trin. Nov. 1, All-Saints ; 6, a4th S. aft. Trin. ; f 
3, 25th S. aft. Trin. ; 20, 26th S. aft. Trin. ; 27, Advent-Sunday; 30, St. Andrew. Dec. 4, 2d S. . 
n Advent ;' U, 3d S. in Advent ; 18, 4th S. in Advent ; 21, St. Thomas ; 25, Christinas; 26, St. I 
itephen ; 27, St. John ; 28, Innocents. 

TIDE-TABXE. 

CHIEFLY FROM THE TABLE IN BDWDITCH'S NAVIGATOR. 

The Calendar pages exhibit the time of high-watey at Boston, New York, and Char|^estoa. 
To find the time of high-water at any of the following places, add to or subtract from 
he time of high-water at New York^ as follows : 



Qbany Add 

Imboy - Sub. 

Lnnapol's, Md. Sub. 

Vnnapolis, N. S. - - - Add 

Baltimore Add 

Bridgeport Add 

I astport Add 

ialifax. N.S. i^ub. 

iolmes' Hole Add 

Cennebeo Add 



6 34 

39 

1 51 

1 49 
5 7 

2 
2 9 
2 15 
1 4 
1 39 



Machias Add 1 54 

Marblehead r - Add 1 49 

Mobile Point Add 1 54 

New Bedford Sub. 1 40 

New Haven Add 2 4 

New London - - ^b. 21 

Newpt»t 'Sub. 1 55 

Norfolk -"feub. 41 

Plymouth Add 2 19 



Portland Add 1 39 

Port^outh Add 2 9 

Providence -tSub. 41 

Quebec --- Add . 8 49 

Richmond Sub. 2 25 

Salem -—-Add 2 19 

Sandy Hook, N. J. - - Sub. 2 45 

Sunbury - — Add 19 

Windsor Add 2 49 



THE CHRISTIAN ALMANAC, 



OTHER PUBIilCATIONS OF THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, 

tfay be had at 150 Nassau-street, New York, or of N. P. Kemp, 28 Comhill, Boston ; William 
>oGGE8HALL, Providence ; Charles Hosmer, Hartford ; J. B. Peck, New Haven ; E . H. Pease, 
i2 State-street, Albany ; R. Wasson, 9 and 10 Cannon-place, Troy ; SeWard & Thcrbur, 137 
5enesee-street, Utica; L. Danforth & Co., 230 Main-street, Buffalo; Tract Depository, 11 
5outh-Sixth-street, Philadelphia ; H. N. Thissell, 8 St. Clair-street, Pittsburgh ; Rev. S. Guiteau, 
! Franklin Buildings, Baltimore; D. W. Harrison, Chalmers-street, Charl^ton; H. Packard, 
14 St. Charles-street, New Orleans ; W. H. Bulkley, Fourth-street, Louisville ; Seely Woo|^, 
\.gent, Walnut-street, near Fourth, Cincinnati ; Rev. C. Peabody, Agent, 73 Market-street, St. 
jouis ;"* A. McFarren, 137 Jefferson-avenue, Detroit ; and of other booksellers and traders. 

DC?=- The ALMANAC is furnished at a low price to those who order it by the 100 or 1,000. 

Tito B6ard of the American Tract Society embraces members of fourteen evangelical denomina- 
ions, united to diffuse the knowledge of Christ and him crucified by its publications, associated with 
jersonal Christian effort, at home and abroad. About 500 colporteurs axe now laboring in the most 
lestitute parts of the country. A donation of $20 constitute*^. Life Member ; $50 a Life Director. 
The usual salaJTr of a colporteur is $150, besides other expenses and books granted. William A. 
_ Hallock, 0. Eastman, and R. S. Cook, Corresponding Secretaries, 0. R. Kingsbury, Assist. 
Jh Treasurer, 150 Nassau-street, New York. Seth Bliss, Secretary, 28 Comhill, Boston. 



Digitized 



by Google 



.-^ 



•^ >-r^^:<^^.=^ . 



_ c^ 



(r 



^ 



M 



"^<- / ^^ 



A I 



Digitized 



by Google 



TABLE OF THB SOLAR SYSTEM. 



EQUINOXES AND 


SOLSTICES FOR 1854.. 




EQUINOXES AND SOLSTICES. 


London. 


BoBton. 


Washington. 


Cincinnati 


San FranciMO. 


Vernal Equinox Mairch - - - 

Summer Solstice June 

Autumnal Equinox -Sept. 

Winter Solstice Dec. 


D. ■. K. 

20 10 20 e. 
•21 7 8e. 
23 9 13 m. 
22 3 Om. 


D. B. M. 

20 5 36 ev. 

21 2 24 ev. 
•23 4 29 mo. 
21 10 16 mo. 


•20 5 12 ev. 
21 2 Oev. 
23 4 5 mo 
21 9 52 ev. 


D. B. M. 

20 4 42 ev. 

21 1 30 ev. 
23 3 35 mo. 
21 9 22 ev. 


D. ■. K. 

20 2 12 e. 

21 11 m. 
•23 1 5 m. 
•21 6 52 e. 



When it is noon at London, it is 6 h. 52 m. in the morning at Washington ; and when it 
is noon at Washington, it is h. 8 m, in the evening at London. 

MORNING AND EVENING STARS FOR 1854. 

Mercury will be morning star until Feb. 8 ; then evening star until March 23 ; then 
morning star until May 28 ; then evening star until July 30 ; then morning star until Sept. 
12 ; then evening star until Nov. 19 ; then morning star until Jan. 20, 1855. Venus vrill 
be evening star until Feb. 28 ; then morning star until Dec. 13 ; then evening star until 
Oct. 1st, 1855. Jupiter will be morning star until July 15; then evening star until Jan. 
29, 1855. Mars will be morning star until Feb. 26 ; then evening star until April 9, 1855. 
Saturn will be evening star until May 26 ; then morning star until Dec. 4 ; then evening 
star until June 10, 1855. 



SATURN'S RINGS 

Will be in a position favorable for visibility the whole of this year, with a telescope of 
moderate power. A third ring has been discovered recently. 

It is said that important discoveries with reference to this planet, have lately heea 
made by the new monster telescope of Rev. Mr. Craig, and that the rings are but 
arches of the most perfect geometrical formation. 

APOGEE AND PERIGEE OF THE SUN. 

Sun's Perigee Janaary 1st, \ j- .-_^ r--„ ^v. -parti, (93.577,000) English 

Sun'. Apogee July l.t, i **^^t*"' ^^^"^ *« ^^^ i9a,7G8,OOo} miL. 



Digitized by L^OOQIC 



I THE 

ILLUSTRATED 

FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 

FOR 

THE UNITED STATES, 

FOR 

THE YEAR OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOUR JESUS CHRIST 



1854, 



BEING THE SECOND AFTER BISSEXin.E. AND UNTIL JULY 4TH, THE 78TH YEAB 
OP THE INDEPENDENCE OP THE UNTTED STATES. 

CALCULATED FOR # 

BOSTON, NEW YORK, WASHINGTON, AND CHARLESTON, 

AND 

FOUR PARALLELS OF LATITUDE 
ADAPTED FOR USE THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY 

WITH 

VALUABLE STATISTICAL INFORMATION CHIEFLY FROM ORIGINAL SOURCES 
ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS IN EQUAL, OR CLUCK TIIklK. 

BY SAMUEL H. WRIGHT. 

DXTMDXX, lATBa COOMTT, KBW TORK. 

BOSTON. Let. «• «r N. ; Lone. 71* 4' W. 
NKW YORK, Lat. 40» «' 40" N.; Long. 74" 1' W. 
WASHINGTON, Lat 38" 63' N. ; Long. IV W. 
CHARLESTON, Lat 32" 47'N. ; Long. 7tf" 67' W. 



PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY 

NEW YORK: 150 NASSAU-STREET; BOSTON: 38 CORNHILL; 

AND BY BOOKSELLERS AND TRADERS. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THI FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 



iV Tbn work has been cbief j ft^mnd by the Ber. TRTON IDWAHDS, D. D., of New Lentfon, Conn., who 
with (reat labor tni care, baa drawn many oftlie sUtiatical tables from or^nal soarces. 

Entered accordias to Act of Congress, in the year 1863, by O. R. KiaeaavsT, in the Clerk's Office of the District 
Court for the Southern District of New Yosk. 



B€I<IPS||8 IN THE YBAR 18ff4. 

This year there will be two Eclipses of the Sun, and two Eclipses of the Moon. 

L A partial Eclipse of the Moon, May 12, in the morning. Magnitude, 2.87 digits on 
the southern limb. Invisible on this continent. 

II. An annular Eclipse of the Sun, Friday, May 26, in the afternoon. Visible princi- 
pally as a rery large partia^ Eclipse ob the. Sun^t northern limb, throughout North Americui 
except along the isthmus of Darien, as in the following table. ^ 



PRINCIPAL 
CITIES. 



Montreal 

Ea8t]>ort 

Rochester 

Milwankie - • 

Buffalo 

Albany 

Galena • 

Detroit --• 

Boston --■ 

Chioaffo ■ 

Iowa City- -- 
New York- - 
PitUburgh -- 
Harriiburgh • 
Philadelphia 
Indianapolis ■ 
Springfield -- 

Columbai 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati -• 
Washington - 
St. Louis 



Befin- 



4 10 
4 43 
3 53 
3 2 

3 47 

4 13 

2 48 

3 20 

4 27 

3 3 

2 40 

4 15 

3 45 

4 1 
4 9i 
3 14 

2 54 

3 30 

4 3 

3 13 

4 2 
2 56 






5 26 
5 56 
5 10 

4 26 

5 5 
5 29 
4 13 

4 47 

5 41 
4 26 

4 6 

5 30 
5 3 
5 17 
5 25 
4 36 
4 19 

4 50 

5 19 

4 44 

5 18 
4 20 



H. M. 

6 33 
6 59 
6 20 

5 41 

6 16 
6 36 

5 29 

6 
6 46 
5 41 

5 24 

6 37 
6 14 
6 27 
6 33 
5 50 

5 35 

6 3 
6 28 

5 57 

6 27 
5 35 



2 23 
2 16 
2 27 
2 39 
2 29 
2 23 
2 41 
234 
2 19 
2 38 
2 44 
2 22 
2 29 
2 26 
2 24 
2 36 
2 41 
2 33 
2 25 
2 34 
2 25 
2 39 



Haeni- 
tuJe. 



Digits. 
11.10 
10.75 
11.07 
10.25 
10.86 
11.23' 
9.81 
10.27 
11.36 
9.85 
9.54 
10.70 
10.02 
10.21 
10.38 
9.41 
9.14 
9.59 
9.98 
9.28 
9.79 
8.69 



PRINCIPAL 
CITIES. 



** Momtn^. 

Astoria* 

San Francisco'* 
Richmond* --- 
NashYiUe — - 

Raleigh 

Little Rock- - 
Huntsville --- 

Augusta 

Tuscaloosa - - - 
MilledgeTille - 
Charleston --- 

Jackson 

Sayaunah 

Natchez 

Mobile 

Tallahassee -• 

Austin 

New Orleans - 
St. Augustine - 

Havana 

Mexico 

King8ton,Jam. 



Begin 



1124 
1127 
4 2 
3 16 
3 58 

2 48 

3 18 
345 
3 14 
3 40 
3 58 
3 3 
3 52 

2 58 

3 17 
338 

2 22 

3 10 

3 54 

4 5 
253 
4 45 



1 5 
1 12 
5 18 

4 36 

5 13 
4 10 

4 37 

5 2 
4 33 

4 55 

5 12 

4 22 

5 6 
4 16 
4 33 
4 52 

3 42 

4 26 

5 8 
5 10 
3 42 
3 39 



2 41 
2 50 
6 26 

5 49 

6 23 
5 25 

5 49 

6 10 

5 45 

6 5 
6 19 

5 35 

6 14 
5 30 

5 43 

6 

4 57 

5 35 

6 13 
6 6 
4 31 



3 17 
3 23 
2 24 
2 33 
2 25 
2 37 
2 31 
2 25 
231 
2 25 
2 21 
2 32 
2 22 
2 32 
2 26 
2 22 
2 35 
2 25 
2 19 
2 1 
1 3d 
1 40 



Masni- 
tudo. 



Dig's. 

10.80 
7.92 
9.30 
8.04 
8.77 
7.22 
7.60 
7.73 
7.10 
7.49 
7.73 
6.63 
7.43 
6.28 
6.24 
6.63 
5.39 
5.88 
6.66 
4.37 
1.53 
3.1S 



NoTB. As a solar Eclipse of the magnitude of this rarely occurs, it may be interesting 
to gire it a particular notice. During this Eclipse the apparent diameter of the Moon will 
be a little less than that of the Sun, and therefore the Sun cannot in any place be entirely 
or totally eclipsed. This circumstance also will cause a bright ring of light to be formed 
around the darkened parts of the Sun. This ring will be only about one-third of a digit 
wide, and will be yisible only in the vicinity where the line of central eclipse passes. The 
eclipse is central in longitude 73° 53' west of G-reenwich, latitude 44° 14' north; and in 
longitude 64° 35^ west, latitude 41° W north. By finding these positions upon a map, 
and drawing a line from one to the other, the towns and countries through which the cen- 
tral eclipse passes will be readily discovered. The path of tiie annular eclipse will be 
about 100 miles wide, and extend about 50 miles each sidp of the line we hare described. 

The annular Eclipse will move about 100 miles per minute, and will pass through the 
eastern part of Upper Canada, through the counties of St. Lawrence, Franklin, Clinton, and 
Essex, and through the northern part of Jefferson, Lewis, Herkimer, Hamilton, Wayne, and 
Washington, in New York. It will be seen in nearly all of Vermont and New Hampshire ; in 
the north-east comer of Massachusetts, and south-western part of Maine. It will be annular at 
Kingston, U. C, at Whitehall, Plattsburgh, Portland, and within ten or twelve miles north- 
east of Boston. 

The line of central and annular eclipse begins at sunrise in the Pacific Ocean near the 
Caroline Islands, long. 162° 51' east, lat. 6° 43^ north, and pass^north-easterly near the 
Sandwich Islands, then enters the Uhited States a UttU m<it)tj>f^l^;»C)^ in C^egon, and 

^uth-easterly, 
lied, to the 
ds at sun- 



then tiavelling nearly easterly, passes through Lake Su 
passes south of Bytown in Canada, and th^ew througK^ 



tper 
tKe 



passes south of Bytown in Canada, and th^<w through liie cuiliiAllM We hat^ 
Atlantic Oeean in York* county^ Me., 15 i^iles norlhw^j^rteiMuth, N. H« 

ii,'rro \ y^ 



\ 



-Digitized by^i^CK^Ql 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 



8 



act, in long. 51° 53' west, lat. 36° 18' north. The partial ecHptse first touches the earth at 
sunrise in long. 176^ 35^ weat, lat. 1° 22' south ; and ends at sunset north-east of the Baha- 
ma Islands, in long. 73° 41' west, lat. 28° 2^ north. 

The first time this eclipse ever occuned was in 1313, July 2d ; since then, it has re- 
torutid 31 tunes, including its return this year. It occurred in April 1800, in May 1818? 
and in May 1836. It will return again in June 1872. Its last return will be in the year 
2593, August 17th. The next solar eclipse that will attract much attention in this coun- 
try, will be in 1858, March 15th. 

III. There will be a very small partial Eclipse of the Moon, Saturday, Nov. 4, in the 
evening. Visible partly in the eastern Section of the New England states. G-reatest mag- 
nitude 0.64 of a digit. The moon will rise Eclipsed at the'foUowing places : 



CHie*. 


Moon 
Rise*. 


Eclipse 
Ends. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Cities. 


Moon 
ilises. 


^!r 


Dura- 
tion. 


Citiee. 


Moon 
Rises. 


Kcliu^e 
Enifs. 


til5m 


Kastport 
Augusta 


4 4ii 
4 45 


5 12 
5 


28 
?L5 


Portland - 
Boston - - 


4 46 
4 49 


468 
4 55 


»0 12 
6 


Q,uebec - 
Montreal - 


4 40 

4 42 


4 54 
4M5 


14 
3 



At Eastport, the Moon will rise at the time of greatest eclipse. At New York, the 
eclipse will end 9 minutes before the Moon rises. This eclipse may be seen when the Moon 
rises in all that part of New England east of the meridian of Lowell, Massachusetts. 

IV. There will be a total Eclipse of the Sun on the 20th of November, invisible in North 
America. This eclipse is conftned mostly to the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. At the Cape 
of Good Hope it will be 6.97 digits in size. 



RISING'AND SETTING OF THE PLANETS. 

It should be observed that these are not sensibly affected by the longitude of a place 
When the hour is less than 6, it is in the evening ; when greater than 6, it is in the morning. 



1854 

Jan. 1 
" 6 
« 11 
" 16 
" 21 
" 26 

Feb. 1 
" 11 
" 21 
" 24 
« -28 

Mar. 6 
it 14 

" 27 

April 8 
cf 17 



Venus Mts - - - 



Mars rises • 
Venus sets - 



Saturn sets - - - 
Jupiter rises - - 
Saturn sets - - - 
Mercury sets 
Jupiter rises - - 
Mercury rises 
Saturn sets - - - 
Jupiter rises ■ - 



8 27 
833 
8 34 
8 35 
843 
8 21 

8 15 
7 41 

6 46 
27 
4 19 

11 4S 

7 19 
2 49 
4 47 

9 23 
54 



Wash- Charles- 
ington. 



8 33 
8 37 
8 38 
8 3S 
8 47 
8 25 

8 16 
7 40 

6 46 
19 
4 8 

11 40 

7 17 
2 39 
4 46 

9 14 
44 



8 41 
8 44 
8 43 
8 42 
8 52 
8 30 

8 16 
7 40 

6 45 
7 

3 53 
11 28 

7 13 
2 24 

4 45 

9 1 
29 



DATE, 



1864 
May 10 

" 20 
June 1 

" 10 

" 20 
July 13 

" 20 
Aug 8 

« 20 
Sept. 1 

" 20 
Oct. 1 

" 20 
Nov. 11 

" 27 
Dec. 7 

" 20 



Mars sets 

Jupiter rises • - 
Venus rises- -- 

Mars sets 

Jupiter rises - - 
Mercury sets - 

Mars sets 

Mercury rises - 
Saturn rises - - 

Mars sets 

Venus rises- -- 
Saturn rises - - 
Jupiter sets • - 
Mercury sets - 
Mercury rises - 
Jupiter sets--- 
Mars sets 



1 57 
11 26 

2 32 
19 
9 18 
8 31 

10 22 

4 10 

11 34 

8 32 

9 59 
8 55 

10 1 
ev517 

5 42 
7 49 

6 16 



Wash- 
ington. 



1 52 
11 16 
235 
16 
9 8 
8 25 

10 23 
4 17 

11 44 

8 38 

4 3 

9 5 
10 12 

eT5 28 

5 35 
7 59 
6 27 



Cha's-' 
ton. 



1 44 
11 1 

2 41 
12 

8 52 
8 15 

10 24 
4 28 

11 59 

8 46 

4 10 

9 20 
10 28 

ev5 44 

5 25 
8 15 

6 44 



PHENOMENA OF THE PliANETS FOR 1854. 

Jahuakt 10, © perigee; 6, 9 brilliant; 15, It (5 $ ; 16, ^ stat; 18, $ stat.; 24, 
<5 brightest; 26, Tp Stat.]) lowest; 28,IJID0. Feb. 5, 6 stat. ; 8, $ sup. c5 ©; 9, D high- 
est; 13, ^ D© ; 19, 5 (5 9 ; 26, ^ 6^ 0; 27, ^ brightest; 28, 9 inf. 6 ©• March 6, 
9 gr.elong. E.; 8, D highest; 13, 5 stat.; 19, 9 stat.; 22, D lowest; 23, $ inf. c5©. 
April 4, D highest; 5, 9 brightest; 10, $ stat.; 36,2i D ©; 15, D lowest; 20, t^ gr. 
elong. W. May 3, IJl 6 © ; 9, 9 gr. elong. W. ; 15, IC stat. D lowest; 26, © eclipsed, 
^ 6 ©; 28, 5 sup. (5 ©; 29, D highest. June2, ^ D ©; 17, 9 (5 ¥; 25, D high- 
est. JvLT 3, 5 gr. elong. E. ; 11, 9 (5 ^ ; 15, 2^ (5 ©, IC brightest; ^, D highest ; 30, 
9 inf. d ©. Auo. 9, S^ a ©, $ stat. ; 18, gr. elong. W. ; 19, D highest; 22, ^^ st,at. 
S«PT. 2, D lowest ; 8, ^ D © ; 12, 5 sup. c^ © ; 13, Z^ stat ; 15, D highest ; 28, ^ stat. ; 
29, D lowest Oct. 12, 2f <i ©, ]) highest; 26, ]) lowest; 28, 5 gr. elong. E. Nov. 7, 
^5©; 9, D highest; 19, $ inf. d ©; 21, 5 <^ 9 ; 23, D lowest; 28, ^ stat Dec. 
4, ^(9©; 6, 5 gr. elong. W., D highest; 13, 9 «"P- d © ; 20, J) lowest 



Digitized 



by Google 



4 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 

CHARACTERS. 

€)0Sun; DMoon; ^ Mercury; JVenua, Earth; <JMars; 2^ Jupiter; 'p Saturn; 
}^ Uranus ; ^ same longitude, or near each other ; D 90° apart ; § opposition, or 180^ apart 

SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 

T Arie«; ^ Taurus; n Oeinini; f3 Can(?er; SI I^o; HJ^ Virgo; rfia Libra; fllScor- 
pio ; / Sagittarius ; V3 Capricorn ; s:s Aquarius ; ^ Pisces. 

ASPECTS AND NODES. 

c5 Conjunction; >|c Sextile, 60 degrees; D Quartile, 90 degrees; A Trine, 120 degrees; Vc 
Quincunx, 150 degrees ; S Opposition, 180 degrees ; Q Ascending Node ; ^ Descending Node. 

CHRONOLOGICAL. CYCLES. 

Dominical Letter, A ; Golden Number, 12; Jewish Lunar Cycle, 9 ; Epact, (Moon's age 
Jan. 1,) 1; Solar Cycle, 15; Roman Indiction, 12; Julian Period, 6567; Age of the world, 
(Septuagint,) 7362. 

NOTES TO THE READER. 

The Calendar page in tliis Almanac is adapted for use in every part of the United States. 
It is based on the fact, that in the same Latitude, tJuit is, on a line running due east and 
west, the Sun aTid Moon rise a7id set at the same moment by the dock or almanac, not 
orily throughout the United States, but around the world — the variations being so small as to 
be of no importance for ordinary purposes. Thus, if on any day the Sun rises at Boston at 5 
minutes past 6, it rises at 5 minutes past 6 on the same line of latitude westward throughout 
the states of Massachusetts, New York, Michigan, Iowa, and the territory of Oregon. 

Hence, a Calendar adapted to Boston for New England, is equally adapted, as to the rising 
and setting of the Sun and Moon, for use in Northern New York and Michigan ; a Calebdar 
for New York city is adapted for use in the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois; 
a Calendar for Washington city is adapted for Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri ; and a 
Calendar for Charleston will answer for North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, and 
Louisiana. Wherever the reader is, look for the state at the top of the Calendar page, and 
underneath are the rising and setting of the Sim and Moon sufficiently accurate for ^ 
practical purposes. 

The changes, fulls, atid quarters of the Moon, however, are governed by another prin- 
ciple, and are essentially the same for all places on the same Lo7igit7ide ; that is, on anf 
line extending due north and south. Thus, the Moon's phases for Charleston, suit Pitts- 
burgh, etc. Any phasis takes place at the same instant of absolute time ; but the local time 
is earlier at the westward, and later at the eastward, at the rat^ oi four minutes for each 
degree of hongiticde ; or at the rate of one minute for every 12 miles 273 rods in the \ali- 
tude of Boston, 13 miles 60 rods in the latitude of New York city, 13 miles 143 rods in the 
latitude of Baltimore, and 14 miles 199 rods in the latitude of Charleston. 



TRUE TIME. 

Two kinds of time are used in Almanacs ; clock or m^ayi-t^me in some, and apparent 
or sun-time in others. Clock-time is always right, while su7i-time varies every dar. 
People generally suppose it is twelve o'clock when the sun is due south, or at a properly 
made noon-mark. But this is a mistake. The sun is seldom on the meridian at tweln 
o'' clock; indeed this is the case only on four days of the year: namely, April 15, June lij 
September 1, and December 24. In this Almanac, as in the Nautical and other best Ai- 
manacs,^ the time used is clock-time. The time when the sun is on the meridian or a< 
the noon-mark, is also given to the nearest second, for the- 1st, 9th, 17th, and 25th dap ?l 
each month, at the right hand of the top of each calendar page. This affords a ready mec^ 
of obtaining correct time and for setting a clock by using a noon-mark, adding or sub* 
tracting as the sun is slow or fast. 

Old-fashioned Almanacs, which use apparent time, give the rising and setting of t^ 
snn's cetitre, and make no allowance for the effect of refraction of the sun's rays by tN 
atmosphere. The more modern and improved Almanacs, which use clock-time^ give ti 
rising and setting of the sun's upper limb, and duly allow for refraction. 

C^ See Tide-table, Memoranda, etc., etc., on the *over. 

* 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



TtlS FAMILY CHAISTIAN ALMANAC. 



iBt MONTH. 



JAIVVARY, 18S4. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter 1 5 

FuU Moon I 14 

Third Quarter • 21 
New Moon 28 



11 3ev. 
4 27 mo. 
8 39 ey. 
28 ev. 



NEW YORK. 



m. M. 
10 51 er. 

4 15 mo. 

8 27 ev. 

16 ev. 



BALTmORE. CHARLES'N . 



I M«rld. 
vHUirk. 



10 40 er. \ 10 27 er. 
4 4 mo. I 3 51 mo. 
8 16 er. I 8 3 er. 
5 ev. 1 11 52 mo. 



1 »: 



1 ler. 

o: 

17 . 

2-3 



5£i 



ill 






b 5 oiM 









o 



9? 






3 .')7 

7 31 

10 2S 

12 41 

axe 



.^a»co»o gCoafttoojgsiQgj 



j^wosor-t Soi-tojeoeo 



S;g§ jjg§?3?5^S?i.^ £??F5^^*2:j .!J 






OWt^OOOJO'H 2O'-t0»C0O<0 1 



goo OOO O O O W^ O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O V^ O O »Q 



ji CO CO CO CO CO "^ Tt -«(• ''t ''I' CO CO CO CO CO CO (N c^ oi CM »-^ rH o o o g gc gc 



«?3Ct 

oovt 
o o ^ 






I? 



^aot^co gOOrr;;2;coco» ^o joScJ'^, ^?? S^S'"^^8 .??^^ 

sJt-0>0«-< 2otHC>IC0'«tO«0.2O«0t^000JO'H Soi-tCOl'W'OO'Sot-OD 



Br»-q'T»-<»Tt-^-^-^-^yT»-^-^000000 0»OU?OtCO OOOO UO O «C 



ji050>0»OJOJO>CiO»050>OiOOOOQOOOr^l^'r);0>.'OO^rJ'C0 7»'M»-^00>XX 



•^»»jkA.p ^«a 



^!:^E3^i3p^^^a^^E2c£;ig^s^^63fi:cg4{s^^g£yl^aE2 



H^UOI^JoIlBd 



i-'CiCOTtOOr-XOJO'^CJCOrtOtOt'XOO'-jOl 



8oJ6J?5c5^^^?.^^« 









i95o^22 gSi:;^S22:S 2^;:i22S5S^?5 g:;«5^?S;5So .?l^£? 

^t^ooo-H 2o'-<oico^o«o.ao«ot^xojo^ gO^COrtOtO g^Ot^OO 



• COTf O CO t~-Q06iQ— <f?JC0'^O«Pl^0»O«-<0IC0^Ot-X0>O»^C0'^O«0 
a-^-^jiTt-^f^-^-^OOOOOOOOO r-» r-l ^ r-* r-> ^ 

a'^TfTf-^'^'^^r>''^Tt^^'»»'-t«'^'^0000000 00 >0 o 






jor-<rHC«cO'^to<oi^xojoo^ ►OtHr-<(McocO'^o«ot««OJO*H |o© 



■fto.-<g.-<»-tf}6io*CTc5g .-i'^(5M?<cogTj<o.-<?*'«t'^^(M'*>c 

rit^XO^ So-HtMCO'-tOtO.SO^t^XOOi-i 2o.-<C0TtO«0 "Stot^x 

■ r-t rH B »-? — H t-H E M 






•gloapB^ang 






•^a^JklJoXt^d ^SE3^Sp£;«^^5^^^gfi:cg^S5^E3p£;^^SE3^E3fe(g^aH 



•ipuoHJOJttia 



»-i0JC0^O«0t*X0>O»-<<MC0"^O<0l>X0»O*H 



8c5?J§5^^8S58§8^?5 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



3d MONTH. 



FEBRVARY, 18S4. 



28 DAYS. 



MOON'S PUA8E0. 



Firtt Quarter • 
Full Moon • • • • 
Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 



BOSTON. NEW YORK. BALTIMORE. CHARLES'N 



5 53 ev. 

10 13 ev. 

6 mo. 

11 55 ev. 



5 41 ev. 

10 1 ev. 
5 48 mo. 

11 43 ev. 



5 30 ev. 
9 50 ev. 
5 37 mo. 
11 32 ev. 



5 17 ev. 
9 37 ev. 
5 24 mo. 
11 19 ev. 



8an on M erld. 
or noon mark. 



ev. 13 66 
14 32 
14 17 
13 18 



rt -> • » 






^1 



9 ^ 



i 2S^% g^^g?°°E^^^^;Sc;3«^°^^oJ^8u^^*;^°°S?§j 



i ^^'^ g5?53^^^^^ g^Si^^^55 g^5i;SS3§§ ^^^ 



« SS::! 6 



S;::6 = 






td O to O <0 <0 «0 CO O CO «0 O <0 <0 <0 to «0 O CO CO <0 CO to to o<o to <o «o 









is 



jj O -4 So •-iOJC0-^"rl*»OCO.2cO t^OOOJOr-i 2oO»CO"^0<0 "S^Dt^ 



9 ^ 






si 



B t« t^ t« t^ t^ t^ t^ t^ CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO to CO to to to to CO to CO to CD CO 



•3i»»Ai JO ^«a 



^HcJ^c^^J^H^H^c^^SR^HpSr^^JS^H^Sp^cg^aH 



H^aoi^ JO ixa 



.-HOJCO-^OCOr-OOOSOi-KMCO-^OcOt-OOOiOT-j 



Sw^(N^C^O«^S 






. QO ^00C»t^a5C00Pl>0)Tj<l-T+i»-iC0i000C0»-<CJOl^»QO'--tX)'*00 
j^ ,-< lOr-i^OlCOTl'COt'OOOOOJOOrHT;^ >'»-<T-<(MMO«0t^000>O 



l«2 



J OrH 20'-<0>eOrf OJOCO.atOt'OOOSOrH Socjco-^ioto "Scot^ 



w to 



. 000>0»-«OJCOOtOt-QQO^O>'^>OCOl--OSO— iCOT}<OCOOpClOi-i 

a ;S T-^ oj W cs» CN (N (N oi OJ « CO « CO c5 CO 00 « TP rr -i^ rr ''I' "^ ^ T> 



j 1-1 O OS t^ CO «0 -^ CO c« »-t o » 
a t* i> t^ i> t' t* t- 1- c^ t^ t* to 



tototototococococototocoQOco^co 




s o»»-<«oco^ 

jj r-« (N C«l CO "<* 



rf O l> 00 o> O -H 



^ ►t-^tHCQOlCO'^'^J'VOt-OiO'-Hr-* 2 



oo cO;::^ 



^^3^:s5o g'^ssssj^^ g^;^:^?;^;:: ^§5^ 

(NCO'*>OOco.S3ci 



atot^oooso 



-^ C '— • V.X w'j V.X »— • • cv ■^ 
»-t §^0»C0^»OCO'S<Dt^ 



s::3g 



to to 






lOCOOOO 






si 

w 5 



a t^ 



COO<rHOO>OOCO»Orl*<M»H 

r-( rH t-( »H 



i>cococototoco<ococococotoco<occ 



•g pap Bjung 



Ot- COCOCOO>0»OTj'Tt-#COCOCO(N(N(rJrH^,-«0000»OJOJOOOO»> 



•^a^AS^Jo^tsa I ^Sf±;tg^!:^H^Hfi;^^)^H^Hfi;i^^!:gE3^i5ci;c^^!^ci 



•l^ltlOl^ JO X-BQ 



.-i(MC0<<J'»OC0l>000>O^(MC0'^»OC0t-000>Q'-< 



SwwcS^c^c§^?J 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



3d. HKONTH. 



IflARCH, 1S4S4. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter • 

Full Moon 

Third Quarter- 
New Moon • - - 



2 25 ev. 
1 9ev. 
1 18e\r. 

7 67. 



2 13 ev. 

57 ev. 

1 6ev. 
11 55 mo. 



BALTIM 


ORE. 


H. M. 

2 2 
46 
55 
11 44 


ev. 
ev. 
ev. 
mo. 



CHARLES'N. 



1 49 ev. 

33 ev. 

42 ev. 

11 31 mo. 



Sun ou Merld. 
•r noon msrk. 



ev. 12 35 
10 44 
8 30 
6 5 



m 












9«'S 



josa»oo»-i 2oooico»o«o<or-ooooo>o>oo ^ ti^ i-i oj ^ «o «o i> oo oo os 



^OOOJO^ gO^CMCO "^T}<lO«^.2 t'OO OSOi-H gO»H(NC0rf OO ® l>00O> 



eio lo t o to CD <o<o optDto coo< oo<o coao o o c© co^to 50 «o to to «o to «o «o 

«B«OCO«0«0«0«0«0«OtO«0«0«0«0<OtO«0«0<OOtOtO<OOOOOOWtl>0«C»0 






^oocno^ 2oihcjcotj«»oo«o,2i>ooo50^ g^^ 



(NCOCO-«*IOO "St^ooos 



B>o>o>o>o>ooo to<oco to tocD<o<o<o<o<o<o to<o<o tototototototototo 



tgto^to«ooto«o«ototoco«ocoeo«oco«oco«oto<otoiooooio»o»oo»-'T 



V9iilJoX»a ^^^■S<^^^^^S^^S^^^S<^H^Hf^S^^^^S^ 



•K^uoKjoiTa -'^«^'^«^^*^2;:J^S^^2^S2gs5S3S5^^^^^^?5 















n 









CO MtHCNCO-^ g^,-(r^ Tj- 1-"^ • TO CO rf 






^^totoco^<ocototo<oto«o«otototoso<oco 



atoocotocD«o«oco«oto?o 



tototoo«ocototocotocoo»o»oo»o»o»ooo 



il 



J O »H '-< 01 C» CO •* "^ «o i> o> 



00^ {iI O «-l r-i OJ d CO -^ O «0 00 O O -H c®o 

i-Tt-* «-< » T-l T-H r-t C 



- -o § 



Ti<»-« . to «o go th ^ iTi 00 "sr CO o> to t^ -^ tor-ito 

»0«0.2t^(»0>0 gOr-KMCO-^-^WSOol^OOOi 



BO tQ>0 0>00>0»0<0<0 



C0'^O;0l-0>O'-iOC0rJ'Ot>000SOT-H 



o»o»6i?« c5 



gatO(OCOCOCOCO(OOCO<OCO 



totoo?oto<otocoto<oo<ocotototototototo 
^^q^^^w^oTF^^on^TcTo^^^^^ 

toto«o«oto«oto«otototo>o>o»ooo w^o »o Ut) 



COOI<N(N^'-<OOj^^O»H,-<t-iC'»OJCOCOCO"^ 



•S-!o»P«tttng 



qC* t^ to «o O O O '^ -^ "^CO 



■^9Bj^}oi^a\ ^^^S<)^^^H^S<:^S^H^S<i^A^H^S<^S^Sd 



■^\no^}olta 



^(NC0^O«>t^XOO;H^C03O^r:;;002g5Hg^C5jtO^5;5^g.O5H 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



4th MONTH. 



APRIIi, 18S4. 



so DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter • 
Full Moon • • - - 
Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 



10 38 mo. 
1 13 mo. 
7 30 ev. 
1 30 mo. 



10 26 mo. 
1 1 mo. 
7 18 er. 
1 18 mo. 



10 15 mo. 

50 mo. 
7 7ev. 

1 7 mo. 



10 2 mo. 
37 mo. 
6 54 ey. 
54 mo. 



S«B OB Merld. 
or oooB iBork. 



3 56 

1 36 



monung. 
11 57 51 




II 



5jO>00.-< 2otHOl"*»0«0<Ot^OOOOO><»0^^ >: tH CJ -* O «0 t* t^ 00 00 OS 



iOr^ go '-Hr-ioicoeO'*"*.2t^ooo»OtH 2 o tH ci» CO CO Tf-it » t- 00 OS o 

'tH ^ C t- '-'1-1 C n «-■ 



i^woJ^c^c^^c^w^E^SwS^cocoweocortcowTOCOcococo-^^ 






n -"^ « • 5 



JO^ 2orH(M&^CO'^Tj«l0.2c-000>0 20'->'-<0»COCO'«*'^»l>000>0 






ll 






viVLJo^'a 



>g^aH^gfacg^aH^gfa<g<{i^H^^fa^^aH^HP^cg^ 



•Tnuoivjo^^a 



^oico^o«>t-»05 0;3jc»co;2;o«ot^oo®^-3g505j5«5^S5g5g»o 






• ^ goo W'-iC0'*«0t^l>00 0>0SOO«-< si.-tCQCO'^tOt'WOO «oo»-; 



li 



j^o-H 2o.-<c«icoco'«i"^o.2«>ooo»»H 2 o r^ okn co co '* '«tg t- oo « o 






li 



>0>t'<0rJ«C0rHOWt^C0'^e00IO 










.^^(jjojco^o«ooo> oo«-i >o»-i,-toip^»ra«ooo«o^^ 1^^ 



:0-i gOi-i(MC0C0'^TtVO.2l>00 0>'-< 2otHOIOICOOO'*'«*'St-000»0 
•—1-^6 t- 1-1 B CO .-I 



'H 'I»«P •;""§ 



ai <:o CO CO <o CO cococococococococococqcocococococqcocococococococo 






0-* Tf»OOC0C0C0t^t'0000000»a»0JOOO'H»H^C»C»C}C0C0C0rJ<Tt-t 



•He^A^JoX^a i^^SH^Sf±;c^^aH^H(i;M^!^H^Hfi;«^^aH^Hfa<g^ 



•qjuoi^joXTa I 



.-i(NC0Tt«OcDt^Q00>O'^C»C0'^OC0t^000SO;-J 



aoJ?3S5^^?SS585s$g 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



5th MONTH. 



HI AY, 18S4. 



31 DAYS. 



M€M>N*8 PHASES. 



First Quarter 5 

Full Moon 12 

Third Quarter 19 

New Moon 26 



PdSTON. 



4 46 mo. 

10 52 mo. 

1 48 mo. 

4 3ev. 



NEW YORK. 



4 34 mo. 

10 40 mo. 

1 36 mo. 

3 51 %v. 



BALTIMORE. 



4 23 mo. 

10 29 mo. 

1 25 mo. 

3 40 ev. 



CHARLES'N 



4 10 mo. 

10 16 mo. 

12 mo. 

3 27 ev. 



Sun an Merld. 
or noon mnrk, 



11 56 57 
11 56 14 
11 56 7 
11 56 37 







■»-H«-< B M y-lT-i a CO i-{t-* 



i«l 2"^2^^^Q°^'-"^ '^ ^ « cM^oi^ o"o ^ 8§ 8§ 5^55'^ g§ «? li? ;s ;s ;s ?§ ?5 



PI 






aS S S »S S o S S "^ "^ **^ **^ ^ "* "^ ^ ^ °° ^ ® S ^ ^ *^ "^ "^ ''^ '^ '^ ^ "^ 



aO«0»0Tj«Tj«'^rf^'^'<t^'^'*'^'^Tl«-^'^'^rr^'^-^rf'«*^TtT}<'^'^^ 



•n»9-Ai JO ^«a 



1^S^^^^,<1^H^SAS<)^S^H&S<)^H^^t^S<1^H^ 



-muojfijoixa 



.-<0JC0'*1«O;0t*000>O'-iCMC0rJ«i0«0t*00C»©'-^ 



Sc5?5c5^c5^S5«w«w 









^-^ SoO«-<OlCOOOt'^-000>0»0^ >i-tO»eO'«tO«Ot^OOO»0»00»HTH 



i^ 



aco gr^ CO CO wwo^ $^^ S "^oJO^Tj- oi«o ^ cm 6* .-i «?b ?5 

-•-^ 20tHr-iOIO«COCOCOrf.2 000>r^ 2oO»HrHOJOJCOCOCO"l 

"-H B h* tH B I 



,00 0>00-4 






JO>QP<0 0'g<COOJ»--»05COt>>COOT*'COO»'--iOOJ«gQt^O«OO^^COOIO»i-H 
*0 O O O «0 O V5 O -^ -"I* "«* "^ '^ -^ rf •* '*1« Tt CO CO « eo CO CO C5 W CO CO CO CO CO 



O WflD 






„'»-ltH(NC0C0rl*«Ot^00 0»OO»H >Oi-l<NC0'^»0l>000»0>O»H,-< §0 fH r-i 



JtH 2o»Hi-i(M(MC0C0C0'<*.2(»O-H SoOtHr^OJCTCOCOCO "SoOOSOrHr^ 



^^^5§^c?gJ55'^5? 



iff 



o^c« CO rfoco t- 00 oiOrH CM CO Tho tot- 00^^532555^^^5525 05^ 



• to-^nci^oico t:-<o-}<cocM*HQogQc»«ov5^coo»^.-4QoosQQt-t:-«o 

««?5oOOO'>^'9»Tt^'4rf-q<-«^^CO?5cOCOCOWCOCOCOCOCOCM5lOIOIWC^ 



U loop t.tmg 






Mjuowjoit^al ^0*COrfOOt-OQC>O ^CMCO;g;0^t:;gOfl>.^ g^g5 C;3^^^g52^ gggH 

-==™— — =^ . 



Digitized 



by Google 



10 



THE FAMILY CHKISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Gtli MONTH. 



jnJIV£, 18S4. 



30 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter • 

Full Moon 

Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 



7 56 CT. 

] 6 46 ev. 

9 30 mo. 

7 17 mo. 



NEW YORK. 



7 44 ev, 

6 ai ev. 
9 18 mo. 

7 5 mo. 



,E^|CHARL 



7 33 ev. 
6 23 ev. 
9 7 mo. 
6 54 mo. 



7 20 ev. 
6 10 ev. 

8 54 mo. 
6 41 mo. 



Sun •■ Merld. 



11 57 30 

11 58 53 

ev. 31 

2 15 



nil 



H 



II 









.C0e0Tj<'<j<O»0«0«0t^t^0000(»0»0»0>OOOr^i-iT-H,-<r-(rH<N0JCi<M0* 



38 ^1 ^^ tJ* ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^' ^^ ^^ ^^ ^* ^^ ^J* ^^ ^'^ '^ ^^ ^'^ ^^ *^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^1* ^f 



fll 



ml 



ig'«^-^Oi:;00 ^^g«^^g§ i?^'^^^'^^-'^.^^'^^ 



rfs 



oo»-^«-<(M<NOico.2ooe»Oi-«'H 2oo ^t-i<No»coco ®ooa>oO'-< 



Z^ G 









*COCOCOCOC*5COCOC*5COCOCOCOC*3COCOC^COCOCOCOCOC*3PQC*3CQCOCOC*5COW 



•3i99j^ JO x»a 



Hd^tg^l^H^HpS^^ll^H^Sfilrg^Il^H^Hpl^^^l^^^i^p^ 



•t^uoj^ JO jC«(I 



T-(OJcO"^o;ot^oooiOT-t(McoT}<o;ot^ooo» 



8c3?5S3^^SS^SSg 









J eOOi-ti-«(M(MC^eo.2ooo>o— t»H 2oor^,-HT-toioj««oooioo^ 













4<MC«C0rl*O«0r'00OOVi»-i >.-40JCOTf»0«OI>000>OOi-t c0^i-<0l 



J 2oO'-4'-ioi(Mc«co.2<X)<»o^^ 2oo»HTHrHO»<Neo"5o»a&oo^ 



«3j)} 



»^ ^ ^ « ?3 CO C? CO « CO ^ CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO ^ -* Tj« 5 Tt ^ ^ 5« Tf ^ ^ 






'K P^P •t"nS 






•^^^A^joxi^a I S^So^S^S^^^^H^S^^M^^S^S^S^^S^S^ 



H^uox^ JO Xt(I I 



.-"t0»C0rfO«0r'000>O^(MC0r*'l0«0t»000>Q»H 



S?Jg3?5^^^S535Sg 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHJII«T1AN ALJIANAC. 



11 



Tdi jhonth. 



JUIiY; 1854- 



31 DAYS, 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter 3 

FuUMoon !10 

Third Quarter ' 16 

New Moon 24 



B|^TON. 



8 7 mo. 

1 40 mo. 

7 41 ev. 

10 32 ev. 



7 ^mo. 

1 28 TOO, 

7 29 ev. 

10 20 ev. 



BALTIMORE. 



7 44 mo. 

1 17 mo. 

7 18 ev. 

10 9ev. 



7 31 mo. 
1 4 mo. 
7 5ev. 
9 56 ev. 



Sun OM Merld. 
or noon mark. 



3 29 

4 51 

5 48 

6 12 



mt 



g« 






11 






>i ,-lrH rH T-» tH .-< rH *-( rH »H rH .-< O 









i8SS5 eS32!S§§ jS"52§afi g^S-^SSS ."S^SSSS? 

■r-ttH B *- «-< »-t tH t-* B e* »*l »H 



i^^^8$^8^2§S^S^S^^^^^^c$S$§i§^c^c^^ 



S!S5S<3*0000t><O«OrfC0O» 



ait^t^b»t^t^r»t^r-'t^t-»t^r-i>r-'t^t^t^b*i>t^t^b-r-'r-'t^r-'t^t^b-»t^t^ 



si 



a -^ "^ Tf Tt -*!« Tf -q< Ti« rt -*!« rf T}< Tt rt -^ Tj« Tt rf -^ -rj* -rj* -* "^ rj« '•t "«J« -*}< -^ rji "* -^ 



•3i»»aJl;o ^*a 



S<)^^^H^^<>iH^S;^^<i^A^S^^<)^A^S^£<^ 



■x{%uojfi}oita 



t-HC?eon*»o«oi^oo<»or^(Nco'«*>o«ot*ooo50;H 



Sc5^c5^c5S^S^^?5 






joor-«<MeoTj<ocoi>oociO'-<^ ► tHO}eo'^o«ot-ooo>o»oo^'-' So 



• r-ii-i 2oO»H'-<0».2000>0>OOi-«rHO» SoO'-KNCO «0000 0>0J0SOO 

"fliH B »- rH THrHi-> tH B M tH 1-4 



3Ve<^S 









* CO <fo CO CO w CO CO CO CO CO v5 CO co 



^^^tZ^^^^^^^^^^;^^ 




jWCOCO-^OCOt^OOOOfH {ilt-KM 



COCO'^0«OI>000>0^.-| SoTH'HCiOl 



5^^j;H |oO*H(NC» «00 00 0>OiO>0 



5l(NO»^C?^(NCO^W?OCOCOrtc6 



cococococo^Tf'^"*t"^ri«"^n'n*Troo 
^T ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^'J' ^^ ^sr ^^ ^T ^* ^r ^T TT ^* '^ ^^ 



f O (N £:• 00 b- rf b- 



•l^ioaptjung 









-n^Bj^joiy^a] S^I^^^&^^^I^h^S^S^^^^^^Sj^S^'^^^S^^^^ 



•vfiuoyijoiTa\ '^<NcoT».o 



«oi^ooo>o*HO»cO'T»'»o«oi>ooa>orj 



^oJS3?5^^^St85gJg?? 



Digitized 



byCioogle 



12 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



I 8tk MONTH. AVeVSl", 1894. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PUASKft. 



Pint Quarter • 
Full Moon • • • • 
Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 
First Quarter • 



BOSTON. 



5 44 ev. 

8 33 mo. 

9 5 mo. 
1 16 er. 
1 23 mo. 



NEW YO 



5 32 ev. 
8 21i«» 
8 dSmo. 
1 4ey. 
1 11 mo. 



BALTIMORE. 



5 21 er. 
8 10 mo. 
8 42 mo. 

53 ev. 

1 10 mo. 



CHARLKS'N. 

5 8 ev. 

7 57 mo. 

8 29 mo. 
40 ev. 
47 mo. 



S«B •« Merld. 



6 3 
5 15 
3 50 
1 54 
46 




II 






j'xci §o»-ioico.aooooo>o>ootH.-i 2 o .X (N CO ''I" "S t-- 1* 00 00 a» a» o .-< 






l?>'^- 



ii^J 



g^iii^S 



■ t^t^t^t^t^t^r^t^t^t^t^^otototococotococotototocDtocQgQOcoo to 



8t ICVS IOO»00«^»0000»00>0 0«0».'5 0>000>0»OW'^OOOOV3«CO 



•Ji^jiijox^a 



5^epi^(S^aH^gfi;^^;^5^gfi;,g^a5^i3£ig^«^^S 



HJ«o|^joX«(i 



^0»CO^lO«t^OOO>0;^C2C2;*0«t:;OO^g55Jg5C5^^Jg5;jg^gjH 






£-1 



^g 



■ 'H rH 1-4 0) '■^ «-4 1-S C 



• ,^»H goi-HCQco.aooooososoooi-i 2oo.-*c»co"St-oogoooo>aftOi-i 

■»-<»H C ki 1-4 r-t T^ i-H C M 1— l*.^ 



«t^t^t^f^t^t^r-'t^t^t^r^t^e^t^<o<o<ogo<o<o<o<o<o<o<p<o<D<o<o<oqp 






'Mi 



CO •* ""t to t- 00 oj o '-j ► *-i 1-1 (N CO CO -^ «c «o 00 o> o -H th gooi-i^oiorco 

1-4 tH a> 1-1 t-i 1-1 c 






i-t-H 2o»H(Nco.2ooooo>o»o>oo^ |oo»H(Nco «t^ooooaoo»aftoo 
f i> t^ t^t^i> t> t> t^ r-»t^<o <p<o<o<o;d<o<o<o<o<o<o<o co to 



1 1^ t- 1- t'lL'^l 

iiou?»ov5«5 



r^Q0®O»H0ie0rj«O«0t-00O»H(MC0'«tO«0t*000>O-HC»C0 
OOO ,-t 1-1 r-l 1-H 1-4 rH t-l t-l t-l 1-1 C« C» C* CI 

Tf'^"^tO»0«0«0»000«0»<»0»0>0«0«000«0«ft«0«0«0«0 



*N'P9p«t«"S 



00 00 00 r* 



l>t^t*<0»«0«00«00'^'^'«^COCOCOC»C«»0»»H.-i»HOOO>0> 



•y»ALjox^a| g^g£^^aH^gpS;^^ag^H^cg^aE5^g£^^aE5^g 



in«>ifjoi^Q| '"'^'^^'^^'"«'^s::;s2s:s;2s^°sg^gg;g^g$ag$ss$gssgs 



Digitized 



by Google 



tHS FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



13 



0th MONTH. SEPTEAIBER, 18S4. so days. 



MOOM'8 PHASES. 



Full Moon 

Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • - 
First Quarter • 



BOStON. 



4 34 ev. 
1 46 mo. 
3 19 mo. 
7 54 mo. 



NSW YORK. 



4 22 ev. 
1 34 mo. 
3 7 mo. 
7 42 mo. 



BALTIMORE. 



4 11 ev. 

1 23 mo. 

2 56 mo. 
7 31 mo. 



CHARLKS'N. 



3 58 ev. 

1 10 mo. 

2 43 mo. 
7 18 mo. 



&■■ •■ Merld. 
or sooB msrk. 



11 59 51 
11 57 13 
11 54 25 
11 51 38 



n 



o 















Si 



j2o»Hoieo.a»>t*ooooo>osoo'^ 2o^o»co»«o<ot*r^oooja'-< § 

" S %m .-^ -H »-t B 



ins 









•Ji»»iA.jo ^^a 



pScg^jSH^Hfarg^aH^gfa^g^aH^gfacg^aH^ggfaxg 



■ij^uoi^joi^d 



^NC0Tt.O«)t^Q0 0>O;HC:,C2;2;V0 50C:;Q0«g5Hg5g5^^^^g5gO 






A 



^i 



i.^'-S5S§2SSSS^25§SISSo^^^2SSo21SS5$S'"§?S'°S^ 



1^^ 2THO»eo.2i>r'OOooooosoo»H 2o»-«c«co "|«o<ot^t'0000o»o | 









gulls 
55 zl a ! 












si 



^ OB e 












•Kioap ttims 






t 



•ai»»j|^joX«(i 



^j^;^5^g^c«^aH^Hfi:il^SH^Hfi;.g^a5^Sii;c^ 



•^(JUOpiJoX'Bd 



^o»«r,.«^«t^Qoo»o;.««;*:2^^222S5}SS5S^SS585^g 



Digitized 



by Google 



14 



THE FAMILY CHKlSTlAl^ ALMANAC. 



lock MONTH. OCTOBER, 18S4. 



. 31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Full Moon 6 

Third Quarter ' 13 

New Moon 21 

First Quarter 28 



2 52 mo. 
8 59 ev. 
4 40 ev. 
2 20 ev. 



NEW YORK. 



2 40 mo. 
8 47 ev. 
4 28 ev. 
2 8ev. 



BALTIMORE. 



CHARLES'N. 



2 29 mo. 
8 36 ev. 
4 17 ev. 
1 57 ev. 



2 16 mo. 
8 23 ev. 
4 4 ev. 
1 44 ev. 



Sun on Merid. 
or uoott mark. 



11 49 39 
11 47 17 
11 45 -25 
11 44 11 



jrH0<>^OOt^l>000J05OO'-< t>^rH<N'«i<OOC0l:^t'000005OO 






II 



CO • t^c» 



^i"= 



« '^^ ^"T ^-'^ w'J ^« < '»-'• 

t:* CM o o -^ 



^5 



a (.X b"j x^ V.) w fc^ TT u'^ V J V J -^ j; -^ -^r '^ '^ -^ ^ V.) (.J u* 1— 1 «-H i.>t 
jOi-i<NC0.2O<0t^l>00CS0iO'H Soi-^OiCO-^ «O«)t-00 050 

*_ U. 1— I r-t C to T-^^ 

xtt yt ^ "^ -^ n c^ m n c^ n n <n a oi oi Qi oi oi ct ci ^ r-> ^ ^ ,-1 ^ 
^ so o o o o o o w^ o o o tm o o o o o o o o o ojojoo o o 

^.^.TTOcol^t-qOOJOOr^OI CM CO Tt ITD O <0 I> 00 Oi Oi O ^ CM CO CO 

aio oooooooo«o«o«ocoococoocoo«o«o<o<o«oco«o«o 



r-^ |Oi-^ 



COOJ T-1 c 



o o o o 

r}«iO CO t- 



Bfsp 



II 



iOi-iCMC0.2«0<0C0t^00 00C»Oi-« cOrHCMCO"* "a>OCOI>I>000 tH 2o^ 



• CO CMOOSl'-OS'CM^qiaQCOtOCOCMr-^OSOOOOTfCO^OOSOOCOOTj'CMi-. 
a^.^.^COCOCOCOCOCOCMCiCMOICMCMCMT^'-trHrH^^rH— t 

a o o o to o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o >.oooo ooooo»o o o 



iOot^a)050T-4CMco"^o«oi^ooo50'^oicO'^o<r>ooa>o-HCMco'^o«o 

«0 000 '-^■-.rHr-Hf-t.-H.-'r-H.-HCMCMCMCMOiCMCM 

acooooo«o«o«ooco«oooco«o«oo«ocoo«ocoto«o<o«o«o«ocococo 



■H»3jii JO ^''a 



M^^^Hf^S<'^^^S^S<^H^S^S<^^^S^^<)^^ 



•J{-iVL0^J0JiVQ^ 



^CM CONOCO t^OOCiOrH CM CO ;2:^;^St::°22gSM^lS?,^C^^E^^gJ^j:5 



gS^ll 






• OSCOCM'^^'-iOOOOt^CICMOOQQQQSpi-tCOOO— t-tOOCOOO -:t^COt-C» 
ITTCM 1-1 OCO TTr-i-^CM •^OCMO •^'-tOCMOCOi-to£cOCO">3«C* 

:CM"«*<01-00000500^'-^ >'-<«-<CM'^Ot't'00000»0SOr-i— < 2oi-iCMtJ« 

' ,-1 r-^ ^ ,-, I3i ^.^r^t; 



• OOCOO .»-(«OCO'<t<5»CM-HCDO_:COOT+.QOCM Ol-l^COCC^ 
a CMCOOW CMOCMOrtC0CMCMS<^*C0C0C0rJ«-'<t^O"<t'^O 

-•O'-<CMC0.2«0«0<0t>t^00 0>O'H 2or-iCMC0'«*«OO«0t^000S 
* «- .— t r-( C (o 



a o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 



CM 1-1 05 or 

oo 

oo rr Tf 



ao oo»oo«o«oo«o»ocoo;oooco«ocoococo<r>ococo<r>«o«ooco 






jO<OOOOOrHr-( S^rHrHCMCMCO'^W'OCOOOOiOO 



•-< ""^ gr-lOCOr-l 



CMCOOOJ 



^ |^CMC0.2«0«0<0l:^l>00OJO^ |o 



5 CJCO'-t OOO 
» • -^ rH O ■^ ■n' ■* 



i-« CM CO Tj< "S o to O t- 00 Oi ^ co^ 



a o o o o o o o o o o o o o wo o o^ 

•t^ 00 CS O 1-l'CM CO "<t'«b l> 00 C3i"o ^ CO ^ 

aooo T-,^^^ 

*0»oo«o«o«oco«ocooco«ocoeo«oco 



OT}<CMi-»0>00OOC0CM»-t0ir^t^C- 



o o wo o 

>0 O t^ 00 



O O^WO wo OOP 

O -H Of CO rj< ;0 l^ 
CM CM 6i CM CM CM CM 

CO o o CO CO CO CO 



o wo o wo 

00 C5 '-^ o» 
CM C^ CO CO 

coco coco 



•g-papg^ung 



^-t CM t- Oi 00 CO wo O) t -H CO O t-4 wo O) CM 
^COO »-<C^C0C0C0CMi-tOC0 CMi^WO 

-:2;f;5'-^^2§?u^2^^Sm822;5^ 

OCOCO'«trfTtOOOCOCOt^t^I>000000 



ososoo 



Ot'OQOsOiOO 

Tji CM rr coo 

O tH ,-( r-i CM CM CM 



C5 05 COCi t 

w-^ Of] 

CM -^QO I 

•^coo" 

CO CO CO -^ 



•yjB^j^joLTal ^^^^S^^^^^^S^S^^S^S^SM'^S^S^S^^-r 



"HJUOl\[JoX-CQ '^CMC0TfW0cpi>00O>OT-HCMC0'*W0C0l:^0 



5cMc4cMCMc5^CM^c5wcO 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMlLir CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



15 



nth MONTH. ]¥OT£ilIBER, 18S4. 



30 DAYS. 



MOOK*S PlIASES. 



Full Moon 

Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • - 
First Quarter • 



4 17 ev. 

5 25 ev. 
5 18 mo. 
9 56 ev. 



4 5 cv. 

5 13 cv. 
5 6 mo. 
9 44 ev. 



3 54 ev. 
5 2ev. 

4 55 mo. 
9 J3 ev. 



3 41 ev. 

4 49 ev. 
4 42 mo. 
9 20 ev. 



Sun on Merld. 
or noon mark, 



11 43 43 
11 43 59 
11 45 10 
11 47 13 




§? 



I 1-1 "f 



SCO Tj<T-)0'<3<eOOi-lOir 

'OOOSOiOOrH t^i-HCO-^OOCO 



I^^^^^^^J^g-'gl^ 



.(N^QO .OOOi-HOJOIOOOCO 



2o^ 



(N(N(MCO , 



; CO t> 00 o> O i-« §o^c 

*-H r-l C 



•OSOOOt 



00 OiOiOr-iOi 



5 >0 O >g) Ut> O O O O rf 



^J< ^^ '^ ^p 



t- «0 «0 CO o o o o -^ ■^ ■^ 



KCDCOCO 



CO CO CO 



OJCVCVJ 

CO CO CO 



COl^-t-OOOSO'-iC 
W <N O* CvJ Oi CO CO c 

co^cocococococococo 



COCOCOCOCOCOrr^j* t:*^ "^ 

cococococococo^cococo 






jc>jco>o.2»o«oco»>oooso»-^ 2 o r-i(M CO ""t o ■£ uti CO i> oj o ^ Sot-ktj 






CO PS 



*o»oiwcococowcocococ*^co'*Tr-g<'<3<Tj<Tt'*T:*Tfioo»o»oooooo 

BCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCCCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCO ococococo 



•a[aaj^ JO ltd 






•HJUoKJOA^o: 



r-iC*C0'«1<>^C0r'000>OT-i(>JC0rfO«0l>00C5O'-<0J 



O— <0JC0^OC0t^0Q0>O 






5^111 



•lOCOt- 



Oi CO 

00<3sc»oO'^ 



OO-^rH t>.-i(NCO'<^OCO»>00000500rH |0«-<(Nrl*iO 



jjCJCOO 



gOIOC0 6lrH 

2o»ocot-oo 



. 2or-.c 



•COCO'n'« 
u O CO l> 



'S^:s 



§OtH(N 






COOI r^OOiOQ t 






^* Tf* '^ "^ ^* TT* "^ ^* ^T ^T ^T 



o 21:3' It! 
CO CO CO CO 

^r ^^ TT ^* 



*coco 

■ CO CO CO 



CO CO w ■^ 
CO CO CO CO CO CO 



i-i(>)co-*coi>ooa50- 
cocococococococococi 



50 
? CO CO CO 



CO CO CO 



O!?JC0tJ< 







^00<35OOr 



5i>c»i>i-^c}r^cococococot^oco ^iTfo 
ri< r-l O ^ CO O »-< (N 1-1 O CO ^ O £ CO .-< 

ir^r^0}C^JC0'>^Ol'•000>0iO»-^«-^ 



COCOOrHO)'^ 

oo o*co 

(NOJCOOCOt^ 



H 



JOICOO 



.aoiraco 



>0 OS I-' Ol r 

Ir-OO 0>0 «■ 



|o^( 



30040I 

icocoio ojc 



*050 p: t-co "s" 






>0>00l^OrfC0C>»-tC 






coco 



cococ* 



"CO CO CO 



COCOCOtJ^tttt^^^^ 

cocococococococococococo 



CO CO CO CO CO 



COCOt- t' 



CO Tji lO CO t^ 00 



t^ t^ l^ t> I> l- 



•g 'xoep Bjung 



^0> 00l>COT*'(MO00U5(N0>»Oi-il-0»t^C«I>-H».9Q0.-4^;C)0pO5OT-i-H.- 

*-0»^ d-^ (MC0OTH5»ri« r-lCOT»* .-iCO-^U^r-HOJCO^Or-lC^COTr 

O"^ TtO»OOC0C0C0C0t^I>b-000000000>0>0Sa»0>OOOOO'H^'H,-< 



•vajiijo^^a 



^ H &4 t» ^ )^ H ^ H Pi4 W ^ ^ H ^ H fe 02 ^ S H ^ H fe o5 ^ J^ H ^ H 



•muowjoX^d 



r-l0»C0"^OC0t^000iOrH(MC0TtOC0C^000>O^0JC0-tOC0t-Q00>O 

^ ^ ^ ,-1 ,H T-4 .-4 »-< r-l ,-H ^ CJ OJ OJ OJ C) CJ CJ CJ C^ CO 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



16 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



liith MONTH. DliCliIIIBliR, 18S4. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON*S PHASES. 



Full Moon 

Third Quarter • 

New Moon 

First Quarter •• 



8 50 mo. 
1 27 ev. 
5 3ev. 
7 54 mo. 



8 38 mo. 
1 15 ev. 
4 51 ev. 
7 42 mo. 



8 27 mo. 
1 4ev. 
4 40 ev. 
7 31 mo. 



8 14 mo. 
51 ev. 
4 27 ev. 
7 18 mo. 



Sun on Merld. 
or noon makrk. 



11 49 17 
11 52 37 
11 56 25 
ev. 25 




jrl*»O<DC0t^00000>OOr-i fc;0(NCO'^»OOa>l>000»00'-t 2o»"«(MC0rf 
■ »H rl .-4 » >-n-<>H C 



.8^5? g^??S^^g32S £23S^S2§§ ^^^'S8§^5! g^^^"^^ 

;C0«O>O.2O<Ot^00OO t-i 2 O r-< (M CO tj» O "5 »0 c^ 00 OS O T-* SO'-iOICO'^ 



H 









m 



jco»oo.S«o«ot*Oooio.-i 2o»-40icoTto ■«»c«>ood»o»-" pOt-ioicou 






ta'^ 



O'-i0ICMC0'^O«0t^000>05O'-<0»(NC0rr-^OOC0C0t^t*r»000000O»Ci 



■3199 j^JO it^d 



pScg<{!^H^Hfacg<ia^^g£>g<iaH^Hfacg<i!^H^gfaig^ 



•lHUOJ^Jol-Bd 



T-iOlCOTfO«Ot^00050r-iOICO"^0«Ol^0005C>j^ 



Boi?5c5^c5o»S5SS^c 









j«0t^t^00 0>05OT-i»-^ ► ,-«i-iO»C0^>ft «0t^000»00 -H 2 O «-H <N CO -^ «0 CO 



u 



«co»o«o.2o«oi>ooo»0'-t 2 o »-< o» CO -**• »ft « >o «& b- o» o r-i 2orHoi'^»o 

■ %^ r-< »-t B U t-4 »-l B 



■wcococococ'bcocococococococococococococococococoSScoco^ Tj* ^3*^ 









Q0CteO»0(M(»<NQ»-Ht^q0t^C0C0Ot-C0 



p^s^? 



*^ 



S2S55S§^ gg5S^;^^^:5^S§ 



:00 0>00«-4 ► O »-t (M 0» CO -* -<* « t>. 00 OS OS O »H 2 O rH Ol (M c^ -^r »o «o t^ 00 

* r-< 1-1 r-l V i-H t-l B 



«o .os<2«o t^oji-fco -:t^(M<o 



*^s, 



t^ 



g^S22^§K .S?355S^^ g^^S-^^S 



i-otOtO.awtlOcOt^OOOTH SoiHCJCO-^O ©»0«0t-0SO'-i flO'-HCO'^O 

' »N tH »-t B W .-1 rH B 









•g -pap g^ung 






•^«AlJO^t.a £(^^s5^g^c^-^SEH^^£<^^S5^gfS.2^aH^gp^ig^ 



•MJUoi^jojtiBa 



rHOlCO'^OCOt^OOOSO'HCiCOrJ'OtDt^OOOSOi-i 



So»85S^c5cSS^S^^« 



Digitized byL^OOQlC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 17 



IS 

flo 

th( 

mi 

ri^ 

of noiioweu logs; ana tnen, oi artinciai Doats, 

of various forms and materials, some of wood, some of skins, and some of bark. 

The earliest navigators on an extended scale were the Phoenicians, who made 

voyages through the Mediterranean, and along the northern coasts of Europe,. 

and down the Red sea, as early as the days of Solomon. The ships of the 

Greeks and Romans were large, but uncouth structures. And even the three 

ships of Columbus were not as large as our ommon schooners, and two had no 

proper decks. How great the progress, and how vast the improvement manifest 

in the ships of the present day, when the ocean is covered with vessels of 

hundreds, and even thousands of tuns burden, beautiful in form, and fitted up 

like floating palaces within ! The launching of one of these vessels of the largest 

class is above represented. 

Good Actions. — When we have practised good actions a while, they become 
easy ; and when they are easy, we begin to take pleasure in them ; and when 
they please us, we do them frequently; and by frequency of acta they grow 
into a habit. Tillouon. 



Digitized 



by Google 



18 HIE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Two Classes op Christians. — There are two classes of Christians — those 
who live chiefly by emotion, and those who live chiefly by faith. The first class, 
those who live chiefly by emotion, remind one of ships, that move by the outward 
impulse of winds operating upon sails. They are often at a dead calm, often out 
of their course, and sometimes driven back. And it is only when the winds are 
fair and powerful that they move onward with rapidity. The other class, those 
who live chiefly by faith, remind one of the magnificent steamers which cross the 
Atlantic, which are moved by an interior and permanent principle, and "which, 
setting at defiance all ordinary obstacles, advance steadily and swiftly to their 
destination, through calm and storm, through cloud and sunshine. 



TOILING IN ROWING. 

"And He saw them tolling in rowing, for the wind was contrary unto them. And about the fourth 

watch of the night He comelh unlo them walking upon the sea." 

Toiling in rowing.' Wind and tide Toiling in rowing/ Dearest Lord, 

Our wearied bark oppose, We faint amid the strife ; 

As oft, with seams that open wide, But thou canst vanquish with a word 

Upon her course she goes , The stormy surge of life. 

And we have taken nothing yet, And when thou walkest on the sea. 

Though still the watch we keep. With hand outstretched to aid, 

Nor fail to cast an empty net grant us strength to cling to thee. 

Into the boisterous deep. And not to be afraid. Mrs. Si^urory 



Mankind in the Thirteenth Century. — They had neither looked into heaven 
nor earth, neither into the sea nor the land, as has been done since. They had 
philosophy without scale, astronomy without demonstration. They made war 
without powder, shot, cannon, or n^ortars ; nay, the mob made their bonfires with- 
out squibs or crackers. They went to sea without compass, and sailed without 
the needle. They viewed the stars without telescopes, and measured altitudes 
without barometers. Learning had no printing-press. The lover was forced to 
send liis mistress a deal board for a love-letter, and a billet-doux might be of the 
size of an ordinary trenchei. The richest robes were the skins of the most formi- 
dable monsters. They carried on trade without books, and correspondence without 
posts ; their merchants kept no accounts, their shopkeepers no cash-books ; they 
had surgery without anatomy, and physicians without materia medica ; they 
gave emetics without ipecacuana, and cured agues without bark. 



Vain Expectations. If you should see a man diggmg in a snow-drift with 
the expectation of finding valuable ore, or planting seeds on the rolling billows, 
you would say at once that he was beside himself. But in what respect does 
this man differ from you, while you sow the seeds of idleness and dissipation in 
your youth, and expect the fruits of age will be a good constitution, elevated 
aff*ection8, and holy principles ? 

This World and the Next. — If men would be at half the pains to provide 
themselves "treasures in heaven," which they are generally at to get estates 
here on earth, it were impossible for any man to be damned. But when we come 
to earthly matters, we do / when to heavenly, we only discourse : heaven has our 
tongues and talk, but the earth our Vhole man besides. South. 

God. — Faith beholds Gi.d ; devotion cleaves to him ; love enjoys him j obedi- 
ence 8erve.«« him. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 19 



elusive of meals. The Ericsson, the caloric or Iwt-air ship recently invented 
by the gentleman whose name she bears, and constructed under his imme^iiate 
supervision, is of the size of the largest ocean steamers, of 2,200 tuns burden, 
2d0 feet long, 40 in breadth, and draws 17 feet o tvater. Her wheels are 32 feet 
in diameter ; and she is propelled, as our readers know, by heated air, instead of 
steam. If fully and finally successful in all that her projector aims at, she will 
revolutionize the navigation of the world. 



Inventions. — Some one thus sums up a few of the advantages of modem in- 
ventions : ** One boy, with a Fourdrinier machine, will make more paper in a 
twelvemonth than all Egypt could have made in a hundred years during the 
reign of the Ptolemies. One girl, with a power-press, will strike off books faster 
than a million scribes could copy them before the invention of printing. One 
man with an iron foundry, will turn out more utensils than Tubal Cain could 
have forged, had he worked diligently to this time.'* 



Digitized 



by Google 



20 TH£ FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Genius and Application. — It is related of the great Audubon, lately deceased, 
that he believed a man could make himself what he pleased by labor ; and that 
by a proper use of every moment of time, the mind might be kept improving to 
the end of life. 



LITTLE THINGS. GOD ALL WISE. 

Th« pebble in the streaii^t scant, God nothing does, nor suffers to be done. 

Has turned the course of many a river ; But thou wouldst do thyself, couldst thou but 
A dew-drop on the infant plant see 

Has warped the giant oak for erer. The end of all events as well as he. 



What the Steam-engine Does. — It propels, it rows, it sculls, it screws, it 
warps, it tows, it elevates, it lowers, it lifts, it pumps, it drains, it irrigates, it 
draws, it pulls, it drives, it carries, it brings, it scatters, it splits, it collects, it 
condenses, it extracts, it breaks, it confines, it opens, it shuts, it digs, it shovels, it 
excavates, it ploughs, it threshes, it separates, it winnows, it washes, it grinds, it 
crushes, it sifis, it bolts, it mixes, it kneads, it moulds, it stamps, it pimches, it 
beats, it presses, it picks, it hews, it cuts, it shaves, it saws, it planes, it turns, 
it bores, it mortices, it drills, it heads, it blows, it forges, it sweeps, it brushes, it 
scrutches, it cards, it spins, it winds, it twists, it throws, it weaves, it shears, it 
coins, it prints. 

Youthful Neglect. — Walter Scott, in a narrative of his personal history, 
gives the following caution to youth : " If it should ever fall to the lot of youth to 
peruse these pages, let such readers remember that it is with the deepest regret 
that I recollect in my manhood the opportunities of learning which I neglected in 
my youth ; that through every part of my literary career I have felt pinched and 
hampered by my own ignorance j and I would this moment give half the reputa- 
tion I have had the good fortune to acquire, if by doing so I could rest the 
remaining part upon a sound foundation of learning and science." 

The Littleness of the Earth. — The universe at large would suffer as little 
in its splendor and variety by the destruction of our planet, as the magnificence 
of a forest by the fall of a single leaf. The leaf quivers on the branch ; it lies 
at the mercy of the slightest accident ; a breath of wind teaFS it from the stem, 
and it lights on the stream of water which passes underneath. In a moment of 
time the life, which we know by the microscope it teems with, is extinguished j 
and an occurrence so insignificant in the eye of a man, and. in the scale of his 
observation, carries in it to the myriad which people this leaf, an event terrible 
and decisive as the destruction of a world. 



A Word Fitly Spoken. — Gen. Cass said recently in the Senate of the United 
States, " Independent of its connection with human destiny hereafter, I believe the 
fate of republican government is indissolubly bound up" with the fate of the Chris- 
tian religion, and that a people who reject its holy faith will find themselves the 
tlaves of their own evil passions and of arbitrary power y 

A Gem from a Persian Poet. — The heavens are a point from the pen of 
God's perfection ; the world is a bud from the bower of his beauty ; the sun is a 
spark from the light of his wisdom ; and the sky is a bubble on the sea of his power. 

The Christian. — Though a great man may, by a rare possibility, be an infidel, 
yet an intellect of the highest otAet must build upon Christianity. ih duincy. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 21 



The New Bible House. — In 1816, suon after the formation of the American 
Bible Society in the city of New York, the agent kept the depository, gratuitously, at 
his own office, a single room up stairs Within the year, a larger room was found 
necessary ; and within another, the calls for Bibles had so increased that a four- 
story building was hired chiefly for printing and binding, in which a room twenty 
feet square was taken for the depository, which room the ag jnt predicted that he 
should yet see filled with Bibles ! In 1822, a larger house was erected in Nassau- 
street, at a cost of $22,500 ; and in that year 57,805 Bibles and Testaments 
were issued. In 1829, and again in 1831, additional buildings were erected; 
and in 1851, two stories were added to a part of the building. The new Bible 
House is located a mile and a half higher up the city, covering a block of about 
three fourths of an acre, surrounded on all sides by streets, with a central yard. 
It is six stories high, the upper stories being occupied for the printing and bind- 
ing, with machinery driven by steam, the boilers being under the yard ; and a 
portion of the first, second, and third stories is rented for stores and offices, from 
the proceeds of which the whole debt incurred will be paid. No funds contrib- 
uted to the Society's general objects are expended for the building. The old Bible 
House in Nassau-street was purchased by another Bible institution, the Ajmeri- 
can and Foreign Bible Society. 



The Infidel's Choice for his Son. — Niebuhr the Gerrran scholar was a 
prince among historians, and equally so among doubters. And after having tried 
for a lifetime, and thus known by ex peri 3. ice the influence of the so-called ra- 
tional and doubting system, of his son he says, ^* He shall believe in the letter of 
the Old and New Testaments^ and I shall nurture in him, from his infancy, a firm 
faith in all that I have lost or feel unctrtain about. "^"^ What a testimony to the 
Christian system, and what a condemnation of infidelity. 

Moments. — Each moment, as it passi^s, is the meeting-place of two eternities 



')* 



Digitized 



by Google 



22 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Living and Dying. — The only certain way to die well, says Calamy, is to 
live well. God doth not just watch how men die, but he will judge every man 
according to his works and the deeds he hath done in the flesh ; those dispositions 
we have nourished, loved, and delighted m all our life, will follow and attend us 
to another world ; and an evil nature, however loath we are to it, or sorry for it, 
will sink us down to the deepest hell. 

THE I'EARL. 

A little particle of rain, It chanced to fall into the sea, 

That from a passing cloud descended, And there an open shell received it : 

Was heard thus idly to complain • In after-years how rich was he, 

"My brief existence now is ended, Who from its prison-house relieved it ; 

Outcast alike of earth and sky, That drop of rain had formed a gem, 

Useless to live, unknown to die." Fit for a monarch's diadem ! 



Eeligious Views of Distinguished Public Men. — Sir Robert Peel, for 
many of the latter years of his life, was in the invariable habit of every night 
reading in the Bible or some religious book for some time before retiring to rest. 
And the favorite book of the late Duke of Wellington, during the last twelve 
months of his life, was Baxter's Saints' Rest. The dying testimonies of Webster 
and Jackson are well known. Well has some one said, in view of the expressed 
faith of the last two, *' How pimy, even to despicableness, are the sophisms of 
those little men who charge faith in Christianity with being weakness or hy- 
pocrisy, when Daniel Webster and Andrew Jackson bowed themselves to the 
authority of the Bible. If Daniel Webster be weak, what is strength ? If Andrew 
Jackson was a hypocrite, what is honesty ?" 



Lord IIailes and the New Testament. — On hearing a gentleman ask, "If 
at the end of the third century, all the copies of the New Testament in the world 
had been destroyed, could their contents have been recovered from the writings of 
the first three centuries ?" Lord Hailes collected all the writers of those centuries, 
and began the examination. And the result was, that after a time he said to a 
friend, *' I have been busy for these two months, searching for chapters and 
sentences of the New Testament j and have actually discovered the whole except 
eleven verses, which satisfies me that I could discover them also. Now," said 
he, " here was a way in which God concealed or hid the treasures of his word, 
that Julian the apostate, and other enemies of Christ, who wished to extirpate 
the gospel from the world, never would have thought of j and though they had, 
they never could have effected their destruction." 

The Poetry of the Bible. — Some one speaking in tiie hearing of the late 
Daniel Webster, of the sublime poetry of the Old Testament, the latter immedi- 
ately and seriously remarked, *'Ah, my friend, the poetry of Isaiah and Job 
and Habakkuk is beautiful indeed; but when you have lived, as I have, sixty- 
nine years, you will give more for the 14th or 17th chapter of John's gospel, or 
for one of the epistles, than for all the poetry of the Bible." 

The Bible. — God's Bible is the book for all, just like the winds of heaven 
and God's sunlight and his pure water, free for all. Good for the prince, good for 
the peasant. It goes higher than human intellect can reach. It goes lower than 
human degradation can descend. It is an ocean for an Edwards or a Chalmers to 
swim in, and t.i tho poor ignoraitt cottMger it is the "small rJfw from b^aveii." 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 23 

The Maine Law at Home. — The wholesale traffic in intoxicatmg diinks has 
been entirely annihilated. Grog-shops are closed. Temptation is removed from 
the young ; few are made drunkards ; drunkards are reformed, and their families 
are made comfortable and happy. Jails, houses of correction, poor-houses are 
almost unneeded. Taxes are diminished, and peace and quietness prevail. Two 
millions of dollars, worse than wasted, have been saved to the state. Pauperism, 
vice, inmmorality, and crime, have decreased. The day and Sabbath schools are 
better attended. Churches are filling up. And after fourteen months' experi- 
ence of the good effects of the law, what did the people of Maine say ? Were they 
satisfied to let tfce law stand ? "V\Tiat said they at the polls ? In the House, 
1 25 were returned in favor of the law, and 25 opposed. In the Senate, 27 were 
elected in favor of the law, and 4 opposed. The people say the law will stand. 

KEEP TO THE RIGHT. 
" Keep to the right," as the law directs, Keep to the right, within and without, 

For such is the rule of the road ; With stranger and kindred and friend ; 

Keep to the right, whoever expects Keep to the right, and you need have no doubt 

Securely to carry life's load. That all will be well in the end. 

Keep to the right, with God and his word. Keep to the right in whatever you do, 

Nor wander, though folly allure ; Nor claim but your own on the way : 

Keep to the right, nor ever be turned Keep to the right, and hold on to the true, 

From what 's faithful and holy and pure. From the morn to the close of life's day. 



Pitching towards Sodom. — The Christian man who sacrifices principle to 
interest, and who makes the law of the Lord a variable thing, is pitching his 
tent towards Sodom. A gentleman, an officer of the church, some years since 
oi»ened a hotel in a country village. He did it to support his family, and it was 
right ; but then, to secure custom, he departed from Christian principles, and 
kept an open bar. In a few years he died, leaving a widow and several sons. 
The hotel was kept up, and his sons attended at the bar. The sons of that man 
all became drmikards, they squandered his property, and his widow is now sus- 
tained by the benevolence of the church. He was a good man, but he pitched 
his tent towards Sodom. 



Habit. — If we wish to know who is the most d«^graded and the most wretched 
of human beings, look for a man who has practised a vice so long that he curses 
it, and clings to it; that he pursues it because he feels a great law of his nature 
driving him on towards it ; but reaching it, knows that it will gnaw his heart, 
and make him roll himself in the dust with anguish. 



Who is truly Great ? — The truly great man is he who chooses the right 
with invincible resolution, who resists the sorest temptations from within and 
without, who bears the heaviest burdens cheerfully ; who is calmest in storms, 
and most fearless under menaces and frowns j whose reliance on truth, on virtue, 
on God, is most unfaltering. 

What is Virtue? — To a student who put this question to the late Dr. 
Archibald Alexander, his simple and admirable reply was, " Virtue consists in 
doing our duty^ in the several relations that we sustain^ in respect to ourselves^ to 
our fellow-men^ and to God^ as known from reason^ conscience^ and revelation^ 

Passion. — Nothing doth so fool a man as extreme passion. This doth make them 
fools which otherwise are not, and show them to be fools which are so. Bp. Hall. 



Digitized 



by Google 



24 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Th« Drunkard's Uotue, or Mi«ery and its Cause. 

Thk Drunkard. — A drunkard is the annoyance of modesty, the trouble of ci- 
vility, the spoil of wealth, the distraction of reason. He is only the brewer's agent, 
the tavern and alehouse benefactor, the beggar's companion, the constable's trouble. 
He is his wife's woe, his children's sorrow, his neighbor's scoff, his own shame. He 
it a tub of swill, a spirit of sleep, a picture of a beast, and a monster of a man. 

Intemperance. — Of over 43,000 persons committed to the New York city- 
prison, the keeper publicly states, that not over one hundred had been brought 
there, the direct or indirect cause of whose imprisonment could not be traced to 
the intoxicating cup. Well may the tax-payers, and all the friends of hu- 
manity cry out for thorough temperance reform. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THIS jFAMJLY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 25 



Total Abitiuence, and its Blested Result. 

Worth Knowing. — Whenever an artisan resident in one of the filthy places 
leaves off strong drink, the usual course of proceeding is this : He begins to pay 
his debts; he purchases decent clothing for himself and family; he makes his 
habitation clean, and provides good furniture ; he buys a few books, takes his 
family to a place of worship ; and if not content with being clean and decent 
among surrounding dirt and wretchedness, he looks for a better residence in 
some airy and salubrious locality, leaving his unimprovable residence to be occu- 
pied by one like his former self, who prefers drinking, smoking, and gambling, 
to the comfort and decencies of domestic life. 



Digitized 



by Google 



26 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Every thino really Desirable is Practicable. — It is common, says 
Burke, for men to say that such and such things are perfectly right, very desirable, 
but that unfortunately they are not practicable. no, no. Those things which 
are not practicable are not desirable. There is nothing in the world really bene- 
ficial, that does not lie within the reach of an informed miderstanding and a well- 
directed pursuit. There is nothing that God has judged good for us, that he has 
not given us the means to accomplish, both in the natural and moral world. If 
we cry, like children, for the moon, like children we must cry on. 

daily duties. 

If in our daily course, our mind Our neighbor and our work farewell. 

Be set to hallow all we find, The trivial round, the conamon task, 

New treasures still of countless price, Would furnish all we ought to ask— 

God will provide for sacrifice. Room to deny ourselves ; a road 

We need not bid, for cloistered cell, To bring us, daily, nearer God. 



The Secret. — I noticed, said Franklin, a mechanic, among a number of 
others, at work on a house erecting but a little way from my office, who always 
appeared to be in a merry humor, and had a kind word and cheerful smile for 
every one he met. Let the day be ever so cold, gloomy, or sunless, a happy 
smile danced like a sunbeam on his cheerful countenance. Meeting him one 
morning, I asked him to tell me the secret of his constant happy flow of spirits. 
"No secret, doctor," he replied ; ** I have got one of the best of wives, and when 
I go to work, she always has a kind word of encouragement for me j and when I 
go home, she meets me with a smile and a kiss, and then tea is sure to be ready, 
and she has done so many little things through the day to please me, that I can- 
not find it in my heart to speak an mikind word to any body." What an influence, 
then, hath woman over the heart of man, to soften it, and make it the fountain of 
cheerful and pure emotions. Speak gently then — a happy smile and a kind word 
of greeting after the toils of the day are over, cost nothing, and go far towards 
making a home happy and peaceful. 

A Good Rule. — A man who is very rich now, was very poor when he was a 
boy. When asked how he got his riches, he replied, " My father taught me never 
to play till my work was finished, and never to spend my money until I had 
earned it. If I had but an hour's work in a day, I must do that the first thing, 
and in an hour. And after this I was allowed to play ; and I then could play 
with much more pleasure than if I had the thought of an unfinished task before 
my mind. I early formed the habit of doing every thing in tune, and it soon 
became easy to do so. It is to this I owe my prosperity." 

Do nothing Rashly. — Cotton Mather used to say, that there was a gentle- 
man mentioned in the 19th chapter of Acts, to whom he was much indebted. 
This was the town-clerk of Ephesus, whose counsel was to do nothing rashly. 
Upon any proposal of consequence, it was usual with him to say, " Let us first 
consult with the town-clerk of Ephesus." What mischief^ trouble, and sorrow 
would be avoided in the world, were the people more in the habit of consulting 
this gentleman. 

The Work and Reward of Faith. — It is the proper work of faith to believe 
what thou seest not, and the reward of faith to see and enjoy what tho" l*as.. 
believed. 



Digitized 



by Google 



IHE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 27 



The American ''Crystal Palace" is erected on Reservoir-square, in the 
city of New York, according to the plan and designs of Messrs. Carstensen and 
Gildemeister. In form it is, at its base, an octagon, or eight-sided, and above, it 
assumes the form of a Greek cross, with a dome over the intersection. Length 
and breadth of the building, each 365 feet; height of dome, 148 feet; ground 
floor, 111,000 square feet; galleries, 62,000 square feet; whole area, 173,000 
square feet, or 4 acres. It was publicly opened in July, 1853. 

Our changing Climate. — The following beautiful passage by Washington 
Irving, might almost make a November day cheerful. " Here let me say a word 
in favor of those vicissitudes of our climate which are too often made the subject 
of exclusive repining. If they annoy us occasionally by changes from hot to 
cold, from wet to dry, they give us one of the most beautiful clbnates in the 
world- They give us the brilliant sunshines of the south of Europe with the 
fresh verdure of the north. They float our summer sky with clouds of gorgeous 
tints or fleecy whiteness, and send down cooling showers to refresh the panting 
earth and keep it green. Our seasons are full of sublimity and beauty. Winter 
with us has none of its proverbial gloom. It may have its howling winds, and 
chilling frosts, and whirling snow-storms; but it has also its long intervals of 
cloudless sunshine, when the snow-clad earth gives redoubled brightness to the 
day — when at night the stars beam with intensest lustre, or the moon floods the 
whole landscape with her most limpid radiance. And then the joyous outbreak 
of our spring, bursting at once into leaf and blossom, redundant with vegetation, 
and vociferous with life ! and the splendors of our summer — its morning volup- 
tuousness and evening glory — its airy palaces of sun-gilt clouds piled up in a 
deep azure sky ; and its gusts of tempest of almost tropical grandeur, when the 
forked lightning and the bellowing thunde'"-volley from the battlements of heaven 
shake the sultry atmosphere ! and the sublime melancholy of our autumn, mag- 
nificent in its decay, withering down the pomp and pride of a woodland coun- 
try, yet reflecting back from its yellow forests the golden serenity of the sky ! 
Surely we may say that in our climate, * The heavens declare the glory of God ; 
and the firmament showeth his handywork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and 
night unto night showeth knowleilgc.' " 



Digitized 



by Google 



28 TU£ FAMILY CU&ISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Humility. — Humility is a Christian duty. It is more than a duty ; it ib 
a principle of religion, and its influence is exceedingly great, not only upon our 
religious, but our social character. They who are truly humble-minded have no 
quarrels, give no offence, contend with no one in wrath and bitterness. Still 
more impossible is it for them to inttUt any one under any circumstances. And 
the way to be humble-minded is, to think less of our virtues and more of our 
sins. 



How often at a single word Create a chaos in the breast. 

The heart with agony is stirred, A smile of hope from those we lov« 

And ties that years oould not have riren, May be an aingel from above ; 

Are scattered to the winds of heaven. A whispered welcome in our ears 

A glance, that looks what lips would si>eak. Be as the mauio of the spheres ; 

Will speed the pulse and blanch the cheek ; The pressure of a gentle hand 

And thoughu, nor looked, nor yet expressed, Worth all that glitters in the land. 



"A Name above every Name." — When the pious Bishop Beveridge was on 
his death-bed, he did not know any of his friends and connections. A minister 
with whom he had been well acquainted visited him ; and when conducted into 
his room he said, ** Bishop Beveridge, do you know me ?" " Who are you ?" 
said the Bishop. Being told who the minister was, he said that he did not know 
him. Another friend came who had been equally well known, and accosted him 
in a similar maimner, " Do you know m€. Bishop Beveridge ?" " Who are you ?" 
said he. Being told it was one of his intimate friends, he said he did not know 
him. His wife t.ien came to his bedside, and asked him if he knew her, " Who 
are you ?'' said he. Being told she was his wife, he said he did not know her, 
"Well," said one, "Bishop Beveridge, do you know the Lord Jesus Christ?" 
^* Jesus Christ !" said he, reviving, as if the name had upon him the influence of 
a charm ; " yes, I have known him these forty years. Precious Saviour, he 

IS MY ONLY HOPE." 



A Eare Occurrence. — A learned clergyman in Vermont was accosted in the 
following manner by an illiterate preacher who despised education. "Sir, you 
have been to college, I suppose ?" "Yes, sir," was the reply. **! am thankful," 
rejoined the former, "that the Lord has opened my mouth to preach without any 
teaming." "A similar event," replied the latter, " occurred in Balaam's timej 
but such things are of rare occurrence at the present day." 

The Garden op the Heart. — I see it is much easier to pull up many weeds 
out of a garden, than one corruption out of the heart ; and to procure a hundred 
flowers to adorn a knot, than one grace to beautify the soul. It is more natural 
to corrupt man to envy, than to imitate the spiritual excellences of others. 

Circumstances. — To know how bad you are, you must become poor ; and to 
know how bad other people are, you must become rich. Many a man thinks it 
is virtue that keeps him from turning rascal, when it is only a full stomach. Be 
careful, and not mistake possessions for principles. 

Tried Friends. — A sharper remarking that there was no knowing one's 
friends till they were tried, was asked if most of his friends had not been tried 
already. 

Property. — Commerce gives gold j religion makes it gain. Young. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 29 



CowpBR AND HIS Harbs. — Who is not familiar with the name of Cowper ? 
Who has not been delighted and taught by the sweet lessons of his poetry ? 
Who has not mourned over his sufferings during the long period of his mental 
depression and gloom ? He understood his own case well enough to know that 
any thing engaging his attention without tiring it, must prove salutary ; and he 
was often found gardening, or pruning the fruit-trees, or feeding the chickens of 
the Rev. John Newton. His friends also presented him some tame hares, to 
which he showed great kindness. They grew up under his care, and continued 
to interest him for nearly twelve years. He has immortalized them in Latin and 
in English, In verse and in prose. One of them Cowper twice nursed in sickness. 
"No creature," he says, "could be more grateful after his recovery, which he 
most significantly expressed by licking my hand ; first the back of it, then the 
palm, then every finger separately, then between all the fingers. This peculiar 
expression of attachment was shown only twice, and each time upon a similar 
occasion." 



Probation. — We can never see this world in its true light, unless we con- 
sider it as a state of probation and discipline — a condition through which we are 
pa.<«8ing to fit us for another. j. w. Alexander. 



Digitized 



by Google 



30 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

The Bible. — To a friend, th<i late Daniel Webster once aaid, "I have read 
through the entire Bible many times. I now make a practice to go through it 
once a year. It is the book of all others for lawyers, as well as for divines ; and 
I pity the man that carmot find in it a rich supply of thought a nd of rules for hia 
conduct. It fits man for life — it prepares him for death." 

THE PRESENT. 
Let the past guide, the future cheer, Fulfil the duties of the day — 

"While youth and health are in their prime ; The next may hear thy funeral cliime ; 

But 0, be still thy greatest care So sha.lt thou wing thy glorious way 

That awful point — the present time. Where all shall be the present time. 



A PARTICULAR Providence. — There is a Jewish tradition concerning Moses, 
which so beautifully illustrates this point as to be worthy of universal notice ; 
for though merely a fable, it is not on that account the less instructive. That 
great prophet, says one of the Rabbins, was once called by God to the top of a 
high mountain, and there permitted to propose any questions he pleased concern- 
ing the government of the universe. In the midst of one of his inquiries as to 
providence, he was directed to look down upon the plain below, where was a clear 
spring of water. At this spring a soldier had alighted from his horse to drink. 
No sooner had he satisfied his thirst and gone, than a little boy came to the same 
place, and finding a purse the soldier had dropped, picked it up and went away. 
Soon after, there came an infirm old man, with hoary hairs, and weary with ago 
and travelling, who, having quenched his thirst, sat down for rest and refresh- 
ment by the side of the spring. The soldier by this time had missed hia purse, 
and returning, demands it of the old man, who affirms he had not seen it, and 
appeals to heaven to attest his innocence and the truth of his assertion. The 
soldier, not believing his assertions, kills him on the spot. Moses falls or. his 
face in horror and amazement, that such an event should be permitted by God, 
when the divine voice thus prevents his expostulation : "Be not surprised, Moses, 
that the Judge of all the earth should have suffered this to come to pass. To 
you there appears no reason why that child should be the occasion of that old 
man's blood being spilled ; but know, that that same old man, years ago, wds the 
murderer of that child's father .'" And so in every dispensation of Providence, 
there is some wise design j and in every one the Judge of all the earth will do 
right. Christian SpecUtor. 

Good Works. — He that has once felt the peace of God in the remission of 
sins, will hardly stop short, or make it a handle for sloth or licentiousness. This 
would be as if a man was travelling to a certain country, and having by some 
means or other got a taste of its excellent fruits, should make it a pretence for 
going no further, or turning back again. Rev. T. Adams. 

Affliction. — The hiding-places of men are discovered by affliction. As one 
has aptly said, " Our refuges are like the nests of birds : in summer, they arc 
hidden among the green leaves; but in winter, they are seen among the naked 
branches." 



I must Live. — A man whom Dr. Johnson reproved for following a useless 
and demoralizing business, said in excuse, " You know, doctor, that I must live." 
To this the brave old hater of every thing mean and hateful, coolly replied, that 
'* he did not see the least necessity of that." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 31 



Home in the West. — The log-cabins of the WesterA country form the habi- 
tations of thousands of the emigrants from foreign lands, and from the older 
states. These cabins, as the name implies, are built of logs, the openings between 
which are filled in with clay ; and for years they furnish a home for the settler, 
until his increasing prosperity enables him to erect a more sightly and convenient 
dwelling. On his return from his labors at the close of the day, the joyous 
greeting of his wife and children is his delightful *^ welcome home.'''' 

A Noble Reply — It is related of the celebrated John Howe, chaplain to 
Oliver Cromwell, that being often applied to for protection by men of all parties 
in those eventful times, he never refused assistance to any worthy person, what- 
ever his religious views, until one day Cromwell said to him, " Mr. Howe, you 
have asked favors for every body except yourself; pray, when does your turn 
come?" "My turn, my lord protector," said Howe, "is always come when I 
can serve another." Waterston. 

Piety and Morality. — True piety and morality are inseparable, or rather 
they are the same spirit differently manifested. Piety is love^ with its face towards 
God ; and morality is lofve^ with its face towards men. T. Edwards. 



Digitized 



by Google 



32 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAH ALMANAC. 

Spirit of Christianity. — The spirit of Christianity circulates in the atmos- 
phere of modem society, its seal is upon all legislation, its light is shed upon all 
circles of knowledge, its phraseology is found in all languages, its precepts 
regulate morals, habits and manners have assumed its form, the fine arts breatiie 
its perfume, and all the movements of genius are full of its inspiration. Bahnez. 



THE PROVINCE OP WOMAN. By Hannah More. 

As tome fair riolet, loreliest of the glade, Its form decays, and all its odors die ; 

Sheds its mild fragrance on the lonely shade, So woman, bom to dignify retreat. 

Withdraws its modest head from public sight, Unknown to floorish, and unseen be great ; 

Nor courts the sun, nor seeks the glare of light, To give domestic life its sweetest charm, 

Should s<»ne rude hand profanely dare intrude. With softness polish, and with rirtue warm ; 

And bear its beauties from its native wood. Fearful of fame, unwilling to be known, 

ExDoeed abroad its languid colors fly. Should seek but heaven's applauses and her own. 



The Two Travellers. — Two travellers once rested at an inn, when suddenly 
a cry arose that there was a fire in the village. One of them got up and ran to 
offer his assistance. But the other strove to detain him, saying, " Why should 
you waste your time ? Are there not hands enough to assist ? Why concern 
ourselves about strangers?" His friend, however, listened not to his remon- 
strances, but hastened to the fire, the other following and looking on at a dis- 
tance. A woman rushed out of the burning dwelling, crying, *^ My childrai ! 
my children !" When the stranger heard this, he darted into the house among 
the burning timbers, while the flames raged fiercely around him. ^' He will surely 
perish !" cried the spectators. Sut after a short time, behold, he came forth with 
scorched hair, carrying two young children in his arms, and delivered them to 
their mother. The house soon fell in, with a terrible crash. As the stranger and 
his companion returned to the inn, the latter said, " Who bade thee risk thy life in 
such a dangerous attempt?" "HE," answered the first, "who bids me put the 
seed into the ground, that it may decay and bring forth the new firuit." "But 
if thou hadst been buried among the ruins ?" His companion smiled and said, 
"Then should I myself have been the seed." Krummaoher. 



The most important Thought. — " I want you to tell me," said a gentle- 
man to the late distinguished Mr. Webster, "what is the most important 
thought that ever occupied your mind?" " The most important thought that 
ever occupied my mind," said Mr. Webster, with the deepest seriousness, " was 
that of my individual respontibility to God.^^ 

Growth in Grace. — The growth of grace is like the polishing of metals. 
There is first an opaque surface j by and by, you see a spark darting out j then a 
strong light ; till at length it sendA back a perfect image of the sun that shines 
upon it Payson. 

The Great Annihilator — " Steam," says Dr. Lardner, " is the great an- 
nihilator — it annihilates time and space." "Yes," says another, "and multi- 
tudes of passengers too." 

Grace. — Divine grace educates the reasoning faculties of the mind, as well as 
the best affections of the heart — ^happily consecrating both to the service of the 
Redeemer. • 

Temptation and Sin. — No degree of temptation justifies amy degree of sin. 

Digitized by CnOOQ IC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 33 



Christopher Columbus, the most distinguished of navigators, and one of 
the most remarkable men of his age, was born at Genoa, in 1437. He sailed 
from Palos, on his daring adventure, August 2, 1492, searching for a new con- 
tinent in the west ; and in that year discovered the Bahama, and some others of 
the West India islands. It was not till his third voyage, made in 1498, that he 
saw the main land, which had been reached before both by Americus Vespucius 
and Sebastian Cabot. He died, after various reverses of fortune, at Valladolid, 
in 1506. 



Habits. — Like flakes of snow that fall unperceived upon the earth, the seem- 
ingly unimportant events of life succeed one another. As the snow gathers to- 
gether, so are our habits formed. No single flake that is added to the pile pro- 
duces a sensible change; no single action creates, however it may exhibit, a 
man s character ; but as the tempest hurls the avalanche down the mountain, 
and overwhelms the inhabitant and his habitation, so passion acting upon the ele- 
ments of mischief which pernicious habits have brought together by imperceptible 
accumulation, may overthrow the edifice of truth and virtue. Jeremy Bentham. 

The Letter H. — Five of the sweetest words in the English language begin 
with H, which is only a breath — Heart, Hope, Home, Happiness, and Heaven. 
Heart is a hope-place, and home is a heart-place, and that man sadly mistaketh, 
who would exchange the happiness of home for any thing less than heaven. 

The Future. — It has been beautifully said, that "the veil which covers the 
face of Futurity is woven by the hand of Mercy." Seek not to raise that veil 
therefore, for sadness might be seen to shade the brow that fancy had arrayed in 
smiles of gladness. 



Digitized 



by Google 



34 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

The Family. — We talk much of the badness of the world ; and there are no 
men that do more to make it bad, than bad parents and family governors. Many 
call for church reformation and state reformation ; but if men would reform, their 
families, and agree in a holy education of their children, and a religious care of 
their servants, every church and state would soon be reformed when they were 
made up of such reformed families. 

A DYING child's REQUEST A FACT. 

" Mamma," a little maiden said, " Why not, my dear ?" the mother cried ; 

Almost with her expiring sigh, " What flower so well the dead adorns ?" 

" Put no sweet roses round my head, " Mamma," the innocent replied. 

When in my coffin-dress Ilie , " " They crowned our Saviour's head with thorns. " 



An Unfaithful Mother. — The mother of a rising family was visited by a 
Christian friend. Considerations drawn from time and eternity, from heaven and 
hell, failed to reach her conscience, which seemed to be encased in a triple shield 
of adamant, until, as he arose to depart, he exclaimed,' " Well, madam, if you, a 
mother, be indifferent to the welfare of your children, and do not pray for them, who 
will ?" The right key was touched. " Very true," she said, her eyes filling with 
tears j "if mothers prove monsters, what can be expected from others ?" By her 
request, he was detained to address the throne of grace on behalf of her family. 
"Remember my children," she said, "and 0, remember their unfaithful mother." 



Ordinary Duties. — ^We are apt to mistake our vocation in looking out of the 
way for occasions to exercise great and rare virtues, and by stepping over the 
ordinary ones which lie directly in the road before us. When we read, we fancy 
we could be martyrs j and when we come to act, we cannot bear a provoking 
word. Hannah More. 



Lived long enough. — In addressing the court and bar on the death of a 
young lawyer, to whom he was strongly attached, the late Mr. Webster said, 
" His race was short; but short as it was, he lived long enough to do what some 
of us who are older have failed to do" — and the tears fell as he spoke — " Ae lived 
long enough to achieve a religious character. ^^ 

Conscience. — Mr. A ■ has a conscience that looks forward and keeps him 

from doing wrong. But Mr. B 's conscience is of the ex post facto order, 

never manifesting itself till after the wrong deed is done, and then acting as a 
terrible avenger. How many there are of this kind, always sinning, and always 
repenting. No class of men, in a moral point of view, sufier so much as they. 

The Call of Providence. — ^What God calls a man to do, he will carry him 
through. I would undertake to govern half a dozen worlds, if God called me to 
do it ; but I would not undertake to govern half a dozen sheep, unless God called 
me to it. Payson. 

An Example for Christians. — The Hindoos, when gathering in their har- 
vest, before it is removed from the threshing-floor take out the portion for their 
god. However poor, however much in debt, or however small the crop may be, 
the god's portion is first given. 

How to be Miserable. — The true recipe for a miserable existence is this, 
* quarrel with Providence." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 35 

Two Blessed Monosyllables. — Pray and stay, aaya the quaint and excel- 
tent Donne, are two blessed monosyllables. To ascend to God, to attend God's 
lescent to us, is the motion and the rest of a Christian ; and as all motion is for 
?est, so let all the motions of our soul in our prayers to God be, that our wills may 
rest in his, and that all that pleases him may please us because it pleases him : 
>ecause it pleases him, it becomes good for us ; and then, when it pleases him, it 
>ecomes seasonable unto us, and expedient for us. 

DARE AND DO. 

Bare to think, though bigots frown ; Dare forsake what you deem wrong ; 

Dare in words your thoughts express ; Dare to walk in wisdom's way ; 

Dare to rise, though oft caist down ; Dare to give where gifts belong ; 

Dare the wronged and scorned to bless. Dare God's precepts to obey. 

Dare from custom to depart ; Do what conscience says is right ; 

Dare the priceless pearl possess ; Do what reason says is best ; 

Dare to wear it next your heart ; Do with willing' mind and heart ; 

Dare, when sinners curse, to bless. Do your duty, and be blest. 

Sensibilities. — Fine sensibilities are like woodbines, delightful luxuries of 
beauty to twine round a solid, upright stem of understanding ; but very poor things 
i^ unsustained by strength, they are left to creep along the ground. John Foster. 

Self-righteousness and the Righteousness which is by Faith. — I am 
now most thoroughly of opinion, and it is an opinion founded on experience, that 
on the system of^ ^^Do this and live^^^ no peace, and even no true and worthy 
obedience can ever be attained. It is, " Believe on the Lord Jesus Christy and 
thou shalt he savedV When this belief enters the heart, joy and confidence enter 
along with it. The righteousness which we try to work out for ourselves eludes 
our impotent grasp ; and never can a soul arrive at true or permanent rest in the 
pursuit of this object. The righteousness which, by faith, we pilt on, secures 
our acceptance with God and our interest in his promises, and gives us a part in 
those sanctifying influences by which we are enabled to do, with aid from on 
high, what we can never do without it. We look to God in a new light ; we 
see him as a reconciled father ; that love to him which terror scares away re- 
enters the heart, and with a new principle and a new power, we become new 
creatures in Christ Jesus. Dr. Chalmers. 



An Extinguisher. — Dr. Taylor of Norwich said to John Newton, "Sir, I 
have collated every word in the Hebrew Scriptures seventeen times j and it is 
very strange if the doctrine of atonement, wrhich you hold, is there, and I have not 
found it." "I am not surprised at this," said Newton. *'I once went to light 
my candle with an extinguisher on. Now prejudice, from education, learning, 
etc., often forms an extinguisher. It is not enough to bring the candle, you must 
remove the extinguisher." 

The Trinity. — The following anecdote of the late Daniel Webster, says the 
Rev. E. N. Kirk, I am authorized from his own lips, to say is authentic. Being 
asked by a Unitarian gentleman, whether he believed that three and one were 
the same thing, he replied in a manner perfectly characteristic, as it disposes of 
the real difficulty of the Trinity, " Sir, I believe you and I do not understand 
the arithmetic of heaven." 



Human Imperfections. — He censures God who quarrels with the imperfec- 
tions of men. Burke. 



u 



Digitized 



by Google 



36 THE FAMILY CU&iSXlAN ALMANAC. 

A Holy Life. — The beauty of a holy life constitutes the most eloquent and 
effective persuasive to religion which one human being can address to another. 
We have many ways of doing good to our fellow-creatures, but none so efficacious 
as leading a virtuous, upright, and well-ordered life. Chalmers. 

ALWAYS DOING GOOD. 

** Amid a busy crowd A whisper on the tmnult thrown, 

That thronged the daily mart, A transitory breath ; 

He dropt a word of hope and love. It raised a brother from the dust, 

Unstudied from the heart. It saved a soul from death." 

FORGIVENESS. RESOLUTION. 

" If thy neighbor should sin," old ChristoTal said. The keen spirit 

^* Never, never unmerciful be ; Seizes the prompt occasion, makes the thoii|^ 

For remember, it is by the mercy of God Start into instant action, and at once 

Thou art not as wicked as he." Plans and performs, resolves and executes. 



Maxims of Bishop Middleton. — Persevere against discouragements; keep 
your temper ; employ leisure in study, and always have some work in hand ; be 
punctual and methodical in business, and never procrastinate ; never be in a hurry; 
preserve self-possession, and do not be talked out of conviction ; rise early, and be 
an economist of time ; maintain dignity without the appearance of pride — ^man- 
ner is something with every body, and every thing with some ; be guarded in dis- 
course, attentive, and slow to speak; never acquiesce in immoral or pernicious 
opinions ; be not forward to assign reasons to those who have no right to ask ; 
think nothing in conduct unimportant or indifferent ; rather set than follow exam- 
ples; practice strict temperance, and in your transactions remember the final 
account. 



Death a great Leveller. — As Alexander the Great was marching in 
pomp at the head of his mighty army, he passed where Diogenes in his tub was 
very intently engaged in examining, arranging, and rearranging a heap of bones. 
The conqueror, causing his hosts to halt, thus spoke : ** What doest thou there, 
Diq^enes ?" The cynic replied, " I have here the bones of thy father Philip, firoin 
which I am trying to separate those of his lowest servant ; but for the life of me 
I cannot determine * which is which.' " 



Pointed Reply of the Duke of Wellington. — The Duke of Wellingfton, 
who had resided in the East, was gravely asked by a young clergyman, **Dj«i 
not your grace think it almost useless and extravagant to preach the gospel to 
the Hindoos ?" The duke immediately rejoined, *' Look, sir, to your marching 
orders, ' Preach the gospel to every creature.' " Mark 16 : 15. 

Enjoyment. — No enjoyment, says Sydney Smith, however inconsiderable, is 
confined to the present moment. A man is the happier for life for having made 
once an agreeable tour, or lived for any length of time with pleasant people, or 
enjoyed any considerable interval of innocent pleasure. 

The Guidance of Providence. — Though God has promised to guide his in- 
quiring children in the way that is right, he has nowhere promised to make this 
way noto teem right to his friends and neighbors, or even to himself. Halybortoo. 

A Good Test. — The pursuit in which we cannot ask God's protection must 
be criminal ; the pleasure for which we dare not thank him cannot be innocent. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 37 

Childhood. — Childhood is like a mirror, catching and reflecting images. One 
impious or profane thoaght uttered by a parentis lip maif operate upon the young 
heart like a careless spray of water thrown upon polished steel, staining it with 
rust which no after scouring can efface. 

LITTLE THINGS. 

Little dropi of water, So our little errors 

Little grains of sand, Lead the soul awaj 

Make the mighty ocean From the paths of rirtue, 

And the beauteous land. Oft in sin to stray. 

And the little moments, Little deeds of kindness. 

Humble though they be. Little words of lore, 

Bfake the mighty ages Make our earth an Eden, 

Of eternity. Like the hearen above. 

Cecil's Testimony to qis Mother's Faithfulness. — The Rev. Richard 
Cecil, speakixlg of his early life, says, " I was desperate. I was determined to go 
on board a privateer. But I had a pious mother. She talked to me, and wept 
Mrhile she talked. There are soft moments even to desperadoes. God does not 
all at once abandon them." One of the largest and most intelligent audiences 
in London was under his spiritual care, and was once exceedingly moved to heaf 
him exclaim from his pulpit, with surprising candor and humility, "As a 
public witness for God and his truth, I must tell you, that you should never 
despair. No distressed woman ever hoped more against hope than the mother of 
your preacher. Sut she prayed and waited patiently. She put her trust in the 
omnipotent arm. She not only prayed, but she instructed his mind, and then 
waited God's season. She lived long enough to hear that child preach the gospel 
which he had once despised. And she said, * Now, Lord, lettest thou thy servant 
depart in peace.' " 

God makes no Mistakes. — In a town in Massachusetts there is a young 
man of fine talents and capabilities for active life, who for years has been a 
cripple, paralytic, and so helpless that he would starve if left alone. A friend 
was commiserating his condition, when with deep earnestness he exclaimed,aas 
he slowly raised his withered hand, " Crod maket no mittakes.^^ How noble the 
sentiment. " Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right ?" Is not this the 
spirit of true and devoted piety ? 

Thk Death of Children. — I have seen persons gather for the parlor their 
choicest flowers, just as they begin to open into full bloom and fragrance, lest 
some passer-by should tear them from the bush and destroy them. Does not God 
sometimes gather into heaven young and innocent children for the same reason, 
lest some rude hand may despoil them of their beauty ? 

LovB. — Love is the diamond among the jewels of the believer's breastplate. 
The other graces^ shine like the precious stones of nature, with their own peculiar 
lustre and various hues, but the diamond is white, uniting all the others. 

The Human Heart. — The human heart is like a feather-bed — it must be 
roughly handled, well shaken, and exposed to a variety of turns, to prevent its 
becoming hard. 

Honesty and Civility. — Honesty sometimes keeps a man from growing 
rich -, and civility from being witty. 



Digitized 



by Google 



3d TK£ FAHILY CHftiSXIAN ALMANAC. 

Peomisbs. — A promise should b« given with caution, and kept with care. It 
should be made by the h«^t, and remembered by the head. A promise is the off- 
spring of intention, the result of reflection, and should be nurtured by recollection* 
A promise and its performance should, like the scales of a true balance, always 
present a mutual adjustment. A promise delayed is justice deferred, neglected 
is an untruth told, attended to is a debt settled. 

FROPBRTT. PRAYER* 

Nothing I hare is rightly called my own, Prayet ardent opens hearen, lets down a streaaa 

But what I make my own by using well. Of glory on tiie oonsecrated honr 

Those deeds of charity which we hare done, Of man, in audience with the Deity. 

Shall stay for ever with us : only the wealth Who worships the great &od, that instant joins 

Which we have so bestowed we truly keep ; The first in heaven, and sets his foot on hell. 

The other is not ours. MiddletoB. Tonne. 



Bending a Tree. — Some years ago, a gentieman in one of our southern states 
had a wild, reckless son. He had long passed the age when/the rod is deemed 
necessary to insure obedience ; but one day, aftei: some great offence, the fathei 
resolved to whip him. The youth submitted, but aftei^ receiving the chastise 
ment, quietly turned to the parent, and pointing to a small tree near the door, 
said, *^ Father, I wish you would bend that tree for me." Surprised, the father 
imswered, "Why, what do you mean?" "Can you do it?" "No, of course 
not." "You could have done it once, and so it is with me: there has been a 
time when you could have bent me to your will ; it is too late now." 

The Christian. — A Christian should look upon himself as sacred and devoted, 
so that what involves but an ordinary degree of crimihality in others, in him 
partakes of the nature of sacrilege j what is a breach of trust in others, is in him 
the profanation of a temple. Robert Hall. 

An Imprcvehi^nt. — "Thirty-five years ago," says an Ohio paper, "there 

were in county thirty distilleries and no church ; now, there are thirty 

churches and no distillery." 

For Ladies.-~A golden rule for a young lady is, to converse always with 
your female friends as if a gentleman were of the party ; and with young men, 
as if your female companions were present. 

Prater for Sanctification. — There cannot be named a pursuit or enterprise 
of human beings, in which there is so little possibility of failure, as praying for 
sanctification. j. w. Alexander. 

A Eemedy. — A lawyer being much indisposed in court, told the witty Erskine 
that he had a violent pain in his bowels for which he could get no relief. " I 'U 
give you an infallible remedy," said the other *, " get you appointed attorney-gen- 
eral, and then you'll have no botoeU.^^ 

Woman. — ^Woman is at the heart of man, from birth to manhood j and in it, 
from manhood to the grave. 

Providence. — To the believer, every providence is but another stroke of the 
chisel upon the marble block, sharpening it for its position in the heavenly temple. 

Arguments and Wishes. — ^Men's arguments often prove nothing but their 

wishes. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 39 

Dbvotednbss to God. — " I should have thought," says John Newton, " mow- 
ers very idle people, but they work while they whet thair scythes. So devoted- 
nesB to God, whether it mows or whets the scythe, still goes on with the work." 

PROVIDENCB. From the Italian. 

Jnst as a mother -with rweet pious face, And whether stem or smiling, lores them 

Veams towards her little children from her seat, still ; 

Oives one a kiss, another an emlnrace, So Providence for us, high, infinite, 

Takes this upon her knee, that to her feet ; Makes our necessities its watchful task. 

And while from actions, looks, complaints, pre- Hearkens to ail our prayers, helps all our wants, 
tences. And e'en if it denies what seems our right, 

She learns their feelings and tiieir rarious will, Either denies because H would hate us ask. 
To this a look, to that a word dispenses, Or seems but to deny, or in denying grants. 

JssTiNO.^^The Arabians have a saying, that it is not good to jest with God, 
death, or the devil : for the first neither can nor will be mocked ; the second 
mocks all men one time or another ; and the third puts an eternal sarcasm on 
those that are too familiar with him. 



Testimony and Argument. — Testimony is like an arrow shot from a. long- 
bow ; the force of it depends on the strength of the hand that draws it. Argu- 
ment is like an arrow from a cross-bow, which has equal force, though shot by a 
child. Boyle. 

Persevering Toil. — Cecil once said of Sir Walter Raleigh, " I knew that he 
can toil terribly :" and in this single expression is the secret of his knowledge 
and greatness. 

Good Advice. — If you would relish your food, labor for itj if you would 
enjoy the raiment, pay for it before you wear it j if you would sleep soundly, take 
a clear conscience to bed with you. 

The true Christian Spirit. — Dr. Johnson observes of Dr. Watts, that 
^* whatever he took in hand was, by his incessant solicitude for souls, converted 
into theology." 

A Dangerous Disease. — Some one telling the famous Marquis Spinola that 
a distinguished general had died of having nothing to do, he answered, ^^ Upon 
my word, that is enough to kill any body." 

Two Heavens.- — That man who reads that he may know, and labors to know 
that he may do, will have two heavens : a heaven of joy, peace, and comfort on 
earth, and a heaven of glory and happiness after death. 

Signs of True Grace. — When self-loving, says Mason, is turned into self- 
loathing, self-excusing into self-condemning, self-admiring into self-abhorring, 
self-seeking into self-denying. 

Christian Charity. — To requite good for good is civU courtesy j evil for evil, 
malicious policy ; evil for good, hatefiil ingratitude } good for evil, only Chris- 
tian charity. Sclater. 

Duties. — Duties in general, like that class of them called debts, give more 
trouble the longer they remain undischarged. 

Prejudice. — Prejudice is opinion without judgment, or judgment pronounced 
before testimony is heard. 



Digitized 



by Google 



40 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 



Prayer. — Let every man study his prayers, and read his duty in the pe- 
titions ; for the body of our prayer is the sum of our duty ; and as we must ask of 
God whatsoever we need, so we must labor for all that we ask. 



TO A CHILD. 



Nerer, my child, forget to pray, 
Whate'er the buiineaa of the day : 
If h&ppy drexnu have blessed thy sleep, 
If startling fears have made thee weep^ 
With holy thoughts begin the day, 
And neW, my child, forget to pray. 

Pray Him by whom the birds are fed. 
To give to thee thy daily bread ; 
If wealth her beauty should bestow, 



Praise Him from whom all blessings flow ; 
If He who gave should take away, 
O ne'er, my chUd, forget to pray. 

The time will come when thou wilt nuss 

A father^s and a mother's kiss ; 

And then, my child, perchance yon '11 see 

Some who in prayer he'er bend the knee : 

From such examples turn away, 

And ne'er, my child, forget to pray. 



THE CHILD S WISH. 

I think, when I read that sweet story of old, Yet still to his footstool in prayer I may go. 

When Jesus was here among men, And ask for a share in his tbve ; 

How he called little children like lambs to his And if I thus earnestly seek him below, 

I wish I had been with him then. [fold. I shall see him and hear him above, 

I wish that his hand had been laid on my head, In that beautiful world he has gone to prepare 

That his arm had been thrown around me. For those who are washed and forgiven ; 

And that I might hare seen his kind looks when And many such children are praising him there, 

he said, For of such is the kingdom of heaven. 
** Let the little ones come onto me." 



Way to lay up real Wealth. — A man, would do well to carry a pencil in 
his pocket, and write down the thoughts of the moment. Those that come un- 
sought for are commonly the most valuable, and should be secured because they 
seldom return. Lord Bacon. 



Strength of Unbelief. — ^How deeply rooted must unbelief be in our hearts, 
when we are surprised to find our prayers answered, instead of feeling sure they 
will be so, if they are only offered up in faith, alhd are in accord with the will of 
God. Guesses at Truth. 



The Ctraveyard. — A Christian graveyard is a cradle, where, in the quiet 
motions of the globe, Jesus rocks his sleeping children. By and by he will wake 
them from their slumber, and in the arms of angels they shall be translated to 
<^e »^e«- G. B. Cheever. 

Praise. — The real satisfaction which praise can afford, is when what is re- 
peated aloud agrees with the whispers of conscience, by showing us that we have 
not endeavored to deserve well in vain.' Johnson. 

What will Last. — Invincible fidelity, g«od-humrtr, and complacency of tem- 
per, says Dr. Johnson, outlive all the charms of a fine face, and make the decays 
of it invisible. 



The Book of Job. — Webster, Carlyle, Coleridge, and we believe Chalmers^ 
each expressed the opinion, that the inspired book of Job is the sublimest poem 
in the possession of mankind. 

Be Active .—Either exercise your graces, or Satan will exercise your corrup- 
tions ; as one bucket descends, another rises. - 1 



Digitized 



by Google 



' THE FAMILY CHKISIIAN ALMANAC. 4J 

Usefulness the whole of Life. — ''My child," said an aged minister t<^ 
hi^ daughter as she was leaving him just after her marriage, '' I want you to 
remember this one thing : aU you can get out of life U usefulnen.''^ Admirable 
thought ; worthy to be engraven in letters of gold. 

/ AN EPITAPH FOR AN INFANT. 

Beneath this stone, in sweet repose, God in his wisdom has recalled 

Is laid a mother's dearest pride ; The precious boon his love had given ; 

A flower that scarce had waked to lif^. And though the casket moulders here, 

And light, and beauty, ere it died. The gem is tpcurlding now in htaven. 



GUILT. MOTHERS. 

L«t no man trust the first false step The mother in her office holds the key 

Of guilt ; it hangs upon a precipice, Of the soul ; and she it is who stamps the coin 

Whose steep descent in last perdition ends. Of character, and makes the being who would be 
Younf. a, savage 

But for her gentle cares, a Christian man. 



Eastern Method of Measuring Time. — The people of the East measure 
time by the length of their shadow. Hence, if you ask a man what o'clock it is, 
he immediately goes into the sun, stands erect, then looking where his shadow 
terminates, he measures the length with his feet, and tells you nearly the time. 
Thus the workmen earnestly desire the shadow which indicates the time for leav- 
ing their work. A person wishing to leave his toil says, '' How long my shadow 
is in coming." "Why did you not come sooner?" "Because I waited for my 
shadow." Li the seventh chapter of Job we find it written, "As a servant 
earnestly desireth the shadow," etc. 



Ancient Cities. — London is a great city, and New Yorkers regard their 
city as an immense municipality. But if the mayors of Nineveh and Babylon 
could revisit the earth, they would laugh at the pretensions of the moderns. The 
area of Babylon was two hundred and twenty-iive square miles, and that of 
Nineveh two hundred and sixteen square miles, while that of London and its 
environs is but one hundred and fourteen square miles. 

A Cardinal's Opinion. — The Abbe Malot expressing a doubt to Biichelieu 
how many masses would save a soul, the cardinal replied, " Pho, you block- 
head \ as many as it would take snow-balls to heat an oven !" 

The Inquisition. — In the Eomiah inquisition in Spain alone, as its own record 
shows, in the last three hundred years, 17,690 persons have been burnt in effigy, 
34,382 burnt alive, and 291,450 imprisoned, scourged, tortured, etc. ; the average 
number of its victims thus being seen to be over a thousand per year, or more 
than three every day. 

A GENTLE King. — George II. being informed that an impudent printer was 
to be punished for having published a spurious king's speech, replied, " I hope 
the man's punishment will be of the mildest sort, because I have read both, and 
as fiar as I understand either of them, I like the spurious speech better than my own. ' ' 

A Forgiving Spirit. — He that cannot forgive others, breaks the bridge over 
which he must pass himself; for every man had need to be forgiven. Herbert 

Labor. — What men want is, not talent, it is purpose ; in other words, not the 
power to achieve, but the will to labor. 



Digitized 



by Google 



42 



TH£ FAMILY CK&ISTIAN ALMANAC. 



PPESIDSMTS AND V1CB-P&BSIDBTIT9 OF THE UNITED STATES, FEOM TUK ADOPTION 
or TUK CONSTITUTION TO THE PRESENT TIME. 



Vo. 


PRESIDENTS. 


RaMdcnce. 


BORN. 


i\ 


il 


DIED. 


i 


yiCEPRBSn>K*TS. 


irf 


1 
3 
3 
4 
5 


George Washington 
George Washington 

John Adams 

Thomas Jefferson - - 
Thomas J«flfWr«on. . 


Virginia - 


1732 


57 


8 


Dec. 14, 1799 


68 


John Adams 

John Adams 

Aanm Burr 

George Clinton-- • 
George Clintont- 
Eldridge Gerryt- 
DanU D.Tompkins 
Dan'l D.Tompkins 
John C. Calhoun - 
John C. Calhoun 
M. Van Buren --- 
R. M.Johnson -- 
John Tyler 


1789 
1793 
1797 
1801 
1805 
1809 
1813 
1817 
1881 
1825 
1629 
1833 
1837 
1841 
IStl 
1&45 
1849 
1850 
1853 


Mass.---- 
Virginia - 


1735 
1743 


62 

58 


4 
8 


July 4,1826 
July 4, 1826 


91 
83 


tf 

7 


James Madison 


Virginia - 


1751 


58 


8 


June 28, 1830 


85 


8 
9 


James Monroe 


Vijginia 


1758 


58 


8 


July 4,1831 


72 


10 
11 
1*2 


JohnQ. Adams --- 
Andrew Jackson- • • 


Mas..---- 
Tennetsee 


1767 
1767 


68 
62 


4 
8 


Feb:* 23, 1848 
J^ne 8,1846 


80 

78 


1.3 
14 


Martin Van Buren 
Wm. H. Harrison* 

John Tyler 

James k. Polk- -- 
Zachary Taylor* - - 
Millard Fillmore - - 
Franklin Pierce - - - 


New York 

Ohio 

Virginia 
Tennessee 
Louisiana 
New York 
N. Ham'e 


1782 
1773 
1790 
1795 

1734 
1800 


55 
68 
51 
49 
65 
60 


4 

4 
4 
1 
3 


April 4, 1841 


68 


15 
16 


June 15, 1849 
July 9, 1850 


64 

66 


George M. Dallas- 
Millard Filmore - - 


17 






William R. Kingt 













* Died in office, and succeeded by the Vice-President. 



t Died in office. 



Q-ovBKNMBNT OF THB Unitxd Statbb. — The teTonteenth Presidential t«rm of four yean 



began on the 4th of March, 1853, and will expire on the 3d of March, 1857. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE New Hampahire-Piettdent Salary 

Vice-President " 

WILLIAM L. MARCY New York Secretary of State »* 

JAMES GUTHRIE Kentucky Secretary of the Treasury " 

JEFFERSON DAVIS Mississippi Secretary of War " 

JAMES C. DOBBIN ----- North Carolina -- Secretary of the Nary '» 

ROBERT M'CLELLAND Michigan Secretary of the Interior " 

JAMES CAMPBELL Pennsylvania Postmaster-General " 

CALEB CUSHING Massachusetta — - Attorney-General " 



$25,000 
5,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
4,000 



CoNORBss. — The Sbmatb is composed of two members elected by the legislature of each 
state for the term of six years. Of course the number of Senators is now sixty-two. The 
Vice-President of the United States is President of the Senate. In his absence, a Freaident 
pro tempore is chosen by the Senate. 

Thb House of Rbprksbntatitss is composed of representatives from each state, in the 
ratio of one to every 70,680 of the population. The present number of members is two hun- 
dred and thirty-three ; and there are four delegates, one each from Oregon, Mii^esota, Utah, 
and New Mexico, who have a right to speak, but not to vote. The compensation of the 
members is $8, and that of the Speaker $16 per day during the session, and $8 for every 
twenty miles' travel in going and returning. 



SupRBMB Court. — Chief Justice, Roger B. Taney of Maryland, salary $5,000. 
Justices, John McLean, Ohio; James M. Wayne, G-eorgia; Vacancy; John Catron, Tennes* 
see; Peter V. Daniel, Virginia; Samuel Kelson, New York; Robert C. Grier, Pennsylva- 
nia; Benjamin R. Curtis, Mass. : salary $4,500. This Court is held in Washington, and 
has but one session annually, commencing on the first Monday in December. 

CiRomr Courts. — The United States are divided into nine judicial circuits, in each of 

which a Circuit Court is held at least twice a year for each state within the circuit, by a Justice 
of the Supreme Court, and the District Judge of the state or district in which the court sits. 

District Courts — The United States are also divided into forty-six districta, in which 
District Courts are held by thirty-dx district judges. 



Digitized 



by Google 



TUB FAMILY CU&i^TlAN ALMANAC. 



43 



Intkkcoubsb with Fokbion Nations. — The psy of Eayoys ExtnordinMry Mul Ministera 
Plenipotentiary, is $9,000 per annum ai salavy, in addition to $9,000 ai outfit. The pay of 
Charges d' Affaires is $4,500 per annum ; of Secretaries of Legation, $2,000 ; of Ministers 
Resident, $6,000. The United States are represented by Ministers Plenipotentiary at the 
courts of Great Britain, France, Russia, Prussia, Spain, Mexico, Braxil, and Chili ; and by 
Char^^es d^ Affaires at the courts of most of the other foreign powers with which Uus country 
Lb connected by commercial intercourse. 

B.xvs^n7K AND Expenditures of Govx&MBfxiiT, for the year ending June 90, 1852. 

RECEIPTS. 

From Customs, riz : 

Quarter ending Sept. 90, 1851 $14,754,909 

Quarter ending Dec. 31, 1851 9,601,509 

Quarter ending March 31, 1852 12,109,7«1 

Quarter ending June 3, 1852 10,873,146 



Total t47,339,320 

Sales of PubHc Lands $2,043,239 

Miscellaneous and incidental 
sources, including Military 
contributions in Mexico 345,820 

Total receipts exclasiTe of loan- -49,728,386 
Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1851 ..10,911,646 



Total means -$60,640,0( 



XXPBKDITVRES. 

Exclnsire of Trust Funds. 

CirULUt $3,422,939 

Foreign interoourse 4,132,671 

Miscellaneous 9,824,158 

Interior Department 5,198,828 

"War Department 8,225,246 

Nary Department 8,928,236 

Expenditures on Public Debt, includ- 
ing Interest, Texas Stock, redemp- 
tion of Loans, Commissions on pur- 
chase of Stock, reimbuntement of 

Treasury Notes, etc 6,275,815 

Total expenditures $16,007,896 

Balance in Treasury, July 1, ISSS- -14,632,136 



Exports and Imports for the year ending June 30, 1852. 

EXPORTS. 

Domestic products $149,861,911 

Foreign goods reexported 17,204,026 

Specie - 42,507,285 



Total $209,573,5 



impoets. 

Foreign products $207,210,101 

Specie 5,362,643 



Total - 



$212,502,744 

British RETsinjE awd Expenditure for the year ending January 5, 1852 — Receipts, 
$261,165,030 ; Expenditures, $227,533,050. 

British Exports akd Imports, for the year ending January 5, 1852, at the official rates, 
not including Ir^nd. 

EXPORTS, 

Domestic prodncU $951,989,050 

Foreign and Colonial goods 168,631 ,860 



Total $1,120,630,910 



Foreign prodncts- 



$517,897,910 



Debt of Great Britaui, January 1, 1852, $3,825,632,910 ; annual charge for interest 
and management, $137,508,915. * 

United States Mint and Branches — Total receipts and coinage during the calendar 
year 1852. 

receipts of bullion. 

At PhUadelphia— Gold $50,874,131 

" Silver 952,297 



Total $51,826,428 

At New Orleans— Gold $3,935,668 

" Silver 118,694 



Total $4,064,362 

At Charlotte— Gold $430,900 

At Dahlonega— Gold $476,789 

Total Bullion— Gold $55,717,488 

« SUver 1,070,991 

The aboTe coinage consisted of 34,224,619 pi^es, of whish 2,201,145 w«r« gold dollars. 



coinage. 

At Philadelphia— Gold $51,506,638 

" SUver 847,410 

" Copper , 50,630 

At New Orleans— Gold $4,470,000 

" Silver 153,000 

At Charlotte— Gold $396,734 

At Dahlonega— Gold $473,815 

Total Coinage— Gold $56,846,187 

" Silver 990,416 

" Copper 50,630 

Grand total $57,896,227 



Digitized 



by Google 



44 



THB FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALilANAG. 



Po«T-OrFicB Statiitics for the year ending June 30, 18d2. — Number of Post-offices, 
21,191 ; extent of 6,711 post-routes, 214,284 miles ; annu&l transportation, 38.985,728 miles; 
gross receipts, $6,925,971; expenditures, $7,108,459; letter postage, $4,226,792; newspa- 
per and pamphlet postage, $789,246 ; new Post-offices, 1,395 ; whole number of letters pas** 
ing through the mails, 95,790,5-24 ; of which unpaid, 32,673,765 ; paid by stamps, 31,897,750; 
paid by money, 18,448,510 ; free, 3,146,000. 

Post-Off ic« in G-rsat BuiTAiif — The gross receipts of the British Post-office for the 
year ending January 5, 1852, was $12,110,840; cost of management, $6,520,815; net 
revenue, $5,590,020. The estimated total number of letters in 1851, was 360,647,187 ; 
number of money orders, 4,661,025. and the amount of them, $44,402,100. 

Raileoass in thx Unitkd States. — The total length of railroads completed and in use, 
on the first of January, 1853, was 13,227 miles ; in various stages of 'progress, 12,928 miles; 
and in the hands of engineers to be completed in three or four years, about 7,000 miles — 
making a total of 33,155 miles, which at an average of $30,000 per mile, including oquip- 
ments, will have taken a capital of $994,650,000. This estimate is from tlie " Americaa 
Railway Q-uide,'^ and is believed to be more accurate, as it refers to a later date, thxua. that 
published by the Census office. 

Railroads in Q-rsat Britain. — According to official returns, the total length of RaQ- 
roads open and in use in G-reat Britain, on the 1st of January, 1852, was 6,890 miles ; au- 
thorued and in course of construction, 5,260 miles ; giving a total of 12,150 miles. Number 
of passengers conveyed on railroads in the year ending December 31, 1851, 85,391,095. 

Railroads complstxd in thk world — 

Miles. 

United Sutes 13,227 

Great Britain and Ireland 6,890 



Germany, including Prussia and Austria 

France 

Belgium 

Russia 

Cuba 

British Provinces 



5,340 
1,831 
532 
422 
359 
205 



MOa*. 

-^ 170 

75 

60 

30 

30 

22 

29,193 

Magnetic Txlboraph — According to the United States Census Report, there are in 
the United States 77 telegraph companies, the single wires of which extend 16,729 miles, 
and the double wires 23,275 miles. 



Italy 

Sweden 

Spain 

South Afnerica • 

India 

Panama 



Total - 



Othkr ILlonbtic Tblbgraphs. — Oa the same authority, there are said to be of the m^- 
netic telecnraph in operation, in 

Mile.. Miles 

England 4,000 Germany 3,000 

Canada 983 France 750 

Prussia 1,700 

G-reat progress has also been made in establishing telegraphic communication in Austria 
Saxony, Bavaria, Tuscany, Holland, Italy, Russia, and India. 

LioHTHODSBS IN THE United States. — In 1852, the Hghthouse establishment of the Unitwi 
States included 398 lighthouses and 47 floating lights ; having in all 3,880 lamps, and 450 
keepers and assistants ; and sustained at an annual cost, including salaries, of $515,343. 

Public LaIcds. — In the year ending June 30, 1852, of public lands sold, 1,553,071 acres; 
located with boimty warranu, 3,201,314 ; swamp land grants, 5,219,188 ; given in aid of 
railroads, 3,025,920 ; making a total disposed of, of 13,115,175 acres. Owned by the United 
States, yet to be put in market, 1,387,534,000 acres, which at $1 25 per acre are worth 
$1,734,417^500. 

Banks In 1851, there were in the United States, 737 banks, with 128 branches; 

capital, $229,084,496; loans and discounts, $412>710,315; specie, $51,907,591; circula- 
tion, $153,968,388 ; deposiks, $120,076,063. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAIJ ALMANAC. 45 

Fropbktt. — The assessed value of the real and personal es>tate of the inhabitants of 
the United States, for the year ending June 1, 1850, was $6,010,207,309; iU true or 
estimated value, $7,133,369,725. Acres of improved land, 118,457,622; unimproved, 
in farms, 184,621,348 ; cash value of both, $3,270,733,093 ; value of farming implements, 
$151,569,675. Horses owned, 4,335,358; asses and mules, 559,229; cows, 6,392,044; 
other horned cattle, 21,968,097 ; sheep, 21,721,814 ; swine, 30,316,608. 

Stsamboats. — There are in the United States 1,205 steam-boats, the total tonnage of 
which is 411,779 tons. Of the whole number 857 are high, and 348 low pressure. 



Steam Ysssels in G-rkat Britain. —On January 1, 1852, theje were registered in the 
various ports of the United Kingdom 1,227, whose tonnage, exclusive of engine room, 
amounted to 186,666 tons. 

Whalb Fishery. — In the year 1852, there were engaged in the United States Whale 
Fishery, 396 ships, and 277 barks, brigs, and schooners. Total tonnage, 208,872 tons. 



Pension Department — The whole number of persons receiving pensions from the United 
States government in 1852, exclusive of navy pensioners, was 18,8(38 ; amount paid them, 
about $1,500,000. Navy pensioners, 726 ; amount paid them, $45,049. Navy widow pen- 
sioners, 514; amount paid them, $101,490. Navy orphan pensioners, 48; amount paid 
them, $6,138. 



Nativity of the Population of the United States According to the census returns 

It appears, that of the free inhabitants of the United States in 1850, 17,737,505 were natives 
of the country, 2,210,828 of foreign birth, and 39,014 unascertained. Of the foreign -bom, 
1,965,518 were resident in the free, and 245,310 in the slave states. The countries from 
which these additions to our population have been derived, and the proportion from each, 
appear in the following table : 



Natives of Ireland 961,719 -43.04 per cent. 

Germany 573,225-35.09 " 

England- -- -278,675- -12.06 « 
British Am. -147,700. - 6.68 " » 



Natives of Scotland 70,550- -3.17 per oent. 

France 54,069-2.44 " 

" Wales 29,868-1.34 " 

" other countries 95,022- -4.47 *' 



Various Classes in the United States in 1850. — 

WHITE FREE COLORED. SLAVES. TOTAI* • 

Male. Femala. Male FemaK Male. Female. 

Deaf and Dumb S,027..--4,058 78---- 65 276-213 9,717 

Blind 4,519- ---3,478 239 ---255 562----649 9,702 

fnsane 7,697 ----7,459 144- ---177 117- -174 15,768 

Idiotic 8,276.... 5,954 234.-.-202 585 ----455 15,706 

Pauperism. — The whole number of paupers in the United States, Jime 1, 1850, accord- 
ing to the census, was 50,353 ; of whom 36,916 were natives, and 13,437 foreigners. The 
whole number receiving aid as paupers within the year ending at the same date, was 
134,972 ; of whom 66,434 were natives, and 68,538 foreigners. The annual cost of sup- 
porting paupers, $2,954,806. ■ 

PAUI'ERISM IN OrEAT BriTAIN AND IrBLAND. — 

No. of Paapers. Coet of auistinj;. 

f n E ngland and W ales, for the year ending January 1, 1852 * 835,360 $8,048,805 

In Ireland, for the year ending September 29, 1851 775,357 5,514,490 

In Scotland, for the year ending May 14, 1851 141,870 2,699,715 

* The report for England and Wales is from 13,987 parishes, but does not include 490 par- 
ishes which ue under local acts, etc. 

Crime. — The whole number of persons convicted of crime in the United States, for the 
year ending June 1, 1850, was about 27,000, of whom 13,000 were native, and 14,000 for- 
eign bom ; thus giving one criminal out of every 1,364 vf the native population, and one out 
of every 158 foreigners, or more than eight times as many criminals from our foreign, as 
from our native population, in proportion to the number o^each. 



Digitized 



by Google 



46 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



RxLithous Stjltibtics of thk Unitki> States The follo-vring very important and ifiier- 

eating itatisties of the various religious denominations in the United States, are from the 
census returns of 1850. 



TABLE I 


., EXHIBITINO RELIGIOUS STATISTICS BY DENOMINATIONS. 






No. of 
church- 
es. 


Aggregate 
accommo- 
dattona. 


Total ralue 
of Chun h 
Property. 


Denominationa. 


No. of 
church- 
es. 


AggrePite 
accommo- 
dations. 


Totat vHlne 
of Church 
property- 


Baptist 

Christian 

Congregational - 
Dutch Reformed 

Episcopal 

Yree - 


8,791 

812 

1,674 

'324 

1,422 

361 

714 

327 

31 

1,203 

110 

12,467 


3,130,878 
'296,050 
795,m 
181,986 
625,213 
108,605 
282,823 
156,932 
16,575 
531,100 
29,900 

4,209,333 


$10,931,382 

845,810 

7,973,962 

4,096,730 

11,261,970 

252,255 

1.709,867 

965,880 

371,600 

2,867,886 

94,245 

14,636,671 


Moravian 

Presbyterian 

Roman-catholic 

S-vredenborg 

Dunker 


331 

4,584 

1,112 

15 

52 

619 

243 

494 

325 


112,185 
2,040,316 
620,950 
5,070 
35,075 
213,552 
137,367 
205,462 
115^347 


443,»I7 

14,369,8b9 

8,973,838 

108.100 

46:025 

690 065 


Friends 

Ger. Reformed - 
Jffwish -- - 


Unitarian 

Universalist 

Minor sects 

Total 


3,268,122 

1,767,015 

741,930 


Lutheran 

Mennonite 


Methodist 


36,011 


13,849,896 


$86,416,639 



TABLE II., SXHIBITINO RSLIOIOUS STATISTICS BY STATES. 



Peoditcts. — Among the productions of the United States, for the year ending June 1, 
1850, were, wheat, 100,503,899 bushels; rye, 14,188,639; Indian com, 592,326,612; oats, 
146,567,879; peas and beans, 9,219,975; Irish potatoes, 65,796,793; sweet potatoes, 
38,259,196 ; barley, 5,167,016 ; buckwheat, 8,956,916 ; gals, of wine, 221,240 ; molasses, 
12,700,606; rice, 215,312,710 lbs.; tobacco, 199,752,646; cotton, 987.449,600; wool, 
52,789,174; butter, 313,266,962; cheese, 105,535,219; maple sugar, 34,249,886; flax, 
7,715,961 ; hops, 3,496,029 ; value of orchard products, 7,723,326 ; market-garden products, 
$5,269,930; home manufactures, $27,481,399; animals slaughtered, 109,485,757. 

The Coal-Teade. — The amount of coal sent to market in 1852, chiefly from the Pennsyl- 
^'ania mines, was 4,996,130 tuns, being an increase over the previous year of 544,814 tuns. 



Mantfactxtres in the United States — The entire capital invested in the various 
manufactures in the United States, on the 1st of June, 1850 — not including any establish- 
ment producing less than the annual value of $500 — amounted, in round numbers, to 
S-ISOjOOOjOOO ; value of ra,w material, $550,000,000 ; amount paid for labor, $240,000,000 ; 
ralue of manufactured articles, $1,020,300,000; number of persons employed, 1,050,000. 



Iron MAmnpAcnrREs. — In the various manufactures of wrought and pig iron, and castings, 
in the United States, according to the census returns of 1850, the total capital invested was 
$49,258,206 ; tons of ore used, 1,589,159 ; tons of iron,, 608,460 ; value of raw material, fuel, 
etc., $27,049,743; number of hands wnployed, 57,284 : total value of products, $54,604,006. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 47 

ANNIVERSARIES AND OFFICERS OF CHARITABLE SOCIETIES* ETC. 

Boston.— AmekicanBoakd FOR Foreign Missions, Tueg. before 2d Wed. in Sept. : Rev. Ruftis 
Anderson, D. D., Rer. Selah B. Treat, Rev. Swan L. Pomroy, D.D., See's ; Henry HiJI, Esq., Tieas., 
Miss. House, 33 Pemberton-square ; Rev. Geo. W. Wood, Sec, and A. Merwin, Agent in Ne\r' 
Yortc, Bible House jAstor-platce. Abibricau Baptist Missionary Union, SdThurs. in May ; Rev 
Sok^mon Feck, B.I)., Rev. Edward Bright. See's, 33 Somerset-st. Ambrican Education Soci- 
KTT, in May ; Rev. Increase M. Tarbox, Sec. ; Q. % FarwelL Treas., 15 Cornhill. American 
Tract Soc. at Boston, last Wed. in May ; Rev. Seth Bliss, Sec, N. P. Kemp, Treas., 28 Corn- 
hill. Prison DuciPLDnc Soc., Rev. L. Dwight, Sec. ; Chas. H. Mills, Treas., 39 Milk-st. Mass. 
HoMB M18810NART Soc., Rev. J. S. Clark, D. D., Sec, 28 Cornhill. Mass. Sabbath-school Soc, 
Rev. A. BuUard, Sec, 13 Cornhill. Amkr. S. S. Union, H. Hoyt, Agent, 9 Cornhill. 

NEW YORK.— AxxRiCAN Bibljb Society, 2d Thurs. in May; Rev. John C. Bngham, D.D.. 
R«T. Joseph Holdich, D. D., See's: Rev. James.H. McNeil, Assistant Sec, J. Hyde, Esq., General 
Agent, Henry Fisher, Assistant Treas., Astor-place. American and Foreign Bibuc Society, 
ReT. R. Babcock, D. D., Cor. Sec, N. C. Piatt, Treas., U. D. Ward, Agt. Depos., 115 Nassau-street. 
Amkrican Biblb Union, Wm. H. Wyckoflf, Esq., Cor. Sec, 350 Broome-st. American Tract 
Soc., Wed. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. Wm. A. Hallpek, D. D., Rev. O. Eastmaa, Rev. R. S. 
Cook, Cor. See's : 0. R. Kingsbury, Assist. Sec and Treas., 150Nassau-st. American Home Mis- 
sionary Soc., Wed. preced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. Milton Badcer, D. D., Rev. Chas. Hall, D. D., 
Rot. David B. Coe, See's ; H. W. Ripley, Assist. Treas., Bible House, Astor-place. Amer. Bap- 
tist Home Mission Soc., Rev. Benj. M. Hill, Cor. Sec. 354 Brooms-st. Board of Foreign 
Missions of Pres. Church, Hon. Walter Lowrie, Rev. John C. Lovncie, D. D., Cor. See's ; Wm. 
Rankin, Jr., Treajs., 23 Centre-st. American and Foreign Christian Union, Tues. preced. 2d 
Thurs. m May ; Rev. Robert Baird, D. D., Rev. E. R. Fairchild, D. D., Cor. See's, Edward Ver- 
non, Gen. Agent and Assist. Treas., 17 Beekman-st. Amer. Seamen's Friend Soc., Mond. pre- 
ced. 2d Thurs. in May ; Rev. J. Spauldine, Rev. H. Loomis, See's, 80 Wall-st. Amer. Temperance 
UmoN, ad 7hurs. in May, evening ; Rev. J. Marsh, D. D. Cor. Sec, 149 Nassau-st. Prot. Episcopal 
Church Missions — Domestic Committee, Rev. W. T. Webbe, Loc Sec^ 49 Chambers-st. ; Foreign 
Committee, Rev. P. P. Irving, and Rev, S. D. Denison, See's, No. 19 Bible House. Methodist — 
Book Concern, Rev. T. Carlton and Rev. Z. PhUlips, Agents, 200 Mulberry and 57 John-st. ; Mis- 
aionary 800., Rev. J. P. Durbin, Corres. Sec, Rev. T. Carlton, Treats., 200 Mulberry-st. ; Sunday- 
School Union, Rev. D. P. Kidder, Cor. Sec, 200 Mulberry-st. Reformed Dutch— Domestic Mis- 
sion, J. S. Bussing, Treas., 32 Cliff-st. ; Foreign Mission, C. L. Little, Treas. Central Ameri- 
can Education Society, Wm. A. Booth, Treas. Society for Coll. and Theol. Education 
AT West, Rev. T. Baldwin, Sec, B. C. Webster, Treasurer, 80 Wall-st. American Missionary 
Association, Rev. George Whipple, and Rev. S. S. Jooelyn, See's; Lewis Tappan, Tieajs., 48 
Beekman-st. American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Soc., L. Ts^pan, Cor. Sec. 46 B«ek« 
man-st. Colonization Society of State of New York. J. B. Pinney, Cor. Sec, Bible House, 
Astor-place. American Society M. C. Jews, Rev. £. R. McGregor, Cor. Sec, Bible House, 
Astor-place. New York, and American Sunday-school Union, J. C. Meeks, Agent, 147 Nas^ 
sau-st., and 38 Park-row. 

PHILADELPHIA.— American Sunday-School Union, Tues. after 3J Thurs. in May ; F. W. 
Porter, Cor. Sec. ; F. A. Packard, Esq., Rec Sec, 310 Chesnut-st. General Assembly's Boards, 
at the Publieation Rooras,1^ Chesnut-st. — ^Domestic Missions, Rev. C. C. Jones, D. D., Cor. Sec; 
ReT. R. Happenitt, Assist. Sec ; S. D. PowelL Esq., Treas. Board of Education, Rev. C. Van 
Rensselaer, D. D., Cor. Sec. ; Jos. B. Mitchell, Esq., Treas. Board of Publication, Rev. George W 
Musgrare, D.D^ Coc Sec ; Rev. W. M. Engles, D. D., Editor; Joseph P. Engles, Publishing 
Agent ; A. W. Mitchell, M. D., Treas. American Baptist Publication Society, 31 North- 

8ixth-st. : Sec, Rev. J. N. Brown, Ed. Secretary, Rev. Benjamin R. Loxley, General 

Agent. Philadelphia Tract Society, WilUam G. Chambera, Agent, South-sixth-atreet, near 
Market. Philadelphia Education Society, 4th Thursday in May ; Rev. James R. Eckard, 
Becretaj. Philadelphia Home Missionary Society, 4th Wednesday in May ; Rev. Robert 
Adair, Secretary, 216 Chesnut-street. 

WASHINGTON.— American Colonization Society, 3d Tuesday in Januay ; Rev. William 
McLain, Secretary. 

MINISTERS* MEETINGS.— General Convention in Maine, Tues. before fourth Wed. in 
June. General Association, New Hampshire, 4th Tues. in Aug. General Convention in 
Vermont, 3d Tues. in June. General Association, Massachusetts, 4th Tues. in June. E van- 
OBLiCAL Consociation, Rhode Island, 2d Tues. in June. General Association, Connecticut, 
3d Tues. in June. General Association, New York, Thurs. before last Sabbath in Aug. Gen- 
eral Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1st Wednesday in October. Gen- 
eral Assembly Presbyterian Church., 3d Thursday in May. Geiocral Conference Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, every 4th year firom 1840. General Synod Reformed Dutch 
Church., on the 1st Wednesday m June. 

YEARLY MEETINGS OF FRIENDS.— New England Yearly Meeting, held at Newport, 
Rhode Island, begins Second day after second Sixth day in Sixth month. New York Yearly 
Mestino, New York City, Sixth day after fourth First day in Fifth month. Philadelphia Year- 
ly Meeting, third Seoond day in Fourth month. Baltimore Yearly Meeting, last Second 
day but one in Tenth month. North Carolina Yearly Meeting is held at New Garden, 
Guilford county. Second day after first First day in Eleventh month. Ohio Yearly Msrting, 
Mount Pleasant, 8«cond day after first First ilay in Ninth month. Indiana Yearly Msbtino, 
Whitewater, oh Fifth day preceding first First day in Tenth month 



Digitized 



by Google 



48 



TU£ FAMILY CURUTIAN ALMANAC. 



TABLE 


aV SIMPLE INTEREST AT 


SIX PER CENT. 


Principal 


One Mo'th 


One Year. 


Principal 


One Month. 


One Tear. 


Principal 


One Montb. 


One T«ir. 




9. 0. ■. 


>. 0. M. 




D. 0. H. 


>. 0. M. 




». 0. «. 


». c. «. 


Cents 10 





tf 


Dolls. 6 


3 


36 


Dolli. 40 


20 


2 40 U 


" 60 


2 


3 


" 7 


3 5 


42 


" 50 


25 


3 00 


Dollt. 1 


5 


6 


•' 8 


4 


48 


" 60 


30 


3 60 U 


2 


1 


12 


9 


4 5 


54 


" 70 


35 


4 20 U 


3 


1 5 


18 


" 10 


5 


60 


" 80 


40 


4 80 U 


4 


2 


24 


21 


10 


1 20 


" 90 


45 


5 40 U 


5 


3 5 


30 


" JO 


15 


1 80 


" 100 


50 


6 00 U 



BOOKS FOB THE FAMILT. 

The euergies of the American Tract Society have been directed for twenty- i 
eight years to the uelection and preparation of the best evangelical books ; uid 
great expense has been incurred to issue them in an attractive style, many of them 
with beautiful engravings, especially for the benefit of the young. Nothing is 
issued which the Christian parent should not wish his child to read and ponder, 
and drink into its inmost spirit. The Society exists for the good of the communily, 
and the prices are so low as merely to save the Society from loss by the total sales. 

THE FAMILY TESTAMENT, "writh brief Notes and Instractions, and Maps, at 60 cents, if 
inraluable for family nse, and 60,000 copies hare been printed in abont two years. VOLUME L 
OF THE OLD TESTAMENT, extending to the end of Job, is also just issued. Also, 

VOLUME V. OF D'AUBIGNE'S HISTORY, containing the Reformation in England to tha 
death of Cardinal Wolsey. $2 20 for the set of fiye volumes. 

GALLAUDET'S SCRIPTURE BIOGRAPHY. The Old Testament complet« in ten yoI 
ames, with upwards of 30 engravings, at $2 50 for the set. 

SONGS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME, with 62 beautiful engravings; one of th« 
most attractive books ever issued ; 35 cents. 

HANNAH MORE'S CHEAP REPOSITORY, 8 vols., with 52 engravings, designed for thi« 
work by Gilbert, $1 50 for the set. 

SONGS OF ZION, an excellent collection of h3rmns and music, 25 cents. 

THE PEEP OF DAY SERIES, 3 vols., each 25 cents ; 52 SCRIPTURE FACTS, by the 
same author, for children, with neat cuts, in one packet, 25 cents. 

BISHOP M'lLVAINE'S EVIDENCES, specially adapted to youth, 55 cents. 

THE RELIGIOUS (OR PASTOR'S) LIBRARY, 24 standard vols. 12mo, at $10. THE 
EVANGELICAL FAMILY LIBRARY, 15 vols. l8mo, $5 50, with 21 additional volumes 
bound to match, $7 50. THE YOUTH'S LIBRARY, of 70 volumes, with 255 highly finished 
engravings, $10. 

THE ILLUSTRATED TRACT PRIMER, and a great variety of the best selected and most 
beautifully illustrated books for children and youth, in packets, or small libraries. 

THE AMERICAN MESSENaEE, 
A monthly religious newspaper, at $5 for forty copies, is welcomed in more than 200,000 families ; 
the Botsohafter, or German Messenger, in more than 25,000. 

THE CHILD'S PAPER, 
With beautiful engravings, monthly, at $1 for ten copies, or $8 for 100 copies, is greeted by the 
children of about 250,000 families. 

The faithful parent has the best books he could desire here prepared to his hand, at the lowest 
prices, and every motive to use this means to bless the children which God has given him. 

FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my Executors the sum of Dollars, in trust, to pay over the sams 

in after my decease, to the person who , when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer 

of the Society, formed in in the year eighteen hundred and 

to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



The interest of any sum in dollar (or 6 days, is the same sum in mitts : viz. of $100, 100 mill^ 
or 10 cents ; of $6,«00, 6,600 millj' or #0 60, etc. Money at compound interest wiU double itseU 
in 11 years, 10 months, Iknd 98 f.^f. 



Digitized 



by Google 



DURATION OF THE SEASONS, ETC. 



Sun in "Winter Signs 89 1 8 

Snn in Spring Signs 92 20 48 

Sun in Summer Siffns 93 14 5 

Sun in Autumnal Signs 69 17 47 



Tropical Year 365 5 48 

Sun North of the Equator 1^6 10 53 

Sun South of the Equator 178 18 55 

Difference 7 15 58 



TO ASCERTAIN THE liENGTH OF THE DAY AND NIGHT, 

At any time of the year, add 12 hours to the time of the Sun^s setting, and from the sum 
subtract the time of rising, for the length of the day. 

Subtract the time of setting from 12 hours, and to the remainder add the time of rising 
next morning, for the length of the night. 

These rules are equally true for apparent time. 

liEAF-TEAR. 

Leap-years arc those that are exactly divisible by 4, and also by 400, and iiot by 100. 
The year 1900 therefore will not be a leap-year. 

THE MOON. 

Every object on the surface of the moon of the height of one hundred feet, is distiiuxtly 
seen through Lord Hosse's telescope. On its surface are craters of extinct volcanoes, rocks, 
and masses of stone almost innumerable. But there are no signs of habitations such as 
•urs, no vestige of architectural remains, to show that the moon is or ever was inhabited by 
a race of mortals similar to ourselves. No water is visible, no sea, no river ; all seems 
desolate. 



VISIBILITY OF MERCURY. 

The most favorable time for seeing Mercury this year, will be early in the evening near 
the 14th March, 13th July, and 11th November; and early in the morning near April 8th, 
August 8th, and November 27th. 

PREDICTIONS OP THE WEATHER, 

Influbnck of the Moon. — Dr. Olbers, the distinguished astronomer of Grermany, was led 
to the following conclusion by an examination founded on careful meteorological obser- 
vations for fifty years in different countries: ""I believe," he says, " that I have demon- 
strated that the influence of the moon upon the weather is so small that it is totally lost 
amid the great variety of other forces and causes which change the state of our atmosphere ;" 
and that " its pretended influence on men, animals, or plants, is all of it due to illusion and 
prejudice." No astronomer can by any means foretell what will be the state of the weather 
on any future day ; and it is time that the community should be no longer imposed upon by 
pretences to predict the weather, or by the ridiculous superstition that there is any influ- 
ence of the signs of the Zodiac upon the parts of the body of man or animals. 

LEGAL RATES OF INTEREST. 

The legal rate is 8 per cent, in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. It is 7 per cent. 
in New York, South Carolina, Georgia, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa. In all the other states, 
it is 6 per cent. 

THE MILKY-WAY. 

The number of telescopic stars in the milky- way is estimated at eighteen millions. In 
order, I will not say to realize the greatness of this number, but, at any rate, to compare it 
with something analogous. I will call attention to the fact, that there are not in the whole 
heavens more than about eight thousand stars visible to the naked eye. Humboldt 

IRISH EMIGRANTS AND THEIR LIBERALITY. 

It is a fact that would defy belief were it not the result of official inquiry, that the emi- 
grants to the United States, from Ireland alone, besides having subsisted themselves, have 
sent back to their kindred for the last three years, nearly five millions of dollars annually, 
thus doubling in three years the purchase money of Louisiana. Edward Everett. 

QUACK MEDICINES. 

A man advertises for " competent persons to undertake the sale of a new medicine," and 
adds, tliat " it will be profitable for the undertaker P No doubt of it. 

SNUFF. 

The best snuff in the world is a snuff of morning air. 



Digitized 



by Google 



Lna= 



MEMORANDA FOR 1854. 




Jan. 1, Circumcision, Ist S. aft. Christmas; 6, Epiphany; 8, Ist S. aft. Epiph. ; 15, 2d B. 
aft. Epiph. ; 22, 3d S. aft. Epiph. ; 25, Conr. of St. Paul ; 29, 4th S. aft. Epiph. Feb. 2, 
of Yir. Mary ; 5, 5th S. aft. Epiph. ; 12, Septuageiima ; 19, Sexagesima; 24, St. li^tthias; 
Qninquagesima. March 1, Ash-Wednesday; 5, Ist S. in Lent; 12, 2d S. in Lent; 19, 3d S. 
in Lent ; 25, Annun. of Vir. Mary ; 26, 4th S. in Lent. April 2, 5th S. in Lent ; 9, 8. before 
Easter; 14, Good-Friday ; 16, Easter-Sunday ; 23, 1st 8. aft. Easter; 25, St. Mark ; 30, 3d S. aft. 
Easter. May 1, Sts. Philip and James ; 7, 3d S. aft. Easter ; 14, 4th S. aft. Easter ; 21, 5th S. aa 
Easter; 25, Ascension-day ; 28, S. aft. Ascension. Jusi 4, Whit-Sunday ; 11, Trinity-Sunday; 
18, 1st S. aft. Trin. ; 24, St. John the Baptist ; 25, 2d S. aft. Trin. ; 29, St. Peter. July 2, 3d B. 
aft. Trin. ; 9, 4th S. aft. Trin. ; 16, 5th S. aft. Trin. ; 23, 6th S. aft. Trin. ; 25, St. James; 30, 
7th 8. aft. Trin. Aug. 6, 6th S. aft. Trin. ; 13, 9th^8. aft. Trin. ; 20, 10th 8. aft. Trin. ; 24, St. 
Bartholomew ; 27, 11th 8. aft. Trin. Sept. 3, 12th S. aft. Trin ; 10, 13th S. aft. Trin. ; 17, I4th 
S.aft. Trin.'; 21, St. Matthew; 24, 15th 8. aft. Trin ; 29, St. Michael and All Angels. Oct. 1, 
16th 8. aft. Trin. ; 6, 17th 8. aft. Trin. ; 15, 18th 8. aft. Trin. ; 18, St. Luke ; 22, 19th 8. aft. Trin. ; I 
28, Sts. Simon and Jude ; 29, 20th 8. aft. Trin. Nov. 1, All Saints ; 5, 21st 8. aft. Trin. ; 12, SSd 
S. aft. Trin. ; 19, 23d 8. aft. Trin. ; 26, 24th 8. aft. Trin. ; 30, St. Andrew. Dec. 3, let 8. in 
Advent; 10, 2d S. in Advent; 17, 3d 8. in Advent; 21, St. Thomas; 24, 4th 8. in Advent; 25. 
Christmas; 26, St. Stephen; 27, St. John, Evan. ; 28, binocents; 31, Ist 8. aft. Christmas. 

TIDE-TABIiE. 

CHIEFLY FROM THE TABLE IN BOVVDITCH'S NAV GATOR. 

The Calendar pages exhibit the time of high-water at Boston, New York, and Charleston, f 
To find the time of high- water at any of the following places, add to or subtract from *" 
the time of high-water, morning or evening, at New York, the quantity of time affixed to [ 
such place in this table. In using the quantities in this table, observe that more thaa 12 | 
hours and less than 24, from midnight or the beginning of morning, is afternoon of the same | 
day; and that more than 12 hours and less than 24, from noon, is morning of tiie next day: t 



Albany Add 6 34 

Annapolis, Md. Sub. 1 51 

Annapolis, N. 8. - - - Add 1 49 

Amboy Sub. 39 

Baltimore Add 5 7 

Bridgeport Add 2 

Cape Split Add 2 

Eastport Add 2 9 

Halifax, N.S. Sub. 2 15 

Holmes' Hole Add 1 4 



Hellgate Add 141 I'ortiand Add 1 39 ]| 

Marblehead Add 149 " ^ ' ' 

Machias Add 1 54 

Mobile Point Add 154 

New Bedford Sub. 1 40 

NewHaven Add 2 4 

New London Sub. 21 

Newport Sub. 1 55 

Norfolk Sub. 41 

Plymouth Add 2 19 

Tides. — La Place pronounces the formula for deducing the tides the most difficult prob- ; 
lem of celestial mechanics. It sometimes happens that the tide comes in several hours 
later or earlier than the most learned calculation would determine ; and this in consequence f| 
of the strengtli and direction of the wind, which the calculator cannot reckon upon. ^ 



Portland Add 1 39 

Portsmouth Add 2 9 

Providence Sub. 41 

Q,uebec Add 8 49 

Richmond Sub. 2 25 

Salem Add 2 19 

Sandy Hook, N. J. - - Sub. 2 45 

St. John, N. B. Add 2 49 

Sunbury Add 19 

Windsor Add 2 49 



THE CHRISTIAN ALMANAC, 

AND 

OTHER PUBLICATIONS OF THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, 

May be had at 150 Nassau-street, New York, or of N. P. Kkmp, 28 Comhill, Boston ; "William I 
CoGGESHALL, Providence ; Charles Hosmbr, Hartford ; F. T.' JaRMan, New Haven ; Pease k 
FisK, 82 State-street, Albany ; R. Wasson, 9 and 10 Cannon-place, Troy ; Sewaiid & THxrHBim, 
137 Genesee-street, Utica ; DANroRXH & Hawley, 230 Main-street, Bufl&ilo ; TrJict Dbposito- t 
RY, 11 South-Sixth-Street, Philadelphia ; H. N. Thissell, 8 St. Clair-street, Pittsburgh ; Rev. S. | 
Guiteau, 2 Franklin Buildings, Baltimore; D. W. Harrison, Chalmers-street, Charleston; H. 
Packard, 152 Camp-st., New Orleans ; W. H. Bulkley, Fourth-street, L«- .isville ; Seely Wood, 
Agent, Walnut-street, near Fourth, Cincinnati ; Rev. C. Peabody, Agent, 61 Market-street, St. 
Louis; A. McFarren, 137 Jefferson-avenue, Detroit; and of other booksellers and traders. 

DC?" The ALMANAC is furnished at a low price to those who order it by the 100 or 1,000. 

The Board of the American Tract Society embraces members of fourteen evangelical denomina- 
tions, united to diffuse the knowledge of Christ and him crucified by its publications, associated with 
personal Christian effort, at home and abroad. About 500 colporteurs are now laboring in the most 
destitute parts of the country. A donation of $20 constitutes a Life Member ; $50 a Life Director. ( 
The usual salary of a colporteur is $150, besides other expenses and books granted. William A. 

Hallock, O. Eastman, and R. S. Cook, Corresponding Secretaries, R. Kingsbury, Assist 
Treasurer, 150 Nassau-street, New Vork. Seth Bliss, Secretary, 28 Comhill, Boston. 

' ^ ' • z 



Digitized 



by Google 



i 



i 



Digitked by CjOOQ IC 



TABLE OF THE SOI^AR SYSTExlT. 



THE PliANET SATURN. 

English papers infonn us that discoveries of an important and most interesting 
kin^, have lately been made as to the planet Saturn, by the new monster-telescope of Mr. 
Craig: namely, that the m/^* are not rings at all, but arcAw of the most perfect geometri- 
cal formation; not of equal thickness, nor chamfered, but rather with terrace-like mould- 
ings. And hence the app arance of the outward rmg, consisting of several concentric 
rings. From this appearance, it is now supposed that none of the rings are in the same 
plane. 

COMPOSITION OF THE MOON. 

Every object on the surface of the moon of the height of one hundred feet, is distinctly 
seen through Lord Rosse's telescope. On its sirface are craters of extinct volcanoes, rocks, 
and masses of stone, almost innumerable. But there are no signs of habitations such as 
ours; no vestige of architectural remains, to show that the moon is, or ever was, inhab- 
ited by a race of mortals similar to ourselves. No water is visible, no sea, no river ; all 
seems desolate. 



SMAIiL FliANETS. 

La Verrier the astronomer, in a paper which he recently read before the Paris acad- 
emy of sciences, suggests that we may expect the discovery of a prodigious number of 
small planets within the solar system. The numerous discoveries of such bodies within 
the last few years, give plausibility to his conjecture. 



liEGAIi RATES OF INTEREST. 

The legal rate is 8 per cent, in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. It is 7 per cent, 
in New York, South Carolina. Georgia, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa. In all the other slates, 
it is 6 per cent. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE 

ILLUSTRATED 

J^AMILY CHEISTIAI ALMAIAC 

FOR 

THE UNITED STATES, 

FOR 

THE YEAR OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOUR JESUS CHRIST 



1855, 



BEIXa THE THIRD AFTER BISSEXTILE, AND UNTIL JULY 4TH, THE 79TH YEAR 
OP THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE UNITED STATES. 

CALCULATED FOR 

BOSTON, NEW YORK, WASHINGTON, AND CHABIESTON, 

FOUR PARALLELS OF LATITUDE. 
ADAPTED FOR USE THROUO-HOUT THE COUNTRY. 

"WITH 

VALUABLE STATISTICAL INFORMATION CHIEFLY FROM ORIGINAL SOURCES. 

ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS IN EQUAL, OR CLOCK TIME. 

BY SAMUEL H. WRIOHT, 

SUMSSS. TATSS OOnjITT, KXW TO&K. 

BOSTON, Lat. 42" 21' N. ; Long. 71* 4' W. 
NEW YORK, Lat 40" 42' 40" N.j Long. 74" 1' W. 
WASHINGTON, LaL 38" fiS' N. ; Long. 77° W. 
CHARLESTON, Lat. 32" 47' N. ; Long. 79" 67' W. 



PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, 

NEW YORK: 150 NASSAU-STREET; BOSTON: 28 CORNHILL} 
AND Br BOOKSELLERS AND TRADERS. 



Digitized 



by Google 



2 THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 

^ Tlim work hM been chiefly prepared by tlie Rer. TRYON EDWARDS, D. D., of New London, Conn^ wbo 
witb (reHt blK>r and care, has drnwu many of the .statisiticul ubleit Irum uriginal sources. 

Entered awordinj to Act of Congress, in the year 1S54, by O. R. KiirotBCBT, in the Clerk's Office of the District 
Court Tor the Soutliern District of New York. 



ECIilPSES IN THE YEAR 1855. 

This year there will be two total and visible Eclipse* of the Moon, and two partial and 
chiefly invisible Eclipses of the Sun. 

I. A Total Eclipse of the Moon, Tuesday evening, May 1st, visible. Magnitude, 18.349 
digits on the Moon's southern limb. The Moon will be totally eclipsed 1 h. 3 m. after the 
Eclipse first begins, and the total obscuration will last 1 h. 36 ra. Duration of the entire 
Eclipse 3 h. 4'2 m. See the followijig table. 

II. A partial Eclipse of the Sun, May 15; invisible in the United States, except in Wash- 
ington Territory, about 400 miles north-east of Astoria. 

III. A total Eclipse of tlie Moon early in Uie morning of Thursday, October 25, visible. 
Magnitude, 17.568 digits on the Moon's northern limb. The Moon will be totally eclipsed 
1 h. and 1 m. after the commencement of the partial Eclipse, and will remain in total ob- 
scuration 1 h. and 29 m. Duration of the Eclipse, 3 h. 25 m. See the following table. 

IV. A partial Eclipse of the Sun, Nov. 9th, invisible in the United States. 

THK TWO TOTAL ECLIPSES OF THE Mt)OX. 



Halifax, N.S. 

Augusta, Me. 

Portland, Me. •- 

Boston, Mass. 

Quebec, L.C. ) 

Providence, R. I. J 

Concord, N.H. 

Hartford, Conn. 

New Haven, Conn. • ■ ■ 

Moutreal, L. C. i 

Albany, N.y. \ 

New York city 

Trenton, N.J 

Philadelphia ) 

Utica, N,Y. } 

Baltimore. Md. ) 

Auburn, N.Y. ) 

Harrisburpli, Pa. ) 

Kingston, U. C ) 

"Washington, D.C.-. ) 

Geneva, N.Y ) 

Petersbur^h, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 

Rochester, N. Y 

Buffalo, N.Y. i 

Raleigh, N. C. \ 

Toronto, U. C. 

Georgetown, S. C. •• ( 
Panama, N. G. ] 



ECLIPSE OF 
MAY. 


KCLll'SE OF 1 
OCTOBER. 


BeRiiis 
ev. IM. 

u.u. 

W 
9.35 
933 
930 


E ml3 
mo. 2i\ 


Begins: Ends 
mo. *i5 iiio. '2o 


H. M . 

1 42 
1 17 
1 15 
1 12 


U. M. 

1 30 
1 5 
1 3 
1 


U. M. 

5 1 
4 36 
4 34 
4 31 


9 29 


1 11 


59 


4 30 


9 2b 
9 24 
9 22 


1 10 
1 6 
1 4 


58 
54 
52 


4 29 
4 25 
4 23 


9 19 


1 1 


49 


4 20 


9 la 
9 16 


1 
058 


48 
46 


4 19 
4 17 


9 14 


50 


44 


4 15 


9 8 


50 


38 


4 9 


9 7 


49 


37 


4 8 


9 6 


48 


36 


4 7 


9 5 
9 4 
9 3 


47 
46 
45 


035 
34 
33 


4 6 
4 5 
4 4 


8 59 


41 


29 


4 


8 57 


39 


27 


3 58 


8 57 


039 


27 


3 58 



ECLIPSE OF 
OCTOBEB. 



Pittsburgh, Pa 

Charleston, S. C. - - 

Savannah, Ga. 

St. Augustine, Fa. - 

Havana. Cuba 

Detroit, Mich. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Tallahassee, Fa. 
Louisville, Ky. - - 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Nashville, Tenn, 
Chicago, III. --- 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Mobile, Ala.-- 
Madison, Wis. 
Springfield, HI.--- 
New Orleans, Lou 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Natchez, Miss. 
Little Rock, Ark 
Vera Cruz, Mexico- 
Iowa City 

Austin, Tex. 

Mexico, Mex 

Santa Fe, New Mexico 

Oregon City --• 

Monterey, Cal. 

San Francisco, Cj 

Astoria. Orei 



Note. This table is arranged in order of longitud^imd thosf '|.llliini w]i<WM^inei< 
of long^itude does not exceed one minute of time, are ^nited. JL4 i v -s o t> 

Saturn; 




' Marr; U JupiiMi , J? Sati 
rt; ^ opp^tij^ii, or 1^ a] 



CHARACTER^. 

©0 Sun ; D Moon ; ^ Mercury ; 9 Venus ; © Ear^; ^ 
^ Uranus ; ^ same longitude, or near each other ; D 90° 

SIGNS av THE ZODIAC.' 

T Aries; ^ Taurus; ^ aeqiini; ^ Cancer; gt I^eo; tlR Virgo; ;ib Libra; tTlScor- 
pio; /Sagittarius; V3 Caprjcom; :;:; Aquarius; ^ Pisces. 

Digitized byLnOOQlC 



^^> 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN 4.LMANAC. 



s 



RISING AND SETTING OF THE PLANETS. 

It should be observed lliat these are not sensibly affected by the lougUnde of a place. 
"When the hoiir is less than 6. it is in the morning ; when greater than 6, it is in the evening. 



DATE. 


PLANET. 


Bodtoit. 


m-tou. 


Cl.arltfo 
U.n. 


DATE. 


PLANET. 


Ccwton. 


Wnsli 

lU^tOll. 


Cl.a'a 
ton. 


1855. 




B. K. 


H. M. 


R. M. 


1855. 




R. M. 


B. U. 


M. Jt. 


Jan. 1 


Mars sets 


6 18 


27 


6 42 


July 1 


Mars rises 


3 4 


3 15 


3 32 


" 10 


Saturn sets 


4 35 


4 2(J 


4 12 


- 10 


Jupiter rises -- 


9 47 


9 42 


9 34 


'* 20 


Venus sets 


5 :3(> 


5 45 


5 58 


" 20 


Venus sets 


9 31 


9 2- 


9 23 


Feb. 1 


Mars sets 


6 '>3 


C 29 


G 38 


Aug I 


Mercury rises- - 


3 25 


2 a> 


3 49 


** 10 


Venus sets 


6 30 


G 35 


6 42 


" 10 


Mars rises 


2 25 


2 30 


2 52 


" 20 


Mercury sets - • 


7 S 


7 10 


7 11 


" 20 


Venus sets 


8 5 


8 8 


8 13 


Mar. 1 


Saturn seta 


I Is 


1 8 


^ 


Sept. 1 


Saturn rises --- 


11 42 


11 53 


12 


** 10 


Verms sets 


7 40 


7 39 


7 37 


- 10 


Mars rises 


2 1 


2 11 


2 25 


*' 20 


Jupiter rises • - • 


4 41 


4 34 


4 24 


" 20 


Jupiter sets --- 


2 58 


3 5 


3 15 


^.F'",J 


Mercury rises- 


454 


4 50 


4 45 


Oct. 1 


Saturn rises - - • 


9 50 


10 1 


10 16 


Saturn sets 


10 51 


10 41 


10 2G 


•' 10 


Mercury sets - 


6 10 


G 18 


6 30 


'' 20 


Venus sets 


9 2-2 


9 12 


8 57 


" 20 


Mars rises 


1 30 


1 35 


1 44 


May 1 


Saturn sets 


9 39 


9 29 


9 14 


Nov. 1 


Saturn rises - - 


7 47 


758 


8 13 


" 10 


Jupiter rises -•- 


1 44 


1 39 


1 30 


" 10 


Venus rises 


3 14 


3 13 


3 11 


'^ 20 


Venus sets 


10 Id 


10 G 


9 47 


" 20 


Mercury rises- - 


5 15 


5 10 


5 2 


June 1 


Jupiter rises - - 


20 


15 


7 


Dec. 1 


Mars rises 


45 


47 


52 


" 10 


Mercury sets - • 


9 21 


9 10 


8 52 


*' 10 


Venus risQs 


3 20 


3 IG 


3 10 


« 20 


Ven us sets 


10 18 


10 10 


9 5(i 


*' 20 


Jupiter sets - - ■ 


9 21, 


9 2G 


9 35 



VENUS. 

Tenus will be brightest on the 2.'3th of A ugust, visible in the west ; and on the 6th of 
November, visible in the east in the morning. 



PHENOMENA OF THE PLANETS FOR 1855. 

January 1, 2^ near<^; 2, ]) highest; Z), ]) apogee; 16, ]) lowest; 18, 11 near $ and 

}) ; 20, 5 sup. d ; ^7, ]) near 1? ; 29, 2^ c5 0, and ]) highest. Feb. I, IJI D : 

7, ^ eclipsed by $ ; 8, $ near $ ; 9, ^ stat. ; 13, ]) lowest; lo, ]) perigee; 18, ^ gr. 

elong. E.; 23, j) near f> ; 26, ]) highest; 27, f> D ©. March 6, $ inf.<5 ©; 13, D 

lowest; 15, ]) (5 21; 16, ]) perigee; 19, ]) near $ ; 2'), D highest; 28, ]) apogee. April 

2, 5 gr. elong. W. ; 7, 9 cJ ^i^ ; 8, ]) lowest ; 9, ^ 6 ; 13, D perigee ; 18, $ (5 D , and 

near 7 stars; 21, ]) highest; 23, J) apogee. May 1, ]) eclipsed; 2, f? c5 9 ". -3. ]) lowest; 

7, <? d $, ^ (5 0; 8,]) perigee; 13, ^ sup. 6 0; 16, <? (5 ^ ; H, $ highest; 18,]) 

high; 22, 2^ D 0; 25, F?c^ $. Ju.\e2, ]) lowest; 3,]) perigee; 10, ^ d ; 14, ^ gr. 

elong. E. ; 1.5, ]) high ; 19, J apogee ; 22, 2i stat. July 1, ]) perigee ; 6, ^ d <? ; 12, 5 

inf- d ; D high ; 19, ^ highest ; 23, 9 gr. elong. E. ; 26, D lowest; 29, D perigree. Aug. 

1, ^ gr. elong. W.; 8,]) highest; 13,]) apogee, W D 0; 21, It brightest and 6>; 25, 9 

brightest ; 26, $ sup. ci ; 27, ]) perigee. Sept. 5, ]) highest ; 8, 9 stat. ; 9, ]) apogee ; 10, 

9 near Spica; 17, 9 ^ $f ; 19, J) lowest; 23, f? D ; 24, ]) perigee. Oct. 1, ]) highest, 

9 inf. 6 0; 6,]) apogee; 11, ^ gr. elong. E.; 15, ^ near Reguius; 16,]) lowest; 19, 

$ and K stat. ; 22, ]) in perigee; 24, J) eclipsed; 29. ]) highest. Nov. 3, 5 inf. 6 i 

6, 9 brightest; 11, '^ 8 (b\ 13, ]) lowest; 16, 2^ D ; 19, $ gr. elong. W.. ]) perigee; 

25,]) highest. Dec. 1,]) apogee; 10,]) lowest; 11, 9 ffr- elong. W. ; 13. D perigee; 15, 

9 in perihelion; 17, 9 east of Spica; 18, ^ <§> ; 23, D highest; 28. <J D ; 29, ]) 

apogee; 31, 5? sup. d 0. 

ASPECTS AND NODES. 

(5 Conjunction; >fc Sextile, 60 degrees; D Quartile. 90 degrees; A Trine, 120 degrees; S 
Opposition, 180 degrees; Q Ascending Node; y Descending Node. 

CHRONOIiOGTCAIi CYCIiES. 

Dominical Letter, G-; G^oiden Number, 13; Jewish Lunar Cycle, 10; E pact. (Moon's ag« 
Jan. 1,) 12; Solar Cycle, 16; Roman Indiction, 13; Julian Period. 6568; Age of the world, 
(Septuagint.) 7363. 

LEAP-YEAR. 

Leap-years are those that are exactly divisible by 4. and also by 400, and not by 100. 
The year 1900 therefore will not be a leap-year. 



Digitized 



by Google 



4 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

NOTES TO THE READER. 

The Calendar page in this Almanac is adapted for use in every part of the United States. 
It is based on the fact, that in the same Latiitide^ that is^ on a line running due east and 
vfesi, the Suji and Moon rise and set at the same moment by the clock or almanaCy not 
only throughout the United States, but around the world — the variations being so small as to 
be of no importance for ordinary purposes. Thus, if on any day the Sun rises at Boston at 5 
minutes past 6, it rises at 5 minutes past 6 on the same line of latitude westward throughout 
the states of Massachusetts, New York, Michigan, Iowa, and the territory of Oregon. 

Hence, a Calendar adapted to Boston for New England, is equally adapted, as to the rismg 
and setting of the Sun and Moon, for use in Nortliern New York and Michigan ; a Calendar 
for New York city is adapted for use in the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois; 
a Calendar for Washington city is adapted for Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri; and a 
Calendar for Charleston will answer for North Carolina, Tennessee, Greorgia, Alabama, and 
Louisiana. Wherever the reader is, look for the state at tlie top of the Calendar page, and 
underneath are the rising and setting of the Sun and Moon sufficiently accurate for all 
practical purposes. 

The changes^ fulls^ and quarters of the Moo?ij however, are governed by another prin- 
ciple, and are essentially the same for all places on the same Longitttde ; that is, on »iy 
line extending due north and soutli. Thus, the Moon's phases for Charleston, suit Pitts- 
burgh, etc. Any phasis takes place at the same instant of absolute time ; but the local time 
it earlier at tHe westward, and later at tlie eastward, at the rate oifour minutes for each 
degree of Longitude; or at the rate of one minute for every 12 miles 273 rods in the lati- 
tude of Boston, 13 miles 60 rods in tlie latitude of New York city, 13 miles 143 rods in the 
latitude of Baltimore, and 14 miles 199 rods in the latitude of Charleston. 



TRUE TIME. 

Two kinds of time are used m Almanacs ; dock or mean'tiTne in some, and apparent 
or tU7i'time in otiiers. Clock-time is always rights while sun-iAine varies every day. 
People generally suppose it is twelve o'clock when the sun is due south, or at a properly 
made noon-mark. But this is a mistake. The sun is seldom on the meridian at twelve 
o'^ clock; indeed this is the case only on four days of the year : namely, April 15, June 15, 
Sept. 1, and Dec. 24. In this Almanac, as in ^e Nautical and other Almanacs, the time 
used is clock-time. The time when the sun is on the meridian or at the noon-mark, is also 
given to the nearest second, for the 1st, 9th, 17th, and 25th days of each month, at the right 
hand of the top of each calendar page. This affords a ready means of obtaining correct time and 
ibr setting a clock by using a noon-mark, adding or subtracting as the sun is slow or fast 

Old-fashioned Almanacs, which use apparent time, give the rising and setting of the 
sun's centre, and make no allowance for the effect of refraction of the sun's rays by the 
atmosphere. The more modern and improved Almanacs, which use clock-time, give the 
rising and setting of the tun's upper limb, and duly allow for refraction. 

MERCURY. 

This planet will be brightest about Feb. 15, June 11, and Oct. 8, at which times it will 
be quite likely to be visible, being tlien in the west immediately after sunset This |ilanet 
will be brightest again about April 5, Aug. 4, and Nov. 22, when it will be in the east just 
before sunrise. 



DURATION OF THE SEASONS, ETC. 



D. R. M. 

Sun in Winter Signs 89 1 8 

Sun in Spring Signs 92 20 41 

Sun in Summer Signs 93 14 11 

Sun in Autumnal Signs 89 17 48 



TropicalYear 365 5 48 

Sun North of the Equator 186 10 52 

Sun South of the Equator 178 18 56 

Difference 7 15 56 



APOGEE AND PERIGEE OF THE SUN. 

Sun^s Terigee January 1 st, -v t 93,505,607 -v 

lr;:^ri|r. i".?..b.r„?.:::::::::::::: U.tan.fto«th. ^^ --) g;^;?"? ^^^ 

Sun's m«an distance, April 3d, and Oct. 8d, / . 95,108,000 / 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



utMONTH. JANUARY, 1855. 



31 DATS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Full Moon 

Third Quarter- • • 

New Moon 

First Quarter 



3 35 mo. 

7 30 mo. 
3 54 mo. 

8 55 ev. 



3 24 mo. 

7 18 mo. 
3 42 mo. 

8 43 ev. 



3 13 mo. 

7 8 mo. 
3 31 mo. 

8 33 ev. 



3 Onno. 
6 54 mo. 
3 18 mo. 
8 20 ev. 



Sun on Merld. 
or noon mark. 



3 50 
7 23 
10 23 
12 38 



goo J-tf^ 

is I II 



I? 



•?Ot^l>OOOOOSOO— t»H 2 O 1-1 (M CO Tf «0 «C |> 00 OS O t-t tH > 1-1 d CO ti< «o «o 






^«^^i^oooooo;:;oico^oo;ot;og2«^553Mg.g5^o^^g5^gjH 



KO «0»00>.0»OOOOtO>0>0»0»0>0>0>.OC>( 



jjco cocoeococococoeococ^wc^oJC^OJOi 



>o >o o o o o u^oo »o »oo 




13 



j«o.2»'^«ot-ooo>o>Oi-« 2 t-ioi CO Ti< »o « lo «o 00 o> o »H 2 o i-i cj eo "^ »o «o 



M 



a^^^TfTfTyrfTy-^-^-^^oioiototoototooiooooootoooo 



ji 05 OS Oi OS 05 OS OS 0» Oi OS 00 00 00 1> l><0 «0 to >0 -* -* CO (N 0» t-t O Oi OS 00 l> t- 



•v».M.jo^«a 



;^H^Hfi;c^«l^H^Hf^«g«;^H^HP^rg«SH^Hfi;cg«S^^ 



•ii^uow JO i^a 



i-tCJC0'^O«0t-000SO-H0»C0'^»0«0l^000SO»-^CIC0 



°c5Sic5Sc5^S5Sww53 



Ha<^$ CI 



i8S!"52!!??3*?3SS??SS§"''*"!g5:S?E8'*§SS§!§S«' 



:«O.a'*»O«Ot>00OS 



o» 2THC«eoTj«w:>"io«ooooso^ 2or-icoTj<oo«c 



c?cy g 


















jo-H,-! goot-tcJC^coco-^otot-ooooTH t^THO»coeo'^w:)«oi>oooo 



I.S 



a,-i « c5 '^j* o o o »o o g T-(C0'* is^"^ Cicnff g»o«ti '^t 

ri<0.2'*>O«0t^00 0SO 2otH<MC0t}««C "«»0<0Q0 0SOiH 2o^ 00-^*0 «0k«0 



i; 



Sa 









•g -pgp tjUng 






•^••Aijoxt^al ^A^S^^ii)^S^&jS::^^)^^^S^^^)^S^^^S^^S^ 



•n,aoMioiTg| -"<^>=^^'^^^«><^S;:^^;g;;3;S^°SS8o;83g5^^^S^g$g?g?3 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



ad MONTH. FEBRUARY, 1855. as days. 



MOOn*8 PHASES. 



FuUMoon I' 1 

Third Quarter-. -I 9 

New Moon i 16 

First Quarter 1 23 



10 58 ev. 
10 17 ev. 

2 4ev. 

50 ev. 



10 46 ev. 
10 5ev. 

1 52 ev. 

38 ev. 



BALTIMORE. 



10 35 ev. 
9 54 ev. 
1 41 ev. 
28 ev. 



10 22 ev. 
9 41 ev. 
1 28 ev. 
15 ev. 



Sum mm Merld. 
•rno«n atArlu 



13 53 
14 30 
14 18 
13 20 



Hi 



as 

« Is - _ 









0>OOj^(N g 






«> It* 00 » 0> O •-• "^ :».^0»"V»^ 






OOOftO 



_, o 



o*-ieoTfO«o , 



• OOCiO-^ I 






a CO 



CO CO w c 



-< C* CO -T O O i 

}. •^ rr ■^ Tj* ■^ '^ 

5 O to wt O O V 



5 vo o I.*:! 



CfCO-I 

»C «.t w? 






te tccocooc 



-OOQO 
5 0<0«> 



«050«0?0?00«0^<0 



cooco 



CO CO CD 



Sjcoc* 
CO coco 




• •w>»OCOI>OOOSO'-< 2,-iO»CO"*W'iCOqJ«OOOOiO.-H cO'-'OICO'Wr 



si 8icSc5c5^oJ^S*CO?3«COc6cOCOCOCOrr.^Tj'-!T5><T'^"V'5rOO 

a o o o o v^ o >o o o v-t^ o o o o o *-^ >»'? o »-•? o o o c? vt vt' o *r? ic 

• towo-^coT^r-tooQCi-cov^-TCO^QCsooi^o-rco.rfocjgo^-X 

SB i^t^i^t^t^t-l^COCOOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOOCOOCOCOCO 



•Ji»»AiJo^'=a 



Hd£:a1gaH^HP^cggaH^HfacggaH^HfacggaH^ 



Miuoiv JO Iva 



rH(^^C0^OC0l'Q0CSOr-.CfC0^OOt2;Q0»O-JgJ«^^^l-00 



-^ 



•^ M Jl ^ ^ 



OOOSOO'-ii-' >O^C»CJ 



58 w 

covt 



CO l^ 00 OS o 



-rco ^-f cocoor »co JN 

.-«0 gcO — Vf^CO'V^.^ 
.-..-. go^'-^WCOW^CO 






ii 

^5 tf 



a -g'-^oooc^o £ •-'CMC 

j£ '^Wt'Ol^OOOlO gO^OIC 



; -5- CO »2 ® ? 

f"«r CO ji o »-« c 

foo "icoooc 



s::: e 



OS -J i^ .— o c 

TT Wt O V^ CO - 

o»-CMCOTr«< 



a ^ — ' 55 oj 6» CM oj ot CM s^i CO 
S ».'T< O "Ci O 'O o *p v"? o o o 



COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOrpTTTr'W'^'"*'^*.' 
O 'rr O O O to O ''T O >-T o o o w? u? o U 



ji oosooi'COO'-rcocMOO 
a t^i-'i^r^r-t^t^t^t^t'CO 



2?^ 
oco 



o o »c >o o -^ 

CO coco coco ci 



t CO " cs ;r I'. « 

f TTTf COCiCOC 

dcocococococ 




j^ r-4 |oo»-i'-i(MCMC0«!r.^»OC0000»O'-^ >i-H.-*CMC0C0'!i'V't«O00OS 



• Tp o oc i- c go CO o -g* o o 

J -^OCO^-OOOSO 2o.-'CMCO'^OCO"o!<0000>0^ 



O'ri-C5^cot:r e"' 



i o CM eo CO "^r «c 



T O I'- 00 OS ^ 2' 
—*'-"-» -^ '^ CM CI 

»0 «0 lO O to XQ IT 



c5cM^CM§JcO?0C0C0C?C0C^CO 

»o »o »o »o >o «o *o IQ vo »o »o *o »c o 



to VQ >0 «0 up »0 to 



■ r-t— i^t^t^t^i" 



CO wo CO Cn» ^ O CO « ' »--; -r C; -p- CI OC 

cr uo to »o »o o rf "^ 

t^l^t-t^^-t-COCOCOCOCOCOCOCO 



CO CO CO CO CO w cc 



•g -pap s^ung 



Ol^ so O CO to to to 



•«* CM "* CM -v ?i wo CO .-^ to 

tO"»r-rrfCOcocoo>0)rH.-4.-400 



C) O 00 CO CO — or 
— »o CM -^ oj v: 

O A CS OS OC 00 t^ 



V».vs.joXT5a I ^tic^^SH^^cx:-,";?!?? -^Hii^^JSH^HctcgCrH^ 



muojv |0 AXQ 



^C»C0"^t0<0r^000SO^C*>C0r}'t0C0t^0005O'-i 



8c5?^S5^'d5§5V;^ 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



3d MONTH. 



MARCH, 1855. 



31 DAYS. 



MIION'S 1*11 A8£S. 



Full Moon I 3 



Thiril (Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 
First Quarter ■ 



6 24 cv. 
11 16 ev. 
2 mo. 
6 42 mo. 




BALTIMORE. 



CHARUCS'N, 



5 2ev. 

10 54 ev. 

11 40 ev. 

6 69 mo. 



4 49 ev. 

10 40 ev. 

11 26 ev. 
6 6 mo. 



Suu ou JUerld. 
or noon luurk. 



12 37 
10 46 
8 34i 
6 91 



"57i 

OS «s 2 

-<5 2 oft 



-•toi-i^ooooooioo'-' cO*-i<M'«j'Ocot'00ooo>oo— to» t;o)co»o>.^>.^ 
;^ «-^ ^ '-' a r-^^ ^^ ^ 

.*Q<o .oo CO coo OS pioocoqpot:- coeooicoi^ _:05cooococoooosco 

aCO wrS'-^^TrTTrfg-gO OttOJ^^O r-iTHg,-iTH lOCO CO 

JO<0.2«0 1^00 0>0— t §OC»C0C0TtOv«0000>OrH §O^OI(NCO'*"^»C 

2 fc; -^ ^ C «a »-t r-i B 



==.H 



Ci C^ OJ «D «0 

<c>co 



a«00 00<D<0<DCOCOOCOCOCOCOCOCOCDCOCOCOCDCOCOO<OCOCO<0<0 

jgp t- o ••t Tf CO CI — • o Qoi-'o Tf•co^ooQOo»oco(^t•-' oj oo ;p »c -5" co oi -^ 

a«0O«0«0O«0O«0«0«0«0O«0«0OO«05050<D«0«0«0»0V3OOO»0iCO 



£*sl^ 




<• — -• W'^ 






■ QCi . 

MO«o.M«oi-^oooiO ioTHOicoTj«o».'a"£«oooo>OTH Sor-'CJcoco-^rcJC 



aO >.Oirt>iOOOOOOtDCOCOCOCDOOCDOCDtDgO<DOtO<OCDtOCO<0;DtO 



ao«ococoo«ococoocococo«oco<o«oco«oo«Dcoo«ou7»c»o>c>o>o»o>c 



•^aajv^joiuQ 



•qiwoj^joXTQ 



HP^</1ttl^E3^£5£c2«aH^Hfecg«S^H^Hfecg«SH^Hti:o 



TH0JC0Tj«O«0l-000>O^0)C0'*O«0l>00CiO'-' 



CNC^^(N^c5wSvS^WC0 



;a.S!5 



as 
o . 



OS. 



/i 



« s-^ 



as 









• coco .•^OQ0-^^^O«-iQ0OC6;0'-i C00>»-i'-'05^OC0«00S»C;0C)lO 

aooi w'4-^'^o gr-ioicjcool ■*,i*-'^ cvcocogrr'^co'-'ocvw:'*- 

j»OCO.2«Ol^00Oi'^ §Oi-i(MC0'^O»O"S«D000iO'-< 2o»-iC}C0C0'*'^«C 



ao loootoooototogp o 0050 tooocotoococoto o<o too too^o 



* CO CO CO CO Oi 01 01 C>< (M OJ »-•»-"-'•-' .-^ '-I OOOOViOWOTT-^r 

BtOCOOtOOOOCOOCOCOCOOtOOOtOOCDOtOOUtJOiOOrrVTlOlOW? 



«5 = 



iP!J 



aCO— tw-O £OiOC^OO<o5»i-H CO— f^rfOlr-iOOi "^'-' o -^ ^ 

• o^^ cOC>^i-ioi(McO'*»r:soooo>0'^ t^'o^CKMeo-^-^eoi^osoc 

"• ^ •"* *"* C r-t 1 — 1 Jl» »-l f— 

J '"' C: . c^ «o o 1-* o J tr? t- -^ t^ cj — * ri" r- -^ -^ o «.'^ ^ --^ Q o> -to o o t^' 
a <NwTf^oo g»-<0}cOcoo)t.^'^^».'i'-*ojc^T}"£>oo'<toi coo-« 

•C0 0.2«0t^00 0>— • eOTHC*COTj«»0».'^"SoOOC50i-H cO'-'C^CO'^'^'^O 
_. >- I-" E as .— tH E 



§1 



a i.~ O O '."O O to O O th .-H i-( ri .-ii-i t-n-H C) 0> <M CI 01 Of 

i.t» K'M.t' •.f»0 0«000«OCOCO«0«0?DO«OCO«0«0«OCO«0«D«OCO«0«0«0 

1^ J2 2]I S 2? tTs Itl!5'^«'5 i>r^'o'^o)"b~o>l>'>o cob) o afi;^^c2 f^J -^ Ci i^ «'^ 

ro CO CO CO o) OJ 01 OJ o* OJ 1-1 ri rH ^-^ i-H rH »o o o w'ti o o t -^ rr 

a«0«0000«00«OCO«0 «0*tO «OCO«OCD?0«0«0«00«0»0»0»0»0»0«C'0«0»?r 



S 'P*P ■4"'^? 



5,-3* '^OOt^OOO-^OCOQOCOO)Ot^«OOCOOCD-fOrosOi«0 0»»CO.--f-1'C:! 

"O Tfcoi-"<tT-.-^,-ic6o»-^couor-^oj'q«»ocoT-ncco co art*.':] 

"C0r-iW0O» -i^rtOCO TtoJi?ScO '^OJvS«CO-*T-iCOO$Vf»-.?5oOJ"^ 
Ot^t>000«0«0'*'«#rtCOCOO»0)Olt-tr-iOOoQ^O^^'-40»OJOJeOCOTj' 



•Jiaa^joii^al gfer^«S^E5^Sfi:c3«!s^H^E5pi:t^Qj!^H^Hpi:^Qja5^ES£^ 



muoivjoitQl ^'^'^^*^*g>^°og^S;:;3^S3:3:'2S^22S^c^g?gSg$'(j$^S^g$g?gco 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



4tk MONTUt. 



APRIL, 1855. 



30 DATS. 



MOON*S PIIA8ES. 



Fall Moon 

Third Quarter - 
New Moon • • • 
Fimt Quarter • 



9 45 mo. 

4 52 ev. 

10 21 mo. 

1 13 mo. 



NEW YORK. 



9 33 mo. 

4 40 ev. 

10 9 mo. 

1 1 mo. 



BALTIMORE. 



CHARLES'S. 



9 22 mo. 
4 30 ev. 
9 58 mo. 
51 mo. 



H. H. 

9 9 mo. 
4 17 ev. 
9 46 mo. 
38 mo. 



San «Hi Mertd. 
•r neon mtmrk. 



4 
1 36 



morning. 
11 57 55 









j^-i>QOOooso>o»H^ cTHc»Ti<o»i>i>oooiaioo-< > t-i CO ^ v^ CO ;d 



i^i^'^^^^Z S«55^^^§l ^^;SS^^^ g^co^^^:?^^ 

J0«0t^000>0^ eO-^WCO'^"^ "StOt^OOOi-KN c O -« (N Ol CO CO "ti"* 

■ ^ i-H d 10 ,-Ij-ItH C 



«B Ol ?{ 6l c5 ^ Sf C$ S W K ^ N W CO CO CO W CO W rt CO C^ CO W CO CO ^ o ^ 



aov:»»o«co»o»f^»o«ti»ooo*ooooco»o»c«t»co»o»oooc5»o«.'to 






vi'x 



acoco-^^o g-4TH,-noco CO ^o *-^6<CMg(M '•rOJOw-rf cy 

^O»t-000>TH So^CJWCO-^-^ ■S«000O>O'-l c <=> "-"^ C^ C^» CO CO -'f •* 



XCOCOCOCOtOCOtttOtOCOtOCOtO<OCD<0<OtOOCOCOCO<OCOCOCDCO<OQOCD 



a'o >o»o»o«r5»o»o«o«.o»o»ooow:'0«to»to»o»o»oouoo»o»o«o»o«c«o 



•3i»»ALJo^«a 



«?^H^Hfi;(^C5eH^HW«^»SH^HP^(^»SH^Hfi:,g«S 



m«oiv JO i»a 



— ioico'^«o;ot>-oooso»-'<Nco'^>o<ot-ooa>or-< 



BoJ^(MC*C^W^wN« 






■^tOCOTfCDOSt-OO'^O'^COCOCO'^'-'t^'x*' •t-(0>C0C000OC0C0«-i 
-i'^'T-i-^THrtNi-i ci COCOOI "^CJVtJCOgi-HOCOCOOyJCOCJ 



jjO <OC^OOO«-H gO'-tOICOCO"^'^'S<OOOOSOT-- lorHt-KMOICOCO-*"^' 



.-^o^t-QQcso— ^o^coT*w^«o^rQ50>0'-^(^J"g•o«ot^opo50T-(<^coT!• 
a«c^5i^l(^JOlcocococortc*co^oc5cort'l^•^3•'^'<*'V'^'3•T^o>o».*^OlO 

BE^O<OC0tOtOtOC0«D<0«0flOtO«O<0<O?D<0?DC0tO«D?0t0?O?D<0COt0«0t0 



1-^ 









J'H^ SoO^r-ldCOCOOCOOOOJO'-^-* ^itHt-KMC^CO-^WOIXJOOOO 



aco^Tto'^^ g^co(N 



COCO'^rf'^t^OOOOr-t 2o»H(N<NOJCOeO'<d«"* 






sic>iOJ^^cocococo«« 
atcototocococotocococo 



C0C0Cy5c0rJ'rtTS«rf^rJ«Tl«"^TtU0O«C»0w5»0»r3 
tO^CDCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOtOCOCOCOCOCDtttOQD 



1.1 



■ o »o o »c wo o o o o o 



<N(N 



"K 'P^P "i^^S 



O"* "* O O «0 CO «o t- !•- t- 



00000>CiO>000«-l^^<NOJ<NCOCOCO'^'«*'Tf 



•iiM^joXTa I «SE2^E5£,^«!^^^gfi:c^«;^^^E5£<g«aH^E5fe^«s 



•^uoi^ JO Xtq; 



T-((?JC0Tj'k0<0t^00O>OT-)(MC0-!t«0CDt^000>Oi-( 



8c5?^»S$^^^S^?5S§ 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC 



5th MONTH. 



MAY, 1855. 



31 DATS. 



MOON*8 PIIASJKS. 



Full Moon 

Third Quarter- • 

New Moon 

First Quarter • • 
Full Moon 



BOSTON. 



11 19 ev. 
10 18 ev. 

9 29 ev. 

7 18 ev. 
10 4 mo. 



NEW YORK. 



11 7ev. 
10 6 ev. 

9 17 ev. 

7 6ev. 

9 52 mo. 



BALTIMORE. 



CHARLES'N. 



10 57 ev. 
9 55 ey. 
9 7ev. 
6 56 ev. 
9 41 mo. 



10 44 ev. 
9 42 ev. 

8 54 ev. 
6 43 ev. 

9 29 mo. 



Sun on Merld. 



11 56 59 
11 56 15 
11 56 8 
11 56 37 



OS vmt as 

lull 



H 



j^t-t-OOOOOiOOrH |.-tCJC0n<O<0t*l>000>0iO^ !> O CM CO rf »o o «o t- 



a MCOW'^oo gTi-(N CO CO ^Ti<o^^oj g CO co cjocm wco 

J.St'OOOOrH SO'HOJOJCOCO^ ««>000>0«-l flOO^»H(MCJ(NC0.a!> 

* )-i »-i t-H B iO »-H .-I B M 



.^CMCOrfOVO«0<Ot-Op0005QOt-lO»OJCO-^"^«QO«0«0!>t^OOqOO>»0 
KCOCOCO(OCOCOCOCOCO<OCOCO<OCOCOCOCOCO<OCO<OCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOt> 



C0CMT^OO0S00t>«0»0Tl<C0CV><M«-IOO0s 



a"6^(«"y'r^«i.p<ii>«53VJUi:^vfc»«ij'^fc'jv.'y».'«'-^v^v^OsOOQQl>'t><PtOO*rt>^'^COCOCO 
THr-trHi-(tH »C O »0 O O O O O O «0 O O O O 






m 

mil 



. .C0»r3>O-H^O00l>O0SOO«0 "^^0>0«Q^'-<fNCO-HCOOOQCO .OJ 
aw-^O -Hgr-tOCOT-lCO COO^ tH TpgOJO^'-t (N^r-iwrl' 

l>00O^ 2oOr-iCSJ(MC0C0C0"S000>Ot-t,-i SoOt-trHCJCMOICO.at- 






1-t »-• c 



T-i T-i y-H a 



^co<oo^o^o^o^otD<Dt^^^t>c^^~l>t^t^t^t^^-^-t^~l>^*t^^^^^t^t^t^»^* 



* 0»000>0 0»OOrr'9''^'^"<l'"^'^'^'^'^'^"^^COCOCOCOCO 

a O O «:> «^ Tf ri* Tj* Tt" '^ Til -^ ''^ Tt rt -^t ''1' Tj< rj< Tf Tf Ti< '^ -^ -^t -^ ^ -* •'t '^ "^ -^ 



•'[©•Ai.jo ^^o: 



j^^&^S^^^^&^S^^^^&^S^^&^S&S^i^^^S 



•il^uopijo Xt([ 



rHCMCOTfO<Ot^QOOO^jOJC3^0COt:;00 0»OjHg^W^U5^^g5«OrH 




aco rfI=HOcorH (not-( »o CO rH vo C0 1-4 o 6co»h th cm C^ CJ .h O CO 

t-i CM CO ""a* <0 I> l> 00 OS OS O tH rH I O tH CSl CO -"f IO «o t* t^ 00 



i ri^<=>S2 gS'^g^^'^g^?? ^2^S^'C5 g^J§53^^^^'=^ «S 



^ ,-1 1-1 B 



^i-iOJCMCOCOCO®OOOSOr-t,-H SoOrHTHOICiOICO.St* 

W rHT-t>-l B >i 



CMco-'^oor^ooosOt-tOJcoTtoeob^ooosQrHNco^w^ 






l^«OOCOCOOSOt-000>OQT»<C>JOCMt-tt'»t^lOOSCOCOO 

lOO COIOOOCOrHOCOt-HOCOTH »0 r-ir-t OC0»-i 

C» CO O «0 t- 00 OS O i-i 1-1 *; 1-1 »H CM CO -"f -^ <0 t^ 00 OS o> O T-t 



COCOCOvOOCSOi-t^H 2oi-tiHTHCJCMCMC0,a00 
01 i-i tH T-( B vt 



O^OJCO 






^P5^^^^f:§???5^S8585SMSS 






^S£(g»a^^Sfi:«g»s5^S 



^2SS55g3?5^^^SM2SSg?3 



Digitized 



by Google 



10 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



6tli niONTH. 



JUNE, 1855. 



30 UAYS. 



MOON*S PHASES. 



Third Quarter 1 7 

New Moon , 14 

Fust Quarter 22 

Full Moon 29 



3 4 mo. 
9 4-5 mo. 
8ev. 
6 30 ev. 



NEW YORK. 



2 52 mo. 
9 33 mo. 
11 56 mo. 
6 18 ev. 



BALTIMORE. 



2 42 mo. 
9 22 mo. 
1 1 46 mo. 

6 Sev. 



2 29 mo. 
9 9 mo. 
11 33 ev. 
5 54 ev. 



Suit »ii Ai«rl(t. 
or noon lUMrL, 



J I 57 _'.' 
II 58 50 
ev. 29 
2 13 



O ^ tf «» ft 



»::?^8^2§Kg'"£^SSJ2;::S:5S5®??:H;;S^SSi2S^"^S8^ 



irtrrrsoig co rt cor-'^cocotN co cog <noc<»cc>*— 'go* 






; CO CO CO C» OJ C4 C^ C^^ W C^ CI CI O) C> C) Ol C> 01 C» CM 0> C^^ Of CO CC CO CO "^ -n* -y 

*o o o w»: o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o w-^ o o o o o uo> wt O i.-t 







-osCM'.'Oog -z-^cooj^Oiooo i^cocoosi^O'^ _: 



^<©Q0Oi CM OCO 



Ol ocoo 
1-. rr '-1 o I 



JOOOO^ 2oO^"^(NOI"£l>OOCftOO^rH |oOOrHrHiMOI.J2 00 






'co^coc^c^^^^ci^Sco^cortcococococortco^cowcocococococo 

55 ^ "1« .g< ^ ^ Tf Tj* ^ Tj< "Sj* TP 'J' ^ Tj* ^ Tf tJ* ^ Tj* ^ ^ ^ T)* ^ ^ ^^ ^* "^ ^ T? 



■5i»9jw JO ^T^a 



£c^«SH^HpSt^«:^H^Hfi;c^«SH^Hfecg«SH^HSi;il 



•qiiioi^ JO iTQ 



rHOICOrJ-OCOt-OOCftO^C^W^iOjO^^^g-OJCO^^^^^O^ 



as" 



»2:sSo^2«^«^i2gsg5^55:5'^^S5^.^g:2:?.?§?525j22Ss:j=*g 



.C00>r-»C0^»«OO-tl"-C0C0 TfOO'C^OC^CO't^l^QOOlCOOOQ .CO 
% Trg'-^Tj'THo5uO(NO^ '"rfWUOOirJ'g CMtT CO OgO 

jO>0^r-( 2oO»-H.-ir-iOJ(M "SOOCSOSOO^--^ §OOOt-i— IO»!N.200 



«c5<N(N^Kw^g5cmoicococoww(5ococo^«^c5c^w«c6«co 



IB ^j< ^^ ^^ '^^ tJ* TJ* ^^ '^' TT *?}* '^ ^q* ^T ^^ ^' ^5^ ^' 



CICMCOCOCOCOCOCOCO 



6 a 

5 •• » » 1 

o i ■ - I 



jT-^ cO'-<(MCJC0»O«0C'00OJOO'-i tJT-i,-(CI(MC0rJ«OC0C^000S0>O^ 
* .-< c «— I «— I ■-H a> r. _- 



.OfCOXOO.:— <00— C0005QQ »Hi^cOO.-H«OOp-:OOl-'t^l-C^COrt .OS 
jl^^ .^rgcvj^^COO— t^^^ OCO <N^g CMrr &i ^g*^ 



a?*^coro 



?oco 

t^ t- f^ <-- I-" 



COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOTfTi'rJ'rfTrTt^^^ 



l^ 1^ »- l^ 1^ t^ t- b- 1 



a oi c5 ^ c*} 



CO C^ CO c» o> o> 



-* n" Tt rJ" rf 



0» 0> (?•> Qi 0» Ol Of 0» 

6» CI 6» 6j 6i oj 6j CI 

^^ ^f ^* ^r ^?t* '^ '^ ^r 



2» CO CO CO CO CO -t "^ T »C O O IT 

6icicicicic5cicicicicicici 



•|,jlo»p tjung 



..QOOO^O 



Q t- ^ O CO 

»o»-<ci tH 

d €»««"-< CO 

coco-^roo 



rHtfiOSCOCOOS-^CO 

'-Ir-.T-dCl 

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 

c5 CI c5 c5 o5 CI CI d 






•^a9^joii»a I £,gga^^^£<^Q?aH^Hc::^qiaH^i5b:igqiaH^H&;(g 



•muoivjoATq| -^^^^''^^'^«>'^S:::;2^;:2;^S£:SSS^^g|g$g;;g^^$;;g$^^ 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



11 



ytlt MONTH. 



JULY, 1855 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 
First Quarter • 
Full Moon • • • • 



8 45 mo. 
8 17 ev. 
3 8 mo 
1 38 mo. 



NEW YORK. 



BALTIMORE. < 



8 2-2 mo. 
7 /)5 ev. 
2 45 mo. 
1 16 mo. 



8 9 mo. 
7 42 ev. 
2 32 mo. 
1 2 mo. 



Sun on JUerld. 
or noon mark. 



3 26 

4 49 

548 

6 12 



ui » S a 

<!3 £ » * 
»^-< a » o 

o [ 



?ococ>'-'(>jcoor-(oo-*t:-c 






a T-i CO C3 £ CO ^^ C>0<M«5 ^ '^ CtO(N'^gO< OOjpOCO 



gOiOo^^ |oo-H-.tc^*co Soooooioooo^^ 2or-..-<cv.: 



t-OOOi 



^^^^_^^^ooooo>oosoooooor't>»«oooTtcococMr-tooq> 
aet>. t^ t> t> t^ t^ t^ t> i'. tr- i":Lt:it- t^t^t'-t^ t^i>t^t^t^t^r-t^t^t^i^i-i-'«o 

« <^ Tj< -f Tj* Tj< Tf Tt Tj* -^ O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O lO o 




.-TCO».'T'0»C30^COC>qOCO«-iO ooco — i^ooo»rj«gQj:oo«ococo .i-*O>C0 
aco-HTT^ooc cv«r5c»5»-^ ^r-tu'Sci'* coo^rtg "ircocog tj"-h 

jjO>OOj;HtH 2oOOrHC>JC0 "SoOOO OSOiOOO^»H gOO^OI. 2 0000 






alLr«^5CQQ<3400'-^o»o>cO'^o«.':«Dt^ooo40Q*H'NcocO'3'».'?«o«oi"-qoos 

"co cortwco'^Trrr-^'vrf'^Tt'^Tr'^rrTroicooooo'Oooooo 



•iia»^joX«a 



»?^E5^gci;c^«5^E3^Sfi;c.1«j^t2^Sc^^«s^^Sfey1«SH 



qjuoivjoiiea 



rHC>*C0"^O«0t-000>O^(MC0rJ«O«0l^000>O;-j0> 



S?JSi§?SIwSS5?5^^« 









u 



ooi-<o».aatto> 



iw^c?wcS3cocococ6co«wc5rtS(NC?c5c^wc>o5w(N(5»^ 



j^'M0IC0C0-f-l'O«0l^0Q0>OO^0>C0C0-t»(7C0l>.0Q0S0>Q'-' 

'co cocococococococococococoTi"«j<'^rj<"^'^-TitTj<Tj«TrTrTfioo 

■ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ r}< Tj* "sj* Tj* ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ t}* ^ Tj* ^ ^ ^ tC ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 






of;,: 9> IL 



r i-* o rr (?» c» 00 o 

M O CO Tj< 6» 

■• rH 0» CO CO TC O CO 



i^c5JS;2£;3*=*£dSS55S^^ 

K i-H .-I r-i T-i -H t as 



^ >Or-. 
rH Q) 

O CO o o» O ^ O O -^l3>^ 
ojo.-<co»0'-icoo£ 



o»c»co 
1-1 CM CO 

t-00O4 



585 £22 









^cocococbc6c6?6cococo 
t^ t- 1- 1^ t^ t^ t^ 1-- 1^ t^ t^ 



CO CO CO CO 






NS5c5S§ico?ococococbc6cocow 

^ Tf ^9* ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ "^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



CO CO CO CO 

t^ t" t^t> t^ t- t* 

OSCSO -^"OJCO 

CO CO Tl* ^ "^ T}< 

rf "g* ^ rj« •* ^ Tj< 






> -t CO ?> -^ 
t- 1^ r* I- 



.^•pept.uns 



.OOgOJOCOCO^COC^OCOrfCOOCOOCO^^^OO^JgCOCO^^gOOCN 






•H»a^JoX*a| CS^H^HfewCSH^Hfei^CaH^gfac^CSH^E 



lOlI^H 



•Mluoi^joX-ral 



^(NCO"^0<Ol^OOO»0--HCi»CO'^»0«Ot>'00 0>0^ 



8c58^S5^^>^S;858^?3 



Digitized byL^OOQlC 



12 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



sth iao:«fTH. 



AUGUST, 1855. 



31 DAYS. 



MOON'l PHASES. 



Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • - 
First Quarter • 
Full Moon • • • - 



4 38 ev. 

2 10 ev. 

3 52 ev. 
8 26 mo. 



4 26 ev. 
1 58 ev. 
3 39 ev. 
8 14 mo. 



4 16 ev. 
1 48 ev. 
3 29 ev. 
8 4 mo. 



4 2ev. 
1 35 ev. 
3 16 ev. 
7 51 mo. 



Sun •» Merid. 
•r noon aiark. 



6 3 

5 17 

3 54 

1 68 




:0>0r-i 2oo»HC0-<t»O«0t^l>000>OSOO»H— I {>r -H CJ CO o to t> 00 00 o> o 



JOiOOT-1,-1 go'-^CJCO-i* "£l>OOOOQOO>0>00^ So-HCM.St^t^OOOOOi 



KtOtOtOOtOCOtO<0<0<OCOCDCOtOCO<0<OtOCOCD^^tO<DOCOtOCOCD(OCO 






arr CO cog»-t»orrTj«Tj«^o»-"cOo»HTj« coclg^^cow « eo 
joooi-HrH 2oo^(Meo "St^ooooooocsoo^ e o ^-i c< .2 1* t* oo oo o> 

« r-i .-H ,-< 1-1 B « r->.-HT-l B ^< 



■ t>'t>'t^t^t^t>t^t^t^t^t^tOgO<OtOtO<0<P<0<0<DtO<D<0<0<0<0<OtO<OCO 



ll 






•v»jiA.jox«a 



^S£«g«:^H^^f£(^«SE5^efi;(g«a5^i5fi;(g«a^^Sji; 



njuoj^jox^o: 



»HC«eo'^«o«ot'000>0'H 



S$2;2;:2S^SSS8c5?5§5^«^?585Sg?3 



Mi 



'r-twH ► rH d CO -^ o to r* 00 

■r-t »-t V 



f-ii-i 2 o th ,-1 CN» CO Tf to r* 00 a o o »H 



i-l tH tH .-H B 



l<<3< CIO 



»I>OOQOOOO>OJOO^ cO'-'C*i.2t*t*oooooo 



. to O Tf CO C^l -H O 0> 00 to O CO C< O g » 
»8t^t^t^t^t^t^t^t-t^t^t^t>t^f-'tOtO 



»o«ooo 
to to to to 



totototototototo to to to 



!NCOTj<OtO 
■ •^ Tj< -^ ■^ O O Ut) «o o o o 



»J§55^S 



l>00O>OrH 



(MCOTfO 

o »^ o o 



i^c5 wcSc 







i .H T-i c» CO "^ Tf o t* a o> o '-t »-• ►^thcjo»coco 



Tj«»OtOt*0>0 



-e 



fCO 



;^|00^ 



«j C^OOOOOO 



>OiQ0"tolrfrjr 



|OrH(NC0 1 



0)0)0 






t*r-oooooo 



Kt^t^t't>t^t^t^t>t^t>'t^ 






'^^'^ 



OOrf 
to to CO to to to 



^ ^ ^ ^ ^ W CO 



§1 



5 00v5o»0 
J« rf '^ "* Tf -t 



OpgOrHW 

rf -^ 'O O O 



CO Tj< tfS to I-- 



t^ to to to t( 

oooso^o»'^otpi>opc 



to to ^ to to 



•5[ p^p t.ung 






25;:i;SSoS 



f^l>.t^t^<OtOtOO»f5»f5 



eocJo^co 

i-<C0-ttO»^ 

»0 Tf T*« -<J« CO 



0>0>0 

•*3"C0 

CO CO Ol CM 



<N^T-lT-lO© 



'-•'rt'gocoo 

OC0«-H ^ 
O O) O) O>00 



•^••i»&.joi»a ^S£ig«aE5^gfi:c^»aE3^HpS:,^«a5^Sji;,^«s5^Hfe 



Hjuox^joXTd 



— tc^co^vatot^oooiOT-toicoTfvt^tot^oooi 



f^^M^^^S^SSgco 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



13 



9th MONTH. SEPTEMBER, 1855. so days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Third Quarter- • 

New Moon 

First Quarter • • 
Full Moon 



3 41 mo. 
6 10 mo. 
2 18 mo. 

4 42 ev. 



NEW YORK. 



3 29 mo. 
5 58 mo. 
2 6 mo. 

4 30 ev. 



BALTIMORE. 



3 19 mo. 
5 47 mo. 
1 56 mo. 

4 20 er. 



3 5 mo. 
5 34 mo. 
1 43 mo. 

4 7 ev. 



Sun on Mertd. 
or noon mark. 



11 59 55 
11 57 18 
11 54 30 
11 51 43 



gicT 

w 



ii 

h 

■<• 

•'I 
1^ 



*i 



5^, 



jO-"-* eO»-i0l'«tO;0t>'r*00a04 0>0>O^*-i ►<MC0O«0«0t^00 0>0SO 



«o>Ot-i 2oo«-<(Meo "Sto t- t^t*ooao>o»-« So^WTf.a^ot^^-ooo 

" 1-H rH C CO ^-'T-' g ^ 












»o tc £ CO 55 CO eo ^ CO 6irfi-icoi-i g oi'^ gcooci rr 



.-H T-4 i-» 63 






■ COtOtOtOtOtOCO ;otototOto;otOtDtO<0{0;OtOtOO>00>0»000»0>Q 






*3i»9Ai. JO ^^a 



tgC;^H^Hfa^O:gH^Hfa(gC:gH^Hfa(gCaH^Hfa(gO 



•MlooW JO ^'Q 



^OICO^O«>t^QO<»0;^C2CO;2;^SJ:;?228c3g5S5Sc$SS5?5^^ 









iS5^i5^ g^R^?§ .§'"S:^^^S5^J§ i^^ 



P^lS^oco 



^H.-*^H S3 



T-i go^CNJCO ©tOt't^t^OOOOOOiO pOr-iC«''t.2<0<0t-^-00 



SS" 



SCO CO <otototocotoco<o<oto<o<ocoto<o<oto<o<ooooooooo*o 






if* 



.o»r-toio^i-<>H«»ooco«or-eoo»r:«QOQOCN»«o^r*eowcoqo^(:«c»o 

OOrH 2 






iOOiOT-i 2 O r-i « CO "S tO-t* t* t* 00 00 0> 0> O T-" 2 r-i CM CO .2 «o «o t- t^ 00 



B;oto;oto<o<oto<o;otoo<ototo<oco<o<o«);o;otooooo»c>f50>o 



a^ w w ^ S ^ CO CO c6 M c6 CO CO 



•KP»P 'i^nS 



^t^o^jHj.og5|g::.^g5ogo 

oOOt^t^r^wto^ooo-^Tf-^coco 



•^^00'^'-*00'^^rHirt00OI«OOiOi»»O 
C0<NC»r-4,-l.-lO^l»OOi-l^rHCIC<J 



•v'Mjoxta (^«s5^Sfi;i^«SH^Hfa(g«SH^Sfi:(^«SE5^g£.^tt 



•muo]^ JO Xtq 



.HWCO'^OCOt'XOJO^WCOrJ' 



S;:j$^2SSa^22SSc3grS5^^^S^85Sg 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



14 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



louiMONTH. OCTOBER, 1855. 



31 DATS. 



MOON*8 PHASES. 



Third Quarter- • 

New Moon 

First Quarter • • 
Full Moon 



6 22 ev. 
10 42 ev. 
10 55 mo. 

2 44 mo. 



NEW YORK. 



6 10 ev. 
10 30 ev. 
10 43 mo. 

2 32 mo. 



5 59 ev. 
10 19 ev. 
10 33 mo. 

2 21 mo. 



5 46ev 
10 6ev. 
10 20 mo. 

2 8 mo. 



Sun on MerM. 
•r aooM Mark.! 



11 49 44 
11 47 22 
11 45 28 
11 44 12 






II 



"i-l T-i C r-tjHj-H 4) «-l r-l I 






SIO O O O O O O O O «0 CD CO to to «0 «0 CO CO CO CO to CO CO to CO «0 CO CO CO CO «o 






joao»H 2 o 1-t c< CO tc ■§ o CO CO r* 00 00 o> »H So'-'C^'^.Soocor^oooo 

* »H r-t C M '-' C ^ T-H 






J CO I- 00 a> o 1-1 w CO Tt o CO r- 00 o» o »-< (N CO •* o CO t^ 00 o> o r^ 2» c*5 "^ ''x CO 

ao »CW5OC0C0C0C0C0t0t0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0tOC0C0 



'\*9j^}oi^a 



aH^Hfi:ig«SH^5fS.g«SH^HpStS«SH^H£«3ea^^ 



-qiuoxVJoXiBCX 



■<OJCO"^«OCOr-OOOiO^O»CO"^OCOt^OOOiO;H 



Sc5g5S3^^^F;85§}g?5 




ji;o'Hoir)<tor*r*ooooo>o>oo^ Soornoirfcor^r^oooiojo— i»h t^ 



al??2g £S5^^S5^ .5gS^^S;S^S" £S^^«^ g2g?S:2*^-5::2 

^oo'-i gO'HCJco'V »ococot*r*ooo>^ gOi-«<MTj«.2»o»ocot*QOa»p 



aO O O O tfS O >0 UO >0 O U*:) IQ tf^ O O O IQ O O »0 >0 Ct) W^ U'^ O O O O IQ o -^ 



KOOUtlOCOCOtOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOtOCOCOtOCOCOtOCOCOCOCOCO<OCOCO 



H. 



'23 



jWOICO-^tOt^aOiOT-i^C* >i i-« »H <M OJ CO -* CO l^ 00 0> O ^ T-I 2o-^»H(M 

■ ^H 1-H *H rH 0) r-t vH rH B 



jjO>o*H go^cjco-^ "^ococor^t^oocio cOi-<cv»'T*«.2»o»o<or*Qooo 



ao o o o o o »^ *o o »o o o o o o o »o o t-'t o o o »o »o >o o o o oj^j^ 
.cpt^aoo5THC^cO"^ocoooosO''^c>icoT»'Oi--ooo>-^oico-rot:--gogi^o> 

JlOOl.'^W:) •-ti-Hi-ti-lr-lr-(»Hr^.-l(?ie«OIOIC5C«O»2>ICOC0 

iiotfdoocococococococototococococococococococococococococococo 



•g pap t^ung 



3COCOCO'*itO«r50COCOCOt*l^000000050>OiOO^i-<'-^C»OI<MCOCOCO'^ 



•^»»A\.J0ii^Q| !^H^H£(gg;^H^H£igC?SH^HfaiggaH^HfatgOaH^ 



H^UOI^JOilBaj 



r-4c^co'Tj«ocot^ao>o-^o)coTf».'?«>i'.ooo>o»H 



S;::s:^2a'32i:;S2^c;g^g3;^^^^S^85S^;5 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



15 



iith MONTH. NOVEMBER, 1855. so days. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Third Quarter- • 

New Moon 

Firist Quarter • • 
Full Moon 



34 ey. 

2 48 ev. 
6 31 ev. 

3 8ev. 



NEW YORK. 



22 ev. 
2 36 ev. 
6 19 ev. 
2 56 ev. 



BALTIMORE. 



11 ev. 
2 25 ev. 
6 9ev. 
2 45 ev. 



CHARL£S*N. 



11 58 mo. 
2 12 ev. 
5 55 ev. 
2 32 ev. 



Sun an Merld. 
or noon mark, 



11 43 43 
11 43 58 
11 45 7 
11 47 9 










KtOOOOOOOOOOOOtOOO'if^'^'^t '^'^•^ TtTfryTt-^^^^ 



j«o r* QO o> o *H c^ CO -^ o to r- go Oi o ^ o» CO g- o «> r- go o> o> o .-t (M CO ''t 

a^^^^(7^^c>^^lc^cicvi(^»^lNOl?5cocococoeoco^^?5cocorrTJ<TJ<<*>^J• 

sco^cocototococotootocococotototocotocototococotococoocoto 






? 



ill 



.00 j;oot-«ooo»H t-050>.-|OT}<t-j:oc2C<"^o .o^wc^-^too 
^^ 2o'-i(McO'^o'ioo«>r*o>o»H go^co-^to.aoto^oooojo.-^ 



.»HOO>QOc^coO"^co(N»-"C50>qoi-«o<oo-«<Ti'eo<Moi^rH»-H.-iooo 



'S^ c5 K CO CO W ?? rt W CO CO rr ^ rf "^t -^r rf "i* Tt Tj« -V §5 o o o o o 
Ht0tOC0<0C0tOC0C0<OC0<0<O(0tO(0tOtOtOCOC0<0(0tOC0CO(Ot0t0tOt0 



'^99J^J0lxa 



^;s:s^isi^^S&s^^S^H&s^'!^H^S^£^^S^^& 



•mVLOJ/i JO X«(I 



^C«C0"^O«0t*»0>O^(NC0'^OOt*-000SO;H 



8oI8S5^^^E585S^ 






.Tf coop T-ic»^ «.-<.-• «ot^ do .-• ^ t- "^ <o o» CI CO '^t <>J <5 <o » t> t- oj CO 

aW<N^'-i^'Hi1«C«O<MOC0T-iO £ CO CO "^ .-< CO CO W 1-1 «5 CO .-^ O CO .-• 

ij»HC«co»c«oi>r*»oooiO>0'-i^ c0^ojT*<o«or- xooosoo^ ►r-i 

» .-H tH »H B .-< r-l fH Q> 



Set: 



iS2 gSJ2i222^ .:::ii^^^;^^§5 g^C5^SgJ g^?§g?:i?g'^^ 

K'-' cOrH(Mco"*o ■2o«:>«6t^ooo-H 2oi-»C0r)<O.2»O»0«0l>00O.-i 



io o £5 o o o o o -^ ^ '*»' Tf "^ ^ Tj« Tj< ^ <* Tj« CO CO CO CO w w « S « e? c? 
M ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^* w* ^1* ^r ^y ^T *^ ^r ^r ^y ^* ^r ^^ ^r ^^ ^r ^r ^r* ^r ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ tj* ^j* ^y 



HtO(OtO(0<OCOtO(OtO<OtOCOCO(OCOCO<OCO<OCOOtOCO<OCOCOI>t^t^t^ 






.oooT*!i-«ooooQ"^iiOO»-noT-io>eocoQpc2co»oo>i-^rf«o_:«oi^i>i>o 

ar-ii-lC^HO 0(N«^(M CO «rt "^ CO (N (N »0 ^ OJ »H »?b CO g »-h O CO Ih 

JCO-^OOOOOiOSOOrH ^0»H^ (NCO-^Ot^OOOiOOr-4 eoo^weo 

* .-H-H rH ft> - T-4j-<»H E 



■^ |o»H(NCO"^ 



o «oo«or*oooi-i §OrHCO'^o.2'<»'»ocot*ooo>o 






s?^ 

-^Tf^ 



ICO CO CO CO c 

■ to«ototo«i 



^"5"^"*'*s"^'«s'COcoJowcoc6^cococococow8*S^ 



d<o<o«oto<o<o<ocococo<ocoto(ocot«t^r^i>t«]>c^t« 



•g pap t^ung 



Q^ ^ o o o o CO to «p t^ !> t^ t^ 00 00 op op o> o> o> o> 






§wSci(Nd5ic5^ 



•iwA^joi^a I ^^^;i^S^S^S^^S^S^a^^S^&^^^^^^&^ 



'T{\uoyi JO X«(i 



■•<NC0T»«O«0t>a0»O-H(MC0rtO«0t'000»P'-i 



SoJS^S5^^§5{^85Sf 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



16 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



i»tk MONTH. DECEMBER, 1855. 31 days. 



MOON*8 PHASES. 



Third Quarter- 
New Moon • • • 
First Quarter • 

Full Moon 

Third Quarter- 



BOSTON. 



9 28 mo. 
5 34 mo. 
2 13 mo. 
5 55 mo. 
7 21 mo. 



NEW YORK. 



9 16 mo. 
5 22 mo. 
2 1 mo. 
5 43 mo. 
7 9 mo. 



BALTIMORE. 



9 5 mo. 
5 12 mo. 
1 50 mo. 

5 33 mo. 

6 58 mo. 



CHARLES'N 



8 52 mo. 

4 59 mo. 
1 37 mo. 

5 20 mo. 

6 45 mo. 



Sua •» MerlA. 



11 49 11 
11 52 31 
11 56 19 
ev. 17 



X 

o 



li 2o*HC«ieo'VO«o«ot^ooo>oso»-4 ► 1-4 o* co -^ »o to t- oo oo o> o o »-• 2o 



si 









■ tOCOtOtOCOtOtOtO(OCOCOCOCOtO<0<&<OtOCOCO(OtO<OCDCOt-»t«t^t*»t^ 



mi 



J aO•^c^leocoo "STCVstoooojo^ c o CN» CO -^ o .2 "^ "i^ <o t- 00 oa o *-* 2 



»-^'^'^-<»'^'^'»T>'TfT>"^T>''^'^-<a'T>'-^T>'Tfr»rfT>"<»'»-^T»T»TyT»-<a«.» 



• ® O ^ (M CO •* O «0 t^ 00 0> O O 1-t ^ CM 01 CO CO •'t Tf O O «0 «0 l> t^ 00 00 OS o» 

■O rH r-4 1-1 *-« 1-1 tH .-» ^H ^H ^H ,-J »H ,-1 rS T-1 ..- t-lr-l .-I .-H 



•j|»»jiA.jox»a 



S9)si^^S&S^)i^S^^^SZ)i^S^S^S^)^S^S^S;i)^ 



^%noy^}olv(l 



^(MCO-^vatOt^OOOO^OJCOTCiOtOt^OOOi 



Sc^?5S3S^^SS5?5Sg?3 






ii 



<S$-«>«'8g2g§S''5eSS?5S§lBB?SS'~«R"52- 

rf»-tOI'^»0«0«OI>00»0>O^TH go^dco-votot^ooooo^ >io»^o» 



J go-^oicocoo "S-^w^cor-oio^H 2oo»co•^»o.9•^»^<e^•ooo»Ol-• 2 

■6 S ^r-t B h; i-« ^ c 



«;5^S???5???5?5??l???!:§?5c?cSc?c?^^^^?;?o??§?^^^5:5^ 



j'^^'^yTy^y^^-^-^-^'^-^-^ 



^■^^■^^■^■^^■^^.^^^■^■^■^■^ 







^co-^oor-oooiOO-H >rH.HO*cO"^«o«ob-oqo>o^ 2oo^o»c»coTf 



j2o^cn»cO'^«o"§'^o«o^-o&0'-< 2o<NeO'^»o.a'T»«o«oi>oooao-H 2 

■ fc «0 1-^rH t S ^ i-H *-4 b 



KTfTl"^'^-^'^-^'^-^'^'^'^'^'^'^-^ 



cococococococ6c%?5co 






•g 'xoap fjimg 






»-^c«ico'>*owt««»oio^^ojco^ic«o»^ooo>0'^(NW'a;«5<P!>ajo>o^ 



•q^uowjoXTa 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



17 



THE OLD AND NEW YEAR. 



Old Tear^ farewell ! It grieves my heart, 
To feel we now bo soon must part : 
Amid the changing scenes of earth, 
Where sorrow wept, or cheerful mirth 
Enjoyed the hour, I 've walked with thee, 
And shared thy blessed sympathy. 
At home, abroad, with friends new found. 
Or those to whom I Ve long been bound, 
1 've travelled side by side with thee ; 
And now to part, is grief to me. 

Farewell! Th<fti goest, to yield thy place 

To one who comes with smiling face^ 

And many promises to be 

A better friend than thou to me, 

To bear me onward to the goal 

With lighter step, and happier soul. 

Well doth he promise; but to win 

A crown of-iife, and free from sin, 

The resting-place of saints secure, 

Ah, who but Christ can that make sure ? 



The Astob Library, a view 
of the interior of which is here 
presented, was founded by the 
late John Jacob Astor, who 
left, by will, four hundred thou- 
sand dollars '< for the establish- 
ment of a public library in New 
York," " which should be open 
at all reasonable hours, &ee of 
expense, to persons resorting 
thereto." The building is lo- 
cated in Lafayette-place, near 
Astor-place, between Fourth 
and Eighth streets. Over eigh- 
ty thousand volumes, carefully 
selected, in the various depart- 
ments of learning, are already 
in the library, which is now 
open to the public; and pro- 
vision is made, by the liberali- 
ty of the founder, for constant 
addition to their number. 



Then to His cross, incoming Year^ 
Let every moment bear me near, 
And nearer still ; thus wilt thou be 
The friend thou promisest, to me ? 
Farewell, Old Year: we ne'er shall meet 
. In market thronged, or crowded street ; 
But we shall rheet Ijefore the throne. 
Where all the deeds mankind have done. 
Proclaimed and judged, shall find award 
From Christ the omniscient living Lord. 

New Year^ thy proffered hand I take, 
With thee thy pilgrimage to make ; 
Or, e'er thy hasty months have fled. 
Perchance to slumber with the dead. 
Whate'er my future lot may be — 
Which thou canst not reveal to me — 
To Him who rules o'er earth and sky. 
Cheerful I yield my destiny. 
May He my footsteps here attend. 
And crown me at my journey's end. 



But one Journey through the World. — An upright man who when dispos- 
ing of the produce of his farm made it an invariable rule to give better measure 
than was required of him, was asked by a friend why he did so, as it would not 
be to his advantage. He replied, "God has permitted me but one journey 
through the world, and when gone I cannot return to rectify mistakes." 



Digitized byLjOOQlC 



18 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

•* What must I Do to Inherit Eternal Life?" — "Life, life, eternal life," 
the moet important of all things to the guilty, the lost, the dying. What must 
I do to inherit it? 

" What must I do ?" Something must be done, and done soon, and done in 
earnest, or I perish. If I remain idle, inactive, unconcerned, a little longer, 
it may be too late. 

" What must I do ?" Not only is something to be done, but I must do it 
Grod has >vrought out a great salvation ; I must receive it at the hand of God. 
No one else can do this for me. I must myself accept the proferred gift, or 
never be saved. 

" What must I do ?" There is a necessity in the case, urgent, pressing, inevi- 
table. The work must be done, or I am undone, for ever undone. Thinking, 
feeling, intending, resolving — all this is not enough. "What God directs must 
be done, and done as he directs, or I perish. 

And now, do you ask in sincerity and earnestness, "What must I do?" By 
the grace of God, and according to his truth, I will tell you. You must admit and 
feel that you are a sinner , guilty, polluted, condemned, lost, and so dead in 
sins as to be in need of eternal life. You must realize that life is to be found 
in Christ " In him is life," John 1:4; and he " giveth life unto the world," 
John 6 : 33. And do you ask, " How shall I obtain it?" " He that believeth on 
the Son hath everlasting life," Jphn 3 : 36. This, then, is what you must do ; 
you must believe on Christ. You must believe that he is the Saviour, the only 
Saviour, an all-sufiBcient Saviour, able to save to the uttermost, willing to save 
all that will co&e to him ; ready and waiting to save you, and to save you now. 

And if you believe him thus to be a Saviour, and are willing to be saved by 
him, you will accept him as your Saviour, according to his word. You will 
repent: that is, you will cease to do evil, that you may learn of Christ to do 
well ; sorrowing that you have ever broken Grod's commands, and resolving and 
praying that you may do so no more. You will believe: that is, you will 
receive all that Christ has said, and trust all that he has promised ; and give 
up yourself, and all that you have and are, to him, for time and eternity. You 
will obey: that is, you will endeavor to do Christ ^s will, as the Bible declares 
it } and to do it sincerely, immediately, uniformly, prayerfully, faithfully, to 
the end of life, relying on the Holy Spirit for strength, and on the grace of 
God in Christ Jesus for acceptance at the final day. Do this, and you shall 
" inherit eternal life." Your sins shall be forgiven ; your heart be renewed ; 
your hope rest on the true foundation : though an outcast, you shall be re- 
stored ; though deserving death, you shall inherit, through grace, eternal life. 



ONLY one life. 



'T is not for man to trifle ; life is brief, Not many lives, but only one have we ; 

And sin is here. One, only one — 

Onr age is but the falling of a leaf, How sacred should that one life ever be — 

A dropping tear. That narrow span I 

"We have no time to sport away the hours ; Day after day filled up with blessed toil, 

All must be earnest in a world like ours. Hour after hour still bringing in new spoil. 



Important Truths. — In a work lately published by Lieber on civil liberty 
and self-government, he says, " There is no right, without a parallel duty; no 
liberty, without the supremacy of law ; no high destiny, without earnest per- 
severance; no greatness, without self-denial.^^ 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 19 



The Christian home, where age in patience waits 

For heaven ; where youth is trained in wisdom's ways 

The Lord to serve, and childhood early taught 

God to remember : this is the abod« 

Of faith and love, of kindness and of hope ; 

This, too, the hallowed sphere of joy and peace. 

Within thy house, if thou would'st have it blest, 

Pray oft, and be the mouth to all the rest ; 

Daily let part of holy writ be read ; 

Let, as the body, so the soul have bread ; 

For many souls as in thy house there be, 

With just as many aouh God trtuteth theef 



Digitized 



by Google 



20 TUB FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALUAKAG. 

Familt GrOTERKMENT. — ^Family government does not consist in watching 
children with a sospicioos eye, frowning at their merry outbursts of innocent 
hilarity, sappressing their joyous laughter, and moulding them into melancholy 
little models of patriarchal gravity. And when tiiey have been in fault, it 
is not to punish them simply on acount of the injury you may have chanced to 
suffer in consequence of their fault, while the disobedience is suffered to pass 
without rebuke. Nor is it to overwhelm the little culprit with a flood of angry 
words ; to stun him with a deafening noise ; to call him by hard names, which 
do not express his misdeeds ; to load him with epithets which would be extrava- 
gant if applied to a fault of tenfold enormity ; or to declare with passionate 
vehemence, that he is the worst child in the neighborhood, and likely to come 
to the gallows. 

But it is to watch anxiously the first risings of sin, and kindly to repress 
them '; to counteract the earliest workings of selfishness ; to suppress the first 
beginnings of rebellion against rightful authority ; to teach an implicit, unques- 
tioning, and cheerful obedience to the will of the parent, as a preparation for 
future allegiance to the requirements of civil authority, and for subjection to the 
will of Grod the great Ruler and Father ; it is to punish a fault because it is a fault, 
because it is sinful and contrary to the commands of Grod, without reference to 
whether it may, or may not, have been productive of immediate iigury to the 
parent or others. It is to reprove with calmness and composure, and not with 
angry irritation, in a few words fitly chosen, and uttered in low and serious tones, 
and not with a torrent of abuse ; to punish as often as you threaten, and threaten 
only when you see the absolute necesdty of punidiment ; to say what you noiean, 
and then do as you say. It is, in a word, to govern your family as in the sight 
of Him who has made you a parent, and given you authority to train up and 
govern your children for Him ; and who will rewarcl your fidelity with such 
blessings as he bestowed on Abraham, or punish your neglect with such curses 
as he visited on EIL 



HASTE NOT — ^REST NOT. 

Without haste, and without rest— Haste not — years can ne'er atone 

Bind the motto to thy hreast ; For one rec^ess action done. 

Heed not flowers that round thee bloom, Duty be thy polar guide — 

Bear it onward to the tomb. Do the rig-At, whate'er betide. 

Ponder well and know the right, Haste not, rest not— conflicts past, 

Onward, then, with all thy might; God shall crown thy work at last. GoeOie. 

One Thing have I Desired op the Lord. — ^It is strange how much more 
wisely we judge in temporal, than in spiritual things. If we should see a man 
trying to be a lawyer, a doctor, and a minister, all at once, we should say, 
without hesitation, " That man will come to nothing ; he will not succeed in 
being any thing." We know very well that a man must stick to fvnd serve one 
thing, if he hopes to make money, or get fame, or do good. But how seldom do 
we witness this concentration of purpose and effort in matters of the soul. 
How often do we see men trying to be at the same time good Christians and 
men of the world. 



How to Read the Bible. — An old man once said, "For a long period I 
puzzled myself about the difficulties of Scripture, until at last I came to the 
resolution that reading the Bible was like eating fish. When I find a diflflculty, 
I lay it aside and call it a bone. Why should I choke on the bone, when there 
is so much nutritious meat?" 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 21 



The ScH00L3ifisTRESS, surrounded by the happy group she teaches, reminds 
us of the importance of our Common Schooh, so many of which throughout the 
land are taught by females. According to the late United States census, there 
are in our public schools, 3,354,173 children — a mighty army to be trained up for 
good or evil ; we trust and pray and hope and believe, for the former. This 
vast number of children, now being educated at the public expense, is more than 
the entire population of this country was when it first engaged in war with 
Great Britain. They are to be the fathers and mothers of the millions of the 
coming generations of our people. Place, then, the Bible in our Common 
Schools. And thus let one of the most important steps be taken for training 
up all who are in them to be intelligent and useful citizens, good members of 
the family, and faitiiful Christians. ' 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



22 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Truth not Lost. — ^Luke Short, when about fifteen years of age, heard a ser- 
mon from the celebrated Flavel, and soon after went to America, where he 
spent the remainder of his life He received no immediate impression from 
FlaveVs sermon, and lived in carelessness and sin till he was a century in age. 
He was now a " sinner a hundred years old ;" and to all appearance, ready to 
" die accursed." But sitting one day in a field, he fell into a busy reflection on 
his past life ; and recurring to the events of his youth, he thought of having 
heard Mr. Flavel preach, and vividly recollected a large portion of his sermon, 
and the extraordinary earnestness with which it was delivered. Starting as if 
stung by an adder, he instantly labored under accusings of conscience, and ran 
from thought to thought till he arrived first at conviction of sin, and next to an 
apprehension of the divine method of saving the guilty. He soon after joined 
an evangelical chui-ch in his vicinity, and to the day of. his death, in the one 
htmdred and sixteenth year of his age, gave satisfactory evidence of being a truly 
converted and believing follower of the Saviour. Mr. Flavel had long before 
passed to his heavenly rest, and could not, while on earth, have supposed that 
his living voice would so long continue to yield its echoes as an instrument of 
doing good to a wandering sinner. Let piinisters and private Christians, who 
labor for the spiritual well-being of their fellow-men, cast their bread upon the 
waters in full faith that though th^y lose sight of it themselves, it shall be 
found after many days. 

the old house clock. 

Oh, the old, old clock, of the household stock, When the dawn looked grey o'er the misty "vray, 

Was the brightest thing auid neatest ; And the early air blew coldly : 

Its hands, though old, had a touch of gold, " Tick, tick," it said — " quick, out of bed, 

And its chime rang still the sweetest. For five I've given warning; 

'Twas a monitor, too, though its words were few. You'll never have health, you'll never get wealth, 

Yet they lived, though nations altered ; Unless you 're up in ^e morning." 

And its voice, still strong, warned old and young, 

When the voice of friendship faltered. Still hourly the sound goes round and round, 

" Tick, tick," it said — " quick, quick, to-bed — With a tone that ceases never ; 

For ten I've given warning ; While teaxs are shed for the bright days fled, 

Up, up, and go, or else, you know, And the old friends lost for ever. 

You'll never rise soon in the morning." Its heart beats on, though hearts are gone 

That warmer beat and younger ; 
A friendly voice was that old, old clock, Its hands still move, though hands we Iot« 

As it stood in the comer smiling. Are clasped on earth no longer. 

And blessed the time with a merry chime, " Tick, tick," it said — " to the churchyard bed, 

The wintry hours beguiling ; The grave hath given warning — 

But a cross old voice was that tiresome clock, Up, up, and rise, and look to the skies, 

As it called at daybreak boldly, And prepare for a heavenly morning.*' 



A Maxim for Home. — ^My mother used to say, that " it was disagreeable to 
be bustling about while father was within j and when he was gone out, the work 
must be done up." Oh that wives and mothers understood and practised this 
wisely and well ! What diflerent scenes would the laboring man's home present, 
if they did. How many a man would be saved from the alehouse fireside, 
where comfort and convenience are studied to seduce him into sin, if wives 
and mothers would but so order their households that when the father returns, 
his coming shall be welcomed with cleanliness and peace, and his home shall be 
made to him the most blessed and grateful place that he can find. 

Doing Nothino. — They that do nothing, are in the readiest way to do that 
which ifl worse than nothing. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



23 



THE MISSIONARY. 



He goes to speak the words of life 

To souls by error tossed ; 
To bear the gospeUs joyful sound 

To lands in darkness lost ; 
To speak his Master's glorious works, 

His grace and power proclaim, 
And teach the untutored sons of sin 

To breathe a Saviour's name. 



And O, the rich reward that waits 

A work of grace like this! 
A life of love, a death of peace, 

A heaven of endless bliss! 
Earth's proudest, noblest honors, fall 

Far, far below the prize 
He gains, who claims this work his own, 

In realms beyond the skies! 



Liberality op Missionary Churches. — The people of Tahiti, and of the 
neighboring islands, contributed in one year $2,550 to the British and Foreign 
Bible Society. The London Missionary acknowledged in one year, $88,740, 
from their mission churches, $20,000 of which was from Southern India, as a 
contribution to the Jubilee fund ; half of the latter sum was contributed by 
the native church at Nagercoil : $800 was received from one station in Jamai- 



Digitized 



by Google 



24 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

ca. The English Baptist Missionary Society report $6,000, contributed in a 
single year towards the support of their pastors, by the mission phurches. Rev. 
Mr. Davis, pastor of a mission church of Africans at New Amsterdam, says, " Dur- 
ing the five years of my pastorate there, that congregation contributed $35,000 
to various objects of charity." In 1852-53, $6,000 were contributed to foreign 
missions by the native churches in the Sandwich Islands. 



How A Missionary Socjiety is beoabdbd by Foreign Bankebs. — ^Mr. Ham- 
lin of the Armenian mission wishing to obtain a loan to apply towards the 
erection of a building for the mission, was asked ttw/w per cent, interest if the 
security was the building, but only six per cent, if-*he security was the obliga- 
tion of the American Board. On asking the reason for the diflference, he was 
told, " Earthquakes may injure your stone building, and political changes may 
occur unfavorably to affect its value ; but neither of these can reach the Ameri- 
can Board of Foreign Missions." 



"THEY SHALL PERISH, BUT THOU REMAINEST." HEB. I : II. 

What shall perish ? Plants that ftourish, Like an oft-rei)eated story, 

Blossoms steeped in dewy tears, Shall be buried and forgot. 

Rashes that the brooklets cherish, 

Oaks that brave a thousand yean. What shall perish ? In their courses 

Stars must fadl, and earth decay, 
What shall perish ? Thrones shall crumble — And old ocean's mightiest forces 

Centuries wreck the proudest walls, Like a bubble fleet away. 

And the heedless traveller stumble 

O'er the Casar's ruined halls. All shall perish, but their Maker ; 

While the soul that trusts his grac«, 
What shall perish ? Man, the glory Of His strength shall be partaker, 

Of this sublunary spot, And in heaven behold his face. 



The Prohibitoby, ob Maine Law in Lowell. — The following statements 
are from the most reliable authority. Every case of drunkenness observed by 
a watchman, or any member of the police, is reported at the police-office, 
whether a prosecution is instituted, or not. For the two months ending Sep- 
tember 22, 1851, there were committed .to the watch-house, 110. Reported as 
being seen drunk, but not arrested, 255 ; total, 366. Two months, ending Sep- 
tember 22, 1852, committed to the watch-house, 41. Reported as being drunk, 
but not arrested, 66 ; total, 107. The testimony of the watchmen and other 
police-oflScers is uniform, that there is much less disturbance and rowdyism than 
under the old regime. It is the testimony too of the grocers, that their cus- 
tomers of a large class pay better than formerly. At the time the law went 
into effect, there were 227 shops and places where intoxicating liquor was sold. 
Whatever has been sold since, has been sold secretly and clandestinely. There 
is no place where it is sold publicly or openly. 



FoBMs. — A man may look at a pane of glass, or through it, or both. Let all 
earthly things be unto thee as glass, to see heaven through. Religious ceremo- 
nies should be pure glass, not dyed in the gorgeous crimsons and purple blues 
and greens of the drapery of saints and saintesses. Coleridge. 

To-MOBBow. — The day on which idle men work, and fools give up their folly, 
and sinners repent and believe, and reform their character and life I 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 25 



cen< 
is I 
up 
are 
mei 
of s 
the 
gull 
the 
seei 
far 
grei 
alll 
mei 
side 
the 
clea 
Alp 
erec 
rooi 
con 
tof 
not 
tati 

such scenes, made impressive by the thunder of the ava- 
lanche, one is prepared to take up the sublime song of the British poet : 

Ye ice-falls ! ye that from the mountain's brow, 
Adown enormous ravines slope amain — 
Torrents, methinks, that heard a mighty voice, 
And stopped at once, amidst their maddest plunge ! 



Digitized 



by Google 



26 THE JTAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Motionless torrents ! Silent cfttarscts ! 

Who made you glorious as the gates of heaven, 

Beneath the keen full moon ? Who bade the sun 

Clothe you 'vrith rainbows ? Who with living flowers 

Of loveliest blue, spread garlands at your feet? 
" G-oD !" let the torrents, like a shout of nations, 

Answer; an4 let the ice-plains echo, "God!" 
"God!" sing, ye meadow-streams, with gladsome voice; 

Ye pine-groves, with your soft and soul-like sounds : 

And they too have a voice, yon piles of snow. 

And in their perilous fall, shall thunder, " God !" 

Ye living flowers, that skirt the eternal frost ; 
Ye wild-goats, sporting round thtf eagle's nest ; 
Ye eagles, playmates of the mountain storm ; 
Yh lightnings, the dread arrows of the cloud» — 
Ye signs and wonders of the elements, 
Utter forth, " GroD,"" and fill the hills with praise! 
Thou too, hoar mount, with thy sky-pointing peaks, 
Oft from whose feet the avalanche unheard 
Shoots downward, glittering through the pure serene 
Into the depths of clouds that veil thy breast— 
Thou kingly spirit throned among the hills — 
Thou dread ambassador from earth to heaven — 
Great hierarch, tell thou the silent sky. 
And tell the stars, and tell yon rising sun, 
^^JEarthj with her tkotisa?id voices^ praises God!" 

Decrease of Candidates for the Ministry. — A large ecclesiastical body 
reports the namber of theological students in seminaries, for the last ten years, 
as follows: 1844, 244 j 1845, 267} 1846, 255; 1847, 268; 1848, 246; 1849, 
250; 1850, 241 ; 1851, 254; 1852, 267; 1853, 240. The average for these ten 
years is 251. The number for 1854 is 261. It will be seen, that although the 
number is a little better than last year, there is no decided and substantial 
increase ; that there still continues to be a lamentable lack of service on the 
part of pious youth ; and that the number for 1854 is but up to the average of 
the last ten years. " Pray ye the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth 
laborers into his harvest." 



The Cost of the Ministry. — Some people talk about ministers, and the cost 
of supporting them, paying their house-rent, table expenses, and other items of 
salary. Did such persons ever think that it costs thirty-five million dollars to 
support American lawyers, and that twelve millions of dollars are paid out annu- 
ally to keep our criminals, while only six millions of dollars are spent annually 
to sustain ministers in the United States? These are facts, and statistics will 
show them to be facts. No one thing exerts such a mighty influence In keeping 
this broad Republic from falling to pieces, as the Bible and its ministers. 

Names of Christians. — The Scripture gives four names to Christians, taken 
from the four cardinal graces so essential to man's salvation : saints, for their 
holiness ; believers, for their faith ; brethren, for their love ; disciples, for their 
knowledge. Fuller. 

Repentance. — Sincere repentance is never too late ; but late repentance is 
often insincere. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 27 



Evert one is familiar with the Magnetic Telegraph, by which messages 
are conveyed, literally on the lightning's wing, from one end of the land to 
the other, as soon they will be from continent to continent. The engraving 
gives a view of Mr. Samuel' Finley Breeze Morse, whose name will for ever be 
associated with this wonderful and most useful invention ; and of whom some 
one has well said, that " if Franklin brought the lightning from heaven, 
Morse both tamed it^ and taught it the English language.^^ It is said that 
the various telegraph lines in the United States are over 41,000 miles in extent, 
and cost nearly $7,000,000. Of these lines the Morse telegraph extends 36,972 
miles; House's lines, 3,850 miles; and Bain's, 570 miles: total, 41,392 miles. 



Theological Differences. — Dr. Stuart was rather fond of controversy. A 
favorite topic with him was the true nature of saving faith, on which subject he 
regarded Dr. Chalmers as in error. They met in the streets of Edinburg, and 
entered at once into a'warm controversy ; street after street, and square after 
square were passed, and at length the disputants parted : Dr. Chalmers taking 
Dr. Stuart by the hand and saying, " If you wish to see my views stated clearly 
and distinctly, read a tract called, * Hinderances to Believers of the Gospel.' " 
"Why," said Dr. Stuart, "that is the very tract I published myself." Dr. 
Chalmers used often to describe this scene as a proof that many may think they 
differ when they really agree. 

Education in Boston. — The amount invested in school-houses in Boston is 

$1,500,000. The yearly appropriations for education are $1,200,000, while the 

amount raised for all other city expenses is only $870,000. The amount expended 

' for instruction in the common schools of Massachusetts last year, was $4 50 for 

each child between five and fifteen years of age in the state. 



Digitized 



by Google 



38 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



Thb ArnucnoN op Christ. — The night is far spent, the day is at hand, and 
the nearer we approach to the full enjoyment of blessedness, the more may we 
feel the attraction of Him whom our soul loveth. Many years ago, I read in the 
" Arabian Nights " a story of a mountain of loadstone. Ships at a great distance 
felt its influence. At first their approach to it was scarcely perceptible. There 
was a declining from their course hardly to be noticed, and it excited little 
apprehension. But the attraction gradually became stronger, until the vessel 
was irresistibly impelled onwards with increased Telocity. At last it drew all 
the nails and iron work to itself, and so the ship fell to pieces. " The path of 
the just is as the shining light" When first the believer feels the love of Christ, 
it is like a mustard-seed ; but it increases, and he is constrained by its influence 
to press more earnestly after the full enjoyment. At last the spirit can no 
more be kept at a distance from Him whom it loves. ' It flies to his embrace, 

and the body is dissolved. James Haldane. 

No Man a Loser by oivixo Himself up to God. — ^JEschines said to Socra- 
tes, "Because I have nothing else to give, I will give thee myselfl" " Do so," 
said Socrates, " and I will give thee back again to thyself better than when I 
received thee." So says God, " Give thyself to me, in thy prayers, in thy praises, 
in thy heart, and in all thy actions, and I will give thee back thyself, and my- 
self too : thyself in a holy liberty to walk in the world in thy calling ; myself 
in giving a blessing upon all the works of thy calling, and implanting in thee a 
holy desire to do all things to my glory." 



" so RUN THAT YE MAT OBTAIN." 1 CoR. 9 : 24. 
Onward for the glorioui prize : Linger not, through coward fear ; 

Straight and clear before thine eyes, Though thy way be dark and drear, 

See, thy homeward pathway liei ; Is not Jesus ever near, 

Rest is not beneath the skiei, Still to bless and guide and cheer? 

Onward, onward still Onward, onward still. 



Onward till the dawn of day ; 
Tarry not: around thy way 
Danger luiks, fear to stay ; 
Rouse thee, Christian, watch and pray. 
Onward, onward still. ' 

Stay not for the flowers of earth ; 
What are hours of idle mirth ? 
What are fading treasures worth, 
To a soul of heavenly birth ? 

Onward, onward still. 



In the way the Saviour trod, 
Gladly bearing every load, 
Meekly bending to the rod, 
Walking humbly with thy God, 

Onward, onward still. 

Rest not here, but onward haste. 
Till each danger shall be past ; 
Till each foe is 'neath thee east, 
Till thou gain thy home at last : 

Onward, ohward still. 



Our Trials. — If Grod hath sent thee a cross, take it up and follow him ; use 
it wisely, lest it be unprofitable ; bear it patiently, lest it be intolerable ; behold 
in it God's anger against sin, and his love towutls thee — in punishing the one, 
and chastening the other. If it be light, slight it not ; if heavy, murmur not 
Not to be sensible of a judgment, is the symptom of a hardened heart ; and to 
be displeased at his displeasure, is a sign of a rebellious will. Quarles. 

Mary Lyon. — The last instruction which Mary Lyon ever gave to her scholars 
at Mount Holyoke, contained this characteristic sentence : " There is nothing in 
the universe that I fear, but that I shall not know all my duty, or shall fear to 
do it." To her pupils she was wont to say, " When you choose your field of 
labor, go where no one else, is willing to go." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 29 



The Village Idler. — Every body knows him. He is an easy, harmless, 
lounging, 'good-natured, good-for-nothing creature! He has time, but it is 
wasted ; talents, but they are utterly uncultivated ; opportunity, but it is never 
improved ; life, but he spends it without object, or use, or aim, or end. In youth 
he neglected school, disobeyed his parents, was a stranger to the house of God, 
made no eflTort to prepare for the future ; and now, without character, respecta- 
bility, employment, or a home, he wanders about from the bar-room to the 
street, and from the street to the bar-room, a burden to himself, a disgrace to 
his relations, and to all a warning, that a misspent youth brings after it a use- 
less manhood and a miserable old age ! 



The Missionaby Work. — " In the missionary work," says Montgomery the 
poet, " all names and distinctions of sects are blended till they are lost, like 
the prismatic colors in a ray of pure and perfect ligh|i. They are divided, but 
not discordant : like the same colors displayed and harmonized in the rainbow, 
they form an arch of glory, ascending on the one hand from heaven to earth — 
a bow of promise, a covenant of peace ; a sign that the storm is passing away, and 
the Sun of righteousness with healing in his wings breaking forth on all nations." 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC Jf^j^ 



30 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

One etaxgeucal Idea. — "I never think of my visit to you," writes Andrew 
Fuller to Dr. Chalmers, " but with pleasure. After parting with you, I was 
struck with the importance that may attach to a single mind receiving an 
evangelical impression. I knew Carey the missionary when he made shoes 
for the maintenance of his family, yet even then his mind had received an evan- 
gelical stamp, and his heart burned incessantly with desire for the salvation of 
the heathen; even then he had acquired a considerable acquaintance with 
Ilebrew, Greek, Latin, and French ; and why? Because his mind was filled 
with the idea of being some day a translator of the word of God into the lan- 
guages of those who sit in darkness ; even then he had drawn out a map of the 
world with sheets of paper pasted together with shoemaker's wax, and the monl 
state of every nation depicted with his pen." 



Ancient; Ruins confirmino the Bible.— In excavations recently made in 
Persia, the palace of Shushan and the tomb of Daniel have probably been found ; 
and also the very pavement described in Esther 1 ; 6, " of red, and blue, and 
white, and black marble." On the tomb is the sculptured figure of a man 
bound hand and foot, with a huge lion in the act of springing upon him to 
devour him. No history could speak more graphically ^e story of Daniel in 
the lion's' den. Various other discoveries have also been made, all of which 
bear out the statements of the Old Testament history as to the times of the 
prophet, and the nation of which he speaks. 

THE pilgrim. 

Art thou a pilgrim ? Doit thou trarel straight Ii He thy rword and shield in peril's hour ? 

By Calvary'i cro«i, to find the narrow gate ? Thy rock, thy refuge, thine abiding tower ? 

Is Christ thy hope, thy trust ? yea, day by day If with thy wealth around thee thou ca:^st bend, 

Thy guide, thy staff, thy lantern, and thy way ? And seek with all thy soul the sinner's Friend, 

Canst thou for Him renounce thy worldly pride ? A beggar still at mercy's opened door — 

Is he thy riches ? Is all dross beside ? Then art thou rich indeed; if not, then art thou poor. 



Sanctified CiviLrrr. — " Sanctified civility," said Philip Henry, " is a great 
ornament to Christianity." True piety of necessity involves true politeness. 
They are greatly in error who suppose that Christianity is not favorable to the 
minor graces of character which mark the polite man. It would cultivate those 
feelings, of which the acts required by the rules of politeness are the appropriate 
expression. Politeness requires that we should always consult the feelings of 
others — ^that we should postpone our convenience to theirs. Christianity re- 
quires that we should love our neighbor as ourself. 

No Cross, no Crown.— Coleridge remarked, that the temper of the present 
age inclines it to every enervating indulgence. Men appear to think the 
Christian armor an unnecessary incumbrance ; they have no desire to engage in 
any combat, to undergo any trial : if religion is to be cultivated, it must be as one 
of the fine arts — as an element of belles-lettres ; they forget, or despise the say- 
ing of Bishop Patrick, that there is no passage to celestiftl glory but by some 
cross ; that we must suffer with Christ, as well as confess him, if we would be 
with him in paradise. 

The Land op the Livino. — Said one to an aged friend, "I had a letter from 
a distant correspondent, who inquired if you were in the land of the Jiving." 
" No," replied the venerable man, "but I am going there. This world is alone 
the world of shadow, and the eternal is the only one of living realities." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 31 



The Life-cab is a kind of boat made of copper or iron, and closed by a 
water-tight door, in which persons, three or four at a time, may be conveyed 
from shipwrecked vessels to the shore. A shot about six inches in diameter, 
with a line attached, is fired 'from a mortar over the vessel; then a hawser is • 
drawn to it from the shore ; and then the life-car, as seen in the drawing, is sus- 
pended from the hawser by short chains at its ends, and drawn backward and 
forward, until all are brought safely to the land. The United States govern- 
ment, the Humane Society, and the New York Insurance companies, together 
maintain quite a number of stations along the Atlantic coast, where these life- 
cars, and various other means of saving and relieving the shipwrecked, are con- 
stantly kept in readiness. As one instance of their successful use, when, in 1850, 
the ship Ayrshire, with some two hundred passengers, was stranded on the 
coast of New Jersey, and the sea breaking entirely over her, so that it was im- 
possible for any boat to reach her, a line was thrown in the manner already 
described, across the wreck, and by means of the life-car, every one of the 
passengers, men, women, and children, and even infants in their mother's arms, 
were brought safely through the foaming surges to the shore. 



The Past and Present. — " New England," says Cotton Mather in 1718, 
" is now so far improved as to have the best part of two hundred meeting-houses." 
What would he say now, (1854,) to find, as there are, over 4,700? 



Handsome and Good. — It was a pertinent and forcible saying of the emperor 
Napoleon, that " a handsome woman pleases the eye, but a good woman pleases 
the heart. The one is a jewel, and the other a treasure." 



Digitized 



by Google 



32 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

An Honest Boy. — " That is right, my boy," said a merchant, smiling appror- 
ingly upon the bright face of his little shop-boy, " ' Honesty is the best policy.' " 
He had brought him a dollar that lay among the dust and paper of the sweeps 
ings. " Should you say that?" asked the lad timidly. "Should I say what? 
that * honesty is the best policy?' Why, it 's a time-honored old saying: I don't 
know about the elevating tendency of the thing ; the spirit is rather narrow, I II 
allow." " So grandmother taught me," replied the boy ; " she said we should 
do right because God approved itj without thinking what man would say." 
The merchant turned abruptly towards the desk, and the thoughtful-faced lad 
resumed his duties. 

In the course of the morning a rich and influential citizen called in thei 
While conversing, he said, " I have no children of my own, and I fear to a 
one. My experience is, that a boy of twelve, the age I should prefer, is 1 
his habits, and if they are bad — " "Stop," said the merchant, "do ^ _^_ 
that lad yonder?" "With that noble brow? yes; what of him?" " He^V- 
markable — " " Yes, yes ; that 's what every body tells me who has b<^ Jo 
dispose of; no doubt he '11 do well enough before your face. I 've tried a good 
many, and have been deceived more than once." " I was going to say," replied 
the merchant calmly, " that he is remarkable for principle. Never have I 
known him to deviate from the right, sir, never. He would restore a pin; 
indeed,'^ (the merchant colored,) " he 's a little too honest for my employ. He 
points out flaws in goods, and I cannot teach him prudence in that respect: 

common prudence,i you know, is — is — common — common prudence is " 

The stranger made no assent, and the merchant hurried on to say, " He was a 
parish orphan — taken by an old woman out of pity, when yet a babe. Poverty 
has been his lot: no doubt he has sufifered'from hunger and cold uncounted 
times ; his hands have been frozen, so have his feet. Sir, that boy would have 
died rather than have been dishonest. I can't account for it, upon mj word 
I can't" "Have you any claim upon him?" "Not the least in the world, 
except what common benevolence offers. Indeed, the boy is entirely too good 
for me." " Then I will adopt him ; and if I have found one really honest boy, 
thank God." 

The little fellow rode with the gentleman in his carriage, and was ushered 
into a luxurious home ; and he who once sat shivering in a cold comer, listening 
to the words of a poor old pious mother who had been taught of the Spirit, 
became one of the best and greatest divines that England ever produced. 
" Them that honor me, I will honor." 

THE CROSS. SAFETY. 

I ne'er took up my croii, Safety consists not in escape 

But Christ my Sayiour bore From dangers of a frightful shape ; 

The heaviest end^ and all the weighty An earthquake may be bid to spare 

While leading on before. The man that 'a strangled by a hair. 

Valuable Presents. — Some one speaking of new-year's presents, says, " The 
best thing to give to your enemy is, forgiveness ; to your opponent, tolerance ; 
to a friend, your heart ; to your children, a good example ; to your father, 
deference ; to your mother, love ; to yourself, respect ; to all men, charity ; to 
God, obedience." 

DoDTO AS "We Please. — ^No one has a right to do as he pleases, except when 
he pleases to do right 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 33 



PoMPEn, the buried city, was overwhelmed by a volcano, a. d. 79. For 
eight days and nights, mount Vesuvius poured forth showers of stones and 
ashes, mingled with streams of mud and hot water, completely burying the 
cities of Stabiae, Herculaneum, and Pompeii. In 1755, the disentombment of 
Pompeii began, and has gradually been carried on more and more ever since. 
And now the traveller may wander through the streets, and gaze upon the 
works of art • and shops and houses and temples and courts of justice and 
prisons, once filled with life, but now silent as the tomb itself. Here is seen the 
skeleton of a man grasping bags of money, and with keys in his hands, as if 
struck down in the very act of escaping with these valuables. And here, in this 
city, perished Drusilla, the wife of Felix the Roman governor, spoken of in the 
Acts of the Apostles, and who said to Paul, " Go thy way for this time ; when 
I have a convenient season, I will call for thee F^ The cut which is given above, 
is a view of the temple of Isis, one of the chief buildings of the buried city. 



Newspapers. — It was not till Queen Ann's time, 1709, that London had a 
daily journal. Scotland had a newspaper in 1653 ; Ireland, in 1641 ; Germany, 
in 1612 ; the American colonies, in 1704. Italy had newspapers earlier than 
any other country. 



Digitized 



by Google 



34 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Fifteen touxo Men. — At a respectable boarding-house in New York, a num- 
ber of years ago, were fifteen young men. Six of them uniformly appeared at 
the breakfast-table on Sabbath morning, shaved, dressed, and prepared for pub- 
lic worship, which they attended both forenoon and afternoon. All became 
highly respected and useful citizens. The other nine were ordinarily absent 
from the breakfast-table on Sabbath morning. At noon they appeared at the 
dinner-table shaved and dressed in a decent manner. In the afternoon they 
went out, but not ordinarily to church ; nor were they usually seen in the place 
of worship. One of them is now living, and in a reputable employment ; the 
other eight became openly vicious. All these failed in business, and are now 
dead. Several of them came to an untimely and awfully tragic end. Many a 
man may say, as did a worthy and opulent citizen, " The keeping of the Sab- 
bath saved me." It will, if duly observed, save alL In the language of its 
Author, " They shall ride upon the high places jof the earth." 

Religious Books amoxg the People. — " If," said the late Daniel Webster 
to a friend, " religious books are not widely circulated among the masses in this 
country, and the people do not t>ecome religious, I do not know what is to be- 
come of us as a nation." And the thought is one to cause solenm reflection on 
the part of every patriot and Christian. If truth be not. diffused, error will be ; 
if God and his word are not known and received, the devil and his works will 
gain the ascendency ; if the evangelical volume does not reach every hamlet 
the pages of a corrupt and licentious literature will ; if the power of the gospel 
is not felt through the length and breadth of the land, anarchy and misrule, 
degradation and misery, corruption and darkness, will reign without mitigation 
or end. 



FAITH, hope, and LOVE. 
There are three lessons I would write — Put thou the shadows from thy brow — 

Three words — as with a burning pen, No night but hath its morn. 

In tracings of eternal light, 
Upon the hearts of men. Have Love .' Not lore alone for one. 

But man as man thy brother call ; 
Have Faith! Where'er thy bark is driven — And scatter like the circling sun, . 

The calm's disport, the tempest's mirth — Thy charities on all. 

Know this, God rules the hosts of heaven. 
The inhabitants of earth. Thus grave these lessons on thy soul — 

Faith, Hope, and Love — and thou shalt find 
Have Hope ! Though clouds environ now, Strength, when life's surges wildest roll — 

Aud gladness hides her face with scorn, Light, when thou else wert blind. 



Religion and Republics. — ^Independent of its connection with human des- 
tiny hereafter, I believe the fate of a republican government is indissolubly bound 
up with the fate of the Christian religion, and that a people who reject its only 
faith will find themselves the slaves of their own evil passions or of arbitrary 
power. Gen. Cass, in U. S. Senate. 

Benevolence. — ^Says the eminent and excellent Baxter, alluding to his chari- 
ties, " This truth I will speak for the encouragement of the charitable. What 
money I have by me now, I obtained almost entirely at the time when I gave 
away the most ; and since I have had less opportunity of giving, I have had less 

increase." 



Duty.— What is duty ? The demands of to-day. 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 35 



The Death of Coliony. — Gaspard de Coligny, Admiral of France, became, 
on the death of Henry 11., the chief of the Protestant party, and its most effi- 
cient leader against the Guises. On the temporary peace of 157 1, he was received 
at court with every appearance of cordiality. But in the horrible massacre of 
St. Bartholomew, in 1572, he was among the victims of popish rage and intoler- 
ance. Still suffering from a wound, the noble Coligny, reposing on the faith 
of the king, was calmly sleeping in his apartment, when the door was burst 
open, and an attendant rushing in, said, " My lord, God calls us to himself ^^ — 
a noble expression, and worthy of a follower of Coligny. " Save yourselves, my 
friends," said the admiral to his attendants ; " all is over with me. I have long 
been ready to die." ' He was immediately dispatched by his popish assassins ; 
his body thrown into the street, to be dragged about in insult by his murderers ; 
while his head was ordered, by the infamous Catharine de Medici, to be sent as a 
present to the Pope, to satisfy him that the man he so feared and hated was no 
more ! Such are the tender mercies of Popery. 



Providence. — "I could write down twenty cases," says a pious man, " when 
1 wished God had done otherwise than he did f but which I now see, had I had 
my own will, would have led to extensive mischief." 



Digitized 



by Google 



36 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

The Soourgb op War. — " When we speak of a general war," said Mr. Glad- 
stone lately, in reference to. the Eastern question, <* we do not speak of a resd 
progress on the road to freedom, of real progress in the advancement of human 
intelligence. These may sometimes be the intentions; rarely I fear are they the 
results of war. When we speak of a general war, we mean the face of nature 
stained with human gore — ^we mean the bread taken out of the mouths of mill- 
ions — ^we mean taxation indefinitely increased, and tradd'and industry wo- 
fully diminished — ^we mean heavy burdens entailed upon our latest posterity— 
we mean that demoralization is let loose, families are broken up, and lust stalks 
unbridled in every country which is visited by the calamity of war. If that 
be a true description of war, is it not also true that it is the absolute duty of 
the government to exercise for themselves that self-command which they recom- 
mend to others, and that they should labor to the uttermost for the adoption 
of every honest and honorable expedient which may be the means of averting 
that frightful scourge." 

The Armt — what Leads Men to it. — ^A surgeon in the United States army 
recently desired to know the most common cause of enlistments. By permis- 
sion of the captain of a company containing fifty-five, in a pledge never to dis- 
close the name of any officer or private, the true history was obtained of every 
man. On investigation it appeared that nine-tenths enlisted on account of 
female difficulty ; thirteen of them had changed their names, and forty-three 
were either drunk, or partially ^, at the time of their enlistment Most of them 
were men of considerable talents and learning, and about one-third had once 
been in elevated stations in life. Four of them had been lawyers, three doctors, 
and two ministers. 



wake with nature. 



Would you knowa pure delight ? Would you free yourself from care ? 

Would you feast the sense of sight ? Would you find a time for prayer ? 

Would you breathe fresli, balmy air ? Would you take your cross each day T 

Would you gushing music hear ? Would you walk in " wisdom's way ?" 

Would you feel a thrill of life. Would yon feel God's grace within, 

Full of peace, with rapture rife ? Helping you to conquer sin ? 

Rouseyou with the rising day, Rise, and at the dawn of day, 

View calm nature's grand display. Take an hour, read, sing, and pray. 



The Bright Side. — ^Dr. Johnson used to say that a habit of looking at the 
best side of every event, is better than a thousand pounds a year. Bishop Hall 
quaintly remarks, " For every bad there might be a worse, and when a man 
breaks his leg, let him be thankful that it was not his neck." When Fenelon's 
library was on fire, " God be praised," he exclaimed, " that it was not the dwell- 
jn^pjoisome poor man." This is the true spirit of cheerfulness and submission—- 
one of the Biost beautiful traits that can possess the human heart Resolve to 
see this world on the sunny side, and you have almost won the battle of life at 
the outset. 

The Pilgrim Fathers and the Sabbath. — Among the reasons assigned by 
the pilgrim fathers of New England for leaving Leyden for this country, was 
" their grief at the profanation of the Sabbath," and the conviction they 
entertained, " how little good they did, or were like to do there, in reforming 
*he Sabbath." 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 37 

God the Biographer. — When but lately the statesman of Marshfield died, 
the nation rung with the question, " Who shall be his biographer ; who shall 
delineate for future ages the life, and the life-work of the great * Defender of 
the Constitution,^ who has notched in such deep and broad lines on the common- 
wealth the impress of his mighty intellect?" "Who shall be the biographer of 
such an intellect, of such a man ?- ' 

The summer sun and shadows had fallen but a few short weeks upon the grave 
at Marshfield, when, at a little distance from his resting-place, there was dying 
a poor widow, obscure, retired, unknown to the world. She had long been "in 
Christ ;" her life had been devoted to Him; like His, it was a life of prayer; 
like Him, she went about doing good ; many souls she had pointed to the cross ; 
and mahy in answer to her prayers had been " plucked as brands from the burn- 
ing." For years she had seemed a white-haired pilgrim almost at the end of her 
course, venerable and venerated, waiting in patience as at the very threshold of 
heaven. She died. There were no "swellings in Jordan" to her; through 
grace it had become but as a little stream, passed as in a moment as she entered 
the mansions of her Father's house. " DuSt to dust," a little company commit- 
ted her to the grave, where no monument is reared, and only the spring writes 
her epitaph in the flowers that bloom over her silent sleep. 

By the world she is forgotten ; her course was too lowly, her sphere too humble 
to attract its notice. Her " life " was not asked by the nation. But she had a 
biographer; not the earthly scholar, or accomplished eulogist, but He who 
writes the record of all his children in the "Book. of Life," in that world-biogra- 
phy that is to be unclasped and read to the assembled universe at the final day. 
Remember, that the same biographer is yours. Let it cheer you when ready 
to faint, or weary in well-doing, or sad and depressed under the neglect or scorn 
of the world. Every day bear in mind that though your " life " may never be 
written on earth or in time, yet you have a biographer in heaven. God is your 
biographer! Let this thought pondered and prayed over, restrain you from sin, 
lead you to purity of heart and life, and cheer and animate you in every unob^ 
trusive work for " the Master." Remember, that by every thought and word and 
deed, you are forming the materials of this biography by the all-seeing, heart- 
searcWng One who is -writing it. And as God is writing your biography, see 
that through his grace you so live that its pages shall not fill you with terror, 
but rather with joy, as they are unfolded at the last gi-eat day. 

♦ AFFLICTION. 

" There is no God," the foolish saith, Eyes which the preacher could not school, 

But none, " There is no sorrow," By way-side graves are raised j 

And nature oft the cry of faith And lips cry, " God be pitiful," 

In bitter need will borrow. That ne'er said, " God be praised." 

The Inconsistency of Scepticism. — The old deists used to say that prophecy 
was so obseurcj that they could not understand the beginning or end of it. 
Modem deists say it is so plain, that it must have been written after the events 
took place. How inconsistent these philosophical sceptics, these unthinking 
free-thinkers. 



Not Weary in WELL-DOixa. — A commercial gentleman, now very wealthy, 
in prosecuting his business, called on one house every week for seven years, 
soliciting an order for goods, before he succeeded. Let not the children of this 
world be wiser in their generation than the children of light 



Digitized 



by Google 



38 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Cabk por thb Soum op Others. — If I ask, as God did of one of old, " Where 
is thy brother?" it is not sufQcient that you answer, " Every man's creed is hi» 
own concern ; I have no right to interfere with him ; he must take his own way 
to heaven ; his religion is no business of mine." Suppose Grod had so felt toward 
you, or Paul had acted on this principle to the GentQes, or our forefathers and 
parents to us, all would have been in the deep darkness of spiritual death. 

Man's religion is first his own business, but never exclusively his own. It is 
like his charity ; to begin at home, but never to stop there. The first question 
every one of us should ask, is, " What must / do to be saved ?" but the very 
next is, *• What must I do that my neighbor may be saved?" 

If a man, any man, has lost his way, is it no business of yoors to point him 
to it ? If he is going blindfold towards a precipice, is it no business of yours to 
tell him of the rocks on which he will soon be dashed in pieces, if he docs not 
turn back from his course ? And if he i8>out of the way to heaven, is it no busi- 
ness of yours to point him to the true way, when you know it, and hope you 
yourself are in it ? Not so thought Harlan Page, or Payson, or Brainerd, or 
Martyn, or Edwards, or the apostles. * When Andrew was converted, as the very 
next thing he goeth and *^ findeth his own brother Simon, and bringeth him to 
Jesus ;" and to every true disciple, the language of Christ is, as to the one he 
had healed of old, '^Go home to thy friends, and tell them how great things the 
Lord hath done for thee f" say, " Come thou with us, and we will do thee good, 
for the Lord hath spoken good concerning Israel." God's express plan for evan- 
gelizing mankind, is to evangelize the individual, and then to make him the 
vehicle of light and love, till all within the reach of his influence are enlighten- 
ed and sanctified. It is not his will that you should go alone to heaven. Shall 
it not be your prayer and effort that you may take many with you ? 

MORNING PRAISE. 
"My voice SHALT TUOU HEAR IN THE MORNING." PSALM 5:3. 

Praise to our Father's love, "With each unfolding leaf, 

"With the first dawning light, ' That drank the genial shower, 

Who watchful drew his angel guard "With every bird that waking sings 

Around us through the night ; Amid its nested bower, 

And while so many die, May our heart-prompted strain 

Or lost in anguish, weep, Harmoniously ascend. 

Or on the couch of suffering toss, Until, through Christ's dear love, we gain 

Gave us this blessed sleep. The day that knows no end. 

Reproof from Slaves. — ^Five thousand slaves who are professing Christians 
in the city of Charleston, South Carolina, have contributed the last year to benev- 
olent objects $15,000, it being on an average three dollars each. Christians 
who are free, what think you of this ? Shall not the example rouse you to do 
more for Him, who has given you the blessings of liberty? 

Doing Good. — "I would not crawl upon the earth," said Pope to Swift, 
'• without doing a little good j I will enjoy the pleasure of giving what I give 
by giving it alive, and seeing others enjoy it. When I die, I should be ashamed 
to leave enough for a monument, if there was a friend in need above ground." 



A Hint for Housekeepers. — A few drops of carbonate of ammonia in a 
small quantity of warm rain-water, will prove a safe and easy anti-acid, etc., 
and will change, if carefully applied, discolored spots upon carpets, and indeed 
all spots, whether produced by acids or alkalies. If a carpet is iigorcd by 
whitewash, this will immediately restore it 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 39 

Thb Deist and the Bible. — A society of gentlemen, most of whom had 
Djoycd a liberal education, and were persona of polished manners, but had 
inhapplly imbibed inlidel principles, used to assemble at each other's houses, 
or the purpose of ridiculing the Scriptures, and of hardening one another in 
heir unbelief. At last, they unanimously formed a resolution solemnly to burn 
he Bible, and so to be troubled no more with a book which was so hostile to 
heir principles, and disquieting to their consciences. The day fixed upon 
irivcd ; a large fire was prepared, a Bible was laid on the table, and a flowing 
•owl ready to drink its dirge. For the execution of their plan, they fixed upon 
. young gentleman of high birth, brilliant vivacity, and elegance of manners, 
le undertook the task, and after a few enlivening glasses, amidst the applause 
if his jovial compeers, he approached the table, took up the Bible, and was 
ralklng leisurely forward to put it into the fire ; but happening to give it a 
oojc, he was seized with trembling ; paleness overspread his countenance, and 
10 seemed convulsed. He returned to the table, and laying down the Bible, 
a'^d, with a strong asseveration, " We will not bum that book till we get a 
fetter.'^ Soon after this, the same gay and lively young gentleman died, and 
t is believed, was led to true repentance, deriving unshaken hopes of forgive- 
less and of future blessedness from that book which he was once going to burn, 
le found it, indeed, the best book not only for a living, but a dying hour. 

" No oxE^s ENEMY BUT HIS OWN," is, generally, the enemy of every body 
le has any thing to do with. He squanders all his own property ; calls on his 
ricnds for loans, bonds, bail, or securities ; involves his nearest relatives ; leaves 
lis wife a beggar ; quarters his orphan children on the public ; and after having 
ndulged himself to the last dollar, entails a life of dependence and poverty on 
lis family, and too often leaves behind him that ill understood reputation of 
larmless folly, which is more injurious to society than some positive crimes. 
Selfishness, profligacy, intemperance, dishonesty, the utter waste of life, the 
atter neglect of all relative and social duties, an evil example, and a worthless 
character, are more or less the invariable attributes of him who is " no one^s 
memy but his own.^^ 

Spibitual and Carnai^ Prayers. — Children shoot arrows on purpose to lose 
Lbem, and never so much as look where they light ; but men, when they shoot, 
lim at the mark, and go after the arrow, to see how near it falls. So wicked, 
;arAal men, when they have said, not made, their prayei*s to Almighty God, 
think no more of them ; but God's children, when they, upon the bended knees 
5f their souls, dart out their prayers, when they pour out their requests unto 
tiim, look after their prayers, eye them up into heaven, observe how God enter- 
tains them, and wait for a happy return at his good will and pleasure. 

Such is War. — ^When the French troops lately embarked at Toulon for Con- 
stantinople, an old man who witnessed their departure, exclaimed in a mournful 
roice, " There goes my only childy to fight for a catise he does not understand ^ 
and against men with whom he never had a difference f'^ To how many wars 
which history records, and in which millions have fallen, will the same remark 

fippiy- 

Bathino. — When a man takes a full morning bath, nine million mouths are 
open to thank him ; for every pore of his skin has separate cause to be grateful 
for his daily ablution. 



Digitized 



by Google 



40 THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Spiritcal Alms. — ^When earthly wants and sorrows appeal, you are not 
regardless of their call. The poor shivering, suflTering child of want, and it may 
be of sin, is not sent away shivering, suflfering, unrelieved by your hand. Mncl] 
might be said of the importance of such alms, and in rebuke of that cold, calcu- 
lating caution or selfishness that will not relieve the misery personified before 
it But there \a another and even a higher alms — alms to those who are noi 
esteemed "poor," to those who make no "cry," who plead no "wants," but -who, 
though they may be "rich in this world," are yet "poor towards God." 

In these spiritual alms are you abundant, diligent, faithful? To high or 
low, rich or poor, neighbors, relatives, friends, or strangers, are you ever ready, 
as God may give opportunity, to dispense those alms which money cannot buy 1 
The tract, the evangelical book, the Bible, the word of Christian exhortation and 
kindness, the word for Christ and the cross, and for the soul, by these you may 
do good to all about you, and perhaps be the means of salvation to those who 
otherwise would peridi; and then by prayer, faithful, earnest, importunate 
prayer, you may bring down God's blessing upon your efforts, the seal of the 
Holy Spirit upon your labors. 

Be not weary in this work. Live near to the throne yourself, and thus let 
your life and conversation be fhigrant of the spirit of heaven ; and in that spirit 
diligently sow the seed, and water it with your tears, and follow it with your 
prayers. Let no one of your acquaintance or friends be able to say, "No man 
cares for my soul." Neglect not the giving of worldly alms; but above all 
things, neglect not the giving of this spiritual alms, wherever God in his prov- 
idence shall open the way. So shall your life be like that of Jesus, who went 
about doing good. So shall you point many a perishing wanderer to him. So 
shall you have many souls as the seal of your faithfulness, and crown of your 
rejoicing in the final day. 



SmcEKiTY NO Test op Truth. — Not unfrequently is it said, " No matter what 
a man believes, if he is only sincere." But there is sincerity in error, in delu^ 
sion, in mistake, as well as in truth. The infant may sincerely believe that the 
candle is harmless, but this will not keep it from burning him. Your neighbor 
may sincerely believe he is taking what will do him good, when by mistake he 
is drinking the poison. Sincerity neither consecrates sin nor canonizes error, 
nor saves from the suffering that attends both. 



Invbntions. — The following will be found useful by way of reference : Glass 
windows were first used in 1180 ; chimneys in houses, 1236 ; lead pipes for con* 
veying water, 1252 ; tallow candles for lights, 1290 ; spectacles invented by an 
Italian, 1299 ; paper first made from linen, 1302 ; woollen cloth first made in 
England, 1331 ; art of painting in oil colors, 1410 ; printing invented, 1440 ; 
watches made in Germany, 1477 ; variation of compass first noticed, 1540 ; pins 
first used in England, 1543 ; circulation of human blood first discovered by Har- 
vey, 1619 } first newspaper published, 1630 ; first steam-engine invented, 1649 ; 
first fire-engine invented, 1663 ; first cotton planted in the United States, 1769 ; 
steam-engine improved by Watt, 1767; steam cotton-mill erected, 1783; ste- 
reotype printing invented in Scotland, 1785 ; animal magnetism discovered by * 
Mesmer, 1788 ; Sabbath-school established in Yorkshire, England, 1789 ; elec- 
tro-magnetic telegraph by Morse, invented 1832 ; daguerreotype process, in- 
vented 1839. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 



41 



i PPESISEHTS AND VICE-PRESIDENTS OF THE ITNITED STATES, FROM THE ADOPTION 
OF THE CONSTITUTION TO THE PRESENT TIME. 



;«.. 


PRESIDENTS, 


Residence. 


BORN. 


|| 


k o 

^1 


DIED. 


4 


VICE-PRESIDETS. 


3 6 
*c 8 


' 1 

t 2 
3 
4 


George Washington 
George Washington 

John Adams 

Thomas Jefferson- - 


Virginia - 


173-2 


57 


8 


Dec. 14, 1799 


68 


John Adams 

John Adams 

Thomas Jefferson - 

Aaron Burr 

George Clinton- -- 
George Clintont- 
EldndgeGerryt- 
Dan'lD. Tompkins 
Dan'l D.Tompkins 
John C. Calhoun - 
John C. Calhoun 
M. Van Buren --- 
R. M. Johnson --- 
John Tyler 


17.-0 
1793 
1797 
IBOl 
1805 
1809 
1*^13 


Mass.-..- 

Virginia - 


1735 
1743 


62 

58 


4 

8 


July 4,1826 
July 4,1820 


91 

83 


6 

7 


James Madison 


Virginia - 


1751 


58 


8 


June 28, 1830 


85 


8 
9 


James Monroe 


Virginia 


1758 


53 


8 


July 4,1831 


72 


1817 
1821 


10 
11 
12 


John Q.. Adams - - - 
Andrew Jackson- - - 


Mass.---- 
Tennessee 


1767 
1767 


58 
62 


4 

8 


Feb. 23, lS4b 
June 8,1845 


80 

78 


1825 
1829 
1833 


13' 
■ 14 


Martin Van Buren 
Wm. H. Harrison* 

John Tyler 

James K. Polk --- 
Zachary Taylor* - - 
Millard Fillmore - - 
Franklin Pierce - - - 


New York 

Ohio 

Virginia - 
Tennessee 
Louisiana 
New York 
N. Ham'e 


1782 
1773 

1700 
1795 
1784 
1800 


55 

68 
51 
49 
65 
50 


4 
4 

t 

3 


AprU 4, 1841 


68' 


1837 
1841 

1841 


15 
16 


June 15, 1849 
July 9, 1850 


54 
66 


George M.Dallas- 
Millard Fillmore- - 


1845 
1849 
1850 
1853 


17 






William R. Kingt 
















* Died in ofEce, and succeeded by the Vice-President. 



t Died in office. 



Government op the United States. — The seventeenth Presidential term of four years 
i)egan on the 4th of March, 1853, and will expire on the 3d of March, 1857. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE New Hampshire- -President Salary $25,000 

DAVID R. ATCHISON Missouri Vice-President, pro tern " 

JVniAjUiM. L. MARCY New York Secretary of State " 

,^AMES GUTHRIE Kentucky Secretary of the Treasury " 

JEFFERSON DAVIS Mississippi Secretary of War " 

JAME S C . DOBBIN North Carolina - - - Secretary of the Navy - - " 

ROBERT M'CLELLAND Michigan Secretary of the Interior " 

^AME S CAMPBELL Pennsylvania Postmaster-General " 

CALEB GUSHING Massachusetts Attorney-General " 



8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 

; ■ Congress — The Senate is composed of two members elected by the legislature of each 
r «tate for the term of six years. Of course the number of Senators is now sixty-two. The 
,Tice-President of the United States is President of the Senate. In his absence, a President 
^ro tempore is chosen by the Senate. 

The House of Representatives is composed of representatives from each state, in the 
ratio of one to every 70,680 of the population. The present number of members is two hun- 
dred and thirty-four ; and there are five delegates, one each from Oregon, Minnesota, Utah, 
L ^cw Mexico, and Washington territories, who have a right to speak, but not to vote. The 
, iiompensation of the members is $8, and that of the Speaker $16 per day during the ses- 
t iion, and $8 for every twenty miles' travel in going and returning. 



SiTPREME Couet. — Chief Justice, Roger B. Taney of Maryland, salary $5,000. Associate 
' Justices, John McLean, Ohio ; James M. Wajme, Greorgia ; John Catron, Tennessee ; Peter 
^ T. Daniel, Virginia ; Samuel Nelson, New York; Robert C. Grier, Pennsylvania; Benjamin 
J 'R. Curtis, Mass. ; John A. Campbell, Alabama : salary $4,500. This Court is held in Wash- 
V ington, and has but one session annually, commencing on the first Monday in December. 

'"^^ CiBcrnT Courts — The United States are divided into nine judicial circuits, in each of 
i' ^ which a Circuit Court is held at least twice a year for each state within the circuit, by a Justice 

.o^of the Supreme Court, and the District Judge of the state or district in which the court sits. 

..| 

District Courts. — The United States are also divided into forty-six districts, in which 
^District Courts are held by thirty-six district judges. 



Digitized 



by Google 



42 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



iTTBRCoxTBas iTiTH FoRKiGN Natioxs. — The pay of Envoys Extraordinary and Ministers 
Plenipotentia'y, is $9,000 per annum as salary, in addition to $9,000 as outfit The pay of 
Charg^es d'AlTaires is $4,500 per annum; of Secretaries of Legation, $2,000; of Ministers 
Resident, $0,000. The United States are represented by Ministers Plenipotentiary at the 
courts of Great Britain, France, Russia, Prussia, Spain, Mexico, Brazil, (^hili, Peru, and 
Central America; and by Charges d'Affaires at the courts of most of the other forei^Ti 
powers with which this country is connected by commercial intercourse. 

States Govkrmmsnt, for the year ending 



Revexub and Expsnditubss of United 
June 30, 1853. 

RECEIPTS. 

From customs $58,931,865 

Fromlands 1,007,084 

Miscellaneous sources 738,02^3 



Total receipts $01,337,574 

Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1852 - - 14,632,136 



Total for service 75,909,710 



EXPENDITURES. 

CiYilList $4,784,396 

Foreign intercourse 599,030 

Miscellaneous 11,792,009 

Department of Interior 5,529,535 

" of War 9,947,-.H)0 

" of Nary 10,891,639 

Public Debt 10,482,-555 

Total expenditures $5i,020,ai3 

Balance in Treasury, July 1, 1853- -21,912^892 



Exports and Imports for the year ending June 30, 1853. 

IMPORTS. 

Including Specie $267,978,647 



Foreign $13,096,213 

Domestic 189,869,10! 

Specie 27,4fc6,fc75 

Total $2;iU,452,*J50 



British Revenue and Expenditure, for the year ending January 5, 1853. — Receipts, 
$266,050,355; expenditures, $253,8G.>,555. 

United States Tonnage for the present year, 4,407,010 tons, against 4,138,141 in 1852.] 

Various Exports. — Cotton exported in 1853,' 1,111,570,370 lbs., valued at $109,456,- 
404; tobacco, 159,8-53 hogsheads, value, $11,319,319; rice, 67,707 tierces, value, $1,607^ 
658; imports reexported, $17,034,553; consumed, and on hand, $250,944,094. 

United States Debt, December 5, 1853, $56,486,708. 

Debt of Great Britain, January 5, 1S52, both funded and unfunded, $3,914,346,910. 

United States Mint and Branches.— The total coinage of the United States mint sad 
its branches from its commencement till the end of 1852, was as follows: gold in valut 
$236,791,615; silver, $79,531,516; copper, $1,446,447; whole number of pieces, 432,-2fri,- 
106 ; total value, $316,769,609. And of this amount the total coinage for 1852, was as 
follows : 



Denominations. 

GOLD. 

Double Eagles • - 

Eagles 

Half-Eagles 

Quajter-Eagles - 
Dollars 



Pieces. Value. 

2,243,026" $14,860,520 00 

281,106 2,811,000 00 

737,927 3,089,035 00 

1,313,531 3,283,827 50 

2,201,145 2,201,145 00 



Total gold - 
copper. 
Cents 5,063,094 



6,770,735 $50,840,187 50 
50,030 94 



Gold and Copper 
Coins 11,839,829 $50,890,818 44 



Dcnominatioos. Pieces. Valoe. 
SILVER. 

Dollars 1,000 1,000 (» 

Half-DoUars JJ21 ,130 110,565 « 

Quarter- Dollars - - - - 273,060 68,265 « 

Dimes 1,965,500 196,550 

Half-Dimes 18,663,500 aM,175 



Total 21,124,190 $1,309,555 



Total coinage -- 32,964,019 $58,200,37:3 ^ 



United States Post-Office, for the year endmg June 30, 1853. — Number of poi 

offices, 22.3-20; established within the year, 1,898; mail-routes, 6,692; aggregate leiigd 

■^743 miles; annual transportation, 61,892,542 miles; of which on raUroads, 12,986,7( 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHEISTIAK ALMANAC. 



43 



milcH; in steam-boats, 6,685,065 miles; in coaches, 21,330,326 miles; and in modes not 
ipecified, 20,890,446 miles: expenditures of the department, $7,982,736; gross revenue, 
$•3,940,724; leaving a delicienry of $2,042,031. The receipts of the year for letter postage 
were, $4,473,227 ; from newspapers and pamphlets, $611,333. 

Post-Ofpice in Gtreat Britain. — The gross receipts of the British post-office for the 
fear ending January 5, 1S53, were $12,171,030; cost of management, $'3,719,535; net 
revenue, 5,45J,095: the estimated total number of letters in 1S53 was, 403,008,780; num- 
ber of money-orders, (in 1S52,) 4,947,825; amount of them, $47,191,385. 

"What makes the Difference between the United States post-office, and that of Great 
Britain? — Ours is an expense, theirs a source of revenue; ours sends probably not a quar- 
ter the number of letters sent by theirs; ours transmits no money for the accommodation of 
the people, theirs sends over $47,000,000 from one part of the land to another, safely, and 
it but a trifling expense, and for the accommodation of all. What makes the difference? 
[s it not defective management in our post-office department, and good management in 
theirs? "What is the remedy for us? Abolish the franking privilege; make all postage 
prepaid ; reduce all letter-postage to two cents ; and adopt the money-order system. Let 
the people think of it, and look to it 

Public Lands — ^In the year ending June 30, 1853, of public lands sold, 1,083,495 acres; 
located under military bounty land warrants, 6,142,360; located under other certificates, 
M37; ceded to the various states as swamp lands, 16,684,253; selected for railro:vd and 
>ther objects, under acts of Congress, 1,427.457 ; total disposed of, 25,346,992 acres, which 
s 12,231,818 acres more than in the year preceding. The quantity of public land now 
iwned by the United States, is 1,391,480,320 acres. The amount that has at different 
imes been donated by Congress for various purposes, up to February 13, 1854, is as follows: 

STATES. 



Acres. 

)hio 3,{-3V'5.'52 

ndiana 4,821 ,H24 

Uinois 15,111,734 

a issouri S.OrfO.GW? 

Alabama 2,609,506 

llississippi 4,118,191 

jouisiana 11,630,482 



Acres. 

Michigan «• - -1 0,622,965 

Arkansas 14.153,076 

Florida 3,916,022 

Iowa 6,999,980 

Wisconsin 5,673,336 

California 7,271,804 

Aflmnesota 5,534,741 



Acres. 

Orftgon 12.18^J,987 * 

x\ew Mexico 7,49=3,1 20 

Utah 6,681,707 

Connecticut 23,040 

Tennessee 3,553,724 

Kentucky 22,400 

Total 134,704,392 



OBJECTS. 

'or Universities 4,065.704 f Swamp-lands 35,799,253 { Canals and rivers 5,a36,873 

ntcr. Improvements 4.669.440 Mihtarv services 25,9(KI.257 1 Miscellaneous 1,052,170 

Ichool purposes 48,900,535 1 RaUroada 8,38:3;i51| ^^^^ 134 704.392 

It is estimated that under the present system, if continued, the government has derived, 
jad tinll derive from its public lands, the sum of $439,570,570. 



Wealth of the States — The population of the United 
nd the aggregate personal and real property is estimated 
Qg are the estimates : 



States is set down at 25,647,000, 
»t $8,-295,560,000. ThefoUow- 



Jew York $1 

•ennaylvania - 

>hio 

'"iri^inia 

ndiana 

'enne^Jiee 

Kentucky • 

ifaKgachusetts 



reorgia 

"Torth Carolina- - 
Uinois 



Alabama $S 

Mississippi i 

South Carolina i 

Missouri S 

Maine S 

Maryland 1 

Louisiana 1 

New Jersey 1 

Michigan 1 

Connecticut 1 

Vermont 1 



OO New Hampshire --$120,000,000 

[JO Arkansas 6<i,000,0()0 

IK) Texas 56.0(K),000 

W Iowa 52,000,000 

IK) Rhode Island 52,0(X),000 

[K) Wisconsin 3G,0(X),000 

[X) Delaware 32,000,000 

M) ' Florida 30,0(H).0<)0 

[K)' District of Columbia l8,(K)0,(MH) 

K) Oregon 8,000,000 

30| 



Militia in the United States. — The number of militia in the United States, accord- 
ng to a document lately furnished to Congress, is as follows: Maine, 44,665; New Hamp- 
hire, 27,667; Massachusetts, 101,781; Vermont, 23,915; Rhode Island, 13,653; Connec- 
icut, 57,719; New York, 201,452; New Jersey, 39,171; Pennsylvania, 276,070; Dela- 
rare, 9,220; Maryland, 46,864; Virginia, 124,002; North Carolina, 79,448; South Caro. 



Digitized by 



L^oogle 



44 THE FAMILY CHEISTIAN ALMANAC. 

Una, 55,209; Georgia, 57,312; Alabama, 44,331; Louisiana, 43,823; Mississippi, 36,081; 
Tennessee, 71,252; Kentucky, 88,629; Ohio, 176,455; Indiana, 53,913; Illinois, 83,134; 
Missouri, 61,000; Arkansas, 17,137; Michigan, 60,017; Florida, 12,122; Texas, 19,776; 
Wisconsin, 32,203; District of Columbia, 1,248. Total of militia in the United States, 
1,959,782, or probably, with full returns from all the states, two millions. 

Armt of the Unitkd States. — The total authorized strength of the United Statei 
army, is 13,821, including officers and men; the actual strength only 10,417. 

Railroads in the United States — The total length of railroads completed and in 
use on the first of January, 1854, is estimated at 15,490 miles ; and that in various stages 
of progress, and in the hands of engineers, at nearly 25,000 miles more, making in all a 
total of some 40,000 miles constructed, or to be constructed within a few years. 

Railroads in Great Britain — According to official returns, the total length of rail- 
roads open and in use in Great Britain on June 30, 1S52, was 6,S90 miles ; nimiber ol 
passengers conveyed in the six months preceding, 39,249,605; number of miles travelled 
by trains, 28,422,872. 

Religious Denominations in the United States. — According to the census of 185Q, 
there were eighteen different religious denominations in the United States, besides several 
minor sects. These minor sects have 325 places of worship; accommodations for 115,347 
worshippers ; and church property of the value of $741,980. The other eighteen denomina- 
tions have 35,686 places of worship; acconunodations for 13,734,549 worshippers; and 
church property of the value of $85,674,659. 

Religious Denominations in Great Britain. — According to parliamentary returns, 
from the census of 1851, it appears that there are in England and Wales, thirty five dii^ 
ferent religious denominations or sects, of which twenty-seven are native, and nim 
t foreign. These various denominations have 34,467 places for worship; and on Sunday, 
March 10, 1851, at the most numerously attended service, there were present of the church 
of England, 2,971,258 persons; of Protestant Dissenters, 3 110,782; of Roman-catholicj, 
249,389; and of other bodies, 24,793; making a total of 6,356,222 persons, out of 17,927^ 
609, (the entire population of England and Wales,) attending religious service at the same 
time. And includQng both parts of the day, it is estimated that 7,261,032 persons attended 
some religious service on that Sunday, leaving 10,666,577 persons not attending any re- 
ligious service on that day. 

Occupations of People in the United States and Great Britain. — The number of 
persons in the United States engaged in conunerce, trade, and manufactures, is 1,596,265; 
agriculture, 2,400,583; government offices, 24,966. In Great Britain, engaged in com- 
merce, trade, and manufactures, 3,092,787; agriculture, 1,490,785; government offices, 16,865. 

Population, Dwellings, and Families in different Countries.— 



Pi>r.ulation. Dwellings. Families. 

United States -19,9H7,569 3,362,142 3,508,045 

Great Britain- 20,7a3.552 3,647,611 4,313,388 

Ireland 6,515,794 1,047,735 not given. 



Population. Dwellings. Funilia 

Austria 36,514,397 not given. 8,218,331 

Prussia 16,331,187 1,M5,174 3,180,:tB 



Quantity of Public Ijand bold, ajco the Auquht paid for rr, in each Year from 1833 
to 1832, inclusive. 
Tesn. Acres. Dollars. Yean. Aeres. Dirilan. 

1833 3,856,227.56 4,972,284 84 1844 1,754,763.13 2,207,67801 

1834 4,658,218.71 6,099,981 04 1845 1,843,527.05 2,470,30311 

1835 12,564,478.85 15.999,804 11 1816 -• 2,263,730.81 2,904,637 ST 

1836 20,074,870.92 25;i67,8a3 061847 2,521,305.50 3,296,404* 

1837 6,601,103.12 7,007,523 04 1848 1,887,553.04 2.021.615 38 

1838 3,414,907.42 4,305,564 64ll849 1^29,902.77 1,756,890 « 

1389 4,976,382.87 6,464,556 79 1850* 769,364.48 996,841 « 

1840 2,236,889.74 2,789,637 53 1851 1 1,846,847.49 2,390,947 « 

1841 1,164,796.11 1,463,364 06 1852t 1,553,071.00 1,975,638 5* 

1842 1,129,217.58 1 417,972 06. ^J ! 

1843 1,605,264.06 2,016,044 30| Total 77,052,422.24 98,407,539 « 

• From January 1st to June 30th. t For year ending June 30th. 

Digitized by LjOOQIC 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



45 



^ BUMARKABIiE 



JANUAR-yf 

Fnion of Great Britain and Ireland, 1801. 

Battle of Princeton, 1777. 

Jupiter's moons discovered, 1610. 

Battle of New Orleans, 1815 ; Whitney diod, 
1825. 

President Dwight died, 1817. 

G. Fox died, 1691. 

Peace with Great Britain, 1784. 

Q,ueen Elizabeth crowned. 

Franklin born, 1706. 

Copernicus bom, 1473. 

Independence of the United FJtates acknow- 
ledged. 178:3 ; Howard died, 1790. 

Louis XVI. beheaded, 1793. 

Byron born, 1788. 

Bums born, 1750. 

Robert Boyle bom, 1628. 

Telegraph in practice in England, 1796. 

Ben jonaon bom, 1574. 

FKBRUARY. 

First Presidential election in United States, 
1789. . 

Lorenzo Dow died, 1834. 

Slavery abolished in French colonies, 1794. 

John Rogers burnt, 1555. • 

Earthquake in New England, 1736. 

Mary Q,ueen of Scots died, 1587. 

Harrison bom, 1773. 

Be Witt Clinton died, 1828. 

Peace with Great Britain, 1815. 

Monasteries suppressed in Fraunce, 1790. 

Valentine's day. 

Galileo bora, 1564. 

Melancthon born, 1497. 

Michael Angelo died, 1563. 

Vermont admitted to the Union, 1791 ; Lu- 
ther died, 1546. 

Florida ceded to the United States, 1821. 

Voltaire bora, 1694: Bellamy born, 1719. 

Robert Hall died, 1831. 

Washington bom. 1732. 

Florida ceded to the United States, 1819 ; J. 
Q,. Adams died, 1848. 

Fulton died, 1815. 

Napoleon leaves Elba, 1815. 
MARCH. 

Wesley died, 1791. 

First Congrev, 1789. 

Madison ^m, 1757. 

BeUamy died, 1790. 

Bible Society first commenced, 1804. 

Benjamin West died, 1820. 

Jackson bora, 1767. 

Bowditch died. 1838. 

St. Patrick's day. 

Stamp Act repealed, 1766. 

Newton died, 1727 ; Cranmer burnt, 1556. 

President Edwards died, 1753. 

Q,ueen Elizabeth died, 1603. 

The Hudson river discovered, 1690. 

Beethoven died. 1827. 

Charles Wesley died, 1788. 

Peace of Utrecht, 1713, 

Calhoun died, 1850. 

APRIL. 

The Allies enter Paris, 1814. 

Jefferson born. 1743. 

Bonaparte dethroned, 1814. 

Harrison died, 1841 ; Goldsmith died, 1774. 

Plato died, 347, B. C. 

Alexander the Great died, 323, B. c. 

Ohio settled, 1788. 

Bacon died, 1626. 



30. 



EVENTS. 

United States Bank incorporated, 1816. 

Henry Clay bom, 1776. 

Seneca died, 65 ; Summerfield bora, 1770. 

Handel died, 1759. 

American Asylum for Deaf and Dumb open» 

ed, 1817. 
Phakespere bom, 1564. 
Franklin died, 1790. 
Battle of Lexington, 1775. 
Nettleton born, 1783. 
Shakespere died, 1616. 
First paper printed in Massachusetts, 1701. 
Cromwell bom, 1399. 
Hume bora, 1711. 

Louisiana ceded to the United States, 1803. 
Washington inaugurated, 1789. 

Union of England and Scotland, 1707. 

Florida and lowa admitted, 1845. 

Bonaparte died, 1821. 

Battle of Oswego, 1814. 

Socrates died, 399, B. c. 

Ticonderoea taken, 1 775. 

William Pitt died, 1778. 

Cuvier died, 1832. 

Vaccination discovered, 1796. 

Mrs. Hemans died, 1835. 

John Jay died. 1829. 

Dark day in New England, 1780. 

Columbus died, 1506 : Lafayette died, 1834 

First steam-ship for Liverpool, 1819. 

Congress met in Philadelphia, 1787 j James- 
town settled, 1607. 

Queen Victoria bora, 1819. 

Paley died, 1805. 

Calvm died, 1564. 

Habeas Corpus granted, 1670. 

William Pitt bora, 1759. 

Wisconsin admitted, 1848. 

Pope died, 1744 ; Jean of Arc born^ 1431. 

Hayden died, 1809. 

JUNE. 

Tennessee admitted, 1796. 

Harvey died, 1657. 

St. Paul's church, London, burnt, 1561. 

Alexander the Great bom, 356, B. c. 

Jackson died, 1845. 

British Parliament abolish slave-trade, 1806. 

New York incorporated, 1665. 

Smnmerfield died, 1825. 

Washington commander in chief, 1775. Bat- 
tle of Marengo, 1800. 

Great eclipse of sun, 1806. 

Battle of Bunker Hill, 1775 ; John Wesley 
bora, 1703. 

Battle of Waterloo, 1815 ; war with Great 
Britain, 1812. 

Pascal bora, 1623; Magna Charta signed, 
1215. 

Mrs. Barbauld bom, 1743. 

Thales died, 545, b. c. 

Bonaparte's second abdication, 1815; M. 
Henry died, 1714. 

Union of Utrecht formed, 1579. 

Julian fhe Apostate died, 363; Doddridge 
bora, 1702. 

Battle of Monmouth, 1781. 

Madison died, 1836. 

Apostle Peter crucified, 65 ; Henry Clay died, 
1852. 

Montezuma died, 1520. 
JULY. 

Gift of Smithson accepted by Congress, 1836. 

Sir lUbort Peel died, 1850. 



Digitized 



byL^oogle 



46 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 



5. 
7 
8. 
9. 

10. 
II. 
12. 
11. 

15, 
17. 
18. 
20. 
21. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 



3. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
18. 
19. 
20 
21. 
23. 
24. 

25. 

26. 
SO. 

31. 



6. 

7. 
10. 
11. 
14. 

17. 

J8. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
23. 
2.5. 
26. 



. Independence, 1776: Adams and Jefferson 

died, 18-.i6. 
. Battle of Chippewa, 1814. 
. Thomas Hooker died, 1047. 

Klihu Yale died, 1721. 

Braddock's defeat, 1755; Gen. Taylor died, 
18-30. 

Daguerre died, 1851. 

J. Q. Adams born, 1767. 

Julius Cesar born, 100, b. C. 

French ReTolution begun, 17S0; battle of 
Prague, 1420. 

Cranaders taice Jeruj^alem, 1099. 

Dr. Watts born, 1674. 

Inquisition restored in Spain, 1814. 

Prideaui died, 1650. 

Burns died, 1796. 

John Newton bom, 1725. 

Dr Pay son bom, 1783. 

Coleridge died, 1834. 

Revolution in France, 1831 ; overthrow of 
Robespierre, 1794. 

Robespierre guillotined, 1794. 

Isabella Graham born. 1742. 

William Penn died, 1718 

French Revolution triumphant, 1830. 
AUGUST. 

Battle of Nile, 1798; the younger President 
Edwards died. 1801. 

Arkwight died, 1792. 

Ben Jonson died, 1637. 

Battle of Thermopyla, 480, b. c. 

Canning died, 1827. 

Louis Philippe pronounced, 1830. 

Dr. Arnold born, 1 740. 

Albert Gallatin died, 1849. 

Jeremy Taylor died, 1667. 

Sheridan died. 178S. 

Bonaparte bora, 1769. 

Battle of Bennington, 1777. 

FulMn's steam-toat successful, 1807. 

Pascll died, 1662, 

Ashburton treaty ratified, 1842. 

Great earthquake at Palermo. 1726. 

Washington city captured, 1814. 

John Owen died, 1683 ; massacre of St. Bar- 
tholomew, 1572. 

Herschel died, 1822 ; mother of Washington 
died, 1789. 

Adam Clarke died, 1832. 

Professor Webster hung for the murd-^r of 
Dr. Parkman, 1850. 

Bunya.1 died, 1688. 

SEPTEMBER. 

Great fire in London, 1660. 

Cromwell died, 1658 ; new style in calendar, 
1754. 

First Congress in Philadelphia, 1774 ; Amer- 
ican Board first met, 1810. 

Lafayette born, 1757. 

Hannah More died, 1833. 

Battle of Lake Erie, 1813. 

Battle of Brandewine, 1777. 

Moscow burned, 1812 ; Duke of Wellington 
died, 1852. 

United States Constitution adopted, 1787. 

Cornwallis surrendered, 1781. 

First book in English, 1471. 

Charles Carroll born, 1737. 
France a Republic, 1792. 

Andre taken, 1780. 

Pacific ocean discovered by Balboa. 1513. 

Constantinople founded, 329 ; Clarkson died, 
1846. 

First railroad, (Stockton in England,) 1825. 



Massilon died, 1742. 
Whitefield diid, 1770. 

OCTOBER. 
St. Paul's, liondon, dedicated, 1340. 
Andre executed, 17i30. 
. Solomon t^toddard bora, 164.1. 
President Edwards bom, 1703. 
Peace of Aix-la Cbapelle, 1748. 
Brainard died, 1747. 
S. Wesley died, 1»37. 
America discovered, 1492. 
Bonaparte arrived at St. Helena, 1815. 
William Penn bom, 1C44. 
Latimer burned^ 1555. 
Burgoyne surrendered, 1777. 
Norway and Sweden united, 1814. 
Comwallis surrendered, 1781 ; John Adami 

bora, i7J5. 
Nelson kiUed, 1S05. 
Dr. Payson died, 1827. 
Daniel Webster died, 1852. 
Hogarth died, 1764; Chaucer died, 14'0. 
Doddridge died, 1751. 
Cuba discovered, 1492; Raleigh beheaded. 

1618. 
Locke died. 1704. 
Last crusade, 1*^70. 

NOVEMBER. 
Stamp Act in America, 1765. 
Erie canal celebration, 1825. 
Gunpowder plot, 1652; Kepler died, 1630. 
Christianity suppressed in France, 1794. 
Milton died^ 1674. 
Cape Cod discovered, 1620. 
Luther bom, 1483; Mahomet bom, 570. 
Baxter bora, 16(2. ' 

Curran died, 1817. 
Charles Carroll died, 1832. 
First English Parbament, 1313: Cowper 

bora, 1731. 
Tea destroyed at Boston, 1773. 
Q,ueen Mary died, 1558. 
Jay's treaty, 1794. 
Cape of Good Hope doubled, 1497. 
Peace with Great Britain, 1814 ; John Enox 

died. 1572. 
New York evacuated, 1783. 
Dr. Watts died, 1748. 
Washington crossed the Delaware, 1776. 
Revolution in Poland, 1831; First steam- 

press used, 1814. 

DECEl^BER. 
Bonaparte emperor of France, 1804. 
Belzoni died. 1823. 
Illinois admitted, 1818. 
Mozart died, 1792; Bible translated into 

English, 1611. I 

Baxter died, 1601. 
Milton born, 1608. 
Mississippi admitted, 1817. 
Indiana admitted, 1816. 
Cromwell protector, 1653. 
New Zealand discovered, 1642. 
Washington died, 1799. 
Hartford Convention, 1814; John Newtom 

died, 1790. 
Great fire in New York, 18Xi. 
Ignatius killed, 107 ; Dr. S. Hopkins died, 

1803. 
Pilgrims landed, 1630. 
Washington resigned command, 1783. 
Sir Isaac Newton bora, 1642. 
Texas admitted, 1845. 
Jesuits founded, 1.535. 
WickUfle died, 1384. 



Digitized 



by Google 



THE FAMILY CHRISTIAN ALMANAC. 47 

ANNIVERSARIES AND OFFICERS OF CHARITABLE SOCIETIES, ETC. 

BOSTON.— AMERICAN' Board FOR Foreign Missions, Tues. before '2d Wed. in Sept. ; Her. Rufus 
Anderson, D. D., Rev. Selah B. Treat. Rev. Swan L. Pomroy, D.D., See's; J. M. Gordon, Treas., 
Miss. House, 33 Pemberton-square ; Rev. Geo. W. Wood, Sec, an^ A. Merwrin, Agent in New- 
York, Bible House, Astor-place. American Baptist Missionary Union, 3d Thurs. in May ; Rev. 
Solomon Peck, D. D., Rev. Edward Bright, D. D., See's, 33 Soraerset-st. American Education 
Society, in May ; Rev. Increiase M. Tarbox, See. : S. T. Farweli, Treas., 15 Cornhill. American 
Tract Soc. at Boston, last Wed. in May ; Rev. Seth Bliss, Sec., N. P. Kemp, Treas., 28 Cornhill. 
Paisoj* DisciPLLXE Soc., Rev. L. Dw^ht, Sec. ; Chas. H. Mills, Treas., 39 Milk-st. Mass. Home 
Missionary Soc, Rev. J. S. Clark, B. D., Sec., Tremont Temple. Mass. Sabbath-school Soc. Rev. 
A. BuUard, Sec, C. 0. Dean, Treas., 13 Cornhill. Amer. S. S. Union, H. Hoyt, Agent, 9 CornhilL 

NEW YORK.— American Bible Society, 2d Thurs. in May; Rev. John C. Brigham, D.D., 
Rev. Jo^ph Holdich, D.'D., Rev. James H. McNeil, See's; J. Hyde, Esq., GeneralAgent, Henry 
Fisher, Assistant Treas., Astor-place. American and Foreibw Bible Society, Rev. R. Babco?k, 
D. D., Cor. Sec, Rev. J. J. Woolsey, Fin'l. Sec, N. C. Piatt, Treas., U. D. Ward, Depos. Agt. 115 
Nassau-street. American Bible Union, Wm. H. WyckofF, Esq , Cor. Sec, 350 Broorae-st. 
Amkrican Tract Soc., Wed.preced. 2d Thurs. in May; Rev. Wm. A. Hallock, D. D., Rev. O. 
Eastman, Rev. R. S. Cook, Cor. See's; 0. R. Kingsbury, Assist. See. and Treas., 150 Nassau-st. 
American Home Missionary Soc., Wed. preeed. 2d Thurs. in May; Rev, Milton Badger, D. D., 
Rev- David B. Coe. Rev. Daniel P. Noyes, See's ; H. W. Ripley, Assist. Treas., Bible House, Astor- 
place. Amer. Baptist Home Mission Soc., Rev. Benj, M. HUl, Cor. Sec. 354 Broome-st. 
BoA.RD OF Foreign Missions of Pres. Church, Hon. Walter Lowrie, Rev. John C. Lowrie, D. D., 
Rev. J. Leighton Wilson, Cor. See's; Wra. Ilankin, Jr., Treas., 23 Centre-st. American and 
Foreign Christian Union, Tues. preeed. 2d Thurs. in May; Rev. Robert Baird, D. D., Rev. B. 
R. Fairchild, D. D., Cor. See's, Edward Vernon. Gen. Agent and Assist. Treas., 156 Chambers-st. 
Amer. Seamen's Friend Soc., Mond. preeed. 2d Thurs. in May; Rev J, Spaulding. Rev, H. 
Loomis, See's, 80 Wall-st. Amer. Temperance Union, 2d Thurs. in May, evening ; Rev. J. Marsh, 

D. D., Cor. Sec. 149 Nassau-st. Prot. Episcopal Church Missions — Domestic Committee, Rev. 
R. B. Van Kleeck, D. D., Sec. and Gen. Agent, 17 Bible House; Foreign Committee, Rev. P. P. 
Irving, and Rev. S. D. Denison, See's, No. 19 Bible House. Methodist— Book Concern, Rev. T. 
Carlton and Rev. Z. Phillips, Agents, 200 Mulberry and 24 Vesey-st.: Missionary Soc, Rev. J. P. 
Durbin, Corres. Sec, Rev.T. Carlton, Treas., 200 Mulberry-st. ; Sunday School Union, Rev. D. P. 
Kidder, Cor. Sec, 200 Mulberry-st. Reformed Dutch — Domestic Mission, Rev. John Garretson, 
Cor. Sec, 103 Fulton-st., J. S. Bussing, Treas., 32 Cliff-st. ; Foreign Mission, C. L. Little, Treas,, 
33 Fulton-st. Central American Education Society, Rev, John N. Lewis. Sec. Bible House ; 
"Wm. A. Booth, Treas. Society for Coll. and Theol. Education at West, Rev T. Bald- 
win, Sec, 80 Wall-st. American Missionary Association, Rev. George Whipple, and Rev. S. 
S. Jocelyn, See's; Lewis Tappan, Treas., 48 Beekman-st. American and Foreign Anti- 
Slavkry Soc., L. Tappan, Cor. Sec, 4S Beekman-st. Colonization Society of State of New 
York, J B. Pinney, Cor. Sec, Bible House, Astor-place. American Society M. C. Jews, Rev. 

E. R. McGregor, Cor. Sec, Bible House, Astor-place. New York, and American Sunday- 
school Union, J. C. Meeks, Agent, 147 Nassau-st., and 38 Park-row. -^ 

PHILADELPHIA.— American Sunday-School Union, Tues. after 3d Thurs. in May: F. W. 
Porter, Cor. Sec. ; F. A. Packard, Esq., Rec Sec, 316 Chesnut-st. General Assembly's Boards, 
at the Publication Rooms, 265 Chestuut-st. — Domestic Missions, Rev. G. W. Musgrave, D. D., Cor. 
Sec; Rev. R. Happersitt, Assist. Sec. ; S. D. Powell, Esq., Treas. Board of Education, Rev. C. 
VanRensselaer, D. D., Cor. Sec. ; William Main, Treas. Board of Publication, Rev. B. M. Smith, 
Cor. Sec; Rev. W. M. Engles, D. D., Editor; Joseph P. Engles, Publishing Agent; W. Sar- 

fent, Sup. of Colp. American Baptist Puelication Society, 1 IS Areh-st. ; Rev. Wm. Shadrack, 
>. l5.. Sec, Rev. J. N. Brown, Ed. Sec, Rev. B. R. Loxley, Dep. Ag. and Assis. Treas. Amer. 
Board For. Missions, Rev. David Malin, Dis. Sec, 386 Chestnut-st. Penn. Bible Soc., Joseph 
H. DuUm, Sec. Pennsylvania Agency of the American Tract Society, 303 Chestnut-st., 
Rev. N. W. Goertner, Cor. See. Philadelphia Education Society, 3d Tue.sday in March ; Rev. 
John Patton, Sec; Wm. Parves, Treas.. 386 Chestnut-st. Philadelphia Home Missionary Soc, 
4th Tues. in April; Rev. Robert Adair, Sec, Henry Perkins, Treas., 386 Chestnut-st. 

"WASHINGTON. — ^American Colonization Society. 3d Tues in Jan. ; Rev.Wra. McLain, Sec. 

RICHMOND.— Southern Baptist Convention— For. Miss. Board, Rev. J. B. Taylor, Cor. Sec. 
Dom. Miss. Board, Rev. J. Walker, Cor. Sec. Bible Board, W. C. Buck, Cor. Sec, Nashville, Tenn. 

MINISTERS' ME ETINGS.— General Con\'ention in Maine, 3d Tues. in June. General 
Association, New Hampshire, 4th Tues. in Aug. General Convention in Vermont, :3d Tues. 
in June. General Association, Massachusetts, 4th Tues. in June. Evangelical Consocia- 
tion, Rhode Island, 2d Tues. in June. General Association, Con.vecticut, ;3d Tues. in June. 
General Association, New York, 3d Wednesday in August. General Convention of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, 1st Wednesday in October. General Assembly Presbyte- 
rian Church, 3d Thursday in May. General Conference Methodist Episcopal Church, 
every 4th year from 1840. Gen. Synod Reformed Dutch Church, on the 1st Wed in June. 

YEARLY MEETINGS OF FRIENDS.— New England Yearly Meeting, held at Newport, 
Rhode Island, begins Second day after second Sixth day in Sixth month. New York Yearly 
Meeting, New York City, Sixth day after fourth First day in Fifth month. Philadelphia Year- 
ly Meeting, third Second day in Fourth month. Baltimore Yearly Meeting, last Second 
day but one in Tenth month. North Carolina Yearly Meeti.ng is held at New Garden, 
Guilford county. Second day after first First day in Eleventh month. Ohio Yearly Meeti.xg, 
Mount Pleasant, Second day after first First day in Ninth month. Indiana Yearly Meeting, 
Wbit«wat«rf on Fifth day preceding first First day in Tenth montli. 



Digitized 



by Google 



48 



THE FAMILY OHltlSTIAN ALMANAC. 



ETANGELICAIi BOOKS. 

To the valuable assortment of Standard Practical Works published by the American Tract 
Society, there is now added, 

"LADY HUNTINGTON AND HER FRIENDS," with four steel Portraits, 292pp. 12mo; 
50 cents, or 70 cents gilt. 

"LIFE OF REV. JEREMIAH HALLOCK," a laborer in the work of God in 1800. 3t^ 
pp. 12mo ; 50 cents, 70 cents gilt. 

"LIFE OF REV. PHILIP HENRY," by his son Matthew Henry the commentator. 346 
pp. 12mo; 45 cents, 60 gilt. 

"THE ATONEMENT OF CHRIST AND THE JUSTIFICATION OF THE SINNER,' 
from the writings of Andrew Fullej^ 39G pp. 12mo ; 50 cents, 70 cents gilt. 

" CHRISTIAN PROGRKSS," a sequel to the "Anxious Inquirer," by J. Angell James. 271 
pp. Ibmo; 25 cents, 35 cents gilt. 

"THE PASTOR'S WIFE, OR MRS. MARTHA SHERMAN," 342 pp ISmo; 30 cents, 
40 cents gilt ; and other works, including several for the young. 

SONGS FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME, with 62 beautiful engravings; 35 cents, 
45 gilt. 

THE FAMILY TESTAMENT, with brief Notes and Instructions, and Maps; 60 cents, SD 
gilt. VOLUME I OF THE OLD TESTAMENT, Genesis to Job, is also published. 

THE RELIGIOUS (OR PASTOR'S) LIBRARY, 25 vols., 12mo, comprises some of the 
most valuable of the Society's publications, suitable for families and pastors. Price $10. 

THE EVANGELICAL FAMILY LIBRARY, 15 vols. 18mo, with steeUplate frontispieces. 
Price $5 50. 

THE YOUTH'S LIBRARY, 70 volumes, comprising 9,630 pages, in fine paper, printing, and 
binding, with 255 highly finished frontispieces and other engravings. Price $10. 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS IN ORNAMENTED PACKETS. Upwards of 200 beautifully illns- 
trated Children's Books are done up in neatly enveloped packets. Two packets at 15 cents ; six at 
20 cents ; and seven at 25 cents. They are also bound in eighteen neat Volumes at 15 cents each ; 
and eighteen at 20 cents. 

A large variety of Volumes and Tracts in German, French, Spanish, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, 
Welsh, Italian, and Portuguese. 

THE A^VIERICAN MESSENGER, issuied monthly to 200,000 families, at 25 cenU single; 
six for $1; twenty for $3; forty for $5. 

THE CHILD'S PAPER is a gem welcomed monthly in more than 250,000 familiea. Ten 
copies for $1; fifty for $4 50; one hundred for $8. Payable in advance. 

Volumes prepaid under 3,000 miles, one cent an ounce, or 23 cents for the Family Testament 
with Notes, 40 cents for the new volume Genesis to Job; 11 cents for the Pilgrim's Progress, or 
Saints' Rest, 18mo; 10 cents for the Songs for the Little Ones at Home ; 3 cents for the Illustra- 
ted Tract Primer in paper covers. Persons so ordering publications, should enclose with the order 
money or stamps to pay for the books and the postage. 



FORItl OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my Executors the sum of Dollars, in trusty to pay over the t 

in after my deoease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall aot as Treararer 

of the Society, fotmed in in the year eighteen hundred and 

to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



TABLE OF SIMPIiE INTEREST AT SIX PER CENT. 


Principal 


One Mo'th 


One Year. 


Principal 


One Month. 


One Year. 


Principal 


One Montli. 


One Year 




D. 0. M. 


D. 0. M. 




D. C. M. 


». 0. a. 




D. 0. M. 


D. 0. a. 


Cents 10 





6 


DoUs. 6 


3 


36 


Dolls. 40 


20 


2 40 


" 50 


2 


3 


" 7 


3 5 


42 


" 60 


25 


3 00 


Dolls. 1 


5 


6 


" 8 


4 


48 


" 60 


30 


3 60 


" 2 


10 


12 


« 9 


4 5 


54 


" 70 


35 


4 20 


« 3 


16 


18 


« 10 


5 


60 


" 80 


40 


4 80 


« 4 


2 


24 


" 21 


10 


1 20 


« 90 


45 


5 40 


« 5 


3 5 


30 


" 30 


15 


1 80 


" 100 


60 


6 00 9 



The interest of any sum in dollars for 6 days, is the same sum in miUs : viz. of $100, 100 mills 
or 10 cents ; of $0,600, 6,600 mills, or $6 60, etc. Money at com^und interest will double itself 
in 11 years, 10 months, and 22 days. I 



Digitized 



by Google 



STATE GOVERNMENTS. 



CAPITALS. 



GOVERNORS. 



Term Exp. Salary. .Legis'e Meets. Gen. Election. 



Alabama — 
Arkansas --- 
California- -- 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Gecr^a 

Illinois 

Indiana 

lo-wa 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Ma.ine 

Maryland 

Maissachusetts 

Miclugan 

Mississippi 

Missouri . 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina- 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania -- 

Rhode Island- | 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

"Vermont 

Virginia 

VSTisconsin 



Montgomery 
Little Rock 
Sacramento 
Hartford and 
New Haven 

Dover 

Tallahassee 
Milledgeville 
Sprin^eld -■ 
Indianapolis 
Iowa City --■ 
Frankfort --■ 
Baton Rouge 

Augusta 

Annapolis - - • 

Boston 

Lansing 

Jackson 

Jefferson City 
Concord-^ --- 

Trenton 

Albany 

Raleigh 

Columbus --- 
Harrisburg - - 
Newport and 
Providence -- 
Columbia ... 
Nashville --- 

Austin 

Montpelier - - 
Richmond - - - 
Madison 



John A. Wilson • - - 
ElLas N. Conway-- 
John Bigler 

Henry Button 

William H. Ross- - 
James E. Broome - 
Herschel V. Johnson 
Joel A. Matteson -- • 
Joseph A. Wright - ■ 
Stephen Hempstead 
Lazarus W. Powell 
PaulO.Hebert 



T. Watkins Ligon 
Emory Washburn 
Andrew Parsons - • 
John J. M'Rea -- 

Sterling Price 

Noah Martin 

Rodman M. Price ■ 
Horatio Seymour - - - 

Davids. Reid 

William MedUl-- 
WUUam Bigler --- 

Williaia W. Hoppin 

J. L. Manning 

Andrew Johnson - - - 
Edward M. Pease - - 
John S. Robinson - - 

Joseph Johnson 

Wm. A. Barstow--- 



Dec. 1855 
Nov. 1856 
Dec. 1855 

May 1854 

Jan. 1855 
Oct. 1855 
Nov. 1855 
Jan. 1857 
Jan. 1856 
Dec. 1854 
Aug. 1855 
Jan. 1856 
Jan. 1855 
Jan. 1857 
Jan. 1855 
Jan. 1855 
Jan. 1856 
Dec. 1856 
June 1854 
Jan. 1857 
Jan. 1855 
Jan. 1855 
Jan. 1855 
Jan. 1855 

May 1854 

Dec. 1854 
Oct. 1855 
Dec. 1855 
Oct. 1854 
Jan: 1856 
Dec. 1855 



$2,500 
1,800 
10,000 

1,100 

1,333 
1,500 
3,000 
1,500 
1,300 
1,000 
2,500 

1,500 
3,600 
2,5P0 
1,500 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,800 
4,000 
2,000 
1,800 
3,000 

400 

3,500 
2,000 
2,000 
750 
5,000 
1,250 



2 Mo. Nov. 
1 Mo. Nov. 
1 Mo. Jan. - 

1 W.May- - 

I Tu. June- 
1 Mo. Nov. - 

1 Mo. Nov, - 

2 M. Jan. - - 
January --- 
I Mo. Deo. - 

1 Mo. Dec, - 

3 Mo. Jan. - 

2 W. Jan. - - 
1 W, Jan.-- 
1 W.Jan. - - 
I W.Jan.- - 
1 Mo. Jan. - 
Last M.Deo. 

1 W. June - 

2 Tu. Jan. - 
I Tu. Jan. 

3 Mo. Nov. - 
1 Mo. Jan. - 
1 Tu. Jan. - 

May & Oct. 

4 Mo. Nov. - 
1 Mo. Oct. - 

In Dec. 

2Th, Oct.-- 
•2 Mo. Jan. - 
1 Mo. Jan. - 



I Mo. Aug. 
1 Mo. Aug. 
1 Tu. Jan. 

1 Mo. April 

2 Tu. Nov. 
1 Mo. Oct. 
1 Mo. Oct. 

1 Tu. Nov. 

2 Tu. Oct. 
1 Mo. Ang. 
1 Mo. Aug. 

1 Mo. Nov. 

2 Mo. Sept. 

1 W. Nov. 

2 Mo. Nov. 
1 Tu. Nov. 
IM.&Tu N. 

1 Mo. Aug. 

2 Tu.TVIarch. 
1 Tu. Nov, 

1 Tu. Nov. 

2 Th. Aug. 
2Tu Oct. 
2 Tu. Oct. 

1 W, April. 

2 Mo. Oct. 
1 Th. Aug. 
1 Mo. Aug. 
1 Tu. Sept. 



1 Tu. Nov. 



The following States hold Legislative sessions biennially, viz.: Delaware, Virginia, North 
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Michigan, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Ten- 
nessee, Ohio, Indiana, Missouri, Iowa, an^. Illinois. 

BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

The following is a comparative view of the condition of the Banks in the United States, accord- 
ing to the returns nearest to January 1, in 1837, 1843, 1848, I85J, and 1854. 

1837. 1843. 1848. 1851. 1854. 

Number of Banks 634 577 622 731 1,059 

Number of Branches 154 114 129 148 149 

Number of Banks and Branches 788 691 751 879 1,208 

Capital paid in $290,772,091 $228,861,948 $204,838,175 $227,807,553 $301,376,071 

RESOURCES. 
Ix)ans and Discounts 525,115,702 254,544,937 344,476,582 413,756,799 607,287,428 



Stocks 12,407,112 

Real Estate 19,064,451 

Other invescments 10,423,030 

Due by other Banks 59,663,910 

Notes of other Banks 36,533,527 

Specie funds 5,366,509 

Specie 37,915,340 

LIABILITIES 

Circulation 149,185,890 

Deposits 127,397,185 

D ue to other Banks 62,421 ,118 

Other liabilities 38,560,239 



28,380,050 
22,820,807 
13,343,599 
20,666,264 
13,306,617 
6,578,375 
33,515,806 



26,498,054 
20,530,955 
8,229,682 
38,904,525 
16,427,716 
10,489,822 
46,369,765 



22,388,989 
20,219,724 
8,935,972 
50,718,015 
17,196,083 
15,341,196 
48,671,048 



44,350,330 
22,367,472 
6,841,429 
55,516,085 
22,659,06(3 
25,579,253 
59,410,253 



58,563,608 128,506,091 155,165,251 204,689,207 

56,168,628 103,226,177 128,957,712 188,186,744 

21,456,523 39,414.371 46,416,928 50,322.162 

7,357,033 5,501,401 6,438,327 13,439/276 



""T^clton'^d^^^^^^^ 114,732,230 5ai,782,268 284,122,963 392,877,951 

339,004,193 136,188,754 271,146,639 330,539,891 443,200,113 



Aggregate of immediate liabili- 
ties, i. e., of circulation, de- 
posits and dues to other Banks 

Aggregate of immediate means, ' 139,479,277 74,067,062 112,191,828 131,926,342 168,164,657 

**T««u^'d:5iuorie^ 8.>«'.'«' ".1«.^« 25,130,252 

"^TrilTa^^rJi"^.'. .*■:* } «,4T1,118 59,835,775 84,546,505 

Notes. — In January, 1837, the inflation of paper credits, consequent on the deposit-bank sys- 
tem and other causes, had nearly reached its height. The revulsion that followed was most severely 
felt in the latter part of 1842 and the beginning of 1843. 

In 1848 the fint deposits of California gold wdre made at the United States Mint. 



Digitized 



by Google 



u 



1 • 91. MS.* 



MEMORANDA FOR 1855. 

Jan. 1, Ciroumcision ; 6, Epiphany ; 7, Ist S. aft. Epiph. ; 14, 2d S. aft. Epiph. ; 21, 3d S. [J 
aft. Epiph. ; 25, Conv. of St. Paul ; 28, 4th S. aft. Epiph. Feb. 2, Purif. of Vir. Mary ; 4, Sep- — 
tuagesima S.; 11, Sexagesima S. ; 18, Quinquagesima S.; 21, Ash-Wednesday; 24, St. Matthias; L 
25, Ist S. in Lent. Mabch 4, 2d 8. in Lent ; 11, 3d S. in Lent ; 18, 4th S. in Lent ; 25, 5th S. ' 
in Lent, and Annun. of Vir. Mary. April 1, 8. before Easter; 6, Good-Friday; 8, Easter- 
Sunday ; 15, 1st S. aft. Easter; 22, 2d S. aft. Easter; 25, St. Mark ; 29, 3d 8. aft. Easter. May 
1, Sts. Philip and James ; 6, 4th 8. aft. Easter; 13, 5th S. aft. Easter; 17, Ascension-day; 20, S. 
aft. Ascension ; 27, Whit-Sunday. Junb 3, Trinity-Sunday ; 10, Ist S. aft. Trin. ; 11, St. Barnabas ; 
17, 2d S. aft. Trin. ; 24, 3d 8. aft. Trili., and Nativ. of St. John the Baptist ; 29, St. Peter. July i 

I, 4th 8. aft. Trin. ; 8, 5th S. aft. Trin. ; 15, 6th 8. aft. Trin. ; 22, 7th S. aft. Trin. ; 25, St. 
James ; 29, 8th S. aft. Trin. Aug. 6, 9th S. aft. Trin. ; 12, 10th 8. aft. Trin. ; 19, 11th 8. aft. Trin. ; 

24, St. Bartholomew ; 26, 12th S. aft. Trin. Sept. 2, 13th 8. aft. Trin. ; 9, 14th S. aft. Trin. ; 16, 
15th S. aft. Trin. ; 21, St. Matthew ; 23, 16th S. aft. Trin. ; 29, St. Michael and All Angels ; 30, 
17th S. aft. Trin. Oct. 7, 18th S. aft. Trin. ; 14, 19th 8. aft. Trin. ; 18, St. Luke ; 21, 20th S. aft. 
Trin. ; 28, 21st S. aft. Trin. ; and Ste. Simon and Jude. Nov. 1, All Saints ; 4, 2ad S. aft. Trin. ; 

II, 23d S. aft. Trin. ; 18, 24th S. aft. Trin. ; 25, 25th 8. aft. Trin. ; 30, St. Andrew. Dec. 2, 1st 
S. in Advent ; 9, 2d 8. in Advent ; 16, 3d S. in Advent ; 21, St. Thomas ; 23, 4th 8. in Advent ; I* 

25, Christmas ; 26, St. Stephen ; 27, St. John Evan. ; 28, Innocents ; 30, S. aft. Christmas. *^ 

TIDE-TABIiE. 

CHIEFLY FROM THE TABLE IN BOWDITCH'S NAVIGATOR. 

The Calendar pages exhibit the time of high-water at Boston, New York, and Charleston, r 
To find the time of high- water at any of the following places, cuid to or subtract from ^ 
the time of high-water, morning or evening, at New York, the quantity of time affixed to 
such place in this table. In using the quantities in this table, observe that more than 12 
hours and less than 24, from midnight or the beginning of morning, is afternoon of the same 
day; and that more than 12 kours and less than 24, from noon, is morning of the next day : 



Albany Add 6 34 

Annapolis, Md. Sub. 1 51 

Annapolis, N. S. - - - Add 1 49 

Amboy Sub. 39 

Baltimore \Add 5 7 

Bridgeport. Add 2 

Cape Split Add 2 

Eastport -Add 2 9 

Halifax, N.S. Sub. 2 15 

Hohnes* Hole Add 1 4 



Portland Add 1 39 

Portsmouth Add 2 9 

Providence Sub. 41 

Quebec Add 8 49 

Richmond Sub. 2 25 i 

Salem Add 9 19 

Sandy Hook, N. J.- - Sub. 2 ^ 

St. John, N. B. - - - - Add 2 49 

Sunbury Add 19 

Windsor Add 2 49 



Hellgate Add 1 41 

Marblehead Add 1 49 

Machias Add 1 54 

Mobile Point Add 1 &4 

New Bedford Sub. 1 40 

NewHaveiK Add 2 4 

New London Sub. 21 

Newport Sub. 1 55 

Norfolk Sub. 41 

Plymouth ----Add 2 19 

Tides. — La Place pronounces the formula for deducing the tides the most difficult prob- I 
lem of celestial mechanics. It sometimes happens that the tide comes in several hours 
later or earlier than the most learned calculation would determine ; and this io consequence H 
of the strength and direction of the wind, which the calculator cannot reckon upon. i 

THE CHRISTIAN ALMANAC, 

ANB 

OTHER PUBIilCATIONS OF THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, I 

May be had at 150 Nassau-street, New York, or of N. P. Kemp, 28 Comhill, Boston ; William 
CoGOESHALL, Providence ; Charles Hosmer, Hartford ; F. T. Jarman, New Haven ; Fisi & 
Little, 82 State-street, Albany ; R. Wasson, 9 and 10 Cannon-place, Troy ; Seward & Thuebur, 
137 Genesee-street, Utica; Glisan, Butler & Frisbee, 199 Main-street, Buffalo; H. N. This- 
3ELL, 303 Chestnut-street, Philadelphia, and 8 St. Clair-street, Pittsburg ; Rev. S. Guitbau, Fayette- 
street, Baltimore ; D. W. Harrison, Chalmers-street, Charleston ; H. Packard, 152 Camp-st., 
New Orleans ; W. H. Bulkley, Fourth-street, Louisville ; Seely Wood, Agent, Walnut-street, 
near Fourth, Cincinnati ; Rev. C. Peabody, Agent, 61 Market-street, St. Louis; W. Y. Johnson, 
68 Lake-street, Chicago, and of other booksellers and traders. 

DC/* The ALMANAC is furnished at a low price to those who order it by the 100 or 1,000. 

The Board of the American Tract Society embraces members of fourteen evangelical denomina- 
tions, united to diffuse the knowledge of Christ and him crucified by its publications, associated with 
personal Christian effort, at home and abroad. About 500 colporteurs are now laboring in the most 
destitute parts of the country. A donation of $20 constitutes a Life Member ; $50 a Life Director. 
The usual salary of a colporteur is $150, besides other expenses and books granted. William A. 

Hallock, 0. Eastman, and R. S. Cook, Corresponding Secretaries, 0. R. Kingsbitry, Assist. 
Treasurer, 150 Nassau-street, Now York. Seth Bliss, Secretary, 28 Comhill, Boston. 



^ 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digitized 



by Google 



Digit 



itiz5d by Google 



Digitized 



by Google